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Full text of "Maid of Athens"

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EX LIBRIS 




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Copyright, 1929 

MABEL CLAIRE ORE 
Editor in Chief 

MARY SCOTT 

Business Manager 



Foreword 



From the choicest threads of student activity we have 
vi'oven a fabric on the looms of thought, like the fabrics cre- 
ated in the period which inspired the theme of our book. 

Interwoven in this fabric, the 1929 Maid of Athens, are 
the flaxen threads of friendship, durable and binding; the 
silken threads of memory, lustrous and lasting. The gay 
bits of color are the zephyr threads of humor that complete 
the pattern. 

As we, the staff weavers, review our creation, we detect 
many flaws. Threads which would have enhanced the motif 
of our work have been left out. Dreams changed to tangi- 
ble pattern forms are ofttimes bereft of their beauty. 

It is our hope, however, that this fabric may be treas- 
ured in your chest of memory. In days yet unborn, may 
you bring it out into the sunlight, and as you fondle it, may 
it appear more refulgent in the mellow gleams of Time. 



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ONTENTS 



Book I 
THE COLLEGE 

Book II 
CLASSES 

Book III 
ATHLETICS 

Book IV 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Book V 
FEATURES 




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EDICATION 



To those alumnae who 
are now giving their unselfish 
service for the cause of Christianity 
at home and abroad do we wish to pay lov- 
ing tribute in the dedication of this volume. May 
we emulate their purposeful lives so that 
we, too, may be worthy daughters of 
the Alma Mater to which they 
have brought honor. 



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A scene of beauty, a joy forever. 




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—iS 




MARY MOORE McCOY. L.H.D., President 










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WILLIAM H. BARNARD. B.5., A.M.. Dean 
University of Alabama; Columbia University 



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FACULTY 



MRS. MARY E. BECKETT 

Graduate of New England Conservatory of Music 
Professor of Violin 



PAUL COOKE. A.B. 

Birmingham-Southern ColleKe 
Assistavt Professor of Evglish and Journalism 



JESSIE CARR BOURNE. B.S.. A.M. 

George Peabody Colltge for Teachers 

Professor of Home Economics 

FRANK M. CHURCH 

Graduate of New England Conservatory: Oberlin 

Conservatory : Organ Student with E. E. 

Glubb and George E. Whiting: two 

years in Europe with Guilnian, 

Widow, and Swayne 

Professor of Piano Music and Pijn- Organ 

MRS. MAUD WILLARD CHURCH. A.B. 

University of Illinois: Special Work at North Car- 
olina State College for Women ; Special Work 
at Florida State College for Women 
Professor of Home Economics 



LAURA E. DAVIS. A.B.. A.M. 

University of Alabama 
Professor of Latin and Spanish 



LEWY DORMAN. A.B., A.M.. Ph.D. 

University of Alabama ; Vanderbilt University ; 

Graduate Work, University of Chicago 

Professor of History and Economics 



DR. W. J. HAGAN 
College Physician 



MRS. ETHEL M. HAGOOD 
Nurse 



* 






laid of Athens 




FACULTY 



MKS. J. D. ELLIS 
Librariari 

ALICE HEAP. A. It.. A.M. 

University of Tennessee 

Professor of Sciftice 

KATHARINE IVEY MOORE. A.B. 

Athens Collepe 

Registrar 

KATHERINE F. PEEBLES. A.B.. AM. 

Vanderbilt University; University of Michigan 

Professor of French 

JOSEPHINE STONE, B.S.. A.M. 

George Peabody College for Teachers 

ProfcHsor of Mathematics 

MRS. E. K. TURNER 

Corcoran Art School : Art Students' League, New 
York; Pupil of Kenyon Cox. Daniel Garber. 
and George Elmer Browne; Pennsyl- 
vania Academy of Fine Arts 
Professor of Art 

NELDA WERNEKE 

Graduate of School of Music. De Pauw University ; 

Student of Eisenberger, in Berlin ; Special 

Pupil of Madame Liszniewska 

Professor of Piano 

MABEL WHITEHEAD. A.B.. B.A.E.. A.M. 

Birmingham-Southern College; Tulane University: 
Diploma from Scarritt Bible and Training 

School ; Emory University 
Professor of Bible and Rclifjtous Education 



FRANCES LeDOYT YKAULEY 

Graduate. Voice and Piano, Knox Conservatory: 

Chicago Musical College; Pupil of Madam 

Hanna Hutler and Isaac Van Grove 

Professor of Voice 



MRS. LELA LESLIE 
Pursar 



EDWARD G. MACKAY. A 

Birmingham-Southern College; E 

Graduate Work. Columbia 

Professor of ICif(/lish 

MRS. FLORENCE F. McCONNELL, 
Alabama State College; Graduate Si 
Dietitian 

MRS. JUDITH M. SUMMERS 
Hostess Founders Hall 



WILDA WEAVER. B.E. 

University of Nebraska; Graduate Work. 

Northwestern University 

Professor of Speech 

MRS. ELIZABETH WHEELER 

Hostess Sanders Hall 

THELMA SPRING 
Student Instructor in Shorthand and Typinu 




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FACULTY SNAPSHOTS 





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President 



SARAH RIGGS 
Vice President 



ELIZABETH BELL 
Secretary 



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Treasurer 



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SENIOR CLASS 



FRANCES ONI ALLGOOD. A.B. 
Cullman. Alabama 

Treasurer Student Board, '27 ; President Sigma 
Delta Literary Society. '27 : Vice President. '26. 
'29 : Treasurer. "28 : Vice President of Class. '26. 
'27, '28 : Treasurer Senior Class. '29 : Vice Presi- 
dent Athletic Association. '27 ; Crow's Nest Staff. 
'28 : Business Manaser Dramatic Club, '27. '29 ; 
Assistant Business Manaper Crow's Nest. '29; 
Treasurer Glee Club. "28 ; Vice President Latin 
Cluh. '28; Treasurer Spanish Club. '28: Le Cercle 
Francais; Varsity Basketball, '26. '27. '28; "A" 
Club. 

We now take pleasure in presenting to you. la- 
dies and Kentlemen, the hero of the Senior Class. 
If you have seen her garbed in one of the best 
quality dark-blue suits from Kinzer & Fairbet- 
ter's. you won't deny her right to this title. Her 
next best achievtment after being matinee idol of 
the Dramatic Club and one of the Glee Club song- 
sters is the art of making humorous remarks. 



BESSIE ELNA BARKER. 
Home Economics 
Athens. Alabama 

Home Economics Club ; 
Society. 



Sigma Delta Literary 



Studies seem to have been Bessie's hobby while 
at Athens College — a thing which many students 
might well wish to have permanently printed by 
their names as a reminder of their efforts. Athens 
will miss such a hard-working and conscientious 
student as Bessie, because there are few of her 
kind. 

MARY ELIZABETH BELL, A.B. 
Vincent, Alabama 

Math Club; Secretary Cla.ssic Club. '26-'27 ; Le 
Cercle Francais: Vice President Spanish Club. '29; 
History Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '27-'28 ; Hik- 
ing Captain. '27-'28 : Secretary Senior Class. '29: 
Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association, '29 ; As- 
sistant Editor Maid of Athens. '29. 

Athens has never known a better student than 
Elizabeth, She is a willing worker and booster 
fur her Alma Mater, Elizabeth is a studious, 
whole-hearted girl, who has made her mark on 
the campus without any pretense. We prophesy 
for her a career of usefulness. 



MARGUERITE PHILLIPS BRIGGS. A.B. 
Bessemer, Alabama 

President Birmingham Club. '27. '28. '29 : Treas- 
urer Le Cercle Francais. •26-'27 ; Beauty Section 
Maid of Athens. '28 ; Feature Editor Crow's Nest. 
■28-'20 : Treasurer Classic Club. ■25-'26 ; Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet. '26-'27. 

"Mag" is not only one of our class beauties, but 
also the talented feature writer for the Crow's 
Nest. She probably won't select a literary career. 
however, for Dame Rumor has it that one of these 
fine months of June — sh. sh. don't tell. We wish 
for you the best that life has, "Mag." 



SENIOR CLASS 



ALMA BULLINGTON. A.B. 
Athens, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Le Cercle Fran- 
cais; Spanish Club; Maid of Athkns Staff. '27. 

Alma is one of those students we admire because 
of her scholastic rtCfn-d and because she is so un- 
assuming about it. We are assured that she will 
be able tu work nut all life's probknis because of 
her skill in Math. 



PAULINE DENSON CAGLE. A.B. 
BiRMiNRiAM. Alabama 

Secretary Phi SiRma Literary Society. '2S : 
Classic Club: Art Club; Le Cercle Francais ; Glee 
Club: HirniinKham Club; Assistant Bu-iness Man- 
ager Maid of Athbns. '2!); President Bible Class. 
•29. 

How "Polly" can graduate in three years, take 
such a prominent part in student activities, and 
be a capable member of Rivers Academy Faculty 
at the same time is more than we can fathimi. 
Nevertheless, we are mighty glad to have her lin- 
ish with the Class of '2i>. Let us wish you happi- 
ness and success in all undertakings. 



THELMA CAVER. A.B. 

BoONmiLLE. MiSSLSSIPPI 

Poetry Editor Crow's Nest. ■28-'29 : Secretary 
Dramatic Club, '28-"29 ; Little Orphan Annie Club; 
Sigma Delta Literary Society. 

M. S. C. W. claimed Thtlma for three years, but 
the urge to come to Athens was too grtat, and to 
us she came. She is a girl of an idealistic nature. 
and possesses a sunny disposition that can't be 
beaten. She will be missed on the campus next 
year. 



MARY ELLEN COLE. B.S. 
Athens, Alabama 

Le Cercle Francais; Phi Sigma Literary Society. 

Mary Ellen has gone about her work on the 
campus quietly, but this same quietmss has won 
her into the htarts of her fellow students. Shj 
has done her work thoroughly at Athens, and we 
expect her to succeed in whatever she undertakes 
to do. 




\ IV' 







SENIOR CLASS 



ELIZABETH ETHEL COOKE. A.B. 
Athens, Alabama 

Secretary Y. W. C. A., '27-'28 ; President. '28- 
"2i) : Elizabethan Club: Le Cercle Francais : P. K. 
Club : Phi Sigma Literary Society ; Life Service 
Hand; Chairman Red Cross Roll Call. '28. 

The quietest, most dignified manner, with a mind 
that enables her to be — that's Ethel. As President 
uf the Y. W. C. A. she has proved to be dependa- 
ble and efticient. Ethel has learned that to be si- 
lent is more wise than to chatter. 



JULIETTE EMILY DUNCAN. 
Athens. Alabama 



A.B. 



"Jet" is one of our prodigal daughters who has 
tried various other colleges, but has returned to 
our Alma Mater her Senior year. Her magnetic 
personality and dusky beauty draw us to her, as 
they shall likewise do the world. 



ELIZABETH FASON, B.S. 

Home Economics 

Aliceville, Alabama 

Phi Sigma Literary Society; Art Club; Home 
Economics Club ; Secretary Sophomore Class. '27- 
■2H. 

If you've ever seen Elizabeth still (except in 
class), you have something on us. She's a win- 
some sort of person and the jolUest girl, with a 
natural love of life. Liveliness is combined with 
sound judgment in her personality. Athena will 
miss you next year. Elizabeth. 



IVALEE FAUST. B.S. 

Home Economics 

Oneonta, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society; Vice President. 
Home Economics Club. '2G : Spanish Club; Hiking 
Club; Dramatic Club: Hiking Captain, '27-'2S. 

'Tis admirable that one so informal and fun- 
loving still possesses an air of dignity. A most 
excellent disposition makes her a favorite, because 
she has those attributes of friendliness and cheer- 
fulness which have won for her a host of friends. 



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SENIOR CLASS 



SARA GAY. A.B. 
Ashland, Alabama 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '27. 'ax. '29: Latin Club: 
GIte Club: Secretary L? Cercle Francais, '27: Re- 
porter. '28; Vice President Glee Club. '27. '2K : 
President College Orchestra, •2H-29 ; Sigma Delta 
Literary Society : Hiking Captain ; Senior Recital 
in Pipe Organ. 

Sara is one of those charming girls who calls to 
mind that little verse: "There's a little bit of bad 
in every good little girl." Not that her mischief 
ever goes too far — O, no! Soon after she dons her 
cap and gown for the last time, "they say," she 
will march down another aisle to anothtr tune. 
We wish you happiness and the best of luck. Sara. 



SUSAN CHARLYN GODBEY. B.S. 

Homt- Economics 

BiRMiNCHAM, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; President Art 
Club. •27-"2H : Glee Club; Home Economics Club; 
Dramatic Club; Hiking Captain, '25; Tennis Club: 
Poster Artist College Orchestra. '2T-"2S ; Maiii OK 
Athens Staff. '2M : Crow's Nest Staff. '2S : P. K. 
Club : Birmingham Club ; Stage Manager Glee 
Club. '29 ; Business Manager Crow's Nest. '2tl. 

Such a hand for drawing ! No less than a suc- 
ct-iisful career can await one so endowed with tal- 
ent. For sweetness of disposition "Charlye" can- 
not be eipialed. She is a good spmt. and »-ver '^o 
vivacious. 



RUBY JANE GRAHAM. A.B. 
Athrns. Alabama 

Secretary Phi Sigma Literary Society. '26 : Pres- 
ident. '28 ; Treasurt r Dramatic Club. '27 ; Vice 
President. '28; French Club: Crow's Nest Staff. 
'27-'2H. 

It has been said that beauty and brains do not 
mix. but Ruby Jane has effectually explod.d thit 
th(.tu-y. During her college curetr she ha^ e.xhib- 
ited marked ability in dramatic art. She is sin- 
cere, charming, and lovable. 



CORONA HARGROVE. 

Home Economics 

Athens. Alabama 



B.S 



Home Economics Club : Sigma Delta Literary 
Society. 

Corona is mutually concerned with dreaming and 
living, but what else is one to expt ct from one 
who has such a charming drawl and the dreamy 
eyes of a true Southern belle'? May life hold the 
best for you. Corona. 





SENIOR CLASS 



B.S. 



Sitima 



GLADYS HUGHEY 

Home Economics 
Elkton, Tennessee 

Home Economics Club : President Phi 
Literary Society, '29; Tenr^ssee Club. 

Who doe'^n't know "Giad?" She is full of life 
and far from lacking in charm of mind and man- 
ner. Shs i=, always doing something worth while. 
One just can't help loving her. If a smile goes a 
long way. then "Glad" is sure of success wherever 
she may go. 



JULIA EXINE LOVIN. A.B. 

Decatuk, Alabama 

President Phi Sigma Literary Society, '26 ; Vice 
President Y. W. C. A., '27; President. '2K ; Treas- 
urer College Orchestra, '29 ; Assistant Editor Maid 
CF Athhns. '28 : Vice President Classic Club, '29 ; 
Editor Crow's Nest. '29. 

"Lovin" is no misnomer for one who is endowed 
with such an unselfish nature and frienilly dispo- 
sition. In every phase of student activity Julia 
has found her niche and filled it well. As the 
capable editor of our paper this year she has ren- 
dered a great service to the school. 



FLORENCE ARCHER MOORE. A B. 

Hopewell. Virginia 

Treasurer Classic Club. '2G-'27 : Honor Roll '26- 
'27 ; Phi Sigma Literary Society ; Le Cercle Fran- 
cais : Hiking Captain, '27; Maid of Athens Statf. 
'2K; Orphan Annie Club; Beauty Section. '28. '29. 

Here is our lovely lady from "Ole Virginny." 
We could wax eloquent about her beauty, but elo- 
quence is rather out of style. You can glance at 
her ijicture and be convinced that we're right. 
Florence came to us from Randolph-Macon, bring- 
ing a (plaint little accent and charming smile that 
ha-^ won a place for her in the hearts of us all. 



JEAN McCOY. A.B. 
Athens, Alabama 

President Glee Club, '27, "28. '29: President 
Sophomore Class. '27 ; President Junior Class. '2S ; 
Student Council. '27, "28. 

Jean possesses the secret of grooming herself in 
the most becoming costumes and wearing them 
with charming grace and style. As president of 
her class for two years, she has shown unusual 
executive ability. Since last summer there seems 
to be a special attraction for her "out where the 
West begins." 



SENIOR CLASS 



ELSIE LEE Mckenzie, b.s. 

Home Economics 
Hamilton. Alabama 

Secretary-Treasurer SiKma Delta Literary So- 
ciety, '2.H : President Home Economics Club, '27 : 
President Spanish Club. '2M ; Hiking Captain: 
Most Popular in Maid of Athens Elections, '29. 

If the old adaee is true about "pretty is as 
pretty does." "Mac" is beautiful in every sense of 
the word. There is a refined elegance about her 
which is a priceless gift to personality. She is 
the kindliest friend imaKinable. with an abidint; 
interest in people. 



HELEN NABORS. B.S. 
Ho m f Eco H am ica 
SiLUKiA, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Home Economics 
Club: Crow's Nest Staff. '2S-'29. 

Helen is another one of our number whd has 
Won a coveted place in the Beauty Section. Her 
sunny disposition and general friendliness combine 
to make her a most attractive person, who will be 
greatly missed from the campus next year. 



EMILY STUART NEVILLE. A.B. 
Trinity. Alabama 

President Le Cercle Francais. '29 ; President 
Dramatic Club, '2w : President Classic Club, "29: 
Phi Sigma Literary Society ; Maid of Athens 
Staff. '27, '2H. '29 ; Diploma in Expression. '28. 

A glance at the above list of honors is proof of 
Emily's executive ability. She is a product of 
Rivers Academy, of which the school can be justly 
proud. Emily possesses that rare art of character 
impersonation, and we predict for her the career 
of a Barrymore in the dramatic world. 



EFFIE KATHRYN OZLEY. B.S. 
Horn*- EconomicH 
SiLURiA. Alabama 

Secretary Sigma Delta Literary Society. '27 ; 
President, '29 ; Secretary-Treasurer Home Eco- 
nomics Club. '27 : President, "29 : Secretary-Treas- 
urer Athletic Association. '26: President. ■2S-'29 : 
Manager Basketball. "27; Student Board. '26; 
Crow's Nest Staff. '2H : Riding Captain. '2H : Hon- 
orary Member "A" Club. '28 : President Senior 
Class. "29; Vice President Student Council. '29. 

If you've ever seen the Statue of Liberty out- 
lined against the sky line of New York [Editor's 
Note : We admit that we haven't], you'll know 
how "Beck" looms against the horizon of college 
life. Since she has risen to pedagogical circle.-;, 
we miss seeing her stride across the campus or 
swinging a tennis racket. The offices Uft vacant 
by her absence are a testimony to the esteem in 
which she is held by the student body. 





SENIOR CLASS 



MABLE ETHEL PHILLIPS. A.B. 

Athens. Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Vice President 
C^Iassic Club, '27 ; Vice President Le Cercle Fran- 
cais. '27 : Math Club. "26. 

Ethel is so contagiously capricious, and how 
easy it is to become enamored by such lustrous 
brown eyes ! She is best characterized by her boy- 
ish manner and her frank, friendly smile. Such 
an ease of manner is admirable. 



JANIE ELIZABETH RAGAN. A.B. 
Hartsblle, Alabama 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '26. '27, '28 : Treasurer 
Spanish Club. '29 : President P. K. Club. '2H , Glee 
Ciub ; Treasurer Phi Sigma Literary Society, '26- 
27: Hiking Captain; Elizabethan Club; Le Cercle 
Francais ; Treasurer Y. W. C. A., '29. 

In Janie we find a girl whose manner seems for- 
mal, but marvelously in keejiing with any situ- 
ation. She has no tciual for kindliness, and would 
prove an agreeable addition to any acquaintance. 
Janie covers a multitude of thoughts with one slow 
friendly smile. One finds it difficult to keep up 
with her prodijjrious activity. 



WILMA HOWARD RICE. A.B. 
Albbktville. Alabama 

Glee Club ; Le Cercle Francais : Spanish Club ; 
Hiking Captain; P. K. Club; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
■27, '29. 

Discreetly severe, yet liberal upon ail just occa- 
iions, Wilma is esteemed by all. She was among 
those college students fortunate enough to be in 
the "P W" ranks at Blue Ridge last summer. We 
predict that she will find happiness in life because 
of her ability to see the silver lining through every 
cloud. 



SARAH RIGGS, A.B. 

BlHMlNGHAM, ALABAMA 

Treasurer Birmingham-Southern Y. W. C. A . 
'2G ; Vice Pre.sident Bellos-Lettres Literary Society 
B. S. C. '26; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '27. '2H. '29: 
Vice President Phi Sigma Literary Society, "27 ; 
President, '2H ; President Student Council. ■28-'29 ; 
Vice President Senior Class, "29 ; Sponsor P. K. 
Club, '2H-'29 : Spanish Club; Le Cercle Francais; 
Glee Club: Birmingham Club; Life Service Band: 
Maid op Athens Staff, '29 ; Crow's Nest Staff. '28. 

Sarah is a decided favorite with every one on 
the campus. She has shown remarkable ability 
for leadership as president of the student body. 
The greatest of her numerous gifts is her golden 
voice. To her fritndship means service and gen- 
erosity. We believe in her future as a great 
singer. 



SENIOR CLASS 



DOROTHY LANE RUTLAND. A.B. 
TusfUMBiA. Alabama 

Vice President SiRma Delta Lit- rary Society. 
'27 ; President. '28 : Assistant Business Mfinaecr 
Maid of Athfjns, '27; Crow*s Nesl Staff. '28: 
Spanish Club; Glee Club; HikinR Club. 

Little red-headed Dorothy seems most hersflf 
when she's at a trym masimerade in blue overall- 
and a torn sun hat. There's a charminK sponta- 
neity and appeal about her that has won a larjre 
place in the hearts of all on the campus. 

MAKY SCOTT. U.S. 
Ifnnif l-U'onomictt 

LoNiiviEw. Alabama 

President. Freshman Class, '27 : Freshman R^i>- 
resentative Student Council "27; Sipma Delta Lit- 
erary Society: Varsity Hasketbal!. '27-'2K ; Home 
Economics Club: Art Club: Glee Club; Le Cerclc 
Francais ; Business Manacer Crow's Nest. ■2S ; 
Member of "A" Club. '2H ; Vice President SijrmH 
Delta Literary Society. "2^ ; Ridinc Captain, "2^ ; 
Captain liaskethall, '28; Feature Section Maii> oy 
Athens. '28. '20; President Sophcmiore Class, '28; 
Treasurer Student Council. '28: Business Manaucr 
Maid of Athens, '29 ; Business Manager Gl-e 
Club. '29. 

Mary is not only an outstandinn student athlet- 
ically speakinp, but in every line of college activ- 
ity. For two years Mary was honored by the Cia^^^ 
of '30 by beinK chosen President. However, sh- 
decided to hurry and finish with ""Beck." The 
Class of '211 was jrlad to welcome her to their 
ranks. This year Mary is proving her busin-j.^s 
ability as Business Manager of our Annual. 

D'JOT STREATKR. A.B. 
Town Crbek, Alabama 

Freshman Cheer Leader at Woman's CoIleRe. '25- 
*26 : "Jolliest Student" in Feature Section, '2fi : 
Varsity Cheer Leader. Athens C<)lleKO, '2fi. *27. 
"28. '29 : President Sijrma Delta Literary Society. 
'28 ; Secretary-Treasurer Athletic Association. '27- 
'28 ; "Most Popular" in Feature Sectiim, '2 i ; 
Spanish Club: Le Cercle Francais; Dramatic Club; 
Girl Scout Captain. ■2f>."27 : Assistant Business 
ManaEcr Maip of Athkns. '28; Diploma in Ex- 
pression. '28 : Certificate in Physical Education, 
'27 : Tennis Manager Sigma Delta Literary Society. 
'28. 

"Jot" is hard to put down in black and white— 
and there we almost made a pun. for every on--' 
knows she wears black and white a great deal. If 
you want to hear the latest record, just drop in 
at Sanders, Room IS. "Jot" may rate "C" on 
some subjects, but she certainly rates "A" on 
personality and pep. 

EDITH CROMWELL TAYS. B.S. 

Home Economics 

BooNt^'iLLE. Mississipri 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Vice President 
Home Economics Club. '27-"2S ; Spanish Club ; 
Hiking Club Captain ; Little Orphan Annie Club. 

Edith is a girl of excellent personage, possessed 
of that rare combination of playfulness and per- 
severance. She is highly accomplished in the art 
of friendship. She has the qualities of a good 
friend, good student, and good companion. 





SENIOR CLASS 



JULIA PETTUS TOTHEROW. A.B. 

AusTiNviLLE, Alabama 

Secretary Phi Sipnia Literary Society, '28 ; Vice 

President, '29 ; Mathematics Club. '26 ; Spanish 

Club ; Le Cercle Francais ; Home Economics Club ; 

Hiking Captain, "28 : Secretary P. K. Club. 

Julia is a rather easy-goinK sort of pirl. and 
one whom we all admire. Whenever we want a 
thinK done efficiently, we can always depend on 
Julia to do it well. She pained some practical ex- 
perience as a pedagoKue last summer, and we wish 
for her continued success in the teaching profes- 
sion. 



PAULINE WOOD. A.B. 

Sylacauga. Alabama 

Secretary Y. W. C. A.. '28-"29 : Crow's Nest 

Reporter. '28-'29 : Secretary Religious Education 

Department : Phi Sigma Literary Society ; Art 

Club. 

"Polly," our jolliest student, can be cheerful in 
spite of any gloom which may surround her. She 
has the friendliest heart imaginable, and an en- 
gaging candor that does a war dance on other 
people's toes. Strange as it may seem, she gets 
by with it, for everybody on the campus is her 
friend. 




SENIORS WITH THEIR SOPHOMORE SISTERS 



^^WL>§5)| 



31 



{D 



"^MV^^- iiv.'''^Vi^A 




SNAPPED HERE AND THERE 



JUNIORS 




opc'd nci -'I 



A.y 




MABEL WlLCOXSOiN 
President 



MABEL CLAIRE ORR 
Vice President 



EMALICE McWILLIAMS 
Secretary -Treasurer 



J^m'^ ^aid of Athens 



'V' 



l^*-' . ^ 





JUNIOR CLASS 



CLEO BARBER 
Birmingham, Alabama 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '28-'29 : Secretary-Treas- 
iin r BirminRham Clnb, '28 ; Le Cercle Francais : 
Phi Sisma Literary Society. 



VIRGINIA CURRIN 

Pulaski, Tennessee 



LUTIE MAE EASTEP 
Athens, Alabama 

Home Economics Club ; Sigma Delta Literary 
Society. 



KATHRYN LORENE FREEMAN 
Hackleburg, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Secretary Le 
Cercle Francais, '28. 




MEMORIE GRA-Y' HOLT 

Athgns, Alabama 

Classic Club ; Sigma Delta Literary Society, 



LUCY HAYWOOD BINFORD 
Athens. Alabama 



BETTIE LOU HORTON 

Athens, Alabama 









JUNIOR CLASS 



MARTHA LOUISE HUMMEL 
HuNTsviLLB. Alabama 

Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '2!): Huntsvilk- Cluii ; Phi 
Sicma Literary Society: Lc Ccrcic Francais ; Kch- I' 

ture Section MAin ok Athkns. *27, '28; Maik of f"" 

Athens Staff. '28. '29. 



MAKGIE IKARD 
Nkw Hope. Alabama 

President Sicma Delta Literary Society. ■2H ; L 
Cercle Francais. 



President Tennessee Club, 
Sipma Delta Literary Society 




MARY LEE MADRY 

Athkns. Alakama 

Siiima Delta Literary Society 



NANNE ELEANOR MiLELLAN 
Alk'kvillk, Alabama 

Home ?>onomics Club : Phi SiRma Literary So- 
ciety, 



MARY LOUISE MORELttCK 
Nashville. Tbnnessktk 

28 ; Secretary. '21) : 



EMALICE McWILLIAMS 
Athens. Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society : Crow 
Staff, "29 ; Secretary Sophomore Class. 



.^%^vA 



PWB)" ^aid of Athens '^^y&SM 





JUNIOR CLASS 



ELLA MAE NEILL 
Falkville. Alabama 



Classic Club : Phi Sigma Literary Society. 



EVELYN NEILL 
Leighton, Alabama 

Maid of Athens Staff. '29 ; Art Club ; Phi 
Sigfma Literary Society : Feature Section Maid of 
Athens. '27. 



GERTRUDE NICHOLSON 

COLLINSVILLE. ALABAMA 
Glee Club. '28. '29. 



MABEL CLAIRE ORR 
Birmingham, Alabama 

President Dramatic Club. '28-'29 ; Editor in 
Chief Maid of Athens. '29 : Vice President Y. W. 
C. A.. '28-'29 : Vice President Athletic Association. 
■28-'29 ; Vice President Junior Class : Editor 
Crow's Nest. '27-'28 : Citizenship Cup. '28 : Presi- 
dent Phi Sigma Literary Society, '27 : Birmingham 
Club. 



ETHEL PEERSON 
Florence, Alabama 
Sigma Delta Literary Society. 




RUBYE REEDER 
Florence. Alabama 

Nest Staff. '28-'29 ; Home Economics 
gma Literary Society. 



fMaid of 5^thens 




JUNIOR CLASS 



ANNE KATE RUTLAND 
Haleyvillk. Alabama 

Assistant Cheer Leader, Woman's College. '27 
Assistant Freshman Uasketbsll Coach. W. C. A. 
'2S : Crow's Nest StatT. ■2.H-'-2il : Sigma Delta Lit 
erary Society. 



TRE.SSIE GERTRUDE SIMS 
Rk[» Hay. Alabama 

Vice President Home Economies Club. '2S-'2fl 
Sigma Delta Literary .Society. 



EVELYN McTYRE WALDROP 
Parrish. Alabama 

Vice President Dramatic Club. '2S-'29 ; Maid of 
Athens Elections. '29 ; Phi Sigma Literary Soci- 
tty : Spanish Club. 



ERMA WEBB 
Haleyville, Alabama 

College Orchestra: Le Cercle Francais : Sigma 
Delta Literary Society : Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '28- 
'29. 



MABEL WILCOXSON 
Lbxington, Alabama 

Glee Club: College Orchestra: President Junior 
Class : Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Maui oe 
Athens StatT. '29. 



MARY RUTH YOUNG 
Arab. Alabama 



Vice President P. K. Club ; 
Phi Sigma Literary Society. 



Le Cercle Francais 



MARGARET YOUNG WALL 
Athens. Alabama 





CAUGHT BY THE CAMERA 



Sp" 



>!ffi«=s:^:^^fe^.?^^^^^^fJ^2>:?ifS^^ 



SOPHOMORES 






MARY TURNER KELLY 
President 



MILDRED POTT 
Vice President 



JANE GARRISON 
Secretary -Treasurer 




maid of Athens >^^M 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 




WILMA ZOE ALLEN 
Athens. Alabama 

MARGUERITE FRANCES ALMON 

Dkcatiir, Alabama 

Treasurer, Hume Economics Club. '2S-'29. 



ADELENE BARNES 
Alexandkk City. Alabama 

BROOKSIE MAE BELL 

HuNTSviLLE. Alabama 

Assistant AdvertisinK Manap:er Crow's Nest, '28- 
'29: Vice President Huntsville Club; Art Club. 



CATHARINE VAUGHAN BEARD 
BiKMiNCHAM. Alabama 

Crow's Nest StatT. '2,K-'2fl : Athletic Association 
Board. '2fl. 

EMILY ELIZABETH BERZETT 
Athens. Alabama 



MARY AUGUSTA BIBB 
Belle Mina, Alabama 



"Maid of Athens . 





SOPHOMORE CLASS 



MARY ELIZABETH ISRELAND 

Henacak. Alabama 

VIROINIA CALDWELL 

WhSiTMORKLAND. TKNNf^SSRE 

President Art Club. ■28-'2!l : Treasurer Orches 
tra : Assistant Business Manatfer Crow's Nest, "28 
'2(1: Dramatic- Club: C.lee Clul). 



MARGARET CLEMENTS 

Enslry. Alabama 

Varsity Basketball. "23. 

CLARA ELIZABETH COPELAND 
HuNTSviLLE. Alabama 

Vice President Collt^e Orchestra ; Maid ok Ath- 
ens Staff. '29 : Glee Club : Dramatic Club : Spanish 
Club : Huntsville Club : Siema Delta Literary So- 
ciety. 



ELIZABETH DAVIS 
Dfx'atur. Alabama 

President Spanish Club. '28-'29 : Crow's Nest 
Staff. '2!» : Secretary-Treasurer Decatur CIvib. 

BESSIE MAE DAWSON 
Fort Payne. Alabama 



EDNA EAVES 

Athens. Alabama 

Home Economics Club. 

JANE GARRISON 
Gallatin. Tennessee 



Presidint Tennessee Club. ■28-'29 ; 
SiKma Delta Literary Society. 



MRS. IRMA IRENE DOBBINS 
Athens. Alabama 

lbruth glaze 

Athens. Alabama 



iat»g::;£;:^rjgL£g^^^~>rgx 




Glee Club: 



iPlh.^m'i- fMaid of mhens ^-^i 



1 •< 





SOPHOMORE CLASS 



BERTHA CLARA GREGG 

Madison. Alabama 



DOROTHY HAGOOD 
Onbonta, Alabama 

Sigma Delta Literary Society ; Athletic Associ- 
ation Board. '29 ; Dramatic Club. 



GRACE ELIZABETH HALEY 

, Oakman, Alabama ■ 

Dramatic Club; "Sigma Delta Literary Society. 



^BJJTH MAE HAYES n J 
-'Athens. AtABAiihr -^^ '"-/- 

Dfatnatjc 6laB':'Le CSf-cIe'-FrSncais*: Plii Sig 
Literary Society. 

PAULINE ELIZABETH HENi)ERSON 

Bayview, 'Alabama 
Home EcpJi(»miQ3 Club; Birmingham Club. 

^ ' ' * ^- * GBADYS GLYN JENKINS 
''T^ Dadeville, Alabama 

Maid of Athens Staff. '29. 



MARY TURNER KELLY 
Sheffield, Alabama 

Pref^ident Sophomor" Class ; Treasurer Student 
Council. "29 : Crow's Nest Staff. '29 : Reporter for 
Sigma Dalta Literary Society, '29. 



EMILY LYLE 
Tanner, Alabama 



JUANITA MARIE JOHNSON 
Athens. Alabama 



VIRGINIA INEZ JOHNSON 
Hartselle. Alabama 







^S^^Si^^i^ 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



LILLIAN McAllister 

HuNTsvii.i.K. Alabama 

Home Economics Cliilt : Sipma Delta Literary 
Society : Huntsville Club. 



LENA ELIZABETH McGREGOR 
Athens. Alabama 

Varsity Basketball. '2H : Sitcma Delta Literary 
Society: Athletic Association Hoard 



MABEL INEZ OUEN 
SOMERVILLE. ALABAMA 

Home Economics Club. 



BETTY PASS 
Hancevillk. Alabama 

Crow's Ntst Staff. '29 ; Sigma Delta Literary 
Society. 



MILDRED LYDIA POTT 
WiNNSBORO. LnULSIANA 

President Orphan Annie Club: Crow's Nest 
Staff. '29: Maib of Athens Staff. '29: Vice Presi- 
dent Sophomore Class : Secretary-Treasurer Art 
Club. . , 

; .- " ■ • ■^•-^,-r 

VIOLA PplNCE 
■ Princeton'. Ai'abama 



MARTHA GRACE ROBERTS 
Chiliiersburc. Alabama 

Home Economics 

MO. . 



Phi Sigma Literary Society 
Club. 






' . JESSIE MAE SANDMN 

Parkish, Alabama 

Home Economics Club ; Phi Sigma Literary So- 
ciety. 




•— f.4^.^ r >*^ 



r-^..J 







maid of 5^thens ^^^ 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



BARBARA SARVER 
Athens, Alabama 

VIRGINIA LOUISE SEIBOLD 

GUNTERSVILLE. ALABAMA 

Home Economics Club. 



MINNIE C. SIDES 
Mrrhuanvh-lk. Alabama 



Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
ary Society. 



■2S-"29 : Phi Siema Liter- 



CHRISTINE SPEARMAN 

Lankttk, Alabama 

Honor Roll. "2H : Phi Si^ma Literary Society. 



MARY ELLIS SPOTTS 
BiRMiNfiHAM, Alabama 
• Siirma Delta Literary Society. 

MILDRED TURNER 
Atlanta, Geokiiia 

Maid of Athens Staff, '29 ; Cheer Leader Phi 
Sipma Literary Society. '2H-'29 : Vice President 
Orphan Annie Club. '29; Art Club. 



HELEN MARGARET YARBROUGH 

Athens, Alabama 

Sipma Delta Literary Society : Le Cercle Fran- 
cais. 

DIXIE ELIZABETH YOUNG 

HuNTSviLLR. Alabama 

Vice President Freshman Class: President 
Hiintsville Chib ; Siprma Delta Literary Society. 



MARY LOU SENTELL 
Paint Rock, Alabama 

CATHERINE MARGARET SCOTT 
Athens, Alabama 

Home Economics Club ; Phi Si^ma Literary So- 
ciety. 



FRESHMEN 





THELMA SPRING 
President 



fSi 




HATTIE CARSON HILL 
Vice President 



MABEL WHEELER 
Secretary -Treasurer 






'^■ 



/ 



</> 'w 



maid of Athens ^"^xSM 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



ETHEL GLADYS ANBERS 



TANNER. Alj^MaIjA^X) h/i*^^ 

n a>^ (-L,J^^''TAjfN{a, Alabama §''^^\jb' *' 



••-JOSEPHINE NAOMI BAKER 
Pratt Citx. Alabama 



HESTER GERTRUDE BOWEN 
Danville, Alabama 





MOZELLE HULA BROWN 
Oakman. Alabama 



KATHLEEN CAMPBELL 
Elkmont. Alabama 



•46 







^ -^"^ 



jk:^^:-' 



^ 




A 



"1,7— 




maid of ^th 






FRESHMAN CLASS 






HATTIE CARSON HILL 
Camaguey. Cuba 



MARY HUNT 
Cooper. Texas 



MARY FRANCES LEVIE 
Sylacauga. Alabama 



MAE VERONA LUKER 
Pell City. Alabama . 



MARY FRANCES MALONE 
Florence. Alabama 



ELIZABETH MURPHY MORELOCK 
Nashville. Tennessee 



FRANCES EDITH NUNGESTER 
Decatur. Alabama 



MILDRED BERNICE NUNGESTER 
Decatur. Alabama 



PAULINE HOLLAND ' 
Athens, Alabama 



ANNIE ELIZABETH MALONE 
Athens. Alabama 



^,.>3i»^ 



3- <^--t>^e" 




vi-> MA0GE ELLEN McDONALD 
Athens. .Alabama 



l-'-^ . V O-^ "^ /v^ 













^^^■^, 



y^' 






^/^ 



..^ 







> maid of ^^tJten-' -^/B^C^^MSI) 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



GLADYS LOUISE OWENS 
Haleyville. Alabama 



ANNIE PEEBLES RICHARDSON 

MOOBESVILLE. ALABAMA 



MARTHA EUGENIA RUTLAND 
Haleyville, Alabama 



ANN REDUS SMITH 
Elkmont. Alabama 




THELMA LORETTA SPRING 
Ensley. Alabama 



GLADYS ELIZAHETH STEGER 

HUNTSMLLE. ALABAMA 



ELISABETH SULLIVAN 
Dbcatur. Alabama 



DOROTHY MAE SUMMERS 
Leeds, Alabama 



MAMIE LOU SWANNER 
Tanner. Alabama 



LAURA ISABELLE SIMMONS 
Birmingham, Alabama 




:< 




ns ^^^L 






^***f /^fio*^, *^«*— «_ 



4^RE^MAN CLASS 

^ ALICE LEE TERRY 
HuNTSviLLE. Alabama 



VLDA' REBECCA THORNBURY 
Valley Head. Alabama 



Val 



X 



'' f "> - DjfCATUR, Alabama 

'"^^^ ^^^^^^ BETH TY 

y 



y ^OHAH TURNER 



LER 

Deja^R. Alabama 



KEULAH TYLER 
Birmingham. Alabama 



MARY ELIZABETH WAITS 

Cleveland, Alabama ^^ 



i»^ ^^V^ ^ SyLACAUGA, I 




REE WOOD 
Alabama 



KATHRYN WOOD 

Sylacauga. Alabama 



DAVID WOODALL 
HiLLSBORo, Alabama 



MABEL ELIZABETH WHEELER 
Birmingham, Alabama 






n 


\m 


m 


1 


^^ 


i 


i 


m 


T. TI 


ss 




^^^> SMaid of S^thens 



A--^^^ 





^aid of Athens -^ 





BASKET BALL 



"Yea, team!" and out rushes the Athens Coyotes, with 
Manager McGregor in the lead. "Yea, Lena! The great- 
est confidence fills the heart of every side-liner when these 
cagers swing into line. 

During our last year of intercollegiate work, our team, 
which for a time had been in a dormant state, received a 
great impetus. Freshman McGregor, and in 1927-28 Ath- 
ens came to the front in basketballdom. Lena will go 
down with others in the sport annals of fame in basketball 
at Athens College. 



The high lights of this year's basket ball season were the 
two games between the Phi Sigma and Sigma Delta Lit- 
erary Societies — one game played on Thanksgiving Day, 
the other played near the close of the season. Sigma Del- 
tas walked off with both victories, but the last one was 
gained by a close score of 19 to 15. Elizabeth Morelock was captain of Phi Sigmas in 
this clash, and Lena McGregor led the Sigma Deltas as Captain. 

During practices the Freshmen have shown more interest and pep than any other 
class, always having a large representation out to play. Next year's Soph, team should 
be a strong contender for the interclass title. 

A Varsity team in basketball has been selected, but will not be announced until the 
annual sports banquet in the spring. 




^aid of Athens 




BASEBALL 



"Batter up!" The baseball season opens and finds many 
Athenians falling into line for the rest of the year. As 
in everything else she goes into, Manager Streater gets 
every one interested in a whirlpool of bats, balls, fouls, 
home runs, and sore throats from yelling. 

Woman's College lost a good booster and Athens gained 
one when Jot came to our campus. How could the Coyotes 
have been spurred on to victory if Jot had not been lead- 
ing the cheers on the side lines? 

She is showing the same pep and interest in baseball, 
and is a great promoter of the nation's leading sport at 
Athens. 




It is surprising to note how students have defeated the "spring fever" and have be- 
come addicts to the Babe Ruth fad. We wonder whether the reason is to keep that 
"willowy figure," or just a spring urge to "gambol on the green." 

Classes bat and battle against each other, but the chief characteristic of the sport 
remains — that is, to play for play's sake. The teams keep in mind, however, that every 
point gained will help pile up their final score for the loving cup awarded at Commence- 
ment to the class excelling in all sports. 




«t„=:i-:S,^^^^fe*ii^J^ 




53 




'Maid of Athens 





HIKING 



Dorothy is capable, dependable, and a booster of all 
school activities. She has perseverance in every task. 
Go ask "Dotty" Hagood; she can tell us something, for she 
has an unusual range of ideas, and thinks and acts in new 
manners every day. Now, Dotty, make five thousand miles 
your goal, but let us give you just a little advice. Re- 
member, this is a hike a la pes and no lifts along the way, 
because — it just isn't the thing to do. 



Hiking is a sport at Athens College which every student 
has entered into whole-heartedly. Even if every one is not 
talented in some special sport, noboby is so disabled that 
she cannot walk. We doubt whether they have any shoo 
soles left. The sidewalks and roads are showing wear and tear, which seems evidence 
of the fact that they have been used by extensive hiking. 

Girls have crawled out of bed at the "bust o' dawn" to go on sunrise hikes, and girls 
who just can't get to breakfast on time have actually gone on early morning gypsy 
hikes -and have taken their breakfasts with them. There have been numerous kinds of 
hikes this year, but when a special one can't be thought of — why, we just hike! Whether 
walking is crowded or not, we needs must hike. 






&^H^^ ^aid of Athens i 



TENNIS 



The tennis courts fairly bristled with keen participa- 
tion in the Spring Tournament. Manager David Wocdall, 
for all her femininity, is living up to her hair cut, and is 
putting the sport over like a man. David is a living ex- 
ample of the fact that "rats" really accomplish what they 
set out to do. She has taken an active part in all sports 
since she hit the campus in September. 

What better sport is there than tennis, anyway? 
"None," shouts David, as she calls "forty love" to hei- 
opponent on the court. 




The three tine year-round courts on the back campus 
have helped to make tennis one of the most popular sports 
among the students. Every maid of Athens takes gjeat delight in showing the ten- 
nis courts to visitors and relating the merits of the champions to C3me from Athens 

College. 

A singles tournament was started in March and ended on April 10. A loviug cup 
was given to the winner of the tournament, and a Varsity letter was presented to the 
winner and the runner-up. 





maid of Athens -^^J^M 





TRACK 



Elizabeth is full of fun and interest in every phase of 
athletics on the campus. She is just the girl for track 
manager. She fleets about like quicksilver. Vigor, pep, 
and zest are her chief characteristics, and she is always 
ready for wholesome fun. She is democratic and sees 
the rights of others before her owm. 

Elizabeth's always doing something to let us know 
all's right with the world. In the Academy she won an 
enviable "rep" in basketball, which she has retained and 
increased during her Freshman year. 



"Puff! Puff!" Not the Pan-American, but the Athens 
students training for track. Freshmen, Sophs, Juniors, 
and even dignified Seniors, all sprinting to breakfast and to classes, preparing for the 
first interclass track and field day. 

Such events as hurdles, one-hundred-yard dash, bi'oad jump, basketball throw, base- 
ball throw, relays, and novelty events were offered. From the class having the most 
points and numerals a team is chosen, and from all the class teams a Varisty track 
team is selected. Announcement of the Varsity team and awarding of college letters is 
made at the annual sports banquet in the spring. 






> ^aid of Athens 



SWIMMING 



Mildred is another one of the booster band for athletics 
on the campus. She is bubbling over with enthusiasm antl 
determination. When work interferes with pleasure, she 
makes a delightful combination of the two, finding pleas- 
ure in her work. She is endowed with the gift of coordi- 
nation between mind and body, which results in a fine 
athlete. 

Mildred has the ability and initiative to impart her skill 
in swimming to others. She is a believer in the motto, 
"Sports for all at Athens." 




Swimming is one of our major sports. For those who 
hunger to try their skill in competition there are inter- 
class and interorganization meets; for the girls who prefer not to attempt such ambi- 
tious competition there are simple and advanced classes; and for those who "swim like 
rocks" a beginners' class is offered. 

We have a course in Red Cross Life Saving — Junior, Senior, and examiner's emblems 
being given to those who pass the course tests. At the end of the year a Varsity team 
is selected and awarded with college letters. 




^aid of j^thens -r^( 





HORSEBACK RIDING 



After spending her Freshman year at Montevallo, Cath- 
arine decided to continue her college career with us. We 
are lucky to have such a sportswoman on our campus. As 
leader of the riding enthusiasts, Manager Beard has been 
very successful. Under her protective care there have 
been few acts of the "Prince of Wails" vairety to happen. 

Catharine's treatment of the horses merits her an hon- 
orary membership in the most humane of all humane soci- 
eties, whichever one that may be. 



"Giddy-ap!" "Whoa!" — and other horsey expressions. 
Be it truthfully said that our steeds are always willing tj 
"giddy-ap," but the "whoa" part is always a matter for 
cur speculation. No casualties have been reported this year, however, which certainly 
speaks well for the riders or for kindly tendencies on the part of said beasts. Roads 
and paths around Athens serve as beautiful bridle paths, especially in fall and spring. 
There is an arrangement in the athletic point system which provides extra points for 
hurdling and good riding form. We are developing riders who would make Buffalo Bill 
hide his head in shame. 




tai».= y-'JJL4C ^^^^*g|^a, 




^x^ 









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i-Q^^'^tflfc^^ 



"T^'- 



J' 




STUDENT COUNCIL 



Sarah Ricgs 
Effie Ozley 
Mabkl W'ilcoxson 

Mary Turner Kelly 

Thelma SpRr\t. 



Prcsiiicm 
\'ice President 

Secretary 
Treasurer 
Freshman Representative 



^^/^^ maid of Athens ^^^SM 
lJ1 




MAID OF ATHENS STAFF 



lassi^sis: 







^aid of Athens t 






/J/fsa Cifljii£ Oqrj 



J^my Sioorr 



Mabel Clairk Orr 
Mary Scott 



Ei.izABtTH Bell 
Emily Neville 
Mabel U'ilcoxson 
Mildred Pott . 
Isabelle Simmons 
June Waterfield 
Louise Hummel 
Clara Copeland 
Evelyn Neil 
Sarah Riggs 
Glyn Jenkins 



Pauline Cagle 
Mildred Turner 



MAID OF ATHENS 



■Jifi^v 



Editor in Chief 
Business Manager 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Assistant 

Senior Class 

Junior Class 

Sophomore Class 

Freshman Class 

Rivers Academy 

Art 

. Art 

Organizations 

Feature 

. Poetry- 



Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS STAFF 



Assistant Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 



o 



'^'^^H^^m5 maid of Athens ^^.^S^^^^ 



?c<«. 




CROW'S NEST STAFF 




Jt/ifi^ £oy/f^ 



THE CROWS NEST 



Julia Lovin 
Charlyn Godbf.y 



Emily Nkville 

Rl'BYE ReEDER 

Elisabeth Sullivan 
Pauline Wood 
Betty Pass 
Elizabeth Davi^ 
Catharine Beard 
Mildred Pott 
Thelma Caver 
Marguerite Briggs 
Emalice McWilliams 
Cherie Giers 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Editor in Chief 
Business Manager 



Assistant Editor 

News Editor 

. Reporter 

Repniter 

Religions Editor 

Sports Editor 

- Sports Editor 

, Joke Editor 

Poetry Editor 

Features Editor 

Exchange Editor 

. Academy Editor 



BUSINESS STAFF 



Oni Allcood 
Mary Breland 
Brooksie Bell 
Virginia Caldwell 

Helen Nabors 
Dorothy Summers 



Assistant Business Manager 

. Advertising Manager 

Assistant Advertising Manager 

Assistant Advertising Manager 

Circulation Manager 

Assistant Circulation Manager 




Y. W. C. A. CABINET 



Ethel Cooke 
Mabel Claire Orr 
Pauline Wood 
Janie Ragan 
Louise Hummel 
Julia Lovin 
Clara Copeland 
WiLMA Rice 
Sarah Riggs . 
Sara Gay 
Erma Webb 
Minnie C. Sides 
Nena Joe Cantrell 



President 

Vice President 

. Secretary 

Treasurer 

Underj-'raduate Representative 

Chairman of Finance Committee 

Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Chairman of World Fellowship Committee 

Chairman of Social Service Committee 

Chairman of Social Committee 

Chairman of Music Committee 

Chairman of Program Committee 

Librarian 



(Bhu=i^:;&5^^^^fes^i 




64 




ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 



F.I-FIE OZLEY . 


. President 


Mahi.i. Clairic Ork . 


Vice President 


1'',L1ZAUETII BliLl. 


Secretary-Treasurer 



«Ifa,>iC;i:;^2^:i^^^fes 












PHI SIGMA LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Ruby Jane Graham 
Julia ToTHEROw 
Pauline Cagle 

Jessie Mae Sandlin 

\IiLDRED Turner 



MEMBERS 



VViLMA Allen 
Marguerite Almon 
Ethel Anderson 
Myrtle Anderson 
Cleo Barber 
Elizabeth Bell 
Adeline Barnes 
Lucy H. Binford 
Marguerite Priggs 
Gertrude Bowen 
Naomi Baker 
Mozelle Brown 
Catharine Beard 
Nena Joe Cantrell 
Ethel Cooke 
Mary Ellen Cole 
Pauline Cagle 
Maureen Cantrell 
Emily Culberson 
Elizabeth Davis 
Elizabeth Fason 
Mabel Ann Farrington 



Ruby- Jane Graham 
Evelyn Reed Gray 
Doris Grayot 
Ruth Hayes 
Ethel Harrison 
Mary Hunt 
Gladys Hughey 
Jewel Hulgan 
Louise Hummel 
Hattie Carson Hill 
Pauline Holland 
Glyn Jenkins 
Virginia Johnson 
Mary Frances Levie 
Julia Lovin 
Mae Luker 
Katherine Moore 
Florence Moore 
Nan McLellan 
Jean McCoy 
Elizabeth Malone 
Madge McDonald 



Mary Lou Maples 
Elizabeth Morelock 
Frances Malone 
Helen Nabors 
Ella Mae Neill 
Emily Neville 
Mildred Nungester 
Frances Nungester 
Inez Oden 
Mabel Claire Orr 
Viola Prince 
Mildred Pott 
Janie Ragan 
WiLMA Rice 
Grace Roberts 
Sarah Riggs 
Rubye Rogers 
Catherine Scott 
Louise Siebold 
Minnie C. Sides 
Evely'N Swift 



. President 
Vice President 

. Secretary 
Sergeant at Arms 
Cheer Leader 



Elisabeth Sullivan 
Isabelle Simmons 
Christine Spearman 
Thelma Spring 
Gladys Steger 
Dorothy Summers 
Jessie Mae Sandlin 
Mamie Swanner 
Julia Totherow 
Mildred Turner 
Dorah Tlirner 
Hilda Thornbury 
Shinko Tsukazaki 
Evelyn Waldrop 
Pauline Wood 
Mabel Wheeler 
Wilma Wood 
Kathry'n Wood 
David Woodall 
Ruth Young 



Q 



m^:^;. maid of Athens iA^- ^'-'^ "> 







/; 



LDnnn 




EmDniM^in 




SIGMA DELTA LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



f.fhe c)7lev 
Oni Ali-cood . 
Mary Scott 
Mary Tlrnkr Kelly . 
D'JoT Streatkr 

Mary Breland 

Miss Alice heai- 



Oni Ai i.cnon 
Naomi Bakkr 
Bertha Barkmr 
Bessie Barki:r 
Brooksie Bell 
IClizabeth Berzett 
Mary Augusta Bibb 
Gertrude Bowen 
Mary Breland 
Alma Buli.incton 
\'ircinia Caldwell 
Thelma Caver 
Mary Kllen Cole 
Clara Copeland 
Emily Culberson 



Bessie Mae Dawson 
Juliette Duncan 
Kdna Kaves 
LuiiE Mae Eastep 
IvA Lee Faust 
LoRENE Freeman 
Marguerite Freeman 
JANE Oarrison 
Sara Gay 
LeRuth Glaze 
Charlyn Godbey 
Bertha Gregg 
Dorothy Hagood 
Beulah Hall 
Grace Haley 



MEMBERS 

CoRON \ HaRCRO\ E 

Ollie Harris 
Pauline Henderson 
Memorie Gray Holt 
Bettie Lou Horton 
Margie Ikard 
Juamta Johnson 
Mary Turner Kelly 
Emily Lyle 
Mary Madry 
Mary Morelock 
Lillian McAllister 
Madge McDonald 
Lena McGregor 
Elsie Lee McKenzie 

67 



I'.MALICE McV\'lLl.IAM£ 

Lera Mae Newtux 
Keeie O/.ley 
Ethel Peerson 
Ethel Phillips 
RowENA Reid 
Anne Richardson 
Kate Rutland 
Dorothy Lane Rutland 
Gene Rutland 
Mary Scott 
^^^RY Lou Sentell 
Tressie Sims 
Anne Smith 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Reporter 
. Cheer Leader 
Clieer Leader 
Sponsor 



M \ry Ellis Spotts 
D'Jot Streater 
Edith Tays 
Alice Terry 
Beth Tyler 
Beilah Tyler 
Mary Waits 
Marc.aret Wall 
Erma Webb 
WiLLA White 
Mabel Wjlcoxson 
Dixie Young 
Helen Yarbrough 



-^^C^ maid of j^thens >^i|^^ 





DRAMATIC CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Mabel Claire Orr 
Evelyn Waldrop 
Thelma Caver 
Oni Allgood .... 
Emily Neville 

Miss Wilda Weaver 



Oni .\llgood 
.\delixe Barnes 
Elizabeth Bell 
Virginia Caldwell 
Nena Joe Cantrell 
Thelma Caver 
Clara Copeland 
Lucille Darby 
Bessie Mae Dawso.n' 
h A Lee Faust 



. President 
\ ice President 

. Secretary 
Business Manager 
Publicity Manager 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 

RtBY Jane Graham 
Grace Haley 
Ruth Hayes 
Dorothy Hagood 
Jewel Hulgan 
Louise Hummel 
Glyn Jenkins 
Mae Luker * 
Evelyn Neil 
Ella Mae Neill 



I'.MiLY Neville 
Frances Nungester 
Mabel Claire Orr 
.\nne Richardson 
Kate Rutland 
IsABELLE Simmons 
Anne Smith 
D'Jot Streater 
Mary Waits 
Evelyn Waldrop 



«ft«=iC:ij^^^^fese&; 




@r^^|gw ^aid of Athens 





GLEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Jean McCoy 
Sara Gay . 
Marguerite Bricgs . . 

Mary Scott 

Miss Frances LeDoyt Veari.ey 



. Presidcin 
\ ice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Business Manager 
Director 



Oni Allgood 
Cleo Barber 
Marguerite Briggs 
Pauline Cagle 
Virginia Caldwell 
Ethel Cooke 
Clara Copeland 
Mabel Ann Farrington 
Jane Garrison 
Sara Gay 
Grace Haley 



MEMBERS 

Hazel Hill 
Louise Hummel 
Julia Lovin 
Jean McCoy 
Elizabeth Malone 
Frances Malone 
Elizabeth Morelock 
Rubye Reeder 
Sarah Riggs 
Wilma Rice 
Janie Ragan 



Dorothy Lane Rutland 
Kate Rutland 
Catherine Scott 
Mary Scott 
Thelma Spring 
Alice Lee Terry 
Beth Tyler 
Shinko Tsukazaki 
Dixie Young 

^L\BEL W'iLCOXSON 




^^V'^^K^ 




S^aid of S^thens 





E,nn 




1^ I i n 





HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



OFFICERS 

Effie Ozley .... ... 

Tressie Sims 

Marguerite Almon ... 

Miss Jessie Carr Bourne 

MEMBERS 

Marguerite Almon Beulah Hall .Mary Lou Maples 

Myrtle Anderson Corona Hargrove Lillian Mc.\llistej'. 

Bertha Barker Ollie Harris Madge McDonald 

Bessie Barker Pauline Henderson Elsie Lee McKenzie 

Gertrude Bowen Pauline Holland Nan McLellan 

Madge Campbell Bettie Lou Horton Helen Nabors 

Edna Eaves Gladys Hughey Inez Oden 

Lutie Mae Eastep Jewel Hulgan Gladys Owens 

Elizabeth Fason Mary Hunt Effie Ozley 

IvA Lee Faust Virginia Johnson Viola Prince 

Charlyn Godbey Mrs. ^L D. Lowe Rubye Reedeb 

Bertha Gregg Mae Luker Rowena Reid 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Sponsor 



Ruby Rogers 
Grace Roberts 
Jessie Mae Sandlin 
Catherine Scott 
Mary Scott 
Mary Lou Sentell 
Louise Siebold 
Tressie Sims 
Gladys Steger 
ICdith Tays 
.\lice Lee Terry 
DoRAH Turner 




APOLLO ART CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Virginia Caldvvei i. 




- President 


Jane Garrison . 




Vice President 


Mildred Pott .... 




Secretary-Treasurer 


Mrs. E. K. Turner 


MEMBERS 


Sponsor 


Cleg Barber 


Mattie Davison 


IsABELLE Simmons 


Brooksie Bell 


Frances Malone 


P'lizabeth Sullivan 


Elizabeth Bell 


Mildred Nungester 


Dorothy Mae Summers 


Mary Brelaxd 


Evelyn Neil 


Shinko Tsukazaki 


\'iRGiNiA Caldwell 


Mildred Pott 


Margaret Swaney 


Clara Copei.and 


Ethel Peersox 


Beui.ah Tyler 


Jane Garrison 


RuBVE Reeder 


.Mildred Turner 


Charlyjj Godbey 


Anne Richardson 


Paim.ine Wood 


Louise Hummel 







«c:;;:;^5^i:3^^fe^i&i> 




71 



maid of Athens ^^^^fi 




BIRMINGHAM CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Marguerite Bricgs President 

Thelma Spring Vice President 

Cleo Barber Secretar\-Treasurer 

Charlyn Godbey Reporter 

MEMBERS 

Naomi Baker Nena Joe Cantkeli. Isabelle Simmons 

Cleg Barber Charlyn Godbey Mary Ellis Spotts 

Catherine Beard Pauline Henderson Thelma Spring 

Marguerite Briggs Nellie James Dorothy Mae Summers 

Josephine Brock Mabel Claire Orr Beulah Tyler 

Pauline Cagle Emmy Lou Parker Pauline Walker 

Maureen Cantrell Sarah Riggs 



V^?<: 








F.THEi. Harrison- 
Julia Lovi.v 
Elisabeth Davis . 

Miss Klorexce 'I'u.man 



Marguerite Almon 
Elizabeth Davis 
Ethel Harrison 



DECATUR CLUB 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 

I, era Mae Newton 
Frances Nungester 
Mildred Xungester 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Sponsor 



Elizabeth Sullivan 
Dokah Turner 
Heth Tyler 



^i^'ikr'W^ maid of Athens S^d^ 




HUNTSVILLE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Dixie Young 
BrooksIe Mae Bell 

Lillian McAllister 

Dr. Mary Moore McCoy' 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Sponsor 



Brooksie Mae Bell 
Clara Copeland 
Louise Hummel ' 



MEMBERS 

Lillian McAllister 
Gladys Steger 



Alice Lee Terry 
Dixie Young 




LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE CLUB 





OFFICERS 




Mildred Pott 




. President 


Mildred Turner 




\ Ice PresiLient 


Katherixe Moore 


MEMBERS 


Secret a r\'-Treasiircr 



TiiELMA Caver Booneville, Miss. 

Hattie Carson Hill Camaguey, Cuba 

Mary Hunt Cooper, Texas 

Katherine Moore Hopewell, \ a. 

Florence Moore Hopewell, \'a. 



Mildred Pott VVinnsboro, La. 

Edith Tays Booneville, .Miss. 

SiiiNKo TsuKAZAKi Beppu, Japan 

MiLiJKED TuRNER_ _ - .Atlanta, Ga. 



tm.^-^ y^jjLA. -^-^^^^-^'g^^^'^^"' 




75 




TENNESSEE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Jane Garrisom 
Mary Evans 

Mary Morelock 

Virginia Caldwell 

Miss Josephine Stone 

Miss Frances LeDoyt Yearley 



. President 
\'ice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Reporter 
Sponsor 
. Mascot 



MEMBERS 



Jessie Carr Bourne Nashville 

Virginia Caldwell Westmoreland 

Mary Evans Lynnville 

Jane Garrison Gallatin 

Alice flEAP Knoxville 

June Waterfield- _ - 



Gladys IIughey , Elkton 

Elizabeth Morelock Nashville 

Mary Morelock Nashville 

Margaret S waney Gallatin 

Joy Waterfield Knoxville 

Knoxville 



<ns«~:i&5^^^^fes^2^ 





Katherine Moore 

Rl 111 Voi'NG 

June Waterfield 
Mary \\ aits 



"P. K." CLUB 



OFFICERS 



President 
\ ice Presidcnl 
. Secret a r\" 
Treasurer 



Nadmi Baker 
Gertrude Bowen 
Mai'reen Cantrell 
Nena Joe Cantrell 
Mercedes Castells 
Ethel Cooke 
Emily Culberson 
Mary Frances Gamble 
Charlyn Godbey 
Bertha Gregg 
15ei i.AH Hall 



MEMBERS 

Haiti E Carson Hill 
Sarah Elizabeth Hill 
Helen Hardon 
Elizabeth Hunter 
Glyn Jenkins 
Katherine Moore 
Florence Moore 
Betty Pass 
Janie Ragan 
W'ilma Rice 
Anne Kate Rutland 



Makiua Jean Rutland 
Jessie Mae Sandlin 
Christine Spearman 
Minnie C. Sides 
Julia Totherow 
Beth Tyler 
Beulah Tyler 
Joy Waterfield 
June W'aterfield 
Mary Waits 
Ruth Voung 




&*i>fe^===. 




'V-« c/ 



iMaid of Athens <^ 



CLASSIC CLUB 



Emily Neville 

Jl'LIA LOVIN 

Mabel W heeler 

Miss Laura K. Da\is 



OFFICERS 



President 
\ ice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Sponsor 



Elizabeth Bell 
Marguerite Briggs 
Pauline Cagle 

Mabel Ann Farrington 
Memorie Gray Holt 
Louise Hummel 



MEMBERS 

Julia Lovtn 
Ella Mae Neill 
Frances Nungester 
Mildred Nungester 
Ethel Phillips 
Barbara Sarver 



Minnie C. Sides 
Isabelle Simmons 
Anne Smith 
Mabel Wheeler 
Ri:th Young 




(OSs; 



i:^^^^^ 




LE CERCLE FRANCAIS 



OFFICERS 



I'.MII.Y XhVILLE 

Louise Hummel 
LoRENE Freeman . 
Erma Webb 

Miss Katherine 



President 
\ ice President 

. Secretary 
Treasurer 
Spt)nsor 



MEMBERS 



WiLMA Allen 
Ethel Anderson 
Cleo Barber 
Adeline Barnes 
Brooksie Bell 
Elizabeth Berzett 
Mary Augusta Bibb 
MozELLE Brown 
Pauline Cagle 
Maureen Cantrell 



Nena Joe Cantrell 
Thelma Caver 
Ethel Cooke 
Lorene Ereeman 
Ruth Hayes 
Louise Hummel 
Margie Ikard 
JuANiTA Johnson 
NLvRY Frank Levie 
Emily Lyle 



Florence Moore 
Mary Morelock 
Emily' Neville 
Mabel Orr 
Betty Pass 
Rowena Reid 
Wilma Rice 
Anne Richardson 
Anne Smith 
Mary Ellis Spotts 



Josephine Stone 
Dorothy Summers 
Hilda Thorn bury 

JlILIA ToTHEROW 

Erma Webb 
Nelda Werneke 
Helen Yarbrough 
Dixie Young 
Ruth ^'ouNG 



«!«^c::^r^^^^sfesei&.^ 




fcirA 




^aid of Athens w^^® 



'^^•^ilSiij^ 




EL CIRCULO ESPANOL 



OFFICERS 



Elizabeth Davis 
Hattie Carson Hill 

KvELYN WaLDROP 

Jame Ragan 

Louise Hummel 



, President 
\ ice President 

. Secretary 
Treasurer 
Reporter 



Adeline Barnes 
Alma Bvllington 
Elizabeth Bell 
Catharine Beard 
Mary Breland 
Emily Culberson 
Marguerite Freeman 
Evelyn Reed Gray 
Doris Grayot 
Ethel Harrison 
Hattie Carson Hill 



MEMBERS 

Louise Hummel 
Julia Lovin 
Mary Madrey 
Elizabeth Morelock 
Mary' Morelock 
Lena McGregor 
Elsie Lee McKenzie 
Evelyn Neil 
Janie Ragan 
Gene Rutland 
Dorothy Lane Rutland 



Kate Rutland 
Tressie Sims 
Isabelle Simmons 
Christine Spearman 
D'Jot Streater 
Elisabeth Sullivan 
Evelyn Swift 
Kathryn Wood 
Pauline Wood 
\\ iLMA Wood 



ATHENIAN BEAUTIES 



In colonial days beauty was attributed only to those deli- 
cate maidens who strove to keep prim and ornamental. 

We present to you four Athenian beauties, chosen by a 
popular vote of the student body. Theirs is the type of 
beauty admired today, not because of its ornamentality, but 
because it portrays the vivaciousness of youth. 

May this volume keep these fair pictures as intact as an 
old locket kept those pictures so dear to the hearts of colonial 
lovers. 



81 




MABEL ANN FARRINGTON 




RUBY JANE GRAHAM 




FLORENCE ARCHER MOORE 




ANN REDUS SMITH 



TWELVE FAVORITES 



On samplers made by our grandmothers favorite verses 
and designs were embroidered with the daintiest of stitches 
and the choicest of threads. 

We have made a sampler on which we have worked twelve 
types of student personality. These favorites were selected 
by a vote of the student body ; therefore ours is a true sam- 
pler of Athens College. 



86 




MARY SCOTT 
Most Representative 




ELIZABETH MORELOCK 
Most Versatile 




ELSIE LEE McKENZIE 
Most Popular 




SHINKO TSUKAZAKI 

Quaintest 




SARAH RIGGS 

The Idealist 




MILDRED POTT 
Most Artistic 




PAULINE WOOD 

JoIIiest 







MARY WAITS 
Most Naive 




JEAN McCOY 
Vogue Model 




EVELYN WALDROP 
Cutest 




LENA McGregor 

Most Athletic 




GLYN JENKINS 
Wittiest 



^ 


F^ 


i 


1 






W 

ff I] 


1 






THE COWS NEST 

MOTTO: "Avoid all Tipograffickle Errers" 



VOL ECKS 



MADE AT HENS KOLLEGE 



NO. 13 



CAGLE TO REPLACE HAL- 
LIBURTON ON SOUTH- 
ERN CONCERT TOUR 

YOUTHFUL ATHENIAN WINS 

NATIONAL FAME AFTER 

DARING FEAT 



"Onsi does not fee' 
so different when 
greatness is thrust 
upon him," Miss Ca- 
g\e stated when in- 
terviewed after her 
nonstop hike from 
Athens to Decatur, 
"because one usually 
lives to be great. " 

When we pleaded 
for a story, she hes- 
itated, like one who 
thinks deeply, and 
opened her other- 
wise brown eyes and 
began : 

"On March 2;!, 
bright and early, I 
set out for this long- 
coveted goal, smiling 
and determined, with 
a look of 'conquer or 
bust' in my eyes— 
and a sandwich in 
my left pocket. It 
was 9 o'clock, and 
traffic was jammed 
along the highway, 
as usual. 

"I walked rather 
slowly at first, real- 
izing that I would 
doubtless gain mo- 
mentum when the 
first Ford passed. At 
last the time came 
for speed, when a 
1830 m o d e 1 Ford 
chassis approached, 
with gas tank and 
motor accessories — 
the only one of its 
kind in captivity. 
The driver, an agent 
for Fairhills Scales 
Company — and a 
man who could well 
advertise his busi- 
ness, since he had so 
much faith in avoir- 
dupois — alighted and 
offered me a cush- 
ioned seat beside 
him. I declined mod- 
estly, and on second 

{Contiiiitcd on iiau': 2) 



PROFESSOR CHURCH 
ANNOUNCES MUSIC 
RECITAL NUMBER 999 

NINE COUNTRIES REPRESENTED, 

FEATURING FAMOUS 

OLD MASTERS 



BOOKISH NO- 
TIONS OF A 
LIBRA- 
RIAN 

Everything has its 
rulesand regulations, 
from the "1 Woulda 
Mada Club" to the 
"Inerout Society," so 
it is with the library. 

According to the 
actions of some, it 
seems that we are 
supposed to stay 
open from Can to 
Can't or Will to 
Won't. There are 
some who come about 
five minutes until 
Can't and stay an 
hour or two thei'e- 
after. Because it is 
a good. Christian in- 
stitution the libra- 
rian smiles sweet- 
ly (?) and says: "O, 
that's all right." 

Another regulation 
is regarding silence. 
For some the library 
is a most convenient 
place to meet and 
talk over one's latest 
"conquest" or "vic- 
tory." While David 
Copperfield reclines 
sadly on the shelf 
and wonders why he 
is so unpopular with 
the ladies, Ivanhoe 
looks wistfully at 
Jane Eyre and mur- 
m u r s ; "Did you 
dream it could ever 
be thus?" Even our 
Faery Queen folds 
her wings and broods 
over the brazenne.ss 
of the modern maid- 
ens. 

Next door to the 
library is an estab- 
1 i s h m e n t which 

(Coutinuid on imijc 2) 



The following pro- 
gram has been re- 
leased by Mr. F. M. 
Church today: 

Di.shwashcr (14y2-l!>29) 
(2) —"Bubbles." from 
the opera "Sudi" 
{ voice) 
Ann Fakrington 

Lowheniirin (O-l'.llH) 
(5) — "The FiBht Is 
On" (organ) 
Sara Gay 

PrettirufTski (1910) 

(.1) —"Tin Pan s" 
(piano) 

Ethel Cookk 

Mary Mor' lock (oriirinul) 
(fi) — "Seoinj: Myself as 
Others Sec Me" (read- 
ine) 
Bb-ssie Mak Dawson 

Daucrherty 

( D— "They Co Simply 
Wild Over Me" (voic;') 
Crack Hai.ky 

Al Jolson (li)On— ) 

(4) — "Sonny" (violin) 
Clara Coi'klanp 
( Accompanied by 
Virginia Calowkll) 

McDowell ( ?l!i?) 

(7) — "March of the 
Collegians" (piano) 
Virginia Calpwkll 

Maegie Cmi-lOOO) 

(!)) — "When You and 
I Were Young" (voice) 
Sarah Rices 

Sinking (1.500-1692) 

(H) — " Boat Song" 
(piano) 

Cleo Barber 



ADVICE TO THE 
WAITRESS 

If you can't fill 'em 
up. 
Leave 'em flat. 
If you can't find a 
cup. 
Whose fault is 
that? 
If you can't please 
them right. 
Don't mind the 
clash; 
If you want them to 
fight. 
Serve 'em hash! 



OUR ENGLISH 
DEPARTMENT 
BROADCASTS 

Dr. Mackay, sens- 
ing that the subject 
in hand was a bit too 
deep for his Shake- 
speare class, said: "I 
believe that Shaken 
speare is over your 
head." Helen Na- 
bors replied, after 
glancing ceiling- 
ward: "I don't see 
him, Dr. Mackay." 

Athens College is 
coming to a terrible 
crash if the faculty 
doesn't refrain from 
ns'.ng slang. It's 
really shocking to 
the students! 
« 

Monsieur Cooke 
asked one of his pu- 
pils to make a sen- 
tence with the past 
tense in it. She 
-aid: "I went to the 
recital last nite." 

One shy maid, 
wishing to raise her 
grade, said: "Mr. 
Cooke, may I en- 
large on that sen- 
tence?" 

.\s he was curious 
to know how it could 
be enlarged upon, he 
gave his permission. 

She replied: "I al- 
ways go to the re- 
citals; I went last 
nite, and I shall go 
to all of them, and 
save my cuts for so- 
ciety or chapel." 



Dora Turner: 
"What opera do you 
like best?" 

Kate Rutland: 
"Car men." 



93 



THE COW'S NEST 



Page T^o 



THE COW'S NEST 

HUBLleHKD Bl-WEAKLY BY THE STUDENTS 



STAFF OF CONTRYBUTERS 

Editor of Chefs Sarah Riogs 

Wanted Adds Evelyn Waldrof 

DEPART MENTAL GOVERNMENT 
Applied Arts 

Enclish Jot Streater 

His Story Qni Allcood 

Klass;ks Catharine Beard 

Sc"ences 

Mithimatick:. Alma Bullington 

Education JE3SIE Mae Sandlin 

Sock.<olo~y Sunny Breland 

Horn- Eck Charley Godbby 

Fceturcs 

I.ilxrry Nena Joe Cantrbll 

K.ubs Emily Neville 

l_oit OTice Dot Rutland 

Y Store M. Ikard vs. J. Totherow 

Stud nt Bored Bo Wilcoxson 

Kill.ns Station Glyn Jenkins 

Wliaf, Ina Namo _ g 



EDITOR'S PAIGE 

(Latest on the market) 

Some people walk around like they 
owned the streets, and some drive cars like 
they owned them. 

I asked a professor once what he'd do if 
his wife handed him a check for $500. He 
said instinct would lead him to sign it. 

A young professor told a fair damsel 
one nite that he'd go through anythin,-; f jr 
her. They say that she showed him' tlic 
door. 

Some people never bother to decide be- 
tween a car and a Ford. 

.A' 

The right angle to approach a math- 
emat.cal problem from is the try-angle. 

^' 

Many students are steady young girls — 
if some were much steadier, they'd be mo- 
tionless. 

A 

Sonie students were born tired, cthe.s 
acquired laziness, and some have sleep 
thrust upon them. 

Showers given to a bride-elect are fore- 
runners of the reign to follow. 

^: 

"We never bore anything but wood," 
says a wise professor, after seeing a stu- 
dent suffering from ennui. 



FAVORITE 

FACULTY 

FARCES 

Dean Barnard: 
"A b s o 1 u tely they 
shall not pass." "I 
have a surprise for 
you today — a pretty 



Standardized test!" 
"Now, Simon says — " 

Dr. Dornian:""Me- 
thinks I see students 
leaving after roll 
call." 

Ethel Cooke: "The 
supply of knowledge 
is greater than the 



demand (economical- 
ly speaking)." 

Dean : "Get pre- 
pared for a mental 
excursion." 

M. Almon (wak- 
ing suddenly) : "I'll 
take my ticket one 
way, please." 

V. Johnson : "Say, 
Rat, did you eve' 
take bichloride?" 

D. Woodall: "No. 
Who teaches it? 
What credit? How 
many hours a week 
does it take?" 

V. J.: "You take it 
rnce in a lifetime. 
You get credit for 
being a fool. It's 
taught in the school 
of Experience." 



CAGLE TO 
REPLACE 

iContinufd from fiailc 1) 

thought I was seated 
in the chariot, and 
we went bumpingly 
along the way. 

"The birds sang 
ever the chimneys, 
party submerged in 
'Ugiy Duckling' 
Lake. The little 
graceful bullfrogs 
opened up their mel- 
low throats with one 
accord in civic op- 
era style. The wind 
blew, the trees flut- 
tered in the breeze; 
and soon I came, 
after a weary day of 
hiking, to the great 
met.-opolis of Deca- 
tur. 

"And here I am, 
with no casualties 
save a sunburned 
tonsil from gazing 
at the skyscrapers. 
I have not decided 
definitely on the of- 
fer you mention." 

Polly Cagle comes 
from a family of 
wide renown, her fa- 
ther being a descend- 
ant of James How- 
Did - You - Peel -Pota- 
toes-on-the -Mayflow- 
er. Her mother will 
be remembered as 
Sally DoLittle of op- 
era fame. 

We wish for Miss 
Cable a brilliant ca- 
reer and congratu- 
late her en route. 



BOOKISH 

NOTIONS 

{Continued frotn page 1) 

proves the truth of 
the saying: 

Man [and man always 
embraces woman] can 
live without friends. 

Man can live without 
books. 

But civilized man cannot 
live without cooks ! 

Really The Blue 

Moon has crabbed 
some of our popular- 
ity, but to the Victor 
b e lo n g s the non- 
sneeze flea powder. 

A picture in the li- 
brary that resembled 
a certain black- 
haiied, black - eyed 
little Freshman who 
was here last year 
failed to produce the 
proper reaction on a 
certain member of 
the faculty — yes, ab- 
sence m a k e s the 
heart grow fonder — 
of the cne that's 
nearest ! 



The Birmingham - 
Southern Glee Club 
arrives today. All 
students are re- 
quested to sit in 
their windows and 
watch the arrival. 

Recital No. 999 
will be given tonite 
in the Auditoruim. 
Since this is just the 
beginning of the sea- 
son, we expect a full 
house. 



LANGUAGE 

LINGO- 
ROMANTIC 
AND 
OTHERWISE 

.4n announcement 
comes fro m the 
Spanish Department 
of the expected ar- 
rival of some petunia 
sprouts. All c'asses 
are eagerly awaiting 
them. 

Miss Peebles has 
been observed with 
a decided wrinkle be- 
tween her brows. 
We wonder if she 
fears to flunk her 
backward faculty 
students. 



94 



ffjr^igw ^aid of Athens 














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flpfm^ maid of Athens ^-^S;^ 







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■RATICAL" VIEWS 




^J^v-^ ^aid of Athens 




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THE FALL RETURN 



A train conies booiiiintr down the rails, 

Black smoke quite fills the sky. 
You would think this country had no 
men 
To see those bonnets fly. 



The flasman has no place to stand; 

Hat boxes, trunks, and "Vies" 
Are packed and stacked. "Hey, bap- 



fCaRe man I 
"Rush on; I'm in an aw-ful fix.' 



"Grab that box, pive me my hat!" 
"O, boy, we're almost there!" 
And lo, the seats where maidens sat 
Are left with vacant stare. 



With chatter, clatter, and "Hell-o, huni' 

They rush within the gate. 
Old students and new reecho fun; 
Shv "Rat.s" await their fate. 



^- 



Old Founders walls 'most swell with 
pride 
To hold again her own. 
And welcome from every country side 
Each girlto her college home. 

Glyn Jenkins, '31. 




<ibi 







A CONTINENTAL ODYSSEY 



By Catharine Vaughan Beard, '31 

[The Maid of Athens takes pleasure in publishing the third annvial prize short story, which received 
the five-dollar award offered each year by Mr. Paul Cooke. Assistant Professor of Enprlish. It has become 
a precedent for the prize story to appear in the Maid of Athens each year.] 



TV PRIL 15, 1777. — Dear nie, what days these last two have been! Sad to some, alas! 
y^ but to me 'wondrous; for did not I, Mary Amanthis Blair, serve my country? 
Scarcely does it seem possible, but the captain himself said that I am a true 
soldier and a patriot. 

Two nights ago, when I climbed into bed and snuggled down under my pink com- 
forter that Aunt Cynthia sent all the way from England last fall — I do love it so, for 
the pink seems of our lovely wild rose — all was so tranquil. The cowbells tinkling 
softly in the meadow behind the house and the murmuring sounds that came from the 
Cimp of the Continentals down beyond the cow pasture seemed as a part of the night. 
Pray, who would have thought of danger, even though I had seen, only the day before, 
boxes carried into the old smokehouse in our backyard? Father called it "ammunition," 
and I saw with mine own eyes the horrid bullets and powder. 

But yester morn when I awoke, la! I could scarce believe my senses, for the lawn 
and veranda were covered with horses and Red Coats. They took no heed of my pretty 
jonquils, just beginning to peep out into the sunny air, but trampled them mercilessly. 
Of those who were not occupied in throwing up breatsworks across the road before the 
house, some rummaged about the outer houses, and some killed the poor squawking 
chickens, and others ran much and fell into the mud vainly trying to catch my pi-etty 
guineas, for as a puffing, angry Red Coat pounced upon a guinea it would rise and fly 
for many yards. I could not restrain my mirth, though frightened out of my wits. 
Down beyond the pasture C3uld be seen our whig soldiers hastening to strengthen their 
fortifications. The prospect was most exhilarating, and, naughty girl that I am, I could 
not but feel some joy mixed in with fear at the thought of an impending battle — "im- 
pending," I say, for la ! all was so peaceful and friendly that it was hard to conceive of 
the horrors of war. Then, too, I had forgotten those boxes in the storehouse — those 
boxe.s which held bullets on which that small army near us depended. 

When I had hurriedly dressed, I slipped down the back stair, prepared to frighten 
black Dinah in the kitchen; but my purpose was never accomplished, for just as I 
reached the curve in the stairway I heard mother and father conversing in low, tense 
t^nes on the steps below me. We could not see each other for the curve in the stairway, 
but by the tone cf the voices I at once realized that that of which they spoke was not for 
my ears; but though I slipped away as quickly as possible, I could not but hear my 
father say: "Mary, we must get those boxes through — " I heard no more, but that 
was enough to set mc thinking. At first I believed that "the boxes" must mean our 
boxes of hr-usehcld goods, but that I dismissed, for only a few days ago the silver and 
other valuables were safely buried in the woods. I thought and thought — how stupid 
of me! And suddenly I know what he meant — the boxes in the smokehouse, of course! 
"We must get them through" to our soldiers. I knew that we must, but how? I thought 
about it during breakfast and after breakfast, but my wondrous plan did not come 
until, looking out of my window while pondering, I saw that the cows had not been 
driven to pasture and that the Red Coats were taking for themselves the rich, sweet 
milk which we were wont to leave for our own soldiers. Our custom was to take all 
the milk that we needed, drive the cows to pasture, and the men in the camp would 
take the remainder. 

It must not be thought that the great idea was mine own. No, the thought was not 
mine. I am quite far advanced in our district school, so that I have been studying the 
"Odyssey," and, though I find it sometimes entertaining, have often grumbled that it 
would benefit me no more when it was done with. That, however, has been retracted; 
for, strange to relate, it was the "Odyssey" that bethought me of my marvelous plot. 



S?^fD?&^> ^aid of Athens 





All (lay I thought and schemed. It seemed as if nijrht would never come. Indeed, 
had .1 not had tasks to perform, truly methinks I could not have lived until the dark. 

And I was sore afraid that father minht attempt some less safe manner of trans- 
portation than I intended. At first I thoufrht to tell him of the way that I had planned, 
but as it seemed quite impractical when put into words, I determined to carry out my 
project alone. But no, not quite alone. I realized that I had not time to accomplish 
my purpose without help; so I took as my confidant Jenny Eve, a negro girl of ours, 
who, little more than my own fourteen years, has been raised about the house and has 
been my companion in more than one mischievous prank. When I first disclosed my 
plan to "her, Jenny showed little enthusiasm; but as the details were woven in, I saw her 
begin to grin broadly; and when I told of how Ulysees had brought his men safely out 
of Polyphemus' cave tied under the goats, she rolled on the ground with suppressed 
mirth, and I knew that my point was won. 

"Lawsy, Miss Anianthis," she gasped, "if you-all don't have some ideas; but s'pose 
dey wuz to ketch us I" 

"But they won't," I assured her, with greater confidence in my voice than in my 
heart, for I had been asking myself that same question all day. 

Late that clear moonlit night — it hardly seems possible that it was only last night — I 
slipped down the back stairs and out into the clear air, with my arms full of narrow 
strips of light huff calico torn from an old skirt, and joined Jenny, equipped with dark 
home-spun hags, under the back-porch steps. Pickets had been posted all about the place, 
and we could hear little sticks break under their feet as they marched up and down, 
and at intervals we could hear them call to each other as they drew nearer together. 
Fortunately, no one seemed stirring in the camp, and a man on picket duty just behind 
the barn seemed to be the only imminent danger. It seemed as if everything fitted per- 
fectly with our need until we reached the smokehouse door. I was stricken suddenly 
quite dumb as I realized that we could not proceed. Jenny voiced my trouble almost 
immediately when she whispered in a husky voice: "We haben't got de key I" For a 
moment I was speechless; then my mind became clear. Wouldn't the key have been 
nlaced where both father and the soldiers would have easy access to it? I expressed 
this idea to Jenny, who instantly dropped to her knees and began to search under every 
stone. But my thoughts being more lofty, I devoted my search to the crevices about 
the top of the door. As I looke<l around to see what occupied my confederate, my eye 
fell on a bluebird's nest in an old walnut tree near by. A woodpecker made the hole 
in the wood last year, and the bluebirds built there. The nest had been torn out, and, 
in truth, when I felt down in the decayed wood, I found the key. 

It took but little time to enter the bullets' storage room; and though I feared that 
surely some one would hear the loud, squeaking noises when the boxes were opened, 
no one came. At first it took much determination to handle the bullets, but soon my 
timidity disappeared, as they seemed quite harmless, and I was truly doing my share 
of the work as we two filled the long, narrow bags and some pillowcases with the 
precious stuff. It was fully one by the clock before all the little bags were filled. They 
were able to contain all the powder and all but a few pounds of the leaden bullets. It 
probably took as much as another hour to carry them to the barn, for I could carry but 
one at a time to Jenny's two. I wondered whether the cows would be able to carry 
them, but Jenny assured me that cows are very strong. Just as we carried the last of 
the load into the barn, guards changed, and we were forced to remain most quiet as 
they passed the open barn door. 

Presently, however, quiet again prevailed ; and after Jenny had placed hay in the 
stalls to keep the animals quiet, we began to tie the sacks under them. The horror 
that passed over me on hearing a stealthy step outside the door was unspeakable, and 
Jenny and I drew back into the shadows none too soon as one of the Red Coats entered. 
His actions at first puzzled me, for instead of looking about for us, as we expected, he 
fumbled with his hand along the wall until he found a quart cup hanging there, which 
we sometimes used in milking. He then approached a temperamental old cow, Pansy, 
making little soothing noises which would have seemed ridiculous had we been less 
frightened. He finally reached the bossy and started milking operations; but milking, 




^^^..A. 




id of Athens S^.,cSWl 




like knitting, is far more difficult than appearances warrant, and no warm drink I'e- 
warded his labors. Presently Pansy, irritated beyond self-control, none too gently 
placed her hind foot suddenly in the center of his stomach. With a smothered oath he 
fell sprawled on the straw-covered barn floor. He jumped up, limping slightly, and 
snatched a pitchfork from against the wall. La, I scarce could breathe; but as Pansy 
turned her great brown eyes, for which she was named, upon him, he dropped the fork 
and fled precipitately. After his departure, we both laughed hysterically; but it was 
with difficulty that I was able to continue my task. 

When we crept back to the house, having completed the night's work, about two hours 
were remaining before dawn ; so I lay down on my bed — but not to sleep. Before me 
lay the most difficult of problems. How I was to get the cattle to pasture before the 
British discovered the burdens tied under them, I knew not. I felt that in some way I 
must succeed, but I was torn between desire to discontinue my part in the matter and 
that of helping my dear father, and, more than that, of aiding America — my country. 

Just before daybreak I rose and went again downstairs, and, having roused Jenny 
Eve from slumber, took buckets to the barn and with her aid milked several of the 
cows. We had not time to milk more. In the dim light of early morning the secret 
parcels were not noticeable, the buff strips securing them being much the color of the 
cows themselves. Several of the British were busying themselves about the camp, and 
they watched with interest as we carried bucket after bucket and set each well in sight. 
Then as the first streaks of light appeared above the horizon, Jenny, with great bustle 
and confusion, drove the herd, unchallenged, into pasturage, and we heard with i-elief 
the bells tinkling down on the far side of the pasture. Presently the American soldiers 
were softly calling to them. One of the pickets near us, looking hungrily at the cov- 
ered milk bucket, remarked with loud laughter that "they probably wouldn't find much 
milk for one morning;" and as we walked slowly away, Jenny tittered nervously: 
"What's dem sojers gonna say when dey finds all dat water in dem pails?" But I did 
not answer. I was wondering myself. 

There was an angry uproar in the yard when our ruse was discovered ; but as they 
thought that our only object was to send the Americans a good breakfast, some only 
laughed good-naturedly; and though there was talk of arresting father, nothing was 
done about it. 

Some time later in the morning our American men attacked, but of the battle I know 
little, for we hurried to the cellar, and during the sound of firing I fell asleep, greatly 
tired by the sleepless night just passed. When I awoke, the battle had already been 
won for America. The British, though making preparations for a skirmish, had been 
surprised by an attack from, as they supposed, a weak foe; but they could not have been 
as surprised as were our men when I told of how it was Jenny and I who had sent the 
ammunition tied under the unsuspected cows. 

And now comes the part so sweet that I can scarce believe its truth. When I had 
finished telling all about last night, the captain bent and kissed my hand. "By your 
leave," he said, "for the bravest little American in the colonies," and gave me a silver 
buckle from his knee. 



<IIISk 



.=~r^5^^^fe^P 




100 




flUs^^-^^^^Sg^^^^fej^^V'-^i^- 



101 




^aid of j^thens 





FACULTY 



CORNELIA S. RAMOS, A.B. 

Athens College; Graduate Student, George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Instructor in Latin and Modern Languages 

ANNIE BEADLES SANDERS, A.B. 

Athens College. 

Instructor in History. 

MRS. MARY E. SIMMONS, A.B. 

Athens College; one year Resident Graduate Work, Columbia University. 

Instructor in English and Science 

PAULINE CAGLE 
Student Instructor in Civics 



ETHEL PEERSON 

Florence State Normal. 

Student Itistr)icfor in English 




fMaidof^hens 




SENIOR CLASS 



SARA JOSEPHINE BROCK 
Birmingham, Alabama 

President of Senior Class (First Semester) ; 
President of D. D. D.'s ; Vice President of Irving 
Literary Society, 



CATHERINE MARTIN 
ATHEN.S, Alabama 

Vice President of Senior Class. '29 ; President of 
Frtshman Class, '26 : Secretary-Treasurer of Irv- 
ing Literary Society. '29 ; Most Original. Maid of 
Athens Elections, '29. 



JEAN LOUISE JOHNSTON 
Athens, Alabama 

Harris Literary Society ; Secretary-Treasurer 
Junior Class, '28. 



MARY EVELYN CARTER 

Athens, Alabama 

Harris Literary Society. 



of 



tsth.r=~:;^3^£^^^fes^i^//'''^i^3°^2^ 




^^^ ^Maid of j^thens I 




SENIOR CLASS 



KITTY BELL McCOKMICK 
Lancston, Alabama 

Harris Literary Society; Mo^t Popular. Maid op 
Athens Elections. '21i. 



BEULAH RICHARDSON 

RUSSELLVILLE. ALABAMA 

Irving Literary Society. 



GLADYS GWENDOLYN SWAFFORl) 
Athens. Alabama 

Secretary-Treasurer of Senior Class, '2U ; Irving 
Literary Society. 



JUNE WATERFIELD 
Glbason, Tennessee 

President of Senior Class ( Second Semester ) ; 
Cheer Leader. '29 : Most Represt ntative. Mau> oe 
Athens Elections. '2ll ; Secretary of P. K. Club. 
'29 : Tennessee Club ; Harris Literary Society ; 
Maid of Athens Staff. *2!). 



WILMER VERONA IJEASLEY 

Athens, Alabama 

Vice President of Harris Literary Society. '29. 



MARY NELL SMITH 
Red Bay. Alabama 



Irving Literary Society. 



MARY ELIZABETH TURNER 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Harris Literary Society: Elizabethan Club; Ten- 
nessee Club; Mary Club. 





105 




^aidof^.hens 




WANDERLUST 



Leaves are falling, 
Winds are calling, 

Time has come to be on wings. 
Morning's taunting. 
Evening's haunting. 

Time to search for unknown things. 
Ever straying, 
Never staying. 

Shackled slave of wanderlust. 
Always straining. 
Ne'er attaining, 

Stooping not to touch the dust. 
Beauty wooing. 
Color suing, 

Only shadows at my side. 
Wand'ring ever, 
Tiring never, 

I search, with silver wings spread wide. 

June Waterfield, '29. 




106 




: maid of Athens -r-^.cSlS 



■^^^ 



■igB^r 




JUNIOR CLASS 



MARY AILEEN EVANS 
Lynnvillb. Tennessee 



CHERIE GIERS 
Valhermoso Springs. Alabama 



HELEN HARDON 
New London, Missouri 



MILDRED MAPLES 
Athens, Alabama 



EMMIE LOU PARKER 
Birmingham. Alabama 



JUDITH .JOY WATERFIELD 
Knoxville. Tennessee 



SADIE COFFEE LAWSON 
Athens. Alabama 



GRACE WALDROP 

Athens. Alabama 



ANNIE FRANCES HIGHTOWER 
Athens. Alabama 



<!lte^=y: vjCy^ 




108 




s 



OPHOMORES 




?Maid of j^thens 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



MERCEDES CASTELLS 
Camat.uey. Cuba 



MATTIE BELL DAVISON 
Sycamore. Alabama 



EDITH JANET DOUGLASS 
Dk Funiak Springs, Florida 



MARY FRANCES GAMBLE 
Birmingham, Alabama 



SARAH ELIZABETH HILL 
Camaguey. Ci'ba 



ELIZABETH HUNTER 
Madison', Alabama 



NELLIE JAMES 
AvoNiiALE, Alabama 



JOSEPHINE MARSH 
Albertville. Alabama 



MAURICE OFFICER 
Athens. Alabama 



MARGARET SWANEY 
Gallatin. Tennessee 



PAULINE WALKER 
Birmingham, Alabama 



MARTHA HIGHTOWER 
Athbns, Alabama 



NANCY MALONE 
Athens, Alabama 




110 






CCDCD 





l!abLcc::f>SU'^U^^^^^^^i=ac«e^ 



112 



S|rBfe;> ^aid of Athens 





YOUTH 



rOUTH is magnetic. The world, fascinated, watches. Youth prepares 
to go out into life; the world holds its breath. What is Youth going to 
do with that life? E.xcited Youth — joyous Youth — expectant Youth — how 
is it to know? What will it be? What is worth while? 

And fi'om the world, with a^ons of experience, conies the answer: Only 
those things are worth while which you can take with you into eternity. 
Don't waste your life on useless things. It is too short. Listen to us ; we 
know. 

But what is useless? Worry is useless. What is done, is done; what 
will be, will be. Worry is petty, weak, futile. It shows lack of faith in 
God. Discontent is useless ; let it go. Where you are, you should be ; what 
you have, you should have. Make the best of it. Leave off self-seeking. 
If you gain power, money, fame, what will it profit you in the eternity that 
is to come? What, after all, will it profit you now? Do fame, money, 
power, then, bring happiness? Nay, if you wish something for yourself, 
help another to gain it. Do not use others as stepping stones ; be a step- 
ping stone for others. You are of no moment ; there have been too many 
millions like you. But others, the great mass of others, the thousands who 
are not you, have their significance. Seek for them and not for yourself. 
Listen to us. Life has taught us, as it will teach you. Youth. 

Leaving off these, what is there? O, there is the soul! There is Time, 
with its countless possibilities. Remember that Time is always, but Today 
is only once. Use your Time. There is work. Sorrow comes to you? 
Work, and forget ! 

Guard your faith and your friends, for they will stay with you forever. 
Remembering these things, keep your happiness. If you are not happy 
today, you never will be; .so be happy now. Life was meant to be happy; 
and when life is worth while, it is happy. 

Listen to us ; we know. 

June Waterfield, '29. 



ias»g: ^^-~Ji.,'^-, ^^^fea 




113 




HARRIS LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Emmie I.ou Parker 

WiLMER BeASLEY 

Sadie Lawson 



. President 
\ ice President 
Secretarv-Treasurcr 



IRVING LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Marv Evans . 
Catherine Martin . 
Rosamond Harllee 



. President 
\'ice President 
Secrctarv-Treasurer 



^--SU^^S^^ 




114 



h\;:^ ^Maid of j^thens I 





RIVERS ACADEMY BASKET BALL 





FIRST TEAM 




Nellie James 




Jumping Cenicr, Captain 


Pauline Walker 




. Guard 


Grace Waldrop 




Guard 


Eugenia Darby 




. Side Center 


Billy Cain 




Forward 


Frances Power? 


SECOND TEAM 


Forward 


Elizabeth Walton 




Jumping Center 


Emmie Lou Parker 




. Guard 


Willie Geiffis 




Guard 


Jennie Hobbs Garth 




Side Center 


ZuLEiKA Glaze 




Forward 


Ellen Church . . 




Forward 




115 




^ maid of 5^thens <;^r^^Q 




OUR ACADEMY 



It should not be so very hard 
For one who knows her true 

To tell you of our Athens dear, 
And sing her praise anew. 



But that is not my mission; 

I'm only^oing to tell 
You of our dear Academy 

That we all love so well. 



We may be few in number; 

Of that we will admit; 
But there's much of pep and loyalty, 

Which helps us out a bit. 



So we'll boost for dear old Athens 

Wherever we may roam, 
And we'll always cherish those bright 
days 
When Athens was our home. 

Helen Hardon. 



116 





> ^aid of j^thens 




WHO S WHO 



Before seeing who's who in Rivers Academy, let us pause 
to say a few words about them. 

It has become a tradition in the Academy to choose six 
types of students from the school each year, which appear 
in the Maid of Athens. This choice is made in a "Who's 
Who" election held by the entire student body. 

It gives us pleasure to present to you the chosen ones of 
Rivers Academy for 1929. 





117 




c/£/,'/,'/je r/o33S G»nrff~ 
Ce/nsrC^/zii 



«ttl~=:C:vL*^i^^^fesasEfi'' 




118 



BffBggw ^aid of Athens 








119 



%^s 




1. ?Maid of j^thens 




TWO POEMS 



By Glyn Jenkins 



OLD BELL 



When earth was young thou were 

A part of its foundation, 
Steeped within its heart, 

Born with creation, 
Till man's power did your heart stir. 

He gave you form and shaped 

This rounding tower, 
Made he from soil 

This stanch molded bower, 
And placed within a heart that waked. 



New birth poured forth in melody, 

Child of senseless earth. 
Became a voice, 

Rivers' moan, and dearth 
Of earth's remorse, 
Became a song, a lyre of ecstasy! 

Full life you lived and done, 

Your message is spent; 
A bystander. 

Gray and bent. 
Yet an age grander, 
For having toiled for men, and won. 



DEDICATION 



We come to gaze in silent awe — 

Yea, reverence — at thy feet. 
To catch the age-old message, to draw 

Some lesson of truth from whisper 
sweet. 

Your silenced tongue has shaped the 
tones, 

For hearts passed on before; 
Clear notes of joy, mellowed moans. 

Have left your walls years many score. 

Could you but speak your story long 

Of human strife and shells, 
Of battle cries, of bullet songs. 

Of men and time and years. 



Could not be found a head so wise. 

So honored, or so famed; 
We see you as a seer disguised. 

And pay you honor, due and gained. 

We give to you this ground to hold. 

In dedication sincere, 
To those before, whose shadows fold 

Our honest efforts here. 

When you a century more shall see, 

And we are then the dust. 
May those be what we wish to be. 

Who pay you honor thus. 



UfaLcC r^^-JVjtjL ^ 




120 



INTRODUCING 

some of our 

BEST FRIENDS 




It is customary for collctje annuals to present tlieir advertisers 
simply as i)arties to a purely commercial transaction. In the 
following^ ]5ag:es The Maid of Athens is presenting its adver- 
tisers as partners in this expression of our student life. 

The constructive force.s of any community or section are its 
religious, its educational, and its economic institutions. The 
division oi this hook to which this page is introductory is onh- one 
instance in which the business firms have joined hands with Athens 
College in the interest of student life. In the Endowment Cam- 
l)aign, as well as advertisers in our student ])uhlications, and in 
many tangil)le expressions of loyalty. the\- have gone on record 
as our l)est friends. 

As our best friends and active partners, therefore, we wish to 
present the following business firms for your consideration. We 
believe \ciur confidence in them will not be misplaced. 




Build Your Future on a Solid Foundation 

An Account with This Bank Will 
Help You Build 



Tennessee Vallej/^ *^ank 

Serving This Section Over a Quarter Century 



954 

DEPARTMENT 

STORES 



J. C. Penney Co., Inc. 



OUR STORES 

SAVE YOU 

MONEY 



617-619 Second Avenue, DECATUR 

We Sell Ready-to- Wear, Clothing and Shoes 
For the Entire Family 



cMuscle Shoals Tlieatres, Inc. 



Princess Theatre 

FLORENCE 



Majestic Theatre 

FLORENCE 



Ritz Theatre 

SHEFFIELD 



Strand Theatre 

TUSCUMBIA 



The Homes of 
Good Amusements 



Ritz Theatre 

ATHENS 



Charting the Route 
to Success 



|M1IM|||1I1||#|M1IM^ 



'I'll nictiil)crs III tlu- Class uf '_"» nf Atliriis folic «,'(.■. the (lipluiuas 
soon to lie received will mark more than the coniijletion uf a 
colk'i,'c course — or the reachin;;; of a j^oal. In the hands of the 
youny" wcinien who liave scored so fine a record, they will serve 
as keys to a future of success. 

Commencement Day marks the endinL; of one ](eriod in \<iur 
lives, the beginning' of another, ^'our diploma tells the world 
that _\du have e(|iiii)ped _\(iurself with knowledge to hel|) you to 
win in the field of life. 

There's another ally you want — a growing account at the strong, 
cxjierienced. helpful l);ink, where interested oflicers and staff nieni- 
l)ers will watch your jirogress and he available with facilities and 
sound advice. In other words, an account at the Fanners & .Mer- 
chants Bank, where comjjlete banking facilities are availaljle. 



Farmers & Merchants Bank 

Athens, Alabama 



i[iTTiiiiiMii[inniriiiri||iirii[TiiiTTiTnrTTTTTni 



cMartin Hardware Company^ 

Headquarters for 

SPORTING GOODS. ELECTRIC REFRIGERATORS 

HARDWARE 
HOUSEHOLD AND KITCHEN UTENSILS 

Phone 275 

Athens, Alabama 







Compliments of 


J. 


W. 


CHAMBERS 


L 


umlDer Compari}/^ 




ATHENS. ALABAMA 

• 



Number 




us Lines, 



INCORPORATED 

Running from Huntsvillc to Sheffield via Athens, 
Rogersville and Florence 

Branch Line from Pulaski to Decatur via Ardmore 
and Athens 

Connections with Buses at Athens for 
Nashville and Birmingham: at Hunts- 
ville for Chattanooga. Gadsden and 
Fayetteville: at Florence for Corinth. 
Russellville and Lawrenceburg. 




"When a Minute Means a Lot to You — Take a Bus" 
Operated by 

Number 7 Bus Lines, Inc. 

Phone No. 7 Athens, Alabama 



Limestone ^rug, Company^ 

The Rexall Store 
A COMPLETE LINE OF TOILET GOODS 



Sarver & Hig,Ktower 

"Outfitters of the Whole Family" 
Phone 10 — Athens 



Gilbert ^rug, Conipany' 

Drugs --- Cigars --- Soda Waters 

Athens, Alabama 

Phone 1 3 



Compliments of 

G. W. Long, Grocery Company^ 

Athens, Alabama 




c4THENS COLLEGE 

FOR YOUNG WOMEN 

" Eighty-iix Years of Uninterrupted Christian Service" 

1843 — 1929 



Mary Moore McCoy. LH.D.. President 

Beautiful Campus and Buildings on site nearly one thousand feet above sea level 
Modern dormitories. Gymnasium with pool heated for summer and winter swim- 
ming. Latest improved tennis courts. Year-round program of directed athletics 
Accredited by Alabama Association of Colleges and Departments of Education of 
other States. Endowment subsrriptions and annuities now amounting to nearly 
$500,000.00. 

A.B. and B.S. Degrees. Special teacher-training in Home Economics with B.S. 
in that field. Splendid Department of Music offering training in Pipe Organ. 
Piano. Voice. Violin. Strong Departments in Art. Dramatics, and Expression. 
Summer school opens June 10. doses August 24: two terms of six and five weeks 
each. Write for catalogues. 



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Ingrum Music Store 

ALL LATEST RECORDS 
Pictures Framed 



I. Rosenau's Sons 

ATHENS. ALABAMA 

Ladies' Rcady-to-Wear, Millinery. 
Shoes, Hosiery. Underwear. 

Novelties 



Holmes 
Furniture Store 

Athens. Alabama 



People will always seek the dealer who has the 

furniture that is distinctively different and at 

the same time most useful and practical. 

Holmes Furniture Store 
Sells for Less 



Sarver and Carter 

"The Pure Food Store" 

Groceries and Fresh Meats 
Phone 241 — 242 



Compliments of 

J AFFE'S 

Ready-to-Wear Store 
Athens, Alabama 



Gloria Gift Shoppe and 
Tea Room 

Athens. Alabama 

Where discr minating people in Athens gather 
for Gifts of Distinctiveness and for Refresh- 
ments daintily served. 

BOOKS — GIFTS — NOVELTIES 

SOUVENIRS — FAVORS 

Finest Toilet Articles for College Girls 



A LITTLE CREEPY 

Two Rolls-Royces rested side by 
side. Suddenly one of them 
twitched violently and shook a 
fender. 

"What's the trouble?" said the 
other. 

"I think I must have one of 
those lizzies on me somewhere." 



"Yesh. Losh sheventy-fi' 
shents." 

"Lost it right here I suppose?" 
"No-o-o-oe! Losh it half a block 
f'm here." 

"Then why are you hunting here 
for it." 

"On'y plashe's any light." 



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Compliments 
of 

A. M. McCONNELL 



Compliments 

of 

MR. W. H. DAVIS OF 

Limestone Beauty 
Shop 

ATHENS. ALABAMA 



Compliments 
of 

Dr. F. G. Poer 



M. TEKS 

WHEN YOUR SHOES WRECK. 
BRING THEM TO TEKS' 



The Home of Low Prices 

Herman Kohn's 
Department Store 

Main and Sixth Street 
TUSCUMBIA. ALABAMA 



Jefferson Hotel 

"The Pride of Athens" 
ATHENS. ALABAMA 



Compliments 
of 

ROSS HOTEL 

ATHENS. ALABAMA 



Where Cc 


tlege Girls Can Find Good 




Things 


to Eat! 


R 


L. 


GRAY 


ATHENS. 


ALABAMA 



Palace Drug Store 

R. E. Hyde. Proprietor 

THE REXALL STORE 
Established in 1912 

TUSCUMBIA. ALABAMA 



Compliments 
of 

Parisian Quality Shop 

LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR 
Wolf Kohn. Proprietor 

TUSCUMBIA, ALA. 



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5 Stores 



1 Factories 



IT COSTS LESS AT 

StercKi Bros. & 
Shumake, Inc. 



Furniture and House 
Furnishings 



707-709 Second Avenue 
515-517 Bank St. 



DECATUR. ALABAMA 



510-512 Second Avenue 
DECATUR. ALABAMA 




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A Modern Department Store, Carry ng 
a Complete Line of 

DRY GOODS. SHOES. READY-TO- 
WEAR. MILLINERY, 
CLOTHING. NOTIONS AND 
ASSOCIATED LINES 



Try Shopping at Moore's 



We Thank the "Maid of Athens" for the Pleasure of 
Doing the Photographic Work for This Annual 



SuUi 



i 



ivan s 



Studi 



lO 



208 Grant Street 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 



Twin City *T3read Covcvpo^ny^ 

Wholesalers and Retailers of 

BREADS, PIES AND CAKES 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 

Always ask for Butter-Nut Bread and Daisy Cakes. 
They are delivered fresh to your grocer every day. 



The Morgan County 
National Bank 

n Yeats of Service to 
North Alabama 



Compliments of the 

Central 
National Bank 

Second Avenue 
DECATUR. ALA. 

For 24 years we have been work ng with and 

for [he commercial, industrial and agricultural 

interests of this section. 



BEAUTIFUL SHOES 
and HOSE 

J. S. Patterson 

Bank Street DECATUR 



Compliments of 

Hunter 
Furniture Company 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 



Tennessee Valley 
Motor Company 

OAKLAND 

and 
PONTIAC 

Decatur. Alabama 



"Say It With Flowers" 
Flowers for All Occasions 

City Park 
Flower Shop 

Princess Theatre Building 
PHONE 105 



Twin City 
Electric Company 

"Electrify Your Home" 

Electrical Supplies and Fixtures. 
Wiring and Repairing 

PHONE 44 6 

W. M. Hoscb C. D. Clardy 



CLOPTON'S 
ICE CREAM 

A Complete Food 

A Delightful Dessert 

'Cream of the Tennessee Valley' 

Made in Decatur. Alabama 



^ HILIIIII1I1II 



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Nungester Drug Co. 

518 Bank Street 
DECATUR. ALABAMA 



Carrel 
Furniture Co. 



618 Bank Street 



Adjacent to Lyons Hotel 
"Fairness to All" 



The cord of friendship, once 
broken, though rejoined, a knot 
always remains. 



A. Z. Bailey Grocery 
Company 

Wholesale Distributors 
DECATUR. ALABAMA 



Allen Beauty Shoppe 

SPECIALIST IN 

Shampooing and Hair Dressing 

Marcel and Finger Waving 

Scientific Facial and 

Scalp Treatments 

228 Grant St. 
DECATUR. ALA. 



CROW « CROW 

Hardware. Furniture and Stoves 
John Deere Tractors 

Phone 109 419-21 Second Ave. 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 



Office Equipment and Supplies 

Royal Typcwritets 

Stationery 

Kyle Stationery 
Company 



Wiley Electric Station 

DECATUR. ALA. 

Starting 

Lighting 

Ignition 



"Eat More Bananas" 

J. F. LOVIN 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 



MATLOCK'S 
CASH STORES 

214-216 2nd Ave. 

109 E. Moulton St. 

Vour Trade Appreciated 



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Compliments of 

SKeffield cNational Bank 



GREER 
DRUG COMPANY 

"Perfect Drug Store Service" 

Phone 5 7 

SHEFFIELD, ALABAMA 



Muscle Shoals' 

Leading Department 

Store 

Where Style and Quality Reign 

Spielberger's 

SHEFFIELD. ALABAMA 
Since 1888 



BUTLER 
DRUG COMPANY 

215 Montgomery Avenue 
SHEFFIELD. ALABAMA 



CITY 
MEAT MARKET 

QUALITY MEATS 

and 

GROCERIES 

Telephone 470 

Third and Raleigh 

A. D. LANE 







Compliments of 


F. 


H 


STANDIFER 

General Agent 




L. 


8 N. RAILROAD 




SHEFFIELD. ALABAMA 



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"ROGERS — SINCE 1894" 



COMMENCEMENT 



— And you teachers are probably as much elated as any of your 
pupils, for it means a summer of travel, study, rest, recreation. 

— And to Those Graduating It Means 

— A great liner . . . points its prow towards the open sea. 
But with all its bulk and strength, this mountain of steel relies 
upon one simple mechanism — its rudder. 

KNOWLEDGE . . . 

— Can be compared to a rudder. It enables those who possess 
it to steer a straight course through the seas of joy and sorrow 
toward an ultimate port — the end of a successful life. 

You're Equipped for the Voyage 

— College Days will shortly fade into the past. But you will feel their influence 
throughout the years. The education you have acquired will assist you in keeping 
upon the right course. 

YOURE FORTUNATE . . . 

Accept Oar Congratulations and Best Wishes --- 

T. M. & B. A. ROGERS OF ROGERS DEPT, STORE 

Florence, Alabama 



S)ay -after-day 
^Performance 

A high mark in one examina- 
tion, or in one study, doesn't 
make a successful school record. 
That is achieved only by good 
grades day after day in every 
subject. 

It's the same way with suc- 
cessful stores. The value of the 
service which a store ofl^ers you 
is measured, not by the per- 
formance of any one department, 
or an occasional value feature: 
hut by steady day-after-day per- 
formance in every department. 
That is the service this store 
strives to give. 

H. q>. Kin^ Co. 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

Florence, Ala. 



Report of the Condition 
— of — 

The First National Bank 

FLORENCE. ALABAMA 

At the Close of Business. 

March 27th. 1929 



RESOURCES 

Lojns and d.scounts . . $1,808,2 9 2.24 

Overdrafts 164.57 

U. S. Government Securities 363.63 1.62 

Bonds, stocks, securities, etc. 467.257.00 

Real estate, furniture and fixtures 183.783.34 

Due from Treasurer of the U, S. 5.000.00 

Cash on hand and in hanks 455.761.96 

Total $3,283,890.73 

LIABILITIES 

Capital stock paid in ... $ 300,000.00 

Sutplus and profits . . 461.462.03 

Circulation 99.997.50 

Deposits 2.422.431.20 



Total 



$3,283,890.73 



N. C. ELTING. President 
S. W. FRIERSON. Vite-Presidenl 

TURNER RICE. Cashier 

R. M. MARTIN. Assislanl Cashier 

L. R. NORVELL. Assistant Cashier 



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Compliments to The Maids of Athens 

CAMERON'S 

FLOWER SHOP 



1 14 E. Tcnn. St. Phone 637 

FLORENCE. ALABAMA 



Southall's 
Drug Store 



Court St. 



FLORENCE 



Stationery. Artists' Supplies. Musical 
Instruments 

Largest Stock of Drugs in 
This Section 



He was a wise shoeshine who 
put up his sign: "Brighten up your 
understanding." 



Ezell-Young 
Company, Inc. 

J'he Exclusive Ladies' Ready-to-Wear 
Shop of Florence 



Phone 197 



Florence. Ala. 



Trowbridge 
Creamery Company 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 
ICE CREAM 

Florence. Alabama 



Let Us Sjvc You Money on Yout Class Rings, 

Pins and Invitations 

When in Florence Pjy Us a Visit 

J. W. SOMMER 

Vouf Jeweler 
106 Court Stre^t Florence 



FLORENCE 


Lumber 


Company 


"The Lumber Numbers 


Florence 


Tuscumbia 


Phcne 27 


Phone 93 1 



Florence Seed and Feed 
Company 

Bulk S«ed for Field and Girden 

Hay. Grain jnd Mixed Feeds 

"Quality and Service" 

QUAKER DAIRY FEEDS 

FAMOUS FULL-O-PF.P POULTRY FEEDS 

Phone 80 1 Florence, Ala. 



B. L. NABORS 

GROCERIES AND FRESH MEATS 

Phone 128 

FLORENCE, ALABAMA 



Permanent Waving 

W. J. CARTER 
Beauty Shop 

Aljbjma Trust W Savings Bank Bidg. 

Florence, Alabama 



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The 
cJHerriniack cJManufacturing, 
Company^ 

Lowell, Massachusetts Huntsville, Alabama 



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NEW YORK 



Lawrence Comp?iny^ 

Selling Agents 



BOSTON 




Hunlsville's Newest Department Store 



^. G. SKerrell Co. 



"Where Your Dollar Has More Cents" 



'Home of Dependable Merthandise" 
Outfitters for Entire Family 



Phone 684 

108-110 Jefferson Street 
Huntsville, Alabama 



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Compliments of 

Huntsville Transfei^ 
and building, cJMaterial Co. 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



Crystal Drug Company 

Guerlains Perfumes and 
Cosmetics 

Elizabeth Arden Creams and 
Whitman's Candies 

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 



W. R. Rison Banking 
Company 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 

Like Athens College hJs this "Gibraltar of 
North Alabama" endeavored to serve its patrons 

wisely and well. 

We solicit a continuance of vour patronage both 

for Athens College and Rison's Bank. 

H. M. RHETT. President 

A. TODD. Cashier 

I. W. WALKER. Assistant C.sbter 



Alabama Cotton Oil 
Company 

Manufacturers of 
COTTON SEED PRODUCTS 

Huntsville. Alabama 



Dickson Paint Company 

Paint — Glass — Wallpaper 
Floor Surfacing 

Phone 881 

No. I 1 South Side Square 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



Sam Schiff man ^ 
Company 

The Friendly Store 

East Side Square Phone 390 

HUNTSVILLE, ALA. 



The Huntsville Coffee 
Company, Inc. 

Roasters of 
TWICKENHAM COFFEE 

Our Coffees Sold by All Leading 
Merchants of Limestone County 



J. C. ^enney^ Co., Incorporated 

Everything in Ready -to-W eat. Clothing, Shoes, and 
Furnishings for Men and Women 



Established 


1879 


Phone 234 


E. 


Karthaus' 


Sons 




Jewelers-Opticians 


Class Rings. Pins, and 


nvitaiions 


Gift 


of Quality for All 


Occasions 




Huntsvillc, Alabama 



Swift ^ Company 

Clinton and Brown Streets 
HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 

"Tasty for Any Meal" 

BROOKFIELD PORK SAUSAGE 
( Links or Patties) 



Cumming's Furniture 
and Hardware Co. 

Three Departments 
Furniture. Hardware, Victrolas and 
Radios 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



For Quality and Service 

Post Office Cafe 

Phone 348 
HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



GETTING IT RIGHT 

Two American Negro soldiers 
were discussing musical instru- 
ments. 

"Yas," said one, "I'se gwine to 
get me a eucaliptis." 

"A what?" queried the other. 

"A eucaliptis — dat's a musical 
instrument, you fool." 

"Go 'long niggah! You cain't 
kid me — dat's one ob de books ob 
de Bible, I know." 



Pitman Brothers 



Huntsville. Ala. 

Department Store 

Convenient Headquarters for All Out-of-Town 

Shoppers 

Men's, Women's and Children's 

READY-TO-WEAR 



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The Acorn Store. 


Inc. 


Always Dependable 




MERCHANDISE 




1 1 9 Washington St. 





TRADE AT LASKYS $ STORE! 

Where You Can Supply Your Whole 
Family at the Lowest Prices 

J. LASKY 

East Side Square 
HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



Olympic 
Confectioneries 

EVERYTHING GOOD TO EAT! 



When in Huntsville 
Visit 

FOWLER BROS. 

Ladies' Ready-to-Wear. Slippers, 
Hosiery 

Jefferson Street 



GERON'S 

Furniture. Art. and 
Gift Shop 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 



We Appreciate Any Part of Your 
Good Business 

DUNNAVANTS 

INCORPORATED 

HUNTSVILLE. ALABAMA 

Good Merchandise as Cheap as Good 
Merchandise Can Be Sold! 



H. L. PtarsJll 

C. J. Ptatsall 



R. J. Ptarsall 
T H. Pcjrsjll 



Say It With Flowers 

H. L. Pearsall ^ Sons 

■ Floofrs by Wuc All Over ihc World" 

Phone 363 HUNTSVILLE 



A HUNDRED YEARS AGO 

A hundred years ago today 

A wilderness was here. 
A man with powder in his gun 

Went forth to kill a deer. 

But now the times have changed 
somewhat, 

Are on a different plan. 
A dear with powder on her nose, 

Goes forth to hunt a man. 



Mc ANELLY 


HARDWARE 


COMPANY 


HUNTSVILLE. ALA. 



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Fraternit3^, College 

and 

Class Jewelry^ 



Commencement Announcements 
AND Invitations 



Official Jeweler to the Senior, 

Junior. Sophomore and Freshman Classes 

of Athens College 



L. G. ^alfoui^ 
Company^ 

Manufacturing 
Jewelers and Stationers 

C2^ttleboro, cMass. 



l"^ iiiiirtTiiTtiFHiitiiiTTiiTiTrr ' TTTTTTmiirri[jiri]iiriiiTTri r J rr ] iiiiiir;i ujauL 



With the Best Wishes 
of the 

Gy4vondale cMills 

— OF — 

^irmin^ham, c/llabama 



NASHVILLE 
COAL COMPANY 

General Office 
NASHVILLE. TENNESSEE 



GOWNS — HOODS — CAPS 
FOR ALL DEGREES 

Quality and Service at a Reasonable Price 

Get Your Out6is from the Firm that Introduced 

them lo the Schools of America 

College Department 

Cotrell and Leonard 

Established 18 32 

ALBANY. N. Y. 



CALUMET 

TEA » COFFEE 

COMPANY 

409-4 1 1 W. Huron St. 
CHICAGO 



BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD 

Yes, I'd like to sit by the side of 
the road and be a friend to man, 
where the Chevvies po by with a 
great big hiss, and the Fords with 
their rattling pan. I'd need a 
stretcher and Red Cross nurse, and 
a doctor with ether can. Then I'd 
sit in a tree by the side of the road 
and be a friend to man. 

— Helen M. Creel. 



"I thought of you all day yester- 
day." 

"You did? How nice of you. 
What were you doing?" 

"I was at the zoo." 



# 



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