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Full text of "Lycoming College catalog"

Lycoming 
College 



1976-1977 




Lycoming 
College 



Lycoming enjoys a continuing and 
mutually supportive relationship with 
The United Methodist Church. The principal 
aim of Lycoming College is to use its 
resources to provide for its students the 
finest undergraduate educational 
opportunity attainable. 

Williamsport, Pennsylvania 17701 
Phone 717-326-1951 



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THIS IS LYCOMING 




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GOALS FOR LYCOMING 

Lycoming enjoys a continuing and mutually supportive relationship with 
The United Methodist Church. It has consistently supported the Methodist 
tradition of providing educational opportunities for persons of all religious 
faiths. Within this setting of religious concern, the search for values must 
continue to be an importa-nt function of this institution. 

THE PRINCIPAL AIM OF THE COLLEGE 

The principal aim of Lycoming College is to use its resources to provide for 
its students the finest undergraduate educational opportunity available. The 
College serves primarily to help each student develop a central core of 
values, awarenesses, strategies, skills, and information that is integrated 
and coherent enough to lead to a productive and fulfilling life in an enor- 
mously complex world, and at the same time is sufficiently open and flexible 
to encourage continuous growth and development. 



4 /THIS IS LYCOMING 



HISTORY 

Founded in 1 8 1 2 as Williamsport Academy, it is the oldest educational in- 
stitution in the city of Williamsport. At first, the Academy served only the 
young through what are now recognized as the elementary grades. With the 
advent of public schools in the city, the Academy expanded its curncular 
offerings to include high school and college preparatory work. 

In 1848, under the patronage of The Methodist Episcopal Church, the 
Academy became Williamsport Dickinson Seminary. The Seminary con- 
tinued as a private boarding school until 1 929 when once again its offerings 
were expanded, this time to include two years of college work. This expan- 
sion resulted in change of the institution's name to Williamsport Dickinson 
Seminary and Junior College. Durings its years as a junior college under 
President John W. Long, the institution forged a strong academic reputa- 
tion, strengthened its faculty, and expanded its physical plant. 

Increasing national demands for higher education following World War II 
prompted another significant step in the growth of the institution. In 1 948, 
the junior college became Lycoming College, a four-year degree-granting 
college of liberal arts and sciences. 

The College has enjoyed the support and stabilizing influence of The United 
Methodist Church for more than a century. During most of that period the 
corporate stock of this institution was owned by the Preachers' Aid Society 
of the Central Pennsylvania Conference. In 1 970 all corporate stock was 
transferred to a self-perpetuating Board of Trustees of Lycoming College. 

Lycoming is approved to grant baccalaureate degrees by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education. The College is accredited by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools and the University Senate 
of The United Methodist Church. It is a member of the National Commission 
on Accrediting, the Association of American Colleges, the Pennsylvania 
Association of Colleges and Universities, the Commission for Independent 
Colleges and Universities, and the National Association of Schools and 
Colleges of The United Methodist Church. 

The name Lycoming is derived from an Indian word "lacomic" meaning 
"Great Stream". It is a name that has been common to north central Penn- 
sylvania since colonial times. 




THIS IS LYCOMING/ 5 




THIS IS LYCOMING 

Lycoming is a coeducational liberal arts college with a student body of 
1.300, approximately 800 men and 500 women. A United Methodist 
related institution, Lycoming is open to students regardless of their 
religious, racial, or national backgrounds. 

At Lycoming it is believed that a liberal arts education is the best hope for an 
enlightened citizenry and that vocational and professional specialization 
must be built on a broad acquaintance with the various disciplines. 
Programs are arranged within a liberal arts framework so that all students 
study the humanities, sciences, and social sciences. 

Beyond the level of general education, the College stresses the pursuit of a 
major. This presses you to achieve competency in a more limited area and 
encourages greater depth and sense of academic achievement. The major 
relates to increased understanding of yourself and your world; it leads both 
to graduate school and to vocation. Majors are not confined to single 
departments of the College; increasingly they are interdepartmental in 
nature, thus permitting the student a wider range of experience in related 
fields. A wide variety of individualized opportunities are also available and 
are described elsewhere in this catalog under "Special Opportunities." 

LOCATION 

Lycoming College, in scenic North Central Pennsylvania ninety miles north 
of Harnsburg. is set upon a slight prominence neardowntown Williamsport 
overlooking the beautiful West Branch Valley of the Susquehanna River. 
Greater Williamsport, with a population of 85,000, is within 200 miles of 
Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Syracuse, Rochester. Buf- 
falo, and Pittsburgh. It is easily accessible by bus. airline, and automobile. 
Interstate 80 passes fifteen miles south of Williamsport; U.S. Routes 1 5 and 
220 come through the city. 



ADMISSIONS 



ADMISSION POLICY 

Lycoming College welcomes applications from prospective students 
regardless of age. sex, race, religious preference, financial resources, color, 
national or ethnic origin. We believe that a diversity in background is indeed 
one of the strengths of our student body and is consistent with the broader 
implications of a liberal arts education. 

This policy is in compliance with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act of 1 964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1 972, and all 
other applicable federal, state and local statutes, ordinances and 
regulations. 

Selective admission is based on academic achievement reflected in high 
school records, class rank, and ACT or SAT scores. In addition, subjects 
studied, counselor and teacher recommendations, and other available in- 
formation that might identify qualified candidates are considered. 

ADMISSION STANDARDS 

1 . You should graduate from an approved secondary school or f u If i 1 1 the re- 
quirements for early admission. 

2. Although a set pattern of high school subjects is not required, a strong 
program of academic subjects is recommended as the most desirable 
preparation for college. You should have a minimum of fifteen academic 
units with substantial work in the areas of English and mathematics, and 
additional work in foreign language, social studies, and science. 

3. The College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test or American College Test is 
required. Your scores are considered with otheracademic information. 

SELECTION PROCESS 

You should file your application between October 1st and May 1st. 
However, your application may be considered after May 1st, if space is 
available. 

Candidates for admission are considered on an individual basis and in a per- 
sonal way. Although emphasis is placed on test scores, class rankand other 
statistical information, much time is devoted to reading your application. 
Transcripts are also evaluated and phone calls and letters are sometimes ex- 
changed in an effort to determine your special talents and qualities. 

The College notifies applicants of acceptance on a rolling schedule. Your 
notification letter will be sent soon after your credentials have been receiv- 
ed. In some instances, it may be necessary to requestyour senior mid-year 
grades and senior ACT or SAT score reports. Your decision to attend Lycom- 
ing must be made on or before the Candidate's Reply Date of May 1 st. The 
College should be notified by payment of a $ 1 00.00 Deposit. After May 1 st, 
this deposit is non-refundable to students who fail to matriculate. For enroll- 
ing students, this is not an extra charge, but it is used to reserve a space at 
the College and will be applied towards the tuition charges for the first 
semester. 

7 



8/ADMISSIONS 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

1 . To apply for admission, you request the application forms from the Direc- 
tor of Admissions. 

2 These items must be submitted before you are considered for admission: 

A. Completed application form and fee of $15.whichisa processing fee 
and non-refundable. 

B. Official secondary school transcript, sent by the high school 
guidance office. 

C. Results from the American College Testing Program (ACT) or the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. 

3. You and your family are invited to campus for a student-conducted tour. 
At that time you will meet with an Admissions Office representative, who 
will provide additional information and answer any specific questions 
you may have. 

MEDICAL HISTORY AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

Each student entering the college is required to submit a medical history 
record and a physical examination form prior to arriving on the campus. A 
parent or guardian of each student under twenty-one years of age must sign 
the health record which authorizes the college health authorities to give 
emergency medical treatment according to good medical practice. In the 
event an operation or other treatment is required for a serious accident or il- 
lness, the College Physician will always secure prior parental consent if the 
circumstances permit. 




ADMISSIONS/9 



COURSE CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Advanced Placement 

If you are entering as a freshman, have studied an advanced course while in 
secondary school, and have taken the appropriate advanced placement ex- 
amination of the College Entrance Examination Board, you are encouraged 
to apply for credit and advanced placement. A grade of three or above is 
generally considered to be satisfactory. 

College Level Examination Program — (CLEPJ 

You may earn college credit for superior achievement on the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP) sponsored by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. By achieving at the 75th percentile or above on the General Ex- 
aminations and the 65th percentile or above on the Subject Examinations, 
you may earn up to fifty percent of the course reguirementsfor a bachelor of 
arts degree. These examinations are administered the third week of each 
month at regional testing locations around the nation. Further information 
may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. While these examinations 
may be taken after enrollment at the College, entering freshmen are en- 
couraged to take the examinations of their choice during the second 
semester of their senior year in high school. If you do so. the College will 
have the test scores prior to your registration. This will assure appropriate 
course credit prior to your selection of freshman courses. 



ADVANCED STANDING BY TRANSFER 

Lycoming College recognizes college level course work you have completed 
at other institutions. You must submit official copies of transcripts from all 
institutions you have attended. Your academic standing will be based on an 
evaluation of all courses taken. All courses passed, which are comparable to 
the curriculum at Lycoming, will be accepted for transfer. However, the final 
eight courses must be taken at Lycoming College. You must be in good 
academic standing with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 (C) to be 
considered for admission. 



EARLY ADMISSION 

Anumberofhigh schools have accelerated and enriched their programs to 
the degree that the advanced students may be intellectually and emotionally 
ready for the collegiate experience by the close of the junior year in high 
school. Lycoming College is willing to consider these students for admis- 
sion to the freshman class each year. 




EARLY ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

1 . Your high school counselor recommends you for early admission. 

2. Your parents approve the advancement as preferable to the senior yea rat 
the high school. 

3. After consultation between you. your parents, your school ad- 
ministrators, and College personnel, you complete the regular applica- 
tion procedure. 

4. You are admitted with full freshman standing. Atthe successful comple- 
tion of your freshman year, your high school receives a grade report from 
the College. The high school then usually awards its standard diploma. 

ADMISSION AS A SPECIAL STUDENT 

Persons who wish to take one or mo re courses and are not regularly enrolled 
at Lycoming may apply for admission to any term as a special student. 
Application forms are available from the Admissions Office. 

PROVISIONS FOR VETERANS 

Lycoming is fully approved for the educational program for veterans under 
Federal Public Laws 550, 634, and 894. 

ADMISSIONS OFFICE 

The Admissions Office is located on the first floor of Long Hall. For an ap- 
pointment please write or call the Admissions Office. The telephone number 
is Wilhamsport 717 326-1951. 

Office hours are: 

Weekdays — September through April 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

— May through August 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Saturdays — September through May 9:00 a.m. to noon 

— June through August No Saturday Hours. 

10 



ADMISSIONS/ 1 7 



ORIENTATION 

The orientation program at Lycoming is designed to help the student enter- 
ing college for the first time to start this new adventure under the most 
favorable circumstances. An entirely new concept of courses, class 
scheduling, and methods of instruction must be assimilated. Adjustments to 
this new experience are important. 

In order to prepare you for the beginning of this experience, Lycoming 
schedules four orientation sessions lasting two and one half days during the 
summer. Each new student is required to attend one of these sessions ac- 
companied by at least one parent. 

The summer program makes it possible to schedule ample time for 
academic advisement, placement testing, and registration. The college is 
able to work more satisfactorily with you in planning programs of study 
tailored to your vocational and academic interests. You complete all 
preliminaries, including registration, during the summer orientation period. 
Textbooks are available for purchase and perusal prior to the opening of 
classes in the fall. 

Information about the dates of orientation sessions and a pre-registration 
form will be mailed to you when you have confirmed your admission to 
Lycoming College. 

In addition to the required orientation program, an extended five-day volun- 
tary orientation experience is provided during the summer. These five-day 
sessions are an abbreviated adaptation of the Outward Bound program. 

Groups of ten students, each under the leadership of two qualified instruc- 
tors, learn to appreciate and extend their abilitytoaccomplish personal and 
group objectives, and increase their own sense of self-esteem. The sessions 
take place in the wild country of North Central Pennsylvania, within a radius 
of 50 miles of Wilhamsport. 



Information regarding Explo wil 
Orientation material. 



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FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



EXPENSES 

Lycoming recognizes the problem of constantly increasing educational 
costs and offers a substantial program of financial aid to assist those 
needing help to attend an excellent private coeducational college. 

If you are academically qualified you should not hesitate to apply to Lycom- 
ing College solely because of financial need. At Lycoming, we make every ef- 
fort to assure that qualified students are not barred due to their limited 
resources. 

The expenses listed below have been kept as low as possible through 
regular voluntary contributions from alumni and friends plus income from 
invested endowment funds. This gift income has permitted Lycoming to 
develop a well-qualified academic community and to continually improve its 
excellent facilities. 

Thus at Lycoming you will receive much more than any fees you pay would 
buy — a rare bargain in today's economy. And if our "bargain" price is still 
beyond your means, our financial aid office will assist you as much as possi- 
ble, as outlined beginning on page 17. 

GENERAL EXPENSES FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1977-1978 

The Comprehensive Fee at Lycoming is $1,350.00 per semester, plus 
special charges which are listed on the following pages. A residence hall 
room costs $300.00 per semester. Board is $350.00 per semester. If, for 
justifiable reason, it is impossible for a student to eat in the College Dining 
Room, permission may be granted to make other meal arrangements. If you 
request the use of a double room as a single room, an available room costs 
more than its regular rate. 

The comprehensive fee covers the regular load of three or four unit courses 
each semester. If there should be a considerable increase in the price of 
commodities and /or services during any semester, the College reserves the 
right to make appropriate increases in the charges for the following 
semester. Additional detailed information will be furnished by the 
Treasurer's Office upon request. 

13 



7 4 / FINANCIA L INFORM A TION 



APPLICATION FEE AND DEPOSITS 

All students applying for admissions are required to send an application fee 
of $ 1 5.00 with the application. This charge is to defray the costs of process- 
ing the application and maintaining academic records and it is non- 
refundable. 

After you are notified that you have been accepted for admission by the 
College, you are required to make a deposit of $100.00. This deposit is 
evidence of your good intention to matriculate and is applicable to the 
general charges of your first semester in attendance; it is not an extra fee. 
This deposit is not refundable if you fail to matriculate at Lycoming. 

All resident students are required to make an additional Room Security 
Deposit of $50.00. If, as a resident student, you are not assessed for any 
damage to your room in the residence hall, the Room Security Deposit is ful- 
ly refunded when you no longer live in the residence hall. This deposit is not 
refundable if you fail to matriculate at Lycoming. 

EXPENSES IN DETAIL PER SEMESTER — 1977-1978 

The College reserves the right to adjust fees at any time. 

One-Time Fees and Deposits 

Resident Students Non-Resident Students 

$ 15.00 Application Fee $ 15.00 

$ 100.00 Admission Deposit $ 100.00 

$ 50.00 Room Security Deposit 

Per Semester (1977-1978) 

$1,350.00 Comprehensive Fee $1,350.00 

$ 300.00 Room 

$ 350.00 Board 



$2,000.00 Basic Cost $1,350.00 

Fees For Part-Time Students 

Application Fee $ 1 5.00 

Each Unit Course $ 300.00 

Additional Charges 

Fifth Unit Course $ 340.00 

Laboratory Fee per Unit Course $5.00 to $ 30.00 

Applied Music Fee (Half-Hour per Week per Semester) $ 50.00 

Practice Teaching Fee (Payable in Junior Year) $ 1 00.00 

Transcript Fee (No Charge for First Transcript) $ 1 .00 

Cap and Gown (Rental at Prevailing Cost) 

R.O.T.C. Basic Course Deposit ' $ 30.00 

R.O.T.C. Advanced Course Deposit $ 30.00 

Late Registration or Late Payment Fee $ 25.00 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION/ 15 



BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 

A book and supply store is conveniently located in Wertz Student Center. 
The estimated cost ranges from $7 5.00 to $ 1 50.00 per year depending on 
the course of study which you pursue. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

The basic fees for each semester are due and payable ten days before the 
beginning of that semester. 

PARTIAL PAYMENTS 

For the convenience of those who find it impossible to follow the schedule of 
payments as listed, arrangements may be made with the College Treasurer 
for the monthly payment of college fees through various educational plans. 
Additional information concerning partial payments may be obtained from 
the Treasurer or Director of Admissions. 

WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

The date on which the Dean of the College approves the student's 
withdrawal form is considered the official date of withdrawal. In the case of 
minors, the approval of the parent or guardian is required before the 
withdrawal is approved and before any refund is made. 




7 6 / FINA NCI A L INF OR MA TION 



Room charges are fixed on a semester basis. If you leave college pnortothe 
end of a semester you will not be entitled to any refund of room charges. 

Refund of tuition and board will be made to students who withdraw volun- 
tarily from the college while in good standing and is fixed on the following 
basis: Students leaving during the first four-week period are charged thirty 
percent; during the second four weeks, sixty percent; during the third four 
weeks, ninety percent; after twelve weeks, full charge. 

Dropping a unit course from the original schedule after the first week of 
either semester will not justify any claim for refund of tuition charges. No re- 
fund will be made to those students who are asked to withdraw from the 
college. Special charges cannot be refunded for any reason whatever. 

PENALTY FOR NON-PAYMENT OF FEES 

You will not be registered for courses in a new semester if your account for 
previous attendance has not been settled. No grades will be issued, no 
diploma, transcript of credits, or certification of withdrawal in good stan- 
ding will be granted to any student until a satisfactory settlement of all 
obligations has been made. 

DAMAGE CHARGES 

Wherever possible, damage to dormitory property will be charged to the 
person or persons directly responsible. Damage and breakage occurring in 
a room will be the responsibility of students occupying the room. Halls and 
bathroom damage will be the responsibility of all students of the section 
where damage occurs. Actual costs of repairs will be charged. 




FINANCIAL AID 



In considering the financing of your col lege education both the expenses in- 
volved and the various methods of meeting them should be considered 
simultaneously. At Lycoming, if you need financial aid. a generous program 
of assistance can help to lower your out-of-pocket cost significantly. 

Since you will be the primary beneficiary of your higher education, we feel 
you should assume part of the responsibility for paying your college ex- 
penses. You can do this by saving, working, and borrowing. We expectyou 
to make every effort to obtain financial support from such outside sources 
as state and local grants, company scholarships for employee's children, 
and other funds you may be eligible to receive. 

A student's parents are often an important source of financial help. Some 
families of modest means can give only moral support, but most also can 
give substantial financial help. We are eager to help you and your parents to 
meet your educational expenses at Lycoming but expect each family to pay 
asmuchasitcan reasonably afford and at least as much as other families in 
similar financial circumstances. 

The establishment of need is the controlling factor in determining the 
amount of any financial aid. A scholarship may be awarded on the basis of 
financial need and academic ability, while a grant is given on the basis of 
financial need alone. Long term, low cost educational loans are availableto 
most students who need them from Federal and State sources. If your 
academic standing is satisfactory, a portion of your college expenses can be 
earned by part-time work. 

Financial need is determined by deducting what you and your parents can 
reasonably contribute toward your education from the actual cost of atten- 
ding Lycoming College. You are eligible to be considered for financial aid up 
to the part of the costs wh+ch it is impossible for you to provide. Your family's 
total financial situation is judged. Not only gross income and net assets are 
considered, but also the number of dependent children, unusual medical 
expenses, marital status of parents, brothers or sisters attending college, 
and other pertinent data. 

To apply for financial assistance, obtain the "Parents Confidential State- 
ment" form from your high school guidance counselor or the Financial Aid 
Office at Lycoming. Submit the completed "Parents Confidential Statement" 
to the College Scholarship Service, P.O. Box 176, Princeton. New Jersey 
08540, at the earliest convenient date. 

17 



; 8 /FINANCIAL INFORM A TION 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



A number of scholarships are awarded to freshman applicants who are in 
the top fifth of their high school class and have a combined score over 1 200 
in the College Entrance Board Tests. The scholarships rangefrom $300to 
full tuition depending upon the student's financial need. These scholarships 
are renewed each year if the student maintains a 3.0 cumulative average 
and financial need continues. There are a numberof Freshman Recognition 
Scholarships of $700.00 each awarded to applicants who have superior 
academic qualifications but do not demonstrate any financial need. These 
scholarships are only for the student's first year at Lycoming. 

GRANTS-IN-AID 

For worthy students who can not qualify for scholarships, Lycoming has an 
extensive program of grants-in-aid up to full tuition. Awards are based on 
demonstrated need and the prospect of the student contributing positively 
to the college community. Renewal requires continued financial need, 
maintenance of satisfactory academic and citizenship standards, and par- 
ticipation in college activities. 

MINISTERIAL GRANTS-IN-AID 

Each applicant for a ministerial grant-in-aid should complete the College 
Scholarship Service form. If there is demonstrated need for more financial 
assistance than a ministerial grant-in-aid will provide, additional types of aid 
will be considered. The ministerial grant-in-aid will be part of a total award to 
meet a demonstrated need — it will not be given in addition to awards which 
will meet established needs. 

Children of ministers of the Central Pennsylvania Annual Conference of The 
United Methodist Church receive grants equal to one-third of the charges 
for tuition. 

Children of ministers of other Annual Conferences of The United Methodist 
Church and of other denominations receive grants equal to one-fourth of 
the charges for tuition. 

Students preparing for the Christian ministry receive grants equal to one- 
fourth of the charges for tuition. They must satisfactorily complete the 
application for pre-m in isteria I discount, file an application for financial a id, 
and demonstrate financial need. 



FEDERAL BASIC EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS 
(BEOG) 

The Educational Amendments of 1972 established this new program of 
basic grants up to $1,400.00 per year for full time students which are 
granted on the basis of financial need. Separate applications to the Federal 
government is required. These applications are available from high school 
guidance offices and from the Financial Aid Office. All students should apply 
for the BEOG program. 



FINANCIAL INFORMATION/ 19 



FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
GRANTS (SEOG) 

This is a Federal program to provide additional assistance to those students 
with heavy financial need. Awards are made of $200.00 to $ 1 ,500.00 and 
are based entirely on financial need. Renewal is available if the applicant has 
no reduction in financial need in succeeding years. 

FEDERAL NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS (NDSL) 

Federal loan funds are available under the National Defense Education Act 
of 1958. Loans up to $1,000.00 per year are granted on the basis of 
academic promise and demonstrated need. Repayment does not begin until 
after graduation or withdrawal. Loans are normally renewed yearly if the 
applicant files a renewal application by May 1st. 

FEDERAL COLLEGE WORK-STUDY GRANTS (CWSP) 

An opportunity is provided for students to earn some part of their College 
expenses and gain some practical experience from working oncampusorm 
selected off-campus programs. The Federal income guidelines must be met 
to be eligible for work-study awards. There are opportunities for campus 
employment for those students who can not meet the Federal guidelines but 
who desire employment; these students should file an application with the 
Placement Office. 




20 /FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



OTHER SOURCES OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

OTHER GRANTS 

All applicants for financial aid are strongly urged to investigate programs 
sponsored by their home state and to apply before the deadline. Penn- 
sylvania applicants should apply for state aid before the deadline (normally 
January 30th) during their senior year in high school. See your guidance 
counselor or write: P.H.E.A.A., Towne House. Harris burg, Pa. 1 7 1 02. 

STATE GUARANTEED LOANS 

Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and most other states provide state 
guaranteed loans through local banks. This program provides long-term 
loans for educational expenses with repayments over an extended, liberal 
payment schedule. See your own bank early for information. 

COMMUNITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

In many communities there are local groups and foundations which provide 
funds to help worthy students. High school awards areoften available. Your 
guidance counselor and principal are the best sources of information. 

EDUCATION FINANCING PLANS 

In addition to direct financial aid described above, the Business Office or the 
Financial Aid Office will provide information, upon request, about plans 
enabling parents to pay college expenses on a monthly basis through 
selected companies. 

RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Students participating in the Army ROTC program a re eligible for three, two, 
and one year ROTC scholarships to finance tuition, books, lab fees, etc., with 
the exception of room and board. Scholarship students also receive 
$100.00 per month during the academic year. 

RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) PROGRAM 

Students participating in the Army ROTC program receive $100.00 per 
academic month of their junior and senior years. They also receive half a se- 
cond lieutenant's pay plus travel expenses for a six-week advanced summer 
camp between their junior and senior years. 

Additional information concerning financial aid can be obtained by writing 
to the Financial Aid Office, Lycoming College, Williamsport, Pa. 1 7701 . 



CAMPUS LIFE 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The College considers one of its responsibilities to be the encouragement of 
as many different activities as are necessary to provide all students with the 
opportunity to participate constructively in this area of student life. 
Departmental clubs; athletics, both intercollegiate and intramural; varied 
interest groups such as clubs, choir, band; social organizations; social ac- 
tivities; self-governing groups; and many informal associations are impor- 
tant in a well-integrated program of student activities. 

STUDENT ASSOCIATION OF LYCOMING COLLEGE 

The Student Association of Lycoming College is the channel through which 
students communicate with other students, administrators, and faculty. 
SALC is the organization which the college recognizes as the representative 
voice of all students. The SALC can be a forum where student concerns, 
needs, desires, and grievances can be discussed and effectively com- 
municated to the administration and faculty. 

The primary concern of SALC is the promotion of student involvement in 
college concerns. As one responsibility of SALC, its president appoints 
students to appropriate student/faculty and administrative committees and 
councils. They have the same individual voting privileges as faculty and ad- 
ministrators. Any interested student is eligible for appointment to these 
committees which play an important role in thefunctioning of theCollege. 

STUDENT UNION 

The Student Union Board is an advisory and functional group of students 
who work with an associate dean of students who helps develop the activity 
and social program. Students are selected for membership on the Board by 
indicating their interest in the program. 

The Board's services to the campus include poster making and publicity, a 
travel service, social programs, dances, lectures, concerts, picnics, films, 
tournaments, recreational activities, bridge, life-saving courses, coffee- 
house, and intercollegiate events. 

21 



22 /CAMPUS LIFE 




CAMPUS CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

A variety of organizations on the campus provide opportunities for social 
and intellectual growth. These groups are organized and conducted by 
students in cooperation with faculty sponsors or advisors. 

Some of the groups are: the Student P.S.E.A. — N.E.A., which gives prospec- 
tive teachers current information on the teaching field and an insight into 
the problems of education; the Sociology-Anthropology Club and the 
Criminal Justice Society for students in these areas of study; the Pre-Law 
Society for students interested in entering the legal profession; the Pre- 
Health Professions Club which includes those who a re planning to become 
doctors, dentists, veterinarians, and medical technologists; WAA, the 
women's athletic association; and the Congress of Black Students, among 
others. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS AND COMMUNICATIONS 

The Spectator, official student newspaper, is published periodically and is 
devoted to interests of the student body, reporting current cam pus events. 

The Arrow, college yearbook, is published annually and presents a record of 
student life during the previous academic year. 

The Pathfinder, published annually by the Dean of the College, presents a 
composite of academic options, procedures, regulations, and policies per- 
taining to the academic program. 

The Guidepost, published annually by the Office of Student Services, is a 
handbook of policies, regulations, and other information. 

The Residence Halls Handbook is published annually by the Office of Stu- 
dent Services and provides information about residence hall facilities, ac- 
tivities, governance, rules, and regulations. 

NOTE: The Pathfinder, the Guidepost. and the Residence Halls Handbook 
are important statements of official College policy and regulations which 
you will receive before you are required to confirm your acceptance of the 
College's offer of admission. 



CAMPUS LIFE/ 23 



The Academic Bulletin is published periodically by the Dean of the College 
to keep students, faculty, and administrators informed of academic affairs. 

The Lycoming, eight newspaper and two magazine editions yearly, informs 
alumni and friends about Lycoming. Students and faculty contribute ar- 
ticles. 

The Campus Radio Station, WRLC, broadcasts on FM to an area of ap- 
proximately 1 square miles. It is operated daily from 1 2 noon to 1 2 mid- 
night. 



FINE ARTS ACTIVITIES 

The Arena Theatre stages many productions throughout the year. You have 
an opportunity to enjoy serious drama, comedies, readings, recitals, and 
even marionette productions, or you can participate — from acting through 
all the behind-the-scene activities. 

Musical organizations at Lycoming offer to vocalists and instrumentalists 
alike a fine opportunity to learn by doing. The choir and the band tour an- 
nually in addition to performing on the campus. There are several choral 
groups and instrumental ensembles offering every able student the chance 
to participate. 

If you are interested in art you can work in many mediums. Many 
professional artists, lecturers, and performers exhibit and appear on cam- 
pus and in the area. 

FRATERNITIES 

Six Greek fraternities provide male students with the advantages of national 
fraternities. Activities of Kappa Delta Rho, Sigma Pi, Lambda Chi Alpha, 
Theta Chi, Alpha Sigma Phi, and Tau Kappa Epsilon are coordinated by I.F.C. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS 

The college offers an attractive program of intercollegiate athletics and en- 
courages wide participation by both men and women. It is a member of the 
National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Conference, and the Northern Division of the Middle Atlantic Conference. 
Lycoming annually meets some of the top-ranking small college teams in 
the East in athletic competition. Contests are scheduled in football, soccer, 
basketball, wrestling, swimming, tennis, golf, and track. A rapidly expanding 
intercollegiate program includes competition with women's teams of other 
colleges in field hockey, swimming, and tennis. 

INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 

An extensive and diversified program of intramural athletic competition af- 
fords an opportunity to participate in one or more sports of your choice. 

Sports include touch football, basketball, volleyball, softball. wrestling for 
me. The Women's Athletic Association operates an intramural program in 
softball. basketball, and volleyball. 



24 /CAMPUS LIFE 



STUDENT SERVICES 

The Office of Student Services is concerned with various aspects of your 
development. On the staff of the Dean of Student Services are three 
associates, each of whom live on campus and are available for counseling 
and advising students with individual problems. In addition, each staff 
member is responsible for specific assignments such as: Religious Ac- 
tivities, Health Service, Organizational Life, Student Activities, the Student 
Union, Housing, Special Programs, Career Counseling and Placement. 

PERSONAL COUNSELING 

The Dean of Student Services and his staff provide advisement and counsel- 
ing for students with emotional and adjustment problems. Each member of 
the staff is qualified to give assistance of a non-therapeutic type. A psy- 
chiatrist serves as a consultant to the staff and is available for evaluation of 
students who may be in need of professional services. Continuing therapy is 
available only through referral to public agencies and private clinicians in 
the community. When a student uses the services of a private clinician he is 
responsible for the payment of his own fees. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The College maintains an out-patient service, located in Rich Hall, which is 
staffed with a registered nurse five days a week from 9:00a.m.to5:00p.m. 
When the Health Service is closed, emergency care is available at the 
Emergency Rooms of both local hospitals. The College pays theemergency 
room charge and the emergency room physician's fee for illness only. The 
student is responsible for other charges. 

The College physician is available from 1 1 :00 a.m. to 1 2:00 noon Monday 
through Friday at the Health Service and on call at other hours through the 
nurses. Normal medical treatment by the Health Service staff at the College 
Health Service is free of charge. However, special medications, x-rays, sur- 
gery, care of major accidents, immunizations, examinations for glasses, 
physician's visits other than in the Health Service, referrals for treatment by 
specialists, and special nursing service, etc., are not included in the free 
health service. The student must payfor a visit to thedoctor's private office. 

STUDY SKILLS PROGRAM 

A series of professionally directed study-skills sessions are scheduled as the 
need arises. Groups of six to ten students are enrolled for a series of three 
one-hour sessions. These include sessions on scheduling of time, test- 
taking, note-taking, and a method of study. 

READING IMPROVEMENT COURSE 

A course designed to improve reading skills is offered atvanous times dur- 
ing the academic year. Skilled instructors teach how to improve reading 
speed and comprehension in short courses which span a three-week 
period. If you are deficient in reading skills, you may sign up for this course 
on a voluntary basis. The charge is $ 1 5.00. Information is sent to students 
during the summer. 



CAMPUS LIFE/ 25 



CAREER DEVELOPMENT CENTER 

The Career Development Center provides a variety of services to help each 
student in preparing for a meaningful career. 

At Lycoming, we believe that many students need, and can be assisted in 
developing, realistic long-range educational and careergoals. Beginning in 
the students' freshman year, the Career Development Center attempts to 
help them resolve questions that are important but often puzzling and 
perplexing. "What are my interests, abilities and needs? What major should I 
select? What are the career trends and employment outlooks? What can I do 
to better prepare for employment in my chosen field?" All freshmen are 
strongly encouraged to avail themselves of individual counseling with a 
career counselor. Career planning seminars in value clarification, skill 
assessment, and decision making are supportive of thefreshman program. 

In today's labor market, it is imperative that students have the opportunity to 
explore a variety of career avenues. Lycoming's program encourages such 
investigation through a comprehensive and up-to-date career library, 
video-cassette presentations, newsletters, a speaker's program which 
brings people from various career specialties to the campus weekly to talk 
with students. First-hand exploration of different occupations and 
professions is afforded by the SHARE (Students Having A Real Experience) 
and internship programs. Participating students observe and work with 
professional and other specialists on a daily basis fora period of time, giving 
students a real insight into the problems and solutions that characterize a 
particular field. 

During the student's senior year, the Career Development Center plays an 
active role in assisting seniors to secure employment or admission to 
graduate or professional school. Thirty-four placement services are provid- 
ed to assist seniors in implementing their career plans. The nucleus of the 
placement service is the individual attention each senior receives from our 
career counselor, thus insuring the student the opportunity to develop a 
sound strategy for job hunting. 

With greater insight into your academic and career goals, the Career 
Development Center is committed to broaden the career opportunities open 
to you after graduation. 



RESIDENCE AND RESIDENCE HALLS 

If you are a single student and do not reside at home you are required to live 
in the college residence halls and eat your meals in the college dining room. 
Request for exceptions to live with relatives must be submitted in writing to 
the Associate Dean of Student Services-Housing. 

If you do not have permission to live off-campus, you must sign a room 
agreement form, agreeing to observe the rules and regulations for resident 
students. An agreement form will be sent to you following confirmation of 
your acceptance. Upperclassmen receive the agreements and rules and 
regulations each Spring. 



26 /CAMPUS LIFE 



Because of the inability of the College to predict enrollment by sex, it is 
necessary to keep assignments of halls as flexible as possible. No hall or unit 
is specifically assigned to women or men on other than a year to year basis. 

Resident students are responsible for the condition of their room and its fur- 
nishings. The College reserves the right to enter and inspect any of its 
property, or the property of a room resident for reasons of damage, health, 
safety, or to determine whether violation of its rules or the law are taking 
place or have occurred. Charges will be assessed for damages to rooms, 
doors, furniture, and commonly used areas. 

Resident students are expected to vacate their rooms during the vacation 
periods when the halls are closed and not later than twenty-four hours 
following their last examinations, except for graduating seniors. 

Regulations regarding quiet hours for study may be established by the Of- 
fice of Student Services or appropriate residence hall councils and are 
published in the Residence Halls Handbook and on the bulletin boards in the 
halls. 

Room visitation by members of the opposite sex is permitted inthehallsonly 
under conditions which are established by the College in cooperation with 
the various residence hall governing groups which share responsibility for 
regulations and are organized each fall before visitation privileges begin. 



STANDARDS OF CONDUCT 

The College expects all of its students to accept the responsibility required 
of adults in a free democratic society. The rules and regulations of the 
College are designed to protect the rights of every member of the communi- 
ty against encroachment by individuals. The limitations which are imposed 
upon the activities of individuals are established for the common good of 
the entire college community. 

Students who are unable to demonstrate that they can accept this respon- 
sibility or are antagonistic to the spirit and general purpose of the College, 
or fail to abide by the regulations established by the College may be dismiss- 
ed or requested to leave the College at any time. Further, at the end of any 
term or semester the College may deny a student the privilege of attending 
any subsequent term or semester when the administration deems this to be 
in the best interest of the College. In addition to the regulations published 
here, specific rules are furnished each student in the Guidepost and the 
Residence Halls Handbook. 

The consumption or possession of alcoholic beverages on campus or at any 
official college function is prohibited. Detailed information regarding the 
laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania are published in the Guidepost. 

Lycoming does not condone the illegal use of drugs by its students. A state- 
ment of the policy on drugs is published in the Guidepost. 

Cheating, lying, and stealing are totally inconsistent with Lycoming stan- 
dards. Although the acceptance and observance of the standards of 
behavior expected by the College is an individual responsibility it is a group 



CAMPUS LIFE/ 27 



responsibility as well. It is incumbent on all Lycoming students that they 
attempt to influence their peers to conduct themselves honorably for the 
collective good. 

It is assumed that a willingness to accept these restrictions is implicit in the 
acceptance of membership in the Lycoming College community. Whenyou 
are admitted to Lycoming you will receive a copy of the Guidepost and a 
copy of the Residence Halls Handbook if you will live in a College residence. 

Both documents are important statements of official College policy, rules, 
and regulations which are part of the contractual agreement which you 
enter into when you register as a student at Lycoming. 



CAMPUS LIFE 

A full program of cultural, professional, athletic, and social activities is an in- 
tegral part of college life at Lycoming. You can find outlets for your talents, 
interests, and abilities among the numerous student organizations- 
fraternities, departmental clubs and honorary societies, student govern- 
ment, publications, and a comprehensive varsity and intramural sports 
program— each abounding in opportunities for student participation. 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Lycoming College provides you with opportunities to mature in your faith 
through voluntary participation in the religious life of the campus and the 
community. 

Faculty and students express their religious convictions through 
membership and participation in nearly thirty Protestant denominations as 
well as the Roman Catholic and Hebrew faiths. Significant opportunities are 
offered to students for the voluntary expression of this religious faith. 

A varied religious life program is maintained as needs arise. The College 
Chapel presents outstanding pulpit voices from off-campus, in the weekly 
worship service on Sunday mornings. 

A Roman Catholic chaplain assists in the activities of the Catholic Council of 
Lycoming College and maintains office hours in Clarke Chapel for counsel- 
ing purposes. Mass is celebrated on campus each Sunday evening. 



28 /LYCOMING CAMPUS 



RESIDENTIAL 

/. North Hall (1 965) — 1 46 students in two-room suites with bath. 

4. East Hall (1 962) — Houses chapters of national f rater nities and other students. The fraternity 
units, distinct self-contained, provide dormitory facihtes. lounge, and a chapter room for 
each group. All students share a large social area on the ground floor 
5. Forest Hall (1968) — 92 students in two-room suites with bath. Honors Dr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher Bliss Forrest and Anna Forest Burfiendt '30, the parents and sister of Kathenne 
Forrest Mathers '28 whose generosity established the memorial. 

£>. Crever Hall (1962) — 126 students in two-room suites with bath. Honors the College's 
founder and first financial agent, the Rev. Benjamin H. Crever, who helped persuade the 
Baltimore Conference to purchase the institution from the Williamsport Town Council in 
1848. 

8. Wesley Hall (1956) — 144 students. Honors the Founder of Methodism. 

9. Rich Hall ( 1 948) — 1 05 students in two-room suites with bath. Honors the Rich family of 

Woolnch. Pennsylvania Houses the college health service and the Sara J. Walter non- 
residents lounge. 

1 1 . Asbury Hall (1 962) — 1 54 students. Honors Bishop Francis Asbury. the father of The United 
Methodist Church in America, who made the circuit through the upper "Susquehanna Dis- 
trict" in 1812, the year the Williamsport Academy (now Lycoming) opened its doors. 

18. Skeath Hall (1965) — 212 students. Honors the late J. Milton Skeath, professor of psy- 
chology and four-time dean of the institution from 1921 to 1 967. 

ACADEMIC 

12-15. The Academic Center (1968) 

12. Laboratories and Arena Theatre — Language, business, mathematics, and physics 

laboratories; Detwiler Planetarium: 204 seat thrust-stage arena theatre: 90 seat Alumni 

Lecture Hall. 
1 3. Faculty Office Building — 69 faculty offices, seminar rooms, 735 seat lecture hall. 
1 4. Wendle Hall — Spacious Pennington Lounge is an informal meeting place for students and 

faculty. Psychology laboratories, 20 classrooms. 
1 5 Library — Can accommodate 700 students in a variety of study and reading situations, has a 

capacity of 250.000 volumes, computer center, audio-visual center. 

2. Art Center ( 1 965) — Studios and art gallery. 

3. Fine Arts Building (1 940) — Art Studios. 

1 9. Eve/and Hall (1912) — Sculpture and art studios. 

2 1 . Science Building ( 1 957) — Chemistry and biology lecture rooms, laboratories, offices. 

CHAPEL 

17. Clarke Chapel (1939) — Worship services and other events in auditorium, classrooms, 
studios and music department faculty offices on ground floor. 

ADMINISTRATION 

10. John W. Long Hall (1951) — College administration offices: President. College Deans, 
Treasurer. Registrar. Admissions. Alumni Affairs. Public Relations. Career Development 
Center, Publications, Development, and Financial Aid. Reception area, central com- 
munications, duplicating and bulk mail services. 

RECREATION 

7. Wertz Student Center (1959) — Dining room. Burchfield Lounge, recreation area, game 
room, music room, book store, post office, and student organization offices. Honors Bishop 
D Frederick Wertz, president of Lycoming from 1955 until 1968. 
1 6. Gymnasium (1923) — Basketball and other courts, swimming pool, bowling alleys, physical 
education offices. 




• 



— X 




30/ SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 



LYCOMING SCHOLAR PROGRAM 

The Lycoming Scholar Program offers highly motivated students an oppor- 
tunity to develop their full potential through a flexible and demanding 
academic program. Persons with the following qualities would most likely 
benefit from this unique program: 

High intellectual ability initially indicated by class standing and combined 
SAT scores; 

Intellectual curiosity, motivation, imagination, creativity, and a desire for ex- 
cellence; 

Sufficient independence of mind to plan and execute a unique personal 
academic program which best uses the resources of the College; 

Commitment to the value of intellectual dialogue. 

SCHOLAR OPPORTUNITIES 

The following opportunities are designed to be helpful to Lycoming 
Scholars in achieving the stated objective of the program. 

The Scholar Council will relax the established distribution requirements 
while maintaining the breadth of a liberal arts education. The program for 
the individual Scholar is to be tailored by the Scholar and his academic con- 
sultant based upon an assessment of the student's previous attainments 
and his needs. This is subject to approval by the Lycoming ScholarCouncil. 

Lycoming Scholars— either singly or in groups — are encouraged to petition 
the Council, in writing, for funds to undertake special educational projects 
involving extra expenses, such as taking trips or bringing in special 
speakers. Students applying for such funds are expected to make the results 
of their investigations available to the Scholarcommunity, and, if possible to 
the college at large. 

Due to the composition of the Scholar Council, Scholars have a greater 
voice in determining the nature of their education than is possible in the 
college as a whole. 

Evidence of participation in the Lycoming Scholar Program will be noted on 
the Scholar's transcript and diploma. A brief description of the prog ram will 
be a part of the transcript. 

At the request of the Scholar, the Council will endorse, for graduate school 
and other post-baccalaureate endeavors, those Scholars who have met the 
objective of the Program. 

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM 

Schola rs may be chosen by theCouncilwhilein their last year of secondary 
education, before actual matriculation at Lycoming. Their potential for 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES/31 



meeting the objective of the Program will be measured by a variety of means. 
Among them are interviews with Scholars and faculty members, and written 
responses to essay questions. 

Scholars also may be chosen from the current Lycoming student body after 
their first year of study. Requirements include: (a) a letter of application, (b) 
letters of recommendation from two faculty members who are not on the 
Council, plus optional letters from present Scholars, and (c) an interview 
with members of the Council. Important factors in granting membership are 
the student's intellectual motivation, independence, desire to participate, 
and academic progress to date which is normally indicated by an average of 
3.25 for two consecutive semesters. February 1st is designated as the 
deadline for application. 



SCHOLAR RESPONSIBILITIES 

During their first year in the Program, all Scholars are on a probationary 
status. They are required to participate in a First-Year Seminar. Following 
successful completion of their probationary period. Scholars will be formal- 
ly admitted to the Program. 

Any Scholar may be asked bytheCounciltoleavetheProgramifheorsheis 
judged not to be making satisfactory progress toward meeting its objective. 
If the academic average of the Scholar drops below a 3.00, the Council will 
look into the matter, but lower grades in themselves need not result in dis- 
missal from the Program; of far more interest is the overall quality of the 
student's work. 

During their last year at Lycoming. Scholars are required to participate in a 
Senior Seminar. In these Seminars each student will report on a Studies or 
Honors project taken during the Junior or Senior year. 

All Scholars will have an academic consultant from the faculty to assist them 
in utilizing the potentialities of the Program. Together with the consultant, 
the Scholar must submit a brief plan of study to the Council at each registra- 
tion period. 

Scholars are expected to create academic programs which emphasize 
depth -of -study in a major area combined with a breadth of inquiry into other 
areas. 

Scholars also are expected to participate in the activities of the Program. 
Achievement of the Scholar Program objective depends upon the continual 
refinement of a program through faculty-student interaction and dialogue 
on policies, procedures, and activities. To this end, the Scholar Council, 
which is charged with administering the program, is composed of four 
students elected by their peers, four faculty members, and the Dean of the 
College, all with equal vote. 

By presenting this highly flexible curriculum, Lycoming College opens the 
door to students who are motivated to remain intellectually creative. If you 
qualify for this program and wish to be considered. Lycoming invites your 
inquiry. 



32/SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 



PART-TIME STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES 



LYCOMING EXPERIMENTAL AUDIT PROGRAM (L.E.A.P) 

As a special service to the community it serves, Lycoming offers any person 
within commuting distance of the College an opportunity to try higher 
education at a minimal cost through its Experimental Audit Program. 
Anyone may take one course on an audit basis (no credit)— free. You can 
take advantage of this opportunity, once, simply by paying the $15.00 
Application Fee, if you have never paid it before. No tuition will be charged; 
you will be responsible for any special charges such as lab fees, material 
costs, transportation, etc. when special charges are normally made for the 
course. 

At the registration for any session you may enroll in a particular course and 
be accepted for that course at the end of the registration period if the class 
has not been filled. 

Currently enrolled students may also take advantage of the Experimental 
Audit Program, once without charge. The course will not be counted in any 
way toward graduation requirements, affect any charges due. nor have any 
bearing on your status as a full or part-time student. 



REGULAR AUDIT 

Any person may audit a course at Lycoming at one-half the tuition for one 
part-time course. Any lab fees and other extra costs must be paid. Credit 
may not be given for an audited course. An experimental or regular audit 
course can not be converted to a credit course after the drop-add period for 
the semester the course is taken. No exams or papers are required of 
students auditing a course, but individual arrangements may be made to 
participate in these activities with the consent of the instructor. 



SPECIAL STUDENT (Part-Time for Credit) 

Any person may take up to two courses during any semester (one only in 
May Term). A part-time special student pays the $1 5.00 Application Fee 
only the first time he registers and pays the part-time rate in effect when he 
takes the course. Three or more courses a semester constitute a full-time 
schedule and the student must first be accepted by the Admissions Office as 
a regular student subject to full-time student fees and procedures. 



SPECIALLY DESIGNED COURSES 

Lycoming is eager to serve the special educational needs which arise in the 
community. Short courses, institutes, workshops, special semesters, and 
long-term training programs to fill the specific needs of any interested 
group canbedesignedona credit or non -credit basis. They can be given on 
or off campus. For more information contact the Dean of the College. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES/ 33 



LIFE LONG LEARNING 

The program consists of short (3-7 weeks) non-credit courses offered 
throughout the year. 1975-76 courses included: How to Listen to a 
Symphony. Photography, Investment Fundamentals, Preparation of Federal 
Personal Income Tax Forms, Astronomy Today, The American Revolution, 
Inflation, Rapid Reading, Photography, Greek Folk Dancing and Culture. 



SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



MAY TERM 

Each year a unique May Term is designed to offer a challenging array of 
special courses. Some of the four-week courses offer study and projects on 
campus; others involve domestic or foreign travel; others offer inter- 
disciplinary credit. Most of the May Term courses are non-traditional in 
nature and are not offered during the regular academic year. 

While the number of courses offered during the May Term may vary 
somewhat from year to year, the faculty generally offers approximately fifty 
courses. Illustrations of the types of courses offered during the May Term 
are as follows: 

For students wishing to travel abroad, a cultural tour of the Soviet Union has 
been offered, with stops in Moscow, Leningrad, Novgorod, Kiev, and 
Budapest, as well as Denmark, Finland and West Germany. London in May 
has been a popular course, exploring the arts, attending plays and operas, 
and meeting with actors, directors, and teachers. From time to time, other 
cultural tours may be arranged, such as tours of Germany, Spain, France, or 
Ireland. Student demand often determines which cultural tours are offered, 
since instructors wish to assemble cultural tours based upon student in- 
terest. 

A number of May Term courses, while not cultural tours, are conducted off- 
campus. The Department of Biology offers a popular course in Marine 
Biology and Biological Oceanography based at the Bermuda Biological Sta- 
tion for Research. Other areas or states visited in the past have included the 
Caribbean area. New Mexico, New York, Vermont, Maine, and Virginia. 

Although student participatin in the May Term is voluntary, response has 
been outstanding, with about 25 to 30 percent of the student body par- 
ticipating. Classes are generally small and very informal, so that students 
may develop close personal relationships among themselves and between 
themselves and the instructor. 

One less obvious advantage of scheduling May Term courses lies in the 
savings in tuition charges. In order to attract students to the program tuition 
has been reduced about 45 percent. Thus, if a student schedules any com- 
bination of four May Term and Summer Session courses, he or she may 
graduate after seven, rather than eight, full semesters. For the 1 976 May 



34 /SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 



Term, tuition was $ 1 75 per unit course. Room charges were $60 and board 
charges were $7 5. Other expenses, such as travel, books and supplies, will 
vary from course to course. 



STUDENT ENRICHMENT SEMESTER 

To expand academic and life opportunities for its students and to increase 
their chances to participate in specialized programs and courses not 
available at the home institution, Lycoming is a participant in the Student 
Enrichment Semester (SES) program. Other members are Bloomsburg, 
Bucknell, Lock Haven, Mansfield, Susquehanna, and Wilhamsport Area 
Community College. 

In your upperclass years, beyond freshman, you will be able to enroll for 
credit as a full-time student, normally for one term, at any co-operating in- 
stitution. Each SES college will stipulate which of its courses and programs 
willbeopentoSES students. Lycoming will approve the courses, programs, 
and credits according to its own policies and procedures. 

As an SES student, you will remain fully enrolled in your degree program at 
Lycoming and will simultaneously enroll, on a full-time basis, at the host in- 
stitution according to its definition of full-time enrollment. You will be sub- 
ject to the rules and regulations of the host institution while there. It will ex- 
tend all opportunities and benefits to you, as an SES student, that itprovides 
for its own students, such as library, housing, meals, cultural activities, stu- 
dent organizations and activities, except where legal constraints provide 
otherwise. You will not be ehgibleforfinancial aid from any host institution. 

SES students will pay tuition to Lycoming according to prevailing policies, 
including charges and deferred payment plans. Applicable no n -tuition fees, 
such as room and board charges and student activities fees, will be paid to 
the host college. 

A special opportunity within the SES program is the cross-registration 
arrangement with the Wilhamsport Area Community College whereby 
students may enroll for less than a full-time course load while remaining 
enrolled in courses at Lycoming. 



INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Each department granting a major provides opportunity to students to work 
independently. Upon consent of the department chairman and the instruc- 
tor, you may register for courses in Independent Study. Normally, the oppor- 
tunity for such study is provided for the better qualified major student who 
has successfully completed the courses making up the core of his major 
program. Except under unusual circumstances, registration for the Studies 
Course is limited to one unit course during each semester. If you wish to 
elect morethanoneunitduringa semester or three or more unit courses in 
Studies in your total college program, approval of the Academic Standing 
Committee must be secured. If you are privileged to do Independent Study 
you register for courses 80-89, Studies. An appropriate title is entered in 
your record. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES/35 



SEMINAR STUDY 

Individual departments may from time to time find it possible to organize 
small classes or seminars for exceptional students interested in subjects or 
topics not usually a part of departmental course offerings. Establishment of 
the seminar and admission of students depends upon the approval of the 
department involved. Occasionally, Visiting Professors, Lecturers, or 
Specialists in Residence will offer such seminar studies. Students who are 
privileged to elect Seminar Study in any department register for courses 
numbered 70-79, Studies, with an appropriate title to be entered upon the 
student's permanent record. Enrollment in seminar courses is normally 
limited to ten students. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

If you desire to enter an Honors program and secure departmental approval 
to apply, a faculty committee shall be convened whose initial responsibility 
shall be to pass upon your eligibility to enter the program. The committee 
responsibility shall also include the direction of the study, and final evalua- 
tion of its worth. Usually the Honors program involves independent study in 
two consecutive unit courses. Students who are privileged to elect Honors 
register for courses numbered 90-99. 

Honors study is expected to result in the completion of a thesis to be defend- 
ed in a final oral examination. Acceptable theses shall be deposited in the 
college library. Successful completion of the Honors program will cause the 
designation of honors in the department to be placed upon the permanent 
record. In the event that the study is not completed successfully, the student 
shall be re-registered in Independent Studies and given a final grade for the 
course. 



THE WASHINGTON SEMESTER 

Upon recommendation of the Department of Political Science, selected 
students are permitted to attend The American University in Washington, 
D.C. for one full semester. Participating students may choose from seven 
different Washington Semester Programs: (1) Washington Semester, (2) 
Washington Urban Semester, (3) Foreign Policy Semester, (4) International 
Development Semester, (5) Washington Economic Policy Semester, (6) 
Washington Science and Technology Semester, and (7) American Studies. 
Ordinarily, students must have junior standing to participate. Eligible 
students with an interest in any of the above programs should consult with 
the Chairman of Political Science for further information. 

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 

An internship program provides students with an opportunity to enrich their 
classroom knowledge through professionally related practical experience. 
An internship allows the student to test concepts and theories in real, 
hopefully challenging, situations. Placed toward the close of the student's 
academic career, the internship experience adds a valuable dimension to 
formal education while meeting the demand for greater relevancy in higher 
education. 



36/SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 



Any junior or senior student in good academic standing who has declared a 
major is able to petition the major department for approval to serve as an in- 
tern for one or two semesters. A maximum of sixteen credits can be earned. 
Guidelines for program development, assignment of tasks, and academic 
requirements such as exams, papers, reports, grades, etc., are established 
in consultation with a faculty director at Lycoming and an agency supervisor 
at the place of internship. 

Students with diverse majors have participated in a wide variety of in- 
ternships including the Allenwood Prison Camp, Community Health Center, 
County Commissioners Office, Department of Environmental Resources, 
Headstart, Historical Society, Litton Industries. Northwestern Mutual Life In- 
surance, and the Williamsport Hospital. 




SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES/37 



INTERNATIONAL INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 

UNITED NATIONS SEMESTER 

Upon recommendation of the faculty of the departments of history or 
political science, you may attend Drew University, Madison, New Jersey, for 
a period of one full semester. The United Nations Semester is intended to 
provide a first- hand acquaintancewith the United Nations, New York City, as 
well as an academic experience equivalent to four normal unit courses. This 
program is open to selected students who have special interests in world 
history, international relations, law, and politics. Ordinarily, onlyjuniors are 
eligible. 

LONDON SEMESTER 

Students interested in spending one semester in London, England may par- 
ticipate in either the London program operated by Drew University or the 
London program run by the American University. The emphasis in both 
programs in on European history, politics, and culture. Participation in 
either program is equivalent to four unit courses. Ordinarily, only juniors are 
eligible. For further details, consult the Department of History or Political 
Science. 

OVERSEAS STUDIES OPPORTUNITIES 

Under auspices of approved universities or agencies, you have an oppor- 
tunity to study in a foreign university. While overseas study is particularly at- 
tractive to students majoring in foreign languages, this opportunity is open 
to all students. Mastery of the foreign language is not required in all 
programs. A file of opportunities for overseas study is available from the 
reference librarian. 



It should be noted that Lycoming College cannot assume responsibili- 
ty for the health, safety, or welfare of any student while he or she is 
engaged in or en route to or from any off-campus studies or activities 
which are not under the exclusive jurisdiction of this institution. 



38 /CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Students who attend a liberal arts institution find numerous career oppor- 
tunities open to them upon graduation. Although students can seek career 
employment related to their academic major, the value of a liberal arts 
education is that students are not restricted to such employment. A liberal 
arts background gives you flexibility to pursue various career avenues, as il- 
lustrated by the careers entered by a few of our typical recent graduates. An 
English major secured employment as a housing counselor for the govern- 
ment; a psychology major, as a manager in a retailing business; a biology 
major, as a food and drug inspector; an accounting major, as a graduate stu- 
dent attending law school; a history major, as a branch manager in a bank- 
ing firm; a political science major, as a county law enforcement agent; a 
business major, as a technical assistant in a television station; a theatre ma- 
jor, as a counselor for underprivileged children. In general, a liberal arts 
education provides a foundation for each student to pursue the type of 
career which focuses upon his abilities, interests, and aspirations. 

Today's employers are seeking college graduates with broad academic 
backgrounds. The primary characteristics desired by employers are in- 
telligence, communication skills, leadership ability, community involve- 
ment, and career identification. Employers believe such individuals will be 
better able to handle the various problems they will encounter in today's 
complex world. 

Lycoming College is committed to assist each student to develop a realistic 
careerplan.The Career Development Center is the primary service designed 
to help students, beginning in their freshman year, to crystallize their future 
plans. Through career counseling, career workshops, career information, 
and similar vehicles, the Career Development Center strives to help each 
student. 

For further information about the Career Development Center see page 2 5. 




CAREER OPPORTUNITIES/39 



CAREER FIELDS UNLIMITED 

Your course of study at Lycoming will help you to gain greater insight into 
many aspects of your wo rid and simultaneously lay a strong foundation for a 
career. Innumerable types of positions are open to liberal arts graduates At 
Lycoming you have the additional opportunity to explore, from an elemen- 
tary to an advanced level, various fields that may lead to avocation or direct 
you toward professional or graduate schools. A wide variety of vocations 
may be entered directly upon graduation. These include positions in 
business, industry, government, and the professions, including teaching. A 
student interested in any of these areas is referred to his advisor, to the ap- 
propriate department, or to a special assigned advisor. Admission to Lycom- 
ing College and registration in any of the cooperative programs listed below 
does not guarantee students admission to the cooperating institution, 
whether it is a hospital, college or university. The prerogative of admitting 
students to the cooperative aspect of the program rests with the 
cooperating institution. 



ACCOUNTING 

There are many reasons for continued rapid growth of the accounting 
profession in the foreseeable future. Lycoming offers a rigorous com- 
prehensive program of undergraduate training in accounting leading to the 
bachelor of arts. The most important aspect of an accountant's service to 
clients and to the public cannot be defined as knowledge, nor even as ex- 
perience, but must be described by more elusive terms: wisdom, perception, 
imagination, circumspection, judgment, integrity. A liberal arts education 
followed by training on-the-job offers you the best background for a 
successful career in accountancy. The academic standards are such as to 
require you to be proficient in math; have an above-average ability to com- 
municate ideas verbally and in written form; show a potential ability to ex- 
press and to interpretabstraction; and demonstratea personality capableof 
developing qualities of business and community leadership. Interested? 
Contact the Accounting Department 



BUSINESS 

Lycoming offers course work in the field of business administration par- 
ticularly designed for training prospective business leaders. Business is a 
highly diversified occupation; therefore the curriculum is not designed to be 
vocational or narrowly pre-professional. The purposes of the business ad- 
ministration curriculum are to train and equip your mind to recognize and 
solve complex problems facing business executives, to develop an ap- 
preciation for rigorous analysis, to practice the arts of verbal and written 
communication, and to expose the developing mind to as wide as possible 
range of course work represented by the traditional liberal arts curriculum, 
to the end that you become truly well educated. Considerable flexibility is 
permissible within the curriculum, and you are encouraged to pursue 
course work most rewarding to you 



40 /CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

The Medical Technology curriculum is organized around an academic 
background of basic science courses in addition to those liberal arts 
courses listed as requirements for the bachelor of arts degree. Preparation 
at Lycoming for a career in medical technology may be made in either of two 
ways: the attainment of the B.A. followed by a clinical internship at any ac- 
credited hospital, or by completion of the Lycoming Cooperative Program. 

A student electing to follow the Cooperative Program in Medical 
Technology will normally spend three years at Lycoming. During this time 
the student must satisfy the general college distribution requirements, ma- 
jor and ASCP (American Society Clinical Pathologists) requirements and 
must successfully complete twenty-four unit courses. The ASCP currently 
requires four courses in chemistry (one of which must be either organic or 
biochemistry), four courses in biology (one of which must be microbiology) 
and a course in mathematics. Three-year students usually major in biology, 
where they are allowed to follow a modified major of six unit courses which 
exempts them from two biology core courses. Ecology (Biology 24) and 
Plant Sciences (Biology 25). Students must also take either Animal 
Physiology (Biology 23) or Cell Physiology (Biology 35). Also required as 
part of the Cooperative Program is the successful completion of a one-year 
internship at an ASCP accredited hospital. Lycoming College is currently af- 
filiated with the following accredited institutions: Wilhamsport Hospital, 
Divine Providence Hospital. Robert Packer Hospital, Lancaster General 
Hospital, and Abington Hospital. Three-year students will be given Lycom- 
ing credit foreachofeightunit courses in biology and chemistry taken dur- 
ing the clinical internship. Lycoming does not consider the Registry ex- 
amination a requirement for graduation. 

A student graduating from Lycoming College before entering a one-year 
hospital internship must satisfy all college, major and ASCP requirements 
and is not eligible for any course exemptions mentioned above. Once 
graduated from Lycoming, the student may apply for admission to a clinical 
program at any hospital. 

Those interested in a medical technology career should contact members of 
the Medical Technology Advisory Committee orthechairmanofthe Biology 
Department before finalizing course decisions. 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

Military Science is a four-year course divided into a basic coursegiven dur- 
ing the Freshman and Sophomore years and an advance course given dur- 
ing the Junior and Senior years. There is also a special program available to 
selected students who were unable to take the basic course which permits 
them to enroll in the advanced course after completing a basic summer 
camp between the Sophomore and Junior years. Students attending the 
basicsummercamparepaidata rate equivalent to one-half of the basic pay 
for a Second Lieutenant with under two years of service and they also 
receive subsistence, housing, uniforms and medical care at government ex- 
pense. Transportation to and from summer camp is also furnished at 
government expense. 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES/ 4 1 



Students enrolled in the advanced course of Military Science receive a 
monthly subsistence pay of $ 1 00 a month, not to exceed 1 months a year. 
To successfully complete the advanced course, students mustattend an ad- 
vanced summer camp between their Junior and Senior years. While at 
summer camp, they are also paid at a rate equivalent to one-half of the basic 
pay for a Second Lieutenant with under two years of service and they also 
receive the same benefits mentioned above at government expense. 

Students successfully completing the advanced course of Military Science 
will qualify for a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the United States 
Army upon graduation and will incur a service obligation in the active Army 
or Army Reserves. Active duty requirements will vary with the type of com- 
mission accepted. 

All books, uniforms, and other military equipment necessary for instruction 
in the Military Science Department a re furnished without expense to the stu- 
dent other than the deposit referred to under "Required Deposits." 



PLANETARIUM EDUCATION 

A unique feature of the major in astronomy at Lycoming is that it has been 
specifically designed to train students in planetarium operation. The se- 
quence of courses in astronomy and physics provides the breadth of 
knowledge that a planetarium educator needs. In addition, students gain 
practical experience by serving as lecturers in the College's Detwiler 
Planetarium. Entering the field of planetarium education is a way for 
students who are interested in astronomy but who do not plan to go on to 
graduate school, to establish professional contact with the community of 
research astronomers. 

Students in other majors (particularly those who are planning on careers in 
teaching) may wish to acquire some experience in planetarium operation. 
They can do so by taking the two courses. Principles of Astronomy 
(Astronomy and Physics 1 1 ) and Planetarium Techniques (Astronomy and 
Physics 30). 

For more information, please contact the Department of Astronomy and 
Physics. 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

If you desire extensive study in biblical history and literature, the historical 
development of Christianity and Christian Doctrine, you may major in 
religion. If you plan to enter the vocation of rehgiouseducation, you should, 
besides majoring in religion, elect five or six unit courses in psychology, 
education, and sociology. This program of study, completely within the 
liberal arts curriculum, will qualify you for work as an Educational Assistant, 
or after graduate study in a theological seminary, as a Director of Religious 
Education. You are invited to contact theTheological Professions Advisory 
Committee (TPAC) for further information on the opportunities, respon- 
sibilities, and requirements of these and other church vocations. More in- 
formation on TPAC may be found on p. 45). 



42 /CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 



TEACHER EDUCATION 

Lycoming prepares teachers for elementary and secondary schools. The 
programs are approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for 
the certification of elementary teachers and for secondary teachers in the 
following areas: biology, chemistry. English, French, general science (with 
an Astronomy-Physics track), German, mathematics, physics. Russian, 
social science, and Spanish. Pennsylvania certificates are recognized in 
many other states either through reciprocal agreements or by transcript 
evaluation. 

The excellent facilities of the public schools in Wilhamsport and the 
surrounding areas are used by education students for observation, par- 
ticipation experiences, and practice teaching. 

Lycoming feels that the best preparation for future teachers is based on the 
liberal arts. Therefore, all education students complete a liberal arts major in 
addition to the education requirements. 

Normally, freshmen are not admitted to education courses. All applicants 
for admission to the Teacher Education Program must register with the 
Education Office no later than registration for the first semester of the 
sophomore year. The Committee on Teacher Education evaluates those 
accepted, at various junctures in their education program, using such 
guidelines as grade point average, potential, course requirements, and 
recommendations. 

Application for practice teaching must be made before October 1 st of the 
junior year. Admission to the professional semester is limited and selective. 
Final approval for student participation in the professional semester is 
granted by the Teacher Education Committee. 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN DRAMA 

The American Academy of Dramatic Arts and Lycoming each recognize ap- 
propriate courses given by the other institution. Normally, in the case of the 
transfer student who is a graduate of the American Academy of Dramatic 
Arts and recommended by them and who has completed two years 
successful study at an accredited college or university, the residency re- 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING 

In cooperation with Bucknell University and the Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity, Lycoming College, through its Department of Astronomy and 
Physics, offers a five-year program in engineering in which the first three 
years are spent at Lycoming and the final two at the engineering school. This 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES/43 



combines the many advantages of a liberal arts education at a small college 
with the technical training of an engineering school. 

If the first year of work at the engineering school is satisfactory, Lycoming 
will award the bachelor of arts degree. Upon completion of thefull five-year 
program, the engineering school will award a bachelor of science in 
engineering. The following engineering specialties may be studied: 
chemical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering at Bucknell Uni- 
versity, and aeronautical, civil, electrical, industrial, mechanical, and 
sanitary engineering at The Pennsylvania State University. 

At Lycoming, a student completes the college distribution requirements and 
takes courses in physics, mathematics and chemistry. To be certain of taking 
all the necessary courses during his three years at Lycoming, it is imperative 
that any student interested in this program consultwith a faculty member of 
the Department of Astronomy and Physics as early as possible— preferably 
during the summer orientation session and certainly not later than the first 
week of the student's first semester at Lycoming. 



COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS IN FORESTRY OR 
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 

Professional and scientific programs of study in forestry for men and women 
are offered in cooperation with the School of Forestry, Duke University. You 
will spend three years in residence at Lycoming and an additional five 
semesters at Duke. Upon satisfactory completion of two semesters at Duke 
you will have earned the A.B. degree from Lycoming, and upon completing 
the remainder of the program will be awarded the M.F., M.S., degree from 
Duke, depending upon the nature of the program. 

You should indicate to the Admissions Office that you wish to enroll in the 
Forestry program. At the end of the first term of the third year, Lycoming 
recommends qualified students for admission to the Duke School of 
Forestry. No application need be made to the School of Forestry before then. 

Major fields of forestry at Duke are: 

FOREST RESOURCE ADMINISTRATION FOREST SCIENCE 

Forest Resource Management Forest Ecology 

Forest Protection Forest Pathology 

Forest Resource Economics and Policy Tree Physiology 
Biometry & Statistics Tree Biochemistry 

Systems Analysis Dendrology & Wood 

Anatomy 
Forest Hydrology 
Forest Meteorology 
Forest Soils 

If you are interested in Forest Resource Administration you are advised to 
elect a concentration in biology, business management, mathematics, 
economics, computer science, statistics, or sociology. If you plan a career in 
Forest Science, you should strengthen your backgrounds in biology, 
chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Typical programs in fields offered at 



44 /CA REER OPPOR TUNI TIES 



Duke are available upon request from the Dean of the School of Forestry, 
Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27706. 

Students interested in these programs must register with the Cooperative 
Forestry Program Coordinator, Biology Department. 

PREPARATION FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

Many careers today require advanced study beyond the bachelor of arts 
degree. In general, preparation for graduate work in one of the academic 
disciplines should include a broad base of liberal studies, a strong un- 
dergraduate major, and adequate supporting work in closely related fields. 
You can design an individual major to meet the needs of some of the newer 
graduate level interdisciplinary programs. Often graduate departments ask 
that a prospective student's competence be measured by the national 
Graduate Record Examinations. Also, they usually require a reading 
knowledge of one or two foreign languages. You should co nsu It departmen- 
tal advisors early in your college years with respect to planning for entrance 
to graduate school. 

PREPARATION FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

The curriculum for the pre-Health Professions (allopathic medicine, dental 
medicine, optometric medicine, osteopathic medicine, pod latric medicine, 
and veterinary medicine) are all organized around a solid foundation in 
biology, chemistry. English, mathematics, and physics. A wide range of sub- 
ject matter from the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts should be in- 
cluded in the program. At least three years of undergraduate study is 
recommended before entry into the professional school; the normal 
procedure is to complete the bachelor of arts degree. 

You should indicate to the Admissions Office, when completing the applica- 
tion to Lycoming College, that you wish to enroll in the pre-Health 
Professions (various fields of medicine) program. The Health Professions 
Advisory Committee (HPAC) will advise you concerning preparation for and 
application to a health professional school. 




CAREER OPPORTUNITIES/45 



PREPARATION FOR LAW SCHOOL 

Lycoming offers a strong academic preparation for students interested in 
law as a profession. Admission to law school is not predicated upon a par- 
ticular major or area of study; rather, a student is encouraged to design a 
course of study (traditional or interdisciplinary major) which is of personal 
interest and significance to the student. Yet, while no specific major is 
recommended, there are certain skills which are of particular relevance to 
the pre-law student and these should be developed during the un- 
dergraduate years: clear writing, analytical thinking and language com- 
prehension. 

Students who are pursuing law as a career should register with the Legal 
Professions Advisory Committee (LPAC) upon entering Lycoming and 
should join the Pre-Law Club on campus. LPAC assists the pre-law student 
through advisement, compilation of recommendations and dissemination 
of information and materials about law and the legal profession. Among its 
activities. LPAC sponsors Pre -LS AT Workshops to help prepare students for 
the Law Boards and an annual Pre-Law Night which brings to campus ad- 
mission deans, law students and practicing lawyers. The Pre-Law Club is an 
organization for students with a common interest in the law. In the past, the 
Club has sponsored films, speakers and field trips, including several to the 
United States Supreme Court. 

PREPARATION FOR THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

As a church-related school, Lycoming well understands the academic, per- 
sonal, and social needs of students who want to prepare themselves for the 
ministry, advanced training in religion, or related vocations. In particular, 
the Theological Professions Advisory Committee (TPAC) acts as a "center" 
for bringing together interested students, faculty, and clergy for dis- 
cussions, advisement, and social activities; also, it may help coordinate in- 
ternships for those who desire practical experience in the parish ministry or 
related areas. Upon entering Lycoming, students should register withTPAC 
if they plan to investigate the religious vocations. 

Generally speaking, students preparing to attend a theological seminary 
should examine the suggestions set down by the Association ofTheological 
Schools (available from TPAC). Recommended is a broad program in the 
liberal arts, which incidentally is largely met by Lycoming's distribution re- 
quirements: a major in oneof the humanities (English, languages, literature, 
philosophy, religion), history, or one of the social sciences (American 
Studies, criminal justice, economics, international studies, political 
science, psychology, sociology-anthropology); and a variety of electives. 
The choice of electives will depend on the requirements of the theological 
school. TPAC will be happy to assist students as they plan their programs. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Lycoming College is a liberal arts institution granting the bachelor of arts 
degree. A degree candidate must fulfill certain minimal course re- 
quirements in breadth of learning— the distribution requirements— and in 
depth of learning in a chosen subject matter field — the major. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Every degree candidate must complete the following degree requirements: 

1. Pass a minimum of 128 semester hours (32 unit courses) with a 
cumulative average of 2.0 or better. Additional credits beyond 128 
semester hours may be completed provided the 2.0 grade pointaverage 
is maintained. A student is subject to suspension or dismissal at the time 
the number of unsuccessful course attempts (grades of F, U, W. WP, WF) 
exceeds six except in case of withdrawal for medical or psychological 
reasons. Exceptions may be granted by the Committee on Academic 
Standing in case of readmission and transfer applicants. 

2. Complete a major consisting of at least eight (8) courses. 

3. Achieve an average of 2. Oor betterforallcoursescounted in the major.* 

4. Complete the Distribution Requirements. 

5. Complete the final eight courses offered for the degree at Lycoming. 

6. Earn one year of credit in Physical Education.** 

7. Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at the College. 

8. Complete the above seven requirements within seven years of con- 
tinuous enrollment following the date of matriculation. All exemptions or 
waivers of specific requirements are made by the Committee on 
Academic Standing. 

"This 2.0 average or better must be attained in those courses stipulated ascompnsing the major. 
This requirement is not met by averaging the grades for all courses completed in the major 
department 
"Exemption, for medical reasons, from participation in physical activity associated with physical 
education may be granted only by the College Physician who considers your medical history, 
your physician's report, and his own physical examination of you 

COURSE WORK 

Instruction at Lycoming College is organized, with few exceptions, on a 
departmental basis. Nearly all courses are unit courses, meaning that each 
course taken by you is considered to carry the same academic value as any 
other course. For transfer purposes each course is considered to be 
equivalent to four semester hours of academic work. Each course meets on 
a schedule set by the department and the instructor involved. Such 

46 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS/ 47 



meetings may be on a lecture, discussion, laboratory, or tutorial basis. Vary- 
ing amounts of additional study, reading, writing, and research will be re- 
quired for each course. Most students elect four courses each semester. 
Students may elect to enroll in five (5) courses during any semester provid- 
ed they are Lycoming Scholars or were admitted to the Dean's List during 
the preceding semester while carrying at leastfour courses. Otherstudents 
may petition the Dean of the College for approval to take five courses. You 
can accelerate by taking courses in the May Term and summer sessions. 

MAJORS 

You are required to complete a series of courses in a field of concentration. 
This is accomplished by completing one of the following type of majors: 

Departmental Major, Established Interdisciplinary Major or 
Individual Interdisciplinary Major. 

DEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 

Departmental majors, as described beginning on page 64, are available in: 

Accounting History 

Art Mathematics 

Astronomy Music 

Biology Philosophy 

Business Administration Physics 

Chemistry Political Science 

Economics Psychology 

English Religion 

Foreign Languages Sociology — Anthropology 

French Russian Theatre 

German Spanish 

You may complete two majors; each will be recorded on your record. 

ESTABLISHED INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJOR (EIM) 

An established Interdisciplinary Major (EIM) can be elected instead of a 
departmental major. Two or more departments work together to establish an 
EIM which must be approved by the Faculty. The following ElM's, as describ- 
ed beginning on page 55 are available. 

Accounting-Mathematics Literature 

American Studies Mass Communications 

Criminal Justice Near East Culture and Archeology 

International Studies Soviet Area Studies 

INDIVIDUAL INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJOR (IIM) 

You may take the initiative and design a unique individual interdisciplinary 
Major (IIM) in consultation with your faculty advisor. You may apply for ap- 
proval of an IIM to the Committee on Special Studies via the Registrar, who 
will provide a copy of the Guidelines For Interdisciplinary Majors and other 
necessary forms. 



48 /ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



Individual Interdisciplinary Majors usually involve two or more departments 
each of which offer a major. An MM is normally comprised of a minimum of 
ten courses beyond those satisfying distribution requirements. If the IIM in- 
volves departments not included in meeting the distribution requirements, 
then the ten courses may include elementary courses usually used to satisfy 
distribution requirements. However, you are expected to take at least six 
courses at the advanced (junior or senior) level as determined in consulta- 
tion with your advisors. Changes in this set of courses com prising the major, 
which may be desired or needed as you progress, must be authorized by the 
Committee on Special Studies. 

As an IIM student, you are advised by a committee composed of one 
professor from each department involved. You choose the chairman who 
functions as your advisor. The Committee on Special Studies must certify 
the successful completion of the IIM for graduation. 

An example of a transcript entry is: 

Interdisciplinary Major in Urban Studies ('History, Psychology, Sociology). 

POLICY ON ADMISSION TO MAJOR 

If you desire an established interdisciplinary major (EIM) or departmental 
major (DM), you must declare your elected major, in the Office of the 
Registrar, no later than the beginning of your junior year. 

If you desire an individual interdisciplinary major (IIM), you must apply to 
and secure the approval of the Committee on Special Studies in conformity 
with established policy. 

If the Committee on Special Studies, the Coordinating Committee for an 
EIM, or a department feels that legitimate reasons exist which may warrant 
removal from major status, that committee or department must submit these 
reasons, in writing, to the Dean of the College who, after consultation with 
you, will decide whether or not you are to be removed from major status. The 
Committee on Special Studies, the Coordinating Committee for an EIM, the 
department, or you may appeal the decision of the Dean of the College to the 
Committee on Academic Standing which will either sustain or modify the 
decision of the Dean of the College. 

If you have not declared a major by the beginning of your junior year, you are 
subject to dismissal from the College. 

ACADEMIC ADVISEMENT 

An advantage of a small college is the rich experience gained by the close 
association of students and faculty. The counseling program at Lycoming 
enables you to discuss various academic problems with your faculty ad- 
visor, your instructors, and the staffs of the Dean of the College and the 
Dean of Student Services. 

As an entering Freshman, you are assigned to a faculty advisor who meets 
with you as needed during the year. You will find your advisor willing to 
guide and assist in the many problems that confront a new college student. 
All students are required to have an assigned major. Students who have 
declared a major must have an advisor from within the major department or 
program. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS/49 



DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS 

One of the reasons a student chooses to come to Lycoming is a desire to ob- 
tain a breadth of knowledge in many areas, a liberal arts education. A stu- 
dent who deliberately elects to attend a liberal arts college is interested in 
more than training in a narrow major; he wants knowledge in an area of 
special interest, his major, amplified by exploration into kindred and 
"unrelated" fields. 

Lycoming College, being a liberal arts institution, insists that a major 
program of study be supported and challenged by the influences of a diver- 
sity of subjects. The major must not become narrow in its vision and sterile in 
its ability to help you function effectively in a world where nothing is neatly 
isolated and compartmentalized. The College believes that the essence of 
liberal education is its potential for exposing you to the multitude of 
historical, traditional, and contemporary avenues of thought and action 
which are brought to light in different ways through the study of various dis- 
ciplines. 

By taking different kinds of subjects, you can discover numerous ways of 
seeing things. You can gain advantage of learning to view events and ap- 
proach problems and questions from various points of view. You can dis- 
cover that the interpretation of events and the relevance of solutions and 
answers will vary greatly for different individuals and groups. 

To have you achieve at least a minimal insight into this multiplicity of 
perspective, thought, and reaction. Lycoming requires thatyou selectsome 
of your courses from the six groups outlined below. Theaimisnotthegar- 
nering of specific, prescribed information, but rather, the development of a 
broadly based perspective of all aspects of life. 

The distribution requirements in English, Mathematics, Fine Arts. Natural 
Science and History and Social Science may be met by superior perfor- 
mance on the General Examinations of the College Level Examination 
Program (CLEP). Further information about CLEP may be obtained from the 
Office of the Registrar. 

Courses for which a grade of S is recorded may not be used toward the 
fulfillment of the distribution requirement. Students may not register for 
English I on an S/U basis. 

ENGLISH 

You are required to pass English I and one other English course. English I 
must be taken during the Freshman year. By passing the CLEP General Ex- 
amination you may be exempted from English I. This examination is offered 
during Freshman Orientation. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE OR MATHEMATICS 

You are required to meet a minimum basic requirement in either a foreign 
language or mathematics. 

Mathematics. If you elect mathematics, you must complete four courses in 
mathematics. By passing the CLEP General Examination you may reduce 



50 /ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



this requirement to two courses other than Math I. This examination is 
offered during the Freshman Orientation. 

Foreign Language. If you elect to take a foreign language, you may choose 
from among French. German, Greek, Hebrew, Russian, or Spanish. You are 
required to pass two courses on the intermediate or a higher course level. 
Placement at the appropriate course level will be determined by the faculty 
of the department of foreign languages and literatures. No student who has 
had two or more years of a given language in high school shall be admitted 
to the elementary course in the same foreign language for credit, except by 
written permission from the chairman of the department. French 28, Rus- 
sian 1 7, 28, 33, 35, 36, 47 and Spanish 28 will meet part of this require- 
ment only if the section taught in the language is completed. 



RELIGION OR PHILOSOPHY 

You are required to pass one year (two courses in the same subject) in either 
philosophy or religion. 

Philosophy. You may take any two philosophy courses. 
Religion. You may take any two religion courses. 



FINE ARTS 

You are required to pass one year (two courses) in one of the following: 

Art. You may take any two art courses. 

Literature. You may take any two literature courses selected from the 
offerings of the departments of English and Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 

Music. Any combination of music courses totaling the equivalent of eight 
semester hours will satisfy this requirement. You can earn the equivalent of 
eight semester hours in Music in one of the following ways: 

1 . Take two academic courses from those numbered Music 1 through 59 
and Music 70's. 

2. Take a total of eight semester hours of applied music, from courses 
numbered Music 60 through 69, which are earned fractionally as 
follows: 

A. V2 semester hour of credit for each ha If -hour of instruction per week 
in courses numbered 60 through 66. 

B. 1 semester hour of credit per semester for each hour of instruction 
per week in courses numbered 60 through 66. 

C. 1 semester hour of credit per semester for Music 67, 68, or 69. 

3. Take one academic course (Music 1 through 59 and Music 70's) plus the 
equivalent of four semester hours earned fractionally in applied music 
courses 60 through 69 as explained in "2" above. 

Theatre. Any two theatre courses 1 and above will satisfy this requirement. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS/ 51 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

You are required to pass one year (any two courses) in one of the following: 
astronomy, biology, chemistry, or physics. 

HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

You are required to pass one year (two courses) in one of the following: 

Economics. You may take any two courses. 

History. You may take any two courses. 

Political Science. You may take any two courses. 

Psychology. You may take Psychology 1 plus one course usually chosen 
from among Psychology 15. 16, 30, 31, 32. or 38. 

Sociology and Anthropology. You may take Sociology 10 plus another 
course. 

NOTE: A course can be used to satisfy only one distribution requirement. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The College uses the traditional letter system of grading: A B C D F or 
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Any student enrolled full-time at Lycoming 
College may receive a maximum of four grades with S or U. Only one course 
may be taken on this basis during any semester. No course takenonanS/U 
basis after the declaration of the major and approval by the department in- 
volved may be used to satisfy a requirement of that major, including courses 
required by the major department which are offered by other departments. 
Instructor-designed S/U courses are excepted from this limitation. 

During the May Term, instructors, with the approval of the Dean of the 
College may designate courses to be taken on an S/U basis only. These 
courses will not count toward the four-course limit. A course selected on a 
S/U basis which is subsequently withdrawn will not count toward the four- 
course limit. 

Any student electing a course on an S/U basis may designate a minimum 
acceptable letter grade of 'A' or 'B'. If the letter grade actually earned by the 
student equals or exceeds the minimum acceptable letter designated by the 
student, then the letter grade actually earned in the course will be entered 
on the student's permanent record and will be used in computing the 
student's GPA. In this case the course will not count toward the four-course 
limit since it was not completed on an S/U basis. If the student fails to 
designate a minimum acceptable letter grade of if the letter grade actually 
earned is lower than the minimum acceptable lettergrade designated by the 
student, then the Registrar will substitute an 'S' for any passing grade ('A', 
'B', 'C or 'D') and a 'U' for an 'F grade. Courses for which a grade of S is 
recorded may not be used toward the fulfillment of any distribution require- 
ment. Students may not register for English 1 on a S/U basis. 

The student shall declare by the end of the period during which courses may 
be added an intention to be graded on an S/U basis. At the same time, and 



52 /ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 



except for instructor designated S/U courses, the student will indicate a 
minimum acceptable letter grade. The instructor will not be notified of these 
decisions, unless the student chooses to do so. A student electing the S/U 
option shall be expected to perform the same work in the course as those be- 
ing graded on the regular basis. 

You will receive full credit for a course passed with a Satisfactory grade. 
Neither the "S" nor the "U" count in computing the grade point average. 

Incomplete grades may be given if you. for absolutely unavoidable reasons, 
have not been able to complete the work requisite to the course. Such cir- 
cumstances usually stem from medical sources. An incomplete grade must 
be removed within six (6) weeks of the next regular semester. 



MID-SEMESTER EVALUATIONS FOR FRESHMEN 

Mid-Semester evaluations are reported for freshman students whose work 
is unsatisfactory. These reports are filed with the Registrar who then reports 
them to the students concerned and their faculty advisors. The evaluation 
report from the instructor may be one of two types: (a) submission of letter 
grade of "D" or "F" (b) submission of a written evaluation forthosefreshmen 
who are performing below the satisfactory level. 



ACADEMIC HONESTY 

The integrity of the academic process of the College requires honesty in all 
phases of the instructional program. The College assumes that students a re 
committed to the principle of academic honesty. Students who fail to honor 
this commitment are subject to dismissal from Lycoming. Procedural 
guidelines and rules for the adjudication of cases of academic dishonesty 
are printed in the Faculty Handbook and Pathfinder available to students in 
the library. 



ACADEMIC HONORS 

The Dean's List is issued at the close of each semester in recognition of 
superior scholarship. Students are admitted to the Dean's List when they 
have completed at least four courses with other than S/U grades during any 
fall or spring semester and have a minimum grade point average of 3.50 for 
the semester. 

You will be awarded the bachelor of arts degree with honors when you have 
earned the following grades: 

Bachelor of Arts, summa cum laude — a 3.90 grade point average. 
Bachelor of Arts, magna cum laude — a 3.50 grade point average. 
Bachelor of Arts, cum laude — a 3.25 grade point average. 

High quality scholarship is also recognized by completion of a departmental 
honors program and by election of students to membership in Honor 
Societies. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS/ 53 



ACADEMIC STANDING 

Students whose cumulative or semester averages fall below "C" are con- 
sidered to be in academic difficulty and their academic record will be 
reviewed by the Dean of the College. Such students may be placed on 
academic probation, suspended, or dismissed according to regulations es- 
tablished by the Faculty. 



CLASS ATTENDANCE 

The academic program at Lycoming is based upon the assumption that 
there is value in class attendance for all students. Individual instructors have 
the prerogative of establishing reasonable absence regulations in any 
course. You are responsible for learning and observing these regulations. 



STUDENT RECORDS 

The policy regarding student educational records is designed to protectthe 
privacy of students against unwarranted intrusions and is consistent with 
Section 438 of the General Education Provision Act (commonly known as 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974, as amended). The 
details of the College's policy on student records and the procedure for 
gaining access to student records is contained in the current issue of the 
Pathfinder. 



WITHDRAWING FROM COURSES 

You may drop any course during the first fifteen days of classes and no 
record of such enrollment shall be made on your permanent record card. 
You mayalsoadd any course during the first fifteen days of classes, subject 
to the approval of the instructor. If you wish to drop a course between the 
fifteenth day and the twelfth week of classes you must secure a withdrawal 
form from the Office of the Registrar. You must present this form to the in- 
structor of the course in question who will then assign one of the following 
grades: 

W — Progress at the time of withdrawal cannot be determined. 
WP — Progress at the time of withdrawal is satisfactory. 
WF — Progress at the time of withdrawal is unsatisfactory. 

This grade is then entered on your permanent record card. No withdrawal 
grade is counted in the computation of the grade point average. Students 
may not withdraw from courses after the twelfth week of a semester. A stu- 
dent is subject to suspension or dismissal at the time the number of un- 
successful attempts (grades of F, U, W, WP, WF) exceeds six. except in case 
of withdrawal for medical or psychological reasons. 



IP 





a' m*. * 



% 









INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS 
ESTABLISHED INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS (EIM) 

ACCOUNTING— MATHEMATICS 

Coordinator— Assistant Professor Mahon 

The Accounting-Mathematics Interdisciplinary Major is designed to offer, 
within a liberal arts framework, courses which will aid you in constructing 
mathematical models for business decision making. You will obtain a sub- 
stantial background in mathematics and a working knowledge in accoun- 
ting. 

Majors will be only four courses short of a math major and three courses 
short of an accounting major. Required accounting courses are: Elemen- 
tary, Intermediate, Costand Budgetary Accounting Theory. In Mathematics 
they are: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II, and III: and Linear Algebra: 
plus two courses from Differential Equations, Introduction to Numerical 
Analysis, and Mathematic Statistics I and II. Business courses required are 
Legal Principles I and II. Recommended courses include: Computer 
Science, Introduction to Statistics, Financial Management, Quantitative 
Business Analysis, Insurance. Principles of Economics, Industrial Psy- 
chology, Social Psychology, and Introduction to Sociology. 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

Coordinator — Associate Professor Piper 

The American Studies major offers a comprehensive program in American 
civilization which introduces you to the complexities underlying the 
development of America and its contemporary life. The thirteen major 
courses you will complete include: 

FOUR CORE COURSES — The primary integrating units of the major, these 
team-taught courses will teach you how to think of ideas from different 
points of view and how to correlate information and methods from various 
disciplines: 

America As a Civilization (First semester of major study) 
American Studies — Research and Methodology (Second semester) 
American Tradition in the Arts and Literature (Third semester) 
Internship or Independent Study (Junior and/or senior year) 

CONCENTRATION AREAS — Six courses in one option and three in the other 
are needed. Your six primary Concentration Option courses in American 
Arts or American Society build around the insights you gain in the Core 
Courses. They focus particular attention on areas most germane to your 
academic and vocational interests. The three additional courses from the 
other option give further breadth to your understanding of America. You 
also will be encouraged to take elective courses relating toothercultures. 

American Arts Concentration Option 

American Art —Art 24 

American Art of the 20th Century —Art 32 

19th Century American Literature —English 26 

20th Century War American Literature —English 28 

55 



56/ INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS 



American Music — Music 51 

American Theatre — Theatre 51 

American Society Concentration Option 

U.S. Social and Intellectual History to 1877 —History 42 

U.S. Social and Intellectual History since 1877 — History 43 

The American Constitutional System — Political Science 30 

The American Political Tradition — Political Science 47 

American Economic Development — Economics 51 

Racial and Cultural Minorities — Sociology 34 

You should design your American Studies major in consultation with the 
program co-ordmator or a member of the American Studies committee. 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Coordinator — Instructor Strauser 

This major is designed to acquaint students with the American criminal 
justice system and to provide an understanding of the social, psychological, 
philosophical, and political contexts within which the system of criminal 
justice functions. Its aim is to develop students' intellectual and scientific 
skills in raising and attempting to answer important questions about the 
system ofjusticeand its placein society. The program offers opportunity for 
in tern experience in the field and prepares for careers in the areas of law en- 
forcement, probation and parole, prisons, and treatment services. 

The major as two tracks. Track I prepares for careers in Law Enforcement. 
Track II prepares for careers in Corrections. 

Track I— Law Enforcement. The major consists of ten courses, distributed as 
follows: 

A. Professional courses in criminal justice (three courses) 

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (Sociology and 
Anthropology 1 5) 

Introduction to Law Enforcement (Sociology and Anthropology 23) 
The American Prison System. (Sociology and Anthropology 39) 

B. Courses mt he social, psychological, philosophical, and political con- 
text of the justice system (seven courses) 

Criminology (Sociology and Anthropology 30) and either Juvenile 
Delinquency (Sociology and Anthropology 21) orRacialand Cultural 
Minorities (Sociology and Anthropology 34) (two courses) 

Abnormal Psychology (Psychology 16) (one course) 

America as a Civilization (American Studies 10), Afro-American 
History (History 28), or United States Social and Intellectual History 
Since 1877 (History 43) (one course) 

Law and Society (Political Science 35) and Civil Rights and Liberties 
(Political Science 31) (two courses) 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS/ 57 



Social and Political Philosophy (Philosophy 22) (one course) 

C. Internship or practicum in law enforcement. (Recommended but not 
required for the major) 

Track II — Corrections. The major consists of ten courses, distributed as 
follows: 

A. Professional courses in criminal justice (three courses) 

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (Sociology and 
Anthropology 1 5) 

The American Prison System (Sociology and Anthropology 39) 
Introduction to Social Work (Sociology and Anthropology 42) 

B. Courses in the social, psychological, philosophical, and political con- 
text of the justice system (seven courses) 

Criminology (Sociology and Anthropology 30) and either Juvenile 
Delinquency (Sociology and Anthropology 21 ) or Racial and Cultural 
Minorities (Sociology and Anthropology 34) (two courses) 

Abnormal Psychology (Psychology 16) (one course) 

America as a Civilization (American Studies 10), Afro-American 
History (History 28). or United States Social and Intellectual History 
Since 1877 (History 43) (one course) 

Law and Society (Political Science 35) and Civil Rights and Liberties 
(Political Science 31) (two courses) 

Social and Political Philosophy (Philosophy 22) (one course) 

C. Internship or practicum in corrections. (Recommended but not re- 
quired for the major) Prerequisites: Mathematics 13, Psychology 2 1 , 
and Psychology 39. These prerequisites may be waived in certain 
cases by the Coordinating Committee. 

Majors should seek advice concerning course selection from members of 
the coordinating committee and should note course prerequisites in plan- 
ning their programs. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

Coordinator: Assistant Professor Larson 

This major in International Studies is designed to integrate an understan- 
ding of the changing sociaCpolitical. and historical environment of Europe 
today with study of Europe in its relations to the rest of the world, particularly 
the United States. It stresses the international relations of the North Atlantic 
Community and offers the student opportunity to emphasize either Euro- 
pean studies or international relations. The program provides multiple 
perspectives on the cultural traits that shape popular attitudes and in- 
stitutions. Study of a single country is included as a data-base for com- 
parisons, and study of its languageas a basis for direct communication with 
its people. 



58 / 'INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS 



The program is intended to prepare a student either for graduate study or for 
careers which have an international component. International obligations 
are increasingly assumed by governmental agencies and a wide range of 
business, social, religious, and educational organizations. Opportunities 
are found in the fields of journalism, publishing, communications, trade. 
banking, advertising, management, and tourism. The program also offers 
flexible career preparation in a variety of essential skills such as research, 
data analysis, report writing, language skills, and the awareness necessary 
for dealing with people and institutions of another culture. Preparation for 
related careers can be obtained through the guided selection of courses 
outside the major in the areas of Business, Economics, Foreign Languages 
and Literatures, Government, History, and International Relations; or 
through a second major. Students should design their programs in con- 
sultation with members of the committee on International Studies and other 
departments. 

By completing 6-8 additional courses in the social sciences (which include 
those courses needed to complete a major in Economics, History or Political 
Science) and the required program in Education, students can be certified 
for the teacher education program in Social Studies. By completing a major 
in the foreign language (5 more courses) and the Education program, 
students can be certified to teach that language. The International Studies 
program also encourages participation in study abroad programs, as well as 
the Washington International Semester, and the United Nations Semester. 

The major includes eleven courses selected as follows: 

International Relations Course— Four or two courses (if two, then four must be taken from Area 
Courses) Courses within this group are designed to provide a basic understanding of the inter- 
national system and of Europe's relations with the rest of the world. Political Science 25 is re- 
quired. 

Political Science 25 World Politics 
Economics 43 International Trade 
History 34 European Diplomatic History 
Political Science 43 International Organization 

Area Courses — Four of two courses (if two, then four must be taken from International Relations 
Courses). Courses within this group are designed to provide a basic understanding of the Euro- 
pean political, social, and economic environment. History 1 1 and Economics 22 are required. 

History 11 Europe 1815-Present 
Economics 22 Economic Systems of the West 
Political Science 20 European Politics 
History 23 20th Century Europe to 1929 
History 24 20th Century Europe Since 1929 

National Courses 

Language — Two courses in one language. 

French 20, plus one course numbered 23 or above (except 28) 
German 20, plus one course numbered 31 or above 
Spanish 20. plus one course numbered 31 or above 

County— One course. The student must select, according to his or her language preparation, 
one Curopean country which will serve as a special interest area through out the program. The 
country selected will serve as the base for individual projects in the major courses, wherever 
possible. 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS/ 59 



France — French 28 Modern France 
Germany— History 80 Topics in German History 
Spain — Spanish 28 Contemporary Hispanic Life 

Elective Course — Once course which should involve further study of some aspect of the program 
Appropriate courses are any Area of International Relations Courses not yet taken History 1 0. 32. 
33". Economics 23. 45; Political Science 37. 38. 39. 46, related foreign hteraturecoursescoun- 
ting toward the Fine Arts requirement, and internships, 

49 SENIOR SEMINAR 

A one -semester seminar, taken in the senior year, in which students and 
several faculty members will pursue an integrative topic in the field of In- 
ternational Studies. Students will work to some extent independently. 
Guest speakers will be invited. The seminar will be open to qualified per- 
sons from outside the major and the college. Prerequisite: Consent of 
the instructor. 



LITERATURE 

Coordinator — Associate Professor Maples 

This major recognizes literature as a distinct discipline beyond national 
boundaries and combines the study of any two literatures in the areas of 
English, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. You can thus explore two 
literatures widely and intensively at the upper levels of course offerings 
within each of the respective departments while developing and applying 
skills in foreign languages. The major prepares you for graduate study in 
either of the two literatures studied or in Comparative Literature. 

The major requires at least six literature courses, equally divided between 
the two literatures concerned. The six must be at the advanced level as 
determined in consultation with advisors (normally courses numbered 20 
and above in English and 40 and above in Foreign Languages). In general, 
two of the advanced courses in each literature should be period courses. 
The third course, taken either as a regular course or as independent study, 
may have as its subject another period, a pa rticu la r author, genre, or literary 
theme, or some other unifying approach or idea. Beyond these six, the major 
must include at least two additional courses from among those counting 
toward a major in the departments involved. Any prerequisite courses in the 
respective departments (for example. English 14, 15. 16, 17, French 23, 
German 33. 34) should be taken during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. You should design your program in consultation with a faculty 
member from each of the literatures concerned. Programs for the major 
must be approved by the departments involved. 



MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

Coordinator — Associate Professor Madden 

The major in Mass Communications offers a liberal arts background and a 
professional sequence through a combination of courses from the 
departments of Art, Business Administration, English, Political Science. 
Sociology-Anthropology, and the Broadcasting and Graphic Arts 
departments of the Wilhamsport Area Community College. The program 



60/ INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS 



assures a broadly based academic foundation with special competency in a 
selected concentration, plus career orientation in a specific area. 

Students must: 

1 . Successfully complete one of the following sequences. 

Advertising 

Advertising Design-Photography 

Broadcast Journalism 

Newspaper 

Public Relations 

2. Take a concentration of at least four courses related to the student's 
program in a single department of the college, in consultation with the 
chairman of that department. If the student concentrates in a department 
represented in the sequence he has chosen, he must take at least three 
courses which are not included in that sequence. 

3. Successfully complete an internship or independent study related to the 
sequence he has chosen. 

Advertising Sequence: 

Comm. 10 Introduction to Mass Communications 

Bus. 28-29 Marketing Management 

Bus. 32 Advertising Principles 

Bus. 47 Creative Advertising 

P.S. 48 Public Opinion and Polling or 

Soc. 47 Research Methods 

G.A. 13 Layout and Design 

G.A. 14 Principles of Typographic Design 

Choose two courses from the following with consent of advisor: 
Art 1 1, Art 27, Br. 20, Eng. 18, Eng. 31 or Eng. 32. 

Advertising Design-Photography Sequence: 

Comm. 10 Introduction to Mass Communications 

Art 1 1 Drawing 

Art 15 Two-dimensional Design 

Art 63 Color Theory 

Art 27 Photography 

Bus. 32 Advertising Principles 

G.A. 13 Layout and Design 

G.A. 14 Principles of Typographic Design 

G.A. 27 Film Assembly and Plate Making 

Choose two courses from the following with consent of advisor: 
Art 16. Art 37, Art 21, Bus. 47, Eng. 31 or Eng. 32. 



Broadcast Journalism Sequence: 

Comm. 10 Introduction to Mass Communications 

Eng. 24 News Writing for Radio and TV 

P.S. 34 Political News Writing 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS/ 6 7 



P.S. 48 Public Opinion and Polling 

Thea. 1 Principles of Oral Communication 

Br. 14 Station Management and Community Responsibility 

Br. 21 In-Service Training I 

Br. 22 In-Service Training II 

Choose two courses from the following with consent of advisor: 
Art 27. P.S. 1 1. P.S. 32. Psych. 30. Soc. 34. 

Newspaper Sequence: 

Comm. 10 Introduction to Mass Communications 

Eng. 23 News Writing for the Print Media 

P.S. 34 Political News Writing 

P.S. 1 1 State and Local Government 

P.S. 48 Public Opinion and Polling 

Art 27 Photography 

G.A. 14 Principles of Typographic Design 

Choose two courses from the following with consent of advisor: 
Art 37. Eng. 22. Eng. 24, P.S. 32. Psych. 30, Soc. 34. 

Public Relations Sequence: 

Comm. 10 Introduction to Mass Communications 

Eng. 23 News Writing for the Print Media 

Eng. 37 Public Relations and Publicity 

Bus. 28-29 Marketing Management 

P.S. 48 Public Opinion and Polling or 

Soc. 47 Research Methods 

Art 27 Photography 

Choose two courses from the following with consent of advisor: 
Art 37, Bus. 32, Eng. 18, Eng. 24, Psych. 30. 



NEAR EAST CULTURE AND ARCHEOLOGY 

Coordinator — Professor Guerra 

The Near East Culture and Archeology interdisciplinary major is designed to 
acquaint you with the "cradle of Western civilization", both initsancientand 
modern aspects. Majors will complete a minimum of eight to ten courses 
related to the Near East. 

Required courses are described in their departmental sections and include: 

1 . Four courses (semesters) in language and culture from: 

History and Culture of the Ancient Near East (Religion 28) 

History of Art (Art 22) 

Ancient History (History 20) 

Old Testament Faith and History (Religion 13) 

Judaism and Islam (Religion 24) 

Two semesters of foreign language (Hebrew 1 , 2 or Greek 1 , 2) 



62 /INTERDISCIPLINARY MAJORS 



2. Two courses (semesters) in archeology from: 

Bible, Archeology, and Faith (Religion 46) 

Special Archeology courses, such as "studies" or in May Term or summer 

sessions in the Near East. 

3. Two courses (semesters) in the cooperating departments (Art, History, 
Political Science, Religion, and Sociology and Anthropology) or related 
departments. These two courses, usually taken in the junior or senior 
years, can be independent study. Topics should be related either to the 
ancient or the modern Near East and must be approved in advance by the 
committee supervising the interdisciplinary program. The study of 
modern Arabic or Hebrew is encouraged. 

Other courses may be suggested by the supervisory committee within the 
limits of a ten course major. The number of courses taken within this 
program applicable toward fulfilling the College distribution requirements 
will vary according to the selection of courses you make. 



SOVIET AREA STUDIES 

Coordinator — Assistant Professor Winston 

The Soviet Area Studies major is an interdisciplinary major designed to 
offer, within the framework of a liberal arts education, intensified study of 
the Soviet Union, communism, and related matters. The program enables 
you to acquire a broader perspective of the USSR than can generally be ob- 
tained within one discipline. A Cultural Tour of the USSR is normally 
available in the May Term and can be used to satisfy one of the courses 
needed for 4 below: 

Required courses are described in their departmental sections and include: 

1 . Six semesters of Russian language and/or literature beyond the elemen- 
tary level. 

2. Topics in Russian and Soviet History (History 31 and 32) 

3. Two courses (semesters) of Senior Seminar on the USSR. 

4. Four courses (semesters) from: 
Comparative Economic Systems (Economics 23) 
The Soviet Political System (Political Science 36) 
Communist Strategies and Tactics (Political Science 37) 
Social and Political Philosophy (Philosophy 22) 

Under this program, up to nine courses required to satisfy the college dis- 
tribution requirements can be completed from the above courses. 



COURSES 



Numbers 1 -9 Elementary courses in departments where such courses are 
not counted as part of the student's major. 

Numbers 10-19 Freshman level 

Numbers 20-29 Sophomore level 

Numbers 30-39 Junior level 

Numbers 40-49 Senior level 

Numbers 50-59 Special Advanced Courses 

Numbers 60-69 Special Sessions Courses 

Numbers 70-79 Seminar Study 

Numbers 80-89 Independent Study 

Numbers 90-99 Independent Study for Departmental Honors 

Courses in the 50-59. 70-79, 80-89. 90-99 number series are not listed 
under each department, but are in effect for each department and represent 
the particular studies listed opposite the numbers above (that is, seminar 
study for all departments fall in the 70-79 series, etc.). 

Courses not in sequence are listed separately, as: 

Introduction to Art Art 10 

Drawing I Art 1 1 

Courses which imply a sequence are indicated with a dash between, mean- 
ing that the first semester must be taken prior to the second, as: 

Intermediate French French 10-11 

64 



ACCOUNTING/65 



ACCOUNTING 



Professor: Richmond (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Mahon 

The purpose of the accounting major is to assist the student prepare for a 
personally satisfying, socially useful, and successful career within the ac- 
counting profession, whether public, private or governmental, through a 
rigorous curriculum stressing pre-professional education. 

To achieve this, all majors are reguired to take Accounting 1 0, 20-2 1 , 30, 
40 and 41 . The remaining two courses of the major reguirement are to be 
selected from Accounting 31 , 42, 43, 44, or Internship after consultation 
with and approval of the department in accordance with the student's 
professional interests and objectives. 

Students seeking entry into the public accounting field are advised to in- 
vestigate the professional requirements for certification in the state in which 
they intend to practice so that they may meet all educational requirements 
prior to graduation. All majors are advised to enroll in Economics 1 Oand 1 1 , 
Business 35. 36, and 38, Mathematics 1 3 and 1 5, and one of the following: 
Business 33, Economics 20 or 37. 

10 ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING THEORY 

An introductory course in recording, classifying, summarizing, and in- 
terpreting the basic business transaction. Problems of classification 
and interpretation of accounts and preparation of financial statements 
are studied. 

20-21 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING THEORY 

An intensive study of accounting statements and analytical procedures 
with emphasis upon corporate accounts. Price level adjustments, 
partnerships, joint ventures, installments and consignment sales, 
branch and home office accounting, and the statement of affairs are 
among topics studied. Prerequisite: Accounting 10. 

30-31 COST AND BUDGETARY ACCOUNTING THEORY 

Methods of accounting for material, labor, and factory overhead ex- 
penses consumed in manufacturing using job order, process and stan- 
dard costing. Application of cost accounting and budgeting theory to 
decision making in the areas of make or buy, expansion of production 
and sales, and accounting for control are dealt with. Prerequisite: Ac- 
counting 2 1 or consent of instructor. 

40 AUDITING THEORY AND PRACTICE 

The science of verifying, analyzing, and interpreting accounts and 
reports. An audit project is presented, solved and the auditor's report is 
written. Prerequisite: Accounting 21. 



66/ACCOUNTING 



41 FEDERAL INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING AND PLANNING 

Analysis of the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code relating to in- 
come, deductions, inventories, and accounting methods. Practical 
problems involving determination of income and deductions, capital 
gains and losses, computation and payment of taxes through 
withholding at the source and through declaration are considered. 
Planning transactions so that a minimum amount of tax will result is 
emphasized. Prerequisite: Accounting 10 or consent of instructor. 



42 FEDERAL INCOME TAX ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 

An analysis of the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code relating to 
partnerships, estates, trusts, and corporations. An extensive series of 
problems is considered and effective tax planning is emphasized. Prere- 
quisite: Accounting 4 7. 



43 CONTEMPORARY ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS 

Certain areas of advanced accounting theory, including fund accoun- 
ting, are covered, and pro b I ems a re taken from past C. P. A. examinations 
which require a thorough knowledge of the core courses in their solu- 
tion. The course is intended to meet the needs of those interested in 
public accounting and preparation for the Certified Public Accountants 
Examination. Prerequisite: Accounting 3 7 or consent of instructor. 



44 CONTROLLERSHIP 

Control process in the organization. General systems theory, financial 
control systems, centralization-decentralization, performance 
measurement and evaluation, forecasts and budgets and marketing, 
production and finance models for control purposes. Prerequisite: Ac- 
counting 3 7 or consent of instructor. 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Interns in accounting typically work off-campus under the supervision 
of a public or private accountant. 



80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Typical examples of recent studies in accounting are: computer 
program to generate financial statements, educational core for public 
accountants, inventory control and church taxation. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See Index 
for Special Program section.) 



AMERICAN STUDIES/67 



AMERICAN STUDIES 

Associate Professor: Piper (Coordinator) 

The American Studies major offers a comprehensive program in American 
civilization which introduces you to the complexities underlying the 
development of America and its contemporary life. For further information 
refer to American Studies which is listed as an Interdisciplinary Major. 

1 AMERICA AS A CIVILIZATION 

An analysis of the historical, socio-cultural, economic, and political 
perspectives on American civilization with special attention to the in- 
terrelationships between these various orientations. 

1 1 AMERICAN STUDIES — RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY 

The study and application of various research methods, including new 
trends in historical study, quantitative analysis, cross-cultural studies, 
and on-site inspection. 

12 AMERICAN TRADITION IN THE ARTS AND LITERATURE 

The relationships of the arts and literature to the various historical 
periods of American life. 

13 INTERNSHIP OR INDEPENDENT STUDY 

An opportunity to relate the learning in the Core Courses and the Con- 
centration Areas to an actual supervised off-campus learning situation 
or independent study project. 



ART 

Associate Professor: Shipley (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Bogle, Hughes 
Part-Time Instructor: Fetter, Putterman, Wild 

A major consists of a balanced program of history of art and studio courses. 
In addition to the core courses of the major program (Art 1 1 , 1 5, or 1 6, 20, 
21 , 2 2, 23, 30, and 46), the student will elect two advanced courses in art 
history. Art 25 and 3 5, or Art 28 and 38 may be substituted for Art 20 and 
30. Majors will be required to present their better work in a one-man show 
during their senior year. 

10 INTRODUCTION TO ART 

Presents historical and contemporary styles of architecture, sculpture, 
painting, and the minor arts: considers the roles of the elements of 
design and of materials and techniques in the creation and appreciation 
of works of art. 



68/ART 



1 1 DRAWING I 

Study of the human figure with gesture and proportion stressed. Stu- 
dent is made familiar with different drawing techniques and media. 
Some drawing from nature. Offered in alternate semesters with Drawing 
II and III. 



14 DESIGN FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 

A course designed to give each student the opportunity to explore, in his 
own creative style, ideas, techniques and methods for involving children 
in expressive activities through the use of a wide range of media in the 
making of prints, puppets, pictorial and design projects, simple model- 
ing, mosaics, plaster casting, weaving and stitchery projects, simple 
jewelry and gift crafts, lettering projects, mobiles, stabiles, and other 
three-dimensional designs created from scrap materials. 

15 TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

The basic fundamentals found in the two-dimensional arts; line, shape, 
form, space, color, and composition are taught in relationship to the 
other two-dimensional arts. Perceptual theories and their relationships 
to what and why we see what we see in arts is discussed with each 
problem. 



16 THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

An introduction to the uses of form and materials. Objects will be 
designed whose form follows function, such as kites; whose form 
follows expressive intent, such as plasterconstructions or moviefilms. 



20 PAINTING I 

An introduction of painting techniques and materials. Coordination of 
color, value, and design within the painting is taught. Some painting 
from the figure. No limitations as to painting media, subject matter or 
style. Prerequisite: Art 15. 



21 DRAWING II 

Continued study of the human figure. Emphasis is placed on realism and 
figure-ground coordination with the use of value and design. Prere- 
quisite: Art 7 7. 



22 HISTORY OF ART I 

A survey of Western architecture, sculpture, and painting. Emphasis is 
on the interrelation of form and content and on the relatedness of the 
visual arts to their cultural environment: Near East, Egypt, Greece, 
Rome, and Medieval Europe. 



ART/69 



23 HISTORY OF ART II 

A survey of Western architecture, sculpture, and painting. Emphasis is 
on the interrelation of form and content and on the relatedness of the 
visual arts to their cultural environment: Renaissance to Modern. 

24 AMERICAN ART 

The development of the arts in America from Colonial times to the Ar- 
mory Show with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries: Copley. 
Greenough, Bulfinch, Homer, Eakins, Richardson, and Sloan. 

25 SCULPTURE I 

An introduction to the techniques, materials, and ideas of sculpture. 
Clay, plaster, wax, wood, and other materials will be used. The course 
will be concerned with ideas about sculpture as expression, and with 
giving material form to ideas. 

26 CRAFTS I 

An introduction to the various craft materials, processes, design 
problems, and techniques involved in work in such crafts as clay. wood, 
fiber, metal, and plastics. 

27 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY 

Objectives of the course are to develop technical skills in the use of 
photographic equipment (cameras, films, darkroom, pnntmaker)andto 
develop sensitivity in the areas of composition, form, light, picture quali- 
ty, etc. Each student must own or have access to a 35mm roll film 
camera. 

28 PRINTMAKING I 

Practice of the techniques of silk-screen, wood-block, and linoleum- 
block printing. Prerequisite: Art 7 7 or 15. 

30 PAINTING II 

Emphasis is placed on individual style and technique. Artists and 
movements in art are studied. No limitations as to painting media, sub- 
ject matter, or style. Prerequisite: Art 20. 

31 MODERN ART 

Major artists and important stylistic developments in Europe from 1 880 
to the present, including Fauvism, Expressionism, Cubism, Dada, and 
Surrealism as well as developments in the United States after 1945 
such as Abstract Expressionism and the painting of the sixties. 

32 AMERICAN ART OF THE 20TH CENTURY 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in the United States from 1 900 to 
the present with emphasis on developments of the fifties and sixties: an 
inquiry into the meaning and historical roots of contemporary art. 



70/ART 



33 19TH CENTURY ART 

Emphasis on painting, sculpture and architecture of Western Europe 
from 1760 to 1900. including the work of late 18th century artists 
David and Goya and 1 9th century developments from Romanticism to 
Post-Impressionism. 

34 ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy from the late 1 3th century 
to the early 16th century, including the work of Giotto, Ghiberti, 
Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, Piero della Francesca, Alberti, 
Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Michelangelo. 

35 SCULPTURE II 

A continuation of Art 25 or Art 1 6, with emphasis on independent pro- 
jects and more complex technique. Casting of bronze and aluminum 
sculpture will be done in the school foundry. Prerequisite: Art 16or25. 

36 CRAFTS II 

More advanced experimentation with crafts materials, with greater 
emphasis upon good craftsmanship and aesthetic quality. Prerequisite: 
Art 26. 



37 PHOTOGRAPHY II 

To extend the skills developed in Photography I by continued growth in 
technical expertise, presentation, conceptual ability, and aesthetic sen- 
sibility. Emphasis is placed upon term essay in area of student's interest 
and presented in booklet format. Prerequisite: Art 27. 



38 PRINTMAKING II 

Further exploration of silk-screen printing techniques, practice of the 
techniques of engraving, drypoint, etching, and aquatint. 



40 PAINTING III 

Professional quality is stressed. There is some experimentation with 
new painting techniques and styles. 

41 DRAWING III 

Continued study of the human figure, individual style and professional 
control of drawing techniques and media are now emphasized. 

46 STUDIO RESEARCH 

Independent research in an elective studio area, conducted under the 
supervision of the appropriate faculty member, includes creation of 
work which may be incorporated in one-man senior exhibition. Student 
works in private studio assigned by the department. 



ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS/ 7 7 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Commercial Design, Interior Design, and photography programs in 
local businesses and Museum work at the Historical Museum. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent studies in anatomy, Aspects of the Art Noveau. Lithography, 
Photography, Pottery, Problems in Illustration, and watercolor. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See Index 
for Special Program section.) 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 

Professor: Fineman 

Associate Professor: W. Smith (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: Enckson 

The department offers two majors. The major in astronomy is specifically 
designed to train students in the field of planetarium education. The major in 
physics prepares students for graduate work in physics or astronomy, for 
the cooperative program in engineering, orfor state certification as secon- 
dary school teachers of physics. 

A number of courses in this department are offered on two levels which 
differ in the degree of mathematical rigor and sophistication needed. All 
such courses have dual catalog numbers, with the letters B (basic) and A 
(advanced) appearing after the course names to indicate the level. Both the 
B and A level of a course meet together for the same three hours of lecture 
each week, while the A level meets for one additional hour each week of 
more advanced mathematical development of the material. This system is 
designated as the "3 + 1 " method. No student may earn credit for both levels 
of a course. 

The major in astronomy requires Astronomy and Physics 1 1 , 1 2, 1 5, 1 6, 30. 
34. 35, and 36; Mathematics 18 and 19 (Calculus I and II); and one year of 
chemistry. One or more of thejollowing are recommended: Astronomy and 
Physics 3, 4, 5, 31, and 32; andArt 27 (Photography I). All junior and senior 
majors must attend and participate in the weekly departmental colloquia. 

The major in physics requires Astronomy and Physics 11, 12, 25, 26, 28. 
29, 44, and at least one additional course numbered between 41 and 48; 
Mathematics 18and19(Calculuslandll);andone year of chemistry. Inad- 
d it ion. Mathematics 20 and 21 (Calculus III and Differential Equations) are 
required for graduate school preparation and for the cooperative program 
in engineering. It is also recommended that students planning on graduate 
study in physics or astronomy take one year of a foreign language and 



72 /ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 



Mathematics 1 3 and 1 5 (Introduction to Statistics and Computer Science). 
With departmental consent, advanced courses may be substituted for 
Astronomy and Physics 1 1 and 12.Alljumorandseniormajors must attend 
and participate in the weekly departmental colloquia. 

3 OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY 

A methods course providing the opportunity to make a variety of 
astronomical observations, both visually and photographically, with 
and without telescopes. The planetarium is used to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the sky at various times during the year and from different 
locations on earth. 

4 FIELD GEOLOGY 

A methods course introducing the field techniques needed to study the 
geology of an area. May term. 

5 HISTORY OF ASTRONOMY 

A comprehensive view of the evolution of astronomical thought from 
ancient Greece to the present, emphasizing the impact that 
astronomical discoveries and the conquest of space have had on 
Western culture. Four hours of lecture per week. 

11 PRINCIPLES OF ASTRONOMY 

A summary of current concepts of the universe, from the solar system to 
distant galaxies. Describes the techniques and instruments used in 
astronomical research. Presents not only what is reasonably well known 
about the universe, but also considers some of the major unsolved 
problems. Three hours of lecture, one hours of discussion and 
planetarium demonstration, and two hours of laboratory per week. Fall 
Semester. 

12 ENVIRONMENTAL AND EARTH SCIENCE 

A study of the physical processes that continually affect the planet 
Earth, shaping our environment. Describes how past events and life- 
forms can be reconstructed from preserved evidence to reveal the 
history of our planet from its origin to the present. Emphasizes the ways 
in which geology, meterology, and oceanography interrelate with man 
and his environment. Three hours of lecture, one hours of discussion 
and demonstration, and two hours of laboratory per week. Spring 
semester. 

15 CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS B 

25 CONCEPTS OF PHYSICS A 

Rather than presenting an encyclopedic view of classical physics, this 
course emphasizes the development of concepts and principles to be 
applied in all further courses. The fundamental quantities and laws of 



ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS/ 73 



mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and thermodynamics will be 
presented and illustrated with numerous problems. Lectures presented 
by the "3 + 7 " method; also one hour of recitation and three hours of 
laboratory per week. Credit may not be earned for both Astronomy and 
Physics 1 5 and 25. Prerequisite for 1 5: Mathematics 1 7 (Precalculus). 
Corequisite for 25: Mathematics 18 (Calculus I). Fall Semester. 

16 WAVES AND PARTICLES B 



26 WAVES AND PARTICLES A 

Description of waves, the wave equation, electromagnetic waves. 
Reflection, refraction, interference, and diffraction. The constituents of 
matter and radiation, the interaction of matter and radiation, wave- 
particle duality. The Bohr atom, atomic structure, and atomic spectra. 
Nuclear structure, radioactive decay, and nuclear reactions. Lectures 
presented by the "3 + 7 " method; also one hours of recitation and three 
hours of laboratory per week. Credit may not be earned for both 
Astronomy and Physics 16 and 26. Prerequisite for Astronomy and 
Physics 16: 15 or 25 (Concepts of Physics B or A). Prerequisite for 
Astronomy and Physics 26; 2 5 (Concepts of Physics A). Corequisite for 
Astronomy and Physics 26: Mathematics 19 (Calculus II). Spring 
Semester. 

28 MECHANICS 

Kinematics and dynamics of single particles and systems of particles. 
Rigid bodies. Introduction to the mechanics of continuous media. Mov- 
ing reference frames. Lagrangian mechanics. Four hours of lecture and 
three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Astronomy and 
Physics 25 (Concepts of Physics A) and Mathematics 1 9 (Calculus II). 



29 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

The electromagnetic field, electrical potential, magnetic field, and elec- 
tric and magnetic properties of matter. Electric circuits. Maxwell's 
equations. Laboratory includes electronics as well as classical electrici- 
ty and magnetism. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory 
per week. Prerequisite: Astronomy and Physics 26 (Waves and Particles 
A) 

30 PLANETARIUM TECHNQUES 

A methods course covering major aspects of planetarium program- 
ming, operation, and maintenance. Students are required to prepare 
and present a planetarium show. Upon successfully completing the 
course, students are eligible to become planetarium assistants. Two 
hours of lecture and demonstration and four hours of practical training 
per week. Prerequisite: Astronomy and Physics 1 1 (Principles of 
Astronomy) or consent of the instructor. 

31 OPTICS AND ELECTRONICS B 



74 /ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 



41 OPTICS AND ELECTRONICS A 

A course oriented toward the design and use of optical and electronics 
instruments. Lectures presented by the "3 + I " method; also three hours 
of laboratory per week. Credit may not be earned for both Astronomy 
and Physics 31 and 41 . Prerequisites for Astronomy and Physics 31:11 
(Principles of Astronomy) and either Astronomy and Physics 1 6 or 26 
(Waves and Particles B or A). Prerequisites for Astronomy and Physics 
41 : 1 1 (Principles of Astronomy) and 26 (Waves and Particles ^.Alter- 
nate years. 

32 ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS B 

42 ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS A 

A survey course on the physics of the upper atmosphere. Lectures 
presented by the "3 + / "method. Credit may not be earned for both 32 
and 42. Prerequisites for 32: 12 (Environmental and Earth Science) and 
Astronomy and Physics 1 6 or 26 (Waves and Particles B or A). Prere- 
quisites for Astronomy and Physics 42: 1 2 (Environmental and Earth 
Science) and Astronomy and Physics 26 (Waves and Particles A). Alter- 
nate years. 

34 RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY B 

44 RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY A 

A detailed presentation of the special theory of relativity, and a short 
view of the general theory and its classical proofs. Man's concepts of the 
universe, with particular attention to alternative modern cosmological 
models. Discussion of the Cosmological Principle, its rationale, and its 
implications. Lectures will be presented by the "3+ I "method. Credit 
may not be earned for both Astronomy and Physics 34 and 44. Prere- 
quisites for Astronomy and Physics 34: 1 1 (Principles of Astronomy) 
and either Astronomy and Physics 1 5 or 25 (Concepts of Physics Bor A), 
Mathematics 1 8 (Calculus I), Prerequisites for Astronomy and Physics 
44: 1 1 (Principles of Astronomy) and 25 (Concepts of Physics A). 

35 STELLAR EVOLUTION AND NUCLEOSYNTHESIS B 

45 STELLAR EVOLUTION AND NUCLEOSYNTHESIS A 

The physical principles governing the internal structure and external 
appearance of stars. Mechanisms of energy generation and transport 
within stars. The evolution of stars from initial formation to final stages. 
The creation of chemical elements by nucleosynthesis. Lectures 
presented by the "3 + I" method. Credit may not be earned for both 
Astronomy and Physics 35 and 45. Prerequisites for Astronomy and 
Physics 35: 1 1 (Principles of Astronomy) and either Astronomy and 
Physics 16 or 26 (Waves and Particles B or A). Corequisite for 
Astronomy and Physics 35: Mathematics 19 (Calculus ll)orconsentof 
the instructor. Prerequisites for Astronomy and Physics 45: 1 1 (Prin- 
ciples of Astronomy) and 26 (Waves and Particles A). Alternate years. 



ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS /7 5 



36 STELLAR DYNAMICS AND GALACTIC STRUCTURE B 



46 STELLAR DYNAMICS AND GALACTIC STRUCTURE A 

The motion of objects in gravitational fields. Introduction to the n-body 
problem. The relation between stellar motions and the galactic poten- 
tial. The large scale structure of galaxies in general and of the Milky Way 
Galaxy in particular. Lectures presented by the "3+ 1" method. Credit 
may not be earned for both Astronomy and Physics 36 and 46. Prere- 
quisites for 36: 11 (Principles of Astronomy) and either 15 or 25 
(Concepts of Physics Bor A). Corequisitefor Astronomy and Physics 36: 
Mathematics 1 9 (Calculus II) or consent of instructor. Prerequisites for 
Astronomy and Physics 46: 1 1 (Principles of Astronomy) and 25 
(Concepts of Physics A). Corequisite for Astronomy and Physics 46: 28 
(Mechanics) or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



48 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS 

Basic concepts and formulation of quantum theory. The free particle. 
the simple harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and central force 
problems will be discussed. Both time independent and time dependent 
perturbation theory will be covered. Four hours of lecture and recitation. 
Prerequisite: either Astronomy and Physics 26 (Waves and Particles A) 
or Chemistry 31 (Physical Chemistry II), and Mathematics 2 1 (Differen- 
tial Equations). 



49 ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS COLLOQUIA 

Active scientists in astronomy, physics, and related areas are invited to 
present lectures on their own research or other professional activities. 
In addition, seniors majoring in astronomy or physics present the results 
of a literature survey or individual research project. One hour per week. 
Majors in this department must attend three semesters without credit 
during junior and senior years (register for non-credit 00, Colloquia). 
Credit may be earned during the senior semester in which the student's 
presentation is given. 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program Section.) 

Interns in physics work off-campus under the supervision of 
professional physicists e_m ployed by local industries or hospitals. 



80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Independent studies may be undertaken in most areas of astronomy 
and/or physics. 



90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



76/B/OLOGY 



BIOLOGY 



Associate Professor: Angstadt (Chairman), Kelley. Sherbine 
Assistant Professor: Diehl, Mayers, Zaccana 

A major consists of eight Biology courses including 10-1 1 . 21 . 22, 23, 24, 
and 25. In addition, one year of chemistry and mathematics is required. Cer- 
tain specific exceptions to the core program will be made for three-year 
students enrolled in cooperative programs. Such exceptions are noted un- 
der the particular cooperative program heading in the Career Opportunities 
section of the catalog and students interested in these programs should 
contact the Program Director before finalizing their individual programs. 
Credit may not be earned for both Biology 1 and 1 or for both Biology 2 and 
1 1 . Consent of instructor may replace Biology 10-1 1 as a prerequisite for all 
Biology courses. 



1-2 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 

An investigation of biological principles, including ecological systems, 
form and function in selected representative organisms (especially 
man), cell theory, molecular biology, reproduction, inheritance, adapta- 
tion, and evolution. The course is designed primarily for students not 
planning to major in the biological sciences. 

3 FIELD BIOLOGY FOR TEACHERS 

A methods course for students preparing to teach biology. Sources and 
methods of collecting and preserving various plant and animal 
materials. Offered summer only. 

5-6 HUMAN ANATOMY — PHYSIOLOGY 

An introduction to the physics and chemistry relative to biological 
systems. Human anatomy, physiology, and developmental biology will 
be surveyed. An introduction to microbiology with emphasis given to 
host-pathogen relationships and the immune response. 

10-11 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY 

An introduction to the study of biology designed for students planning 
to major in the biological sciences. Majortopicsconsidered includethe 
origin of life, cellular respiration and photosynthesis, genetics, develop- 
ment, anatomy and physiology, ecology, behavior and evolution. 

21 MICROBIOLOGY 

A study of microorganisms. Emphasis is given to the identification and 
physiology of microorganisms as well as to their role in disease, their 
economic importance and industrial applications. Prerequisite: Biology 
7 0-7 7. 



BIOLOGY/ 77 



22 GENETICS 

A general consideration of the principles governing inheritance in- 
cluding treatment of classical, molecular, cytological. physiological, 
microbial, human and population genetics. Prerequisite: Biology 10- 

23 ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 

The mechanisms and functions of animal systems including the 
autonomic, endocrine, digestive, cardio-vascular, respiratory, renal, 
nervous, and reproductive systems. Mammalian physiology is stressed. 
Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1 . 

24 ECOLOGY 

The study of the principles of ecology with emphasis on the role of 
chemical, physical, and biological factors affecting the distribution and 
succession of plant and animal populations and communities. Included 
will be field studies of local habitats as well as laboratory experimenta- 
tion. Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1. 

25 PLANT SCIENCES 

A survey of the structure, development, function, classification and use 
of plants, with emphasis on flowering plants. The study will comprise 
four general topic areas: Form, including morphology and anatomy of 
plants in growth and reproduction; Function, concentrating on nutrition 
and metabolism peculiar to photosynthetic organisms; classification 
systems and plant identification; and human uses of plants. Prere- 
quisite: Biology 10-1 1. 

30 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY OF VERTEBRATES 

Detailed examination of the origins, structure, and functions of the prin- 
cipal organs of vertebrates. Special attention is given to the progressive 
modification of organs from lower to higher vertebrates. Prerequisite: 
Biology 10-1 1. Alternate years. 

31 HISTOLOGY 

A study of the basic body tissues and the microscopic anatomy of the 
organs and structures of the body which are formed from them. Focus is 
on normal human histology. Prerequisite: Biology 10-11. Alternate 
years. 

33 ECONOMIC AND SYSTEMATIC BOTANY 

Structure and classification of plants, with emphasis on those species, 
particularly food and drug plants, having significance for human affairs. 
Prerequisites: Biology 10-11, Biology 25. Alternate years. 

34 INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

Comparative study of the invertebrate phyla with emphasis on 
phylogeny, physiology, and morphology. Prerequisite: Biology 10-11. 
Alternate years. 



78/BIOLOGY 



35 CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY 

Physico-chemical background of cellular function; functions of mem- 
brane systems and organelles; metabolic pathways; biochemical and 
cellular bases of growth; development and responses of organisms. 
Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1 , and a year of Chemistry. Alternate years. 

36 INTRODUCTION TO MARINE BIOLOGY AND BIOLOGICAL 
OCEANOGRAPHY 

The study of major marine habitats and the adaptations of marine 
organisms as well as the physical and chemical characteristics of 
oceans. This field oriented course is held at a major Marine Biological 
Station, and includes diving and collecting from boats. Prerequisite: 
Biology 1 0-1 1 , May term only. 

37 FIELD ORNITHOLOGY 

A field oriented course, with in-the-f leld discussions, demonstrations 
and exercises dealing with the systematics and identification of the 
birds of the Northern U.S., their behavior, migration, habitat selection 
and populations dynamics. Studies will stress experimental techniques 
used in the field, including banding, recording and playback methods, 
territorial mapping and population analysis. Prerequisite: Biology 10- 
1 1 , May term only. 

38 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY 

A rigorous introduction to Clinical Microbiology with emphasis given to 
rapid identification of human bacterial pathogens. Laboratory to in- 
clude such diagnostic procedures as antibiotic sensitivity testing, 
senlogica I diagnosis, anaerobic culture techniques and hemolytic reac- 
tions. Field trips will be taken to several clinical labs. Prerequisites: 
Biology 10-1 1 . Biology 21, May term only. 

40 PARASITOLOGY 

The biology of parasites and parasitism. Studies on the major groups of 
animal parasites, their taxonomy and life cycles, with an emphasis on 
those of medical and veterinary importance. Prerequisite: Biology 10- 
1 1 . Alternate years. 

41 VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

A study of the development of vertebrates from fertilization to the fully 
formed fetus. Particular attention is given to the chick and human as 
representative organisms. Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1 Alternate years. 

42 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 

A study of the causation, function, evolution, and biological 
significance of animal behaviors in their normal environmentand social 
contexts. Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1. Alternate years. 



BIOLOGY/ 79 



43 ICHTHYOLOGY 

The course will encompass the anatomy, taxonomy, and life historiesof 
both freshwater and marine fish. Species of major economic and sport 
interest will be featured, while the areas of fish management, 
aquiculture, and fish harvesting will be considered. Prerequisite: 
Biology 10-1 7. Alternate years. 



44 BIOCHEMISTRY 

Emphasis is given to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino 
acids, proteins, and nucleic acids; integration of metabolism; and 
biochemical control mechanisms including allosteric control, induc- 
tion, repression, as well as the various types of inhibitive control 
mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20-2 7 or Chemistry 5. or consent 
of instructor. Cross-listed as Chemistry 44. Alternate years. 

46 PLANT ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

A study of plant physiology as a function of plant anatomy. Metabolic 
relationships and environmental factors will be examined from a 
background of the structure and development of cells, tissues, organs, 
and whole plants. Prerequisites: Biology 1 '0-1 7, Biology 25. Alternate 
years. 



47 IMMUNOLOGY 

The course introduces concepts concerning how pathogens cause dis- 
ease and host defense mechanisms against infectious diseases. 
Characterization of and relationships between antigens, haptens, and 
antibodies are presented. Serological assays will include: agglutination 
precipitations, immunofluorescence, Immunoelectrophoresis, and 
complement fixation. Other topics are: immediate and delayed 
hypersensitivities (i.e. allergies such as hay fever and poison ivy), im- 
munological renal diseases, immunohematology (blood groups, etc.). 
the chemistry and function of complement, autoimmunity and organ 
graft rejection phenomena. Prerequisite: Biology 10-11. Alternate 
years. 



48 ENDOCRINOLOGY 

This course begins with a survey of the role of the endocrine hormones 
in the integration of body functions. This is followed by a study of the 
control of hormone synthesis and release, and a consideration of the 
mechanisms by which hormones accomplish their effects on target 
organs. Prerequisite: Biology 10-1 1. Alternate years. 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section) 

Recent samples of internships in the department include ones with the 
Department of Environmental Resources, nuclear medicine or 
rehabilitative therapies at the local hospital. 



80/ BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section) 

Departmental Studies are experimentally oriented and may entail either 
lab or field work. 



90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

Examples of recent Honors Projects have involved stream analysis, gyp- 
sy moth research, drug synthesis and testing. 




BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Professor: Hollenback (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: King, Weaver 
Instructor: Waite 
Lecturer: Larrabee 
Part-Time Instructor: Rauff 

The major is designed to train students in analytical thinking and verbal 
and oral communication, in addition to educating them in the principal dis- 
ciplines of business. To accomplish this, ten courses are required: Business 
10-11. 23. 28-29, 38-39. 40, and 41 and Mathematics 1 3. Accounting 10 
may be substituted for Business 1 if a student changes his major. Majors 
also are urged to enroll in Economics 10, 11; Business 35 and 36; 
Mathematics 1 2 and 1 5. The additional elective offerings are intended to 
add depth in the areas of finance, marketing, and management. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION/81 



10-11 MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 

The business firm is a decision-making institution adapting to a con- 
stantly changing environment. Future administrators and managers are 
introduced to their stewardship responsibilities by use of accounting 
and statistical techniques as tools in planning and controlling the 
organization. 

23 QUANTITATIVE BUSINESS ANALYSIS 

Techniques of quantitative analysis useful in business management. 
Topics include: sampling, hypothesis testing, index numbers, analysis 
of time series, linear programming, and decision theory. Prerequisite: 
Math 13 or consent of instructor. 

28-29 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 

Planning, organization, and control of the distribution activities of the 
firm, and an analysis and evaluation of the marketing system, its in- 
stitutions and processes. Application of marketing principles and the 
development of strategies for specific marketing problems. Product, 
channel flow, promotion and pricing strategies explored. Readings, 
cases, and games. 

32 ADVERTISING 

Nature, scope, methods, and effects of promotion. Techniques of 
analysis and control in the use of advertising, and publicity as tools in 
developing business strategy. 

33 INVESTMENTS 

Analysis of the leading types of investments available to the individual 
and the firm. Use of forecasting methods, financial reports, and finan- 
cial indicators. Methods of buying and selling securities with a discus- 
sion of the agencies involved including brokerage houses and stockex- 
changes. 

34 INSURANCE 

Analysis of the major insurance methods of overcoming risk, including: 
life, accident, health, marine, and social insurance. Fidelity and surety 
bonds. Commercial and government plans. 

35 LEGAL PRINCIPLES I 

Lectures and analysis of cases on the nature, sources, and fundamen- 
tals of the law in general, and particularly as relating to contracts, agen- 
cy, and negotiable instruments. Open only to juniors and seniors. 

36 LEGAL PRINCIPLES II 

Lectures on the fundamentals and history of the law relating to legal 
associations, real property, wills, and estates. Open only to juniors and 
seniors. 



82 /BUSINESS A DMINIS TRA TION 



38-39 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

Planning, organization, and control of the financial aspects of the firm. 
Development of financial principles and application to specific 
situations. Sources and uses of funds, costs of funds, profit determina- 
tion, expansion, reorgnization and liquidation. Prerequisite: Business 
7 7 or Accounting 20, and Business 23. 



40 MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS 

Structural characteristics and functional relationships of a business 
organization as well as the problems encountered in coordinating the 
internal resources of a firm. Emphasis on administrative efficiency and 
procedures. 



41 BUSINESS POLICIES 

Planning, organization, and control of business operations; setting of 
goals; coordination of resources; development of policies. Analysis of 
strategic decisions encompassing all areas of a business, and the use 
and analysis of control measures. Emphasis on both the internal 
relationship of various elements of production, finance, marketing, and 
personnel and the relationship of the business entity to external stimuli. 
Readings, cases, and games. Prerequisites: Business 23. 28-29. 38-39. 
and 40 or consent of instructor. Seniors only. 

42 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

An introduction to the managerial problems of recruiting, selecting, 
training, and retraining the human resources of the firm. Emphasis is 
placed on the interrelationship of personnel policies with management 
objectives and philosophies in such areas as fringe benefits, wage and 
salary policies, union activities, and health and safety. 



43 RETAIL MANAGEMENT I 

Planning, organization, and control of the retailing firm. Competitive 
strategy development through store location, layout, administrative 
organization, buying and pricing. Cases, reading, and papers. Alternate 
years. 

44 RETAIL MANAGEMENT II 

Inventory control, retail sales, promotion, and financial analysis of the 
enterprise. Survey of current issues and government, social, and 
economic forces of concern to the retailer. Retailing principles applies 
to specific management situations through cases, games, and reading. 
Prerequisite: Business 43 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

45 ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY 

An analysis of organizational design through the use of analytical 
models. Using the systems approach, an understanding of human 



CHEMISTRY/83 



behavior in formal organizations is developed, and practical problems 
of organizational design are discussed. Topics include: traditional 
organizational theory, behavior patters, organizational design, and 
change. Alternate years. 

46 PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

An introduction to the production function in industry. Topics include: 
product design, plant location and layout, operational analysis, perfor- 
mance standards, line balance theory, inventory control, and the impact 
of automation through technological change. Alternate years. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Typical examples are marketing analysis for a paper products firm, plan- 
ning a branch store, hotel and real estate management, banking and in- 
surance. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for 
Special Program section.) 

Examples of recent studies are: The economic impact of a college on a 
community: a marketing strategy for a local firm entering the consumer 
market. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

A recent project was a study of the evolution of anti-trust legislation in 
the United States. 



CHEMISTRY 

Professor: Hummer (Chairman), Radspinner 
Assistant Professor: Franz 
Part-time Instructor; Fineman 

A major consists of eight Chemistry courses: Chemistry 10-1 1 , 20-21 , 
30-31. 32, and 33; Mathematics 18-19, 20, and Astronomy and Physics 
25, 26. Mathematics 1 5 and_21 . and French, German.orRussiana re highly 
recommended. 



5 BRIEF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

This course is designed for those non-chemistry majors who elect a 
single semester course only in organic chemistry. The material will il- 
lustrate principles and concepts of organic chemistry supported by that 
descriptive material which would find application for students of 
medical technology, biology, nursing, forestry, education, and the 
humanities. Topics included are bonding and structure, alkanes, 



84 /CHEMISTRY 



arenes, and their functional derivatives, amino acids and proteins, car- 
bohydrates, and other naturally-occurring compounds. Three hours of 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1 0. Not open for credit to students who have received credit 
for Chemistry 20. 

10 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

An introduction to the concepts and models of chemistry which are 
necessary for an understanding of the fabric and dynamics of the 
material world. These principles include stoichiometry, atomic and 
molecular structure and properties, the states of matter, solutions, 
kinetics, equilibrium, and nomenclature. A study of the chemistry of 
representative elements and their compounds is made through the 
application of fundamental principles. The laboratory treats quantitative 
relationships as well as qualitative analysis. Three hours lecture, one 
hour discussion, and one three-hour laboratory period each week. 

Prerequisite: Placement in Chemistry 10 is determined in part by a 
student's score on part of the CLEP mathematics examination taken by 
all incoming Freshmen during orientation. 



1 1 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

Continuation of Chemistry 10. with emphasis on the foundations of 
analytical, inorganic, and physical chemistry. The principal unifying 
concepts of chemical systems are examined in both Chemistry 1 and 
1 1 . Three hours lecture, one hour discussion, and one three-hour 
laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 10. 

20-21 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A systematic study of the compounds of carbon including both aliphatic 
and aromatic series. The laboratory work introduces the student to sim- 
ple fundamental methods of organic synthesis, isolation, and analysis. 
Three hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each week. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 1 . 

30-31 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of the fundamental principles of theoretical chemistry and their 
applications. The laboratory work includes techniques in 
physiochemical measurements. Three hours lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 1, Mathematics 
20, and one year of Physics or consent of instructor. 

32 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of the fundamental methods of gravimetric, volumetric, and 
elementary instrumental analysis together with practice in laboratory 
techniques and calculations of these methods. Two hours lecture and 
two three-hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
1 1 or consent of instructor. 



CHEMISTRY/85 



33 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A study of modern theories of atomic and molecular structure and their 
relationship to the chemistry of selected elements and their com- 
pounds. Three hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each 
week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 30, Mathematics 20. and one year of 
Physics or consent of instructor. 



39 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS 

After presenting the origin, basic concepts and formulation of Quantum 
Mechanics with emphasis on its physical meaning the free particle, sim- 
ple harmonic oscillator and central force problems will be investigated. 
Both time independent and time dependent perturbation theory will be 
covered. The elegant operator formalism of quantum mechanics will 
conclude the course. Four hours of lecture and recitation. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 2 1 .either Chemistry 31 or Astronomy and Physics 26, and 
consent of instructor. Cross-listed as Astronomy and Physics 48. 



40 ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Selected topics, which may include mechanisms of organic reactions, 
synthesis, detailed structure and chemistry of natural products, 
polynuclear hydrocarbons, and aromatic heterocyclics. Three hours 
lecture. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 . 



41 QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 

Theory and application of the systematic identification of pure organic 
compounds and mixtures. Two hours lecture and two three-hour 
laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 . 

43 ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of advanced analytical methods with emphasis on 
chromatographic, electrochemical, and spectroscopic methods of 
analysis. Three hours lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each 
week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 3 1 and 32. 

44 BIOCHEMISTRY 

Emphasis is given to the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino 
acids, proteins, and nucleic acids; integration of metabolism; and 
biochemical control mechanisms including allosteric control, induc- 
tion, repression, as well as the various types of inhibitive control 
mechanisms. Prerequisite: Chemistry 21 or 5 or consent of instructor. 
Cross-listed as Biology 44. 

45 SPECTROSCOPY AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE 

Theory and practice of molecular structure determination by spec- 
troscopic methods. Three hours lecture. Pre or co-requisites: Chemistry 
3 1 . 33. or consent of instructor. 



86 /CHEMISTRY 



48 CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM 

A seminar in which faculty, students, and invited professional chemists 
discuss their own research activities or those of others which have 
appeared in the recent chemical literature. Prerequisite: Three 
semesters of non -credit Chemistry Colloquium 00 taken during the 
junior and sen/or years. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

The student will ordinarily work under supervision in an industrial 
laboratory and submit a written report on his project. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

The student will ordinarily work on a laboratory research project and will 
write a thesis on his work. 



90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

The student will ordinarily work on a laboratory research project with 
emphasis being on the student's showing initiative and making a 
scholarly contribution. A thesis will be written. 




ECONOMICS/87 



ECONOMICS 

Professor: Opdahl. Rabold (Chairman) 

The major has two tracks. Track I is designed for the student whose primary 
interest lies in business management; Track II is designed for students with 
an interest in graduate work, teaching, government, or non-business 
careers and for those with less well defined interests. 

Track I — Managerial Economics requires: Economics 10, 11, 32, and 41; 
Business 10-1 1, or Accounting 10 and 20; Business 38 and 39; plus two 
electives from the following: Economics 20, 31, 35, 37, 43 and Business 
40. 

Track II — Political Economy requires: Economics 10, 11, 30, 31, 40, and 
five electives of which three must be in economics and two in political 
science, all selected with the advice and consent of the student's advisor or 
department chairman. 

In addition, the following courses are recommended: All majors — Math 1 3 
and Business 23; Majors planning graduate work— Math 18-19; Track II 
maiors — Business 10-11. 



2 CONSUMER ECONOMICS 

A course in "family" or "practical" economics, designed to teach 
students how they and their families can be intelligent consumers; that 
is, how they can spend, save, and borrow so as to maximize the value 
they receive for the income they have. Treats subjects such as intelligent 
shopping; the uses and abuses of credit; investing, savings; buying in- 
surance, automobiles and houses; medical care costs; estates and wills; 
etc. Alternate years. 

10 PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY I 

Macroeconomics. Deals with problems of the economic system as a 
whole. What influences the level of national income and employment? 
What is inflationandwhydowe have it? What is the role of government 
in a modern capitalistic system? How does business organize to 
produce the goods and services we demand? How are the American 
financial and banking systems organized? What is the nature of 
American unionism? What are the elements of government finance and 
fiscal policy? 

1 1 PRINCIPLES OF POLITICAL ECONOMY II 

This semester focuses upon microeconomics and selected current 
economic problems. It deals with the relatively small units of the 
economy such as the firm and the family. Analyzes demand and supply. 
Discusses how business firms decide what and how much to produce 
and how goods and services are priced in different types of markets. 
Also considers such problems as economic growth, international trade, 
poverty, discrimination, ecology, and alternative economic systems. 



88/EC0N0MICS 



20 MONEY AND BANKING 

Covers business fluctuations and monetary and fiscal policy; the finan- 
cial organization of society; the banking system; credit institutions; 
capital markets; and international financial relations. Prerequisite: 
Economics 10 and 1 1 . Alternate years. 



22 ECONOMIC SYSTEMS OF THE WEST: Capitalism and Socialism 

A comparative analysis of the underlying ideologies, the basic in- 
stitutions and the performance of selected economic systems extant in 
the West. Alternate years. 



23 SOVIET-TYPE ECONOMIES 

An analysis of the ideologies, institutions, and performance of Soviet- 
type economies, with emphasis upon Marxian theory and the economy 
of the U.S.S.R.; comparison of selected Eastern European and Chinese 
approaches to Communism. Alternate years. 



24 URBAN PROBLEMS 

The application of economic theory to the study of significant social, 
political, and economic problems associated with urbanization, in- 
cluding poverty employment education, crime, health, housing, land 
use and the environment, transportation, and public finance. Analysis of 
solutions offered. Alternate years. 



25 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 

A study of the relationship between environmental decay and economic 
growth, with particular reference to failures of the price and property 
rights systems; application of cost/benefit analysis; measures aimed at 
the creation of an ecologically viable economy. Alternate years. 



30 INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 

An advanced analysis of contemporary theory regarding consumer de- 
mand, production costs and theory, profit maximization, market struc- 
tures, and the determinants of returns to the factors of production. 
Prerequisite: Economics 10 and 1 1 . 



31 INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 

An advanced analysis of contemporary theory and practicewith regard 
to business fluctuations, national income accounting, the determina- 
tion of income and employment levels, and the use of monetary and 
fiscal policy. Prerequisite: Economics 10 and 1 1 . 



ECONOMICS/89 



32 GOVERNMENT AND THE ECONOMY 

An analytical survey of government's efforts to maintain competition 
through antitrust legislation; to supervise acceptable cases of private 
monopoly through public utility regulation and via means of regulatory 
commissions; and to encourage or restrain various types of private 
economic activities. Alternate years. Prerequisite: Economics 10 and 
11 . or consent of instructor. 

35 LABOR PROBLEMS 

The history of organized labor in the United States, including the struc- 
ture of unions; employers' opposition to unions; the role of government 
in labor-management relations; the economic impact of unions. Alter- 
nate years. 

37 PUBLIC FINANCE 

An analysis of the fiscal economics of the public sector, including the 
development, concepts, and theories of public expenditures, taxation, 
and debt at all levels of American government. Includes also the use of 
fiscal policy as an economic control device. Prerequisite: Economics 10 
and 1 1 or consent of instructor. 

40 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 

A discussion of the origins, development, and significance of the 
economic ideas embodied in the works of Smith, Marx. Schumpeter. 
Keynes, and others. Prerequisite: Economics Wand 1 1 or consent of 
instructor. 

41 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 

The application of economic theory and methodology to the solution of 
business problems. Subjects include: optimizing techniques, risk 
analysis, demand theory, production theory, cost theory, linear 
programming, capital budgeting, market structures, and the theory of 
pricing. Prerequisite: Economics 10 and 1 1 . 

43 INTERNATIONAL TRADE 

A study of the principles, theories, development, and policies concer- 
ning international economic relations, with particular reference to the 
United States. Subjects covered include: U.S. commencal policyand its 
development; international trade theory; tariffs and other protectionist 
devices; international monetary system and its problems; balance of 
payments issues. Alternate years. Prerequisite: Economics Wand 1 1. 

45 DEVELOPMENT OF UNDERDEVELOPED NATIONS 

A study of the theories and problems of capital accumulation, allocation 
of resources, technological development, growth, planning techniques 
and institutions, and international relations encountered by the 
developing nations. Alternate years. 



90 /EDUCATION 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Typically off-campus in business, banking, or government, supervised 
by assigned employee of sponsoring organization. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special 
Program section.) 

Superior students may select independent study in various courses, 
particularly in preparation for graduate school. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



EDUCATION 

Associate Professor: Keesbury (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Conrad 
Part-Time Instructor: Schaeffer 

Education 20 and Psychology 38 are prerequisites to all other offerings in 
the Education Department. Education 20 should be taken at least two (2) 
semesters before the Professional Semester. 

Students seeking elementary certification must complete Mathematics 7. 
Education 30, 40, 41 , and 42 as prerequisitestothe Professional Semester. 
which includes Education 45, 47, and 48. They must also complete the 
Elementary Games section of the Physical Education course. 

Students seeking secondary certification must fulfill the requirements of a 
participation experience in area schools before the Professional Semester. 
Arrangements for participation are to be made through the Education 
Department. Application for the secondary or elementary Professional 
Semester must be made before October 1st of the junior year. 

20 INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF EDUCATION 

A study of teaching as a profession with emphasis on the economic, 
social, political, and religious conditions which influence American 
schools and teachers. Consideration is given to the school environ- 
ment, the curriculum, and the children with the intention that the 
students will examine more rationally their own motives for entering the 
profession. Not open to freshman. 

30 THE PSYCHOLOGY AND TEACHING OF READING IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL 

A background course in the psychological, emotional, and physical 
basis of reading. A study of the learning process as it applies to reading, 
child development and the curriculum. The development of a reading 
program from the beginning (readiness) through principles, problems. 



EDUCATION/91 



techniques, and materials used in the total elementary schools. Obser- 
vation of and participation with supenorteachers in elementary schools 
of the Greater Williamsport Area. Prerequisites: Education 20 and Psy- 
chology 38. 

32 INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS 

A study of the value, design, construction, and application of the visual 
and auditory aids to learning. Practical experience in the handling of 
audio-visual equipment and materials is provided. Application of Audio- 
Visual Techniques. Application of the visual and auditory aids to lear- 
ning. Students will plan and carry out actual teaching assignments 
utilizing various A-V devices. 

39 PUBLIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

An examination of the various curricula of the public schools and their 
relationships to current practices. Special attention will be given to the 
meaning and nature of the curriculum; the desirable outcomes of the 
curriculum; conflicting and variant conceptions of curncular content; 
modern techniques of curncular construction; criteria for the evalua- 
tion of curricula; the curriculum as a teaching instrument. Emphasis will 
be placed upon the curriculum work with in the teaching field of each in- 
dividual. 




92 /EDUCATION 



40 LANGUAGE ARTS AND CHILDREN'S LITERATURE FOR ELEMENTARY 
TEACHERS 

This course is designed to consider the principles, problems, materials, 
and techniques of teaching English, spelling, penmanship, choral 
speaking, and children's literature. Observation of superior teachers in 
elementary schools of the Greater Williamsport Area. Prerequisite: 
Education 30 or consent of instructor. 

41 TEACHING THE SOCIAL STUDIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Studies and experiences to develop a basic understanding of the struc- 
ture, concepts, and processes of anthropology, economics, geography, 
history, political science, and sociology as these relate to the elemen- 
tary school social science curriculum. Practical applications, 
demonstrations of methods, and the development of integrated 
teaching units using tests, reference books, films, and other teaching 
materials. Prerequisite: Education 30 or consent of instructor. 

42 SCIENCE. HEALTH. AND SAFETY FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS 

Science methods and materials interpreting children's science ex- 
periences and guiding the development of their scientific concepts. A 
briefing of the science content of the curriculum, its material and use. 
An introduction to the methods of first aid, preservation of health, 
prevention of accidents, and the development of good health habits. 
Prerequisite: Education 30 or consent of instructor. 

45 METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

A study of methods and materials of teaching all elementary school sub- 
jects, including art and music, with a viewto preparing studentsfortheir 
particular student teaching assignment. Demonstration lessons by 
students, micro-teaching, simulation activities, and group interrelation 
studies may be included. Prerequisite: Education 30, 40. 41, and 42. 

46 METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
(PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

A study of materials, methods, and techniques of teaching with 
emphasis on the student's major. Stress is placed on the selection and 
utilization of visual and auditory aids to learning. Students will teach 
demonstration lessons in the presence of the instructor and the 
members of the class and will observe superior teachers in the secon- 
dary schools of the Greater Williamsport Area. Prerequisites: Education 
20, Psychology 38, and the Participation Experience. 

Al PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN EDUCATION 
(PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Seminar in the issues, problems and challenges encountered by 
teachers in the American public schools, especially those related to the 
student teaching experience. 



ENGLISH/93 



48 PRACTICE TEACHING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
(PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Two Units. Exceeds state mandated minimum requirements. 
Professional laboratory experience under the supervision of a selected 
cooperating teacher in a public elementary school of the Greater 
Williamsport Area. Organized learning experiences. Actual classroom 
experience.* 

49 PRACTICE TEACHING IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL 
(PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Two Units. Exceeds state mandated minimum requirements. 
Professional laboratory experience under the supervision of a selected 
cooperating teacher in a public secondary school of the Greater 
Williamsport Area. Organized learning experience. Emphasis on actual 
classroom experience, responsibility in the guidance program and out- 
of-class activities.* 



'Practice teachers are required to follow the calendar of the school district to which they are 
assigned. 



ENGLISH 



Professor: Graham 

Associate Professor: Gustafson, Madden (Chairman) 

Assistant Professor: Ford, Jensen, Rife 

Part-Time Instructor: Logue 

A major consists of nine courses not including English 1. These nine 
courses must include English 14. 15, 16, 17 and one writing course from 
the following: English 18, 22. 23, 24. 35 and 36. 

The four electives may include any course from English 1 2 and above not 
already taken to satisfy the preceding requirements. With the consent of the 
English Department, an appropriate course from the offerings of other 
departments may be substituted for an English elective. 

Majors seeking secondary certification in English are required to take 
English 38. 

The English Department is one of six cooperating in the interdisciplinary 
program in Mass Communications, and would be an appropriate depart- 
ment for the four-course specialization required for the Communications 
major. The department also participates with seven others in the American 
Studies interdisciplinary major, in which American literature courses con- 
stitute an important part of the American arts concentration area. 



94 /ENGLISH 



1 COMPOSITION 

Frequent practice in expository writing to foster clarity of organization 
and expression in the development of ideas. Assigned readings varying 
from section to section; focus on writing in all sections. 

12 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 

An introduction to the study of literature, designed primarily for 
freshmen. Lectures and discussions focusing on the major literary 
genres. 

14 BRITISH LITERATURE I 

Literary forms, themes and authors from the Anglo-Saxon through the 
Neo-C lass ica I periods. Such writers as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, 
Milton, Swift, Pope, and Johnson; representative works from BeowulfXo 
Sheridan's The Rivals. 

15 BRITISH LITERATURE II 

Literary movements and authors from the Romantic Period to the pre- 
sent. Particular emphasis on such writers as Blake. Wordsworth, 
Shelley, Mill, Tennyson, Browning, Rossetti, Arnold, Hardy, Yeats, Eliot. 

16 19TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Brief survey of American literature and thought before 1 800, followed 
by more intensive study of the literature and thought of the period 
1800-1900. Bryant, Cooper, Emerson, Thoreau, Poe, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Howells, and others. 

17 20TH CENTURY AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Major writers, movements, and tendencies in American literature during 
the present century. Such forces as naturalism, realism, and modern- 
ism; and such writers as James, Dreiser, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, 
Eliot, and Stevens. 

18 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

Practical training in the writing of more extended essays of the kinds 
written in English I, and other kinds of expository and argumentative 
prose, including such forms as: essays of opinion and personal essays; 
critical commentaries and reviews; synopses, reports, and research 
papers. 

20 THE NATURE OF FICTION 

Study of either the novel or the short story; one or the other in a given 
semester, not both in the same semester. Novel: representative novels 
from the 1 8th Century to the present with emphasis on the development 
of the genre. Short story: emphasis on points of view of the authors 
studied. 



ENGLISH/95 



21 THE DEVELOPMENT OF DRAMA 

Discussion of typical plays of the Western World emphasizing conven- 
tions of form and performance. Varying focus and content ranging from 
classical to modern playwrights and periods. 

22 CRITICAL WRITING 

Introduction to the various ways of thinking and writing about literature 
and film, designed for people who wish to improve their understanding 
and enjoyment of the books and poems they read and the plays and films 
they see. 

23 NEWS WRITING FOR THE PRINT MEDIA 

Analysis and practice of the basic forms of news reporting and feature 
writing. The elements of news, the lead, style and structure, and types of 
stories. Students who have taken English 24 may only take writing 
workshop sessions of this course for Vi unit. 

24 NEWS WRITING FOR RADIO AND TV 

Offered in conjunction with English 23. Separate workshop sessions to 
analyze and practice the basic forms of news reporting as they apply to 
radio and TV. Students who have taken English 23 may only take 
workshop sessions of this course for V2 unit. 

30 SHAKESPEARE 

Study of representative plays drawn from the four sub-genres of 
Shakespeare's dramas: comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. Some 
attention to Shakespeare's life and times, but primary focus on the work 
itself. 

31 MODERN FICTION 

Study of the techniques, development, and major tendencies of modern 
fiction, from the last quarter of the 1 9th Century to the 1 950's. Primary 
attention to representative works of such major writers as James. Con- 
rad, Joyce, Lawrence, Hemingway, and Faulkner. 

32 MODERN POETRY 

Introduction to the themes and structures of 20th Century poetry. 
Beginning with Pound, Eliot, and Yeats, and moving through the century 
to the most recent accomplishments of contemporary poets. Alternate 
years. 

33 WOMEN AND LITERATURE 

Study of woman writers alternating with study of the image of women in 
literature written by men and women. Possible focuses: major women 
writers of 1 9th and 20th Century British and American literature; con- 
temporary women writers: traditional images of women in literature. 
Alternate years. 



96/ENGLISH 



34 FILM AND LITERATURE 

Analysis of the techniques of two different forms of communication— 
cinema and novel or play— by comparing the same story in both 
mediums. Attention to both "classic" and modern films and literature. 
Alternate years. 

35 FICTION WRITING 

Beginning course in the writing of short fiction. Some study of the 
sources and techniques of modern and contemporary writers, butchief 
focus on student writing. Alternate years. 

36 POETRY WRITING 

A first course in poetry writing. Attention to the "closed" and "open" for- 
mal traditions of current poetry. In-class emphasis on student writing. 
Alternate years. 

37 PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PUBLICITY WRITING 

Communication and publicity techniques in thefield of public relations 
focused on writing for the media; some attention to speeches, letters 
and house organs. Prerequisite: English 23 or English 24 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

38 STRUCTURE AND HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Study of the historical origins of the language and a modern language 
theory. Alternate years. 

40 THE HERO IN MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 

Study of the literature of the period as it reveals a transition from the 
concept of the epic hero to that of the chivalric hero, with the attendant 
shifts in literary forms, in codes for heroic behavior, and in philosophic 
world view. Prerequisite: English 14 or consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

41 ROMANCE AND EPIC IN THE RENAISSANCE 

Study of major writers from Malory to Milton. Emphasis on such works 
as Le Morte DArthur, Don Quixote, The Faerie Queene. and Paradise 
Lost, with other selected prose and dramatic works. Prerequisite: 
English 14 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

42 POETRY OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD 

Study of the literary, philosophical, and historical significance of the 
Romantic Movement. Emphasis on the poetry of Blake. Wordworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Prerequisite: English 14 or con- 
sent of instructor. Alternate years. 

43 DICKENS AND THE VICTORIAN NOVEL 

Comparison and contrast of four or five of Dickens' novels with other 
novels from the 1 830's through the 1870's by such authors as 
Thackeray, the Brontes. Meredith, Trol lope, and Hardy. Alternate years. 



ENGLISH/97 



44 THE IRISH RENAISSANCE 

Analysis of the sudden flowering of Irish literature in the early years of 
the 20th Century as witnessed in the works of Yeats. Joyce, Synge. 
O'Casey, and others. Prerequisite: English 7 5 or 17 or consent of in- 
structor. Alternate years. 

45 AMERICAN DRAMA FROM O'NEILL TO MILLER 

Study of the development of the first significant American drama in the 
decades following World War I, especially the experimental drama of 
the 1 9 20's and the social drama of the 1 930's. O'Neill, Anderson, Rice, 
Behrman, Saroyan, Wilder, Odets. Hellman, and others. Prerequisite: 
English 1 7 or 21 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

46 THE AMERICAN RENAISSANCE 

Concentrated study of the American poets and novelists who 
revolutionized literary form and idea at the middle of the 1 9th Century. 
One or two writers from each of the following two groups: Emerson, 
Thoreau, and Whitman; Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville. Prerequisite: 
English 16 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

47 AMERICAN NOVELISTS AND POETS OF THE JAZZ AGE AND DEPRES- 
SION 

Concentrated study of two or three major writers in the social context of 
this period in modern American literature. Such combinations as 
Hemingway/Fitzgerald/Eliot and Faulkner/Frost are likely. Prere- 
quisite: English 1 7 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

48 CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE 

Consideration of representative British, American, and some continen- 
tal works, primarily fiction, written after World War II by such writers as 
Barth, Bellow, Updike, Burgess, Murdoch, Fowles, and Nabokov. Alter- 
nate years. 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program Section.) 

Interns typically work off campus in a profession related to their career 
interest such as law, public relations, journalism and others. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent studies include Chaucer, D.H. Lawrence, The Creative Process in 
Literature and Art, the Arthurian Legend, and Existentialism in 
Literature. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL 
HONORS (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent projects were Communication Models and the Feedback Princi- 
ple, and Images of Women in the 1 890's. 



98 /FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

Associate Professor: Flam, Maples (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: MacKenzie, Taylor, Winston 
Part-Time Instructor: Hupin 

Study of foreign languages and literatures offers opportunity to explore 
broadly the varieties of human experience and thought. It contributes both 
to personal and to international understanding by providing competence in 
a foreign language and a critical acquaintance with the literature and 
culture of foreign peoples. A major can serve as entree to careers in 
business, industry, government, publishing, education, journalism, social 
agencies, translating, and writing. It prepares for graduate work in literature 
or linguistics and the international fields of politics, commerce, law, health, 
and area studies. 

FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, and SPANISH are offered as major fields of 
study. The major consists of at least eight courses numbered 1 or above. 
Majors seeking teacher certification and students planning to enter 
graduate school are advised to begin study of a second foreign language. 
The department encourages the development in breadth of programs in- 
cluding allied courses from related fields or a second major, and also in- 
dividual or established interdisciplinary majors combining interest in 
several literatures or area or cross-cultural studies, for exam pie: Soviet Area 
Studies, International Studies, 20th Century Studies, the Major in 
Literature. Majors, Teacher certification candidates, and in fact all college 
students are encouraged to spend at least a semester of study abroad by 
applying to one of the many programs available. The department maintains 
a file of such programs. The department also participates in a student ex- 
change program with the Padagogische Hochschule of Gottingen. 

Courses taught in English: The following courses are taught in English — 
Foreign Languages and Literatures 1 8, 25, French 28, Russian 1 7, 28, 33, 
35. 36. 47. and Spanish 28. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

1 8 CULTURAL TOUR OF THE BALKANS. GREECE. AND TURKEY 

Under arrangement with the State Bureaus of Tourism the participants 
will visit Belgrade, Budapest, Cluj, Bucharest, Sophia, Istanbul, Athens, 
Sarajevo, and Dubrovnik. The participants will have this opportunity to 
do comparative analysis based on political developments and economic 
reforms. The itinerary is designed to offer field-work for students to test 
empirically the changing relations between the East European states 
and the Soviet Union. The influence of the Russian language and culture 
will be observed and discussed throughout the tour. Credit in other 
departments will be granted to students upon presentation of a project 
previously approved by faculty members in Art, Political Science, 
History, Sociology and Anthropology, Economics, and Education. This 
course may count towards the Russian major with the consent of the in- 
structor No knowledge of a foreign language is required. May term only. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES/99 



25 CONTINENTAL LITERATURE 

A study of such major continental authors as Cervantes. Dostoevsky, 
Chekhov, Dante, Ibsen, Proust, Gide, Kafka, Hesse, Goethe, Sartre, 
Camus, Brecht, and lonesco. Works read in English translation will vary 
and be organized around a different them or topic; recent topics have 
been existentialism, modernism, and drama. Prerequisite: None. Maybe 
repeated for credit with consent of instructor. May be accepted toward 
the English major with consent of the English Department. 

38 FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SYSTEMS AND PROCESS 

Study of basic linguistic concepts as a tool for language learning and 
teaching. Discussion and application of language teaching techniques, 
including work in the language laboratory. Designed forfuture teachers 
of one or more languages and normally taken in the Junior year. 
Students should arrange through the Education Department to fulfill in 
the same semester the requirements of a participation experience in 
area schools. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



FRENCH 



A major consists of at least eight courses numbered 1 or above, including 
at least one numbered 40 or above. Foreign Languages and Literatures 25 
and 38 may be included in the major. 

All majors who wish to be certified for teaching must pass courses 23, 31, 
Foreign Languages and Literatures 38, and at least two courses numbered 
40 or above. A language proficiency test is required of these students dur- 
ing their senior year. 

1-2 ELEMENTARY 

The aim of the course is to acquire the fundamentals of the language 
with a view to using them. Regular practice in speaking, understanding, 
and reading. 

10-1 1 INTERMEDIATE 

Review and development of the fundamentals of the language for im- 
mediate use in speaking, understanding, and reading with a view to 
building confidence in self-expression. Prerequisite: French 2 or 
equivalent. 

20 CONVERSATION 

Designed to develop conversational fluency and comprehension 
through small group discussions focusing on topics from readings in 
modern French culture, such as French social attitudes and French- 
American cultural differences. Some attention to grammar and writing. 
Prerequisite: French 7 1 or equivalent. 



100/ FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



23 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES 

Studies in French literature, with emphasis on critical reading and inter- 
pretation. Discussions, lectures, oral exposes, papers. Prerequisite: 
French 20 or equivalent. 

28 MODERN FRANCE 

A course designed to familiarize students with political and social struc- 
tures and cultural attitudes in contemporary French society. Materials 
studied may include such documents as newspaper articles, interviews, 
and sociological surveys, and readings in history, religion, 
anthropology and the arts. Some attention to the changing education 
system and the family and to events and ideas which have shaped 
French society. May include some comparative study of France and the 
United States. 

English Section: Not applicable toward satisfying the Foreign Language 
distribution requirement. Prerequisite: None. 

French Section: Offers readings, papers, and interviews in French for 
students with sufficient language skill. Can be applied toward the 
Foreign Language distribution requirement. Prerequisite: French 10 or 
equivalent competency as determined by the department. 

31 FRENCH GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE 

Study of phonetics and grammatical rules and their practical applica- 
tion in speaking and writing. Recommended for all majors. 



41 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE 
RENAISSANCE 

A study of selected works from La Chanson de Roland to Montaigne. 
Prerequisite: French 23 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

43 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 1 7TH CENTURY 

A study of major texts of the period: preciosite, the origins and theories 
of French classicism. Corneille, Pascal, Descartes. Classical tragedy 
and comedy: Racine, Moliere. LaFontaine, Mme de La Fayette, La 
Bruyere. Prerequisite: French 23 or consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

45 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 1 8TH CENTURY 

The literary expression of ideas: Montesquieu, Voltaire. Rousseau, and 
the Encyclopedists. Prerequisite: French 23 or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 

47 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 1 9TH CENTURY 

The dimensions of the Romantic sensibility: Musset. Hugo. Vigny, 
Balzac, Stendhal. Realism and Naturalism in the novels of Flaubert and 
Zola. Reaction in the poetry of Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlame. and 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES/ 101 



Mallarme. Prerequisite: French 23 or consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

48 MODERN FRENCH THEATRE 

Major trends in French drama from the turn of the century to Existen- 
tialism and the Theatre of the Absurd. Giraudoux. Anouilh, Sartre. 
Camus, Beckett, lonesco. Genet, Adamov, and others. Prerequisite: 
French 23 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

49 FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY 

Representative poets and novelists of modern France. Readings 
selected from the works of authors such as Proust, Gide, Aragon, Giono, 
Mauriac, Celine, Malraux, Saint-Exupery. Camus, the "new novelists" 
(Robbe-Gnllet, Butor, Sarraute. Le Clezio), and the poetry of Apollinaire, 
Valery. the Surrealists (Breton, Reverdy, Eluard, Char), Saint-John 
Perse, Supervielle, Prevert, and others. Some attention to works of 
French-speaking African writers. Prerequisite: French 23 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Examples of recent studies in French include translation, existentialism, 
the classical period, Enlightenment literature, and Saint-Exupery. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



GERMAN 



A major consists of eight courses numbered 10 or above. Foreign 
Languages and Literatures 38 and one unit of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures 25 may be included in the major. 

All majors who wish to be certified for teaching must pass courses 3 1 , 33, 
34, and Foreign Languages and Literatures 38. A language proficiency test 
is required of these students during their senior year. 

1-2 ELEMENTARY 

Aim of course is to acquire the fundamentals of the language with a view 
to using them. Regular practice in speaking, understanding and 
reading. 



102 /FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



10-1 1 INTERMEDIATE 



Review and development of fundamentals of the language for im- 
mediate use in speaking, understanding, and reading with a view to 
building confidence in self-expression. Prerequisite; German 2 or 
equivalent. 



20 CONVERSATION 

Designed to develop aural comprehension and conversational fluency. 
Readings and discussions on topics of contemporary society in Ger- 
man, Switzerland, and Austria. Some attention to grammar and writing. 
Prerequisite: German 7 / or equivalent. 



31 GERMAN GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE 

Study of intonation, complex grammatical rules and their practical 
application, stylistics, and a brief survey of the development of the 
language. Recommended for all majors. 



33 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with important periods of German 
Literature, representative authors, and major cultural developments in 
Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. The course deals with literature 
from the Early Middle Ages through the 1 8th century. Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 20 or consent of instructor. 



34 SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with important periods of German 
literature, representative authors, and major cultural developments in 
German. Austria, and Switzerland. The course deals with the literature 
from the 1 9th century to the present. Prerequisite: German 20 or con- 
sent of instructor. 



40 GOETHE 

A study of the life and works of Goethe. Goethe's significance in the 
Classical period and later. Readings in the major works. Prerequisite: 
German 33 or 34 or consent of instructor. 



41 CLASSICAL GERMAN DRAMA 

The development of das klassische Drama with emphasis on works of 
Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller. Prerequisite: German 20. 



42 MODERN GERMAN DRAMA 

The emergence of modern Drama commencing with Buchner and 
leading to Brecht. Prerequisite: German 20. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES / 7 03 



43 THE NOVELLE 

The German Novelle as a genre relating to various literary periods. 
Prerequisite: German 20. 

45 GERMAN POETRY 

A study of selected poets or the poetry of various literary periods. Prere- 
quisite: German 33 or 34 or consent of instructor. 

47 MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE 

A study of the major movements and writers from Naturalism, Ex- 
pressionism, and the postwar period. Hauptmann, Rilke. Mann, Hesse, 
Kaiser, and others. Prerequisite: German 33 or 34 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Examples of recent studies in German include Classicism, Germanic 
Mythology, Hermann Hesse, the dramas of Frisch and Durrenmatt. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

GREEK 

Greek is not offered as a major. 

1 -2 NEW TESTAMENT GRAMMAR AND READINGS 

Fundamentals of New Testament Greek grammar and readings of 
selected passages of the Greek text. Alternate years. 

1 1 THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MARK 

A critical reading of the Greek text with special attention to exegetical 
questions. Alternate years. 

1 2 THE EPISTLE TO THE ROMANS 

A critical reading of the Greek text with special attention being given to 
the theology of St. Paul. Alternate years. 

HEBREW 

Hebrew is not offered as a major. 

1 -2 OLD TESTAMENT GRAMMAR AND READINGS 

Fundamentals of Old Testament Hebrew grammar and readings of 
selected passages of the Hebrew text. Alternate years. 



104/ FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



11-12 INTERMEDIATE OLD TESTAMENT HEBREW 



A critical reading of the Old Testament Hebrew text with special atten- 
tion to exegetical questions. Thetext read varies from year to year. Alter- 
nate years. 



RUSSIAN 

A major consists of eight courses numbered 1 or above, including 20 and 
21. Foreign Languages and Literature 38 and one unit of Foreign 
Languages and Literature 25 may be included in the major. 

All majors who wish to be certified for teaching must pass courses 20, 2 1 . 
28. 33, and Foreign Languages and Literatures 38. A language proficiency 
test is required of these students during their senior year. 

In orderforcreditin Russian 17, 28, 33, 35, 36. and 47 to be applicable to 
the Foreign Language distribution requirement, students must enroll in the 
Russian section of these courses. 

1-2 ELEMENTARY I and II 

The aim of the course is to acquire the fundamentals of the language 
with a view to using them. Regular practice in speaking, understanding 
and reading. 

10 INTERMEDIATE I 

Review and development of the fundamentals of the language for im- 
mediate use in speaking, understanding and reading with a view to 
building confidence in self-expression. Prerequisite: Russian 2 or 
equivalent. 

1 1 INTERMEDIATE II 

Intensive reading of selected short stories or other works; outside 
reading, oral and written reports on everyday topics. Prerequisite: Rus- 
sian 7 or equivalent. 

1 7 CULTURAL TOUR OF THE USSR 

This study-tour gives the student the opportunity to meet formally and 
informally with the Russian people, attend theatre performances, tour 
collective farms, and visit important historical sites with trained guides. 
The objectives of this study-tour are: (1) exposure to the cultural, 
historical, and political aspects of Soviet life. (2) conversation and com- 
prehension practice for students applying creditforthiscourse towards 
the distribution requirement. Open to all students. No knowledge of 
Russian Language is required. Credit in other departments will be 
granted to students upon presentation of a project previously approved 
by faculty members in Art, Political Science, History, Sociology and 
Anthropology, Economics, and Education. May term only. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES/ 105 



20 ADVANCED I 

Designed to develop a high degree of aural comprehension and conver- 
sational fluency. Directed composition and readings. Prerequisite: Rus- 
sian 7 7 or equivalent. 



21 ADVANCED II 

Intensive development of aural comprehension and conversational 
fluency. Directed readings and oral reports. Prerequisite: Russian 20or 
equivalent. 

28 RUSSIAN CULTURE 

Russian life and culture as seen through literature, newspapers, music 
of the gypsies, slides. Russian guest speakers, etc. Contemporary 
values, attitudes, traditions will be examined and discussed. Lectures 
and readings in English. Russian majors will be required to read part of 
the material in Russian. No prerequisites. 



33 SURVEY OF THE GOLDEN PERIOD 

Designed to acquaint the student with the representative works of the 
19th century major authors: Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, 
Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Goncharov, etc. Major social and political 
developments will be discussed. Lecturesand readings in English. Rus- 
sian majors will be required to read part of the material in Russian. No 
prerequisites. 



35 DOSTOEVSKY AND TOLSTOY 

Study of the major works of Leo Tolstoy and Feodor Dostoevsky. Discus- 
sion of their social and philosophical development. Lectures and 
readings in English. Russian majors will be required to read part of the 
material in Russian. No prerequisites. 



36 SOLZHENITSYN AND OTHER DISSIDENTS 

Study of the Soviet dissident literature of the recent past as documents 
of social and political trends. Lecturesand readings in English. Russian 
majors will be required to read part of the material in Russian. No prere- 
quisites. 



47 SOVIET LITERATURE 

Survey of major Soviet literary figures, monuments, styles. Revolution 
and its impact on literature and writers. Revival of psychological novel, 
short story, contemporary poetry. Lectures and readings in English. 
Russian majors will be required to read part of the material in Russian. 
Normally should be taken after Russian 33. 



106 /FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



48 READINGS IN MODERN RUSSIAN 

Reading and translating representative Soviet periodicals and selected 
texts in the social sciences. Study of political and social terminology. 
Soviet idioms. Prerequisite: Russian 21 or equivalent. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent studies include complex grammar and advanced readings, 
socialist realism, a major Russian literary work, intensive advanced con- 
versation. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



SPANISH 

A major consists of eight courses numbered 1 or above, including at least 
one numbered 40 or above. Foreign Languages and Literatures 38 may be 
included. Normally, Foreign Languages and Literatures 25 does not count 
toward the major. 

All majors who wish to be certified for teaching must pass Foreign 
Languages and Literatures 38, Spanish 31, and one from 33, 34, or 35. A 
language proficiency test is required of these students during their senior 
year. 



1-2 ELEMENTARY 

Aim of course is to acquire the fundamentals of the language with a view 
to using them. Regular practice in speaking, understanding, and 
reading. 

10-1 1 INTERMEDIATE 

Review and development of fundamentals of the language for im- 
mediate use in speaking, understanding, and reading with a view to 
building confidence in self-expression. Prerequisite: Spanish 2 or 
equivalent. 

20 ADVANCED 

The purpose of this course is to improve the student's ability in spon- 
taneous conversations, focusing on everyday activities and matters of 
current concern as suggested in readings from Latin American and 
peninsular sources. Vocabulary building is stressed. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 7 1 or equivalent. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES /1 07 



28 CONTEMPORARY HISPANIC LIFE 

To introduce students to the Spanish people — their values, customs, 
and institutions, with reference to the major socio-economic, political, 
and artistic forces governing present-day Spain. Readings will include 
selections from periodical literature as well as historical and literary tex- 
ts. Lectures in English. 

English Secion: Not applicable toward satisfying the Foreign Language 
Distribution requirement. Prerequisite: None. 

Spanish Section: Students with sufficient language skill wishing to take 
this course for credit towards the Foreign Language distribution re- 
quirement will be given special readings and other assignments in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 1 7 or equivalent competency as deter- 
mined by the department. 

31 SPANISH GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE 

Study of intonation, complex grammatical rules and their practical 
application, and a brief survey of the development of the language. 
Recommended for all majors. 

33 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with important periods of Spanish 
literature, representative authors, and major socio-economic 
developments. The course deals with the literature from the beginning 
through the 17th century. Open to students majoring in other 
departments after consultation with instructor. Alternate years. 

34 SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with important periods of Spanish 
literature, representative authors, and major socio-economic 
developments. The course deals with the literature from the 1 8th cen- 
tury to the present. Open to students majoring in other departments 
after consultation with the instructor. Alternate years. 

35 SURVEY OF SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with important periods of Spanish- 
American literature, representative authors, and majorsocio-economic 
developments. The course deals with the literature, especially the essay 
and poetry, from 1 6th century to present. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. Alternate years. 

44 SPANISH LITERATURE OF THE GOLDEN AGE 

A study of representative works and principal literary figures in the 
poetry, prose, and drama of the 1 6th and 1 7th centuries, from Fernando 
de Rojas to Calderon. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 



108/ FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



47 19TH CENTURY NOVEL 

Regionalism, realism, and naturalism in prose fiction, with emphasis on 
the works of Galdos. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

48 THE GENERATION OF '98 

Principal literary figures of the early 20th century: Unamuno, Azorin. 
Valle Inclan, Baroja, Benavente, Machado, Jimenez, etc. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

49 SPANISH AMERICAN NOVEL 

Twentieth Century novelists from Azuela to Garcia Marquez. Prere- 
quisite: Consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent studies include literary, linguistic, and cultural topics, and 
themes such as urban problems as reflected in the modern novel. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 




HISTORY 7 1 09 



HISTORY 

Associate Professor: Piper (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Larson, Morris 

A major consists of ten courses, including 10, 1 1 and 45. At least seven 
courses must be taken in the department. The following courses may be 
counted toward fulfilling the major requirements: American Studies 10, 
Political Science 39, Religion 28 and 46. Other appropriate courses outside 
the department may be counted upon departmental approval. For History 
majors who student teach in history, the major consists of nine courses. In 
addition to the courses listed below, special courses, independent study 
and honors are available. Special courses recently taught and anticipated 
include a biographical study of European Monarch s, the European Left, the 
Industrialization and Urbanization of Modern Europe, Utopian Movements 
in America, the Peace Movement in America. The Vietnam War. and 
American Legal History. History majors are encouraged to participate in the 
internship program. 



10 EUROPE 1500-1815 

An examination of the political, social, cultural and intellectual history of 
Europe and its relations with other areas of the world from 1 500 to 
1815. 

1 1 EUROPE 1815-Present 

An examination of the political, social, cultural, and intellectual history 
of Europe and its relations with other areas of the world from 1 81 5 to 
the present. 

12 UNITED STATES HISTORY 1763-1877 

A study of the men, measures, and movements which have been signifi- 
cant in the development of the United States between 1763a nd 1877. 
Attention is paid to the problems of minority groups as well as to majori- 
ty and national influences. 

13 UNITED STATES HISTORY 1877-Present 

A study of the men. measures, and movements which have been signifi- 
cant in the development of the United States since 1 877. Attention is 
paid to the problems of minority groups as well as to majority and 
national influences. 

20 ANCIENT HISTORY 

A study of the ancient western world, including the foundations of the 
westerntradition in Greece, theemergence and expansion of the Roman 
state, its experience as a Republic, and its transformation into the Em- 
pire. The course will focus on the social and intellectual life of Greece 
and Rome as well as political and economic changes. Alternate years. 



7 10/ HISTORY 



22 MEDIEVAL EUROPE AND ITS NEIGHBORS 

The history of Europe from the dissolution of the Roman Empire to the 
mid-fifteenth century. The course will deal with the growing estrange- 
ment of western Catholic Europe from the Byzantium and Islam, 
culminating in the Crusades; the rise of the Islamic Empire and its later 
fragmentation; the development and growth of feudalism; the conflict of 
empire and papacy, and the rise of towns. Alternate years. 

23 20TH CENTURY EUROPE TO 1929 

An intensive study of various aspects of the political, economic, social, 
and intellectual history of Europe from 1 900 to 1 929. Topics include 
the irrational ist movement, the causes of imperialism, the origins of the 
First World War, the Russian Revolution and establishment of the Soviet 
Regime, and the attempts at peacemaking after 1918. Prerequisite: 
History 1 1 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

24 20TH CENTURY EUROPE SINCE 1929 

An intensive study of various aspects of the political, economic, social, 
and intellectual history of Europe from 1 929 to the present. Topics in- 
clude the nature of fascism, development of Stalinist Russia, outbreak of 
World War II, origins of the Cold War, and the economic reconstruction 
and integration of Western Europe since 1 945. Prerequisite: History 7 / 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

25 FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON 

An analysis of the political, social, and intellectual background of the 
French Revolution, a survey of the course of revolutionary development, 
and an estimate of the results of the Napoleonic conquests and ad- 
ministration. Prerequisite: History 7 or consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

26 COLONIAL AMERICA AND THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA 

The establishment of British settlements on the American continent, 
their history as colonies, the causes and events of the American Revolu- 
tion, the critical period following independence, and proposal and 
adoption of the United States Constitution. Alternate years. 



27 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES 

This course begins with the Progressive Era and includes the political, 
economic, and social developments in the 20th Century. Emphasis will 
be placed on the domestic and international demands which have faced 
the United States in the period following World War II. 



28 AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY 

A study of the experiences and participation of Afro-Americans in the 
United States. The course includes historical experiences such as 



HISTORY/ 7 7 7 



slavery, abolition, reconstruction, and urbanization. It also raises the 
issue of the development and growth of white racism, and the effect of 
this racism on contemporary Afro-American social, intellectual, and 
political life. Alternate years. 

31 HISTORY OF RUSSIA 

A survey of Russian history emphasizing the rise of Moscovy and the 
reasons for the failure of theTzanst regime to successfully overcome the 
challenge of the modern world. Prerequisite: History 7 7 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

32 HISTORY OF THE SOVIET UNION 

An intensive study of the political, economic, and social history of the 
Soviet Union emphasizing the reasons for the Bolshevik victory. 1917- 
21, the origins and nature of the Stalinist regime, Soviet industrializa- 
tion, and the development of post-Stalinist Russia. Prerequisite: History 
7 7 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

33 CONFLICT IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

An in-depth study of the changing nature of war and its relationship to 
the development of Western Civilization since the end of the Middle 
Ages. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of war in the 
development of the modern nation state and the origins and nature of 
total war. Alternate years. 

34 DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF EUROPE SINCE 1 789 

A survey of the development of the European states system and the 
relations between the European states since the beginning of the 
French Revolution. Prerequisite: History 1 7 or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 



36 SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA 

The course is a survey from prehistoric times to the present. Special 
emphasis is placed upon pre-colonial African societies, the slave trade, 
European exploration and imperialism, the impact of colonialism upon 
African societies, economic development and exploitation of the 
colonies, and the roots of African nationalism. Alternate years. 



37 AGE OF JEFFERSON AND JACKSON 

The theme of the course is the emergence of the political and social 
characteristics that shaped modern America. The personalities of 
Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, John Randolph. Aaron Burr, and An- 
drew Jackson receive special attention. Special consideration is given 
to the first and second party systems, the decline in community 
cohesive ness, the westward movement, and the growing importance of 
the family as a unit of social organization. Alternate years. 



1 12 /HISTORY 



38 CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 

The problems and evens leading to war, the political and military history 
of the war, and the bitter aftermath to the Compromise of 1 877. 

39 20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES RELIGION 

The study of historical and cultural developments in American society 
which relates to religion or are commonly called religions. This involves 
consideration of the institutional and intellectual development of 
several faith groups as well as discussion of certain problems, such as 
the persistence of religious bigotry and the changing modes of Church- 
State relationships. Alternate years. 

40 HISTORY OF RENAISSANCE THOUGHT 

A study of the classical, humanist, and scholastic elements involved in 
the development of the Renaissance outlook views, and values, both in 
Italy and in Northern Europe. The various combinations of social and 
political circumstances which constitute the historical context of these 
intellectual developments will be noted. Alternate years. 

41 HISTORY OF REFORMATION THOUGHT 

A study of the ideas and systems of ideas propounded priorto the Refor- 
mation but which are historically related to its inception and of the ideas 
and systems of ideas involved in the formation of the major Reformation. 
Protestant traditions and in the Catholic Reformation. Included are the 
ideas of the humanists of the Reformation Era. Alternate years. 

42 UNITED STATES SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY TO 1877 

A study of the social and intellectual experience of the United States 
from its colonial antecedents through reconstruction. Among the topics 
considered are Puritanism, Transcendentalism, Community Life and 
Organization, Education and Social Reform Movements. Prerequisite: 2 
courses from History 12, 13, 28 or consent of instructor. 

43 UNITED STATE SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY SINCE 1 877 

A study of the social and intellectual experience of the United States 
from reconstruction to the present day. Among the topics considered 
are Social Darwinism, Pragmatism, Community Life and Organization, 
Education and Social Reform Movements. Prerequisite: 2 courses from 
History 12, 13, 28. or consent of instructor. 

45 HISTORICAL METHODS 

This course focuses on the nature and meaning of history. It will open to 
the student different historical approaches and will provide the oppor- 
tunity to explore these approaches in terms of particular topics and 
periods. Majors are required to enroll in this course in either their Junior 
or Senior year. The course is open to other students who have two 
courses in history or consent of the instructor. 



MASS COMMUNICATIONS/ 1 13 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Typically, history interns work for local government agencies engaged 
in historical projects or in the County Historical Museum. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent topics include studies of the immigration of American blacks, 
political dissension in the Weimer Republic. Indian relations before the 
American Revolution and the history of Lycoming County. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENT HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

Two recent projects were the Germans in Pennsylvania Politics, 1 878- 
1938 and the Reign of Tiglath Pileser I (1 1 1 6-1 07 5 B.C.). 



MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

Associate Professor: Madden (Coordinator) 

The major in Mass Communications offers a liberal arts background and a 
professional sequence through a combination of courses from the 
departments of Art, Business Administration, English, Political Science, 
Sociology-Anthropology and the Broadcasting and Graphic Arts 
departments of the Williamsport Area Community College. The program 
assures a broadly based academic foundation with special competency in a 
selected concentration, plus career orientation in a specific area. 
For further information on requirements, refer to details of the Mass Com- 
munications program listed as an interdisciplinary major on page 59. 

10 INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

Part 1 : Theories of the process of mass communications and introduc- 
tion to the mass media; attention will be given to problems of censorship 
and media ethics. Part 2: Analysis of the mass media's impact on society; 
emphasis will be placed on the social, psychological and political im- 
plications of the media's shaping influence on man and his institutions. 

Through special arrangement, the following courses offered at the 
Williamsport Area Community College are available to students in the Mass 
Communications major "b/i/y. The WACC courses are taken as part of the 
student's semester schedule and are listed with Lycoming offerings during 
registration periods. 

GRAPHIC ARTS 

13 LAYOUT AND DESIGN 

Analysis of materials, tools and techniques used in preparation of copy 
for reproduction; paste-up and color separation overlays. 4 Cr. 



1 14 /MASS COMMUNICATIONS 



14 PRINCIPLES OF TYPOGRAPHIC DESIGN 

Training in conventional and modern layouts as applied to solution of 
problems in printing typography. 4 Cr. 

27 FILM ASSEMBLY AND PLATEMAKING 

A study and application of various methods of assemblying negatives 
and positives in the form of flats in preparation for making offset plates. 
Theory and application relating to various types of plates and process- 
ing procedures and register requirements of stripping and platemaking 
4 Cr. 

BROADCASTING 

1 4 STATION MANAGEMENT AND COMMUNITY RESPONSIBILITY 

Study of problems related to serving community needs while making a 
profit; ratio of advertising to program time; characterof station; meeting 
community responsibility through community interest programs; 
responsible use of editorial privilege. 3 Cr. 

20 BROADCAST ADVERTISING 

The impact of advertising and its history in American culture is studied. 
The phases of marketing analysis along with media selection are ex- 
amined. Preparation of radio and TV advertising are then a large part of 
student activity. 3 Cr. 

21 IN-SERVICE TRAINING I 

Supervised work with the Office of College Information in the prepara- 
tion of typed news releases for local radio stations, or assignments to 
the College's closed-circuit television production teams. 2 Cr. 

22 IN-SERVICE TRAINING II 

Advanced work with the Office of College Information in the preparation 
of "public service" programs for local radio stations, or more responsi- 
ble assignments on closed-circuit television. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Interns usually work off campus in a field related to their com- 
munications sequence; some may work with the student newspaper or 
radio station. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Studies involve research related to the communications sequence of 
the student. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



MATHEMATICS/ 115 



MATHEMATICS 



Associate Professor: Getchell (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Cantor, Henninger, Hubbard 

A major consists of ten courses numbered 1 or above; Mathematics 1 8- 
1 9, 20, 24, 42, either 34or35and three other courses numbered above 20 
must be included. Students seeking secondary certification in Mathematics 
are required to take Math 30 and 36 and are advised to take Philosophy 26. 
All majors are advised to elect Philosophy 24and36and Physics 2 5. In ad- 
dition to the courses listed below, special courses are occasionally 
available — recent topics include: Data Structures, Theory of Numbers, 
History of Mathematics, Graph Theory and Discrete Probability. 



1 MODELING REALITY 

This course consists of two parts, each lasting one-half semester. One 
part will study the central ideas of the calculus, its historical develop- 
ment and some of its modern applications. The other part will take a 
similar approach to the various finite models. In both parts, the primary 
emphasis will be on what can be done with mathematics, rather than 
how to do it. The main goal of the course is to increase the students' 
awareness of the impact of mathematics upon society today. 

2 QUANTIFYING REALITY 

This course consists of two parts, each lasting one-half semester. One 
part will study the role of statistics in society today. The other part will 
take a similar approach to digital computers. In both parts the primary 
emphasis will be on what can be done, rather than how to do it. The main 
goal of this course is to make the student aware of the growing influence 
which statistical analysis and the uses of digital computers are likely to 
have on society in the near future. 

3 INTRODUCTION TO CALCULUS 

An intuitive approach to the calculus concepts with applications to 
business, biology, and social science problems. Not open to students 
who have completed Math 18. 

7 MODERN ELEMENTARY GEOMETRY AND NUMBER THEORY 

This course is intended for prospective elementary school teachers and 
is required of all those seeking elementary certification. Topics include 
the development of the real number system and its larger sub-systems, 
computational algorithms, axiomatic systems, measurement, shape 
and symmetry. Co-requisite: Any Education course numbered 30 or 
above which is specifically required for Elementary Certification and 
application to the Elementary Professional Semester, or permission of 
Instructor. 



116 /MATHEMATICS 



12 FINITE MATHEMATICS FOR DECISION MAKING 

An introduction to some of the principal mathematical models, not in- 
volving calculus, which are used in Business Administration, social 
sciences and operations research. The course will include both deter- 
ministic models, such as graphs, networks, linear programming and 
voting models and probabilistic models such as Markov chains and 
games. 

13 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 

Describing distributions of measurements, probability and random 
variables, binomial and normal probability distributions, statistical in- 
ference from small samples, linear regression and correlation, analysis 
of enumerative data. 

15 COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Study of mathematics relevant to computing. A survey of machine and 
symbolic programming. Introduction to FORTRAN IV programming. In- 
cludes laboratory experience on an IBM 1 130. 

17 PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS 

The study of logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, polynomial and 
rational functions, their graphs and elementary properties. 

18-19 ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS Ml 

The study of the concepts of limits and continuity, differentiation and in- 
tegration of algebraic and transcendental functions, maximum and 
minimum, related rates, polar coordinates, vectors, solid geometry, 
convergent and divergent series, partial differentiation, multiple in- 
tegrals. Prerequisite: Math 7 7 or equivalent. 

20 CALCULUS III AND MATRIX ALGEBRA 

Further work in convergent and divergent series, matrix algebra, and 
selected topics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 19. 



21 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

A study of ordinary differential equations and their applications: first 
order linear differential equations, the Picard Existence Theorem, solu- 
tion by separation of variables, solution by numerical methods; second 
order linear differential equations, solution by variation of parameters, 
solution by power series, solution by Laplace transforms; systems of 
first order equations, solution by eigenvalues; qualitative theory, stabili- 
ty theory, asymptotic behavior, and the Poincare-Bendixon Theorem. 
Besides the usual applications in physics and engineering, con- 
siderable attention will be given to modern applications in the social and 
life sciences. Prerequisite: Mathematics 20. or consent of Instructor. 
Offered each year, alternating Spring and May Terms. 



MATHEMATICS/ 1 17 



24 FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS 

Topics regularly included are the nature of mathematical systems, es- 
sentials of logical reasoning, and axiomatic foundations of set theory. 
Other topics frequently included are approaches to the concepts of in- 
finity and continuity, and the construction of the real number system. 
The course serves as a bridge from the ele me ntary calculus to advanced 
courses in algebra and analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 19. or con- 
sent of Instructor. 



30 TOPICS IN GEOMETRY 

An axiomatic treatment of Euclidean geometry, and an introduction to 
related geometries. Prerequisite: Mathematics 18. Alternate years. 

31 INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 

Study and analysis of tabulated data leading to interpolation, numerical 
solution of equations and systems of equations, numerical integration. 
Co-requisite: Mathematics 20. Prerequisite: Mathematics 7 5. Alternate 
years. 



32-33 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS l-ll 

A study of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, ex- 
pected values and moments, sampling, point estimation, sampling'dis- 
tributions. interval estimation, test of hypotheses, regression and linear 
hypotheses, experimental design models. Co-requisite: Mathematics 
20. Alternate years. 



34 ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 

An introduction to groups, rings, and fields. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
24. Alternate years. 



35 LINEAR ALGEBRA 

An introduction to vector spaces and linear transformations. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 24. Alternate years. 



36 CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

A course designed for mathematics majors who are planning to teach at 
the secondary level. Emphasis will be placed on the mathematics that 
forms the foundation of secondary mathematics. Ideas will be presented 
to familiarize the student with various curriculum proposals, to provide 
for innovation within the existing curriculum and to expand the boun- 
daries of the existing curriculum. Open only to junior and sen/or math 
majors enrolled in the secondary education program. Alternate years. 



7 18 /MUSIC 



42 REAL ANALYSIS 

A rigorous analysis of the basic concepts of real variable calculus: the 
real number system as a complete, ordered field; the topology of Eucli- 
dean space, compact sets, the He me- Bo re I Theorem; continuity, the In- 
termediate Value Theorem; derivatives, the Mean Value Theorem; 
Riemann integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; infinite 
series, and Taylor's theorem. Prerequisite: Mathematics 24. 

43 COMPLEX ANALYSIS 

Introduction to the complex number system, functions of a complex 
variable, transformations, analytic functions, and complex integration. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 20. Alternate years. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Interns with computer science and statistics background have helped 
other institutions do research on their data. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

The department will consider any to pic of interest to a qualified student. 
Recently completed studies focused on data structures, computer 
graphics, designs of geodesic domes and integer programming. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

One student produced an Honors paper entitled "Construction of Rings 
from Bounded Modular Lattices." This project helped prepare the stu- 
dent for graduate study in mathematics. 

MUSIC 

Professor: Morgan (Chairman) 
Associate Professor: Russell, Sheaffer 
Assistant Professor: Thayer 

A major consists of eight courses numbered 1 and above. Each major must 
complete one-half unit of applied music each semester as follows: par- 
ticipation in an ensemble (67, 68, 69), and three half-hour music lessons 
(60 to 66), or their equivalent. 

1-2 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC 

A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the nature of 
music. Extensive guided listening is used to help the student develop his 
ability as a perceptive listener. 

10-1 1 MUSIC THEORY I AND II 

An integrated course in musicianship including sight singing, eart rain- 
ing, written and keyboard harmony. 



MUSIC/ 119 



20-21 MUSIC THEORY III AND IV 

A continuation of the integrated course moving toward newer uses of 
musical materials. Prerequisite: Music 7 1 . Alternate years. 

28 COUNTERPOINT 

A study of the five species in two, three, and four-part writing. Alternate 
years. 

29 ORCHESTRATION 

Astudy of modern orchestral instruments, and examination of their use 
by the great masters with practical problems in instrumentation. Alter- 
nate years. 

30 COMPOSITION 

Creative writing in smaller vocal instrumental forms. The college 
musical organizations serve to make performance possible. Alternate 
years. 



31 CONDUCTING 

A study of the fundamentals of conducting with frequent opportunity for 
practical experience. Alternate years. 

32 ELECTRONIC MUSIC I 

The course involves learning thefunction and operational techniques of 
the components of an electronic music studio. The modules involved in- 
clude tape recorders and signal generators. Tape recording techniques 
from the beginning stages through advanced use of quad-radial stereo 
sound are involved. In addition, the operation and understanding of 
various wave forms, individually and collectively, will be included. 

33 ELECTRONIC MUSIC II 
Continuation of Music 32. 



35 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE TO J.S. BACH 

A survey of the history of music from antiquity to the beginning of the 
1 8th century with emphasis on nonmensural chant, the beginnings of 
harmony and counterpoint and their development. Prerequisite: Music 
2. Alternate years. 

36 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE 1 8TH CENTURY 

Emphasizing the achievements of the late Baroqueand largelyconcern- 
ed with the lives and works of Bach, Handel, Haydn, and Mozart. Prere- 
quisite: Music 2. Alternate years. 



120/ MUSIC 



42 ELECTRONIC MUSIC III 

A continuation of the processes begun in Music 32 and 33, plus the ad- 
dition of the study of and practice in the use of various methods of signal 
modification. Also included is the study of form in electronic music. 
Prerequisite: Music 33. 

43 ELECTRONIC MUSIC IV 

A study of mixing and equalization techniques as applied to multiple 
track electronic music composition. Prerequisite: Music 42. 

45 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE 1 9TH CENTURY 

A survey of the music of the 1 9th century, including study of Beethoven, 
Chopin, Schubert, Brahms, Wagner, and Debussy and their principal 
media and forms. Prerequisite: Music 2. Alternate years. 

46 MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY 

The survey of music history culminates with the study of the works of 
such moderns as Stravinsky. Bartok, Prokofief, Shostakovich, Barber, 
Copland, Menotti, and Stockhausen. Attention is given to atonality and 
expressionism. Prerequisite: Music 2. Alternate years. 



APPLIED MUSIC 

The study of performance in Piano, Voice, Organ, Strings, Brass, 
Woodwinds, and Percussion is designed to develop sound technique and a 
knowledge of the appropriate literature. Student recitals offer opportunity 
to gain experience in performance. Music majors or other qualified students 
in performance may present formal recitals. 

Credit for Applied Music courses (Music 60 through 69) is earned on a frac- 
tional basis— SEE PAGE 50 for the fractional values involved. An Applied 
Music Course (60 series) shou Id NOTbe substituted for an academic course 
in a student's schedule but should be IN ADDITION TO the normal four 
academic courses taken per semester. 

Private Instruction In: 

60 Piano 62 Strings (Guitar and 63 Organ 65 Woodwinds 

61 Voice Other Stringed Instruments) 64 Brass 66 Percussion 



67 PIANO ENSEMBLE 

A course designed to explore piano literature forfourand eight hands. 

68 VOCAL ENSEMBLE 

A course designed to enable any student possessing at least average 
vocal talent to study choral technique. Emphasis is placed upon tone 
production, diction and phrasing. 



MUSIC/ 121 



69 INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE 

A course directed toward developing fine ensemble music through a 
study of group instrumental procedures. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Internships in music are arranged with off-campus organizations. 
usually churches or businesses within the music industry. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Among the recent music studies topics was a study of the organ music 
of Olivier Messiaen and the preparation of a manual explaining the Elec- 
tronic Music applications of an oscilloscope. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

Preparation of a performance edition for modern organ of selected lute 
music of the Spanish composer. Cadezon. 




122 /PHILOSOPHY 



PHILOSOPHY 

Assistant Professor: Griffith, Herring (Chairman), Whelan 
Part-Time Instructor: McLaughlin 

The study of philosophy develops a critical understanding of the basic con- 
cepts and presuppositions around which we organize our thought in 
science, religion, education, morality, the arts, and other human enter- 
prises. A major in philosophy, together with appropriate other courses, can 
provide an excellent preparation for policy-making positions of many kinds, 
for graduate study in several fields, and for careers in education, law, and 
the ministry. The major consists of at least eight courses numbered 1 or 
above, at least six of which must be numbered 20 or above. These courses 
must include Philosophy 32 or 33, 34 or 35, and 49. In addition to the 
courses listed below, special courses are often offered — recent examples 
are philosophy in literature, bioethics, and philosophy of law. 

5 PRACTICAL LOGIC 

A general introduction to topics in logic and their applications to prac- 
tical reasoning, with primary emphasis on detecting fallacies, 
evaluating inductive reasoning, and understanding the rudiments of 
scientific method. 

1 1 ALTERNATIVE WORLDVIEWS 

An introductory philosophical examination of some of the d iff e rent ways 
man has attempted to understand the universe and his place in it, with 
particular attention to what might be called scientific, religious, and 
commonsense worldviews. Discussion centers on apparent conflicts 
between worldviews and ways philosophers have suggested to resolve 
these conflicts. 

12 THOUGHT, LANGUAGE, AND REALITY 

An introductory philosophical investigation of some of the conceptual 
issues suggested by the following questions: What is thought? Could a 
machine think? Do animals think? What is the relation between thought 
and language? Do our words adequately express our thoughts? Must 
children think in order to speak or must they speak in order to think? 
What is the relation between language and reality? Is any language ade- 
quate to describe the world? Does language determine our conception 
of the world? 



13 MIND, BODY, AND THE SELF 

An introductory philosophical examination of some problems concer- 
ning the nature of self. The following questions are usually considered: 
Is the self a physical or non-physical entity? Is the self determined or 
free? Could the self survive the death of the body? In whatdoesthe iden- 
tity of the self consist? Discussion centers on some of the suggestions 
philosophers have made about how to answer these questions. 



PHILOSOPHY/ 123 



14 CONTEMPORARY MORAL ISSUES 

An introductory philosophical examination of a number of contem- 
porary moral issues which call for personal decision. Topics often dis- 
cussed include these: the good life, obligation to others, sexual ethics, 
abortion, suicide and death, violence and pacificism, obedience to the 
law, the relevance of beliefs to morality. Discussion centers on some of 
the suggestions philosophers have made about how to answer these 
questions. 



1 5 ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY 

An introductory philosophical examination of the moral dimension of 
various contemporary public issues, such as scientific experimentation 
on humans, the use of scientific discoveries, the relation of ethics to 
politics and the law, the enforcement of morals, the problem of fair dis- 
tribution of goods and opportunities, the legitimacy of restricting the 
useof natural resources, and the application of ethicsto business prac- 
tice. Discussion centers on some of the suggestions philosophers have 
made about how to deal with these issues. 



20 ETHICAL THEORIES 

An inquiry concerning the grounds which distinguish morally right ac- 
tions from morally wrong actions. Central to the course is critical con- 
sideration of the proposals and the rationale of relativists, egoists, 
utilitarians, and other ethical theorists. Prerequisite: One course in 
philosophy, or junior or senior standing. 



21 AESTHETICS 




22 SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

Of central interest is the question of the relation between human nature 
and the proper social and political order. Emphasis is placed on an ex- 
amination of the logic of social and political thought and on the analysis 
of key concepts such as power, authority, freedom, law, rights, justice 
and social and political obligation. Prerequisite: One course in 
philosophy, or junior or senior standing. 



124 /PHILOSOPHY 



23 PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

An examination of some of the philosophical issues which arise when 
one considers the following question: How is the study of persons — 
some of whom are, at least potentially, rational agents — different from, 
and related to. the scientific study of other natural phenomena? Prere- 
quisite: One course in philosophy, or junior or senior standing. Alternate 
years. 

24 PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

A consideration of philosophically important conceptual problems aris- 
ing from reflection about natural science, including such topics as the 
nature of scientific laws and theories, the character of explanation, the 
import of prediction, the existence of "non-observable" theoretical en- 
tities such as electrons and genes, the problem of justifying induction, 
and various puzzles associated with probability. Prerequisite: One 
course in philosophy, or junior or senior standing. Alternate years. 

25 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

A philosophical examination of religion. Included are such topics as the 
nature of religious discourse, arguments for and against the existence 
of God, and the relation between religion and science. Readings from 
classical and contemporary sources. Prerequisite: One course in 
philosophy, or junior or senior standing. 

26 PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

An examination of the basic concepts involved in thought about educa- 
tion, and a consideration of the various methods for justifying 
educational proposals. Typical of the issues discussed are these: Are 
education and indoctrination different? Is there a role for authority in 
education? Are education and schooling compatible? What do we need 
to learn? Prerequisite: One course in philosophy, or junior or senior 
standing. 

32 ANCIENT GREEK METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY 

Primarily an examination of the metaphysical and epistemological views 
of Plato and Aristotle. Some attention is paid to the intellectual milieu 
out of which they developed. However, the main interest is on critically 
understanding philosophical issues raised in selected Platonic and 
Aristotelian texts. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, or junior or 
senior standing. Alternate years. 

33 ANCIENT GREEK POLITICS AND ETHICS 

An examination of the political, ethical, cultural, and educational views 
of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Considerable attention is paid to the 
relation between these ideas and the social and intellectual milieu out of 
which they developed. However, the primary emphasis is on critically 
understanding philosophical issues raised in selected Platonic and 
Aristotelian texts. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, or junior or 
senior standing. Alternate years. 



PHILOSOPHY/ 125 



34 CONTINENTAL RATIONALISM 

An examination of the philosophical views of the continental 
rationalists, with primary emphasis on the works of Descartes. In addi- 
tion, the works of other rationalists, such as Spinoza and Leibniz, are 
usually discussed. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, or junior or 
senior standing. Alternate years. 



35 BRITISH EMPIRICISM AND KANT 

An examination of the philosophical views of the British empiricists, 
such as Locke, Berkeley, and Hume, and of Kant's response to these 
views. Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, or junior or senior stan- 
ding. Alternate years. 



36 SYMBOLIC LOGIC 

A study of modern symbolic logic, including truth-functional logic, the 
logic of propositional functions, and deductive systems. Attention is 
also given to various topics in the philosophy of logic. Alternate years. 



37 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE 

A careful examination of several of the philosophically important topics 
related to the existence and use of language, including meaning, 
reference, definition, synonymity, analyticity, truth, and speech acts. 
Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, or junior or senior standing. 
Alternate years. 



49 DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 

An investigation, carried on by discussions and papers, into one 
philosophical problem, text, philosopher, or movement. A different 
topic is selected each semester; recent topics include Sidgwick's ethics, 
religious language, Kierkegaard, legal punishment, and Wittgenstein. 
This seminar is designed to provide junior and senior philosophy majors 
and other qualified students with more than the usual opportunity for 
concentrated and cooperative inquiry. Prerequisite: Consent of the in- 
structor. This seminar may be repeated for credit. 



80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Recent studies in philosophy include metaethics, Nietzsche, moral 
education. Rawls' theory of justice, existentialism, euthanasia, and 
Plato's ethics. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



126/PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Associate Professor: Burch (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Phillips, Whitehill 
Instructor: Holmes 

1 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Coeducational physical education classes. Basic instructions in fun- 
damentals, knowledge, and appreciation of sports that include swim- 
ming, tennis, bowling, volleyball, archery, field hockey, soccer, golf, 
badminton, modern dance, skiing, elementary games (for elementary 
teachers), toneastics, physical fitness, and other activities. Orienteering 
backpacking, cross country skiing, alpine skiing, jogging, and cycling 
are offered on a contract basis. Beginning swimming is required for all 
nonswimmers. Students may select any activity offered. A reasonable 
degree of proficiency is required of the student in the activities in which 
he chooses to participate. Emphasis is on the potential use of activities 
as recreational and leisure-time interests. Two semesters of physical 
education (two hours per week) are required. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor: Jose 

Associate Professor: Giglio (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Roskin 
Instructor: Herman 

The major is designed to provide a systematic understanding of government 
and politics at the international, national, state, and local levels. Majors are 
encouraged to develop their faculties to make independent, objective 
analysis which can be applied to the broad spectrum of the social sciences. 

Although the political science major is not designed as a vocational major, 
students with such training may go directly into government service, jour- 
nalism, teaching, or private administrative agencies. Apolitical science ma- 
jor can provide the base for the study of law, or for graduate studies leading 
to administrative work in federal, state, or local government, international 
organizations, or college teaching. Students seeking certification to teach 
secondary school social studies may major in political science but should 
consult their advisors and the education department. Washington National 
and International Semesters are available at the American University and a 
United Nations Semester at Drew University. 

A major consists of eight political science courses, including Political 
Science 1 5 and at least one course in each of the five areas (A to E) below. 
Students entering the major as juniors or seniors may, with departmental 
permission, substitute Political Science 20, European Politics, for Political 
Science 1 5. To encourage familiarity with other social sciences, at least two 
courses must be completed from the following: American Studies 10; 
Business 35 and 36 (recommended for pre- law); Economics 10, 1 1 , 32, 45; 
History 24, 32, 33, 34; Philosophy 22; Sociology and Anthropology 26, 38. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE/ 127 



15 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS 

The behavior and misbehavior of the political animal, man. Why he 
forms political communities, how he may improve them, and how he 
may destroy them. Required of all political science majors; open to a 
limited number of other interested students. 



A. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 

I GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES 

An introduction to American national government which emphasizes 
both structural-functional analysis and policymaking processes. In ad- 
dition to the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, 
attention will be given to political parties and interest groups, elections 
and voting behavior, and constitutional rights. Recommended to all 
Social Science Education majors and to those students who have had 
inadequate or insufficient preparation in American government. 

II STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

An examination of the general principles, major problems, and political 
processes of the states and their subdivisions, together with their role in 
a federal type of government. 

30 THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL SYSTEM 

An analysis of the Supreme Court in the American system of government 
with some attention paid to judicial decisionmaking. Topics include: 
judicial review, federalism, constitutional limits on legislative and ex- 
ecutive powers, elections and representation. 

31 CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES 

What are our rights and liberties as Americans? What should they be? A 
frank discussion of the nature and scope of the constitutional 
guarantees, First Amendment rights, the rights of criminal suspects and 
defendants, racial and sexual equality, and equal protection of the laws. 
Students will read and brief the more important Supreme Court 
decisions. 

33 BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

What is a bureaucracy? Why and how do bureaucracies arise? What has 
been the political impact of growth of bureaucracy in government? 
These questions, among others, will be considered in this examination 
of public bureaucracies. Alternate years. 

B. AMERICAN POLITICS 

22 POLITICAL PARTIES AND INTEREST GROUPS 

An examination of the history, organization, functions, and methods of 
American political parties. Special attention is devoted to the role of 
organized interest groups in the political process. 



7 25 /POLITICAL SCIENCE 



23 AMERICAN PRESIDENCY 



A study of the office and powers of the president with analysis of his ma- 
jor roles as chief administrator, legislator, political leader, foreign policy 
maker, and commander-in-chief. Special attention is given to those 
presidents who led the nation boldly. 

24 THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS 

A study of the role of the legislature in the framework of the national and 
state governments. Consideration of the influence of the parties, 
pressure groups, public opinion, constituencies, the "committee 
system", the "administration" and the constitution in the lawmaking 
process. Alternate years. 

32 THE POLITICS OF CITIES AND SUBURBS 

An examination of the history, legal basis, power, forms, services, and 
problems of the cities and their suburbs, with special reference to 
current experiments in the solution of the problems of metropolitan 
areas. 



C. POLITICAL THEORY AND METHODOLOGY 

35 LAW AND SOCIETY 

An examination into the nature, sources, functions, and limits of lawas 
an instrument of political and social control. Included for discussion are 
legal problems pertaining to the family, crime, deviant behavior, pover- 
ty, and minority groups. Alternate years. 

46 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES 

The growth, development and current status of liberalism, conser- 
vatism, nationalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. Alternate 
years. 

47 THE AMERICAN POLITICAL TRADITION 

An examination of the significant ideas which have shaped the 
American political tradition from their European origins to the present. 
with emphasis on the influence of these ideas in the development of 
American democracy. Special attention will be paid to an analysis of 
contemporary ideological movements: Black Power, New Left, and 
Radical Feminism. Alternate years. 

48 PUBLIC OPINION AND POLLING 

A course dealing with the general topic and methodology of polling. 
Content includes exploration of the processes by which people's 
political opinions are formed, the manipulation of public opinion 
through the uses of propaganda, and the American response to politics 
and political issues. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 71 29 



D. COMPARATIVE POLITICS 

20 EUROPEAN POLITICS 

A study of the political systems of East and West Europe with emphasis 
on comparison and patterns of government. The course will review 
politics in Northern (Britain. West Germany. Sweden), Latin (France. Ita- 
ly, Spain) and Eastern (Soviet Union, East Germany, Yugoslavia) Europe 
and attempt to find underlying similarities and differences. 

36 THE SOVIET POLITICAL SYSTEM 

The political theory and practice of the Soviet Union, including some 
comparison with other Communist states such as China and 
Yugoslavia. Alternate years. 

38 POLITICS OF DEVELOPING AREAS 

The causes and possible cures for socio-political backwardness in Asia, 
Africa, and Latin America. Alternate years. 



E. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

25 WORLD POLITICS 

Why is there war? An introduction to international relations with 
emphasis on the varieties of conflicts which may grow into war. 

37 COMMUNIST STRATEGIES AND TACTICS 

The foreign policies of the various Communist states; the breakup of 
monolithic communism into national -interest communism as practiced 
by the Soviet Union, China. Romania, and Yugoslavia. Alternate years. 

39 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

The U.S. role in the world in geographic, strategic, historical, and 
ideological perspectives, plus an examination of the domestic forces 
shaping U.S. policy. Alternate years. 

43 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 

An examination of structure and function of the League of Nations and 
particularly the United Nations with emphasison activities related to the 
maintenance of international peace and security. Alternate years. 



F. NON-AREA ELECTIVES 

34 POLITICAL NEWSWRITING 

A workshop course in the reporting and rewriting of public affairs atthe 
local, national and international levels. There will be neither texts nor ex- 
aminations, but short written assignments will be due every class 
meeting. Alternate years. 



130 /PSYCHOLOGY 



G. SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

56-59 INTERNSHIPS (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Students may receive academic credit for serving as interns in struc- 
tured learning situations with a wide variety of public and private agen- 
cies and organizations. Students have served as interns with the Public 
Defender's Office, the Lycoming County Court Administrator, and the 
Williamsport City Government. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Current studies relate to elections— local, state, and federal while past 
studies have included Soviet and world politics. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor: Hancock (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Berthold, O'Brien 

A major consists of Psychology 10, 20. 21 , 22, and four other psychology 
courses. Mathematics 1 3 is also required. In addition to the departmental 
requirements, majors are urged to include courses in Animal Physiology, 
Sociology, and the Mathematics option of the distribution requirements. 

10 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the empirical study of human and other animal 
behavior. Areas considered may include: learning, personality, social, 
physiological, sensory, cognition, and developmental. 

15 ORGANIZATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The application of the principles and methods of psycho logy to selected 
organizational and industrial situations. Prerequisite: Psychology 10. 

16 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the patterns of deviant behavior with emphasis on 
cause, function, and treatment. The various models for the concep- 
tualization of abnormal behavior are critically examined. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 10. 

20 SENSORY EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The examination of psychophysical methodology and basic 
neuro physio logical methods as they are applied to the understanding of 
sensory processes. Prerequisite: Psychology 10: Mathematics 13. 

21 LEARNING EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Learning processes. The examination of the basic methods and prin- 
ciples of animal and human learning. Prerequisite: Psychology 10: 
Mathematics 13. 



PSYCHOLOGY/ 131 



22 PERSONALITY THEORY 

Theories of Personality. A comparison of different theoretical views on 
the development and functioning of personality. Examined in detail are 
three general viewpoints of personality: psychoanalytic, stimulus- 
response (behavionstic), and phenomenological. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 10. 

30 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An examination of behavior in social contexts including motivation, 
perception, group processes and leadership, attitudes, and methods of 
research. Prerequisite: Psychology 10. 

31 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

A study of the basic principles of early human growth and development. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 1 0. 

32 ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 

The study areas will include theories of adolescence; current issues 
raised by as well as about the "generation of youth"; research findings 
bearing on theories and issues of growth beyond childhood; and self- 
exploration. Prerequisite: Psychology 10. 

33 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the physiological psychologist's method of approach 
to the understanding of behavior as well as the set of principles that 
relate the function and organization of the nervous system to the 
phenomena of behavior. The course emphasis is on the relationship 
between brain function and the physiological bases of learning, percep- 
tion, and motivation. Laboratory experience includes both behavioral 
testing and basic small-animal neurosurgical technique as well as 
histological methodology. Prerequisite: Psychology 20 or Biology 23. 
and Mathematics 13. 

34 PRINCIPLES OF MEASUREMENT 

Psychometric method and theory, including scale transformation, 
norms, standardization, validation procedures and estimation of 
reliability. Prerequisite: Psychology 10, Mathematics 13. 

35 HISTORY AND SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

The growth of scientific psychology and the theories and systems that 
have accompanied its development. Prerequisite: 4 courses in Psy- 
chology. 

37 COGNITION 

An investigation of human mental processes along the two major 
dimensions of directed and undirected thought. Topic areas include: 
recognition, attention, conceptualization, problem-solving, fantasy, 
language, dreaming, and creativity. Prerequisite: Psychology 10. 



132 /PSYCHOLOGY 



38 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the empirical study of the teaching -learning process. 
Areas considered may include educational objectives, pupil and teacher 
characteristics, concept learning, problem solving and creativity, at- 
titudes and values, motivation, retention and transfer, and evaluation 
and measurement. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 



39 BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION 

A detailed examination of the applied analysis of behavior. Focus will be 
on the application of experimental method to the individual clinical 
case. The course will covertargeting behavior, base-rating, intervention 
strategies and outcome evaluation. Learning based modification 
techniques such as contingency management, counter-conditioning, 
extinction, discrimination training, aversive conditioning and negative 
practice will be examined. Prerequisite: Psychology 2 7. 



40 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN 

Consideration of a variety of designs currently used in Psychology with 
emphasis on the appropriate statistical analyses. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 20 and 2 1 . 



48-49 PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 

An off-campus involvement in the application of psychological skills 
and principles in institutional settings. The experience includes training 
in behavior modification and traditional counseling techniques as 
applied in prisons, mental health centers, and schools forthe mentally 
retarded. Classroom training focuses on various therapeutic techni- 
ques and on the student's understanding of himself in the counselor 
role. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Internships give students an opportunity to relate on -cam pus academic 
experiences to society in general and to their post-baccalaureate objec- 
tives in particular. Our students have, for example, worked in prisons, 
public and private schools, county government, and the American Red 
Cross. 



80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Independent Study is an opportunity for students to pursue special in- 
terests in areas for which courses are not offered. In addition, students 
have an opportunity to study a topic in more depth than is possible in the 
regular classroom situation. Studies in the past have included child 
abuse, counseling of hospital patients, and research in the psychology 
of natural disasters. 



RELIGION/ 133 



90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

Honors in Psychology require original contributions to the literature of 
Psychology through independent study. The most recent honors project 
was a study of the relationship between socio-economic status and 
visual vs. auditory learning. 



RELIGION 

Professor: Guerra, Rhodes 

Assistant Professor: Hughes (Chairman) 

A major consists often courses including 1 1 . 1 2. 1 3, and 1 4. At least seven 
courses must be taken in the department. The following courses may be 
counted toward fulfilling the major requirements: Greek 1 1 and 1 2, Hebrew 
1 1 and 1 2, History 39 and 41, Philosophy 25, and Sociology 33. 

1 1 DEATH AND DYING 

A study of death from personal, social, and universal standpoints, with 
emphasis upon what the dying may teach the living. Principal issues are 
the stages of dying, bereavement, suicide, funeral conduct, and the 
religious doctrines of death and immortality. Course includes, as op- 
tional, practical projects with terminal patients under professional 
supervision. 

1 2 RELIGION AND THE SPIRIT OF SCIENCE 

A comparison of the approaches taken by religion and science towards 
such topics as: evolution, psychic phenomena, primitive creation 
myths, modern astronomy, depth psychology, and the concept of 
"revelation." The role of "faith," "fact," and "intuition" in each discipline 
will be examined. Scientists, engineers, and technicians will be invited 
to share their views informally with the class. 

1 3 OLD TESTAMENT FAITH AND HISTORY 

A critical examination of the literature within its historical setting and in 
the light of archeological findings to show the faith and religious life of 
the Hebrew-Jewish community in the biblical period, and an introduc- 
tion to the history of interpretation with an emphasis on contemporary 
Old Testament criticism and theology. 

14 NEW TESTAMENT FAITH AND HISTORY 

A critical examination of the literature within its historical setting to 
show the faith and religious life of the Christian community in the 
biblical period, and an introduction to the history of interpretation with 
an emphasis on contemporary New Testament criticism and theology. 



134 /RELIGION 



22 PROTESTANTISM IN THE MODERN WORLD 

An examination of changing Protestant thought and life from Luther to 
the present, against the backdrop of a culture itself rapidly changing 
from the Seventeenth century scientific revolution to Marxism. 
Darwinism, and depth psychology. Special attention will be paid to the 
constant interaction between Protestantism and the world in which it 
finds itself. 

23 AFRICAN RELIGIONS 

An examination of the integrated life of the Black man in Africa before it 
was altered by Western imperialism. We will emphasize the "religious" 
side of the African's life, examining the way in which it is interwoven with 
his daily activities, from before his birth to after his death. Some atten- 
tion will be given to Western influences on this traditional lifestyle. 

24 JUDAISM AND ISLAM 

An examination of the rise, growth, and expansion of Judaism and Islam, 
with special attention given tothetheological contentsof the literatures 
of these religions as far as they are normative in matters of faith, prac- 
tice, and organization. Also a review of their contributions to the 
spiritual heritage of mankind. 

25 ORIENTAL RELIGION 

A phenomenology of the formative forces and concepts of Indian, 
Chinese, and Japanese religions; special attention devoted to social and 
political relations, mythical and aesthetic forms. East and West en- 
counter. 

28 HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST 

A study of the history and culture of Mesopotamia. Anatolia. Syria- 
Palestine, and Egypt, from the rise of Sumenan culture to Alexanderthe 
Great. Careful attention will be given to the religious views prevalent in 
the Ancient Near East as far as these views interacted with the culture 
and faith of Biblical man. 

30 PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION 

A study of the broad insights of psychology in relation to the phenomena 
of religion and religious behavior. The course concentrates on religious 
experience or manifestations rather than on concepts. Tentative 
solutions will be sought to questions such as: What does it feel I ike to be 
religious or to have a religious experience? What is the religious func- 
tion in human development? How does one think psychologically about 
theological problems? 

31 CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS 

An unfolding of ethics as horizon, engagement, destiny; and inter- 
disciplinary theoretical study closely related to the practical problems of 
violence and power, racism and revolution, assassination and authority. 



RELIGION/135 



32 CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS IN CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS 

An examination of the approach of religion and other disciplines to an 
issue of current concern; prospective topics include the ethics of 
violence, the social thought of Jacques Ellul, and the ethics of genetic 
control. The course may be repeated for credit. 



33 ROMAN CATHOLIC THOUGHT 

The development of Thomism. Neo-Thomism. and Transcendental 
Thomism; limited attention given to pastoral and ecclesiological issues 
in the post-concihar era after Vatican II. 



37 BIBLICAL TOPICS 

An in-depth study of Biblical topics related both to the Old Testament 
and the New Testament. Topics include prophecy, wisdom literature, the 
Dead Sea Scrolls, the teachings of Jesus, Pauline theology, Judaism 
and Christian origins, redaction criticism— the way the Synoptic 
Gospels and John give final form to their message. Course will vary from 
year to year and may be taken for credit a second time if the topic is 
different from one previously studied. 

41 CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS ISSUES 

A study of the theological significance of some contemporary intellec- 
tual developments in western culture. The content of this course will 
vary from year to year. Subjects studied in recent years include the 
following: the theological significance of Freud, Marx, and Nietzsche; 
Christianity and existentialism; theology and depth psychology; and the 
religious dimension of contemporary literature. 

42 THE NATURE AND MISSION OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the nature of the church and its mission in contemporary 
society including an analysis of the role of the church and an examina- 
tion of ways of renewal. 

43 THE EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH 

A study of religious education as a function of the church with special 
attention given to the nature and objectives of Christian education, 
methods of teaching religion, and the relations between faith and lear- 
ning. 

46 BIBLE, ARCHEOLOGY, AND FAITH 

A study of the role of archeology in reconstructing the world in which 
the Biblical literature originated, with special attention given to 
a re heo logical results that throw light on the clarification of the Biblical 
text. Also an introduction to basic archeological method, and a study in 
depth of several representative excavations along with the artifacts and 
material culture recovered from different historical periods. 



136 /SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Interns in religion usually work in local churches under the supervision 
of the pastor and a member of the faculty. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Current study areas are in the biblical languages. New Testament 
theology, comparative religions, and the ethics of technology. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

A recent project was on the theology of Hope with reference to the 
thought of Ernst Bloch and Alfred North Whitehead. 



SOCIOLOGY — ANTHROPOLOGY 

Professor: McCrary 

Assistant Professor: Jo, Wilk (Chairman) 

Instructor: Rux, Strauser 

A major consists of Sociology-Anthropology 10, 14, 16, 44, 47 and three 
other courses within the department with the exception of 1 5, 23. Religion 
46 may also be counted toward the major. Sociology-Anthropology majors 
are encouraged to participate in the internship program. 

10 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

An introduction to the problems, concepts, and methods in sociology 
today, including analysis of stratification, organization of groups and in- 
stitutions, social movements, and deviants in social structure. 



14 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 

An introduction to the subfields of anthropology; its subject matter, 
methodology, and goals. Examination of biological and cultural evolu- 
tion, the fossil evidence for human evolution and questions raised in 
relation to human evolution. Other topics include race, human nature, 
primate behavior, and prehistoric cultural development. 



1 5 INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 

An introduction to the role of law enforcement, courts, and corrections 
in the administration of justice; the historical development of police, 
courts and corrections; jurisdiction and procedures of courts; an in- 
troduction to the studies, literature, and research in criminal justice; 
careers in criminal mstice. 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY/ 137 



16 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

An examination of cultural and social anthropology designed to 
familiarize the student with the analytical approaches to the diverse 
cultures of the world The relevancy of cultural anthropology for an un- 
derstanding of the human condition will be stressed. Topics to be 
covered include: the nature of primitive societies in contrast to 
civilizations, the concept of culture and cultural relativism, the in- 
dividual and culture, the social patterning of behavior and social con- 
trol, an anthropological perspectiveon thecultureof the United States. 

20 MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 

The history, structure, and functions of modern American family life, 
emphasizing dating, courtship, factors in marital adjustment, and the 
changing status of family members. Prerequisite: Sociology- 
Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 

21 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 

A multidisciphnary approach to the study of the constellation of factors 
that relate to juvenile delinquency causation, handling the juvenile 
delinquent in the criminal justice system, treatment strategies, preven- 
tion and community responsibility. Prerequisite: Sociology- 
Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 

22 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF MEXICO 

Examination of the diverse cultures of Mesoamenca from preconquest 
indigenous peoples to modern Mexican state, including the rise and fall 
of Aztec and Maya civilization, transformation from primitive 
agriculturalist to peasant, concepts of folk society and culture of pover- 
ty; an analysis of contemporary problems of rural Mexico and the role of 
peasants in modern revolutionary movements. Offered at least once 
every three years. 

23 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Principles, theories and doctrines of the law of crimes, elements in 
crime, analysis of criminal investigation, important case law. Prere- 
quisite: Sociology-Anthropology 15 or consent of instructor. 

24 RURAL AND URBAN COMMUNITIES 

The concept of community is treated as it operates and affects individual 
and group behavior in rural, suburban, and urban settings. Emphasis is 
placed upon characteristic institutions and problems of modern city life. 
Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 

26 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 

An analysis of the dynamics, structure, and reaction to social 
movements with focus on contemporary social movements. Prere- 
quisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 



138/ SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



27 SOCIALIZATION THROUGH THE LIFE SPAN 



Examination of the relationship between the individual and society in 
the development of behavior potentials of groups and cultures. The 
course will study the continual process of learning how to be "human" 
which occurs throughout the life span. A cross cultural approach is 
utilized to examine the process of acquisition of skills, motives, and at- 
titudes necessary for role performance in childhood, adolescence, with 
an emphasis on young adulthood, adulthood, middle age, and old age. 
Life span developmental theory will be used in conjunction with 
socialization theory and role theory. Prerequisite: Sociology- 
Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 



28 AGING AND SOCIETY 

Analysis of cross cultural characteristics of the aged as individuals and 
as members of groups. Emphasis is placed upon variables: health, hous- 
ing, socio-economic status, personal adjustment, retirementand social 
participation. Sociological, social psychological and anthropological 
frames of reference utilized in analysis and description of aging and its 
relationship to society, culture, and personality. 



29 TWENTIETH CENTURY CHINESE SOCIETY 

An analysis of the interaction between the individual and society un- 
dergoing rapid social change in the Chinese cultural context. Topics in- 
clude Confucian examintion system and social mobility, the traditional 
Chinese village and family, origins of Chinese Marxism and how it has 
been implemented in social institutions of The People's Republic of 
China. Alternate years. 



30 CRIMINOLOGY 

Analysis of the sociology of law, conditions under which criminal laws 
develop, etiology of crime, epidemiology of crime including explanation 
of statistical distribution of criminal behavior in terms of time, space, 
and social location. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or con- 
sent of instructor. 



31 SOCIOLOGY OF WOMEN 

A sociological examination of the role of women in American society 
through an analysis of the social institutions which affecttheirdevelop- 
ment. Role analysis theory will be applied to the past, present and future 
experience of women as it relates to the role options of the society as a 
whole. Students will do an original research project on the role of 
women as part of the requirements for the course. Prerequisite: 
Sociology-Anthropology 10. Alternate years. 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY / 1 39 



32 INSTITUTIONS 

Introduces the student to the sociological concept of social institution, 
the types of social institutions to be found in all societies, and the in- 
terrelationships between the social institutions within a society. The 
course is divided into two basic parts: 1 . That aspect which deals with 
the systematic organization of society in general, and 2. The concentra- 
tion on a particular social institution: economic, political, educational, 
and social welfare. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology Wor consent 
of instructor. 

33 SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 

An examination of the major theories of the relationship of religion to 
society, and a survey of sociological studies of religious behavior. Prere- 
quisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 

34 RACIAL AND CULTURAL MINORITIES 

Study of racial, cultural and national groups within framework of 
American cultural values. Culture conflict and its resolution will be ex- 
amined for selected minority groups. 

35 CULTURE AND PERSONALITY 

Introduction to psychological anthropology, its theories and 
methodologies. Emphasiswillbe placed on the relationship between in- 
dividual and culture, national character, cognition and culture, culture 
and mental disorders, and cross cultural considerations of the concept 
of self. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 1 6 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Offered at least once every three years. 

36 THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF PRIMITIVE RELIGIONS 

The course will familiarize the student with the wealth of 
anthropological data on the religions and world views developed by 
primitive peoples. The functions of primitive religion in regard to the in- 
dividual, society and various cultural institutions will be examined. Sub- 
jects to be surveyed include myth, witchcraft, vision quests, spirit 
possession, the cultural use of dreams and revitalization movements. 
Particular emphasis will be given to shamanism, transcultural religious 
experience, and the creation of cultural realitiesthrough religions. Both 
a social scientific and existentialist perspective will be employed. Prere- 
quisite: Sociology-Anthropology 16 or consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

37 THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF AMERICAN INDIANS 

An ethnographic survey of native North American Indian and Eskimo 
cultures, such as the Iroquois, Plains Indians, Pueblos, Kwakiutl, and 
Netsilik. Changes in native lifeways due to European contacts and Un- 
ited States expansion will be considered. Recent cultural developments 
among American Indians will be placed in an anthropological perspec- 
tive. Offered at least once every three years. 



140 /SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



38 LEGAL AND POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 



The course is designed to familiarize the student with the techniques of 
conflict resolution and the utilization of public power in primitive society 
as well as the various theories of primitive law and government. The rise 
of the state and an anthropological perspective on modern law and 
government will be included. The concepts of self -regulation and social 
control, legitimacy, coercion, and exploitation will be the organizing 
focus. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 16 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Alternate years. 



39 THE AMERICAN PRISON SYSTEM 

Nature and history of punishment, evolution of the prison and prison 
methods with emphasis on prison community, prison architecture, in- 
stitutional programs, inmate rights and sentences. Review of punish- 
ment vs. treatment, detention facilities, jails reformatories, prison 
organization and administration, custody and discipline. Prerequisite: 
Sociology-Anthropology 1 5. 



41 SOCIAL STRATIFICATION 

An analysis of the nature of stratification systems, with special reference 
to American social structure. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



42 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK 

Consideration of basic social work concepts, principles and techniques 
of interviewing, individual case work, group work, and community; 
development of skills and techniques of social work applied to the cor- 
rectional setting. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or consent 
of instructor. 



43 ALTERNATIVE LIFE STYLES 

Analysis of new life styles in American Society: life styles of minority 
groups and others who are considered by society to be nonconforming. 
Examination of the challenges to conformity and ramifications of non- 
comformity in American Society. Will include an inquiry into behavior 
which has historically been labeled deviant covering such topics as: 
mental illness, addiction to alcohol and narcotics, homosexuality, and 
prostitution. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology Wor consent of in- 
structor. 



44 SOCIAL THEORY 

The history of the development of sociological thought from its earliest 
philosophical beginnings is treated through discussions and reports. 
Emphasis is placed upon sociological thought since the time of Comte. 
Prequ/s/te: Sociology-Anthropology 10 or consent of instructor. 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY/ 14 1 



45 ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY 

The history of the development of anthropological thought from the 
eighteenth century to the present. Emphasis is placed upon 
anthropological thought since 1850. Topics include evolutionism, 
historical-particularism, cultural idealism, cultural materialism, func- 
tionalism, structuralism and ethnoscience. Prerequisite: Sociology- 
Anthropology 16 or consent of instructor. Offered at least once every 
three years. 

41 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 

Study of the research process in sociology and anthropology, including 
formation of research design (theory, methodology, and techniques), 
and practical application in the investigation of a research problem. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 13 and Sociology-Anthropology 10 or con- 
sent of instructor. 

48-49 PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY 

Introduces the student to a practical work experience involving com- 
munity agencies in order to effect a synthesis of the student's academic 
course work and its practical applications in a community agency. 
Specifics of the course to be worked out in conjunction with depart- 
ment, student and agency. Prerequisite: Sociology-Anthropology 1 or 
consent of instructor. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section) 

Interns in Sociology-Anthropology typically work off-campus with 
social service agencies under the supervision of administrators. 
However, other internship experiences such as with the Lycoming 
County Historical Museum are available. 

Interns in criminal justice work off-campus in criminal justice agencies 
such as penal institutions and probation and parole departments under 
the supervision of administrative personnel. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Typical examples of recent studies in Sociology-Anthropology are 
American Indian world views and religions and program evaluation in 
the human services area. Recent studies in the criminal justice area are 
the status of women in the criminal justice system and model correc- 
tional legislation and standards. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 



142/ THEATRE 



THEATRE 

Professor: Falk (Chairman) 
Assistant Professor: Dartt 
Part-Time Instructor: Jesewski 

The major consists of eight courses. exceptTheatre 1 . with a concentration 
in Acting. Directing, or Design. The Fine Arts requirement may be satisfied 
by selecting any two courses, except Theatre 1. In addition to the 
departmental requirements, majors are urged to include courses in Art, 
Music, Psychology, and English. 

1 FUNDAMENTALS OF ORAL COMMUNICATION 

The dynamics of oral communication. The development of elementary 
principles of simple oral communication through lectures, prepared 
assignments in speaking, and informal class exercises. Utilizes video 
tape sequences for "instant feedback" to students. 

10 INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 

Designed as a comprehensive introduction to the aesthetics of theatre. 
From the spectator's point of view, the nature of theatre will be explored 
including dramatic literature and the integrated functioning of acting, 
directing, and all production aspects. 

1 1 INTRODUCTION TO FILM 

A basic course in understanding the film medium. The class will in- 
vestigate film technique through lectures and by viewing regular weekly 
films chosen from classic, contemporary, and experimental shortfilms. 

12 HISTORY OF THEATRE I 

A detailed study of the development of theatre from the Greeks to the 
Restoration. Alternate years. 

13 HISTORY OF THEATRE II 

The history of the theatre from 1 660. Alternate years. 

14 ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE 

The fundamental principles and methods of oral reading and the inter- 
pretation of literature are introduced. Materials will be chosen from 
poetry, prose, the novel, and drama. Alternate years. 

1 5 PLAYWRITING AND DRAMATIC CRITICISM 

An investigation of the techniques of playwriting with an emphasis on 
creative writing, culminating in a written one -act play, plus an historical 
survey of dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis 
upon developing the student's ability to write reviews and criticism of 
theatrical productions and films. Alternate years. 



THEATRE/143 



18 PLAY PRODUCTION FOR COMMUNITY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

Stagecraft and the various other aspects of play production are in- 
troduced. Through material presented in the course and laboratory 
work on the Arena Theatre stage, the student will acquire experience to 
produce theatrical scenery for community and secondary school 
theatre. 



20 CREATIVE DRAMA FOR CHILDREN 

Designed especially for those intending to be teachers, this course ex- 
plores the dramatic possibilities of creative Dlaymaking for children on 
all grade levels. Special emphasis is placed on story telling, dramatiza- 
tion, pantomime, and dramatic play. Alternate years. 



24 INTRODUCTION TO ACTING 

An introductory study of the actor's preparation, with emphasis on 
developing the actor's creative imagination through improvisations and 
scene study. 



26 INTRODUCTION TO DIRECTING 

An introductory study of the function of the director in preparation, 
rehearsal, and performance. Emphasis is placed on developing the 
student's ability to analyze scripts and on the development of the 
student's imagination. 



28 INTRODUCTION TO SCENE DESIGN AND STAGECRAFT 

An introduction to the theatre with an emphasis on stagecraft. The 
productions each semester serve as the laboratory to provide the prac- 
tical experience necessary to understand the material presented in the 
classroom. 



29 MARIONETTE PRODUCTION 

Introduces the construction, costuming, and performing of a play 
through the medium of string puppets. Alternate years. 



31 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES OF PLAY PRODUCTION 

A detailed consideration of the interrelated problems and techniques of 
play analysis, production styles, and design. Offered summer only. 



34 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO: ACTING 

Instruction and practice in character analysis and projection, with 
emphasis on vocal and body techniques. 



144 /THEATRE 



35 THEORIES OF THE MODERN THEATRE 

An advanced course exploring the philosophical roots of the modern 
theatre from the birth of realism to the present, and the influences on 
modern theatre practice. Selected readingsfrom Nietzsche. Marx. Jung. 
Freud, Whitehead, Kierkegaard, Sartre, Camus, as well as Antoine. 
Copeau. Stanislavski, Shaw, Meyerhold, Artaud, Brecht, Brook. 
Grotowski. Alternate years. 



36 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO: DIRECTING 

Emphasis is placed on the student's ability to function in preparation 
and rehearsal. Practical experience involves the directing of two one-act 
plays from the contemporary theatre. 



38 INTERMEDIATE STUDIO: SCENE AND LIGHTING DESIGN 

The theory of stage and light ingdesignwithemphasison their practical 
application to the theatre. 



40 MASTERS OF WORLD DRAMA 

An intensive and detailed analysis of the plays, and related works, in- 
cluding criticism of great authors, that have shaped world theatre. 
Authors to be selected on the basis of interest of students and faculty. At 
times, more than one author will be treated in a term. Ibsen, Brecht, 
Moliere, Williams, Albee. Alternate years. May be accepted toward 
English major with consent of English Department. 



42 ADVANCED STUDIO COSTUME DESIGN 

The theory of costuming for the stage, elements of design, planning, 
production, and construction of costumes for the theatre. Students will 
participate in the design of a production. 



42 ADVANCED STUDIO: PROPERTIES DESIGN 

The theory of properties design for the stage including the production of 
specific properties for staging use. Elements of design, fabrication, and 
the construction of properties employing a variety of materials and the 
application of new theatrical technology. 



44 ADVANCED STUDIO: ACTING 

Preparation of monologues and two-character scenes. Contemporary 
and classical. The student will appear in major campus productions. 



46 ADVANCED STUDIO: DIRECTING 

Emphasis will be placed on the student's ability to produce a major 
three-act play from the script to the stage for public performance. 



THEATRE/145 



48 ADVANCED STUDIO: DESIGN 

Independent work in conceptual and practical design. The student will 
design one full production as his major project. 

56-59 INTERNSHIP (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Interns in theatre work off-campus in such theatres as the Guthrie 
Theatre. Minneapolis and the New Jersey Shakespeare Festival. 

80-89 INDEPENDENT STUDY (See Index for Special Program section.) 

Some recent independent studies have been the roles of women as 
characters in drama, scene design and lighting design for an Arena 
production. 

90-99 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 
(See Index for Special Program section.) 

A typical study could be the writing and production of an original play. 




COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Fred A. Pennington Chairman Emeritus 

OFFICERS 

W. Gibbs McKenney Chairman 

Walter J. Heim Vice Chairman 

Paul G. Gilmore Secretary 

Kenneth E. Himes Treasurer 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

John G. Detwiler Delray Beach, FL 

Bishop Hermann W. Kaebnick. D.D.. L.H.D., LL.D Hershey 

Ralph E. Kelchner Jersey Shore 

Arnold A. Phipps, II Williamsport 

George L. Stearns. II Williamsport 

The Rev. L. Elbert Wilson Orlando, FL 

TRUSTEES 

Term Expires 1 977 

Elected 

1 974 J. Robert Fahnestock Williamsport 

1 974 Daniel G. Fultz Pittsford, NY 

(Alumni Representative) 

1 974 Mrs. Fred S. Gorman York 

1 965 James G. Law Bloomsburg 

1 970 John E. Person. Jr Williamsport 

1965 Hon. Herman T. Schneebeli Williamsport 

1 972 Donald E. Shearer. M.D Montoursville 

1961 Nathan W. Stuart. J.D Williamsport 

1971 Willis W. Willard, III. M.D Hershey 

1 958 W. Russell Zachanas Allentown 

146 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL/ 147 



Term Expires 1 978 

Elected 

1 969 Richard R. Cramer, D.D.S Hershey 

1 973 Guy M. Davies Lancaster 

1 975 Susan A. Deery. Ed.D Williamsburg. VA 

(Alumni Representative) 

1 969 Samuel H. Evert Bloomsburg 

1 972 The Rev. Brian A. Fetterman Harrisburg 

1 965 Walter J. Heim Montoursville 

1 969 Kenneth E. Himes Williamsport 

1 970 Woodrow A. Knight Williamsport 

1972 John W. Lundy Williamsport 

1 969 Mrs. Donald G. Remley Williamsport 

1 972 Harold H. Shreckengast, Jr Jenkintown 

1 967 The Rev. Donald H. Treese. D.D Carlisle 



Term Expires 1 979 

Elected 

1 970 Walter T. Dunston, D.D.S Philadelphia 

1 951 Paul G. Gilmore Williamsport 

1 973 Robert G. Little, M.D Harrisburg 

1964 W. Gibbs McKenney Baltimore, MD 

1 973 G. Jackson Miller Altoona 

1972 The Rev. Paul E. Myers, D.D Hershey 

1958 Fred A. Pennington Mechanicsburg 

1 976 Hon. Kent D. Shelhamer Berwick 

1961 The Rev. Wallace F. Stettler. HH.D Kingston 

1976 Walter W. Wilt Camp Hill 

(Alumni Representative) 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Walter J. Heim, Chairman 

Richard R. Cramer Paul E. Myers 

Guy M. Davies John E. Person, Jr. 

Samuel H. Evert Mrs. Donald G. Remley 

Paul G. Gilmore Herman T. Schneebeli 

Woodrow A. Knight Harold H. Shreckengast, Jr. 

W. Gibbs McKenney Nathan W. Stuart 

W. Russell Zachanas 



148 /COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

HAROLD H. HUTSON President Emeritus 

B.A.. LL.D.. Wofford College; B.D., Duke University 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; L.H.D., Ohio Wes/eyan 

FREDERICK E. BLUMER (1976) President 

B.A.. Mi 1 1 saps College 

B.D., Ph.D., Emory University 
JAMES R. JOSE (1970) Dean of the College 

B.A., Mount Union College; M.A., Ph.D., The American University 
JACK C. BUCKLE (1957) Dean of Student Services 

A.B., Juniata College; M.S., Syracuse University 
KENNETH E. HIMES (1948) Treasurer 

B.S., Drexel University; G.S.B., Rutgers University 
OLIVER E. HARRIS (1956) Director of Development 

A.B., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

R. ANDREW LADY (1957) Director of Institutional Relations 

and Assistant to the President 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.S., D.Ed., The Pennsylvania University 
WILLIAM L. BAKER (1 965) Business Manager 

B.S., Lycoming College 
CHARLES E. WEYANT (1971) Director of Library Services 

B.A., American University; M.S., Simmons College 
FRANK J. KAMUS (1963) Director of Admissions 

B.S., Lock Haven State College 
ROBERT J. GLUNK (1965) Registrar and Assistant to the Dean 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 
DALE V. BOWER ( 1 968) Director of Alumni Affairs 

B.S., Lycoming College; B.D., United Theological Seminary 
BRUCE L. SWANGER (1968) Director of Public Relations 

A.B., Bucknell University 

RUSSELL A. BL00DG00D (1969) Manager of Food Service 

ROBERT L. EDDINGER (1967) Director of Buildings & Grounds 

DOROTHY J. STREETER (1946) Book Store Manager 

CLARENCE W. BURCH (1962) Director of Athletics 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
DOUGLAS J. KEIPER (1 970) Associate Dean of Student Services 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
ANDREW H. MOYER (1970) Coordinator of Computer Services 

B.T., Elizabethtown College 
R. ALBION SMITH (1971) Associate Dean of Student Services 

B.S., Springfield College; M.S.S., Syracuse University 
WENRICH H. GREEN (1968) Assistant Director of Admissions 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.S., The Pennsylvania State University 
ROBERT L. CURRY, JR. (1972) Assistant in Athletics 

A.B., Lycoming College 

PATRICIA A. STALGAITIS (1 974) Assistant Director of Admissions 

A.B., Lycoming College 

DEBRA A. D'AGUILLO (1976) Assistant Dean of Student Services 

B.A.. SUNY at Binghamton; M.S., SUNY at Albany 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL/ 149 



FACULTY 

EMERITI 

MABEL K. BAUER Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.S., Cornell University: M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

DAVID G. BUSEY Associate Professor Emeritus of 

Physical Education 

B.S.. M.S., University of Illinois 
LEROY F. DERR Professor Emeritus of Education 

A.B., Urs/nus College; M.A., Bucknell University 

Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 
ROBERT H. EWING Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B., College of Wooster; M.A., University of Michigan 

HH.D., Lycoming College 
W. ARTHUR FAUS Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

A.B., Dickinson College; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University 
PHIL G. GILLETTE Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish 

A.B.. Ohio University; M.A., Columbia University 

HAROLD W. HAYDEN Librarian Emeritus 

and Professor Emeritus of Library Services 

A.B., Nebraska State Teachers College; B.S.. University of Illinois; 

M.A. in L.S., University of Michigan 
GEORGE W. HOWE Professor Emeritus of Geology 

A.B., M.S., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Cornell University 
M. RAYMOND JAMISON Assistant Professor Emeritus of Physics 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Bucknell University 
WALTER G. MclVER Professor Emeritus of Music 

Mus.B., Westminster Choir College; 

A.B., Bucknell University; M.A., New York University 
LORING B. PRIEST Professor Emeritus of History 

LITTB., Rutgers University; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

DONALD G. REMLEY Assistant Professor Emeritus of 

Mathematics and Physics 

A.B., Dickinson College; M.A., Columbia University 
LOUISE R. SCHAEFFER Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.A., Bucknell University 

D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
GEORGE S. SHORTESS Professor Emeritus of Biology 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins University 
FRANCES K. SKEATH . ._. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

A.B.. M.A., Bucknell University 

D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
JOHN A. STUART Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A.. William Jewell College; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
HELEN B. WEIDMAN Professor Emeritus of Political Science 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 



150 /COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



PROFESSORS 



ROBERT F. FALK (1970) Theatre 

B.A., B.D., Drew University; M.A.. Ph.D., Wayne State University 
MORTON A. FINEMAN (1966) Physics 

A.B.. Indiana University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
JOHN P. GRAHAM (1939) English - Mace Bearer 

Ph.B., Dickinson College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
EDUARDO GUERRA (1960) Religion 

B.D., Southern Methodist University; 

S.T.M., Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary 
JOHN G. HANCOCK (1967) Psychology 

B.S., M.S.. Bucknell University; Ph.D., 

The Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN G. HOLLENBACK (1952) Business Administration 

Marshal of the College 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
JAMES K. HUMMER (1962) Chemistry 

B.N.S., Tufts University; M.S., Middlebury College; 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
JAMES R.JOSE (1970) Political Science 

B.A., Mount Union College; M.A., Ph.D., The American University 
JACK S. McCRARY (1969) Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., 

Washington University 
GLEN E. MORGAN (1961) Music 

B.M., M.M.. Ph.D., Indiana University 
ROGER W. OPDAHL (1963)** Economics 

A.B., Hofstra University; M.A., Columbia University; 

D.Ed.. The Pennsylvania State University 
ROBERT W. RABOLD (1955) Economics 

B.A., The Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Pittsburgh 
JOHN A. RADSPINNER (1957) Chemistry 

B.S., University of Richmond; M.S., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute; D.Sc, Carnegie-Mellon University 
0. THOMPSON RHODES (1961)* Religion 

B.S., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Ph.D.. Drew University 
LOGAN A. RICHMOND (1954) Accounting 

B.S.. Lycoming College; M.B.A.. New York University; 

C.P.A. (Pennsylvania) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

ROBERT B. ANGSTADT (1967) Biology 

B.S., Urs/nus College; M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

MYRNA A. BARNES (1959) Library Services 

A.B., University of California at Los Angeles; 
M.S. in L.S., Drexel University 



"On Sabbatical Fall Semester 1976-77. 
'"On Sabbatical Spring Semester 1976-77. 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL /1 51 



BERNARD P. FLAM (1963) Spanish 

A.B., New York University; M.A., Harvard University; 

Ph.D.. University of Wisconsin 
CHARLES L. GETCHELL (1967) Mathematics 

B.S.. University of Massachusetts; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
ERNEST D. GIGLIO (1972) Political Science 

B.A., Queens College; M.A.. The State University 

of New York at Albany; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
DAN D. GUSTAFSON (1971) English 

B.A., Amherst College; M.A., University of California at Berkeley; 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska 
FORREST E. KEESBURY (1970) Education 

B.S., Defiance College; M.A., Bowling Green State University; 

Ed.D., Lehigh University 
ALDEN G. KELLEY (1966) Biology 

B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Purdue University 
GERTRUDE B. MADDEN (1958)** English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Bucknell University 
ROBERT J. B. MAPLES (1969) French 

A.B., University of Rochester; Ph.D.. Yale University 
JOHN F. PIPER. JR. (1969)** History 

A.B., Lafayette College; B.D., Yale University; Ph.D., Duke University 
MARY LANDON RUSSELL (1936) Music 

Mus.B., Susquehanna University Conservatory of Music; 

M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 
JAMES W. SHEAFFER (1949) Music 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.S.. 

University of Pennsylvania 
K. BRUCE SHERBINE (1969) Biology 

A.B., Gettysburg College; M.S.. Temple University; 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 
ROGER D. SHIPLEY (1967) Art 

B.A., Otterbe/n College; M.F.A., 

Cranbrook Academy of Art 
WILLY SMITH (1966) Physics 

B.S.E., The University of the Republic (Uruguay); 

M.S.E., Ph.D., University of Michigan 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

SUSAN K. BEIDLER (1975) Library Services 

B.A., University of Delaware; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 
HOWARD C. BERTHOLD, JR. (1976) Psychology 

B.A.. Franklin and Marshall College; M.A.. The University of Iowa; 

Ph.D.. The University of Massachusetts 
JON R. BOGLE (1976) Art 

B.F.A., B.S.. M.F.A.. Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
CLARENCE W. BURCH (1962) Physical Education 

B.S.. M.Ed.. University of Pittsburgh 



"On Sabbatical Spring Semester 1976-77. 



7 52 /COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



RITA M. CANTOR (1976) Mathematics 

B.A.. Queens College; M.A.T., Cornell University; Ph.D., 

Cornell University 
JOHN H. CONRAD (1959) Education 

B.S.. Mansfield State College; M.A.. New York University 
GARY E. DARTT (1969)** Theatre 

B.S.. Augustana College; M.F.A.. University of Minnesota 
JACK D. DIEHL, JR. (1971) Biology 

B.S., M.A.. Sam Houston State College; 

M.S.. Ph.D.. University of Connecticut 
RICHARD R. ERICKSON (1973) Astronomy and Physics 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.S.. Ph.D., University of Chicago 
WILLIAM D. FORD (197 2) English 

B.A.. Occidental College; M. A., M.F.A.. Ph.D., University of Iowa 
DAVID A. FRANZ (1970) Chemistry 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A.T., The Johns Hopkins University; 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 
STEPHEN R. GRIFFITH (1 970) Philosophy 

A.B., Cornell University; M.A.. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
THOMAS J. HENNINGER (1966) Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest College; M.A.. University of Kansas 
OWEN F. HERRING (1965) Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest College 
JOHN R. HUBBARD (197 5) Mathematics 

A.B., University of Rochester; A.M., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
OCTAVIA HUGHES (1971) Art 

B.A.. Radcliffe College; M.A., Columbia University 
RICHARD A. HUGHES (1970) Religion 

B.A., Indiana Central College; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University 
EMILY R. JENSEN (1969) English 

B.A.. Jamestown College; M.A.. University of Denver; 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 
MOON H. JO (197 5) Sociology 

B.A.. Valparaiso University; M.A., Howard University; 

Ph.D., New York University 
ELIZABETH H. KING (1956) Business Administration 

B.S.. Geneva College; M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
ROBERT H. LARSON (1969) History 

B.A., The Citadel; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
PAULA. MacKENZIE (1970) German 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 
OWEN J. MAHON (1973) Accounting 

B.S., M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
LYNDON J. MAYERS (1970) Biology 

B.S., University of Rhode Island; M.S., Ph.D., University of Maine 
RICHARD J. MORRIS (1976) History 

B.A., Boston State College; M.A., Ohio University; 

Ph.D., New York University 



"On Sabbatical Spring Semester 1976-77. 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL / 1 53 



RICHARD M. O'BRIEN (1971) Psychology 

A.B.. Franklin College; M.A.. Ph.D., West Virginia University 
NELSON PHILLIPS (1959) Physical Education 

B.S., Springfield College 
DAVID J. RIFE (1970) English 

B.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D.. Southern Illinois University 
MICHAEL G. ROSKIN (1972) Political Science 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley; 

M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 

Ph.D., The American University 
JARI ANNE TAYLOR (1975) Modern Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
FRED M. THAYER, JR. (1976) Music 

A.B., Syracuse University; B.M.. Ithaca College; 

M.M.. SUNY of B/nghamton; D.M.A.. Cornell University 
H. BRUCE WEAVER (1974) Business Administration 

B.B.A., Stetson University; J. D.. Vanderbilt University; 

MB. A., Florida Technological University 
CHARLES E. WEYANT (1971) Library Services 

B.A., The American University; M.S., Simmons College 
JOHN M. WHELAN. JR. (1971) Philosophy 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; 

Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin 
BUDD F. WHITEHILL (1957) Physical Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State College; 

M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
STANLEY T. WILK (1973) Anthropology 

B.A., Hunter College; Ph.D.. University of Pittsburgh 
LEO K. WINSTON (1964) Russian 

B.A., Sir George Williams University; M.A., universite de Montreal 
ROBERT A. ZACCARIA (1973) Biology 

B.A., Bridgewater College; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

INSTRUCTORS 

DIANNE F. HERMAN (1974) Political Science 

B.A., University of California at Berkeley; 

M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 
DEBORAH J. HOLMES (1976) Physical Education 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 
JULIA M. RUX (1970) Sociology 

B.A.. Hanover College; M.A., University of Wisconsin 
LARRY R. STRAUSER (1973) Sociology 

A.B., Lycoming College; M.P.A., University of Arizona 
JAMES P. WAITE (1 975) Business Administration 

B.S.. Boston College; MB. A., University of Dayton 

LECTURER 

DON M. LARRABEE II (197 2) Lecturer in Law 

A.B.. Franklin and Marshall; 
LL.B., Fordham University 



7 54 /COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS 

KATHERINE L. FETTER (1963) Art 

B.S.. Kutztown State College 
MARYT. FINEMAN (197 5) Chemistry 

B.A., Simmons College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh 
MARTINE HUPIN (1976) French 

Licence, Universite de Reims, France 
JAMES E. LOGUE (1976) English 

B.A.. M.A., Bucknell University 
MICHAEL L. MCLAUGHLIN (I 975) Philosophy 

B.A., Lock Haven State College; 

M.A., Purdue University 
FLORENCE PUTTERMAN (1972) Art 

B.S., New York University; 

M.F.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

MORTON RAUFF (1 974) Business Administration 

LOUISE R. SCHAEFFER (1962) Education 

A.B., Lycoming College; MA., Bucknell University; 

D.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 
TERRY WILD (197 2) Art 

B.A.. Lycoming College; B.F.A., Art Center 

College of Design 



MEDICAL STAFF 

FREDERIC C. LECHNER, M.D College Physician 

B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; M.D., Jefferson Medical College 
ROBERT S. YASUI, M.D College Surgeon 

M.D., Temple University 
RUTH J. BURKET. R.N College Nurse 

fiamot Hospital School of Nursing 
EMALINE W. DEIBERT, R.N College Nurse 

W/lliamsport Hospital School of Nursing 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL / 1 55 



A DMINIS TRA Tl VE A SSIS TA N TS 

LOUISE S. BANKS Secretary to the Librarian 

BETTY S. BECK Bookstore Assistant 

EMILY C. BIICHLE Secretary to the Treasurer 

PAULINE M. BRUNGARD Student Loan Coordinator 

B.S., Lycoming College 

SHIRLEY M. CAMPBELL Assistant in Treasurer's Office 

ELIZABETH G. COWLES Career Development Secretary 

MARGARET A. DEWAR Secretary in Admissions Office 

DEBORAH A. EISEMANN Secretary to Coaches 

JUNE L. EVANS Secretary in Education Office 

IRENE EVERDALE Secretary to Director of Buildings 

& Grounds 

S. JEAN GAIR Faculty Secretary 

ANNE S. GIBBON Faculty Secretary 

KITTY S. GLOSSER Secretary in Admissions Office 

ESTHER GOOD Supervisor of Housekeeping 

RALPH W. HELLAN Computer Operations Programmer 

A.B., Lycoming College 

HELEN C. HELLER Secretary to the Registrar 

ISABEL G. HESS Library Assistant 

PHYLLIS M. HOLMES Secretary to the President 

DEE A. HORN Secretary in Student Aid Office 

MINNIE OLA HOUSEKNECHT Library Assistant 

JEAN JANASKIE Faculty Secretary 

NAOMI E. KEPNER Switchboard Operator 

EDITH LIPFERT Library Assistant 

VIVIAN MEIKRANTZ Secretary to the Dean of the College 

DEBRA MISSIGMAN Secretary to the Athletic Director 

HANNAH MORIARITY Secretary to the Director of Alumni Affairs 

MARILYN MULLINGS Faculty Secretary 

SANDRA MUNDRICK Secretary in Computer Center 

PHYLLIS B. MYERS Secretary in Registrar's Office 

DIANE NYMAN Secretary in Student Services Office 

MARION R. NYMAN Cashier-Bookkeeper 

BETTY J. PARIS Secretary to Directors of Development 

A.B., Lycoming College and Public Relations 

MARIAN L. RUBENDALL Secretary to Dean of Student Services 

BETTY JUNE SWANGER Accountant and Office Manager 

RHELDA M. UMPSTEAD Bulk Mailing Coordinator 

HELEN I. VINCENT Library Assistant 

JUNE WAGNER Faculty Secretary 

RONALD WAY Office Services Coordinator 

MARGARET WISE Secretary in Admissions Office 

CHERYL A. YEARICK Library Assistant 



156 /COLLEGE PERSONNEL 



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of Lycoming College has a membership of over 
seven thousand men and women. It is governed by an Executive Board con- 
sisting of four officers and twenty-one members-at-large, elected through 
mail ballot by the membership of the Association. The board also has forty- 
two members representing specific geographic areas of alumni concentra- 
tion, the senior class president, the student body president, and a represen- 
tative of the last graduating class. The Association annually nominates one 
alumni representative for a three-year term on the College Board of 
Trustees. The Director of Alumni Affairs directs the activities of the Alumni 
Office. 

The Alumni Association has the following purpose as stated in its constitu- 
tion: "As an off-campus constituency, the Association's purpose is to seek 
ways of maintaining an active and mutually beneficial relationship between 
the college and its alumni, utilizing their talents, resources and counsel to 
further the objective and program of Lycoming College." 

All former students of Williarmsport Dickinson Seminary and all former 
students, who have successfully completed one year of study at 
Williamsport Dickinson Junior College or Lycoming College shall be 
members of the Association. Any person who leaves Lycoming College after 
successfully completing one year and re-enters as a student within four 
years of his/her initial matriculation, shall not be a member of the Alumni 
Association while enrolled as a student at Lycoming College. 

Acting as the representative of alumni on the campus, and working also with 
undergraduates, the Alumni office aids in keeping alumni informed and in- 
terested in the program, growth, and activities of the college through 
regular publications mailed to all Alumni on record. Arrangements for 
Homecoming, Alumni Day, Class Reunions, club meetings and similar ac- 
tivites are coordinated through this office. The Alumni Association 
promotes group travel programs, supplies back-year class rings, sells water 
colors of the campus and sells alumni chairs. 

Through The Lycoming College Fund, the alumni office is closely associated 
with the development program of the college. Lycoming College holds 
membership in the Council for Advancement and Support of Education. 
Communications to the Alumni Association should be addressed to the 
Alumni Office. 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mr. John B. Ernst '58 

21 1 Belmont Avenue, Doylestown, PA 18901 
Vice-President for Campus Affairs — Mr. Wenrich H. Green '65 

R.D. #1, Williamsport, PA 1 7701 
Vice-President for Regional Affairs — Mr. Kent T. Baldwin '64 

2620 Blair Street, Montoursville, PA 1 7754 
Secretary — Mrs. Larry Strauser (Keigh Cronauer '58) 

R.D. 3, Montoursville. PA 17754 
Last Retiring President — Mr. George A. Nichols '59 

R.D. 2, Newton Road, Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1 



COLLEGE PERSONNEL/ 157 



Alumni 

Term Expires June 1977 

Miss Jana H. Barbor '71 — 1 34 Morton Road. Springfield, PA 1 9064 
Mr. John R. Biggar '66 — R.D. 2. Box 301 -H. Center Valley, PA 18034 
Mr. Donald E. Failor '68 — 1 2 Country Club Place, Camp Hill. PA 1 701 1 
Mr. Barry C. Hamilton '70 

1 7 South Black Friar Road, Rosemont, PA 1 901 
Mrs. Charles E. Peterson, Jr. (Marjone Sundin '49) 

730 North 30th Street, Allentown, PA 18104 
Dr. Mary Schweikle '63 

2905 Orchard Avenue, R.D. 3, Montoursville, PA 17754 
Miss Linda L. Sheetz '72 — 321 Center Street, Wilhamsport, PA 1 7701 

Term Expires June 1 978 

Mr. William Aufncht '74 — Ambassador West Apartments #51 5. 

1601 Penn Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 1 5221 
Mr. Samuel A. David '71 — 406 Roe Avenue, Elmira, N.Y. 14901 
Dr. Ronald L. Harpster '58 — 896 Schoolhouse Lane, Dover, DE 19901 
Mrs. Eleanore McCoy '7 2 — 1 142 Park Avenue. Williamsport. PA 1 7 701 
Mrs. Mary Landon Russell '33 

81 2 Lincoln Avenue, Williamsport, PA 1 7701 
Mr. BarryF.Thomas'60 — 2526 EastThird Street. Montoursville. PA 1 7754 
Mr. Ronald C. Travis '67 — 1 509 Elmira Street. Williamsport, PA 1 7701 

Term Expires June. 1979 

Mrs. Leo Calistri (Judith Fry '56) 

310 Fayette Drive, Fayetteville, NY 13066 
Mrs. James A. Chilton (Susan Strohmenger '69) 

R.D. #1, Box 92A. Clarks Summit, PA 1841 1 
Dr. Thomas Gallen, Jr. '65 — 58 N. Mam Street. Sherborn. MA 01 770 
Mr. Richard H. Lloyd '59 — 209 Feigles Road. Muncy, PA 17756 
Mrs. William R. Sandmeyer (Dorothy Ferrell '43 & '63) 

47 East Houston Avenue, Montgomery, PA 1 7752 
Mr. Barnard C.Taylor, II '65— 1 38 South Third Street, Lewisburg, PA 17837 
Mr. Ralph Zeigler '70 — 81 5 Third Avenue, Williamsport, PA 1 7701 

Members of the Board Serving a One-Year Term 
Student Association of Lycoming College President- 
Mr. Patrick J. Cerillo '77 
Senior Class President— Mr. Richard P. Belenski '77 
Representative of the Class of 1 976— Mr. Gareth D. Keene '76 



Alumni Representative to Lycoming College Board of Trustees 

(1 97 7) Mr. Daniel G. Fultz '57 — 3 7 Oak Manor Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534 

(1 978) Dr. Susan Albert Deery '69 

700 Conway Drive #204, Williamsburg, VA 23185 
(1979) Mr. Walter W. Wilt '65 

320 North 24th Street. Camp Hill, PA 1 701 1 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1976-1977 



SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 


DECEMBER 


JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


1 


12 3 4 5 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


27 28 




30 31 




MARCH 


APRIL 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


26 27 28 29 30 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


28 29 30 31 



158 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1976-1977 

FALL SEMESTER 



September 5— Sunday 
1 — Tuesday 
8— Wednesday 

November 24— Wednesday 
29— Monday 

December 21 — Tuesday 



Dormitories open 12 noon. 
Late Registration 
Classes begin. 

Thanksgiving recess begins 8 p.m. 
Classes resume 8 a.m. 

Semester ends 5 p.m. 



SPRING SEMESTER 

January 2 — Sunday 

3— Monday 

February 25— Friday 

March 1— Monday 

April 8— Friday 

22— Friday 
May 1 — Sunday 



Dormitories open 12 noon. 
Classes begin. 

Spring recess begins 5 p.m. 

Classes resume 8 a.m. 

Afternoon Classes suspended 
(Good Friday) 
Semester ends 5 p.m. 

Commencement. 



MAY TERM 

May 2— Monday Dormitories open 1 a.m. 

3— Tuesday Registration, and classes begin. 

27 — Friday Term ends 



SUMMER TERM 

June 



July 



5— Sunday 
6 — Monday 

1 5— Friday 



Dormitories open 1 2 noon. 
Registration, and classes begin. 

Term ends. 



159 



160 /INDEX 



INDEX 

Academic Advisement 48 

Academic Calendar 1 58-1 59 

Academic Center 28 

Academic Honesty 52 

Academic Honors 52 

Academic Program 46 

Academic Standing 53 

Accounting Career 39 

Accounting-Mathematics (EIM) ... 55 

Accreditation 4 

Activities, Student 21 

Additional Charges 14 

Administration 28 

Administrative Assistants 155 

Administrative Staff 1 48 

Admissions 7 

Admissions Office 10 

Admission Policy 7 

Admission Standards 7 

Advanced Placement 9 

Advanced Standing by Transfer .... 9 
Allopathic Medicine. 

Preparation for 44 

Alumni Association 156 

American Studies (EIM) 55 

Application Fee and Deposits 14 

Application Procedure 8 

Athletics. Intramural 23 

Attendance. Class 53 

Audit 32 

Board of Trustees 146 

Books and Supplies 15 

Building Description 28 

Business Career 39 

Calendar. Academic 1 58-1 59 

Campus Life 21,27 

Campus Map 29 

Career Development Center 25 

Career Opportunities 38-45 

Accounting 39 

Business 39 

Dental School. Preparation for . . 44 
Drama-Cooperative Program .... 42 
Engineering-Cooperative 

Program 42 

Environmental Studies 43 

Forestry-Cooperative Program . . 43 
Graduate Study. Preparation for . 44 

Health Professions 44 

Law School. Preparation for .... 45 
Medical School. Preparation for 44 

Medical Technology 40 

Military Science 40 



Planetarium Education 41 

Religious Education 41 

Teacher Education 42 

Theological Education, 

Preparation for 45 

Veterinary School, 

Preparation for 44 

Chapel 28 

Christian Ministry, Preparation for 45 

Class Attendance 53 

Clubs and Organizations 

on Campus 22 

College Level Examination 

Program (CLEP) 9 

College Personnel 1 46-1 55 

Communications with the 

College 164 

Community Scholarships 20 

Conduct, Standards of 26 

Counseling, Academic 48 

Counseling. Personal 24 

Course Credit by Examination 9 

Course Descriptions 64 

Course Work 46 

Criminal Justice (EIM) 56 

Damage Charges 16 

Degree Programs 46 

Degree Requirements 46 

Dental School. Preparation for .... 44 

Departmental Honors 35 

Departmental Majors 47 

Deposit 7, 14 

Deposit Refund 7, 14 

Discrimination Compliance 

Statement 7 

Distribution Requirements 49 

English 49 

Fine Arts 50 

Foreign Language 49 

History and Social Science 51 

Mathematics 49 

Natural Science 51 

Philosophy 50 

Religion 50 

Drama. Cooperative Program 42 

Early Admission Procedure 9-10 

Education Financing Plans 20 

Educational Opportunity Grants ... 1 9 
Engineering- Cooperative 

Program 42 

English Requirement 49 

Entrance Examinations (CEEB) 8 

Environmental Studies 43 

Established Interdisciplinary 
Major (EIM) 47. 55 



INDEX/ 161 



Evaluation, Freshman Mid- 
Semester 52 

Expenses 13-14 

Faculty 149 

Facilities 28 

Fees 13-16 

Financial Aid 17 

Financial Assistance 20 

Financial Information 13 

Fine Arts Activities 23 

Fine Arts Requirements 50 

Foreign Language Requirements . . 49 
Forestry-Cooperative Program .... 43 

Fraternities. Social 23 

General Expenses 13 

Goals for Lycoming 3 

Grading System 51 

Graduate Study 44 

Graduation Requirements 46 

Grants-m-Aid 18-20 

Handbooks for Students 
(Guidepost, Pathfinder. 

Residence Halls) 22 

Health Professions Careers 44 

Health Service 24 

History of the College 4 

History Requirement 51 

Honor Societies 52 

Honors. Academic 52 

Honors. Departmental 35 

Independent Study 34 

Intercollegiate Sports 23 

Intercultural Studies 37 

Interdisciplinary Majors 47, 55 

Established Majors (EIM) ... 55-62 

Individual Majors (MM) 47 

International Studies (EIM) 57 

Internship Program 35 

Interviews 8, 10 

Intramural Athletics 23 

Law School, Preparation for 45 

Life Long Learning 33 

Literature (EIM) 59 

Loans 19-20 

Location 5 

London Semester 7 37 

Lycoming Experimental Audit 

Program (LEAP) 32 

Lycoming Scholar Program 30 

Major 47 

Admission to 48 

Departmental 47 

Interdisciplinary (EIM, MM) 47 

Mass Communications (EIM) 59 

Mathematics Requirement 49 



May Term 33 

Medical College, Preparation for . . 44 

Medical History 8 

Medical Staff 154 

Medical Technology 40 

Mid-Semester Evaluation 

(Freshman) 52 

Military Science 40 

Ministerial Grants-in-Aid 18 

National Defense Student Loans 

(NDSL) 19 

Natural Science Requirement 51 

Near East Culture and 

Archeology (EIM) 61 

Non-Payment of Fees Penalty 16 

Non-Residents Lounge 28 

Objectives and Purpose 5 

Optometry School. 

Preparation for 44 

Organizations and Clubs 

on Campus 22 

Orientation 11 

Osteopathy School. 

Preparation for 44 

Overseas Studies Opportunities ... 37 
Part-time Student Opportunities 

Lycoming Experimental 
Audit Program (LEAP) 32 

Regular Audit 32 

Special Student (Part-time 

for Credit) 32 

Payment of Fees 15 

Payments, Partial 15 

Penalty for Non-Payment of Fees ..16 

Personal Counseling 24 

Philosophy Requirement 50 

Physical Examination 8 

Placement Services 25 

Planetarium Education 41 

Podiatry School, Preparation for . . 44 

Principal Aim of the College 3 

Publications and Communications 22 

Purpose and Objectives 5 

Radio Station-Campus 23 

Reading Improvement Course 24 

Recreation 28 

Refunds 15 

Regulations (Standards of 

Conduct) 26 

Religion Requirement 50 

Religious Education 41 

Religious Life 27 

Requirements, Distribution 49 

Requirements for Admission 7 

Requirements for Graduation 46 



162 /INDEX 



Reserve Officer Training Corps 

(ROTC) Scholarships 20 

Residence 25 

Residence Halls 25 

Residential 28 

Scholarships 18. 20 

Selection Process 7 

Seminar Study 35 

Sequential Courses 64 

Social Science Requirement 51 

Soviet Area Studies (EIM) 62 

Specially Designed Courses 32 

Special Opportunities 30 

Special Programs 33 

Departmental Honors 35 

Independent Study 34 

International Studies 37 

Internship Program 35 

London Semester 37 

Lycoming Scholar Program 30 

May Term 33 

Overseas Studies Opportunities . 37 

Seminar Study 35 

Student Enrichment Semester . . 34 

United Nations Semester 37 

Washington Semester 35 

Special Student, Admission as .... 1 

Sports 23 

Standards of Admission 7 

Standards of Conduct 26 

State Grants and Loans 20 

Student Activities 21 

Student Association 21 

Student Enrichment Semester 

(SES) 34 

Student Publications 22 

Student Records 53 

Student Services 24 

Student Union 21 

Study Skills Program 24 

Summer Session Calendar 159 

Teacher Education 42 

Theological Seminary, 

Preparation for 45 

Traditions 4 

Transfer 9 

Trustees 146 

United Nations Semester 37 

Veterans, Provisions for 10 

Veterinary School, Preparation for 44 

Washington Semester 35 

Withdrawal from College 15 

Withdrawing from Courses 53 

Work-Study Grants 19 



COMMUNICATION WITH THE COLLEGE 

This document contains pertinent information about the college, its 
philosophy, programs, policies, regulations, and offerings. All students and 
prospective students are urged to read it carefully and completely. 

Inquiries of a specific nature should be addressed as follows: 

Director of Admissions: 

Admission to the freshman class. 
Admission with advanced standing. 
Re-entry of students to Lycoming College. 
Request for catalogs. 

Treasurer: 

Payment of college bills. 
Inquiries concerning expenses. 

Director of Student Aid: 

Scholarships and loan funds for students in college. 
Financial assistance for entering students. 

Dean of the College: 

Information about faculty and faculty activities. 
Academic work of students in college. 

Dean of Student Services: 

Questions or problems concerning student's health. 
Residence and campus regulations. 

Registrar: 

Requests for transcripts. 
Notices of withdrawal. 

Career Development Center: 
Career Counseling. 
Employment while in college. 
Employment upon graduation. 

Director of Development: 
Gifts or bequests. 

Director of Alumni Affairs 

Director of Public Relations 

Address: LYCOMING COLLEGE. Williamsport. Pennsylvania 17701 
Telephone: 326-1 951 Area Code 71 7 

ALL OF THE PROVISIONS IN THIS CATALOG ARE EFFECTIVE JUNE 1 . 1976 

Lycoming College reserves the right to make any necessary changes in the academic calendar, 
charges, courses or any other section of this catalog. 

164