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Full text of "Major Notes"

mm noT-ES 



millsaps college 
magazine 
winter, 1968 



illsapsians Abroad: 

Teachers and 

Students Learn 

Through Travel 



ight: Professor Howard 
;nder at the Parthenon 



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mfljofl noT-ES 

millsaps college magazine 
winter, 1968 



MERGED INSTITUTIONS: Grenada 

College, Whitworth College, Millsaps 
College. 

MEMBER: American Alumni Council, 
American College Public Relations As- 
sociation. 



CONTENTS 



3 European Reaction to 
Americans in Vietnam 

8 Troubadours in the Tropics 

12 Seven Trips to Europe: 
Travels of Paul Hardin 

16 Events of Note 

21 Major Miscellany 

23 When Giving Can Save 

About this issue: This Major Notes is an 
attempt to show how Millsaps faculty mem- 
bers have increased their effectiveness 
through travel abroad and how they, and 
the students, serve as ambassadors for 
Millsaps. It by no means attempts to be 
a complete coverage. Many other students 
and faculty members have traveled abroad 
also, it is recognized. Students live abroad 
through .Junior Year Abroad Programs. 
But the people included have something to 
say — as would the others — and we think 
you will be interested. 



Volume 9 



January, 1968 



Number 3 



Published quarterly by Millsaps College in Jackson, 
Mississippi. Entered as second class matter on Oc- 
tober 15, 1959, at the Post Office in Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Shirley Caldwell, '56, Editor 

James J. Livesay, '41, Executive Director, Alumni 
Association 



Photo Credits: Cover, unknown; pages 4-6, Ronald 
Davis; pages 8-11 and back cover, Leland Byler and 
Bob Rldgway; pages 12, 17, 20, Charles Gerald; 
page 18, Ernest Rucker; page 19, Jim Lucas. 



Presidential Views 

by Dr. Benjamin B. Graves 

A question frequently asked by parents, students, donors,, 
legislators, and others interested in higher education is "WhatI 
does a quality education cost?" This question frankly perplexes I 
even those of us in college administration. Nevertheless, it is ai 
valid inquiry and one around which exists a great deal of confusion, 
if not misinformation. 

A quality education in a residential college or university today 
is apt to cost somebody at least $3,000 per student per year for 
basic costs, normally defined as tuition, room, and board. To many^ 
of us, especially those who live in Mississippi, where educational J 
costs, and perhaps quality, have been generally on the low side, 
this figure perhaps sounds astronomical. Nevertheless, 1 shall stand 
on it. 

Let me try to put the matter into a Millsaps perspective. For 
the coming year we have established a basic tuition of $1,200, with 
room and board an additional $700, making the basic cost to the^ 
student approximately $1,900. The College, however, will supple- 'I 
ment these funds with another $1,100 from other sources. More- 
over, many of our students, through various aid programs, will 
pay to the institution far less than the $1,900 basic cost. We must, 
then, find ways to make up these differentials because we shall 
spend something in the magnitude of $3,000 on each student. 

To give some other comparisons, a student in one of the better j 
Eastern colleges will pay basic costs in 1968-69 in the range of i 
$3,000 and $4,000. Bear in mind that basic costs are those borne ; 
only by the student. Additionally, these same colleges will provide, I 
from their own funds and other sources, another $2,000 to $6,000. | 
For example, Yale University will operate on a budget in 1968-69 [ 
of roughly $90,000,000, and enrolls 9,000 students. This equates to' 
about $10,000 in expenditure per student. The University of Chicago 
reports that it spends about $13,500 for a graduate student in ' 
biology. Medical schools across the country frequently spend , 
$15,000 per year per student. 

Now let's turn to the state system in Mississippi for another ; 
point of comparison. Students at one of the state universities next 
year will pay a basic cost of $1,000 to $1,300 in room, board, and; 
tuition. But look for the hidden factor! The state will subsidize! 
each student about $1,500 in operating and capital funds. Even ini! 
the state institution, we come back to this range of $2,500 to $3,000', 
as being the amount spent for education of the student. j 

If the foregoing figures are disturbing, let me close with two j 
external but no irrelevant comparisons. The nation is spending! 
about $1,000 a year on an enrollee in the Job Corps, where per- 
sons are being trained in such vocations as bakers, machinery 
operators, and barbers. It costs about $3,000 a year to keep a man 
in the federal penitentiary. 

A college education today is probably worth $200,000 to the I 
typical student. So, even in this era of mushrooming prices and ' 
galloping inflation, higher education is still a bargain. As loyal | 
alumni and friends, you will, I believe, agree with me that Millsaps, | 
considering its quality and using any broad scale of measurement, 
remains one of the nation's best educational buys. 







Millsapsians Abroad 

European Reaction to 
Americans In Vietnam 

A first-hand report 



By Howard Bavender 
Assistant Professor of Political Science 

On the TWA seven o'clock night flight to London out 
of Dulles, what surprises you is the suddenness of the 
dawn. By midnight, Washington time, a light blue band 
appears and hangs suspended on the horizon. As you 
fly into this dawn, the hovering blue band slowly ex- 
pands with hght. Finally the charming young lady who 
has been feeding you, on and off all night, gently pushes 
a Continental breakfast in front of you with the word 
that London is an hour away. 

There is first a glimpse of the green fields of Eng- 
land; then, all at once, the buildings and runways of 
London's Heathrow Airport rise up, and you are there. 

British courtesy, always a wonder to those unused to 
the likes of it, eases the formalities and confusion of 
entry. On the way into London cars stack up — just like 
our traffic — but drivers light up a cigarette and assume 
a calmly preoccupied look. These people are used to 
waiting. 

Since I am in London to study politics, my first point 
cf contact is the American Embassy. There it sits, 
dominating Grosvenor Square, of menacing, elegant, 
Georgian architecture, looking a little like an embat- 
tled fortress of concrete and glass topped by an im- 
mense spread-winged eagle. 

I am particularly interested in the impact on other 
countries of American involvement in Vietnam, and 1 
soon learn that British political parties wish Vietnam 
did not exist. As with the other European politicians I 
talked with, they are sympathetic and polite, but equally 
frank in telling you that this is our mess and they are 
not about to get involved in it. Between Labor and Con- 
servatives, it is the latter that furnishes more internal 
party agreement on Britain's support of the American 
position. But not even the Conservatives would go be- 
yond Prime Minister Wilson's policy. Beyond this is a 
considerable public apathy about it all. Parties simply 
will not commit themselves to an issue that is for their 
people completely overshadowed by more immedi- 
ate and meaningful problems. If one accepts the valid- 
ity of the American role in Asia, Europe's current atti- 
tude about Vietnam is not unlike that prevailing in the 
heyday of Stanley Baldwin and Neville Chamberlin 
when Hitler and Mussolini were on the rise. 

Last fall the British Labor Party conference 
revolted against the Wilson support of the Johnson ad- 
ministration position in Vietnam. An indication of this 



development came to me in an encounter with a young 
Laborite who, it turned out, had been in a Jackson jail 
back in 1964. A Yale student then, he had come South in 
a wave of Civil Rights workers. His reasoning about 
Vietnam is fairly characteristic of Labor's left wing. 
Ho Chi Minh, this young man argued, is a Tito, i.e., he 
is his own man, a nationalist who would have defied 
China and done so with the encouragement of Moscow. 
The war is a civil war, an insurgent movement. True, 
Hanoi has intervened to gain control of the movement, 
but nonetheless it is a civil war and for this reason we 
lack justification for our intervention. 

With Laborites and Conservatives, the bombing is 
the most seriously disturbing issue. They agree they 
want it stopped or at least narrowly restricted to crucial 
targets. Britons see the bombings on their television 
sets, and many recall the experiences of twenty-five 
years ago. Laboring classes especially, a Party mem- 
ber said, do not understand the war and are the least 
sympathetic of all classes in this socially stratified 
society to the American role in Southeast Asia. 

By now many Americans are familiar with the flam- 
boyant, rather kookish, Foreign Secretary, George 
Brown. Shortly before making this trip I had read in 
the New York Times a background study of the For- 
eign Secretary which dwelt on certain weaknesses in 
his makeup — alleged to be women, liquor, and a general 
tendency to just plain erratic behavior. Were the stor- 
ies true? 1 asked. A Laborite in a position to know in- 
sisted that the specific stories used by the Times were 
not true, but added with a knowing smile, "I could tell 
you some other stories that are really good!" Conserva- 
tives were more sober about Mr. Brown: "A security 
risk!" exclaimed one. I watched the Foreign Secretary 
in a major House of Commons debate on the Middle East 
crisis, where under intense questioning from both sides 
of the House he maintained his "cool" and bore up, I 
thought, in the style of a first-rate House of Commons 
man. 

Throughout my conversations in Europe I often 
heard expressed a longing for John F. Kennedy. The 
feeling toward President Johnson ranged from indiffer- 
ence to respect for him as a politician's politician. Only 
in Rome was I to hear him described as the "most real- 
istic president in many years." There was no evidence 
of hostility toward the President, not even, surprisingly, 
from communists. For most Europeans, though, Ken- 



3 



"French parties . . . plan for the day 
when DeGaulle is no longer .... Certain reversals 

in France's foreign policy are sure to come. 

These reversals will become evident in renewal of the 

military and economic cooperation 

with the Western Alliance . . . ." 



nedy, as one Frenchman put it, was "my kind of Presi- 
dent." They speak of "Bobby" as if he were the heir of 
a dynasty with a legitimate claim to the Presidency, one 
who could one day be expected to come into his own. 

Orly airport is the new France. It is huge, full of 
marble, glass, and attractive young French men and 
women who move you along with brusque efficiency and 
excellent English. Going out on an escalator, one has 
time to read the large letters on a wall stating that this 
building was opened in the presence of the President of 
the Republic and his ministers back in 1959. This first 
taste of La Grandeur is impressive. 

It is Sunday, and the London weather — bright sun 
and clear skies — is carrying over across the channel. As 
the sweep of the Paris skyline with the famous land- 
marks, dominated by the Eiffel Tower, comes into view, 
tourists on the Air France bus going into the city mur- 
mur appreciative exclamations of recognition. Parisians 
promenade on Sunday. They love their city as no other 
people in the world love a city. All that the world knows 
or imagines Paris to be is here: wide avenues lined with 
trees, the sidewalk cafes, and those long loaves of 
bread being carried home from the neighborhood bakery. 



The Author: 

Howard Bavender 
came to Millsaps last 
year from Springfield 
College in Springfield, 
Massachusetts. He is 
one of the most ac- 
tive teachers on the 
campus. He doesn't 
believe in in - class 
teaching only: He has 
taken his students to 
the ports of New Or- 
leans to study inter- 
national trade and to 
the United Nations. 
He received his BA 
degree from College 
of Idaho, his IVLA from 
the University of Wis- 
consin, and has done 
some doctoral work 
at the University of 
Texas. This trip to 
Europe was not his 
first, another having 
been made in 1965-66. 
He has also traveled 
in Asia. 




If Paris is romance, it is also history, the kind that 
is sensed in Marie Antoinette's dark cell in the Con- 
ciergerie. You enter the cell by stooping low, as she was 
forced to stoop by the revolutionaries, who lowered the 
height of her cell door in retaliation for her defiant re- 
mark that she would never bow her head to anyone. In- 
side, amid a few pathetic relics, hangs the blade of a 
guillotine. There is a lesson in martyrdom here, for the 
Revolution that demanded the life of Marie Antoinette 
turned her from a vain and foolish woman into the 
brave and tragic queen of haunting legend. There is 
irony, too, in that here, where the Terror sent thousands 
to their death, the law courts of France now administer 
justice. 

Paris is a great political capital revolving around 
Charles de Gaulle. He is an omnipresence, felt if not 
necessarily visible. The Elysee Palace might be Olympus 
and the General might be Zeus within. French politicians 
make jokes about him as irreverent as anything 
heard in America. There is, however, little of the 
element of pathological bitterness that Americans are 
familiar enough with in public attitudes toward their 
own presidents. What seems to be universal, even 
among the Gaullists, is an acute awareness that the 
great man is, after all, mortal and that his end must 
come, and it cannot be too far away, either. French 
parties, then, are restive, and plan for the day when De 
Gaulle is no longer. At this point two things can be 
stated with certainty about what will follow De Gaulle. 
The French will no longer tolerate a weak executive of 
the kind that for them meant disaster in the Third and 
Fourth Republics. A prominent French socialist acknowl- 
edged that a strong presidency may well prove to be 
De Gaulle's lasting contribution to France. He has 
brought the French a stability of the kind they had not 
known since 1789. Secondly, while La Grandeur as a 
concept in French politics may be expected to endure 
after the General is gone (it is of long standing in 
French politics, antedating De Gaulle by many years), 
certain important reversals in France's foreign policy 
are sure to come. These reversals will become evident in 
renewal of the military and economic cooperation with 
the Western Alliance, including the admission of Britain 
to the European Community if, as was frequently men- 
tioned, she accepts the principles of the Treaty of Rome. 

For Americans, the most interesting personality in 
French politics is Jean Lecanuet, a senator, who has giv- 
en France a taste for the Kennedy image in his youth 
and style. Lecanuet placed third in the 1965 presidential 
election. I asked Pierre Bordry, Lecanuet's chef du cabi- 
net, why the Senator entered a race he was bound to 
lose from the start. Bordry, a boyish-looking 27, said 
that it was because there was a need to give French 
voters a truly democratic alternative to De Gaulle. 
Francois Mitterrand, who placed second in the presi- 
dential election of late 1965, he pointed out, had com- 




munist support, and France, Bordry continued, was 
capable of going communist, having as she does the 
largest European Communist Party outside Italy. 

De Gaulle has pre-empted Vietnam as an issue for 
French parties. Few, outside of the communists, agree 
with the tenor of De Gaulle's frequent denunciations of 
the American role. I discovered far greater understand- 
ing of the steps that led to American involvement than 
Americans might think. For eight years Vietnam was 
the anguish of France. The French know only too well 
what it is about. We must extricate ourselves, I was 
told, but this can only come about through negotiations. 
Without exception, wherever I raised the question, it 
was believed that the beginning of such negotiations 
would be geared to political developments in the United 
States, particularly the 1968 elections. 

I was to learn of an interesting luncheon conversa- 
tion last spring between American Ambassador Bohlen 
and a small group of French politicians. The Ambassa- 
dor was warned that the Israeli government considered 
an Arab attack imminent. His reply was that domestic 
dissension in the United States over Vietnam precluded 
any move by the United States to halt such an attack. 
American public opinion simply would not accept any- 
thing that might appear to involve us in another con- 
fUct. The point of this story, according to my informant, 
who participated in the luncheon, was that America was 
being threatened with immobilisme in its foreign poUcy 
because of Vietnam. 

This kind of reproach as to what we might have 
done to ward off events I was to encounter again in 
Greece. 

Where Democracy Began . . . 

Ancient Athens, where democracy began, has known 
little of it through the centuries. She has known many 
more tyrants and demagogues than democrats. The 
Parthenon, eloquent embodiment of the creativity of 
which rational man is capable, looks out to Homer's 
"wine-dark sea" where the Battle of Salamis shaped 
the destiny of European civilization. But in the city be- 
low a small group of military despots, with the totali- 
tarian paraphernalia of secret police, censorship, and 
concentration camps for their political enemies, rules 
modern Greece. 

The way in which these men have taken power is 
an ominous study in how democracy can fall to a small 
group of willful men bent on destroying it. Because polit- 
ical activity has been suppressed in Greece, it was diffi- 
cult to find people willing to talk. It was here that I first 
learned of what has since proved to be a recurrent rumor 
about the role of the CIA in the coup of the Greek 
colonels. A Center Party deputy told me, "I don't be- 
lieve it (about the CIA), but still the evidence is there." 
The junta, made up mostly of colonels, commanded 
strategic units in and around Athens. These were units 



with which American military advisers were closely in- 
volved because of Greece's NATO role. The extensive 
troop movements that preceded the coup could not 
have been other than obvious to Americans. Athens had 
been rife with rumors of an impending seizure of pow- 
er. King Constantine refused to believe these rumors. 
Since Americans could not help but know of the unusual 
military activity, one of two conclusions is difficult to 
avoid: either they (the Americans) were ignorant of 
what it meant and, if they were, incredibly stupid; or 
they knew what it meant and approved of it. An Ameri- 
can stand supporting the king would have placed us be- 
hind the cause of democracy. To Eastern Europeans 
American inaction in the Greek coup is being propa- 
gandized by communists as support of a fascist regime. 

The junta's case, explained to me by a government 
spokesman, is less convincing. Their case is essentially 
this: the Center Party, Greece's largest single party, 
headed by the Papandreou father and son combination, 
was moving towards a secret rapprochement with the 
Greek communists in an effort to seize the government 
and overthrow the monarchy. Since Greece has a 
minuscule communist party, this seemed to me improb- 
able, and I said so. The answer to this was that it would 
have been necessary for the communists to provide the 
Center Party with the necessary votes for electoral vic- 
tories in a few key districts to give Papandreou forces 
the votes needed in Parliament. The government has 
made public evidence purporting to describe these 
secret negotiations between Center Party and com- 
munist representatives. My own sources, which I am 
compelled to identify only as "reliable," discount the 
charges of an impending coup by Papandreou. If it is 
true that the CIA was involved, then we indeed have a 
dangerous division in the foreign policy-making machin- 
ery of this country, a fear that has been voiced before 
in other quarters. 

Constantine's attempted counter-coup late this fall, 
it was evident last summer, was simply a matter of 
time. It is clear now that the King's backers seriously 
overestimated his popularity. It is clear, too, that when 
the government spokesman warned me that the junta 
was more strongly entrenched than I was willing to ad- 
mit, he was quite right. 

Italy Takes "Right" Positions 

If the only lasting peace the Western World has ever 
known has hinged on its great empires, those which 
have produced Pax Romana, Pax Britannica, and now, 
as some say. Pax Americana, then a visit to Hadrian's 
Villa outside Rome is cause for reflection. Eleanor 
Clark in her Rome and a Villa has written of this coun- 
try seat of Hadrian, one of Rome's more civilized em- 
perors, "It is the saddest place in the world, gaunt as an 
old abandoned graveyard, only what is buried there is 
the Roman Empire." The vast Villa was the heart of an 



"Among those involved in the decision-making 

process within the parties, Vietnam is understood as well 

as it is here . ... It should be pointed out that 

with the exception of the communists 

there is no widespread feeling against American 

involvement." 



empire, a world of its own where Hadrian recreated 
aspects of the empire he continuously traveled. 
Hadrian's Villa is in a valley. Directly above it is Tivoli, 
in the Alban hills, a Roman spa where today, every 
Tuesday afternoon, the local Rotary International meets 
for lunch. In Tivoli is another monument to the transi- 
toriness of man's self-glorification, Villa d'Este, created 
by a Renaissance Cardinal as a paradise of terraced 
fountains and Cyprus trees. 

Rome is the creation of her caesars, those of 
antiquity and those more modern in origin, the popes, 
the Renaissance lords. Amid their colossal creations of 
pomp and pride, with Rome's sweltering heat and 
jammed streets, modern Italy is not easy to discover. 

Dr. Angelo Sperrazza, head of the foreign section of 
the Christian Democratic Party, agreed to meet me in 
the party headquarters directly behind the Piazza 
Venezio, where Mussolini did his famous Roman bal- 
cony scenes. The Christian Democratic parties of Eu- 
rope are Catholicism's answer to Marxism. Dr. Sperraz- 
za is typical of the military, socially conscious layman 
of a church facing a forbidding challenge from the larg- 
est Communist Party outside the communist system. He 
has youth, idealism, high intelligence, and a commit- 
ment to a vision of a new and greater Italy. 

He denied what I had previously been told was a 
slowly rising communist vote in Italy, a vote now at 
about a fourth of the total. Italy's survival depends on 
strong political parties and leadership among her youth. 
The present weaknesses of Italian parties comes from 
public apathy and distrust of the parties. The Chris- 
tian Democratic government of Premier Aldo Moro sup- 
ports the Johnson Vietnam policy. Public response to 
this issue is negligible. In striking contrast to this atti- 
tude was the reaction of the Italian public to the Arab- 
Israeli war in June. Italians were open and mag- 
nanimous in manifestations of sympathy for the Israelis. 
In part, this outpouring of feeling was the mark of an 
anti-fascism developed through years of effective com- 
munist propaganda. Italians, never anti-semitic, abhorred 
the mistreatment of Europe's Jews, which they associ- 
ated with fascism. 

I learned from another source that political dissen- 
sion in the United States over Vietnam had for a time 
caused pressure to be brought on the Moro government 
to weaken its support. This came from Moro's coalition 
partners, Pietro Nenni's left-wing Socialists. The Mid- 
dle East crisis cut the ground from this faction by bring- 
ing home to the Italian public the closeness of the com- 
munist military threat, in the open Soviet support of 
the Arab attack through their show of naval strength in 
the Mediterranean. 

Commenting on the Italian government's sup- 
port of the Johnson administration on Vietnam, some- 
one remarked that it really amounted to little. The Ital- 
ians took all the right positions so far as Americans 





were concerned but lacked the world influence that 
would enable them to do much more than talk about it. 

New Communists Seem Mellowed 

The new Europe has a capital in Brussels, head- 
ijuarters of the European Community (the three com- 
munities, Coal and Steel, Common Market, and Eura- 
tom, are now merged to the extent that they have a 
common executive and administrative system), made 
up of the six countries constituting the economic core of 
Europe. Brussels is a trilingual city (French, German, 
and English); if you add Flemish, it is quadrilingual. 
While a sense of Europeanness is increasingly evident 
in the capitals of Europe, it is even more obvious that 
considerable ground will have to be covered before a 
political United States of Europe is a reality. A visit to 
the giant bureaucratic complex of the Community is 
enough to make one realize that De Gaulle is right 
when he says that the nation state, for the foreseeable 
future, is the only viable reality in the international po- 
litical system. The Community is evolving gradually into 
a political state, but it is likely to be another generation 
before it can command the kind of emotional loyalty 
characteristic of a nation state. 

My meeting with two Belgian communists was re- 
vealing in that it brought out the thinking of the Moscow- 
oriented communist of the Kosygin-Breshnev generation. 
Faith in the Marxist dialectic remains unshaken, but 
there is no talk of taking to the streets to hasten the 
revolution. The new generation even accepts the Eu- 
ropean Community idea, formerly anathema to com- 
munists. One of the Belgians I talked with, a member 
of the Party's Central Committee, responding to a ques- 
tion as to his interpretation of the ghetto riots then 
sweeping to the United States, explained them in terms 
that sounded to me much more moderate than the Marx- 
ist-influenced American sociologist C. Wright MiUs might 
have used. Did he believe this was the beginning of a 
revolution? He shook his head. No, American political 
institutions would cope with these problems as they had 
other problems of equal magnitude in the past. 

Before I left I picked up a pamphlet on the desk 
which described Americans in Vietnam as worse than 
Hitler. I showed it to the one who spoke English particu- 
larly well and said, "Surely you know this is nonsense!" 
Without answering directly, he gave me a patient 
smile, shrugged his shoulders as if to say, "Well, Com- 
rade, you know how it is." 

Negro Government Rules Nassau 

On the way back I stopped in Nassau, in the 
Bahamas. There a quiet revolution had taken place six 
months earlier. An all-Negro government, the product, 
in part, of Britain's insistence upon a one man-one vote 
rule in the islands, had taken over from a white oligarchy 



that had been governing the islands for three centuries. 
Quite a few of this governing class were descendants of 
Loyalists in the American Revolution and of Confederate 
sympathizers migrating to the Bahamas after the Civil 
War. In the Royal Victoria Hotel, where captains of 
Confederate raiders once made their headquarters, afflu- 
ent American Negroes now take their ease. The shock of 
this to the whites of the Bahamas would be analogous to 
the feeling of Mississippi whites discovering one morn- 
ing that they had an all-Negro government in Jackson. 

The tactics of Sir Stafford Sands, now in self-imposed 
exile in Spain, and then under investigation by a Royal 
Commission, furnishes fascinating if somewhat lurid 
example of the tight oligarchical rule prevailing in the 
islands. Sir Stafford, whom I heard described by admir- 
ers and enemies alike as "brilliant and ruthless," was 
minister of finance and tourism and in this position made 
the tourist industry into the mainstay of the island's 
economy. Sir Stafford himself was subsequently to 
acknowledge before the Royal Commission that in the 
process of developing tourism he had enriched him- 
self in excess of a million dollars as the result of favors 
to American gambling interests, all done in a way that 
could not be called illegal. 

The government of Premier Lynden Pindling, him- 
self a product of a British legal education, has moved 
slowly and cautiously toward a more socially conscious 
political order in the islands. In an income tax-free econ- 
omy, the Pindling government has indicated that it ex- 
pects the tourist industry to put more of its huge profits 
back into the economy. And in doing this, I was told by 
one of their advisers from the old British colonial serv- 
ice, "They're learning, and learning well." 

Europeans Apathetic About Vietnam 

To conclude: 1 found that while European political 
parties dislike and even fear the implications of Viet- 
nam, it is on the other hand far from true to contend, as 
do some people, that it has lost us support abroad to a 
serious degree. Among those involved in the decision- 
making process within the parties, Vietnam is under- 
stood as well as it is here. Even among the Gaullists 
there is considerable sympathy, if not support, for the 
United States. If sections of the European public do not 
understand Vietnam, it is more than likely because of a 
lack of interest as much as anything. At the same time 
it should be pointed out that with the exception of the 
communists there is no widespread feeling against 
American involvement, either. 

Finally, there is a new era fast taking shape in Eu- 
rope. It reflects the intelligence and creativity of a great 
civilization that is as old as the West and as young and 
vital as its youth of vision and imagination who in Eu- 
rope, as elsewhere, are rapidly become the majority of 
the population. 



I 



On Tour: 



Troubadours in the Tropics 




iwsi.;'v4 



-<f 






HEU.0 'TROUBADOURS 

WELCOME TO GUANTANAMO ^ 
WE HOPE YOU ENJOY YOl 



l^' 



The Millsaps Troubadours were greeted at Guantanamo, Cuba, by a big sign welcoming them to the base. 



Four weeks in the Caribbean. Lazing in the sun, water 
skiing, sailboating, yachting, fishing, playing tennis, golf- 
ing, skin diving, swimming, shopping, sightseeing. 

The Millsaps Troubadours had all this last summer, 
and all for the price of a song. 

And the ability to make that song sound good, and 
the presentation of it look good. 

The Troubadours, six males and six coeds and their 
director, Leland Byler, were chosen to entertain in the 
Caribbean Command by the National Music Council-USO. 
They left June 4 for Charleston, South Carolina, the next 
day taking an eight-hour flight to Fort Clajrton in the 
Panama Canal Zone. 

"We were billeted in especially nice visiting officers' 
quarters at Fort Clayton for ten days," said Mr. Byler in 
a written report on the trip. "The weather at this season 
was quite humid and warm. We were assigned a bus, a 
truck to carry our equipment, and a couple of men who 
assisted with sound and lighting on all our shows. We were 
billeted on the Pacific side and made trips to the Atlan- 
tic side on three occasions. 

"We were there on the anniversary of the rioting in 
Panama City and the city was off limits for all military 
personnel for a week of our stay. Shortly before our de- 
parture we went into the city to shop and, although we 



did not realize it then, the best bargains of our entire 
trip were available in Panama. This part of our trip in- 
cluded a tour of old Panama, a dinner at the Tivoli Hotel 
for the Troubadours and all service personnel connected 
with entertainment, a tour of the Canal, and a two-hour 
cruise in Gatun Lake." 

A couple who saw the Millsaps group in Panama ar- 
ranged with their tour officer to have six young couples 
teach them Panamanian folk dances. And a Millsaps 
alumnus, Sam Moody of the Class of 1928, invited the 
singers aboard his yacht for a deep-sea fishing excursion. 

Continued Mr. Byler, "From Panama we went to 
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, flying in General Alger's plane. 
The Navy sent a large bus to the airport with a huge 
sign on the sid^ welcoming us to Guantanamo Bay. The 
bus and Mr. Joe Ramirez were available for any of our 
transportation needs during the four days of our stay 
there. We were billeted in a large house in the residence 
area, eating at the enlisted men's mess hall at no cost to 
us. There were many recreation facilities available-golf- 
ing, horseback riding, swimming, and sailing. We had our 
largest audience here, 2,000, in one of the outdoor theat- 
ers that are common in the Caribbean Command. It was 
from here that many members of our troupe called home 
by way of the shortwave radio located at Guantanamo." 

Joe Ramirez made an impression on the Troubadours. 



8 




Doing what any tourist spends a large amount of time on, Paul Newsom snaps a scenic view. 



A native Puerto Rican, he invited the troupe to his home, 
where they met two refugees from Communist Cuba. 
One had climbed over the fence separating Guantanamo 
from Communist Cuba. 

Mark Matheny, one of the members of the group, 
said of this part of their trip, "The appearance of Guan- 
tanamo was almost in direct contrast to Panama. Where- 
as Panama was lush and green, Guantanamo was desert- 
like. And of course there was the fence dividing the U. S. 
outpost from Communist Cuba. Just beyond the fence 
Castro had put up a sign: 'Territory free of the United 
States.'" 

"From Guantanamo Bay we went to Puerto Rico," 
Mr. Byler continued, "where, at Roosevelt Roads, we 
stayed in a large VOQ installation. The facilities were 
very nice, but we were pretty much on our own as far 
as free time was concerned. We rented a station wagon 
and were able to travel to the shopping area, go to the 
beach, and sightsee. In Puerto Rico we had no escort of- 
ficer, only someone in charge of special services at each 
post. All our programs here were indoors, and we went 
everywhel-e by bus. 

"From Puerto Rico we went to Antigua, flying in an 
admiral's plane which had special appointments for com- 
munication not normally found on commercial planes. 



"The remainder of our tour consisted of 'one night 
stands' on different islands — Grand Turk, San Salvador, 
Eleuthera. These posts werei smaller, in some instances 
had no dependents on base, and our program seemed to 
be especially appreciated by these men. After these stops 
we went to Patrick Air Force Base, back in the U. S. 
From Patrick we were taken by bus to Orlando, Florida, 
where we took a jet to AtlEmta and a DC-6 to Jackson." 

Mr. Byler summarized, "The Troubadours returned 
with a deep sense of accomplishment. Each of us was 
impressed with the value of such a tour to the military 
men, whose enthusiastic response to the show was over- 
whelming. At virtually all bases, demands for encores, 
and repeated comments that this was one of the best USO 
shows that had been seen, gave us all a justifiable pride 
in a job well done. The military men enjoyed the enter- 
tainment and also appreciated the willingness of the 
group to socialize and visit with them. Wherever possible 
our troupe remained after the program to get acquainted 
and talk with the servicemen who were interested. For 
many, this was as enjoyable as the program itself." 

The Troubadours have recorded their tour program, 
and the record is on sale under the title "Troubadours 
in the Tropics." It sells for $4 in the Music Hall and Pub- 
lic Relations Office and will be mailed post paid at no 
extra charge. 




10 




The Troubadours did a good bit of 
sightseeing on their tour. In the top 
left picture, five of them are seen at 
the ruins of a cathedral in Panama. 
The same ruin is shown in the bottom 
right picture, below. Another picture 
on the left shows the group being 
rowed from the yacht of Sam Moody, 
'28, to Tobago Island, and another 
shows the costumed Troubadours pur- 
chasing fruit in Panama for one of 
their almost nightly fruit parties. The 
final picture on the left page shows 
half the group clowning for a camera- 
man — Leland Byler, in this case. 
To the immediate left, Mark Matheny 
attempts to catch a swan at the Pres- 
ident's home in Panama. The altar 
shown fascinated the entertainers: 
during an invasion the gold chapel 
was whitewashed, and the plunderers 
missed this treasure. Immediately be- 
low is the fence separating Communist 
Cuba from the Guantanamo base. All 
photographs on these pages were made 
by Charles Gerald from slides taken 
on the trip by Leland Byler and Bob 
Ridgway. 


















11 




12 



Millsapsians Abroad 



Seven Trips to Europe Make Hardin 
''Most Widely Traveled Mississippian'' 



No one asks Paul Hardin any more what he'll be do- 
ing in the summer. The question now is not what but 
where. 

Every summer since 1961 Mr. Hardin has traveled to 
Europe. He has been called one of Mississippi's most 
widely traveled citizens. 

But Hardin is not a person who thinks he has to 
see something new each time he goes, so his farthest 
point to date is Istanbul, Turkey. "I find that when I 
return to a country that I've been to before, or a city, 
it's even more pleasant than it was before," he ex- 
plains. 

He really has two purposes in making his trips — or 
had, when he started out. One is to visit the haunts of 
literary figures and the other is to increase his vast 
collection of friends. The former helps in his teaching, 
and the latter, indirectly, does also. 

His interest might not have been quite so great if 
back in 1858 a young man named Dr. William Giles had 
not migrated to America from Nottingham, England. Dr. 
Giles had been advised to come to the States for reasons 
of health. He came from the Florida coast over an Indian 
trail and settled down near the present site of Menden- 
hall, Mississippi, in a community called Westville. He 
married a local girl and reared a family, among whom 
was a daughter, Mary. Mary married a Methodist min- 
ister, Paul D. Hardin. Dr. Giles' adopted homeland ap- 
parently agreed with him, since he lived into his nine- 
ties, but throughout his life he continued to take Eng- 
lish newspapers and talked a great deal about his native 
England. 

His love of England was transmitted to his daughter 
Mary and her son Paul, who greatly desired to go to 
England. Through the years they maintained correspond- 
ence with cousins there. So, in the summer of 1961, Paul 
finally made his "trip of a lifetime," his "trip to Eu- 
rope." 

The next summer, when he arrived back in England, 
he was kiddingly reminded by his cousins that he had 
already made his trip of a lifetime. But Hardin had 
found that his appetite for travel had been whetted by 
that first visit: "One taste of travel of the sort that I 
experienced that first summer has given me an in- 
satiable desire to go back," he says. 

And he had learned that foreign travel is not that 
expensive, especially if one makes friends as easily as 
he does. His formula for a happy vacation on a low 
budget is given later. 

Hardin always starts his travels from England. One 



summer he went on to Denmark, Norway, and Swed- 
en. Another summer he spent in Germany and Austria, 
where he visited the Tyrolean Alps and took a trip on 
the Danube. Another year he spent a great deal of his 
time in Yugoslavia. Last summer he stayed in Athens 
and on the Greek isle of Corfu, and then went back to 
Yugoslavia. 

"Almost every place that I've gone," Hardin says, 
"my reason has been to visit someone that I met on 
earlier travels — to stay on a farm in Austria, to visit the 
family of a young scholar I met in Athens. This particu- 
lar young man told me that if I would come to visit in 
their home near Vienna his family would be very glad 
to have me, and they did subsequently invite me. I 
stayed more than a week in Yugoslavia with brothers 
who turned out to be three of the outstanding soccer 
players of Europe. This type of experience to me is won- 
derful. It gives you great perspective in your own life 
to realize how people are all over the world. They're 
not very different. There are friendly people every- 
where. It's all really fascinating. The most interesting 
part of travel, once you've been to see the cathedrals 
and museums, is to visit in homes, to go to the places 
the natives go and meet their friends, and do simple 
things of life together." 

As a teacher of English literature, and as a devotee 
of 17th century literature, Hardin naturally was inclined 
to make his journeys a sort of Uterary pilgrimage. He 
says that having such an object as this in mind is a great 
help, particularly to a person traveling alone. 

So, to aid in his pilgrimage, he bought a book en- 
titled Literature and Locality, described in its foreword 
as a "systematic guide to literary topography of the 
whole of Britain and Ireland." 

Hardin says, "I keep this book near when I start 
traveling around, so if I go to a certain town I can al- 
ways look it up in the index and make certain I do 
not miss any literary associations there might be there. 

"I've always had a particular interest in the 17th 
century. George Herbert is one of my favorite writers. I 
knew that at one point in his career he lived in a small 
religious community at a place called Little Gidding. 
This religious community had been established by a 
man named Nicholas Ferrar, who had taken over j an 
old farm and there, with his family, had built a small 
chapel and had invited various people to come there for 
a religious retreat. This place meant a great deal to 
Herbert and also to Crashaw, and I had a desire to 
visit it. 



13 



!1 


i^ij 


lU 


|i| 




mA 



"So I looked up the location in this book and found 
that 'about six miles north of Huntingdon, the B660 road 
crosses the AI (Great North) Road, and the western 
arm leads to Little Gidding.' 

"I started out with a cousin to see if we could locate 
it. We stopped in the nearby towns, but no one had ever 
heard of Little Gidding. We did get a hint when some- 
one said that there was Great Gidding down the road, 
so we started out for Great Gidding. Just before we got 
to it we saw a sign which said, 'Little Gidding Only' — 
that's the English way of letting you know that it's a 
deadend road — and we turned and went down there. 
After a very short distance we came to the deadend 
and it was in a farm yard. We were practically in the 
man's pigsty. We had to turn the car around, sort of 
embarrassed at being on someone's private property, 
and we saw the farmer feeding his pigs; so, in an 
apologetic way, we said, 'Sorry, we're looking for a 
place called Little Gidding, a chapel.' And he said, 
'There it is, right on the other side over there.' We 
looked and there, in the near distance, was a beautiful 
little chapel. We visited this chapel that had meant a 
great deal to Herbert and Crashaw. It truly is a beauti- 
ful place. 

"When I got back to London I opened up T. S. Eliot's 
Four Quartets. I wanted to reread the section called 
'Little Gidding': 

If you came this way. 
Taking the route you would be likely to take 
From the place you would be likely to come from. 
If you came this way in may time, you would find 
the hedges 

White again, in May, with voluptuary sweetness. 
It would be the same at the end of the journey. 
If you came at night like a broken king, 
If you came by day not knowing what you came for. 
It would be the same, when you leave the rough road 
And turn behind the pig-sty to the dull facade 
And the tombstone. And what you thought you came 

for 
Is only a shell, a husk of meaning 
From which the purpose breaks only when it is 

fulfilled 
If at all. Either you had no purpose 
Or the purpose is beyond the end you figured 
And is altered in fulfilment. There are other 

places 
Which also are the world's end, some at the sea 

jaws, 
Or over a dark lake, in a desert or a city — 
But this is the nearest, in place and time, 
Now and in England. 

"I felt that we had had exactly the same experience. 
We didn't quite know where we were going and in fact 
didn't know how to find it and just ended up in a pigsty, 
and it was the very same experience. 



Literary Experiences Relived 

"This sort of experience is repeated over and over 
again. It might be a visit to Keats' home in Hampstead 
Heath, where you can just look out the window and see 
the very tree that held the birdsnest that inspired 'Ode 
to a Nightingale,' or perhaps climb up on the walls of 
Windsor Castle and look out over the Thames River to 
the playing fields of Eton. You have the same feeling 
that Thomas Gray must have had when he wrote 'Ode 
on a Distant Prospect of Eton College.' 

"One summer in the Lake District I was walking 
down the side of the road. The landscape was too beau- 
tiful for riding. I felt I just had to get out and walk and 
enjoy the beauty. I was walking beside Esthwaite Lake, 
right outside of Grasmere, and I saw a rock by the 
side of the water, and I decided I would climb up on 
the rock and sit there to watch the sun set. While I 
was sitting there I noticed a small metal plaque on the 
side of the rock. It stated, 'Here Wordsworth sat many 
hours at the close of the day and meditated.' 

"You have the impression that perhaps you are re- 
living some of the experiences of the writers you've 
always appreciated and loved. You can follow these 
people, go as far as the Hebrides and experience the 
travels that Boswell and Johnson had. You can certain- 
ly relive some of Robert Burns when you visit a place 
like Tam O'Shanter's Inn and go on down by the auld 
haunted kirk and take a look at the auld Brig O'Doon. 
You might envision Tam O'Shanter's ride, particularly 
on a stormy, windy night. 

"You can go places where the English writers lived 
on the Continent. Surely you are very close to Keats 
when you visit his apartment at the side of the Span- 
ish Steps in Rome. Back in Britain you can visit Shrop- 
shire, and look across the fields that Housman loved. Al- 
most any place you stop you can relive in imagination 
some of the experiences of the great writers. The words 
that you read later become entirely fresh when in your 
imagination you recall the places described. You 
think of someone like Carlyle, who would sit in his room 
in Chelsea— it was lined with cork, you know, to keep it 
perfectly quiet so he couldn't hear the rumbling of the 
carts on the cobbled streets of the city. Or you can 
climb up to the top floor of Samuel Johnson's house on 
Fleet Street in London, to the garret, as he called it, 
where he put together the first great English dictionary. 
You might visit some inn or tavern where some great 
person frequently visited. Or perhaps make a visit to 
the Great Hall at Hampton Court Palace, where Shake- 
speare was supposed to have acted in plays. Or stay in 
some place like the Falcon Inn, right across from New 
Place in Stratford. The Falcon was there during Shake- 
speare's time, and you can look at it, realizing that this 
is the same view that Shakespeare had every morning 
when he first opened his curtains and looked out across 
the street. 



14 



"You have the impression that 

perhaps you are reliving some of the 

experiences of the writers you've 

always appreciated and loved." 



"Whenever we read anything we form our idea of the 
appearance of the places described, and some of these 
impressions are entirely inaccurate. I have changed many 
of my ideas. Robert Herrick writes about 'loathed 
Devonshire.' You know that he couldn't have been com- 
pletely unhappy with the countryside — it's too beautiful — 
he was simply unhappy with living in a rural atmos- 
phere when he preferred to be back in London. So now 
when I read of Herrick I picture the spot where he 
lived, the handsome rectory, a rather palatial place for 
a minister to live. He was actually rather happy in Devon 
even though he did miss London, but you do feel very, 
very remote from London when you're in Devon." 

Lectures Natives on Homeland 

However much he enjoys being a traveler, Hardin 
still is first a teacher, and he has sometimes taken ad- 
vantage of various situations to combine the two ex- 
periences: "I've frequently given some impromptu lec- 
tures," he says. "I did last summer at the Protestant 




Looking every bit the disting^uished, stately 
Briton, Hardin dons finery to attend English 
wedding of Millsaps alumnus. 



Cemetery in Rome where Keats and Shelley are buried. 
A couple of American soldiers there seemed rather in- 
terested in what I had to tell them. And some time ago 
I was at Grasmere looking at the Wordsworth family 
graves. There are several William Wordsworths buried 
in a row there, and it's very confusing. But knowing the 
death date of William Wordsworth, I had figured out 
which grave belonged to the poet. As I was leaving I saw 
a group of English tourists walking in, so I followed 
them and listened to their comments. They couldn't fig- 
ure it out at all, so I explained it to them, and they 
were very interested. I found that I enjoyed that little 
teaching experience, and I found myself for the next 
some time following groups going in so that I could lec- 
ture on the location of the graves in that cemetery." 

He is also very much the admissions director of 
Millsaps College on his travels. At least one foreign stu- 
dent is enrolled this year because of Hardin. He thinks 
enrolling foreign students is mutually advantageous to 
foreigners and to Millsaps. "I know what foreign travel 
has meant to me," he says, "and how much perspective 
it has given in understanding people." 

Hardin Formula for Travel 

Hardin's formula for happy travel consists mainly 
of not acting like a tourist. "I avoid the big American 
Hilton-type hotels throughout Europe," he explains. "I 
think staying there is a great mistake for a person who 
has to watch his money very carefully. I believe you 
should travel as the people of that country travel, and 
stay in the same hotels in which they stay. I've been in 
places like Cannes, on the French Riviera, where it's 
rather expensive, and people told me, 'Oh, you can't af- 
ford that,' but you can if you go back from the beach 
a block or two and stay in the hotels where the French 
stay. There was a convention of filling station operators 
in the hotel where I had accommodations; there 
weren't any Americans. It is a dreadful error, I think, to 
stay in the great American hotels. You're not going 
to stay in a hotel room much anyway, if you travel as 
I do. Occasionally I take time out for a very fine meal, 
but this sort of thing takes up too much of yoiu" travel 
time — and money. 

"Traveling on buses and streetcars is a wonderful 
way of meeting people, and standing in lines waiting for 
something. The London Underground is a great educa- 
tion. I've never made reservations anywhere and yet 
I've never had any trouble finding a place to stay. I 
never get theatre tickets ahead of time. I never have my 
plans ironed down so that I can't go anywhere else I 
might enjoy." 

Next summer, at the invitation of an Englishman 
who lives in Nairobi, Mr. Hardin will be off to Kenya 
to shoot (with a camera) wild animals. After that, who 
knows ? 



15 



Events of Note 



FORD MONEY RECEIVED 

A total of $327,245 has been re- 
ceived from the Ford Foundation on 
the basis of matching funds raised 
during the first report period, which 
ended June 30, 1967. 

The Ford payment matches only 
$818,133 of the money raised in the 
"Toward A Destiny of Excellence" 
program. As of June 30 a total of 
$1,579,252 was on the books, but about 
half of it was not submitted this year 
because of Foundation and Internal 
Revenue regulations. The balance, 
however, will be eligible for a grant 
equal to 40% of its value in the fu- 
ture, officials stated. 

The total amount pledged in the 
campaign had passed the $3 million 
mark by the end of the year. Some 
$750,000 remains to be secured by 
June 30, 1969, in order to assure Mill- 
saps the entire $1.5 million offered by 
the Ford Foundation. 

With the 40% guaranteed by the 
grant, the $3 million already raised 
assures the college of $4,200,000 in 
cash, pledges, property, and securi- 
ties to be used in developing the Mis- 
sissippi school as a regional center 
of excellence. 

The $1.5 million grant was offered 
to Millsaps in 1966 as a part of the 
Foundation's challenge grant pro- 
gram. Millsaps must raised two and 
a half times the amount, or $3.75 
million, by June 30, 1969, to receive 
the full amount. The "Toward A Des- 
tiny of Excellence" campaign to pro- 
vide the matching funds was official- 
ly launched last February. 

The Foundation advanced Millsaps 
$250,000 of the grant in the fall of 
1966. With the help of the advance, 
during the first year Millsaps has 
made progress toward the achieve- 
ment of goals stated to the Founda- 
tion, which included strengthening the 
academic program by raising faculty 
salaries, providing additional student 
aid, and increasing library holdings; 
and building an academic complex to 
house a lecture center, a fine arts 
center, and library expansion. 

In a report to the Foundation, of- 



ficials said that part of the advance 
was allocated to the improvement of 
the instructional program, including 
a general increase in faculty salaries 
on a fixed scale based on level of 
academic training, tenure status, and 
length of service to Millsaps; for re- 
placing obsolete electronic equipment 
in the language laboratories; and to 
the purchase of new laboratory equip- 
ment for the Department of Econom- 
ics and Business Administration. 

Another amount was directed to- 
ward library improvement. Salaries 
were raised and an additional librari- 
an was added. The improvements al- 
so included the purchase of shelving 
and stacks as well as books and re- 
lated materials. 

A large amount of the money was 
allocated for student aid. 

The President's Contingency Fund 
was used to employ an assistant to 
the school's business manager and to 
supplement resources in the further 
development of a data processing of- 
fice. 

Another small amount was used to 
renovate Founders Hall for use as an 
office and classroom building. 

Since the beginning of the second 
year, and thus not included in the 
report to the Foundation, major ren- 
ovations have been begun in the Chris- 
tian Center, which will continue to 
house the drama program because of 
its large auditorium. The new con- 
struction includes improving the 
drama facilities, air conditioning the 
entire building, and adding class- 
rooms and seminar rooms. 

SLIDES GIVEN TO DRIVE 

A set of some 1,000 microscopic 
slides, representing more than ten 
years of work and of inestimable val- 
ue, has been given as a contribution 
to the "Toward A Destiny of Excel- 
lence" program. 

Dr. and Mrs. James Perry have do- 
nated their research slides for use in 
the teaching program. Dr. Perry has 
been a member of the biology faculty 
at Millsaps since 1964 and Mrs. Perry 
serves as his research associate. 



A biological supplies firm will make 
a monetary evaluation of the slides to 
determine the amount which may be 
reported to the Ford Foundation for 
matching purposes. Until July, 1969, 
the Foundation will increase gifts to 
Millsaps by 40'rc as a part of its chal- 
lenge grant program. 

Officials have said, however, that a 
monetary value cannot begin to rep- 
resent the true worth of the slides. 
"These slides are really priceless," 
says James McKeown, acting chair- 
man of the Biology Department. 
"Each is hand made with care and 
attention. Mrs. Perry has spent as 
much as half a day perfecting one 
slide." 

Most of the slides illustrate research 
on the disease polyarteritis nodosa, 
on which Dr. Perry is the leading au- 
thority. The disease is one which 
causes inflamation and swelling of 
the arteries. In extreme cases it can 
cause death. 

The fact that most of the slides 
show disease reaction increases their 
value, since supply houses generally 
offer only slides of healthy tissues. A 
«lide showing an effect of the disease 
polyarteritis nodosa would be virtual- 
ly impossible to purchase. 

"The students will be able to see 
changes in glands caused by disease," 
says Dr. Perry. "They will be able 
to see the effects of malignant 
growths and to learn what a malig- 
nant growth looks like under a micro- 
scope, as well as other pathological 
changes. The slides will help students 
realize that abnormalities in glands 
are not necessarily cancerous." 

Mrs. Perry has made almost all of 
the slides in the collection. She uses 
specialized stains for different stud- 
ies, to bring out different things. The 
slides will last indefinitely, she says. 

Each slide is a product of a process 
in which the tissue is put into various 
solutions, encased in paraffin, cut, 
put onto slides, and stained. The 
staining itself is a 30-mlnute process 
involving putting the mounted tissue 
through 18 different solutions and tim- 
ing each step. 



16 



The Millsaps study of polyarteritis 
nodosa, which has been underway 
since Dr. Perry joined the faculty, is 
continuing this year. Additional slides 
made in the study will also be given 
to Millsaps. 

Dr. Perry is a graduate of St. Louis 
University. He also earned his Mas- 
ter's degree there and received his 
Ph.D. from the University of Cincin- 
nati. He taught at Marquette Univer- 
sity for 22 years and has also taught 
at Rockhurst College and Xavier Uni- 
versity. Mrs. Perry is also a gradu- 
ate of St. Louis University. 

SINGLETARY IS ALUM OF YEAR 

Otis A. Singletary, one of the na- 
tion's top educators, was named 
Alumnus of the Year for 1967 during 
Homecoming in October. 

Dr. Singletary, who is vice president 
of the American Council on Educa- 
tion, was cited as the alumnus who 
has made the most outstanding con- 
tribution to community, church, and 
college during the past year. He was 
chosen from nominees named in open 
nominations. 

Dr. Singletary was the first direc- 
tor of the Job Corps and was chan- 
cellor at the University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro before ac- 
cepting his present position. 



At the Homecoming banquet he 
was presented a certificate of appre- 
ciation after a citation detailing his 
contributions was read by Mark Ma- 
theny, president of the student body. 
He was honored at an informal re- 
ception immediately following the 
banquet. His name will be added to 
a permanent plaque displayed in the 
Student Center. 

A native of Gulfport, Mississippi, 
Dr. Singletary is married to the for- 
mer Gloria Walton, of Pascagoula, 
Mississippi, who was a member of 
the Millsaps Class of '48. 

Dr. Singletary graduated from Mill- 
saps in 1947. He served in the Navy 
from 1943 to 1946, connpleting require- 
ments for his degree after his return. 
He earned a Master of Arts degree 
at Louisiana State University in 1949 
and his Doctor of Philosophy degree 
at LSU in 1954, taking time out dur- 
ing this period for service during the 
Korean Conflict. 

He joined the history staff at the 
University of Texas in 1954. He also 
served as director of the Special Pro- 
grams Division of the College of Arts 
and Science, then associate dean of 
the College of Arts and Science, and 
finally professor of history and as- 
sistant to the president. In 1956 and 
1957 he was selected to receive the 



Singletary Named Alumnus of Year at Homecoming 




Otis Singletary, center. Class of 1947, was named the top alumnus of 
1967. With him are President Benjamin B. Graves, left, and Alumni Associa- 
tion President Eugene Countiss, of New Orleans. 



University Student Association's 
Teaching Excellence Award, and the 
next year he was given the Scar- 
borough Teaching Excellence Award. 

In 1955 he received the Moncado 
Book Award for his dissertation, "The 
Negro Militia Movement During Rad- 
ical Reconstruction." In 1957 the 
University of Texas published the 
manuscript under the title Negro Mi- 
litia and Reconstruction. He is also 
the author of The Mexican War and 
has contributed to the Louisiana His- 
torical Quarterly, the Southwestern 
Historical Quarterly, and the Texas 
Quarterly. He was associate editor of 
the Southwestern Historical Quarter- 
ly. 

Among his other duties at Texas, 
he served as regional chairman for 
Louisiana and Texas for the Wood- 
row Wilson National Fellowship Foun- 
dation. For three years he was a 
member of the Administrative Com- 
mittee of the Southern Fellowship 
Fund. He was director of the Uni- 
versity's Superior Student Program. 

In 1961 Dr. Singletary was chosen 
by the Carnegie Corporation of New 
York as a recipient of a Carnegie Ad- 
ministrator Grant. He traveled 
throughout the United States for an 
academic semester, studying various 
college administrations. 

In April of 1961 he was invited by 
the University of North Carolina to 
accept the chancellorship of the Wom- 
an's College at Greensboro. During 
his five-year administration the school 
was changed in status from a college 
for women to a coeducational insti- 
tution, enrollment was increased by 
65%, and admission standards were 
raised. 

When President Johnson inaugurat- 
ed his antipoverty program in 1964 
he asked Dr. Singletary to become 
the first director of the Job Corps. He 
was given a leave of absence by the 
University to accept the appointment. 

After a year with the Job Corps he 
returned to his job at North Carolina, 
but in 1965 he resigned to become 
vice president of the American Coun- 
cil on Education. 

He has been a member of a number 
of professional and civic organiEations. 
He is a member of Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity. 

Dr. and Mrs. Singletary have three 
children. The family now resides in 
McLean, Virginia. 

SCHOLARSHIP AID IS HIGH 

The largest scholarship and loan 
program ever undertaken at Millsaps, 
both in terms of amount of money and 



17 



percentage of participation, is in ef- 
fect this year, according to Jaclc 
Woodward, director. 

Mr. Woodward, wiio is cliairman of 
the faculty Awards Committee, said 
$438,733 in scholarships and loans has 
been awarded to date this year. About 
59% of the student body receives fi- 
nancial aid of some form. An esti- 
mated 55% work to help defray ex- 
penses. 

The increase in the student aid pro- 
gram is one project of the Ford 
Foundation grant and the "Toward A 
Destiny of Excellence" campaign. 
Some $60,000 has already been ap- 
plied to the program. 

A total of 384 scholarships have 
been awarded for the 1967-68 session 
thus far. Forty-one per cent of the 
student body shares in the scholar- 
ship program, which totals $237,945. 
The awards range from $25 to $1,500 
per year. 

In the loan program 290 loans to- 
taling $200,788 were granted. Thirty- 
two per cent of the student body have 
received loans through the College 
from the National Defense Education 
Act, the United Student Aid Fund, and 
the Methodist Student Loan. Loans 
range from $50 to $1,000 per year. 

.A.ccording to Mr. Woodward, 20% of 
the students work on the campus and 
an estimated 35% work off the camp- 
us. The on-campus figures include 
students who are participating in the 
federal work-study program. 

Mr. Woodward said no student who 
meets admission requirements is de- 
nied admission to Millsaps because 
of inability to pay. The amount of aid 
a student receives depends on the 
ability of his parents to contribute to 
his expenses. 

The scholarships include grants to 
Methodist ministerial students and to 
children of ministers in the two Meth- 
odist Conferences in Mississippi. 

MILLSAPS STUDENTS SHOW WELL 

Five Millsaps students went off to 
summer school at Harvard, Yale, 
and Columbia last summer, and 
racked up some of the highest grades 
in their courses. 

Four of the five students were chos- 
en to participate in the Harvard-Yale- 
Columbia Intensive Summer Studies 
Program under full scholarships val- 
ued at some $2,000. The fifth received 
a Washington Semester scholarship 
for a summer of study at Harvard. 

Included in the first four were Lan- 
ny Carlson, of Groves, Texas, Gary 
Carson, of Biloxi, Mississippi, Charles 
Swoope, of Newton, Mississippi, and 
James Woods, of Jackson. All are 



Perrys Contribute Slides 




Some 1,000 microscopic slides were given to the "Destiny of 
Excellence" drive by Dr. and Mrs. James Perry. Dr. Perry is 
professor of biology and Mrs. Perry is his research associate. 



seniors this year except Woods, who 
is a junior. Their scholarships cov- 
ered room, board, tuition, travel, and 
a living expense allowance as well as 
a grant in lieu of summer earnings 
to help cover costs this fall. 

The fifth was Henry Chatham, of 
Meridian, Mississippi, a senior. He 
was one of two persons from 200 eligi- 
ble chosen for a scholarship. 

Although Millsaps was probably one 
of the strongest schools represented 
in the program, the Millsaps students 
still acquitted themselves quite well in 
study on the Harvard-Yale-Columbia 
level. 

Said one of the participants, "I re- 
turned to Millsaps confident that I 
was receiving a finer education than 
the students from the fifty other 
Southern colleges represented." 

Lest anyone think he was stricken 
by a strong attack of school spirit-itis, 
he hastened to add that his feeling 
was "a quiet conviction that Millsaps 
was accomplishing her purpose in de- 
manding from her students the disci- 
pline, intellectual aggressiveness, and 
maturity that she does." 

Another of the participants received 
a letter from his Yale professor which 
said in part, "You were obviously one 
of the best trained students in either 
class, familiar with a great variety of 
critical techniques and widely read. 
. . .Your critical writing was prob- 



ably the best in either class. . . ." 

Chatham said of his experience 
"Harvard, of course, has good teach 
ers, and the competition for grades i: 
the keenest in the nation. The pro 
fessors had written many of the texti 
used by Millsaps students. 

"But I left convinced that most Mill 
saps teachers, despite the impressiv( 
credentials of Harvard profs, wen 
more successful in their chosen pro 
fession. I felt that our teachers did a; 
well or better than the Harvard prof; 
in actually teaching their students. 

"I can attribute it only to a stronj 
sense of dedication on the part o 
the Millsaps teacher." 

The idea behind Chatham's scholar 
ship was to allow students the oppor 
tunity of taking courses which migh 
not be available to them at theii 
home schools and of studying undei 
teachers of national renown. 

Chatham took two courses in socia 
relations, "Psychology of Religion' 
and "Social Structure of the Sovie 
Union," and audited an economic: 
course. He earned a B-plus and ai 
A-minus. Harvard did not includi 
grade distribution charts with tran 
scripts. 

Carlson, Carson, and Swoope wen 
among 75 participants selected to at 
tend Yale out of 650 interviewed 
Carlson took courses in social stratifi 



18 



William C. Harris 



i&KUKVi 




authors history book. 



cation and ethics and wrote a direct- 
ed study paper entitled "Humanistic 
Sociology." He was the only student 
out of eleven scoring in the 95-100 (A) 
ranking in social stratification and 
lacked one point being in the "excel- 
lent" category in ethics. 

Both Carson and Swoope took 
courses entitled "The Practice and 
Criticism of Fiction" and "Amer- 
ican Literature, 1865-1914." Out of 65 
grades given in English courses, four 
of the five A's awarded were earned 
by Carson and Swoope. 

The participants at Yale also wrote 
lengthy directed-study papers under 
the close supervision of a Yale pro- 
fessor and a graduate tutor. Swoope 
earned an A-minus on his paper and 
was one of two in the class in the top 
category. Carson, with 87, was the on- 
ly student scoring in the B-plus cate- 
gory. The Millsaps students took two 
of the top three grades on the di- 
rected study papers. 

Woods, the only student to attend 
Columbia, took courses in history and 
comparative literature, earning an A 
and an A-minus. Columbia, like 
Harvard, did not distribute the 
grades. 

The Intensive Summer Studies Pro- 
gram provides an opportunity for stu- 
dents to pursue a special course of 
study designed to prepare them more 
fully for graduate study. Side bene- 
fits include the fact that participants 
will receive top priority in considera- 
tion for acceptance by and for schol- 
arships to graduate schools. 

Carlson is a preministerial student 
majoring in sociology. Carson and 
Swoope are English majors planning 
to teach. Chatham is a political sci- 
ence major interested in law. Woods 
is a history major. 

They were not the only Millsaps 
students who attended the Eastern 
schools, but they were the only partici- 
pants in the special programs. A stu- 
dent from another school who partici- 
pated in the Intensive Summer Stud- 
ies Program has transferred to Mill- 
saps this year. 

PROF WRITES BOOK 

A definitive portrayal of Mississippi 
during the first two years after the 
Civil War is made in a book fresh 
from the press written by a Millsaps 
College professor. 

Presidential Reconstruction in Mis- 
sissippi, by Dr. William C. Harris, 
associate professor of history at Mill- 
saps, is a handsome, 279-page volume 
which is selling in bookstores for $8. 

Published by the Louisiana State 



University Press, the book is a study 
of the political, psychological, and 
physical effects of the Civil War and 
its aftermath on the state and its peo- 
ple. 

The volume is the third by persons 
connected with Millsaps to be pub- 
lished in recent months. Two alumni 
are also authors of new books, one a 
novel and one a biography for teen- 
agers. Nash Burger is the author of 
A Confederate Spy: Rose O'Neal 
Greenhow, and Dr. Roy C. De- 
Lamotte has written The Valley of 
Time. During the summer books by 
alumnus Paul Ramsey, Who Speaks 
for the Church and Deeds and Rules 
in Christian Ethics, were published. 

Harris' book is the first devoted ex- 
clusively to Presidential Reconstruc- 
tion in a Southern state. Most his- 
torical accounts pass over the two- 
year period immediately after the war 
with a few general comments, con- 
centrate instead on the struggle be- 
tween President Andrew Johnson and 
Congress, and then move on to Con- 
gressional or Radical Reconstruction. 

Harris said he chose Mississippi for 
his study because "in some ways its 
characteristics and experiences were 
an extreme form of those common to 
other states of the region." 

He explained, "Mississippi experi- 
enced a great deal of physical de- 
struction during the Civil War; it was 
partially occupied by Federal troops 
for an extended period of time; it 
had been the largest cotton producing 
state in 1860; it depended upon Negro 
labor more than any other state ex- 
cept perhaps South Carolina; it had 
an influential and vocal group that 
had opposed the policies of the domi- 
nant party before 1865 and was 
anxious to challenge the acts of the 
past two decades; it was the first 
state to hold a reconstruction conven- 
tion under the Presidential plan of re- 
construction; and it was the first 
state to attempt to define the place 
of the Negro in its postwar society." 

President Johnson's moderate plan 
for reconstruction allowed the old 
electorate to continue to direct the 
political activities of the states. When 
miUtary rule was reimposed upon the 
South, less latitude was available for 
local decisions and for the candid ex- 
pression by Southerners of attitudes 
and opinions regarding the postwar 
settlement. 

Dr. Harris has been a member of 
the Millsaps faculty since 1963. He re- 
ceived his Bachelor of Arts, Master of 
Arts, and Ph.D. degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 



19 



SINGERS MAKE RECORDINGS 

A recording of the Millsaps Singers' 
performance of the Mozart Vesperae 
Sollennes de Confessore with the Chi- 
cago Chamber Orchestra and a re- 
cording of the Troubadours' Carib- 
bean tour program have been re- 
leased by the Department of Music. 

The 60-voice Concert Choir, directed 
by Leland Byler, performed the 
Mozart vesper with the Chicago 
Chamber Orchestra last spring when 
the famed orchestra presented a con- 
cert on the campus. 

The Troubadours' album, "Trouba- 
dours in the Tropics," features the 
music performed by the 12-member 
ensemble on a tour of military instal- 
lations in the Caribbean Command 
last summer. The Tour was made un- 
der the auspices of the USO-Depart- 
ment of Defense. The Troubadours, 
whose main reason for being is en- 
tertainment, perform Broadway show 
music, folk songs, and other popular 
music. 

Members of the Troubadours are 
also members of the Concert Choir. 
Leland Byler also directs the ensem- 
ble. 

Both new albums are on sale at 
Millsaps in the Music Hall and the 
Public Relations Office. Mail orders 
will be sent postpaid at no extra 
charge. Each album is $4 and is 
available in stereo. 

DEW NAMED FUND CHAIRMAN 

Kenneth Dew, of Jackson, has been 
appointed chairman of the 1967-68 
Alumni Fund. 

Mr. Dew will direct efforts to reach 
a goal of $70,000 set for the 1967-68 
drive, which will end June 30, 1968. 
Participation by 3,000 alumni has 
been set as the minimum for the year. 

Last year, under the leadership of 
Foster Collins, of Jackson, a total of 
$59,781 was given through the Alumni 
Fund. The amount will guarantee an 
additonal 40% from the Ford Founda- 
tion as a part of its $1.5 million grant. 

During the past year 2,591 persons 
contributed to the Alumni Fund, rep- 
resenting an increase in participation 
from 19% the previous year to 30% 
last year. 

Mr. Dew is a 1957 graduate of Mill- 
saps. He is vice president in charge 
of advertising at Deposit Guaranty 
National Bank. 

He has been active in a number of 
charitable drives and is a member of 
Civitan, serving last year as secre- 
tary of the Mississippi District of 
Civitan International. 





^UTu^i ALO^^N/ 




"Troubadours in the Tropics," one of two new MUlsaps recordings, is 
displayed by, from the left, standing, Erwyn Freeman, of Meridian, Missis- 
sippi; Sharon Bishop, of Denver, Colorado; and Naomi Tattis, of Jackson; 
and, seated. Bob Ridgway, of Jackson. 



vember 16 to Dr. and Mrs. William J. 
Hardin (Blythe Jeffrey), both '58, of 
Jackson. 

Karen Lynn Holladay, born April 15 
to Mr. and Mrs. Curtis O. Holladay, 
of Grafton, Wisconsin. Mr. Holladay 
graduated in 1958. 

Joseph Daniel Husband, born No- 
vember 26 to Dr. and Mrs. L. S. Hus- 
band (Elizabeth Anne McGlothlin), 
•60-'61 and '65, of Whitfield, Missis- 
sippi. 

Robert Eric Lampldn, born October 
12 to the Reverend and Mrs. William 
Lampkin (Johnnie Swindull), '60 and 
'57, of Grenada, Mississippi. 

William Stanton Mitchell, born Au- 
gust 9 to Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rhett 
Mitchell (Patricia Burford), '64 and 
'62, of Lafayette, Louisiana. 

Susanna Orr, born April 29 to Mr. 
and Mrs. William Orr (Susanna Mize), 
'64 and '62, of Jackson. 

David Warner Parker, born Sep- 
tember 16 to Mr. and Mrs. Tommy 
Parker (Mary Ruth Brasher), '54 and 
'53-'54, of McComb, Mississippi. 

Melissa Ann Pamell, born July 19 
to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Parnell, of 
Charlotte, North Carolina. Mr. Parnell 
graduated in 1956. 

David Stuart Reeves, born October 
21 to Mr. and Mrs. Martin G. Reeves, 
of Mobile, Alabama. Mr. Reeves grad- 
uated in 1960. 

Jason Hamilton Smith, adopted by 
Lcdr. and Mrs. Leverne O. Smith, of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. Mr. Smith 
graduated in 1957. 



(Children listed in this column must 
be under one year of age. Please re- 
port births promptly to assure publi- 
cation.) 

Wendy Kay Agnew, born October 
23 to Mr. and Mrs. Lee B. Agnew Jr., 
(Donna Kay Calhoun, '64), of Jackson. 

Howard K. Bowman, III, born Oc- 
tober 14 to Mr. and Mrs. Howard K. 
Bowman (Sarah Frances Clark, '47), 
of Orlando, Florida. 

Robert Bradley Crawford, born Oc- 
tober 20 to Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Craw- 
ford (Mary Helen Utesch, '60-'63), of 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

Jay Warren Curtis, born July 4 to 
Mr. and Mrs. Pat H. Curtis, of Fort 
Wayne, Indiana. Mr. Curtis graduat- 
ed in 1953. 

William E. Davenport, 11, born 
July 29 to Mr. and Mrs. William Eu- 
gene Davenport (Sandra Robison), '63 
and '64, of Birmingham, Alabama. 

Alicia Susan Gault, born June 4 to 
Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Gault, Jr., (Mar- 
tha Ann Woolly), '60-'62 and '59-' 63, 
of Alice, Texas. 

Amy Elizabeth Hardin, born No- 



20 



Major Miscellany 



1900-1919 
The Reverend Dr. R. T. Henry, '15, 
ivas honored on October 5, the fiftieth 
anniversary of his admission to the 
^orth Mississippi Conference of the 
Methodist Church. Dr. Henry, now a 
-esident of Umatilla, Florida, was a 
nissionary to China for twenty years 
and has also served as business man- 
ager of the Board of Missions of the 
Methodist Church. 

1920-1929 
John Knox Bettersworth's Confed- 
jrate Mississippi: The People and 
Policies of a Cotton State in i^'artime, 

las been cited in a new historical book 
as "the most useful secondary source 
'or conditions in Mississippi during 
;he Confederate period." This is the 
statement of Dr. William C. Harris, of 
;he Millsaps faculty, in Presidential 
Reconstruction in Mississippi. Dr. Bet- 
;ersworth, '29, is academic vice pres- 
dent of Mississippi State University. 

Nash K. Burger, a member of the 
staff of the New York Times, has 
written Confederate Spy: Rose 
3'Neale Greenhow, a biography for 
;eenagers. It was published in associ- 
ation with Franklin Watts, Inc. 

1930-1939 
The Upper Room, worldwide inter- 
lenominational devotional guide, ac- 
cepted a meditation by Mrs. Bess 
sharp (Bess P h e 1 a n, Grenada '31- 
32) for the November-December is- 
sue. It was the meditation for Decem- 
)er 11. Mrs. Sharp resides in Mon- 
■oe, Louisiana. 

Dr. Marion Mansell, '35, has been 
•e-elected for a three-year term to 
he Board of Trustees of Tusculum 
College, in Greeneville, Tennessee. 
jExecutive of the Synod of Mid-South, 
br. Mansell is also a trustee of Knox- 
!/ilIe College and Warren Wilson Col- 
ege. 

The Distinguished Service Award, 
he highest honor bestowed by the 
50uthern Medical Association, has 
3een given to Dr. Robert Moreton, '35, 
issistant director of the University of 



Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and 
Tumor Institute of Houston. Last 
March he received the Brotherhood 
Citation Award of the National Con- 
ference of Christians and Jews. 

Collected Works for the Keyboard, 

Volume III of a five - volume set of 
seventeenth century musical compo- 
sitions which he edited in a modern 
translation, has been received by Dr. 
Brooks Haynes, '36, from his publisher 
in Rome. Dr. Haynes, who is chair- 
man of the Music Department at Blue 
Mountain (Mississippi) College, has 
spent eight years translating the 
works of Bernado Pasquini, an Ital- 
ian composer who lived from 1637 to 
1710. 

The Valley of Time is the latest 
novel by Gregory Wilson, who in real- 
ity is Dr. Roy C. DeLamotte, '39. Dr. 
DeLamotte, who teaches at Paine Col- 
lege in Augusta, Georgia, is also the 
author of The Stained Glass Jungle. 

1940-1949 
J. D. Cox, '47, has been promoted 
to senior vice president by Deposit 
Guaranty National Bank of Jackson. 
Mr. Cox is in charge of bank person- 
nel. 

On January 1 Marvin R. White, '48, 
became the eighth president of Pearl 
River Junior College in Poplarville, 
Mississippi, where he had held var- 
ious other positions. Mr. White is mar- 
ried to the former Marjorie Lee Dan- 
iels and has two children. 

Dr. Charles L. Darby, '49, has been 
named assistant vice president for in- 
struction at the University of Georgia. 
He is a professor of psychology. 

1950-1959 
Thomas L. Wright, '50, is serving 
as deputy state fund chairman for 
the annual Red Cross drive. Next 
year he will assume the position of 
fund chairman for sixteen central 
Mississippi counties. Mr. Wright was 
recently promoted to executive vice 
president by First National Bank of 
Jackson. He and his wife, the former 
Sadie Heard, have two children. 



Dr. David H. Shelton, '51, has been 
appointed head of the Department of 
Economics and Business Administra- 
tion at the University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro. Announcement of 
the appointment was made by Chan- 
cellor James S. Ferguson, '37. 

James C. Pounds, '52, has received 
a promotion with Insurance Company 
of North America. He is now manager 
of the Alabama Service Office in Of- 
fice Park, Mountain Brook. Prior to 
his promotion he was sales manager 
of INA's Atlanta Service Office. Mrs. 
Pounds is the former Jane Easter. 
The couple and their two sons reside 
in Birmingham. 

Robert H. Parnell, '56, has recent- 
ly been appointed area manager of 
The Wackenhut Corporation, the 
third largest investigative and securi- 
ty organization in the nation. His of- 
fices in Charlotte, North Carolina, are 
in the same building as those of Dr. 
Edwin S. Mize, '59, who is engaged in 
the practice of family medicine. 

Dr. Erl Mehearg, '57, has been com- 
missioned by Governor Paul B. John- 
son to serve on the Mississippi State 
Board of Psychological Examiners. 
She is associate professor of psycholo- 
gy and director of the University of 
Southern Mississippi Psychological 
and Special Education Clinic. 

Major Edwin B. Orr, '57, will re- 
turn from combat duty in Vietnam 
in February to begin his residency in 
urology at the University of Missis- 
sippi Hospital. Major Orr, who has 
been serving as a flight surgeon, with 
his official duty station Uban, Thai- 
land, has flown combat missions over 
North Vietnam. He is married to the 
former Gay Piper, '59. 

J. Paul C o m o 1 a, '57, has been 
named general manager of the Trinity 
Improvement Association, an organi- 
zation working for flood control, 
navigation, recreation, and soil and 
wildlife conservation in the seventeen- 
county Trinity River Basin between 
Fort Worth, Texas, and the Gulf of 
Mexico. When Mr. Comola left Mis- 
sissippi for a TIA post in 1962, the 
Mississippi legislature unanimously 
adopted a joint resolution commend- 
ing him for his work in stace wate 
resources development. 

Clifton L. Rushing, Jr., '58, has been 
promoted to the rank of major in 
the Marine Corps. He is a member of 
the commanding general's staff at 



21 



Fleet Marine Force, Atlantic. Major 
and Mrs. Rushing and their three 
children reside in Norfolk, Virginia. 

The Reverend Young C. Lee, '58, 
has come up with a new way of at- 
tempting to reach the non-churchgoers 
in the Clarkdale-Jerome (Arizona) 
Charge. Mr. Lee's church is paying 
$40 for one-fourth sponsorship of the 
play-by-play report of iMingus Union 
High School games. Commercials are 
dignified and meaningful, asking, for 
example, the listener to consider 
God's and the church's place in his 
life. In the first four weeks nine new 
families had begun attending I\Ir. 
Lee's church. 

Formerly supervisor of technology 
for Brush Beryllium in Elmore, Ohio, 
Curtis HoUaday, '58, is now working 
with Globe Union, Inc., in Glendale, 
Wisconsin. He and his wife and two 
children live in Grafton, Wisconsin. 

Mrs. Jimmy Harpole (Jeannette 
Lundquist, '59) is teaching the sixth 
grade at Poplar Springs Elementary 
School in Meridian, Mississippi. Her 
husband is a minister at Druid Hills 
Methodist Church. The Harpoles have 
three children. 

1960-1967 
The Jackson Daily News carried a 
long feature on Billy Moore, "62, dur- 
ing his visit home in November. It 
included a picture of Princess Grace 
and Prince Rainier visiting the Ocean- 
ographer, and in the background is 
Mr. Moore. He has just completed a 
long voyage aboard the research ves- 
sel. A research associate and teach- 
ing fellow at the State University of 
New York at Stonybrook, Long Island, 
he expects to use his research project 
— involving the use of radioactive iso- 
topes to evaluate oceanic processes — 
to complete his doctoral degree. 

William Eugene Daveilport, '63, is 
employed as a city planner by the 
Rust Engineering Company, a divi- 
sion of Litton Industries. The Daven- 
ports (Sandra Robison, '64) and their 
new son reside in Birmingham, Ala- 
bama. 

A North Carolina Public Library 
Scholarship Grant has been awarded 
to Edward William Brody, Jr., '60-'61, 
who is studying at the Emory Urd- 
versity Library School. He has been 
a member of the staff of the public 
library of CharloUe and Mecklenburg 
County (North Carolina) since 1966. 

Having completed requirements for 



his Ph.D. at Vanderbilt, Dr. Stewart 
A. Ware, '64, has joined the faculty 
of the College of William and Mary 
in Williamsburg, 'Virginia. He is teach- 
ing and engaging in scientific research 
in the Department of Biology. 

Robert W. Barnwell, '64, has joined 
the political science faculty of the Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi. He 
completed work for his Master's de- 
gree at Tulane last May, and is pres- 
ently working toward a doctorate at 
Tulane. 

After being selected as one of the 
three top winners in Metropolitan Op- 
era auditions, Paula Page, '64, de- 
parted in November for study under 
a Fulbright Fellowship in Hamburg, 
Germany. During the first few 
months in Europe she planned to au- 
dition for various opera companies 
and then begin her study in Febru- 
ary. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
Spanish was awarded to Jack Rob- 
erts, '64, by Louisiana State Univer- 
sity in May. He is serving as assist- 
ant professor in the Department of 
Spanish and Portuguese at the Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles. 

On the Air Force front, William O. 
Trent, '67, has been commissioned a 
second lieutenant and has been as- 
signed to Laredo AFB, Texas, for pi- 
lot training. Kenner E. Day, Jr., '66, 
a member of the Air Force Commu- 
nications Service, has been assigned 
to Wurtsmith AFB, Michigan. Mrs. 
Day is the former Cynthia Ducey, '67. 




Susan Padgett Barry, '64, to Frank 
Montgomery Duke. Living in Jackson. 

Ellen Elise Bums, '62, to Marcus 
Alfred Treadway, Jr., '59-'63. 

Alice Kathryn Casey, '31, to Joseph 
Jan Vir.ce. Living in Arlington, Vir- 
ginia. 

Shirley Garrett Clark to William 
Phillip Wallace, '50 - '52. Living in 
Jackson. 

Emily Deupree Compton, '63-'65, to 
William Brandsford Greene, Jr., '63- 
'66. 

Marilyn Dianne Dickson, '65, to 



Richard Dear Foxworth, '56. Livin 
in Columbia, Mississippi. 

Eleanor Gresham, '62, to Rober 
S. Schechter. Li\ing in Philadelphic 
Pennsylvania. 

:\Irs. Arnold Smith Hederma 
(Mary Eleanor Shaughnessy, '35-'38 
to Dr. John Robert Watts. Living i 
Ocean Springs, Mississippi. 

Bonnie Faye James, '65, to Zek 
Welborn Powell, Jr. Living in Jacl 
son. 

Charlotte McNamee to John Hok 
Smith, '60-'67. Living in Jackson. 

Sharon Nan Monk, '66, to Lt. Joh 
Grant Jones. Living in PensacoU 
Florida. 

Joanne Munsil to the Reverend Mi 
Ivan B. Burnett, Jr., '62. Living i 
Scottsdale, Arizona. 

Carolyn Tabb. '67, to Ward V a 
Skiver, '66. Living in Jackson. 

Devada Wetmore, '62, to Captai 
William Edward Boiling, '60-'61. Mr: 
Boiling is living in Greenwood, Mi; 
sissippi, while Captain Boiling con 
pletes a tour of duty in Vietnam. 



In Memoriam 



Bradford B. Breeland, '37, of Loui 
ville, Kentucky, who died August 5 

O. B. Eaton, '03-'05, who died Ai 
gust 15 in Fernwood, Mississippi. 

William Barton Fleming, '65-' 6 
who died in Jackson on October 24. 

Mrs. William C. Fullilove (Doroth 
Raynham, '44), who died October : 
in Montgomery, Alabama. 

Dabney Parrish GillUand, '51, wl 
died November 19 in Fort Wort] 
Texas, after an apparent heart a 
tack. 

George Sullivan Hamilton, '04-05, ( 
Jackson, who died December 16. 

William Fielfling Holloman, '40, ( 
Colum.b'ia, South Carolina, who die 
December 13. 

Walter L. McGahey. '05-'08, i 
Jackson, who died November 10. 

The Reverend William R. Murra; 
'38, of Summit, Mississippi, who die 
December 5. 

Dr. W. C. Newman, D.D. '58, ( 
INIemphis, who died November 14. 

James Franklin Noble, Sr., '09, i 
Brookhaven, Mississippi, who die 
December 8. 

Dwight McBride Taylor, '31-32, ( 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi, who died D( 
cember 25. 



22 



When Giving Can Save . 



by Phil Converse 
Assistant Director of Development 



Tax Advantages of An Irrevocable Living Trust 



Past issues of Major Notes have carried some 
very interesting articles written by Barry Brindley, 
Assistant to the President, pointing out ways that 
prospective donors may contribute to Millsaps College. 

Probably one of the most profitable methods in 
relation to tax advantages is through the utilization 
of a legal instrument called a trust. A trust is defined 
by Black's Law Dictionary as being a confidence 
reposed in one person, who is termed trustee, for the 
benefit of another, who is called cestui que trust, re- 
specting property held by the trustee for the benefit 
of the cestui que trust. 

In the following paragraphs I would like to share 
with you some illustrations of profitable giving 
through the use of a trust. For example: 

Mr. Smith would like to make a contribution to 
Millsaps College, but he does not wish to reduce his 
income from his investments. One feasible plan for 
Mr. Smith to pursue would be to put some of his 
investments in an irrevocable living trust with all 
the income payable to himself for life. At his death, 
the principal would then go to Millsaps. What tax 
advantages would this arrangement have for Mr. 
Smith? First of all, let us assume that Mr. Smith is 
fifty-five years old. He wants to deposit $25,000 in this 
trust fund to begin with and intends to increase the 
fund each year thereafter. 

Section 20.2031-7 of the Federal Estate Tax Regu- 
lations provides a table showing the present worth 
of a life interest and a remainder interest in each 
$1.00, based on the age of the tenant. This table must 
be consulted to complete the exact amount of educa- 
tional gifts under a trust agreement like the one pre- 
sumed in this example. In Mr. Smith's case the educa- 
tional gift considered the first year would be 54 cents 
(present value of $1.00 at the death of a person now 
age fifty-five) times $25,000, or $13,500. This $13,500 
is deductible on Mr. Smith's income tax return up to 
the amount allowed by the Federal Income Tax laws. 

Let us suppose that each year thereafter Mr. 
Smith decides to deposit an additional $10,000 to the 
trust fund. For every year Mr. Smith does this, he 
will be entitled to a contribution deduction. Mr. 



Smith's second-year contribution will be 55 cents 
(present value of $1.00 at the death of a person aged 
fifty-six) times $10,000, or $5,500. 

It is easily seen that under this plan Mr. Smith's 
income is not reduced but his income tax is. In addi- 
tion, Mr. Smith is also reducing his taxable estate 
after death because the principal amount in the trust 
fund no longer belongs to him. 

Let us look at one other situation somewhat simi- 
lar to the example above. 

Let us assume that Mr. Smith has acquired a great 
deal of money in investments and securities. He 
wishes to make a donation to Millsaps College but 
must consider providing for his wife in event of his 
death. One alternative for Mr. Smith is to deposit 
his securities in an irrevocable living trust and name 
a bank as trustee. Under these terms the bank would 
have full control over the investment of the funds of 
the trust. Mr. Smith will receive the income from 
trust for the remainder of his life and then Mrs. 
Smith will receive the income from the trust for the 
remainder of her life. Following Mrs. Smith's death, 
the trust will terminate and the principal amount 
deposited in the trust will go to Millsaps. 

There are several tax advantages connected with 
this type of trust. First of all, Mr. Smith is entitled 
to an income tax contribution for the year that he 
actually deposits the securities. The amount is 
determined by using a special table, similar to the 
one mentioned in the first example used to calculate 
the present value of $1.00 at the time of death. Second, 
if the trustee decided to sell some of the securities in 
order to increase the interest of the, principal amount, 
then Mr. Smith would be exempt from paying any 
capital gains tax, since the gains on the sale are 
made by the trustees and constitute a part of the 
principal sum which will eventually go to Millsaps. 

The purpose of these illustrations is to show you 
more ways by which you and Millsaps College can 
benefit by your gift. If you should be interested in 
taking advantage of any of these opportunities of giv- 
ing to Millsaps College, please contact the Develop- 
ment Office, Millsaps College. 



23 



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J A C K 



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KING 

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N C H S 

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illsaps College 
3^206 .ckson, Miss. 3921( 




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Millsaps Troubadours 
visits a monument in 
Panama. 



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millsaps college 
magazine 
spring, 1968 




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millsaps college magazine 
spring, 1968 



MERGED INSTITUTIONS: Grenada 
College, Whitworth College, Millsaps 
College. 

MEMBER: American Alumni Council, 
American College Public Relations As- 
sociation. 



CONTENTS 

2 Millsaps and the Federal Govern- 
ment 

8 Mock Republican Convention 

9 The Plain Fact Is 
25 Events of Note 

27 Major Miscellany 

30 Future Alumni 

30 From This Day 

30 In Memoriam 

31 Wise Estate Planning 

On the front cover: Jim Lucas has 
photographed the Christian Center in the 
spring. The building has been modified 
significantly to improve its stage facilities. 
The modification was accomplished through 
a federal matching grant of almost $75,000. 
Other aspects of federal education expendi- 
tures are examined in "Millsaps and the 
Federal Government," beginning on page 
2. 



Volume 9 



May, 1968 



Number 4 



Published quarterly by Millsaps College in Jackson, 
Mississippi. Entered as second class matter on Oc- 
tober 15, 1959, at the Post Office in Jackson, Mis- 
sissippi, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Wayne Dowdy, '65, Editor 

James J. Livesay, Ml, Executive Director, Alumni 
Association 



A GENEROUS BENEFACTOR 




•* 



A federal grant of $75,000 
for renovation of the Christ- 
iaTk Center has made pos- 
sible a new stage for the 
center's auditorium. The 
new facilities include a 
larger stage area and more 
room for storage of props. 



But Could We Get More? 



MILLSAPS AND THE 
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 



In the past year the federal government paid about 
one fourth of the operating expenses of all the colleges 
and universities in the nation. For the average private 
college or university the portion of the operating budget 
coming from federal funds was about one third. Yet O. 
E. Browning, who shares the responsibility of seeking 
federal money for Millsaps College, says, "If we get as 
much as ten percent of pur operating expenses from the 
government, I would be very much surprised." 

Whether seeking funds for operating expenses or new 
capital plant facilities, Millsaps has one major handicap 
in the stiff competition for federal support: money. 

Unlike larger, better endowed institutions, such as 
Cornell, New York University, Texas A & M, and Ohio 
University, Millsaps can not spare funds to retain lobby- 
ists and maintain offices in Washington. In lieu of full- 
time liaison activities, several Millsaps administrators 
and teachers share this responsibility on a part-time 
basis. 

Browning, who came to the college in 1966 after 
earning his Masters at the University of Florida, is pur- 
chasing agent and assists Business Manager J. W. Wood 
in the day-to-day fiscal operation of the school. Browning 
also devotes as much time as possible to searching fed- 
eral enactments for available fuuas. 

In addition to his teaching duties, Dr. Richard R. 
Priddy, Chairman of the Geoiogy Department, has been 
particularly active in getting federal money for science 
projects. 

Jack L. Woodward, the Religious Life Director, esti- 
mates that about ninety-five percent of his time is spent 
helping students obtain federal loans or grants. 

Business Manager Wood, President Benjamin 
Graves, Director of Development Barry Brindley, Dean 
of the Faculty Frank M. Laney and others have helped 
in this job, which has been made difficult, according to 
one educational writer, by "increasing red tape, poor co- 
ordination among federal agencies, and inadequate com- 
munication with Washington." 

The inability to hire a fulltime staff to solicit federal 
money is not the only way in which Millsaps has been 



handicapped by its comparative lack of funds. The most 
important aspect of the problem is Millsaps' difficulty in 
providing matching funds, which are required by many 
of the government's programs. Usually Millsaps can not 
spare the money needed for the matching programs — it 
is needed for current expenses. 

Millsaps' current operating expenses have been in- 
creasing dramatically in recent years. All colleges, in- 
cluding Millsaps, have been forced to compete with priv- 
ate industry for teachers whose talents are needed for 
ever-increasing research work. The expanding labor 
market has provided new, higher paying jobs for admin- 
istration and staff workers. Maintenance expenses have 
gone up, as have prices for utilities, food, etc. 

In longer-term expenditures, deterioration of old fa- 
cilities has made new dormitories and classroom build- 
ings necessary, and construction costs for these projects 
have been spiraling upward. 

Millsaps' support comes from three basic sources: 
charges, philanthropy, and government. While costs have 
been increasing so steadily, non-government income has 
not been keeping pace. 

Although Millsaps has raised its tuition charges sev- 
eral times in recent years, the Millsaps student pays for 
about sixty percent of the expenses involved in his edu- 
cation. While Millsaps has always relied heavily on its 
affiliation with The Methodist Church, the percentage of 
the college's regular income derived from the church has 
decreased annually. 

No immediate end to this pressure is in sight. Ac- 
cording to Business Manager Wood, who is well acquaint- 
ed with the problems of making Millsaps' ends meet, 
■'the costs of education are increasing so rapidly that 
we must find new income, or our program must be 
curtailed." 

The Millsaps administration feels that curtailing the 
college's program is not a desirable alternative, and in 
its search for new income, the school has found the fed- 
eral government to be a generous benefactor, even 
though the amounts received from Washington by Mill- 
saps are not as substantial as those received by other in- 
stitutions. 




Browning: "If we get as much 
as ten percent .... I would be 
very much surprised." 

Millsaps' federal support can be divided into three 
general categories: 1 — aid to its students, 2 — funds for 
special projects and teaching fellowships, and 3 — funds 
for permanent facilities. 

Jack Woodward administers government aid to needy 
students, man.v of whom could not afford the cost of 
higher education without this help. As late as 1961 Wood- 
ward could keep the federal forms and paper-work in a 
small box. Now a wall of filing cabinets is necessary. 

307 Millsaps students, almost one third of the total 
enrollment, receive aid from the federal government 
whether in the form of a loan, an outright grant, or a 
job. 

Fifteen are attending under the G. I. Bill, and six get 
benefits as ciiildren of veterans. The remaining 286 stu- 
dents participate in several federal programs. 

Educational Opportunity Grants. For the 1967-68 
school year, Millsaps students will receive $137,500 under 
this program, which provides direct awards for students 
of exceptional financial need and academic promise. 
Through an Educational Opportunity Grant, a student 
may receive up to $800 a year for his educational ex- 
penses. 

College Work-Study. This program gives part-time 
jobs to needy students, who work up to fifteen hours 
a week while attending classes fulltime. The jobs are 
usually in campus offices. Millsaps' Work-Study allot- 
ment for the current school year is $64,000. 

National Defense Student Loans. With a defense loan, 
money is borrowed from the government and is repaid 
over a ten year period. The low interest rate doesn't be- 
gin to run until after the student has finished his educa- 
tion. For this school year, $103,000 has been appropriated 
to MilUsaps for these loans. The college must approve 
and make the loans, and is responsible for their collec- 
tion. 



Through the Educational Opportunity Grants, Col 
lege Work-Study and National Defense Student Loans, 
Woodward's office is administering a total of more than 
$300,000 for the current school year. 

The second category of federal involvement involves^ 
funds for current projects and operating expenses. Mill- 1 
saps has qualified for several of these programs, which] 
are designed to improve the curriculum, purchase need- 
ed equipment, supplement faculty salaries, and make; 
funds available for research. Most of these programs 
are science-oriented, and of these many are adminis- 
tered by Dr. Priddy. | 

I 
Since 1955 Millsaps has sought 50 government grants , 

in science, and of this number has received 29. Priddy 
feels that Millsaps' success ratio would be higher if Mill- 
saps offered a graduate program. "In most cases thei 
reasoning behind refusal is not given, but in a few in- 
stances it has been pointed out that a graduate program' 
would increase our ability to fulfill the requirements' 
of National Science Foundation grants. In five instances 
Millsaps would have been awarded moneys for summer: 
institutes for high school teachers if this work would 
have counted toward a graduate degree." 




A 



Priddy: A graduate program 
would mean more federal grants. 




ACADEMIC COMPLEX* 



LLSAPS COLLEGE •JACKSON 



;SIPPI 



Construction is scheduled to begin this summer on Mill- 
saps' proposed Academic Complex, shown in an artist's 
sketch. When completed, the complex will house a Fine 
Arts unit, a Lecture Center, and a Library Addition. The 
Lecture Center will have four amphi-theater classrooms 
which will seat from 75 to 180 students. The Fine Arts Unit 
will contain art studios and gallery, a recital-lecture audi- 
torium, a choral rehearsal classroom, a music library, and 
several practice rooms. The Complex will extend from the 
Library to Murrah Hall. 



Priddy has worked with five types of federal grant 
programs. 

Equipment. These grants furnish funds to purchase 
new science equipment and modify old. They are match- 
ing programs, and since 1959 the college has received 
$32,500 from the government, which Millsaps has matched 
dollar for dollar. The requests for equipment originate 
in the several science disciplines. 

Undergraduate Research. Since 1959 Millsaps has 
been given $95,000 to finance field and laboratory work 
for its science students. 

Conferences and Short Courses, on geology and 
oceanography, have been conducted in cooperation with 
the Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, and financed with 
$91,000 from the government. The bulk of this money 
goes for maintenance of conference participants, who 
come from throughout the United States and Canada. 
The money has also been used to purchase instruments 
and equipment and charter transportation. 

High School Teacher Courses. $20,000 has been grant- 
ed to the college since 1959 for these weekend courses, 
which are designed to improve high school instruction in 
the multiple sciences. The major costs involved are re- 
muneration of participants and teaching expenses. 

Grants to Science Faculty to Continue Investiga- 
tions. This is the fifth category administered by individ- 



ual science faculty, and it has accounted for $15,000 since 
1959. 

For the current school year Millsaps has National 
Science Foundation Grants of $8,905 to improve sciences, 
$2,000 to improve Chemistry teaching, $8,200 to improve 
Chemistry laboratory work, $16,100 for Biology-Geology 
equipment, and $24,590 to improve teaching through a 
June short-course for college teachers on Mississippi's 
coast. 

Millsaps has three other grants which are not science- 
oriented, and are categorized as special projects and 
teaching fellowships. 

Developing Institutions Grant. This program gives 
$81,000 to Millsaps, which is to be used "to achieve a 
higher academic quality through faculty improvement 
. . .and introduction of new curriculum materials." 

Library Books Grant. The Millsaps Library will re- 
ceive $7,000 for the current year under this grant, which 
stipulates that the college's own library expenditure must 
exceed that of the preceding year. 

Grants for Classroom and Laboratory Equipment. 

For the current year Millsaps is getting almost $60,000 
under this grant which is administered Mr. Browning. 
The grant restricts Millsaps' equipment purchases to 
"audiovisual, laboratory and classroom equipment, 
printed and published materials other than textbooks, 
and closed circuit equipment. 




Woodward: Helps almost one third of Millsaps' 
students get federal aid. 



The third broad category of federal aid involves loans 
and grants for construction of new buildings and perma- 
nent facilities. 

Government money has played an important part in 
recent construction and renovation projects on the 
campus. A forty year loan of $1,226,000 helped in the con- 
struction of the two new dormitories which have recent- 
ly been occupied. 

$75,000 in government funds have been used in the 
renovation of the Christian Center. The Center's drama 
facilities were improved, the entire building was air-con-' 
ditioned, and classrooms were added. 

Construction is expected to begin in July on the new ' 
Academic Complex which will house a Fine Arts Center, 
an addition to the Library, and additional classrooms. 
Two government programs — a grant of $850,000 and a 
loan of $383,000— will be put with $1.3 million of Millsaps' 
own funds for this ambitious undertalting. 

The amount of Millsaps' support from the govern- 
ment, small compared to that received by some institu- 
tions, is probably surprising to those who are unaware 
of the magnitude of the government's expenditures in 
higher education. 

Business Manager Wood says, "There are those who 
say that a college should not become dependent on gov- 
ernment support, and I agree with them." Millsaps' ad- 
ministration prefers non-government income, which is 
usually free from stipulations and conditions, and does 
not depend on congressional appropriation. Institutions 
whose programs are undergirded by government grants 
and loans suffer directly when Congress cuts its educa- 
tional appropriations. The financial pressure caused by 
Vietnam has already been felt on some campuses, and 
many educators fear that the biggest cuts are yet to 
come. 



Wood: "A college should not become 
pendent on government support." 



de- 





A noted economist recently visit- 
ed the Millsaps campus under the 
auspices of the Visiting Science Pro- 
gram in Economics, which was estab- 
lished through a grant from the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. Dr. Ber- 
nard Sliger, Vice-Chancellor of Lou- 
isiana State University, delivered sev- 
eral talks to students and held con- 
ferences with members of the Mill- 
saps Economics faculty. The Visiting 
Science Program was designed to 
stimulate interest in economics among 
college students and to provide oppor- 
tunities for college economics teachers 
to discuss their teaching and research 
problems with a visiting economist. 



Participation of Millsaps College in Federal Programs in the 

1967-68 School Year 



student Aid: 

Educational Opportunity Grants (needy students) 
College Work-Study (jobs for needy students) 
N.D.S.L.* (Loans to students on 10 year basis) 

Academic Program Aid 

Developing Institutions Grants (To improve Curriculum) 

Library Books Grants (To improve Library) 

N.S.F.** Grant (To improve Sciences) 

N.S.F. Grant to improve Chemistry teaching 

N.S.F. Grant to improve Chemistry Laboratory Work 

N.S.F Grant for Biology-Geology Equipment 

N.S.F. Grant to improve Geology teaching*** 

Grants for Classroom and Laboratory Equipment 

Physical Facilities Aid 

Two Dormitories (Loan) 

Christian Center Renovation and Stage 

Fine Arts-Library Addition-Classroom Complex (Grant) 

Fine Arts-Library Addition-Classroom Complex (Loan) 



Government 


Millsaps' 


share 


share 


$ 137,500 


$ 


64,246 


11,337 


103,307 


11,478 


81,315 


9,500 


6,968 


— 0— 


8,905 


— 0— 


2,000 


— 0— 


8,200 


8,200 


16,100 


16,100 


24,590 


— 0— 


59,685 


59,685 


1,226,000 


87,000 


74,095 


190,574 


850,220 


1,317,441 


383,000 





*National Defense Student Loan 
**NationaI Science Foundation 
***Conducted at Gulf Coast Research Laboratory for College level teachers. 



CAUCUS .... "MR. CHAIRMAN' 



PLATFORM COMMITTEE 



MILLSAPS' 

MOCK REPUBLICAN 

CONVENTION 

Richard M. Nixon emerged the victorious nominee 
in Millsaps' Mock Republican Convention, held in Buie 
Gymnasium March 11-13. The nomination was captured 
by the Nixon forces on the fifth baUot after the tired 
backers of some favorite son candidates withdrew in 
favor of Nixon. New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller 
had been in contention for the first four ballots. 

The students accepted Illinois Senator Charles Percy 
for the Vice-Presidential nomination by acclamation. 





South Carolina Republican Senator Strom Thurmond 
gave the convention's keynote address Monday night. 
Thurmond, a former Governor of South Carolina, ran un- 
successfully for President in 1948 on the States' Rights 
Democrat ticket. His running mate was Governor Field- 
ing Wright of Mississippi. In 1964 Thurmond switched par- 
ty affiliations when the Republicans nominated Barry 
Goldwater. 

The Mock Convention, which was sponsored by the 
Fre-Law Club, gives students an opportunity to partici- 
pate in one of the most important phases of the Ameri- 
can electoral process. The students have been remark- 
ably accurate in their selections. In 1960 John F. Ken- 
nedy was chosen for the presidency, with Lyndon John- 
son his running - mate. In 1964 the Mock convention 
reached an impasse with Barry Goldwater forces leading 
substantially on every ballot, while failing to receive the 
necessary majority after several ballots. Dean Laney de- 
nied the students' request for a suspension of classes on 
the following day, and the convention was adjourned well 
past midnight with the Goldwater forces claiming a 
moral, if not actual victory. 



Sen. Strom Thurmond 




A Special Report 



The 

Plain Fact Is . . 

. . . our colleges and 
universities "are facing 
what might easily 
become a crisis'' 

OUR COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, over the last 20 years, have 
experienced an expansion that is without precedent — in build- 
ings and in budgets, in students and in professors, in reputation 
and in rewards — in power and pride and in deserved prestige. As 
we try to tell our countrymen that we are faced with imminent 
bankruptcy, we confront the painful fact that in the eyes of the 
American people — and I think also in the eyes of disinterested 
observers abroad— we are a triumphant success. The observers 
seem to beUeve — and I believe myself — that the American cam- 
pus ranks with the American corporation among the handful of 
first-class contributions which our civilization has made to the 
annals of human institutions. We come before the country to 
plead financial emergency at a time when our public standing 
has never been higher. It is at the least an unhappy accident of 
timing. 

— McGeorge Bundy 

President, The Ford Foundation 




X 




V 






A Special Report 



A STATE-SUPPORTED UNIVERSITY in the Midwest makes 
/% a sad announcement: With more well-qualified 
r — % applicants for its freshman class than ever be- 
A ^^^fore, the university must tighten its entrance 
requirements. Qualified though the kids are, the univer- 
sity must turn many of them away. 

► A private college in New England raises its tuition 
fee for the seventh time since World War II. In doing 
so, it admits ruefully: "Many of the best high-school 
graduates can't afford to come here, any more." 

► A state college network in the West, long regarded 
as one of the nation's finest, cannot offer its students 
the usual range of instruction this year. Despite inten- 
sive recruiting, more than 1,000 openings on the faculty 
were unfilled at the start of the academic year. 

► A church-related college in the South, whose de- 
nomination's leaders believe in strict separation of church 
and state, severs its church ties in order to seek money 
from the government. The college must have such money, 
say its administrators — or it will die. 

Outwardly, America's colleges and universities ap- 
pear more affluent than at any time in the past. In the 
aggregate they have more money, more students, more 
buildings, better-paid faculties, than ever before in their 
history. 

Yet many are on the edge of deep trouble. 

"The plain fact," in the words of the president of 
Columbia University, "is that we are facing what might 
easily become a crisis in the financing of American higher 
education, and the sooner we know about it, the better 
off we will be." 

THE TROUBLE is HOt limited to a few institutions. 
Nor does it affect only one or two types of 
institution. Large universities, small colleges; 
state-supported and privately supported: the 
problem faces them all. 

Before preparing this report, the editors asked more 
than 500 college and university presidents to tell us — 
off the record, if they preferred — just how they viewed 
the future of their institutions. With rare exceptions, the 
presidents agreed on this assessment: 77;^? the money is 
not now in sight to meet the rising costs of higher educa- 
tion . . . to serve the growing numbers of bright, qualified 
students . . . and to pay for the myriad activities that Amer- 
icans now demand of their colleges and universities. 
Important programs and necessary new buildings are 



A 



LL OF US are hard-put to see where we are going 
to get the funds to meet the educational demands 
of the coming decade. 

— A university president 



being deferred for lack of money, the presidents said. 
Many admitted to budget-tightening measures reminis- 
cent of those taken in days of the Great Depression. 

Is this new? Haven't the colleges and universities al- 
ways needed money? Is there something different about 
the situation today? 

The answer is "Yes" — to all three questions. 

The president of a large state university gave us this 
view of the over-all situation, at both the publicly and 
the privately supported institutions of higher education: 

"A good many institutions of higher learning are 
operating at a deficit," he said. "First, the private col- 
leges and universities: they are eating into their endow- 
ments in order to meet their expenses. Second, the public 
institutions. It is not legal to spend beyond our means, 
but here we have another kind of deficit: a deficit in 
quality, which will be extremely difficult to remedy even 
when adequate funding becomes available." 

Other presidents' comments were equally revealing: 

► From a university in the Ivy League: "Independent 
national universities face an uncertain future which 
threatens to blunt their thrust, curb their leadership, and 
jeopardize their independence. Every one that I know 
about is facing a deficit in its operating budget, this 
year or next. And all of us are hard-put to see where we 
are going to get the funds to meet the educational de- 
mands of the coming decade." 

► From a municipal college in the Midwest: "The best 
word to describe our situation is 'desperate.' We are 
operating at a deficit of about 20 per cent of our total 
expenditure." 

► From a private liberal arts college in Missouri: "Only 
by increasing our tuition charges are we keeping our 
heads above water. Expenditures are galloping to such 
a degree that I don't know how we will make out in the 
future." 

► From a church-related university on the West Coast: 
"We face very serious problems. Even though our tuition 
is below-average, we have already priced ourselves out of 
part of our market. We have gone deeply into debt for 
dormitories. Our church support is declining. At times, 
the outlook is grim." 

► From a state university in the Big Ten: "The bud- 
get for our operations must be considered tight. It is 
less than we need to meet the demands upon the univer- 
sity for teaching, research, and public service." 

► From a small liberal arts college in Ohio: "We are 



on a hand-tcr-mouth, 'kitchen' economy. Our ten-year 
projections indicate that we can maintain our quality 
only by doubling in size." 

► From a small college in the Northeast: "For the 
first time in its 150-year history, our college has a planned 
deficit. We are holding our heads above water at the 
moment — but, in terms of quality education, this can- 
not long continue without additional means of support." 

► From a state college in California: "We are not 
permitted to operate at a deficit. The funding of our bud- 
get at a level considerably below that proposed by the 
trustees has made it difficult for us to recruit staff mem- 
bers and has forced us to defer very-much-needed im- 
provements in our existing activities." 

► From a women's college in the South: "For the 
coming year, pur budget is the tightest we have had in 
my fifteen years as president." 

What's gone wrong? 
Talk of the sort quoted above may 
seem strange, as one looks at the un- 
paralleled growth of America's colleges 
and universities during the past decade: 

► Hardly a campus in the land does not have a brand- 
new building or one under construction. Colleges and 
universities are spending more than $2 billion a year for 
capital expansion. 

► Faculty salaries have nearly doubled in the past 
decade. (But in some regions they are still woefully low.] 

► Private, voluntary support to colleges and univer- 
sities has more than tripled since 1958. Higher educa- 
tion's share of the philanthropic dollar has risen from 
1 1 per cent to 17 per cent. 

► State tax funds appropriated for higher education 
have increased 44 per cent in just two years, to a 1967-68 
total of nearly $4.4 bilhon. This is 214 per cent more than 
the sum appropriated eight years ago. 

► Endowment funds have more than doubled over 
the past decade. They're now estimated to be about $12 
billion, at market value. 

► Federal funds going to institutions of higher educa- 
tion have more than doubled in four years. 

► More than 300 new colleges and universities have 
been founded since 1945. 

► All in all, the total expenditure this year for U.S. 
higher education is some $18 billion — more than three 
times as much as in 1955. 






Moreover, America's colleges and universities have 
absorbed the tidal wave of students that was supposed to 
have swamped them by now. They have managed to ful- 
fill their teaching and research functions and to under- 
take a variety of new public-service programs — despite 
the ominous predictions of faculty shortages heard ten 
or fifteen years ago. Says one foundation official: 

"The system is bigger, stronger, and more productive 
than it has ever been, than any system of higher educa- 
tion in the world." 

Why, then, the growing concern? 

Re-examine the progress of the past ten years, and 
this fact becomes apparent: The progress was great — 
but it did not deal with the basic flaws in higher educa- 
tion's financial situation. Rather, it made the whole en- 
terprise bigger, more sophisticated, and more expensive. 

Voluntary contributions grew — but the complexity and 
costliness of the nation's colleges and universities grew 
faster. 

Endowment funds grew — but the need for the income 
From them grew faster. 

State appropriations grew — but the need grew faster. 

Faculty salaries were rising. New courses were needed, 
due to the unprecedented "knowledge explosion." More 
costly apparatus was required, as scientific progress grew 
more complex. Enrollments burgeoned — and students 
stayed on for more advanced (and more expensive) train- 
ing at higher levels. 

And, for most of the nation's 2,300 colleges and uni- 
versities, an old problem remained — and was intensified, 
as the costs of education rose: gifts, endowment, and 
government funds continued to go, disproportionately, 
to a relative handful of institutions. Some 36 per cent of 
all voluntary contributions, for example, went to just 55 
major universities. Some 90 per cent of all endowment 
Funds were owned by fewer than 5 per cent of the insti- 
tutions. In 1966, the most recent year reported, some 70 
per cent of the federal government's funds for higher 
education went to 100 institutions. 

McGeorge Bundy, the president of the Ford Founda- 
tion, puts it this way: 

"Great gains have been made; the academic profession 
has reached a wholly new level of economic strength, 
and the instruments of excellence — the libraries and 



Drawings by Peter Hooven 




E 



ACH NEW ATTEMPT at a massivc solution has left 
the trustees and presidents just where they started. 

— A foundation president 



laboratories — are stronger than ever. But the university 
that pauses to look back will quickly fall behind in the 
endless race to the future." 

Mr. Bundy says further: 

"The greatest general problem of higher education is 
money .... The multiplying needs of the nation's col- 
leges and universities force a recognition that each new 
attempt at a massive solution has left the trustees and 
presidents just where they started: in very great need." 

THE FINANCIAL PROBLEMS of higher education 
are unlike those, say, of industry. Colleges and 
universities do not operate like General Mo- 
tors. On the contrary, they sell their two pri- 
mary services — teaching and research — at a loss. 

It is safe to say (although details may differ from 
institution to institution) that the American college or 
university student pays only a fraction of the cost of his 
education. 

This cost varies with the level of education and with 
the educational practices of the institution he attends. 
Undergraduate education, for instance, costs less than 
graduate education — which in turn may cost less than 
medical education. And the cost of educating a student 
in the sciences is greater than in the humanities. What- 
ever the variations, however, the student's tuition and 
fees pay only a portion of the bill. 

"As private enterprises," says one president, "we don't 
seem to be doing so well. We lose money every time we 
take in another student." 

Of course, neither he nor his colleagues on other 
campuses would have it otherwise. Nor, it seems clear, 
would most of the American people. 

But just as student instruction is provided at a sub- 
stantial reduction from the actual cost, so is the research 
that the nation's universities perform on a vast scale for 
the federal government. On this particular below-cost 
service, as contrasted with that involving the provision 
of education to their students, many colleges and univer- 
sities are considerably less than enthusiastic. 

In brief: The federal government rarely pays the full 
cost of the research it sponsors. Most of the money goes 
for direct costs (compensation for faculty time, equip- 
ment, computer use, etc.) Some of it goes for indirect 
costs (such "overhead" costs of the institution as payroll 
departments, libraries, etc.). Government policy stipu- 
lates that the institutions receiving federal research grants 




must share in the cost of the research by contributing, in 
some fashion, a percentage of the total amount of the 
grant. 

University presidents have insisted for many years 
that the government should pay the full cost of the re- 
search it sponsors. Under the present system of cost- 
sharing, they point out, it actually costs their institutions 
money to conduct federally sponsored research. This has 
been one of the most controversial issues in the partner- 
ship between higher education and the federal govern- 
ment, and it continues to be so. 

In commercial terms, then, colleges and universities 
sell their products at a loss. If they are to avoid going 
bankrupt, they must make up — from other sources — the 
difference between the income they receive for their ser- 
vices and the money they spend to provide them. 

With costs spiraling upward, that task becomes ever 
more formidable. 

HERE ARE SOME of the harsh facts: Operating ex- 
penditures for higher education more than 
tripled during the past decade — from about $4 
billion in 1956 to $12.7 billion last year. By 
1970, if government projections are correct, colleges and 
universities will be spending over $18 billion for their 
current operations, plus another $2 billion or $3 billion 
for capital expansion. 

Why such steep increases in expenditures? There are 
several reasons: 

► Student enrollment is now close to 7 million — 
twice what it was in 1960. 

► The rapid accumulation of new knowledge and a 
resulting trend toward specialization have led to a broad- 
ening of the curricula, a sharp increase in graduate study, 
a need for sophisticated new equipment, and increased 
library acquisitions. All are very costly. 

► An unprecedented growth in faculty salaries — long 
overdue — has raised instructional costs at most institu- 
tions. (Faculty salaries account for roughly half of the 
educational expenses of the average institution of higher 
learning.) 

► About 20 per cent of the financial "growth" during 
the past decade is accounted for by inflation. 

Not only has the over-all cost of higher education in- 
creased markedly, but the cost per student has risen 
steadily, despite increases in enrollment which might, in 
any other "industry," be expected to lower the unit cost. 

Colleges and universities apparently have not im- 
proved their productivity at the same pace as the econ- 
omy generally. A recent study of the financial trends in 
three private universities illustrates this. Between 1905 
and 1966, the educational cost per student at the three 
universities, viewed compositely, increased 20-fold, 
against an economy-wide increase of three- to four-fold. 
In each of the three periods of peace, direct costs per 
student increased about 8 per cent, against a 2 per cent 
annual increase in the economy-wide index. 




Some observers conclude from this that higher educa- 
tion must be made more efficient — that ways must be 
found to educate more students with fewer faculty and 
staff members. Some institutions have moved in this 
direction by adopting a year-round calendar of opera- 
tions, permitting them to make maximum use of the 
faculty and physical plant. Instructional devices, pro- 
grammed learning, closed-circuit television, and other 
technological systems are being employed to increase 
productivity and to gain economies through larger 
classes. 

The problem, however, is to increase efficiency with- 
out jeopardizing the special character of higher educa- 
tion. Scholars are quick to point out that management 
techniques and business practices cannot be applied 
easily to colleges and universities. They observe, for 
example, that on strict cost-accounting principles, a col- 
lege could not justify its library. A physics professor, 
complaining about large classes, remarks: "When you 
get a hundred kids in a classroom, that's not education; 
that's show business." 

The college and university presidents whom we sur- 
veyed in the preparation of this report generally believe 
their institutions are making every dollar work. There is 
room for improvement, they acknowledge. But few feel 
the financial problems of higher education can be signifi- 
cantly reduced through more efficient management. 

ONE THING seems fairly certain: The costs of 
\ higher education will continue to rise. To 
' meet their projected expenses, colleges and 
universities will need to increase their annual 
operating income by more than $4 billion during the 
four-year period between 1966 and 1970. They must find 
another $8 billion or $10 billion for capital outlays. 
Consider what this might mean for a typical private 



% 




university. A recent report presented this hypothetical 
case, based on actual projections of university expendi- 
tures and income: 

The institution's budget is now in balance. Its educa- 
tional and general expenditures total $24.5 million a 
year. 

Assume that the university's expenditures per student 
vill continue to grow at the rate of the past ten years — 
7.5 per cent annually. Assume, too, that the university's 
enrollment will continue to grow at its rate of the past 
en years — 3.4 per cent annually. Ten years hence, the 
astitution's educational and general expenses would total 
S70.7 million. 

At best, continues the analysis, tuition payments in 

^he next ten years will grow at a rate of 6 per cent a year; 

at worst, at a rate of 4 per cent — compared with 9 per 

ent over the past ten years. Endowment income will 

row at a rate of 3.5 to 5 per cent, compared with 7.7 per 

ent over the past decade. Gifts and grants will grow at 

rate of 4.5 to 6 per cent, compared with 6.5 per cent 

■over the past decade. 

"If the income from private sources grew at the higher 
rates projected," says the analysis, "it would increase 
from $24.5 million to $50.9 million — leaving a deficit of 
$19.8 million, ten years hence. If its income from private 
sources grew at the lower rates projected, it would have 
increased to only $43 million — leaving a shortage of 
$27.8 million, ten years hence." 



In publicly supported colleges and universities, the 
outlook is no brighter, although the gloom is of a differ- 
ent variety. Says the report of a study by two professors 
at the University of Wisconsin: 

"Public institutions of higher education in the United 
States are now operating at a quality deficit of more than 
a billion dollars a year. In addition, despite heavy con- 
struction schedules, they have accumulated a major capi- 
tal lag." 

The deficit cited by the Wisconsin professors is a com- 
putation of the cost of bringing the public institutions' 
expenditures per student to a level comparable with that 
at the private institutions. With the enrollment growth 
expected by 1975, the professors calculate, the "quality 
deficit" in public higher education will reach $2.5 billion. 

The problem is caused, in large part, by the tremendous 
enrollment increases in public colleges and universities. 
The institutions' resources, says the Wisconsin study, 
"may not prove equal to the task." 

Moreover, there are indications that public institutions 
may be nearing the limit of expansion, unless they receive 
a massive infusion of new funds. One of every seven pub- 
lic universities rejected qualified applicants from their 
own states last fall; two of every seven rejected qualified 
applicants from other states. One of every ten raised ad- 
missions standards for in-state students; one in six raised 
standards for out-of-state students. 

WILL THE FUNDS be found to meet the pro- 
jected cost increases of higher education? 
Colleges and universities have tradi- 
tionally received their operating income 
from three sources: /row the students, in the form of tui- 
tion and fees; from the state, in the form of legislative 
appropriations; and from individuals, foundations, and 
corporations, in the form of gifts. (Money from the federal 
government for operating expenses is still more of a hope 
than a reality.) 

Can these traditional sources of funds continue to 
meet the need? The question is much on the minds of the 
nation's college and university presidents. 

► Tuition and fees: They have been rising — and are 
likely to rise more. A number of private "prestige" in- 
stitutions have passed the $2,000 mark. Public institutions 
are under mounting pressure to raise tuition and fees, 
and their student charges have been rising at a faster rate 
than those in private institutions. 

The problem of student charges is one of the most 
controversial issues in higher education today. Some feel 
that the student, as the direct beneficiary of an education, 
should pay most or all of its real costs. Others disagree 
emphatically: since society as a whole is the ultimate 
beneficiary, they argue, every student should have the 
right to an education, whether he can afford it or not. 

The leaders of publicly supported colleges and univer- 
sities are almost unanimous on this point: that higher 
tuitions and fees will erode the premise of equal oppor- 



T 



uition: We are reaching a point of diminishing 
returns. — A college president 



It's hke buying a second home. 



-A parent 



tunity on which public higher education is based. They 
would hke to see the present trend reversed — toward free, 
or at least lower-cost, higher education. 

Leaders of private institutions find the rising tuitions 
equally disturbing. Heavily dependent upon the income 
they receive from students, many such institutions find 
that raising their tuition is inescapable, as costs rise. 
Scores of presidents surveyed for this report, however, 
said that mounting tuition costs are "pricing us out of 
the market." Said one: "As our tuition rises beyond the 
reach of a larger and larger segment of the college-age 
population, we find it more and more difficult to attract 
our quota of students. We are reaching a point of dimin- 
ishing returns." 

Parents and students also are worried. Said one father 
who has been financing a college education for three 
daughters: "It's like buying a second home." 

Stanford Professor Roger A. , Freeman says it isn't 
really that bad. In his book. Crisis in College Finance?, 
he points out that when tuition increases have been ad- 
justed to the shrinking value of the dollar or are related 
to rising levels of income, the cost to the student actually 
declined between 1941 and 1961. But this is small consola- 
tion to a man with an annual salary of $15,000 and three 
daughters in college. 

Colleges and universities will be under increasing pres- 
sure to raise their rates still higher, but if they do, they 
will run the risk of pricing themselves beyond the means 
of more and more students. Indeed, the evidence is strong 
that resistance to high tuition is growing, even in rela- 
tively well-to-do families. The College Scholarship Ser- 
vice, an arm of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
reported recently that some middle- and upper-income 
parents have been "substituting relatively low-cost insti- 
tutions" because of the rising prices at some of the na- 
tion's colleges and universities. 

The presidents of such institutions have nightmares 
over such trends. One of them, the head of a private 
college in Minnesota, told us: 

"We are so dependent upon tuition for approximately 
50 per cent of our operating expenses that if 40 fewer 
students come in September than we expect, we could 
have a budgetary deficit this year of $50,000 or more." 

► State appropriations: The 50 states have appropri- 
ated nearly $4.4 billion for their colleges and universities 
this year — a figure that includes neither the $l-$2 billion 
spent by public institutions for capital expansion, nor 
the appropriations of local governments, which account 



for about 10 per cent of all public appropriations for the 
operating expenses of higher education. 

The record set by the states is remarkable — one that 
many observers would have declared impossible, as re- 
cently as eight years ago. In those eight years, the states 
have increased their appropriations for higher education 
by an incredible 214 per cent. 

Can the states sustain this growth in their support of 
higher education? Will they be willing to do so? 

The more pessimistic observers believe that the states 
can't and won't, without a drastic overhaul in the tax 
structures on which state financing is based. The most 
productive tax sources, such observers say, have been 
pre-empted by the federal government. They also believe 
that more and more state funds will be used, in the fu- 
ture, to meet increasing demands for other services. 

Optimists, on the other hand, are convinced the states 
are far from reaching the upper limits of their ability to 
raise revenue. Tax reforms, they say, will enable states 
to increase their annual budgets sufficiently to meet higher 
education's needs. 

The debate is theoretical. As a staff report to the Ad- 
visory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations con- 
cluded: "The appraisal of a state's fiscal capacity is a 
political decision [that] it alone can make. It is not a 
researchable problem." 

Ultimately, in short, the decision rests with the tax- 
payer. 

► Voluntary private gifts: Gifts are vital to higher 
education. 

In private colleges and universities, they are part of the 
lifeblood. Such institutions commonly budget a deficit, 
and then pray that it will be met by private gifts. 

In public institutions, private gifts supplement state 
appropriations. They provide what is often called "a 
margin for excellence." Many public institutions use such 
funds to raise faculty salaries above the levels paid for by 
the state, and are thus able to compete for top scholars. 
A number of institutions depend upon private gifts for 
student facilities that the state does not provide. 

Will private giving grow fast enough to meet the grow- 
ing need? As with state appropriations, opinions vary. 

John J. Schwartz, executive director of the American 
Association of Fund-Raising Counsel, feels there is a 
great untapped reservoir. At present, for example, only 
one out of every four alumni and alumnae contributes to 
higher education. And, while American business corpora- 
tions gaVe an estimated $300 million to education 



i 





"^ 



i 



) 



/^ 




in 1965-66, this was only about 0.37 percent of their net 
income before taxes. On the average, companies contrib- 
ute only about 1.10 per cent of net income before taxes 
to all causes — well below the 5 per cent allowed by the 
Federal government. Certainly there is room for expan- 
sion. 

(Colleges and universities are working overtime to tap 
this reservoir. Mr. Schwartz's association alone lists 117 
colleges and universities that are now campaigning to 
raise a combined total of $4 billion.) 

But others are not so certain that expansion in private 
giving will indeed take place. The 46th annual survey by 
the John Price Jones Company, a firm of fund-raising 
counselors, sampled 50 colleges and universities and found 
a decline in voluntary giving of 8.7 per cent in 12 months. 
The Council for Financial Aid to Education and the 
American Alumni Council calculate that voluntary sup- 
port for higher education in 1965-66 declined by some 
1.2 per cent in the same period. 

Refining these figures gives them more meaning. The 
major private universities, for example, received about 
36 per cent of the SI. 2 billion given to higher education 
— a decrease from the previous year. Private liberal arts 
colleges also fell behind: coeducational colleges dropped 
10 per cent, men's colleges dropped 16.2 per cent, and 
women's colleges dropped 12.6 percent. State institutions, 
on the other hand, increased their private support by 
23.8 per cent. 

The record of some cohesive groups of colleges and 
universities is also revealing. Voluntary support of eight 
Ivy League institutions declined 27.8 per cent, for a total 
loss of $61 million. The Seven College Conference, a 
group of women's colleges, reported a drop of 41 per cent. 
The Associated Colleges of the Midwest dropped about 



o 



N THE QUESTION OF FEDERAL AID, everybody seems 
to be running to the same side of the boat. 

— A college president 



5.5 per cent. The Council of Southern Universities de- 
clined 6.2 per cent. Fifty-five major private universities 
received 7.7 per cent less from gifts. 

Four groups gained. The state universities and colleges 
received 20.5 per cent more in private gifts in 1965-66 
than in the previous year. Fourteen technological insti- 
tutions gained 10.8 percent. Members of the Great Lakes 
College Association gained 5.6 per cent. And Western 
Conference universities, plus the University of Chicago, 
gained 34.5 per cent. (Within each such group, of course, 
individual colleges may have gained or lost differently 
from the group as a whole.) ^ 

The biggest drop in voluntary contributions came in 
foundation grants. Although this may have been due, in 
part, to the fact that there had been some unusually large 
grants the previous year, it may also have been a fore- 
taste of things to come. Many of those who observe 
foundations closely think such grants will be harder and 
harder for colleges and universities to come by, in years 
to come. 

FEARING that the traditional sources of revenue may 
not yield the necessary funds, college and uni- 
versity presidents are looking more and more to 
Washington for the solution to their financial 
problems. 

The president of a large state university in the South, 
whose views are typical of many, told us; "Increased fed- 
eral support is essential to the fiscal stability of the col- 
leges and universities of the land. And such aid is a proper 
federal expenditure." 

Most of his colleagues agreed — some reluctantly. Said 
the president of a college in Iowa: "I don't like it . . . but 
it may be inevitable." Another remarked: "On the ques- 



tion of federal aid, everybody seems to be running to the 
same side of the boat." 

More federal aid is almost certain to come. The ques- 
tion is. When? And in what form? 

Realism compels this answer: In the near future, the 
federal government is unlikely to provide substantial 
support for the operating expenses of the country's col- 
leges and universities. 

The war in Vietnam is one reason. Painful effects of 
war-prompted economies have already been felt on the 
campuses. The effective federal funding of research per 
faculty member is declining. Construction grants are be- 
coming scarcer. Fellowship programs either have been 
reduced or have merely held the line. 

Indeed, the changes in the flow of federal money to the 
campuses may be the major event that has brought higher 
education's financial problems to their present head. 

Would things be different in a peacetime economy? 
Many college and university administrators think so. 
They already are planning for the day when the Vietnam 
war ends and when, the thinking goes, huge sums of fed- 
eral money will be available for higher education. It is no 
secret that some government officials are operating on 
the same assumption and are designing new programs of 
support for higher education, to be put into effect when 
the war ends. 

Others are not so certain the postwar money flow is 
that inevitable. One of the doubters is Clark Kerr, former 
president of the University of California and a man with 
considerable first-hand knowledge of the relationship be- 
tween higher education and the federal government. Mr. 
Kerr is inclined to believe that the colleges and universi- 
ties will have to fight for their place on a national priority 
fist that will be crammed with a number of other pressing 




c 



OLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES are tougli. They have 
survived countless cataclysms and crises, and one 
way or another they will endure. 

— A college president 



problems: air and water pollution, civil rights, and the 
plight of the nation's cities, to name but a few. 

One thing seems clear: The pattern of federal aid must 
change dramatically, if it is to help solve the financial 
problems of U.S. higher education. Directly or indirectly, 
more federal dollars must be applied to meeting the in- 
creasing costs of operating the colleges and universities, 
even as the government continues its support of students, 
of building programs, and of research. 

IN SEARCHING for a Way out of their financial difficul- 
ties, colleges and universities face the hazard that their 
individual interests may conflict. Some form of com- 
petition (since the institutions are many and the 
sources of dollars few) is inevitable and healthy. But one 
form of competition is potentially dangerous and de- 
structive and, in the view of impartial supporters of all 
institutions of higher education, must be avoided at all 
costs. 

This is a conflict between private and public colleges 
and universities. 

In simpler times, there was little cause for friction. 
Public institutions received their funds from the states. 
Private institutions received their funds from private 
sources. 

No longer. All along the line, and with increasing fre- 
quency, both types of institution are seeking both public 
and private support — often from the same sources: 

► The state treasuries: More and more private insti- 
tutions are suggesting that some form of state aid is not 
only necessary but appropriate. A number of states have 
already enacted programs of aid to students attending 
private institutions. Some 40 per cent of the state ap- 
propriation for higher education in Pennsylvania now 
goes to private institutions. 

► The private philanthropists: More and more public 
institutions are seeking gifts from individuals, founda- 
tions, and corporations, to supplement the funds they 
receive from the state. As noted earlier in this report, 
their efforts are meeting with growing success. 

► The federal government: Both public and private 
colleges and universities receive funds from Washington. 
But the different types of institution sometimes disagree 
on the fundamentals of distributing it. 

Should the government help pay the operating costs of 
colleges and universities by making grants directly to the 
institutions — perhaps through a formula based on enroll- 



ments? The heads of many public institutions are inclined 
to think so. The heads of many low-enrollment, high- 
tuition private institutions, by contrast, tend to favor pro- 
grams that operate indirectly — perhaps by giving enough 
money to the students themselves, to enable them to pay 
for an education at whatever institutions they might 
choose. 

Similarly, the strongest opposition to long-term, fed- 
erally underwritten student-loan plans — some envisioning 
a payback period extending over most of one's lifetime — 
comes from public institutions, while some private-college 
and university leaders find, in such plans, a hope that 
their institutions might be able to charge "full-cost" tui- 
tion rates without barring students whose families can't 
afford to pay. 

In such frictional situations, involving not only billions 
of dollars but also some very deep-seated convictions 
about the country's educational philosophy, the chances 
that destructive conflicts might develop are obviously I 
great. If such conflicts were to grow, they could only sap 
the energies of all who engage in them. 

IF THERE IS INDEED A CRISIS building in American higher 
education, it is not solely a problem of meeting the 
minimum needs of our colleges and universities in 
the years ahead. Nor, for most, is it a question of 
survive or perish; "colleges and universities are tough," 
as one president put it; "they have survived countless 
cataclysms and crises, and one way or another they will 
endure." 

The real crisis will be finding the means of providing 
the quality, the innovation, the pioneering that the nation 
needs, if its system of higher education is to meet the 
demands of the morrow. 

Not only must America's colleges and universities 
serve millions more students in the years ahead; they 
must also equip these young people to live in a world that 
is changing with incredible swiftness and complexity. At 
the same time, they must carry on the basic research on 
which the nation's scientific and technological advance- 
ment rests. And they must be ever-ready to help meet the 
immediateand long-range needsofsociety; ever-responsive 
to society's demands. 
At present, the questions outnumber the answers. 
► How can the United States make sure that its col- 
leges and universities not only will accomplish the mini- 
mum task but will, in the words of one corporate leader. 



N 



OTHiNG IS MORE IMPORTANT than the Critical and 
knowledgeable interest of our alumni. It cannot 
possibly be measured in merely financial terms. 

— A university president 



provide "an educational system adequate to enable us to 
live in the complex environment of this century?" 

► Do we really want to preserve the diversity of an 
educational system that has brought the country a 
strength unknown in any other time or any other place? 
And, if so, can we? 

► How can we provide every youth with as much 
education as he is qualified for? 

► Can a balance be achieved in the sources of higher 
education's support, so that public and private institutions 
can flourish side by side? 

► How can federal money best be channeled into our 
colleges and universities without jeopardizing their inde- 
pendence and without discouraging support either from 
the state legislatures or from private philanthropy? 

The answers will come painfully; there is no panacea. 
Quick solutions, fashioned in an atmosphere of crisis, are 
likely to compound the problem. The right answers will 
emerge only from greater understanding on the part of 
the country's citizens, from honest and candid discussion 
of the problems, and from the cooperation and support of 
all elements of society. 

The president of a state university in the Southwest told 
us: "Among state universities, nothing is more important 



than the growing critical and knowledgeable interest of 
our alumni. That interest leads to general support. It 
cannot possibly be measured in merely financial terms." 

A private college president said: "The greatest single 
source of improvement can come from a realization on 
the part of a broad segment of our population that higher 
education must have support. Not only will people have 
to give more, but more will have to give." 

But do people understand? A special study by the 
Council for Financial Aid to Education found that: 

► 82 per cent of persons in managerial positions or 
the professions do not consider American business to be 
an important source of gift support for colleges and 
universities. 

► 59 per cent of persons with incomes of $10,000 or 
over do not think higher education has financial problems. 

► 52 per cent of college graduates apparently are not 
aware that their alma mater has financial problems. 

To America's colleges and universities, these are the 
most discouraging revelations of all. Unless the American 
people — especially the college and university alumni — 
can come alive to the reality of higher education's im- 
pending crisis, then the problems of today will be the 
disasters of tomorrow. 



The report on this and the preceding 15 
pages is the product of a cooperative en- 
deavor in which scores of schools, colleges, 
and universities are taking part. It was pre- 
pared under the direction of the group listed 
below, who form editorial projects for 
EDUCATION, a non-profit organization associ- 
ated with the American Alumni Council. 



Naturally, in a report of such length and 
scope, not all statements necessarily reflect 
the views of all the persons involved, or of 
their institutions. Copyright © 1968 by Edi- 
torial Projects for Education, Inc. All rights 
reserved; no part may be reproduced without 
the express permission of the editors. Printed 
in U. S. A. 



DENTON BEAL 

Carnegie-Mellon University 

DAVID A. BURR 

The University of Oklahoma 

MARALYN O. GILLESPIE" 

Swarthinore College 

CHARLES M. HELMKEN 

American Alumni Council 

GEORGE C. KELLER 

Columbia University 



JOHN I. MATTILL 

Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

KEN METZLER 

The University of Oregon 

RUSSELL OLIN 

The University of Colorado 

JOHN W. PATON 

Wesleyan University 

ROBERT M. RHODES 

The University of Pennsylvania 



STANLEY SAPLIN 

New York University 

VERNE A. STADTMAN 

The University of California 

FREDERIC A. STOTT 

Phillips Academy, Andover 

FRANK J. TATE 

The Ohio State University 

CHARLES E. WIDMAYER 

Dartmouth College 



DOROTHY F. WILLIAMS 

Simmons College 

RONALD A. WOLK 

The Carnegie Commission on 
Higher Education 

ELIZABETH BOND WOOD 

SHeet Briar College 

CHESLEY WORTHINGTON 

Brown University 



CORBIN GWALTNEY 

Executive Editor 



JOHN A. CROWL 

Associate Editor 



WILLIAM A. MILLER, JR. 

Alanaging Editor 



Events of Note 



SILVER STAR 

AWARDED POSTHUMOUSLY 

The Silver Star has been awarded 
posthumously to Marine Lt. Forrest 
Goodwin, '64, who was the first Mill- 
saps graduate to die in Vietnam. 

According to the citation, Goodwin 
was killed while leading his platoon 
"across twenty-five meters of open 
terrain swept by vicious machine gun 
fire. His inspiring example enabled 
Ills platoon to successfully overrun 
the enemy positions with a minimum 
of casualties. During this engage- 
ment, while courageously leading his 
men, he fell mortally wounded." 



S 




Mrs. Helen Daniel has been a favor- 
ite house-mother since coming to the 
college in 1953. When she moved from 
Ezelle Hall to the new men's dormi- 
tory recently, several former stu- 
dents conducted a campaign to fur- 
nish her new lounge. The effort was 



SUMMER WORKSHOP PLANNED 

Millsaps has announced plans for 
a Summer Workshop in Theatre, 
which will be under the guidance of 
Players' Director Lance Goss. 

Two courses in theatre will be of- 
fered, and they will be open to all 
students, including incoming fresh- 
men. The students enrolled in the 
courses will be expected to participate 
in two productions, which will be stag- 
ed one each semester of the summer 
session. 

Goss plans to do two contemporary 
plays. The second, during the second 
semester, will probably be a musical. 

This will be Millsaps' first work- 
shop venture. 



THIS LOUNGE IS FURNISHED IN HONOH OF 

MRS. HELEN DANIEL 

WBO 

AS DORMITORT HOSTESS 

KEPT nS CIVILIZED WHILE BEING EDUCATED 



MILLSAPS MEN 
19S3-1966 



a success. The lounge has been hand- 
somely furnished, and also has a col- 
or television set. 

Her friends will be happy to know 
that "Mrs. D." is recuperating nicely 
from recent surgery. 



ANOTHER COAST 
STUDY ANNOUNCED 

Millsaps has received $25,000 to un- 
derwrite another conference of col- 
lege teachers to study the Mississip- 
pi Sound. 

The conference, which is officially 
titled "A Short Course in the Ocean- 
ography of Mississippi Sound for Col- 
lege Teachers, will be held June 10- 
29, and will be directed by Dr. Rich- 
ard R. Priddy, chairman of the Mill- 
saps Geology department. 

Twenty - five teachers of biology, 
chemistry, earth science, geology and 
physics will be chosen to participate 
in the conference. One hundred and 
five applications have been received. 
According to Dr. Priddy, preference 
will be given to teachers who can best 
benefit by such a coastal study. 

The course is the fourth to be di- 
rected by Priddy under the auspices 
of the National Science Foundation. 
The three previous conferences, which 
were titled "Geology of the Mississip- 
pi Sound," drew participants from 
throughout the United States and 
Canada. 

FORD FOUNDATION 
DRIVE IN MERIDIAN 

The ambitious campaign to raise 
$3.75 million to match a Ford Foun- 
dation grant of $1.5 million moved in- 
to the Meridian area in March and 
April. Campaign officials were en- 
thusiastic about prospects for success. 

The Meridian campaign was head- 
ed by Thomas R. Ward, widely re- 
spected Meridian attorney. 

Assisting Mr. Ward were Area Vice- 
Chairman W. H. "Billy" Entrekin 
and Arrangements Chairman Law- 
rence Rabb, both of Meridian. 

Millsaps President Dr. Benjamin 
Graves addressed a meeting of Mill- 
saps alumni, parents of students, and 
friends of the college March 19. The 
film "Toward A Destiny of Excel- 
lence" was also shown. 



25 



Plans Announced 
For Alumni Day 
And Sports Banquet 

James J. Livesay, Executive Direc- 
tor of the Millsaps Alumni Associa- 
tion, has announced plans for Alumni 
Day, Saturday, May 4. In conjunction 
with Alumni Day, Millsaps will have 
its first annual All-Sports Award Ban- 
quet, Friday, May 3, at 6:30 P. i\I. in 
the college cafeteria. 

Featured speaker for the sports ban- 
quet will be Bill Wade, Backfield 
Coach of the National Football Lea- 
gue's Chicago Bears. Wade, who was 
a leading NFL quarterback prior to 
his retirement two years ago, will be 
introduced by Doby Bartling of Jack- 
son. 

Prior to Wade's address, five form- 
er Millsaps athletes will be inducted 
into Millsaps' Sports Hall of Fame. 
They are Sam Vick, Claude Passeau, 
Gaines Crawford, Charlie Ward, and 
H. F. Zimoski. 

Vick, who attended Millsaps from 
1914-16, was an outfielder for the New 
York Yankees and the Boston Red 
Sox. While at Millsaps, Vick led the 
Majors to state college championships 
in 1915 and 1916. He was recently in- 
ducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall 
of Fame. 

Passeau is also a former major 
league baseball player and a member 
of the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame. 
He attended Millsaps in 1928-31, and 
later pitched for the Chicago Cubs, 
Pittsburgh Pirates and Philadelphia 
Phillies. His major league record was 
162 victories and 150 losses. 

Gaines Crawford, who graduated 
from the college in 1929, is remem- 
bered as probably the best football 
player ever to wear a Millsaps uni- 
form. Crawford was the standout per- 
former on some good Major teams, 
and coached for many years at Mathis- 
ton and Eupora. A talented athlete in 
all sports, he lettered in four sports 
each of his four years at Millsaps. 

Charlie Ward led Millsaps basket- 
ball teams to successful seasons in the 
late thirties and early forties. A 1941 
graduate and a resident of Pelahat- 
chie. Ward's name is found frequently 
in the Millsaps basketball record 
books. 

A standout college player at Yale 
before entering the coaching ranks, 
Zimoski mentored some of Millsaps' 
most successful football teams. He 
coached at Millsaps during the twen- 
ties. 




Joe W. Bailey, Coffeeville, Presi- 
dent of the Millsaps Associates, is 
shown discussing plans for the As- 
sociates' state-wide "Target: Victory 
Dinner" with College President Dr. 
Benjamin Graves and three area 
Vice-Presidents. 

Mr. Bailey has designated all of 
the Associates' area Vice-Presidents 
to serve as attendance chairmen for 
the event, which will feature an ad- 
dress by Dr. Andrew Holt, President 
of the University of Tennessee. 



Pictured above, from left to right 
are Brevik Schimmel, Rolling Fork 
Bailey, Dewey Sanderson, Laurel 
President Graves, and Roy Black 
Nettleton. 

Area Vice-Presidents not picturec 
are Richard McRae, Jackson, Buc 
Young, Maben, and J. M'. Alford, Mc 
Comb. 

The "Target: Victory Dinner" wil 
be held in the Olympic Room of the 
Heidelberg Hotel on May 23 at 7:0( 
p.m. 



In addition to the Hall of Fame in- 
duction, awards will also be present- 
ed for the 1967-68 competition. 

Athletic Director James A. Mont- 
gomery plans to make the banquet an 
annual affair. The Millsaps Sports Hall 
of Fame is being initiated to "accord 
deserved recognition to athletes who 
have brought honor to our college." 

Following the sports banquet Fri- 
day night. Alumni Day activities are 
expected to draw a large number of 
Millsapsians back to the campus. 

On the Alumni Day agenda are a 
noon barbeque, reunions for Grenada 
and Whitworth Colleges, a Faculty- 
Student Symposium, and the Alumni 
Banquet at 6:00 P. M. in the Boyd 
Campbell Student Center. 

Dr. Ross Moore will speak at the 
banquet. Dr. Moore, who graduated 
from Millsaps in 1923, is the son of 
a member of the college's first facul- 
ty. He is the senior member of the 
faculty, and will soon retire from the 
full-time faculty. 



Dr. Moore's address will be follow 
ed by the induction of the Class o 
1968 into the Alumni Association, anr 
the installation of the new associatioi 
officers. The election has been con 
ducted by a mail ballot. Nominatec 
are H. V. Allen, Jr., '36, and Kenneth 
Dew, '57, both of Jackson, for Presi 
dent; and William O. Carter, '48, G 
C. Clark, '38, William J. Crosby, '61 
Robert Matheny, '42, William S, Mul 
lins. III, '59, and Harmon E. Tillman: 
'52, for Vice President. Three Vict 
Presidents will be chosen. 

The nominees for Secretary are Mrs 
John W. Nicholson (Jo Timberlake 
'41) and Emily Greener, '56, both olt 
Jackson. 

Livesay urged all alumni to makt 
plans to attend the alumni festivities 
The campus has been lovely thi; 
spring, and friends from the faculty 
and student body will be in attendance 

According to Livesay, "There is nci 
time like right now to plan a trip baci' 
to Millsaps. Next year may be ever 
busier." 



26 



Major 
Miscellany 



Before 1900 
Alexander Harvey Shannon, 1898, 
believed to be the senior alumnus of 
the college, is living in Washington, 
D. C. and is enjoying good health. 
Mr. Shannon, who will celebrate his 
ninety-ninth birthday August 6, was 
a minister before entering Millsaps 
in 1894. While a student he served 
as chaplain of the State Penitentiary, 
and after graduation taught English 
at Mississippi A&M College before 
moving to Washington. 

1900-1919 
Sam Vick, '14-'16, has been induct- 
ed into membership in the Mississip- 
pi Sports Hall of Fame. Mr. Vick 
was a standout athlete at Millsaps 
whose most notable performance was 
in baseball as an outfielder. He led 
the Majors' state college champion- 
ship teams in 1915 and 1916 and la- 
ter played in the big leagues with 
the New York Yankees and the Bos- 
ton Red Sox. 

1920-1929 
M. B. Swayze, '26, will step out as 
general manager of the Mississippi 
Economic Council on April 30. He has 
held this position since 1949, and has 
played a significant role in the im- 
proved economy of the state. 

Orrin H. Swayze, '27, was recent- 
ly presented the Golden Deeds Award 
of the Jackson Exchange Club. Mr. 
Swayze, retired Executive Vice-Pres- 
ident and member of the Board of 
Directors of the First National Bank 
in Jackson, has held practically every 
position of leadership in the civic, 
cultural, and reliigious life of Jack- 
son. In March Mr. Swayze was also 
initiated into the Court of Honor of 
Kappa Alpha Order, recognizing his 
[service to the fraternity. 



1930-1939 
Dr. Merrill O. Hines, '31, has been 
named to the Board of Governors of 
the American College of Surgeons. 
Dr. Hines is Medical Director of 
Oschner Clinic in New Orleans and 
has been a member of the faculty 
of Tulane University School of Medi- 
cine since 1945. 

The Board of Trustees of the Gulf- 
port Municipal Separate School Dis- 
trict has approved a four year con- 
tract renewal for Superintendent of 
Schools W. L. Rigby, '32. Rigby is 
presently serving as President of the 
Mississippi Education Association. 

Robert Gordon Grantham, '34, has 
been appointed Chairman of the Lay 
Advisory Board of St. Dominic's Hos- 
pital in Jackson. A former special 
agent for the FBI, he opened the 
Jackson office of the law firm 
Brunini, Everett, Grantham, and Quin 
in 1945. 

Mrs. Laura D. Satterfield Harrell, 

'34, continues to be honored as a 
medical and historical writer. She 
was recently included in the fifth edi- 
tion of Who's Who in American Wom- 
en. Mrs. Harrell is now a research 
and editorial assistant of the Missis- 
sippi Department of Archives and 
History. 

Paul Ramsey, '35, has been appoint- 
ed to a Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Foun- 
dation Visiting Professorship of Ge- 
netic Ethics in the Department of 
Obstetrics and Gynecology at the 
Georgetown University School of Med- 
icine. He is at Georgetown this se- 
mester and will also spend the spring 
semester of 1969 there. He is Harring- 
ton Spear Paine Professor of Chris- 
tian Ethics at Princeton. 



A group of Millsaps alumni got to- 
gether in Indiana during February 
following a service conducted by 
Bishop Ellis Finger, '37. They in- 
cluded Rev. and Mrs. Robert Hunt, 
'53, Rev. and Mrs. Hardy Nail, '56 
(Ivy Wallace, '55), Mr. and Mrs. Da- 
vid Best (Mary Sue Smith, '52), Rev. 
and Mrs. Hubert Barlow, '49, (Bar- 
bara Ann Bell, '49), and Rev. and 
Mrs. Gerald Trigg, '56, (Rose Cun- 
ningham, '57). The group plans an- 
other meeting soon. 

According to Vanderbilt Alumnus 
magazine. Dr. E. Baylis Shanks, '38, 
Chairman of the Mathematics De- 
partment of Vanderbilt University, has 
solved an incredibly complicated sys- 
tem of differential equations to de- 
velop formulas which determine the 
orbits, re-entry, and landing positions 
of space vehicles. The National Aero- 
nautics and Space Administration 
says that Dr. Shanks' formulas rep- 
resent a savings to American taxpay- 
ers of computer time worth $250,000 
a year. 

Mrs. C. C. Germany, Jr. (Roma 
Fern Champanois, '39) , who teaches 
English and Spanish at William Win- 
ans Attendance Center, has been 
honored as a Star Teacher for that 
school. 



1940-1949 

After serving as a roving Pacific 
writer for Copley News Service 
for several years, Joe H. Brooks, '41, 
is now covering the White House and 
Congress and expects to stay in 
Washington. In his previous assign- 
ment he covered the war in Vietnam 
on three occasions. 

Nat S. Rogers, '41, has been named 
Chairman of the Board of Deposit 
Guaranty National Bank in Jackson. 
He has been President of the bank 
since 1958. In December he was also 
elected a director of Mississippi Pow- 
er and Light Company. Mrs. Rogers 
is the former Helen Elizabeth Ricks, 
'42, and the family has three chil- 
dren. 

Lawrence W. Rabb, '42, has recent- 
ly returned from a tour of West Ger- 
many where he and his wife were 
guests of the Federal Republic. Mr. 
Rabb, Meridian attorney, is serving 
the college's "Toward A Destiny of 
Excellence" campaign as Arrange- 
ments Chairman of the Meridian area 
phase. 



27 



Forrest H. Frantz, Sr., '43-'44, has 
written a book which has been pub- 
lished by a subsidiary of Prentice- 
Hall. It is "The Miracle Success Sys- 
tem: A Scientific Way to Get What 
You Want In Life." He and his wife, 
Marie Grubbs, '44, reside with their 
three children at Garland, Texas. 

William T. Haywood, '45-46, Vice- 
President for Business and Finance 
of Mercer University, Macon, Geor- 
gia, is new President of Southern As- 
sociation of College and University 
Business Officers. Mr. Haywood is al- 
so President of the National Associa- 
tion of Educational Buyers. 

Walter R. Bivins, '46, has been ap- 
pointed to the Board of Trustees of 
Hinds Junior College. He has been 
with the Employment Security Com- 
mission since 1936, where he is now 
state director of the Unemployment 
Security Division. 

Robert Nichols, '46, has been ap- 
pointed City Prosecuting Attorney in 
Jackson. A former District Attorney, 
Mr. Nichols has served as Vice-Presi- 
dent of the Mississippi State Bar As- 
sociation. 

William Henry Izard was recently 
appointed Supervising Accountant, 
Classifications, by American Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Company. His 
wife is the former Betty Klumb, 
'47, and they live with their two 



daughters in Murray Hill, New Jer- 
sey. 

The Alumnus of the Year in 1967, 
Dr. Otis A. Singletary, '47, has been 
appointed Executive Vice-Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs of the Univer- 
sity of Texas system. Dr. Singletary, 
who was Director of the Job Corps 
from 1964 to 1966, has been Vice-Pres- 
ident of the American Council on Edu- 
cation. 

Dr. Dennis Roberts, '47, has been 
elected to the Board of Directors of 
the Society for the Preservation of 
Oral Health. Dr. Roberts was Presi- 
dent of the organization in 1967. 

A new appointment has made L. L. 
Brantley, '47, district geophysicist of 
Atlantic Richfield Oil Company's New 
Mexico-Arizona District of the North 
American producing division. Prior to 
receiving the new appointment he was 
senior geophysicist with the Southeast 
Texas Offshore Group in Houston. 

In receiving a promotion to the rank 
of Brigadier General, George M. Mc- 
Williams, '48, became Mississippi's 
first federally recognized officer for 
the Air National Guard. General Mc- 
Williams is deputy chief of staff of 
the Mississippi Air National Guard 
and base detachment commander of 
the Air Guard facility at Thompson 
Field in Rankin County. He is married 



to the former Dorothy Rue Myers, 
'49. 

1950-1959 
Rev. Duncan Clark, '52, pastor ol 
the University Methodist Church al 
Oxford, conducted a pre-Easter Re- 
vival at the Louise Methodist Church 

The Legion of Merit Medal has beer 
awarded to Major Robert E. Blount 
Jr., '53, in ceremonies at the Walter 
Reed Institute of Research, where he 
is assigned as an internist in the De- 
partment of Virus Diseases. Major 
Blount, who is a third generatior 
alumnus of the college, earned the 
medal for exceptionally meritorious 
conduct as Chief of the Medical Serv- 
ice with the 85th Evacuation Hospi- 
tal in the Republic of South Viet- 
nam. The Blounts and their two chil- 
dren live in Wheaton, Maryland. 

Clarence N. Young, '53, has beer 
appointed Senior Vice - President ol 
Britton and Koontz First National 
Bank in Natchez. 

A Student Teacher Achievement 
Recognition Program award winner 
has named Mrs. Hascal Ishee (May 
Ruth Watkins, '54) the teacher who 
made the greatest contribution to this 
scholastic achievement. Mrs. Ishee 
teaches English at Northeast Jones 
Junior High School in Laurel, Missis- 
sippi. 




Dr. Andrew Holt 



Speaker for the Millsaps Associates' 
Target-Victory Dinner May 23 will be 
Dr. Andrew David (Andy) Holt, Presi- 
dent of the University of Tennessee. 
One of America's leading educators, 
Dr. Holt is also one of the nation's 
most popular speakers. Dr. Holt enter- 



tains his audience while informing and 
challenging them. 

He is past President of the National 
Education Association, the highest 
honor that the nation's teachers can 
bestow upon a colleague. 

Under Dr. Holt's leadership the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee has grown sub- 
stantially in size, programs, and pres- 
tige, becoming the twenty-third larg- 
est institution of higher education in 
the nation. 

He has been, successively, an 
elementary teacher, a high school 
teacher and coach, a demonstration 
school principal, a college professor, 
Executive Secretary of the Tennessee 
Education Association, then an ad- 
ministrator at the University of Ten- 
nessee — President since 1959. 



28 



Arthur Pigott, '54-'55, former Vice- 
President of the Pascagoula - Moss 
Point Bank, has been named Presi- 
dent of the Bank of Blountville at 
Prentiss, Mississippi. 

Standard Oil Company of Kentucky 
has appointed^S. Herschel Leech, '55, 
to the position of Jackson division 
sales manager. He and his wife and 
their four children reside in Jackson. 

Rev. James R. McCormick, '57, 
pastor of the Valley Plaza Methodist 
Church in Scottsdale, Arizona, 
preached revival services at the 
Christ Methodist Church in Jackson. 
Rev. McCormick, whose first pastor- 
ate was the Trinity Methodist Church 
in Jackson, is married to the former 
Patricia Chunn, '57. 

Dr. John McEachin, '57, a pedia- 
trician in Meridian, was nominated 
I for the annual Meridian Jaycee Dis- 
I tinguished Service Award. He has al- 
' so played an active role in the Ford 
Foundation matching funds campaign 
in the Meridian and Lauderdale Coun- 
.ty area. His wife is the former Sylvia 
Stevens, '56. 

Capt. Daphne A. Richardson, '57, 

has been graduated from the U. S. 
Air Force Flight Nurse Course at the 
School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks 
Air Force Base, Texas. 

Thomas B. Fanning:, '58, has joined 
fthe Department of Pastoral Care and 
Education of Bryce Hospital, Tusca- 
loosa, Alabama, as a Staff Chaplain. 
jiHe is a former chaplain at the Mis- 
j'sissippi State Hospital at Whitfield. 
The Fannings (Gail Weakley) have 
I one son. 

Mrs. William J. Flathau (Mary 
I Ruth Smith, '58) has been chosen for 
histing in Outstanding Young Women 
of 1967. In recent years she has giv- 
en several dramatic readings for the 
Vicksburg Book Club. 

A study of the mammals of Iran, 
written by Doug M. Lay, '58, has been 
published by the Field Museum of 
Natural History. Mr. Lay was a mem- 
ber of the Street Expedition to Iran 
in 1962-63. He was a Street Expedition 
Fellow and also received a Thomas 
I J. Dee Fellowship from the Field 
Museum for the six-month period re- 
quired for writing the report. He is a 
candidate for a doctoral degree at 
the University of Chicago. 

Phil Payment, '58, has been named 
President of the Magnolia State Sav- 
lings and Loan Association. Mr. and 



Mrs. Payment and their seven chil- 
dren live in Jackson. 

Franz Ryan Epting, '59, was award- 
ed a Ph. D. in Psychology by Ohio 
State University. He is presently an 
Assistant Professor in Psychology at 
the University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Robert E. Gentry, '59, has recently 
been elected to serve as Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Memphis Food Brok- 
ers Association. He is associated with 
the L Guy Williams Company, manu- 
facturers representative, of Memphis. 

Sam E. Scott, '59, has been appoint- 
ed attorney for the Mississippi Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Board. His 
wife is the former Mariella Lingle, 
'60, and they live in Jackson. 

Clifton Ware, '59, performed the 
leading role in the spring production 
of the University of Southern Missis- 
sippi's Opera Workshop. Mr. Ware, 
Assistant Professor of Voice at South- 
ern, is now working toward a Doc- 
tor of Music Performance degree 
from Northwestern. His wife is the 
former Bettye Oldham, '60. 



1960-1967 

Mrs. William J. Burnett of Waynes- 
boro (Mary Carol Caughman, '60) has 
been selected for listing in the 1967 
edition of Outstanding Young Women 
of America. Her husband is Vice 
President and Trust Officer of the 
First State Bank. 

Capt. Russell D. Thompson, '60 is 

on duty at Bien Hoa Air Base, Viet- 
nam. Captain Thompson is a legal of- 
ficer. 

Eugene CouUet, '62, is pursuing a 
directing career in Hollywood, hav- 
ing earned his Masters Degree in 
Theatre from the University of Den- 
ver. He served as assistant to Paule 
Emile Dieber of the Comedie Fran- 
caise for the production of Racine's 
"Phaedra," which was winner of the 
Outer Circle Critics Award as t h e 
best off-Broadway production of 1965. 
He has also appeared in films and 
on television. 

Three young ministers who gradu- 
ated from Millsaps were honored by 
their home church, Summit Methodist 
Church, of Summit, Mississippi, in 
December. Donald Fortenberry, '62, 
is now director of youth work for the 
Methodist Conference. Larry Adams, 
'66, is a graduate student at Duke 
University Divinity School, and John 
Whittington, '67, is a first year gradu- 
ate student at Duke. 



Andre Clemandot, '62, was inducted 
into the Court of Honor of Kappa Al- 
pha in March for his years of serv- 
ice to the fraternity. He is Director 
of Communications with the Cham- 
ber of Commerce in Jackson. 

Jim Leverett, '62, has been signed 
as a member of the 1968 repertory 
company of the American Shake- 
speare Festival in Stratford, Connec- 
ticutt. He has been active in off- 
Broadway productions for the past 
several years. 

J. Ralph Sowell, Jr., '62, has been 
presented the Distinguished Service 
Award by the Jackson Junior Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Sowell represents 
Hinds County in the State legislature, 
and is public relations director and 
instructor at Hinds Junior College. 

Josh Stevens, '62, is Chairman of 
the Highway Committee of the West 
Point Chamber of Commerce. He is a 
member of the law firm Tubb and 
Stevens. 

Lee Roy Goff, '63, has been promot- 
ed to staff representative in the 
Marketing Department headquarters 
of American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company in New York City. 

Linda Lane, '63, a member of the 
faculty of Mississippi College, has 
been selected for listing in the 1967 
edition of Outstanding Young Women 
of America. Miss Lane participated 
in "The Experiment in International 
Living" last summer, spending five 
weeks in Mulhouse, France, and tour- 
ing France with a group of Ameri- 
can and French students. 

Lieutenant Jim Pate, '63, is serv- 
ing as a Navy pilot on the Carrier 
Ranger, stationed in the Gulf of Ton- 
kin. 

W. Eugene Ainsworth, Jr., '64, is 
now the Administrative Assistant to 
Mississippi Congressman G. V. "Son- 
ny" Montgomery. Mr. Ainsworth, who 
recently passed the State Bar Exam- 
ination and has been admitted to prac- 
tice law, was formerly Research Di- 
rector with the Mississippi Economic 
Council. He and his wife (Joy Wil- 
liamson, '66) reside in Alexandria, 
Virginia. 

Paul Keller, '64, math and science 
teacher at Vidalia High School, is the 
recipient of a National Defense Edu- 
cation Act academic year institute 
grant at the University of Florida. 

Curt Lamar, '64, who is an appli- 
cant for a Ph. D. degree in history 
at Louisiana State University, has 
been invited to join Phi Kappa Phi 



29 



Honor Society. Mrs. Lamar is the for- 
mer Dana Townes, '64. 

Lieutenant Paul M. Miller, Jr., '65, 
lias been recognized for fielping his 
unit win the U. S. Air Force Outstand- 
ing Unit Award. Lt. Miller, a missle 
launch officer, is stationed at McCon- 
nell Air Force Base, Kansas. 

Recently named Oxford's Outstand- 
ing Young Educator was Mrs. Gerald 
Jacks (Beth Boswell, '66), who works 
with the only special education class 
in Lafayette County. Her husband 
('65) will receive his law degree from 
Old Miss in August. 

VV. K. "Tim" Journey, Jr., '66, now 
with the Peace Corps in Guatemala, 
has devised a cheap well digging ma- 
chine for use by peasants in that 
country. 

Ward W. Van Skiver, '66, has been 
named to the President's Club of the 
Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Com- 
pany for his outstanding first year 
sales record with the company. The 
Van Skivers (Carolyn Tabb, '66) live 
in Jackson. 




f UTuRi ^i^^^^ 



«n« 



-^^^S^^^^> 



(Children listed in this column must 
be under one year of age. Please re- 
port births promptly to assure publi- 
cation.) 

Bruce Stephen Antley, born Decem- 
ber 30, to Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. 
Antley of Clarksville, Arkansas. Mr. 
Antley graduated in 1955. 

William Alford Barksdale, Jr. born 
November 3 to Mr. and Mrs. William 
A. Barksdale (Kay Barrett, '64). Mr. 
Barksdale graduated in 1964. They are 
living in Jackson. 

Douglas Joseph Beaver, born Janu- 
ary 8, to Cdr. and Mrs. John T. Beav- 
er (Emily Shields, '60) of Waipahu, 
Hawaii. 

Elizabeth Ann Bryant adopted by 
Mr. and Mrs. Willard Bryant (Ann 
Ammons, '48) of San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. She is welcomed by her broth- 
er. Will. 

Martha Rachel Cole born January 



8 to Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Huwitt Cole 
of Richton, Mississippi. Dr. Cole grad- 
uated in 1950. 

Sabrina Jane Cox born November 
17, to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cox (Pen- 
ny Woffard, "62) of Eau Gallic, Flori- 
da. She was greeted by Derrick, 3. 

Jennifer Paine Davis born Novem- 
ber 29, to Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas D. 
Davis (Ina Carolyn Paine, '60) of Au- 
burn, Alabama. 

John Morgan Douglass III born 
March 30, to Mrs. John Morgan Doug- 
lass, Jr. Mr. Douglass graduated in 
1932, Mrs. Douglass is the former 
Eleanor Barksdale. They are living in 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

John Mark Greenough born on July 
28, to Reverend and Mrs. Earl Green- 
ough of Jackson. Reverend Greenough 
graduated in 1956. 

Eric William James born July 5, to 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. James (Sybil 
Foy, '54) of Jackson. Mr. James was 
a member of the Class of 1955. The 
newcomer is welcomed by his broth- 
er, Malcolm J., 2. 

Leslie Elizabeth Lemon born Febru- 
ary 19, to Mr. and Mrs .Brad Lemon 
(Nancy Carol Neyman, '59) of Ocean 
Springs, Mississippi. She is welcomed 
by Kelly, Scott and Jim. 

Brian Scott McMurry born January 
9, to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Manning 
McMurry (Myra Kibler, '63) of Val- 
dosta, Georgia. 

Marion Virginia Milwee, born Feb- 
ruary 19, to the Reverend and Mrs. 
Richard Milwee of Benton, Arkansas. 
Mr. Milwee was a member of the 
Class of 1960. 

Douglas Russell Thompson born on 
January 31, to Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Thompson of Jackson. Mr. Russell 
was a member of the Class of 1959. 

Jeffrey Duran Tomlin born Janu- 
ary 25, to Mr. and Mrs. William Dur- 
and Tomlin of Tupelo, Mississippi. 
Mr. Durand attended Millsaps from 
195(5-1958. The newcomer is welcomed 
by a sister, Jennifer Lynn, 5. 

Marshall Stiles Yates born Novem- 
ber 22, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Yates 
(Gayle Graham, '61) of New 
Brighton, Minnesota. He is welcomed 
by a sister, Natasha, 4. 



NOTE: Persons wishing to have births, 
marriages, or deaths reported in Major 
Notes should submit information to the 
editor as soon after the event as possible. 
Information for "Major Miscellany" should 
also be addressed to Editor, Major Notes, 
Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi 39210. 




Mary Lois Adkins to James Keith' 
Smith, '67. I 

I 

Amanda Fenna Frank, '66, to JohnI 
Berry Stokes. Living in Huntsville, 
Alabama. 

Olivia Mae House, '67, to Robert 
Alaon Tomson, Jr., '66. 

Patricia Miles, '66-67, to James Ed-t 
gar Sandusky, '67. Living in Oxford.l 



Paula Vivian Page, '64, to Charles 
Micheal Singher. Living in Hamburg, 
Germany. 






Elizabeth Jeneanne Sharp, '55, to 
Edward Eugene Story, Jr. 

Carol Ann Walker, '68, to Robert 
Myers Wade. 



In Memoriam 



Edwin T, Calhoun, '30, who died 
March 23. He lived in Jackson. 

Chester E. Hawkins, '58-59, who died 
March 3. He lived in Jackson. 

Frank Buford Hays, Jr., '37-'38, who i 
died January 1. He lived in Co- 
lumbus. ( 

Percy R. Philp, who died January 15. 
He lived in Jackson. I 

Lt. Spencer B. Powers, '64-65, who 
died in Vietnam February 8. He» 
lived in Cary. 

Mrs. W. T. Shrock (MoUie Donald), j 
1885 Whitworth College, who died' 
in November 1966. She lived in 
Goodman. 

Judson W. Smith III, '59, who died 
February 4. He lived in Atlanta, 
Ga. 

Col. James G. Watkins, '17, who died 
January 30. He lived in Sante Fe, 
New Mexico. 

Lt. Richard O. Williams, '60, who died 
in Vietnam January 5. He lived 
in Natchez, Miss. 



30 



When Giving Can Save 



by Philip R. Converse 

Attorney at Law 

Assistant Director of Development 



"Toward A Destiny of Excellence" Through Wise Estate 

Planning 



Anyone who pays income tax knows how much 
money is talcen out of his salary each year. Probably 
something not quite so well known is the size of one 
lump sum that may disappear through the Federal 
estate tax in property passing from one person to an- 
other. I would like to take this opportunity to briefly dis- 
cuss and illustrate how additional income and capital 
can be saved through wise estate planning. 

We shall assume a hypothetical situation and show 
how, through careful planning, you might leave a sizeable 
gift to Millsaps College and yet retain more income for 
your survivors than if you had left a simple will (out- 
right distribution of one's estate to the wife and then 
she in turn leaving everything to the children) as 8 out 
of every 10 Americans do today. 

Many people fail to plan their estate or even draw a 
will because they actually don't know what is included 
in an estate for tax purposes and, consequently, don't 
feel that their meager belongings need that attention. 
For tax purposes, virtually everything you own, control, 
or have rights to, will be considered part of your estate. 
You can make a rough estimate of your own estate by 
including the following: cash in your savings and check- 
ing accounts; stocks, bonds, notes and mortgages; face 
value of life insurance policies, including personal and 
group plans; benefits coming to you as participant in 
pension or profit sharing plans; jointly owned property 
(unless survivor can prove his contribution); homes or 
other parcels of real estate; car, boat and other personal 
possessions; inheritances or trusts, some rights over 
which may be taxable. When you total these items, 
chances are that your estate is worth a lot more than you 
would have thought. 

Our tax laws are designed to encourage the taxpayer 
to give to charitable and worthy causes as defined by 
Section 2055 Subsection (a) of the Internal Revenue Code, 
which reads, "For purposes of the tax imposed by Sec- 
tion 2001, the value of taxable estate shall be determined 
by deducting from the value of the gross estate the 
amount of all bequests, legacies, devises, or transfers 
(including the interest which falls into any such bequest, 
legacy, devise, transfer or power, if the disclaimer is 
made before the date prescribed for the filing of the 
estate tax return)." 

Every estate is allowed a $60,000 exemption and it 
is also possible for a man to pass one-half of his estate, 
after deducting settlement costs, to his wife free of tax. 

Now let's assume a hypothetical situation — the 
Smith family. Mr. Smith has property and other assets 
which had a total value of $250,000 and passes his estate 
under a simple will, i.e., leaving everything to his wife. 
The first loss to Mr. Smith's estate will be the estate 
settlement costs, which in this case will amount to about 
$20,000. The $20,000 figure is based on the national aver- 
age of estate settlement costs, which is 8% and includes 
all final expenses, attorney and executor's fees. Mr. 
Smith can pass one-half of his adjusted gross estate, 
after settlement, by virtue of the marital deduction, thus 
leaving a taxable estate of $115,000. Of this $115,000, Mr. 



Smith's estate is also entitled to the $60,000 exemption 
which is available to every United States citizen or resi- 
dent. Mr. Smith pays estate tax on $55,000 which amounts 
to $8,250, thus leaving his wife a total estate of $221,750. 
($115,000 — $8,250 =$106,250 + $115,000 = $221,750). 

When Mrs. Smith dies, her $221,750 estate will suffer 
a tax of $33,903 plus the 8% settlement cost amounting 
to $17,740, which means her children will have at their 
disposal a total of $170,107. 

Now let us look at the same hypothetical situation 
with one change. Suppose the gross estate again is 
$250,000. The same amount of $115,000 passes tax free 
to his wife and the other $115,000 is taxed as was be- 
fore — $8,250. At this point Mr. Smith set up a trust for 
the remaining $106,750. The trust could be set up so that 
Mrs. Smith could receive the income from this trust for 
the remainder of her life, and then the principal amount 
would pass tax free to Mrs. Smith's children after her 
death. Thus only the $115,000 which passed to Mrs. Smith 
under the marital deduction would be taxed and burdened 
with settlement costs. Settlement costs on the $115,000 
would amount to $9,200 and the tax would be $6,076, 
leaving $99,724 to pass to the children in addition to the 
$106,750 in the trust, making a total of $206,474 available 
to the children after Mrs. Smith's death. So we can see 
with the addition of a trust in contrast to the standard 
simple will, we have saved the children $36,367. 

Now let us take the same hypothesis one step fur- 
ther. Suppose Mr. Smith was also very interested in Mill- 
saps College and wished to provide for his family and 
then set up a scholarship fund at the College. Mr. Smith's 
attorney suggested that he consider making a bequest 
to Millsaps in the amount of 10% of his gross estate, 
which would be $25,000. He wished Millsaps to receive 
this gift following the death of both he and his wife. Un- 
der this arrangement, and because of the gift to Millsaps 
at his wife's death, Mr. Smith's estate gained a charitable 
tax deduction based on the $25,000 gift. 

Again, Mr. Smith's gross estate is $250,000 and after 
deductions his wife received outright $115,000. However, 
the other half of Mr. Smith's estate would be taxable 
only to the extent of $4,232 rather than $8,250 because of 
the charitable g.ift to Millsaps; and the trust for Mrs. 
Smith's benefit would amount to $110,768 instead of 
$106,750. Mrs. Smith would enjoy the same benefits under 
the trust as before but would have more capital working 
for her during her life. Then at her death, taxes and 
costs would be the same, $6,076 and $9,200 respectively. 
Mrs. Smith would leave $99,724 to her children who 
would also receive $85,768 from the trust and Millsaps 
would receive the $25,000 gift. Actually the children would 
receive a total of $185,492 which is $15,000 more than they 
would receive if the same estate was distributed through 
a simple will. 

I have tried to point out just one possible example 
of wise estate planning whereby you can provide for your 
survivors and also help Millsaps College reach her 
"Destiny of Excellence." For further information on re- 
lated matters, please contact me at the Development 
Office at Millsaps College. 



31 



Millsaps College 
Jackson, Miss. 39210 



T e 6 <r 
s w N s M V r 

1031100 SdVSHIlMl 
INVAyaO V AHVl'J SSIW| 



Memories 

of 

Millsaps 

are 

Coffee in the 
Grill, 

Chapel on 
Thursday 
morning, 

Dr. Moore's 
history class. 

The fraternity's 
big formal, 

and 

Preparation for 
Comprehensive 
examinations. 

Here a Millsaps senior co-ed 
studies in the library for her 
» written comprehensive. 

Relive the 
Memories 
of ' 
Millsaps. 
Attend 
Alumni Day 
May 4. 




does not bid you 
enter the house of his wisdom, 
but rather leads you 
threshold 



mm noT^s 



millsaps college 

magazine 

summer, 1968 




your 



mm 



Presidential Views 

hij Dr. Benjamin B. Graves 



Throughout the 78 year history of Millsaps College, 
a common thread of strength has prevailed. This con- 
sistent thread is the high quality of the teaching function 
in the College. Such names as Murrah, Moore, Watkins, 
Hamilton, Mitchell, Swearingen, White, Lin, Craig, Good- 
man, Price, Reicken, Smith, Key, Sullivan, Harrell, and 
Sanders invariably come up in alumni gatherings. These 
people left indelible imprints on the minds of thousands 
of Millsaps alumni. They have been characterized by 
three particular devotions: to their discipline, to the 
student, and to the total institution. 

Other interesting attributes seem to have been versa- 
tility and dedication to their church. Dr. Milton Christian 
White, for example, was a professor of English and ap- 
parently excelled in this discipline. Yet he still found 
time to direct dramatic productions, coach the debating 
team, coach the tennis team, and teach in his church. 
Dr. Ross Moore's talents have similarly ranged over a 
wide spectrum. Though he has gained genuine promi- 
nence as a historian, his initial training and teaching 
responsibilities were in the area of chemistry. Like Dr. 
White, he has been a great contributor to his church and 
to that facet of college student leadership exemplified 
by Omicron Delta Kappa. 

Looking at the college teaching profession from a 
national point of view, there seems to have been a signi- 
ficant shift in the last two decades in the attitudes of 
the teaching profession. The trend is toward a primary 
concern for one's discipline with a lesser concern for the 
student and for the institution. It is especially noticeable 
in the larger institution. This shift, in the opinion of 
many observers, may account for much of the unrest 
and turmoil existing on many college and university 
campuses today. 

Though the trend can be explained by a number of 
factors, perhaps the most important is the reversal in 



the supply and demand situation for college and univer 
sity professors. From the founding of Millsaps in 1890 tc 
a period roughly concomitant with the end of World Wai 
n, the supply of college teachers exceeded the demand 
and institutions could and did expect an element of loyal 
ty toward the student and toward the institution. In the 
last two decades, however, this demand situation has 
completely reversed. The reversal in supply-demanc 
relationships has been felt in many ways, the mosi 
noticeable of which is the rapid increase in faculty salar 
ies. Though this increase is both desirable and necessary 
if the college professor is to remain near an equitable 
position relative to his professional peers in business, in- 
dustry and government, it has created many problems 
for institutions. The smaller private college has ex- 
perienced financial pressures beyond those of most other 
institutions. This pressure is most evident in the recruit- 
ing retention of an outstanding faculty. 

Along with the problem, there is, I think, a unique 
opportunity for the private liberal arts college. Dr. Byron 
Trippet, President of the Independent College Funds of 
America and for many years a very successful Dean 
and President of Wabash College in Indiana, recently 
spoke at Millsaps. He expressed the opinion here that 
our type of college is the remaining place where the 
older tradition of triangular loyalty to the discipline, to 
the student, and to the institution still prevails. He thinks 
this is our great advantage, and I am inclined to agree. 

It shall always be our purpose at Millsaps to main- 
tain the tradition of distinguished and meaningful col- 
lege teaching. Our professors must exert every ounce of 
their energy toward making their contributions a genuine 
experience for the students and a source of pride to the 
institution. By so doing, they will not only contribute 
to the total development of the student but, I think, to 
their own integrity and satisfaction as an individual 
who is making a significant contribution to Millsaps, to 
the State, to the nation and indeed to the world. 



SCHEDULE 

of 

MAJOR 

EVENTS 



August 7-10 
i August 11-16 

I 

.August 19-23 
September 5 
September 7 

I 

September 12 



'■September 14 



September 21 



September 27 



October 4 



October 12 



October 19 



October 30 



"South Pacific" 

IMillsaps Summer Worksiiop in Tlieater 

8:30 p.m., Christian Center Auditorium 

New School for Music (Piano Workshop) 
Christian Center Auditorium and Music Hall 

M, Y. F. Youth Assembly 

Orientation Retreat 

Dormitories open 
Freshman orientation 
Fall rush begins 

Classes meet on regular schedule 

IMillsaps vs. Henderson State 
2:00 p.m., Alumni Field 

Millsaps vs. Sewanee 
(there) 

Millsaps vs. Harding 
2:00 p.m., Alumni Field 

Millsaps vs. Northwood Institute 
2:00 p.m.. Alumni Field 

HOMECOMING 
Millsaps vs. Southwestern 
2:00 p.m., Alumni Field 
Class Reunions 

Millsaps vs. Ouachita 
2:00 p.m.. Alumni Field 

"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum" 

Millsaps Players 

Christian Center Auditorium, 8:15 p.m. 



mm noTts 



millsaps college magazine 
summer, 1968 

MERGED INSTITUTIONS: Grenada 

College, Whitworth College, Millsaps 
College. 

MEMBER: American Alumni Council, 
American College Public Relations As- 
sociation. 

CONTENTS 

4 Professor Ross Moore and the 
Threshold of the Mind 

10 What Millsaps Has Been, and 

Is Now 

14 French Class at Millsaps 

17 Events of Note 

19 Major Miscellany 

22 From This Day 

22 Future Alumni 

22 In Memoriam 

The senior member of the Millsaps 
faculty, Dr. Ross Moore, is going to 
join the college's part-time faculty 
soon. In this issue of Major Notes, 
Ronald Goodbread, a former student 
of Dr. Moore who is now in Graduate 
School working toward his Ph.D., tells 
of the effect Dr. Moore has had on 
the college. The issue also contains 
a reprint of Dr. Moore's address to 
the Alumni Day Banquet, which gives 
some insight into the college as seen 
by this able and loved teacher. 

As Dr. Moore said in his Alumni 
Day address, "In one respect Millsaps 
will not be as good next year because 
Elizabeth Craig will be on halftime." 
Miss Craig, Professor of French, is 
the subject of an interesting article 
found in Major Notes' files which is 
being published in this issue without 
the consent of the unknown author. 

Volume 10 August, 1968 Number 1 



Published quarterly by Millsaps College in 
Jackson, Mississippi. Entered as second class 
matter on October 15, 1959, at the Post Office 
in Jackson, Mississippi, under the Act of Aug- 
ust 24, 1912. 



Wayne Dowdy, '65, Director of Public In- 
formation 
Photographs by Bob Ridgway and Jim Lucas 



Professor Ross Moore 

And The Threshold of the Mind 



by Ronald Goodbread, '66 




Writing about Dr. Ross Henderson Moore ought to 
give the historian an opportunity to implement his sel- 
dom-used reserve of superlatives. It is the paradox of 
human intelligence that we faU to find precise ex- 
pression for those thoughts that are most worthy of 
communication. And those qualities that are mandatory 
to emulate the best of our species are unfortunately 
seldom communicable. Yet even the ordinary reservoir 
of third degree comparisons is over-worked when used 
to describe Professor Moore. The sole solution, perhaps, 
Is to progress the praenomen to "Professor Most." 

It is customary in essays of this nature for the 
author to insert some remark about his inadequacy to 
deal with the topic, so that the subject will seem that 
much greater or more profound and of course, to show 
that the author is endowed with the requisite measure 
of humility. The first purpose is academic and the last 
would be also but for the publication of this little effort 
in the distinguished journal the reader now holds before 
him. The writer, nevertheless, profers his apologies ab 
initio for his failure to select and place his words with 
the finesse and expertise that are essential to do the 
subject justice. The effort, he realizes, as full of respect, 
gratitude and affection as it is, is not adequate. As Mr. 
Justice Frankfurter remarked, "Justice must satisfy 
the appearance of justice." And while inadequate words 
are logicaUy the daughters of the earth, the admirable 
qualities which we praise here in Ross Moore are the 
sons of heaven. The bread, however, is herewith cast 



upon the waters with the sincere prayer that the Eternj 
Father Strong to Save will appreciate it as the best of th 
work that a poor etmylogical miller has to offer on b( 
half of genuine greatness. 

At the outset it should be noted that not always ha 
that greatness been assumed. Shortly after Founder 
Day in 1927, President David Martin Key of MiUsap 
College wrote to the eminent American historian, Di 
WiUiam E. Dodd at the University of Chicago askin 
the Professor to "Give me a frank and confidentij 
statement as to the success and worthwhile-ness of th 
work Mr. Moore has done (on his Master's Degree) . . 
and whether you consider him to have the ability an 
the training to become head of a department of Histor 
Ln a College of Liberal Arts." Unfortunately Dr. Dodd' 
reply has been lost with some of President Key's paper: 
but one might hazard a guess that the requested repoi 
was encouraging for the young professor, who was i 
that time not yet twenty-four years of age. Contrastingly 
thirty-seven years later, there was virtually unanimou 
agreement with the thoughts of Dr. E. ;M. CoUins, Jr 
which were embodied in a letter to Dr. Moore, saying, 
I cannot think of a better goal to which any 
young teacher could aspire than to be more like 
you. For you are one of the rare talents who 
can combine scholarship with warmth, humor, 
and understanding. In my mind you are the em- 
bodiment of all that is good and noble at Millsaps 
College. 



> 




When Ross Moore was enrolled at grad- 
uate school at the University of Chicago, 
Millsaps President David Martin Key wrote 
a faculty member at Chicago asking for "a 
frank and confidential statement as to the 
success and worthwhile-ness of the work 
Mr. Moore has done .... and whether you 
consider him to have the ability .... to 
become head of a Department of History 
in a College of Liberal Arts." 



One is prompted to ask what was the constant, the 
Prime Directive, during those intervening years and 
since then, that has kept Ross Henderson Moore 
synonymous with the institution we all love. 

The student who knows Dr. Moore realizes that 
although he is a man of inspiring intelligence and 
fluent advocacy, the student has learned from this good 
man that vast erudition is no substitute for creative 
imagination. To one trained in Constitutional Law, the 
raison d'etre de Professor Moore recalls the statement 
in the great academic freedom case, Wieman v. Upde- 
graff: "Teachers must fulfill their function by precept 
and practice, by the very atmosphere which they gene- 
rate; they must be exemplars of open-mindedness and 
free inquiry." 

Perhaps Ross Moore can stand firmly in the affirma- 
tion of teaching because he too had an example that 
testified daily for those values he represents to us to- 
day. His father. Dr. James Adolphus Moore, Professor 
and Chairman of the first Department of Mathematics 
and Astronomy at Millsaps College, was recognized as 
a scholar and a gentleman. Upon his loss in 1908, the 
Bobashela eulogized him by remarking that, "So single 
was his aim in life, so constant his devotion to duty, 
and withal so unique was his personality, that he is be- 
come an integral part of the history of Millsaps College." 
Indeed only twelve years of the entire history of Millsaps 
College have passed without a Moore on the campus. 
His son Ross has extended his heritage to the fullest. 



R. H. Moore is constant. He is not fundamentalist. He 
reaches toward the realization of truth in the daily 
performance of his duty. He does not suggest simple 
answers for complex problems, nor is he easy prey for 
the age-old snake-oil medicine peddler who sells sweet- 
tasting colored water panaceas for the ills of academic 
or political society. There is, pointedly, no disposition 
on his part to "Let George do it." 

This aversion to perforated logic, this awareness 
that there are no simple or easy solutions to the in- 
creasingly viscous world that has come about in his 
own lifetime is, perhaps, what led Dr. Moore away from 
the clinical discipline of the chemistry faculty position 
he first occupied on the Millsaps staff in 1923. It moved 
him to the life of the social sciences and the humanities 
and made of him an historian. The same problems that 
first aroused his concern still surround us, as they have 
for all of his lifetime. 

Thirty-six years ago the Chairman of the Department 
of History at Millsaps College was telling students that. 
The acknowledged need in the world today is 
intelligent leadership ... If freshmen could 
realize just how much their own education de- 
pends on individual thinking, they might help us 
to remedy a serious situation . . . People who do 
things alike . . . will learn alike . . . (and) will 
always act alike - so many automatons ... A 
college should be a place where students learn 
to think for themselves .... 



If men are born free, an issue still in doubt in our 
own time, then the duty of a liberal education is to 
help free men to become wise. The rigidity of illiberalism 
will not survive in a true academic community. What 
Dr. Moore was challenging the 1932 freshman class to 
do was to liberate their thinlcing patterns as well as 
their thoughts. If college is not a place for a newer out- 
look it is only a continuation of high school. Although 
no evidence that means were available to carry this 
philosophy into the reality of alteration, diversification, 
and even transformation of the college extant was evi- 
dent, it is a striking fact that each of does indeed re- 
member a different Millsaps, altered, diversified and 
transformed, until today those who advocate policy 
changes are free to do so. In the center of change, how- 
ever, there is the constant: each of us remembers the 
same Ross, Moore. 



Subsequently, today, many other administrative 
circles do not exercise commensurate logic by allowing 
students to be taught to think for themselves and to 
function independently, while at the same time failing 
to allow these lessons to be put into practice within 
their own academic communities. 



Historically the university originated without an 
administration. At least partially its origins were in the 
student guilds of the thirtennth century in which the 
teachers were hired, fired, and directed by the students. 
The larger university system that has since developed 
should function — as Millsaps does today — on an inter- 
personal faculty-student relationship, with emphasis plac- 
ed on the needs and the development of the individual 
student. To the extent that any administration interferes 
with this relationship, to that extent the administration 
has overstepped its practical purpose. 



Perhaps it is partly to avoid this risk altogether 
that Ross Moore has never yielded to the temptation to 
become a college administrator, although that oppor- 
tunity has been offered him (and although that very op- 
portunity is the goal upon which many of us place the 
highest value, intent and aspiration). As is evidenced 
by his Alumni Day Speech, reprinted elsewhere in this 
issue. Dr. Moore defends this point of view with as much 
adamacy as his personality can command. Moreover, 
he has felt this way since he himself was a sophomore 
in college. To him, if the student did not diversify him- 
self he was "wasting his time." He has led in student 
activism and on its behalf by establishing programs 
ranging from Omicron Delta Kappa, to the History 401 
Senior Seminar, to the International Relations Club. He 
has advocated change even when it was hazardous to do 
so. In 1937, the International Relations Club under his 
sponsorship took a step which at that time was nothing 
short of ethnocentric "treason," when the members wir- 
ed Mississippi Senators to vote in favor of the Gavagan 
anti-lynching bill then before the United States Senate. 
"Such a vote will require courage on your part," they 
said, "but will, we believe, reflect the sentiments of 
responsible, clear-thinking Mississippians." In short, as 
one of Dr. Moore's former students pertinantly observ- 
ed, "You see, Ross hasn't changed; the people around 
Ross have changed." 




"He is become an integral part of the history of 
Millsaps College." 



6 




"Teachers must fulfill their function by precept and practice, by the 
very atmosphere which they generate; they must be exemplars of open- 
mindedness and free inquiry." 



Approximately one-half of the Millsaps Student Body 
goes on after the bachelor'3 degree to do graduate and 
advanced graduate work. While this is a great adventure, 
there is also a great liability — particularly for a Mill- 
saps history major. He incurs the risk of meeting for 
the second and third times in graduate school what he 
had already learned as a Junior in college from Dr. 
Moore. He faces the danger of not being exposed to 
many new ideas and concepts. Fresh from the active 
confrontation of an intelligent teacher and an active 
student body, he often finds in the larger university 
people not seeking an education but rather a ticket to 
middle class consumption standards. The desire for suc- 
cess in the pursuit of excellence which characterized 
his period of study with Professor Moore ai that stage 
receives its greatest test. Now the burden br-comes 
especially heavy and the urgency to rest, to cry respite, 
to falter, is agonizing. For those who can survive this 
tribulation the reward is not repose but is fulfillment. 

In this effort the preparation furnished by Ross 



Moore has been unusually successful. In history alone, 
the names of David Donald, John K. Bettersworth, James 
S. Ferguson, Otis A. Singletary, Robert Haynes and the 
late Vernon L. Wharton, are among the most distinguish- 
ed. The Education of Historians in the United States 
presents a list of the colleges and universities which, in 
the period 1936-1956, provided the baccalaureate degrees 
of men receiving the Ph.D. in history. Of the more than 
one thousand accredited institutions of higher learning 
in the United States, Millsaps made the list in the top 
138. This is particularly meritorious since the size of the 
respective departments is a factor which must be taken 
into consideration to achieve an accurate comparison. 
Only four of the colleges whose history departments had 
a better record than the one chaired by Dr. R. H. 
Moore, were smaller than Millsaps in enrollment. All 
of this points to the fact that there is one man who has 
been at least substantially responsible for an atmosphere 
of develpoment and achievement in the profession of 
history. 



He is a man with a non-fundamentalist open- 
mindedness. He lives his doctrine of individual responsi- 
bility and his warnn humaneness testifies for the com- 
mon decency and the dignity of mankind. Through him 
we are caught up here and now in a world of remoter 
horizons, on a tertiary plane of hyperactive and ultra- 
sensitive perception, far removed from the clamour of 
outside society. We know first and foremost that we are 
but ioti on this speck of dust called Earth, far out in 
an ever-expanding universe. To waste the flickering in- 
stant of a lifetime is beneath the dignity of humanity. 
This Ross Moore has taught us. 

There is, therefore, a purpose driving each of his 
students; there is a force that acts a priori which does 
not admit failure, does not allow respite or acquiescence 
to the problems which we set out to ameliorate. We pre- 
ceive as did Alfred Lord Tennyson that 

The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks; 
The long day wanes; the slow moon climbs; the deep 
Moans around with many voices. Come, my friends, 
'Tis not too late to seek a newer world. 

We guide ourselves in the maelstrom of education by the 

inextinguishable star of excellence. 

Leadership is the pursuit of excellence. It is, as 
Professor Vincent Scully of Yale University says, what 
makes the student realize that "You want things done 
that nature doesn't want." It is, as Dr. Ross Moore has 
said, perhaps the world's greatest need today. 

The teaching profession should — but it is the only 
learned profession that does not — - have a definition 
for malfeasance of practice. However, if a guideline 
is ever to be drawn, the framers would profit consider- 
ably by taking a long look at the leadership qualities of 
Ross Henderson Moore. For here is one of academe's 
finest exemplars. 

Many professors throw up a smokescreen of ac- 
ademic regalia and professorial jargon to achieve a 
facade to deflect and dispell questions. Dr. Moore pre- 
sents a demeanor which prompts and encourages in- 
tellectual curiosity. Here is the teacher to whom the 
student professes his ignorance rather than attempting 
to hide it. And it is this profession of ignorance more 
than anything else which contributes to its own demise. 
We become wiser as we recognize our ignorance. 

The student, then, is concerned with feeling even 
more than with knowledge and thought. The flow of in- 
formation and persuasion that comes from the lectures 
of Professor Moore echos in the long, silent chambers 
of the mind and creates in each student a rapport and 
a curiosity. The student who commonly looks at the 
neck of the fellow in front of him, or who spends the 
class period reading and augmenting the inter-fraternity 
memoranda on the desk top, becomes a participator in 
the learning process. The Professor quietly reassures 
the student, with a "Well, I don't believe that had taken 
place yet," in response to an erroneous answer. He en- 
courages response with what the attorney would call 
leading questions. And he binds all this up with his 
most strategic weapon; his contemporary attitude. This 
is not only a lecture style in the first person plural, but 
it is a quality inherent in Millsaps College itself: 
"changing permanence." 




"Ross Moore offers not so much advice on facts, as 
the realization of capacity and the possibility of accom- 
plishment." 



Dr. Moore's constancy does not mean that his is 
the same intelect it was last year, or ten, or forty years 
ago (in spite of the fact that those who knew him in 
1923 say he hasn't changed a bit in physical appearance). 
The scholarship is the same, the animation is perhaps 
tempered more by dignity than by age, but the attitude 
is staunchly contemporary. Here we find a man, who 
can still teach a respectable course in chemistry, making 
history a vital force in the lives of men. This is not to 
suggest that his courses are personality-centered. They 
are not; they are problem-centered. It is, however, his 
personality that facilitates the solving of the problems 
he presents. He does not use the Socratic method very 



8 



much; he explains things with a clarity and lucidity 
that usually comes only in the fourth or fifth draft of the 
expert writer's text. The art of making complex and 
difficult ideas seem clear and easy to groups is the hall- 
mark of the true teacher. He does not present the stu- 
dent with the answers. This, Professor Moore has said, 
is nothing short of pushing buttons on human adding 
machines so that the students will click with the in- 
evitable answers on an examination. What he does is 
to lead the student to the verge of a chain of reasoning 
that enables the astute observer to discover the solution 
even before the final question is concluded. "You know, 
Ross has ways of getting you to do what he wants you 
to do," one of his students recalled. 

In the final analysis the Prime Directive may be 
traced to one feeling that Ross Moore has never let 
pass beyond the scope of his consciousness. He has 
never forgotten what it was like to be a young professor. 
One recalls the words of praise that Dr. Collins had for 
his senior colleague: "I cannot think of a better goal 
to which any young teacher could aspire than to be 
more like you." So that Dr. Moore has been his own 
best example. And like any philosopher worthy of the 
name he discounts it. Similarly, neither has Dr. Moore 
forgotten what it is to be a student, for in every serious 
aspect of the term is what he remains. It is the paradox 
of the student mind that it has a tremendous perception 
for detecting "bull" from the lectern, but it cannot be- 
lieve that the process is reversible. Consequently, not 
only is Dr. Moore's attitude one of utility, but it is also 
one of professional self-defense! 

Complementing this attitude is the fact that Dr. 
Moore takes joy in what he is doing. "Oh he's a born 
teacher," says the matchless Mrs. Moore. "I sometimes 
think that if he had money . . . Ross would actually 
pay for the privilege of teaching." 

Utility, devotion, liberalism, excellence: leadership. 
There can surely be no finer aspect of leadership than 
the one represented in helping a developing mind to 
unfold in the course of a college career. Miraculously 
this is the quality that is mysteriously achieved some- 
where in the relationship between a real teacher and a 
real student. For the student, as he later understands, 
this is even more important than the factual content of 
the coursework. The challenge is not only presented, 
but the will to accept and to execute it is magnified. 
Ross Moore, therefore, offers not so much advice or 
facts, as the realization of capacity and the possibility 
of accomplishment. He teaches us what we ourselves 
will be capable of if we manage our imaginations with 
sufficient devotion and if we are sufficiently ruthless 
toward any cheapening substitute of the real thing. 

Today, as we recognize the cataclysmic change 
around us, and that the existence and implementation 
of constructive challenge must be the basic reasons for 
education, we must also recognize that there are certain 
fundamentals in the world by which even the most 
radical course must be charted. A great many of these 
elemental truths are epitomized in the persoi-.ality and 
career of Dr. Ross Henderson Moore. For it is he, like 
Gibran's Prophet, who "does not bid you enter the 
house of his wisdom, but rather leads you to the threshold 
of your own mind." The challenge to the student must 
lie in that new awareness of how high his own threshold 
is to be. 





"I sometimes think that if he had money, 
would actually pay for the privilege of teaching.' 



Ross 



THE TEXT OF DR. ROSS MOORE'S 
ALUMNI DAY ADDRESS 



Students frequently ask for a review period to re- 
fresh their minds on things they already know. Tonight 
it might be well to have such a session to remind us 
of what Millsaps College has been and is now. You are 
aware that many things have changed and neither the 
buildings, the faculty, nor the student body are per- 
putual — but in a very true sense the essence of Mill- 
saps is the same, in spirit, purpose, and product. How 
can I personalize this better than by saying: Bob 
Matheny — Mark Matheny; Clara Porter Cavett — Lucy 
Cavett; Gene Countiss — Junior and Senior; Garland Hol- 
loman — Floyci Holloman. And soon we will be comparing 
three generations. 

May we continue our review by remembering what 
is the real purpose of an institution of higher learning. 
Merely to impart knowledge does not distinguish it. 
Rather, the aim should be to develop the ability to think 
and this can be done only where discussion is free and 
unfettered, which means academic freedom for both 
faculty and students. 

As Richard Nixon says in the Saturday Review 
(August 27, 1968) : 

Academic freedom is a free society's great- 
est single advantage in its competition with 
totalitarian societies. No society can be great 
without the creative power it unleashes .... 
There is the academic freedom of the student to 
investigate any theory, to challenge any pre- 
mise, to refuse to accept any old shibboleths and 
myths. 

There is a second academic freedom of the 
student to espouse any cause, to engage in the 
cut and thrust of partisian political or social de- 
bate, both on and off campus, without jeopardy 
to his or her academic career. 
And I quote from the Millsaps Purpose: "As an insti- 
tution of higher learning, Millsaps College fosters an 
attitude of continuing intellectual awareness, of toler- 
ance, and of unbiased inquiry, without which true edu- 
cation cannot exist." 



Professors have also become aware of student 
rights and the American Association of University Pro- 
fessors holds that they should be free to examine and 
discuss all questions of interest to them, and to express 
opinions publicly and privately so long as they do not 
disrupt the operation of the institution. 

The real questions are: Is Millsaps College doing 
its job? Are we maintaining high standards? What is 
the record of our products? While our products are not 
like those of General Motors — or should I say FORD — 
they are alive and often kicking. 

It might be appropriate here to go into the usual 
listings about Woodrow Wilson scholarships, etc. But 
you have done your homework and read Major Notes, 
so let me insert only one commercial. 

On this year's Graduate Record examination — in 
comparison with students from all over the nation we 
had three seniors who made the highest scores attain- 
able — 99% — and five others scored above 95, with 
30 as a passing grade. 

What I am suggesting is that while you are evaluat- 
ing Millsaps keep your mind on the really improtant 
things. How well are we educating our students? It is 
so easy to take your eye off the ball and to lose per- 
spective, then denounce the College because we did not 
win all of our games; or complain that there are not 
enough parking places on campus. I am sure no Mill- 
saps graduate would ever do this. 

Work is about to start on a history of Millsaps. I 
am not planning to write it but I do know a little about 
the subject (and I did agree to contribute a chapter on 
Housemothers of Founders' Hall entitled "Founders 
Keepers"). 

Our school has always been safe for diversity and, 
like all other good educational institutions, we have 
people with a variety of ideas and opinions. Many of 
these have represented a minority on campus and defi- 
nitely a minority within the State. 

So let us continue to review our rememberance of 
things past. 



10 



WHAT MILLSAPS HAS BEEN, 

AND IS NOW 




PROFESSOR J. REESE LIN was very unpop- 
ular in his day because he favored free silver. 



Do you remember Free Silver? Professor Lin is 
my authority for the story that he was very unpopular 
for a time because he favored the gold standard. 

Professor Harrell said some people objected when 
Millsaps students built a bonfire on Observatory Hill to 
show that they were in favor of the war with Spain in 
•98. 

Dr. Swearingen and other campus neighbors com- 
plained that our ministerial students had a too highly 
developed appetite for chicken. 

But I arn certainly not going to tell you what went 
on in upper Burton in the twenties. Or during the panty 
raids of the fifties. Some of you can furnish your own 
details and show your souvenirs. 

There was so much dissent over Dr. Kern putting 
on a Shakespeare play that the curtain stayed down for 
years. We later enjoyed tableaux and morality plays, 
and now — Desire Under the Elms. 

Eyebrows were raised when Bertha Ricketts insisted 
on taking Biology in a class of men. And a long-time 
student movement finally got football restored to the 
sports program, thanks to Car], Howarth and others. 

Dr. Julius Crisler withdrew his support from the 
College for a time when he learned that we had com- 
pulsory chapel only four days a week. 

Does anyone here remember Henry Collins' Purple 
and White article on Bilbo? It's a wonder the College 
did not close its doors. Or when students signed peace 
pledges in the thirties to the great chagrin of Major 
Calvin Wells, who came out to denounce them in a long 
chapel speech. 

And later there was the telegram from the Interna- 
tional Relations Club supporting the anti-lynching bill that 
gave us a very bad press. Or Dr. Ferguson's near- 
capture of the Democratic precinct election that made 
headhnes in local papers and raised the oft-repeated 
query — "What's going on at Millsaps?" 



11 



The outcry against Dr. Sullivan's acceptance of the 
theory of evolution came close to proving that an insti- 
tution cannot survive without adjusting to its environ- 
ment. But if we had, Millsaps would no longer be a 
real institution of higher learning. This was part of 
the Fundamentalism-Modernism controversy during 
which a couple of professors were fired, before the days 
of A.A.U.P. 

Did you know that the 1934 Bobashela became a 
"stone" around our neck? President Key had been 
depicted with the body of one of his very primitive an- 
cestors and his reaction was very much to the point. 
In answer to protests from the local press he said that 
if our students were all-knowing and had attained per- 
fect judgment, they would not still be students. 

Millsaps is supposed to have lost thousands of dol- 
lars because President Finger declared that thera were 
no communists at the College and he therefore saw no 
reason for our students to be required to sign the Dis- 
claimer oath. Others censured him for allowing dances 
on the campus. 

The period of the sixties is so recent there is no 
need to continue our review. But we have moved from 
the time when we thought girls had too little hair (in 
the twenties) to the time when men have too much. 
My father wore a beard while he taught here and I 
have threatened to grow one when the College bans 
them. 

Now, what is the purpose of this review? Mainly to 
tell you that Millsaps has always been this way. Never 
in a strait jacket, never insisting on complete conformi- 
ty, and always willing for its faculty and students to 
express their opinions and to espouse unpopular causes 
while hoping they would show some restraint. 

Why has this been true? Because without a large 
degree of tolerance, patience, and freedom we cannot 
develop our ability to think. Surely we cannot contend 
that all these incidents were desirable, useful, or that 
they did not harm the College. But as President Stahr 
of Indiana has said, "We have far too much to lose 
ultimately if we unleash the forces of suppression." 

We are all very much concerned about what is 
happening throughout the world in higher education. The 
spectacular events which are still making headlines 
trouble us deeply. We might despair if we did not keep 
our perspective and realize that these events have oc- 
curred on only a few campuses and were participated 
in by only two or three percent of their students. We 
have had none of this violence at Millsaps and do not 
anticipate any. 

It has been mainly in the large universities where 
students feel that they have been neglected and and are 
not able to communicate with the faculty and administra- 
tion. They complain of being merely the "forgotten" 
of the sixties. Universities have become so big and im- 
personal that mass instruction has taken the place of 
inquiry and the I B M card has become a symbol of 
alienation. 

Harold Howe points out in The New York Times 
(April 27, 1968) that students cannot understand why 
university professors, who are responsible for the reach 
into space, for splitting the atom, are unable to make 
their courses pertinent to the Lives of the students. 

Once again we can be proud to be, as Dr. Smith 
would say, "A small Liberal Arts college." 




I 



DR. FERGUSON'S near-capture of 
the Democratic precinct election rais- 
ed the query "What's going on at Mill- 
saps?" 




"The outcry against DR. SULLIVAN'S acceptance 
of the theory of evolution came close to proving that an 
institution can not survive without adjusting to its 
environment." 



12 




"PROFESSOR HARRELL said some 
people objected when Millsaps students 
built a bonfire on Observatory Hill to show 
that they were in favor of the war with 
Spain in '98." 



Understandably but unfortunately it is the good 
students who cause the trouble. 

Activists usually turn out to be the brightest 
and most articulate students — the top 5 or 10 
per cent who provide much of the effervescence 
on campus. They often are the students with the 
"fire" and the originality — and the grades — 
that admissions officers so assiduously cultivate 
in their freshmen classes. — Newsweek (May 6, 
1968). 

Michigan State secured 560 Merit Scholars to up- 
grade their intellectual atmosphere. A professor said, 
"Let's face it. This was an extra-conservative campus 
until the Merit Scholars came. These kids are disturbing 
a lot of people who need disturbing." 

Scholars are not always tranquil bookworms. But 
even though the maintenance men would be glad if the 
activists went away, the professors would not. 

What are the reasons given for these widespread 
disorders? 

The area of student protest encompasses a 
rising tide of discontent with the curriculum, 
with the lecture system as a method of teaching, 
and with dull or inept professors. I have heard 
singularly little protest against dull or inept 
students. Anne Firor Scott, Duke Alumni Register 
(August, 1967). 

Other reasons range from cafeteria food (they seem 
to want Soul Food at Northwestern), dormitory hours, 
heat in the rooms — to Vietnam and co-ed equality 
(Goodness only knows what can be done about that). I 
am not sure just where this came from. Maybe Colum- 
bia was the germ of the notion. 

You heard of the Barnard co-ed who lied to get to 
live off campus with her boy friend in a strictly un- 



structured relationship. The College came to regret 
that they had not let sleeping co-eds lie, and the final 
punishment was not allowing her to eat in the cafeteria. 
The question is not so much what to do when dis- 
turbances occur, but how to prevent them. This is being 
handled very successfully on many campuses without 
publicity by placing responsibilities on students, listen- 
ing to their grievances, and getting their assistance in 
solving problems. 

Colleges that "freeze-up" and refuse to recognize 
legitimate student rights will continue to have trouble, 
for whereas only one per cent will protest over Vietnam, 
a large number become activists when they feel that 
their requests are not being heard or student rights 
flaunted. 

Time magazine in a recent Essay (May 3, 1968) 
states that the students have taught the administrations 
that some of the proposed changes are good and the 
way to deal with student power is to anticipate it and 
initiate changes before the students demand them. 

We at Millsaps are fortunate in having a relatively 
small student body; a good faculty that is genuinely in- 
terested in the students; together with a willingness to 
change our curriculum and update our procedures. 

Our administration is alert and does listen to student 
opinion and tries to correct grievances, with a determi- 
nation to maintain freedom as well as high standards. 

Dr. Graves does not ask for your sympathy, but he, 
Dean Laney, Dean Christmas, and the College, desperate- 
ly need your understanding and support. 

"One great educator became so infuriated with 
what he called the licentious, outrageous and disgraceful 
behavior of students at his college that he quit in dis- 
gust. The college was at Carthage, the year was A.D. 
383, and the dismayed teacher, as he relates in Con- 
fessions, was St. Augustine. Sometimes students can try 
the patience of a saint." Time (May 3, 1968). 

You may have heard us called "A Candle Burning 
in the Darkness' when Hodding Carter recently paid 
us a very high tribute. I know you have heard it before 
but it deserves frequent repetition. 

Millsaps College is perhaps the most cou- 
rageous institution in the nation . . . and has had 
a difficult time in Mississippi because it has a 
"tradition of relative liberalism." 

It lets its students and its professors speak 
their minds . . . and occasionally has suffered 
for doing so. 

Carter said Millsaps has "survived and at- 
tracted the best student body in Mississippi. 

It has a higher percentage of what I con- 
sider the right people than probably any other 
school in the South . . . They go because Millsaps 
challenges their souls .... 

There is not an institution in the country that 
cannot learn something from this little school in 
Mississippi ... It is a candle burning in the 
darkness." 

The Greenville, S. C. News (April 21, 1967) 

In one respect Millsaps will not be as good next 

year because Elizabeth Craig will be on half-time. But 

in other ways it remains the same. The Sigs still love 

the KA's. 

So let us continue the pursuit of excellence and re- 
member that your college and mine is not perfect. If 
it were we couldn't call it Millsaps. We would call it 
ALL SAINTS. 



13 




MISS CRAIG'S 



FRENCH CLASS 
AT MILLSAPS 



— anonymous 



French class at Millsaps College isn't just French 
class. It's a daily trip to Paris via the vivacious per- 
sonality of the teacher, petite Elizabeth Craig, with a 
Scotch name and a Sorbonne diploma. From her ash- 
blonde hair, just starting to silver, to her heels, she is 
every inch of her five-foot-three a cultured French lady 
who can conjure up for you at the sound of a school 
gong the enchanting city of Paris. 

At her classroom door you are already back in 
French atmosphere, if you really did leave it yesterday. 
Her bulletin board, like a bannerette, flags you with its 
fresh and up-to-date Parisian lore. Has Queen Eliza- 
beth II visited Paris? There will be news clippings and 
perhaps even pictures of the gowns she wore. Another 
day it may be a coat of arms with fleurs-de-lis on a 
field argent. Thus you are' introduced into Miss Craig's 
classroom, her castle, which she adorns as she pleases. 
When Paris was under seige, she even draped it in 
black! You enter, and you are back in France. 

High on the walls are delightful scenes of French 
coast and countryside. Start your journey where you 
will: at a little quaint fishing village in Saint-Malo or 
where swift tides sweep up at Mont-Saint-Michel. Car- 
cassonne with lowered drawbridge invites you, and a 
little farther on you glimpse the rose beauty of Amiens. 

Perhaps your desk is in the back. Then you probably 
sit between a four-foot wrought iron Eiffel Tower and a 
cardboard replica of one of the lamps in the triple 
cluster on Alexandre Trois Bridge. On your left you be- 
hold a large map of France; beneath it is a three dimen- 
sional construction of a Parisian avenue with its shops 
and ancient buildings, with Notre-Dame in the back- 
ground. You stare at the red and yellow map of Paris 
on the front wall or perhaps enjoy the phrases and 



epigrams newly posted to acquaint first year students 
with idiomatic expressions. An out-dated calendar with 
a lithograph of the famous "Marianne" of the Revolu- 
tion catches your eye, another instance of the heart 
having reasons which the head does not know. 

By now Miss Craig, her small coquettish purple hat 
perched high on her head, is calling the roll, in French, 
of course. If mademoiselle does not answer, you may be 
asked, "Ou est votre voisine?" and you'd better know. 
Discussion follows. Now is the time to bring forward 
any French souvenir you happen to have. It will be 
passed around to each student to be examined, even if 
it be only a simple postcard. Anything French is a 
conversation piece at this interval: fashions, current 
movies, and TV. If a remark in French is addressed 
to you and you can't answer, someone else chimes in. 
Even singing may be in order. When the college drama- 
tized "South Pacific," it took no coaxing at all to get 
permission to sing the hit "Dites-moi." Always the last 
period before Christmas is devoted to singing French 
carols and the deep contralto you hear is Miss Craig 
herself. 

"Tiens!" is her equivalent for "tsk" when someone 
is satisfied with mediocre translation, and no jokesters 
need apply. That doesn't mean that there's ever a dull 
moment. If anything like that seems to threaten to hap- 
pen. Miss Craig swiftly siezes her purse and you're ir 
for a few surprises. If it be winter, the purse will be 
black patent leather with gold handles; if spring, white 
emblazoned with French travel stickers. Both are as 
big as suitcases. As one by one the contents are hoisted 
from the depths, she orders: "Nommez les objets!' 
Naming the objects isn't as simple as it sounds wher 
you see dangling before your eyes such unexpected 



14 




articles as phonograph records, last year's license plate, 
a bag of cookies, her grade book, three sets of papers, 

.several bunches of keys, and almost anything else. 

Those papers will receive her own marking, too. 

,That way she knows her student, what he knows, what 
he means, and can watch his daily progress. If it is 

[slow-going for him, he may be called to her office for 
a short conference. She must not let him become dis- 

jcouraged if he is truly working at his lessons. Together 
they locate the difficulty. C'est bien! 

Perhaps you sit between Pierre and Marie and they 
are good friends. You are the one-too-many. Would you 

.mind changing your place? Then they could sit side by 

iside. It is pleasanter so, you understand? You do, and as 
you move to a vacant place by the window, you marvel 
at the keen appreciation and charming respect for young 
love. All students are seated in alphabetical order in the 

I beginning, but if that tends to hinder any affaire de 

Icoeur, those concerned are invited to make it known 

■ privately and the places will be changed. 

Paris with its glittering spectacle of Old World 
majesty — how this little French teacher in her fascinat- 
ting, artistic way whisks you there in the class discus- 

;sions and readings. You forget your surroundings. Today 
you walk with her down Champs-Elysees from Arc de 
Triomphe to Place de la Concorde. Only two blocks 
rnore along a tree-lined avenue and you are at the 
Madeleine. Another day it will be the Louvre or the 
He de la Cite'. She will not let you overlook the stained 
! glass walls of Sainte-Chapelle, built by Saint-Louis to 
house the Crown of Thorns, nor Notre-Dame with its 
rose window and leering gargoyles. Often she will detour 
you to the Hotel des Invalides where Napoleon's tatter- 



ed battle flags still hang. Upon your memory she im- 
prints the picture of his sarcophagus of red porphyry 
until you, too, seem to fall beneath the spell of his power. 
StOl another time it may be just a quiet evening along 
the quay with lights shimmering in the Seine. No matter 
what the place or the hour, her Paris is always enchant- 
ing. 




It will be well for you to become saturated with all 
this because a part of your examination will be this 
special brand of Cook's tour: choice of eight out of 
twelve short paragraphs in French, describing important, 
places in Paris. When you translate, see to it that you 
are accurate. Whatever you do, don't put her loved Sor- 
bonne on the wrong side of the Seine! 

Back to Millsaps for a moment! Sometime during 
the second semester, usually in April, it is customary 
to hold what is called "Faculty Waiter Night." Faculty 
members carry the trays and serve the students. You 
tip generously for mixed motives: politics and charity, 
each teacher donating his "earnings" to a fund to aid 
students in other lands. Guess who takes in the most 
and steals the show in her little black and white outfit 
and frilly cap. She can be hostess at many other times, 
too. From time to time, she entertains her third year 
students at Christmas at a French party at her home. 
You almost wade in French Christmas cards, but you 
enjoy it and so does she. As you advance in your French 
course, you are included more and more in her delight- 
ful, informal gatherings and enjoy the richness of her 
friendship. She is personally interested in each of her 
students, and it is an interest which refines and ennobles. 

Someone has said that you never leave Paris; you 
take it with you. That, with her excellent teaching and 
sterling qualities of character is just what Elizabeth 
Craig has done. She has brought Champs-Elysees to 
Millsaps. Her students are grateful. So are all who have 
the good fortune to know her. 



15 




In May Miss Elizabeth Craig, who will join Millsaps' 
part-time faculty in the fall semester, was honored at a 
reception held in the Boyd Campbell Student Union 
Building. Miss Craig is shown accepting a gift from the 
Alumni Association (above), and from her fellow faculty 
members (below). 




16 



Events of Note 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 
ANNOUNCED 

The Majors will play five home 
football contests this fall, and season 
tickets for these games are now on 
sale. 

Dr. Jim Montgomery, Director of 
Athletics, said that information about 
the fall schedule and an order blank 
for tickets were mailed to alumni in 
July. 

A season ticket for the five game 
home schedule costs $10.00, and may 
be purchased by sending a check or 
money order to Ticket Office, De- 
partment of Athletics, Millsaps Col- 
lege, Jackson, Mississippi 39210. 

The five home games on tap for 
the Majors include Henderson State 
on September 14, Harding College on 
September 27, Northwood Institute on 
October 4, Southwestern-at-Memphis 
on October 12, and Ouachita Baptist 
University on October 19. 

Northwood Institute is the only 
newcomer to the list. The school is lo- 
cated in Cedarville, Texas. 

The Majors' engagement with their 
traditional rivals, the Southwestern 
Lynx, will be Millsaps' Homecoming 
game. 

All of the home games will start at 
2:00 p. m. and will be played in Alum- 
ni Field. 

The Majors schedule also includes 
on-the-road games with S e w a n e e, 
Randolph-Macon, Georgetown, and 
Maryville. 

Head Coach Harper Davis and as- 
sistant Tommy Ranager will welcome 
a squad of forty-six men for fall 
practice. Twenty-three of this number 
will be returning lettermen. 

Last year's team posted a 1-6-1 
record, but Coach Davis looks for the 
experience of this year's team to re- 
sult in an improved season. 



INVESTMENTS 
IN MILLSAPS 

Millsaps President Dr. Benjamin B. 
Graves announced two substantial 
gifts to the college in recent weeks. 

The first was a contribution of $50,- 
000 from the Kresge Foundation of 
Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Graves an- 
nounced the Kresge gift at the Target- 
Victory Dinner, held by the Millsaps 
Associates in May. 

Mr. William H. Baldwin is Presi- 
dent and Trustee of the Kresge Foun- 
dation. Dr. Graves noted that the 
Foundation has given significant fi- 
nancial support to American higher 
education, particularly private, 
church-related institutions. 

A generous gift from the Vickers 
Division of the Sperry-Rand Corpora- 
tion was announced on June 28. 

The manager of Vickers' Jackson 
plant, W. H. Presley, Jr., presented 
the check to Dr. Graves. 

Dr. Graves credited Frank Smith, 
Vice-President of Mississippi Power 
and Light Company, with the initial 
contact with Vickers in soliciting con- 
tributions for the college. 

Sm.ith was a worker in the non- 
alumni phase of the Jackson area 
"Toward a Destiny of Excellence" 
Campaign. The non-alumni campaign 
was headed by Herman Hines, Jack- 
son banker. 



HOMECOMING 
October 12 

Make Plans To Attend! 



MILLSAPS ARTS 

AND LECTURE SERIES 

Newscaster David Brinkley head- 
lines the first season of the Millsaps 
Arts and Lecture Series. The Series' 
Executive Director, Mrs. Armand 
Coullet, announced that other events 
in the Series will involve nationally- 
noted author Eudora Welty, the New 
Orleans Philharmonic Symphohy Or- 
chestra, the Millsaps Singers, and the 
Millsaps Players. 

The Players will open the first sea- 
son on October 30 with "A Funny 
Thing Happened on the Way to the 
Forum." The popular musical will be 
presented through November 2, with 
performances in the Christian Cen- 
ter Auditorium. 

Eudora Welty will give a lecture 
ai.d reading on December 5 in the 
Christian Center Auditorium. Miss 
Welty is the author of a number of 
books of short stories and several 
novels, and has contributed essays 
and articles to various publications. 
She has lectured at many colleges 
and universities, and has been writer- 
in-residence at several of them. A 
few years ago she was writer-in-resi- 
dence at Millsaps. Her next published 
work will be a novel. 

The New Orleans Philharmonic- 
Symphony Orchestra will come to 
Jackson on February 13 to perform 
in the new City Auditorium with the 
Millsaps Singers. The Orchestra, 
which gave concerts in twenty states 
last year, is under the direction of 
Werner Torkanowsky. Torkanowsky 
added another pennant to the Orches- 
tra's banners last August at Phil- 
harmonic Hall, Lincoln Center, New 
York City, where he conducted the 
Mozart Requiem and received a 
standing ovation. Of the eighty-five 



17 



musicians in the orchestra, only one 
of them born in New Orleans, fifty 
are string players. 

The Millsaps Singers are recognized 
as one of the most outstanding col- 
legiate choral groups in the South. 
The Singers are in great demand for 
appearances on their annual tours 
which have taken them to all parts 
of the Nation. The Singers are di- 
rected by Leland Byler. 

On March 12, Lance Goss' Players 
will present Shakespeare's Romeo and 
Juliet in the Christian Center Audi- 
torium. The drama will be presented 
nightly through March 15. 

Brinkley will come to Jackson on 
either April 26 or May 24. The exact 
date and place of his appearance will 
be announced shortly. He is one half 
of the Huntley-Brinkley news team on 
NBC Television that has dominated 
ratings during the 1960's. 

Memberships in the Millsaps Arts 
and Lecture Series are now being 
made available to the public. A mem- 
bership will entitle the holder to ad- 
mission to each of the five events in 
the Series. 



ATTENDS PLANNED 
GIFTS SEMINAR 

The College's Assistant Director of 
Development, Philip Ray Converse, 
attended the Planned Gifts Seminar 
given by Kennedy Sinclaire, In- 
corporated, of Montclair, New Jersey, 
in June. 

Mr. Converse, who works in trusts, 
deferred gifts, and wills, graduated 
from Millsaps in 1964. He received his 
law degree from the Jackson School 
of Law in 1966 and then passed the 
State Bar Examination. He is a mem- 
ber of both the Mississippi and Amer- 
ican Bar Associations. 

The Planned Gifts Seminar is a 
course of intensive study in the meth- 
ods of planned giving. The curriculum 
covers the opportunities for inter 
vivos and deferred gifts, a thorough 
grounding in Federal income, estate, 
and gift taxes, modern methods of 
property distribution, the techniques 
involved in financial planning, and a 
review of will clauses. 

Director of Development J. Barry 
Brindley attended the Seminar in 
1966. The training given Mr. Con- 
verse and Mr. Brindley should prove 
invaluable to those who wish to 
make an investment in the future of 
Millsaps. 




J. C. ANTHONY (above) is the new head basketball coach at Mill 
saps. He replaces Dr. James A. Montgomery, who is devoting full-tim( 
efforts to his duties as Director of Athletics. Coach Anthony, who wil 
also serve the college as Dean of Men, comes to Millsaps from South 
western-at-Memphis, where he assisted in both basketball and football 
Before going to Southwestern, he had an extremely successful recon 
as basketball coach at Greenwood High School. He is a native of Watei 
Valley. 



HISTORY OF COLLEGE 
TO BE WRITTEN 

Materials are now being gathered 
for a book to be published on the his- 
tory of the college. The work is being 
done by Ronald Goodbread, who is 
presently acquiring and cataloging 
these materials in the new Archives 
Room in Murrah Hall on the campus. 

Mr. Goodbread, a 1966 Millsaps 
graduate, has received his Masters 
Degree from the University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro, and has done 
advanced graduate work toward the 
Ph.D. at the University of Georgia. 

The College calls upon alumni and 
friends to contribute to this project in 
the way of materials, information, 
and interviews. Materials can be 
Xeroxed and returned immediately. 

Mr. Goodbread is being assisted in 
the project by Dr. Ross H. Moore. All 
correspondence should be directed to 
Mr. Goodbread at P. O. Box 15406, 
Millsaps College or, after September 
1, to Dr. Moore. 




MR. GOODBREAD 



18 



Major 
Miscellany 



1900-1919 

I A Millsaps graduate who has made 
valuable contributions to the Method- 
ist Church and the civic affairs of his 
community is Dr. B. Z. Welch ('04). 
iDr. Welch recently celebrated h i s 
sixty-second anniversary in the prac- 
tice of medicine. After moving to Bi- 
iloxi in 1915, Dr. Welch was an organ- 
lizer of the Biloxi Chamber of Com- 
merce and Lions Club, and served as 
President of both organizations. He 
Vas recipient of the Biloxi Outstand- 
ing Citizen Award in 1957, and the 
First Methodist Church made him 
Chairman Emeritus of its Official 
Board. 

James A. Cunningham, '06, one of 
the South's most respected attorneys, 
was recently honored by the Missis- 
sippi Legislature for his service to the 
legislature and the law profession in 
Mississippi. Now 94, Mr. Cunningham 
is still active in the practice of law. 
He passed the bar exam in 1906, while 
a member of the first legislative ses- 
sion meeting in the new Capitol build- 
ing. 

Three Millsaps graduates were in- 
volved in a reorganization of the Di- 
vision of Television, Radio, and Film 
Communication of the United Meth- 
!odist Church, in line with organiza- 
itional changes for church agencies, 
voted at the recent Uniting Confer- 
ence in Dallas. The Reverend Jim 
Campbell, '07-'10, will head the sec- 
tion of Media Resources, which will 
include a Department of Communica- 
tion Training and Utilization. This 
department will be directed by the 
Reverend Sam S. Barefield, '46. 
Edgar Gossard, '54, will direct the 
Bureau of Consultation Services. 



Fred Smith, '12, prominent Missis- 
sippi attorney, was the principal 
speaker at the Naturalization and 
Law Day ceremonies in the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court for the Southern District 
of Mississippi on May 1 at Vicksburg. 
Mr. Smith, who has been a trustee of 
the college, has served as Chairman 
of the Board of the Peoples Bank of 
Ripley and as a director of Standard 
Life Insurance Company and the E. 
L. Bruce Company. He has been a 
member of both houses of the Missis- 
sippi legislature, and is a former 
President of the Mississippi Econom- 
ic Council. 

George L. Sugg, '17-'18, who is di- 
rector of public relations for Godwin 
Advertising Agency, was presented 
the Silver Medal Award by the 
Greater Jackson Advertising Club for 
"a lifetime of service spent in the 
highest traditions of the advertising 
profession." He was managing editor 
of the Jackson Daily News before 
joining the Godwin agency. 

1920-1929 

Louise Wilkinson, '27, who teaches 
the third grade at Galloway School in 
Jackson, is retiring after 41 years of 
teaching. Miss Wilkinson, who lives 
near Florence, said that her greatest 
satisfaction in teaching has been the 
success of her pupils who have grown 
up "to make good." Her retirement 
was announced in a lengthy article in 
the Jackson newspaper. 

Major General Robert E. Blount, 

'28, who is Commander of the Army's 
Fitzsimons General Hospital in Den- 
ver, has announced plans to retire 
from active duty. 



Elton B. Whitten, '28, is executive 
secretary of the National Rehabilita- 
tion Association, with headquarters in 
Washington, D. C. He also edits a 
magazine published by the Associa- 
tion. 

1930-1939 

Mrs. Roy Henderson (Adomae 
Partin, '33), children's librarian for 
three years with the Meridian Public 
Library, has resigned to move to New 
York City. She will work in one of the 
branch libraries there. 

The Picayune School Board has an- 
nounced the appointment of B. T. 
Akers, '35, as Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Schools. Akers has been assistant 
to the Director of Activities of the 
Mississippi High School Activities As- 
sociation. 

C. R. Godwin, '35, has been elected 
to the Board of Directors of the Mis- 
sissippi Economic Council. Mr. God- 
win is a prominent businessman in 
Pontotoc and is a director of the Bank 
of Mississippi in Tupelo. 

Dr. Robert D. Moreton, '35, has re- 
ceived the Distinguished Citizen 
Award from Goodwill Industries of 
Houston, Texas. Dr. Moreton is pre- 
sently the assistant director of T h e 
University of Texas M. D. Anderson 
Hospital. He was honored for his con- 
tributions to the rehabilitation of can- 
cer patients. 

The President of the National Office 
Products Association is William G. 
Kimbrell, '38. Mr. Kimbrell is Presi- 
dent of the Office Supply Company in 
Greenville. 

1940-1949 

The Reverend Aubrey B. Smith, '40, 
recently conducted revival services at 
the First Methodist Church in Magee. 
The Reverend Smith is Superintend- 
ent of the Meridian District of the 
United Methodist Church. 

Dr. Gwin J. Kolb ('41), Chairman of 
the Department of English Language 
and Literature at the University of 
Chicago, was recently selected chair- 
man of the Association of Depart- 
ments of English, a group of more 
than 800 college and junior college 
English department chairmen. 

Mrs. Cecil Inman, Jr. (Theo Stovall, 
'40-'41) was guest speaker at the Na- 
tional Life Members Banquet during 
the annual convention of the National 
Council of State Garden Clubs. Her 
presentation was "Art as a Personal 
Experience." Mrs. Inman also recent- 
ly completed costume designs for 
the Jackson Ballet Guild's premier of 
Eudora Welty's "Shoe Bird." 



19 



Walter R. Bivins ('46), director of 
the unemployment insurance division 
of the Mississippi Employment Securi- 
ty Commission, has been elected to 
the Board of Trustees of the Beau- 
voir Shrine. Bivins, who graduated 
from the Jackson School of Law and 
was admitted to the Mississippi Bar 
in 1937, is also a director of the 
Mississippi Bank and Trust Company 
and a trustee of Hinds Junior College. 

The Reverend David A. Harris, '47, 
long-time pastor of Wesley Methodist 
Church in Tupelo, has been appointed 
to the pastorate of the First Method- 
ist Church of Pontotoc. 

The Reverend David A. Mcintosh 

('49) is the new pastor of the Central 
Methodist Church in Meridian. The 
Reverend Mcintosh has held pastor- 
ates at Morton, Scooba, Ridgeland, 
and most recently at Alta Woods 
Methodist Church in Jackson. He is 
married to the former Rosemary 
Thigpen ('46-'49). 

1950-1959 

Dr. William E. Riecken, Jr., '52, a 
flight surgeon with the Mississippi Air 
National Guard, will be in Washing- 
ton, D. C, for six weeks this summer 
on a public health field assigment. 
Dr. Riecken is engaged in graduate 
work at the University of North Caro- 
lina School of Public Health. 

The Reverend Roy H. Ryan, '52, 
has become Director of Middle Adult 
Ministries, General Board of Educa- 
tion of the United Methodist Church. 
He is formerly Associate Minister of 
Lovers Lane Church in Dallas. 

Major James N. Simmons, Jr., '54, 
an orthopedic surgeon, is assigned to 
a unit of the United States Air Force 
at Torrejon Air Base, Spain. 

James W. Lipscomb, III, '56, has 
been named Controller of the Missis- 
sippi Hospital and Medical Service. 
He was formerly assistant controller 
of Duke University. 

Edwin T. Upton, '56, has been 
awarded the Doctor of Education de- 
gree from Syracuse University. He is 
now Minister of Education of the Lov- 
ers Lane Methodist Church in Dallas, 
which has 7,000 members. 

Dr. George Armstrong, III, '57, was 
among key Air Force Reserve Offi- 
cers attending the 39th Annual Aero- 
space Medical Association meeting in 
Miami. Captain Armstrong is chief 
medical resident at the Presbyterian 
Medical Center in Denver. 



The Reverend T. D. Gilbert ('57) 

is now pastor of the J. T. Leggett Me- 
morial Methodist Church in Biloxi. He 
has been at St. John's Methodist 
Church in Yazoo City for the past six 
years. 

Dr. Bill Graham, '58, is a radiolog- 
ist at the 71st Evacuation Hospital at 
Pleiku in the Central highlands of Vi- 
etnam. Presently he is the only radio- 
logist at the hospital that had over 
2,000 patients in the month of March. 
His wife (Betty Garrison, '58) and 
children are living in Ft. Worth. 

Dr. John H. Stone, '58, has recently 
been named Chief Resident in Medi- 
cine at Grady Memorial Hospital in 
Atlanta. The position at the hospital, 
which is the principal teaching facil- 
ity of Emory University School of 
Medicine, carries with it an appoint- 
ment as Instructor in the Department 
of Medicine. After graduation from 
the Washington University School of 
Medicine in St. Louis, Dr. Stone was 
in the Cardiovascular Disease Control 
program of the U. S. Public Health 
Service. For the past two years he 
has been a Fellow in Cardiology at 
Grady Hospital. 

The Reverend and Mrs. John Sharp 
Gatewood (Elizabeth Ann Clark, '59) 
have conducted a three week tour of 
the Holy Land. The Reverend Gate- 
wood, who graduated in '60, is Associ- 
ate Minister of Christ Methodist 
Church of St. Petersburg, Florida. The 
Gatewoods have three children. 

Clayton Taylor Lewis, '59-'61, is 
now practicing law in Philadelphia, 
^lississippi, where he is County At- 
torney. He and Mrs. Lewis (Lynda 
Rhodes, '60-'61) are the proud par- 
ents of two daughters, Lynee and Me- 
lissa Ann. 



1960-1968 

Amory High School's annual year- 
book has been dedicated to Larry 
Marett, '60. Mr. Marett, who earned 
his Masters degree at the University 
of Mississippi, teaches chemistry, 
physics and biology. 

Lee Acres Methodist Church of 
Tupelo has welcomed its new minis- 
ter, the Reverend Donald E. Wild- 
men, '60. The Reverend Wildmon is 
also the author of the weekly news- 
paper column "Whatsoever Things" 
which appears in more than 200 news- 
papers across the United States. 



Jack Ryan, '61, is now handling 
press relations for Ringling Bros, and 
Barnum & Bailey Circus. He was re- 
cently the featured speaker at the an- 
.nual banquet of the Circus Fans As- 
sociation of America, which was held 
in Philadelphia. Ryan described in de- 
tail how the Big Show is rehearsed 
each January in 'Venice, Florida. 

Captain Larry Aycock is on duty at 
Tuy Hoa Air Base, Vietnam. Dr. Ay- 
cock, '62, a medical officer, is a mem- 
ber of the Pacific Air Forces. 

Lewis J. Lord, '62, has been ap- 
pointed Southern division news editoi 
for United Press International. In thii 
job Mr. Lord will direct UPI news 
coverage in eight Southern states. He 
is married to the former Cathryn Col- 
lins, '59. 

Karl D. Smith, '62, has received ar 
NDEA Fellowship for three years 
study toward his doctorate at the Uni 
versify of Alabama. Mr. Smith now 
teaches at Lake High School. 

Captain and Mrs. William Edwarc 
Boiling (Devada Wetmore, '62) arc 
stationed at Fort Benning, Georgia 
Captain Boiling has served two tours 
of active duty in Vietnam and has 
been awarded two Purple Hearts, £ 
Bronze Star, Distinguished Flying 
Cross, several Air Medals, and has 
been recommended for the Silver Star 

James R. Dumas, Jr., '63, has beer 
named to membership in Blue Kej 
National Honor Society at Loyola Uni- 
versity. A sophomore in the Loyolc 
School of Dentistry, Mr. Dumas i: 
president of his class. 

Russell Lyons, Jr., '63, recently re 
turned from Tunisia, North Africa 
where he was engaged in mineral ex 
ploration. He and his wife, the formei 
!\Telne Williamson, are now living ii 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. Russell ii 
now conducting geophysical explora 
tions for petroleum and gas. 

?vlrs. Thomas F. Martin (Suzanne 
DeMoss, '64) has been selected to ap 
pear in the 1967 edition of Outstand 
ing Young Women of America. T h i 
Martins reside in Pikeville, Kentucky 
where he is minister of the Firs 
Christian Church. 

Dr. Don Mitchell, '64, was selectee 
by the graduating students at the Uni 
versify of Mississippi Medical Centei 
as the 1968 Most Outstanding Intern 
He has entered the Air Force as i 
flight surgeon and is stationed at Mc 
Connell Air Force Base, Kansas. H( 
and Mrs. Mitchell (Mary Sue McDor 
nell, '63) recently welcomed a daugh 
ter, Sally Kay. 



20 



1968 

/(^ (i^J^//^((/j/ie</ <fc/if^i'e/rie/i^ Ot /At' fU' iv/o/i »>y'/i/ 
^ fzeu?/f/ff jf<A/i<fr/ 

3 jLoiwvablc <^ Centum ■■■ ImvivveuLeniT^ 






<T?i(/fTf///irfifj/iefea/'ume C ^in€?'cctm C^Uf/>i?u Uof(nc(t 




Among students elected to full mem- 
ership in the University of Mississip- 
li Medical Center chapter of the 
ociety of the Sigma Xi were Peggy 
Coleman, '65, and Lyndle Garrett, '65. 

R. L. Daughdrill, '65, is serving as 
'resident of the Grow With Us Club, 
"he Club is an employee's organiza- 
ion of Deposit Guaranty National 
!ank in Jaclcson. 

Tom Fowlkes ('65), a recent grad- 
ate of the University of Virginia 
chool of Law, will work for a year 
s a clerk for Judge J. P. Coleman 
f the United States Court of Appeals, 
le and Mrs. Fowlkes (Rachel Davis, 
S6) are living in Ackerman. 

Robert E. Lewis, '65, has been ap- 
iointed assistant administrator of Le 
tonheur Children's Hospital. Mr. Lew- 
3, who received his Masters degree 
1 hospital administration from Geor- 



gia State College in Atlanta, will be 
in charge of the hospital's admissions, 
personnel, pharmacy, and business 
office. 

Mrs. Russell Johnson (Ann Webb, 
'65) is now a psychologist in the 
Prince William County, Virginia 
school system. Her husband is on ac- 
tive duty in Vietnam with the Marine 
Corps. 

Ronald A. Atkinson, '66, has been 
awarded the Master of Arts degree in 
Mathematics from the University of 
Alabama. He plans to pursue ad- 
vanced graduate work in math. 

Mary Neal Richerson, '66, has been 
awarded a special fellowship by the 
German government for a year of 
study in Germany. Miss Richerson's 
fellowship will take her to the Uni- 
versity of Tubingen, and the nearby 
Schiller National Museum at 



Marbach, for research on the late 
18th century poet Friedrich Holderlin. 
She is now a graduate student at 
Pennsylvania State University. 

Graham Lewis, '67, has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
Air Force upon graduation from Offi- 
cer Training School at Lackland Air 
Force Base, Texas. 

Millsaps Dye, Jr., '68, is a student 
minister for Methodist Youth this 
summer prior to entering the Candler 
School of Theology at Emory Univer- 
sity in Atlanta. He will be associated 
with the Leland Methodist Church, 
and will be in charge of IMPACT, a 
program for Methodist teenagers. 

Jimmy Waide '68, is employed on 
the staff of United States Senator John 
Stennis during the summer months. 
He will enter Tulane Law School in 
the fall on a three year scholarship. 



21 




Margaret Lee Allen, '67, to James 
Travis Roberts, '63-'64. 

Judy Brown, '68, to Thomas Fenter, 
'66. Living in Jackson. 

Shirley Caldwell, '56, to Charles 
Gerald. Living in Baton Rouge. 

Charlotte Cox, '68, to John Morrow 
III, '66. Living in Jackson. 

Mary Evans Davidson, '68, to "Wil- 
liam Knox Austin, '66. Living in Jack- 
son. 

Susan Duquette, '68, to William 
Mayfield, '66. Living in Jackson. 

Cynthia Ann Felder, '67, to Thomas 
Martin Murphree, Jr., '66. Living in 
Oxford. 

Janice Williams, '66, to Jack Laws. 
Living in Jackson. 

Suzanne Elise Riley, '67, to James 
F. Brown. 




f uTu^i Alp^^N/ 




Lynn Ainsworth, born June 13 to 
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Ainsworth, Jr. 
(Joy Williamson, '66) of Washington, 
D. C. Mr. Ainsworth graduated in 
1964. 

Susan Leigh and Jonathan Neal Blu- 
menthal, born February 1 to Dr. and 
Mrs. Bernard Blumenthal (Janice 
Blumenthal, '61) of Mountain Air 
Force Base, Idaho. The twins are wel- 
comed by brothers Daniel and David. 

Bill Clements, born January 21, to 
Mr. and Mrs. Ronald E. Clements 
(Sarah MoUis Lawson, '52-'54) of 
Memphis. 



Leah Cathryn Collins, 3 months 
old, adopted April 11 by Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy P. ColUns, '60 (Nina Akers Coop- 
er, '61) of EUicott City, Maryland. 
She was welcomed by John Copeland, 
2. 

Susan Dunbar Dowdy, born April 

18, to Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Dowdy 
(Susan Tenney, '66). Mr. Dowdy grad- 
uated in 1965. Living in Jackson. 

David Robert McCarley, born 
March 6, to Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Mc- 
Carley (Mary Grace Cox, '60). Mr. 
McCarley is a 1957 graduate. 

Sally Kay Mitchell, born October 

19, to Dr. and Mrs. Don Mitchell 
(Mary Sue McDonnell, '63) of Mc- 
Connell Air Force Base, Kansas. Dr. 
Mitchell graduated in 1964. 

Kathryn Louise Moreland, born 
May 1, to Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Patrick 
Moreland (Alice Wells, '63). She is 
welcomed by brother Lloyd, Jr. and 
sister Eleanor. The Morelands are 
living in Jackson. 

Mark Alan Thornton, born March 
14, to Mr. and Mrs. Lether Thornton 
(Lynda Grice, '62) of Meridian. 

Derek Sean Waggoner, born March 
8, to Mr. and Mrs. Phillip R. Waggon- 
er (Deborah Miao, '65) of Morgan- 
town, West Virginia. 

Anne Lauren Waits, born April 30 
to the Rev. and Mrs. Jim L. Waits 
(Fentress Boone, '65) of Nashville. 
The Rev. Waits is a 1958 graduate. 

Patrick Joseph Wimbish, born De- 
cember 18 to Mr. and Mrs. Glenn 
Joseph Wimbish, Jr. (Evelyn G o d- 
bold, '56-'58) of Norman, Oklahoma. 
Mr. Wimbish is a 1957 graduate. 
Patrick was welcomed by Megan, 7, 
and Jill, 2. 



In Memoriam 



Prentiss C. Alexander, Sr., '18-'19, 
who died in June. He lived in Bay 
Springs. 

Sallie W. Baley, '15, who died June 
18. She lived in Jackson. 

John R. Bane, '20, who died June 
11. He lived in Jackson. 

Hal T. Fowlkes, a non-alumnus who 
was Vice-Chairman of the Millsaps 
Associates, died April 20. He lived in 
Wiggins. 

Lloyd H. Gates, Sr., '11-'13, who 
died in May. He lived in Jackson. 

Evelyn A. Jackson, '29, who died 
June 5. She lived in Laurel. 

Jesse M. Johnson, '27-'28, who died 
June 4. He lived in Jackson. 

Armand Karow, '35, who died June 
3. He lived in Clinton. 

William Poindexter Kimbrough, a 
non-alumnus who helped build the 
Disciple House dormitory for theologi- 
cal students, died April 28. He lived in 
Gulfport. 

Brigadier General John W. Patton, 
Jr., '16-'17, who died May 14. He 
lived in Jackson. 

A. H. Shannon, 1898, believed to 
have been the oldest living alumnus 
of the college (MAJOR NOTES, May, 
1968), who died May 9. He lived in 
Washington, D. C. 

The Reverend Walter Ranager, '49, 
who died April 29. 



NOTE: Persons wishing to have births, 
marriages, or deaths reported in Major 
Notes should submit information to the 
editor as soon after the event as possible. 
Information for "Major Miscellany" should 
also be addressed to Editor, Major Notes, 
Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi 39210. 



HOMECOMING 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 12 

Millsaps vs. Southv\restern 

2:00 P. M., Alumni Field 

Class Reunions — 1919 (Golden), 1944 (Silver), 
1920, 1921, 1937, 1938, 1939, 
1940, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 



22 



When Giving Can Save 



by Philip R. Converse 

Attorney at Law 

Assistant Director of Development 




"Toward A Destiny of Excellence" 
Through Wise Estate Planning 



According to a recent article in U. S. News and 
World Report, nearly 100 million dollars in cash and 
other assets piled up each week in the state probate 
courts left by people dying without wills. The article 
also said that additional millions probably piled up he- 
cause of undated or unclear wills. 

Less than one-half of the adult population in the 
United States today have wills. Most Americans operate 
under the common fallacy that their estate is not large 
enough to merit writing a will. For estate tax purposes 
all real estate, stocks and bonds, life insurance, jointly 
owned property, mortgages, notes, cash, powers of ap- 
pointment and personal belongings are included in one's 
estate. Recent studies show that in the 1967 calendar 
year, 6.4 million people had estates valued at $60,000 
or more. This is roughly 3.2 per cent of all the people 
filing income tax returns in that year. 



Sound financial planning can save estate, gift, and 
income taxes, plus solving multitudes of personal prob- 
lems for your; family. Everyone ought to take the time 
to periodically review the assets of his or her estate. 
Most people are really quite surprised at what they 
have accumulated through the years. 

Millsaps College is now prepared to work with your 
attorney, accountant and insurance agent to show you 
how you might: increase your disposable income, mean- 
ing more financial security during your life; increase 
the amount of your estate available for distribution to 
your beneficiaries, meaning more financial security for 
your family; conserve the value of your estate through 
professional management and efficient administration. 

If any of these points interest you, please contact 
me at the Development Office, Millsaps College, or 
phone 355-3404. 



23 



O " I- " 



JACKSON . Wl S 
J) 9 ^. 1 6 



Millsaps College 
Jackson. Miss. 39210 




w 



mm mm 



millsaps college 
magazine 
fall, 1968 



SCHEDULE 

of 

MAJOR 

EVENTS 



November 2 
November 9 
November 12 

November 16 

November 23 
December 4 

December 4-7 

December 5 

December 11-14 
December 17 
January 13 
January 15 



Millsaps vs. 
Maryville 



Maryville, Tennessee 



Millsaps vs. Georgetown, Kentucky 
Georgetown 



Ashish Khan and 
Company 



Millsaps vs. 
Randolph-Macon 

High School Day 



Millsaps Heritage 

Series 

Christian Center 

Auditorium 

Ashland, Virginia 



Basketball: Buie Gymnasium 

Millsaps vs. Belhaven 



Play in the round 

Eudora Welty 
(Lecture and 
Reading) 

Play in the round 



Millsaps Players 
Galloway Hall 

Millsaps Arts and 

Lecture Series 

Christian Center 

Auditorium 

Millsaps Players 
GaUoway HaU 



Basketball: Buie Gymnasium 

Millsaps vs. Lambuth 

Basketball: Buie Gymnasium 

MiUsaps vs. Birmingham-Southern 

Basketball: Buie Gymnasium 

Millsaps vs. Southwestern 



Most events held on campus are open 
to the general public. Alumni and 
friends of the college are always wel- 
come at Millsaps. 



c 



(DflJOfl nOT-E! 

millsaps college magazine 
fall, 1968 



MERGED INSTITUTIONS: Grenada 
College, Whitworth College, Millsaps 
College. 

MEMBER: American Alumni Council, 
American College Public Relations As- 
sociation. 

CONTENTS 
3 



10 
27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
35 
35 
35 



A Report from the President 
of the College 

A Report of Giving 

Academic Complex 

Homecoming, 1968 

Honorary 
Strieker 



Degree for 



Millsaps Football 
Events of Note 
Major Miscellany 
In Memoriam 
From this Day 
Future Alumni 



ON THE COVERS 

The front cover depicts the construc- 
tion work which is underway on MiU- 
saps' $2.6 million Academic Complex. 
The building wiU be completed by 
1970. On the back cover, Majors' foot- 
ball coach Harper Davis "gets a ride" 
after Millsaps won its fifth straight 
game of the year, defeating South- 
western at Homecoming 61-8. The 
Majors lost their sixth game to pow- 
erful Ouachita University, but at press 
time for this pubUcation were prepar- 
ing for their final three games, look- 
ing to finish with an 8-1 record. 



Volume 10 November, 1968 Number 2 



Published quarterly by Millsaps College In 
Jackson, Mississippi. Entered as second class 
matter on October 15, 1959, at the Post Office 
in Jackson, Mississippi, un^er the Act of Aug' 
ust 24, 1912. 



Wayne Dowdy, '65, Director of Public In' 

formation 

Photographs by Bob Rldgway 



A Report 

From The President 

Of The College 




BENJAMIN B. GRAVES 

Dr. Benjamin B. Graves has served 
as president of Millsaps College since 
February, 1965. 

He is a graduate of the University 
of Mississippi, has a Master's degree 
in Business Administration from the 
Harvard Graduate School of Business 
Administration, and earned a Doctor 
of Philosophy degree at Louisiana 
State University. 

He taught at LSU, the University of 
Virginia, and the University of Mis- 
sissippi before joining Millsaps. He 
was associated with Humble Oil Com- 
pany for a number of years. 

As an author and lecturer Dr. 
Graves has spoken in fifteen states 
and has been a regular lecturer in 
executive development programs at 
several institutions. 

He is a member of a number of 
professional organizations and is 
active in civic, church, and service 
organizations in Jackson. 

Dr. Graves, a native of Jones Coun- 
ty, Mississippi, is married to the 
former Hazeline Wood and has three 
children. 



Recent reports from campuses throughout the world 
have been a source of dismay and alarm for most of 
us, as we hear of disruptive confrontations between 
students, teachers, and administrators. For the most 
part, these confrontations have solved no problems, and 
have left destruction and dissension in their wake. 

Fortunately, such disruption has not been the case 
at Millsaps College. 1 would be less than honest if 1 
told you that we have had no incidents. However, all 
doors on our campus have been open. Our students have 
responded with maturity to proposals from our faculty 
and administration, while the administration has sought 
to be sensitive to the thoughtful suggestions of faculty 
and students. This climate of open discussion has re- 
sulted in a period of usually quiet, sometimes dynamic 
progress by each segment of the Millsaps College com- 
inunity. Therefore, the past year at the College can 
best be characterized as a time for building, as stu- 
dents, faculty and administration work together to build 
both their individual futures and that of the institution. 



STUDENTS 

On June 2, Millsaps College coinpleted its seventy- 
sixth year with Commencement Exercises in the 
Christian Center Auditorium. Mr. William B. Johnson, 
President of the Illinois Central Railroad, gave the 
Commencement Address, and the Baccalaureate Sermon 
was delivered by Dr. Harvey H. Pothoff, Professor of 
Christian Theology at the Iliff School of Theology. De- 
grees were awarded to 128 men and women in various 
disciplines of the Arts, Sciences and Music. Fifty addi- 
tional students received degrees at the end of the sum- 
mer session in August. 

In keeping with what has become a tradition at 
the College, most of these graduates are continuing their 
study in professional or graduate schools, many of them 
studying under fellowships or scholarships of national 
importance. The 1968 graduating class included one re- 
cipient of a Danforth Fellowship, two NDEA Fellows, 
and two Designates for the Woodrow Wilson National 
Fellowships (out of a total of five awarded to seniors 
in all colleges and universities in the State of Mississip- 
pi). 



An indication of the calibre of students which Mill- 
saps attracts and the quality of the education which 
these students receive at the College can be gained 
from the results of the Graduate Record Examination, a 
graduation requirement of all Millsaps students. At 
most other schools, this examination is given to only 
those students who plan to enter graduate schools. When 
compared with other graduating students, the 1968 Mill- 
saps class scored an average 64.14 percentile. Our grad- 
uates have consistently recorded scores which rank 
well into the upper half of those taking the test na- 
tion-wide. 



Enrollment 

Evidencing the growth of Millsaps' student com- 
munity, 277 young men and women enrolled in Septem- 
ber in the largest freshman class in the College's his- 
tory. Until now, the 1965-66 freshman class had been the 
largest with 260 members. The current freshman class 
is a most promising one. Of Mississippi's seven Na- 
tional Merit winners who chose to attend college within 
the state, three have enrolled at Millsaps. Of last year's 
five high school seniors who won National Council of 
Teachers of English Awards, four chose Millsaps for 
their higher education. In all, twenty National Merit 
finalists and six National Merit commended students 
are members of our current freshman class. 

That Millsaps' primary area of service continues to 
be the State of Mississippi is reflected by the fact that 
seventy-five percent of the members of our freshman 
class came from within the state. However, our receipt 
of the Ford Foundation Challenge Grant as a "regional 
center of excellence" has done much to enhance the col- 
lege's reputation in other areas, and our recruiting ef- 
forts in other states meet with increasing success with 
each passing year. Fourteen different states are repre- 
sented in this .vear's freshman class. During the 1967-68 
sessions twenty-seven states and four foreign countries 
were represented in the student body. 

Enrollment during the 1967-68 sessions of the college 
was the largest in its history, with 935 students enrolled 
in the fall term and 940 in the spring term. Our enroll- 
ment has continued to increase in the 1968 fall semester, 
despite a regrettable but absolutely necessary tuition in- 
crease. Nine hundred and sixty-one students are cur- 
rently enrolled, which is the largest total ever for the 
college. In coming years, Millsaps will seek to gradual- 
ly increase its enrollment, provided we are able to ac- 
complish this without compromising our present admis- 
sion requirements. We are looking toward a goal of 
1500 students by 1975. 



Student Activities 

The Millsaps Troubadours have been selected by the 
United Service Organization for an entertainment tour 
of military installations in the European Command. 
This is the fourth time in recent years that the Trouba- 
dours were given such an invitation. In the spring, the 
Millsaps Singers toured eight states, and each of their 
concerts was received with enthusiasm, as were the 
performances of the Millsaps Players, who completed 
another successful year. 







v-?. 










^■-^^h 






The students became involved this spring in a Mock 
Republican Convention, a traditional election year ex- 
ercise in politics sponsored by the students. Senator 
Strom Thurmond of South Carolina visited the campus 
to deliver the Mock Convention's keynote address. 

In lieu of the traditional chapel requirement, the 
Millsaps Series is novi' offering convocations, lectures, 
music, drama, and art on a voluntary attendance basis. 
The response from students has been most encouraging. 



Athletics 

Dr. James A. Montgomery will now devote all his 
efforts to his duties as Director of Athletics. Under Dr. 
Montgomery, the intercollegiate and intramural sports 
programs will offer the opportunity for competitive par- 
ticipation to the entire student body. During the 1967-68 
school year, it is estimated that more than one half of 
our students participated in some intramural or inter- 
collegiate athletic competition. J. C. Anthony replaced 
Dr. Montgomery as Head Basketball Coach. He will also 
serve as Dean of Men. 

Millsaps continues to offer financial assistance to de- 
serving young athletes through the Diamond Anniver- 
sary Scholarships, and has been successful in attracting 
capable scholar-athletes to the school. 

The college's athletic program has outgrown its 
present facilities, and the Board of Trustees recently 
authorized a study of the needs of the Physical Edu- 
cation Department. An architectural firm has been re- 
tained, and an area of fourteen acres has been set 
aside for future development of these needed athletic 
facilities. 



Financial Aid 

Through the generosity of the college's supporters, 
Millsaps' ability to award non-government financial 
aid to deserving students has increased significantly in 
recent years. For example, three incoming freshmen are 
attending as recipients of David Martin Key Scholar- 
ships, which are four-year stipends honoring Dr. D. M. 
Key, President of Millsaps from 1923 to 1938. Ten other 
outstanding high school graduates have enrolled as re- 
cipients of R. Mason Strieker Memorial Scholarships. 
This particular fund was established in 1967 in honor 
of Mr. Strieker, a prominent Mississippi businessman 
and benefactor of the college. 

Aside from financial aid coming from private sour- 
ces, 307 Millsaps students are now receiving some as- 
sistance in the form of grants and loans from govern- 
mental sources. This number represents almost one third 
of the entire student body. 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



Faculty 

In the 1967-68 school year the Millsaps student body 
was served by a faculty of 61 full-time and 19 part-time 
teachers. Eighteen members of the full-time faculty had 
Ph.D. degrees. This number has been increased to 21 
for the current school year. The total does not include 
three teachers who have completed the requirements 
for the Ph.D. and whose receipt of the degree is expected 
within the current school year. Five faculty members 
working for the Ph.D. are in the dissertation stage, and 
it is hoped that these degrees will be received before the 
beginning of the next school year. 

During the past four years, the college has made 
significant improvement in its faculty salary schedule, 
rising on the A.A.U.P.'s national scale from a "D" rat- 
ing to "C". However, the demand for quality teachers 
continues to exceed the supply. It is imperative that Mill- 
saps continually re-emphasize the fact that a superior 
faculty is an absolutely essential ingredient in an edu- 
cational program of real excellence. 



Curriculum 

The faculty has devoted much work to plans for fu- 
ture academic development. In the spring the faculty 
approved the establishment of a Department of Art, 
and also authorized the establishment of a Major in 
Speech and Drama. Mr. William Rowell, who came to 
the College in the summer from MSCW, is Chairman of 
the Art Department. The department is temporarily lo- 
cated in Galloway Hall, but will move into a spacious 
area of galleries, lecture rooms, and offices upon com- 
pletion of our Academic Complex. 

In the spring semester Millsaps inaugurated its first 
course in Computer Programming. This program was 
made possible through the cooperation of the Computer 
Center^ of the Mississippi Research and Development 
Center, which is located near the campus. The course 
will continue to be taught at the Computer Center until 
the necessary equipment can be provided on the cam- 
pus. 

After more than three years' planning and work, a 
significant new curriculum was inaugurated in Septem- 
ber for incoming freshmen. This new program is known 
as the Heritage Program, and is being offered on a 
pilot basis to selected students. The Heritage Program 
will integrate such disciplines as history, art, litera- 
ture, music, religion, and philosophy in a unique ap- 
proach to the study of Western Civilization. The pro- 
gram is designed to replace several traditional fresh- 
man courses, and wiU be taught by a team of teachers. 

In cooperation with Drew University, Millsaps be- 
gan this year to offer a junior year semester in political 
science in London, England. The faculty includes mem- 
bers of the faculty of the London School of Economics 
and Political Science, Oxford University, Leeds Univer- 
sity and other outstanding schools. 






INTERNAL AFFAIRS 







d 



■-^;;» 'i^i^r_ 



%: 



f^SfS*^ 






•^^■-'y 




■>A'.. 




Business Management 

The college has enjoyed a year of progress and in- 
novation in the area of business management. The Busi- 
ness Office now does much of its work with data proc- 
essing equipmenf, which is expected to cut operating 
costs and increase efficiency. 

The college's cost of maintenance and operations 
is increasing rapidly. This increase, which is being felt 
nationwide, can be attributed to several factors. Among 
these are the new minimun^ wage requirement, the 
necessity for additional administrative personnel, the 
need for trained workmen to maintain and operate new 
air-conditioning, heating and other equipment, and the 
long-delayed need for capital improvements of campus 
buildings. 

All college housing is now in excellent condition, 
providing attractive and comfortable rooms for all resi- 
dent students. The food service has been improved with 
the employment of professional management in this 
area. A part-time registered nurse has been added to 
the medical staff. During the past school year, some 
eight hundred students were treated for various ill- 
nesses in the infirmary. 



Physical Facilities 

The air-conditioning and renovation of the Christian 
Center has been accomplished, partially with proceeds 
from the "Toward a Destiny of Excellence" program. 
The improvements include a new lighting system, a 
larger stage area, additional stage equipment, and sev- 
eral new seminar rooms and faculty offices. 

Construction has started on the new Academic Com- 
plex, a magnificent $2.6 million structure. This building 
will be partially financed through proceeds from the 
'Toward a Destiny of Excellence" effort. When com- 
pleted, the Complex will, house a library addition, art 
and music centers, lecture rooms, recital rooms, and of- 
fices. It will contain a Computer Center, where a com- 
plete line of both computer and data processing equip- 
ment will be available for use by faculty, administra- 
tion and students. The Complex, which will be a three- 
story structure longer than a football field, will also 
contain an audio-visual center, with storage and re- 
trieval areas for programmed instructional material. 

The construction of the Academic Complex, which 
has been described as the most exciting educational 
construction in the state's recent history, will do much 
to signify a new era of excellence for the college. The 
building will be completed by 1970. 



Government Assistance 

In recent years the college has given considerable 
attention to government programs of financial assist- 
ance. During the 1967-68 school year, Millsaps received 
more than $90,000 for faculty research programs and 
for classroom equipment, and over $80,000 to aid in 
the development of its academic program. 



EXTERNAL RELATIONS 



The major external activities of alumni relations, 
public relations, publications, and fund-raising have 
been merged into one new department — the Department 
of Institutional Development. This consolidation was ef- 
fected to create a more efficient and economical opera- 
tion, and should provide more effective coordination 
of these important areas. The Department has begun 
to use data processing equipment in the compilation of 
mailing lists and gift records. 



Alumni 

The Millsaps Alumni Association enjoyed a most 
successful year during the presidency of Dr. Eugene 
Countiss, and the association continues to meet with 
success during the administration of Dr. Countiss' suc- 
cessor, Mr. H. V. Allen, Jr. 

The Development Department plans and stages the 
annual Homecoming Weekend in the fall and the Alumni 
Weekend in the spring. In May, Alumni Weekend, in- 
cluding Past Presidents Day, the All-Sports Award Ban- 
quet, and Alumni Day, attracted more than 600 persons 
to the campus. Highlights of the weekend were talks 
by Dr. Ross Moore, senior member of the faculty, and 
former pro football quarterback Bill Wade. 

Supporters of the college continue to make gratify- 
ing contributions to meet current operating costs. The 
1967-68 Alumni Fund won national recognition from the 
American Alumni Council for improvement in the num- 
ber of alumni participating in the fund. Under the di- 
rection of new Alumni Fund Chairman G. C. Clark of 
Jackson, this year's alumni support for current opera- 
tions is exceeding expectations. 



Church Relations 

The response of Mississippi Methodists to the needs 
of its institutions through the Methodist Action Crusade 
has been a source of excitement and encouragement. 
Millsaps will receive $1,500,000 from this campaign, 
which will be the largest amount received from a single 
church campaign since the college was founded in 1890. 

T»he Church-College relationship is a two-way street, 
and Millsaps is conscious of its responsibility to the 
Methodists of Mississippi. Primarily, it is to the educa- 
tion of young men and women who plan to enter church- 
related vocations. Eight members of the 1968 graduating 
class have enrolled in Methodist theological seminar- 
ies, and there are now twenty-eight Methodist ministerial 
students studying at Millsaps, many of whom already 
serve their church as student pastors. Eight students 
are preparing for careers in Christian education, three 
plan to be church choral directors, and one a deaconess. 






8 





The Methodist congregations in Mississippi have 
rendered invaluable assistance to the College in the re- 
cruitment of capable students. Films dealing with the Col- 
lege have been shown by church groups, and Methodists 
have worked to foster interest in Millsaps among tal- 
ented prospective students. 

The North Mississippi Methodist Conference held its 
Annual Conference on the campus in June, and the 
Mississippi Conference will meet on the campus next 
summer. The Methodist Youth Assembly of the Missis- 
sippi Conference was welcomed to the campus in Au- 
gust. 

Millsaps seeks to strengthen its ties with Mississippi 
Methodists, who ha^e been a source of spiritual and ma- 
terial support for the mission to which the college is 
called. 



"Toward a Destiny of Excellence" Program 

The Ford Foundation Challenge Grant pledges are 
approaching $3,200,000, and the amount received in pay- 
ment on these pledges has passed $2,400,000. Since the 
Ford Foundation will allow the college to use its regular 
annual giving to match its grant, our total matchable 
funds have gone past $3,000,000. With less than eight 
months to go in the campaign, it is imperative that 
we receive payments on the pledges already made and 
locate other gifts in sufficient number and size before 
the June 30, 1969 deadline. 



Millsaps Associates 

In an attempt to recognize the many individuals 
who have contributed generously of their time and mon- 
ey to the Ford Challenge Grant Campaign, the Millsaps 
Associates sponsored a "Target-Victory" Dinner on May 
23 at the Hotel Heidelberg. Dr. Andrew Holt, President 
of the University of Tennessee, gave the principal ad- 
dress at the meeting, which was attended by over 500 
workers and contributors. A $50,000 grant from the 
Kresge Foundation was announced at this banquet. The 
Associates, under the chairmanship of Mr. Joe N. Bailey, 
Jr. of Coffeeville, continue to provide excellent support 
for the college. 



SUMMARY 

Millsaps, like other higher institutions of learning, 
is faced with problems. These include the need to in- 
crease faculty salaries, increase scholarship funds, pur- 
chase new equipment, construct needed physical facili- 
ties, and increase library holdings. However, our prob- 
lems are not insurmountable ones. With ultimate faith 
in the College and its constituency, we see no reason 
why those who love and recognize the value of Millsaps 
College will not be able to continue their concerted ef- 
forts, building toward the College's destiny of excellence. 



9 









Report Of Giving 
1967^8 ^ 



10 



a 







Giving to Millsaps College, 1967-68 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE 

Alumni Fund 

1967-1968 

Eugene Countiss - President, Alumni Association 
Kenneth Dew - Chairman, Alumni Fund 

General Contributors (Alumni) 1,431 

General Contributors (Friends) 9 

Major Investors (Alumni) 132 

Major Investors (Friends) 5 

Corporate Alumnus Program 11 

Total Gifts 1,588 

Total Alumni Gifts 1,563 

Designated Gifts 

Unrestricted Gifts 



$14,420.73 

171.00 

18,795.00 

450.00 

2,746.00 

36,582.73 

33,215.73 

7,098.00 

29,484.73 



MEMORIAL GIFTS 

Persons wishing to memorialize or honor a loved one or friend 
Fund. Support of Christian Higher Education is a fitting tribute, 
memory gifts were received last year appear below. 

MEMORIAL AND HONOR GIFTS 



Mr. CoUye W. Alford 

Mrs. R. A. Biggs 

Mr. B. B. Breeland 

Mrs. W. T. Brown 

Dr. J. R. Countiss, Sr. 

The Reverend E. H. Cunningham, Sr. 

Mrs. W. Crawford Dennis 

Mr. Claude W. Eubanks 

Mr. Bill Fleming 

Mrs. Eli Flowers 

Honor Gifts* 



Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Gentry* 

Mr. Robert M. Gibson, Sr. 

Mr. Donald Gray 

Mr. Peter John Griffin 

Mr. C. E. Haynes 

Dr. Frank Hays 

Mrs. W. A. Hewitt 

Dr. A. A. Kern 

Mr. Paul Killer 

Miss Corrine Laney 



may give through the Alumni 
The names of those in whose 



Mr. James J. Livesay* 

Mr. Joe Henry Morris 

Mr. Gordon Patton 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Plummer 

Dr. W. E. Riecken, Sr. 

The Reverend G. T. Sledge 

Mr. Judson Smith 

Dr. W. B. Smith, Sr. 

Colonel James G. Watkins 

Mr. Charles G. Wright 



DESIGNATED GIFTS 

Most contributions made to the Alumni Fund are un-restricted in nature and can be used to 
meet any need of the college. Many other gifts are restricted, and are directed to a project in 
which the donor has particular interest. Both types of gifts are needed and appreciated. 



Department of Athletics 
Department of Psychology 
Department of Music 
Diamond Anniversary Scholarship 



DESIGNATED GIFTS 

Kimball Student Aid Fund 
Library Book Fund 
J. Reese Lin Chair of Philosophy 
Wilma Susan Long Scholarship Fund 



Millsaps Singers 

Millsaps Troubadours 

B. E. Mitchell Chair of Mathematics 

J. B. Price Chair of Chemistry 



11 



Comparative Report By Classes 





Number 


Number 








Number 


Number 






Class 


Solicited 


Giving 


Percentage 


Amount 


Class 


Solicited 


Giving 


Percentage 


Amount 


Before 


1900 8 


3 


37.5% 


$ 121.00 


1937 


89 


18 


20.2% 


385.00 


1900 


5 


1 


20.0% 


3.00 


1938 


112 


28 


25.0% 


654.00 


1901 


3 











1939 


120 


20 


16.7% 


861.00 


1902 


3 


1 


33.3% 


10.00 


1940 


121 


22 


18.2% 


498.50 


1903 


7 











1941 


156 


35 


22.4% 


820.00 


1904 


8 


2 


25.0% 


60.00 


1942 


145 


24 


15.9% 


693.50 


1905 


8 


2 


25.0% 


125.00 


1943 


149 


21 


14.1% 


519.50 


1906 


6 


3 


50.0% 


625.00 


1944 


134 


20 


14.9% 


2,479.50 


1907 


9 


2 


22.2% 


105.00 


1945 


104 


14 


13.5% 


153.50 


1908 


13 


4 


30.8% 


42.00 


1946 


91 


11 


12.1% 


284.00 


1909 


16 


6 


37.5% 


195.00 


1947 


216 


36 


16.7% 


595.00 


1910 


11 


4 


36.4% 


32.00 


1948 


178 


23 


12.9% 


752.50 


1911 


15 


2 


13.3% 


13.00 


1949 


269 


43 


16.0% 


543.50 


1912 


24 


5 


20.8% 


142.00 


1950 


277 


41 


14.8% 


1,047.00 


1913 


14 


4 


28.6% 


22.00 


1951 


207 


28 


13.5% 


578.00 


1914 


20 


4 


20.0% 


29.00 


1952 


163 


26 


16.0% 


639.00 


1915 


16 


4 


25.0% 


117.50 


1953 


210 


35 


16.7% 


993.50 


1916 


28 


7 


25.0% 


271.50 


1954 


202 


47 


23.3% 


574.50 


1917 


21 


5 


23.8% 


111.00 


1955 


175 


29 


16.5% 


388.00 


1918 


26 


7 


26.9% 


225.00 


1956 


245 


35 


14.3% 


705.00 


1919 


17 


3 


17.6% 


23.00 


1957 


264 


39 


14.4% 


475.50 


1920 


28 


7 


25.0% 


88.50 


1958 


310 


55 


17.8% 


633.50 


1921 


24 


9 


37.5% 


403.00 


1959 


304 


51 


16.8% 


674.00 


1922 


38 


7 


18.1% 


151.00 


1930 


367 


50 


13.6% 


429.00 


1923 


42 


10 


23.8% 


186,50 


1961 


342 


36 


10.6% 


461.00 


1924 


75 


25 


33.3% 


794.50 


1962 


361 


57 


15.8% 


756.50 


1925 


66 


20 


30.3% 


603.50 


1963 


278 


33 


11.8% 


217.00 


1926 


76 


15 


19.7% 


576.00 


1964 


312 


53 


16.9% 


415.85 


1927 


66 


21 


31.8% 


481.00 


1965 


194 


38 


19.6% 


235.50 


1928 


76 


20 


26.3% 


428.25 


1966 


324 


44 


13.6% 


327.38 


1929 


120 


27 


22.5% 


895.25 


1967 


176 


31 


17.6% 


147.00 


1930 


103 


27 


26.2% 


438.50 


1968 


29 


2 


6.8% 


23.50 


1931 


116 


23 


19.8% 


381.50 


Later 




2 




7.50 


1932 


97 


17 


17.6% 


482.50 


Anonymous 




60 




156.00 


1933 


100 


21 


21.0% 


524.50 


Grenada 


368 


51 


13.9% 


565.00 


1934 


97 


22 


22.7% 


2,662.50 


Whitworth 


246 


17 


6.9% 


351.00 


1935 


124 


24 


19.4% 


995.00 


Friends 




14 




621.00 


1936 


114 


24 


21.1% 


832.00 


CAP 




11 




2,746.00 



1934 
1944 
1950 
1935 
1953 
1929 
1939 
1936 
1941 


Top Ten 
Amount 


Classes 
Contribul 


in 
ed 

. $2,662.50 
. 2,479.50 
. 1,047.00 
995.00 
993.50 
895.25 
861.00 
832.00 
820.00 
794.50 


Top Ten Classes in 
Number Giving 

1962 

1958 

1964 

1959 

Grenada 

1960 

1954 

1966 

1949 

1950 


.. 57 
.. 55 
.. 53 
.. 51 
.. 51 
.. 50 
.. 47 
.. 44 
.. 43 
.. 41 


Top Ten Classes 
In Percentage Giving 

1906 50.0% 

Before 1900 37.5% 

1909 37.5% 

1921 37.5% 

1910 36.4% 

1902 33.3%. 

1924 33.3% 

1927 31.8%. 

1925 30.3% 


1924 








1913 28.6% 



Major Investors 

Alumni who contributed $100.00 or more to the 
Alumni Fund during 1967-68. 



Mosby M. Alford 
Mrs. Harry R. Allen 

(Betty Joan Gray) 
Henry V. Allen, Jr. 
Edgar L. Anderson, Jr. 
W. E. Ayres 
Mrs. W. E. Ayres 

(Diane Brown) 
W. A. Bealle 
Oscar D. Bonner, Jr. 
John C. Boswell 
Mrs. John C. Boswell 

(Ruth Ridgway) 
L. H. Brandon 
R. R. Branton 
Mrs. R. R. Branton 

(Doris Alford) 
Charles E. Brown 
Mrs. Charles E. Brown 

(Mary Rebecca Taylor) 
Ernest W. Brown 
Nancy R. Brown 
Rex I. Brown 
Carolyn Bufkin 
Mrs. Luther Byars 

(Lurline Patton) 
Elmer Dean Calloway 
James W. Campbell 
Mrs. James W. Campbell 

(Evelyn Flowers) 
C. C. Clark 
Victor S. Coleman 
Henry B. Collins 
Victor B. Cotten 
Eugene H. Countiss 
Mrs. John H. Cox, Jr. 

(Bonnie Catherine Griffin) 
Charity Crisler 
Sam Weeks Currie 
Ollie Dillon, Jr. 
Mrs. R. A. Doggett 

(Jennie Mills) 
George T. Dorris 



Wilford C. Doss 
Mrs. Wilford C. Doss 

(Mary Margaret McRae) 
Mrs. Agnes Eubanks 

(Agnes Inez Eubanks) 
Julian B. Feibelman 
W. R. Ferris 
John Gaddis 
Spurgeon Gaskin 
Mrs. Spurgeon Gaskin 

(Carlee Swayze) 
Chauncey R. Godwin 
Sedley J. Greer 
Mrs. Sedley J. Greer 

(Annie Ruth Junkin) 
Fred J. Groome 
Waverly Hall 
Charles C. Hand 
Mrs. Erwin Heinen 

(Emily Plummer) 
Mrs. Gordon Hensley 

(Claire King) 
Merrill O. Hines 
Fred O. HoUaday 
Robert T. Hollingsworth 
C. Rav Hozendorf 
W. Rufus Huddleston 
Mrs. W. R. Huddleston 

(Martha Burton) 
Rolfe Lanier Hunt 
H. B. Ivy 
George H. Jones 
Harris A. Jones 
Howard S. Jones 
Maurice Jones 
Warren C. Jones 
Mrs. Wylie V. Kees 

(Mary Sue Burnham) 
John T. Kimball 
Mrs. John T. Kimball 

(Louise Day) 
Mrs. Raymond E. King 

(Yvonne Mclnturff) 



Gwin Kolb 
Mrs. Gwin Kolb 

(Ruth Godbold) 
Heber Ladner 
James H. Lemly 
E. D. Lewis 
Joe Bailey Love 
Wesley Merle Mann 
Mrs. Wesley Merle Mann 

(Frances Wortman) 
Percy A. Matthews 
Robert M. Mayo 
William F. McCormick 
Thomas F. McDonnell 
Mrs. Thomas F. McDonnell 

(Alice Weems) 
E. .Stuart Mclntyre, Jr. 
Mary Frances McMurry 
Sterling S. McNair 
Mar.jorie Miller 
Sam Robert Moody 
Mrs. C. L. Neill 

(Susie Ridgway) 
John L. Neill 
Mrs. Richard Norton 

(Wesley Ann Travis) 
Dale O. Overmyer 
Claude W. Passeau 
Mrs. L. C. Ramsey 

(Vivian Alford) 
Mrs. Walter C. Ranager 

(Elizabeth Lauderdale) 
Mrs. Ralph H. Read 

(Mary Larene Hill) 
John B. Ricketts 
Mrs. C. R. Ridgway 

(Hattie Lewis) 
Charles Robert Ridgway, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles R. Ridgway, Jr. 

(Sara Maud Haney) 
W. Bryant Ridgway 
Walter S. Ridgway, II 
William Riecken, Jr. 



Mrs. William Riecken, Jr. 

(Jcanean Pridgen) 
Charlton S. Roby 
Vic Roby 
Nat Rogers 
Mrs. Nat Rogers 

(Helen Ricks) 
John F. Rollins 
Thomas G. Ross 
Mrs. Dewey Sanderson 

(Fannie Buck Leonard) 
Barry S. Seng 
Austin L. Shipman 
Mrs. Carl A. Smith 

(Sara Jane Gant) 
Fred B. Smith 
John R. Smith 
Donald R. Stacy 
Rufus P. Stainback 
Edward Stewart 
Joseph H. Stone 
C. C. Sullivan 
Bill Tate 
Mrs. Bill Tate 

(Elizabeth Sue McCormack) 
Jack A. Taylor 
Mrs. Jack A. Taylor 

(Pansy Barksdale) 
Janice Trimble 
Mrs. Warren B. Trimble 

(Celia Brevard) 
Alfred T. Tucker 
Elizabeth Lou Tynes 
Wilbourn W. Wasson 
Mrs. Wilbourn W. Wasson 

(Annie Lou Heidelberg) 
John D. Wofford 
Mrs. John D. Wofford 

(Elizabeth Ridgway) 
Charles N. Wright 
Mrs. Charles N. Wright 

(Betty Small) 




13 



Report of Giving By Classes 



Before 1900 

William Jackson Baker 
Garner W. Green, Sr. 
Harris A. Jones 

1900 

Thomas M. Lemly 

1902 

James D. Tillman, Jr. 

1904 

Lovick P. Wasson 

Benton Z. Welch 

1905 

Aubrey C. Griffin 

John B. Ricketts 

1906 

C. A. Bowen 
E. D. Lewis 
John L. NelU 

1907 

C. C. Applewhite 
Mrs. C. L. Nelll 
(Susie Ridgway) 

1908 

G. P. Cook 

W. F. Murrah 

W. S. Ridgway 

John W. Saunders 



1909 

Jason A. Alford 
J. H. Brooks 
Charles C. Hand 
Mrs. Leon McCluer 

(Mary Moore) 
Tom A. Stennls 
Basil Franklin Witt 

1910 

John Wesley Crisler 

Mrs. Edith M. Laird 

(Edith McCluer) 
Mrs. F. E. Rehfeldt 

(Mattle N. Cooper) 
Leon W. Whitson 

1911 

Edgar Dade Gunning 

Adele Knowles 

1912 

William W. Huntley 
Randolph Peets, Sr. 
Hugh E. Price 
Fred B. Smith 
Fulton Thompson 

191.-) 

J. B. Honeycutt 
Logan Scarborough 
Frank T. Scott 
Martm L. White 




191J 

J. B. Cain 
Thomas M. Cooper 
O. H. Howard 
Eekford L. Summer 

1915 

John W. Case 
C. C. Clark 
V. B. Hathorn 
Robert T. Henry 

191G 

Mrs. V. B. Hathorn 

(Henrietta Lowther) 
Mrs. L. R. Humphreys 

(Mary McAlpine) 
Annie Lester 
Percy A. Matthews 
Leon McCluer 
James Ridgway 
T. B. Sylvester 

1917 

Albert Luther Bennett 
Otie G. Branstetter 
Mrs. E. L. Brien 

(Elizabeth H. Watkins) 
Mr.s. E. A. Harwell 

(Mary Shrulds) 
E. M. Summer 

1918 

Mrs. Leon Douglas 

(Maude Kennedy) 
Julian B. Feibelman 
W. B. Gates 
Elise Moore 
Mrs. Mary Etta Newsom 

(Mary Etta Cavett) 
J. S. Shipman 
William E. Toles 

1919 

A. M. Andrews 
W. C. Ellis, Jr. 
Garner M. Lester 

1920 

Cornelius A. Bostick 
Oscar Conner, Jr. 
Mrs. I. C. Enochs 

(Crawford Swearingen) 
C. G. Howorth 
Mrs. Cecil Thurman 

(OUie Pickens) 
Aimee Wilcox 
Mrs. E. E. Williams 

(Estell Cheatham) 

1921 

Andrew J. Boyles 
Mi-s. Luther Byars 
(Lurline Patton) 
Eugene McGee Ervin 
Robert F. Harrell 
Brunner M. Hunt 
J. S. Maxey 
McWillie M. Robinson 
Austin L. Shipman 
C. C. Sullivan 

1922 

Henry B. Collins 
H. H. Davis 
John B. Harris 
Vernon W. Holleman 
W. J. Johnson 
M^ B. Swearingen 
Wirt A. Yerger 

1923 

Mrs. Collye W. Alford 

(Erma Kile) 
Robert T. Hollingsworth 
Mrs. R. H. Hutto 

(Ruby McClellan) 
Mrs. Walter R. Lee 

(Helen Ball) 
Laura Bell Lindsey 
Fred W. McEwen 
Koss H. Moore 
J. F. Ruffin, Jr. 
Leigh Watkins 
Mrs. Leigh Watkins 

(Henrietta Skinner) 



1924 

Francis E. Ballard 

Mrs. Sylvan Boyette 

(Virginia Hunt) 
Ernest W. Brown 
Gladys Cagle 
James W. Campbell 
Eli M. Chatoney 
Guy E. Clark 
William W. Combs 
Mrs. Armand Coullet 

(Magnolia Simpson) 
Dudley D. Culley, Sr. 
Mrs. B. B. Graves 

(Evalyn Power) 
Mrs. Erwin Heinen 

(Emily Plummer) 
Caroline Howie 
Rolfe Lanier Hunt 
Hermes H, Knoblock 
Ary Lotterhos 
Frances Moore 
Mrs. Ross H. Moore 

(Alice Sutton) 
Daniel William Poole 
John B. Shearer 
J. W. Sistrunk 
Oliver B. Triplett, Jr. 
Cecil Rhodes Walley 
Jesse Watson 
Mrs. W. A. Yerger 

(Rivers Applewhite) 

1925 

Frank A. Calhoun 

Mrs. James W. Campbell 

I Evelyn Flowers) 
Kathleen Carmichael 
Charles C. Combs 
Mrs. Oscar Conner, Jr. 

(Alma Bufkin) 
J. O. Harris 
Mrs. O. W. Jackson 

(Irene Simpson) 
George H. Jones 
Mrs. C. W. Lorance 

(Pattie Mae Elkins) 
William F. McCormick 
S. S. McNair 
J. Dewitte Mullen 
T. H. Navlor 
Mrs. Glenn Roll 

(Ethel Marley) 
Mrs. V. K. Smith 

(Rosalie Lowe) 
Walter Spiva 
Mrs. Walter Spiva 

(Mary Davenport) 
Bethany Swearingen 
Alberta C. Taylor 
John W. Young 

1926 

Shellie M, Bailey 

James E. Baxter 

W. A. Bealle 

Mrs. Morgan Bishop 

(Lucie Mae McMullan) 
Vernon E. Chalfant 
Mrs. C. M. Chapman 

(Eurania Pyron) 
Jones S. Hamilton 
W. D. Howard 
W. Rufus Huddleston 
Durell D.' Martin 
Mrs. M. D. Massey 

(Amelia E. Stapp) 
Emmv Lou Patton 
K. T. Pickett, Jr. 
I. H. Sells 
H. W. F. Vaughan 
Mrs. Alton G. Westbrook 

(Katherine Smith) 

1927 

R. R. Branton 
R. L. Calhoun 
Mrs. Joe Carr 

(Ellen Cooper Smith) 
Joe W. Coker 
Mrs. C. C. Combs 

(Hester Legg) 
H. G. Everett 
Arden O. French 
Mrs. Maybelle Alford Furness 
Mrs. Leon Hall 

(Cynthia Penn) 
Warren C. Kennington 



14 



Helen Lotterhos 
Amanda Lane Lowther 
HUlman O. McKenzie 
Hazel Neville 
Mrs. Ralph H. Read 

( Mary Larene Hill) 
Mrs. W. B. Seals 

(Daisy Newman) 
Eron M. Sharp 
Mrs. Eron M. Sharp 

(Alma Blissit) 
J. R. Smith 
Ruth Tucker 
Mrs. E. W. Walker 

(Millicent Price) 

1928 

Mrs. A. K. Anderson 

(Elizabeth Setzler) 
R. E. Blount 
Mrs. James M. Ewing 

(Maggie Flowers) 
Archie Lee Gooch 
WiUiam T. Hankins 
Mrs. R. Clifford Hearon 

(Margaret O'Neal) 
R. E. Hobgood 
Mrs. W. R. Huddleston 

(Martha Burton) 
N. F. Kendall 
L. S. Kendrick 
Wesley Merle Mann 
Mrs. Wesley Merle Mann 

(Frances Wortman) 
Leroy L. Matheny 
Sam Robert Moody 
Mrs. T. H. Naylor 

(Martha Watkins) 
M. A. Peevey 
George Oscar Robinson 
Mrs. M. B. Swearingen 

(Mary Louise Foster) 
Mrs. George Vinsonhaler 

(Therese Barksdale) 
E. B. Whitten 

1929 

Ruth Alford 

E. L. Anderson, Jr. 

W. A. Bilbo 

Mrs. R. E. Blount 

(Alice Ridgway) 
Mrs. R. R. Branton 

(Doris Alford) 
John T. Caldwell 
Mrs. John T. Caldwell 

(Marguerite CruU) 
Mrs. W. W. Chatham 

(.Mattie Mae Boswell) 
Eugene H. Countiss 
Eugenia Crisler 
W. B. Dribben 
Alfred M. Ellison, Jr. 
Robert C. Embry 
Mrs. Luther Flowers 

(Sarah Hughes) 
Bessie Will Gilliland 
Harold Graves 
Graham H. Hicks 
Mrs. Edward C. Homan 

(Laura D. Stovall) 
Heber Ladner 
James W. O'Briant 
William M. Price 
Theodore K. Scott 
James W. Sells 
Eugene Thompson 
Virginia Vance 
Leon L. Wheeless 
HUda J. White 

1930 

WiUiam E. Barksdale 
Audie C. Bishop 
Mrs. A. J. Blackmon 

(Ouida mizey) 
Howard E. Boone 
Mrs. John Bozeman 

(Ruth Oliphant) 
Mrs. Harry N. Cavalier 

(Helen Grace Welch) 
Mrs. Ruth G. Clark 

(AUie Ruth Greer) 
Haver Cecil Currie 
Mrs. Agnes Inez Eubanks 

(Agnes Inez Eubanks) 
Mrs. E. E. Floumoy 

(Patricia Gotten) 
E. Frank Griffin 
Mrs. Walter Lee Head 

(Margaret Ellen Whisenhunt) 
T. R. Holt 
Mildred Home 
Ransom Cary Jones 



Mrs. R. B. Lefoldt 

(Susie Wood) 
David C. Longinottl 
Joe Bailey Love 

D. G. McLaurin 

Mrs. George W. MUler, Jr. 

(Maurine Smith) 
Carlton U. Mounger 
James Q. Perkins 
Mrs. Ralph T. Phillips 

(Hattie Mildred Williams) 
A. Travis Ira 
Mrs. Ralph Webb 

(Rose Lee McKeithen) 
Ralph P. Welsh 
V. B. Wheeless 

1931 

Elsie Abney 
Garnett K. Adair 
Edwin B. Bell 
Mrs. C. V. Dodd, Jr. 

(Alma Hutchison) 
Garner W. Green, Jr. 
Arvo R. Haarala 
Robert A. Hassell 
Merrill O. Hines 

E. A. Kelly 

Mrs. A, J. Martin 

(Laura Lighteap) 
Mrs. J. W. O'Briant 

(Cora Marjorie Sharder) 
Mrs. M. A. Peevey 

(Lucile Hutson) 
George B. Pickett 
Mrs^ Grace Rieherson 

(Grace Elizabeth Dear) 
Cruse Stark 
Mrs. H. L. Stennett 

(Eula Mae Weems) 
Mrs. Fulton Thompson 

(Martha Louise HoUiday) 
C. W. Walker 
R. E. Wasson 
Victor H. Watts 
Mrs. Leon L. Wheeless 

(Frances King) 
Mrs. V. B. Wheeless 

(Elizabeth Sutton) 
Annie Mae Young 

1932 

Mrs. Edwin B. Bell 

(Frances Decell) 
Mrs. John Clark BosweU 

I Ruth Ridgway) 
Mrs. Pat Burt 

(Mary Louise Elliott) 
Mrs. J. H. Cameron 

(Burnell Gillaspy) 
Luther Currie 
W. R. Ferris 
Mrs. Frances Garmire 

(Frances T. McWillie) 
Spurgeon Gaskin 
Edward A. Khayat 
Mrs. J. S. Lawson 

(Sara Carolyn Simmons) 
David A. Livingston 
Mrs. M. C. Mansoll 

(Mary Velma Simpson) 
William McMurtray 
Claude W. Passeau 
Mrs. Jed M. Powers 

(Carolyn Campbell) 
Mrs. J. A. Travis, Jr. 

(Katherine Brennan) 
Lee Savoy Travis 

1933 

Mrs. William E. Barksdale 

(Mary Eleanor Alford) 
John Clark Boswell 
Steve Burwell, Jr. 
Mrs. J. R. Cato 

(Juanitya Winstead) 
Mrs. Nye Doxey 

(E!ma Jones) 
Mrs. T. D. Faust, Jr. 

(Louise Colbert) 
Mrs. Spurgeon Gaskin 

(Carlee Swayze) 
Fred O. Holladay 
John B. Howell, Jr. 
Mrs. Wylie V. Kees 

(Mary Sue Burnham) 
Rabian Lane 
Floyd O. Lewis 
Mrs. H. L. McAdams 

(Margaret Clarke) 
Mrs. Louis H. McCraw 

(Mary Virginia Wells) 
Mrs. Lawrence McMillin 

(Marguerite Gainey) 




15 



George McMurry 


Harry A. Cole, Jr. 


Mrs. Lawrence B. Martin 


Mrs. John H. Sivley 


Marvin A. Rlggs 


Mendell M. DavU 


(Louise Moorer) 


(Martha Jane Mansfield) 


Mrs. L. L. Trent 


Fred Ezelle 


Clayton Morgan 


Mrs. V. L. Wharton 


(Ann Stevens Lewis) 


James S. Ferguson 


Mrs. A. L. Parman 


(Beverly Dickerson) 


Gycelle Tynes 


H. E. Finger, Jr. 


(Ernestine Roberts) 




Henry B. Varner 


Mrs. Joe Guess 


Mrs. Tillman Nathan Peters 


1943 


Claude B. Yarborough 


(India C. Sykes) 


(Esther Taylor) 


Otho M. Brantley 




J. L. Guyse 


W. B. Ridgway 


Mrs. R. T. Bryant 


1934 


Robert M. Mayo 


Mrs. Marvin A. Riggs 


(Agatha Worthington) 


L. A. Bennett 


Mrs. Elizabeth P. Miller 


(Virginia Mayfield) 


Delores Craft 


Norman Bradley 


(Elizabeth May Pickett) 


Mrs. Rod S. Russ 


Mrs. L. S. Crumbley 


Mildred Cagle 


Mrs. Erwin Peyton 


(Mary Therese Burdette) 


(Doris Ann Murphree) 


\V. M. Childress 


(Anna Opal Brumfield) 


Arthur C. Spinks 


N. A. Dickson 


John 0. Cresap 


William R. Richerson 


Mrs. Warren B. Trimble 


Ann K. Duke 


Henry C. Dorrls 


W. N. Robertson, Jr. 


(Celia Brevard) 


Alan R. Holmes 


John T. Griffin 


Will Kent Robinson 


Joseph S. Vandiver 


Joe Kilgore 


Garland Holloman 


Harry W. Stout 


Mrs. S. M. Vauclain 


Mrs. James J. Livesay 


C. Ray Hozendorf 


A. T. Tatum 


(Edwina Flowers) 


(Mary Lee Busby) 


H. B. Ivy 


Mrs. Leora Thompson 


Kate Wells 


Gerald Magee McMillan 


Maurice Jones 


(Leora White) 


Jennie Youngblood 


H. C. Mitchell, Jr. 


Mrs. Manlius Kelly 


Mrs. George R. Voorhees 




Mrs. D. L. Mumpower 


(Elizabeth Warren) 


(Phyllis Louisa Matthews) 


1941 


(Louise Lancaster) 


J. T. Kimball 




E. S. Allen 


Joseph C. Odom 


Richard F. Kinnaird 


1938 


Walter C. Beard 


Mrs. W. C. Ranager 


Mrs. Rabian Lane 


R. A. Brannon, Jr. 


Joseph H. Brooks, Jr. 


(Elizabeth Lauderdale) 


(Maude McLean) 


Mrs. Charles E. Brown 


James R. Cavett, Jr. 


W. S. Ridgway, H 


Mrs. Tom McDonnell 


(Mary Rebecca Taylor) 


Elizabeth Lenoir Cavin 


Mrs. Landis Rogers 


(Alice Weems) 


Mrs. Jean Kinnaird Brueske 


Koy C. Clark 


(Maye Doggett) 


Mrs. R. T. Pickett, Jr. 


(Jean Mary Kinnaird) 


Mrs. Robert C. Dow 


Alford M. Schultz 


(Mary Eleanor Chisholm) 


G. C. Clark 


(Mary Jane Mohead) 


OUie D. Smith 


Arthur L. Rogers, Jr. 


Leonard E. Clark 


Mrs. J. Magee Gabbert 


Mrs. Pete E. Taylor 


George T. Ross 


Marvin A, Cohen 


(Kathryn DeCelle) 


(Charline Harris) 


Joseph H. Stone 


Mrs. H. A. Cole, Jr. 


Martha Gerald 


Janice Trimble 


William Tremaine, Jr. 


(Helen Hare) 


Mrs. Butelle Graham 


Jack M. Whitney, II 


Ruth Young 


W. M, Commander 


(Mary Hall) 






James S. Conner 


Thomas G. Hamby 


1944 


1933 


Ralph Joseph Elfert, Jr. 


Mrs. Thomas G. Hamby 


A. Ray Adams 


Mosby M. Alford 


Mrs. Ransom Cary Jones 


(Rosa Eudy) 


Mrs. James R. Cavett, Jr. 


Mrs. Norman Bradley 


(Jessie Vic Russell) 


Joseph T. Humphries 


(Clara Porter) 


(Frances Weems) 


Eugenia Mauldin 


Mrs. J. H. Kent, Jr. 


James G. Chastain 


Charles E. Brown 


Mrs. William McClintock 


(Mary Alyce Moore) 


Victor B. Gotten 


Mrs. Steve Burwell, Jr. 


(Catherine Wofford) 


Gwin Kolb 


Mrs. John H. Cox, Jr. 


(Carolyn Hand) 


Archie Lee Meadows 


James J. Livesay 


(Bonnie Catherine Griffin) 


Mrs, Frank Cabell 


Mrs. Archie Lee Meadows 


Mrs. Don J. Lynch 


Edith M. Hart 


(Helen Hargrave) 


(Sybil Hinson) 


(Elizabeth Lee Campbell) 


Mrs. Robert Holland 


T. Miller Dickson 


Mrs. Juan Jose Menendez 


Mrs. E. J. Matulich 


(Gertrude Pepper) 


Mrs. J. N. Dykes 


(Jessie Lola Davis) 


(Maxine Young) 


Aylene Hurst 


(Ethel McMurry) 


William Richard Murray 


Margaret McDougal 


William Paul Joseph 


Robert L. Ezelle, Jr. 


M. J. Peden 


Calvin J. Michel 


Mrs. J. T. Kimball 


Jack C. Gates 


Malcolm L. Pigford 


Mar.ioric Miller 


(Louise Day) 


Chauncey R. Godwin 


John R. Rimmer 


Charles M. Murry 


Mrs. William S. Neal 


Joe Guess 


Vic Roby 


David M. Pearson, Jr. 


(Priscilla Morson) 


Paul D. Hardin 


Lee Rogers, Jr. 


Kyle Phillips 


Mrs. H. Peyton Noland 


John P. Henry 


Charles Wesley Simms 


Mrs. Paul Ramsey 


(Sarah Elizabeth Brien) 


Mrs. 0. R. Johnson 


Mrs. Floyd Smith 


(Effie Register) 


Mrs. John A. Norwood 


(Mary Inez Noel) 


(Imogene Blount) 


Van Richardson 


(Louise PuUen) 


Thomas F. McDonnell 


Carroll H. Varner 


Thomas Robertson, Jr. 


Mrs. William W. Pearson 


Haden E. McKay 


Fletcher F. Veazey, Jr. 


Nat S. Rogers 


(Elizabeth Erie Bobo) 


Paul Ramsey 


Rodney D. Walker 


Mrs. William S. Sims 


Mrs. Van Richardson 


Charles Robert Ridgway, Jr. 


W. W. Wasson 


(Mary Cavett Newsom) 


(Vera Mae Coffman) 


Kenneth D. Terrell 




Mrs. Carl A. Smith 


Curtis Erwin Slay 


Mrs. W. R, Trim 


1939 


(Sarah Jane Gant) 


Mrs. Bill Tate 


(Louise Ferguson) 


Oscar D. Bonner, Jr. 


James B. Sumrall 


(Elizabeth Sue McCormack) 


Mrs. Gycelle Tynes 


Fred J. Bush 


W. O. Tynes, Jr. 


Zach Taylor, Jr. 


(Dorothy Cowen) 


Mrs. Joe Carraway 


Mrs. J. D. Upshaw 


Noel C. Womack 


James T. Vance 


(Edythe Wylma Castle) 


(Christine Ferguson) 


Mrs. Noel C. Womack 


Mrs. James T. Vance 


Paul Carruth 


Robert C. Wingate 


(Flora Mae Arant) 


(Mary Hughes) 


Foster Collins 


Gordon Robert Worthington, Jr. 




Mrs. S. E. Wittel 


Mrs. W. M. Commander 




1945 


(Burnice Crosby) 


(Mary Sue Lamb) 


1912 


Mrs. W. W. Barnard 




Charity Crisler 


Mrs. James W. Alexander 


(Frances Lyn Herring) 


1636 


Roy DeLamotte 


(Corinne Walker Ball) 


James E. Calloway 


Henry V. Allen, Jr. 


George T. Dorris 


Mrs. B. E. Burris 


Mrs. Brookes Davis 


Mrs. Richard Aubert 


B. K. Melton 


(Eva Tynes) 


(Dannie Rebacca Rice) 


(Vivian Ramsey) 


Mrs. D. L. Monk 


Mrs. A. B. Chesser 


Mrs. Martha Fergerson 


Mrs. Josephine M. Berry 


(Marjorie Hull) 


(Carolyn Slaymaker) 


(Martha Jane Braun) 


(Josephine Morrow) 


Edgar H. Robertson 


Edwin C. Daniels 


A. Jack Glaze 


Charles H. Birdsong 


Mrs. Dudley Stewart 


Mrs. Robert Day 


Robert R. Godbold, Jr. 


Jack Bowen 


(Jane Hyde West) 


(Jeanette MacFalls) 


Mrs. M. J. Hensley 


Webb Buie 


Lewis Thames 


Wilford C. Doss 


(Elva Tharp) 


Mrs. Webb M. Buie 


A. T. Tucker 


Mrs. Wilford C. Doss 


Mrs. Joe Kilgore 


(Ora Lee Graves) 


Mrs. T. A. Waits 


(Mary Margaret McRae) 


(Helen Frances Hughes) 


J. H. Cameron 


(Sue F. Watkins) 


Mrs. Fred Ezelle 


Edward N. Kramer, Jr. 


Mrs. Edwin S. Cook 


Mrs. V/. W. Wasson 


(Katherine Ann Grimes) 


Mrs. Marjorie Mounger Nevels 


(Marianne Ford) 


(Annie Lou Heidelberg) 


Floyd E. Gillis, Jr. 


(Marjorie Mounger) 


Caxton Doggett 


F. J. Weston 


Mrs. J. Stanley Gresley 


Nina H. Reeves 


Read P. Dunn, Jr. 


Mrs. J. W. Wood 


(Elizabeth Jane Landstreet) 


Mrs. Zach Taylor, Jr. 


Nora Graves 


(Grace Cunningham) 


Mrs. Gwin Kolb 


(Dot Jones) 


George W. Hymers, Jr. 


Mrs. D. E. Woodman 


(Ruth Godbold) 


Clay N. Wells 


Mrs. Harry Lambdin 


(Elizabeth Wilson) 


Mrs. F. T. Leaville 


Joseph Eason Wroten 


(Norvelle Beard) 




(Glenn Calhoun Sweany) 




James H. Lemly 


1940 


Raymond S. Martin 


1946 


Aubrey C. Maxted 


Mary K. Askew 


Robert M. Matheny 


John Roy Bane, Jr. 


John E. Melvin 


Mrs. Ralph R. Bartsch 


Edward J. Matulich 


Mrs. W. W. McLellan, Jr. 


Joseph C. Pickett 


(Martha Faust Connor) 


W. Avery Philp 


(Charline Gerrard) 


Landis Rogers 


Mrs. C. P. Breckenridge 


Mrs. C. R. Ridgway, Jr. 


Mrs. Claribel Moncure 


J. L. Ross 


(Florence McClung Worthington) 


(Sara Maud Haney) 


(Claribel Hunt) 


Thomas G. Ross 


Edwin Guy Brent 


Charlton S. Roby 


Mrs. Robert F. Nay 


George R. Stephenson 


Roy D. Byars, Jr. 


Mrs. Nat S. Rogers 


(Mary Ethel Mize) 


P. K. Sturgeon 


Mrs. N. A. Dickson 


(Helen E. Ricks) 


Mrs. Sally Ann O'Brien 


Mrs. John Wooldridge 


(Mary Eleanor Myers) 


William D. Ross, Jr. 


(Sally Ann O'Brien) 


(Dorothy Strahan) 


J. Manning Hudson 


Mrs. William D. Ross, Jr. 


Mrs. J. T. Oxner, Jr. 




Martha Ann Kendrick 


(Nell Triplett) 


(Margene Summers) 


1937 


Mrs. Jack C. King 


Mrs. Bett> Murphy Ryder 


Mrs. Jiny Peterson 


Thomas V. Banks 


(Corinne Denson) 


(Betty Murphy) 


(Patricia Platte) 



16 



Mrs. C. E. Salter, Jr. 

(Marjorie Carol Burdsal) 
Barry S. Seng 
W. E. Shanks 
Mrs. John R. Suddoth 

(Mary Sanders) 

1947 

Mrs. Edward M. Anderson 

(Flora Giardina) 
William F. Baltz 
Mrs. Frank Bauman 

(Sara Dixie Brlggs) 
Mrs. Howard K. Bowman, Jr. 

(Sarah Frances Clark) 
Lonnie Lewis Brantley, Jr. 
Mrs. John F. Buchanan 

(Peggy Helen Carr) 
Carolyn Bufkln 
Mrs. Neal Calhoun 

(Mary Edgar Wharton) 
Craig Castle 
Mrs. J. A. Chamlee 

(Cleo Warren) 
Billy Chapman 
Mrs. H. L. E. Chenoweth 

(Sarah Deal) 
Charles Clark 
Victor S. Coleman 
Mrs. James S. Conner 

(Betty Langdon) 
Wallace L. Cook 
Mrs. Harry L. Corban 

(Eleanor Johnson) 
Keyes Currle 
K. B. Denson 
Mrs. Roger Elgert 

(Laura Mae Godbold) 
Mrs. Kenneth I. Franks 

(Ann Marie Hobbs) 
Frances Gandy 
Mrs. George Paul Koribanic 

(Helene Minyard) 
A. C. Lassiter, Jr. 
Mrs. Sutton Marks 

(Helen Murphy) 
Mrs. William W. May 

(Betty Sue Pittman) 
Wmiam J. NorvUle 
J. W. Patterson 
Joseph Allen Reynolds, Jr. 
Mrs. Fred A. Schenk, Jr. 

(Janice Nicholson) 
Mrs. W. E. Shanks 

(Alice Josephine Crisler) 
Mrs. Joe Byrd Sills 

(Myra Nichols) 
Rufus P. Stainbaek 
William G. Toland 
Robert M. Yarbrough, Jr. 
Donald S. Youngblood 

1948 

John M. Beard 
L. H. Brandon 
William D. Buntin 
Elmer Dean Calloway 
William O. Carter, Jr. 
John H. Christmas 
Mrs. F. G. Cox, Jr. 

(Alma Van Hook) 
Charles R. Franklin 
Frances Ann Galloway 
Mrs. R. C. Hardy 

(Ida Fae Emmerich) 
Mrs. H. G. Hase 

(Ethel Nola Eastman) 
Mrs. George L. Maddox 

(Evelyn Godbold) 
Sutton Marks 
Mrs. Samuel H. Poston 

(Bobble Gillis) 
H. Lowery Rush 
Robert Eugene Schabot 
Joe Byrd SUls 
T. Brock Thomhm 
Mrs. C. M. Toler 

(Ada Mae Bain) 
Alanson V. Tumbough 
Mrs. WllUam WUson Watson 

(Clara Ruth Wedig) 
Jackson H. Worley 
Charles N. Wright 

1949 

Charles A. Barton 

Mrs. John H. Christmas 

(Barbara Robertson) 
Robert H. Conerly 
O. W. Conner, III 
William Ray Crout 
Mrs. K. B. Denson 

(Marian Grlffing) 



John F. Egger 
Henry Folwell, Jr. 
Mrs. Henry Folwell, Jr. 

(Jean Alloway Fox) 
Mrs. William A. Fulton 

(Ruth Inez Johnson) 
John Garrard 
William F. Goodman, Jr. 
Ralph Hutto 

James H. Jenkins, Jr. 
Mrs. James C. Leverette, Jr. 

(Nadine Rhue McKinnon) 
James E. Lott 
Mrs. Richard W. Lowe 

(Geraldine Mayo) 
George L. Maddox 
Paul E. Martin 
Mrs. J. W. McDaniel 

(Dorothy Nell Evans) 
David Mcintosh 
Leonard Metts 
Robert F. Nay 
T. W. Perrott 
W. T. Phelps 
Otis S. Pigott 
Ernest P. Reeves 
John Fletcher Rollins 
Mrs. John Schindler 

(Chris Hall) 
Carlos Reid Smith 
Alvin Summerlin 
Mrs. Dan Tabb 

(Madge Davis) 
Mrs. Michael J. Thieryung 

(Doris Leech) 
Howard B. Trimble 
Mrs. John H. Underwood 

(Mary Anna Medlin) 
William Wilson Watson 
Mrs. Charles C. Wiggers 

(Mary Tennent) 
Robert L. Williams, Jr. 
Gerald R. Woodward 
William D. Wright 
J. W. Youngblood 
Mrs. J. W. Youngblood 

(Nora Louise Havard) 
Hendrik Zander, Jr. 

1950 

William F. Appleby 

D. Elton Brown 

Mrs. Tom Crosby, Jr. 

(Wilma Dyess) 
Mrs. Genta Doner 

(Genta Davis) 
Allen Ray Durrett 
Mrs. J. N. Ellis, Jr. 

(Betty Garber) 
John Gaddis 
J. Paul Gaudet 
Mrs. S. J. Greer 

(Annie Ruth Junkin) 
Joseph R. Huggins 
Mrs. Cecil G. Jenkins 

(Patsy Abemathy) 
W. Burwell Jones 
W. M. Jones, Jr. 
William Richard Jones 
Richard Kimbrough 
Walter S. McCreight, Jr. 
Mrs. David Mcintosh 

(Rosemary Thigpen) 
Herman L. McKenzie 
James A. Miller 
Mrs. James A. Miller 

(Mary Ann Caldwell) 
Dick T. Patterson 
Louise E. Peacock 
Mrs. Otis Pigott 

(Carolyn Webb) 
Kathryn Rimmer 
James S. Roland 
Mrs. H. L. Rush, Jr. 

(Betty Joyce McLemore) 
Paul Eugene Russell 
Mrs. Dewey Sanderson 

(Fanni3 Buck Leonard) 
Alex C. Shotts, Jr. 
Mrs. Carlos Reid Smith 

(Dorris Liming) 
Ike F. Smith 
Mrs. John W. Steen, Jr. 

(Dorothy Jean Lipham) 
Parks C. Stewart 
BiU Tate 

Charles Lee Taylor 
Latney C. Welker, Jr. 
Mrs. Latney C. Welker, Jr. 

(Mary Virginia Boyles) 
Charles C. Wiggers 
John D. Wofford 
Mrs. John D. Wofford 

(Elizabeth Rldgway) 
Robert J. Yohannan 



1951 

Mrs. M. C. Adams 

(Doris Puckett) 
Mrs. Joe V. Anglin 

(Linda McCluney) 
Mrs. B. Anthony 

(Tiny Belle Williamson) 
Richard L. Berry 
Janie M. Boyles 
Rex I. Brown 
Audley O. Burford 
Mrs. Sid Champion 

(Mary Johnson Lipsey) 
Cooper C. Clements, Jr. 
Ollie Dillon, Jr. 
Mrs. Peyton H. Gardner 

(Betty Ann Posey) 
Sophia Grittman 
Waverly Hall 
William P. Harwell 
Dorothy Hubbard 
Mrs. Raymond J. Hyer 

(Louie Louise Mitchell) 
Cecil G. Jenkins 
Mrs. Raymond E. King 

(Yvonne Mclnturff) 
Mrs. E. A, Loftin 

(Mary Elizabeth Stevenson) 
Mrs. Joe H. Morris, Jr. 

(Virginia Price) 
Joe H. Sanderson 
W. B. Selah, Jr. 
David H. Shelton 
Mrs. Harry Shields 

(Mary Virginia Leep) 
S. L. Varnado 
WiUiam G. Wills 
Mrs. G. R. Wood, Jr. 

(Anna Louise Coleman) 
Mrs. Herman Yueh 

(Grace Chang) 

1952 

Hugh R. Baker 

E. H. Blackwell 

Sammie Terrell Boleware 

Mrs. Chester Bolton 

(Norma Ruth Harrell) 
William H. Brewer 
J. B. Conerly 
William E. Curtis 
Mrs. Charles M. Deaton 

(Mary Dent Dickerson) 
Marvin Franklin 
Billy M. Graham 
K. Edwin Graham 
C. Wesley Grisham 
Robert Jacobs 
Mrs. James H. Jenkins, Jr. 

(Marianne Chunn) 
Mrs. Clayton Lawrence 

(Sue Rivers Horton) 
Sale Lilly, Jr. 
Mrs. Sale Lilly, Jr. 

(Evelyn Lee Hawkins) 
Mrs. J. C. Odom 

(Jo Holland) 
Dale O. Overmyer 
William Riecken, Jr. 
Mrs. Paul E. Russell 

(Barbara Lee McBride) 
Roy H. Ryan 
Mrs. James R. Shaw, Jr. 

(Bonnie Lucy George) 
J. P. Stafford 
Mrs. Harry F. Thomas 

(Thelma Ann Canode) 
Harmon E. Tillman, Jr. 

1953 

Mrs. Harry R. Allen 

(Betty Joan Gray) 
Mrs. W. E. Ayres 

(Diane Brown) 
John R. Barr 
Mrs. John R. Barr 

(Elizabeth M. Hulen) 
Robert E. Blount, Jr. 
Chester Bolton 
Charles H. Boyles 
Leila June Bruce 
Mrs. Maxie Bruce 

(Sarah Lucille Conerly) 
Mrs. William R. Clement 

(Ethel CecUe Brown) 
Mrs. Rome Emmons 

(Cola O'Neal) 
Sedley Joseph Greer 
Mrs. Milton Haden 

(Adalee Matheny) 
ThomEis E. Jolly 
Albert Raybum Jones 
Mrs. Joel G. King 

(Annabelle Crisler) 



Jo Ann Kux 
John T. Lewis, HI 
Mary Frances McMurry 
Henry Piles Mills, Jr. 
Mrs. James C. Norris 

(Rachal Simpson) 
Mrs. Richard Norton 

(Wesley Ann Travis) 
Mrs. James R. Ransom 

(Margueritte Denny) 
John C. Sandefur 
Mrs. Robert G. Sibbald 

(Mary Ann Derrick) 
Charles R. Sommers 
William Leonard Stewart 
Larry E. Wallace 
Mrs. L. E. Wallace 

(Catherine Swayze) 
William Lamar Weems 
John C. Wellons, Jr. 
John A. Williams 
Mrs. Charles N. Wright 

(Betty Small) 
Mrs. William D. Wright 

(Jo Anne Bratton) 
Joe E. Young 

1954 

W. E. Ayres 

Jack Roy Birchum 

Mrs. T. H. Boone 

(Edna Khayat) 
John R. Broadwater 
Mrs. John R. Broadwater 

(Mauleene Presley) 
Glenn A. Cain 
William R. Clement 
Mrs. Stephen E. Collins 

(Mary Vaughn) 
Magruder S. Corban 
William L. Crim 
Lonnie A. Cumberland 
Leroy Durrett 
Doris Anita Edin 
Mrs. Paul G. Green 

(Vera Bernice Edgar) 
Louis W. Hodges 
Mrs. Louis W. Hodges 

(Helen Elizabeth Davis) 
Mrs. James D. Holden 

(Joan Wilson) 
John M. Howell 
Yeager Hudson 
Mrs. Yeager Hudson 

(Louise Hight) 
Mrs. Joseph R. Huggins 

(Barbara Walker) 
Mrs. George L. Hunt 

(Jo Glyn Hughes) 
Mrs. H. H. Ishee 

(May Ruth Watkins) 
Mrs. William J. James 

(S.vbil Foy) 
Rodney W. Jeffreys 
Frank B. Mangum 
William M. Moore 
Franklin A. Nash, Jr. 
Norma L. Norton 
Leslie J. Page, Jr. 
George W. Phillips 
Charles H. Pigott 
Mrs. Richard H. Ramsey, III 

(Betty Norton) 
D. E. Richardson 
Mrs. WUllam Riecken, Jr. 

(Jeaneane Pridgen) 
M. M. Robinson, Jr. 
William S. Romey 
Lee Andrew Stricklin 
Mrs. Richard L. Tourtellotte 

(Janella Lansing) 
Mrs. Robert Vansuch 

(Jo Anne Cooper) 
Frank C. Wade 
Oscar N. Walley, Jr. 
Mrs. Harold L. Walters, Jr. 

(Carolyn Wilson) 
Mrs. W. Lamar Weems 

(Nanette Weaver) 
Benton Wells 
Morris E. White 
Berry G. Whitehurst 

1955 

Eugene B. Antley 

Mrs. Dorothy Ford Bainton 

(Dorothy Dee Ford) 
R. Fulton Barksdale 
Mrs. Sara T. Beard 

(Sara Summers Thompson) 
Mrs. J. H. Bratton, Jr. 

(Alleen Sharp Davis) 
Mrs. Howard B. Burch 

(Clarice Black) 



17 



Mrs. James K. Child 

(Kay Fort) 
Stephen E. Collins 
Mrs. J. B. Conerly 

(Theresa Terry) 
Mrs. I.ols R. David 

(Lois Rogers) 
Mrs. Bobby Zack Ellis 

(Nell Marie Vaughan) 
John M. Flowers 
Robert S. Geddlc 
Mrs. Garland G. Gee 

(Dorothy Wiseman) 
Mrs. Tom L. Head 

(Margaret Michel) 
Georse Lewis Hunt, Jr. 
William J. James 
Mrs. John T. Lewis 

(Helen Fay Head) 
Mrs Robert N. Lindeborn 

(Vera Katherlne Webb) 
Bruce L. Nicholas 
Roy Acton Parker 
Charles A. Planch 
EUnora Rlecken 
Mrs. John C. Sandefur 

(Marv Louise Flowers) 
John b. Stringer 
Marion Swayze 
R. Warren Wasson 
Mrs. R. T. Woodard 

(Frances Moore) 
Ernest Workman 

1956 

Myrna Fay Allen 

Patrick G. Allen 

Mrs. Jere Lyle Andrews 

(Gail Fielder) 
John M. Awad 
Thomas H. Boone 
Jerry Boykin 
Benjamin Hal Brown, Jr. 
Mrs. Benjamin Hal Brown, Jr. 

(Margaret Airey Woods) 
John B. Campbell 
Joseph S. Conti 
Mrs. William S. Cook 

(Barbara Jones) 
Mrs. Magruder S. Corban 

(Margaret Hathorn) 
Mrs. Berry Crain 

(Inez Claud) 
Zorah Curry 
Charles M. Deaton 
Marvin S. Dyess, Jr. 
Mrs. Gordon Hensley 

(Claire King) 
John Hubbard 
Mrs. Wayne Hudson 

(Clydell Carter) 
Richard R. Jost 
William E. Lampton 
Mrs. Donald C. McGregor 

(Sara Jo Smith) 
Don R. McPherson 
Ann Holmes McShane 
Mrs. Dan S. Murrell 

(Pat Hillman) 
Robert H. Parnell 
Tom O. Prewitt, Jr. 
Anita Barry Reed 
Mrs. M. E. Robinson 
(Millv Wadlington) 
Mrs. J. W. Terry, Jr. 

(Dorothv Murray) 
Mrs. Harmon E. Tillman 

(Nona Kinchloe) 
O. Gerald Trigg 
Mrs. Summer L. Walters, Jr. 

(Betty Barfield) 
Albert N. Williamson 
J. W. Wood 



1957 

Mrs E. E. Barlow, Jr. 

(Dorothy Anita Perry) 
Harry K. B)air, Jr. 
Mrs.'H. R. Blair. Jr. 

(Marilyn Wood) 
Mrs. Laura C. Blair 

(Laura Collins) 
Kathrvn Bufkin 
Mrs. Billy Coile 

(Gail Moorhead) 
Milton Olin Cook 
Mrs. Milton Olin Cook 

(Millicent King) 
Kenneth Dew 
Oscar Dowdle, Jr. 
Joseph C. Franklin 
James Don Gordon 
Redmond B. Hutchison, Jr. 
Mrs. Paul J. Illk 

(Goldie Crippen) 



Mrs. James E. Inkster 

(Lucy Price) 
Sam L. Jones 
Mrs. Sam L. Jones 

(Nancy Peacock) 
Mrs. W. J. King 

(Marjorle Jeane Eubank) 
Mrs. Don E. Lee 

(Ethel Marilyn McNeill) 
Mrs. Alvah Carl Long, Jr. 

(Lvnnlce Parker) 
June C. Martin 
Max Harold McDanlel 
Mrs. Max McDanlel 

(Sandra Miller) 
Mrs. Edward W. McRae 

(Martina Riley) 
John D. Morgan 
John Philley 
Mrs. James S. Poole 

(Kathleen Priest) 
Mrs. Tom O. Prewitt, Jr. 

(Patricia Morgan) 
Leslie W. Shelton, Jr. 
Edward Stewart 
Jack B. Stewart, Jr. 
Mrs. Jack B. Stewart, Jr. 

(Jerre Gee) 
Mrs. Walter L. Thrash 

(Freida Wlggs) 
Mrs. O. Gerald Trigg 

(Rose Cunningham) 
Summer L. Walters, Jr. 
Robert B. Wesley 
Glenn Wimbish, Jr. 
James Woodrick 
Robert R. Young 



1958 

Bobby De Ainsworth 

Mrs. Raymond Thomas Arnold 

(Janice Mae Bower) 
Mrs. Willis D. Bethay, Jr. 

(Louise Ruth Riddell) 
Mrs. Billy Chapman 

(Betty Gall Trapp) 
Mrs. Walter M. Denny, Jr. 

( Peggy Perry ) 
T. H. Dinkins, Jr. 
Mrs. Richard W. Dortch 

(Joyce Nail) 
Bettv Louise Eakin 
Bobby Zack Ellis 
James H. Everitt, Jr. 
James M. Ewing 
Thomas B. Fanning 
Louis A. Farber 
William L. Graham 
Mrs. William L. Graham 

(Betty Garrison) 
Curtis O. HoUaday 
J. B. Home 
Sarah Hulsey 
Mrs. George R. Jones 
(Sara Louise Jones) 
Howard S. Jones 
Lawrence D. King 
Ralph Edwin King, Jr. 
Mrs. Ralph Edwin King, Jr. 

(Jeannette Sylvester) 
Mrs. Frank Loper 

(Rebecca E. Evans) 
G. A. McCarty, Jr. 
Mrs. G. A. McCarty, Jr. 

(Monica Kay Farrar) 
Donald C. McGregor 
Thomas W. McNair 
John H. Mills 
Mrs. Bailey Moncrief 

(Charlotte Oswalt) 
Ray H. Montgomery 
Mrs. John P. Morse 

(Claire E. Manning) 
Mrs. Donald C. Mosley 

(Susan Baird Young) 
Thomas H. Naylor 
Jimmie Nevell, Jr. 
James S. Poole 
John P. Potter 
Mrs. John P. Potter 
(Jeanette Ratcliff) 
Gerald E. Russell 
T. K. Scott, Jr. 
Norman P. Sojourner 
John H. Stone 
Jack A. Taylor 
Mrs. J. A. Taylor 

(Pansy Valentine Barksdale) 
Mrs. John E. Thomas 

(Margaret Ewing) 
Sam A. Tomlinson, III 
Mrs. Sam A. Tomlinson, III 

(Glenda Wadsworth) 
Jim L. Waits 
Herbert Arthur Ward, Jr. 



Kennard W. Wellons 

Edwin Williams, Jr. 

Mrs. Joseph E. Wilson, Jr. 

(Nancy Caroline Vines) 
John E. Wlmberly 
Mark Yerger 
V. D. Youngblood 



1959 

Robert L. Abney, III 

Mrs. Robert L. Abney, III 

(Shirley Habeeb) 
Mrs. J. W. Armacost 

(Virginia Perry) 
William D. Balgord 
Arnold A. Bush, Jr. 
Mrs. James H. Butler 
(Jacquelyn Felder) 
Mrs. Billy O. Cherry 

(Shirley Mae Stoker) 
Mrs. Henry Lee Church 
(Annie Laurie Dennis) 
Clvde V. Clark 
Frank Bush Collins 
Joseph R. Cowart 
Mrs. Allen J. Dawson 
(Julia Anne Beckcs) 
Fred Dowling 
James H. Durrett 
Franz Epting 
Lloyd Fortenberry 
Ann Foster 
Mrs. James Gantt 
(EUse Mcintosh) 
Mrs John Sharp Gatewood 

(Elizabeth Ann Clark) 
Robert E. Gentry 
Fred J. Groome 
David Ray Hamrick 
Mary Opal Hartley 
Mrs. Karl W. Hatten 

(Ruth Land) 
Avit J. Hebert 
John D. Humphrey 
Elliot Jones 
Mrs. Bradford Lemon 

(Nancy Neyman) 
Palmer Manning 
E. Stuart Mclntyre, Jr. 
Edwin P. McKaskel 
Bailev Moncrief 
William S. Mullins 
Frank Lynn O'Keete 
Mrs. Leslie Joe Page, Jr. 

(Frances Irene West) 
Dick Pepper 
William Murphy Rainey 
Mrs Thomas George Richardson 

(Mary Hammerly Sherrod) 
Mrs. Donald E. Richmond 

(Carolyn Allen) 
Mrs. Graham B. Shaw 

(Svbil Hester) 
Judson Waller Smith, III 
John E. Thomas 
Ophelia Tisdale 
Marv Emma Tumlin 
D. Clifton Ware, Jr. 
Robert A. Weems 
Thomas C. Welch 
Mrs. Robert B. Wesley 

(Frances Furr) 
Jon E. Williams 
Mrs. John E. Wlmberly 

(Clara Irene Smith) 
Mrs. Mark Y'erger 

(Elizabeth Ann Porter) 

1960 

Robert E. Abraham 
D. Allen Bishop, Jr. 
Mrs. J. D. Bourne, Jr. 

(Jewel Taylor) 
Mrs. Durwood R. Boyles 

(Regina Pauline Harlan) 
W. Gardner Brock 
Albert Y. Brown, Jr. 
Mrs. James T. Brown 

(Joan Frazier) 
Walter U. Brown, Jr. 
Mrs. Arnold A. Bush 

(Zoe Harvey) 
Cathy Carlson 
Wilton C. Carter 
Mrs. W. C. Carter 

(Delores Cumbest) 
Mrs. John H. Cook 

(Lurline Johnson) 
Mrs. Malcolm W. Culpepper 

(Cella Rhodes Cc*e) 
Mrs. William M. Dye, Jr. 

(Carole Ann Shields) 
Charles Ferguson 
John Sharp Gatewood 



Mrs. Ed Gordon 

(Aldlne M. Tucker) 
Mrs. William S. Hicks 

(Luclle Pillow) 
Barbara S. Hudson 
James E. Inkster 
Charles K. Johnson 
Mrs. Charles R. Johnson 

(Gwendolyn Harwell) 
Brent Johnston 
Mrs. William E. Lampton 

(Sandra Jo Watson) 
Mrs. Steven Llpson 

(Edna McShane) 
Robert E. McArthur 
Mrs. James A. Nicholas 

(Mary Sue Cater) 
James F. Oaks 
Mrs. Johnny D. Odom 

(Ella Martha Qulnn) 
Jack L. Ratliff 
Martin G. Reeves 
John T. Rush 
Nancv Shearin 
Wayne W. Sherman 
Douglas Slocum 
David Steckler 
Mrs. Kenneth Steiner, Jr. 

(Grace Louise Frost) 
Mrs. Jacky Stubbs 

(Bcttye Ann Hamilton) 
John C. Sullivan, Jr. 
Mrs. T. A. Tlgrett 

(Katherine Strait) 
Mrs. D. Clifton Ware, Jr. 

(Bettye Oldham) 
Mrs. Thomas C. Welch 

(Josephine Anne Goodwin) 
Donald E. Wildmon 
Mrs. Lynn B. Willcockson 

(Elizabeth I. Walter) 
Mrs. Glenn Wimbish, Jr. 

(Evelvn Godbold) 
Mrs. James Woodrick 

(Rosa Ann Rials) 
Mrs. R. R. Young 

(Mary Edith Brown) 

1961 

Albert G. Boone 
Ella Lou Butler 
Frank G. Carney 
Mrs. R. C. Carter 

(Evelvn Grant) 
Billv R. Coile 
Mrs. Charles H. Craft 

(Peggv Roberts) 
William J. Crosby 
Sam Weeks Currie 
Mrs. Fred Dowling 

(Betty Jean Burgdorff) 
Margaret Gooch 
James Harold Gray 
Mrs. Inez McCoy Greenstadt 

(Evelyn Inex McCoy) 
Mrs. C. A. Gullette 

I Marv Ann Orndorff) 
John William Hall 
Mrs. William G. Hardin 

(Frances Kerr) 
Donald R. Harrigill 
John A. Higginbottom 
Reuben K. Houston, Jr. 
Mrs. R. K. Houston, Jr. 

(Alice Wiggers) 
David D. Husband 
Francis M. Libby 
Mrs. W. K. Martinson 

(Rita Maxine Randall) 
Thomas R. Mayfield 
Mrs. William S. Mullins 

(Barbara Helen Himel) 
Mrs. Thomas H. Naylor 
(Marv Louise Scales) 
Mrs. G'eorge D. Ord, Jr. 

(Nell Rose Valetine) 
J. K. Perry 
Mrs. Larry G. Pierson 

(Bunny Cowan) 
James C. Pittman, Jr. 
Mrs. Eustice Raines, Sr. 

(Helen Fllppo) 
Mrs. J. L. Root 

(Elizabeth Joy Allen) 
Donald R. Stacy 
Lucy Annette Stewart 
Mrs". R. A. Weems 
(Janis Mitchell) 
Mrs. Edwin H. Wenzel 

(Claudia Mabus) 
Parham Williams 

1962 

Mrs. W. R. Anderson, Jr. 
(Nancy Grlsham) 



18 



Henry A. Ash 

Mrs. VirgU Bigham 

(Judith Seviah Ware) 
W. A. BUlups, Jr. 
Mrs. W. A. Billups, Jr. 

(Linda Gayle Moss) 
Thomasina Blissard 
Mrs. W. E. Boiling 

(Devada Witmore) 
Mrs. Roland C. Bradley 

lEdwina F. Harrison) 
Nancy R. Brown 
Walter R. Brown 
W. Jack Bufkin 
Andre Clemandot, Jr. 
Jack Reese Clement 
Albert Elmore 
Hugh R. Felder, Jr. 
Bill Fortenberry 
Fred Gipson 
Ben Goodwin, Jr. 
Mrs. Ben Goodwin, Jr. 

(Virginia Carolyn Dunn) 
Mrs. Doris Moore Graham 

(Doris Moore) 
Mrs. Donald R. Harrigill 

(Susan Coats) 
Mrs. William H. Hickman 

(Louise Menetee) 
Mrs. Paul C. Horn 

(Cynthia A. Orcutt) 
Mrs. Brent Johnston 

(Cynthia Dubard) 
Merritt Jones 
Mrs. Robert R. Kain 

(Dianne Utesch) 
Lamar Landfair 
Robert N. Leggett, Jr. 
Mrs. C. John Mann 

(Diane Kay Messmann) 
Mrs. Barrie McArthur 

(Judy Monk) 
Mrs. Harry W. McCraw 

(Shirley Jean Prouty) 
Shirley McDaniel 
David Morgan 
George Mart Mounger 
Perry Nations 
Robert N. Naylor, II 
Mrs. W. W. Orr 

(Susanna Mize) 
Rachael Peden 
Patricia Ann Perry 
James A. Prewitt 
George H. Robinson, Jr. 
Mrs. Matthew Schott 

(Leah Marie Park) 
L. Moody Simnxs, Jr. 
Karl Dee Smith 
Ralph Sowell, Jr. 
Mrs. Brenda Stockwell 

(Brenda Sartoris) 



Mrs. Bruce M. Sutton 

(Lodena Sessums) 
Mrs. M. L. Thigpen 

(Sue Belle Hart) 
Mrs. A. C. Tipton, Jr. 

(Senith Ann CowUard) 
Mrs. James A. Townes, III 

(Carolyn Shannon) 
Elizabeth L. Tynes 
James A. Underwood 
Calvin Vanlandingham 
Frank K. Walsh 
Mrs. Jon Williams 

(J. Harley Harris) 
E. E. Woodall, Jr. 
John E. Woods 



1963 

Mrs. Joe AUiston, Jr. 

(Mary Ellen Williamson) 
James Donald Blanton 
Virginia Buckner 
Cal W. Bullock, Jr. 
Barbara Butler 
Frank D. Carson, IV 
Mrs. Harry M. Clark 

(Robbie Dale Clark) 
John Benton Clark 
Mrs. Jack Reese Clement 

(Susan Marie Ward) 
William L. Collins 
Mrs. John D. Commer 

(Janet Faye Oliver) 
Mrs. Wayne E. DeLawter 

(Patricia Ann Hendricks) 
Ann Elizabeth Jenkins 
Mrs. Robert N. Leggett, Jr. 

(Nell Carleen Smith) 
Mrs. Thomas LeMaire 

(Peggy Chancellor) 
Dempsey M. Levi 
Julia Ann McGuffee 
Tom McHorse 
David L. Meadows 
Mrs. Don Q. Mitchell 

(Mary Sue McDonnell) 
Lewis A. Nordan 
Mrs. Lewis A. Nordan 

(Mary Mitman) 
Mrs. J. R. Paterson 

(Mamie Carolyn Teaster) 
Jim Persons 
Mrs. E. L. Reilly 

(Cora Miner) 
W. L. Runge 
Mrs. L. Moody Simms, Jr. 

(Barbara Griffin) 
Richard J. Stamm 
Mrs. John C. Sullivan, Jr. 

(Bettye Yarborough) 
Morris L. Thigpen 




Mrs. Larry E. Tuminello 

(Hilarie Ann Owen) 
James M. Underwood 
J. Rockne Wilson 

1964 

Jerry Bostick Beam 

Gabrielle Beard 

Mrs. Cecil R. Burnham 

(Celia C. Breland) 
Sam G. Cole 
Mrs. Guy Collins 

(Sarah Irby) 
Philip Ray Converse 
Stephen Cranford 
Mrs. R. A. Crawford 

(Mary Helen Utesch) 
Henry Ecton, II 
Mary Dell Fleming 
Travis Fulton 
Mrs. John Hathcock 

(Maryilyn Fincher) 
Garland Holloman, Jr. 
Lowell S. Husband, Jr. 
Mrs. Merritt Jones 

(Mary Margaret Atwood) 
Warren C. Jones 
Paul C. Keller 
Mrs. Mary Holt Kepner 

(Mary Holt) 
Curt Lamar 
Mrs. Curt Lamar 

(Dana Townes) 
Daniel B. Lay 
Barbara Lefeve 
John S. Lewis, Jr. 
Mrs. Sammie Malone 

(Sammie Dean Pickering) 
Mrs. E. M. Marks 

(Lynda Costas) 
Mrs. Thomas Floyd Martin 

(Suzanne DeMoss) 
Ben McEachin 
Don Q. Mitchell 
Suzanne Murfee 
William W. Orr 
Davis Owen 
James R. Paterson 
Allen D. Phillips 
Judith Price 
Mrs. Charles E. Reaves 

(Sandra Joyce Carter) 
Jack Roberts 
Mrs. Joseph H. Sharp 

(Donna Rae Bell) 
Mrs. Robert A. Shive, Jr. 

(Lynda Jean Fowler) 
J. H. Shoemaker 
Dean E. Smith 
Melvyn Lee Smith 
Vence Smith, Jr. 
Mrs. Vence Smith, Jr. 

(Kathryn Dexter Alexander) 
Mrs. Ronold Staley 

(Marsha Beale) 
C. E, Swain 
Mrs. Evelyn B. Thomas 

(Evelyn Burdickl 
James A. Torrey, Jr. 
Mrs. James M. Underwood 

(Sandra Jo Rainwater) 
Stewart A. Ware 
Mrs. Edwin Werkheiser 

(Nell McNeill) 
William J. Witt 
Mrs. William J. Witt 

(Marilvn Stewart) 
Mrs. Herbert S. Yates 

(Jennifer Stocker) 

1965 

Mrs. N. E. Arther 

(Julia Lynn Price) 
Evelyn Barron 
James A. Breaux 
Edward L. Chaney 
Mrs. Edward L. Chaney 

(Lillian Thomell) 
James A. Clov 
Mrs. Sam G. Cole 

(Ruth Ezelle Pickett) 
Richard A. Coleman 
Mrs. Tom Coleman 

(Peggy Whittington) 
Ronnie Daughdrill 
William H. Dodge 
Mrs. William H. Dodge 

(Joy Weston) 
Barbara Donald 
Richard M. Dunn 
John Thomas Fowlkes 
Mrs. W. W. Fuller 

(Gertrude G. McDonnell) 
Mauricio Goldwasser 



William E. Graves 
Mrs. William E. Graves 

(Kay HoUingsworth) 
Mrs. Douglas H. Greene 

(Mabel Poindexter MuUins) 
Alix Gregory Hallman 
Malcolm W. Heard, Jr. 
Mrs. James E. HoUoway 

(Polly Elaine Commer) 
Mrs. Lowell S. Husband 

(Elizabeth Ann McGlothlln) 
Larrv R. Lipscomb 
Mrs. W. T. McCraney 

(Jane W. Owen) 
Max B. Ostner, Jr. 
Mrs. George B. Pickett, Jr. 

(Lvnn Krutz) 
Mrs. Zekc W. Powell, Jr. 

(Bonnie Faye James) 
Jimmie M. Purser 
Nicholas Charles Rebold 
Curtis Rogers 
Milanne M. Smith 
Lovelle Upton 
Mrs. Jim L. Waits 

(Fentress Boone) 
Johnnie Marie Whitfield 
Mrs. Parham Williams 

(Norma Ruth Cumberland) 
Mrs. P. W. Yeates 

(Peggy Jean Lowry) 

1966 

Larr^' Adams 
William L. Addkison 
Mrs. P. K. Barron 

(Winifred Calhoun Cheney) 
Rodney J. Bartlett 
Mrs. Rodney J. Bartlett 

(Beverly Featherston) 
Stephen K. Cooper 
Luther M. Dove 
Mrs. Henrv Ecton 

(Barbara Earle Diffrient) 
Nat B. Ellis 
T. H. Ferrell 
Mrs. John Thomas Fowlkes 

(Rachel Gayle Davis) 
Mrs. C. Coleman Frye, Jr. 

(Mary Kathryn Hymers) 
Douglas H. Greene 
Mrs. Oliver H. Hopkins, Jr. 

(Rosemary Hillman) 
Mrs. Leonora P. Hudson 

(Leonora Pirrett) 
William B. Johnson 
W. B. Liles 
Gerald Lord 
Mrs. R. E. Luckett 

(Jeanne Burnett) 
Mrs. Robert Lumpston 

(Ann Stephenson) 
Mrs. W. T. May, Jr. 

(Margaret Gale Burke) 
Mrs. Miles McCaddon 

(Beauvais Staples) 
Mrs. David L. Meadows 

(.Anna N. Dennery) 
Sherry Monk 
Robert Frank Morris 
John H. Morrow, 111 
David Perrv 
George B. Pickett, Jr. 
Mrs. Jean Piatt 

(Jean Pullin) 
Charles Richard Rains 
Mary Neai Richerson 
Mrs. Bruce Rogow 

(Norma Watkins) 
Michele Staiano 
Tom Starling 
John W. Tarver 
Douglas M. Tedards 
Samuel L. Tucker 
Ward W. VanSkiver 
Frank Venturini, Jr. 
Sara Ann Wier 
Mrs. W. P. Wilcox 

(Rebecca Campbell) 
Ruth Marie Williams 
Mrs. Martin Erie Willoughby 

(Margaret Brown) 
Mrs. Wanda Weems Zeagler 

(Wanoa Weems) 

1967 

Charles Awad 

James Awad 

Mrs. James R. Brown, Jr. 

(Suzanne Riley) 
William. W. Croswell 
Mrs. W. W. Croswell 

(Rachel O'Hara Baas) 
Martha Curtis 



19 



Pauline Dement 
James C. Dress 
Eleanor E. Ferrell 
Mrs. Robert W. Gough 

(Constance Adcle Mllonas) 
Charles R. Hallford 
George Marlon Harris, Jr. 
Kathy Kaminer 
Mrs. W. F. Lane 

{Anne Graham) 
Robert E. Luckett 
Daniel D. McKee 
Jean Nicholson 
Anno Powers 
Mrs. Jinimie Purser 

(Paulett Warren) 
Mrs. Robert H. Shackleford, Jr. 

{Billie Fox) 
Mrs. Fred Slas 

(Dorris Fisher) 
Sidney M. Simpkins 
James Keith Smith 
Mrs. Anthony Tampary 

(Dorothy Green) 
Philip Thiac 
Nancy Jean Thompson 
Mrs. Edwina Turner 

(Edwina McDonald) 
Ellen Gilchrist Walker 
Lovett H. Weems, Jr. 
W. Paul Wilcox 
William H. Wooldridge 

1968 

Ernest C. Rucker 

A. Tommy Tucker, Jr. 

Van C. Worsham, Jr. 

Later 

Mrs. Ernest C. Rucker 
(Jimmic Dell Agnew) 



Anonymous 



58 



Grenada 

Mrs. Ward Allen 

(Roberta Cornelia DuBard) 
Mrs. E. R. Arnold 

(Ruth West) 
Ernestine Barnes 
Mabel Barnes 
Mrs. Roy Beadles 

(Ruth Bailey) 
Mrs. James T. Brand 

(Mildred Watkins) 



Mrs. Joseph H. Brooks 

(Ruth Jaco) 
Catherine Allen Carruth 
Kathleen Clardy 
Mrs. Dan F. Crumpton 

(Eva Mae Brownlea) 
Mrs. C. W. Dibble 

(Winnie Crenshaw) 
Mrs. R. A. Doggett 

(Jennie Mills) 
Mrs. J. D. Dorroh 

(Mary Griffin) 
Mrs. Walter F. Doty 

(Ruth McPherson) 
Mrs. L. A. Dubard, Sr. 

(Alma Beck) 
Mrs. Walter Ely 

(Ruth Blaekwell) 
Mrs. W. C. Faulk 

(Patty Tindall) 
Bama Finger 
Marietta Finger 
Mrs. W. H. Gardner 

(Katherine Bryson) 
Mrs. J. H. Hager 

(Frances Baker) 
Mrs. Edith B. Hays 

(Edith Brown) 
Mrs. P. M. Hollis 

(Nelle York) 
Lizzie Horn 
Mri. R. C. Hubbard 

(Marion Dubard) 
Mrs. J. W. Lipscomb 

(Ann Dubard) 
Mrs. J. D. Lord 

(Clara Rogers) 
Mrs. G. E. McDougal 

(Sue Yelvington) 
Mrs. John McEachin 

(Alma Katherine Dubard) 
Mary Edwina McKee 
Mrs. Albert H. McLemore 

(Anne Tillman) 
Mrs. George McMurry 

(Grace Cowles Horton) 
Bessie Maude Miller 
Thelma Moody 
Mary Miller Murry 
Mrs. L. J. Page 

(Thelma Horn) 
Mrs. Estelle M. Parker 

(Estelle Mabry) 
Mrs. Smith Richardson 
Mrs. Frances M. Robertson 

(Frances McClatchey) 



Mrs. Gerald W. ShlH 

(Maveleen Wilson) 
Mrs. Maude Simmons 

(Maude Newton) 
Mrs. W. C. Smallwood 

(Hazel Hoiiey) 
Virginia F. Thomas 
Mrs. lone S. Thompson 

(lone Stone) 
Mrs. R. H. Tomlinson 

(Hattie Tate Baker) 
Jessie Van Osdel 
Mrs. John Thomas Wilkinson 
Mrs. Henry W. Williams 

(Thelma McKeithen) 
Mrs. Jeff T. Wilson 

(Louise McCorkle) 
Mrs. W. Lewis Wood 

(Helen Young) 
Mrs. James R. Yerger 

(Bernice Lawrence) 

Whitworth 

Mrs. Ben S. Beall 

(Tallulah Lipscomb) 
Mrs. M. H. Brooks 

(Dorothy Middleton) 
Louise Cortright 
Mrs. Frank Delagorzer 

(Lucy Powers) 
Mrs. Harold Graves 

(Ola Reed) 
Mrs. J. I. Hurst 

(Ary Carruth) 
Mrs. W. F. Mahaffey 

(Mamie Bell) 
Mrs. H. D. Mann 

(Helen Merritt) 
Mrs. J. C. McGehee 

(Mary Cook) 
Mrs. L. C. Ramsey 

(Vivian Alford) 
Mrs. C. R. Ridgway 

(Hattie Lewis) 
Mrs. V. M. Roby 

(Edith Stevens) 
Mrs. T. H. Rousseau 

(Irene F. Easterling) 
Mrs. George Saunders 
Mrs. Charles A. Stewart 

(Georgia Brumfield) 
Mary Weems 
Mrs. J. W. Young 

(Lova Lane) 



Friends 

Mrs. B. B. Breeland 

Bond Fleming 

R. J. Gilbert 

Mrs. Dick Houston Hall 

Joel Howell 

Mrs. Charles H. Juister 

Raymond King 

M. W. McCormlck 

Mrs. George Pickett 

The Print Shop 

W. R. Smith 

Tatum R. Stacy 

George Vinsonhaler 

Corporate Alumnus Program 

Aetna Life Affiliated Companies 

Matching Gift by 

V. Dudley LeGette 
American Foreign Power Company 

Matching Gift bv 

John T. Kimball 
American Home Products 

Corporation 

Matching Gift by 

Earl T. Lewis 
Armstrong Cork Company 

Matching Gift by 

Dick T. Patterson 
Burlington Industries 

Matching Gift by 

James G. Guess 
Esso 

Matching Gift by 

Jessie D. Puckett, Jr. 
Gulf Oil Corporation 

Matching Gifts by 

Joseph C. Franklin, Jr. 

George W. Hall, Jr. 

Richard R. McLeod 

Tatum R. Stacy 

Donald R. Stacy 
International Business Machines 
Corporation 

Matching Gifts by 

A. H. Downing 

C. R. Jennings 
J. W. Morris 
McGraw-Edison Company 

Matching Gift by 

Fred O. HoUaday 
Phoenix of Hartford 

Matching Gift by 

Foster Collins 
Gifts from Corporations 

United States Steel 










20 



The 'Toward A Desfiny of Excellence" Program 

(Includes only those who have paid on pledges) 



Miss Nancy Diann Adams 

Mr. W. Jeff Adams 

Mr. W. E. Addkison 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Alexander 

Mr. C. Paul Allen 

Mr. Charles R. Allen 

Mr. Charles W. Allen, Jr. 

Mrs. Charles W. Allen, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Allen 

Rev. Rex Alman, Jr. 

American Commercial Lines 

American Cyanamid Company 

American Oil Foundation 

Dr. W. H. Anderson 

Mr. George R. Andrews 

Miss Cornelia Armstrong 

Miss Helen J. Armstrong 

Armstrong Cork Company 

Mr. Jefferson G. Artz 

Dr. S. E. Ashmore 

Miss Carol Ann Augustus 

Mrs. Maud Aukerman 

Mr. John M. Awad 

Mr. McCarrell Ayers 

Mr. W. E. Ayres 

Mrs. W. E. Ayres 

Mr. John J. Babb 

Mr. Joseph N. Bailey, III 

Mrs. Joe N. Bailey, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon Bailey, Sr. 

Dr. Thomas A. Baines 

Dr. Dorothy F. Bainton 

Miss Jane Elizabeth Baker 

Dr. Martin Baker 

Mrs. Martin Baker 

Michael Baker, Jr., Inc. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Baker 

Dr. Richard Baltz 

Bank of Mississippi 

Mr. Jeptha S. Barbour 

Mr. Battle M. Barksdale 

Mrs. Battle M. Barksdale 

Mrs. Battle Barksdale 

Mr. J. L. Barnes 

Mr. John .H, Barnes 

Miss Vera E. Barron 

Mr. Charles S. Barry 

Mrs. Charles S. Barry 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Bartling 

Mr. M. Doby Bartling 

Mrs. Ralph R. Bartsch 

Mrs. Emily MacDuff Barwicfc 

Dr. Ross Bass 

Mrs. Ross Bass 

Mr. Wallace W. Bass 

Mr. John C. Batte 

Dr. A. V. Beacham 

Mr. L. Lamar Beacham, Jr. 

Mr. F. M. Blaird, Jr. 

Mrs. Lester L. Bear 

Mrs. Robert Beckett 

Mr. Frederick M. Belk 

Mr. Robert E. Bell 

Mr. William B. Bell 

Mrs. William B. Bell 

Mrs. F. G. Bennett 

Mr. Joseph S. Bennett 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bernius 

Dr. Roy A. Berry 

Mrs. W. G. Bertschinger 

Big Ten Tire Company 

Biggs, Weir, Neal and Chastain 

Binder and Bush, Attorneys 

Mrs. Robert E. Bird 

Mr. Walter Richard Bivins 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Carl Black, Jr. 

Dr. Ronald P. Black 

Mrs. A. J. Blackmon 

Dr. Richard L. Blount 

Mr. Don BIythe 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Bobo, Sr. 

Mrs. Frances Boeckman 

Miss Sally Ann Boggan 

Dr. Oscar D. Bonner 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Boone 

Mr. Howard E. Boone 

Mrs. Ralph Boozman 

The Borden Company 

Mrs. Elma C. Bomman 

Bostick Brothers, Inc. 

Mrs. Larry L. Bouchillon 

Mr. George T. Bounds 

Dr. C. A. Bowen 

Mrs. C. A. Bowen 

Dr. Frank Bowen 

Mrs. Howard K. Bowman, Jr. 



Mr. David Boydstun 

Miss Mary Margaret Boyles 

J. C, Bradford Company 

Mr. C. Norman Bradley 

Mrs. C. Norman Bradley 

Mr. Tom P. Brady 

Dr. L. H. Brandon 

Dr. Carl D. Brannan 

Miss Otie G. Bransetter 

Rev. Otho M. Brantley 

Rev. R. R. Branton 

Mrs. R. R. Branton 

Miss Christine Brewer 

Mr. W. P. Bridges, Jr. 

Mrs. W. P. Bridges, Jr. 

Mr. J. Barry Brindley 

Mrs. J. Barry Brindley 

Mr. and Mrs. Carol Brinson 

Mr. J. Denny Britt 

Mrs. J. Denny Britt 

Miss Josie Britton 

Mr. V. J. Brocato 

Mr. C. G. Brock 

Miss Beverly Brooks 

Chaplain J. H. Brooks 

Mrs. J. H. Brooks 

Miss Sara Brooks 

Estate of W. T. Brown 

Mr. James C. Brown 

Miss Judy Browne 

Mr. Rex Brown 

Rev. Joseph B. Brunini 

Mr. Edmund L. Brunini 

Mr. George H. Brunson 

Mr. Terry Breckalow 

Mr. Billy M. Bufkin 

Mrs. D. W. Bufkin 

Mr. W. E. Bufkin 

Miss Marjorie Lee Buie 

W. M. Buie Insurance Agency 

Mr. W. M, Buie, III 

Mr. Cal W. Bullock, Jr. 

Rev. and Mrs. Carl M. Bullock 

Dr. Hugh J. Burford 

Mr. James D. Burwell 

Mrs. James D. Burwell 

Mr. John L. Burwell 

Mr. Steve Bur\vell, Jr. 

Mrs. Steve Burwell, Jr. 

Miss Patricia Bush 

Mr. C. M Butler 

Dr. Wilton Bvars, II 

Mrs. Wilton Byars, II 

Mr. B. E. Cain 

Dr. Charles E. Cain 

Rev. J. B. Cain 

Mrs. Henry Caldwell 

Mrs. Neal Calhoun 

Mr. A. D. Califf 

Dr. Shirley Callen 

Dr. Claude G. Callender 

Mr. Robert E. Calloway 

Mrs. James A. Cameron 

Mrs. Carey W. Campbell 

Campbell Construction Co. 

Mr. James B. Campbell 

Mr. Rex D. Cannon 

Capitol Broadcasting Co. 

Capitol Street Methodist Church 

Capitol Tobacco & Specialty Co., 

Inc. 
Capitol Welding Supply Company 
Mrs. Charles M. Coravati 
Mr. Charles E. Carmichael 
Miss Cassell C. Carpenter 
Miss Dianna Carpenter 
Mr. Travis T. Carpenter 
Mr. Oscar C. Carr, Jr. 
Mr. R. B. Carr 
Miss Irene Carroll 
Mi.ss Camille Carson 
Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Carter, Jr. 
Mr. Sam P. Carter 
Mr. William O. Carter, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cartwright 
Mr. R. Dyson Casbum 
Mr. Alex L. Case 
Rev. John M. Case 
Mrs. John M. Case 
Cataphote Corporation 
Mr. Phillip M. Catchings 
Miss Elizabeth Ann Catha 
Mr. C. N. Catledge 
Mrs. C. N. Catledge 
Mr. Clint Cavett 
Central School Supply Company 



Mr. Anthony M. Champagne 

Mrs. P. N. Chase 

Mrs. W. A. Chase 

Miss Alice A. Chesser 

Miss Alice L. Chilton 

Mr. Chun Pang Chin 

Mr. John H. Christmas 

Mrs. John H. Christmas 

Mr. W. K. Christovich 

Rev. C. C. Clark 

Mr. Grover C. Clark, Jr. 

Mr. John B. Clark 

Mr. Julian L. Clark 

Mr. Leonard Ellis Clark 

Miss Lynn Clark 

Mr. Victor B. Clark 

Mr. N. E. Clarkson 

Mrs. N. E. Clarkson 

The Clayton Fund 

Miss Martha Clayton 

Mr. Richard D. Clayton 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Clayton 

Mrs. B. H. Clegg 

Climate Engineers, Inc. 

Coastal Chemical Corp. 

Miss Jov Cockrell 

Mr. H. S. Cohoon 

Mrs. Frances Coker 

Mr. Sam G. Cole, HI 

Mrs. Sam G. Cole, HI 

Miss Mary Susan Collins 

Mr. Roy P. Collins 

Mrs. Roy P. Collins 

Mr. Harris Collins 

Dr. W. L. Collins 

Mrs. A. J. Comfort 

Commercial National Bank 

Mrs. J. F. Conger 

Mr. Ed Connell 

Mr. C. Willis Connell 

Rev. J. S. Conner 

Mrs. J. S. Conner 

Mr. Lucian W. Conner 

Mr. Joseph S. Conti 

Continental Can Company 

Mr. Philip R. Converse 

Miss Carol Ann Cook 

Mr. Gilbert P. Cook 

Rev. John H. Cook 

Mrs. John H. Cook 

Mr. R. P. Cook, Sr. 

Mr. R. P. Cook, III 

Mr. W. G. Cook, Sr. 

Mr. George E. Cooper 

Mr. H. V. Cooper 

Mr. Robert E. Cooper 

Mr. William Charles Cooper 

Mr. G. C. Cortright, Jr. 

Mr. Peter J. Costas 

Mr. Armond Coullet 

Mrs. Armond Coullet 

Dr. Eugene H. Countiss 

Miss Dolores J. Craft 

Miss Elizabeth Craig 

Mr. James W. Craig 

Mr. E. J. Craigo 

Mr. R. L. Crawford 

Mrs. R. L. Crawford 

Miss Carolyn Sue Crecink 

Mr. John W. Crisler 

Dr. W. L. Crouch 

Mrs. W. L. Crouch 

Dr. Dan F. Crumpton, Jr. 

Mr. R. P. Crutcher 

Miss Kathleen Cummings 

Mrs. P. E. Cunningham 

Rev. George T. Currey 

Mrs. George T. Currey 

Mr. Tracy Currie 

Mr. J. G. Curtis 

Miss Martha E. Curtis 

Mr. and Mrs. George Dahlin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Daiches 

Dr. Enoch Dangerfield 

Miss Donna Ruth Daniel 

Mrs. Helen Daniel 

Daniel Coker Horton 

Daniel Coker and Horton 

Miss Alice E. Davis 

Miss Dorothy May Davis 

Mr. J. Harper Davis 

Mrs. Hartwell Davis, Jr. 

Miss Iva Lou Davis 

Jones S. Davis Foundation 

Mr. Mendell M. Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell C. Davis 



Mi.ss Ruby Kay Dawson 

Mr. L. D. Dean 

Mr. William J. Decell 

Mrs. Philip Decker 

Mr. James W. Dees 

Joe T. Dehmer Distributor, Inc. 

Delta Exploration Company, Inc. 

Delta Steel Company 

Miss Pauline O. Dement 

Mr. Vance Dement 

Mr. E. A. DeMillei 

Dr. C. H. Denser, Jr. 

Mr. Partee Denton 

Mrs. Wayne Denington 

Mr. Kenneth R. Dew 

Mr. Thomas A. DeWeese 

Dixie Rubber Stamp Company 

Mrs. Samuel E. Dixon, Jr. 

Mrs. Henry Dodge 

Rev. Blanton Doggett 

Mr. David Doggett 

Mr. and Mrs. George Donovan 

Mr. George Donovan 

Mr. Reid P. Dorr 

Miss Adrienne Doss 

Mr. J. Kearney Dossett 

Mr. Wayne Dowdy 

Mrs. Wayne Dowdy 

Mr. Michael B. Drane 

Mr. William G. Duck 

Mr. Richard M. Dunn 

Rev. A. Eugene Dyess 

Mr. P. H. Eager, Jr. 

Mr. Wilber Clyde Eakin 

Miss Mary Ann Edge 

Dr. Boyd C. Edwards 

Dr. Edwin W. Edwards 

Dr. J. B. Edwards, III 

Miss Jo F. Edwards 

Mr. Paul E. Eiwards 

Mr. John Fontaine Egger, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Elrod 

Dr. Leo Elson 

Mr. J. O. Emmerich 

Engineers Laboratories, Inc. 

Mr. Shaw Enochs, Jr. 

Rev. R. L. Entrekin 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

Mr. Eugene M. Ervin 

Esso Education Foundation 

Dr. John W. Evans 

Mr. R. L. Ezelle, Jr. 

Mr. William Ezelle 

Rev. Thomas B. Fanning 

Mrs. Herbert Fant 

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Fatherree 

Mr. T. Benton Fatherree 

Mr. Donald E. Faulkner 

Miss Cindy A. Felder 

Dr. James S. Ferguson 

Mrs. James S. Ferguson 

Mrs. Robert Field 

Miss Mary Ann Finch 

Mr. H. E. Finger 

First Federal Savings and Loan 

Association 
First Mississippi Corporation 
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Fish 
Mrs. Alvin P. Flannes 
Mr. Edward Fleming 
Mrs. Edward Fleming 
Rev. G. Harold Fleming 
Dr. Richard C. Fleming 
Mr. W. B. Fletcher, Jr. 
Mr. Calvin E. Flint, Jr. 
Mr. Henry G. Flowers 
Miss Leslie Jeanne Floyd 
Dr. B. P. Folk 
Mrs. B. P. Folk 
Mrs. S. J. Foose 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Y. Foote 
The Ford Foundation 
Forestry Suppliers, Inc. 
Mr. C. H. Foster, Jr. 
Mrs. C. H. Foster, Jr. 
Mr. Frank Foster 
Mr. and Mrs. John Barr Foster 
Mr. James Ray Fountain, Jr. 
Mr. James E. Fowler 
Mr. Hal T. Fowlkes 
Mr. J. T. Fowlkes 
Mrs. J. T. Fowlkes 
Mrs. Montyne Fox 
Fox-Everett, Inc. 
John and Mary Franklin 

Foundation 



21 



Bishop Marvin A. Franklin 

Mr. David D. Franks 

Mrs. David D. Franks 

Lieutenant (jg) Dumont Freeman, 

III 
Mr. Erwvn Freeman 
Dr. Howard C. Friday 
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Frugl 
Mr. Le.ster L. Furr, Jr. 
Mr. William P. Furr 
Mrs. James Tate Gabbert 
Mr. Ewin D. Gaby, Jr. 
Mrs. Ewin D. Gaby, Jr. 
Miss Brenda Gaddy 
Miss Brenda Joyce Gaddy 
Mr. S. H. Gaines 
Rev. Andrew F. Gallman 
Mr. Charles B. Galloway 
Mr. William F. Galtney 
Mrs. T. A. Gamblin 
Mrs. R. Gilmer Garmon 
Miss Polly Gatlin 
Mr. and Mrs. C. V. Gault 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Geary 
Lt. Col. Arthur N. Gentry 
Mr. Charles Gerald 
Mrs. Charles Gerald 
Mr. J. R. Germany 
Rev. R. O. Gerow 
Mr. L. A. Gilliam, Jr. 
Miss Bessie W. Gilliland 
Mr. Chauncey R. Godwin 
Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Golding, Jr. 
Mr. Joe Gonzales, Jr. 
Mr. W. F. Goodman, Jr. 
Mr. Larry M. Goodpaster 
Mr. Arthur Goodsell 
Mrs. Arthur Goodsell 
Mr. David Gordon 
Mr. Lance Goss 
Miss Kathryn Lynn Grabau 
Graduate Supply House 
Dr. Billy M. Graham 
Mr. and Mrs. Butello Graham 
Mr. Stanley Graham 
Dr. W. L. Graham 
Mrs. W. L. Graham 
Mr. Ernest Graves 
Dr. J. H. Graves 
Dr. Sidney O. Graves 
Mr. J. W. Green, Jr. 
Mrs. J. W. Green, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack F. Greene 
Miss Emilv Greener 
Mr. Billy C. Greenlee 
Mr. O. T. Greenlee 
Miss Dorothy V. Greer 
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Grenfell 
Mrs. Jane L. Gresley 
Mr. Aubrev C. Griffin 
Mr. Chris Grillis, Jr. 
Mr. Shelby M. Grubbs 
Mr. John L. Guest 
Mrs Karl G. Guild 
Gulf Oil Foundation 
Dr. Arthur C. Guyton 
Rev. and Mrs. Guy Halford 
Mrs. D. H. Hall 
Hall Foundation. Inc. 
Mrs. J. D. HaU 
Mr. M. H. Hall, Sr. 
Mr. Charles R. Hallford 
Mr. L. M. Hamberlin 
Mr. John Eudy Hamby 
Mr. Thomas G. Hamby 
Mrs. Thomas G. Hamby 
Mr. Howard Hamill 
Mrs. A. P. Hamilton 
John Hancock Insurance Company 
Dr. Albert P. Hand 
Mr. James Hand. Jr. 
Mr. William T. Hanklns 
Miss Daphne S. Harden 
Mr. Paul D. Hardin 
Mr. Phil Hardin 
Dr. William J. Hardin 
Mrs. William J. Hardin 
Mr. Robert L. Harper 
Miss Elizabeth Harrell 
Mr. Robert F. Harrell 
Mr. Don Harrigill 
Mrs. Doft Harrigill 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack L. Harris 
Miss Nancy Ann Harris 
Dr. William C. Harris 
Mr. W. C. Harrison 
Mrs. W. C. Harrison 
Miss Charlotte A. Hart 
Harts Bakery 
Mrs. S. F. Hart 
Harvey Construction Co. 
Lt. Col. V. B. Hathorn, Jr. 
Dr. James R. Hatten 
Dr. Shin Hayao 
Mr. Charles F. Hayes 



Mr. Victor W. Head 

Mr. Malcolm Heard, Sr. 

Hearn Oil Co. 

Mr. Jame;. E. Hearon 

Mrs. K. E. Hederi 

Miss Carol L. Hederman 

Dr. William R. Hendee 

Mrs. William R. Hendee 

Miss Betty Jean Henderson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Henderson 

Mr. F. E. Henson 

Hercules, Inc. 

Mr. Dan Herlong 

Mrs. Dan Herlong 

Mr. William J. Herm 

Mrs. William J. Herm 

Mrs. Beverly Herring 

Mr. W. B. Herring 

Mr. Jefferson M. Hester 

Mr. Byron T. Hetrick 

Mr. Purser Hewitt 

Miss Susanne Hicks 

Rev. John A. Higginbotham 

Mr. James Allen High, Jr. 

Mrs. Paul T. Hill 

Rev. Byrd Hillman 

Miss Joy Zelda Hilton 

Mr. S. R. Hinds 

Mrs. S. R. Hinds 

Mr. J. Herman Hines 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd L. Hobbs 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Hodges 

Mr. Ale.x A. Hogan 

Mr. Bill Hogg, Jr. 

Miss Reida Hollingsworth 

Mr. C. C. Hollomon 

Mrs. C. C. Hollomon 

Miss Floy HoUoman 

Rev. Garland Holloman 

Mrs. Nancy HoUoway 

Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Holley, Jr. 

Mr. Richard M. B. Holmes 

Mr. Sub Holmes 

Miss Beth Hood 

Mr. Orvel E. Hooker 

Mr. Albert L. Hopkins 

Dr. William D. Horan 

Miss Mildred Horn 

Lt. Col. Marion E. Horton 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hough 

Household Finance Foundation 

Miss Caroline Howe 

Mrs. Virgil Howie 

Mr. Carl G. Howorth 

Mr. John R. Hubbard 

Dr. J. Manning Hudson 

Mr. Edward W. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Y. L. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. Calvin Hull 

Mr. J. F. Humber, Jr. 

Miss Beverly Jo Humphries 

Rev. J. T. Humphries 

Dr. B. M. Hunt 

Mrs. F. A. Hunt 

Miss Melinda Hutcherson 

International Business Machines 

Corporation 
Mr. Philip E. Irby, Jr. 
Irby Construction Company 
Jackson Clearing House 
Jackson Jitney Jungle 
Jackson Oil Products Company 
Jackson Patrol Service 
Mrs. T. G. Jackson, Jr. 
Jackson Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 
Jackson Steam Laundry 
Jackson Stone Company 
Mr. Harry Jacobs 
Mrs. Harry Jacobs 
Mr. Glenn James 
Mrs. Glenn James 
Mr. William J. James 
Mrs. William J. James 
Miss Ann E. Jenkins 
Mr. J. Howard Jenkins, Jr. 
Mrs. J. Howard Jenkins, Jr. 
Mr. E. R. Jobe 
Mrs. Charles T. Johnson 
Mrs. R. H. Johnson, Jr. 
Mrs. W. W. Johnson 
Mr. Wendell Johnson 
Mr. Brent L. Johnston 
Mrs. Brent L. Johnston 
Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Johnson, Jr. 
Mr. J. Harvey Johnston, Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cledice T. Jones 
Mr. Lib B. Jones 
Miss Virginia Anne Jones 
Rev. W. M. Jones 
Dr. Warren C. Jones 
Mr. Warren C. Jones, Jr. 
Dr. William B. Jones 
Mrs. Willie C. Jones 
Miss Cindy Jordan 
Mr. Bert Jordan 



A. Joseph Company 

Mr. Ernest L. Joyner 

Kalem Methodist Church 

Mrs. Eunice Karow 

Mrs. W. H. Karstedt 

Mr. Wylie V. Kees 

Rev. and Mrs. C. Keller, Jr. 

Mr. Isaiah B. Kelly 

Estate of Dr. A. A. Kem 

Mr. S. H. Kernell 

Mr. William B. Kerr 

Miss Louise Killingsworth 

Miss Mathilde Killingsworth 

Mr. Donald D. Kilmer 

Mr. John T. Kimball 

Mrs. John T. Kimball 

Mr. John L. King 

Mr. W. Hampton King 

Dr. Richard F. Kinnard 

Mr. \V. J. Klaus 

Mr. Charles C. Kleinschmidt 

Mr. Charles E. Klinck 

Mrs. Catherine P. Klipple 

Miss Marie Knapp 

Mr. G. M. Knight 

Mr. Harland L. Knight 

Mr. Robert B. Kochtitzky 

Mr. Philip Kolb 

Mrs. Philip Kolb 

Mr. Phillip A. Koonce 

Krystal Company Foundation 

Miss Jo Ann Kux 

Kwik Kafe of Jackson, Inc. 

Mrs. S. Hudson Kyle 

Lamar Life Insurance Company 

Lamar Outdoor Inc. 

Mr. Clifton G. Lamb, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Lampton 

Miss Carol Lane 

Dr. Frank M. Laney, Jr. 

Mr. L. C. Latham 

Miss Dorothy Lauderdale 

Rev. George Roy Lawrence 

Mrs. Bill Lax 

Mr. M. N. Lay 

Miss Mary F. Lay 

Mr. Reber B. Layton 

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Leake 

Mr. G3orge D. Lee 

Mrs. Joseph T. Lee 

Mr. L. H. Lee, Jr. 

Mr. Stephen H. Leech 

Dr. J. W. Leggett, Jr. 

Rev. J. W. Leggett, III 

Mrs. J. W. Leggett, III 

Mr. Emmet Leonard 

Miss Annie W. Lester 

Dr. R. W. Levenway 

Mr. Dempsey M. Levi 

Mr. James H. Lewis 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon E. Lewis, Jr. 

Mr. Morris Lewis, Jr. 

Dr. T. W. Lewis, III 

Mrs. T. W. Lewis, III 

Mr. Arthur Liles 

Mr. Hubert S. Lipscomb 

Mrs. Hubert S. Lipscomb 

Mrs. J. W. Lipscomb 

Mr. Rodney A. Little 

Mrs. Rodney A. Little 

Mr. James Livesay 

Mrs. James Livesay 

Mr. Sidney Levingston 

Mr. Kimball Livingston 

Mr. Henry S. Loeb 

Miss Margaret R. Longest 

Mr. W. C. Longmire 

Mr. W. E. Loper, Jr. 

Mr. Gerald Lord 

Lott Vendors, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Love 

Mr. and Mrs. James Buie Love 

Mr. N. W. Lovitt 

Mrs. R. W. Lowe 

Mrs. F. Coleman Lowery, Jr. 

Mr. Edwin W. Lowther 

Mrs. William E. Luoma 

Mrs. M. J. Luster 

Mr. Jimmy L. Lyles 

Mrs. Leise J. MacDuff 

Mr. R. L. MacLeUan 

Mr. D. D. Maddox 

Mr. R. H. Magruder 

Mr. J. T. Majure 

Mr. W. Palmer Manning 

Mr. James M. Marble 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Marett 

Mr. L. P. Marshall 

Miss Lynn Marshall 

Dr. Albert F. Martin 

Mr. David Lloyd Martin 

Martin School Equip. Co. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Martin, Jr. 

Mrs. Lawrence B. Martin 

Dr. Raymond Martin 



Mr. Fred Massey 

Mrs. Fred Massey 

Dr. James D. Massie 

Mr. Robert Mark Matheny 

Mr. Jesse P. Matthews, Jr. 

Mr. John M. Mattingly 

Mrs. Joe Henry Maw 

Maxwell, Spencer and Hust 

Mr. Robert O. May 

Mrs. W. W. May 

Mr. Robert C. Maynor 

Mrs. Robert C. Maynor 

Mr. Robert M. Mayo, Jr. 

Mr. Robert McCarley 

Mrs. Robert McCarley 

Dr. Ben McCarty Jr. 

Mr. H. F. McCarty 

Mr. W. B. McCarty, Sr. 

McCarty-Holman Company, Inc. 

Mr. Joe B. McCaskill 

Mrs. Joe B. McCaskill 

Mr. James McClure 

Mrs. Virginia McCoy 

Mr. Dan McCullen 

Mr. Ray McCullen 

Mrs. Ray McCullen 

Miss Mary Ann McDonald 

Dr. T. F. McDonnell 

Mrs. T. F. McDonnell 

Dr. Ben McEachin 

Mr. H. B. McGehee 

Mrs. B. H. McGehee 

Mr. J. B. McGehee 

Dr. Curtis H. McGown, II 

McGraw-Hill, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. R. McHorse 

Miss Dorothy A. Mclnvale 

Mr. Daniel D. McKee 

Rev. W. C. McLelland 

Mrs. W. C. McLelland 

Mrs. Charles L. McLemore 

Miss Susan McLemore 

Mr. R. D. McLendon 

Mr. David McMullan 

Mrs. David McMullan 

Mr. W. P. McMullan 

Mrs. Madeleine McMullan 

Mrs. Dorothy McNair 

McNees Medical Supply Co. 

Mr. John M. McRae 

Mr. Richard McRae 

Mrs. Richard McRae 

Rev. Julius McRaney 

Mr. George M. McWilliams 

Mrs. George M. McWilliams 

Miss Becky Meacham 

Mrs. John Meacham, Jr. 

Mr. R. R. Meacham 

Mrs. T. G. Meaders, Jr. 

Mr. Dewitt T. Measells 

Mr. Doug Medley 

Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Meisburg 

Miss Linosey B. Mercer 

Metropolitan Life 

Mr. Leonard Metts 

Miazza, DeMiller & Word 

Mr. L. G. Milam, Jr. 

Mr. H. D. Miller, Jr. 

Mrs. H. D. Miller, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norton Miller 

Miller Oil Purchasing Company 

Mississippi Valley Gas Company 

Mississippi Bedding Company 

Mississippi Materials Company 

Mississippi Milk Prod. Assn. 

Mississippi Power & Light Con 

pany 
M.P.I. Industries 
Mississippi School Supply 
Mississippi Stationery Company 
Mississippi Iron & Steel Compan 
Dr. Don Q. Mitchell 
Mrs. Don Q. Mitchell 
Mr. Guy Mitchell, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Larry Mitchell 
Mrs. Prentiss Mitchell 
Lane Moak Pontiac 
Mrs. Noel Monaghan 
Mr. and Mrs. K. W. Montgomery 
Miss Thelma Moody 
Dr. John W. Moore 
Mrs. John W. Moore 
Miss Pamela J. Moore 
Dr. R. Edgar Moore 
Dr. Ross H. Moore 
Mrs. Ross H. Moore 
Miss Helen Morehead 
Miss Mildred L. Morehead 
Capt. J. K. Morgan, Jr. 
Miss Margaret Lynn Morris 
Mr. W. Howard Morris 
Mr. James H. Morrow 
Rev. Dwyn M. Mounger 
Mr. Thomas R. MuUins 
Mr. R. S. Munford 



22 



Mutual of New York 

Dr. and Mrs. Onnie P. Myers 

Mr. W. D. Myers 

Mrs. W. D. Myers 

Mr. William C. Nabors 

Dr. R. W. Naef 

Mrs. R. W. Naef 

Mr. N. K. Nail 

Mr. Louis Navarro 

Mrs. Louis Navarro 

Mr. T. H, Naylor, Jr. 

Mrs, T. H. Naylor, Jr. 

Dr. Thomas N. Naylor 

Mrs. Thomas N. Naylor 

Mr. Bob Neblett 

Mr. Fred Neil 

Mr. Dave M. Neill 

Mr. John A. Neill 

Mrs. Horace A. Nelson 

Dr. Sarah Waudine Nelson 

Mr. H. M. Newcomb 

Mrs. Charles H. Newell, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard Nichols 

Mr. Robert G. Nichols, Jr. 

Rev. C. W. Nicholson 

Mr. E. H. Nicholson 

Mrs. E. H. Nicholson 

Miss Gloria J. Nicholson 

Mr. J. W. Nicholson, Jr. 

Mrs. J. W. Nicholson, Jr. 

Miss Gloria J. Nicholson 

Mr. Sam Niemetz 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Noel 

Norris Industries, Inc. 

Northside Civitan Club 

Miss Ora Nunley 

Miss Mary O'Bryant 

Mr. Joseph W. O. Callaghan 

Miss Glenda Odom 

Mr. Joseph C. Odom 

Mrs. Joseph C. Odom 

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. O'Ferrell 

Mr. Kindren O'Keete 

Mr. Paul Oliver 

Mrs. Tom O'Shields 

Mr. N. W. Overstreet 

Overstreet Kuykendall 

Mr. William H. Owens 

Mr. Tom Pace 

Mr. Lawrence G. Painter, Jr. 

Mr. Fred Parker 

Mr. Lynn C. Parker 

Dr. Marion P. Parker 

Mr. A. L. Parman 

Mrs. Don Parsons 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Van Partridge 

Mrs. Glenn P. Pate 

Mr. Dick T, Patterson 

Dr. J. W. Patterson 

Mr. and Mrs. Kelly Patterson 

Mr. George E. Patton 

Col. J. W. Patton, Jr. 

Mrs. Hugh Payne 

Miss Mary F. Payne 

Mr. Randolph D. Peets, Jr. 

Mrs. Randolph D. Peets, Jr. 

Mr. William I. Peltz 

Bishop E. J. Pendergrass 

Miss Louise Perkins 

Mr. John Burton Perkins 

Dr. James Perry 

Pet Dairy Products, Co. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pharis, Jr. 

Mr. C. W. Phillips 

Mrs. Ralph T. Phillips 

Phoenix of Hartford 

Mr. George B. Pickett 

Mr. George Pickett, Jr. 

Mrs. George Pickett. Jr. 

Mr. R. T. Pickett, Jr. 

Mrs. R. T. Pickett, Jr. 

Rev. Charles H. Pigott 

Honorable Abe Plough 

Mr. John H. Poag 

Mr. Frank E. Polanski 

Mrs. J. R. Posey, Jr. 

Post & Witty 

Miss Carol Anne Powero 

Mr. Spencer B. Powers 

Presto Manufacturing Company 

Mr. James R. Preston 

Rev. T. O, Prewitt 

Mrs. J. B. Price 

Mr. James H. Price 

Mr. Joseph M. Price 

Mr. Milton E. Price 

Dr. Richard Priddy 

Prudential Ins. Co. 

Mr. Paul Pullen 

Mrs. W. H. Pullen, Jr. 

Mrs. H. E. Purvis, Jr. 

Mr. Percy Quinn 

Mr. Tommy Ranager 

Mr. Edward Lee Ranck 

Mr. E. P. Rawson 



Mrs. E. P. Rawson 

Miss Esther Read 

Dr. Edwin L. Redding 

Mrs. Edwin L. Redding 

Mr. Gordon R. Reeves 

Mr. James Leslie Reeves 

Reid McGee & Company 

Dr. Lee H. Reiff 

Mrs. Rose Wells Reynolds 

Mrs. J. Earl Rhea 

Miss Rebecca Rice 

Miss Alene Richardson 

Miss Daphne Richardson 

Mr. J. Melvin Richardson 

Rev. W. R. Richerson 

Richton Methodist Church 

Mr. and Mrs. Joel Ricks 

Mr. and Mrs. Tally Riddell 

Mr. C. R. Ridgwav 

Mrs. C. R. Ridgway 

Miss Ellnora Riecken 

Mrs. William E. Riecken 

Mr. Frank A. Riley 

Estate of Solon F. Riley 

Dr. William Riley 

Mr. Arnold A. Ritchie 

Mrs. O. R. Rivers 

Mrs. Frank E. Rives 

Mr. Richard Robbins 

Mrs. Elizabeth Robertson 

Mr. James N. Robertson 

Mr. W. N. Robertson, Jr. 

Mrs. Jerry G. Robinson 

Rev. W. L. Robinson 

Mr. Charlton S. Roby 

Mrs. Charlton S. Roby 

Mr. E. O. Roden 

Mrs. Velma Rodgers 

Mr, Alex Rogers 

Mr. Arthur L. Rogers, Jr. 

Miss Emma Rogers 

Miss Gwendolyn Rogers 

Mr. Nat S. Rogers 

Mrs. Nat S. Rogers 

Miss Gloria J. Rogillio 

Mr. W. Emory Rose 

Miss Helen G. Rosebrough 

Mr. I. A. Rosenbaum, Jr. 

Dr. Thomas G. Ross 

Mr. Sam J. Ruff 

Miss Marguerite Rush 

Mr. C. H. Russell, Jr. 

Mrs. G. C. Russell 

Mr. John .'\nthony Ryan 

Mr. Joseph J. Sodka 

Miss Margaret A. Sample 

Dr. A. G. Sanders 

Mrs. A. G. Sanders 

Mr. Albert Sanders, Jr. 

Mr. J. M. Sanders 

Mrs. Dewey R. Sanderson 

Mr. and Mrs. J. K. Sandusky 

Mr. James E. Sandusky 

Mr. Melvis Scarborough 

Dr. and Mrs. Louis Schiesari 

Mr. James W. Schimpf 

Mrs. James W. Schimpf 

Mr. Al. J. Schultz 

Mrs. Charles C. Scott 

Mr. Samuel Scott 

Mrs. Samuel Scott 

Mr. T. K. Scott 

Mr. Tom B. Scott, Jr. 

Mrs. Tom B. Scott, Jr. 

Ssars Roebuck & Company 

Mrs. R. M. Seawright 

Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Self 

Mr. W. G. Shackelford 

Mrs. W. G. Shackelford 

Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Shands 

Mr. William E. Shanks 

Mrs. William E. Shanks 

Mrs. John T. Sharp 

Mr. James A. Shaw, III 

Mr. Jerry Wayne Sheffield 

Mr. and Mrs. W, R. Shepherd 

Mr. Jack O. Shuford, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Shurley 

Miss Dorothy Ellen Sibley 

Mr. John L. Sigman 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ivan Simmons 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter Simmons 

Mr. R. S. Simpson 

Mrs. Stanley Sims 

The Singer Company 

Dr. W. F. Sistrunk 

Mrs. James B. Skewes 

Mrs. James H. Skewes 

Mr. Joseph Skinner 

Mrs. Joseph Skinner 

Dr. J. D. Slay 

Mr. Catchings B. Smith 

Mr. Cecil H. Smith 

Mr. David A. Smith 

Hershel Smith Company 



Miss Irene Marie Smith 
Mrs. James K. Smith 
Mr. Joshua D. Smith 
Mr. W. C. Smith, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Smith 
Dr. J. 0. Snowden, Jr. 
Mr. John Charles Sorrells 
Mr. Charles M. Sours 
South Central Plumbing 
South Central Bell Telephone 

Company 
Mr. John M. Spaugh 
Leland Speed-Mounger & Co. 
Speed Mechanical Inc. 
Mr. W. H. Spell 
Mr. Collins Spencer 
Mr. Jimmy Spinks 
Mr. Walter Spiva, Jr. 
Mrs. Walter Spiva, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Splvey 
Stauffer Chemical Company 
The Hon. John C. Stennis 
Dr. George R. Stephenson 
Mr. G. A. Sterling 
Mr. Joe R. Stevens 
Mrs. Joe R. Stevens 
Mr. Gary Stewart 
Mrs. Nola Stewart 
Mrs. Bert W. Stiles Estate 
Mrs. Madeline Stockdell 
Mrs. Robert M. Stockett 
Mr. J. F. Stodghill 
Miss Bess Stoker 
Miss Betsy Stone 
Mrs. Dick Stone 
Mr. S. L. Stringer 
Sudie's 

Mr. E. L. Summer 
Superior Sales Company 
Dr. John E. Sutphin, Sr. 
Mr. C. M. Swango, Jr. 
Mrs. Allen C. Swarts 
Miss Bethany Swearingen 
Dr. M. B. Swearingen 
Mrs. M. B. Swearingen 
Dr. Jonathan Sweat 
Svlvania Methodist Church 
Mr. J. H. Tabb 
Miss Elizabeth M. Tate 
Mr. W. F. Tate 
Mrs. W. F. Tate 
Mr. Byron Tatum 
Mrs. Robert E. Taylor, Jr. 
Mr. S. S. Taylor, Jr. 
Mrs. S. S. Taylor, Jr. 
Mr. Zach Taylor, Jr. 
Mrs. Zach Taylor, Jr. 
Temple Ford Co., Inc. 
Mrs. Merle B. Tennvson 
Dr. Kenneth D. Terrell 
Mrs. Horace Thomas 
Mr. Mitchell R. Thomas 
Mr. J. O. Thompson 
Mrs. Lonnie Thompson, Jr. 
Miss Nancy Thompson 
Mrs. Percy P. Thompson 
Dr. and Mrs. Dan Thornton, Jr. 
Mrs. Lether Thornton, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Tilghman 
Mr. W. E. Tillman 
Mrs. Lena Tohill 
Mr. Arch Toler 
Mrs. Ken Toler 
Mr. William D. Tomlin 
Mrs. W. T. Townsend 
The Trane Company 
Mr. Cecil F. Travis 
Mr. Robert C. Travis 
Miss Janice Trimble 
Mrs. Warren B. Trimble 
Mr. Donald G. Triplett 
Mrs. Joycelyn Trotter 
Mr. A. T. Tiicker 
Miss Alma Ruth Tucker 
Miss Barbara Ann Tucker 
Mr. William B. Tull, Jr. 
Mrs. William B. Tull, Jr. 
Mr. John L. Turner 
Mr. Gycelle Tynes 
Mrs. Gycelle Tynes 
Pennzoil United Inc. 
Miss Pam Upshaw 
Mr. Henry K. Van Every 
Mr. Ward W. VanSkiver 
Mr. Charles Edwin Vamer 
Dr. J. E. Vamer, Jr. 
Mrs. J. E. Varner, Jr. 
Mr. Franklin W. Vaughan 
Rev. H. W. F. Vaughan 
Vickers, Inc. 
Mr. Harol V. Sobren 
Mr. Doug Wade 
Mr. James D. Waide, III 
Miss Carol Ann Walker 
Mr. David J. Walker 



Dr. K. P. Walker 
Dr. and Mrs. Kirby Walker 
Nick Walker Ins. Agency 
Mrs. George C. Wallace 
Miss Ruth Buck Wallace 
Mrs. O. B. Walton, Jr. 
Mr. Robert L. Walton, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert L. Walton, Jr. 
Dr. A. Gayden Ward 
Mr. George L. Ward 
Mrs. George L. Ward 
Rev. James O. Ware 
Mr. Lawrence A. Waring 
Miss Dorothy Warner 
Mr. Andrew D. Warriner 
Mr. James A. Wascom 
Rev. Lovick P. Wasson 
Mr. Rhodes T. Wasson 
Mr. Thomas H. Watkins 
Will Watkins Memorial Bible 
Class — Galloway Memorial 
Methodist Church 
Mr. Steve J. Watras 
Mr. John T. Watson 
Miss Linda Watson 
Mr. P. F. Watzek 
Capt. Joseph C. Way 
Mrs. Ruby B. Weeks 
Mrs. Kathryn H. Weir 
Mrs. F. J. Weissinger 
Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Weissinger 
Miss Judy Weissinger 
Mrs. Nell M. Werkheiser 
Mr. James A. Wheeler 
Lt. Col. Harold R. White 
Mr. and Mrs. I. H. Whiteside 
Mr. Jack M. Whitney, II 
Wholesale Supply Company 
Dr. W. B. Wiener 
Miss Carolyn Wiggers 
Miss Aimee Wilcox 
Mr. John L. Wilkerson 
Dr. and Mrs. E. LeRoy Wilkins 
Mr. George M. Wilkinson 
Mr. John Larry Wilkinson 
Mr. Charles Henry Williams 
Mr. Emmett Williams, Jr. 
F. W. Williams Agency 
Mr. Jack C. Williams 
Mr. John C. Williams, Jr. 
Mrs. Nancv Williams 
Lt. R. O. Williams 
Mr. Robert L. Williams, Jr. 
Rev. Kelly Williams 
Mrs. Kelly Williams, Jr. 
Mr. W. Keith Williams 
Mr. A. N. Williamson, Jr. 
Mr. Donald W. Williamson 
Rev. Jerry M. Williamson 
Mr. Kenneth D. Wills 
Mr. N. D. Wills 
Mrs. W. G. Wills 
Mrs. H. J. Wilson 
Mr. R. Baxter Wilson 
Mr. M. M. Winkler 
Mr. William F. Winter 
Mr. Sherwood W. Wise 
Miss Alice L. Wotford 
Dr. J. L. Wofford 
Mrs. J. L. Wofford 
Dr. John D. Wofford 
Mrs. John D. Wofford 
M-. and Mrs. Karl Wolfe 
Rev. Rov Wolfe 
Mrs. Roy Wolfe 
Dr. Noel C. Womack, Jr. 
Mrs. Noel C. Womack, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank A. Wood 
Mr. J. W. Wood 
Mrs. J. W. Wood 
Mr. George F. Woodliff 
Mr. Joseph B. Woods, Jr. 
Mrs. Joseph B. Woods, Jr. 
Mr. Tommy Wooldridge 
Mrs. R. D. Wooldridge 
Mr. Wallace Wooten 
Dr. Charles N. Wright 
Mrs. Charles N. Wright 
Wright Music Company 
Mr. Donald D. Wrighton 
Mr. Claude Yarborough 
Mr. J. T. Young 
Mrs. R. H. Young 
Mr. Howard Youngblood 
Mrs. Howard Youngblood 
Mr. and Mrs. George Zeigler 
Zinsco Electrical Products 
Mr. James Zouboukos 
Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Zouboukos 



23 



STUDENTS AND 


Mr. Charles E. Carmlchael 


Rev. Thomas B. Fanning 


Miss Reida HoUlngsworth 


ALUMNI 


Miss Cassell C. Carpenter 


Mrs. Herbert Fant 


Mr. C. C. Hollomon 


Miss Nancy Diann Adams 


Miss Dianna Carpenter 


Mr. Donald E. Faulkner 


Mrs. C. C. Hollomon 


Mr. W. E. Addkison 


Miss Irene Carroll 


Miss Cindy A. Felder 


Miss Floy HoUoman 


Mr, C. Paul Allen 


Mr. William 0. Carter, Jr. 


Dr. James S. Ferguson 


Rev. Garland Holloman 


Mr. Charles R. Allen 


Mr. R. Dyson Casbum 


Mrs. James S. Ferguson 


Mr. Richard M. B. Holmes 


Mr. Charles W. Allen, Jr. 


Rev. John M. Case 


Mrs. Robert Field 


Miss Beth Hood 


Mrs. Charles W. Allen, Jr. 


Mrs. John M. Case 


Miss Marv Ann Finch 


Mr. Albert L. Hopkins 


Rev. Kex Alman, Jr. 


Mr. Phillip M. Catehings 


Mrs. Alvin P. Flannes 


Miss Mildred Horn 


Mr. George R. Andrews 


Miss Elizabeth Ann Catha 


Mr. Edward Fleming 


Miss Caroline Howe 


Miss Cornelia Armstrong 


Mr. C. N. Catledge 


Mrs. Edward Fleming 


Mr. Carl G. Howorth 


Miss Helen J. Armstrong 


Mrs. C. N. Catledge 


Dr. Richard C. Fleming 


Mr. John R. Hubbard 


Mr. Jefferson G. Artz 


Mr. Clint Cavett 


Mr. Calvin E. Flint. Jr. 


Dr. J. .Manning Hudson 


Dr. S. E. Ashmore 


Mr. Anthony M. Champagne 


Mr. Henry G. Flowers 


Mr. Calvin Hull 


Miss Carol Ann Augustus 


Mrs. P. N. Chase 


Miss Leslie Jeanne Floyd 


Miss Beverly Jo Humphries 


Mr. John M. Awad 


Miss Alice A. Chesser 


Mrs. B. P. Folk 


Rev. J. T. Humphries 


Mr. W. E. Avrcs 


Miss Alice L. Chilton 


Mr. C. H. Foster, Jr. 


Dr. B. M. Hunt 


Mrs. W. E. Ayres 


Mr. John H. Christmas 


Mrs. C. H. Foster, Jr. 


Miss Melinda Hutcherson 


Mr. Joseph N. Bailey, HI 


Mrs. John H. Christmas 


Mr. James Ray Fountain, Jr. 


Mr. Philip E. Irby, Jr. 


Mrs. Joe N. Bailey, Jr. 


Rev. C. C. Clark 


Mr. J. T. Fowlkes 


Mr. Harry Jacobs 


Dr. Thomas A. Baines 


Mr. Grover C. Clark, Jr. 


Mrs. J. T. Fowlkes 


Mrs. Harry Jacobs 


Dr. DorD'hy F. Bainton 


Mr. John B. Clark 


Mrs. Montyne Fox 


Mr. Glenn James 


Miss Jane Elizabeth Baker 


Mr. Leonard Ellis Clark 


Bishop Marvin A. Franklin 


Mrs. Glenn James 


Dr. Martin Baker 


Miss Lynn Clark 


Mr. David D. Franks 


Mr. William J. James 


.Mrs. Martin Baker 


Mr. Victor B. Clark 


Mrs. David D. Franks 


Mrs. William J. James 


Mr. Jcptha S. Barbour 


Mr. N. E. Clarkson 


Lt. (jg) Dumont Freeman, III 


Mr. J. Howard Jenkins, Jr. 


Mrs. Battle M. Barksdale 


Mrs. N. E. Clarkson 


Mr. Erwyn Freeman 


Mrs. J. Howard Jenkins, Jr. 


Mrs. Battle Barksdale 


Miss Martha Clayton 


Mr. Lester L. Furr, Jr. 


Mrs. R. H. Johnson. Jr. 


Mr. J. L. Barnes 


Mr. Richard D. Clayton 


Mrs. James Tate Gabbert 


Mr. Brent L. Johnston 


Miss Vera E. Barron 


Miss Joy Cockrell 


Mr. Edwin D. Gaby, Jr. 


Mrs. Br:nt L. Johnston 


Mr. Charles S. Barry 


Mrs. Frances Coker 


Mrs. Edwin D. Gaby, Jr. 


Mr. J. Harvey Johnston, Sr. 


Mrs. Charles S. Barry 


Mr. Sam G. Cole, III 


Miss Brenda Gaddy 


Mr. Lib B. Jones 


Mrs. Ralph R. Bartseh 


Mrs. Sam G. Cole, III 


Miss Brenda Joyce Gaddy 


Miss Virginia Anne Jones 


Mrs. Ross Bass 


Miss Mary Susan Collins 


Rev. Andrew F. Gallman 


Dr. Warren C. Jones 


Dr. A. V. Beacham 


Mr. Roy P. Collins 


Mr. Charles B. Galloway 


Mr. Warren C. Jones, Jr. 


Mr. L. Lamar Beacham, Jr. 


Mrs. Roy P. Collins 


Mrs. T. A. Gamblin 


Dr. William B. Jones 


Mr. F. M. Blaird. Jr. 


Mr. Harris Collins 


Mrs. R. Gilmer Garmon 


Miss Cindy Jordan 


Mrs. Lester L. Bear 


Dr. W. L. Collins 


Miss Polly Gatlin 


Mrs. Eunice Karow 


Mr. Frederick M. Belk 


Mrs. A. J. Comfort 


Mrs. Charles Gerald 


Mrs. W. H. Kar.stedt 


Mr. Robert E. Bell 


Mrs. J. F. Conger 


Miss Bessie W. Gilliland 


Mr. Isaiah B. Kellv 


Mr. William B. Bell 


Rev. J. S. Conner 


Mr. Chauncey R. Godwin 


Mr. S. H. Kcrnell 


Mrs. William B. Bell 


Mrs. J. S. Conner 


Mr. W. F. Goodman, Jr. 


Mr. William B. Kerr 


Mr. Joseph S. Bennett 


Mr. Joseph S. Conti 


Mr. Larry M. Goodpaster 


Mr. John T. Kimball 


Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Bemius 


Mr. Philip R. Converse 


Mr. Arthur Goodsell 


Mrs. John T. Kimball 


Mrs. W. G. Bertschinger 


Miss Carol Ann Cook 


Mrs. Arthur Goodsell 


Dr. Ritnard F. Kinnard 


Mr. Walter Richard Bivins 


Mr. Gilbert P. Cook 


Mr. Lance Goss 


Mr. Charles C. Kleinschmidt 


Dr. Ronald P. Black 


Mrs. John H. Cook 


Miss Kathryn Lynn Grabau 


Mrs. Catherine P. Klipple 


Mrs. A. J. Blackmon 


Mr. W. G. Cook, Sr. 


Dr. Billy M. Graham 


Miss Marie Knapp 


Dr. Richard L. Blount 


Mr. George E. Cooper 


Mr. Stanley Graham 


Mr. Robert B. Kochtitzky 


Mr. Don Blythe 


Mr. Robert E. Cooper 


Dr. W. L. Graham 


Mr. Philip Kolb 


Miss Sally Ann Boggan 


Mr. William Charles Cooper 


Mrs. W. L. Graham 


!Virs. )-m.ip Kolb 


Dr. Oscar D. Bonner 


Mr. Peter J. Costas 


Mr. Ernest Graves 


Miss Jo Ann Kux 


Mr. Howard E. Boone 


Mrs. Armond CouUet 


Dr. Sidney 0. Graves 


Mr. Clifton G. Lamb, Jr. 


Mrs. Ralph Boozman 


Dr. Eugene H. Countiss 


Mr. J. W. Green, Jr. 


Miss Carol Lane 


Mrs. Elma C. Bornman 


Miss Dolores J. Craft 


Mrs. J. W. Green, Jr. 


Miss Dorothy Lauderdale 


Mrs. Larry L. Bouchillon 


Mr. R. L. Crawford 


Miss Emily Greener 


Rev. George Roy Lawrence 


ivir. George T. Bounds 


Mrs. R. L. Crawford 


Mr. Billy C. Greenlee 


Mrs. Bill Lax 


Dr. C. A. Bowen 


Miss Carolyn Sue Crecink 


Mr. 0. T. Greenlee 


Miss Mary F. Lay 


Mrs. C. A. Bowen 


Mr. John W. Crisler 


Miss Dorthy V. Greer 


Mr. Reber B. Layton 


Mrs. Howard K. Bowman, Jr. 


Dr. W. L. Crouch 


Mrs. Jane L. Gresley 


Mr. George D. Lee 


Miss Mary Margaret Boyles 


Mrs. W. L. Crouch 


Mr. Aubrey C. Griffin 


Mrs. Joseph T. Lee 


Mr. C. Norman Bradley 


Miss Kathleen Cummings 


Mr. Chris Grillis, Jr. 


Mr. Stephen H. Leech 


Mrs. C. Norman Bradley 


Rev. George T. Currey 


Mr. Shelby M. Grubbs 


Dr. J. W. Leggett, Jr. 


Dr. L. N. Brandon 


Mrs. George T. Currey 


Mrs. Karl G. Guild 


Rev. J. W. Leggett, III 


Miss Otie G. Bransetter 


Mr. Tracy Currie 


Mrs. J. D. Hall 


Mrs. J. W. Leggett, III 


Rev. Otho M. Brantley 


Miss Martha E. Curtis 


Mr. Charles R. Hallford 


Mr. Emmet Leonard 


Rev. R. R. Branton 


Dr. Enoch Dangerfield 


Mr. L. M. Hamberlin 


Miss Annie W. Lester 


Mrs. R. R. Branton 


Miss Donna Ruth Daniel 


Mr. John Eudy Hamby 


Mr. Dempsey M. Levi 


Miss Christine Brewer 


Miss Dorothy May Davis 


Mr. Thomas G. Hamby 


Mr. James H. Lewis 


Mr. W. P. Bridges, Jr. 


Mr. J. Harper Davis 


Mrs. Thomas G. Hamby 


Dr. T. W. Lewis, III 


Mrs. W. P. Bridges, Jr. 


Mrs. Hartwell Davis, Jr. 


Dr. Albert P. Hand 


Mrs. T. W. Lewis, III 


Mr. J. Barry Brindley 


Miss Iva Lou Davis 


Mr. William T. Hankins 


Mr. Arthur Liles 


Mrs. J. Barry Brindley 


Mr. Mendell M. Davis 


Miss Daphne S. Harden 


Mr. Hubert S. Lipscomb 


Mr. J. Denny Britt 


Miss Ruby Kay Dawson 


Mr. Paul D. Hardin 


Mrs. Hubert S. Lipscomb 


Mrs. J. Denny Britt 


Mr. William J. Decell 


Dr. William J. Hardin 


Mrs. J. W. Lipscomb 


Mi.ss Beverly Brooks 


Mrs. Philip Decker 


Mrs. William J. Hardin 


Mr. Rodney A. Little 


Chaplain J. H. Brooks 


Mr. James W. Dees 


Mr. Robert L. Harper 


Mrs. Rodney A. Little 


Mrs. J. H. Brooks 


Miss Pauline 0. Dement 


Miss Elizabeth Harrell 


Mr. James Livesay 


Mr. James C. Brown 


Dr. C. H. Denser, Jr. 


Mr. Robert F. Harrell 


Mrs. James Livesay 


Miss Judy Browne 


Mrs. Wayne Derrington 


Mr. Don Harriglll 


Mr. Kimball Livingston 


Mr. Terry Breckalow 


Mrs. Samuel E. Dixon, Jr. 


Mrs. Don Harriglll 


Miss Margaret R. Longest 


Mrs. D. W. Bufkin 


Mrs. Henry Dodge 


Miss Nancy Ann Harris 


Mr. W. C. Longraire 


Mr. W. E. Bufkin 


Rev. Blanton Doggett 


Mrs. C. W. Harrison 


Mr. W. E. Loper, Jr. 


Miss Mariorie Lee Buie 


Mr. David Doggett 


Miss Charlotte A. Hart 


Mr. Gerald Lord 


Mr. W. M. Buie, III 


Miss Adrienne Doss 


Lt. Col. V. B. Hathorn, Jr. 


Mrs. R. W. Lowe 


Mr. Cal W. Bullock, Jr. 


Mr. Wayne Dowdy 


Dr. Shin Hayao 


Mrs. F. Coleman Lowery, Jr. 


Dr. Hugh J. Burford 


Mrs. Wayne Dowdy 


Mr. Victor W. Heard 


Mr. Edwin W. Lowther 


Mr. James D. Burwell 


Mr. Michael B. Drane 


Miss Carol L. Hederman 


Mrs. William E. Luoma 


Mrs. James D. BurweU 


Mr. William G. Duck 


Dr. William R. Hendee 


Mr. J. T. Ma.iure 


Mr. John L. Burwell 


Mr. Richard M. Dunn 


Mrs. William R. Hendee 


Mr. W. Palmer Manning 


Mr. St(*Ve Burwell, Jr. 


Mr. Wilber Clyde Eakin 


Mr. Dan Herlong 


Miss Lynn Marshall 


Mrs. Steve Burwell, Jr. 


Dr. Boyd C. Edwards 


Mrs. Dan Herlong 


Dr. Albert F. Martin 


Miss Patricia Bush 


Dr. Edwin W. Edwards 


Mr. William J. Herm 


Mr. David Lloyd Martin 


Mr. C. M. But'er 


Dr. J. B. Edwards, III 


Mrs. William J. Herm 


Mrs. Lawrence B. Martin 


Dr. Wilton Byars, II 


Miss Jo F. Edwards 


Mr. Jefferson M. Hester 


Dr. Raymond Martin 


Mrs. Wilton Byars, II 


Mr. John Fontaine Egger, Sr. 


Mr. Byron T. Hetriek 


Mr. Fred Massey 


Rev. J. B. Cain 


Mr. J. O. Emmerich 


Miss Susanne Hicks 


Mrs. Fred Massey 


Mrs. Henry Caldwell 


Mr. Shaw Enochs, Jr. 


Rev. John A. Higginbotham 


Dr. James D. Massie 


Mrs. Neal Calhoun 


Rev. R. L. Entrekin 


Mrs. Paul T. Hill 


Mr. Robert Mark Matheny 


Dr. Shirley Callen 


Mr. Eugene M. Ervin 


Rev. Byrd Hillman 


Mr. Jesse P. Matthews, Jr. 


Mrs. James A. Cameron 


Dr. John W. Evans 


Miss Joy Zelda Hilton 


Mrs. Joe Henry Maw 


Mrs. Carey W. Campbell 


Mr. R. L. EzeUe, Jr. 


Mr. S. R. Hinds 


Mrs. W. W. May 


Mr. James B. Campbell 


Mr. William Ezelle 


Mrs. S. R. Hinds 


Mr. Robert C. Maynor 



24 



Mrs. Robert C. Maynor 

Mr. Robert M. Mayo, Jr. 

Mr. Robert McCarley 

Mrs. Robert McCarley 

Dr. Ben McCartv, Jr. 

Mr. W. B. McCarty, Sr. 

Mr. Joe B. McCaskill 

Mrs. Joe B. McCaskill 

Mr. James McClure 

Mr Dan McCullen 

Mr. Ray McCullen 

Mrs. Ray McCullen 

Miss Mary Ann McDonald 

Dr. T. F. McDonnell 

Mrs. T. F. McDonnell 

Dr. Ben McEachin 

Mr. H. B. McGehee 

Mrs. H. B. McGehee 

Dr. Curtis H. McGown, II 

Miss Dorothy A. Mclnvale 

Mr. Daniel D. McKee 

Rev. W. C. McLelland 

Mrs. W. C. McLelland 

Mrs. Charles L. McLemore 

Miss Susan McLemore 

Mr. David McMuUan 

Mrs. David McMullan 

Mr. John M. McRae 

Mrs. Richard McRae 

Rev. Julius McRaney 

Mr. George M. McWilliams 

Mrs. George M. McWilliams 

Miss Becky Meacham 

Mrs. T. G. Meaders, Jr. 

Mr. Dewitt T. Measells 

Mr. Doug Medley 

Miss Lindsey B. Mercer 

Mr. Leonard Metts 

Mr. H. D. Miller, Jr. 

Mrs. H. D. Miller, Jr. 

Dr. Don Q. Mitchell 

Mrs. Don Q. Mitchell 

Mrs. Prentiss Mitchell 

Miss Thelma Moody 

Dr. John W. Moore 

Mrs. John W. Moore 

Miss Pamela J. Moore 

Dr. Ross H. Moore 

Mrs. Ross H. Moore 

Miss Helen Morehead 

Miss Margaret Lynn Morris 

Rev. Dwyn M. Mounger 

Mr. Thomas R. Mullins 

Mr. W. D. Myers 

Mrs. W. D. Myers 

Mr. William C. Nabors 

Dr. R. W. Naef 

Mrs. R. W. Naef 

Mr. N. K. Nail 

Mr. Louis Navarro 

Mrs. Louis Navarro 

Mr. T. H. Naylor, Jr. 

Mrs. T. H. Naylor, Jr. 

Dr. Thomas H. Naylor 

Mrs. Thomas H. Naylor 

Mr. Bob Neblett 

Mr. John A. Neill 

Mrs. Horace A. Nelson 

Dr. Sarah Waudine Nelson 

Mrs. Charles H. Newell, Jr. 

Mr. Robert G. Nichols, Jr. 

Rev. C. W. Nicholson 

Mr. E. H. Nicholson 

Mrs. E. H. Nicholson 

Mr. J. W. Nicholson, Jr. 

Mrs. J. W. Nicholson, Jr. 

Mr. Joseph W. O'Callaghan 

Miss Gler.da Odom 

Mr. Joseph C. Odom 

Mrs. Joseph C. Odom 

Mrs. Tom O'Shields 

Mr. Lawrence G. Painter, Jr. 

Mr. Fred Parker 

Dr. Marion P. Parker 

Mrs. Don Parsons 

Mrs. Glenn P. Pate 

Mr. Dick T. Patterson 

Dr. J. W. Patterson 

Mr. George E. Patton 

Col. J. W. Patton, Jr. 

Miss Mary F. Payne 

Mr. Randolph D. Peets, Jr. 

Mrs. Randolph D. Peets, Jr. 

Bishop E. J. Pendergrass 

Miss Louise Perkins 

Mr. John Burton Perkins 

Mrs. Ralph T. Phillips 

Mr. George B. Pickett 

Mr. George Pickett, Jr. 

Mrs. George Pickett, Jr. 

Mr. R. T. Pickett, Jr. 

Mrs. R. T. Pickett, Jr. 

Rev. Charles H. Pigott 



Mr. John H. Poag 

Mrs. J. R. Posey, Jr. 

Miss Carol Anne Powers 

Mr. James R. Preston 

Rev. T. O. Prewitt 

Mr. Joseph M. Price 

Mr. Milton E. Price 

Mrs. H. E. Purvis, Jr. 

Mr. Edward Lee Ranek 

Mrs. E. P. Rawson 

Miss Esther Read 

Dr. Edwin L. Redding 

Mrs. Edwin L. Redding 

Mr. Gordon R. Reeves 

Mr. James Leslie Reeves 

Mrs. Rose Wells Reynolds 

Mrs. J. Earl Rhea 

Miss Daphne Richardson 

Mr. J. Melvin Richardson 

Rev. W. R. Richerson 

Mr. C. R. Ridgway 

Mrs. C. R. Ridgway 

Miss Ellnora Riecken 

Estate of Solon F. Riley 

Mrs. O. R. Rivers 

Mrs. Frank E. Rives 

Mr. Richard Robbins 

Mr. W. N. Robertson, Jr. 

Mrs. Jerry G. Robinson 

Rev. W. L. Robinson 

Mr. Charlton S. Roby 

Mr. Arthur L. Rogers, Jr. 

Miss Gwendolyn Rogers 

Mr. Nat S. Rogers 

Mrs. Nat S. Rogers 

Dr. Thomas G. Ross 

Mr. Sam J. Ruff 

Miss Marguerite Rush 

Mr. John Anthony Ryan 

Miss Margaret A. Sample 

Dr. A. G. Sanders. 

Mrs. A. G. Sanders 

Mr. Albert Sanders, Jr. 

Mrs. Dewey R. Sanderson 

Mr. James E. Sandusky 

Mr. Melvis Scarborough 

Mr. James W. Schimpf 

Mrs. James W. Schimpf 

Mr. Samuel Scott 

Mrs. Samuel Scott 

Mr. T. K. Scott 

Mr. Tom B. Scott, Jr. 

Mrs. Tom B. Scott, Jr. 

Mrs. R. M. Seawright 

Mr. W. G. Shackelford 

Mrs. W. G. Shackelford 

Mr. William E. Shanks 

Mrs. William E. Shanks 

Mr. James A. Shaw, III 

Miss Dorothy Ellen Sibley 

Mr. John L. Sigman 

Mr. R. S. Simpson 

Mrs. Stanlev Sims 

Dr. W. F. Sistrunk 

Mr. Joseph Skinner 

Mrs. Joseph Skinner 

Dr. J. D. Slay 

Mr. Cecil H. Smith 

Mr. David A. Smith 

Miss Irene Marie Smith 

Mrs. James K. Smith 

Mr. Joshua D. Smith 

Mr. W. C. Smith, Jr. 

Dr. J. O. Snowden, Jr. 

Mr. John Ch^rl^s Sorrells 

Mr. Charles M. Sours 

Mr. Jimmy Spinks 

Mr. Walter bpiva, Jr. 

Mrs. Walter Spiva, Jr. 

Dr. George R. Stephenson 

Mr. Joe R. Stevens 

Mrs. Joe R. Stevens 

Mr. Gary Stewart 

Mrs. Bert W. Stiles Estate 

Mrs. Madeline Stockdell 

Mrs. Robert N. Stockett 

Miss Betsy Stone 

Mrs. Dick Stone 

Mr. E. L. Summer 

Dr. John E. Sutphin, Sr. 

Mr. C. M. Swango, Jr. 

Mrs. Allen C. Swarts 

Miss Bethany Swearingen 

Dr. M. B. Swearingen 

Mrs. M. B. Swearingen 

Mr. W. F. Tate 

Mrs. W. F. Tate 

Mrs. Robert E. Tavlor, Jr. 

Mr. S. S. Taylor, Jr. 

Mrs. S. S. Taylor, Jr. 

Mr. Zach Taylor, Jr. 

Mrs. Zach Taylor, Jr. 

Mrs. Merle B. Tennyson 



Dr. Kenneth D. Terrell 
Mrs. Horace Thomas 
Mrs. Lonnie Thompson, Jr. 
Miss Nancy Thompson 
Mrs. Percy P. Thompson 
Mrs. Lether Thornton, Jr. 
Mrs. Ken Toler 
Mr. William D. Tomlin 
Mrs. W. T. Towsend 
Miss Janice Trimble 
Mrs. Warren B. Trimble 
Mr. Donald G. Triplett 
Mr. A, T. Tucker 
Miss Alma Ruth Tucker 
Miss Barbara Ann Tucker 
Mr. William B. Tull. Jr. 
Mrs. William. B. Tull, Jr. 
Mr. Gycelle Tynes 
Mrs. Gycelle Tynes 
Miss Pam Upshaw 
Mr. Henry K. Van Every 
Mr. Ward Van Skiver 
Mr. Charles Edwin Vamer 
Dr. J. E. Varner, Jr. 
Mrs. J. E. Varner, Jr. 
Mr. Franklin W. Vaughan 
Rev. H. W. F. Vaughan 
Mr. Harold V. Sebren 
Mr. Doug Wail° 
Mr. James D. Waide, III 
Miss Carolyn Ann Walker 
Mr. David J. Walker 
Miss Ruth Buck Wallace 
Mrs. O. B. Walton, Jr. 
Mr. Robert L. Walton, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert L. Walton, Jr. 
Mr. George L. Ward 
Mrs. George L. Ward 
Rev. James O. Ware 
Mr. Lawrence A. Waring 
Mr. James A. Wascom 
Rev. Lovick P. Wasson 
Mr. John T. Watson 
Capt. Joseph C. Way 
Mrs. Kathryn H. Weir 
Mrs. F. J. Weissinger 
Miss Judy Weissinger 
Mrs. Nell M. Workheiser 
Mr. Jack N. Whitney, II 
Miss Carolyn Wiggers 
Miss Aimee Wilcox 
Mr. John L. Wilkerson 
Mr. Charles Henry Williams 
Mr. Jack C. Williams 
Mr. John C. Williams, Jr. 
Lt. R. O. Williams 
Mr. Robert L. Williams, Jr. 
Rev. Kelly Williams 
Mrs. Kelly Williams, Jr. 
Mr. A. N. Williamson, Jr. 
Rev. Jerry M. Williamson 
Mr. Kenneth D. Wills 
Mr. N. D. Wills 
Mrs. W. G. Wills 
Miss Alice L. Wofford 
Dr. J. L. Wofford 
Mrs. J. L. Wofford 
Dr. John D. Wofford 
Mrs. John D. Wofford 
Rev. Roy Wolfe 
Mrs. Roy Wolfe 
Dr. .Noel C. Womack, Jr. 
Mrs. I\oeI C. Womack, Jr. 
Mr. J. W. Wood 
Mrs. J. W. Wood 
Mr. Joseph B. Woods, Jr. 
Mrs. Joseph B. Woods, Jr. 
Mr. Tommv Wooldridge 
Dr. Charles N. Wright 
Mrs. Charles N. Wright 
Mr. Donald D. Wrighton 
Mr. Claude Yarborough 
Mrs. R. H. Young 
Mr. Howard Youngblood 
Mrs. Howard Y'oungblood 



Trustees 

Rev. Blanton Doggett 

Mr. John Fontaine Egger, Sr. 

Rev. J. T. Humphries 

Dr. B. M. Hunt 

Dr. J. W. Leggett, Jr. 

Bishop E. J. Pendergrass 

Rev. W. L. Robinson 

Mr. Nat S. Rogers 

Dr. J. D. Slay 



Associates 

Mr. Joe N. Bailey, Jr. 

Dr. A. V. Beacham 

Mr. Frederick M. Belk 

Dr. Frank Bowen 

Mr. James B. Campbell 

Mr. William Charles Cooper 

Mr. G. C. Cortright. Jr. 

Mrs. P. E. Cunningham 

Mr. Partee Denton 

Mr. J. O. Emmerich 

Mr. R. L. Ezelle, Jr. 

Mr. W. B. Fletcher, Jr. 

Mr. Hal T. Fowlkes 

Mr. J. R. Germany 

Mr. Ernest Graves 

Mrs. D. H. Hall 

Mr. M. H. Hall, Sr. 

Mr. Howard Hamill 

Mr. James Hand. Jr. 

Mr. F. E. Henson 

Mr. C. C. HoUomon 

Mr. Bert Jordan 

Mr. Wylie V. Kees 

Mr. L. C. Latham 

Dr. J. W. Leggett, Jr. 

Mr. James H. Lewis 

Mr. N. W. Lovitt 

Mr. D. U. Maddox 

Dr. Raymond Martin 

Mr. Robert O. May 

Mr. H. F. McCarty 

Mr. Richard McRae 

Mr. Paul Oliver 

Mr. George B. Pickett 

Mr. Charlton S. Roby 

Mr. Albert Sanders, Jr. 

Mr. AI. J. Schultz 

Mr. J. H. Tabb 

Mr. William F. Winter 

Mr. J. T. Young 



Friends 

Anonymous 

Mr. W. Jeff Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Alexander 

Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Allen 

American Commercial Lines 

American Cyanamid Company 

Dr. vv H. Anderson 

Armstrong Cork Company 

Mrs. Maud Aukerman 

Mr. McCarrell Ayers 

Michael Baker, Jr., Inc. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. H. Baker 

Dr. Richard Baltz 

Bank of Mississippi 

Mr. Battle M. Barksdale 

Mr. Battle Barksdale 

Mr. John H. Barnes 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Bartling 

Mr. M. Doby Bartling 

Mrs. Emily MacDuff Barwick 

Dr. Ross Bass 

Dr. Ross F. Bass 

Mr. John C. Batte 

Mrs. Robert Beckett 

L*r. Roy A. Berry 

Big Ten Tire Co. 

Biggs, Wier, Neal & Chastain 

Binder & Bush, Attorneys 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl D. Black, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Bobo, Sr. 

Mrs. Frances Boeckman 

Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Boone 

The Borden Company 

Bostick Brothers Inc. 

Dr. Frank W. Bowen 

Mr. David Boydstun 

J. C. Bradford & Companv 

Mr. Tom P. Brady 

Dr. Carl D. Brannan 

Mr. and Mrs. Carrol Brinson 

Miss Josie Britton 

Mr. V. J. Brocato 

Mr. C. G. Brock 

Miss Sara Brooks 

Mr. Rex Brown 

Estate of W. T. Brown 

Rev. Joseph B. Brunini 

Mr. Ed Brunini 

Mr. Billy M. Bufkin 

W. M. Buie Insurance Agency 

Mr. Webster M. Buie, HI 

Rev. and Mrs. Henry M. Bullock 

Mr. John L. Burwell 

Mr. B. E. Cain 

Dr. Charles E. Cain 



25 



Mr. A, D. Callff 

Dr. Claude G. Callender 

Mr. Robert E. Calloway 

Campbell Construction Co. 

Mr. Rex D. Cannon 

Capitol Broadcasting Co. 

Capitol Tobacco & Special 

Capitol Welding Supply Company 

Mrs. Charles M. Coravati 

Mr. Travis T. Carpenter 

Mr. Oscar C. Carr, Jr. 

Miss CamiUe Carson 

Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Carter, Jr. 

Mr. Sam P. Carter 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Cartwright 

Mr. Alex L. Case 

Cataphote Corporation 

Central School Supply Company 

Mrs. W. A. Chase 

Mr. \V. K. Christovich 

Mr. Julian L. Clark 

The Clayton Fund 

Mrs. R. H. Clegg 

Climate Engineers, Inc. 

Coastal Chemical Corp. 

Mr. H. S. Cohoon 

Commercial National Bank 

Mr. Ed Connell 

Mr. C. Willis Connell 

Mr. Lucian W. Conner 

Continental Can Company 

Rev. John H. Cook 

Mr. R. P. Cook, Sr. 

Mr. R. P. Cook, III 

Mr. H. V. Cooper 

Miss Elizabeth Craig 

Mr. James W. Craig 

Mr. E. J. Craigo 

Mr. Dan F. Crumpton, Jr. 

Mr. R. P. Crutcher 

Mr. and Mrs. George Dahlin, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Daiches 

Mrs. Helen Daniel 

Daniel, Coker and Horton 

Mrs. Mary Ann Davidson 

Miss Alice E. Davis 

Mr. L. D. Dean 

Joe T. Dehmer Distributor, Inc. 

Delta Exploration Company, Inc. 

Delta Steel Company 

Mr. Vance Dement 

Mr. E. A. DeMiller 

Mr. Kenneth R. Dew 

Dixie Rubber Stamp Co. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Donovan 

Mr. George Donovan 

Mr. Reid P. Dorr 

Rev. A. Eugene Dyess 

Mr. P. H. Eager, Jr. 

Miss Mary Ann Edge 

Mr. Paul E. Edwards 

Engineers Lab. Inc. 

Equitable Life Assurance Society 

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Fatherree 

Mr. T. Benton Fatherree 

Mr. H. E. Finger 

First Federal Savings and Loan 

Association 
First Mississippi Corporation 
Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Fish 
Rev. G. Harold Fleming 
Dr. B. P. Folk 
Mr. and- Mrs. L. Y. Foote 
Forestry Suppliers, Inc. 
Mr. Frank Foster 
Mr. and Mrs. John Ban* Foster 
Mr. James E. P'owler 
Fox-Everett, Inc. 
Dr. Howard C. Friday 
Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Frugi 
Mr. William P. Furr 
Mr. S. H. Gaines 
Mr. William F. Galtney 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Geary 
Lt. Col. Arthur N. Gentry 
Mr. Charles Gerald 
Mr. J. R. Germany 
Rev. R. O. Gerow 
Mr. L. A. Gilliam, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Golding, Jr. 
Mr. Joe Gonzales, Jr. 
Mr. David Gordon 
Graduate Supply House 
Mr, and Mrs. Butello Graham 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack F. Greene 
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Grenfell 
Mr. John L. Guest 
Dr. Arthur C. Guyton 
Rev. and Mrs. Guy Halford 
Mrs. A. P. Hamilton 
John Hancock Ins. Co. 
Mr. Phil Hardin 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack L. Harris 



Dr. William C. Harris 

Mr. W. C. Harrison 

Harts Bakery 

Mrs. S F. Hart 

Harvey Construction Co. 

Dr. James R. Hatten 

Mr. Charles F. Hayes 

Hearn Oil Co. 

Mr. James E. Hearon 

Mrs. K. E. Hederi 

Miss Betty Jean Henderson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Henderson 

Hercules, Inc. 

Mrs. Beverly Herring 

Mr. W. B. Herring 

Mr. Purser Hewitt 

Mr. James Allen High, Jr. 

Mr. J. Herman Hines 

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd L. Hobbs 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Hodges 

Mr. Alex A. Hogan 

Mr. Bill Hogg, Jr. 

Mrs. Nancy Holloway 

Dr. and Mrs. R. L. Holley, Jr. 

Mr. Sub Holmes 

Mr. Orvel E. Hooker 

Dr. William D. Horan 

Lt. Col. Marion E. Horton 

Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Hough 

Mrs. Virgil Howie 

Mr. Edward W. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Y. L. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. J. F. Humber, Jr. 

Mrs. F. A. Hunt 

International Business Machines 

Irby Construction Company 

Jackson Clearing House 

Jackson Jitnev Jungle 

Jackson Oil Products Co. 

Jackson Patrol Service 

Mrs. T. G. Jackson, Jr. 

Jackson Coca-Cola Bottling Co. 

Jackson Steam Laundry 

Jackson Stone Company 

Miss Anne E. Jenkins 

Mr. E. R. Jobe 

Mrs. Charles T. Johnson 

Mrs. W. W. Johnson 

Mr. Wi-'ndoU Johnson 

Dr. and Mrs. J. H. Johnson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clediee T. Jones 

Rev. W. M. Jones 

Mrs. Willie C. Jones 

A. Joseph Company 

Mr. Ernest L. Joyner 

Rev. and Mrs. C. Keller, Jr. 

Estate of Dr. A. A. Kern 

Miss Louise Killingsworth 

Miss Mathilde Killingsworth 

Mr. Donald D. Kilmer 

Mr. John L. King 

Mr. W. Hampton King 

Mr. W. J. Klaus 

Mr. Charles E. Klinck 

Mr. G. M. Knight 

Mr. Harland L. Knight 

Mr. Phillip A. Koonce 

Kwlk Kafe of Jackson, Inc. 

Mrs. S. Hudson Kyle 

Lamar Life Insurance Company 

Lamar Outdoor Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Lampton 

Dr. Frank M. Laney, Jr. 

Mr. M. N. Lav 

Mr. L. H. Lee, Jr. 

Mr. Sidney Levingston 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon E. Lewis, Jr. 

Mr. Morrir. Lewis, Jr. 

Mr. Henry S. Loeb 

Lott Vendors, Inc. 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Love 

Mr. and Mrs. James Buie Love 

Mrs. M. J. Luster 

Mr. Jimmy L. Lyles 

Mrs. Leise J. MacDuff 

Mr. R. L. McLellan 

Mr. R. H. Magruder 

Mr. James M. Marble 

Martin School Equip. Co. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Martin, Jr. 

Mr. John M. Mattingly 

Maxwell, Spencer and Hust 

Mr. H. F. McCarty 

McCarty-Holman Co., Inc. 

Mrs. Virginia McCoy 

McGraw-Hill, Inc. 

Mr. R. D. McLendon 

Mr. W. P. McMuUan 

Mrs. Madeleine McMullan 

Mrs. Dorothy McNair 

McNees Medical Supply Co. 

Mr. R. R. Meacham 

Metropolitan Life 



Miazza, DeMiller & Word 
Mr. L. G. Milam, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Norton Miller 
Miller Oil Purchasing Co. 
Mississippi Valley Gas Co. 
Mississippi Bedding Company 
Miss. Materials Company 
Mississippi Milk Products 

Association 
Mississippi Power & Light Co. 
M.P.I. Industries 
Mississippi School Supply 
Mississippi Stationery Co. 
Mississippi Iron & Steel Co. 
Mr. Guy Mitchell, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. Larry Mitchell 
Lane-Moak Pontiac 
Mrs. Noel Monaghan 
Mr. and Mrs. K. W. Montgomery 
Miss Mildred L. Morehead 
Capt. J. K. Morgan, Jr. 
Mr. James H. Morrow 
Mr. R. S. Munford 
Mutual of New York 
Dr. and Mrs. Onnie P. Meyers 
Mr. Dave M. Neill 
Dr. and Mrs. Howard Nichols 
Mr. Sam Niemetz 
Norris Industries, Inc. 
Ncrthside Civitan Club 
Miss Ora Nunley 
Miss Mary O'Bryant 
Mr. and Mrs. R. W. O'Ferrell 
Mr. Kindren O'Keefe 
Mr. N. W. Overstreet 
Overstreet, Kuykendall 
Mr. William H. Owens 
Pilr. Tom Pace 
Mr. Lynn C. Parker 
Mr. A. L. Parm"'i 
Mr. and Mrs. Kelly Patterson 
Mr. William I. i-eitz 
Dr. James Perry 
Pet Dairy Products Co. 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Pharis, Jr. 
Mr. C. W. Phillips 
Phoenix of Hartford 
The Honorable Abe Plough 
Mr. Frank E. Polanski 
Post and Witty 

Presto Manufacturing Company 
Dr. Richard Priddy 
Prudential Insurance Company 
Mr. Paul Pulien 
Mrs. W. H. Pulien, Jr. 
Mr. Percy Qulnn 
Mr. Tommy Ranager 
Mr. E. P. Rawson 
Reid McGee and Co. 
Dr. Lee H. Reiff 
Mrs. Rebecca Rice 
Miss Alene Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Ricks 
Mr. and Mrs. Tally Riddell 
Mrs. William E. Riecken 
Mr. Frank A. Riley 
Dr. William Riley 
Mr. James N. Robertson 
Mrs. Charlton S. Roby 
Mr. E. O. Roden 
Mrs. Velma Rodgers 
Mr. Alex Rogers 
Miss Emma Rogers 
Miss Gwendolyn Rogers 
Miss Gloria J. RogUlio 
Mr. W Emory Rose 
Miss Helen G. Rosebrough 
Mr. I. A. Rosenbaum, Jr. 
Mr. C. H. Russell, Jr. 
Mrs. G. C. Russell 
Mr. J. M. Sanders 
Dr. and Mrs. Louis Schiesarl 
Mrs. Charles C. Scott 
Sears, Roebuck and Co. 
Mr. and Mrs. D. P. Self 
Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Shands 
Mrs. John T. Sharp 
Mr. Jerry Wayne Sheffield 
Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Shepherd 



Mr. Jack O. Shuford, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Ivan Simmons 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter Simmons 

The Singer Company 

Mrs. James B. Skewes 

Mrs. James H. Skewes 

Mr. Catchings B. Smith 

Hershel Smith Company 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Smith 

South Central Bell Telephone 

Company 
South Central Plumbing 
Mr. John M. Spaugh 
Leland Speed-Mounger & Co. 
Speed Mechanical, Inc. 
Mr. W. H. Spell 
Mr. Collins Spencer 
Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Spivey 
Stauffer Chemical Co. 
The Honorable John C. Stennis 
Mr. G. A. Sterling 
Mrs. Nola Stewart 
Mr. J. F. Stodghill 
Miss Bess Stoker 
Mr. S. L. Stringer 
Sudie's 

Superior Sales Co. 
Dr. Jonathan Sweat 
Miss Elizabeth M. Tate 
Mr. Byron Tatum 
Temple Ford Co., Inc. 
Mr. Mitchell R. Thomas 
Mr. J. O. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Tilghman 
Mr. W. E. Tillman 
Mrs. Lena Tohill 
Mr. Arch Tolsr 
Mr. Ken Toler 
The Trane Company 
Mr. Cecil F. Travis 
Mr. Robert C. Travis 
Mrs. Joycelyn Trotter 
Mr. John L. Turner 
Pennzoil United Inc. 
Dr. K. P. Walker 
Dr. and Mrs. Kirby Walker 
Nick Walker Ins. Agency 
Mrs. George C. Wallace 
Miss Dorothy Warner 
Mr. Andrew P. Warriner 
Mr. Rhodes T. Wasson 
Mr. Thomas H. Watkins 
Mr. Steve J. Watras 
Miss Linda Watson 
Mr. P. F. Watzek 
Mr. James A. Wheeler 
Lt. Col. Harold R. White 
Wholesale Supply Company 
Dr. W. B. Wiener 
Dr. and Mrs. E. Leroy Wilkins 
Mr. George M. Wilkinson 
Mr. John Larry Wilkinson 
Mr. Emmett Williams, Jr. 
F. W. Williams Agency 
Mrs. Nancy Williams 
Mr. W. Keith Williams 
Mrs. H. J. Wilson 
Mr. R. Baxter Wilson 
Mr. M. M. Winkler 
Mr. Sherwood W. Wise 
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Wolfe 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank A. Wood 
Mr. George F. Woodliff 
Mr. Wallace Wooten 
Wright Music Company 
Mr. and Mrs. George Zeigler 
Zinsco Electrical Products 
Mr. James Zouboukos 
Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Zouboukos 



26 



Academic Complex 



The college's landscape has been altered signifi- 
cantly by construction work on the $2.6 million Academic 
Complex. The top photograph, taken in July, 1968, shows 
the old parking lot between Murrah Hall and the Mill- 
saps-Wilson Library. The bottom picture depicts the 



same area in October, after construction crews had 
started their work on what has been called "the most 
exciting construction at a Mississippi educational insti- 
tution in years." Construction of the Academic Complex 
is scheduled for completion by 1970. 













>'i^ 










V 






''^ 




27 



Homecoming, 1968 

James .1. Livesay, the Associate Di- 
rector of Development for Alumni Af- 
lairs, called it "one of the best Home- 
comings yet." Alumni Association 
President H. V. Allen, Jr. agreed, as 
did the hundreds of Millsaps alumni 
and friends who returned to the camp- 
us for Homecoming Weekend, Octo- 
ber 11-12. 

Highlights of the weekend -long 
events were the crowning of Miss 
Mary Belinda Bettcher as Homecom- 
ing Queen, the naming of Chancellor 
James S. Ferguson as Alumnus of tiie 
Year, and the surprising 61-8 win over 
traditional rival Southwestern of Mem- 
phis in the Homecoming game. 

Bishop Homer Ellis Finger, Resi- 
dent Bishop of the Nashville Area of 
the United Methodist Church and 
President of the College from 1952 to 
1963, returned to Millsaps to deliver 
the address for the Convocation on 
Friday, October 11. The Convocation 
formally opened the school's seventy- 
seventh session, and also served as a 
commencem.ent of the Homecoming 
activities. 

Alumni Association President Allen 
and College President Dr. Benjamin 
B. Graves presented Miss Bettcher 
during the halftime of the football 
game. Miss Bettcher, the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Warren R. Bettcher of 
Little Rock, Arkansas, is a senior 
majoring in elementary education, 
and has been a cheerleader for four 
years. She is a member of the Kappa 
Delta sorority. 

Other members of the Homecoming 
Court, who were chosen in a campus 
election, were Cynthia Lynn Brunson 
of Jackson, Diane McLemore of Gulf- 
port, Patricia Murphree of Aberdeen, 
and Vicki Lynn Ozborn of In- 
dianapolis, Indiana. 

During the Homecoming Banquet 
Saturday evening, Dr. James S. 
Ferguson, Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
was named the Alumnus of the Year. 
.Dr. Ferguson, who is recognized as 
one of the South's leading educators 
both as a teacher and administrator, 
served on the Millsaps faculty from 
1944 to 1962. He was Dean of the Col- 
lege from 1954 to 1962. 




Homecoming Queen 
Mary Belinda Bettcher 




Alumnus-of-the-Year Dr. James S. Ferguson 
with President Benjamin B. Graves (left) and 
Alumni Association President H. V. Allen, Jr. 



28 



Millsaps Confers Honorary Degree on Strieker 



During the October 11 Convocation, 
which formally opened the school's 
seventy-seventh session, Millsaps con- 
ferred the Honorary Degree of Doctor 
of Laws on businessman Robert 
Mason Strieker of Woodville, Missis- 
sippi. 

Dean Frank M. Laney presented 
Dr. Strieker to President Benjamin 
Graves for the conferring of the de- 
gree. Here is the text of Dean Laney's 
remarks. 

"Robert Mason Strieker was born 
in the last quarter of the 19th century 
in Fort Adamis, Mississippi, where 
his grandparents had settled in the 
1840's after leaving their native Ger- 
many to make a new life for them- 
selves in America. Mr. Strieker re- 
ceived his early education in private 
tutorial schools in Ft. Adams, and 
continued his preparatory and early 
college training in Mississippi and in 
Virginia, where he attended old Ran- 
dolph-Macon Academy. From 1903 to 
1905 he attended Millsaps College. Be- 
cause his financial resources would 
not permit him to continue his study 
for m.ore than two years and because 
of his evident desire to make every 
minute of his student years at this 
college contribute to his greatest 
growth, he was granted an unprece- 
dented permission to take whatever 
courses seemed most profitable for 
his development. He has himself re- 
ferred to these years at Millsaps 
as his 'Best Years,' when his 'young 
mind, thirsty for knowledge,' reacted 
to 'new discoveries, new ideas, new 
principles, forces and scientific rea- 
sons for the things that keep us alert, 
happy and appreciative of hfe itself.' 

'Leaving college after these two 
years, he returned to Fort Adams, 
where he entered upon a life-long ca- 
reer in the timber and cattle business. 
In more recent years he has been in- 
terested in oil development. In time 
he came to be recognized as an au- 
thority in these fields in the area of 
the lower Mississippi River Valley, 
and as a business man of integrity 
and broad knowledge. Through the 
years he maintained an interest in 
cultural and reUgious values, and 
i'xempUfied in his community the 
tirtues of good citizenship and diUgent 
labor. 

'His love and appreciation for his 
Mma Mater and for its contribution 
;o his life and work were demonstrat- 
?d in a peculiarly effective manner 




when, in the spring of 1967, he came 
forward and offered a generous con- 
tribution to the Ford Challenge Grant 
Campaign of Millsaps College, provid- 
ing for that campaign a vigorous be- 
ginning and for his fellow alumni an 
inspiring challenge to follow his lead- 
ership in undergirding the cause of 
church-reiated higher education in 
Mississippi. It was characteristic of 
Robert Mason Strieker that his gift 
to this cause should be designated for 
the purpose of providing scholarships 
for worthy students who, like himself 



many years before, find themselves 
without the material resources to pro- 
vide for a complete college education. 
"In recognition, therefore, of his 
exemplary contributions to the busi- 
ness life of his community and state, 
his deep appreciation for learning, 
his interest in the youth of the na- 
tion, and his love and loyal devotion 
to his Alma Mater, the Faculty and 
Board of Trustees of Millsaps College 
have approved the conferring of the 
Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws 
upon Robert Mason Strieker." 



29 



Football 



SURPRISING MAJORS HAVE 5-1 RECORD 




The surprising Millsaps Majors are 
having their best football season in 
more than a decade. Following a re- 
building year in 1967 (1 win, 6 losses 
and 1 tie), the Majors of Coaches 
Harper Davis and Tommy Ranager 
recorded victories over Henderson 
State (22-14), Sewanee (16-0), Hard- 
ing (21-6), Northwood (45-7), and 
Southwestern (61-8), before losing to 
a tough Ouachita University team 
(10-24). 

The Majors have three games re- 
maining on their schedule, and each 
of the games will be played away 
from home. The remaining opponents 
on the schedule are Maryville College 
on November 2, Georgetown College 
on November 9, and Randolph-Macon 
College on November 16. Alumni liv- 
ing in the areas where these games 
will be played should make an effort 
to see the Majors in action. They play 
an exciting brand of football, and it 
is very possible that they will finish 
the season with an 8-1 record. 

As might be expected during a suc- 
cessful season, a great deal of atten- 
tion has been devoted to the team. 
Meridian columnist John Perkins, '61, 
who is also a member of the Missis- 
sippi State House of Representatives, 
commented at length about the Maj- 
ors following their first three games. 
With Mr. Perkins' permission, we 
are reprinting his comments from the 
MERIDIAN STAR of September 30. 

"Sweet nectar of victory tastes dou- 
bly sweet to lowly peasants who 



normally drink the dregs of bitter de- 
feat. 

"The mightiest of football's herald- 
ed legions lie fallen in the dust of de- 
feat. There is no joy at South Bend 
and West Point where Notre Dame 
and Army lick their wounds and In- 
diana's roses have wilted in the Kan- 
sas sun. The atmosphere at Stark- 
ville must resemble a tomb as the 
awful truth sinks in on loyal grads of 
Old A. & M. But the loudest horns of 
celebration sound not at Tuscaloosa 
or Los Angeles where Alabama or 
Southern Cal rooters have become 
glutted with victory. Harken the mer- 
riment from Methodist Hill, where 
Millsaps revels in a 3-0 record, tops 
in the nation for ALL college football 
teams. 

"For nearly two decades Millsaps 
has been the laughing stock of col- 
lege football, even falling out of the 
class of ancient and hated rival Mis- 
sissippi College and forced to endure 
ridicule from more prosperous athlet- 
ic quarters while the Major gridders 
wallowed in the humiliation of de- 
feat after defeat. 

"Now, however, the bottom rail is 
on top — even though the position may 
be temporary as the season lunges 
from week to week and the thin but 
sturdy Purple line seeks to hold out 
the assaults of enemy runners and 
passers and Major scorers eke out 
enough points to raise victory's stand- 
ard. How long the bubble endures be- 



fore the almost-inevitable burst comes 
is open to speculation. 

"It has been a long time since a 
real, honest - to - goodness miracle 
transpired. One may be in the grid- 
iron making. Millsaps has won two 
games it was not supposed to win- 
rallying in the fourth period to snatch 
victory from defeat against Hender- 
son State, an Arkansas team which 
walloped Mississippi College a week 
later, and then scaled the mountain 
in Tennessee to shutout Sewanee, al- 
ways a strong foe. Alumni almost ex- 
pected this weekend's 21-6 win over 
Harding College. 

"Can Millsaps go undefeated? Will 
the Majors win the remainder of their 
games and accomplish a miracle and 
wind up 9-0 after compiling a dismal 
1-6-1 record last year? It would be 
more realistic to expect the Fighting 
Majors to wind up 5-4 or maybe even 
7-2 with a stretch of luck and an all- 
out effort. . .but there IS always the 
chance. . . . 

"The success Millsaps is enjoying 
on the gridiron may be a harbinger 
for the small, liberal arts college 
which has always stressed academics 
over athletics to the benefit of the 
students but not always to the great 
est success on the football field or or 
the basketball court. 

"Perhaps, able young men are now 
realizing that a good education car 
be coupled with low-pressure, play 
for-fun athletics and a successful ca 
reer in business or the professions a 
a later date." 




30 



Events of Note 



MANAGEMENT SEMINARS 

The Department of Economics and 
Business Administration at Millsaps 
is currently holding a series of week- 
ly management seminars, which deal 
with "Management and the Chang- 
ing Environment of Business in Amer- 
ica." The program is bringing lead- 
ing figures in American economics to 
the Millsaps campus for discussion 
and problem-solving sessions with 
Mississippi's top management repre- 
sentatives. 

The seminar consists of six weekly 
sessions, to be held on Fridays until 
November 22. The meetings are held 
in the Forum Room of the Millsaps- 
Wilson Library, and are being attend- 
ed by more than thirty representa- 
tives of Mississippi management. 

Lecturers for the sessions include 
Dr. William Ross, Dean of the College 
of Business Administration at Lou- 
isiana State University; Dr. Benjamin 
B. Graves, President of Millsaps Col- 
lege; Professor William J. Hodge of 
the Department of Management of 
Florida State University; Dr. Ray 
Marshall, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Economics of the University 
of Kentucky; Dr. James L. McKen- 
ney. Professor of Business Adminis- 
tration, Harvard School of Business, 
Harvard University; and Dr. Ike H. 
Harrison, Dean of the School of Busi- 
ness of Texas Christian University. 

ENROLLMENT REACHES 
RECORD raOH 

Millsaps has the largest enrollment 



in the history of the college, accord- 
ing to Registrar and Director of Ad- 
missions Paul Hardin. 965 men and 
women are enrolled for the fall se- 
mester. 

Hardin also announced the largest 
Freshman class ever at Millsaps, 
with 277 students. Hardin described 
the class as "an exceptionally quali- 
fied group." The class' median ACT 
score was 25, well above the average 
of all other schools in the state. 

The Freshman class includes twen- 
ty National Merit finahsts and six 
National Merit commended students. 

MILLSAPS IN ALLIANCE 
OF SOUTHERN SCHOOLS 

Millsaps is one of nine liberal arts 
colleges in the South which have 
formed an alliance to develop a vari- 
ety of collegiate programs. Vander- 
bilt University will be the "central 
university" in the alliance. 

Besides Millsaps, other participat- 
ing colleges are Davidson College in 
North Carolina, Emory and Henry in 
Virginia, Centre in Kentucky, Birm- 
ingham-Southern in Alabama, Cente- 
nary in Louisiana, Hendrix in Arkan- 
sas, and Southwestern and Vanderbilt 
in Tennessee. 

Details of the cooperative venture 
are indefinite, according to Dr. 
Leonard B. Beach, Vanderbilt's Dean 
of Institutional Relations. According 
to Dr. Beach, the institutions will 
work together in a variety of fields. 



"■\Ve are hoping to use Oak Ridge as 
a source in programming nuclear sci- 
ence, for example." 

FORD CAMPAIGN INTO 
MEMPHIS, McCOMB, LAUREL 

The Ford Foundation Challenge 
Grant Program has moved into Mem- 
phis, while plans are being completed 
for campaigns in the Laurel and Mc- 
Comb-Natchez areas. 

According to Mr. George B. Pickett 
of Jackson, the campaign's Nation- 
al General Chairman, Mr. Edward 
Stewart, '57, Memphis investment 
hanker, will be the Area Chairman in 
Memphis. 

Max B. Ostner, Jr., '65, will serve 
as Arrangements Chairman. Division 
Leaders will be Ralph A. McCool, '36- 
'37, and William J. Crosby, '61. Those 
serving as Team Captains will be Dr. 
W. F. Murrah, '08, Tom Lail, Jr., '63, 
Robert E. Lewis, '65, Robert E. 
Gentry, '59. WilUam C. Wofford, '38, 
Morris Liming, '50, Theron Lemly, 
'34, Mark C. Yerger, '58, and Dr. Lee 
L. Wardlaw, '61. 

A successful Sales School Meeting 
was held on Tuesday, October 29 at 
the University Club in Memphis. 

Juhan Prince, '49, McComb school 
administrator, has agreed to serve as 
Area Chairman for the McComb- 
Natchez campaign. Other workers in 
this area and the Laurel area have 
not been announced. 



MILLSAPS COLLEGE "MAJORS" 
1968-69 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



Dec. 


2 


Monday 


University of South 
Alabama 


MobUe 


Jan. 


15 


Wednesday 


Southwestern-at- 
Memphis 


Jackson 


Dec. 


4 


Wednesday 


Belhaven 


MiUsaps 


Jan. 


27 


Monday 


Huntingdon CoUege Montgomery 


Dec. 


7 


Saturday 


Birmingham-Southern 




Jan. 


31 


Friday 


Lambuth CoUege Jackson, Tenn. 








CoUege 


Birmingham 


Feb. 


1 


Saturday 


Lambuth CoUege Jackson. Tenn. 


Dec. 


11 


Wednesday 


Spring Hill CoUege 


MobUe 












Dec. 


13 


Friday 


Northwood Institute 


Dallas, Tex. 


Feb. 


7 


Friday 


Baptist Christian CoUeg 


e Jackson 


Dec. 


14 


Saturday 


Austin College Sherman, Tex. 


Feb. 


8 


Saturday 


WiUiam Carey CoUege 


Jackson 


Dec. 


17 


Tuesday 


Lambuth CoUege Jackson, Miss. 


Feb. 


11 


Tuesday 


Belhaven 


Belhaven 


Dec. 


19 


Thursday 


WiUiam Carey 


Hattiesburg 


Feb. 


15 


Saturday 


Huntingdon CoUege 


Jackson 


Jan. 


6 


Monday 


Spring HiU CoUege 


Jackson 


Feb. 


17 


Monday 


Southwestern-at- 




Jan. 


9 


Thursday 


Denominational 










Memphis 


Memphis 








Tourney 


Belhaven 


Feb. 


20 


Thursday 


University of South 




Jan. 


13 


Monday 


Birmingham-Southern 










Alabama 


Jackson 








College 


Jackson 


Feb. 


25 


Tuesday 


Delta State CoUege 


Cleveland 








AU games begii 


1 at 7:30 P 


M. 







31 



C"«iE;'cl? 




Homecoming- queen Mary Belinda Bett- 
cher, a Senior from Little Rock, Arkansas, 
is crowned by Alumni Association President 
H. V. Allen. Looking on are President 
Benjamin Graves and Miss Bettcher's 
escort, Carl Bush of Tupelo. 




President Graves (left) and Nat S. Rog- 
ers of Jackson (right), Chairman of the 
Millsaps Board of Trustees, are pictured 
with Dr. Robert Mason Strieker, a promi- 
nent Mississippi businessman. Dr. Strieker 
had just received the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws from the College. 




The Early Days Club, which is composed 
of members of Millsaps, Grenada and Whit- 
worth classes of 1919 and earlier, met dur- 
ing the recent Homecoming Weekend. 
Among those present were, back row, left 
to right. Gamer Lester, '19, Mrs. Benjamin 
Graves, Dr. Dewey Dearman, '19, President 
Benjamin Graves, Dean Frank Laney, 
Ronald Goodbread, '66; middle row, left 
to right, Mrs. Gamer Lester, Mrs. Frank 
Laney, The Reverend J. L. Neill, '06, Mrs. 

C. L. Neill, '08, Dr. C. C. Norton, '19, The 
Reverend C. C. Clark, '15, Mrs. John Fitz- 
maurice and her father, Dr. W. F. Mur- 
rah, '08; Front row, Mrs. C. C. Norton, J. 

D. TUlman, '02, Frank Scott, '13, W. P. 
Bridges, '15, The Reverend J. O. Ware, '11, 
Mrs. J. O. Ware, and Miss Annie Lester, '16. 



32 



Major 
Miscellany 



1900-1919 
Dr. Julian B. Feibelman, '18, Rabbi 
Emeritus of Temple Sanai and for 
many years a leader in the religious, 
cultural, charitable and educational 
life of New Orleans, was awarded The 
Times-Picayune Loving Cup for 1967. 
The award, which was established in 
1901, is symboUe of outstanding, un- 
selfish service to New Orleans. Its re- 
cipient is selected on the basis of con- 
tributions to the community. 

1920-1929 
Major General Robert E. Blount, 

'28, has been named an assistant dean 
of the University of Mississippi School 
of Medicine. He retired as a Com- 
manding General of Fitzsimons Gen- 
eral Hospital in Denver, Colorado, 
on July 31. The appointment of 
General Blount, who is a native of 
Bassfield, was approved by the Board 
of Trustees of the Institutions of High- 
er Learning. Mrs. Blount is the form- 
er Alice Ridg^way, '29. 

The Reverend Dwyn M. Mounger, 
'28, who has been executive secretary 
of the Committee on Church Exten- 
sion for the Presbytery of Central 
Mississippi, has accepted a call as 
minister of the First Presbyterian 
Church in Gulfport. 

1930-1939 
Eug^enia Maulding, '38, who has 



been on the faculty of the Depart- 
ment of Library Service, College of 
Education, University of Tennessee, 
was recently listed in Who's Who in 
American Women and Dictionary of 
International Biography. 

1940-1949 

William Mingee, '40-'42, has been 
named Assistant Manager of Pension 
Sales for the Pilot Life Insurance 
Company and is assigned to the com- 
pany's home office in Greensboro, 
N. C. 

Tom B. Scott, Jr., '40-'43, who is 
President of First Federal Savings 
and Loan Association of Jackson, has 
been nominated for President of the 
United States Savings and Loan 
League for the coming year. Nat S. 
Rogers, '41, President of Deposit 
Guaranty National Bank and Chair- 
man of the Millsaps College Board of 
Trustees, has been installed as Vice- 
President of the American Banking 
Association and will succeed to the 
Presidency of the organization next 
year. Mrs. Scott is the former Laura 
Hewes, '42-'44, while Mrs. Rogers is 
the former Helen Elizabeth Ricks, '42. 

W. A. Saums, '41, has been promot- 
ed to technical director of Georgia- 
Pacific's Crossett, Arkansas opera- 
tions. He was formerly technical di- 
rector of the company's Louisville, 
Mississippi facility. 



Dr. G. Kinsey Stewart, '43-'44, has 
joined the staff of the Southern Mis- 
sissippi Mental Health Service. Form- 
erly the senior psychologist at the 
Kennedy Child Study Center in Santa 
Monica, California, Dr. Stewart is liv- 
ing in Long Beach, Mississippi. Mrs. 
Stewart is the former Marguerite 
Stanley, '43-'46. 

The Reverend D. A. Reily, '44, is 
pastor of the Sao Vicente Charge in 
Brazil, where he has three churches 
and is in the process of building two 
new churches on the charge. The Rev- 
erend Reily is working on his Ph.D. 
dissertation in his spare time, and is 
also doing a biographical study of 
William Capers, one of the early Bish- 
ops of the Southern Methodist 
Church. 

Dr. James D. Powell, '47, Associate 
Professor of Education at the Univer- 
sity of Alabama, and Dr. R. R. Prid- 
dy. Professor of Geology at Millsaps 
College, worked together in conduct- 
ing a workshop for the Junior High 
science teachers of the Huntsville, 
Alabama area during August. 

Dr. and Mrs. George Maddox (Eve- 
lyn Godbold, '48) of Duke University 
will be in England this year, where 
Dr. Maddox will be studying under a 
grant made by the National Institute 
of Health. Dr. Maddox is a 1949 grad- 
uate. 

1950-1959 

Dr. Earl T. Lewis, '50, has been 
named associate director of Medical 
Communications, a newly created po- 
sition on the medical staff at Wyeth 
Laboratories, manufacturer. From 
1955 to 1959, Dr. Lewis was in private 
practice in Simpson County, Missis- 
sippi. His wife is the former Mary 
Sue Enochs, '51. 

Ben Woods, '50, was named Vice 
President recently by the Board of 
Directors of Deposit Guaranty Na- 
tional Bank in Jackson. Mr. Woods, a 
former state President of the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, earned a 
graduate certificate from the Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking. He is mar- 
ried to the former Bettye Jane San- 
ford, '49. 

The Reverend Martin Case, '51-'52, 
has assumed his duties as Associate 
Minister of Galloway Memorial Unit- 
ed Methodist Church in Jackson. He 
has been pastor of a church near 
Camp David, Maryland, where Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Johnson worshipped 
on several occasions while visiting the 
nearby Presidential retreat. 

Van Cavett, '53, will attend Stan- 
ford University this year on a Pro- 



33 



fessional Journalism Fellowship fi- 
nanced by the Ford Foundation. 

William L. Stewart, '53, has been 
elected County Prosecuting Attorney 
for Harrison County, Mississippi. He 
has been practicing law in Gulfport. 

The Rev. Charles Laseter, '54, pas- 
tor of the Collins Methodist Church 
for the past four years, has been 
transferred to the EUisville Method- 
ist Church. The Rev. R. M. Huffman, 
'60, assumed the pastorate in Collins. 

Dr. James Gordon, '57, who has 
been associated with the Navy Hospi- 
tal in Beaufort, South Carolina, is 
now in Jackson. 

Mr. Bob Ainsworth, '58, is the new 
President of the Jackson Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. He is employ- 
ed as a research Geologist at the U.S. 
Army Engineer Waterways Experi- 
ment Station. 

Ruth Ann Hall, '58, has been work- 
ing with the Baptist Dental Centre in 
Ibadan, Nigeria, for more than six 
months. She says that the Centre has 
more patients than can possibly be 
treated, and for every patient, there 
is a full house of observers. As 
patients are treated, their friends and 
relatives listen to taped messages and 
are given pocket Bibles. Ruth Ann 
has also been teaching school in the 
Newton Memorial School in Oshogbo. 

R. S. (Bob) Hardin, '58, has accept- 
ed the post of director of the Tippah 
County Resource Development Asso- 
ciation. The association, which will 
operate under a government grant, is 
to help provide better jobs in Tippah 
County through industrial develop- 
ment and improvement of public fa- 
cilities. 

Dr. George Douglas Cain, '59, is in 
London conducting a year's research 
in Hepatology. Dr. Cain, who has 
been awarded the Mead Johnson 
Grant through the American College 
of Physicians, will be studying under 
Dr. Shelia Sherlock, a world renowned 
expert in Hepatology. 

The Reverend William W. Horlock, 
'59, has been named the Executive Di- 
rector of the Protestant Radio and 
Television Center in Atlanta, Georgia. 
For the past five years he has been 
pastor of the St. Andrew Methodist 
Church in Marietta. He and Mrs. Hor- 
lock (Jcrrell Thrash, '58) have three 
children: Susan, 10, Bill, Jr., 5, and 
Laura, 3. 

The Reverend Melton McNeil, '59, 
pastor of Briar Cliff Methodist Church 
in Atlanta, recently conducted reviv- 
al services at St. Marks Methodist 
Church in Aberdeen. 



Dr. Ray L. Wesson, '59, has com- 
pleted the medical service officer 
basic course at Brooke Army Medical 
Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 
Dr. Wesson was a resident physician- 
surgeon at the University of Missis- 
sippi Medical Center before entering 
the Army. 

1960-1968 

Ralph E. Glenn, '61, has been 
named director of ministerial enlist- 
ment for the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion of the Christian Church (Disci- 
ples of Christ). He has been the as- 
sistant minister of Central Christian 
Church in Austin, Texas, for the past 
two years. 

Martha Gail Garrison, '62, who has 
been teaching at Wake Forest Uni- 
versity, is now an Instructor of Ro- 
mance Languages at the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Eldridge Rogers, '62, has been ap- 
pointed Director of Student Activities 
and Physical Education Instructor at 
Hopkinsville Community College in 
Hopkinsville, Kentucky. Previously 
Athletic Director and Basketball 
Coach at Christian County High 
School in Hopkinsville, Mr. Rogers re- 
ceived his MA degree from Austin 
Peay State University in 1965. 

Shirley Ryland, '62-'64, is in Geneva, 
Switzerland, working for DuPont. 
After transferring to the University 
of North Carolina in 1964, Miss Ry- 
land was selected for membership in 
Phi Beta Kappa. 

Mr. Peter L. Sklar, '63, has recent- 
ly been named Regional Manager for 
Bio-Dynamics, Inc. In this position, 
Mr. Sklar will direct the company's 
sales in four Mid-South states. 

Carl Hagwood, '64, recently grad- 
uated with distinction from the Uni- 
versity of Mississippi Law School. Mr. 
Hagwood, who was first in his grad- 
uating class, is now serving as a law 
clerk to Judge Claude F. Clayton, 
United States Fifth Circuit Court of 
Appeals. 

The Reverend Travis R. Fulton, '64, 
was graduated cum laude from the 
Emory University Candler School of 
Theology in Atlanta, Georgia. He was 
later ordained an Elder in the Mis- 
sissippi Conference of the United 
Methodist Church. 

Mrs. Thomas Glenn Jackson (Vir- 
ginia Lee White, '64) recently re- 
ceived her Ph.D. degree from George 
Peabody College for Teachers in 
Nashville, Tennessee. Her dissertation 
was entitled "Modification of Chil- 
dren's Academic Productivity 
Through Modeling Procedures." 



Lovelle Upton, '65, Is now in New 
Orleans with H. 1. S. Sportswear Com- 
pany. For the past two years, Mr. Up- 
ton has been assistant football coach 
and physical education instructor at 
Northwest Mississippi Junior College 
in Senatobia. He and Mrs. Upton now 
have two children, Larry Lovelle and 
Laura Anne. 

Jerry Husky, '67, has been named 
head football coach at Terry, Missis- 
sippi High School. He served last 
year as an assistant coach at Ray- 
mond. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. James L. Rob- 
erts, Jr. (Brenda Dawn Newsom, '66) 
received Masters degrees from Mis- 
sissippi State University in August. 
Mr. Roberts, a 1967 graduate, was 
co-author of a research study pub- 
lished by the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research. 

Mr. Henry E. Chatham, Jr., '68, 
who is a first-year law student at 
Harvard University, has received an 
Omicron Delta Kappa Scholarship, 
which are awarded to selected sen- 
ior members of this honorary fra- 
ternity who plan to take graduate 
work. 

Lieutenant Commander L. 0. Smith, 
'57, was recently awarded the Viet- 
namese Medal of Honor. He is Naval 
Support Activity Civic Action Officer. 

The Reverend Donald Adcock, '61, 
has moved to Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, 
where he has assumed the pastorate 
of the Bailey Road Christian Church. 

Frank Jones, '65, has received his 
D.D.S. degree from the University of 
Tennessee, and is now doing public 
health work in Macon County, Mis- 
souri. He is married to the former 
Celia Price, •63-'66. 

Larry E. Adams, '66, is overseas 
this fall under a new International 
Work-Study Year for Seminary Stu- 
dents, developed by the World Divi- 
sion of the United Methodist Board of 
Missions. A student at Duke Univer- 
sity Divinity School, Adams will be lo- 
cated at the Epworth Theological Col- 
lege in Salisbury, Rhodesia. 

James T. Gabbert, Jr., '66, has 
completed requirements for the M.S. 
degree in Statistics at Virginia Poly- 
technic Institute, and is now working 
as an industrial engineer with 
Raytheon Company, Missile Systems 
Division, Andover, Massachusetts. 



NOTE: Persons wishing to have births, 
marriages, or deaths reported in Major 
Notes should submit information to the 
editor as soon after the event as possible. 
Information for "Major Miscellany" should 
also be addressed to Editor, Major Notes, 
Millsaps College, Jackson, Mississippi 39210. 



34 




Boimie Carol Borford, '63, to Cloyd 
Jefferson Obert, III. Living in Tusca- 
loosa, Alabama. 

Barbara Jo Carraway, '68, to 
Charles Weaver, '68. Attending South- 
ern Methodist University in Dallas. 

Linda Morrow, '68 to Ira Harvey, 
'65. Living in Jackson. 

Hazle Eileen Traxler, '65, to Richard 
Burroughs. Living in Grosse Pointe 
Park, Michigan. 




^uTu^e ^L^^^^'' 




Alicia Lynette Beam, born October 
9 to Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Bostick 
Beam, '64, of Tupelo, Mississippi. 

Bethany Evelyn Chaney, bom Au- 
gust 31 to Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Chaney, 
both '65, of KnoxviUe, Tennessee. 
Mrs. Chaney is the former Lillian 
Thornell. 

Charles Edward Gibson, IV, bom 

October 8 to Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
E. Gibson, III, of Jackson. Mr. Gib- 
son graduated in 1964. Mrs. Gibson 
is the former Katherine Davis, '63-'64 

Mark Tyner Hagwood, bom October 
30, 1967, to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hag- 
wood (Betty Joe Tyner, '65) of Tupelo, 
Mississippi. Mr. Hagwood graduated 
in 1965. 

Stephanie Leigh and Leslie Diane 
Lipson, born July 25 to Dr. and Mrs. 
Steven Lipson (Edna McShane, '60) of 



Baltimore, Maryland. The twins were 
welcomed by Lisa, 2. 

Sean McCauley, bom August 13 to 
Mr. and Mrs. DeWayne McCauley 
(Janice Johnson, '61) of Rockledge, 
Florida. 

Lori Jane McDade, born July 15 to 
Mr. and Mrs. Bob H. McDade (Elma 
Jane Monroe, '56-'58) of Jackson. She 
was welcomed by Daniel, 10, Lucy, 
9, and Kenneth, 7. 

David Leigh Meadows, Jr., born 
October 29 to Dr. and Mrs. David 
Leigh Meadows of Jackson. Dr. Mead- 
ows graduated in 1963, while Mrs. 
Meadows, the former Anna Den- 
nery, graduated in 1966. 

James Douglas Medley, Jr., born 
October 27 to Mr. and Mrs. Doug 
Medley, '61-'64, of Jackson. 

Julie Ann Meisberg, born November 
7, 1967, to the Reverend and Mrs. 
Stephen Meisberg, Jr. The Reverend 
Meisberg graduated in 1963, while 
Mrs. Meisberg is the former Clara 
Frances Jackson, '62. They are living 
in Venice, Florida. 

Katherine Leone Minar, bom Octo- 
ber 14, 1967, to Captain and Mrs. Gary 
Minar (Barbara Goodyear, '58-'60) of 
Dayton, Ohio. Greeted by Steven, 6 
and Jeffrey, 4. 

June Beth Ricks, born October 19, 
1967, to Mr. and Mrs. James S. Ricks 
(Patsy Rodden, '65) of Jackson. 

David Gardner Shoemaker, born 
August 25 to Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Shoemaker, '63, (EUse Matheny, '63) 
of Conway, Arkansas. 

Henry Atwood Sklar, bom Septem- 
ber 1 to Mr. and Mrs. Pete L. Sklar, 
'63, of New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Jennifer Anne Spraggins, born May 
4 to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Spraggins 
(Cynthia Karer, '57-'58) of Tuscaloosa, 
Alabama. Welcomed by Christy, 3. 

Scott Berry Stokes, bom May 31 to 
Mr. and Mrs. John B. Stokes (Aman- 
da Frank, '66) of Huntsville, Ala- 
bama. 

Andrea Lee Taylor, bom January 
26. Adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam R. Taylor (Ann Heggie, '52) of 
Baytown, Texas. 

Mary Janette White, born Septem- 
ber 19 to Dr. and Mrs. David G. Rob- 
inson (Mary Alice White, '60) of Ft. 
Myers, Florida. 

William Joseph Wood, bom June 26 
to Mr. and Mrs. Joe H. Wood (Janice 
Eileen Thigpen, '64) of Titus, Ala- 
bama. 



In Memoriam 



John Dennis Andrews, '67-'68, of 
Wiggins, who died July 13. 

Mrs. J. A. Brown, Jr., '56, of Jack- 
son, who died August 9. 

J. W. Frost, '07, of Grenada, who 
died September 16. 

Judge D. M. Graham, who grad- 
uated from the Millsaps Law School 
in 1900. Judge Graham, of Gulfport, 
died October 16. 

William W. Huntley, '08-'09, of Jack- 
son, who died September 16. 

James Madison Kennedy, '04, of 
Bay Springs, who died June 29. 

Dr. Robert F. Mantz, Jr., '48, of 
Natchez, who died July 8. 

Dr. Albert FrankUn Martin, '38-'40, 
of Aberdeen, who died August 14. 

Thomas Haywood PhiUips, '11, of 
Yazoo City, who died September 6. 

Robert M. Street, '56-'57, of Vicks- 
burg, who died July 7. 

Zachary Taylor, '11, of Jackson, 
who died October 25. 

Dr. Benton Z. Welch, '04, of Biloxi, 
who died July 19. 



High School 
Juniors and Seniors 
are invited to attend 

HIGH SCHCK)L 
DAY 

at Millsaps, 

Saturday, November 23. 

Contact the Admissions 

Office at Millsaps 

for more details. 



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