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Full text of "Lykens-Williams Valley history - directory and pictorial review. Embracing the entire Lykens and Williams Valley, in the effort to preserve the past and perpetuate the present."

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Gc M. L. 

974.801 

D26ba 

1390144 

GENEALOGY COLLECTION. 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



U£ 




3 1833 01126 3412 



To tnose ■wno were born ana reared in 
this valley. TKose who now live here. 
Those v^ho have at one time lived here 
ana are now living elsewhere. Those 
who lived in this history and have now 
passed into the De>)ond. 

To these folks, this \)olurae is respect- 
fully dedicated. 



'Remember the Days of Old, Consider^ the Years 
of Many Generations/' — Deut. 32: 7. 



Lykens- Williams Valley 
History - Directory 
and Pictorial Review 



Embracing the entire Lykens and Williams Valley, in 
the effort to preserve the past and perpetuate the present. 




Edited and Compiled by 

J. ALLEN BARRETT 



Published by J. kllen 'Barrett 



Press of 

The TelegrapK Printing Company 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 



AUTHOR'S PRELUDE NOTE 

In a brief resume of the history of the Lykens and 
"Williams Valley it is out of place to treat the Aborigines and 
even the early history of the state of Pennsylvania, save when 
some allusion to either may be deemed necessary. The founder 
of Pennsylvania is certainly deserving of grateful remembrance 
for his efforts to settle his Province, to protect the pioneers and 
to foster their industry and thrift. He was a remarkable man 
in many respects, and his "Frame of Government" is a model 
unequalled by the laws of any of the colonies or Provinces. The 
"Concessions" agreed upon in England for the encouragement 
of emigration to his Province was an important factor in that 
great movement which so materially assisted in building up 
this Western empire, and gave to the world the great state 
founded in peace. The inducements by Penn to settle were not 
confined to right of soil or voice in government, but religious 
tolerance was guaranteed by him. The law of religious liberty 
as framed by him, and passed by the first Assembly at Chesi;er 
on the 10th of December, 1682, was the first Act of toleration 
ever given to any people in the history of nations. 

Owing to this toleration on the part of the Proprietary 
of Pennsylvania, that Province became a refuge and home to 
the people of all creeds and religious beliefs. It is true that 
during the life time of the Founder, liberty of conscience was 
not questioned but at a later period, we regret to say, his re- 
ligious adherents would have throttled tolerance had they not 
feared revolution. 1 3^0i 4-4 

As a general thing the first settlers were staid farmers. 
Their mutual wants produced mutual dependence, hence they 
were kind and friendly to each other— they were even hospit- 

5 



6 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

able to strangers. Their want of money in the early times 
made it necessary for them to associate for the purpose of build- 
ing houses, cutting their grain, etc. This they did in turn for 
each other without any other pay than the pleasures which 
usually attended a country frolic. Strictly speaking, what is 
attributed to them as virtues might be called good qualities, 
arising from necessity and the peculiar state of society in which 
these people lived — patience, industry and temperance. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



PREFATORY NOTE 

The publication of this volume is made possible by the 
support of the business people whose advertisements are con- 
tained herein. The Author earnestly requests the READER 
when in need of any commodity, to consult the Business Direc- 
tory of this book. 



To those who are living in the present twentieth century, 
and have learned to revel in the resources into the past, the 
facts herein gathered should have a charm. The present will 
soon belong to the past, and thus, as the years roll on apace, the 
very sketches here contained will be more highly treasured. If 
the sketches of some who ought to have a place here are wanting, 
it is not the fault of the Publisher — it is that of the individual, 
l^eoring in mind constantly, however, the limited space of this 
volume prohibits the dwelling in detail on any sulbject and ex- 
cluding altogether minor and non-important matter, thus af- 
fording room for the really important and interesting subjects 
which permits the submission to the subscribers, of a perfectly 
reliable as well as valuable book. 

As introductory to this volume, a resume of the liistory 
of the Lykens-Williams Valley is given, with other data nowhere 
else to be found. This feature being peculiar to this work. 

In presenting the Lykens-Williams Valley History-Directory 
and Pictorial Review to its patrons, the Publisher and Author 
acknowledges with gratitude, the encouragement and support 
the enterprise has received, and the willing assistance in enab- 
ling him to surmount the many unforseen obstacles to be met 
with in the production of a work of this nature and magnitude. 
To procure the material for its compilation, official records 
were carefully examined, newspaper files searched, manuscripts, 
letters and memoranda were sought, History volumes were con- 
sulted and throughout the resume, excerpts were taken from 
Gordon's History of Pennsylvania, W. H. Egle's History of 
Pennsylvania, Egle's History of Dauphin and Lebanon Counties, 



g L^kens-wiLliaMs vAllEy histOrY 

The Biographical Encj^clopedia of Dauphin County, Richard 
Nolan Diary, Diaries of old residents of the valley, Lykens Stan- 
dard, Millersburg Sentinel, Elizabethville Echo, Williamstown 
Times, Tower City Herald, and direct information from parties 
still living. To name those here would require several pages; 
therefore, ever mindful of the valuable assistance, my sincere 
thanks and appreciation are extended. Great care was taken 
to have sketches as free from error as possible, but I do not 
hold myself responsible for mistakes, as no charge was made for 
the insertion of any printed matter contained in this book, ex- 
cept for advertisements. 

Therefore, kind reader, I submit to you this volume, — sin- 
cerely trusting you will be appreciable enough to realize the 
task involved to publish the same, that you will appreciate its 
value now and in time to come ; and in knowing this, I feel that 
the effort has not been in vain. 

J. Allen Barrett. 

Lykens, Pa., March ir>th, 1922. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Subject Page 

Business Directory Last Page 

Did You Know, or, Do You Remember Department, The 294 

District Number 3. U. S. Selective Draft. Statistics 201) 

Elizabetliville, Important Dates in History of 193 

Early Families of The Valley 31 

Early Settlers, How Lived 21 

Game and Fish, Past and Present, By V. W. Barrett, Lykens Pa, . . 18,0 
Geological Survey, A., of The Lykeus-Williams Valley — By H. E. 

Buffington, Esq., Lykens, Pa 13 

Gratz F'air Association 55 

High Schools In The Valley 208 

Hoffman's Reformed Church 208 

History of The Lykens-Willlams Valley, Proper 22 

History of Towns in The Valley — 

History of Berrysburg 97 

History of Ellzabethville 131 

History of Gratz 52 

History of Lykens Township 51 

History of Lykens Borough 100 

History of Millersburg 63 

History of Mifflntownship 95 

History of Porter Township 160 

History of Tower City 165 

History of Wiconisco 89 

History of Williamstown 145 

History of The Discovery of Lykens Valley Coal 42 

Honor Roll of The Valley- 
Honor Roll of Berrysburg 284 

Honor Roll of Ellzabethville 286 

Honor Roll of Gratz 279 

Honor Roll of Lykens 285 

Honor Roll of Millersburg 280 

Honor Roll of Tower City 290 

Honor Roll of Wiconisco 283 

Honor Roll of Williamstown 287 

Indian, Lykens-Willlams Valley 18 

"Love Rock" A Legend of a Romantic Spot on Berry's Mt 32 

Lykens, Important Dates In The History of 192 

Lykens- Wiconisco Athletic Club 224 

Lykens Valley Summex--Rambo Apple 212 



iO LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Subject Page 

Millersburg Gun Club 210 

Mine Casualties at Lykens Vallej- Mines 193 

Mine Casualties at Williamstown Mines 197 

Mine Casualties at Towercity Mines 200 

Mine Casualties at East and West Brookside Mines 200 

Municipal Authorities of — 

Berrysburg , 187 

Elizabethville 188 

Gratz 185 

Lykens 188 

Millersburg 185 

Tower City 191 

Wiconisco Township 186 

Washington Township 190 

Williams Township 189 

Williamstown 190 

Public Services in The Valley 207 

Roads in The Valley 206 

Railroads and Transportations 206 

Stone Church, The Old; Elizabethville 228 

Sports of The Valley 213 

St. John's Lutheran Church (Hill) 226 

Twin County Base Ball League. Teams and Entire Statistics 

for Season 1921 217 

Towercity Swimming Pool 226 

Who's Who in The Lykens-Williams Valley— 

Elizabethville 260 

Gratz 55 

Lykens 239 

Millersburg 231 

Wiconisco 236 

Williamstown 269 

Towercity 275 

"Wild Life in The Lykens-Williams Valley" By— Seth E. Gordon, 

Sec. Penna. State Game Commission 203 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW H 



INDEX TO PICTORIAL REVIEW. 

Subject pfig^s 

Avenue, Scenes on Grand Avenue, Towercity 166, 168, 169, 170, 172, 173 

Basin, Lykens Valley ' 46 

Breaker, Lykens Valley 47 

Breaker, Brookside Tower City 48 

Breaker, Williamstown 49 

Breaker, New at Brookside 50 

Building, On Present Brubaker Site, Millersburg 65 

Bridge, Across Wiconisco Creek 68 

Building, Brubaker, Millersburg 7(5 

Bridge, Concrete Across Wiconisco Creek at Millersburg 81 

Bridge, Trolley, at Wiconisco 90 

Building, Old Polm; Where Present L. V. Bank now stands, Eliza- 

bethville 137 

Budd, Portrait of the Late Cap't. Richard Budd, Williamstown . . 147 

Canal, Old Wiconisco at Millersburg 44 

Canal, Old Wiconisco, Loading Boats 44 

Canal, Old Wiconiseo', end of 45 

Cottage Hill, Millersburg 67 

Cemetery, Millersburg 69 

Church, M. E. Millersburg 75 

Church, Reformed Millersburg 78 

Church, Lutheran Millersburg 79 

Creek, Wiconisco 89 

Church, Zion Lutheran Lykens 103 

Church, Grace M. E. Lykens 104 

Church, Old Stone Elizabethville 133 

Church, Salem Lutheran E'lizabethville 134 

Church, Salem Reformed Elizabethville 134 

Church, Methodist Williamstown 149 

Camp, Beaver One The West Branch Lykens 182 

Club, Millersburg Gun 211 

Depot, P. R. R., Millersburg 75 

Draft, U. S. Selective Number 3 Elizabethville 209 

Elizabethville, Market Street 133 

House, Old Water. For Wiconisco Canal 24 

House, School, Millersburg, 1825-1860 70 

Houses, Pioneer of Millersburg ^2 

Hall, K. of P., Lykens 102 

House, School, Elizabethville 132 

Hotel, Snyder, Elizabethville 132 

Hotel, Central, Williamstown 147 

Hotel, Tower City 1^7 

House, School, Tower City 171 

Lykens, Andrew, Drawing 1*^0 

Lykens, Main and Market Streets 101 

Lykens, A scene in 1*^4 

Lykens, "When the Late Train Arrives" 105 

Lykens, A scene in 10*5 

Lykens, Main and Market Streets, 1860 107 



12 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTOIiY 

Lykens, Birds-E'ye-View 1888 108 

Lykens, A Scene In 110 

Lykens, Birds-Eye-View Hi! 

Mountain, Berry's Below Millersburg 27 

Mohautongo, Base of 28 

Miller, Mrs. Daniel, Portrait 63 

Market Square, Winter Scene, Millersburg 66 

Market St., Millersburg 71 

Market Sq., Millersburg, lo72 72 

Millersburg, Bird's-Eye-View, 1872 72 

Millersburg, The Original Town 73 

Millersburg, Bird's-Eye-View 80 

Map, Industrial of Elizabetliville 135 

Map, Elizabethville, 1875 136 

Office, Old Shipping for Lykens Valley Coal Co 43 

Office, Post, Millersburg 78 

Patrick, Mt., From End of Valley 25 

Jratrick, Mt., A Study in Reflection 26 

Patrick, Mt., From Millersburg 30 

Plant, New Electric, at Lykens Colliery 50 

Park, Millersburg 64, 77 

Pool Swimming, Lykens Ill 

Preserve, State Game, Scene on the Same 181 

Preserve, State Game, Keepers Camp 204 

Race Track, Gratz Fair Grounds 56, 57, 60, 61 

Railroad, Old Lykens Valley 68 

Reservoir, Lykens 113 

Rieservoir, Tower City 173 

Shaft, East, Brookside 47 

Street Scene in Millersburg 74, 76, 77 

Seminary, Old Berrysburg 98 

Trestle, Summit rsianch at Mt. Patrick 45 

Tavern, Old Red, Elizabethville 137 

Tower, Charlemagne, Portrait of 165 

Tower City, Bird's-Eye-View 175 

Team, Basket-Bail, Wiconisco H. S 215 

Team, Foot-Ball, L. & W. A. C 225 

Valley, A Scene Leading From Millersburg 23 

Wisconisco, A Scene in the Town 91, 92 

Wreck, P. R. R. Lykens, 1921 109 

Williams, Daniel, from a Description 145 

Williamstown, A Scene in the Borough, 146 

Williamstown, Bird's-Eye-View from a Drawing in 1888 148 

Wreck, P. & R. R., Tower City 174, 176 

Yard, Old Northern Central 70 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



13 




^J,M 



GEOLOGICAL SURVEY 



by 

H. E. BUFPINGTON, ESQ. 

Lykens, Pa. 



This geological review will embrace a short structural, strat- 
ographic, and economic survey, as well as the prehistoric forma- 
tion. 

A structural survey of the northern part of Dauphin County, 
known as the Lykens, Williams and Pine Valleys, discloses them 
to be wholly within and at the western end of a large canoe 
shaped basin. The rock strata of the two last valleys dipping 
steeply toward each other, at Lykens dipping north, at Gratz 
dipping south, forming a huge cradle within which nestles the 
lofty Big Lick and Gratztown Mountains. The basin sinks 
deeply toward the east and rapidly rises and flattens out toward 
the west, until at Loyalton the same formation of bed rocks 
which underly Lykens and Gratz, unite at the surface and spread 
out as the broad, flat Lykens Valley, and extending beyond the 
river at Millersburg where it was thrown up into the air by the 
underlying Pocono rocks coming to the surface as the juncture 



14 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

of two mountains, 'i'lie rocks of tlie Berry's Mountain dip tu 
the north and those of the Mahantango to the south. I'he hard 
plates of Pocono sandstone which form the back hone of tliese 
mountains, having better withstood the elements while the soft 
shales of the valley were being eroded and washed away, have 
created a well defined mountain as the boundary line, encir- 
cling the western end of the great syncline. 

The big trough enfolds what is known as the Lower Anthra- 
cite basin, extending sixty miles long and six miles wide at its 
greatest width, from the mountain top at Loyalton, Dauphin 
County to Mauch Chunck, Carbon County. 

East of Tower City, it is broken into or joined by a narrow 
over-throw syncline deep enough to carry the coal formations, 
and extending south-westward like a spur as the Stony and 
Sharp mountain. 

The coal strata of the Big Lick Mountain dips north, whiU' 
that of the Gratztown Mountain, dips south, bringing Bear Val- 
ley as the center line of the trough. The base line of the lower 
coal veins spooning out at the surface on the mountain top at 
Loyalton, rapidly sinks toward the east until at Lykens it 
reaches a depth of 2702 feet. The pitch of the veins down the 
sides of the trough becomes very steep, at places approaching the 
perpendicular. The north dip or Lykens side is continuous and 
unbroken rounding the bottom and ascending the other side 
for a short distance; at this point the south dip or Gratz side has 
a down throw fault breaking its continuity ; the rock formation 
having at this point split oft' and slipped down. This fault has 
not been defined in the lower formations of the Lykens Valley. 

The Stratography 

When viewed according to their origin there are four kinds 
of rocks: Ignious, or those formed by fire as granite, eLc, Sedi- 
mentary, fragments broken down from other rocks, washed 
away and deposited in water as the shales, sandstones, and con- 
glomerate; Animal origin, as the shells of oysters, etc., accumu- 
lated under water, forming limestone, etc. ; Vegetable source, 
producing carbon deposits, as coal, etc. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW JS 



Kocks of ignious or animal source do not appear in the 
Lykens Valley; however with these exceptions the Cove Dyke 
crosses the river above Halifax and is lost in the Berry's Moun- 
tain south of Rife. The molten trap-rock coming up through 
this crack in the earth's crust most probably will be found to 
continue across the Ljd^ens Valley, but at some distance beneath 
the surface. Also there is a well-defined layer of calcarious 
shale on the George Hai*ner farm east of Elizabethville. This 
is the nearest approach to limestone found in the valley. 

The rocks are all of a sedimentary formation with the up- 
permost layers interlaid with the vegetable rocks, the coals, and 
the slates. 

Belonging to Devonian and Carboniferous series the rocks 
are here displayed in their truest types. 

The Pocono white sandstone forming the backbone of the 
Berry's and Mahantango iMountains here attain a thickness of 
two thousand feet. The sandstones are white and gray, with 
very little shale but occasional layers of hard conglomerate. 
The Criswald Gap conglomerate here attains a thickness of 
twenty feet. There also appears in the gorge south of Lykens 
at Peewee Rock a fossiliferous shale containing an abundance 
of vegetable fossils, among which the writer has classified 
the Lepidodendron, Chemungeuse, and Primaevum, Archaeop- 
teris, Bochchiana, etc. Underlying the uppermost layer of con- 
glomerate in the Pocono formation is a stratum of laminate rock, 
It is very persistent .thus forming a reliable key rock. 

The ]\Iauch Chunk red shale overlies the Pocono forming 
the whole surface bed of the three valleys, and here attains a 
thickness of over two thousand feet, consisting chiefiy of red 
shales with occasional thin layer of red sand stone. 

The Pottsville formation is the typical conglomerate over- 
lying the Mauch Chunk shales, and having a thickness of over 
six hundred feet. Hoisting its massive conglomerate rocks a 
thousand feet above the valleys it forms the rugged mountains 
north of Lykens, interlaced with six beds of coal it here yields 
three thick workeable veins of the famous Red Ash coal. The 
carboniferous proper w-bere it appears in the Bear Valley, 



IQ LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

north of Lykens, overlies the conglomerate with but a small 
part of its formation. Only the lower productive measures 
has its bottom beds sunk deep enough in the trough between the 
Big Lick and Gratztown Mountains to be retained. However 
towards the east more layers are preserved until finally all the 
beds of the series are included. 

Economic 

The shales of the valleys disintregrate into a fertile farming 
soil; the Pocono sandstones are used for building purposes and 
road making. The coal is extensively mined by the most mod- 
ern and up-to-date equipped collieries in the world and forms 
the chief occupation of the region. 

The trough formation precludes oil from ever being pro- 
duced in commercial quantities in the Lykens Valley. The ap- 
parent small anti-cline fold passing through Berrysburg is a 
structural trap sufficient to collect oil if a porous oil bearing 
rock is present, but its restricted area of drainage would make 
the pool so small as to ,bie worthless. 

There are no precious metals nor minerals found except the 
scant aluminum and the iron contained in the red shales. 

Historic Formation. 

When the primitive great upheaval hoisted the first land 
above the water, creating the formative base of the North 
American Continent, it appeared as a large mass of granite in 
Canada, shaped like the letter V, with its apex resting on the 
northern shores of the Great Lakes, its one broad arm extending 
toward Alaska, the other paralleling the St. Lawrence River, 
with the Hudson Bay occupying the center. All the rest of 
North America still remained under water. Within the sea 
along the eastern front, paralleling the Atlantic Shore line for 
a one thousand miles was a long deep, broad trough. A de- 
pression under the sea counter-balancing the great uplift. 

During millions of years the elements were attacking the 
massive land granite, disintegrating, eroding and washing the 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 17 



sediment into the sea, where it was deposited as level layers of 
mud, sand or gravel, determined by its nearness to the shore 
line at the time of being laid down. 

The bottom of the great trough was filled up thicker than 
elsewhere, until at the close of the carboniferous era we find 
thai the successive seas of the Cambrian, Silurian, Devonian 
and carboniferous periods had accumulated a deposit of over 
thirty- -five thousand feet, more than seven miles thick. 

This added weight to an already weakened crust at the 
trough line, caused a gradual sinking of the under part of the 
shell into the molten center mass. It melted off the bottom 
shell of the trough until it became too weak to withstand the 
lateral pressure of the tremendous shrinkage strain from the 
cooling of the earth. 

The great squeeze, at the close of the carboniferous era, 
came as a thrust from the southeast lifting the crust out of the sea 
and folding it up for a distance of one thousand miles along 
Avhat is now the Atlantic Coast Line. Known as the Appa- 
lachian uplift it formed the mountain system from jNIaine to 
North Carolina. 

Across the continental trough at Lykens, it is estimated 
the distance of the then level strata was shortened twenty miles 
by the shrinkage thrust, resulting in a folding up and a stand- 
ing on end of the strata, forming the synclines and anticlines, 
the troughs and the hogbacks of our present geological struc- 
ture. 

The end of tliis upheaval marked the second great day for 
the permanent uplifting of land out of the seas. From Kansas 
west the whole of the United States, except a few islands, was 
still under water. 

At some places as at BeUefonte, the crust broke off and 
was shoved up seven miles into the air; at others, as at Rock- 
Wile it folded over on itself and looped back; at Lykens, the 
South side of the coal trough arose to an anticline whose crest 
line extends from the Glen at Lykens to Fisherville, then sweep- 
ing south in a slightly depressed plateau it meets the Round 
Top-Inglenook anticline and dips south with the Peters moun- 



18 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

tain as the north side of Stony Mountain overthrow coal syn- 
cline. At the close of the upheaval a big layer of broken, split 
and crumbled up mass of Mauch Chunk shale, Pottsville 
conglomerate, and Carboniferous formation overlaid the three 
valleys thousands of feet thick, with the still solid part tilted 
on its edge at an angle of sixty-five degrees. 

Then for many more millions of years the rains and the 
elements kept eroding away at this covering mass and swept it 
into the then New Jersey sea, until today there remains only 
a small fraction of the carbonifers, and the Pottsville comglom- 
erate with its coal veins. For every ton remaining thousands 
have been swept away and lost on the bosom of the coastal lands. 

THE LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY INDIAN 

In complexion, our uncivilized predecessors were of tawny 
color, inclining to red, which, differing from the complexion of 
every other portion of the human family, seems peculiar to most, 
if not all, the aborigines. Their cheek-bones were high and pro- 
minent; their eyes widely separated; their noses usuallj^ broad, 
even when curved in outline ; and the ordinary cast of their fea- 
tures was coarse and often inexpressive. The men were generally 
tall, straight, well proportioned, and hardly ever corpulent or 
in any manner deformed. The women were too apt to be short 
and clumsy ; their features were seldom delicate or handsome ; 
and Avhat feminine graces they had were soon obliterated by hard 
bodilj^ labor combined with mental and moral degradation. The 
beautiful Indian maiden was only a mj^th or the dream of the 
poet. The mode of life of the men, and perchance their natural 
constitution, gave them a power of enduring fatique and priva- 
tion such as no European could rival. When necessary they 
would hunt for days together while suffering from hunger, or per- 
form long journeys through the forests with no other refresh- 
ment than a little parched corn and water. 

For subsistence, the Indian depended much less upon 
agriculture than upon either fishing or hunting. They confined 
themselves chiefly to the raising of beans, corn, and tobacco. 
The corn and beans were cultivated bv women and children, 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 19 



the tobacco alone was thought worthy of the labor and attention 
of the men. The women of an ordinary family would commonly 
raise in a single season two or three heaps of corn, each con- 
taining twelve, fifteen, or twenty bushels. The corn was spread 
day after day in the sun, carefully shielded from the rain or 
dew, and when in this way sutficiently prepared was buried in 
the earth and thus preserved for the winter's subsistence. 

Hunting and fishing were perchance the chief dependence 
for food. The forest was filled with animals, some of them 
beasts of prey, others suitable for food, others valuable on 
account of their furs. Flocks of wild turkeys roam^ed through 
the woods, partridges and pheasants abounded, both in the woods 
and open country, and at certain times of the year the pigeons 
collected in such numbers that their flight seemed to obscure 
the light of the sun. The ponds, creeks, and rivers swarmed 
with water-fowl. The river Susquehanna was alive with fish, 
and every spring great numbers of shad, rock-fish, salmon, 
and perch ascended the streams furnishing a seasonable supply 
to the natives when their provisions were exhausted by a long 
and severe winter. 

The clotliing of the natives was composed of skins cured so 
as to be soft and pliable, and sometimes ornamental with paint 
and beads manufactured from shells. It may be stated in this 
connection that very little is known of the process used by the 
Indians to prepare bear- and deer-skins for shoes and clothing. 
Loskiel says, ''Their shoes are of deer-skin, without heels, 
some being very neatly made by the women. Their skins are 
tanned with the brains of deer, which make them soft; some 
leave the fur upon the skin, and such fur shoes are remarkably 
light and easy." The buffalo robes sold by our furriers as 
tanned by the Indians are softer than those that are tanned 
by civilized people. Occasionally the women decked themselves 
in mantles made of feathers overlapping eacli other, as on the 
back of the fowl, and presenting an appearance of fantastic 
gayety which no doubt prodigiously delighted the wearers. 
Their dress consisted usually of two articles, a leather skirt, or 
undergarment, ornamented with fringe, and a skirt of the same 



20 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

material fastened around the waist witli a belt and reaching 
nearly to the feet. Their hair they dressed in a thick, heavy 
plait, which fell down upon the neck; and they sometimes orna- 
mented their heads with bands of wampum or with a small cap. 
The men went bareheaded, with their hair fantastically trim- 
med each according to his own fancy. One warrior would have 
it shaved on one side of the head and long on the other. Another 
might be seen with his scalp completely bare, except a strip two 
or three inches in width running from the forehead over to the 
nape of the neck. This was kept short, and so thoroughly 
stiffened with paint and bear's-grease as to stand up straight, 
after the fashion of a cock's comb or the crest of a warrior's 
helmet. The legs were covered with leggins of dressed deer 
skin, and the lower part of the body was protected by the 
breech-cloth, usually called by the early settlers Indian-breeches. 
Moccasins, that is, light shoes of soft-dressed leather, were 
common to both sexes, and, like other portions of the attire, were 
many times tastefully ornamented with embroidery of wampum. 
The men often dispensed with their leggins, especially in sum- 
mer ; while in winter they protected themselves against the 
bleak air by adding to their garments a mantle of skins. The 
male children ran about until they were ten or twelve years old 
in a state of nature; the girls were provided with an apron, 
although of very economical dimensions. 

As to their houses and furniture, their food and its prepar- 
ation, amusements, courtships and marriage, we shall not refer. 
There are certain peculiarities characteristic of the Indian which 
are interesting to dwell upon, but these must be left to another 
occasion. A few remarks, however, upon their moral life may 
explain their future conduct towards the white settlers. The 
Indian of to-day, however, is a fair type of those savages who 
lived in our locality two centuries ago. We dislike to picture 
vice in all its horrid details, and to much that is inherent in 
the savage nature of the aborigine we shall refrain from refer- 
ring. 

Although marriage was not always recognized among their 
rites, unfaithfulness was looked upon as a crime, and even death 
was frequently inflicted for this offense by the irate husband. 



DIKBCTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 21 



licentiousness was common, and the man who looked upon tlie 
waywardness of his wife, visiting her with blows and wounds, 
may have been the most debauclied creature in the tribe. No 
female ever ventured alone, for bestiality was the besetting sin of 
the race. Uncleanness was in all their manners. Impatient of 
bodily labor, and indisposed to thought, they naturally turned 
for pleasure to those coarse gratihcations of the senses which 
were within reach. They were indolent when not strongly in- 
cited to exertion; they were gluttonous when supplied with 
an abundance of food, and they became intemperate as soon as 
the means of intemperance were placed within their reach. 
They were revengeful by nature; custom had made vengeance 
with them a matter of duty and honor. They had little idea of 
truth; they were natural-born liars, and as a result were the 
meanest of robbere. As for murder and arson they had no com- 
punctions of conscience; there were no retined feelings in their 
nature. Selfish in the extreme, they never realized what was 
ennobling. 

HOW THE EARLY SETTLERS LIVED. 

Little we know, in this day of comfort and luxury, how 
our ancestors fared. Although the elder settlers had some sheep, 
yet their increase was slow, owing to the depredations of wolves 
and other animals. It was therefore, a work of time to secure 
a crop of wool. Deerskin was a substitute for men and boys, 
and all generally wore leather breeches; and occa.sionally women 
and girls were compelled to resort to the use of the same mate- 
rial. 

The women did the spinning and generally wove all the 
cloth for the family, the men being engaged in clearing and 
cultivating the soil, or with their trusty rifle went in search of 
deer or other game for food. Our early settlers, Scotch-Irish 
as well as German, had large families, and it required the con- 
tinued labor of the wife and mother to provide them with any- 
thing like comfortable clothing. The men were not insensible 
to this devotedness on the part of their wives, but assisted in 
whatever was necessary, even in the cookery and the cases were 



22 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

few where they could not do all the work of the house. The 
patient endurance, however, of the women we commend to the 
ladies of the present. That endurance did not arise from a 
slavish servility or insensibility to their rights and comforts, 
but justly appreciating their situation, they nobly encountered 
the difficulties which could not be avoided. 

Possessing all the atl'ections of the wife, the tenderness of 
the mother, and the sympathies of the women, their tears flowed 
freely for other's griefs, wliilst they bore their own with a for- 
titude which none but a woman could exercise. 

The entire education of her children devolved on the moth- 
er, and notwithstanding the difficulties to be encountered, she 
did not allow them to grow up with out instructions, but amidst 
all her numerous cares taught them to read and instructed 
them in the principles of Christianity. Noble matrons ! Your 
achievements have come down to us through a hundred years 
for our admiration and example. 

HISTORY OF THE LYKENS-AVILLIAMS VALLEY. 

The Wiconisco or Lykens valley includes that section of 
the upper end of Dauphin County that is watered by the Wic- 
onisco Creek and it's branches, save where local names have 
been given to certain portions. 

The early history of the Lykens-Williams valley is one of 
interest, inasmuch as the individual for whom the entire valley 
now takes it's name was among the very first settlers. In the 
fall of the year 1755 a certain Mr. Andrew Lycans settled on a 
tract of about two hundred acres, situated on the northerly side 
of the Whiconescong Creek, near the present site of Loyalton, 
a few yards north of the bridge that crosses the "Wiconisco 
Creek. Until the Spring of the year 1756 these pioneers were 
not disturbed in their homes, however following Braddoek's 
defeat in that year, everywhere along the frontier the savages 
began their work of devastation and death. Their implacable 
cruelty was stimulated by the Frencii promising a reward for 
scalps and being put into possession of their lands. On 
the morning of the 7th of March 1756, Andrew Lycans and 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



23 



John Rewalt went out early to fodder their cattle, when two 
guns were fired on them. Neither being harmed they ran into 




the house and prepared themselves for defense in case of an 
attack. The Indians then got under cover of a hog-house near 



24 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



the dwelling house, when John Lyeans a son of Andrew, John 
Rewalt and Ludwig Shott, crept out of the house in order to 




a 
O 



a. 
E 

3 

Q. 



3 
O 

X 



O 



get a shot at them, but were fired upon by the savages and all 
wounded, the latter (Shott) in the abdomen. At this time 
Andrew Lyeans saw one of the Indians over the hog-house, and 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



25 



also two white men getting out ol; the same and running at a 
little distance from it. Upon this Lycans and his party attempt- 
ed to escape, but were pursued by about sixteen Indians. John 




Scene of Mt. Patrick, looking from end of Valley 

Lycans and Rewalt being badly injured and not being able to 
do anything, with a negro who was with them, made off, leaving 



26 



LYKBNS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Andrew Lycans, Sliott and a boy to engage with the Indians. 
The savages pursued them so closely, that one of them coming 
up to the boy was going to strike his tomahawk into him, when 




o 

■o 
c 
o 



S 
o 



c 



re 
Q. 



< 



Andrew Lycans turned and shot him dead, while Shott killed 
two more and wounded several others in addition. At last 
being exhausted and wounded, they sat down on a log to rest 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



27 



themselves ; but the Indians were somewhat cautious, and stood 
some distance from them, and consequently returned to look 
after their own wounded. Ly cans' and all his party managed 





3 
J2 



O 



GO 




to get over into Hanover Township where they were properly 
cared for. Here Andrew Lycans died, leaving a wife and six 
children. It is not known when Lycans' family with the other 



2S 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



settlers returned to their homes in the Wiconisco valley, but 
not until all danger was over, and although on a number of 
occasions they were obliged to leave all and flee before the ma- 
rauding savages, yet the one alluded to, was the only occasion 












3 



O 



a 

c 
o 



(0 



« 



where they so narrowly escaped with their lives. Mrs. Jane 
Lycans in February 1765, had a patent issued to her for the 
land on which her husband had located. The Lycans Cabin 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 29 



stood until about the year 1863, on the McClnre farm, now own- 
ed by Josiah Hoover. Ludwig Shott died about 1790, and left 
a large family : some of his descendents remain in the valley. 

Andrew Lycans has given his name to the beautiful valley 
of the Wiconisco, owing perchance to the terrible encounter 
with the Indians as narrated. The orthography has been chang- 
ed within the last sixty some years, but the reason therefor has 
not been learned. Whether Lykens or Lycans, it is trusted that 
no attempt be ever made to deprive the first pioneer of the 
name which has been appropriately given to it. 

In the year 1771, Henry Schoffstall built a house for Joel 
Ferree of Lancaster County. This house was located at Oak- 
Dale Forge, At this time there were few settlers in the valley. 
Among them however where — Schott, Benjamin Buffington, John 
N. Hoffman and Philip Umholtz. Farther up (East) the 
Williams valley lived Conrad Updegraff, Daniel Williams, 
Martin Blum and a Daniel Hain. 

The Oak Dale Forge was built about the year 1828 by 
James Buchanan. Mr. Buchanan came from Harrisburg. He 
subsequently removed to Baltimore, where he died. He kept 
a store at the forge and also the Post Office, which latter 
was established about 1830, the mail being carried by pack- 
horse. Previous to that time the Post Office was at Millers- 
burg, each neighbor taking his turn to bring the mail from 
there weekly. 

From 1795 to 1800 there were only three houses built be- 
tween the Forge and Lykens. The old Bohner farm, Seebolt 
and one on the old Solomon Schoffstall property. 

The first election held in the Valley or in Lykens Town- 
ship, was probably in Gratz, about the year 1815. Hoffman's 
Church was the first place for religious worship. 

The importance of the Lykens-Williams Valley may be dated 
from the year 1825, when coal was discovered. From that 
year to the present time the valley took very rapid and pro- 
gressive strides. The south portion of the Valley is named 
after a Mr. Williams who built and conducted a grist-mill, 
near Williamstown, which is also named after him. This Valley, 



30 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



hardly a mile in width, extends east from its junction with 
Lykens Valley ten miles, with the Short Mountain on the North 




and Berry ■» Mountain on the south, to a point where it coalesces 
with Clark's Valley, the two headed off by Broad mountain be- 
yond Tower City. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 31 



Coal mining is the Chief Industry of the valley, and de- 
pending almost wholly upon the mines are, Tower-city, Sheri- 
dan, Williamstown, Dayton, Wiconisco, and Lykens. Loyalton, 
while partly dependent, is a farming center. Elizabethville 
depends upon local commercial Industries and farming while 
Millersburg is the terminus of the coal industry maintains 
large machine Industries, Rail Road, etc., It must also be borne 
in mind however, that aside from the coal mining Industry, 
there are also a number of real progressive manufacturing con- 
cerns in each town of the valley, which support a like number 
of citizens. It is estimated that about eighty percent of tlie 
residents of the entire valley are property owners. In the year 
1800 this valley was practically a dense forest with a few 
scattered settlers, to-day 1922 as per the 1920 census the popula- 
tion of the valley is estimated at 17,000. 

Early Families of the Valley 

Among the early families of the valley we find the following 
names as very early and prominent: — 

Benjamin Buffington Dr. Robert Auchmuty 

Andrew Reigle Hartman Rickert 

Mathias Freck John F. Bowman 

John B. Hoffman Jacob Hoover 

Benjaman Bretz Abraham Jury 

Philip Runk Rev. Charles E. Muench 

Adam Cooper Simon Shallada 

Daniel Etzweilor John Peter Williard 



32 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



LOVE ROCK. 

The Indian Traditional story of Love Rock herewith pub- 
lished is gathered and gleaned from very authentic sources. 
It appears that this story was published some many years ago 
in the old Lykens Register. Efforts to obtain the real authorship 
were utterly fruitless, to obtain a copy of the same seemed 
equally difficult. 

Fortunately, Mr. Edward L. Rowe, of Lykens, who as- 
sisted in this search was successful in finding an age worn copy 
of the very story. The task then to recopy it seemed impossible, 
due to the condition of the paper and faded composition. How- 
ever, he finally deciphered and revived the old legend, and con- 
tributed it to this publication. The Author very grateful, feels 
certain that the reader will appreciate his interesting contribu- 
tion. 

The story is herewith printed with due respects and sin- 
cere courtesy to the unknown Author, and to Mr. Rowe my 
highest type of appreciation. 

(The Author). 

Love Rock 

A Legend of a Romantic spot on Berry's Mountain. 

There is a little town nestled in a narrow teeming valley, 
between two bold mountains up sixteen miles above the Broad 
Susquehanna river, not outside the county which boasts the 
capital of our State, whose people are kind, courteous and 
hospitable. The stranger visiting there may find some venerable 
and trembling loquacious inliabStants to recount to him a 
legend connected with an attractive spot high up above the 
village, among thick brush and mossy boulders. Something in 
this fashion the patriarch will tell you: Long years ago, be- 
fore the opening of the revolution, in which my great grand- 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 33 



father fought valiantl}' and died with his sixty-eight comrades 
in the mistaken battle of Monmouth — heaven rest his soul! — a 
party of sturdy young Englishmen left their homes in the old 
world to find, as they hoped, adventure and wealth in the 
new. They landed at New York. They stayed there but a 
fortnight, and then impatient to explore and revel in the ex- 
ploits of the marvelous and boundless uninhal)ited country 
offered to venturesome spirits, agreed to separate, to meet again 
one year hence. 

Among the party were two brothers, Harold and AVilliam 
Wingans, whose affection for each other was beautiful and un- 
limited. They were twins but very unlike in form and differing 
much in nature. 

William was tall, nobly formed, with light, clustering curls, 
and bright hazel eyes that made his handsome face look hand- 
somer. He was frank and gentle, yet bold, with much impetu- 
osity. Harold was scarce of medium height, with dark hair and 
eyes, which were never quiet, a well developed form, that would 
easily grow into stoutness in the midst of ease and luxury. 
He had a daring disposition and strong passions, but with a 
will equally as strong. Thus they differed much, only they 
loved each other as brothers seldom love. 

They never dreamed of being apart ; So when it came to 
choosing companions for their travels they choose each other. 

For six months they roamed almost everywhere, now living 
for weeks alone, then associated with other adventurers. They 
forgot their desire for wealth in the intoxication of hunting and 
trapping and in saving their locks from the knife of the treach- 
erous redskins. 

At length they stumbled into Penn's domains, and were 
ravished with the placid Susquehanna and its glorious natural 
attractions. They were bold fellows, were these boys, not yet 
twenty-five, and when one fine Summer day they came suddenly 
upon a party of Indians encamped along the broad river at a 
point w^here a narrow creek emptied its then ])ure watere, cold 



34 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

and sparkling, from the big hills, into the placid stream, they 
placed themselves on an agreeable footing with the savages by 
their friendliness and prompt show of confidence. They learned 
in a short time that this company was a part of a rather large 
encampment sixteen miles up among the hills, and although 
there was at that period much discussion and acrimony between 
the whites and the aborigines, the brothers were treated very 
civilly and even invited, in the indifferent fashion of the Indian, 
to accompany them to the place where they would "heap deer- 
and bear kill." The invitation was accepted, and the next 
morning before the sun had gilded the mountain tops and glim- 
mered on the clear, shallow water of the Susquehanna, they be- 
gan their march up the little valley. Sixteen miles was not 
much of a distance to the red men and equally insignificant to 
the two Englishmen, and before noon they came upon the en- 
campment, at the foot of one of those hills that in the locality 
in question range up into the Schuylkill region, leaving deep 
and close valleys between them. The brothers were struck 
with the appearance of the camping ground which resembled 
rather a permanent Indian town, in fact it was almost such, as 
the savages had been here for a month, and, so far as present 
indications tended, they might remain so much longer. There 
was bustle and confusion, noise, never musical and mostly dis- 
cordant, created by a general commotion among the dirty, 
nude youngsters and gaunt, devilish looking dogs, unintelligible 
sounds came from the tongues of termagrant squaws, merry 
tones of a few handsome and many unhandsome maidens, and 
the guttural utterances and grunts of the bold warriors as they 
stood or strode about, watching Avitli ceaseless scrutiny onerous 
duties being performed by their drudging wives, added most 
emphatic and yet not unpleasant variety to the boisterous com- 
motion. Many of the tents were gaily decorated, and one erected 
in the center of the encampment, was especially resplendent with 
gaudy and variegated colors, and gaily streaming pieces of 
cloth, while the tent itself was rendered conspicously attractive 
with bright designs painted upon it by the not unsldlled brush 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 35 



of some dusky artist. The brothers stopped at the edge of the 
town and contemplated the animated scene. They had seen much 
of Indian life in their brief sojourn in the wilds of America, but 
they had not yet been spectators of a picture so singular and 
engaging as this. Harold asked a young son of the forest what 
it all meant: the ten-year old brave for answer bit him in the 
leg. He reached down to shake the young rascal, but William 
restrained him with a warning admonition not to arouse the 
anger of their dangerous hosts. They were, however, soon en- 
lightened bj^ one of the party whom they had first met, who told 
them that that afternoon the chief's adopted daughter was to 
wed his son, a strong and valiant young brave, whose face and 
form were as handsome as an attendant of the Great Spirit, and 
whose war like deeds were as numerous as the trembling leaves 
on the swaying pines, such was the florid and expressive de- 
scription of the Indian. J^330i44 

The Englishmen were conducted to a tent and a gene-70us, 
if not delicate, collation of well cooked venison and delicious 
trout were set before them, to wliieli they did palpable justice. 
"I should like to see this happy maiden." said William, as the 
two finished their meal. ''I have noticed some rather hand- 
some young women here, and a chief's daughter may be pre- 
sumed to be superior to them all in her charms of form and 
dress. Suppose we try to catch a glimpse of her." Harold 
agreed with the precautionary advice that they should take heed 
not to be too curious. There seemed little curiosity on the part 
of the Indians as they strolled among them, and the English- 
men could not discover whether or not all whom they met had 
seen them before or had been told of their presence in the camp. 
The din among the natives, instead of diminishing, steadily 
increased. Eveiy one was good natured, and Harold became 
so nnich affected with the levity of the occasion that he said he 
would not harm the youngster who had bit him further than 
to'soundly spank him. It was a difficult matter for the brothers 
to get a glimpse of the interior of the pretty tent in wliicli the 
princess was hidden, for it was warily guarded by several 



36 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

braves. They were lamenting in rather loud voice their disap- 
pointment, when they heard within the tent a woman's voice 
singing in excellent English, without a trace of foreign accent. 
The impetuous Harold would have dashed into the tent had 
not his more considerate brother restrained him. They listened 
to the words and were more astonished. They were not those 
of a song, but in a low, musical voice the men were being told 
that the maiden within was a white girl, captured by the red- 
skins, adopted by the chief, and now forced to marry his son. 
The sentinals could not understand English, and she sang the 
words to throw them off their guard. 

What intentions the brothers had for relief of the girl 
were frustrated by the sudden appearance of the chief of the 
tribe accompanied by his son. The old brave was yet a fine 
speciman of manhood, which the strangers noticed as he walked 
up to each and extended his hand in friendly greeting. His 
son did the same, and for the present the brothers felt secure. 

When the two Indians had bade their guests welcome they 
walked towards the entrance of the tent, and as the son, follow- 
ing the old chief, was about to enter, Harold sprang forward 
with an assuring smile and attempted to follow him. But the 
warrior with a grunt, gently waved him back and disappeared 
within, "By jove!" exclaimed Harold in disappointment, "They 
don't want us in there, that's certain." But, he continued 
and his voice grew firmer, "we must rescue this girl, and before 
many hours. The ceremony takes place at evening, in truth, at the 
time it will be dark, what do you propose?" "The question is 
hard to answer, ' ' replied his brother : ' ' but let us remove from 
here we may attract too much attention." The camp we have 
said was at the foot of a mountain, and but a short distance 
away there was a large drove of horses grazing on the banks 
of a beautiful stream (Rattling Creek). The brothers, appar- 
ently actuated by nothing but idle curiosity, reconnoitered the 
surroundings. No one but Harold observed his brother leave the 
camp and follow a very narrow and rocky path running almost 
perpendicularly towards the top of the mountain. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 37 



A well defined road tempted Harold to follow it, and he 
was also soon lost to view. An hour passed before they met 
again at the edge of the camp, "Now your plan?" asked Har- 
old. "It is this," replied his brother; "as you see these In- 
dians have fire-water, and will begin soon to get generally hil- 
arious. This will aid us much in escaping observation. But 
we had better not remain away so long." They returned 
within the camp, and ascertaining that no one was in the tent 
with the captive maiden, and no one around likely to under- 
stand what they said, the In-others drew as near to the tent as 
consistent with safety, and in a moderately loud tone William 
acquainted Harold witli his scheme to rescue the girl. She 
heard everything that was said. William Wingens' prediction 
that the indulgence of the savages in the store rum would favor 
the desperate act of the brothers was already becoming verified, 
but not with the swiftness they desired. It was now but two 
hours until nightfall, when the rude and singular marriage cere- 
mony of the Indians would take place. But the Englishmen 
determined that this particular wedding should not occur if 
they could prevent it. To accelerate matters, therefore ,the 
two joined with groups of the savages and began drinking w'ith 
them with prodigious alacrity, remembering, ho^vever, to im- 
bibe about once to their companions dozen drams. 

It was a strange and uncanny picture indeed on which the 
sun east his last rays, and upon which the shades of the night, 
rendered denser in the valle\% fell. With the disappearance of 
the sun the uproar of jubilations and drunken revelry began to 
assume unw^onted loudness. There was an ear-splitting mixture 
of howls from the men, women and children, dismally melan- 
choly howls from tlie half-starved curs and excruciating howls 
from the primitive nuisical instruments, all in celebration of 
the nuptials of the son of the chief. Then out from the gaudy 
tent slowly moved the maiden, her fair form clad in pretty In- 
dian costume. She advanced with a firm step and clieery smile 
to the young brave, and together they walked towards a mon- 
strous, roaring, crackling fire, which made the darkness darker 
where it's rays could not reach, and threw crooked and weird 
shadows up the gloomy mountain side. William Wingans had 



38 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

noticed all this, but as the girl and the warrior were being sur- 
rounder by the old chief and his attendants, he looked in vain 
for his brother. He was about to start in search of him when 
Harold emerged from the path he followed in the afternoon. 
Easily getting together amid the confusion and noise, Harold 
said: "There is the chief's horse under that big oak tree. Be 
there and mounted ten minutes from now, and be ready to take 
the girl from my arms. See to your weapons." With these 
words the bold youth walked away. The revelry increased 
among the Indians, and without being observed "William reached 
the tree and mounted the noble animal Harold had placed there. 
He was well screened from view by the thick underbrush and 
trees, but he could observe all the movements in the camp. 
Again he lost sight of Harold, only for a moment, however, 
for looking around he discovered him standing not more than 
ten paces from the maiden and her companions. Suddenly the 
girl knelt before the venerable chief and looking up to him said, 
in the Indian tongue. "My Father, the Great Spirit looks 
down from the black sky with his fiery eyes, the grass nestles 
strangely beneath my feet and the wind sighs through yonder 
trees like the doe when the arrows of your braves pierce her 
heart ; methinks all is not well. Let me go apart for a moment, 
that I may kneel to the Great Spirit. ' ' The request was singular, 
but the warrior nodded assent, and the girl walked with bent 
head and slow steps toward where Harold Wingans stood con- 
cealed, with one hand holding a steed he had taken from the 
drove. The maiden did not know just where he was concealed, 
and she might have passed him, but a low hiss like an adder's 
made her pause. She knew there were many eyes upon her, but 
she turned towards the concealed man and sank on her knees 
and commenced to pray. In a moment Harold was on his horse, 
and the girl, rising to her feet, was lifted into the saddle be- 
fore him. A dash beneath the branches, across the path to Wil- 
liam, was but the work of a minute. But Harold had been seen 
as his steed leaped the path, and a howl, a thousand times more 
hideous than those heard before, echoed through the valley. 
"Quick, take her," whispered Harold to his brother hurriedly, 
as he placed the girl on the saddle before the latter, ' ' Follow the 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 39 



path up the monntain, keep in it until you are on the other side. 
I will take the road below and decoy them. See!" The last 
word called William's attention to a blanlvet which was folded 
something in the shape of a human form, which Harold now 
held as he had held the girl. He recrossed the path and the 
savages saw and followed him. The animal upon which Wil- 
liam rode was a splendid one, and he dashed up and over the 
rocks with his double burden as if he were conscious of their 
great danger. All might have been well with them, for Har- 
old's deco}' completely deceived the Indians and drew them 
after him ; but as William rode along, the path which heretofore 
was well screened by a dense growth of weeds and small trees, 
led into a clear spot, and as he looked below he knew that he was 
seen by the redskins. He urged his horse on by every induce- 
ment, but his heart sank when he heard the crackling of twigs 
and shouts behind him. The Indians were following on foot, 
and almost any of their sturdy vvarriors might overtake his 
sorely tired steed. But he was nearing the top, upon which 
welcome fact he was congratulating himself, when looking 
back he was astounded and appalled at seeing a dozen forms 
not twenty j^ards below him. They might have shot him. The 
chief had ordered the capture of all alive, to reach the top was 
now Williams only chance, and he did gain it, only to find 
himself almost surrounded. Still there was one way of escape 
from the clutches of the savages, if not from death. Just be- 
fore him, the hill he was on came to an abrupt ending, as if 
chiseled down by some mighty Titan. To think of Jumping 
down a hundred feet into the ravine below was to think only 
of death. The question flashed to his mind, would it not be as 
well to leave them capture the girl. They would save her life 
at least. He could not ask her, for she lay as if dead On his 
arm. He was on the point of calling to his foes to come when 
above the shouts around him he heard Harold call far from be- 
low: "Jump the horse over, and keep well on him; they have 
wounded me to death." 

William did not stop longer to think. He turned the ani- 
mal's head toward the precipice and with a shout his horse 
rose in the air and then sank with alarming velocity through 



40 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

space. No one these many years has seen a miracle performed. 
On this night one was done. The horse strucl< the ground 
like a piece of lead. He fell upon no rocks, but as he touched 
the earth William sprang off with his charge and a glance 
showed him the animal was dead. He knew there were no In- 
dians at that point and plunging into the thicket encumbered 
with the girl, he was able to escape and fortunately meet a 
party of emigrants in the morning. 

When your agreeable patriarch has told you all this you 
will thank him for the story. But he will hastily say that it 
is not yet finished, and your narrator proceeds. 

Harold Wingans was right when he shouted to his brother 
that he was mortally wounded. He fell with the last word upon 
his lips, and little, I assure you, was his handsome body re- 
spected by those red devils. But there is still a more melan- 
choly ending of this sad tale. 

No matter how treacherous or murderous an Indian's 
nature may be, it can love, and can be true to that love. The old 
chief's son inourned for days and months the maiden he loved, 
and many were the fruitless searches he made for her. He 
began to visit the spot where the great leap had been made. 
He went there often. One day he came down among his people, 
for he would not allow them to leave their encampment, laugh- 
ing and singing love songs, and his hair gaily decorated with 
gaudy flowers and pretty grasses, while he danced through the 
camp with the lightest of steps. His people looked at him and 
then at each other. His father, the chief, old feeble and sick 
saw him and the old man fell back dead. It broke his heart 
when he saw his noble boy a helpless maniac. Then the tribe left 
those grounds, but they could not prevail upon the disappointed 
lover to accompany them. He climbed again to the fatal spot, 
and there for five years he lived and labored. At what did he 
labor? you ask. Go to-m.orrow up a narrow pathway straight 
out from Market St., Lykens, follow it, and you will be treading 
where William Wingans rode with the rescued white girl in his 
arms. When you get to the top you will find where he made that 
great jump. Look over the edge and you will see about five feet 
below tw^o large recesses cut in the solid rock. In one of these. 



Directory and pictorial review 41 



both cut by himself, the heart broken Indian lover sat day by 
day, waiting in silence for the maid who came not, until ten 
years later, when William AVingans brought his wife and child 
among these wilds with a liunting party. Her Indian adorer 
saw her as he looked up from his lonely seat. He smiled and 
motioned to the recess beside him. Then he closed his eyes, 
AVhen Wingans reached him he w^as dead. The ancient legend 
teller stops speaking. Is that all? you ask. "That is all, except 
that we still call the place, as it was named long ago. Love 
Eock." 



42 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



LYKENS VALLEY COAL— WHEN DISCOVERED. 

On a Sabbath day in the year 1825, Jacob Burd, Sr., and 
Peter Kimes, then living at the lower end of Short Mountain, 
in what Avas then Lykens township, in the northeastern part of 
Dauphin County, went out on the mountain for a stroll, and 
when near the top paused, and took in the magnificent view of 
the valley below. One of them having a stick in his hand, care- 
lessly dug it into the ground. The dirt seemed suspiciously 
black. They made haste to communicate this to others, and 
soon the opinion became general that there must be coal de- 
posits in the mountain. Not many days thereafter a party were 
successful in digging out what proved to be an excellent quality 
of coal and a road was made and the coal brought down the 
mountain in wagons. 

The tract of land before comparatively worthless, now be- 
came an object of great commercial value, the richness of the 
coal being fully established as the very first order of red ash, 
with ashes heavy, and containing 89 percent of fixed carbon. 
The tract consisted of 1600 acres and was purchased a short time 
before this by Mr. Thomas P. Cope, then a well-known merchant 
of Philadelphia, for the paltry sum of $400.00 the consideration 
being one-half in store goods and the rest in shoe buckles. These 
lands were for a time controlled by IMr. Cope but afterwards' 
became the property of the Short Mt. Coal Company, superin- 
tended by Job R. Tyson, a prominent attorney of Philadelphia 
and a son-in-law of Mr. Cope. 

Coal M^as gotten out of the moutnain in a small and scat- 
tered way until the year 1831, when the Wiconisco Coal Com- 
pany (named after the Wiconisco Creek, a stream in the im- 
mediate vicinity) was organized and consisted of six members, 
as follows: Simon Gratz, Samuel Richards, George H. Thomp- 
son, and Charles R. Thompson, all of Philadelphia; and Henry 
Shreiner and Henry Shaeffer of Dauphin County. The first 
named gentleman, Mr. Gratz, was possessed of rather large 
means and visited the region frequently, taking great interest 
in it's development. Work was now begun in the drifts in the 
gap at Bear Creek, a tributary of Wiconisco Creek, and coal 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



43 



was sold in the \dcinity in 1832. James Todarff, John Brown, 
and William Hall, who came from Schuylkill County, were the 




first experienced miners to lend their skill to the great work. 
It may be stated here that, the Short Mountain Coal Company, 
where this work was commenced, is a prong of the Southern An- 



44 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



thracite Coal, field, forming a narrow basin, hardly a mile wide at 
the head of the valley. The Southern side of the basin of the 
North dip is the one that has been worked from that time to 
the present. 




Old Wiconisco Canal Basin, Millersburg 




Loading the canal boats on the Wloonisco Canal, from the 
Lykens Valley Trestles 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



45 




The Summit Branch Trestle Work, Susquehanna River 
and IVIt. Patricia 






End of Lykens Valley Trestle and End of Wiconisco Canal 

April 7tli, 1830 an act of Legislature was passed formiiij'- 
the Lykens Valley Railroad and Coal Company, the object of 
which was to construct a railroad from :Millersburg, a point on 



46 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



the Susquehanna river 16 miles distant. The road was located 
on the North foot of Berry's mountain by a Mr. Ash win, an 
English civil engineer. The road was constructed under the 
direction of ^ohn Paul, Jr., civil engineer, Henry Sheaffer, 
superintendent, and Simon Sallada Director. This was the 




Lykens Valley Basin and Wharf also end of Old Wiconisco Canal 

fourth railroad in the United States, and the first in Dauphin 
County, built for the purpose of carrying Anthracite Coal. The 
road was completed in 1834, and coal was taken to Millersburg 
by horse power on a flat strip rail. It required two days to make 
a trip to Millersburg, as the road was a single track, badly con- 
structed, and the cars frequently jumped the track. A num- 
ber of Ark loads of coal were shipped down the Susquehanna 
river from Millersburg in the Spring of 1834. Coal could only 
be shipped in this way in time of a high freshet, as ordinarily 
the river would have been too shallow. This being too spasmodic, 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



47 



" r^^/a^ X 




Old Lykens Valley Breaker 




Shafl at East Brookside 



48 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




The Old Brookside Breaker 

another plan soon suggested itself. The coal cars were boated 
across the river from the terminus of the railroad at Millers- 
burg to the Pennsylvania canal at Mount Patrick on the op- 
posite side of the river. 

The Lykens Valley company erected a set of shutes at this 
point, where they shipped their coal to market. The first boat 
load of Lykens Valley coal sent by canal, left Mt. Patrick Satur- 
day, April 19th, 1834 by a boat number 76, with 43 tons, Capt. 
C. Faunce in charge the shipment was consigned to Thomas 
Borbridge, Columbia, Pennsylvania. 

Shipments continued in this way until 1845, when the 
railroad was worn out, and nothing more was done until 1848, 
when the road was re-graded and laid with T rail. The Wico- 
nisco Canal as built in 1848 and shipments resumed and rapidly 
increased from that time. Coal was mostly shipped in lump 
form until 1848, when the old Lykens Valley coal breaker was 
built, and aasorted sizes were obtained for shipment. Since 
this time the Coal Industry has been largely revolutionized. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



49 




^^ ^^riST 



The Summit Branch Breaker at Williamstown 

and millions of dollars have been expended in modern methods 
of mining" and preparing the prodnct for market. Macliinery 
has replaced the older methods and just this year 1922 a modern 
electric plant has been completed at the Lykens Colliery, which 
will furnish snlficient electric power to the local mines of the 
Susquehanna Collieries Co. This huge plant has been erected 
at a cost of something like two million dollars, the fuel to oper- 
ate this plant consists only of the coal dirt, heretofore carelessly 
thrown away. A modern and proficient shaft has been sunlc, 
which enables a quicker and more increased out[)Ut of coal per 
day with a great depreciation in the costs. In the Pioneer days 
of this industry it required two days to make a trip to IMillers- 
burg with a few small cars full of coal — to-day a train load of 
about fifty cars holding approximately thirty tons each, leave 
the mines for market everv twenty four hours. 



50 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




The New $2,000,000.00 Electric Plant at the Lykens Colliery 




New Breaker at Brookside Colliery 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 51 



LYKENS TOWNSHIP AND GRATZ BOROUGH 

Lykens Township 

Upon the petition of inhabitants of Upper Paxtang town- 
ship asking for a division of said townships, tiio court issued 
an order at their January sessions, 1810, to three Commissioners 
to inquire into the propriety of granting said prayer, and to 
make a plot or draft of the townsliip, etc. The Commissioners 
reported in favor of a division of the township hy vhe following 
line, to wit: ''Beginning at a pine tree in the Halifax township 
line on the Summit of Berry's Mountain at Peter Mountain. 
Gap ; thence north ten degrees east along and near a public road 
which leads from Halifax to Sunbury through Hain's Gap, 
four hundred and sixty perches to a post on the north side of 
Wiconisco Creek near the said road ; thence north eighty perches 
to a pine ; thence running along the public road aforesaid north 
five degrees west four hundred and seventy perches to Buffing- 
ton's Church, leaving the said church on the westward; thence 
a course north ten degrees west, leaving the dwelling of John 
Hopple westward eleven hundred and fifty perches to Mahan- 
tango Creek," etc. 

The report then follows the lines around the two divisions 
of Upper Paxtang as they were after taking off Halifax town- 
ship (running the lines across the river). It is therefore un- 
necessary to follow them further here, as the line given above 
shows the divisions of what was then Upper Paxtang township. 
This report was confirmed by the court on the 3rd of September, 
1810, and it was ordered that the eastern division be called 
Lykens township. Lykens township was reduced in 1819 by 
the formation of Mifflin township from Upper Paxtang and 
Lykens, and further in 1840 when that portion of south of the 
north side of Coal or Thick Mountain was erected into Wico- 
nisco township. 

This township and the valley is named for Andrew Lycans, 
one of the earliest pioneers of this section, and to whom full 
reference has been made in the sketch of Lykens Valley proper. 



52 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



GRATZ BOROUGH 

Gratz was laid out in 1805 by Simon Gratz. It is situated on 
the road leading" from Millersburg to Reading, thirty miles 
from Harrisburg. It was incorporated into a borough April 
3, 1852. In 1838, Mrs. Frey kept the tavern and Solomon 
Shindle a store. 

The oldest family of this place is (Harman) lioffnum, one 
of the earliest settlers in the valley and a prominent family. 
Squire Hott'man had been magistrate for a number of years. 
When he came to Gratz in 1819 there were only five houses in 
the place ; one was the oldest house, built here by Ludwig Schoff- 
stall, now the old Umholtz propert}^ The second was built by 
Lewis Faust, who sold it to Rev. William Hedel, now belong- 
ing to the estate of A. K. Kepler, deceased. The third was oc- 
cupied by George Feagley, and the fourth by Adonijah 
]\Iatthias, a Frenchman. The fifth was occupied by George 
Crapp, a tenant of Mr. Wise. The store Avas kept by Conrod 
Frey, then by his widow, and later by her son-in-law, Solomon 
Shindle. 

The first Burgess of Gratz was Theodore Gratz in 1852, and 
the town clerk was James Kissinger 1S52. 

This town, located on the old Reading road, was the centre 
and field of the old-time Militia musters, at which thousands 
used to assemble to witness the evolution of the battalions, 
Jacob Hoover had a noted grist-mill two miles distant, on the 
Little Wiconisco. After the opening of the Coal mines a post 
office was established. The ridge in which the borough stands 
was in the old times called "Wild Cat Ridge," from its being 
the abode in pioneer times of wild-cats. 

St. Simeon's Evangelical Lutheran and Reformed Congre- 
gations were organized in 1823, and until 1832 preaching was 
had in a house built by INIr. Gratz. A joint Church edifice w-as 
built in 1832. Rev. Isaac Gerhart was the first Reformed and 
Rev. John Peter Shindel the first Lutheran pastor. The pastors 
of St. John's Lutheran and Hoffman Reformed Churches have 
generally preached here. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 53 



Iloffiuan -Reformed Church. — This old church edifice, a 
two-story frame, built over a half century, is two and one-fourth 
miles from Berrysburg, three from Gratz, and is in Lykens 
township. The ground on which it was erected was donated 
by Squire John Hoffman, who was a magistrate from his twenty- 
fifth year until his death in 1877. 

Coleman Church. — This Union Church of the Lutheran and Re- 
formed Churches is near the Schuylkill County line, in the 
extreme eastern part of Lykens township. St. Matthew's is the 
name of the Lutheran Congregation, which is supplied with 
preaching by pastors of St. John's Church. 

Early History of Gratz 

Ludwig Schoffstall, who came from Lancaster county, built 
the first house in Gratz, a two story log.. Frey kept his store in 
it for a long time — he then attached the tavern. 

Conrad Frey built the tavern about 1820. These buildings 
were followed in the succession named by the log dwellings 
of Matthias Bellow, Faust , Kev. Handel, Daniel Fegley, An- 
thony Matthias, Squire Reedy and John Reichard. The first 
church was the brick, built in 1832 — German Reformed and 
Lutheran. The first pastors, Rev. Isaac Gerhart and John Peter 
Shindel. Before the brick church was erected, meetings were 
held by the said pastors in an old log structure, built for that 
purpose by Simon Gratz. The first school house was built in 
1822 by Levi Buffington, the CaiToenter of the old Hoffman 
Church, which he erected a^bout 1771. 

Anthony Hautz was the first pastor of the old Hoffman 
Church. He came back when he was seventy-five years of age — 
a very small, gray headed man, about five feet in height. A 
grist mill was built quite early, about a quarter of a mile from 
town, by one John Salladay, and ran by a stream of water 
from a spring-wheel over twenty feet high. Mr. Salladay 
was one of first settlers. Jacob Laudenslager was also one of tlie 
old settlers — lived about the present town, and had patented 
400 acres in one tract. Old John Hoft'man lived a quarter of a 
mile South of the Hoffman Church. Andrew Hoffman lived 
east of Jacob Loudenslager a quarter of a ndle and had patented 



54 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

about 100 acres. Peter Stein, adjoining, had 300 acres. Peter 
Hoffman lived down the Wiconisco creek, a mile this side of the 
Forge and had 400 acres. The old Reading road was made in 
1800. Peter Hain owned the Gap west of town. The Gap was 
named for him. He originally owned the lands upon which 
Uniontown is now situated, before Hepner. Adam Heller laid 
out Berry sburg. He lived where Daniel Romberger now lives, 
which was formerly called Hellerstown. The place where the 
brick church is now located, near Gratz, was formerly called 
Wild Cat Ridge, on account of a great numlxr of Wild Cats 
congregating there. Conrad Frey came from Reading Pa. The 
Methodist Church was built in 1846. 



HARRY SMITH 

Wholesale and Retail 

Temperance Drinks ana 
Ice Cream 

Pool Parlor, Cigars, Tobacco ana Confections 

Big Assortment of Records 

Full Line Patent Medicines and Drugs 

GRATZ, PENNA. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



55 




MR. HARRY SI\IITH 
^^^^ Gratz, Pa. 

L ^^W^ ^^^' ^^^^^^^^ ^'^^ '^f'^^^ ^^1 Bethle- 

m ^, ^im hem, Pa., and first came to the bor- 

ough of Gratz in the year 1898 as 
a public exliibitor. In 1899 he 
returned to Gratz and settled in 
the borough permanently opening 
and conducting a gymnasium and 
engaging'' in amusement produc- 
tions throughout the state. He 
is a great enthusiast for training 
dogs, cats, goats, etc. — and has been 
very successful along this line. For the past 18 years he has con- 
ducted the leading confection, soda, lunch and billiard parlor in 
Gratz. He has also attached to his property a large and spacious 
hall, in Avhich he still exhibits first class motion picture plays, en- 
joying the unique distinction of being the pioneer motion pic- 
ture exhibitor in the entire valley. It is Mr. Smith v ho is 
spoken of in the historj- brief of Gratz Fa!ir. Aside from his 
much business, he is the patentee of several national amuse- 
ment contrivances as well as the manufacturer and has shipped 
"The Smith Jazz Swing" as far as Australia and Canada. 
He is a keenly interested citizen of the borough and well re- 
spected throughout the community. IMr. Smith has been Presi- 
dent of The Gratz Fair Association since 1908. 

GRATZ FAIR ASSOCIATION 



This fair association, and the only one in Dauphin County 
was first organized in the year 1873. The grounds are located 
just East of the historic borough of Gratz, and reput.ed to 
be one of the very best sites in the state. The track is an 
excellant one and manv horses that have won great honors and 



56 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



57 




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58 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

some that are still taking the larger cups to day, have at one 
time or another spent considerable time in training on this track 
as well as competing in the races held annually in connection 
with the fair. 

As in the course of the life of nearly every project, there 
arrived a time when the continuance of Gratz Fair held in a 
balance. This happened along the year 1905, at this time it 
was decided that the proposition was no longer a paying pro- 
ject and the interested parties at that time decided to discon- 
tinue it and sell the grounds in lots. The sale was commenced 
an several lots disposed of, when Mr, Harry Smith of Gratz, a 
wide-awake business man and thoroughly experienced Showman, 
offered to buy the grounds on the condition that the same be 
leased to him for a period of two years in order that he might 
determine further it's practibility, at the end of which period 
he would then purchase. This was done and it was during 
the years 1906-1907 that the fair was conducted under the super- 
vision of Mr. Smith. The two year try-out, proved so won- 
derful a success, contingent with the injection of good clean 
amusements and the creation of more instilled interest in horse 
racing; and at the end of the period a company was organized 
by Mr, Smith, and the grounds taken over. Since that date keen 
interest manifests itself in the Gratz Fair. Annually crowds 
of thousands attend its three to four day diversion and amuse- 
ment, and as it were the old ground has been revived to the 
twentieth century type and today is referred to as the play 
ground of the valley. 

"Who has lived and dwelt in this old historic valley and 
never at any time attended the Fair would be rather a diffi- 
cult task for one to solve. Fine exhibition buildings have been 
from time to time erected, large grandstands to accommodate 
hundreds have been erected, modern conveniences for the pa- 
trons and exhibitors installed, etc., etc., and today on Fair-Day 
one visiting the grounds must be impressed with the wonderful 
spectacle presented, with blaring bands, difusion of colors, toys 
souvenirs, horses, automobiles, in short the scene would impress 
one as of a large tented fairy-land, overflowing with joymakers 
and attractions. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 59 

The Author must pause to remind you that the bigger por- 
tion of all that is said of and seen of Grratz Fair is nothing more 
than the results of one who has the affair at heart and who is 
largely responsible for its present day success, this one is none 
other than Mr. Harry Smith, who at the critical time came to 
the front and not only saved it from oblivion but better still, 
made it greater than ever before. 

When Mr. Smith organized the company in 1906 the direc- 
tors were : 

Mr. Harry Smith, Gratz, Pa. 

J. J. Coleman, Gratz, Pa. 

M. A. Hartman, Gratz, Pa. 

J. W. Phillips, Gratz, Pa. 

LeM'is Hoffman, Gratz, Pa. 

Jonathan Smeltz, Gratz, Pa. 

Rueben Stiely, Gratz, Pa. 

P. J. Artz, Gratz, Pa. 

D. S. Artz, Gratz, Pa. 

A. C. Artz, Gratz, Pa. 

William Heckler, Lykens, Pa. 

Dr. A. B. Longshore Herndon, Pa. 

Malcolm Stewart, Williamstown, Pa. 

D. Edgar Rank, Williamstown, Pa. 

Aaron Daniels, Gratz, Pa. 

George Eby, .• . . Lykens. Pa. 

Dr. W. E. Lebo, Gratz, Pa. 

W. 0. Rogers, Gratz, Pa. 

John Geist, Williamstown, Pa. 

Abe Gross, Gratz, Pa. 

D. S. lOinger, Gratz, Pa. 

This company Avan organized and chartered, and the stock 
was sold throughout the entirety of the Lykens-Williams Val- 
ley, to name the stockholders here would require too much 
space. The illustrations accompanying this article speak well 
for the fair grounds. Thesie pictures were made June 21st, 
1922, by Mr. Ed. Smink, of Lykens, Pa. You will note that at 
this date we were able to have three training horses line up on 



60 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



61 




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62 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

two of the exposures. There is not possibly a week goes by 
but that there are some horses, either local in the valley or 
from some removed city, training on the track. 

The present Officers and Directors are as follows: 

Officers 

President, Harry Smith 

Vice-President, Harvey Miller 

Cor. Secretary, Guy Klinger 

Recording Secretary, Darius J. Wiest 

Supt. Poultry Dept., A. W. Klinger 

Supt. Fruit House, U. H. Daniel 

Supt. Implement Dept.,. . . .W. E. Brosious 

Directors 

Harry Smith Wm. Hechler 

Harvey Miller A. E. Willier 

Jos. Laudensilager M. E. Klinger 

Darius J. Wiest Amos Hartman 

J. E. A. Moyer Allen Hartman 

J. W. Phillips W. E. Brosious 

W. 0. Leitzel Chas. Hartman 

Daniel Kebaeh . U. H. Daniel 

Guy R. Klinger Goe. W. Eby 
John E. Geist 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



63 




MRS. DANIEL MILLER 

Wife of the founder of 
Millersburg 



Photo by Noll 



HISTORY OF THE BOROUGH OF MILLERSBURG 

I\Iillsburg borough is situated on the Susquehanna River, 
at the confluence of the Wiconisco Creek, twenty three miles 
north of Harrisburg, on the Northern Central and Lykens Val- 
ley Branch Rail Roads. The place was settled some years 
prior to the time it was laid out. It derived its name from 
Daniel Lliller and John Miller, who emigrated from Lancaster 
County about 1790. They took up some four hundred acres 
of land and began a settlement. It was laid by Daniel ]\Iiller 
into lots in July 1807, and incorporated into a borough April 
8, 1850 from which time its progress has been rapid. Daniel 
Miller died in October 1828, leaving one child, Mary, who on 
the 11th clay of February, 1838, married George W. Bowers. 



64 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



The first settlers in tliis region- known as ' ' Lykens Valley, ' ' 
were French Huguenots and Germans. Francis Jacques or 













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ft, 



'Jacobs," Connnonly known as "French Jaculj, " Larue or 
LaRoy, Shora, Sandoe, the Kleins, AVerts, Steevers, Shutts, 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



65 



Ferrees, Millers, Andrew Lycans and John R'ewalt are found 
among the earliest names of white men who settled in this sec- 




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tion. About the time John and Daniel Miller settled here, 
"French Jacob" built his grist-mill on the north bank of the 



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LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Wiconisco Creek, just above the foot of Race Street, and near 
to which, sometime before, he had built his log cabin, then con- 




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sidered quite a pretentious structure, large and strongly put 
together, and well provided with loop-holes — a sort of fort to 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL, REVIEW 



67 



which the settlers might fiy for safety in case of attack from the 
Indians. Here was taught the first school kept by Daniel Miller 




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the proprietor of the town. Neither cabin nor mill are longer 
to be seen. Domestic trouble had caused at an early date the 



68 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Photo by Noll Old Bridge across Wiconisco Creek, Millersburg 




Lykens Valley R. R. Looking East from Balcony of Old Station 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



69 



owner "Jacobs" to remove forever from the spot. The place 
(mill and cabin) fell under the ban of superstition, several of 
the settlers having seen about it divers, strange and unearthly 




Photo by Noll View of Millersburg Cemetery 

appearances, "shapes, dire, dismal and horrible." Time and 
the spoilations of men have done their work, and the almost oblit- 
erated channel of the old head-race alone is seen to mark the 



70 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Millersburg School House from 1825 to 1860 — On present site 
of the Johnson-Baillie Shoe Factory 




Northern Central Yard, looking south from Old Station at Millersburg 
(X denotes Old Style Switch) 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



71 



spot where once was the forest home of the old French Hugue- 
not. Upon a part of this land Daniel Miller, the then sole pro- 




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prietor through Peter Williams his surveyor, laid out the town- 
lots in July 1807. These lots sold very readily, being drawn by 



72 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



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LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Photo by Noll 



Residential Section, East Union Street, Millersburg 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



75 




Photo by Noll 



i;. il. iJepot, Millersburg 




Photo by Noll 



M. E. Cliurcli, Millersburg 



76 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Photo hy Noll 



Brubaker Building, from Center Street, Millersburg 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



77 




I koto by Noll 



Park, Market Square 




'hoto by Noll 



Scene on Pine Street, Millersburg 



78 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Photo bit Soil Kepner Building, Market Street. Showing Post Office, Mlllersburg 




Photo hy Noll 



Reformed Church, Mlllersburg 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



79 



lottery, and soon the place assumed the importance of a rapidly 
growing and prosperous town. The town is regularly laid 
out, with spacious streets crossing each other at right angles. 




Lutheran Church. Center Street, Millersburg 



Photo hy Soil 

and practical alley ways giving passage to the rear of each 
building. The Susquehanna River at this point is a mile in 
width, stretching away in lake-like form some three miles. Ircm 




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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL, REVIEW 



81 



Berry's Mountain in the South to the Mahantango Mountain 
in the North, at which points, forcing its way through the^e 




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mountains much diminished in its bed, it hurriedly tumbles 
over rocks and pebbles of the passage, winding quickly out of 
sight. 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Photo hy Noll SOME OF THE PIONEER HOUSES OF MILLERSBURG 

The building In the center was built by Daniel Miller, founder of the town and was his home. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



83 



The first school was taught in a log cabin or fort by Daniel 
Miller, the founder of the town, and he was succeeded by a Mrs. 
Miller. This fort was built about 1794: on the bauks of the 
Wiconisco Creek as a place of safety from the surrounding In- 




GEORGE M. BRUBAKER 
Who did a Great Deal for Millersburg 



dians. The next school was built about 1812 or 1813, on Tnion 
Street, and was taught by a well educated German. This house 
was superseded by a poorly constructed brick buildiug and tluit 
by a frame structure on middle Street. In 1833 a select school 
was taught by Mrs. Susan Barringer, a lady of considerable 
culture, wiio established a good educational sentiment, and was 
succeeded by Samuel McYan, a man of scholastic al)ilities. 
About 1844 or 1845 the free-school system was adopted, tifter 
being defeated twice, as the town and township were at that 
time one school district. The most active school men of the 



g4 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

town during these days were — Jacob Seal, Dr. Eobert Aueh- 
rauty, David Link, Simon Wert, Adam Light, John Ebery, Ben- 
jamin Musser and Mathias Freck. 

In 1846 there were in Millersburg about eighty dwellings, 
two stores, one mill and three churches. In 1850 it had five 
hundred population, which it doubled in 1860 and trebled in 
1880, until now 1922 the population is 3000 

The Millersburg Herald (newspaper) was founded and es- 
tablished in January 1875 by J. B. Seal. It is a weekly family 
Journal, specially devoted to local news. It is a four page sheet 
and enjoys a large circulation. The paper is published today 
by Hay Bowman, and is called the Millersburg Sentinel. 

The officers of the borough since its incorporation in 1850 
have been — 1850, Simon Wert; 1852, J. J. Bowman; 1853, 
Jacob Seal; 1855, Jacob Rothvon; 1857, Geo. M. Brubaker ; 
1858, J L. Bomgardner; 1859, C. Penrose; 1862, Geo. Slate; 
1864, B. G. Steever; 1865, Simon Wert; 1867, A. Douden; 1870 
Simon Wert; 1872, J. S. Musser; 1874, H. Frank; 1876, J. S. 
Musser; 1879 B. G. Steever; 1880, J. L. Freck. 

The Literary Society was organized — 1876; Trinity Ee- 
formed Church erected — 1833 ; St. Pauls Lutheran^ Church 
erected — 1856; Evangelical organized — 1840, erected — 1860; 
Methodist Episcopal Church erected — 1858. 

The First National Bank was organized Feb. 12, 1867, as 
the Lykens Valley Bank. The present building was erected in 
1869. 

The Millersburg Bank was organized in the fall of 1868. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



85 



* — 



First National Bank 

MiUersburg, Pa. 



INCORPORATED 1875 



Officers 



Directors 

A. G. BASHOAR, 
C. p. POLK, 

A. G. Bashoar, Pres. levi walborn, 

C. p. PoLfi, Vice Pres. a. m. romberger, 

J. W. Hoffman, Cashier s. s. pick, 

L. M. SHEPP, 
HOWARD HELWIG 



CAPITAL $ 50,000.00 

SURPLUS ANT) PROFITS $ 85,000.00 

DEPOSITS .$502,000.00 

RESO'ORCES $700,000.00 

'' We want your patronage, 
OUT motto is Service " 



This Bank is a Member of the Federal Reserve System 



86 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Millersburg Baking 
Company 

JOBE'S QUALITY BREAD AND 
FANCY CAKES 

110 North Street Millersburg, Pa. . 

INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 



J. H. Rowe & Sons 



MILLERSBURG, PA. 



C C. McLAUGHLIM 

Billiard Parlors 

SMOKERS' SUPPLIES 

Soft Drinks, Candy 

Russ Bros. Velvet Ice Cream 

MARKET STREET MILLERSBURG, PA. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 87 



*• 



SUBSCRIBE TO YOUR HOME NEIVSPAPER 

TH E 

"MILLERSBURG SENTINEL" 

Established 1884 

ISSUED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING 
$1.50 THE YEAR 

Try Us For Quality 
JOB PRINTING 

HAY W. BOWMAN, Editor^Propnctor 



Confectionery Supplies Novelties 

Watkins Candy Co. 

W. W. WATKINS, Proprietor 
WHOLESALE CONFECTIONS 

Distributors for Loiciiey's and Goss' Chocolates 

MILLERSBURG, PA. 



88 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




JQ LJT7/^lZt?t>nP Marble and Granite Works 
. O. nil/V>(lVll/rVl MILLERSBURG, PA. 



Herbert N. Miller 

Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries 

MILLERSBURG, PA. 



SOLE AGENT FOR FLORSHEIM SHOES 



w»— ■ ! ■;— t^f^f^ f 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



89 




A Scene Along Wiconisco Creek 



HISTORY OF WICONISCO. 

The 90th. section of an act of the General Assembly, passed 
July 2, 1839, Pamp. laws, Page 602, provides: 

That that part of Lykens Township, in the County of 
Dauphin, North of lines to be run by the Supervisors of said 
Township, "Commencing at a bridge crossing the head of Sny- 
der 's Mill Dam at the IVIifflin Township line ; thence east to the 
hand board in the forks of the road on the lands of Haldeman 
and Elder ; tehnce a straight line to a house of Peter Rickert, 
at the foot of the Short Mountain; thence east along the foot 
of the mountain (north side) to the Schuylkill County line, 
shall hereafter form a separate Township and shall be called 
Wiconisco. 

The early history of Wiconisco is embraced in that of the 
valley proper. The erection of this Township divested the old 
Township of Lykens of all its coal mining operations; all the 
collieries and coal beds now lying in this Wiconisco Township. 



90 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



The contiguity of the town of Lykens, however, to that of 
Wiconisco Borough being less than one half a mile distant, still 
gives the former borough the prestige of being the business 
centre of the Susquehanna Collieries Company coal operations. 
The enterprising town of Wiconisco lies on the historical 
stream and in the Township of the same name. It is located 
on a tract of forty eight acres of land sold in 1826 by Greorge 
Pearce as executor of James Way. The condition of the sale 
being that the person purchasing the tract, should pay imme- 
diately after the sale, twenty five dollars as hand money. This 




Trolley Bridge, Wiconisco 

forty eight acre tract was struck down to John Gilbert for 
twelve dollars. IMr. Pearce then demanded of Mr. Gilbert the 
twenty five dollars hand money, according to the conditions, 
which the latter would not pay and did not take the land. Then 
Daniel Hoffman agreed to take it, but according to the deed, 
he only paid twelve dollars after all. After Hoffman's death his 
heirs sold it for something like fifty dollars per acre. Henry 
Shaefer opened the first store in a small log house, in the year 
1832. Another early settler was his brother Michael Shaefer, 
who died in November, 1849. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



91 



The town was laid out in the year 1848 by Thomas Couch 
and Peter W. Shaefer. At about this time, Benjamin Garman, 
who kept store several years prior to 1848 removed it to Lykens. 
Wiconisco is largely settled by miners, who with their families 
compose an industrious and thrifty class of people. Lykens is 
separated from Wiconisco by tlie Wiconisco Creek. The Wicon- 
isco Tanery was at one time the leading industrial plant of the 
town, and was owned by Geo. D. Moyer & son. This establish- 
ment, however, has some years back been completely destroyed 
by fire, and was never rebuilt. 




View of Pottsviile Street, Wiconisco, taken some years back 



The Methodist Episcopal Church was erected in 1854; The 
Evangelical Association wa.s organized in 1831 ; The Welsh Bab- 
tist Church was erected in the year 1865. 

The number of houses in and about Wisconisco in 1864 was 
probably not twenty. A man by the name of Lance built tbc 
first house in Wiconisco, where the Methodist Church now 
stands. Another house stood in the swamp, below the railroad, 
then occupied by a man named Wagner. Michael Shaeffer built 
the tavern. lie never lived to take possession of it — died before 



92 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




I 



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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 93 

it was completed and was buried in the old graveyard near the 
company's stables. He first kept tavern in an old frame house 
near the dirt bank. Many of the first miners boarded with him. 
Behind the old breaker there were two houses — one occupied 
by M. Couch, the company's superintendent. Michael Shaeffer. 
with his brother Henry, came from Germany with their father 
when mere boys. It is thought from Hesse Darmstadt. An old 
block house near the company 's stables was the Meeting house — 
Methodist. Mr. Shaeffer took the coal trucks down to Millers- 
burg with horses. The track began behind the old breaker. At 
that time ' ' Shinplasters, " were in vogue. The miners received 
no more than four dollars a week. Six dollars was considered 
very high wages. A man by the name of Frederic Alvord then 
received the highest wages, eight dollars per week, for black- 
smithing for the company. In the beginning the trucks were 
only driven once a week to Millersburg, in trains of eight or 
ten, drove only gangways then — no breasts. Mr. Bordner drove 
the first gangway of the Short Mountain mines. During the 
earlier mining period the men were paid only every three or 
four months. 



Established 1868 S. H. MILLER, Manager 

Samuel Miller ESTATE 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

54 years of Faithful Service 
WicoNisco^ Pa. 



•* 



94 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




W. H. KISSINGER AND COMPANY 

WICOMISCO, PA. 
THE STORE, that stands for a square deal for evt'ryl)ody — 

that has accumulated an increasing list of satisfied 
customers. 

that has been the Workingman's friend, having 
supplied his needs in adversity as well as pros- 
perity- — 

that for a number of years has supplied the mer- 
chandise needs of the people of Wiconisco and 
vicinity — 

THIS STORE SOLICITS YOUR PATRONAGE 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 95 



HISTORY OF MIFFLIN TOWNSHIP AND BERRYSBURG. 



MIFFLIN TOWNSHIP 

At a Court of Quarter Sessions held the 22nd day of Oc- 
tober, 1818, an order was issued to three commissioners to in- 
quire into the propriety of dividing the townships of Upper 
Paxtang" and Lykens, then embracing the whole of Lykens 
Valley, into three townships, as had been petitioned for by the 
inhabitants of said valley. The Commissioners reported that 
they were of opinion that the two aforesaid townships ought to 
be divided into three, and that they had according]}^ run and 
marked the lines of division as follows to wit: 

"The first township beginning at Maliantango Creek, a short 
distance below Miller's fording, on the old Sunburj^ road ; tlience 
down the same to the river, and across said river to the mouth 
of West Mahantango Creek ; thence down the western shore of 
the Susquehanna to a point opposite to Berry's Mountain; 
thence by Halifax Township across said river and along the 
summit of said mountain five miles 200 perches to a chestnut-oak 
tree: thence north 71/9 west 6 miles 80 perches to the beginning, 
wliich we called Upper Paxtang Township. The second we 
have called Berry Township, beginning at the Chestnut-oak a- 
foresaid; thence by the summit of Berry's Mountain aforesaid 
4 miles 260 perches to a small Chestnut-oak; thence north 6 
west 7 miles (through Hain's Gap) to Mahantango Creek afore- 
said; thence down the same to the point aforesaid, near Miller's 
fording; thence by the line of Upper Paxtang aforesaid (re- 
versed) south 7I/2 degrees east 6 east 80 perches to the beginn- 
ing. The third beginning at the same Chestnut-oak aforesaid ; 
thence along the summit of Berry's Mountain aforesaid 10 miles 
to the line of Schuylkill County; thence by the same 8I4 miles 
to Mahantango Creek aforesaid ; thence down the same to Berry 
Township aforesaid; thence by the same south 6 degrees east 
7 miles to the beginning, and which we have called Lykens 
Township." 



96 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

This report was confirmed by the court March 12, 1819, 
except so far as the new or center division which the court 
ordered to be called Mifflin Township instead of Berry, as sug- 
gested by the commission. It was named for General and Gov- 
ernor Thomas Mifflin. 

The Township is bounded on the north by Northumberland 
County, east by Lykens Township, south by Washington Town- 
ship, and on the west by Upper Paxtang Township. The Ma- 
hantango Mountains run the entire length of the upper part of 
the township, the Mahantango Creek, the Northumberland 
County boundary, being at the foot on the north side. The 
township is well watered and tbere are many fine productive 
farms. Much of the history of the township is identified with 
the history of the Lykens Valley proper; that which may have 
transpired during the eventful eras of the valleys existance will 
be found in other portions of this book. It contains two im- 
portant towns, Berry sburg and Uniontown. Berrysburg being 
the only one in the Lykens-Williams Valley. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 97 



BERRYSBURG. 

Berrysburg is situated on the road leading from IMillers- 
biirg through Lykens into Schuylkill County, thirty-five miles 
from Harrisburg. It was incorporated into a borough Dec. 14, 
1869. The town was laid out by John xVdams Heller, in Dec. 
1819, w^ho owned a large tract of land, including the present 
town and a farm adjoining, now the old Daniel Romburger 
property. 

Pleller was of a pioneer family in the valley, but removed, 
1839 to Sugar Valley, and subsequently to Ohio. John Paul 
Jr. of Elizabethville surveyed the town for Heller, who called 
it Berrysburg, from the mountain named Berry's lying in the 
vicinity, but for many years it went bj^ name of the j'yroprie- 
tor. 

A school was organized in Berrysburg about 1826. The 
different organized churches owned small tracts of land, from 
ten to twenty acres, on which a schoolhouse was erected, all one 
story with divisions, one part to be occupied by the teacher and 
his family and the other as a school-room. All the schools were 
taught in private houses except three, which were built by the 
citizens. The land in some cases was purchased for a few 
dollars and some donated, but in either instance only sufficient 
to erect the building. On a fixed day the inhabitants assemb- 
led at the place where the house was to be built, and some w^ent 
felling trees, others to hauling logs, and the rest erected 
the house. The furniture was made of pine or oak boards nailed 
against the wall ; the benches made of slats. 

The first Chief Burgess of Berrysburg was Jonathan 
Tobias 1870, and the first town clerk was Peter S. Bergstresser. 

Berrysburg Seminary 

This institution was organized about sixty-nine years ago, 
but in the lapse of time its building was sold to the town for 
public school purposes. On the reorganization in 1879 the sem- 



98 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



inary secured the property known as the town hall for its room. 
Nearly one-half of the teachers in the upper end of the county 
have been connected with this seminary at one time or other. It 
was built by Rev. H, S. Bosler, and its first teacher, in 1851, 
was Edward Witraan. The seminaiy has long} since been 
bandoned. 




The Old Berrysburg Seminary — This Building no longer stands 



St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church was erected in 
1791. 

Union Salem Church of the Lutheran and Reformed Con- 
gregations was built in 1844, and rebuilt in 1873. 

Evangelical Association. — This congregation was organized 
1846, and the church edifice was erected the same year. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 99 



Methodist Episcopal Church. — This church in 1866 was 
made a part of Millersburg and Berrysburg Circuit, and in 
1870 of the circuit composed of Berrysburg, Oakdale, and Cross- 
Roads. The latter was abandoned in 1877, but the church prop- 
erty at Oakdale is still owned. 

The United Brethern have a large congregiation and neat 
church in the western part of the township near the Paxtang 
line. 



100 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




ANDRP:W (Lycans) lykens 
(From a Description) 



The early pioneer of the 
valley and from whom 
Lykens Valley and Lykens 
tovvH derive their names. 



HISTORY OF LYKENS BOROUGH 

The land where Lykens and part of Wiconisco now stands 
was owned by James Way, of Chester County, who died in the 
year 1825 before receiving a patent therefor from the State. His 
executor, George Pearce, obtained a patent for the land Feb. 
2, 1826. and had it surveyed by Isaac Ferree and his son Joel B. 
Ferree. After the survey, the land was put up at public sale. 
The sale was held at the old (Good) mill at Loyalton. The 
condition of the sale was that at least twenty-five dollars payment 
in hand, must be made immediately after the sale. 

The tract of 180 acres on which the borough of Lykens now 
stands was struck down to Jane and Rachel Ferree for the sum 
of $65.97. The sale really was to their father, Isaac Ferree. 
But for prudential reasons he ordered the deed for this tract, 
made in the name of liis two daughters, Jane and Rachel. Isaac 
Ferree, formerly owned a considerable amount of land in this 
section, and operated a powder-mill the products of which he 
sold all over the country. He brought the saltpetre from Phila- 
delphia by teams. Joel B. Ferree and his sisters subsequently 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



101 



laid out a town on this tract, and in honor of the early pioreer 
of the valley, Andrew Lycans, called it Lykenstown, and the 
two sisters sold the lots for eleven dollars each. They were all 
numbered and drawn by lottery, and some hundred lots were 
thus drawn and sold. Upon these lots log houses were built 
by — William Zerby, Isaac Ferree, Martin Blum, Jacob Staley, 




Corner of Main and Market Streets. Picture taken 20 years agD. 

Kate Bordner, Benjamin Drum, John Shehan and Patrick 
Martin, south of the railroad. The first log house however, was 
built -by Joel B. Ferree, in the lower part of the borouoh, in 
April, 1832. The stone work of which was done by Richard 
Nolan. (Richard Nolan Diary) This was the extent of Lykens 
in 1832. 

In the year 1816 Simon Gratz recovered a .judgement for a 
small amount against Isaac Ferree and kept it alive by suc- 
cessive writs of scire facies. In 1835 said judgement was issued 
upon, and the land sold as belonging to Isaac Ferree, the court 
holding in legal contest, that his daughters only held the pro- 
perty in trust for him. Therefore Simon Gratz, purchasing 
at Sheriff's sale the interest of Isaac Ferree, it is presumed 
received a good title. After the death of Simon Gratz. the hind 



102 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



was conveyed to "William Hawkins, who the same day sold it to 
Edward Gratz. He bought up a tax title to the same, held by 
Jacob Haldeman and Thomas Elder, July 8, 1847, which gave 
him an undisputed title. He then caused it to be immediately 




K. of P. Hall, Lykens. 

laid out in lots the second time, as they are now, by Daniel 
Hoffman, in 1848. The first purchasers under Ferree sisters, all 
lost their lots with the exception of those whose deeds had been 
recorded at a certain date. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



103 



Since its first settlement the town has rapidly increased in 
wealth, influence and population. It is the center of the coal 
trade in the Upper End. 




ZICN LUTHERAN CHURCH, LYKENS 
C. S. Jones, Pastor. 

Lykens borough was incorporated in the year 1871, the Chief 
Burgesses since that date have been. 

Hon. Moses R. Young, 1871-3: L. K. Katzenburg, 1873-5: 
Charles Wolcott, 1875-6 : John E. Nace, 1876-7 ; Charles Wolcott, 
1878-80; W. S. Young, 1880, (resigned Aug. 2, 1880); Riley 
Bressler, 1880-2 : S. H. Barrett, 1882-3 : F. J. Douden, 1887-91 : 
W. S. Young, 1891-7: Jacob Trout, 1897-1900: H. F. Bueck, 
1900-3 : Jacob Trout, 1903-6 : N. E. Snyder, 1906-9 ; Jacob Trout, 
1909-14; J. W. Witmer, 1914-22 : George W. Troxel, 1922-4 years. 



104 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Scene in North Second Street, Lykens. 




Grace Methodist Church, Lykens 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



105 



Aside from many Industrial plants and manufacturing; 
concerns, the town also supports a weekly newspaper. This 
paper is published by INIr. Charles ]M. Coles, son of the late 
S. B. Coles, who has been a pioneer in that business in the Valley. 
The first paper published in Lykens was the Farmer's and Min- 
er's Journal, and the first issue appeared Aug. 16, 1856. This 




"When the late train arrives" — Lykens 

paper was supplanted by the Business i\Ien's Journal until the 
year 1865, when the first issue of The Upper Dauphin Register 
and Lykens Valley IMiner appeared. Jan. 1, 1872 the paper was 
enlarged and the name changed to the Lykens Register. From 
this name it became the Ijykens Record and so on until today 
we have ''The Lykens Standard" published by C. M. Coles, 
a son of S. B. Coles who has been identified with the paper since 
1856. 

The first house in Lykens was Ferree's house, now occupied 
by the brick building of Charles Price and building of Jolm 
Koppenhaver. The second, Zerbe's opposite Squire Ferree's. 
Next the corner house, but lately demolished for the erection of 
the brick house of William. A Wallace, now property of Charles 
Price. Stehley's stood in the woods near the creek. Next 



106 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



107 





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108 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

















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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



109 





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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



111 




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DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



113 




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114 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Kissley's. Next an old log house, built by the Fegley's. Next 
Patrick Martin 's. There was a two and a half story frame 
house near the creek, back of the Valley house, on what is now 
Water Street. This was built by Edward Myers for a man by 
the name of Fisher, No store in Lykens at that time. Merchan- 
dise of every sort chiefly brought from the store of Josiah 
Bowman at the Forge. 

The other store in all this part of the country was that of 
Henry Shaeffer's, at the Lykens Valley Colliery. Some few 
of the people worked in the mines, others employed themselves 
in the manufacture of shingles, spokes, posts and stays, which 
they traded for necessities of life. No church at that time ; 
but a place of worship in an old school house near the Company's 
stable. The Companj^ then mined coal Avithout preparation. 
It M^as taken by horse railway to Millersburg, there flatted across 
the Susquehanna to Mt. Patrick, on the opposite side, and 
placed on the canal boats of the North Branch for shipment 
to Harrisburg. There was no public house at that time. The 
company would not tolerate any upon its own graunds, and 
would not sell ground for hotel purposes. 

Jacob Stehely, a gentleman of large means, who died at 
Harrisburg, rather eccentric, yet very entertaining and full 
of wit and humor — in his latter days fond of hunting and fish- 
ing — ''batched" in the woods at that time, supported by his son 
John, at Harrisburg. Mr. Stehely was about sixty years of age, 
and quite intelligent, full of information and lively when in 
company, which he tried to avoid, preferring the life of a hermit. 

The mail was gotten at Thomas Harper's at the Forge. 
Isaac Ferree was quite an old man then. Had sons running a 
sawmill in "Greenland"— the only sawmill then about. The 
mill in "Greenland" was erected in 1840, by the Ferree 's — 
Joel, Jefferson, Washington, Uriah and Jacob. Shortly after- 
wards the mill at Round top was erected by the same parties 
and the one at Greenland abandoned. The elections were held 
at the tavern of Michfel Sha^ffer. Deer were plenty — bear also — 
fish in abundance — wild turkeys. The men employed in the 
mines about twenty. The old Lykens Valley breaker was erected 
in 1845-7. No breaker in 1^40. The mines were then a mere 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW II5 



drift. In 1853 there were about fift}^ houses in Lykens, about 
the same number in Wiconisco. The orders in 1853 were 
the American Mechanics and Sons of Temperance. No Odd 
Fellows at that time. They organized shortly after. The 
orders mentioned met in John Hensel's building on Main 
Street, second story, steps on the outside leading up. Preaching 
in stone church, Lykens, the only church then, by Watson, it is 
thought. The first railroad consisted of wa*ought-iron tacked 
on wooden rails — called by the natives the ' ' Slabtrack ' ' road.' 

Today the population of Lykens is 3000, The modern im- 
provements have been. Electric lights. Water, Gas, Trolley ser- 
vice, pavements, State Road, P. R. R, P. & R. R. R., Telephone, 
Telegraph and all modern improvements and facilities making 
for a real progTessive community. At the time of this writ- 
ing, deliberation is being held incidental to the town purchasing 
an $8000.00 Fire Fighting Apparatus. (Later) Apparatus pur- 
chased. 



LYKENS RESERVOIR TAKEN IN 1887 

Reading left to right — Fred Schmidt, George Irving', Thomas L. 
Davis, Job White, Dr. W. J. Smith, Mr. Prichard, Asley Cook, B. F. 
Stoner. From left to right those sitting are — Dr. W. H. Uhler, Richard 
Walters, G. B. Brubaker, David Gratz, Andrew Hoffman. John M. 
Blum, Samuel B. Coles, and Dr. A. G. Stanley. (See illustration, 
(Page 113). 



116 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



HENSEL 

Clothing House 

LYKENS 
1891 :-: 1922 



Men's and Boys' Store 



LARGEST AND OLDEST 
FROM POTTSVILLE TO HARRISBURG 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 117 

BEEF PORK 

Bowman Cash Market 

HARRY A. BOWMAN, Proprietor 

Choice Meats and Fancy Groceries 

Our Home-itiade 
Bologna and Sausage a Specialty 

558 Main Street Lykens, Pa. 

LAMB Bell Phone VEAL 

Established 1897 

GEO. W. TROXELL 

FIRST CLASS 



• • 



Shoe Repairing 

S. PINE STREET, LYKENS 

Electric Machines Prices Reasonable 

Visitors Welcome 



Abraham Lincoln's Advice — 

Don't worry, eat three square meals a day. Keep your 
digestion good. Be courteous to your creditors. Take 
plenty of exercise and go slow and easy. And if old Abe 
were living today he would say — 

DO YOUR BUYING AT 




LYKENS, PENNA. 



118 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Travelers Headquarters Established 1854 

Hotel Glen 

Steam Heat 

Electric Lights 

A II Modern Conveniences 

Refreshments at the Bar 

C. J. WITMER, Proprietor 

LYKENS, PENNA. 



MINERS DEPOSIT BANK, Lykens, Penna. 

Members — Federal Reserve System 

Capital, $50,000.00 

Surplus and Profits, 133,000.00 

Deposits 734,000.00 

R. J. N. BAKER, President F J. DOUDEN, Vice-President 

SAMUEL S. FEAR, Cashier 



*— 



E. Leroy Keen 

Attorney and Counselor at Law 

222 Market Street J. N. Baker Building 

Harrisburg, Pa. Lykens, Pa. 



I 
*- 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW HQ 



Forman Brothers 

Clothing, Shoes, Ladies' and 
Gents' Fu rn is h ings, Carpets, 
Rugs, Oilcloth, Linoleum, 
Stoves and Furniture 

Mayers— FORMAN— Harry 

LYKENS— WICONISCO 
PENNA. 



FORD PARTS HYDRO TORON 

OF TIRES 

ALL KINDS 

Kissinger's 

T/re and Accessory House 

LYKENS, PA. 

IF YOU PAY LESS, YOU GET LESS 

FIRST GASOLINE 

CLASS AND 

ACCESSORIES OIL 



-* 



I 
•* 



120 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Louis Wentzler 



BREWING 

BEVERAGES 



am 



MANUFACTURER OF 

ARTIFICIAL ICE 



Patronize Your Home Industry 



I 
f 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



121 



*• 



R. Coble John H. Eby J. M. Sheibley 

Preside7it Vice-President Cashier 

CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00 

First National Bank, Lykens, Penna. 

Under direct supervision United States Government 
We solicit your business large or small 



"KRAMER" 

THE BUILDER 

We Build Anything Large or Small 

Let us draw your plans and give you an Estimate 

Our Prices Challenge 

Competitors 

JOS. F. KRAMER 

BELL PHONE 23-K LYKENS, PA. 



— * 



GEORGE W. EBY 

Wholesale Dealer in 

CONFECTIONERY— TOBACCO— CIGARS AND 

CIGARETTES 

Cigar Specialties 

El Rocco Peyton Randolph Paulo Honest Abe Bull Nose Blunt 
xAIarket Street LYKENS, PA. 



Lykens Furniture and Music Store 

REIFF and HELT, Proprietors 

VICTOR VICTROLAS— WEAVER PIANOS 

FURNITURE 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Lykens ----- Pennsylvania 



122 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Lykens Music Store 

Geo. a. KosieRj Proprietor 



,«»<M«|,, 




Cu}i?iinffham Pianos 

Sonora Talking Machines 

Vocalion Talking Machines 

Sheet Music 

String Instruments and Accessories 

Singer Sewing Machines and Parts 

Hemstitching and Picot Edging 

LYKENS, PA. 



•* 



G. C. KINSEY 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 
Bell 'Phone 293 

529 South Second Street Lykens, Pa. 

All work done to conform with Underwriters Code 

EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL 

ESTIMATES FREE 

Motor Troubles a Specialty 




"THE AURORA" 

BILLIARD PARLOR 



Ice Cream 



Cand 



les 



Cigars 



Tobacco 



Lunch 



WM. L. WITMER, Proprietor 



East Main Street 



LYKENS, PA. 



-* 
-* 



DIRECTORY AXD PICTORIAL REVIEW 



123 



Steam Heat 



Baths 



Electric Light 



Best AccommodaHons for the 
Traveling Public 




Commercial Hotel 



LYKENS, PENNA. 



Chas. Spiekermann, Proprietor 

Refreshments and Cigars at the Bar 



124 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



4. — 



LYKENS MERCANTILE CO. 

WHOLESALE 

Groceries, Flour and Feed 

LYKENS, PENNJA. 

W. H. Kissinger, President 

Elmer Romberger, Vice-President 

Jacob A. Bogar, Secretary 

Chas. E. Hoffman, Treasurer and Manager 

"LYKENS' STANDARD" 

Established 1898 

Chas. M. Coles, Editor and Publisher 

PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY MORNING 
AT LYKENS, PA. 

BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUM IN UPPER DAU- 
PHIN COUNTY— CIRCULATION THE LARGEST 

Advertising rates upon application 

If in need of Job Printing of any description, ask us for 
quotation — we do Printing of every description 




^^A«^rt^rf,^AS>4*^J^.v 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 125 



Established 1857 



Union House 

Cor. Main and Market Streets 

WILLIAM HECHLER 

PROPRIETOR 

LYKENS, PENNSYLVANIA 



"The Jeweler}? Store of the Valle})" 

"The Price of Honest Jewelry is Genuinely Com- 
mensurate With Genuine Quality" 

We Carry the Largest and Most Complete Stock of Fine 

Jewelry in the Valley. 

All Repair Work is done by an Accomplished Expert — Eyes 
are Examined and Lenses Adjusted by a Registered Opto- 
metrist. 

SUGGESTIONS 
Diamonds Watches 

Rings Necklaces 

Cut Glass and Silverware 

A General Line of Jewelry 
"Your Satisfaction is Our Success" 

WALTER E. SMTDER 

537 MAIN STREET LYKENS, PA. 



126 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




CM 

On 



o 



00 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



127 



4. — 




CHI 
NAMEL 



Nothing so beautifies the house 
or makes it so "homey" as nice 
turniture, and nothing gives you 
such hne furniture as that fin- 
ished with Chi-Namel. 

Try it on that scratched buffet 
or rough floor. 



Buy it at 



BLANNING'S 



Hardvv'are St 




ore 



LYKENS AND WILLIAMSTOWN 



t 

■ + 



DR. J. NEVIN BAKER 

DENTIST 

LYKENS :-: :-: :-: PENNSYLVANIA 



128 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



BOTH LEADERS 




NEW SEDAN 




SPEED WAGON 
24-Hour Service 

REO 

Sales and Service Station 
515 Market Street 
H. D. HELT, Proprietor LYKENS, PENNA. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW i29 



— + 



^- E- Smith E. G_ S^ijh 



Smitn's 

The Fashion Shop 



Ladies Apparel Exclusively) 



Alterations Free 



Main Street Lykens, Pa. 



130 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



L3)kens Motor Car Company 

JAS. D. KELT, President 
GEO. D. CAIRNS, Manager 



CHEVROLET TOURING CARS 

INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS 

Complete line of Auto Accessories — Pneumatic Tires and 
Solid Tires of Standard Makes Only 

Let us overhaul y9ur car or make any necessary adjust- 
ments — All work under personal supervision of the Manager 
and fully guaranteed. 



C L THOMAS 

Billiard Parlor "Smoke House" 

The largest and most complete line of cigars, pipes and 
smokers sundries in the valley — 

LUNCH ICE CREAM SODA WATER 

Sole Agency for — Norris Exquisite Chocolates 

THE HOUSE OF QUALITY AND SERVICE 

LYKENS, PA. 
Watch our windows for Real Bargains 



•* 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



131 




LEDRU BENDER 

Whose Great Grandfather 

founded 

Elizabethville and after 

whose 

Great Grandmother 

Mrs. 

Elizabeth (John) Bender 

the town is naiiicd. 



HISTORY OF ELIZABETHVILLE 

Elizabethville is a prosperous borough, situated on the 
Pennsylvania Rail Road, about nine miles from Millersburfr. 
The western portion of the town was laid out by John Bender 
in the year 1817. Mr. Bender being at that time the owner of 
large tracts of land in this vicinity. It was for a long time 
called "Benderstoettle," but finally the name of l']lizabethville 
was given it in honor of the founder's wife, (Mrs, Elizabeth 
Bender).' Before this part of the town was laid out, a Richard 
Peter had built a house on the lot, which is now known as the 
Rickert property in the western portion of the town. After the 
laying out of the place, the first house was built by John 
Bender, and stood on the Old Road, but was later removed to 
the new road, and is now the old Messersmith |)ro|)cr1\ . It was 
a log structure, Imt later weather boarded and remodeled. 
The first blacksmith in the town was Martin I'aiil. Jillliough 



132 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



John Smith had a blacksmith shop a short distance from the 
village while his father Adam Smith, at an earlier period had 



^■' " 



i 




Elizabethville School House. 




Hotel Snyder, Elizabethville 



a. slioi) rarthcr removed from the village. Adam Smith, moved 
1<) town (hiring the year 1819. The first store was opened by 
Benjamin Buffington in 1842, at which time there were not 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



133 




The Old Stone Church, Elizabethville. In this cemelary back of the church is buried 

many of the old pioneers of the Valley, annong them John Bender, 

founder of Elizabethville 




Market Street, Elizabethville 



134 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



.^ies^K^ 



^'^. 




Ul 



s 







3 



q: 



IS 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIE 



W 



135 



over a dozen log houses in the town. John Bender, the IouikI.t 
of Elizabethville, kept the first hotel, which, being on the ohi 
ITarrisbnrg road, was quite a resort for travelers i.ii.I team- 




Industry map of Elizabethville 1910 



stars. The first wagon-maker was Benjamin R. Buffington. The 
first Physician was Dr. John B. Stroup, who located and iirac- 
tieed medicine in Elizabethville in the year 1852. 



336 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




w 

o 
O 



3 

ts 
Q 



Q 



R! 

C 



CO 

H 









DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



]3- 




The Old Red Tavern, now the Hotel Snyder 




Old Polm Building, Elizabethville. where the Lykens Valley Bank now stands 



138 LYKBNS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

The Eastern section of the present borough was founded by 
Ephraim E. Bender, a brother of John Bender, and up until 
the year 1832 there was only one house in this section. This 
part of the town was then called Cross-Roads, later it was called 
Washington Square, by which latter title it is generally known. 
The business centre of the present town is located on the original 
Cross-Roads, Washington Squire site of the historical develop- 
ment. The town today is a flourishing community with modern 
and up-to-date public service facilities, well stocked stores, 
Telegra})li office and a number of successful manufacturing 
establishments. Among the latter is the Swab Wagon Company 
and the Buflington IManufacturing Company, Both these con- 
cerns employ scores of citizens. 

Elizabethville was incorporated as a borough in the year 
1893 

The Lutheran and Reformed churches were erected in 
1833. 

The United Brethern Church was erected by the Metho- 
dists in the year 1871, who in 1877 conveyed the same to the 
former denomination. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 139 



The First National Bank 

of elizabethville. pa. 

Charter No. 5563 

Organized 1900 
CAPITAL, $25,000.00 

surplus and profits, 68,876.00 

rp:sources, 553,000.00 

Officers 

L T. BuFFlNGTON, President 

A. M. ROMBERGER, Vice-Presicleiit 

H. H. Hassinger, Cashier 

L. C. BuFFlNGTON^ Assistant Cashier 

Directors 

L T. Buffington A. M. Romberger C. F. Eby 
L. W. Bolton C. T. Romberger S. H. Kniscl\ 
H. H. Hassinger 

Member of The Ameican Bankers Association diul of tlu 
Pennsylvania Bankers Association 



Elizabethville Planing Mill 

I. T. Buffington, Proprietor 
Manufacturer of 

LUMBER 

SasK, Doors, Blinds, 

LatK, Shingles, Etc. 

ELIZABETHVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA. 

Siding Flooring, Shutters, Moulding, Store Room Fi.^urcs 
Chamber Suits, Parlor Suits, Couches, Tables and Chairs 

Both Phones 



— + 



140 



i. — 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



CAPITAL STOCK $50,000 



The Silver Black Fox Co., Inc. 

Exclusive Agents for Duffus Diamond Quality 

H. L. ROMBERGER, Manager 
ELIZABETHVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA. 



--#*«»^ 



S#S*;fSirf>*' 







James E. Lentz, President 

C. T. Romberger, Vice-President 

A. E. Romberger, Sec. and Treas. 



J. P. Duffus, Neiu York 
M. S. Lewis, Reading 



DIRECTORS 

D. W. Romberger, Elizabethville 
H. L. Romberger, Elizabeth<ville 



Associated with Ranches at Prince Edward Island, Ontario, 
New York State and Reading, Pa. 

TO YOU who know the value of highest quality silver black foxes. 
TO YOU who want to own one or more pair but cannot because 

of the high original cost. 
TO YOU who could use $1000, to $5000, additional annual income. 

TO YOU who would like to start in the Fox business and get from 
$100, to $700, for everv pelt you raise. (We WILL 
BUY ALL YOU RAISE AxND PAY $500 EACH). 
Write or call at the ranch for free information how to 
get started. 

Our Memorandum Service on skins is for your benefit and is 
utilized by the largest and most exclusive houses everywhere. Han- 
dled by the, Duffus Silver Fox Store, 21 West 30th Street, New 
York City, N. Y. Mr. Duffus is an active member of our company. 

A copy of our Comments on the Silver Black Fox Industry is 
yours for the asking. 

Visitors always welcome. Ranch however closed between January 
and June. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



141 




THE WEAVER APPAREL CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Men's Dress and Work Shirts 

A SHIRT THAT FITS 

For sale by all first-class Haberdashers and Department Stores 

RLIZABRTHVILLR, PA. 



The Oldest Fire Insurance Company) in Central Pennsylvania 

Incorporated 1854 



OFFICERS: 

Amos Lebo, 

President 

H. M. Miller. 
Sec. and Treas. 

Miles V. Miller, 

Ass 't Sec 'y 




DIRECTORS: 

Amos Lebo, 

D. D. Helt. 

J. A. Henninger, 
H. M. M.ller. 
L. W. Bolton. 

E. T. Jamisoti, 
Lee A. Zeiglcr. 



Home Office Building 



Lykens Valley Mutual Fire Insurance Co. 

Elizabethville^ Pa. 

Reliable Insurance at Reasonable Cost 



142 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



THE 

"ELIZABETHVILLE ECHO" 

Issued EVERY THURSDAY MORNING 



— * 



SUBSCRIPTION 
$1.50 A YEAR IN ADVANCE 



M. A. MILLER 

Editor and Proprietor 

GEORGE BUFFINGTON 

Funeral Director and Embalmer 
ELIZABETHVILLE, PA. 

All Calls Given Prompt and Careful Jtte?ition 



Electrical Supplies Lighting Fixtures 

and Appliances Electric Motors 

Wiring and Repairing at a very reasonable cost 
Estimates Cheerfully Given 

A complete line of wiring material and specialties carried 
in stock at all times. 

H. S. MATTER, Electrical Contractor 
Bell Telephone Elizabethville, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 343 



Washington House 

Chas. Keaffer, Proprietor 
ELIZABETHVILLE, PA. 



Electric Light Garage Steam Heat 



— + 



Elizabethville Motor Car Co. 

JAMES E. LENTZ, Manager 

BUICK — DODGE 

lieliable Cars and Service OUR MOTTO 



"Tlie Corner Store" of Eli2at)etK\)ille, Penna. 

Offers You Excellent Shopping Facilities 

Its splendid location, modern equipment and larfje assort- 
ment of seasonable merchandise make it a fascinating place 
for shopping. 

Prompt Service Merchandise of Quality 

Courteous Treatment Fair Prices 

Your patronage not only solicited but appreciated as well 

With best wishes, 

A. M. ROMBERGER 

Established 1900 H<'ll 'lVK-pb"tn- 



144 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



ESTABLISHED 1868 



SWAB WAGON CO., Inc. 




Manufacturers of Farm and Spring Wagons, Buggies, carriages and 

Commercial Truck Bodies. 

Dealers in Pleasure and Commercial Cars — Auto Accessories 

Elizabethville, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



145 




DANIEL WILLIAMS 

A 

sketcli from discription 

of tlie 

founder of and nainesake 

of 

AVillianis Valley 

and 
Williamstown. 



HISTORY OF WILLIAMSTOAVX AND 
WILLIAMS TOWNSHIP 



On the 7tli of February, 1869, the township of Williams 
was formed from the township of W^ieonisco, the court direct- 
ing the boundary lines as follows: 

"Beginning at a black-oak on the Schuylkill County line 
east 461/2 degrees south 1380 perches; thence south 81 degrees 
west 1400 perches along the highlands of Berry's ^lountain ; 
thence due north 490 perches; thence north 60 degrees east 415 
perches to the place of beginning." 

As thus formed the township is bounded on the Noi-th by 
Lykens tow^nship, on the East by the Schuylkill County line, on 
the south by Jackson township and on the west by AViconisco 
township. Although one of the smallest townshij).s in Dauphin 
County, it is by no means the least important. It is Ihe center 
of the Ly kens-Williams Valley coal basin. Its early history 
and developement of its coal interests are pari of the liitsory 
of the valley. The business of the to^^^lship cenlres in tli<- min- 
ing operations. 



146 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



This great Coal Mart has come into existence as a town 
since the commencement of the Coal trade. It is located on 
the Williams Valley Eailroad Branch of the Philadelphia and 
Reading Railroad. The Summit Branch of the P. R. R. also 
enters the town. Here is located what was in the year 1873 
the most famous and largest Coal mine or Colliery in America. 
The coal Company began operations in the Spring of 1866. 




East Market Street, Williamstown, Pa. 

The town was laid out by the Coal Company, by Martin Blum 
and Mr. Lewis Heilner, and by Henry Workman, which three 
parties and Company owned all the land upon which the town 
now stands. What is the town proper was Once offered in ex- 
change for five thousand shingles, and subsequently sold for 
a span of horses, not worth over three hundred dollars, by a 
Mr. Updegrove. The first store in the place was kept by Jacob 
Hartman, and the next three were opened and owned by George 
Haines, Daniel Batdorf and Joseph W. Durbin. The oldest 
house in or near the town is the old John Hartman property, 
built before the coal trade opened. Jacob Hartman kept the 
first tavern and George Haines the second, both in connection 
with their little stores. Joseph W. Durbin was the first regular 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



147 




The late Cap't Richard Budd. 




Market Street from Central Hotel, Williamstown 



148 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



]49 



raerehant on a large scale, and located here in May, 186(1. The 
town was laid out in 1869, and in 1883 was the largest mining 




Methodist Church, Williamslown 



town In'thTUpper End. The Evangelical Assoc-iation nvtiMl 
the first chnrch, which was bnilt in 1860 and 1870, and on the 
29th day of December 1870 the congregation was incorporated. 



150 LYKENS-WIL.LIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

The Methodist Episcopal church was erected in 1871, The 
Emanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church was erected in 1874. 
The Primitive Methodist Church was erected in 1876 on Broad 
street. The United Brethren in Christ editice was erected a 
few years later then 1876. The Roman Catholic Church was 
erected in 1875, under the auspices of Rev. Mark 'Neill. 

Since the time of its incorporation the Chief Burgesses have 
been — 

J. W. Durbin 
Amos Lebo 
Lazarius Zerby 
D. F. Lebo 
Clark HofE 
L. C. Carl 
Edward McNut 
Frank M. Shadle. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 151 



! . . . ! 

Unrivaled Hosiery Mill 

WILLIAMSTOWN, PA. 



TKe Most Complete Manufacturing 
Plant in tKe Valle}) 



S. D. BAUSHER, President 
J. B. LESHER, Treasurer and Manager 

Established 1908 



Bestok Underv?ear Co. 

Office. Williamstown Mill, Tower City 



MAKERS OjF 
DEPENDABLE 
MERCHANDISE 



S. D. BAUSHER, "President 

J. B. LESHER, Treasurer and Manager 

Established 1913 



152 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Variet}? Incorporated 

Dealers in Post Cards, Wall Paper, Window Shades, Sta- 
tionery, Kodaks, Toys, Sporting Goods and a thousand 
other things. 

// we haven't what you roant 
we will get it for you 

STORE CORNER MARKET AND EAST STREETS 
WILLIAMSTOWN, PA. 



ESTABLISHED 1889 

WM. O. ROWE 

Meat Market 







Home Dressed and Manufactured Goods 

FRESH AND SMOKED MEATS 

Delivery Wagon None Better Bell Phone 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



153 
— ♦ 



Ford 
Cars 
Trucks 

and Fordson Tractors 




Ford Service, With genuine Ford parts, the Ford way 

Complete Line of Accessories 

PHILADELPftlA ^^^ ^"^^' battery with 

''^^^i©Q^[M]®g5[2) ^ quarter sawed wood 

p^^dl^DE) separator. All makes 

'ffiHTlilJf repaired & rechar^^cd. 




J. N. Snyder 



Authorized Ford Sales & Service 



Williamstown, Pa. 



]54 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Bell Phone Established 1911 



Th 



Academy 
0/ Music 

A FAMILY THEATRE 



The Home of 

Motion Picture Vaudeville 

Musical Comedy 

Drama or Repertoire 

"NEVER DARK HOUSE" 

Complete Scenery 

Modern Improvements 

Good Music 

C. DONLEY, H. C. KURTZ, 

Proprietor Manager 

Williamstown, Penna. 

Trolley Stops at the Door. Excellent Parking Facilites 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 155 



Established 19 10 

WM. D. MORGAN 

CONTRACTOR 

Stone, Brick and Concrete Work 

Cement, Sand, Lime, Brick 
Flagstone and Iron Fences 

Our Guarantee of Quality and our Service Go with 
Everything We Sell 

BELL TELEPHONE 

WILLIAMSTOWN, PA. 

Magazine SuDScription Ageno? 

Service and Reliability 



LOWEST PRICES 
PROMPT AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 



LANE F. RUBENDALL 

Market Street Bell Phonk 

WILLIAMSTOWN, PA. 



156 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



The 

Williamstown Times 

Tht Linofype Way 
Bell Telephone Issued every Friday 

R. J. SELFRIDGE, Publisher 
A II Kinds of 

JOB PRINTING 

Williamstown, Pa. . 



I 



J. B. Lesher, Pres. A. L. Pritchard, Vice-Pres. 

]. B. Whitworth, Secty. W. M. Groff, Cashie?- 

Miners and Merchants Bank 

WILLIAMSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

PAYS YOU 

ON TOUR SAVINGS 

Solicites Your Account, No- Matter How Small 

Bank opened for Business August 17th, 1920 
Total resourses March 15th, 1922, $348,000.00 

We Invite You To Make This Bank Your Bank 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 157 



Chiropractic Is the Science of 
Palpating Nerve Tracing and 
Adjusting Vertebrae for the 
Relief of Diseased Conditions 



EVERY living tissue and cell in the body must at 
all times receive 100% of life force or nerve 
energy, to express 100% of life and function. Any 
tissue or cell receiving less than 100% of life force 
or nerve energy is comparatively thrown in a weak- 
ened condition or disease. This life force or nerve 
energy is conveyed to all tissues and cells by means 
of the nervous system. Any pressure on a nerve 
will diminish this flow of life force or nerve energy 
to the extent of the pressure on the nerve. These 
pressures occur at the exit of the nerve from the 
spinal column. This is invariably the cause of 
disease. The Chiropractor quickly corrects this 
cause and lets the life force or nerve energy flow 
to all tissues and cells Avhich will cjuickly bring 
about a permanent cure. Call on >oiir Cliiro- 
practor for your ills and enjoy lOO*/^ of Health. 



John W. Shipe, D. C. 

CHIROPRACTOR 
403 E. Market Street Williamstown. Pa 



158 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Lykens Valley Li^ht 
and Power Company 

. WILLIAMSTOWN. 



Our aim is to serve all of the people, who wish to 
be served, all of the time. 

As you grow and prosper, we grow and prosper — 
only we must do our growing first in order to be 
ready to serve you when and as you wish. The 
electrical growth of any community is much greater 
than the growth of population. Ten years ago all 
of your electrical wants were supplied by a plant 
of less than 300 KW capacity, while this same 
community is now being served by a modern steam 
turbine plant of 3,000 KW capacity. This great 
growth was made possible only by our faith in 
your ultimate conversion to the use of electicity to 
do many of the things you used to do by other 
means. 

Nearly all of our factories are to-day run by elec- 
tricity. Seventy-five per cent of our women iron 
by electricity. Many wash by the same means. 
Some use it entirely for cooking. A great many 
sweep with it. Hundreds curl their hair with it. 
In fact, to the average family, the monthly bill for 
electricity represents not only the cost of light but 
also includes the cost of doing, easily, many of the 
household chores. 



4. — 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



159 



' ■ ' ■ — » 

AARON RALPH j q RALPH 

Aaron RalpK & Son 

Everything in 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

UNDERTAKER AND FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

Modern Equipment 

518 West Market Street 

WILLIAMSTOWN, PA. 

Bell Phone 913 Established 1888 



160 LYKENS-WILLIAAIS VALLEY HISTORY 

HISTORY OF PORTER TOWNSHIP 
AND WILLIAMS VALLEY 

Porter township, one of the richest townships in Schuyl- 
kill county, was named after Governor David Porter, an early 
governor of Pennsylvania. It was taken from lower Malian- 
tongo township about lb40, and even from its birth bid well 
to become not only one of the most distinguished townships in 
Schuylkill county, but also one of which Pennsylvania may be 
proud. 

Peter's mountain divides the township into two valleys, 
Williams and one known as Clarks starting just opposite the 
Seely log house which was situated on a bank of Wiconisco 
Creek, directly opposite of what is now the Tower City House. 
Peter 's mountain in early times was a great deer hunting ground. 
Sportsmen came long distances annually to hunt there, and it 
is predicted that in time to come it will again assume its former 
position of being one of the most popular sporting districts in 
Pennsylvania, since game is being placed there annually by the 
state. 

Porter township embraces all of Williams Valley, one of 
the most picturesque valleys in Pennsylvania. It derived 
its name from Daniel Williams and his son Enmier who took 
up two tracts of land in their own names as early as 1774. They 
also took up tracts in the names of other men, thus actually 
assuming possession of nearly the whole valley. 

Daniel Williams, the real owner of the valley and father 
of Emnier, was noted for his stature, being six feet four inches 
in height with broad shoulders and a deep chest and having 
remarkably long arms and large hands. He is also said to have 
been mentally an extraordinay man. 

Enmier Williams, the son, is reported to have lived in the 
valley during the Revolutionary war. His mother was the 
daughter of Kushwa, the chief of a large tribe of Delaware 
Indians. 

A large portion of the land not taken up by the Williamses 
was taken up hj James Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW iQi 



Independence and a judge of the Supreme Court of the United 
States, but he sold out about 1796 to John Lewis Barde, who 
in turn was sold out by a sheriff to William Jilunson. Charle- 
magne Tower was the la^^Ter of Munson, and shortly after the 
latter 's death the land became the property of the former. 
Today a large portion of it is owned and operated by the Phila- 
delphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company. 

South and a little west of the old Seely log liouse tlicre 
was erected a saw mill about 1837, now totally destroyed. Di- 
rectly west there was erected a large stone grist-mill known as 
"Thompson's Mill," Alexander Thompson being the owner 
of nearly all the land on which our present Sheridan is built. 
From that time on many more saw-mills were erected and the 
more ambitious settlers proceeded to clear the land. This great 
work was begun by George Borcott, an Indian who commenced 
the work of clearing on the land now owned by George Schwalm, 
At the death of Bo-rcott, the work was taken up by later set- 
tlers. Some of the earlier saw-mills were located on land 
now occupied by the following: John Heim, Geo. Schwalm, 
George Reiner, Theodore Updegrave, Charles Schaeffer and 
Henry Bohr. The timber was converted into lumber and that 
Avhich was not used for building purposes was taken to Tremout 
and exchanged for store goods and finally sent to Philadelphia. 
A powder mill was constructed on the farm wliich was owned 
and occupied by the late Walter Brown. A tannery was erected 
on land now occupied by Wm. Reedy and also one on land now 
occupied by John Reinhardt. 

About 1842, on the site of the residence of Henry Row, 
where John IMiller now resides in Reinerton there was erected 
a house and barn of considerable dimensions and the first post 
office and store were located there. It was known as Bcarniont 
post office and store until 1869, when it was abandoned as sudi 
and Joliett on top of the mountain. Jolmstown ami Tower 
City post offices took its place. Up to this time the inhal)itants 
of the township had to go to Pinegrove and later to Tremont for 
the eatables which they could not produce at home. Much of the 
traveling was done on foot. 



162 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

After the formation of the township the following named 
persons were leading- characters: — 

George Reiner, who lived in what is known as the Half-way 
House at Muir now occupied by John Eisenacher. 

Jacob ]\Iiller, who occupied the home east of Muir, now 
owned by N. C. Nelson. 

Peter Miller, who lived in one of the first houses west of 
what is now Good Spring. 

John Hand who resided in the house south of Orwin which 
one of his descendants Joseph Hand now occupies. 

Paul Kessler, a distinguished person from Clarks Valley, 
now living at Orwin. 

Valentine Achternacht, wdio resided in the house west of 
Sheridan, now occupied by Jehn Sneesavage and known as the 
"stone hotel." 

Levi Fehler, who occupied the home in Reinerton, where 
John Miller now resides, and 

Alexander Thompson, the original proprietor of all the 
land on which our present Sheridan is located. 

Shortly after the Seely came into the valley there was a 
man living on Stony mountain called the "pirate." He was 
a man of great stature with a heavy beard and apparently his 
nickname befitted him. He claimed to have been sent by Thomas 
O'Brien of Reading to take possession in the name of Chamber- 
lain, O'Brien and Co., and built a log cahin on the side of the 
mountain, afterwards occupied by the Sponsler family, but 
which is now totally destroyed. This was the second house at 
the foot of Stony mountain, the first one being occupied by Mr. 
Philip Miller. This log cabin was given by George Hawk to 
George Wagner, about the year 1862, for entering the service 
of the north in the Civil war, as substitute for the former, wiio 
had been drafted into the service. Mr. Wagner returned, but 
was so severely wounded that he died in a few years. This is 
one of the. many examples which shows the brotherly love of 
the early settlers. 

The first house in the township was built by Daniel Green 
of Reading on the top of Broad mountain. He converted it 
into a tavera, but becoming disgusted with his own venture sold 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



163 



out to a man named Bartsche, who in turn sold out to Joseph 
Keffer. From that time on it was called the Keffer Tavern 
Stand, and from it our present Keffers derived its name. It 
became a rendezvous for drafted men during the war of 1812, 
the saw-mill hack of the tavern being their main retreat. 

Up to this time there were only two school houses in tlio 
township, one above Orwin and the other near our present 
Greenwood cemetery, but each one had its own difficulties to 
contend with and for a time education in the township pro- 
gressed very slowly. Now there are eight school houses in the 
township, each furnished with a veiy efficient faculty and hav- 
ing the right to apply to the school board of directors when there 
is a deficiency in supplies or anything else. Tlie land on which 
the first public school house was erected was given by John 
Hand, the father of AVilliams Valley, as he was called, who was 
noted for his sterling integrity and his belief in free public edu- 
cation. On this land, which is now part of Tower City a 
log building was erected, intended for a Lutheran church, 
but also used as a school house for a short time. This was 
also the first church in the township. It was destroyed b\- 
boys about 1878. 

At this time there were only five houses in Orwin. five in 
Tower City and scarcely more than fifty scattered thruout 
the township. There were seventy-four voters in the township 
and only one election poll, which was located at the Half-way 
House, Muir now occupied by John Eisenacher. Tiicre were 
three hotels in the township and only one store. The first house 
built by Charlemagne Tower was named the Tower City House, 
It is now occupied by Morris Updegrave. 

Up to 1870 there was no doctor living in the township. 
Some of the first practitioners were Drs. E. F. Pliilips, S. De- 
Veny, and K. B. Wilson. One of the first practicing attorneys 
was J. Wallace McCool. 

The oldest burying ground is at Orwin. It was donate I 
by Peter Miller. The earliest settlers who died before a regulai- 
burying ground was established are buried at various places on 
the farms. Mrs. George IMiller, said to be the first white person 



164 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

buried in the valley, lies on the Lebo farm now owned by George 
Schwalm, about one rod north of the public road and six rods 
from the line fence between the two farms. 

Coal mining and agriculture are the principal industries. 
The so-called coal fever broke out in the anthracite regions be- 
tween the years 1820 and 1830. Several well known citizens of 
Pennsylvania embarked in the enterprise, but learned that "all 
that glitters is not gold. ' ' 

Ebeneezer Seely and his son John T. of New York, built 
the old Seely log house between Williams and Clarks Valleys 
and started what is now known as the "Red Shale Tunnel." 
Tliej^ were unable to carry out their project owing to the lack 
of funds, so they also failed to open up the coal industry. Fin- 
ally parties from Harrisburg obtained a charter in the name 
of the Williams Valley Railroad and Mining Co., and they were 
the first to successfully carry on the coal industry. 

The opening of the coal mines was the principal reason 
why Porter township was so rapidly settled. A certain early 
settler, Wendall Houtz by name, visited this section on horse- 
l>ack and upon view determined to settle. He erected the house 
east of Muir, which was known as the hotel at the forks. It 
was destroyed by fire some years ago, but was rebuilt and is now 
occupied by John Batdorf, Mr. Houtz made his home there 
not because the land was more fertile than at any other 
place, but because there was a constant stream of water flowing 
by. 

John Hand, the father of Williams Valley, also built his 
home about one-half mile south of Orwin for the same reason. 
For similar reasons the first houses were so widely separated. 
These houses were now connected by roads, in the construction 
of which they followed the Indian trails, which furnishes suffi- 
cient reason for the roads not being straight since Indians al- 
ways travelled in crooked paths. 

To-day the houses are not so widely separated, the many 
more roads are being kept in repair, education is improving, 
the coal industry is progressing and Porter township has become 
one of the most prominent townships in Schuylkill county and 
also in Pennsvlvania. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



165 



^ ««l 








■%^f>^. 


#" 




^ 
















^^ A^^ 


^ 


BiflBli 


--■%JI 


^H 








1 


^^>-;£t'/'^A/^''r ''^li^ '' 


^^M ^^''y>Z^Z'^J^>'C^-^ 



CHARLEMAXGE TOWER 

Founder and Builder 
of 
Tower City. 



HISTORY OF TOWER CITY 

There are many people in this valley who have even at- 
tained middle or old age who knows very little of the early history 
of Tower City. This may not be true of every individual l»ut il 
can safely be assumed to be true of many. 

The foundation of the town came from the disclosure of 
the coal mines wliich were developed by Benjamin Kaufman, 
Wieonisco, who w^as in the mercantile business, Colonel E. G. 
Savage, who was in the foundry business at Lykens and James 
Savage who was a practical miner. 

The famous Brookside mines were developed in l^iiT. A 
railroad was constructed from Tremont to Brookside to con- 
vey this coal to market. 

After various financial diUficulties 1h.' owners discovcrnl 
one of the finest deposits of anthracite coal in llie world. 



166 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Scene on Grand Avenue, taken many years ago. 





Scene on Grand Avenue 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



167 



Elias Kaufman, formerly of Llewellyn, built the first 
breaker at this opening, and served afterwards as outside super- 
intendent until 1885, 

The former owner sold this colliery to the Repelier, Gordon 
& Co., who operated it for a few years. They in turn sold it 
to the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company who 
own it to this day. 




Tower City Hotel built by Charlemange Tower, founder cf the town. 

They made extensive improvements which necessitated them 
to make a division comprising the Brookside district, which is 
now in charge of Joseph ]\Iaguire. 

After the opening of the coal mines it became necessary 
to establish a town to house the employees. 

About seventy-five years ago a geological survey wa.s made 
thru this section of the state. A yoimg man by the name of 
Samuel Kaufman, Minersville was a member of the engineer 
corps of the party. They sank a test hole at Keffers and found 
evidences of a very fine deposit of anthracite eoal. 



108 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Scene on Grand Avenue 




Scene on Grand Avenue 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



169 




Scene on Grand Avenue 




Vievy 90 Grand Avenue 



170 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Mr. Kaufman while in this vicinity had occasion to go 
to Pottsville. While there he met a young acquaintance of his, 




Scene on Grand Avenue 




Scene on Grand Avenue 



Charlemagne Tower. He told his friend that if he possessed any 
money, or ever got any, he should buy all the lands he could 
purchase in the Williams Valley, as the mountains in that sec- 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



171 



tion, without a doubt, contained one of the finest deposits of 
anthracite coal to be found anywhere. Mr. Tower, not havin- 
any funds at the time, did not pay any attention to the mZ 
gestion. 

During the Civil war, this young lawyer, thru his natural 
shrewdness, succeeded in accumulating a fair sum of money. 
Naturally looking for a place to invest his money, liis thoughts 
drifted back to the suggestion of young Kaufman. 




Public School Building, Tower City 

During his investigation of local conditions lie found the 
valley sparsely populated. Those people who diil reside there 
had purchased land for farming purposes and were eompeUed 
to purchase a certain amount of mountain land whieli had prac- 
tically no value to them. 

. Mr. Tower succeeded in getting a man by the name of 
William Yohe, who then resided near Valh-y View to act a.s his 
agent. Mr. Yohe had the confidence of the local i)oople and so 
they approved of anything he said or did. 



172 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Thru Mr. Tower's financial shrewdness and Mr. Yohe's 
influence, so the story goes, he purchased the Brookside moun- 
tain land in which the valuable coal deposit was located as low 
as $4. per acre. 

It was largely thru Mr. Tower's influence that the rail- 
road was built and the mines developed. After purchasing the 
land he decided to build a town and name it Tower City. 




Scene on Grand Avenue 



In order to control the territory on which the town was to 
be located he purchased the John Dietrich farm on which Orwin, 
then called Johnstown was located. He also purchased all the 
land from Bearmont to the Sulphur Creek, the dividing line 
between Sheridan and the borough, with the exception of the 
Henry Rowe farm at Reinertown, now owned by Albert Ste- 
phens. 

The idea was to have the main part of the town w^here 
Reinertown is now located. The cellar was dug and all arrange- 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 173 




Tower City Rsservoir 




Scene on Grand Avenue 



174 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



ments made for a large building or hotel to be erected on the 
vacant lot owned by John Mease and be known as the Tower 
City House. 

A misunderstanding arose between Mr. Tower's repre- 
sentative and Mr. Row. In view of this misunderstanding ]\Ir. 
Row refused to sell his farm to Mr. Tower. 




Scene of the wreck on the Williams Valley Railroad abcve Tower City, two lives lost. 

In order not to give ^Ir. Row the benefit of his improve- 
ments, Mr. Tower ordered the abandoning of the building at the 
above mentioned place and decided to locate the Tower City 
House a mile west of that point, where the building is now 
located and which placed the town in that section of the val- 
ley. This place was then a swamp and perhaps one of the 
most undesirable places in the valley for such an undertaking. 

One of the old land marks of Tower City is the Seeley Tun- 
nel north of the United Brethern Church. 

Before the opening of the coal mines some enterprising 
parties conceived the idea of building a railroad from Dauphin 
to Ashland, Pa. The railroad was to extend from Dauphin, 
thru Clark's Valley, and thru the Brookside mountain, by w^ay of 
the Seeley Tunnel, to Ashland. 




> 

U 

to 

m 



L76 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




Scene of wreck on Williams Valley Railroad 




Scene of wreck on Williams Valley Railroad 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 177 



The tunnel was driven for quite a distance when the funds 
became exhausted and the undertaking was abandoned. 

There was from twelve to fifteen miles of road bed graded 
at the west end of Clarks Valley. Experienced miners say that 
if this tunnel had been driven thru the mountain they would 
have discovered all the coal measures which have since been 
found in this district. The expenses of preparing the coal 
would have been less than at present because they would then be 
on a water level which would avoid the expense of pumping. 

The eastern approach to the town which followed a crooked 
Indian trail along the south side of the valley was not satis- 
factory, so Mr. Tower decided to build a public road from Kef- 
fers to Tower City. He built what is now known as the state 
road at his own expense. The cost is said to have been over 
$100,000. 

Mr. Tower wished Porter township to take over the road 
and pay for the upkeep of same. A number of the larger tax 
payers objected to this obligation on their part. 

Mr. Tower's experience as a lawyer, and his financial stand- 
ing gave him an advantage over the local people. He succeeded 
in having a bill passed by the Legislature at Harrisburg which 
compelled Porter township to take over the road and compensiite 
him for all money expended. 

Until 1893 Tower City was a part of Porter township. 
At which time a majority of the people decided to be incorpor- 
ated into a borough. Since then the town has steadily been im- 
proving until to-day Tower City is one of the most progressive 
towns in the valley as well as in the county. 



178 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Capital $50,000.00 



Surplus $75,000.00 



TKe Tower City ISJ ational Bank 



TOWER CITY, PA. 

ORGANIZED FEBRUARY 1902 




SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT 

Accounts of individuals and firms solicited 

Interest paid on time deposits and Chi-istmas Saving 

Club Accounts 

Every accommodation consistent with good banking extended 

OFFICERS 

C. M. Kaufman^ President 
W. F. Knecht, Vice-President 
A. 



I. A. Evans 
R. W. Daub 
A. A. Unger 
H. A. Evans 



D. Lewis, Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

J. B. Watkins 
W. J. Powell 
Jno. Pfeiffer 
G. W. Dreibelbis 



W. N. Snvder 
W. F. Knecht 

B. W. Fees 

C. M. Kaufman 



Fred J. Doudcn 



Isaac Mossop 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



179 



4. — 



Do You Get Your HOME PAPER ? 

West SckuylkiU Herald 

Published Every Friday at 

TOWER CITY, PA. 

By the Year, ^1,50 

Single Copies, .i)i 

W. F. KNECHT 

EDITOR AKD PROPRIETOR 



— + 



FURNITURE 
Victrolas and Records 

Pianos ana Music 

H. S. SNYDER & CO. 

Bell Phone 7-14 207 E. Grand A\uiuc 

TOWER CITY, PA. 

ni\e Midwa}? General Store 

"Quality and Service" our Motto 

We carry a full and complete line of Groceries. Dry Goods. 
Notions and Miner's Supplies. 

WILLIAM D. KEEN, Profriktor 

Dayton, Pa. 

» ■ ' ■ ■ 



180 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY H1ST0R"X 




"GAME AND FISH 

Past and Present in 
THE Lykens-Willl\ms 
Valley. ' ' 

By 

V. W. Barrett, 
Lykens, Fa. 

My personal knowledge of 
the Game and Fish con- 
ditions in The Lykens-Will- 
iams Valley dates back to 
1875. At wliich time I be- 
gan to successfully hunt and fish. Wiconisco Creek teemed 
with fish; suckers, eels, cat-fish and pike were in abundance, 
while at the mouth of the several clear water tributaries 
many fine trout were caught and occasionally in the main 
stream. Many fishermen went up the Bear creek where ex- 
cellent chub-fishing could be had. But for a number of years 
past the sulphur water and culm from the coal mines on the 
north side has about rid this stream of fish life. Rattling Creek 
which empties into the "Wiconisco just below Lykens Boro 
is a clear, clean mountain-brook and in it you could always 
find trout, suckers and eels. Both east and west branches of 
this stream have plenty of trout in them, but never seem to 
grow more than 8 to 10 inches long, (has been stocked a num- 
ber of times). But from Lykens reservoir to the mouth of the 
stream many "good ones" have been caught. I personally 
know of a brown trout 19 inches long caught in the above water 
during the summer of 1918. The mountains which bound this 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



181 



valley on the north and south from Tower City to the Susfiue- 
hanna were well stocked with game. Ruffed Grouse, Rabbits 
and numerous flocks of Wild Turkeys. "Short Mt." on the 



^ 










E 
a 
CO 



north was still well timbered and grey squirrels wore pleiit.lul 
w^hile on "BeiTy's Mt." on the south quite a few deer could 
still be found. In those days I hunted .it h the best of deer 
hunters, men who were expert rifle men and who coiUd and 



]82 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



183 



rlid kill many deer. Among whom were William (Bill), John 
and Jacob Wingert— Philip, David and Daniel Hawk-Frank 
Byerly— Nathaniel Woland— Wm. Mumma— John Hoffman— 
Emanuel Deitrich Jonas and Levi Buffington. But owing to 
the cutting of the timber, mountain fires, and the running at 
large of many dogs, deer became from year to year more scarce 
till in fact from 1890 to 1900 there were few deer killed, and 
from 1900 up to 1919 when the "Game Com." of Pa., lib(M-ated 
49 deer at one time and several more later on at the "Game 
Preserve or Refuge," it was a rare occurrence to see a deer or 
even a deer track north of "Stoney Mt." But now, thanks to 
the stringent Game Law, and the untiring efforts of our Game 
Commissioners, we can again find our forests populated with 
deer. On either mountain north or south the length of the valley 
their signs and foot prints can be found, during the summer 
months they are seen by day and night, crossing the roads 
and often in the fields with the farmers cattle. During tlio 
season just passed, Dec. 1-15, 1921 there were eleven bucks 
killed by our local hunters, more deer than were killed in this 
vicinity in 20 years. So with the elimination of tlieir natural 
enemies, prevention of forest fires and a strict enforcement of 
the Game Laws there is absolutely no reason wliy in ;i few 
years our forests should not be again the thickly tenanted li(.me of 

the deer. 

Of the smaller game at this writing, T would say there arc 
still some wild turkeys here, although tlieir natural food chest- 
nuts and acorns are no more, I know of two small floeks on 
"Berry's Mt.",and (quoting J. A. Bretz, Game Protector), one 
flock of about a dozen on "Short Mt." seen during the last montii. 
Ruffed grouse are still plentiful hut owing to the thick gn.wtli 
of underbrush are very hard to kill. On the mountains rabbits 
are imusuallv scarce, but in the farming disti-icts aiid swamps 
many good kills are made. Heavy and crusty snows of late 
have almost exterminated the quail. In my hoyho.xl .lays it 
was onlv a good days shooting for men like Geo. Irving. Job 
White Edw Walters, David Gratz, James Cox. dames Dando 
and many other of the best wing shots of the valley, to come 
in with from 50 to 100 and even more quad tor a day s Imnt 



184 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

for party. Though not plenty, there were a number of wood- 
cock killed each year. During the last few years the "Game 
Com. ' ' has set at liberty a number of pairs of Hares, snow shoe 
rabbits, English (Ring neck) Pheasant and quail and it is 
hoped that conditions favoring our small game will again 
, abound to the satisfaction of all. If the Sportsmen of the 
Lykens- Williams Valley will sincerely cooperate with the 
"Game, Fish and Forestry" Depts. of the State we can be 
assured that future generations will not only have as good but 
better sport in forest, field and stream than our ancestors did 
in years gone by. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW igo 

IVIUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OP GRATZ 

Chief Burgess 
James Kissinger 

Council 

Geo. Hepler Elmer Coleman 

John Willard Harry Umholtz 

Harvey Miller Ira Rothennal 

School Board 

Chas. Zerfing Chas. Evitts 

Oscar Clark Wm. Reed 

Darius Wcist 

Board of Health 

Wm. Brosius 0. T. Tobias 

Tax Collector Harry Umholtz 

Treasurer Ralph Troxel and Earl HofTiiian 

Auditors Ralph Troxel and Karl Hoffman 

Justice of the Peace I). F. Coleman 

Constable Jacob "Witmer 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OP MILLERSBUHG, PEXXA. 

Chief Burgess 
Frederick T. ]\TcGuire 

Borough Secretary Slcplicn B. Jury 

Borough Treasurer ^VilIialll M. Ib-rrohl 

Counciliiien 

First Ward Second Ward 

J. A. W. Brubaker Frank C. Campbell. I'nsidrnt. 

Frank K. Lenker C^harles L. Fcidt 

R. A. Zimmerman Chester I. Cnlp 



186 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Borough Solicitor 
Henry Lewis Lark, Esq. 

Chief of Police 
William Baker 

Constables 
First Ward Second Ward 

Charles Bechtel Edward Shatto 

Justice of the peace 
First Ward Second Ward 

Hector H. High James D. Bowman 

Tax Collector 
M. Edward Wilt, Second Ward 

Assessor 

First Ward Second Ward 

James T. Light Webster Leffler 



*t5 



School Board 

Roscoe W. Hoffman, Pros. C. P. Polk, V. P. 

Frederick K. Chance, Secy. Dr. J. E. Bogar, Treasurer. 

Geo. M. Weaver 

Board of Health 
Dr. John W. Starr, Pres. T. F, Bradenbaugh 

Frederick K. Chance Samuel T. Light 

Dr. D. E. Hottenstein Stephen B. Jury, Secy. 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF AVICONISCO 

TOWNSHIP 

Constable 
D. 0. Shomper 

School Board 

Charles Price Claude ]Minnich 

Thomas Thomas Dr. E. L. Royer 

Richard Lewis 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW Jgy 

Board of Supervisors 
John Beadel Charles V. Rowe 

Adam Palmer 

Assessors 
James Kelly Ross Iliggins 

Auditors 
Theo. Gordon Foster Ilocliliindcr 

John Seip 

Tri-annual Assessor 

Edward Minnich 

Health Officer Edward Steever 

Justice of the Peace Cliurlcs 11. Ilaniian 

Tax Collector John (". Kiiilcy 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF BERRYSBURCJ, PA. 

Chief Burgess 
Charles Keboch 

Councilmen 

Peter P. Deibler Daniel i^lattcr 

George F. Werner Robert K()p])enliav('r 

Charles Lebo Robert AV. Deil)I('r 

School Board 

W. W. Hoover Harry Weaver 

John Forney Daniel Lowfr 

W. C. Kochor 

Board of Health 
Emanuel Lyter Isaac Howe 

Wellington Miller W. H. Mover 

Charles Deibler 

Tax Collector "•'"•'> ^J"^^«' 

Assessor ^^"''^'' ^'*''".^''' 

Justice of the Peace ^'- ^- ^^""'*** 

Constable Emanuel I.ytor 



188 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF LYKENS BOROUGH 

Chief Burgess 
George W. Troxel 

Councilmen 

George Ibberson, President 

A. F. Hanna Arthur Hoffman 

Ray Bowman Hiram Messner 

John Renshaw Chas. A. Yeager, Secretary 

School Board 

James D. Helt Grover C. Kinsey 

W. Walter Duncan John Ebv 

Charles W. Henninger. 

Board of Health 

John "Welker, President Harry Blyler, Secretary 

Geo, Cook Harry Walde 

John Werner, Health Officer 

Borongh Treasurer J. M. Miller 

Supervisor and Police AVilliam Kuntzleman 

Justices of the Peace W. Walter Young, W. L. Sansom 

Assessors F. J. Douden, AVilliam Witmer 

Constable Oscar Hawk 

Tax Collector J. M. Miller 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF ELIZABETHVILLE, PA, 

Chief Burgess 
Harold L. Romberger 

Councilmen 

R. K. Buffington, President C. T. Romberger 

G. Fred Gaupp H. H. Hassinger 

Earl K. Romberger D. A. Andre 

Edward F. Uhler W. F. Swab, Secretary 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



189 



School Board 
S. H. Knisely, President Dr. W. L. Stevenson, Treasurer 

J. H. Lyter, Secretary J. A. Hoffman 

J. A. Boyer 

Board of Health 
C. Elmer Gulp, President Dr. H. H. Collins, Scrn (orif 

G. W. Lenker G. A. Kocher 

Dr. Wm. H. Buehler 

Borough Treasurer Geo. W. Swab 

Supervisor J. F. Cook 

Justices of the Peace I. S. Daniels, and S. Deitrich 

Assessor J. II. Bonawitz 

Constable James F. Hoffner 

Park Commission 

Dr. E. L. Steever G. Fred Ganpp 

Harry Swab 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OP WILLIA:\IS T0^V^•S1111^ 

Constable 
■ Charles L. Witmer 

School Board 
Oscar IMoffet, President James C. Miller, Secretary 

Ira Q. Clouser Arthur A. Berry 

William E. Beitler, Treasurer 

Board of Supervisors 
William D. Keen Morris M. :\IilUT. h'aad Masl,r 

W. G. Williams, Sec.-Treas. 

Auditors 

Daniel V. James, President Norman A. Sierer, Seen tar y 

Clayton C. >AIil]er 

4 ... .Mirliii'l Knorr 

Assess&r , , , , 

Tax> Collector 



]90 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF WILLIAMSTOWN 

BOROUGH 

Chief Burgess 
Frank M. Shadel 

Councilmen 
Edward Lewis, President Charles A. Rank, Secretary 

John N. Snyder Harry A. Miller 

Charles Bost George Bressler 

School Board 
Charles G. Fromme, President Frank Wagner, Secretary 
S. T. Fickinger Albert Wolfe 

Frank Hoffman 

Board of Health 

Thomas Bond, Sr. Ted Blum 

Aaron Crook, Secretary John J. Buggy 

Assessors William I. Griffith, Roy G. Thompson 

Justices of the Peace George R. Wren, John Condell 

Borough Treasurer Burton A. Williard 

Supervisor and Police Fritz Reisiig 

Constables John McCord, Thomas Warlow 

Tax Collector .- William G. Stokes 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF WASHINGTON TOWN- 
SHIP (LOYALTON ETC.) 

Constable 
John Harman, Jr. 

School Board, 
W. L. Gougler, President John Neiman, Vice-President 

George Hartman 
Norman Shreffler, Secretary A, H. Rowe, Treasurer 

Board of Supervisors 
J. P. Johns Frank Henninger 

Mr. Shadel 



\ 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW jgi 



Roadmasters 

Frank Weaver Arthur Peidt 

Assessor -wt- r ma-. 

VV. L. i ion man 

Justices of the Peace R. E. Bohner, Arthur Feidt 

Health Officer rp ^. j^^^^ 

Tax Collector George I). Kissinger 

MUNICIPAL AUTHORITIES OF TIIK BOROU(!II 
OF TOWERCITY 

Chief Burgess 
William F. Jones 

Council 
W. J. Powell Wayne Clemmer 

Joseph W^hite William Shadel 

Oliver Travitz Harper Updegrove 

S. W. Fesig, Secretary 

School Board 
H. Gable W. P. Klinger 

D. E. Messner William H. Martz 

Board of Health 
Swimming Pool and Park Comuiission 

H. P. Gable, President Dr. Russell Jlenry, Tnasmir 

H, T. Callen, Secretary 

Borough Treasurer George Reinoehl 

Tax Collector Chas. M. Kauffman 

Assessor George Selirope 

Justices of the Peace S. M. Fesig, Walter J. Henry 

Constable \h\\'u\ Schwaim 

Supervisor (Miarlfs Harlman 

Borough Police Cliiirl.-s II;irtMian 



192 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



IMPORTANT DATES IN THE HISTORY OF LYKENS 

BOROUGH. 

Discovery of coal 1825 

Town Settled 1832 

First house was built by Joel B, Ferree in 1832 

First store conducted by M. Blum in 1832 

First coal sold in the vicinity 1832 

First man to be killed in the mines 1833 

Lykens Valley Railroad constructed 1834 

Railroad regraded and T rail laid 1848 

Town laid out in lots 1848 

Erection of M. E. Church. (Nolan Diary) 1852 

Erection of Roman Catholic Church 1853 

First Newspaper (Now the Lykens Standard ) 1856 

Erection of Zion Lutheran Church 1859 

Lykens M'as incorporated as a borough in 1871 

Miners Deposit Bank 1872 

Evangelical Association 1873 

St. Johns Lutheran Church 1874 

German Reformed Church 1874 

United Brethern Church 1874 

Christ Episcopal Church 1874 

First Telephone constructed by C. W. Snyder in 1880 

Water piped into the borough 1885 

Fire department organized in 1885 

Williams Valley Railroad finished 1892 

Lykens Valley railways (Trolley) 1899 

Compulsory side-walks 1906 

Moving Pictures introduction 1907 

Gas 1914 

Electric Lights and power 1885 

First National Bank . 1917 

Free delivery of mail 1920 

State road 1921 

Public school 

New building erected 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKVIEW 



193 



IMPORTANT DATES IN THE HISTOKY OF TllK Uoli- 
OUGH OF ELIZABETIIVILLE. 

Town was laid out in lots in ISIT 

First house erected (East end of town) about 1S2:> 

First Mail lf^32 

School iy;j;^ 

Lutheran and Reformed (Jhurch erected 1833 

Lykens Valley Railroad 1834 

First store conducted in the town 1842 

Oldest Born Resident of the town, Theodore ililler. honi ls4G 

F'irst Physician in the town lcSr)2 

Lykens Valley Mutual Fire Ins. Co. organized 1854 

United Brethern Church erected 1871 

Lykens Valley Bank 1 881 

Telephone constructed by H. H. Weaver 1885 

Water Companw organized and water piped 1881) 

Fire Department organized. .. .1889, chartered 1894 

First National Bank. . . .II. H. Weaver 19il() 

Elizabethville incorporated as a borough in l'^!':{ 

Electric Lights 19U9 

Moving Pictures 1909 

State Road l-'l!' 

MINE CASUALTIES AT LYKENS VALLEY MIXKS. 

WICONISCO 

Fatalities, Lykens Valley Mines, Since Januanj 121. 1S7S 

Peter Sholey January 21. 1S7H 

William Messner February 8. 1878 

John Wert ^'">' ^-- ^"^''^ 

Chas. Baker '^"•"' ^■'- ^^"^^ 

Jos. Loden \"^'»'-^' -"• '"'^'^ 

Philip Hoffman .\..vcmi1).t 21. 18,8 

Uhland •^'"'•'••^ -•^- l'^"-' 

Peter Martin •^'''>- •'• ^'^'•' 

William Ely ^'^'>' '• l^'ll 

^, ^ , lulv 111. IS,*) 

Chas. Zerby 



]94 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Thomas Conley July 22 

Samuel Romberger September 15 

William Weaklam October 2 

Michael Sheboske March 16 

Simon Kneiley May 3 

M. Douglas May 10 

George West May 10 

Robert Williams May ]0 

Thomas Evans May 10 

John Higgins September 14 

Thomas Lord October 20. 

Peter Eby January 3 

Robert Snyder September 2 

George Shively May 28 

Thomas Cook September 13 

Casimear Hentz November 7 

Lawrence Shamper February 15 

Jacob Hoffman April 8 

Elmer Kocher September 16 

Peter Starmoski May 28 

George Machamer July 13 

Joseph Dunlap Jr July 28 

Newton Woodside October 15 

Daniel Woland August 26 

John Cook June 23 

William Taylor August 13 

George Kondrect September 16 

William Zarker May 2 

John C. Zimmerman May 14 

Harry Umholtz July 12 

George Orndorf September 12 

Elias Esterline September 21 

William Keist January 22 

Frank Miller January 23 

Henry Erdman February 11 

Claude Como July 25 

William Davis August 7 

Phil. Hoffman November 15 



1879 
1879 
1879 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1883 
1883 
1883 
1884 
1884 
1884 
1885 
1885 
1885 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1887 
1887 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1888 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 
1889 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW I95 



John Halick July n, WM 

James F. Rettinger September 18, 189(: 

Barney Hentz April H, 1891 

Elias Harman August 31, 1891 

Albert Harley August 24, 1892 

Rueben Zimmerman .March 30, 1892 

A. Blackway October 27, 1892 

Edward Mark May 25, 1893 

Julius Braner ^lay 6, 1893 

Thomas Acalay August 14, 1893 

Thomas Walls September 8, 1893 

Edward Zerby February 6, 1 894 

William 0. Bateman April 23, 1894 

Harris Minnich January 9, 1895 

Frank Matter May 28. 1895 

Jos. Enders August 14, 1895 

Charles Zandt November 11, 1895 

Samuel Samuels January 28. 1897 

Aaron Umholtz January 28, 1897 

William Lewis June 11, 1897 

Cy. Parfet April 2G, 1898 

Simon Kneiley August 1. 1898 

Jos. Werner October 4. 1898 

Albert Williams ^"^^ -• ^^-^'^ 

Arthur Hammond .lanuary lU, 1900 

Edward Hoffman July 12. 19(X> 

James Higgins September 11. l!>00 

William Longhurst January lo. 1!M)1 

Uriah Minnich /'•'.;;• I o!!! 

T r^'XT -1 ....June 20. 1901 

James O 'Neil ,^. , ,,,^, 

^ t:, 1 AuiTUst 2(v 1901 

George Fegley ^ - 

. , a V. ■ ^ December 24. r.HM 

Andrew Sehnich 

n/r- 1, ^ XT 11 December 19. 19<»1 

Michael Kelly } . __ i qo" 

Frank Behney ' ''^^ '"'" " ./ '~ 

Au'''ust •». I.'"'' 

Henrv W. Row • • '^ " 

TTTiT Tjr XT 1, . November 25. 1903 

William W. Hawk 

™ , -P,. 1 August fi. 19(M 

Charles Pickup ., , „-,- 

.,,_,.,, . . Februnn- 2. I9n.) 

Joseph Remoehl 



196 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



John Windishmau September 18 

August Martin April 17 

David Reese January 2 

Joseph Loreck March 28 

Cj^rus Miller January 12 

John Forney July 29 

Richard Noble December 26 

Harry Harman July 19 

Henry Miller January — 

Edward Harner November 4 

Harry Trout June- 
Walter Hand October 25 

Wilson Gainor February 17 

Joseph Wagonowski March 30 

Clayton Deibler April 20 

John E. Hoover May 3 

Andrew Dodd June 30 

Evan Evans June 30 

Thomas L. Mahoney June 30 

Herman Braner August 18 

William Coles December 12 

William Conley February 6 

John E. Batdorff February 9 

William Rosier March 25 

Emanuel P. Miller ; April 6 

John Zimmerman May 21 

John Hool June 12 

David Stence August 23 

Andrew Fansant November 29 

Harry Kocher December 14 

Chas. G. Reigle March 19 

William H. Metz March 30, 

Nick Jarice May 8 

Frank Hodge May 8 

George Baxter '. May 8 

8am Kerda July 22 

Est. Willis July 22 

Joe Patterson July 22 



1905 
1905 
1906 
1906 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1910 
3910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 
1914 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



197 



Emanuel Peters j,,,^,^^. ^^ j^^- 

George Foster j^,„; ^-^ j^j- 

Frank Klme Januarv 31, iyi(J 

George McCoy ^^,^,,^.1, j^^ jg^g 

John Grell December 10, 1916 

Wm. Hchoifstall ;^,,,. r^ jgi^ 

^60. Hart ,I,,I,. 19^ ^917 

John Charney August 15, 1917 

Lewis Shadel Augu.st If). 1!)17 

Roy Ki.ssiuger :\lareli 24. 1918 

Chas. Fenstermacher June 17, 1918 

Thos. Davis June 17. 1918 

Rudolph Hirseh June 17, 1918 

William Houtz April 7. 1919 

Alfred Kemble October 23, 1919 

John M. Williams Decembi-r 10, HH!) 

Chester Forney February 9. 1920 

Isaac Zerby February 9. 1920 

Harry Williams Mardi 2. 1920 

George Thomas (Brickette) September 11. 1920 

Daniel Philips February 7. 1921 

Leo Krobath April 4, 1921 

Claude Maehamer .lun.' 29. 1921 

Edward Loudenslager Noveml)er 28, 1921 

MINE CASUALITIES AT WILLIA:\rSTOWX :\riXKS. 
EMPLOYEES KILLED I^ROM WILLI. X.MS- 
TOWN AND VICINITY 

Mine Fatalities at Williamstoint CoUirrn. Since 1SS-) 

Joe Lester -Lily 4. 1885 

Sam Hamilton Line 2. 1885 

Ben Cain December 1 . 188fi 

Frank McBride 'l"''y •>• l'"^^- 

Christ KirtchofiP Nnvmhrr 29. 1892 

Wm. Temple •^'"'''■•> '^- ^^^"^ 

Frank Prickert ^^«>" ''• ^^^^ 

Thomas Kinney -'^''•>' ^' ^^'''^ 



198 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Harry Weist May 23 

Chas. McMullen July 21 

John Hess August 30 

Wm. Speicker August 30 

Levi Keed February 20 

William Hoffman March 17 

Nathan Jones March 17 

William Price July 16 

Joe. Roudebush July 19 

John Llewellyn July 19 

Martin Tait July 19 

Harry Kosier January 21 

Daniel Enders February 14 

James Shuttleworth July 23 

Thomas Jones November 8 

Thomas Pharl February 15 

W. W. Thompson August 3 

Thomas D. Jones November 25 

Daniel Updegrove March 25 

George Warfield April 14 

Em']. Lightner August 30 

Sam'l. Rehnard September 21 

Thomas Richardson November 23 

William Kauffman March 23 

Geo. Radel April 5 

F. Bowers April 5 

Levi Miller May 14 

William Punch July 1 2 

Wehry Noel August 21 

George Astog November 20 

Charles Remanaco July 17 

Chas, A. James September 26 

John Marungle December 21 

Jerry Murry March 11 

John Hill March 11 

John Finney March 21 

M. Golden May 25 

Geo. Radel Mav 25 



1893 

1893 

1893 

1893 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1900 

1901 

1901 

1901 

1902 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1904 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



199 



John Kinney ^^^^ 25, 1904 

Aaron Koppenhaver May 25, 1904 

Torpets KoppenJiaver y[.^y o') 1904 

Albert Nau y^i^y 25^ 1904 

Henry Frederic :\I.;y 25,19(»4 

Joseph Punch :\lay 25, 19(i4 

Enoch Morgan May 25, 1904 

Albert James May 25, 1904 

Robert Graham February 14, 1905 

Charles Bufifington March 15, 1905 

Theo Kirtchoff January 18, 1906 

Henry Noel December 31 1906 

Cyrus Miller January I'J. 1907 

George Brokaes March 1, 1907 

Harry Harman July 19. 1907 

Benj. Waffendon October 1^4, 1907 

Arther Hawk July 15, 1!»08 

Chas. Richart -luly 15, 1908 

eTohn Wittle July 1 5. 1908 

John Riley -July 15. 1908 

James Bowman July 15, 1908 

Michael Stachem July 15. 1908 

Claude Higgins September 2.s. 190S 

Joseph Horwath January l!l. 1!I09 

Jacob Miller April lL>. 19(»9 

James Kander J»m«' I''- I-'"-* 

George Feadder •'^lay 1. T'l 1 

George Hess December 1 . liM 1 

William Bainbridge December 9. 1!U 1 

Charles Boniski •'""•' -"• l''^-' 

Felix Hadoc 'i'"^' -"• ^''''^ 

Erwin Etzweiler February 4. VM4 

John Crozier February 17. IMU 

Charles Roudenbush February 17. IIH 1 

JohnWelker ^I^«''<-'' 1*>- ^''^^ 

Harrv Lynch ^^''•■^•'' ''^' ^"'^ 

George Hallowav Deeember 14. 1!M4 

Michael Schlet ^*'^*''"''- ^'^- ^''^'' 



200 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Joseph Olscabadge April 19, 1916 

William Leitzel J^'ebruary 1, 1918 

Andrew Adams July 1, 1918 

(jreorge Kreiner September 14, 1918 

Charles Barry January 15, 1919 

Edward Wommer February 8, 1919 

George Leavick April 9, 1919 

Arthur McNeai December 24, 1919 

Edward Donely December 29, 1919 

James Woffendon March 3, 1 920 

George Batdorf August 14, 1920 

George Kotz August 24, 1920 

John H. Haskin November 30, 1920 

A. W. Koppenhaver April 9, 1921 

James Kichardson 1921 

Sandy Frue September 27, 1921 

COMPLETE CASITALTY LIST AT THE TOWER CITY 
MINES. EMPLOYEES KILLED FROM TOWER- 
CITY AND VICINITY 

Segretto Rocco August 1, 1918 

Robert Nunemacher August 1, 1918 

Levi Miller February 4, 1920 

Charles English March 10, 1920 

John Devine July 20, 1920 

Amos Lemke June 30, 1 921 

Wilson Paul November 21 , 1021 

(From the office of the Mine Inspector, Ghas. J. Price, Lykens, 
Pa.) 

MINE CASUALITIES AT EAST AND WEST BROOKSTD^. 
COLLIERY. EMPLOYEES KILLED FROM TOWERCTTY, 
REINERTOWN, JOHNSTOWN AND VICINITY. 

John Gamper October 2, 1 905 

Charles Shadle February 5, 1906 

John F. Schneider . Fcbruarv 17, 1906 



DIRECTORY AXD PICTORIAL REVIEW 



201 



iSimon Evau,s t i 10 

., ^ July 12 

George Fornej- j,,,^. .,t, 

Harvey Krall November 4 

Henry Perkins, November 20 

Andrew Schneider December JO 

Anthony Denioricliia December 27 

Henry Savage February 11 

George Holdsmick March 4 

Edward Bechtel August 26 

Daniel Hert .January 5 

Paul Matty lanuary 19 

Alex Shumaker Marcli 9 

William Bryer October J9 

Anthony Wa.shko Septeml)er 7 

John Brown January 80 

Daniel Shoffstall March 2 

Charles Mekson \pi-il 18 

William Shultz A|)ril 17 

Earl Bonawitz June 28 

(Jliarles Jesabonus Oct. 11 

John Ludwig Dec. 2 

Daniel Tobias Oct. 27 

Howard Bogar -Mar. JS 

George Sharaper June !»> 

John Louns . \»ig. 2 

John Farrell Aug. 2 

Daniel Farley ^"?. 2 

John Fessler Aug. 2 

Henry ^lurphy ^"ir. 2 

Daniel McGuiley \">-'- - 

Harry fland, Sr Aug. 

Howard Hand ^"f? 

Thomas Bekney ^"-- 

Jacob Koppenhaver '^"f- 

Victor Zanoni ^'•^• 

Egidis Lucehi ^"P^- 

Kicharda Federizzi ^"f^- 

Antoni's Opasici '^"?' 



1906 
1907 
1907 
19117 
1907 
1907 
1908 
1908 
1908 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1911 
1911 
1!>11 
1911 
1911 
1911 
l!n2 
1918 
1918 
lf»18 
li)18 
l'n8 
1918 
1918 
1!»18 
1918 
l!tl8 
lit 18 
l!n8 
1!M8 
1918 
1918 
1918 



Nick Fandoupe Aug. 2 

Carmine Decarapion . . , Aug. 2 

Jos. Grazions , . Aug. 2 

Alex Lesner Aug. 2 

H. W. Schoffstall Aug. 2 

Milton Strbhecker July 24 

Harry Reiner Jan. 26 

Harry Wagner May 7 

Soloman Zerby July 31 

Oscar Bettinger Dec. 15 

Frank Crabb Dee. 16 

John Tschubb Dec. 21 

Barney Koher Mar. 14 

John Labord ]\Iar. 15 

Waladis Zerota July 6 

Frank Troutman Jan. 3 

Wm. Buchanan July 7 

Henry Wert Dee. 27 

James Lupoid Jan. 5 

William Connors June 17 

William Adams July 13 

Oscar Bender Jan. 21 

Frank Ersenmacher " Jan 23 

Harve}^ Brown April 4 

Wm. G. R. Boyer July 24 

Sammuel Demilko Sept. 20 

Joseph Barrie Dec. 20 

James Beshel June 23 

Frank Reed Mar. 7 

George Thompson June 20 

Peter Kerher Sept. 15 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



LOli 



WILD LIFE IN THE LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY. 
By Seth E. Gordon, Secretary of Penna. State Game Commission 

When Avhite men first came to the Lykens-Williams Valley, 
they found the entire territory covered with an unbroken f(jrest 
except for a few places where the original American, tlie Indian 
had found it expedient to destroy the trees in order that he 
might raise corn, have suitable camping places, etc. Game 
of aU sorts was found in abundance and the Indian, instead of 
being a destroyer, as most white people have always thought 
him to be, was careful to maintain a generous supi)ly of bene- 
ficial wild life in the territory he was occupying, as a large 
part of his food consisted of wild meat of various kinds. The 
Indian rarely killed game simply for the lust of killing, but 
instead killed only what was needed for food. While men 
found it necessary- to clear off* lands for agricultural purposes, 
also in order that they might build their homes a safe distance 
from dense forest cover as a protection against intruders, 
especially the Indian. Then followed the lumberman, and the 
home of our wild life was rapidly reduced in area, thus crowd- 
ing the remaining game and wild animals onto a comparatively 
limited territory, and today instead of all Lykens-Williaius 
Valley being a splendid home for wild creatures, the territory 
for various species is very restricted, and the population, espec- 
ially the hunters, doubled many times. 

Our ancestors came to America to seek freedom from 
European persecutions and restrictions. Thev looked upon 
America as a land of plenty, and called it "the land of the free 
and the home of the brave ' '. They thought our natural resourees, 
including beneficial wild life, were inexhaustible, and <lid not 
give the future a passing thought. On the other haiul. had it 
not been for a goodly supply of game to furnish food for the 
early settlers it would have been impossible for our forefathers 
to establish themselves on this Continent with the rapidity they 

did. 

When white'men first came to the Lykens-Williams Valley 
section they found the buffalo, elk, deei-. In^ar. wild tnrk.'v. 
ruffed grouse, squirrel and rabbit, as well as animals elas.s.tl 



204 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



as vermin such as the panther, wolf, wild cat and fox in goodly 
numbers. These last mentioned wild creatures maintained a 



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proper balance in the wild life of tlie forest. • Quail were not 
plentiful, because they were more confined to cultivated and semi- 
cultivated lands rather than dense forest territory, and in- 
creased up to a certain point as the territory was settled. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



205 



As the land was cleared and the timber taken out, game 
was reduced very rapidly, as it furnished a large part of the 
food supply. Later, forest fires practically destroyed what 
remained of the various species as well as the forests. The 
methods of the lumberman at that time were criminally wasteful, 
but forest fires rapidly completed the work of destruction. 

Later, beneficial wild life of all sorts was protected l)y law, 
and in most instances increased gradually under such protec- 
tion, even though the hunting population increased rapidly. 
The Department of Forestry purchased a tract of about 4,(X)() 
acres near Lykens, and the only game birds or animals remaining 
thereon and nearby territory at that time were a few rutVcd 
grouse (native pheasants) and cotton tailed ral)bits. In liH8 
the Game Commission established a game refuge of about 1,80<) 
acres on the State forest land in question, in which were stockeil 
more than 50 deer, quite a number of wild turkeys, ring-neck 
pheasants, squirrels, varying hares (snowshoe ral)bits), etc., 
which will gradually increase and overflow to the surrounding 
territory. No hunting is permitted within tlie refuge at any 
time. With proper protection of game and forests, the Valley 
and adjacent territory in years to come will undoubtedly again 
supply a sufficient amount of game to serve as an incentive to 
take the sportsmen of that territory into the open to eii.joy a 
day with dog and gun, get away from their daily n.utine of 
life, and come back better fitted to take up their daily toil. 
However, the wild life resources of the Valley can never again be 
expected to furnish a meat supply, as was the cas.- when our an- 
cestors came to this territory, although deer will un.loul.tedly 
become more plentiful than prior to cutting our tnnber, as 
nothing, outside of adequate laws properly enforced, .-ould br 
more favorable to these animals than the sort of ..Towth that 
follows the lumberman and forest fires. 

Various forms of wild life are now extinct an.l wdl i.ro- 
bablv never again appear in any number in this s.H-t.un. largely 
because the territory is too densely populat.Ml. or because ih.y 
have vanished from the face of the earth. It .s hoped, howe .m^ 
that black bears may become part of the ta.ma m the terntor. 
s"ding LykenlwiUiams Valley when natural cond..u,ns 
are again favorable. 



206 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

ROADS IN THE VALLEY 

Through the Ly kens- Williams Valley courses the Pennsyl- 
vania State Highway. This road is of the good examples being 
copied by many states, daily. The construction is of concrete, 
however at this time the concrete section is made as far as Rife, 
Pa. foundation throughout the valley is rapidly progressing and 
it is estimated that in five years the permanent cement road 
will be finally laid down. The road begins, or enters the vaiiey 
rather, at INlillert^burg, Pa., and touches the following towns," 
Millersburg, Rife, Elizabethville, Loyalton, Big Run, Lykens, 
Wiconisco, Dayton, Williamstown, Greenfields, Sheridan, Tower- 
city, from where it continues to Pottsville. The two principal 
city connections through this valley are Harrisburg and Potts- 
ville. 



RAILROADS AND TRANSPORTATIONS. 

Lykens is the terminus for the Pennsylvania Rail Road and 
Philadelphia and Reading Rail Road. The Lykens Valley Rail 
Ways (Trolley) also terminates here. The Pennsylvania Rail 
Road serve Lykens, Wiconisco, Loyalton, Elizabethville, Camp 
Grounds, Lenkers, Woodside and Millersburg. The Philadelphia 
& Reading serve Lykens, Wiconisco, Dayton, Williamstown, 
Greenfield, Sheridan, Tower-city and way stations enroute to 
Pottsville, Pa. The Lykens Valley Rail Way (Trolley) serve 
and connect Lykens, Wiconisco, Dayton, Williamstown, Green- 
field, Sheridan and Tower-city. There are further, a number 
Auto-Bus service cars at the disposal of the public, obtaining in 
practically each town. These ears offer at reasonable rates, ac- 
commodation throughout the valley as well as points farther re- 
moved. 

Each town maintains, under private ownership, first-class 
drayage service. General hauling of all kinds is founded and 
carried on in each town. All these ways and means of transpor- 
tation serve to exemplify monuments of a successful and pro- 
gressing community. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 2U7 



PUBLIC SERVICES IN THE VALLEY. 

Electric Li (this. 

The Lykens Valley Light and Power Co!n,)any loeat.-.l an.! 
operating at Willianistown, manufactures jind distrihiites i-h-v- 
tricity to the following towns in llie valley— Tow. -r-city, 
Willianistown, Wiconiseo, Lykens, Jioyalton and Elizabetli 
ville. The company afford the service to the entire country «lis- 
trict lying between these towais in fact furnish lights and power 
to three fourths of the valley. Millersl)urg electri<-ity is 
furnished by the Juniata Public Service Corp. 

Water. 
Each town maintains its own water supply, hut not as a 
borough property. These reservoirs are controlled by indivi- 
duals, who have constructed fine supply dams and eonvey the 
water to the respective homes at very reasonable rates. The 
water obtained in any of the towns in lliis valley is wholly 
spring vrater. The reservoirs are located back in tlit- mountains, 
where springs and small brooks are diverted into well built 
dams and then conveyed to the homes. Sufficient liealth patrols 
cover the water sheds regularly at stipulated times of the year, 
thus guaranteeing to the public the best of sanitary conditions. 
In short the water of the various towns in the valley is of the 
best to be had anywhere and has been very favorably conunen- 
ted upon by critic analyses on several occasions. 

Gas. 
The Williamstown Gas ('ompany oj)eratiii^- and manufac- 
turing w^ater gas at Lykens, supplies this modern eonvenienet- in 
the following towns — Lykens, Wiconiseo, Williamstown. The 
Gas is conveyed for lighting and heating-cooking purposes and 
is one of the very appreciative services to these towns. It is 
expected that within reiLsonable length of time this company 
will extend their lines to every town in the valley. 

Telephone and Telegraph. 
The Telephones of the valley are the Tnited and Hell com 
panics. Each town is connected therewith and service is 



208 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

oi±' metropolitan nature. The Teleg'raph companies are the 
Western Union and the Postal Telegraph. All local railroad 
stations are the stations for these respective companies. 

HIGH SCHOOLS IN LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY. 

There are very few sections of similar area in the state 
that can boast of the high school facilities provided in this 
valley. All the liigh schools — six in number — are rated by the 
state department as first grade high schools. They are located 
at Williamstown, Wiconisco, Lykens, Elizabethville, Millersbnrg, 
and Berrysburg. The school at Berrysburg is a rural commun- 
ity vocational high school which receives federal and state aid 
to the extent of two-thirds of the salaries of the teachers, to- 
gether with other appropriations. Academic, home-making and 
agricultural courses are offered. Home-making courses are also 
given in Willi amstown and Wiconisco. Commercial courses are 
offered in Williamstown and Millersbnrg. Physical Training 
is an important feature of the work in Millersbnrg. A number 
of the high schools have orchestras. These high schools have 
formed a league for the promotion of inter-school athletics and 
debating. All the schools have a greatly increased enrollment 
this year. — By Prof. F. E. Shaml)augh, Dauphin County Super- 
intendent of Public Schools. 

The schools at Tower City and Porter Township are also 
rated alike with the valley to the State, embodying the same 
equipments and advanced courses. 

HOFPMANS REFORMED CHURCH. 

This old church edifice, a two-story frame, built almost one 
hundred years ago, is two and one fourth miles from Berrys- 
burg, three miles from Gratz, and is in Lykens Township. The 
ground on which it is erected, was donated by Squire John 
Hoffman who was a magistrate from his twenty-fifth year until 
his death in the year 1877. The church is still used and has a 
wide and large congregation. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 




210 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

MILLERSBURG GUN CLUB. 

At the extreme Southeast end of this historic Lykens-Will- 
iams Valley, where the Wiconisco Creek empties into the beautiful 
Susquehanna river, is located one of the leading Gun Clubs of 
Pennsylvania. This club's equipment is up to date in every 
respect : a one and one-half frame Club house, with fire-place 
and spacious porches, on the side, is located in a maple groove, 
which is a beautiful recreation park. There ideal Liggett Traps 
are located to throw the targets, out over the water, with the 
sky as a clear background. 

The Millersburg Gun Club and Game Protective Associ- 
ation was organized August 13, 1915, the object of which was to 
fraternize the lovers of rod, gun and "all out doors," the suc- 
cess of which was evinced by the membership roll, which reached 
almost the three-hundred mark in its banner year. 

As a game protective association, it liberates almast annually, 
Quail, Grouse, Ringneck Pheasants and rabbits, to restock 
the game fields. It feeds Game birds when the ground is 
covered with snow and assists in investigations of illegal shoot- 
ing of game and helps to protect same. 

The present officers are: 
Dr. J. W. Starr, President H. S. Gilbert, Secretary 

B. Nimmons, Vice President R. Musser, Treasurer 

H. Forney, Captain 

Board of Governors 
G. Mark Brubaker Lincoln Haines 

H. E. Hoifman 



DHiECTORY AND PICTOltlAl. KKMKW 



211 




3 

5 



3 

o 



i 



212 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



LYKENS VALLEY SUMMER-RAMBO APPLE. 

The famous Summer-Rambo apple, now grown in very 
many sections of this state and county was discovered in the 
Lykens Valley, This tree bearing the fruit was first found on 
the Benjamin Reigle farm near the Reigle church about six 
miles from Millersburg and is one of the choicest varieties of 
the present markets. The discovery occurred over a hundred 
years ago and is one of the cherished bits of ancestral infor- 
mation handed down through the Jerry Weaver family of 
Millersburg. 

To those who have not known this before it is well to re- 
member, as well as display great pride in knowing that each 
and every Summer-RamlDo dates back to our beautiful valley and 
has been grafted, transplanted, raised and developed from this 
humble beginning until now, it has become one of the nation's 
choicest fruits. 



DIRECTOllY AND PJCTURIAL liEViEW 213 



SPORTS OF THE VALLEY 

Here in the Lykens-Williams Valley are followed and in- 
dulged ill many of the diversified sports of the country, liasc- 
bail, Football, Tennis, Basketball, Hunting, Fishing, Trap- 
shooting, Trapping, Swimming and Skating. The leading 
amusement or eommercialized sport, however, is Hascl»all. In 
this end the Twin County League predoiiiinatt's. This jeaguu 
is formed of the various towns in the valley and heated antag- 
onism ereates a valley- wide interest in the sport. 

The pennant winner for the season 1921 was the Williams- 
town team. 

Football is played in nearly all the towns and wilii a tVw 
exceptions is confined wholly to local high schools. There being 
however picked teams of some of the towns who engag;* oc- 
casionally in hotly contested games. Tennis, liasketball. eie.. 
have organized team-followers and neatly kept courts and halls 
offer at various seasons of the year real live i)arti('ipation in 
those sports. Track-Meets are frequently lu-ld duriii'jr the 
summer months' and are participated in by eatli town. During 
the season 1921 Lykens-Wiconisco Football team attained the 
distinction of being the champions of Dauphin and York 
Counties. An illustration of this team apjiearing ou page 22.') in 
this volume, along with the personnel, si)eaks truly f(tr its.-It. 
On th? following pages are given tiie line-up of most «.f the 
teams, with their summary for the season of liU'l. and they 
surelv have a record to be proud of. 



214 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



J. Albert 
Quarter-Back 

Ray JMack 
Half-Back 
B. Lowry 
Half-Back 
Jerry Mack 
Full-Back 

"Biiik" Coles 
End 



Pat Shoniper 
Earl Dolan 



TEAMS' OF THE VALLEY. 

Williamstown Football Team. 

Joe Kramer 
Tackle 

Jim Savage 
Guard 

Lee Kramer 
Center 

Bob Ramsey 
Guard 

Charlie Eromme 
Tackle 

Jimraie Meehan 
End 

Suhstitutes. 

Pat Savage 
Mart Walkinshaw 



POPULAR SPORTS OF WICONISCO 

High School 

Boys' Basket-Bail Team 

This loam lias won the honors of being the Champions of the 
Upper End, Season of 1921-1922 

Foivards 

Rol^ert Keen 

Center 
John Gittings 

Guards 

Carson Schoffstal 
Suhstitutes 

Leroy Cooper 



Laurence Batdorf 



Paul Aucker 
Ilolden Thomas 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



215 




216 



LYKEXS-WJLLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Girls' Basket-Bali Team 
Foivards 
Millie Minnieh Edith Hoffman 

Center 
Beatrice Esterline 

Guards 
Leah Miu'her Florence Batdorf 

Substitutes 
Florence Cooper Pauline Lewis 



WILLIAMSTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 
Girls' Basket-Ball Team 
Foivards 
Florence jMack Nora Zimmerman 

Center 
Hannah Fickinger 

Giiards 
Dorothy Walkinshaw May Walkinshaw 

Suhstitute 
Bernice Leo 

Bojj's Basket-Ball Team 
Foivards 
H. Lesher S. Warlow (Capt'n.) 

Center 
J. Shuttles worth 

Guards 
AV. Hoffman H. Morgan 

Suhstitute 
C. Donley 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKVIKW 



•2V 



PERSONNEL OF THE TWIN-COUNTY LEAOIK TKAMS 

SEASON OP 1921 



AViLLIAMSTOWN 

R. J. Mates, Mgr. 

G. Adams, p 

Budd, p 

F. Shuttlesworth, p-c f 

Row, c 

J. Shuttlesworth, 1 b-2 1) 

J. Shuttlesforth, 1 b-2 b 

Thompson, 1 1) 

Meehan, 2 b 

Mates, s s 

Albright, ;] b 

liourie, 1 f 

Buggy, c f 

Rhoades, r f 



Lykens 

C. L. Thomas and 
W. C. Tniiit. .Mjrra. 

Buggy, ]) 
R. Maftcr, p 
Reigle, p 
Daniels, c 
Magee, c 
('lough, 1 h-p 
Kimmell, 1 b-e 
Kepner, 2 b 
Umhollz, s s-3 b 
B. Williams, 8b- s s 
E. Williams, 1 f 
Messner, c f 
Foster, t- f 



IIaijfax 
Isaac F. Bowman, Mgr. 

Matter, p 
II. Biever, p 
Hoffman, c 
L. Lebo, e 
Landis, 1 b-p 
Freeland, 2 b 
R. Biever, s s 
N. Bowman, 3 b 
Spahr, 1 f 
Wert, c f 
S, Bowman, r f 
n. Bowman, ntil 



MiLLKRSBURG 

Geo. Frvf, Mgr. 



Mcr>ri(l(", p 
Kline, i>-3 b 
R. Ilolt'iiuiii, 3 l»-|> 
Frye, c 
Day, 1 b 
R. MWlvv, 1 b 
Seal. 2 h 
Kerr, 2 I) 
S. Miller, s s 
Shatto, 1 f 
FralieU. c f-p 
Adams, c f 
lleckert. r f 



23 8 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Tower city 

M. L. Beamensderfer and 
Jack Fesig, Mgrs. 
H. Shomper, p 
Williams, p-3 b 
Driesigacker, p 
Beamensderfer, c 
Fegley, 1 b 
R. Shomper, 2h-r f 
H. Updegrove, 8 s 
R. Miller, 3 b 
Unger, 2 b-3 b 
A. Updegrove, 1 f 
Nyer, c f-1 b 
C. Lebo, c f 
R. Updegrove, r f 

The best p'ayers in their 

Pitchers 

a. Adams i\V) 

Buggy (L) 

N. Shuttlesworth (W) 

Stansfield (E) 

H. Biever (H) 

H. Shomper (T C) 

Hoffman (M) 

Catchers 
Frye (M) 

Beamensderfer (T C) 
Row (W) 
G. Buffington (E) 

First basemen 

N. Shuttlesworth (W) 
Land is (H) 
Miller (E) 



Elizabethville 

S. M. Bolton, Mgr. 

Stansfield, p 
Fetterhoff, p 
G. Buffington, c 
J^Iiller, 1 b 
Mattis, s s-2 b 
Walker, 2 b 
Fauber, s s 
J. Zeigler, 3 b 
R. Buffington, 1 f 
L. Zeigler, c f-p 
Tschopp, r f 
Swab, util 
P. Buffington util 
E. Zeigler, util 

respective positions : 

Second basemen 
Mattis (E) 
Meehan (W) 
Freeland (H) 

Third basemen 

J. Zeigler (E) 

Kline (M) 

B. Williams (L) 

Short stops 
R. Biever (H) 
Mates (W) 
Umholtz (L) 

Left fielders 

E. Williams (L) 

Lourie (W) 

A. Updegrove (T C) 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL KIAIKW 



2\\) 



Centre fielders Rig^t fielders 

^^^ert (H) • S. Bowman (II) 
Messner (L) Foster (L) 
F. Shuttlesworth (W) R. Updej,Tove (T C) 

TWIN-COUNTY BASEBALL J.KAGLE 
Leading Batters 

G. A. B. R. II. 1'. ( . 

F. Shuttlesworth (W) 17 61 19 28 .459 

N. Shuttlesworth (W) 14 55 8 23 .418 

Mattis (Ej 38 159 36 66 .415 

Frye (M) 32 121 27 50 .413 

Lourie (W) 38 168 43 64 .381 

G. Buffington (E) 35 138 20 50 .362 

G. Adams (W) 16 45 8 16 .355 

J. Zeigler (E) 33 123 26 42 .341 

R. Updegrove (T C) 24 62 18 21 .339 

Feg-ley (T C) 30 111 20 37 .333 

S. Bowman f 11) 20 76 8 25 .329 

R. Biever ai) 38 140 35 46 .328 

B. Williams (L) 36 128 39 42 .328 

Row (W) 39 144 36 47 .326 

R. Buffinoton (E) 39 137 22 38 .321 

Landis (H) 37 140 25 44 .314 

L. Zeigler (E) 35 137 25 44 .313 

Mates (WO •"^f^ 1<'» ^^ •'">- -^l^' 

Most runs made by Mo^l thru has, hils nunl, Im 



Mates (W) 43 

Lourie (W^ 43 



E. Williams (Li 

Males (W) 

E- Williams (L) 39 t^^„ffi,,,,„ ,,,, 

B. Williams (L) 39 

R. Shomper (T C) 37 

Mattis (E) 36 

Row (WO 36 

Most two base hits made hy E. Williams (L) .. . 6 

R. Biever (H) 18 H. Sliomper (T C) . 5 

Mattis (E) IT) Lourie (W) 3 

Frye (M) 1- ^^- ^Villiams (L) ■'? 



Kimmell (Li 

.1///.s7 Imnii runs nnidi /)»/ 



220 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Most stolen bases made by 

Frye (M) 16 

Wert (H) 16 

J. Shiittlesworth (W) ... 15 

J. Zeigler (E) 15 



Most sacrifice hits made by 

J. Zeigler (E) 9 

Walker (E) 8 

E. Adams (M) 8 

H. Bowman (H) 7 

Umholtz (L) 7 

G. Biiffington (E) 7 



Best pitching records made hy 

W. 

G. Adams (W) " 11 

Buggy (L) 8 

N. Shuttlesworth (W) 5 

Stansfield (E) ;. ... 12 

Matter (H) 8 

R. Matter (L) 5 

Budd (W) 8 

H. Biever (H) 10 

H. Shomper (T C) 8 

Team Fielding 

P. 0. A. E. 

Williamstown 997 414 80 

Tower City 926 371 92 

Halifax 973 442 101 

Millersburg 968 446 103 

Lykens 1021 411 120 

Elizabethville 1022 454 150 

Team Batting 



L. 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
2 
5 
7 
8 



T. C. 
1491 
1389 
1516 
1517 
1552 
1626 



Williamstown . 
Elizabethville . , 
Lykens 1447 



AB R H 2b3b4bsbsh 

1369 308 428 50 37 16 81 39 

1421 243 438 60 28 3 58 41 

285 385 64 42 13 40 22 



Tower City 1188 192 298 35 11 9 50 18 

Halifax 1285 172 316 60 11 



5 



74 18 



P.C. 

.917 
.888 
.833 
.750 
.727 
.714 
.615 
.588 
.500 



P.C. 

.946 
.934 
.933 
.932 
.923 
.908 



p c 
.313 
.308 
.266 
.251 
.246 



Millersburg 1166 164 284 55 13 5 71 41 .244 



DIKECTURY AND PICTORIAL HKMHW 



TWIN-COUNTY BASEBALL LKAdlK 
. Pitching Records 

Av. 
Runn 
Per 

G Inn,gs R W. S. O. B.B. Game W. I,. ivt. 

F. Shuttleworth (W) 5 31 17 33 17 4 o 3 1.000 

McBride (M) 7 42 27 47 24 17 5 2 1.000 

Patrick (T. C.) 2 11 3 11 4 7 3 1 1.000 

Bendigo (T. C.) 2 7 5 7 6 2 6 1 o 1.000 

Adams (W) ir, 104 .52 102 69 27 4 Vj 11 1 .917 

Bugg^- (L) 13 77 39 .'}6 88 17 4 Vs K 1 .888 

N. Shuttleworth (W) .... 8 58 26 49 62 6 4 5 1 .833 

Stansfteld (E) 16.144 98 161 88 36 6 12 4" . 7.'.0 

Matter (H) 12 91 55 83 60 21 5Vi H 3 .727 

R. Matter (L) 10 54 30 56 28 11 6 5 2 .714 

Burld (W) 15 105 41 80 97 26 3 Vj 8 5 .815 

H. Biever (H) 17 143 56 132 143 18 3 Vi 10 7 .588 

H. Shomper (T. C.) 22 138 95 149 107 26 6 8 8 .500 

Clough (L) 6 47 36 41 26 20 7 3 3 . SOO 

Sallada (L) 3 17 14 17 13 13 7 1 1 .500 

Kline (M) 12 78 55 106 45 18 O^ 5 7 .416 

Messner (L) 5 35 12 26 35 10 3 2 3 .400 

R. Hoffman (M) 19 126 74 131 75 30 5 5 8 .385 

Reigle (L) 12 28 58 78 68 19 6% 3 5 .S7i 

Landis (H) 11 84 40 79 CS 19 4 V* 3 6 .333 

Fralick (M) 8 51 48 65 30 14 8 V^ 2 4 .333 

Williams (T. C.) 16 91 68 111 42 11 6% 3 H .272 

Driesigacker (T. C.) 7 36 31 45 30 22 7% 1 4 .200 

Fetterhoff (E) 14 109 97 113 66 20 8 2 12 .143 

L. Zeigler (E) 5 16 28 32 12 6 Ifi 2 .000 

J. Shuttleworth (W) 4 24 31 43 3 6 12 O 2 .000 

Wise (E) 3 13 17 27 8 14 12 3 .000 

Ruff (E) 3 14 15 23 14 6 10 1 .000 

R. Buffington (E) 2 14 10 8 5 4 7 1 .000 

The following pitchers lost the onl}' game they pitclieil in: .Miller and KniiiT (or 

Tower City, S. Bowman and Corsnitz for Halifax, M. .M:itt<T fur l.yketis. Shatlo (or 
Millersburg, Jones for Williamstown and J. Zeigler, Strieker and .\pi> f^ir Kli.-.i!..-ilnillr 



DEFENSIVE RECORDS 



G. 

G. Adams (W) p 16 

N. Shuttlesworth (W) 1 b.-p.. 14 

T. Miller (E') c. f 10 

Spangler (L) 2 b 7 

M. Miller (E) 1 b., 37 

J. Shuttlesworth (W) 1 b., 33 

Daniels (L) 1 b., 32 

Spahr (H) 1. f., 34 

Beamensderfer (T. C.) c. .. 40 

Landi.s (H) 1 b.-p., 37 



P.O. 



A. 



K. 



p.r. 



1 


45 





1.00(1 


64 


2f> 





1.00(1 


9 





(» 


1.000 


6 


7 





l.OOfl 


35:? 


i;; 


5 


.98fi 


197 


37 


A 


.983 


214 


28 


5 


.980 


45 


3 


1 


.980 


2 fir. 


42 


8 


.974 


267 


35 


S 


.974 



222 ■ LYKENS-WILLIAMS 



VALLE\ 


HISTOBX 




264 


6 


8 


.971 


28 


6 


1 


.971 


- 122 


4 


4 


.969 


40 


21 


2 


.968 


218 


46 


9 


.967 


286 


29 


11 


.966 


143 


22 


6 


.965 


8 


42 


2 


.961 


7 


43 


2 


.961 


143 


2 


6 


.960 


121 


17 


6 


.959 


3 


42 


2 


.957 


212 


36 


12 


.954 


213 


16 


11 


.954 


59 


1 


3 


.952 


191 


23 


11 


.951 


47 


7 


3 


.947 


45 


7 


3 


.945 


137 


19 


9 


.945 


28 


40 


4 


.944 


44 


56 


6 


.943 


101 


8 


7 


.939 


60 


90 


10 


.937 


54 


19 


5 


.936 


78 


9 


6 


.935 


20 


6 


2 


.928 


39 


36 


6 


.926 


62 


1 


5 


.926 


17 


57 


6 


.925 


37 


21 


5 


.921 


29 


5 


3 


.919 


23 


22 


4 


.918 


9 


24 


3 


.917 


3 


8 


1 


.916 


54 


9 


6 


.913 


78 


89 


16 


.912 


23 


7 


4 


.912 


102 


122 


22 


.911 


31 


72 


10 


.911 


24 


7 


3 


.911 


24 


15 


4 


.907 


45 


107 


16 


.905 


79 


63 


15 


.904 


71 


107 


19 


.904 


87 


23 


12 


.901 


80 


64 


16 


.900 


65 


15 


9 


.898 


18 


17 


4 


.897 


48 


78 


15 


.893 


37 


12 


6 


.891 


26 


56 


10 


.891 


37 


4 


5 


.891 


8 


32 


5 


.888 


31 


6 


5 


.881 


22 


63 


12 


.876 


4 


10 


2 


.875 



Fegley (T. C.) 1 b., 30 

Schroyer (H) c 5 

Tliompson (W) 1 b 19 

Kerr (M) c.-2 b., 12 

Frye (M) c, 32 

Row (W) c 39 

L. Lebo (H) c, 20 

M. Matter (H) p., 21 

H. Biever (H) p., 18 

^ay (M) 1 b 15 

H. Bowman (H|) util 40 

H. Shomper (T. C.) p., 25 

G. Buffington (E) e 35 

Clough (L) 1 b., 33 

Nyer (T. C.) c. f.-l b 18 

R. Miller (M) 1 b 29 

A. Updegrove (T. C.) 1. f., .. 31 

E. Foster (L) r. f., 35 

Magee (L) c, 22 

R. Miller (T. C. )3 b 22 

Meehan (W) 2 b 28 

Kimiuell (L) c.-e. f., 18 

Kepner (L) 2 1)., 38 

R. Buffington (E) 1. f., 39 

I. Hoffman (H) c 10 

F. Shuttlesworth (W) c. f.-p., 17 

Fralick (M) util.-p 34 

M. Buggy (M) c. f 32 

Stansfield (E) p., 18 

McBride (M) util. p., 17 

Heckert (M) r. f 29 

Messner (L) c. f.-p., 27 

Reigle (L) p., 17 

Sallada (L) p., 4 

Adams (M) c. f 34 

Mattis (E) s. S.-2 b., 38 

S. Bowman (H) r. f 20 

S. Miller (M) s. s 38 

Kline (M) p.-3 b., 27 

Tschopp (B) r. f., 25 

J. Buggy (L) c. f.-p 29 

H. Updegrove (T. C.) s. s. . . 39 

Freeland (H) 2 b 40 

Mates (W) s. s., 39 

Walker (E) util. 30 

R. Shomper (T. C. ) 2 b.-r. f., 39 

Lourie (W) 1. f., 38 

Seal (M) 2 b 12 

N. Bowman (H) 3 b 40 

L. Zeigler (E) e. f. , 35 

Albright (W) 3 b., 32 

C. Lebo (T. C.) c. f 16 

Budd (W) p. 21 

Rhodes (W) r. f., 37 

R. Hoffman (M) p.-3 b., 33 

Driesigacker (T. C.) p 10 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



223 



Neubaum (M) r. f 

L. Shorn per (T. C.) util.. 
J. Zeigler (E) 3 b., .. 
E. Williams (L) 1. f., . 

Wert (H) c. f 

Unger (T. C.) 2 b.-3 b., 
Umholtz (L) 3 b.-s. s., 

SHatto (M) 1. f., 

W. Williams (T. C.) p.-r 
B. Williams (L) s. s.-3 b. 
R. Biever (H) s. s., ... 

Fauber (E) s. s 

E. Zeigler (E) util., .. 
P. Buffington (E) util., 
I. Bowman (H) 1 b., . 
R. Updegrove (T. C.) r. f 

Fetterhoff (E') p., 

Mitchell (L) c. f 

Swab (E^ util 

J. Buffington (E) 3 b., . 





5 

oo 

38 
32 
21 
37 
22 
31 
36 
38 
31 
13 
16 

7 

24 
21 

9 
10 

7 



4 


3 


1 


6 


1 


1 


32 


58 


14 


50 


12 


8 


33 


3 


6 


29 


19 


8 


47 


54 


17 


25 


4 


5 


24 


26 


9 


77 


89 


29 


35 


114 


27 


61 


64 


25 


24 


15 


.S 


19 





4 


58 





»> 


26 


2 


1 


8 


28 


12 


7 


7 


5 


9 


12 


8 


6 


8 


13 



.875 
.875 
.865 
.857 
.857 
.857 
.856 
.853 
.847 
.843 
.841 
.833 
.830 
.826 
.816 
.800 
.750 
.737 
.724 
..'.19 



TWIN COUNTY BASEBALL LEAGUE 
Final Standing Season of 1921 





ti 


< 








« 














u 


>. 


> 




to 




05 

s 


73 


X 


.a 
CO 


^^ 


oi 




u: t 




53 








(U 






— V 




^2 


M 


^ 


,—1 


> 


N 


Q 


— i_ 




^ 






s 




5 


5? 


^ — 


Williamstown, . . 




5 


6 


5 


5 


6 


27 


.710 


Lvkens 


3 




4 


4 


5 


1 


23 


.589 


Halifax 


2 


4 

4 


4 


4 


6 

O 

o 


6 
4 


16 
1.'. 
14 


..-..'.0 


Millersburg, 


1 


.41:1 
.::.s4 


Tower City 

Elizabethville, . . 


3 

2 


2 
1 


2 
2 


5 
4 


5 


3 


Lost 


.. 11 


16 


18 


22 


24 


26 


1 1 1 


- 



224 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



LYKENS AND WICONISCO ATHLETIC CLUB 
FOOT-BALL SQUAD. 

Those appeai'ing in illustration. 

Top, left to right — Malcolm W. Orr, Coach: Reigle, Guard: 
Ray Hoffman, Centre: "Kat" Snyder, Centre: Cooper, Half 
Back : Jim Hoffman, Half Back : Kosier, End : Bateman, Referee : 
William ("Hammer") Witmer, Manager. 

Second Row, left to right — "Uni" Snyder, End: Loyd Snyder, 
Guard : Williams, Quarter Back : Umholtz, Full Back : Shreiner, 
Full Back, (Captain) : Kniley, Half Back: Irvin Snyder, Guard: 
J. Thompson, Guard : Golden, Tackle : 

Sitting, left to right— Ike Witmer, End: "Spud" O'Neil, 
Tackle : Calnon, End : Wm. Mahoney, Tackle : Troutman, Half 
Back : Walter Hoffman, Quarter Back. 

Summary of 1921 Season. 

L. & W. A. C. 
L. & W. A. C. 
L. & W. A. C. 
L. & W. A. C. 13 At Home 
L. & W. A. C. 53 At Home 
L. & W. A. C. 40 At Home 
L. & W. A. C. 7 At Away 
L. & AV. A. C. 20 At Home 
L. & W. A. C. 20 At Home 
L. & W. A. C. 13 At Away 
L. & W. A. C. 37 At Home 



October 8 


Northumberlan( 


i 


, October 16 


Pottsville 


26 


October 23 


Shamokin 





October 29 


Shamokin 





November 8 


Ashland 





November 11 


Pottsville 





November 13 


Treverton 





November 19 


Treverton 





November 24 


Williamstown 





November 26 


Williamstown 





December 3 


York 






7 At Away 
At Away 
At Away 



The L. & W. A. C. Foot-Ball team has set a record never 
before attained by any team in the Valley. Each player was 
well trained to his respective position by the excellent coach, 
Mr. Malcolm W. Orr whose timely judgement and keen know- 
ledge of Foot-Balldom was well examplified. Under the man- 
agement of William L. Witmer Proprietor of the Auraror Pool 
Parlor, the team could have attained no better laurels then 
the Champions of Dauphin and York Counties. Which title 
they so nobly carried off. 



226 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



TOWER CITY SWIMMING POOL 

Tower City and Porter Township Swimming Pool and Park 

Playground. 

Very unfortunately it was impossible to have a picture of 
this beautiful spot made, due to the weather. Since this vol- 
umn was compiled during the winter months of 1921-1922. 
The Author, however has visited the place and must confess 
that here is the making for a real honest recreation site. The 
pool in itself is one of the very beautiful to behold and the im- 
provements proposed to be made by the commission during the 
Spring of 1922, certainly will afford seashore pleasures here 
in the mountains. The entire site is comprised of nineteen acres. 
The shrubbery and timber is chiefly Spruce, the contour of the 
hills is magnificent while the pool reflects to one the mes- 
sage of mirth and joy. Towercity and Porter Township as well 
as the surrounding territory can well be proud of so exact and 
ideal a site and stream for the purpose they pursue. It is the 
natural gift of mother earth. 

ST. JOHNS LUTHEEAN (HILL) CHURCH. 
St. Johns congregation of Lykens Valley, Dauphin County, 
occupies in various particulars a unique position among sister 
congregations. She was never fettered with union Churches. 
She had almost continuously a pastor right in her midst. Latt- 
erly, altho a country congregation, she has had the exclusive ser- 
vices of a pastor — with church privileges equal to any town con- 
gregation. Highly favored in location and temporal possessions 
and more so in spiritual privileges, — what has thus far been her 
history ? 

Location. — Lykens Valley, noted for its beauty, fertility of 
soil and coal, is in the most northern part of Dauphin County, 
and extending eastward from the Susquehanna River. St. 
Johns is seated in the very centre of this valley with the church 
on an elevation overlooking the country in every direction for 
many miles and therefore the popular name — "the hill church". 
A stranger on seeing this beautiful two-story brick church, with 

\ 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 227 



handsome steeple— cross surmounted— is led to exclaim in the 
words of the Psalmist in his description of Mt. Zion— Ps. 47. 

Early History.~Th.e congregation, according to date of 
organization, stands second to those in the valley and of Con- 
ference, altho preaching began here simultaneously with that 
of other points. The Rev. J. Mich. Enderline— pioneer mis.sion- 
ary— began his labors in this vicinity in the year 1773 and ex- 
tended them from Upper Dauphin into Schuylkill, Northumber- 
land and Snyder Counties. In 1870 this congregation \va.s 
organized by R'ev. Enderline with Christian Schung and John 
Matter as deacons. 

Churches. — For twenty years the infant congregation em- 
ployed a log school house for its place of worship, which gave 
it the name in early years of "the school house congregation.** 
January 19, 1797, at a congregational meeting a conunittee was 
elected and charged with the erection of a "new" church. 
This church— without corner stone— was built of logs on the 
present site with galleries on three sides — a stately church in 
its day. Dedicated October 24, 1802, by Rev. Jolin Ilerbst. 
pastor, and Dr. George Lochman, of Harrisburg. Later this 
edifice was weatherboarded and in 1856 the steeple with belfry 
was added. 

In the year of 1876 the log church gave way to the present 
handsome church. The corner-stone was laid ]\Iay 21. 1S76. liy 
the pastor, the Rev. R. S. Wagner, assisted by Dr. K. .1. )•'. 
Schantz, and Revs. M. B. Lenker and J. M. Urich. The dedi- 
cation took place Nov. 11, 1877. Dimensions, TiO by 87 feet. 
Steeple and pulpit recess. Ample basement for Sunday School 
purposes, divided into three departments. Cost of church. 
$13,122. The last of the debt on this ehureh was pai<l in ISOci. 



228 LIKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



THE OLD STONE CHURCH, ELIZABETHVILLE, PA. 

(By a vote of 130 to 32 the congTegation of the Lutheran 
and Reformed Churches on Sunday, ]\Iarch 5th, 1911, decided 
to dispose of the old stone church in the west end of town. Mr. 
Harvey M. Miller, the Poet Laureate of the valley, being moved 
by the action, wrote the following poem : 

The Old Stone Church. 

The old stone church is crumbling down 

And falling to decay; 
The Christian cradle of the town 

Is marked for Ruin's prey. 

The temple that our fathers reared, 

In service to our God, 
Like they, shall soon have disappeared 

And ciTimbled in the sod. 

Yet, be it leveled to the ground. 

And not a stone remain, — 
On memory's walls will still be found 

The old church pictured plain. 

The good old songs we used to sing 

AVithin those hallowed walls, 
Thro' all our days shall sweetly ring. 

Until the Master calls. 

We'll see our fathers gathered there, 

As in the golden days, 
Our dear old mothers bowed in prayer. 

Shall lift their hearts in praise. 

And from that consecrated desk 

Both Steck and Kretzing taught. 
And now in memory's arabesr|ue 

We find their faces wrought. 



DIKECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKMKW .>,y 



There Wagner read the ble&sed liook, 
And Stauffer heav'n portrayed, 

There Hillpot bid us upward look, 
And Kuhn devoutly prayed. 

These, all, are gone to their reward, 
Their souls are with the just, 

And now, this temple of the lord ; 
Shall mingle with their dust. 

The old church but a pile of stone ? 

Forbid, Almighty God! 
This was our father's Christian home, 

Here saintty mothers trod. 

Oh, consecrate yourselves anew 
And to their faith be bound ! 

They blazed the way for me jiiid vdu 
Upon this holy ground. 

Where Ilemping led the i)ioneer. 

And taught him to be true. 
And Gerhardt rang the gospel t-Icar, — 

Will all come into view. 

There Welden, Leis and Yeagcr stood. 

Expounding sacred Love, 
And marshalled Christian hrotherhuod 

Before the civil AYar. 

And wliile men murdered men for hate. 

Upon the battlefield, 
Walz preached the Love Immaculate, 

Whereby all wounds are healed. 

And Bressler broke the bread of life. 

Unsheathed the Spirit's swonl. 
And generaled for a holier strife 

The ai'my of the Lord. 



230 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



There, from the pulpit Shindel told 
The good old, sweet old story; 

There Lesher massed the faithful bold 
And led the way to glory, 

A pile of stone ! — and is that all ? 

Mayhap, by worldly rules, 
Nay, see within that basement hall 

The mother of our schools. 

Alas, how quickly we forget! 

How thankless all mankind! 
How dumb to every sacred debt. 

To grateful service blind. 

Go, tear it down ! Let not a stone 

Remain on yonder hill. 
Wher'er the love of God was sown 

Its memory lingers still. 

And when we, too, shall take our flight 
And crumble 'neath the sod, 

The old stone church will greet our sight 
In the galleries of God! 

Harvey M. Miller 
EUzahethville, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



231 



WHO'S WHO IN MILLERSBURG 




CHAS. W. NOLL 

MiLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Mr. Noll is a native of Millersburg and oni' of its wry 
progressive business men. He is a photographer of indisputable 
knowledge and character. A large number of the illustrations 
in this volume are his work and they all speak for themselves. 
He is a member of the Millersburg Gun Club, a lover of the 
great out-doors and is connected with a number of local frater- 
nal organizations. He has constantly been a vahiable assistance 
to all local, civic and community enterprises. 

S. W. COOPER 
Millersburg, Pa. 

Mr. Cooper is a life-long native of .Alillersburg. He is a 
descendent of the early Kuper family, early settlers of the 
valley. The author has been able to trace Mr. Cooper's family 



232 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

line back to 1756. He has served the borough as school director 
for nine years, and served as county surveyor for a period of 
three years. Mr. Cooper is at present engaged in the Engin- 
eering business, and is rated among Millersburg's successful 
business men. 

c. c. McLaughlin 

MiLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Mr. McLaughlin was born at Carsonville, Pa. and is a grad- 
uate of Shippensburg Normal School class of 1906. Taught 
in public schools of Jefferson, Jackson Townships and Elizabeth- 
ville borough. For 6 years he was assist. Chief Clerk to the 
State Water Supply Commission, which position he resigned to 
become Secretary and General Manager of the Millersburg 
jNIilling Co. Inc. In 1921 he purchased his present business. 
Billiard Parlor and cigars, at 249 Market Street, in which he 
is still engaged. ^Iv. ]\IcLaughlin is a real business man and 
is a highly respected citizen of the borough. He takes a keen 
interest in the sports of the town, and has held several execu- 
tive positions in several sporting organizations. 

DR. J. W. STARK 

IMlLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Dr. Starr came to Millersburg in 1895 entering the drug 
business, which business he still conducts. He is an active 
member in the Millersburg Gun Club and takes a keen interest 
in all out of door sports. He has served the Borough as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health for a number of years and has 
been instrumental in various community enterprises. At the 
time of the Centennial Celebration in 1907, Dr. Starr was a 
member of the Executive Committee. 

THOMAS J. LONG 

IMlLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Here is a native citizen of the borough of Millersburg and 
a direct descendent of the old Longe family, who were among 
the first to settle in this section. There is a narration of this 
family, which recites being driven from their home by the In- 
dians, from the present site of Millersburg. Mr. Long is a life- 



DlIiECTOKY AND PICTOiilAL liEVlEW oy^ 



long resident of the borough where he has conducted l.usiness 
for many years. At present he is engaged in the Hardware 
business which dates back twenty years. 

JAMES LIGHT 

]\llLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Mr. Light is a native of Millersburg and a dcsccndcnt of 
very early settlers. He has been a school teacher for twenty- 
seven years, grammar school at Millersburg. At an early ajre 
he developed a desire to enter the pliotography Inisiness and 
up until 1872 was active in that line of work. .\ number of 
the illustrations appearing in this volume are the results of 
jMr. Light's early activities, especially so the picture of Wicon- 
isco Canal, taken in 1872. 

J. S. HECKERT 

IMlLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Born in Northumberland County, Mr. Heckert came to 
Millersburg at the age of nine years and has been a life-long 
resident of that Borough since. He entered the marble and 
granite works, business in 1888. He has served the Boniugh in 
the capacity of council man for a number of years, jdaying a 
very important part in the development of the lown and iiring- 
ing about many improvements among which might be named 
pavements, paved streets, electric lights, sewers, etc., He is a 
highly respected citizen of Millersburir and is interested in 
every movement making for the betterment of the community. 

H. H. WALBORX 

IVIlLLERSBURG, Pa. 

Mr. Walborn is a native and life-long resident of this Uir- 
ough. He is a descendent of the early settlers of thr valley. 
For twenty years he conducted a baking establishment and 
was organizer of the Modern Woodmen of Ameriea in this 
vicinity, of which order he is still Distri.-t Deputy. Mr has 
served the Borough as School Director f(.r a number of yeaiN 
and is one of its highly respected eiti/cns. .Mr. Walborn is an 
enthusiastic follower of Tzaak Walton, a.id a very interested 
member of the gi'cat outdoor sports. 



234 



LTKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





S. W. COOPER 
Millersburg, Pa. 



HERBERT M. MILLER 
Millersburg, Pa. 





c. c. McLaughlin 

Millersburg, Pa. 



JAMES LIGHT 
Millersburg, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



235 




DR. J. W. STARR 
Millersburg, Pa. 



THOMAS J. LONG 
Millersburg, Pa. 




H. H. WALBORN 
Millersburfl, P«. 



H. H. HOY 

Millersburg, Pa. 



')jf; LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTOllY 



WHO'S WHO IN WTCONISCO 

JOHN MURPHY 

WicoNisco, Pa, 

Mr. Murphy was born iu Irelaucl and came to Wiconiscu 
.sometime along 185U. He assisted materially in the develop- 
ment of the town and to-day stands out as one of not only 
Wiconisco's respected citizens, but also the entire valley. 

jNIr. Murjjhy has been engaged in the hotel business for 
thirty-two years, but immediately upon prohibition enactment, 
discontinued the same and entered the grocery business. He 
has served the county as Commissioner and while serving, was 
instrumental in having the county taxes adjusted from 8 mills 
on two-third value to 3 mills on half valuation. At the out- 
break of the civil war he served a period of several months 
before being mustered. In October 1864 he enlisted in the 
regular army and was assigned to the third Pennsylvania cav- 
alry. He served as an orderly to the staff of President Lincoln, 
and rode into Petersburg Virginia with the staff when that 
city fell. A unique experience of Mr. Murphy is that he carried 
the last message issued by General Meade in the civil war. He 
carried this message and delivered the same a few minutes 
prior to Lee's surrender. He served throughout the entire period 
of the war and was mustered out of the army with the fifth 
Penn'a Cavalry. Mr. Murphy, is of a jovial nature and known 
to every child in the community, he is a friend of everybody 
and a real citizen of the country. 

CHARLES H. HARMAN 
WicoNisco, Pa. 

Mr. Harman was born in Lykens Township, and came to 
Wiconisco in 1880. In 1899 he was elected Justice of the Peace 
of that Township, which office he still holds. He served as 
assessor from 1905 to 1913. It is Mr. Harman 's grandfather 
that is spoken of as assisting in the construction of the Lykens 
Valley Railroad. 



UlltECTOHY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 2\i'i 



W. II. KISSINGER 
WicoNisco, Pa. 

This enterprising business was started by A. F. Kiimiiel 
in the year ISbf) and J\lr. Kissinger was then the manager. In 
the year 1905 the name was changed lo W. II. Kissinger and 
Company. In 1904 the place of business was destroyed by lire 
and to-day a modern building occupies the ohl site of the Kiss- 
inger and Company store. ^Ir. Kissingei- is the inauagcr. lie 
assisted to organize the Lykens N^allcy .MciH-aiilih' ("oinitany 
in 1911 and has been its Pi-esideut siiu'e thai tinif. 

SAMUEL H. MIIjLEK 
WicoNisco, Pa. 

One of the oldest mercantile establislnnents (if Wieonisco 
is that of Samuel INIiller Estate, now conducted l)y S. II. MiUcr. 
The business was first started by Mr. .Miller's iatin-r in 1S<>H 
as Miller and Heilner. In 1900 Mr. :\liller purchased tlie siuiie 
and upon his death in 1904, his son continued the business and 
up until date has made very progressive iniproveiiients. Mr. 
Miller is a Director of the Lykens Building and Loan A.>vso<'i- 
ation and the First National Bank also of that town, lie is 
a loyal supporter of all civic and conuiiuiiity iiinvements in 
Wieonisco. 

FORM AN BROTHERS 
WicoNisco, Pa. 

The business of Forman Brothers is a nionuineiit to real 
perseverance and business piinciples. Ccmiing to Lykens in th.- 
year 1906— these two brothers located in Wieonisco and began 
business at once on a very small scale. They increascil yearly. 
until 1911 they conducted probably tlu- birgesf nien-han.lis.- 
store in Wieonisco. Continuing in thrir progress! vene.s.s untd 
1918 in which year they opencl a branch in Lyk.-ns. Ti.-day 
they'are considered among the largest Merchandise Department 
enterprises in the ui)per end. They have always supi.orted all 
local, civic and community mov.>m.-n1s. and a.- b-.tb w.-ll re- 
spected citizens of both towns. 



238 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





ISAAC MOSSOP 
Wiconisco, Pa. 



MAYERS FORMAN 
Wiconisco, Pa. 





W H. KISSINGER 
Wiconisco, Pa. 



SQUIRE — CHAS. H. HARMAN 
Wiconisco, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REMKW 239 



WHO'S WHO IN LYKENS 

DAVID GRATZ 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Gratz is the only survivor, of the Simon Gratz ances- 
try, living in this valley. He is a son of Edward Gratz. and 
a grandson of Simon Gratz. His father, Edward Gratz, owned 
and laid the Borough of Lykens out in lots as it is now. David 
came to Lykens with his father in 1858 and has heen a constant 
resident since that time. He has assisted in tiie many "ways 
and means" incidental to developing the present town. The 
Gratz people practically owned this section at one time, and 
played a very important part in the early progressive develop- 
ments. Gratz borough in the Lykens valley is named after its 
founder, Simon Gratz, gi*andfather Of David. 

HENRY KEISER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Keiser was born in Gratz October 26, 1840. In the 
spring of the year 1850 Mr. Keiser came to Lykens. and is 
probably the oldest citizen of the Borough. The author knows 
of no other person living here longer. When ^Ir. Keiser came to 
Lykens there were about thirty log houses and only two (Irifts 
at the mines. It was during the year 1850 that the first steam 
engine came into the town. Mr. Keiser is a descendent of John 
N. Hoffman, who was one of the very early pioneers of the 
valley. In April 1861 he enlisted and served tlirongliout the 
entire period of the war, taking part in thirty-two engagement.s. 
He has been School Director of Wiconisco nine years. Lykens 
one vear; has been assessor in Lvkens sixteen years. Uo ha.s 
also served in employment thirty years lus sujiply (derk for thi» 
local coal company. Mr. Keiser is a meml)er of tlie T. <^. <">. F. 
for fifty-one years. 



240 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 




GEO. W. TROXELL 
Lykens, Pa. 





CHAS. SPEIKERMANN 
Lykens, Pa. 




J. M. MILLER 
Lykens, Pa. 



CHARLES COLES 
Lykens, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RE\IEAV .)4| 



WILLIA:M IRVING 
Lykens, Pa. 

:\Ir. Irving, one of Lykens elderly and respected eitizens, 
was born in Wilkes-Barre in the year 1841. He came to Lykens in 
187-4 and entered the Bottling business, in which he engaged 
until 1877 when he entered the hostelry business, conducting the 
Valley House located at Main and Pine «ts. Tliis business he 
sold in 1908 and retired. Mr. Irving was a member of tlic First 
Defenders, enlisting on the 16th day of April. lS»il. He was 
attached to the National Light Infantry. He delights in having 
had the occasion to shake hands with President Lincoln. He 
saw service in many important battles of the war and fortu- 
nately was not injured. He is a member of llie organization 
known as the First Defenders, who meet on April, 18, of each 
year. Of this organization which originally numbered five hun- 
dred and thirty members, there are to-day only about fifteen 
left. Their meetings are of mutual discussion and a general 
''get-together" character, and have been carried on since the 
end of the civil war. 

Mr. Irving is held in highest esteem by all who know liini. 
He is known to nearly every person, man woman and child in 
the town and his kindly appearance and .joll.v disjiosition have 
won for him an enviable pedestal of local citizenship. He has 
assisted and taken initiatives in many civic movements during 
his career here, and withstanding his age, is about every day 
with the alacrity of one many years his junior. 

A. F. IIANNA 
Lykens, Pa. 

The author concedes that there are others, liut insists tliai 
Mr. A. F. Hanna is one of the extraordinarly keen interest.'<| 
citizens of the borough. Mr. Hanna has done much for the t«»\vn 
of Lykens, and done so with a conscientious disposition and 
self-sacrificing spirit. He is a son of the late K. C. Hanna 
who for thirteen years was siiiierinfendent of the h»cal coal 
company. To Mr. IIann;i. Hie aiith(.r publicly ext.'n.js his 



242 



LYKENS-WILLIAJVIS VALLEY HISTORY 





A. F. HANNA 
Lykens, Pa. 



WILLIAM IRVING 
Lykens, Pa. 





A. BRUCE MORRIS 
Lykens, Pa. 



WILLIAM KAUDERMAN 
Lykens, Pa. 



DIliECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIKW 243 



thanks for his unselfish spirit and valuable assistance in compli- 
ation of this volume, • ' Lykens-Williams Valley History— Direc- 
tory." He has served the "borough in the capacity of Council- 
man for a number of years, and while at times being much hand- 
icapped, has proven himself to be a well balanced legislator. Mr. 
Hanna owns over one-half of the acreage of Lykens Borougli 
and allows the water mains which supply the town with water, 
to traverse his lands free of all charge. He is imown to nearly 
eveiy citizen in the borough, and is respected with (luality 
esteem. There are divers places where he is called "Coloner' 
Hanna, and one should not be surprised if while walking a 
thoroughfare in Philadelphia you should hear him hailed by his 
many acquaintances as Colonel Hanna. To account here, of 
his civic and community activities, we should not have sufficient 
space. 

CHARLES W. SNYDER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Snyder is a native of Lykens, a descendent of early 
settlers and a very highly respected citizen of the borough. He 
has been an employee at the mines for 57 years, as a Safety 
Inspector. Mr. Snyder has formed a habit of keeping a record 
of important dates at the colliery as well as keeping a list of all 
the men killed. The results of this habit is distributed in this 
volume. He also installed the first telephone and first electric 
door bell in Lykens. 

GEORGE A. ROSIER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Kosier, one of the successful and progressive busine.ss 
men of Lykens, was born at Gratz. When a young boy his 
family removed to Wieonisco where he worked in the mines a 
number of years. In 1895 he began the Drayage business an<l 
has built up a veiy profitable business. This business he still 
conducts. In 1913 he entered the :\rusic busine.ss, and today 
conducts an up-to-date music establishment. He has serve.l the 



244 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





LOUIS WENTZLER 
Lykens, Pa. 



JOHN S. REIFF 
Lykens, Pa. 





CHAS. J. WITMER 
Lykens, Pa. 



W. H. HECKLER 
Lykens, Pa. 



LUliECTORY AND nCTUUIAl. REVIEW oi.' 



Borough as a School Director and, while during his term as 
such, was iustruineiitai in having music adopted as a branch of 
the Lykens Public Schools. i\lr. Rosier is a director of tlie 
Lykens Building and Loan Association and a veteran of tlie 
world war. Connected with him in the present .Music House 
business is his son Jonas. He is a descendent of Mr. Wilbam 
Rosier, an early settler of the valley. 

GEORGE W. PAE'FET 
Lykens, Pa, 

Mr. Parfet is a native of Lykens and one of it 's successful 
business men. He was prominent in the organizati(jn of the 
Lykens Business Men's Association and acted as duiirnian on 
the very important committee which successfully l)rought about 
decided changes in rail-road freight charges. Since ISilS Mr. 
Parfet has been conducting a very heavy stocked and pr<tgr«*s- 
sive mercantile business. He has served thr borough in the 
capacity of Councilman and. was instrumental in various ehangt-s 
which were essential to bettering the community geiu-rally. 
Mr. Parfet enjoys the distinction of being a 32nd. degree ^hi.son. 
He is a man of exceptional energy, thoroughly pi-ogn-ssive aiitl 
a valuable asset to every movement designed to benefit the 
Borough. 

CHAS. A. HOFP 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Hoff is a son of S. B. Hotf, former I'rotlionotary of 
York Coimty. He is a native of York (V)unty and ent.T.'d 
business in Dauphin County first in .Aliddh'town in IS!).'), lb- 
engaged in the Hardware business and in H'Ol n-moved to 
Lykens, in which place he has since conducted Ids stor.'. Mr. 
Hoff is one of Lykens successful citizens, and one who has al- 
ways taken a keen interest in local developments, llr is a 
graduate of Millersville State Normal Cb.ss of 1S!K{. Mr. HotT 
has served the borough as School Dinn-tor over a pmod of 
seventeen years. During this tim,. th. i-.d ^.-hool building 



246 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





Squire W. S. Young, Lykens, Pa. 



R. J. Budd, Lykens, Pa. 





Walter Freer, Lykens, Pa. 



Geo. W. Eby, Lykens, Pa. 




Chas A. Hoff, Lykens, Pa. 




J. A. Bogar, Lykens, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW ^47 



was remodeled and rated a First-Class High School of the state 
He is a Director of the First National l-JanU and Manager of 
the Lykens Savings Fund and Loan Corporation for the past 
fifteen years. He has twice been elected Representative of the 
County to the State Democratic Convention and in 1913 was 
appointed Post Master which he still retains. During his career 
as Post Master he has installed Free Delivery of mail and a 
Star Rural Route. His receipts are also just a few points from 
placing the local P. 0. on a second class basis. His civic and 
community interest is largely manifested throughout the town. 

WALTER E. SNYDER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Another well-known and successful business man here is 
Walter E. Snyder. Mr. Snyder has been in the Jewelry busi- 
ness for the past twenty-two years and has not only established 
an enviable reputation as a thoroughly reliable business man, 
but has developed a prosperous and successful business. He Is 
a graduate Optometrist and is considered a local expert in that 
line of business. Mr. Snyder has taken an unselfish interest 
in all movements designed for the benefit of the community 
and his keen foresight has been very well balance*! in many 
cases. He assisted in making possible the now famous Lykens 
Swimming Pool, He is an enthusiastic fan to the great out door 
sports. Fraternally he is a member of several organizations 
among which is Ashlar Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. 

JACOB A. BOGAR 

9 

Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Bogar was born in Wiconisco in the year 187.3. hi tlu' 
year 1892, he graduated from the local High School. L. H. S. 
Since 1897 he has managed the large store of Cobh' and Sons 
and has had and enjoyed a very successful career. He is nn 
enterprising citizen of the Borough .iti.l lias served as scIum.! 
director for a number of years. 



248 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





E. LEROY KEEN 
Lykens, Pa. 



WALTER E. SNYDER 
Lykens, Pa. 





FORREST S. HENSEL 
Lykens, Pa. 



THE LATE THOMAS A. HENSEL 
Lykens, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 049 



JOHN S. REIFF 
Lykens, Pa. 

The name R'eiff, iimiicdialcly suggests l.yk.-iis. Mv. Uciff, 
who is engaged in the Undertaking-FurniUiie luisiiicss since 
. the early history of the town, is a native of the JJon.iigh and onu 
of it's very sincere and progressive citizens. In the year 1!)0!), 
he associated with himself in business, Mr. .1. I), lldi ami to-day 
this partnership have and conduct the largest l"iiniiture .-stal)- 
lishment in upper Dauphin County. :\Ir. l^eilf is a man of re- 
putable character, very sincere and enterprising, lie has been 
of valuable assistance in locating numnfacturing concerns in 
the valley, has served the Borough as Councilman for a nnmlM-r 
of years and served Dauphin County as Siiei-itf one term. 1 It- 
has always taken a deep interest in the develoi)ment of the town 
and has contributed nnicli toward the same. 

GEORGE W. TROXEL, Chief Jiurycss 
Lykens, Pa. 

When the citizens of the Borough of Lykens elected .Mr. 
Troxel to serve the position of chief executive nf tlie liorough. 
they certainly made an elegant selection. ^Ir. Tro.xcl came t<» 
Lykens about thirty-five years ago, having- been jjorn in Ldval- 
ton, just four miles west of the borough. For tlie past twenty- 
five years he has successfully conducted a iiiddei-n ami np-t«)- 
date shoe repairing establishment. He is a business man of in- 
disputable calibre, and Lykens will be managed in a busine.s.s 
manner of the right style. The Chief Burgess strongly protests 
against Auto-speeding and has declared liimseU" to rid the town 
of this very dangerous menace. He is fair and just and exer- 
cises very keen judgment. It is well to assume that liykens 
will certainly progress under the regime of a business-nian- 
mayor. 

ARTTTFR BRUCE Mol.'b'js 

liYKRNS, Pa. 

Arthur Bruce Morris, born in Lykens. .«<on oj" Wiliiam II. and 
Martha J. Morris, (nee Minuicin li;is been a residei-f -.1 I vl.-ns 



250 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





SAMUEL E. DEITRICH 
Lykens, Pa. 



JAS. D. HELT 
Lykens, Pa. 





Lvkcns Ps 
REV. W. C. ESBENSHADE, A. M. 



DR. J. N. BAKER 
Lykens. Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 251 

practically all his life save two years when his parents resided 
at Greensburg. Was a pupil of the Lykens Public School until 
he graduated from the grammar grade when he entered tlie 
employ of Samuel B. Coles & Son, publishers of the Lykens 
Standard in which office he started in the capacity Df "devil." 
After eight years he became the ]\lanaging Editor of the paper 
and is serving in that capacity to this time 

Mr. Morris is well-known thruout the cntiie Ipper Kud 
of Dauphin County. He was connected with various organ- 
izations as their chairman of various events held at tihs place, 
among them being the Home-Coming Celebration of the Worbl 
War Veterans, held under the direction of Washington ("amp. 
No. 238, P. O. S. of A., of which organization he is a Past Pres- 
ident. June 26, 1919, he entered the service of the Fnited 
States in the World War and after eight months of service 
attained the rank of Sergeant-Major, being discharged from 
the service, March 1st, 1920. 

CHARLES M. COLES 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Coles was born in Lykens, Pa., and is a son of the late 
Samuel B. Coles, pioneer of newspaperdom in this valley. Mr. 
Coles attended the Lykens High School, from which he entered the 
South Broad Street Conservatory of Music, Philadelphia, grad- 
uating from that place in 1890. For twenty years following 
he taught music in and around Lykens and Wiconisoo; in 1010 
associating himself with his father in the newspaper business, 
publishing the Lykens Standard. :\lr. Coles upon the death of 
his father on September 26, 1916 continued to publish the paper 
and since that time has made very rapid and progressive 
strides. He has added to the .iob printing department more 
modern machinery, greatly faciliating himself for more output. 
In 1921 he erected a modern, model printing plant, one not U> 
be seen elsewhere between Harrisburg and Pott.ville. of whieh 
the community is avcH proud. 






LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





HARRY FORMAN 
Lykens, Pa. 



LEWIS A. HOFFMAN 
Lykens, Pa. 





CHARLES L. BAUM 
Lykens, Pa. 



GEO. W. PARFET 
Lykens, Pa. 



DIKECTORY AND PICTORIAL REMKW .,-0 



CHARLES J. PRICE 
Lykens, Pa, 

iMr. Price, the present District State Coal lusi)ector, \va.s 
born in Wales.. He came to America at the age of five years 
and engaged in and about the mines in Tioga County, until 
1875, when he came to Lykens, from which time h,- has been a 
resident. January 1, 1906 he was appointed District Mine 
Lispector, and enjoys the distinction of being the only Dauphin 
Countian to have ever attained that position. He is a director 
of the Miners' Deposit Bank and is a valuable assistant to all 
local civic and community enterprises. 

CHARLES SPIEKERMANN , 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Spiekermann was born in Ashland, Schuylkill County. 
He entered the hotel business in Minersville, coming to Lyken.s 
about twelve years ago. After a brief absence he again re- 
turned to Lykens in 1917 as proprietor of the Comiiiercial 
Hotel, in wliicli business he is still engaged. .Mr. Spiekermann 
is a practical hotel manager having gained liis experience in 
Minersville, Reading and Harrisburg where he lias engageil in 
this business. His parents emigrated from Germany in 1S82 
locating in Schuylkill County. 

LOUIS WENTZLER 
Lykens, Pa, 

Mr. Wentzler was born in Hanover, ]\ruenden, Germany in 
1869 and came to Lykens in 1895. He engaged in the bn'wery 
business on South Street which he purchased from the Hun-k 
Estate. In 1907 Mr. Wentzler took over the entin' cMntroJ «>f 
the brewery and since then has been the sole owner and man- 
ager. He has made many im])rovements ami has (M|uipitnl his 
plant with most modern and uj) I0 date ni;icliin<T\ . .Mr. W-nt 
zler served the Borough twelve years hs a inrnil.er of .-ouni-il 
and is affiliated with the Elks iiiid loe;il onln- ..I' K. < ' < ». \|. 



254 LYKBNS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



CHARLES J. WITHER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Witmer, who conducts the Hotel Glen, was born in 
Lykens Valley in 1876, He entered the hotel business in Lykens 
sixteen years ago. He is a member of the L. 0. 0. M. and of 
the local Fire Department. Mr. Witmer is considered one of 
the best wing shots in the valley, and not many years ago was 
recognized as a state-wide contestant in that diversion. 

WILLIAM H. HECKLER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr, Heckler was born in Tremont, Schuylkill County, in 
1869. He has been in the hotel business twenty one years, 
coming to Lykens in 1905 and conducting the Union House 
Hotel, since that time. He has served the borough as Council- 
man and has assisted the various movements made for bettering 
local conditions and the community as a whole. He is a member 
of the local lodge of L, 0. O, M, and of the B. P, 0. E. 

FORREST S. HENSEL 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Hensel was born in Lykens in the year 1890, grad- 
uating from the local high school in 1908 he then entered 
Lebanon Valley College, graduating 1912 with an A. B. Degree. 
During his spare time up until 1912 he assisted in the conduct- 
ing of the Hensel Clothing House owned then by his father. Upon 
the death of his father in 1921 he became general manager of 
that concern. He is an earnest supporter of civic pride and 
sports. 

GEORGE W. EBY 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Eby was born in Perry County, coming to Lykens, in 
1895, where he has engaged in the wholesale confectionery 
business since that time. He is a director of the First National 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 255 



Bank, of the Wicouisco Tei. & Tel. Company and of the Lykens 
Motor Car Co. He is also a director of the Gratz Fair Asso.-i- 
ation. Mr. Eby has been v^ery successful in business due to 
his keen insight in general management and is among the Bor- 
ough's most highly respected citizens. 

CHARLES LLOYD BAUM 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Baum, sou of early settlers (Iloltzman family i. was 
born in Gratz, He is a son of Mrs. Sarah Baum of 414 Pine 
Street. At an early age Mr. Baum developed a talent for oil 
painting and his work has been recognized by some of the most 
severe critics in art circles. If one were to visit his studio, 
one would be very much taken with the wonderful work of Mr. 
Baum's brush. He is a highly respected citizen of the Borougli 
and is entirely deserving of special mention along his line of 
art. 

SAMUEL E. DEITRICH 
Lykens, Pa. 

One of the very progressive and familiar citizens of Lykens 
is Mr. Samuel E. Deitrich. He is a native of this community 
and has at all times been instrumental in and assisted the 
many improvement steps of the present borough. By trade he 
is an accomplished Tailor having put in thirty-two years at 
that business. At present he is connected with the Hensel 
Clothing House, wdiere he has been during the course of his pro- 
fession for the past seventeen years. Tn 1890 he graduated 
from the Wicouisco High School. Fraternally he is connected 
with several local organizations, among which is the Knight.s 
of Pj^thias of which lodge he is Degree Ma.ster. His keen 
opinion has been sought by many in regard to community and 
lodge affairs. 

WALTER E. FREER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Freer came to Lykens in the year 1004 from New 
York Citv and commenced business under the name of The 



256 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Manhattan Supply Company. He has conducted this business 
ever since and has enjoyed excellent success. He has always 
been an exponent to any movement for bettering the community 
and is a highly respected citizen of the borough. 

LEWIS A. HOFFMAN 
Lykens, Pa, 

There is only one Restaurant-Soda Fountain establishment 
in Lykens, and Mr. Hoffman is the proud owner. He is a very 
tactful business man and enjoys a very successful business. 
Lewis, as we all know him, has been born and reared in Lykens 
and a graduate of our local High School. He entered business 
in December of the year 1914, and since that time has acquired 
the old Garman property in which his business and residence 
is now located at 619 Main Street. He has always assisted in 
the various civic and community enterprises from time to time, 
and was a very valuable asset to the success of the Lykens Dia- 
mond Home Coming celebration. 



^o 



JAMES D. HELT 
Lykens, Pa. 

Among the reputable and successful j'oung business men 
of Lykens that have had a profitable business here, there are 
perhaps none deserving of more special mention than Mr. J. 
D. Helt. Mr. Helt was born in Jackson Township. He entered 
in business in Lykens in the year 1909 identifying himself with 
Mr. J. S. R'eiff in the furniture and undertaking business. His 
rapid strides have only been the direct residt of careful methods 
and keen decisions. To-day he is a director of several of the 
Valley's largest enterprises. He has been elected a school di- 
rector of Lykens Borough in 1922 and is a member of the Blue 
Lodge, Masonic Order. 

DR. J. NEVIN BAKER 
Lykens, Pa. 

Born in Lewistown, Mr. Baker came to Lykens in 1893, 
entering the practice of his profession. Dentistry. He is a 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 257 



graduate of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. Dr. 
Baker has sei-^ed the borough as School Director for a numljer 
of years, and has always taken a keen interest in all civic enter- 
prises. He is at present President of the Miners Deposit Bank, 
of which he has been a director a number of years; President 
of the Building and Loan association and one of the organ- 
izers of the Williams Valley Bank at Williamstown. He is 
one of the higlily respected citizens of the Borough, and known 
to practically everybody in the Valley. 

THOMAS A. HENSEL 
Lykbns, Pa. 

Mr. Hensel, who for many years was one of the familiar 
faces to be seen in Ljdfens, until 1885 worked in the mines, 
from which he engaged in clerking in a general clothing store, 
later purchased the same and in 1891 began business fur him- 
self. Through real perseverance and business tactics, Mr. Hen- 
sel arose to the unique distinction of the biggest Retail cloth- 
ier of the Upper End. He was a son of the late John and 
Susan Hensel and was very prominent in all civic and com- 
munity affairs of not only Lykens but the entire valley. Mr. 
Hensel died at his home, Lykens, December 14. 1021, following 
a stroke of paralysis. He was aged 68 years. 

REV. W. C. ESBENSHADE, A. M. 
Lykens, Pa. 

Mr. Esbenshade was born and reared near Strasburg, Lan- 
caster County, where he obtained his early education in the 
local High School. In the year 1897, he graduated from the 
Millersville State Norman School, receiving his state cortiticnto 
in 1899. He is a graduate of the Perkionian Seminary, r.'iuis- 
Taurg, Pa., 1901; Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pa., A. li. 1905. 
receiving his A. M. Degree at that place in 1917. He was n-- 
ceived in the Philadelphia Methodist Conference in 1905, wliere 
he obtained his Theological training. In 1920, lie was appoinL-d 
pastor of the Grace M. E. Church at this place. 



258 



Li'KENS-WILLlAJMS VALLEY HISTORY 



JACOB M. MILLER 
Lykens, Pa. 

^Ir. ]\liller was born in Lykens November 18, 1868 ; he 
attended the Wiconisco High School. Mr. Miller entered busi- 
ness in Lykens about 1890 conducting a general store and con- 
tinuing in this business up imtil 1919. He has been a Notary 
Public since 1903 and representative of a number of fire in- 
surance companies since 1903, Tax Collector of Lykens Borough 
inl921 and Treasurer of the Borough about eighteen years. 
He is Treasurer of the Saving Fund and Loan Corporation 
since 1908 and Treasurer of the I. 0. 0. F. about fifteen years. 
In 1903 he began business with general real estate in and about 
the town and valley and to-day is counted an able authority 
on that subject. Fraternally he is a member of Ashlar Lodge 
No. 570 F. & A. "M. also of the ^lodern Woodmen of America. 




The Late S. B. COLES 
Lykens, Pa. 



HENRY KEISER 
Lykens, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKVIIAV 



259 





CHARLES SNYDER 
Lykens, Pa. 



GEO. A. KOSIER 
Lykens. Pa. 





A. H. ROWE 
Lcyalton, Pa. 



JOSEPH SHOLLEY 
Lykens P«. 



260 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



WHO'S WHO IN ELIZABETHVILLE 
HAROLD L. ROMBERGER 

ELIZABETHVILLE, Pa, 

Mr. Romberger is a native of Elizabethville. "He is associ- 
ated with his father, D. W. Romberger, in the Hide and Tallow 
business. He is also a Director of and Manager of the Eliza- 
bethville Silver Black Fox Co. Inc. At the election in 1921 he 
was chosen Chief Burgess of the borough by a very large major- 
ity. He is a member of the protective department of the 
Penna. State Game Commission. Harold is a 3'oung man of 
Elizabethville, but one of its very progressive citizens. He is 
married and has two children. 

C. H. KNISELY 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Mr. Knisely came to Elizabethville in 1896 as principal of 
the Public Schools. He taught school until the year 1899 when 
he resigned to become JManager of the Swab Wagon Company, 
of which he is President and Manager to-day. He is a member 
of the Elizabethville School Board and a Director of the First 
National Bank. Mr. Knisely is Superintendent of the Lutheran 
Sunday School and an ardent supporter of all good wholesome 
ideas making for a better community. 

DANIEL W. ROMBERGER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Daniel W. Romberger was born in Lykens Township, Dau- 
phin County, Pa., February 23, 1870, a son of Samuel and 
Sarah (Brewer) Romberger. He was brought up as a tanner 
and farmer, attended public school but stopped at an early age 
to work in his father's tannery. In 1883 he came to Elizabeth- 
ville with his father; on December 5th. 1891 was married at 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



261 





HAROLD L. ROMBERGER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 



C. H KNISELY 
Elizabethville. Pa. 





THEO. E. MILLER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 



HARRY H. WEAVER 
Elizabethville. Pa. 



262 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

Elizabethvilie to JSadie A. Gottshall of Pillow, Pa.; in 1892 
went into partnership wdtli his father in the hide and tallow 
business ; in this business he is still engaged ; is also owner of 
the rendering plant and is owner of the Fox Ranch located on 
his farm. Mr. Romberger holds one-fourth of the stock of the 
animals of this ranch. Mr. Romberger in a very successful 
business man of Elizabethvilie and has done a lot for the town 
and its citizens. To Mr. and Mrs. Romberger five children 
were born, all of them living: Melvin C, Harold L., Lawrence 
U., Faye 0. and Daniel W. Jr. Mr. Romberger 's wife died at 
Elizabethvilie, June 11, 1917. He has at all times assisted in 
civic and community enterprises and is one of the very re- 
spected citizens of Elizabethvilie. 

HARVEY M. MILLER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Miller, Harvey M., native of Elizabethvilie, son of James 
jMiller, who was for fifty-one years secretary and treasurer of 
the Lykens Valley Mutual Fire Insurance Co., the oldest cor- 
poration in the valley. Spent fifteen years as rate clerk for 
various trunk lines of some of the larger railroad centers of the 
East. Has contributed at various times to popular magazines, 
mostly humorous verse. Author of three Pennsylvania-German 
books of prose and poetry and contributed under the nom de 
plume "Solly Hulsbuck" to more than twenty weekly news- 
papers published in dialect-speaking counties of the state. De- 
clared by Prof. Richards before the German Society of John 
Hopkins University to be the most prolific dialect writer in Penn- 
sylvania. Author of Harmonies of the Heart, a book of sentimen- 
tal verse, and of Poems of Childhood, which was revised by 
Prof. H. G. Dornheim in a thesis delivered at a literary function 
at Temple University and declared to be the equal of Steven- 
son's "Child's Garden of Verses." 

Mr. MiUer was one of the organizers of Elizabethvilie 's 
Board of Trade and served it as secretary, when he also helped 
to organize the Valley Shoe Co. He was also instrumental in 
organizing the Bolton Rug Mills. Both are among the town's 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



26a 



substantial industries. In the general insurance business for 
some years, was a member of the building committee for the 
erection of the tine new office building of the Lykens Valb'v 
Mutual Fire Insurance Co., and on the death of his father in 
1920 succeeded him as secretary and treasurer of the e<iiiipaii\-. 




THE LATE SAMUEL B. ROMBER:(iKK 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Samuel B. Romberger, was born in Lykens to\vMsln|. Dau- 
phin county. Pa., August 9, 1845. He was a s..u of Dan.el and 
Hannah (Bergstesser) Komberger. Daniel Ron.berger,, fath. r 
of Samuel B., was born in Lykens townshi,.. Dauphu, eount^-^ 
Pa., February 19, 1816. He was brought up as a farmer and 
was married in his native place. Pie settled ou a lar.n .n \N ash- 
ington township in 1854, and later located on . tarm .n 1 ery. 
burg where he died Jidy 20, 1882. IT.s w.te .\u.\ u. Llu-a- 



2tJ4 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

bethville in 1889. Samuel B. E-omberger was of German des- 
cent on his father's side, and on his mother's side Scotch- 
Irish. He attended school in his native place until he was nine 
years old, when his family removed to Washington township. 
His education was finished in the common schools there. In 
his seventeenth year he began an apprenticeship at tanning 
with Isaiah ]\Iatters, at Uniontown, Pa. He served three years, 
during which time he received $175, which was $40 in excess 
of the contract. He worked at his trade a year and a half in 
Schuylkill County, Pa. He then formed a partnership with 
Reuben Weiser, and established a tanyard at Green Briar, 
Northumberland County, and continued in business there two 
and a half years, at the end of this time he bought the tanyard 
known as Stines plant, above Gratz. He operated this plant 
for fourteen years, having sold the one at Green Briar. In the 
spring of 1883, Mr. Romberger disposed of his property in 
Lykens township and located at Elizabethville, where he at 
first operated a tannery, but later relinquished the tanning and 
dealt in hides and tallow. In 1892 he took into partnership 
two of his sons and soon the firm had branches at Carlisle, 
Pottstown, Wilks-Barre, Tyrone and Shamokin and in 1910 a 
new one started at Harrisburg under the name of S. B. Rom- 
berger 's Sons Co. Mr. Romberger was active outside of his 
own business, for he was a sincere promoter of the growth and 
prosperity of his town. He and his brother John purchased 
the land between Callowhill St. and Church St. and laid it out 
in lots and sold them, as a natural result the town began to 
grow. i\Ir. Romberger was President of the Lj'-kens Valley Mu- 
tual Ins. Company for more than thirty years, one of its organ- 
izers, and for five years Vice President of the First National 
Bank. He helped organize Maple Grove Cemetary Association, 
and for fifteen years was a director for the Lykens Valley Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Co. and for years was prominent in the 
affairs of the Water Co. He was a consistent member of the 
Evangelical Church. His children are Daniel W., Penrose C, 
Ira P., Elba and Ella. He died Friday March 11, 1922, aged 
76 years, at the home of his daughter. Mrs. A. W. Krebs, 1838 
North Second Street. Harrisburg. Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKVIKW 



265 




JAMES E. LENTZ 
Elizabethville, Pa. 



HARVEY M. MILLER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 




DR. E. L. STEEVER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 




A. M. ROMBERQER 
Elizabethville. Pa. 



2(j(j LYKENa-WlLLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

HARRY II. A^EA\'ER 
Elizabethville^ Pa. 

Mr. Weaver is a native of Elizabeth vilie where he has 
resided all his life. 

At the age of 12 he became a telegraph operator and took 
charge of the Western Union Telegraph otilee then in his father's 
store. Afterwards took charge of*the Freight and Ticket Office 
of the P. R. R. at Elizabethville. 

He was connected with a number of industries of Eliza- 
bethville among which are the following: 

In 1875 he organized the Victor Printing Co. which he 
owned. He printed a number of ])ooks for the novelty trade 
as well as the first newspaper for the town a monthly known as 
the Owl afterwards The Monthly Independent. Then printed 
The Weekly Democrat for Capt. J. A. Ettinger in 1879 which 
he afterwards continued as The Weekly Independent. 

He was one of the organizers of the Elizabethville AVater 
Co. also of the Reliance Hose Co. No. 1. of which he is now 
and has been the Treasurer from the time of its organization. 

In 1885 he organized the Lykens Telegraph and Telephone 
Co. of which he was General ^Manager until the same was mer- 
ged with the United Telephone Co. He built the first teleplione 
lines in the Upper End of Dauphin Co. and Western Schuyl- 
kill Co. 

In 1887 he entered the firm of Fred W^eaver & Son, General 
Merchants and Weaver & Son distillers who succeeded W-'eaver 
& Gilbert originally organized in 1873. 

He organized the First National Bank of Elizabethville, 
Pa. in 1900 of which he was a director for many years. 

He is at present the owner of Weaver & Son dealers in 
Coal and Merchandise and is connected with the Rossman- 
Weaver Co. and the Weaver apparel Co. who have seven shirt 
factories in operation — Elizabethville, Berrysburg, Enders, Rife 
and Klingerstown. 

He built many hoiises for the Avorking men payable on the 
building and loan plan at cost which enabled tliem to own their 
own homes. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 2t)l 



A. M. ROMBERGER 

EUZABETUVILLE, Pa. 

Mr. R'omberger was born in Northumberland County near 
Pillow and has been a resident of this valley for the past thirty 
four years. He entered the General .Merchandise business in 
Elizabethville in 1900 and has enjoyed a very successful career. 
He is a director of the First National Bank at Elizabethville 
and Millersbnrg, President of the local water company and a 
trustee of the Schuylkill County Seminary. 

JAMES E. LEXTZ 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Born in Washington Township, one mile East of Eliziilietli- 
ville — 1886 moved to Mifflin Township, near Berrysburg — LSi)»j 
moved to Elizabethville, entering produce busines.s. ]S5)!> 
entered the wholesale Tobacco business, sold the same in l!M»l 
and went on the road for the Reid Tobacco Co. of .Milton. In 
1914 became a candidate for Recorder of Deetls and Clei-k of 
the Orphans Court of Dauphin County, elected and served 
four years in that capacity. Throughout the period of the war. 
Mr. Lentz was a valuable asset to the Valley Red Cross chapters 
and assisted very ably in all local movements, incidental to 
successfully promoting the war. lie was instrumental in hav- 
ing a health centre in Elizabethville. In 1920 ^Ir. Lent/, en- 
tered the Automobile business which he still i)rogres.sively eon- 
ducts. He is connected with various enterprises, among which 
President of the Williams Valley Hospital, locateil at Williams- 
town, Pa. He is also Chairman of the Dauphin County Kcpuh- 
lican Committee since 1931. Mr. Lentz is a very sincere citizen 
of Elizabethville and has always proven to be ready to back up 
anything that is designed to benefit the community. He j.s 
married and has two daughters. 



268 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



WARREN J. DANIELS 
Elizabethville^ Pa, 



Mr. Daniels is a native of 




which being a Director of the 



Elizabethville, having been born 
and reared there. He is a 
descendant of the early set- 
tlers, (Daniels family). In 
1915 he was elected County 
Surveyor of Dauphin County 
and served in that capacity 
one term. Mr. Daniels was 
instrumental in having the 
park and playground estab- 
lished in Elizabethville, inso- 
far as he made preliminary 
examination of the grounds 
and presented favorable sug- 
gestive maps. During the con- 
scription period he was presi- 
dent of the Local Board Num- 
ber 3, Selective Draft, U. S. 
He is connected with several 
commercial houses, among 

Elizabethville Water Company. 



EARNEST L. STEEVER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

Mr. Steever is the only druggist in Elizabethville, where 
he purchased the business of J. C. Stroup the former druggist. 
In 1909 he graduated from the Wiconisco High School, from 
whence he entered the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, grad- 
uating in 1914. He came to Elizabethville in 1916 and opened 
business, from which time he has been \evy successful. Locally 
he is a member of the Park Commission and is a very pro- 



gressive citizen. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW ^W 



WHO S WHO lx\ WILLIAMSTOWX 
FRANK M. SHADLE 

WiLLIAMSTOWN, Pa. 

Mr, Sliadle was born at Loyalton and when a small boy 
removed with his family to Wiliiainstown. His first business 
venture was in the baking business, which he conducted for 
five years. He has been a Justice of the Peace at Williauis- 
town for thirteen years. At the Primary Election in 191'J Mr. 
Shadle polled a very heavy- vote in the valley for Dauphin 
County Commissioner on the Republican ticket. He served as 
Foreman of the State Highway Department for six yeai-s, hav- 
ing charge of the roads between Lykens and the Schuylkill 
County line. Under his administration many improvements 
"were made, among which was the Row Hollow, east of Wicon- 
isco. He is a director of the Fairview Cemetary Association 
and first Vice President of the same. Also the manager of the 
Palace Theatre since 1907 and in 1921 was elected Chief Bur- 
gess of Williamstown. 

J. B. LESHER 
Williamstown, Pa, 

Mr. Lesher is a native of Berks County. lie came to 
Williamstown entering business on the site now occupied by 
J. W. Durbin and Son, general store. Selling to :\Ir. Durbin 
later he left the community for a few years. Upon returning 
he engaged in the management of the New Era Cash Store for 
a short while. In 1908 he entered the mannfaoturinir busiiit>ss. 
which today is known as the Unrivalled Hosiery Mills. Later 
he built a branch to this business at Tower City. In 191:^ he 
promoted the Best Stock underwear plant at Tower City and 
at present is operating the mills at W^illiamstown, Tower City 
and Mahanoy City, all the work being shipped to William.s- 
town, finished there and placed on the market. Mr. Lesher 
Personally superintends and manages these concerns. H- has 



270 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





FRANK M SHADLE 
Williamslown, Pa. 



J. B. LESHER 
Williamstown, Pa. 





CYRUS DONLEY 
Williamstown, Pa. 



J. B. WHITWORTH 
Williamstown, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 071 



served the Borough as a member of Council one term. Ho is 
President of the Miners and IMerchants Bank at Williainstown. 
Director of the Berks County Trust Company and lumuMdiis 
other manufacturing houses. For a number of years he has 
been Sunday School Superintendent of the loi-al Methodist 
Church. 

J. B. WHITWUKTll 

WlLLIAMSTOWN, Pa. 

Mr. Whitworth is a native of \Yest Virginia, coming into 
the Valley and locating at Tower City in 1!)U. In l!)!.") he 
came to Williamstown and identified himself as Superintendent 
of the Lykens Valley Light and Power Company. He is a 
graduate of the Bliss Electrical college, Washington. D. C. 
a director and Secretary of the Miners and Merchants Hank 
and a member of the Board of Government, local Civic Club. 
Mr. Whitworth is one of the organizers and the largest j) resent 
operator taking coal from the Wiconisco Creek in this valley. 

CYRUS DONLEY 
Williamstown, Pa. 

Mr. Donley was born in Lebanon County. IK' i-anie to 
Williamstown in 1868. He is one of the early developers of 
the community and has assisted in each and every movement 
bettering the same. He served the Borough in ("ouneij t'or 
tvrelve years and as Borough Treasurer for two trniis. He 
served a term as Dauphin County Mercantile Ap|)raiser ami 
is a Director of the Miners and Merchants Bank of tliis town. 
Mr, Donley has been in business in Williamstown for the past 
thirty years, and is one of the community's iiKKst higlily re- 
spected citizens. 

LANE F. RUBENDALL 
Williamstown, Pa. 

Mr. Rubendall is a native of Williamstown an<l a deseen<l- 
ant of early settlers. He is a graduate of the loeal llii;li 
School and a very earnest supporter of sports. He has sened 



272 



LYKENS-WILLIAJMS VALLEY HISTORY 





JNO. N. SNYDER 
Williamstown, Pa. 



WILLIAM M. GROFF 
Williamstown, Pa. 





WILLIAM BLANNING 
Williamstown, Pa. 



DR. J. W. SHIPE, D.C. 
Williamstown, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 073 



Williams Township as tax collector since 1910 and clerk of the 
Township Road District about nine years. During the Twin- 
County League activities Mr. Rubendall was the official pub- 
licity Manager. He is a very highly respected citizen of Will- 
iamstown and with his acute physical handicap has been very 
successful in the various enterprises he introduced making for 
his support. 

WILLIAM M. GROFF 

WiLLIAMSTOWN, Pa. 

Mr. Groff was born in Columbia, Pa. Sixteen y«.'ars ago 
he began his career in the banking business and since that time 
has been Cashier of the Columbia Trust Company, Central 
National Bank of Columbia, Treasurer of the Commercial Trust 
Company, Harrisburg, and at present is Cashier of the Minei-s 
and Merchants Bank, Williamstown. He entered the business 
in Harrisburg in the year 1916, coming to Willianistown in 
1920. Mr. Groff is a Director of the Variety Corner Store, Inc. 
He is also a very interested member of the Twin-County League 
and a real supporter of the national sports. 

J. N. SNYDER 
Williamstown, Pa. 

Mr. Snyder was born at Loyalton of an okl line family of 
early settlers in the Valley. In 1898 he came to Williamstown 
and in 1915 entered the automobile business, being the present 
Ford distributor of that community. He is also at present a 
member of the Borough Council, and has served the Borough 
for a number of years in the capacity of Treasurer. Mr. Snyder 
is at present the Republican Committeeman of this borough, and 
with other county. offices has also served ;is M.-n-hantih' Ap- 
praiser for one terra. 



274 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





WM. O. ROWE 
Williamstown, Pa. 



WM. D. KEEN 
Dayton 




LANE F. RUBENDALL 
Williamstown. Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW .^7;; 



WHO'S WHO IN TOWER CITY 

CHARLES M. KAUFFMAN 
Tower City, Pa. 

Mr. Kauifman is one of Tower City's successful aud pro- 
gressive business men. Born in Llewellyn, he entered the retail 
store business in Tower City in 1885. In 1891 he helped to organ- 
ize and develope the Williams Valley Railroad and was elected 
its first President and General Manager. January 22nd. 1!I02 
he was instrumental in organizing the Tower City Natioiud 
Bank and elected its first president, which position he still 
holds. In 1904, Mr. Kauffman assisted in the organization of 
the Williams Valley Bank at Williamstown and was the fii"st 
secretary of the Board. In the year 1900 he helped organize u 
very important community necessity, water company, and is 
still president of the same. In 1896 Mr. Kauffman established 
the Green Wood Cemetery a short distance south-east of town, 
which he still owns, and which is rated among the very finest bur- 
ial grounds in the valley. Mr. Kauffman is a member of ami Past 
Master of Swatara Lodge No. 267 P. A. M. of Tremont. He is 
a large real estate OAvner in the valley and a sincere exponent 
of civic pride. 

H. S. SNYDER 
Tower City, Pa. 

Mr. Snyder was born in Center County, and came to the 
Lykens- Williams Valley in September 1917. as chief clerk of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad at Lykens, Pa. .Mr. Snyder wliiK- 
serving in this capacity displayed a keen interest in the com- 
munity civics, being one of the developers of the famous 
Lj^kens Swimming Pool. In 1920 he entered the furnitur.' and 
general house furnishing business in Tower City. He is a ^rad 
uate of the Springs Mills Higli School. Center County, class ..f 
1898. 



276 



LYKENS-AVILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 





W. F. JONES 
Tower City. Pa. 



H. T. CALLEN 
Tower City, Pa. 





0. M. KAUFFIVIAN 
Tower City, Pa. 



H. S. SNYDER 
Tower City, Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



277 



WILLIAM F. JONES 
To\^^R City, Pa. 

^ Born in Shamokin, Mr. Jones came to the Lykens Valley in 
1871. He located first in Lykens, engaging in general merchan- 
dise in the building now occupied by W. IL Cooper's garage. 
He later removed to Wiconisco, from there to AVilliams- 
town and from there to Tower City, each time and in each place 
engaging in the retail business. IMr. Jones is the present Chief 
Burgess of Tower City and the oldest man occupying that pos- 
ition in the valley and second to the oldest in Pennsylvania. 
He was one of the incorporators of the Boroughs of AVilliams- 
town and Tower City, a Director of the Williams Valley Bank. 
Wllliamstown, and was President of the Tower City School 
Board, at the time of the erection of the new building. 

H. T. CALLEN 
Tower City, Pa. 

]Mr. Callen is a native of Tower City and on January 1, 
1922, became Postmaster of that place. He was Secretary of 
District Number 5, Selective Service Board located at Pottsvilie. 
during the war. He served two years as Traveling Auditor of 
the Bureau of Investigation. Penns^dvania State An<lilor-Oen- 
ral's Department. Mr. Callen served the Borough in the capac- 
ity of clerk for nineteen years, twelve years ehief clerk at Brook- 
side Collier}', and has been a bona fide exponent of local civic 
and community pride. 

W. F. KNECHT 
Tower City, Pa. 

Mr. Knecht was born in Pottsvilie and canif to Tower City 
in 1878, entering the Baking business. In ISOS \w established 
and began publishing the West Schuylkill Herald. pn-siMit 
weekly paper of Tower City, of which he is sole owner. lie is 
Vice-President of the Tower City National Bank, a memb.T of 
the I. 0. 0. F., and of the Swatara Lodge F. & A. M. He has 
served the Borough in the capacity of Scliool Director for a 
number of years. 



278 LYKENS-WILLIAAIS VALLEY HISTUKY 

J. B. W ATKINS 
Tower City, Pa. 

Mr. Watkins is a native of Tower City, having been born 
and reared in the Borough. He is a descendant of early settlers 
and one of the town's successful business men. In 1895 he 
entered the wholesale confectionery business which he still con- 
ducts. He is a director of the Tower City National Bank, which 
he assisted in organizing and is recognized as an exponent of 
local civic pride. 

E. H. KAUFFMAN 
Tower City, Pa. 

Mr. Kauffman is a native of Tower City, being a descend- 
ant of the Kauffman family who played such an important part 
in the development of the Borough ; at present he conducts the 
Kauffman General Store, which was begun by his father, and 
which is one of the oldest establishments of its kind in the town. 
He is a strong supporter of all civic and community enterprises 
and has supported all local movements tending toward the 
betterment of the coraniunitv. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



L'79 



HONOR ROLL OF THE VALLP]Y-EACH TUWN 

SEPARATE 

Names of Citizens Who Served in the Great World War 

{Note) In compiling tlie following list of nauu's, great 
■care was taken to avoid errors and give as near as possible an 
accurate roll. Should some names not appear it is not the 
fault of the compiler since three months of seaix-li against vari- 
ous handicaps were entailed in its compilation, notwithstaiuling 
which this list is complete to the best of my knowledge and 
belief. J. A. 11. 



Roscoe Blyler 
Earle Hotl'man 
^lorris Hartman 
Norman Daniel 
Charles Daniels 
Perry AVillard 
Harry Zerfing 
jMarlin Hoffman 
Ray Coleman 
Oeorge Kissinger 
Fred Kissinger 
Thomas Umholtz 
Oeorge Sitlinger 
Foster Coleman 
John Welker 
Allen Shoffstall 
Harry AVelker 
William Smeltz 
.Walter Raimer 
Henry Ferree 
John Sitlinger 
George Koppenhaver 
Ralph Rotharmel 
James Koppenhaver 



Gratz 

Charles Shade 
William Steely 
Benjamin Evitts 
Joel Daniel 
Elmer Clark 
Blair Schiuiiiky 
Harry Folk 
Carlos Daiiii'l 
Ralph Witmei- 
Albert Zerling 
Isaiah Schminky 
Daniel Smeltz 
Ray Snyder 
Channeey Solada 
Earl Dietrich 
Guy Klinger 
Lewis Slieil) 
Charles Kopjieiihaver 
Harry Clamle I'mholtz 
Earle l\eed 
Homer Stine 
IMark Stine 
II(mier rmlioltz 
JjU'iil) Shaih' 



280 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



MiLLERSBURG 

AUeman, George Millersbiirg, Pa. 

Barnhart, Earl C Millersbiirg, Pa. 

Bashoar, Carl Millersbiirg, Pa. 

Bender, Chas. E Millersburg, Pa. 

Bender, Robert 1912 Brown St., Phila. Pa. 

Blasser, Kay M Millersburg, Pa. 

Blasser, Walter J Noblesville, Ind. 

Bordner, Earl G Millersburg, Pa. 

Bowman, S. S Millersburg, Pa. 

Bowman, Howard Millersburg, Pa. 

Boyer, C. E Millersburg, Pa. 

Bradenbaugh, W. B ^lillersbiirg, Pa. 

Brow^n, Palmer Millersburg, Pa. 

Brown, Earle R Liverpool, Pa. R. D. 1 

Buffington, George Millersburg, Pa. 

Buyer, Dr. B. M Millersburg, Pa. 

Chubb, Jacob Millersburg, Pa. 

Deibler, Walter Paradise, Pa. 

Doney, Robert Millersburg, Pa. 

Dreibelbis, Harry Millersburg, Pa. 

Dressier, John Millersburg, Pa. 

Erieg, Harry L Millersburg, Pa. 

Etzweiler, John Millersburg, Pa. 

Etzweiler, Arthur W Dauphin, Pa. R. D, 1 

Eves, Dr. P. AV 1810 State St., Harrisburg,' Pa. 

Feagley, Albert F Paxton, Pa. 

Forney, G, AA^ Millersburg, Pa. 

Fralick, Gordon E Millersburg, Pa. 

Frank, Harry Carl Millersburg, Pa. 

Cansert, Harry Millersburg, Pa. 

Carver, Davis L Millersburg, Pa. 

Gilbert, Allen F Millersburg, Pa. 

Gilbert, F. G 38 No. 17th, St., Harrisburg, Pa. 



DIKECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



281 



Hartman, James SliUersburg, Pa. 

Hartman, Thomas Millersburg, Pa. 

High, Paul Millersburg' Pa 

Hoffman, Alfred Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoffman, Bruce Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoffman, T. R Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoffman, Howard B Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoy, Nevin N Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoy, Herbert C Millersburg, Pa. 

Hoy, Joe Millersburg, Pa. 

Jury, Paul E Millersburg, Pa. 

Johnson, H. D MOlersburg, Pa. 

Johnson, Merle MOlersburg, Pa. 

Klingman, L. E Millersburg, Pa. 

Kepner, Ray E .Afillersburg, Pa. 

Kepner, Howard Jr Millersburg, Pa. 

Kerr, Robert V. C Millersburg, Pa. 

Kline, Joe W Millersburg, Pa. 

Kline, Ira M Millersburg, Pa. 

Kuhns, H. L Millersburg, Pa. 

Lawley, Frank P Millersburg, Pa. 

Lenker, Harry 142 E. Phila. St., York. Pa. 

Lenker, La\^Tence Millersburg, Pa. 

Lenlcer, Luther Millersburg, Pa. 

Lindsley, Allen Millersburg, Pa. 

Liddick, Sheridan C Millersburg, Pa. 

Link, Frank Millersburg, Pa. 

Link, Chas. J .Millersburg, Pa. 

Loomis, Walter G .Millersburg, Pa. 

Louden, Christy :\lillersburg. Pa. 

Marks, Lee :\lillersburg. Pa. 

Matter, Clayton ^lillersbui-g, l^i. 

Maxwell, C. J Millersburg, Pa. 

McBride, Grover C .Millersburg. Pa. 

Messner, Lloyd H Millersburg, Pa. 

Messner, E. A Millersburg, P;i. 



282 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



:\Iessner, John Millersburg 

Messner, Mark A 96 N. 18th. 

Messuer, George H Paxton, Pa, 

Meek, Lloyd L Millersburg 

Michael, George Millersburg 

Miller, Herbert N Millersburg 

Miller, Robert F Millersburg 

Miller, Arthur V Millersburg 

]\Iuggio, C Millersburg 

Xeubaum, Fred Millersburg 

Xeubaum, Frederich E Halifax, Pa 

Novinger, Russell Millersburg 

Novinger, Chas. L Millersburg 

Polk, Claude Millersburg 

Pottiger, Boyd Millersburg 

Radel, Clarence IMillersburg 

R'arig, Claude Millersburg 

Reid, Chas. 1 817 S. 

Reisch, Harry INIillersburg 

Rothermell, John Millersburg 

Rutter, Paul F. A ^Millersburg 

Schaffer, Clarence ]Millersbrrg 

Shaffer, Isaac W Millersburg 

Salada. Chauncy Millersburg 

Shatto, Chas. E :\Iillersbii.rg 

Sheetz, a: C Halifax, Pa 

Shetron, Garnet Millersburg 

Shoop, Allen A Millersburg 

Shrawder, Charles Millersburg 

Sneeder, L. R Millersburg 

Snyder, Raymond D Millersburg 

Spong, Ralph B Millersburg 

Stahl, Robert M Millersburg 

Starr, Rev. Ralph E .Millersburg 

Stence, William Millersburg 

Stinner. Fred Millersburg 



Pa. 
St., Harrisburg, Pa- 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Broadway, Dayton. Ohio 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 

R. D. 3 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 
Pa. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 2b3 



Strub, Frauds Millersbiirg, Pa. 

Tschopp, AVilliam Millersbiirg, Ta. 

Walborn, Elmer Millersburg, Pa. 

Walborn, Robert Alillersbiirg, Pa. 

Watkins, W, W Millersburg, P;i. 

Watts, Guy Millersburg, Pa. 

Weaver, Marlin P Millersburg, Pa. 

, Wenner, George E! Millersburg, Pa. 

Wert, Mark W Millersburg, Pa. 

Wingard, George S Millersburg, Pa. 

Wingard, D. M Millersburg, Pa. 

Wright, Harry Millersburg, Pa. 

James Bair, MiUersburg, Pa. 

R. H. Bowman, Millersburg, Pa. 

Josiah G. Fry, Millersburg, Pa. 

Harry Kitner, Millersburg, Pa. 

Russell C. Kitner, Millersburg, Pa. 

W. M. Kerstetter, Millersburg, Pa. 

W. L. Koppenhaver, Millersburg. Pa. 

Ralph Kuntzelman, Halifax. Pa. \\. 1 

Solomon Leitzel, Millersburg, Pa. 

Isaac H. Mesener, Millersburg, Pa. 

Lester Reigler, :\Tillersburg, Pa. 

A. J. Skeels, Millersl)urg, Pa. 

Slmer Sultzbaugh, Millersburg, Pa. 

Chas. Witmer Millersburg, Pa. 

Jonathan Zerby, Millersburg, Pa. 

Harry Brown 0. C. Riehl.-r 

Arthur Coleman Leroy Thompson 



WiCONISCO 



Roy C. Acaley Win. A. Calnon 

William Bateman Homer Coleman 

Anmoul Bordner T-^^lvin Casb.w 

Leonard Boden K'.b.rt Caslow 

Chartes Buffington -Tohu II. De.tnrh 



284 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



David P. Evans 
Forrest Evans 
Albert K. Foster 
Samuel Forney 
George Fetterhoif 
Thomas Guryther 
Morris Gittin 
Harry Hocklander 
Harold Higgns 
Joseph Allen Harman 
Edward Park Harman 
William H. Hart 
Elmer Johns 
Edward Jury 
Ray Jones 
Michael F. Kelly 
E. Leroy Keen 
Johna W. Keen 
Huyden M. Keinger 
Harney Kelly 
Homer Klinger 
Edward Kolvic 
John Henry Kinsinger 
Sammel Lodovinski 
George J. Miller 
William E. Mahoney 
Jas. T. ]\IeAuliffe 

Hirman 



Charles Mesner 
Robert E. xMinnich 
John D. Palmer 
Harvey J. Row 
Stiney Russelnage 
Clarence E. Sanders 
Albert E. Snyder 
Edward H. Seip 
Roy E. Seip 
Gunnis Rlckert 
William- E. Seip 
Harry W. Steener 
John I, Shadel 
Ralph Smeltz 
Harry Shamper 
Thomas AV, James 
George W. James 
Elmer E. Umholtz 
Harry C, Umholtz 
AVm. Henry Williams 
Albert R. Watkeys 
David John Watkeys 
Harper W. Weist 
George R. Witmer 
Joseph Weaver 
John Ydrresick 
George J. Ydrresick 
Zimmerman 



Berryburg 



Joseph Stover 
Forrest Keboch 
Harry Wade 
Paul Lyter 



Guy Shoop 
Walter Lebo 
Harry Hartman 
Roscoe Daniel 
Hain 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



285 



Lykens 



Floyd D. Reese 
Gu}' Arrisoii 
Samuel H. Barrett 
Homer Beadle 
rCharles Bretz 
Lamar Cooper 
Joseph Cyckonski 
Ambrose Cycuskouskie 
Charles A. Deitrieh 
John H. ^B. Deitrieh 
Charles Dressel 
David J. Evans 
William C. Evans 
Malvin S. Finton 
Harrv^ C. Finton 
Adam J. Faust 
Leo N. Fritz 
Author Bruce Morris 
Howard E. Miller 
James E. Machamer 
Eugene M. McAuliffe 
:\Iyron F. Nutt 
"Wellington J. O'Gourek 
Fred W. Paul 
Clarence C. Parfet 
Eugene C. Pinkerton 
George Albert Pell 
Clayton Peters 
John Russel Page 
David Romberger 
Clarence Romberger 
William P. Radel 
George R'adel 
George Allen Row 
William G. Reigle 
David Romberger 



William II. Sargeant 

Victor Shalley 

Robert E. Swat 

William Salada 

Harry B. Salada 

Lee A. Schmincli 

Daney Snyder 

Ivin G. Snyder 

Clarence Schoffstall (Loyahon) 

William Charles Schoffstall 

Lee H. Schreiner 

Charles E. Schreiner 

S. Ray Stanley 

Martin Sponick 

James N. Smith 

John T. Saltzer 

John Fredrick Schott 

Frank D. Stuppy 

Hany M. Troxeli 

John F. Troxeli 

Carroll Thomas 

Ray C. Wise 

Charles J. Walde 

Carl AYest 

Allen Williams 

George William Weaver 

James Byron Williams 

Harry C. Werner 

George AVym 

Herman J. Wcntzler 

Wellington -J. Voss 

Lewis II. (teager 

Charles J. Zigner 

Clayton J. Good 

Ray F. (Jood 

Rudolpli -i. (ioldberger 



286 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLFA' HISTORY 



Elmer Grim 
Ralph Grim 
Author L. Helt 
John Albert Hentz 
Edward Hoover 
Sammuel J. Hoff 
John D. Harper 
Carnelins M. Harper 
William H. Harman 
Lewis Iberson 
Earl C. James 
Paul W. Kniley 
Joseph Skolnic 



George 



(Jiiaries Krauthoff 
Jonas E. Koiser 
Claude Keiser 
Edward D. Keiser 
Marion K. Keiser 
James Edward Kocher 
Harry A. Klinger 
Belton G. Klinger 
Earl L. Lehr 
Charles S. Longo 
Edward V. Longo 
Vincent Longo 
Author W. Lawley 
W. Lehr 



Elizabethville 



Charles H. Snyder 
James E. Snyder 
Stew^art V. Swab 
Sidney Goldman 
Irvrn Spessler 
Jesse 0. Zeigler 
Edwin W. Zeigler 
Philip B. Musser 
Allen C. Lentz 
Lloyd E. Enders 
Kev. P. M. Haldeman 
Miles V. Miller 
Forrest A. Bohner 
Howard L. Weaver 
Dr. Robert E. Barto 
Lewis C. Buffington 
Willis H, Cooper 
Mark L. Matter 
Harm- D. Bahnev 



Homer A. Erdman 
John A. Dubendorf 
Edwin C. Bechtel 
John B. Klinger 
Charles 0. Dobson 
Elwood R. Miller 
Charles A. Hetrick 
Joseph W. Stover 
Harry L. Wade 
Laurence Romberger 
C. Russel Botts 
Lester A. Enders 
Lester Harner 
Clinton Whitcomb 
Leroy A. Temple 
Warren L. Koppenhaver 
John D. Palmer 
Harry Okenreider 
Paul Gonder 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REMKW 



287 



John Hummel (Killed in Action) 
Lloyd Tschopp (Killed in Action) 
Walter A. Irving (Wounded in Action) 
Clair A. Hoke (Wounded in Action) 
Byran Stroup (Wounded in Action) 



WlLLIAMSTOWN 



Frank Amthor 

Stanley R. Adams 

Wm. Andrew Scavidge 

Geo. A. Adams 

^lark L. Adams 

*Jas. W. Burns 

Thos. J. Bell 

Jos. A. Byerly 

Wm. Breslin 

Thos. Bottomly 

Paul Bates 

Chas. W. Bast 

Edw. P. Boyle 

Jos. A. Barnes 

Earl Bond 

W. Y. Blanning 

Thos. Bond, Jr. 

John S. Blum 

Howard A. Blanning 

Elwood E. Blanning 

Gordon Britton 

J. A. Baddorf 

Jos. BergzoU 

G. Campbell 

Thos. Cook 

Chas. Curtis 

H. LeRov Carl 



Paul Carl 
P. F. Craven 
Ed. J. Coles 
Art Clouser 
Dennis Cavaiiaiitrli 
Thos. E. Dohm 
Jos. W. Diirhiii 
Thos. J. Doyle 
Richard Doyle 
G. F. Doyle 
Sam G. Enders 
Harry Edwards 
Roy L. Frantz 
Stanley E. Fliim 
Claranee Fickingcr 
John H. Falk 
Harper Finley 
Wilson Greiner 
Wesley Grillitli 
AVm. J. Grillilli 
Allen Flinu 
Thos. W. Graham 
Jos. M. Gniham 
Jas. J. Gaffney 
Michael Garver 
John S. Geist 
Jos. J. Golden 



288 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Ray Greiner 
John Harmon 
Clarence Hoover 



Beecher R. Hay 
Harold J. Hay 
Fred Hoffman 




PAT CRAVEN 



Nace Hopple 
F. G. Humbert 
J. W. H. Jones 
Wm. J. Kennedy 



Russel Kissinger 
R. Frank Keene 
John A. Klinger 
David L. Klinger 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



289 



Jas. P. Kelly 
Gordon Kinsey 
Henry L. Kramer 
]\Tark M. Kelly 
]\Iark Kilraine 
Arthur Klinger 
Elmer Kissinger 
Leo Lynch 
Wm. T. Lynch 
David Lewis 
Jesse Lewis 
Abe Lewis 
Roy C. Long 
Wm. J. Lower 
Ray i\Iiller 
Raymond IMiller 
Andrew jMelkhko 
Chas. W. Miller 
Arthur Moffet 
David Morgan 
Odon ^IcNails 
Homer McNeal 
Lester Moyer 
John jMurray 
Thomas JMates 
Howard McNanan 
Vincent Maher 
Jas. McNamara 
Jeremiah McNamara 
Ray T. McNamara 
Peter IMcHugh 
Chas. Michaels 
Jas. Meehan 
Otto Messner 
Ross W. Moss 
Jos. Melisky 



Forrest W. Nace 
Geo. M. Nace 
Jeremiah Nace 
Mark Newton 
Jas. C. Newton 
James Newton 
Jas. Noel 
S. Pickalovidge 
Edw. C. Punch 
Wm. F. Punch 
Jos. S. Pliillips 
Harry Perkins 
Wm. Powell 
Harvey Pennell 
John C. Pennell 
Jos. Phillips 
Sebert Pliillips 
p]. R. Raudenbush 
Jos. Rautlenbush 
Wilmer Rowe 
Jas. Richardson 
Harry Raiitzen 
Mark Rautzen 
Earl Rickert 
Jos. B. Ralph 
S. Clair Row 
Stephen Rebinsky 
Forrest Reigle 
Francis Reigle 
Jas. Ryan 
Thos. Ryan 
Stcplien Rabm 
Norman Schell 
Gordon Sauers 
David Samuels 
Felix R. Sanniels 
Wm. E. Slraub 



290 



LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Lehr Straub 
Leo A. Schwink 
Wilbert F. Straub 
Jos. Diirbin Stites 
Harry J. Stites 
Jos. Shuttlesworth 
*Rol)t. Shuttlesworth 
N. Shuttlesworth 
Frank Schuttlesworth 
Wm. Schuttlesworth 
Patrick Savage 
Jas. F. Savage 
Jos. D. Stinner 
Vincent F. Smith 
Allen W. Saussraan 
Geo. L. Saussman 
Harry Shammo 
Kay Smith 
Eay Troxell 
Howard V. Troutman 



Chas. 



Jos. Thomas 
J. Thomas 
Geo. Valiska 
B. W. Whitcomb 
John Washburn 
Wm. W. Watkins 
Daniel F Wise 
*Irvin Werdt 
Clarence Waters 
Wm. McK, Wagner 
Albert Wolfe 
Clarence Walters 

JMark Walkinshaw 
Jas. G. Walkinshaw 
Jos. W. Warlow 
John C. West 
Clarence J. Wolfe 
Earle Werdt 

Clias. Williams 
Rny Yoder 

Llat A. Yokus 
H. Straub 



TOWER CITY, PA. AND PORTER TOWNSHIP 



Tower City and end op Valley 



Allen, James C, 
*Antes, Charles F., 

Bowers, Harvey A., 
tBerney, Daniel B,, 
*Bender, Fred, 

Bowers, Harry A., 
^Bender. Irwin M., 



Barrv, Arthur, 
*Brennan, Thomas, 

Bailey, James A., 
*Blackman, Ray, 
* Bowman, Thomas, 

Bettinger, Irwin, 

Bohr. Charles F., 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



291 



Bowers, William E., 

*Bohr, Oscar H., 

fBoyer, William, 

*Bender, William F., 
Cleary, Leo, 
Cambell, Walter, 
Carl, Charles J., 
Craft, William, 
Dinger, Ralph, 

fDonato, Angelo, 
Donetelli, Tony, 

*Dnbbs. William H., 
Dawns, William, 
Diechert, Edward, 
Evans, Charles R., 

*Eng-lish, Webster D. 

*Eberts, Clinton C, 
Evans, Chester, 

*Evans, Harvey A., 
Fry, Edwin, 
Ferree, Elmer F., 
Fetterhoff, Victor F., 
Fesig, John, 

*Foo:arty, Charles, 
Fry, Wilbur, 

*Farrell, Harold, 

*Gehres, Harry, 

tCriffith, John, 
Ganley, Joseph R., 

*Gehres, Jacob, 
Houtz, Clair E., 
Horn, Luther F., 

*Hoffman, Harvey S., 
Hawk, David J., 
Henry, Russel A., 

*Humbert, Fredrick C, 



tHossler, Fredrick, 

Hoover, Albert, 

Hand, John IL, 

Hand, Simon E., 

Hand, Clarence .M., 

Hand, Edgar F., 

Hand, Josiah i\. 

Hand, Edward F., 
*Hand, R. H., 
§Heartler, Harry •].. 

Heberling. Ctinrles E., 
§Hensel, Elmer, 
*Herb, Clarence I).. 
*Haslam, Elnici-, 

Heartier, David. 

Heberling. .lohn A.. 
*Plummcl, Harry. 

Houtz, Edward .)r.. 

Hossler, Benjamin. 

Hollenstcim. Oliver, 

Jones, William K. •!.. 
*Jones. Stanley I\.. 
fKaufman. Benjamin IC, 
tKnecht, Gilbert .1.. 
*Knecht. Roy. 
§KopchoU, Peter. 
*King. Charles. 
*Kehl, George P.. 
*Kopp. L.vii .1.. 

Kolva. Wilson. 

Kiiourt". William. 

Kolb. Micheal W.. 

Kaufman, l-eroy. 

Kuntzleman. Albert, 

Kurtz. Hany C, 

Kantner. Clark, 



292 



L\ KENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



Katerman, Harry, 
Kuntzleman, Amos H., 
Long, Robert E,, 
Lyons, Timothy J., 
Lyons, Joseph J., 

*Lord, John J., 
Lyons, Daniel F. J., 

fLenord, Terrance W., 
Lebo, Irvin L., 

*Lodish, Anthony, 

*Leonard, Leo, 

*Machamer, George W., 

*Machamer, Clair W., 
Machamer, Harry L., 

*Miller, /Warren, 

^Miller, William, 

*Willer, Stanley R., 
Meyers, Harry E., 
Miller, Edward F., 
Miller, William A., 
Miller, John A., 
Minnich, Ralph C. J., 
Mack, James H., 
*Maher, Ray, 
Mione, Samuel, 
*McDonald, John Leo, 
*Messner, John G., 
*Morgan, James G., 
McMullen, Vincent, 
Murray, Joseph, 
Miller, Abraham P., 
*Nash, Joseph H., 
§Nash, William A., 
*Neidlinger, Elvin, 
Neidlinger, Emory, 
Ne3''er, John, 



*Neyer, Franklin C. M., 
fNelson, Isaac, 
Nelson-, Charles, 
*Ney, Earl, 
*Nable, Charles H., 
Nunemacher, James F., 
§Nunemacher, Allen, 
Neidlinger, Walter, 
*Powell, Charles L., 
*Patrick, Charles, 
*Patrick, William, 
*Patrick, Lloyd, 
*Peiffer, Charles, 

Powell, James C, 

Russell, Harry IL, 

Riczkis, William, 
*Reightler, Charles, 

Russelavage, Stiney, 

Reedy, Robert C, 

Reedy, Ray, in Germany. 

Reiner, Ralph R., 

Rickert, Harry A., 
*Snyder, Chester R., 
*Snyder, Edward, 

Schell, Leo F. J., 

Stoud, Edwin L., 

Starr, William J,, 

Snyder, John F., 

Shingler, Albert R., 

Schrope, Robert, 

Shomper, William F., 

Shoop, Harry, 

Salem, Lester. 
§Schaffer, Walter, 

Shadle, Clayton, 
*Schreiner, Charles A., 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 



293 



Shadle, Eronemans T., 


Underkoffler, Daniel R.. 


*Shutz, Sherman, 


TJhler, George, 


Shuey, Geant H., 


:j:Unger, Herl)ert, 


:j:Sehwenk, Earl, 


*Workman, Frank J., 


*Schwenk, William H., 


Wolfgang, Clarence M., 


§Schaffer, Ira, 


Workman, Edward, 


Sponsler, John H., 


Wean, Lincoln, 


*Shell, Georg-e F., 


Wood, Edward, 


Shiley, Harvey A., 


Watldns, Ivan C, 


*Snyder, Samuel A., 


Warfield Harry C, 


Snyder, Joseph, 


*Wise, John C, 


Trout, John G., 


*Wagner, Norman, 


*Travitz, Clarence, 


Walsh, Thomas J., 


*Thompson, Russell L., 


* Williams, Albert, 


* Thompson, Allen, 


Wagner, Clayton, 




Wise, Albert R., 


Unger, Simon E., 


William, Fred W., 


Updegrave, Harper, 


*Zerbe, Ulysses W.. 


* "Wonnded. 


t Died in camn. 



•j- — W'ounded, died. 



§— Killed. 



294 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



THE ''DID YOU KNOW" OR "DO YOU REMEMBER'" 

DEPARTMENT 

Charles Zerby of Lykens, was lost March 22, 1895; found 
drowned in the Wiconisco Creek a few feet below the Penn- 
sylvania Trestle, April 1, 1895. 



—The great Anthracite coal strikes were : 
September 17, 1900— to— October 29, 1900 
May 27, 1902— to— October 27, 1902 



— The Hoisting Engine installed at the top of short moun- 
tain slope, Lykens, December 1, 1901, was built by Joseph 
Duncan of Lykens, Pa. 



— Edward C. Hanna, former Supt. of the Colliery for 13 
years, and father of our distinguished citizen, A. F. Hanna, 
dropped dead on the stainvay of the Masonic Temple, in Phila- 
delphia, Frida}^ December 27, 1907, aged 84 years. 

— The first aeroplane to fly over the Lykens Valley occured 
April 20, 1913, when Walter Johnson of New York flew from 
IMillersburg to Wiconisco in 13 minutes, landing about 9 :30 
A. M. 



— February 22, 1918, was the first time in the history of the 
coal mines that the miners worked on that date — Washington's 
birthdav. 



— The Bull Engine House fire happened on the first day of 
Januar}^ 1876, 



— The first telephone installed in the valley was installed 
on Short ^Mountain Slope in the year 1880 by C. W. Snyder 
and Henry Erdman of Lykens. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL RKVIKW 2\)o 

— The Big brick mines at Dayton oloserl operations in 
December, 1877. 

— The new Breaker at Short ^lountain Colliery was built 
February 17, 1913. 

— The Short ^Mountain AVashery burned to tiie jrroinul 
April 18, 1919 

— The first trip of coal ])rought up the new No. 1 shaft at 
Lvkens occurred October 14, 1915. 

— A flag pole was erected and flag raised at Short .Moun- 
tain Colliery April 28, 1917— Community Services. 

* 

— The ncAV power plant at Short .Mountain Colliery- 
Ground broken -^"'y 1^- l'*^'^ 

Slush pumped up 'Ii>"'' ^ '^^ ^"-^ 

First boiler fired August 1 1. 1!>21 

First current turned on and conveyed to AVilliamstown. 

Greenfield pump " October \\' 1!»21 



The first electric doorbell in Lvkens was installe<l by C. 

W. Snyder, in the home of Jonas Garnian in the year ISSO. 

—Lvkens is named after and in hon..r ..f An-lr.u Lvkens 
(Lycans) who settled at the old Forge f Oak-dale i in 17:.!). Tho 
Lykens Valley also derived its name from this source. 

— Elizabethville is named after au.l in lion-r of Kli/.ab.-th. 
wife of John Bender, who founded th.' town in tli.- year ISli. 

— Millersburg is named after an.l in lu.nor of Dani.«l and 
John Miller, who founded the town in th.- year 1790. 



296 lAKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

— Williamstown is named after and in honor of Daniel 
"Williams who was a pioneer of the valley and who conducted 
a Gris-mill near Williamstown. The Williams Valley also de- 
rives it's name from this man. 



— Wiconisco is named after the Wiconisco Creek, as well as 
is the Wiconisco Township. This creek is an historical stream 
and is of Indian traditional origin. The original name spelled 
was Whiconescong. 



— The first private home and store in Lykens to be equipped 
with telephone service was the property of Lewis H. Heilner, 
now the W. H. Uhler Drug Store property, in 1880. 



— John Paul, Jr., who resided at Elizabethville, was a valu- 
able consulting engineer during the construction of the Lykens 
Valley railroad. He was also called into consultation by a 
large construction company at the time of the building of the 
famous Altoona Horse Shoe Bend, and he at that time solved tlie 
perplexities confronted, and made possible this great railroad 
feat. 



— In 1846 Millersburg was a town camposed of about eighty 
dwellings, two stores, one mill and three churches. 



— Berrysburg was the first seat of the organization of the 
Evangelical denomination in this region. 



— Ludwig Minsker, an emigrate from the Palatinate, 
located in Clark's Valley in the year 1750. He built his log 
cabin on a run near where the old John Hocker, Jr., property 
now stands. He was a man of great courage, and the Indians 
of the neighborhood fearing him, never molested him or his 
family 



— Andrew (Lyvan) Lykens settled at the old Forge, Oak- 
Dale, now Loyalton, in the year 1750. 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIEW 297 



—Oak-Dale Forge was built about the year 1828 by James 
Buchanan, who at the same time or year following, built six or 
seven houses for his workmen. Some of the older families re- 
siding here at that time were the following— John (iinter. 
Thomas Nutt, George Gonner, Samuel Boon and Joseph Dunlai). 

— The first Post Office located in the Lykens-Williams 
Valley, was at Oak-Dale, now Loyalton, and that the firet Post 
Master was Mr. James Buchanan. In those days mail was 
•carried by pony each week and neighbors i)rior to that time took 
turns at walldng to Millersburg weekly for mail. 



— The first Justice-of-the-Peace in the Ly kens-Williams 
Valley was Mr. Adam Wise and date as of February 1st. 1799. 
The second Justice was Mr. John Hopple, March 19th. 1799. 
The places of residence of these men in the valley could not be 
ascertained. 



— Towercity is named after and in honor of it 's founder. 
Charlmagne Tower. Mr. Tower was one of the largest land 
owners of Schuylkill County in this valley and praetically de- 
veloped the coal industry in that end. He died a few years ago 
leaving an estate estimated at twenty three million dollars. 
This etsate is of perpetual nature and is today refuted to be 
worth thirty three million. 



— When the United Mine Workers of Ameriea Distiict 
number 9 held their convention in Lykens. Pa. in the old ()i)i'ra 
house up on the hill, in 1901. Do you remember that funny 
song George Kosier rendered, ''Hi-Le, Ili-Lo." etc.— at the 
convention ? 



— Gratz Borough was laid out and named in honor of Simon 
Gratz, grandfather of Mr. David Gratz, residing on Mark.'t St. 
Lvkens, Pa. 



—The first settlers in the Lykens-Williiims Valb-y w.-re 
Prench Huguenots and Germans, 



298 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 

— The Lykens vallej^ Railroad built in 1834, drawn by 
horse power, on a flat strap rail, was the fourth railroad in the 
United States for the purpose of transporting Anthracite coa!. 



— The Wiconiseo Canal was built in the year 1848. 



— Berrysburg is named after the Berry's Mountain lying 
in the vicinity. 



— Hon. Harry Baker, Pennsylvania State Republican Chair- 
man, began his political carrer when Senator A. F. Thompson 
of Lykens apponted him a Page in the Senate, some years ago. 



— The first steam boat to go up the Susquehanna River 
past Millersburg occurred in 1825. The name of the boat was 
Codores (Nolan Diary) . 



— The first crime committed in the valley (murder) occurred 
in 1857, a short distance below Fennels ]Mines on Short ^Nloun- 
tain (Nolan Diary). 



— The first execution in Harrisburg took place July 14, 
1798. The hanging was done on wliat is now Capital Hill 
(Nolan Diary). 



— The last woolen mill conducted in the valley was by 
Samuel Wolfe, about 2^ miles west of Loyalton. 



— In 1863 there were just three houses in Williamstown. 
That the town was then called Buehlerton? 



— Smallpox epidemic in Lykens-AViconisco in 1874. Ap- 
proximate total deaths were seventy. 



— Do you remember when Wiconiseo Creek was a clear 
water brook, and one could catch v^ath hook and line, all kinds 
of fresh water fish including trout, etc.? 



DIRECTORY AND PICTORIAL REVIKW oy.j 



Did you knoAv that Lyken-Williams Valley at its hiohc-st 
pomt of elevation, is live thousand feet above sea level? 

Cyclone passed through valley touching Eli/al.ethville most 
serious, during the year 1850. The property which stood on 
the lot now occupied by the Hassinger home, was blown ck-aii 
into the middle of the street. 



Theodore Miller, is the oldest resident of Elizabethvill 



Did you know that Mr. I'. B. .Miller, one of the early pion- 
eers of the valley and father of Theo. Miller of ElizalUhville, con- 
ceived the idea and assisted materially in organizing the Lykens 
Valley Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and was that company's 
first Secretary and Treasurer. 



Did you know that a close relative of Hon. George Washing- 
ton, our first president is buried in the old cemetery located on 
the Elmer Romberger farm at the Western end of Short .Mt. 
near Loyalton. 



Did you ever notice that peculiar sight while traveling from 
the upper end of the valley to 3Iillersburg on the Pennsylvania 
R. R. ? If this is news to you, pay attention next time you make 
that trip and .just before you come to Woodside station yon will 
pass a brick house, which in passing presents all four sides to 
view. Traveling West, looking from the right side, you will 
first notice the Eastern side, then the front or Southern siile. as 
you proceed you will see the AVest Side and tinally liefore you 
are aware of it you are looking at the Xortheni expo.Mire of the 
property. Look for it next time. 



Hon. George Coles formerly of Wieonisco, is at present 
United States District Attorney in llu- rhihidelphi;! District. 



When Lykens was laid out in lots by Edward (iratz. father 
of our citizen, David Gratz of Market Street, it happened clur- 
ing the year 1848. Did you know that the first baby hoy horn 



;}()Q LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



in the then organized town was none other our former ice- 
man, Mr. William Matter, who still resides in the borough and 
enjoys the distinction of being the oldest native citizen. 



"While Mr. William H. Matter may be the oldest native citi- 
zen of Lykens borough, the oldest resident is Mr. Henry Keiser 
of Market Street. Mr. Keiser came to Lykens, however, just 
a few' days before Mr. Matter was born in the year 1848. 



Did you know that during the summer of either 1894 or 
]895, William Farnura, a present well-known motion picture 
star, worked in and about the mines of Williamstown, the en- 
tire summer. 



Did you know that Eva Tanguay, one of the leading cele- 
brites of the stage to day, appeared for her first time on the 
stage, in the Old Lykens Opera House about 1894. 



Did you know that Rubendalls run, which empties into the 
Wiconisco Creek, a short distance West of Williamstown at the 
North side of the Valley, is named after and in honor of Isaac 
Rubendall, one of the earlier settlers of the valley. 



Did you know that the first church organization in Wicon- 
isco happened in 1838. 



Did you know, or do you remember when during the month 
of January 1911, the thermometer registered 29 degrees below 
zero in many parts of the valley. 



Did you know that Lutheranism began in The Lykens- 
Williams Valley about the year 1795. It began with Father 
Wirt who preached at Wirt's or Killinger church. 



Did you know that Gratz Borough is one of the oldest in- 
corporated boroughs in the county of Dauphin. 



DIRECTOIIY AND PICTORIAL RE\IE\V 



301 




In Memory of 

Our Former Great American President 

The Late 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT 



302 LYKENS-WILLIAMS VALLEY HISTORY 



The Live Store Always Reliable 

The Store Everybody is Talking About 

DOUTRICHS 



SQUARE DEALING 
GREATER VALUES 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx, Kuppenheimer 
and Society Brand Clothes 

304 Market Street Harrisburg, Pa. 



®I^^ ®?bgrapl| pnntmg (Ha, 

Plant: State and Cameron Sts. Sales Office: 216 Federal Square 

Barrtaburg, ppttnagltiama 

PRINTING 

DESIGNING 

PHOTO -ENGRAVING 

DIE STAMPING 

PLATE PRINTING 

EMBOSSING 

BINDING 

RULING 

LOOSE-LEAF WORK 

**Th€ Complete Printing Establishment** 



. BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

cit YOUR BUSINESS. ^"^'"^^^ ^°"-^*^^ *" The Lykens-WiUiams Valley Soli- 
To consult and use the Directory proceed as per. these instructions 
The compilation below consists of a careful, alphabetically^ arranged list 
of comni^dities and the key to the same is very simple. After having ascer- 
tained the^ article you desire to purchase, consult this list, find the article 
or class of the same and refer to the pages listed as the commodity 
I- * Yu^ instance you are interested in Automobiles, find Automobiles in the 
list there you will find numbers 128. 130 and so on ; turn to those pages and 
find the business announcements of various houses dealing in that -line from 
these you will undoubtedly be able to select your needs. 

DIRECTORY 

Commodity PaQes 

Advertising 87, 124, 142, 156. 179 

Agencies 128, 130, 143, 144, 153, 155 

Amusements I54 

Animals 140 

Automobiles 128,' 130, 143, 144, 153 

Auto. Accessories 128, 130, 119, 143, 144, 153 

Baking 86 

Banking ,s."». US. liil. i:t<.». l.-.c. 17s 

Beverages .-,4. sf.. V20. V22 

Billiards .-,4. m. 122, l.Sd 

Builders 121, 139 

Confection 86, 87, 121, 130, 143, 179 

Cleaning 116 

Contracting 121, 142. 126, 155 

Department Store 93, 94, 117, 119, 126, 143, 179 

Distributors 153, 121, 87, 122, 124, 139, 144, 155 

Dry Goods 88, 93, 94, 117, 126. 143, 179 

Electrical 126, 142 

Furniture 119. 121, 122. 139, 159, 179 

Funeral Directing 121, 142, 159 

General Mdse 93, 94, 116, 117, 119, 124, 126, 143, 179 

Groceries 88, 93, 94, 117. 126, 143, 179 

Hardware 121. 127, 139, 155 

Hotels lis, 123. 125. 143 

Insurance 86. 141 

Investments 118, 85, 121, 139, 140, 156, 17s 

Ice 120 

Ice Cream •">4. Sf!. 122. VAO 

Jewlery 125 

Lumber l*'^ 

Manufacturing 139, 141, 144, 151. 152 

Meats 11"- 15- 

Men-s Clothing ll"'.. HO. 12<i. 14:!. .•{02 

Men's and Women's Clothing 119, 126. 143 

Music -^4. 119. 121. 122. 179 

Medicines and Drugs ^'^ 

Newspapers S7, 124, 142, 156. 179 

Notions 88, 94, 117. 119. 126. 143. 1.52, 179 

Novelties and Stationery 81, l;i2 

Prof essLial '.■;::.■.■.■ 11^ 127. 142. 157. 159 

Pressing 

Public Service 

Public Conveniences • • -1^'. 

Refreshments US. 120. 123. 125. 1.30. 143 

thoS 88. 93. 116. 117. 119. 126. 143. 179 

Shoe Repairing • :;, ' ,1 

^Zl'"^ """'"' ::::::::-i3o.i2s:-ii9:-i43. 144; 153 

tSScJos ■.■.■.■.■.■.■.■;.■.■.■.■.■;.■.■.■.■ ■>^. NO. 121. 122. 1^ 

Tomb Stones • •,; • ■.■ ; " V.;,.; , ,'.. 

Women's Clothing i''- '-• '-"• ' '' 



lit; 
l.".s 



610 '