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Full text of "The Lynn review. A monthly epitome of Lynn affairs"

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ie Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



60 cents per Year 
Single Copies 5 cents 



NOVEMBER, 1907 



TentW tsRr 
No. 1 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust 



Company 



MAIN OFFICE, BERGENGREN BLOCK, CENTRAL SQ., LYNN, MASS. 
BRANCH OFFICE, 25 MARKET SQUARE, WEST LYNN, MASS. 



New and thoroughly up-to-date SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES have 
recently been installed in our large, burglar proof vault. Said 
vault, w^ith its massive doors, its heavy walls of steel and pro- 
tected with modern locks, affords the greatest possible protection 
for your valuables. Boxes rent at prices ranging from $5.00 to 
$50.00 per year according to size. 



Rightly-Made Clothing 



Hats 
Caps 



■^M^^^Cxoss^ 






21-23 n\arVyet Slj 



Furnishing 
Goods 



Trunks, Bags, Suit Cases 



ov- 



V 



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^ 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



^paiE6c®QfJ'(?f^i3«SJ^«@#. 



MAY MANTON 
PATTERNS 



11 and 13 Market Street 



MAY MANTON 
PATTERNS 



FALL DRESS GOODS and SILKS 

The mission of this ad. is to tell you of the beautiful array of New Fall Di'ess Goods and Silks 
we have waiting for your inspection. 

Never before in the history of this store's business have we assembled such a strong array 
of the new and desirable fabrics such as this store is noted for. 

In the Black Goods section you will find all the old favorites together with the best of the new. 

In the Colored Goods section we are showing an unusually fine assortment of the season's 
best cloths in Foreign and Domestic Goods. 

Best of all we are giving full as good values in this department as one year ago. 

In order to do this we have cut our profits in many cases 10 to 20 per cent. 

BLACK and COLORED SILKS 

What has been said of the Dress Goods may truthfully be said of the Silks. The assortment 
was never better. The prices, owing to placing large orders before the advance in silks, are prac- 
tically the same as last fall. 

We call particular attention to our yard wide guaranteed Black Taffetas at 

$1.00, 1.25, 1.39, 1.50 yard 




I see by The Review that the 
Lynn Gas & Electric Company have 
an abundance of coke, made from 
high grade coal, and no advance in 
price is predicted. 

Just right for a quick fire during 
the cool mornings and evenings of 
autumn or for general winter use. 



WHOLE COKE 



BROKEN COKE 



8 bushels 
10 bushels 
20 bushels 
30 bushels 
40 bushels 



$1.00 
$1.20 
$2.00 
$3.00 
$4.00 



7 bushels 
10 bushels 
20 bushels 
30 bushels 
40 bushels 



$1.00 
$1.40 
$2.40 
$3.60 
$4.80 



If you prefer to do your own teaming you can buy coke at the 
wharf 2 cents a bushel less. 



They are also selling GAS RADIATORS $1.50 
(Made to order) 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Lynn Revie^v 

A MONTHLY Epitome of 

LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 



Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



NOVEMBER, 1907 tenth year 



Will Suffolk county please defeat 
John B. Moran! 



And they seriously talked of John B. 
Moran as a presidential candidate one 
year ago! 

It was lucky for Lynn, last month, 
that the Boston & Maine had a Saugus 
Branch railroad. 



Who shall it be for mayor, Ex-Sena- 
tor Thos. F. Porter, Alderman Tapper, 
Alderman Call — or somebody else? 



Everything should be done by the 
city council to make the board of health 
work thoroughly and promptly done. 
A sufficient number of inspectors should 
be possible at all times for the work 
because there is a no more important 
department in the city than that of the 
board of health. 



Saugus, as a part of Lynn, would only 
be returning to old conditions. It costs 
money to live in Saugus and the way 
we are going forward in Lynn, finan- 
cially, indicates that it won't be long 
before we will be on the Saugus basis, 
therefore to unite with Lynn, Saugus 
would not be gaining much of anything, 
and they could not have such interest- 
ing indignation meetings over the ques- 
tion of taxation. 



A local paper says: "There is too 
much politics in the fire department." 
This has been apparent ever since the 
fire department was established, and it 
is very difficult to bring fire department 
affairs in Lynn to a modern basis, as 
the chief engineer can well attest. 
Small politics has been played so long 
that many of the department members 
cannot get it out of their heads that 
hand tub practices should not still 
govern. 



Government of Cities. 

The need of change in Lynn's munici- 
pal government is being discussed the 
same as in other cities. The Des Moines 
and Galveston commission plans of gov- 
erning cities are receiving much atten- 
tion. Everybody concedes that the 
present alleged "system" governing 
Lynn municipal work is a gigantic fail- 
ure, and a source of unnecessary expense 
and annoyance to citizens. How to 
cure the many evils is a grave question. 
Municipal government is the weakest 
fabric in the political system of the 
United States. The evils afflicting 
Lynn possess every other municipality. 
The one great difficulty is a lack of 
individual responsibility. 



The Peabody cars are a "mess" on 
Saturday nights, and many other trips 
show cars overcrowded to an unreason- 
able extent. 



Lynn does not appear to cut much of 
a figure in Essex county or congress- 
ional politics. For the larger part 
Essex county politics are mixed up with 
a congressional district in which Lynn 
has no interest. In congressional poli- 
tics Lynn is away from the political 
infiuences which govern the larger por- 
tion of the district, hence its lack of 
influence. 

The school committee has ascertained 
that the lot secured for the new Classi- 
cal High School building is not suffi- 
ciently large. There are probably other 
objections to the area which the school 
board could present to the city council, 
but they probably do not want to go 
into details in this direction. Certainly 
the North Common street lot would not 
in any way fit the building the school 
board informs the board of public works 
will be necessary. 



We agree with Congressman Gillett 
that the Phillippines should be sold at the 
eariiest possible moment. This country 
was never favored with a greater gold 
brick than is comprised in the Phillip- 
pines. We were obliged to take the 
Phillippines in honor, but it has been a 
fearfully costly transaction and does not 
fit into the American scheme in the 
least degree. If the other countries 
want them we should sell them in sec- 
tions to Japan, Great Britain, France 
and Germany. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



REAL ESTATE 

If you are contemplating purchasing a home 
or property for investment, it will pay you to 
call and see me. 1 have many desirable estates 
for sale. 

GEORGE W. BREED, Item Bldg. 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.55 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



insurance. 



This is the most economical period of 
the year to put in 

NEXT WINTER'S COAL SUPPLY 

Now being unloaded, clean and 
without any dust. Coal is 

AT THE LOWEST PRICE TO-DAY 

Telephone 56S 

Stevens & Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 



GROVER'S 

SOFT SHOES tor TENDER FEET 



FOR M^OMEN'S >VEAR 



5g^ 38? 

Sample Shoes at Retail 23 Oxford St., Lynn 




See the Eve 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Moon Changes. 

New Moon, November 5. 
First Quarter, Nov. 12. 
Full Moon, Nov. 19. 
La.st Quarter. Nov. 27. 

A 

Tart Comment by Senator Lodge. 

QENATOR LODGE doubtless had Mr. 
io Whitney in mind when speaking as 
follows at last month's convention: — 

The American Expres.s Company is, no doubt, 
beloved and admired for its low charges and 
obliging disposition by all who are so happy as to 
come within the sphere of its operations, but I do 
not care to have its representative and mouth- 
piece placed in the chair of Winthrop and Andrew. 

When the Legislature is called upon to deter- 
mine whether e.xpress companies shall own or 
control the stock of railroad companies, I do not 
want the representative of an express company to 
be Governor of the commonwealth. The Standard 
Oil interests are understood to control the Ameri- 
can Express Company, and their representatives 
are on the board of that company's directors. 

I do not care to have, and the people of Massa- 
chusetts will not permit, a friend and ally of the 
Standard Oil to become their chief magistrate. 

To this end reject alike the interested servant of 
corporations and the man who wildly shrieks 
against them. To this end see to it that you elect 
men of untarnished record, who will take up their 
high offices with no thought or hope of personal 
profit, with no desire except to guard the honor 
and advance the interests of the state. 

Mr. Whitney may have done much to 
develop Boston's street car, gas and 
other public service corporations, but at 
this time he is the type of a man that is 
not popular with the voters. He has 
made his wealth in corporations that have 
thrived at the expense of the public. 

Lynn's grand old young man, Harri- 
son Newhall, passed his eighty-eighth 
birthday last month. It is given to few 
men to have enjoyed such an honorable 
and useful life as that of Mr. Newhall. 
His point of view has always been 
young. By his hopeful and comforting 
disposition he has done much to aid 
others. May his light not be dimmed 
for many, many years, is the hearty 
wish of all who have the pleasure of his 
acquaintance. 

"Pat," said one man to the other, 
"can you tell me why they always have 
a rooster and niver a hen on the top iv 
thim barns?" "Sure," replied Pat, 
"an' it must be because av the difficulty 
they'd had in collecting the eggs. " — 
Chicago Daily News. 

BAKER. GEER&InGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 

341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



"Object, Matrimony.** 

A half-repentant bachelor, with quite a pile of 

rocks. 
Dropped in one day beside the way, and bought 

a pair of socks. 
Arrived at home— romantic joy— he wond'ringly 

drew out 
A note deep hidden in the hose— from some 

fair hand, no doubt. 

"I'm twenty years of age," it read, "and called 

a country belle. 
With you I'd like to correspond— if you will 

never tell — 
My object matrimony is— and yours, I hope, the 

same; 
If you'll address me, I'll respond." And then 

she wrote her name. 

On fire with hope, the bachelor that very even- 
ing wrote. 

And folded his epistle with a kiss inside the 
note. 

Sly Cupid had him in his mesh — no very clever 
catch. 

For, after all, quite foolish is a half-repentant 
bach. 

But, oh, how sheepish did he feel, when from 

the fair unknown 
This answer came to quench his flame: "An 

old maid I have grown. 
Alas, 'twas forty years ago I planned that fond 

surprise. 
Defeated by a heartless wretch who wouldn't 

advertise." 

—Printer's Ink. 

The entertainment to be given by the 
Lend-A-Hand Club of the Unitarian 
church in the Lynn Theatre, Tuesday 
evening, Dec. 10, deserves a splendid 
patronage. The proceeds will be de- 
voted to the most deserving charitable 
work which the Lend-A-Hand club has 
been engaged in for several years past. 
Sixty Lynn young women will give a 
musical and singing specialty entitled 
"The Debutantes en Tour," and it is 
announced that there will be several 
new and novel features. The perform- 
ers are now being steadily coached in 
dancing and singing by professional 
artists. If you want to be entertained 
and help charity, remember the Lend-A- 
Hand club entertainment, Tuesday 
evening, December 10. 
»?« 

The Boston and Eastern Electric Rail- 
road Company will ask the Legislature 
to let it dig another tunnel under the 
harbor to East Boston. Plans for a 
bore over a mile long, which, with its 
approaches, will cost about $11,000,000, 
were filed with the State Railroad Com- 
mission last month by Engineer James 
H. Bickford. This seems more like 
business, and to enter Boston in such a 
manner gives a suretv of rapid transit. 
A 

Jones— Do you like corn on the ear? 

Smith— I never had one. — Selected. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



If I Should Die To-Night. 

If I should die to-night 
And should you come to my cold corpse and say. 
Weeping and heartsick o'er my lifeless clay — 

If I should die to-night 
And you should come in deepest grief and woe 
And say, "Here's that ten dollars that I owe" — 

I might arise in my large white cravat 

And say, "What's that?" 

If I should die to-night 
And you should come to my cold corpse and kneel. 
Clasping my bier to show the grief you feel — 

I say, if 1 should die tonight 
And you should come to me, and there and then 
Just even hint 'bout payin' me that ten, 

I might arise the while; 

But I'd drop dead again. 

— Ben King. 

The Liverpool England Post has re- 
ceived an envelope and letter from a 
lady brought back to her house through 
the return letter branch of the general 
post office. The envelope bears a child- 
ish scrawl in lead pencil which reads: 
"To the Dear God in Heaven." 

The post office intelligently stamped 
it "Insufficiently Addressed." 

Inside on a tiny slip of paper was 
written : 

"Dear God: Please make mother 

better. She is Mrs. of Huskisson 

street." 

Mrs. had been ill, and her daughter, 

aged 6, wrote the letter. 

, "Why was he arrested?" 

"On suspicion; he was caught enter- 
ing a powder mill with a copy of Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox's Toems of Passion' 
under his arm." — Houston Post. 



CITY OF LYNN. 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAU DEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites— Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 

Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



EDWIN W. INGALLS 

Specialist in Slioe Trade Advertising 

Representing ALL American and 
European Shoe Journals. 

333 Union Street, LYNN, MASS. 



STATE ELECTION. 



City Clerk's Office, October 28, 1907. 
In accordance with the Revised Lavi^s, Chapter 
11, notice is hereby given that meetings of the 
qualified voters of the City of Lynn will be held on 
Tuesday, the fifth day of November, 1907, in the 
several polling places heretofore designated by 
the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. The polls will 
be opened at 6 o'clock in the morning and closed at 
4 o'clock in the afternoon. And said voters, may, 
in the several precincts in which they are entitled 
to vote, between said hours, give in their votes on 
one ballot for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, 
Secretary, Treasurer, Auditor, Attorney-General, 
Councillor, one Senator for the first Essex district, 
one Senator for the seventh Middlesex district, two 
Representatives for each of the Representative 
districts numbered 12, 13, 14 and 15; also for 
County Commissioner, Associate Commissioners, 
District Attorney and Sheriff; also yes or no upon 
the following question: "Shall the proposed 
Amendment to the Constitution authorizing the 
Governor, with the consent of the Council, to 
remove Justices of the Peace and Notaries Public 
be approved and ratified?" 
Attest* 

JOSEPH W. ATTWILL, 

City Clerk. 



By HAROLD MacGRATH 

The Best Man 

Author of THE MAN ON THE BOX 
and HALF A ROGUE 



$1.50 postpaid 



The BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS 

INDIANAPOLIS 



Cardinal Wiseman was of rotund pro- 
portions, and he used to relate, with 
great gusto, that, when he was staying 
at Lord Clifford's house, one of the 
maid-servants, who had been told that 
his proper title was "Your Eminence," 
used to say, as she dropped her reveren- 
tial courtesy, "Yes, your Immense. " 



The pine is a native of America. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



No Unbelief. 

There is no unbelief! 
Whoever plants a seed beneath the sod. 
And waits to see it push away the clod. 

He trusts in God. 
Whoever says, when clouds are in the sky, 
"Be patient, heart, lisrht breaketh by and by," 

Trusts the Most High. 
Whoever sees, 'neath winter's field of snow. 
The silent harvest of the future grow, 

God's power must know. 
Whoever lies down on his couch to sleep. 
Content to lock each sense in slumber deep. 

Knows God will keep. 
Whoever says "to-morrow" "the unknown," 
"The future" — trusts unto that power alone 

He dares disown. 
The heart that looks on when the eyelids close. 
And dares to live when life has only woes, 

God's comfort knows. 

There is no unbelief: 
And still by day and night unconciously. 
The heart lives by the faith the lips decry, 

God knoweth why. 

— Charles Kingsley. 

A 

The Cobbet School Work. 

A local writer says:— 

There is really no need of the Cobbet School 
Parents' Association rushing to the common 
council with any communication, as the school 
committee calculates that there will be need of 
repairs to the gas pipes after the contractors have 
been at work on the $32,000 job of sanitary and 
ventilating work. 

No need of speaking to the common 
council! The facts are that nothing 
was done toward remedying the trouble 
until the government was appealed to — 
this in spite of the great amount of ill- 
ness caused several months ago by the 
escaping gas. The manner in which 
municipal work is attended to is a 
caution. 

The fame of Keith's theatre for giv- 
ing big shows, greater even than those 
offered in the variety theatres in the 
larger cities, is spreading all over the 
country, and the amusement seekers of 
New England can congratulate them- 
selves on the fact that there is nothing 
novel or original in the world of vaude- 
ville that they are not afforded an op- 
portunity of witnessing, quite often in 
advance of any other theatre-goers in 
America. Many of the leading vaude- 
ville artists will appear at Keith's dur- 
ing the present month. 

There is no doubt of the re-election of 
John H. McKenney to the general court 
in the Ward 1 and Ward 5 district, and 
the election of John S. Cormack in the 
same district. They will be good work- 
ing members. Representative McKen- 
ney did not miss a roll call at the last 
session. 



New Styles for Women. 

Paris reports that blue shades are so 
good in miUinery as to be getting scarce. 

Velvet-and-satin hats in the less ex- 
aggerated mushroom brim shapes are 
very much favored as the season ad- 
vances. 

Hand-sewn English gloves for both 
women and men are very much in vogue 
for street wear — the most correct dress- 
ers demanding them. 

Some of the most recent importations 
in women's belts are beautiful cut jet 
on silk elastic bodies with elaborate cut 
jet buckles. Other ultra modish belts 
are the new purple and plum shades 
with cut-steel studding. 

A very correct walking boot for 
women is the high-cut button tan boot, 
designed to wear with short skirts. 
Other winter tan boots have the ooze 
top— very distinctive— and some clever 
patent calf boots have tan cloth tops. 

Some of the latest imported model 
gowns are of beautiful chiffon velvet in 
very rich shades. Striped velvets are 
also arriving from Paris, these gowns 
being very elaborately finished with 
hand embroidery. 

Subscribe for the Review. 



LYNN 

FIVE CENTS 

SAVINGS 

BANK 

HAS 

MONEY TO LOAN 

ON 

MORTGAGES 

OF 

REAL ESTATE 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



T T/^nnTT* FOR WHOM YOU WILL, 
\/ IJ 1 pi- but if you want reliable 
^^ Rubber Goods of any kind, 
Rain Coats. Rubbers, Water Bottles, etc., the 
popular verdict is, 

YOU'LL FIND THEM AT 

HOWE'S, 52 Central Sq., Lynn 


1 
1 


LYNN THEATRE 

FRANK G. HARRISON - MANAGER 


Week of November 4 

BLACK BEAUTY 

November 11- SHORE ACRES 

Balance of week 

ADAM-GOOD CO. 

Week of November 25 

CLARA TURNER 






TWO NEW NOVELS TO BE READ 


THE DAUGHTER OF 
ANDERSON CROW 

By George Barr McCutcheon 










There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 


THE STOOPING LADY 

By Maurice Hewlett 


DODD, MEAD & COMPANY 








Remember to vote for 

Alderman 
John W. Tapper 

as a Candidate 
for Mayor 

At the Republican Caucuses 

Tuesday, November 19 

Forty years a resident of Lynn. 
In closer touch with Lynn's 

needs and desires than any 

other candidate. 
In the Common Council 1901 

and 1902. 
Alderman 1906, 1907. 
President of the Board of 

Aldermen in 1906. 
Vote for the Best Equipped 

Candidate. 
Vote for JOHN W. TAPPER. 

H. E. CARLTON, 
Chairman Campaign Committee. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Thanksgiving. 

For morning- and the hopes of day. 
For hours to work and hours to play. 
For courage and contentment here. 
For trust to strengthen, joy to cheer — 
W^e praise tliee. Lord! 

For evening and the duties done. 
For every strife of <onscience won. 
For hours to dream and liours to rest. 
For all thy love made manifest — 
We bless thee. Lord ! 

For home and those who love us there. 
For friends and kindred everywhere. 
For life and for the life to be. 
Eternal fellowship with thee — 
We thank thee. Lord! 
'. — Frank Dempster Sherman. 

iSSi 

~' A New IVIove'by D. B. H. Power. 

D. B. H. Power, the well known 
Central Square house furnisher, has 
added to his first floor, what is practi- 
cally, an entertainment hall. The new 
apartment is of generous size, and seat- 
ing facilities are provided for those who 
would be interested in entertainments 
given by the Victor and Edison machines. 
There is an almost endless variety of 
selections, some from the leading mas- 
ters, and a most delightful entertain- 
ment is provided. It is understood to 
be the plan of Mr. Power to give enter- 
tainments at stated periods during the 
week so that the public can secure a 
full realization of the wonderful results 
possible from the Victor and Edison 
records. The new apartment is decor- 
ated in perfect taste and every detail 
has been carefully carried out, with the 
result that a very attractive and finely 
arranged entertainment hall has been 
constructed. There ai'e over two thous- 
and records to select from, and enter- 
tainments of pleasing variety are in 
store for those who are interested. The 
classic music of the great composers, 
rare voices of the greatest and most 
famous singers the world has ever 
known, splendid stirring orchestra and 
band selections are features of the Vic- 
tor and Edison machines, and they can 
be brought into the home at a moder- 
ate cost. 

Patronize the merchants who adver- 
tise in The Review. 



The Popular Shades of the Season 

can always be seen in the windows of 

Hall's Millinery Store 

Hundreds of Ready-Trimmed Hals to select 
from at this place. 



Mrs. Fish Says It's Very Expensive to 

k_^ iT^ --.. Lii> Be Rich. t*a, .7 

"It is very expensive to be rich. The 
penalty of being wealthy is paid by the 
possessors of wealth through the extor- 
tion, the mulcting, the scheming of 
tradesmen and milliners. What costs 
Mrs. John Smith, wife of the sturdy 
mechanic, $25, costs Mrs. Brown, wife 
of the banker, $50," says Mrs. Stuyves- 
ant Fish, society woman and one who, 
without ostentation, dresses herself in 
the upper C of taste. 

She says he who sells furs and gowns 
and automobile coats and furniture and 
hats in the majority of cases, has one 
price for the woman who has wealth 
and another for the woman who hasn't. 

"Is it true," Mrs. Fish was asked, 
"that the majority of the large city 
merchants have these two prices?" 

"It most assuredly is," the society 
woman responded, emphatically. "They 
mark their prices according to the finan- 
cial status of the purchaser." 

Student — "There must be some mis- 
take in my examination marking. I 
don't think I deserve an absolute zero." 

Inspector — "Neither do I, but it is 
the lowest mark I am allowed to give." 



MONEY 

DEPOSITED ON 

OR BEFORE 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4 

WILL DRAW 

INTEREST 

FROM THAT DATE 



COMMONWEALTH 
SAVINGS BANK 

325 UNION STREET 

J. G. PINKHAM. President. 

W. M. BARNEY. Treasurer 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Visions of Thanksgiving. 

Now doth the turkey see in dreams 

The visions of a day 
That makes his heart go pit-a-pat 

And turns his feathers gray. 

The smell of celery gives him pain. 

And though his eyes are wet 
With tears of coming sorrow, he 

Tries bravely to forget. 

A little cranberry is to him 

The crimson badge of fate 
That he must wear when he is called 

Into his future state. 

An oyster makes him shut his eyes 

To miss the sightof it; 
And when he sees an ax. Great Scott! 

He almost has a fit. 

He thinks about the people who 

Will sound his requiem. 
And wonders how it's going to feel 

To be inside of them. 

Ah, guileless dreamer, you are up 

Against Thanksgiving Day; 
You've got to starve yourself to death 

Or die the other way. 

— William J. Lampton. 

»?<! 

The former attendants at the Cobbet 
school on FrankKn street are being 
solicited for funds with which to pur- 
chase a memorial in honor of Sidney I. 
Breed, former janitor of the school 
building. Mr. Breed particularly en- 
deared himself to all of the pupils of 
the Cobbet school. He had a loving 
personality and particularly impressed 
himself on the youthful mind. It is en- 
couraging to note that the memorial 
fund is being generously subscribed to 
by the pupils who so pleasantly remem- 
ber Sidney Ingalls Breed. 

This extract from a local paper shows 
how the city does some of its "busi- 
ness:" — "The pupils of the upper rooms 
of the Ingalls school were dismissed on 
Monday on account of the lack of heat. 
There will be two new boilers installed 
at an early date, so as to obviate the 
necessity of a repetition of the dis- 
missal." 

W. Wallace Kimball, who died last 
month, was at one time a prominent 
Lynn citizen. He had always been a 
hard worker, took much interest in 
whatever he had to do, developed a 
splendid family, and in many ways did 
much for the community. 

»?4 

A small boy returning from school 
told his mother that the teacher said he 
had more in his head than any boy in 
his class. He also had the hives, and she 
put him in the B class. 



First Essex District Senator. 

1 REPUBLICANS in the First Essex 
\ district are doing much thinking. 
The chances are that hundreds of them 
will vote for M. F. Phelan, the Demo- 
cratic nominee, as they did one year ago, 
when Mr. Phelan came within twenty- 
one votes of being elected. 

They will do this because they believe 
Mr. Phelan to be a better man for the 
public service than Mr. Salter. He has 
proven this by his service two years in 
the house, where he represented a Re- 
publican district. 

Mr. Phelan is not a narrow partisan. 
Broad-minded, of independent thought, 
and a strong worker for Lynn and its 
best interests, it is believed that his 
election would be best for this city. 

Mr. Phelan comes from good stock. 
He was born and bred in Lynn, was 
educated at Harvard College and the 
Harvard Law School, and in character, 
strength among men, and knowledge of 
the pubhc service, is to be much desired 
for senator. 

So far as Lynn's interests are con- 
cerned, and the proper solution of every 
question coming before the senate, Mr. 
Phelan may be relied upon to render 
honest, intelligent, thorough and pains- 
taking service. His career in the house 
gives that promise. 

As Mr. Phelan said in a recent ad- 
dress: "There is no legislation which 
more directly or immediately affects the 
conditions and circumstances under 
which we are to live than that of our 
State legislature. There is no duty of 
citizenship which calls from us a 
greater responsibility than that of choos- 
ing for ourselves the best material avail- 
able to represent us in the work of legis- 
lation. Entirely irrespective of the 
personality of the candidates, the close 
vote of last year is a marked indication 
of the great care and attention given by 
the voter to his responsibilities of citizen- 
ship and a source of great encourage- 
ment to the candidate who enters a 
contest in which success depends on an 
appeal to citizens as citizens. 

"The duties and responsibilities of the 
Massachusetts legislator is not to be 
based on partisan motives. The great 
bulk of legislation with which our legis- 
lature deals is a matter of public and not 
party interest and the duty of voters is 
the careful, serious and responsible duty 
of selecting men who in turn will be im- 
pressed with the careful, serious and 
responsible duty of dealing with meas- 
ures." 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



Autumn Fashions. 

The Maple owned that she was tired of 

always wearinp: green. 
She knew that she had grown, of late, 

too shabby to be seen. 
The Oak and Beech and Chestnut then 

deplored their shabbiness. 
And all, except the Hemlock sad, were 

wild to change their dress. 
"For fashion plate we'll take the flow- 
ers." the rustling Maple said. 
"And like the Tulip I'll be clothed in 

splendid gold and red!" 
"The cheerful Sunflower suits me best," 

the lightsome Beech replied; 
"The Marigold my choice shall be," the 

Chestnut spoke with pride. 
The sturdy Oak took time to think. — "I 

hate such glaring hues; 
The Gillyflower, so dark and rich, I for 

my model choose." 
So every tree in all the grove except the 

Hemlock sad. 
According to his wish ere long in bril- 
liant dress was clad. 
And here they stand through all the soft 

and bright November days; 
They wish to look like flowers — indeed, 

they look like huge bouquets! 

—Edith M. Thomas. 

A 

We hope and trust that Lynn will be 
found on the right side in the guberna- 
torial contest. We mean by the "right 
side" the re-election of Governor Guild. 
Lynn was on the wrong side last year, 
being carried away by the Moran hulla- 
balloo. It is our belief that he has been 
a stronger governor than people ima- 
gined he would make. Speaking of him 
in 1905 the Review remarked as follows: 

Curtis Guild, Jr., in his busy life has been a 
man of achievement. As a youth in college he 
was easily among the foremost in his classes and 
graduated from Harvard with the highest honors. 
As a business man he has published a commercial 
paper of wide influence for the best interests of 
the community. As a military man he has served 
the state in time of peace and the nation in time 
of war. and as a public man his best efforts have 
always been directed along the highest plane of 
citizenship. 

And the argument is good to-day. 

It is refreshing to read Henry C. 
Shelley's dramatic reviews in the Bos- 
ton Herald. They are written independ- 
ent of the box office, and although the 
decadence of the stage does not give 
much opportunity to Mr. Shelley he 
makes the best possible use of the 
present dramatic situation. He is a 
fair and unbiased critic, who brings 
much ability to his work. The Herald 
is to be congratulated. 

The largest weekly pay roll of the 
General Electric Company in Lynn was 
$135,000. The weekly payments are 
now, approximately, $100,000. 



School House Accommodations. 

School house accommodations in Ljmn 
are not at all desirable in many locali- 
ties, and the failure to provide proper 
facilities for school work is not at all 
creditable to the city government. 
There is much indignation on account of 
the failure to provide a sufficient num- 
ber of school buildings, and stores and 
dwellings have been engaged and classes 
placed in them for instruction. Slack- 
ness is the most important characteris- 
tic of Lynn municipal work, and it is 
no more marked than in the failure to 
provide a sufficient number of school 
houses. A new school building should 
be erected every year. None have been 
erected during the past two years. At 
the close of the schools last June there 
were nearly 600 more pupils registered 
than the year before, and it is estimated 
that fully 500 more children have applied 
for admission this term, making about 
1000 extra children. With about 50 to a 
room this means 20 additional rooms, 
where there is not one available in a 
school building. 

Mr. Dooley on Strikes. 

"Ye haven't sthruck yet, have ye?" 
said Mr. Dooley. 

'■'Not yet," said Mr. Hennessy. "But 
th' dillygate was up at th' mills today 
an' we may be called out anny minyit 
now." 

"Will ye go?" asked Mr. Dooley. 

"Ye bet I will, " said Mr. Hennessy, 
"Ye just bet I will. I stand firm be 
union principles, an' besides it's hot as 
blazes up there these days. I wudden't 
mind havin' a few weeks off." 

"Ye'll do right to quit," said Mr, 
Dooley. "I have no sympathy with 
sthrikers. I have no sympathy with 
thim anny more thin I have with people 
goin' off to a picnic. A sthrike is a 
wurrukin' man's vacation." 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold best during the past 
month were : The Lady of the Decora- 
tion, The Traitor, Satan Sanderson, The 
Brass Bowl, Alice-for-Short, and Bea- 
trix of Clare. 

The longest distance a golf ball was 
ever driven, by any official record, is 
382 yards— by W. J. Travis at Garden 
City in 1903. 

Subscribe for The Review. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



UNUSUAL 

is the word to apply to our bargains. Don't 
lose the chance of inspecting them. In every 
line we offer you tempting values, especially in 

IRISH POINT CURTAINS 
FINE MUSLIN CURTAINS 
DRAPERIES AND UPHOL- 
STERY GOODS. Call in. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 Market Street 

Fine Rugs Woven from Old Carpeting. 
Agent for Lewis Batting Co. 



X 



A Good Opening. 

Ian Maclaren was talking to a group 
of literary beginners in New York. 
"Begin your stories well," he said em- 
phatically. "There's nothing like a 
good beginning. Indeed, it's half the 
battle." Then with a smile this excel- 
lent beginner of stories added : ' 'Always 
bear in mind the case of the young man 
who, desiring to marry, secured a favor- 
able hearing from his sweetheart's iras- 
cible father by opening the interview 
with the words: "I know a way, sir, 
whereby you can save money." — Good 
Health. 



New York business man, while in 
J:\. Chicago recently, was expecting a 
money-order letter in a day or two. In 
order to avoid any difficulty in identifi- 
cation, he went to a clerk in the post- 
office and said: "I am expecting a 
money order to the amount of one hun- 
dred dollars, and my name is Thomas 
Blank. Here are a lot of letters ad- 
dressed to me from various places. You 
will observe the postmarks. So, you 
see, if I am not the man I claim to be, 
I must have murdered that man and pos- 
sessed myself of his letters, and am now 
personating him. As that is not hkely, 
you must admit that I am the man." 
The New Yorker, having delivered him- 
self of the foregoing, left the post-office. 
In a few days the money order came, 
and the man from New York repaired 
to the office to get his order cashed. He 
expected to find the clerk ready for him, 
but at first the clerk did not recollect 
him. Presently the New Yorker suc- 
ceeded in recalling himself to the man's 
memory. "Oh yes." said the clerk, 
quite seriously, "you're the chap that 
murdered the other man. "^ — Harper's 
Weekly. 

Be sociable. 



TDEOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



Navel Rupture, Tendency to Corpulency or any 
Abdominal Weakness demands the use of an 

All Elastic Abdominal Belt 




We manufacture all to special measure which 
insures a perfect tit and most efficient support. 
Send for cataloprue No. 2. 

CURTIS & SPINDELL CO., 7 Munroe St., Lynn 



Many a man with splendid ability gets 
on the rocks because his ability is not 
well directed. The finest ship in the 
navy without a rudder and a mind to 
direct it is only a menace to human life. 
There are plenty of people, too, who 
work hard enough, but they never get 
out of the "dog trot" of life. A mod- 
erate amount of ability is all that is 
needed to get on in life. When to this 
is added a mind to work and a straight 
aim you get the combination that wins 
out every time. There are so many 
with ability and capacity for work 
who never "get there." They don't 
get far enough. They fall by the way. 
They never finish anything and make a 
clean job of it. There are a hundred of 
those who make a bluff at a job to one 
who carries it through to a satisfactory 
completion. That is why the proportion 
of successes in life is as small as it is. — 
Canadian Shoe and Leather Journal. 
»?« 

It should be remembered to the credit 
of Lieut. Governor Draper that the 
businesslike treatment of the Foxboro 
state institution was largely due to his 
efforts. He had charge of the investi- 
gation and his treatment of the situa- 
tion brought forward many compli- 
ments. The business acumen and good 
judgment of Lieut. Governor Draper 
has been in evidence many times, and it 
is not believed that the voters will be 
sidetracked by an appeal to class preju- 
dice. Lieut. Governor Draper has well 
demonstrated the worth of labor in both 
deed and action. 

A 

"Are you a married man?" asked the 
lawyer who was doing the cross-exam- 
ining. '*No, " answered the witness, 
who had one arm in a sling and traces 
of the strenuous life on his face. "I 
was run over by an automobile last 
week." — Chicago News. 



Babyhood. 

What is the little one thinking about? 
Very wonderful things, no doubt 

Unwritten history, 

Unfathomed mystery. 
Yet chuckles and crows and nods and winks 
As if his head were as full of kinks 
And curious riddles as any sphinx! 
Warped by colic and wet by tears, 
Punctured by pins and tortured by fears 
Our little nephew will lose two years. 
And he'll never know 
Where the summers go — 
He need not laugh, for he'll find it so. 

Who can tell what a baby thinks? 

Who can follow the gossamer links 
By which the mannikin feels his way 
Out from the shore of the great unknown. 

Blind and wailing and alone, 

Into the light of day? 

Out from the shore of the unknown sea. 

Tossing in pitiful agony — 

Of the unknown sea that reels and rolls 

Specked with the barks of little souLs — 

Barks that were launched on the other side 

And slipped from heaven on an ebbing tide! 

What does he think of his mother's eyes? 

What does he think of his mother's hair? 
What of the cradle roof that flies 
Forward and backward through the air? 

What does he think of his mother's breast 

Bare and beautiful, smooth and white — 

Seeking it ever with fresh delight. 

Cup of his life and couch of his rest? 

What does he think as her quick embrace 
Presses his hand and buries his face 
Deep where the heart throbs sink and swell 
With a tenderness she can never tell. 

Though she murmur the words 

Of all the birds- 
Words she has learned to murmur well? 
Now he thinks he'll go to sleep. 
I can see the shadow creep 
Over his eyes in soft eclipse. 
Over his brow and over his lips. 
Out of his little finger tips. 
Softly sinking, down he goes. 
See, he is hushed in sweet repose. 

—J. G. Holland. 
»74 

It is interesting to note that city 
officials who have not been able to fairly 
grasp municipal problems, are very 
much impressed with the Galveston 
Commission plan of running the muni- 
cipality. Something should be done. 
Business methods are not now govern- 
ing the city, but it is not much worse 
than in past years. Although the city 
is constantly growing larger, the weak- 
ness in the management is more appar- 
ent. The government of cities is the 
worst proposition in American politics 
to-day. There is not so much graft as 
there is favoritism. Influence is a 
greater briber than money. 

Clerk — "Let me show you our latest 
machines. We have a motor car now 
that can climb any hill on earth." 

Chauffeur- "That's nothing. The 
last one you sold me tried to climb 
a tree."— Topeka State Journal. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



GREEN & SON 

T3T A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
X"^lAiNL^O AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



"Nothing Succeeds Like Success." 

The Lynn Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Co. has been doing 
business since 1828 

About 80 Years of Success. 



Get our rate on a policy. 
LYNN MUTUAL FIRE INS. CO. 

112 MARKET STREET 



Remember to f\Q tyQ when you want 

telephone number ZO or A." anything in 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN 

FURS? 



We solicit an 
examination 
of our line. 
Largest line 
ever shown 
in Lynn. 
We can save 
you money. 

AMOS B. CHASE 

HATTER AND FURRIER 

123 MUNROE STREET 



DO NOT FAIL TO SEE OUR ALL NEW 

HOLIDAY STOCK 

NEXT MONTH 



Everything in Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Table Ware, etc. 

at greatly reduced prices over those charged in Boston 

for like quality goods. 
Our Optical Department does a large business. Eyes tested 

free of charge. 
Headquarters for Wedding Gifts of every description. A 

special line of Cut Glass Goods. 
Bear us in mind when there is a Wedding Present to be 

bought. 

JAMES H. CONNER 



81 PEARL STREET 



NEAR UNION 



LYNN, MASS. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



The Fruit of the Tree 

By 
EDITH WHARTON 

Illustrated $1.50 



"Mrs. Wharton has embodied life, not 
lectured upon it."-N.Y. Eveninj? Post. 



CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS 

153 FIFTH AVENUE - NEW YORK 



My Guerdon. 

I stood where gifts were showered on men from 
Heaven, 

And some had honors and the joy thereof; 
And some received with solemn, radiant faces 

The gift of love. 

The green I saw of bay-leaves, and of laurel. 

Of gold the gleam. 
A voice spoke to me, standing empty-handed, 

"For thee — a dream." 

Forbear to pity, ye who richly laden 

Forth from the place of Heaven's bounty went; 
Who marvel that I smile, my hands still empty — 

I am content. 

Ye cannot guess how dowered beyond the measure. 

Of your receiving to myself I seem. 
Lonely and cold, I yet pass on enraptured— 

I have my dream. 

—Anne Reeve Aldrich. 

A good story of John Bright is told by 
the Daily News. While he was paying 
one of his fishing visits to Castleconnel 
on the Shannon, Mr. Bright had an 
amusing encounter with the local parish 
priest. The genial "soggarth," who 
was noted for his humor, approached 
Mr. Bright with a request for a sub- 
scription in aid of an ornamental rail- 
ing around his church. "You belong to 
a different faith to mine," said Mr. 
Bright, "and how can you expect help 
from me when it may be used for bring- 
ing some people of my own persuasion 
into your church?" "My dear sir, you 
need have no fears on that score," said 
the priest, "what I want that railing for 
is to keep your friends out!" He got 
his subscription, and a handsome railing 
now encloses Castleconnel church. 



It's Quality and Fit that makes the 



SHIRT what it is— the best. 

downing SHIRT MAKER LYNN 



Alderman Tapper a Candidate for 
Mayor. 

Alderman John W. Tapper of Ward 
7 made a frank avowal of his candi- 
dacy for Republican nomination for 
mayor last month. Alderman Tapper 
has had an experience in the common 
council and upper branch, which is 
believed to well fit him for the position 
of mayor. He is forty-three years of 
age, and has resided in Lynn since he 
was three years old. His experience as 
a business man would serve the city to 
advantage, and as everybody under- 
stands there is need of business judg- 
ment and executive ability in the 
mayor's chair. 

As Alderman Tapper stated in an in- 
terview with a local paper: — "The 
industrial development of Lynn demands 
the closest attention and no obstacle 
should be permitted to stand in the way 
of its rapid development. Because of 
my knowledge of conditions, and being 
willing to assume the grave responsibil- 
ities of the office, I submit my name as 
a candidate, asking only to be considered 
as such upon my record as a public 
official." 

During his service as a member of 
the city council. Alderman Tapper has 
disposed of several business questions 
in a manner decidedly advantageous to 
the city, and his record gives promise 
that were he to be elected mayor the 
city's affairs would be conducted in a 
prompt, energetic and intelligent man- 
ner. 

The Republican mayoralty caucuses 
will be held on Tuesday, November 19. 

Amos B. Chase never before showed 
such substantial values in women's furs 
as this season. He has an extra large 
stock and they are representative of the 
best fines it is possible to secure. The 
women of Lynn and vicinity will be 
much interested in an examination of 
these furs and even if they are not 
ready to buy, Mr. Chase solicits an in- 
spection of the stock at 123 Munroe 
street. 

New Yorkers are straining their necks 
to look at the new Singer building, 
erected to a height of 555 feet, said to 
be the second highest structure in the 
world, and exceeded only by the Eiffel 
tower. 

A 

If your sjnrits are low, do something; 
if you have been doing something, do 
something different. — Edward Everett 
Hale. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Orders by Telephone Promptly Attended To 

ANDREW SCHLEHUBER 

Baker, Caterer 
Confectioner 

78 EXCHANGE STREET 



All kinds of Catering in First-Class Style. 

Special Prices to Churches and Large Parties 
of all kinds. 

Orders for Sunday should be given Saturday 
before to insure prompt delivery. 



The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 



A Modern Health Creed. 

Here is the guide of the true physical 
culturist: Eat and drink moderately. 
Exercise enough to keep the body vig- 
orous. Walk, ride, or play golf in pref- 
erence to puUing chest weights. Make 
sure that the waste of the body is car- 
ried off. Stand straight, breathe deep- 
ly, put the back of the neck against the 
collar. Take enough sleep, and avoid 
worry like the poison that it is. Never 
use a stimulant except in an emergency, 
and when the emergency is over take a 
vacation. Look out for pain as a dan- 
ger signal. Have the eyes well looked 
after. Work hard. Rest absolutely. 
Above all, keep intensely alive. — Dr. 
Gulick. 

The nursery-maid, wheeling the per- 
ambulator, meets papa and mamma. 
Papa and mamma are delighted. Papa 
"Oh let's have a peep at dear little 
ootsy tootsy. " Maid, "Gracious good- 
ness! I forgot to put the baby in. " — 
Tit-Bits. 



VICTO 





Don't borrow your fun 



Have your own. Have it at home. Have a Victor. 

A small payment down and a dollar a week gives you 
the grand soloists; the great bands and orchestras; the 
popular ballad singers; the comic song hits — a world of 
melody and fun. 

We'll tell you all about the easy-payment plan today 
if you'll call. 




D. B. H. POWER 



51 CENTRAL SQUARE 



LYNN, MASS. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



November. 

Like a late watcher, tired and sleep-inclined. 
Yet patient at her post and smiling still. 
The year keeps vixil. Look you where you will, 
In all her wild domain you shall not find 
Her hand has lost its cunninK-: still the wind 
Plays its soft descants; still each ripplinj? rill 
Goes singinK seaward: while, on every hill. 
The sun pours benediction bland and kind 

As blest the summer; still the crickets hide 
In the warm grass, — and ever and anon, 
A bee reels by, store-laden from the lawn 

Where bloom late flowers, alert and open-eyed: 
"How fair," they sigh with me, "and oh, how dear. 
This lingering sweetness of the dying year!" 

—Caroline A. Mason. 

»r4 

County Commissioner. 

Nobody conversant with the situation 
believes that the vote for county com- 
missioner will be seriously interfered 
with in this section through the failure 
to nominate a Lynn man. Senator 
Grosvenor will secure about all of his 
party vote, and there is no doubt of his 
election. His extended business exper- 
ience should well serve him in the 
administrative, judicial and executive 
duties of a county commissioner. 

A marked contrast to the conditions 
surrounding the office of sealer of 
weights and measures exists in Boston 
and Lynn. The Boston details are suf- 
ficiently well known. Here in Lynn 
there is not a department of public 
work so economically and conscientiously 
looked after as that of sealer of weights 
and measures. The economies practiced 
and the attention to duty is something 
never before excelled, and the record of 
work done well demonstrates what an 
individual can do when he is thoroughly 
in love with his occupation, and is only 
bound on well serving the community. 
John B. McCarthy is a model public 
servant. 

A 

You know the old yarn of the man 
who was all run down in health, whose 
wife was of the fussy, nagging breed; 
the wife went to the physician for a 
tonic; the M.D. inquired and prescribed: 
"Take these sedative pills three times a 
day." "Take them? Why, doctor, it 
is my husband who is sick." "Yes, I 
know," replied the doctor, "he'll get 
the benefit all right, if you take them." 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGown, D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN, MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 : 1.30 


to 5.00 



DINING ROOM 
FURNITURE 
HOLIDAYS 



FOR 
THE 



COMPLETE LINE 

TABLES, Round or Square, $4.50 

to $35.00. 
CHAIRS, Leather or Hardwood 

Seat, 75c, to $6.00. 
SIDEBOARDS and BUFFETS, 

$12.50 to $50.00. 



DINNER SETS 

Just arrived, in pretty, neat pat- 
terns. Good serviceable wear, 
$9.00 to $18.00. 



W. B. GIFFORD 

97-99 MARKET STREET, LYNN 



What will probably be the stiffest 
fight for many years will be made 
against license in Lynn next month. 
The anti-saloon league has a good Lynn 
organization, which evidently means 
business. The great weakness of the 
license law is the controlling of the 
business by a few wholesale dealers, 
and the making of Lynn the headquar- 
ters for the spirituously inclined from 
near-by cities and towns where hquor is 
not sold under a license law. License 
was voted in Lynn last year by a major- 
ity of fourteen hundred— not much to 
overcome. 

The "Hallowe'en" window in the W. 
F. Newhall jewelry store on Market 
street, last month, went far ahead of 
the display of last year. Much original- 
ity and aptness is evidenced in the win- 
dow trims at this store. 



The Widow — I want a man to do odd 
jobs about the house, run errands; one 
that never answers back and is always 
ready to do my bidding. 

Applicant — You're looking for a hus- 
band, ma'am. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Richard Mansfield. 

No competent and instructed student 
of dramatic affairs will quarrel with the 
opinion that the untimely death of Rich- 
ard Mansfield is a substantial and irre- 
parable loss to the American stage. Un- 
til overtaken by the illness which caused 
his death, he was, and for many years 
indisputably had been, the most original 
and energetic, the most vital and crea- 
tive force in the theatre, where his 
prominence was gained and his achieve- 
ments won. 

Critical estimates differ widely as to 
the character of his personal gifts and 
the value of his individual accomplish- 
ment. There are many intelligently 
appreciative theatregoers who have al- 
ways been insensible to his appeal and 
and who have denied that he possessed 
any genuine faculty of impersonation. 

They have contended that no matter 
what might be the role in which he ap- 
peared he remained indubitably and un- 
mistakably himself; that there was 
never any forgetting or mistaking or 
losing sight of the fact that there stood 
Mansfield. This is an exaggeration, of 
course, but it is not without some basis 
of truth. 

Yet it was not as an actor that Mans- 
field was at his best. His most consid- 
erable and important accomplishments 
were in the field of management. He 
was to the stage of this country what 
Henry Irving was for so many years to 
that of England, and it was in those 
splendid productions of which he was 
the author that his greatest contribu- 
tion to the general enjoyment consisted. 
It is upon these productions that his 
professional memory will rest. 

French Maid (to inquiring friend) : 
"Oui, madame is ill, but ze doctor haf 
pronounce it something very trifling, 
very small." Friend: "Oh I'm so re- 
lieved. What does the doctor say the 
trouble is?" French Maid: "Let me 
recall. It was something very little. 
Oh, oui. Ze doctor says zat madame 
has ze smallpox." — Woman's Home 
Companion. 

Mrs. Hoon (in the midst of her read- 
ing)— Here is an item which says that 
a certain man in Philadelphia was fined 
$10 for holding a girl's hand. 

Mr. Hoon — Well, I don't know that 
that is too much for a person in Phila- 
delphia to pay for a little excitement. — 
Selected. 



When Falls the Curtain. 

When falls the curtain, he who plays the clown 

And he, the king, are on a common level: 
The villain with the virtuous one sits down. 

The angel smiles on him who played the devil; 
The peasant fraternizes with the peer; 

And village maids and courtly dames and queens 
Mingle together without fear or sneer, — ■ 

They're only players all, behind the scenes! 

When falls the curtain upon the play of Life, — 

This play designed to entertain the gods, — 
The parts assigned us In its mimic strife 

(Though now we think so) will not make much 
odds; 
Who plays on earth the king will be as mean 

As any thrall that wearied him with prayers, — 
Peasant and peer and country girl and queen 

Behind the scenes will all be only players! 

—Denis A. McCarthy. 

Why Marriages Fail. 

ri'^HE Right Rev. John Sheepshanks, 
X the aged Bishop of Norwich, Eng- 
land, drew enthusiastic applause last 
month, at the annual church Congress, 
by his dicta on the marriage question. 
He regretfully admitted that if the 
clergy could unmarry as well as marry 
they would be far more busily employed 
than in the busiest times now. 

He said that when marriages were 
regretted it was largely because they 
had been hasty and ill considered. The 
great causes of domestic unhappiness 
were selfishness and temper. Men were 
more selfish than women. Man put his 
great sturdy arms akimbo and declared 
that he was the one person to be consid- 
ered in the home. 

The Bishop denounced nagging, but 
said that when there was a tiff the man 
ought to initiate a reconciliation. Men 
ought to regard as important and 
remember the anniversaries of their 
wedding days and their wives' birthdays 
and give them presents, not forgetting 
a good loving kiss. 

Middle aged women often complained 
that their husbands kissed the children, 
but would not kiss them. Women 
long for a demonstration of affection. 
Much trouble would be avoided if men 
would remember this. 

The Bishop, in warmly urging mar- 
riage, declared that it was intended, 
among other things, for peopling 
heaven. Some people have held that 
he had the wrong locality in mind. 

"I suppose," remarked the dear girl, 
"that you do not believe in love at first 
sight?" 

"Oh, yes, I do," rejoined the old 
bachelor. "If men were gifted with 
second sight they would never fall in 
love." — Home Magazine. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



I ABo^u\^ ^Sr Safety Razor § 

" The Best in its Line 9 

S Reasonable in Price 5^ 

^ Jos. W. Harding & Co. Z 

5^ ?,2-:H Central S(i., Lynn Jg 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best (luality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable u.se. 

J. B. CEi W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office. Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 1091,-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



Everything 

YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 

VARIETY 

AT 

LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, etc. 



EVERYTHING for the TABLE 



Porter, Pearson CBi Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 



The Line to the West 

BOSTON 
-nrf MAINE 

RAILROAD 

Through Sleeping Cars 

Excellent Dining-Car Service 

Tourist Cars 

Tickets, Time-Tables and detailed information at Boston 
City Ticket Office, 322 Washington Street. 



D. J. FLANDERS 
Pass. Traf. Mgr, 



C. M. BURT 

Gen'l Pass. Agt. 



Fasf Through 
Trains to 

Chicago 
St. Louis 
Minneapolis 
St. Paul 
Kansas City 
Cleveland 
Buffalo 

y^rom 

'BOSTOJ^ 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Have YOU Ever Visited Our 

MILLINERY SECTION? 

You'll find it especially interesting 
at this time— showing as it does a 
splendid assortment of very pretty 
hats— all right up to the style in 
their finest detail. 

Goddard Bros.' MILLINERY has 
gained a reputation for exclusive- 
ness — but we never take advantage 
of this reputation by "tucking on" 
an extra price. 

OUR PRICES ARE MOSTLY BETWEEN 

J5.00 and $15.00 

GODDARD BROS., Market Street 




CLOTHES PRESSED, CLEANED 
AND KEPT IN ORDER 



WE give you the best service possible for $1.50 per month, $4.00 per 
three months, and $15.00 for one year. No contracts made for 
less than six months. This will allow one person three pieces 
per week. We CLEAN, make small REPAIRS and press under this con- 
tract. Our team calls for and delivers your goods in Lynn, Salem, Swamp- 
scott and Peabody. 

Our DYEING and CLEANSING is as good as can be had at any first- 
class dye house. 

We have a first-class Repair Shop where we re-line Coats and Vests, 
put Velvet Collars on Overcoats, and make general alterations. We would 
be pleased to have you give us a trial and we are sure we can please you. 
Telephone 546-2, send a postal and our team will call. 

Atlantic Cleansing Company 

J. H. H. Hartshorn, Mgr. Established 1899. 117 Broad Street, Lynn 



When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



h Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



50 cents per Year 
SitiR-le Copies 5 cents 



DECEMBER, 1907 



Tenth Year 
No. 2 




NO STORE EAST OF BOSTON 
WILL HAVE SUCH A 

(EltnstmaH iiaplay 

AS WE SHALL SHOW. J* GIFTS OF 

PRACTICAL VALUE 

FOR EVERYBODY IN THE FAMILY. 



MAKE A NOT?: TO COME TO OUR STORE. 

Burrows CSi, Sanborn 

UNION AND SILSBEE STREETS 



RIGHTLY-MADE 

SUITS-OVERCOATS 

At $12.00, $15.00, $16.00, $18.00, $20.00 



We are showing a strong line of Suits and Overcoats at 

these prices. Made of the most desirable 

fabrics, well tailored, etc. 

Don't fail to see our selection before purchasing. 






THE LYNN REVIEW 




Telephone 1807 



No. 312 UNION STREET 



Furs for the Holidays 

One of the most acceptable Christmas Gifts. Furs purchased now 
will be held until Christmas Eve if so desired. 



Opossum Throw scarf, satin lined; i-eg-- 

ular $5.00 value; sale price . $3.98 

Gray Squirrel Throw, satin lined; sale 
price 4.98 

Blended and Gray Squirrel and Real 
Mink Throws, satin lined; sale price 6.98 

Natural Mink Tie, Edna May style, 
satin lined; sale price .... 10.00 

Throws and Shawls in Isabellaand sable 
fox, gray and black lynx, satin lined: 
extra fine quality: sale price . . 15.00 

Natural Mink Fancy Shawls and Ties, 
finished with heads and tails, bro- 
caded and satin linings; 
sale price . 18.75 to 45.00 

Natural and Blended Opossum Pillow 
Muffs, large size; sale price . . 3.98 



Gray Squirrel Pillow Muffs, satin lined: 

sale price $5.98 

Isabella and Sable Fox Pillow Muffs. 



one and two stripe; sale price 



7.50 



Isabella and Sable Fox. Gray and 
blended Squirrel Pillow Muffs, extra 
fine quality; sale price . . 10.00 

Other special values in natural mink, 
gray and black lynx, Jap mink, fox 
and blended squirrel Pillow Muffs. 
highest grade, carefully selected; 
sale price . . 15.00 to 37.50 

Children's Fur Sets, a complete line 
just opened, including everything 
new and desirable, sale 
price, per set . 98c. to 10.00 




I see by The Review that the 
Lynn Gas & Electric Company have 
an abundance of coke, made from 
high grade coal, and no advance in 
price is predicted. 

Just right for a quick fire during 
the cool mornings and evenings of 
autumn or for general winter use. 



WHOLE COKE 



BROKEN COKE 



8 bushels 


$1.00 


7 bushels 


$1.00 


10 bushels 


$1.20 


10 bushels 


$1.40 


20 bushels 


$2.00 


20 bushels 


$2 40 


30 bushels 


$3.00 


30 bushels 


$3 60 


40 bushels 


$4.00 


40 bushels 


$4.80 



If you prefer to do your own teaming you can buy coke at the 
wharf 2 cents a bushel less. 



They are also selling GAS RADIATORS $1.50 
(Made to order) 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Lynn Review 

A MONTHLY Epitome of 

LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



DECEMBER, 1907 

Pippins wins! 



TENTH YEAR 
No. 2 



That smile did it! 



It looks bad for the merger. 
Will Boston voters have Fits? 
Porter's poems, people ponder! 



The City Hall "gang" (so-called) is 
saying nothing. 

For a farewell appearance as a guber- 
natorial candidate Gov. Guild did well. 



There is only one proper way to settle 
Lynn's grade crossing problem— De- 
pression. 

To a correspondent: No, it does not 
mean that we shall have more poetry. 
Probably less. 

Counting time and money, probably 
Henry M. Whitney has expended $150,- 
000 in Massachusetts politics. Does it 
pay? 



There will be a new "Yes" and "No" 
vote at the city election this year, to 
settle the question of age and service 
pensions for firemen. Under the pro- 
posed law the city council is to settle 
the disposition of such pensions, if the 
voters of this city say "Yes" to the 
proposition. 

It is interesting to consider the fol- 
lowing figures as a result of the last 
election:— Senator, First Essex District, 
Salter, Republican 3,893; Phelan, Dem- 
ocrat 3,620; State Auditor, Fii'st Essex 
District, Turner, Republican 5,660; 
Conry, Democrat 1,897. The vote for 
state auditor is given because that best 
illustrates the regular party vote, both 
Democratic and Republican. It will be 
seen from this that Mr. Salter was 1,167 
behind the auditor vote, and that Mr. 
Phelan ran about 1,700 ahead. 



The Financial Flurry. 

/^COUNTERMANDS and deferred 
\^ shipments are the things that are 
troubling the Lynn shoe manufacturers 
today. The financial flurry, although 
having settled itself in large part at the 
headquarters of finance, is just being 
felt most severely by some of the re- 
tailers and jobbers, and they have be- 
come somewhat panicky, and therefore 
request manufacturers to countermand 
some orders and defer shipments three 
or four weeks on some of their lines. 
This action seems nonsensical because 
the real prosperity of the country is not 
in dispute. 

Banking and financial methods have 
become irregular, currency has become 
scarce, and there are other ills in the 
financial body less important than those 
referred to, but in the humble opinion 
of the writer, who has had quite a few 
years' experience in the shoe trade and 
who has weathered several panics, there 
is no cause for alarm. Reason and 
judgment should prevail and people 
should not get excited. 

Nine-tenths of the business is done on 
the basis of confidence, which is a plant 
of slow growth, and people, instead of 
pulling in their horns, should do every- 
thing to restore confidence. 

It won't come back until people show 
a disposition to take some chances and 
not economize in every direction. For 
economy all around destroys confidence. 
There is reason in all things, and it 
should be liberally called upon at this 
juncture. Stop hedging. ^a-^Lv^ -j^^aHtj 



" The voters had an idea that reciproc- 
ity with Canada as outlined by Mr. 
Whitney, was opening up business ad- 
vantages for that gentleman, and they 
decided that they would give Mr. Whit- 
ney a monopoly of operation. 



To show the consideration given to 
municipal matters, it is cited that Lynn 
city officials estimated that the entire 
work upon the Sea street extension 
would cost less than $100,000. It is now 
estimated that the total cost will at 
least be $200,000, and it looks as if the 
city, of Lynn was "stuck." Essex 
County has paid $50,000, having agreed 
to pay one-half of the estimated cost of 
$100,000. As usual Lynn gets the small 
end. The Sea street extension is prac- 
tically a county road, and Essex 
County should at least pay one-half of 
its cost. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 











ONLY ONE MARKET - NO BRANCH STORES 




FiSH 




FRESH 






FROM 






THE 






SEA 






•^UR buying facilities surpass most 
If others— we maintain a Wholesale 
^""^ Department in Boston. 






Our selling- facilities have been pro- 
nounced practically perfect by experts. 






Our experiencfe covers an actual fish sell- 
ing period of twenty-five years. 






Don't this prove to you we can supply 
your fish wants better than anyone else? 






Try us today and be convinced. 






Williams Bros. 






Lynn's Leading Fish Dealers 






213-217 Union Street 






Only One Store 






Phones 28 and 29 




ONLY ONE MARKET — NO BRANCH STORES 









When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




The Republican Mayoralty Candidate. 

Thomas F. Porter 
was complimented 
by a most generous 
vote in the Repub- 
lican municipal cau- 
cuses. He showed 
^reat strength, and 
liis friends believe 
that the confidence 
expressed by the 
voters will be well 
maintained when he 
takes the office of 
mayor the first 
Monday in January. 
Mr. Porter has had a municipal and 
state political experience which should 
well serve him in the office of mayor, and 
his election is generally conceded. A 
genial and pleasing personality tends to 
make Mr. Porter a most popular candi- 
date, and as a successful business man, 
with a thorough knowledge of Lynn's 
municipal conditions, Mr. Porter as 
mayor, should do important work for 
the city of Lynn. 

A liberal patronage should be extended 
toward the Lend-A-Hand Club charity 
show to be given in Lynn Theatre, Tues- 
day evening, December 17. The re- 
hearsals are most encouraging, giving 
promise of a most delightful evening. 
The entertainment is to be given by 
sixty Lynn young women, and it will be 
largely of a musical nature. Several 
new and attractive novelties are prom- 
ised. Tickets may now be secured from 
members of the Lend-A-Hand Club of 
the Unitarian Church. 



The Item's weather prophet usually 
hits conditions fairly correct, but his 
prognostications for November as "a 
bleak and stormy month" were not 
found to be correct. He got one good 
storm in, however, but, generally speak- 
ing, November served us very kindly. 
There was one period of ten days in 
November when the weather was de- 
lightful, without any rain. 

"Do you go to school?" a small girl 
was asked by her mother's friend. 

"Oh, yes," nonchalantly replied the 
youngster, looking a bit bored. 

"And what do you learn?" 

"Oh. nothing. I go to a private 
school," came back the reply. 



Rules lor Christmas Shopping. 

V SENSIBLE woman has sent out 
some rules about Christmas shop- 
ping which are worth reading. Her main 
purpose is to save the strain on children, 
clerks, and working people generally to 
whom the Christmas season is a night- 
mare on account of the hurry and rush 
of a crowd of frenzied shoppers, who 
put ofi" to the last day what can be done 
much better weeks before the holidays. 
Here are her suggestions: 

Have it all done one week before 
Christmas. 

Shop early in the day. 

Carry home as many parcels as pos- 
sible. 

Do not ask to have parcels delivered 
on the day of purchase. 

Do not ask to have articles sent home 
on approval. 

Do not shop during luncheon hours, 
thus shortening the hour for the clerks. 

If these rules were followed by even 
a fair proportion of people who can do 
so as well as not, it would work great 
relief. There are those of course, who 
love the stern struggle which is needed 
to satisfy their demands in the last few 
days of the rush of Christmas buying; 
but anybody who can persuade the pub- 
lic to do even part of this work well in 
advance is a benefactor of the human 
race. We are glad to do our share in 
urging a reform that is so well worth 
while. 



On the occasion of the lord mayor's 
visit to North London recently, a cap- 
tain was heard to remark to his corps: 
"Close up, boys! Close up! Close up! 
If the enemy were to fire on you when 
you are straggling along like that, they 
wouldn't kill a single man of you — Tit- 
Bits. 



LYNN THEATRE 

FRANK G. HARRISON Managrer 



Dec. 4-5 — Moving Pictures and Illustrated 
Songs. 
Dec. 7-The Train Robbers. 
Week of Dec. 9-GaKe Stock Co. 
Dec. 10— Hattie Williams in "The Little 
Cherub." 
Week of Dec. 16 except Dec. 17, Knicker- 
bocker Stock Co. 
Dec. 17 — Lend-A-Hand Society. 
Week of Dec. 28 — Frankie Carpenter. 
Dec. 30-31 and Jan 1— A Millionaire's Revenge. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CITY OF LYNN. 




THERE ARE 200 SEN- 
SIBLE CHRISTMAS 
PRESENTS in our Stock 


CITY ELECTION. 


City Clerk's Office, Dec. 4, 1907. 


In accordance with the provisions of the Re- 
vised Laws, Chapter 11. notice is hereby given 
that meetings of the male voters of Lynn will be 
held on Tuesday, the 10th day of December, 1907, 
in the several polling: places heretofoi-e designated 
by the Board of Aldermen. 

The polls will open at 6 o'clock in the morning 
and close at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, and all such 
citizens will, in the several precincts in which 
they are entitled to vote, between said hours, give 
in their votes all on one ballot, for Mayor and 
eleven Aldermen, one Assessor for three years, 
four members of the School Committee for three 
years, one member of the Board of Public Works 
for three years, one member of the Board of Pub- 
lic Works for one year to fill vacancy, from the 
city at large; one member of the Common Council 
from Ward 1, two members each from Wards 2and 
7, five members each from Wards 3, 4, 5 and 6. 

Also yes or no in answer to the questions: — 

Shall the provisions of Section 82, Chapter 32, of 


Imported and Domestic Perfumes 
—Toilet Soaps— Fancy Brushes of all 
kinds— Toilet Goods— Cold Creams- 
Face Powders— Bath Luxuries are 
just a few. 

We also have a fine line of 
CIGARS and BOX CON- 
FECTIONERY which make 
attractive Christmas gifts. 

Regular line of Drugs, Chemicals 

and Medicines of the best. 
Visit our store. You receive Super- 
ior Goods with Superior Service. 


the Revised Laws, relative to age and service pen- 
sions to members of the Fire Department be 
accepted? 

Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxi- 
cating liquor in this city? 

Also, that meetings of the women voters of the 
city will be held the same day, and in the same 
places for the election of School Committee. 

Attest: 

JOSEPH W. ATTWILL, City Clerk. 


JAMES B. SMALL, Ph.G. 

APOTHECARY 

Essex Street and Central Avenue 

LYNN 










;|j^aIlMtf5^||ft^^>3«sjd. 



11 AND 13 MARKET STREET 
All street cars pass or transfer to our doors 

GUIDE TO HOLIDAY SHOPPERS 

Where to buy, and what to buy, will be the all-important 
question from now on. Below we list the more im- 
portant of the useful and acceptable Xmas 
gifts that may be found here in great 

variety, and, as usual, the best \ 

possible quality at the price. 



Kid Gloves 
Golf Gloves 
Made Veils 
Shell Goods 
Aprons 
Umbrellas 
Silk Waists 
Silk Petticoats 
Towels 



Kimonas 

Stationery 

Handkerchiefs 

Neckwear 

Long Scarfs 

Ribbons 

Silks 

Dress Goods 

Furs 



Lawn Waists 
Napkins 
Wrappers 
Fancy Goods 
Xmas Cards 
Belts 

Leather Goods 
Boxed Hosiery 
Toilet Goods 



Percales 
Lawns 
White Goods 
Fancy Linens 
Wool" Blankets 
Bath Robes 
Petticoats 
Dolls 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The License Vole. 

Those who opposed license were not 
poUtic in starting their agitation so 
early. They would have had a better 
chance to have carried the city for No 
License had they waited. The early 
work put the license advocates on their 
mettle, with the result that no less than 
1,000 (out of a total new registration of 
about 1,500) Yes voters were placed 
upon the registry list. 

This seems to indicate a Yes vote 
because the last year's majority for 
license was about 1,400. Had the No 
License people laid low and not revealed 
their hand until registration was closed 
they would have perhaps carried the 
city. 

It is argued that if Lynn votes No, 
the drunkenness on the Lynn and Bos- 
ton trainswould make a decided nuisance. 

It is not a desirable question, in many 
ways, to handle, this subject of License 
or No-License, but it is a fact that pro- 
hibition has never been anything like a 
success in Lynn. Voters have promptly 
returned to the law of license, and given 
it a longer lease of life, than they ever 
did no-license. 

Ethics do not always control. It is 
"what is best and most practical in a 
city the size of Lynn?" The Lynn 
police say "the license law is well en- 
forced, better than in any other city, 
that the saloons carry out the closing 
law to the limit, that no gambling or 
music is allowed in them, and that, on 
the whole, the law is better handled 
than no-Hcense ever could be, in a city 
the size of Lynn." The police further 
say that "with the out-of-town people 
cut out from the reckoning the liquor 
traffic in Lynn would be on as desirable 
a basis as could be expected." The 
license law has been in force in Lynn 
about eleven years. 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS IN 
ABUNDANCE 

An up-to-date and very beau- 
tiful stock of Gold Jewelry, 
Watches, Clocks, Diamonds, 
Cut Glass, etc. 

We invite your Inspection. 

NEWHALL'S JEWELRY STORE, 

52 Market Street, Lynn 

Established 1872 Telephone 1047— 3 



FREE LECTURES 

Mr. Lazenby will give the following 
course of lectures in the public library: 

TUKSDAY. DECEMBER :'.-Walt 
Whitman, the poet of the Uemocracy. 
TIIE.SDAY. DECEMBER )0— John 
Greenleaf Whittiei — the poet of a 
people. 

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17-James 
Russell Lowell and the cry for free- 
dom. 

The lectures commence at 8 o'clock and are free. 
The public cordially invited. 



Charles O. Breed for Alderman. 

Those people who have been talking 
for many years past about the necessity 
of successful business men becoming 
more largely connected with the city 
government have an opportunity this 
year to vote in accordance with their 
conversation, at least in one direction. 
Charles Orrin Breed, of West Lynn, 
was nominated for alderman in the Re- 
publican caucuses. He has proven his 
worth in the business world, has retired 
from active work, and is in a position 
to give substantially all of his time to 
the city. If he is not elected as a mem- 
ber of the board of aldermen next year, 
the voters should forever hold their 
peace about the necessity of "better 
men coming to the front in municipal 
politics." We feel such confidence in 
the common sense and good judgment 
of the Lynn voters that we will venture 
this prophecy— Charles Orrin Breed will 
secure the largest vote for alderman 
cast for any one nominee, of any party, 
on December 10. 



Goddard Bros. 90-92 Market street 
have sent out some very clever booklets 
for the Christmas shopper, entitled 
"What to buy for Christmas," contain- 
ing a list of all the merchandise of their 
various departments suitable for Christ- 
mas presents, and the prices. These 
little booklets are arranged in convenient 
form and are a great help to the unde- 
cided shopper. They have also gotten 
out some merchandise bonds, which are 
redeemable at any time for merchandise 
and are very convenient for a person to 
give for a present when they do not 
care to select the gift themselves. 
These bonds are handsomely Htho- 
graphed and make a most acceptable 
present. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Tax Collector's Notice 



To Poll and Personal Estate Taxpayers: 

All Poll and personal Estate Taxes for the year 1907 that 
have not been paid should be attended to at once. Sum- 
monses have been issued and demands will next be made 
and later warrants issued. The warrants, that will follow 
the demands after the expiration of fourteen days, will be 
issued by precincts, commencing with precinct one of each 
ward and continuing until completed. Payments before the 
warrants will save expense and personal annoyance, as the 
Constable, to whom a warrant is issued, always collects his 
fee with and in addition to the tax, 

HARTWELL S. FRENCH, 
Collector of Taxes of the City of Lynn. 

Lynn, Mass., November 25, 1907. 







"A masterpiece surpassing 'The Riprht 
of Way.' " 


CHRISTMAS ^ 


The weavers 

By GILBERT PARKER 

"The book is great, and greatly to be 
praised "—N. Y. World. 

"Surpassing even The Seats of the Mighty 
and The Right of Way." — Chicago Record 
Herald. 


^ NOVELTIES 

IN ICES, CAKES, 
PASTRY, Etc. 

Order early for 

CHRISTMAS 


"An absorbing piece of fiction which 
leaves no expectation unfulfilled."— P/ji'/adc/- 
phia I'ublic Ledger. 


SCHLEHUBER 


HARPER & BROTHERS 


BAKER— CATERER— CONFECTIONER 


PUBLISHERS 


78 Exchange Street 






GROVER'S 


SOFT SHOES for TENDER FEET 


FOR WOMKX'S AVEAR 


5S? 58? 


Sample Shoes at Retail 23 Oxford St., Lynn 



When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Furniture That Will Make 
Ideal Xmas Gifts 



IF you want your Xmas gift to be of a practical nature- 
something that will bring a great deal of pleasure to the 
recipient— you couldn't do better than select something 
in the furniture line. 
We are well prepared to meet many cases of this kind 
— ready to supply you with a piece of furniture that will 
win for you many a kindly thought long after your gift has been 
received. The furniture we offer we guarantee to give perfect 
satisfaction, for before it found a place in our stock it had to 
measure up to our high standard of quality. To-day we present 
for your consideration furniture ' 'that will make ideal gifts. ' ' 



Morris Chairs from $6.75 


Oak Rockers from $3.00 


Parlor Tables 


' 3.50 


Library Tables 


8.00 


Chiffoniers ' 


' 5.00 


Dressing Cases 


9.00 


Clothes Poles 


.75 


China Closets " 


15.00 


Sideboards 


' 15.00 


Buffets 


20.00 


Dining Tables 


' 5.00 


Sewing Tables *' 


3.50 


Shaving Stands 


' 3.50 


Smoking Tables 


2.00 


Pedestals 


' 3.50 


Folding Screens 


1.25 


Music Cabinets 


' 5.00 


Cellarettes 


9.00 


Hall Racks ] 


' 6.50 


Hall Seats 


6.00 


Combination Desks ' 


' 20.00 


Toilet Tables \\ 


15.00 


Brass Beds 


' 16.00 


Iron Beds 


4.00 


Roll Top Desks 


' 20.00 


Flat Top Desks 


7.50 


Shirt Waist Boxes 


' 1.75 


Book Shelves " 


2.00 


Foot Rests 


' 1.25 


Couches 


12.50 


Medicine Cabinets 


' 2.50 


Folding Tables " 


2.00 


Parlor Cabinets 


' 10.00 


Tabourets * ' 


.50 


Piano Stools 


' 2.25 


Piano Benches " 


9.00 


Willow Rockers 


' 3.00 


Grass Rockers 


6.50 


Smoking Cabinets 


' 4.00 


Hall Clocks [\ 


10.00 


Parlor Clocks 


' 5.00 


Record Cabinets 


8.00 


Ladies' Desks 


' 4.00 


Child's Iron Cribs " 


5.50 



Edison Phonographs. Victor Talking Machines 

Globe- Wernicke Book Cases 

D. B. H. POWER, Central Sq., Lynn 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CHRISTMAS 


Christmas 


brings to mind a long line 
of thought on expen- 
sive things. 


1 Suggestions 


WHAT WE CARRY 

is sensible presents 
at reasonable prices 

And just here we will give you 
the list: Pillow Tops, Lace 
Curtains, Muslin Curtains, 
Draperies, Window Curtains, 
Art Squares, Rugs, Carpets, 
Utility Boxes, Bed PuiTs. 


RAIN COATS 

MACKINTOSHES 

RUBBER COATS RUBBERS 

RUBBER BOOTS 

OVERSHOES LEGGINS 

GAITERS 

WATER BOTTLES 

CLOTHES WRINGERS 

DOOR MATS FOOT BALLS 

STRIKING BAGS 


Everything new for Christmas. 
Call in and give us an inspec- 
tion. 


FOUNTAIN PENS 

RUBBER TOYS 

WHITELY EXERCISERS 


ALBION K. HALL 


Howe's Rubber Store 


39 Market Street 


52 CENTRAL SQUARE 







An Epitaph. 

Here lies Anne Mann; she lived an 
Old Maid and died an old Mann. —Bath 
Abbey. 



Do all your Christmas shopping in 
Lynn. 

A man who spends his time inventing 
excuses will never invent anything else. 




FOR RE-ELECTION 



Alderman John H. Nelson 



of Ward Four 



Member of School Committee for 
seven years. 

Member of Common Council, 1905-06. 

President of Common Council, 1906. 

Alderman from Ward 4 in 1907. 

Chairman of Committee on Public 
Property, member of Committees 
on Water Supply, Grade Crossings, 
Accounts, and New Court House 
for Lynn. 

John H. Nelson, tiO Baltimore Street. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



U 



A Mother- Song. 

Sleep, baby, sleep! The Christmas stars are 
shining, 
Clear and bright the Christmas stars climb up 
the vaulte<l sky; 
Low hangs the pale moon, in the west declining: 
Sleep, baby, sleep, the Christmas morn is nigh! 

Hush, baby, hush! For Earth her watch is 
keeping; 
Watches and waits she the angels' song to hear; 
Listening for the swift rush of their wings down- 
sweeping, 
Joy and Peace proclaiming through the midnight 
clear. 

Dream, baby, dream! The far-off chimes are 
ringing; 
Tenderly and solemnly the music soars and 
swells; 
With soft reverberation the happy bells are 
swinging. 
While each to each responsive the same sweet 
story tells! 

Hark, baby, hark! Hear how the choral voices. 

All jubilantly singing, take up the glad refrain, 
"Unto you is born a Saviour," while heaven with 
earth rejoices. 
And all its lofty battlements re-echo with the 
strain! 

Wake, baby, wake! For lo! in floods of glory 
The Christmas Day advances over the hills of 
morn! 
Wake, baby, wake! and smile to hear the story 
How Christ, the Son of Mary, in Bethlehem was 
born ! 

— Julia C.R. Dorr. 

The Board of Public Works. 

Robert S. Si.sson secured generous 
recognition in the Republican caucuses 
for the board of public works for the 
three-years term. Mr. Sisson has al- 
ways done what he considers to best 
serve Lynn's interests since being a 
member of the boai'd and his knowledge 
of municipal work should be of great 
advantage to Lynn in the future because 
it is generally assumed that Mr. Sisson 
will be re-elected. 

George C. Blakeley is the Republican 
nominee for the board of public works 
for the one-year term. Mr. Blakely has 
served in the common council and the 
board of aldermen, and his friends 
beheve that he will be elected. Mr. 
Blakeley has had a business training 
which makes him especially conversant 
with city contracts, and he should bring 
ability to the position of a member of 
the board of public works, in the event 
of his election. 



For SNAP and LASTING SMART- 
NESS buv our "Benjamin" rnado 
$20 and $2.1 SUITS and OVERCOATS 

DOWNING 

115 to 119 Munroe Street, Lynn 



Special 
Christmas 

Remembrances 

In Jewelry of every 
description 

Diamond, Ruby, Emerald, Sap- 
phire and Pearl Rings 

(engraved free) 
at prices that will surprise you 

they are so low. 

Watches, Clocks, Chains, etc. 

We can supply you with 

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS 

that give service 

from $1 to $100. 

Be sure to examine our stock. 
It is of splendid variety. 



THE HILL CO., INC. 

GEO. F. ANDREWS, Mgr. 

254 UNION ST., COR. SILSBEE 

Ici on parle Francais. 



Joseph L. Pierce, candidate for re- 
election to the common council in Ward 
5, is a lucky man. He has thirteen 
letters in his name, and was counted in 
by one vote, his total being 413. With 
this luck there should be higher honors 
in store for Mr. Pierce, and he should 
look out and do business on Friday, the 
thirteenth. 



A Maine Prayer. 

A little girl in Auburn, Me., recently 
made her go-to-bed prayer in these 
words: "Dear God, be awfully careful 
of yourself, for if we should lose you 
we have nobody but the President, and 
papa does not like the way he acts." 

Do all your Christmas shopping in 
Lynn. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Hon. Asa T. Newhall for Assessor. 

WE refer at length on another page 
to the Asa T. Newhall candi- 
dacy. As nearly as possible muni- 
cipal questions should be settled upon a 
business basis. When the opportunity 
affords itself to secure men with long 
municipal experience, breadth, judg- 
ment, and acquaintance with the city's 
needs and desires, such men should be 
retained by the city in public place. 
This year a particularly good oppor- 
tunity affords itself for the voters to 
re-elect a public servant who has done 
valuable work in the office the past two 
years. 

Ex-Mayor Asa T. Newhall should be 
re-elected assessor for three years, for 
the reason that he has shown himself to 
be a competent, well informed, patient, 
obliging and intelligent official. Voters 
should settle the election of this official 
from a non-partisan standpoint, as they 
did two years ago. 

Locality might be waived under cer- 
tain conditions, but to elect Mr. Jack- 
son would give ward three two general 
assessors (John R. Story residing in 
ward three) and wards 4, 5 and 6, the 
largest city wards, would be without 
representation on the board. We do 
not beheve the voters will agree to this 
plan. 

Few men have a better understanding 
of Lynn's needs and desires, and his 
good judgment and keen foresight will 
no doubt result in a large Republican 
vote going to Mr. Newhall. 

It should be determined by ordinance 
in Lynn that all automobiles be equipped 
with the same kind of horn and their 
notes of the same key. The variation 
in auto "warnings" is such that people 
are many times in doubt whether they 
are listening to an auto screech or a 
new-fangled street piano. 

Little Edna — What is leisure, mamma? 

Mamma— It's the spare time a woman 
has in which she can do some other kind 
of work, my dear. —Chicago News. 

Do all your Christmas shopping in 
Lynn. 

BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



ANCESTORS 

A New Novel by 

GERTRUDE ATHERTON 

Author of "The Conqueror." 

A GREAT American novel of the old San Fran- 
j-\ Cisco. Mrs. Atherton has presented Cali- 
fornia with all its ancestral beauty and pride 
embodied in a higrh-bred young g-irl. The city, 
with its teeming- life, glows and lives in these 
pages, and is really as great a part of the drama 
as are the characters in the foreground, leading to 
a moving and impressive climax in the San Fran- 
cisco earthquake. The greatest work Mrs. Ather- 
ton has done is ANCESTORS. 

HARPER & BROTHERS, Publishers, NEW YORK 



Football at Yale and Harvard. 

'^l^HE esteemed Item gets into football 
JL like this:— 

It is claimed that Yale is never satisfied unless a 
game is won, while Harvard is pleased if the 
eleven makes a good showing. Does this fairly 
represent the "spirit" of the rival universities? 
It may in the matter of sports, and if so it will in 
a large degree account for the victories and 
defeats. 

We do not know anything about the 
above "claim," but to lovers of sports 
it sounds foolish. 

There is much written about college 
football that indicates the writers do 
not have anything like a clear idea of 
the situation. It is the same old story 
as for 20 years about Harvard and Yale 
at football and rowing. The New York 
Sun asked: "How much longer is Har- 
vard going to rally for Yale and give 
her a hard fight, but still lose?" and a 
Lynn Harvard student gave these 
answers to the Sun. They may interest 
the esteemed Item: 

Just so long as the amateur system 
prevails at Harvard and the profes- 
sional idea is worked out at Yale. 

Just so long as Yale develops the 
Forbes and pays their expenses as stud- 
ents simply to play football. 

Just so long as the Harvard Faculty 
remains (practically) unanimously op- 
posed to football in the commercial 
spirit. 

Just so long as Yale spends $1,000 to 
Harvard's $100 for coaching. 

Just so long as Yale has a Camp who 
is in the football industry as if it were 
his regular business. 

Stella— Does she put her money in a 
stocking? 

Bella— No, on her back. 

a* 

Our sympathy is with Mr. Nichols- 
Fred H. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



Chrystmasse of Olde. 

God rest you, Chrysten gentil men. 

Wherever you may be,— 
God rest you all in fielde or hall. 

Or on ye stormy sea; 
For on this morn oure Chryst was born 

That saveth you and me. 
Last night ye shepherds in ye east 

Saw many a wondrous thing-; 
Ye sky last night flamed passing bright 

Whiles that ye stars did sing. 
And angels came to bless ye name 

Of Jesus Chryst oure Kyng. 
God i-est you, Chrysten gentil men. 

Faring where'er you may; 
In noblesse court do thou no sport. 

In tournament no playe. 
In paynim lands hold thou thy hands 

From bloudy works this daye. 
But thinking on ye gentil Lord 

That died upon ye tree. 
Let troublings cease and deeds of peace 

Abound in Chrystantie; 
For on this morn ye Chryst is born 

That saveth you and me. 

— Eugene Field. 

The Street Cars. 

The street railway company is evi- 
dently determined to paint all of its 
cars yellow, or something that appears 
to be that color. This is a mistake. It 
is a tough proposition picking out one's 
car at present, and if the new policy is 
carried out the conditions will be worse. 
The scheme must save money for the 
railroad, and that gets consideration 
before the convenience of the public. If 
the local officials had their way each car 
line would have its own distinctively 
painted cars. That is as it should be. 

The cheap twaddle directed toward 
Chief Engineer Harris of the fire de- 
partment still goes on. It is hard work 
for men who have played politics in the 
fire department for several years to 
give up the habit. They cannot under- 
stand how it is that business methods 
should be injected into this depai'tment, 
and they continue their fighting and 
snarling. It would be a good idea for 
the city government, when they elect a 
chief, to give him full charge of the de- 
partment, because proper discipline 
cannot be exercised when contrary con- 
ditions exist. Chief Engineer Harris 
has done much for the development of 
the Lynn fire department and he should 
be heartily sustained by all who are in- 
terested in Lynn's welfare. 
A 
There was a young lady of Niger 

Who smiled as she rode on a Tiger 
They came back from the ride 
With the lady inside. 
And the smile on the face of the Tiger. 
— Selected. 
»?4 

Lynnfield street will be improved. 



Lieut. Governor Draper. 

Mr. E. Gerry Brown and his political 
stage villain assistants, who were go- 
ing to do "such things" to Lieut. Gov. 
Draper, were somewhat disappointed. 
Mr. Draper led Brown by nearly 80,000 
votes, and was ahead of Schofield by 
over 82,000 votes. The public become 
somewhat wearied of Mr. Brown's ac- 
cusations, and the best evidence that he 
was dealing in something beside facts, 
was the vote received in Milford and 
Hopedale, where the voters are best ac- 
quainted with Lieut. Gov. Draper. He 
secured the most flattering endorsement 
ever given him in those localities where 
Mr. Brown stated that manufacturing 
conditions, under the direction of Mr. 
Draper, were in such a dreadful con- 
dition. Lieut. Gov. Draper should take 
much satisfaction from the manner in 
which his neighbors and those who are 
best acquainted with him tendered their 
support at the polls. 

A 

On Christmas Day. 

On Christmas Day a maid and I 

Were walking very slow 
From church, and all the grayish sky 

Was filled with falling snow. 

I hoisted an umbrella up 

To guard her from the storm. 
Half filled with happiness my cup. 

My heart with love was warm. 

"Dear me," I sighed, "here is a go. 

There's not a soul in sight. 
If I but had some mistletoe. 

My heart indeed were light." 

Unfortunate am I, though big, 

A most unlucky fellow." 
"Why dear," she cried, "I tied a sprig 
On top of the umbrella!" 

»T<i 

Michael A. Fenton, who died last 
month, was an original character. In- 
telligent, shrewd and observing, he was 
strongly liked by a large circle of 
friends. He was exceedingly diplo- 
matic, a good judge of character, and 
most entertaining among his friends. 
He stood his long illness with remark- 
able fortitude, and at all times had the 
cheery word. No individual in ordinary 
life knew and understood human nature 
better than M. A. Fenton. 

Tax collector French is after the Tax 
Dodgers. They should be called to ac- 
count, and made to pay their bills with 
interest. 

A 

Do all your Christmas shopping in 
Lynn. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



We have Holiday Pres- 
ents in Abundance to 
Fit All Pocket Books 



Toilet Goods 

Perfumes 

Stationery 

Cigars 

Confectionery 

Also a fine line of the East- 
man Cameras and Supplies. 

A Camera makes an excel- 
lent Xmas gift. 

Also we carry the best of 
Medicines, and make a spec- 
ialty of Prescription Work. 

Wm. A. Wilson, 

FAMILY DRUGGIST 
205 Franklin Street. 



GREEN & SON 

"DT A T\.T r\0 NO BETTER MADE 
r'^liT.lN^O AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



This is the most economical period of 
the year to put in 

THE WINTER'S COAL SUPPLY 

Now being unloaded, clean and 
without any dust. Coal is 

AT THE LOWEST PRICE TO-DAY 

Stevens & Neivhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 



CITY OF LYNN. 



GEORGE W. BREED 

INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



Examination of Candidates for 

Teachers' Certificates 

of Qualification. 



Candidates for primary and grammar 
school certificates will be examined in 
room 12, Cobbet school, on Friday, Dec- 
ember 27 and Saturday, December 28, 
at 9 o'clock A. M., on each day. 

All candidates for these certificates 
must present certificates of good char- 
acter and health, and of at least two 
years successful experience in teaching 
and governing schools. 

The names of those who secure the 
above certificates will be placed on an 
APPROVED LIST for appointment as 
REGULAR TEACHERS in the primary 
and grammar schools of the city of Lynn, 
and persons on the approved list will be 
given PREFERENCE for appointment 
as regular teachers over all except nor- 
mal graduates who have satisfactorily 
completed the course under supervision 
in the Eastern Avenue school. 

SUBSTITUTES now employed in the 
schools, who have not completed the 
above course, MUST PASS THIS EX- 
AMINATION before they can become 
eligible for a regular position. 

IT IS NECESSARY FOR CANDI- 
DATES TO BE PRESENT ON BOTH 
DAYS. 

GEORGE S. BURGESS, 

Secretary. 



Table Lamps for Christmas 

Every Style, Variety and Price. 

You will be liable to find just what you are 

lookinjr for. 

CHAS. C. PHILLIPS 

74 Exchange Street 
GAS AND ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



Navtl Rupture, Tendency to Corpulency or any 
Abdominal Weakness demands the use of an 

All Elastic Abdominal Belt 




We manufacture all to special nnuMire which 
insures a perfect fit and most efficient support. 
Send for cataloirue No. 2. 

CURTIS & SPINDELL CO., 7 Munroe St., Lynn 



Governor Guild's E ndorsement. 

Gov. Guild's tremendous plurality 
may be largely due to Democratic de- 
moralization, but it is in part a personal 
victory for him, and indicates that 
he possesses the confidence of the people 
of this Commonwealth. The democ- 
racy is indeed in a bad plight. An in- 
teresting complication is threatened 
in the splitting of the Whitney vote 
by the appearance of his name three 
times on the ballot. Since the Indepen- 
dence League candidate probably re- 
ceived more votes than were placed 
against Mr. Whitney's name under the 
designation, "Democratic," it is as- 
serted that the Democratic party will 
lose to the league its share of control of 
the election machinery. However this 
may result, it looks as if Mr. Whitney 
were pretty well out of the political 
field in this state. A distrust of him 
has never ceased to exist largely as the 
result of his questionable dealings with 
past Legislatures. 

The Manufacturers' National Bank 
has resources of $1,697,526.40 and as 
security for deposits, $1,027,673.88, 
leaving a surplus of assets after satisfy- 
ing all demands of depositors of $669,- 
852.52. It is a showing that speaks not 
only for soundness and safety, but of an 
amplitude of resources to fully meet 
every banking demand of the city it 
serves. 

Do all your Christmas shopping in 
Lynn. 



D 



O YOU KNOW HOW LITTLE IT 
costs to obtain a fire insurance policy on 
your furniture? 

ASK US FOR PRICES 



ROBERT S. SISSON & SON 

302-303 Item Kuildinp:. Lynn 



December. 

The lakes of ice gleam bluer than the lakes 
Of water 'neath the summer sunshine gleamed: 
Far fairer than when placidly it streamed. 
The brook its frozen architecture makes. 
And under bridges white its swift way takes. 
Snow comes and goes as messenger who dreamed 
Might linger on the road; or one who deemed 
His message hostile, gently for their sakes 
Who listened might reveal it by degrees. 
We gird against the cold of winter wind 
Our loins now with mighty bands of sleep. 
In longest, darkest nights take rest and ease. 
And every shortening day as shadows creep 
O'er the brief noontide, fresh surprises find. 

-(H. H.) 

A 

There was a good illustration fur- 
nished last month of the manner in 
which municipal work is not attended 
to, in the conditions of street crossings 
near the center of the city, for several 
days. The crossings were allowed to be 
covered with two or three inches of 
mud, and the public suffered great in- 
convenience, no attempt being made 
whatever to clear them, outside of the 
immediate center. 

By the way, what has become of the 
woman's club house project? When 
are we to have the new building at the 
corner of Nahant and Broad streets? 

Mr. Austin was nearly defeated by 
the scattering vote. 



QIlirtBtmaa 



mMftamamm 



Ladies', Misses' and Children's 
FURS— Mink Scarfs and Muffs 
in great variety — Squirrel, 
Lynx, French Marten, etc., in 
Scarfs and Muffs at low prices. 

Oot MISSES' SETS have good 
sized Muffs and Scarfs. . '. . *. 

Men's Fur, Felt and Silk Lined 
Gloves. See our Hne of Suit 
Cases, Traveling Bags and 
Traveling Cases before buying. 

Amos B. Chase 

Hatter and Furrier, 123 Munroe Street 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 




CHRISTMAS 
DELICACIES 


EVERYTHING 

YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 
VARIETY 

AT 
LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, etc. 




THE AUDITORIUM 


ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE SHOW 


Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites — Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 

Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 


EVERYTHING for the TABLE 




The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 


Porter, Pearson CSi, Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 







The Line io the West 




Through Sleeping Cars 

Excellent Dining-Car Service 

Tourist Cars 

Tickets, Time-Tables and detailed information at Boston 
City Ticket Office, 322 Washington Street. 



D. J. FLANOERS 
Pass. Traf. Mgr. 



C. M. BURT 

Gen'l Pass. Agt. 



rasf Through 
Trains io 



St. Louis 
inneapolis 



Kansas City 



J^rom 
-BOS TO J^ 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



Hiaivatha on Shopping. 

"Goodness me!" said Hiawatha 

As he watched the Christmas shoppers 

Loaded down with countless bundles, 

"Goodness me. likewise g-ood heavens! 

What an awful bore is Christmas, 

Yesterday I took a journey 

Down the street to buy a necktie — 

Entere<l a department buildinpr. 

Walked about among the shoppers. 

Saw the busy little clerklets 

Bustlinp:, crowding, jumping sidewise. 

Shooting plunk and taking orders; 

Saw the father of the family 

Talking to a blonderina 

Who presided o'er the counter 

Where the choicest works of fiction 

Go for twenty cents a volume; 

Saw the festive high school student 

With a waffle for a sky-piece 

Spending his small change, my dearies. 

For a pony set of bracelets 

To be left in Effie's stocking; 

Saw the thoughtless wife investing 

Hubby's roll in smoking jackets 

Weird cigars and gaudy mufflers 

Silverware and other trifles. 

Now, I ween the merry Yuletide 

Is becoming quite outrageous; 

Really if this continues 

Every father in the country 

Will apj)ly for a receiver. 

Will be in the same condition 

Now prevailing down in Zion 

What a simple thing was Christmas 

In the days when I was moving 

In the Injun upper circles — 

In the days when people called me 

The H. Lehr of the Objibways, 

I was courting Minnehaha, 

Maybe you will not believe it 

When you look at me, my children. 

But I never have been noted 

For the great amount of Wampum 

That I have about my person. 

And in those days, as in these days 

I was never long on velvet 

Never capable of showing 

Many twenty dollar bank notes 

Therefore I was rather puzzled 

With this Christmas pri.position. 

I had priced a dozen diamonds 

In a sort of listless manner; 

I had looked at grand pianos. 

Sealskin sacques and set of Shakspeare 

Just as if I meant to buy tliem. 

And I had the blues, my children. 

Till Nokomis gave me counsel. 

By the way, 1 want to tell you. 

That this same old female Injun 

Was the best that ever happened. 

She had put me wise so often 

That I had much admiration 

For her Russell Sage astuteness. 

'Hiawatha you are dipr)y!' 

Were the words of old Nokomis; 

'You are moping 'round the wigwam 

Just because you cannot purchase 

Something fancy and exi)ensive 

For your copper-coIore<l money. 

Use your head, O Hiawatha, 

Take some simple little trifle 

To the tent of Minnehaha, 

Hand her out some conversation 

Bearing on the Yuletide spirit; 

Say that the intrinsic value 

Of your gift to her is nothing 

(Which will be no fabrication) 

And, in short, make up in con talk 

What you lack in filthy lucre.' 

Straightway then I bent my footsteps 

To the home of Minnehaha, W*mrx-j 

Swiped an arrow from her father 



Bit my monogram upon it, 

Made a spiel to Laughing Water 

As advised by old Nokomis. 

And she took it; though I reckon 

That her joy was not ecstatic. 

This will give you some slight inkling 

Of the drunken sailor methixis 

I employed when I went shopping 

In the festal Christmas season, 

In the land of the Ojibways." 

— Milwaukee Sentinel. 

Keith's New Theatre. 

"A theatre of perpetual sunshine," 
is the editorial comment of a noted 
critic after spending an evening at 
Keith's, and the many thousands of 
amusement seekers who find pleasur- 
able entertainment there each week 
will gladly re-echo his sentiment. It is 
the one place in Boston that is not al- 
lowed to grow old or tarnished, and the 
claim of the management that it is 
"more than ever before one of the 
sights of Boston" is quite within the 
truth. There will be many high-class 
vaudeville artists appear at Keith's this 
month and the attractions around 
Christmas will, as usual, be of much 
pleasure and intellectual value to the 
children. The strong point with Keith's 
is the ability of the management to 
steadily interest the old and young. 
The week of December 9 will be a 
memorable one, when the attractions 
will include Marie Lloyd, the highest 
priced English specialty artist now 
before the public; Hilda Spong and 
Company, Rice and Prevost, Zingari 
Troupe, Paul LaCroix, McKenzie and 
Shannon, Jack Gardner, Max York and 
his Fox Terriers, and others. 

Voting for the City's Interests. 

A local paper requested voters to go 
to the polls in the caucuses last month 
"and cast a vote for the best interests 
of Lynn." With the character, standing 
and qualifications of the many candi- 
dates for oflice not known to over five 
per cent, of the voters, how could they 
be expected to pass intelligently upon 
the claims of those who seek municipal 
office? The caucus system is weak in 
this direction. It does not give people 
a sufficient opportunity to pass upon the 
qualifications of those seeking office. 
There should be some body in Lynn 
which should have experts pass upon 
the worth and character of men seeking 

fositions in the municipal government, 
nvestigations conducted by such a body 
would help out voters, who would be 
delighted to "cast a vote for the best 
interests of Lynn." 



18 



THE LYKN REVIEW 



Some su ggestions for e verybody 
in the family 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS 
IN ABUNDANCE 



EASY FOR YOU TO SELECT SOMETHING FROM THIS 

LIST FOR WIFE, DAUGHTER, SON, 

FATHER or SWEETHEART 



Diamonds 

Scissors 

Forks 

Bon-Bon Spoons 

Sugar Tongs 

Paper Cutters 

Match Boxes 

Toilet Jars 

Velvet Brushes 

Tooth Powder Bottles 

Bonnet Brushes 

Pocket Combs 



Mucilage Bottles 
Ink Stands 
Toilet Bottles 
Table Bells 
Hair Receivers 
Salt and Pepper Bottles 
Hat Pins 
Mustard Spoons 
Sugar Spoons 
Butter Knives 
Cigar Jars 

Sterling Silver Combs 
and Brushes 



Sterling Silver Hand 

Mirrors 
Tea Sets 
Opera Glasses 
Clocks 
Women's Chatelaine and 

Gold Watches 
Bracelets 
Rings 
Studs 
Cuff Buttons 



All the goods are new— the latest styles and at prices 
that are 25 per cent, below those in Boston on same 
quality goods. 

We have some especially low-priced Diamonds, bought 
before the advance. You will be surprised at the 
reasonable prices. 

We engrave all goods in the best manner possible, FREE OF CHARGE 



MAKE PURCHASES EARLY. They tvill be set aside for you. 

Selection much better NOW. 

JAMES H. CONNER 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN 

81 Pearl Street Near Union Lynn, Mass. 

Longest Established Lynn Jewelry Store 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



Hope. 

I have a fleet of ships at sea 

That sail and sail away. 
All freighted down with hopes that I 

Look out for day by day. 

My ships are swept to East and West 

Before the gales that blow. 
And many a hope is lost for aye 

That I had long ago. 

I wonder if, despite the storms. 

It shall be mine to see 
One ship with one high hope at last 

Sail safely home to me. 

— S. E. Riser. 

i>7i 
The Lynn Banks Did Nobly 

during the recent financial flurry. 
Good reports were heard from all of 
them so far as their treatment of custo- 
mers was concerned. They accommo- 
dated their patrons with 6 per cent, 
money while refusing outside calls for 
loans, with ample security, from 7 to 10 
per cent. The Lynn banks have done 
more for this community than any other 
single factor. They have banked on 
character and ability, and they have 
been uniformly successful, because no 
city of Lynn's size in the country is 
believed to have stronger banking insti- 
tutions. There is altogether too much 
of a disposition among people who do 
not know what they are talking about, 
to criticise the banks, when passing 
through pressing periods like that of 
last month. If people could only learn 
to hold their tongues and not talk about 
so much that they do not know or under- 
stand, at least one-half of the difficul- 
ties arising from a financial disturbance 
would be alleviated. 
A 
' 'Tomorrow, ' ' announced five-year-old 
Sidney, proudly to his kindergarten 
teacher, "is my birthday." "Why," 
returned she, "it is mine, too." The 
boy's face clouded with perplexity; and, 
after a brief silence, he exclaimed, 
"How did you get so much bigger'n 
me?"— Lippincott's. 

Mial W. Chase, Dr. Herbert W. New- 
hall and Mrs. May L. Sheldon, school 
board members who are candidates for 
re-election, are almost certain to be 
again endorsed by the voters. Their 
record is such that they deserve such 
treatment. They have well served the 
city in past years. 

Those Western avenue (West Lynn) 
lodging houses are fire traps. They 
demonstrate how buildings may be con- 
structed contrary to the city ordinances. 



Christmas 
Suggestions 

Our stock is full of useful 

XMAS GIFTS 

Gifts that will last and keep the 
memory of the giver always in 
mind. 

DESKS - MORRIS CHAIRS 
FANCY ROCKERS — PIC- 
TURES-BED SETS-RUGS 
COUCHES-COUCH COVERS 
TABLES —BABY ROBES 
CARPET SWEEPERS 
TABLE COVERS— MANTEL 
DRAPERIES. 

Goods purchased now will be stored 
until Xmas. Prompt delivery 

W. B. GIFFORD 

97-99 MARKET STREET 



The Ward three Republicans have 
nominated a particularly strong candi- 
date for the common council in Charles 
I. Burrows. He was born in Lynn, but 
for several years past has resided in 
New Hampshire, where he has been in 
fairly close touch with politics. This is 
not mentioned to disparage Mr. Bur- 
rows, because as everj^body understands 
New Hampshii-e politics is a tough 
proposition, but the experience gained 
in the granite state should much aid Mr. 
Burrows in settling Lynn's political 
problems. 

Man has now so far advanced in his 
effort to banish night that in Paris, for 
example, the artificial illumination is 
estimated to be nearly one-ten thous- 
andth of the amount of .sunlight. This 
approaches the amount of illumination, 
of solar origin, on the planet Saturn. 

D. B. H. Power's Thanksgiving win- 
dow display last month was most attract- 
ive. No store windows in the city pay 
a better return on the investment than 
those of Mr. Power, where originality 
and timeliness is much in evidence in 
the displays. 



20 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CS, W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 



Tel. 109i-2 



Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 
167 Market Street. 



AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



By OCTAVE THANET 

The Lion's Share 

A ROMANCE of modern American 
life — which means not "love in 
idleness, " but hotter-veined "love 
in business." No one can tell about it 
so charming-ly as does Octave Thanet. 
Along with the love-story there is a 
mysterious disappearance, followed by 
a thrilling chase; the whole being flav- 
ored with rich and kindly humor. 
By the author of THE MAN OF THE HOUR. 
With six beautiful Pictures by E. 
M. ASHE. $1.50 postpaid. 

The BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY 

Publishers. Indianapolis 



'Nothing Succeeds Like Success." 



The Lynn Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Co. has been doing 
business since 1828 

About 80 Years of Success. 



Get our rate on a policy. 



LYNN MUTUAL FIRE INS. CO. 

112 MARKET STREET 



ASK US 
ABOUT 



o&R Safety Razor | 

The Best in its Line ™ 

^ Reasonable in Price 4J 

2 Jos. W. Harding & Co. >[ 

JJ 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.5 6 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.7B 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



"^S^- 




See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
bi'eaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



21 



Moon's Changes. 

New Moon, Dec. 5. 
First Quarter, Dec. 11. 
Full Moon, Dec. 19. 
Last Quarter, Dec. 27. 

John H. Nelson Should be Re-elected. 

JOHN H. NELSON of Ward 4 is a 
fl candidate for re-election to the 
board of aldermen. The work Mr. Nel- 
son has done for Lynn entitles him to 
another term in the upper branch. He 
has been attentive to his duties and has 
well safeguarded the city's interests in 
all matters with which he has had to do. 

Mr. Nelson received the second largest 
vote in the Republican caucuses last 
month. He is serving his first year as 
alderman, having previously served two 
years as councilman, being President of 
the Common Council in 1906, having a 
record of being one of the most success- 
ful presidents the city has had. His 
committee appointments, rulings, etc., 
gave great satisfaction to both the 
minority and his own party. Mr. Nel- 
son is a member of the fii'm and treas- 
urer of the William Firth Co., one of 
the largest importers of textile machin- 
ery in the United States. 

He has been a resident of Lynn for 
nearly twenty-five years. He is a mem- 
ber of the East Lynn Lodge of Odd Fel- 
lows, DeSoto Colony, Pilgrim Fathers, 
Lynn Board of Trade, Oxford Club and 
Prospect Club, and also a member of 
the New England Cotton Manufactu- 
rers' Association, Exchange Club of 
Boston, and the Danvers Country Club. 



It is hoped that the same generous 
support given in past years will be ten- 
dered the Lynn Oratorio Society this 
season, which opens in High School 
Hall, Wednesday evening, Dec. 11 with 
the oratorio of "Arminius" by Max 
Bruch. Most ehcouraging progress has 
been noted at the rehearsals, and the 
work done at these preliminary meetings 
gives promise of a splendid opening of 
the season of local oratorio. 



The professor of English was noted 
for being absent-minded. He used to 
call the roll before the lecture. One 
morning, after calhng a name to which 
there was no response, he looked up 
and, peering over his spectacles, asked 
sharply, "Who is the absent boy in the 
vacant chair I see before me?" — Lip- 
pincott's. 



My Liftle Boy Blue. 

My little boy blue is not the one 

Who didn't blow his horn. 
But under the haystack fell asleep 

While cows got into the corn. 
My little boy blue is wide awake, 

He never will go to sleep. 
From early morn till the day is done. 

When his eyes begin to peep. 
His sheep are wooden ones painted white. 

And mostly on three legs stand; 
Without any tails, like little Bo Peep's, 

They travel in Baby Land. 
You ask, "Why call him little boy blue?" 

Didst ever notice his eyes? 
They're just the shade of the deepest hue 

That lives in the summer skies. 
A little blue dress and pinafore. 

Just like a happy blue jay. 
He wears, and I sometimes almost fear 

He will be flying away. 
Ah, me! how quickly the years will go. 

And jacket for pinafore 
He'll don; to a big strong laddie grown. 

My little boy blue no more. 

Dora Denison-Keeney. 

»?<• 

Better Done by Roosevelt Than by Debs. 

A foundation of better times has 
been laid by the hands of the President. 
If business leaders will co-operate, con- 
ditions will be more favorable to the 
small investor than they have ever been 
through long days of financial jugglery. 
It was impossible for the country to go 
on much farther along the way it was 
proceeding. If Roosevelt had not be- 
gun the work of reconstruction, it 
would have been carried on by hands 
far more ruthless of the rights of cap- 
ital. 



O. R. Howe adopted a unique way of 
celebrating the 18th anniversary of his 
rubber store, last month, and at the 
same time assist the various churches 
that are holding fairs at this time. 
Circulars were sent to every church in 
Lynn and vicinity that two per cent, on 
all sales during the month of November 
would be donated to any society that 
the customer may designate on the cash 
register checks. 

According to the Bookman, the six 
books which sold the best, in the order 
of demand, the past month, were: — 
The Younger Set, Satan Sanderson, The 
Daughter of Anderson Crow, The Lady 
of the Decoration, The Weavers and 
The Traitor. 

School children are more tender than 
they were some years ago, if the "no 
school" or deferred starting of school 
signals are any criterion. 



22 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



WHY MAKE A "« //Vrrii^ -^/ICC! a* 


per argument 


CHANGE ? V U 1 ti 1 JEir> ;Sb/i"s^- '^^'^^^^--^^ 


If you want money available for public improvements you should vote YES 


The large and small 


property owners are vitally interested. A YES vote yields a revenue whiel 


is only to be had from 


about FIVE MILLION (SS.OOO.OOO) dollars' worth of taxable property. 




NOVEMBER 29. 1907. STATEMENT OF THE ACCOUNT OF LIQUOR LICENSES 


FOR THE PAST ELEVEN YEARS, 1897 TO 1907 INCLUSIV E. 


CREDIT 




RECEIPTS 


$1,219,614.70 


EXPENDITURES 




Commonwealth of Massachusetts ...... 


$304,903.75 


Transferred to School Department 


$309,238 81 






Police Department 


190,500 00 




" 


Fire Department 


87,000 00 




" 


j Health Department' 


68,057 26 




' 


[ Lighting Streets .... 


64,950 16 






[ Highway Department 


44,230 01 




" 


] Poor Department 


36,007 75 




" 


] Contingencies .... 


29,570 80 






Drainage .... 


15,000 00 




" 


' Soldiers' and Sailors' Relief 


12,200 13 






Incidental E.xpenses 


9,131 78 






1 Little River & Strawberry Brook Improvemen 


t 5,000 00 




" ' 


Repairs on Rifle Range 


3,600 00 






Salaries ..... 


. 3,510 00 






] Street Improvements 


3,003 00 




' 


] Small-pox Hospital 


2.813 83 






Abolition of Grade Crossings 


2.50 1 00 




" ' 


1 License Commissioners 


2,.500 00 






1 Expenses in Engineer's Office . 


2,500 00 




" ' 


Sidewalks and Street Crossings 


2,250 00 




. 


] Engine-house Repairs 


2,000 00 






Ward Si.x School-house . . , 


1,849 88 






] Awards and Executions . 


1,750 00 


- 




' Children's Home Improvement 


1,600 00 






Care of Brooks .... 


2,425 00 






] Emergency Hospital Stable 


1.250 00 






Printing and Stationery 


1,001 00 






' State Aid ..... 


1.000 00 




" 


' City Hall Repairs 


1,000 00 






Merchants' Week 


1,000 00 




" 


] Brown Tail Moth Extermination 


1,500 00 






] Assessors' Department 


600 00 




" 


Assessor's Clerks 


500 00 




.* 


Hospital for Contagious Diseases 


700 00 






' Ward Two School-house 


452 99 




' 


Treasurer's Clerks 


350 00 






1 Public Parks .... 


500 00 


' 




[ Ward Si.x Engine-house 


324 99 




" 


City Hall Expenses 


400 00 






] Auditor's Clerk .... 


150 00 






Typewriting .... 


324 50 






Labor Day Observance 


200 11 




" 


Precinct Expenses 


100 00 




" 


Rent of Polling Places 


75 00 






Western Burial Grounds 


50 00 






Assistant Assessors ... 24 58 
Lynnfield Street School-house . . . 19 37 


$914,710.95 




$1,219,614.70 


$914,710.95 NET 




received in eleven years and spent for the benefit of the taxpayers of the City of Lynn. 1 


RECEIPTS from Liquor Licenses, 1907 


$124,788 00 


PAID TO STATE, one-fouith '. 

NET TO CITY OF LYNN 


31.197 00 


$93,591 00 


Can the property owners afford to lose this $93,591.00? 




Do they want to make it up in direct taxation and ko without improvements ? 


Vote YES on Tuesday. December 10 and continue the sensible and practicable license law. which 


means REVENUE and REGULATION. 




W. H. Buckley, 98 Kirtland Street, Lynn, Mass. 





THE LYNN REVIEW 



23 




THE re-nomination of Asa T. Newhall for assessor affords an opportunity to 
continue in tiiis important office a man who has always "made good" in posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility, and whose service on this board has been 
both a benefit and a credit to the city, and a satisfaction to those who recognize 
that he is "the right man in the right place." 

Two years ago when he was first a candidate for this office, we advocated in 
these columns his election in the interest of the public welfare. That no mistake 
was made is evident from the many favorable comments that have come to us. 

Mr. Newhall has fully met the expectations of those who at that time recognized 
his pecuhar fitness and ability for discharging the varied duties of this important 
office. Every voter owes it to himself and to the public to aid by his vote in elect- 
ing one whose practical training, coupled with the experience gained during his two 
years of service, so thoroughly equips him to meet and discharge the duties of 
an assessor. 

The credentials of a candidate for this office should bear the seal of ability, rather 
than the political designation of any party. 

All should give thoughtful consideration to a matter in which every voter has 
such a vital interest. We take pride in again according Mr. Newhall hearty en- 
dorsement and support, and it is believed that his candidacy will be approved more 
emphatically than at his election two years ago, more especially by the growing 
non-partisan vote for municipal office. 

Consider his re-election a matter of your own personal concern, and he will be 
elected on Tuesday, December 10th. 



24 THE LYNN REVIEW 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 



New and thoroughly up-to-date boxes have recently been in- 
stalled in our vault. 

You will doubtless appreciate this opportunity to keep your 

papers of value in a strictly private box, in a fire and 

burglar-proof vault. Rental $5 to $50 per year. 

You are invited to call and inspect. 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office, 25 Market Square, West Lynn, Mass. 



GODDARD BROS. 

84-92 MARKET STREET 

Christmas Hdfs. 

For Men, Women and Children 

THE immense assortment of HOLIDAY HDFS. now on dis- 
play at our HDF. BOOTH will surely please you -and the 
prices as usual are very reasonable. Choice new patterns 
from the best makers of Switzerland, France and Ireland, and 
splendid values from domestic manufacturers, contribute to 
make this the finest Hdf. display in Essex County. 

LINEN INITIAL HDFS. FRENCH CONVENT HDFS. 

DAINTY EMBROIDERED HDFS. NEW PRINCESS LACE HDFS. 

CHILDREN'S BOX HDFS. 
Prices 5c. to $5.00 

Write for our booklet ''What to Buy for Christmas." 



When dealing- with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



1908 1908 

POSSIBLY YOU ARE ALREADY A PATRON 
OF THIS TRUST COMPANY. IF NOT, IT 
MIGHT BE WELL TO START IN WITH THE 
NEW YEAR. A TRIAL MAY PROVE MU- 
TUALLY PROFITABLE. WITH A VIEW OF 
GETTING BETTER ACQUAINTED, WE INVITE 
YOU TO CALL. 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office. 25 Market Square, West Lynn, Mass. 




THE LYNN REVIEW 



^pr^V^^^g^^^ 


TELEPHONE 1807 


312 UNION STREET 


Look for Announcement of our Great 


January 




Mark-Down 


Sale 


which will be continued 


the 


entire month 





YOU READ THE 
PAPER— 

Electricity Will Do 
the Washing. 

Let the Wash Wom- 
an Do the Ironing — 

"1900" 

Self - Working 
\A/asher 

Now being Demonstrated 
in Exhibition De- 
partment of 

LYNN GAS ca, ELECTRIC CO. 

Try a Gas Radiator, only $1.50 (actual cost). 




When (ioaliiiK with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Lynn Review 

a monthly epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street. Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



JANUARY, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 
No. 3 



While we had a "No" vote we shall 
have Porter! 



It was somewhat peculiar that on 
such a wet day Lynn should go dry. 



The 1908 common council has more 
than the usual amount of sensible mat- 
erial. 

Saugus is not yet a part of Lynn, and 
is not likely to be for some time to 
come. 



Very fine spring weather this winter! 
[P. S. We hope when this is read the 
weather man will not be serving a 
blizzard.] 



Judge Henry T. Lummus seems to 
have the most sensible idea yet promul- 
gated regarding the establishment of a 
county court house in Lynn. 



It came out in the recent campaign 
that Lynn liquor dealers paid the city 
$20,000 annually for water! Is this a 
reflection on the quality of liquid sold in 
Lynn? 

My, what a leak! 418,000 gallons per 
day at Walden Pond. But engineers 
say that we should not get scared — that 
it is only an "average leak!" Almost 
everything about municipal government 
seems to be leaky, nowadays. 



Mayor Barney did certainly hand it 
out to Wheeler & Betton, and the archi- 
tects say, in answer, that they have 
notO. K'dthe construction bills and will 
not do so, on the manual swimming 
school — excuse us, we mean training 
school. Mr. Wheeler says, in effect, 
"what can the citv expect for $20,000— 
marked down from $50,000?" The poor 
old city of Lynn gets hit hard every 
time. 



The Postmaster General and Santa Claus 

It was not a wise man who notified 
the public that local charities would 
take up the answering of letters ad- 
dressed to Santa Claus. It would have 
been far better to do the work quietly 
and let the public in after Christmas. 

The postmaster general's press bureau 
worked overtime last month. It looks 
like systematic booming of Mr. von L. 
Meyer for political preferment. Noth- 
ing like it has ever been known in Amer- 
ican politics and if you don't believe it 
just follow the papers. There must be 
a considerable expenditure of money 
back of this consistent booming. 



The Special Days of 1908. 

Lent commences March 4, and Easter 
Sunday will be April 19. 

Washington's Birthday comes Satur- 
day, February 22. 

St. Patrick's Day, Tuesday, March 17. 

Patriots' Day comes on Easter Sun- 
day, April 19. 

Memorial Day, Saturday, May 30. 

Bunker Hill Day, Wednesday, June 17. 

Independence Day, Saturday, July 4. 

Labor Day, Monday, September 7. 

Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Novem- 
ber 26. 

Christmas, Friday, December 25. 

Mayor-Elect Porter. 

Hon. Thomas F. Porter was elected 
by a majority quite unexpected. He 
will have a diflficult job handling the no 
license proposition, but he states that it 
will be his aim to have the laws observed 
and to give the city his best services in 
every way. Mr. Porter is progressive, 
his genial nature would not allow him 
to be otherwise, and his intimate 
knowledge of Lynn municipal conditions 
should work to the best advantage of 
this enterprising and progressive city. 

If all of the suggested improvements 
are carried out by Lynn next year, 1908 
promises to be a most expensive twelve 
months for this municipality, but there 
is much work of vital necessity, includ- 
ing a new Classical high school building, 
a new sixteen-room school building in 
West Lynn, and a municipal building in 
the westerly section of the city. Also 
the erection of new city stables, to say 
nothing about the proposed extension of 
Market street. Mayor Barney believes 
that the city should leave no stone un- 
turned to get the necessary authority 
from the legislature for the extension 
of Market street. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



fi 



Safety Razor 



A8K US 
ABOUT OUR 

The Best in its Line 

Reasonable in Price & 

2 Jos. W. Harding & Co. 2 

^ 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 



"A masterpiece snriiassincr 'The Riuht 
of Way.' •• 

The weavers 

By GILBLHT PARKER 

"The book is grreat, and greatly to be 
praised "—N. Y. World. 

"Surpassing even The Seaf.i of the Mighty 
and The Right of Wag." — Chicago Record 
Herald. 

"An absorbing: piece of fiction which 
leaves no expectation unfulfilled."— P/v(7arfc<- 
phia Public Ledger. 

HARPER & BROTHERS 

PUBLISHERS 



GEORGE W. BREED 
INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING 



Everything 



YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 

VARIETY 

AT 

LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, RaisiAs, etc. 



EVERYTHING for the TABLE 



Porter, Pearson CSi, Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 






See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Rhyme and Reason. 

SAW an amazing- thing at the show 
the other night. A pretty woman 
was actually and obviously wearing hair 
on her head. Surrounding her were Mar- 
cel waves till it made you seasick to 
look at 'em, rats that called aloud for 
traps and poison, wads of false frizzes 
that were of the sort so perfectly de- 
fined by Tom in "Old Fashioned Girl"— 
"Somebody's hair on the top of her head 
in the place where it ought not to be." 
The pretty woman — come to think of it 
I guess that the principal reason for her 
being pretty— had just parted what hair 
grew on her head, after waving it a 
ti'ifle, had stuck in some inconspicuous 
tortoise shell combs on the side, and had 
made the ends into an elongated coil. 
There was positively not a bit of junk 
on either side or the top of her head, 
though I suppose if it had been becom- 
ing to wear the hair high she would 
have added a barrette to catch up the 
loose ends in her neck. My, but she 
was conspicuous, though! The woman 
sitting next had in her hair by actual 
count, nine articles, not including hair- 
pins—four side combs, one back comb, 
a barrette. a jewelled slide and a couple 
of ornaments like Lady Macbeth's dag- 
ger, worn in the same engaging way in 
which the stenographer wears the lead 
pencils provided by her employer.— Sara 
Sylvester. 

One of the most successful financial 
institutions in Lynn is the Security Safe 
Deposit and Trust Company. There has 
been splendid growth and development 
in connection with this company during 
the past year or two. This indicates 
substantial and intelligent management 
and shows the wise disposition of Lynn 
people to support their own banking in- 
stitution, rather than go outside of the 
city and help to develop banking institu- 
tions in other places. 
A 

The week of Jan. 6 will mark Mr. B. 
F. Keith's 25th anniversary as a factor 
in Boston theatricals, for on Jan. 8, 1883, 
he opened his first amusement enterprise 
in this city. As might naturally be ex- 
pected, "Anniversarj' Week" will be a 
memorable occasion at Keith's Theatre, 
a special programme to commemorate 
the event being in preparation. 

_ Keep open front side door (on safety 
"ide) of electric cars, while passing 
through the city. 



An Arab Saying. 

Remember, three thingrs come not back: 
The an-ow sent upon its track — 
It will not swerve, it will not stay 
Its speed; it (lies to wound or slay. 

The spoken word so soon forgot 
By thee; but it has perished not; 
In other hearts 'tis living still. 
And doing work for good or ill. 

And the lost opportunity, 

That Cometh back no more to thee 

In vain thou weepcst, in vain doth yearn. 

Those three will never more return. 

— Constanlina E. Brooks. 

»?« 

The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 



"My Lord, the Duke of Buckingham, 
awaits without the portals. " "Tell the 
lobster to go back and get them. " 

A health expert tells us that there is 
only one disease— congestion, and that 
there is only one cure— circulation. 



^o<=>ooo<zr>ooo<=>ooo<c:=>ooo<=:>o^ 

^ ^Jl^xm ^imtxtntmx ^ 



^o< 



>000< 



>000< 



>000<z:>000<z:>0'5^ 



25 EXCHANGE ST. 
LYNN 

President. . . CHARLES S. PURINTON 
Treasurer, . . FREDERICK L. BUBIER 

c^TWONEY DEPOSITED 

IN JANUARY 
GOES UPON INTEREST 
FEBRUARY 1 

Open Every Business Day, from 9 to 1 o'clock 
Also SATURDAYS, from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



ANCESTORS 

A New Novel by 

GERTRUDE ATHERTON 

Author of "The Conqueror." 

A GREAT American novel of the old San Fran- 
j\ Cisco. Mrs. Atherton has presented Cali- 
fornia with all its ancestral beauty and pride 
embodied in a high-bred young girl. The city, 
with its teeming life, glows and lives in these 
pages, and is really as great a part of the drama 
as are the characters in the foreground, leading to 
a moving and impressive climax in the San Fran- 
cisco earthquake. The greatest woi'k Mrs. Ather- 
ton has done is ANCESTORS. 

HARPER & BROTHERS, Publishers, NEW YORK 



GREEN & SON 

"DT A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
r'^ix^iNvJo AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay tViat can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CEi W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109i-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 

VAUDEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KbITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites — Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 



Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year jiolicy is $12.55 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



TDEOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



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THE LYNN REVIEW 



Changes in Modern Weddings. 

IT is interesting to note how wedding 
fashions have altered within even the 
memory of most of us, says the London 
Daily Mail. 

Twenty-one years ago the marriage 
ceremony had to be over by 12 o'clock, 
and the custom of the wedding break- 
fast was in full force. Then the hours 
were extended to 3, and as the fashion- 
able hour grew later the breakfast gave 
place to the reception. 

It is now fashionable to be married 
between 2 and half past according to 
Mr. Maisey of St. George's, Hanover 
Square; the quiet wedding, which a few 
years back took place at half past 9, 
now takes place at noon. 

Evening weddings are not allowed 
now, though about twenty years ago it 
was possible to be married at 6 in the 
evening with a special license, costing 
thirty guineas and obtainable from the 
Archbishop. This practice was, how- 
ever, speedily discontinued. Saturday 
still is chosen for about two-fifths of the 
modern weddings: while Tuesday and 
Thursday are each selected for a fifth, 
Wednesday is unusual, and Friday ex- 
tremely rare. 

One of the most popular offerings the 
bridegroom can present to the brides- 
maids at this season of the year is a 
handsome muff:' made in one of the new 
patterns, the long bolster shape fringed 
with tails, the flounce, or the large pil- 
low shape. 

Such a muff as this is costly, but not 
more so than the beautiful presents given 
by one bridegroom this month, which con- 
sisted of gold powder boxes worn dang- 
ling from the wi'ist by gold chains. 

There is actuallj'' a new wedding ring 
for the bridegroom of very sentimental 
proclivities to purchase. It is a ring 
that opens by the means of a secret and 
completely hidden slide— completely hid- 
den, that is to say, except to the bride, 
who knows how to manipulate it. 

On the slide are inscribed words of 
devotion from the bridegroom to his 
bride, such as "Until death do us part, " 
"Thine for ever," and so forth. 

Much sensation has been caused of 
late by the public requests of two very 
smart and wealthy brides to be. One of 
them, a recent debutante, has announced 
that she wishes for the quietest of wed- 
dings; the other has published a request 
that no wedding presents shall be sent 
to her. 

In both instances a very obvious blow 
has been aimed at the too prevalent idea 



that even the most casual of acquaint- 
ances should be invited to the wedding, 
instead of those really and truly inter- 
ested in the alliance. 

Other indications there are that the 
sensationally splendid and ostentatious 
weddings of the past will not find favor 
much longer with modern brides. 

One of them is the revival of an old 
fashion, that of displaying the presents 
the day before the wedding and asking 
to the gathering the acquaintances and 
not very closely linked friends of the 
family, reserving invitations for the 
eei-emony at church and the reception 
afterward for relatives and dear friends. 

Water weddings, in which the happy 
pair have proceeded by river to the 
church, have been instituted this year, 
one taking place only the other day. 

Many little changes are creeping into 
the etiquette of the wedding dress. 
Once considered correct only when it was 
of the snowiest of white satin, it has 
been recently seen made of lace posed 
upon silver tissue. 

Oddly enough, also, there have been 
not a few cases lately in which the wed- 
ding dress has not been worn for the 
ceremony, but has been kept to be put 
on after the knot has been tied at a reg- 
istrar's office, when the bride has gone 
home and donned an exquisite bridal 
toilette in which to figure at the recep- 
tion. 

We Have Changed All That. 

The ancients thought the world was flat 

And right they were; 
There's not a bit of doubt of that, 

I must aver. 
They had no bridge, benighted dubs. 

No brainstorms then; 
They had no cigarettes or clubs. 

Like modern men. 

They had no chorus girls, no graft; 

No car ahead. 
They had no Foraker, no Taft, 

No valiant Ted. 
They had no mergers in their day. 

No rye or gin. 
They thought the world was flat, and say. 

It must have been. 

—Louisville Courier-Journal. 

We are bound by every rule of justice 
and equity to give the New Year credit 
for being a good one, until he proves 
himself unworthy the confidence we re- 
pose in him. — Sketches by Boz. 

Williams Bros, calendar for 1908 is a 
work of art, and was in great demand. 
Householders will find it very beautiful 
and practical. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriei-s of the REVIEW are broug^ht to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



This is the most economical period of 
the year to put in 

THE WINTER'S COAL SUPPLY 

Now being unloaded, clean and 
without any dust. Coal is 

AT THE LOWEST PRICE TO-DAY 

Telephone 56S — 

Stevens & Ncm^tiall 

Sea Street, Lynn 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



I Tremont Temple 

BURTON 
HOLMES 



TRAVELOG5JES 



COLORED VIEWS 
MOTION PICTURES 



Course A, 5 FRIDAY EVES. . 
Course B, 5 SATURDAY MATS. 



at 8.15 
at 2.30 



BERLIN 
VIENNA 
PARIS . 
LONDON 
FEZ . . 



. . Jan. 17 and IS 
. . Jan. 24 and 2r, 
Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 
. . . Feb. 7 and S 
. . Feb. 14 and 15 



Course Tickets Q_, So1f» Tfln 7 
$4, $3 and $2 ^^'^^ OdiC JctH. / 

CourselSale Closes Jan. 11. Sing-le Sale 
Opens Jan. 14 

MAIL ORDERS NOW 



STEV\^ART 
FURNACES 

ARE 
THE BEST 



COME IN AND SEE 
THEM AT 

J.F.Morgan ca Son 

66 MUNROE ST. 



NOW IS BARGAIN TIME 



XX 7 E have them on all goods. It will pay 

\ V you to come in and look over our as- 

^ sortmentof CARPETS. DRAPERIES, 

LACE AND MUSLIN CURTAINS. ART 

SQUARES, PORTIERES, SOFA PILLOWS. 

Wise people buy their next Christmas pres- 
ents now and save money. 

A special 10 per cent, discount on all stock 
RUGS purchased within TEN DAYS from 
January 1, 1908. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 MARKET STREET 



"Give me the man wlio can hold on 
when others let gro, who pushes ahead 
when others turn back; who stitTens up 
when others weaken; who advances 
when others retreat; who knows no such 
word as can't or give up; and I will 
show you a man who will win in the end, 
no matter what opposes him, no matter 
what obstacles confront him." — Orison 
Swett Marden. 

Geraldine Farrar's manager, after 
much persuasion, agreed to her singing 
in her native town of Melrose. But 
when they noted the price of seats at 
$5, $4 and $3, that was the Melrose cue 
for heart failure! 



When dealinf? with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Inventorial. 

The first was from his mother. 'Twas a tie of 
livid jrreen — 
He'd never seen a tie so green before. 
He left it in the tissue and with bright and hope- 
ful mien 
Bestowed it on the grocer's boy next door. 

The next was from his sister. They were wrist 
cuffs made of blue — 
A brighter blue had never seen the day. 
He felt a twinge of sorrow, but with no one else in 
view 
He gave them to the kid across the way. 

The third was from his brother— just a pair of 
yellow socks — 
He did not know that yellow was so bright. 
He sighed a little sadly, as 'twas three successive 
shocks. 
Then bestowed them on a coon as black as night. 

The fourth was from a cousin. Once again he 
dreamed his dreams- 
No doubt she'd sent him something really nice. 
The things were purple mittens— royal purple 
trimmed with cream — 
He gave them to the man that brought the ice. 

The fifth was from an auntie— here he shuddered 
o'er the knot; 
His awful luck was getting on his nerves. 
He gave the doggoned package to the laundress 
on the spot — 
'Twas just a jar of crimson hued preserves. 

The sixth was from his uncle; he could barely 
loose the string; 
A pair of red suspenders met his gaze. 
The reddest — here the janitor responded to his 
ring — 
They lasted him the balance of his days. 

The last was from his sweetheart — pray forgive 
his rising tears; 
A blow like that is really very hard — 
She ."^ent two pretty cupids with pink bowknots in 
their ears. 
In the middle of a little picture card. 

— L. S. Waterhouse. 

'^* 

The January issue of the American 
Review of Reviews is of more than ord- 
inary interest, having- special articles on 
Mr. Roosevelt's position, Taft and For- 
aker, Mr. Cortelyou, the President's 
Message, the railroad question, indus- 
trial and labor questions, the army and 
navy, and scores of other interesting 
articles. The record of current events 
with portraits and illustrations is more 
than usually interesting. 



If there were no fools to be parted 
from their money more men would have 
to work for a living. 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



The Fair Sex. 

After a girl has hypnotized a young 
man into buying her a solitaire she be- 
gins to wonder what she could have 
done with other men if it were not too 
late. 

A woman is always glad when her 
husband has a holiday so that he can 
put in about 18 hours doing odd jobs 
at home. 

Perhaps women are wearing sleeves 
short enough to expose their funny- 
bones merely to prove that they have a 
sense of humor. 

If a girl remains single until her ideal 
man comes along the chances are that 
her maiden name will adorn her tomb- 
stone. 

In a small town the monotony of a 
woman's life would be something fierce 
if it wasn't for the gossip floating about. 

A homely girl is always willing to ad- 
mit that her pretty rival hasn't any 



The owner of a large amount of real 
estate in Lynn, a very wealthy man, 
resides in a neai'by town. He does not 
have the reputation of being an Andrew 
Carnegie, and has never spent much 
time giving away libraries, or the article 
they use in constructing them. The 
story is told that some time ago he 
waited upon a tenant for his rent, and 
she said it come very hard because of 
the need of provisions and coal, for 
which she had money laid out, but she 
would leave the matter to the landlord, 
and he replied that he thought she 
ought to pay her rent. She did so. but 
a few hours later she was gladdened by 
the presence of a ton of coal and a gen- 
erous supply of provisions. Here was a 
case where"^ the business instinct pre- 
vailed, but where, nevertheless, deserv- 
ing charity was respected. This man 
never mixes business and charity. 

Mayor-elect Thomas F. Porter has a 
most sensible idea regarding changing 
the Boston and Maine railroad grades in 
Lynn, believing that depression is the 
only way in which the work should be 
done. Better spend three miUion dollars 
to do the work right then two million 
dollars to do the same incorrectly. 

A lazy man is just about as useless as 
a dead one— besides he takes up more 
room. — Fra Elbertus. 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



Subscribe for The Review. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



New Year's Eve. 

Old Year, decrepit year, art going: out 

Alone into the night, the winter night? 

The breast of Mother Earth is chilly white, 

Snow-clad and pulseless— have you not a doxibt 

Of welcome? See! The night is bitter cold. 

And you are worn and weary, burden-bent — 

Tarry a little longer: we have spent 

Full many happy hours in days of old. 

The new year comes, you say, you must depart — 

Yes, yes, I know, but hasten not! Once more 

Shake hands — good-bye, old friend! within my 

heart 
A place is ever yours. Open the door! 
Welcome, New Year! but do not jostle so 
My aged friend. God speed! and let him go. 

— Dora Denison-Keeney. 

The evils caused by intemperance in 
the use of alcohol are conspiciously de- 
grading and disgusting. But there are 
other evils which lack the immortal ele- 
ment, at least in any conspicuous de- 
gree, but which cause wide-spread 
misery and physical ruin. Tea and cof- 
fee come half-way between alcohol and 
cocaine. To a large proportion of the 
community tea and coffee bring suffer- 
ings commonly not understood, but 
serious and health destroying. But far 
beyond these as agents of evil are 
drinks so commonly taken even at soda 
fountains. Thousands of young people, 
to say nothing of some invalids, are 
getting in the habit of taking bracers, 
pick-me-ups, headache cures, catarrh 
remedies, mostly cocaine, and the like, 
which fix upon the users the habit of 
taking cocaine, morphine, coca cola, 
and other powerful but dangerous drinks 
and drugs.— The Christian Register. 

The attractions at Keith's theatre 
continue to be of a high order of merit, 
the increase in the attendance well 
demonstrating this fact. During Janu- 
ary there will be several headliners of a 
high order, including many new acts. 
The biograph explores the world for 
pictures. Keith's performances are 
clean, bright and entertaining, and it 
is remarkable how well he maintains 
his standard. At Keith's, women and 
children are always certain to find much 
to please them. 

According to the Bookman, the six 
books which sold the best in the order 
of demand during the past month were: 
The Weavers,The Shuttle,The Daughter 
of Anderson Crow, The Younger Set, 
Satan Sanderson, and The Lady of the 
Decoration. 

Breed and Newhall still continue to be 
good names to conjure with Lynn voters. 



The Lend-A-Hand Performance. 

THE Lend-A-Hand Club show in the 
Lynn Theatre last month was a dis- 
tinct social and financial success, and 
great credit is due Mrs. Fred E. Baker, 
chairman of the general committee. She 
was ably aided in her many duties and it 
is to be regretted that the musical and 
dancing directors were not more com- 
pletely on to their jobs. Plainly speak- 
ing, they did not know their business, 
and did not get any where near the re- 
sults expected from the splendid material 
with which they had to work. It is 
probably the last appearance of Messrs. 
Coleman and Nash in Lynn. 

More money was taken into the Lynn 
Theatre than at any single performance 
ever given in this city and a generous 
sum was netted for charity. 

It was a considerable undertaking and 
the performers developed much bright- 
ness and cleverness, and while there 
were many cheery spots, the work of 
Mrs. B. W. Currier, Miss Marion Pink- 
ham, and Miss H. Anabel Ingalls stood 
out especially prominent. 

It was a most enjoyable evening and 
the audience manifested much pleasure. 
Two years hence we shall look forward 
to another show, and we wonder if the 
Lend-A-Hand and Oxford Clubs will 
then unite in a grand performance for 
the cause of charity? That would, in- 
deed, be a stellar event. 



The Spalding Dry Goods Co. showed 
marked enterprise last month when it 
distributed among its employees a per- 
centage on their sales in addition to the 
regular salaries. The firm realized that 
the holiday trade was an extra tax on 
the energies of the clerks, that they 
were called upon to perform an unusual 
amount of work, and on that account 
decided upon the percentage plan to 
make them more interested and satis- 
fied with their work, and it proved to 
be'a most satisfactory plan. 

The 1908 city government, besides en- 
forcing the no-license law has got a 
few other things to consider— the new 
high school, the extension of Market 
street, completing the Sea street exten- 
sion, the erection of a municipal 
building in West Lynn, and the provid- 
ing of a larger number of passable 
streets and sidewalks. 

There is no fool like an educated fool. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



Last Year's Doll. 

I'm only a last year's doll! 

I thought I was lovely and fair — 
But alas for the cheeks that were rosy, 

Alas, for the once-flowinj? hair! 
I'm sure that my back is broken. 

For it hurts me when I rise! 
Oh, I'd cry for very sorrow. 

But I've lost out both my eyes. 

In comes my pretty mistress. 

With my rival in her arms. 
A fine young miss, most surely. 

Arrayed in her borrowed charms! 
My dress and my sHtjpers, too. 

But sadder, oh, sadder than all. 
She's won the dear love I have lost. 

For I'm only a last year's doll. 

Oh, pity me, hearts that are tender, 

I'm lonely and battered and bruised, 
I'm tucked out of sight in the closet. 

Forgotten, despised and abused ! 
I'm only a last year's doll. 

Alone with my troubled heart. 
Sweet mistress, still I love thee. 

Inconstant though thou art. 

— Eugene Field. 



When Kipling was a twelve-year-old, 
his father took him on a sea voyage, 
and, as Kipling senior suffered badly 
from seasickness, he left the boy to his 
own devices. Presently a tremendous 
commotion was heard, and the boat- 
swain dashed into Mr. Kipling's cabin, 
shouting at the top of his voice: "Mr. 
Kipling, your boy has crawled out on 
the yardarm! If he lets go, he'll drown 
to a certainty!" "Yes," said the suf- 
ferer, falling back on his pillow, "but 
he won't let go. "—Argonaut. 

Boston is coming along fast. Thirty- 
three dollars of every one hundred ap- 
propriated, goes to paying the interest 
on its debt. How long will it take Bos- 
ton to eat itself up through debt? The 
per capita debt of Boston is $97, and fi- 
nancially it is without any question the 
worst governed large city in the United 
States. Lynn is rapidly getting into 
Boston's financial condition. What shall 
we do to be saved? 



"Hell is full of peek-a-boo waists, " 
says a minister. And what style could 
be more appropriate for that climate? — 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


. D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN. MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



Do We Want a Merger? 

SOME people who pretend to know all 
about the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford railroad say that Boston & 
Maine railroad patrons don't want any- 
thing to do with that hydra-headed mon- 
ster. They tell us that the N. Y., N. 
H. & Hartford is "the worst thing that 
ever happened" in the railroad line. 

A Connecticut commuter who is up 
against the N. Y., N. H. & Hartford 
gets rid of the following, which is most 
interesting at the present time when a 
merger with the Boston & Maine rail- 
road is under consideration : 

"President Mellen of the New Haven road in 
addressing the innocent Connecticut grangers at 
Hartford observed yesterday: 

"Because there has been a skunk under a barn 
that is a trouble to the community, is no occasion 
for the destruction or upsetting of all the barns in 
a village. 

"The implication would seem to be that when 
you get used to the smell you can ride in dirty old 
cars. That's what we commuters have to do who 
travel on his line. 

"He further remarked that the road he repre- 
sented had been made 'the football of politi- 
cians.' 'This is the most arrant nonsense. Mr. 
Mellen's road has been the one great force for cor- 
ruption in Connecticut politics, just as the insur- 
ance and traction companies have been in New 
York. To-day the New Haven road is the master 
of Connecticut. It owns all the railroads; 
it owns all the trolleys: it is monopolizing the 
lighting: it owns all the steamboat lines; is mer- 
ciless, unscrupulous and all-powerful. The foot- 
ball of politics ! It is to laugh. 

"The charter of the road requires it to pay any 
net earnings over 10 per cent, to the State. Is 
there any record that the State ever got a nickel? 
No! Its earnings have gone to pay dividends on 
new capital issued to construct the magnificent 
monopoly now controlled by William Rockefeller 
and J. Pierpont Morgan: to buy up at extrava- 
gant prices the public utilities of the State, often 
promoted by insiders, who thus have made two 
fortunes out of the game. 

"As to politicians, the road owns them in this 
State body and soul." 

A certain childless woman moved to 
the suburbs and devoted herself to the 
raising of poultry. A witty friend went 
out to spend the day, and was shown a 
fine lot of young chickens. "These," 
said the mistress of the place (a la Cor- 
nelia), "these are my jewels." "And 
I suppose some day you'll have them 
set," responded the visitor, quickly.— 
Lippincott's. 

It has been suggested that the play- 
ers appear before President Roosevelt 
(by command) as they do in the English 
Court. Fancy what Theodore would 
say after listening to "Coarse" Payton! 



Sti-eet cars have 
forty-seven years. 



run in Lynn for 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



On the Cliff. 

I stand upon the headland. 

Where it rises? o'er the bay. 
And gaze across the waters. 

Where the glad waves are at play. 

And I wish that I could journey 

To the islands fair and far. 

Lying dim, away to eastward. 
Where the gates of morning are. 

For it seems that all of beauty. 
That my soul has dreamed, must be 

Waiting where those Blessed Islands 
Lie across the gleaming sea. 

Shall I ever make the journey? 

Shall I find my dream come true? 
Are those islands of the Blessed 

Waiting there, for me and you? 

Oh, we must, we do believe it. 

Still we gaze across the sea; 
Hope and love shall find a Harbor 

Where the Blessed Islands be. 

— William Henry Savage. 

»Ti 

An ex-governor of Wisconsin, a fa- 
mous story-teller, thus reported his ex- 
perience at a New Jersey clam-bake. 
' 'I started my speech, ' ' said the ex-gov- 
ernor, by stating that I had been enjoy- 
ing their low-necked clams. A long- 
faced old man across the table scowled 
and said in a stage whisper, 'Little 
necks, not low necks. ' I paid no atten- 
tion to him, but after dinner he followed 
me out of the hall. 'You don't have 
many clams in Wisconsin, I reckon,' 
said he. 'Well,' I said, 'we have some, 
but it's a good way to water, and, in 
driving them across the country, their 
feet get sore and they don't thrive very 
well.' 'Why, man alive, said he, clams 
haven't any feet!' Soon after that he 
buttonholed one of my friends. 'Is that 
fellow governor of Wisconsin?' he 
demanded. My friend admitted that I 
was. 'W-a-1, ' said he, 'p'r'aps he may 
be a smart enough man for Wisconsin, 
but he's a good deal of a fool at the 
seashore.' " 



LYNN FIVE CENT SAVINGS BANK 

ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the corporation for the 
choice of officers and the transaction of any other 
legal business will be held at the banking room, 
112 Market street, on Monday, Januai-y 13, 19 8, at 
5 o'clock P. M. 

HENRY E. NEWHALL, Clerk. 

Lynn, Dec. 23, 1907. 



SCHLEHUBER 

BAKER CATERER 
CONFECTIONER 

The largest and most important catering busi- 
ness east of Boston, with much 
work done in that city 

Catering for large and i^mall parties 

SCHLEHUBER ^^^trnr^'" 



You have probably heard the story of 
the little girl who at her prayers in the 
morning said: "Good-by, God; we are 
going to move to Missouri. ' ' Her wicked 
brother, who happened to overhear her 
and who was jubilant at the idea of the 
journey, used the very same sentence, 
but he said: "Good, by God, we are go- 
ing to move to Missouri." 

Not for Riley. 

Riley, eating fresh bologna, 

Found a chunk of wood within it. 

"Oi don't mind th' dog," said Riley. 
"But th' dog-house— I'm agin' it!" 

Although she may know she is pretty, 
the average woman likes to have her 
opinion confirmed once in a while. 



GROVER'S 

SOFT SHOES for TENDER FEET 

FOR \VOMEN^'S ^VKAR 

Sample Shoes at Retail 23 Oxford St., Lynn 



When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



The No Vote. 

''pHE decision of the voters for no- 

X license by a majority of nearly 
1,700, was unexpected by everybody. 
Of course the "knowing ones" had it 
pretty well figured out. They knew it 
was going No, but they could not suc- 
cessfully estimate the majority. 

Thei'e were many reasons causing the 
change from license to no license. The 
pendulum swings to the extreme about 
so often, and as it has been about ten 
years since the no license law prevailed, 
Lynn was about due to change. 

What the result will be in a city of 
80,000 inhabitants is not hard to conject- 
ure. There will be much illegal busi- 
ness, but that is not any reason why 
people shouldn't vote no, if they acted 
upon the question through principle. 

If the officers cannot enforce the law 
that is another thing. That they will 
not be able to enforce the no-license law 
is not a rash prediction. If the Lynn 
police should arrest all of the offenders 
the courts would be so clogged that they 
could not attend to one-tenth of the 
cases, and the district attorney would 
have noil prossing matinees by the score. 
It is one of the most difficult laws to en- 
force, before the average jury, and it 
means a great expenditure of time and 
money to got the necessary evidence. 

There are many people who are glad 
that Lynn has got a no-license vote 
because it raps the wholesalers, the 
methods of whom had become distaste- 
ful to the general public. 

Probably there will not be one half of 
the arrests under no license that resulted 
under license, and that in itself is suffi- 
cient justification to those who voted no. 

Then we won't be the sink-hole 
for Peabody, Salem and other towns 
that we are at present. While the 
Lynn and Boston trains will be a trifle 
unclean, still, those who voted no are of 
the opinion that, on the whole, the city 
will show an improved condition. 

May their predictions prove correct, 
is the hearty wish of all having the best 
interests of the city at heart. 

When man invented money the devil 
enlarged hell. 



Remember to nn «jQ when you want 

telephone number ZO '"" ZV 



anything in 



FISH 



Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street. Lynn, Mass. 



January. 

O Winter! frozen pulse and heart of fire. 
What loss is theirs who from thy kingdom turn 
Dismayed, and think thy snow a sculptured urn 
Of death! Far sooner in midsummer tire 
The streams than under ice. June could not hire 
Her roses to forepo the slrenprth they learn 
In sleei)ing- on thy breast. No fires can burn 
The bridges thou dost lay where men desire 

In vain to build. 
O Heart, when Love's sun g-oes 
To northward, and the sounds of singing cease. 
Keep warm by inner fires, and rest in peace. 
Sleep on content, as sleeps the patient rose. 
Walk boldly on the white untrodden snows. 
The winter is the winter's own release. 

—Helen Hunt Jackson. 



Rev. Arthur J. Covell. 

The going away from Lynn of Rev. 
Arthur J. Covell, who for about ten 
years was pastor of the North Congre- 
gational church, is much regretted by 
this community. Rev. Mr. Covell and 
his estimable wife had done much for 
the growth and development of the 
North church parish, and while it may 
be all for the best for him to leave this 
city, it was the cause of much regret, 
not only among his parishioners, but 
with a large number of citizens who 
were not immediately interested in the 
work of the North church, except so far 
as it benefitted the city. There was a 
breadth of judgment and consideration 
in Mr. Covell's work which at all times 
made for the public good, and we hope 
for his great success and future happi- 
ness in the Fitchburg parish. 

It is interesting to note the great prog- 
ress made in the cultivation and mar- 
keting of oysters. Few people realize 
the skill that is now employed in plant- 
ing and growing these palatable shell- 
fish. Much labor and time are expended 
in selecting the right spot and securing 
results, and the Rocky Point Oyster Co. 
with beds at Providence, is considered 
to have the finest oysters in the country. 
One dealer in every city is selected and 
they ship their goods direct to that 
dealer. Williams Bros, have secured 
this agency in Lynn, and they have 
never had cause to regret their action, 
they making a specialty of Rocky Point 
oysters, giving them as strong a guar- 
antee as possible. L>Tin people evi- 
dently approve of this combination, 
judging from the large number con- 
sumed, and the steadily growing trade 
assures Williams Bros, that their efforts 
to give Lynn the best are appreciated. 
A 

The man who does not consider woman 
in a kindly way is devoid of all manhood. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



There's Music in My Heart. 

There's music in my heart to-day 

The Master-hand is on the keys. 
Calling' me up to the windy hills 

And down to the purple seas. 
Let time draw back when I hear that tune — 

Old to the soul when the stars were new 
And swing the doors to the four great winds. 

That my feet may wander through. 
North or South, and East or West; 

Over the rim with the bellied sails. 
From the mountains' feet to the empty plains. 

Or down the silent trails — 

It matters not which door you choose; 

The same clear tune blows through them all. 
Though one heart leaps to the grind of seas, 

And one to the rain-bird's call. 
However you hide in the city's din 

And drown your ears with its siren songs. 
Some day steal in those thin, wild notes. 

And you leave the foolish throngs. 
God grant that the day will find me not 

When the tune shall mellow and thrill in vain, 
So long as the plains are red with sun. 

And the woods are black with rain. 

— Lloyd Roberts. 



Not Studying Anatomy. 

"Seeing women trying to scramble up 
and down the stairs at the back of these 
motor busses reminds me of an experi- 
ence an American friend of mine had in 
London last summer," said a woman 
riding on one of the new Fifth avenue 
busses. 

"It's almost impossible to descend the 
stairs without quite a display of lin- 
gerie, as you probably know. But the 
English women flop down the stairs like 
so many turtles, leaving the arrange- 
ment of their skirts to take care of 
itself. 

"My American friend, however, was 
on the top of the bus and spent several 
moments modestly gathering her skirts 
together. Several persons were blocked 
behind her, and the cockney bus con- 
ductor on the platform below called up 
impatiently: 

"Step right along, lady please; legs 
aren't no treat to me." -New York Sun. 

President Frank A. Turnbull of the 
Common Council showed his popularity 
by being high man in the aldermanic 
list, receiving 6,936 votes. Frank M. 
Allen came second, with 6,860, Edward 
C. Cann, third, with 6,835, and Charles 
Orrin Breed, fourth, with 6,774 votes. 

"I trust, Miss Tappit, " said the 
kindly employer to his stenographer, 
"that you have something in reserve for 
a rainy day." "Yes, sir," answered 
the young woman: "I am going to 
marry a man named Mackintosh." 



'F there is that in a man's 
nature which demands 
the best and •will take 
nothing less, and he does 
not demoralize this standard 
by the habit of deterioration 
in everything he does, he will 
achieve distinction in some 
line if he has the persistence 
and determination to follow 
his ideal. 

But if he is satisfied with 
the cheap and shoddy, the 
botched and slovenly, if he is 
not particular about quality in 
his work, or in his environ- 
ment, or personal habits, then 
he must expect to take sec- 
ond place; to fall into the rear 
of the procession. 

People who have accom- 
plished work worth -while 
have had a very high sense 
of the way to do things. They 
have not been content with 
mediocrity ; they have not 
confined themselves to the 
beaten tracks ; they have 
never been satisfied to do 
things just as others do them, 
but always a little better. 
They always pushed things 
that came to their hands a 
little higher up— a little far- 
ther on. 



"Was your wife angry when you got 
home so late last night?" 

"Angry? Why, my boy, the dear 
woman pelted me with flowers!" 

"But how did you get that black eye?" 

"Well, you see, she neglected to take 
the flowers out of the pots before she 
threw them." — Cleveland Leader. 

We notice by the New York Sun that 
Mr. Hard and Miss Brown were married 
in that city last month. Probably this 
is the way they would have their toast 
served. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



Losses. 

Upon the white sea sand 

There sat a pilerim band, 
Tellinp the losses that their lives had known; 

While evening waned away 

From breezy cliff and bay, 
And the strong tide went out with weary moan. 

One spake, with quivering lip, 

Of a fair freighted ship 
With all his household to the deep gone down; 

But one had wilder woe — 

For a fair face, long ago 
Lost in the darker depths of a great town. 

There were who mourned their youth 

With a most loving ruth. 
For its brave hopes and memories ever green; 

And one upon the west 

Turned an eye that would not rest. 
For far-off hills whereon its joys had been. 

Some talked of vanished gold. 

Some of proud honors told. 
Some spake of friends that were their trust no 
more; 

And one of a green grave 

Beside a foreign wave. 
That made him sit so lonely on the shore. 

But when their tales were done. 

There spake among them one, 
A stranger, seeming from all sorrows free; 

"Sad losses have ye met. 

But mine is heavier yet; 
For a believing heart hath gone from me." 

"Alas!" these pilgrims said, 

"For the living and the dead — 
For fortune's cruelty, for love's sure cross. 

For the wrecks of land and sea! 

But, howe'er it came to thee. 
Thine, stranger, is life's last and heaviest loss!" 
— Frances Brown. 

Paquin's Rule of Beauty. 

The death of Paquin, the Paris dress 
desigrner and contemporary of Worth, 
recalls his dictum: "The chief compo- 
nents of true beauty in the female form 
are unity and variety. Beauty demands 
the coexistence of these attributes, the 
former for the satisfaction of sensibility 
and the latter for the satisfaction of 
intelligence. There is one thing we 
dressmakers seek more than all else in 
a perfect figure for women, and that is 
line." Faquin's real name was Isidore 
Jacob. 

Some day, somebody should get to- 
gether Judge Berry's apt remarks and 
stories. They would make most inter- 
esting reading. The writer was think- 
ing of several of them the other day, 
and one of the most impressive was the 
remark the Judge made to the writer 
some years ago, after he had made a 
speech before a local society. The 
writer asked how it went, and the judge 
remarked: "Pretty bad — if they had 
charged an admission fee to get out they 
would have made money." 

Men are called but few get up. 



Assessor Asa T. Newhall. 

The voters decided by a majority of 
about 3,000 not to have politics enter 
into the office of assessor. The head of 
the Republican ticket was elected 
mayor by a majority of 2,700 votes, 
while Mr. Newhall. Democratic nominee 
for assessor, was elected by nearly 3,000 
majority, against 1,700 credited him two 
years ago. This is something of a 
tribute to the public confidence in Mr. 
Newhall and is an emphatic endorse- 
ment of his manner of attending to 
municipal business. A compliment 
should be paid to Mr. George H. Jackson, 
Mr. Newhall's opponent, for the man- 
ner in which he met his defeat. It was 
a most original and gentlemanly tribute 
to the verdict of the people, and Mr. 
Jackson is entitled to the best wishes of 
this community for the splendid manner 
in which he received the voters' opinion. 
Many times clever people get fruit from 
a defeat, and certainly the popular 
opinion of Mr. Jackson was very much 
improved when the public read his letter 
to Mr. Newhall. 

»T4 

Try Again. 

There was a young lady named Wister 

Who bragged that no man ever kister. 

Said a dandy from France, 

"I will take ze one chance!" 

He did, but she dodged and he mister! 

Is Lynn a foreign country? This 
query suggests itself on account of the 
Tremont Theatre advertising last month, 
"Valoni, the juggler, first appearance 
in America. ' ' Valoni appeared in Lynn 
less than one year ago. This reference 
to Valoni was about as correct as the 
Klaw & Erlanger statement that Su- 
zanne Adams was blessed with "a salary 
of $7000 per week" for singing at the 
Tremont. This amount would go very 
near to annihilating the total weekly 
receipts. Small wonder that these 
people are to emerge from the vaude- 
ville business. 

William H. Niles, the well known 
attorney, passed his sixty-eighth birth- 
day last month. No man of his years in 
this vicinity is more energetic, success- 
ful or painstaking in his work. Mr. 
Niles is loyal and sincere to every duty 
and it is with great pleasure that we 
record his fine health and pleasant out- 
look upon life on his sixty-eighth birth- 
day. 

Where there's a will there's generally 
a lawsuit. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Leap Year Prospects. 

Dawn, at whose breaking the hearts of the 
gloomy. 

Quicken like trees at the presage of Spring, 
Tell me of Her that is coming to woo me. 

Coming to wed me, her bridegroom, her king; 
Year, whose propitious arrival may restitute 

Courage in celibates worn at the knee. 
Friend of philogamists baffled and destitute, 

What of the bride you are bringing to me? 

Is she a maiden commanding and queenly. 

Deep-eyed and beautiful — pleasant and plain? 
Is she — great Weller!— a widow, serenely 

Settled on trying her fortunes again? 
Or is she fairly dainty and winsome — 

Sweet one-and-twenty, or still in her teens? 
Speak of her looks and her "ways" and put in 
some 

Sound information concerning her "means." 

How will she woo me? With ogling and deep sighs. 

Floods of hyperbole, butter and gush? 
Should I be placidly blind to her sheer)'s eyes? 

How in the world can I compass a blush? 
Sa.v, if the lad.v insists upon kneeling. 

Calls me "beloved," it may be, or "sweet," 
What sort of a lunatic shall I be feeling? 

What shall I do with my hands and my feet? 

When, in response to her fervid persuasion, 

I have emitted a faltering "Yes," 
Who should proceed to improve the occasion. 

Which should impart the initial caress? 
If she takes liberties, ought I to scold her? 

Is it "laid down" or a matter of taste. 
Which head reclines on the other one's shoulder? 

Whose arm encircles the other one's waist? 

Truly, O Leap Year, your sporting tradition. 

When it's applied to a definite fact. 
Rather inverts one's accustomed position. 

Rather demands the employment of tact! 
Still it displays a refreshing bright side; 

Novel, as well; for however things go, 
I'm not afraid of them — I'm on the right side — 

I needn't fear that monotonous "No!"' 

— Punch. 



Divorces in Aby.ssinia are scarcer and 
yet easier to obtain than anywhere else 
in the world, according to Frank R. 
Mowrer, Consul-General of the United 
States at Addis Abeba. Mr. Mowrer 
has just returned from the country of 
King Menelik and is filled with strange 
tales of that land. "As in every other 
kind of dispute in Abyssinia, when a 
man decides to get a divorce from his 
wife he calls a court by the roadside and 
has his case tried," said Mr. Mowrer 
last night. "A man and a woman will 
be traveling, for instance. Perhaps 
they have lived together in connubial 
joy for many years, but they agree to 
disagree. The man asks the first pass- 
erby to become the judge. Another is 
selected as his attorney and still another 
as the lawyer for the defence. Court is 
then held informally by the side of the 
public highway and a decision is ren- 
dered in accordance with the facts. If 
the divorce is granted the man and 
woman go their respective ways, parted 
probably forever." 



''pHERE will be general regret that 
L Charles A. Cross has decided to 
retire from active management of the 
Alfred Cross & Co. clothing store. Mr 
Cross feels called upon to take this step 
by reason of his health, which he has 
been building up for some time past, 
but his physician does not think it ad- 
visable for him to continue in active 
business. It will be pleasant for Lynn 
people to understand, hov/ever, that Mr. 
Cro.ss will be president of the new com- 
pany, and will have a voice in directing 
its general policy. The Cross clothing 
store has been in existence since 1854, 
and no concern in the city has developed 
a better reputation for honorable treat- 
ment of its patrons. The new company 
will be managed by the most intelligent 
and progressive forces at present in the 
clothing business, and the manager of 
the new company will be William C. 
Jones, who is well and favorably known 
to Lynn people, and who has for eleven 
years been connected with the clothing 
store of Samuel T. Patterson. Mr. 
Jones has an army of friends who wish 
him every success with his new respon- 
sibilities. 



Unresigned. 

It seems but yesterday, 
I begged to stay 

And play, 
A little moment more. 
The sun was scarcely down. 

The busy town 
Not hushed yet from the labors of the day; 
It seemed too soon to put 

The toys away. 

Today, an older child, 

I stand 
Upon the edge of Spirit Land, 
And watch the shadows fall. 
Father, again I pray 

To stay. 
It seems too soon to put 

Earth's joys away. 

»?! 

All our possessions are as nothing 
compared to health, strength, and a clear 
conscience.— Hosea Ballou. 



It is the man who sanctifies a place, 
and it is work that sanctifies the man. 



Those who wear the 



^'J^Lari^AcJLo 



Shirt, always get satisfaction 
DOWNING, Shirt Maker 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



The Boston & Eastern Electric Railroad. 

IT is the general opinion that the rail- 
road commissioners will grant a 
charter to the Boston and Eastern Elec- 
tric Railroad Co. in accordance with the 
changes in the Boston terminal from 
Charlestown to Post Office Square. 

It is the feeling that the charter will be 
granted because of the previous atti- 
tude of the commissioners when they 
intimated that changes in the plan 
which had been made might result in a 
charter being issued. 

It has been apparent to all who have 
given consideration to the subject that 
the proposed Sullivan Square terminal 
was out of the question. 

If the railroad should push its Lynn 
location more to the westward it would 
meet with more popular favor in this 
city. There is still objection to the 
railroad going through the Lynn Market 
street section, as proposed, and property 
owners in this locality may be relied 
upon to present their objections to the 
railroad commissioners. 

It seems likely, however, that if the 
new company can give evidence that 
they can supply the necessary money, 
the Boston and Eastern Electric Rail- 
road will be a reality. Rapid transit 
seems to be the thing nowadays. 

Where Was Father? 

"Go to father," she said, when I asked her to wed. 
And she knew that I knew that her /ather was 

dead; 
And she knew that I knew what a life he had 

led; 
And she knew that I knew what she meant when 
she said: 

"Go to father!" 

—Dallas, Tex., Hittite. 

The Oxford Club banquet last month 
was a delightful success. The banquet 
was never before excelled in Lynn — at 
least that was the opinion of those who 
sat at the Oxford Club board. President 
Arthur W. Pinkham presided with felic- 
ity, and the speeches were entertaining 
and instructive. It now looks as if the 
Oxford Club banquet would be an an- 
nual affair. 

A 

The Merchants and Manufacturers' 
Insurance Co. had a most successful ex- 
perience during 1907, when they did a 
total business of $500,000 for the six 
months in which they did business, and 
did not have losses amounting to $100. 

Though the bud may be bitter, sweet 
will be the rose. 



His First Day at School. 

A pair of mittens, warm and red. 

New shoes that had shiny toes, 
A velvet cap for his curly head. 

And a tie of palest rose; 
A bajr of books, a twelve-inch rule. 

And the daintiest hands in town — 
These were the thinRS that went to school 

Witli William Herbert Biown. 
A rag-ged mitten without a thumb. 

Two shoes that were scorched at the toes, 
A head that whirled with a dizzy hum 

Since the snowball hit his nose; 
A strintrless bag and a broken rule. 

And the dingiest hands in town — 
These were the things that came from school 

With happy "Billy" Hrown. 

— Mary Catherine Hews. 

Attached to Mrs. Brady. 

'^'^HE Bradys used to drive several 
X miles to mass each Sunday in "the 
little thrap" with "th' ouldgray mare." 
Micky, "the boy," a being of many 
summers, whom custom and a conserva- 
tive tradition had, in spite of his uncer- 
tain years, always treated as the pos- 
sessor of perpetual adolescence, drove. 
Next him sat Mrs. Brady, decorous in 
black, while, scattered about the straw 
in the body of the vehicle, was a large 
assortment of "childer" — Bradys of all 
ages, sexes and sizes, barelegged and 
otherwise— each exuberant and articu- 
late. 

It remains to this day a disputed point 
among the Bradys as to what memory 
of earlier and more frisky days induced 
"th' ould gray mare" to behave as she 
did on this particular Sunday. 

Rounding a corner, she swerved into 
the ditch, and before Micky, the boy, 
could cope with the situation, a pile of 
Bradys, vertical and horizontal, had 
been dumped into the ditch, with the 
little trap turned over and resting on 
top of the struggling heap. 

Then, high above the babel of cries 
came Mrs. Brady's voice: "Pull me 
out, Mick, for the love o' Hivin! The 
black legs is mine." 

Don't worry; eat three square meals 
a day; say your prayers; be courteous 
to your creditors; exercise; go slow and 
go easy. Maybe there are other things 
you need to make you happy, but these, 
I reckon, will give you a good lift. — 
Abraham Lincoln. 

»?4 

If George Washington ever told a lie 
it was probably when Martha asked him 
for money. 

Heated arguments are composed of 
hot air. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



IRISH CHERRIES. 

A MERRY CHRISTMAS AT SLATTERY'S. 



P 




AT had just put the 
finishing touches to 
the Christmas tree. 
"The tree looks 
foine, don't ye think, 
Ellen?" he asked a 
moment later when 
his portly wife came 
into the room and 
found Pat admiring 
the result of his more 
or less artistic handi- 
work. 

Ellen, with arms 
akimbo, was lost in 
rapture. She gazed 
open-mouthed at the 
gaily decorated ever- 
green. 

"And, EUie," Pat 
went on, "Oi've a 
bit of a surprise fur 
ye." 

He walked to the cupboard and drew 
forth a parcel. He opened this on his 
way back to where his wife stood. It 
was a bottle of olives. 

"Oh, Hon!" she broke out, raptur- 
ously. "Ain't it— ain't it— 'Tis a foine 
— foine vaish. Jist the thing for the 
parlor mantel shelf. Oi wanted to — " 

"Ellie, " Pat interrupted, "yere good 
sinse is shlapin' now fur onct. 'Taint a 
vaish. It's somethin' fur to eat." 

Mrs. Slattery sunk into a nearby 
chair, chagrined. Pat placed the bottle 
of olives upon the table and took a seat 
opposite that of his wife. 

"They say they're foine atein'," he 
resumed, "a rale dilicacy. The rich 
they eat thim by the toon. Oh, yes, 
Ellie, they be the rale thing. Jist take 
a look at thim, me darlint. " 

Mrs. Slattery took the bottle up in 
her hands and held it as a connoisseur 
would a piece of costly and rare china. 
"An' what be they called, Pat?" she 
asked. "They be called Oirish chur- 
ries," he pi'omptly replied. "They be 
put up in Spain be the Dagoes, ixprissly 
fur the Oirish. Oi bought thim from 
the Dago what keeps the dillekittisen 
shop forninst Mulcahy's bakery. Oi 
wint in an' axed fur somethin' spicial — 
somethin' suit'ble fur a gran' Crismus 
dinner. An' Oi seen a swell of a 



woman there buy in' about twinty bot- 
tles o' these — these Oirish churries, an' 
before she wint out Oi sez, sez Oi, so 
she could hear, sez Oi: 'Oi'll take wan 
bottle now, an' call fur the rist some 
other toime. ' Oi plinked down me 
chink, an' was surproised to git back 
some change. Oi laid me eyes to the 
lady wit a look of wiltin' scorn, an' 
marched gran' outo' the shop." 

Pat held high his head as he finished, 
and Ellen sniff'ed in approbation of his 
act. 

The bottle of olives stood in regal 
grandeur upon the parlor mantel that 
night, and the next morning continued 
to shed a light of wonder and expecta- 
tion upon the Slattery youngsters. By 
noon the excitement of the day, the 
Christinas tree, the presents and that 
which stood in silent and awesome sim- 
plicity upon the parlor mantel, was 
almost too much to bear. The children 
grew pale, and Pat himself trembled. 
Mrs. Slattery alone showed the forti- 
tude of a strong race. It was a proud 
moment for her when she took the bot- 
tle of olives from its place of honor and 
put it upon the high glass cake-stand at 
the center of the table. 

In time the family seated themselves 
at the festal board. The meal pro- 
gressed. And finally Pat reached over 
and took the bottle of olives up in his 
hand. 

"Sure they be fur dissert," he said. 
"Be ye all through atein'? Be ye all 
through atein', Oi say? Be ye?" 

The heads around the table nodded. 

"Oi wonder," said Pat, as he began 
to ply the corksci-ew, "Oi wonder does 
it come sizzhn' out loike — loike sham- 
plain? Oi wonder, does it? Maybe," 
and he held the neck of the bottle toward 
one of the children. A yelp as of pain 
rang out, followed by general dodging. 

' 'There now, ' ' said Pat, 

The cork had been removed and he 
was smelling into the bottle. 

"Where's the sass dishes, Ellie?" he 
asked. 

Mrs. Slattery handed them to him. 

"Oi must sipple a bit of the juish 
firsht, " he went on. 

Pat poui'ed out a tablespoonful of the 
liquid covering the olives and swallowed 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



it. Something like a spasm passed over 
him; but he said nothing, and with the 
handle of the spoon rolled the hard 
green globes out into the sauce dishes. 

"Jist a few fur the childer, " he said, 
"to see if they loike thim. A little bit 
more juish fur Tommy. There now. ' ' 

Mrs. Slattery handed the wonderful 
dessert around. And she was just seat- 
ing herself when Httle Tommy began to 
gulp, sputter and grow red in the face. 

"He's chokin', Pat!" cried Mrs. 
Slattery. "Belt him wan on the back." 

Pat's hand descended forcibly upon 
the now gasping Tommy's shoulder 
blades, at which an olive shot from the 
child's mouth, flew across the table and 
hit Jerry, the baby, upon the tip of the 
nose. 

"I didn't know they wuz so— so hard," 
Tommy explained. "I wanted to bite 
it to pieces but I couldn'. It jist slipped 
down." 

"An is it harrd they be?" asked Pat 
a moment later, the idea that he had 
probably been swindled shaping itself. 
"So they're hard, be they?" 

The ne.xt moment his teeth closed upon 
an olive. It had been conveyed to his 
mouth in a spoon, with a generous sup- 
ply of liquid. 

A monkey munching a peanut was the 
first picture his countenance revealed. 
A simpering smile followed. And then 
there came such distortion that the 
hearts of the children were struck with 
terror. 
"Is yours hard, Ellie?" Pat asked. 

The wife nodded. 

"An' yours, Tommy?" 

Tommy nodded. 

"An' yours?" 

Another nod. 

And so on round the table. 

"Oi give him fair play," Pat then 
said, firmly. "Yis, Oi give him fair 
play. They're all hard. They're ain't 
a roipe wan in thim. Oi've been sh win- 
died. An' be a Dago— a dirty, dommed 
Dago. An' they ain't churries at all, 
at all," examining a pit. "They ain't 
churries; they be plu-ums, grane plu- 
ums. If them Dagoes— thim dom Da- 
goes from Spain, think they c'n come 
over here to Ameriky an' run the coun- 
try, they're mistaken. They can't 
work no grane plu-ums on me. Oi'U 
smash that macaroni's face. Oi'll make 
vermichilli soup out o' him. Oi tell ye, 
Ellie, he won't be fit to be seen when 
Oi finish with him. So they're all hard 
—the plu-ums, ivery wan o' thim, be 
they?" 



Footsteps were then heard on the 
doorstep, and a moment later a prim 
young lady bounded into the room. 

"It's Mary!" Pat cried out. 

And Mary the eldest daughter, serv- 
ing as maid in the aristocratic neighbor- 
hood of the town, screamed a Merry 
Christmas, and told of her unexpected 
pleasure at being allowed to come home 
for her holiday dinner. 

"And you have olives ! ' ' she exclaimed, 
removing her hat and jacket. "Oh, how 
I love 'em!" 

Mary sat down. She picked up an 
olive and ate with relish. IPhen another. 
And still another. 

Pat stared in amazement. His wife 
folded her arms, and sat speechless. 
The children were stricken dumb. 

"Oh, they're so good! " Mary cried 
out. "Oh, they're so good!" 

Mrs. Slattery nodded. "Yis, they be 
good," she put in. "Oi don't know 
whin Oi ate annything so dihcious. " 

"They're so refreshing," Mary said. 
"But you musn't drink the juice, paw." 
(Pat made one last grand eff'ort.) 

"Oh, no," he said, putting the spoon 
of liquid back into the sauce plate. "Oi 
wasn't goin' to But ye see, the juice 
jist slipped out whin Oi took out the— 
the things. They be jist gran', Oi think. 
Don't ye, childer?" 

But the children remained mute. 

"Oh, Oi suppose they be all right," 
Pat went on, rising from the table and 
going ont into the kitchen. "Oi sup- 
pose they be all right— all right." 

Pat stood at the kitchen door and 
looked in through the crack at his 
daughter still eating olives. 

"Look at her eatin' em," he mused. 
"How in the divil kin she do it? Me 
mouth tastes loike Oi bin atein' petri- 
fied grane gooseburries. But thin Oi 
alwuz said our Mary wuz a wonder. 
An' a wonder she is, begobs!" — The 
Home Magazine. 



If you haven't spent a"cTR&As 
that ten dollars L^^f L^.YJvl 

some of it at HOWES RUBBER STORE, 52 Cen- 
tral Stiuare. 

We have RAIN COATS, RUBBER 
COATS, OVERSHOES, WATER 
BOTTLES, ETC, 

Certain parishes in England still re- 
ceive twelve pounds a year from lega- 
cies, the money held in trust to supply 
wood for the burning of heretics. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Watch Out! 

for announcement in daily papers of our 

Annual Clearance 

Sale 

Furniture, Carpets, etc. 

You know what a clearance sale means with us— 
this one will be the greatest ever 

TITUS CEi BUCKLEY COMPANY, LYNN 



SATISFACTORY SERVICE 



OUR patrons tell an unvarying story of 
satisfaction regarding our banking 
accommodations, and this impels us to 
suggest that you would also be pleased with 
our service. The small depositor receives 
the same careful, courteous treatment as 
those of larger means. 

Manufacturers National Bank 

B. W. CURRIER, President 

WM. B. LITTLEFIELD, Vice-President 

CLIFTON COLBURN, Cashier 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



ie Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



50 cents per Year IPtr''D'D TT A "D V 1 Ctf\Q Tenth Year 

Singrle Copies 5 cents T JliJjlt U ASX 1 , lyUO No. 4 




HAVE you Deeds, Mortgages, Insurance Policies or 
other papers that you do not care to lose? If so we 
advise you to rent a SAFE in our Fire-Proof Vault. 
Our smaller safe will hold a good many papers; 
also a few articles of jewelry. The small safe costs 
you only $5.00 a year. We invite you to call and inspect. 

Security Safe Deposit CBi, Trust Co. 

Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn 
Branch Office, 25 Market Square, West Lynn 



GROVER'S 

SOFT SHOES for TENDER FEET 



FOR WOMKX'S W^EAR 



32" SS^ 



Sample Shoes at Retail 23 Oxford St., Lynn 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Everything 


1 AB^d^^K Safety Razor | 

Pi The Best in its Line ™ 
^ Reasonable in Price &{ 

2 Jos. W. Harding & Co. z 

9 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 


YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 

VARIETY 

AT 

LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, etc. 


This is the most economical period of 
the year to put in 

THE WINTER'S COAL SUPPLY 

Now being unloaded, clean and 
without any dust. Coal is 

AT THE LOWEST PRICE TO-DAY 

Telephone 568 

Stevens & Newhall 


EVERYTHING for the TABLE 


Sea Street, Lynn 




Porter, Pearson CBb Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 


On $1000 INURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.55 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. 1. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 








J?^- 



-^-'^^p^^ 



GAS OPERATING 



The Jewell Stills 



For Drinking water and Technical 
Use 

PURE WATER HoO 

They operate automatically — 
delivering the distilled water 
cold, aerated, palatable, crys- 
tal clear and germ proof. Just 
right for family use or for 
physicians, apothecaries or any 
artisan who requires water that 
is absolutely pure. To be con- 
connected with the gas and 
water supply over the sink or 
commode. 



Call at our stove store, 90 Exchange street, where will also be seen Electric 
washing machines and a full line of Electric and Gas Appliances. 

Lynn Gas and Electric Company 



When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



t^ Lynn Review^ 

A Monthly epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 

Edwin W. In^alls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 



Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



FEBRUARY, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 4 



There are many details to be settled 
before Market street can be extended 
to Nahant Beach. 



Mayor Porter says he "recollects the 
experience of 1896, with a no-license 
vote," but in spite of that he will do his 
best to enforce the law. 



The most vital and necessary work in 
Lynn at present is better streets and 
sidewalks. It is the best service that 
can possibly be done for this community. 

Separate the grades in only oneway- 
Depression. Better wait fifty years to 
do the work right rather than to spend 
two million dollars and do the job incor- 
rectly. 

Many people agree with Mayor Porter 
that the school yards should be thrown 
open to all children, and that the pubhc 
grounds should be open for the. free use 
of children. 

The Lynn Weekly Times says: — "We 
question if any person knows what the 
financial condition of the city really is." 
Speak softly, brother. "The greater 
the truth the greater the libel." 



Lynn should I'eclaim the fifteen acres 
of marsh land abutting on its harbor, 
develop the twelve miles of shore front, 
as recommended by Mayor Porter, and 
then we would have facilities for bring- 
ing to Lynn as large vessels as come 
into Boston. 

A fat woman entered a crowded car 
and, seizing a strap, stood directly in 
front of a man seated in the corner. As 
the car started, she lunged against his 
newspaper and at the same time trod 
heavily on his toes. As soon as he could 
extricate himself, he rose and offered 
her his seat. ■ "You are very kind, sir, " 
she said, panting for breath, "Not at 
all. madam," he replied: "it's not kind- 
ness, it's simply self-defence." 



Shall Saugus Become a Part of Lynn? 

IT is not believed that a majority of 
the voters of Saugus or Lynn would 
vote that the town be annexed to this 
municipality. Financially it is a stand- 
off between the city and town. Both 
are equally poor. 

There are some reasons why Saugus 
should be a part of Lynn. At present 
we supply Saugus with its water and 
fighting, and Saugus is a part of the 
Lynn post office' system. There are 
many common interests that exist 
between Lynn and Saugus, and at one 
time the town was a part of this city. 

The town of Saugus has at present an 
estimated population of 6,800, and the 
valuation of personal property and real 
estate is put at $5,687,069. The total 
area embraced within the town lines is 
6,388 acres. The town has a debt of 
$280,000, which includes bonds for high- 
ways, water pipes, schools and other 
improvements. There is a sinking fund 
of $9,000 especially to take care of the 
school bonds when they become due. 
Annually the town makes an appropria- 
tion to meet a portion of the outstand- 
ing debt. 

Lynn has an area of 7,207 acres with 
a population of about 83,000 and a valua- 
tion of $65,000,000. The gross debt is 
$4,985,700 and in the sinking fund to 
care for the debt when it becomes due is 
$1,185,000. This leaves the net debt at 
$3,800,000. 



One of the greatest favors the 1908 
city council could do to the Lynn public 
would be the cutting out of the proposed 
North Common street site for the new 
Classical High School building, and de- 
cide to erect the structure upon a more 
desirable lot, just outside of the line of 
traffic. The Classical High School build- 
ing should be located centrally, but it 
should not be placed upon a largely 
traveled thoroughfare. 



The elaborate $25,000 heating and 
ventilating system in the Cobbett school 
is (unofficially) pronounced a failure. Is 
it possible to get practical work done in 
this direction by so-called experts? The 
Oxford Club has spent $2,000 or more in 
the endeavor to ventilate the structure, 
and conditions are no better than when 
the building was first occupied. The 
suggestions of sanitary and ventilating 
"experts" should always be taken cum 
grano salis. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



"Proflress." 

Old Style— Wanted: A hired g^irl to 
do housework and make herself gener- 
ally useful. Wages two dollars a week 
and found. Apply at servants' entrance. 

New Style— Wanted: A service-lady, 
black or white, domestic or foreign, to 
accept five dollars a week with all the 
comforts of an elegant home and make. 
She may receive her friends in the draw- 
ing room, have seven evenings, morn- 
ings and afternoons of each week, have 
her own night key, and com.plain if the 
place isn't run to suit her. She will 
take orders from nobody, but it is hoped 
that she will listen to requests when 
properly made. Have a hand played 
piano in the house, but will get the 
other kind if applicant is of musical 
tastes without corresponding accom- 
plishment. Family v/ill be glad to eat 
at second table. Telephone in house. 
Have horses and so forth, but will sub- 
stitute automobile if desired. No dogs. 
Children will be sent to an asylum if not 
satisfactory. Houses of latest modern 
design, in exclusive neighborhood. Em- 
ployer will give bond for the discharge 
of "her duties and asks nothing except 
that applicant will not "give notice," 
so that she (the employer) may tell her 
fashionable friends that she is not doing 
her own work. AppHcant will please 
give address and employer will call on 
her before inviting her to the position 
ofi'ered. No references required. —Life. 

I am not sure that absolute justice 
comes to everybody in the world; but I 
do know that the best way to get justice 
is not to be too anxious about it. As 
love goes to those who do not lie in wait 
for it, so does the great reward gravi- 
tate to the patient man— the man who 
does his work and holds his peace.— Era 
Elbertus. ; ^^ m^m 

"Why is Jones growing a beard?" 
' 'Oh, I believe his wife made him a pres- 
ent of some ties. "-Leslie's Weekly. 

A lie is the most industrious thing on 
earth. 



FANCY GLASSWARE 

for Inverted Lisrhts. In red, Kreen, (lowered, 
ir.cd, opal, fij?ui-ed, frosted and clear. 
Come in and see them 

CHARLES C. PHILLIPS 



n Excbancre Street 



Telephone 469 



GEORGE W. BREED 

INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. Cgj, W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 1091-2 Branch Officer, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Strati. 

AMOS S. BROVk^N. Manager. 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are bi-ought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
10-26. 



Courtesy. 

One of the small things that count for 
success in business life is courtesy. 
This has very aptly been styled "the 
handmaid to culture." Be courteous to 
each other, to customers, to callers, to 
every one with whom you come in con- 
tact. The voice, the expi'ession, the 
gesture — all should indicate a due regard 
for the consideration of others and their 
rights. Particularly is courtesy desir- 
able when using the 'phone as a repi'e- 
sentative of the company. Your man- 
ner typifies the character of the insti- 
tution. It is the pleasant, cheerful ac- 
cent that counts, not what you say so 
much as it is the way j^ou say it. Think 
kind thoughts, speak kind words, do kind 
deeds in business, not for effect but for 
courtesy's sake. Be well poised; be 
courteous. — Canadian Shoe and Leather 
Journal. 

Two friends returning from a late 
evening gathering, says a writer in the 
New Orleans Times-Democrat, noticed 
a Chinaman. The following exchange 
of remarks followed: "I wonder what 
that Chinaman is doing up so late, ' ' said 
one. "Shirts, I suppose," came the 
answer. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Y" ou can tell a man better by how he 
gives than almost anything else. 
There is the man who gives generously 
and promptly, and who gives you the im- 
pression that you are conferring a priv- 
ilege on him by giving him the oppor- 
tunity. Then there is the man who fig- 
ures it all out carefully and gives just 
about half v/hat he is able. Then there 
is the fellow whose brow wrinkles, as, 
without arguing the question, he pulls 
out his cheque book, and the very way 
he writes out the cheque proclaims he 
thinks you a nuisance. Next we have 
the man who has to be coaxed, or who 
gives because he finds out that some one 
else in the same class has given and he 
feels he must follow the lead. Then 
there comes the fellow who by his talk 
gives you the impression that he is 
always giving and who whines about the 
numerous "claims" on his purse, wind- 
ing up by telling you about a second- 
hand organ that he used for a genera- 
tion and donated at its original value to 
a mission. Then thei-e is a man to 
whom giving is as foreign as volapuk. 
He has no more idea of the claims upon 
him of those about him than a ' 'heathen 
Chinee" has of the nebular hypothesis. 
But the first giver is worth all the i*est 
with a few extra loud-mouthed givers 
thrown in. Put that down.— Canadian 
Shoe and Leather Journal. 



While all of Mr. Keith's theatres are 
furnished and decorated in a liberal 
manner, and the high-class vaudeville 
entertainment given in one can be taken 
as a sample of that in the others, special 
attention is directed to Keith's Theatre, 
Boston, which has been called "the 
model playhouse of the country," a gen- 
eralization that might be extended to 
the world, for European travelers aver 
that there is nothing comparable with it 
on the other side of the Atlantic. This 
theatre has come to be regarded as "one 
of the show places of Boston," and no 
visitor to the city ever goes away with- 
out having inspected it. The February 
bookings are of a special high order. 



GREEN & SON 
t:>t a T\.Tr\o no better made 

l:"^l/\iNL^O AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



Washington's Birthday. 

'Tis splendid to live soerrandly. 

That long after you are gone, 
The things you did are remembered. 

And recounted under the sun; 
To live so bravely and purely, 

That a nation stops on its way. 
And once a year, with banner and drum. 

Keeps its thouprht of your natal day. 

'Tis splendid to have a record 

So white and free from stain 
That, held to the li>;ht, it shows no blot, 

ThouKh te.sted and tried amain; 
That age to age forever 

Repeats its story of love. 
And your birthday lives in a nation's heart. 

All other days above. 

And this is WashinRton's glory, 

A steadfast soul and true. 
Who stood for his country's honor 

When his country's days were few. 
And now, when its days are many. 

And its flag of stars is flung 
To the breeze in defiant challenge. 

His name is on every tongue. 

Yes, it's splendid to live so bravely. 

To be so great and strong. 
That your memory is ever a tocsin 

To rally the foes of the wrong: 
To live so proudly and ijuiely. 

That your people pause in their way. 
And year by yeai'. with banner and drum. 

Keep the thought of your natal day. 

— Margaret Sangster. 



Ex-Governor Long's Proposed Sunday 
Law. 

Former Governor John D. Long is 
getting somewhat narrow in his old age. 
He calls for the mo.^t stringent Sunday 
closing bill that has appeared on Beacon 
Hill in recent years. There may be 
some merit in the proposition, but it' 
looks extreme. The bill provides that 
whoever is present on the Lord's day at 
a game, sport, play or public diversion, 
except a concert of sacred, classical or 
patriotic music, or a lecture shall be 
punished by a fine of not more than $5 
for each offence,- and that whoever 
takes part in such things, or whoever 
keeps open his shop, warehouse or work- 
house or does any manner of work ex- 
cept labor of necessity or charity, shall 
be fined not more than $50. 
»?» 

Reporter— Now that I have described 
your dress and those of your maids, the 
house decorations and the presents, what 
shall I say about the bridegroom when 
we print the account of the wedding? 

Bride-Elect - Well, I suppose his name 
must go in. You might say that he was 
among those present. -Southern Mes- 
senger. 

iff* 

An old bachelor says that some women 
marry for the purpose of obtaining a 
listener who can't get away. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Opportunity. 

"They do me wrong who say 1 come no more 
When once I knock and fail to find you in; 

For every day I stand outside your door. 
And bid you wake, and rise to fight and win. 

"Wail not for precious chances passed away. 
Weep not for golden ages on the wane! 

Each night I burn the records of the day; 
At sunrise evei-y soul is born again. 

"Laugh like a boy at splendors that have sped. 
To vanished joys be blind and deaf and dumb; 

My judgments seal the dead past with its dead. 
But never bind a moment yet to come. 

"Though deep in mire, wring not your hands 

and weep; 
I lend my arm to all who say 'I can!' 
No shamefaced outcast ever sank so deep - 
But yet might rise and be again a man! 

"Dost thou behold thy lost youth all aghast? 

Dost reel from righteous retribution's blow? 
Then turn from blotted archives of the past 
And find the future's pages white as snow. 

"Art thou a mourner? Rouse thee from thy spell; 

Art thou a sinner? Sins may be foi-given; 
Each morning gives the wings to flee from hell, 

Each night a star to guide thy feet to heaven?" 
— Walter Malone in reply to the brilliant lines of 
the late senator J. J. Ingalls upon "Opportunity." 

The beauty of work depends upon the 
way we meet it— whether we are our- 
selves each morning, to attack it as an 
enemy that must be vanquished before 
night comes, or whether we open our 
eyes with the sunrise to welcome it as 
an approaching friend who will keep us 
delightful company all day, and who 
will make us ieel at evening that the 
day was well worth its fatigue. — Lucy 
Larcom. 

And now comes Henry Gassaway 
Davis, candidate for vice president, with 
Alton B. Parker, presidential candidate 
of a few years ago. Henry Gassaway 
is eighty-fuur years of age and he pro- 
poses to marry a woman thirty-five 
years of age. By the way, when did 
you ever hear of a woman worth mil- 
lions and eighty-four years of age mar- 
rying a poor man of thirty-five? If you 
have information regarding such an oc- 
currance we should be pleased to hear 
from you. 

Mrs. Bi'iggs brought home a new girl 
from the intelligence office and in- 
structed her in her duties. "And do 
you have to be called in the morning?" 
she asked. "I don't have to be, mum," 
replied the new girl, hopefully, "Unless 
you just happens to need me. ' ' — Yonkers 
Statesman. 

Love laughs at all locks but one— wed- 
lock. 



Harry Creighton Ingalls and Alexan- 
der Phillips have formed a partnership 
for the practice of architecture in New 
Yoik City. Mr. Ingalls is the son of 
Jerome Ingalls of Lynn, and he is cred- 
ited with having reached a high position 
in his chosen profession. He has had 
the benefit of long practical instruction 
in European centres, it is pleasant to 
observe young men climbing the ladder 
of success. Lynn has sent out a body 
of strong men into the world, and some 
day we propose to enumerate the list. 
»?« 

The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 

An Irish sailor fell from a lower part 
of the rigging on the first lieutenant, 
carrying him to the deck. "Where did 
you come from, you rascal?" said the 
lieutenant as soon as he gained his feet. 
"From the north of Ireland, your 
honor. ' ' — Exchange. 



MONEY 

DEPOSITED ON OR BEFORE 

Wednesday 



WILL DRAW INTEREST FROM 
THAT DATE. 



COMMONV\^EALTH 
Savings Bank 

325 Union Street, cor. Almont 

Joseph G. Pinkham, President 

William M. Barney, Treasurer 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Four Gifts. 

I heard or dreamed I heard, four mortals pray. 

The first: "With pilt of gold I would be blessed; 
And [ will take unto my latest day 

My chances for the rest." 

The second to his God: "Lord, grant me fame. 
Wide fame, as 'twere with flaming fiery pen 

Athwart Thy ' ighest heav'ns to scroll my name 
Hefore the eyes of men." 

And one the gift of love: "God, grant me love. 
Which every smaller blessing doth enfold. 

To bind my life as with a chain whereof 
Each link is purest gold." 

And one apart, did bow himself and pray — 
The lowliest he of ail — that God would send. 

To bless the measure of his earthly day. 
One kind and steadfast friend 

— Elizabeth May Montague in Harper's Bazar. 



Things to Quit. 

Gossiping. 

Fidgeting. 

Grumbling. 

Hairsplitting. 

Saying fate is against you. 

Finding fault with the weather. 

Going around with a gloomy face. 

P"'auit-finding, nagging and worrying. 

Taking offense where none is intended. 

Dwelling on fancied slights and wrongs 

Talking big things and doing small 
ones. 

Scolding and flying into a passion over 
trifles. 

Boasting of what you can do instead 
of doing it. 

Thinking that life is a grind and not 
worth living. 

Talking continually about yourself 
and your affairs. 

Depreciating yourself and making 
light of your abilities. 

Saying unkind things about acquaint- 
ances and friends. 

Exaggerating and making mountains 
out of molehills.— Success. 

Dreams of the Healthy. 

There has been much discussion as to 
whether one dreams only on falling to 
sleep and during the act of waking up, 
or whether dreams take place at any 
time during sleep. While not definitely 
determined as yet, the evidence seems 
to be rather in favor of the view that 
' one may dream at any time during the 
night or the whole night through. 
Dreaming is common to perfectly 
healthy persons, and in itself is no evi- 
dence of disorder. —Harper's Magazine. 

Woman is a slave to fashion and man 
to habit. 



Moon's Changes. 

New Moon. Feb. 2. 
First Quarter, Feb. 8. 
Full Moon, Feb. 17. 
Last Quarter, Feb. 24. 



Lynn as a Shire Town. 

SEVERAL thousand petitioners have 
asked the general court to authorize 
the county of Essex to acquire land in 
Lynn and erect a courthouse for the 
probate and superior courts of the 
county. The bill provides briefly that 
the land shall not cost more than $50,000, 
while the total expense for the con- 
struction and furnishing is not to exceed 
$400,000 and the county commissioners 
are forbidden from making any contract 
involving a larger expenditure. The 
city of Lynn under the bill is made the 
shire town of the county of Essex and 
sittings of the probate court are to be 
held in Lynn on first Monday of every 
month and sessions of the superior court 
for civil business shall be held at Lynn 
the first Monday of February and JSIov- 
ember. Sittings for criminal business 
shall be held on the second Monday of 
April. For civil cases, for trial by jury 
and without jury the towns and cities of 
Swampscott, Nahant, Saugus, Lynnfield 
and Lynn shall constitute a district in 
the superior court. The provisions of 
this section of the bill are not to take 
effect until the completion of the court- 
house. 

A 

There was a young lady of Tampa, 
Whose hair grew damper and damper; 
When to dry it she t'-ied. 
She just gave up and cried, — 
And threw it all into the hamper. 

Spalding's Baseball Record. 

Spalding's Baseball Record is the 
name of an entirely new publication, 
edited by the veteran Henry Chadwick, 
which cannot fail to interest the fans all 
over the country. It is profusely illus- 
trated, all of the champion major and 
minor league teams, together with crack 
individual players, being reproduced. 
All sorts of baseball records, dating 
back for a period of nearly forty years, 
are published, together with other inter- 
esting matter. The book i.s entirely sep- 
arate from Spalding's Official Baseball 
Guide, which will come out later on after 
the various playing schedules have been 
adopted. 

Treat a man like a dog and he will act 
like one. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Sorrow. 

Count each affliction, whether light or grave, 
God's messenger sent down to thee. Do thou 
With courtesy receive him; rise and bow. 
And, ere his shadow pass thy threshold, crave 
Permission first his heavenly feet to lave. 
Then lay before him all thou hast. Allow 
No cloud of passion to usurp thy brow 
Or mar thy hospitality, no wave 
Of mortal tumult to obliterate 
The soul's marmoreal calmness. Grief should be 
Like joy, majestic, equable, sedate. 
Confirming, cleansing raising, making free; 
Strong to consume small troubles to commend 
Great thoughts, grave thoughts, thoughts lasting 
to the end. 

— Aubrey Thomas De Vere. 

»?« 
Motlier-in-l,aw Was Late. 

A veteran circus clown says to the 
Kansas City Journal. "This is one of 
my jokes which entered upon this life 
about the year 1866, and is still doing 
time in some of the almanacs. I rush 
up to the ringmaster crying as if my 
heart was being shivered to pieces. The 
ringmaster sympathetically wants to 
know: 

" 'What on earth are you howling 
about? You act as if you had lost every 
friend on earth.' 

"Fairly roaring out my sobs I would 
reply: 

" 'You'd cry, too, if you had had the 
miserable luck that came to me to-day.' 

" 'Well, well, there is no use going on 
that way; tell me what your trouble is 
and maybe I can help you. ' 

" 'Nobody can help me! It's too ter- 
rible!' 

" 'Tell it, man! Tell it!' commands 
the ringmaster. 

" 'They had a wreck on the Santa Fe 
Railroad yesterday. Two trains that 
were trying to pass on the same track 
butted into each other and every man, 
woman and child on both trains was 
killed in a minute.' 

"More howls. 

" 'Well,' says the ringmaster, 'I don't 
see Vv^hat you're blubbering about. You 
didn't have any people on those trains 
did you?' 

" 'No, that's what's the matter with 
me. My mothei--in-law had a ticket to 
go on one of them, but was late to the 
depot and missed it. ' 

John H. Nelson, as President of the 
Board of Aldermen for 1908, brings to 
the position the results of a long practi- 
cal city government experience, and it 
is generally believed that he will make 
a successful deputy mayor. 
iff* 

Subscribe for the ReviEiw. 



The Six-Cent Street Car Fare. 

The talked of six-cent street railway 
fare will probably be popular if the ser- 
vice is improved in several directions. 
More attention should be paid to the 
running of larger cars when a hard 
storm is on, morning, noon and night. 
One day last month, when a hard storm 
was prevailing all day, short cars were 
run on several of the lines, overcrowd- 
ing the cars most uncomfortably. 

The local street railway managers 
would like to do many things to improve 
the service but they have not the power 
so to do. 

When the dividends are the first con- 
sideration with the public service corpo- 
ration the public is likely to suffer. 
When the street rail v/ay company passed 
out of local control public convenience 
was interfered with. It is true in every 
case, the further away the control the 
more undesirable the service, and if you 
don't believe it. ask those who live on 
the line of the Boston and Albany Rail- 
road. 

Take Joy home. 
And make a place in thy great heart for her. 
And give her time to gi-ow, and cherish her; 
Then will she come, and oft will sing to thee 
When thou art working in tlje furrows; ay. 
Or weeding in the sacred hour of dawn. ' 

It is a comely fashion to be glad; 
Joy is the grace we say to God. 

— Jean Ingelow. 
I?4 

B. F. Keith, of Boston, never did a 
greater service to the community than 
when he made his great fight to free 
Tremont street, between Boylston street 
and Scollay square, from electric cars 
and their poles and wires. This grand 
achievement is due more to the energy 
and munificence of B. F. Keith than to 
any other individual, and he should for- 
ever be held in grateful remembrance 
by all people interested in the welfare 
of the city of Boston. We had the 
pleasure of attending the dinner given 
in honor of Mr. Keith by merchants and 
prominent rnen of Boston to congratu- 
late him on the success of his great con- 
test for the preservation of Tremont 
street. This thoroughfare now ranks 
with Princes street in Edinburgh, con- 
sidered by many as being the finest 
business thoroughfare in the world. 

How unjust we are to ourselves! We 
study everything else but the Divine 
Principle within our own persons. We 
need a new revelation, not of heaven 
and hell, but of the Spirit within our- 
selves. — W. E. Channing. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Do you remember the old-fashioned 
jumpers you used to wear — the kind 
where the blouse hitched onto the 
trousers and made you look like a bar- 
rel of flour out for a walk? Of course, 
if you are a lady, your memory will not 
run back that far, but a good many 
older men folks will never forget the 
"combinations" which they wore once 
on a time. Well, we are coming back 
to them, if a gentleman — an artist 
named Jepson- has his way, a consum- 
mation of which he is devoutly sanguine. 
He was bothered by coat-tails and the 
endless round of putting on and taking 
off coats (most of us have only one coat 
to put on and take off and are not both- 
ered that way) and he invented what is 
called by courtesy the Jepson suit. He 
wears it too. Ii is a one-piece suit, built 
on the principle of the little "nightie- 
drawers" the kids wear in slumberland, 
except that it has no feet, and it can be 
slipped on and off with the greatest 
ease. The Jepson suit is adapted to 
every man, but is particularly designed 
to lend artistic grace to fat men. Put 
a fat man into a Jepson suit and you 
have a thing of beauty and a joy for- 
ever. Life is going to be worth living 
when the Jepson suit comes into uni- 
versal use. The only trouble is that 
the thing must button up in the back if 
the front is artistic and up the front if 
the back is artistic. A consensus of 
masculine opinion doubtless would re- 
veal the great majority of men in favor 
of making all Jepson suits to button up 
the back. Men have buttoned women's 
waists so long they will welcome eagerly 
a chance to get even and if they don't 
ask for back buttons our guess is wrong. 

We quoted a saying by Abraham Lin- 
coln and the Lynn Weekly Times took 
the same from our columns, omitting 
credit to the martyr president. Mod- 
esty forbids us having the public think 
that we deal in such wisdom as that 
dealt out by President Lincoln. 

Be helpful. 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



When the Ship Comes In. 

1 want to be waitingf upon the shore 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 
I want to be waiting to see it sail 
Over the seas of the fairy tale. 
Laden with treasures of jjrold for me 
And my heart as young as it used to be. 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 
Oh. I shall know of the golden morn. 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 
I've watched for its coming through all the years. 
Watched it with smiling and waited with tears. 
Dreamed of it breasting the wave and the foam; 
1 want to be there when the ship comes home. 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 
"We'll all be happy," we used to say, 

"When the beautiful ship comes in." 
"We'll all be happy," the great throng cried 
Who waited with us by the golden tide. 
For. oh. so many are waiting, dear. 
Day after day and year after year. 

Till the beautiful ship comes in! 
Old or young, I will hobble down 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 
Old or young, I will chase the gleam 
Of fairy fancy and elfin dream. 
And all my sorrows will fade away. 
And all my troubles will vanish some day. 

When the beautiful ship comes in! 

— Exchange. 

The Decadence of the Drama. 

The decadence of the stage was well 
illustrated in this city last month, when 
James Burrows appeared in a minor 
part in one of thejurid melodramas. It 
was almost pitiful when it is remem- 
bered that many years ago, and for a 
score of years, he was an honored mem- 
ber of the old Boston Museum Stock Co. 
The public taste regarding the drama 
has very much changed in the past 
twenty-five years. People now go to 
the play-house for recreation and not 
education. The drama will continue to 
go to decay so long as these conditions 
continue. 

J. F. Morgan & Son have a reputation 
for doing the best plumbing. Their 
work is thoroughly well done and up to 
date. Architects and builders who are 
intimately acquainted with their work 
say that Morgan & Son do some of the 
finest plumbing work that they observe. 
When a house develops a reputation for 
quality of work at a fair price it is build- 
ing the best foundation possible for its 
business. Probably that is the reason 
why Morgan & Son have a good share 
of the best plumbing work now done in 
Lynn and vicinity. 

Lewis Dockstader should be heartily 
ashamed of the show he gave in Lynn 
last month. Luckily he comes but once 
a year. He has lost his old time clever- 
ness. 



10 THE LYNN REVIEW 

A VITAL NECESSITY FOR BUSINESS. 

BETTER FREIGHT FACILITIES IMPERATIVELY NECESSARY FOR LYNN 
SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 

NOT all desirable things can be secured through legislation. But the law mak- 
ing power can help, and most wonderfully at times. It has an opportunity, at 
this session of the Legislature, to help Massachusetts manufacturers (and particu- 
larly Lynn shoe manufacturers) by making it possible to have better freight facil- 
ities. Reference is not made to the Boston and Maine Railroad, but to the other 
service coming into the state. 

The present inferior service is felt by everybody, directly and indirectly, and it 
is time there was a change. It took from Dec. 10 to Jan. 16 for a small box to 
make the "run" from New York City to Lynn. And that is only one of hundreds 
of similar illustrations which might be related. 

When it takes from the 12th of December until the second of January to get a 
piece of machinery from New York to Beverly, there is something radically wrong 
about our transportation facilities. 

That is the experience of the Beverly Evening Times. A machine shipped on 
that date, disappeared from view as completely as though it had been dropped in the 
ocean by the steamship company that guaranteed to deliver it in Beverly safe and 
sound. Then after tracers are put on there is no excusing the delay and no satis- 
factory explanation for the delay. 

It is not for us to suggest the remedy, whether it be a merger of all the rail- 
roads, or a traffic arrangement which shall be controlled by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, but the putting through of freight without such unseemly 
delay is a subject that has got to be solved if New England is to continue to 
prosper. 

There is at present a disposition for each railroad to secure the lion's share by 
making the longest possible haul over its lines, to the detriment of the shipper, 
who doesn't care who gets the pay for the woi'k so long as he gets quick results. 
He doesn't want his freight carted way around Robin Hood's barn when a corner 
can be cut and save time in delivery. 

Some kind of a deal must soon be demanded by the business men and the cal- 
amity howler, who opposes it, will be brushed aside. The best way can be safely 
left to those who know it and understand railroading, but relief in some form, 
must soon come. We must have relief from the Legislature at the present session. 

At the present time it is well known that frequently as much, or more, time is 
taken to get goods delivered by freight between Lynn for example and. points in 
southern Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut, as is consumed from points 
on the New York, New Haven and Hartford to Buffalo, N. Y., or even to points 
further West or South. 

It is not alone the shoe manufacturers who have been forced to put up with 
these unsatisfactory conditions. The leather manufacturers of Salem and Peabody, 
the cotton and woolen manufacturers of Lawrence and Lowell as well as the vai'ious 
other manufacturers have keenly felt the need of some through route between points 
in this state and others in Rhode Island and Connecticut, which are not on the same 
line of railroad. 

This desire on the part of all large shippers in this section, to get an improved 
service and one that will afford a quicker delivery of their goods, has awakened a 
lively interest in the subject of closer business relations between the railroads which 
handles these goods. 

Those who best understand the situation believe that the policy of the State, in 
encouraging the operation of non-competitive railroads in conjunction, can be car- 
ried still farther with great advantage to the manufacturing interests as well as all 
others. 

There is probably not one person in a thousand who will not agree that the 
policy which put more than 125 separate I'ailroad companies under one system (the 
present Boston and Maine) will if carried out, be of large and general benefit to 
the industries of this section. It probably is not too much to say that if it were put 
to a popular vote, not one of the manufacturers of Essex county would favor a 
return to the original conditions which existed 20 years ago. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



Boston & Maine Railroad. 

''pHE death of George F. Evans, gen- 
1 eral manager of the Maiiie Central 
Raihoad, recalls the time when Lucius 
Tuttlewas so bitterly criticised for caus- 
ing Payson Tucker to be succeeded by 
Mr. Evans. Mr. Tuttle said nothing. He 
bided his time. It was not many montjis 
before his good judgment was generally 
acclaimed, and the verdict rendered that 
Mr. Evans was the most able manager 
ever administering Maine Central af- 
fairs. Payson Tucker was not in the 
class with Mr. Evans. 

The ability of Mr. Tuttle as ai-ailroad 
man is well reflected in the report of 
Louis D. Brandeis, who, on his own in- 
itiative, prepared a report on the rela- 
tive positions of the B. & M. and New 
York, New Haven and Hartford Rail- 
roads. Mr. Brandeis scores the N. Y., 
N. H. and Hartford unmercifully, and 
uses figures from its reports so to do, 
but says of the Boston & Maine:— "The 
company is strictly a railroad corpora- 
tion, one of the leading railroad systems 
of America, with 3,592.17 miles of line 
and gross earnings of $50,986,553 60. In 
six years the Boston & Maine Railroad 
increased its railroad gross earnings 
34.41 per cent, and its surplus over fixed 
charges applicable to dividends in- 
creased 115 per cent. During the past 
six years its financial condition has been 
growing steadily in strength. 

»?« 

\ Singer's Lungs. 

The singer at the end of the practice 
aria panted heavily. 

"I sang 196 notes that time," he said, 
"without once taking breath." 

"Indeed. That must be a record." 

"No. The record is held by Courtice 
Pounds. Pounds sang 316 notes without 
respiration in 1898. The record previous 
to that was held by Farinelli, with 300 
notes. Norman Salmond has sung 287 
notes in this way." 

"It is wonderful what lungs trained 
singers have. The average man could 
hardly sing 50 notes without breathing, 
whereas to the singer 200 would be 
nothing. —Philadelphia Bulletin. 

A woman on the train entering Grand 
Rapids asked the conductor how long 
the cars stopped at the Union Station. 
He replied: "Madam, we stop just four 
minutes, from two to two, to two two. ' ' 
The woman turned to her companion 
and said: "I wonder if he thinks he's 
the whistle on the engine?" — Selected. 



February. 

Winter at lenjrth slow- waning to its close. 
Nature declares her penance well-nigh done; 
And sends, in challenge to the laggard sun. 
Fair, truant days, balmy and soft as those 
May scatters: thfn mock-penitent she grows. 
Owns tlie sad cheat. — and jubilant, like one 
Who knows no master, apes, for very fun. 
Her ol^-time ligors, piling deep her snows 
As in midwinter. Ah, a wayward thing 
Is Nature! Something of her April mood 
Disturbs — nay, warms and quickens all her blood: 
And whether summer, winter, autumn, spring, 
Holds her in leash, she breaks away at will, — 
Supreme for all her bonds, and regnant still! 

— Caroline A. Mason. 

Lynn Charity Work. 

William Shute, who died several years 
ago, made one of the best wills ever re- 
corded for Lynn's charitable institu- 
tions, which have recently been paid 
the bequest under the provisions of the 
Shute will. Whenever it is the desire 
of any of our wealthy friends to bestow 
their money intelligently they should 
consult the Shute will for details. Never 
was a better job done in Lynn, and all 
honor to Mr. and Mrs. Shute. 

Speaking of charitable bequests, re- 
minds us of the will of Aujjustus B. 
Martin. Here was another noble mind. 
Eventually the entire Martin estate 
goes to the Lynn Hospital. The esti- 
mated value is between $200,000 and 
$300,000. 

It is estimated that it will take $100,- 
000 to place Lynn Hospital upon a mod- 
ern basis, such as the physicians in 
charge believe is necessary for the wel- 
fare of the institution, and the cost of 
maintenance is increasing each year. 
Some strong financing has got to be 
done if it is expected to maintain the 
Lynn Hospital under existing conditions. 

A few years ago the school in the 
little red school-house between Nashua. 
N. H., and Pepperell had for its teacher 
a young woman noted for her beauty. 
As a well-known wa,g named Williams 
and a young man were riding past the 
the school, Williams who had heard of 
, the teacher's beauty, determined to see 
her. Alighting from his carriage, he 
rapped at the door, which she opened, 
when he asked if any or her pupils had 
lost a book. She inquired if any one 
missed a book but no loss was reported. 
She then said to Williams: "Why, have 
you found one?" •"No," he answered, 
"but I didn't know but I might. " — Bos- 
ton Herald. 

A truly good woman is the noblest 
work of God. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Kipling with the Dentist. 

Rudyard Kipling, when in San Fran- 
cisco, had to pass through a familiar 
and trying experience. He wrote of it 
thus: "I might as well tell you that 
my head is getting swelled from the 
treatment I have received in 'Frisco. In 
the last day it has swelled to such an 
extent as almost to bury my left eye. 
It is a bad tooth! This morning by the 
aid of the other eye I managed to steer 
my way through the crowded streets 
into a firm of dentists, where one vil- 
lian, after looking me over, passed me 
over to another, v/ho, after an hour's 
work, hewed off the end of my toof. "I 
'quealed and 'quealed like anything, and 
flung me down maimed and exhausted 
on a chair. They told me that, if I 
would come back to-morrow, they would 
put a crown on it; but I feel as if I 
already deserve a inartyr's crown of 
suffering and go not back." — Pacific 
Monthly. 

The Proposed FiHlrataon Scheme. 

Expert advice is many times faulty. 
It does not always rest upon a practical 
basis. The filtration scheme 'proposed 
for Lynn's water supply is recommended 
by experts. Filtration schemes are 
largely experimental. The State Board 
of Health is not always practical, and it 
is believed that before the citj^ of Lynn 
spends money in this direction, a disin- 
terested commission should investigate 
matters for the benefit of the tax 
payers . 

The judge was at dinner in the new 
household when the young wife asked: 
"Did you ever try any of my biscuits, 
judge?" "No,"* said the judge, "I 
never did, but I dare say they deserve 
it. " 




BAKER CATERER 
CONFECTIONER 

The largest and most important catering busi- 
ness east of Boston, with much 
worl; done in that city 

Catering for large and small parties 

First-Class Work only. 

SCHLEHUBER ^«E^g?,rst. 



LYNN THEATRE 



FRANK G. HARRISON 



Manager 



Week of Feb. 3 

ELMER STOCK CO. 

Feb. 10-OXFORD CLUB 

Week commencing Feb. 11 

DANIEL R. RYAN 

Week of Feb. 17 

QUINCY ADAMS SAWYER 

Week of Feb. 24 

AVERY STRONG CO. 



• It is certainly good news, if it is true, 
that the American Federation of Labor 
is to take a stand against the tipping of 
waiters in restaui'ants and hotels. Pro- 
prietors of restaurants and hotels ought 
to pay their help sufficient wages. The 
tip system is degrading to the man who 
is a victim of it. In Boston there is a 
restaurant where no tips are allowed but 
the waiters are well paid, good food is 
served, the patrons all receive equal 
treatment, and everybody is happy atid 
satisfied. There is.no reason why the 
same thing could not be practiced gen- 
erally. —Banker and Tradesman. 



Composure. 

They who are naturall}^ cool, and of a 
quiet turn of mind, upon whom nothing 
can make too powerful an impression, 
who are not wont to be excited either 
by great sorrow or by great joy, have 
the best chances of living long and hap- 
py after their manner. Preserve, there- 
fore, under all circumstances, a com- 
posure of mind which no happiness, no 
misfortune, can too much disturb. Love 
nothing too violently; hate nothing too 
passionately; fear nothing too strongly. 

The American Review of Reviews for 
for February has the portrait of the 
banker poet Edmund Clarence Stedman, 
and more than ordinarily interesting ar- 
ticles on the progress of the world with 
references to the panic, currency legis- 
lation, railroad finances. New York's 
electric tunnels. Gov. Hvighes, the crisis 
in the Japanese ministry, France's fi- 
nancial dominance, and liquor legislation 
all over the world. 

^T<9 

To the average man any old cigar 
tastes good if you can convince him it 
costs 15 cents. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



My Valentine. 

"If you love me 
As I love you. 
No knife can cut 
Our love in two!" 

That was the way the couplet ran; 
The boy who sent it is now a man. 

And I a wife and a mother; 
My playmate of the long- ago 
Is married. — but not to me, oh. no! 

He learned to love another! 

"E'en such is life!" He used to say 
I'd V>o his little wife some day; 

When we went to school together. 
And hand and hand we laughing sped; 
Or he would draw me on his sled 

In snowy winter weather. 

How shyly glad, what joy was mine. 
When I received that valentine 

All stuck with gilt and roses! 
But, land! He narr ed Hetty Trim! 
That I regret not having him. 

Of course no one supposes? 

— Dora Denison-Keeney. 



The Small Tradesman. 

The small grocer is slowly but surely 
being annihilated in Lynn. The passing 
of the smaller tradesman is to be re- 
gretted, but it seems to be the trend of 
the times. Wage earners will chirp 
about the necessity and the desirability 
of sustaining "the under dog," and do a 
great amount of talking against monop- 
oly, and the larger interests, and in the 
next breath they will fairly clamber 
over themselves to get into the store 
where goods are being sold on a small 
margin. Prosperity does not come 
through low prices, either for commodi- 
ties or for labor, but the very element 
in the comm.unity which does the most 
talking against combinations of capital 
and the merging of interests, are the very 
ones who sustain such enterprises when 
they are presented for popular support. 
The passing of the smaller tradesman is 
a serious proposition for every com- 
munity. 

There was 28,188 buildings destroyed 
by the San Francisco earthquake. Six 
thousand new buildings have been erect- 
ed, and three thousand more are in the 
process of construction. These nine 
thousand buildings contain more floor 
space than all of those destroyed. 



Remember to <jq oQ when you want 

telephone number ^O or i^ anything in 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



A Humble Opinion on the Presidency. 

CHARLES H. HASTINGS, as a del- 
egate to the National Republican 
Convention, has our approval. We do 
not know whom Mr. Hastings will sup- 
port for president. It is understood 
that he has not yet stated his prefer- 
ence, and will be "guided by the senti- 
ment of the district." Undoubtedly 
the officials at Washington are not sit- 
ting up nights waiting for our opinion, 
but we have one, nevertheless, and it is 
this: 

That Gov. Charles E Hughes of New 
York, on the summing up to-day, is the 
best equipped man for president. Scl-- 
retary Taft does not show up well in his 
speeches. He appears as a defender of 
the present administration, and does not 
throw much light upon public questions. 
His speeches are disappointing, to say 
the least, and we do not maintain the 
opinion of him that we once held. 

Gov. Hughes has shown by his atti- 
tude on public questions that he respects 
the rights of both labor and capital, he 
does not cater for political support, and 
in every way he has demonstrated him- 
self to be the best equipped man of all 
the suggested presidential candidates. 
The ablest man in the country— Secre- 
tary Root— is not a probability, as it is 
generally the opinion that his corporate 
affiliations would seriously interfere 
with his securing popular support. 

^* 

Whatever hath been written shall remain. 
Nor be erased, nor written o'er again; 
The unwritten only still belongs to thee. 
Take heed and ponder well what that shall be. 
— Longfellow. 

tsst 

(Original for the Lynn Review.) 
Concerning Words. 

The most used words— I love you. 

Second on the list— Please remit. 

The most delightful words — Enclosed 
find check. 

The most important words — Forget it. 

The boresome word— Really? 

Two valuable words — Equanimity and 
Moderation. 

The most talked about word- Weather. 



There were nearly two million arriv- 
als and departures from Paris last year, 
More than two hundred thousand people 
went in and out of Paris during Octo- 
ber. People who visit Paris are accom- 
modated with 11,530 hotels and boarding 
houses. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Because II Does Not Pay. 

The lawyer president of the slowest 
railroad in America— Boston, Revere 
Beach and Lynn — who knows as much 
as could be expected from one in his po- 
sition concex'ning railroads, is quoted as 
saying that trains are cut out (and the 
public discommoded) "because they did 
not pay." 

"Does not pay!" No matter about 
the dear people. When it does not 
"pay" to exploit them then they are 
advised to search for the woods. When 
the public gives a franchise they assume 
they are to be accommodated by a pub- 
lic carrier, but they are fooled in having 
such assumption. 

Mayor Porter should call on the rail- 
road commissioners, if proper service 
is not given the public. 

A North Philadelphia woman, who is 
locally famous for her cooking, had 
seme of her neighbors and friends at 
her home one evening last week to a 
supper given in honor of her daughter. 
Everything on the table was admired 
by her guests. Among the things that 
was admired most of all was a beautiful 
cake. 

"It is so soft," exclaimed one of the 
guests. 

"And so light," praised another. 

"Pray tell us where you got the re- 
cipe," from another. 

"I am very glad you think it is so soft 
and light," replied the hostess. "I 
made it out of my own head." — Phila- 
delohia Ledger. 

A man can be 17 kinds of a sinner and 
his wife will forgive him, but if he is 
one kind of a fool she never will. 

The man who deserves success gener- 
ally gets it. 



'Just Fits the Pocket." 



The American Shoemaking Pocket 
Directory of Shoe Manufacturers is 
now ready for delivery and contains 
over 500 CHANGES FROM LAST 
YEAR, including the names of many 
new firms. Price $2.00. 



AMERICAN SHOEMAKING 

212 Essex Street, Boston, Mass. 



THE PLACE to buy 
PILLOW TOPS 

if you want the largest and finest vai-iety to 
select from. Also a fine line of 

DRAPERIES, 

WINDOW CURTAINS, MUSLIN 

CURTAINS. 

CARPETS, RUGS 

at the lowest prices to be obtained east of 
Boston. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 Market Street 



The Religion ol Life. 

Whatever separates religion from life 
or makes it only a part of life is dis- 
tinctively an evil. All of life is religious, 
just as all of one's body is alive. There 
is no distinctly religious realm, as apart 
from other realms. A man is just as 
religious in his office as he is in his 
church pew. Religion is like a sea that 
inundates all of life. It finds no higher 
level in a man's worship than it does in 
his work. Reality is to be gauged by 
the lowest level. It cannot rise higher 
elsewhere, except in waves of feeling 
that soon subside. I do not ask con- 
cerning your religion. Your life reveals 
it. — Paragraph Pulpit. 

Preferred Age. 

"Yes," said the old man, addressing 
his visitor, "I am proud of my girls and 
should like to see them all comfortably 
married, and as I have made a little 
money they won't go to their husbands 
penniless. There's Margaret, 25 years 
old and a real good girl. I shall give her 
a thousand pounds when she marries. 
Then comes Bet, who won't see 35 again, 
and she'll have two thousand, and the 
man who takes Dora, who is 40, will have 
three thousand with her." The young 
man reflected a moment or so and then 
nervously inquired: "You haven't one 
about 50, have you?" — The Tatler. 

»?4 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold the best in the order of 
demand the past month were: — The 
Weavers, The Shuttle, The Fruit of the 
Tree, Satan Sanderson, The Daughter 
of Anderson Crow, and the Lady of the 
Decoration. 

Patronize the merchants who adver- 
tise in The Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



The Travelers. 

Two travelers on a lonely road. 

And the black nig-ht coming down. 
Each bowed with Ihe weightof a deadly sin; 
Each far from the goal he sought to win, 

And the guerdon— a golUen crown. 

Said one to the Other, "Where go you, my 
brother?" 

And the other he made reply, 
"I follow me for yon beckoning star. 
But the way is long and the tall cliffs bar. 

And I fear that death is nigh. 

Said one to the other, "What bear you, my 
brother. 

That cumbering burden within?" 
" 'Tis a burden of gold wherefor I have sold 
The pride of my youth and the joys of old; 

'Tis a burden of hard bought sin " 
•Then black night fell on the lonely road. 

But the ghostly moon shone out. 
And a coward's knife took toll of life. 
And the pale moon witnessed the deadly strife 

And heard the murderer's shout. 

To the gates of the land of Heart's Desii-e 

A lonely traveler came. 
A double pack was upon his back. 
And his heart was faint and his soul was black 

With murder's lasting shame. 

But he turned from the gates of Heart's Desire, 

For a white soul barred his way. 
And the traveler knew he could not pass through. 
For the soul was the soul of the man he slew. 

And he heard the spirit say: 

"Ye must go back by the road ye came ^ 

And beiiring my sins and thine. 
Ye freed my soul that I won my goal. 
And thy broken heart hath made mine whole. 

And the crown ye sought is mine." 

— Selected. 



"There has not been a time in the his- 
tory of the American stage when the 
theatre received so much attention as it 
receives now, from the public and the 
press, and there has not been a time 
when the quality of its average presen- 
timents so little deserved the respect of 
intellect and judicious taste. What are 
the causes that have produced this de- 
plorable effect?" — William Winter. 



Peculiar Mr. Davidson. 

Mr. John Davidson, one of the oldest 
and wealthiest citizens of the city, has 
never in his life worn a necktie. Every 
morning in the year he puts on a newly 
laundered collar, but never a necktie. 
He says he does not think he could stand 
one and cannot see how any other man 
can be comfortable with one on. 

Mr. Davidson has never owned a pair 
of gloves either. He has worked in all 
sorts of weather without any covering 
for his hands but that which nature put 
on them. There was another distin- 
guished man in this State— the late 
Chief Justice David Martin— who never 
wore a necktie. While on the Supreme 
bench there was a reception given in 
his honor, and the fact that he appeared 
without a necktie so shocked Brigadier- 
General Hughes of the State Militia that 
he used it as a campaign argument 
against his election ten years ago.— 
Wichita Eagle. _ 

The death of City Auditor Austin H. 
Edwards was a shock to the community. 
It was not generally known that he was 
ill. Mr. Edwards was the picture of 
health, with his rosy cheeks and fair 
complexion, but when pneumonia and 
pleurisy set in the combination was too 
much for his usually strong physique. He 
led the simple life, got much enjoyment 
out of his work, was a faithful public 
official, and his early taking away is 
sadly deplored. ^ 

Widow Patch of South Royalston, 
Mass., hung crepe on her door-knob to 
attract the neighbors who had neglected 
to call upon her. The ad brought re- 
turns, for the country people all wanted 
to see if "she looked natural," and to 
learn what she died of. 



1NCORPOR.A.TED Ix^S 

Lynn Mutual Fire Insurance Comp'y 

112 MARKET STREET 

ANNUAL STATEMENT, JANUARY, 1908 

Amount Insured $2.455.314.50 

Cash Assets 71.368.63 

Re-Insurance Reserve $18,201.47 | -lo 0(^7 qq 

All Other Liabilities 166.52^ i^^^{..k> 

Cash Surplus $53,000.64 

DIVIDENDS 
70 per cent, on 5-year Policies; 40 per cent, on 3-year Policies; 20 per cent, on 1-year Policies. 

James S. Newhall, Prfsident and Treasurer; I. A. Newhall. Secretary 

Directors— .Joseph B. Breed. Chas. S. Grovcr, Warren S. Hixon. Samuel J. Mollis. Rufus Kimball, 

Jame.^ S Newhall. Charles H. Newhall. Thos. P. Nichols, Henry F. Tapley. 



16 



THE LYKN REVIEW 



Ventilation of Cars. 

The occasional protest against the 
lack of proper ventilation in street cars 
is met by the statement that many peo- 
ple object to any air circulating in a car 
on a cold day, and insist on having ven- 
tilation cut off where there is any. 
People who walk along the street, well 
clad and apparently finding no difficulty 
in keeping comfortable, sit down in a 
comparatively warm car, with the sajtie 
winter clothing on, and often times in- 
sist that everything shall be closed 
tightly. There is a protest of a glance 
and often of a murmur if a door is 
opened widely merely for a moment to 
let somebody through. It would seem 
as though the owners of the cars should 
rot be criticised too harshly for a con- 
dition of affairs that is brought about 
partly because carmakers know the 
public desire to be warm i-egardless of 
everything else, or because a section of 
the public insists that cars in which 
they ride shall be tightly locked against 
any more air than is absolutely essen- 
tial to life. —Brockton Daily Enterprise. 

The ToJat Cost. 

Melton C. Weeks, the milHonaire qui- 
nine manufacture of the west, in the 
course of an address in Denver on the 
new pure drug law, told a drug story. 
"We are too much like a druggist I used 
to know in Santa Fe. 

"A miner rode into Santa Fe with 
dyspepsia one day, consulted a doctor 
and took his prescription to my druggist 
friend to be made up. 

" 'Well, how much?' said the miner, 
when the prescription was finished. 

" 'Let's see,' said the druggist. 'It's 
ft dollar ten for the medicine and fifteen 
cents for the bottle. That makes—' 

"He hesitated, afraid he might have 
forgotten something and the^ miner said 
impatiently: 

" 'Well, hurry up, boss. Put a price 
on the cork and let us know the worst. ' " 
— Home Magazine. 

tfSt 

If there is a finei- sp^it on earth than our own 
^hore Boulevard, we confess we have not traveled 
extensively enough to recall where it is. Perhaps 
some of our readers can. We doubt their ability 
to do r.o how-ever. — Lynn Weekly Times, 

Pi-obably there is none finer, bfother, 
in the world, except in Italy. But the 
Lynn Boulevard ranks with the roadway 
which skirts the Bay of Naples. 

Experience which costs nothing is 
worthless. 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEA^IL LE SHQ 

Booked by the KtlTH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites— Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 



Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



It made a Difference. 

Hall Caine visited one October the 
country home of a New York man. It 
was in New England, on a mountain 
side, and the splendid colors of the foli- 
age- the scarlets and golds and innum- 
erable flam.elike tints— gave to the still 
forests an indescribable magnificence. 

The leaves fell in a rain of color 
through the .transparent air. In the 
garden, one afternoon, he heard a gar- 
dener say to his little son, — 

"I wish you would rake up those dead 
leaves in a pile." 

"Oh, I don't feel like it," whined the 
boy. "My back's sore, and I've got a 
cramp in my wrist, and there's growing 
pains in hry legs. " 

"After you get 'em raked up," went 
on the gardener, calmly, "you can make 
a nice big bonfire out of them and jump 
over it." 

The boy began to whoop and leap. 

"Hurrah!" heshouted. "Where's the 
rake?" — Rochester Herald. 



Mrs. Highflyer — Yes, George was 
away behind in his alimony, said money 
was tight and all that, but I brought 
him around. 

The Plantonic Friend — How did you 
manage it? 

Mrs. Highflyer— Oh I wrote him a 
little letter threatening to go back and 
live v/ith him. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



Thomas Ray, is a candidate for chief 
engineer 6f the fire department. His 
friends hope to defeat Chief Harris. 
The opponents of the present chief state 
that he does not have proper discipline 
in the department. The friends of 
Chief Harris say that there never was 
any system or discipline in the depart- 
ment until he took the office. There 
seems to be a wide difference of opinion 
reg'arding the ability of Chief Harris. 
The indications are that he will succeed 
himself. The general opinion has been 
that the new chief ha-^ successfully ad- 
ministered the affairs of the department. 
The supporters of Dept. Chief Ray feel 
confident of his election, which will oc- 
cur in March, when the decision is made 
by the city council. The News remarks : 
—"The re-election of Chief Harris should 
be considered solely upon the merit of his 
service to the city." 

Read these veritable specimens of 
definitions, written by public-school 
children: "Stability is taking care of a 
stable." "A mosquito is the child of 
black and white parents. " "Monastery 
is the place for monsters." "Tocsin is 
something to do with getting drunk." 
"Expostulation is to have the small- 
pox." "Cannibal is two brothers who 
killed each other in the Bible. " "Anat- 
omy is the human body, which consists 
of three parts, the head, the chist, and 
the stummick. The head contains the 
eyes and brains if any. The chist con- 
tains the lungs and a piece of the liver. 
The stummick is devoted to the bowels, 
of which there are five, a, e, i, o, u, and 
sometimes w and y. " — Everybody's 
Magazine. 

A well-known musician, according to 
the New York Tribune, was talking 
about old-fashioned concerts. "Some 
of the hits directed at these concerts 
were merited," he said. "A Chicago 
man once called upstaii-s to his daugh- 
ters: 'What a time you gii'ls take get- 
ting ready for the concert! Look at me 
a bit of wadding in each ear, and I'm all 
ready.' " 



'™^'^JlUt^iae;' 



It Fits, it Wears, it Pleases. SHIRT 

DOWNING, SHIRT MAKER 



Fearless Man and Timid Maid. 

They strolled alonpr the meadow path, 
And she looked up and he looked down; 

Her cheeks were red, her brow was fair. 
Her eyes were big: and soft and brown. 

They passed along the meadow path. 
Her laushter echoed in the air. 

Far off the smoke hunjr o'er the town. 
And they were all alone out there. 

They strolled alonp the meadow path 
Lfntil they reached the fence, when she 

Ex'''ainied: "Ahis! I cannot climb!" 
'Then let me help you, please," said he. 

He helped her up, rail after rail. 

And looked upon her anxious-faced; 

She leaned against him trustingly. 
He had an arm around her waist. 

At last they reached the top, and while 
She sat there tremblinor and afraid. 

He jumpefl and, turning, with a smile, 
Reached upward for the lovely maid. 

She tumbled in his arms — somehow , 

Her lips touched his as she came down — 

Away across the level fields 
The smoke still hung above the town. 



Ah, had he, but the day before, 
Been safely hidden somewhere near. 

He might have seen her leaping o'er 
That fence as lightly as a deei\ 

-S. E. Riser. 

»?4 

The New York World presents as 
number four in its suggestions of presi- 
dential names for the New England can- 
didate, William L. Douglas, Ex-Gov- 
ernor of Massachusetts. In a double- 
leaded editorial it argues Mr. Douglas' 
qualifications as an old-fashioned Dem- 
ocrat, who is neither a Populist or 
Socialist; who would be stronger than 
Bryan in the West, and could carry his 
own state of Massachusetts. All of 
which is very complimentary to Mr. 
Douglas, and will be appreciated here in 
Massachusetts, but The World fails to 
take into consideration the situation in 
the Democratic party in this state. 
Douglas could not carry Massachusetts 
after treating Whitney as he did, and 
causing the split by having Bartlett run 
for governor. 

A Scotch minister had been away on a 
vacation, says a writer in Punch, and on 
his return asked the sexton how all had 
gone in his absence. "Very well, in- 
deed," was the cheering response. 
"They do say that most meenisters 
leave some one worse than themselves 
to fill the pulpit when they go away— 
but you never do that, sir." 

There is an old saying that woman is 
made to mourn, but that don't give man 
a right to pile the agony on her. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Growing Old. 

At six— I well remember when — 
I fancied ail folks old at ten. 

But when I'd turned my first decade. 
Fifteen appeared more truly staid. 

But when the fifteenth round I'd run, 
I thought none old till twenty-one. 

Then oddly, when I'd reached that age, 
I held that thirty made folks sage. 

But when my thirtieth year was told, 
I said : "At twoscoie men grow old!" 

Yet twoscore came and found me thrifty, 
And so I drew the line at fifty. 

But when I reached that age, I swore 
None could be old until threescore! 

And here I am at sixty now, 

As young as when at six, I trow! 

'Tis true, my hair is somewhat gray. 
And that 1 use a cane, to-day; 

'Tis true these rogues about my knee 
Say "Giandpa!" when they speak to me; 

But, bless > our soul, I'm young- as when 
I thought all people old at ten ! 

Perhaps a little wiser grown — 
Perhaps some old illusions flown; 

But wond'ring still, while years have rolled. 
When is it that a man grows old? 

—Marc Cook. 

The Superintendent of Streets in 
Cleveland recently .summoned to his 
presence an Irish officer, to whom he 
said: "It is reported to me that there 
is a dead d)g in Horner street. I want 
you to see to its disposition." "Yis, 
sor," said the subordinate, who imme- 
diately set out upon his mission. In 
half an hour the Irishman telephoned 
his chief as follows, "I have made in- 
quiries about the dog's disposition and I 
find that it was a savage one. " — Lip- 
pincott's. 

Mrs. Edward H. Dixey as "The Wild 
Rosy of Yucatan" in Prince Pro Tern, 
given last month, made a most decided 
hit. She recalled the days when Josie 
Sadler played the same role in the Bos- 
ton Museum, and her husband, Fred 
Lennox, was the famous Tommy Tomp- 
kins. Mrs. Dixey had a good concep- 
tion of the part, made all of her points 
in good taste, and very much pleased 
the audience with her faithful portrayal 
of the character. 

She (coming up suddenly) —"Where 
did that wave go?" He (coughing and 
strangling)— "I swallowed it." — Dub- 
lin World. 

»r« 

Never lie, but never speak all the 
truth you know. 



THe Biright First Born. 

They were discussing the law of en- 
tail—the English law bequeathing the 
bulk of the family property to the eldest 
son. 

"There is 50 per cent, of logic in that 
law," said a physician, "and if the fam- 
ily property went to the firstborn, 
whether son or daughter, the law would 
contain 100 per cent, of logic. For the 
first born child is practically always 
the best— best in brain, in build, in 
beauty, in everything. 

"V/hy is this so? It is because mar- 
ried people love one another more pro- 
foundly at the beginning than after- 
ward: for love, like all things, grows 
old, grows weak, often dies. 

"Mrs. Craigie— John Oliver Hobbs— 
was a first born child. So was Marie 
Coi'elii. So was Richard Mansfield. So 
were Joseph Chamberlain, Lord Kitch- 
ener, Max Muller, Henry Irving, George 
Meredith. 

"Look back into the past and we see 
again the preeminence of the firstborn, 
among them Mohammed, Confucius, 
Raphael, Milton, Dante, Goethe, Byron, 
Shelley and Heine." — Providence Jour- 
nal. 

Representative McCann is on the right 
track. The city charters should be uni- 
form, and this is not the only detail of 
municipal work that should be conducted 
on a uniform basis. The public school 
system should be run by the various , 
communities under the direction of cen- 
tral state authority, and all schools put 
upon the same basis. There is too 
much special legislation. Uniform city 
charters would cure much of this unnec- 
essary business. With moi'e bu-siness- 
like methods governing the cities, at 
least two months time would be saved 
in a legislative session. 

It would appear from an incident re- 
corded in an exchange that not all rail- 
road officials are up in the geography of 
grace. The story goes that a tract so- 
ciety not long ago sent a Chicago rail- 
way agent a bundle of free tracts to be 
placed on the time-table rack. One of 
the tracts was entitled "A Route for 
the New Jerusalem. ' ' The agent wrote 
back to the society, "We cannot place 
the ti-acts, as the N. J. is not on our 
route. ' ' — Observer. 
lA 

Forbid that old age should afflict you 
with its meanest disease — avarice. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



Let us learn to be content with what 
we have. Let us get rid of our false 
estimates, set up all the higher ideals, 
—a quiet home, vines of our own plant- 
ing, a few books full of the inspiration 
of a genius, a few friends worthy of 
being loved and able to love us in 
return, a hundred innocent pleasures 
that bring no pain or remorse, a devo- 
tion to the right that will never swerve, 
a simple religion empty of all bigotry, 
full of trust and hope and love.— and to 
such a philosophy this empty world will 
give up all the joy it has. —David Swing. 

Live straight and you will never re- 
gret it. 



A minister accepted a call to a church, 
many of whose members bred and raced 
horses. A few weeks later he was asked 
to invite the prayers of the congrega- 
tion for Lucy Grey. Willingly he did 
so for three Sundays. On the fourth, 
one of the deacons told him that he need 
not any more. "Why," asked the good 
man with an anxious look, ' 'is she dead?" 
"Oh, no." said the deacon; she's won 
the steeplechase!" 

»?« 

The man who believes his money will 
do anything for him is the man who will 
do anything for it. 

A 

Subscribe for The Review. 



WMEZ^IV 



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BESuRElHATlftuRTicig&T Reads 
^l^B 1. 



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MRailrdiad 



r'THE 

Scenic 

ROUTE" 
Winter and Summer 

[Fa^ trains leave from North Station, Boston, for West- 
ern points and the Pacific Coast. Parlor, Sleeping 
Dining and Tourist car Service on through trains. 

special attention given to all intjuiries. 
Send two cents in stamfis for booklet '■'Hills ami I 'ales 
of Massachusetts.''^ Address Passenger De/'t., Boston. 

Oeneral Ra55en5er Agent 
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THE LYNN REVIEW 




See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



TDEOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



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ie Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



50 cents per Year Tl/T A "D/^XJ 1 OAO Tenth Year 

Single Copies 5 cents MAJXL'rl, iyUO No. 5 



Safe Deposit Boxes 

JUST THE PLACE TO KEEP YOUR VALUABLE PAPERS 



Rental, $5.00 per year 

Never risk valuable papers around the house, especially when you 
can rent a Safe Deposit Box so cheaply. 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn 
Branch Office, 25 Market Square, West Lynn 




Telephone 1807 312 Union Street 

Big Cash Raising Sale in Full Force 

Customers who braved the inclement weather that 
prevailed during the opening of our sale, expressed 
great astonishment at the wonderful values offered 
and bought liberally. While our business has been 
very big, the assortments are large and bargains 
plentiful. 

DO NOT MISS YOUR CHANCE TO HAVE ONE 
DOLLAR DO THE WORK OF TWO 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




SPECIAL NOTICE 



TO ALL WHO CONTEMPLATE PUTTING 
IN GAS. 

Service pipes will be laid by this Company 
into cellar walls free of all expense to the appli- 
cant, providing the distance is not unusually 
long and that no ledge is encountered. 

It is a good plan to make application as early 
as possible so that unnecessary delays may be 
avoided. 



Lynn Gas and Electric Co. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



^ Lynn Review 

A MONTHLY EPITOME OF 
LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street. Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



MARCH, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 5 



A local paper reports: "The City 
Hall bell must come down. ' ' Good. 

Keep open front side door (on safety 
side) of electric cars, while passing 
through the city. 

The move for direct nominations by 
the people for county officers should 
be made law by the legislature. At 
present the voice of the caucus is cast 
aside, and the manipulators do the busi- 
ness of nominating. 



Mayor Porter will have a busy year if 
he is going to provide us with better 
streets, new classical high school, the 
extension of Market street, the comple- 
tion of the Sea street extension, and the 
erection of a municipal building in West 
Lynn. With the reduced revenues from 
no-license and other causes and the un- 
pleasant industrial outlook, most cer- 
tainly Mayor Porter is up against it, 
and his friends should extend every con- 
sideration. 

Do It Right, or Do Notlting. 

This should be Lynn's motto in con- 
nection with the railroad grade separa- 
tion. 

There is only one CORRECT way to 
do it-DEPRESSlON. 

All the other plans are makeshifts and 
subterfuges. 

Expensive! you say? Surely! Most 
everything that is worth anything costs 
money. 

The experience of the world is favor- 
able to depression, and if Lynn agrees 
to anything different the city should re- 
ceive censure. 

Better for Lynn to pay $500,000 above 
its legal share in the work, and have it 
done correctly, than to stand for a party 
wall through Lynn's busy industrial 
centre. 

It would be a terrible error! 

Think it over at City Hall. 



Never explain: Your friends do 
not need it, and your enemies 
will not believe you anyway.— 
Fra Elbertus. 



Thanks, Anne! 

The Lynn Review this month is a 
very neat little magazine, and between 
its yellow covers are many bright bits, 
both of prose and verse which are well 
worth reading. —Lynn Evening News. 



The general opinion seems to be that 
speaker Cole was imposed upon. That 
he acted in good faith when securing 
reduced fares for needy young students, 
everybody acquainted -with the facts 
really believes. He has been pursued 
by certain poHtical opponents in an un- 
reasonable manner, almost from the 
very day that he entered politics, but he 
seems to like the sport, and he is wel- 
come to all the enjoyment he can get 
out of it. 



There may have been a time when 
conditions were worse, but we do not 
recall it, in connection with icy side- 
walks in Lynn. But last month it did 
really seem as if the supervision of the 
sidewalks by the city had entirely 
ceased. Nothing whatever was done to 
relieve the icy glare in many of the 
largely traveled sections of the city 
either by the municipality or abuttors. 
When will the time come that simple 
municipal work can be carried on in a 
proper manner? Nothing is more im- 
portant than the care of streets and 
sidewalks. 

A member of the school board who 
has had the most to do with the Cobbet 
school ventilation improvements, so- 
called, believes that the difficulties en- 
countered last month will be corrected. 
The children in the Cobbet school build- 
ing were in a dangerous position last 
month. Upon one side of the building 
they were roasting, and on the other 
side they were freezing. The thermom- 
eter in some rooms was down to 62, and 
the conditions were dangerous from the 
health standpoint. About as much pro- 
gress appears to have been made in 
ventilating and heating during the past 
decade as in medicine. We seem to be 
standing still in these important direc- 
tions. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.55 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 




Everything 


112 Market Street 


YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 

VARIETY 

AT 

LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, etc. 




We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 


We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you wrant the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CS, W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 1091,-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS' S. BROWN, Manager. 


EVERYTHING for the TABLE 






The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 


Porter, Pearson CSi, Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 










See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
' ' hard - to - button ' ' 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



> 

School Teachers' Salaries. 

The change of front by the school 
board in deciding not to raise the salary of 
the grammar and primary school teach- 
ers caused very much surprise, but it is 
understood that the action was due to 
dull times. In December the school 
board favored a $50 yearly increase. 
The reason given by those who changed 
opinion is that the industrial conditions 
do not warrant a raise in the amounts 
paid the teachers and that while they 
believe the teachers should receive more 
than at present they could not see their 
way clear to grant the increase. 

Chairman French states that he does 
not believe a hardship is being imposed 
on the teachers and it was only justice to 
ask them to wait another year before 
giving the increase. Dr. Newhall says 
that while he voted last month to in- 
crease salaries he had changed his mind. 

174 

The Gradations of Theft. 

Mrs. Chadwick's operations have 
demonstrated anew the great theory of 
theft, says the Peoria Star. Here it is: 

Stealing a million— genius. 

Stealing $500.000-sagacity. 

Stealing $100,000-shrewdness. 

Stealing $50,000— misfortune. 

Stealing $25.000— irregularity. 

Stealing $10, 000 — misappropriation. 

Stealing $5,000- speculation. 

Stealing $2,500— embezzlement. 

Stealing $1.250— swindling. 

Stealing $100— larceny. 

Stealing $10— theft. 

Stealing a ham — war on society. 

The esteemed Item recently remarked : 

The weather man promises snow for to-morrow. 
The temperature must rise a good deal before his 
Iire<liction can be realized. 

At the time this paragraph appeared 
the weather was around the zero mark, 
when we have seen snow in great quan- 
tities. We have always understood 
that it snowed in the arctic regions 
where the thermometer plays many en- 
gagements around the 50 below zero 
mark. 

He who loves Nature has Religion. 



ROBERT S. SISSON & SON 

INSURANCE 

have removed their offices to 83 blake street 

Insurance of all kinds. 

Furniture insured at the trifling expense of 

two cents a week. 



Poor Lir Brack Sheep. 

Poor HI' brack sheep, dat strayed away, 

Donelos' in the win' and rain. 
An' de Shepherd he say: "O hirelin'. 

Go tin' my sheep again " 
An' de hirelin, frown. "O Shepherd, 

Dat sheep am brack and bad." 
But de Shepherd he smile like the lil' brack sheep 

Is de onliest lamb he had. 

Is de onliest lamb he had. 

An' he say. "O hirelin', hasten! 

For de win' and rain am col'. 
An' dat lil' brack sheep am lonesome 

Out dere so far from de fol'." 
An' de hirelin' frown, "O Shepherd, 

Dat sheep am ol' an' firray." 
But de Shepherd he smile like de lil' brack sheep 

Wuz fair as de break ob day, 

Wuz fair as de break ob day. 

An' he say, "O hirelin', hasten! 

Lo, here is de ninety an' nine. 
But dere, way off from de sheep-fol' 

Is dat lil' brack sheep ob mine." 
An' de hirelin' frown, "O Shepherd, 

De rest ob the sheep am here." 
But de Shepherd he smile like de lil' brack sheep 

He hoi' it de mostes' dear. 

He hoi' it de mostes' dear. 

An' de Shepherd go out in de darkness. 

Where de night was col' an' bleak. 
An' de lil' brack sheep he fin' it. 

An' lay it agains' his cheek. 
An' de hirelin' frown, "O Shepherd 

Don' bring dat sheep to me." 
But de Shepherd he smile, and he hoi' it close. 

An' de lil' brack sheep — is me. 

An' de lil' brack sheep — is me. 

—Ethel Maude Colson. 

A 

The recent meeting of the Lynn 
Twentieth Century Club, when Presi- 
dent Eliot made an address on "Govern- 
ment of Cities by Commissions," was 
one of the best meetings of its kind 
ever held in Lynn. There should be 
monthly meetings during the winter 
with talks and discussions on municipal 
topics. As before observed the govern- 
ment of cities is now the most absorb- 
ing question in America. President 
Eliot intimated the other evening that 
Boston might easily save three million 
dollars a year were its local government 
properly managed. President Eliot 
pointed out the importance of more 
realty tax payers being members of the 
municipal government. 
A 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold the best in the order 
of demand during the past month were: 
—The Weavers, The Shuttle, The Lady 
of the Decoration, Days Off, The Old 
Peabody Pew, and The Daughter of 
Anderson Crow. 

Woman is usually very level-headed. 
But she is fooled and tyranized by the 
dressmaker. The tyranny of the tailor 
over man is not so complete. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites— Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 



Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



This is the most economical period of 
the year to put in 

THE WINTERS COAL SUPPLY 

Now being unloaded, clean and 
without any dust. Coal is 

AT THE LOWEST PRICE TO-DAY 

Telephone 568 

Stevens & Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 



GROVER'S 

SOFT SHOES for TENDER FEET 



FOR ^VOMEX'S AVEA.R 



Sample Shoes at Retail 23 Oxford St., Lynn 



SECOND ANNUAL MARCH 

Clearance Sale 



UNUSUAL BARGAINS IN 
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silver and Silver Plated Ware, 
Cut Glass and Diamonds 

Some elegant wedding and birthday presents. 

We are selling diamond rings lower than they can be bought 

at the present market prices. 



Come and see for yourself. 
No trouble to show goods. 

J. H. CONNER 



Established 1848 



81 Pearl Street 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Moon's Changes. 

New Moon, Mar. 2. 
First Quarter, Mar. 9. 
Full Moon, Mar. 17. 
Last Quarter, Mar. 25. 
New Moon: Mar. 31. 

March. 

March! March! March! They are coming 

In troops to the tune of the wind; 
Red-headed woodpeckers drumming. 

Gold-crested thrushes behind; 
Sparrows in brown jackets hopping 

Past every gateway and door; 
Finches with crimson caps stopping 

Just where they stopped years before. 
March! March! March! They are slipping 

Into their places at last: 
Little white lily-buds, dripping 

Under the showers that fall fast; 
Buttercups, violets, roses; 

Snowdrop and bluebell and pink; 
Throng upon throng of sweet posies, 

Pending the dewdrops to drink. 
March! March! March! They will hurry 

Forth at the wild bugle-sound; 
Blossoms and birds in a flurry. 

Fluttering all over the ground. 
Hang out your flags, birch and willow! 

Shake out your red tassels, larch! 
Up, blades of grass, from your pillow! 

Hear who is calling you — March ! 

— Lucy Larcom 
»T4 

Life, America's wittiest publication, 
recently reached the age of twenty-five 
years. No other publication has the 
spirit of Life. It is unique in more 
ways than one. Life soaks the reckless 
automobilist without mercy, and at the 
same time carries more automobile ad- 
vertising than any other publication in 
the country. Life pays good money for 
its contributions, is always up to the 
minute, and its comments on matters 
theatrical are better written than any 
other dramatic review now offered the 
American public. Long life to Life, 
and may we be able to join in its golden 
anniversary. 

A middle-aged farmer accosted a 
serious faced youth outside the Grand 
Central Station in New York the other 
day. "Young man," he said, plucking 
his sleeve, "I want to go to Central 
Park." The youth seemed lost in con- 
sideration for a moment. "Well," he 
said finally, "you may just this once. 
But I don't want you ever, ever to ask 
me again." — Everybody's Magazine. 



GREEN & SON 

"DT A "NT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
"1/^.iNl^O AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



The Extension of Washington Street. 

ONE of the most necessary and vital 
improvements suggested is the ex- 
tension of Washington street from Bos- 
ton street to Pine Hill. The matter will 
soon be taken up by the city council. 
The residents of Pine Hill and vicinity 
are persistent in their demonstrations 
that the extension of the street would 
mean much in the development of the 
city. 

For years this proposition has been 
before the people and but little opposi- 
tion has ever been manifested. Lack of 
funds, however, has frequently been 
given as a reason why the street should 
not then be carried over the hill near 
Boston street. 

Renewed energy has been shown by 
those who desire to see the improve- 
ment carried out, and numerous mem- 
bers of the government have been en- 
listed in favor of the idea. It is pointed 
out that at a very moderate expense the 
street could be built and thus afford di- 
rect communication between the Pine 
Hill district and downtown sections. 

Territory needed for the expansion of 
the city would be made accessible 
through the building of the street ex- 
tension, and it is claimed that the valu- 
ation of property benefited would be 
sufficient, in taxes, to repay the city for 
the amount expended. 

There was a young man in a flat. 
The kind that they call "anti-fat"; 

He couldn't turn ro\ind. 

But he said, "I have found 
That I know just where everything's at." 
— William Wallace Whitelock 

Other vaudeville theatres may come 
and go, but Keith's goes on its own in- 
dividualistic way. The stamp of genius 
and character is all over the elegant 
playhouse. The man who lifted vaude- 
ville from the depths and made it 
cleanly, congenial and helpful for old 
and young of both sexes, deserves 
praise. The test of a theatre's goodness 
lies in this application — "Would you 
have your daughter attend it?" Fifty- 
two weeks in a year the an.swer is ' 'Yes" 
so far as the beautiful Keith's theatre is 
concerned, and parents in Boston and 
the suburbs should, indeed, feel pleased 
that such high class and interesting en- 
tertainments are at their door, not ex- 
celled anywhere in the world. 

The cannibals really love children - 
speaking gastronomically. 



8 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The land of the deepest snow is in the 
North CaHfornia mountains, where it is 
often times thirty feet in depth. The 
residents have the deUghts of telescope 
chimneys, flagpoles to show the loca- 
tion of buried houses, tunnels to the 
surface, and the men go about on skis, 
and horses wear snow shoes. 

Instructor in Public Speaking— ' 'What 
is the matter with you, Mr. Brown? 
Can't you speak any louder? Be more 
enthusiastic. Open your mouth and 
throw yourself into it!" 

Subscribe for The Review. 



Robert S. Sisson & Son have removed 
from the Item Building, and are now 
located at 83 Blake street, next to 
Central National Bank, where they give 
satisfactory service on matters pertain- 
ing to real estate, insurance and mort- 
gages. 

Accommodating feet — "George, I've 
got a pair of shoes that might fit you. 
What size do you wear?" "Why — ah— 
sebbens — eights— nines— tens — lebens— 
ah ain't peticklah 'bout half sizes, sah." 
-Life. ^^^ 

No man can fail of happiness who 
goes straightforward in the path of duty. 



WMEITS^ 



>1AK£- THAT TItII» 



BeSuRETiiAT'YbuiiTicK.ET Reads 



oMjiiNlE 

Railrdad 



l"THE 
SCENIC 
ROUTE" 

Winter and Summer 

iFa^ trains leave from North Station, Boston, for West- 
ern points and the Pacific Coast. Parlor, Sleeping 
Dining and Tourist car Service on through trains. 

Sf>ecial attention ^h'cn tn all inquiries. 
Send tivo cents in stamps for booklet " ffills anii I'alcs 
of Massachusettsy Address I'assenger Dept., Boston. 

(jeneraL Passenger Agent 
EKOSTOIV. 



When dealing; with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The T«vo Mysteries. 

We know not what it is, dear, this sleep so deep 

and still — 
The folded hands the awful calm, the cheek so 

pale and chill: 
The lids that will not lift again, though we may 

call and call; 
The strange white solitude of peace that settles 

over all. 
We know not what it means, dear— this desolate 

heart pain. 
This dread to take our daily way and walk in it 

again. 
We know not to what other spher the loved who 

leave us go 
Nor why we're left to wonder still nor why we do 

not know. 
But this we know: Our loved and dead, if they 

should come this day — 
Should come and ask us "What is life?" not one 

of us could sav. 
Life is a mystery as dead as ever death can be: 
Yet, oh, how dear it is to us — this life we live and 

see! 
The child who enters life comes not with know- 
ledge or intent; 
So those who enter death must go as little 

children sent. 
Nothing is known. But I believe that God is 

overhead; 
And as life is to the living, so death is to the dead. 
Mary Mapes Dodge. 

The American Review of Reviews for 
March is a most interesting number, 
having important articles on the Ten 
Years Since the Spanish War, Taft's 
Report on the Phillipines, Bitterness 
Against the President, Is Federal Pa- 
tronage Used for Taft, The Hughes 
Movement, The Lisbon Tragedy, Politi- 
cal Conditions in Portugal, and the 
Troubles of Persia. There are also 
some special articles on the Outlook for 
Business Recovery and the Magnetic 
Work of the Carnegie Institution. 

Charles H. Tucker, elected as city 
auditor, to succeed the late Mr. Ed- 
wards, brings ability, good nature and a 
thorough acquaintance with municipal 
business to his new work. He has had 
a good training for his new duties, and 
his advancement gives much pleasure to 
a host of friends. 

"Are you related to the bride or 
groom elect?" asked the busy usher. 
"No." "Then what interest have you 
in the ceremony?" "I'm the defeated 
candidate." 



We notice that Col. Melvin O. 
Adams, President of the Boston, Revere 
Beach and Lynn Railroad, made a stren- 
uous protest before the railroad commit- 
tee of the Boston Board of Aldermen, 
upon the petition to abolish grade cross- 
ings at East Boston. Col. Adams 
argued that the present stringency in 
the money market would make the 
changing of the grades a burden to his 
company. When it is dollars and cents 
compared with the killing and maiming 
people at dangerous railroad crossings 
corporations of the character of the 
Boston, Revere Beach and Lynn Rail- 
road may be relied upon, through their 
officers, to do everything possible to 
block improvement. 

What a relief it will be when the 
Thaw family ceases to be a source of 
revenue, from the news standpoint, for 
the daily papers. Of all the degenerated 
rich the Thaw family takes first prize. 
It has been a stench in the nostrils of 
the American public for several years. 
Now we know what money can do for 
those who do not know how to spend it. 
A 

Love is not blind— it only keeps its 
eyes closed. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


, D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN, MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



Men's Spring Hats 

All the Leaders 

$2.00-$2.50-$3.00 

This is to be a BROWN hat 
season 

SEE OURS ' 

Dunlap Agent 

Amos B. Chase 

Hatter and Furrier 
123 MUNROE ST., LYNN 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Classical High School Location. 

WE hope that Mayor Porter will be 
brave enough to use his influence 
not to have the new Classical high 
school building erected on the North 
Common street lot. There are many 
grave objections to the erection of the 
building at this point. The first and 
most important is that the lot is not 
sufficiently large, and it would call for a 
much greater expenditure for land than 
has been suggested. The second objec- 
tion against the lot is that it is in a too 
largely traveled section for a Classical 
high school building, the first considera- 
tion in the construction of which should 
be quietness and harmonious surround- 
ings. These are not secured in the 
North Common street lot, and this thor- 
oughfare is likely to be a retail business 
street within a comparatively few years. 
It is to be likened to Boylston street in 
Boston, and if that city was to think of 
locating a high school building on that 
thoroughfare it would be laughed at. 

Already it is suggested that the city 
take the land on North Common street 
from the library to Hanover street, and 
a member of last year's city council, 
and who is also a member of this year's 
government says 

"We made a beginning:, but I am of the opinion 
now that we should take the property on North 
Common street from the library to Hanover street. 
The fact that this will add several thousand dollars 
more to the expense of providing the school should 
not deter the government from acting favorably. 
The intention is to put up a building that will in 
all probability eventually cost about $300,000 and 
therefore the subject of land should be very care- 
fully considered. We should not place such a 
building as is contemplated on a lot hardly large 
enough. 

"The library building is probably the most beau- 
tiful structure in Essex county and it is so placed, 
back from the street, as to bring out the best ap- 
pearance. To place the school building close to 
the sidewalk line would take much, not only from 
its appearance, but from the library. 

"Lynn now has the opportunity to add greatly to 
the beauty of City Hall square and vicinity, and 
we believe the citizens would endorse the expen- 
diture of sufficient money to procure enough land 
to mak« the best display possible of the new build- 
ing. We are putting up a structure that will 
stand for many ye<Trs to come, and it is to be lo- 
cated on a main street where it will be seen by 
many thousands. There is such a thing as too 
much economy." 

This is an important matter, and 
every member of the city council should 
give it most careful attention. We 
have no lot to suggest, but we under- 
stand that there are several available 
which are centrally located just outside 
of the line of travel in the vicinity of 
the common. 

The member of the city council quoted, 
intimates that the building should be lo- 



cated "on a main street. " This is not 
at all desirable for a Classical high 
school building, which should not be 
erected for show purposes. It needs to 
be built for the best service of the stu- 
dents. This is not obtainable on a noisy 
thoroughfare, and the city will not be 
justified in paying a fancy price for land. 
It is wholly unnecessary. 

If it is necessary to erect a Classical 
high school building for show purposes, 
as the member of the city government 
suggests, why not put it on Mt. Vernon 
street, opposite central depot? This 
would be a delightful show place. This 
manner of reasoning gives the public a 
clear idea of the business judgment they 
are up against when some members of 
the city council are talking. 

Optimism at Eighty. 

'I am yet younger than appears, 

I never learned to count my age by years. 

While swift thoughts visit me, fresh fancies 

gladden. 
While hope can charm me still, and memory 

sadden. 
While still my heart to the old friend is true 
And yet gives hearty welcome to the new. 
While praise and shame my spirit load or lighten. 
While every change has power to shade or brighten, 
May I not claim without offence to truth. 
Though eighty years oppose, I hold my youth.' 



Spring Style Influences. 

Greek effects in indoor costumes. 

Tailored suits in navy blue serge. 

Separate coats in tailored form. 

Braid bindings on both separate and 
suit coats. 

Petticoats in black and white. 

Silk and lingerie waists with frills and 
jabots. 

Turban shapes in millinery. 

Cutaway outline for both separate and 
suit coats. 

Coats of spangled gauze and lace for 
indoor costumes. 

Wide draped sash of fabric or ribbon 
completing day and evening costumes. 

Her— "Oh, I met such a lovely, polite 
man to-day." Him — "Where was 
that?" Her— "On the street. I must 
have been carrying my umbrella care- 
lessly, for he bumped his eye into it. 
And I said, 'Pardon me,' and he said, 
'Don't mention it. I have another eye 
left.' "—Cleveland Leader. 

There were 6,680,000,000 passengers 
carried last year by the electric rail- 
roads in the United States, 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



The Bachelor's Lament. 

ReturniriK home at close of day. 
Who Kently chides my long delay. 
And by my side deliRhts to stay? 
Nobody ! 

Who sits for me an easy chair. 
Spreads out the papers with such care. 
And lays my slippers ready there? 
Nobody! 

Who plunged in deep and dire distress. 
When anxious cares my heart oppress. 
Who whispers hopes of happiness? 
Nobody! 

When sickness comes and sorrow twain. 
And g-rief distracts my fevered brain. 
Who sympathizes with my pain? 
Nobo<iy! 

But I'm resolved, so help me fate. 
To change at once my single state. 
At Hymen's alter I will mate 
Somebody! 
— Thomasville Enterprise. 

Mayor Porter did good work in bring- 
ing the Boston, Revere Beach & Lynn 
railroad to terms. This railroad is con- 
venient, if it is not speedy, for a great 
number of people, and for them to be 
discommoded simply because certain 
trains "did not pay" is in line with the 
treatment the public is receiving from 
some corporations these days. And this 
sort of thing is what causes the general 
unrest and sulky feeling toward corpo- 
rations. They do not seem to under- 
stand that the first consideration with 
them should be to accommodate the 
public. They first consider dividends, 
and in that way blind, hoodwink, and 
not well serve the public. If the Bos- 
ton, Revere Beach & Lynn railroad was 
run by a railroad man the public might 
perhaps get more satisfactory service. 

Little Bobby's Aunt Helen went to 
spend the night at Bobby's house. She 
slept in the room next to the nursery. 
In the morning she heard Bobby making 
a great fuss about being dressed. She 
called through the register which is be- 
tween the two rooms, "Bobby, Bobby, 
what's going on in there?" The answer 
came back promptly, in a pitiful wail, 
"My 'tockin's. " — Harper's Magazine. 

The Knickerbocker Trust Company 
might have been saved had the men of 
money taken proper steps. The trust 
companies of New York lost $300,000,000 
in forty days and only one company 
went under. That certainly proves that 
the trust companies are in far better 
condition than the country is led to be- 
lieve by the information sent out from 
New York. 



The Great Automobile Race. 

An event of great interest to all 
America as well as to Europe and the 
world at large started at eleven o'clock 
on the morning of February 12th, with 
the start of the New York to Paris auto- 
mobile race. 

This race is not one of time as much 
as one of endurance, and none but the 
best machines are entered. French, 
Italian, German, as well as American 
cars are represented in this contest. 

The route between New York and 
San Francisco takes in over 500 cities 
and towns in the United States and the 
schedule calls for the an-ival at Valdez, 
Alaska, about March 29. Traversing 
Alaska, it is expected they will reach 
Siberia about May 15. 

It will take some five or six months to 
cover the distance through Siberia, the 
whole of Europe to Paris, which point 
they expect to reach by November 1. 

A consideration of the route traversed 
will make apparent the obstacles to be 
overcome and the severity of the test 
to which the machines will be put. 



Curious Calendar Facts. 

No century begins on Wednesday, Fri- 
day or Saturday. The same calendars 
can be used every twenty years. Oct- 
ober always begins on the same day of 
the week as January, April as July, 
September as December, February, 
March and November begin on the same 
days; May. June and August always 
begin on different days from each other 
and every other month in the year. The 
first and last days of the year are always 
the same. These rules do not apply to 
leap year, when comparison is made be- 
tween days before and after Feb. 29. 
A 

Joseph Chamberlain was the guest of 
honor at a dinner in an important city. 
The mayor presided, and, when coffee 
was being served, the mayor leaned 
over and touched Mr. Chamberlain, say- 
ing, "Shall we let the people enjoy 
themselves a little longer, or had we 
better have your speech now?" 
»?« 

"Modern women are extravagant," 
says Mrs. Ellen H. Richards, "but it is 
the conditions of our modern life, with 
its loss of personal independence, which 
are to blame for the extravagance." 
A 

Many players on the stage of life 
take hints of disapproval for encores. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



1 ABou?wR Safety Razor | 

8 The Best in its Line 9 
M Reasonable in Price g 

2 Jos. W. Harding & Co. 9 

W 32-34 Central Sq.. Lynn R 


Each for Himself. 

Each for himself must tread life's devious way. 
No yearning mother-love one step has spared 

The child's uncertain feet; but day by day 
His toilsome journey he has pressed unshared. 

Each for himself must fight the foe within. 

No bjprrowed weapon and no alien arm 
Avail when stronk temptation, subtle sin, 
j Against his weakness rise to work him harm. 


ALMOST CLEANING 
HOUSE TIME 

And YO U will want something' in the line of 
CARPETS, RUGS. DRAPERIES. POR- 
TIERES. LACE or MUSLIN CURTAINS. 
SHELF DRAPERIES. Etc. 

When that time comes give us a call before 
going elsewhere. We have all new goods, and 
are sure of suiting you as to our prices. 

Don't throw away your Old Carpeting. We 
make them into durable Rugs at small expense. 

ALBION K. HALL, 

39 Market St. 


Each for himself must bear his sorrow's weight. 
Though love and pity near him weeping stand; 

His lone heart mourns in chambers desolate 
The while he sits with clasped hand in hand. 

Each for himself life's riddles must unknit. 
And learn through failure while he gropes 
through pain, 

Howe'er so frail his folly, weak his wit, 
The wisest of earth's counsel is in vain. 

Each for himself must face death's deepening 
night — 
Leap from the brink and pass beyond recall. 
Lo! then, the sudden crossing into light — 
Each for himself shall find the God of all. 

— By Anne Fitzhugh Maclean. 

A 

Heartfelt sympathy goes out to 




John F. McCarty by the tragic death 
of his wife. She had reared a large 
family, and her great joy was in the 
companionship of her children and 
grandchildren. To become mentally ill 
in middle life, and go out from life in 
such a sad manner, was a shock to her 
many friends. 


There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 







The Solidity of a 
Bank Account 



VERY largely rests upon the strength, character and 
reputation of the Directing Force. Confidence is the 
chief requisite in a Bank. We get it and maintain 
it because our success rests upon the business success of our 
board of directors. This institution, with the backing of 
resources amounting to $1,381,947 also offers conservative 
and careful management under directors who have made a 
success of their personal business. 

Manufacturers' National Bank 

B. W. Currier, President 

W. B. Littlefield, Vice President 

Clifton Colburn, Cashier 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



Vanity. 

At five a maiden's wants are few — 
A set of blocks, a doll or two, 
A little place inside to play. 
If should come a rainy day, 
A pair of shoes, a pinafore; 
I really think of nothing mc/re. _^ 

Nor wants she overmuch at'terf. ™ 

A birthday party now and then, 
A bit of ribbon for her hair, 
A little better dress to wear. 
Perhaps a pony cant to drive — 
A bit more than she did at five. 
A modest increase at fifteen, 
A party dress, in red or green; 
A room alone that she may fix 
With bric-a-brac and candlesticks. 
A parasol, a fan and — oh. 
1 quite forgot to add a beau! 
At twenty she is quite above 
All childish wants — she asks but love 
And dreams of princes tall and fair, 
Who come a-wooing and who dare 
All dangers, and she keeps apart 
For him the castle of her heart. 
At twenty-five her fancy goes 
To bonnets, frills and furbelows. 
A country place, a house in town, 
A better rig than Mrs. Brown 
Or Black or Jones and just a wee 
Small figure in Society. 
At thirty— well a little tea 
For the distinguished Mrs. B., 
Who writes; a prince to entertain, 
A long-haired lion to make vain 
With silly tricks, a horse show box 
And just a little plunge in stocks. 
At thirty-five and forty — well. 
There isn't much that's new to tell — 
A little bigger country place, 
A real good lotion for the face 
And some reduction made in those 
One can afford to say she knows. 
At fifty — does her fancy end? 
She wants — ah, yes; she wants a friend 
To prove her years were not in vain; 
She wants those dreams of youth again. 
When princes-errant, tall and fair. 
Lived, loved and came a wooing there. 
At seventy she wants to know 
Why vanity and hollow show 
Tempt Wisdom from its lofty seat; 
She wants but ease for gouty feet 
And peace to wonder what must be 
The last leaf's musings on the tree. 
-J. W. Foley in New York Times. 



A Bostonian died, and, when he ar- 
rived at St. Peter's gate, he was asked 
the usual questions: "What is your 
name, and, where are you from?" The 
answer was, "Mr. So-and-So, from 
Boston" — "You may come in," said St. 
Peter, "but I know you won't like it." 



GEORGE W. BREED 
INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate, 

ITEM BUILDING 



Senator Rayner on Roosevelt. 

"Now, I say, with great deference 
and respect, both for the office and for 
its occupant, that the president of the 
United States has also, with the best 
intentions, unconsciously contributed to 
the misfortunes that have overtaken us. 

' ' Monopoly is the curse of this country, 
and I take up my line of march, as I 
have always done, with the attacking 
party that will eventually level it to the 
earth and rescue from its deadly grasp 
the honest business enterprises of the 
land and the prostrate rights of the 
American people. I differ, however, 
with the president in his method of as- 
sault. 

"The diagnosis of the president is 
perfectly correct, but in most of the in- 
stances he cites his remedies are either 
unlawful or impracticable. From the 
violent fervor of his utterances there is 
an idea running through the pubHc mind 
that he has come to the conclusion that 
every man engaged in a large business 
enterprise is a malefactor and that 
every good citizen of the land ought to 
spend at least one term in the peniten- 
tiary. " 

A 

Look Out for Fads from Experts. 

The News says: — 

It is clear that at least one member of the local 
water board has his mind unalterably set in favor 
of filtration. No conditions nor circumstances 
could apparently have any effect upon his deter- 
mination that Lynn shall have a filtration bed. 
This member may have a clearer view of the situa- 
tion and the future than anybody else, or it may 
be simply a case of plain, every-day obstinacy. 

Lynn has suffered so much in the past 
from fads and fancies of so-called water 
experts, that this city had best go slow 
on the question. There are many rea- 
sons against the city adopting filtration 
beds, and we had best carefully consider 
before putting our heads in a noose. 
Many times the views of experts are 
very costly and unsatisfactory. 



Young Genius (who has had the talk 
to himself, and as usual, about himself) : 
"Well, good-bye, dear Mrs. Meltham. 
It always does me good to come and see 
you. I had such a headache when I 
came, and now I've quite lost it. " Mrs. 
Meltham— "Oh, it's not lost! I've got 
it. " — Punch. 

A 

Madame Vera Komisarzhevsky is to 
make her appearance as an actress in 
New York this month. If you see her 
don't tell anybody her name. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



DANA A. SANBORN 

ARCHITECT 

has removed his offices to the NEW ITEM 

BUILDING, 38 Exchange Street 

Lynn, Massachusetts. 



Room 300 



Telephone 786 



SCHLEHUBER 



BAKER CATERER 
CONFECTIONER 

First-Class Wedding Work 
a Specialty 

Catering for large and small parties 

SCHLEHUBER '^^'^Srn^^^*- 



A Lynn merchant had a bargain sale 
last month on corkscrews, his window 
being largely decorated with the same. 
Was this on account of the near ap- 
proach of May 1? 



Slavery, with its results, could not 
live in the same country and in peace by 
the side of Abraham Lincoln, James 
Russell Lowell, Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, 
William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phil- 
lips, Theodore Parker, George William 
Curtis, William ElleryChanning, James 
Freeman Clarke, and our own living 
saint and sage, Edward Everett Hale. 
I repeat that, when slavery touched 
these great souls, something happened; 
and the institution of human slavery 
was forever banished from our land, and 
the world was convinced anew that it 
was impossible for human bondage and 
oppression to dwell in peace in the same 
land with education and religious free- 
dom. — Booker T. Washington. 

»?« 

There are nettles everywhere. 
But the smooth green grasses are more common 

still; 
The blue in heaven is larger than the cloud. 

— E. B. Browning, 

"You can't paint the lily," declared 
the rose. "Maybe not, " responded the 
aster. "But have you noticed?" No- 
ticed what?" "The lily pads!"— Wash- 
ington Herald. 




■C(S^J)(Pf^<5i^«@ 



0. 



11 and 13 Market Street 

"Cadet" Scientific Stockings 

EVERY PAIR FULLY GUARANTEED 

For this issue of THE REVIEW we wish to call your attention to the New 
Scientific Stockings that are having such a wonderful sale wherever they have 
been shown. ALL MOTHERS will appreciate a chance to break away from the 
darning basket. The way to do it is to buy the new "Cadet" Stockings which 
are wear-proof — reinforced at knee, heel and toe with stoutest Irish linen. Made 
of plied yarn— no weak places— no seams to chafe and rub. 

"CADET" STRONG POINTS 

KNEE — won't wear through. HEEL — proof against the grind and w/ear. 
TOE — hand finished, no seam. 'Welt — Very elastic. 
INSTEP— on and off easily. 

That is why the linen-spliced "Cadet" Stockings are the best you can buy at 

the price. 



Made for Men, Women and Children 

and sold in Lynn 

ONLY AT THIS STORE 



Price per pair, 

all styles 



25c. 



When dealinc: with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



Navel Rupture, Tendency to Corpulency or any 
Abdominal Weakness demands the use of an 

All Elastic Abdominal Belt 




We manufacture all to special measure which 
insures a perfect fit and most efficient support. 
Send for cataloKUe No. 2. 

CURTIS & SPINDELL CO., 7 Munroe St., Lynn 



And now they are going to get after 
people in Lynn who do not pay the gro- 
cer, the baker and the candle stick 
maker. A credit reporting company is 
coming into Lynn and systematically 
pick out the dead ones, and tell the 
merchants whom to trust. Systematic 
work in this direction should help Lynn 
merchants, although in recent years 
those who do not pay their bills have 
been on the rack to a considerable ex- 
tent in this community. The weekly 
payment of rents, the ready cash called 
for by grocers, and many other new 
wrinkles, has made it easier for people 
to collect the money due them. There 
always will be a certain sponging ele- 
ment in the community whose chief de- 
light appears to be living at the expense 
of the landlord and grocer, to say noth- 
ing about other tradesmen. 

Some day the reform of city govern- 
ments in American cities will be forced 
upon the people. Haphazard, short- 
term men in charge of the American 
city's affairs, the lack of professional 
mayors like the mayors of Germany, 
and of permanent boards of technical 
experts like those of England, are the 
crying defects of our cities. The Gal- 
veston plan of government by commis- 
sion is not one that would work well 
everywhere. 

It is said that a man is apt to get his 
back up if you tell him to hump himself. 



WEAR 



"^uiov^iioe.; 



SHIRT 

DOWNING, SHIRT MAKER 



Hoiv the Women Do It In Denmark. 

The women of Copenhagen, Denmark, 
have been much stirred up over the 
question of whether or no the Ladies' 
Reading Club, the leading woman's club 
of that city, shall have a clubhouse of 
its own or continue in its present all too 
small quarters. The plan for building 
a clubhouse of their own was brought 
up by Miss Alberti, who has been the 
president of the club for the last sixteen 
years, during which time the member- 
ship has grown from something under 
eight hundred to nearly four thousand. 
Her plans were first presented last 
April, but because the Danish women 
knew nothing about building a house 
without having enough money to pay for 
it before starting the proposition met 
with overwhelming defeat. 

At a recent meeting of the club the 
result was very different. Half an hour 
before the time appointed for the meet- 
ing to open the hall was crowded to its 
utmost capacity, and there was as many 
more women in the court outside who 
couldn't get in. After a warm discus- 
sion that lasted three hours the proposal 
to build a clubhouse was carried by a 
majority of more than two- thirds. 

Happiness. 

Happiness, I have discovered, is nearly 
always a rebound from hard work. It 
is one of the follies of men to imagine 
that they can enjoy mere thought or 
emotion or sentiment. As well try to 
eat beauty. For happiness must be 
tricked. She loves to see men at work. 
She loves sweat, weariness, self-sacri- 
fice. She will be found not in palaces, 
but lurking in corn-fields and factories 
and hovering over littered desks. She 
crowns the unconscious head of the busy 
child. If you look up suddenly from 
hard work, you will see her; but, if you 
look too long, she fades sorrowfully 
away. — American Magazine. 

"Mr. Gibbons," said the teacher of 
the class in rhetoric, "point out the ab- 
surdity in this figure of speech: 'At this 
time the Emperor Frederick hatched out 
a scheme,' etc." "It seems to me all 
right," replied the young man after 
some reflection. "It does? Explain, if 
you please, how he could have 'hatched 
out' a scheme." "Well, he might have 
had his mind set on it.' " 

"The age of discretion" is never 
reached. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Bright Side. 

There is many a rest in the road of life, 

If we only would stop to take it. 
And many a tone from the better land. 

If the querulous heart would wake it! 
To the sunny soul that is full of hope. 

And whose beautiful trust ne'er faileth. 
The jrrass is Kreeii and the flowers are bright; 

Though the wintry storm prevaileth. 

Better to hope, though the clouds hang low. 

And to keep the eyes still lifted; 
For the sweet blue sky will soon peep through 

When the ominous clouds are rifted. 
There was never a night without a day. 

Or an evening without a morning. 
And the darkest hour as the proverb goes. 

Is the hour before the dawning. 

There is many a gem in the path of life. 

Which we pass in our idle pleasure. 
That is richer far than the jeweled crown. 

Or the miser's hoarded treasure; 
It may be the love of a little child. 

Or a mother's prayers to Heaven; 
Or only a beggar's grateful thanks 

For a cup of water given. 

Better to weave in the web of life 

A bright and golden filling, 
And to do God's will with a ready heart 
And hands that are swift and willing, 
Than to snap the delicate, slender threads 

Of our curious lives asunder. 
And then blame Heaven for the tangled ends. 
And sit and grrieve and wonder. 

— M. A. Kidder. 
A 
The Lynn Oratorio Society is deserv- 
ing of splendid patronage Thursday 
evening, April 9, when it will produce 
Goethe's "Faust." Prominent artists 
will assist, including Josephine Knight, 
soprano; Helen Allen Hunt, contralto; 
Edward P. Johnson, tenor; Frederic 
Martin, bass; and the new Italian bari- 
tone, Guiseppe Picco. The chorus will 
be considerably increased. The excel- 
lent talent which is to assist the Orato- 
rio Society deserves liberal support from 
the Lynn public. 

A 
Never give pearls to people who don't 
know them from glass beads. 



Here is Wisdom. 

Hope is one thing you can't bunco the 
average man out of. 

It is hard to get along in this world 
without woman, and harder to get along 
with her. 

After a man reaches the age of 50 he 
is enthusiastic over nothing but his 
troubles. 

Why do you throw rice at a newly 
married couple when mush would be 
much more appropriate? 

It is curious that fortune-tellers have 
to work for a living. 

Typewriters are getting cheaper— the 
machines, not the blonde operators. 

Some people are only happy when 
they busy with other people's business. 

Holding a girl's hand has fooled more 
men than holding a poker hand. 



The presidential sentimejit in Lynn is 
thought to be decidedly for Governor 
Hughes. He is not only a good agita- 
tor, but a builder up. What the coun- 
try is suffering from is the destruction 
caused by agitation, and now we need 
nursing and developing in order to inject 
confidence into business, and thereby 
have the mills and factories running. 

During the past month 75,000 tons of 
ice have been housed in Lynn. That 
should carry us through a hot summer, 
but when it is considered that there are 
three refrigerators in Lynn, the com- 
bined capacity of which is 600 tons, 
the amount of ice cut does not seem 
so large. 

A 

It is believed that the efforts will be 
successful to establish a shoe trade 
manufacturing school in Lynn. 



INCORPORATED 1828 



Lynn Mutual Fire Insurance Comp'y 



112 MARKET STREET 



ANNUAL STATEMENT, JANUARY, 1908 



$18,201.47 I 
166.52 \ 



^,455.314.50 
71,368.63 
18, 367.99 

$53,000.64 

DIVIDENDS 

70 percent, on 5-year Policies; 40 percent, on 3-year Policies; 20 per cent, on 1-year Policies. 

James S. Newhall, President and Treasurer; I. A. Newhall, Secretary 

Directors— Jo.seph B. Breed. Chas. S. Grover, Warren S. Hixon. Samuel J. Hollis. Rufus Kimball, 

James S. Newhall, Charles H. Newhall, Thos. P. Nichols, Henry F. Tapley. 



Amount Insured 
Cash Assets 
Re-Insurance Reserve 
All Other Liabilities 
Cash Surplus 




THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



A Tragic Story. 

There lived a saKo in days of yore 
And he a handsome pitftail wore; 
But he wondered much, and sorrowed more. 
Because it hunpr behind him. 

He mused upon this curious case. 
And swore he'd change the pigtail's place. 
And have it hanging at his face. 
Not dangling there behind him. 

Says he, "The mystery I've found, — 
I'll turn me round," — he turned him round; 
But still it hung behind him. 

Then round and round, and out and in. 
All day the puzzled sage did spin; 
In vain — it mattered not a pin — 
The pigtail hung behind him. 

And right and left, and round about. 
And up and down and in and out 
He turned; but still the pigtail stout 
Hung steadily behind him. 

And though his efforts never .slack. 
And though he twist, and twirl, and tack, 
Alas! still faithful to his back. 
The pigtail hangs behind him. 

— William Makepeace Thackeray. 

Atlantic Cleansing Co. 

Care of clothing is more important 
than its selection. Clothing properly 
cared for wears much longer and gives 
constant satisfaction. The Atlantic 
Cleansing Co., 117 Broad street, Lynn, 
makes a specialty of caring for clothing 
on a basis of $15 per year, and for this 
amount they send a team to your door, 
get your goods and return them 
promptly, clean, press and repair, and 
take a suit each week. It is the most 
satisfactory service of its kind ever de- 
veloped in Lynn, and the patronage is 
constantly increasing. Peabody and 
Swampscott residents are served at the 
same prices as prevail in Lynn, the de- 
livery service being the same. The 
company also makes small repairs on all 
garments, where it has a regular con- 
tract for cleaning and pressing. People 
who are desirous of prompt, thorough 
and intelligent clothes cleaning service 
should put themselves in touch with the 
Atlantic Cleansing Co., of which J. H. 
H. Hartshorn is general manager. 



There may be two sides to every story, 
but the editor sees only one side. 



BAKER. GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



MAKING, LAYING 
REPAIRING 

CARPETS 

is a specialty with us 

Special attention is given to 
Making, Laying and Refitting 
CARPETS; also stretching of 
Foreign Rugs, Repairing or 
Correction of Shape is also 
made an important part of our 
Repair Department. Carpets 
to be made over will be taken 
up, cleaned, or naptha-cleansed 
if desired, and re-laid at short 
notice. 

TELEPHONE 819-1 

for first-class work of this description 

W. B. GIFFORD 

Market St., Lynn 



The city council should not allow any- 
thing to interfere with the proper lay- 
ing out of the Lynn and Lynnfield road- 
way. The government endorses a ten- 
year loan of $10,000, and the finance 
committee will consider the suggestion. 
It is understood that the county commis- 
sioners will give aid to the project. A 
modem roadway between Lynn and 
Lynnfield will be of great help to Lynn 
merchants, and be the means of divert- 
ing much Wakefield and Lynnfield trade 
to this city. 

When Gen. Leonard Wood was a 
small boy, he was called up in a gram- 
mar class. The teacher said: "Leonard 
give me a sentence, and we'll see if we 
can change it to the imperative mood." 
"The horse draws the cart," said Leon- 
ard. "Very good. "Now change the 
sentence to an imperative. ' ' ' 'Get up !' ' 
said young Wood. 

Out at Night. 

My teeth are like the stars? 

They certainly are. 

And how is that? 

They both come out at night. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Where-Away. 

O the Lands of Where-Away! 
Tell u£ — tell us — where are they? 
Through the darkness and the dawn 
We have journeyed on and on — 
From the cradle to the cross — 
From possession unto loss. — 
Seeking still, from day to day. 
For the lands of Where-Away. 

When our baby-feet were first 
Planted where the daisies burst. 
And the greenest grasses grew 
In the fields we wandered through, — 
On. with childish discontent. 
Ever on and on we went. 
Hoping still to pass, some day, 
O'er the verge of Where-Away. 

Roses laid their velvet lips 
On our own, with fragrant sips; 
But their kisses held us not. 
All their sweetness we forgot: — 
Though the brambles in our track 
Plucked at us to hold us back— 
"Just ahead," we used to say, 
"Lie the Lands of Where-Away." 

Children at the pasture-bars. 

Through the dusk, like glimmering stars. 

Waved their hantls that we should bide 

With them over eventide: 

Down the dark their voices failed 

Falleringly, as they hailed. 

And died into yesterday — 

Night ahead and — Where-Away? 

Twining arms about us thrown — 
Warm caresses, all our own. 
Can but stay us for a spell — 
Love hath little new to tell 
To the soul in need supreme. 
Aching ever with the dream 
Of the endless bliss it may 
Find in Lands of Where" A way! 

—James Whitcomb Riley. 

An order was issued from the State 
Gas and Electric Light Commission, 
last month, authorizing the Lynn Gas 
and Electric Company to make an addi- 
tional issue of 1,950 shares of the par 
value of $100 a share, of which 950 
shares shall be used for the payment of 
promissory notes and 1,000 shares 
for the extension of the plant, and the 
Gas and Electric Light Company fix the 
market value of .such shares at $235 a 
share. Arthur W. Pinkham has been 
added to the directorate of this company. 



The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 

If we could have to-morrow's judg- 
ment to-day, we would all be million- 
aires. 



Ttie Fair Sex. 

Women who own cut glass shouldn't 
throw stones. 

When women borrow trouble they 
usually pay back double. 

A woman's idea of a smart man is one 
who always agrees with her. 

A woman can keep a secret if nobody 
cares whether she does or not. 

There are more ways than one for a 
woman to have her own way. 

It sometimes happens that a self-made 
man is unmade by a woman. 

Many a man knows from experience 
that it is far easier to find a wife than it 
is to lose her. 

Shortly after marriage a woman dis- 
covers that her husband has to have 
something to growl about, so she ceases 
to pay any attention to him. 

Wise is the man who is as attentive 
to his wife as he was when she was his 
sweetheart; only her relationship to 
him has changed, not her nature. 

The Spalding Dry Goods Co. makes a 
special appeal to the public regarding a 
line of warranted hosiery, which they 
have just taken on, and for which they 
are sole agents in Lynn. The "Cadet" 
brand is positively guaranteed, and if 
returned damaged after reasonable 
wear new hosiery will be furnished 
without cost, this guarantee going with 
each pair. The claim made for the 
"Cadet" hosiery is that they cannot 
tear because of being knitted from 
twisted yarns, giving double and uni- 
form strength ; that every pair is rein- 
forced with stoutest Irish linen, which 
is proof against perspiration, and that 
they are dyed by a special process 
which does not weaken the texture and 
is fast color. They are made for men, 
women and children, and sell at 25 cents 
per pair. 

It is superb work on the part of the 
post office department when a letter 
posted thirty miles north of Portland, 
Me., on a Saturday morning is delivered 
in Lynn Tuesday, a. m. Many people 
believe that the postal service is going 
backward, and instances are constantly 
being recorded to so demonstrate. 
A 

"Really," remarked the lazy cad, 
"I've been wondering what to give up 
during Lent. ' ' ' 'Well, ' ' remarked Miss 
Peppery, "you might give up your seat 
in a street car occasionally. "—Phila- 
delphia Press. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



We will make your Old Clothes look 
just like New 

FOR A NOMINAL SUM 

Our DYEING and CLEANSING is as good as can be had at 

any first-class Dye House. 

We have a first-class Repair Shop, wht re we reline Coats and Vests, 
put Velvet Collars on Overcoats, and make General Alterations. We would 
be pleased to have you give us a trial and are sure we can please you. 

We give you the best service possible for $1.50 per month, $4.00 per 
three months, and $15.00 for one year. No contracts made for less than six 
months. This will allow one person three pieces per week. We CLEAN, 
make small REPAIRS and PKESS under this contract. 

Our team calls for and dehvers your goods in Lynn, Salem, Swampscott 
and Peabody. 

Telephone 546-2, or send a postal. 

Atlantic Cleansing Company 

J. H. H. HARTSHORN, Manager. 117 Broad Street, Lynn. 



TDEOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



A FEW REASONS WHY 

YOU SHOULD COME TO 

HEADQUARTERS 

FOR YOUR FISH 



OUR EXPERIENCE IS 25 YEARS OLD 

We've bought and sold a good many fish during that 
time— became experts, in fact. 

OUR WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT IN BOSTON 

Gives us first choice in all new arrivals of fish. That's 
one reason why we can offer you the best quality of 
fish at about the price our competitors advertise infer- 
ior grades. 

WE'LL NEVER SELL YOU 

Cold storage fish for strictly fresh goods, although it's 
frequently done in some markets. We'll give you the 
best ones we can buy. 

WE OFTEN PAY MORE 

For our fish than some unscrupulous dealers advertise 
as their selling price. Our reason for doing this is to 
give you quality and satisfaction. 



WILLIAMS BROS. 

LYNN'S LEADING FISH DEALERS 
213-217 UNION STREET 

ONLY ONE STORE 



Phones 28 and 29 



When dealintr with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



We Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



60 cents pier Year a T)T) T T -» OAO Tenth Year 

Sinsle Copies 5 cents AiXvlJu, iyUO No. 6 



READY FOR EASTERo 



ALL departments are now showing com- 
plete lines of the latest ideas in depend- 
^ able merchandise. The Easter novelties 
in the ready to wear stocks and dress acces- 
sories will appeal strongly to the shopper who 
wants something different. 

WE WOULD APPRECIATE A CALL 

BURROWS est SANBORN 

Lynn's Leading Department Store. Established 1872 



ESTABLISHED 1846 

A Perfect Milk is a Perfect Food 

"Among the large dealers who have improved the milk supply of 
Boston, the firm of H. P. Hood (^ Sons stands in the front rank. 
for before the boards of health began to labor for a purer, cleaner, 
safer milk supply in the country, before the appointment of milk 
commissions, this company, through its own inspectors, had at- 
tained that end."— The Boston Herald, Jan. .10, imis. 

The next jar of milk or cream you buy, order HOOD'S and realize 
its superiority over any other. It is PURE, CLEAN, and SAFE. 

Hood's Cream is the Cream of Quality 
H. P. HOOD C^ SONS 

W^holesale and Retail Dealers in Milk, Cream, and all Dairy Products 

193 Alley Street, West Lynn Telephone Lynn Mm 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Labor is Benefitted and 

the Public Gets a 

Good Return 




To keep our men employed un- 
til the season opens 

During the month 
gf April 

Wew\\\se\\a$12.00 COTTAGE 
GAS RANGE (as shown in the 
illustration) 

For 

moo Cash 



C Orders booked in April for Spot Cash only 

<L All piping and connections for these stoves 
made for the cost of material only. 

C No charge will be made for labor. 

C Remember that we put gas into buildings 
free of expense (reasonable distance) and that the 
price of gas is only 

85 Cents per thousand cubic feet 

C Cheaper than in many of the larger cities. 



LYNN GAS CS, ELECTRIC CO. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



^e Lynn Review 

A MONTHLY EPITOME OF 
LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. In^alls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



APRIL, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 
No. 6 



Will the board of public works please 
give us more decent streets and side- 
walks? 

Salem people think we will have a 
court house in Lynn when snow drifts 
are popular in that region referred to by 
people when they are enforcing a heated 
argument. 

That is correct. Test the filtration 
idea on a reasonable basis, and then we 
will decide on spending the many thou- 
sands of dollars called for by the experts, 
for filtration. 



There will be no pony express licenses 
granted this year for common carriers 
to transport liquor into Lynn after May 
1, which is as it should be, and the com- 
mittee on licenses deserves credit for 
its action. 

Speaking of Lynn improvements : Are 
we not placing too many irons in the 
fire? Are we not taking hold of so 
many things that we are likely to fall 
through on comparatively all of them? 
Agitation is all right, but sometimes it 
may be over done. 



There is considerable interest in the 
proposed widening and grading of Lynn- 
field street, between that town and 
Wyoma, and everybody interested in 
maintaining good streets believes that 
this improvement should go through. It 
has the enthusiastic backing of the board 
of trade, merchants' association, and 
kindred organizations, and the county 
commissioners will probably give the 
project encouragement if the city of 
Lynn will appropriate $10,000 for its 
share of the work. It is seldom indeed 
that a public improvement has such an 
enthusiastic support from the public as 
the proper laying out of Lynnfield street, 
and the county commissioners will soon 
be prepared to say how much they will 
contribute toward the cost of the work. 



To the City Council: Do not 
locate the new Classical High 
School building on North Com- 
mon street. Location of build- 
ing is more important than style 
of construction. Get a proper 
location before plans are adopted. 
The Board of Public Works is 
against the suggested North 
Common street site. It is in 
every way undesirable, because 
quietness is one of the first con- 
siderations in locating such a 
school building. Make a proper 
start, or the building will be a 
failure. 



That manual training school building 
is a Jonah. It needed the Collinwood 
holocaust to call attention to the fact 
that the doors of the manual training 
school building opened inward. That 
building is certainly a "calamity how- 
ler." 

Mayor Porter is fast getting into the 
' 'delights' ' of his position. Philip Smith 
was a most capable registrar, and the 
mayor was harshly criticised for appoint- 
ing Arthur L. Ellis in his place. No 
man has a better general knowledge of 
Lynn voters than Mr. Smith. If efl[i- 
ciency was the chief consideration in 
filling the position, Smith should have 
been retained. 



It sounds natural to hear "the future 
commercial development of the land- 
locked Lynn harbor," talked about. 
This question has been before the Lynn 
public for a half century or more. Com- 
paratively little progress has been made, 
except for the benefit of several indi- 
viduals who have been candidates for 
public office. It is hoped that the pro- 
posed extension of Market street will 
help Lynn harbor, but there are some 
people who have theirdoubts aboutthis, 
and many do not believe that we would 
have a real harbor if we could go out to 
the end of Nahant. However, if we can 
get a dredging appropriation from the 
state it is believed that much can be 
done to improve Lynn harbor. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Geo. C. Melville Co. 

—SPRING, 1908— 



OPENING DISPLAY 



UO I Oil lYliOtl/ rjij^g service this store is ready to give you ? 

Wc A.T€ Aflxi'OliS To have you find out at once the result of our care - 
" ful and painstaking preparations for a most worthy 

and extensive supply for your needs in dress for spring and summer 
wear. We would like 

To Have You Inspect ^^e most beautiful practical and reasonably 
^ priced stock of TAILORED SUITS we have 

ever shown. Prices range from $13. 90 to $75. 00. Exceptionally special values 
at $15.00, $18.75, $25.00, $29.75, $35.00. Every Suit at price named represents 
a saving of from $5.00 to $12.00, compared with Boston stores of equal values. 

Our endless assortment of the New, Dainty and Exclusive PRINCESS DRESSES, 
RECEPTION and EVENING GOWNS. LINGERIE and SILK SHIRT WAIST SUITS 

bids fair to make a lasting impression on the shoppers of Lynn and neighboring: cities and many 
new friends to this— your fast-growing store. Biggest variety of WAISTS, SKIRTS, COATS 
and PETTICOATS of superior qualities at moderate prices. 



Married Women Make Money 



THE safe way to pay bills is by check. We have opened 
fifty new accounts for women since January 1 of this year. 
It is the modern way to do business. Not only do you 
settle the account, but at the same moment you secure a receipt 
of a most complete nature. You have made a properly dated 
record of the payment yourself, it appears again in your bank 
pass book and later you receive the check with the receiver's 
acknowledgement written on the back. Pay your bills by a 
check on the Manufacturers National Bank and you pay them to 
stay paid. You have always proof of the payment. You pro- 
tect yourself against double charges. You make money. 



Manufacturers National Bank 

B. W. CURKIER, President, WM. B. LITTLEFIELD, Vice-President, 
CLIFTON COLBURN, Cashier. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Kevifw. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



April. 

No such honorwi <lay3 as these! While yet 
Fair Aphrodite reigrned, men seeking wide 
For some fair thiiiK whioh should forever bide 
On earth, her beauteous memory to set 
In fitting frame that no age could forfret. 
Her name in lovely April's name did hide. 
And leave it there, eternally allied 
To all the fairest flowers Spring did beget. 
And when fair Aphrodite passed from earth. 
Her shrines forgotten anil her feasts of mirth, 
A holier symbol still in seal and sign. 
Sweet April took, of kingdom most divine. 
When Christ ascended, in the time of birth 
Of spring anemones, in Palestine. 

-<H. H. H.) 



Don't Fold Your Arms. 

By foldine^ your arms you pu]l the 
shoulders forward, flatten the chest and 
impair deep breathing. Folding the 
arms across the chest so flattens it down 
that it requires a conscious effort to 
keep the chest in what should be its 
natural position. As soon as you forget 
yourself down drops the chest. 

We cannot see ourselves as others see 
us. If we could many of us would be 
ashamed of our shapes. The position 
you hold your body in most of the time 
soon becomes its natural po.sition. Con- 
tinuously folding your arms across the 
chest will develop a flat chest and a 
rounded back. 

Here are four other hints which should 
be made habits: Keep the back of the 
neck close to the back of the collar at 
all possible times. Always carry the 
chest farther to the front than any 
other part of the anterior body. Draw 
the abdomen in and up a hundred times 
each day. Take a dozen deep, slow 
breaths a dozen times a day.— The Fam- 
ily Doctor 

Just to give up and rest 

All on a Love secure. 

Out of a world that's hard at bent. 

Looking to heaven as sure: 

Ever to hope through cloud and fear. 

In darkest night that the dawn is near: 

Just to wait at the Master's feet- 

Surely, now, the bitter is sweet. 

— Henry Van Dyke 

Old Gentleman — "Well, my Httle 
man, how many fish have you caught?" 

Bobby— 'When I've got another, I 
shall have one. " — Comic Cuts. 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



THIS IS THE 

RENOVATING PERIOD 

OF THE YEAR 

1 fl6T6jOT6, you should come 
to our store and see the latest 
styles in WALL PAPERS, 
CARPETS. DRAPERIES,etc. 
We have the newest and best 
goods at the lowest prices. 
Won't you give us the oppor- 
tunity to figure upon work you 
have in mind to do this Spring? 
We can serve you much better 
in every respect than the Bos- 
ton stores, because we have an 
excellent variety and sell at 
lower prices than prevail in 
Boston. If you have carpets 
to take up, dust and lay 

TELEPHONE 819-1 

W. B. GIFFORD 

97-99 Market Street 



The enlarged and re-arranged hair- 
dressing and manicure parlors of Mrs. 
Nellie Macdonald in the Currier Block 
at 333 Union street are without doubt 
the best appointed rooms of their kind 
in the city. Two new rooms have been 
added to the establishment, giving a 
reception room, a small room for mani- 
cure and facial work, a large well 
lighted room for hair dressing, and a 
back room for general work. The rooms 
are handsomely decorated, and with the 
new rugs and furniture give a most at- 
tractive appearance. Since starting in 
four years ago Mrs. MacDonald has es- 
tablished a large business, and its in- 
crease made the present step imperative, 
A 

A lawyer had a horse that always 
balked when he attempted to cross a 
certain bridge leading out of the village. 
No amount of whipping or urging 
would induce him to cross it, so he ad- 
vertised him for sale: "To be sold for 
no other reason than that the owner 
would like to leave town." 



Gi'eat is the law! A Lynn man was 
arrested and held in bonds of $500 for 
using a second-hand two-cent stamp! 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CITY OF LYNN. 



NOTICE. 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures in this city 
gives public notice to all inhabitants or persons 
having a place of business therein, who use scales, 
weights, measures or milk cans or jars, for the 
purpose of selling any goods, wares, merchandise 
or other commodities for public weighing, to bring 
in their scales, weights and measures to be ad- 
justed, verified, and sealed, at the office in City 
Hall, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS and SATUR- 
DAYS, from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M.. or at any other 
time the sealer is notiflefl. No fees for work done 
in the office. 

If the notice is not complied with the Sealer of 
Weights and Measures shall go to the houses, 
stores and shops of persons mentioned, who have 
neglected to comply with the notice given and 
shall be entitled to receive for said services the 
compensation set forth in Chapter 51, Section 14, 
of the General Statutes. 

JOHN B. McCarthy, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

N, B. — Upon notification I will be at the office. 
City Hall, any time to suit your convenience. 

ABo^u'^ HSr Safety Razor | 

The Best in its Line 9 

fc Reasonable in Price SJ 

2 Jos. W. Harding & Co. 9 

Jj 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn X 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites — Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 

Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



SECURITY 
SAFE DEPOSIT 



and 



TRUST CO. 



MAIN OFFICE 

Bergengren Block 

Central Sq., Lynn 

BRANCH OFFICE 

25 Market Sq. 

West Lynn 



A Safe Deposit Box in 
our Burglar, Fire and 
Water Proof Vaults, 
rented at a price of $5 
affords ample protec- 
tion for the Safe Keep- 
ing of your Insurance 
Policies, Bank Books and 
other Valuable Papers. 



You7' Inspection of our 
Vaults is desired 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Navel Rupture, Tendency to Corpulency or any 
Abdominal Weakness demands the use of an 

All Elastic Abdominal Belt 




We manufacture all to special measure which 
insures a perfect fit and most efficient support. 
Send for catalogue No. 2. 

CURTIS & SPINDELL CO., 203-205 Oxford St. 



The Growtli of Insanity. 

SO long as the polite insane asylums, 
otherwise called sanitoriums. are so 
generally recognized with their lax and 
convenient rules, tragedies will occur. 
The recent loss of two valuable lives in 
Boston calls marked attention to this 
question, and there should be a revision 
of the laws pertaining to the care, cus- 
tody and committment of the insane, es- 
pecially, as Dr. Frank W. Page recently 
pointed out, to the numerous lesser pri- 
vate retreats where supervision is so lax, 
and where knowledge of individual men- 
tal states is conspicuous by its absence. 
The conducting of these polite insane 
asylums is working great havoc. 

On this point Dr. Page says: — "Under 
a growing, but false, sentiment respect- 
ing greater liberty for the insane, many 
persons are permitted at large who 
should be restrained for the public's 
good, and under a deluded belief that a 
stigma attaches to treatment in the in- 
sane hospital many a suicidal case of 
melancholia is sent to some 'home' 
where proper supervision and surveil- 
lance are, from the very necessary con- 
ditions of the home, impossible, and 
thus cures sacrificed that might, under 
other and better conditions, be promptly 
secured. Hence, too, the necessity of 
establishing psychopathic hospitals for 
the prompt and early study, care and 
classification of acute cases. " 

A little light shines out from the midst 
of the evidence which is being accumu- 
lated by the finance commission concern- 
ing excessive bids by parties making 
contracts with the city of Boston. One 
man has been found who says he is 
"sorry." None have been heard of yet 
who are so ".sorry" or so conscience 
stricken that they are offering to pay 
back any of their ill-gotten gains. 



Easter Magic. 

Piously with downcast eyes 
Out to church on Easter trips she: 

Like a bird of paradise 
To her pew devoutedly slips she; 

Heedless of her Paris clothes 

Down upon her knees she Koes. 

As the deep toned organ peals 

Rapt in ecstasy she lingers. 
While a furtive glance she steals 

Through her taper, white gloved fingers 
At the envious women that 
Silently admire her hat. 

Seems she to the swains who wait 
After church to walk beside her 

Saintly and immaculate: 
And 'twere treason to deride her 

If she cares to take the air 

With the richest fellow there. 

Clasping prayer book in her hands. 
What celestial thoughts consume her 

While his ardent hopes she fans! 
Who .so base to loose the rumor 

That this artless angel fair 

Angles for the millionaire? 

—George T. Marsh 



According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold best in the order of 
demand the past month were: The 
Shuttle, The Weavers, The Lady of the 
Decoration, Three Weeks, Rosaline and 
The Great Secret. 



BUY YOUR EASTER HAT OF US 




Sole Agent for 

DUNLAP HATS, 

STETSON, GUYER aud LAMSON 

& HUBBARD HATS 

Same shapes in $2.00 Hats 

Silk Opera Hats always in stock 

EASTER GLOVES 

AMOS B. CHASE 

HATTER AND FURRIER 
123 Munroe Street 

gfe^COLD STORAGE FOR FURS 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CITY OF LYNN. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

Examination of Candidates for 

Teachers' Certificates of 

Qualifications. 

Candidates for primary and 
grammar school certificates will 
be examined in room 12, Cobbet 
School, Franklin street, on Fri- 
day, April 10, and Saturday, April 
11, 1908, at nine o'clock A. M., on 
each day. 

All candidates for these certifi- 
cates must present certificates of 
good character and health, and 
of at least two years of success- 
ful experience in teaching and 
governing schools. 

The names of those who secure 
the above certificates will be 
placed on an APPROVED LIST 
for appointment as REGULAR 
TEACHERS in the primary and 
grammar schools of the City of 
Lynn, and persons on the ap- 
proved list will be given PRE- 
FERENCE for appointment as 
regular teachers over all except 
Normal School graduates who 
have satisfactorily completed the 
course under supervision in the 
Eastern Avenue school. 

SUBSTITUTES now employed 
in the schools who have not com- 
pleted the above course MUST 
PASS THIS EXAMATION be- 
fore they can become eligible for 
a regular position. 

GEORGE S. BURGESS, 

Secretary. 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.55 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. 1. A. NEWHALL 

1)2 Market Street 



GREEN & SON 

"DT A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
X i.rVlN vJO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



LET US DO 
YOUR SPRING CLEANING 

Curtains Laundered by Special Process to 
look like new. 

Furniture upholstered and repaired. 

We take up carpets, clean, make over and 
relay them, work done by experienced work- 
men. 

We make you a handsome, durable, double- 
faced ruff any size you desire, out of your old 
carpetins'. 

See our New Lines of Carpets, Rugs, Art 
Squares, Portieres, Couch Covers, Upholstery 
Goofls, Lace Curtains, etc. 

ALBION K. HALL, 39,Market St. 

Telephone Connection 



Everything 



YOU wish in Meats, 
Fowl, Canned Goods, 
Groceries, Provisions. 

A BOSTON 

VARIETY 

AT 

LYNN PRICES 

See our stock of Fancy Crack- 
ers, Fruits, Nuts, Raisins, etc. 



EVERYTHING for the TABLE 



Porter, Pearson CSl, Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 



When (leiilinti; with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Easter Bells. 

Ring loud, O bells of Easter: 

Your peals through spaces rinp; 
With joy the fair earth greets you 

Through all the notes of sprinK. 
Ring in all peace and gladness. 

Ring out all strife and tears. 
As downward through the ages 

You've rung the passing years. 

Ring clear, O bells, your message 

Throughout all nature thrills: 
In all things living touches. 

As when from Judah's hills 
There rose the light triumphant 

O'er death and mortal fears. 
And dawned that first great Easter — 

The Easter of the years. 

Ring sweet, O bells, your lesson 

Unto each heart to-day; 
That all before the Master 

May but life's lillies lay; 
Ring soft — ring low; your chiming 

May bridge some past — its tears. 
For those, perchance, who moumeth 

Some Easter in the years. 

Again, O bells of Easter, 

Ring out in thrilling peal. 
That we. through all our pulses 

The new-born glory feel 
God's living, loving presence. 

As each new spring appears 
In all that breathes around us. 

Throughout the march of years. 

— Beatrice Harlowe 



Trick of tlie Shirtwaist. 

The problem of how to put on a shirt- 
waist that buttons in the back and but- 
ton it without the aid of a maid or other 
assistance has been solved by a New 
York girl. This is how she does it: 

She puts the waist on, the opening in 
front, without putting her arms through 
the armholes. Then she closes the neck 
and pins it evenly. 

Next she buttons down about three 
buttons and then turns the garment 
around in its proper place. Lifting the 
waist up about her neck she slips her 
arms through into the sleeves, pulls it 
down at the waist and by reaching up 
the back she very easily closes the re- 
maining buttons. 

This sounds complicated and on the 
face of it doesn't seem as though it 
could be accomplished, but as a matter 
of fact the inventor of the method de- 
clares that it is just the easiest thing in 
the world. — The New York Sun. 



Tlie Classical High .School Building 
Location. 

IT is not believed that the present city 
council favors the North Common 
street lot, therefore a determined fight 
should be made against locating a high 
school building there. The city can dis- 
pose of the land purchased, or employ 
it for other purposes later on. To locate 
a classical high school building there 
will be a lasting error, and grow more 
apparent as the street develops for re- 
tailing and kindred purposes. 

It seems to be quite the general opin- 
ion that the city is making a mistake in 
locating the new high school building on 
the North Common street lot. It will be 
an expensive proposition before the 
building is completed, and in many ways 
the location is undesirable. 

An ideal place for a high school build- 
ing would be the Augustus B. Martin 
estate on Lawton avenue. Probably 
nothing more ideal and practical could 
be suggested, assuming that the estate 
is upon the market, concerning which 
the writer does not know. There are 
many locations far more desirable than 
the North Common street lot, and as 
time goes on the error of locating a 
classical high school building at this 
point will be more clearly shown. The 
board of public works does not believe 
this to be a proper location. Many more 
economical and desirable lots could be 
readily suggested. 

A sufficient amount of land has not 
been secured for the new building. Re- 
ferring to this point the item well says: 
"'Before the plans for a new high school 
building are finally accepted let it be 
made sure that sufficient land for school 
purposes is secured. It may cost some 
extra money, but it will be far better to 
appropriate it than some years hence be 
obHged to bitterly lament that we neg- 
lected to do so." 

The lovely lily toileth not. 

And neither doth it spin. 
But just at Easter time it costs 

An awful lot of tin. 

—New York World 

tiSk 

Subscribe for The Review. 



MRS. NELLIE MACDONALD 
Hair Dressing and Manicure Parlors 

Rooms 52. 59, 60. No. .■?33 Union Street 
CuiTier Building 
Scientific Treatment of Hair, Skin and Scalp. 
Facial Massage, Shampooing. Singeing and 
Hair Dressing. 



Don't buy your Easter hat until you look at 
the assortment at 

Hall's Millinery Store 

Largrest Stock and Lowest Prices in the City. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Tempus Fugit. 

Do not stop to kiss your wife — 

Hurry! 
There's a car! Drop fork and knife. 

Hurry! 
When you go to get your lunch 
Push and struggle with the bunch. 
Anything will do to munch. 

Hurry! 

If you wish to catch a train. 

Hurry ! 
One may never come again. 

Hurry! 
If you are a second late 
And you find the. 've shut the gate. 
Climb the fence— but never wait. 

Hurry! 

Now remember life is brief. 

Hurry! 
Even though you come to grief. 

Hurry! 
Save a minute, time is cash; 
Grab your hat and make a dash. 
Don't care if you come to smash, 

Hurry! 

— Bohemian 
»?« 

The fame of Keith's theatre for giv- 
ing big shows, greater even than those 
offered in the variety theatres in the 
metropolitan centres, is spreading all 
over the country, and the amusement 
seekers of New England can congratu- 
late themselves on the fact that there is 
nothing new, novel or original in the 
world of vaudeville that they are not 
afforded an opportunity of witnessing 
quite in advance of any other theatre- 
goers in America. There are particu- 
larly strong attractions offered at 
Keith's this month and Easter week 
will have a much stronger bill than is 
usual. 

Of 

The platform of Representative Luce, 
who announces himself as a Republican 
candidate for Lieut. Governor, is so 
good that it lacks only wings, to be the 
real thing. Among the few things 
called for in Mr. Luce's platform is 
strict economy, liberal expenditures for 
the care of the afflicted, direct inherit- 
ance tax, anti-stock watering laws, en- 
couragement of co-operative insurance, 
suppression of the saloon, decorous ob- 
servance of the Sabbath, one day of rest 
in seven, and a dozen other propositions 
that border on goodness. 

The attention of Mrs. Alice Roosevelt 
Longworth is called to the able speech 
to mothers made by her father, the 
President. 

A 

The Lynn Oratorio Society closes its 
season with "Faust" in high school hall, 
on Thursday evening, April 9. 



Tlie Fire Department Old-Timers 

Who have never been strong for disci- 
pline in the ranks, were disappointed 
last month by the re-election of Chief 
Harris. 

They moved "Heaven and earth" to 
defeat Chief Harris, and they mustered 
a strong vote in opposition. The "Any- 
thing to beat Harris" cry was strong 
with the exponents of cheap politics, as 
an analysis of the vote will show. 

Chief Harris has brought discipline 
into the department, and then it was he 
who broke up the old-time regime. 
Therefore the "hand-tub" element 
wanted a fire fighter whose age is 
against him, when developing the de- 
partment is under consideration. 

Now that the City Council has shown 
its faith in Chief Harris by re-electing 
him for three years he should be given 
suflRcient power to run the department 
correctly, from his point of view. 

The present chief has put more force, 
vim and discipline into the department 
than it has ever before manifested. 

His position should be divorced from 
politics. The small fry politicians should 
not be allowed to disturb a man when 
the sole endeavor is to perform his duty 
for the city's best interest. 

When the chief desires to make a 
move for what he considers the good of 
the department he should be allowed so 
to do, without having to go to the board 
of aldermen, with which body the poli- 
ticians get in their work. 

Fire department members should be 
made to realize that they all cannot be 
captains, and should do their duty ac- 
cordingly. 

The charter of the city should be so 
amended that the fire chief hold office 
during good behavior. Such a move 
would distinctly be for the good of the 
service. 



All the girls at Panama love bright colors when 
it comes to the choice for dress, and therefore it is 
not strange that Avita Sanchez, who was born 
there, indulges her fancy with the Rogers broth- 
ers. Miss Sanchez is a natural-born dancer, but 
her temperament is such that she wants to ad- 
vance into more dramatic roles, and her friends 
declare that before long she will be in tragedy. — 
Boston Herald. 

We have seen Miss Sanchez "act" in 
comedy, and are prepared to assert that 
she is now enacting "tragedy." 



My sister spoke when she was four 
weeks old. 

That is nothing. My brother cursed 
the day he was born. —Selected. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



A Work Tliat Promotes Public Health. 

IT^ORmore than sixty years H. P. 
Hood & Sons have maintained the 
highest standard in the quality of their 
dairy products. They know that a per- 
fect milk is a perfect food, because ex- 
periments have proved that in every 100 
pounds of milk nature has provided a 
complete nourishment without the addi- 
tion of any other food, a condition to 
which no other food can attain. This 
has been their motto and guide during 
their long continuous service, so they 
are trying to show the pubHc the value 
of milk as a food and the safeguards 
and detail which attend the delivery in 
large cities of a milk that is pure, clean 
and safe. 

This firm, in order to safeguard the 
health and happiness of the customers, 
employ skilled inspectors to instruct the 
farmers as to the health of the herd and 
its protection, the cleanliness of the 
cows and their surroundings, the con- 
struction and care of utensils, the health 
of the employees and the manner of 
milking, and the handling of the milk. 
In addition they maintain a laboratory 
and make daily bacteriological test* and 
analyses, perfecting unexcelled trans- 
portation facilities and protecting the 
milk, cream, and butter from contami- 
nation during transportation from the 
farm to the consumers' door. 

This improvement of recent years in 
the quality of the milk supply has not 
been accomplished without great ex- 
pense. The milk commissions say that 
an ideal milk — that is a milk practically 
free from bacteria— cannot be delivered 
to families for less than 15 cents a quart, 
though even at that price it would be 
very desirable for family use, particu- 
larly for small children. 

The incidental expense of the milk 
business is probably greater in compar- 
ison to the selling price of goods than is 
incurred in handling any other commo- 
dity. In the first place, a generation 
since, glass jars were not used. This 
item alone is a great expense, continu- 
ally increasing by loss and breakage. 
The labor of filling the bottles, waste of 
milk by spilling, salaries of drivers, cost 
of keeping horses (two or three often 
being required on one long route) de- 
preciation in value of horses, wagons, 
and harnesses, and the cost of keeping 
accounts — these are a few of the fixed 
expenses. Another expense of H. P. 
Hood & Sons is an efficient and expen- 
sive laboratory force for the constant 
inspection and testing of milk as it ar- 



rives in the city. Curiously enough the 
first test is made by the taste. This 
milk, which is collected from some of 
the finest farms in New England, is 
transported in insulated cars attached 
to fast trains and is kept at a tempera- 
ture of from 40 to 50 degrees. On 
reaching the receiving room the milk is 
filtered and bottled, the caps being in- 
serted by the latest improved hygienic 
device— and all this is done in an abso- 
lutely clean, tiled room. 

Persons visiting a Hood laboratory 
and seeing its hygienic methods are al- 
ways amazed and delighted, for although 
most people know that this firm has long 
been in advance of the most energetic 
boards of health or even the United 
States Department of Agriculture, they 
are all surprised not only at the size of 
the place, but at the innumerable ways 
taken to insure the best possible milk 
for their customers' consumption. 

That their work is a campaign of edu- 
cation is shown from facts cited in the 
records carefuMy kept, of milk refused 
because of lack of proper cleanliness, • 
lack of proper flavor, or some good 
reason, and at a later time its accept- 
ance because the lack was overcome. 

i!!Si 
Voices oi Springtime. 

The wind is shivering: at the pine tree's root; 
The violet and the wind-flower, do they know 
This chilling: day, all covered 'neath the snow. 
That it will search and find each tiny sh<x)t. 
And help the blushing: laurel lift its head. 
Where erst were withered leaves and mosses dead? 
Dear little sleeping: flow'rets, do you hear 
The voice of laug^hinx waters coming: near? 
The brooklets, breaking bounds, go leapinsr through 
The meadows, — hark the bird's song! All things 

thrill 
With resurrected life! Each heart should fill 
With joy, and love and life again renew. 

— Dora Denison-Keeney 

»?4 

The pursuit of money is painful, and 
the possession of it afterward often 
more so. 



LYNN THEATRE 



FRANK G. HARRISON 



Manager 



Commencing Monday Evening, 
April 6. 1908 

MOVING PICTURES AND HIGH- 
GRADE VAUDEVILLE 

Every Afternoon and Evening 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



LYNN BOARD OF HEALTH 




GEORGE W. BREED 
INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING 


March IS, 19<W. 
The following is from the Acts of 1907 concern- 
ing factories and workshops; 


Chapter 503: Section 2. Suitable receptacles for 
expectoration shall be provided in all factories and 
workshops by the proprietors thereof, the same to 
be of such form and construction and of such 
number as shall be satisfactory to the Board of 
Health of the city or town in which the factory or 
workshop is situated. 

Section ?.. This act shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

(Approved June V-i. 190T.) 

In compliance with the foregoing act of the Leg- 
islature, the Lynn Board of Health at its meeting- 
held March 18, 1908 voted that every factoi-y and 
workshop in the city of Lynn shall be provided 
with one cuspidor for every five or less males, 
and one for every twenty-five or less females- 
This numbei may be increased or decreased by the 








We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 

We always cari-y large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. ca. W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office. Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. W9I,-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN. Mana.ger. 


Board of Health to suit conditions. These cuspi- 
dors must be water tight and so constructed that 
they cannot be easily overturned, and must be 
kept in a sanitary condition. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

William M. Cowan, Chairman. 




There is one Headache Cure that is .safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 








T^ROFANITY is 

r^ never excusa- 

"*■ ble, but with a 

' ' hard - to - button ' ' 

, i««fc> ...^1^...^. collar the provocation 

^■P^^PP^SaHB^'^^^^^^^ collars that are fur- 

the collar or cufF, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
_,^ ., thread Eyelet - End 
VJ|:^^ ^"n^ H \rf^ Button-Hole. Do not 
OV^v:; Lilt: J— 'jrt; take the old style 

straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



t3 



I Saw From The Beach. 

I saw from the beach, when the morning was 
shining, 
A bark o'er the waters move gloriously on; 
I came when thesun o'er that beach was declining. 
The bark was still there, but the waters were 
gone. 

And such is the fate of our life's early promise. 
So passing the springtide of joy we have known 

Each wave, that we danced on at morning, ebbs 
from us. 
And leaves us, at eve, on the bleak shore alone. 

Ne'er tell me of glories, serenely adorning 

The close of our day, the calm eve of our night: 
Give me back, give me back the wild freshness of 
morning. 
Her clouds and her tears are worth evening's 
best light. 

Oh. who would not welcome that moment's re- 
turning. 
When passion first waked a new life through his 
frame. 
And his soul, like the wood, that grows precious 
in burning. 
Gave out all its sweets to love's exquisite flame. 
1 — Thomas Moore 

»?4 

The First Universalist Church Society 
is to be heartily congratulated on its 
75th birthday. This church has done 
splendid work toward the upbuilding of 
this community. A breadth and tolera- 
tion has been displayed that has at- 
tracted people to the church. The Sun- 
day School "the recruiting station of 
the church." has always been very 
largely attended, and through its splen- 
did management adults' interest in the 
church has been greatly stimulated. All 
honor to the First Universalist church on 
its 75th anniversary, and may it find 
itself with greater honors on its centen- 
nial anniversary. 

Simplicity in the machine and allied 
industries is well illustrated when it 
is stated that the General Electric Co. 
in making Curtis steam turbines has a 
simple wheel which takes the place of 
piston, piston rod, cross head, guides, 
wrist pin, connecting rod crank, crank 
pin and fly wheel. 



There were 120 fares recorded one 
way on one trip of one car, between 
Lynn and Peabody, not long ago. This 
is said to be high watermark for a trip. 



The ANTISEPTIC shop 

The most extreme care is taken to insure 
perfect sanitary work in Hair Cutting, Shav- 
ing. Facial Treatment. Etc. 

LA FUM & DEVOE. 23 Exchange St. 

(Ipen Monday .\fternfH)iis 



Protecting School Children. 

In Cleveland, Ohio, an investigation 
of the buildings occupied by public 
schools, undertaken after the North Col- 
linwood fire, has disclosed the fact that 
60 per cent, of the structures are dan- 
gerously inflammable. The responsibil- 
ity for keeping them open none of the 
school authorities are willing to accept. 
These buildings are to be shut up and 
kept closed until their defects have been 
remedied. In Illinois all "school build- 
ings that do not meet the requirements 
of the State Board of Health are closed, 
nor will they be reopened until the 
changes necessary to make them reason- 
ably safe have been completed. 

A correspondent of the Item, anent 
this subject, says of the Cobbet school- 
First, there arc no fire escapes on the building, 
as required by law. Second, there are no proper 
means provided for shutting off the ba.sement from 
the upper stairways, and that a fire once started 
in the basement would bar all egress from the 
liuilding. That while the double doors, front and 
back, swing outward, one of each pair of these 
is always fastened, and that during a recent fire 
drill the fastenings on one had to be broken. The 
standpipe and hose might be of some service pro- 
vided they were properly inspected to see that 
the valves were in working order and the ho.se in 
good condition. But it has been reported for two 
or three years, that the hose is in no condition to 
stand a fire pressure. Now is the time to have 
these conditions remedied. 

Which is very timely comment, and it 
might be added that the rickety, wooden 
stairways in the Cobbet building are a 
great element of danger. 

Do not let us wait for a Collingwood 
disaster in order to have the evils reme- 
died. 

As the Iron Trade Review so well 
says: "A fault that is altogether too 
common in buildings in which great 
numbers of people congregate— and this 
applies to factories as well as schools — 
is the non-fireproof construction of stairs 
and halls. Had these portions of the 
ColHnwood school been of brick, steel or 
concrete, or other non-inflammable ma- 
terial, despite the panic and jam at the 
partition, the loss of life would have 
been much less. 

It should be made a criminal offense to 
construct the halls and stairways of any 
new public or semi-public building with 
other than fire-proof materials. It may 
be impractical to re-construct all the 
present buildings to conform to this 
rule, but there is a good alternative 
close at hand. We refer to the auto- 
matic sprinkler." 

Life isn't so much in holding a good 
hand as playing a poor hand well. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



BEGINNING 



APRIL 13 



MAJESTIC THEATRE, BOSTON, ONE WEEK monday 

TV/f A TT OT?T^T7T?Q will be received now and filled 
IVliAli^ VyiVX-»r^JXO prior to opening box office sale 

MRS. FISKE in Rosmersholm 



PRICES 50c.. 75c., $1.00, $1.50. $2.00 



UA 1 rl/KllNUr small parties 



SCHLEHUBER 

Baker, Caterer, 
Confectioner 



Ea.ster Novelties in Ices. Place Cards, Favors 
and all kinds of Fancy Cards and Noveltie.s 
such as all first class caterers should carry. 
When in want of anythinsr in the confection- 
ery line ask to see it 



when you want 



Remember to t\Q «jQ when you 

telephone number ^O or ^y anything 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



PLAY BALL 

The season is most here. Our goods have 
arrived — the celebrated Victor line. Our win- 
dow shows goods and prices. Come and look 
them over. 

HOWE'S RUBBER STORE, 

5'2 Central Sciuare 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quality at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens CB, Newhall 

Sea Street, L)'nn 
Telephone 568 




OUR 

GOODYEAR 

WELT 

SHOES 

WILL 

COMPLETE 

YOUR 

EASTER 

COSTUME 



PATRICIAN Easter Styles for this 
'"•"•^•^•^•^^'^ year were never equaled 

PATRICIAN isthewomen's$3.50and 

^"— — — ■— — $4.00 shoe of excellence 

PATRICIAN "«t only enforces Style, 
■-"-■■~~~^— ~~ but in comfort and fit- 
ting qualities is the leader in women's 
shoes. 

PATRICIAN i^ made in fifty or more 
— ^^^-^^^^ styles, from the strong 
Goodyear Welt Walking Boot to the 
lightest Hand Turned Evening Shoe. 

Boots $3.50 and $4.00 
Oxfords $3.00 



THOMAS P. FEELEY 

50 CENTRAL SQUARE 



When dealing' with advertisers please mention The Lynn Re>new 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



The Two Knights. 

Away in the forest there stands a good knigrht 

Clad all in a coat of mail; 
His lance is made of an icicle bright, 

His arrows are the hail. 
And now and again he encounters a knight 

In Lincoln green arrayed; 
His crest is a spray of hawthorne white, 

A sunbeam is his blade. 
They fight from dawn till set of sun. 

Till the leaves come out on the trees. 
And all the rivers begin to run. 

To carry the news to the seas! 
Till all the flowers spring from the earth. 

And wild grass is green on the ground: 
Then winter yields to the green knight's worth. 
And is out of sight at a bound. 

—Lucy Fitch Perkins, in St. Nicholas. 

»?4 

The Hotel Martinique 

At Broadway and 33d street, New York, 
is unique in its service. No other of the 
large hotels in the metropolis give such 
value, when location and size of rooms 
are considered, and the restaurant ser- 
vice is most satisfactory. The popular- 
priced breakfasts have become famous, 
and the Dutch room and main dining 
hall furnish a cuisine which is not ex- 
celled, in the opinion of people who have 
traveled well over the world. The Ho- 
tel Martinique organization is superb, 
and that is the main reason why the ser- 
vice is so substantial on a reasonable 
price basis. If you contemplate going 
to New York send a postal card for the 
Martinique booklet. It will interest you. 
Elegant rooms at a low price have at- 
tracted such a clientele that the Martin- 
ique goes to "standing room only" al- 
most every day. The Hotel Martinique 
restaurants have attracted marked at- 
tention from epicures of both continents 
and in every respect this institution is 
one of the most complete hostelries in 
the metropolis. 

Speaking to the students of the Chicago 
Latin School and the University School 
for boys the other day President Wood- 
row Wilson of Princeton said, "Marry 
early have ideals and cherish them, culti- 
vate the spirit of service, and remember 
that the citizen owes a great deal to the 
country and its institutions." 

Subscribe for the Review. 



A Model Municipal Document. 

George S. Burgess, secretary of the 
school committee, is to be congratulated 
upon the splendid arrangement and illus- 
trating of the board's report for 1907. 
The book of one hundred and fifty or 
more pages just issued contains, besides 
the numerous statistics and reports, 
several illustrations of the new manual 
training school building, also photo- 
graphs showing the improved sanitary 
conditions in the Cobbet and Whiting 
schools, and others showing the work 
that has been done in school gardening. 
The table showing the comparative cost 
of school maintenance for the last ten 
years brings out some interesting points. 
The total membership in the schools last 
year was 12,560, averaging 35 pupils to 
each teacher. 

Among the worst signs of the times is 
the unhesitating resort to misrepresen- 
tation and to other unscrupulous meth- 
ods in seeking to get the advantage 
over a competitor, and other like lack of 
business honesty. 

iff* 

That was a polite 300-pound man in a 
Peabody car the other day. He arose 
and gave three women a seat! 



■WHERE SHALL I BUY MY HAT? 
Advance Spring Styles are now being shown 
at the Millinery Parlors of Miss Addie M. 
Wright whose hats are always distinguished 
for Beauty, Quality and Design. A woman 
can make no mistake when she buys her hat 
from MISS ADDIE M. WRIGHT, 
New Address 28 Olive Street 



^()<cr>000«CZ><)00<=Z>000<CI>000<3>0^ 

5 IGijnn ilnjstttuttnn y 
^ for ^^ainngs | 

^O<ri>O0O<=Z>O00«C=r>00()<CI>00(>«C=>O'5i 



25 EXCHANGE ST. 
LYNN 

President. . . CHARLES S. PURINTON 
Treasurer. . . FREDERICK L. BUBIER 

c^TWONEY DEPOSITED 

IN APRIL 

GOES UPON INTEREST 

MAY 1 

Open Every Business Day. from9 to 1 o'clock 
Also SATURDAYS, from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



George C. Melville is giving more 
than his usual attention to the styles 
which prevail in his Union street store, 
novi^ going to New York every week in 
order to keep in close touch with the 
new styles and novelties that are being 
constantly envolved. He has the New 
York styles in his Lynn store immedi- 
ately on their being introduced, and in 
that way makes the Melville establish- 
ment the headquarters for all those who 
desire the latest and newest creations in 
gowns, suits, lingerie, silk shirt waist 
suits, waists, skirts, coats and petti- 
coats. Those who patronize the Mel- 
ville store are always assured of strictly 
new and exclusive designs, those which 
give the custom-made air. 



WEDDING 

From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



There appeared to be a "conspiracy" 
against chief Harris the night he was 
re-elected — March 10— when there were 
several alarms for fire. Was anybody 
trjnng to "get even" with the chief? 

Those in a position to know say Klaw 
& Erlanger lost $400,000 in trying to 
break into vaudeville. 



Sixty-fourth Annual Statement 
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

87 MILK STREET, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

BEJAMIN F. STEVENS. President ALFRED D. FOSTER. Vice-President 

DANIEL F. APPEL. Secretary JACOB A. BARBEY. A.ssi.stant Secretary 

WILLIAM F. DAVIS. Assistant Secretary 



Actual Market Values, December 31, 1907 



ASSETS 

Bonds and Stocks . . . $23,185,827.00 

Real Estate 2,487,663.47 

Loans on Mortgage . . 11,718,808.34 

Loans on Collateral Security . 974,900.00 
Loans on Policies and Premium 

Notes 4.886,935.78 

Interest and Rents due and accrued 3.30, 182.10 

Net Outstanding Premiums . 315,319.73 

Cash in Banks and Office . 575,242. 76 
$44,474,879.18 

Less Book Value of Stocks and 

Bonds ove. Actual Market Value $292,004.00 
$44,182,875.18 



Insurance in Force (paid for basis) 

Net Increase for the year (paid for basis) 



LIABILITIES 

Reserve at Massachu- 
setts Standard 140, 089, 690. (X ) 

Present Value of Fu- 
ture Instalments on 
Matured Policies 17.3,042.88 

Deathand Endowment 
Claims reported and 
awaiting proofs 273.038.39 

Premiums Paid in Ad- 
vance . . . 54,424.99 

Balance of Dividend 
Account 422,16:^.40 

Commission and Ex- 
penses accrued 38,913.92 

Insurance Taxes pay- 
able in 1908 . . 107,8.59.27 

SURPLUS . . . 3,023,742.33 



$44,182,875.18 

$178,872,320 
5,476,117 



Insurance Expenses in 1907 to Expense Loading 
Actual Mortality in 1907 to Tabular Expectation 



75. J per cent. 
67.2 per cent. 



CHARLES H 



FLOOD, Manager, Home Office Agency. 87 Milk Street, Boston 

A. H. CURTIS, General Agent. 176 Federal Street. Boston, Mass. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



The First Snowdrop. 

"I want to fret up," the Snowdi-op said. 
As she loosened the wraps about her head. 
"It may be the world is white with snow, 
Yet I'd rather be there than here below. 
'Tis horrid to be curled up so ti|?ht— 
I want to look out and see the lisht. 

"My dear little sisters are fast asleep. 

And I am the first to take a peep 

Out of my bed, where snugly rolled. 

I slept in warm blankets, fold on fold. 

But now I am ever so wide awake. 

And it's surely time for the morn to break. 

"My dress is the prettiest e'er was seen; 
'Tis white, with an overskirt of green. 
With six pretty silken cords that hold 
A.s many tiny tassels of gold. 
Oh. I have been working, never fear, 
To look my best, when I do appear. 

"And I must welcome the song-birds home. 
There seems such a stirring all around. 
And I hear new voice.s above the ground. 
The buds on the willows are calling, 'Come': 
For this is the message they bring I guess, 
'Get up, little maid; it is time to dress.' " 
— Julia M. Dana 

Edward Johnson, who made such a 
splendid impression when singing with 
the Lynn Oratorio Society, surprised the 
writer with his excellent singing and 
fine acting in "The Waltz Dream" in 
New York, last month. He has made 
a decided hit in this Strauss operetta, 
showing ability in acting that even his 
closest friends did not think he pos- 
sessed. He is to appear in Lynn April 
9 with the Oratorio Society. 

Chief Harris is credited with doing 
excellent work at the Boyce block fire. 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convince<i. if 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



The "Business Methods" ol m City. 

V side- light on how municipal work 
is attended to is brought to the 
attention of the public when it is 
stated that $200,000 worth of personal 
and poll taxes are due the city. How 
long would a private business run under 
such conditions? A citizen who has al- 
ways paid his water tax in advance, 
never failing so to do in twenty-five 
years, had a summons served upon him 
the other day for non-payment of a 
water bill which he never received, and 
when he reads the report made to the 
city council that there is $'200,000 owing 
the city for uncollected personal and 
poll taxes he comes to the conclusion 
that city business is run on a farce com- 
edy order. 

We have been told how one citizen 
owed $1,900 for back water taxes which 
have not been paid up as yet. Then we 
have been told how a former member of 
the public water board owed nearly 
$1,000, with smaller accounts galore 
standing as uncollected, all of which is 
very delightful reading to this citizen, 
who, as before stated, had always paid 
his water tax in advance, and who was 
pounced upon by the process server the 
other day for the paj'ment of a water 
bill which he had never received and has 
not been favored with up to this writing. 

It is such "business methods" as this 
which bring the municipalty to ridicule 
and abuse. There should be more civil 
service examinations to demonstrate 
whether or not men in charge are fitted 
to properly attend to their work. 



The Lynn works of the General Elec- 
tric Company now has a weekly pay roll 
of $72,000. The highest ever reached 
was $135,000. 



INCORPORATED 182.S 

Lynn Mutual Fire Insurance Comp'y 

112 MARKET STREET 

ANNUAL STATEMENT, JANUARY, 1908 

Amount Insured $2.455,314.50 

Cash Assets 71,368.63 

Re-Insurance Reserve $18,201.47 i 

All Other Liabilities 166.52 ( 

Cash Surplus 

DIVIDENDS 
70 per cent, on 5-year Policies; 40 per cent, on 3-year Policies; 20 per cent, on 1-year Policie.*:, 

James S. Newhall, President and Treasurer; I. A. Newhall, Secretary 

Directors— Joseph B. Breed. Cha.s. S. Grover, Warren S. Hixon. Samuel J. Hollis, Rufus Kimball 

James S. Newhall. Charles H. Newhall. Thos. P. Nichols, Henry F. Tapley. 



18,367.99 

$53,000,64 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Each In His OMm Tongue. 

A fire mist and a planet: 

A crystal and a cell, 
A jelly-fish and a saurian. 

And caves where the cave men dwell: 
Then a sense of law and beauty. 

And a face turned from the clod — 
Some call it Evolution, 

And others call it God. 

A haze on the horizon, 

The Infinite, tender sky, 
The ripe rich tint of the cornfields. 

And the wild geese sailing high. 
And all over upland and lowland 

The glow of the golden rod — 
Some of us call it autumn. 

And others call it God. 

Like tides on a crescent sea-beach 

When the moon is new and thin. 
Into our hearts high yearnings 

Come welling and surging in. 
Come from the mystic ocean 

Whose rim no foot has trod — 
Some of us call it Longing, 

And others call it God. 

A picket frozen on duty, 

A mother starved for her brood. 
Socrates drinking the hemlock. 

And Jesus on the rood; 
And thousands who, humble and nameless. 

The straight hard pathway trod — 
Some call it Consecration — 

And others call it God. 

—William Herbert Can-uth. 



Manager Frank G. Harrison, of the 
Lynn Theatre, made a considerable suc- 
cess of his management of the Sousa 
Band tour last month. The business 
done all around the circuit was very 
large, and Mr. Harrison showed splen- 
did judgment in booking this attraction 
for an extended engagement for this 
section of New England, including Bos- 
ton, where the receipts were phenome- 
nal, quite ahead of anything ever done 
by Mr. Sousa in the chief New England 
city. The Sousa concert in Lynn gave 
most excellent satisfaction. 



The Review man would like to know 
why, in these days when 'tis stylish for 
women to wear upholstery hair, it would 
not be wise for theatre managers to ask 
women not only to remove hats but hair! 

Governors Russell, Greenhalge and 
Guild paid the penalty for political and 
social success! Does it pay? 



WEAR ,, \x , 

THT?. »♦ l/l 



JiicuL^ilvxt'-j 



SHIRT 

DOWNING, SHIRT MAKER 



Speaker Cole. 

We agree with the Salem Saturday 
Evening Observer when it says: — 

It looks aa though the Dist. Attorney went out of 
his way a little when he attacked Speaker John N. 
Cole at the meeting of the Civic League in Haver- 
hill on Tuesday evening. It appeals as though he 
is chagrined over the poor showing he made in 
supporting in the Superior Court the indictment 
of which he managed to secure from Grand jury. 
The most of the people think that the speaker has 
been unjustly pursued in this matter and the ill- 
tempered attack of the District Attorney will hurt 
him more than it will the speaker. The speaker 
has been declared guiltless of any crime and the 
matter ought to be dropped by the District At- 
torney. 

The District Attorney is not a good 
loser. He came dangerously near con- 
tempt, in passing on the court's decision 
in favor of speaker Cole. Mr. Peters 
had probably followed President Roose- 
velt anent Judge Humphrey in the beef 
packers' decision. As District Attorney, 
Mr. Peters has not demonstrated that 
he is the man of acumen and judgment 
most needed in such a responsible posi- 
tion. 

Dear little blossoms down under the snow. 
You must be weary of winter, I know; 
Hark, while I sing you a message of cheer! 
Summer is coming! And springtime is here! 
— Emily Huntington Miller 

Spring Styles. 

Pongee is to be the prevailing material 
from which the smartest gowns will be 
made. There is a large variety of colors 
and tones to be selected from, but most 
prominent are the blues, Copenhagen 
blue leading. The new coats are some- 
what severe in their cut, and the styles 
are almost innumerable, although the 
cutaway is the leader. Plain coats are 
still to be worn with the check, plaid or 
stripe skirts. White serge suits will be 
very popular. The jumper effect in 
waists continues in favor, and a fresh 
variety of designs has been introduced 
by fashion authority. Particularly at- 
tractive for this season are the new de- 
tachable embroidered collars and cuffs 
for tailored summer coats.. 

Egg-rolling on the White House lawn 
has long been an Easter custom in 
Washington. So has it been a custom 
in a neighboring Sunday-school to give 
Easter eggs to the children. Last Easter 
the superintendent of the school startled 
his hearers by this announcement: 
"Now, children, we will sing hymn 
number ninety-three 'Begin, my soul, 
the exalted lay,' after which I will dis- 
tribute the eggs. ' ' — Youth 's Companion . 



THE LYNN REVIEW 19 

THE COMMERCE COMMISSION'S REPORT 

EXCEPTIONALLY intricate are tlie problems which were referred to the 
State Commission on Commerce and Industry, consisting of Joseph B. War- 
ner, George G. Crocker, William L. Douglas, Charles F. Adams, 2d, and 
James R. Crozier. While the weight of the recommendations of the Commission 
on the merger is outwardly weakened by the dissenting reports of two of its mem- 
bers, the circumstances connected with this defection are calculated greatly to 
lessen its influence upon the public mind. Ex-Governor Douglas has been com- 
pelled, by business engagements and the needs of recreation, to be absent from a 
considerable share of the sessions of the Commission, and for the last month in 
particular has been in Florida. Mr. Crozier, the labor union member, was ap- 
pointed on the Commission as recently as Feb. 5 to take the place of Edward 
Cohen, who was a victim of the State House tragedy. The dissenters are therefore 
those who have given the least attention to the subject. Moreover, neither was a 
member of the sub-committee to which was assigned the transportation problem in 
the original division of work. It seems to be true that the labor union interests of 
this community like the Boston & Maine management better than they do the New 
Haven, for reasons into which it is not now necessary to enter, and this attitude of 
labor has constituted a rather characteristic prejudgment of the case on its part. 
Doubtless this feeling accounts sufficiently for the attitude of its representative on 
the Commission. 

The real report, then, not only because the majority report, but by reason of 
the exceptionally high character and standing of the investigators, is that signed 
by Messrs. Warner, Crocker and Adams. To the methods by which their inquiry 
has been made the dissenters chiefly object; but the majority shrewdly note that 
this is the first time they have heard any objection on the part of the two dissenters 
on this score. Mr. Brandeis. the leader of the anti-merger propaganda in this 
State, has repeatedly made the charge of "star-chamber methods" against the 
majority members of this Commission, but their reasons for conducting a private 
inquiry will, we believe, find general approval. Everybody acknowledges that if 
an actual ascertainment of facts is desired, more can be accomplished in an hour by 
experts, with access to the books and the men concerned, in the privacy of a com- 
mittee room, than could be brought out in a day at a public hearing, with opportu- 
nities of cross questioning, and all the resulting temptations to "play for the gal- 
leries." Incidentally, the Commissioners doubted the propriety during the autumn 
panic of subjecting to public attack, by resourceful attorneys, the property inter- 
ests of two great railroad systems. The Commissioners felt that they could ascer- 
tain actual conditions much better by working quietly, and are now willing to let 
their findings stand on their own merits. 

The Commission's conclusions on the merger leaves little room in logic for es- 
cape. It has long been manifest that the Boston & Maine would find lodgement in 
stronger financial hands, and overtures in that direction have been made before the 
New Haven system appeared on the scene; these will continue in case it is now de- 
barred. "If not in New Haven, where?" It was inevitable that they should see 
many advantages in the welding of the two systems, but the argument which evi- 
dently had greatest weight with them was that this union would strengthen New 
England's place in the transportation councils of the country. Railroad operations, 
largely regulated by traffic associations, are responsive to interests which have the 
largest volume of business. 

The Commission could hardly propose to require the New Haven to do certain things in exchange 
for the merger privilege; the State cannot well say to an interest holding one-third of a property that it 
must do this or do that with the other two-thirds. It did seem fair, since the object of the merger is to 
secure greater efficiency, for the Commission to recommend that if within five years it should turn out 
that the consolidation was not working well in the opinion of the railroad commissioners, the State of 
Massachusetts should have the right to buy the stock. This conclusion, it is safe to say, was reached 
reluctantly, since these gentlemen deplore State ownership, but they doubtless felt that enough public 
interest exist e<l to jiistify placing on the New Haven such an obligation. Perhaps as important as any- 
thing is the recommendation that the New Haven shall submit to some plan for the better management 
of the docks and terminals of Boston, for the advantage of all the railroads, in the light of the city's 
needs. The financial condition of the two railroad systems, while really a stockholders' question, has 
been carefully investigated by the Commission. Its experts, at work day and night for two 
months, present a searching examination, from which it is fair to infer that they believe the New Haven 
is as well able to continue paying eight per cent, as the Boston & Maine is to continue paying seven. 
Less would be heard to-day of the inadequacy of the Boston & Maine system had it enjoyed a freer hand 
in the disposal of securities. 

Asa whole, the document is worthy of the most studious attention. It should be distributed widely. 
Every man who a.=sumes to shape our laws should familiarize himself thoroughly with its contents. Sel- 
dom has a legislative body had an opportunity to be better advised! — Boston Transcript 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



OUR EASTER DISPLAY 

High Class Millinery 
Smart Spring Apparel 

Laces. Embroideries, New Hosiery, Corsets, Veils and Veilings, 
Petticoats, Infants' Wear, Gloves, Neckwear, Art Em- 
broidery, Undermuslins, Ribbons, Belts 

We cordially invite you to call and enjoy what we 
think is the finest collection of Spring Goods ever shov^n 
in Lynn. Some of our friends have been kind enough 
to call our store the style-shop of the city. 

GODDARD BROS. 

Market Street 




Now for the Daily 
f^Baby Carriage Parade 

o 



,NCE again the baby carriage 
will be the predominating 
vehicle on street and park 
sidewalks. The daily outings and 
airings discontinued in most cases 
last Fall can now be resumed with 
the arrival of Spring days. To fur- 
ther that end and to make it more 
comfortable for the little tots, we are now showing and ready for 
your purchase, a fine lot of carriages and go-carts. If you're the 
owner of a baby, you surely ought 
to own one of these baby carriages. 






$1.75 to $50 



D. B. H. Power, Central Sq., Lynn 



When dealing: with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 




Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office, 25 Market Sq., 'West Lynn, Mass. 



BENJAMIN F. SPINNEY, President 

LUTHER S. JOHNSON Vice Presidents SAMUEL J. HOLLIS 

HARRISON P. BURRILL, Treasurer 



Capital $200,000 

Surplus (earned) . . . 100,000 

Profit and Loss . . . 75,000 

Deposits 1,500,000 



Interest allowed on deposits, subject to check. Interest of 3 % al- 
lowed on deposits in Savings Department. 
Safe Deposit Vaults. 



New York Styles Find Immediate 
Representation Here 

BECAUSE we have the most desirable facilities to secure them. Our rep- 
resentative, exclusively serving us, is in New York every week 
and a new style in the Metropolis on Monday is in our store by the fol- 
lowing Thursday. We have the INDIVIDUAL ideas. Different from all others. 
You won't duplicate your neighbor's suit here, our assortment is so varied and 
limited in number. Every taste is here satisfied, and the "Custom Made" idea 
fully carried out in new, dainty and exclusive Princess Dresses, Reception and 
Evening Gowns, Lingerie and Shirt Waist Suits, Waists, Skirts, Coats and 
Petticoats of superior qualities at moderate prices. 




Telephone 1807 .^W ^C^X^^^t^ST^'^C^ 312 Union St. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




Dining 

Room 

Suites 



To day we quote a num- 
ber of our special values in 
Dining Room Suites. If you 
are in need of our new din- 
ing room furniture you will 
do well to come and see this 
furniture and compare the 
prices with those elsewhere. 



D. B. H. POWER 



Complete House Furnishers 



Central Square, Lynn 




is the selHng- of Gas and Electricity. We have spent thousands 
of dollars in the last twenty years in improving the quality of 
gas, and at the same time reducing its cost to the consumer. 
How well we have succeeded is the best shown by the fact that 
though we have steadily improved the quality we have been 
enabled by largely increased facilities and consumption to reduce 
the price so that the gas which cost vou $2,50 per 1000 feet in 
1881 costs but 85 cents net per lOOO' feet in 1908. Electricity 
12 cents net per K. W. Making both Gas and Electricity for 
cooking and lighting the cheapest fuel known, 

GAS AND ELECTRIC APPLIANCES AT COST 

LYNN GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



"^ Lynn Review 

A MONTHLY EPITOME OF 
LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 

Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



MAY, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 
No. 7 



Mercy! Such hats!! 



May 1 — About this time expect a dry 
spell. —Robert Thomas. 

There were 17,000 Jews in Chelsea. 
Small wonder there was a conflagration. 



What Lynn really needs, to make its 
retail store scheme a success, is a few 
more clothing establishments. 



Lynn has $1,755,300 worth of property 
which is exempt from taxation under 
the state laws. Salem has $3,144,289 
worth of property not liable to taxation. 



Somerville will go just the same as 
Chelsea, if we may judge from the qual- 
ity of its building construction, and 
Lynn wants to look out and not get in 
like condition. 

The brewers hold 3,772 chattel mort- 
gages on New York City saloons. The 
wholesalers' control of the saloons is one 
reason why Lynn people so strongly 
voted against license. 

The filtration water plan impresses 
many people as a fad, especially when 
it is noted, as George N. Nichols re- 
cently pointed out, that according to the 
annual report of the Board of Health, 
twelve people died during the past year 
in Lynn from typhoid fever and 41 died 
from old age. That does not indicate 
impure water. 

After a rain storm there is a miniature 
lake created at the South side of the 
i Boston & Maine Railroad entrance, and 
whoever is responsible for this depres- 
sion in the street, whether the railroad 
or city, should see to it that the condi- 
tions are improved, and the area put to 
the proper level, because it much inter- 
feres with the appearance of the local- 
ity, to say nothing of the unhealthful 
conditions of stagnant water. 



Charles Henry Newhall was a Man. 
In every walk of life he was the same 
sterling character. Business did not 
harden him. He was cheery, optimistic 
and kindly, because Nature so ruled. 
Nothing was assumed. Home, art, lit- 
erature, the church, drama, business, 
social life— all were enjoyed by him in a 
sensible, temperate manner. He was 
never carried away in any one direction. 
His poise was perfect. He was Lynn's 
most benevolent citizen. When the fi- 
nancial help called for was not a strictly 
bankable proposition Mr. Newhall often 
came to the rescue and risked his own 
on the man's character, honesty and sin- 
cerity of purpose. And seldom was he 
deceived, as many times he has told the 
writer. He believed in Human Nature, 
and well supported it in every way, be- 
ing a thorough and consistent believer 
in the Brotherhood of Man. Lynn never 
developed a more public spirited or 
Loyal Son than was Charles Henry 
Newhall. 



The aggregate cost of the sixteen bat- 
tleships now on the Pacific ocean was 
$96,606,000, and it costs $9,417,000 a 
year to maintain them, or a little more 
than $25,000 per day. Our entire battle- 
ship fleet, built and building, numbers 
twenty-nine, including the two monster 
new ships of the Dreadnought type. 
The coal for the present cruise will cost 
over one million dollars. 



The high school muddle has not yet 
been settled, and it is not clear when it 
will be. The fact is, the North Com- 
mon street lot is too small, and not well 
situated for a Classical high school build- 
ing. The city should make a confession 
that it has acted wrongly and secure a 
new location because the municipality 
can dispose of the present lot to good 
advantage and probably not be a loser 
of more than $5,000. That is not a bad 
loss when the botched work is taken in- 
to consideration. By all means get a 
proper location before adopting plans 
for a Classical high school building. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



LYNN BOARD OF HEALTH 



March 18, 1908. 
The following is from the Acts of 1907 concern- 
ing factories and workshops: 

Chapter 503: Section 2. Suitable receptacles for 
expectoration shall be provided in all factories and 
workshops by the proprietors thereof, the same to 
be of such form and construction and of such 
number as shall be satisfactory to the Board of 
Health of the city or town in which the factory or 
workshop is situated. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its 
passag'e. 

(Approved June 13, 1907.) 

In compliance with the foregoing act of the Leg- 
islature, the Lynn Board of Health at its meeting 
held March 18, 1908 voted that every factory and 
workshop in the city of Lynn shall be' provided 
with one cuspidor for every five or less males, 
and one for every twenty-five or less females. 
This number may be increased or decreased by the 
Board of Health to suit conditions. These cuspi- 
dors must be water tight and so constructed that 
they cannot be easily overturned, and must be 
kept in a sanitary condition. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

William M. Cowan, Chairman. 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quality at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens CBi Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



The GARDEN HOSE 

Season has arrived 
New reliable goods at 

HOWE'S RUBBER STORE 

52 Central Square 



The Venus of Milo Explained. 

"I tried to hold on a Merry Widow 
hat in a gale," she said. 
Herewith the knowing asked no more. 



SAMPSON ca, ALLEN 

Electrical Engineers 

GAS and ELECTRIC CONSTRUCTION 

Motors Dynamos Fixtures 

Estimates Given 

53-57 Exchange St. Telephone Connections 



LYNN THEATRE 



FRANK G. HARRISON 



Manager 



MOVING PICTURES AND HIGH- 
GRADE VAUDEVILLE 

Every Afternoon and Evening 



WHERE WILL WE GO? 








.,EW ENGLAND 
YAariON RESO 

Eveiy Vacationist 

snould have one or these 
beautirul puolications. It 
tellg you what you ■want to 
know^ about 

CNt Summer Outing 

Send for it to-day, it's FREE. Address 
" Resorts " Gen. Pass. Dept. B. & M. R, R., 
Boston, Mass. 

O. J. FLANDERS, P.T.M. C. M. BURT, G.P.A. 






When dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Land of Sleep. 

mariner, where is the country so fair 
That all of the sleep comes from? 

Does it lie in the West, where twilight finds rest. 

In the fielda where the insects hum? 
Does it lie in the East, where the little waves feast 

On the sands of the golden shore? 
Does it lie in the South, where the nightingale's 
mouth 

Sings melodies o'er and o'er? 

Oh, where do they keep, in the country of sleep. 

The chests that our dreams are in. 
The visions so bright that we follow at night 

When we live in the Might Have Been? 
For that wonderful land with the beautiful strand 

Is a country of Make Believe, 
Where we wander with kings and a yellow bhxi 
sings. 

And strange is the tale they weave. 

Dearest child, I have gone to the uttermost dawn. 

Have sailed to the western rim. 
Have followed the sun when the daylight was 
done 

Till the stars in the East grew dim, 

1 have sought after sleep where the arctic birds 

sweep 
The arch of the southern sky. 
All the wide world around, but I never have found 
The land where the sweet dreams lie. 

I'll tell you, my dear, why I missed it, I fear. 

That wonderful land so fair: 
My ship it was strong, but my course it was 
wrong, 

With no zephyr to blow me there. 
To travel afar where the sweet visions are 

You must sail in a cot of white. 
And the breeze that will bear your little ship there 

Is the lullaby song at night. 

— Douglas Malloch 

»?« 

Acting Governor Draper appears to 
apply the business instinct to his new 
duties, and impresses people with the 
idea that they have a safe man at the 
head of the state government. We wish 
that the law might have allowed the 
Meikle boy's claim for legal services to 
go through, but the acting governor was 
no doubt acting under competent legal 
authority when he refused to sign the 
bill. He gave the cjuestion thorough 
and intelligent consideration, and the 

?ublic is bound to accept his verdict, 
he legislature backed up the veto by a 
large majority. 

A schoolmaster was trying to explain 
the meaning of the word "conceited." 

"Now, boys," he said, suppose that I 
was always boasting of my learning — 
that I knew a great deal of Latin, for 
instance— or I said I was a handsome 
man, what would you say I was?" 

"A liar, sir!" was the ready response. 
A 

The Methodists in America number 
about three million, which would give 
them more than a half a million voters, 
— enough to give them the balance of 
power in a closely contested election. 



The Public Health and the Pre- 
scription Ads. 

The daily papers that are accepting 
for their advertising columns the various 
prescriptions for the many complaints 
that flesh is heir to, are putting them- 
selves in a dangerous position before 
the public. Daily papers should have 
more regard for the public health than 
to publish, as advertising matter, these 
prescriptions because they cannot be 
generally taken with safety. It is be- 
lieved to be a matter for the public 
health boards to consider. War against 
patent medicines has been based upon 
the reasoning that, indiscriminately 
taken they were a source of great dan- 
ger to the public, and certainly if this is 
true, these prescription ads. that now 
appear as a general cure-all should be 
regulated by law. 

The young man Hopkins did a splendid 
job on the occasion of the Fenton house 
burlary, last month, and his coolness and 
judgment cannot be too strongly com- 
mended. 

When you cannot find the old clothes 
you will know they have been sent to 
Chelsea. 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton, Pres., 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.— Treas. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



GREEN & SON 

TDT A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
"l-rVlN VjO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CSi W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109i-2 Branch Offices, SOS Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



Established 1882 



Lynn Marble and Granite 
Works 



MONUMENTS, TABLETS, POSTS 
AND CURBING 

Our prices are as low as the lowest consis- 
tent with the work we produce. 

We cordially request an inspection of a most 
attractive assortment of 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 
MONUMENT WORK 

comprising many exclusive styles specially 
imported for us. 

We are showing a larger assortment than 
ever before, and thus are enabled to suit the 
most fastidious tastes. 

Most careful attention is given to every de- 
tail, and all work is guaranteed to be the best 
obtainable. 

G. B. MERRILL & CO. 

Successors 

132 Boston Street, Lynn 

Pneumatic tools for fine lettering and carv- 
ing. 

We are in no way connected with any other 
firm doing business under the above name. 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites— Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 



Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box oflice 



Let us 



AWMNG WORK 



Send us a pos- 
tal card. 
All of the new 

patterns of 
Awning Work 

Tel. 396-4 



F. R. BENNER CO., 302 Broad St., Lynn 



Ladies' Panama 
Sailors 



Men's Stiff and Soft Hats 

All Colors 

Dress and Driving Gloves 
Cold Storage for Furs 

Let us call for yours 



AMOS B.CHASE 

HATTER AND FURRIER 
123 MUNROE STREET 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The B. & IVf . and New Haven Merger. 

''pHE railroad merger has practically 
J. been effected, so those on the inside 
assert. It may be that the New Haven 
railroad can be prevented asserting its 
rights, but it is not believed hardly 
probable. Had the New York Central 
and Boston and Albany merger been a 
success there would probably not have 
been so much feeling against the merg- 
ing of the New Haven and Boston and 
Maine Railroads. Everybody under- 
stands that the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road gives better service combined than 
the 147 railroads which formerly consti- 
tuted the system. However, the public 
feeling is strongly against monopoly and 
combination. This is an unreasonable 
position many times, but nevertheless 
the public has not been educated to the 
contrary, and the Roosevelt agitation 
only increases their feeling against 
combined capital. However, we opine 
that the New Haven will run the Boston 
and Maine railroad sooner or later, if 
not in the open, indirectly, and time has 
got to prove whether or not such a pro- 
ceeding is in the public interest. There 
is expert testimony both ways concern- 
ing railroads combining, but we have 
always thought that the Boston and 
Maine was a better paying proposition 
than the New Haven, and Mr. Brandeis 
presents the figures to demonstrate that 
fact. 

Some alert New England citizens per- 
ceive that the New Haven railroad, if 
allowed to dominate the transportation 
system of their region would do its best 
to stifle business and thus diminish pas- 
sengers and freight. The New Haven 
management, it is foreseen, and its 
successors and assigns forever, will to 
the end of time bite the hand that 
feeds them. If it is apprehended that 
"alien" interests controlling the New 
Haven have their minds intent upon 
ruining Boston in order to build up New 
York, we can only stand aghast at the 
bill of expenses. They have thus far in 
four years expended on the steam lines 
alone something like $125,000,000 for 
road beds, bridges, cars and locomotives 
wherewith and whereon to hustle New 
England business once and for all out of 
New England, never to return. If the 
hideous design will not succeed after 
this feat of engineering, we must recon- 
cile ourselves to the idea that New Eng- 
land is too tough to exterminate. If 
the "alien" interests have spent $125,- 
000,000 in four years to demolish south- 



em New England, how much will it cost 
to devastate the entire region from 
Poughkeepsie Bridge to the Bay of 
Fundy? 

The Two Singers. 

A singrer Bang- a son? of teara. 

And the great world heard and wept. 
For he sangr of the sorrowa of the fleeting years 

And the hopes which the dead past kept. 
And souls in anguish their burdens bore. 
And the world was sadder than ever before. 
A singer sang a aong of cheer. 

And the great world listened and smiled. 
For he sang of the love of a father dear 

And the trust of a little child; 
And souls that before had forgotten to pray 
Looked up and went singing along their way. 

— Selected 

The death of Lynn's war Mayor, Hon. 
Peter M. Neal, at the good old age of 
ninety-six years, was greatly regretted 
by troops of friends who hoped he would 
become a centenarian. Mayor Neal did 
great service for Lynn during the war 
period, and the city was never presided 
over by a more honest, straightforward 
and enterprising official. His friendship 
was greatly prized. 
•!!!■ 

The General Electric Company in Lynn 
is now employing about 4,500 less tnan 
one year ago, and 3,000 less than two 
years ago. 



MONEY 



Deposited on 
or before 



WEDNESDAY 
JUNE 6 

Will draw interest from 
that date 

Commonwealth Savings 
Bank 

325 Union Street corner Almont 



Joseph G. Pinkham, President, 

^Villiam M. Barney, Treasurer 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



There is No Better 
Food Than Fish 



M 


K 



SPECIALLY when it 
comes from our Mar- 
ket. One thing to 
GET GOOD FISH. 
Another thing is, to 
KEEP THEM GOOD. 
We know how in both instances. All 
of the health experts put Fish at the 
top of their diet lists. They know 
what is good for mankind. We have 
assortment and quality in Fish. Every- 
thing in the Fish kingdom is here, just 
as fresh as if immediately taken from 
the water, as our service well retains 
the freshness and sweetness of our 
fish. If you are not a regular custo- 
mer of "the best appointed fish market 
east of Boston" let us hear from you 
by telephone or postal. Our teams will 
call at your residence for orders. 



WILLIAMS BROS. 

LYNN'S LEADING FISH DEALERS 

213-217 UNION STREET 

ONLY ONE STORE 'PHONES 28 AND 29 



When dealine with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



"Merry Widow" Hats lor the Men. 

THE performance at the Chatelet 
Theatre in Paris was interrupted the 
other evening by a hat dispute which 
had its novel side. Two women wearing 
the enormous hats dear to Parisian 
theatregoers came and sat themselves 
in the second row of the orchestra stalls 
immediately in front of two men. The 
men begged the women to remove their 
headdresses, but in vain. The women 
pleaded first that they had not come to 
the theatre with their hair done in such a 
way as to allow their hats to be re- 
moved; second, that anyone who insisted 
upon a woman taking off her hat when 
she did not want to was deficient in the 
most elementary rules of French gallan- 
try, and finally that there was no regu- 
lation at the Chatelet Theatre against 
wearing hats of any kind. 

The two men left the theatre and did 
not return until the second act and the 
women were congratulating themselves 
on their successful firmness when in 
filed four porters from the markets and 
took up their seats in the front row just 
before the two women. Now, a French 
market porter is a big, husky individual 
to begin with, but these four were wear- 
ing the traditional market porters' hats, 
a huge sombrero that measures a yard 
across. 

It was now the women's turn to beg 
for the removal of headgear, but the 
porters paid no heed to their entreaties. 
The house caught on to the joke and the 
uproar that ensued stopped the play, 
the strong arm of the law was called in, 
the hat wearers, male and female, were 
haled before the nearest commissary of 
police and the two men who had thus 

i secured their revenge saw the rest of 

j the play in peace. 



The Curtis & Spindell Co. have a 
model factory at their new location 
203 Oxford street. The building has 
been fitted up especially for them, giv- 
ing commodious offices on the street 

i floor and ample facilities for the manu- 
facture of their seamless heel elastic 
stockings, surgical appliances, etc. on 
the floor above. The Curtis & Spindell 

i Co. have had this move in mind for 
some time, and last month they made 
the change. 



When the Chelsea fire was in progress, 
last month, one Salem-Boston car took 
148 fares on one trip. 



"The Man Land." 

Little boy. little boy. would you go so soon. 

To the land where the grown man lives? 
Would you barter your toys and your fairy things 

For the things that grown man gives? 
Would you leave the haven whose doors are set 

With the jewels of Love's alloy 
For the land of emptiness and regret? 

Wowld you go. littl« boy, little boy? 

It's a land far off, little boy, little boy. 

And the way it is dark and steep; 
And once you have passed through its doors, little 
boy. 

You mayn't even come back to sleep. 
There is no tucking in, no good-night kiss. 

No mornings of childhood joy. 
It's passion and pain you give for this. 

Think well, little boy, little boy ! 

Little boy, little boy. can't you see the ghosts 

That live in the land off there; 
The "broken hearts." "fair hopes," all dead; 

"Lost faith" and 'grim despair?" 
There's a train for that land in the after years. 

When old Time rushes in to destroy 
The walls that stands 'tween the joy and the 
tears — 

So don't go, little boy, little boy!— 

—Metropolitan Magazine 

Senator Lodge 

has received great praise for his mas- 
terful effort at the state convention last 
month. Many think it was his ' 'great- 
est effort." Be that as it may it is 
beyond doubt that Senator Lodge held 
the convention, and had he so desired it 
would have declared for Taf t by an over- 
whelming vote. It was a Lodge victory 
— the action of the convention— and 
when we note that some of the papers 
refer to "Senator Crane's victory" it is 
to smile. Senator Lodge stands nearer 
to Massachusetts Republicans than ever 
before, and the one reason is this— he is 
true to his friends. And we are prouder 
than ever that, as a delegate to a repre- 
sentative convention we voted for Mr. 
Lodge to become a candidate for the 
first office he ever aspired to fill. 
»?« 
President Hadley of Yale not long ago 
entertained at dinner a Yale Freshman, 
the son of one of his classmates. The 
conversation turned to football and what 
the president had to say was news to 
the Freshman, who realized the fact 
with surprise. He listened some time, 
and then said to Mrs. Hadley, "Do you 
know, Mrs. Hadley, that only illustrates 
the old saying that one can learn some- 
thing of anybody. ' ' 

»T4 

The detail given by Howard Gould in 
the divorce trial agamst his wife seems 
to indicate that the Gould family is a 
close second to the Thaw family in de- 
generacy. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



^t^^ HERE are five 
WPItSE good princi- 
^^>gJ?Sl pies of action 
to be adopted: To ben- 
efit others without be- 
ing lavish; to encourage 
labor without being 
harsh; to add to your 
resources without being 
covetous; to be digni- 
fied without being super- 
cilious; and to inspire 
awe without being aus- 
tere. — Confucius. 



Canon Ainger was a great favorite 
with children, and upon one occasion 
was asked to assist at a juvenile party. 
Arriving at what he thought was his 
destination, a house in a row of others 
exactly alike, the canon made his way 
up to the drawing-room. "Don't an- 
nounce me," said he to the domestic, 
and thereupon the reverend gentleman 
went down upon all-fours, ruffled up his 
white hair, and crawled into the room 
uttering the growls of an angry polar 
bear. What was his horror and amaze- 
ment to find when he got into the room 
two old ladies petrified with astonish- 
ment. He had found his way into the 
next-door house instead of into the one 
to which he was bidden. — Tid-Bits. 



"I don't mind telling you," said the 
pretty girl confidentially, ' 'that I want 
to take a thorough course in cooking in 
order to fit myself to be a good wife. ' ' 

"You are doing the right thing my 
dear," said the matron in charge of 
the cooking school. "May I ask how 
soon you expect to be married?" 

"How should I know?" rejoined the 
pretty girl, daintily rolling up her 
sleeves. * 'I haven't found the man yet. ' ' 
— Chicago Tribune. 



"Rapid Transit" in Boston. 

ARE the transit commissioners, who 
have charge of extending the rail- 
way service in Boston, in the employ of 
the Boston Elevated Railway Co. ? "This 
would seem to be the case, when it is 
considered how slowly progress is made 
in giving proper railroad convenience to 
the public in Boston. It is no less than 
scandalous, the manner in which men, 
women and children are treated in the 
Boston subway cars. 

They are herded in like cattle, and 
women and children are made to suffer 
many indignities. In Massachusetts, 
where they say the law making powers 
do good work such a condition of affairs 
is not to be expected, and if the politi- 
cians who are in charge of railroad su- 
pervision can not be made to work in the 
interest of the public they should be 
thrown out of office. 

We no sooner get one railroad line in 
working order in Boston before the con- 
gestion is just as marked as before, 
therefore the public does not get relief. 
When the Washington street subway is 
opened congestion is likely to result. 
Work will then begin on another line, 
and it won't be ready for the public un- 
til it is necessary to run the same cattle 
cars as at present. 

This way of running things gives the 
transit commissioners a more steady job, 
and as the public pays the bill the com- 
missioners can sit by and laugh at them. 

The Boston papers do not serve the 
public in connection with this lack of ac- 
commodations, it being impossible to 
have a word printed in the majority of 
the Boston papers directed against the 
Boston Elevated Railroad Co., they so 
thoroughly subsidizing and making im- 
mune the Boston papers, so far as criti- 
cism is concerned against them, by their 
advertising favors. 



One winter's day a very bow-legged 
tramp called at a home in Ontario and 
stood to warm himself by the kitchen 
stove. A little boy in the home sur- 
veyed him carefully for some minutes, 
then finally approaching him, he said, 
"Say, mister, you better stand back; 
you're warping." 

First Suburbanite— Did you ever go 
on one of those Cook's tours? 

Second Suburbanite — Oh, yes; I vis- 
ited every intelligence office from one 
end of the city to the other. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



The American Boy Praised. 

Sir William Henry Preece of London, 
formerly president of the Institution of 
Civil Engineers and now Consulting En- 
gineer to the Colonies, in the course of a 
lecture before the Society of Arts eulo- 
gized the technical education which is 
given in America. He said among other 
things that the American boy was men- 
tally two years ahead of the European 
boy. His precocity was assisted by his 
keenness and vivacity. He worked with 
the determination to succeed, both at 
his studies and his games. It was for- 
tunate for the Americans that education 
in their country had been kept outside 
of politics, instead of in England, being 
the shuttlecock of parties. 



The President in his recent message 
is squarely out for tariff revision, and 
the long period of dodging of that issue 
by the Republican leaders seems to be 
past. Congress should surely not ad- 
journ without taking steps for gathering 
data from a scientific standpoint for ad- 
justment of the question on a business 
basis, so as to harmonize to the best de- 
gree possible all conflicting interests. 
A fair and practical tariff is wanted 
which shall give American industries a 
living chance, and yet not permit any of 
these industries to squeeze exorbitant 
profits out of the consuming public. 



1 A book of practical advice on adver- 
t tising in general, but more particularly 
on bank advertising has recently been 
published by the Bankers Publishing Co. , 
90 Wilham St., New York. It is the 
work of T. D. MacGregor of the Bank- 
ers Magazine, who gives it the title 
"I'ushing your Business." After a 
chapter on the technical foundation of 
julvertising he discusses various adver- 
tising mediums, including booklets and 
house organs. After several chapters 
on the various kinds of bank advertising 
the book closes with a chapter on effec- 
tive business letters. The book is pro- 
fitable reading both for the advertiser 
and advertising men. 

They are getting quite particular at 
Fort William, Ont., recently arresting 
19 Doukhobors, nine women and ten 
men for parading unclothed through the 
streets. 

The concessions of the weak are the 
concessions of fear. —Burke. 



The Minuet. 

Grandma told me all about it. 
Told me so I couldn't doubt it. 
How she danced — my Grandma danced ! — 

Long ago. 
How she held her pretty head. 
How her dainty skirt she spr^d. 
Turning: out her little toes; 
How she slowly leaned and rose — 

Long ago. 

Grandma's hair was bright and sunny; 
Dimpled cheeks, too — ah, how funny! 
Really quite a pretty girl. 

Long ago. 
Bless her! why, she wears a cap, 
Grandma does, and takes a nap 
E>very single day; and yet 
Gi"andma danced the minuet 

Long ago. 

Now she sits there rocking, rocking. 
Always knitting Grandpa's stocking — 
(Every girl was taught to knit 
Long ago.) 
Yet her figure is so neat, 
And her ways so staid and sweet, 
I can almost see her now 
Bending to her partner's bow. 
Long ago. 

Grandma says our modern jumping. 
Hopping, rushing, whirling, bumping. 
Would have shocked the gentle folk 
Long ago. 
No — they moved with stately grace. 
Everything in proper place. 
Gliding slowly forward, then 
Slowly curtesying back again. 

Long ago. 
Modem ways are quite alarming. 
Grandma says; but boys were charming — 
Girls and boys, I mean, of course — 
Long ago. 
Bravely modest, grandly shy, — 
She would like to have us try 
Just to feel like those who met 
In the graceful minuet 

Long ago. 
With the minuet in fashion. 
Who could fly into a passion? 
All would wear the calm they wore 
Long ago. 
In time to come, if I, perchance. 
Should tell my grandchild of our dance, 
I should really like to say, 
"We did it, dear, in some such way. 
Long ago." 

—Mary Mapes Dodg«. 
A 
The Pullman Company has mailed 
checks, representing a total of $175,000, 
to certain of its employees as an ex- 
pression of its gratitude for courtesy 
to the traveling public in 1907. The 
checks went to 1,153 conductors and 
2,617 porters, being one month's pay to 
each man. These are all on the "roll of 
honor." Five hundred and thirty-six 
conductors and 1,783 porters received no 
checks. The system will be continued 
in 1908. 

In the Electric Car. — "Sir, you are 
standing on my toe!" "Beg pardon, 
but can't you pull it out from under? 
I'm standing on one foot. " — Exchange. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



GEORGE W. BREED 
INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block. PEABODY. MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



A woman agitator, holding forth on 
the platform and presenting the great- 
ness of her sex, cried out: "Take away 
woman, and what would follow?" And 
from the audience came a clear, male 
voice: "We would. "—Selected. 



NEW YORK CITY 



A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 
The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
— a restaurant 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for inen. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
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Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Send Jor Booklet 

T. F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



THAT ORDER FOR 

ICE CREAM 



ALL FLAVORS 

Will be attended by your calling us on 'Phone 
305-2. Give orders for Sunday on Saturday if 
possible. 



SCHLEHUBER 



Baker Caterer Confectioner 78 Exchange St. 



Helping Her. 

"You loved her very much?" 

"So much that when her first husband 
died I married her that I might share 
her grief and so lessen it. " 

"And how did it work?" 

"Fine! I'm sorrier now for his death 
than she is." — Houston Post. 

One day the office boy went to the 
editor of the Soaring Eagle and said : 

"There is a tramp at the door, and he 
says he has had nothing to eat for six 
days." 

"Fetch him in," said the editor. "If 
we can find out how he does it we can 
run this paper for another week!" 

On the mighty deep. 

The great ocean liner rolled and 
pitched. 

"Henry," faltered the young bride, 
"do you still love me?" 

"More than ever, darling!" was 
Henry's fervent answer. 

Then there was an eloquent silence. 

"Henry,' she gasped, turning her 
pale, ghastly face away, "I thought 
that would make me feel better, but it 
doesn't." — Chicago Tribune. 

If you wish to be miserable you must 
think about yourself, about what you 
want, what you like, what respect 
people ought to pay you, and then to 
you nothing will be pure. You will 
spoil everything you touch, you will 
make sin and misery for yourself out of 
everything which God sends you and 
you will be as wretched as you choose. 
— Charles Kingsley. 

An ounce of help is worth a ton of 
preaching to the fellow who is down and 
out. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



May. 

month when they who love must love and wed! 
Were one to go to worlds where May is nausrht. 
And seek to tell the memories he had brought 
From earth of thee, what were most fitly said? 

1 know not if the rosy showers shed 

From apple-boughs, or if the soft green wrought 

In fields, or if the robin's call be fraught Z 

The most with thy delight. Perhaps they read 

Thee best who in the ancient time did say 

Thou wert the sacred month unto the old; 

No blossom blooms upon thy brightest day 

So subtly sweet as memories which unfold 

In aged hearts which in thy sunshine lie. 

To Bun themselves once more before they die. 

-(H. H.) 

A 
The Government of a City. 

The dust nuisance was considerably in 
evidence last month. One of the mem- 
bers of the city government was asked 
why it was not abated and he said that 
the city did not have sufficient money to 
start the work on street watering when 
it should be commenced. For quite a 
number of days the public health was 
very much imperiled by flying dust, with 
no relief from the city. Why municipal 
business shows such a lack of attention, 
and the public is so severely discom- 
moded at times, it is hard to fathom. 

Ever since Lynn became a city it has 
always been apparent that the care of 
streets, with here and there an excep- 
tion, was attended to in a slack, slipshod 
or expensive manner. And it really 
does seem as if there was not much re- 
lief in sight, although it is not always 
best to be too pessimistic. The govern- 
ment of cities is a tough proposition, and 
nothing more difficult to solve faces the 
American people to-day. Where munic- 
ipal business is the concern of all it does 
not seem to bother anybody. Lack of 
firm executive control and responsibility 
makes most of the trouble. 

"Macaroons and ice-cream! You 
ought to eat something more substan- 
tial for luncheon, Grace." "I guess I 
ought. Waiter, add some mixed pickles 
to that order." — Pittsburgh Leader. 

Fiddler — Shall I play "Way Down 
Upon the Suwanee River?" 

Reader— Anywhere so long as you 
don't play here! 



The Pnbllc Library. 

That is a fine idea in connection with 
the Public Library distribution. It has 
been arranged to distribute books 
through the Sunday schools connected 
with the different churches. A Sunday 
school may apply to the library and be 
given a limited number of books for the 
use of the members of the school. The 
same restrictions govern the use and 
time in which the books may be held, as 
if drawn from the library direct. De- 
nominational books will not be issued. 
Standard literature will be supplied the 
schools, containing the best reading 
possible to secure, and the books will all 
be selected. The necessary move now 
is for the Sunday schools to apply to the 
library and make arrangements, so that 
the books may be properly cared and 
accounted for. The trustees hope by 
this method to bring many persons in 
closer touch with the books owned by 
the city and greatly increase the circu- 
lation, thus benefiting the people and 
making the value of the library much 
greater. 

A 

"How shall I a habit break?" 
As you did the habit make: 
As you gathered you must lose: 
As you yielded , now refuse. 

—John Boyle O'Reilly. 

Manager Keith seems to keep on the 
even tenor of his vaudeville way, set- 
ting before his thousands of patrons the 
best novelties in the way of variety that 
research and money can procure. It is 
a positive fact that the best and strong- 
est continuous entertainment is offered 
week in and week out at Keith's that 
can be seen any where in the world. 
Any person competent to offer an opin- 
ion will endorse this statement. There 
is an elegant list of attractions for this 
month. The management states that 
the coming summer shows will echpse 
anything in the vaudeville line ever of- 
fered in Boston in corresponding seasons. 

The echo is the only earthly thing 
that can cheat a woman out of the last 
word. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


, D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN, MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



WEDDING RINGS Tk\' 

From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Memorial Day. 

Not as white saints without a blot. 

Whose souls were stainless of a spot. 

Were these plain men of average clay, — 

But mortal, like plain men to-day. 

For always, in the dark hours of need, 

A man is furnished for the deed; 

And always when the storm clouds lower. 

Strong men are ready for the hour. 

And thus, from earth's most common breed 

Spring heroes fit for every need. 

These men were common men. 'tis true. 
Just common men like me and you. 
The plain man is the basic clod 
From which we grow the demigod; 
And in the average man is curled 
The hero stuff that rules the world. 
And so we deck on hill and glen. 
The hero graves of common men. 

Plain, common men of every day. 

Who left their homes to march away. 

To perish on the battle plain, 

As common men will do again; 

To lift a ghastly, glazing eye 

Up to a lurid stranger sky 

Until it sees a painted rag — 

The same old common spangled flag — 

And then to die, and testify 

To all the ages, far and nigh. 

How commonplace it is to die. 

It is not merely now and then 
We find such hearts in common men, — 
Such hero souls enwrapt away 
In swathing folds of common clay — 
But standing face to face with fate. 
All common men are always great. 
For men are cowards in the gloom 
Of their own little, selfish fears. — 
Not when the thunder-steps of doom 
Stride through the trembling years. 
And in an open flight with fata 
All common men are always great. 

— Sam Walter Foss 
»T4 

Willie Edouin, the English comedian 
who was always a favorite in Lynn, has 
recently died in London. He will be 
well remembered by the older genera- 
tion of theatregoers in "Rice's Surprise 
Party" with his beautiful wife, Alice 
Atherton, and later in his own piece of 
"Fun in a Picture Gallery" which made 
a great success. 



The proposed station of the Boston & 
Eastern Electric Railway Co. on the 
Cadet Hall site on Market street looks 
good. It really seems as if the promo- 
ters of the proposed new railroad had a 
considerable backing, and those who are 
in charge of the proposition state that it 
will surely go through to success. 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



Essex County Board of Trade. 

''pHE Essex County Board of Trade, 
J_ formed last month in Lynn, prom- 
ises to wield considerable influence. 
The first question to come before the 
new association will undoubtedly be the 
establishment of one or more agricultu- 
ral high schools in the county. This 
was one of the main reasons actuating 
the movers in this city toward a county 
organization. 

Under the law passed by the legisla- 
ture in June, 1906, the state is commit- 
ted to the establishment of 20 such high 
schools, the county and state paying 
jointly the expense of maintenance. No 
school has been started and it is believed 
that, with the progress now made, Essex 
county will be the first to take advan- 
tage of the law. 

At the state house it is learned that 
the object of these schools is to provide 
a practical education to graduates of 
the grammar schools, so that a boy may 
be taught the composition of the land 
near his home, what vegetables and 
fruits prosper in this latitude and under 
what conditions {he best results may be 
obtained in farming. Girls will also be 
taught economics and housekeeping, so 
as to fit them for life after they leave 
school. This looks like very practical 
work, drawing the young people toward 
Nature. 

Several correspondents of the New 
York Sun interested the public by giv- 
ing a list of the twenty-five "greatest 
men," from their point of view. One 
man left out George Washington, but of 
course he was not of much account ! One 
of the correspondents facetiously re- 
marked: "Lives there the man with 
soul so base as not to know that the 
twenty-five greatest men in history are 
T. Roosevelt." 

Following two hours discussion 150 
members of the Boston Chamber of 
Commerce, representing 1,000 leading 
business men, went on record last 
month, as opposed to the merger of the 
New Haven and Boston & Maine rail- 
roads. The vote was almost unanimous. 



According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold the best in the order 
of demand the past month were: The 
Black Bag, The Ancient Law, The Shut- 
tle, The Weavers, The Lady of the Dec- 
oration, and Somehow Good. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



Navel Rupture, Tendency to Corpulency or any 
Abdominal Weakness demands the use of an 

All Elastic Abdominal Belt 




We manufacture all to special measure which 
insures a perfect fit and most efficient support. 
Send for catalogue No. 2. 

CURTIS & SPINDELL CO., 203-205 Oxford St. 



One of the greatest outrages that the 
United States ever committed was the 
failure to raise the unsightly and melan- 
choly wreck of the battleship Maine in 
the harbor of Havana. For ten years 
the neglecting and vacillating policy 
governing the American people has been 
responsible for this outrage upon com- 
mon decency. To think that the coun- 
try has not had sufficient pride, not to 
say patriotism, to recover this wreck 
and provide burial for the unrecovered 
dead, simply seems astounding when one 
considers all of the facts in the case. The 
Committee on Naval Affairs of Congress 
now has a resolution slumbering on its 
files calling for action for the removal 
of the wreck. 

Govern the lips 

As they were palace doors, the king within; 
Tranquil and fair and courteous be all words 
Which from their presence win. 

—Edwin Arnold 



The Farther Hills. 

The clouds upon the mountain rest; 

A gloom is on the autumn day; 
But down the valley, in the west. 

The sudden sunlight breaks its way — 
A light lies on the farther hills. 

Forget thy sorrow, heart of mine! 

Though shadows fall and fades the leaf. 
Somewhere is joy, though 'tis not thine; 

The power that sent can heal thy grief; 
And light lies on the farther hill. 

Thou wouldst not with the world be one 

If ne'er thou knewest hurt and wrong: 
Take comfort: thou the darkened sun 
Never again bring gleam or song — 
The light lies on the farther hills. 

—Richard Watson Gilder 

»T« 

Loiver Telephone Rates. 

A movement is on foot to secure lower 
telephone rates and it is probable that 
the matter will be taken up by the city 
council and board of trade and negotia- 
tions opened with the telephone com- 
pany in a very short time. A less price 
for out-of-town catls will also be asked 
for, the rate to Boston and Salem being 
now 10 cents, and the argument is made 
that the action of the company in estab- 
lishing a new rule for places in the met- 
ropolitan district should also be made to 
apply to Lynn. te?' ■<^ 

Previous efforts to secure reductions 
in rates have resulted in some conces- 
sions, better service and other improve- 
ments, but the business men behind the 
present movement say they first intend 
to ask the company for lower rates and 
if the reply is not satisfactory appeal to 
the state highway commission. 



A fellow standing in the jam about 
the soldiers' and sailors' monument in 
New York on Decoration Day remarked 
grumpily, "I'd rather be a hve jackass 
than a dead soldier. ' ' An old gentleman 
turning on him said contemptuously: 
"You certainly embody your wish. You 
are to be congratulated. It is seldom 
that a man is what he would rather 
be." 

A woman is seldom satisfied with a 

Eurchase unless she can make herself 
elieve that she got more than her 
money's worth. 



BAKER. GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



Integrity is a great and commendable 
virtue. A man of integrity is a true 
man, a bold man, and a steady man; he 
is to be trusted and relied upon. No 
bribes can corrupt him, no fear daunt 
him; his word is slow in coming, but 
sure. He shines brightest in the fire, 
and his friend hears of him most when 
he most needs him. His courage grows 
with danger, and conquers opposition 
with constancy. As he cannot be flat- 
tered or frightened into what he dis- 
likes, so he hates flattery and temporiz- 
ing in others. He runs with truth, and 
not with the times; with right, and not 
with might. His rule is straight; soon 
seen, but seldom followed.— William 
Penn. 



Hay Fever 



InHtant Belief 
I and positive cure. 
Trial treatment 
mailed free. 
Tozlco l!abopatory, 1123 Broadway. New York. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Beware of the Chelsea Junkies. 

THE Board of Health should use every 
ounce of power that it controls to 
prevent Lynn becoming a junk heap as 
a result of the Chelsea conflagration. 

The Globe correspondent points out 
that the activity of the Board of 
Health officials results from current 
rumors that the burned-out junkmen 
are seeking to locate their business in- 
terests in Lynn. It has been ascertained 
that many of the dealers have been 
seeking locations in Lynn, and it has 
been understood that options have been 
obtained on property. Should a deter- 
mined effort be made by the Chelsea 
dealers to locate here they will be forced 
to fight the combined opposition of the 
Lynn dealers and of the local health au- 
thorities, who see in it a possible serious 
menace to the health of the city. 

At the present time Lynn appears to 
the Chelsea dealers to be the logical city 
for them in which to locate their store- 
houses. There are a number of whole- 
sale junk dealers now doing business 
here who deal exclusively in rags and 
paper and in metals and bottles, but the 
conditions are regulated by the health 
authorities, who have been strictly en- 
forcing the regulations. No dwelling in 
Lynn can be used for the storage of 
rags or for the handling or sale, without 
a written permit from the board of 
health, and no such permission has ever 
been granted in this city. 

Should the Chelsea dealers obtain a 
foothold in Lynn, they would be sub- 
jected to much more stringent regula- 
tions than was the case in Chelsea, and 
the authorities are prepared to enforce 
to the letter the regulations relative to 
sanitation and the construction of build- 
ings. 

Lynn does not want any rag district 
and the officials believe that the city 
has at the present time as many junk 
shops and warehouses devoted exclu- 
sively to that business as local condi- 
tions demand, and any move to increase 
the number will be stubbornly fought. 

The Board of Trade should rise up 
against the junk nuisance. It will ma- 
terially hurt Lynn. 

It is hoped the Chelsea wholesale rag 
and junk dealers will not obtain a foot- 
hold in Lynn because nothing could be 
much more dangerous in the way of 
spreading disease, and as for danger 
from fire, nothing need be said in view 
of the recent calamity in Chelsea. If 
Chelsea does not want to tolerate the 



junkies any longer there is no reason 
why many of them should thrust them- 
selves into Lynn, where there are plenty 
now to handle the business. Lynn has 
had its fire and does not want an added 
danger of another similar to that in 
Chelsea. 

The board of health should have abso- 
lute control of the junk business because 
it so largely affects the public health. 

Sympathy. 

A plump little girl and a thin little bird 

Were out in the meadow together. 
''How cold that poor little bird must be. 
Without any clothes, like mine," said she, 

"Although it is sunshiny weather." 

"A nice little girl is that," said he; 
"But oh, how cold she must be! for see. 

She hasn't a single feather!" 
So each shivered to think of the other poor thing. 

Although it was sunshiny weather. 

— M. Johnson 

In round figures we have 3,000,000 
square miles out of a total of 50,000,000 
square miles of the world's area. We 
have a population of 86,000,000, or a 
fraction over 5 per cent, of the world's. 
With an area of 5.9 per cent, of the 
world 's, and a population of 5. 2 per cent. , 
we are raising annually 43 per cent, of 
the world's total production of wheat, 
corn and oats. Of corn alone, — one of 
the most important cereals known to 
mankind, — we are producing 78.8 per 
cent. ; of tobacco we are raising 31.1 per 
cent., and of cotton 71.3 per cent., says 
Richard H. Edmonds in the American 
Review of Reviews of May. 



A woman hurried up to a policeman at 
the corner of Twenty-third street in 
New York City. "Does this crosstown 
car take you down to the bridge toward 
Brooklyn?" she demanded. "Why, 
madam," returned the policeman, "do 
you want to go to Brooklyn?" "No, I 
don't want to," the woman replied, 
"but I have to." 

Woman declares man lies and then 
complains that he don't compliment her 
enough. 



Don't have your ceilings 

SMOKED UP 

Use mica canopies over your chimneys and 
shades, 10c, 15c and 20c each. 

CHAS. C. PHILLIPS 

72-74 Exchange Street Tel. 469 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



Moon's Changes. 

First Quarter, May 8. 
Full Moon, May 15. 
Laat Quarter, May 22. 
New Moon, May 29. 

The increase in the number and quan- 
tity of drugs which may be used to pre- 
vent pain, quiet the nerves, and produce 
effects similar to those gained by the 
use of alcohol widens the temperance 
problem. Nothing is gained and some- 
thing may be lost beyond recall when a 
family drops the use of beer and begins 
to take doses of cocaine. From all 
quarters come reports of the increased 
use of this pernicious drug which, with 
morphine and other narcotics, may easily 
be substituted for the more evident and 
grosser form of intoxication. Men and 
women throughout the South are said to 
be secretly introducing among the ne- 
groes and poor whites drugs which, hab- 
itually taken, destroy both body and 
soul. Recovery from the pestilent in- 
fluence of these drugs is even more dif- 
ficult than that from the degradation 
caused by alcohol. — Christian Register. 

Our life is a gift and the Giver 
Can withold himself from none; 
The fount gives itself to the river — 
The fount and the stream are one. 

— Charles Gordon Ames 

The first number of the Baseball 
Magazine appeared last month and bids 
fair to be warmly welcomed by the 
many followers of the national game. 
That Jacob C. Morse, for twenty-five 
years baseball editor of the Boston 
Herald and one of the best authorities 
on the sport, is editing it, could not give 
it higher recommendation. Besides the 
many articles concerning baseball facts, 
anecdote, and discussion, the magazine 
is splendidly illustrated. The first num- 
ber gives every promise of future suc- 
cess. 

Mrs. Style — "I want a hat but it 
must be in the latest style." 

Shopman — "Kindly take a chair, 
madam, and wait a few minutes; the 
fashion is just changing. " — Washington 
Star. 



Careful Buyers 



are giving much attention to our 
FURNITURE Department. 

Everything with which to furnish 
the home. 

This is a good time to select 

NEW CARPETS AND 
WALL PAPERS 

of which we have a complete and 
up-to-date assortment. 

Carpets taken up, cleaned and re- 
laid. Prompt service. 
Excellent work. 

W. B. GIFFORD 

97-99 MARKET STREET, LYNN 



Hall's Millinery Store 

17 Market St., Lynn 

has no special bargain days but gives the best 
value in goods every day in the week. 

Mourning Goods always in stock. 



Would You Not Like a Piece of This? 

Probably more than a million dollars 
is lying in the vaults of banks in Massa- 
chusetts, steadily accumulating as inter- 
est is added to the thousands of deposits, 
and all of this vast sum is awaiting legal 
claimants. 

In many cases the original depositor 
is dead and the heirs or next of kin posj 
sibly do not know that any cash is ready 
for them if they but prove their claim 
to it. In other instances the where- 
abouts of the depositor is unknown, and 
it may be that even he has forgotten, 
that he ever had such an account. 

Thomas B. Reed once went into an 
unfamiliar barber shop to be shaved. 
When the negro barber had about fin- 
ished, he began to try to sell a hair 
tonic. "Hair purty thin, suh, " he said, 
fingering the two or three stray locks 
that fringed Mr. Reed's bald pate. 
"Been that way long, suh?" "I was 
born that way," replied Reed. 
»?« 

Charles S. Grover is a worthy suc- 
cessor to Charles H. Newhall as a com- 
missioner of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

There is much dampness in Nahant. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



They Do Not Now Use Their Stockings 

"Wait, Helen, till the others get out. 
It takes me a perfect age to pin on my 
hat, ' ' said the matinee girl in the aisle 
seat. 

"I should think it did," said her chum 
impatiently, 

"Well, if you'll just keep your dispo- 
sition in check for a moment I'll tell you 
why." Very gingerly she placed her 
hat on her chestnut coiffure and pro- 
ceeded to insert the hatpins. 

"You know during the panic I drew 
out every cent of money I had in bank 
—it was only $250 and after I got it it 
became a white elephant on my hands. 
I didn't know what on earth to do with it. 
I couldn't leave it in my room for all the 
boarders or servants to get if they 
chose to search for it and I had learned 
from sad experience that it is poor econ- 
omy to carry it in good stockings — it 
simply makes 'Jacob's ladders' all up 
and down them. 

"Well, one day — how I ever thought 
of it I couldn't tell you— I was brushing 
my puffs over my knee when the bright 
idea flashed through my head that it 
would be the easiest thing in the world 
to hide a bill in each puff. As soon as 
possible I got five $50 bills —nice, clean, 
new ones— and folded them into thedar- 
lingest little bundles; then I wound a 
puff around each one. They're much 
safer than the bank, for I always wear 
a net, and they're so little inconvenience, 
except when I put in my hatpins. " — 
New York Sun. 

Wife — Henry, can't you let me have 
some money to-day? 

Husband — What did you do with that 
dollar I let you have last week? 

Wife (good naturedly) — Well, I had 
to have a new bonnet and a heavier 
wrap, and Willie and Katie needed new 
shoes, and John had to have a new suit, 
and Frank a new hat, and Caroline 
needed a new gown, and Mary a pair of 
new gloves, and David an overcoat — and 
—and— and. really, Henry, I don't re- 
member what I did with the change. — 
Detroit Free Press. 

The Veteran. 

Methuselah grinned. 

"Just think how long after the war 
my widow will be drawing a pension," 
he chuckled. 

Therewith he celebrated his eight 
hundredth birthday. 



Be My Sweetheart. 

Sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

When birds are on the wing. 
When bee and bud and babbling flood 

Bespeak the birth of spring; 
Come sweetheart, be my sweetheart. 

And wear this posy ring. 
Sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

In the golden summer glow 
Of the earth aflush with the gracious blush 

Which the ripening fields foreshow; 
Dear sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

As into the noon we go. 
Sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

When falls the bounteous year. 
When the fruit and wine of tree and vine 

Give us their harvest cheer; 
Oh, sweetheart be my sweetheart. 

For winter it draweth near. 
Sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

When the year is white and old. 
When the fire of youth is spent, forsooth. 

And the hand of age is cold ; 
Yet, sweetheart, be my sweetheart 

Till the year of our love be told. 

— Eugene Field 

Good Health. 

The secret of eternal youth would 
make a multimillionaire of its lucky 
possessor. But the precious receipt is 
still unknown, and society women must 
keep their looks at the cost of time, 
much time and more money. 

The modern health craze has done 
great good in this direction. Temper- 
ance is a watchword of the moment, and 
smart society goes in strong for the 
"simple life" and for so-called vegeta- 
rianism. To my mind, plenty of sleep 
and the avoidance of meat and alcohol 
are safe to preserve one's youthful 
vitality. And a few women have adopt- 
ed this system for their spiritual as well 
as bodily betterment. If you want to 
grow in grace you must diet," said a 
certain wiseacre. Then the "don't 
worry" doctrine has common sense on 
its side. Worry makes wrinkles, and as 
for bad temper— well, that is the root of 
all evil. 

Rest cures have come to stay; and the 
deep breathing exercises, are another 
sovereign remedy. Massage also does 
wonders and so does the much abused 
system of face treatment. Anyhow, 
the fact remains that middle age is at a 
discount in the twentieth century. 
»?« 

"Now, Thomas," said a certain bish- 
op, after taking his servant to task one 
morning, "who is it that sees all we do, 
and hears all we say, and knows all we 
think, and who regards even me in my 
bishop's robes as but a vile worm of the 
dust?" And Thomas replied, "The 
missus, sir!" — The Christian Guardian. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



QUALITY WORK 

IN 

PAPER HANGING 

At Reasonable Prices 



Arthur B. and Henry H. Munroe, 
known as the Munroe Bros, or Mun- 
roe Boys, formerly paper hangers 
for P. B. Magrane, and W. C. Mc- 
Namara, Jr., formerly wall paper 
salesman for the same firm, may be 
found as below, where they have 
opened a store for the sale of Wall 
Paper and Moulding, and are taking 
orders for paper hanging, painting 
and whitewashing. 

Remember, the Munroe Bros, can- 
not be engaged from any other store. 



MUNROE CSb CO. 
84. i Union St. 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.66 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



HOUSE CLEANING 

Let us attend to your Wants 

CURTAINS laundered to look like new. 
FURNITURE upholstered and repaired. 
CARPETS taken up, cleaned, made over and 

relaid — Work done by experienced workmen. 

RUGS made from your old carpeting, any size 

you desire. Haniisome, dural)le, double-faced. 

11' you want NEW Carpets, Rugs, Art Squares, 

Portieres, Couch Covers, Upholstery Goods, 

Lace Curtains, etc. see our line. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 Market Street Phone 1695 



I abo^u't^ HL Safety Razor | 

" The Best in its Line 5 

fA Reasonable in Price Qg> 

S^ Jos. W. Harding & Co. 9 

32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 




See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
' ' hard - to - button ' ' 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Titus ®j Buckley Co. 

MAKERS OF HOMES 


Rugs 

PRICES 

$9.00 $15.00 
$27.00 
$39.00 
$45.00 


Go Carts 

PRICES 

$1.98 $3.00 
$5.49 
$12.00 
$25.00 


REFRIGERATORS 


II 




Our facilities for Supplying money orders are complete 
whether you want them at home or abroad. 

We have Travelers' Checks, and Letters of Credit for use 
in either America or Europe. 

We have our own money orders and also handle the Ameri- 
can Express Co. Checks. Far safer than carrying the cash. 

The cost of our Travelers' Checks is very small, especially 
when their advantages are considered. 

Manufacturers National Bank 

B. W. CURRIER. President, 

W. B. LITTLEFIELD, Vice President, 

CLIFTON COLBURN, Cashier. 



When dealing: with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



BO cents per Year TTTTvTTT' 1 OHO Tenth Year 

Single Copies 5 cents J U IN ili, it7UO No. 8 



Safe Deposit Vaults 



BEFORE LEAVING HOME for a PROLONGED VACATION 
place your VALUABLES in the VAULTS of the 

i^^rurtty Baft ir^jHstt Sc otruBt (Enmpang 

Main Office, Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office, 25 Market Sq., West Lynn, Mass. 



WE RECEIVE TRUNKS, BOXES AND BULKY PACKAGES 
FOR STORAGE 



The June Bride 

ND ALL INTERESTED in housekeeping affairs 
will find everything here to interest them. 

See what we can do for you in CARPETS, RANGES, 
IRON BEDS, GO-CARTS, REFRIGERATORS, etc., and 
every desirable article necessary for the home. 

We gladly give estimates on fitting up apartments 
complete. 

No Boston store can give you such low prices for 
similar quality of house furnishings. 

TITUS ca, BUCKLEY CO. 

298-310 UNION STREET, LYNN 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



An Electric Fan, 
Good Clear Lights 
and a Gas Cook 
Stove 

are the chief factors 
in summer time enjoy- 
ment of home. 








If your home is not already equipped with wires 
for Hghts and fans and piped for gas in the kitchen 
we want you to get in touch with us and let us fix 
things for you. 

There is no light so easy and comforting to the 
eyes in reading as the electric light used rightly. 

A fan can be attached to any ordinary electric 
socket, and you are always cool. 




Our woman demonstrator wishes to 
know of any gas ranges in Lynn, 
Swampscott, Saugus or Nahant that 
are not working perfectly in every 
particular. A complaint left at 90 
Exchange St. or a call to 'phone 1348 
will receive immediate attention. 



Lynn Gas and Electric Co. 



When dealinj; with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



*^ Lynn Review 

a monthly epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. In^alls, 333 Union Street. Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



JUNE, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 8 



The Elks' building is a decided orna- 
ment to Central Square. 



Is it probable that the railroad grade 
crossings in Lynn will be separated ? 



The Sunday papers, as made up today, 
must be dull reading for people not in- 
terested in sports. 



Now that we are happy and content- 
ed, and all of the old maids are resting 
in bliss, and the conservator happy, to 
say nothing of the general public, the 
Bard returns! 

The demands for public improvements 
in Lynn are of such magnitude that one 
is made dizzy trying to figure out where 
the municipality can secure the neces- 
sary money to carry them out. 



A correspondent states that he has 
observed shutters open upon factory 
buildings in Lynn after business hours, 
and he wonders if the insurance compa- 
nies are wise to the condition of affairs. 



It is hoped that the excellent suggest- 
ion of Mayor Porter that schoolhouse 
yards be thrown open as play-grounds 
for all children until sunset be carried 
out this summer. It is a most worthy 
idea. 

It will take a strong man to defeat 
Mr. Draper for the governorship of 
Massachusetts. As acting governor he 
has shown judgment, discretion and 
wise consideration for the interest of all 
the people. 

We may expect a demagogic campaign 
from the outset with Senator Vahey 
seeking a governorship. He will prob- 
ably be just as radical as Mr. Moran, 
and has not hesitated up to date to do 
everything possible toward stirring up 
prejudice among the people. 



Happiness depends upon the 
individual. It does not come for 
the asking. The conscience of a 
good deed alone is the best source 
of happiness, and nine-tenths of 
the delightful sensation is due 
wholly to the manner in which 
you act towards others. Because 
you cannot be happy is, in the 
larger number of instances, due 
to this one thing — Failure to 
Reconcile Yourself. 



Certainly the lid is on tight in Lynn, 
and the law against illegal selling of 
liquor is being enforced to the limit 
according to all indications. Monday 
morning police court records are strong 
indications. If there are 1500 or 2000 
less arrests during the year the no- 
license people will believe that their ar- 
gument is the best one. 



The authorities should lose no time in 
making safe the stairways in the Cob- 
bett. Whiting and Shepard school 
buildings. They are perfect specimens 
of tinder boxes, being constructed of 
wood and not at all substantial, so in- 
spector Breed reports. These stairways 
should be iron from the foundation up- 
ward. It is fearful to contemplate what 
would happen if the children were 
obliged to use these stairways when the 
buildings were on fire. The Ohio disas- 
ter should teach us to have stairways 
constructed properly. It is no less than 
criminal for the city to have hundreds 
of children in these school buildings with 
such flimsy stairways. 



Those who use the telephone service 
are largely responsible for its success. 
It is very easy to criticise, but those who 
are using the service should understand 
that it is important for them to do their 
part before telephoning can be a success. 
A broad view of the question by tele- 
phone subscribers will save much time, 
trouble and expense, not only for the 
subscriber, but for the company, and 
with the reduction in the maintenance 
account the telephone service is corre- 
spondingly benefitted. The educational 
campaign now being conducted by the 
telephone company in this connection is 
most interesting and should do a great 
work for the benefit and improvement 
of the service. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



LONG 



Remember: One fare for the 
Round Trip— for the message 
and answer. 

It may cost a little more — but 
so does the Twentieth Cen- 
tury Limited. 



A Chain and Its Links 



I 



N telephoning there are three links in the chain 
that constitutes ''good service": 1. The person 
calling. 2. The operator. 3. The person called. 



No matter how much any one or any two of these links 
do to develop good service, the result is determined by the 
measure of co-operation of the third. A chain is no 
stronger than its weakest link. 

If the person calling fails to consult the catalogue and 
gives a wrong number, the operator inevitably repeats 
the error. If the person called fails to answer promptly 
and the caller leaves the telephone, naturally ' 'there is 
no one on the line." 

Being human, the operator— the third link— is liable to 
err occasionally, but careful analysis demonstrates that 
she is not fairly chargeable with many of the difficulties 
frequently ascribed to her. 

If link No. 1 gives the right number and calls distinctly, 
and link No. S answers promptly, the Telephone Company 
will be responsible for its part of the chain. If no higher 
motive actuated it, the motive of economy, or self-interest, 
would suffice. -1 ■ M 



:SLJ 



FROM ANY PAY STATION YOU CAN SPEAK TO ANY 
ONE OF 300,000 TELEPHONES IN THE TERRITORY OF 
THE NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE & TELEGRAPH CO. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



What Need I Care? 

What need I care for falling rain ? 

For sombre cloud and dripping pane 
And madly moaning wind ? 

For lightning's flash and thunder's roar, 
And dash of wave on rocky shore. 

So weird and so unkind? 

What the' the storm were wild and high ? 

'Twere vain to sit me down and sigh. 
And prophecy of ill,— 

That blinding flash and deafening roar 
Shall vex the earth for evermore. 

And evil have its will. 

Do I not know the rain will cease? 

The clouds disperse, the bow of peace 
Illumine all the sky? 

That o'er the earth the sun will shine 
And shed its warmth like gen'rous wine 

And bid the shadows fly ? 

Do I not know that in the storm 
Is hid the oak its strength and form 

And length of clinging root? 
Food for the beasts o'er all the plain 

Blossoming flower and golden grain 
And blush of ripen'd fruit? 

O halting soul twixt good and ill. 
Canst thou not bide His pleasure still ? 

The rain will cease to fall 
When thou art strengthened; and the light 

That shines at eventide grow bright 
Round him who trusts thro' all. 

:— F. O. Hodge. 

Nowadays we must not drink spirits 
nor eat meat; we must not smoke; the 
air of cities is poisonous, the air of the 
country too strong:; the light ruins our 
eyes and the noise racks our nerves; 
snaking hands is a means of collecting 
microbes and kissing is pure suicide. 
Life is indeed growing dull and difficult. 
—Madrid Diario. 

Three months after facing the parson 
together they were seated at the tea- 
table. "Do you love me still?" quer- 
ried the young wife, after the manner of 
her kind. "Of course I love you still," 
he answered. "Now, keep quiet while 
I read the paper." — Chicago News. 
A 

Of all the sinful wasters of man's in- 
heritance on earth, and all are in this 
regard sinners, the very worst are the 
people of America. — Prof. Shaler. 

A Western barber shop has this sign; 
"Razors honed and pants pressed in the 
rear." 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



A correspondent of The Review wish- 
es to know if it is right for him to pay 
his fare under the following circumstan- 
ces: He is coming from Swampscott, 
and when paying his fare asks the con- 
ductor when he is likely to arrive at 
Central Square. When he gets the in- 
formation he asks the conductor for a 
transfer for a car due to leave the 
square at the time the conductor says 
he will arrive. The car on which he is 
riding arrives at the square ten minutes 
late, the transfer cannot be used, and 
he asks the conductor to change the 
transfer so that it may be used upon 
another car going about eight minutes 
later. The conductor refuses. Now, 
what our ladylike correspondent wants 
to know is this — should not the railroad 
give the passenger a transfer that he 
can use when the railroad has not main- 
tained its obHgation by keeping its time? 
Respectfully referred to the gentleman- 
ly officials of the Boston and Northern 
Railroad Company. 

Their Substitute. 

One of Private John Allen's favorite 
stories is about a Georgia bishop. 

One of the members of the Bishop's 
church met the reverend gentleman one 
Sunday afternoon and was horrified to 
find the Bishop carrying a shotgun. 

"My dear Bishop," he protested, "I 
am shocked to find you out shooting on 
Sunday. The Apostles did not go shoot- 
ing on Sunday." 

"No, " replied the Bishop, "they did 
not. The shooting was very bad in Pal- 
estine, and they went fishing instead." 
— Cleveland Leader. 

The address of President Tuttle favor- 
ing the New Haven and Boston and 
Maine merger was strong and convinc- 
ing, as are the remarks usually made 
by the Boston and Maine President. 
Mr. Tuttle pointed out that consolida- 
tions of railroads had benefitted New 
England, and that the public would not 
now return to the conditions that pre- 
vailed when several large corporations 
controlled what is now the Boston and 
Maine system. It is certain that Presi- 
dent Tuttle's able and logical address 
greatly affected public sentiment in 
favor of the proposed merger. 

Portly Dame— Save me! Oh, save me! 

Fireman — I'll do my best, mum, but I 
am afraid I shall have to take you down 
in instalments. — Bon Vivant. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



GREEN & SON 

"DT A "IVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
ir l/l-iN VJO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quaUty at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens CBi Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



The pubHsher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



The New Summer 

Goods Are In 

Muslin and Lace Curtains in Dainty Designs. 
Japanese Screens and Mattings. 
Draperies, Carpets, Rugs and Art Squares 
at as low prices as any of the Boston stores. 
Call in and See Us. 
Fine Rugs woven from old carpeting. 

ALBION K. HALL 

TEL. 1695 39 MARKET ST. 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



Fashion. 

Knicker— Do you think hoopskirts will 
ever return? 

Bocker— The women are wearing them 
on their heads this year.— N. Y. Sun. 




Does Your 

Bedroom 

Want for Anything ? 

Perhaps you need a new 
mattress, new spring, a new 
bed, a new rug or something 
else to make your bedroom 
as attractive and comfort- 
able as you would want it to 
be. Our store at present is 
simply overflowing with sug- 
gestions in this matter and 
you will do well to come and 
make your selections before 
the most desirable of them 
have been secured by others. 

D. B. H. POWER 

Complete House Furnisher 
Central Sq., Lynn 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Buttercup, Poppy. Forget-Me-Not. 

Buttercup, Poppy, Foi-Ret-me-not.^ 
These three bloomed in a garden spot ; 
And once, all merry with song and play, 
A little one heard three voices say ; 

" Shine or shadow, summer or spring, 
O thou child with the tangled hair 

And laughing eyes, we three shall bring 
Each an offering, passing fair ! " 
The little one did not understand ; 
But they bent and kissed the dimpled hand. 

Buttercup gamboUea all day long. 
Sharing the little one's mirth and song ; 
Then, stealing along on misty gleams. 
Poppy came, bring the sweetest dreams, — 

Playing and dreaming, that was all. 

Till once the sleeper would not awake. 

Kissing the little face under the pall, [spake. 
We thought of the words the third flower 
And we found, betimes, in a hallowed spot. 
The solace and peace of Forget-me-not. 

Buttercup shareth the joy of day. 
Glinting with gold the hours of play : 
Bringeth the Poppy sweet repose, [close. 

When the hands would fold and the eyes would 
And after it all, — the play and the sleep 

Of a little life, — what cometh then? 
To the hearts that ache and the eyes that weep 
A wee flower bringeth God's peace a^ain: 
Each one aerveth its tender lot, — 
Buttercup, Poppy, Forget-me-not. 

— Eugene Field. 

The city had a narrow escape from 
another great fire last month when the 
plant of the J. B. Blood company was 
partially destroyed. The fire depart- 
ment under the direction of Chief Har- 
ris deserves great commendation for its 
splendid work in handling the fire, and 
the prompt work in closing the doors 
between the wooden and brick parts of 
the store undoubtedly prevented a con- 
flagration. 

Strange as it may appear to some, the 
advertising mediums with the "largest 
circulation" are by no means the most 
profitable. In the matter of circulation, 
quaHty and kind are of far more impor- 
tance than quantity and that is one rea- 
son why The Lynn Review is such a 
good advertising proposition. 



He — If you refuse me I shall go out 
and hang myself to the lamp-post in 
front of your house. 

She — Now, George, you know father 
said he wouldn't have you hanging 
around here. — Life. 



Two Seasonable 
Articles 

GO-CARTS $1.98 to $27.50 

Our line has something to satis- 
fy every want. New patterns, 
parasol or hood top; brown or 
white finish; folding gear, etc. 

REFRIGERATORS 

$7.25 to $30.00 

Made of hard or soft wood, 
charcoal inner lining, scientific 
ventilating arrangement, remov- 
able ice box. All the new things 
in refrigerator construction. 

Only agent in Lynn for White 
Frost (steel) Refrigerators. 

W. B. GIFFORD 

Home Furnisher 
97-99 MARKET STREET, LYNN 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



To show the power possessed by one 
American, Edward H. Harriman may 
journey by steamship from New York 
to New Orleans, thence by rail to San 
Francisco, across the Pacific ocean to 
China, and returning by another route 
to the United States may go to Ogden 
by any one of three rail lines and thence 
to Kansas City or Omaha without leav- 
ing the deck or platform of a carrier 
which he controls and without duplica- 
ting any part of his journey. He has 
further what appears to be a dominating 
control in the Illinois Central railroad, 
running directly north from the Gulf of 
Mexico to the Great Lakes parallel with 
the Mississippi river. Within a year 
his sphere of influence has extended 
eastward. The Union Pacific and Ore- 
gon Short Line, which he controls, have 
acquired 18.6 per cent, of the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad at a cost of $45,000,000, 
and have invested $19,600,000 in the 
New York Central and Hudson river. 

To escape criticism do nothing, say 
nothing and be nothing. 

It will now be called "Laporte of 

Missing Men." 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



STRAWS ARE READY! 




AWNING WORK 



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tal card. 
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patterns of 
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Wise heads wear our Straw Hats. 

We have them all from Sailors to 
Panamas. See us before you buy. 



Amos B. Chase 

Hatter and Furrier. 123 Munroe Street 

Cold Storage for Furs. Telephone 425-1 



GEORGE W. BREED 
INSURANCE 

of all kinds placed in the most reliable com- 
panies at lowest rate. 

ITEM BUILDING . 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.65 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 




See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



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THE LYNN REVIEW 



June. 

O month whose promise and fulfilment blend. 
And burst in one ! it seems the earth can store 
In all her roomy house no treasure more; 
Of all her wealth no farthing have to spend 
On fruit, when once this stintless flowering end. 
And yet no tiniest flower shall fall before 
It hath made ready at its hidden core 
Its tithe of seed, which we may count and tend 
Till harvest. Joy of blossomed lovo, for thee 
Seems it no fairer thinj? can yet have birth ? 
No room is left for deeper ecstasy ? 
Watch well if seeds grrow strong, to scatter free 
Germs for thy future summers on the earth. 
A joy which is but joy soon comes to dearth. 

— H. H. 

On the twelfth day of last month at 
7.20 p. m., there was witnessed in the 
Western horizon one of the most beau- 
ful cloud effects that has ever been seen 
in this section. The grand panorama 
did not last more than ten minutes, and 
it is beyond the writer's ability to faith- 
fully describe it, except to state that 
there was a very light color above with 
a dark gray base, the top of which was 
broken up so as to resemble mountain 
peaks and ravines. It was altogether 
one of the most beautiful s'ghts the 
writer ever saw, and it was with great 
regret that he could not see the view 
from a high point, because it must have 
been one of grandeur when the horizon 
could have been seen in its entirety. 
»?■ 

One of the local papers says, regard- 
ing the clearing of the land for the pro- 
posed new high school:— "Some of the 
tenants on the land taken by the city 
have not moved as yet." One of them 
has moved, after hving more than sixty 
years on the lot, and now has her home 
m the Danvers asylum. The shock was 
too great and the mind became shatter- 
ed, and the woman will probably never 
recover. 

You hear quite a few funny remarks 
at a ball game. Last month in Boston, 
pitcher Ferguson of the National Club 
had a man on the opposite team run 
from the first to second base while he 
had the ball in his hands, a somewhat 
unusual performance. One of the spec- 
tators called out: "Send Mr. Ferguson 
an alarm o'clock!" 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold the best in the order 
of demand the past month were The 
Black Bag, The Barrier. The Shuttle, 
Somehow Good, The Ancient Law, and 
The Weavers. 

Many people now fail to make money. 
Do you get the point. 



We read in the papers that three 
people were forced to take their lives in 
their hands to get into the burning J. B. 
Blood Co. building to shut fire doors, 
after the blaze was well under way. 
This looks like a rank specimen of care- 
lessness for a concern to have their 
building provided with fire doors and 
then to have them left open after the 
store has been closed for the day. It is 
a good example however, of the care 
65 3rcised over fire preventatives. Many 
buildings provided with shutters would 
not be properly protected if the insur- 
ance inspector was not well on to his job. 
He does his work thoroughly and fire 
shutters are made to do their work in 
the larger number of instances in Lynn. 
When a high grade business house has 
modern fire doors and does not take the 
precaution to have them closed at night 
it would seem as if some one was guilty 
of gross carelessness, all of which leads 
to the inquiry, what is the use of pro- 
viding fire doors if they are not to be 
closed after business hours? 

A wine agent had his life insured the 
other day. To the question, "Do you 
use water freely?" he replied, "Merely 
to bathe in." 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton, Pres., 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.-Treas. 



eas. I 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



WILL THERE BE A MERGER? 

It Now Looks Somewhat Doubtful if tlie 

New Haven Formally Absorbs 

the Boston & Maine 

The Supreme Court decision, showing 
the New Haven Railroad to be a violat- 
or of the Massachusetts railroad laws, 
put something of a crimp into the mer- 
ger talk, and rather gave proof that 
some of the statements made by Mr. 
Brandeis against the merger are found- 
ed on good law. 

The merger is likely to go through, 
law or no law, because Mr. Morgan and 
the Pennsylvania railroad so desires. 
And it is not thought that a law can be 
framed to stop it. If the merger is not 
worked directly it will be operated indi- 
rectly. 

The New Haven road has come under 
criticism of late, and its stock has suf- 
fered on Wall street, as the result of 
the increase in the company's debt. 
This has suggested the question whether 
the New Haven is going to be in a po- 
sition to handle satisfactorily a system 
covering all of New England. The New 
Haven's new debt, however, represents 
property of great earning capacity. The 
biggest block, for instance, was issued 
to pay for its Boston and Maine stock. 

The impression has been, as pointed 
out by the Greenfield Gazette, that the 
New Haven road gives the public more 
than the Boston and Maine, in the way 
of fast trains, adherence to schedules, 
comfortable cars and well kept stations, 
and all that goes to make up a first- 
class modern passenger service. Con- 
solidation of non-competitive railroad 
systems tends to some economies in 
operation. It helps to make services 
previously operating disjointedly and 
inharmoniously, to work more in refer- 
ence to each others needs. It puts a 
system in position to make the strong- 
est possible bid for new business, and 
obtain the freight rates needed by the 
section it covers. 

The Boston and Maine is likely, if this 
merger fails, to become within a few 
years the property of some system out- 
side of New England. A sale to the 
New Haven maintains a practically 
home control. As the New Haven has 
a good record for serving the public, 
and as a worse fate might befall the 
B. & M., many are favorable to a law 
permitting a merger under the strict 
control of the state. Think, for in- 
stance, what a fearful fate would be in 
store for us if the Boston and Albany 
got the Boston and Maine! 



If I Should Tell You. 

If I should tell you all the bitter woe 

That I have known, — the lonely, toilsome years. 
The trampled hopes, the sorrows, deep and slow. 

The lacks, the losses, and the hidden tears, — 

Your eyes would fill , your tender heart would bleed. 
And you would cry in sympathetic pain, 

" Poor strug-g-ling- soul, you have been tried indeed; 
Ah, I shall never envy you again ! " 

But if, instead, I should rehearse to you 
The many blessings which my life has held, — 

The happy days, the friends beloved and true. 
The lofty hopes and dreams yet undispelled, 

The loves undying, the peaceful rest, — 
Your ready lips would breathe another strain : 

" Thrice favored soul, you have indeed been blest ; 
Ah, I shall never pity you again! " 

And yet both tales were true ; like all the rest. 
My life has had its bright and gloomy phase ; 

Ah, happy he who shines within his breast 
The bright reflection of his sunnier days! 

There is no pain without some small relief: 
There is no joy without some pang untold ; 

The life whose web is warped with darkest grief 
Holds in its woof some threads of tender gold. 

And not }n vain the thorny way is crossed 
By any earnest soul which, passing through. 

Learns only this, — ah, lesson often lost! — 
That other silent souls have suffered too. 

So give me still, dear friend, as heretofore 
Smiles for my joy, and tears for my distress, 

Since every smile I deem one blessing more. 
And every tear I count one sorrow less. 

— Elizabeth Akers. 



Everybody is aware that school teach- 
ers will many times punish the entire 
class because there is no confession 
from an individual, when an indiscre- 
tion is committed. This happened some 
years ago, but the public was never let 
into it. It was in the high school. A 
class of thirty was penalized to the ex- 
tent of having to come back for an hour 
after school for two weeks. All of the 
class with one exception, and the princi- 
pal felt that he gave a good robust bill 
of health regarding his innocence. The 
fact was that the immune member was 
the individual who committed the of- 
fence, without the help or assistance of 
any other member of the class. 



Even a fool, when he holdeth his 
peace, is counted wise; and he that 
shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of 
understanding. — Proverbs XVII-28. 



ROBERT S. SISSON & 

INSURANCE 



SON 



have removed their oflices to 83 Blake street 

Insurance of all kinds. 

Furniture insured at the trifling expense of 

two cents a week. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



THE LIBERAL RELIGION. 

How an Unorthodox Writer in tlie Sun 
Replies to a Critic. 

A correspondent of the New York Sun 
intimated that those who were not or- 
thodox had never done and were not 
now doing any good in the world, with a 
particularly strong attack upon Unitari- 
ans. Another correspondent of the Sun 
met this attack with the following: "Or- 
thodoxy means in the general under- 
standing of the word, acceptance of the 
Principal dogmas of the Church; the 
rinity, the Incarnation and the Atone- 
ment. No one of the men or women 
whom I shall mention believed in any of 
these. The five women who have reached 
the highest intellectual plane, Mary 
Somerville, Harriet Martineau, Frances 
Power Cobbe, George EHot and Mrs. 
Humphrey Ward, were or are all ' ' unbe- 
lievers. " Miss Cobbe was a leader in 
many philanthropic works. 

"The four who have done the most 
good in the world of the sort your cor- 
respondents refer to are probably Flor- 
ence Nightingale, Mary Carpenter, 
Dorothea Dix and Clara Barton, all 
' ' unbelievers. ' ' To these may be added 
Mary Livermore, Catherine Sedgwick, 
Helen Hunt Jackson, Julia Ward Howe, 
Louisa Schuyler, Margaret Fu Her, 
Lydia Maria Child, Maria Mitchell, 
Louisa M. Alcott, Celia Thaxter, Mrs. 
Gaskell, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and 
the authoresses of the hymns " Nearer, 
My God, to Thee" and "In the Cross 
of Christ I glory," all Unitarians. 

"Coming now to the men in this 
country best known for philanthropy, 
Stephen Girard, Samuel G. Howe, Jos- 
eph Tuckerman, Peter Cooper, Samuel 
J. May, Henry Bergh, Abbott Lawrence, 
Enoch Pratt, John A. Andrew, John 
Smithson, Gerrit Smith, A. A. Low, 
William H. Baldwin, Captain Goddard 
and Andrew Carnegie, all were Unitari- 
ans or unorthodox. The entire anti- 
slavery movement up to the time of the 
war was conducted by the unorthodox, 
the Church frowning on it and insisting 
that slavery was a divine institution. 

"The temperance movement for a 
long time had to make its way unaided 
by the Church. The first attempt to re- 
lieve women from their legal disabilities 
was inaugurated by a Judge of the Ma- 
rine Court whose name for the moment 
escapes me and who was called an 
atheist. Most of the greatest men in 
our early history, Jefferson, Adams, 
Monroe, Franklin, Madison, Chief Jus- 
tice Marshall and Morris, were unortho- 



dox, and Morris, who was considered 
the closest friend of Washington, told 
Jefferson, as recorded by Jefferson, that 
Washington was in belief a deist. The 
great hberators Mazzini and Kossuth 
were outside the pale, as was also Abra- 
ham Lincoln. 

" Unitarianism appears to me to have 
accomplished a great work in softening 
orthodox beliefs. The great trouble 
with the churches to-day in my humble 
judgment is that they go on repeating in 
the creeds a great deal which they no 
longer really believe, which leads to 
insincerity, and in religion the first thing 
should be sincerity." 



Some murmur when their sky is clear 

And wholly bright to view. 
If one small speck of dark appear 

In their great heaven of blue; 
And some with thankful love are filled. 

If but one streak of light, 
One ray of God's good mercy gild 

The darkness of their night. 

— Trench. 

Jones was riding on a street car the 
other night when a man who had been 
drinking entered and sat down beside 
him. The new comer was very talka- 
tive, in fact spoke loud enough to be 
heard by everyone in the car. He talked 
on general subjects, about Japan, Amer- 
ica, and most all the countries, but 
Jones had his head turned the other 
way because of the offensive breath of 
the talkative one. When he had got 
through talking to the whole car, he 
addressed Jones more particularly: 
"Now I have talked on all of these sub- 
jects, what nationality do you think I 
am?" And without a moment's thought 
came the reply: "To judge from the 
odor of your breath, you must have come 
from spirit land." At this retort the 
whole car full burst out laughing, while 
the talkative one at once subsided. 

»?4 

When you mock the sufferings of 
others you are inviting some for your- 
self. 

A 

Subscribe for the Review. 



W. F. NEWHALL F. C. NEWHALL 

A WEDDING GIFT 

PURCHASED AT 

NewhalFs Jewelry Store 

will certainly prove gratifying to 

its recipients. 

Established 1872 Telephone 1047-3 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



when you want 



Remember to r%c\ oQ when you 

telephone number ZO or ZY anything 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



Orders by Telephone Promptly Attended To 

Andrew Schlehuber 

BAKER, CATERER, 
CONFECTIONER 

78 EXCHANGE STREET 

All kinds of Catering- in First-class Style. 

Special Prices to Churches and Large Parties 
of all kinds. 

Orders for Sunday should be given Satux'day 
before to insure prompt delivery. 



WHERE WILL WE 00? 





NE^ ENGLAND 
YiiATION RESORTS 

Every Vacationist 

snoula nave one or these 
beautirul publications. It 
tells you what you -want to 
know about 

Cbat Summer Outing 

Send for it to-day, it's FREE. Address 
" Resorts " Cen. Pass. Dept. E. & M. R. R. 
Bostun, Mass. ' 

D. J. FLANDERS, P.T.M. C. M. BURT, G.P.A. 






Love. 

Let me but love my love without disguise. 
Nor wear a mask of fashion old or new. 
Nor wait to speak until I can hear a clew. 

Nor play a part to shine in others' eyes. 

Nor bow my knees to what my heart denies; 
But what I am, to that let me be true. 
And let me worship where my love is due. 

And so through love and worship let me rise. 

For love is but the heart's immortal thirst 
To be completely known and all forgiven. 
Even as sinful souls that enter heaven; 

So take mc, dear, and understand my worst, 
And freely pardon it, because confessed. 
And let me find, in loving thee, my best. 
— Henry Van Dyke. 

Has Moral Courage 

In commenting upon the make up of 
Speaker Cole and his courage, the Salem 
News recently said: 

"Notwithstanding the fact that the house, by a 
tie vote, had killed the bill providing for the pay- 
ment of $5000 to the widow and children of Edward 
Cohen, who was shot and killed by the lun.-itic 
Steele, while in the State House, Speaker Cole 
directed the clerk to read his name. He then vot- 
ed against the bill. When by reason of a tie vote, 
this or that measure has been defeated, the speak- 
er of the house or the president of the senate is 
apt to be criticised by certain elements, on the 
score that the official "dodged." Speaker Cole 
evidently had this fact in mind. While it was not 
necessary for him to declare himself, his prompt 
action to this end has not only left room for doubt 
as to his opinion of the merits of the measure, but 
it has also won for hnn the favor of constituents 
who admire moral courage." 

A young teacher, whose efforts to 
inoculate elementary anatomy had been 
unusually discouraging, at last asked in 
despair, "Well, I wonder if any boy here 
can tell me what the spinal cord really 
is?" She was met by a row of blank 
and irresponsive faces, till finally one 
small voice piped up in great excite- 
ment: "The spine cord is what runs 
through you. Your head sits on one end 
and you sit on the other. " — New York 
Sun. 

»?« 

There are no fairyfolk that ride 
About the world at night. 
Who give you rings and other things. 
To pay for doing right. 
But if you do to others what 
You'd have them do to you. 
You'll be as blest as if the best 
Of storybooks were true. 

— Alice Cary. 

The head-mistress of a certain village 
school was one day examining a few of 
her select pupils in grammar. "Stand 
up, Freddie, and make me a sentence 
containing the word "seldom," she said, 
pointing to a small urchin. Freddie 
paused as if in thought, then with a 
flush of triumph on his face replied, 
"Last week father had five horses, but 
yesterday he seldom!" 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



18 



Spring and I'and the Sea. 

A dull grey day, and shadows creeping 

Over the land and over the sea. 

Out on the rocks the whitecaps breaking 

With swirl of foam that beckons nie; 

White gulls dipping across the waves. 

An odor of Spring in the chill damp air; 

A time of vague and nameless longing 

For hopes and days that have vanished— where? 

The salt air brings to me the scent 

Of flowers and blossoms from over the sea. 

From a land that is fair and far away, 

A hind where my wandering soul would be. 

Now 1 hear the tinkle of Spanish guitars 

And see the dainty twinkling feet 

Of senoritas with starry eyes 

Dance at the first gay opening bars. 

I see a cloudless southern sky. 

And villas with pilasters gleaming white. 

Tropical foliatre and flowers rare 

That bloom and die in a single night. 

Then over my dreams there creeps a pall 

A dull grey day and a failing light. 

Out on the rocks the whit«caps breaking. 

Deep in my heart a lonely aching — 

Spring and I and the sea, 

— Anne Hathaway. 

»?« 

It was twenty- three years ago that 
Mr. Keith inaugurated his amusement 
enterprise in Boston in a very small 
way, but even in their infancy it was 
Mr. Keith's aim and object to present 
to the public nothing but the very best 
and cleanest attraction.s. Mr. Keith 
still adheres to his first plan— "The Best 
That Money Can Produce. ' ' Those who 
wish to enjoy one of the most delightful 
entertainments ever offered in Boston 
will not fail to visit Mr. Keith's mag- 
nificent theatre, whei'e the latest novel- 
ties rule each week. No American 
manager has such a firm grasp upon 
European specialties as Mr. Keith, and 
during the summer many foreign acts 
will be seen at Keith's Theatre not to 
be given in any other city east of New 
York. 

William H. Niles to retire from the 
bar! That reporter must be in the kin- 
dergarten class. Never! Not while he 
lives. And Mr. Niles takes such ex- 
ceeding good care of himself he is likely 
to be spared to the profession, which he 
adorns, for many more years. 

Bishop Potter is credited with saying 
he can resist everything but temptation. 



WEDDING RINGS i"8^\^ 

From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



THE HIGH SCHOOL LOT. 

What a Citizen Says to Mayor Porter 

Regarding the North Common 

Street Lot. 

Writing to Mayor Porter a well known 
citizen says regarding the proposed site 
for the Classical high school building:— 

"I am very much opposed to the 
North Common street lot selected for 
the new Classical high school for the 
reason that I do not think a school 
building should be in such close proxim- 
ity to the mercantile section of the city. 
West Lynn is practically a city with 
20,000 or more population, and in a few 
years it cannot be otherwise than that 
both sides of the Common will be largely 
used for mercantile purposes. I believe 
those thoroughfares will develop like 
Boylston street in Boston, only of course 
on a smaller scale, but relatively just 
the same. 

"I am not wedded to any location 
because I do not feel like being an advo- 
cate for any individual who wishes to 
dispose of real estate. It has always 
seemed to me that the Spinney and 
Tapley lots on Hanover street were 
ideal. 

"I suppose the A. B. Martin estate 
would be objectionable for some reasons, 
but is it not worthy of consideration? 
The location would be delightful, but 
whether it could be secured at a fair 
price I do not know. 

"Of one thing I feel very certain. 
The North Common street lot is decidedly 
objectionable for many reasons, which 
are obvious on consideration. A Classi- 
cal high school building, to my mind, 
above all other structures, should be in 
a quiet, somewhat retired location, and 
should not be built for show. It should 
be wholly arranged for school purposes, 
and not be any part of a public building- 
parade. Because the library may be 
well located is no indication that several 
hundred school children can do proper 
work, and that the Classical high school 
building would be desirably located in 
the immediate vicinity. 

"By all means have the location of 
the Classical high school building correct 
beyond any reasonable doubt before a 
building is constructed." 



Needy One — I say, old man, could you 
lend me a dollar for a day or two? 

The Other One— My dear fellow, the 
dollar I lend is out at present, and I've 
several names down for it when it comes 
back. — Harper's Weekly. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



cj s KB Instant Relief 

Hay Fever SIS"- 

Toxlco Laboratory, ll'-i3 Broadway, >few York. 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CSi W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 1091,-2 Branch Offi.ces, SOS Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



There are more Catholics and Meth- 
odists in Baltimore, in proportion to 
population, than in any other city in the 
United States. 



NEW YORK CITY 



®t|? Il^rmttag? 

A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 
The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
—a restaurant 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for men. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
ese servants. 

Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Srtid Jor Booklet 

F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



True Dope. 

She wore a merry widow hat, 
Behind her at the game I pondered; 
And when the speeding ball met bat, 
I blinked my eyes and sadly wondered; 
I know not if it was a hit 
Or if the fielder went to sleep; .> 

I simply know my tongue I bit 
With muttered curses — low but deep; 
For looking, I saw naught but that 
She wore a merry widow hat. 

— Grantland Rice. 

A 

Did you ever hear the story told about 
a Boston man who once visited a west- 
ern community called Tin Can, where 
the habits and morals were of the min- 
ing camp variety? Every second build- 
ing had a barroom with a poker game 
attachment. The tenderfoot went from 
one saloon to the other and found every- 
thing wide open and everybody enjoying 
themselves. In one place, as he looked 
on at a poker game with the sky for the 
limit, he became excited as he saw the 
dealer slip himself four aces from the 
bottom of the pack. "Suffering cod- 
fish!" he whispered, as he excitedly 
clutched the sleeve of the man next to 
him; "Did you notice that?" "Notice 
what?" "Why, that duffer just dealt 
himself four aces." The miner looked 
at the Boston tenderfoot calmly and re- 
plied, "Well, wasn't it his deal?" 

The Rev. Mr. Freuder of Philadelphia 
tells this story of himself. Some time 
ago he was invited to dine at the house 
of a friend, whose wife went into her 
kitchen to give some final orders. Inci- 
dently she added to the servant, "We 
are to have a Jewish Rabbi for dinner 
to-day." For a moment the maid sur- 
veyed her mistress in grim silence. 
Then she spoke with decision: "All I 
have to say is, if you have a Jewish 
rabbi for dinner you '11 cook it yourself. ' ' 



It looks like a new structure for the 
Unitarian Church, although the matter 
has not been formally discussed by the 
trustees. The location of a new church 
would be largely left to the discretion 
and judgment of those members whose 
generosity might make it possible. 



Safety Razor | 



ASK US 
ABOUT OUR 

The Best in its Line 

Reasonable in Price ^ 

Jos. W. Harding & Co. / 

W 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 






THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



A Song o! tiie Burden Bearer. 

Over the narrow footpath 

That led from my lowly door, 
I went with a thought of the Master, 

As oft I had walked before; 
My heart was heavily laden. 

And with tears my eyes were dim. 
But I knew I should lose the burden 

Could I get a glimpse of Him. 

Over the trodden pathway. 

Through the fields all shorn and bare, 
I went with a step that faltered. 

And a face that told of care; 
I had lost the light of morning. 

With its shimmer of sun and dew. 
But a gracious look of the Master 

Would the strength of morn renew. 

While yet my courage wavered. 

And the sky before me blurred, 
I heard a voice behind me 

Saying a tender word; 
And I turned to see the brightness 

Of Heaven upon the road. 
And suddenly lost the pressure 

Of the weary, crushing load. 

Nothing that hour was alteretl, 

I still had the weight of care. 
But I bore it now with the gladness 

Which comes of answered prayer; 
No grief of the soul can fetter 

Nor cloud the vision, when 
The dear Lord gives the spirit 

To breath His will. Amen. 

— Margaret E. Sangster 



' Thoughtful of Him. 

"See here," said the lady, "you told 
me that work would only cost me $13, 
and here you've sent in a bill for $14. " 

"Yes'm, " replied the carpenter, "you 
see, when I came to think the thing over 
afterward I was afraid maybe you'd be 
superstitious about that 13." — Catholic 
Standard and Times. 

"What can be more perfect in its 
way," says the Buffalo Commercial, 
"than the remark of Tommy (hampered 
with a conscience and home from an 
afternoon party) : 'Mamma, darling, 
I've a great favor to ask of you. Please 
don't ask me how I behaved!" 

When a woman chooses a man with a 
bald head, a pair of bowlegs and a Sat- 
urday night pay check of $10 you can't 
accuse her of marrying for anything but 
pure, unalloyed, uncontaminated, un- 
questioned and undying love. — Lamar 
(Mo.) Democrat. 



FOR NINETEEN YEARS 

We have been headquarters for 
BOSTON BELTING CO.'S GARDEN HOSE. 
Always reliable — none better in the market, 
Also cheaper grades, making 7 grades from 7 
cents to 18 cents a foot. Also Hose Sundries 
of every description. 
Howe's Rubber Store, 52 Central Sq. 



OLD MAID PHILOSOPHY 

Some Blessings in Being Single; Be- 
sides. There's Always Hope. 

First — However dreary the outlook, 
as you wait for Prince Charming to show 
up, it is infinitely pleasanter than some 
find it who sit up waiting for their hus- 
bands to come home! 

Second— As you read divorce cases, 
and the stories of deserted wives and 
mothers, throw envy to the winds 
and be glad that you missed those mer- 
cies, anyway, as well as whatever led to 
these culminations. 

Third— A happy old maid is easily pos- 
sible, as is an unhappy Mrs. 

Fourth — Be cheerful over the fact 
that no man is afraid to be agreeable to 
you because of your jealous husband— 
and enjoy all the attentions that come 
your way, from men, and women, too. 

Fifth— If you feel a bit lonely now and 
then, look about among the "eligibles" 
of your acquaintance and see how many 
(or how few) of them all you would be 
willing to pour breakfast coffee with 
conversation for 365 times a year. 

Sixth — Rejoice and be exceeding glad 
that there is no one to smooth his locks 
with your side comb because he doesn't 
"know what the — has become" of his 
military brushes. 

Seventh— Take all the comfort you 
can in the thought that on "bargain 
day" you don't have to get home at a 
certain hour or minute on pain of a re- 
frigerating process if your husband's 
dinner is late. 

Eighth— Be glad, too, that when you 
go to the bank for a new supply of the 
"needful" you are not obliged to ex- 
plain why you need it or what you did 
with that "last month's five dollars." 
Not all men "cough up" as readily as 
the cashier does. 

Ninth— Remember with gratitude that 
"it is never too late to mend," nor to 
marry, and be sure to keep your mend- 
ing (or marriage) basket ever in view 
of the man whose capture will make 
you eternally happy. 

Tenth— "If at first you don't suc- 
ceed," don't give up the ship. — New 
York Herald. 



God gave me a little heart 
To love whate'er he made; 
Gave me strength to bear my part. 
Glad and unafraid. 

Laura E. Richards. 

A 

If every woman had her way, cooks 
would have to study hypnotism. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Opportun ity. 

To each man's life there comes a time supreme. 

One day, one night, one morning- or one r.oon. 
One rift through which sublime fulfillments gleam. 

One freighted hour ; one moment opportune. 
One time when Fate goes floating with the stream, 

One once betwixt too late ; too soon. 
Ah! happy he, who, knowing how to wait. 

Knows also how to work and watch and stand 
On life's broad deck, alert and at the prow 
To seize the passing moment big with Fate 

From Opportunity's extended hand 
When the great Clock of Destiny strikes " Now." 

It is good to have lived and loved and 
labored. It is good to be mi.ssed from 
the ranks while the march is going on. 
It is good to have lived so that men shall 
sigh and hearts shall ache when we are 
gone. The sigh and the heartache shall 
bring their joy in after days, when 
memory half gives back what we 
thought we had lost forever. It is good 
to have worked with all the energy at 
our command. And it is good to rest 
when that work is done. — Walter L. 
Sheldon. 

Always reckon that the Fourth of July 
is exactly five weeks from Memorial 
Day every year, and you will be correct. 

Sins that make you lose your head 
have the same effect on your heart. 



An American doctor built an elegant 
home, says the San Francisco Chronicle. 
His bathroom was of white marble and 
a music-box was concealed in the room. 
An Englishman came to visit the doctor, 
who, when he escorted his guest to the 
bathroom, turned on the music-box to 
give his guest a pleasant surprise. An 
hour later the Englishman joined his 
host, and the doctor asked what his 
guest thought of the bathroom. The 
EngHshman replied, "It is beautiful." 
"How did you like my music-box?" 
Said his guest with great disgust in his 
tones: "Bah! That music-box! The 
old thing played 'God save the King,' 
and I had to stand up the whole time I 
was trying to bathe." 

"And then," exclaimed Miss Passay 
indignantly, "she asked me if I wouldn't 
marry the first man that came along!" 

"The idea'!" exclaimed Miss Cutting. 
"Don't these obviously unnecessary 
questions make you tired? "-London Tel- 
egraph. 

One may study and gain knowledge, 
but you must live to gain wisdom. 

Subscribe for The Review. 



FOR THE JUNE 
W^EDDING 

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A special line of goods suitable for W^edding Gifts and Grad- 
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An elegant line of Cut Glass. 

Fine Watch Repairing and Engraving a specialty. 

Our Optical Department is growing every day, 
owing to the great pains taken in examining the 
eyes and giving the proper glasses required. 

Tel. 518 1 J. H. CONNER 81 Pearl St. 



Whenf dealing with advertisers please mention the Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



In the Twilight. 

The fire upon the hearth is low. 

And there is stillness everywhere, 

And like winged spirits, here and there. 

The firelight shadows fluttering go. 

And as the shadows round me creep, 
A childish treble breaks the gloom. 
And softly from a further room 

Comes : " Now 1 lay me down to sleci)." 

And somehow, with that little prayer 
And that sweet treble in my ears. 
My thoughts go back to distant years. 

And lingprs with a dear one there; 

And as I hear my child's Amen, 

My mother's faith comes back to me — 
Crouched at her side I seem to be. 

And mother holds my hands again. 

Oh for an hour in that dear place; 

Oh for the peace of that dear time; 

Oh for that childish trust sublime; 
Oh for a glimpse of mother's face! 
Yet as the shadows round me creep, 

1 do not seem to be alone — 

Sweet magic of that treble tone 
And " Now I lay me down to sleep." 

— Eugene Field. 

Good Form. 

A Washington correspondent told the 
other night a story that he claimed to 
have heard from President Roosevelt at 
a Gridiron Club dinner: 

' 'Two women, ' ' he said, ' 'were discuss- 
ing some new neighbors who had moved 
into one of the most sumptuous houses 
in their city. 

' ' 'They seem to be very rich, ' said the 
first. 

' ' 'Oh, they are, ' said the second. 

" 'Shall you call?' 

" 'Decidedly.' 

" 'You are sure, are you, that they are 
— er — quite correct, quite — er — good 
form?' 

" 'Oh, my dear. I'm positive,' said 
the second woman. 'They have thirty 
servants, eighteen horses, twelve dogs, 
eleven automobiles and one child.' " 

a* 

What greater thing is there for two 
human souls than to feel that they are 
joined for life, —to strengthen each oth- 
er in all labor, to rest in each other in 
all sorrow, to minister to each other in 
all pain, to be one with each other in 
silent, unspeakable memories at the 
moment of the last parting. — George 
Eliot. 



We Keep Nothing But Millinery 

See our line of Nobby Sailors All the go 
this season, and we have them right up to 
date. Our goods come direct from the manu- 
facturers and importers, and we can save you 
one profit. See our complete line of Hats, 
Bonnets, Toques, Lingerie Hats, in fact every- 
thing in headgear. 

HALL'S MILLINERY STORE 



Coeducation is Condemned. 

A writer in the Times, who is furnish- 
ing an interesting series of articles on 
"A Year Among Americans," seriously 
criticises the American method of co- 
education of the sexes. He admits its 
advantages for physiological and social 
reasons, but points out that at most of 
the coeducation schools girls are in the 
majority and the attention of the teach- 
ers is bestowed on them in proportion. 

A girl matures earlier than a boy and 
at the age at which the two are educat- 
ed together her power of concentration 
is greater. Thus it happens in many 
classes that the nature of the teaching 
is determined by the requirements of 
the girls, and as there is an irrepressi- 
ble tendency for the minority to imitate 
the majority the boys become an inferior 
copy of the girls, acquiring the girls' 
gentleness and sensitiveness, but not 
the proper strength of either sex. 

Eventually the boys are irreparably 
wounded in their dignity and lose faith 
in themselves. There is no greater 
danger to character than this. The 
school which fails to fortify character 
fails in all. 

Subscribe for The Lynn Review. 



Established 1SS2 



Lynn Granite and Marble Works 

G. B. MERRILL & CO., Proprietors 



132 
BOSTON 

ST.. 
LYNN, 

MASS. 

Telephone 
connection 




18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Must Read 26 Books a Day. 

Somebody has figured it out that a 
man will have to read at the rate of 
twenty-six books a day to keep up with 
American literature alone Last year, 
according to the Independent, we broke 
the record : 2,481 more books published in 
the United States than in 1906; far 
ahead of any previous year. 

The total number for 1907 was 9,620, 
from which may be subtracted 695 new 
editions, leaving 8,925 really new books 
appearing in the United States. 

Of these 6,517 were by American au- 
thors or were new editions manufact- 
ured in the United States, the others 
being by English or other foreign auth- 
ors or consisting of imported editions, 
bound or in sheets. 

We are gradually making good our 
literary declaration of independence, 
every year producing a larger propor- 
tion of the books we read, especially 
fiction. In quantity if not in quality 
we are catching up with England, 
where last year 9,914 books appeared, 
only 294 ahead of us, whereas in 1906 the 
English publications outnumbered the 
American by 1,464. 

The French in 1907 produced 10,785, 
of which, however, 2,000 or 3,000 were 
mere pamphlets. The Italian book pro- 
duction for the same year was 7,040. 
In the American list fiction of course 
stands at the head with 1,171 titles. 
Next to it and rapidly gaining on it is 
theology and religion, with 876. 

The classes following are law, physi- 
cal and mathematical science, poetry 
and the drama. Why is it that people 
will continue to say that religion is a 
dead issue and that nobody reads poetry 
in face of the fact that last year in 
this country the number of new publi- 
cations in religion was more than 40 per 
cent, greater than the year before, and 
the volumes of poetry more than doubled? 



The Wedding of the Sales-Lady. 

She was a stylish sales-ladee, 

A night-watch-gentleman was he. 

He loved, and asked if she'd agree 

A clergy-jjentleman to see. 

She murmured "Yes," and grew quite red. 

But quii kly fixed the day to wed. 

The wedding was a swell affair — 

No common " men " or " women " ther«. 

To be "en regie " was her aim. 

Ho only "gents " and " ladies " came. 

The cashier-lady of the store. 

The gentleman who walks the floor. 

The elevator-gentleman, 

The scrub-lady — and so it ran. 

Then when arrived the parting time. 

Cab-gentlemen with two sublime 

Real lady horses, snowy white 

Whirled bride and groom into the night: 

And e'en the trunks that with them went 

Were handled by a baggage-gent. 

— Catholic Standard. 

»T4 

A well-known club-man of New York 
was in camp with a friend from Minne- 
sota. Toward morning the New Yorker 
awoke shivering with the cold. The 
fire was very low. His companion was 
fast asleep. It isn't nice to get out of 
a warm blanket to roll frosty logs to the 
fire, so the wily New Yorker gave his 
friend a kick and then pretended to be 
asleep. There was no response, and 
presently he tried another kick. At 
this the Westerner broke into a laugh. 
"I did the same thing to you twenty 
minutes ago, ' ' he explained, ' 'and that's 
how you came to be awake." Then, of 
course, both turned out to build a fire. 



As an express train was going through 
a station, says Tid-Bits, one of the pas- 
sengers leaned too far out of the win- 
dow, overbalanced, and fell out. He 
fortunately landed on a sand heap, so 
that he did himself no great injury, but, 
with torn clothes and not a few bruises, 
said to a porter who was standing by, 
"What shall I do?" "You're all right 
mister," said the porter. Your ticket 
allows you to stop off." 




Many supposed RHEUMATIC 

Tmuhles can be traced to a FALLEN 
FOOT ARCH. If you are havin- 
painful experiences let us examine 
your feet and advise. 

We make things to help you and take 
pride in properly applying them. 




For VARICOSE VEINS we make a Special Elastic Stocking that will give the right sup- 
port at the right place. 

We have moved into our new 
factory 203-205 Oxford St. Office 
and well appointed fitting rooms 
on street floor. Cars pass. Lady 
attendants. 

Telephone l.?2 

Curtis & Spindeil Co. 



Abdominal Troubles and 
Back Aches yield to our 
custom made Abdominal 
Belts. 

Special Appliances to order 
and fit guaranteed. 




THE LYNN REVIEW 19 



SHALL WE LOSE THE OPPORTUNITY? 

LEGISLATORS ARE CALLED UPON TO ACT WITH GREAT WISDOM 
ON THE MERGER PROPOSITION. 

THE recent decision of the Supreme Court with reference 
to the holding of trolley lines by the New Haven system 
brings the Boston and Maine merger proposition to a crisis. 
The time now appears to have definitely arrived when the legis- 
lature must take a step either forward or backward, as this 
decision establishes beyond any question that the stock of the 
Boston and Maine held by the New Haven must be sold unless 
validating acts are passed. 

The serious question which the legislators must face is wheth- 
er or not they will allow this important interest to pass forever 
from this jurisdiction and beyond the limits of Massachusetts, or 
will allow it to repose in the treasury of the New Haven road to 
be administered under the direction of the Massachusetts Railroad 
Commission, and always within reach of our own legislature. 

Judging from past events it is to be feared that the legisla- 
ture will insist upon a policy which will drive these holdings to New 
York or to Canada or to some other large railway interest, but 
there has been such extended discussion, and so many substan- 
tial interests have expressed themselves strongly in favor of 
retaining control here in Massachusetts that the belief is becom- 
ing very general that the legislature will insist upon the advan- 
tage which is clearly given the state by the recent decision, 
namely, the practical control by legislature, courts and commis- 
sion of this great system, and incidentally of any grist that 
is carried to its mill. 

It now looks as though the New Haven might be called upon 
by the legislature to keep this stock for a time at least until the 
Railroad Commission or some other competent tribunal can deter- 
mine just where the interest of the commonwealth lies. 

Something surely must be done if the Boston and Maine sys- 
tem is to be relieved of the embarrassment caused by inability 
to pass votes to provide for financing its urgent needs in connec- 
tion with maturing obligations and imperative improvements 
and extensions. 

The right to vote upon the stock held by the New Haven is 
an absolute necessity, and if the legislature wishes to assist the 
Boston and Maine and Mr. Tuttle, it will pass some sort of an 
act giving that right at least to an extent sufficient to meet 
present emergencies. — Lowell Sun, 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



HABIT 



is a cable ; we weave a 
strand of it every day, 
and at last cannot break 
it. Better weave carefulness in all financial 
transactions. Through a check account your 
deposits, payments and balances are correctly 
shown and these daily weavings strengthen your 
commercial cable. 



Manufacturers National Bank 

BENJAMIN W. CURRIER, President 

WM. B. LITTTLEFIELD, Vice-President 

CLIFTON COLBURN, Cashier 



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V^-L/Vy 1 IXJ—yO and Kept in Order 



WE give you the best service possible for $1.50 per month, $4.00 
per three months, and $15.00 for one year. No contracts made 
for less than six months. This will allow one person three 
pieces per week. We CLEAN, make small REPAIRS, and press un- 
der this contract. Our team calls for and delivers your goods in Lynn, 
Salem, Swampscott and Peabody. 

Our DYEING and CLEANSING is as good as can be had at any 
first-class dye house. 

We have a first-class repair shop where we re-line coats and vests, 
put velvet collars on overcoats, and make general alterations. We 
would be pleased to have you give us a trial and we are sure we can 
please you. Telephone 546-2, or send a postal and our team will call. 

ATLANTIC CLEANSING COMPANY 

J. H. H. Hartshorn, Mgr. Established 1899. 117 Broad Street, Lynn 



When dealinfir with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 




60 cent* per Year TTTT V 1 QHS 

Sinffl« Copies 6 cents J U ij 1 , luKJO 



SECURITY SAFE DEPOSIT 
□AND TRUST COMPANYO 

MAIN OFFICE, BERGENGREN BLOCK, CENTRAL SQUARE, LYNN 
BRANCH OFFICE, No. 25 MARKET SQUARE, WEST LYNN, MASS. 

Safe Deposit Boxes .^ Storage Vaults 

Before leaving home for your vacation, why not 
place your valuables in the vaults of this company. 
We receive TRUNKS, BOXES and BULKY PACK- 
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SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent at prices ranging 
from $5.00 to $50.00 per year. 



W^HEN 'TIS A NEW IDEA IN 
WOMEN'S COSTUMES 

YOU get it here. No old styles are tolerated. Everything 
brand new and right up to the minute. 
Costumes that have the individual touch as if they 
come from the expensive dressmaker. 

We have the variety that makes it possible to select a cos- 
tume or garment that everybody else has not got. 

See our exclusive styles (not to be seen elsewhere in Lynn) 
in Princess Dresses, Reception and Evening Gowns, Lingerie 
and Shirt Waist Suits, Skirts, Coats and Petticoats of superior 
qualities at moderate prices. 



Telephone 1807 ^^T^^J^^^X^^^mX^Sw 312 Union Street 




THE LYNN REVIEW 



Large City Advantages 
at Town Expense] 



m' 



In calling attention to oui- Building Lots in Swampscott 
we wish to have prospective ' purchasers bear in mind 
these points : 

The very lowt t^x rate, giving City Advantages at 
a town expense. 

New and high grade streets just completed through 
the property. ., 

Each lot has 50 feet frontage, and over 5000 square 

feet. 
Fine Brick School on the premises. 
Large Public Playground. 
Neighborhood as select as Brookline. 
Two to fiv€«minutes from steam trains. 
Five minutes to the Atlantic Ocean. 
Gas and ElectHc Lights. 
Metropolitan water and sewers. 
No hou^se less than 13 feet from the street line. 
Mortgage rate only 5 per cent. , with only small 

payments down. 

STETSON LAND CO. 

SWAMPSCOTT, MASS. 

See Clifton Colburn, Manufacturers' Bank; J. H. 
Sisk, 145MdnroeSt. Stephen Smart, Swampscott, 
Mass., will meet you by request on the premises; 
telephone 1596-2. 

A. R. Ellis, Builder, telephone 1413. 

When dealinjr with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



^e Lynn Review 

A Monthly Epitome of 

LYNN AFFAIRS 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingails, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



JULY, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 9 



Lynn should have a shoe trade school. 



The city hall should be remodeled and 
enlarged. 

Lost — Somewhere between sunrise 
and sunset — a new county court house. 



When the Thaw trials and the High 
Rock complications are settled the pub- 
lic will rest easier. 



Lynn needs a general purchasing 
agency so that the city's business may 
be done upon a business basis. 



The school board did well to elect 
their old officers. This is one of the best 
managed departments in the city and 
comes into very close touch with most of 
our people. 

Speaking of the great need of quiet- 
ness in Lynn the night before the Fourth. 
the News very aptly remarks. "If 
the police feel unable to cope with the 
Wapping gang call out the militia." 



We are glad that the board of public 
works finally decided to repair the side- 
walk on the east side of Union street, 
near Central Depot. For too long a 
time sober men have appeared intoxicat- 
ed when walking along this thorough- 
fare. 

Lynn has to pay $28,088. 12 as its share 
of the expenses in the Metropolitan dis- 
trict. This is a good expenditure for 
Lynn when it is noted the advantages 
that have been secured for this munici- 
pality. 

The greatest hot weather political joke 
of this season was the talk in some of 
the papers regarding Col. Melvin O. 
Adams for vice-president. There is 
much rubbish in the political ash heap, 
but this was the very limit. 



That Wapping Gang. 

Those Wapping hoodlums should be 
put down without mercy. They are a 
tough lot. When a married man, twenty- 
five years of age, heads a gang of hood- 
lums in stealing barrels for a July Fourth 
bonfire and hurls defiance at a police 
officer who is endeavoring to preserve 
the public peace, the judge or jury should 
dispose of such an offender with most 
emphatic haste. The authorities have 
dallied with this Wapping aggrega- 
tion too long. They are cheap, low down 
and offensive, and they carry terror to 
many people in that locality. When we 
lived in Wapping there was no such go- 
ings on and it must be that the change 
in the character of the population has 
much reduced in quality during the past 
decade. The Wapping crowd is more 
lawless than was ever the old Brickyard 
gang. Judge Sisk did his full duty in 
handing out a three-months house of 
correction sentence to the chief offender. 



July— Chronology 

John Hay died, 1905. 
James A. Garfield shot, 1881. 
Bishop Newman died, 1899. 
Crimean War ended, 1855. 
Financial Panic in Denver, 1893. 
Atlantic Cable laid, 1865. 
Robert Fulton born, 1765. 

A correspondent states that it was 
wrong for the city to lay out Sea street 
as it did. He claims that it should have 
been done under the betterment plan, and 
the property owners benefitted should 
have paid the bulk of the expense. 

If the other months show up as well 
for no-license as the month of May there 
won't be much question as to Lynn con- 
tinuing in the no column. There were 
only 136 arrests for drunkenness this 
May as against 479 arrests in the same 
month last year. That is an emphatic 
argument in favor of no-license. 

If some of the politicians did not have 
the Lynn harbor for a working basis we 
wonder what they would do. We are 
again in the throes of a harbor discus- 
sion, and the recommendation of the 
United States engineers that the nat- 
ional goverment provide funds for en- 
larging and deepening the turning basin 
connected with the channel in the harbor 
is very pleasing to members of the board 
of trade and persons interested in the 
development of Lynn and improvement 
of harbor facilities. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.56 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 




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When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



My Shadow. 

I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me. 
And what can be the use of him is more than I 

can see. 
He is very, very like me from the heels up to the 

head, 
And I see him jump before me when I jump into 

my bed. 

The funniest thing about him is the way he likes 

to grow — 
Not at all like proper children, which is always 

very slow — 
For he sometimes shoots up taller, like an india 

rubber ball, 
And he sometimes gets so little that there's none 

of him at all. 
He hasn't got a notion of how children ought to 

play 
And can only make a fool of me in every sort of 

way. 
He stays so close beside me, he's a coward, you 

can see — 
I'd think shame to stick to nursie as that shadow 

sticks to me. 

One morning very early, before the sun was up, 

I rose and found the shining dew on every butter- 
cup. 

But my lazy little shadow, like an arrant sleepy- 
head. 

Had stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep 
in bed. 

— Robert Louis Stevenson 

At a dinner in honor of Richard Henry 
Stoddard, ex-Judge Henry E. Howland 
told a story of how Mr. Stoddard opened 
a tomato can, to illustrate his intense 
ardor. Mr. Stoddard, he said, went 
into the closet to open the can, and soon 
his wife heard him talking vigorously. 
"What are you doing there, Mr. Stod- 
dard?" she asked. "Opening a toma- 
to can," he said. "What with?" asked 
his wife. "With a knife," replied Mr. 
Stoddard : ' 'did you think I was opening 
it with my teeth?" No," she said, 
"but from your language I thought 
that you were opening it with prayer. ' ' 
— The Independent. 
A 

According to the Bookman, the six 
books which sold the best during the 
past month in the order of demand were : 
The Barrier, The Black Bag, The Shut- 
tle, Old Wives for New, The Lady of the 
Decoration, and The Fair Moon of Bath. 

Criticism of Chief Engineer Harris of 
the fire department has not been so fre- 
quent since his splendid work at the 
Blood fire. 



From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



George C. Melville has recovered from 
his long illness and is now giving his 
usual close personal attention to busi- 
ness. There is now in progress at the 
Melville store a special sale of ready- 
made garments in all the popular warm 
weather materials, shirt waists, prin- 
cess dresses and lingerie costumes, sep- 
arate coats, skirts and petticoats, which 
have accumulated during the past few 
weeks on account of unseasonable weath- 
er, poor business conditions, etc. These 
goods are now offered at prices which 
will very likely much interest the shrewd 
women buyers in Lynn and vicinity. 
The Melville store has a reputation for 
g:iving, not only good values, but styles 
and patterns which cannot be duplicated 
in any other store in this section because 
Mr. Melville has the exclusive handling 
of his most important offerings. The 
particular attention of women is called 
to the sale now in progress at the Mel- 
ville store. 

Senior Partner — "That new lady 
shorthand clerk who types your letters 
spells ridiculously." 

Junior Partner — "Does she? Well, if 
she does, it's about the only word she 
can spell, so far as my observation goes. ' ' 



^()<CI>O0()<=>)0()<CI>O0()<=>O0()<==>O<s? 

5 iCamt iluBtttuttnn y 

^0<z>ooo<z:^K)00<ii>000<z>ooo<::^>0^ 



25 EXCHANGE ST. 
LYNN 



President. . 
Treasurer. . 



CHARLES S. PURINTON 
FREDERICK L. BUBIER 



cTWONEY DEPOSITED 

IN JULY 

GOES UPON INTEREST 

AUGUST 1 

Open Every Business Day, from9 to 1 o'clock 
Also SATURDAYS, from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CITY OF LYNN 



Inspector of Buildings* Notice. 



Lynn, Mass., June 22, 1908. 

To the Citizens of Lynn — 

You are respectfully requested to use 
extra precaution in clearing back yards 
and area ways from all rubbish and com- 
bustible material; owners and occupants 
of buildings in the business part of the 
city to see that their shutters are care- 
fully closed from closing time until after 
the close of the celebration of our na- 
tional holiday, to avoid danger from fire. 

Per order 

HERBERT C. BAYRD, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



I ABOUT OUR Safety Razor | 

Pi The Best in its Line 9 

^ Reasonable in Price 5s{ 

j? Jos. W. Harding & Co. Z 

55 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quality at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens CBb Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



HayFever 



Instant Relief 
I aixl positive cure. 
Trial treatment 
mulled free. 
Toxlco Laboratory, 1123 Broadway, New York. 




We have in our stock TWO MAKES OF REFRIGERATORS 

EDDY and ALASKA 

THEY have been selected from scores of other refrigerators 
as being the best in workmanship and finish, economical in 
the use of ice, and thoroughly dependable in their retention and 
circulation of cold dry air. In sultry, humid weather, the 
weather that tries all refrigerators, foods and liquids will be 
kept sweet and pure. 

Prices begin at $6.00 and go to $45.00 



WE WOULD LIKE TO SHOW THEM TO YOU 



D. B. H. POWER 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHER Central Square, Lynn 



When dealinir with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



A Song of the Aged. 

When sunset pales, like melting ruby, in pellucid 
lake, 
The snowy swan, slow sailing, seeks his rest 
among the rushes. 
Now, lilies, fold your chalices, more pure than 
alabaster. 
So, croon and nestle, children of all birds, to 
notes of thrushes. 

At eventide return all they that wander forth in 
morning. 
Adown the hillside come the willing kine, and 
bleating sheep 
Descend the pasture paths that lead them to their 
lowly fold. 
When stretch the purple wings of night above 
the heights and deep. 

The fishers bring their boats to shore amid efful- 
gent gloaming. 
His heavy step the husbandman directs to near- 
ing light. 
With growing peace 1 hail sweet portals of my 
Father's house; 
Fori have worked a full day through, am weary; 
then Good-night. 

—Albert H. Plumb, Jr. 

The nineteenth annual report of the 
Lynn Park Commissioners recently is- 
sued reflects special credit upon Nathan 
M. Hawkes, chairman of the board. 
Besides the numerous reports there is a 
review of conditions in Lynn Woods with 
especial reference to the brown-tail 
moth. The report is profusely illustrat- 
ed, one picture in colors of the Lantern 
Rock path in autumn calling for particu- 
lar mention. About two thousand people 
visited the High Rock Reservation dur- 
ing Old Home Week of last year. 

Frank W. Atkins' recent gift to the 
city of about three and one-half acres of 
land near Flax pond for a playground is 
only another very useful way of adding to 
the attractiveness, beauty and general 
enjoyment of Lakeside, toward the build- 
ing up of which he has done much. The 
demand for it was almost necessary in 
the vicinity and the city must only take 
possession and improve one acre within 
a year. There should be scores of these 
breathing places about the city. 
A 

Sentimental Young Lady — "Ah, Pro- 
fessor! what would this old oak say if it 
could talk?" Professor — "It would say, 
'I am an elm.' " — Fliegende Blatter. 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 




KEEPS 
CONTEKTS 
HOT 
« HOURS 



COLD 
7? HOURS 



THE 

THERMOS 

BOTTLE 



Keeps hot Hquids hot 2U hours — 
Ice cold liquids ice cold 72 hours. 
It consists of one glass bottle inside 
another with a vacuum between 
through which neither heat nor cold 
can pass. No chemicals. Lasts a 
lifetime. Filled, cleaned, emptied 
same as any ordinary bottle. 

The THERMOS Bottle Outdoors- 
When Motoring, Yachting, Picnic- 
ing. Hunting, Fishing, Canoeing, 
Traveling, you can have hot and cold 
drinks ready if you put them into 
THERMOS Bottles before you start. 
There's a Thermos Basket for 6 bot- 
tles, also leather case for 2. 

The THERMOS Bottle Indoors- 
Keeps baby's milk warm and sweet 
day and night— always ready. In the 
sick room the THERMOS Bottle 
keeps nourishment and drinks at 
the right temperature— prevents in- 
fection—saves steps for nurses. 
At Home, Office or Factory the 
THERMOS Bottle supplies drinks hot 
or cold just when you want them. 

Thermos Bottles are sold everywhere. 
If your dealer will not supply you we 
will ship direct. Pints $3.75. Quarts 
$5.75. Write for Jree booklet. 

American Thermos Bottle Co. 

533 Fifth Ave., New York. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Orders by Telephone Promptly Attended To 

Andrew Schlehuber 

BAKER, CATERER, 
CONFECTIONER 

78 EXCHANGE STREET 

All kinds of Catering in First-class Style. 

Special Prices to Churches and Large Pai'ties 
of all kinds. 

Orders for Sunday should be given Saturday 
before to insure prompt delivery. 



GREEN & SON 

T->T A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
JrlAINVjO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



NEW YORK CITY 



A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 
The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
— a restaurant 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for men. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
ese servants. 

Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Send Jor Booklet 

T. F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



HOWE 



is showing quite a line 
of Auto Coats for Ladies 
and Gentlemen in Oil, 
Khaki, Rubber, Mohair, Hydegrade and Silk. 
Prices S5.00 to $20.00. 



The RUBBER STORE 

52 Central Sq. 



Trolley Information. 

For the past three years the Boston & Northern 
and Old Colony Street Railway Companies have 
had a public office of the Passenger Department 
at 309 Washington Street, Boston, and in conjunc- 
tion with this office has been conducted a general 
free trolley information bureau. Not only has the 
literature, maps, time tables and other matters 
concerning these two systems been kept there for 
free distritiution, but also all of those which could 
be obtained from other companies throughout 
New England, while arrangements have been 
made for special cars and excursions conducted. 

During the summer months of the past two 
years the New England Street Railway Club has 
conducted a free trolley information bureau at 
306 Washington Street. This, also, has been much 
appreciated and of great value to all concerned. 
While this plan in both instances, as has been 
stated, started as an experiment, it is an experi- 
ment no longer. It is an established fact. 

With the idea based on past experience, that the 
public would be better served with less confusion 
and with greater facility by a concentration of 
effort, during the summer months this year the 
free trolley information bureaus of both will be 
combined in the office of the Passenger Depart- 
ment of the Boston & Northern and Old Colony 
Street Railway Companies at 309 Washington 
Street. 

At this office will be found all the trolley infor- 
mation about the lines of New England, and some 
outside of New England, that it is a human possi- 
bility to secure. There will be a great variety of 
maps, time tables and other publications which, 
with any information, will be given very gladly 
free of charge. Special trolley publications that 
are known as reliable, which are usually for gen- 
eral sale on newstands will be sold here, as well as 
such special excursion tickets, etc., as may be 
offered for sale at various times. All that years 
of experience and unfailing good will can devise or 
secure for the benefit of the present or prospec- 
tive trolley rider will be found at this office, the 
only generally authorized trolley information 
bureau in the city of Boston. 



For Your Summer Home 

Imported expressly for us. 

Japanese Piazza Screens at very 
Low Prices. Japanese Piazza Seats 
at Wholesale Prices. 

Muslin Curtains, Sofa Pillows, 
Couch Covers, Oilcloths and Lino- 
leums, White Iron Beds. 

Prices Reasonable 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 Market Street 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



July. 

Some flowers are withered and some joys have 

died; 
The garden reeks with an East Indian scent 
From beds where gillyflowers stand weak and 

spent; 
The white heat pales the skies from side to side; 
But in still lakes and rivers, cool, content. 
Like starry blooms on a new firmament. 
White lilies float and i-egally abide. 
In vain the pallid clouds refuse to share 
Their dews; the lily feels no thirst no dread. 
Unharmed she lifts her queenly face and head; 
She drinks of living waters and keeps fair. 

-(H. H.) 

A 

If you are not informed regarding the 
wonderful facilities of the Thermos bot- 
tles in keeping water and other liquids 
hot and cold you should at once inquire. 
An interesting announcement on another 
page gives full details. Many of our 
people have these bottles in regular use 
and it will mean much for your comfort 
and convenience if you want hot or cold 
drinks at your bedside at night, or on your 
auto trip to know that these bottles 
give you steadily good service. They 
never fail. The writer recently, at At- 
lantic City, saw one of these bottles in a 
demonstrator's window, resting on a 
cake of ice. The demonstrator took up 
the bottle, removed the top and poured 
out boiling water. It had rested upon 
the ice several hours. 
■?« 

The death of Rev. John D. Pickles 
carried sorrow to many hearts. He was 
an able and energetic man, and no min- 
ister ever worked more loyally for the 
welfare of his parish. Dr. Pickles was 
near to his people, and kindly, sympa- 
thetic and helpful to a marked degree. 
He literally worked himself to death 
and was completely bound up in the suc- 
cess of his parish. When he died he 
was promoting a movement toward se- 
curing a new edifice for St. Paul's and 
his earnestness of purpose and wonder- 
ful energy led him to overtax his ener- 
gies. Dr. Pickles will be sincerely 
mourned, fully as much outside of his 
denomination as in it. 

Don't be content to be an average 
man. Strive to excel. Thus will the 
average be raised. 



Women and Their Clothes. 

'"pHE latest information from Paris 
X regarding styles is that there is a 
climax in skirts, and that Paris is rebel- 
ling against the clinging and empire 
gowns. Extravagance in dress never 
was at such a high point, and the sheath 
skirts, scarfs and draperies are com- 
plained against because they cling so 
closely. 

An extreme has been reached in em- 
pire and clinging models, and the new 
modes are said by fashion authorities 
not to be likely to find favor in America. 
The sheath skirt in moderate lines and 
the short waist are accepted fashions. 

Satin of the softest, supplest sorts is 
a great favorite, even for the hot weath- 
er frock, being peculiarly well adapted 
to the present modes, and either above 
or in combination with other materials 
it is used for everything from trotting 
costumes to ball gowns. In medium 
tones it makes most practical and mod- 
ish afternoon frocks. 

The life of duty, not the life of mere 
ease or mere pleasure— that is the kind 
of life which makes the great man as it 
makes the great nation. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


, D.D.S. 1 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN. MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton, Pres., 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.-Treae. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



A Progressive Trolley Tale. 

Ten little men were sitting in a line 

In a car. when one fell out — then there were nine. 

Nine little men stuck to their seats like fate. 
When a pretty girl got in; then there were eight. 

Eight little men thought they were in flirt heaven, 
When her escort threw one out, which left seven. 

Seven little men they hurried out of the mix. 
Ana the last one transferred quick, then there 
were six. 

Six little men sat quiet, glad to be alive. 
When one tried a nickel bad; of course, that 
made five. 

Five little man all crowded toj near the door. 
One got "pinched" for stealing rides; then there 
were four. 

Four little men. all meek as they could be, 
When they saw a free lunch sign; then there 
were three. 

Three little men sat chatting, feeling very blue. 
When one's new green hat blew ofT — then there 
were two. 

Two little men were talking of a recent "bun," 
One got thirsty thinking of it; then there was one. 

One little man thought he would make all the run. 
When a "Merry Widow" hat came in— then there 

was none! 

— By Josh Wink, in the Baltimore American. 



Improved Telephone Service. 

''r>HE telephone company shows a de- 
L cided disposition to give good service 
to its Lynn subscribers. There are 
nearly 4000 daily calls outside of Lynn, 
the larger part being for Boston. 

Arrangements have been made so that 
there are direct circuits to Boston, Salem 
and other exchanges within the radius of 
fifteen miles. This new arrangement is 
greatly appreciated by the Lynn sub- 
scriber who now practically has the 
Boston telephone service at his immedi- 
ate command. 

The same operating methods now in 
use in Boston have been adopted in 
Lynn, adding greatly to the efficiency of 
the toll service to the Lynn subscribers. 
Calling any of these points the subscrib- 
er only has to give the exchange name 
and the number of the party he desires 
to the operator, who calls the exchange 
and connects the desired party without 
the intervention of a toll operator and 
without the necessity of the subscriber 
removing the receiver from his ear. 
This enables a Lynn subscriber to get a 
party in Boston or nearby town almost 
as quickly as he can reach a subscriber 
in Lynn. 

Amos H. Humphrey, of the D. B. H. 
Power Company, wore a very expansive 
smile last month. 'Twas a boy, the 
second male Humphrey. 



The Railroad Mix-up. 

WJ E do not blame President Tuttle of 
V T the Boston and Maine Railroad for 
turning his back upon the mess of legis- 
lation which the solons at Beacon Hill 
were serving up for the railroad corpo- 
rations. When the politicians get up 
against a business question the pubhc 
has a small show for relief. It is too bad 
that this railroad question has been 
made the foot-ball of politics and not 
decided upon its merits. 

The Lynn representatives, with one 
exception voted for the merging of the 
railroad interests. We believe that this 
represents Lynn public sentiment. Con- 
solidations may not be desirable from 
every point of view, but in the larger 
number of instances they have worked in 
the public interest. Theoretically, they 
seem wrong. Practically they appear to 
have worked out for the genera! good. 
Nobody with any sense would return to 
the days of 147 railroads on the B. & M. , 
when you had to get out at about every 
other junction to buy a ticket for anoth- 
er ride. Such days have gone for good. 
Consolidation is the law of to-day, and 
it seems too bad that the Boston and 
Maine and the New York, New Haven 
and Hartford Railroads cannot get to- 
gether upon a business basis, without the 
playing of small politics, and the con- 
ducting of false agitation among the 
people. It is believed that the laws of 
Massachusetts can properly safeguard 
any railroad consolidation that might be 
decided upon by the legislature. 
A 

The idea of Alderman James E. Rich 
that the collection of paper and rags 
should become a municipal duty and be 
made by the board of health is worthy 
of much careful consideration, both from 
the standpoint of health and of better- 
ment of property value and general liv- 
ing conditions. The large storehouse 
which he suggests could be located in 
an obscure part of the city, occupying 
very much less space than the present 
individual junk dealers; and the rags 
and paper could be collected and treated 
in such a way as first of all to protect 
public health, and not by any means for 
financial gain. That the city would suf- 
fer a financial loss would be extremely 
doubtful when one considers on what a 
large scale the work could be carried on. 

About 8000 fares were taken on the 
Nahant Beach railroad on the hottest 
Sunday last month. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



How Would You Like It? 

"How would you like," said the Firecracker red. 

"To have a match slow applied to your head; 

To feel the flame crawlins: along your hair. 

And then to explode beyond repair?" 

"How would you like," said the Torpedo Cane, 

To be frequently pounded with miprht and main 

On pavement, or floor, or solid rock. 

And lose some of your height at every shock?" 

"How would you like." said the Roman Candle. 

"To be lighted up by your only handle. 

And then to go 'way ofl' in the air. 

To come down a stick, just anywhere?" 

"Our lives," they agreed, "are full of foreboding 

Of a horrible death by a sudden exploding; 

Though we fear its no use the idea to discuss. 

We'd rather the hose would be turned on us!" 

— Camilla J. Knight 

A 

In commenting on the J. B. Blood Co. 
fire it should have been stated in favor 
of the firm that had it not been for their 
fire wall, built by them at a much high- 
er altitude than was prescribed by the 
insurance companies, there would have 
been danger of a West Lynn conflagra- 
tion. Also, the extinguishing service 
maintained by the company did splendid 
work in staying the flames at the start. 
This is not stated to in any way reduce 
the praise accorded the Lynn fire depart- 
ment for its splendid service, but mere- 
ly to give the public to understand that 
the J. B. Blood Co. in maintaining such 
a splendid fire wall and fire service in 
their establishment did a great public 
service, because the insurance men stat- 
ed that had it not been for these fire 
preventatives Lynn would undoubtedly 
have been visited by a conflagration. 

"Professor," she said, "do tell me 
the name of some good piece of classi- 
cal music for the piano! I am so tired 
of hearing my daughters play what 
everybody else plays." "Well, mad- 
am," responded the "lion" of the even- 
ing, "suppose you try — let me see — 
'Rolfe's Opus 97.' " "I am glad you 
mentioned that, professor, " she rejoined 
with enthusiasm. "If there is anything 
in the world I am fond of, it is opuses!" 
—Youth's Companion. 

Senator Lodge showed his great abili- 
ty in the National Republican Conven- 
tion last month. There was no chance 
to rush through the third-term idea, 
with Senator Lodge in the chair. By 
and by it will dawn upon those who have 
pooh-poohed Mr. Lodge's ability that he 
is a most able and astute politician. 

There are lots of bargain-counter peo- 
ple in the show-window class. 



The Central Bank Vice-Presidency. 

''pHE action of the directors of the 
1 Central National Bank in electing 
John H. Cross as vice-president gives to 
that institution a worthy successor to 
the late Charles Henry Newhall. Mr. 




Cross has been a director of the Cen- 
tral bank for several years and he has 
become expert as a judge of credits, 
not only in the shoe trade, but in other 
lines of industry. The Central bank is 
to be congratulated upon having such a 
well equipped successor to the late vice- 
president Newhall. 



The troubles of the members of the 
Gould family continue to fill many col- 
umns of the newspapers. Between the 
matrimonial difficulties of Howard Gould 
and his wife and the antics of Anna 
Gould and her former husband and the 
attempt to form a new "princely" alli- 
ance with French "aristocracy." people 
who are without means are probably 
more than ever ready to come to the con- 
clusion that money is too often a curse. 

There were 860 or more degrees given 
out at Harvard last month, on the most 
humid day of the season — and the Bos- 
ton Journal weather man said it "even 
seemed hotter than that." 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Bought your 

Straw Hat 

Yet? 

Panamas are "IT" 
this Season 

We have them for Ladies and Gentlemen 

LADIES' $6.00 AND $8.00 
MEN'S $5.00 TO $12.00 

In the Soft Braids and Sailors we 
are, as usual, at the iop. 

See us before buying your straw. 



AMOS B.CHASE 

Cold Storage for Furs 

Telephone 425 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CEu W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109i-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



Mr. Spriggins (gently): "My dear, a 
Boston man was shot by a burglar and 
his life was saved by a button which the 
bullet struck." Mrs. Spriggins: "Well, 
what of it?" Mr. Spriggins: "Noth- 
ing, only the button must have been 
on. " — Sacred Heart Review. 



TDEGPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



A Dream Cruise. 

My prayers I say and lay me down; 

The lights of Starland gleam afar. 
My trundle bed is Sleepy Town, 

My window is the harbor bar. 

Beyond the curtained patch of blue 
There lies a fair and wondrous sea; 

My dream ship feels the flowing tide, 
I hear my sailors calling me. 

A shallop skims across the blue. 
And Jackies touch their hats, polite. 

"Come get aboard, dear captain, do. 
The bells are sounding candle light." 

The lullaby my mother croons 
Grows fainter and still fainter grows; 

The bos'n pipes his merry tunes 
And dances on his timber toes. 

Heigh-ho! a merry crew, I ween. 
For some are wood, and some are dough. 

And some before in books I've seen. 
And some are dolls I used to know. 

Now, where away, oh captain, where? 

I'd sail me swift. I'd sail me far. 
The evening winds are blowing fair, 

We'll head her for the Morning Star. 

— George W. Stevens 

In addition to representing the New 
England Mutual Life Insurance Co. Jos- 
eph W. Wood has made arrangements 
for special facilities for the executing 
of all forms of surety bonds. He is in a 
position to give you the best possible 
service and will guarantee that the rates 
named shall be as low or lower than it is 
possible to secure elsewhere. Corporate 
suretyship is very rapidly taking the 
place of personal surety. Mr. Wood 
handles surety bonds, whether they be 
judicial, official, contract, or fidelity. 
He is also in a position to handle all other 
forms of insurance, including fire, acci- 
dent of all kinds, health, liability, auto- 
mobile and annuities. Mr. Wood is at 
140 Congress street, Boston. 



It is not an easy matter for some peo- 
ple to secure the shoes they want in 
Lynn. This is peculiar when it is con- 
sidered that Lynn is such a prominent 
shoe manufacturing center. Several 
lines of shoes which have the largest 
sale in the country are not sold in Lynn. 

One of the greatest forces for good in 
this city is the Public Library. 

BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



The Collar That They Wore. 

"Henry Plumley ran a collar factory. 
Times were reputed to be hard with 
him. When his factoi-y, which was 
very heavily insured, burned down there 
was every indication that he had set the 
place on fire himself in oi-der to get the 
insurance money. Vii-ginia City was 
the soul of honor in those days. Shocked 
beyond words, it rose en masse, seized 
Henry Plumley, put a halter around his 
neck and lynched him. 

"But hedidn(-t die. The sheriff ar- 
rived and cut him down in time. He 
was tried and found guilty and served a 
term in jail. 

"On his release you wouldn't have 
thought that he'd retui'n to Virginia 
City again, eh? He did, though. He 
came back, i-eopened his collar factory 
and prospered. 

"What gave him his start was the odd 
advertisement with which he announced 
his return to business among us. Pre- 
ceded by a brass band, Henry, in a great 
gilt chariot, burst upon our streets. He 
sat on a kind of golden throne, and he 
held on a crimson cushion in his lap an 
old, old collar. Above the collar, on a 
crimson banner, waved this inscription 
in hugh letters of gold: 

" 'This is the collar we wore when we 
were lynched. It saved our life. Be 
wise in time and use no other. At all 
retailers, 10 cents apiece, three for a 
quarter.' "—Washington Star. 

Mayor Porter has recently laid before 
the finance committee a recommendation 
of the state sealer to appoint an assist- 
ant to the local sealer of weights and 
measures and to provide more service- 
able quarters. It is hoped that this will 
be met with the committee's approval, 
for the work of this city department has 
been most painstaking and conscientious 
under Mr. McCarthy's direction. 

»T4 

The celebration of the Fourth of July in 
Lynn will surely keep up to the mark set 
in previous years. Besides the numer- 
ous athletic sports and band concerts 
there will be an illuminated canoe car- 
nival on Flax pond together with an 
aerial display of fireworks. 

In London a cook was correcting the 
grammar of a housemaid. "Don't say 
' ax,' you wulgar critter," corrected the 
cook, "sayharsk!" 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. Many are called but few get up. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Last Road. 

Across the silence of the hills 

(Oh, distant hills of dream!) 
The piper's magic music shrills 

And ripples like a stream. 
Beyond the moor, beyond the fen. 

Thin, tremulous and silver clear. 
It pierces to the souls of men; 

It calls — and they must hear. 

The voice of all the crowded town 

(Oh, voice of tears and laughter!) 
The piper's charmed note shall drown; 

They turn and follow after. 
By its wild lure their feet are drawn 

To walk a way they do not know. 
Whatever heart be left to mourn 

It calls— and they must go. 

They leave their heart's desire behind; 

(Oh, witching tune the piper plays!) 
None know that they may hope to find; 

What waits beyond the trackless ways 
No grief can hold, no love can keep; 

No wild regret their eyes can dim. 
Whatever heart be left to weep 

The piper calls — they follow him. 
— Pall Mall Magazine 



Both the state and county taxes are 
larger than last year. Hence by the loss 
of the license fees and the increasing 
expenses of the city all the time, a high- 
er rate must be paid by property owners. 
But the value of property owned in the 
city is expected to show an increase of 
about half a million, while personal prop- 
erty has fallen off about one million 
dollars due to general business depres- 
sion and persons moving from Lynn. 
Many knotty problems will be presented 
to the finance committee of the city 
council, for strenuous efforts must be 
made to keep the city in normal condi- 
tion financially. 

"It is worth reviving, that sweet little 
story of one of the princely grandsons 
who asked Queen Victoria for a sovereign 
and received instead a lecture against 
extravagance in the royal handwrit- 
ing. The boy politely thanked her: 
"Dearest Grandmamma, — I received 
your letter, and hope you will not think 
I was disappointed because you could not 
send me any money. It was very kind 
of you to give me good advice. I sold 
your letter for £4 lOs. " — Transcript. 

The Yale degree to John Pierpont 
Morgan was well deserved. He is the 
greatest force for American prosperity, 
and it will be a sorry day for this coun- 
try when he ceases to be in control. He 
is a business man, and succeeds by build- 
ing up — never tearing down. 

The greatest illusion of all is to think 
you haven't any. 



What Carnegie Has Done. 

Before steel produced the greatest 
corporation on earth it produced the 
greatest single business man in history. 
Andrew Carnegie could not do what he 
did without help, but it was his brain 
and his hand that steered the ship. 
When he and his forty partners were 
bought out and Carnegie quit business, 
all his partners were multi-millionaires, 
and he now has a steel pension of forty- 
four thousand dollars a day. The ex- 
travagance of Louis XIV. is still a full 
page in history, but that profligate mon- 
arch in all his long reign did not squand- 
er one-tenth as much as Mr. Carnegie 
has given away in the last six years. 
The Steel Laird's donations now amount 
to a total of $122,500,000. Of this 
amount $42,000,000 has gone to erect 
1400 public libraries. 



Rossbach, pitcher for Galesburg, of 
the Illinois-Missouri league, pitched a 
game last month in which he did not 
allow the opposing batsmen a hit, and 
not one of them succeeded in reaching 
first base. But twenty-seven men faced 
him during the whole nine innings. 



LIFE 
INSURANCE 

IN THE BEST AND STRONGEST 
COMPANIES IN AMERICA 

Study These Rates 

Annua! Cost N£W Whole Life Policy per $1,000 

Age 20 . $14.96 I Age 40 . $26.09 

Age 25 . 16.77 I Age 45 . 31.47 

Age 30 . 19.08 1 Age 50 . 38.83 

Age 35 . 22.10 | Age 55 . 48.98 



Send age. nearest birthday, for 
specimen policy. State occupa- 
tion. Write TODAY. 



DO NOT DELAY 

W. E. WARREN 

Room 51 
333 Union Street, Lynn 

Send all correspondence to P.O. Box 536, Lynn 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15. 



Moon Changes. 

First Quarter, July 6. 
Full Moon, July 13. 
Last Quarter, July 20. 
New Moon, July 27. 

A 
The Refreshing Ride to Nahant. 

''pHE Nahant railroad is becoming 
1 quite a popular route for many peo- 
ple who like to have the cooling off pro- 
cess applied after the heat of the day. 
There has been a great development in 
evening car riding to Nahant during the 
present season, not due wholly to the 
spiritual question, but on account of 
people having ascertained, as they did 
last month, that on many of the hot 
days the thermometer runs from ten to 
fifteen degrees lower in Nahant than in 
Lynn. This is particularly the case 
when a Southwest wind is on as was the 
case several times last month, and under 
these conditions it is a great relief to 
ride to Nahant. The Nahant Beach car 
line is splendidly maintained, both in 
point of equipment and every other de- 
tail. The cars are just as orderly and 
well managed as before liquor selling 
conditions were reversed in Lynn, so 
that there need be no apprehension on 
this point. It is the first requisite of 
the Nahant Beach railroad that no dis- 
orderly passenger will be tolerated. 

He Wants Information. 

To the Editor of the Review : 

Has Mrs. Alice Roosevelt Longworth 
ever read her father's addresses relative 
to race suicide, and what a mother 

should do? ONE OF TRIPLETS. 

In answer to the correspondent we 
would state that we have no knowledge 
regarding what Mrs. Alice has read, but 
would state that existing facts are 
against Mrs. Longworth having taken 
her father's advice in the direction al- 
luded to. 

It was a shame to remove those noble 
elms on Franklin street. It takes a 
century to grow such handsome trees, 
and then you do not always get such re- 
sults. Small wonder the abutters were 
indignant. 



BRIGHTER AND CHtAPER LIGHT. 

Don't lilanic the tras or the meter for poor 
liKht and larRe gas bills; usually the fault lies 
with the poor lightint? appliances. The best 
illumination for the least money can be ob- 
tained through using 

Lindsay Lights and Mantles. 

Cha.s. C. Phillips, 72-74 Exchanpe St.. Lynn. 

Gas ar.d Electrical Contractor. 



The Builders. 

The Jester built a house one day 

Of cards, with many a color Kay; 

And bit his thumbs and twirled his hair, 

As piece by piece, and layer by layer. 

He built his pasteboard palace up. 

Till his deft fingers reached the top. 

And as the final card he laid 

And smiled upon the house he made, 

Alas! an errant wind blew by. 

Scattering- all his cards on high. 

But Motley laughed and laughed and then. 

He skipped away, nor built again. 

Sir Wisdom built a castle fair 
Not out of cards but out of air; 
Adorned with every rainbow shade. 
With turret, dome and bastion made; 
Ah. never yet in Fairyland 
Did such a wonder palace stand; 
But as his spendthrift fancy built 
With radiant hopes and dreams of gilt. 
The castle vanished in the air. 
Though not a wisp of wind was there. 
And Wisdom wept and wept and then — 
A house of Shadows built again, 

— William F. McCormack 

•?« 

Mr. Hurlburt's Address. 

THE memorial address of Hon. Henry 
F. Hurlburt, delivered in Lynn last 
month, was decidedly out of the beaten 
track. Mr. Hurlburt belongs to the new 
school of orators, and he plainly demon- 
strated that fact in his address, which 
originally treated of incidents growing 
out of the great rebeUion. It was one 
of the most largely commented upon 
memorial addresses ever delivered in 
Lynn, and the general opinion gave Mr. 
Hurlburt credit for presenting an elo- 
quent review of the civil war, and, a& 
the Item remarked: "This admirable 
address will hold an honored place among 
the many tributes that have been paid 
by the orators who have preceded him 
since Memorial Day has been observed 
in Lynn." 

Scant Consideration. 

In a recent report at Harvard Univer- 
sity of the preparatory schools from 
which a graduating class came, although 
the Lynn Classical High School had ten of 
that number it was simply listed under 
various eastern high schools. Not more 
than five of the individual schools men- 
tioned could boast of as many, but we 
suppose that as the Classical High is 
simply a public school, there is no call 
for individual mention. 

' 'There was a strange man here to see 
you to-day, papa, "said little Ethel, as 
she ran to meet her father in the hall. 
"Did he have a bill?" "No, papa; he 
had just a plain nose. " — Union Signal. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



A Great Trolley Trip. 

Commencing- July 1 the Old Colony Street Ry. 
Co. will run a special through car from Post Office 
Square, Boston, to Providence and Fall River, 
daily with the exception of Sunday. This trip will 
make it possible to go by trolley through one of 
the finest, scenically, districts of Massachusetts to 
either of these cities where the cars will arrive in 
time to take the various lines of boats to New York. 

In previous years this service has been run only 
to F^all River, but many thousands have been car- 
ried to that point. This year there has been a 
general demand for the service and it has been 
extended so that Providence has been taken in as 
well. The trip will be made in the best of cars 
and with the best of speed and service. 

The return trip from either of these places may 
also be made in the same way, taking the special 
cars at Providence, Market Square, at 8 A. M., 
every morning but Mondays and the regular cars 
from Fall River at 7.30 A.M., or before, and chang- 
ng to the special through cars at Taunton. 

Tickets for the trip may be obtained at the office 
of the Passenger Department of the company at 
309 Washington St., Boston, for 7.5 cents each way. 



The aldermen recently adopted an or- 
der of Alderman Rich to have a five man 
commission, disinterested parties and 
not office holders appointed by the may- 
or to consider plans for street and side- 
walk improvements. Some aldermen 
believe the present work in this line is 
careless and unsystematic, but this new 
plan would make things more practical 
and business like. 



OUR low expenses and 
facilities for buying 
all goods to the best 
advantage allow us to sell 

GROCERIES, 

PROVISIONS, 

MEATS, FOWL, 

CANNED GOODS, 

FANCY CRACKERS, 

FRUIT, NUTS, RAISINS 

ETC. 

AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

We have Everything- 
for the Table 

Porter, Pearson CBi> Co. 

Essex and Sutton Sts., Lynn 
George E. Pearson 



Old Wives 
—for New 

A Novel by 

David Graham Phillips 

"Things about women that have 
never seen the light of day before." 

Cloth $1.50 
D. Appleton & Co., New York 



M. Armengand, an engineer and sci- 
entist, who has for many years been 
experimenting with the telespectroscope 
or telephote, which is intended to extend 
the range of human vision to extraordi- 
nary distances, says he has so far per- 
fected his apparatus that he can now 
foretell that the time is not far distant 
w^hen a man sitting in Paris or London 
will be able to see what is going on in 
New York. He asserts that he has 
made remarkable progress in his exper- 
iments during the last three months. 
The apparatus is similar to that used for 
the telegraphic transmission of photo- 
graphs. He utilizes the properties of 
selenium. His method was inspired by 
the development of the cinematograph. 

Grover Cleveland was a strong factor 
in many ways, in the country's history, 
but he never accomplished much in legis- 
lation. He was not a successful poli- 
tician, in the larger sense; was honest 
and straightforward, but not diplomatic. 
The three most conspicuous features of 
Mr. Cleveland's public career are these: 
His steadfast fidelity to civil service re- 
form, his readiness to go to war with 
the strongest of naval powers in defence 
of a principle that is part of the Monroe 
doctrine, and his courageous but strictly 
constitutional application of Federal 
force in the case of the Chicago railway 
riots of 1894. 



REAL ESTATE 

Large assortment of properties in all sections 

of the City and Suburbs. 

BUY AND SELL THROUGH 

GEORGE W. BREED 

ITEM BUILDING 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



I Shall Not Pass Again. 

I shall not pass this way again. 

But far beyond earth's where and when. 

May I look back alonj? a road 

Where on both sides good seed I sowed. 

I shall not pass this way again. 
May wisdom guide my tongue and pen, I 
And love be mine that so 1 may 
Plant roses all along the way.J 

I shall not pass this way again,? 
May I be courteous to men —] 
Faithful to friend, true to my God — 
A fragrance on the path 1 trod. 

— Anon 
»?4 

It is wonderful how Keith's theatre 
holds and attracts the multitude. Hot 
or cold, clear or stormy, it matters not, 
Keith's is full to overflowing at almost 
every performance. To the ordinary 
observer this appears somewhat pecul- 
iar, when the ups and downs of most 
playhouses are considered. But the 
trained observer defines the reason— it 
is because Keith's is clean and refined, 
and such a policy does not prevent the 
giving of a bright and snappy show. 
Surely, Keith's is the "Radium of Vau- 
deville ' ' — where sunshine and brightness 
reigns, and a show always on that holds 
and interests every member of the fam- 
ily. That is the reason why if it is on 
at Keith's 'tis fit for son and daughter 
to see. This month there will be several 
new acts never before seen at Keith's. 

The Twentieth Century Club which 
recently completed its first year has 
been most successful both in an educa- 
tional and social way, and gives promise 
of a very bright future. Dr. C. M. Cobb 
the retiring president has been succeed- 
ed by James E. Odlin, and the second 
year will surely be one of much benefit 
to Lynn. President Eliot's talk on mu- 
nicipal conditions before the club was 
a rare treat. 

The death of Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth 
Green, wife of Eugene A. Green, last 
month, sent to the higher life a woman 
much esteemed and respected. She was 
a great lover of home and was strong in 
all of the characteristics that make for a 
good and cheerful life. 



Remember to nQ t\Q when you want 

telephone number ZO or ^y anything in 



FISH 



Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



The Sin and the Foolishness of it! 

A SPASM of horror swept over the 
country a few weeks ago, when 
one hundred and seventy-four children 
were caught in a fire trap at Colling- 
wood and killed. 

Yet now we are getting ready to de- 
stroy, or irreparably wound and injure, 
at least five thousand children exactly 
as we have done once a year for several 
decades. 

The instruments of death are deliber- 
ately being purchased, placed on sale, 
advertised in alluring lines, and on July 
Fourth the massacre will be at its maxi- 
mum. 

Last year there were reported, in the 
large cities alone, over three hundred 
deaths from lockjaw, following injury 
to hands; four hundred and forty per- 
sons lost one eye, and over a hundred 
children were reported as having both 
eyes blown out by explosives on this 
one day. 

Hardly a village can be found in 
America where there are not armless or 
sightless beings who are living out ling- 
ering deaths, victims of this violent way 
of expressing "patriotism." — The Fra. 

"When a boy goes forth for liberty. 

Her cause to celebrate," 
Said Thomas from the sofa, 

Where he proudly lay in state — 
"And blacks his eye and busts his 

Thumb, and singes off his hair. 
He'd ought to get a pension, by all 

That's right and fair." 

A 

The Boston Herald, discerningly re- 
marks that Acting Governor Draper's 
vetoes have been somewhat numerous, 
but they have proved just about so many 
feathers in his hat. In the case of the 
Spanish war veterans' preference bill, 
it was necessary to disregard the appar- 
ent "popularity" of the measure. But 
the acting governor showed a discrimi- 
nating appreciation of the public wel- 
fare and justified his rejection of the 
legislative enactment. Sentimental ap- 
proval of privileges for a specified class 
of applicants for appointment to the 
civil service found a sufficient answer in 
the logic of the veto message. 

Mrs. Charles H. Pinkham and family, 
which includes President Arthur W. 
Pinkham of the Oxford Club, is having 
a most delightful European trip accord- 
ing to advices received since they sailed 
last month. They landed at Naples and 
are working northward. They will ar- 
rive home in September. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



18 



*Tis Likely to be President Taft. 

In nominating William H. Taft for 
president, the Republican party makes 
a magnificent choice. It is a triumph 
of fitness, for no contemporary states- 
man has had a more complete training 
for the office, none has shown more 
intelligent comprehension of the prob- 
lems of the day, none has a better gijft 
for leadership and for the moulding of 
men and events along the path of prog- 
ress. It is a nomination that will inspire 
the warmest enthusiasm, for no other 
candidate in the field has so appealed to 
affection and imagination. It is a nomi- 
nation of the deepest sagacity for it 
places the party straight in line with 
the administration of President Roose- 
velt, and the overpowering feeling to- 
day is a desire to continue unbroken the 
work begun by that administration, not- 
withstanding the difference of opinion 
that exists relative to the manner and 
method in which the president does 
things. The "Roosevelt ideas" (through 
Taft) will prevail at the November 
election. 

Mark Twain says he can tell a lie, but 
he won't. 



The Lynn Ice Co. 

Office. 333 Union Street 



Main Office 
Telephone 585-2 



Pond Office 
Telephone 69S 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers of 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 



ICE 



To ice consumers who do not like the bother 
of paying each time we recommend our 

TICKET SYSTEM 

We sell 12 TICKETS grood for 25 lbs. each, 
or a total of 300 lbs. of Ice (payable in advance) 
for 95 cents, the regular price for which 
would be $1.05 thus making a saving of 10c. 
on the regular rate for that quantity. 

Tickets can be bought of all our drivers and 
at our main office. 

Currier Block, 333 Union St. 

Room 34 



At this season of the year when so 
much more milk is used than at other 
times it is incumbent upon everybody 
to be certain that the milk is strictly 
pure and handled under proper condi- 
tions. No milk ever coming into Lynr 
is handled with more care and precau- 
tion than the Hood product. Nothing is 
lost sight of in taking care of the milk 
after leaving the Hood farms, and the 
milk may be used with the utmost free- 
dom because no person's hands touches 
it at any stage on the journey between 
the Hood farm and the Lynn consumer. 
The most modern sanitary facilities are 
employed at every point to prevent in- 
fection of the milk, which is the real 
article in every way, the cream not 
being taken from it. All of this be- 
comes important when it is considered 
that probably no article of food conveys 
more sickness than milk, therefore it is 
very important that the housewife 
carefully consider the surroundings of 
the milk coming to her house. Next to 
the public water supply the milk is the 
most important health element to watch. 
This community should feel thankful 
that the Hood milk product is so care- 
fully and intelligently supervised. 

Cynic (savagely) — They say the only 
way the fashionable woman of to-day 
recognizes her baby is by looking at the 
nurse. 

Fashionable mother (unmoved) — 
How perfectly clever; when one changes 
nurses so often! I always tell ours by 
the baby carriage. 

The plan to build a new grammar 
school building in Breed square. West 
Lynn, is one of great merit, and is cer- 
tainly a wise move for the future. No 
section of the city is growing faster to- 
day than West Lynn and therefore the 
city will undoubtedly act accordingly. 

Helen and Marion's mother had given 
them a few cents for candy, and, as 
Helen was the older, she ran down- 
stairs to make the purchase, and inquir- 
ing at the same time, "What kind shall 
I get, mamma?" when Marion, fond of 
candy, shouted. "Helen, Helen, get the 
kind you don't like!" — Chicago Tribune. 

Harvard at rowing was so successful 
over Yale and Cornell by the aid of a 
professional coach, we wonder why it 
would not be a good scheme to employ 
professional coaching direction in foot 
ball. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



LONG 

DlSTAl^CE ' 
TELEPHONE, 



The Ear of the business and 
social world is attuned to the 
sound of the "Bell." 

If you would command the 
world's attention - - RING ! 



"Be Sure Youre Right, etc." 

Ever notice what queer pr^nksi in tra^nsposing .figur^ your 
mind will play ? 

Take three numbers -^1468, 1546, 6428, for eicample. NoW 
'• dismiss them from your mind for ia minute and then try to recall 
them. ' 

How easily you wonder whether it wasn't "1648" or "1456" 
or "6248." 

That's one reason why telephone subscribers are asked to 
consult the; directory before giving a number— because this 
peculiar psychological trait is almost certain to lead to "wrong 
number" calls. ■ > 

Such calls are not merely an annoyance but an 'eco- 
nomic waste. They abuse the patience of the person thus, 
needlessly disturbed; they consume (instead of save) the time 
of the caller; and they burden the Telephone Company with a 
double operating expense. 

Another reason why the directory should be consulted is 
found in the fact that telephone numbers occasionally are 
changed. 

If you take pains 10 ascercaui the correct luiniDer uesired, 
and then pronounce it distinctly, in 999 instances out of 10(X) 
you will get the correct connection. 



The New England Telephone and Telegraph'Company 
is one link in the chain of the great "Bell System," and in 
the states of Maihe, New Hampshire, Vermont and Massa- 
chusetts is connected with 300,000 telephones. 



When d«elinR with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



BURN GAS 

USE EUCTRinTY 
PRICES RIGHT 

LYNN GAS i EUaiilC (0 




Sii«te Co^ee b^ntM AUGUST, 1908 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Main OfBce : Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office : 25 Market Square, West Lynn, Mass. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES 
J^ STORAGE VAULTS^ 



BEFORE leaving home for your vacation, why 
not place your valuables in the vaults of this 
company? We receive TRUNKS, BOXES 
and BULKY PACKAGES for any length of 
time. Charges low. Safe Deposit Boxes to rent at 
prices ranging from $5.00 to $50.00 per year. 



2s Semi- Annual Clearance Sale 
Is Now On 

Seasonable Merchandise at Greatly Reduced Prices 

THE opportunity to participate in the extreme bargains offered is a great 
money saving time lor the women of Lynn, Peabody and Marblehead. 
All Spring and Summer Wearables will be sold at Clearance Sale Prices. 
Handsome, Stylish, Tailored Suits in Exclusive Patterns at a fraction of their 
original cost. They would make splendid suits for Fall wear. 
Everything is going, nothing has been reserved. 




Telephone 1807 312 Union Street 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



LONG 

DlSTAl^CE ' 
TELEPHOlil, 



Telephone Talks 

Household business before pleasure. 
Party line "telephone visits" need not be 
curtailed even on party-lines, but your 
service would be improved if they were 
made in conventional visiting hours. 



"Rush Hours" 

No other public service is called upon to meet such extra- 
ordinary fluctuations of demand as is the telephone. The 
"rush hours" of trolley and steam roads represent, by com- 
parison, a demand that is steady and moderate. 

Moreover, during the transportation "rush hour" crush 
some people must stand, or if they insist upon having a seat, 
must wait for less crowded cars. 

In telephoning, however, the simile would be applied by 
stating that each "passenger" must have, not a seat, but a 
"special car," and that this car must have a ' 'special motorman 
and conductor," and the absolute right of way over a ' 'special 
pair of rails" from the point where its journey begins to the 
point where it ends. 

In telephone exchanges, the "rush hours" are usually those 
between 8.30 and 11 A. M. It is during this period that party- 
line subscribers are apt to be most troubled by "busy" reports. 

It would materially help the service of subscribers on such 
lines if calls that are not imperative— social calls, for example — 
were deferred to the afternoon, leaving the morning hours free 
for domestic business calls. 

It would be well if party-line users would keep in mind this 
fact— that while any one subscriber on it is talking, it is closed 
to every other person connected therewith, and also to every 
person desirous of communicating with him or with any other 
person on that line. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



*^ Lynn Review 

a monthly epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalis, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



AUGUST, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 10 



Keep on improving the streets. 

The public schools will re-open Mon- 
day, Sept. 14. 

Who would now vote to restore City 
Hall square to the old-time conditions? 

Washington street should be brick 
paved from Liberty street to Western 
avenue. 

Lynn shoe business has not been so 
dull for years as during the past two 
months. 

Whistler's criticism of Beerbohn 
Tree's Hamlet is always amusing. Mr. 
Whistler said that "Mr. Tree's Hamlet 
was funny without being vulgar. ' ' 



Why not make the stairways safe in 
the public school buildings before there 
is a holocaust? Wooden stairways should 
not be tolerated in the large school build- 
ings. 

Lynn should fight to the last ditch 
every plan for grade separation at Cen- 
tral Square that does not call for DE- 
PRESSION. Elevated tracks are not 
for the city's welfare. 



If you want to see how the grade ques- 
tion is treated at city hall take a look at 
the Franklin street sidewalks, and Han- 
over and Laighton streets at the junction 
of Franklin street. 'Tis awful! 



The leasing of selling priviliges to out- 
of-town fakirs on the common July 4 
may be a source of entertainment and 
amusement to some people, but it is not 
profitable or desirable for the city. 



Why should the city repeat the War- 
ren pavement on Franklin street after 
the experience on North Common street? 
We venture to predict that no more 
Warren pavement will be put down in 
Lynn. 



Lynn hospital patients were glad that 
the Wappingites deferred their July 4 
celebration. 

There is a no more agreeable ride by 
trolley in New England, on a hot day, 
than from Lynn to Nahant. A sea 
breeze always prevails. July 12 when 
the thermometer rose to 100 in the shade 
in Lynn it was comfortable in Nahant. 

There appears to have been only 2,500 
fatalities in this country on account of 
July 4 patriotism this year, as against 
about 5,000 last year. We could not help 
thinking that the work of the Lynn oflfi- 
cers in Wapping would not be without 
its good results! 

If you want to know what gossip and 
cheap scandal talk will do for anybody 
just consider how Mrs. Lombard of 
Swampscott was treated in connection 
with the death of her husband. Such a 
complete job of smirching and abusing 
an innocent woman never was noted in 
this locality. 

A correspondent wants the Review 
to state that "the Wappingites are not 
malicious; that they like fun but do not 
harm anybody; and that the man ar- 
rested some time ago was not a member 
of the 'bunch'; that he was an interlo- 
per, being under the influence of the 
ardent and joined the barrel party while 
homeward bound." We are glad to 
print this statement, but cannot help 
thinking that the young men of Wapping 
are somewhat malicious — the weight of 
evidence is against them. 

The "campaign of education" now 
carried on by the New England Tele- 
phone Company is most interesting and 
altogether novel. It opens up remark- 
able advertising possibilities heretofore 
not considered. Just so much as this 
enlightening talk regarding co-operation 
in telephoning makes an impression on 
the public mind the service will be (Cor- 
respondingly benefitted. With subscrib- 
ers co-operating, the service can be 
more expeditiously and economically 
given, and all who use the telephone 
should understand that what they do is 
an important link in the chain — in other 
words, poor service is many times the 
fault of the patron by his using the lines 
unreasonably by a long talk, or failure 
to give the correct number. And there 
are scores of delinquences against the 
patron. Do all you can to help "Cen- 
tral" then the service will be vastly im- 
proved. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CS, W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109J,-2 Branch Offices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN. Manager. 



ABOUT OUR Safety Razor 2 

The Best in its Line " 

Reasonable in Price S^ 

Jos. W. Harding & Co. 9 

32-34 Central Sq.. Lynn JJ 



NEW YORK CITY 



A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 
The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
— a restaurant 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for men. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
ese servants. 

Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Send for Booklet 



T. F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



An African Hunting Story. 

A rhino told his fellows 

The sight that he had seen. 
How he had tracked a Man Beast 

Of terrifying mien. 

His teeth were strong and gnashing. 

His eyes were wild and glared, 
A stick was in his fore paws. 

His brawny breast was bared. 

His walk was most majestic. 

He shook the earth with thud. 
And every other minute 

He paused to bellow "Blood!" 

The rhino stopped in terror 

That such a beast should be. 
The jungle folk assembled. 

Decided all to flee. 

Quote they, "We must believe it. 

This tale which you disclose. 
Because you carry always 

Your horn above your nose." 

— McLandburgh Wilson, in New^York Sun 



The Nation's Prayer. 

God give us men! A time like this demands 
Strong minds, great hearts, true faith and ready 

hands. 
Men whom the lust of office does not kill; 

Men whom the spoils of office cannot buy; 
Men who possess opinions and a will; 

Men who have honor and who will not lie; 
Men who can stand before a demagogue 
And scorn his treacherous flatteries without 
winking. 
Tall men, sun crowned, who live above the fog 
In public duty and in private thinking! 

Members of the board of trade went 
to New York last month to confer with 
men interested in developing Lynn's 
harbor front, making valuable property 
out of the mud flats, enlarging and 
deepening the turning basin connected 
with the channel in the harbor, and 
providing several slips at which vessels 
may unload. Those who have studied 
the^ situation are favorably impressed 
with the project and are now only wait- 
ing for a report from the engineers to 
ascertain whether the harbor bottom is 
of mud and clay, which will permit of 
the going ahead with the project, or 
whether it is rock and ledge, which will 
be another problem for the board to 
grapple with. It is hoped that the 
former will be the case, as then there 
will be no delay and the work will be 
gone ahead with rapidly. 

The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Ttie Boston and Eastern. 

We note that the Boston Elevated 
Railroad Company is to oppose the en- 
trance of the proposed Boston and East- 
ern Railroad into Boston. This is quite 
in line with the Boston Elevated Com- 
pany. They oppose all progress and 
stifle all new railroad facilities until the 
very limit of endurance is reached by 
the public. It looks like more rapid 
transit between Boston and Lynn and 
beyond, and we do not believe that the 
railroad commissioners will be hood- 
winked by the so-called "vested inter- 
ests" now in the locality. If they have 
not made good by giving the public 
proper service they should be made to 
suffer. By paying an interest on wat- 
ered stock the public is hoodwinked and 
blinded and not properly accommodated 
— especially on the cattle cars run in the 
Boston subway. And this corporation 
is to oppose the Boston and Eastern 
entering Boston! We shall see what 
the opposition will amount to. 

The city and country have got a hard 
proposition to contend with in the exter- 
mination of the brown-tail moth. The 
first year that they appeared all property 
owners took great precaution and pains 
in clearing their trees of the nests, but 
now many have got tired of it and grown 
indifferent and this causes the work done 
by others to amount to nothing. Para- 
sites and flies have been turned loose by 
the millions, and the city has already 
spent nearly $100,000 during the past five 
years, and yet this year they appear to 
be as numerous as at any time during 
the whole period. It is very evident 
that this fall and winter much more ar- 
dent and extensive work has got to be 
done by the city and individuals if we are 
ever going to be free from these pests. 

»74 

A Toast. 

Here's to the girls in peek-a-boos, 

And here's to the girls in tan; 
Here's to the girls in oxford shoes. 

For every girl, a man. 
For every man, a lassie true: 

This thought all others stills; 
For every lass, brown-eyed or blue, 

A man to pay her bills. 

—West Coast Trade 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



The Filtration of City Water 

Which is now in progress at the rear 
of the City Hall is interesting. The color 
of the water is much improved, but it is 
doubtful if the taste is better. It will 
be interesting to watch results. Some 
experts say that practical results cannot 
be secured through a filtration basin, 
and that water is best filtered by the 
consumer. In other words, the purifi- 
cation should be at the point of consump- 
tion, eliminating all danger of contami- 
nation by any method of conveyance 
from the point of purification to the con- 
sumer. However, everybody is having 
a chance to form an opinion of their 
own, and great interest has been mani- 
fested in the experiment, many people 
coming from all over the city with bot- 
tles in which to carry away water for 
closer examination. Some report it as 
tasting much better than the unfiltered 
water, being free from the flat taste, 
but the question is, would it taste better 
being filtered in the manner suggested 
after running through the miles of water 
pipes? That being filtered at City Hall 
has only a short distance to run, and that 
through clean, new pipes. 

'I'^HE controversy now going on regard- 
X ing the increased salaries of mem- 
bers of the water department bids fair 
to result in a serious breach between the 
mayor and that body if an understand- 
ing is not soon reached. It is the policy 
of this year's finance committee to cut 
expenses as low as possible and to figure 
very closely, and the increasing of the 
wages $17.60 per week has not met with 
favor. Contrary to rule, the water 
board waived the mayor's rights in the 
matter, and ordered the increased wages 
paid. Mayor Porter believes that the 
men were getting good wages consider- 
ing the times, and that if more money 
is to be expended it should be in hiring 
men who have no work, and that he will 
take the matter up with the finance 
committee or the city solicitor as soon 
as possible. The city already has some 
debts on hand which must be settled — 
being liable to a fine of $5000 if not put- 
ting the rifle range in proper order — 
must appoint an assistant to the sealer 
of weights and 'measures — the Conta- 
gious Hospital appropriation of $8000 
for the year has already been used — 
these are only a few of the instances 
cited by the mayor as reason why the 
water board commissioners should not 
have their wages increased. And the 
public stands with the mayor. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



How to Prepare for Europe 

A New "Little Giant" Reference Book, con- 
taining a mine of information to the travel- 
ler, both before and during the European trip 

By H. A. GUERBER 

16 Maps, 100 Illustrations, Tables, Bibliographies. 
Size 4^2 X G^'4. Limp Cloth, $2.00 net; 
Limp Leather, $2.50 special net. (Postage 16c.) 
It differs from other guide-books in many im- 
portant points: 

1. It has suggestive articles on how to travel; how 






COMPLETE ESTIMATES GIVEN 
ON DECORATING HOUSES FROM 
THE CEILING TO .-. .-, .'. .'. 

RUGS 


to fit one's self for European trip; what to read in 




preparation; the peculiar customs of each country 
the traveller ought to know in advance. 

2. It has bibliographies of history, art, travel and 
fiction, chronological tables; lists of painters, sculp- 
tors, architects and musicians and their works. 

3. It has historical sketches of each country and 
many illustrations of works of art and architecture. 

As a condensed history of Europe it is intensely 
interesting. 

Travellers will find it a necessity in their prep- 
arations, and will make it a constant companion on 
their journey. 
DODD. MEAD & COMPANY. NEW YORK 


^T WHEN YOU ARE IN 
^1 THE MARKET FOR 
^^ ORIENTAL RUGS- 
THE BEST QUALITY AT 
LOWEST PRICES— PLEASE 
ADDRESS 

WILLIAM E. WOOD 


Indiscretion. 

Lives of all great men remind us 
Certain things we should have learnt. 

One is; not to leave behind us 
Love-letters that should be burnt! 


p. 0. Box 536 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 






The Poor Boarder. 

Quite small was his bedroom, but he 

Was meek and content as a saint. 
He made no complaint for you see. 


WE HAVE ACCESS TO THE 
WORLD'S FINEST RUGS 


There was really no room for complaint. 




— Philadelphia Press 








See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
' ' hard - to - button ' ' 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cufF, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Very Much To The Point. 

The triteness of the New England 
Telephone Company's advertising cam- 
paign of education in connection with 
the telephone service came to mind the 
other day, when the writer wanted to 
reach a party on one of the "town meet- 
ing" lines. It was Arabella telling 
Sophronia about the happenings of the 
night before at a beach resort, and the 
"spree" tied up the line an unreason- 
able long time. Why do not people 
have more sense than to discommode 
telephone subscribers by their cheap 
twaddle? Most people are reasonable 
and thoughtful, but when one runs up 
against a case of this kind, when having 
an important message 'tis hard to keep 
your patience. 

The long argued subject of the chief 
of the fire department being placed at 
the head of the fire alarm system and 
put in a position to supervise the con- 
struction of electric Hnes has again come 
up for discussion since the death of Capt. 
E. L. Hiller, who so well and faithfully 
attended to his duties as city electrician. 
The city council has under consideration 
a change which will result in the chief 
being consulted in all matters affecting 
the fire alarm even with a city electri- 
cian in office. These two departments 
are now entirely separate and as the 
electrical department is the nerve cen- 
tre of the fire department it is thought 
that they should be more in harmony 
with one another than is now the case. 
A 

Chelsea appears to be a popular resort 
for Lynn residents to go to quench their 
thirst. The Chelsea police court record 
shows 128 Lynn men being arrested for 
drunkenness in that city, during June 
and according to the oflficials there were 
more Lynn drunks appearing regularly 
in that court than from any other city, 
and more than from Chelsea itself. 
However, those who voted no do not be- 
lieve that the financial loss to Lynn will 
be heavy enough to more than offset 
the peace and security felt by this com- 
munity by the streets being free from 
drunkenness and rowdyism. 



BAKER. GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 

341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



WHY A YOUNG WOMAN SHOULD 
HAVE A BANK ACCOUNT. 



If she expects some day to be a 
housekeeper it is imperative that she 
learn the "value" of money. Other- 
wise household expenses jump. 

The proper care of money is one 
of the things one instinctively learns 
from having a Bank account. 

Young women, this bank would 
like to open an account with you. 

MONEY deposited on or before 

Wednesday, September 2, 

will draw interest from that date. 



COMMONWEALTH SAVINGS BANK 
325 Union Cor., Almont St. 

Dr. JOS. G. PiNKHAM, President 

WM. M. BARNEY, - Treasurer 



Why were not the unsightly poles on 
Franklin street removed, and the two or 
three wires strung on them placed in the 
wire subway provided sometime ago on 
that thoroughfare? To remove noble 
elms and retain the poles is in line with 
the manner in which much city work is 
now carried on. Had there not been a 
wire subway in Franklin street the omis- 
sion to properly do the work would not 
have been so much thought of. 

In Paris the Theatre Commission, un- 
der the presidency of Prefect of Police 
Lepine, has decided to prohibit women 
from wearing hats of excessive dimen- 
sions in theatres under penalty of a 
fine. This decision is the result of nu- 
merous scenes in theatres since the pre- 
sent huge headgear became fashionable. 



In men whom men pronounce as ill, 

I find so much of goodness still; 

In men whom men pronounce divine, 

I find so much of sin and blot; 
I hesitate to draw a line 

Between the two, when God has not. 

— Anon 

When it is not Thaw in the papers it 
is Glidden with his autos or aeros. Give 
us a rest! 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



CITY OF LYNN. 



PUBLIC VACCINA" 



Office of the Board of Health. 

Lynn, July 10, 1908. 

Pubhc vaccination will be made at the 
office of the Board of Health in the 
basement of City Hall on the following 
dates: Aug. 7, 13, 20 and 27 from 3.15 
to 4 o'clock P. M. 

Parents are particularly requested to 
present their children on the first two 
days to avoid the crowd of the last 
few days. 

BOARD OF HEALTH, 

Gustavus A. Badger, Clerk. 



GREEN & SON 

"f->T A TVT/^O NO BETTER MADE 
Jr 1 AiN <JO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



Orders by Telephone Promptly Attended To 

Andrew Schlehuber 

BAKER, CATERER, 
CONFECTIONER 

78 EXCHANGE STREET 

All kinds of Catering in First-class Style. 

Special Prices to Churches and Large Parties 
of all kinds. 

Orders for Sunday should be given Saturday 
before to insure prompt delivery. 



Now is the time to get busy cleaning out, 
repairing or puting in order 

YOUR FURNACE 

We can install a NEW furnace for 5'ou at 
a very reasonable figure, at present. Now is 
the time to do this. Lowest Prices 
lor the Best Work. 

H. F. POOL, 5 Market Street, Lynn, Mass. 



The recent fire next door to Howe's 
Rubber store filled the place with a 
dense smoke damaging many of their 
goods slightly, and they are selling their 
women's rain garments at from twenty 
to fifty per cent, discount. 



THERE has never been upon 
the earth a generation of free 
men and women. It is not 
yet time to write a creed. Wait 
until the chains are broken — until 
dungeons are not regarded as tem- 
ples. Wait until solemnity is not 
mistaken for wisdom — until men- 
tal cowardice ceases to be known 
as reverence. Wait until the living 
are considered the equals of the 
dead — until the cradle takes pre- 
cedence of the coffin. Wait until 
what we know can be spoken with- 
out regard to what others may be- 
lieve. Wait until teachers take the 
place of preachers — until followers 
become investigators. Wait until 
the world is free before you write a 
creed. In this creed there will be 
but one word: Liberty. 

I know not what discoveries, 
what inventions, what thoughts, 
may leap from the brain of the 
world. I know not what garments 
of glory may be woven by the years 
to come. I cannot dream of the 
victories to be won upon the fields 
of thought; but I do know that 
coming from the infinite sea of the 
future, there will never touch this 
" bank and shoal of time " a richer 
gift, a rarer blessing than Liberty — 
for man, for woman and for child. 
• — Robert G. Ingersoll. 



Talk about politeness. "Why do you 
know I have a friend, " said a Lynn man, 
"who is that polite when he talks to a 
woman over the telephone he removes 
his hat!" 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which sold the best in the order 
of demand during the past month were: 
Mr. Crewe's Career, The Barrier, The 
Coast of Chance, The Husbands of Edith, 
Old Wives for New, and the Primadonna 
and Rose MacLeod were tied for sixth 
place. 



FOLLOW THE LEADERS 

Open on Monday Afternoons 
THE ANTISEPTIC BARBER SHOP 
We now open our shop every day at 7 
A. M.. closing at 7.30 P. M., except Saturdays, 
when the hours are from 7 A. M. to 10 P. M. 

LeFLAM C8, DEVOE 
The Antiseptic Barber Shop. 21 Exchange St. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Bryan to 
Speak Here 

The Distinguished Nebras- 
kan Appears Without Fail. 
Everybody to hear Him. 

Bryan is speaking here to- 
day, and will speak again to- 
morrow and the next day and 
every day thereafter. This 
will be good news to all, for 
even Mr. Bryan's political op- 
ponents admit his great ora- 
torical powers and are willing 
to go hungry to hear him speak . 

His subjects are carefully 
chosen. They include the po- 
litical questions, such as the 
Trusts, the Railroads, the 
Labor Question, the Banking 
Laws, Swollen Fortunes, the 
Tariff, Imperialism, Election 
of Senators. He will also de- 
liver his famous lyceum ora- 
tions on "An Ideal Republic" 
and "Immortality." 

The last named consists of 
extracts from his lecture on 
"The Prince of Peace." This 
is Mrs. Bryan's favorite of all 
her distinguished husband's 
addresses and one that the 
ladies always flock to hear. 

The way that Bryan happens 
to speak here and everywhere 
else every day from now on 
is this: Bryan recently spoke 
selections from ten of his best 
speeches into Thomas A. Edi- 
son's wonderful Phonograph. 
It was done in the library of his 
home at Lincoln, Neb., one of 
the Edison Recording experts 
making a trip there for the 
purpose. A set of what are 
known as master wax records 
were secured. From these 
hundreds of thousands of the 
regular duplicate Edison Rec- 
ords have been made. 

Call and hear these speeches. 
j The concert room is open every 
day at all hours. 

D. B. H. POWER 

Central Square 
Lynn 



The Complexities of the Complexion. 

The condition of the skin has practi- 
cally no more to do with the color of the 
complexion than glass in a florist's win- 
dows has with the flowers displayed be- 
hind it. 

Skin foods can be bought at the gro- 
cer's and butcher's, not at the drug- 
gist's. 

The skin has little more power of ab- 
sorption than a mackintosh coat. Noth- 
ing save the strongest drugs can be 
driven through it, except under pressure 
of a powerful electric current. 

Wash the face as if it were a window- 
pane, not a kitchen floor. 

The best colors to apply to the face — 
through the opening provided for that 
purpose— are red meats, green vegeta- 
bles, purple fruits, golden butter, white 
bread and sugar. — Saturday Evening 
Post. 

Pick Me Up-She— "Yes, I never 'ad 
such cheek from a bus conductor in me 
life. I ses to 'im, I ses, 'if I wasn't a 
born lady, with relations in the aristoc- 
racy, I'd twist yer bloomin' neck in 
three places,' I ses." 

Subscribe for The Review. 



LIKE 
INSURANCE 

IN THE BEST AND STRONGEST 
COMPANIES IN AMERICA 

Study These Rates 

Annual Cost NEW Whole Life Policy per $1,000 

Age 20 . $14.96 Age 40 . $26.09 

Age 25 . 16.77 j Age 45 . 31.47 

Age 30 . 19.08 Age 50 . 38.83 

Age 35 . 22.10 Age 55 . 48.98 



Send age, nearest birthday, for 
specimen policy. State occupa- 
tion. Write TODAY. 



DO NOT DELAY 

W. E. WARREN 

Room 51 
333 Union Street, Lynn 

Send all correspondence to P.O. Box 536, Lynn 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Dangerous Stairways. 

SOME day there will be fearful loss of 
life in Lynn owing to badly arranged 
and poorly lighted stairways in factories, 
school buildings and other structures. 
Why the state authorities allow so many 
dangei'ous stairways it is hard to con- 
jecture. Speaking of dangerous condi- 
tions in buildings, S. Ohver Breed, who 
is employed by the insurance companies 
to look after building conditions, recently 
called attention to the bad conditions in 
the direction noted. In his opinion the 
stairways are too narrow. Furthermore 
there are too many stairways with turns 
instead of landings. The treads at the 
turns are not wide enough and very dan- 
gerous especially if the stairway is dark. 
A law governing stairway construction 
should take the place of the judgment 
of the inspectors when the safety of oc- 
cupants of a building are in question. 
This law should regulate the heights of 
risers, the width of stairways and also 
forbid stairs with anything but landings, 
in all public buildings, like school build- 
ings and factories for example. 

It is to be regretted that the high 
school girls' drill in battalions will have 
to be aboHshed to make room for two 
recitation rooms in the present drill hall. 
Much congestion is feared after the 
opening of the schools in September. 
The committee on schoolhouses, is al- 
ready at work. The need of a new 
schoolhouse in West Lynn and the new 
Classical High schoolhouse is apparently 
very urgent to relieve the congestion. 

She Made It Easy. 

They were a crowd of married men, 
reminiscent of the days of their court- 
ship. 

"Jim, I don't see how you ever picked 
up courage enough to ask your wife, you 
were always such a bashful sort." 

"Well," replied Jim, "she made it 
pretty easy for me. You know I shined 
up to her for a long time and of course 
she must have known I meant business. 
But the only time we ever made refer- 
ence to it was one night we were sitting 
on the porch. I said to her, rather cas- 
ually, so she wouldn't think I meant 
anything definite: 

" 'Do you think you'll ever marry?' 

"She said she thought she might, so I 
said, 'When?' 

"'Whenever you do, ' was her quick 
retort, and I said 'AH right.' So Wg 
fixed it up." — Youngstown Telegram. 



Slumber Fairies. 

Hush, my little one! Hush! Liedown. 

Mamma will sing, — 
Sing of a boy in a wee white gown, 
Sing of a king with a golden crown. 
A crown of curls on a sweet, small head. 
And a throne as high as a trundle-bed. 

Dear little king! 

Hush, my baby! a song I know 

Softer than all, — 
A song as soft as the falling snow, 
And I will sing it so light and low. 
Baby must listen and lie as still 
As the snow-flakes lie on the quiet hill. 

Where they fall. 

Does baby know, when the day grown late, 

Chilly and dim. 
The slumber-fairies, who stand and wait 
Out in the lane and beyond the gate 
Pass over the lawn and open the door 
And steal across the nursery floor. 

Looking for him? 

Such tiny fairies, with slippers white 

Over their feet. 
Their cloaks are gray as the early night. 
But their caps are lit with a silver light. 
As if a moonbeam were caught, perhaps, 
And cut up small into fairy caps 

Dainty and neat. 

Up the side of the trundle-bed 

Softly they go. 
And over the pillow with gentle tread 
They come to the golden baby-head. 
Under his lashes he tries to peep, 
But before he knows he is fast asleep. 

Isn't it so? 

For they bind the baby with fairy charms 

Wondrous to tell. 
They loose the clasp of the dimpled arms. 
And smooth his forehead with soft, small palms. 
And draw their cloaks o'er his drowsy ears. 
Till a fairy music is all he hears. 
Pleasing him well. 

They shade his eyes with a little dream. 

Where did it grow? 
It grew by the side of the fairy stream. 
Where baby wandereth now, I deem. 
With the slumber-fairies to guide his feet. 
Good-night, dear laddie! Your rest be sweet! 

Mamma must go. 

— Katherine Lee Bates 



The change in Market street by the 
removal of the wires and all but two 
poles has been greatly for the better. 
All the wires except the trolley have 
been placed underground. The trolley 
wires have been attached to neighbor- 
ing buildings except in two cases where 
owners of buildings have objected. It 
is planned to make these lone poles as 
ornamental as possible and to carry on 
this work further in other down town 
streets. 

Whatever you do, do not judge people 
hastily. Try to judge them as you 
would wish them to judge you. 



Be careful not to slip a cog. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



August. 

We read of high-born dames, sick of life's glare 
Who in dim cloisters fain would end their days. 
Exchanging pomp for pious prayer and praise: 
Summer, is such thy role, that thou dost wear 
This nun-like torpor in thine altered air? 

We miss the sweet June freshness, and the ways 
Of happy, hot July: this August haze 
Is like a veil shrouding thy features fair; 
This drowsy stillness is a convent-calm. 
Oppressing us like sadness. Oh, sweet nun. 
Is it for penance? What deed hast thou done. 
That happy mirth should change to sob and 
psalm. 
And telling of thy beads against the pane 
In the low patter of this August rain? 

— Caroline A. Mason 



Terrors of a Palace. 

The reported discovery by the Czarina 
of a terrorist death sentence lying on 
the bed of her sleeping son recalls two 
similar tragic episodes in the life of her 
mother-in-law, the Dowager Empress. 

On one occasion she found on her hus- 
band's dressing table a curious and un- 
famihar jewel case, and on picking it up 
to examine it more closely was both 
surprised and alarmed at its weight. 
Hurrying with it into her own room, she 
plunged it into a basin of water and 
summoned the prefect of police, who 
pronounced the innocent looking jewel 
case a bomb of a particularly deadly 
type. 

On another occasion on entering Alex- 
ander's study the Czarina fancied she 
heard a slight rusthng sound behind the 
window curtains. With a rare presence 
of mind she took her husband away un- 
der pretext of bidding his children good 
night in the nursery. On leaving the 
room she locked the door and gave the 
key to a party of soldiers, who on enter- 
ing and examining the study made the 
startling discovery that some one had 
made his escape through the window. 

Lynnfield residents are much pleased 
with the prospects of the widening, re- 
grading and straightening of Lynnfield 
street to the Great Woods road in the 
near future. Much time has been spent 
by the County commissioners and others 
in public hearings, surveying, and esti- 
mating the cost of making the improve- 
ment, but when it is finally accom- 
plished it is felt that it will well repay 
for the time spent. That it is necessary 
for public convenience has long been 
felt by the commissioners, and now wkl 
probably be gone ahead with rapidly. 

It is easy to see through things in this 
world— peek-a-boo shirtwaists, for in- 
stance. 



Making Flax Pond Beautiful. 

A PARAGRAPH in the Item written 
by a "Citizen" regai'ding the value 
of Flax Pond as a public resort is a sub- 
ject which should have long ago been 
discussed. Flax Pond, if properly at- 
tended to by the city and the ground 
around its shores laid out in an attrac- 
tive manner would make the area a 
"Charles River" in Lynn. As the writ- 
er in the Item remarked: "There is no 
more beautiful and no more convenient 
place for the aquatic sports and the fire- 
works and water carnival especially on 
Fourth of July, as was demonstrated 
last month. It is situated within the 
city limits, and affords an ideal place for 
the recreation of the citizens, whether 
their fancy be for bathing, boating or 
fishing in summer, or skating in winter. 
But there is danger of this beautiful 
body of water being spoiled by the use 
of its shores for house lots, and by its 
being filled in at several points. Another 
injury that should be prevented is the 
increasing pollution of the water, it hav- 
ing gone so far even now that prudent 
people fear to use it for bathing, and 
this must also be a danger to the ice 
supplies. The time has come when there 
is need of an organization to guard and 
improve Flax Pond. People of taste 
want a beautiful city. The shore boule- 
vard is magnificent. But how about the 
rest of the city? We need a Flax Pond 
Association, and its works would benefit 
the city as a whole. 

Mr. Hinckly— I'm not going to church 
any more till they get a new minister. 

Mrs. Hinckly — Don't you like the 
present minister's sermons? 

Mr. Hinckly — Oh! yes; but he talks so 
loud he wakes me up. — Syracuse Herald. 
A 

Husband— "I can't make out what is 
wrong with my meerschaum pipe. 
There is a very peculiar taste with it, 
and it don't draw." Wife — "That's 
odd. It seemed to draw all right when 
Johnny was blowing bubbles." — Judy. 
iSSi 

At the country dance. "Miss Hay- 
slip, is your program full?" "No, I 
have only had one sandwich. ' ' — Selected. 

The head of the New York police calls 
for $16,350,499 to run the department 
the coming vear. 

The girl who wears her heart on her 
sleeve is never afraid of wearing it out. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



A High Grade Commercial School. 

IT is a matter of congratulation for 
Lynn people that in the Burdett Col- 
lege, Lynn, this city should have a school 
teaching business studies that is the 
peer of any commercial school in the 
United States. It is well known that 
the building housing this school is not 
only one of the finest in the city, but 
easily out-classes any in the country 
used for a similar purpose, while the 
richness of furnishings and convenience 
of equipment are in entire harmony with 
its beautiful exterior. 

It is a constant source of surprise to 
visitors to learn the large number of 
pupils who are educated in this school 
annually, there having been between 
four hundred and five hundred the past 
year in both the day and night sessions. 

To see the college at its best one 
should call when the students are at 
work in order to thoroughly appreciate 
its businessUke methods and its practi- 
cal results. The utiHtarian value of 
commercial schools is too frequently 
underrated by people unfamiHar with 
the extreme care and attention bestowed 
upon the courses of study and it is not 
saying too much when we state that this 
school has been an important factor in 
the business and economic life of our city. 

Many a Lynn family has had its yearly 
income considerably augmented by hav- 
ing placed one or more of its members 
in this school, where after graduation 
lucrative positions are found by the em- 
ployment departments without charge 
to pupils. The pupils have the benefit 
of the employment department of both 
the Lynn and the Boston schools. 

This school certainly has the ability 
to find positions for all its worthy grad- 
uates. As an example of this it pub- 
lishes a list of nearly three hundred 
pupils that have been placed during the 
last year. 

Many Boston business men send regu- 
larly to Lynn for these graduates, 
chiefly because of their superior train- 
ing and their familiarity with up-to-date 
office equipment, which, by the way, 
must be an excellent stimulus to the 
pupil in producing the highest quality of 
work. 

The achievements of this institution 
in the past are the best evidence of its 
ability to do good work in the future, 
and the large number of students who 
are signifying their intention to enter 
this coming fall bears eloquent testi- 
mony to the success of this school and 
its line of work. 



A beautiful catalog is issued to all 
who may be interested in taking up any 
of these courses. 

My Creed. 

I hold that Christian grace abounds 

Where charity is seen; that when 
We climb to heaven, 'tis on the rounds 

Of love to men. 
I hold all else named piety, 

A selfish scheme — a vain pretense; 
Where center is not, can there be 

Circumference? 
This I moreover hold, and dare 

Affirm, where'er my rhyme may go. 
Whatever things be sweet or fair. 

Love makes them so; 
Whether it be the lullabies 

That charm to rest the nestling bird. 
Or that sweet confidence of sighs, 
And blushes without word; 

Whether the dazzling and the flush of softly- 
sumptuous garden bowers. 
Or by some cabin-door, or bush 

Of rugged flowers. 
'Tis not the wide phylactery. 

Nor stubborn fast, or stated prayers 
That makes us saints; we judge the tree 

By the fruit it bears. 
And when a man can live apart 

From work, on theological trust, 
I know the blood about his heart 

Is dry as dust. 

-J. G. Whittier 

Money builds the house, but love 
makes the home. 



I 



when you want 



Remember to tya oQ when you 

telephone number ZO or Zy anything 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street, Lynn, Mass. 



^A/^OOD of the best 
quality at 
reasonable 



AND 



COAL 



prices 



Stevens CEi Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a DweUing 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.56 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.75 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. L A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



THE LYNN REVIEW ' 



13 



Robbery In Small Loans. 

''pHE new law in Massachusetts in a 
i measure protects those individuals 
who are in the habit of negotiating small 
loans of money at ruinous rates of inter- 
est. The money sharks well know how 
to protect themselves, but in some de- 
gree, at least, the new law protects 
those people who are in the habit of ne- 
gotiating small loans. Under the new 
law a firm or corporation may engage 
in the business of making small loans of 
$200 or less, upon which a rate of inter- 
est, greater than 12 per cent, per annum 
is charged. The licensing officer or board 
shall from time to time establish regu- 
lations respecting the business carried 
on by the persons so licensed, and the 
rate of interest to be charged by them 
having due regard to the amount of the 
loan and the time for which it is made; 
and no licensee should charge or receive 
upon any loan a greater rate of interest 
than that fixed by the licensing officer 
or board. In the case of a loan to which 
the provisions of the first section apply, 
an amount not exceeding $2, if the loan 
does not exceed $25, nor exceeding $10 
if the loan exceeds $100; not exceeding 
$3 if the loan exceeds $25, but does not 
exceed $50; not exceeding $5 if the loan 
exceed $50, but does not exceed $100, 
may, if both parties to the loan so agree, 
be paid by the borrower or added to 
the debt, and taken by the lender, as 
the expense of making the loan, and 
such amount shall not be counted as 
part of the interest on said loan. A 
greater amount than the above specified 
shall not be taken for such purpose and 
any money paid, promised or taken in 
excess of such amount shall be deemed 
to be interest. 

National banks, all banking institu- 
tions which are under the supervision of 
the Bank Commissioner, loan companies 
and loan associations established by 
special charter and placed under said 
supervision shall be exempt from the 
provisions of this act. No assignment 
of wages, or order for wages of less 
than $200 shall be valid against an em- 
ployer of the person making such assign- 
ment or order until said assignment or 
order is accepted in writing by the em- 
ployer and said assignment or order and 
the acceptance of the same has been 
filed and recorded with the clerk of the 
city or town where the party making the 
assignment or order resides, if a resi- 
dent of the Commonwealth, or in 
which he is employed if not a resident 



of the Commonwealth. No such as- 
signment or order for wages to be 
earned in the future shall be valid, when 
made by a married man unless the writ- 
ten consent of his wife to the making of 
each assignment or order is attached 
thereto. All previous acts are repealed. 



An Indian Serenade. 

I arise from dreams of thee 

In the first sweet sleep of night. 
When the winds are breathing low 

And the stars are shining bright. 
I arise from dreams of thee, 

And a spirit in my feet 
Hath led me — who knows how? 

To thy chamber window, sweet! 

The wandering airs they faint 
In the dark, the silent stream — 

And the Champak's odors pine 
Like sweet thoughts in a dream; 

The nightingale's complaint 
It dies upon her heart. 

As I must die on thine, 

O, beloved as thou art! 

O, lift me from the grass! 
Idie! I faint! I fail! 

Let thy love in kisses rain 
On my lips and eyelids pale. 
My cheek is cold and white, alas! 

My heart beats loud and fast; 
O. press it to thine own again, 

\pVhere it will break at last! 

—Percy Bysshe Shelley 

Subscribe for The Lynn Review, 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton, Pres., 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.-Treas. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




VACATION GOODS 
Trunks, Suit Cases and Bags 

All our Trunks and Leather Goods 

Marked and Delivered Free 

All our Straw Hats at J price 

AMOS B. CHASE 

123 Munroe Street, - - Lynn 



The Three Fishers. 

Three fishers went sailing away to the West, 

Away to the West as the sun went down; 
Each thought on the woman who loved him the 
best, 
And the children stood watching them out of 
the town; 
For men must work, and women must weep. 

And there's little to earn, and many to keep, 
Though the harbor-bar be moaning. 

Three wives sat up in the lighthouse tower. 

And trimmed the lamps as the sun went down. 
And they looked at the squall, and they looked at 
the shower. 
And the night rack came rolling up, ragged and 
brown; 
But men must work and women must weep. 
Though storms be sudden, and waters deep. 
And the harbor-bar be moaning. 

Three corpses lay out on the shining sands. 

In the morning gleam as the tide went down. 
And the women are watching and wringing their 
hands. 
For those who will never come home to the town. 
For men must work and women must weep. 

And the sooner it's over, the sooner to sleep. 
And good-by to the bar and its moaning. 

— Charles Kingsley 



The Little Lazy Cloud. 

A pretty little cloud away up in the sky. 

Said it did not care if the earth was dry; 

'Twas having such a nice time sailing all around. 

It wouldn't, no, it wouldn't, tumble on the ground. 

So the pretty little lilies hung their aching heads. 
And the golden pansies cuddled in their beds; 
The cherries couldn't grow a bit, you would have 

pitied them; 
They'd hardly strength to hold to the little slender 

stem. 

By and by the little cloud felt a dreadful shock. 
Just as does a boat when it hits upon a rock; 
Something ran all through it, burning like a flame, 
And the little cloud began to cry as down to earth 
it came. 

Then old Grandpa Thunder, as he growled away, 
Said, "I thought I'd make you mind 'fore another 

day: 
Little clouds were meant to fall when the earth is 

dry 
And not go sailing round away up in the sky." 

And old Grandma Lightning, flitting to and fro. 
Said, "What were you made for. I would like to 

know. 
That you spend your precious time sailing all 

around. 
When you know you ought to be buried in the 

ground?" 

Then lilies dear and pansies all began to bloom. 
And the cherries grew and grew till they took up 

all the room. 
Then by and by the little cloud, with all its duty 

done. 
Was caught up by a rainbow and allowed a little 
fun. 

— Selected. 
Of 

The Work of the Board of Assessors. 

Members of the city government who 
have looked into the matter say that the 
present assessed valuation as made up 
by the board of assessors is very equit- 
able, businesslike and satisfactory, and 
that there is no occasion for any radical 
action. Government members beheve 
that the assessors' department is one of 
the best managed in the city, the work 
calling for much judgment, patience and 
common sense. It is believed that the 
incompleteness of the survey of the city 
is a hindrance to the work of the assess- 
ors. This work should be completed at 
once to intelligently aid in the continua- 
tion of the work of revising valuations. 

Enlargement and re-arrangement of 
the city hall building is just as neces- 
sary as ever. 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



REAL ESTATE 

Large assortment of properties in all sections 

of the City and Suburbs. 

BUY AND SELL THROUGH 

GEORGE W. BREED 

ITEM BUILDING 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



stay at Home, My Heart. 

Stay, stay at home, my heart and rest; 
Home keeping hearts are happiest. 
For those that wander they know not where 
Are full of trouble and full of care. 
To stay at home is best. 

Weary and homesick and distressed. 
They wander east, they wander west 
And are baffled and beaten and blown about 
By the winds of the wilderness of doubt. 
To stay at home is best. 

Then stay at home, my heart, and rest. 
The bird is safest in its nest: 
O'er all that flutter their wings and fly 
A hawk is hovering in the sky. 
To stay at home is best. 

— Longfellow 
^« 

West Lynn people are glad to learn 
that a lot has at last been chosen for the 
proposed new grammar school building, 
the need for which has been pressing 
for a long time past. The committee 
on education has for about two months 
been hunting for a lot to suit their needs, 
and after much dickering with real estate 
dealers succeeded last month in securing 
the Thomson lot between Western ave. 
and Hood street consisting of 51,900 
square feet at a cost of $13,623.75. The 
lot purchased is only large enough upon 
which to erect a school house, but the 
committee has an option on the Western 
ave. front of the Thomson lot, which 
may be purchased at any future time. 
No time should be lost in erecting the 
structure so that pupils in the westerly 
section of the city can be properly pro- 
provided with school accommodations. 



"See here, Lucy," said the teacher to 
one of her bright scholars, "you have 
written the word 'oyster' without an 
'r'." "Oh, yes!" exclaimed the schol- 
ar, reaching for the slate to make the 
correction. "I must have been thinking 
this was one of those months when there 
is no 'r' in oysters. — Yonkers Statesman. 



Not As I Will. 

Blindfolded and alone I stand 
With unknown thresholds on each hand; 
The darkness deepens as I grope. 
Afraid to fear, afraid to hope; 
Yet this one thing I learn to know. 
Each day more surely as I go. 
That doors are opened, ways are made. 
Burdens are lifted or are laid .3 

By some great tew unseen and still, 
Unfathomed purpose to fulfill, 
"Not as I will." 

Blindfolded and alone I wait. 
Loss seems too bitter, gain too late; 
Too heavy burdens in the load. 
And too few helpers on the road; 
And joy is weak, and grief is strong. 
And years and days so long, so long; 
Yet this one thing I learn to know, 
Each day more surely as I go. 
That I am glad the good and ill 
By changeless law are ordered still, 
"Not as I will." 

"Not as I will," the sound grows sweet 
Each time my lips the words repeat. 
"Not as I will," the darkness feels 
More safe than light when this thought steals 
Like whispered voice to calm and bless 
All unrest and all loneliness. 
"Not as I will," because the One 
Who loved us first and best has gone 
Before us on the road, and still 
For us must all His love fulfill, 
"Not as we will." 

— Helen Hunt Jackson 

A 

Lynn people appear quite certain that 
the law against the illegal selling of 
liquor is being splendidly enforced, and 
credit is given to Mayor Porter and City 
Marshal Burckes for their thoroughness 
of action. It was supposed that there 
would be much more illegal hquor selling 
than has been noted since the first of 
May. 

People of Lynn should rise en masse 
against any separation of railroad grades 
through the center of Lynn except by 
depression. That is the only proper and 
satisfactory way to do the work. An 
elevated structure should not be toler- 
ated for one moment. 



The extension of Market street to 
Nahant Beach is just as desirable as 
ever, but it looks far away because of 
the expense and the decided interfer- 
ence with abuttors' rights. 



From $2.50 to $10.00 



18 Kt. 



The beat you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



There are reasons for believing that 
the proposed new church building sug- 
gested for the Unitarian society will be- 
come an assured fact through the mu- 
nificence of the late Charles Henry New- 
hall, and members of the society. 

Will the time ever come when the fif- 
teen acres of harbor flats will be filled 
in and the twelve miles of Lynn shore 
front properly developed? Lynn should 
have a harbor which would admit vessels 
of all draughts. 

Subscribe for the Review. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Base Ball Magazine. 

^T'^HE August number of the Baseball 
X Magazine is one that will appeal 
very strongly to lovers of base ball. 
The magazine is most attractively pre- 
sented, is printed on the finest of paper 
and is profusely illustrated. In the 
present number which has just made its 
appearance on the stands one finds a 
very clever article about that clever 
catcher of the Boston Nationals— Frank 
Bowerman; a contribution by Pitcher 
White of the Chicago White Sox; John 
C. Chapman, one of the cleverest men 
ever in base-ball tells how he discovered 
Hughey Jennings; George Cohan the 
clever actor and playwright has an in- 
teresting article on base-ball ; John Mor- 
rill, known all over New England, writes 
on the Boston champions of 30 years ago 
in a most readable way; Rabbi Fleischer 
of Boston tackles the Sunday base-ball 
proposition very interestingly; then 
there are others who contribute to the 
columns in the persons of Elbert Hub- 
bard, Tim Murnane, George Scannel, 
Orel Guyer, Dr. H. A. Dobson of Wash- 
ington, George M. Graham of Phila. and 
Charles Somerville. E. B. Bird one of 
Boston's cleverest artists has a fine car- 
toon on the poor umpire. Each number 
of the magazine has been an improve- 
ment upon its predecessor. There is a 
vast field for a magazine of this kind 
and it ought to receive the heartiest 
support of the lovers of the game in this 
country. 



Let U3 

estimate 

on 

AWNING WORK 

Send U3 a pos- 
tal card. 
All of the new 

patterns of 
Awning Work 

Tel. 396-4 

F. R. BENNER CO.. 302 Broad St., Lynn 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



Lost. 

Has any one found a dream? 

It was lost 1 know not where — 
And alas! I know how — 

So dear, so sweet, so fair! 

I have sought for it in vain. 
Yea, weeks and months and years; 

Eager one day with hope — 
The next, bowed down with tears. 

God made it — no one else. 

Not one on earth could make 
A thing so dear its loss 

A woman's heart could break. 

Has any one found it? Speak. 

It was white as the whitest dove. 
All else is offered for it! 

Its name, I think, was— Love. 

— Ella Higginson 



At Keith's Boston Theatre it is al- 
together remarkable how uniformly 
strong are the bills presented. Many 
times one will look at the program and 
wonder if it is strong, because the gi'eat 
developments of vaudevillians by Mr. 
Keith makes their visits less rare, and 
on that account the average person can- 
not follow the people as a few years 
ago. All of this makes for the best. 
The long interims between the appear- 
ances of artists gives more variety to 
the acts, and much develops vaudeville. 
We often wonder how long it will be 
before Mr. Keith will use the term: 
"This performance can be seen this sea- 
son only in the Keith theatres." The 
trend seems to be in that direction. 
Never were the August bookings so 
strong at Keith's as this year and the 
summer season in the Boston Theatre 
(while the Keith theatre is being re-ar- 
ranged for the fall and winter season) 
is proving a great success. 



Alderman Breed is on the right track. 
There should be the fullest protection 
afforded the beautiful trees about the 
city. The ruthless destruction on Frank- 
lin street should not again be tolerated. 
It was nothing less than an outrage to 
cut down such trees as formerly graced 
this thoroughfare. Alderman Breed's 
draft of an ordinance intended to more 
satisfactorily regulate the removal of 
shade trees from the public highways is 
to the effect that no shade tree shall be 
razed until after a hearing has been 
given the parties at interest. It is also 
provided that such hearings shall be ad- 
vertised two or more times in the daily 
papers and notices of the same tacked 
on the tree in question at least three 
days prior to the date of the hearing. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



Moon Changes. 

First Quarter, August 4. 
Full Moon, August 11. 
Laat Quarter, August 18. 
New Moon, August 26. 

Woman's Wit Uncertain. 

"Don't always rely upon the ready 
wit of a woman," said the man who is 
sometimes pleased to consider himself 
an oracle. "That ready wit business is 
sometimes prone to get 'way off. 

"For example, my wife and children 
had been staying in the country for sev- 
eral weeks and I was regular with my 
letters, as every loving husband should 
be. Finally on the day before my wife 
was to start for home I concluded my 
letter to her with these words : 

",'This will be the last letter I will 
write to you for a long, long time. ' 

"When I got down to my office the 
next morning I found a telegram from 
my wife waiting for me. 'What on 
earth do you mean?' read the dispatch. 

"Later a registered letter came from 
her. She had blotted most every line 
with tears. What it was all about I 
could not imagine. 

"Then my telephone bell rang, and 
when I answered I heard my wife's 
voice speaking over the long distance 
phone. 

" 'Oh, John,' said she. 'Is that really 
you? I thought you had committed sui- 
cide!' "—New York Sun, 



MID-SUMMER PRICES 

on all our Goods 

Just convince yourself by a call 

Special Mark-Down Sale on 

JAPANESE PORCH SCREENS 

98c. to $1.69 

New Double Face RUGS-89c. 

New line of Pillow Tops selling at 25c. 

Ask to see our New Automobile 

Hassocks 

NEVER TOO BUSY TO SHOW GOODS 

ALBION K. HALL, 39 Market St. 

Fine RUGS woven from OLD CARPETING 



LADIES RAIN COATS 

Slightly smoked by the fire next door. 20 
to 50 per cent, discount. 

OLIVER R. HOWE 

(Howe's Rubber Store. i 
52 Central Square, - - Lynn 



Q EITHER Germany, nor 
England, nor France is 
held in a scabbard; at 
this day when Waterloo 
is only a clash of sabres, 
Germany has Goethe above Bluch- 
er, and England, Byron above 
Wellington. A mighty dawn of 
ideas is peculiar to our age, and 
in this dawn England and Ger- 
many have their own magnificent 
flash. They are majestic because 
they think; the high level they 
bring to civilization is intrinsic to 
them; it comes from themselves 
and not from an accident. Any 
aggrandizement the nineteenth 
century may have cannot boast of 
Waterloo as its fountain head; for 
only barbarous nations grow sud- 
denly after victory — it is the tran- 
sient vanity of torrents swollen by 
a storm. Civilized nations, especi- 
ally at the present day, are not 
elevated or debased by the good 
or evil fortune of a captain, and 
their specific weight in the human 
family results from something 
more than a battle. Their honor, 
dignity, enlightenment and genius 
are not numbers which those 
gamblers, heroes and conquerors, 
can stake in the lottery of battles. 
Very often a battle lost is prog- 
ress gained, and less of glory and 
more of liberty. The drummer is 
silent and reason speaks. 

— Victor Hugo. 



A minister in Florida had been labor- 
ing hard to raise money for a church. 
Finally a friend from the North sent 
him the last hundred dollars needed, and 
the day he received it he was presented 
with a son and heir. The Sunday fol- 
lowing the congregation shook with sup- 
pressed laughter when the poor man, 
thinking only of the donation, thanked 
God for the small succor that had just 
arrived. —W. H. McElroy. 

Fear of death caused many people to 
embrace religion in the old days. Peo- 
ple do not now so generally fear death, 
hence the lessened influence of the 
church. Many people court death. 
Others fear that it won't come to their 
relief. 

Nine-tenths of what a man knows 
about his neighbors his wife tells him. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Hot Weather Suggestions. 

Eat one-fourth less in summer than in 
winter. 

Eat meat in moderation. Select the 
lighter meats. 

Banish all alcoholic beverages. 

Eat most largely of cooked fruits and 
vegetables. 

Drink nothing below 60 deg. in tem- 
perature, and drink sparingly. 

Be careful to seek the society of 
cheerful friends. 

Practice moderation in open air exer- 
cise. 

Don't fret; don't worry. 



"The Dreamer Lives Forever." 

I am tired of planning and toiling 

In the crowded hives of men; 
Heart weary of building and spoiling 

And spoiling and building again. 
And long for the dear old country 

Where I dreamed my youth away 
For a dreamer lives forever 

And the toiler dies in a day. 

The Weight ol a Dress. 

"Now," said the woman who sat sur- 
rounded by several miniature mountains 
of fashion books, "can you tell me how 
much this dress will weigh?" 

"With the kind of trimming you se- 
lected, a little less than five pounds," 
said the dressmaker. 

"Oh that's not heavy," said the cus- 
tomer. ' 'You may buy the material and 
trimmings already decided upon and 
make it up at once. " 

"What a strange question, " said an- 
other customer when the first woman 
had gone out. Isn't it unusual to ask 
about the weight of a dress?" 

"Not now," said the dressmaker. 
"There was a time when if a woman 
fancied a particular pattern made up 
from a certain kind of material she 
would order it, no matter if it weighed 
one pound or one hundred pounds. But 
in this day of hygienic living many a 
woman gives thought to the literal bur- 
den of the clothes she carries around 
and desires information on that point 
before deciding upon a new dress. It is 
the business of every dressmaker to 
have some idea on the subject, and al- 
though I cannot forecast the weight of 
a gown to the fraction of an ounce I can 
give some pretty straight guesses." — 
New York Sun. 



No time should be lost in giving Lynn 
a shoe trade school. 



A Woman's Idea of Women. 

WJ OMEN are not nearly such beauty 

T T lovers as men. Provided a man 

be strong and clean looking and manly, 

he will have hosts of women admirers. 

Women very rarely fall in love with 
namby-pamby "pretty" men. But no 
matter how silly a girl may be, if she 
only has a pretty face, men will flutter 
about her like moths about a candle. 

Added to this, they are most insincere 
in their attitude toward beauty. 

You will often hear a man exclaim: 

"Miss makes me tired! She takes 

such care of her complexion that she 
never can golf or sail, because she must 
always wear a veil." 

But if Miss ruined her complex- 
ion by too much exposure to the sun, 
that same man would be the first to no- 
tice it, and his interest in her would 
quickly wane. 

Of course all men are not geese where 
a pretty face is concerned. Many of 
them see below the surface and realize 
that a girl can be exceedingly charming 
and sweet without being in the least 
pretty. 

But there is no doubt that a pretty 
face works great havoc in the average 
masculine heart. 

Young men, you may not beheve it, 
but the first thing a girl notices about a 
man is his size. 

He need not be so very tall, though 
she likes that, too; but he must be 
strong. 

She loves to see his muscle, and if she 
is fond of him she likes to have him hold 
her two hands in a clasp so firm that, 
struggle as she may, she cannot escape. 

His face may seem ugly to all the rest 
of the world, but if it is kind and gentle 
to her, that is all she cares for. — Se- 
lected. 



"Effie," said Margie, who was labor- 
iously spelling words from a first 
reader, "how can I tell which is a 'd' 
and which is a 'b'?" "Why," replied 
Effie, wisely, "the 'd' has its tummy on 
its back." — Harper's Weekly. 



Veneration of money leads to con- 
tempt for men. 



Hay Fever 



Instant Relief 
I and positive cure. 
Trial treatment 
mailed free. 
Toxlco Laboratory, 1123 Broadway, New York. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 19 



r^T OHT'H'Ih^CI Pressed, Cleaned 
V^'-L/V-/ 1 JTlX-yO and Kept in Order 



WE give you the best service possible for $1.50 per month, $4.00 
per three months, and $15.00 for one year. No contracts made 
for less than six months. This will allow one person three 
Sieces per week. We CLEAN, make small REPAIRS, and press un- 
er this contract. Our team calls for and delivers your goods in Lynn, 
Salem, Swampscott and Peabody. 

Our DYEING and CLEANSING is as good as can be had at any 
first-class dye house. 

We have a first-class repair shop where we re-line coats and vests, 
put velvet collars on overcoats, and make general alterations. We 
would be pleased to have you give us a trial and we are sure we can 
please you. Telephone 546-2, or send a postal and our team will call. 

ATLANTIC CLEANSING COMPANY 

J. H. H. Hartshorn, Mgr. Established 1899. 117 Broad Street, Lynn 



TDEOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



If You Want 

PERFECT 
COOKING 



YOU WILL 
COOK WITH 



LYNN GAS &. ELECTRIC C? 



l! 




50 cents »er Year QTrPTTTTV/TPT?!? 1 QAQ 

Single Cc.pies 5 cents Olhr i lit V/in ill SX^ lV\JO 



Security Safe Deposit and Trust Co. 

Main Office : Bergengren Block, Central Square, Lynn, Mass. 
Branch Office : 25 Market Square, West Lynn, Mass. 



INTEREST allowed on DEPOSITS subject 
to CHECK. 

£)EPOSITS in SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
draw INTEREST at the rate of 3 per 
cent, per annum. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES to rent. Prices 
ranging from $5.00 to $50.00 per year. 



DO NOT BUY 

FALL and WINTER GARMENTS 

until you have seen our 

ALL NEW STOCK 

IN WOMEN'S READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS 

The Pick of the Very Latest New York Stock that cannot be duplicated 

elsewhere in Lynn 

Telephone 1807 312 Union Street 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



IhONG 






Telephone Talks 



A ' 'prompt ' ' answer turneth away 
ivrath. You know how you feel when 
you are kept ivaiting at the telephone. 

Remember : Example is better than 
precept. 



"No One on the Line" 

It has been pointed out that there are three parties to a 
telephone conversation, namely, the person calling, the oper- 
ator, and, last but not least, the person called. 

The operator has no authority to compel an answer to her 
summons. She simply forwards to your telephone a mechan- 
ical signal. Interpreted, this means "Some one desires to 
speak to you." It remains for you, the person called to 
recognize this request. 

There are two strong reasons why you should answer 
promptly, and both vitally concern you : 

Ilf you are slow in answering, the caller may hang 
up the telephone and assume that you are not ac- 
cessible. Later, if you answer at your leisure, the 
operator can vouchsafe no information save that 
"there is no one on the line." Who called you? 
The operator probably does not know. Any opera- 
tor in your exchange may have called you, rather 
than the operator specially assigned to answer your 
calls. 



2 



From the moment the operator calling you * 'plugs 
in" on your line until she ceases her effort to attract 
your attention, your line is ' 'busy' ' to all other callers. 



If you are dilatory, therefore, you are obstructing your own 
service. You are also causing disappointment to your caller 
and annoyance to yourself. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Lynn Revie^v 

A Monthly Epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 

Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 

Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



SEPTEMBER, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 

No. 11 



Spare the shade trees! 



Are you on the raft with Taft? 



City of Chelsea— thirteen letters, 
that prophetic? 



Is 



Lynn's valuation is now $68,000,000. 
A rather tidy sum. 

It costs the city $2,680 to lay 1.702 
square yards of granolithic sidewalk on 
Franklin street. 



The tax rate this year is $20 per $1000, 
and the average rate for the past three 
years has been $18.33. 



Granolithic sidewalks in front of the 
Isaac Wyman tenement house property 
are rather expensive luxuries for the 
millionaire, and it is understood that he 
does not believe in them. 



The election of Luther Atwood as 
trustee of the public library promotes a 
gentleman to a position for the filling of 
which he is eminently well qualified. 
The city is to be congratulated on secur- 
ing the services of Mr. Atwood. 



We notice in an interview that Mrs. 
Kern, wife of the Democratic candidate 
for vice-president, has "decided ideas." 
She states that "she rather dreads her 
social career in Washington." Mrs. 
Kern should not lose any sleep on this 
account. 

John D. Rockefeller has been quoted 
as saying that the requisites for success 
in life are economy, industry and stead- 
fastness. Mr. Carnegie mentions indus- 
try, steadfastness and economy as the 
desiderata, and the late Marshall Field 
insisted that steadfastness, economy and 
industry would carry a man well toward 
the front. 



The Independent Telephones. 

Great things were promised when the 
independent telephone companies pre- 
sented their prospectuses to the public. 
People are seldom gainers by competi- 
tive public service companies. The con- 
sumer has to "pay the freight", sooner 
or later, and the logical result of over- 
capitalization, insufficient maintenance, 
and loss of financial credit has to be 
borne by the dear people. 

We have had our fill in Lynn of com- 
peting public service companies, and the 
city has had to pay a good round sum in 
consequence. We were promised "re- 
lief" through an independent telephone 
movement which only resulted in bother, 
trouble and expense. 

As the Boston News Bureau points 
out, "the record of foreclosures, passed 
dividends, and receiverships of the inde- 
pendent companies emphasizes the fact 
that between promise and performance 
lay many obstacles not disclosed in a 
promoters' prospectus." 



There have been 345 new buildings, 
(which includes 208 dwelling houses) 
erected in Lynn the past year. 



"If the American Express Company 
lost $34,000 on Massachusetts business 
in 1907, it is pretty certain that the loss 
will be greater during the present year. 
The public did not take kindly to the 
raise in express charges recently inaug- 
urated and a great deal of the business 
which was turned over to the American, 
was transferred to local expresses after 
the increase in rates" very correctly 
says the Salem Observer. Twenty-five 
cents expressage on a small package be- 
tween Lynn and Boston seems to border 
upon the outrageous. 



The Boston & Maine Railroad is in a 
sorry state, financially, according to 
President Tuttle, and it really looks like 
hard sledding for this corporation, with 
the passenger business in June $60,000, 
in July $100,000 and August $150,000 less 
than one year ago, and the freight busi- 
ness is not more than one-half of that of 
one year ago. What the finality will be 
for the Boston & Maine and other rail- 
roads it is hard to conjecture. Certainly 
the injection of politics in business has 
placed the railroads on a rocky road. 
The Boston & Maine recently purchased 
7,000 tons of steel rails, but if the busi- 
ness had been normal the corporation 
would have purchased 40,000 tons. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The Harbor Improvements. 

It is probable that the city govern- 
ment will take hold of the proposed har- 
bor iniprovements in good earnest. Af- 
ter hearing the report of the committee 
from the board of trade which has been 
looking over similar work being done at 
other places the city government has 
been presented a request for the $10,000 
necessary for the work. The proposition 
is to extend a retaining bulkhead from 
the Nahant shore to a point on the West 
Lynn shore and in this manner it would 
be possible to fill in about 300 acres of 
what is now flat lands. This would add 
14,000,000 square feet of valuable com- 
mercial land at $1 a foot at the lowest 
estimate, and this would mean that the 
land valuation alone on our present rate 
of taxation would produce a yearly in- 
come of $252,000, to say nothing of the 
revenue from the dock facilities. The 
proposition is to have two wide ship 
canals more than 35 feet deep at low 
water, which will aff^ord ample dock fa- 
cilities—dredge the turning basin just 
outside the reclaimed land and prepare 
a short, deep channel to the ocean. The 
flat lands as they at present stand are an 
eyesore as well as a menace to public 
health, and are of absolutely no value as 
far as taxation goes. If the United 
States government should take hold of 
the work in connection with the Harbor 
and Land Commissioners Lynn could 
easily be made one of the greatest sea- 
port cities on the Atlantic coast. Let us 
hope that the work will be carried out in 
the very near future. 
»?« 

On one occasion the friends of a young 
woman were saying to the young man to 
whom she had betrothed herself that it 
was a great risk to intrust her fortunes 
into his keeping. To which he replied 
that he was fully aware of that fact, but 
he really could not understand why it 
should be assumed that the risks were 
all on one side. 

Darwin acknowledged himself sold 
when his little niece asked him seriously 
what a cat has which no other animal 
has. He gave it up after mature dehb- 
eration; and then the sly little puss an- 
swered, "Kittens." 
»?• 

Flossie was watching the masons lay 
brick, and the process interested her 
greatly. "0 mamma," she exclaimed, 
as she saw the man putting on mortar; 
"they're buttering bi-icks. ain't they?" 



Rock-A-By Land. 

Ho and away for the Rock-a-by land — 

The rollicking, frolicking Rock-a-by land, 

Where the little ones go on the hush-a-by cars 

To play peek-a-boo with the silvery stars. 

'Tis the airiest, fairiest land that I know — 

Is this land where the dollies and sugar plums 

grow; 
The dream train is ready with Love in command 
For the 

Rollicking, 

Frolicking 

Rock-a-by land. 

Rock-a-by land — 

Sweet Rock-a-by land! 
Dancing and singing while bluebells are ringing. 

Close your eyes, little one. 

Soon you will stand 
On the borders of far away Rock-a-by land. 

Such a queer little car for the Rock-a-by land — 
The rollicking, frolicking Rock-a-by land. 
The wheels are the rockers: 'tis deep and 'tis wide. 
All quilted and cushioned for baby's long ride; 
Then out through the shadows we dreamily go 
Past Slumberland hills and the heights of by-low — 
We are off on a journey delightful and grand 
For the 

Rollicking, 

Frolicking 

Rock-a-by land. 

Rock-a-by land — 

Dear Kock-a-by land ! 
Stars are a-gleaming while baby is dreaming— 

Dreaming sweet dreams 

Of a fairykin band 
In the far away beautiful Rock-a-by land 

Oh, what a trip to the Rock-a-by land — 
The rollicking, frolicking Rock-a-by land 
There's dancing and singing and music that's 

sweet 
And Peek-a-boo dreams that are tiny and fleet. 
We glide past Love's river, with ripples and 

gleams 
Through blossoming meadows in silvery streams; 
At Sound Asleep station we finally stand 
For the 

Rollicking 

Frolicking 

Rock-a-by land. 

Rock-a-by land — 

Charming Rock-a-by land! 
Fairies are winging while baby is swinging. 

Nestle close, little one! 

Now hand in hand 
We'll wander and dream in the Rock-a-by land! 

— E. A. Brininstool 

Marriage. 

The Englishman — It's rather the prop- 
er thing to do. 

The Irishman— A foretaste of heaven. 

The Scotchman — It's aricht, if she's 
got the siller. 

The Dutchman — Who vill cook der 
dinner if you no have got dervraw? 

The Italian — Marriage gives a man 
another angel to pray for him and saves 
him the trouble of doing it himself. 

The American — Haven't got the time. 

»r« 

A man never realizes how many faults 
he has until he has been married a few 
months. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Moon Changes. 

First Quarter, September 3. 
Full Moon, September 10. 
Last Quarter, September 16. 
New Moon, September 25. 

The Street Commission. 

The new street commission named by 
Mayor Porter is a credit to his discern- 
ment and judgment. It is an ideal body 
for the work in hand. The city is much 
in need of street improvement, the pub- 
lic feeling for a long time that they were 
not getting anywhere near the returns 
to be expected from the amount of 
money expended. Now it is up to the 
street commission to find out where the 
errors have been and correct them. In 
the past ten years nearly one million 
dollars has been expended on the streets, 
but one would never think it possible 
after traveling over the sidewalks in the 
central part of the city. More care 
should be taken in the hiring of individ- 
uals to work upon the street, not much 
judgment or discrimination having been 
practiced heretofore. The street depart- 
ment as well as all other city depart- 
ments should be run on a business basis 
and it now looks as if it might get some- 
where near the ideal in this department 
under the direction of the new street 
commission. 

A 

According to the Bookman, the six 
books which sold best in the order of de- 
mand during the past month were Mr. 
Crewe's Career, The Lure of the Mask, 
The Barrier, The Coast of Chance, The 
Chaperon, and The Husbands of Edith. 

Evolution. 

He cut initials on a tree; 

Love moved without a hitch, 
For when a few short years had passed 

He went and cut a switch. 

Client— Didn't you make a mistake in 
going into law instead of the army? 

Lawyer — Why? 

Client— By the way you charge there 
would be little left of the enemy.— Sa- 
cred Heart Review. 
A 

Subscribe for The Review. 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



Lines to Mary Ann. 

I was hasty, very hasty— I am sorry, Mary Ann. 
Won't you come back to our kitchen and forgive 

me if you can? 
I am lonfring, Mary, longing for a look into your 

eyes. 
And my human self is hungry, hungry for your 

lemon pies: 
For the matter of a dollar we have drifted far 

apart. 
I will pay if you'll forgive me and will forge an 

apple tart. 
When I see the leaden biscuit and the leathery 

steak I scan, 
I am on my knees for pardon, for your pardon, 

Mary Ann. 

I remember how it happened, it is clear as it can 

be. 
How you wanted twenty dollars, and I told you 

Twenty-three; 
I was very young and foolish, on my dignity intent, 
And I swear it, Mary, swear it. did not know what 

cooking meant. 
I am older now and chastened; won't you pardon 

me the break? 
Won't you listen to my pleading and come back to 

broil a steak? 
Won't you smother me with mushrooms, fashioned 

Mary, as you can? 
Won't you make some fluffy biscuit like you use to 

Mary Ann? 

Ah, if you could lift the biscuit! Ah, if you could 

only look 
On the pale, anaemic coffee since my wife has had 

to cook; 
If you saw the steak she serves me, how our every 

daily meal 
From once being a real pleasure has become but 

an ordeal. 
You'd have pity, Mary, pity, though your love for 

me is gone, 
And you'd hurry back, 1 know it, and would put 

the broiler on; 
And the gravity specific of the biscuits you'd 

reduce — 
Oh, have mercy, Mary, mercy; don't be stubborn 

—what's the use? 

—J. W. Foley in Sat. Eve. Post 

Hair Dressing Changes. 

The extremely flat marcel wave has 
given place to a softer, rounder and 
more natural style of wave. The hair 
is no longer worn over a "rat" or roll 
of hair, but is allowed to form in a nat- 
ural pompadour which is arranged in an 
irregular outline to suit the face. Fin- 
ger puffs are used to fill out discrepan- 
cies, but three medium-sized ones are 
quite sufficient. If you are medium 
height or below it, do not make the 
mistake of piling masses of puffs and 
false hair on top of your head. It 
gives one a top-heavy look and takes 
away the crowning glory of woman — 
a head of beautiful hair simply and 
becomingly arranged. 
A 

The thing that makes the trouble is 
not so much what actually happens, but 
what we fear may happen, and it is fear 
and imagination that causes panics. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a Dwelling 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.66 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.76 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always can-y large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. CSi W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office. Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109i-2 Branch Otfices, 305 Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN, Manager. 



GREEN & SON 

IDT A IVT/^C NO BETTER MADE 
X Ir^iNwO AT ANY PRICE 

E. A. Green, The Piano Man 

30 Market Street 



Balzac and the Thief. 

A story, said to be new, of Balzac is 
related by a French contemporary. A 
burglar gained admission to Balzac's 
house and was soon at work, by the 
light of the moon, at the lock of the 
secretaire in the novelist's chamber. 
Balzac was asleep at the time, but the 
movements of the intruder aroused him. 
The burglar, who was working most in- 
dustriously, paused. A strident laugh 
arrested his operations and he beheld by 
the moonlight the novelist sitting up in 
bed, his sides aching with laughter. 

"What is it that makes you merry?" 
demanded the burglar. 

"I laugh," replied the author of 
"Pere Goriot. " to think that you should 
come in the night without a lantern to 
search my secretaire for money when I 
can never find any there in broad day- 
light."— Westminster Gazette. 



A man sent this answer to a book- 
seller who sent in his account for a book 
some time before delivered: "I never 
ordered the book. If I did, you did not 
send it. If I got it, I paid for it. If I 
didn't, I won't. "—Town and Country 
Journal. 





See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
ble, but with a 
' ' hard - to - button ' ' 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EYELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cuff, and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
sist on the three- 
thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



It Wouldn't Do. 

If all the skies were sunshine. 

Our faces would be fain 
To feel once more upon them 

The cooling- splash of rain. 

If all the world were music. 
Our hearts would often long- 

For one sweet strain of silence 
To break the endless song. 

If life were always merry 
Our souls would seek relief 

And rest from weary laughter 
In the quiet arms of grief 

— Bridgeman's Magazine 

A 

How Wu Fights Oil Age. 

Wu Ting-fang, Chinese Minister to 
this country, recently made the state- 
ment that he had discovered the secret 
of longevity, mentioning a period of 200 
years to which he might live through a 
system of diet. A Boston man who sent 
him an inquiry has received the follow- 
ing plan of daily procedure: In answer 
to your letter requesting my plan of diet 
I have to say as follows. (1) I have 
given up my breakfast, taken two meals 
a day, lunch and dinner; (2) abstain 
from all flesh food; my diet is rice, or, 
when I go out to dinner, whole wheat 
bread, fresh vegetables, nuts and fruit; 
(3) I avoid all coffee, cocoa, tea, liquors, 
condiments and all rich foods: (4) I 
have given up salt also, because it is 
found that salt makes one's bones stifl"; 
(5) I masticate every mouthful of food 
thoroughly before it is swallowed; (6) 
I don't drink at meals, but between 
meals or one hour after meals; (7) I 
practice deep breathing; (8) I take 
"moderate exercise. 



A wealthy Irish lady, whose summer 
home is situated near a garrison town 
in Ireland, once sent an invitation to 
Capt. Armstrong to take tea with her, 
saying, "that the pleasure of Capt. 
Armstrong's company is respectfully 
requested," etc. To her astonishment 
she received by an orderly the following 
note: "Enlisted men Jones and Smith 
have been detailed to do guard duty, 
but the remainder of Capt. Armstrong's 
company accept with pleasure Mrs. 
Weyler's polite invitation." — Argonaut. 

A 

Willard — Papa, may I go in swimming? 

Papa— Why, Willard, only an hour 
ago you complained of a pain in your 
stomach. 

Willard— That's all right, papa. I 
can swim on my back— Selected. 



II You Do Not Want Dyspepsia. 

It is absolutely essential to eat slowly 
and chew with the greatest thorough- 
ness. Complete chewing in the mouth. 
Permitting no washing down with cof- 
fee or tea, salivates the food so that it 
is ready for digestion when it goes into 
the stomach, and persistence will put 
good flesh on any lean dyspeptic. There 
is a theory that when solid food is 
chewed in the mouth to an absolute pulp 
that the organs in the back of the mouth 
exercise a selective action and send to 
the stomach only that which is fitted to 
be converted into blood and tissue, thus 
relieving the digestive organs of hand- 
ling the waste. Whether or not this is 
correct is for the science of the future 
to determine. Certain it is that nature 
gave us grinding teeth for the purpose 
of chewing our food and never intended 
that we should swallow it unchewed, as 
do those animals having more than one 
stomach. 



An Expert's Criticism. 

Stella— What do you think of 



sheath skirt? 

Bella— It looks 
mice. 



the 



like an invitation to 



LIFE 
INSURANCE 

IN THE BEST AND STRONGEST 
COMPANIES IN AMERICA 

Study These Rates 

Annual Cost NEW Whole Life Policy per $1,000 

Age 20 . $14.96 Age 40 . $26.09 
Age 25 . 16.77 Age 45 . 31.47 
Age 30 . 19.08 : Age 50 . 38.83 
Age 35 . 22.10 Age 55 . 48.98 



Send age, nearest birthday, for 
specimen policy. State occui)a- 
tii)n. Write TODAY. 



DO NOT DELAY 

W. E. WARREN 

Room 51 
333 Union Street, Lynn 

Send all correspondence to P.O. Box 536, Lynn 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



NEW YORK CITY 



A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 
The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
— a re St aura nt 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for men. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
ese servants. 

Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Send tor Booklet 

F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quahty at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens C^ Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



The Man Who Saves 

for his money's sake only is a fool, — 
the man whose aim in saving is to in- 
sure him against poverty and want is 
wise and his object in saving is praise- 
worthy. There are a great many ways 
to save besides laying by money and by 
saving in other directions you are thus 
enabled to lay by more money. 

There is a firm in Lynn which makes 
an offer that will not only be a saving 
but an investment. They make a pro- 
position to take care of your clothing 
and give full value for the money — 
and you invest with the advantage of 
taking away all care from yourself 
and they back up their business meth- 
ods by prompt service and the best 
work. 

We could cite many instances of 
satisfied customers who cannot say 
too much in commendation of this ser- 
vice, and they are all shrewd business 
men and women whose appearance is 
worth much to them, and who all say 
that in having their clothes properly 
cared for they save an amount each 
year which would purchase for them 
another suit. 

It is a business proposition, and one 
which should appeal to all well groomed 
men and women, as, while we do not 
agree with the tailor that clothing is 
nine-tenths of the man. we do believe 
that a neat personal appearance is 
coming to play a more important part 
each year in business as well as social 
life. A man or woman who wears well- 
ordered clothing, which shows taste 
and refinement, stands a much better 
show in getting an audience than one 
whose clothes show lack of care and 
attention. 

Believing this to be sound common 
sense we want to make the proposition 
to you, that you take out a contract 
with us for six months at $1.50 per 
month, $4.00 for three months, $15.00 
f oi one year. 

This allows one person three pieces 
a week, and we will clean, make re- 
pairs and press under this contract, 
our team calling for and delivering 
your goods, whether you live in Lynn. 
Salem, Swampscott or Peabody. We 
make a specialty of dyeing and cleans- 
ing women's garments of all kinds. 

"Telephone 613-2 or send us a postal 



ATLANTIC CLEANSING CO. 

J, H. H. HARTSHORN, Manager 

No. 117 Broad Street 
LYNN 



When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Great Loss of Water. 

The water board gave out the report 
by Engineer W. S. Johnson of the loss 
of water in the Lynn storage system. 
The report shows that this loss is some- 
times, 1,200,000 gallons daily, or one- 
fifth of the required daily supply of 
Lynn, but when the reservoirs are drawn 
down the leakage decreases rapidly, so 
that the average quantity is much less. 
Mr. Johnson says that the leakage at 
Birch pond is greater in proportion than 
at Walden pond dam. An especially im- 
portant point is brought out that the 
plans of the old water board that con- 
structed the Walden pond dam of con- 
troversial repute to some time increase 
the storage capacity of the city by ele- 
vating the dam level 20 feet go for 
naught. Engineer Johnson declares that 
this plan is not to be considered, as with 
the increased body of water the leakage 
in this dam would increase largely. He 
finds that there is no danger of the dam 
giving way. He suggests no method of 
stopping the daily loss of water. So far 
as it is possible to determine from the 
observations the leaks are in no case 
such as to affect the safety of the dams, 
and the most serious feature in regard 
to the leaks is the loss from the reser- 
voirs of a great quantity of water which 
has been obtained at a large expense. 

Explained. 

Ann was very fond of Willie 

When he came to see her first. 
But she later called him silly — 

Said he was, of all, the worst. 
And one day she learned the reason 

Why he talked so like a 

He had studied Love a season 

In a correspondence school. 

Mrs. Borrman Wells was describing at 
dinner in New York a suffrage meeting 
where the mob made a great disturb- 
ance. "The noise, " she said, "can only 
be likened to the hubbub that I once 
heard coming from the nursery of a 
friend with whom I was taking tea. 
Terrified by the turmoil, my friend and 
I burst into the nursery breathless. The 
children were in a close group by the 
window, the baby in the middle. They 
looked up calmly. 'What on earth are 
you doing?' the mother demanded. The 
oldest boy answered, 'We've found 
gran'ma's teeth, and we're filing them 
down and fitting them on baby.' " 

Love is that which roots in sacrifice, 
grows in service, blooms in joy. 



We Parted in Silence. 

We parted in silence, we parted by night. 

On the banks of that lonely river; 
Where the fragrant limes their boughs unite. 

We met— and we parted forever! 
The night-bird sang, and the stars above 

Told many a touching story. 
Of friends long passed to the kingdom of love. 

Where the soul wears its mantle of glory. 

We parted in silence — our cheeks were wet 

With the tears that were past controlling: 
We vow'd we would never, no, never forget, 

And those vows at the time were consoling; 
But those lips that echo'd the sounds of mine 

Are as cold as that lonely river; 
And that eye. that beautiful spirit's shrine. 

Has shrouded its fires forever. 

And now on the midnight sky I look. 

And my heart grows full of weeping; 
Each star is to me a sealed book, 

Some tale of that loved one keeping 
We parted in silence — we parted in tears— 

On the banks of that lonely river; 
But the odor and bloom of those bygone years 

Shall hang o'er its waters forever. 



Perplexed in the Extreme. 

Othello had just smothered Desde- 
mona. 

"And yet," he murmured, "she said 
she slept perfectly in a 6x9 top floor in- 
side room in a summer hotel." 

Herewith he considered it an acci- 
dent. -N. Y. Sun. 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton, Pres.. 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.-Treas. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



September. 

The days once more their dainty fare outspread; 

For Nature, roused from dreams, and making 
good. 

At length, the promise of her larger mood, 
No longer doles us out her wine and bread 
In scanty sort, — but pours for us, instead. 

Her spicy, sweet September! Now the blood 

Of high resolve begins again to flood 
Our nerveless souls, and life wakes, duty-wed. 

Nature, wise steward, thou art justified! 
For thou hast kept the good wine until now. 
Against this tardy bridal, this late vow 

Pledging our days to toil while days abide: — 
Where are the fallow fields, that we may sow 
And reap the latter harvest, ere we go? 

— Caroline A. Mason 



A Timc-Saving Device. 

Every employee of the Bank of Eng- 
land is required to sign his name in a 
book on his arrival in the morning, and, 
if late, must give the reason therefor. 
The chief cause of tardiness is usually 
fog, and the first man to arrive writes 
"fog" opposite his name, and those who 
follow write "ditto." The other day, 
however, the first late man gave as the 
reason, "wife had twins," and twenty 
other late men mechanically signed "dit- 
to" underneath. — Success. 

Hon. Arthur B. Breed will be a can- 
didate for nomination for the general 
court from the Ward 5 district, this fall. 
It is believed that Mr. Breed and Rep- 
resentative McCormack will be nomi- 
nated. Mr. Breed is especially well 
fitted to perform the duties of a mem- 
ber of the general court. Exceedingly 
well informed, patient and thorough in 
all that he undertakes, he is the type 
of a representative who is most likely to 
do the most satisfactory work for his 
city and constituency. 

A man was going down into the New 
York Subway, and, the stairs being wet 
and slippery, he lost his footing, slipped 
to the bottom, and as he went down, 
tripped a lady, who fell into his lap. 
When they reached the bottom, she was 
a little dazed and did not immediately 
get up. Whereupon the man politely 
remarked, "Madam, this is as far as I 
go." 

a* 

Jones— Are you going to vote for 
Bryan this year? 

Smith— No. I think I shall vote for 
Taft because I can vote for Bryan any 
old time. — Selected 

When a man brags of his virtues the 
devil is the first to applaud. 



The High School Location. 

''I'^HE site for the proposed new Classi- 
X cal High School building on North 
Common street, decided upon by last, 
year's city government, is entirely out 
of the question. Additional land seems 
to be imperatively necessary if the city 
government decides to build on this loca- 
tion, which is so undesirable from many 
points of view, as previously pointed out 
in the Review. A location should be 
secured more in accordance with the 
character and importance of the build- 
ing. 

Speaking of the land bought by last 
year's government, Mayor Porter re- 
cently remarked : ' 'The city council has 
expressed its preference regarding an 
architect and now we must take up the 
site problem. We have a frontage of 
198 feet on North Common street, but 
the lot is so irregularly shaped that the 
width at the rear is very much less. 
The southern bound bears steadily in all 
the way from the street. 

'The building, of course, can't be set 
on the street line; it must go back as 
far as the library, and we have not got 
a width of 198 feet at that distance back 
from the street. Then our depth is but 
130 feet on one side and takes the 50 
feet or so which the building will be set 
back and we have no land to speak of. If 
we are to build on North Common street 
we must either go to Hanover street 
and take five parcels there or go towards 
the library and take land from at least 
as many more owners in this direction. 

'Which of these sets of owners will 
make the most favorable terms will prob- 
ably determine the direction in which we 
will go and we must go quite a ways, for 
in addition to the building we should al- 
low quite an open space — the school 
board says 30 feet — on each side. We 
must begin on the site problem right 
away and after we get enough land, then 
we can reasonably look forward to the 
development of plans and the erection of 
a building, but to-day we are quite a 
distance from anywhere except the place 
we began." 

The concise and important talk of 
Mayor Porter wholly coincides with the 
Review's position that the present lot 
is wholly inadequate. 



We exaggerate misfortune and happi- 
ness alike. We are never either so 
wretched or so happy as we say we are. 
— Balzac. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



At Sleepy Time. 

"Oh. dear!" tho little Tin Soldier cried. 

"I've marched this whole day long. 
Though my gun is heavy and hard to hold, 

And my legs are far from strong." 

"And now I should like some rest; 

It certainly can't be right. 
To expect a veteran like myself. 

To stand on guard all night." 

The little Tin Horse, in great distress. 

Called: Who will attend me? 
I want to be put in my nice neat stall. 

And be given some oats for tea. 

"I've been to market town and back 

Today at my fastest trot; 
And now I am lying upside down 

With my harness tied in a knot." 

Cried Jack-in-a-box, "I've jumped and bounced 

Till I'm quite worn out tonight. 
Will somebody please shut up my house. 

And fasten the roof down tight?" 

"I'm hoarse as a crow!" said the barking dog; 

"I'm tired?" sighed the Woolly Sheep; 
"We are all of us that." crieti Jumping Jack, 

"And we need some rest and sleep. 

"We should like to go to our beds at once. 

And shut up our eyes <iuite tight. 
Will our dear little master come. 

And settle us all for the night?" 

But it was Mamma who put them up 

In a row on the nursery shelf. 
For never a word the Master heard,— 

He was fast asleep himself! 

— Ellen Manley 

B. F. Keith deserves the fullest credit 
for making the vaudeville stage respect- 
able. Parents send children to Keith's 
theatre without hesitation. It is known 
that the show has been "edited" to the 
extent that women and children may 
witness it with freedom. There is a 
delightful "atmosphere" in the Keith 
theatre, and evidence on every hand that 
high character prevails in the manage- 
ment. During September there will 
appear at this theatre many of the more 
prominent and highest salaried leaders 
in vaudeville, and as usual, it will be 
made plain that nowhere in the world is 
vaudeville of a higher class than in 
Keith's new theatre. 



Mr. Walton's Schooliiouse Ideas. 

SCHOOL Committeeman Walton has 
the right idea concerning school house 
accommodations and the committee to 
be in charge of them. Mr. Walton has 
had an experience of eighteen years, and 
has seen the committee on education cut 
down during that time from 21 members 
to 12, and believes that a less number 
still would do the work better. He be- 
lieves that putting the building and re- 
pairing of school houses in the hands of 
the school committee and reduce that 
body to three or five members, would 
make the work more successful. As it 
now stands there are too many bossing 
the job and consequently nothing is be- 
ing done. There is only one danger in 
reducing the membership and that is, 
there being a salary this fact might at- 
tract undesirable men to the position, 
but in eliminating other branches of the 
government from the power to erect and 
care for school buildings would much 
simplify matters. Mr. Walton believes 
that in order to cut the number of pu- 
pils in a room down to the average, 
which is 35, there must be erected every 
year at least one school building. This 
has never been done by the city. Every 
child is entitled to at least nine years of 
schooling from the city, and it should be 
given them under the best circumstan- 
ces possible, including instruction and 
healthy surroundings. 



The Boston American is not fussy. In 
its issue of July 29 with headlines taking 
up one-half of the first page they an- 
nounced that W. K. Vanderbilt had 
been fatally injured in an automobile 
accident near Paris. The facts were 
that the stepson of Mr. Vanderbilt was 
killed. But a little error like that on 
the part of the American is not at all 
bothersome. 



Burglar (rousing the sleeping head of 
the family— (Don't move or I'll shoot. 
Whar's your money hid? 

Head of the family (struck by a bright 
thought) —It's in the pocket of my wife's 
dress. 

"That's all right. I'll just take the 
dress. Thanks. " — Chicago Tribune. 

An untried sportsman entered a tailor 
shop and said, "I am a rower, and I 
want to be measured for two pairs of 
rowing trousers, — the kind with sliding 
seats." 



The Grief of Eve. 

Adam and Eve were leaving the Gar- 
den. 

"I have a perfectly lovely coat of tan 
and nobody to see it," she wailed. 

Herewith she felt her isolation keenly. 
— N. Y. Sun. 

»?• 

"The weather used to be in four acts 
— spring, summer, autumn and winter. 

"Well?" 

"But now nature seems to have gone 
into vaudeville." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Four-Leaf Clover. 

I know a place where the sun is like gokl, 
And the cherry blooms burst with snow, 

An<l down underneath is the loveliest nook. 
Where the four-leaf clovers grow. 

One leaf is for hope, and one is for faith. 

And one is for love, you know. 
And God put another in for luck — 

If you search, you will find where they grow. 

But you must have hope, and you must have faith. 
You must love and be strong — and so — 

If you work, if you wait, you will find the place 
Where the four- leaf clovers grow. 

— Ella Higginson 



A commuter on his lonely way home 
from the station, heard footsteps behind 
him. He increased his speed. The foot- 
steps quickened. The commuter darted 
down a lane. The footsteps pursued. 
In desperation he vaulted over a fence, 
and rushed into a churchyard. "If he 
follows me here," he thought fearfully, 
"there can be no doubt as to his inten- 
tions." The man behind was scramb- 
ling over the fence. Quivering with 
fear, the nervous one faced his pursuer. 
"What do you want?" he demanded. 
"Wh-why are you following me?" 
"Say," asked the stranger, mopping 
his brow, "do you always go home like 
this? I'm going up to Mr. Brown's, 
and the man at the station told me to 
follow you as you lived next dooi'. 
Excuse my asking you, but is there 
much more to do before we get there?" 
— Everybody's Magazine. 



THE AUDITORIUM 



ALWAYS A HIGH CLASS 
VAUDEVILLE SHOW 

Booked by the KEITH CIRCUIT 

Metropolitan Favorites— Large City 
Attractions— All at Popular Prices 

Evenings at 8. Matinees every day at 2. Seats 

may be booked for the season by 

applying at the box office 



We are just starting a line of Automobile Sup- 
plies:— Cylinder Oil, Carbide, Packard 
Cable, Spark Plugs, Kitsee Batteries, 
Dry Cells, Pocket Ammeters. We will 
get any parts promptly and make repairs. 
TRY US 
CHAS. C. PHILLIPS, Inc, 
72-74 Exchange Street. Telephone 469 



COMPLETE ESTIMATES GIVEN 
ON DECORATING HOUSES FROM 
THE CEILING TO .'. .■. .". .". 

RUGS 



CWHEN YOU ARE IN 
THE MARKET FOR 
ORIENTAL RUGS— 
THE BEST QUALITY AT 
LOWEST PRICES— PLEASE 
ADDRESS 

WILLIAM E. WOOD 



p. O. Box 536: 



LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 



WE HAVE ACCESS TO THE 
WORLD'S FINEST RUGS 



The Prolessor Waited. 

A new sort of duplicity among college 
men was uncovered when the Harvard 
Crimson recently printed the following: 

"There appeared in yesterday's Crim- 
son a notice stating that there would be 
no meeting in Music 3. Prof. Spalding, 
whose name was signed to the notice but 
who had nothing to do with the insertion, 
waited in vain for his class. It is with 
chagrin that we must publicly announce 
that there is still among us a man who 
stoops to forgery as a means of avoiding 
attendance at his lectures. Afraid to 
face the result of his own cuts, he has 
adopted the method of the coward. 

Forgery is rather a new crime in col- 
leges, at least forgery with no attempt 
to gain money as its object. 

Bason— "I see they have put a sound- 
ing board at the back of the minister's 
pulpit. What do you suppose that's 
for?" Egbert— "Why, it's to throw 
out the sound. " Bason — "Gracious! If 
you throw out the sound, there won't be 
anything left in the sermon. " — Ex- 
change. 

Of two evils choose neither. One of 
them will choose you fast enough. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



The Socialist Idea 

is bound to develop in this country. No 
doubt about that. Many see in it a 
panacea for many of our ills, but they 
are deluded. Prominent socialists as- 
sume that the producer is allowed but a 
small share of the product of his toil and 
that the balance is unjustly appropriated 
by the capitalist. If this were true it 
would be a just cause of complaint. 

A superficial view in some instances 
would give color to the claim, but when 
it is considered that the vast majority 
of all the people contribute directly or 
indirectly to production, and the annual 
surplus, after supporting the people, 
is comparatively small and would give 
each individual only a small additional 
allowance, it becomes clear that the 
wrongs seen by the socialist are largely 
imaginary. 

Assuming that the annual surplus to 
be $2,000,000 in property, which is suffic- 
iently large, and that the population 
will number 85,000,000, if the surplus 
were equally divided among all the peo- 
ple each would receive something over 
$23, which clearly shows the fallacy of 
the socialist claim of wrongful appro- 
priation of the products of labor by the 
capitalists. 

They tell in Milwaukee of a subscrip- 
tion book agent who once tried to sell a 
set of Shakespeare to a wealthy German. 
After talking for five minutes he was 
interrupted by his listener who exclaimed 
impatiently: 

"You vant to sell me somedings — no? 
Veil vat it is?" 

"Shakespeare," said the agent. 

'-Don't vant it! I got Pabst's beer, 
und Schlitz's beer, and Blatz's beer. I 
know nutting about dis Shake's beer 
und I don't vant any." 

i!!Si 
The Foam born. 

The Venus of Milo explained. 

"I tried to stretch hands across the 
sea," she said. 

Thus it was seen that peace hath her 
dangers. — N. Y. Sun. 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



A Song of Unknown Heroes. 

Let me sintr a sonK for the hero 

Who fell unnanicii. unknown — 
The common soldier. lyinK' 

Beneath no costly stone — 
Who fouK^ht where the foe was strongest 

And. after the day was done. 
Was merely among "the missing 

Three hundred and sixty-one." 

Let me sing a song for the hero 

Who knelt at the rail to pray 
While the boats with the weeping women 

And children were rowed away — 
Who, being a man and gifted 

With the strength God gives to men. 
Was one of the "hundred sailors" 

Who will ne'er tread decks again 

Let me sing a song for the hero 

Who. weary, wasted, wan — 
With disease and the world against him — 

Toiled hopefully, bravely on — 
Who, robbed of earth's choicest pleasures. 

Could smile as he worked away. 
And lies with the unnamed millions 

Awaiting the Judgment Day. 

Let me sing the song of the heroes 

Who died unknown, unnamed. 
And my song shall be of the bravest 

That Death and the grave e'er claimed ! 
And my song shall live the longest 

Of all the songs e'er sung 
And still be the song of the heroes 

When the last sad knell is rung! 

-S. E. Kiser 
•!?« 

The Geo. C. Melville Co. conducted 
the most novel and successful sale in its 
history the first portion of August. It 
was the first cut price fur sale ever con- 
ducted by this house during the sum- 
mer months, and the reception of the 
idea by the public resulted most satis- 
factorily. Those who purchased furs 
had them placed in cold storage free of 
charge for the remainder of the season. 
What makes cut price sales popular in 
the Melville store is the fact that the 
public is thoroughly assured that all 
representations made are in good faith. 



At The Savings Bank. 

Mrs. Newly wed— I want to draw out 
twenty dollars please. Five dollars for 
a pair of shoes, four dollars for theatre 
tickets, ten dollars to give my girl on 
account, and" 

Cashier— Sorry, madam, but while 
you've been talking the bank has 
stopped payment. 

A 

A visitor to Boston Common, pausing 
at a gathering of Socialists, heard the 
peroration of a fluent speech: "When 
these principles are triumphant, we shall 
have comfort and happiness from Cana- 
da to Mexico, from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific, from Alpha to Omaha!" — Pacif- 
ic Unitarian. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The publisher of the REVIEW will be 
thankful if all instances of improper delivery 
by carriers of the REVIEW are brought to his 
attention. Send postal card to publication 
office, 333 Union street, Lynn, or telephone 
1026. 



Fall Renovating Time 

IS ABOUT HERE AND YOU WILL 
WANT NEW THINGS FOR WINTER 



DONT FORGET irt-ri 

line of Rugs. Oil Cloth. Linoleums, Curtains, 
Draperies, Sofa Pillows, and when you want 
your carpets cleansed in fine shape drop us a 
line or telephone. Work done quickly and 
reasonably. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 Market Street 
Rugs Made From Old Carpeting 



A prominent physician has said that 
"if one-half the meat, one-fourth the 
bread and all the candy given to children 
could be made to give place to fruit of 
which apples formed a large proportion, 
the death rate would be greatly reduced 
and all would be healthier and have far 
greater brain activity." As the apple 
contains more phosphoric acid in easily 
digested form than any other fruit it is 
of high value as a brain food. 

One Good Turn Deserves Another. 

We .sent the heathen flannel shirts 

In proper winter style; 
Why can't the heathen send to us 

Their bracelet and their smile? 

A man went to a negro to buy a tur- 
key. He told him he wanted a tame 
turkey. The colored gentlemen sold 
him a bird, and, when he arrived home, 
he found it had shot in it." He took it 
back to the negro and said, "I told you 
I wanted a tame turkey; this bird has 
shot in it." "I beg pardon, sah; dat 
shot was intended fer me." 

The teacher told the class to make the 
numerals from 1 to 12. The class went 
to work, and one little boy got through 
very quickly. The teacher praised him 
for getting through his lessons so well. 
He looked frankly at her, and said, 
"Yes'm, I copied them from the face of 
the clock : the rest did not. ' ' 
A 

Nobody is as good today as he is going 
to be tomorrow. 



REAL ESTATE 

Large assortment of properties in all sections 

of the City and Suburbs. 

BUY AND SELL THROUGH 

GEORGE W. BREED 

ITEM BUILDING 



Lucky by Comparison. 

Buncum — I see by the papers that you 
have made an assignment for the bene- 
fit of your creditors? 

Skinner — Yes; my affairs are in a bad 
shape. I won't be able to pay ten cents 
on the dollar. 

"You're a lucky dog. Why, when I 
failed two years ago I had so much 
property left that I had to pay fifty 
cents on the dollar. "—Chicago News. 

A visiting gentleman' had submitted 
for some time to the attentions of the 
three-year-old boy of his hostess, but at 
last grew a little tired of having his 
whiskers pulled and his corns trodden 
upon. 

"Madam," said he, "there is one 
thing about your charming little boy 
which especially pleases me." 

"And what is that?" asked the smil- 
ing mother. 

"That he isn't a twin. " — Rochester 
Herald. 

An Eager Parent. 

"Jack is so brave! He went right in- 
to the library and said to father. 'I 
want to marry your daughter. ' " 
"And what did your father say?" 
"He said: 'Good! Which one?' " — 
Lippincott's. 

"Genii means spirits," explained a 
teacher. "Now, James, you may give 
me a sentence in which you use genii." 
"A man went down street, and bought 
several bottles of genii," answered 
James, promptly. —People's Magazine. 

The rich harvest of this life is a crop 
of reflected happiness. 



ABo^uT SBr Safety Razor | 

The Best in its Line ™ 

Reasonable in Price 5j 

g- Jos. W. HARDING & Co. 2 

55 32-34 Central Sq., Lynn ^ 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



The agitation for a modification of the 
rule of celibacy of the Roman priest- 
hood, which has figured at various times 
in the history of the Church, has been 
renewed with conspicuous vigor in Mu- 
nich, the centre of Catholic Bavaria. 
The advocates of a new order of things, 
under which the clergy may marry un- 
der certain restrictions and regulations, 
are preparing a great petition to the 
Vatican which repeats the arguments 
for the projected reform already written 
down in the history of ecclesiasticism, 
and points out some of the requirements 
of modern life which add foz-ce to the 
ancient plea. The petitioners advocate 
changes in the rule of the Church which 
would place its practice in similarity 
with that of the Eastern Church, where- 
in the lay priesthood are encouraged to 
marry before they take holy orders. It 
is predicted that the Vatican will regard 
the proposed innovation as another man- 
ifestation of the spirit of modernism 
against which Pius X has taken so de- 
termined a stand. 

A 
Her Answer. 

Her eyes were as blue as the heavens above; 

And the stars they were never so bright. 
Love her? Why, yes, to be sure — but my love 

Was sadly commingled with fright. 
All winter I stood at the portal of Fate, 

Both longing and fearing to knock; 
One should not be rash in a matter of weight. 

For all may be lost by a shock. 

At last one night, putting prudence to flight. 
I charged the sweet Foe like a brave^ 

But fancy my feelings, victorious wight. 
As I harked to the answer she gave: 

"1 ought to say 'no.' " said serenely the Fair, 
"Yes, I ought, with a scolding, and more! — 

I've waited for weeks— don't rumple my hair- 
Why didn't you tell me before!" 

— Samuel Minturn Peck 

A 

Representative Matthew McCann has 
a splendid backing for a renomination. 
His friends say for him that he has had 
much influence in the legislature and 
they believe that his re-election will 
benefit the city of Lynn. 

Stella-What does Mr. Taft's letter 
remind you of? 

Bella— Jack's. He took twenty pages 
to say he loved me. — New York Sun. 



From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



Delicate. 

Little Willie isn't well- 
Seems to have a bilious spell. 
We'er afraid he is delicate. 
• Had some apf)le-tarts at eight: 
Nine o'clock 'twas cookies; then 
Followed ginger cakes at ten. 
At eleven slipped around 
And some cheese and doughnuts found.) 
Didn't heed the dinner bell; 
Wouldn't eat; he isn't well. 

Little Willie isn't well— 
(One o'clock 'twas bread and jell'; 
Two o'clock 'twas pumpkin pie; 
Throe, some cake upon the sly; 
Maple caramels at four; 
Hick'ry nuts at five, galore). 
For when supper time came he 
Was as languid as could be! 
What can ail the boy? Do tell. 
Little Willie isn't well. 

Little Willie isn't well. 
Send for good old Doctor Dell, 
Willie doesn't feel "just right," — 
Hasn't any appetite; 
Wouldn't dinner, supper eat. 
Though his mamma did entreat. 
Is it chicken-pox. you think? 
Should he have some milk to drink? 
Give him nux? Or calomel? 
Little Willie isn't well. 

— Woman's Home Companion 

No License and the Arrest Column. 

No license is showing up very well in 
this city if the number of arrests during 
the first three months is any sign. Last 
year during the months of May, June 
and July 1,462 arrests were made for 
drunkenness against 344 this year. For 
the three months in 1907, 71 per cent, of 
the total arrests were for drunkenness, 
and this year 44 per cent, were arrested 
on that charge. The total arrests also 
show a corresponding decrease for each 
month. In May, 1907, 614 arrests were 
made, and 229 this year. In June, 1907, 
708 were arrested against 277 in 1908. 
For July 1907, 709 persons were taken 
against 267 during July of this year. 

Local merchants continue to be strong- 
ly of the opinion that the no license pol- 
icy is a decided detriment to their inter- 
ests, but the no license people say it is 
due to the general industrial conditions 
and not to the no license policy. 



Arms and the Goddess. 

The Venus of Milo has just disposed 
of her arms. 

"But," they cried, "the present fash- 
ion is to have no hips." 

Sadly she realized she had made a mis- 
take. -N. Y. Sun. 

•?« 

There are lots of bargain-counter peo- 
ple in the show-window class. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



HOSPITAL 
SUNDAY 



SEPTEMBER27 

Remember the Date and 
Help the Hospital 



CITY OF LYNN. SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



OPENING OF SCHOOLS 



Finley Peter Dunne, author of "Mr. 
Dooley," is an occasional visitor at a 
certain academy not far from New York. 
On a recent visit there he was accom- 
panied by a well-known banker, who, 
being impressed by the beautiful sur- 
rounding country, suggested that they 
should take a walk the next morning at 
six o'clock. 

"Thank you," replied Mr. Dunne, 
"but I never walk in my sleep." — Lip- 
pincott's. 

Deacon— By the way, that man Brown 
you married a year ago, has he paid you 
your fee yet? 

Clergyman— No; the last time I re- 
minded him of it he said I'd be fortunate 
if he didn't sue me for damages. — Bos- 
ton Transcript. 

"Micky, wot's a philanthropist?" 
"Well, it's like this — if I wuz to swipe 
a quarter from ye when ye wasn't 
lookin', an' den offer ye a dime, if ye'd 
promise to buy a toot' brush with it, I'd 
be one of them things. "—The Broom 
Maker. 

The Beginning of a Commonplace. 

Adam and Eve were packing up. 

"Yes," they protested, "we had a 
perfectly charming time in the country. ' ' 

"Thus the vacation lie had its birth.— 
N. Y. Sun. 

Even a clever girl if wise, will learn 
to cook. 



ROBERT S. SISSON & SON 

83BlakeSt., next to Central National Bank 
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

Furniture insured at the trifling expense of 
two cents a week. 



The public schools of Lynn will 
open Monday, Sept. 14th. The 
Morning Session of all GRADE 
SCHOOLS begins at 8.45 o'clock. 
ALL HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS, 
except those of the entering 
class, will report at 8 o'clock. 

Pupils of the ENTERING 
CLASS will report at the High 
School building at 11 o'clock. 

Only vaccinated children over 
five years of age are admitted to 
the public schools. Those who 
cannot read are admitted only 
during the first three weeks. 

^ GEORGE S. BURGESS, 
Secretary. 

An old hen was pecking at some stray 
carpet tacks in the back yard. 

"Now, what do you suppose that hen 
is eating those tacks for?" said Homer. 

"Perhaps," rejoined his better half, 
"she is going to lay a carpet." 



A baby probably cries because it don't 
know how to cuss. 

In conveying happiness to others you 
increase your own. 



The Opportune Time to 

J-JeCOra.Le. our stock of waU papers, 
both foreign and domes- 
tic designs were never more complete. We 
invite your inspection at our salesroom, or on 
request we will submit samples. A pleasure 
to do satisfactory work. Our competent work- 
men make our work satisfactory. They cannot 
be hired through any other store. 

MUNROE BROS. 

84 1-2 UNION ST. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



Man's Rocky Road. 

A man's life is full of crosses and 
temptations. 

He comes into this world without his 
consent, and goes out against his will, 
and the trip between the two is exceed- 
ingly rocky. The rule of contraries is 
one of the important features of the 
trip. 

When he is little the big girls kiss him, 
but when he is grown up the little girls 
kiss him. 

If he is poor he is a bad manager; if 
he is rich he is dishonest. 

If he needs credit he can't get it; if 
he is prosperous, everyone wants to do 
him a favor. 

If he's in politics, it's for pie; if he's 
out of politics, you can't place him, and 
he's no good for his country. 

If he doesn't give to charity, he is a 
stingy cuss; if he does it is for show. 

If he is actively religious, he is a hyp- 
ocrite; if he takes no interest in religion 
he is a hardened sinner. 

If he shows affection, he is a soft 
specimen; if he cares for no one, he is 
cold-blooded. 

If he dies young, there was a great 
future ahead of him ; if he lives to an old 
age he has missed his calling. 

The road is rocky, but man loves to 
travel it. 

When Polly Shells the Peas. 

Of all her more accomplished deeds 

Let others sing- the praise, 
Describe the charm of when she rides. 

The rapture when she plays: 
Though homelier, I count my theme 

Surpassing all of these. 
And therefore chant with halting rhyme 

When Polly shells the peas. 

Domestic is the picture made, 

And I can understand 
Why they should burst their jackets through 

To tumble in her hand. 
Perhaps I am as green as they. 

And yield with equal ease. 
My heart pops also from its pod 

When Polly shells the peas. 

— McLandburgh Wilson 

»T4 

A woman should hear a little music, 
read a little poetry and look at a pleas- 
ant picture every day of her life. — 
Goethe. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. ' 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


. D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET 






LYNN, MASS. 






Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



Twilight. 

The God of day has sunk behind the hills. 

A peaceful calm pervades the cooling air. 
And in the after-glow of fading light. 

The landscape seems so wondrous chaste and 
fair. 
Now through the air the droning beetles whirl. 

And birds send softly forth their vesper lay. 
While I here at my window musing sit. 

And contemplate the scene of dying day. 

And while I muse, I fully realize. 

That 1 have reached life's evening stage. 
And soon for me the sun of years must set. 

And I shall know the twilight of old age. 
Ah well! when life's long day draws to its close. 

And Death shall come to spirit me away, 
I only ask that I may go to rest. 

As peacefully as the dying day. 

And may the twilight after-glow of life. 

Shine softly on my actions of the past. 
And deep repentance rectify each wrong, 

Till life becomes a perfect thing at last. 
And finally when night of death shall come. 

And bring with it surcease of toil and pain, 
I hope to die. as sinks the setting sun. 

And feel as sure that I shall rise again. 

—Jake H. Harrison 

To be a "Passable" Pianist. 

Paderewski has confided to the world 
the secret of how he become a good pian- 
ist. He gives the six following direc- 
tions: 

1. You must have the gift. 

2. You must choose a good master 
and obey him blindly. 

3. You must practice exercises four 
hours daily and give one hour to digital 
agility. 

4. You must remember that agility 
alone does not suffice; you must also 
possess rhythm, precision and practice 
the pedals. 

5. You must exercise the five fingers 
equally. Study especially the passing 
of the thumb under the hand and the 
passing of the hand over the thumb. 

6. You must strike the notes with 
assurance and deeply, and make use of 
the pedal in the central octaves to give 
color. 

Follow these precepts diligently, says 
the celebrated Pole, and in ten years you 
will be a passable pianist. 

A story is related of a young man 
who was recently married to the daugh- 
ter of a wealthy merchant. The groom 
did not have a penny, but he was honest. 
He was so honest that he would not even 
prevaricate in the marriage ceremony. 
He was repeating what the minister 
said. 

"With all my worldly goods I thee 
endow," read the minister. 

"With all thy worldly goods I me en- 
dow," repeated the groom. This was 
real honesty. —Sketch. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Lullaby. 

ThrouKh Sleepv-land doth a river flow; 
On its further bank white daisies grow; 
And snow-white sheep, in wooly fluss 
Must, one by one. be ferried across. 
In a little boat they safely ride 
To the meadows green on the other side. 

Lullaby, sing lullaby! 
The boatman comes to carry the sheep 
In his little boat to the land of sleep; 
Upon his head is a poppy wreath; 
His eyelids droop, and his eyes beneath 
Are drowsy from counting, "One, two, three." — 
How many sheep does the baby see? 

Lullaby, sing lullaby! 
One little sheep has gone over the stream. 
They press to the bank. How eager they seem! 
Two little sheep, alone on the shore. — 
Only two sheep, but he's bringing- one more; 
Three little sheep in the flowery fields. 
Cropping the grass which Sleepy-land yields. 

Lullaby, sing lullaby! 
Four little, five little sheep now are over; 
Six little, seven little sheep in the clover, — 
Deep in the honey-sweet clover they stand. 
Eight little, nine little sheep, now they land; 
Ten, and eleven, and twelve little sheep! — 
And baby, herself, is gone with them tosle?p! — 

Lullaby, sing lullaby! 

— E. Cavazza 

Nearing the End. 

Joe Lincoln, whose Cape Cod Folks 
are well-known characters, I'ecently at- 
tended a lecture. When asked how he 
liked it, he related this little story: 

"A stranger entered a church in the 
middle of the sermon and seated himself 
in the back pew. After awhile he began 
to fidget. Leaning over to the white- 
haired man at his side, evidently an old 
member of the congregation, he whis- 
pered : 

"How long has he been preaching?" 

"Thirty or forty years, I think,' the 
old man answered, 'I don't know ex- 
actly.' 

"I'll stay then,' decided the stranger. 
'He must be nearly done.'" — Every- 
body's Magazine. 

1^ 

That which makes life worth living 
cannot be bought with money. If you 
are rich you may buy a fine house, but 
you cannot buy a happy home; that 
must be made— made by you and by 
those who occupy it with you. With 
money you can rent a pew in some fash- 
ionable church, but you cannot rent a 
good conscience — that depends upon your 
manner of living and dealing with others. 
— Schaffer. 

The Cause of It. 

Stella — What bankrupted him? 

Bella — His wife dressed so people 
wouldn't think he was becoming bank- 
rupt. — New York Sun. 



Trials of a IVIinister. 

iT the recent Unitarian Festival in 
j\. Boston. Rev. John Haynes Holmes 
spoke wittily of various phases of New 
York life as compared with Boston, such 
as the strenuous experiences in travel- 
ling in the subway, where, in consequence 
of trying to follow the rule prescribed in 
Boston of "conducting one's self with 
due regard to the rights and comforts of 
others," he found it impossible ever to 
get a train; also of having his pocket 
picked and being obliged to walk home 
two miles. "On my way home," he 
said, "I passed my own church and saw 
this notice, 'Rev. John Haynes Holmes 
will preach next Sunday; subject, "The 
Joy of living!"' I never preached a 
sermon with less fervor and conviction 
in my life. One Sunday morning two 
years ago, just before Dr. Collyer en- 
tered the pulpit, a young man came into 
his study, and went off with Dr. Coll- 
yer's brand-new winter overcoat, and 
Dr. Collyer, if you will believe it, had 
to go into the pulpit and preach from 
the text, 'If he take your coat, give him 
your cloak also.' Dr. Collyer said he'd 
be blamed if he would." 



Queen Wilhelmina, of Holland, is one 
of the busiest monarchs of Europe, and 
is never happier than when attending to 
affairs of state. Even as a child she 
was fond of asserting her authority. 
One day she sent for a certain minister 
and announced that she had quarreled 
with and dismissed her governess. The 
minister gravely asked: "When does 
your majesty wish her to be beheaded? 
You know it is the custom in Holland to 
behead all those who are officially dis- 
graced. It will be necessary for your 
majesty to be present at the execution, 

and" Here the child queen abruptly 

left the apartment and the governess 
was reinstated at once. —Argonaut. 

A prisoner at the sessions had been 
duly convicted of theft, when it was 
seen, on "proving previous convictions, " 
that he had actually been in prison at 
the time the theft was committed. 
"Why didn't you say so?" asked the 
judge of the prisoner angrily. "Your 
lordship, I was afraid of prejudicing the 
jury against me." — Exchange. 

A 

In this world one must be a little too 
kind to be kind enough. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 19 



Do You Cook w^ith Gas? 

(Most everybody does) 

All Gas Ranges are made about on the same lines and 
are capable of doing faultless work. 

If you have any trouble whatever drop us a card, call at 
Stove Store, 90 Exchange Street or 'phone 1348 and a com- 
petent demonstrator will respond and give you free instruc- 
tions as to the most efficient and economical methods to 
adopt to make the gas range what it really is "The House 
Keepers' Best Friend." 

/A New Gas Laundry Iron. $1.50, including hose. Burns\ 
\l-2 cent an hour. Guaranteed to give perlect satisfaction/ 

LYNN GAS ca ELECTRIC COMPANY 



T>EOPLE desiring the Review EVERY 
month should take notice that they 
must become subscribers. Fifty cents per 
year is the subscription price. 



When you receive the LYNN REVIEW 
and you are not a subscriber, it is an 
invitation to subscribe. 



When dealing with advertioers please mention The Lynn Review 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




Start the OYSTER 
SEASON right today 



YSTERS come into general favor TUESDAY, 
September first. Have you made your plans 
as to where you are going to buy yours ? 

We want to supply you. We are better 
equipped than ever— better even, perhaps, 
than you think. Why don't you try our 
oysters and see how good they are ? 

Small Oysters 

to stew, scallop or fancy roast 

Medium Oysters 

if you wish a little larger size at a slight increase in cost 

Large Fancy Oysters 

for those who prefer the best 

Opened to order from the shell for serving on the half-shell, 
for invalids or fancy dishes of highest quality goods. 



To secure good results in cooking you must have the 
best ingredients— buy OUR OYSTERS and you need not 
worry over results— it's easy to cook them right. Better 
order some TODAY — we guarantee the quality, and we 
know they'll please you. 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

LYNN'S LEADING FISH DEALERS 

ONLY ONE STORE 

'Phones 28 and 29 213-217 UNION STREET 



When dealine with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



re Lynn Review 



By EDWIN W. INGALLS 



50 cents per Year /^/^'T>/^T)T7'"D 1 OAO Tenth Year 

Single Copies 5 cents UU i UoJlfK, lyUO No. 12 



nrVl^ "Ro-nl^ M'oKif POSSIBLY YOU WHO 
± lie J-ldlllV XAdUiL read this, have never kept 

S^SiS^^^^^^^^^^^^^^SSZ^SSZ ^ bank account. If not, 

let us suggest that you 
try the experiment. You will find it helpful in many ways. Aside 
from the fact that your money will be safe from theft and fire, such 
a habit tends to thrift, economy, discipline and a general under- 
standing of business principles, all of which are essential to success. 
It also affords a convenient method for the payment of bills; and, as 
the checks are always preserved and returned to you, they serve 
as receipts for the amounts paid. Come in and let us talk it over. 



Security Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company 



Beni;imin F.Sp nney, President 

Luther S. Johnson ' .,■ d ,j .- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^"""^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Samuel J. HoUis , vicei^resiaents Bergengren Building, Central Square, Lynn 

Harrison P. Burrill, Treasurer Branch Office: 25 Market Sq.. West Lynn 




Telephone 1807 312 Union Street 



Formal Authoritative Public Exhibition 

NEW FALL oAPPAREL 

For Women and Misses 

SHOWING THE CORRECT STYLES IN 

New Tailored Suits Evening Wraps Silk Petticoats 

Direcioire Gowns Rich Black Furs Tourist Coats 

Satin and Voile Skirts Dress Waists Russian Pony Coats 



THE LYNN REVIEW 




We've started many young folks housekeeping happily 
Now we would like to start you, too. 

"It's everything- in making- a g-ood start. " To have a cosily and com- 
fortably furnished home from the beg-inning is much more preferable to the 
old way — that of beginning with scantily furnished rooms and waiting-, wait- 
ing, waiting— until after long years you possess a real home. 

No need to wait until you save up the amount required to furnish that 
home you have in mind. We'll deliver everything wanted now and you can 
pay us weekly. In this manner you can enjoy the possession of the goods 
while you are paying for them. 

D. B. H. POWER 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHERo 











GAS COKE 

is the cheapest, cleanest and best solid fuel there 
is known. Being intensely hot and easily con- 
trolled it is especially adapted to House Heaters, 
Ranges, Grates, etc. It will not clinker and 
leaves no ashes to sift. 

40 Bushels Whole Coke, $4.00 
40 Bushels Broken Coke, 4.80 

Smaller Lots to Suit 

Gas Radiators, $1.50. Gas Flat Irons, $1.50, complete. 

LYNN GAS CEi ELECTRIC CO. 











When dealing with advertisers please mention The Lynn Review. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



"^e Lynn Review 

A Monthly epitome of 
Lynn affairs 



PUBLISHED BY 



Edwin W. Ingalls, 333 Union Street, Lynn 



Five cents per copy. Fifty cents per year. 
Telephone Lynn 1026. 



OCTOBER, 1908 



TENTH YEAR 
No. 12 



The shoe trade is getting better. 



Politics are beginning to be lively. 



The school registration this year is 
10,725. 

The man who does not want Taf t must 
be daft. 

Chelsea has certainly been pursued by 
the fire fiend. 



The street railway companies suffer 
very much by reason of the dull times. 



Street watering would appear to be 
about as much of a gamble in Lynn as 
stock watering. 

Will the time ever come that the city's 
business be transacted more like that of 
the private individual? 



How many who opposed the widening 
of City Hall Square would return the 
area to its former condition? 



When they were locating the Salem 
high school building why did they not 
place it further out of town? 



The unclean cars of the Boston & 
Maine show to what extent the com- 
pany has been obliged to practice econ- 
omy. 

Had license prevailed in Lynn since 
May 1, and the saloons been open, the 
ice dealers say there would have been a 
famine. 

The appointment of Mrs. Cordelia A. 
Frazier as matron at police headquar- 
ters brings a worthy woman to the posi- 
tion, so long and desirably filled by 
Sarah C. Jillson. 



Evidence multiplies that municipal 
work is being very badly done in several 
departments. The government of cities 
is a deep question. 

The types made it appear "McCor- 
mack" in last month's Review, but it is 
John S. Cormack of ward five who will be 
re-elected to the legislature next month* 



As has been the case for several years 
past, Patrick B. Magrane is the largest 
individual taxpayer in the city, and his 
contribution to the city treasury this 
year amounts to $12,336.71. The largest 
corporation tax is paid by the General 
Electric Co., whose bill this year totals 
$38,205.04, with the Lynn Gas and Elec- 
tric Co. next in line, paying $33,185.94. 
The United Shoe Machinery Co. pays 
$15,012.00, the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road pays $13,363.00 and the Boston and 
Northern Street Railway Co. $10,363.90. 



Lieut. Governor Draper as candidate 
for governor will secure a much larger 
vote in this vicinity than one year ago. 
Many commendatoi'y words are heard 
concerning Mr. Draper. His broad- 
gauge business principles are just what 
is needed in public life to-day. Lawyers 
are all right, and very necessary in pub- 
lic place, but more trained business men 
are absolutely necessary. In past years 
Massachusetts has had fine service from 
its "Business Men" Governors, and we 
hope that the great ability of Lieut. 
Gov. Draper will be recognized by his 
being promoted to first place. 



It is quite evident that the Lynn city 
government members cannot cope with 
more than one subject at a time, and 
ample evidence of this is the lack of at- 
tention to the question of extending 
Market street. On November 15, 1906 
the order was passed by the city council 
making a taking of the land of the heirs 
of T. A. Newhall at the foot of Market 
street. The city is given by law two 
years in which to enter a property, and 
the time is now nearly at hand and 
nothing has been done about it. Other 
matters have come up for consideration 
and the Market street extension ques- 
tion has been entirely lost sight of. It 
would seem as if an important matter as 
this was deemed to be when the agita- 
tion first came up should have been set- 
tled before anything else was started 
upon, and thus save needless trouble 
and controversy. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Why Lynn Should Support The Orato- 
rio Society. 

An appreciation of genuine music is 
one of the sure marks of real culture 
and higher civilization. Lynn wants all 
that is due it from a reputation for cul- 
ture. For this reason even a mediocre 
society should be encouraged, but the 
Lynn Oratorio Society has no superior, 
if we may beHeve the words of the most 
competent critics. So Lynn should take 
still greater pride in sustaining it. 

No such body is long self-supporting. 
Abroad the state or the municipalities 
back musical societies; in our large 
cities individual men of wealth crave 
the honor, and in many of our neighbor- 
ing cities several men of means unite in 
this sei'vice. Lynn has as much at 
stake as any of these. 

By an unsolicited, voluntary donation 
of $450 last year, the late Chas. H. 
Newhall pointed out the way to advance 
the musical culture of Lynn. The work 
he began should continue. 

Here is a home industry that gives 
the best article at one-half the expense 
of time and money demanded by Boston. 
Lynn should support it, and should en- 
courage its young singers who devote 
their talent, money and time, to make 
Lynn second to no city in its reputation 
for choral music. 

The Oratorio season opens Dec. 2, 
with Mendelsohn's "St. Paul," and 
chorus rehearsals commence Wednes- 
day evening, Oct. 14. 

An Irishman who had started photog- 
raphy went into a shop to purchase a 
small bottle in which to mix some of his 
solutions. Seeing one he wanted, he 
asked how much it would be. "Well," 
said the chemist, "it will be twopence 
as it is, but, if you want anything in it, 
I won't charge you for the bottle." 
"Faith, sor, " said Pat, "then put a 
cork in it!"— Tit-Bits. 



Teacher— "Johnny, give an example 
of a hypocrite. ' ' Johnny : — "A boy wot 
comes t' school wid a smile on his face. ' ' 



Once More 
The Warning! 

Typhoid fever increases and the 
people are advised to use every 
precaution to prevent the spread 
of this dread disease. Keep your 
health good by drinking 

Deep Glen 
Spring Water 

This spring water is absolutely 
pure. No pollution. No disease 
germs. Have a supply of the 
finest drinking water in the coun- 
try served right at your door. 
In lots of five gallons, 6 cents a 
gallon delivered. 

Telephone 1675 

Lover's Leap Spring Water Co. 

17 Forest Street 



Whatever style and quality of head- 
wear you want you can find it at 

Hall's cTVlillinerjr Store 

17 Market Street, Lynn, ^TVIassachusetts 
Largest stock C& lowest prices in the city 



President Roosevelt likes to leave the 
White House at times and make informal 
calls on his friends. One night last win- 
ter he strolled up to Attorney-General 
Moody's house and rang the bell. 

The negro butler came to the door. 
He peered out suspiciously and asked: 
"What you all-want?" 

"I should like to see Mr. Moody." 

"Mr. Moody ain't in to nobody." 

"Oh I guess he will see me. Tell him 
the President is here." 

"The President?" said the butler, 
suspiciously. 

"Yes, the President." 

The butler pulled the door almost shut. 
He looked at Mr. Roosevelt's slouch hat 
with disdainful eye and inquired, scorn- 
fully: "President ob what?" — Saturday 
Evening Post. 

Of heroes and hero-v>orship we hear 
much. But there is a spiritual heroism 
little known, that of the man who re- 
solves to conquer himself, — hardest of 
all conquests. Impatience, envy, rage, 
selfishness, eager for success or sullen 
at defeat, passions of the flesh and pas- 
sions of the spirit. — these are his ene- 
mies. — Orville Dewey. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The True and the Untrue. 

He was a liog 
But he stayed at home 
And guarded the family night and day. 

He was a dog 
That didn't roam. 
He lay on the porch or chased the stray — 
The tramp, the burglar, the hen away; 
For a dog's true heart for that household beat 
At morning and evening, in cold and heat. 

He was a dog. 

He was a man 

And didn't stay 
To cherish his wife and children fair. 

He was a man 
And every day 
His heart grew callous, its love-beats rare. 
He thought of himself at the close of day 
And cigar in his fingers, hurried away 
To the club, the lodge, the store, the show. 
But he had a right to go, you know. 

He was a man. — New York Globe. 

A delightful atmosphere prevails in 
Boston's leading home of vaudeville, 
where women and children can always 
be certain to find entertainment of the 
most wholesome description. They are 
taking chances when they attend the 
average vaudeville show. This style of 
entertainment has been brought to its 
present high state of excellence almost 
solely through the ability and business 
acumen of Mr. B. F. Keith. The obser- 
vant individual may readily notice the 
difference between the Keith and other 
houses, and as the life-blood of enter- 
tainments rests with the support of 
women and children it can be safely pre- 
dicted that however "advanced" the 
vaudeville proposition, it will take an 
extraordinary amount of time and effort 
to reach the eminence attained by Mr. 
Keith. 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which have sold the best in the 
order of demand during the past month 
are Mr. Crewe's Career. The Lure of 
the Ma.sk. The Barrier, The Coast of 
Chance, The Wayfarers and Halfway 
House. 

A 

A Lynn barber was out of town, re- 
cently, and when asked his calling (de- 
siring to be among "the elect") replied 
that he was "in the wool business!" 



BAKER, GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St. Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



Moon Changes. 

First Quarter, October 3. 
Full Moon, October 9. 
Last Quarter, October 16. 
New Moon. October 2.5. 

A 
The City's Lack of Business Policy. 

Alderman TurnbuU gave out a state- 
ment characterizing the city's financial 
policy as an example of a "municipal 
swelled head," and further says:— "If 
the city business were conducted as it 
ought to be, Lynn would have a tax 
rate of $18 and could then point with 
pride to the fact that it is an industrial 
city. Notwithstanding that we have 
spent $1 , 100, 000 for street improvements 
in nine years, there is hardly a decent 
stretch of sidewalk or street in Glen- 
mere. The West Lynn municipal build- 
ing has been tied up for years because 
instead of desiring just a sub-police sta- 
tion, as at first proposed, people want a 
$50,000 building. We were told that a 
fifteen room building would be ample 
for the new classical high school, but 
now we find that some members of the 
city government want a palace with a 
few acres of beautiful grounds around 
it, and the appropriation of $250,000 
doesn't appear to be anywhere near 
large enough. ' ' 



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25 EXCHANGE ST. 
LYNN 



President. 
Treasurer. 



CHARLES S. PURINTON 
FREDERICK L. BUBIER 



c^TVIONEY DEPOSITED 

IN OCTOBER 

GOES UPON INTEREST 

NOVEMBER 1 

Open Every Business Day, from9 to 1 o'clock 
Also SATURDAYS, from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Why Lynn Should Support The Orato- 
rio Society. 

An appreciation of genuine music is 
one of the sure marks of real culture 
and higher civilization. Lynn wants all 
that is due it from a reputation for cul- 
ture. For this reason even a mediocre 
society should be encouraged, but the 
Lynn Oratorio Society has no superior, 
if we may believe the words of the most 
competent critics. So Lynn should take 
still greater pride in sustaining it. 

No such body is long self-supporting. 
Abroad the state or the municipalities 
back musical societies; in our large 
cities individual men of wealth crave 
the honor, and in many of our neighbor- 
ing cities several men of means unite in 
this service. Lynn has as much at 
stake as any of these. 

By an unsolicited, voluntary donation 
of $450 last year, the late Chas. H. 
Newhall pointed out the way to advance 
the musical culture of Lynn. The work 
he began should continue. 

Here is a home industry that gives 
the best article at one-half the expense 
of time and money demanded by Boston. 
Lynn should support it, and should en- 
courage its young singers who devote 
their talent, money and time, to make 
Lynn second to no city in its reputation 
for choral music. 

The Oratorio season opens Dec. 2, 
with Mendelsohn's "St. Paul," and 
chorus rehearsals commence Wednes- 
day evening, Oct. 14. 

Ok 

An Irishman who had started photog- 
raphy went into a shop to purchase a 
small bottle in which to mix some of his 
solutions. Seeing one he wanted, he 
asked how much it would be. "Well," 
said the chemist, ' 'it will be twopence 
as it is, but, if you want anything in it, 
I won't charge you for the bottle." 
"Faith, sor," said Pat, "then put a 
cork in it!"— Tit-Bits. 



Teacher— "Johnny, give an example 
of a hypocrite. ' ' Johnny :— " A boy wot 
comes t' school wid a smile on his face." 



Once More 
The Warning! 

Typhoid fever increases and the 
people are advised to use every 
precaution to prevent the spread 
of this dread disease. Keep your 
health good by drinking 

Deep Glen 
Spring Water 

This spring water is absolutely 
pure. No pollution. No disease 
germs. Have a supply of the 
finest drinking water in the coun- 
try served right at your door. 
In lots of five gallons, 6 cents a 
gallon delivered. 

Telephone 1675 

Lover's Leap Spring Water Co. 

17 Forest Street 



Whatever style and quality of head- 
wear you want you can find it at 

Hall's c7Vlilliner)r Store 

17 Market Street, Lynn, tTWassachusetts 
Largest stock C& lowest prices in the city 



President Roosevelt likes to leave the 
White House at times and make informal 
calls on his friends. One night last win- 
ter he strolled up to Attorney-General 
Moody's house and rang the bell. 

The negro butler came to the door. 
He peered out suspiciously and asked: 
"What you all-want?" 

"I should like to see Mr. Moody." 

"Mr. Moody ain't in to nobody." 

"Oh I guess he will see me. Tell him 
the President is here." 

"The President?" said the butler, 
suspiciously. 

"Yes, the President." 

The butler pulled the door almost shut. 
He looked at Mr. Roosevelt's slouch hat 
with disdainful eye and inquired, scorn- 
fully: "President ob what?"— Saturday 
Evening Post. 

Of heroes and hero-^'vorship we hear 
much. But there is a spiritual heroism 
little known, that of the man who re- 
solves to conquer himself, — hardest of 
all conquests. Impatience, envy, rage, 
selfishness, eager for success or sullen 
at defeat, passions of the flesh and pas- 
sions of the spirit, — these are his ene- 
mies. — Orville Dewey. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



The True and the Untrue. 

He was a dog 

But he stayed at home 

And guarded the family night and day. 

He was a dog 
That didn't roam. 
He lay on the porch or chased the stray — 
The tramp, the burglar, the hen away; 
For a dog's true heart for that household beat 
At morning and evening, in cold and heat. 

He was a dog. 

He was a man 
And didn't stay 
To cherish his wife and children fair. 

He was a man 
And every day 
His heart grew callous, its love-beats rare. 
He thought of himself at the close of day 
And cigar in his fingers, hurried away 
To the club, the lodge, the store, the show. 
But he had a right to go, you know. 

He was a man.^New York Globe. 

ifk 

A delightful atmosphere prevails in 
Boston's leading home of vaudeville, 
where women and children can always 
be certain to find entertainment of the 
most wholesome description. They are 
taking chances when they attend the 
average vaudeville show. This style of 
entertainment has been brought to its 
present high state of excellence almost 
solely through the ability and business 
acumen of Mr. B. F. Keith. The obser- 
vant individual may readily notice the 
difference between the Keith and other 
houses, and as the life-blood of enter- 
tainments rests with the support of 
women and children it can be safely pre- 
dicted that however "advanced" the 
vaudeville proposition, it will take an 
extraordinary amount of time and effort 
to reach the eminence attained by Mr. 
Keith. 

According to the Bookman the six 
books which have sold the best in the 
order of demand during the past month 
are Mr. Crewe's Career, The Lure of 
the Mask. The Barrier, The Coast of 
Chance, The Wayfarers and Halfway 
House. 

A 

A Lynn barber was out of town, re- 
cently, and when asked his calling (de- 
siring to be among "the elect") replied 
that he was "in the wool business!" 



BAKER. GEER&INGALLS 

Insurance, Real Estate 



341 Union St., Lynn. Bergengren Bldg. 



Moon Changes. 

First Quarter, October 3. 
Full Moon. October 9. 
Last Quarter, October 16. 
New Moon, October 25. 



The City's Lack oi Business Policy. 

Alderman TurnbuU gave out a state- 
ment characterizing the city's financial 
policy as an example of a "municipal 
swelled head," and further says:— "If 
the city business were conducted as it 
ought to be, Lynn would have a tax 
rate of $18 and could then point with 
pride to the fact that it is an industrial 
city. Notwithstanding that we have 
spent $1,100,000 for street improvements 
in nine years, there is hardly a decent 
stretch of sidewalk or street in Glen- 
mere. The West Lynn municipal build- 
ing has been tied up for years because 
instead of desiring just a sub-police sta- 
tion, as at first proposed, people want a 
$50,000 building. We were told that a 
fifteen room building would be ample 
for the new classical high school, but 
now we find that some members of the 
city government want a palace with a 
few acres of beautiful grounds around 
it, and the appropriation of $250,000 
doesn't appear to be anywhere near 
large enough. ' ' 



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ICgmt SluBtttuttmt I 

^()<rz>O0()«c=>)0O<zr>O0()<ii>O0()<cz>)^ 



25 EXCHANGE ST. 
LYNN 



President. . 
Treasurer. . 



CHARLES S. PURINTON 
FREDERICK L. BUBIER 



cTWONEY DEPOSITED 

IN OCTOBER 

GOES UPON INTEREST 

NOVEMBER 1 

Open Every Business Day, from9 to 1 o'clock 
Also SATURDAYS, from 2.30 to 5.30 p.m. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



JUST PUBLISHED 



F.HOPKINSON SMITH'S 



NEW NOVEL 

PETER 



Illustrated 



$1.50 



"Peter is one of those high souled 
gentlemen who make life better worth 
living." — New York Tribune. 

CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS 



SOME WISDOM IN THIS. 

To My Daughter Agnes, upon Bobby's 
Entanglement witli a Black- 
mailing Woman. 

No man can guard against being roped 
in by a scheming woman the first time; 
but if it happens twice he deserves it, 
and turn him out to stay an idiot, for 
the signs are so plain. A man swindler 
takes a man's money and makes a fool 
of him; but a woman swindler takes a 
man's money and leaves a smirch on 
him. Only a man's nearest and dearest 
can help him live down such a smirch; 
so, Agnes, if my son has been this par- 
ticular variety of everlasting blank fool, 
don't turn against him. He needs you. 
Moreover, you'll find him improved by 
it. He'll be so much more humble. — 
Saturday Evening Post. 

A 

On one occasion when he was busy, 
President Lincoln received a delegation 
of men who were endeavoring to hurry 
the passing of some petty bill. When 
they entered, Lincoln looked up gravely 
and said : 

"If you call the tail of a sheep a leg, 
how many legs will the sheep have?" 

"Five," said the spokesman. 

"No," replied Lincoln, "it would only 
have four. Calling the tail a leg 
wouldn't make it one. The delegation 
departed in discomfiture. ^New Yoi*k 
Tribune. 

"Is the master of the house in?" in- 
quired the smooth-tongued book-agent 
of the little boy who had answered his 
ring. "Nope, " said the boy. "Little 
boys should not tell falsehoods," said 
the book-agent. Isn't that your father 
reading the newspaper there by the win- 
dow?" "Yep," was the answer, "that's 
pa all right, but ma is out. "—Youth's 
Companion. 



OCTOBER 

suggests getting the house ready for the long 
Fall and Winter evenings. When you USE 
the house you want it inviting. 

Let us help you on CARPETS, CURTAINS. 
DRAPERIES. SOFA PILLOWS, etc. 

We will take up and clean that carpet at a 
day's notice. 

ALBION K. HALL 

39 MARKET STREET 

Rugs Made From OLD Carpeting 



There is one Headache Cure that is safe, speedy 
ana sure 

HEAD-CURO POWDERS 

Manufactured by 

HENRY J. PUSHARD 

9 Allen's Block, PEABODY, MASS. 
Sent by mail for 25 cents Send stamps 



NEW YORK CITY 



A CLUB HOTEL FOR MEN 

The name tells the story 

Seventh Ave. and Forty-second St. 

Junction of Broadway 




Restaurant on 
the street floor, 
— a restaurant 
where ladies are 
welcome. 

Every other part 
of the house ex- 
clusively for 7nen. 

Telephones in 
every room. 

Respectful, 
quiet, obedient 
and alert Japan- 
e^se servants. 

Bedroom and 
bath $2.00 a 
day upward. 



Send for Booklet 



T. F. PADDELL, Proprietor 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



They Sin Who Tell Us Love Can Die. 

They sin who tell us love can die. 

With life all other passions fly — 

All others are but vanity. 

In heaven ambition cannot dwell. 

Nor avarice in the vaults of hell; 

Earthly these passions of the earth. 

They perish where they had their birth; 

But love is indestructible. 

Its holy fame forever burneth; 

From heaven it came, to heaven returneth. 

Too oft on earth a troubled guest, 

At times deceived, at times oppressed. 

It here is tried and purified. 

Then hath in heaven its perfect rest. 

It soweth here with toil and care. 

But the harvest time of love is there. 

—Robert Southey 



Rev. Donald H. Gerrish, as a pastor 
for St. Paul's church, seems to be the 
unanimous choice of all concerned and it 
is with a feeling of marked satisfaction 
that the people of this church again wel- 
come a regular head. Ever since the 
untimely death of Rev. John D. Pickles, 
in June, the pulpit has been filled with 
supplies and parish work has been of 
necessity much neglected. While Mr. 
Gerrish comes to St. Paul's with hard 
work and a large parish to confront him, 
still it is felt that with the marked suc- 
cesses of the past in other churches, 
that he is fully equal to cope with the 
big problems to be met with here. It 
will probably be some time before plans 
for a new church can be again taken up, 
but it is hoped that in the near future 
the work started by Dr. Pickles, and in 
which he was so much interested, will 
be carried out. 

A 

A well-known Washington correspon- 
dent, when a reporter on the New York 
Tribune, was sent one Saturday night to 
interview Father Ducey, a priest famous 
both for his wit and his good deeds. 
Father Ducey was in the confessional, 
Norcross was told, and that he could go 
in and see him and come out before any- 
body went in, without any doubt. He 
found the reverend father waiting and 
began a timorous conversation with him, 
being somewhat awed by his unaccus- 
tomed surroundings. 

"Good-evening, Father?" 

"Good-evening, my son." 

"Father, I am a reporter from the 
New York Tribune." 

"Very well, I absolve you from that. " 
— Argonaut. 

Some Lynn shoe manufacturers are 
making over one hundred and fifty styles 
of shoes for next spring and summer. 



The New- Street Commission. 

The new street commission composed 
of five citizens with Ex-Mayor Eastham 
at the head, lost no time in getting to 
work. It looks as if energetic and re- 
sultful work would be done by this body 
in the near future in all matters which 
it undertakes. The commission will en- 
deavor to obtain good results by co-op- 
eration with each department and by 
not going contrary to the wishes of any 
department. The work done on streets 
and sidewalks for the past fifteen years 
will be carefully gone over and the com- 
mission will endeavor to improve greatly 
upon it. The cost of conducting the city 
stables and the matter of sprinkHng 
streets will be looked into and the main 
object of the new body will be to see 
how much work can be done without 
borrowing money. With all the duties 
now laid upon the commission it bids 
fair to become one of the most import- 
ant municipal bodies ever created in 
Lynn, and as an outcome it is expected 
that important improvements in street 
work will be accomplished. 

Most people would succeed in small 
things if they were not troubled with 
great ambitions. —Longfellow. 



LIFE 
INSURANCE 

IN THE BEST AND STRONGEST 
COMPANIES IN AMERICA 

Study These Rates 

Annual Cost NEW Whole Life Policy per $1,000 

Age 20 . $14.96 Age 40 . $26.09 

Age 25 . 16.77 \ Age 45 . 31.47 

Age 30 . 19.08 Age 50 . 38.83 

Age 35 . 22.10 Age 55 . 48.98 



Send age, nearest birthday, for 
specimen policy. State occupa- 
tion. Write TODAY. 



DO NOT DELAY 

W. E. WARREN 

Room 51 
333 Union Street, Lynn 

Send all correspondence to P.O. Box 536, Lynn 



v,^ 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Fresh Air Necessary to Restful Sleep. 

Fresh air is an absolute requirement 
for deep breathing, and to have a room 
as "cold as outdoors," far from being a 
term of reproach, is especially desirable 
at night. When the temperature of a 
sleeping room is low the bed coverings 
must be warm and air from the window, 
which must be wide open, should not 
blow directly upon the bed. As the 
head is more exposed at night than dur- 
ing the day when the coiffure is made, a 
light scarf, or if necessary, a thin flan- 
nel cap should be worn. Otherwise 
there will be grave danger of getting 
cold in the head. If women would sleep 
in a room whose temperature is like this 
they would be healthier, have clearer 
complexions and brighter eyes. 

After sleeping in a cold room the per- 
fect routine of the morning should in- 
clude a cold sponge when getting up. 
This should be followed by a brisk rub 
with a coarse towel. Spend about five 
minutes rubbing— it is worth quarts of 
medicine. 

Let a girl who works in an office or 
shop try for six months this method of 
exercise and sleeping and see if she 
does not feel like another person, for 
instead of going to business feeling dull 
she will be brisk and energetic. Her 
work will be better than the average, 
and at the same time it will be less of 
an effort. 

You get closer to God by living nearer 
to your neighbor. 



LYNN THEATRE 



FRANK G. HARRISON . 



Manager 



The Cummings Stock 
Company 

in 

Repertoire 

Prices— 10, 20, 30, 50 cents 

Matinees, all Seats, IS cents 



REAL ESTATE 

Large assortment of properties in all sections 

of the City and Suburbs. 

BUY AND SELL THROUGH 

GEORGE W. BREED 

ITEM BUILDING 



WALL PAPER 

One of the finest assortments of Wall Paper 
and Moulding to be found in the city at the 
store of 

MUNROE CSl CO. 

We do Best Quality Work in Paper Hanging 
at reasonable prices. 

Orders taken for Painting and 
Whitewashing 

84 1-2 Union St. 



WOOD 



AND 



COAL 



of the best 

quality at 

reasonable 

prices 



Stevens CBl Newhall 

Sea Street, Lynn 
Telephone 568 



Wisdom. 

This wisdom is from a recent circular 
letter, sent out by a successful veteran 
wholesale merchant of Boston: 

"People break down, not from hard 
work, but from their mental attitude 
toward their occupation, from excesses 
and superfluities, over-indulgence of the 
appetites and passions and other un- 
wholesome material and physical states 
or conditions. If you loved your work 
and understand the higher law which 
governs, so as to draw a constant sup- 
ply of strength you can labor untiringly; 
if you are engaged in work distasteful 
to you, either change your business or 
your attitude toward it. If you cannot 
realize your ideal, you can idealize your 
real." 

Mrs. Kratchet— Bridget, I don't like 
the looks of that man who called to see 
you last night. 

Bridget — Well, well, ain't it funny, 
Ma'am he said the same about you. — 
Philadelphia Ledger. 

Wise men make mistakes, but they 
don't repeat them. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



JOSEPH MEDILL PATTERSON'S 
STARTLING STORY OF SOCIETY 

A Little Brother 
ofihe Rich 

HAS CREATED A SENSATION 

This most-talked of novel presents in bril- 
liant literary style a vivid and truthful pic- 
ture of society and stage life. 

Of your Bookseller or sent postpaid on re- 
ceipt of Price $1.50. 

The REILLY & BRITTON CO., Chicago. 



The herring fishermen who infested 
the local harbor to such an extent last 
month caused much annoyance and un- 
easiness among property owners along 
the water front. Herring catchers are 
not allowed in any harbor in this vicinity 
and as a result the Boston Italians have 
come in large numbers, and after secur- 
ing their fish they tie their boats up to 
any wharf with their torches not more 
than a foot from the piling, thus putting 
the property in great danger from fire. 
Then too the Boston and Lynn fisher- 
men have been at odds for some time, — 
the Lynn men claiming that when their 
seines are full of fish the Boston men 
come in, crossing their seines and upset- 
ting them, causing them to loose 200 and 
300 fish at a time. It is hoped that 
Game Warden Burney will be as suc- 
cessful in driving them from Lynn as he 
has been from other harbors as serious 
disturbances are likely to occur if they 
are allowed to continue their fishing. 



Amos B. Chase, Munroe street, has 
put in stock the largest line of furs for 
this season that he has ever handled. 
They are much finer and in greater va- 
riety than ever before and it is without 
doubt the most comprehensive showing 
of furs ever made in Lynn, doing credit 
to a Boston or New York store. Mink 
and lynx are still the leaders as last 
year, and in these particular lines Mr. 
Chase's assortment is most interesting. 
The fur repair department connected 
with this store is becoming very busy 
therefore it is important that all people 
wishing furs repaired should hand their 
work in promptly. The women of Lynn 
and vicinity will be particularly inter- 
ested in Mr. Chase's showing of the 
latest style furs. 



The Cost of the Filtration Plant. 

There appears to be a decided differ- 
ence in the cost of the proposed new fil- 
tration plant as figured out by the water 
board and the figures filed with the city 
council by the engineer employed to 
criticise the water board's report. The 
figures as given by the engineer are as 
follows: Land, $12,000; 12 one-half acre 
filter beds complete, $450,000; pipelines, 
$60,000; clear water reservoir, $20,000; 
Saugus river pumping plant, $11,000; 
covering distributing reservoirs, $100,- 
000. The first discrepancy comes in the 
cost of original construction which the 
water board gave as $59,100, and which 
the state board of health figured at $75, - 
000. The cost of covering the filter 
beds and the filling of Walden pond is 
estimated as four times as great as that 
figured upon by the water board. With 
the engineer employed by the water 
board giving the total figures as $313,900 
and the engineer employed by the city 
council estimating the cost at $900,000 
the question of filtration becomes more 
and more complicated and the city coun- 
cil finds itself further than ever from a 
decision of the question. 

Subscribe for The Lynn Review. 



Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

Organized in 1852 

Has a reputation for doing busi- 
ness conservatively and reliably with 
prompt payment of losses. 

Amount of property insured ac- 
cording to the 56th Annual Report, 
April 1, 1908 was $2,460,805. 

Amount of losses paid during the 
year, $853. 

Amount of losses paid since the 
company was organized, $72,771, 
which is a tribute to its careful and 
painstaking management. 

When considering fire insurance 
upon your dwelling, please remember 

Saugus Mutual Fire Ins. Co. 

112 Market St., Lynn 

Horace H. Atherton. Prcs.. 

Wilbur F. Newhall, Sec.-Treas. 



10 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Doesn't Think Much of Women. 

1>R0F. W. I. THOMAS of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago is hkely to re- 
ceive more of the sharp criticism and 
censure which was visited on him sev- 
eral months ago when his book, "Sex 
and Society," appeared. 

His views of women as expressed in 
that book aroused the indignation of 
many prominent women who declared 
his reputation as a sociologist did not 
prevent him from beingunjust to women. 

In the October issue of the American 
Magazine Prof. Thomas has an article 
entitled "The Adventitious Character of 
Woman," in which he handles the fair 
sex without gloves and points out the 
origin and cause of what are generally 
considered their foibles, weaknesses and 
blandishments. 

"There is a basis of truth," he says, 
"in Pope's hard saying that women 
have no characters at all." Because 
their problem is not to accommodate 
themselves to the solid realities of the 
world of experience and sense, but to 
adjust themselves to the personalty of 
men, it is not surprising that they should 
assume protean shapes. ' ' He points out 
that primitive woman was practically a 
slave and beast of burden, but with the 
growth of civihzation she gained control 
over man by coquetry. 

As for the morality of women, the 
professor considers it mere expediency 
rather than an innate virtue. In fact 
he asserts her morality is not her own, 
but was made for her by man. "This 
moral code which man has invented for 
her, ' ' he says, ' 'has brought to the front 
elemental traits which under our moral 
code are not reckoned the best. Her 
morality is a morality of the person 
and of bodily habits, as contrasted with 
the commercial and public morality of 
man. Purity, constancy, reserve and 
devotion ai'e the qualities in woman 
which please and flatter the male." 



A Unitarian lady in Brooklyn was giv- 
ing her new cook instructions in regard 
to the breakfast food. "We like it well 
done," she said, "but not all mushy." 
"You don't need to tell me anything 
about it," said the cook, "I know just 
exactly how you want it. I have worked 
for Unitarian families before." 



Death and Love are the two wings 
which bear man from earth to heaven. — 
Michael Angelo. 



October's Bright Blue Weather. 

O suns and skies and clouds of June, 
And flowers of June together. 

Ye cannot rival for one hour 
October's bright blue weather. 

When loud the bumble-bee makes haste. 

Belated, thriftless vagrant. 
And golden-rod is dying fast. 

And lanes with grapes are fragrant; 

When gentians roll their fringes tight 

To save them for the morning. 
And chestnuts fall from satin burrs 

Without a sound of warning; 

When on the ground red apples lie . 

In piles like jewels shining. 
And redder still on old stone walls 

Are leaves of woodbine twining; 

When all the lovely wayside things 
Their white-winged seeds are sowing. 

And in the fields, still green and fair. 
Late aftermaths are growing; 

When springs run low, and on the brooks. 

In idle golden freighting. 
Bright leaves sink noiseless in the hush 

Of woods, for winter waiting; 

When comrades seek sweet country haunts. 

By twos and twos together. 
And count like misers hour by hour, 

October's bright blue weather. 

O suns and skies and flowers of June. 

Count all your boasts together. 
Love loveth best of all the year 

October's bright blue weather. 



-(H. H.) 



»T4 



The idea of Alderman TurnbuU for a 
commission to take charge of the con- 
struction of all municipal buildings has 
found favor with the city council, but it 
is expected that the friends of the board 
of public works, at which it is aimed, 
will strongly oppose its passage when it 
again comes up for consideration. The 
idea appears to be a good one, and would 
relieve the board of much responsibility 
in supervising the erection and repairing 
of city buildings. The commission idea 
seems to be growing in Lynn, and will 
most likely be given a strong trial in the 
not distant future, in many departments. 
»T« 
A Fall Design. 
No; she is not tattoed. 

That queer plan 
Is a nice peek-a-booed 
Coat of tan. 

He said to his wife as he was leaving 
home in the morning, "Oh, by the way, 
my dear, if I find I can't get away from 
the works in time for the dinner to-night, 
I'll send you a note by a messenger." 
The wise replied : ' ' You needn 't bother. 
I've already found the note in your coat 
pocket." 



m 



Building operations are fairly lively 
Lynn despite the general dullness. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



11 



Propose a Fire Commission. 

THE National Board of Underwriters, 
after several weeks spent in inspect- 
ing the local fire department, have rec- 
ommended that a commission be estab- 
lished to exercise complete control over 
this department, instead of its being 
controlled, as at present by a committee 
composed of members of the city govern- 
ment, who know little or nothing, about 
the requirements of the fire department 
and its fire fighting force. The commis- 
sion, as recommended by the national 
board, would consist of three members, 
one to be the chief engineer and the 
other two non-office holding citizens ap- 
pointed either by the Mayor or by vote 
of the city council, the latter two mem- 
bers to hold office for more than one 
year, thus eliminating politics from the 
department to some degree. Hereto- 
fore many improvements have been 
blocked by the committee having in 
charge matters pertaining to this de- 
partment either from personal reasons 
or because of the failure to understand 
the importance of improvements under 
consideration. As far as equipment of 
the local department is concerned the 
inspectors did net find much to criticise. 
A new water tower, and large and more 
modern hose wagons which could carry 
1,200 feet of hose, instead of 1,000, as at 
present, were recommended by the in- 
spectors. The engines were found to 
be in good condition. Lynn's depart- 
ment is one of the largest in New Eng- 
land, and should be put upon a plane 
with other large departments in the 
East. The present idea looks like a 
good one and should be strongly consid- 
ered by those interested. 

Tlie World's Way. 

One that was full of g-ladness sang 
Only the measures that were sad. 

And all his listeners pitied him 
And wept to think what woes he had. 

One that was full of sadness sang- 
Only the measures that were gay. 

And all who hearkened envied him. 
And longed to share his joy lit way. 
— Charlotte Becker 

Truly Great Men. 

Moses, Homer, Pericles, Plato, Aris- 
totle, Archimedes, Julius Casser, Au- 
gustus Caeser, Charlemagne, Dante, 
Milton, Leonardo da Vinci, Galileo, 
Shakespeare, Bacon, Cromwell, New- 
ton, Beethoven, Goethe, Washington, 
Franklin, Napoleon, Lincoln, Emerson, 
John Fiske, Herbert Spencer. 



The Shopper. 

The shopper flits from store to store 

As busy as a beaver. 
From roof to basement, on each floor. 
She prices goods and paws them o'er. 

Lest some one should deceive her. 

She looks at hundred dollar rugs. 

At furniture expensive; 
And while the weary salesman tugs 
And pulls and hauls and lifts and lugs. 

She makes remarks offensive. 

She tries on jackets, capes and cloaks 

Of sealskin and of sable; 
And as the fur she fondly strokes. 
She says she thinks this season's yokes 

Are all abominable. 

She dons a dozen costly hats, 

And scorns them in the mirror. 
Until, the milliners have bats 
Beneath their bulging coiffure rats 
To think they've nothing dearer. 

From morn till night the shopper shops. 

Of goods and prices talking. 
Until, at last, I think, she stops 
Because, for.sooth, her underprops 

Are weary with the walking. 

At six o'clock she crowds her way 

Into the fullest trolley. 
Content that in a single day 
She's closed a bargain for a spray 

Of decorative holly. 

In conning o'er the matter, though. 

She thinks the merchant plucked her. 
The holly cost five cents, and so. 
To get the money back, you know, 
She bilks the poor conductor. 

— Willis Brooks 

Forestalling Governors. 

INCREASING restiveness is displayed 
at the fastening upon the state of the 
so-called promotion plan, by which the 
governor is nominated three years in 
advance by capturing the nomination 
for lieutenant governor. If the lower 
office were an adequate preparation for 
the higher, there might be some sense in 
making the promotion very frequently 
says the Greenfield Gazette. But it is 
always a mistake to let such a custom 
become a fixed precedent. The present 
time is not oppoi'tune for an attempt 
to break the succession, as it is as cer- 
tain as anything in politics can be that 
the present lieutenant governor will be- 
come governor. But any time is oppor- 
tune for a protest against so inelastic a 
rule. The Republican convention might 
well serve an advance notice on future 
competitors, by passing a resolution at 
some time within the next two years, 
making it clear that candidates of first 
class abiUty who have not served the 
irksome probation of the lieutenant gov- 
ernorship are not to be barred out of 
further contests. 

A 
Subscribe for The Review. 



12 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



"O Friend! I know not which way I must look 

For comfort, being, as I am opprest. 

To think that now our Life is only drest 

For show; mean handy-work of craftsman, cook. 

Or g-room ! We must run glittering like a Brook 

In the open sunshine, or we are unblest: 

The wealthiest man among us is the best: 

No grandeur now in nature or in book 

Delights us. Rapine, avarice, expense. 

This is idolatry; and these we adore: 

Plain living and high thinking are no more: 

The homely beauty of the good old cause 

Is gone; our peace, our fearful innocence. 

And pure religion breathing household laws." 

— Wordsworth 



The D. B. H. Power company has on 
hand for the fall and winter season an 
unusually large stock of the Glenwood 
ranges, which have so many exclu- 
sive features of excellence. Glenwood 
ranges have developed a large sale in 
Lynn through the efforts of D. B. H. 
Power company. They are well liked 
because they give excellent service at 
small fuel cost, and the baking results 
are perfect. The Power company wants 
every housewife to see a demonstration 
of the Glenwood if they are interested 
in the installing of a new range, 



A newly-married man looks like a 
pair of new shoes feel. 



AUTUMN STYLES IN 

HATS 



The New Soft Telescope 

ALL COLORS 
Prices, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00 



Young Men's Stiff Hats 

COLORS AND BLACK 
Prices $2.00, $2.50, $3.00 



Sole Agent for 
DUNLAP HATS 



AMOS B. CHASE 

123 Munroe Street 




A Whole Carload of the 
FAMOUS 



Quaker 

Ranges 

EVERY YEAR IN THE 
PAST HALF-CENTURY 

has marked an improvement in 
Quaker Range construction, 
and the Quaker line to-day rep- 
resents all that's newest and 
best in good range making. 
Beautiful in design, original in 
construction, and economically 
run. 

Come and see them 

W^. B. GIFFORD 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS 

97-99 Market St. 



Nora, the new maid, had been told to 
tell callers at the door that her mistress 
was not at home. "Is Mrs. Blank at 
home?" asked the first to arrive. "For 
this wan toime, " said Nora, "she ain't. 
But the saints help her if you ask again. 
I'll not loi twoice for anybody living." 
— Home Magazine. 

An editor of a Western exchange re- 
cently began worrying about how he 
would get his shirt on over his wings 
after reaching Paradise. An envious 
contemporary sarcastically observed 
that his difficulty would likely be in 
finding out how he could get his hat on 
over his horns.—Guyman(Kans.) Herald. 

Many a man is willing to die for his 
country, but he wants to fix the date 
himself. 



when you want 



Remember to «jg «jQ when you 

telephone number ZO or ^y anything 

FISH 

Best appointed Fish Market east of Boston 

WILLIAMS BROS. 

215-217 Union Street. Lynn. Mass. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



13 



When Evening Brings Us Home. 

When twilight shadows softly fall 

Across the fading light. 
And vesper bells in music call 

The herald of the night. 
The hour that breathes of peace and rest 

To those who sadly roam. 
That hour that is dearest, sweetest, best. 

When evening brings us home. 

Forget the trials of the day. 

The toil, the grief, the care. 
All seem to fade at sunset ray. 

The world grew bright and fair; 
And yet the shadow deeper falls. 

And weary wanderers roam; 
But through the gloom a loved voice calls. 

When evening brings us home. 

And lagging feet quick onward press 

To meet those at the door. 
Where Love in answering caress 

Waits loyal evermore: 
Most blessed hour of all the day 

To those who toil and roam. 
Love is the star that lights our way 

When evening brings us home. 

And if it be that no one waits 

In earthly home to greet. 
There is a home beyond the gates. 

Where all who love shall meet; 
So we may say in truth alway 

To those who sadly roam. 
Each heart shall find its own some day. 

When evening brings us home. 

—Senator J. R. McCain of Alabama 

»?4 

One reason why we never cared for 
the motto, "In God we Trust," was be- 
cause when it was put upon the coins 
many well-meaning people desired it for 
the same reason that they wished to put 
God and Christ into the Constitution of 
the United States. They wished to dis- 
franchise all Jews, Pagans, Unitarians, 
Theists, and other such miscellaneous 
cattle. They claimed that this was a 
Christian nation, and nobody but a 
Christian should be allowed to vote and 
hold office. It marks an improvement 
in the lifetime of a generation that all 
such pleas are now dropped, and the one 
reason advanced for restoring the legend 
is that it represented the mood of de- 
pendence upon Divine Providence gene- 
rated by the calamities of the Civil War. 
^Christian Register. 



Street improvements go on, but we 
wish that the city had $1,000,000 in hand 
to do additional work. 'Tis needed. 



N. 


W. 


HODGKINS, 


D.D.S. 




Successor to W. Y. MacGowr 


1, D.D.S. 




333 


UNION STREET ' 






LYNN. MASS. 


j 




Hours 


: 8.30 to 12.00 ; 1.30 


to 5.00 



COMPLETE ESTIMATES GIVEN 
ON DECORATING HOUSES FROM 
THE CEILING TO .•. 

RUGS 



CWHEN YOU ARE IN 
THE MARKET FOR 
ORIENTAL RUGS- 
THE BEST QUALITY AT 
LOWEST PRICES— PLEASE 
ADDRESS 

WILLIAM E. WOOD 



= p. O. Box 536 

LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 



WE HAVE ACCESS TO THE 
WORLD'S FINEST RUGS 



The Lynn Educational Association 
presents an interesting course for this 
season, which includes many well-known 
artists who have before appeared in 
Lynn. The church course started last 
month with the Harvard Male Quartet 
of Boston assisted by Mr. Dudley Pres- 
cott. For October 19, Stiles Eighth 
Regiment Band is scheduled to furnish 
the concert; November 16 there will be 
an old folk's concert; and December 21 
Albert Armstrong will present his pic- 
ture play of "The Little Minister." 
The High School Course also includes 
some entertaining programs, the first of 
which will be October 5 by Prof. Henry 
Lawrence Southwick in a recital of Ham- 
let, and November 2, Signor Guisseppe 
Picco, will give a song recital assisted by 
Signora Picco at the piano. Seven more 
attractive programs are promised for 
the remainder of the season. 
A 

The Lynn Review is a small paper, 
but it pays to advertise in it. When the 
Review gets into a home it stays there 
and is thoroughly read, being taken up 
from day to day by various members of 
the family. "The best things some 
times come in the smallest packages." 
Napoleon was a little man. 



14 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Orpheum Resumes Vaudeville. 

The Orpheum Theatre, Boston, re- 
sumed its place as a vaudeville house on 
October 5 with one of the best bills ever 
put on the stage in Boston. 

The theatre is now under the manage- 
ment of William Morris Inc. and is one 
of a chain of 140 vaudeville houses in 
America and Europe. Mr. Morris for 
many years has been the agent in New 
York who secured for vaudeville mana- 
gers their biggest acts, but now that he 
has his own circuit of theatres, he pur- 
poses to retain these acts for production 
only at his houses. Among the star 
acts scheduled for early production at 
the Orpheum in Boston are, Harry Lau- 
der, Vesta Victoria, Laurence Irving, 
Daisy (Lloyd) Wood, Amelia Bingham, 
Cissie Loftus, Ross and Fenton, Alex- 
ander Carr, Mabel Barrison and Joseph 
Howard, Robert J. Fitzsimmons and 
wife, Clarice Vance, James J. Morton, 
Grace Hazard and others. 



The boarder was complaining that the 
bed was too short and the landlady said 
that he was too long in it. 



WATCH ES 
^CLQCKSj^' 
JEWEL R Y 

CUT GLASS 



OUR OPTICAL DEPART- 
MENT IS GROWING EVERY 
DAY, —OWING TO THE 
GREAT PAINS TAKEN IN 
EXAMINING THE EYES 
AND GIVING THE PROPER 
GLASSES REQUIRED. 

J. H. CONNER 



Tel. 518-1 



81 PEARL STREET 



Would Make the One Trip Do. 

There is nothing like being forehand- 
ed. A gentleman, falling ill, his Irish 
servant was dispatched in haste for a 
physician. After being absent an un- 
usually long time, Pat returned out of 
breath, but with a satisfied look on his 
countenance as he informed his mistress: 
"Oi've seen them all, an' towld them 
all, an' they're all comin'." She was 
much puzzled to know his meaning, un- 
til presently the medical man called. 
Immediately at his heels came the cler- 
gyman, who expressed in hushed ac- 
cents his sorrow at the serious illness of 
the master of the house, and putting 
down his hat and gloves awaited pa- 
tiently the exit of the doctor in order 
that he might administer spiritual con- 
solation. He had scarcely got settled 
when a sudden knock was heard, and a 
gentleman in black tiptoed in, preceded 
by his card, announcing himself as the 
proprietor of a local undertaking estab- 
lishment. At a loss to understand his 
mission, the lady of the house was on the 
point of asking him, when the door bell 
rang once more and the cemetery sexton 
was ushered in. A little light began to 
break as each stated he had been noti- 
fied by the Irish servant of his presence 
being desired at the house. On being 
summoned, Pat was asked by his indig- 
nant mistress what he meant by his 
heartless and senseless procedure, and 
exclaimed in injured tones: "Shure, 
mum, oi thought oi'd be a bit forehand- 
ed loike an' make the wan thrip do." 



Orders by Telephone Promptly Attended To 



Andrew Schlehuber 

BAKER, CATERER, 
CONFECTIONER 

78 EXCHANGE STREET 

All kinds of Catering in First-class Style. 

Special Prices to Churches and Large Parties 
of all kinds. 

Orders for Sunday should be given Saturday 
before to insure prompt delivery. 



EDWIN W. INGALLS 

Specialist in Shoe Trade Advertising 

Representing ALL American and 
European Shoe Journals. 

333 Union Street, LYNN, MASS. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



15 



The School House Problem. 

''I'^HE most serious problem confront- 
X ing the school department appears 
at present to be the accommodating of 
high school pupils. If the city govern- 
ment ever decides upon a Classical High 
School building lot, it is hoped that the 
building will be put up with all haste 
possible, which will relieve the high 
school situation. Each year more and 
more room has been needed, and every 
available place on the upper floors of the 
present high school building has been 
put into use, but this year it was neces- 
sary to make the girls' drill hall into 
class rooms, and this brings up the ques- 
tion whether physical drills for the girls 
will be aboHshed or not. Last year the 
boys' bataUion of the English High was 
so large that on one day of each week 
the girls' hall was taken by them, and 
it is only a question of time when the 
boys' hall will have to be taken for class 
rooms. 

On the whole, Superintendent Peaslee, 
reports that the situation is not much 
more strained than one year ago, and 
that with the portable school building in 
the Shepard school yard and the opening 
of two new rooms in the Center street 
school, formerly used only for evening 
drawing classes, the children can be 
stowed away quite comfortably. 

One of the worst features is the poor 
condition of the primary schools, some 
of which have not been fit for use, ac- 
cording to many people, for some years. 
The school officials, however, are not 
blamed for this condition of affairs and 
were it not for the fact that they are 
powerless in the matter of finances they 
would long ago have remedied the exist- 
ing conditions to a large extent. 

For every grain of wit there is a grain 
of folly. For everything you have 
missed, you have gained something else; 
and for everything you gain you lose 
something. If the gatherer gathers too 
much, nature takes out of the man what 
she puts into his chest; swells the es- 
tate, but kills the owner. Nature hates 
monopolies and exceptions. —Emerson. 



The Best Silver Polish in the World 

SILVER CREAM 

TAYLOR'S GOLD SOLUTION 
Price 25 cents. Try it and be convinced. If 
you cannot call — Telephone. 

JAMES H. CONNER, 81 Pearl St. 



October. 

Of all the twelve, bright months! art thou the one 
Best loved of Nature, that, with partial care. 
She bids her subtle elements prepare 

This robe of beauty for her favorite son. — 

This coat of many colors, deftly spun 

From tissues of the rainbow, from the rare. 
Brave hues of sunset when the day dies fair. 

From misty, purple dawnings, ere begun 
Is the swift, beautiful coming of the light? 

O princely garniture! Well may the rest 

(In dun, or ermine, or soft greenness drest). 
Beholding thee thus royally bedight. 

Envy thy state, thou favorite of the year. 

Darling of Nature, month without a peer! 

— Caroline A. Mason 

Sir John R. Robinson has related the 
story of a beautiful vase in the home of 
a doctor. It was given to him by a 
grateful young lady, who came one day 
and said she had a secret. She was 
about to be married, and married to the 
only man she loved; but unfortunately, 
when a foolish girl, she had flirted with a 
young cousin and had tattooed his name, 
"Johnny," on the calf of her leg. The 
doctor asked if the bridegroom's name 
was Tomrfiy, as, if so, there would be 
less trouble in making an alteration. 
His name was quite different, says 
Chamber's Journal, so the tattoo marks 
were redone with milk, although an 
ugly scar remained. 

The Geo. C. Melville Co. is making a 
special effort to fill the wants of the 
high school misses. They have estab- 
lished a special department for all wants 
in apparel desired by these young wo- 
men. They have an all new assortment 
in misses and juniors suits, skirts, coats 
and sweaters, exclusive and substantial 
novelties, that will interest the young 
miss in want of something out of the 
ordinary at popular prices. The Mel- 
ville Co. is fast developing a reputa- 
tion for maintaining a high grade cloak 
and suit house, particularly interesting 
trade on the line of exclusiveness, show- 
ing styles not presented elsewhere, in 
this vicinity. Their enterprise and 
forcefulness has developed a splendid 
business. 

A 

The belief of the drunkard that he 
has an hereditary devil whom he cannot 
resist is, we believe, invariably unsup- 
ported by the facts. A man may inherit 
an unstable nervous organization, but 
whether he shall take to drink, or opium, 
or stealing, or some other form of vic- 
ious indulgence will depend more upon 
himself than upon his ancestors. 

Subscribe for the Review. 



16 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Outside the Gate. 

She stood outside the gate of Heaven, and saw 

them entering in, 
A world-long train of shining ones, all washed in 

blood from sin. 

The hero-martyr in that blaze uplifted his strong 

eye. 
And trod firm the reconquered soil of his nativity. 

And he who had despised his life and laid it down 

in pain. 
Now triumphed in its worthiness, and took it up 

again. 

The holy one who had met God in desert cave alone. 
Feared not to stand with brethren around the 
Father's throne. 

They who had done in darkest ni?ht the deeds of 

light and flame. 
Circled with them about, as with a glowing halo. 

came. 

And humble souls who held themselves too dear 
for earth to buy. 

Now passed through the golden gate to live eter- 
nally. 

And when into the glory the last of all did go, 
"Thank God there is a Heaven!" she cried "though 
mine is endless woe." 

The angel of the golden gate said "Where then 

dost thou dwell? 
And who art thou that enterest not?" "A soul 

escaped from Hell." 

"Who knows to bless with prayer like thine in 

Hell can never be, 
God's angel could not. if he would, bar up this 

door from thee." 

She left her sin outside the gate, she meekly en- 
tered there, 

Breathed free the blessed air of Heaven, and knew 
her native air. 

— E. S H. 

»Ti 

Goddard Bros., 84--92 Market street, 
have opened a new shoe department in 
their store, in which they will cater to 
the footwear wants of women, misses' 
and children. They have a tastefully 
arranged department which will be car- 
ried on under the management of Mr. 
Philip Gushing. The lines carried are 
all well known, and include the latest 
and most up-to-date features of style 
and leathers, the shoes having been 
made expressly for them. The women 
of Lynn and vicinity should make it a 
point to pay an early call to this new 
shoe department which will maintain 
the same high standard of quality which 
characterizes the other departments in 
this store. 



Now is the Time to get busy repairing or put- 
ting in order 

YOUR FURNACE 

We can install a NEW furnace for you at a 
very reasonable figure, at present. Now is 
the time to do this, before you start your 
furnace fire. Lowest prices for the Best Work. 

H. F. POOL. 5 Market St., Lynn 



IDT TfD'D'C^'D^ will be needed soon and 
IX»Ji->J-)ii«IXO vve wish to say that our 
new goods have arrived, and to suggest that in 
fair weather you prepare for storms. "GOLD 
SEAL" RUBBERS are the best in the world. 

HOWE'S RUBBER STORE, 

52 Central Square 



We sell Coal as Low as the Lowest. 



We always carry large stock of FRANKLIN 
COAL, all sizes. 

If you want the best GEORGIA CREEK 
COAL don't fail to place your order with us. 

Masons' supplies delivered at short notice. 

Best quality oats and hay that can be found 
on the market, especially adapted for private 
stable use. 

J. B. ca, W. A. LAMPER 

Wharves and Office, Sea Street Extension. 

Tel. 109i-2 Branch Offices, SOS Union Street, 

167 Market Street. 

AMOS S. BROWN. Manager. 



On $1000 INSURANCE on a DweUing 

The premium for a five year policy is $12.66 

Dividend at expiration at 70 per cent 8.76 

Net cost for five years $3.70 

This is an actual transaction. See me on mutual 

insurance. I. A. NEWHALL 

112 Market Street 



Fatality of the Fourth. 

If one is in doubt as to the need of a 
reform in our methods of celebrating the 
Fourth of July he has but to read the 
following. Five thousand, six hundred 
and twenty-three men, women and chil- 
dren killed and injured— is the record of 
the slaughter that went to make an 
American holiday in 1908. This is the 
indictment that the American Medical 
association, through its official journal, 
in grim rows of statistics and a biting 
editorial, brings against the American 
people before the bar of humanity. The 
bull fights, for which the American 
taunts his Latin neighbor, sink into in- 
significance; the tragedies of the foot- 
ball gridiron, which have raised such 
storms of indignation, are trivial by 
comparison, and only the gladitorial con- 
flicts of pagan Rome rival the carnage 
of the American Fourth of July. And 
the Romans did not kill childi-en. The 
number of casualties is 1,210 more than 
last year, though the number of deaths, 
163, is one less. The list contains 157 
more names than that of 1906, the sec- 
ond largest of the six years during 
which statistics have been kept by the 
journal of the American Medical associa- 
tion. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



17 



The Land of Boy. 

A wonderful land is the land of boy. 

Where the hands on the clock mark the moments 

of joy. 
Where the hills are sugar the mountains are cake 
And the rivers flow into an ice-cream lake; 
Where candy grows on the forest trees 
And the fairies dwell with their mysteries; 
The land of boy — away, away 
Through the happy valleys of Golden Day! 
The land of boy is a dear delight. 
Where the sun shines sweetly and soft and bright; 
Where the air is filled with the robin's song 
And the heart of venture beats bold and strong; 
Where hope's grave star burns clear and fair 
And the wine of summer is in the air: 
The land of boy — away, away 
The road winds down to the Golden Day! 
There are tops and trinkets and marbles and 

books. 
Penknives, putty, and fishing hooks; 
Printing presses and railroad trains. 
Wheelbarrows, wagons, and driving reins; 
Boats and whistles and hoops and skates. 
Sledges and sponges and drawing slates; 
The land of boy — away, away 
Over the hills of the Child-at-Play! 
The land of boy is a sunny place. 
Where rosy cheeks and a smiling face. 
Where romp and laughter and chatter and gleam 
Go round and round till the meadows dream 
And the stars come out and the golden west 
Is red where the sun has gone to rest: 
The land of boy — away, away 
To the wand of fairy and elf and fay! 
Merry games and the venture heart 
In the land of boy are a living part; 
Castle building and ships that sail 
On the pirate main, and the paths of whale: 
Hope and love and beauty and gleam — 
All, all are a part of the boy-land dream; 
To the land of boy I long to stray 
Through the happy valleys of Golden Day? 
— Baltimore Sun 

It is the mystery of the unknown 

That fascinates us. We are children still. 

Wayward and wistful, with one hand we cling 

To the familiar things we call our own. 

And with the other, resolute of will. 

Grope in the dark for what the day will bring. 

— Henry Wardsworth Longfellow 

According to the statement of the ten- 
year-old daughter of a Massachusetts 
clergyman, there are ways of making an 
old sermon seem almost new. "Molly, ' ' 
said one of the friends of this young 
critic, "does your father ever preach 
the same sermon twice?" "I think 
perhaps he does," returned Molly, cau- 
tiously; "but I think he talks loud and 
soft in different places the second time, 
so it doesn't sound the same at all. 



From $2.50 to $10.00 

The best you ever saw for the money. We 
also have some fine suggestions for Birthday 
Gifts. 

James H. Conner, 81 Pearl St. 



The Police One Day Oft In 15 Plan. 

iT does not look as if there would be a 
speedy settlement of the one-day-in 
15 off for members of the police force — 
that is to the satisfaction of those in- 
volved in the controversy. The question 
has been under discussion for the past 
five years and at that time the one-day- 
off in eight order was put through and 
Lynn was the first to try it. During 
that year the officers asked for an in- 
creased salary and after some months a 
compromise was reached, but when the 
raise came the order for one-day-off in 
eight was repealed. Ever since that 
time repeated efforts have been made 
to get the day-off plan working again, 
but up to this year was unsuccessful. 
This year the legislature granted one 
day off in thirty, and the local patrol- 
man have since had that time, but are 
not satisfied with this arrangement. 
Mayor Porter, in vetoing the order gave 
as his reason, that the extra expense of 
putting men on duty in place of those 
enjoying the day off would not be justi- 
fied at this time, and reported that such 
was the opinion of several prominent 
and heavy taxpayers with whom he had 
conferred. In passing over the veto 
the common council has subjected itself 
to much criticism, and the end does not 
appear to be in sight. 

Don't Laugh At Women. 

Don't laugh at her sharpening of pencils. 

Don't jeer at her throwing a rock; 
Don't sneer till you get so. like her, you can whet 

A knife on the edge of a crock. 
Don't laugh at the way she drives nails in; 

Don't chortle that women are fools — 
With one hairpin she can do more things than a 
man 

Can do with a whole box of tools. 

»?« 

In his "RambHng Recollections" Sir 
Henry Drummond Wolff has a story to 
tell in illustration of the deference 
which English people of the lower class- 
es show to those in high places. "The 
daughter of a lady of very high rank 
had some pain in her foot, which her 
mother asked the governess to be good 
enough to look at. The latter, after 
examining it, said, 'If it were not for 
her ladyship's exalted rank, I should 
say it was a bunion.' " 

What is to be, will be and it's all in a 
day's work let no man therefore shirk 
neither let him be afraid. — Kipling. 
A 

Work is the cure for most of life's 
ills. 



18 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



Choosing Choux. 

"ATES, " said Gladys Gwendolin to her 
IL friend, as they parted at the cor- 
ner of the Avenue, '"your new suit is 
lovely, dear, and screamingly becoming. 
But it would improve the effect if you'd 
get one of those soft bunches of malines, 
a chou, you know, and wear it at the 
back of your neck. " 

"I beheve you're right," agreed Er- 
myntrude; "I'll go right in to Money- 
maker's and get one now." 

The two girls parted, and Ermyntrude 
entered the big department store. 

"Where shall I find choux?" she asked 
of an affable floorwalker. 

"Third floor, madam; take the eleva- 
tor. ' ' 

On the third floor Ermyntrude again 
asked directions: 

"Where are the choux, please?" 

"Ties?" 

"Why, yes — sort of ties. I suppose. 
But they're called choux. I want black 
ones." 

"Shoe department, three aisles to the 
left." 

"Oh, I don't mean that kind." 

"All kinds are there." 

"But I don't mean shoes at all. I 
mean choux. I want black ones and 
white ones both. ' ' 

"You will find all colors in the shoe 
department." 

"I don't want shoes at all! I want 
choux, lace ones you know." 

"The lace shoes and button shoes are 
both there, madam." 

"Oh you don't understand me! I want 
white lace choux, ties, you know, and 
black ones and tan-colored and light 
blue." 

"You'll find the blue among the even- 
ing wear; the others are all in the reg- 
ular shoe department." 

"Oh, have you a regular chou de- 
partment? I didn't suppose there was 
such a demand for them. Now, I only 
want one of each color. " 

"We don't sell them singly, madam." 

"Oh, it's the wholesale department, 
then. Well, where do you retail choux?" 

"It is the retail department, but we 
sell them only in pairs." 

"You don't understand me yet! I 
want choux! Choux, not shoes! Just 
one chou, to wear at the back of my 
neck." 

The floorwalker understood at last. 
The poor young thing was crazy! It 
was pathetic, but she must be removed 
from the store immediately and without 
creating a commotion. 



"Yes," he said soothingly— "Yes, you 
shall have a shoe to wear at the back of 
your neck, and a mitten to wear on your 
left ear, and a cake of soap for a breast- 
pin. " 

He had always heard that one must 
humor the vagaries of a lunatic, and he 
felt proud of his achievement when he 
saw the irate and indignant young 
woman start hastily toward the eleva- 
tor, little dreaming she was on her way 
to report him at the office.— Carolyn 
Wells in Saturday Evening Post. 

Hope. 

If, in all our mortal wanderings 

Cruel seems the hand of fate, 
We shall find a light 'mid darkness, 

If we can but hope and wait. 
All the stoiTiiy tides of passion, 

All the bitterness of grief, 
All of human woe and sorrow. 

Find in hope a sweet relief. 
When the burdens fall the heaviest. 

Every ray of sunlight gone, 
Hope still whispers "compensation" 

In the life that waits beyond. 

—Eliza M. Hickok. 

The Mother o1 Methodism. 

It has been agreed by the Methodists 
of the United States and Canada to erect 
a monument to Barbara Heck, the 
"Mother of American Methodism." 

The Hecks, Paul and Barbara, hus- 
band and wife, were Loyalists, and be- 
cause of it went to Canada during or 
just after the Revolution. The graves 
of the two are marked by a single stone 
in the yard of the Blue Church on the 
banks of the St. Lawrence, near Pres- 
cott, Ont. This stone gives no hint of 
the remarkable services to religion of 
Barbara Heck. It simply records her 
as the wife of Paul Heck. 

It is said to have been directly due to 
the labors of Mrs. Heck that Phihp 
Embury and other famous Methodist 
leaders of that time came to America. 

Didn't Choose Him. 

Mother (to httle daughter)— I am sur- 
prised, Ethel, that you should talk so 
impertinently to your father. I'm sure 
you never heard me talk that way to 
him. 

Ethel— Well, you choosed him, and I 
didn't.— Chicago Ledger. 

Don't worry is one of the maxims for 
the woman who wants to keep young. 
The mean hearted woman grows old 
early. Think sweet thoughts and you 
will keep your youth. — Selected. 



THE LYNN REVIEW 



19 



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New^ Shoe Department 

Fine Footwear for Women 
at Moderate Prices 

ALL OF OUR SHOES WERE MADE EXPRESSLY FOR US by manu- 
facturers who are recognized as leaders in their respective hnes. 

STORM BOOTS, BOOTS AND OXFOPF^ 

$2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00 

Grover's Soft Shoes for Tender feat and the New Easy Sn,-.- known as 
the "Timbro" Flexible Welt are a specialty. 

We also carry MISSES' and CHILDREN'S LINES. 

We are exclusive agents for Mrs. King's celebrated "Kant Slip" Turn 
Shoes for infants and children, shown in all leathers and combinations of 
colors, from $L0() up. 

GODDARD BROS. 

S4-92 MARKET STREET 




t 



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See the Eye 



PROFANITY is 
never excusa- 
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" hard - to - button " 
collar the provocation 
is great. Buy only 
collars that are fur- 
nished with the 

EVELET-END 
BUTTON-HOLE 

This is the only but- 
ton-hole that can be 
buttoned without 
breaking the finger 
nails and spoiling your 
temper. It outwears 
the collar or cutT. and 
gives ease and com- 
fort to the user. In- 
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thread Eyelet - End 
Button-Hole. Do not 
take the old style 
straight button-hole. 



LE D '08 



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