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Full text of "Lycoming, the alumni bulletin"

Bulletin 




Catalogue Issue 1961-1962 



LYCOMING 



Williamsport, Pennsylvania 




Lycoming is a Christian co-educational 

liberal arts and sciences college. 

It is open to students ol all 

backgrounds and opinions. 

It explores all available avenues to truth 

and stands firm in the liberal arts tradition 

of training the whole prison. 



LYCOMING 

College Bulletin 

WILLIAMSPORT, PENNSYLVANIA 

Approved to Grant Baccalaureate Degrees by the 
Pennsylvania State Department of Public Instruction 

Accredited by 

The Middle States Association of Colleges 

and Secondary Schools 

The University Senate of The Methodist Church 

Member of 

Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Universities 

National Association of Schools and Colleges 

of The Methodist Church 

Association of American Colleges 

The National Commission on Accrediting 

Catalogue Issue 1961-1962 

Register for 1960-1961 



LYCOMING COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Second-class mail privileges 
authorized at Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Issued four times a year: January, 
April, September, December 

Vol. XIV January, 1961, No. 1 
Catalogue Issue 



Contents 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

PERSONNEL OF THE COLLEGE 

Page 

Board of Directors 10 

Administrative Staff 12 

Faculty 13 

Administrative Assistants 19 

PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

CAMPUS LIFE 

History and Tradition 24 

Religious Traditions 25 

Locale 26 

Campus Life 27 

College Honors 31 

Programs and Rules 34 

Health Services 41 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

Admissions 44 

Standards 48 

Degree Requirements 51 

Curricula 55 

Courses 62 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 

Expenses 102 

Endowment and Scholarships 107 

DEGREES CONFERRED 

Honorary Degrees Conferred 114 

Bachelors Degrees Conferred 116 

INDEX 

3 



COMMUNICATIONS WITH THE COLLEGE 

This Bulletin contains pertinent information relative to the College, its 
philosophy, programs, policies, regulations and offerings. All students 
and prospective students are urged to read it carefully and completely. 

Inquiries of a specific nature should be addressed as follows: 

PRESIDENT: 

Gifts or bequests. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE: 

Information about faculty and faculty activities. 
Academic work of students in College. 

TREASURER: 

Payment of College bills. 

Inquiries concerning expenses. 

Scholarships and loan funds for students in College. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT: 
Alumni information. 
Public relations. 

DEAN OF STUDENTS: 

Questions or problems concerning students' health. 
Residence and campus regulations. 

REGISTRAR: 

Requests for transcripts. 
Notices of withdrawal. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS: 

Admission to the freshman class. 
Admission with advanced standing. 
Financial assistance for entering students. 
Re-entry of students to Lycoming College. 
Requests for catalogues. 

DIRECTOR OF PLACEMENT: 
Opportunities for self-help. 
Employment while in College. 
Employment upon graduation. 



Address: Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pa. 
Telephone Number: Williamsport 3-9411 



1960 



1961 



1962 



JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tun *>d Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fn Sal 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 


12 3 4 5 6 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 29 30 31 


31 




30 31 




AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


Sun lion Tun Met] Thur Fri Sil 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur In Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fn (Sal 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


Sun Mon- Tun Wed Thur f r, Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tuei Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mm Tun W*d Thur Fri Sal 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


1 2 


l 2 3 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 -25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 .33 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tuei Wed Thur Fn Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


1 


I 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


29 30 31 


29 30 


30 31 


30 






NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fri Sal 


Sun Mon Tues Wed Thur Fn Sal 


Sun Mon Tuei Wed Thur Fri Sal 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


Sun Mm Tun *rd Thur Fri S*; 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fn aSat 


Sun Mon Tun Wed Thur Fn Sal 


Sun M.a Tun Wrd Thur M Sal 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 


1 2 


1 2 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 5 6 7 8' 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



Academic Calendar 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1960-1961 

September 18, Sunday. Freshman Orientation Begins 

September 20-21, Tuesday and Wednesday. Registration 

September 22, Thursday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Begin 

September 25, Sunday. Matriculation Service 

October 15, Saturday. Homecoming 

November 5, Saturday. Mid-semester 

November 23, Wednesday, 12:00 Noon. Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

November 28, Monday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Resume 

December 22, Thursday, 5:00 p. m. Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Resume 

January 12, Thursday, 5:00 p. m. Reading Period Begins 

January 17, Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. Final Examinations Begin 

January 25, Wednesday, 5:00 p. m. First Semester Ends 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1960-61 

January 30, Monday. Registration 

January 31, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Begin, Mid-Year Convocation 

March 24, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Mid-Semester, Easter Recess Begins 

April 3, Monday, 7:00 p. m. Classes Resume 

May 19, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Reading Period Begins 

May 23, Tuesday, 1:30 p. m. Final Examinations Begin 

June 2, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Second Semester Ends 

June 4, Sunday. Baccalaureate and Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1961 

FIRST SESSION 

June 12, Monday, 9.00 a. m. Registration and Class Organization 
July 21, Friday, 12:25 p. m. First Session Ends 

SECOND SESSION 

July 24, Monday, 9:00 a.m. Registration and Class Organization 
September 1, Friday, 12:25 p.m. Second Session Ends 



FIRST SEMESTER, 1961-1962 

September 17, Sunday. Freshman Orientation Begins 

September 19-20, Tuesday and Wednesday. Registration 

September 21, Thursday. Classes Begin 

September 24, Sunday. Matriculation Service 

October 7, Saturday. Homecoming 

November 11, Saturday. Mid-semester 

November 22, Wednesday, 12:00 Noon. Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

November 27, Monday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Resume 

December 21, Thursday, 5:00 p. m. Christmas Recess Begins 

January 3, Wednesday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Resume 

January 12, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Reading Period Begins 

January 18, Thursday, 9:00 a. m. Final Examinations Begin 

January 26, Friday, 5:00 p.m. First Semester Ends 



SECOND SEMESTER, 1961-1962 

January 29, Monday. Registration 

January 30, Tuesday, 8:00 a. m. Classes Begin, Mid-Year Convocation 

March 24, Saturday. Mid-Semester 

April 13, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Easter Recess Begins 

April 23, Monday, 7:00 p.m. Classes Resume 

May 17, Thursday, 5:00 p. m. Reading Period Begins 

May 22, Tuesday, 9:00 a. m. Final Examinations Begin 

June 1, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Second Semester Ends 

June 3, Sunday. Baccalaureate and Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1962 



FIRST SESSION 



June 11, Monday, 9:00 a.m. Registration and Class Organization 
July 20, Friday, 12:25 p. m. First Session Ends 

SECOND SESSION 

July 23, Monday, 9:00 a. m. Registration and Class Organization 
August 31, Friday, 12:25 p. m. Second Session Ends 



The Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association of Lycoming College has a living member- 
ship of almost five thousand men and women. It is governed by an 
Executive Board of five officers and twenty-one members nominated 
and elected by the membership. It elects annually a member to the 
Board of Directors of the College for a three-year term. The Assistant 
to the President of the College directs the activities of the Alumni 
Office. 

The Alumni Association of Lycoming College has two objectives: 
(1) to promote the interests of the College, and (2) to foster among 
its members loyalty and devotion to their alma mater. All persons 
who have successfully completed one year of study at Lycoming Col- 
lege, or Williamsport-Dickinson Junior College, and all former students 
of Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary are members of the Association. 

The Alumni Office is located in room 208 on the second floor of 
Old Main. Arrangements for Homecoming, Alumni Day, Class Re- 
unions, Club meetings and similar activities are coordinated through 
this office. There are active Alumni Clubs in Harrisburg, Philadelphia, 
and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Rochester, New York; and Northern 
New Jersey. 

Lycoming College holds Class A, B, and C memberships in the 
American Alumni Council. Through its Alumni Fund, the Alumni Of- 
fice is closely associated with the Development Program of the College. 

Acting as the representative of alumni on the campus, and working 
also with undergraduates, the Alumni office aids in keeping alumni in- 
formed and interested in the program, growth and activities of the 
College. 

Communications to the Alumni Association should be addressed 
to the Alumni Office. 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



Board of Directors 



OFFICERS 

Hon. Robert F. Rich President 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Vice-President 

Mr. Paul G. Gilmore Secretary 

Mr. Kenneth E. Himes ( not a director ) Treasurer 



HONORARY DIRECTORS 

The Rev. W. W. Banks Clearfield 

The Rev. A. Lawrence Miller, Ph.D Williamsport 

The Rev. W. E. Watkins, D.D Williamsport 

The Rev. L. Elbert Wilson Orlando, Fla. 



DIRECTORS 

First 
Elected Term Expires 1961 

1949 Mr. Charles V. Adams MontoursviUe 

1949 Bishop Fred Pierce Corson, D.D., LL.D Philadelphia 

1948 Mr. Frank L. Dunham Wellsboro 

1951 Mr. Paul G. Gilmore Williamsport 

1958 The Rev. William A. Keese, D.D Baltimore, Md. 

1943 Mr. Ralph E. Kelchner Jersey Shore 

1958 The Rev. Dwight S. Large, D.D Philadelphia 

1958 Mr. Lawson D. Matter Harrisburg 

1958 Mr. Fred A. Pennington Mechanicsburg 

1958 Mr. W. Russell Zacharias Allentown 

( Alumni Representative ) 



10 



First 
Elected Term Expires 1962 

1953 Mr. Jesse S. Bell Williamsport 

1953 Mr. Ernest M. Case Williamsport 

1959 Mrs. A. Roy Flanigan Williamsport 

(Alumni Representative) 

1958 The Rev. Herbert W. Glassco, D.D Clearfield 

1953 The Rev. F. LaMont Henninger, Th.D., S.T.D Harrisburg 

1960 Bishop W. Vernon Middleton, Ph.D., D.D Pittsburgh 

1932 Mrs. H. Marshall Stecker Mt. Carmel 

1918 Mr. George W. Sykes Cranberry Lake, N.Y. 

1956 The Rev. Lester A. Welliver, D.D., LL.D Williamsport 

First 
Elected Term Expires 1963 

1957 The Rev. Sheridan W. Bell, D.D Harrisburg 

1948 Mr. Harold A. Brown Williamsport 

1960 The Rev. Robert R. Croyle, D.D Altoona 

(Alumni Representative) 

1957 Mr. Horace S. Heim Montoursville 

1938 Mrs. Layton S. Lyon Williamsport 

1942 The Rev. Elvin Clay Myers, D.D New Cumberland 

1941 Mr. Arnold A. Phipps Williamsport 

1931 Hon. Robert F. Rich, LL.D Woolrich 

1936 Mr. George L. Stearns, II Williamsport 

1942 Judge Charles Scott Williams Williamsport 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mr. Harold A. Brown 

Mr. Ernest M. Case 

Mr. Frank L. Dunham 

Mr. Paul G. Gilmore 

Mr. Horace S. Heim 

The Rev. Elvin Clay Myers, D.D. 

Mr. Fred A. Pennington 

Mr. Arnold A. Phipps 

Mr. George L. Stearns, II 

Judge Charles S. Williams 



11 



Administrative Staff 



D. Frederick Wertz President 

A.B., LL.D., Dickinson College; A.M., S.T.B., Boston University. 

David G. Mobberley Dean of the College 

B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., The 
Iowa State University. 

Kenneth E. Himes Treasurer and Business Manager 

B.S., Drexel Institute of Technology; G.S.B., Rutgers University. 

R. Andrew Lady 

Assistant to the President and Director of Development 
A.B., Lycoming College; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Jack C. Buckle Dean of Students 

A.B., Juniata College; M.S., Syracuse University. 

G. Hedl Gramley Registrar 

B.S., Albright College; M.A., Bucknell University. 

Oliver E. Harris Director of Admissions 

A.B., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Helen M . Fellx Dean of Worn en 

B.S., East Stroudsburg State College. 

M. Ruth Grierson Librarian 

A.B., Alma College, A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; M.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

L. Paul Neufer Director of Religious Activities 

A.B., Dickinson College; S.T.B., S.T.M., Boston University. 

Leroy F. Derr Director of Teacher Education 

A.B., Ursinus College; M.A., Bucknell University; Ed.D., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 

Davtd G. Busey Director of Physical Education and Athletics 

B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.S. in Ed., University of Illinois. 

Donald G. Remley Director of Placement 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Columbia University. 

H. Lawrence Swartz Director of Public Relations 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.S., Boston University. 

Dantel G. Fultz Assistant to the Business Manager 

A.B., Lycoming College. 

12 



Faculty 



EMERITI 

William S. Hoffman Academic Dean Emeritus 

B.S., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University. 

James W. Sterling Associate Professor of English Emeritus 

A.B., A.M., Syracuse University; Litt.D., Lycoming College. 



PROFESSORS 

Arnold J. Currier ( 1955 ) Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Colgate University; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 

LeRoy F. Derr ( 1957 ) Professor of Education 

A.B., Ursinus; M.A., Bucknell University; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

George W. Howe ( 1949 ) Professor of Biology and Geology 

A.B., M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Cornell University. 

David G. Mobberley ( 1958 ) Dean of the College; Professor of Biology 
B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College; M.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., The 
Iowa State University. 

Loring B. Priest ( 1949) 

Divisional Director, Social Sciences; Professor of History 

Litt.B., Butgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University. 

EricV. Sandin (1946) 

Divisional Director, Humanities; Professor of English 

B.S., Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

George S. Shortess ( 1948) 

Divisional Director, Natural Sciences; Professor of Biology 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

J. Melton Skeath ( 1921 ) Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., The Penn- 
sylvania State University. 

Helen Breese Weidman ( 1944 ) Professor of Political Science 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

13 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Joseph D. Babcock ( 1931 ) Associate Professor of Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Bucknell University. 

Thomas G. Barnes ( 1956 ) Associate Professor of History 

A.B., Harvard University; D.Phil., Oxford University. (On leave 1960-61). 

Mabel K. Bauer ( 1942 ) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Cornell University; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

David G. Busey ( 1954 ) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S. in Phys. Ed., M.S. in Ed., University of Illinois. 

John W. Chandler ( 1952 ) Associate Professor of Art 

A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.Ed., Boston University. 

Rorert H. Ewing ( 1947 ) Associate Professor of History 

A.B., College of Wooster; M.A., University of Michigan. 

W. Arthur Faus ( 1951 ) Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Dickinson College; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University. 

Phel G. Gillette ( 1929 ) Associate Professor of German and Spanish 
A.B., Ohio University; M.A., Columbia University. 

John P. Graham ( 1939 ) Associate Professor of English 

Ph.B., Dickinson College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 

M. Ruth Grierson ( 1955 ) Librarian With Rank of Associate Professor 
A.B., Alma College; A.B.L.S., University of Michigan; M.S., Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

JOHX G. HOLLENBACK ( 1952 ) 

Associate Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Oldrich H. Kadlec ( 1960 ) Associate Professor of French 

State Examination, University of Prague; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Frances E. Knights (1947) Associate Prof essor of Mathematics 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Walter G. McIver ( 1946 ) Associate Professor of Voice 

Mus.B., Westminster Choir College; A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., New 
York University. 

Robert W. Rabold ( 1955 ) 

Divisional Director, Business Administration; 
Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

John A. Radspinner ( 1957 ) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Bichmond College; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; D.Sc, Carnegie 
Institute of Technology. 

14 



Otto L. Sonder, Jr. ( 1956 ) Associate Professor of Sociology 

A.B., American University; A.M., Bucknell University. 

John A. Stuart ( 1958 ) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., William Jewell; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Armand J. L. VanBaelen ( 1947 ) Associate Professor of Mathematics 
College Communal, Tirlemont, Belgium; B.S., Agric. College, Gembloux, 
Belgium; M.S., Rutgers University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Bartley C. Block ( 1958 ) Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern University. 

William L. Bricker ( 1955) 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration and Economics 
A.B., M.A., University of Washington. 

Robert H. Byington ( 1960 ) Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Roger Earle Cogswell ( 1946 ) Assbtant Professor of French 

A.B., Sorbonne University, Paris, France; M.A., The Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 

John H. Conrad ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Mansfield State Teachers College; M.A., New York University. 

Werner J. Fries ( 1958 ) Assistant Professor of German 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Theodore K. Frutiger ( 1956; 1960 ) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B., Bucknell University. 

Eleanor Radcliffe Garner ( 1957 ) Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., A.M., George Washington University. 

Eloise Gompf ( 1960 ) Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Western College; A.M., Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Kenneth Josephson ( 1958 ) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Columbia University; A.M., Eastman School of Music in the University 
of Rochester. 

Elizabeth H. King ( 1956 ) 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Geneva College, M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Donald T. Kyte ( 1956 ) Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Wesleyan University; A.M., Boston University. 

15 



Robert G. Leh ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Carrie E. Miller ( 1958 ) Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Kansas State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver. 

Norman J. Myers ( 1959 ) Assistant Professor of Speech 

B.A., Hiram College; M.A., University of Illinois. 

Neale H. Mucklow ( 1957 ) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Hamilton College. 

L. Paul Neufer ( 1960 ) Assistant Professor of Religion 

A.B., Dickinson College; S.T.B., S.T.M., Boston University. 

Joseph R. Peck, II ( 1956 ) Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., University of Florida. 

Howard L. Ramsey ( 1955 ) Assistant Professor of Religion 

A.B., B.D., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Donald George Remley ( 1946 ) Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Logan A. Richmond ( 1954 ) 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S., Lycoming College; M.A., New York University. 

Mary Landon Russell ( 1936 ) Assistant Professor of Organ, Piano 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music; M.A., The Pennsyl- 
vania State University. 

James W. Sheaffer ( 1949 ) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Indiana State College; M.S., University of Pennsylvania. 

Muriel L. Toppan ( 1960 ) 

Cataloging Librarian With Rank of Assistant Professor 
A.B., M.A., Boston University; M.S.L.S., Simmons College. 

Michael M. Wargo ( 1957 ) Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University. (On leave 1960-61 ). 



INSTRUCTORS 

Wayne A. Allen ( 1960 ) Instructor in History 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.A., University of Michigan. 

David C. Anderson ( 1959 ) Instructor in Business Administration 

B.S., University of West Virginia. 

16 



Myrna A. Barnes ( 1959) 

Circulation Librarian With Rank of Instructor 
A.B., University of California at Los Angeles. 

Laura. M. Coleman ( 1959) 

Reference Librarian With Rank of Instructor 
B.S., Millersville State College. 

Enrique Garcia ( 1960 ) Instructor in Spanish 

A.B., Wesleyan University. 

Edward Guerra ( 1960 ) Instructor in Religion 

B.D., Southern Methodist University; S.T.M., Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. 

Ian F. James ( 1958 ) Instructor in Art 

M.F.A., Syracuse University. 

Jane K. Landon ( 1956 ) Instructor in Piano 

A.B., Lycoming College. 

Gertrude B. Madden ( 1958 ) Instructor in English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania. 

Marion E. Maynard ( 1959 ) Instructor in English 

A.B., Bucknell University. 

Donna K. Miller ( 1960 ) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College. 

Nelson Phillips ( 1959 ) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Springfield College. 

Janice M. Stebbins ( 1960) Instructor in Biology 

B.S., Lycoming College. 

Richard T. Stites ( 1959 ) Instructor in History 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., George Washington University. 

Sally F. Vargo ( 1953 ) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Budd F. Whitehill ( 1957 ) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 



LECTURER 

Don L. Larrabee ( 1945 ) , Attorney at Law Lecturer in Business Law 
A.B., Allegheny College; Graduate Division of the Wharton School; Law 
School of The University of Pennsylvania. 

17 



PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS 

Donald Daughenbaugh Assistant Basketball Coach 

B.S., Health and Physical Education, Stroudsburg State College; M.S., Health. 
Education and Recreation, Boston University. 

Nellie F. Gorgas Secretarial Science 

B.S., Lycoming College. 

Clarence W. Green Assistant Football Coach 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; M.S. in Ed., Bucknell University. 

Florence M. A. Hilbish English 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Eva Keller Art 

B.S., M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. 

Ruth S. Marvin Medical Secretarial 

R.N., St. Camillus School of Nursing, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Rollie Myers Assistant Football Coach 

B.S. in Phy. Ed., Lock Haven State College. 

Robert D. Smink Education 

B.S., M.S., Bucknell University. 

James Wehr Business Administration 

B.S., Lycoming College. 

Ned E. Weller History; Religion 

A.B., Lycoming College; S.T.B., Boston University. 



18 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 



Nora L. Bartlett 

Emily C. Bhchle 

Barbara A. Earnest 

Clara E. Fritsche 

Nellie F. Gorgas 

B.S., Lycoming College. 

Margaret E. Heinz 

Ruth E. Kohr 

Sylvia J. Long 

Barbara M. Dissinger 

B.M., M.M., Westminster Choir College 

Sue L. New 

Marian L. Rubendall 

Carol J. Sortman 

Jo Ann Spencer 

Dorothy J. Streeter 

Barbara A. Ulmer 

Helen J. Wadlow 

Sandra L. Walton 

Vivian Younkin 



Library Assistant 

Secretary to the Business Manager 

Secretary to Placement and Education 

Accountant 
Secretary to the President 

Bookstore Assistant 

Faculty Secretary 

Secretary to the Begistrar 

Secretary to the Assistant to the President 



Head Besident, Rich Hall 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Assistant in Treasurers Office 

Bookstore Manager 

Assistant in Treasurers Office 

Secretary to the Dean of the College 

Secretary to the Librarian 

Supervisor of Housekeeping 



MEDICAL STAFF 

Frederic C. Lechner, M.D. College Physician 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; M.D., Jefferson Medical College. 

Robert S. Yasui, M.D. College Surgeon 

M.D., Temple University. 

Ruth J. Burket, R.N. College Nurse 

Hamot Hospital School of Nursing. 



19 



PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 



Purpose and Objectives 



Lycoming College devotes itself to the vocation of humanity: the 
vocation that enables man to become aware of what it means to love 
truth, goodness, and beauty, by 

fostering free inquiry and learning in a curricular experience that 
provides basic knowledge of the cultural, social, and natural world, 

developing searching, critical, and creative attitudes of mind, 
encouraging cultural explorations essential to a free society, 

affirming the Christian faith as a valid interpretation of the voca- 
tion of humanity, 

developing an appreciation for the values of social, mental and 
physical well-being, and 

preparing students for professional and vocational opportunities 
that may be pursued upon a more humanitarian level because of 
foundations laid by a strong liberal education. 

"Vocation of humanity" suggests that the primary concern of The 
College is human life and living. We find this concern manifesting 
itself, in a Christian setting, as an affirmation of the fundamental dig- 
nity and worth of all human beings. The entire program of The Col- 
lege is directed toward fulfillment of objectives that seek to fit young 
men and women for "the living of these days," in a global society in 
which the priceless commodity is human life. The program is de- 
scribed in some detail in the following sections of this catalogue. 
Under the titles, Campus Life, Academic Program and Curricula, 
reference is made to the locale, history, traditions, activities and 
academic program of The College. 



22 



CAMPUS LIFE 



History and Tradition 



Lycoming is a new name for an old institution. The original 
school was founded in 1812 and was known as Williamsport Academy. 
It was the first educational institution in Williamsport, and as such 
confined its efforts to teaching the young. Later, as the public school 
system developed, the Academy elevated its program to include the 
higher grades and college preparatory work. 

In 1848, under the patronage of The Methodist Episcopal Church, 
the Academy became Williamsport-Dickinson Seminary. The semi- 
nary status continued until 1929, when another change created Dickin- 
son Junior College. During its years as a junior college, the institution 
forged a sound academic reputation, expanded its facilities and 
strengthened its faculty. 

The increased demand for higher education following World 
War II prompted another change in 1948 when the junior college 
became a four-year liberal arts and sciences college and changed its 
name to Lycoming. The name Lycoming is a corruption of the 
Indian word "lacomic" — from the vocabulary of the Monsey ( Muncy ) 
tribe — meaning "Great Stream." Lycoming is a name that has been 
common to north central Pennsylvania since colonial times and is an 
appropriate one for a school that has been, and is continuing to be, 
influential in the educational, cultural and spiritual development of 
the area. 

The foregoing brief history is evidence of one aspect of Lycom- 
ing's tradition: that of growth and evolution to meet the demands of 
our changing society and culture. 

Through more than a century of its history, the College has had 
the stabilizing influence of The Methodist Church, another aspect of 
its tradition. The evolution of Lycoming from its origins to its present 
status has been accomplished without abandoning its convictions that 
the Christian philosophy of life is the proper leaven of higher educa- 
tion. Lycoming strives to foster a Christian atmosphere in all aspects 
of the college program, and to stress the development and practice of 
a Christian way of life. 

Since Lycoming is a small college — 900 students — it has been 
able to continue its tradition of friendliness and fellowship among 
students, faculty and administration. In this personalized setting, 
students can be motivated — indeed, inspired — to apply themselves 
more diligently and to develop their potentialities more completely. 
Throughout, Lycoming emphasizes the importance and value of 
scholarship, intellectual curiosity, critical evaluation, and integrity. 

24 



Religious Traditions 



Lycoming College is owned by the Preachers' Aid Society of The 
Methodist Church. Its faculty and students express their religious 
convictions through membership and participation in almost thirty 
Protestant denominations and the Roman Catholic and Jewish faiths. 
It is the purpose of the College to provide its students with significant 
opportunities for the expression of religious faith. Each student is 
encouraged to be loyal to the church of his choice in the city of 
Williamsport by his attendance and support. 

Lycoming College firmly believes in Christian higher education. 
In numerous ways it provides opportunities and guidance for students 
who wish to develop and practice the Christian philosophy of life. 
This is accomplished: 

through the Department of Religion, established by the late Hon- 
orable M. B. Rich, for eighteen years President of the Board of 
Directors. 

through the weekly Chapel Program, which brings to the campus 
outstanding religious leaders who share with the Student Body 
the best in contemporary religious thinking. 

through the Director of Religious Activities, who is a member 
of the Faculty with teaching responsibilities. He is responsible 
for co-ordinating the religious activities of the College and pro- 
vides counselling in the area of religion to students who request 
his assistance. He serves as Executive Secretary to the Religious 
Life Council. 

through the Religious Life Council, the student organization re- 
sponsible for co-ordinating religious groups on the campus. It is 
composed of representatives from all student religious organiza- 
tions, the Student Government, Faculty, Administration, and the 
local clergy. 

through the annual period of religious emphasis, usually held 
during the third week of February, under the sponsorship of the 
Religious Life Council, when students and faculty discuss to- 
gether common problems in some aspect of religion, with the 
objective of stimulating discussion and interest in this area of 
campus life. 

25 



26 Lycoming College Bulletin 

through religious organizations which include the Methodist Stu- 
dent Movement (meeting weekly at the College Church, Pine 
Street Methodist Church, located at the intersection of Pine Street 
and Edwin Street) and the John Wesley Club. Other denomina- 
tional groups include the Canterbury Club (Episcopal), the 
Icthus Club (Presbyterian), the Lutheran Club, the Newman 
Club (Roman Catholic), and the Roger Williams Club (Baptist). 
Each of these meets regularly to provide members of its faith with 
the opportunity to participate in activities of common interest. 



Locale 



Williamsport, home of Lycoming College, is located on the West 
Branch of the beautiful Susquehanna River in north central Pennsyl- 
vania. Its population is approximately forty-five thousand, and its 
industry is diversified. 

Williamsport is in an area that is famous for its beautiful mountain 
scenery, and fine outdoor recreational facilities. Such sports as hunt- 
ing and fishing attract thousands of enthusiasts from other areas an- 
nually. The community has a fine public school system and a civic 
choir; it has two large parks and numerous playgrounds and is gener- 
ally oriented to provide exceptional opportunities for youth. There 
are eighty-eight churches, representing a large number of denomina- 
tions and convictions. 

Williamsport is within two hundred miles of Washington, D. C, 
Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, Albany, Syracuse, Buffalo, 
Rochester, and Pittsburgh. It is easily accessible by air, train, bus, or 
automobile. Allegheny, Capital and Trans World Airlines have twenty 
flights daily, with passenger service direct to Albany, Boston, Buffalo, 
Cleveland, Detroit, Erie, New York City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, 
Providence, Rochester, and Washington, D. C. The Pennsylvania 
Railroad provides daily passenger service to all major cities. Grey- 
hound Lines and Edwards Lakes-to-Sea System run busses to all major 
cities dailv. Williamsport is on U. S. Highways Nos. 15 and 220, and 
on State Highway No. 14. 



Campus Life 



Lycoming College accepts the responsibility of making every situ- 
ation in which learning occurs constructive and positive. The College 
believes that learning is a continuous process that takes place, not 
only in the classroom, but in every college activity. 

The College assumes its responsibility in this area by directing 
the extra-curricular educational experiences of the students in such a 
way that these activities contribute to the achievement of the objec- 
tives of the College, by complementing the academic life of the 
campus. 

The College considers one of its responsibilities to be the encour- 
agement of as many different activities as are necessary to provide all 
students with the opportunity to participate constructively in this area 
of student life. Departmental clubs; athletics, both intercollegiate and 
intramural; varied interest groups such as denominational clubs, the 
choir, the band, etc.; social organizations; social activities; self-govern- 
ing groups; and many informal associations are equally important in 
a well-integrated program of student activities. 

Recognizing the need for skilled leadership in our world, it is the 
purpose of the College to utilize students in as many of the leadership 
positions as possible. In doing so, the students will be given the 
opportunity to accept greater responsibilities, and to learn as they 
participate. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Self-government by students in certain areas of campus life is an 
objective achieved through the Student Government Association of 
Lycoming College. The Student Council is the legislative body of the 
Association. The officers of the Student Government Association are 
elected from the entire student body. Members of Student Council are 
elected by classes and certain other organizations. 

The Student Council has been delegated authority for certain 
areas of campus life. The establishment of parking regulations and 
their enforcement is the responsibility of Student Government. Stu- 
dents are employed by Student Council to serve as enforcement offi- 
cers. All fines collected for violations are turned over to Student 
Council to pay for the costs of the registration of automobiles and the 
enforcement officers. 

27 



28 Lycoming College Bulletin 

A Student Court has been established by Student Council to hear 
cases involving the violation of the parking regulations. This court is 
also empowered to consider cases referred to it by the Student Union 
Court or to hear cases on appeal of students from the Student Union 
Court. 

The Student Court is composed of four students appointed by the 
President of the Student Council with the approval of the Council 
and the Dean of Students. 

A number of standing committees of Student Council are con- 
cerned with specific areas of student life. The Social Calendar-Con- 
cessions Committee is responsible for approving the scheduling of all 
social activities by student organizations, and awards concessions to 
student groups for "fund raising" purposes upon request. The Dining 
Room Committee is responsible for the dress regulations in the Dining 
Room and advises the manager in menu planning and other areas of 
concern. 

Homecoming, Winter Week-end and Spring Week-end are major 
social activities under the sponsorship of Student Council. Each of 
these week-ends feature a major dance with a "name band," along 
with a full program of activities. 

Other governing groups on the campus are the Inter-Fraternity 
Council, the Men's Dormitory Council, the Women's Dormitory Coun- 
cil, and Associated Women Students. Each operates under limited 
authority in situations related to its specific area. 



SOCIAL AND CULTURAL INFLUENCES 

Lycoming aims to give its students every possible opportunity 
to become familiar with the best social customs and usages. The 
development of poise and ease in handling oneself in social situations 
is a major objective in the program of the College. These experiences 
are provided through the dining room, coffees and receptions, and 
other social functions. 

The Artist and Lecture Series presents several performances of 
the best obtainable talent in music, drama, the dance, and lecture. 
The Series is presented to provide wider cultural experiences than 
might normally be available to the student. Although the Series is 
entertaining, its prime objective is to acquaint the student with the arts 
and the humanities as they are performed on a professional level. 



Campus Life 29 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

There are six official college publications. Each is devoted to a 
specific area of college life, and is designed to communicate to selected 
groups of the college constituency. 

The Bell, official student newspaper, is published weekly, and is 
devoted to interests of the student body, reporting current campus 
events. 

The Arrow, college yearbook, is published in May and presents a 
record of student life during the current academic year. 

The Guidepost, published annually by Student Government, is a 
student handbook of regulations and miscellaneous information. It is 
designed primarily for new students and is published annually and 
distributed to them prior to their arrival on the campus. 

The Alumni Office publishes The Alumni Bulletin three times 
yearly. It is designed to keep the alumni informed of current happen- 
ings at the college and on alumni activities. The Newsletter is pub- 
lished periodically, between issues of the Bulletin. 

The Student Bulletin and The Faculty Bulletin are published 
weekly by the office of the Dean of the College. The Lycoming Li- 
brary Student Handbook is published by the Library every September. 

The Campus Radio Station broadcasts nightly from 7:00 p. m. un- 
til midnight on a wired circuit to Wesley Hall, Rich Hall and Old 
Main. The station broadcasts study music, news commentary, sports 
results, and special programs of interest to the student body. 

CAMPUS CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

A variety of organizations on the campus provides opportunities 
for social and intellectual growth. These groups are organized and 
conducted by students in cooperation with faculty sponsors or advisers. 

Some of the groups are: The International Relations Club, which 
is the campus focus for study and discussion of world affairs; the 
Student Education Association of Pennsylvania, which gives prospec- 
tive teachers current information on the teaching field and an insight 
into the problems of education; the Drama Club, which stages a 
variety of dramatic productions including their own original work; 
The Varsity Club, composed of lettermen, promotes college spirit in 
sports; the Biochemp Society for pre-professional students in the sci- 



30 Lycoming College Bulletin 

ences; the Business Club for students majoring in business administra- 
tion. The Philosophy Society provides an outlet for all students inter- 
ested in the informal discussion of philosophic concepts; the Spanish 
Club and German Club study the language and the life and culture 
of the countries; and the Associated Women Students sponsor parties 
and teas for students, faculty and parents. 



FRATERNITIES 

Five Greek letter groups on the campus provide a means of bring- 
ing to men students the advantages of national fraternal organization 
as well as group housing. They include the Psi Chapter of Kappa 
Delta Rho, Beta Lambda Chapter of Sigma Pi, Iota Beta Zeta Chapter 
of Lambda Chi Alpha, Epsilon Beta Chapter of Theta Chi, and the 
Nu Chapter of Alpha Gamma Upsilon. 

The Inter-Fraternity Council coordinates the activities of the 
fraternities. 



College Honors 



INDIVIDUAL HONORS 



THE CHIEFTAIN AWARD 

The Chieftain Award is given to that senior who, in the opinion 
of the students and faculty, has contributed the most to Lycoming 
College through support of school activities; who has a pleasing per- 
sonality and the ability to get along with his co-workers, both students 
and faculty; who has evidenced a good moral code; and who has a 
good scholastic standing. 

SUMMA CUM LAUDE 

The degree summa cum laude shall be conferred on students who 
have an academic average for their entire college course from 3.90 
through 4.00. 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE 

The degree magna cum laude shall be conferred on students who 
have an academic average for their entire college course from 3.50 
through 3.89. 

CUM LAUDE 

The degree cum laude shall be conferred on students who have 
an academic average for their entire college course from 3.25 through 
3.49. 



A student must have passed at least ninety semester hours at 
Lycoming College to be eligible for College Honors. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

The Dean's List is issued at the end of every semester to give 
recognition to those students who have earned significant academic 
achievement. Students who have a 3.4 grade average during the 
semester are thus recognized for superior academic achievement. 

31 



32 Lycoming College Bulletin 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

SACHEM HONOR SOCIETY 

Any graduating student who has attended Lycoming College for 
at least three years and has attained a point average of 3.50 or above, 
or any junior student who has attended Lycoming College for three 
years and has attained a point average of 3.70 or above is eligible for 
membership. 

ALPHA PSI OMEGA 

This national honorary society is for dramatic students. Worthy 
students are elected to the fraternity as a reward for their efforts in 
participating in the plays staged by the Lycoming College Players. 

PHI ALPHA THETA 

This national honorary society is for those students interested in 
history. To be eligible, students must have completed, with a grade 
average of at least 3.1, a minimum of 15 semester hours in history. For 
two-thirds of the remainder of the work there must be a grade average 
of at least 3.0. The local chapter is Zeta Zeta. 

Students interested in history who do not meet these standards are 
eligible for associate membership. 



TAU BETA SIGMA 

This national honorary sorority for college bandswomen elects to 
membership each year those women who have shown outstanding per- 
formance with the college band. Lycoming's chapter is Beta EpsOon. 



KAPPA KAPPA PSI 

Each year men students demonstrating outstanding band musician- 
ship are elected to membership in the Gamma Tau chapter of this 
national honorary fraternity for college bandsmen. 



College Honors 33 

IRUSKA HONOR SOCIETY 

No more than seven juniors are selected annually for membership 
in Iruska, which honors juniors active in extra-curricular activities, 
who best represent the spirit of campus leadership at Lycoming 
College. 

WHO'S WHO IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 
AND UNIVERSITIES 

The Senior class elects members to Who's Who. The Senior 
members are honored by having their names appear in the annual 
issue of the national publication, Who's Who in American Colleges and 
Universities. Election is on the basis of a satisfactory scholastic aver- 
age, personal character, service to the College, and outstanding leader- 
ship in extra-curricular activities. 



Programs and Rules 



ORIENTATION 

A period preceding the opening of the Fall Term is set aside to 
provide freshmen and transfer students with assistance in making the 
adjustment to Lycoming College. A special program consisting of 
placement testing, interviews with faculty counselors, general ori- 
entation meetings, formal convocation, registration, and social and rec- 
reational activity is prepared. Faculty and selected upperclassmen are 
present to assist the new student during this period. All new students 
are required to participate in this program. The schedule is mailed to 
each freshman and transfer student during the summer. 

During the first Fall Semester a freshman is on campus, he must 
complete a course in Orientation, which is required for graduation. 
This course, meeting weekly, carries one hour of credit ( not applicable 
toward the degree) and covers the various aspects of adjustment to 
college, the use of the library, study skills, attitudes, and motivation. 



FRESHMAN CUSTOMS 

Certain traditions and customs have been established for fresh- 
men. They are designed to help the freshmen become acquainted 
with the history and customs of Lycoming College. Each regulation 
has a purpose in the development of the individual into a class group 
which is a part of the total college community. The customs freshmen 
will be expected to observe are printed in the Guidepost. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS 

The College offers an attractive program of intercollegiate ath- 
letics and encourages wide participation by its students. It is a mem- 
ber of the Middle Atlantic Athletic Conference and the National Col- 
legiate Athletic Association. Lycoming annually meets some of the 
top-ranking small college teams in the East in athletic competition. 
Contests are scheduled with other colleges in football, basketball, 
wrestling, baseball, tennis, golf, swimming, and soccer. 

34 



Programs and Rules 35 

INTRAMAURAL ATHLETICS 

An extensive and diversified program of intramural athletic com- 
petition affords opportunity for every student to participate in one 
or more sports of his own choosing. 

Sports for men include touch football, basketball, volleyball, bowl- 
ing, badminton, table tennis, tennis, softball, golf, wrestling, swim- 
ming, horseshoes, track and field. 

Sports for women include competition in basketball, volleyball, 
bowling, badminton, table tennis, tennis, softball, swimming, field 
hockey, archery, and rhythmical activities. Field days are arranged 
with WAA groups of other colleges and universities during the school 
year. 

COUNSELLING PROGRAM 

An advantage of a small college is the rich experience gained by 
the close association of students and faculty. In addition to this valu- 
able personal relationship, which affords students the opportunity to 
discuss various problems with their instructors, Lycoming has a well- 
rounded counselling program for its students. Under the direction of 
the Dean of the College, this program includes areas as represented by 
the Dean of Students, the Dean of Women, and Faculty Advisers. 

The program begins with a personal interview between the Direc- 
tor of Admissions and the candidate for admission. These interviews 
are sufficient in length to obtain a picture of the student, his back- 
ground, and his plans for the future. When the student enters the 
College as a Freshman, he is assigned to a faculty adviser. The new 
student will meet with this adviser regularly during the year. The 
Freshman will find his adviser eager to guide and assist in the many 
problems that confront the new college student. Certain tests will 
be made available to the students for diagnostic purposes and to assist 
in advisement. These tests will be offered on a referral basis to those 
students for whom the need is obvious. Additional counselling is avail- 
able to the student in the area of academic, personal and emotional 
adjustment. 

PLACEMENT SERVICE 

The Placement Bureau maintains a register listing the abilities and 
major interests of students and recent alumni. Literature from busi- 
nesses and industrial associations is kept available. Consultations with 



36 Lycoming College Bulletin 

the Placement Director assist students toward wise selection of a pro- 
fession. Interviews are then scheduled at which students meet and 
confer with representatives from companies in which they are inter- 
ested. Lycoming graduates are usually placed before commencement. 

There are many diversified businesses in Williamsport. These 
firms give students at Lycoming splendid opportunities for visits, tours, 
and conferences. They also afford the student body a variety of part- 
time jobs during each college session. The Placement Bureau serves 
as a clearinghouse for part-time employment and can usually find 
work for every student needing it. 



PROVISIONS FOR VETERANS 

Lycoming is fully approved for the educational program for Vet- 
erans under Federal Public Laws 550, 634, and 894. 



RESIDENCE 

All single students who do not reside at home are required to 
live in the College residence halls and eat then meals in the College 
dining room. Special diets cannot be provided. Some male students 
may be assigned to private homes because of a shortage of space in 
the residence halls. Exceptions to these regulations can be approved 
only for the purpose of working for room and/or board or to live with 
relatives. Requests for exceptions must be submitted in writing to the 
Dean of Students or the Dean of Women. The petition must include 
the name of the householder and the address where the student wishes 
to live. 

Members and pledges of social fraternities are required to live in 
their houses when space is available. All fraternity members eat 
their meals in the College dining room. 

Residents furnish their own linens, towels, blankets, bedspreads, 
and wastebaskets. Residents of fraternities and Old Main also fur- 
nish their own desk lamps. Drapes are provided in Rich Hall and Rich 
House, but are not provided in Wesley Hall, Old Main or fraternity 
houses. 

Linens, towels and blankets may be rented from the Merit Laun- 
dry & Dry Cleaning Co. Information is sent to all resident students 
concerning this service following their assignment to a room. 



Programs and Rules 37 

WOMEN'S RESIDENCE 

Resident women students live either in Rich Hall, Rich House, 
or the new dormitory for women. Rich House is the honor house 
for upperclass women. The main residence for women is Rich Hall, 
which was built in 1948 and will accommodate 120 women. Rooms 
are arranged in suites of two rooms with two students living in each 
room. Each four students have private bath facilities. The new 
dormitory will house 66 upperclass women students. 

Also located in Rich Hall are the Infirmary, recreation room, 
television room, and laundry facilities. Lounges, telephone switch- 
board, and the office for the Head Resident are all located on the first 
floor. 

All resident women students are members of the Resident Wo- 
men's Association of Lycoming College. They establish standards and 
regulations for community living and endeavor to assist each new 
student in her adjustment to living in a college dormitory. All dormi- 
tory activities are under the supervision of the Dean of Women. 



MEN'S RESIDENCE 

All resident men live in Wesley Hall, Old Main, fraternity houses, 
or in private homes designated by the College. Upperclassmen have 
priority in assignment of all rooms, except for 52 places reserved for 
freshmen on the third floor of Wesley Hall. Rooms for freshmen are 
assigned according to the date the room reservation fee of $50.00 is 
paid following notification of admission. 

All rooms are for double occupancy. Rooms are furnished with 
a single bed, pillow, a desk, desk chair, and a dresser for each occu- 
pant. In Wesley Hall the furniture is built into the room, except for 
the bed, and a light is provided over the desk. Window shades are 
provided in all rooms. It is advisable to wait until after arriving on 
the campus to purchase drapes and bedspreads, if desired. 



DISCIPLINE 

The College expects all of its students to accept the responsibility 
required of citizens in a free democratic society. The rules and regu- 
lations of the College are designed to protect the rights of every mem- 
ber of the community against encroachment by individuals. The limi- 
tations which are imposed upon the activities of individuals are estab- 
lished for the common good of the entire college community. 



38 Lycoming College Bulletin 

Students who are unable to demonstrate that they can accept this 
responsibility or who are antagonistic to the spirit and general purpose 
of the College, or who fail to abide by the regulations established by 
the College may be dismissed or requested to leave the College at any 
time during the academic year. 



REGULATIONS 

Certain regulations have been established by the College. In 
addition to those published here, specific rules are furnished each 
student upon matriculation, or are published in the Guidepost. 

Announcements during the academic year may amend or supple- 
ment the catalogue regulations. 



ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

The position of Lycoming College regarding the use of alcoholic 
beverages by its campus constituency is based upon the official position 
of The Methodist Church, which is stated in Paragraph 2022 of the 
Discipline of The Methodist Church, 1956 edition, and upon the 
premise that any activity not contributing constructively to the devel- 
opment of a mature citizen in the college community is inconsistent 
with the aims and ideals of the College. 

Specific rules and regulations regarding the use of alcoholic bev- 
erages are based on the above statement and are consistent with the 
statutes of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in regard to the pur- 
chase and use of alcoholic beverages by persons under 21 years of age. 

The following situations may result in dismissal from the College 
or other disciplinary action: 

1. The possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages inside any col- 
lege building, or on college property, including the storage of 
such beverages in automobiles on the campus. 

2. The use of alcoholic beverages by women, regardless of age, 
while they are resident students of the college and are not under 
the chaperonage of their parents. 

3. Returning to the campus in an intoxicated condition resulting in 
an inability to control behavior so that it is acceptable at all 
times. 

4. The illegal purchase or consumption of alcoholic beverages by 
male students of the college under 21 years of age. 



Programs and Rules 39 

5. The provision of alcoholic beverages by legally qualified male 
student purchasers to students under 21 years of age. 

6. The possession and/or use of alcoholic beverages at any social 
function sponsored by the college or any organization of students, 
regardless of location. 

7. The rental and/or use of non-college facilities where alcoholic 
beverages are present and/or are consumed by the students pres- 
ent. This includes party rooms, cabin parties, picnics, etc. 

8. Any situation resulting in behavior reflecting discredit upon the 
college which has resulted from the consumption of alcoholic 
beverages. This includes public intoxication, situations where 
police are involved, or where public notice is attracted and re- 
ported to college officials. 

9. Any situation not covered specifically under the above regulations 
which indicates that the students are deliberately seeking to avoid 
the responsibility for the violation of regulations by individuals 
or groups. 

10. Any violation of the Liquor Control Act, as amended, of the Com- 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. 

These rules and regulations have been formulated for the protec- 
tion of the reputation and the well-being of the college community. 
Their observance is expected of every student of Lycoming College. 
It is assumed that a willingness to observe these regulations is implicit 
in the acceptance of membership in the Lycoming College community. 



AUTOMOBILES 

All resident male students classified as freshmen or sophomores 
by the Registrar's office, and all those resident male students on aca- 
demic probation may not operate or have in their possession in Wil- 
liamsport, or the surrounding area, motor vehicles of any nature. No 
resident women students will be permitted to operate or have in their 
possession in Williamsport or the surrounding area, a motor vehicle 
of any nature. Exceptions for students needing automobiles for em- 
ployment purposes may be granted only upon written petition to the 
Dean of Students. 

Parking privileges on the campus are reserved for students, facul- 
ty, and staff members who have registered their automobiles and have 
been issued parking stickers for their cars. 



40 Lycoming College bulletin 

FIREARMS 

No resident student may keep firearms or ammunition in the place 
of his residence or stored in an automobile on the campus. Facilities 
for storing firearms for hunting purposes are available in the Dean 
of Students' Office. 

GAMBLING 

The use of money or stakes representing money in card games or 
other games is prohibited while a student is in residence at the College. 

DORMITORIES 

Dormitory students are responsible for the furnishings and the 
condition of their rooms. Inspections of rooms and their contents are 
made periodically. Charges will be assessed for damages to rooms and 
furniture. 

Dormitory students are expected to vacate their rooms during the 
vacation periods when the dormitories are closed and no later than 24 
hours following their last examinations except for graduating seniors. 

Regulations regarding quiet hours for study are established by 
the appropriate Dorm Councils and are published in the Guidepost 
and on the dormitory bulletin boards. 



MONEY AND VALUABLES 

The College accepts no responsibility for loss of valuables due to 
theft, fire, or other causes. Students may deposit money in the Trea- 
surer's Office. Withdrawals are permitted on Friday afternoons, only. 



MARRIAGE 

Students who change their marital status are requested to notify 
the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women prior to their marriage. 

Married students may not live in the college dormitories. If a 
woman student marries while a resident student, she must vacate her 
room in the residence hall immediately. 



Health Services 



MEDICAL HISTORY AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

Each student entering the College is required to submit a medical 
history record and a physical examination form prior to arriving on 
the campus. The parent or guardian of each student under 21 years 
of age must sign the health record which authorizes the College health 
authorities to give emergency medical treatment according to good 
medical practice. In the event an operation or other treatment is 
required for a serious accident or illness, the College Physician will 
always secure prior parental consent if the circumstances permit. 

Exemption from participation in physical activity associated with 
Physical Education may be granted only by the College Physician. 
This exemption is based upon the medical history, report of the stu- 
dent's physician, and a physical examination by the College Physician. 

INFIRMARY SERVICE 

The College maintains an Infirmary which is staffed on a seven- 
day week, twenty-four-hour day basis with Registered Nurses. The 
College Physician is on call when needed. Normal medical treatment 
by the Health Service Staff at the College Infirmary is free of charge. 
However, overnight bed care, special medications, x-rays, surgery, 
care of major accidents, immunizations, examinations for glasses, 
Physician's calls other than in the Infirmary, and special nursing ser- 
vice, etc., are not included in the Infirmary service which is provided 
free. A daily room charge for Infirmary bed care of $8.00 is made. 
This charge is covered under the Accident and Sickness Insurance 
Program of the College. 

ACCIDENT AND SICKNESS INSURANCE 

All resident students are required to purchase the Accident and 
Sickness Group Insurance plan of the College for the academic year, 
unless they can present evidence that they are covered under some 
other health insurance program. Non-resident students may participate 
in the College Group Insurance Plan on a voluntary basis. If a student 
becomes ineligible under another plan because of age, he must enter 
the College Program in the semester in which he loses his other cover- 
age. The Insurance Plan will also be available for a twelve-months' 
coverage on a voluntary basis for all students. Information concerning 
the Plan and its benefits will be sent to all students during the summer. 

41 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Admissions 



ADMISSIONS POLICY 

The policy of Lycoming College is to admit applicants who, in 
the opinion of the Admissions Committee, are best qualified to profit 
by the opportunities offered by the College, and who can at the same 
time make positive contributions to undergraduate life. Due consid- 
eration is given not only to academic attainment, as evidenced by 
school records and examinations, but also to the applicant's character, 
personality, and interest and accomplishments in extra-curricular 
pursuits. 

Admission to Lycoming College is on a competitive basis. Early 
application, while encouraged, does not assure admission. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Persons desiring to apply for admission should request official 
forms from the Director of Admissions. 

The Admissions Office compiles a personal file for each applicant 
and the following items must be submitted before final acceptance is 
approved: 

1. Application for Admission and secondary school record on 
forms supplied by the College. A registration fee of $10.00 must 
accompany each application. This fee is not refundable. 

2. A small recent photograph ( approximately 2" x 3" ) of the 
applicant. 

3. The Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. Applicants wishing to enter the College in September 
should arrange to take these examinations no later than February of 
their senior year. 

The responsibility for arranging to take these examinations rests 
with the applicant. However, the Director of Admissions will be 
glad to advise any applicant on this matter if requested. 

44 



Admissions 45 

In addition to the above, all applicants are required to visit the 
campus and to meet with the Director of Admissions or a representa- 
tive of the Admissions Office. This conference provides an opportu- 
nity for reviewing the applicant's academic record, discussing his 
(or her) plans, and answering questions. 

Following receipt of the above items, the Admissions Committee 
will determine those applicants who can be accepted. All applicants 
will be notified accordingly by letter as promptly as possible. Action 
of the Admissions Committee must be regarded as final. 



THE COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION 
BOARD TESTS 

During the academic year 1960-61, the College Entrance Exam- 
ination Board will administer the Scholastic Aptitude Tests on each 
of the dates listed below. The deadline for application is approxi- 
mately one month prior to the test date. 

Date of Tests 

Saturday, December 3, 1960 Saturday, March 18, 1961 

Saturday, January 14, 1961 Saturday, May 20, 1961 

Saturday, February 4, 1961 Wednesday, August 9, 1961 

Applicants should consult with their high school counsellors con- 
cerning the details of registering for the tests, or write directly to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New 
Jersey, requesting the Bulletin of Information. This bulletin, obtain- 
able without charge, contains rules regarding applications, fees, re- 
ports, and the conduct of the tests; lists of examination centers, and an 
application blank bound in it. The completed blank should be re- 
turned to the College Board office promptly. The applicant will then 
be supplied with further information about the tests and his ticket of 
admission to the test center he has specified. The results of the tests 
are sent directly to the college(s) listed by the applicant, but not to 
the applicant. Results are normally received by the Colleges three to 
four weeks following the test date. 

A writing sample exercise will be offered by the College Board on 
December 3, 1960, and January 14, 1961. This is not a requirement 
for admission to Lycoming, but applicants who take this writing test 
are asked to have a copy of it submitted to this College. 



46 Lycoming College Bulletin 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

The usual evidence of academic preparation to enter Lycoming 
College is the satisfactory completion of 16 units of high school work, 
consisting of 4 units of English, and at least 2 of History, 2 of Mathe- 
matics, 2 of Science, and 5 elective units. 

Cooperative engineering students and mathematics majors must 
include plane geometry as one of the two units of mathematics. A 
letter of recommendation from the applicant's private teacher and/or 
high school music supervisor should accompany the application of 
music majors. 

EARLY DECISION PLAN 

Lycoming College has adopted an Early Decision Plan which 
will permit the Director of Admissions to notify well qualified candi- 
dates at the beginning of their senior year in high school that their 
admission to the college is assured upon graduation. Further infor- 
mation concerning the Early Decision Plan or the regular programs 
of study offered at Lycoming can be obtained by writing to the 
Director of Admissions. 



ADVANCED STANDING 

A limited number of students with advanced standing may be 
admitted to Lycoming each year. The determining factors in con- 
sidering such applicants will be their academic records at the previous 
college, their field of concentration, and the reasons prompting their 
desire to transfer. All transfer applicants must show evidence of hon- 
orable dismissal from their previous college(s), must submit an official 
transcript of all work taken at other colleges, copies of their current 
catalogues, and must come to the Campus for a personal interview. 
Upon acceptance, the transfer student should contact the Registrar 
to prepare a schedule of studies for the coming semester. A student 
admitted with advanced standing is required to complete at Lycoming 
the last thirty hours in order to qualify for a bachelor's degree. Trans- 
fer students must satisfy the College graduation requirements to be 
awarded a degree. 

ADMISSION TO SUMMER SESSIONS 
AND EVENING CLASSES 

Persons desiring admission to summer sessions or evening classes 
should apply to the Director of Admissions. All candidates for degrees 



Admissions 47 

must meet the same entrance requirements as those attending regular 
session day classes. 

Applicants who hold degrees from other colleges or universities 
will be admitted as special students. Such applicants must present 
written evidence stating the field of concentration, the degree, and 
the date conferred. 

All other applicants who desire admission to specific courses will 
be considered on the basis of preparation and experience. 



ADMISSIONS OFFICE 

The Admissions Office is located on the Campus on the first floor 
of the Old Main Building. The office is open Monday through Friday 
from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m., and on Saturday from 9 a. m. until noon. 
Appointments for interviews may be arranged by writing or calling 
the office. The telephone number is Williamsport 3-9411, Extension 12. 

All applicants are required to visit the Campus if possible and to 
inspect the facilities of the College and meet with some of its officials. 
Appointments are not required, but visitors are advised to arrange 
for them if they wish to see particular members of the administrative 
staff or faculty. 



Standards 



CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Admission to the Freshman Class: See requirements for admis- 
sion to Lycoming College, Page 44. 

Admission to the Sophomore Class: Freshmen qualify for ad- 
mission to the sophomore class after completing at least 23 semester 
hours of college work and achieving a cumulative grade point average 
of at least 1.8. Those who do not qualify for admission to the sopho- 
more class shall retake recommended freshman courses in which they 
are deficient. 

Admission to the Junior Class: Sophomores qualify for admission 
to the junior class after completing at least 54 semester hours of college 
work and achieving a cumulative grade point average of at least 1.9. 
Satisfactory performance in written English, as judged by a proficiency 
examination administered by the English Department in the second 
semester of the sophomore year, is also a condition of admission to 
junior standing. 

Admission to the Senior Class: Juniors qualify for admission to 
the senior class after completing at least 85 semester hours of college 
work and achieving a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0. 
No Junior may enter senior classification until all freshman, sophomore 
and junior required courses, including foreign language where appli- 
cable, have been passed. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

A credit hour is defined as one hour of classroom work, or the 
equivalent, each week during a full term of sixteen weeks. Ordinarily, 
two hours of laboratory work are rated as one credit hour. 

Lycoming College uses the letter system of grading. "A" indi- 
cates work of highest excellence showing a superior grasp of the 
content, as well as independent and creative thinking in the course. 
"B" signifies better than average achievement wherein the student 
reveals insight and understanding. A grade of "C" is given for satis- 
factory achievement where the work has been of adequate quality 

48 



Standards 49 

and quantity. "C" is generally regarded as an average grade. A "D" 
grade indicates that the student has met the minimum requirements 
of the course. "F" is the failing grade, and the student receives neither 
credits nor quality points for courses carrying an "F" grade. A student 
must repeat all required courses for which he receives an "F" grade. 

Scholastic rank is determined by the quality point system. A 
grade of "A" carries 4 quality points per semester hour. "B" carries 3, 
'"C" carries 2, "D" carries 1, and "F" carries 0. A student's scholastic 
or grade-point average is computed by dividing total quality points 
earned by total credits scheduled. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The College offers courses of study leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. The minimum requirements are: 

120 academic hours, including required courses and one major of at 
least 24 semester hours. 

Cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in all college work at 
Lycoming College. 

Four semester hours credit in Physical Education to be taken in the 
first two years (not included in the 120 academic hours). 

Chapel credit for each fall and spring semester of attendance at 
Lycoming College. 

All students must complete a one-hour required course in Orientation. 

All financial obligations incurred at the College must be paid. 

The work of the final year is to be taken at this College, except in the 
case of students enrolling in the cooperative programs in medi- 
cal technology, engineering, or forestry. 

PROBATION AND DISMISSAL 

Freshmen whose grade-point average is 1.5 or lower in the first 
semester are placed on academic probation. Failure to achieve a 
cumulative grade-point average of at least 1.4 for the freshman year 
will result in academic dismissal. 

Any student beyond two full semesters' work whose grade-point 
average is below 1.5 for a semester or whose grade-point average is 
between 1.5 and 2.0 for two successive semesters is placed on academic 
probation. Removal from academic probationary status is accom- 



50 Lycoming College Bulletin 

plished by the student's earning a grade-point average of at least 2.0 
in the succeeding semester. Academic dismissal will result if the 
student has not succeeded in removing himself from probation in the 
semester succeeding. 

Probation rules do not prevent the immediate dismissal of any 
student who establishes an exceptionally low academic record in any 
semester. The College also reserves the right to dismiss any student 
at any time if the Administration considers such action to be in the 
best interests of the student or college. 

Where unusual or extenuating circumstances seem to warrant, 
academic dismissal from Lycoming College may be reviewed by the 
Dean of the College. 

ATTENDANCE 

The program at Lycoming is built on the assumption that there 
is value in class and chapel attendance for all students. Therefore, 
all students are expected to attend all classes and a specified number 
of chapel exercises. 

Specific regulations as to permissible absences and penalties for 
excessive absences are announced from time to time. Responsibility 
for learning and observing these regulations rests with the student. 

NORMAL STUDENT LOAD 

All candidates for degrees are expected to register for a normal 
semester hour load of four or five courses. Grade point average values 
used to determine honors, Dean's List, probation and dismissal are 
based upon a minimum of four courses of academic work per semester. 

Students who wish to carry more than the normal load of five 
academic courses may do so after securing written permission from 
the Dean of the College. Charges for the overload will be assessed 
the student at the rate of $30.00 for every semester hour in excess of 
five academic courses. 



Degree Requirements 



Lycoming College confers the Bachelor of Arts degree. Candi- 
dates for the Bachelor of Arts degree follow programs designed to 
fulfill the objectives of The College within the normal 120 semester 
hours (8 semesters) of college work. In every program the curricular 
experience provides a basic knowledge of the cultural, social, and 
natural world with emphasis upon the development of searching, 
critical, and creative attitudes of mind. Achievement of these objec- 
tives is sought by requiring of the student a core of general studies 
courses as well as a major of at least twenty-four semester hours. 



ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

A flexible requirement of three to six semester hours allows the 
student admission to introductory or advanced courses, depending 
upon the quality of his preparation in English. A thorough testing 
program during Freshman Days determines the level at which the 
student may enter the composition courses. Students admitted to 
advanced composition meet the requirement with a three semester 
hour course, English 103. Those admitted to introductory composi- 
tion meet the requirement by taking English 101-102, six semester 
hours. Students admitted to English 102 as first semester freshmen 
are expected to take English 103 in the second semester. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR MATHEMATICS 

Experience in a foreign language or mathematics is required of 
all students. The level of achievement is adjudged to be completion of 
the second year college course in either area. 

A. Foreign Language: 

Students electing foreign language must meet the requirement of 
two years of French, German, Greek, Russian, or Spanish. The 
first year may be waived if the student demonstrates sufficient 
proficiency in the language by: (1) offering a satisfactory grade 

51 



52 Lycoming College Bulletin 

in an examination administered during Freshman Days; (2) offer- 
ing a satisfactory grade in the Language Achievement Test cf the 
College Board Examinations; or (3) offering acceptable transfer 
credits for an introductory course ( two semesters ) on the college 
level. Students who elect a foreign language and who present for 
admission to Lycoming College at least two years of that language 
on the high school level, but who do not qualify for waiver of the 
first year college course under the conditions described above are 
required to take the first year college course without credit unless 
18 or more acceptable units were completed in high school, or to 
elect another language at the first year level. 

B. Mathematics: 

Students electing mathematics must meet the requirement of two 
years by taking College Algebra and Trigonometry ( Mathematics 
101-102) and Analytical Geometry and Differential Calculus 
(Mathematics 201-205) or Introduction to Modern Mathematics 
(Mathematics 207-208). The first year, Mathematics 101-102 may 
be waived if the student demonstrates some proficiency by offer- 
ing a satisfactory grade on an examination administered during 
Freshman Days or if he presents acceptable transfer credits for 
the introductory sequence (two semesters) on the college level. 

KNOWLEDGE OF THE CULTURAL, SOCIAL 
AND NATURAL WORLD 

One of the objectives of The College specifies knowledge of the 
cultural, social and natural world as vital to the education of every 
student. Achievement of this objective is sought by requiring students 
to take a minimum of one year cf work in a single department in each 
of the following broad areas or groups of departments. 

A. Literature in English, French, German, Russian or Spanish. 

B. Religion or Philosophy. 

C. Art, Music, or Speech ( Drama ) . 

D. History or Political Science. 

E. Economics, Psychology or Sociology. 

F. Biology, Chemistry, Geology or Physics. 

To add depth as well as breadth to his program of general studies, 
the student takes at least one course beyond the one-year sequence in 
the selected departments of at least three of the above groups. 



Degree Requirements 53 

THE MAJOR 

Competence in a special area of academic work that may mean the 
satisfaction of certain vocational desires is to be sought in a major of at 
least twenty-four semester hours in one of the following: 

American Civilization German 

Art History 

Biology Mathematics 

Business Administration Music 

Accounting Philosophy 

Banking and Finance Physics 

General Business Political Science 

Marketing and Retailing Psychology 

Chemistry Religion 

Economics Russian 

English Sociology 

French Spanish 

Special curricula, with majors in one of the areas listed above, are 
offered in teacher training, cooperative engineering, medical tech- 
nology, cooperative forestry, and in preparation for professional edu- 
cation in dentistry, law, medicine, the Christian ministry and Christian 
education. Attention is also called to the fact that the majors in the 
areas listed above are suitable for preparation of the candidate for 
admission to graduate school. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Two years (four semesters) of physical education are required 
of all students. This requirement will ordinarily be met during the 
freshman and sophomore years. 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

During the first Fall Semester a freshman is on campus, he must 
complete a course in Orientation. 



CHAPEL 

Chapel attendance is required of all students during every semes- 
ter in which they are registered for 12 or more hours. 



54 



Lycoming College Bulletin 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



A typical schedule of courses for the Freshman Year is outlined 
below. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Hrs. 
3 



English Composition 

Foreign Language or 

Mathematics 3-4 

The Beginning Course 

in the Major Field 3-5 

Two courses selected from 

among the following: 6—8 

1. Art, Music, or Theatre 

2. Religion or Philosophy 

3. History or Political Science 

4. A Laboratory Science 



English Composition 

Foreign Language or 
Mathematics 



Hrs. 
3 

3-i 



The Beginning Course 

in the Major Field 3-5 

Two courses selected from 

among the following: 6—8 

1. Art, Music, or Theatre 

2. Religion or Philosophy 

3. History or Political Science 

4. A Laboratory Science 



Total not to exceed 



17 



Total not to exceed 



17 



Students will register for courses only after consultation with and 
approval of faculty advisers. It is expected that students will elect 
those courses recommended by the department in which the major is 
to be taken. Course selection will obviously vary considerably de- 
pending upon the curriculum, the major and student interests. 

Programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree at Ly- 
coming College are described in some detail in the following para- 
graphs. Each program calls for a variety of different courses. But 
ordinarily, the courses to be taken in the freshman year will conform 
closely to the general outline given above regardless of the curriculum 
chosen. 



Curricula 



PURPOSES OF THE CURRICULA 

Courses of study in Lycoming College are designed to fulfill two 
specific but interrelated purposes. The first is to acquaint the student 
with the liberal arts heritage of human civilization and the American 
nation, and the second is to provide him an opportunity to explore 
from an elementary to an advanced level various subject matter fields 
that may fit him for a life's vocation or direct him toward professional 
or graduate schools. 

The curricula are organized so that the basic purposes may be 
fulfilled simultaneously within the normal 120 semester hours ( 8 semes- 
ters) of college work. 



THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

Electing a major in college work depends upon a variety of 
factors. Preparation for a specific vocation will very often determine 
the major. But for the student who does not have a specific vocational 
aim, the choice of a major, which can be deferred until the beginning 
of the junior year in some cases, must depend upon other factors. 
Not the least important of these are the student's interest and aptitude. 
Every effort will be made through the counselling service offered by 
the College to determine the range of interests and aptitudes and 
thereby enable the student to come to a decision that will be best 
for him. 

Because education is a continuous process that does not end at 
the completion of four years of college work, the student is encouraged, 
when aptitude and ability indicate probable success, to consider the 
opportunities available through graduate and professional studies. 
Listed below are a number of professional and graduate areas for 
which preparation may be secured at Lycoming College. 



AMERICAN CIVILIZATION MAJOR 

Recognizing the rich, intellectual heritage associated with the 
founding and subsequent development of the American nation, the 
Departments of English and History in Lycoming College have estab- 
lished a combined English-History curriculum which focuses attention 

55 



56 Lycoming College Bulletin 

upon American civilization. Here the uniqueness of American democ- 
racy, cradled and nurtured on this continent, is stressed throughout. 
In order to achieve the deepest insight into the American scene, both 
historical and contemporary, the curriculum includes, in addition to 
those freshman and sophomore history and English requirements, 
twenty-four hours of 300- and 400- level English and history courses 
including History 359-360, American Social and Intellectual History, 
six advanced hours in American literature and not more than nine 
advanced hours in either subject. Students desiring a thorough back- 
ground in American civilization in preparation for graduate work, the 
Christian ministry, civil or foreign service or teaching will find this a 
most attractive and exciting curriculum. 

PREPARATION FOR DENTAL SCHOOL 

At least three years of pre-dental study are suggested before 
entry into a college of dentistry. However, many students prefer to 
defer their matriculation in a dental college until they have earned a 
Bachelor of Arts degree. The pre-dental curriculum is organized 
around the basic courses in biology, chemistry and physics. Electing 
a major in one of the natural sciences is the usual procedure. The 
student should consult the catalogue of the college of dentistry to 
which he expects to apply so that all courses specifically required by 
that college of dentistry may be included in his program at Lycoming 
College. The modern practitioner of dentistry is not just a dentist. 
He is a human being dealing with other human personalities and as 
such must be conversant in a great variety of human experiences. 
For this reason, the pre-dental curriculum will be augmented with 
courses from many areas of academic work. In addition to the science 
courses, therefore, the pre-dental student will include in his curriculum 
courses from the fine arts, humanities and social sciences, as well as a 
foreign language. 

COOPERATIVE CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING 

Consistent with increased attention being given nationally to 
engineering education, Lycoming College offers a cooperative cur- 
riculum combining the manifold advantages of a small liberal arts 
college with the training to be secured at an engineering school. By 
arrangement with Bucknell University and The Pennsylvania State 
University, the College offers a five-year program the first three years 
of which are spent at Lycoming and the final two at the engineering 
school. Upon completion of the first year at the engineering school, 
the student's record will be sent to Lycoming College, and if the work 



Curricula 57 

is satisfactory, Lycoming College will award the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Upon the completion of the five-year program of studies, a 
Bachelor of Science in Engineering is awarded by the engineering 
school. Combined programs offer an opportunity for completion of 
studies in the following areas: Bucknell University: chemical, civil, 
electrical, or mechanical engineering; The Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity: aeronautical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical or sanitary 
engineering. 

Prescribed work at Lycoming includes, in addition to the degree 
requirements outlined above, courses in chemistry, mathematics and 
physics. Because the demands of the engineering curricula may differ 
somewhat, a program of studies at Lycoming College will be designed 
for each student when his plans as to type of engineering program 
preferred have been finally fixed. The Director of the Division of 
Natural Science or a member of the teaching staff in the physical 
sciences will aid each cooperative engineering student in planning his 
program. 

COOPERATIVE CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY 

Lycoming College offers a program for forestry students which 
combines a strong liberal arts and science background with profes- 
sional training in forestry at the Duke School of Forestry, Duke Uni- 
versity, Durham, North Carolina. 

The program as established is of five years' duration. A student 
electing to pursue this program of study will spend three years at 
Lycoming where he will meet the liberal arts degree requirements, 
including such subjects as English, a foreign language, biology, chem- 
istry, physics, mathematics and economics. 

Upon satisfactory completion of these three years' work at Ly- 
coming College, the student will apply for admission to the Duke 
School of Forestry for one summer and two years of training in for- 
estry. At the end of his first year at Duke, his record will be sent to 
Lycoming College. If the work be satisfactory for this fourth year in 
college, Lycoming will award the Bachelor of Arts degree. Upon the 
satisfactory completion of the second year in forestry school, the pro- 
fessional degree, Master of Forestry, will be awarded by Duke 
University. 

PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL 

Many colleges of law require a Bachelor of Arts degree for ad- 
mission. The four-year degree program in pre-law at Lycoming 



58 Lycoming College Bulletin 

College provides a background for the prospective student of law. 
Requirements include courses in political science and history, but also 
specified is a wide range of subject matter, designed to acquaint the 
student with the vast scope of human experience. Students may 
expect to major in economics, history, political science, or related fields 
as they prepare for matriculation in law school. Individual programs 
are tailored to fit the student's needs as well as to meet the specific 
requirements of the law school to which he applies for admission. 



PREPARATION FOR MEDICAL SCHOOL 

This curriculum is organized around a solid foundation of the 
basic courses in biology, chemistry and physics. Pre-medical students 
usually major in one of the natural sciences. The student should be 
aware of the specific pre-medical course requirements demanded by 
the medical school to which he will apply so that all such requirements 
can be fitted properly into his curriculum at Lycoming College. Con- 
sistent with suggestions of the medical schools, a wide range of subject 
matter from the humanities, social sciences and fine arts are also to be 
included in the curriculum. Some students may matriculate in a 
college of medicine after three years of pre-medical work, but the 
more normal procedure is to elect four years of pre-medical study and 
enter the medical college with a Bachelor of Arts degree. 



PREPARATION FOR THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

(Christian Ministry) 

Young men and women called to the Christian ministry or related 
vocations will find the pre-ministerial curriculum at Lycoming College 
an exciting and challenging opportunity. Basic courses specified by 
the American Association of Theological Schools are virtually identical 
with the program of courses required for a Bachelor of Arts degree at 
Lycoming College. Such courses offer a wide range of subject matter 
presenting many opportunities for the eager pre-ministerial student to 
acquaint himself with the broad scope of human experience. Prepara- 
tion for seminary includes earning a Bachelor of Arts degree with a 
major in one of a variety of fields such as English, history, American 
civilization, philosophy or a social science. So that every student may 
have a curriculum designed to fit his individual needs, the offerings in 
the junior and senior year are largely elective. However, the choice 
of elective* will depend upon the specific requirements of the theo- 
logical school in which the student expects to matriculate. 



Curricula 59 

CURRICULUM IN RELIGION AND 
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Any student desiring extensive study in Biblical history and litera- 
ture, the historical development of Christianity, and Christian doctrine, 
may major in religion. A qualified student planning to enter the voca- 
tion of religious education should, besides majoring in religion, elect 
18-21 semester hours in prescribed psychology, education, sociology, 
and church music courses. This program of study, completely within 
the liberal arts curriculum, is to qualify graduates for work as Educa- 
tional Assistants, or after graduate study in a theological seminary, as 
Directors of Christian Education. Interested students, or prospective 
students, are invited to contact Dr. Ramsey of the Department of 
Religion for further information concerning the opportunities, respon- 
sibilities and requirements of these and other church vocations. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

Lycoming College trains teachers for both elementary and sec- 
ondary education. The program is clearly identified with the liberal 
arts nature of the College, and hence, no candidate for the profession 
of teaching is considered apart from the total liberal arts objective. 
Teacher education candidates meet all general course requirements 
of the College including a major in a subject matter field. Professional 
education requirements are stipulated as follows: 

Secondary Education. Eighteen semester hours of professional educa- 
tion courses including Education 201, Introduction to Education; 
Psychology 309, Educational Psychology; Education 401 (six hours), 
Practice Teaching; and six additional hours in Education. 

Elementary Education. Thirty-six semester hours of professional and 
approved liberal education courses including Education 201, Introduc- 
tion to Education; Psychology 309, Educational Psychology; Education 
334, Reading Methods; Education 344, Elementary Methods and 
Techniques; and Education 400 (six hours), Practice Teaching. Addi- 
tional approved hours may be selected from among a minimum of four 
of the following courses or areas: Mathematics or modern Foreign 
Language on the 200 level; Music Theory or Music History and 
Literature; Elementary Design or Art History or Appreciation; Lab- 
oratory Science; and History, Political Science, Sociology, Economics 
or Psychology. 



60 Lycoming College Bulletin 

Students may be considered for admission to the teacher education 
program under the following general terms: 

1. Freshmen are not admissible to candidacy nor are they eligible for 
registration in courses offered by the Education Department. 

2. Potential candidates must be approved by the Teacher Education 
Committee who will evaluate the candidates by personal interview, 
and review of aptitude examinations and academic records. 

3. Candidates must receive a satisfactory grade in Education 201, 
Introduction to Education. This course will normally be elected 
in the Junior Year. 

Once admitted to candidacy, the following policies are in effect 
for students: 

1. Attendance upon meetings of teacher education societies, clubs, or 
seminars is strongly recommended. These meetings are oriented 
toward the stimulation of professional attitudes. 

2. Students will elect courses in academic and professional areas 
according to the demands of the major field. 

3. Registration for Education 400 or 401, Practice Teaching, will be 
permitted only when a satisfactory cumulative grade point average 
has been achieved in all courses. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 

Lycoming College offers course work in the area of general busi- 
ness particularly designed for training the prospective business execu- 
tive. The modern American executive has a broad scope of intellectual 
interests outside his field of specialization. For this reason, the stu- 
dents enrolled in this curriculum will be required to take a wide range 
of courses in humanities, fine arts and the natural and social sciences. 
In addition to these courses specified under Degree Requirements 
above, the business student will be required to take Elementary 
Accounting, Statistics, Business Law, Principles of Economics, Money 
and Banking, and Corporate Finance. The remainder of the courses 
to be taken in the field of business will depend upon the major. 

a. Major in general business: Advanced courses in the field business 
administration and/or economics totalling 24 semester hours, be- 
yond the basic courses outlined above. 

b. Major in accounting: Intermediate Accounting and at least 18 
additional hours in Accounting. 



Curricula 61 

c. Major in banking and finance: Intermediate Accounting and at 
least 18 additional hours in recommended business courses. 

d. Major in retail distribution: At least 24 semester hours in courses 
in retailing, marketing, and selling. 

e. Major in economics: Principles of Economics and 24 additional 
hours in economics. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

This curriculum is organized around an academic background of 
basic science courses in addition to those liberal arts courses listed as 
requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Twelve semester hours 
in biology are required as well as one semester of mathematics. In 
chemistry, General Chemistry and Quantitative Analysis are specified. 
Three years are spent in obtaining this academic background; the 
fourth year is spent in the medical laboratories of an approved hospital. 
The senior year will consist of an internship of a full calendar year at a 
hospital accredited in the Registry of Medical Technologists of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists. The College will give credit 
for the year when it is informed that the student has successfully 
passed the examinations given by the Registry of Medical Technolo- 
gists of the American Society of Clinical Pathologists. 



Courses 



DIVISIONS 

HUMANITIES: Eric V. Sandin, Director 

Art, English, French, German, Greek, Music, Philosophy, Religion, 
Russian, Spanish, Speech. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES: Loring B. Priest, Director 

History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology. 

NATURAL SCIENCES: George S. Shortess, Director 

Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: Robert W. Rabold, Director 
Business Administration, Economics. 



ART 

Associate Professor Chandler 

Instructor James 

Part-time Instructor Keller 

The major in art consists of thirty semester hours of which nine hours are 
in art theory. 

130. APPRECIATION OF ART. A general introduction to the history and 
appreciation of Western Art, from Prehistoric Art in Europe to Contemporary 
Art. Films and slides will be used to illustrate the lectures. Three class periods 
each week. 

Three hours credit. 

141-142. DESIGN. An introduction to the basic principles of design. Special 
emphasis will be given to developing the student's creative ability by means 
of problems in two-dimensional and three-dimensional design involving line, 
form, tone, volume, and space. Considerable emphasis will be placed on 
color. Six class periods each week. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

143-144. DRAWING 1. The course is designed to acquaint the student with 
various drawing media, as he creates drawings of still-life, landscape and figure 
subjects. Six class periods each week. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

62 



Art 63 

243-244. DRAWING II. Continuation of Art 143-144. Six class periods each 
week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

245-246. PAINTING I. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the stu- 
dent with various painting media, such as oil, watercolor, and gouache. The 
student will be encouraged to create and develop his own ideas in his search 
for a suitable technique and method of expressing himself. Six class periods 
each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

308. MEDIEVAL ART. A study of visual art forms of the medieval period, 
with particular stress on Romanesque and Gothic churches. Assigned readings, 
films, slides, and lectures. 

Three hours credit. 

313-314. COMPOSITION. The purpose of this course is to acquaint the 
student with the basic fundamentals which govern the arrangement, or place- 
ment, of the various elements which form a work of art. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

341-342. APPLIED DESIGN. The contemporary spirit will be fostered as 
the student engages in various crafts, such as blockprinting, gesso, and silk- 
screen printing. Six class periods each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

345-346. PAINTING II. A continuation of Art 245-246. Six class periods 
each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

407. AMERICAN ART. The visual arts in American life from the seven- 
teenth century to the present, with special emphasis on Pennsylvania's contri- 
bution to the development of American Art. Slides and films will be used to 
illustrate the lectures. Visits to the local museum and other places of art inter- 
est in the area. Three class periods each week. 

Three hours credit. 

409. CONTEMPORARY ART. The contemporary idiom in the visual arts. 
Divergent trends as revealed by a study of some of the well-known contem- 
porary artists, their fives, and works. Emphasis on the men who have made 
a distinct contribution to the origin and development of new ideas in the field 
of art today. Films and slides will be used to illustrate the lectures. Three 
class periods each week. 

Three hours credit. 

445.446. PAINTING III. Continuation of Art 345-346. Six class periods each 
week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



64 Lycoming College Bulletin 

BIOLOGY 

Professors Shortess, Howe and Mobberley 
Assistant Professor Block 
Instructor Stebbins 

The major in biology consists of twenty-four semester hours. 

101. GENERAL BIOLOGY (Botany). An introduction to the principles of 
biology, including a systemic study of characteristic types of plants. Two hours 
lecture and recitation and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Four hours credit. 

102. GENERAL BIOLOGY (Zoology). An introduction to the principles of 
biology, including a systemic study of characteristic types of animals. Two 
hours lecture and recitation and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Four hours credit. 

103. MICROBIOLOGY. This course emphasizes the study of micro-organisms 
that affect mankind, especially those that cause disease. Laboratory exercises 
deal with elementary bacteriological techniques and plant and animal parasites. 
Three hours lecture and recitation and one two-hour laboratory period each week. 

Four hours credit. 

105. ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. A basic study is made of the skeletal, 
muscular, circulatory, digestive, nervous, excretory, and reproductive systems 
of the human body and its functions. Three hours class and four hours lab- 
oratory each week. 

Five hours credit. 

107. BOTANY. More specialized and advanced study of plants than is of- 
fered in General Biology. Two hours lecture and recitation and four hours lab- 
oratory each week. 

Four hours credit. 

108. BOTANY. A study of the classification of plants and their distribution. 
Two hours lecture and recitation and four hours laboratory each week. 

Four hours credit. 

201. COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. Deals with dissections of 
representative vertebrates. Two hours lecture and recitation and two two-hour 
laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit. 

301. PHYSIOLOGY. A study of the physiological processes of the human 
body. Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 201. 

Four hours credit. 



Business Administration 65 

302. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. The study of the development of an 
amphibian, the chick, and a mammal, from fertilization of the egg to fully formed 
embryo. Two hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit. 

401. HISTOLOGY. The study of cells and tissues of the human body. Two 
hours lecture and two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Prerequisite, Biology 201. 
Four hours credit. 

402. GENETICS. A study of the principles of inheritance and their applica- 
tion to human biology and to the improvement of plants and animals. 

Prerequisite, Biology 101-102. 
Three or four hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN BIOLOGY. Conferences, research projects, and writ- 
ten reports on selected topics designed to extend the student's knowledge in 
chosen fields of biology. Limited to qualified majors. 
Four hours credit each semester. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Associate Professor Hollenback 

Assistant Professors Bricker, King, and Richmond 

Instructor Anderson 

Lecturer Larrabee 

Part-time Instructors Gorgas, Marvin and Wehr 

101-102. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING. An introductory course in which 
no prior knowledge of accounting is assumed. The course introduces the theory 
of the balance sheet, problems of classification and interpretation of accounts, 
preparation of financial statements, and accounting for single proprietorship, 
partnership, and corporation. Manufacturing accounts, taxes, and cost account- 
ing are also presented. To be scheduled only by students who plan to major 
in accounting. Two hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory period each 
week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

105-106. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. An introductory course in which 
no prior knowledge of accounting is assumed, for the student who is interested 
primarily in using accounting as a management tool. Covers basic principles 
of accounting, then proceeds to show applications to specific management prob- 
lems such as budgeting, inventory control, and management reporting. Not to 
be scheduled by students who plan to major in accounting. Two hours lecture 
and one two-hour laboratory period each week. 
Three hours credit each semester. 



66 Lycoming College Bulletin 

215-216. INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING. This course carries the funda- 
mentals of accounting presented in Elementary Accounting into the advanced 
field. It presents an intensive study of accounting statements with a considera- 
tion of special analytical accounting procedures and an emphasis upon cor- 
poration stock and bond accounts. 

Prerequisite, Business 101-102. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

223. OFFICE MACHINES. Demonstration by the instructor of the proper 
techniques for operation of various business machines. Students obtain actual 
practice in the use of these machines in order to develop skill and speed. Class 
meets five times each week. 

Three hours credit. 

227-228. INTERMEDIATE SHORTHAND. Review of theory and the devel- 
opment of speed in the writing and transcribing of Gregg shorthand. Special 
training to acquire technical vocabularies in the fields of advertising, agriculture, 
banking, insurance, and law. Class meets five times each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

229-230. INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING. Development and speed type- 
writing with a high degree of accuracy. Instruction and practice in typing all 
business letters and forms, tabulations, manuscripts, legal documents, Mimeo- 
graph stencils, and Ditto master sheets. Class meets five times each week. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

239. PERSONAL TYPEWRITING. Mastery of the touch system of type- 
writing with stress on accuracy and skill in the development of good style and 
form in typewritten material. 

Two hours credit (no credit toward graduation except for those students 
majoring in Business Administration). 

302. BUSINESS LAW I. Lecture course on the fundamentals of the law 
relating to business transactions: contracts, agency, negotiable instruments. 

Four hours credit. 

303. BUSINESS LAW II. Lecture course on the fundamentals of the law 
relating to partnerships, corporations, sales, personal security contracts, guaranty 
and suretyship, insurance, and real estate. 

Four hours credit. 

304. CREDITS AND COLLECTIONS. The fundamentals of credit, investi- 
gation and analysis of risks, collection plans and policies. The organization of 
credit and collection agencies is studied. 

Prerequisite, Business 101-102 or 105-106. 

Three hours credit. 



Business Administration 67 

305. MARKETING. Retail, wholesale, and manufacturing trade channels; 
types of middlemen and functions; cooperative associations; marketing functions 
of policies of retailer, wholesaler and manufacturer; produce exchange and 
other markets. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration. 
Three hours credit. 

306. INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. A study of the 
basic principles of scientific management and business operations with which 
the individual entering a modern business enterprise should be familiar, includ- 
ing the development of a new business, the organization and function of the 
various departments, and the control of such factors as sales, costs, materials, 
and labor. 

Three hours credit. 

308. INVESTMENTS. This course deals with the leading types of invest- 
ments, tests, investment programs, financial reports, forecasting methods and 
agencies, stock exchanges, brokerage houses, methods of buying and selling 
securities, etc. Laboratory work and case studies. 

Prerequisite, Business 101-102, or Business 105-106. 

Three hours credit. 

311-312. COST ACCOUNTING. Methods of accounting for material, labor 
and factory overhead expenses consumed in manufacturing are introduced. Prac- 
tice sets are used to illustrate job order and process costing. The recent develop- 
ment of the use of standard costs is introduced and illustrated through problems 
and a practice set. The application of cost principles to the distributive and 
administrative functions of a business is also presented. 

Prerequisites, Business 215-216, or consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

313-314. TAX ACCOUNTING. Federal Income Tax Law and Accounting. 
An analysis of the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code that relate to in- 
come taxes of individuals, partnerships, trusts, estates and corporations with 
discussion and demonstration of the application of the law and the regulations 
to accounting procedures in the preparation of tax returns. An extensive series 
of practical problems are considered, involving determination of income and 
deductions, capital gains and losses, computation and payment of taxes through 
withholding at the source and declarations. 

Prerequisites, Business 101-102, and consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

337. CORPORATE FINANCE. This course deals with the financing of busi- 
ness; the sources of capital and financial agencies such as note brokers, mortgage 
banks, investment bankers, commercial banks and commercial paper houses. An 
analysis of business promotions, reorganizations, mergers and consolidations, and 
the manner in which they are financed. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration. 

Three hours credit. 

341-342. PRINCIPLES OF RETAILING. Survey of the field of retailing; 
history and development of different types of stores, advantages and disadvan- 



68 Lycoming College Bulletin 

tages of each type; store location, layout, and organizations; duties and functions 
of the different departments; cooperative movements in retailing; selection, 
training, and supervision of employees. 
Thre hours credit each semester. 

345. ADVERTISING AND SALES PROMOTION. Fundamental principles of 
the science of advertising; advertising media, copy, appeals, layouts, type, illus- 
tration, art, psychology; and fundamental principles of sales promotion and 
coordination of all forms within the organization. 

Three hours credit. 

346. SALESMANSHIP. A study of the place of selling in our economy, past 
and present; its contributions, costs and criticisms, as well as a study of the 
art of personal selling on all levels of the distribution process. 

Three hours credit. 

351. BUSINESS STATISTICS. An introduction to the elementary theory of 
statistical analysis with special reference to business and economic applications. 

Prerequisite, Junior standing. 

Three hours credit. 

401. REAL ESTATE. The fundamentals of the real estate business including 
a study of titles, mortgages, leases, advertising, sales, purchase, development, 
and management of real estate. 

Three hours credit. 

402. INSURANCE I. The fundamentals of fire, marine, health, accident, cas- 
ualty, and social insurance. Commercial and governmental plans. 

Three hours credit. 

403. INSURANCE II. Life insurance and annuities. Fidelity and surety bonds. 
Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. Designed primarily, 
but not exclusively for the student who desires to pursue graduate training in 
Business Administration. Under the supervision and guidance of the instructor, 
the student will write a paper on some specific business problem, integrating 
his knowledge of the disciplines, using acceptable research techniques, and 
demonstrating his proficiency, not only in discipline, but in composition. During 
the latter phases of composition, the student will present his paper and defend 
its conclusions. 

Prerequisite, Business Administration major with at least 18 semester hours 
in Business Administration and consent of the instructor. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

423-424. AUDITING. This course deals with the science of verifying, analyz- 
ing, and interpreting accounts and reports. An audit project is presented, solved 
and interpreted throughout the year. 

Prerequisite, Business 311-312. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

425. C. P. A. PROBLEMS. This course is intended to meet the needs of those 
interested in professional accounting and preparation for Certified Public Ac- 
countants Examination. The problems presented throughout the course are taken 



Business Administration 69 

from past C. P. A. and American Institute of Accountants Examinations and 
require in their solution a thorough knowledge of the subject matter of pre- 
requisite courses taken. 

Prerequisite, Business 311-312. 

Three hours credit. 

426. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING. Accounting procedures used by 
municipal, state and federal governments and others using fund accounting; a 
study of fund journal entries, ledgers, operating statements. 

Prerequisite, Business 215-216. 

Three hours credit. 

428. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. Organization and responsibilities of the 
personnel department: selection, training, welfare work, methods of payment, 
incentives for better work, morale, personal problems connected with industry 
and merchandising. 

Three hours credit. 

431. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING. This course offers an extended treatment 
of the functions and applications of accounting for those who wish additional 
accounting background in preparation for entrance into the accounting profes- 
sion. It treats such special problems as partnerships and joint venture account- 
ing; installment and consignment sales; branch and home office accounting; 
corporate combinations; and the preparation of consolidated statements. 

Prerequisite, Business 215-216. 

Three hours credit. 

441. RETAIL BUYING AND MERCHANDISING. Problems of merchandis- 
ing. Responsibilities of the buyer; what, when, where, and how to buy; types 
of merchandise, pricing, leased departments, sales planning, and merchandise 
control; importance of volume, mark-up, mark-down, and turn-over; emphasis 
on making a profit; actual store problems. 

Prerequisite or concurrent, Business 341-342. 

Three hours credit. 

444. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. The role of the marketing executive in 
our society, including an analytical approach to specific marketing problems 
confronting the businessman. Emphasis is placed on the application of market- 
ing and economic theory to decision-making in the areas of product choice, 
promotion, location, choice of channels, and marketing strategy. Collateral read- 
ing and cases. 

Prerequisite, Business 305. 

Three hours credit. 

445-446. RETAIL PROBLEMS. A survey of current issues confronting retail 
management and examination of the management, merchandising and publicity 
activities of retail stores. Current trends and differences in store practices are 
stressed; emphasis is given to governmental regulations, labor and employee- 
employer relations. The case method is used extensively in the development of 
the course. 

Prerequisite, Business 341-342. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



70 Lycoming College Bulletin 

CHEMISTRY 

Professor Currier 

Associate Professors Bauer and Radspinner 

Thirty semester hours are required for a major in Chemistry. Mathematics 
through Integral Calculus and Physics 101-102 are also required. Students who 
intend to enter upon graduate study in Chemistry should include Chemistry 
401-402, Physical Chemistry, in their programs. Pre-medical students majoring 
in Chemistry should include Chemistry 301-302, Organic Chemistry, and Chem- 
istry 405, Biochemistry in their programs. 

101-102. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. A systematic study of the fundamental 
laws and theories of chemistry in connection with the most important metallic 
and non-metallic elements and their compounds. Three hours lecture and two 
two-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Five hours credit each semester. 

103. APPLIED CHEMISTRY. A brief survey of general chemistry designed 
to prepare the student for an understanding of some of the many applications 
of chemistry to the home, to nutrition, and to nursing. Three hours lecture 
and one two-hour laboratory period each week. 
Four hours credit. 

201. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. An elementary course in the modern theo- 
ries of solutions of electrolytes and their applications to cation and anion analysis. 
Two hours lecture and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Four hours credit. 

202-203. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. A study of the fundamental methods 
of elementary gravimetric and volumetric analysis together with practice in 
laboratory techniques and calculations of these methods. Two hours lecture 
and two three-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

205. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. A one semester course in simple quan- 
titative analysis given more briefly than course 202-203. The course is designed 
chiefly for laboratory technician students. Two hours lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods each week. 
Four hours credit. 

301-302. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. A systematic study of the compounds of 
carbon including both aliphatic and aromatic series. The laboratory work in- 
troduces the student to simple fundamental methods of organic synthesis. Three 
hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each week. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

401-402. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. A study of the fundamental principles of 
theoretical chemistry and their applications. The laboratory work includes tech- 
niques in physico-chemical measurements. Three hours lecture and one four- 
hour laboratory period each week. 

Prerequisite, one year of calculus. 

Four hours credit each semester. 



Economics 71 

405. BIOCHEMISTRY. A general course dealing with the chemical com- 
position and metabolic processes and significance of carbohydrates, lipids, pro- 
teins, and biocatalysts in living tissues. Three hours lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period each week. 

Prerequisites, Chemistry 301-302, Biology 101-102. 

Four hours credit. 

411-412. INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH. An investigation of a selected 
problem of limited scope, involving conferences, library and laboratory work. 
Limited to qualified majors. 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



ECONOMICS 

Associate Professor Rabold 

Assistant Professors Bricker and Kyte 

The major in economics consists of twenty-four semester hours. 

105. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES. A discussion of eco- 
nomic principles designed for the student who is required to schedule only 
three credits of economics. Includes such topics as money and banking, prices, 
public debt and expenditures, taxation, business organization, monopoly and 
competition, labor problems and agricultural problems. Not to be scheduled by 
those requiring six credits of economics nor by students desiring to go beyond 
principles. 

Three hours credit. 

201-202. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. A study of the organization of 
the economic system and principles and problems that govern economic activity. 
Major topics covered include: production, consumption, exchange, distribution, 
risks of enterprise, banking, international trade, profits, rent, wages, and social 
reforms. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-202. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. A general survey course, showing the 
relation of physical environment to man's economic and cultural achievements. 
Emphasis is placed on the part the United States plays in the occupations of 
man, as contrasted to other producing areas of the world. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

305. LABOR PROBLEMS. A study of the American labor movement and 
the position of the worker in modern industrial society. Unemployment, wages, 
hours, child labor, woman in industry, the aged workers, unions, and industrial 
peace are among the problems considered. 

Prerequisite, Six hours in Economics. 

Three hours credit. 



72 Lycoming College Bulletin 

306. LABOR LEGISLATION. A continuation of labor problems. Labor and 
the courts; federal regulation of capital-labor relations; the work of federal 
labor boards. 

Prerequisite, Economics 305. 

Three hours credit. 

308. INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC THEORY. Analysis of contemporary 
value theory. It covers the theory of commodity price and output determina- 
tion under various market situations; the theory of factor price determination; 
and consideration of aggregative economics or National Income Accounting. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

311. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. The economic development 
and comparative analysis of various economic systems including Capitalism, So- 
cialism, Communism, and Fascism. 

Prerequisites, Economics 201-202 or consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit. 

315. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF EUROPE. A study of the Euro- 
pean economy (including Great Britain) from Medieval times to the present. 
Special attention will be given to the economic problems of feudalism, mer- 
cantilism, the origins and growth of capitalism, and the formation and prob- 
lems of the national economies. Historical facts and interpretations will be 
related to theories of growth and development such as found in the writings 
of Tawney, Sombart, Pirenne, and Max Weber. 

Prerequisite, Economics 202 or Economics 105. 
Three hours credit. 

316. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNITED STATES. An anal- 
ysis of the economic development of the United States from colonial times to 
the present. An integration of historical analysis and economic theory, stress- 
ing economic forces in the 19th and 20th centuries, and their influence upon 
our present economy. 

Prerequisite, Economics 202, or Economics 105. 
Three hours credit. 

326. MONEY AND BANKING I. A study of the nature and functions of 
money; paper and deposit currency; the nature and functions of our com- 
mercial banking system; the organization and structure of the Federal Reserve 
System; and the importance of money and banking in our economy. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 
Three hours credit. 

327. MONEY AND BANKING II. The historical development of the mone- 
tary, commercial banking, and central banking systems in the United States; 
the value of money; monetary and fiscal policy; international monetary rela- 
tionships; chain and branch banking; and miscellaneous banking institutions. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 
Three hours credit. 



Economics 73 

403. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. An advanced course which 
deals with the origin, growth and significance of economic institutions with 
emphasis upon those of Europe and the United States. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Economics numbered above 200. 

Three hours credit. 

405. PUBLIC FINANCE. Public revenue and expenditures; preparation of 
budgets; public taxation; public borrowing. 

Prerequisite, six hours in Business Administration numbered above 200 

and Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

409. THE BUSINESS CYCLE. History and general nature of the business 
cycle; its causes and its relation to the economic process as a whole; possible 
remedies, public and private; source materials and current literature. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

412. CURRENT ECONOMIC PROBLEMS. A survey of important economic 
problems such as money and banking, finance, labor, public utilities, interna- 
tional trade, business cycles, and other types of economic systems in their con- 
flict with Capitalism. Designed to permit the student of economics to apply 
economic knowledge to the appreciation and solution of contemporary problems. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

413. INTERNATIONAL TRADE. A study of the fundamental principles of 
international trade and foreign exchange. Topics include American and foreign 
tariff histories, mercantilistic policies, commercial policies, balance of payments, 
exchange control and other currency problems, and a survey of the practical 
problems confronting the international trader, including the development of 
an international trade vocabulary. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN ECONOMICS. Designed primarily, but not exclu- 
sively for the student who desires to pursue graduate training in Economics. 
Under the supervision and guidance of the instructor the student will write a 
paper on some specific economics problem, integrating his knowledge of the 
disciplines, using acceptable research techniques, and demonstrating his pro- 
ficiency, not only in the discipline, but in composition. During the latter 
phases of composition, the student will present his conclusions. 

Prerequisite, Economics major with at least 18 semester hours in Economics 

and consent of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

417. ECONOMICS OF THE BUSINESS FIRM. The application of selected 
areas of microeconomic theory to the solution of problems of business manage- 



74 Lycoming College Bulletin 

ment. Includes such topics as the tools of analysis, profit maximization, the 
determinants of demand, and cost determinants. 

Prerequisite, six hours of Business Administration or Economics above the 
200 level. 

Three hours credit. 

419. GOVERNMENT AND THE ECONOMY. The course will aim to give 
an analytical survey of important areas of contact between economic life and 
government. More specifically the course will relate to matters of economic 
policy in the United States as they apply to government regulation of business, 
including transportation, to the problems of economic growth, economic stability, 
redistribution of income, foreign economic aid, and other issues that are con- 
cerned with the changing role of government in economic Me. 

Prerequisite, Economics 201-202, or consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit. 



EDUCATION 

Professor Derr 

Assistant Professor Conrad 

Mr. Gramley 

Part-time Instructor Smtnk 

201. INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION. This basic course introduces the 
student to the social value of public education, the changing conception of the 
purposes of education, the problems facing the schools; and to fields of profes- 
sional activity. Required of all students desiring certification for teaching. 

Three hours credit. 

301. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. The course deals with 
the development and problems of secondary education in a democracy. Con- 
sideration of the many special problems of high school students is included. 

Three hours credit. 
EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. (Sociology 302). 

303. AUDIO-VISUAL EDUCATION. A study of the value, design, construc- 
tion, and application of the visual and auditory aids to learning. Practical 
experience in the handling of audio-visual equipment and materials is provided. 

Three hours credit. 

304. METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL. The 
course deals with a study of materials and methods of teaching with emphasis 
on the student's major. Stress is placed on the selection of suitable curricular 



Education 75 

materials. Students will teach demonstration lessons in the presence of the 
instructor and the members of the class. 

Three hours credit. 

306. HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. A study of the ec- 
onomic, social, political and religious conditions which have influenced the 
different educational programs and philosophies, with emphasis being placed 
on the American educational system. 

Three hours credit. 

307. EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR 
HIGH SCHOOL. Consideration is given to the major types of activities, prin- 
ciples, financial control, credit and evaluation. 

Three hours credit. 

308. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. The importance of 
guidance and personnel service in secondary and on other educational levels is 
stressed. An analysis of records, tests, and grades is included. 

Three hours credit. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. (Psychology 309). 

334. READING METHODS AND MATERIALS. A course designed to study 
the development of a reading program from the beginnings (readiness) through 
principles, problems, techniques, and materials used in the total elementary 
schools. 

Three hours credit. 

344. METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. The 
course deals with a study of materials and methods of teaching with emphasis 
on the selection of suitable curricular materials. Students will teach demonstra- 
tion lessons in the presence of the instructor and the members of the class. 
Observation of superior teachers in elementary schools of the greater Williamsport 
area will be planned. 
Three hours credit. 

400. PRACTICE TEACHING. Teaching experience in the public schools of 
this area on the elementary level under the supervision of a cooperating teacher. 

Prerequisite, twelve hours credit in Education, including Education 201, 
334, and 344, and Psychology 309, and an average of at least 2.0 in all 
college work. 
Six hours credit. 

401. PRACTICE TEACHING. Teaching experience in a junior or senior 
high school in the greater Williamsport area; observation of the teaching of 
veteran teachers; gradual acceptance of the full responsibilities of the teacher. 

Prerequisites, six hours credit in Education, including Education 201 and 
Psychology 309 and an average of at least 2.0 in all college work. 

Six hours credit. 



76 Lycoming College Bulletin 

ENGLISH 

Professor Sandin 

Associate Professors Graham and Stuart 

Assistant Professors Bytngton, Garner, and Peck 

Instructors Madden and Maynard 

Part-time Instructor Hilbish 

The major in English consists of thirty semester hours exclusive of required 
courses in composition. English 311, Shakespeare, and six hours in American 
Literature are required; twenty-one hours must be in courses numbered 300 
or 400; and only six of the twenty-one hours may be in courses in advanced 
composition. 

50. REMEDIAL ENGLISH. Elementary course required of freshmen unpre- 
pared for English 101. Class meets three times each week. No credit toward 
a degree. 

101-102. COMPOSITION. The two-fold purpose is to teach the student to 
read good prose of ordinary difficulty, both critically and appreciatively, and 
to organize his ideas in logical, connected discourse. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

103. COMPOSITION. Intensive study of and practice in using advanced 
techniques of writing expository prose for freshmen showing marked proficiency 
in composition. 

Three hours credit. 

201-202. ENGLISH LITERATURE. A study of the major movements and 
authors from their beginnings to the contemporary period. First semester, to 
1798; second semester, since 1798. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

203-204. AMERICAN LITERATURE. A study of American literature from 
the colonial to the contemporary period. First semester, to 1860; second semes- 
ter, since 1860. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

205-206. WORLD LITERATURE. A study of the most important works in 
world literature from Homer to Tolstoy. First semester, Homer to Dante; 
second semester, Cervantes to Tolstoy. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301. ROMANTIC MOVEMENT. A study in the English Romantic poets, 
Wordsworth to Keats. 

Three hours credit. 



English 77 

303. VICTORIAN POETRY. The major poets from Tennyson to Housman. 
Three hours credit. 

304. VICTORIAN PROSE. Emphasis is placed on the attitudes of the lead- 
ing essayists toward the many and varied problems of the Victorian age. 

Three hours credit. 

305-306. ENGLISH NOVEL. From DeFoe to Galsworthy. First semester, 
DeFoe to Jane Austen; second semester, Dickens to Galsworthy. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

311. SHAKESPEARE. A study of representative plays. 
Three hours credit. 

316. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE. A study of the major trends in 
American and English literature of the recent past. 
Three hours credit. 

320. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Consent of the instructor; limited to 15 
students. 

Three hours credit. 

321. IMAGINATIVE WRITING. Emphasis on various forms of creative 
writing, such as fiction, poetry, familiar essays. Consent of the instructor; lim- 
ited to 15 students. 

Three hours credit. 

327. JOURNALISM. Extensive readings will be followed by writing assign- 
ments in such forms as the feature article, the essay, business and government 
reports, the editorial and the straight news article. 
Three hours credit. 

404. AMERICAN REGIONAL FICTION. A study in the development of 
local color and regional literature after the Civil War. 
Three hours credit. 

410. HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Some knowledge of Latin 
and one modern language will be helpful. 
Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN ENGLISH LITERATURE. Conferences, oral and 
written reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge 
of English literature. Limited to qualified majors. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

417-418. STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. Conferences, oral and 
written reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge 
of American literature. Limited to qualified majors. 
Three hours credit each semester. 



78 Lycoming College Bulletin 

FRENCH 

Associate Professor Kadlec 
Assistant Professor Cogswell 

The major in French consists of twenty-four semester hours, above 100 
level courses, including French 401-402, Survey. 

111-112. ELEMENTARY. Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar; prac- 
tice in reading, conversation, and composition. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modem texts; 
practice in conversation and composition. Reports on outside reading. 

Prerequisite, French 111-112 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

303-304. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. An intensive 
course designed to develop a high degree of aural comprehension and conversa- 
tional fluency. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

311-312. ADVANCED. Reading and oral reproduction of nineteenth and 
twentieth century drama. Outside reading and written reports. One-third 
of the time is devoted to further study of grammar and of idioms, with special 
emphasis on writing in French. 

Prerequisite, French 211-212 or equivalent. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

321-322. FRENCH NOVEL. Novelists of the 19th and 20th centuries. An 
introduction to Benjamin Constant, Georges Sand, Balzac, Stendjahl, Zola, Bour- 
get, France, Proust, Gide, Jules Romains, Martin duGard, and Camus. 

Prerequisite, French 311-312 or equivalent. 

Three horirs credit each semester. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works from the earliest monu- 
ments to modern times. Analysis of the texts and their relations to other litera- 
tures. Introduction to graduate methods of research and preparation. Required 
of all majors. 

Prerequisite, French 321-322 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

403-404. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. Thorough study of grammar. Cours de 
style: French "from the inside," practice in composition and development of 
literary writing. 

Prerequisite, French 311-312 or equivalent. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

415-416. STUDIES IN FRENCH. Special studies for majors. Conference 
hours and reports to be arranged. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



Geology 79 

GEOLOGY 

Professor Howe 

101. GEOLOGY. An introduction to earth science with particular regard 
for the origin of the earth, its physical structure and the forces which account 
for its present surface features. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period a week. 

Four hours credit. 

102. GEOLOGY. Geological history and principles are stressed. Emphasis 
is placed on the geology of the United States generally, and that of Pennsyl- 
vania in particular. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. 

Prerequisite, Geology 101. 
Four hours credit. 



GERMAN 

Assistant Professor Fries 

The major in German consists of twenty-four semester hours, above 100 
level courses, including German 411-412, Survey of German Civilization. 

111-112. ELEMENTARY. Introduction into patterns and grammatical and 
syntactical foundations of the German language. Intensive drill in the active 
use of simple language. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE. A continuation and extension of Elementary 
German, leading to a degree of competence in the active handling and an 
understanding of the structure of the German language. Reading of contem- 
porary material. 

Prerequisite, German 112 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

217-218. READING. An alternative terminal course to German 211-212, 
offered to students who primarily desire an ability to read and translate exposi- 
tory prose, especially of a scholarly nature. Not part of a major sequence. 

Prerequisite, German 112 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

303-304. COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. Extensive practice in the 

use of the written and oral language. 

Prerequisite, German 211-212 or equivalent. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

311-312. ADVANCED. Readings in German literary masterpieces. Exercises 
and reports based on the texts. 

Prerequisite, German 211-212. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



80 Lycoming College Bulletin 

403-404. THE AGE OF GOETHE. Readings and discussions of represen- 
tative works on the German classical period. 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

405-406. THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES. Readings and discussions of 
representative works of the major literary movements of the period. 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

411-412. SURVEY OF GERMAN CIVILIZATION. A study of the major devel- 
opments in German thought and culture, demonstrated on selected texts from 
all major periods of German literary history. Offered on demand, recommended 
for German majors, and majors in other fields in the humanities. 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

415-416. STUDIES IN GERMAN. Special studies for majors. Conferences 
and reports to be arranged. 

Prerequisite, consent of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



GREEK 

Assistant Professor Ramsey 

205-206. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK GRAMMAR. Fundamentals of New 
Testament Greek grammar. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

317. SELECTED READINGS FROM THE NEW TESTAMENT. The read- 
ing of passages chosen from the Greek Testament for their literary merit and 
significance for the Christian faith. 

Prerequisite, Greek 206. 
Three hours credit. 

318. THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MARK. A critical reading of the 
Greek text with reference to the problems of higher and lower Biblical criticism. 

Prerequisite, Greek 206. 
Three hours credit. 

418. THE EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS. A critical study of the Greek 
text with special attention being given to the theology of St. Paul. 

Prerequisite, Greek 206. 

Three hours credit. 



History 81 

HISTORY 

Professor Priest 

Associate Professors Barnes and Ewtng 
Assistant Professors Gompf and Wargo 
Instructors Allen and Stites 

The major in history consists of thirty semester hours. 

105-106. MODERN EUROPE. An examination of the political, social, cul- 
tural and intellectual experience of the peoples of Europe from the era of the 
high Renaissance and the Reformation to the conclusion of World War I. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

205-206. FOUNDATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES (1492-1837). The 
colonial and early national backgrounds of factors important in the growth of 
the United States. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

302. AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. A study of the most significant 
diplomatic problems arising out of wars, westward expansion, and colonial 
possession, with special attention to the evolution of the United States as a 
world power. 

Three hours credit. 

320. PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY. A history of Pennsylvania from its found- 
ing to the present day. All phases of life in the colony and commonwealth are 
treated. 

Three hours credit. 

341-342. THE ANCIENT WORLD. A brief account of the origins of civi- 
lization in the ancient Near East followed by a more intensive study of the 
political, social and cultural history of ancient Greece. The second semester 
is concerned with the Roman Republic and Empire. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

343-344. MEDIEVAL EUROPE. The disintegration of ancient civilization 
and susequent developments during the early middle ages. The second semes- 
ter traces the formation of a new civilization in the later middle ages and 
examines the course of the Renaissance and of the Reformation. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

345-346. RECENT AND CONTEMPORARY EUROPE. The political, dip- 
lomatic, and imperial history of Europe from 1914 to the present. The first 
semester takes the account to the beginning of World War II, the second semes- 
ter from that point to the present. 

Prerequisite, History 105-106. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



82 Lycoming College Bulletin 

347-348. HISTORY OF ENGLAND. The political, constitutional, social and 
cultural history of England through medieval and modern times. The first 
semester takes the account to 1660, the second semester, to the present. 

Prerequisite, History 105-106. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

349-350. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. The first semester will cover the stream 
of Russian history from its origins down to the eve of the Russian Revolution 
of 1917, with special emphasis on the revolutionary-intellectual tradition and 
the growth of Marxism. The second semester will deal with the Revolution 
and the ensuing Soviet period down to the present. 

Prerequisite, History 105-106. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

351-352. HISTORY OF THE FAR EAST. The great oriental civilizations of 
China, Japan and Southeast Asia will be investigated in historical context during 
the first semester, ending with the impact of the West in the nineteenth cen- 
tury. The second semester will deal chiefly with twentieth century develop- 
ments, with special emphasis on the growth of communism in East Asia. 

Prerequisite, History 105-106. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

353-354. HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST. First semester: the birth of 
civilizations and the course of political, cultural and religious currents in the 
ancient Near East; the impact of the rise and spread of Islam. Second semes- 
ter: the rise and decline of the Ottoman Empire and its relations with the 
fringe areas of the Near East, including the Balkans, Iran, and North Africa. 

Prerequisite, History 105-106. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

355-356. THE CIVIL WAR AND THE RISE OF MODERN AMERICA. 
Causes, courses, and aftermath of the Civil War followed in the second semes- 
ter by study of forces creating present day America. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

357-358. RECENT AND CONTEMPORARY UNITED STATES. World War 
I and its effect upon the United States followed by World War II and subsequent 
American history. 

Prerequisite, six hours of history. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

359-360. AMERICAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY. The rise 
and development of all phases of American social and intellectual experiences 
from colonial settlement to the present. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



Mathematics 83 

The following studies courses are open only to students of Junior or Senior 
standing, with consent of instructor. 

415-416. a. STUDIES IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY. 

b. STUDIES IN THE ERA OF THE RENAISSANCE AND 
REFORMATION. 

c. STUDIES IN BRITISH CONSTITUTIONAL AND 
LEGAL HISTORY. 

d. STUDIES IN THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND 
NAPOLEONIC ERA. 

e. STUDIES IN RUSSIAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY. 

f. STUDIES IN COLONIAL AMERICA. 

g. STUDIES IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY, 
h. STUDIES IN PENNSYLVANIA HISTORY. 



MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professors Knights and VanBaelen 
Assistant Professors Frutiger and Remley 

The major in mathematics consists of twenty-four semester hours beyond the 
100 level courses. 

101. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. After a rapid review of quadratic equations, 
this course deals with the binomial theorem, permutations, and combinations, 
probability, series, determinants, and theory of equations. 

Three hours credit. 

102. TRIGONOMETRY. An introductory course in plane trigonometry dealing 
with the use of logarithms in the solution of plane triangles, together with the 
trigonometric functions of an angle and the fundamental identities connecting 
its functions. 

Three hours credit. 

151. ENGINEERING DRAWING. The principles of orthographic projection, 
axiometric drawing, and perspective through instrumental and free hand exercises. 
Vertical lettering, free hand sketches, uses of drawing instruments, drafting room 
practice in conventional representations, practice in pencil and ink tracing, sec- 
tions, theory of dimensioning, detail and assembly drawings and the reading of 
working drawings. Class meets two two-hour laboratory periods each week. 

Two hours credit. 



84 Lycoming College Bulletin 

152. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY. Graphical solution of the more advanced 
space problems, both theoretical and practical and those encountered in engineer- 
ing practice; practice in inclined free hand lettering. Problems involve the 
measurement of angles and distances and the generation of various surfaces, 
together with their sections, developments and intersections. In each project, 
visualization and analysis lead to a logical and efficient solution. Class meets two 
two-hour laboratory periods each week. 
Two hours credit. 

201. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. A study of the graphs of various equations; 
curves resulting from simple locus conditions with stress on the loci of the second 
degree; polar co-ordinates, and co-ordinates of space. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 102. 

Four hours credit. 

205. DIFFERENTIAL CALCULUS. Functions, limits, slope, derivatives of 
algebraic and transcendental functions and their applications to maxima and 
minima, rates, curvature. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 201. 

Three hours credit. 

207-208. INTRODUCTION TO MODERN MATHEMATICS. Introduces stu- 
dent to such topics in modern mathematics as symbolic logic, sets and sub-sets, 
probability theory, vectors and matrices, linear programming and theory of games. 
Applications from the field of biological and social sciences. 
Three hours credit each semester. 

302. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. A first course in ordinary differential 
equations. Includes differential equations of first order with applications to 
physics, mechanics, and chemistry; linear equations with constant coefficients, 
simultaneous equations, and some special higher order equations. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 306. 
Three hours credit. 

303. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. A survey of the historical development 
of arithmetic, algebra, trigonometry, and the beginnings of analytic geometry 
and calculus. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 305. 
Three hours credit. 

305. INTEGRAL CALCULUS I. Indefinite and definite integration, improper 
integrals. Applications: areas, volumes, length of curves, surfaces of revolution, 
moments, pressure and work. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 205. 
Three hours credit. 

306. INTEGRAL CALCULUS II. Review of solid analytic geometry, partial 
differentiation and applications, multiple integral and applications, infinite series, 
expansions, MacLaurin's and Taylor's Theorem with and without remainder, and 
an introduction to differential equations. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 305. 
Three hours credit. 



Music 85 

401. ADVANCED CALCULUS. Includes a short course in solid analytic 
geometry, partial differentiation, power series, MacLaurin and Taylor series, 
multiple integrals. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 305-306. 

Three hours credit. 

403. HIGHER ALGEBRA. Includes the study of the binomial theorem for any 
index, the summation of series, mathematical induction, elements of the theory of 
numbers, indeterminate equations, and probability. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101. 

Three hours credit. 

405. ELEMENTARY THEORY OF EQUATIONS. Complex number, binom- 
ial equations, polynomials and solution of polynomial equations. Determinants 
and introduction to matrices. Linear equations. Elimination. 

Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN MATHEMATICS. Conferences, oral and written reports 
on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge of mathematics. 
Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



MUSIC 

Associate Professor McIver 

Assistant Professors Josephson, Russell, and Sheaffer 

Instructor Landon 

A major in music consists of thirty semester hours adequately distributed in 
Principles, History and Literature, and Applied Music. A minimum of fifteen 
semester hours in Principles, History and Literature is required. 

A. PRINCIPLES 

121-122. THEORY. An integrated course in the fundamentals of music and 
musicianship including written harmony, sight singing, ear training, and key- 
board harmony. Class meets five times each week. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

221-222. THEORY. A continuation of the integrated course in music and 
musicianship. Class meets five times each week. 

Prerequisite, Music 121-122. 

Four hours credit each semester. 



86 Lycoming College Bulletin 

321. ADVANCED HARMONY. Altered chords and a thorough review of 
seventh, ninth, and eleventh chords, with analysis of material used in modem 
music. Continued work at the keyboard. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 

Three hours credit. 

322. COUNTERPOINT. A study of the five species in two, three, and four 
part writing. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 

Three hours credit. 

401. ORCHESTRATION. A study of modern orchestral instruments, an exam- 
ination of their use by the great masters with practical problems of instrumenta- 
tion. 

Prerequisite, Music 221-222. 

Three hours credit. 

402. COMPOSITION. Creative writing in smaller vocal and instrumental forms. 
The college musical organizations serve to make performances possible. 

Prerequisite, Music 322. 

Three hours credit. 

403. FORM AND ANALYSIS. A study of harmonic and contrapuntal forms, 
with analysis of representative works of music literature. 

Prerequisite, Music 222. 

Three hours credit. 

B. HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

130. MUSIC APPRECIATION. A general study of concert repertory designed 
to stimulate enjoyment and taste through the development of good listening 
techniques. 

Three hours credit. 

226. THE GOLDEN AGE OF POLYPHONY. A survey of the musical litera- 
ture of the 15th and 16th centuries with time given to the singing of great poly- 
phonic compositions. 

Prerequisite, Music 130. 

Three hours credit. 

227. CLASSIC AND BAROQUE MUSIC. A study of the development and 
growth of music and musical forms during the 17th and 18th centuries. The 
emergence of opera, oratorio, the sonata, the symphony, the concerto and the 
modern orchestra. 

Prerequisite, Music 130. 

Three hours credit. 



Music 87 

228. ROMANTIC MUSIC. Music of the 19th century with emphasis on 
subjectivity, nationalism, and virtuosity for program music. 

Prerequisite, Music 130. 

Three hours credit. 

229. MUSIC OF THE 20TH CENTURY. A study of music written in the 20th 
century with an examination of musical trends since 1900. 

Prerequisite, Music 130. 

Three hours credit. 

307-308. HISTORY OF MUSIC. A survey of the history of music from 
antiquity to 1750. (First Semester). A survey of the history of music from 
1750 to the twentieth century. (Second Semester). 

Three hours credit each semester. 

309 HYMNOLOGY. A study of the hymnody of the Christian Church. 
Emphasis is directed toward an appreciation of the Church's finest hymns. 
Three hours credit. 

406. CONTEMPORARY TECHNIQUES. This course, beginning with the style 
of Debussy and continuing through the contemporary composers, is designed to 
provide training in contemporary harmonic and contrapuntal technics. Con- 
temporary American composers will be studied in the second half of the course. 
Three hours credit. 

415. SENIOR STUDIES. Herein opportunity is afforded to the senior majoring 
in music to develop a project in research. Such work is undertaken in consulta- 
tion with a faculty adviser. Emphasis is directed toward the development of 
creative thinking. May be taken only with the permission of the head of the 
department. 

Three hours credit. 

C. APPLIED MUSIC 

131-132. PIANO CLASS. A beginning class in piano designed primarily for the 
voice and instrumental majors. No more than eight students to a class. Two 
classes each week. 

One hour credit each semester. 

135-136. PRIVATE PIANO INSTRUCTION. Training in the fundamentals 

235-236 of technique. Progressive studies are used to make possible a study 

335-336 of the world's finest piano literature. Participation in recitals is part 

435-436 of the course. Senior recital. 

One-half or one hour credit each semester. 

141-142. VOICE CLASS. Group instruction for beginning voice students. 
Emphasis on personal requirements with opportunity for individual performance. 
Two classes each week. 

One hour credit each semester. 



88 Lycoming College Bulletin 

145-146. PRIVATE VOICE INSTRUCTION. Training in the fundamentals of 

245-246 good singing with a study of various styles of song literature. Per- 

345-346 formance in recitals is required once each semester, with fourth year 

445-446 voice students presenting a major recital before graduation. 

One-half or one hour credit each semester. 

151-152. BAND INSTRUMENTS CLASS. Group instruction at the beginning 
level in band instruments. Two classes each week. 

One hour credit each semester. 

155-156. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN BAND INSTRUMENTS. Training in 

255-256 the fundamentals of performance on one or more instruments of the 

355-356 band. Progressive studies offer the opportunity for the student to 

455-456 advance to the level of recital performance. Senior recital required. 

One-half or one hour credit each semester. 

165-166. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN STRINGS. Training in the funda- 

265-266 mentals of performance on one or more of the string instruments. 

365-366 Progressive studies make possible advancement to the level of recital 

465-466 performance. Senior recital required. 

One-half or one hour credit each semester. 

175-176. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN ORGAN. Satisfactory background in 
275-276 piano is required to study organ. Additional work in piano may be 
375-376 required at the discretion of the department head. The organ student 
475-476 is given the opportunity to work with progressive studies in both 
church and concert repertory. Senior recital required. 

One-half or one hour credit each semester. 

325-326. CHORAL AND/OR INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING. A study of 
the fundamentals of conducting with frequent opportunity for practical experience. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

334. PIANO ENSEMBLE. A course designed to explore piano literature for 
four and eight hands. Required of piano majors. Open to any qualified student. 
Two classes each week. 

One hour credit, with a maximum of two hours credit. 

344. VOCAL METHOD CLASS. A study of anatomy relative to vocalization; 
diction is studied through phonetic spelling. Practical application is made by 
singing individually and as a class. Required of voice majors. Open to any 
qualified student. Two classes each week. 

One hour credit. 

354. INSTRUMENTAL METHOD CLASS. A course designed to study instru- 
mental method. Required of instrumental majors. Open to any qualified student. 
Two classes each week. 

One hour credit. 



Philosophy 89 

PHILOSOPHY 

Associate Professor Faus 
Assistant Professor Mucklow 

A major in philosophy consists of twenty-four semester hours. Philosophy 
301-302 shall be elected in the Sophomore or Junior year. 

201-202. ETHICS. An examination of some of the fundamental ethical prob- 
lems of man and society and the corresponding theories of moral and political 
philosophy. Readings in philosophical classics. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-302. HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY. First semester: the history of philoso- 
phy from its beginnings among the Greeks to the founding of modern science. 
Second semester: the history of philosophy continued to the present century. 
One concern is to understand the fundamental thoughts of the great philosophers, 
including Plato, Aristotle, St. Thomas Aquinas, Descartes, the British empiricists, 
and Kant. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

305-306. LOGIC. Introduction to elementary formal deductive logic and its 
application to arguments expressed in English. Investigation of selected topics 
in semantics, such as truth and meaning, and in mathematics and law, such as the 
nature of mathematical truth and the role of definition in jurisprudence. Exam- 
ination of the nature of reasoning, through comparison of the kinds of arguments 
found in such diverse realms of discourse as mathematics, law, and ethics. 

Offered in alternate years. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

307. AESTHETICS. A study of form, harmony and beauty and their relations 
to the integrated experiences of the individual person. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

309. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY. A study of the important trends and chief 
world-views among American philosophers, including present-day thinkers in this 
country. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

310. METAPHYSICS. A study of the chief philosophical world-views with 
the aim of developing a perspective for the interpretation of experience. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 



90 Lycoming College Bulletin 

312. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. A study of the philosophical foundations 
of religion, with special emphasis on the intellectual bases for the belief in God, 
the problem of good-and-evil, human personality, religious experience, and human 
immortality. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 

Three hours credit. 

316. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. An examination of the nature of science. 
Offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202. 
Three hours credit. 

405. SEMINAR IN PHILOSOPHY. An analysis of one philosophical problem, 
philosopher, or movement. Discussions and papers on a topic such as the free- 
dom of the will, Kant's moral philosophy, or logical atomism. 

Offered in alternate years. 

Prerequisite, Philosophy 201-202 and consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit. 

413-414. STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY. These studies will involve an intensive 
research study of the writings of one or more outstanding philosophers. Limited 
to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Associate Professor Busey 

Instructors Miller, Phillips, Vargo, and Whttehill 

101-102. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Men). Basic instruction in fundamentals 
of sports that include touch-football, soccer, volleyball, table tennis, bowling, bad- 
minton, wrestling, swimming, gymnastics and tumbling, softball, tennis, golf and 
archery. 

A regulation four-piece uniform consisting of a Lycoming College T-shirt, 
royal blue shorts, and a royal blue sweat suit, along with a basketball-type rubber- 
soled shoe is required for all class work in physical education. This uniform may 
be secured at the college bookstore. 

One hour credit each semester. 

201-202. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Men). More advanced work in the 
various activities with added emphasis on those sports that have the greatest 
potential as recreational and leisure time interests in after-college life. 

Uniform requirement is the same as for Phys. Ed. 101-102. 

One hour credit each semester. 



Physics 91 

111-112. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Women). Basic instruction in funda- 
mentals of swimming, tennis, badminton, bowling, table tennis, archery, volley- 
ball, basketball, softball, field hockey, soccer, stunts and tumbling, rhythmics, 
informal gymnastics, folk, modern and character dancing. 

A regulation two-piece uniform consisting of a white blouse and blue shorts, 
along with a tennis-type, rubber-soled shoe is required for all class work in physi- 
cal education. This uniform may be secured at the college bookstore. 

One hour credit each semester. 

211-212. PHYSICAL EDUCATION (Women). More advanced work in activi- 
ties offered freshmen. A reasonable degree of proficiency in a sport of her choice 
shall be required. 

One hour credit each semester. 



PHYSICS 

Associate Professor Babcock 
Assistant Professor Remley 

101-102. GENERAL PHYSICS. A course in the first semester covering mechan- 
ics, heat, and sound; and in the second semester, magnetism, electricity, and light. 
Lectures and recitations based on a standard text accompanied by a systematic 
course in quantitative laboratory practice. Three hours lecture and two two-hour 
laboratory periods each week. 

Five hours credit each semester. 

Prerequisite, Mathematics 101-102 or equivalent. 

201. STATICS. The division of mechanics which includes the fundamental con- 
ception of a force, the resolution of a force into components, and the composition 
of forces into a resultant. Both the analytical and the graphic solutions are used. 

Prerequisites, Mathematics 205, 305; 306; Physics 101. 
Three hours credit. 

202. STRENGTH OF MATERIALS. The application of analytical and vector 
methods to mechanical systems, including moment and shear diagrams. 

Prerequisite, Physics 201. 
Three hours credit. 

301. DYNAMICS. A division of mechanics including forces which act on a 
body to cause a change in its motion. 

Prerequisite, Physics 201. 
Three hours credit. 

302. METEOROLOGY. A study of basic principles pertaining to the observa- 
tion and recording of weather data, and the basing of future weather predictions 
on them. 

Three hours credit. 



92 Lycoming College Bulletin 

303. LIGHT. A study of the theories of physical optics and an introduction to 
modern spectroscopy. 

Prerequisite, Physics 101-102. Conference on mathematical background 
required. 

Three hours credit. 

305-306. ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM. This course treats electrical 
and magnetic phenomena. Theoretical concepts as well as problems are stressed. 
Selected topics include circuits, inductances, and capacitance. Laboratory work 
is included. 

Prerequisite, Physics 102. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

401-402. MODERN PHYSICS. Recent developments in modern physics includ- 
ing atomic and nuclear structure. Special attention is given the quantum theory, 
special relativity, radiation laws. Selected topics include nuclear reactions, nuclear 
fission, the Bohr theory of the atom and radioactivity. 

Prerequisite, Physics 102. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Weidman 
Assistant Professor Leh 

The major in political science consists cf twenty-four semester hours. 

201. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. An inquiry into the structure and func- 
tions of the various organs of national government, with special reference to their 
expansion to meet the problems of a modern society. 

Three hours credit. 

202. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. A comparative study of the 
organization and functions of the states and their subdivisions, their relationship 
to the federal government, and the newer concept of the work of state adminis- 
tration. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

301. PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL SCIENCE. A study to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the functions of the modern state, the development of political thought, 
individual liberty under the law, and the nature of political parties. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 



Political Science 93 

302. POLITICAL PARTIES AND PRESSURE POLITICS. A study of political 
parties in the United States with emphasis upon factors of control, campaign 
techniques, propaganda, and their relationship to pressure groups. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

303. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. An analysis of several governments of 
the world, affording a comparison between democratic and authoritarian states, 
with particular attention directed to changes resulting from World War II. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

304. MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. An analysis of different forms of city 
government in the United States, the relation of the city to the states, city politics 
and elections, and the problems of municipal administration. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

401-402. POLITICAL THEORIES. Theories of government in the writings of 
philosophers, ancient and modern. First semester: Greek, Roman, and medieval; 
second semester: theories which accompanied the rise of the nation-state and its 
subsequent development. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201 and consent of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

403. PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Concept of bureaucracy and its place in 
government. The development of public administration in America with atten- 
tion to its increasing professionalization. Theory and practice of public adminis- 
tration and personnel administration. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

407-408. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW. A course designed to trace Supreme 
Court decisions as a reflection of social and political conflicts; to reveal the judi- 
ciary as a vital instrument of government; to observe the adaptation of basic law 
to the various crises in human affairs; and to analyze constitutional doctrine 
through tlie use of the case method. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

411. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION. A study of the development, 
structure, and functions of the principal agencies of international co-operation, 
with particular attention to the United Naions and to regional organizations. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 



94 Lycoming College Bulletin 

412. WORLD POLITICS. An analysis of the dynamic factors in international 
political behavior with special reference to power and ideology; mutuality and 
conflict of national interests; policy formation and execution in the continuing 
world crisis. 

Prerequisite, Political Science 201. 

Three hours credit. 

415-416. STUDIES IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. Conferences, and oral and 
written reports on selected topics designed to round out a student's knowledge of 
Political Science. Limited to qualified majors. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor Skeath 
Assistant Professor Miller 
Mr. Buckle and Mr. Lady 

The major in Psychology consists of thirty semester hours including Psychol- 
ogy 111-112, General Psychology; Psychology 211-212, Patterns of Behavior; 
Psychology 311-312, Statistics and Experimental Psychology; and Psychology 421- 
422, Seminar in Personality. Students majoring in Psychology are encouraged to 
include in their programs courses in zoology, anatomy, physiology and genetics; 
History 359-360, American Social and Intellectual History; foreign language 
(French, German, or Russian); Mathematics 207-208, Introduction to Modern 
Mathematics; and Philosophy 301-302, History of Philosophy. 

111-112. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. Introductory study of behavior. Survey 
of experimental studies of motivation, learning, thinking, perceiving, individual 
differences. Emphasis on scientific methodology. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

211-212. PATTERNS OF BEHAVIOR. Study of normal personality and adjust- 
ment together with deviations as illustrated in various forms of mental illness. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

308. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. Behavior from birth to adolescence: intellectual, 
emotional, social, physical development. 

Three hours credit. 

309. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Psychological principles as applied to 
learning and the development of personality. 

Three hours credit. 

311-312. STATISTICS AND EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. Elementary 
statistics through correlation and significant differences. Experimental studies 
emphasizing research method and design. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



Religion 95 

321-322. LEARNING AND LEARNING THEORY. Exposition and analysis 
of systematic conceptions of the learning process from the behavioristic and field 
points of view. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

417-418. PRACTICUM IN HUMAN RELATIONS. Case studies of family, 
personal, social, and industrial situations. 
Two hours credit each semester. 

421-422. SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY. Exposition and analysis of phenom- 
enological, bio-social, and psychoanalytic conceptions of personality theory. 
Three hours credit each semester. 



RELIGION 

Assistant Professors Neufer and Ramsey 
Instructor Guerra 
Part-time Instructor Weller 

A major in religion consists of twenty-four semester hours. 

111. THE HEBREW-CHRISTIAN TRADITION. A survey of the fundamental 
cultural and religious themes of the Hebrew-Christian heritage with reference to 
their historical development. Substantial reading assigned in the Bible. 
Three hours credit. 

206. THE LITERATURE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT. A study of the major 
works of the Old Testament with special reference to their origins, contents, and 
historical significance. 
Three hours credit. 

208. THE LITERATURE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT. A study of the major 
writings of the New Testament with reference to their authorship, date, and signi- 
ficance for the understanding of primitive and contemporary Christianity. 
Three hours credit. 

305. THE PROPHETS. A consideration of the prophetic movement in Israel 
beginning with the pre-literary prophets and including the works of Amos, Hosea, 
Isaiah, Jeremiah, and the prophets of the Restoration. 
Three hours credit. 

307. THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF JESUS. An approach to the life and 
teachings of Jesus through the critical study of the sources and the reconstruction 
of the historical, social, and religious setting of His ministry. 

Prerequisite, Religion 206 or 305. 

Three hours credit. 

310. THE HISTORY OF RELIGION IN AMERICA. A survey in American 
church history with special attention being given to the prominent personalities 
and environmental factors involved in the founding and development of the 
various religious groups — Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish — in this country. 
Three hours credit. 



96 Lycoming College Bulletin 

312. INTRODUCTION TO NEAR EASTERN ARCHAEOLOGY. A scientific 
study, in survey form, of the major results of archaeological investigations in the 
Near East since 1900, in the light of their bearing upon the biblical materials and 
Near Eastern history and culture. Basic archaeological methods, form-types and 
the care and preservation of artifacts will be considered. Local field work will 
be arranged. Open to Juniors and Seniors with consent of instructor. Limited to 
twelve students. 

Three hours credit. 

THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MARK. (Greek 318). 

403. THE ORGANIZATION AND WORK OF THE LOCAL CHURCH. A 

study of the nature and structure of the local church, its roles in the community, 
and the responsibilities of its personnel. 
Three hours credit. 

404. THE EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY OF THE LOCAL CHURCH. An 

introduction to religious education as a function of the local church, with special 
attention being given to the nature and goals of Christian education, methods of 
church-school teaching, and the relation between faith and learning. 
Three hours credit. 

411. THE RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD. A survey of the religious beliefs 
and practices of mankind through the historical study of the major living religions; 
an attempt to illuminate the origins, the nature, and the development of religion. 
Three hours credit. 

414. PROTESTANT CHRISTIANITY. An historical and theological study of 
the origin and development of the Protestant movement, 1500-1950, with particu- 
lar emphasis on American Protestantism. 

Prerequisite, Religion 208 or 307. 

Three hours credit. 

THE EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS. (Greek 418). 



RUSSIAN 

Associate Professor Kadlec 

The major in Russian consists of twenty-four semester hours, above 100 level 
courses, including Russian 401-402, Survey. 

111-112. ELEMENTARY. Fundamentals of pronunciation, Cyrillic alphabet 
and grammar; practice in reading, conversation and composition. 
Four hours credit each semester. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modern texts; 
practice in conversation and composition. Reports on outside reading. 

Prerequisite, Russian 111-112. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



Sociology 97 

217-218. READING. An alternative terminal course to Russian 211-212, offered 
to students who primarily desire an ability to read and translate expository prose, 
especially of a scholarly nature. 

Prerequisite, Russian 111-112, or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

311-312. ADVANCED. Readings in Russian literary masterpieces, accompanied 
by lectures on Russian literature. 

Prerequisite, Russian 211-212 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works, with special emphasis 
upon 19th century writer (Pushkin, Gogol, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky). 

Prerequisite, Russian 311-312 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

411-412. ADVANCED RUSSIAN CONVERSATION AND GRAMMAR. Pri- 
marily for those who intend to teach Russian in secondary schools. This course 
deals with the Russian phonetic system, speech patterns and idioms. 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Associate Professor Sonder 

The major in sociology consists of twenty-four semester hours. 

105. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. An introduction to the systematic 
study of human inter-relationships and the products of these relationships. 
Three hours credit. 

202. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY. The history, structure, and functions 
of modern American family life, emphasizing dating, courtship, factors in marital 
adjustment, and the changing status of family members. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 or junior standing. 

Three hours credit. 

205. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL PROBLEMS. A study of the causal theories, 
manifestations, and possible solutions for the social phenomena which are current- 
ly accepted as problems. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105. 
Three hours credit. 

214. GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY. A survey of the physical and cultural 
evolution of man and society, placing emphasis upon the comparative descriptions 
of recent primitive societies. 
Three hours credit. 



98 Lycoming College Bulletin 

302. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. The aims, purposes, and operation of 
education are interpreted from the sociological viewpoint with emphasis upon the 
home and community as they affect the educative process, as well as upon the 
special role of the teacher in school and society. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105. 

Three hours credit. 

305. CRIMINOLOGY. The nature, genesis, and organization of criminal 
behavior is examined from both group and individual viewpoints. Juvenile delin- 
quency and the treatment of crime are presented. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105. 

Three hours credit. 

308. RURAL AND URBAN COMMUNITIES. The concept of community is 
treated as it operates and affects individual and group behavior in rural, suburban, 
and urban settings. Emphasis is placed upon characteristic institutions and prob- 
lems of modern city life. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105. 
Three hours credit. 

309. RACIAL AND CULTURAL MINORITIES. A study of the adjustments 
of minority racial, cultural, and national groups in modern America. Attention is 
also given to minority problems within their world setting. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105. 
Three hours credit. 

STATISTICS. ( Psychology 311). 

312. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. The mob 
and crowd are treated as social phenomena. The major social movements within 
western civilization are described with analysis. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 and junior standing. 

Three hours credit. 

314. POPULATION. The size, growth, and trends within population are pre- 
sented along with their significant results for culture and social change. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 and junior standing. 

Three hours credit. 

407. GROUPS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN NATURE. An 
integrated, theoretical explanation of meaningful social behavior is developed and 
applied to classes, age groupings, and institutions of modern American society. 
Emphasis is placed upon the concepts of self, role, and stratification. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 and three additional hours in Sociology. 
Three hours credit. 

408. THE DYNAMICS OF PUBLIC OPINION. A theoretical and research- 
based study of the foundation, formation, and operation of public opinion in 
American society. Emphasis is placed upon polling and propaganda techniques, 
and analysis is made of the major media of public opinion. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 and junior standing. 
Three hours credit. 



Spanish 99 

409. SOCIOLOGY APPLIED TO BUSINESS AND THE PROFESSIONS. The 
principles of Sociology are treated to reflect their usefulness in business, industry, 
and such professions as the ministry, social work, and counselling. 

Prerequisite, Sociology 105 and one other Sociology course or permission of 
instructor. 

Three hours credit. 

410. STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT. The 
history of the development of sociological thought from its earliest philosophical 
beginnings is treated through discussions and reports. Emphasis is placed upon 
sociological thought since the time of Comte. 

Limited to qualified majors, others with permission of instructor. 

Three hours credit. 

423-424. STUDIES IN SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. The methods of socio- 
logical research are treated, and students acquire practical experience in the 
application of these methods. 

Limited to qualified majors; others with consent of instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



SPANISH 

Associate Professor Gillette 
Instructor Garcia 

The major in Spanish consists of twenty-four semester hours, above 100 level 
courses, including Spanish 401-402, Survey. 

111-112. ELEMENTARY. Fundamentals of pronunciation and grammar; prac- 
tice in reading, conversation and composition. 

Four hours credit each semester. 

211-212. INTERMEDIATE. Review of grammar. Study of modern texts; 
outside readings and reports; practice in conversation and composition. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 111-112 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

301-302. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. Spanish style illustrated by reading repre- 
sentative modern authors. Difficult points of grammar and usage studied. Drill 
on idioms and verb forms of high frequency. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 311-312 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

303-304. CONVERSATION. Study of customs, manners, and conditions in 
Latin America. Representative works are read and discussed in Spanish. Class 
meets four times each week. 

Prerequisite, permission of the instructor. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



100 Lycoming College Bulletin 

311-312. ADVANCED. Reading of Golden Age and modern texts; outside 
readings and reports. Study of principal literary movements and civilization. 

Prerequisite, Spanish 211-212 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

401-402. SURVEY. A study of representative works from the earliest monu- 
ments to modern times. Analysis of the texts and their relations to other litera- 
tures. Required of all majors. 

Prerequisites, Spanish 301-302 or equivalent. 

Three hours credit each semester. 

415-416. STUDIES IN SPANISH. Special studies for majors. Conference 
hours and reports to be arranged. 

Three hours credit each semester. 



SPEECH 



Assistant Professor Myers 



105. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH I. Development of the elementary prin- 
ciples of simple oral communication through lectures, prepared assignments in 
speaking and informal class exercises. 

Three hours credit. 

106. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH II. A continuation of elementary prin- 
ciples with emphasis upon persuasive and argumentative speaking, debate group 
discussion, parliamentary procedure and speeches for special occasions. 

Prerequisite, Speech 105. 
Three hours credit. 

212. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE I. A survey of the artistic and techni- 
cal functioning of theatre including playwriting, acting, directing, and design. 

Three hours credit. 

213. INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE II. A continuation of Speech 212 with 
emphasis upon playwriting, acting, directing and design. Students will elect one 
or two of these emphases for intensive, directed study through lectures, seminar 
discussions and demonstrations. 

Prerequisites, Speech 212 and consent of instructor. 
Three hours credit. 

311. WORLD DRAMA. A survey of world dramatic literature from Greeks to 
the present. 

Three hours credit. 



EXPENSES AND 

FINANCIAL AID 



Expenses 



GENERAL EXPENSES 

In considering the expenses of college, it is well to bear in mind 
that no student actually pays the full cost of his education. State 
colleges are enabled to keep the cost of tuition within reasonable 
limits by grants from the public treasury; independent colleges 
achieve this by voluntary contributions supplemented by income from 
their invested endowment funds. At Lycoming College, the tuition 
fee which each student pays represents only a portion of the total 
instruction cost. Tuition is kept at the lowest possible minimum 
consistent with adequate facilities and competent instruction. 

Tuition at Lycoming is $450.00 per semester, plus certain fees 
which are listed on the following pages. For boarding students the 
room expense amounts to $150.00 per semester except for residents in 
Old Main. Board is $225.00 per semester (the academic year com- 
prises two semesters of approximately sixteen weeks each). If, for 
justifiable reason, it is impossible for a student to eat in the College 
Dining Hall, permission may be given the student to make other ar- 
rangements for meals. However, in the event such permission is 
granted, the room cost will be 50% higher than the above rates. If a 
student requests the use of a double room as a single room and the 
room is available, he will be charged 50% more than regular rates. 

The tuition charge covers the regular or prescribed course of 
study which normally comprises four or five subjects ( 12-18 hours ) . 
If a student elects to carry additional courses a charge of $30.00 per 
credit hour is levied. Those students carrying fewer than 12 hours 
are also charged at the rate of $30.00 per credit hour Additional 
detailed information will be furnished by the Treasurer's Office upon 
request. 

APPLICATION FEE AND DEPOSIT 

All students applying for admission are required to send an 
application fee of $10.00 with the application. This charge is to 
partially defray the costs of processing the application, maintaining 
academic records and is non-refundable. 

After a student is notified that he has been accepted for admission 
by the College, he is required to make a deposit of $50.00. This de- 

102 



Expenses 103 

posit is evidence of the applicant's good intention to matriculate and 
is applicable to the general charges of the semester, and is not an 
extra fee. This deposit is not refundable. 

All returning students are required to pay a deposit of $50.00 on 
or before April 15, to reserve their place in the student body. This 
deposit is credited to the student's account, but is not refundable. 

BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

A modern book and supply store is conveniently located in the 
Student Activities Building. Books and supplies are purchased by 
the individual student. The estimated cost is approximately $75.00 
per year, but will vary somewhat in accordance with the course of 
study which the student is pursuing. The bookstore is open registra- 
tion day and daily thereafter. 

ART AND MUSIC 

Tuition for art and music majors is higher than it is for the other 
courses of study. In these programs best results are obtained by 
individual instruction; consequently the expense is greater. The cost 
in excess of the normal tuition varies according to the student's pro- 
gram of study but does not exceed $50.00 per semester. The exact 
cost is determined at the time of registration. 

Special or part-time music students are charged $50.00 per semes- 
ter for one one-half hour lesson per week. 

A charge of $5.00 per semester for piano and $10.00 per semester 
for organ is made when these instruments are required for practice. 
These rates are for one period per day for each lesson scheduled. 

Special or part-time applied art students will be charged $100.00 
for six class periods per week (three credit hours). 

EXPENSES IN DETAIL PER SEMESTER 

RESIDENT STUDENTS (Those living in College Dormitories) 

Per Semester 

Tuition $450.00 

Room 150.00 

Board 225.00 

Activity Fee 37.50 

Basic cost per semester $862.50 



104 Lycoming College Bulletin 

NON-RESIDENT STUDENTS 

( Those not living in College Dormitories ) 

Tuition $450.00 

Activity Fee 37.50 

Basic cost per semester $487.50 

SPECIAL CHARGES 
Laboratory Fees Per Semester: 

Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics $10.00 to $30.00 

Office Practice ( Secretarial Course ) 10.00 

Office Machines 10.00 

Typewriting 10.00 

Practice Teaching 40.00 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Additional Credit Per Semester Hour 30.00 

Diplomas 10.00 

Transcript Fee ( no charge for first transcript ) 1.00 

Caps and Gowns (rental at prevailing cost) 

The College reserves the right to adjust fees at any time as condi- 
tions necessitate. 



PAYMENT OF FEES 

The basic fees for the semester are due and payable on or before 
registration day for that semester. Checks or money orders should 
be payable to Lycoming College. These basic fees are as follows: 

Resident Students $862.50 

Non-Resident Students $487.50 

Charges for laboratory fees and additional credit hours will 
be billed and payable immediately following each registration 
period. 

PARTIAL PAYMENTS 

For the convenience of those who find it impossible to follow the 
schedule of payments as listed, arrangements may be made with the 
College Treasurer, for the monthly payment of college fees. Addi- 
tional information concerning partial payments may be obtained from 
the Treasurer, or Director of Admissions. 



Expenses 105 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

The date on which the Dean of the College approves the student's 
withdrawal sheet is considered the official date of withdrawal. In the 
case of minors, the approval of the parent or guardian is required 
before the withdrawal is approved and before any refund is made. 

Room rentals have been fixed on a semester basis. Consequently, 
students leaving College prior to the ending of a semester will not be 
entitled to any refund of room rent. Board will be pro-rated by the 
week over the period of attendance. 

Refund of tuition will be made to students who withdraw volun- 
tarily from the College while in good standing and is fixed on the 
following basis: Students leaving during the first four-week period are 
charged 30%; during the second four weeks 60%; during the third four 
weeks, 90%; after twelve weeks, full charge. 

Dropping a subject from the original schedule after the first week 
of either semester will not justify any claim for refund of tuition 
charges. Written permission to drop the subject must be obtained 
from the Dean's Office. No refund will be made to those students 
who are asked to withdraw from the College. 

Other fees cannot be refunded for any reason whatever. 

PENALTY FOR NON-PAYMENT OF FEES 

A student will not be registered for courses in a new semester if 
his account for previous attendance has not been settled. 

No grades will be issued, no diploma, certificate, transcript of 
credits, or certification of withdrawal in good standing will be granted 
to any student until a satisfactory settlement of all obligations has 
been made. 

DAMAGE CHARGES 

Wherever possible, damage to dormitory property will be charged 
to the person or persons directly responsible. Damage and breakage 
occurring in a room will be the responsibility of students occupying 
the room. 

Halls and bathroom damage will be the responsibility of all stu- 
dents of the section where damage occurs. Actual costs of repairs 
will be charged. 

FINANCIAL AID 

A generous program of financial aid for students is designed to 
recognize outstanding achievement and to supplement limited re- 
sources by providing assistance to students in their efforts to obtain a 
college education. This assistance may take any one, or any combina- 



106 Lycoming College Bulletin 

tion, of the following forms: (1) Scholarships, (2) Grants-in-aid, (3) 
Discounts, (4) Loans, (5) Workships. 

With the exception of discounts, the establishment of need is the 
controlling factor in determining the amount of the grant or award. 
To this end, Lycoming uses the College Scholarship Service sponsored 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. Prescribed forms are 
furnished by the College upon request. 

Scholarships are awarded to the beginning student on the basis 
of academic achievement as evidenced by the scores on the College 
Entrance Examination Board tests and a ranking in the first fifth of 
the high school class. To continue the receipt of the award during 
succeeding years, a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 plus must 
be maintained together with satisfactory campus citizenship. 

Grants-In-Aid are awarded annually to students on the basis of 
a demonstrated need. The size of the grant is determined by need 
and by the promise of becoming beneficial members of the college 
family and of society. 

Loans — Student loans are available from the following sources: 

1. Title II of the National Defense Education Act of 1959 (Public 
Law 85-864). 

2. Methodist Student Loans made available by The Methodist 
Church. 

3. The Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Rich Loan and Prize Fund. The in- 
come from a capital fund of $10,000 is available for loan. 

4. Donald Robert Ahn Memorial Fund in Music. The principal 
of the Memorial Fund is available for loans to worthy students 
who are majoring in music. 

5. The Lambda Chi Alpha Loan Fund, created by the gift of $500 
of Dean and Mrs. William S. Hoffman. The purpose of the 
fund is to grant loans in small amounts for emergencies where 
the student is able to show immediate need of financial 
assistance. 

Detailed information concerning the above loans is available upon 
request. 

Workships: Financial assistance is made available to a limited 
number of students annually in both the College and the city by means 
of gainful employment. 

Discounts: Financial assistance is available through grants from 
The Methodist Church to children of ministers and ministerial stu- 
dents. Consideration is also given to families with more than one 
student at the College. 



Endowment and Scholarships 



ENDOWMENT 

The Margaret A. Stevenson Powell gift to Endowment. $1,200 the gift 
of her children. 

The Pearl C. Detwiler gift to Endowment. $500 bequeathed by her husband. 

The Frank Wilson Klepser Memorial gift to Endowment. $5,000 given by 
his parents. 

The Benjamin C. Bowman gift to Endowment. $5,000 the gift of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. Walter Bowman. 

The Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Young gift to Endowment. $10,000. 

The Miriam P. Welch gift to Endowment. $500. 

The Wilson Hendrix Reiley Memorial gift to Endowment. $500. 

The Mrs. Margaret J. Freeman gift to Endowment. $1,000. 

The Agnes L. Hermance Art gift to Endowment. $2,000. 

The Grace Stanley Dice Memorial gift to Endowment. $1,000 the gift of 
her husband, Willis C. Dice. 

The Clarke Memorial Fund of about $100,000, provided by gift and be- 
quest by the late Miss Martha B. Clarke, of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, a former 
student, in the interest of the develoment program of Lycoming College. This 
was applied to the erection of the Clarke Building. 

The Julia Trump Rich Memorial Fund, Endowment through annuity, of 
$25,000, the gift of Robert F. Rich, husband. 

The M. B. Rich Chair of Religion. Endowment $50,000. 

The Rich Family Endowment of $75,000. The income therefrom to be 
used for the upkeep of Rich Hall, Fine Arts Building and President's Residence. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

Over two thousand dollars is awarded annually in scholarships and prizes. 
This not only encourages scholastic attainment, but also affords generous help 
to needy, worthy students. The list of scholarships and prizes follows: 

THE DeWITT BODINE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late DeWitt Bodine, 
of Hughesville, Pa. 

The entire expenses of board and tuition to that pupil of the graduating 
class of the Hughesville High School who shall excel in scholarship and character. 

THE EDWARD J. GRAY SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Rev. Dr. 
Edward J. Gray, for thirty-one years the honored president of this institution. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid annually, in equal amounts, to the two 
applicants who attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deportment 
in the Senior Class. 

107 



108 Lycoming College Bulletin 

THE ALEXANDER E. PATTON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Hon. 
Alexander E. Patton, Curwensville, Pa. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid annually, in equal amounts, to the two 
applicants who attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deportment 
in the Junior Class. 

THE GEORGE W. HUNTLEY, JR. SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late 
George W. Huntley, Jr., Emporium, Pa. 

The interest on $7,000 is available to help defray the tuition and expenses 
for the first year only of any graduate of Emporium High School who meets 
provisions as set forth in the trust agreement. The selection is made by the 
Superintendent of Schools, Cameron Co., Pa. 

THE ELIZABETH S. JACKSON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Mrs. 
Elizabeth S. Jackson of Berwick, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be paid annually to the applicant who attains a 
required rank highest in scholarship and deportment in the Sophomore Class. 

THE DONALD C. WOLFE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Mrs. Nora 
E. Wolfe, of Williamsport, Pa. 

The interest on $4,000 to be paid annually to a worthy ministerial student 
to be selected by the trustees of Lycoming College. 

THE WILLIAM WOODCOCK SCHOLARSHIP, founded by William L. Wood- 
cock, Esq., of Altoona, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be paid annually to the applicant who attains a 
required rank second in scholarship and deportment in the Sophomore Class. 

THE HIRAM AND ELIZABETH WISE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by Hiram 
Wise, Montoursville, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be paid annually to that ministerial or missionary 
student who because of present circumstances and promise of future usefulness 
shall, in the judgment of the President, be deemed worthy of the same. 

THE MRS. JENNIE M. RICH SCHOLARSHIP of $5,000, the gift of her son, 
John Woods Rich, the interest on which is to be used in aiding worthy and 
needy students preparing for the Christian ministry or for deaconess or mission- 
ary work. 

THE McDOWELL SCHOLARSHIP, founded by Mr. and Mrs. James E. Mc- 
Dowell, of Williamsport, Pa. 

The interest on $500 to be awarded annually by the President and Faculty 
to that ministerial student of the graduating class who shall excel in scholarship, 
deportment, and promise of usefulness, and who declares his intention to make 
the ministry his life work. 

THE DAVID GROVE AND WIFE SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late David 
Grove, of Lewistown, Pa. 

The interest on $2,040 to be given to worthy, needy students studying for 
the ministry, the holder or holders thereof to be appointed by the said Lycoming 
College. 



Endowments and Scholarships 109 

THE MARY STRONG CLEMENS SCHOLARSHIP FUND OF $2,500 donated 
by the late Chaplain Joseph Clemens, of Manila, P. I. 

The interest to be used as scholarship, or scholarship loan aid, for the 
benefit of a student or students of Lycoming College who are preparing for 
the Christian ministry, or for deaconess work, or its equivalent, in the Methodist 
Church. Beneficiaries may be named by Mrs. Mary Strong Clemens, or in the 
absence of such recommendation the recipient or recipients shall be named by 
the President of the School. 

THE BERYL CLINE GLENN SCHOLARSHIP. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid annually to a worthy student in the 
Music Department. The selection is made by the President and Faculty. 

THE BISHOP WILLIAM PERRY EVELAND MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, 
founded by the Alumni of Lycoming College who were students during the 
administration of Bishop William Perry Eveland and in his honor. 

The interest on $1,250 to be paid annually to a needy, worthy student 
or students who shall make the most satisfactory progress in scholarship and 
give promise of future usefulness and who by loyalty, school spirit, and par- 
ticipation in school activities is considered by the President and Faculty to most 
fully represent the standards and ideals of Lycoming College. 

THE AMOS JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the late Rev. Amos 
Johnson, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

$500 to be held and invested by Lycoming College and the income arising 
therefrom to be used for the education of ministerial students of limited means. 

THE BENJAMIN C. CONNER SCHOLARSHIP, the interest on $500 given 
by an alumnus of the college to be awarded to that graduating student who 
has had at least 24 hours of mathematics beyond Mathematics 100 and whose 
average is highest for the mathematics courses taken beyond Mathematics 301. 

THE RICH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP FUND of $5,000, provided in the 
will of the late Hon. M. B. Rich, the interest of which is to be awarded 
annually to worthy young men or women who intend to devote their lives to 
the preaching of die Gospel, the missionary cause, or the work of a deaconess. 
The beneficiary shall be named by the Faculty with the approval of the Board 
of Trustees. 

THE C. LUTHER CULLER SCHOLARSHIP, the interest from an endow- 
ment of $5,000 provided in the will of C. Luther Culler, of Williamsport, a 
graduate of Lycoming College in the Class of 1876. Awarded on scholarship. 

THE CLARA KRAMER EATON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, founded by 
the late Clara Kramer Eaton, of Trevorton, Pa. 

The interest on $8,000 to be awarded annually to that student in the grad- 
uating class at Trevorton High School attaining the highest average in scholar- 
ship, for the purpose of defraying the expenses of a year of instruction at 
Lycoming College. 



110 Lycoming College Bulletin 

THE ELISHA BENSON KLINE SCHOLARSHIP PRIZE IN MATHEMATICS, 
founded by I. Clinton Kline, Sunbury, Pa., in honor of his elder brother who 
graduated from the College in 1868. 

The interest on $1,000 to be paid to a student or students at the discretion 
of the President of Lycoming College. 

THE NATIONAL METHODIST SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, authorized by the 
General Conference of The Methodist Church, are granted on the basis of finan- 
cial need, promise of usefulness, leadership ability, and scholarship, to Method- 
ist students enrolling as full-time students in an accredited Methodist college 
or university. 

THE COMPETITIVE TRUSTEE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

A reduction in tuition of $250.00 per semester for four years to contestants 
receiving the highest scores in a competitive examination. 

THE BYRON C. BRUNSTETTER SCIENCE AWARD, established by Mrs. 
Frank H. Brunstetter in memory of her son. 

The income on $500 to be awarded to that senior majoring in the chemical 
and biological sciences who shall be judged by the Science division to have 
been a superior student in these sciences. 

THE CLASS OF 1907 SCHOLARSHIP of $25 to be awarded annually to that 
student at Lycoming College who shall attain high scholarship and who, in 
the opinion of the President and the faculty, has been outstanding in the 
promotion of college spirit through participation in athletics and other non- 
curricular college activities. This scholarship is made available through the 
gift of A. R. Evans. 

THE JOHN W. LONG MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP, created by gifts from 
alumni in memory of Dr. John W. Long, who served as president of the College 
for a period of thirty-four years. 

THE JOAN BERRY FOUNDATION, established by Mr. and Mrs. William 
Berry, in memory of Joan Berry. 

The income from the Joan Berry Foundation to be used to provide 
financial assistance to deserving and needy students, who, in the opinion of 
the President of the College, are entitled to help. 

THE GRIT SCHOLARSHIP, established by The Grit Publishing Co., Wil- 
liamsport, Pa. 

The interest on $25,000 to be used to provide scholarship assistance for 
children of employees of The Grit Publishing Company, or other graduates of 
local high schools. 

FACULTY WIVES SCHOLARSHIP, founded by the Faculty Wives Club of 
Lycoming College. An award of $50.00 to be given to a sophomore girl during 
the second semester of each year. Recipient to be chosen by a committee 
of the Faculty Wives Club. 



Endowments and Scholarships 111 

PRIZES 

THE RICH PRIZE of $25.00, given in honor of the late Hon. and Mrs. M. 
B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to the student in the Freshman Class who shall 
attain a required rank highest in scholarship and deportment. 

THE METZLER PRIZE of $10.00 for superior work in Junior English, given 
by the late Rev. Oliver Sterling Metzler, of the Central Pennsylvania Con- 
ference. 

THE RICH PRIZES of $10.00 and $5.00 each, given in honor of the late 
Hon. and Mrs. M. B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to be awarded to the two stu- 
dents who at a public contest shall excel in reading the Scriptures. 

THE RICH PRIZES of $15.00 and $10.00 each, given in honor of the late 
Hon. and Mrs. M. B. Rich, of Woolrich, Pa., to be awarded to the two stu- 
dents who shall excel in writing and delivering an original oration. 

THE FACULTY PRIZE, awarded to that day student whose scholastic record 
has been satisfactory and who, in the opinion of the faculty, has been out- 
standing in the promotion of school spirit through participation in school 
activities. 

THE 1930 DART PRIZE, the interest on $300.00 to be given to that student 
or students in the Art Department according to the recommendation of the 
Head of the Art Department. 

THE KAPPA DELTA RHO FRATERNITY PRIZE of $25.00 to that college 
organization which during the past year best exemplified an ideal of Kappa 
Delta Rho; athletic prowess, social grace, or intellectual achievement. Awarded 
by a majority vote of the brothers, in June. 

THE WILLIAMSPORT CIVIC CHOIR PRIZE, to be awarded to that mem- 
ber of Lycoming Choir who in the judgment of the director, the choir members, 
and the faculty shall have demonstrated through his choir activity, his loyalty 
to the ideals of Lycoming College. 

AN AWARD BY THE PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUB- 
LIC ACCOUNTANTS to the senior judged to be the best accountant in terms 
of scholarship, personality, and qualities of leadership. 

THE PHI ALPHA THETA SENIOR KEY, presented by the Lycoming College 
Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honorary fraternity, to the 
graduating Senior who has maintained the highest average in the field of history 
among those who have completed at least twenty-one semester hours in that 
subject. 

THE PHI ALPHA THETA SOPHOMORE KEY, presented by the Lycoming 
College Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the national history honorary fraternity, 
to the Sophomore who has the highest average in the field of history among those 
who have completed the survey courses in that subject. 

THE DON LINCOLN LARRABEE LAW PRIZE of $100.00 to be awarded 
to that student in recognition of superior scholarship in the study of Business 
Law. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Honorary Degrees Conferred 



Lloyd Christ Wicke, D.D 1956 

Bishop, The Methodist Church 
Pittsburgh Area 

Pauline Frederick, HH.D 1956 

News Analyst, National Broadcasting 
Company, Inc. 

Victor Blake Hann, HH.D 1956 

Superintendent, The Methodist Home for Children 
Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania 

James Walter Sterling, Litt.D 1956 

Associate Professor (Emeritus) of English 
Lycoming College 

Harold Crawford Walters, D.D.* 1956 

President of the Conference 

The Methodist Church, Great Britain 

Ferdinand Sigg, D.D 1956 

Bishop, The Methodist Church 
Geneva Area 

Walter Earl Ledden, D.D 1957 

Bishop, The Methodist Church 
Syracuse Area 

Harry E. Humphreys, Jr., HH.D 1957 

President and Chairman of the Board 
United States Rubber Company 

Frank E. Masland, Jr., HH.D 1957 

President 

C. H. Masland and Sons 

George R. Lamade, Litt.D 1957 

President 

Grit Publishing Company 

John E. Person, Litt.D 1957 

President 
Sun-Gazette Company 

Mrs. Mae O. Bamber, Litt.D 1958 

Mayor 

Southport, Lancashire, England 

Howard Thomas Brinton, D.D 1958 

Missionary, The Methodist Church 
Belgian Congo, Africa 

114 



Honorary Degrees Conferred 115 

Ralph J. Bunche, L.H.D 1958 

Under-Secretary Without Department 
United Nations 

William T. Piper, HH.D 1958 

President 

Piper Aircraft Corporation 

Robert F. Rich, LL.D 1958 

President, Woolrich Woolen Mills 

President, Board of Directors, Lycoming College 

George Shuman, Jr., LL.D 1958 

Financial Vice-President and Treasurer 
Dickinson College 

Joseph Szczepkowski, D.D 1959 

General Superintendent of the Polish 
Methodist Church 

Malcolm V. Mussina, D.D 1959 

Executive Secretary, The Board of Education 
Central Pennsylvania Annual Conference 
The Methodist Church 

Edwin Crever Dunning, L.H.D 1959 

Assistant Professor of Voice and Opera 
San Jose State College 

Frederick Voris Follmer, LL.D 1959 

Judge, United States District Court 
Middle District of Pennsylvania 

Conway W. Dickson, LL.D 1959 

Attorney-at-Law 
Berwick 

Maud Keister Jenson, D.D I960 

Missionary, The Methodist Church 
Korea 

Charles Yrigoyen, D.D 1960 

Pastor, Arch Street Methodist Church 
Philadelphia 

Francis R. Geigle, L.H.D 1960 

Executive Vice-President 
Northern Illinois University 

Charles Coolidge Parlin, LL.D 1960 

Attorney-at-Law 

Shearman and Sterling and Wright, New York City 

( Positions indicated were those held by Honorary Alumni 
at time degrees were awarded ) 
Deceased 



Bachelors Degrees Conferred 



CLASS OF 1960 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 



Douglas Neal Akers 

George Rudolph Alt 

Margaret June Amoss 

John Neill Armstrong, Jr. 

John James Audet, Jr. 

Helen Elizabeth Axman 

Warren Arthur Baker 

Stanley James Bassett 

John Albert Bausinger 

Lois Dangle Beach 

Ann Harper Bender 

William Edward Berkheiser, Jr. 

Charles Henry Berry 

Franklin Horatio Bird 

Catharine Ann Bosworth 

Robert Nelson Bowser 

Florence Burt Brush 

Reed Carrington 

Henry Wallace Codd 

Mary Lu Connolly 

Eugene Emanuel Cook 

Walter G. Cyphers 

William Herman Damaska 

Wilmer Fell Davis, Jr. 

Ints Delgalvis 

John Anthony Donaldson 

James Eugene Ennis 

Larry LeRoy Eshelman 

Janet Dittmar Farley 



James R. Farrell 
William Dean Fox 
Leo Albert Glunk 
Richard John Handley 
Carol Ann Hane 
Philip Henry Houser 
James Henry Kalkstein 
Arthur Berdell Kline, Jr. 
Donald Norris Kohlhaas 
Judith Anne Kramer 
Jan David Kuczma 
Eleanor Ruth Layton 
Robert LeRoy Long 
Averill Lee Lowell 
Thomas Jefferson Lowell 
John Raymond Maiolo 
Gertrude Ann McKelvey 
Harold Ellis McKelvey 
Norman Bret Medow 
Lawrence Edward Merle 
Nancy Jane Moff 
Raymond Lester Morris, Jr. 
William Camden Moser 
Jane Kay Pauling 
Darrell Colebrook Peckham 
Richard Warren Phillips 
JoAnne Elsie Poe 
James Henry Poulliott 
Richard Leroy Raudabaugh 



116 



Bachelors Degrees Conferred 



117 



John Stewart Renn 
Paul Nevel Rickolt 
Barbara Thomas Roller 
Harry William Ryder 
George Charles Schlesinger 
Barbara Ann Shempp 
Gary Thomas Simpkins 
Samuel Conrad Speidel 
Marlin Robert Strohecker 



Eileen Margaret Taylor 
Kenneth Robert Thomas 
Marlin Amos Thomas 
Thomas Joseph Wall 
Daniel Cyril Ward 
Alton Daniel Whitley, Jr. 
James Lee Williams 
Barbara Neff Youngman 
Charles Ludwig Youngman 



CLASS OF 1960 



Bachelor of 



Fred Joseph Agnello 
Beverlee Eugenie Arnds 
Edgar Raymond Baker 
Mary Jo Bigley 
Ann Sue Bingaman 
Harold Eugene Bower 
James Ray Bragonier 
Roger Charles Briess 
Joseph Dean Brungard 
James Terry Bullock 
William Lobbett Burdick 
Leland John Calistri 
Donald Laverne Cassel 
Robert Ernest Chianelli 
Patricia Jennings Codd 
John Robert Cox 
Thomas Joseph Donovan 
Harvey C. Eby, Jr. 
Jack Wendall Eyer 
Mark Twain Fishel 
Natalie Ann Franke 
Albert Clayton Good 
Wayne Lewis Green 



Science Degree 

John Philip Grier 
Charles Woodward Griggs 
Arthur Anthony Haberberger 
Charles Frederick Harris, Jr. 
Ivan Lee Hartman 
Dale Monroe Hill 
John David Hoffman 
Mary Shipley Hoffman 
Donald James Holler 
James David Holman 
James Maxwell Hopkins 
Donna Smith Houser 
William Bruce Jones 
Herbert Gage Kane 
Richard Lee Karschner 
Frank Oliver Keely, III 
Isabel Kathryn Keliher 
Dolores May Keller 
Robert Lyle King 
Donald Martin Kohler 
Robert Anthony Kranz 
Richard Henry Kuntz 
Patricia Ellen Lewis 



118 



Lycoming College Bulletin 



Richard Heath Lloyd 
Helen Annette Macensky 
Eleanor Josephine Martino 
Keith Eugene Mauery 
Jay Henry McCormick 
David Freemont McCready 
Kenneth Graham McDaniel 
Steward Michael McMinn 
Gary Mehrl Neights 
Shirley Ann Ostrander 
Alfred Herbert Peterson 
Albert Jesse Pompeo 
Phyllis Lee Potter 
George Lynn Poust 
Lewis William Price 
Rollin Charles Price 
Rocco Robert Ragano 
Charles Edward Receski 
Robert Franklin Remaley 
Frederick David Rhinehelder 
Barbara Sue Robinson 
Floyd Arnold Roller 

Thomas 



Walter Raymond Ross 
Allan Lowell Rotter 
Herman Dale Ryder 
Sylvia Irene Searfoss 
Gladys Gribbroek Seeling 
Hugh Hastings Sides 
Gertrude Peters Sommers 
Janice Mary Stebbins 
Donald Franklin Steele 
William Ronald Steger 
Kay Joyce Stenger 
Albert Johnson Stevens, III 
Robert Louis Stevens 
Raymond Kenneth Stone, Jr. 
Fred Barry Thomas 
Leroy William Thompson 
Ronald Edward Thompson 
Burke Richard Veley 
Donald Joseph Warrington 
Robert Monroe Whipple 
Peter MacMichael Wickert 
George Hosterman Wilson 
Mahlon Winder 



INDEX 



Index 



PACE 

Accrediting 1 

Activity Fee 103 

Administrative Assistants 19 

Administrative Staff 12 

Admissions Office 47 

Admissions Policy 44 

Admissions Requirements 46 

Advanced Standing 46 

Alcoholic Beverages 38 

Alumni Association 8 

Application Procedure 44, 102 

Art 62, 103 

Attendance 50 

Automobiles 39 

Bachelors Degrees Conferred 116 

Biology 64 

Board of Directors 10 

Books and Supplies 103 

Business Administration 65 

Calendar 5 

Calendar, Academic 6 

Campus Clubs and 

Organizations 29 

Campus Life 27 

Chapel 53 

Chemistry 70 

Classification of Students 48 

College Entrance Examination 

Board Tests 45 

College Honors 31 

College Publications and 

Communications 4, 29 

Contents 3 

Cooperative Curricula 56 

Counselling Program 35 

Courses 62 

Art 62 

Biology 64 

Business Administration 65 

Chemistry 70 

Economics 71 

Education 74 

English 76 



PAGE 

French 78 

Geology 79 

German 79 

Greek 80 

History 81 

Mathematics 83 

Music 85 

Philosophy 89 

Physical Education 90 

Physics 91 

Political Science 92 

Psychology 94 

Religion 95 

Russian 96 

Sociology 97 

Spanish 99 

Speech 100 

Cultural Influences 28 

Curricula 55 

Damage Charges 105 

Degrees 51, 114 

Degrees Conferred 113 

Degree Requirements 51 

Deposit 102 

Discipline 37 

Discounts 106 

Dismissal 49 

Divisions 62 

Early Admission 46 

Economics 71 

Education 74 

Endowment 107 

Engineering 56 

English 76 

Evening Classes 46 

Expenses 102, 103 

Faculty 13 

Fees 102, 104 

Financial Aid 105 

Forestry 57 

Fraternities 30 

French 78 

Freshman Customs 34 



120 



Index 



121 



PAGE 

Geology 79 

German 79 

Grading System 48 

Graduation Requirements 49 

Grants-In-Aid 106 

Greek 80 

Guidance 35 

Health Services 41 

History 81 

History and Tradition 24 

Honorary Degrees Conferred 114 

Honors, College 31 

Honors, Individual 31 

Honor Societies 32 

Infirmary Service 41 

Insurance 41 

Intercollegiate Sports 34 

Intramural Athletics 35 

Loans 106 

Locale 26 

Major 53, 55 

Marriage 40 

Mathematics 83 

Medical Staff 19 

Music 85, 103 

Normal Student Load 50 

Organ 88 

Orientation 34, 53 

Overload 50, 102 

Payment of Fees 104 

Payments, Partial 104 

Philosophy 89 

Physical Education 53, 90 

Physical Examination 41 

Physics 91 

Piano 87 

Placement Service 35 

Political Science 92 

Prizes Ill 

Probation and Dismissal 49 

Programs and Rules 34 

Programs of Study 54 

American Civilization 55 



PAGE 

Preparation for Dental 

School 56 

Cooperative Curriculum 

in Engineering 56 

Cooperative Curriculum 

in Forestry 57 

Preparation for 

Law School 57 

Preparation for 

Medical School 58 

Preparation for 

Theological Seminary 58 
Curriculum in Religion and 

Religious Education 59 
Teacher Education: 

Secondary Education 59 

Elementary Education 59 

Business Administration 60 

Medical Technology 61 

Psychology 94 

Purpose and Objectives 22 

Refunds 105 

Regulations 38 

Religion 95 

Religious Traditions 25 

Requirements: 

English Composition 51 

Foreign Languages 51 

Residence 36 

Russian 96 

Scholarships 106, 107 

Social and Cultural Influences .... 28 

Sociology 97 

Spanish 99 

Speech 100 

Standards 48 

Student Activities 27 

Student Government 27 

Student Publications 29 

Students, Classifications of 48 

Summer Sessions 6, 46 

Table of Contents 3 

Tradition 24, 25 

Veterans, Provisions for 36 

Withdrawals 105 

Workshops 106 



Preliminary Enrollment Blank 
Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 



Date 

Name 

Address 

Phone Number Sex Age 

Years of High School Work Completed 

Name of High School 

College Work Completed (If any) 

When do you expect to enter Lycoming? 

Which curriculum do you wish to study? 

If a veteran, check Public Law under which you are eligible 
for training: 550 894 



Mail appropriate blank to: 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

LYCOMING COLLEGE, WILLIAMSPORT, PA. 



Application for Admission to Summer Sessions 
Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Name 

Address 

is a student in good standing at 

College 

Location 

and has permission to enroll in the following courses at Lycoming College: 

Semester Hours 



Signed 

Date Dean or Registrar 





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