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Full text of "Lycoming College catalog"



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CHOICES 



THE ACADEMIC CATALOG 






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The Mission 



The mission of Lycoming College is to 
provide a distinguished baccalaureate educa- 
tion in the liberal arts. This is achieved within 
a coeducational, supportive, residential setting 
through programs that develop communica- 
tion and critical thinking skills; foster self- 
awareness while increasing receptivity to new 
concepts and perspectives; explore literary 
and scientific traditions; cultivate an aesthetic 
sensibility; elicit social responsibility; 
promote racial inclusiveness, gender equality, 
and an appreciation of cultural diversity; and 
produce leadership for the institutions of 
society. Each student is encouraged to 
develop and strengthen virtues and traits of 
character that enable, ennoble, and emancipate 
the human spirit while deepening commitment 
to those values that undergird civilization. 



Fully accredited, Lycoming is a member of 
the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools, and the University Senate of The 
United Methodist Church. It is a member of 
the Association of American Colleges and 
Universities, the Pennsylvania Association of 
Colleges and Universities, the Commission for 
Independent Colleges and Universities, the 
National Commission on Accrediting and the 
National Association of Schools and Colleges 
of The United Methodist Church. 

Also, the Department of Nursing is 
accredited by the National League for 
Nursing. The Department of Chemistry is 
approved by the American Chemical Society 
to certify upon graduation those students who 
meet or exceed the requirements established 
by the Society for membership. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



CONTENTS 



Contents 



Academic Calendar, 1996-1997 2 



Welcome to Lycoming 4 



The Campus 6 



Admission to Lycoming 10 



Financial Matters 13 



Student Affairs 23 



Academic Policies And Regulations 26 



The Academic Program 36 



The Curriculum 56 



The Board of Trustees 165 



Administrative Staff/Faculty 166 



The Alumni Association 181 



Index 183 



Conmiunication With 

Lycoming College Inside Back Cover 




The general regulations and policies stated in this 
catalog are in effect for the 1996-97 academic year. 
Freshmen beginning their first terms at Lycoming College 
in the fall of 1996 or the spring of 1997 are thereafter 
governed by the policies stated in this catalog. 

If changes are made in subsequent editions of the 
catalog to either general requirements or major require- 
ments, students have the option of following their original 
program or a subsequent catalog version, but the College 
always reserves the right to determine which requirements 
apply. 

If a student interrupts his or her education but returns 
to the College after no more than one academic year has 
passed, he/she will retain the same requirements in effect 
at the initial date of entrance. A student who withdraws 
from the College for more than one year will, upon return, 
be required to complete the requirements currently 
imposed upon other students of the same academic level. 
A student who transfers to the College with advanced 
standing will be subject to the requirements imposed upon 
other students at the College who have attained the same 
academic level. Post-baccalaureate students will be 
subject to the requirements in effect at the date of 
entrance to post-baccalaureate studies and must complete 
both distribution and major requirements. This does not 
apply to non-degree students in certificate-only programs. 

Lycoming College reserves the right to amend or 
change the policies and procedures stated in this catalog 
without prior notice to those who may be affected by 
them. The provisions of this publication are not to be 
regarded as an irrevocable contract between the applicant 
and/or the student and Lycoming College. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 
Printed in Canada 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Academic 
Calendar 






Fall Semester 


Spring Semester 


Bills are due 


August 9 


December 13 


Orientation of new faculty 


August 22 




Residence halls open for freshmen 


August 23 at 8 a.m. 


January 5 at 8 a.m. 


Residence halls open for upperclassmen 


August 24 at 10 a.m. 


January 5 at 8 a.m. 


Classes begin first period 


August 26 


January 6 


Processing of drop/add begins 


August 26 


January 6 


Re-registration fee of $25 applies 
after this date 


August 30 


January 10 


Last day for drop/add 


August 30 


January 10 


Last day to elect audit and pass/fail grades 


August 30 


January 10 


Last day for submission of final grades for 
courses for which Incomplete grades were 
recorded in Spring, May, and Summer terms 


October 4 




Last day for submission of final grades 
for courses for which Incomplete 
grades were recorded in fall semester 




February 14 


Mid-semester deficiency reports due 
in Registrar's Office at noon 


October 14 


February 21 


Residence halls close at 6 p.m. for 
spring recess 




February 21 


Residence halls open at 10 a.m. 




March 2 


Classes resume first period after 
spring recess 




March 3 


Enrollment deposit deadline 




March 14 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

• 







Fall Semester 


Spring Semester 


Last day to withdraw from courses 


October 25 


March 14 


Last days to withdraw from 
half semester courses. 


1 St 7 weeks 
2nd 7 weeks 


September 25 
November 13 


February 5 
April 2 


Residence halls close at 6:00 p.m. for 
Thanksgiving recess 


November 26 




Residence halls open at 10 a.m. 


December 1 




Classes resume first period after 
Thanksgiving 


December 2 




Final examinations begin 


December 9 


April 21 


Semester ends at 5:00 p.m. 


December 13 


April 25 


Residence halls close at 6:00 p.m. 


December 13 


April 25 





SP 
May Term 


ECIAL SESSIC 

Summer 

Session #1 


)NS 

Summer 
Session #2 


Residence halls open noon - 2:30 p.m. 


May 4 


June 1 


July 6 


Classes begin 


May 5 


June 2 


July? 


Last day for drop/add 


May 6 


June 4 


July 9 


Last day to elect audit and pass/fail grades 


May 6 


June 4 


July 9 


Last day to withdraw from courses 


May 21 


June 23 


July 28 


Term ends 


May 30 


July 3 


August 8 


Residence halls close at 4:00 p.m. 


May 30 


July 3 


August 8 



Special dates to remember: 

Freshman Seminar August 23, 24, 25 

New Student Convocation August 23 

Labor Day (classes in session). . . September 2 

Science Saturday September 28 

Long Weekend (no classes) . . October 18,19, 20 

Homecoming Weekend October 4, 5, 6 

Admissions Open House October 26 

Parents Weekend November 1, 2, 3 

Admissions Open House November 9 

Business Open House November 1 6 

Thanksgiving recess Nov. 26 - Dec. 1 



Admissions Open House January 1 8 

Admissions Open House February 15 

Spring recess February 21 - March 3 

Good Friday (no classes) March 28 

Accepted Students Day April 13 

Honors Convocation April 13 

Baccalaureate May 3 

Conmiencement May 4 

Memorial Day (no classes) May 26 

Independence Day (no classes) July 4 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



WELCOME TO LYCOMING 



Welcome To 
Lycoming College 



Lycoming College is a small liberal arts 
college dedicated to providing the type of 
learning that can be used for a lifetime in a 
supportive, residential environment that 
fosters individual growth and close interper- 
sonal relationships. 

U.S. News and World Report has recog- 
nized Lycoming as one of the top ten, regional 
colleges in the United States. It is something 
that Lycoming alumni have quietly known for 
years. The reasons are simple. 

All of Lycoming's resources and faculty 
are dedicated to the undergraduate education 
of just 1500 students. Classes are small and 
all faculty members teach. With a 13 to 1 
ratio of students to faculty, classes of five or 
ten students are not uncommon, while even 
large introductory courses average about 30 
students. This means abundant opportunities 
for individual attention by a faculty truly 
committed to teaching. 

Lycoming students are superbly prepared 
to meet the challenges of life through an 
academic program that includes both breadth 
of study in the humanities, social sciences and 
natural sciences and depth of study in at least 
one area of concentration. 

Those areas of concentration include 
bachelor of arts programs in 33 major fields, a 
bachelor of fine arts degree in sculpture, a 
bachelor of science in two major fields, and a 
bachelor of science degree in nursing. 

Those who intend to continue in medicine, 
dentistry, law, the ministry or teaching will 
find excellent preprofessional preparation. 
Through a number of cooperative programs 
with other colleges and universities, 
Lycoming students can study engineering, 
forestry, environment, podiatric medicine. 




optometry, and medical technology — while 
still enjoying the benefits of a small college 
experience. They can also study at 
Westminster College in Oxford, England; 
Anglia Polytechnic University in Cambridge, 
England; Regent's College in London, 
England; or spend a semester in Washington, 
D.C., or New York City through a number of 
other cooperative programs. 

One of Lycoming's most popular and 
successful ways of blending career planning 
with a liberal arts education is through its 
internship program. Close to one-third of 
Lycoming students gain real job experience as 
part of a semester course load. The 
Williamsport area is particularly rich in 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



WELCOME TO LYCOMING 



internship opportunities in business, mass 
communication, government, health and social 
services. The close relationship between the 
College and the community has given 
Lycoming students a chance to roll up their 
sleeves and gain resume-enhancing experience 
rather than mere observation. 

Most students complete their program of 
study in four years, usually by taking four 
courses each fall and spring semester. How- 
ever, students may take one course during 
Lycoming's May Term and from one to two 
courses in each Summer Term. 

Perhaps one of the most important qualities 
of Lycoming is its feeling of community. 
Lycoming is a truly residential college where 
all students, with the exception of close 
commuters, live on campus in one of the 
College's residence halls. 

The quality of campus life is enriched by a 
variety of extracurricular activities in which 
Lycoming students gain valuable leadership 
training. 

Students produce a weekly newspaper, run 
the campus radio station, edit a yearbook, 
mount theatre productions, participate in a 
nationally acclaimed choir and concert band, 
as well as organize and manage their own 
social fraternities and sororities, special 
interest clubs and campus-wide social events. 

Student athletes can try out for 19 different 
varsity sports (10 for men, 9 for women) or 
participate in the College's strong intramural 
program. 

All students are admitted free to the 
Lycoming College Artist Series which has 
brought The New York City Opera National 
Company; such Broadway musicals as Annie, 
Into the Woods and Big River, and other 
artists, ranging from the Tokyo String Quartet 
to the Pilobolus Dance Theater. Student-run 
programs have brought in Gin Blossoms, C & 
C Music Factory, Howie Mandel, Brian 
Adams, and Rythm Syndicate. 

Lycoming's campus lies near the historic 
downtown of Williamsport, a city best known 




as the birthplace of Little League Baseball and 
the site of its annual international champion- 
ship. The greater metro area has a population 
of approximately 75,000. 

The rolling hills and forestlands of 
northcentral Pennsylvania provide some of the 
state's best scenery, as well as hiking, 
camping, kayaking, and other outdoor 
recreation. Yet Lycoming is less than a four- 
hour drive from New York City, Philadelphia, 
Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Pittsburgh. 

The College enjoys a relationship with the 
United Methodist Church and supports its 
tradition of providing an education to persons 
of all faiths. The College is firmly committed 
to a policy of cultural diversity and expects its 
students to work together in an atmosphere of 
respect and tolerance. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE CAMPUS 

• 



History 

The history of Lycoming College has been 
one of continual evolution. The institution has 
been, at one time or another, an elementary and 
secondary school, a seminary, a junior college 
and at present a four-year liberal arts college — 
going through three name changes in the 
process. Sold by the Presbyterians to the 
Methodists (who bought it as a source of 
revenue), it is today an independent non- 
profit, private college, affiliated with the 
United Methodist Church. 

Its beginning dates back to 1812 — making 
Lycoming one of the 50 oldest colleges in 
America — when it was founded as the 
Williamsport Academy, that city's first 
elementary and secondary school. The school 
was administered by a Board of Trustees 
made up primarily of staunch Presbyterians. 

By 1848, Williamsport had its own public 
school system well in place, and the private 
school was becoming a financial burden. A 
visionary circuit preacher. Rev. Benjamin H. 
Crever, persuaded the Methodists to buy the 
school. They named the institution Dickinson 
Seminary and offered college preparatory 
courses. Rev. Crever is considered the 
school's true founder. 

The seminary operated as a private 
boarding school until 1929 when a college 
curriculum was added and it became the 
Williamsport Dickinson Junior College, the 
first junior college in Pennsylvania. 

In 1947, the junior college became a four- 
year degree-granting college of liberal arts and 
sciences. It adopted the name Lycoming, derived 
from the Indian word "lacomic," meaning 
"Great Stream," a name that enjoys local 
popularity as the name of the county, a 
township and a creek. 

In its evolutionary tradition, Lycoming 
College continues to expand its programs and 
improve its academic excellence with each 
decade, seeking to provide a truly distin- 
guished baccalaureate education to every 
student entering its doors. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 




The Campus 

Nineteen buildings sit on Lycoming's 35- 
acre campus. Most buildings have been 
constructed since 1950. All are easy to reach 
from anywhere on campus. A I2-acre athletic 
field and football stadium lie a few blocks 
north of the main campus. 

Modem buildings include the eight 
residence halls, which contain clean and 
comfortable double rooms; the student union; 
and the physical education/recreation center. 
Up-to-date facilities include the library, the 
theatre, the planetarium, the computer center, 
an elect-ronic-music studio, a photography 
laboratory, and an art gallery. The computer 
center opened in 1969; the art gallery and the 
physical educ-ation center opened in 1980. 
An arts center was renovated and opened in 
1983. The Heim Biology and Chemistry 
Building opened in 1990. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE CAMPUS 



Residence Halls 

Asbury Hall (1962) — Named in honor of 
Bishop Francis Asbury, the father of The 
United Methodist Church in America, who 
made the circuit through the upper Susquehanna 
District in 1812, the year Lycoming (then the 
Williamsport Academy) opened its doors. 
Asbury Hall houses freshman students in a co- 
educational environment. The Telecommuni- 
cations Office is located in the basement. 

Crever Hall (1962) — Honors Lycoming's 
founder and first financial agent, the Rev. 
Benjamin H. Crever, who helped persuade the 
Baltimore Conference to purchase the school 
from the Williamsport Town Council in 1848. 

East Hall (1962) — Houses five chapters of 
Lycoming's fraternities and sororities. The 
self-contained units contain student rooms and 
a chapter room. 

Forrest Hall (1968) — Honors Dr. and Mrs. 
Fletcher Bliss Forrest and Anna Forrest 
Burfeindt '30, the parents and sister of 
Katherine Forrest Mathers '28, whose 
generosity established the memorial. 

Rich Hall (1948) — Honors the Rich family 
of Woolrich, Pennsylvania. It houses health 
and counseling services, dining services 
office, security, residence life, and buildings 
and grounds. Rich is an all female hall. 

Skeath Hall (1965) — The largest residence 
hall honors the late J. Milton Skeath, professor 
of psychology and four-time Dean of the 
College from 1921 to 1967. It houses 
freshmen in a co-educational environment. 

Wesley Hall (1956) — Honors John Wesley, 
the founder of Methodism. This building 
houses a number of Greek organizations, as 
well as independent students. 

Williams Hall (1965) — Honors Mary Ellen 
Whitehead Williams, mother of Joseph A. 



Williams, of St. Marys, Pennsylvania, whose 
bequest established the memorial. 

Academic Buildings 

Academic Center (1968) — The most architec- 
turally impressive complex on campus, the 
Center is composed of four buildings: the 
John G. Snowden Memorial Library, Wendle 
Hall, the Arena Theatre and Laboratories, and 
the faculty office building. 

John G. Snowden Memorial Library 

(1968) — The library is named after the late 
state senator John G. Snowden. An active 
instruction program acquaints students with 
academic library strategies and supports their 
specific research in each discipline studied. 
Students become familiar with traditional 
methods of research as well as new informa- 
tion technologies utilizing computerized CD- 
ROM and on-line searching, and the Internet. 
The collection includes more than 160,000 
volumes, approximately 1000 periodical titles, 
and a strong reference section suitable to an 
undergraduate education. The Snowden 
Memorial Library also serves as a partial 
depository for U.S. government publications 
and houses the archives of the Central 
Pennsylvania Conference of the United 
Methodist Church and the College archives. 

Art Gallery (1980) — Located in the north- 
west comer of the first floor of the John G. 
Snowden Memorial Library, the gallery 
contains exhibits year-round, including shows 
of student work. 

Office of Communications Technology/ 
Computer Center(1969) — Lycoming 
College provides at least one computer 
network access point in each room on campus. 
This is the completion of an ambitious three 
year undertaking to enrich the educational 
environment. Students have access to a 
variety of on campus resources and world 
wide resources through the network. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE CAMPUS 



The college maintains three public use 
computer labs, two labs populated with IBM 
compatible computers, and one lab populated 
by Macintosh computers. The IBM based labs 
use the Windows operating system. These 
labs utilize several popular software packages, 
including WordPerfect, Excel, Freelance and 
BMDP. The Macintosh lab uses the System 7 
operating system. WordPerfect, PageMaker, 
Photoshop, Quark and Macromedia Director 
are among the applications available in the 
Macintosh lab. Laser printing is available in 
both labs, with scanning and color printing 
available in the Macintosh lab. 

Lycoming College maintains a site on 
the World Wide Web. Our URL is 
http://www.lycoming.edu Any student who is 
enrolled at Lycoming may receive a free 
E-mail account as well as unlimited access to 
the Internet and World Wide Web by filling 
out an application and attending an introduc- 
tory workshop. Most academic departments 
maintain home pages and resources under 
the Lycoming College home pages. Many 
faculty post departmental information, syllabi, 
information about majors and a variety of 
other resources under their departmental home 
pages. A growing number of faculty require 
students to have E-mail accounts so that they 
may communicate during off hours. 

Any student living in a residence hall may 
apply to join the Residential Networking 
Program, ResNet. Students need properly 
configured computers to give them access to 
E-mail and the World Wide Web from their 
rooms. The college has arranged through a 
local service provider to offer access to off- 
campus students for E-mail and the World 
Wide Web at reduced rates 

The Office of Communications Technol- 
ogy offers a series of workshops during the 
academic year to help students become 
familiar with E-mail, accessing the World 
Wide Web and building home pages. 

The college maintains a video-conference 
facility that provides courses, lectures or other 



resources that would otherwise be unavail- 
able. Lycoming is part of a consortium of 
schools that is using this technology to 
enhance educational opportunities. 

The College runs its administrative 
computing system from a UNIX based plat- 
form featuring a Hewlett Packard 8270. An 
IBM RS6000 running AIX provides access to 
a variety of different software packages to 
students in the Mathematical Sciences. 

ResNet (1995) - Any student who has a 
computer is encouraged to bring it to campus. 
To join the Residential Networking Program, 
ResNet, a student must have a computer that 
meets a minimal set of standards and he/she 
must compete the Residential Networking 
Access Account Application, contracting for 
the complete set of Internet Services. The 
access account fee is $15.00 per month. 
Applications are available in the Residence 
Life Office, the Telecommunications Office, or 
in the Office of Communications Technology. 

Video Conference Facility (1995) - The 

college maintains a specially equipped 
video-conference facility that provides access 
to courses, lectures and resources that would 
otherwise be unavailable. Lycoming is part of 
a consortium of schools that uses this technol- 
ogy to enhance educational opportunities. 

Computer Graphics Lab (1993) — This 
computer lab features state-of-the-art Macintosh 
graphic stations equipped with animation, 
photographic imaging, and paint and draw 
programs for both fine arts and commercial 
design students, along with desktop publishing 
and a number of other programs for general 
use. The programs are updated annually. 

Nursing Skills Laboratory (1983) — 

Located in the lower level of the Academic 
Center, it is a rephca of a modem hospital ward, 
complete with 10 simulated work stations, a 
nurses' station, an intensive care unit and all 
the medical equipment used by nurses. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE CAMPUS 



Wendle Hall (1968) — Named after the 
George Wendle family, a College benefactor, 
this building contains 21 classrooms, the 
psychology laboratories, three computer lab- 
oratories with 50 IBM terminals available for 
use, and spacious Pennington Lounge, an 
informal meeting place for students and faculty. 

Arena Theatre and Laboratories (1968) — 

The 204-seat thrust-stage theatre is one of the 
finest in the region. It includes projection 
facilities, scene and costume shops, a make-up 
room, and a multiple-use area known as the 
Down Stage, where one-act experimental 
plays are performed. The language, business, 
mathematics, and physics laboratories are 
situated on the upper floors. The Detwiler 
Planetarium is located on the ground floor. 

Faculty Office Building (1968) — Contains 
faculty offices, seminar rooms, and a 735-seat 
lecture hall. 

Fine Arts Center (1923, renovated 1983) — 

Contains studios, sculpture foundry, wood- 
shop, printmaking shop, classrooms, lecture 
hall, offices. 

Academic Resource Center — Located on 
the top floor of the Fine Arts Center, it is 
operated by a professional staff and peer tutors 
during the academic year. The Center offers 
workshops, tutoring, and counseling. 

Photography Laboratory (1984) — Located 
in the lower level of the Fine Arts Center, it is 
fully equipped for both black and white and 
color photography. 

Communication Center (1987) — The focal 
point of the facility is a fully equipped 
broadcast quality television studio and control 
room. The building also houses two editing 
rooms, a classroom, faculty offices, the FM 
radio station and the student newspaper office. 

Heim Biology and Chemistry Building 
(1990) — The $10 million Heim Building is 



one of the finest undergraduate science facilities 
in the East. The three-level structure totals 
more than 63,000 square feet and contains 
state-of-the-art biology and chemistry labora- 
tories, lecture halls, seminar rooms, a science 
reading area and a greenhouse as well as 
classrooms and faculty offices. 

Clarke Building & Chapel (1939) — 

Lycoming's landmark honors Martha 
B. Clarke, a benefactor. The building contains 
Clarke Chapel, St. John Neumann Chapel, the 
United Campus Ministry Center, a recital hall, 
music classrooms, practice studios, an elec- 
tronic-music studio and faculty offices. 

Administration Buildings 

Drum House — Built in 1857 the Admissions 
House is the oldest building on the campus. It 
was first occupied by a Presbyterian parson. 

The Admissions House was bought by the 
College in 1931, along with twenty-eight 
other dwellings, and in 1940 became the 
President's home. John W. Long occupied it 
for the remainder of his tenure and D. Frederick 
Wertz lived in the house from 1955 until 1965 
when the College made the property at 325 
Grampian Boulevard the President's home. 
The building was then converted for use by 
the Fine Arts Department. In 1983, when a 
new Fine Arts facility was completed, the 
department was relocated and the house was 
vacant until 1987 when it was restored by 
college craftsmen to its original Federalist 
design under the supervision of Carol Baker 
'60, who kindly volunteered her services 
during the year-long reconstruction. The 
Admissions House was a gift of the W.F. Rich 
family. 

John W. Long Hall (1951) — Named after 
President Long (1921-1955), it houses the 
administrative offices, including those of the 
President, Dean, Treasurer, Dean of Student 
Affairs, Registrar, Alumni and Parent Pro- 
grams, College Relations, Institutional 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ADMISSION TO LYCOMING 




Advancement, Publications, and Financial 
Aid. It includes a reception area and the 
printing and bulk mail office. 

Recreation Facilities 

Physical Education and Recreation Center 

(1980) — Includes the George R. Lamade 
Gymnasium, which contains basketball and 
other courts; a six-lane swimming pool; all- 
purpose room; sauna and steam room; weight 
room; offices; classrooms, and the Alumni 
Lounge. 

Wertz Student Center (1959) — Named 
after D. Frederick Wertz, President (1955- 
1968), it contains the main and private dining 
rooms, Burchfield Lounge, a recreation area, 
game rooms, Jack's Comer, bookstore, post 
office, student activities office. Career Develop- 
ment Center, and student organization offices. 

Handicapped Accessibility 

Most facilities at Lycoming College are 
accessible to those with limited mobility. In 
addition, the College will make special 
accommodations whenever necessary to meet 
the needs of any of its students. 



Admission 
To Lycoming 

Lycoming College welcomes applications 
from prospective students regardless of age, 
sex, race, religion, financial resources, color, 
national or ethnic background. 

Admission Decision Criteria 

Admission to Lycoming College is competi- 
tive. Applicants are evaluated on the basis of 
their academic preparation, talents, and 
interests, as well as the College's capacity to 
help them achieve their educational objectives 
and career goals. 

Successful candidates for admission have 
typically completed a college preparatory 
program in high school which includes four 
years of English, three years of math, two years 
of foreign language, two years of natural or 
physical science, three years of social science, 
and two years of academic electives. 

In addition, successful admission candidates 
generally place in the top two-fifths of their 
high school graduating class, and have better 
than average SAT or ACT scores. 

From time to time supplemental materials, as 
well as a personal interview, may be required 
prior to the determination of admissibility. 

Admission Application 
Filing Period 

Applications for the fall semester will be 
accepted from June 1st of the preceding year 
through April 1st of the year in which studies 
are to begin. Applications for the spring 
semester are accepted from the preceding May 
1st through December 1st. 

Applications, when complete, are reviewed 
and evaluated on a rolling basis. Generally, 
applicants are notified in writing regarding the 
outcome of their apphcations within three weeks 
following the receipt of all required materials. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



o 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ADMISSION TO LYCOMING 



Freshman Applicants 

Freshman applicants must complete the 
following steps: 

1 ) Submit the completed Lycoming College 
Admission Application. 

2) Submit the non-refundable $25 
application fee. 

3) Provide official transcripts of all high 
school and post-secondary school studies 
(whether or not completed). 

4) Submit official results of the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT I) or the American 
College Test (ACT). 

5) Submit two personal letters of recommendation. 

Transfer Applicants 

Lycoming College considers applications 
from students who have attended other post- 
secondary educational institutions. These 
applicants must have earned a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 2.0 (on a 4 
point scale) in transferable courses at the post- 
secondary institution(s) attended. 

Transfer applicants must complete each of 
the following steps: 

1) Complete and return application with the 
$25 application fee. 

2) Provide official transcripts and course 
descriptions or catalogs from each 
post-secondary school attended. Students 
who have accumulated less than 24 
semester hours or 36 credit hours must also 
submit high school transcripts. 

3) Submit the Lycoming Transfer Form 
(it will be sent to you upon application). 

4) Submit two letters of recommendation. 

Applicants may transfer up to 64 semester 
credits at the Lycoming College 100 and 200 
level and up to 32 semester credits at the 
Lycoming College 300 and 400 level for a 
total of 96 credits. Students must complete the 
final 32 credits of the degree program at 
Lycoming College. At least 16 credits in the 
major area must be taken at Lycoming College. 
Challenge examinations may not be used to 
fulfill this requirement. 



Additional information regarding the 
transfer of college credit appears on page 27. 

International Applicants 

Prospective students who are neither 
citizens nor permanent residents of the United 
States are welcome to apply for admission. 

International applicants must complete 
each of the following steps: 

1) Submit the completed Lycoming College 
Admission Application. 

2) Provide certified true copies of all 
secondary (and when applicable, post- 
secondary) transcripts, mark sheets, diplo- 
mas, and certificates in the original lan- 
guages, as well as in English (when the 
originals are not in English). Transla- 
tions of non-English materials must be 
certified as true and correct. 

3) Submit two letters of recommendation. 

4) Provide proof of the ability to read, write, 
and speak English at the college level as 
evidenced by a TOEFL score of at least 
500, or comparable evidence of English 
language fluency. 

5) International students who are currently 
studying in the United States must be 
"in-status" with the United States De- 
partment of Justice, Immigration and 
Naturalization Service. They must also 
be ehgible to transfer to Lycoming College. 

Please note that the minimum amount 
required for each academic year of study 
(September through April) at Lycoming 
College is U.S. $21,000. Summer living 
expenses (May through August) average 
an additional U.S. $4,500, and are not 
included in $21,000 amount. 

Note To All Students: 

1 ) If there is additional information that 
would be helpful to the Admissions Com- 
mittee in reviewing your application, please 
indicate it on a separate piece of paper. 

2) If you are 24 or older, the requirement for 
the SAT or ACT assessment may be waived. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ADMISSION TO LYCOMING 



Readmission to the College 

All students who leave the College for one 
or more semesters must apply for readmission 
through the Office of the Registrar. Students 
will be notified by mail when readmission has 
been granted. They must then pay a deposit of 
$100 confirming their intention to re-matricu- 
late in order to receive registration materials. 
Students seeking residence must submit an 
additional $100 Room Reservation Deposit as 
well as contact the Office of Residence Life to 
make arrangements to reserve a room. These 
deposits are non-refundable. Students who do 
not attend Lycoming College the term for which 
readmittance is granted will be required to 
complete another readmission apphcation when 
they desire to return. Students who return to 
the College after no more than one academic 
year has passed may retain the same require- 
ments in effect at the initial date of entrance. 
After one year, students will be required to 
complete the requirements currently imposed 
upon other students of the same academic level. 

Confirmation of Intent 
to Enroll at Lycoming 

Admitted applicants are asked to confirm 
their intent to enroll for the fall semester no 
later than the preceding May 1st, or by December 
1 St for the following spring semester by 
submitting the appropriate deposit. Nonresident, 
commuting students are required to submit a 
$100 Confirmation Deposit. Resident students 
are required to submit the $100 Confirmation 
Deposit, as well as a $100 Room Reservation 
Deposit. Admitted international applicants are 
required to submit all applicable deposits prior 
to the issuance of the 1-20 form. 

Deposits are non-refundable after May 1st 
for the following fall semester, and December 
1st for the following spring semester. 

Student Orientation 

Incoming freshmen are required to attend one 
of three summer orientation sessions with at 
least one parent before they enroll in the fall. 



Upperclass transfer students are invited to a 
separate session. The purpose of the program is 
to acquaint the new students and their parents 
more fully with the College so that they can 
begin their Lycoming experience under the most 
favorable circumstances. Students will take 
placement tests, meet their academic advisor, 
and preregister for fall classes. Information on 
orientation is mailed to new students after they 
confirm their intention to enroll. 

Withdrawal of Admission Offers 

Lycoming College reserves the right to 
withdraw offers of admission when: 

1) information requested as part of the 
admission application process is not 
provided by applicants, 

2) misrepresentation of fact to the College by 
applicants occurs during the application 
process, 

3) the conduct of applicants is not in keeping 
with the ethical or moral standards as set 
forth in the Lycoming College Catalog or 
the Lycoming College Student Handbook. 

Admissions Office 
Location and Hours 

Prospective students and their families are 
encouraged to visit the campus for a student- 
conducted tour and an interview with an admis- 
sions counselor, who will provide additional 
information about the College and answer 
questions. 

The Office of Admissions is located on 
Washington Boulevard and College Place. For 
an appointment, telephone 1-800-345-3920 or 
(717)321-4026, or write Office of Admissions, 
Lycoming College, Wilhamsport, PA 17701. 

OfHce hours are: 
Weekdays 

September through April: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

May through August: 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 

September through April: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon 

May through August: appointments by request. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



o 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 

• 



Financial Matters 

Expenses for the 
Academic Year 1996-97 

The following expenses are effective for 

the regular fall and spring semesters. The 

College reserves the right to adjust fees at any 

time. The fees for each semester are payable 

approximately two weeks prior to the start of 

classes for the semester as indicated on the 

semester bill. 

Per Semester Per Year 



Fees 






Tuition 


$7,700 


$15,400 


Room Rent 


$1,175 


$2,350 


Board 


$1,075 


$2,150 


Total 


$9,950 


$19,900 



One-Time Student Fees 

Application Fee $25 

Confirmation Deposit $100 

Contingency Deposit $100 

Room Reservation Deposit $100 

Part-Time Students Fees 

Application Fee $25 

Each Unit Course $1,925 

Additional Charges 

Non-refundable Enrollment Deposit for 

Returning Students $100 

Activity Fee $60 

Applied Music Fee (half-hour 

per week per semester) $175 

Cap and Gown Rental prevailing cost 

Laboratory Fee per Unit Course. . $10 to $100 

Reregistration Fee $25 

Parking Permit (for the academic year) $20 

Practice Teaching Fee 

(payable in junior year) $400 

School Nurse Fee $400 

R.O.T.C. Uniform Deposit 

(payable at Bucknell University) $75 

Transcript Fee $3* 

Placement Retest Fee $25 

Single Room Charge. . . . additional charge of 

$470 per semester. 




The tuition covers the regular course load of 
twelve to sixteen credits each semester. 
Resident students must board at the College 
unless, for extraordinary reasons, authorization 
is extended for other eating arrangements. If a 
double room is used as a single room, there is 
an additional charge of $470 per semester. The 
estimated cost for books and supplies is up to 
$800 per year, depending on the course of 
study. Special session (May Term and Summer 
Session) charges for tuition, room, and board are 
estabUshed during the fall semester. 

*$3 for 1 transcript; $1 for each additional 
copy ordered in the same request. Transcripts 
provided free to currently-enrolled students. 

Entry Fees and Deposits 

Application Fee — All students applying for 
admission must submit a $25 application fee. 
This charge defrays the cost of processing the 
application and is nonrefundable. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



RNANCIAL MATTERS 



Confirmation Deposit — After students have 
been notified of their admission to Lycoming, 
they are required to make a $100 Confirma- 
tion Deposit to confirm their intention to 
matriculate. Students seeking residence must 
submit an additional $100 Room Reservation 
Deposit. All deposits are appHed to the general 
charges for the first semester of attendance. 
After May 1 , deposits are nonrefundable. 

Contingency Deposit — A one-time deposit 
of $100 is required of all full-time students as 
a guarantee for payment of damage to or loss 
of College property, for library and parking 
fines, or similar penalties imposed by the 
College. The balance of this deposit is 
refunded after all debts to the College have 
been paid, either upon graduation or upon 
written request submitted to the Registrar two 
weeks prior to voluntary permanent termina- 
tion of enrollment. (See page 29.) 

Enrollment Deposit — A non-refundable 
enrollment deposit of $100 is required of all 
current full and part-time degree-seeking 
students each spring in order to pre-register 
for the subsequent fall semester courses and/or 
to participate in the annual room selection 
process. This deposit is appUed against the fall 
semester bill. 

Partial Payments 

For the convenience of those who find it 
impossible to follow the regular schedule of 
payments, arrangements may be made with 
the College Bursar for the monthly payment of 
College fees through various educational 
plans. Additional information may be 
obtained from the Treasurer's Office or 
Admissions Office. 

Lycoming College Withdrawal 
Refund Policy 

The College has adopted for all students 
the refund policies prescribed by the U. S. 
Department of Education for those receiving 



Federal financial aid. If a student withdraws 
from the College on or before the first day of 
classes, all money paid by or on behalf of the 
student, with the exception of the enrollment 
deposit, will be refunded. If the student is a 
recipient of financial aid, all financial aid 
programs will be refunded as well. 

Students wishing to withdraw from the 
College during the semester should meet with 
the Associate Dean of the College or the 
Assistant Dean for Freshmen to ensure that 
student financial and academic records are 
properly closed. The effective date of calculat- 
ing refunds shall be the date the notification of 
withdrawal is given to the Dean or the date of 
last class attended, whichever is later. 

Students withdrawing, or dropping during 
their first semester of attendance at Lycoming 
will receive a prorated refund for tuition, fees, 
room and board, less an administrative fee of 
$100 and any unpaid charges, according to the 
following schedule: 

Refund Charge 
During Week 1 90% 10% 

During Weeks 2 and 3 80% 20% 

During Week 4 70% 30% 

During Weeks 5 and 6 60% 40% 

During Week 7 50% 50% 

During Weeks 8 and 9 40% 60% 

After 9th Week 0% 100% 

All other students will receive a refund of 
tuition, fees, room and board, less an admin- 
istrative fee of $100, according to the follow- 
ing schedule: 

Refund Charge 
On the First Day of Class 100% 0% 
Remainder of Week 1 and 2 90% 10% 
During Weeks 3 and 4 50% 50% 

During Weeks 5 through 8 25% 75% 
After 8th Week 0% 100% 

Comparative schedules apply to the May and 
Summer terms. 

The U. S. Department of Education 
requires that, for any student receiving federal 
financial aid, the federal programs be re- 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



funded IN FULL in a prescribed order prior to 
any refund being issued to the student. State 
Grant programs have varying regulations 
concerning refunds, but most will require at 
least a partial refund of the State Grant. If the 
student has received a Lycoming Grant, a pro- 
rated portion of the student's refund also will 
be repaid to the Lycoming Grant program. 
This will reduce, or in many cases eliminate, 
the amount of the refund the student otherwise 
would receive. Detailed examples are 
available from the Financial Aid Office. 

Full-time students who, after reducing their 
course loads, continue to be enrolled for 12 to 
16 semester hours are not eligible for a refund 
of tuition for an individual course. Students 
who register for extra hours in excess of 16 
hours per semester and who later reduce their 
loads will be refunded the fee charged for 
overloads according to the above schedules. 
Students who enroll full-time and subse- 
quently assume part-time status by reducing 
their loads below 12 hours, and part-time 
students who drop individual courses, will be 
refunded according to the above schedules for 
the semester hours dropped. The assumption 
of part-time status normally involves a 
substantial reduction of financial aid since 
most financial aid programs do not extend 
eligibility to part-time students. 

The calculated refund will be reduced by 
unpaid charges. Any balance remaining will 
be billed to the student. Unpaid student 
account balances will be charged interest at 
the rate of 1 % per month on the month-end 
balance until account is paid in full. Should 
legal collection become necessary, all costs of 
collection will be added to the balance due. 

Non-Payment of Fees Penalty 

Students will not be registered for courses 
in a new semester if their accounts for 
previous attendance have not been settled. 
Diplomas, transcripts, and certifications of 
withdrawals in good standing are issued only 
when a satisfactory settlement of all financial 



obligations has been made in the Business 
Office. Final grades may also be held in 
some cases. Unpaid student accounts will be 
charged interest at the rate of 1 % per month 
on the month-end balance until accounts are 
paid in full. Should legal collection become 
necessary, all costs of collection will be added 
to the balance due. 



FINANCIAL AID 

NOTE: A more detailed explanation of 
Lycoming College financial aid programs, 
policies and procedures is contained in the 
student consumer's guide available through 
the Office of Financial Aid. 

Lycoming College is committed to helping 
students and families meet college costs. 
While some assistance is available to students 
regardless of need (merit scholarships), the 
primary purpose of the College's financial aid 
program is to help qualified students of 
limited financial resources attend Lycoming 
College. Scholarships may be awarded on the 
basis of merit and/or need, while grants are 
provided solely on the basis of financial need. 
Long-term educational loans with favorable 
interest rates and repayment terms are 
available, as are part-time employment 
opportunities. 

It is important to submit financial aid 
applications after January 1 st, as appropriate 
income information becomes available, but 
before April 1 . Although applications may be 
filed later, applicants can only receive 
consideration for remaining available funds 
and normally will not receive full funding of 
his or her eligibility. 

To be considered for financial aid, students 
and families must complete the following 
steps for each year the student seeks assistance: 

1 . Fully complete and submit the Lycoming 
Financial Aid Application (LFAA). 
Return the completed application to the 
Financial Aid Office. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



HNANCIAL MATTERS 



2. When completed, send signed copies of the 
student's and parent(s) Federal tax returns 
(1040, 1040A or 1040EZ), including all 
schedules, to the Financial Aid Office. 
The tax returns required are for the year 
preceding the academic year in which the 
student seeks assistance. 

3. Fully complete and submit the Free 
Application For Federal Student Aid 
(FAFSA). Returning students should 
submit the Renewal FAFSA. 

4. PA residents can apply for state grant 
assistance using the FAFSA as well. Non- 
PA residents should contact the State Grant 
Agency in their home state to see if 
additional forms must be filed. 

Basic eligibility requirements for all 
federal programs are listed on the FAFSA 
application. Students are responsible for 
understanding the basic eligibility require- 
ments. 

Financial Aid Satisfactory 
Progress Policy 

To remain eligible for federal, state, and 
institutional financial aid, all students must 
maintain financial aid satisfactory progress as 
defined below. The financial aid satisfactory 
progress policy is separate and distinct from 
the College's academic progress policy. 

Students retain eligibility for financial aid 
for ten (10) semesters of full-time study. 
However, it is the College's practice to limit 
institutional grants/scholarships to eight (8) 
semesters of full-time study. Should students 
attend beyond eight semesters of full-time 
study, they may still be eligible for federal 
and/or state aid for the 9th or 10th semester. 

In some instances a student may appeal 
academic suspension and be permitted to 
continue enrollment even though the student 
has fallen behind in credit hours or cumulative 
GPA (see Academic Levels and Academic 
Standing sections on page 31). A student who 
is granted an academic appeal may continue to 



receive financial assistance only if the student 
meets the minimum qualitative (GPA) and 
quantitative (credits completed) requirements 
listed below; 



End of 
Semesters 

1 


Min. Cmn. 
GPA 

1.5 


Min. Cr. 

Completed 

10 


2 


1.6 


20 


3 


1.7 


34 


4 


2.0 


48 


5 


2.0 


61 


6 


2.0 


74 


7 


2.0 


88 


8 


2.0 


102 


9 


2.0 


115 


10 


2.0 


128 



Students who fail to successfully complete 
the minimum number of credits and/or who 
fail to meet the minimum cumulative GPA 
requirement will be placed on financial aid 
probation. This allows one additional 
semester of course work to bring the aca- 
demic record up to minimum standards. 
Failure to meet the stated minimum after the 
probation period will result in a suspension of 
all (federal, state, and institutional) financial 
aid until the standards are met. 

Financial aid satisfactory progress is mea- 
sured annually and cumulatively by the Office 
of Financial Aid. Official notification of 
probation or suspension is made by the Office 
of Financial Aid. Students wishing to appeal 
his or her suspension of aid, and who have 
legitimate reason for doing so (e.g. illness), must 
put their request in writing to the Director of 
Financial Aid at least two weeks prior to the 
start of the semester for which the exception is 
sought. Students placed on Financial Aid Pro- 
bation for a period of two (2) consecutive sem- 
esters, and who have therefore been granted an 
appeal after the first probation semester, are pro- 
hibited from future appeals. If the student fails 
to attain the minimum standards after the second 
semester of probation, eligibility for financial 
assistance will be cancelled automatically. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



Acceptance of an appeal is only valid for 
determining eligibility for financial assistance 
and has absolutely no bearing on any determi- 
nation made by the Registrar and/or the 
Academic Standards Committee. 

College Scholarships & Grants 

NOTE: Lycoming Scholarships and Grants 
(including Endowed and Restricted College 
funds) are awarded to eUgible students who are 
full-time and degree-seeking. Students already 
possessing a bachelor's degree are ineligible for 
scholarships, grants and institutional loans. 
Refer to the student Financial Aid Guide and/or 
the Financial Aid Update for a more detailed 
explanation of ehgibility requirements for all 
Lycoming programs. 

Lycoming Grant awards depending upon 
financial need, may be granted to students to 
help meet their documented financial need. 
Renewal requires continued financial need as 
determined by Federal Methodology and/ or 
the financial aid director. Students should 
expect the Grant-in- Aid award to remain 
constant for each semester they are enrolled. 

Ministerial Grants are awarded to dependent 
children of United Methodist ministers and 
ordained ministers of other denominations. 
This grant amounts to 33% of tuition for 
children of United Methodist ministers in the 
Central Pennsylvania Conference and 25% of 
tuition for all others. Students meeting the 
criteria for this grant and any other Lycoming 
Scholarship(s) will be awarded the 
scholarship(s)/grant that provides the highest 
dollar amount; both will not be awarded. 

Pre-Ministerial Student Grants of up to 

25% tuition are awarded to students preparing 
for the Christian ministry. Students must 
complete a pre-ministerial grant application 
available through the financial aid office. 
Students meeting the criteria for this grant and 
any other Lycoming Scholarship(s) will be 



awarded the scholarship(s)/grant that provides 
the highest dollar amount; both will not be 
awarded. 

Two-in-Family Grants are awarded to each 
member of a family attending Lycoming at 
the same time. The amount is 10% of tuition, 
room and board charged by the College for 
resident students (for commuting students the 
amount is 10% of tuition only). Each family 
member must not be eligible for any other 
financial aid program of the College. If the 
student is eligible for any other Lycoming aid, 
including scholarships, the student will be 
awarded whichever is greater. 

Federal Grants 

Pell Grants are made available by the federal 
government. Eligibility is based upon a 
federal formula. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grants may be awarded to students with 
exceptional financial need. Priority must be 
given to Pell Grant recipients. Funds are 
provided by the federal government. Funds 
are limited. 

State Grants 

Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance 
Agency (PHEAA) Grants are available for 
PA residents meeting domicile and financial 
requirements of the program. Eligibility is 
determined by PHEAA. These grants are 
available for a maximum of 8 semesters. Non- 
PA residents should contact the State Grant 
Agency in their home state for availability of 
funds to students attending out-of-state colleges. 

Loan Programs 

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan allows 
eligible Freshmen to borrow a maximum of 
$2,625 annually. Eligible Sophomores may 
borrow up to a maximum of $3,500 annually. 
Eligible Juniors and Seniors may borrow up to 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 

• 



a maximum of $5,500 annually. The federal 
government pays the interest while the student 
is enrolled on at least a half-time basis. The 
student begins to repay the loan (interest and 
principal) 6 months after leaving school. The 
interest rate for new borrowers is variable 
based on the 91 -DAY T-BILL plus 3.1%, 
capped at 8.25%. The rate is adjusted every 
July 1 . Loan amounts are pro-rated for less 
than full-time students. Eligibility is based on 
financial need. 

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan 

provides an opportunity for students to borrow 
under the Stafford Program who do not qualify 
for the maximum amount of subsidized 
Stafford loan. Maximum grade level amount 
minus subsidized eligibility equals unsub- 
sidized eUgibility. Interest must be paid by the 
borrower on a quarterly basis while enrolled 
(check with your lender to see if interest 
payments may be deferred). Other aspects of 
the loan are similar to those under the Subsi- 
dized program. Independent students may be 
eligible for higher loan limits; contact the 
Financial Aid Office for more information. 

Federal Perkins Loan (formerly the National 
Direct Student Loan) may be offered to 
students with exceptional need. Borrowers 
must repay the loan, plus 5% per annum 
simple interest on the unpaid balance, over a 
period beginning nine months after the date on 
which the borrower ceases to be enrolled at 
least half-time. Funds are limited. 

PLUS Loan is a loan parents may take out on 
behalf of their dependent student. The amount 
a parent may borrow for one year is equal to 
the cost of education for one year minus any 
fman-cial aid the student is eligible for in that 
year. The interest rate is variable but is capped 
at 9%. The interest rate is determined every 
July 1 and is equal to the bond equivalent rate 
of 52-week T-Bill plus 3.1%. An application 
is available at your bank or other lending 
institution. 



Employment Opportunities 

Federal College Work-Study Program 
Awards provide work opportunities on campus 
for quaUfied students. Students receive pay- 
checks for work performed in the previous pay 
period. Based on documented need and 
awarded by the Financial Aid Office. Funding 
is limited. The student assumes full responsi- 
bility in locating a job. Returning students 
who wish to work the following year must 
have their name submitted to the Financial 
Aid Office by their supervisor before the end 
of the Spring semester. 

Students also have the opportunity to seek 
work-study employment off-campus in the 
Community Service program. Interested 
students can get additional information in the 
Financial Aid Office. 

Lycoming Campus Employment Program 

is similar to Federal Work-Study except that 
students are paid with institutional funds only 
and is not based on financial need. A limited 
number of jobs are available. Funding is 
limited. 

Presidential Fellowships in Music are 

available for selected students. Auditions and 
interviews are conducted annually by the 
Music department. A tuition stipend of $250 
is awarded for each semester the student 
serves as a Fellow. Recipients are expected to 
fulfill responsibilities assigned each semester 
by the Department with the primary responsi- 
bility being musical performance. Renewable 
upon Departmental recommendation. 

Faculty Scholar Fellowships of $1,500 may 
be available to students receiving the $12,500 
Faculty Scholar Award. Fellowship recipients 
are expected to work approximately 10 to 12 
hours per week for the department sponsoring 
the fellowship. Renewable upon Departmen- 
tal recommendation; students must also 
maintain a 3.00 cumulative G.P.A. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 

• 



Other Job Opportunities are frequently 
available with local business firms or persons. 
Contact the Career Development Office of the 
College for information on these opportunities. 

Other Aid Sources 

Veterans and Dependents Benefits are 

available for qualified veterans and children of 
deceased or disabled veterans. Contact the 
Veteran's Officer in the Registrar's Office. 

Reserved Officers Training Corps (ROTC) 

Stipends and Scholarships are available for 
qualified students. Contact the Financial Aid 
Office for more information. 

Tuition Exchange Grants may be available. 
Lycoming College is a member of both the 
Tuition Exchange Program and the CICU 
Tuition Exchange Program. These programs 
are for dependent students of employees at 
participating institutions of higher education. 
Students should contact the Tuition Exchange 
officer at their sponsor institution for informa- 
tion regarding sponsorship. Students are 
expected to apply for all federal and state grants. 
If the student receives a federal or state grant, 
those amounts may be applied toward room and 
board charges if the student resides in the dorms. 
If the student commutes, the grant amount is 
equal to tuition less federal and state grants. 

United Methodist Scholarships may be 

available to full-time degree-seeking applicants 
who have a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or better, 
are active in Christian activities, and who are 
active, full members of a United Methodist 
church. Demonstrated financial need is also 
required. Normally, seven $500 scholarships 
are awarded each year. Annual application is 
required. Recipients are selected by the 
Director of Financial Aid and will be awarded 
to the neediest students. The funds are pro- 
vided by the United Methodist Church. 
Applications are available in the Financial Aid 
Office. Renewal requires a cumulative GPA of 
at least 3.00. 



United Methodist Student Loans are 

available on a very limited basis to students 
who are members of the United Methodist 
Church. The maximum amount which may be 
borrowed for an academic year is $1,000 
subject to the availability of the funds. Contact 
The Board of Higher Education and Ministry, 
P.O. Box 871, Nashville, TN 37202 for more 
information. 

Non-college Aid Opportunities are often 
available through family employers or labor 
unions, business firms, fraternal and religious 
organizations, and secondary schools. Your 
parents should contact their employer or 
organizations of which they are members for 
information on financial aid resources. 

Endowed & Restricted 
College Funds 

These funds are thoughtfully and 
generously provided by alumni and friends of 
Lycoming College. Most awards are based on 
documented financial need, in combination 
with other criteria, and are awarded through 
the Financial Aid Office. 

The William T. and Ruth S. Askey Scholar- 
ship Fund is available to a full-time sopho- 
more, junior or senior in good academic 
standing, having demonstrated need. Prefer- 
ence will be given to Lycoming County 
residents who are Lutheran Church members. 

Franklin L. Artley Scholarship is available 
annually to assist a ministerial student(s). 

Eph and Bess Baker Scholarship of $6,000 
is available at $1,500 per year for four years. 
It is awarded annually to a full-time student 
who exhibits academic promise and has a 
permanent residence in Lycoming County. 
Preference is given to students with demon- 
strated financial need. A minimum cumula- 
tive GPA of 3.00 is needed for renewal. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



Leland J. Calistri, Sr. Memorial Scholarship 
Fund - The scholarship provides financial 
assistance to students from the Williamsport 
area who have a demonstrated financial need. 
The memorial scholarship established by 
friends and loved ones bring recognition to 
Leland J. Calistri (Alumnus of the Class of 
1960) and his life of dedicated service to the 
Williamsport community, his loyalty to and 
love of family, and his fondness of his college. 

Case Memorial Scholarship is awarded 
annually to a student(s) in good academic 
standing with demonstrated financial need. 

Mary Strong Clemins Scholarship is 

available for a student(s) preparing for Chris- 
tian ministry or for deaconess work or its 
equivalent in the United Methodist Church. 

C. Luther Culler Memorial Scholarship is 

awarded to a student based on scholarship. 

Dewitt-Bodine Scholarship is awarded to the 
highest-ranked student in the graduating class 
each year from the Hughesville High School 
who attends Lycoming College. The recipient 
is designated by the Hughesville Guidance 
Counselor. The scholarship amount is $2,200 
and is credited at $550 per year for four years 
attendance at Lycoming. 

Clara Kramer Eaton Scholarship is awarded 
to the highest-ranked student in the graduating 
class from Line Mountain High School who 
attends Lycoming College. The recipient is 
selected by the high school's guidance office. 
The scholarship is $400 per year for up to four 
years of attendance at Lycoming. 

Richard W. Gieniec Memorial Scholarship 

is available to a full-time student in good 
academic standing who has demonstrated 
financial need and who has the prospect of 
contributing positively to the college commu- 
nity. Preference is given to a student who 
meets any or all of the following criteria: 1) 
resident of Lancaster County, Pa.; 2)leaming- 
disabled; 3)soccer player. 



Beryl Kline Glenn Scholarship is periodi- 
cally awarded to a student majoring in music. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Grove Scholarship is 

periodically awarded to a needy student 
studying faith and ministry. 

Robert L Hamilton Scholarship is awarded 
through the generosity of Mr. Hamilton, to a 
needy student. 

Sarah and Elsie Harding Scholarship is 

awarded to a student(s) in good academic 
standing with demonstrated financial need. 

Esther M. Heefner Scholarship is available 
to help a needy and deserving student(s). 

Edward P. and Jeanette Fuller Heether 
Scholarship is available to help needy and 
deserving students who are in good academic 
standing. 

James A. Heether Scholarship is available 
based on financial need. Priority will be given 
to a chemistry major. 

R. Lee Hite Memorial Scholarship is 

awarded to a student in economics, engineer- 
ing, business or a related field of study and 
who is from one of the 29 counties in Pennsyl- 
vania and 2 counties in New York served by 
The Hite Company. 

The Helen Clarke Holder Scholarship is 

available to student(s) with demonstrated 
financial need who are preparing to teach. 
Mrs. Holder, a master teacher and a member 
of the Class of 1933, established the scholar- 
ship through a bequest. 

George W. Huntley Jr. Scholarship of $900 
is available to help defray the tuition and 
expenses for the first year only of any 
undergraduate of Cameron County High 
School. The selection is made by the Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Cameron, Pa. In case 
there is no applicant from Cameron County, 
the scholarship may be awarded to any student 
preparing for the Christian Ministry. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 



Elizabeth S. Jackson Scholarship may be 

available to the student who attains the 
required rank highest in deportment and 
scholarship in the sophomore class. 

Paul and Mildred John Scholarship was 

established in 1990 by Mr. and Mrs. John to 
recognize the significant contributions their 
friend, Robert L. Shangraw '58, has made to 
the betterment of Lycoming College. This 
endowed scholarship provides annual income 
for full-time students who are pursuing a major 
in any of Lycoming's business programs. 
Preference is given to candidates who demon- 
strate financial need, are children of employees 
of the Ritz-Craft Corporation of Pa., Inc. and/ 
or residents of Union County, Pa. 

Amos Johnson Scholarship is available for 
the education of a ministerial student of 
limited means. 

Morgan V. Knapp Music Scholarship Fund 

is awarded as follows: 40% to financially 
needy students, in satisfactory academic 
standing, who are majoring in music or who 
are pursuing courses in vocal music, key- 
board, strings, and/or other musical instru- 
ments in that priority order; 20%, as needed, 
on the recommendation of the Music Depart- 
ment faculty, to students, who in their opinion 
should be encouraged to study privately in the 
areas of voice, keyboard, strings, and/or other 
musical instruments in that priority order; 
20% to the College Tour Choir Fund and 20% 
to the Band Tour Fund. 

John R. and Leona Fisher Knaul Scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to a student(s) in 
good academic standing with demonstrated 
financial need. 

Charles J. and Jean M. Kocian Scholarship 

is awarded annually to an upperclass 
student(s) in good academic standing with 
demonstrated financial need. 



LAMCO Scholarship may be available to 
students with the following selection priori- 



ties: 1) children and grandchildren of employ- 
ees of The Grit; 2) graduates of high schools 
of the city of Williamsport; 3) graduates of 
high schools of Lycoming County. 

James G. and Fern S. Law Scholarship was 

established in 1990 by Mrs. Fern S. Law as a 
memorial tribute to her husband, James 
Graham Law, who served Lycoming College 
as a member of the Board of Trustees from 
1965 to 1986. Annual income is to be 
awarded to a full-time student from the 
Bloomsburg area who shows academic 
promise and demonstrates financial need. 

Doris Lennon Scholarship is available to 
help dedicated young students, in need of 
financial assistance, who are preparing for 
church work. 

Lenore M. Losch Scholarship is awarded 
annually to a student in good academic 
standing with demonstrated financial need. 
Preference may be given to Lycoming County 
students preparing to teach. 

Lycoming County Medical Society Alliance 
Scholarship is awarded annually to a student 
in good academic standing with demonstrated 
financial need, who is majoring in Nursing or 
another pre-professional program in health 
care. Preference will be given to non- 
traditional single parents. 

The Lycoming County Scholarship is 

awarded annually to students who permanent- 
ly reside in Lycoming County, with prefer- 
ence given to entering freshmen who demon- 
strate financial need. 

Mary E. McLane Endowed Nursing 
Scholarship is awarded to a junior or senior 
nursing student at Lycoming College who has 
demonstrated financial need. 

James E. and Bernadine Decker 
Nancarrow Scholarship is awarded to a 
student(s) in good academic standing with 
demonstrated financial need. Preference may 
be given to students from Lycoming County. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FINANCIAL MATTERS 

• 



Earl Nearoof Memorial Scholarship is avail- 
able to assist young students entering Christian 
work with preference given to students from the 
Warrior Mark and Tyrone, Pa., areas. 

Fred A. and Elizabeth W. Pennington 
Endowed Scholarship is awarded to finan- 
cially needy students who are chemistry 
majors and plan to pursue a career using their 
chemistry training. 

Polcyn Loan Fund was established in 1986 
by Dr. Kenneth A. Polcyn '58, in honor of his 
parents. Loan awards may be made to student 
athletes who are in good academic standing 
and who have documented financial need. 

John A. Radspinner Scholarship created by 
his former students to honor and recognize 
this beloved faculty member's thirty years of 
service to Lycoming College and its students. 
This endowed scholarship is awarded to chem- 
istry majors with a preference but not limited 
to students who demonstrate financial need. 

Mort Rauff Memorial Scholarship is award- 
ed to a deserving student in good academic 
standing. Preference is given to an individual 
who demonstrates financial need and who is an 
active member of the swimming team. 

Ada Remley Memorial Scholarship is an 

award available to a currently-enrolled female 
who has 1 ) earned a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of 3.25; 2) completed a 
minimum of 5 full-time semesters or the 
equivalent (72 semester hours); 3) has an 
intended graduation date during the coming 
academic year (January, May or September); 
and 4) who has not already been a recipient of 
the scholarship. 

Jennie M. Rich Memorial Scholarship is 

available for worthy and needy students 
preparing for the Christian ministry or 
deaconess or missionary work. 

Margaret Rich and Elmer B. Staats 
Scholarship of up to $ 1 ,000 is available to an 
academically-talented student who intends to 



pursue a career in public service. Preference is 
given to students with documented financial need. 

Leonard H. Rothermel Scholarship is 

awarded to financially needy students in 
satisfactory academic standing, with primary 
preference given to Treverton residents and 
secondary preference given to Line 
Mountain School District Area students. 

J. Milton Skeath Memorial Scholarship is 

available for a psychology major. 

Robert Barry Spieth Memorial Scholarship 

is awarded to a student who demonstrates 
financial need with preference given to a 
Business Administration major who is an 
active member of Sigma Pi. Minimum 
cumulative GPA is 2.00. 

Albert R. and Judith L. Styrcula Scholarship 

is awarded to a Dundee, N.Y. Central High 
student of scholastic ability enrolling in one of 
Lycoming's four-year programs. Second 
consideration will be given to dependents of 
Foodcraft, Inc. employees (employed from 1972 
through 1988). Third consideration will be 
given to any qualified resident of Snyder or 
Lycoming County in Pa. or Yates County in N.Y. 

Brandy Lee Sudol Memorial Scholarship is 

awarded annually to a student in good academic 
standing with demonstrated financial need. 
Preference will be given to nursing majors from 
the Danville, Pa., area. 

Minnie V. Taylor/AAUW Endowed Scholar- 
ship Fund - The fund is awarded to students 
with demonstrated financial need. Preference 
is given to students from the Cogan House 
Township, and/or Lycoming County. The 
scholarship fund was established through the 
kind generosity of the American Association of 
University Women - Williamsport Branch 
and a bequest through the Estate of Minnie V. 
Taylor, alumna of the Class of 1896 and former 
Dean of Women students. 



Bishop D. Frederick Wertz and Betty Rowe 
Wertz Scholarship is awarded annually to a 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FINANCIAL MATTERS • STUDENT AFFAIRS 



student(s) in good academic standing with 
demonstrated financial need. 

Andrew J. and Mary Wood White Scholar- 
ship is awarded with preference to a freshman 
female with demonstrated financial need, 
based on scholastic achievement and academic 
promise, who is pursuing courses in the pure 
liberal arts. 

Samuel Willard Memorial Scholarship is 

awarded to a junior or senior student who is in 
need of financial assistance in order to 
complete his or her degree. 

Hiram and Elizabeth Wise Scholarship is 

available for a ministerial or missionary 
student who, because of present circumstances 
and promise of future usefulness, is deemed 
worthy of the award. 

Dr. Paul E. Witmeyer Memorial 
Scholarship is available for a student inter- 
ested in education. 

Donald C. Wolfe Memorial Scholarship is 

available for a worthy ministerial student. 

William Woodcock Scholarship is available 
annually to the full-time, degree-seeking 
student who attains the required rank second 
in scholarship and deportment in the sopho- 
more class. 

Phyllis L. Yasui Endowed Scholarship 
Fund - The scholarship is to be awarded to 
students with demonstrated financial need. 
Preference is given to students from the United 
Methodist Children's Home in Mechanicsburg, 
Pennsylvania. The fund brings special 
recognition to the Yasui Family's many years 
of dedicated service to Lycoming College — 
Dr. Robert S. Yasui as the College's sports 
physician and Mrs. Phyllis L. Yasui as a 
College Trustee and volunteer. 

Raymond A. and L. Marie Zimmerman 
Scholarship is available for the benefit of 
students preparing for the Christian ministry. 




Student 
Affairs 

The Division of Student Affairs coordi- 
nates a variety of programs, services, and 
activities designed to enhance students' 
personal, social, and educational growth and 
development. This is accomplished through a 
composite of programs, offices, and staff 
including: 

• Career Development Center 

• Campus Ministry 

• Commuter Student Affairs 

• Counseling Services 

• Greek life 

• Health Services 

• International student advising 

• Intramural sports, recreation, 
and leisure time activity 

• Judicial affairs 

• Residence Life 

• Safety and Security 

• Student activities and leadership 
development 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



The Student Affairs staff view students as 
collaborators in the educational process and, 
therefore, expect that students will take 
responsibility for managing our educational 
community. 

Career Development Center 

The Career Development Center provides 
services which are designed to help students 
identify their abilities and interests, set 
realistic goals, and plan academic programs to 
meet these goals. Counseling for Lycoming 
students begins in the freshman year. 

Individual and group counseling focus on 
teaching students how they can learn about 
different career fields and present themselves 
to potential employers in a positive and 
effective manner. Helping students make 
appropriate and meaningful connections 
between college and career is a goal of the 
Career Development Center. 

Counseling Services 

Counseling Services assist students to ensure 
that their college experience is prosperous and 
rewarding. Professional, confidential services 
are provided free of charge to Lycoming 
students. Counseling Services are designed to 
facilitate one's self-understanding as well as 
to provide support for students' adjustment 
and transition to college life. Counseling 
Services also provide advocacy to students 
with learning differences and conducts outreach 
programs for the entire college community. 

Health Services 

Lycoming College Health Services focuses 
on the holistic care of the individual, health 
maintenance, and wellness through health 
education and prevention of illness. Educa- 
tional materials and instructional programs are 
available through the Student Health Services. 

Routine medical care is provided without 
charge on a daily basis Monday-Friday 
8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. during the fall and spring 



semesters. The office is staffed by a full-time 
registered nurse with a physician available on a 
daily basis. 

Health Services' policies reflect the 
recommendations of the American College 
Health Association (ACHA), the Pennsylvania 
Department of Health, and the Centers for 
Disease Control (CDC). 

Residence Life 

As a residential college, Lycoming offers 
students the opportunity to integrate academic 
and residential experiences. The Residence 
Life Office is committed to providing a living/ 
learning environment to help each resident 
grow as a person and as a student. Lycoming 
College requires all students to live in college 
housing and participate in the college board 
plan each of their four years. Married 
students, students residing with their parents 
within a 40 mile radius, students living with 
their dependents, and students 23 years or 
older may request to be exempted from this 
policy. Such requests should be submitted in 
writing to the Dean of Student Affairs at least 
three weeks prior to the beginning of the 
semester for which students are requesting 
permission to live off campus. 

Residence halls put students at the heart of 
College activity — offering greater opportuni- 
ties for participation. Through programs, 
leadership opportunities, and peer interactions, 
residents gain a sense of belonging to the 
campus community, acquire new knowledge 
and skills, have easy access to College 
services, make informed choices, and assume 
responsibility for themselves and their 
community. 

The residence halls are staffed with 
upperclass students who serve as Resident 
Advisors (RAs) selected on the basis of 
leadership skills. RAs provide information, 
refer students to campus and local resources, 
help enforce College and community stan- 
dards, use helping skills for students in need, 
and facilitate educational and social programs. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



Most importantly, RAs assist residents in the 
development and maintenance of strong, 
positive residence hall communities. The 
Residence Life Council also encourages 
student participation and involvement in such 
areas as policy formulation, facility improve- 
ment, and general resident concerns. With the 
guidance and support of Residence Life staff, 
each resident is expected to become involved 
in promoting a positive learning environment 
in their community. 

Several different living options are 
available for students in our eight residence 
halls. Asbury and Skeath Halls house all 
freshmen students in a co-educational environ- 
ment encouraging students to develop class 
identity and unity. The six upperclass halls 
offer opportunities for co-educational housing, 
an all female hall, fraternity and sorority 
chapter housing, contract/intensive study 
areas, non-smoking environments, and other 
special interest housing options. Additional 
information is sent to students following their 
acceptance by the College. 

Athletics 

Athletics are an important part of the 
Lycoming experience. As a member of the 
NCAA, Lycoming sponsors seventeen 
intercollegiate sports for both mtti and women 
student-athletes. 

Men can choose from football, soccer, 
cross country, wrestling, golf, basketball, 
swimming, tennis, and track and field. 
Women can compete in soccer, cross country, 
volleyball, basketball, swimming, softball, 
tennis, and track and field. 

Lycoming is a member of the Middle 
Atlantic Conference, which is a Division III 
athletic conference. As a Division III school, 
Lycoming does not offer athletic scholarships. 

In addition, the College offers a very active 
intramural and recreation program that is open 
to all students. This program includes, among 
others, basketball, softball, water polo, beach 
volleyball, and flag football. 



Student Programs 

The Office of Student Programs offers 
assistance and resources for all campus 
activities and student organizations. Through 
the efforts of the student administered Campus 
Activities Board (CAB), extra and co- 
curricular programming is offered to the entire 
college community. CAB programming is 
designed to enhance the overall educational 
experience of students through the exposure to 
social, cultural, and recreational programs. 
Members of the staff in Student Activities also 
direct leadership training programs for the 
student government, the Interfratemity and 
Panhellenic Councils, the International 
Student Organization, the Arrow Yearbook, 
and all registered student organizations. 

Religious Life 

The United Campus Ministry, staffed by a 
Protestant minister and a Roman Catholic lay 
minister, provides a wide range of activities in 
support of the spiritual development and 
religious life of students. Ecumenical and 
inclusive in nature. Campus Ministry at 
Lycoming provides worship services, service 
projects, social occasions, retreats, study 
opportunities, and personal counseling. 
The chaplains are an integral part of campus 
life and are available to students who may 
need support, counsel, or direction. 

Safety and Security 

The Department of Safety & Security 
strives to maintain an environment that is free 
of unnecessary hazards and disruptions. This 
responsibility includes the enforcement of 
Lycoming College rules, regulations, and 
policies. Security personnel are scheduled on 
an around-the-clock basis. An emergency 
telephone line is always monitored to respond 
to serious events on campus. Twenty-four 
hour a day telephone extensions are used to 
handle general security concerns. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



STUDENT AFFAIRS • ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 




The department solicits the cooperation of 
the entire college community in reporting 
unsafe conditions and suspicious activity on 
the Lycoming College campus. 

Other services provided by the department 
are: First aid and ambulatory medical tran- 
sportation, emergency maintenance referral, 
an escort service, guest and parking registra- 
tion, and the dissemination of telephone 
numbers and general information to the public 
when the College switchboard is closed. 

Standards of Conduct 

Lycoming College is committed to the 
creation and maintenance of a living-learning 
environment which fosters the intellectual, 
personal, social and ethical development of its 
students. Respect for the rights of others and 
self-discipline are essential to the fulfillment 
of these goals. Students are expected to 
adhere to the policies contained in the Student 
Handbook and other College publications. 
These policies, rules and regulations are part 
of the contractual agreement students enter 
into when they register at Lycoming College. 

Students who demonstrate an unwilling- 
ness to abide by these policies will be subject 
to disciplinary action which may include 
suspension or expulsion from the College. 
Students are encouraged to review the Student 
Handbook and Residence Hall Agreement in 
order to familiarize themselves with the 
policies governing student conduct. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Academic 
Policies And 
Regulations 

THE UNIT 
COURSE SYSTEM 

Instruction at Lycoming College is orga- 
nized, with few exceptions, on a departmental 
basis. Most courses are unit courses, meaning 
that each course taken is considered to be 
equivalent to four semester hours of credit. 
Exceptions occur in applied music and theatre 
practicum courses, which are offered for either 
one-half or one semester hour of credit, and in 
departments that have elected to offer certain 
courses for the equivalent of one, two or three 
semester hours of credit. Furthermore, 
independent studies and internships carrying 
two semester hours of credit may be designed. 

The normal student course load is four 
courses during the fall and spring semesters. 
Students who elect to attend the special sessions 
may enroll in one course during the May term 
and one or two courses in each of the summer 
terms. A student is considered full time when 
enrolled for a minimum of three courses 
during the fall or spring semesters, one course 
for the May term, and two courses for each of 
the summer terms. 

Students may enroll in five courses during 
the fall and spring semesters if they are 
Lycoming scholars or were admitted to the 
Dean's List at the end of the previous semes- 
ter. Exceptions may be granted by the Dean 
of the College. Overloads are not permitted 
during the May and summer terms. 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



ALTERNATIVE CREDIT 
SOURCES 

Transfer Credit 

Matriculated students who wish to study at 
other campuses must obtain prior written 
approval to do so from their advisor and the 
Lycoming College Registrar. Course work 
counting toward a major or minor must also be 
approved in advance by the chairperson of the 
department in which the major or minor is 
offered. Once a course is approved, the credit 
and grades for the course will be transferred to 
Lycoming and calculated in the student's grade 
point average as if the courses were taken here. 
This means that "D" and "F" grades will be 
transferred as well as all other grades. In 
addition, students are expected to be registered 
at Lycoming for their last eight courses. Re- 
quests for waivers of this regulation must be 
sent to the Committee on Academic Standards. 
Final determination of transfer credit will be 
made by the Lycoming College Registrar based 
on official transcripts only. 

Credit By Examination 

Students may earn credit or advanced 
placement through the standardized examina- 
tions listed below. A maximum of 50 percent 
of the course requirements for the Baccalaure- 
ate degree may be earned through these exam- 
inations. The appropriate academic department 
will determine which tests they will accept 
and the course equivalencies. A list of 
approved examinations is available in the 
Office of the Registrar. Although these exam- 
inations may be taken after matriculation, new 
students who are competent in a given area are 
encouraged to take the examination of their 
choice before entering Lycoming so that the 
college will have the test scores available for 
registration advising for the first semester of 
enrollment. Students applying to the college 
for the first time should inform the Admis- 
sions Office that they have completed these 
tests and provide the official scores as part of 



their application packet. Continuing students 
must send official test scores to the Office of 
the Registrar and inform their academic 
advisors when examinations have been taken. 

The College Entrance Examination Board 
Advanced Placement (CEEB AP) - A score 
of three or above is required for credit or 
advanced placement. 

The International Baccalaureate - Students 
who have completed the full diploma and 
have scores of five or above will be granted 
32 credit hours, specific courses will be based 
on the examinations taken. Students who 
have completed the certificate will be granted 
credit based on the examinations taken. 
Subsidiary examinations will not be considered. 

The American College Testing Proficiency 
Examination Program (ACT PEP) - A score 
equivalent to a grade of "B" or above is required. 

College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP) - A score at the 75th percentile or 
above on the General Examinations and a 
score equivalent to a grade of "B" or above on 
the Subject Examinations is required. 

Defense Activity for Non-Traditional 
Education Support (D ANTES) - A score 
equivalent to a grade of "B" or above is required. 

STUDENT RECORDS 

The policy regarding student educational 
records is designed to protect the privacy of 
students against unwarranted intrusions and is 
consistent with Section 43B of the General 
Education Provision Act (commonly known as 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974, as amended). The details of the College 
policy on student records and the procedures 
for gaining access to student records are 
contained in the current issue of the Student 
Handbook, which is available in the library and 
the Office of the Dean of Student Affairs. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



REGISTRATION 

During the registration period, students select 
their courses for the next semester and register 
their course selections in the Office of the 
Registrar. Course selection is made in consult- 
ation with the student's faculty advisor in order 
to insure that the course schedule is consistent 
with College requirements and student goals. 
After the registration period, any change in the 
student's course schedule must be approved by 
both the faculty advisor and Office of the 
Registrar. Students may not receive credit for 
courses in which they are not formally registered. 

During the first five days of classes, students 
may drop any course without any record of 
such enrollment appearing on their permanent 
record, and they may add any course that is 
not closed. The permanent record will reflect 
the student's registration as of the conclusion 
of the drop/add period. Students wishing to 
withdraw from a course between the fifth day 
and the 9th week of classes must secure a 
withdrawal form from the Office of the 
Registrar. Withdrawal grades are not 
computed in the grade point average. Stu- 
dents may not withdraw from courses after the 
9th week of a semester and the comparable 
period during the May and summer terms. 

In two-credit (1/2 unit) courses meeting 
only during the last half of any semester, 
students may drop/add for a period of five 
days, effective with the mid-term date shown 
on the academic calendar. Withdrawal from 
half-semester courses with a withdrawal grade 
may occur within 4 1/2 weeks of the begin- 
ning of the course. It is understood that the 
period of time at the beginning of the semester 
will be identical, for example, a period of five 
days as indicated above. 

Cross Registration 

A special opportunity exists in the 
Williamsport area for students to take courses 
at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. 
Students may enroll for less than a full-time 



course load at Penn College while remaining 
enrolled in courses at Lycoming. 

NON-DEGREE STUDENTS 

Students who do not wish to pursue a degree at 
Lycoming College may, if space permits, register 
for credit or audit courses on either a part-time 
or full-time basis. Students who register for one 
or two courses are considered to be enrolled part- 
time; students who register for three or four 
courses are considered to be enrolled full-time. 

Anyone wishing to register as a non-degree 
student must fill out an application form in the 
Admissions Office, pay a one-time application 
fee and pay the tuition rate in effect at the time 
of each enrollment. After a non-degree student 
has attempted four courses, the student must 
either matriculate or obtain permission from the 
Dean of the College to continue study on a non- 
degree basis. 

All non-degree students are subject to the 
general laws and regulations of the College as 
stated in the College Catalog and the Student 
Handbook. The College reserves the right to 
deny permission to register individuals who 
do not meet the standards of the College. 

Students who wish to change from a non- 
degree to a degree status must reapply (with 
no application fee) and satisfy all conditions 
for admission and registration in effect at the 
time of application for degree status. 

AUDITORS 

Any person may audit courses at Lycoming 
at one-fourth tuition per course. Members of 
the Lycoming College Scholar Program may 
audit a fifth course per semester at no additional 
charge. Laboratory and other special fees must 
be paid in full. Examinations, papers, and 
other evaluation devices are not required of 
auditors, but individual arrangements may be 
made to complete such exercises with consent 
of the instructor. The option to audit a course 
must be declared during the same period 
(currently five days) at the beginning of each 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



semester, half-semester, or term as drop/add 
and pass/fail and must be completed in the 
Registrar's Office. 

ATTENDANCE 

The academic program at Lycoming is 
based upon the assumption that there is value 
in class attendance for all students. Individual 
instructors have the prerogative of establishing 
reasonable absence regulations in any course. 
The student is responsible for learning and 
observing these regulations. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM 
THE COLLEGE 

A student who wishes to withdraw from 
the College during the semester should contact 
the Office of the Associate Dean of the 
College or the Assistant Dean for Freshmen. 
College personnel will explain the procedure 
to ensure that the student's financial and 
academic records are properly closed. 

A student who decides to discontinue study 
at the College as of the conclusion of the 
current semester must provide the Registrar 
with written notification of such plans in order 
to receive a refund of the contingency deposit. 
See page 14 for details. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The evaluation of student performance in 
credit courses is indicated by the use of 
traditional letter symbols. These symbols and 
their definitions are as follows: 

A EXCELLENT - Signifies superior achieve- 
ment through mastery of content or skills and 
demonstration of creative and independent 
thinking. 

B GOOD - Signifies better-than-average 
achievement wherein the student reveals 
insight and understanding. 

C SATISFACTORY - Signifies satisfactory 
achievement wherein the student's work has 



been of average quality and quantity. The 
student has demonstrated basic competence in 
the subject area and may enroll in additional 
course work. 

D PASSING - Signifies unsatisfactory 
achievement wherein the student met only the 
minimum requirements for passing the course 
and should not continue in the subject area 
without departmental advice. 

F FAILING — Signifies that the student has 
not met the minimum requirements for 
passing the course. 

I INCOMPLETE WORK — Assigned in 
accordance with the restrictions of established 
academic policy. 

R A REPEATED COURSE — Students shall 
have the option of repeating courses for which 
they already have received a passing grade in 
addition to those which they have failed. Credit 
is received only once for the course. The most 
recent course grade will count toward the GPA 

P PASSING WORK, NO GRADE AS- 
SIGNED — Converted from traditional grade 
of A through D-. 

X AUDIT — Work as an auditor for which 
no credit is earned. 

W WITHDRAWAL — Signifies withdrawal 
from the course from the sixth day through the 
ninth week of the semester. 

The cumulative 
grade point 
average (GPA) is 
calculated by 
multiplying quahty 
points by credits 
and dividing the 
total quality points 
by the total credits. 
A quality point is 
the unit of mea- 
surement of the 
quality of work 
done by the 
student. 





Quality Points 




Earned for Each 


Grade 


Semester Hour 


A 


4.00 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.67 


C+ 


2.33 


C 


2.00 


C- 


1.67 


D+ 


1.33 


D 


1.00 


D- 


0.67 


F 


0.00 



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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



The grade point average for the major is 
calculated in the same way as the cumulative 
grade point average. 

A minimum of 2.00 is required for the 
cumulative grade point average in the major to 
meet the requirements for graduation. The 
cumulative GPA is not determined by 
averaging semester GPA's. 

Pass/Fail 

Use of the pass/fail grading option is 
limited as follows (this does not apply to 
ENGL 105): 

• Students may enroll on a P/F basis in no 
more that one course per semester and in no 
more than four courses during their under- 
graduate careers. 

• P/F courses completed after declaration of a 
major may not be used to satisfy a require- 
ment of that major, including courses required 
by the major department which are offered 
by other departments. (Instructor-designated 
courses are excepted from this limitation.) 

• Courses for which a grade of P is recorded 
may not be used toward fulfillment of any 
distribution or "W" course requirement. 

• Students may not enroll in ENGL 106 on a 
P/F basis. 

• A course selected on a P/F basis from which 
a student subsequently withdraws will not 
count toward the four-course limit. 

• Instructor-designated courses may be 
offered during the May term with the 
approval of the Dean of the College. Such 
courses are not counted toward the four- 
course limit. 

• P grades are not computed in the grade 
point average. 

• Students electing the P/F option may designate 
a minimum acceptance letter grade from A to 
B-. If the student earns the designated grade 
or better, the grade will be recorded in the 
permanent record and computed in the grade 
point average. If a student selects P/F (with 
no designated minimum acceptance grade) 
and earns a grade of A to D-, a P will be 



recorded in the permanent record but not 
computed in the grade point average. In all 
cases, if a student earns a grade of F this 
grade will be recorded in the permanent 
record and computed in the student's grade 
point average. 

• Students must declare the P/F option before 
the drop/add deadlines. 

• Instructors are not notified which of their 
students are enrolled on an P/F basis. 

• Students electing the P/F option are 
expected to perform the same work as those 
enrolled on a regular basis. 

Incomplete Grades 

Incomplete grades may be given if, for 
absolutely unavoidable reasons (usually 
medical in nature), the student has not been 
able to complete the work required in the 
course. An incomplete grade must be removed 
within six weeks of the next regular semester. 

Repetition of Course 

Students shall have the option of repeating 
courses for which they already have received a 
passing grade in addition to those which they 
have failed. Recording of grades for all 
repeated courses shall be governed by the 
following conditions: 

• A course may be repeated only one time. 
Both attempts will be recorded on the 
student's transcript. 

• Credit for the course will be given only once. 

• The most recent grade will count toward the 
GPA with this exception: A "W" grade 
cannot replace another grade. 

• A repeated course will be counted toward 
the total number of unsuccessful attempts. 

ACADEMIC LEVELS 

The following table is used to determine the 
academic grade level of degree candidates. 
See page 16 for related Financial Aid 
information. 



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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



Year 


Semester 


Number of Semester 
Hours Earned 


Freshman 


1 


Less than 1 2 




2 


At least 12 but less than 24 


Sophomore 1 


At least 24 but less than 40 




2 


At least 40 but less than 56 


Junior 


1 


At least 56 but less than 76 


Senior 


2 
1 


At least 76 but less than 96 
At least 96 but less than 1 12 




2 


More than 112 



ACADEMIC STANDING 

Students will be considered in good 
academic standing if they meet the following 
standard: 

Hours Completed Cumulative GPA 

less than or equal to 16 1.70 

more than 16, less than or equal to 32 1 .80 
more than 32, less than or equal to 48 1 .90 
more than 48 2.00 

Students who do not meet this standard will be 
placed on academic probation. 

Students will be subject to suspension from 
the College if they: 

• are on probation for two consecutive 
semesters 

• achieve a grade point average of 1 .00 or 
below during any one semester 

Students will be subject to dismissal 
from the College if they: 

• cannot reasonably complete all require- 
ments for a degree 

• exceed 24 semester hours of unsuccessful 
course attempts (grades of F, W, and R) 
except in the case of withdrawal for medical 
or psychological reasons 

ACADEMIC HONESTY 

The integrity of the academic process of 
the College requires honesty in all phases of 
the instructional program. The College 
assumes that students are committed to the 
principle of academic honesty. Students who 



fail to honor this commitment are subject to 
dismissal. Procedural guidelines and rules for the 
adjudication of cases of academic dishonesty are 
printed in The Faculty Handbook and The 
Pathfinder (the student academic handbook), 
copies of which are available in the library. 

ACADEMIC HONORS 

Dean's List 

Students are admitted to the Dean's List at 
the end of the fall and spring semesters if they 
have completed at least 15 credits with other 
than P or R grades, and have a minimum grade 
point average of 3.50 for the semester. 

Graduation Honors 

Students are awarded the Bachelor of Arts 
degree, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, the 
Bachelor of Science degree, or the Bachelor of 
Science in Nursing degree with honors when 
they have earned the following grade point 
averages based on all courses attempted at 
Lycoming, with a minimum of 64 credits (16 
units) required for a student to be eligible for 
honors: 

summa cum laude exactly 3.90-4.00 

magna cum laude exactly 3.50-3.89 

cum laude exactly 3.25-3.49 

Academic Honor Awards, Prizes, and 
Societies - Superior academic achievement is 
recognized through the conferring of awards 
and prizes at the annual Honors Convocation 
and Commencement and through election to 
membership in honor societies. 

SOCIETIES 

Biology Beta Beta Beta 

Freshmen Men Blue Key 

Freshmen Women Gold Key 

Economics Omicron Delta Epsilon 

Education Kappa Delta Pi 

English Sigma Tau Delta 

Foreign Language Phi Sigma Iota 

General Academic Phi Kappa Phi 

History Phi Alpha Theta 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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ACADEMIC POLICffiS AND REGULATIONS 



Nursing Sigma Theta Tau 

Philosophy Phi Sigma Tau 

Physics Sigma Pi Sigma 

Political Science Pi Sigma Alpha 

Psychology Psi Chi 

Social Science Pi Gamma Mu 

Theatre Alpha Psi Omega 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

Endowed Funds 

William T. and Ruth S. Askey Music Prize 

is given to a graduating senior who is recog- 
nized for his/her proficiency as a music major. 

Jack C. Buckle Award is given annually to a 
junior male smdent with high moral qualities, 
who has at least a 2.00 cumulative GPA and, 
who has made an unusual contribution to campus 
life through leadership in student activities. 

Byron C. Brunstetter Science Award is 

given to a senior chemistry /biology major for 
outstanding achievement in chemical and 
biological sciences. 

Class of 1907 Prize is given to the senior who 
has been outstanding in the promotion of 
College spirit through participation in athletics 
and other activities. 

Benjamin C. Conner Prize is given to the 
graduating student who has done outstanding 
work in mathematics. 

Criminal Justice Society Prize is given to 
the criminal justice major who has demon- 
strated outstanding classroom performance, a 
promise of leadership and service to college 
and community. 

W. Arthur Faus Memorial Prize is given in 
memory of Dr. W. Arthur Faus, a former 
Professor of Philosophy at Lycoming College, 
to the graduating senior who has done 
outstanding work in philosophy. 

Durant L. Furey III Memorial Prize is 

given to the senior accounting major who has 
shown outstanding achievement in accounting. 



Gillette Foreign Language Prizes are given 
to senior French, German, and Spanish majors 
who have achieved excellence in these foreign 
languages. 

Dan Gustafson Award, in memory of a 
former member of the English Department, is 
given to the senior English major whose 
analytical writing demonstrates the highest 
standards of literary and critical excellence. 

Helen R. Hoover Community Service Prize 

is given annually to a graduating senior who 
has demonstrated a personal commitment to 
serving the fortunate citizens in either greater 
Williamsport or their own community of 
permanent residence. 

Elisha Benson Kline Prize is given to the 
senior mathematics major with outstanding 
achievement in the field. 

Charles J. Kocian Awards are given to the 
accounting, business administration, and 
economics majors who show the greatest 
proficiency in statistics; the mathematics 
major who shows the greatest proficiency in 
applied mathematics; the graduating senior 
who shows the greatest proficiency in 
computer science; the graduating senior who 
shows the greatest proficiency in operations 
research; the graduating senior business 
administration major with the highest grade 
point average; the graduating political science 
major with the highest grade point average; 
the graduating senior with the highest average 
in the class and the graduating nursing major 
with the highest grade point average. 

Alfred Kohler Studio Artist Award - The 

award is to be given to a deserving art studio 
major for the purchase of supplies in their 
chosen studio area. The award may or may 
not be given each year. The Lycoming Art 
Department will administer the award. 
Student selection is based upon meritorious 
achievement through a portfolio review. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



Don Lincoln Larrabee Law Prize is given to 
the graduating student who has shown 
outstanding scholarship in legal principles. 

The John M. Lindemuth Endowed Prize 

Fund, established in 1986 by Mr. and Mrs. 
John M. Lindemuth of Williamsport, Pennsyl- 
vania, provides annual cash awards for 
varsity football players who earn the highest 
cumulative grade point average in their chosen 
field of academic study at Lycoming College. 
This prize is managed in compliance with 
current NCAA regulations concerning 
scholastic awards for athletes. 

C. Daniel and Jeanne Little Award, 

presented in memory of two Lycoming 
alumni, is given to the outstanding student in 
public administration. 

Phoebe R. Lyon Prize, is given to the senior 
who has achieved outstanding attainments in 
the study of English. 

The Gertrude B. Madden Mass Communi- 
cation Award, established in 1985 by the 
students of the Mass Communication Society, 
is presented annually to the senior mass com- 
munication major who, in the judgment of his 
or her peers, has best integrated academic 
excellence, professional development in a mass 
media field and contribution to campus media. 

The McDowell Prize is given to the senior 
ministerial student who excels in scholarship, 
deportment, and promise of usefulness, and 
who declares his intention to make the 
ministry his life work. 

The Metzler Prize is given to a junior for 
superior work in Junior English. 

M.B. Rich Prizes are given to: the student in 
the freshman class who attains the highest 
rank in scholarship and deportment; to the two 
students who at a public contest excel in 
reading the Scriptures; and to the two students 
who excel in writing and delivering an 
original oration. 



The Professor Logan A. Richmond 
Accounting Prize is awarded annually to a 
graduating senior who has done outstanding 
work in accounting and demonstrated excep- 
tional proficiency in writing. 

The Janet A. Rodgers Academic Award, 

established in honor of the founding chair of 
the Department of Nursing, provides an annual 
$100 award to a senior nursing student who 
demonstrates exceptional academic achieve- 
ment and has been an active participant in 
health-related programs. 

Mary L. Russell Award, named in honor of a 
professor emeritus of music, is given for 
outstanding musical achievement. 

Nathan A. Scheib Memorial Music Fund, in 

memory of a friend of the College, provides 
financial assistance to qualified deserving 
students for advanced training in music. 

Trask Chemistry Prize is given to the senior 
chemistry major who has done outstanding 
work in the field. 

The James E. Wehr Award is presented to a 
student who has demonstrated a personal 
expertise in the subject of financial accounting. 

Williamsport Rotary Club Nursing Prize 

This prize is awarded to a part-time student 
taking courses on a regular basis in the B.S.N, 
program. Preference will to be given to a 
registered nurse with the highest cumulative 
GPA who is also a permanent resident of the 
greater Williamsport community. 

The Sol "Woody" Wolfe Athletic Prize is 

awarded annually to that participant in an 
authorized N.C.A.A. sport who has shown the 
most improvement in intercollegiate competi- 
tion in his first three years in college. 

Annual Prizes 

American Chemical Society Award, sponsored 
by the Susquehanna Valley Chapter of the 
society, is given to the outstanding senior in 
chemistry. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



Accounting Society Service Award is given 
for outstanding service to the Lycoming 
College Accounting Society. 

American Institute of Chemists Prize, given 
by the Philadelphia section of the Institute, goes 
to a senior major with an outstanding record of 
leadership, ability, character and scholastic 
achievement. 

Arena Theatre Awards: 

Performance - This award is given to the 
senior who has demonstrated outstanding 
ability in theatre performance. 
Technical Theatre - This award is given to the 
senior who has demonstrated outstanding 
ability in technical theatre. 

Biology Service Award is given to the 
student who has shown good academic work 
and has fostered the ideals of the department 
by willingness to become involved in the 
activities of the department. 

Freshman Biology Award is given to the 
freshman who has obtained the highest overall 
average in BIO 1 10-1 1 1 (major biology 
lecture and laboratory). 

CRC Press Chemistry Achievement Award 

is given to that freshman who has demonstrated 
outstanding achievement in general chemistry. 

Chieftain Award, the College's most presti- 
gious award, is given to the senior who has 
contributed most to Lycoming through support 
of school activities; who has exhibited out- 
standing leadership qualities; who has worked 
effectively with other members of the College 
community; who has evidenced a good moral 
code; and whose academic rank is above the 
median for the preceding senior class. 

Civic Choir Award is given to the College 
choir member who has outstanding musical 
ability and who has made significant leader- 
ship contributions to the choir. 



Contribution Award is awarded to the 
chapter who through volunteerism or philan- 



thropic work has contributed to either or all 
of the area, campus, or world communities. 

EHzabeth Cowles Dedication to Greek Life 
Award is awarded in honor of the Alpha Rho 
Omega advisor from 1983-1994 to the 
individual who has dedicated his/her time and 
energy for the betterment of Greek life at 
Lycoming College. 

Durkheim Prize is given to the outstanding 
senior sociology/anthropology major(s). 

Bishop William Perry Eveland Prize is 

given to the senior who has shown progress in 
scholarship, loyalty, school spirit, and 
participation in school activities. 

Excellence in Two-Dimensional Art Award 

is given to the outstanding senior art major in 
this field. 

Excellence in Three-Dimensional Art 
Award is given to the outstanding senior art 
major in this field. 

Excellence in Political Science Award is 

given to the senior political science major who 
has performed with excellence. 

J.W. Feree Award, given in memory of the 
first mathematics professor at Lycoming's fore- 
runner, the Dickinson Seminary, goes to the 
student most active in mathematical sciences. 

Faculty Prize is given to the commuting 
student with satisfactory scholarship and who 
has been outstanding in promotion of school 
spirit through participation in school activities. 

Freshman Academic Award is given to the 
freshman student(s) with the highest GPA 
after the fall semester. 

John P. Graham Award, named in honor of 
a professor emeritus, is given to the senior 
English major who achieves the highest 
average in English. 

Edward J. Gray Prizes are given to the 
graduating students with the highest and 
second highest averages. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS 



Greek Man of the Year is bestowed upon the 
man of outstanding character within the Greek 
community. He is one who has contributed 
greatly to the Greek system as well as his 
chapter while at Lycoming College. 

Greek Woman of the Year is bestowed upon 
the woman of outstanding character within the 
Greek community. She is one who has cont- 
ributed greatly to the Greek system as well as 
her chapter while at Lycoming College. 

The John G. HoIIenback Award is given for 
high academic performance and outstanding 
service to the Business Department. 

IRUSKA Awards denote membership in the 
society for juniors who are very active on 
campus. 

Junior Book Award is given to the outstand- 
ing junior political science major. 

The Kramer and Hoffman Associates 
Award is given for superior achievement in 
the study of federal income tax. 

The Makisu Award is given for outstanding 
service to the college community, for dedica- 
tion above and beyond the realm of one's 
obligations to the College. 

Department of Mathematical Sciences 
Award is given to that student demonstrating 
excellence in computer programming. [Or 
other criterion to be specified (by the depart- 
ment); e.g. "outstanding scholarship"] 

Ethel McDonald Pax Christi Award is given 
for outstanding but quiet consistency in the 
life of faith and the practice of Christianity, 
noteworthy personal integrity and humble 
loving compassion expressed in daily life. 

Walter G. Mclver Award, named after 
Lycoming's former choir director, is given to 
an outstanding and dedicated choir member 
who has made significant campus contribu- 
tions outside of choir. 



New Member Class Academic Excellence is 

awarded to the new member class (pledge 
class) who has achieved the highest GPA 
within the Greek system. 

Most Improved Pledge Grades is awarded to 
the pledge class whose GPA has shown the 
greatest improvement within the Greek 
system. 

Most Improved GPA for a Greek Chapter 

is awarded to the chapter whose entire chapter 
has shown the greatest improvement within 
the Greek system. 

Department of Nursing Award for Clinical 
Excellence is given for outstanding achieve- 
ment in the clinical setting. 

Department of Nursing Faculty Award is 

given to the senior nursing major who best 
exemplifies the spirit of the profession. 

Lycoming College Nursing Honor Society 
Research Recognition Award is given to the 
nursing student who has demonstrated an in- 
depth understanding of the research process, 
as evidenced by a completed research project, 
with formal dissemination of the results of the 
study. 

Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public 
Accountants Award is given to the senior 
accounting major who has demonstrated high 
scholastic standing and qualities of leadership. 

The Penguin Award, in memory of Robert T. 
Guellich, II, '92, recognizes the junior student 
who has excelled in English, preferably with a 
concentration in political science, and who has 
contributed significantly to campus life. 

Pocahontas Award is given to Lycoming's 
outstanding female athlete. 

Psi Chi Service Award is given for contribu- 
tions to the Psychology Department. 

Research and Writing Prize in History is 
given to the student who does the best work in 
HIST 449. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS • THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Sadler Prize is given to the student with the 
highest achievement in calculus, foundations 
of mathematics, algebra, and analysis. 

Senior Management Award is given to the 
business major whose senior management 
project was judged best by the Business 
Administration Department. 

Senior Scholarship Prize in History is given 
to the senior major with the highest average. 

Service to Lycoming Award, sponsored by 
the Office of Student Services, is given to 
students who have made outstanding 
contributions to Lycoming. 

Frances K. Skeath Award is given to the 
senior with outstanding achievement in 
mathematics. 

J. Milton Skeath Award is given for superior 
undergraduate achievement and potential for 
further work in psychology. 

Sophomore Intermediate Accounting 
Award is given for the accounting major with 
the highest average in Intermediate Account- 
ing at the end of the spring term. 

The John A. Streeter Memorial Award in 

Economics is given to a graduating student for 
outstanding achievement in economics. 

The John A. Streeter Memorial Award in 

Music is given to the College band member 
who has outstanding musical ability and who 
has made significant leadership contributions 
to the band. 

Tomahawk Award is given to Lycoming's 
outstanding male athlete. 

Wall Street Journal Awards: One award is 
given to a senior business major for excel- 
lence in the field and service to the College 
conrmiunity, and another award is given for 
excellence in economics. 




THE 

Academic 
Program 

Lycoming College awards four different 
degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of 
Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.) 
and Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.). 
For students wishing to do so, multiple degrees 
are possible. Candidates for multiple degrees 
must satisfy all requirements for each degree. 
Freshmen entering the College during the 
1996-97 academic year are subject to the 
requirements which appear on the following 
pages. Continuing students are subject to the 
Catalog in effect at the time of their entry 
unless they elect to complete the current 
curriculum. Students who transfer to the 
College with advanced standing will be 
subject to the requirements imposed upon 
other students at the College who have 
attained the same academic level. Post- 
baccalaureate students will be subject to the 
requirements in effect at the date of entrance 
to post-baccalaureate studies and must 
complete both distribution and major require- 
ments. This does not apply to non-degree 
students in certificate-only programs. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



If a Student interrupts his or her education 
but returns to the College after no more than 
one academic year has passed, he/she will retain 
the same requirements in effect at the initial 
date of entrance. A student who withdraws 
from the College for more than one year will, 
upon return, be required to complete the 
requirements currently imposed upon other 
students of the same academic level. 

Exceptions to or waivers of any requirements 
and/or policies listed in this Catalog must be 
made by the Committee on Academic Standards. 

THE BACHELOR OF 
ARTS DEGREE 

Lycoming College is committed to the 
principle that a liberal arts education is the 
ideal foundation for an informed and produc- 
tive life. The liberal arts - including the fme 
arts, the humanities, mathematics, the natural 
and social sciences - have created the social, 
political, economic and intellectual systems 
which help define contemporary existence. 
Therefore it is essential that students grasp the 
modes of inquiry and knowledge associated 
with these disciplines. 

Consequently, the Bachelor of Arts degree 
is conferred upon the student who has completed 
an educational program incorporating the two 
principles of the liberal arts known as distribu- 
tion and concentration. The objective of the 
distribution principle is to insure that the stud- 
ent achieves breadth in learning through the 
study of the major dimensions of human 
inquiry: the humanities, the social sciences, 
and the natural sciences. The objective of 
the concentration principle is to provide depth 
of learning through completion of a program 
of study in a given discipline or subject area 
known as the major. The effect of both prin- 
ciples is to impart knowledge, inspire inquiry, 
and encourage creative thought. 



Requirements For Graduation 

Every B.A. degree candidate is expected to 
meet the following requirements in order to 
qualify for graduation: 

• Complete the distribution program. 

• Complete the Writing Across the Curriculum 
Program requirements. 

• Earn one year of credit in Physical Activi- 
ties, Wellness, and Community Service. 
Athletic training courses or Military Science 
1 1 , 02 1 , 03 1 , or 04 1 may satisfy this 
requirement. 

• Complete a major consisting of at least eight 
courses with a minimum grade point average 
of 2.00. 

• Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester 
hours) with a minimum cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00. Additional credits 
beyond 128 semester hours may be completed 
provided that the minimum 2.00 cumulative 
average is maintained. 

• Complete in residence the final eight courses 
offered for the degree at Lycoming. 

• Complete the above requirements within 
seven years of continuous enrollment 
following the date of matriculation. 

• Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at 
the College. 

THE BACHELOR OF 
FINE ARTS DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is specifi- 
cally designed to train professional artists. The 
B.F.A. in sculpture is a synthesis of three diverse 
forms of education: a studio art program that 
emphasizes the skills and concepts of the 
visual language, an apprenticeship that takes 
technical expertise as the departure point, and 
the scholastic method employed in both art 
history and the general-education component. 

Requirements 

Every B.F.A degree candidate is expected 
to meet the following requirements in order to 
qualify for graduation: 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



• Complete the 12-course Art Department 
course of study, while achieving a minimum 
grade point average of 2.00 in these courses. 

• Complete the distribution program. 

• Complete Writing Across the Curriculum 
Program requirements. 

• Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester 
hours) with a minimum cumulative grade 
point average of 2.00 in these courses. 

• Complete one of the field specialization 
apprenticeships at the Johnson Atelier 
Technical Institute of Sculpture. 

• Earn one year of credit in Physical Activi- 
ties, Wellness and Community Service. 
Athletic training courses or Military Science 
1 1 , 02 1 , 03 1 , or 04 1 may satisfy this 
requirement. 

• Complete in residence the final eight 
courses offered for the degree at Lycoming. 

• Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at 
the College. 

• Have a public exhibition of original art 
work and make an oral defense. 

THE BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE DEGREE 

The Bachelor of Science degree is available 
to students majoring in Biology or Chemistry. 
Students may elect either the B.A. or the B.S. 
degree in these majors. The B.S. degree is 
appropriate for students planning further 
education in a graduate or professional school. 

Requirements 

Every B.S. degree candidate is expected to 
meet the following requirements in order to 
qualify for graduation: 

• Complete the B.S. major in either Biology or 
Chemistry as described on page 74 and 84 
respectively with a minimum grade point 
average of 2.00 in the major. 

• Complete the distribution program. 

• Complete the Writing Across the Curriculum 
Program requirements. 

• Earn one year of credit in Physical Activi- 
ties, Wellness, and Community Service. 



Athletic Training courses or Military Science 
1 1 , 02 1 , 03 1 or 04 1 may satisfy this 
requirement. 

• Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester 
hours) with a minimum grade point average 
of 2.00. Additional credits beyond 128 
semester hours may be completed provided 
that the minimum 2.00 cumulative average is 
maintained. 

• Complete in residence the final eight courses 
offered for the degree at Lycoming. 

• Complete the above requirements within 
seven years of continuous enrollment 
following the date of matriculation. 

• Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at 
the College. 

THE BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE IN 
NURSING DEGREE 

The program of study leading to the 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree is 
designed to prepare men and women as 
beginning practitioners of professional nursing, 
quaUfied for first-level positions in a variety of 
health settings and for graduate study in nursing. 
Upon satisfactory completion of the program, a 
graduate is eligible to write the State Board of 
Nursing examination for licensure as a 
registered nurse. The goal of the program is to 
develop a liberally-educated and self-directed 
individual who is prepared to contribute to the 
welfare of the nation through the practice of 
professional nursing, which supports the 
promotion and restoration of the health of 
individuals and famihes in a variety of settings. 

Requirements 

Every B.S.N, degree candidate is expected 
to meet the following requirements in order to 
qualify for graduation: 

• Complete the 13-course major with a 
minimum cumulative grade point average of 
2.00, including the required May term 
following the junior year. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



• Complete the distribution requirements for 
the B.S.N, degree. 

• Complete Writing Across the Curriculum 
Program requirements. 

• Pass a minimum of 32 units (128 semester 
hours) with a minimum cumulative average 
of 2.00. 

• Earn one year of credit in Physical Activi- 
ties, Wellness and Community Service. 
Athletic training or Military Science Oil, 
021, 031 or 041 may satisfy this requirement. 

• Complete in residence the final eight 
courses offered for the degree at Lycoming 

• Satisfy all financial obligations incurred at 
the College. 

• Complete the degree requirements within a 
five-year period after admission to the nursing 
major. Candidates who are unable to meet this 
requirement must petition for an extension. 

THE DISTRIBUTION 
PROGRAM 

The Distribution Program for 
the B.A., B.F.A., and B.S. 
Degrees 

A course can be used to satisfy only one 
distribution requirement (except in the Cultural 
Diversity area). Courses for which a grade of 
"P" is recorded may not be used toward the 
fulfillment of the distribution requirements. 
(Refer to pages 29 and 30 for an explanation 
of the grading system.) No more than two 
courses used to satisfy the distribution require- 
ments may be selected from the same depart- 
ment, except for ENGL 105 and 106 or 107 
and Foreign Language Courses numbered 
below 222. A course in any of the following 
distribution requirements refers to a full-unit 
course (four semester hours) taken at Lycoming, 
any appropriate combination of fractional unit 
courses taken at Lycoming which accumulate 
to four semester hours, any appropriate course 
which is taken by cross-registration, any 
appropriate course which is part of an approved 



off-campus program (such as those listed in 
the catalog sections titled COOPERATIVE 
PROGRAMS and SPECIAL ACADEMIC 
OPPORTUNITIES), or any approved course 
transferred from another institution. 

Special distribution requirements which 
apply to students in the Lycoming Scholar 
Program appear on page 48. For the B.S.N. 
degree, see the special modified distribution 
requirements on page 40. For information re- 
garding CLEP and AP credit see page 27. 

A. English - Students are required to pass 
ENGL 105, unless exempted on the basis of 
the college's placement examination, and 
ENGL 106 or 107. ENGL 105 and ENGL 
106 or 107 must be taken during the freshman 
year unless the student does not successfully 
complete ENGL 105 during the first semester. 

B. Fine Arts - Students are required to pass 
two courses (or the equivalent) from Art, 
Creative Writing, Literature, Music, and/or 
THEA 100, 112, 114, 148, 332, 333, 335. 

C. Foreign Language - Students are required 
to pass a course in French, German, Greek, 
Hebrew, or Spanish numbered 101, unless 
exempted on the basis of placement, and a 
course numbered above 101 in the same 
language. Placement at the appropriate course 
level will be determined by the faculty of the 
Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. Students who have completed 
two or more years of a given language in high 
school are not admitted for credit to the 
elementary course in the same foreign 
language except by written permission of the 
chairman of the department. 

D. Humanities - Students are required to pass 
four courses from History, Literature, includ- 
ing THEA 333 and 335, Philosophy, and/or 
Religion. At least one course must be suc- 
cessfully completed in 3 of the 4 disciplines. 

E. Mathematics - Students are required to 
demonstrate competence in basic algebra and 
to pass one course selected from CPTR 108, 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



MATH 103, 106, 109, 112, 116, 128, 129, 130 
or 214. Competence in basic algebra may be 
demonstrated by: passing the basic algebra 
section of the Mathematics Placement Exami- 
nation, or successfully completing MATH 100. 
The Mathematics Placement Examination 
may be scheduled a maximum of three times, 
only one of which may be after matriculation. 
A retest fee of $25 will be charged for each 
private test administration. 

F. Natural Sciences - Two courses chosen from 
Astronomy/Physics, Biology, and/or Chemisty. 

G. Social Sciences - Students are required to 
pass two courses from Economics, Political 
Science, Psychology and/or Sociology/ 
Anthropology. 

H. Cultural Diversity - Students are required 
to pass one designated course which intro- 
duces students to Cultural Diversity which are 
distinct from the predominant Anglo-Ameri- 
can culture. The course selected to fulfill this 
requirement may also be used to satisfy one of 
the other general education requirements in 
the liberal arts. Students also may fulfill the 
cultural diversity requirement by successfully 
completing at least one semester (4 units) in a 
college-accepted study abroad program. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses and 
will be offered as such. Students must check 
semester class schedules to determine which 
courses are offered as "D" (cultural diversity) 
courses for that semester. 



ART 

BUSINESS 

ENGLISH 

FRENCH 

GERMAN 

HISTORY 

MUSIC 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

PSYCHOLOGY 

RELIGION 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ART 222, 339 
BUS 244,319 
ENGL 334 
FRN228 
GERM 221, 222 
HIST 120, 140, 
230,240,310 
MUS 116, 128,234 
PSCI 220, 326, 340 
PS Y 341 
REL 110,224, 
225, 226, 228 



SOCIOLOGY/ 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

SPANISH 
THEATRE 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 



SOC229, 331, 
334, 335, 336, 
337, 338 
221,222,311 
THEA112, 114, 
332,333,335,410 
WMST 320 



The Distribution Program 
For The B.S.N. Degree 

A. English - Same as for the B.A., B.F.A., and 
B.S. degrees. 

B. Fine Arts - Same as for the B.A., B.F.A., 
and B.S. degrees. 

C. Foreign Language - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A., and B.S. degrees. 

D. Humanities - Same as for the B.A., B.F.A., 
and B.S. degrees. 

E. Mathematics - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A., and B.S. degrees. 

F. Natural Sciences - CHEM 108, 1 15. 

G. Social Sciences - Students are required to 
pass PSY 1 10 and one other course from 
Economics, Political Science, Psychology and/ 
or Sociology/Anthropology. 

H. Cultural Diversity - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A., and B.S. degrees. 

Writing Across The 
Curriculum Program 

I. Purpose 

The Lycoming College Writing Across the 
Curriculum Program has been developed in 
response to the conviction that writing skills 
promote intellectual growth and are a hallmark 
of the educated person. The program has 
therefore been designed to achieve two major, 
interrelated objectives: 

1 ) to enhance student learning in general 
and subject mastery in particular, and 

2) to develop students' abilities to commu- 
nicate clearly. In this program, students 
are given opportunities to write in a 
variety of contexts and in a substantial 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



number of courses, in which they receive 
faculty guidance and reinforcement. 

II. Program Requirements 

Students must successfully complete the 
following writing requirements: 

1) ENGL 105 or exemption from the course. 

2) ENGL 106 (Composition) or ENGL 
107 Honors Composition. 

3) A writing component in all distribution 
courses completed at Lycoming. 

4) Three courses designated as writing- 
intensive, or "W" courses. 

• Successful completion of ENGL 106 
or 107 is a prerequisite for enrollment 
in writing-intensive courses. 

• All courses designated "W" are 
numbered 200 or above. 

• One of the student's "W" courses must 
be in his/her major (or one of the 
majors) or with departmental approval 
from a related department. Not all 
three can be from the same major. 

III. Approved Writing Intensive Courses 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such. Students must check 
semester class schedules to determine which 
courses are offered as "W" courses for that 
semester. 



ACCOUNTING 

AMERICAN STUDIES 
ART 

ASTRONOMY 

BIOLOGY 

BUSINESS 

CHEMISTRY 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 

ENGLISH 



ACCT 223, 
224, 442 
HIST 443 
ART 222, 223, 331, 
333, 334, 336, 339 
ASTR 230 
BIO 222, 224 
BUS 244, 441 
CHEM 330, 332 
CPTR 246, 344 
HIST 230, 443 
ECON 337, 440 
EDU 343, 344 
ENGL 331, 334, 
335, 336, 420 



FRENCH 

GERMAN 

HISTORY 

INTERNATIONAL 

STUDIES 
COMMUNICATIONS 
MATHEMATICS 
MUSIC 
NEAR EAST CULTURE ART 222 



FRN441 
GERM 431, 441 
HIST 218, 230, 

332, 443, 449 
INST 449 

COMM 226, 330 
MATH 234 
MUS 336 



NURSING 
PHILOSOPHY 



PHYSICS 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
PSYCHOLOGY 
RELIGION 
SOCIOLOGY/ 

ANTHROPOLOGY 
SPANISH 
THEATRE 



NURS221,435 
PHIL216, 218, 219, 
301,332,333,334, 
335, 449 
PHYS 338, 447 
PSCI 223, 244 
PSY 225, 43 1,432 
REL230, 331 
SOC 229, 441 

SPAN 418 
THEA 332, 333 



Physical Activities, Wellness, and 
Community Service Program 

I. Purpose 

This program is designed to promote 
students' physical welfare, health awareness 
and encourage a sense of civic responsibility. 

II. Program Requirements 

Students must pass any combination of two 
semesters of course work selected from the 
following: 

1 . Designated physical activities courses. 

2. Designated varsity athletics. 

3. Designated wellness couses. 

4. Designated community service projects. 

CONCENTRATION 

The Major 

Students are required to complete a series of 
courses in one departmental or interdisciplinary 
(established or individual) major. Specific course 
requirements for each major offered by the 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



College are listed in the curriculum section of 
this catalog. Students must earn a 2.00 or 
higher grade point average in those courses 
stipulated as comprising the major. Students 
must declare a major by the beginning of their 
junior year. Departmental and established 
interdisciplinary majors are declared in the 
Office of the Registrar, whereas individual 
interdisciplinary majors must be approved by 
the Committee on Curriculum Development. 
Students may complete more than one major, 
each of which will be recorded on the tran- 
script. Students may be removed from major 
status if they are not making satisfactory 
progress in their major. This action is taken 
by the Dean of the College upon the recom- 
mendation of the department, coordinating 
committee (for established interdisciplinary 
majors), or Curriculum Development Com- 
mittee (for individual interdisciplinary 
majors). The decision of the Dean of the 
College may be appealed to the Academic 
Standards Committee by the student involved 
or by the recommending department or 
committee. 

Departmental Majors — The following 

Departmental majors are available: 

Accounting 

Art History 

Art Studio 

Astronomy 

Biology 

Business Administration 

Chemistry 

Communication 

Computer Science 

Economics 

English 

French 

German 

History 

Mathematics 

Music 

Nursing 

Philosophy 

Physics 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Political Science 

Psychology 

Religion 

Sociology/Anthropology 

Spanish 

Theatre 

Established Interdisciplinary Majors — 

The following established interdisciplinary 
majors include course work in two or more 
departments: 

Accounting/Mathematical Sciences 

Actuarial Mathematics 

American Studies 

Criminal Justice 

International Studies 

Literature 

Near East Culture and Archaeology 

Individual Interdisciplinary Majors — 

Students may design majors which are unique 
to their needs and objectives and which 
combine course work in more than one depart- 
ment. These majors are developed in consul- 
tation with students' faculty advisors and with 
a panel of faculty members from each of the 
sponsoring departments. The applications are 
acted upon by the Curriculum Development 
Committee. The major normally consists of 
10 courses beyond those taken to satisfy the 
distribution requirements. Students are expect- 
ed to complete at least six courses at the junior 
or senior level. Examples of individual inter- 
disciplinary majors are: Racial and Cultural 
Minorities, Illustration in the Print Medium, 
Environmental Law, Advertising, Art/Business, 
Human Behavior, and Images of Man. 

Major in Sculpture Leading to 
Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree — Through a 
cooperative program with the Johnson Atelier 
Technical Institute of Sculpture in Mercerville, 
New Jersey, students may earn a B.F.A. degree 
in sculpture. The major consists of a core 
academic program, a course of study in art, 
elective courses, and an apprenticeship at the 
Johnson Atelier. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL 

PROGRAMS (also see "Pre-Profes- 
sional Advising" in The Advising Program 
section) 

Preparation for Educational Professions — 

Lycoming College believes that the liberal arts 
provide the best preparation for future teachers. 
Thus, all education students complete a liberal 
arts major in addition to the Lycoming College 
Teacher Education Certificate requirements. 
Students can be certified in elementary education 
or one or more of the following secondary areas: 
art (K-12), biology, chemistry, English, French, 
general science (with biology or astronomy/ 
physics tracks), German, mathematics, music 
(K-12), physics, social studies, and Spanish. 
All teacher education programs are approved by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 
Pennsylvania certificates are recognized in most 
other states either through reciprocal agree- 
ments or by transcript evaluation. See the 
Education Department listing on page 96. 

Preparation for Health Professions — The 

program of pre-professional education for the 
health professions (allopathic, dental, osteo- 
pathic, podiatric and veterinary medicine; 
optometry, and pharmacy) is organized around 
a sound foundation in biology, chemistry, math- 
ematics, and physics and a wide range of subject 
matter from the humanities, social sciences, 
and fine arts. At least three years of under- 
graduate study is recommended before entry 
into a professional school; the normal proced- 
ure is to complete the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

Students interested in one of the health 
professions or in an allied health career should 
make their intentions known to the Admissions 
Office when applying and to the Health 
Professions Advisory Committee (HP AC) 
during their first semester (see page 52). 

Preparation for Legal Professions — 

Lycoming offers a strong preparation for 
students interested in law as a profession. 
Admission to law school is not predicated 



upon a particular major or area of study; rather, 
a student is encouraged to design a course of 
study (traditional or interdisciplinary major) 
which is of personal interest and significance. 
While no specific major is recommended, there 
are certain skills of particular relevance to the 
pre-law student: clear writing, analytical 
thinking, and reading comprehension. These 
skills should be developed during the under- 
graduate years. 

Pre-law students should register with the 
Legal Professions Advisory Committee (LPAC) 
during their first semester (see page 52). 

Preparation for Theological Professions — 

Students preparing to attend a theological 
seminary should examine the suggestions set 
down by the Association of Theological 
Schools. It is recommended that students pursue a 
broad program in the liberal arts with a major in 
one of the humanities (English, history, lan- 
guages, literature, philosophy, religion) or one 
of the social sciences (American studies, 
criminal justice, economics, international 
studies, political science, psychology, sociology- 
anthropology). Students preparing for a career 
in religious education should major in religion 
and elect five or six courses in psychology, 
education and sociology. This program of study 
will qualify students to work as educational 
assistants or directors of religious education 
after graduate study in a theological seminary. 

Students should register with the Theological 
Professions Advisory Committee (TPAC) 
during their first semester. TPAC acts as a 
"center" for students, faculty, and clergy to 
discuss the needs of students who want to 
prepare themselves for the ministry, religious 
education, advanced training in religion, or 
related vocations (see page 52). 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS 

Lycoming has developed several cooperative 
programs to provide students with opportunities 
to extend their knowledge, abilities, and talents 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



in selected areas through access to the 
specialized academic programs and facilities 
of other colleges, universities, academies and 
hospitals. Although thorough advising and 
curricular planning are provided for each of 
the cooperative programs, admission to 
Lycoming and registration in the program of 
choice do not guarantee admission to the 
cooperating institution. The prerogative of 
admitting students to the cooperative aspect of 
the program rests with the cooperating 
institution. Students who are interested in a 
cooperative program should contact the 
coordinator during the first week of the first 
semester of their enrollment at Lycoming. 
This is necessary to plan their course pro- 
grams in a manner that will ensure completion 
of required courses according to the schedule 
stipulated for the program. All cooperative 
programs require special coordination of 
course scheduling at Lycoming. 

Engineering — Combining the advantages of 
a liberal arts education and the technical train- 
ing of an engineering curriculum, this program 
is offered in conjunction with The Pennsylva- 
nia State University and Washington Univer- 
sity at St. Louis. Students complete three years 
of study at Lycoming and two years at the 
cooperating university. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the first year of engineering 
studies, Lycoming awards a Bachelor of Arts 
degree. When students successfully complete 
the second year of engineering studies, the 
cooperating university awards a Bachelor of 
Science degree in engineering. 

At Lycoming, students complete the dis- 
tribution program and courses in physics, 
mathematics, and chemistry. The Pennsylva- 
nia State University offers aerospace, agricul- 
tural, ceramic, chemical, civil, computer, 
electrical, engineering science, industrial, 
mechanical, mining and nuclear engineering. 
Similar offerings are available at Washington 
University at St. Louis. 



Forestry or Environmental Studies — 

Lycoming College offers a cooperative 
program with Duke University in environ- 
mental management and forestry. Qualified 
students can earn the baccalaureate and master 
degrees in five years, spending three years at 
Lycoming and two years at Duke. All 
Lycoming distribution and major require- 
ments must be completed by the end of the 
junior year. At the end of the first year at 
Duke, a baccalaureate degree will be awarded 
by Lycoming. Duke will award the profes- 
sional degree of Master of Forestry or Master 
of Environmental Management to qualified 
candidates at the end of the second year. 

The major program emphases at Duke are 
Forest Resource Management, Resource Eco- 
nomics and Policy, and Resource Ecology. 

The program is flexible enough, however, 
to accommodate a variety of individual designs. 
An undergraduate major in one of the natural 
sciences, social sciences, or bus-iness may 
provide good preparation for the programs at 
Duke, but a student with any undergraduate 
concentration will be considered for admission. 
All students need at least two courses each in 
biology, mathematics, and economics. 

Students begin the program at Duke in July 
after their junior year at Lycoming with a one- 
month session of field work in natural resource 
management. They must complete a total of 
48 units which generally takes four semesters. 

Some students prefer to complete the 
baccalaureate degree before undertaking 
graduate study at Duke. The master degree 
requirements for these students are the same 
as for those students entering after the junior 
year, but the 48-unit requirement may be 
reduced for completed relevant undergraduate 
work of satisfactory quality. All credit 
reductions are determined individually and 
consider the students' educational background 
and objectives. 

Medical Technology - Students desiring a 
career in medical technology may either 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



complete a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science program followed by a clinical 
internship at any American Medical Associa- 
tion-accredited hospital, or they may complete 
the cooperative program. Students electing 
the cooperative program normally study for 
three years at Lycoming, during which time 
they complete 24 unit courses, including the 
College distribution requirements, a major, 
and requirements of the National Accrediting 
Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences 
(NAACLS). The current requirements of the 
NAACLS are: four courses in chemistry (one 
of which must be either organic or biochemis- 
try); four courses in biology (including 
courses in microbiology and immunology), 
and one course in mathematics. 

Students in the cooperative program usually 
major in biology, following a modified major 
of six unit courses that exempts them from 
Ecology (BIO 224) and Plant Sciences (BIO 
225). Students must take either Microbiology 
(BIO 221) or Microbiology for the Health 
Sciences (BIO 226), and either Animal 
Physiology (BIO 223) or Cell Physiology (BIO 
335). The cooperative program requires 
successful completion of a one-year internship 
at an American Medical Association-accred- 
ited hospital. Lycoming is affiliated with the 
following accredited hospitals: Divine 
Providence, Rolling Hill, Robert Packer, 
Lancaster, and Abington. Students in the 
cooperative program receive credit at 
Lycoming for each of eight courses in biology 
and chemistry successfully completed during 
the clinical internship. Successful completion 
of the Registry Examination is not considered a 
graduation requirement at Lycoming College. 
Students entering a clinical internship for 
one year after graduation from Lycoming 
must complete all of the requirements of the 
cooperative program, but are not eligible for 
the biology major exemptions indicated 
above. Upon graduation, such students may 
apply for admission to a clinical program at 
any hospital. 



Optometry — Through the Accelerated 
Optometry Education Curriculum Program, 
students interested in a career in optometry may 
qualify for admission to the Pennsylvania 
College of Optometry after only three years at 
Lycoming College. 

After four years at the Pennsylvania College 
of Optometry, a student will earn a Doctor of 
Optometry degree. Selection of candidates for 
the professional segment of the program is 
completed by the admissions committee of the 
Pennsylvania College of Optometry during the 
student's third year at Lycoming. (This is one 
of two routes that students may choose. Any 
student, of course, may follow the regular 
application procedures for admission to the 
Pennsylvania College of Optometry or another 
college of optometry to matriculate following 
completion of his or her baccalaureate program.) 
During the three years at Lycoming College, 
the student will complete 24 unit courses, 
including all distribution requirements, and will 
prepare for his or her professional training by 
obtaining a solid foundation in biology, chemis- 
try, physics, and mathematics. During the first 
year of study at the Pennsylvania College of 
Optometry, the student will take 39 semester 
hours of basic science courses in addition to 
introductions to optometry and health care. Suc- 
cessful completion of the first year of profes- 
sional training will complete the course require- 
ments for the B.A. degree at Lycoming College. 

Most students will find it convenient to 
major in biology in order to satisfy the require- 
ments of Lycoming College and the 
Pennsylvania College of Optometry. Such 
students are allowed to complete a modified 
biology major which will exempt them from 
two biology courses: Ecology (BIO 224) and 
Plant Sciences (BIO 225). (This modified 
major requires the successful completion of the 
initial year at the Pennsylvania College of 
Optometry.) Students desiring other majors 
must coordinate their plans with the Health 
Professions Advisory Committee in order to 
ensure that they have satisfied all requirements. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



o 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Podiatry — Students interested in podiatry 
may either seek admission to a college of 
podiatric medicine upon completion of the 
Bachelor of Arts degree or through the Accel- 
erated Podiatric Medical Education-Curricu- 
lum Program (APMEC). The latter program 
provides an opportunity for students to 
qualify for admission to the Pennsylvania 
College of Podiatric Medicine (PCPM) or the 
Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine (OCPM) 
after three years of study at Lycoming. At 
Lycoming, students in the APMEC program 
must successfully complete 24 unit courses, 
including the distribution requirements and a 
basic foundation in biology, chemistry, 
physics, and mathematics. During the first 
year of study at PCPM or OCPM, students 
must successfully complete a program of basic 
science courses and an introduction to podia- 
try. Successful completion of the first year of 
professional training will contribute toward the 
fulfillment of the course requirements for a 
Bachelor of Arts degree at Lycoming. 

Students in the cooperative program who 
major in biology will be allowed to complete 
a modified major which will exempt them 
from two biology courses: Ecology (BIO 
224) and Plant Sciences (BIO 225) (This 
modified major requires the successful com- 
pletion of the initial year at PCPM or OCPM.) 

Students interested in a career in podiatric 
medicine should indicate their intentions to 
the Health Professions Advisory Committee. 

Sculpture — The Art Department with the 
Johnson Atelier Technical Institute of 
Sculpture in Mercerville, New Jersey, offers a 
B.F.A. degree in sculpture. The Atelier uses a 
classical apprenticeship approach as its 
teaching method. This ancient method of 
teaching is combined at Johnson with the 
most modem and technically advanced 
foundry and fabricating techniques. 

The Art Department offers a synthesis 
program that interrelates the student experi- 
ence at both institutions. This is achieved by 



having the student rotate between Lycoming 
and the Atelier so that each form of education 
is a preparation for the other. Lycoming offers 
a core academic program, a course of study in 
the Art Department, and elective course 
opportunities. Lycoming gives eight course 
units of college credit to the student for having 
successfully completed one of the apprentice- 
ship programs at the Johnson Atelier. 

All work completed by the student at 
Lycoming by the end of the sophomore 
year will be applicable to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree with a major in art should the student 
decide to withdraw from the B.F.A. program. 
If the student should withdraw from the 
cooperative program prior to completing the 
apprenticeship at the Johnson Atelier, 
Lycoming will give up to four units of credits 
or one semester's work for the internship. If, 
however, the student completes more work at 
the Atelier than the four units, that extra work 
will not be credited to a Bachelor of Arts 
degree; it will only be counted toward a 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, and then only if 
the course at the Atelier is completed. 

This course of study is very rigorous. It 
requires the student to study almost continu- 
ously, either at Lycoming or at the Johnson 
Atelier, during the four years it takes to 
complete the degree. (See Art Department 
listing for specific program.) 

U.S. Army Reserve Officers Training 
Corps Program (R.O.T.C.) — The program 
provides an opportunity for Lycoming 
students to enroll in R.O.T.C. Lycoming 
notes enrollment in and successful completion 
of the program on student transcripts. Mili- 
tary Science is a four-year program divided 
into a basic course given during the freshman 
and sophomore years and an advanced course 
given during the junior and senior years. 
Students who have not completed the basic 
course may qualify for the advanced course by 
completing summer camp between the 
sophomore and junior years. Students 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



enrolled in the advanced course receive an 
annual stipend of $ 1 ,000. One course each in 
written communication, human behavior, and 
military history will fulfill the professional 
military education requirements. R.O.T.C. 
scholarship cadets must also complete one 
semester of a foreign language. 

Students successfully completing the 
advanced course and advanced summer camp 
between the junior and senior years will qualify 
for a commission as a Second Lieutenant in 
the United States Army upon graduation, and 
will incur a service obligation in the active 
Army or Army Reserves. The only expense 
to the student for this program is the $75 uni- 
form deposit, which is refundable, less costs. 

The Minor 

The College awards two kinds of minors, 
departmental and interdisciplinary, in recog- 
nition of concentrated course work in an area 
other than the student's major. All minors 
are subject to the following limitations: 

• A minor must include at least two courses 
which are not counted in the student's major. 

• A student may receive at most two minors. 

• Students with two majors may receive only 
one minor; students with three majors may 
not receive a minor. 

• Students may not receive a minor in their 
major discipline unless their major disci- 
pline is Art and the minor is Art History. (A 
discipline is any course of study in which a 
student can major. Tracks within majors are 
not separate disciplines.) 

• A student may not receive a minor unless 
his/her average in the courses which count 
for his/her minor is a minimum of 2.00. 

• Courses taken P/F may not be counted 
toward a minor. 

Students must declare their intention to 
minor by signing a form available in the 
Registrar's Office, obtaining required faculty 
signatures, and returning the completed form 
to the Office of the Registrar. 



When students complete a minor, the title 
will be indicated on their official transcript. 
Students must meet the requirements for the 
minor which are in effect at the time they 
declare a minor or which are in effect subse- 
quent to that time before they graduate. 

Departmental Minors — Requirements for a 
departmental minor vary from department to 
department. Students interested in pursuing a 
departmental minor should consult that 
department for its policy regarding minors. 

Departmental minors are available in the 
following areas: 

ACCOUNTING 

Financial Accounting 

Managerial Accounting 

Federal Income Tax 
ART 

Art History 

Commercial Design 

Painting 

Photography 

Sculpture 
ASTRONOMY 
BIOLOGY 

Biology 

Environmental Science 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Marketing 

Finance 

General Management 
CHEMISTRY 
COMMUNICATION 
ECONOMICS 
ENGLISH 

Literature 

Writing 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES 

French 

German 

Spanish 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



HISTORY 

American History 

European History 

History 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Computer Science 

Mathematics 
PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 

Philosophy and Law 

Philosophy and Science 

The History of Philosophy 
PHYSICS 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 

World Politics 

Legal Studies 
PSYCHOLOGY 
RELIGION 

SOCIOLOGY/ANTHROPOLOGY 
THEATRE 

Theatre History & Literature 

Performance 

Technical Theatre 

Interdisciplinary Minors — Interdisciplinary 
minors include course work in two or more 
departments. Students interested in interdisci- 
plinary minors should consult the faculty 
coordinator of that minor. Interdisciplinary 
minors are available in the following areas: 
BIBLICAL LANGUAGES, CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE, MASS COMMUNICATION, and 
WOMEN'S STUDIES. 

THE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Scholar Program 

The Lycoming College Scholar Program is a 
special program designed to meet the needs and 
aspirations of highly motivated students of 
superior intellectual ability. The Lycoming 
Scholar satisfies the College's distribution 
requirements, generally on a more exacting 
level and with more challenging courses than 
the average student. Lycoming Scholars also 
participate in special interdisciplinary seminars 



and in serious independent study culminating in 
a senior project. Scholars may audit a fifth 
course each semester at no additional cost. In 
addition. Scholars may be exempted from the 
usual limitations on independent studies by the 
Individual Studies Committee. 

Students are admitted to the program by 
invitation of the Scholar Council, the group 
which oversees the program. The council 
consists of a director and four other faculty 
selected by the Dean of the College, and four 
students elected by current scholars. The 
guidelines governing selection of new 
scholars are flexible; academic excellence, 
intellectual curiosity, and creativity are all taken 
into account. Students who desire to participate 
in the Scholar Program but are not invited may 
petition the Scholar Council for consideration. 
Petitioning students should provide the Scholar 
Council with letters of recommendation from 
Lycoming faculty and a transcript to be sent to 
the director of the Scholar Program. 

To remain in the program, students must main- 
tain a cumulative average of 3.00 or better. Stu- 
dents who drop below this average will be placed 
on Scholar probation for one semester. After one 
semester, they will be asked to leave the program 
if their GPA has not returned to 3.00 or higher. 
To graduate as a Scholar, a student must have at 
least a 3.00 cumulative average. Scholars must 
successfully complete five Lycoming Scholars 
Seminars, as well as the non-credit Senior Scholar 
Seminar in which they present the results of their 
independent studies. In addition, the following 
distribution requirements must be met. 

Scholar Distribution Requirements for 
Students in B.A., B.F.A., and B.S. Programs 

A. English - Scholars must complete ENGL 
106 or ENGL 107. The Scholar Council 
strongly recommends that qualified scholars 
enroll in ENGL 107 if scheduling permits. 
ENGL 106 or 107 must be taken during the 
freshman year. 

B. Fine Arts - Scholars are required to pass two 
courses (or the equivalent) from the following: 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Art: ART 111, 115, 220 or higher; Music: 
MUS 117, 135 or higher; Theatre: THEA 
1 12 or higher, excluding THEA 148; Creative 
Writing: ENGL 240, 322, 342, 41 1, 412, 441 
or 442; Literature: Any English Literature 
course except ENGL 215 and the literature 
courses of the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Literatures (French, 
German, or Spanish). 

C. Foreign Language - Scholars are required 
to pass a course in French, German, Greek, 
Hebrew, or Spanish numbered 1 1 1 or higher. 
Placement at the appropriate course level will 
be determined by the faculty of the Department 
of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Scholars 
who have completed two or more years of a 
given language in high school are not admit- 
ted for credit to the elementary course in the 
same foreign language except by written 
permission of the chairman of the department. 

D. Humanities - Scholars are required to pass 
four courses from three of the following 
disciplines: History: any course numbered 
200 or higher; Literature: any English 
literature course (except ENGL 215) and the 
literature courses of the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures (French, 
German, or Spanish); Philosophy: any course 
numbered 220 or higher; Religion: any course 
numbered 222 or higher. 

E. Mathematics - Scholars must earn at least 
a grade of B (3.00) in one of MATH 103, 106, 
109, 1 12, or CPTR 108; or successfully 
complete one of MATH 116, 128, 129, 130, 
or 214. 

F. Natural Sciences - Scholars are required to 
pass two courses from the following: As- 
tronomy/Physics: any course numbered 1 1 1 
or higher; Biology: any course numbered 1 10 
or higher; Chemistry: any course numbered 
110 or higher. 

G. Social Sciences - Scholars are required to 
pass two courses from the following: Eco- 
nomics: any course numbered 1 10 or higher; 



Political Science: any course numbered 106 
or higher; Psychology: any course numbered 
1 10, 224 or higher (excluding PSY 338); 
Sociology/Anthropology: any course num- 
bered 1 10, 220, 224, 226, 227, 229, 300 or 
higher. 

H. Cultural Diversity - Scholars are required 
to pass one designated course which intro- 
duces students to Cultural Diversity which is 
distinct from the dominant western culture. 
Approaches to study may be artistic, histori- 
cal, sociological, anthropological, interna- 
tional, psychological, or issues oriented. The 
course selected to fulfill this requirement may 
also be used to satisfy one of the other general 
education requirements in the liberal arts. 

Scholar Distribution Requirements for 
Students in B.S.N. Program 

A. English - Same as for the B.A., B.F.A. and 
B.S. degrees. 

B. Fine Arts - Same as for the B.A., B.F.A. 
and B.S. degrees. 

C. Foreign Language - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A. and B.S. degrees. 

D. Humanities - Scholars are required to pass 
four courses from three of the following 
disciplines: History: any course numbered 
200 or higher; Literature: any English 
literature course (except ENGL 215) and the 
literature courses of the Department of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures (French, 
German, or Spanish); Philosophy: any course 
numbered 219 or higher; Religion: any course 
numbered 1 20 or higher. 

E. Mathematics - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A. and B.S. degrees. 

F. Natural Sciences - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A. and B.S. degrees. 

G. Social Sciences - Scholars are required to 
pass PSY 1 10 and one course from the 
following: Economics: any course numbered 
110 or higher; Political Science: any course 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



numbered 106 or higher; Psychology: any 
course numbered 1 12 or higher (excluding 
PSY 338); Sociology/ Anthropology: any 
course numbered 1 10 or higher. 

H. Cultural Diversity - Same as for the B.A., 
B.F.A. and B.S. degrees. 

I. Writing Across the Curriculum. This 
requirement is the same as that stipulated by 
the College for all students. 

J. Physical Activities, Wellness and Commu- 
nity Service - This requirement is the same as 
that stipulated by the College for all students. 

K. Lycoming Scholar Seminars — Team- 
taught interdisciplinary seminars are held 
every semester under the direction of the 
Lycoming Scholar Council. They meet for one 
hour each week (Tuesdays at noon) and carry 
one hour of credit. Grades are "A/F" and are 
based on students' performance. Lycoming 
Scholars are required to successfully complete 
five seminars and they are permitted to register 
for as many as eight. Topics for each academic 
year will be selected by the Scholar Council 
and announced before spring registration of the 
previous year. Students must be accepted into 
the Scholar Program before they enroll in a 
Scholar Seminar. Scholars are strongly urged to 
register for a least one seminar during the 
freshman year. 

L. Senior Project — In the senior year, 
scholars must successfully complete an 
independent studies or departmental honors 
project which has been approved in advance 
by the Independent Studies Committee and 
the Scholar Council. This project must be 
presented orally as part of the Senior Scholar 
Seminar and be accepted by the Scholar 
Council. 

M. Major — Scholars must complete a 
major and 32 units, exclusive of the Senior 
Scholar Seminar. 



Note to Transfer Students — In the case of 
transfer students and those who seek to enter the 
program after their freshman year and in other 
cases deemed by the Scholar Council to involve 
special or extraordinary circumstances, the 
Council shall make adjustments to the scholar 
distribution requirements provided that in all 
cases such exceptions and adjustments would 
still satisfy the regular College distribution 
requirements. 

Management Scholars 
Program of the Institute for 
Management Studies 

The Management Scholars Program is 
designed for the academically talented student 
who has a major or minor in accounting, 
economics or business administration, and who 
is a member of the Institute for Management 
Studies (a student who is accepted into the 
Management Scholars Program automatically 
becomes a member of the Institute for Manage- 
ment Studies). The student participates in 
special management seminars, has internship 
and/or independent study experiences, and 
gives a formal presentation in the senior year. 

To become a Management Scholar, a 
student must meet the following criteria: 

1 . The student has a major in accounting, 
business administration, or economics and 
has completed three courses in one of these 
departments or the student has a minor in 
accounting, business administration or 
economics and has completed two courses 
in one of these departments. 

2. The student has at least sophomore status. 

3. The student has a GPA of 3.25 or higher. 

4. The student has successfully participated in 
three or more semesters of the Lycoming 
Scholars Program or the student has been 
recommended by the Director of the 
Management Scholars Program. 

Management scholars are required to complete 
two Management Scholar Seminars and to 
complete an appropriate internship, 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



practicum and/or independent study which re- 
sults in a major paper and a public presentation 
of their findings. To graduate as a Management 
Scholar, the student must also complete a major 
or minor in one of the three departments and 
maintain a GPA of 3.25 or higher. 

Students who are currently Lycoming College 
Scholars are welcomed to become Manage- 
ment Scholars and participate in both pro- 
grams. 

Departmental Honors 

Honors projects are normally undertaken 
only in a student's major, and are available 
only to exceptionally well-qualified students 
who have a solid background in the area of 
the project and are capable of considerable 
self-direction. The prerequisites for registra- 
tion in an honors program are as follows: 

• A faculty member from the department(s) 
in which the honors project is to be under- 
taken must agree to be the director and must 
secure departmental approval of the project. 

• The director, in consultation with the 
student, must convene a committee consist- 
ing of two faculty members from the 
department in which the project is to be 
undertaken, one of whom is the director of 
the project, and one faculty member from 
each of two other departments related to the 
subject matter of the study. 

• The Honors Committee must then certify by 
their signatures on the application that the 
project in question is academically legiti- 
mate and worthy of pursuit as an honors 
project, and that the student in question is 
qualified to pursue the project. 

• The project must be approved by the 
Committee on Individual Studies. 

Students successfully complete honors 
projects by satisfying the following conditions 
in accordance with guidelines established by 
the Committee on Individual Studies: 

• The student must produce a substantial 
research paper, critical study, or creative 



project. If the end product is a creative 
project, a critical paper analyzing the 
techniques and principles employed and the 
nature of the achievement represented in the 
project shall be also submitted. 

• The student must successfully explain and 
defend the work in a final oral examination 
given by the honors committee. 

• The Honors Committee must certify that the 
student has successfully defended the project, 
and that the student's achievement is clearly 
superior to that which would ordinarily be 
required to earn a grade of "A" in a regular 
independent studies course. 

• The Committee on Individual Studies must 
certify that the student has satisfied all of 
the conditions mentioned above. 

Except in unusual circumstances, honors 
projects are expected to involve independent 
study in two consecutive unit courses. 
Successful completion of the honors project 
will cause the designation of honors in that 
department to be placed upon the permanent 
record. Acceptable theses are deposited in the 
College library. In the event that the study is 
not completed successfully or is not deemed 
worthy of honors, the student shall be re- 
registered in independent studies and 
given a final grade for the course. 

THE ADVISING PROGRAM 

Academic Advising 

One advantage of a small college is the 
direct, personal contact between a student and 
the College faculty who care about that student's 
personal, academic, and professional aspirations. 
The student can draw upon their years of 
experience to resolve questions about social 
adjustment, workload, study skills, tutoring 
and more. Perhaps the member of the faculty 
with the most impact on a student is the 
academic advisor. 

The freshman advisor, whom the student 
meets at summer orientation, assists with 
course selection by providing accurate informa- 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



tion about requirements and programs and 
with personal adjustment by helping the student 
discover life and career goals. In addition, 
the advisor will refer students to other campus 
resources whenever the need is apparent. 

During the sophomore year, the student 
will choose a major and select an advisor from 
the major department. The new advisor, while 
serving as a resource, can best advise that 
student about course selection and career 
opportunities. 

Advisors at Lycoming endeavor to 
contribute to students' development in yet 
another way. They insist that students assume 
full responsibility for their decisions and 
academic progress. By doing so, they help to 
prepare them for the harder choices and 
responsibilities of the professional world. 

Also, Lycoming provides special advising 
programs for careers in medicine, law and 
religion. Interested students should register 
with the appropriate advisory committee 
immediately after deciding to enter one of 
these professions. 

Pre-Professional Advising 

(also see "Pre-Professional Programs" in 
the Concentration section) 

Preparation for Educational Professions — 

Students interested in obtaining teacher cert- 
ification should consult with a member of the 
Education Department as early as possible. 
See the Education Department listing on 
page 96. 

Preparation for Health Professions — 

Students interested in one of the health 
profession or in an allied health career should 
make their intentions know to the Admissions 
Office when applying and to the Health 
Professions Advisory Committee (HPAC) 
during their first semester. This committee 
advises students concerning preparation for 
and application to health-professions schools. 
All pre-health professions students are invited 
to join the student Pre-Health Professions 



Association. See also descriptions of the 
nursing program and of the cooperative 
programs in podiatric medicine, optometry, 
and medical technology. 

Preparation for Legal Professions — 

Students interested in pre-law should register 
with the Legal Professions Advisory Commit- 
tee (LP AC) during their first semester and 
should join the Pre-Law Society on campus. 
LP AC assists the pre-law student through 
advising, compilation of recommendations, 
and dissemination of information and materi- 
als about law and the legal profession. The 
Pre-Law Society sponsors films, speakers, and 
field trips including visits to law school 
campuses. 

Preparation for Theological Professions — 

Students who plan to investigate the religious 
vocations should register with the Theological 
Professions Advisory Committee (TPAC) 
during their first semester. TPAC acts as a 
"center" for students, faculty, and clergy to 
discuss the needs of students who want to 
prepare themselves for the ministry, religious 
education, advanced training in religion, or 
related vocations. Also, it may help coordi- 
nate internships for students who desire 
practical experience in the parish ministry or 
related areas. 



ACADEMIC 
SUPPORT SERVICES 

Academic Resource Center 
(ARC) 

Daniel Hartsock, Director 

The Academic Resource Center, located on 

the second floor of the Fine Arts Building, 

provides a variety of free services to the 

campus community. 

Writing Center — Working one-on- 
one. Writing Tutors use questioning 
techniques to help others improve 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



individual papers while developing 
confidence and independence as writers. 
Other services include the Paper File, a 
file of graded essays maintained by 
course; the Writing Room, a quiet place 
for writers to work; self-paced, computer 
assisted typing instruction; and the 
Documentation Style Manual for use 
when citing sources on research projects. 
Tutoring Center — The ARC provides 
one-on-one peer tutoring in math, foreign 
languages, and sciences on a walk-in 
basis and peer tutoring by arrangement in 
other subjects. Tutors assist students 
with homework assignments and exam 
review. 

Survival Skills Program — The ARC 
and volunteer faculty conduct a group of 
study skills workshops on time manage- 
ment, note-taking from lectures, reading 
textbooks, successful study techniques 
and WordPerfect. 

100 

SUCCESS SKILLS WORKSHOP 

A seven-week course, the workshop introduces 
students to a variety of topics important to 
student success. Among these are time 
management, learning styles, motivation, 
highlighting text, note-taking, and word- 
processing. Topics will be selected to meet 
students' needs. ARC 100 is highly recom- 
mended for students who, in consultation with 
their academic advisors, choose to improve 
their academic skills. This noncredit course 
will be graded on a pass/fail basis. 

Office of the Assistant 
Dean for Freshmen 

Lycoming College believes a student's 
freshman year needs structure and support. 
This office serves as a focal point for the 
freshman and his or her family. 

Freshman Orientation — The purpose 
of this required program is to acquaint 
new students and their families more 



fully with the College so that they can 
begin their Lycoming experience under 
the most favorable circumstances. 
Students sit for placement tests, confer 
with their academic advisors, preregister 
for fall classes, and become acquainted 
with their classmates. 

Crossing Thresholds — Begins the day 

freshmen arrive with New Student Con- 
vocation. The weekend activities include 
community service, readings, informal 
writing, career, library and financial aid 
workshops along with social events. 

Information and Support — Students 
and their families find the Office of the 
Assistant Dean for Freshmen an acces- 
sible resource to resolving problems, 
developing solutions, coordinating 
services and enabling student success. 
Student and Family newsletters are 
provided during the year. 

SPECIAL ACADEMIC 
OPPORTUNITIES 

May Term — The May term is a four-week 
voluntary session designed to provide students 
with courses listed in the catalog and experi- 
mental and special courses that are not 
normally available during the fall and spring 
semesters and summer term. Some courses 
are offered on campus; others involve travel. 
A number offer interdisciplinary credit. 
Examples of the types of courses offered 
during the May term are: 

STUDY-TRAVEL: Cultural tours of Germany, 
Spain, and France; Archaeological expeditions 
to study tricultural communities in New 
Mexico; Utopian Communities; Revolution- 
ary and Civil War Sites; Colonial America on 
Tour; Art on the East Coast; The New 
Kingdom in Ancient Egypt. 

ON-CAMPUS: Field Geology, Field Ornithol- 
ogy, Energy Economics, Writer's Seminar, 
Psychology of Group Processes, Collective 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Bargaining, Aquatic Biology, Medical Genet- 
ics, Energy Alternatives, White Collar Crime, 
Lasers and their Applications, Selected Short 
Story Writers and their Works, Popular Forms 
of Contemporary Fiction, Administrative and 
Organizational Behavior of PoUce, Plant and 
Greenhouse Management and Street Law. 
In addition to the courses themselves, 
attractions include less formal classes and 
reduced tuition rates. 

Summer Sessions I and II — These two 
successive 6-week academic terms offer the 
opportunity for students to complete two- 
semester sequences of courses as well as 
additional opportunities to complete intern- 
ships, independent studies and semester 
courses. 

Independent Studies — Independent studies 
are available to any qualified student who 
wishes to engage in and receive academic 
credit for any academically legitimate course 
of study for which he or she could not other- 
wise receive credit. It may be pursued at any 
level (introductory, intermediate, or advanced) 
and in any department, whether or not the 
student is a major in that department. Studies 
projects which duplicate catalog courses are 
subject to the same provisions which apply to 
all studies projects. In order for a student to 
be registered in an independent study course, 
the following conditions must be satisfied: 

1 ) An appropriate member of the faculty must 
agree to supervise the project and must 
certify by signing the application form that 
the project involves an amount of legiti- 
mate academic work appropriate for the 
amount of academic credit requested and 
that the student in question is qualified to 
pursue the project. 

2) The studies project must be approved by 
the chair of the department in which the 
studies project is to be undertaken. In the 
case of catalog courses, all department 
members must approve offering the catalog 
course as an independent studies course. 



3) After the project is approved by the 
instructor and the chair of the appropriate 
department, the studies project must be 
approved by the Committee on Individual 
Studies. 



Participation in independent studies 
projects, with the exception of those which 
duplicate catalog courses, is subject to the 
following: 

• Students may not engage in more than one 
independent studies project during any 
given semester. 

• Students may not engage in more than two 
independent studies projects during their 
academic careers at Lycoming College. 

• The Individual Studies Committee may 
exempt members of the Lycoming College 
Scholar Program from these two limitations. 

As with other academic policies, any other 
exceptions to these two rules must be ap- 
proved by the Committee on Academic 
Standards. 

Internship Program — An internship is a 
course jointly sponsored by the College and a 
public or private agency or subdivision of the 
College in which a student is able to earn 
college credit by participating in some active 
capacity as an assistant, aide, or apprentice. 
At least one-half of the effort expended by the 
intern should consist of academic work related 
to agency situations. The objectives of the 
internship program are: 

1 ) to further the development of a central 
core of values, awarenesses, strategies, 
skills, and information through experiences 
outside the classroom or other campus 
situations, and 

2) to facilitate the integration of theory and 
practice by encouraging students to relate 
their on-campus academic experiences 
more directly to society in general and to 
possible career and other post-baccalaure- 
ate objectives in particular. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



Any junior or senior student in good acad- 
emic standing may petition the Committee on 
Individual Studies for approval to serve as an 
intern. A maximum of 16 credits can be earned 
through the Internship Program. GuideUnes for 
program development, assignment of tasks and 
academic requirements, such as exams, papers, 
reports, grades, etc., are established in consulta- 
tion with a faculty director at Lycoming and an 
agency supervisor at the place of internship. 

Students with diverse majors have partici- 
pated in a wide variety of internships, 
including ones with NBC Television in New 
York City, the Allenwood Federal Prison 
Camp, Pennsylvania State Department of 
Environmental Resources, Lycoming County 
Historical Society, the American Cancer 
Society, business and accounting firms, law 
offices, hospitals, social service agencies, 
banks and Congressional offices. 

Teacher Intern Program — The purpose of 
the Teacher Intern Program is to provide 
individuals who have completed a baccalaure- 
ate degree with the opportunity to become 
certified teachers through on-the-job training. 
Interns can earn a Lycoming College Teacher 
Education Certificate and be certified by the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in elementary 
education or one or more of the following 
secondary areas: art, biology, chemistry, English, 
French, general science (with biology or astro- 
nomy/physics tracks), German, math-ematics, 
music, physics, social studies, and Spanish. 

Interested individuals should file a formal 
application with the Education Department for 
admission to the Intern Program. Upon 
completion of the application process, interns 
receive a letter of Intern Candidacy from the 
Pennsylvania Department of Education which 
the candidate then uses to apply for a teaching 
position. Necessary professional coursework 
can be completed prior to the teaching experi- 
ence when individuals obtain teaching posi- 
tions. (See Education Department on page 92 
for course listing.) 



The Philadelphia Urban Semester — A full 
semester liberal arts program for professional 
development and field study is now available 
to Lycoming students. The program is open 
to juniors majoring in any discipUne or 
program. The Philadelphia Urban Semester is 
sponsored and administered by the Great 
Lakes Colleges Association. 

Washington Semester — With the consent of 
the Department of Political Science, selected 
students are permitted to study in Washington, 
D.C., at The American University for one 
semester. They may choose from seven 
different programs: Washington Semester, 
Urban Semester, Foreign Policy Semester, 
International Development Semester, Economic 
Policy Semester, Science and Technology 
Semester, or American Studies Semester. 

United Nations Semester — With the 
consent of either the Department of History or 
Political Science, selected students may 
enroll at Drew University in Madison, New 
Jersey, in the United Nations Semester, which 
is designed to provide a first-hand acquain- 
tance with the world organization. Students 
with special interests in world history, 
international relations, law, and politics are 
eligible to participate. 

London Semesters — The London Semester 
programs of Drew University and The 
American University emphasize European 
history, poUtics, and culture. Interested students 
may participate with the consent of either the 
Departments of History or Political Science. 

England Exchange Programs — In special 
cooperative programs between Lycoming 
College and Westminster College, Oxford; 
Anglia Polytechnic University, Cambridge; 
and Regent's College, London; students can 
participate in a semester abroad and receive 
Lycoming College credit. Interested students 
should contact the Dean for specific ehgibility. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



CURRICULUM 



Capitol Semester Internship Program — 

This program is available to eligible students 
on a competitive basis. The program is co- 
sponsored by Pennsylvania's Office of 
Administration and Department of Education. 
Paid internships are available to students in 
most majors. Interested students should 
contact the Career Development Center for 
additional information. 

Study Abroad — Students have the opportu- 
nity to study abroad under the auspices of 
approved universities and agencies. While 
study abroad is particularly attractive to 
students majoring in foreign languages and 
literatures, this opportunity is open to all 
students with a grade point average of at least 
2.50, subject to approval of the host institu- 
tion. Mastery of a foreign language is 
desirable but not required in all programs. Dr. 
Ernest Giglio, professor of political science, 
serves as coordinator for the Study Abroad 
Program. Interested students may contact him 
about opportunities available and procedural 
questions. 

Student Teaching Abroad — Lycoming 
College has established a cooperative 
program with Moorhead State University 
enabling teacher education students to do all 
or part of their student teaching in a foreign 
country. 

This program offers exceptional students 
the opportunity to student teach in nearly any 
country in the world. Students are placed in 
independent international schools where 
English is the instructional language. An 
effort is made to assign students to geographi- 
cal areas that will enrich their backgrounds, 
serve their special interests and expand their 
cultural horizons. 

NOTE: Lycoming College cannot assume 
responsibility for the health, safety, or welfare of 
students engaged in or en route to or from any 
off-campus studies or activities which are not 
under its exclusive jurisdiction. 




Curriculum 

Numbers 100-149 Introductory courses and 

Freshman level courses 

Numbers 200-249 Intermediate courses and 

Sophomore level courses 

Numbers 300-349 Intermediate courses and 

Junior level courses 

Numbers 400-449 Advanced courses and 

Senior level courses 

Numbers N50-N59* Non-catalog courses 

offered on a limited basis 

Numbers 160-169 Applied Music, Theatre 

Practicums and other fractional credit courses 

Numbers 470-479 Internships 

Numbers N80-N89* Independent Study 

Numbers 490-49 1 Independent Study for 

Departmental Honors 

*N = course level 1 , 2, 3 or 4 as determined by 

department 

Courses not in sequence are listed 

separately, as: 

Drawing ART 1 1 1 

Color Theory ART 212 

Courses which imply a sequence are indicated 
with a dash between, meaning that the first 
semester must be taken prior to the second, as: 

Intermediate French 

FRN 111-112 



All students have the right of access to all courses. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ACCOUNTING 

• 



ACCOUNTING (accd 

Associate Professor: Kuhns (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professor: Wienecke 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Slocum 

The purpose of the accounting major is 
to help prepare the student for a career within 
the accounting profession. The major has two 
tracks. Track I is designed for students whose 
primary interests he in the financial area of 
public accounting and provides preparation for 
the Certified Public Accountant Examination; 
Track II is designed for students with an 
interest in management accounting and 
provides preparation for the Certified Manage- 
ment Accountant Examination. 

Track I — Financial Accounting requires: 

ACCT 110, 223, 344, 345, 436, 440, 441, 443, 
445; MATH 103; CPTR 108; and one unit to 
be selected from BUS 345, ACCT 224, 226, 
227, 442, 448 or 449. 

Additional courses available for students 
seeking entry into the public accounting 
profession may include ACCT 226, 224, 
442, 447, and 449; ECON 1 10, 1 11, 220, 337; 
and BUS 340, 345. 

Track II — Management Accounting 
requires: ACCT 1 10, 223, 224, 344, 444 and 
449; MATH 103; CPTR 108; and BUS 244, 
338 and 339. All Track II majors are advised 
to enroll in ECON 1 10 and 1 1 1 , and BUS 235 
and 236. Students planning to sit for the 
Certified Management Accountant Examina- 
tion are advised to enroll in ACCT 440, 441, 
442 and 443. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: ACCT 223, 224, 
442. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "W" courses for that semester. 




Minors 

Three minors are offered by the Depart- 
ment of Accounting. The following courses 
are required to complete a minor in 
Financial Accounting: ACCT 1 10, 344, 345, 
443, 447 and any other accounting 
course or independent study. A minor in 
Managerial Accounting requires the comple- 
tion of ACCT 1 10, 223, 224, 344 and 444. To 
obtain a minor in Federal Income Tax, a 
student must complete ACCT 1 10, 344, 345, 
441 and 442. 

110 

ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING THEORY 
An introductory course in recording, classify- 
ing, summarizing, and interpreting the basic 
business transaction. Problems of classifica- 
tion and interpretation of accounts and 
preparation of financial statements are studied. 
Prerequisite: Second-semester freshman or 
consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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ACCOUNTING 



111 

MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING 

An introduction to the various components 
of managerial accounting. Emphasis is placed 
on managerial problem-solving- techniques 
and the analysis of the results. Accounting 
systems, costing procedures, cost-volume 
profit relationships, managerial control 
processes and the use of computers as aids to 
decision-making are studied. Students will 
gain hands-on experience with various 
computer applications of managerial account- 
ing. Prerequisite: ACCT 110. 

223 

COST AND BUDGETARY 

ACCOUNTING THEORY I 

Methods of accounting for material, labor 
and factory overhead expenses consumed in 
manufacturing using job order, process, and 
standard costing techniques. Prerequisite: 
ACCT 110. 

224 

COST AND BUDGETARY 
ACCOUNTING THEORY II 

Application of cost accounting and 
budgetary theory to decision making in the 
area of make or buy, expansion of production 
and sales, break even analysis, decision 
modeling, internal control and information 
systems. Prerequisite: ACCT 223 and MATH 
103. 

226 

GOVERNMENT AND FUND ACCOUNTING 

This course is designed to introduce 
accounting for not-for-profit organizations. 
Municipal accounting and reporting are 
studied. Prerequisite: ACCT 110. 

344 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 
THEORY I 

An in-depth examination of the environ- 
ment within which financial accounting theory 
exists. An examination of the basic postulates 
that underlie financial statements and a 



critique of what financial reporting means. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 223 or consent of 
instructor. 

345 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 
THEORY II 

An examination of the various accounting 
and reporting issues affecting assets. Prereq- 
uisite: ACCT 344. 

436 

INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING 
THEORY III 

An examination of the various accounting 
and reporting issues affecting liabilities, 
stockholder equity, earnings per share, cash 
flows and accounting changes. Prerequisite: 
ACCT 345 

440 

AUDITING THEORY 

A study of the science or art of verifying, 
analyzing, and interpreting accounts and 
reports. The goal of the course is to empha- 
size concepts which will enable students to 
understand the philosophy and environment of 
auditing. Special attention is given to the 
public accounting profession, studying 
auditing standards, professional ethics, the 
legal liability inherent in the attest function, 
the study and evaluation of internal control, 
the nature of evidence, the growing use of 
statistical sampling, the impact of electronic 
data processing, and the basic approach to 
planning an audit. Finally, various audit 
reports expressing independent expert 
opinions on the fairness of financial statem.ents 
are studied. Prerequisite: ACCT 344, MATH 
103, and CPTR 108. 

441 

FEDERAL INCOME TAX 

Analysis of the provisions of the Internal 
Revenue Code relating to income, deductions, 
inventories, and accounting methods. Practical 
problems involving determination of income 



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ACCOUNTING 



and deductions, capital gains and losses, 
computation and payment of taxes through 
withholding at the source and through declara- 
tion are considered. Planning transactions so 
that a minimum amount of tax will result is 
emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 110 or 
consent of instructor. 

442 

FEDERAL INCOME TAX 
ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 

An analysis of the provisions of the 
Internal Revenue Code relating to partner- 
ships, estates, trusts, and corporations. An 
extensive series of problems is considered, 
and effective tax planning is emphasized. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 441. 

443 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I 

Certain areas of advanced accounting 
theory, including business combinations and 
consolidated financial statements. Prerequi- 
site: A CCT 345. One-half unit of credit. 

444 

CONTROLLERSHIP 

Control process in the organization. 
General systems theory, financial control 
systems, centralization-decentralization, 
performance measurement and evaluation, 
forecasts and budgets, and marketing, produc- 
tion and finance models for control purposes. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 224 or consent of 
instructor. 

445 

AUDITING PRACTICE 

An audit project is presented, solved and 
the auditor's report written. This course is 
limited to students who have either completed 
or are enrolled in ACCT 440. One-half unit of 
credit. 

447 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTING II 

An intensive study of partnerships, 
installment and consignment sales, branch 
accounting, bankruptcy and reorganization. 



estates and trusts, government entities, and 
non-profit organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 
443. One-half unit of credit. 

448 

CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS 
FOR C.P.A. CANDIDATES 

Problems from the Accounting Practice 
sections of past C.P.A. examinations, which 
require a thorough knowledge of the core 
courses in their solution, are assigned. The 
course is intended to meet the needs of those 
interested in public accounting and prepara- 
tion for the Certified Public Accountant's 
examination. Prerequisite: ACCT 436. One- 
half unit of credit. 

449 

PRACTICUM IN ACCOUNTING 

An introduction to the real world of 
accounting. Students are placed in Manage- 
rial and Public Accounting positions in order 
to effect a synthesis of the students' academic 
course work and its practical applications. 

Specifics of the course work to be worked 
out in conjunction with department, student 
and sponsor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Interns in accounting typically work off 
campus under the supervision of a public or 
private accountant. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Typical examples of recent studies in 
accounting are: computer program to generate 
financial statements, educational core for 
public accountants, inventory control, and 
church taxation. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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ACCOUNTING-MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES • AMERICAN STUDIES 




ACCOUNTING - 

MATHEMATICAL 

SCIENCES 

Associate Professor: Kuhns (Coordinator) 

The accounting-mathematical sciences 
interdiscipUnary major is designed to offer, 
within a liberal arts framework, courses which 
will aid in constructing mathematical models 
for business decision-making. Students 
obtain the necessary substantial background in 
both mathematical sciences and accounting. 

Required accounting courses are: ACCT 
1 10, 223, 224, 344, 345, 441, 442. In math- 
ematical sciences, required courses are: CPTR 
125, 321 and MATH 112, 128, 129, 338 and 
either 103 or 332. Recommended courses 
include: MATH 130, 238, 333; BUS 223, 
235, 236, 338, 339; CPTR 108, 246; ECON 
110, 111;PSY224, 225;andSOC 110. 



AMERICAN 
STUDIES (AMST) 

Professor: Piper (Coordinator) 

The American Studies major offers a 
comprehensive program in American 
civilization which introduces students to the 
complexities underlying the development of 
America and its contemporary life. Thirteen 
courses are included. 

Four Course Requirements 

The primary integrating units of the major, 
these courses — some team-taught — will encour- 
age students to consider ideas from different 
points of view and help them to correlate 
information and methods from various disci- 
plines: 

1 . AMST 200 — America as a Civilization 

(First semester of major study) 

2. AMST 220 — American Tradition in the 

Arts and Literature 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



AMERICAN STUDIES 




3. HIST 449 or SOC 447 — Research and 
Methodology (junior or senior year) 

4. Internship or Independent Study (junior 
or senior year) 

Concentration Areas 

Six courses in one option and three in the 
other are needed. Six primary concentration- 
option courses in American Arts or American 
Society build around the insights gained in the 
core courses. They focus particular attention 
on areas most germane to academic and 
vocational interests. The three additional 
courses from the other option give further 
breadth to an understanding of America. 
Students also will be encouraged to take 
elective courses relating to other cultures. 

Students should design their American 
Studies major in consultation with the 
program coordinator. 



American Arts Concentration Option 

ART 332 — American Art of the 20th 

Century 
ENGL 222 — American Literature I 
ENGL 223 — American Literature II 
MUS 128 — American Music 
MUS N 80 — Studies in American Music 
THEA N 80 — Studies in American 
Theatre 

American Society Concentration Option 

ECON 224 — Urban Problems 

HIST 442 — U.S. Social and Intellectual 

History to 1877 
HIST 443 — U.S. Social and Intellectual 

History since 1877 
PSCI33 1 — Civil Rights and Liberties 
PSCI 335 — Law and Society 
SOC 334 — Racial and Cultural Minorities 

200 

AMERICA AS A CIVILIZATION 

An analysis of the historical, sociocultural, 
economic, and political perspectives of 
American civilization with special attention to 
the interrelationships between these various 
orientations. May be taken for either one-half 
unit (Section 200A) or full unit (Section B); 
declared majors and prospective majors 
should take the full-unit course, 200B. 
Alternate years. 

220 

AMERICAN TRADITION IN 
THE ARTS AND LITERATURE 

The relationship of the arts and literature to 
the various historical periods of American life. 

470-479 INTERNSHIP 
N80-N89 INDEPENDENT STUDY 
490-491 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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ART 




ART (ART) 



Professors: Bogle, Shipley (Chairperson) 
Associate Professor: Golahny 
Assistant Professor: Estomin 
Adjunct Faculty at Johnson Atelier: Bartons, 
Lash, Pitynski, Ulry 

The Art Department offers two majors in 
the B.A. Degree (Studio Art and Art History) 
and a second degree program, a B.F.A. 
Degree in Sculpture. 

THE B.A. DEGREE - 
STUDIO ART 

To complete a Bachelor of Arts Degree 
with a major in studio art, the students must 
complete the seven-course foundation 
program and the requirements for an area of 
specialization, participate in each semester's 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



colloquium (while a declared major), and 
satisfactorily participate in the senior exhibi- 
tion. Exception to participation in the 
colloquium may be made by the art faculty. 

Foundation Program 

ART 11 1 — Drawing I 

ART 115 — Two-Dimensional Design 

ART 116 — Figure Modeling 

ART 2 1 2 — Color Theory 

ART 222 — Survey of Art: Ancient Medieval 

and Non-Western Art 
ART 223 — Survey of Art: Ancient, 

Medieval, and Non- Western Art 
ART 227 — Introduction to Photography 
ART 148, 248, 348, 448 — Art Colloquium 

Areas of Specialization 

I. Painting 

ART 220 — Painting I 

ART 221— Drawing n 

ART 330 — Painting II 

ART 446 — Studio Research 

and two art history courses numbered 

300 or above. 

II. Printmaking 

ART 221— Drawing II 

ART 228 — Printmaking I 

ART 338 — Printmaking II 

ART 446 — Studio Research 

and two art history courses numbered 

300 or above. 

III. Sculpture 

ART 225 — Sculpture I 

ART 226 — Figure Modeling II 

ART 335 — Sculpture II 

ART 446 — Smdio Research 

and two art history courses numbered 

300 or above. 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ART 



rv. Commercial Design 

ART 221 —Drawing II 

ART 337 — Photography II 

ART 343 — Computer Graphics for 

Print Media 
ART 344 — Computer Graphics for 

Electronic Media 
ART 442 — Special Projects with 

Commercial Design 
ART 470 — Internship 

A student is encouraged to take the 
following courses: Advertising (BUS 332, 
Feature Writing for Special Audiences (Mass 
COMM 323), Principles of Communication 
COMM 1 10 and PS Y 224). 

V. Generalist Art Major 

To be taken by those students who are seeking 
teaching certification in Art. In addition, this 
area of specialization is recommended for those 
students also majoring or minoring in Psychol- 
ogy with a possible future career in art therapy. 
ART 119 — Ceramics I 
ART 220 — Painting I 
ART 225 — Sculpture I 
ART 228 — Printmaking I 
and two art history courses numbered 300 or 
higher. 

Students planning to complete the art 
certification program must also fulfill the 
following requirements for art in the Educa- 
tion Department: 
EDUC 200 — Introduction to the Study of 

Education 
EDUC 332 — Teaching Visual Art in the 

Schools 
PS Y 338 — Educational Psychology 
EDUC 446, 447 and 449 — Professional 

Semester 

VI. Photography/Electronic Art 

ART 337 - Photography II 

ART 342 - Photography III 

ART 343 - Computer Graphics for Print 

Media 
ART 446 - Studio Research 



and two Art History courses numbered 300 or 
above. Students are also encourage to take 
ART 344 - Computer Graphics for Electronic 
Media and to complete an Internship. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: ART 222, 223, 331, 
333 and 334. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

THE B.A. DEGREE - 
ART HISTORY 

To complete a Bachelor of Arts degree 
with a major in art history, a student 
must take courses in art history, studio art, and 
history and/or religion. A student majoring in 
art history is advised to take a foreign lan- 
guage. Art History majors (once declared) are 
required to participate in each semester's art 
colloquium. 

Required of all students: 

ART 222 — Survey of Art: Ancient, 

Medieval, and Non- Western Art 

ART 223 — Survey of Art: From Renaissance 
through the Modem Age 

ART 447 — Art History Research 

ART 148, 248, 348, 448 - Art Colloquium 

Choose four of the following: 

ART 33 1 — 20th Century European Art 
ART 332 — American Art of the 20th Century 
ART 333 — 19th Century European and 

American Art 
ART 334 — Art of the Renaissance 
ART 336 — Art of the Baroque 
ART 339 — Women in Art 

Choose two of the following: 

ART 1 1 1 — Drawing I 

ART 115 — Two-Dimensional Design 

ART 116 — Figure Modeling I 

ART 227 — Introduction to Photography 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ART 



Choose two of the following: 

HIST 210 — Ancient History 
HIST 212 — Medieval Europe and 

its Neighbors 
HIST 418 — History of Renaissance Thought 
REL 113 — Old Testament Faith and History 
REL 114 — New Testament Faith and History 
REL 226 — Biblical Archaeology 

It is further suggested that the student 
choose electives in other departments that may 
complement the study of art history. Among 
these recommended electives are: 
FRN 412 — French Literature of the 

19th Century 
ENGL 336 — Shakespeare 
MUS 117 — Survey of Western Music 
MUS 335 — History of Western Music I 
MUS 336 — History of Western Music II 
THEA 332 — History of Theatre I 
THEA 333 — History of Theatre II 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: 
ART 222, 339. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: ART 222, 223, 331, 
333 and 334. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

Minors 

Five minors are offered by the Art Depart- 
ment. Requirements for each follow: Commer- 
cial Design: ART 111,115,212, 223, 227 and 
343; Painting: ART 111,115, 220, 330 and 
221 or 223; Photography: ART 111,212,223, 
227, 337 and 342; Sculpture: ART 116, 225, 
226, 335, and 1 1 1, 1 19 or 445; Art History: 
ART 222, 223 and two advanced art history 
courses. Art majors who minor in art history 
must take two additional upper level courses 
beyond the two required for the minor intended 
for students who major in other disciplines (i.e., 
ART 222, 223 and four upper level courses). 



THE B.F.A. DEGREE 
IN SCULPTURE 

The student completes a specified course of 
study in the Art Department, the Lycoming 
College distribution requirements, and one of 
the field specialization apprenticeship pro- 
grams at the Johnson Atelier in Mercerville, 
New Jersey. 

The Art Department course of study 
consists of 12 courses in studio and art 
history: Figure Modeling I and II (ART 1 16 
and 226), Sculpture I and II (ART 225 and 
335), Drawing I and II (ART 1 1 1 and 221), 
Introduction to Photography (ART 227), 2-D 
Design (ART 115), Survey of Art (ART 222 
and 223), and two additional courses in Art 
History (ART 331, 333, 334, 336 or 339). 

Twelve additional course units are required 
of the student. The student must meet the 
requirements of the distribution program 
within these courses. 

In order to complete the B.F.A. degree the 
student must participate in the art colloquium 
every semester while taking course work at 
Lycoming (as a declared major) and must 
participate in a senior exhibition. Exception to 
participation in the colloquium may be made 
by the art faculty. 

The student must also complete one of the 
field specialization apprenticeships at the 
Johnson Atelier Technical Institute of Sculpture 
in Mercerville, New Jersey. This requires the 
student to be at the Johnson Atelier for a period 
of between 16 and 23 1/2 months. The student 
receives eight course units of credit at Lycoming 
College for successfully completing the field 
specialization apprenticeship at Johnson 
Atelier. It is expected that the work for the 
apprenticeship component will be completed 
during the summers and the junior year. 

Admission to the B.F.A. degree program is 
on the basis of meeting the admission stan- 
dards of Lycoming College, and passing a 
portfolio review and interview by members of 
the Lycoming College Art Department. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ART 

• 



The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: ART 222, 223, 334. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Ill 

DRAWING I 

Study of the human figure with gesture and 
proportion stressed. Student is made familiar 
with different drawing techniques and media. 
Some drawings from nature. Offered in 
alternate semesters with Drawing II and III. 

115 

TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

The basic fundamentals found in the two- 
dimensional arts: line, shape, form, space, 
color, and composition are taught in relation- 
ship to the other two-dimensional arts. 
Perceptual theories and their relationships to 
what and why we see what we see in art are 
discussed with each problem. 

116 

FIGURE MODELING I 

Understanding the figure will be approached 
through learning the basic structures and pro- 
portions of the figure. The course is conceived 
as a three-dimensional drawing class. At least 
one figure will be cast by each student. 

119 

CERAMICS I 

Emphasis placed on pottery design as it 
relates to function of vessels and the design 
parameters imposed by the characteristics of 
clay. The techniques of ceramics are taught to 
encourage expression rather than to dispense 
merely a technical body of information. 

212 

COLOR THEORY 

A study of the physical and emotional 
aspects of color. Emphasis will be placed on 
the study of color as an aesthetic agent for the 
artist. The color theories of Johannes Itten 



will form the base for this course with some 
study of the theories of Albert Munsell, Faber 
Birren, and Wilhelm Ostwald. 

220 

PAINTING I 

An introduction of painting techniques and 
materials. Coordination of color, value, and 
design within the painting is taught. Some 
painting from the figure. No limitations as to 
painting media, subject matter, or style. 
Prerequisite: ART 115 or consent of instructor. 

Ill 

DRAWING II 

Continued study of the human figure. 
Emphasis is placed on realism and figure- 
ground coordination with the use of value and 
design. Prerequisite: ART HI. 

Ill 

SURVEY OF ART: ANCIENT, 

MEDIEVAL, AND NON- WESTERN ART 

A survey of the major developments in the 
visual arts of the Ancient, Medieval, and Non- 
western fields. Emphasis is on the interrelation 
of form and content, the function and meaning 
of the visual arts within their respective 
cultures, and the importance of visual literacy. 

223 

SURVEY OF ART: FROM THE 
RENAISSANCE THROUGH 
THE MODERN AGE 

A survey of Western architecture, sculp- 
ture, and painting. Emphasis is on the 
interrelation of form and content and on the 
relatedness of the visual arts to their cultural 
environment: 14th-20th centuries. 

225 
SCULPTURE I 

An introduction to the techniques, materi- 
als, and ideas of sculpture. Clay, plaster, wax, 
wood, and other materials will be used. The 
course will be concerned with ideas about 
sculpture as expression, and with giving 
material form to ideas. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ART 

• 



226 

FIGURE MODELING II 

Will exploit the structures and understand- 
ings learned in Figure Modeling I to produce 
larger, more complex figurative works. There 
will be a requirement to cast one of the works 
in plaster. Prerequisite: ART 116 and consent 
of instructor. 

227 

INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY 
Objectives of the course are to develop 
technical skills in the use of photographic 
equipment (cameras, films, darkroom, 
printmaker) and to develop sensitivity in the 
areas of composition, form, light, picture 
quality, etc. Each student must own (or have 
access to) a 35mm camera capable of full- 
manual operation. 

228 
PRINTMAKING I 

Introduction to the techniques of 
silkscreen, intaglio, monotype and lithography 
printing. One edition of at least six prints 
must be completed in each area. Prerequisite: 
ART 111 or 115; or consent of instructor. 

229 
CERAMICS II 

Continuation of Ceramics I. Emphasis on 
use of the wheel and technical aspects such as 
glaze making and kiln firing. Prerequisite: 
ART 119. 

330 

PAINTING II 

Emphasis is placed on individual style and 
technique. Artists and movements in art are 
studied. No limitations as to painting media, 
subject matter, or style. Prerequisite: 
ART 220. 



331 

20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN 
AND AMERICAN ART 

Developments in European and American 
Art from about 1 880 to the present, including 
Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstraction, 
Abstract Expressionism, Photorealism, and 
Post-Modemism. 

333 

19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN 
AND AMERICAN ART 
The art of Western Europe and the United 
States from 1780-1900, with emphasis on 
painting in France. Those artists to be studied 
include David, Goya, Delacroix, Courbet, the 
Impressionists, Turner, Homer, Cole and 
Eakins. 

334 

ART OF THE RENAISSANCE 

The art of Italy and Northern Europe from 
1300 to 1530, with emphasis on the painters 
Giotto, Masaccio, Leonardo da Vinci, 
Raphael, Titian, Van Eyck, and Durer, the 
sculptors Ghiberti, Donatello and Mich- 
elangelo, and the architects Brunelleschi and 
Alberti. 

335 
SCULPTURE II 

A continuation of Sculpture I (Art 225). 
Emphasis is on advanced technical process. 
Casting of bronze and aluminum sculpture 
will be done in the school foundry. Prerequi- 
site: ART 225. 

336 

ART OF THE BAROQUE 

Seventeenth-century painting and sculpture 
in Italy and The Netherlands with emphasis on 
Bernini, Poussin, Rubens, and Rembrandt, with 
special attention given to the expressive, nar- 
rative, and painterly styles present in their ai1. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ART 

• 



337 
PHOTOGRAPHY II 

To extend the skills developed in Photogra- 
phy I (ART 227) by continued growth in 
technical expertise including instruction in 
photo art processes such as collage, multiple 
images, hand-coloring and/or toning. Empha- 
sis is placed on conceptual and aesthetic 
aspects of photography. Prerequisite: ART 227. 

338 

PRINTMAKING II 

Further study of the techniques of 
silkscreen, intaglio, monotype, and lithogra- 
phy printing with emphasis on multi-plate and 
viscosity printing. Two editions of at least six 
prints must be completed in each of two areas. 
Prerequisite: ART 228. 

339 

WOMEN IN ART 

A survey of women artists from a variety 
of viewpoints — aesthetic, historical, social, 
political and economic — which seeks to 
understand and integrate the contributions of 
women artists into the mainstream of the 
history of art. 

342 
PHOTOGRAPHY HI 

Study of techniques and aesthetics of color 
photography using color negatives and/or 
slides, advanced imaging techniques utilizing 
the computer to enhance and manipulate 
students' original photographs, and introduc- 
tion to large format view cameras. Integration 
of tools to students' own artistic process 
emphasized. A portfolio including examples 
of color, image processing and large format 
work will be produced. Prerequisites: ART 
227, 337, and 343. 

343 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR PRINT MEDIA 

Use of computers as an artist's and 
designer's tool. Concentrated, hands-on study 
of image manipulation, illustration and layout 



programs. Content of course includes funda- 
mentals of vector and raster imaging, typography, 
design, layout, color separation, and manipu- 
lating computer images obtained from scan-ners, 
video sources, and the students' own original 
production using computer paint software. 
Prerequisite: ART 22 7 and either ART 11 J or 
115; or consent of instructor. 

344 

COMPUTER GRAPHICS 
FOR ELECTRONIC MEDIA 

Use of the computer as a tool to create, 
manipulate and edit video for artistic and 
commercial purposes. Content of course 
includes computer animation, multi-media 
program production and computer interfaced 
video production. Prerequisite: ART 343 or 
consent of instructor. 

440 

PAINTING ni 

Professional quality is stressed. There is 
some experimentation with new painting 
techniques and styles. 

441 

DRAWING III 

Continued study of the human figure, 
individual style, and professional control of 
drawing techniques and media are emphasized. 
Prerequisite: ART 221 

442 

SPECIAL PROJECT IN 
COMMERCIAL DESIGN 

Concentrated research, preparation and 
execution of a series of projects in commercial 
design utilizing computer graphics, page layout 
programs and paint, draw and image manipula- 
tion software that simulate traditional airbrush, 
water-based mediums, markers, colored pencils 
and ink pens. The following skills are in- 
volved: illustration, photography, design, 
typesetting, lettering, layout, overlays, scanning 
color separation, matching and proofing and 
preparation of files for a service bureau or 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ART • ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 



printer. Prerequisite: ART 343 or consent of 
instructor. 

445 

SCULPTURE m 

In Sculpture III the student is expected to 
produce a series of sculptures that follow a 
conceptual and technical line of development. 
Prerequisite: ART 116, 225, and 335. 

446 

STUDIO RESEARCH 

Independent research in an elective studio 
area, conducted under the supervision of the 
appropriate faculty member, includes creation 
of work which may be incorporated in the 
senior group exhibition. Student works in 
private studio assigned by the department. 

447 

ART HISTORY RESEARCH 

Independent research, conducted under the 
supervision of the appropriate faculty mem- 
ber, includes the research and writing of a 
thesis, to be presented to a committee of Art 
Department faculty. This course may be 
repeated for credit. 

148, 248, 348 and 448 
ART COLLOQUIUM 

A non-credit seminar in which faculty, 
students and invited professionals discuss and 
critique specific art projects. Required of all 
students majoring in art. Taken each semes- 
ter. Meets 2-4 times each semester. Pass/Fail. 
Non-credit seminar. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Recent studies in anatomy. Aspects of the 
art nouveau, lithography, photography, 
pottery, problems in illustration, and water- 
color. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




ASTRONOMY 
AND PHYSICS 

Associate Professors: Erickson, Fisher 
Assistant Professor: Wolfe (Chairperson) 

The department offers two majors. The 
major in astronomy is specifically designed to 
train students in the field of planetarium 
education; it also may serve as a basis for 
earning state certification as a secondary 
school teacher of general science. The major 
in physics can prepare students for graduate 
work in physics, astronomy, and related 
physical sciences, for the cooperative 
program in engineering, for state certification 
as secondary school teachers of physics, or for 
technical positions in industry. 



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ASTRONOMY (astr) 

The major in astronomy requires courses in 
astronomy, physics, chemistry and 
mathematics. The astronomy courses include 
ASTR 1 1 1 and five additional courses 
numbered ASTR 1 1 2 or higher; at least four 
of these five additional courses must be 
numbered ASTR 230 or higher. Other 
required courses are PHYS 225-226, CHEM 
1 10-1 1 1 or 330-331, and MATH 128-129. 
Astronomy majors are also required to register 
for four semesters of ASTR 349 and 449 (non- 
credit colloquia). The following courses are 
recommended: PHIL 223 and 333, PHYS 
333, and ART 227. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: ASTR 230. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in astronomy consists of a grade 
of C or better in both ASTR 1 1 1 and PHYS 
225 plus any three additional courses selected 
from PHYS 226 or ASTR courses numbered 
200 or higher. 

104 

FIELD GEOLOGY 
A methods course introducing the field 
techniques needed to study the geology 
of an area. May or summer term only. 

107 

OBSERVATIONAL ASTRONOMY 

A methods course providing the opportu- 
nity to make a variety of astronomical 
observations, both visually and photographic- 
ally, with and without telescopes. The 
planetarium is used to familiarize the student 
with the sky at various times during the year 
and from different locations on earth. May or 
summer term only. 



101 

PRINCIPLES OF ASTRONOMY 
111 

PRINCIPLES OF ASTRONOMY 

A summary of current concepts of the 
universe from the solar system to distant 
galaxies. Describes the techniques and 
instruments used in astronomical research. 
Presents not only what is reasonably well 
known about the universe, but also considers 
some of the major unsolved problems ASTR 

101 and 111 share the same three hours of 
lecture and two hours of laboratory each 
week. ASTR 111 has one additional hour each 
week for more advanced mathematical 
treatment of the material. Credit may not be 
earned for both 101 and 111. Corequisite for 
111: MATH 127 or consent of instructor. 

102 

PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY 
112 

PRINCIPLES OF GEOLOGY 

A study of the surface processes and 
internal structure of the planet Earth. Shows 
how past events and lifeforms can be recon- 
structed from preserved evidence to reveal the 
geologic history of our planet from its origin 
to the present. Describes the ways geology 
influences our environment. ASTR 102 and 
112 share the same three hours of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory each week. 112 has 
one additional hour each week for more 
advanced mathematical treatment of the 
material. Credit may not be earned for both 

102 and 112. Corequisite for 112: MATH 127 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

114 

MANNED SPACE FLIGHT I 

Traces the beginnings of rocketry and 
spaceflight capability from Sputnik (1957) 
through the conclusion of the Apollo moon 
landings (1972). Extensive use of NASA 
video and other audio-visual aids. Examina- 
tion of scientific, engineering and political 



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motivations. When taken in May term, must 
be scheduled with ASTR 115. Not for distribu- 
tion. Alternate years. One-half unit of credit. 

115 

MANNED SPACE FLIGHT II 

Examines manned spaceflight from Skylab 
missions (1973-74) through Apollo-Soyuz Test 
Project, early Space Shuttle missions, to 
current U.S. and Soviet space efforts. Exten- 
sive use of NASA video. Examination of 
scientific, engineering, and political motiva- 
tions. When taken in May Term, must be 
scheduled with ASTR 1 14. Not for distribution. 
A Itemate years. One-half unit of credit. 

230 

PLANETARIUM TECHNIQUES 

A methods course covering major aspects of 
planetarium programming, operation 
and maintenance. Students are required to 
prepare and present a planetarium show. Upon 
successfully completing the course, students 
are eligible to become planetarium assistants. 
Three hours of lecture and demonstration and 
three hours of practical training per week. 
Prerequisite: a grade ofC or better in ASTR 
101 or 111. Alternate years. 

243 

PLANETARY SCIENCE 

A comparative survey of the various 
classes of natural objects that orbit the sun, 
including the major planets, their satellites, the 
minor planets, and comets. Topics include 
meteorological processes in atmospheres, 
geological processes that shape surface 
features, internal structures, the role of 
spacecraft in the exploration of the solar 
system, and clues to the origin and dynamic 
evolution of the solar system. Four hours of 
lecture per week. Prerequisites: a grade ofC 
or better in ASTR 111 or 112, or PHYS 225. 
Alternate years. 



344 

RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY 

A detailed presentation of the special 
theory of relativity and an introduction to the 
general theory. Topics include: observational 
and experimental tests of relativity, four- 
vectors, tensors, space-time curvature, 
alternative cosmological models, and the 
origin and future of the universe. Four hours 
of lecture per week. Prerequisites: ASTR 111 
and PHYS 225. Alternate years. Cross-listed 
as PHYS 344. 

445 

STELLAR EVOLUTION 

The physical principles governing the 
internal structure and external appearance of 
stars. Mechanisms of energy generation and 
transport within stars. The evolution of stars 
from initial formation to final stages. The 
creation of chemical elements by nucleosyn- 
thesis. Four hours of lecture per week. 
Prerequisites: ASTR 111 and PHYS 226. 
Alternate years. 

446 

STELLAR DYNAMICS AND 

GALACTIC STRUCTURE 

The motion of objects in gravitational 
fields. Introduction to the n-body problem. 
The relation between stellar motions and the 
galactic potential. The large-scale structure of 
galaxies in general and of the Milky Way 
Galaxy in particular. Four hours of lecture 
per week. Prerequisites: ASTR 111 and 
PHYS 225. Alternate years. 

349 & 449 

ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS COLLOQUIA 

This non-credit but required course for 
juniors and seniors majoring in astronomy and 
physics offers students a chance to meet and 
hear active scientists in astronomy, physics, 
and related scientific areas talk about their 
own research or professional activities. In 
addition, majors in astronomy and physics 



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must present two lectures, one given during 
the junior year and one given during the senior 
year, on the results of a literature survey or 
their individual research. Students majoring 
in this department are required to attend four 
semesters during the junior and senior years. 
A letter grade will be given when the student 
gives a lecture. Otherwise the grade will be P/ 
F. Students in the Cooperative Program in 
Liberal Arts and Engineering are required to 
attend two semesters and present one lecture 
during their junior year. Non-credit course. 
One hour per week. Cross-listed as PHYS 
349 & 449. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Independent studies may be undertaken in 
most areas of astronomy. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

PHYSICS (PHYS) 

The major in physics requires courses in 
physics, chemistry and mathematics. The 
required physics courses must include PHYS 
225, 226, 331, 332 and four additional courses 
numbered PHYS 333 or higher. Up to two 
courses chosen from ASTR III, 112, 243, 
445 and 446 may substitute for two of the four 
physics electives. Other required courses are 
CHEM 1 10-1 1 1 or 330-331, and MATH 128- 
129. Physics majors are also required to 
register for four semesters of PHYS 349 and 
449 (non-credit coUoquia). The following 
courses are recommended: MATH 231, 238; 
CPTR 125 (all three required for the coopera- 
tive engineering program and by many 
graduate schools), and PHIL 223, 333. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 



may be offered as such: PHYS 338, 447. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in physics requires completion of 
the following courses with a C grade or better: 
PHYS 225-226, 331, 332, and one additional 
course selected from PHYS courses numbered 
300 or higher. 

106 

ENERGY ALTERNATIVES 

A physicist's definition of work, energy, and 
power. The various energy sources available 
for use, such as fossil fuels, nuclear fission and 
fusion, hydro, solar, wind, and geothermal. The 
advantages and disadvantages of each energy- 
conversion method, including availability, 
efficiency, and environmental effects. Present 
areas of energy research and possible future 
developments. Projections of possible future 
energy demands. Exercises and experiments in 
energy collection, conversion, and utilization. 
May or summer term only. 

108 

GREAT IDEAS OF 

THE PHYSICAL UNIVERSE 

An introduction to several major concepts 
of physics which have developed over the past 
several centuries, relating them to their 
broad implications. The emphasis is on a 
descriptive rather than a mathematical 
discussion of topics which range from early 
Greek concepts of science to present day 
methods and techniques used to describe the 
physical universe. Many distinctions and 
similarities between science and other areas of 
human endeavor will be studied to demon- 
strate the beauty, simplicity, harmony, and 
grandeur of some of the basic laws which 
govern the universe. Three hours of lecture 
and two hours of laboratory per week. 
Alternate years. 



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225-226 

FUNDAMENTALS OF PHYSICS I-II 

A mathematically rigorous introduction to 
physics designed for majors in physics, astro- 
nomy, chemistry and mathematics. Topics 
include mechanics, thermodynamics, electric- 
ity and magnetism, waves, optics, and modem 
physics. Five hours of lecture and recitation 
and one three-hour laboratory per week. Core- 
quisite: MATH 128 or 129. With consent of 
department, MATH 109 may substitute for 
MATH 128 or 129 as a prerequisite. 

331 

CLASSICAL MECHANICS 

An analytical approach to classical mechan- 
ics. Topics include: kinematics and dynamics 
of single particles and systems of particles, 
gravitation and other central forces, moving 
reference frames, and Lagrangian and Hamilto- 
nian formulations of mechanics. Four hours of 
lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: MATH 129 and a grade ofC or 
better in PHYS 225. 

332 
ELECTROMAGNETISM 

A theoretical treatment of classical electro- 
magnetism. Topics include: electrostatics, 
magnetostatics, electric and magnetic poten- 
tials, electric and magnetic properties of matter. 
Maxwell's equations, the electromagnetic 
field, and the propagation of electromagnetic 
radiation. Four hours of lecture and three hours 
of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: MATH 
129 and a grade ofC or better in PHYS 226. 

333 

OPTICS 

Geometrical optics, optical systems, 
physical optics, interference, Fraunhofer 
and Fresnel diffraction, and coherence and 
lasers will be covered. Three hours of lecture 
and three hours of laboratory per week. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 226 and MATH 128; or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



336 

MATHEMATICAL METHODS OF PHYSICS 

Solution of ordinary linear differential 
equations using power series and Laplace 
transforms, nonlinear differential and coupled 
differential equations, Fourier analysis using 
both trigonometric and complex exponential 
functions, complex variables, eigenvalue 
problems, infinite dimensional vector spaces, 
partial differential equations, boundary value 
problem solutions to the wave equation, heat 
flow equation and Laplace's equation. Prereq- 
uisites: MATH 231 and 238. Alternate years. 

337 

THERMODYNAMICS AND 

STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

Classical thermodynamics will be presented, 
showing that the macroscopic properties of a 
system can be specified without a knowledge of 
the microscopic properties of the constituents of 
the system. Then statistical mechanics will be 
developed, showing that these same macro- 
scopic properties are determined by the micro- 
scopic properties. Four hours of lecture and 
recitation per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 226 
and MATH 129. Alternate years. 

338 

MODERN PHYSICS 

Thorough investigation of changes in the 
classical understanding of space and time 
together with those of energy and matter that 
led to the time development of relativistic and 
quantum mechanical theories. Topics include: 
introduction to special relativity, blackbody 
radiation, the postulation of the photon and 
quantization, atomic spectra, interactions of 
matter and energy, Bohr model of the atom, 
concepts of symmetry, and development and 
applications of the Schrodinger equation. 
Four hours of lecture and one-three hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MATH 
129 and a grade ofC or better in PHYS 226. 



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339 

SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

Topics include crystalline structures, 
periodic potentials, band structure, free 
electron model, semiconductor physics, 
electromagnetic and thermal properties of 
solids, superconductivity, and superfluidity. 
Four hours of lecture and three hours of 
laboratory per week. Prerequisites: PHYS 
332 and MATH J 29; or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 

344 

RELATIVITY AND COSMOLOGY 

A detailed presentation of the special theory of 
relativity and an introduction to the general 
theory. Topics include: observational and 
experimental tests of relativity, four vectors, 
tensors, space-time curvature, alternative 
cosmological models, and the origin and future 
of the universe. Four hours of lecture per week. 
Prerequisites: ASTR 111 and PHYS 225. 
Alternate years. Cross-listed as ASTR 344. 

439 

E^JTRODUCTION TO 
QUANTUM MECHANICS 

Basic concepts and formulation of quantum 
theory. The free particle, the simple harmonic 
oscillator, the hydrogen atom, and central force 
problems will be discussed. Both time-indepen- 
dent and time-dependent perturbation theory 
will be covered. Four hours of lecture and 
recitation. Prerequisite: Either PHYS 226 or 
CHEM331, andMATH231. Cross-listed as 
CHEM439. 

447 

NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE PHYSICS 
The course will consider properties of 
nuclei, nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear 
reactions (including fission and fusion), and 
properties of elementary particles. The 
interactions of nuclear particles with matter 
and the detection of nuclear particles will be 
covered. It will be shown how observed 



phenomena lead to theories on the nature of 
fundamental interactions, how these forces act 
at the smallest measurable distances, and what 
is expected to occur at even smaller distances. 
Four hours of lecture and recitation and three 
hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 
PHYS 226, MATH 129, and either PHYS 338 
or CHEM 110. Alternate years. 

349 & 449 

ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS 
COLLOQUIA 

This non-credit but required course for juniors 
and seniors majoring in astronomy and physics 
offers students a chance to meet and hear active 
scientists in astronomy, physics and related 
scientific areas talk about their own research or 
professional activities. In addition, majors in 
astronomy and physics must present two lectures, 
one given during the junior year and one given 
during the senior year, on the results of a literature 
survey or their individual research. Students 
majoring in this department are required to attend 
four semesters during thejunior and senior 
years. A letter grade will be given when the 
student gives a lecture. Otherwise the grade will 
be P/F. Students in the Cooperative Program in 
Liberal Arts and Engineering are required to 
attend two semesters and present one lecture 
during their junior year. Non-credit course. One 
hourperweek. Cross-listed as ASTR 349 & 449. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Interns in physics work off campus under 
the supervision of professional physicists 
employed by local industries or hospitals. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 
Independent studies may be undertaken in 
most areas of physics. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 



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BIOLOGY 



BIOLOGY (BIO) 

Professors: Angstadt, Diehl 

Associate Professors: Gabriel (Chairperson), 

Zaccaria, Zimmerman 
Assistant Professors: Briggs, Newman 

A major consists of eight biology courses, 
including 1 10-11 1, 221, 222, 223, 224, and 225. 
In addition, juniors and seniors majoring in 
biology are required to register for BIO 349/449 
(non-credit colloquium) during all semesters on 
campus. With departmental consent, BIO 226 
may be substituted for BIO 22 1 . Only two 
courses numbered below 200 may count toward 
the major. Departmental internships and the 
practicum cannot be used to fulfill the eighth 
required course. In addition, three units of 
chemistry and two units of math-ematical 
science are required. The chemistry requirement 
must include at least one unit of organic chemis- 
try chosen from CHEM 115, 220, or 22 1 . The 
mathematical sciences courses must be chosen 
fromCPTR 108, 125 and/or MATH 103, 109, 
127, 128 or above. Certain specific exceptions 
to the core program will be made for three-year 
students enrolled in cooperative programs. Such 
exceptions are noted under the particular 
cooperative program described in the Academic 
Program chapter of the catalog. Students 
interested in these programs should contact the 
program director before finalizing their indi- 
vidual programs. Consent of instructor may 
replace BIO 110-111 as a prerequisite for all 
biology courses. 

The following courses have been approved to 
be offered as writing intensive courses and may 
be offered as such: BIO 222, 224. Students must 
check semester class schedules to determine 
which courses are offered as "W" courses for 
that semester. 

Biology majors will be awarded either a 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science 
degree. Majors who complete the 13-course 
requirement above will be awarded the B.A. 
degree. Majors who complete three 
additional courses in the natural sciences at or 




above the 200 level or in the mathematical 
sciences (127 or above) will be eligible to 
elect the B.S. degree. 

Minor 

The Department of Biology offers two 
minors: Biology or Environmental Science. 

A minor in biology requires the completion 
of four courses numbered 200 or higher, with 
their appropriate prerequisites (i.e., two 
introductory biology courses). At least two of 
these must be from the 200 series of courses. A 
minor in Environmental Science consists of two 
introductory biology courses, BIO 224, two 
additional courses in biology numbered 200 or 
higher, one course in economics (recommend 
ECON 225), and ASTR 1 12. 

101-102 

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 

An investigation of biological principles, 
including ecological systems, form and function 
in selected representative organisms (especially 
man), cell theory, molecular biology, reproduc- 
tion, inheritance, adaption, and evolution. The 



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course is designed primarily for students not 
planning to major in the biological sciences. 
Credit may not be earned for both BIO 1 01 and 
110 or for both BIO 1 02 and 11 1. Three hours of 
lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. 

110-111 

INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGY 

An introduction to the study of biology 
designed for students planning to major in the 
biological sciences. Major topics considered 
include the origin of life, cellular respiration 
and photosynthesis, genetics, development, 
anatomy and physiology, ecology, behavior, 
and evolution. Credit may not be earned for 
both BIO 101 and 110 or for both BIO 102 
and 111. Three hours of lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. 

113-114 

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

Using the organ-systems approach, the 
course is an introduction to the human body — 
its anatomy, physiology, and normal develop- 
ment — with particular attention to structure 
and function at all levels of its biological 
organization (molecular through organismal). 
Three hours of lecture, and one three-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
115 or 220, or consent of instructor. 

130 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

This course provides an introduction to eco- 
logical principles and concepts with an exami- 
nation of the biological basis of contemporary 
environmental problems. The effects of human 
population on earth's resources are studied 
against a background of biological and health 
sciences. This course is designed primarily for 
students not planning to major in the biological 
sciences. Three hours of lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Pre-requisite: BIO 
101 or 110. This course is not a substitute for 
BIO 1 11 for majors. 



221 

MICROBIOLOGY 

A study of microorganisms. Emphasis is given 
to the identification and physiology of microor- 
ganisms as well as to their role in disease, their 
economic importance, and industrial applica- 
tions. Three hours of lecture and two two-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: BIO 
110-111. Not open to students who have 
received credit for BIO 226. 

222 
GENETICS 

A general consideration of the principles 
governing inheritance, including treatment of 
classical, molecular, cytological, physiology, 
microbial, human, and population genetics. 
Three hours of lecture and two two-hour 
laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 110-111. 

223 

ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY 

The mechanisms and functions of animal 
systems, including the autonomic, endocrine, 
digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, 
nervous, and reproductive systems. Mammal- 
ian physiology is stressed. Three hours of 
lecture and one three-hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. 

11^ 
ECOLOGY 

The study of the principles of ecology with 
emphasis on the role of chemical, physical, 
and biological factors affecting the distribu- 
tion and succession of plant and animal 
populations and communities. Included will 
be field studies of local habitats as well as 
laboratory experimentation. Three hours of 
lecture and one three-hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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• 



225 

PLANT SCIENCES 

A survey of the structure, development, 
function, classification, and use of plants and 
related organisms. The study will comprise 
four general topic areas: form, including 
morphology and anatomy of plants in growth 
and reproduction; function, concentrating on 
nutrition and metabolism peculiar to photosyn- 
thetic organisms; classification systems and 
plant identification, and human uses of plants. 
Three hours of lecture and one three hour lab- 
oratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. 

226 

MICROBIOLOGY FOR 
THE HEALTH SCIENCES 

A study of microorganisms with emphasis 
given to their taxonomy and their role in various 
aspects of human infectious disease. Mecha- 
nisms for treating and preventing infectious 
diseases will be presented. Laboratory to include 
diagnostic culture procedures, antibiotic 
sensitivity testing, serology, anaerobic tech- 
niques and a study of hemolytic reactions. Three 
hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per 
week. Prerequisite: One year of introductory 
level biology, one year of chemistry or consent of 
instructor. Not open to students who have 
received credit for BIO 22 1 . 

328 

AQUATIC BIOLOGY 

A field-oriented course dealing with freshwa- 
ter ecosystems. Studies will include a survey 
of the plankton, benthos, and fish — as well as 
the physical and chemical characteristics of 
water that influence their distribution. Several 
local field trips and an extended field trip to a 
field station will familiarize students with the 
diversity of habitats and techniques of limnolo- 
gists. Alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO 
110-111. 



329 

TROPICAL MARINE BIOLOGY 

A field-oriented course where students 
study the creatures of the fringing reefs, 
barrier reefs, lagoons, turtlegrass beds and 
mangrove swamps at a tropical marine 
laboratory. Studies will include survey of 
plankton, invertebrates, and fish as well as the 
physical and chemical characteristics that 
influence their distribution. Prerequisite: 
BIO 110-111. Alternate May terms. 

330 

COMPARATIVE ANATOMY 
OF VERTEBRATES 

Detailed examination of the origins, 
structure, and functions of the principal organs 
of the vertebrates. Special attention is given 
to the progressive modification of organs from 
lower to higher vertebrates. Three hours of 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory per week. 
Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

334 

INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

Comparative study of the invertebrate 
phyla with emphasis on phylogeny, physiol- 
ogy, morphology, and ecology. Two three- 
hour lecture/laboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

336 

EVOLUTION 

The study of the origin and modification of 
Ufe on earth. Topics discussed include molecu- 
lar evolution, population genetics, gene flow, 
natural selection, sexual selection, kin selection, 
neutral theory, extinction, co-evolution, and 
the evolution of man. Four hours of lecture 
per week. Prerequisite: BIO 110-111, or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

339 

MEDICAL GENETICS 

This course is concerned with the relation- 
ships of heredity to disease. Discussions will 
focus on topics such as chromosomal abnor- 



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malities, metabolic variation and disease, 
somatic cell genetics, genetic screening, and 
immunogenetics. Laboratory exercises will 
offer practical experiences in genetic diagnos- 
tic techniques. Prerequisite: BIO 101-102 or 
110-111. May term only. 

342 

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR 

A study of causation, function, evolution, 
and biological significance of animal behav- 
iors in their normal environment and social 
contexts. Three hours of lecture and one four- 
hour laboratory each week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

346 

VIROLOGY 

An introduction to the study of viruses. The 
course will cover virus anatomy and reproduc- 
tion, diseases caused by viruses, modem 
treatments of viral infections and viral vaccines 
produced by recombinant DNA and other 
technologies. Course content will also include 
a description of how viruses are used as tools 
for genetic engineering and for studying 
cellular processes like membrane signal 
transduction, regulation of genetic expression 
and oncogenesis (cancer). Four hours of 
lecture per week. Prerequisite: BIO 110-111 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

347 
IMMUNOLOGY 

The course introduces concepts concerning 
how pathogens cause disease and host defense 
mechanisms against infectious diseases. 
Characterization of and relationships between 
antigens, haptens, and antibodies are presented. 
Serological assays will include: agglutination, 
precipitations, immunofluorescence, 
immunoeletrophoresis, and complement 
fixation. Other topics are: immediate and 
delayed hypersensitivities (i.e. allergies such as 
hay fever and poison ivy), immunological renal 



diseases, immunohematology (blood groups, 
etc), hybridome technology, the chemistry and 
function of complement, autoimmunity, and 
organ graft rejection phenomena. Three hours 
of lecture, one three-hour laboratory, and one 
hour of arranged work per week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

400 

BIOLOGY PRACTICUM 

A work-oriented experience for junior or 
senior biology majors jointly sponsored by the 
Department and a public or private agency. 
The practicum is designed to integrate 
classroom theory with field or laboratory 
practice. In addition to attendance at a weekly 
seminar, students will spend 10-12 hours per 
week at the sponsoring agency. Academic 
work will include, but is not limited to: a log, 
readings, recitation and an assigned research 
paper related to the specific agency's activi- 
ties. May be repeated once for credit with 
permission of the instructor. 

431 

HISTOLOGY 

A study of the basic body tissues and the 
microscopic anatomy of the organs and 
structures of the body which are formed from 
them. Focus is on normal human histology. 
Three hours of lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 110- 
111. Alternate years. 

433 

MEDICINAL AND POISONOUS PLANTS 

An overview of plants that produce 
physiologically active substances that are 
important to humans and animals. Major 
themes include: Mechanisms and symptoms 
of poisoning, and plant chemicals with useful 
physiological effects. Laboratory topics 
include plant classification and techniques for 
compound identification. Three hours of 
lecture and one three-hour laboratory per 
week. Prerequisites: BIO 110-111, or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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• 



435 

CELL BIOLOGY 

An intensive study of the cell as the basic 
unit of life. Topics will include: origins of 
cellular life, biochemistry of the cell, 
enzymatic reactions, cellular membranes, 
intracellular communication, the cell cycle, 
the cytoskeleton and cell motility, protein 
sorting, distribution and secretion. Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 110-111 and one semester of 
organic chemistry. Alternate years. 

440 

PARASITOLOGY AND 
MEDICAL ENTOMOLOGY 

The biology of parasites and parasitism. 
Studies on the major groups of animal parasites 
and anthropod vectors of disease will involve 
taxonomy and life cycles. Emphasis will be 
made on parasites of medical and veterinary 
importance. Three hours of lecture and one 
three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisite: 
BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

441 

VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

A study of the development of vertebrates 
from fertilization to the fully formed fetus. 
Particular attention is given to the chick and 
human as representative organisms. Two three- 
hour lectureAaboratory periods per week. 
Prerequisite: BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

444 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Emphasis is given to the metabolism of 
carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, 
and nucleic acids; integration of metabolism; 
and biochemical control mechanisms, 
including allosteric control, induction, 
repression, signal transduction as well as the 
various types of inhibitive control mecha- 
nisms. Three hours of lecture, one three-hour 
laboratory and one hour of arranged work per 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1 15 or 221, or 
consent of instructor. Cross-listed as CHEM 
444. Alternate years. 



445 

RADIATION BIOLOGY 

A study of the effects of ionizing and non- 
ionizing radiations on cells, tissues and organ- 
isms. Consideration will be given to repair 
mechanisms and how repair deficiencies 
elucidate the nature of radiation damage. Three 
hours of lecture and one three-hour laborato- 
ry per week. Prerequisites: BIO 110-111, 
one year of chemistry. Alternate years. 

446 

PLANT ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

A study of plant physiology as a function 
of plant anatomy. Metabolic relationships and 
environmental factors will be examined from 
a background of the structure and develop- 
ment of cells, tissues, organs, and whole 
plants. Three hours of lecture and one three- 
hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIO 
110-111 and 225. Alternate years. 

448 

ENDOCRINOLOGY 

This course begins with a survey of the 
role of the endocrine hormones in the integra- 
tion of body functions. This is followed by a 
study of the control of hormone synthesis and 
release, and a consideration of the mecha- 
nisms by which hormones accomplish their 
effects on target organs. Two three-hour 
lectureAaboratory periods per week. Pre- 
requisite: BIO 110-111. Alternate years. 

349 & 449 

BIOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

This course offers the student a chance to 
become famihar with research in the biological 
sciences using techniques such as meeting and 
talking with active researchers, reading and 
critically analyzing the current hterature, and 
discussing the ideas and methods shaping 
biology. Students will be required to read and 
analyze specific papers, actively participate in 
discussions. Students majoring in this depart- 
ment are required to enroll during all semesters 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



BIOLOGY • BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 




spent on campus in the junior and senior years. 
The grade will be P/F. Non-credit course. 
One hour per week. Prerequisites: biology 
majors with junior or senior class standing. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Recent samples of internships in the 
department include ones with the Department 
of Environmental Resources, nuclear medicine 
or rehabilitative therapies at a local hospital. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Departmental studies are experimentally- 
oriented and may entail either lab or field 
work. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 
Examples of recent honors projects have 
involved stream analysis, gypsy moth 
research, drug synthesis and testing. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

(BUS) 

Associate Professor: Weaver (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professors: Stemgold, Toncar 
Instructor: Henninger 
Part-time Instructors: A. Alexander, Larrabee 

This major is designed to educate students 
about business and management functions in 
both commercial and non-commercial 
organizations. The program provides a well- 
balanced preparation for a wide variety of 
professions and careers, including banking, 
financial services, small business manage- 
ment, marketing, sales, advertising, retailing, 
general management, supervision, invest- 
ments, human resources management, and 
management information systems. The major 
is also appropriate for students who plan to 
attend graduate school in business or related 
fields, such as law or public administration. 

Majors 

The department offers four major tracks: 

( 1 ) general management, 

(2) financial management, 

(3) marketing management, and 

(4) international management. 

All business administration students are 
required to sucessfully complete the following 
seven foundation courses: ACCT 1 10, 
MATH 103, BUS 223, 228, 244, 338, and 
either ECON 110 or 111. 

Major Track 1 - General Management 

In addition to the foundation courses students 
must also complete ACCT 111, BUS 441, 
442, and any one of the following courses: 
BUS320, 341,orPSY225. 

Major Track 2 - Financial Management 

In addition to the foundation courses students 
must also complete ACCT 111, BUS 339, 441, 
and any one of the following courses: BUS 
340, 345 or ECON 220. 



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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Major Track 3 - Marketing Management 

In addition to the foundation courses students 
must also complete BUS 319, 342, 429, and 
any one of the following courses: BUS 332, 
343, 444. 

Major Track 4 - International Business 
Management 

In addition to the foundation courses students 
must also complete 2 courses from 2 of the 
following 3 groups: ECON 221 or PSCI 220; 
ECON 240 or PSCI 237; PSCI 225 or 437; 
2 courses from ECON 343, BUS 319, 435; 
and two additional courses in the same 
language used to satisfy the foreign language 
distribution requirement. 

International management majors are 
encouraged to minor in a foreign language. 
Additionally, it is the expectation, though not 
a requirement, that they will complete a 
practicum or internship relating to interna- 
tional business preferably in a foreign country. 

Minors 

The department offers three minors: 

(1) general management, 

(2) financial management, and 

(3) marketing management. 

Minor Track 1 - General Management 

Students are required to complete BUS 1 12, 
228, 244, one course in the department 
numbered 300 or higher, and either BUS 223 
or a second course in the department num- 
bered 300 or higher. If two courses are taken 
numbered 300 or higher, each must be chosen 
from a different major track. 

Minor Track 2 - Financial Management 

Students are required to complete BUS 338, 
339, 340, ECON 220 and either ECON 441 or 
BUS 345. 

Minor Track 3 - Marketing Management 

Students are required to take BUS 228, 319, 
342 and any two of the following: BUS 332, 
343, 429 or 444. 



Internships 

Through BUS 439, Business Practicum, 
the department offers a wide variety of 
internships with businesses, government 
agencies and nonprofit organization. In 
addition, the department is a member of the 
institute for Management Studies, which also 
offers internships, including several full-time 
paid internships during the summer. 

Recommended Courses 

All majors and minors are encouraged to 
complete a selection of the following courses: 

• ACCT 1 1 1 Managerial Accounting 
(Track 3 majors) 

• BUS 235 Legal Principles I 

• ECON 1 10 Principles of Macroeconomics 
and 1 1 1 Principles of Microeconomics 

• COMM 21 1 Public Speaking and Group 
Communication, 323 Feature Writing for 
Special Audiences, and 235 Writing and 
Speaking in Business and the Professions. 

• PHIL 216 Ethical Issues in Business, and 

• PSCI 1 10 Government and Politics in the 
United States 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: 
BUS 244, 319. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

Writing Intensive Courses 

The following courses have been approved to 
be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: BUS 244, 441. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Institute for Management Studies 

The Department of Business Administra- 
tion is a member of the Institute for Manage- 
ment Studies. See page 1 14. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



112 

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY 

A critical examination of the role of business 
in modem society. Topics include the social 
and economic roles of business management 
techniques by commercial and non-commer- 
cial organizations (e.g., banks, manufacturers, 
retail stores, hospitals), and business careers 
and functions. Designed for students consid- 
ering majors or minors in business, and for non- 
majors seeking a broad understanding of 
business. May not be taken for credit by 
students who have successfully completed four 
or more courses in BUS. 

223 

QUANTITATIVE BUSINESS ANALYSIS 

A study of the opportunities and shortcom- 
ings of a quantitative approach to managerial 
decision-making. Using hand-computed and 
computer generated decisional models, students 
explore quantitative applications to quality 
control, resource allocation, inventory control, 
decisional analysis, network scheduling, 
forecasting, and other topics. Prerequisite: 
MATH 103 or consent of instructor. 

228 

MARKETING PRINCIPLES 

A study of the methods used by business and 
nonprofit organizations to design, price, 
promote and distribute their products and 
services. Topics include new product develop- 
ment, advertising, retailing, consumer behavior, 
marketing strategy, ethical issues in marketing 
and others. Readings, case studies, library 
assignments and team research projects. 

235 

LEGAL PRINCIPLES I 

Lectures and analyses of cases on the 
nature, sources, and fundamentals of the law 
in general, and particularly as relating to 
contracts, agency, and negotiable instruments. 



236 

LEGAL PRINCIPLES II 

Lectures on the fundamentals and history of 
the law relating to legal association, real 
property, wills, and estates. 

241 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

This course is designed to familiarize students 
with the environment and institutional frame- 
work in which international firms operate. 
Through readings, case studies and discussions, 
students will investigate the primary problems 
confronting international businesses, including 
cross-cultural conflicts, trade and payment 
systems, "multination-alization" of business 
enterprises, the changing relationship between 
former communist East and capitalist West, and 
the role of the business manager in that environ- 
ment. Prerequisite: BUS 228 or consent of 
instructor. 

244 

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT 

A study of the complex character of 
organizational life and the discipline and 
process of management. Topics include the 
evolution and scope of organizations and 
management, planning, organizing, leading, 
and controlling. Emphasis is placed on the 
importance of managing in a global environ- 
ment, understanding the ethical imphcations of 
managerial decisions, and appreciating work 
place diversity. 

319 

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 

An investigation of the challenges of doing 
business in an increasingly global environment. 
Special emphasis is placed on the cultural and 
social diversity of international markets. 
Examines the marketing strategies of global 
firms, and the challenges of international 
pricing, distribution, advertising and 
product development. Prerequisite: BUS 228 
or consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



320 

MANAGEMENT INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS 

A study of the design and implementation 
of computerized information-based systems to 
support managerial decision-making. Build- 
ing upon spreadsheet and personal computing 
experience, students gain an understanding of 
the characteristics, inputs, outputs, and 
functional aspects of management information 
systems and the interrelationships among 
information system components, applications 
and the organization as a whole. Prerequisites: 
BUS 223 or 244, or consent of instructor. 

332 

ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION 

How businesses and other institutions 
promote their products to consumers. The 
role of advertising and promotion in the 
marketing strategy of the firm in investigated, 
and the effects of different promotional tools 
and advertising techniques is discussed. 
Prerequisite: BUS 228 or consent of 
instructor. 

338 

FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

A study of the fundamental theory, tools, 
and methods of financial management. 
Topics include the mathematics of finance, 
working capital management, capital budget- 
ing, and analysis of financial statements. 
Prerequisites: ACCT 110 and BUS 223, or 
consent of instructor. 

339 

INTERMEDIATE HNANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

An intensive study of issues and applica- 
tions of financial management. Topics 
covered include international finance, ethics, 
capital structures, cost of capital, financial 
analysis and forecasting. Extensive use of 
directed and non-directed cases. Prerequisite: 
BUS 338 or consent of instructor. 



340 

INVESTMENTS 

An introduction to the financial sector of the 
economy and the structure and functions of 
financial markets and the agencies involved; 
brokerage houses and stock exchanges; the 
various types of investments available. Tech- 
niques used to evaluate financial securities. 
Also covered are recent developments in 
investment theory. Prerequisite: BUS 338 or 
consent of instructor. 

342 

MARKETING RESEARCH 

This is a study of the principles and practices 
of marketing research. The focus is on the 
development and application of marketing 
research studies. Topics covered include 
selection of a research design, project planning 
and scheduUng, data specification and gathering, 
quantitative methods to analyze data, inter- 
pretation of data, and research report writing. 
Reading, cases, and research project. Prerequi- 
site: MATH 103 and BUS 228, or consent of 
instructor. 

343 

RETAIL AND SERVICES MARKETING 

A study of marketing practices by compa- 
nies that directly sell goods and services to 
consumers, such as department stores, restau- 
rants, mail-order firms, banks hospitals and 
accounting practices. Emphasis is placed on 
the methods used by organizations to attract 
and satisfy their customers and cUents. Prerequi- 
site: BUS 228 or consent of instructor. 

345 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS 
Deals with the analysis of financial state- 
ments as an aid to decision making. The theme 
of the course is understanding the financial data 
which are analyzed as well as the methods by 
which they are analyzed and interpreted. This 
course should prove of value to all who need a 
thorough understanding of the uses to which 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



financial statements are put as well as to those 
who must know how to use them intelligently 
and effectively. This includes accountants, 
security analysts, lending officers, credit 
analysts, managers, and all others who make 
decisions on the basis of financial data. 
Prerequisite: A CCT I JO. 

429 

MARKETING STRATEGY 

A study of the methods used by business 
and nonprofit organizations to analyze and 
select target markets, and then to develop 
strategies for gaining and maintaining these 
customers. Topics include competitive 
strategy, market segmentation, product 
positioning, business demographics and 
marketing-related financial analysis. Read- 
ings, case studies, library assignments and 
computer exercises. Prerequisites: BUS 228 
and MATH 103, or consent of instructor 

435 

INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

A study of the environment and methods of 
international financial management. Topics 
include international financial markets and 
instruments, analysis of capital budgeting and 
investment abroad, multinational working 
capital management, and foreign exchange 
and other risk. Prerequisite: BUS 241 and 338, 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

439 

BUSINESS PRACTICUM 

This course provides students with practical 
work experience with local companies and 
organizations. Students work 10-12hoursper 
week for their sponsor organizations, in addition 
to attending a weekly seminar on management 
topics relevant to their work assignments. Since 
enrollment is limited by the available number of 
positions, students must apply directly to the 
business department before preregistration to be 
eligible for the course. Majors only and consent 
ofinstructor. 



441 

BUSINESS POLICIES 

Planning, organization, and control of 
business operations; setting of goals; coordina- 
tion of resources, development of policies. 
Analysis of strategic decisions encompassing 
all areas of a business, and the use and analysis 
of control measures. Emphasis on both the 
internal relationship of various elements of 
production, finance, marketing, and personnel, 
and the relationship of the business entity to 
external stimuli. Readings, cases, and games. 
Prerequisite: BUS 223, 228, 244, and 338, or 
consent ofinstructor. Seniors only. 

442 

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

A study of the recruitment, selection, 
development, compensation, retention, 
evaluation, and promotion of personnel within 
an organization. Emphasis is on understand- 
ing these major activities performed by 
Human Resource Management professionals 
as organizations deal with increased laws 
and regulations, the proliferation of lawsuits 
related to Human Resources, changes in work 
force characteristics, and an increasingly 
competitive work environment. Prerequisite: 
BUS 244 or consent ofinstructor. 

444 

APPLIED MARKETING RESEARCH 

Students design, implement and present 
marketing studies for local businesses and 
other client organizations. Depending on the 
project, research methods may include 
customer surveys, focus groups, demographic 
studies and computerized information 
searches. In addition, students study market 
research methods and problems, such as 
designing questionnaires, selecting samples, 
detecting sources of bias, and presenting 
results to clients. Prerequisite: BUS 342 or 
consent of instructor. May be repeated once 
for credit with consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION • CHEMISTRY 



446 

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

An introduction to the planning, organiza- 
tion, and controlling of operations in a produc- 
tion facility. The course also incorporates 
quantitative techniques and computer applica- 
tions used in the production and operations 
management environment. Topics include 
capacity and layout planning, facility location 
analysis, job design and work measurement, 
production scheduling, materials requirement 
planning models, and quality controls. Stu- 
dents will engage in the actual design of an 
inventory status file and MRP system. Prereq- 
uisite: BUS 223 or consent of instructor. 

449 

MANAGING THE SMALL BUSINESS 

How the potential businessman proceeds in 
establishing, operating, and profiting from a 
small business operation. Considered and 
analyzed are such aspects as marketing, 
managing, financing, promoting, insuring, 
establishing, developing, and staffing the small 
retail, wholesale service, and manufacturing 
firm. May term. Prerequisite: ACCT 111, and 
BUS 228, 338; or consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Typical examples are marketing analysis 
for a paper products firm, planning a branch 
store, hotel and real estate management, 
banking and insurance. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 
Examples of recent studies are: the 
economic impact of a college on a community 
and marketing strategy for a local firm 
entering the consumer market. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

A recent project was a study of the evolution 
of anti-trust legislation in the United States. 




CHEMISTRY (chem) 

Professor: Franz 

Associate Professor: McDonald (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professors: Bendorf, Mahler 
Part-time Instructors: Evans, Miller 

The Department of Chemistry offers 
both B.A. and B.S. degree programs. 

The B.A. degree 

To complete the B.A. degree a student 
must complete CHEM 110-111, 220-221, 
330-331, 332 and 333; PHYS 225-226; 
MATH 128, 129 and one of the following 
courses: MATH 103, 231, 238, 332 or CPTR 
125. MATH 231 and 238 and French or 
German are strongly recommended for 
students planning on graduate study in 
chemistry. To be certified in secondary 
education, chemistry majors must also pass 
two biology courses numbered 1 10 or higher. 

The B.S. degree 

The Department is approved by the 
American Chemical Society (ACS) to certify 
those students whose programs meet or 
exceed requirements established by the ACS. 
Students who wish to earn ACS certification 
must complete the major described above as 
well as CHEM 443 and two courses from 
CHEM 440, 442, 447 and 480 (490). Students 
who complete the ACS-certified degree are 
eligible to elect a B.S. degree. Students who 
complete the ACS certified degree are also 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



CHEMISTRY 

• 



eligible for admission to the American 
Chemical Society following gradation. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: CHEM 330, 332. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as "W 
courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in chemistry requires completion 
of four courses numbered 220 or higher; at 
least one must be taken from each of the 
following groups: Group A (220-221, 440, 
442, 444, 447) and Group B (226 or 332, 330- 
331,333,439,443). Named minors in 
specialized areas may be designed by students 
with departmental approval. 

108 

CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES 

An introduction to the principles of inor- 
ganic chemistry. Topics include atomic and 
molecular structure, nomenclature, gases, 
solutions, acids and bases, kinetics, equiUbrium, 
oxidation-reduction, and stoichiometry. The 
approach is primarily descriptive with illustra- 
tions drawn mostly from the health sciences. 
Along with CHEM 1 15, this course is designed 
for those students who require only two 
semesters of chemistry, and is not intended for 
students planning to enroll in chemistry courses 
numbered 200 or above. Three hours of 
lecture, one hour of discussion, and one three- 
hour laboratory period each week. Pre- 
requisite: MATH 100 or consent of department. 
Not open for credit to students who have 
received credit for CHEM 110. 

110 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

A quantitative introduction to the concepts 
and models of chemistry. Topics include 
stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, 
nomenclature, bonding, thermochemistry, 
gases, solutions, and chemical reactions. The 
laboratory introduces the student to methods of 
separation, purification, and identification of 
compounds according to their physical 



properties. This course is designed for students 
who plan to major in one of the sciences. 
Three hours lecture, one hour of discussion 
and one three-hour laboratory period each 
week. Prerequisite: MATH 100 or consent of 
the Chemistry Department. Not open for 
credit to students who have received credit for 
CHEM 108 except by consent of the department 

111 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

A continuation of CHEM 1 10, with 
emphasis placed on the foundations of analytical, 
inorganic, and physical chemistry. Topics 
include kinetics, general and ionic equilibria, 
acid-base theory, electrochemistry, thermody- 
namics, nuclear chemistry, coordination 
chemistry, and descriptive inorganic chemistry 
of selected elements. The laboratory treats 
aspects of quantitative and qualitative inor- 
ganic analysis. Three hours of lecture, one 
hour of discussion, and one three-hour labor- 
atory period each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 
110 or consent of department. 

115 

BRIEF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A descriptive study of the compounds of 
carbon. This course will illustrate the principles 
of organic chemistry with material relevant to 
students in medical technology, biology, 
nursing, forestry, education and the humanities. 
Topics include nomenclature, alkanes, arenes, 
functional derivatives, amino acids and proteins, 
carbohydrates and other naturally occurring 
compounds. This course is designed for students 
who require only one semester of organic 
chemistry. Three hours of lecture, one hour of 
discussion, and one three -hour laboratory 
period each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or 
110. Not open for credit to students who have 
received credit for CHEM 220. 

220-221 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A systematic study of the compounds of 
carbon, including both aliphatic and aromatic 
series. The laboratory work introduces the 
student to simple fundamental methods of 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



CHEMISTRY 



organic synthesis, isolation, and analysis. Three 
hours of lecture and one four-hour laboratory 
period each week. Prerequisite: CHEM 111. 

226 

CLINICAL ANALYSIS 

A presentation of selected wet-chemical and 
instrumental methods of quantitative analysis 
with an orientation toward clinical applications 
in medical technology. Topics include: general 
methods and calculations; solutions; titrations; 
photometric analyses (colorimetric, atomic 
absorption, flame emission); electrochemical 
methods (ion-selective electrodes, coulometry); 
automation. Lecture, recitation, and laboratory 
daily. Prerequisite: CHEM 110-111 or consent 
of instructor. May not be taken for credit 
following CHEM 332. May term only. 

330-331 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of the fundamental principles of 
theoretical chemistry and their applications. 
The laboratory work includes techniques in 
physiochemical measurements. Three hours of 
lecture and one four-hour laboratory period each 
week. Prerequisite: CHEM 111, MATH 129, 
and one year of physics; or consent of instructor. 

332 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of the fundamental methods of 
gravimetric, volumetric and elementary instr- 
umental analysis together with practice in lab- 
oratory techniques and calculations of these 
methods. Two hours of lecture and two three- 
hour laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 1 1 1 or consent of instructor. 

333 

ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 
A study of modem theories of atomic and 
molecular structure and their relationship to the 
chemistry of selected elements and their 
compounds. Three hours of lecture and one 
four-hour laboratory period each week. Pre- 
requisite: CHEM 330, MATH 129, and one year 
of physics; or consent of instructor. 



439 

INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS 

After presenting the origin, basic concepts, 
and formulation of quantum mechanics with 
emphasis on its physical meaning, the course 
will investigate the free particle, simple harmonic 
oscillator, and central-force problems. Both 
time-independent and time-dependent perturba- 
tion theory will be covered. The elegant 
operator formalism of quantum mechanics will 
conclude the course. Four hours of lecture and 
recitation. Prerequisites: MATH 231, either 
CHEM 331 or PHYS 226, and consent of instruc- 
tor. Cross-listed as PHYS 439. 

440 

ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Theory and application of modem synthetic 
organic chemistry. Topics may include oxida- 
tion-reduction processes, carbon-carbon bond 
forming reactions, functional group transforma- 
tions, and multi- step syntheses of natural products 
(antibiotics, antitumor agents, and antiviral 
agents). Three hours of lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period. Prerequisite: CHEM 221. 

442 

SPECTROSCOPY AND 
MOLECULAR STRUCTURE 

Theory and appUcation of the identification of 
organic compounds. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the utilization of spectroscopic tech- 
niques ( H-NMR, C-NMR, IR, UV-VIS, and 
MS). Three of hours lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period each week. Prerequisites: 
CHEM 221 or 331, or consent of instructor. 

443 

ADVANCED ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

A study of advanced analytical methods with 
emphasis on chromatographic, electrochemical, 
and spectroscopic methods of instmmental 
analysis. Three hours lecture and one four-hour 
laboratory period each week. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 331 and 332, or consent of instructor. 

444 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

Emphasis is given to the metabolism of 
carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins, and 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



CHEMISTRY • COMMUNICATION 



nucleic acids; integration of metabolism; and 
biochemical control mechanisms, including 
allosteric control, induction, repression, signal 
transduction as well as the various types of 
inhibitive control mechanisms. Prerequisite: 
CHEM 115 or 221, or consent of instructor. 
Cross-listed as BIO 444. 

447 

POLYMER CHEMISTRY 

An introduction to the synthesis, characteri- 
zation, and applications of high molecular 
weight materials, i.e., macro-molecules. 
Special emphasis will be given to synthetic 
polymer systems. Three hours of lecture, one 
four-hour lab per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 
221 and 330, or consent of instructor. 

348 & 448 

CHEMISTRY COLLOQUIUM 

A seminar in which faculty, students and 
invited professional chemists discuss their own 
research activities or those of others which 
have appeared in recent chemical literature. 
Prerequisite: Three semesters of non-credit 
Chemistry Colloquium taken during the junior 
and senior years. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

The student will ordinarily work under 
supervision in an industrial laboratory and 
submit a written report on the project. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

The student will ordinarily work on a 
laboratory research project and will write a 
thesis on the work. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

The student will ordinarily work on a 
laboratory research project with emphasis on 
showing initiative and making a scholarly 
contribution. A thesis will be written. 




COMMUNICATION 

Assistant Professor: Wild (Chairperson) 

The major in Communication seeks to 
provide a foundation in communication theory 
and media criticism as well as expertise in a 
particular area of communication. All 
students majoring in Communication must 
complete the five courses listed in the Core 
and eight additional courses in one of the 
three areas of concentration listed below: four 
required courses and four elective courses. 
Sophomores, juniors, and seniors who have 
declared a major in Communication are 
required to enroll in and successfully com- 
plete the non-credit Media Arts Colloquium 
during each semester they are on campus or 
until they have successfully completed at least 
four semesters of this noncredit course. All 
students in this major should consider electing 
an internship before graduation. 

The major in Communication enables 
students to pursue employment and/or 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



COMMUNICATION 



graduate studies in a variety of fields includ- 
ing corporate communication, public rela- 
tions, audio and video production, print and 
broadcast journalism, professional media 
writing, and media research and analysis. 

All majors in Communication are encour- 
aged to take advanced courses in a foreign 
language and to consider the following liberal 
arts electives: MATH 103 and/or courses in 
Computer Science; ART 222 and 223; courses 
in contemporary American and/or interna- 
tional history, economics, and political 
science; and courses in literature from the 
Departments of Theatre, English, and Foreign 
Languages and Literatures. 

The following course has been designated 
as writing intensive and may be offered as 
such: COMM 326. Students should check 
semester class schedules to determine which 
courses are offered as "W" courses for that 
semester. 

Minor 

A minor in Communication consists of any 
three courses from the Core and two other 
courses offered by the Communication 
Department. At least one of the five courses 
in the minor must be at the 300-level or above. 

CORE COURSES REQUIRED OF 
ALL MAJORS 

COMM 1 10 Principles of Communication 
COMM 326 Media Criticism and Cultural 

Studies: Literature, Film, and 

Television 
COMM 440 Senior Seminar 
COMM 246, 346, 446 Media Arts 
Colloquium 
PSCI210 Communication and Society 
THE A 1 12 America on Screen 



Majors must concentrate in one of the 
following three areas of study. 

A. Public Relations and Corporate 
Communication 

Required for all students in this concentration: 
COMM 2 1 1 Public Speaking and Group 

Communication 
COMM 235 Writing and Speaking in 

Business and the Professions 
COMM 324 Public Relations Cases and 

Problem-Solving 
PSCI 436 Mass Media Law and 

Regulation 

Elective choices for students in this 

concentration: 

COMM 1 17 Media Writing Principles with 

Desktop Publishing 
COMM 323 Feature Writing for Special 

Audiences 
BUS 228 Marketing Principles 

BUS 244 Organization and Management 

BUS 332 Advertising and Promotion 

PSY 224 Social Psychology 

PSY 225 Industrial and Organizational 

Psychology 

B. Electronic Media 

Required for all students in this concentration: 
COMM 2 1 8 Audio Production for Radio 

and Video 
COMM 223 Basic Video Production 
COMM 348 Advanced Video Production 
ART 227 Introduction to Photography 

Elective choices for students in this 

concentration: 

COMM 225 The Art of Scriptwriting 

ART 343 Computer Graphics for Print 

Media 
ART 344 Computer Graphics for 

Electronic Media 
PSCI 436 Mass Media Law and 

Regulation 
THEA 1 14 Film Art: Motion Picture 

Masterpieces 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



COMMUNICATION 

• 



C. Reporting and Media Writing 

Required for all students in this concentration: 
COMM 2 1 1 Public Speaking and Group 

Communication 
COMM 229 Print and Broadcast Journalism 
COMM 323 Feature Writing for Special 

Audiences 
PSCI 436 Mass Media Law and 

Regulation 

Elective choices for students in this 

concentration: 

COMM 117 



Media Writing Principles with 
Desktop Publishing 
The Art of Scriptwriting 
Writing and Speaking in 
Business and the Professions 
Topics in Investigative 
Reporting 

hitroduction to Creative Writing 
Advanced Writing: Technical 
and Professional 
Advanced Writing: The 
Creative Essay 



COMM 225 
COMM 235 

COMM 333 

ENGL 240 
ENGL 321 

ENGL 322 

110 

PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATION 

Introduction to the basic theories and 
principles of communication as they apply to 
individuals, groups, and the media industries. 
Emphasis on writing, research, and oral 
communication. 

117 

MEDIA WRITING PRINCIPLES WITH 
DESKTOP PUBLISHING 

Intensive drill and practice in desktop 
publishing and the basic forms of media 
writing. Major emphasis on the elements of 
lead, style, and structure. Designed for 
students with little or no experience in 
desktop publishing and writing for the media. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 



211 

PUBLIC SPEAKING AND 
GROUP COMMUNICATION 

Speaking extemporaneously in a variety of 
situations to general as well as targeted 
audiences. Emphasis on developing skills in 
teamwork and leadership and on solving 
problems using oral communication skills. 
Training in writing, organizing, and delivering 
speeches using traditional research methods as 
well as emerging technologies. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107. 

218 

AUDIO PRODUCTION FOR 
RADIO AND VIDEO 

Study of the principles and techniques of 
audio production as applied to radio and other 
media. Consideration of various program formats 
and the use of sound media as an art form. 
Includes historical as well as contemporary 
examples of audio production and sound design. 

223 

BASIC VIDEO PRODUCTION 

Training in the fundamentals of prepro- 
duction, production, and postproduction for 
video. Emphasis on mastering the basics of 
video production from concept to completion. 
Prerequisites: course work or experience in 
technical theatre, photography, film studies, 
and/or audio production; or consent of 
instructor. 

225 

THE ART OF SCRIPTWRITING 

Training in analyzing and writing scripts for 
defined audiences and purposes. Developing 
the original screenplay as well as scripts for 
business, advertising, and education will be 
considered. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 

229 

PRINT AND BROADCAST JOURNALISM 

Study of form and content of news gathering 
and beat reporting. Training in researching, 
interviewing, organizing, and editing a variety 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



COMMUNICATION 

• 



of news stories for the Lycoming College 
newspaper and for campus radio. Considers 
the ethical issues of reporting for print and 
broadcast. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 

235 

WRITING AND SPEAKING IN BUSINESS 

AND THE PROFESSIONS 

Study of communication theory as applied 
to business and professional settings. Using 
writing, speaking, research, and the electronic 
media to solve a variety of communication 
problems that frequently occur in the world of 
work. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 

323 

FEATURE WRITING FOR 

SPECIAL AUDIENCES 

Practice in writing a variety of feature 
stories and editorials for different media and 
audiences. Study of the ways in which feature 
writing for magazines compares and contrasts 
with feature writing for newspapers and 
feature stories for television. Readings, peer 
review, and training in how to develop ideas 
using primary and secondary research. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 

324 

PUBLIC RELATIONS CASES AND 
PROBLEM SOLVING 

Training in methods of public relations 
research, program planning and evaluation, 
working with the media, writing for public 
relations and advertising, and conducting a 
public relations campaign to solve a problem 
or crisis. Emphasis on writing, speaking, and 
electronic communication. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107. 

326 

MEDIA CRITICISM AND CULTURAL 

STUDIES: LITERATURE, HLM, AND 

TELEVISION 

Introduction to methods of analyzing popular 

culture and the arts using one or more of these 

approaches: textual criticism, content analysis, 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



semiotics, auteur criticism, historical criticism, 
frame theory, and structural analysis. Com- 
parison of the ways in which different media 
create values and portray individuals, social 
conflicts, and human aspirations. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107. 

333 

TOPICS IN INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING 

An advanced course in researching complex 
issues and developing stories for diverse 
audiences using print and electronic media. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107. 

348 

ADVANCED VIDEO PRODUCTION 

Advanced production of documentary, 
narrative, and experimental video. Exploration 
of a variety of approaches to motivating talent 
and directing for the camera. Prerequisite: 
COMM 223, or advanced course work in 
acting and directing, or consent of instructor. 

246, 346, and 446 

MEDIA ARTS COLLOQUIUM 

A seminar in which faculty, students, and 
invited professionals meet two or three times 
each semester to discuss topics pertaining to 
the field of communication and to the work 
students are doing in campus media. Each 
student enrolled in the seminar is required to 
keep a log and to work for a minimum of three 
hours each week in one or more of the follow- 
ing: campus newspaper; campus yearbook; 
campus radio; campus television; public 
relations; corporate communication. Open 
only to majors. Non-credit and Pass/Fail. 
Once the major is declared, students are 
required to enroll in the seminar each semester 
until they graduate or until they have success- 
fully completed four semesters, whichever 
comes first. 

400 

PRACTICUM 

An elective for junior and senior majors who 

wish to acquire additional experience in 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



COMMUNICATION • CRIMINAL JUSTICE 




CRIMINAL 
JUSTICE 



working with practicing professionals. Open 
only to majors and minors. 

440 

SENIOR SEMINAR 

Reading and discussion of one or more 
topics of interest to communication special- 
ists. Focus on preparing individual projects 
related to seminar topics and the student's 
area(s) of expertise for public presentation. 
Majors are required to enroll in this course 
either in their junior or senior year. Open to 
nonmajors with consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP 

Interns usually work off-campus in a field 

related to their area of study. Prerequisite: 

junior or senior standing. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 
Studies involve research related to the area of 
study of the student. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPART- 
MENTAL HONORS (See index) 



Assistant Professor: Strauser (Coordinator) 

This major is designed to acquaint students 
with the American criminal justice system and 
to provide an understanding of the social, 
psychological, philosophical, and political 
contexts within which the system of criminal 
justice functions. Its aim is to develop students' 
intellectual and scientific skills in raising and 
attempting to answer important questions about 
the system of justice and its place in society. 
The program offers opportunity for intern 
experience in the field, and prepares for careers 
in the areas of law enforcement, probation and 
parole, prisons, and treatment services. 

The major has two tracks. Track I prepares 
for careers in law enforcement. Track II 
prepares for careers in corrections. 

Track I - Law Enforcement. 

The major consists of 10 courses, distrib- 
uted as follows: 

A. Professional courses in criminal justice 
(three courses) 

SOC 1 1 5 Introduction to the Criminal 

Justice System 
SOC 223 Introduction to Law 

Enforcement 
SOC 339 The American Prison 

System 

B. Courses in the social, psychological, 
philosophical, and political context of the 
justice system (seven courses): 



SOC 300 

PSY116 

PSCI331 

PSCI 335 

PHIL 218 

One course from: 

SOC 221 

SOC 334 



Criminology 
Abnormal Psychology 
Civil Rights and Liberties 
Law and Society 
Issues in Criminal Justice 

Juvenile Delinquency or 
Cultural Minorities 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



CRIMINAL JUSTICE • ECONOMICS 



One course from: 
AMST 200 
HIST 230 
HIST 443 



America as a Civilization or 
Afro- American History or 
U.S. Social and Intellectual 
History Since 1877 



C. Internship or practicum in law enforcement 
(recommended but not required for the major). 

Track II - Corrections 

The major consists of 10 courses distributed as 
follows: 

A. Professional courses in criminal justice 
(three courses) 

SOC 1 1 5 Introduction to the Criminal Justice 

System 
SOC 222 Introcuction to Human Services 
SOC 339 The American Prison System 

B. Courses in the social, psychological, 
philosophical, and political context of the 
justice system (seven courses): 

Same as Track I. 

C. Internship or practicum in corrections 
(recommended but not required for the major). 
Prerequisite: MATH 130, PSY 239 and 431. 
These prerequisites may be waived in certain 
cases by the coordinating committee. 

Majors should seek advice concerning 
course selection from members of the coordi- 
nating committee and should note course 
prerequisites in planning their programs. 

Minor 

A minor in criminal justice consists of five 
courses. Required courses include: SOC 1 15 
and any four other courses in the Criminal 
Justice major listed above, at least three of 
which must be numbered 200 or above. To 
receive credit for a minor in Criminal Justice, a 
student must maintain a minimum 2.00 cumula- 
tive average in courses completed for the minor. 




ECONOMICS (EcoN) 

Associate Professor: Madresehee (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professors: Sprunger, Yerger 

The major has two tracks. Track I is designed 
for the student whose primary interest lies in 
business management; Track II is designed to 
provide a broad understanding of economic, 
social, and business problems. In addition to 
preparing students for a career in business or 
government, this track provides an excellent 
background for graduate or professional studies. 

Track I - Managerial Economics requires 
ECON 1 10, 1 1 1, 220, 332 and either 330 or 
441 ; ACCT 1 10 and either ACCT 1 1 1 or BUS 
429; BUS 338; and two other economics 
courses numbered 200 or above, excluding 
ECON 349. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



o 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ECONOMICS 

• 



Track II - General Economics requires 
ECON 110, 11 1,33 1,440, 330 or 441, and 
three other courses in economics. Depending 
on their academic and career interests, students 
are encouraged to select a minor in another 
department such as political science, philoso- 
phy, or history. 

In addition, the following courses are 
recommended: all majors - MATH 103 and 
BUS 223; majors planning graduate 
work - MATH 1 12 and 128; Track 11 majors - 
ACCT 1 10 and either 1 1 1 or 344. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: ECON 337, 440. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in economics requires the comple- 
tion of ECON 1 10, 1 1 1 and three other econom- 
ics courses numbered 200 or above, or any four 
economics courses numbered 200 or above. 

The Department of Economics is a member 
of the Institute for Management Studies. See 
page 114. 

102 

CONSUMER ECONOMICS 

A course in " family" or "practical" 
economics, designed to teach students how 
they and their families can be intelligent 
consumers; that is, how they can spend, save, 
and borrow so as to maximize the value they 
receive for the income they have. Treats 
subjects such as intelligent shopping; the uses 
and abuses of credit; investing, savings, 
buying insurance, automobiles and houses; 
medical care costs; estates and wills, etc. 

110 

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS 

Macroeconomics deals with problems of the 
economic system as a whole. What influences 
the level of national income and employment? 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



What is inflation and why do we have it? What 
is the role of government in a modem capitalis- 
tic system? How does business organize to 
produce the goods and services we demand? 
How are the American financial and banking 
systems organized? What is the nature of 
American unionism? What are the elements of 
government finance and fiscal policy? 

HI 

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 

This course focuses upon microeconomics 
and selected current economic problems. It 
deals with the relatively small units of the 
economy such as the firm and the family. 
Analyzes demand and supply. Discusses how 
business firms decide what and how much to 
produce and how goods and services are 
priced in different types of markets. Also 
considers such problems as economic growth, 
international trade, poverty, discrimination, 
ecology, and alternative economic systems. 

220 

MONEY AND BANKING 

Covers business fluctuations and monetary 
and fiscal policy; the financial organization of 
society; the banking system; credit institutions; 
capital markets, and international financial 
relations. Prerequisite: ECON 110. 

221 

COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 
A comparative analysis of the underlying 
ideologies, the basic institutions, and the 
performance of selected economic systems. 
Alternate years. 

URBAN PROBLEMS 

The application of economic theory to the 
study of significant social, political, and 
economic problems associated with urbaniza- 
tion, including poverty, employment, educa- 
tion, crime, health, housing, land use and the 
environment, transportation, and public 



^» 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ECONOMICS 



finance. Analysis of solutions offered. 
Alternate years. 

225 

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS 

A study of the relationship between 
environmental decay and economic growth, 
with particular reference to failures of the 
price and property-rights systems; application 
of cost/benefit analysis, measures aimed at the 
creation of an ecologically- viable economy. 

229 

BUSINESS CYCLES AND FORECASTING 

An introduction to the nature and history of 
business fluctuations, the tools used in 
aggregate analysis, theories that seek to explain 
the cycle, and techniques used in fore-casting 
economic activity. Prerequisite: ECONllO 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

230 

ECONOMETRICS 

Econometric models provide one of the 
most useful and necessary sets of tools for 
decision-making. By using a variety of 
modem statistical methods, econometrics 
helps us to estimate economic relationships, 
test different economic behaviors, and 
forecast different economic variables. Pre- 
requisites: Mathematic 103, ECON 110 and 
111; or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

240 

ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

An introduction to the theory and practice 
of economic geography with emphasis upon 
the historical dynamics of local, regional, and 
global organization. This course considers the 
forces reshaping global economic geography 
including the factors that determine the 
competitive advantage of nations. These 
factors include resources such as food, energy, 
materials, and changing patterns of world 
population. Also included will be theoretical 
literature reparding locational decisions and 
choice, as well as the rapidly changing global 



economy in the context of trade theory and the 
shifting focus of international economics 
activity. 

330 

INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS 

An advanced analysis of contemporary 
theory regarding consumer demand, production 
costs and theory, profit maximization, market 
structures, and the determinants of returns to 
the factors of production. Prerequisites: ECON 
110 and 111. Alternate years. 

331 

INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS 

An advanced analysis of contemporary 
theory and practice with regard to business 
fluctuation, national income accounting, the 
determination of income and employment 
levels, and the use of monetary and fiscal 
policy. Prerequisites: ECON 110 and 111. 
Alternate years. 

332 

GOVERNMENT AND THE ECONOMY 

An analytical survey of government's 
efforts to maintain competition through 
antitrust legislation to supervise acceptable 
cases of private monopoly, through public 
utility regulation and via means of regulatory 
commissions, and to encourage or restrain 
various types of private economic activities. 
Prerequisites: ECON 110 and 111, or 
consent of instructor. 

335 

LABOR PROBLEMS 

The history of organized labor in the 
United States, including the structure of 
unions, employers' opposition to unions, the 
role of government in labor-management 
relations and the economic impact of unions. 
Alternate years. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



o 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ECONOMICS 



337 

PUBLIC FINANCE 

An analysis of the fiscal economics of the 
public sector, including the development, 
concepts, and theories of public expenditures, 
taxation, and debt at all levels of American 
government. Also includes the use of fiscal 
policy as an economic control device. 
Prerequisite: ECON 110 and 111, or consent 
of instructor. Alternate years. 

343 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE 

A study of the principles, theories, develop- 
ment, and policies concerning international 
economic relations, with particular reference to 
the United States. Subjects covered include: 
U.S. commercial policy and its development, 
international trade theory, tariffs and other 
protectionist devices, international monetary 
system and its problems, balance of payments 
issues. Alternate years. Prerequisites: ECON 
llOandlll. 

349 

MANAGEMENT PRACTICUM 

An apprentice-level work experience for 
junior or senior economics majors jointly 
sponsored by the department and a public or 
private agency (or a subdivision of the college 
itself) designed to better integrate classroom 
theory and workplace practice. In addition to 
attendance at a weekly seminar, students will 
spend 10-12 hours per week at the sponsoring 
agency per unit of credit. At least one-half of 
the effort expended will consist of academic 
work related to agency activities. 

440 

HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 

A discussion of the origins, development, 
and significance of the economic ideas 
embodied in the works of Smith, Marx, 
Schumpeter, Keynes, and others. Prerequi- 
sites: ECON 110 and 111, or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG ■ 



441 

MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS 

The application of economic theory and 
methodology to the solution of business 
problems. Subjects include: optimizing 
techniques, risk analysis, demand theory, 
production theory, cost theory, linear pro- 
gramming, capital budgeting, market struc- 
tures, and the theory of pricing. Prerequisites: 
ECON 110 and 111. Some understanding of 
differential calculus is recommended. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Typically off-campus in business, banking 
or government, supervised by assigned 
employee of sponsoring organization. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Superior students may select independent 
study in various courses, particularly in 
preparation for graduate school. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




LYCOMING COLLEGE 



EDUCATION 




EDUCATION (EDuc) 

Assistant Professors: Blair 
Conrad (Chairperson), Hungerford 

Part-time Instructors: Bossert, Grove, Mosser, 
Salvatori, Straub 

The Education Department offers Pennsyl- 
vania-approved teacher certification programs 
in elementary and secondary education, as well 
as a school nurse certification program. 

Students seeking secondary certification 
must complete EDUC 200 and PSY 338 as 
prerequisites to the professional semester 
(EDUC 446, 447, 449) as well as the necessary 
subject area courses. Students must have the 
required 14 half-day observations with their 
assigned cooperating teacher during the 
semester prior to their professional semester. 
Students may earn secondary certification in 
one or more of the following areas: art (K-12), 
biology, chemistry, EngUsh, French (K-12), 
general science, German (K-12), mathematics. 



music (K-12), physics, school nurse (K-12), 
social studies, and Spanish (K-12). 

Students seeking elementary certification 
must complete EDUC 200, PSY 338, MATH 
205, EDUC 000, 341, 342, 343, and 344 as 
prerequisites to the professional semester 
(EDUC 445, 447, 448). Students must have 
the required 14 half-day observations with 
their assigned cooperating teacher during the 
semester prior to their professional semester. 

Students interested in the teacher education 
program should refer to the Teacher Educa- 
tion Handbook, which specifies the current 
requirements for certification. Early consulta- 
tion with a member of the Education Depart- 
ment is strongly recommended. Application 
for the professional semester must be made 
during the fall semester of the junior year. 
The Department of Education admits to the 
professional semester only those applicants 
who are in good academic standing, have 
satisfactorily completed the participation 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



o 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



EDUCATION 



requirements, have paid the student teaching 
fee, and have received a positive evaluation 
based upon: (a) recommendation from the 
student's major department; (b) a screening 
interview conducted by the Education 
Department; and (c) a writing sample from the 
student. Major departments have different 
criteria for their recommendations. Therefore, 
the student should consult with the chairper- 
son of the major department about those 
requirements. 

Additional teacher intern program informa- 
tion can be found on page 55. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: EDUC 343 and 
344. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

000 

SEMINAR IN ART, MUSIC, PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION, and MATH ACTIVITIES 

Each elementary student teacher attends a 
series of 24 seminars, conducted prior to 
student teaching, during the fall semester of 
the senior year. These seminars, conducted by 
certified public school personnel, emphasize 
activities and knowledge which are helpful in 
the self-contained elementary classroom. 
Non-credit course. 

200 

INTRODUCTION TO THE 

STUDY OF EDUCATION 

A study of teaching as a profession with 
emphasis on the economic, social, political, 
and religious conditions which influence 
American schools and teachers. Consideration 
is given to the school environment, the 
curriculum, and the children with the intention 
that students will examine more rationally their 
own motives for entering the profession. 



232 

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA 

AND COMMUNICATIONS 

A study of the value, design, construction, 
and application of the visual and auditory aids 
to learning. Practical experience in the 
handling of audio-visual equipment and 
materials is provided. Application of audio- 
visual techniques. Application of the visual 
and auditory aids to learning. Students will 
plan and carry out actual teaching assignments 
utilizing various A-V devices. 

239 

PUBLIC SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

An examination of the various curricula of 
the public schools and their relationship to 
current practices. Special attention will be 
given to the meaning and nature of the 
curriculum, the desirable outcomes of the 
curriculum, conflicting and variant concep- 
tions of curricula content, modem techniques 
of curricular construction, criteria for the 
evaluation of curricula, the curriculum as a 
teaching instrument. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the curriculum work within the teaching 
field of each individual. 

332 

TEACHING VISUAL ARTS IN 

THE SCHOOLS 

Methods and materials of teaching visual 
arts with an emphasis on curriculum develop- 
ment and the components of comprehensive 
visual arts education. Course work will 
include observation of visual art classes in 
elementary and secondary schools in the 
greater Williamsport area. Required of art 
majors in the K-12 certification rogram. 

341 

TEACHING THE SOCIAL STUDIES IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Studies and experiences to develop a basic 
understanding of the structure, concepts, and 
processes of anthropology, economics. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



EDUCATION 



geography, history, poUtical science, and 
sociology as they relate to the elementary 
school social science curriculum. Practical 
applications, demonstrations of methods, and 
the development of integrated teaching units 
using tests, reference books, films, and other 
teaching materials. Observation and 
participation in Lycoming County elementary 
schools. Prerequisites: EDUC 200 and PSY 
338, or consent of instructor. 

342 

TEACHING SCIENCE IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Science methods and materials interpreting 
children's science experiences and guiding the 
development of the scientific concepts. A 
study of the science content of the curriculum, 
its material and use. Observation and partici- 
pation in Lycoming County elementary 
schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 200 and PSY 
338, or consent of instructor. 

343 

TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS AND 
CHILDREN'S LITERATURE IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. 

A course designed to consider means of 
communication, oral and written, including 
both practical and creative uses. Attention 
will be given to listening, speaking, written 
expression, linguistics and grammar, and 
spelling. Stress will be placed upon the 
interrelatedness of the language arts. Chil- 
dren's literature will be explored as a vehicle 
for developing creative characteristics in 
children and for ensuring an appreciation of the 
creative writing of others. Observation and 
participation in Lycoming County elementary 
schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 200 and PSY 
338, or consent of instructor. 

344 

TEACHING READING IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

A basic course in the philosophy and 
rationale for the implementation of an 



elementary reading program from kindergar- 
ten through sixth grade. Emphasis is upon 
designing a reading instructional program 
which reflects the nature of the learning 
process and recognizes principles of child 
development through examination of the 
principles, problems, methods, and materials 
used in elementary reading programs. Prereq- 
uisite: EDUC 200 or PSY 338, or consent of 
instructor. 

The Elementary Professional Semester 

The following courses comprise the Elemen- 
tary Professional Semester: 

EDUC 445 — Methods of Teaching 

in the Elementary School 

EDUC 447 — Problems in Contemporary 
American Education 

EDUC 448 — Student Teaching in the 
Elementary School 

445 

METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (PART OF THE 
PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

The course emphasizes the relationship 
between the theoretical studies of physical, 
social and cognitive development and the 
elementary classroom environment. Particular 
consideration will be given to the appropriate 
age and developmental level of the students 
with an emphasis upon selection and 
utilization of methods in all the elementary 
subject areas, including art and music. 
Specific attention is given to the development 
of strategies for structuring lesson plans, for 
maintaining classroom control, and for overall 
classroom management. Direct application is 
made to the individual student teaching 
experience. Prerequisites: MATH 205, 
EDUC 000, 341, 342, 343, and 344, and pre- 
student teaching participation. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



EDUCATION 

• 



447 

PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICAN EDUCATION (PART OF THE 
PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Seminar on the issues, problems, and 
challenges encountered by teachers in the 
American public schools, especially those 
related to the student teaching experience. 

448 

STUDENT TEACHING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (PART OF 
THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Professional experience under the supervi- 
sion of a selected cooperating teacher in a 
public elementary school in Lycoming 
County. Student teachers are required to 
follow the calendar of the school district to 
which they are assigned. Two units maximum. 

Students are considered full time when 
enrolled in the Professional Semester. Those 
students needing an additional course must 
comply with the standards stated in the 
College catalog. 

The Secondary Professional Semester 

The following courses comprise the 
Secondary Professional Semester: 

EDUC 446 Methods of Teaching 

in the Secondary School 

EDUC 447 Problems in Contemporary 
American Education 

EDUC 449 Student Teaching in the 
Secondary School 

The Art/Music (K-12) Professional Semester 

The following courses comprise the Art/ 
Music (K-12) Professional Semester: 
EDUC 447 Problems in Contemporary 

American Education 
EDUC 448 Student Teaching in the 
Elementary School 
(6 semester hours) 

EDUC 449 Student Teaching in the 
Secondary School 
(6 semester hours) 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



446 

METHODS OF TEACHING IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (PART OF 
THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 
A study of materials, methods, and 
techniques with emphasis on the student's 
major. Stress is placed on the selection and 
utilization of visual and auditory aids to 
learning. Students teach demonstration 
lessons in the presence of the instructor and 
the members of the class and observe superior 
teachers in Lycoming County secondary 
schools. Prerequisite: EDUC 200, PSY 338, 
and pre- student teaching participation. 

447 

PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY 
AMERICAN EDUCATION (PART OF 
THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Seminar on the issues, problems, and 
challenges encountered by teachers in the 
American public schools, especially those 
related to the student teaching experience. 

449 

STUDENT TEACHING IN THE 
SECONDARY SCHOOL (PART OF 
THE PROFESSIONAL SEMESTER) 

Professional laboratory experience under 
the supervision of a selected cooperating 
teacher in a public secondary school in 
Lycoming County. Student teachers are 
required to follow the calendar of the school 
district to which they are assigned. Two units 
maximum. 

Students are considered full time when 
enrolled in the Professional Semester. Those 
students needing an additional course must 
comply with the standards stated in the 
College catalog. 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ENGLISH 

• 




ENGLISH (ENGL) 

Professors: Jensen, Rife 

Associate Professor: Hawkes (Chairperson), 

Moses 
Assistant Professors: Feinstein, Hafer, Lewes 
Visiting Instructor: Keller 

The department offers two programs 
leading to the major in English: 

Track I - English Major in Literature 

This track is designed for students who 
choose English as a liberal arts major that pre- 
pares them for a wide range of career options; 
for students who choose English as their subject 
area for elementary certification or who wish to 
earn secondary certification in English; for 
students who wish to improve their verbal and 
analytic ability in preparation for a specific 
career, such as technical writing, business, or 
law; and for students who intend to pursue 
graduate study in British or American literature. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



A minimum often courses is required for 
Track I. Required courses are ENGL 217, 220, 
221, 222, and 223; two courses selected from 
ENGL 31 1,312, 313, 314, and 315; one from 
ENGL 335 and 336; and two electives from 
among courses numbered 215 and above. 

Students who wish to earn secondary certifi- 
cation must complete a minimum of twelve 
courses in English. Required courses in 
English are 217, 220, 221, 222, 223, 335, 336, 
and 338; three courses selected from 31 1, 312, 
313,314, and 315; and one elective from 
among courses numbered 215 and above. 
Required courses outside English are EDUC 
200, 446, 447, and 449; PSY 1 10 and 338; and 
THEA 100. 

Students who intend to pursue graduate 
study in British or American literature should 
complete the twelve English courses specified 
for secondary certification and, as part of that 
sequence, take ENGL 449, Advanced Criti- 
cism, as their English elective. 

Track 11 - English Major in Creative Writing 

This track is designed for students who 
aspire to careers as professional writers, as 
editors, and as publishers; for students who 
plan to continue studies in an M.F.A. or M.A. 
program; or for students who would like to 
discover their creative potential while pursu- 
ing a fundamental liberal arts education. 
A minimum often courses is required for 
Track H. Required courses are ENGL 240; two 
courses selected from ENGL 220, 22 1 , 222, 223 
and 225; two fromENGL31 1,312,313, 314 
and 3 15; one from ENGL 33 1 or 332; one from 
ENGL 335 and 336; two from ENGL 34 1,342, 
44 1 , and 442 (note prerequisites); and one from 
ENGL411or412. 

Students who wish to earn secondary 
certification must complete a minimum of 
twelve courses in English. Required courses 
are ENGL 240; two courses selected from 
ENGL 220, 221, 222, 223, 224 and 225; two 
from 31 1,312, 313, 314, and 315; one from331 
and 332; 335, 336, 338; two from 341, 342, 441, 
442 and one from 411 and 412. Required 

I 1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ENGLISH 



courses outside English are EDUC 200, 446, 
447, and 449; PS Y 110 and 338; and THEA 100. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a cultural diversity course: 
ENGL 334. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved to 
be offered as writing intensive courses and may 
be offered as such: ENGL 33 1 , 334, 335, 336, 
420. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

Minor 

The department offers two minors in 
EngUsh: 

Literature: Five courses in literature at the 
200 level or above, at least three of which 
must be numbered 300 or above. 

Writing: Five courses, four of which are 
chosen from ENGL 217, 240, 321, 322, and 
338; plus one writing-intensive course in 
literature at the 300 level. 

105 

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE WRITING 

A review of grammar and an introduction to 
college-level reading and writing. One unit 
grade of "P" will be assigned when the student 
has successfully completed all of the work in 
the course. Required of, and limited to, those 
who have not been exempted from ENGL 105. 

106 

COMPOSITION 

Extensive practice in analytical writing. 
Special emphasis on developing the compos- 
ing skills needed to articulate and defend a 
position in various situations requiring the use 
of written English. Credit may not be earned 
for both 106 and 107. 



107 

HONORS COMPOSITION 

Extensive practice in analytical writing. 
Special emphasis on developing the writing 
skills of students who have the potential to 
benefit from advanced work. Placement by 
examination only. Credit may not be earned 
for both 106 and 107. 

215 

INTRODUCTION TO 
LITERARY INTERPRETATION 

Practice in the methods of close reading and 
formal analysis. Identification of primary 
elements and structures of literary representa- 
tion. Literaturechosenforstudy will vary. Pre- 
requisite: ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 

Ill 

CRITICAL WRITING SEMINAR 

Brief introduction to criticism as a disci- 
pline, followed by workshop training in 
writing critical papers on the major literary 
genres. Prerequisite: Grade of C + or better 
in ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 

220 

BRITISH LITERATURE I 

Literary forms, themes, and authors from 
the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th 
century. Emphasis on such writers as 
Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, 
Pope, and Johnson; representative works from 
Beowulf Xo Bumey's Evelina. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 
Ill 
BRITISH LITERATURE II 

Literary movements and authors from the 
beginnings of Romanticism to the end of the 
19th century. Particularemphasisonsuch 
writers as Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, 
Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Arnold, Hardy, 
and Yeats. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ENGLISH 

• 



222 

AMERICAN LITERATURE I 

Survey of American literature from the 
beginning to the Civil War, with major 
emphasis on the writers of the Romantic 
period: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Dickinson, and Whitman. Prerequi- 
site: ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 

AMERICAN LITERATURE II 
Survey of American Uterature from the Civil War to 
the present, emphasizing such authors as Twain, 
James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Eliot, 
Stevens,0'Neill,andWiUiams./'r£re^M/5/re; 
ENGL 1 06/107 or consentof instructor. 

225 

CLASSICAL LITERATURE 
A study, in translation, of Greek and Roman 
works that have influenced Western writers. 
Literary forms studied include epic, drama, satire, 
and love poetry . Writers studied include Homer, 
Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil, Juvenal, 
Horace, Lucretius, and Ovid. Prerequisite: ENGL 
1 06/1 07 or consent of instructor. 

240 

INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING 

Workshopdiscussions,structuredexercises,and 
readings in contemporary literature to provide 
practice andbasic instruction in the writing and 
evaluationofpoetryandfiction. Prere^Mw//^.- 
ENGL 1 06/107 orconsentof instructor. 

311 

MEDIEVAL LITERATURE 

Readings in Old and Middle English poetry and 
prose from Bede' s Ecclesiastical History to 
Malory's Arthurian romance. Study of lyric, 
narrative, drama, and romance with emphasis on 
the cultural context from which these forms 
emerge. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

312 

RENAISSANCE LITERATURE 

An examination of themes and literary forms of 
the Renaissance. Authors studied will include 



Donne, Marlowe, More, Shakespeare, Sidney, 
Spenser, and Surrey. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/ 
107 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

313 

RESTORATION AND 
18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE 

Consideration of selected themes, writers, 
or modes of Restoration and 1 8th-century 
literature (1660-1800) with emphasis on the 
social, political, and intellectual life of that 
era. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or consent 
of instructor. A Itemate years. 

314 

ROMANTIC LITERATURE 

Concentrated study in the writers, texts, and 
themes of the Romantic period (1789- 1 832) with 
emphasis on the social, political, and intellectual 
hfeofthatera. Prerequisite: ENGL106/107or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

315 

VICTORIAN LITERATURE 

Concentrated study in the writers, texts, and 
themes of the Victorian period ( 1 832- 1 90 1 ) with 
emphasis on the social, political, and intellectual 
hfeofthatera. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/1 07 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

321 

ADVANCED WRITING: 
TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL 

A course providing practice in report and 
technical writing, proposals, and other areas 
where competence will be expected in the 
business and scientific worlds. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 

311 

ADVANCED WRITING: 

THE CREATIVE ESSAY 

A course in which students from all 
disciplines learn to explore and define 
themselves through the essay, a form used to 
express the universal through the particular 
and the personal. Readings will include 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ENGLISH 



essayists from Montaigne to Gould. Prerequi- 
site: Grade ofC+ or better in ENGL 106/107 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

331 

20TH-CENTURY FICTION 

Examination of the novels and short fiction 
of such major writers as Conrad, Woolf, 
Joyce, Faulkner, Fowles, and Nabokov, with 
special emphasis on the relationship of their 
works to concepts of modernism. Prerequi- 
site: ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 

332 

20TH-CENTURY POETRY 

Studies in the themes and visions of 
modem and contemporary poets including 
Yeats, Frost, Stevens, Williams, Pound, Moore, 
Eliot, Hughes, Roethke, Bishop, Berryman, 
Lowell, Larkin, Ginsberg, Sexton, Rich, Plath, 
Baraka, Heaney, and Dove. Prerequisite: 
ENGL 106/107 or consent of instructor. 

333 

THE NOVEL 

An examination primarily of British and 
American works from the 18th century to the 
present, focusing on the novel's ability — since 
its explosive inception — to redefine its own 
boundaries. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

334 

WOMEN IN LITERATURE 

An examination — literary, social, and 
historical — of literature by women represent- 
ing diverse cultures. Each course will examine 
a particular theme significant to women 
writers from more than one cultural back- 
ground. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

335 
CHAUCER 

A study of the major works with emphasis 
on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and 
Criseyde. Some attention to language study 
and to the traditions out of which Chaucer's 



works arose. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

336 

SHAKESPEARE 

A study of representative plays in the 
context of Shakespeare's life and times. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

338 

LINGUISTICS AND THE ANALYSIS OF 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 

Introduction to methods of analyzing spoken 
and written English. Classroom work sup- 
ported by weekly tutorials, in which the student 
gains practical experience in identifying, 
diagnosing, and correcting basic communica- 
tions problems. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

341 

POETRY WORKSHOP I 

An intermediate workshop focusing on the 
writing of poetry and methods of analysis. 
Prerequisite: Grade ofB or better in ENGL 
240 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

342 

FICTION WORKSHOP I 

An intermediate course in the writing of 
short fiction in a workshop environment, where 
the student is trained to hear language at work. 
Emphasis on characterization and story. 
Prerequisite: Grade ofB or better in ENGL 
240 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

411 

FORM AND THEORY: POETRY 

Principles of meter, rhyme, formal structure, 
and traditional and contemporary poetic forms 
will be studied through readings, discussion, 
and exercises. Designed to enhance skills in both 
practical criticism and in creative writing, this 
course will pay particular attention to theories 
concerned with the relationship between form 
and content in poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 240 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ENGLISH 



412 

FORM AND THEORY: FICTION 

A course that examines philosophical and 
aesthetic theories of fiction, and the resulting 
fiction based on those theories. Authors will 
most likely include Aristotle, Calvino, Gardner, 
Gass, and Nabokov. Prerequisite: ENGL 240 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

420 

SELECTED WRITERS 

An intensive study of no more than three 
writers, selected on the basis of student and 
faculty interest. Possible combinations 
include: Frost, Hemingway, and Faulkner; 
O'Connor, Welty, and Porter; Spenser and 
Milton; Hawthorne, Melville, and Dickens; 
Woolf, Forster, and Lawrence; Joyce and 
Yeats. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

421 

TOPICS IN LITERATURE 

Examination of a literary theme, idea, or 
movement as it appears in one or more types 
of literature and as it cuts across various 
epochs. Possible topics include: American 
Novelists and Poets of the Jazz Age and 
Depression; The Bible and Literature; Gothic 
Tradition in American Literature; Mystery and 
Detective Fiction; The Hero in Literature. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

441 

POETRY WORKSHOP II 

An advanced workshop in the writing of 
poetry. Students will receive intensive anal- 
ysis of their own work and acquire experience 
in evaluating the work of their peers. Prereq- 
uisite: ENGL 341. Alternate years. 

442 

FICTION WORKSHOP II 

An advanced course in the writing of short 
fiction. Emphasis on the complexities of 
voice and tone. The student will be encouraged 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



to develop and control his or her individual 
style and produce publishable fiction. Prereq- 
uisite: ENGL 342. Alternate years. 

449 

ADVANCED CRITICISM 

Reading and discussion in the theory and 
history of criticism. Examination of both 
traditional and contemporary ideas about the 
value and nature of literary expression and its 
place in human culture generally. Work in the 
course includes practical as well as theoretical 
use of the ideas and methods of critical 
inquiry. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

The department provides internships in 
editing, legal work, publishing, and technical 
writing. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Recent studies include the role of Pennsyl- 
vania in the fiction of John O'Hara; the 
changing image of women in American art 
and literature (1890-1945); the hard-boiled 
detective novel; contemporary women writers; 
and Milton's use of the Bible in Paradise 
Lost. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

Recent projects include "The Function of 
the Past in the Fiction of William Faulkner" 
and "Illusion, Order, and Art in the Novels of 
Virginia Woolf." 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 




FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES 

Professor: MacKenzie (Chairperson) 
Associate Professors: Buedel, Maples 
Assistant Professor: G. Clark 
Part-time Instructors: A. Falk, Boring 

Study of foreign languages and literatures 
offers opportunity to explore broadly the 
varieties of human experience and thought. It 
contributes both to personal and to interna- 
tional understanding by providing competence 
in a foreign language and a critical acquain- 
tance with the literature and culture of foreign 
peoples. A major can serve as entree to careers 
in business, government, publishing, education, 
journalism, social agencies, translating, and 
writing. It prepares for graduate work in liter- 
ature or Unguistics and the international fields of 
poUtics, business, law, health, and area studies. 

French, German, and Spanish are offered 
as major fields of smdy. The major consists of 
at least eight courses numbered 1 1 1 or above. 
Majors seeking teacher certification and students 
planning to enter graduate school are advised to 
begin study of a second foreign language. The 
department encourages students to consider 
allied courses from related fields or a second 
major, and also individual or established 
interdisciplinary majors combining interest in 
several literatures or area or cross-cultural 



studies; for example. International Studies, 
20th Century Studies, the Major in Literature. 

The department endorses study abroad for all 
our students. Opportunities are available in pro- 
grams in France (Paris, Montpelier, Nancy, 
Rennes), in Germany and Austria (Berlin, 
Freiburg, Marburg, Munich, Vienna), and in 
Spain and Mexico (Madrid, Seville, Mexico 
City, Cuemavaca). Interested students should 
begin planning with their major advisor by the 
first week of the semester prior to departure. 
To qualify, students must have sophomore 
standing or better, an overall GPA of at least 
2.50, and at least a GPA of 3.00 in language 
courses. Other qualifications include recom- 
mendation from faculty in the major and 
completion of specific courses in language, 
literature, or culture. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
AND LITERATURES (fll) 

225 

CONTINENTAL LITERATURE 

A study of such major continental authors 
as Cervantes, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Dante, 
Ibsen, Proust, Gide, Kafka, Hesse, Goethe, 
Sartre, Camus, Brecht, and lonesco. Works 
read in English translation will vary and be 
organized around a different theme or topic; 
recent topics have been existentialism, modem- 
ism, drama, the Weimar era, and 20th century 
Scandinavian and German prose writers. 
Prerequisite: None. Taught in English. May be 
repeated for credit with consent of instructor. 
May be accepted toward the English major 
with consent of the Department of English. 

338 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE: 

SYSTEMS AND PROCESS 

Study of basic linguistic concepts as a tool for 
language learning and teaching. Discussion and 
application of language teaching techniques, 
including work in the language laboratory. 
Designed for future teachers of one or more 
languages and normally taken in the junior year. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



Students should arrange through the Department 
of Education to fulfill in the same semester the 
requirements of a participation experience in 
area schools. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
Taught in English. Does not count toward 
majors in French, German, and Spanish. 

FRENCH (FRN) 

A major consist of a minimum of 32 semester 
hours of FRN courses numbered 1 1 1 or above, 
including at least two from 402, 412, 423, and 
427. In addition, all majors who wish to be 
certified for secondary teaching must pass 
FRN 221-222, 228, and FLL 338 (the latter 
course with a grade of B or better). 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as cultural diversity course: FRN 
228. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: FRN 441. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in French consists of at least 16 
semester hours of courses numbered 221 and 
above. Courses 1 1 1 and 1 12 may be counted 
towards the minor, but then the minor must 
consist of at least 20 semester hours of 
courses, 12 hours of which must be numbered 
200 above. 

101-102 

ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

The aim of this sequence of courses is to 
acquire the fundamentals of the language with 
a view to using them. Regular practice in 
speaking, understanding, and reading. 

111-112 

INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

Review and development of the fundamen- 
tals of the language for immediate use in 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



speaking, understanding, and reading, with a 
view to building confidence in self-expres- 
sion. Prerequisite: FRN 102 or equivalent. 

221-222 

FRENCH LANGUAGE PRACTICE 

Further training in speaking, listening 
comprehension, reading, and writing. In- 
cludes extensive work in grammar. Prerequi- 
site: FRN 112 or equivalent. 

228 

MODERN FRANCE 

A course designed to familiarize students with 
political and social structures and cultural 
attitudes in contemporary French society. 
Material studied may include such documents as 
newspaper articles, interviews and sociological 
surveys, and readings in history, religion, 
anthropology, and the arts. Some attention to the 
changing education system and the family and to 
events and ideas which have shaped French 
society. May include some comparative study 
of France and the United States. Prerequisite: 
FRN 221 or consent of instructor. 

402 

FRENCH LITERATURE TO 1800 

Major authors and movements from the 
Medieval, Renaissance, Classical and Enlight- 
enment periods. Includes the chanson de 
geste, Villon, Montaigne, Comeille, Racine, 
Moliere, Voltaire, and Rousseau. Prerequi- 
site: FRN 222 or 228, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Alternate years. 

All 

FRENCH LITERATURE 
OF THE 19TH CENTURY 

The dimensions of the Romantic sensibil- 
ity: Musset, Hugo, Vigny, Balzac, Stendhal. 
Realism and Naturalism in the novels of 
Flaubert and Zola. Reaction in the poetry of 
Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, and 
Mallarme. Prerequisite: FRN 222 or 228, or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



423 

MODERN FRENCH THEATRE 

Major trends in French drama from the turn 
of the century to Existentiahsm and the 
Theatre of the Absurd, Giraudoux, Anouilh, 
Sartre, Camus, Beckett, lonesco. Genet, 
Adamov, and others. Prerequisite: FRN 222 
or 228, or consent of instructor. 

All 

FRENCH LITERATURE OF 

THE 20TH CENTURY 

Representative poets and novelists of 
modem France. Readings selected from the 
works of authors such as Proust, Gide, Aragon, 
Giono, Mauriac, Celine, Malraux, Saint- 
Exupery, Camus, the "new novelists" (Robbe- 
Grillet, Butor, Sarraute, Le Clezio), and the 
poetry of Apollinaire, Valery, the Surrealists 
(Breton, Reverdy, Eluard, Char), Saint- John 
Perse, Supervielle, Prevert, and others. Some 
attention to works of French-speaking African 
writers. Prerequisite: FRN 222 or 228, or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

441 

ADVANCED LANGUAGE PRACTICE 

Intensive practice for advanced students 
who wish to improve further their spoken and 
written French. Includes work in oral compre- 
hension, phonetics, pronunciation, oral and 
written composition, and translation. Prereq- 
uisite: One course from FRN 402, 412, 423, 
427: or consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Examples of recent studies in French 
include translation. Existentialism, the 
classical period, enlightenment literature, and 
Saint-Exupery. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 



GERMAN (GERM) 

A major consists of a minimum of 32 
semester hours of GERM courses numbered 
1 1 1 or above. One unit of FLL 225 may be 
included in the major with permission. GERM 
431 or 441 is required of all majors. 

All majors who wish to be certified for 
secondary teaching must pass GERM 323 and 
325. In addition to the 32 semester hours of 
courses for the major they must also pass FLL 
338 with a grade of B or better. All majors are 
urged to enroll in HIST 416, MUS 336, PSCI 
220, and THEA 335. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses and 
may be offered as such: GERM 221, 222. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as "D" 
courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may offered as such: GERM 431, 441. Students 
must check semester class schedules to deter- 
mine which courses are offered as "W" courses 
for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in German consists of at least 16 sem- 
ester hours of courses numbered 221 and above. 
Courses 1 1 1 and 1 12 may be counted toward 
the minor, but then the minor must consist of at 
least 20 semester hours of courses, 12 hours of 
which must be numbered 200 or above. One 
unit of FLL 225 may be included in the minor 
with permission. 

101-102 

ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

The aim of this sequence of courses is to 
acquire the fundamentals of the language with 
a view to using them. Regular practice in 
speaking, understanding, and reading. 

111-112 

INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

This sequence of courses reviews and develops 
the fundamentals of the language for immediate 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^M 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



use in speaking, understanding, and reading 
with a view to building confidence in self- 
expression. Prerequisite: GERM 102 or 
equivalent. 

221-222 

COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW 
AND LANGUAGE PRACTICE 

This sequence of courses is designed to review 
and develop skills in speaking, listening, writing 
and reading. Grammar and vocabulary building 
are stressed with intensive review, writing 
practice and some reading on contemporary 
issues in German-speaking countries. Some 
attention is given to the development of the 
language, its relationship to English and 
Phonetics. Prerequisite: GERM 112 or 
equivalent. 

323 

SURVEY OF GERMAN 
LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION I 
Designed to acquaint the student with 
important periods of German literature, 
representative authors, and major cultural 
developments in Germany, Austria, and 
Switzerland. The course deals with literature 
and culture from the Early Middle Ages 
through the 18th century. Prerequisite: 
GERM 222 or consent of instructor. 

325 

SURVEY OF GERMAN 

LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION II 

Designed to acquaint the student with 
important periods of German literature, repre- 
sentative authors, and major cultural develop- 
ments in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. 
The course deals with literature and culture 
from the 19th century to the present. Prerequi- 
site: GERM 222 or consent of instructor. 

411 

THE NOVELLE 

The German Novelle as a genre relating to 
various literary periods. Prerequisite: GERM 
323 or 325, or consent of instructor. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



421 

GERMAN POETRY 

A study of selected poets or the poetry of various 
literary periods. Possible topics include: Romantic 
poetry, Heine, Rilke, and Benn. Prerequisite: 
GERM 323 or 325, or consent of instructor. 

431 

GOETHE 

A study of the life and works of Goethe. Goethe's 
significance in the Classical period and later. 
Readings in the major works. Prerequisite: 
GERM 323 or 325, or consent of instructor. 

433 

CLASSICAL GERMAN DRAMA 

The development of das klassische Drama 
with emphasis on works of Lessing, Goethe, 
Kleist, and Schiller. Prerequisite: GERM 323 
or 325, or consent of instructor. 

441 

CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE 

Representative poets, novelists and drama- 
tists of contemporary Germany, Switzerland 
and Austria covering the period from 1945 to 
the present. Readings selected from writers 
such as: Borchert, Boll, Brecht, Benn, Frisch, 
Durrenmatt, Bichsel, Handke, Walser, Grass 
and others. Prerequisite: GERM 323 or 325, 
or consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Examples of recent studies in German include 
Classicism, Germanic Mythology, Hermann 
Hesse, the dramas of Frisch and Durrenmatt. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

GREEK (GRK) 

SEE RELIGION 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 



HEBREW (HEBR) 

SEE RELIGION 

SPANISH (SPAN) 

A major consists of 32 semester hours of 
SPAN courses numbered 1 1 1 and above. One 
course must focus on literature from Spain and 
one course must focus on literature from 
Spanish America. Eight semester hours must 
be at the 400 level. In addition, all majors who 
wish to be certified for secondary teaching 
must pass SPAN 22 1 , 222, 3 II , 4 1 8 and FLL 
338 (the latter with a grade of "B" or better). 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: 
SPAN 221, 222, 311. Students must check 
semester class schedules to determine which 
courses are offered as "D" courses for that 
semester. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: SPAN 418. 

Minor 

A minor in Spanish consists of at least 16 
semester hours of courses numbered 22 1 or 
above. Courses 1 1 1 and 1 12 may be counted 
toward the minor, but then the minor must con- 
sist of at least 20 semester hours of courses, 12 
hours of which must be numbered 200 or above. 

101-102 

ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

The aim of this sequence of courses is to 
acquire the fundamentals of the language with 
a view to using them. Regular practice in 
speaking, understanding, and reading. 

111-112 

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

This sequence of courses reviews and 
develops the fundamentals of the language for 
immediate use in speaking, understanding, 
reading and writing with a view to building 
confidence in self-expression. Prerequisite: 
SPAN 102 or equivalent. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



221-222 

CONVERSATION, REVIEW, 
AND COMPOSITION 

Intensive discussion and writing on a variety 
of subjects in conjunction with contemporary 
readings. Includes in-depth grammar review. 
Designed to provide greater breadth and 
fluency in spoken and written Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPAN J 12 or equivalent. 

311 

HISPANIC CULTURE 

To introduce students to the Spanish- 
speaking people — their values, customs and 
institutions, with reference to the geographic 
and historical forces governing present-day 
Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: SPAN 
222 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

321 

SPECIAL TOPICS OR AUTHORS 
IN LITERATURE 

Examination of significant cultural or literary 
topics concerning the Spanish-speaking world. 
Possible topics or genres include: Latin American 
short stories; modem Spanish theatre; Latin 
American women writers; Chicano literature. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 222 or consent of the 
instructor. Can be repeated once for credit. 

323 

SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE AND 

CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with 
important periods of Spanish literature, repre- 
sentative authors, and major socio-economic 
developments. The course deals with the 
literature from the Middle Ages to the present. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 222 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Alternate years. 

325 

SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LIT- 
ERATURE AND CIVILIZATION 

Designed to acquaint the student with 
important periods of Spanish- American 
literature, representative authors, and major 



^m 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES • HISTORY 



socio-economic developments. The course 
deals with the literature, especially the essay 
and poetry, from the 16th century to the 
present. Prerequisite: SPAN 222 or consent 
of instructor. Alternate years. 

418 

ADVANCED LANGUAGE PRACTICE 

Intensive practice for advanced students 
who wish to improve further their spoken and 
written Spanish. Includes work in oral 
comprehension, pronunciation, oral and 
written composition, and translation. Pre- 
requisite: One SPAN course at the 300 's level 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

424 

SPANISH LITERATURE 
OF THE GOLDEN AGE 

A study of representative works and principal 
Uterary figures in the poetry, prose, and drama 
of the 16th and 17th centuries. Prerequisite: 
SPAN 323 and 325, or consent of instructor. 

426 

MODERN HISPANIC LITERATURE 

Readings of important works of drama, 
poetry, and prose from the major periods of 
the 19th and 20th century Spanish and Latin- 
American literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 323 
and 325, or consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Recent studies include literary, linguistic, 
and cultural topics and themes such as urban 
problems as reflected in the modem novel. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




HISTORY (HIST) 

Professors: Larson, Piper 

Associate Professor: Morris (Chairperson) 

Visiting Assistant Professor: Witwer 

A major consists of 10 courses, including HIST 
1 10, 1 1 1 , and 449. At least seven courses must 
be taken in the department. The following 
courses may be counted toward fulfilling the 
major requirements: AMST 200, PSCI 439, 
REL 226 and 228. Other appropriate courses 
outside the department may be counted upon 
departmental approval. For history majors who 
student teach in history, the major consists of 
nine courses. In addition to the courses Usted 
below, special courses, independent study, and 
honors are available. Special courses recently 
taught and anticipated include a biographical 
study of European Monarchs, the European 
Left, the Industrialization and Urbanization of 
Modem Europe, Utopian Movements in 
America , the Peace Movement in America, 
The Vietnam War, and American Legal 
History. History majors are encouraged to 
participate in the intemship program. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses and 
may be offered as such: HIST 120, 140, 230, 
240, 310. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "D" courses for that semester. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



HISTORY 



The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: HIST 218, 230, 443, 
449. Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

Minor 

Three minors are offered by the Department 
of History. The following courses are required 
to complete a minor in American history: HIST 
125, 126, and three courses in American history 
numbered 200 and above (HIST 1 20 and/or 310 
may be substituted.) A minor in European 
history requires the completion of HIST 1 10, 
1 1 1 and three courses in European history 
numbered 200 and above. To obtain a minor in 
History (without national or geographical 
designation), a student must complete six 
courses in history, of which three must be 
chosen from HIST 110, 1 1 1, 125, and 126 and 
three must be history courses numbered 200 
and above. 

105 

SELECTED THEMES IN 
WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

A survey of the political, economic, social, 
and cultural values and institutions in Western 
Civilization from the time of classical Greece to 
the present. One-half unit of credit. (Not open 
to students who have had HIST 110 and 111). 

110 

EUROPE 1500-1815 

An examination of the political, social, 
cultural, and intellectual history of Europe and 
its relations with other areas of the world from 
1500 to 1815. 

Ill 

EUROPE 1815-PRESENT 

An examination of the political, social, 
cultural, and intellectual history of Europe and 
its relations with other areas of the world from 
1 8 1 5 to the present. 



120 

LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY 

An examination of the native civilization, the 
age of discovery and conquest, Spanish colonial 
policy, the independence movements, and the 
development of modem institutions and gov- 
ernments in Latin America. Alternate years. 

125 

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1601-1877 

A study of the men, measures, and movements 
which have been significant in the development 
of the United States between 1607 and 1877. 
Attention is paid to the problems of minority 
groups as well as to majority and national 
influences. 

126 

UNITED STATES HISTORY 1877-PRESENT 

A study of men, measures, and movements 
which have been significant in the development 
of the United States since 1877. Attention is paid 
to the problems of minority groups as well as to 
majority and national influences. 

140 

SURVEY OF ASIAN HISTORY 

A comprehensive overview of Asian history 
with emphasis on those Pacific Rim countries 
which have greatest current impact on political 
and economic development in the United 
States. Alternate Years. 

210 

ANCIENT HISTORY 

A study of the ancient western world, including 
the foundations of the western tradition in 
Greece, the emergence and expansion of the 
Roman state, its experience as a republic, and 
its transformation into the Empire. The course 
will focus on the social and intellectual life of 
Greece and Rome as well as political and 
economic changes. Alternate years. 

Ill 

MEDIEVAL EUROPE AND ITS NEIGHBORS 

The history of Europe from the dissolution of 
the Roman Empire to the mid- 15th century. The 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



® 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



HISTORY 



course will deal with the growing estrangement 
of western Catholic Europe from Byzantium and 
Islam, culminating in the Crusades; the rise of 
the Islamic Empire and its later fragmentation; 
the development and growth of feudalism; the 
conflict of empire and papacy, and the rise of the 
towns. Alternate years. 

216 

FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON 

An analysis of the political, social, and 
intellectual background of the French Revolu- 
tion, a survey of the course of revolutionary 
development, and an estimate of the results of 
the Napoleonic conquests and administration. 
Prerequisite: HIST 110 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Alternate years. 

218 

EUROPE IN THE ERA OF THE WORLD WARS 
An intensive study of the political, economic, 
social, and cultural history of Europe from 
1900-1945. Topics include the rise of 
irrationalism, the origins of the First World 
War, the Communist and Fascist Revolutions, 
and the attempts to preserve peace before 1939. 
Prerequisite: HIST 111 or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 

219 

CONTEMPORARY EUROPE 

An intensive study of the poUtical, economic, 
social, and cultural history of Europe since 1945. 
Topics include the post-war economic recovery 
of Europe, the Sovietization of Eastern Europe, 
the origins of the Cold War, decolon-ization, and 
the flowering of the welfare state. Prerequisite: 
HIST 111 or consent of instructor. 

Ill 

HISTORY OF WORLD WAR II 

A comprehensive examination of World War 
II, emphasizing the effects of ideological, eco- 
nomic, and political forces on the formulation 
of military strategy and the conduct of opera- 
tion; the nature and extent of the expansion of 
government powers; and the experience of war 



from the perspective of ordinary civilians and 
military alike. Does not count toward distribution. 

226 

COLONIAL AMERICA AND 
THE REVOLUTIONARY ERA 

The establishment of British settlements on the 
American continent, their history as colonies, the 
causes and events of the American Revolution, 
the critical period following independence, and 
proposal and adoption of the United States 
Constitution. Alternate years. 

230 

AFRO- AMERICAN HISTORY 

A study of the experiences and participation 
of Afro- Americans in the United States. The 
course includes historical experiences such as 
slavery, abolition, reconstruction, and urbaniza- 
tion. It also raises the issue of the development 
and growth of white racism, and the effect of this 
racism on contemporary Afro-American social, 
intellectual, and political life. Alternate years. 

240 

MODERN CHINA 

This course will explore the social, political 
and cultural changes in China since the early 19th 
Century. Particular attention will be given to the 
Communist Revolution and the developments in 
China since Mao's death. Alternate years. 

244 

20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES 

This course begins with the Progressive Era and 
includes the political, economic, and social 
developments in the 20th century. Emphasis will 
be placed on the domestic and international 
demands which have faced the United States in 
the period following World War II. 

310 

WOMEN IN HISTORY 

An examination of the social, political, 
economic and intellectual experience of women 
in the Western World from ancient times to the 
present. May be taken for either one-half unit 
(section 310A) or full unit (section 31 OB); 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



HISTORY 

• 



declared majors and prospective majors 
should take the full-unit course, 310B. 

316 

CONFLICT IN WESTERN CIVILIZATION 

An in-depth study of the changing nature 
of war and its relationship to the development 
of Western Civilization since the end of the 
Middle Ages. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on the role of war in the development 
of the modem nation state and the origins and 
nature of total war. Alternate years. 

320 

DIPLOMATIC HISTORY 
OF EUROPE SINCE 1789 

A survey of the development of the European- 
states system and the relations between the 
European states since the beginning of the 
French Revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 1 1 1 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

ill 

THE CRISIS OF LIBERALISM AND 

NATIONALISM: EUROPE 1848-1870 

An in-depth investigation of the crucial 
"Middle Years" of 19th century Europe from 
the revolutions of 1 848 through the unification 
of Germany. The course centers on the 
struggles for power within the major states of 
Europe at this time, and how the vehicle of 
nationalism was used to bring about one type 
of solution. Alternate years. 

328 

AGE OF JEFFERSON AND JACKSON 

The theme of the course is the emergence 
of the political and social characteristics that 
shaped modem America. The personalities of 
Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, John 
Randolph, Aaron Burr, and Andrew Jackson 
receive special attention. Special considera- 
tion is given to the first and second party 
systems, the decline in community cohesive- 
ness, the westward movement, and the 
growing importance of the family as a unit of 
social organization. Alternate years. 



332 

CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION 

The problems and events leading to war, the 
political and military history of the war, and the 
bitter aftermath to the Compromise of 1 877. 

340 

20TH CENTURY UNITED STATES RELIGION 
The study of historical and cultural develop- 
ments in American society which relate to 
religion or what is commonly called religion. 
This involves consideration of the institutional 
and intellectual development of several faith 
groups as well as discussion of certain prob- 
lems, such as the persistence of religious 
bigotry and the changing modes of church-state 
relationships. Alternate years. 

416 

HISTORY OF REFORMATION THOUGHT 

A study of the ideas and systems of ideas 
propounded prior to the Reformation, but which 
are historically related to its inception, and of 
the ideas and systems of ideas involved in the 
formulation of the major Reformation Protestant 
traditions, and in the Catholic Reformation. 
Included are the ideas of the humanists of the 
Reformation Era. Alternate years. 

418 

HISTORY OF RENAISSANCE THOUGHT 

A study of the classical, humanist, and 
scholastic elements involved in the develop- 
ment of the Renaissance outlook on views and 
values, both in Italy and in Northern Europe. 
The various combinations of social and political 
circumstances which constitute the historical 
context of these intellectual developments will 
be noted. Alternate years. 

442 

UNITED STATES SOCIAL AND 
INTELLECTUAL HISTORY TO 1877 
A study of the social and intellectual 
experience of the United States from its colonial 
antecedents through reconstmction. Among the 
topics considered are Puritanism, Transcenden- 
talism, community life and organization. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



HISTORY • INSTITUTE FOR MANAGEMENT STUDIES AND MANAGEMENT SCHOLARS PROGRAM 



education, and social reform movements. 
Prerequisites: Two courses from HIST 125, 
126, 230; or consent of instructor. 

443 

UNITED STATES SOCIAL AND 
INTELLECTUAL HISTORY SINCE 1877 

A study of the social and intellectual 
experience of the United States from recon- 
struction to the present day. Among the topics 
considered are social Darwinism, pragmatism, 
community life and organization, education 
and social reform movements. Prerequisite: 
Two courses from HIST 125, 126, 230; or 
consent of instructor. 

449 

HISTORICAL METHODS 

This course focuses on the nature and 
meaning of history. It will open to the student 
different historical approaches and will 
provide the opportunity to explore these 
approaches in terms of particular topics and 
periods. Majors are required to enroll in this 
course in either their junior or senior year. 
The course is open to other students who have 
two courses in history or consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Typically, history interns work for local 
government agencies engaged in historical 
projects or for the Lycoming County Histori- 
cal Museum. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 
Recent topics include studies of the 
immigration of American blacks, political 
dissension in the Weimer republic, Indian 
relations before the American Revolution, and 
the history of Lycoming County. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




INSTITUTE FOR 

MANAGEMENT 

STUDIES (IMS) AND 

MANAGEMENT 

SCHOLARS 

PROGRAM 

Associate Professor: Madresehee (Director) 

The purpose of the Institute for Management 
Studies is to enhance the educational opportuni- 
ties for students majoring or minoring in 
accounting, business administration, or econom- 
ics. It does this by offering an expanded intern- 
ship program, special seminars on important 
management topics, student involvement in 
faculty research and professional projects, 
executive development seminars, and a Manage- 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



INSTITUTE FOR MANAGEMENT STUDIES AND MANAGEMENT SCHOLARS PROGRAM 



ment Scholars Program for academically 
talented students (described below). In addition, 
the IMS hosts guest speakers and conferences on 
current management issues. 

To become a member of the Institute for 
Management Studies, a student must meet the 
following criteria: 

1 . The student has a major in accounting, 
business administration, or economics and 
has completed three courses in one of these 
departments, or the student has a minor in 
accounting, business administration, or 
economics and has completed two courses 
in one of these departments. 

2. The student has at least sophomore status. 

3. The student has a GPA of 2.50 or higher. 
To graduate as a member of the IMS, the 

student must complete an appropriate 
practicum, internship, or independent study 
which results in a major paper; participate in 
designated IMS seminars and events; and 
maintain a GPA of 2.50 or higher. 

340 

MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP STUDY 
A practicum in which students work as interns 
for businesses, government agencies and 
nonprofit organizations in the Williamsport 
area and locations in Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, New York, Washington, D.C., and 
other places. Reading, writing and research 
assignments vary by the credit value of the 
experience. Enrollments are limited to the 
numbers of available placements. Most 
internships are full-time paid positions, 
although part-time and unpaid positions are 
occasionally accepted. Four to eight semester 
hours of credit. Prerequisite: Membership in 
the Institute for Management Studies and 
consent of the Director. May be repeated for 
a maximum of 16 credits. 



Management Scholars Program 

The Management Scholars Program is 
designed for academically talented students 
who have a major or minor in accounting, 
business administration, or economics and who 
are members of the Institute for Management 
Studies (students who are accepted into the 
Management Scholars Program automatically 
become members of the Institute for Manage- 
ment Studies). The students participate in 
special management seminars, have internships 
and/or independent study experiences, and give 
formal presentations in the senior year. 

To become a Management Scholar, a 
student must meet the following criteria: 

1 . The student meets the requirements for 
becoming a member of the Institute for 
Management Studies (described above). 

2. The student has a GPA of 3.25 or higher. 

3. The student has successfully participated 
in three or more semesters of the Lycoming 
Scholars Program, or the student has been 
approved by the Director of the Manage- 
ment Scholars Program. 

Management scholars are required to 
complete two Management Scholar Seminars 
and to complete an appropriate internship, 
practicum, and/or independent study which 
results in a major paper and a public presenta- 
tion of their findings. To graduate as a 
Management Scholar, the student must also 
complete a major or minor in one of the three 
departments and maintain a GPA of 3.25 or 
higher. 

Students who are currently Lycoming College 
Scholars are welcome to become Management 
Scholars and participate in both programs. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^H 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 




INTERNATIONAL 
STUDIES (INST) 

Professor: Larson (Coordinator) 

The major is designed to integrate an 
understanding of the changing social, poHtical, 
and historical environment of Europe today 
with study of Europe in its relations to the rest 
of the world, particularly the United States. It 
stresses the international relations of the North 
Atlantic community and offers the student 
opportunity to emphasize either European 
studies or international relations. The 
program provides multiple perspectives on the 
cultural traits that shape popular attitudes and 
institutions. Study of a single country is 
included as a data-base for comparisons, and 
study of its language as a basis for direct 
communication with its people. 

The program is intended to prepare a student 
either for graduate study or for careers which 
have an international component. International 



obligations are increasingly assumed by gov- 
ernment agencies and a wide range of business, 
social, religious, and educational organizations. 
Opportunities are found in the fields of journal- 
ism, publishing, communications, trade, bank- 
ing, advertising, management, and tourism. The 
program also offers flexible career preparation 
in a variety of essential skills, such as research, 
data analysis, report writing, language skills, 
and the awareness necessary for dealing with 
people and institutions of another culture. 
Preparation for related careers can be obtained 
through the guided selection of courses outside 
the major in the areas of business, economics, 
foreign languages and literatures, government, 
history, and international relations or through a 
second major. Students should design their 
programs in consultation with members of the 
Committee on International Studies. 

By completing six to eight additional courses 
in the social sciences (which include those 
courses needed to complete a major in econom- 
ics, history, political science, or sociology/ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 



anthropology) and the required program in 
education, students can be certified for the 
teacher education program in social studies. 
By completing a major in the foreign lan- 
guages (five or more courses) and the educa- 
tion program, students can be certified to 
teach that language. The International Studies 
program also encourages participation in 
study abroad programs such as programs at 
Westminster College in Oxford, England, as 
well as the Washington and United Nations 
semesters. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: INST 449. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

The major consists of 1 1 courses including 
INST 449 plus the following: 

International Relations Courses - Four or 
two courses (if two, then four must be taken 
from Area Courses). Courses within this 
group are designed to provide a basic under- 
standing of the international system and of 
Europe's relations with the rest of the world. 
PSCI 225 is required. 

PSCI 225 International Relations 

ECON 343 International Trade 

HIST 320 European Diplomatic History 

PSCI 439 American Foreign Policy 

Area Courses - Four or two courses (if two, 
then four must be taken from International 
Relations Courses). Courses within this group 
are designed to provide a basic understanding 
of the European political, social, and eco- 
nomic environment. HIST 1 1 1 and ECON 
221 are required. 

HIST 1 1 1 Europe 1 8 1 5-Present 

ECON 22 1 Comparative Economic Systems 

PSCI 220 Comparative Pohtics 

HIST 2 1 8 Europe in the Era of the 

World Wars 
HIST 2 1 9 Contemporary Europe 



National Courses 

Language - Two courses in one language. 

FRN 221, plus one course numbered 222 

or above (except 228) 

GERM 22 1 , plus one course numbered 222 

or above 

SPAN 221, plus one course numbered 222 or 

above (except 311) 

Country - One course. The student must 
select, according to his or her language 
preparation, one European country which will 
serve as a social interest area throughout the 
program. The country selected will serve as 
the base for individual projects in the major 
courses wherever possible. 

France FRN 228 Modem France 

Germany HIST N80 Topics in 

German History 
Spain SPAN 311 Hispanic Culture 

Elective Course - One course which should 
involve further study of some aspect of the 
program. Appropriate courses are any area or 
international relations courses not yet taken; 
HIST 1 10, 316; PSCI 326, 438; related foreign 
literature courses counting toward the fine arts 
requirement and internships. 

449 

SENIOR SEMINAR 

A one-semester seminar, taken in the 
senior year, in which students and several 
faculty members will pursue an integrative 
topic in the field of international studies. 
Students will work to some extent independ- 
ently. Guest speakers will be invited. The 
seminar will be open to qualified persons 
from outside the major and the College. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



LITERATURE • MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 



LITERATURE (lit) 

Associate Professor: Maples (Coordinator) 

This major recognizes literature as a 
distinct discipline beyond national boundaries 
and combines the study of any two literatures 
in the areas of English, French, German, and 
Spanish. Students can thus explore two 
literatures widely and intensively at the upper 
levels of course offerings within each of the 
respective departments while developing and 
applying skills in foreign languages. The 
major prepares students for graduate study in 
either of the two literatures studied or in 
comparative literature. 

The major requires at least six literature 
courses, equally divided between the two 
literatures concerned. The six must be at the 
advanced level as determined in consultation 
with advisors (normally courses numbered 
200 and above in English and 400 and above 
in foreign languages). In general, two of 
the advanced courses in each literature should 
be period courses. The third course, taken 
either as a regular course or an independent 
study, may have as its subject another period, 
a particular author, genre, or literary theme, or 
some other unifying approach or idea. 
Beyond these six, the major must include at 
least two additional courses from among those 
counting toward a major in the departments 
involved. Any prerequisite courses in the 
respective departments (for example: ENGL 
106, FRN 221-222 or 228, GERM 221-222, 
SPAN 221-222) should be taken during the 
freshman year. Students should design their 
programs in consultation with a faculty 
member from each of the literatures con- 
cerned. Programs for the major must be 
approved by the departments involved. 




MATHEMATICAL 
SCIENCES 

Associate Professors: Haley, Sprechini 
Assistant Professors: DeSilva, Golshan, 

Weida (Chairperson) 
Visiting Assistant Professor: Spickler 
Visiting Instructors: Burke, Schweinsberg 
Part-time Instructors: Davis, Abercrombie, 

Collins 
The Department of Mathematical Sciences 
offers major and minor programs in 
computer science and mathematics. 

ACTUARIAL 
MATHEMATICS 

Associate Professor: Gene Sprechini, 
(Coordinator) 
The Actuarial Mathematics major is 
designed to offer, within a liberal arts frame- 
work, coursework to prepare for an actuarial 
career. Students obtain the necessary math- 
ematical background for the first actuarial 
exam and two or three exams beyond the 
first one. Students also obtain some back- 
ground in accounting, economics, and business 
which is needed for an actuarial career. At the 
time of completion of all major requirements, 
or shortly thereafter, a student should be 
prepared to sit for up to four of the examina- 
tions of the Society of Actuaries. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 



The Actuarial Mathematics major consists 
of 14 unit courses and two semesters of non- 
credit colloquia. In Mathematical Sciences, 
required courses are CPTR 125, MATH 128, 
129, 130, 234, 238, 321, 332, 333, and 338. 
Also required are ACCT 1 10; ECON 1 10; one 
of MATH 214 or ECON 230; one of ACCT 
111; ACCT 44 1 ; BUS 338; ECON 33 1 or 
441 ; two semesters of MATH 339 or 449 
taken during the junior and/or senior years; 
successful completion of the Course 100 
Examination of the Society of Actuaries by 
the end of the junior year. 

Recommended courses include: ACCT 
223, 224, 226, 344; BUS 339, 342; CPTR 108; 
ECON 220, 229, 332, 337; MATH 106, 231, 
432, 434. It is also strongly recommended that 
the student complete of as many of the actuarial 
examinations as possible prior to graduation. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

(CPTR) 

A major in computer science consists of 1 1 
courses: MATH 116, 128, and 129, CPTR 125, 
246, 247, 32 1 , 344, 445, and two other computer 
science courses numbered 320 or above. 
Recommended extradepartmental courses: 
PHIL 225 and PS Y 337. In addition to the regular 
courses listed below, special courses are 
occasionally available. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: CPTR 246, 344. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in computer science consists of 
Math 1 16, CPTR 125, 246, 247, and two other 
computer science courses numbered 220 or 
above. 

The recommended schedule to enable a 
student to complete the computer science major 
in four years is as follows: 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Spring 

CPTR 125 CPTR 246* 

MATH 127, 128, or 129 MATH 127, 128, or 
ENGL 106* 129 

* CPTR 246 is often offered as a writing 
intensive course, and ENGL 106 is a prerequi- 
site to all writing intensive courses. 



Spring 

CPTR elective 
MATH 129 



Spring 

CPTR 445 or 
CPTR elective 

CPTR 321 
or CPTR elective 

Spring 

CPTR 445 or 
CPTR elective 

CPTR 321 
or CPTR elective 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall 

CPTR 247 
MATH 116 
MATH 128 or 129 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall 

CPTR 344 or 

CPTR elective 
(MATH 130 

recommended) 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall 

CPTR 344 or 

CPTR elective 
(MATH 130 

recommended) 

101 

MICROCOMPUTER FILE MANAGEMENT 

An introduction to a file-management 
system, i.e. a database system that uses a 
single file, in the MS-DOS environment. 
One-half unit of credit. This course may not 
be used to meet distribution requirements. 

108 

MATHEMATICAL PROBLEM-SOLVING 
WITH MICROCOMPUTERS 

An introduction to the use of microcom- 
puter-based, integrated software in solving 
problems from mathematics and related areas. 
Included are uses of spreadsheet, database and 
graphics functions to analyze, solve, and 
display solutions to problems from the areas 
of number theory, algebra, geometry, statis- 
tics, and the mathematics of business and 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICAL SCENCES 



finance. Emphasis is given to the processes 
involved in mathematical modeling. Labora- 
tory experience is included using current 
software. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemp- 
tion from MATH 100. 

125 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Introduction to programming utilizing a 
block-structured high-level programming 
language. Topics include algorithms, program 
structure, and computer configuration. 
Laboratory experience is included 

246 

PRINCIPLES OF 
ADVANCED PROGRAMMING 

Principles of effective programming, 
including structured programming, stepwise 
refinement, assertion proving, style, debug- 
ging, control structures, decision tables, finite 
state machines, recursion, and encoding. 
Utilities most recently used include SVS 
Pascal, the UMX operating system, C, and 
Shell programming. Prerequisite: A grade of 
C or better in CPTR 125. 

247 

DATA STRUCTURES 

Representation of data and algorithms 
associated with data structures. Topics 
include representation of lists, trees, graphs 
and strings, algorithms for searching and 
sorting. Prerequisite: A grade ofC or better 
in CPTR 246 or consent of instructor. 
Corequisite: MATH 116. 

321 

INTRODUCTION TO 
NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 

Topics from the theory of interpolation; 
numerical approaches to approximation of roots 
and functions, integration, systems of differen- 
tial equations, linear systems, matrix inversion, 
and the eigenvalue problem. Prerequisite: 
CPTR 125 and MATH 129; MATH 130 strongly 
recommended. Cross-listed as MA TH 321. 



344 

MACHINE LANGUAGE 

Principles of machine language program- 
ming; computer organization and representa- 
tion of numbers, strings, arrays, and list 
structures at the machine level; interrupt 
programming, relocatable code, linking load- 
ers; interfacing with operating systems. Pre- 
requisite: A grade ofC or better in CPTR 246; 
CPTR 247 strongly recommended. 

345 

INTRODUCTION TO 
COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

An introduction to graphics hardware and 
software with emphasis on the mathematics 
necessary to represent, transform, and display 
images of two- and three-dimensional objects. 
Laboratory exercises will be designed to explore 
the capabilities of the graphics system and to 
test the students' understanding of the 
principles discussed in class. Prerequisite: 
CPTR 246 and either CPTR 247 or consent of 
instructor; MATH 130 recommended. Alter- 
nate years. 

349 

DATABASE SYSTEMS 

External storage structures, hashed files, 
indexed files; relational, network, and 
hierarchical data models; relational algebra 
and the relational calculus; design theory for 
relational databases; query optimization; 
concurrent operations; database protection. 
Prerequisite: CPTR 247. Alternate years. 

445 

SYSTEMS PROGRAMMING 

The emphasis in this course is on the 
algorithms used in programming the various 
parts of a computer system. These parts 
include assemblers, loaders, editors, interrupt 
processors, input/output schedulers, processor 
and job schedulers, and memory managers. 
Prerequisite: CPTR 247 and 344. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 



446 

COMPILER CONSTRUCTION 

The emphasis in this course is on the 
construction of translators for programming 
languages. Topics include lexical analysis, 
block structure, grammars, parsing, program 
representation, and run-time organization. 
Prerequisite: CPTR 247. Alternate years. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

MATHEMATICS (MATH) 

A major in mathematics consists of 10 unit 
courses in the mathematical sciences and four 
semesters of non-credit colloquia: CPTR 125, 
MATH 128, 129, 130, 234, 238, 432, 434, and 
two other mathematics courses numbered 220 
or above, one of which may be replaced by 
MATH 112, 1 16, or 214. Majors are required 
to attend the colloquia during their junior and 
senior years (MATH 339 and 449 respec- 
tively). See the course description for further 
information regarding the colloquium require- 
ment. Students who are interested in pursuing 
a career in actuarial science should consider 
the actuarial mathematics major. 

Students seeking secondary certification in 
mathematics are required to complete MATH 
330, 336, and either 103 or 332, and are 
advised to enroll in PHIL 217. Also, all 
majors are advised to elect PHIL 225, 333 and 
PHYS 225, 226. 

In addition to the regular courses listed 
below, special courses are occasionally 
available. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: MATH 234. Stu- 



dents must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in mathematics consists of MATH 
128, 129, 234, 238, and two additional courses 
numbered 200 or above, one of which may be 
replaced with MATH 130. 

The recommended schedule to enable a 
student to complete the mathematics major in 
four years is as follows: 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall 

MATH 127, 128, or 129 
(possibly CPTR 125) 



Spring 

MATH 128 or 129 
CPTR 125 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Spring 

MATH 1 29 or 23 8 MATH 234 

MATH 130 MATH 238 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall 

MATH 432 or 434 
(possibly MATH 

elective *) 
MATH 339 



Spring 

MATH elective * 
if needed, CPTR 125 
MATH 339 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall 

MATH 432 or 434 
(possibly MATH 

elective *) 
MATH 339 



Spring 

if needed, MATH 
elective * 

ifneeded, CPTR 125 
MATH 339 

* Candidates for secondary certification in 
Mathematics must complete MATH 330 and 
336 as MATH electives. 

100 

INDIVIDUALIZED LABORATORY IN- 
STRUCTION IN BASIC ALGEBRA 

A self-paced study of arithmetic and 
decimals, fractions, the real number line, 
factoring, solutions to linear and quadratic 
equations, graphs of linear and quadratic 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICAL SCffiNCES 



functions, expressions with rational exponents, 
algebraic functions, exponential functions, and 
inequalities. This course is limited to students 
placed therein by the Mathematics Depart- 
ment. One-half unit of credit. 

103 

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 

Topics include tabular and graphical 
descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous 
probability distributions. Central Limit 
Theorem, one- and two-sample hypotheses 
tests, analysis of variance, chisquared tests, 
nonparametric tests, linear regression and 
correlation. Other topics may include index 
numbers, time series, sampling design, and 
experimental design. Course also includes 
some use of a microcomputer. Prerequisite: 
Credit for or exemption from MATH 100. 

106 

COMBINATORICS 

An introduction to the analysis of counting 
problems. Topics include permutations, 
combinations, binomial coefficients, inclu- 
sion/exclusion principle, and partitions. The 
nature of the subject allows questions to be 
posed in everyday language while still 
developing sophisticated mathematical 
concepts. Prerequisite: Credit for or 
exemption from MATH 100. 

109 

APPLIED ELEMENTARY CALCULUS 

An intuitive approach to the calculus 
concepts with applications to business, 
biology, and social-science problems. Not 
open to students who have completed MATH 
128. Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption 
from MATH 100. 



Ill 

FINITE MATHEMATICS 
FOR DECISION-MAKING 

An introduction to some of the principal 
mathematical models, not involving calculus, 
which are used in business administration, 
social sciences, and operations research. The 
course will include both deterministic models 
such as graphs, networks, linear programming 
and voting models, and probabilistic models 
such as Markov chains and games. Prerequisite: 
Credit for or exemption from MA TH 1 00. 

116 

DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 

An introduction to discrete structures. 
Topics include equivalence relations, parti- 
tions and quotient sets, mathematical induc- 
tion, recursive functions, elementary logic, 
discrete number systems, elementary combi- 
natorial theory, and general algebraic struc- 
tures emphasizing semi-groups, groups, 
lattices. Boolean algebras, graphs, and trees. 
Prerequisite: CPTR 125 or consent of 
instructor. 

127 

PRECALCULUS MATHEMATICS 

The study of polynomial, rational, exponen- 
tial, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, 
their graphs and elementary properties. This 
course is an intensive preparation for students 
planning to take Calculus (MATH 128-129), 
those in the Scholars Program, or those whose 
major specifically requires Precalculus. 
Prerequisite: Credit for or exemption from 
MATH 100. 

128-129 

CALCULUS WITH 
ANALYTIC GEOMETRY I & II 

Differentiation and integration of algebraic 
and trigonometric functions, conic sections and 
their applications, graphing plane curves, 
applications to related rate and external 
problems, areas of plane regions, volumes of 
solids of revolution, and other applications; 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 



differentiation and integration of transcenden- 
tal functions, parametric equations, polar 
coordinates, infinite sequences and series, and 
series expansions of functions. Prerequisite 
for 128: Exemption from or a grade ofC or 
better in MATH 127. Prerequisite for 129: 
exemption from or a grade ofC or better in 
MATH 128. 

130 

INTRODUCTION TO MATRIX ALGEBRA 

Systems of linear equations and matrix 
arithmetic. Points and hyperplanes, infinite 
dimensional geometries. Bases and linear 
independence. Matrix representations of 
linear mappings. The fixed point problem. 
Special classes of matrices. Prerequisite: 
MATH 127 or its equivalent. 

205 

MATHEMATICS IN 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

This course is intended for prospective 
elementary school teachers and is required of 
all those seeking elementary certification. 
Topics include systems of numbers and 
numeration, computational algorithms, 
environmental and transformation geometry, 
measurement, and mathematical concept 
formation. Observation and participation in 
Greater Williamsport elementary schools. 
Prerequisite: PSY 338 and credit for or 
exemption from MATH 100. Corequisite: 
Any EDUC course numbered 341 or above 
which is specifically required for elementary 
certification. 

214 

MULTIVARIABLE STATISTICS 

The study of statistical techniques involv- 
ing several variables. Topics include multiple 
regression and correlation, one-and two-way 
analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, 
analysis of two- and three-way contingency 
tables, and discriminant analysis. Other topics 
may include cluster analysis, factor analysis 



and canonical correlations, repeated measure 
designs, time series analysis, and nonparamet- 
ric methods. Course also includes extensive 
use of a statistical package (currently BMDP). 
Prerequisite: A grade ofC or better in MATH 
103 or its equivalent, or MATH 332. 

231 

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

A study of ordinary differential equations 
and linear systems. Solution techniques 
include: reduction of order, undetermined 
coefficients, variation of parameters, Laplace 
transforms, power series, and eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors. A brief discussion of numerical 
methods may also be included. Prerequisite: 
A grade of Cor better in MATH 129; MATH 
130 recommended. 

233 

COMPLEX VARIABLES 

Complex numbers, analytic functions, 
complex integration, Cauchy's theorems and 
their applications. Corequisite: MATH 238. 
Alternate years. 

234 

FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS 

Topics regularly included are the nature of 
mathematical systems, essentials of logical 
reasoning, and axiomatic foundations of set 
theory. Other topics frequently included are 
approaches to the concepts of infinity and 
continuity, and the construction of the real 
number system. The course serves as a bridge 
from elementary calculus to advanced courses 
in algebra and analysis. Prerequisite: A grade 
ofC or better in MATH 129 or 130; both 
courses recommended. 

238 

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS 

Algebra, geometry, and calculus in 
multidimensional Euclidean space; n-tuples, 
matrices; lines, planes, curves, surfaces; 
vector functions of a single variable, accelera- 
tion, curvature; functions for several variables. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICAL SCffiNCES 



gradient; line integrals, vector fields, multiple 
integrals, change of variable, areas, volumes; 
Green's theorem. Prerequisites: A grade of 
C or better in MATH 129, and either MATH 
130 or 231. 

321 

INTRODUCTION TO 
NUMERICAL ANALYSIS 

Topics from the theory of interpolation; 
numerical approaches to approximating roots 
and functions, integration, systems of differen- 
tial equations, linear systems, matrix inver- 
sion, and the eigenvalue problem. Prerequi- 
site: CPTR 125 and MATH 129; MATH 130 
strongly recommended. Cross-listed as CPTR 
321. 

330 

TOPICS IN GEOMETRY 

An axiomatic treatment of Euclidean 
geometry with an historical perspective. 
Prerequisite: MATH 234. Alternate years. 

332-333 

MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS MI 
A study of probability, discrete and 
continuous random variables, expected values 
and moments, sampling, point estimation, 
sampling distributions, interval estimation, 
test of hypotheses, regression and linear 
hypotheses, experimental design models. 
Corequisite: MATH 238. Alternate years. 

336 

CONCEPTS OF MATHEMATICS 
IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

A course designed for mathematics majors 
who are planning to teach at the secondary 
level. Emphasis will be placed on the mathe- 
matics that form the foundation of secondary 
mathematics. Ideas will be presented to 
famiharize the student with the various 
curriculum proposals, to provide for innova- 
tion within the existing curriculum, and to 
expand the boundaries of the existing 



curriculum. Prerequisite: A grade ofC or 
better in MATH 129; student must be junior or 
senior mathematics major enrolled in the 
secondary certification program. 

338 

OPERATIONS RESEARCH 

Queuing theory, including simulations 
techniques, optimization theory, including 
linear programming, integer programming, 
and dynamic programming; game theory, 
including two-person zero-sum games, coopera- 
tive games, and multiperson games. Prerequi- 
site: MATH 112 or 130. Alternate years. 

432 

REAL ANALYSIS 

An introduction to the rigorous analysis of 
the concepts of real variable calculus in the 
setting of normed spaces. Topics from: 
topology of the Euclidean plane, complete- 
ness, compactness, the Heine-Borel theorem; 
functions on Euclidean space, continuity, 
uniform continuity, differentiability; series 
and convergence; Riemann integral. Pre- 
requisite: MATH 238 and a grade of C or 
better in MATH 234. 

434 

ABSTRACT ALGEBRA 

An integrated approach to groups, rings, 
fields, and vector spaces and functions which 
preserve their structure. Prerequisite: MATH 
130 and a grade ofC or better in MATH 234. 

438 
SEMINAR 

Topics in modem mathematics of current 
interest to the instructor. A different topic is 
selected each semester. This semester is 
designed to provide junior and senior mathe- 
matics majors and other qualified students with 
more than the usual opportunity for concen- 
trated and cooperative inquiry. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. One-half unit of credit. 
This course may be repeated for credit. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES • MILITARY SCIENCE 



339 & 449 

MATH COLLOQUIA 

This non-credit but required course for 
junior and senior mathematics and actuarial 
mathematics majors offers students a chance 
to hear presentations on topics related to, but 
not directly covered in formal MATH courses. 
Mathematics majors are required to attend 
colloquia each semester of their junior (339) 
and senior (449) years. Actuarial mathematics 
majors are required to attend colloquia any 
two semesters of their junior and senior years. 
Mathematics majors must present two lectures, 
one during the junior year and one during the 
senior year. Actuarial mathematics majors 
present one lecture during one of the semes- 
ters in which they are enrolled. A letter grade 
will be given in semesters in which the 
student gives a presentation, otherwise the 
grade will be P/F. Seniors are strongly 
encouraged to give their presentations during 
the fall semester. Mathematics majors 
applying for the professional semester in 
education are required to give their first 
presentation before the eighth week of the fall 
semester of their junior year, and the second 
presentation before the eighth week of the fall 
semester of their senior year. With Depart- 
mental approval, mathematics majors will be 
required to take three semesters of 339 or 449; 
such approval is granted only in extraordinary 
circumstances and will require the student to 
give one presentation in each of the three 
semesters. One hour per week. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




MILITARY 
SCIENCE (MLsc) 

The U.S. Army Reserve Officer Training 
Corps (ROTC) program is offered to 
Lycoming College students in cooperation 
with Bucknell University. The introductory 
courses are taught on Lycoming's campus and 
the program provides transportation to 
Bucknell University for the advanced courses. 
Details of the ROTC program can be found on 
page 47. 

Oil 

INTRODUCTION TO ROTC 

The course is designed to acquaint the 
student with the ROTC program and with the 
Army as a potential employer after graduation. 
Students will learn about the Army's history, 
organization, equipment, and role in the 
nation. Students will also learn some funda- 
mental military skills, customs, and traditions. 
No credit. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



012 

INDIVIDUAL MILITARY SKILLS 

The course expands upon the skills learned 
in the previous semester. Several classes will 
be held at the rifle range to develop marks- 
manship skills. There will also be training in 
radio communication and first aid skills. No 
credit. 

021 

LAND NAVIGATION 

Students will learn how to use military 
topographic maps and reference systems. The 
course includes theory and practical exercises 
in navigating using compass, map terrain 
association. There will also be some instruc- 
tion and practice in military writing and 
briefing skills. No credit. 

022 

LEADERSHIP THEORY 

The focus is on leading a small group of 
individuals. The course examines the role of 
the leader, military leadership concept, 
personal character, decision-making, imple- 
menting decisions, motivation and supervi- 
sion. The course also includes instruction and 
practice on conducting performance-oriented 
training. No credit. 

031 

APPLIED LEADERSHIP 

The student serves as a small unit leader in 
the ROTC organization. Student leadership is 
evaluated and developed. The student has 
some responsibilities to care for and train 
younger cadets. Instruction on small (infan- 
try) unit tactics is used as a vehicle to provide 
students a variety of leadership challenges. 
No credit. 

032 

SMALL UNIT TACTICS 

The course requires planning and practic- 
ing tactical operations at small unit level. 
Students continue to apply/develop leadership 
skills in increasingly complex situations. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



Topics include preparation of orders, offense, 
defense, reconnaissance, patrolling, fire 
support, and airmobile operations. No credit. 

041 

MENTORING AND MANAGING 

The student serves as a cadet officer in 
the ROTC organization and plans and 
organizes several major training activities. 
Course work includes delegating and con- 
trolling, setting objectives, making leadership 
assessments, counseling, supervising, and 
evaluating. No credit. 

042 

PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS 

The student serves in a different leadership 
position and continues to develop and apply 
the skills learned in the previous semester. 
The course also examines military officership 
as a profession and the ethical behavior 
expected of an officer. The course also serves 
to prepare the student for an initial assignment 
as an Army lieutenant. No credit. 




1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MUSIC 



MUSIC (Mus) 



Professor: Boerckel (Chairperson) 
Associate Professor: Thayer 
Assistant Professor: Janda 
Part-time Instructors: Bailey, Burke, 

Campbell, Comegys, Flanagan, Grube, 

Lakey, Leidhecker, Mitchell, Mullen, 

Muzzo, Russell 

The student majoring in music is required 
to take a balanced program of music theory, 
history, applied music, and ensemble. A 
minimum of eight courses (exclusive of all 
ensemble, applied music and instrumental and 
vocal methods courses) is required and must 
include MUS 110, 1 11, 220, 221, 335, and 
336. Each major must participate in an 
ensemble (MUS 167, 168, and/or 169) and 
take one hour of applied music per week for a 
minimum of four semesters including the 
entire period in which the individual is 
registered as a music major (see MUS 160- 
169). The major must include at least one-half 
hour of piano in the applied program unless a 
piano proficiency test is requested and passed. 
Anyone declaring music as a second major 
must do so by the beginning of the junior year. 

Music majors seeking certification in music 
education (K-12) must also take PSY 1 10 and 
338; EDUC 200 and the Professional Semester; 
MUS 261-7, 332, 333, 334, 446, and pass the 
piano proficiency examination. Students who 
wish to obtain certification in music education 
should consult with the department as soon as 
possible, preferably before scheduling classes 
for the freshman year. 

The Music Department recommends that 
non-majors select courses from the following 
list to meet distribution requirements: MUS 
1 16, 1 17, 128, 135-8, 224, and 234. Applied 
music and ensemble courses may also be used 
to meet distribution requirements. 

Student recitals offer opportunities to gain 
experience in public performance. Music 
majors and other students qualified in perfor- 
mance may present formal recitals. 

The following courses have been approved 




to be offered as cultural diversity courses: MUS 
1 16, 128, 234. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "D" courses for that semester. 
The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a writing intensive course and 
may be offered as such: MUS 336. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

110-111 

MUSIC THEORY I AND II 

A two-semester course, intended for 
students who have some music-reading 
ability, which examines the fundamental 
components and theoretical concepts of music. 
Students develop musicianship through 
application of applied skills. Prerequisite to 
MUS 111: MUS 110. 

116 

INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC 

A basic course in the materials and tech- 
niques of music. Examples drawn from various 
periods of western and non- western styles are 
designed to enhance perception and apprecia- 
tion through careful and informed listening. 

117 

SURVEY OF WESTERN MUSIC 

A chronological survey of music in 
Western civilization from Middle Ages to the 
present. Composers and musical styles are 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^M 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MUSIC 

• 



considered in the context of the broader 
culture of each major era. 

128 

AMERICAN MUSIC 

An introductory survey of all types of Ameri- 
can music from pre-Revolutionary days to the 
present. Categories to be covered are folk music 
of different origins, the development of show 
music into Broadway musicals, serious concert 
music for large and small ensembles, jazz, and 
various popular musics from "Tin Pan Alley" to 
Rock to New Wave. Alternate years. 

135-136 

INTRODUCTION TO DANCE I AND II 

An introduction to the techniques of basic 
movement and interpretation in ballet, jazz, 
and modem dance. Classes include improvi- 
sation and choreography. Prerequisite for 
MUS 136: MUS 135 or consent of instructor. 
One-half unit of credit each. Not open to 
students who have received credit for THEA 
135-136 or THEA 235-236. 

137 

HISTORY OF THE DANCE I 

A survey of classical ballet from the Ballets de 
cour of 1 7th century France to the present with 
emphasis on the contributions of Petipa, Fokien, 
Cecchetti, and Balanchine. One -half unit of 
credit. Not open to students who have received 
creditforTHEA 137 or 138. 

138 

HISTORY OF THE DANCE II 

A survey of the forms of dance, excluding 
classical ballet, as independent works of art 
and as they have reflected the history of 
civilization from primitive times to the 
present. Prerequisite: MUS 137 or consent of 
instructor. One-half unit of credit. Not open 
to students who have received credit for 
THEA 137 or 138. 



220-221 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MUSIC THEORY III AND IV 

A continuation of the integrated theory 
course moving toward newer uses of music 
materials. Prerequisite: MUS 111. 

224 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC I 

A non-technical introduction to electronic 
music and MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital 
Interface) for the major and non-major alike. 
The course traces the development of MIDI 
from its origin to present-day digital synthesizers 
in combination with sequencing computers. 

225 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC II 

Further consideration of recording tech- 
niques. Use of microphones, multi-track 
recording, mixing, special effects devices, and 
synchronization will be introduced. Students 
will take part in live recording of concerts and 
rehearsals of a variety of ensembles. Student 
projects will include complete recording 
sessions and the production of electronic music 
compositions utilizing classical studio tech- 
niques and real-time networks. Prerequisite: 
MUS 224 or consent of instructor. 

234 

HISTORY OF JAZZ 

A survey of jazz styles, composers, and 
performers from 1 890 to the present: origins, 
ragtime, blues. New Orleans, Chicago, swing, 
bebop, cool, funky, free jazz, third stream, and 
contemporary. 

235-236 

INTERMEDIATE DANCE I AND II 

Studies of the techniques of basic movement 
and interpretation in ballet, jazz and modem 
dance at the intermediate level. Classes include 
improvisation and choreography. Prerequisite 
for MUS 235: MUS 136 or consent of instruc- 
tor. Prerequisite for MUS 236: MUS 235 or 
consent of instructor. One-half unit of credit 
each. Not open to students who have received 
credit for THEA 135-136 or THEA 235-236. 
330 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MUSIC 

• 



COMPOSITION I 

An introductory course for majors and non- 
majors who wish to explore their composing 
abihties. Guided individual projects in smaller 
instrumental and vocal forms, together with 
identification and use of techniques employed 
by the major composers of the 20th century. 
Prerequisite: MUS HI or consent of instructor. 

332 

TEACHING MUSIC IN THE SCHOOLS 

Methods and materials of teaching music 
in the schools with emphasis on curriculum 
development and procedures for choral and 
instrumental ensembles at the elementary and 
secondary levels. Course work will include 
observation of music classes in elementary 
and secondary schools in the Greater Wil- 
liamsport area. Alternate years. 

333 

CHORAL CONDUCTING 

A study of choral conducting with frequent 
opportunity for practical experience. Empha- 
sis will be placed upon technical development, 
rehearsal technique, and stylistic integrity. 
Prerequisite: MUS 110-111 or consent of 
instructor. Alternate years. 

334 

INSTRUMENTAL CONDUCTING 

A study of instrumental conducting with an 
emphasis on acquiring skills for self-analysis. 
Topics include the physical skills and intellec- 
tual preparation necessary for clear, expressive, 
and informed conducting. Other areas such as 
the development of rehearsal techniques and 
improvement of aural skills will be addressed on 
a continual basis. Prerequisite: MUS 110-111 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

335 

HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC I 

The development of musical styles and 
forms from Gregorian chant through Mozart, 
including composers from the medieval. 
Renaissance, baroque, and early classical eras. 



336 

HISTORY OF WESTERN MUSIC II 

The development of musical styles and 
forms from Beethoven to the present, includ- 
ing composers from the late classical, roman- 
tic, and modem eras. 

339 

ORCHESTRATION 

A study of modem orchestral instmments 
and examination of their use by the great 
masters with practical problems in instmmen- 
tation. The College Music Organizations 
serve to make performance experience 
possible. Prerequisite: MUS 110-111 or 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

440 

COMPOSITION II 

For students interested in intensive work 
emphasizing the development of a personal 
style of composing. Guided individual 
projects in larger instmmental and vocal 
forms, together with analysis of selected 
works from the 20th century repertory. Pre- 
requisite: MUS 330 or consent of instructor. 

445 

SPECIAL TOPICS IN MUSIC 

The intensive study of a selected area of 
music literature, designed to develop research 
techniques in music. The topic is announced 
at the Spring pre-registration. Sample topics 
include: Beethoven, Impressionism, Vienna 
1900-1914. Prerequisite: MUS 116, 117 or 
221; or consent of instructor. 

446 

RECITAL 

The preparation and presentation of a full- 
length public recital, normally during the 
student's senior year. MUS 446 may substi- 
tute for one hour of applied music (MUS 1 60- 
166). Prerequisite: Approval by the depart- 
ment. May be repeated for credit. 



470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



MUSIC 

• 



N80-N89 

D^DEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

APPLIED MUSIC 
AND ENSEMBLE 

The study of performance in piano, harpsi- 
chord, voice, organ, strings, guitar, brass, 
woodwinds, and percussion is designed to 
develop sound technique and a knowledge of 
the appropriate literature for the instrument. 
Student recitals offer opportunities to gain 
experience in public performance. 

Credit for applied music courses (private 
lessons) and ensemble (choir, orchestra and 
band) is earned on a fractional basis. One hour 
lesson per week earns one hour credit. One 
half-hour lesson per week earns one half-hour 
credit. Ensemble credit totals one hour credit if 
the student enrolls for one or two ensembles (for 
more information, see course descriptions 
below). When scheduling please note that an 
applied course or ensemble should not be sub- 
stituted for an academic course, but should be 
taken in addition to the normal four academic 
courses. 

Extra fees apply for private lessons (MUSI 60- 
1 66) as follows: $ 1 75 per semester for a half- 
hour lesson per week. $350 per semester for a 
one hour lesson per week. Private lessons are 
given for 1 3 weeks. 1 60 Piano or Harpsichord, 
161 Voice, 162 Strings or Guitar, 163 Organ, 
164 Brass, 165 Woodwinds, 166 Percussion. 

167 

ORCHESTRAL ENSEMBLE 

The Williamsport Symphony Orchestra 
allows students with significant instrumental 
experience to become members of this regional 
ensemble. Participation in the W.S.O. is 
contingent upon audition and the availability of 
openings. Students are allowed a maximum of 



one hour of Ensemble credit per semester. A 
student who is enrolled in orchestra only 
should register for MUS 167B (one hour 
credit). A student may belong to two en- 
sembles, choosing either Choir or Concert 
Band as the second group. Such a student will 
then register for MUS 1 67 A ( 1 /2 hour credit) 
plus either MUS 168 A (1/2 hour credit) or 
MUS 169A (1/2 hour credit). 

168 

CHORAL ENSEMBLE (CHOIR) 

Participation in the College Choir is de- 
signed to enable any student possessing at least 
average talent an opportunity to study choral 
technique. Emphasis is placed upon acquain- 
tance with choral literature, tone production, 
diction, and phrasing. Students are allowed a 
maximum of one hour of Ensemble credit per 
semester. A student who is enrolled in Choir 
only should register for MUS 168B (one hour 
credit). A student may belong to two en- 
sembles, choosing either Orchestra or Concert 
Band as the second group. Such a student will 
then register for MUS 168 A (1/2 hour credit) 
plus either MUS 167 A (1/2 hour credit) or 
MUS 169A( 1/2 hour credit). If a student has 
auditioned and been selected for the twenty- 
voice Chamber Choir (no credit available), he/ 
she should register for MUS 168C. 

169 

CONCERT BAND 

The College Concert Band allows students 
with some instrumental experience to become 
acquainted with good band literature and 
develop personal musicianship through 
participation in group instrumental activity. 
Students are allowed a maximum of one hour 
of Ensemble credit per semester. A student 
who is enrolled in Band only should register 
for MUS 169B (one hour credit). A student 
may belong to two ensembles, choosing either 
Orchestra or Choir as the second group. Such 
a student will then register for MUS 169 A 
(1/2 hour credit) plus either MUS 167A ( 1/2 
hour credit) or MUS 168A (1/2 hour credit). 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



MUSIC • NEAR EAST CULTURE AND ARCHAEOLOGY 




"HM NEAR EAST 
— -^ CULTURE AND 



If a student has auditioned and been selected 
for the woodwind or brass quintets (no credit 
available), he/she should register for MUS 
169C or 169D. 

INSTRUMENTAL AND 
VOCAL METHODS 

Instrumental and vocal methods classes are 
designed to provide students seeking certifica- 
tion in music education with a basic under- 
standing of all standard band and orchestral 
instruments as well as a familiarity with 
fundamental techniques of singing. 

MUS 261 Brass Methods (one hour credit) 

MUS 262 Percussion Methods 

(one hour credit) 
MUS 263, 264 String Methods I and 11 

(one hour credit each) 
MUS 265 Vocal Methods (one hour credit) 
MUS 266, 267 Woodwind Methods I and II 

(one hour credit each) 



ARCHAEOLOGY 

Professor: Guerra (Coordinator) 

The Near East culture and archaeology 
interdisciplinary major is designed to acquaint 
students with the "cradle of Western civiliza- 
tion," both in its ancient and modem aspects. 
Majors will complete a minimum of eight to 
ten courses related to the Near East. 

Required courses are described in their 
departmental sections and include: 

1 . Four courses in language and culture from: 
REL 228 History and Culture of the 

Ancient Near East 
ART 222 History of Art 
HIST 210 Ancient History 
REL 113 Old Testament Faith and History 
REL 224 Judaism and Islam 
Two semesters of foreign language 
HEBR 101-102, or GRK 101-102 

2. Two courses in archaeology from: 
REL 226, Biblical Archaeology, or 
special archaeology courses, such as 
independent studies or May or summer 
terms in the Near East. 

3 . Two courses in the cooperating departments 
(art, history, political science, religion and 
sociology-anthropology) or related depart- 
ments . These two courses, usually taken in the 
juniororsenioryears,canbeindependentstudy. 
Topicsshouldberelatedeithertothe ancient or 
the modem Near East and must be approved in 
advance by the committee supervising the 
interdisciplinary program. The study of modem 
Arabic or Hebrew is encouraged. 

Other courses may be suggested by the 
supervisory committee within the limits of a 1 0- 
course major. The number of courses taken 
within this program applicable toward fulfilling 
the College distribution requirements will vary 
according to the selection of courses. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



NURSING 



NURSING (NURS) 

Associate Professors: Parrish (Chairperson), 

Pagana 
Assistant Professors: Ficca, Gray-Vickrey 
Instructors: Lauver, Slotleski-Krum 
Visiting Instructor: Anderer 
Part-time Instructors: Ingram, Painter, 

Sawyer, Terry-Manchester 
Students wishing to major in nursing will 
be admitted to the College under the usual 
admission procedures. Freshmen are required 
to satisfactorily complete ENGL 106 or 107, 
CHEM 108, 1 15 and PSY 110. In addition, to 
be considered for continuation in nursing, a 
minimum GPA of 2.50 is required at comple- 
tion of the freshman year. A declaration of 
major form should be submitted to the 
Department of Nursing by September 30 of 
the Sophomore year. 

Major in Nursing 

The major in nursing consists of: NURS 
221, 330, 331, 332, 333, 336, 337, 338, 435, 
440, 441, 442, and nursing elective (422, 424, 
430, or 443) or N80-N89. Statistics also is 
required. Courses are ordered and must be 
taken in sequence. In addition, the following 
are prerequisites for specific nursing courses: 
CHEM 108, 115; BIO 113-114, 226; PSY 110. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: NURS 221, 435. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Second Degree Students 

The Department of Nursing offers a unique 
opportunity for individuals who have already 
earned a baccalaureate degree in another 
discipline to complete the requirements for a 
B.S.N, in 18 months. Students interested in 
pursuing this fastrack program must complete 
the hberal arts and general science requirements 
prior to beginning this 1 8 month clinical track. 




Applications are accepted throughout the 
academic year with clinical nursing courses 
beginning in Summer Session II. Individual- 
ized advisement is available on an ongoing 
basis through the Department of Nursing. 

Registered Nurses 

The Department of Nursing offers an 
alternative curriculum for registered nurses 
within the existing B.S.N, program. The goals 
of this alternative curriculum are to provide 
registered nurses with the opportunity to earn an 
educationally sound B.S.N, degree while 
completing the degree requirements in as short a 
time period as possible, and to meet the unique 
needs of registered nurses. NURS 300 is open 
only to registered nurses and is required as part 
of the alternative curriculum. 

The Department of Nursing supports the 
Pennsylvania Articulation Model which promotes 
the practice of providing educational programs 
for nurses from state approved and National 
League for Nursing accredited schools which 
facilitates progression into the next educational 
program without unnecessary repetition. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



NURSING 



Validation testing (ACT PEP exams) may be 
required for ( 1 ) individuals who graduated 
from any nursing program more than 10 years 
prior to application, (2) individuals who 
graduated more than 3 years prior to applica- 
tion and who have not worked at least 1000 
hours in the preceding 3 years, or (3) individu- 
als who graduated from non-NLN accredited 
nursing programs. 

RNs from an NLN accredited program who 
graduated within 3 years of matriculating into 
the B.S.N, program and RNs who graduated 
from an NLN accredited program more than 3 
but not more than 10 years before matriculat- 
ing into the B.S.N, program and who have 
worked for at least 1000 hours within the last 
three years will receive transfer credit for 
NURS 221, 330, 331, 332, 333, 337, 338, and 
440 upon successful completion of NURS 
441, COMPREHENSIVE NURSING CARE. 

To obtain the B.S.N., all RNs will be 
required to successfully complete NURS 300, 
336, 424, 435, 441 , and 442. In addition, 
RNs will be required to take any 5 science 
courses chosen from CHEM 108 or higher, 
BIO 1 10 or higher, PHYS 225 or higher, or 
other courses approved by the Department of 
Nursing upon evaluation of a student's tran- 
script. At least two of these must be labora- 
tory science courses which may be substituted 
for CHEM 108 and/or 1 15 to satisfy the 
natural sciences distribution requirement. 

Additional information for registered 
nurses seeking the B.S.N is available from the 
Department of Nursing. Individual advising is 
offered to all registered nurses. 

School Nurse Certification 

The Department of Nursing, in collaboration 
with the Department of Education, offers an 
additional curriculum for the Registered Nurse 
with a BSN (or a Lycoming College nursing 
student) who wishes to be certified as a school 
nurse. The goal of this program is to provide 
the RN with a BSN an opportunity for career 
mobility. Courses required for completion of 



the certification program consist of EDUC 200, 
an approved education-related elective, PSY 
338, and NURS 422, 423, 424, 430, and 431. 
In addition, the following are prerequisites for 
specific courses: PSY 1 10 and 1 17. 

Additional information for registered nurses 
seeking School Nurse Certification is available 
from the Department of Nursing. Individual- 
ized advising is offered to all prospective 
School Nurse Candidates. 

Clinical Learning Resources 

In addition to the College's modem, well- 
equipped Nursing Skills Lab complete with 
Critical Care Unit and interactive video 
technology, opportunity for self-learning is 
provided in the adjacent Learning Center which 
is equipped with electronic study carrels and 
audio-visual materials. 

A wide variety of health-care agencies in the 
surrounding area is utilized for clinical experi- 
ences. Cooperating hospitals and agencies 
include: Susquehanna Health Services, Evan- 
gelical Hospital, Geisinger Medical Center, 
Leader Nursing Home and Rehabilitation 
Center, Danville State Hospital, Pennsylvania 
Department of Health, Regional Home Health 
Services, Rose View Manor, and The 
Williamsport Home. 

Expenses of the Nursing Program 

Students are responsible for their own transporta- 
tion to assigned clinical areas. The student of 
nursing assumes all financial obligations listed in 
the section on fees in this bulletin including a $40 
lab fee for each of the clinical nursing courses 
(NURS 22 1,3 10, 330, 33 1,332, 333, 440, and 
44 1 ). Additional expenses include uniforms, 
name pin, watch with second hand, bandage 
scissors, stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, liability 
insurance, annual health examinations, and 
standardized achievement tests. 

Students must also maintain annual Health 
Provider CPR certification as offered by the 
American Heart Association or American 
Red Cross. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



NURSING 



Policies Specific to Nursing 

In addition to the Lycoming College 
continuance policies, the following policies 
are specific to all declared majors in the 
Department of Nursing: 

1 . A grade of C- or better is required in all 
clinical nursing courses to continue in the 
nursing program. These courses are 
NURS 221, 310, 330, 331, 332, 333, 440 
and 441 . Students who earn a grade of less 
than 70 percent or 1 .67 in either the 
theoretical or clinical component of a 
nursing course will be required to repeat 
both components of the course before being 
permitted to continue in the nursing 
sequence. Students who do not satisfy this 
requirement in the second attempt will be 
dismissed from the nursing program. 

2. Policies regarding absence from classes or 
from the clinical portion of nursing courses are 
determined by the instructor(s) responsible for 
the course. No absence from the clinical 
portion of the course will be excused other than 
for illness or family emergency. In individual 
cases, students may make arrangements with 
instructors to be excused for extracurricular 
activities. Excessive absence for any reason 
will necessitate repeating the entire course. 

101 

TOPICS IN HEALTH 

Exploration of health-related topics designed 
for the prenursing or fost-year nursing student 
and non-majors. Topics vary. May be 
repeated for credit. No prerequisites. One- 
half unit of credit. May not be used to satisfy 
major requirements. 

Ill 

FOUNDATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL 
NURSING PRACTICE 

Introduction of major theoretical elements 
underlying professional nursing practice. 
Essentials of normal nutrition, therapeutic 
application of dietary principles, and their 
relationship to the health of individuals, families 
and communities are explored. Focus on the 



concept of health and common health 
problems, recognizing the multi-directional 
influence of the individual, family, and 
environment. In this first clinical course, the 
student will utilize the nursing process in 
assisting clients to attain a maximum level of 
functioning. Four hours of lecture and five 
hours of clinical laboratory. 1 1/2 units. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 108, 115, and BIO 113. 
G.P.A. of 2.50 or higher at the completion of 
the Freshman Year. Corequisite: BIO 114. 
Open to nursing majors only. 

300 

THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS 
OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING 

Theoretical concepts underlying profes- 
sional practice. Additional focus on health 
and common health problems, recognition of 
multi-directional influence of the individual, 
family, and environment. Two hour seminar. 
1/2 unit of credit. OPEN TO RNs ONLY. 

330-331 

NURSING CARE OF THE 
DEVELOPING FAMILY 

Examination of health and nursing needs of 
beginning and developing families. Initial 
emphasis on nursing needs of mothers and 
infants within the family unit as well as the 
common health problems of children through 
adolescence. Subsequent emphasis on nursing 
needs of children and mothers with health 
problems of acute and long term nature, the 
influence of illness on their development and 
the effect of illness on the family. Emphasis 
placed on physical assessment skills throughout 
the lifespan with adequate practice time in the 
skills and clinical laboratories. Three hours of 
lecture, 7 1/2 hours clinical laboratory, 1 hour 
for 330 and 2 hours for 331 health assessment 
content. 1 1/2 Units each. Prerequisite for 
NURS 330: NURS 221, BIO 114 and 226. 
Corequisite: NURS 332 and 337. Prerequisite 
for NURS 331: NURS 330, 332, and 337. 
Corequisite: NURS 333 and 338. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



NURSING 

• 



332-333 

NURSING CARE OF THE ADULT 

Identification of adult health care needs 
and implementation of nursing activities based 
on an understanding of growth and develop- 
ment, pathophysiology, communication skills, 
interpersonal dynamics, and psychosocial 
interventions. Three hours of lecture, 7 1/2 
hours clinical laboratory, 1 hour for 332 and 
2 hours for 333 health assessment content. 
1 1/2 units each. Prerequisite for NURS 332: 
NURS 221, BIO 114 and 226. Corequisite: 
NURS 330 and 337. Prerequisite for NURS 
333: NURS 330, 332 and 337. Corequisite: 
NURS 331 and 338. 

336 

THE NURSE IN THE SOCIAL SYSTEM 

Seminar discussions and clinical laboratory 
using the hospital as a prototype. Theories of 
social systems. Examination of induction into 
the hospital system. Evaluation of standards 
of care. Focus on utilization of change theory. 
Twelve hours of lecture and 96 hours of 
clinical laboratory. 1 unit. Prerequisites: 
NURS 337, 338. Required for the nursing 
major and offered only in May term. RNs who 
are enrolled in the BSN program may register 
for NURS 336 for two semester hours with 
consent of instructor. 

337-338 

BASIC CONCEPTS OF PHARMACOLOGY 

AND THERAPEUTICS I and II 

Fundamentals of pharmacology and 
therapeutics are presented for the various 
classes of drugs. Relationships of pharmaco- 
logical mechanisms to the affected biochemi- 
cal and physiological processes. Interactions 
and toxicological aspects of drug therapy are 
reviewed. Two hours of lecture. One-half 
unit of credit each. Corequisite for NURS 337: 
NURS 330 and 332, or consent of instructor. 
Corequisite for NURS 338: NURS 331 and 
333, or consent of instructor. Open to non- 
nursing majors with appropriate science back- 
ground, corequisites waived for non-majors. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG I 



422 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Examination of learning theories appropriate 
to all age groups. Discussion of the concepts 
and techniques necessary for assessment, plan- 
ning, implementation, and evaluation of the 
teaching/learning process. Emphasis will be 
placed on self care. Two hour lecture for 1/2 
unit of credit. Required for school nurse 
candidates. Prerequisite: Senior standing or 
consent of instructor. 

423 

HEALTH EDUCATION CLINICAL 

Clinical practice includes teaching experi- 
ence in the public school system. This practice 
results in a culmination of the theoretical 
content contained in NURS 422. Five hour 
clinical laboratory for 1/2 unit ofcedit. 
Required for School Nurse Candidates. 
Prerequisites: Senior standing or consent of 
instructor. 

424 

ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT 

Identification and demonstration of 
advanced assessment techniques with an 
emphasis on abnormal findings. Learning 
experiences are provided to develop a systemat- 
ic approach to physical assessment. Through- 
out the course, emphasis is placed on the 
wellness component of physical assessment 
with reference to major health deviations. 
Two hours of lecture for 1/2 unit of credit. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of 
instructor. 

425 

ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT 
CLINICAL LABORATORY 

A clinical laboratory that allows additional 
practice for the student enrolled in NURS 424. 
Five hours clinical laboratory for 1/2 unit of 
credit. Prerequisite: Senior standing or 
consent of instructor. 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



NfURSING 



430 

COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING 

Overview of the role of the community 
health nurse in a variety of settings, e.g., 
industries, state health clinics, MHMR, school 
systems. Discussion of wellness promotion, 
availability of community resources, environ- 
mental health, prevention and treatment of 
communicable diseases, and group process 
with emphasis on communication skills. Two 
hour lecture for 1/2 unit of credit. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of the instructor. 

431 

SCHOOL NURSE PRACTICUM 

Essentials of school health, school nursing, 
and health promotion. These concepts serve as 
a basis for the development of an understand- 
ing of the role of the school with the opportu- 
nity to function in the role of the school nurse. 
It is a course built on the culmination of know- 
ledge obtained in previous nursing courses 
and nursing experiences. 210 hours clinical 
and seminar. Prerequisite: OPEN TO SCHOOL 
NURSE CANDIDATES who have met all 
other requirements for certification and have 
obtained departmental approval. Must have a 
valid Pennsylvania RN license. 

435 

RESEARCH IN NURSING 

Expansion of theoretical basis of research 
methodology with emphasis on analyzing, 
criticizing, and interpreting nursing research. 
Development of a research proposal focusing 
on a nursing problem. Four hours of lecture. 
1 unit. Prerequisites: MATH 103, Computer 
Science elective, and NURS 330 and 332, or 
consent of instructor. Open to non-nursing 
majors. 

440 

NURSING CARE OF THE EMOTIONALLY 
TROUBLED INDIVIDUAL AND FAMILY 

Examination of disturbed human relation- 
ships with focus on intrapsychic, interpersonal. 



and physiologic etiology. Emphasis on 
advanced therapeutic nurse-patient relation- 
ships within the context of family, community, 
and health care systems. Three hours of lecture 
and 7 1/2 hours clinical laboratory. 1 1/2 
units. Prerequisite: NURS 331, 333 and 336. 

441 

COMPREHENSIVE NURSING CARE 

Culminating nursing course with focus on 
leadership and management skills in a choice 
of clinical settings. Seminars provide oppor- 
tunities for students to share commonalities 
and unique aspects of professional practice. 
Three hours of lecture and 7 1/2 hours of 
clinical laboratory. 1 1/2 units. Prerequisite: 
NURS 336 and 440. 

442 

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES 

An analysis of nursing issues in the context 
of the historical background of the profession, 
the social forces which influence nursing, and 
nursing's impact upon society. Two-hour 
seminar. 1/2 unit of credit. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

443 

TOPICS IN NURSING 

Selected topic courses in nursing designed 
to permit students to pursue subjects which, 
because of their specialized nature, may not be 
offered on a regular basis. 1/2 unit of credit. 
May be repeated for credit with departmental 
permission Prerequisite: Senior standing or 
consent of instructor. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN NURSING 

An opportunity to develop and implement 
an individual plan of study under faculty 
guidance. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



PHILOSOPHY 



PHILOSOPHY (PHIL) 

Professor: Whelan 

Associate Professor: Griffith 

Assistant Professor: Herring (Chairperson) 

The study of philosophy develops a critical 
understanding of the basic concepts and 
presuppositions around which we organize our 
thought in morality, law, religion, science, 
education, the arts and other human endeavors. 

A major in philosophy, together with other 
appropriate courses, can provide an excellent 
preparation for policy-making positions of 
many kinds, for graduate study in several 
fields, and for careers in education, law, and 
the ministry. The major in philosophy 
consists of eight courses numbered 1 14 
or above, including 301, 302, 449 and at least 
three other courses numbered 225 or above. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: PHIL 216, 218, 219, 
301, 332, 333, 334, 335, 449. Students must 
check semester class schedules to determine 
which courses are offered as "W" courses for 
that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in philosophy consists of any four 
philosophy courses numbered 220 or above; or 
any five philosophy courses numbered 1 14 or 
above, three of which must be numbered 225 or 
above. Three more specialized minors are also 
available: a minor in the History of Philosophy 
consists of four courses from PHIL 223, 224, 
301, 302, 400, 449 and Independent Studies; a 
minor in Philosophy and Science consists of 
four courses from PHIL 223, 225, 33 1, 333, 
400, 449 and Independent Studies; a minor in 
Philosophy and Law consists of four courses 
from PHIL 224, 225, 334, 335, 400, 449 and 
Independent Studies or five courses including 
any three courses from the preceding list and 
two courses from PHIL 11 5, 2 16, 2 18, 2 19. 
Since topics in PHIL 400, 449 and Independent 




Study vary, these courses may be used to count 
toward a specialized minor only if they are 
approved by the department. 

105 

PRACTICAL REASONING 

A general introduction to topics in logic 
and their application to practical reasoning, 
with primary emphasis on detecting fallacies, 
evaluating inductive reasoning, and under- 
standing the rudiments of scientific method. 
Not open to students who have completed two 
courses in philosophy. 

114 

PHILOSOPHY AND PERSONAL CHOICE 

An introductory philosophical examination 
of a number of contemporary moral issues 
which call for personal decision. Topics often 
investigated include: the "good" life, obliga- 
tion to others, sexual ethics, abortion, suicide 
and death, violence and pacifism, obedience to 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^M 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



PHILOSOPHY 

• 



the law, the relevance of personal beliefs to 
morality. Discussion centers on some of the 
suggestions philosophers have made about 
how to make such decisions. Not open to 
students who have completed two courses in 
philosophy. 

115 

PHILOSOPHY AND PUBLIC POLICY 

An introductory philosophical examination 
of the moral and conceptual dimensions of 
various contemporary public issues, such as 
the relation of ethics to politics and the law, 
the enforcement of morals, the problems of 
fair distribution of goods and opportunities, 
the legitimacy of restricting the use of natural 
resources, and the application of ethics to 
business practice. Discussion centers on some 
of the suggestions philosophers have made 
about how to deal with these issues. Not open 
to students who have completed two courses 
in philosophy. 

117 

PHILOSOPHY AND 
SUPERNATURAL PHENOMENA 

A critical examination of the philosophical 
issues raised by near-death and out-of- body 
experiences, ESP, time travel, reports of ghosts 
and spirits, astrology, prophecy, demon pos- 
session, faith healing, miracles, psychokinesis, 
and the like. Offered May and Summer terms 
only. 

216 

ETHICAL ISSUES IN BUSINESS 

An introductory philosophical examination 
of a variety of moral problems that arise 
concerning the American business system. 
Included are a systematic consideration of 
typical moral problems faced by individuals 
and an examination of common moral 
criticisms of the business system itself. 



217 

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES 

IN EDUCATION 

An examination of the basic concepts 
involved in thought about education, and a 
consideration of the various methods for 
justifying educational proposals. Typical of 
the issues discussed are: Are education and 
indoctrination different? What is a liberal 
education? Are education and schooling 
compatible? What do we need to learn? 
Alternate years. 

218 

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES 
IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

An introductory examination of various 
philosophical issues and concepts which are of 
special importance in legal contexts. Discus- 
sion includes both general topics, such as the 
justification of punishment, and more specific 
topics, such as the insanity defense and the 
rights of the accused. Readings are arranged 
topically and include both classical and 
contemporary sources. 

219 

PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUES 
IN HEALTH CARE 

An investigation of some of the philosophi- 
cal issues which arise in therapy and in health 
research and planning. Topics typically 
include euthanasia, confidentiality, informed 
consent, behavior control, experimentation on 
humans and animals, abortion, genetic 
engineering, population control, and distribu- 
tion of health care resources. 

220 

CENTRAL PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY 

A study of several central philosophical 
problems, such as the problem of free will and 
determinism, the relationship between the mind 
and the body, the nature and limits of human 
knowledge, arguments about the existence of 
God, and the problem of personal identity. 



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PHILOSOPHY 



223 

HISTORY OF SCIENCE 

AND METAPHYSICS 

An historical survey of the attempt to 
understand the physical universe. Particular 
attention is paid to common origins of 
philosophy and science in the works of the 
ancient Greek philosophers, to the question of 
how scientific and philosophical thinking 
differs from mythological and technological 
thinking, to the rationalism-empiricism 
dispute in science and metaphysics, and to the 
interaction between philosophy and science in 
formulating fundamental questions about the 
physical universe and in developing and 
criticizing concepts designed to answer them. 
Alternate years. 

224 

HISTORY OF SOCIAL AND 

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

An historical survey of the most important 
social and political philosophers from Socrates 
to Marx. Special attention is paid to the 
relationship between ethics and politics as 
seen by Plato and Aristotle and to the social 
contract theories of Hobbes, Locke, and 
Rousseau. Alternate years. 

225 

SYMBOLIC LOGIC 

A study of modem symbolic logic and its 
application to the analysis of arguments. 
Included are truth-functional relations, the 
logic of propositional functions, and deductive 
systems. Attention is also given to 
various topics in the philosophy of logic. 
Alternate years. 

301 

ANCIENT GREEK PHILOSOPHY 

A critical examination of the ancient Greek 
philosophers, with particular emphasis on 
Plato and Aristotle. Prerequisite: Two 
courses in philosophy or consent of instructor. 



302 

EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY 

A critical examination of the Continental 
Rationalists (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz), the 
British Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, Hume), 
and Kant. Prerequisite: Two courses in 
philosophy or consent of instructor. 

331 

PHILOSOPHY AND HUMAN NATURE 
An examination of a variety of classical 
and contemporary philosophical questions 
about human nature. Among the questions 
typically considered are these: Is there such a 
thing as human nature? Are human beings 
different, in any fundamental way, from other 
animals? Are human beings free? Is human 
consciousness just a brain process? Are 
human beings inherently predisposed to evil? 
Are human beings biologically determined to 
be selfish or aggressive? Are the differences 
in achievement between men and women 
biologically based? Prerequisite: Students 
without previous study in philosophy must 
have consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

332 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 

A philosophical examination of religion. 
Included are such topics as the nature of 
religious discourse, arguments for and against 
the existence of God, and the relation between 
religion and science. Readings from classical 
and contemporary sources. Prerequisite: 
Students without previous study in philosophy 
must have consent of instructor. Alternate 
years. 

333 

PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL SCIENCE 

A consideration of philosophically impor- 
tant conceptual problems arising from 
reflection about natural science, including 
such topics as the nature of scientific laws and 
theories, the character of explanation, the 
importance of prediction, the existence of 



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PHILOSOPHY • PHYSICS 

• 



"non-observable" theoretical entities such as 
electrons and genes, the problem of justifying 
induction, and various puzzles associated with 
probability. Prerequisite: Students without 
previous study in philosophy must have 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

334 

CONTEMPORARY 
POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

A systematic philosophical investigation of 
the relation between human nature and the 
proper social and political order. Topics 
studied include the purpose of government, 
the nature of legitimate authority, the founda- 
tion of human rights, and the limits of human 
freedom. Emphasis is placed on the logic of 
social and political thought and on the 
analysis of basic principles and concepts. 
Prerequisite: Students without previous study 
in philosophy must have consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 

335 

ETHICAL THEORY 

An inquiry concerning the grounds which 
distinguish morally right from morally wrong 
actions. Central to the course is critical 
consideration of the proposals and the 
rationales of relativists, egoists, utilitarians, 
and other ethical theorists. Various topics in 
metaethics are also included. Prerequisite: 
Students without previous study in philosophy 
must have consent of instructor. 

400 

PHILOSOPHICAL RESEARCH 

A course which instructs students in 
philosophical research and the preparation of 
papers suitable for reading at undergraduate 
conferences or submission to undergraduate 
philosophical journals. Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. Offered May and Summer terms 
only. 



449 

DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 

An investigation carried on by discussions 
and papers, into one philosophical problem, 
text, philosopher, or movement. A different 
topic is selected each semester. Recent topics 
include artificial intelligence, the 
ethics of research on human subjects, life after 
death, personal identity, and human rights. 
This seminar is designed to provide junior and 
senior philosophy majors and other qualified 
students with more than the usual opportunity 
for concentrated and cooperative inquiry. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. This 
seminar may be repeated for credit. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Recent independent studies in philosophy 
include Nietzsche, moral education, Rawls' 
theory of justice, existentialism, euthanasia, 
Plato's ethics, and philosophical aesthetics. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 



PHYSICS 

(See Astronomy/Physics) 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

• 



PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

Instructor: Holmes (Chairperson) 

ATHLETIC TRAINING 
INTERNSHIP (AT) 

Lycoming College established an appren- 
ticeship program in 1979 after recognizing 
two conditions: the importance of the care 
and prevention of athletic injuries by trained 
professionals, and the career's promising 
growth potential. 

To complete the internship students are 
required to take the four courses below as well 
as BIO 113 and 1 14 and one nutrition course. 
Students also are required to undergo practical 
work under the supervision of Lycoming's 
certified athletic trainer. Students are offi- 
cially accepted into the Internship program 
after successful completion of the first year of 
practical work and AT 1 10. 

Students who finish the Internship program 
become eligible to participate in the National 
Athletic Trainers Association (N.A.T.A.) 
Certification examination to earn the status of 
an N.A.T.A. certified trainer. This Internship 
program also allows the passing students to 
qualify for the State examination to become 
Class B athletic trainers under Pennsylvania 
Act 63 P.S.S1310.1. Students interested in 
this program should contact the Physical 
Education Department. 

Athletic training classes do not count 
toward fulfilling graduation requirements 
except as the physical education requirements 
of two courses. 

110 

BASIC ATHLETIC TRAINING 

Covers the basics in prevention, evaluation, 
treatment, and rehabihtation of athletic injuries. 
Two lectures, one lab per week. Three credit 
hours. Prerequisite: CPR certification and 
Basic First Aid certification. 




215 

ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT 

Basic concepts of Kinesiology, the study of 
human movement, and Biomechanics, the 
study of mechanical aspects of human move- 
ment. Three lectures per week, project. Three 
credit hours. Prerequisite: BIO 113 and 114. 

310 

ADVANCED ATHLETIC TRAINING 

A more in-depth course in injury evalu- 
ation, rehabilitation, and therapeutic modali- 
ties. Three lectures per week. Three credit 
hours. Prerequisite: AT 110. 

410 

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY 

The study of the effects of exercise on the 
human body. Two lectures and one lab per 
week. Three credit hours. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES, 
WELLNESS, AND COMMUNITY 
SERVICE 

This program is designed to promote 
students' physical welfare, health awareness, 
and encourage a sense of civic responsibility. 
Students must successfully complete any 
combination of two semesters of course work 
selected from the following: 

1 . Designated Physical Activities courses 

2. Designated varsity athletics 



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3. Designated wellness courses 

4. Designated community service projects. 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 
COURSES (PHED) 

102 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 

This topics course satisfies one-half 
semester of physical education. Coeduca- 
tional classes meet twice a week with basic 
instruction in fundamentals, knowledge, and 
appreciation of various sports. Emphasis is on 
the potential use of activities as recreational 
and leisure time interests. 

105 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 

This topics course satisfies one semester of 
physical education. Coeducational classes 
meet twice a week with basic instruction in 
fundamentals, knowledge, and appreciation of 
various sports. Emphasis is on the potential 
use of activities as recreational and leisure 
time interests. 

110 - 120 

VARSITY ATHLETICS 

Students who compete on a varsity sports 
team may register for a semester of Physical 
Activity during the semester listed. A full 
season must be completed to satisfy the 
Physical Activity requirement. It is the 
student's responsibility to withdraw from the 
course should they not complete the season. 

110 - BASKETBALL 

111 - CROSS COUNTRY 

112 - FOOTBALL 

113 - GOLF 

114 - SOCCER 

115 - SOFTBALL 

116 - SWIMMING 
117 -TENNIS 
118 -TRACK 

119 - VOLLEYBALL 

120 - WRESTLING 



WELLNESS (WELL) 

102 

TOPICS IN WELLNESS 

This topics course satisfies one-half 
semester of wellness study. Wellness courses 
meet two hours per week covering various 
topics that may include Stress Management, 
Preventing Communicable Diseases, Personal 
Health and Wellness, and other current health 
issues. These courses promote student 
wellness during their stay at Lycoming as well 
as their post graduate years. This course may 
be repeated with the same topics only with 
departmental consent. 

105 

This topics course satisfies one semester of 
wellness study. Wellness courses meet two 
hours per week covering various topics that 
may include Stress Management, Preventing 
Communicable Diseases, Personal Health and 
Wellness, and other current health issues. 
These courses promote student wellness 
during their stay at Lycoming as well as their 
post graduate years. This course may be 
repeated with the same topics only with 
departmental consent. 

106 

FIRST AID/CPR 

This course satisfies one semester of 
wellness study. This course will prepare 
students to recognize emergencies and make 
appropriate decisions for first aid care. Also 
included are an emphasis on safety and 
assessment of personal habits to reduce risk of 
injury and illness. American Red Cross First 
Aid and CPR certifications are earned upon 
successful completion of the course. 

COMMUNITY SERVICE (COMS) 

These courses require 2-3 hours per week 
in a combination of seminars and agency 
placement. 



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PHYSICAL EDUCATION • POLITICAL SCIENCE 




105 

COMMUNITY SERVICE I 

This course satisfies one semester of 
community service. An experiential learning 
opportunity accomplished in conjunction with 
local agencies or college departments. The 
outcome of such service will promote stu- 
dents' personal and social development as 
well as civic responsibility. Students must 
preregisterfor this course. May not be 
repeated. 

106 

COMMUNITY SERVICE II 

This course satisfies one semester of 
community service. Students may elect to 
enroll in a second semester of community 
service to satisfy the graduation requirement. 
This will require the student to be engaged in 
a somewhat more sophisticated level of 
learning and service. Students must preregis- 
terfor this course. Prerequisite: COMS 105. 



POLITICAL 
SCIENCE (psci) 

Professors: Giglio, Roskin (Chairperson) 
Part-time Professor of Legal Studies: Raup 
Part-time Instructor: Wolf 

The major is designed to provide a systematic 
understanding of government and politics at the 
international, national, state, and local levels. 
Majors are encouraged to develop their skills to 
make independent, objective analyses which 
can be applied to the broad spectrum of the 
social sciences. 

Although the political science major is not 
designed as a vocational major, students with 
such training may go directly into government 
service, journalism, teaching, or private admin- 
istrative agencies. A political science major can 
provide the base for the study of law, or for 
grad- uate studies leading to administrative 
work in federal, state, or local governments, 
international organizations, or college teaching. 
Students seeking certification to teach secon- 
dary school social studies may major in 
political science but should consult their 
advisors and the education department. 

A major consists of eight political science 
courses, including PSCI 106. Prospective 
majors are encouraged to take this course their 
freshman year. An exemption will be granted 
only if it strengthens the student's program. 
In addition to 106, students must satisfactorily 
complete two courses in area A, one course in 
area B and two courses in area C. Students 
must pass PSCI 400, Political Analysis, 
normally taken in their senior year. 

The following courses have been approved to 
be offered as cultural diversity courses: PSCI 
220, 326, 340. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved to 
be offered as writing intensive courses and may 
be offered as such: PSCI 223, 244. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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POLITICAL SCIENCE 



determine which courses are offered as "W" 
courses for that semester. 

For non-majors, the department offers three 
minors: a minor in PoHtical Science consists of 
any four courses numbered 200 or above from 
areas A to C; a minor in World Politics consists 
of four courses selected from area C; and a minor 
in Legal Studies consists of four courses in area 
B. Students are encouraged to consult with 
department members on the selection of a minor. 

106 

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICS 

An introductory course in political science 
that asks how and why people form political 
communities, what holds them together, and 
how political systems may either improve or 
damage themselves. Includes comparison of 
the U.S. with other countries and discussion of 
current political and public-policy issues. 

210 

COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY 

Reviews and critiques the impact of the 
mass media on American society. Consider- 
ation of how the media form attitudes, nomi- 
nate and elect candidates, cover news, and 
monitor governmental activities as well as 
possible remedies to media-related problems. 

400 

POLITICAL ANALYSIS 

A capstone course required for majors in 
Political Science normally taken in their senior 
year. Students will integrate their knowledge 
of political phenomena and deepen their 
methodological sophistication by applying 
several analytical approaches to a series of 
case studies. Open to non-majors with permis- 
sion of instructor. 

A. American Politics 
110 

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 
IN THE UNITED STATES 

An introduction to American national 
government which emphasizes both structural- 



functional analysis and policy-making processes. 
In addition to the legislative, executive, and 
judicial branches of government, attention will 
be given to political parties and interest groups, 
elections and voting behavior, and constitu- 
tional rights. Recommended to all social 
science-education candidates and to those 
students who have had inadequate or insuffi- 
cient preparation in American government. 

Ill 

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

An examination of the general principles, 
major problems, and political processes of the 
states and their subdivisions, together with 
their role in a federal type of government. 

223 

PRESIDENCY AND CONGRESS 

The constitutional roles, campaign styles, and 
interactions of the U.S. presidency and 
congress. Special attention is given presi- 
dents, senators, and congresspersons who 
substantially contribute to the democratic 
process. Alternate years. 

244 

THE POLITICAL FILM 

The great and enduring political questions 
presented in fiction movies, for classroom 
discussion and papers. Course draws from a 
library of cinema classics on videotape to 
probe political arrangements, power relation- 
ships, and the legal process. Alternate years. 

333 

BUREAUCRACY AND PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION 

The business of making government work 
at the administrative level. The organizational 
structure, relevant laws and court cases, and 
legislative oversight of federal, state, and local 
public bureaucracy. Alternate years. 

347 

WOMEN AND POLITICS 

The historical, philosophical, and practical 
context and conduct of women in a variety of 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



political roles. This course considers both 
elective and nonelective activities, and includes 
analyses of women' s issues currently on 
legislative and court agendas. /4//emare>'ear5. 

448 

PUBLIC OPINION AND POLLING 

A course dealing with the general topic 
and methodology of polling. Content includes 
exploration of the processes by which 
people's political opinions are formed, the 
manipulation of public opinion through the 
uses of propaganda, and the American 
response to politics and political issues. 
Alternative years. 

B. Legal Studies 
331 

CIVIL RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES 

What are our rights and liberties as 
Americans? What should they be? A frank 
discussion of the nature and scope of the 
constitutional guarantees. First Amendment 
rights, the rights of criminal suspects and 
defendants, racial and sexual equality, and 
equal protection of the laws. Students will 
read and brief the more important Supreme 
Court decisions. Prerequisite: junior or 
senior standing, or consent of instructor. 

332 

COURTS AND THE CRIMINAL 

JUSTICE SYSTEM 

The course consists of two components: 
criminal law and criminal procedure. Crimi- 
nal procedure carefully explores constitutional 
law and procedural rules which dominate 
court handling of criminal cases. Criminal 
law explores concepts relating to criminal 
responsibility and the establishment of 
selected offenses. Emphasis is placed on "hot 
button" issues in the field: balancing protec- 
tion of fundamental freedoms against society's 
need to solve an prevent crime; plea negotia- 
tions; the politicizing of the criminal justice 
system; mandatory sentencing schemes; 



management challenges to fast handling of 
criminal cases; the changing line between 
juvenile and adult criminal court; wisdom of 
using criminal punishment in an attempt to 
control some forms of behavior. There will be 
two field trips to court proceedings. Prerequi- 
site: junior or senior standing, or consent of 
instructor. 

335 

LAW AND SOCIETY 

An examination of the nature, sources, 
functions, and limits of law as an instrument 
of political and social control. Included for 
discussion are legal problems pertaining to the 
family, crime, deviant behavior, poverty, and 
minority groups. Prerequisite: junior or 
senior standing, or consent of instructor. 

436 

MASS MEDIA LAW AND REGULATION 
An examination of the legal structure and 
the system by which mass communication is 
controlled in this society. The forces which 
shape, influence, and make policy will be 
considered. Prerequisite: junior or senior 
standing, or consent of instructor. 

C. World Politics 

220 

COMPARATIVE POLITICS 

A study of the world' s political systems with 
emphasis on comparisons and patterns of 
government. The course will review politics in 
major nations on four continents and attempt to 
find underlying similarities and differences. 

225 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

The basic factors and concepts of interna- 
tional relations, such as international systems, 
national interest and security, wars, 
decolonization, nationalism, economic 
development, trade blocs, and international 
law and organizations. 



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POLITICAL SCIENCE 

• 



237 

POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 

The territorial dimension of politics as 
studied through questions of states, bound- 
aries, subdivisions, regions, voting patterns, 
and strategies. Includes extensive map 
reviews for students taking state teacher 
examinations. Alternate years. 

243 

THE VIETNAM WAR 

The background and context of the war, how 
the United States got involved, the military 
lessons, and the war's impact on U.S. society, 
politics, and economy. Alternate years. 

326 

POLITICAL CULTURES 

An exploration of the "people" aspects of 
political life in several countries. The way 
people interact with each other and with 
government, what they expect from the 
system, how they acquire their political 
attitudes and styles, and how these contribute 
to the type of government. Alternate years. 

340 

EAST EUROPEAN POLITICS 

A review of the geographical, historical, 
and political factors effecting East Europe, 
how the region broke out of the Soviet sphere, 
and its chances for developing a stable 
democracy and market economy. Includes 
Balkan security problems such as the breakup 
of Yugoslavia and ongoing boundary and 
ethnic quarrels. Alternate years. 

437 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS THEORY 
The several contending theories of interna- 
tional relations, why states and statesmen 
behave as they do, what inclines them to war 
or peace, and the nature of individual respon- 
sibility in a tumultuous world. Prerequisite: 
PSCI 225 or consent of instructor. 
Alternate years. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



439 

AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

The U.S. role in the world in geographic, 
strategic, historical, and ideological perspec- 
tives, plus an examination of the domestic 
forces shaping U.S. policy. Alternate years. 

D. Special Programs 

470-479 

INTERNSHIPS (See index) 

Students may receive academic credit for 
serving as interns in structured learning situations 
with a wide variety of public and private 
agencies and organizations. Students have 
served as interns with the Public Defender' s 
Office, the Lycoming County Court Adminis- 
trator, and the Williamsport City government. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Current studies relate to elections — local, 
state, and federal — while past studies have 
included Soviet and world politics. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




PSYCHOLOGY 

• 



PSYCHOLOGY (psy) 

Associate Professors: Berthold (Chairperson), 

Ryan 
Assistant Professors: Hakala, Olsen 
Instructor: Schult 
Visiting Instructor: Cimini 

The major provides training in both theoreti- 
cal and appHed psychology. It is designed to 
meet the needs of students seeking careers in 
psychology or other natural or social sciences. 
It also meets the needs of students seeking a 
better understanding of human behavior as a 
means of furthering individual and career 
goals in other areas. Psychology majors and 
others are urged to discuss course selections in 
psychology with members of the department 
to help insure appropriate course selection. 

A major consists of 32 semester hours in 
psychology, including PSY 1 10, 336, 431, and 
432. Statistics also is required. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a cultural diversity course: PSY 
34 1 . Students must check semester class 
schedules to determine which courses are 
offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: PSY 225, 431, 432. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in psychology consists of 20 
semester hours in psychology including PSY 
1 10 and four other psychology courses (three 
of which must be numbered 200 or above) 
which must be approved by the department. 

101 

TOPICS 

Exploration of a specific basic or applied 
topic in psychology. Different topics will be 
explored different semesters. Potential topics 
include the psychology of disasters, applied 




behavioral psychology, and organizational 
psychology. The course is open to elementary 
and advanced undergraduates. No Prerequi- 
sites. One-half unit of credit. May be repeat- 
ed once for credit with departmental permis- 
sion. May not be used to satisfy distribution or 
major requirements. 

110 

INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the empirical study of 
human and other animal behavior. Areas 
considered may include: learning, personality, 
social, physiological, sensory, cognition, and 
developmental. 

112 

GROUP PROCESSES AND 
INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 

An introduction to research and theories on 
small group formation, structure, and perfor- 
mance. Topics include group communication, 
conformity, leadership, conflict, and decision- 
making. Emphasis will be placed upon applying 
principles of group dynamics to different types of 
groups. Prerequisite: PSY 1 1 or consent of 
instructor. May term only. 

116 

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the patterns of deviant 
behavior with emphasis on cause, function, and 
treatment. The various models for the concept- 



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PSYCHOLOGY 

• 



ualization of abnormal behavior are critically 
examined. Prerequisite: PSY 1 10. 

Ill 

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

A study of the basic principles of human 
growth and development throughout the life 
span. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

118 

ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 

The study areas will include theories of 
adolescence; current issues raised by as well 
as about the "generation of youth"; research 
findings bearing on theories and issues of 
growth beyond childhood, and self-explora- 
tion. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

220 

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF 
CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS 

This course will review current theory and 
research on love. The progress of close, 
interpersonal relationships from initiation to 
termination will be discussed. In addition, the 
relation between love and sex will be ex- 
plored, and current research on sexuality 
reviewed. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

224 

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The scientific exploration of interpersonal 
communication and behavior. Topics include 
attitudes and attitude change, attraction and 
communication, social perception and social 
influence, prosocial and antisocial behavior 
and group processes. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

225 

INDUSTRIAL AND 

ORGANIZATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The application of the principles and 
methods of psychology to selected industrial 
and organizational situations. Prerequisite: 
PSY 110 or consent of instructor. 



239 

BEHAVIOR MODMCATION 

A detailed examination of the applied i 

analysis of behavior. Focus will be on the 
application of experimental method to the 
individual clinical case. The course will cover 
targeting behavior, base-rating, intervention 
strategies, and outcome evaluation. Learning- 
based modification techniques such as 
contingency management, counter-condition- 
ing, extinction, discrimination training, 
aversive conditioning, and negative practice 
will be examined. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or 
consent of instructor. 

240 

PSYCHOLOGY OF ADULT 

PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT 

A study of psychological theories and 
research on coping with normal developmen- 
tal changes and common problems of adult- 
hood. Focus will be upon adult transitions, 
stress management, intimate relationships, 
sexuality, parenting skills, and work adjust- 
ment. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

333 

PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the physiological 
psychologist's method of approach to the 
understanding of behavior as well as the set of 
principles that relate the function and organi- 
zation of the nervous system to the phenom- 
ena of behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 110 or 
consent of instructor. 

334 

PRINCIPLES OF MEASUREMENT 

Psychometric methods and theory, including 
scale transformation, norms, standardization, 
validation procedures, and estimation of 
reliability. Prerequisites: PSY 110 and 
statistics. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



PSYCHOLOGY 



336 

PERSONALITY THEORY 

A review of the major theories of personality 
development and personality functioning. In 
addition to covering the details of each theory, 
the implications and applications of each theory 
will be considered. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

337 
COGNITION 

An investigation of human mental processes 
along the two major dimensions: directed and 
undirected thought. Topic areas include 
recognition, attention, conceptualization, 
problem-solving, fantasy, language, dreaming, 
and creativity. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

338 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

An introduction to the empirical study of 
the teaching-learning process. Areas consid- 
ered may include educational objectives, pupil 
and teacher characteristics, concept learning, 
problem-solving and creativity, attitudes and 
values, motivation, retention and transfer, 
evaluation and measurement. Prerequisite: 
PSY 110 or consent of instructor. 

341 

PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN 

A review of contemporary theory and 
research on the psychology of gender differ- 
ences. The major theories and basic research 
on gender differences will be covered. 
Special topics include sex differences in 
achievement, power, and communication; sex- 
role stereotypes; beliefs about masculinity and 
femininity; and gender influences on mental 
health. Prerequisite: PSY 110. 

410 

DYSFUNCTIONAL FAMILIES AND 
CHILD DEVELOPMENT 

This course will explore the relations 
between a variety of types of family dysfunc- 
tions and child development and psychopa- 



thology. Specifically, topics in child abuse, 
neglect, sexual abuse, and children from 
violent homes, alcoholic homes, and homes 
with mentally ill parents will be studied. The 
course will focus on empirical literature about 
dysfunctional families and child development, 
biographical and political perspectives. 
Prerequisite: PSY 116 and 117, or consent of 
instructor. 

431 

LEARNING EXPERIMENTAL 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Learning processes. The examination of 
the basic methods and principles of animal 
and human learning. Prerequisites: PSY 110 
and statistics. 

432 

SENSORY EXPERIMENTAL 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The examination of psychophysical 
methodology and basic neurophysiological 
methods as they are applied to the understand- 
ing of sensor processes. Prerequisites: PSY 
110 and statistics. 

448-449 

PRACTICUM IN PSYCHOLOGY 

An off-campus experience in a community 
setting offering psychological services, 
supplemented with classroom instruction and 
discussion. PSY 448 covers the basic 
counseling skills, while PSY 449 covers the 
major theoretical approaches to counseling. 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Internships give students an opportunity to 
relate on-campus academic experiences to 
society in general and to their post-baccalaure- 
ate objectives in particular. Students have, for 
example, worked in prisons, public and 
private schools, county government, and for 
the American Red Cross. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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PSYCHOLOGY -RELIGION 




RELIGION 



(REL) 



N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Independent study is an opportunity for 
students to pursue special interests in areas for 
which courses are not offered. In addition, 
students have an opportunity to study a topic 
in more depth than is possible in the 
regular classroom situation. Studies in the 
past have included child abuse, counseling of 
hospital patients, and research in the psychol- 
ogy of natural disasters. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 
Honors in psychology requires original 
contributions to the literature of psychology 
through independent study. The most recent 
honors project was a study of the effect of 
self-esteem on attitude-behavior consistency. 



Professors: Guerra, Hughes (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professor: Van Voorst 

A major consists of 10 courses, including 
REL 1 13, 1 14, and 120. At least seven 
courses must be taken in the department. The 
following courses may be counted toward 
fulfilling the major requirements: GRK 221 
and 222, Hebrew 221 and 222, HIST 340 and 
416, PHIL 332, and SOC 333. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: 
REL 1 10, 224, 225, 226, 228. Students must 
check semester class schedules to determine 
which courses are offered as "D" courses for 
that semester. The following courses have 
been approved to be offered as writing 
intensive courses and may be offered as such: 
REL 230, 331. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "W" courses for that semester. 

A minor in religion consists of one course 
from REL 1 10, 1 13 or 1 14 and four rehgion 
courses numbered 200 or above. 

An interdisciplinary minor in Biblical 
Languages requires the completion of GRK 
221, 222 and HEBR 221 and 222. 

110 

INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION 

Designed for the beginning student, this 
course examines what it means to be religious. 
Some of the issues are the definition of 
religion, the meaning of symbolism, concepts 
of God, ecstatic phenomena. Specific 
attention will be devoted to the current 
problem of cults and religious liberty. 

113 

OLD TESTAMENT FAITH AND HISTORY 

A critical examination of the literature 
within its historical setting and in the light of 
archaeological findings to show the faith and 
religious life of the Hebrew- Jewish corrmiu- 
nity in the Biblical period, and an introduction 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



RELIGION 



to the history of interpretation with an 
emphasis on contemporary Old Testament 
criticism and theology. 

114 

NEW TESTAMENT FAITH 
AND HISTORY 

A critical examination of the literature 
within its historical setting to show the faith 
and religious life of the Christian community 
in the Biblical period, and an introduction to 
the history of interpretation with an emphasis 
on contemporary New Testament criticism 
and theology. 

119 

RELIGION AND POPULAR CULTURE 

An examination of the interaction of religion 
and culture in an historical perspective 
followed by a direct analysis of the ethical and 
religious issues raised by contemporary 
American popular culture. Readings include 
artistic and social-scientific as well as ethical 
and religious approaches to popular culture. 

120 

DEATH AND DYING 

A study of death from personal, social and 
universal standpoints with emphasis upon what 
the dying may teach the living. Principal issues 
are the stages of dying, bereavement, suicide, 
funeral conduct, and the religious doctrines of 
death and immortality. Course includes, as 
optional, practical projects with terminal 
patients under professional supervision. Only 
one course from the combination ofREL 120 
and 121 may be used for distribution. 

121 

AFTER DEATH AND DYING 

An examination of the question of life after 
death in terms of contemporary clinical 
studies, the New Testament resurrection 
narratives, the Asian doctrine of reincarnation, 
and the classical theological beliefs of 
providence and predestination. REL 120 is 



recommended but not required. Only one 
course from the combination of REL 120 and 
121 may be used for distribution. 

Ill 

PROTESTANTISM IN THE 

MODERN WORLD 

An examination of Protestant thought and 
life from Luther to the present against the 
backdrop of a culture rapidly changing from 
the 17th century scientific revolution to 
Marxism, Darwinism, and depth psychology. 
Special attention will be paid to the constant 
interaction between Protestantism and the 
world in which it finds itself. 

223 

THE BACKGROUNDS OF CHRISTIANITY 

A study of the historical, cultural, and rel- 
igious background of the formation of 
Christianity and the antecedents of Christian 
belief and practice in post-exilic Judaism and 
in Hellenism. 

224 

JUDAISM AND ISLAM 

An examination of the rise, growth, and 
expansion of Judaism and Islam with special 
attention given to the theological contents of 
the literatures of these religions as far as they 
are normative in matters of faith, practice, and 
organization. Also, a review of their contribu- 
tions to the spiritual heritage of mankind. 

225 

ORIENTAL RELIGION 

A phenomenological study of the basic 
content of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Chinese 
Taoism with special attention to social and 
political relations, mythical and aesthetic 
forms, and the East- West dialogue. 

226 

BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY 

A study of the role of archaeology in 
reconstructing the world in which the Biblical 
literature originated with special attention 
given to archaeological results that throw light 



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on the clarification of the Biblical text. Also, 
an introduction to basic archaeological method 
and a study in depth of several representative 
excavations along with the artifacts and material 
culture recovered from different historical 
periods. 

227 

HISTORY AND THEOLOGY 

OF THE EARLY CHURCH 

An examination of the life and theology of 
the church from the close of the New Testa- 
ment to the fifth century. Special attention 
will be given to the struggles of the church 
with heretical movements, the controversies 
concerning the person and nature of Christ, 
and the encounter of the church with the 
Roman Empire. 

228 

HISTORY AND CULTURE 

OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST 

A study of the history and culture of 
Mesopotamia, Anatolia, Syria-Palestine, and 
Egypt from the rise of the Sumerian culture to 
Alexander the Great. Careful attention will be 
given to the religious views prevalent in the 
ancient Near East as far as these views 
interacted with the culture and faith of the 
Biblical tradition. 

230 

PSYCHOLOGY OF RELIGION 

A study into the broad insights of psychol- 
ogy in relation to the phenomena of religion 
and religious behavior. The course concen- 
trates on religious experience or manifesta- 
tions rather than concepts. Tentative solutions 
will be sought to questions such as: What 
does it feel like to be religious or to have a 
religious experience? What is the religious 
function in human development? How does 
one think psychologically about theological 
problems? 



331 

CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS 

A study of Christian ethics as a normative 
perspective for contemporary moral problems 
with emphasis upon the interaction of law and 
religion, decision-making in the field of 
biomedical practice, and the reconstruction of 
society in a planetary civilization. 

332 

CONTEMPORARY PROBLEMS E^ 
CHRISTIAN SOCIAL ETHICS 

An examination of the approach of religion 
and other disciplines to an issue of current 
concern; current topics include the theological 
significance of law, the ethics of love, and the 
Holocaust. May be repeated for credit if the 
topic is different from one previously studied. 

337 

BIBLICAL TOPICS 

An in-depth study of Biblical topics related 
to the Old and New Testaments. Topics include 
prophecy, wisdom literature, the Dead Sea 
Scrolls, the teachings of Jesus, Pauline 
theology, Judaism and Christian origins, 
redaction criticism - the way the Synoptic 
Gospels and John give final form to their 
message. Course will vary from year to year 
and may be repeated for credit once if the 
topic is different from one previously studied. 

341 

CONTEMPORARY RELIGIOUS ISSUES 
A study of the theological significance of 
some contemporary intellectual developments 
in Western culture. The content of this course 
will vary from year to year. Subjects studied 
in recent years include the theological 
significance of Freud, Marx, and Nietzsche; 
Christianity and existentialism; theology and 
depth psychology; the religious dimension of 
contemporary literature. 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



RELIGION 

• 



342 

THE NATURE AND MISSION 
OF THE CHURCH 

A study of the nature of the Church as 
"The People of God" with reference to the 
BibHcal, Protestant, Orthodox, and Roman 
Catholic traditions. 

401 

FIELD ARCHAEOLOGY 

Participation in an archaeological dig in the 
Near East. Instruction in excavation techniques, 
recording and the processing of artifacts. A 
survey of excavation and research and the use 
of archaeology as a tool for elucidating 
historical and cultural changes. Special fees 
apply. May Term or Summer Sessions only. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Interns in religion usually work in local 
churches under the supervision of the pastor 
and a member of the faculty. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

Current study areas are in the Biblical 
languages, Biblical history and theology. 
Biblical archaeology, comparative religions, 
and the ethics of technology. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 

GREEK (GRK) 

Greek is not offered as a major. An interdis- 
ciplinary minor in Biblical Languages requires 
the completion of GRK 221, 222 and HEBR 

221,222. 

101-102 

NEW TESTAMENT 
GRAMMAR AND READINGS 

Fundamentals of New Testament Greek 
grammar and readings of selected passages of 
the Greek text. Does not satisfy humanities 
requirement. 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



221 

READINGS IN THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS 

A comparative study of the synoptic tradition 
in Greek. Prerequisite: GRK 102 or equiva- 
lent. Does not satisfy humanities requirement. 

Ill 

READINGS IN THE PAULINE EPISTLES 

Selected readings from the letters of Paul 
in Greek. Prerequisite: GRK 221 or equivalent. 
Does not satisfy humanities requirement. 

HEBREW (HEBR) 

Hebrew is not offered as a major. An 
interdisciplinary minor in Biblical Languages 
requires the completion of GRK 22 1 , 222 and 
HEBR 221, 222. 

101-102 

OLD TESTAMENT 
GRAMMAR AND READINGS 

Fundamentals of Old Testament Hebrew 
grammar and readings of selected passages of 
the Hebrew text. Does not satisfy humanities 
requirement. 

Ill 

READINGS IN OLD 
TESTAMENT NARRATIVE 

A critical reading of the Hebrew text of 
selected narrative portions of the Old Testa- 
ment with special attention being given to 
exegetical questions. The text read varies 
from year to year. Prerequisite: HEBR 102 
or equivalent. Does not satisfy humanities 
requirement. 

Ill 

READINGS IN THE PROPHETIC BOOKS 

AND WISDOM LITERATURE 

A critical reading of the Hebrew text of 
selected portions of Old Testament prophecy 
and wisdom literature with special attention 
being given to exegetical questions. The text 
read varies from year to year. Prerequisite: 
HEBR 221 or equivalent. Does not satisfy 
humanities requirement. 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



SCHOLAR PROGRAM • 

• 



SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 



SCHOLAR 
PROGRAM (scHOL) 

Professor: Boerckel (Director) 

The Lycoming College Scholar Program is a 
special program designed to meet the needs and 
aspirations of highly motivated students of 
superior intellectual ability. The Lycoming 
Scholar satisfies the College distribution 
requirements, generally on a more exacting 
level and with more challenging courses than 
the average student. Lycoming Scholars also 
participate in special interdisciplinary seminars 
and in serious independent study culminating 
in a senior project. 

301 

LYCOMING SCHOLAR SEMINAR 

Team taught interdisciplinary seminar held 
each semester under the direction of the 
Lycoming Scholar Council. May be repeated 
for credit. Completion of five semesters is 
required by the Scholar Program. Prerequisite: 
Acceptance into the Lycoming Scholar 
Program. One-quarter unit of credit. Grade 
will be recorded as "A " or "F. " 

450 

SENIOR SEMINAR 

During the senior year, Lycoming Scholars 
complete independent studies or departmental 
honors projects. These projects are presented 
to scholars and faculty in the senior seminar. 
Non-credit course. Prerequisite: Acceptance 
into the Lycoming Scholar Program. 




SOCIOLOGY- 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

(SOC) 

Professor: Wilk (Chairperson) 
Assistant Professors: S. Alexander, Davison, 
Strauser 

The Sociology- Anthropology Department 
offers two tracks in the major. Both tracks 
introduce the students to the fundamental 
concepts of the discipline, and both tracks 
prepare the student for graduate school. 

Track I emphasizes the theoretical aspects 
of sociology and anthropology. Track II 
emphasizes the application of sociology and 
anthropology to human services. 

Track I - Sociology- Anthropology requires 
the core course sequence SOC 110, 1 14, 229, 
444, and 447 and three other courses within 
the department with the exception of 1 15, 222, 
223, 225, 440, and 443. REL 226 may also be 
counted toward the major. 

Track II - Human Services in a Socio- 
Cultural Perspective requires SOC 1 10, 222, 

229, 443, 444, and 447. In addition, students 



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SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 



must select two courses from among the 
following: SOC 220, 221, 227, 228, 300, 334, 
and 335. Students are also required to choose 
two units from the following courses: PSY 
1 10, ECON 224, PSCI 333, and SOC 230. 
Recommended courses: ACCT 1 10, 226; 
SPAN 111,112; HIST 1 26; and PHIL 334. 

Majors in both tracks are encouraged to 
participate in the internship program. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: SOC 
229, 331, 334, 335, 336, 337, 338. Students 
must check semester class schedules to deter- 
mine which courses are offered as "D" courses 
for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: SOC 229, 441. Students 
must check semester class schedules to deter- 
mine which courses are offered as "W" courses 
for that semester. 

Minor 

A minor in sociology and anthropology 
consists of SOC 1 10 and four other SOC 
courses approved by the department, three of 
which must be numbered 220 or above. SOC 
1 15, 223, 225, 339, and 440 cannot count 
toward the minor. 

110 

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

An introduction to the problems, concepts, 
and methods in sociology today, including 
analysis of stratification, organization of 
groups and institutions, social movements, 
and deviants in social structure. 

114 

INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 

An introduction to the subfields of anthro- 
pology; its subject matter, methodology, and 
goals, examination of biological and cultural 
evolution, the fossil evidence for human 
evolution, and questions raised in relation to 



human evolution. Other topics include race, 
human nature, primate behavior, and prehis- 
toric cultural development. 

115 

INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 

An introduction to the role of law enforce- 
ment, courts, and corrections in the admini- 
stration of justice; the historical development 
of police, courts, and corrections; jurisdiction 
and procedures of courts; an introduction to 
the studies, literature, and research in criminal 
justice; careers in criminal justice. 

220 

MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 

The history, structure, and functions of 
modem American family life, emphasizing 
dating, courtship, factors in marital adjustment, 
and the changing status of family members. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 or consent of instructor. 

221 

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 

A multidisciplinary approach to the study 
of the constellation of factors that relate to 
juvenile delinquency causation, handling the 
juvenile delinquent in the criminal justice 
system, treatment strategies, prevention, and 
community responsibility. Prerequisite: SOC 
1 10 or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

222 

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES 

The course is designed for students inter- 
ested in learning about, or entering, the human 
services profession. It will review the history, 
the range, and the goals of human services 
together with a survey of various strategies 
and approaches to human problems. It will 
include practical discussions of social behav- 
ioral differences as they relate to stress and 
conflict in people's lives. Prerequisite: SOC 
110 and/or PSY 110; or consent of instructor. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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223 

INTRODUCTION TO 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 

Principles, theories, and doctrines of the 
law of crimes, elements in crime, analysis of 
criminal investigation, important case 
law. Prerequisite: SOC 115 or consent 
of instructor. 

225 

INTRODUCTION TO 
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

This course is designed for advanced 
criminal justice majors. Emphasis is placed 
on an in-depth study of detection and investi- 
gation of major crimes. Particular attention is 
placed on the use of criminalistics, legal 
parameters of evidence and interrogation, and 
prosecutory procedures. Prerequisite: SOC 
223 or consent of instructor. Will not be 
counted toward the sociology-anthropology 
major. 

226 

SOCIAL MOVEMENTS 

An analysis of the dynamics, structure, and 
reactions to social movements with focus on 
contemporary social movements. Prerequi- 
site: SOC 110 or consent of instructor. 

227 

SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

The course examines the causes, character- 
istics, and consequences of social problems in 
America from diverse socio-cultural perspect- 
ives. Topics discussed typically include crime, 
urban crises, family disorganization, poverty, 
race problems, drug abuse, and other related 
issues. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or consent of 
instructor. 

228 

AGING AND SOCIETY 

Analysis of cross-cultural characteristics of the 
aged as individuals and as members of groups. 
Emphasis is placed upon variables: health, 
housing, socio-economic status, personal 



adjustment, retirement, and social participation. 
Sociological, social psychological, and anthro- 
pological frames of reference utiUzed in analysis 
and description of aging and its relationship to 
society, culture, and personality, health, 
housing, socio-economic status, personal 
adjustment, retirement, and social participation. 

229 

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

An examination of cultural and social 
anthropology designed to familiarize the 
student with the analytical approaches to the 
diverse cultures of the world. The relevancy of 
cultural anthropology for an understanding of 
the human condition will be stressed. Topics to 
be covered include the nature of primitive 
societies in contrast to civilizations, the concept 
of culture and cultural relativism, the individual 
and culture, the social patterning of behavior 
and social control, an anthropological perspec- 
tive on the culture of the United States. 

230 

SELF AND SOCIETY 

This course is concerned with the behavior 
of individuals who occupy positions in social 
structures, organizations and groups. The 
focus is on the behavior of individuals as it is 
controlled, influenced, or limited by the social 
environment; and the manner in which the 
behavior of individuals reacts upon, shapes 
and alters social structures and enters into the 
functioning of groups. This course will also 
explore symbolic interactionism, a major 
theoretical perspective in sociology which 
focuses primary attention on the way in which 
individuals define and continually redefine 
reality on the basis of social interaction. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 or consent of instructor. 

300 

CRIMINOLOGY 

Analysis of the sociology of law; condi- 
tions under which criminal laws develop; 
etiology of crime; epidemiology of crime, 
including explanation of statistical distribution 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 



of criminal behavior in terms of time, space, 
and social location. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 
consent of instructor. 

331 

SOCIOLOGY OF WOMEN 

A sociological examination of the role of 
women in American society through an analysis 
of the social institutions which affect their 
development. Role-analysis theory will be 
applied to the past, present, and future experi- 
ence of women as it relates to the role options of 
society as a whole. Students will do an original 
research project on the role of women. Prereq- 
uisite: SOCl 10. 

332 

INSTITUTIONS 

Introduces the student to the sociological 
concept of social institution, the types of 
social institutions to be found in all societies, 
and the interrelationships between the social 
institutions within a society. The course is 
divided into two basic parts: 1 . That aspect 
which deals with the systematic organization 
of society in general, and 2. The concentration 
on a particular social institution: economic, 
political, educational, or social welfare. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 or consent of instructor. 

333 

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION 

An examination of the major theories of 
the relationship of religion to society and a 
survey of sociological studies of religious 
behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or consent 
of instructor. 

334 

RACIAL AND CULTURAL MINORITIES 

Study of racial, cultural, and national 
groups within the framework of American 
cultural values. An analysis will include 
historical, cultural, and social factors underly- 
ing ethnic and racial conflict. Field trips and 
individual reports are part of the requirements 
for the course. Prerequisite: SOC 1 10 or 
consent of instructor. 



335 

CULTURE AND PERSONALITY 

Introduction to psychological anthropology, 
its theories and methodologies. Emphasis will 
be placed on the relationship between indi- 
vidual and culture, national character, 
cognition and culture, culture and mental 
disorders, and cross-cultural considerations of 
the concept of self. Prerequisite: SOC 229 or 
consent of instructor. 

336 

THE ANTHROPOLOGY 
OF PRIMITIVE RELIGIONS 

The course will familiarize the student with 
the wealth of anthropological data on the 
religions and world views developed by 
primitive peoples. The functions of primitive 
religion in regard to the individual, society, and 
various cultural institutions will be examined. 
Subjects to be surveyed include myth, witch- 
craft, vision quests, spirit possession, the 
cultural use of dreams, and revitalization 
movements. Particular emphasis will be given 
to shamanism, transcultural religious experi- 
ence, and the creation of cultural realities 
through religions. Both a social scientific and 
existential perspective will be employed. 
Prerequisite: SOC 229 or consent of instructor. 

337 

THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF 

AMERICAN INDIANS 

An ethnographic survey of native North 
American Indian and Eskimo cultures, such as 
the Iroquois, Plains Indians, Pueblo, Kwakiutl, 
and Netsilik. Changes in native lifeways due to 
European contacts and United States expansion 
will be considered. Recent cultural develop- 
ments among American Indians will be placed 
in an anthropological perspective. 

338 

LEGAL AND POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

The course is designed to familiarize the 
student with the techniques of conflict resolu- 
tion and the utilization of public power in 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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primitive society as well as the various 
theories of primitive law and government. 
The rise of the state and an anthropological 
perspective on modem law and government 
will be included. The concepts of self- 
regulation and social control, legitimacy, 
coercion, and exploitation will be the organiz- 
ing focus. Prerequisite: SOC 229 or consent 
of instructor. 

339 

THE AMERICAN PRISON SYSTEM 

Nature and history of punishment, evolu- 
tion of the prison and prison methods with 
emphasis on prison community, prison 
architecture, institutional programs, inmate 
rights, and sentences. Review of punishment 
versus treatment, detention facilities, jails, 
reformatories, prison organization and 
administration, custody, and discipline. 
Prerequisite: SOC 115. 

440 

PROBATION AND PAROLE 

A course designed for the advanced criminal 
justice major. While the course concerns the 
study of probation and parole as parts of the 
criminal justice system and their impact on the 
system as a whole, the primary emphasis is the 
impact on the offender. Particular attention is 
given to diagnostic report writing on offenders, 
pre-sentence investigation, offender classifica- 
tion, and parole planning. Prerequisites: SOC 
115 and 339. 

441 

SOCIAL STRATinCATION 

An analysis of stratification systems with 
specific reference to American society. The 
course will include an analysis of poverty, 
wealth, and power in the United States. 
Particular attention will be given to factors 
which generate and maintain inequality, along 
with the impact of inequality on the lives of 
Americans. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 
consent of instructor. 



443 

HUMAN SERVICES IN 
HELPING INSTITUTIONS 

The course examines the organizational 
and conceptual context within which human 
services are delivered in contemporary 
society. Subjects to be covered include 
ethnographic study of nursing homes, prisons, 
therapeutic communities, mental hospitals, 
and other human service institutions. The 
methodology of fieldwork will be explored so 
as to sensitize the student to the socio-cultural 
dimensions of helping environments and 
relationships. Prerequisite: SOC 110 or 229, 
or consent of instructor. Alternate years. 

444 

SOCIAL THEORY 

The history of the development of sociologi- 
cal thought from its earliest philosophical 
beginnings is treated through discussions and 
reports. Emphasis is placed upon sociological 
thought since the time of Comte. Prerequisite: 
SOC 110 or consent of instructor. 

445 

ANTHROPOLOGICAL THEORY j 

The history of the development of anthro- \ 
pological thought from the 18th century to the 
present. Emphasis is placed upon anthropo- 
logical thought since 1850. Topics include 
evolutionism, historical-particularism, cultural 
idealism, cultural materialism, functionalism, 
structuralism, and ethnoscience. Prerequisite: 
SOC 229 or consent of instructor. 

447 

RESEARCH METHODS IN 

SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 

Study of the research process in sociology- 
anthropology. Attention is given to the 
process of designing and administering 
research and the application of research. 
Different methodological skills are consid- 
ered, including field work, questionnaire 
construction, and other methods of data 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY • THEATRE 



gathering and the analysis of data. Prerequi- 
site: SOC 1 10 and MATH 103, or consent of 
instructor. 

448-449 

PRACTICUM IN SOCIOLOGY 

Introduces the student to a practical work 
experience involving community agencies in 
order to effect a synthesis of the student's 
academic course work and its practical 
applications in a community agency. Specif- 
ics of the course to be worked out in conjunc- 
tion with department, student and agency. 
Prerequisite: SOC 110 and consent of 
instructor. 

470-479 

INTERNSHIP (See index) 

Interns in sociology-anthropology typically 
work off campus with social service agencies 
under the supervision of administrators. 
However, other internship experiences, such 
as with the Lycoming County Historical 
Museum, are available. Interns in 
criminaljustice work off campus in criminal 
justice agencies, such as penal institutions and 
probation and parole departments, under the 
supervision of administrative personnel. 

N80-N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index) 

An opportunity to pursue specific interests 
and topics not usually covered in regular 
courses. Through a program of readings and 
tutorials, the student will have the opportunity 
to pursue these interests and topics in 
greater depth than is usually possible in a 
regular course. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR 
DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index) 




THEATRE (thea) 

Professor: R. Falk (Chairperson) 
Associate Professor: Allen 
Visiting Assistant Professor: George 
Part-time Instructors: Clark, Denton 

The primary responsibilities of the Theatre 
Department are to teach appreciation, service, 
foundational and specialized courses; to 
prepare students for advanced study and 
training; and to sponsor worthwhile produc- 
tion programs in which students can practice 
the art and craft of theatre, and which will be a 
dynamic contribution to the cultural life of the 
College community. 

Production groups sponsored by the 
Theatre Department are the Arena Theatre, 
The Arena Summer Theatre, The Emerald 
City Players, The Alpha Psi Omega Fraternity 
and the Downstage Theatre. Facilities used 
for performances by these groups are an 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THEATRE 



intimate thrust stage (The Arena) and a small 
black box studio theatre (The Downstage 
Theatre) in the Academic Center. 

The department offers several courses to be 
selected for distribution requirements: THEA 
100, 1 12, 1 14, 148, 332, 333, 335 (Fine Arts) 
THEA 333, 335 (Humanities and Literature). 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as cultural diversity courses: 
THEA 1 12, 1 14, 332, 333, 335, 410. Students 
must check semester class schedules to 
determine which courses are offered as "D" 
courses for that semester. 

The following courses have been approved 
to be offered as writing intensive courses and 
may be offered as such: THEA 332, 333. 
Students must check semester class schedules 
to determine which courses are offered as 
"W" courses for that semester. 

Major 

The major consists of the equivalent of 10 
to 10.5 units. All theatre majors are required 
to complete the following: THEA 100, 148, 
332, 333, 410 and the equivalent of 1 full unit 
of THEA 160 and/or 161 (6 units). 

The department offers three major tracks: 
Track I: ACTING (4.5 Units) THEA 140, 
226, 240, 232 (1/2 unit); and one from the 
following: 335 or 402. 

Track II: DIRECTING: (4.0 Units) THEA 
140, 226, 336; and one from the following: 
335 or 402. 

Track IE: DESIGN/TECH (4.5 Units) THEA 
228, 229, 232 (1/2 unit), 320; and one from 
the following: 335, 402, 425, 428, 429, 431. 

Majors are urged to include courses in art, 
music, psychology, and English, or other areas 
of special interest. 

Majors are urged to include THEA 440 in 
Track I, THEA 426 in Track II, and THEA 
430 in Track III. 

Minor 

Three minors are available in the Theatre 
Department. 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



• A minor in Performance consists of THEA 
100, 140, 226, 240, 336. 

• A minor in Technical Theatre consists of 
THEA 100, 148, 228, 229, and 320 or 430. 

• A minor in Theatre History and Literature 
consists of THEA 100, 332, 333, 335 and 
410. 

100 

INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE 

A comprehensive introduction to the 
aesthetics of theatre. From the spectator's 
point of view, the nature of theatre will be 
explored, including dramatic literature and the 
integral functioning of acting, directing and all 
production aspects. Concurrent enrollment in 
THEA 148 prohibited. 

112 

AMERICA ON SCREEN 

Introduction to the art of understanding 
moving images to discover the cultural values 
of American filmmakers and their audiences. 
Comparison of the ways in which films and 
television use comedy, drama, and the docum- 
entary to examine topics having to do with 
values, beliefs, and cultural diversity in 
America. 

114 

FILM ART: MOTION PICTURE 
MASTERPIECES 

Study of selected classic experimental and 
narrative films from around the world as well 
as from Hollywood. Consideration of what 
makes a classic through examination of such 
topics as acting, writing, directing, style, and 
genre. 

135-136 

INTRODUCTION TO DANCE I AND U 

An introduction to the techniques of basic 
movement and interpretation in ballet, jazz, 
and modem dance. Classes include improvi- 
sation and choreography. Prerequisite for 
THEA 136: THEA 135 or consent of 
instructor. One-half unit of credit each. Not 

I 1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THEATRE 

• 



open to students who have received credit for 
MUS 135-136 or MUS 235-236. 

137 

HISTORY OF THE DANCE I 

A survey of classical ballet from the Ballets 
de cour of 17th-century France to the present 
with emphasis on the contributions of Petipa, 
Fokine, Cecchetti, and Balanchine. One-half 
unit of credit. Not open to students who have 
received credit for MUS 137 or 138. 

138 

HISTORY OF THE DANCE II 

A survey of the forms of dance, excluding 
classical ballet, as independent works of art and 
as they have reflected the history of civil- ization 
from primitive times to the present. Pre- 
requisite: THEA 137 or consent of instructor. 
One-half unit of credit. Not open to students 
who have received credit for MUS 137 or 138. 

140 

ACTING I 

An introductory study of the actor's pre- 
paration with emphasis on developing the actor's 
creative imagination through improvisations and 
scene study. Prerequisite: THEA 100. 

148 

PLAY PRODUCTION 

Stagecraft and the various aspects of 
production are introduced. Through material 
presented and laboratory work on the Arena 
Theatre productions, students will acquire 
experience with design, scenery, properties, 
costumes and lighting. Prerequisite: THEA 
100. Concurrent enrollment in THEA 100 
prohibited. 

160 

TECHNICAL THEATRE PRACTICUM 

161 

REHEARSAL AND PERFORMANCE 
PRACTICUM 

Supervised participation in the various 
aspects of technical production, rehearsal and 



performance of the Theatre Department's 
major presentations in the Arena Theatre. 
Credit for Theatre Practicum is earned on a 
fractional basis. Students may register for one- 
half semester hour course credit per production 
for active participation in the designated area of 
technology and performance, hmited to one 
semester hour credit per sem-ester and eight 
semester hours credit over four years. Credit 
may not be used to satisfy dist-ribution require- 
ments in Fine Arts. Students may not register for 
Theatre Practicum while taking THEA 148 
without permission of the instructor. When 
scheduling, students should register for Theatre 
Practicum in addition to the normal four 
academic courses. Because students may not be 
cast or assigned duties in time to meet the drop/ 
add deadline, late reg-istration for THEA 160 
and 161 (Rehearsal and Performance) will be 
permitted without penalty. 

220 

VOICE AND DICTION 

Introduction to the fundamental techniques 
of vocal production for the theatre. Empha- 
sizes an individual program of personal vocal 
development. Dialects and phonetic study of 
the major European accents and EngUsh accents. 
Includes oral practice of relevant literature. 
Alternate years. One-half unit of credit. 

226 

DIRECTING I 

An introductory study of the function of the 
director in preparation, rehearsal and perfor- 
mance. Emphasis is placed on developing the 
student's ability to analyze scripts, and on the 
development of the student's imagination. 
Prerequisite: THEA 140. Alternate years. 

228 

SCENE DESIGN 

Development of scene design techniques 
through study of the practice in rendering, 
perspective drawing, plan drafting, sketching 
and model building. Beginning work in 
theory, techniques, and practices in scenery 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^H 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THEATRE 

• 



painting for the theatre. Participation on Arena 
Theatre productions will be part of the class- 
room requirements. Prerequisite: THEA 148. 

229 

LIGHTING DESIGN 

The theory of stage and lighting design 
with emphasis on their practical application to 
the theatre. Prerequisite: THEA 148. 

231 

SUMMER THEATRE PRACTICUM 

Practical application in construction, design 
and production problems and techniques 
through laboratory and plays in production. Pre- 
requisite: THEA 148. Offered summer only. 

232 

STAGE MAKEUP 

Essentials in stage makeup: straight, 
character, special types. Effects of light on 
makeup are included. Recommended for 
performers and directors of educational, church 
and community theatres. Prerequisite: THEA 
148. One-half unit of credit. Alternate Years. 

233 

ADVANCED MAKEUP 

Advanced techniques in makeup design. 

Three-dimensional and prosthetic makeups 

are included, with emphasis on nonrealistic 

and nonhuman forms. Prerequisite: THEA 

232. One-half unit of credit. Alternate years. 

235-236 

INTERMEDIATE DANCE I AND n 

Studies of the techniques of basic move- 
ment and interpretation in ballet, jazz, and 
modem dance at the intermediate level. 
Classes include improvisation and choreogra- 
phy. Prerequisite for THEA 235: THEA 136 
or consent of instructor. Prerequisite for 
THEA 236: THEA 235 or consent of instruc- 
tor. One-half unit of credit each. Not open to 
students who have received credit for MUS 
135-136 or MUS 235-236. 



240 

ACTING II 

Continued practice in character analysis. 
The study of acting styles is introduced with a 
strong emphasis on performing Shakespeare's 
plays. Prerequisite: THEA 140 

320 

COSTUME DESIGN 

The theory of costuming for the stage, 
elements of design, planning, production and 
construction of costumes for the theatre. 
Students will participate in the construction of 
costumes for Arena Theatre productions. 
Prerequisite: THEA 148 or consent of 
instructor. 

332 

THEATRE HISTORY I 

A historical survey of Western and Non- 
Western styles of theatre from the beginning 
to the present. Included is a study of the 
evolution of theatre architecture and perfor- I 
mance space as well as technical develop- 
ments. Alternate years. 

333 

THEATRE HISTORY II: LITERATURE 

A study of the major dramatic literature J 
that shapes the Western and non- Western ' 

theatre. Benchmark plays that are identified 
with specific periods and styles will be 
explored in depth. Prerequisite: THEA 332. 

335 , 

MODERN DRAMA ^ 

A study of the major dramatic literature in 
depth that constitutes the body of the modem 
theatre, from 1875 to the present. Included 
will be a survey of alternative theatre styles, 
both scripted and non-scripted. Ethnic, 
minority and contemporary problem plays will 
be surveyed as well. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THEATRE 

• 



336 

DIRECTING II 

Emphasis is placed on the student's ability 
to function as a director in the rehearsal 
process. Practical experience involves the 
directing of two one-act plays from the 
contemporary theatre in the Downstage 
Theatre. Prerequisite: THEA 226. 

337 
PLAYWRITING 

An investigation of the techniques of 
play writing with an emphasis on creative 
writing, culminating in a written one-act 
play. Prerequisite: ENGL 106/107 and THEA 
226. Alternate years. 

402 

SHAKESPEARE ON STAGE 

A study of Shakespeare's plays in produc- 
tion terms. Emphasis will be on translating 
works from the page to the stage, with special 
attention to language, poetry, acting styles as 
well as technical problems. Contemporary 
productions will be viewed 

410 

THEATRE AND CULTURE 

Exploration of one or more historic periods 
in a specific locale to discover the nature of 
the theatre in its cultural context. Included 
will be a study of the art, music, literature, 
political and social framework of the period 
and locale. Prerequisite: THEA 332 and 333. 

425 

ADVANCED COSTUME DESIGN STUDIO 

Practical application of costume design for 
the studio or main stage productions. 
Prerequistie: THEA 320 and consent of 
instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

426 

DIRECTING III 

Emphasis will be placed on the student's 
ability to produce a major three-act play from 



the script to the stage for public performance. 
Prerequisite: THEA 336. 

428 

ADVANCED SCENE DESIGN STUDIO 

Practical application of scene design for the 
studio or main stage productions. Prerequi- 
site: Consent of instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

429 

ADVANCED LIGHTING DESIGN STUDIO 

Practical application of lighting design for 
the studio or main stage productions. Prereq- 
uisite: Consent of instructor. May be repeated 
for credit. 

430 

PROPERTY DESIGN 

The theory of properties design for the 
stage, including the production of specific 
properties for staging use. Elements of design, 
fabrication, and the construction of properties 
employing a variety of materials and applica- 
tion of new theatrical technology. Prerequi- 
sites: THEA 228 and 320. Alternate years. 

431 

ADVANCED PROPERTY DESIGN STUDIO 

Practical application of properties design 
for studio or main stage productions. Prereq- 
uisite: THEA 430 and consent of instructor. 
May be repeated for credit. 

440 

ACTING III 

Preparation of monologues and two 
character scenes, contemporary and classical, 
and preparation of a professional acting 
audition. The student will appear in major 
campus productions. Prerequisite: THEA 240. 

441 

ADVANCED ACTING STUDIO 

Practical application of acting for studio or 
main stage productions. Prerequisite: THEA 
240 and consent of instructor. May be 
repeated for credit. 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



THEATRE • WOMEN'S STUDffiS 




444 

ADVANCED DIRECTING STUDIO 

Practical application of directing for studio 
or main stage productions. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor and THEA 336. May be 
repeated for credit. 

470 - 479 

INTERNSHIP (See Index) 

Students in the theatre work off campus in 
theatres such as the Guthrie Theatre, Minne- 
apolis, and the Hartford Stage and the Trinity 
Repertory. 

N80/N89 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES (See Index) 
Subjects for Independent Studies are 
chosen in conjunction with faculty members. 

490-491 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES: DEPT. HONORS 
Students who qualify for Dept. Honors will 
produce a major independent project in 
research or technical theatre. 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 

(WMST) 

Steering Committee: Beidler, Briggs, 
J. Hurlbert, Morris, Ryan (Coordinator) 
Although a major in women's studies is 
available only under the policies regarding 
Individual Interdisciplinary Majors (see p.48), 
an established minor in women's studies is 
provided. WMST 320 and three of the 
following courses are required for the minor. 

ART 339 Women in Art 
ENGL 334 Women and Literature 
HIST 3 1 Women in History 
PSCI 347 Women and Politics 
PS Y 34 1 Psychology of Women 
SOC 33 1 Sociology of Women 

With the approval of the coordinator, an 
appropriate special course or independent 
studies project may be substituted for one of 
the four courses required for the minor. To 
receive credit for a minor in women's studies, 
a student must maintain at least a 2.00 average 
in courses taken for that minor. 

The following course has been approved to 
be offered as a cultural diversity course: 
WMST 320. Students must check semester 
class schedules to determine which courses 
are offered as "D" courses for that semester. 

320 

ISSUES IN WOMEN'S STUDIES 

An examination of women's issues from an 
interdisciplinary perspective. The course will 
explore the social construction of gender, 
feminist research methods and theories, and 
the role of patriarchy in women's lives. 
Topics may involve language, art, science, 
politics, culture, violence, race, class, thnic 
differences, sexuality, and pornography. 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



The Board Of Trustees 



OFFICERS 

Robert L. Shangraw '58 

Chairman 

Donald E. Failor '68 

Vice Chairman 

John C. Schultz 

Secretary 

Ann S. Pepperman 

Assistant Secretary 

EMERITI 

Samuel H. Evert, '34, LL.D. 

Kenneth E. Himes, LL.D. 

W. Gibbs McKenney, LL.D., L.H.D 

Chairman Emeritus 

Fred A. Pennington, LL.D. 

Chairman Emeritus 

William Pickelner, LL.D. 

Marguerite G. Rich 

The Rev. Wallace F. Stettler, H.H.D. 

TERM EXPIRES 1997 

1994 William J. Ainsworth '63 

1994 David R.Bahl 

1 979 David Y. Brouse '47 

1994 Jay W. Cleveland, Sr. 

1 994 Marjorie F. Jones '50 

1988 David B. Lee '61 

1982 Margaret D. L'Heureux 

1973 Robert G. Little '63 

1 99 1 George A. Nichols '59 

1988 Ann S. Pepperman 

1988 John C. Schultz 

1994 Hugh H. Sides '60 

1988 Jeanne K. Twigg '74 

1994 Burke R. Veley '60 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



TERM EXPIRES 1998 

1986 Harold D. Chapman 
1980 Richard W. DeWald '61 
1992 James E. Douthat 

1992 Donald E. Failor '68 

1995 Michael J. Hayes '63 

1 99 1 The Rev. Bishop Felton E. May 
1989 V. Jud Rogers 

1983 Hon. Clinton W. Smith '55 

1992 Alvin M. Younger, Jr. '71 

TRUSTEES 

TERM EXPIRES 1999 

Elected 

1987 Leo A. Calistri '59 

1993 Melvin H. Campbell, Jr. '70 

1996 James Hebe '71 

1 978 Harold D. Hershberger, Jr. '51 

1989 Kenrick R. Khan '57 
1993 Dale N. Krapf '67 

1984 D. Stephen Martz '64 
1993 Thomas J. McElheny '69 
1992 Henry D. Sahakian 

1985 Robert L. Shangraw '58 

1 972 Harold H. Shreckengast, Jr. '50 
(Chairman Emeritus) 

1990 Phyllis L. Yasui 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Administrative Staff 



James E. Douthat (1989) 

President 

A.B., The College of William and Mary 

M.Div., Duke University 

Ed.D., Duke University 

John F. Piper, Jr. (1969) 

Dean of the College 
A.B., Lafayette College 
B.D., Yale University 
Ph.D., Duke University 

Daniel G. Fultz (1989) 
Executive V.P. and Treasurer 
B.A., Lycoming College 
M.B.A., Bucknell University 

M. Ben Hogan (1992) 

Dean of Student Affairs 

B.A., St. Francis College 

M.S., University of Southern Maine 

Ed.D., Vanderbilt University 

Robert Mothersbaugh (1993) 

Director of Development 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

James D. Spencer (1989) 

Dean of Admissions & Financial Aid 
B.A., Concordia College 

Kimberley D. Anstee (1995) 

Director of Alumni and Parent Programs 
B.A., Lycoming College 
M.A., Syracuse University 

Daniel Ashlock, Jr. (1994) 

Director of Student Programs/Leadership 
B.S., Northern Arizona University 
M.S. Central Connecticut State 

Jeffrey Baird (1992) 

Director of Safety & Security 
B.A., Mansfield University 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Steven D. Bobo (1995) 

Student Life Coordinator 

B.A., Cabrini College 

M.S., Shippensburg University 

Dale V. Bower (1968) 

Director of Planned Giving 

B.S., Lycoming College 

B.D., United Theological Seminary 

Mark Britten (1994) 

Director of Counseling Services 

B.A., Mansfield University 

M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

Melissa J. Buchanan (1995) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Erin Cahill (1994) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Gettysburg College 

Steven Caravaggio (1992) 

Director of Academic Computing 
& End User Services 
B.A., Lycoming College 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 

Benjamin H. Comfort, III (1996) 

Director of Financial Aid 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Natasha Cooper (1993) 

Assistant Instructional Services Librarian and 

Assistant Professor 

B.A., Colgate University 

M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

M.L.S., Syracuse University 

Molly Costello (1991) 

Director of College Relations 
A.B., Mount Holyoke College 
M.B.A., Southeastern Massachusetts University 

Robert L. Curry (1969) 

Associate Director of Athletics 
B.A., Lycoming College 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 



Jerry S. Faico (1990) 

Director of Student Programs 

B.S., Westminster College 

M.A., Bowling Green State University 

Denise Davidson (1994) 

Asst. Dean, Director of Residence Life 

B.A., Clark University 

M.S., Miami University of Ohio 

Robert F. Falk (1970) 
Associate Dean of the College 
A.B., Drew University 
B.D., Drew Theological School 
M.A., Wayne State University 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 

Sister Catherine Ann Gilvary IHM (1994) 

Catholic Campus Minister 

A.B., M.A., M.S., Marywood College 

Frank L. Girardi (1984) 

Director of Athletics 

B.S., West Chester State College 

Murray J. Hanford (1991) 

Publications Manager 

Daniel J. Hartsock (1981) 

Director of Academic Resource Center and 
Coordinator of Advising 
B.H., The Pennsylvania State University 
M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Alice N. Heaps (1986) 

Associate Director of Admissions 
B.S., Shippensburg University 

David Heffner (1994) 

Assoc. Dean/Director of 

Communications Technology 
B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 
M.S., Bloomsburg University 

Thomas J. Henninger (1966) 

Director of Administrative 

Computing and Data Networks 
B.S., Wake Forest College 
M.A., University of Kansas 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



Rebecca L. C. Hile (1995) 

Registrar 

B.A., Point Park College 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

J. Marco Hunsberger (1989) 

Campus Minister 

B.A., Mercer University 

M.Div., United Theological Seminary 

Michelle M. Jones (1996) 

Director of Accounting 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Wayne E. Kinley (1990) 

Controller and Assistant Treasurer 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Tara Licsko (1994) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Wendy Mahonski (1995) 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 
B.A., Lycoming College 

David J. Martin (1990) 

Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds 
B.S., Huntington College 

Barbara S. Matthews (1994) 

Part time Counselor 

B.A., SUNY 

M.Ed., Penn State University 

Wanda McDonough (1994) 

Director of the Annual Fund 
B.A., Bloomsburg University 

Jeffrey Michaels (1995) 

Sports Information Director 
B.A., Lycoming College 
M.S., Slippery Rock University 

Lisette N. Ormsbee (1995) 

Instructional Services Librarian and Asst. Professor 
B.A., St. Joseph's College 
MLIS, Brigham Young University 



^p 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF • FACULTY 




H. Karen Ransdorf (1990) 

Campus Store Manager 

Tamara A. Ray burn (1995) 

Asst. Director Student Programs/Leadership 
B.A., Kentucky Wesley an College 
M.A., Ball State University 

Leann M. Ritter (1995) 

Part time Registered Nurse 

Nancy Robinson (1990) 

Accounting Supervisor 

A.A.S., Pennsylvania College of Technology 

B.S., Lock Haven University 

Bruce Rosengrant (1994) 

Development Officer 

B.A., M.A., Bloomsburg University 

Thomas L, Ruhl (1995) 

Development Officer 

B.S., Bloomsburg University 

Stephen M. Schierloh (1992) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Juniata College 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



William C. Sherwood (1990) 

Business Manager 

B.S., Lycoming College 

M.B.A., Michigan State University 

Jeremy Spencer (1995) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Sandra L. Stipcak (1995) 

Nurse Director 

B.S.N., Indiana University of PA 

Diana VanFIeet (1993) 

Director of Prospect Research 
B.A., Bloomsburg University 

Christine Wallace 

PT Director of Internships 

A.S., Tomkins Cortland Community College 

B.S., State University College at Oneonta 

Cara Wehler-Bloom (1994) 

Admissions Counselor 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Mary B. Wolf (1985) 

Assistant Dean for Freshmen 
B.A., St. Mary's College 
M.P.A., University of Michigan 

Emeriti 

Jack C. Buckle 

Dean of Students Emeritus 
A.B., Juniata College 
M.S., Syracuse University 

Harold H. Hutson 

President Emeritus 
B.A., LL.D., Wofford College 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 
L.H.D., Ohio Wesleyan University 

Bishop D. Frederick Wertz 

President Emeritus 
A.B., Dickinson College 
M.A., Boston University 
S.T.B., Boston University 
LL.D., Dickinson College 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FACULTY 



FACULTY 

Professors 

Robert B. Angstadt (1967) 

Biology 

B.S., Ur sinus College 

M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Gary M. Boerckel (1979) 

Music 

Director of Lycoming Scholars 
B.A., B.M., Oberlin College 
M.M., Ohio University 
D.M.A., University of Iowa 

Jon R. Bogle (1976) 

Art 

B.F.A., B.S., M.F.A., Tyler School of Art; 

Temple University 

Jack D. Diehl, Jr. (1971) 

Biology 

B.S., M.A., Sam Houston State University 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Robert F. Falk (1970)** 

Theatre 

Marshal of the College 

Associate Dean 

B.A., B.D., Drew University 

M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 

David A. Franz (1970) 

Chemistry 

Marshal of the College 

A.B., Princeton University 

M.A.T., The Johns Hopkins University 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Ernest D. Giglio (1972) **** 
Political Science 
B.A., Queens College 
M.A.,SUNY at Albany 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Eduardo Guerra (1960) 

Religion 

B.D., Southern Methodist University 

S.T.M., Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG ■ 



Richard A. Hughes (1970) 

Religion 

B.A., University of Indianapolis 

S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston University 

Emily R. Jensen (1969) 

English 

B.A., Jamestown College 

M.A., University of Denver 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

Robert H. Larson (1969) 

History 

B.A., The Citadel 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Paul A. MacKenzie (1970) 

German 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Boston University 

John F. Piper, Jr. (1969) 

History 

Dean of the College 
A.B., Lafayette College 
B.D., Yale University 
Ph.D., Duke University 

David J. Rife (1970) 

English 

B.A., University of Florida 

M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 

Michael G. Roskin (1972) 

PoUtical Science 

A.B., University of California at Berkeley 

M.A., University of California at Los Angeles 

Ph.D., The American University 

Roger D. Shipley (1967) 

Art 

B.A., Otterbein College 

M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 

John M. Whelan, Jr. (1971) 

Philosophy 

B.A., University of Notre Dame 

Ph.D., The University of Texas at Austin 

Stanley T. Wilk (1973) 

Anthropology 

B.A., Hunter College 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

• 



Associate Professors 

Jerry D. AUen (1984) 

Theatre 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Utah State University 

Susan K. Beidler (1975) 

Collection Management Services Librarian 

B.A., University of Delaware 

M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh 

Howard C. Berthold, Jr. (1976) 

Psychology 

B.A., Franklin and Marshall College 

M.A., University of Iowa 

Ph.D., The University of Massachusetts 

Barbara F. Buedel (1989) 

Spanish 

B.A., University of Kentucky 

M.A., M. Phil, Ph.D., Yale University 

Richard R. Erickson (1973) 

Astronomy and Physics 
B.A., University of Minnesota 
M.S., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

David Fisher (1984) 

Physics 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

Edward G. Gabriel (1977) 

Biology 

B.A., M.A., Alfred University 

M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University 

Amy Golahny (1985) 

Art 

B.A., Brandeis University 

M.A., Williams College - Clark Art Institute 

M. Phil, Ph.D., Columbia University 

Stephen R. Griffith (1970) 

Philosophy 

A.B., Cornell University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

David K. Haley (1980) 

Mathematics 

B.A., Acadia University 

M.S., Ph.D., Queens University 

Habil, Universitat Mannheim 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



G. W. Hawkes (1989)* 

English 

B.A., University of Washington-Seattle 

M.A., Ph.D., SUNY-Binghamton 

Bruce M. Hurlbert (1982) 

Director of Library Services 

B.A., The Citadel 

M.S.L.S., Florida State University 

Janet Hurlbert (1985) 

Instructional Services Librarian 
B.A., M.A., University of Denver 

Eldon F. Kuhns, II (1979) 

Accounting 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M. Accounting, University of Oklahoma 

C.P.A. (Pennsylvania) 

Mehrdad Madresehee (1986) 

Economics 

B.S., University of Tehran 

M.S., National University of Iran 

M.S., University of Idaho 

Ph.D., Washington State University 

Robert J. B. Maples (1969) 

French 

A.B., University of Rochester 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Chriss McDonald (1987)* 

Chemistry 

B.S., Manchester College 

Ph.D., Miami University of Ohio 

Richard J. Morris (1976) 

History 

B.A., Boston State College 
M.A., Ohio University 
Ph.D., New York University 

Carole Moses (1982)** 

English 

B.A., Adelphi University 

M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

Ph.D., SUNY at Binghamton 

Kathleen D. Pagana (1982) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Maryland 

M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FACULTY 



Doris P. Parrish (1983) 

Nursing 

B.S., SUNY at Plattsburgh 

M.S., Russell Sage College 

Ph. D. , University of Texas at Austin 

Kathryn M. Ryan (1981)*** 

Psychology 

B.S., University of Illinois 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Gene D. Sprechini (1981) 

Mathematics 

B.S., Wilkes College 

M.A., Ph.D., SUNY at Binghamton 

Fred M. Thayer, Jr. (1976) 

Music 

A.B., Syracuse University 
B.M., Ithaca College 
M.M., SUNY at Binghamton 
D.M.A., Cornell University 

H. Bruce Weaver (1974) 

Business Administration 

B.B.A., Stetson University 

J.D., Vanderbilt University 

M.B.A., University of Central Florida 

Robert A. Zaccaria (1973) 

Biology 

B.A., Bridgewater College 

Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Melvin C. Zimmerman (1979)** 

Biology 

B.S., SUNY at Cortland 

M.S., Ph.D., Miami University 

Assistant Professors 

Susan Alexander (1991) 

Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., American University 

Holly D.Bendorf (1995) 

Chemistry 

B.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

Ph.D., University of California-Los Angeles 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



James Blair (1994) 

Education 

B.S., Bloomsburg University 

M.E., D.Ed. The Pennsylvania State University 

Michelle Briggs (1992) 

Biology 

B.S., Cornell University 

M.S., University of Iowa 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

Gloria Clark (1993) 

Foreign Languages 
B.A., Lycoming College 
M.A. University of Delaware 
Ph.D., SUNY— Binghamton 

John H. Conrad (1959) 

Education 

B.S., Mansfield State College 

M.A., New York University 

Elizabeth L. Davison (1995) 

Sociology 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian College 

M.S. Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

Santusht S. deSilva (1983) 

Mathematics 

B. Sc, University of Sri Lanka 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Lynn Estomin (1993) 

Art 

B.A., Antioch College 

M.F.A., University of Cincinnati 

Sascha Feinstein (1995) 

English 

B.A., University of Rochester 

M.F.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Michelle S. Ficca (1985) 

Nursing 

B.S., Stroudsburg State University 

M.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

Bahram Golshan (1989)** 

Mathematical Science 

B.S., Jundi Shapour University, Iran 

M.S., Edinboro State University of Pennsylvania 

M.S., Kent State University 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 



® 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



Margaret Gray-Vickrey (1986) 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , SUNY at Plattsburgh 
M.S., Northern Illinois University 
D.N.S., SUNY at Buffalo 

Gary Hafer (1992) 

English 

B.A., M.A., Kutztown University 

Ph.D., Purdue University 

Christopher M. Hakala (1996) 

Psychology 

B.A., Castleton State College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Owen F. Herring (1965) 

Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest College 

Rachael Hungerford (1989) 

Education 

A.A., Cayuga County Community College 
B.S., State University of New York at Plattsburgh 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts/Amherst 

Diane C. Janda (1988) 

Music 

B.M., University of Texas at Austin 
M.M., D.M.A., University of Cincinnati, 
College-Conservatory of Music 

Darby Lewes (1993) 

English 

B.A., Saint Xavier College 
M.A., Northwestern University 
Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Charles Mahler (1994) 

Chemistry 

B.A., The Ohio State University 

M.S., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Jeffrey D. Newman (1995) 

Biology 

B.S., University of South Carolina 

Ph.D., Marquette University 

Kurt H. Olsen (1993) 

Psychology 

B.S., St. Lawrence University 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Rochester 

LYCOMING COLLEGE ■ 



Philip W. Sprunger (1993) 

Economics 

B.S., B.A., Bethel College 

M. A., Ph.D., Indiana University 

Arthur Sterngold (1988)* 

Business Administration 

B.A., Princeton University 

M.B.A., Northwestern University 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

Larry R. Strauser (1973) 

Sociology 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.P.A., University of Arizona 

Mark Toncar (1994) 

Business Administration 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Kent State University 

Robert E. Van Voorst (1989)** 

Religion 

B.A., Hope College 

M.Div., Western Theological Seminary 

S.T.M., Ph.D., Union Theological Seminary 

Richard Weida (1987) 

Mathematics 

B.S., Muhlenberg College 

M.S., Ph.D, University of Delaware 

Richard E. Wienecke (1982)* 

Accounting 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.S., Bucknell University 

M.B.A., Long Island University 

C.P.A. (Pennsylvania and New York) 

Fredric M. Wild, Jr. (1978) 

Mass Communication 

B.A., Emory University 

M. Div., Yale Divinity School 

M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

David H. Wolfe (1989)* 

Physics 

B.S., Lock Haven State College 
M.S., Pennsylvania State University 
Ph.D., Kent State University 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FACULTY 

• 



David B. Yerger (1996) 

Economics 

B.S., Lock Haven University 

M.S., Cornell University 

Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 

* On Sabbatical Fall Semester 1996 
** On Sabbatical Spring Semester 1997 
*** On Sabbatical Academic Year 1996-97 
**** On Sabbatical Calendar Year 1997 

Instructors 

Edward Henninger (1988) 

Business Administration 
B.S., Shippensburg University 
M.B.A., Shippensburg University 

Deborah J. Holmes (1976) 

Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., The Pennsylvania State University 

LoriLauver (1995) 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

M.S.N. , College Misericordia 

Carolyn A. Schult (1995) 

Psychology 

B.A., Oberlin College 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Susan Slotleski-Krum (1994) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., M.S.N, College Misericordia 

Visiting, Special, and 
Part-time Appointments 

Diane Abercrombie (1988) 

Mathematics 

B.Bus.Admin., Bernard M. Baruch College, 
CUNY 

Albert Alexander (1993) 

Business Administration 

B.S., M.S., Syracuse University 

Tammy Anderer (1995) 

Visiting Instructor - Nursing 
B.S.N. , Bloomsburg University 
M.S.N. , College Misericordia 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG ■ 



Betsy Boring (1992) 

Spanish 

B.S., Bloomsburg State University 

George Bossert (1991) 

Education 

B.S., Lock Haven University 

M.S., Bucknell University 

Matthew M. Burke (1996) 

Visiting Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A., Earlham College 

M.S., Washington State University 

Katharine Cimini (1992) 

Psychology 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.A., College of William and Mary 

Joan Moyer Clark (1987) 

Music/Theatre 

Regina Collins (1991) 

Mathematics 

B.A., Rosemont College 

Natasha Cooper (1993) 

Library 

B.A., Colgate University 

M.L.S., Syracuse University 

Richard S. Coulter (1990) 

Music 

B.F.A., M.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Roger Davis (1984) 

Mathematics 

B.S.Ed., Clarion State College 

M.S.Ed., Bucknell University 

James E. Denton, III (1982) 

Theatre 

David Ellis (1992) 

Psychology 

B.A., State University of New York at Oswego 
M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
Psy.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Deborah Evans-Grove (1994) 

Education 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.Ed., Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University 



^^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

• 



Amy Falk (1991) 

Spanish 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

Steven George (1995) 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Theatre 
B.F.A., Carnegie-Mellon University 
M.F.A., Clarion State College 

Lori Guise (1988) 

Nursing 

B.S., Mount St. Mary's College 

M.S.Ed., lona College 

Sheila Hartung (1994) 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , M.S.N. , Villanova University 

Millie Hepburn-Smith (1993) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., State University of New York-Brockport 

Dorothy Hoy (1993) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., Messiah College 

Sherril Ingram (1991) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Pittsburgh 

M.S.N., Virginia Commonwealth University 

Jane Keller (1990) 

Visiting Instructor of EngUsh 
B.A., Bucknell University 
M.S., Wilkes College 

Don M. Larrabee, H (1972) 

Lecturer in Law 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College 

LL.B., Fordham University 

James Logue (1976) 

English 

A.B., M.S., Bucknell University 

Timothy Mahoney (1992) 

Sociology 

B.A., Lock Haven State University 

M.S., Eastern Kentucky University 



Alison Maloney (1995) 

Nursing 

Lou Ann Miller (1993) 

Chemistry 

A.B., Lycoming College 

M.S., Bucknell University 

Bruce Mosser (1990) 

Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State University 

Ami Pagana (1995) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., Thomas Jefferson University 

Lynn Painter (1995) 

Nursing 

B.S.N., Bloomsburg University 

M.S.N., College Misericordia 

Thomas Raup (1995) 

Visiting Professor of Legal Studies 
A.B., Columbia College 
J.D., Columbia School of Law 

Anthony Salvatori (1988) 

Education 

B.S., Lock Haven State University 

M.Ed., Bloomsburg University 

Dianne Todd Sawyer (1994) 

Nursing 

B.S., Hartwick College 

M.S., University of Rochester 

Joanne Schweinsberg (1992) 

Mathematics 

B.S., Mansfield State University 

M.A., Bucknell University 

Donald Slocum (1995) 

Accounting 

B.S., Cornell University 

M.S., Ph.D., The American University 

Gary Steele (1988) 

Music 

B.M., Juilliard School 

M.M., Eastman School of Music 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Q 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FACULTY 

• 



Ronald Straub (1989) 

Education 

B.S., East Stroudsburg University 

M.S., Lehigh University 

Brenda Terry-Manchester (1995) 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , Lycoming College 

M.S.N., College Misericordia 

David S. Witwer (1994) 

History 

B.A., DePauw University 

M.A.. Ph.D., Brown University 

Mary Wolf (1985) 

Assistant Dean for Freshmen/Political Science 
B.A., St. Mary's College 
M.P.A., University of Michigan 

Applied Music Instructors 

Diana L. Bailey (1986) 

Saxaphone 

B.S., Susquehanna University 

Judith D. Burke (1991) 

Clarinet 

B.S., Mansfield University 

Richard W. Campbell (1991) 

Bassoon 

B.M., Eastman School of Music 

Kate Comegys (1995) 

Voice 

B.S. THe College of St. Rose 

Jakki Flanagan (1992) 

Horn 

B. Mus., Temple University 

M. S., Mansfield University 

Jean Grube (1990) 

Voice 

B.M., Susquehanna University 

Richard J. Lakey (1979) 

Organ and Piano 

A.B., Westminster Choir College, 

M.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 



Robert Leidhecker (1989) 

Percussion 

B.M., Mansfield University 

Yvonne Mitchell (1991) 

Piano 

B.A., Lycoming College 

W. Stanley Mullen (1994) 

Guitar 

B. Mus. The Pennsylvania State University 

Grace K. Muzzo (1991) 

Piano 

B.M.E., Gordon College 

M.M.E., Westminster Choir College 

Mary L. Russell (1936) 

Music 

B.S., Susquehanna University 

Conservatory of Music 

M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

Adjunct Faculty & Staff 

Galal Amed, M.D. 

Medical Director, School of 
Medical Technology 
Divine Providence Hospital 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

Vivian Anagnoste, M.D. 

Medical Director, Clinical Laboratory 

Science Program 

Rolling Hill Hospital/Elkins Park, PA 19117 

Brooke Barrie (1984) 

Sculpture 

Johnson Atelier Technical Institute of Sculpture 

James Barton (1984) 

Sculpture 

Johnson Atelier Technical Institute of Sculpture 

Paul J. Cherney, M.D. 

Medical Director, School of 
Medical Technology 
Abington Memorial Hospital 
Abington, PA 19001 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



^P 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

• 



Gerald R. Fahs, M.D. 

Medical Director, School of 
Medical Technology 
The Lancaster General Hospital 
Lancaster, PA 17603 

Nadine Gladfelter, M.S., MT (ASCP) 

Program Director, School of Medical 

Technology 

The Lancaster General Hospital 

Lancaster, PA 17603 

Phyllis Gotkin, Ph.D., MT (ASCP) 

Program Director, Clinical Laboratory 
Science Program 
Rolling Hill Hospital 
Elkins Park, PA 19117 

Joseph T. King, M.D. 

Medical Advisor & Associate Pathologist 
Clinical Laboratory Science Program 
Robert Packer Hospital 
Sayre,PA 18840 

Barbara Kravitz, B.S., MT (ASCP) 

Education Coordinator, Clinical Laboratory 
Science Program 
Rolling Hill Hospital 
Elkins Park, PA 19117 

Jon Lash (1984) 

Sculpture 

Johnson Atelier Technical 

Institute of Sculpture 

Loretta A. Moffatt, B.S., MT (ASCP) 
Program Director, School of 
Medical Technology 
Divine Providence Hospital 
Williamsport, PA 17701 

Andrzej Pitynski (1984) 

Sculpture 

Johnson Atelier Technical 

Institute of Sculpture 

Barbara J. Scheelje, B.S., MT (ASCP) 

Program Director, School of 
Medical Technology 
Abington Memorial Hospital 
Abington, PA 19001 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Brian D. Spezialetti, M.S., M.T. (ASCP) 

Program Director 

Clinical Laboratory Science Program 

Robert Packer Hospital 

Sayre, PA 18840 

Emeriti 

Clarence W. Burch 

Professor Emeritus of Physical Education 
B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

John P. Graham 

Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Dickinson College 

M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

John G. Hollenback 

Professor Emeritus of Business 

Administration 

B.S., M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

James K. Hummer 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.N.S., Tufts University 
M.S., Middlebury College 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

M. Raymond Jamison 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of Physics 
B.S., Ursinus College 
M.S., Bucknell University 

Walter G. Mclver 

Professor Emeritus of Music 
Mus.B., Westminster Choir College 
A.B., Bucknell University 
M.A., New York University 

Roger W. Opdahl 

Professor Emeritus of Economics 

A.B., Hofstra University 

M.A., Columbia University 

D. Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

Robert W. Rabold 

Professor Emeritus of Economics 
B.A., The Pennsylvania State University 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 



^h 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



FACULTY • ATHLETIC STAFF 



John A. Radspinner 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 
B.S., University of Richmond 
M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
D.S., Carnegie Mellon Institute 

Logan A. Richmond 

Professor Emeritus of Accounting 
B.S., Lycoming College 
M.B.A., New York University 
C.P.A. (Pennsylvania) 

Mary Landon Russell 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
Mus. B., Susquehanna University 
Conservatory of Music 
M.A., The Pennsylvania State University 

Louise R. Schaeffer 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Lycoming College 

M.A., Bucknell University 

D. Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

James W. Sheaffer 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Frances K. Skeath 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

A.B., M.A., Bucknell University 

D. Ed., The Pennsylvania State University 

John A. Stuart 

Professor Emeritus of EngUsh 

B.A., William Jewell College 

M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 



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Athletic 
Staff 

Joseph M. Bressi 

Head Men's Basketball Coach 
B.S., East Stroudsburg University 

Gene Bruno 

Men's Assistant Basketball Coach 
B.S., Trenton State College 

Roger Crebs 

Head Wrestling Coach 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Robert L. Curry 

Associate Athletic Director 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Christen Ditzler 

Head Women's Basketball Coach 
Head Women's Softball Coach 
B.A., Franklin & Marshall College 

Rob Eaton 

Head Men's Soccer Coach 
Head Women's Soccer Coach 
Golf Coach 
B.S., Lock Haven University 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



® 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ATHLETIC STAFF 



Mike Flamingo 

Assistant Wrestling Coach 
B.S., Mansfield University 

Matthew H. Ficca 

Head Athletic Trainer 

B.S., East Stroudsburg University 

M.S., University of South Alabama 

Robyn Flaherty 

Assistant Women's Basketball Coach 
Assistant Women's Softball Coach 
B.S., Lycoming College 

Robert L. George 

Assistant Football Coach 

B.S., West Chester State University 

M.S., SUNY at Cortland 

Frank L. Girardl 

Director of Athletics 
Head Football Coach 
B.S., West Chester State College 

Thomas R. Griffith 

Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Gene Haupt 

Assistant Football Coach 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Deborah J. Holmes 

Women's Tennis Coach 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

Sonny Kirkpatrick 

Head Volleyball Coach 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Jay Kramer 

Head Men'sAVomen's Swimming Coach 
Head Men'sAVomen's Cross Country Coach 
B.S., University of Wisconsin-Lacrosse 
M.S., University of Iowa 

Joe Lumbis 

Equipment Manager 



Terry Mantle 

Assistant Football Coach 
B.S., Lock Haven University 

Joe Mark 

Men's Tennis Coach 

Yvonne M. Meuse 

Cheerleading Advisor 

Jason Miller 

Assistant Soccer Coach 

B.S., California University of Pennsylvania 

Dan Muthler 

Assistant Wrestling Coach 
B.S., U.S. Naval Academy 

Brian J. Oakes 

Part time Athletic Trainer 
B.S., Lock Haven University 

Gene J. Peluso 

Head LaCrosse Coach 

B.S., Nazareth College of Rochester 

Stephanie Radulski 

Assistant Soccer Coach 
B.A., Dickinson College 

Pat Schemery 

Assistant Football Coach 
B.S., Mansfield University 

Michael J. Silecchia 

Asst. Football Coach 
B.A., Mansfield University 
M.A., Mansfield University 

Mike Weber 

Assistant Football Coach 
B.A., Lycoming College 

Steve Wiser 

Assistant Football Coach 
B.A., Lycoming College 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



® 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 



Administrative Assistants 



Victoria G. Anderton 

Campus Store Assistant 

Patricia Barclay 

Communications Officer 

Melody A. Bartlett 

Purchasing Coordinator 

Trudy L. Beachem 

Gift Records Specialist 

Michael J. Beatty 

Security Supervisor 

Theresa M. Beatty 

Faculty Secretary, Biology and 
Chemistry Departments 

Nathalie R. Beck 

Assistant to the President 

Kyle Bowen 

Mailroom Coordinator 

Brigitte C. Brahms 

Telecommunications Coordinator 

Sandra L. Burrows 

Secretary, College Relations 

Diane Carl 

Secretary to President 

Barbara J. Carlin 

Executive Secretary to Dean of 
Admissions & Financial Aid 

Diana L. Cleveland 

System Administrator 

Luana L. Cleveland 

Gallery Coordinator 

Richard L. Cowher II 

Printing Services Coordinator 

June V. Creveling 

Secretary, Buildings & Grounds 
and Safety & Security 

Allen Cunningham 

Communications Officer 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 




Mary E. Dahlgren 

Admissions Data Coordinator 

Dawn M. Davison 

Research and Travel Asst. 

Julia Dougherty 

Library Technician, Circulation 

Terri R. DriscoU 

Secretary, Athletics 

Gladys M. Engel 

Faculty Secretary, Theatre 

Angela Fahrenbach 

Communications Officer 

Robert W. Fans 

Mailroom Assistant & Assistant Press Operator 

Orlan Fisher 

Mailroom Assistant 

Paula M. Fisher 

Assistant Admissions Data Coordinator/ 
Secretary 

Sandra L. Goodsite 

Systems Analyst 

Steven Hanun 

Coordinator of Student Computing 

Diane J. Hassinger 

Executive Secretary to Dean of College 

Esther L. Henninger 

Secretary, Athletics 



^a 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 



Carol Hoover 

Printing Services Assistant 

Barbara E. Horn 

Faculty Secretary, Education 

Jennifer Jamieson 

Secretary 

Kristin Johnson 

Safety Officer 

David M. Kelchner 

Records and Data Manager 

Shelly A. LaForme 

Cashier & Bookkeeper 

Richard D. Lane 

Library Evening Proctor 

Gale D. Laubacher 

Accounts Payable Coordinator 

Donna M. Laughrey 

Campus Store Assistant 

Peggie A. LeFever 

Personnel Coordinator 

B. Brian Leonard 

Coordinator of Audiovisual 
and Multimedia 

Shirley D. Lloyd 

Switchboard Operator 

John J. Maness 

Security Supervisor 

Dorothy E. Maples 

Box Office Manager 

D. Maxine McCormick 

Recorder 

Nielin L. Meredith 

Assistant Admissions Data Coordinator 

Jason C. Miller 

Network Administor 

Rebecca R. Miller 

Secretary, Financial Aid 

Yvonne L. Miller 

Technical Support Analyst 

LYCOMING COLLEGE 



Marlene L. Neece 

Library Technician, Document Delivery 

Larry Newsuan 

Security Officer 

Judith E. Noble 

Library Technician, Acquisitions 

Marion R. Nyman 

Bursar/Executive Secretary 
to the Treasurer & Controller 

Melissa Pinkerton 

Development Services Coordinator 

Julie Rupert 

Secretary, Business Manager 

Sherry L. Schaefer 

Secretary, Residence Life 

Fern L. Schon 

Payroll & Student Loan Coordinator 

Gregory S. Seidel 

Security Supervisor 

Pamela S. Smith 

Secretary, Career Development Center 

Gail Spencer 

Library Technician, Circulation 

Robin Straka 

Assistant to the Registrar 

Sheran L. Swank 

Faculty Secretary 

Patricia J. Triaca 

Library Technician, Cataloging/ 
Government Document 

Carolyn I. Vander Weide 

Faculty Secretary 

Judy E. Walker 

Secretary, Health & Counseling Services 

Nancy A. Walker 

Faculty Secretary 

Scott Warner 

Security Officer 



^^ 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS • ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 




Deborah E. Weaver 

Manager, Residence Halls Operations 

Donna A. Weaver 

Assistant, Student Activities 

Sandra Wenzel 

Campus Store Assistant 

Geraldine H. Wescott 

Library Technician, Periodicals 

Roberta Wheeler 

Gift & Biographical Records Specialist 

Patricia S. Wittig 

Secretary, Campus Ministries 

Jean C. Wool 

Executive Secretary to Dean of Student Affairs 

Amy M. Yocum 

Faculty Secretary 

Gregory Zelensky 

Security Officer 

1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG ■ 



Alumni 
Association 

The Alumni Association of Lycoming 
College has a membership of nearly 13,000 men 
and women. It is govemed by an Executive 
Board consisting of 24 members-at-large. The 
Board includes members representing various 
class years and geographic areas, the senior 
class president, the current student body pres- 
ident, and past presidents of the last graduating 
class and the Student Senate of Lycoming 
College. The Director of Alumni and Parent 
Programs manages the activities of the Alumni 
office. 

The Alumni Association has the following 
purpose as stated in its constitution: "As an off- 
campus constituency, the association's purpose 
is to seek ways of maintaining an active and 
mutually beneficial relationship between the 
College and its alumni, utilizing their talents, 
resources, and counsel to further the objectives 
and programs of Lycoming College." 

All former students of Williamsport 
Dickinson Seminary and all former students 
who have successfully completed one year of 
study at Williamsport Dickinson Junior College 
or Lycoming College are considered members 
of the association. 

Acting as the representative of alumni on 
the campus and working also with undergradu- 
ates, the Alumni office is responsible for keeping 
alumni informed and interested in the programs, 
growth, and acdvities of the College through 
regular publications mailed to all alumni on 
record. Arrangements for Home-coming, Class 
Reunions, club meetings, and similar acdvities 
are coordinated through this office. Through 
the Lycoming College Annual Fund, the Alumni 
office is closely associated with the develop- 
ment program of the College. Communications 
to the Alumni Association should be addressed 
to the Alumni and Parent Programs Office. 



^ 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE BOARD 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
EXECUTIVE BOARD 

TERM EXPIRES OCTOBER 1996 
N. Mark Achenbach '58 
Jay W. Cleveland '88 
Patricia S. Courtright '74 
Kenneth L. Koetzner '61 
Jean M. White '48 

TERM EXPIRES OCTOBER 1997 
Julie A. Hottle Day '88 
Helen H. Fultz '57 
Angela V. Hyte '73 
JuUe M. MaKatche '92 
Debra A. Oberg-Kmiecik '87 
Debra S. Schneider '86 
Jon C. Vandevander '79 
Dennis G. Youshaw '61 

TERM EXPIRES OCTOBER 1998 
Daniel W. Bythewood '68 
Robert P. Crockett '61 
Paul B. Henry '66 
William R. Lawry '64 
Fred Y. Legge '53 
Linda Porr Sweeney '78 
J. Michael Schweder '71 
Ronalee B. Trogner '69 




Members of the Board 
Serving a One- Year Term 

Student Senate of 
Lycoming College (SSLC) 
President 

Alicia L. Klosowski 

SSLC Past President 

Erica S. Dohner 

'96 Senior Class President 

Kellie A. O'Connor 

'97 Senior Class President 

Michael S. Wiltshire 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



INDEX 

• 



Index 



Academic Advising 51 

Academic Calendar 2 

Academic Honesty/Standing 31 

Academic Honors 31 

Academic Program 36 

Accounting Curriculum 57 

Accounting-Mathematics (EIM) 60 

Admission to Lycoming 10 

Advanced Placement 27 

Advanced Standing by Transfer 27 

Advisory Committees 51 

Health Professions 52 

Legal Professions 52 

Theological Professions 52 

Allopathic Medicine, Preparation 51 

American Studies (EIM) 60 

Anthropology Curriculum 154 

Application Fee and Deposits 13 

Applied Music Requirements 130 

Art Curriculum 62 

Astronomy and Physics Curriculum 68 

Athletic Training 141 

Audit 28 

Awards 32 

B.F.A. Degree 37 

Biology Curriculum 74 

Board of Trustees 165 

B.S.N. Degree 38 

Business Administration Curriculum 79 

Campus Facilities 6 

Capitol Semester 56 

Career Development Services 24 

Chemistry Curriculum 84 

Christian Ministry, Advising for 52 

Class Attendance 29 

College and the Church 6 

College Level Examination 

Program (CLEP) 27 

Computer Science Curriculum 119 

Conduct, Standards of 26 

Contingency Deposits 14 

Cooperative Programs 43 

Engineering 44 

Environmental Studies 44 

Forestry 44 



Medical Technology 44 

Military Science 46 

Optometry 45 

Podiatric Medicine 46 

Sculpture 46 

Counseling, Personal 24 

Course Credit by Examination 27 

Criminal Justice (EIM) 91 

Cultural Diversity 40 

Degree Programs/Requirements 37 

Dental School, Preparation 52 

Departmental Honors 51 

Deposits/Deposit Refunds 14 

Distribution Requirements 39 

English 39 

Fine Arts 39 

Foreign Language 39 

Humanities 39 

Mathematics 39 

Natural Sciences 40 

Social Sciences 40 

Economics Curriculum 92 

Education Curriculum 96 

Education Financing Plans 16 

Educational Opportunity Grants 17 

Engineering, Cooperative Program 44 

English Curriculum 100 

English Requirement 39 

Entrance Examination (CEEB) 27 

Environmental Science 75 

Environmental Studies 44 

Established Interdisciplinary Major (EIM). . 42 

Faculty 169 

Federal Grants and Loans 17-18 

Fees 13-14 

Financial Aid/Assistance 15 

Fine Arts Requirements 39 

Foreign Language Requirement 39 

Foreign Languages and 

Literatures Curriculum 105 

Forestry, Cooperative Program 44 

French Curriculum 106 

German Curriculum 107 

Grading System 29 

Graduation Requirements 37 



1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG 



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LYCOMING COLLEGE 



INDEX 

• 



Greek Curriculum 108 

Health Professions, Preparation 52 

Health Services 24 

Hebrew Curriculum 109 

History Curriculum 110 

Honor Societies 31 

Humanities Requirement 39 

Independent Study 54 

Institute for Management Studies 114 

Interdisciplinary Majors 42 

Established Majors (EIM) 42 

Individual Majors (IIM) 42 

International Studies 116 

Internship Programs 54 

Johnson Atelier 64 

Legal Professions, Preparation 52 

Literature (EIM) 118 

Loans 17 

London Semester 55 

Lycoming Scholar Program 48 

Major 41 

Admission to 41 

Departmental 42 

Interdisciplinary (EIM, IIM) 42 

Management Scholars Program 114 

Mathematical Sciences 118 

Mathematic Requirements 39 

May Term 53 

Medical School, Preparation 52 

Medical Technology 44 

Military Science 125 

Minor 47 

Music Curriculum 127 

National Direct Student Loans (NDSL) 18 

Natural Science Requirement 40 

Near East Culture and Archaeology (EIM). .131 

Non-degree Students 28 

Nursing 132 

Optometry 45 

Optometry School, Preparation 52 

Osteopathy School, Preparation 51 

Payment of Fees 13 

Philadelphia Semester 55 

Philosophy Curriculum 137 

Physical Activity, Wellness 

& Community Service Program 141 

Physical Activity Curriculum 142 



Physics Curriculum 68 

Placement Services 24 

Podiatric Medicine, 

Cooperative Program 46 

Political Science Curriculum 143 

Psychology Curriculum 147 

Readmission 12 

Refunds 14 

Registration 28 

Religion Curriculum 150 

Repeated Courses 30 

Reserve Officer Training 

Corps Program (ROTC) 46 

Residence and Residence Halls 24 

Scholarships/Grants 17 

Scholarships (ROTC) 19 

Scholar Program 48 

Scholar Seminar 154 

Sculpture 64 

Social Science Requirement 40 

Sociology- Anthropology Curriculum 154 

Spanish Curriculum 109 

Special Facilities & Programs 53 

Independent Study 54 

Internship Program 54 

May Term 53 

Overseas Studies Opportunities 55 

Staff 166,179 

State Grants and Loans 17 

Student Records 27 

Study Abroad 56 

Supplemental Educational 

Opportunity Grant (SEOG) 17 

Theatre Curriculum 159 

Theological Professions, Advising 52 

Unit Course System 26 

United Nations Semester 55 

Veterinary School, Preparation 51 

Washington Semester 55 

Wellness Curriculum 141 

Westminster Oxford Semester 55 

Withdrawal from College 29 

Withdrawal of Admissions Application 12 

Women's Studies 164 

Work-Study Grants 18 

Writing Across The Curriculum Program. . . 40 



LYCOMING COLLEGE 



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1996-97 ACADEMIC CATALOG