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Full text of "The Malone cook book;"




Class 1%V5 
Book Mj31 



Copyright N". 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



The 



" We may live without friends, We may live 
without books, 
But civilized man cannot live without cooks." 



Malone Cook Book 



Compiled from Recipes contributed by 
Ladies of Malone and published by 
the Woman's Aid Society of the 
FIRST CONG REG A TIONAL 
CHURCH, Malone. New York. 



Rutland, Vt.: 

THE TUTTLE COMPANY. 

Printers. 



BHARY OF j 
uPESS. \ 


>ie» 


Received 


14 


1903 


ght 


tnuy 


1- 


XXe.N« 


^1 3. rl 

)PY B. ] 



A^ 






FIRST EDITION EDITED BY 



riRS. C. S. RICHARDSON and MRS. M. E. McCLARY 



SECOND EDITION REVISED BY 

MRS. GEORGE HAWKINS and MRS. M. E. McCLARY 



THIRD EDITION REVISED AND ENLARGED BY 

MRS. GEORGE HAWKINS, MRS. M. E. McCLARY 

MRS. C. W. BREED, 

MRS. D. R. DEEDING and MRS. W. H. KING. 



FOURTH EDITION REVISED AND ENLARGED BY 

MRS. GEORGE.. HAWKINS,.,, .MRS. M. E. McCLARY 

": 'yl A ?:Mfei.c. m breed, 

Mp:S.,p,,IJ, BELDING, and MRS. W. H. KING. 



€ f » « ' « ■ 



Copyrighted 1903 by the Woman's Aid Society First Congre- 
gational Church, Malone, N. Y. 



CONTENTS. 



Weig"hts and Measures, 

Time Required for Cooking, . 

Table Service, 

Soups, 

Fish and Oysters, 

Meats and Poultry, . 

Fish and Meat Sauces with Relishes, 

Croquettes, . 

Vegetables, 

Salads, 

Eggs, . . 

Cheese Dishes and Sandwiches, 

Bread, Breakfast and Tea Cakes, 

Pies and Puddings, 

Pudding Sauces, 

Desserts, 

Frozen Desserts, 

Cakes, 

Fillings for Layer Cakes, 

Small Cakes and Cookies, 

Pickles and Relishes, 

Preserving, Canning and Jellies, 

Coffee, Tea and Other Beverages, 

Chafing-dish, 

Candy, 

For the Sick, 

Miscellaneous, 



6 

7 

8 

11 

17 

24 

37 

41 

45 

56 

66 

70 

75 

90 

110 

113 

120 

129 

139 

144 

150 

156 

164 

168 

172 

177 

180 



A Table of Weights and Measures for House- 
keepers. 

'-'■With weights and measures just and true, 

With stoves of even heat, 
Well buttered tins and quiet nerves. 

Success will be complete.'''' 

Ten eg-gs, ..... One pound 

One quart of flour, 

Two cupfuls of butter, 

One generous pint of liquid, 

Two cupfuls of granulated sug-ar, 

Two heaping- cupfuls of powdered sug-ar, 

One pint of finely chopped meat, packed solidly. 

The cup used is the common kitchen cup, holding half a pint. 
Two and one-half teaspoonfuls make . . One tablespoonful 

Four tablespoonfuls make . . . One wineglassful 

Two wineglassfuls make .... One gill 

Two gills make .... One teacupful 

Two teacupfuls make .... One pint 

Four teaspoonfuls of salt make . . One ounce 

One and one-half tablespoonfuls granulated sugar make One ounce 
Two tablespoonfuls of flour make . . One ounce 

One pint of loaf sugar weighs . . Ten ounces 

One pint of brown sugar weighs . . Twelve ounces 

One pint of granulated sugar weighs . . Sixteen ounces 

One pint of wheat flour weighs . . Nine ounces 

One pint of corn meal weighs . . . Eleven ounces 

A piece of butter the size of an o.^^ weighs . about 1 \ ounces 

One square of Baker's chocolate weighs . One ounce 



Time Required for Cooking the following Meats 
and Vegetables. 

Beef, sirloin, rare, per pound, eight to ten minutes. 

Beef, sirloin, well done, per pound, twelve to fifteen minutes. 

Chickens, three to four pounds weight, one to one and one-half hours. 

Duck, tame, from forty to sixty minutes. 

Lamb, well done, per pound, fifteen minutes. 

Pork, well done, per pound, thirty minutes. 

Turkey, ten pounds, three hours. 

Veal, well done, per pound, twenty minutes. 

Pototoes, boiled, thirty minutes. 

Potatoes, baked, forty-five minutes. 

Sweet potatoes, boiled, forty-five minutes. 

Sweet potatoes, baked, one hour. 

Squash, boiled, twenty-five minutes. 

Squash, baked, forty-five minutes. 

Green peas, boiled, twenty to forty minutes. 

Shelled beans, one hour. 

String beans, one to two hours. 

Green corn, from twenty to thirty minutes. 

Asparagus, fifteen to thirty minutes. 

Spinach, one to two hours. 

Tomatoes, one hour. 

Cabbage, forty-five minutes to two hours. 

Cauliflower, one to two hours. 

Dandelions, two to three hours. 

Beet greens, one hour. 

Onions, one to two hours. 

Beets, one to five hours. 

Turnip s, forty-five minutes to one hour. 

Parsnips, from one-half to one hour. 



lo TABLE SERVICE 

Bills of fare can easily be made from the following table and 
served in the order indicated: 

First Course — Raw oysters. 

Second Course — Soup. 

Third Course— Fish. 

Fourth Course — Entrees: croquettes, sweet breads, fricassees. 

Fifth Course — Roast meats. 

Sixth Course — Sherbet. 

Seventh Course — Entremets: dressed vegetables, served alone 
each, as asparagus, spinach, cauliflower, macaroni, dressed eggs, 
etc. 

Eighth Course — Game. 

Ninth Course — Salad. 

Tenth Course — ^Cheese — macaroni dressed with cheese, cheese 
omelet, etc. ; cheese and salad often served together. 

Eleventh Course — Puddings, charlottes, creams, etc. 

Twelfth Course— Glaces: anything iced— ice cream, water ice, 
frozen pudding, etc. 

Thirteenth Course — Dessert: fruit, nuts, raisins, bonbons, etc. 

Fourteenth Course — Coffee. 

It is very simple to prepare a dinner "a la Russe," as the many 
dishes do not have to be hot and in perfection the same minute, and 
served all together, but each succeeding course can be prepared 
while the other is being served and eaten. For a " tea party," or, 
in city parlance, "high tea," the coffee and tea equipages stand 
before the hostess. The table may be ornamented with fruit and 
flowers, but not in the formal fashion of a dinner party. Preserves 
may stand on the table in glass dishes. 

Fried oysters, croquettes, chops and green peas, omelet and 
cold meats of various kinds may be served by the host. Vegetable 
and other salads are always welcome, and hot bread and coftee 
indispensable. 

Bouillon often forms a first course. With bouillon a large tea- 
spoon is provided. 



SOUPS 

*' Good broth and good keeping do much now and then. 
Good diet with wisdom best comforteth men. ' ' 

General Directions. — The basis of all good soups is the broth of 
meat. Put the meat into cold water, allowing one and one-half 
pints for one pound of bone and meat — equal quantities of each. 
Do not let it boil for the first half hour; then simmer slowly till done, 
keeping the pot closely covered. The next day, when the soup is 
cold, remove the fat. 

Beef Stock. — Half a shin of beef; cover it with cold water, and 
boil slowly five or six hours, salt it and strain. In the morning take 
off fat. Then add the vegetables and herbs used for seasoning, 
cooking all well together about one hour. Strain the soup before 
sending to table. 

Rice or Barley Soup. — Add to the above half a cup of rice or 
barley, and boil for one hour. 

Vermicelli Soup. — One cup of vermicelli; break it up and boil ten 
or fifteen minutes. Then add to beef stock. 

Macaroni Soup. — One cup of macaroni; boil three-quarters of an 
hour. Then add to beef stock. 

Consomm^. — Four pounds of the lower part of a round of beef, 
four pounds of the knuckle of veal, two tablespoons of butter, six 
quarts of cold water, one large onion, one-half a carrot, three stalks 
of celery, one tablespoon of salt, bouquet of herbs and a few spices. 
Cut the beef and veal into pieces, put one tablespoon of butter into a 
very clean soup kettle with the pieces of meat, stir over a hot fire until 
the meat is browned but not burned. Then add one quart of water; 
cook until a glaze has formed on bottom of the kettle, say about one 
hour. Then add five quarts of cold water, let it come slowly to the 
boiling point, set back and simmer for six hours. Remove scum 
from time to time. One hour before serving, add vegetables which 



12 SOUPS 

have been cut fine and browned in one tablespoon of butter. Add 
herbs and spices and one tablespoon of salt. When done strain 
through a fine cloth into a bowl and cool without covering-. If the 
Consomme is not clear, put over the fire again, bring to the boiling 
point and add the white and crushed shell of one ^^^, mixed with a 
little cold water, boil two minutes, then stand on back of range to 
settle, then strain through two thicknesses of cheese cloth. 

Bouillon. — A knuckle of beef well cracked and a small veal bone; 
one-half each of a carrot, turnip and onion; a little celery. Cover 
the^bones with water and let kettle stand where it will boil slowly 
all da3^- -twelve hours if possible; the last three hours have the vege- 
tables in. Salt, strain through a colander into a stone jar; in the 
morning remove all fat. Heat the jelly, which should be solid, and 
strain through a flannel bag. Bouillon is simply good, strong stock, 
well seasoned. Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Bouillon, No. 2. — Should be served in little china cups. Place 
a fowl that has been half roasted in the soup kettle, with three 
pounds of lean beef, salt and pepper them and pour over them three 
quarts of cold water. Then set it over a good fire. In about halt 
an hour remove the scum, then add ordinary sized carrot, one small 
leek, one stalk of celery, a little parsley, bay leaf, one onion and 
two cloves, clove of garlic, let it simmer for about five hours, then 
skim again; strain into an earthen bowl, where it can cool rapidly. 
When ready to serve, heat. Mrs. J. R. Flanders. 

Vegetable Tomato Soup. — Two quarts beef stock, one can or one 
quart of fresh tomatoes, one-half can or one-half pint fresh peas, 
same quantity string beans, cut in small pieces, and a small onion, 
cut fine. Cook all in stock, season with pepper and salt. Do not 
strain. Serve with squares of toast. Mrs. Ralph. 

Black Bean Soup.^ — Soak one pint of black beans over night. In 
the morning pour oft' the water, and add three quarts of water, with 
any bones, either of beef or mutton. Boil slowly five or six hours. 
When half done add one scant teaspoon of cloves in a bag, and an 



SOUPS 13 

onion, if liked. Skim carefully if it is to be used the same day. 
Strain it, mashing the beans slightly with a spoon. Lay slices of 
lemon and hard boiled o.^^ in the tureen, and pour the soup upon 
them. Mrs. Richardson. 

Bean Soup. — To about three pounds of a well-broken joint of veal 
add four quarts of water, and let it boil one hour. To this add a 
scant pint of beans, which have been previously soaked over night 
and parboiled. Let cook slowly two hours. Season with pepper 
and salt. One-half hour before going to the table add a cup of sweet 
milk; also a small piece of butter. Serve with crackers. 

Mrs. Emma Hawkins. 

Pea Soup. — Use one quart of split peas, soaking them over 
night. Put over the fire at nine in the morning, in four quarts of 
cold water; add one finely chopped onion and a pound of salt pork. 
Boil four hours; strain and put back on the stove for one-half hour. 

Mrs. Gillett. 

SpHt Pea Soup. — One cup of peas, three pints of cold water, one 
tablespoon of butter, one tablespoon of flour, one-half teaspoon of 
sugar, one teaspoon of salt, one salt spoon of white pepper. Soak 
peas over night, put them on to boil in three pints of cold water, and 
let them simmer until dissolved, adding enough water as it boils 
away to keep three pints of liquid in the kettle. Keep well scraped 
from the sides of kettle, and when soft, rub through a strainer, and 
put on to boil again. Add either water, stock, milk or cream to 
make the consistency 3^ou wish. It .should be more like a puree 
than a soup. Cook the butter and flour together, and add to the 
strained soup w^hile boiling; add salt and pepper, and when it has 
simmered ten minutes serve at once with toasted dice of bread. It 
must always be strained, and thickened with flour and butter, or it 
will separate as it cools. It may be varied in many ways, hy 
adding half of a can of tomatoes before straining, or by boiling 
with the peas a small onion, or by adding any remnants of bone or 
meat. Mrs. J. Lincoln. 



'4 



SOUPS 



Tomato Soup. — One can or a quart of nice ripe tomatoes, chopped 
fine; also, two or three good-sized onions, chopped fine, a handful of 
rice, two quarts of water. Boil nearly an hour. Then add pepper, 
salt, and butter the size of a small egg; last, add one quart of good, 
rich milk. Taste, and season more if needed; it requires a good 
deal of salt. Mrs. J. S. Phillips. 

Tomato Soup. — One quart can of tomatoes, three pints of milk, a 
large tablespoonful of flour, butter the size of an o.^^, pepper and 
salt to taste, a scant teaspoonful of soda. Put the tomato on to stew 
and the milk in a double kettle to boil, reserving, however, half a 
cupful to mix with the flour. Mix the flour smoothly with this cold 
milk, stir into the boiling^'milk, and cook ten minutes. To the 
tomato add the soda, stir well, and rub through a strainer that is 
fine enough to keep back the seeds. Add butter, salt and pepper to 
the milk, and then the tomato. Serve immediately. A little 
■whipped cream added when serving improves this. If half the rule 
is made stir the tomatoes well in the can before dividing, as the liquid 
portion is the more acid. Miss Mary Meehan. 

Tomato Soup. — Put into a sauce-pan one quart of stewed or can 
of tomatoes, one pint of stock, one bay leaf, one small onion, sprig of 
parsley, let all cook for fifteen minutes, press through a sieve to 
remove seeds, return to the sauce-pan and place on the range, rub a 
tablespoon of butter and two of flour together until smooth and stir 
into the soup when boiling. Stir constantly until smooth, add salt 
and pepper. Serve with Croutons. 

Potato Soup.^ — Three potatoes, one pint of milk, or milk and 
water, one teaspoon of chopped onion, one-half teaspoon each of flour 
and butter. Cook onion in milk, then add the potato, which has been 
previously boiled and mashed. Rub through strainer and return to 
kettle. Stir flour and butter together, add a little soup and stir into 
the remaining soup. Boil a few moments, season with pepper, salt 
and a little parsley. Serve with toasted crackers. 

Stewed Oysters. — One quart of milk, one quart of water; salt 



SOUPS 15 

and pepper to taste; six crackers rolled fine and cooked in the milk 
and water twenty minutes; then add three pints of oysters and half 
a cup of butter, and let it come to a boil. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Oyster Soup. — Put one quart of oysters in a colander to drain, 
then pour over them one pint of cold water and drain it into the 
liquor. Put the liquor into the sauce pan and when it boils skim it. 
Add one pint of milk or cream. Wash the 03^sters by allowing cold 
water to run over them through the colander. Add them to the soup 
with one tablespoon of butter, salt^ and pepper to taste. Let all 
come to a boil and serve. 

Turkish Soup. — Bring to the boiling point one quart of good 
stock (white preferable). Add to it one teaspoon of onion juice, blade 
of mace, one bay leaf and a little parsley if liked. Stand over a 
moderate fire fifteen minutes. Then strain and add two-thirds of a 
pint of milk, salt and pepper to taste. When ready to serve take 
kettle from the fire and add quickly the yolks of two eggs, beaten 
with two tablespoons of cream. Serve immediately with cheese 
croutons. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Turkey Soup. — Boil a turkey or chicken carcass, dressing and 
all, for two hours, adding one onion. Take out and chop all the meat 
and return to the soup. Then add stalks of celery, cut fine, and 
thicken with two tablespoonfuls of flour. Half an hour before 
serving, add one cup of cream or milk. Mrs. Breed. 

White Stock for Soup. — To four pounds of veal, lamb or chicken, 
put five quarts of cold water. This should be heated only moderately 
for the first half hour, after which place the pot on back of stove, 
allowing the soup to simmer for four or five iiours or until the meat 
falls from the bones. Strain through colander into an earthen dish, 
add a little salt and set to cool; when cool remove fat. 

Mrs. Breed. 

Cream of Celery Soup.— To one pint of white stock add a small 
onion, large cup of celery cut in small pieces, cook until soft enough 



J 6 SOUPS 

to strain throug-h a sieve, after which return to the kettle; add one 
pint of milk; thicken to the consistency of cream, using- about one 
tablespoon of flour. Just before serving add one pint of cream and 
a piece of butter the size of a M^alnut. Mrs. Breed. 

Asparagus Soup. — Follow directions"for celery soup, substituting- 
asparag-us for celery, and use the asparag-us tips to drop in about 
five to ten minutes before serving. 

Cream of Green Peas. — Follow the directions for celery soup, 
substituting one pint of green peas for celery. 

Corn Soup. — One pint of grated corn, one quart of milk, one pint 
of hot water, one even tablespoonful of flour, two tablespoonfuls of 
butter, one slice of onion, salt and pepper to taste. Cook the corn 
in the water thirty minutes. Let the milk and onion come to a boil. 
Mix the butter and flour together, add a few tablespoonfuls of the 
boiling milk, when smooth, stir into the milk and cook eight 
minutes, remove the onion, strain corn and add to the above. After 
cooking a little add one cup of sweet cream, and when thoroughly 
heated, a small piece of butter, and serve. Mrs. H. E. King. 

Corn Bisque. ^Take one can of corn, place on back of stove, let 
it cook slowly for three or four hours, then strain through a colander. 
To the liquid add one pint of milk, and thicken as desired, (about 
one tablespoonful of flour). Just before serving, add one cup of 
sweet cream which has been heated, and butter size of a walnut. 
Salt to taste. Serve when hot. Makes enough for eight or ten 
bouillon cups. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Velvet Soups.— To a quart of strong, well-flavored consommo 
(beef, chicken, mutton, game, or "combination ") add a large cupful 
of rich cream which has been poured boiling hot on the beaten 3^olks 
of four eggs mixed with four tablespoonfuls of cold cream. As a 
last touch of seasoning in reheating, add a little powdered mace. 
Boiled chestnuts or blanched almonds, pounded to a paste, may be 
added, if desired. 



FISH AND OYSTERS 

" The best fish is the one that's caught.'" 

Baked Trout. — Dry fish thoroughly, inside and out. Sprinkle 
inside with pepper and salt, and put in a small cup of butter. Cut 
fish in sections and insert small strips of salt pork; put in dripping- 
pan, on a rack. Just before taking from the oven pour over the fish 
a coffee cup of sweet cream. Let brown if necessary; thicken gravy 
with a little flour. 

Stuffed Lake Trout.— Clean the fish and prepare a dressing of 
bread crumbs, butter, salt, pepper, a little milk, to moisten, and fill 
the fish. Bake about one hour. Miss W. Childs. 

Fish Dressing. — One cupful of stale bread crumbs, moisten with 
a little cold water, add a small onion chopped very fine, or the juice. 
One teaspoonful of thyme, savory, parsley, salt and pepper to taste, 
mix with one &gg, stuff, tie, and bake with slices of salt pork until 
done. Mrs. W. S. Lawrence. 

Brook Trout, Fried. — Wash, wipe and roll in meal or flour; drop 
into the frying pan of hot butter; fry to a nice brown. After 
removing the fish, pour a cup of cream into the frying pan, adding a 
little pepper and salt; boil a minute or two and pour over the trout. 

Mrs. Gillett. 

Adirondack Trout. — ^Catch'em; remove inwards; pack in fine salt 
to slime — two ounces to each pound of fish; let them remain in slime 
twelve hours; then clean thoroughly and pack in broken ice and 
swamp moss; keep in a cool place till used. To fry, put a piece of 
butter size of an egg in a pan; heat as hot as possible without 
burning; drain and lay trout in pan; salt lightly; cook on one side; 
remove pa7i from fire; turn the trout and crisp to taste. Serve la 
ivoods, M. E. McClary. 



i8 FISH AND OYSTERS 

Boiled Salmon. — The middle slice of salmon is the best. Sew- 
up neatly in cheese cloth, boil a quarter of an hour to the pound in 
hot salted water. When done, unwrap with care, lay upon a hot 
platter, taking- care not to break it. Have ready a large cupful of 
drawn butter, very rich, in which has been stirred a tablespoonful 
of minced parsley and the juice of a lemon. Pour half upon the 
salmon and serve the rest in a boat. Garnish with parsley and 
sliced eg-gs, or slices of lemon. Any fresh iish can be cooked in 
this way. 

Turbot a la Creme.— Take a white iish or two pounds of halibut; 
steam or boil twenty minutes; break in flakes; remove the bones 
and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Take one quart of milk, three 
large slices of onion, a little parsley; put over the fire and boil one 
minute; mix four tablespoonfuls of flour with one-half cup of butter, 
add a little milk and mix to a cream; then pour it into the boiling- 
milk and stir and cook until it forms a thick cream; take from the 
fire; add the yolks of two well- beaten eg-gs, and strain through a 
coarse strainer. Put in a buttered baking dish a layer of sauce 
and a layer of fish alternately until the dish is full, the sauce being 
on top; sprinkle with bread crumbs and bake one-half hour in a 
moderate oven. May be baked in shells. Mrs. J. E. Taylor. 

Creamed Codfish. — Put fish on the stove in cold water; keep 
warm, but do not boil until the fish is softened; remove bones and 
skin, shred finely and put it in a sauce pan with rich milk, in 
proportion of one pint of milk to one coffee cup of fish; let it come to 
a boil and thicken with a teaspoon of flour. Just before taking from 
the stove stir in butter size of an \^^^', and one beaten ^^^. Season 
with pepper and garnish with hard-boiled eggs, or place poached 
eggs carefully on fish with a little salt and pepper on each &^^. If 
you wish, the fish may be shredded before putting in cold water. 
Fish prepared as above is good poured over buttered toast. 

Codfish Balls. — One coffee cup of boiled codfish, picked very fine; 
add two cups of mashed potatoes, one ^^^, three tablespoons of cream, 



FISH AND OYSTERS ig 

and butter size of an egg; salt and pepper to taste. Beat all 
together until very light; make into balls, roll in flour and fry in 
butter. Enough for five persons. Nellie O'Connell. 

Codfish Balls. — One quart of potatoes, pared and sliced; one pint 
of codfish, finely shredded; two eggs, one tablespoon of butter. Boil 
potatoes and codfish together, mash and add the beaten eggs and 
butter. Beat all together until very light. Shape in balls and fry 
like doughnuts. Mrs. Chipperfield. 

Note. — One-half teaspoon of mustard improves fish cakes. 

Codfish and Potatoes.— Prepare the fish as for fish balls, only 
not as fine; put in a baking dish, with alternate layers of cold boiled 
potatoes sliced and seasoned with butter and pepper. Pour over 
all two cups of sweet cream or cream sauce. Bake one-half hour. 

Mrs. Pease. 

Codfish Fried in Butter. — Pull codfish apart and soak over night. 
In the morning put in a dry towel, absorbing all the water. Make a 
batter of .two eggs, a tablespoon of flour; roll the fish in this and fry 
in butter. Miss Chambers. 

Broiled Fish.— Wash and dry fish in a towel. Place on a 
greased broiler, flesh side down, over clear coals, but not so hot as 
for beef steak. Season with butter, pepper and salt. Salt fish 
freshened twenty-four hours is also good broiled. 

Salt Mackerel. — Freshen over night with the flesh side down. 
Bake in dripping pan one-half hour; then place on hot platter and 
add one small cup of sweet cream and a little butter. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Broiled Mackerel.— Soak the fish in a large pan of cold water, 
flesh side down, for eighteen hours; change the water. When ready 
to cook, wipe dry and lay on a greased broiler, broil with flesh side 
down, over a clear fire, then turn and broil the skin side. Be care- 



20 FISH AND OYSTERS 

ful, as this side burns quickly. When cooked place on hot platter 
and spread with butter or serve with Maitre d' Hotel Sauce. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Broiled Finnan Haddie.— Plunge fish into boiling water and let 
it remain five minutes, then dry thoroughly on a cloth. Broil over 
a clear fire, flesh side down at first, turning occasionally to keep 
from burning; the skin side needs only to brown, the flesh side 
needs the cooking. When done put on hot platter with a little butter, 
or one tablespoon of melted butter and a teaspoon of lemon juice. 

Broiled Shad Roe. — Wash and dry the roe with care not to break 
the skin, place it on a well-greased broiler and rub it with butter 
once or twice during the time of broiling; cook to a nice brown, place 
it on a hot dish and cover with a Maitre d' Hotel sauce. Can be 
baked or cooked in a Saute-pan. 

Halibut a La Flamande.— Have steaks two inches thick cut from 
the halibut, cover the bottom of a baking pan with one tablespoon 
each of butter in small bits, onion and parsley chopped fine, one- 
half teaspoon of salt and a few dashes of pepper. Lay the steak on 
this. Beat the yolk of one o.^^ light, brush it over the top of the fish 
and cover with one tablespoon each of onion and parsley chopped 
fine, one tablespoon of butter, one-half teaspoon of salt and a little 
pepper. Pour over each steak one teaspoon of lemon juice. Bake 
forty minutes. Garnish with lemon and parsley. Serve with 
HoUandaise sauce. Mrs. J. E. Ta3dor. 

Broiled Halibut. — Season the slices with salt and pepper, and 
lay them in melted butter for half an hour, having them well covered 
on both sides. Roll in flour and broil from twenty to thirty minutes 
over a clear fire. Serve on a hot dish, garnishing with parsley and 
slices of lemon. The slices of halibut should be about an inch thick 
and for every pound there should be three tablespoonfuls of butter. 

Miss Parloa. 



FISH AND OYSTERS 21 

Escaloped Fish. — Take cooked fresh fish; put alternate layers of 
fish and cream sauce in a baking- dish. Cover with fine cracker 
crumbs and pieces of butter. Bake one-half hour. 

Oyster Cocktails.— In a wineg-lass put one tablespoon of lemon 
juice, four tablespoons of tomato catsup, tliree drops of tabasco 
sauce, a dash of celery salt and a dash of Worcestershire sauce for 
six oysters. Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Escaloped Oysters.— Butter a dish that is about three inches 
deep; put in a layer of cracker and bread crumbs; then a layer of 
oysters free from their liquor; then bits of butter; sprinkle with 
pepper and salt; do this until you have used a quart of oysters; over 
the whole pour a teacup of sweet cream, and bake three-quarters of 
an hour. Mrs. Parmelee. 

Fried Oysters. — Take with great care from the liquor as many 
oysters as you wish to fry; lay flat on a soft napkin; press another 
lightly over to absorb all liquor; beat several eggs in bowl; roll 
fresh, crisp oyster crackers to fine powder; melt enough sweet butter 
to cover bottom of pan one-eighth inch deep; dip each oyster in eggs, 
and roll in cracker, without breaking the oyster, until completely 
incrusted; place carefully in pan, and fry quickly to nice brown; 
turn oysters so as not to break crusting. Serve on hot plates with 
buttered toast. T. W. Miller. 

Note. — Serve with oysters finely shredded cabbage, with French 
dressing. 

Fricasseed Oysters. — Put in a sauce pan one quart of oysters 
with their liquor, boil a little, then put in a colander, shake well 
until thoroughly dry, then put back in the sauce pan with a cup of 
sweet cream, a little butter, a little white pepper and salt; put a 
tablespoon of flour into the cream to thicken. Serve on toast. 

Mrs. Belding. 

Creamed Oysters.— Put butter size of an English walnut into a 
sauce pan, add a little parsley, celery, onion, mace, nutmeg, and a 
small piece of bay leaf. Let simmer, but not brown. Sprinkle in two 



22 FISH AND OYSTERS 

tablespoonfuls of flour, cook, stirring constantly. Pour in strained 
juice of one and one-half pints of oysters (hot), cook slowly for one- 
half hour. Then add one-half cup of thick cream, heated. Run 
throug-h a sieve. If not thick enough add a little more flour wet with 
milk. Season with red pepper and salt, juice of one-half lemon. 
Cook oysters in sauce until plump and hot. Mrs. S. A. Beman. 

Deviled Scallops. — Put one quart of scallops in sauce pan, bring 
to boiling point in their own liquor, drain and chop fine, saving 
liquor. Put three tablespoonfuls of butter in a bowl, beat to a 
cream, add scant teaspoonful of made mustard, one teaspoonful of 
salt, dash of cayenne, and beat well. Now add one cup of hot stock. 
Stir scallops and then liquor into this sauce and let stand one-half 
hour. Then put in baking dish or shells. Sprinkle with crumbs 
and dot with butter and bake in a moderate oven twenty minutes. 

Miss Parloa. 

Scallops Fried in Batter. — Make a batter of one pint of flour, two 
eggs, one tablespoonful of salad oil, one teaspoonful of salt, nearly 
one-half pint of milk. Beat eggs light, add milk, then pour the 
mixture upon the flour. Beat hard for two or three minutes. Then 
add salt and oil. Drain and dry one quart of scallops, season with 
salt and pepper. Drop into the batter and then drop spoonfuls of 
scallops and batter into boiling lard. Cook for three minutes, 
drain and serve at once. Miss Parloa. 

Deviled Crabs.— Twenty-five live crabs steamed about twenty 
minutes; pick them out carefully, bodies first, then the claws. 
Take four hard boiled eggs, mash fine, mix them with crab meat, 
fork them together. Take two cups of milk, two tablespoons of butter 
and two of flour creamed together; have the milk scalding. One 
tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce, about one-third of a nutmeg 
grated, a little cayenne pepper, salt to taste. Take fifteen shells 
and wash carefully, then fill shells and cover with white dried 
bread crumbs, put a little butter on each and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. Frank Haven. 



FISH AND OYSTERS 23 

A Simple Timbale of Halibut. — Take a half pound of uncooked 
halibut. Cut it into fine pieces, pound it in a mortar, and pass it 
throug-h a sieve. Mix a cupful of white bread crumbs with a half 
cupful of cream, and stir until it makes a smooth paste; remove it 
from the fire, add the fish pulp, a half teaspoonful of salt, and a 
dash of paprica. Then beat in lig-htly, a little at a time, the 
whipped whites of five egg-s. Fill buttered timbale molds with the 
mixture, and place them in a pan of hot water in a moderate oven 
for thirty minutes. This will fill a quart mold, or eight individual 
molds. Serve with a white or with a tomato sauce. 

Mrs. Belding-. 

Salmon Wiggle. — One and one-half cups of milk, four tablespoons 
of butter, three tablespoons of flour, one cup salmon picked apart 
with fork, one cup green peas, pepper and salt to taste. Make a 
sauce of the milk, butter and flour. When it thickens, stir in peas 
which have been previously warmed. Serve hot. 

Sadie Thompson. 

Little Pigs in Blankets. — Take as many large oysters as are 
wished and dry them with a towel. Have some fat bacon cut in 
very thin slices, cover each oyster with them and pin on with wooden 
toothpicks. Broil or roast them until the bacon is crisp and brown. 
Do not remove toothpicks. Serve hot. 

" Within these folds we may confidently look to find the intel- 
lectual powers of man." — Duke of Ar gyle. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 

" JV/io can offef such a dish 
May dispense with soup or fish; 
And if he a guest should wish, 
Let him send for vie.'''' 

Roast Beef. — Place meat on a rack which will raise it a little 
above the bottom of the pan. Put in a corner of the pan a half tea- 
spoonful of salt and a quarter of a teaspoonful of pepper. Put in 
also two tablespoonfuls of water. Place in a very hot oven for 
fifteen or twenty minutes until meat is browned; then lower the 
temperature of the oven and cook more slowly until done; baste 
frequently. Allow fifteen minutes to the pound. Mrs. Belding. 

Yorkshire Pudding. — One pint of milk; one teaspoonful of salt; 
two cups of flour sifted with one teaspoonful baking powder; four 
egg-s, beaten thoroughly; mix all together quickly — eggs, milk and 
salt, then flour — pour off fat from the gravy in the pan, and then 
pour in the pudding. Continue the roasting, letting the drippings 
fall on the pudding; baste the meat with the gravy taken from the 
pan. From half an hour to fifty minutes will make the pudding. 
Cut the pudding in small squares and serve about the beef, or 
separately if preferred. Mrs. C. L. Hubbard. 

Beef a la Mode. — Take from six to eight pounds of the round of 
beef, free from bone; one-fourth pound of salt pork; cut the pork into 
one-fourth inch strips, pepper, and draw through the beef with a 
larding needle; place in a kettle one-third full of boiling water — 
keeping the beef from the bottom of the kettle by placing a wire 
frame or narrow pieces of board under it. Then cut fine two or 
three carrots, one large onion, and put over the beef; keep enough 
water in the kettle to steam the meat; care should be used not to 
burn. Cook three to four hours, keeping the kettle closely covered; 
when done remove the beef, leaving carrots and onions in liquor, 
which thicken for grary. Mrs. Ralph. 



MEATS AND POULTRY 25 

Smothered Beef and Onions. — Take a good-sized steak (round is 
the best) and six onions; remove bone from steak; chop onions fine; 
pepper and salt; place on steak, and roll; fasten firmly; put in fry- 
ing pan with a little water; cover closely, and steam about fifteen 
minutes; then put a good-sized piece of butter in the pan, and cover 
again; steam till done,, having just enough water in pan to keep from 
burning. Mrs. Ralph. 

Irish Stew.— Take the remnants of a roast of beef; pare four 
potatoes and slice one-half inch thick; one or two onions cut up fine; 
one-third cup of rice, if desired. Place meat over fire in three 
quarts of cold water, two hours before dinner, onions and rice one 
hour, potatoes twenty minutes. Season with pepper and salt. 
Remove bones and add dumplings fifteen minutes before serving. 
For the dumplings use one pint of flour, two rounded teaspoonfuls 
baking powder, salt, and sweet milk for a stiff batter. Drop by 
spoonfuls into boiling soup fifteen minutes before serving. Do not 
raise the cover or let the soup cease to boil after they are added. 

Mrs. McClary. 

To Broil Beefsteak. — A perfect steak should be from one and 
one-half to two inches thick. Trim it a good shape, heat the broiler 
very hot, greasing with a piece of the fat. Lay outside edge 
towards the handle so that the fat may run on the meat. Place it 
close to the hot coals and count ten slowly, turn it and do the same, 
to sear the outside and keep the juices in, then hold it farther from 
the coals, turning very frequently. Broil from eight to fifteen minutes 
according to the thickness of the steak. A steak should be rare, but 
not raw, should have a uniform red color and be full of juice. Put on 
hot platter, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and spread with butter. 
It is excellent with tomato or mushroom sauce poured over the steak. 

Mrs. Belding. 

Hamburg Steaks. — Chop one pound of lean raw meat very fine, 
remove all the fiber possible. To the mince add one-half table- 
spoonful of onion juice, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one-fourth tea- 
[31 



26 MEA TS AND PO UL TR Y 

spoonful of pepper, dash of nutmeg, one egg. Form into small 
balls and flatten, or shape in tin, good inch and a half thick. Broil 
same as beefsteak. Serve with Maitre d'Hotel sauce. 

Roast Steak. — Have two pounds of good tender steak. Have 
ready a dressing of bread crumbs; spread this on the steak and 
roll; tie firmly. Have the oven hot, and bake an hour. Sprinkle 
on salt and pepper just before it is done. Mrs. Gillard. 

Potted Beef. — Take a large beef shank, and put into enough cold 
water to cover it. Boil till very tender — till all the bones and 
cartilage can be easily removed. Chop the meat fine, and replace 
in the pot with the liquor, which should be about one quart. Let 
it simmer gently; season with salt, pepper and a little sage or 
summer savory if you wish. Press, and when cold cut into slices. 
It is convenient for tea. Mrs. Gilbert. 

Beef's Tongue. — Boil a fresh tongue in salted water one and one- 
half hours. Before putting it in the water, trim it carefuUj^ and 
skewer into good shape. When it is boiled remove the skin. If it is 
to be used cold, replace the skewer, put it again in the water in 
which it was boiled and let it remain until cold. If used hot, pour 
over it a white or a piquante sauce, garnish with parsle\^ Spinach 
is a good vegetable to serve with tongue. Mrs. Belding. 

Creamed Dried Beef. — One cup of dried beef. Let it soak in 
warm water a few minutes; pour off the water and add one pint of 
milk and cream. Thicken with a little flour, and season with 
pepper, salt and butter. Just before taking from the stove add one 
^^^, well beaten. 

Packing Beef. — For one hundred pounds of beef, take four quarts 
of salt, one and one-half ounces saltpetre, one and one-half ounces 
soda, four pounds sugar. Rub this together and then rub on the 
beef; pack very tightly and solidly; this makes the brine. For 
small families use small package, that each layer may be as small 
as possible, as taking away part of a layer drains the brine from the 



MEA rs AND PO UL TR Y 27 

remainder of the layer. Adding water takes away the peculiar 
excellence and tenderness of the beef. George Hawkins. 

Corned Beef Hash. — To one heaping measure of meat chopped 
fine, allow two measures of chopped potato, season with pepper; 
put in frying pan and moisten with milk or cream; when hot add a 
generous piece of butter and mix. It may now be put in a baking 
dish and cooked in a quick oven until brown or left in the frying 
pan and cooked fifteen minutes, stirring occasionally. 

Mrs. James Sawyer. 

Hash Balls. — Prepare hash as above, form into small, round 
cakes about an inch thick; dip in ^^^, roll in bread crumbs and fry 
like croquettes. Serve with tomato sauce. 

Meat Puffs. — Chop meat that has been previously cooked; season 
well with pepper, salt and butter; moisten with a little stock or 
water. Make nice puff paste; roll thin; cut into round cakes; fill 
with meat and bake. Serve warm. Miss Amelia Greeno. 

Chopped Beef. — Take tender steak and chop very fine, removing 
all the fibre; make into a flat ball. Put it on the broiler over 
bright coals, only heating through; season with butter and salt. 
Nice for invalids. Mrs. Parmelee. 

Roast Lamb. — Put salt and pepper on the meat and with a flour 
dredge sprinkle on a little flour. Place in the dripping pan without 
water. If there is not enough fat to baste it, when thoroughly 
heated, throw on a cup of boiling water in which has been placed a 
little butter. Baste frequently. If you choose, use a dressing made 
as for turkey. Serve with mint sauce. Mrs. Gillett. 

Crown of Lamb with Peas. — In cooking it care must be taken 
that it is thoroughly done. With the length of the ribs on both sides 
a crown roast may be prepared which is very effective in appearance. 
Stand the. two pieces with the bone side outwards and draw them 
round together to a circle, tying or skewering them. Cover the ends 



28 ME A TS AND PO UL TR Y 

of the bones with greased paper or a flour and water paste so that 
they will not char, then roast in a quick oven. In serving fill with 
nicely cooked peas. 

Ragout of Mutton. — For six persons. Three pounds of mutton, a 
carrot, a turnip, two tablespoons chopped onion, one quart potatoes, 
measured after being pared, and cut into one-half inch cubes; three 
tablespoons flour, three of butter, three pints of boiling water, and 
enough salt and pepper. Cut most of the fat off", and then cut meat 
in small pieces. Season and roll in flour. Put butter in frying 
pan, and all the vegetables (except potatoes), cut fine. Cook slowl}' 
five minutes, then add meat. Stir over a hot fire until a golden 
brown. Pour on the water and cook slowly one and one-half hours. 
Add potatoes and cook one-half hour longer. Mrs. Chipperfield. 

Venison. — Lard the venison, rub with butter and dredge with 
flour, place in a hot oven and roast fifteen minutes to every pound, 
basting every ten minutes, at first with melted butter, and then with 
its own drippings. When half done season with salt and pepper. 
When done put on hot platter, add two tablespoons of flour to the fat 
in the pan, add one pint of stock and cook; take from the fire and 
add one tablespoon of currant jelly, season with salt and pepper. 

Veal Cutlets. — Take cutlets and partly cook, then dip in a beaten 
&^g and roll in bread crumbs. Fry brown in lard and butter. 
When cooked, remove, and put a little water in the pan, thicken with 
teaspoon of flour, season with butter, pepper and salt; pour over 
cutlets and serve. Mis Greeno. 

Veal Pot Pie. — Take three pounds of veal; put in hot water, 
enough to cover; cook slowly about three hours, or till tender; renew 
water as it boils away. It is well to plan for this the day you are 
baking bread. Take of raised dough for dumpling as you would 
for biscuit; when light steam one hour in steamer. Cook the potatoes 
either by themselves or with the meat for half an hour. Put meat, 



ME A TS A ND PO UL TR Y 29 

potatoes and dumplings on a platter and pour over gravy. For gravy- 
take some of the water in which the meat is cooked, thicken with 
flour wet in cold water. Season with butter, pepper and salt. 

Mrs. C. D. Hubbard. 

Veal Stew, English.— Three pounds of shoulder of veal, cut into 
four-inch pieces, stewed with a large onion, sliced, and a piece 01 
salt lean and fat pork. When nearly done add salt and pepper, 
thicken gravy, adding a small can of button mushrooms. Stew 
fifteen minutes after. A little chopped parsley is an improvement. 

Mrs. W. S. Lawrence. 

Veal Balls.— Chop cold veal fine; add half as much bread 
crumbs and a little butter, stir in two eggs, season, make into balls, 
and fry in butter. Mrs. W. A. Short. 

Pate de Veau. — Three and one-half pounds of veal chopped fine, 
with one slice of fat pork, two crackers, rolled fine, two eggs, a 
piece of butter size of an ^^^, one tablespoon of salt, one-half tea- 
spoon of pepper, one nutmeg. Work all together in form of a loaf; 
put bits of butter on top, and cracker crumbs; put in baking tin 
and bake two or three hours, basting often. Mrs. Baker Stevens. 

Veal ii la Sweetbreads. — Cut veal steaks vety thin, then into 
pieces suitable for serving. Pound until very tender — dip into Qgg, 
then into bread crumbs. Have plenty of butter hot in frying pan 
and cook to a golden brown. Take meat from the pan and put in 
one-half cupful of cream, let boil one minute and pour over veal. 

Mrs. MacAllister. 

Blanquette of Veal.— One and one-half cupfuls of cold veal cut in 
thin bits as large as a quarter of a dollar, half a cup of finely 
chopped cooked ham. Butter a sauce pan and pour in a coffee cup 
of cream, when it boils stir in one teaspoon of flour wet in milk; let 
boil till it thickens, then add the meat, pinch of nutmeg, salt anj 
pepper to taste; lastly stir in the yolk of one egg beaten with a 
tablespoon of cold milk. Stir for a moment, then pour on a hot 
platter and garnish with hard boiled eggs and a slice of lemon. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



30 31 E A TS A ND PO UL TR Y 

To Bake a Ham. — Boil three hours, then take out of water, 
remove rind and sprinkle the top with flour rubbed with a little 
butter, stick cloves over and bake one hour. Mrs. L. Whitney. 

Boiled Ham. — Cover with cold water and boil slowly. A ham 
weig-hing twelve pounds will require five hours. If you wish to serve 
it hot, skin and sprinkle with a little sugar, sticking- in cloves. Then 
set in the oven thirty minutes. If to be served cold, do not remove it 
from the water until cold. 

To Fry Ham and Eggs. — Put slices of ham into a hot pan, fry 
until done, then remove and drop eggs in pan. If necessary add a 
small bit of lard to fry the eggs, frequently covering them with the 
hot fat. 

Head Cheese.— To one pig's head add one heart, one liver, one 
tongue. Clean the head nicely, put it all in a brine twenty-four 
hours, then boil until very soft, remove bones, and chop fine; add salt, 
pepper and sage to taste, and four small onions, chopped fine, mix 
thoroughly, put in a colander over a kettle of hot water over night; in 
the morning put weights on, and press like cheese. Mrs. Willard. 

Souse. — Take lean neck pieces of pig, also legs, chopping off 
feet, soak in cold water until blood is extracted, scrape thoroughly 
until white and clean. Boil tender till all bones and cartilage can 
be removed. Put meat in a colander and pick up fine, be sure to 
take out all small bones. Season with salt, pepper and sage. Put 
weights on and let stand until it is thoroughly drained and cold. 

Mrs. F. W. Lawrence. 

Sausage. — For each pound of lean fresh pork use one half pound 
of fat pork. Grind with a meat or vegetable grinder. Season 
with two teaspoonfuls of sage, finely sifted, one level teaspoonful of 
salt and one teaspoonful of pepper for each pound of the meat. Mix 
thoroughly and test b}'^ frying a small piece. Add more of the 
seasoning if desired. Pack in muslin bags five inches wide and 
twelve inches long. Mrs. McClary. 



ME A TS AND PO UL TR Y 31 

Sausage. — Thirty pounds of meat, one-third fat and two-thirds 
lean, thirty-four teaspoonfuls salt, eig-hteen of sag-e, six of allspice, 
six of pepper, four of cloves. Mrs. M. K. Wead. 

Fried Pork and Milk Gravy. — Cut slices very thin, put into frying- 
pan in hot water for a few minutes, take out on a plate and let drip. 
Dip in flour and shake off. Put back into the dry pan and fry 
until crisp. Mix a part of the fat with milk and thicken for g-ravy. 
Season to taste. 

Liver and Bacon. — Slice liver and let it remain in cold water 
one hour, take out, dry and roll in flour. Fry thin slices of bacon 
crisp, remove bacon, put the liver in the pan and fry carefully and 
thoroughly. 

Tripe. — Select the honey comb, cut into convenient pieces for 
serving- and pour over warmi water and let it remain in this about 
ten minutes; then drain thoroughly and ag-ain place the tripe in 
water in a spider and cook slowly until tender — about twenty minutes; 
have ready another spider with a little melted butter and lard. 
Drain the tripe, cover with an eg-g- batter and fry a delicate brown. 
Tripe for six persons requires the batter made as follows: Two 
well-beaten eg-gs, one-fourth cup of milk and one-half cup of flour. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Directions for Preparing Sweetbreads. — Sweetbreads should be 
thrown into cold water the moment they come from the market, then 
wash well, allowing them to remain in cold water one hour. Then 
free from all fat, lard or not as you wish. Put them into boiling 
water in a granite or porcelain sauce pan, add a teaspoon of salt, 
stand over a moderate fire and parboil fifteen minutes, then throw 
them into ice cold water for five minutes, then remove any skin or 
rough parts. Now put in the refrigerator until ready to use. They 
will keep from thirty to forty hours. Always use a silver knife to 
cut sweetbreads. This process of parboiling and blanching is 
necessary in whatever form the sweetbreads are to be used. 

Miss Alice J. Watkins. 



32 31 E A TS A ND PO ULTRY 

Fried Sweetbreads. — Prepare sweetbreads according to directions, 
then cut them into nice pieces, dip them first in egg, then in bread 
crumbs, and fry in boiling- fat. Serve with cream sauce. 

Miss Alice J. Watkins. 

Fried Sweetbreads, No. 2. — Fry several thin slices of bacon to a 
crisp. Cut three sweetbreads into slices and fry in bacon fat till 
done. Put them on a hot platter. Pour out fat and melt two table- 
spoons of butter in the pan, add juice of one-half lemon and pour 
over sweetbreads. If the butter is allowed to scorch the dish is 
ruined. 

Creamed Sweetbreads. — Prepare two pairs of sweetbreads 
according to directions, then break into pieces and add one can of 
mushrooms. Squeeze over all the juice of one-half lemon. Put in a 
sauce pan one cup of cream, one of veal stock or juice of mushrooms, 
one small onion, a little mace and nutmeg. Put over fire and when 
hot stir in one tablespoon of flour which has been mixed with one 
and one-half tablespoons of butter. Let cook ten minutes, then 
strain and add sweetbreads; let this cook slowly ten minutes. Serve 
immediately. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Dressing for Fowls.— One quart of bread crumbs which have 
been chopped, not soaked; season with salt, pepper, sage, and a 
generous supply of butter; beat in one or two eggs. The best 
authorities say that dressing is the finest when it crumbles as the 
fowl is cut. Moisten with a little water or milk if desired. 

Mrs. McCla'-3'. 

Oyster Dressing. — One quart of 03'sters, add bread crumbs till you 
can mould like a loaf of bread, butter size of two eggs, pepper, salt 
and sage to taste. Mrs. Grinnell. 

To Cook a Turkey. — The turkey should be killed three or four 
days before it is cooked; wasli thoroughly, then wipe dry the inside, 
and rub with fine salt; fill with dressing. Bake slowly four or five 
hours, according to size; or steam tw^o hours and bake two, basting 
frequentl3% Mrs. G. W. Hubbard. 



MEA TS A ND PO UL TR } ' jj 

Roast Goose (English Method). — Parboil the g-oose fifteen minutes 
to extract the oil. Stuff with a dressing- made of one cup of mashed 
potato, one large onion, one tablespoonful each of butter and sage, 
one <s:^^, salt and pepper to taste. Tie firmly and roast in a 
moderate oven. Baste frequently with salt and water. When brown 
cover with a greased paper to keep from burning. Roast about 

three hours. 

"■ Ne'er failed old Scolland to Produce 
At each high tide her savory goose.'" 

Roast Duck. — Prepare the same as goose, using turkey or goose 
dressing. Koast in a quick oven from one hour to an hour and one- 
half. Baste frequently. 

Fricasseed Chicken. — Joint the chicken and place over the fire 
with sufficient water to cover. Boil until tender, then pour out any 
water remaining and brown chicken in the pot; add milk and 
cream, as much as required for gravy. Season with butter, pepper 
and salt; thicken with flour. Place the chicken on slices of toast 
and pour over it the gravy. Mrs. Parmelee. 

Fricasseed Chicken.— Take a spring chicken; cut at the joints; 
cook until tender; season with pepper and salt and a piece of butter; 
have ready soda biscuits; split them open and butter them; thicken 
the broth with flour, lay the chicken on a platter with the biscuit, 
and pour the gravy over. Mrs. M. S. Mallon. 

Cream Chicken and Mushrooms.— Prepare two chickens as for a 
stew; boil until tender. Pour the liquor oft" from a can of mushrooms 
and boil them twenty minutes with the chicken. Skim out the 
chicken and mushrooms on a platter, and pour over hot cream 
sauce. Mrs. Temple. 

Broiled Chicken.— About an hour before it is wanted cut open, 
and lay in a dripping pan — putting in the pan butter, pepper and 
salt, and a little water; cover closely. Set in a hot oven; when 
thoroughly steamed, take out and put on a broiler long enough to 
brown, and pour over the water, butter, etc., in the pan. 

Mrs. Pitman. 



S4 ME A TS A ND PO UL TR Y 

Fried Chicken. — Roll the chicken in a little flt»ur, fry in half 
butter and lard (considerable in the pan), have the butter and lard 
very hot; after both sides brown, cover over and cook slowly about 
one hour. If there is much butter or lard in the pan pour it out, 
then pour on half a cup of boiling- water, hold the cover down tight 
for about five minutes for one side, turn the chicken and do the same 
for the other side, then leave the cover on until ready to serve. 

Julia Goggin. 

Smothered Chicken. — Rub the inside of the chicken with fine salt 
and a little pepper; sprinkle flour over the outside; put it, with a 
bit of butter size of a butternul, and about a pint of water, in the 
dripping pan; cover closely; set in the oven and cook one and one- 
half hours; baste frequently; turn once or twice, so as to cook evenly; 
then remove the cover and brown lightly; add one-half cup of cream 
and a teaspoonful of flour to the gravy in the pan; boil up and serve. 

Mrs. G. W. Hubbard. 

Chicken Pie. — Cook the chickens thoroughly. Season with 
pepper and salt after it is done. Make a good baking- powder 
biscuit crust, with plenty of butter rolled in. Line the rim of a 
soup plate or platter with a strip of the pastry. Put the chicken in, 
free from bones, with as much of the broth as the plate will hold, 
with a good quantity of butter; cover with the pastry, making a cut 
in the center. The backbone in the center of the plate keeps up the 
crust. Miss Meeker. 

Curry of Chicken in Rice Border.— Boil until tender a four-pound 
chicken. This can be done the day before it is wanted to serve. 
When the chicken is cold, remove the skin and bones. Cut the meat 
into neat squares; put two tablespoonfuls of butter into a sauce pan; 
cut into it one onion; let this cook for about thirty minutes; it must 
not brown, but just be soft and yellow; then add two tablespoonfuls 
of flour; mix; add one pnit of the liquor in which the chicken was 
boiled; stir constantly until it thickens; add one teaspoonful of 
Indian curry powder and one half of a teaspoonful of salt; add the 



MEATS AND POULTRY 35 

chicken; cover the pan and stand it on the back part of the fire for 
about twenty minutes. Arrange a neat border of nicely boiled rice 
around a meat dish, put tlie chicken in the center and serve. 

Pressed Chicken. — Boil three chickens till well done; bone, and 
pull to pieces in flakes; season with butter, pepper and salt; then 
pour over it the broth in which it was boiled and mix well together. 
Put it into a pan or mould and press. Mrs. H. D. Hickok. 

Chicken Terrapin. ^ — Cut into small pieces enough of cold cooked 
chicken to measure one pint. Put one tablespoonful each of butter 
and flour in a sauce pan over the fire and stir till cooked, then add 
gradually one cupful of thin cream or milk and stir till thick. Add 
the chicken and when well heated three hard boiled eggs cut into 
pieces, and salt and pepper to season. 

The Way Adam Dresses Partridges. — He breaks the skin over the 
breast bone, gives a sudden jerk to the left, another to the right, and 
the animal is completely skinned. The bones of the wings are broken 
close to the body, and all but the breast is thrown away. This is 
broiled on a forked stick before the fire, and is a bit altogether too 
good for a king. George Hawkins. 

Mock Pate de Foie Gras. — Lard thickly over the top a calf's 
liver, put it in a sauce pan with one chopped onion, two bay leaves, 
a blade of mace, a half dozen pepper corns, six whole cloves, one salt 
spoon salt, a lump of loaf sugar and one pint of stock. Cover the 
pan and cook slowly three hours. When done remove the liver, cut it 
in slices, put them in an earthen dish and strain over the liquor. 
Stand aside over night. In the morning heat the liver, then pound 
it to a paste; add a teaspoon of salt, a salt spoon of white pepper 
and one-third of a pound of melted butter. Mix all well together 
and press through a sieve. Pack in small pots, smooth the top and 
pour over melted butter. Addie Stevenson. 



36 31 E A TS A ND PO UL TR Y 

Boudins a la Reine.— To every pint of finely chopped cooked 
chicken or veal allow one tablespoon of butter, half cup of cream, 
whites of three eg-gs and one tablespoon of chopped parsley, salt and 
pepper to taste. Melt the butter, add it to the chicken with the 
cream and seasoning-, mix well, rubbing it to a paste with a spoon. 
Beat whites of eg-g-s to a stiff froth and add carefully to the meat; 
fill cups two-thirds full and bake twenty minutes like custards in a 
pan of water. Serve with Bechamel sauce. 

Boudins. ^ — One pint of cold chopped meat. One tablespoon of 
butter, two tablespoons of dried bread crumbs, one-half cup of stock 
or boiling water, two beaten eggs, salt and pepper to taste. Put all 
ingredients over the fire and stir until nicely mixed. Fill custard 
cups two-thirds full, stand in a baking pan half filled with boiling 
water, and bake in a moderate oven twenty minutes. When done 
turn carefully on a heated dish, and pour around them cream, or 
Bt'chamel sauce. Mrs. Chipperfield. 



FISH AND MEAT SAUCES WITH RELISHES 

" The good things of life are not to he had singly. 
But come to us with a mixture.'''' — Chas. Lamb 

Drawn Butter Gravy. — Two tablespoons of butter, one of flour, 
rubbed together. Pour over it one cup of boiling- water; boil a few 
minutes, add salt and pepper. Miss Childs. 

Mint Sauce. — Chop mint very line and put into vinegar with 
sugar. Let stand one hour before serving. Mrs. S. W. Gillett. 

Butter Sauce. — Beat together one-half cupful of butter and one 
tablespoonful of flour. Pour on this mixture half a pint of boiling 
water. Place the sauce pan on the fire, and stir constantly until 
the sauce boils; then take from the fire immediately. 

Cream Sauce. — One pint of cream (or milk, with one tablespoon 
of butter), one generous tablespoonful of flour, and salt and pepper to 
taste. Let the cream come to a boil. Have the flour mixed smooth 
with half a cupful of cream reserved from the pint; and stir it into 
the boiling cream. Add seasoning and boil three minutes. This 
sauce is good for delicate meats, fish and vegetables, and to pour 
around croquettes and omelets. Miss M. E. Parmelee. 

White Sauce for Fish. — One quart of milk; add a small slice of 
onion, two sprigs of parsley, salt and pepper to taste, and boil. 
Stir four tablespoons of flour and four of butter till light, and mix 
with a little of the warm milk; then stir into the boiling milk; cook 
eight minutes, and strain. Miss Parloa. 

To Make Gravy Brown. — If very brown gravy is desired place 
flour in a dry spider and stir constantly until it browns thoroughly, 
then when used stir with cold water as the ordinary thickening. 



38 FISH AND 31 E A T SA UCES 

Tomato Sauce. — One-half of a small onion sliced and fried in 
one tablespoonful of butter; add one-half can of tomatoes, two cloves, 
salt and pepper. Cook twenty minutes — thicken with teaspoon of 
flour and strain. A little cayenne pepper and chopped parsley may 
be added if liked. 

Mushroom Sauce.— Put a piece of butter the size of a walnut 
into a tin basin, and when it bubbles add a teaspoon (not heaping-) 
of flour, when well cooked stir in a cupful of stock and half a teacup 
of the mushroom juice from the can, let it simmer for a minute or 
two, then after straining- add one-half or three quarters of a can of 
mushrooms, pepper, salt and a few drops of lemon juice. When 
thoroug-hly hot it is ready to pour over the meat. 

Sauce Tartare.— To one cup of mayonnaise dressing add one 
tablespoon each of capers and chopped cucumber pickles, one table- 
spoon of chopped parsley and one teaspoon of onion juice. Mix well 
and serve. 

Piquante Sauce. — Two cupfuls of brown stock, four tablespoons 
of butter, two of flour, four of vinegar, one of chopped onion, one of 
chopped capers, two of chopped pickles, dash of cayenne, one tea- 
spoon of sugar, one-half of salt, one of tarragon vinegar. Melt the 
butter in a sauce pan, add the flour and stir until well browned, 
draw to a cooler place, and slowly add the stock, stirring constantly. 
Add salt and cayenne and let simmer ten minutes. In another sauce 
pan, boil the vinegar, onion and sugar rapidly for five miiiutes, 
then add it to the sauce, also the capers, pickles and tarragon 
vinegar. Stir well and let cook for two minutes. If the sauce 
becomes too thick, dilute with a little water. 

Maitre d' Hotel Sauce. — Two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
tablespoonful of chopped parsley, one tablespoonful of lemon juice, 
one-half teaspoonful of salt, one-half teaspoonful of pepper. Rub 
the butter to a cream, add salt, pepper and parsley chopped fine, 
then the lemon juice slowly. Spread it on broiled meat or fish. 



FISH AND ME A T SA UCES 



39 



Let the heat of the meat melt the batter. The dish must not be be 
put in the oven after the sauce is spread, or the parsley will lose its 
freshness. 

Caper Sauce. — Melt two tablespoons of butter, add one table- 
spoon of flour, stir till smooth, then add one and one-half cups of 
boiling water. Stir till cooked. Add two tablespoons of capers. 
Take from the lire and add two teaspoons lemon juice and the beaten 
yolk of one egg". Season with salt and pepper. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Horse Radish Sauce for Fish.— Four tablespoons of cream whip- 
ped stiff, add one tablespoon of vinegar, three tablespoons of grated 
horse radish, a little cayenne pepper and salt. Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Sauce for Raw Oysters. — Cut a raw onion with a silver knife and 
scrape until the juice coats the knife blade; use knife for mixing 
the sauce. One-half cup of tomato catsup, juice of one lemon, one 
tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce, one-half teaspoon of salt, one- 
fourth teaspoon of paprika. Serve very cold. Mrs. Capron. 

Bechamel Sauce. ^ — Melt one tablespoonful of butter without burn- 
ing, add one tablespoonful of flour and mix till smooth. Add one 
cup of cream or one-half cupful each of cream and stock; stir 
continually until it thickens. Season with salt and pepper and just 
before taking from the fire add quickly the beaten yolk of one egg. 

Sauce Hollandaise.— Put two tablespoons of butter and a gill of 
water into a small sauce pan and slowly heat. Then pour this over 
the yolks of four eggs beaten to a cream, stand it over boiling water 
and stir until jelly like. Then add one-half teaspoon of salt, one 
tablespoonful of lemon juice, and a little white pepper; take a tea- 
spoonful of butter on the end of a knife, and so touch it all over the 
top that the butter will be added little by little. Serve at once. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

"When we have succeeded then shall be our time to rejoice and 
freely l^ngh.""— Buckley's Sophocles. 



40 FISH AND MEAT SAUCES 

Cranberry Jelly.— One quart of cranberries, one pound of sugar, 
and one pint of boiling water. Cook twenty minutes, strain, wet the 
mould and pour in the juice. Mrs. Frank Haven. 

Mint Jelly. — One bunch of mint, one-half pint of boiling water, 
one teaspoonful of gelatine. When cold add a very little sugar, 
lemon juice and spiced vinegar. Strain and pour into mould. 

Mrs. John Cantwell. 

Cranberry Sauce. — One quart of cranberries put into one quart 
of cold water over a quick fire. When it comes to a boil pour off the 
water, add another quart of water and two cups of sugar; put on 
the back of the stove and cook slowly for about two and one-half 
hours. Mrs. Breed. 

Delmonico Apple. — One can each of peaches and apples heated. 
One pound of macaroons rolled, one pound of almonds blanched and 
chopped. Butter a baking dish and put in a layer of peaches, then 
one of macaroons, then nuts and then apples. Repeat until fruit is 
used. Put butter between each layer; bake until brown. To be 
used with meats. Mrs. William Breed. 

Fried Apples. — ^Cut tart apples in round slices, remove core and 
fry in butter, or in gravy after pork or ham has been fried. 

Apple Charlotte.— Put in a buttered pudding dish a layer of 
grated apples, seasoned with butter, sugar and cinnamon; then a 
layer of cracker crumbs — alternate layers until the dish is tilled — 
three layers will fill it — having cracker crumbs on top. Bake a light 
brown. To be served with meats. Fouquet House. 

Baked Bananas. — Make a syrup of three-quarters of a cupful of 
water, one-quarter of a cupful of lemon juice and one-half of a cupful 
of sugar for half a dozen bananas. Strip off the skins, cut into 
quarters, place in a deep baking dish, pour over the hot syrup and 
bake until tender, basting several times with the syrup. 

Fried Bananas.— Peel, cut in halves, roll in bread crumbs, then 
in ^^^i and again in bread crumbs, fry in deep fat until brown. 
Serve with lemons cut in quarters. Mrs. George Williamson. 



CROQUETTES. 

•' To make them one must have a spark of genius. 
General Directions for Making Croquettes. 



Sauce for Croquette Mixture.— (To this amount of sauce add two 
cupfuls of chopped meat). One tablespoonful of butter; one teaspoon- 
ful of onion juice; two tablespoonfuls of flour; one teaspoonful of 
salt; one cupful of cream; one-fourtli teaspoonful of pepper; one egg; 
dash of cayenne; dash of nutmeg. Put the cream into a double 
boiler and scald. Rub the butter and flour together, add to the 
cream and stir until the sauce is thicic, add seasoning, remove from 
the fire, and stir in the beaten ^^^, cook a moment, now add what- 
ever meat desired, and pour on a platter to cool. Let stand two 
hours or more. Have ready a beaten q^^, then take a tablespoon of 
the mixture, roll lightly between the hands into a ball. Have 
plenty of sifted crumbs on a board, roll the ball lightly on the 
crumbs into the shape of a cylinder, then drop in &^^ and roll again 
in the crumbs. When the lard is hot (see directions for frying), dip 
frying basket in lard to grease, take out and lay in the basket four 
croquettes and immerse in the hot fat to cook to a delicate brown. 
Take from the basket and place on a brown paper in the heater 
until ready to serve. 

Note. —For frying, use good sweet lard in deep kettle. Sub- 
stances which are moist, as fish balls, croquettes, oysters, corn meal 
mush, cold boiled rice, etc., should be first dipped in beaten ^g^^ 
then rolled in sifted bread or cracker. A quantity of this can be 
prepared and kept ready for use. The temperature of the fat for 
frying should be high enough to brown a bit of bread in half a 
second. Use a frying basket. If preferred use olive oil or cotton- 
seed oil instead of lard. 

[41 



42 CROQUETTES 

Chicken Croquettes. — One pint of cream come to a boil; thicken 
with two even tablespoonfuls of butter and four heaping tablespoon- 
fuls of flour. Season with one-half teaspoonful salt; ^ few grains of 
cayenne pepper. The sauce should be very thick; add a beaten egg 
just as it is taken from the fire. One-half pound of chicken minced 
ver}^ fine; season with one-fourth teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful 
of chopped parsley; one teaspoonful of lemon juice; one teaspoonful 
of chopped celery; stir into the hot sauce; mix thoroughl}'; spread 
thin on a platter until perfectly cold and stiff. Shape croquettes, 
roll in the beaten white of an q^^ and cracker dust, and fry. 

Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Note.—Ow^ four-pound chicken makes twenty-six croquettes. 

Veal Croquettes. — Same as chicken. 

Sweetbread Croquettes. — One pair of sweetbreads prepared 
according to directions. Make a cream sauce of the following: One 
tablespoon of butter, one gill of sweet cream, one-fourth teaspoon of 
white pepper, two tablespoons of flour, one tablespoon of chopped 
parsley. When this is cooked, take from the fire, add the sweet- 
breads, salt to taste, parsley, and, if you like, two teaspoons of 
chopped mushrooms, mix well and turn out to cool. They should 
stand at least five hours in a cool place to form nicely, then form 
into croquettes. Dip first in &^^ and then in bread crumbs and fry 
in boiling fat. Miss Watkins. 

Oyster Croquettes. — Boil twenty-five oysters in their liquor five 
minutes, drain and cut fine with a silver knife and drain again. 
Make a cream sauce of one tablespoon of butter, two of flour, one 
gill of oyster liquor and one gill of cream, when cooked add oysters 
and beaten yolks of two eggs. Cook a moment, take from the fire 
and add a tablespoon of chopped parsley, ten drops of onion juice, a 
grating of nutmeg, and salt and pepper to taste. Pour out on a 
platter and follow general directions for croquettes. 

Jean Hawkins. 



CROQUETTES 



43 



Oyster Croquettes. — One pint of cream, one tablespoon of butter, 
four large tablespoons of flour, salt and pepper to taste. Parboil 
one pint of oysters, drain and cut into quarters and mix with the 
cream sauce. Drop a spoonful into the crumbs, roll in eggs, then in 
crumbs again, repeat the eggs and crumbs and fry in very hot lard. 

Mrs. John Cantwell. 

Potato Croquettes. — Season cold mashed potatoes with salt, 
pepper and butter; moisten with sweet milk or cream; mix thor- 
oughly with this one beaten ^^^^ and then make up into small rolls, 
being careful to have the surface perfectl}^ smooth; and fry a rich, 
golden brown in hot lard. 

Rice and Meat Croquettes. — One cupful of boiled rice, one cupful 
of finel3^ chopped cooked meat, an}" kind; one teaspoonful of salt, a 
little pepper, two tablespoonfuls of butter, half a cupful of milk, one 
^^^. Put the milk on to boil, add the meat, rice and seasoning. 
When this boils, add the 'd.^^, well beaten, stir one minute. After 
cooling, shape, dip in o.^^ and cracker crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

Rice Croquettes.— One large cupful of cooked rice, half a cupful 
of milk, one ^^^, one tablespoonful of sugar, one of butter, half a 
teaspoonful of salt, a slight grating of nutmeg. Put the milk on to 
boil, and add the rice and seasoning. When it boils up add the egg, 
well beaten. Stir one minute; then take off and cool. When cold 
shape, roll in ^^^ and cracker crumbs and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. W. H. King. 

Macaroni Croquettes. — Cook three ounces (about twelve sticks) of 
macaroni and cut into one-fourth inch pieces. Rub one large table- 
spoon of butter and two of flour to a smooth paste and stir into one- 
half pint of boiling milk. Stir until a thick paste is formed. Then 
add two tablespoons of grated cheese, the yolks of two eggs and cook 
a moment; add the macaroni; salt and pepper to taste, and turn out 
to cool. Proceed as for any croquette. Serve with tomato sance. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



44- CROQUETTES 

Royal Croquettes. — One-half pint of cooked breast of chicken, 
chopped fine; one-half pint of cooked sweetbreads cut fine. One gill 
of minced mushrooms. Follow "General Directions" given for 
making croquettes, adding a little lemon juice. 

Cheese Croquettes.— Three tablespoonfuls of butter, one-fourth 
cup of flour, yolks of two eggs, two-thirds of a cup of milk, one and 
one-half cups of mild cheese grated, little salt and white pepper, 
dash of cayenne. Make a thick sauce of the butter, flour and milk, 
add yolks of the eggs unbeaten; when well blended add cheese. As 
soon as the cheese melts remove from the fire, add seasoning, spread 
in a shallow pan to cool. Turn on a board, cut in strips one-half 
inch thick and three inches long, dip in crumbs, eggs and crumbs 
again. Fry in deep fat. Serve for a cheese course. 

Miss Mary Fay. 



VEGETABLES. 

" The onion strong, the parsnip sweet. 
The twining bean, the ruddy beet. 
Yea, all the garden brings to light 
Speak it a landscape of delight.'''' 

Note.— AW green vegetables must be washed thoroughly in cold 
water and dropped into water which has been salted and is just 
beginning to boil. There should be a tablespoonful of salt for every 
two quarts of water. It is well to let old potatoes soak in salted 
water an hour or two before cooking. 

Saratoga Fried Potatoes. — Cut with slicer into thin slices, which 
are improved by being put into cold water over night, with a small 
piece of alum, to make crisp. Rinse in cold water, and dry with a 
crash towel; fry to a light brown in boiling lard. 

Mrs. Cherrier. 

French Fried Potatoes. — Pare uncooked potatoes, divide them 
lengthwise in halves and each half in three pieces, let stand in 
salted water two hours, drain and wipe. Fry in good hot lard ten 
minutes, drain and dredge with a little salt. 

Mrs. F. E. Taylor. 

Potato Whip.— Beat one pint of mashed potato seasoned with 
salt, pepper, and a little milk. Two tablespoons of butter and the 
yolks of two eggs. When very light and creamy, add the well- 
beaten whites; heap lightly on a dish and brown in the oven. 

Mrs. Lincoln. 

Potatoes with Ham. — Mash six boiled potatoes with two table- 
spoonfuls of softened butter, add gradually two beaten eggs, and 
one-half pint of finely chopped boiled ham. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Lincoln. 



46 VEGETABLES 

Lyonnaise Potatoes.— Put a piece of butter the size of an egg in a 
frying pan with one small, finely chopped onion. When this is 
browned put in slices of cold boiled potato; turn carefully until 
brown; add a teaspoonful of finely chopped parsley, salt and pepper. 

Escaloped Potato. — Cut up cold boiled potatoes in small pieces; 
fill a quart dish. Put into a stew pan one pint of cream, piece of 
butter size of a small &^^. Take a tablespoonful of flour, stir it into 
one-half cup of milk until smooth. Stir this into the cream when 
hot; let come to a boil; salt and pepper to taste. Pour this over 
potatoes, and loosen them with a fork so the cream will run through 
them. Bake three-quarters of an hour in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. George Sabin. 

Escaloped Potatoes — Raw. — Pare and slice them very thin; take 
as much milk as you think will cover them, and stir into this about 
a tablespoonful of flour — first in a little of the milk. Then, having 
put them in a dish with as much butter, pepper and salt as will 
season well, pour the milk over them, and bake an hour. 

Mrs. H. D. Thompson. 

Browned Sweet Potatoes. — Boil a little; slice thin and lay in a 
pudding dish; sprinkle each layer with a little salt, pepper, sugar 
and butter; put in the oven and brown. Mrs. Spann. 

Glazed Sweet Potatoes. — Boil the potatoes until nearly done, peel 
and cut into thick slices lengthwise. Put in a pan and sprinkle 
thickly with brown sugar and bits of butter. (For a good-sized tin 
of^potatoes, use one-half cup of sugar and two tablespoons of butter). 
Cook from one hour to an hour and one-half in a moderate oven. 
Turn each piece several times while in the oven, that the pieces may 
be well covered with the sugar. Addie Stevenson. 

Southern Way. — Prepare sweet potatoes as above. Fill a baking 
dish with laj'ers of the slices thickly covered with brown sugar and 
bits of butter. Cook in a hot oven for thirty minutes. 



VEGETABLES 47 

Warmed-up Potatoes. — Put one quart of sliced nciv potatoes, 
baked or boiled, into a spider and pour over them three-quarters of 
a cup of milk and half a cup of butter. Pepper and salt to taste. 
Heat on the back of the stove, then cook three minutes, chopping- with 
a knife, and turning* the potatoes to keep from burning. 

Mrs. Channel. 

Potato PufF. — One teacupful of chopped meat; one teacupful of 
mashed potato; two egg"s; a little milk, to soften; season with salt 
and pepper. Bake half an hour. Mrs. H. D. Hickok. 

Stuffed Potatoes. — Bake potatoes of medium size, cut a piece of 
the skin from the flat side of the potatoes. Remove the inside, mash, 
and mix with it any highly seasoned meat, chopped fine, also a 
seasoning of butter, salt and pepper. Fill the skins rounding full. 
Set in the oven to brown over. If preferred leave out the meat. 

Delmonico Potatoes. — Cut cold boiled potatoes very fine and to 
each pint allow a half pint of cream, two ounces of butter, a tea- 
spoonful of salt, a dash of pepper; then put them in a baking dish 
about two inches deep, nearly cover them with the cream; put the 
butter (melted) over them; put dish in hot oven and brown nicely. 

Table Talk. 

Hashed and Browned Potatoes. — One]quartof cooked potato cubes, 
two tablespoonfuls of butter, one tablespoonful of flour, one and one- 
half teaspoonfuls of salt, one-half teaspoonful of pepper, one tea- 
spoonful of Liebig Company's Extract of beef, one teaspoonful of 
minced onion, one-half pint of water. 

Put the onion and one tablespoonful of butter in a frying pan 
and set on -the fire. When the onion begins to turn a light straw 
color, add the flour, and stir until smooth and frothy. Gradually 
add the water, and stir until it boils. Now add half the salt and 
pepper, as well as all the extract of meat, and cook for five minutes. 
Season the potatoes with the remainder of the salt and pepper, and 
stir them into the sauce. Cook for five minutes without stirring. 



48 . VEGETABLES 

Put one tablespoonful of butter in a second frying pan and set 
on the fire. When quite hot, turn the potatoes into this pan, spread- 
ing- them lig-htly, and cook for fifteen minutes, being- careful not to 
burn the potatoes, but to brown them thoroughly. At the end of the 
quarter-hour, fold the potatoes over, and turn out on a warm dish, 
as if they were an omelet. Serve at once. 

Hashed and Browned Potatoes, No. 2.— Chop cold boiled potatoes 
very fine; season with salt and pepper; to each potato allow one 
tablespoon of cream, mix well. Put a tablespoon of butter in a fr}^- 
ing pan. When hot, put in the potato about one inch thick and press 
down smoothly and firmly. Cook slowly until the whole is nicely 
browned; fold over one half, cook a moment longer, and turn on a 
hot dish as an omelet. Mrs. J. Lincoln. 

Potatoes au Gratin. — Five potatoes, thoroughly cold, cut in small 
dice; make a cream sauce of one cup of milk, one tablespoonful of 
flour, one of butter, stir butter and flour, add milk, one level tea- 
spoonful of salt, sprinkle of white pepper; add the potatoes, mix well 
with the sauce, put on small oval platter, cover with grated cheese 
and bake until brown. Lucy King Allen. 

Baked Squash. — Cut in pieces; scrape well; bake from one to 
one and one-half hours, according to the thickness of the squash. 
Equally good steamed three-fourths of an hour. Mash and season 
with butter. 

Parsnips.— Boil until tender in a little salted water; take up; 
cut in strips and fry in melteJ butter. 

Vegetable Oysters.— Wash and scrape well; cut into thin slices; 
put in boiling water; cook nearly one hour. Drain, if necessar}', 
and add rich milk or cream; thicken slightl}^ with corn starch; 
season well with butter, pepper and salt. 



VEGETABLES 49 

Fried Cabbage. — Take a small cabbag-e, chop fine, put in a fry- 
ing- pan with water enough to cover, and cook until tender. Then 
add one teacupful of sweet cream, piece of butter half the size of an 
egg, pepper and salt. Fry till nearly dry. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Frank White. 

Cauliflower.— Soak the cauliflower in salt and water half an 
hour, then boil in slightly salted water until tender. Drain and 
serve with cream sauce. Mrs. Hawkins. 

String Beans. — Cut off each end and remove the strings. Put in 
boiling water and cook at least two hours, or until tender. ' If the 
water has not boiled away, drain, and season with salt, pepper 
and butter; add a cup of sweet cream. 

Shelled Beans. — Put beans into salted boiling water and cook 
until tender, then drain off the water, moisten them with butter and 
season with salt and pepper, add a little hot cream or cover with 
white sauce. 

Peas. — Shell and put in boiling water; cook one-half hour; drain 
if necessary, and season with butter, pepper, salt, and cup of sweet 
cream. If liked, thicken a little with flour. Let all come to a boil 
and serve immediately. 

Note. — ^Many serve the last two vegetables without liquid, simply 
seasoning with salt, pepper and butter. It is difficult to say just 
how long they should cook, so much depends upon the age and the 
length of time they have been gathered. 

Spinach.— Pick over carefully a half peck of spinach, cut off 
roots; wash through several waters; drain by taking up in handfuls, 
shaking and pressing out all the remaining water. Put in kettle; 
add a cupful of hot water, stand over the fire and boil until tender, 
about fifteen or twenty minutes. Then drain in colander, cutting 
fine with knife. Some like it chopped very fine. Then put in a 
sauce pan with two tablespoonfuls of butter, salt and pepper to 
taste. Stir until very hot. Then serve. 



50 



VEGETABLES 



Egg Plant. — Cut the egg-plant into slices one-quarter of an inch 
thick after removing the skin. Sprinkle the slices with salt, pile 
them one upon another. Place on them a plate holding a weight, let 
stand two hours or more to press out the juice. Dip the slices in o^gg 
and crumbs and fry on both sides in butter. Mrs. Belding. 



Stewed Mushrooms.— Cut off the ends of the stalks and pare a 
pint of mushrooms; as each is prepared throw it into cold water in 
which is a little lemon juice. In a sauce pan put three ounces of 
butter, juice of half a lemon, salt and white pepper to taste. Cover 
the pan closely and let the mushrooms stew gently for twenty 
minutes, then thicken with one teaspoon of flour, after which add 
sufficient cream > to make the sauce of proper consistency. Add a 
little grated nutmeg. If the mushrooms are not tender, cook five 
minutes longer. 



Succotash.— Remove the corn from the cob, and an hour and a 
half before dinner put the cobs, with a few shelled beans, into cold 
water to boil; after one hour take out the cobs, put in the corn, and 
boil half an hour. There should be no more water at first than will 
be necessary to make the succotash of the right thickness, as having 
too much occasions a loss of richness imparted by the cobs. Before 
you take up, add butter, pepper and salt. This is a much better 
way than to boil the corn on the cob and then cut it off. 

Mrs. A. G. Crooks. 

Escaloped Onions. — Pare and slice enough onions to fill a baking 
dish; parboil in water till tender. Butter a dish, put in a layer of 
onions, sprinkle over a layer of crumbs, add salt and pepper, and a 
few bits of butter, then another layer of onions, etc. Continue so till 
the dish is full. Have the last layer crumbs. Put bits of butter 
over the top, pour over a half cup of cream and bake in a moderate 
oven one hour or less, according to the size of the dish. 



VEGETABLES 51 

Baked Spanish Onions. — Boil onions two hours, after which take 
out the inside of each one and chop. Mix with bread crumbs, 
butter, salt and pepper. Fill the onions with this dressing-. Put 
into a pan and bake for one hour. Mrs. Breed. 

Scalloped Tomatoes. — Place in a baking- dish a layer of bread 
crumbs, then a la3'er of peeled, sliced tomatoes with bits of butter, 
a little pepper and salt, then bread crumbs, tomatoes, etc., until the 
dish is full — having- the bread crumbs on top. Bake one hour. 

Mrs. Parmelee. 

Stuffed Tomatoes. — Six medium, smooth tomatoes, one-half tea- 
spoonful of salt, a little pepper, one tablespoon of butter, one-half 
cupful of bread crumbs, a little sage if liked. Cut a slice from top of 
each, scoop out as much of the pulp and juice as possible without 
injuring- the shape, mix pulp and juice with the other ingredients, 
and fill tlie tomatoes with this mixture. Put on the tops and bake 
slowly three-quarters of an hour. Slide the cake turner under the 
tomatoes and lift gently on to a hot platter, garnish with parsle}' 
and serve. 

Stewed Tomatoes. — ^Pour boiling water over a dozen sound, ripe 
tomatoes; let them remain for a few moments; then peel off the 
skins, slice them and put them over the iire in a granite sauce pan. 
Stew them about forty minutes, then add a tablespoonful of butter, 
salt and pepper to taste; serve hot. It desired thicken with bread 
crumbs. 

Fried Tomatoes. — Cut firm tomatoes in thick slices. Fry them 
in butter until brown, being very careful not to burn. If necessary 
add more butter while cooking; season with salt and pepper. 
Remove tomatoes to a hot platter and pour into the pan one cup of 
cream, when hot add carefully the beaten yolks of two eggs; take at 
once from the stove and pour over the tomatoes. Milk thickened with 
a little flour may be used instead of cream, adding a little butter. 
This is a good luncheon dish. Esther H. Taylor. 



52 



VEGETABLES 



Asparagus.— Take the tender part of the asparagus, cut stalks of 
equal length, and tie in bundles; boil in salted water for twenty 
minutes; have ready slices of nicely toasted bread; dip these in the 
asparagus liquor, butter them, and lay on a hot dish; drain the 
asparagus; untie and arrange on toast; pour over all hot cream 
seasoned with butter. Mrs. Mallon. 

Asparagus with Cream Sauce. — Boil asparagus about twenty 
minutes in salted water, drain and lay on hot platter, pouring cream 
sauce over the tender part. 

" Fingers were made before forks." — Swift. 

Macaroni with Cheese. — Break and wash twelve sticks of maca- 
roni, and boil rapidly for twenty-five minutes in two quarts of water 
with one tablespoonful of salt. Drain and add half a pint of cream 
sauce. Turn into a buttered escaloped dish. Sprinkle over the 
macaroni half a cupful each of grated cheese and bread crumbs 
mixed. Place in tlie oven and brown. It will take about twent}' 
minutes. Miss Parloa. 

- Macaroni. — Take a dozen sticks of macaroni; boil in strong salt 
and water; put into a baking dish a layer of macaroni; then bits of 
butter and a little salt; then a layer of grated cheese; and so on 
until the dish is full; fill up with milk, and set into the oven; cover 
over, bake an hour slowly, then remove the cover and brown nicely. 

Mrs. M. K. Wead. 

Italian Macaroni. — Cook macaroni. Have ready some grated 
cheese, chopped onion, (enough to flavor) tomato and stock. Butter 
a dish and put in a layer of macaroni, cheese, some tomato, a little 
onion, some stock, butter, salt and pepper. Continue in this way 
until the dish is full, pour over one teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce. 
Then set the dish on the range; stir all thoroughly; take from the 
range, put a layer of cheese over the top and bake. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 

Another Way. — Cook macaroni in salted water; take from the 
water and pour over a rich white sauce and serve with grated cheese. 



VEGETABLES jj 

Macaroni with Tomato Sauce.— Boil and drain as directed for 
plain boiled macaroni, pour over it one pint of tomato sauce. 



Southern Way of Boiling Rice.— Pick over the rice; rinse it 
in cold water until perfectly clean; then put it in a pot of boiling- 
water, allowing- a quart of water to less than a teacup of rice; 
boil it hard seventeen, minutes; drain off the vi^ater very close, 
and let it steam fifteen minutes with the lid off. When carefully 
done in this way each kernel stands out by itself, while it is per- 
fectly tender. 

Boiled Rice. — Put two quarts of boiling- water into a stew 
pan; when the water boils hard pour in a cup of thoroughly 
washed rice and a good pinch of salt; let it boil hard for 
fifteen minutes, shaking the pan occasionally. Try the grain and 
if soft pour into a colander immediately and put it under the cold 
water faucet, shaking it well; put it back on the range and cover 
until ready to serve. 

Stewed Celery with Cream Sauce.— Wash and scrape the tender 
white part of two heads of celery. Cut in pieces two inches long. 
Cover with boiling water and simmer gently half an hour. Season 
well with salt. Drain off the water, add a pint of cream sauce and 
serve. Miss Parloa. 

StufFed Green Peppers. — Use green sweet peppers. Cut length- 
wise and remove seeds. Put in boiling water for five minutes to 
parboil. Fill each one with a stuffing made of equal parts of 
softened bread crumbs and minced meat (chicken or veal preferred), 
well seasoned with salt, butter and a few drops of onion juice. 
Place in a baking dish with stock about one inch deep. Bake in a 
moderate oven one half hour. Some prefer it without onion. 

Mrs. Beman. 



54 



VEGETABLES 



Boston Baked Beans. — To one pint of dry beans allow a full half 
pound of pork, a large spoonful of molasses, one teaspoon each of 
salt, sugar and mustard. Soak the beans over night; in the morn- 
ing put them in fresh water and simmer until tender, but do not let 
them break to pieces; skim them out of this water into a quart bean 
pot. Mix molasses, sugar, etc., together in hot water enough to fill 
the pot; cut the rind of pork in squares and put it with the beans; as 
the water cooks away fill the pot with more, adding the last water 
within three hours of serving. Cook slowly from eight to ten hours, 
or longer. Mrs. George Noyes. 

Pork and Beans. — Two quarts of beans, soaked in water over 
night; in the morning, parboil them until tender; drain through a 
colander; boil a pound and a half of pork in three pints of water for 
half an hour. Then into this water in which the pork has been 
cooked, put the beans, and let them boil ten minutes; take all out 
into a baking dish; add one tablespoonful of molasses; bake several 
hours. Miss Chambers. 

Pillau — {Profwimced Pillaff). — Make a rich broth of any kind of 
meat, using plenty of fat; add half a can of tomatoes, or you maj^ 
use fresh tomatoes; cook thoroughly and strain through a colander; 
then to the liquid add one-third rice; cook slowly, stirring well at 
first, until all the liquid is absorbed and the rice is soft. 

Charles S. Richardson. 

Apple Brownies. — Take apples, if small, eight or nine, pare and 
quarter. Place in a pretty baking dish, the broad side up, and 
only one layer. Melt butter the size of an egg and pour over the 
apples. Cover with a cup of sugar and bake three hours. Excellent 
used as a vegetable. Mrs. Richardson. 

Apple Fritters. — Peel and core four apples and cut in slices. 
Beat the yolks of two eggs light, to which add a gill of water, a 
pinch of salt and a pint of flour, then the beaten whites of the eggs. 
Slip the slices of apple into the batter and fry in hot lard. When 
cooked dust with powdered sugar. 



VEGETABLES 55 

Corn Cakes. — One half dozen ears of corn, two eggs, one heaping 
tablespoon of flour, one teaspoon of baking powder, two tablespoons 
of milk; pepper and salt. Cut the corn through each ear and press 
the milk from the corn wnth the back of a knife. Beat yolks and 
whip, whites separately, adding whites the last thing. Fry on a grid- 
dle. Drop the batter from a spoon. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Corn Cakes. — ^One dozen ears of grated corn, five tablespoonfuls 
of thick sweet cream, two tablespoonfuls of flour, yolks of two eggs, 
whites of three well-beaten eggs with a little salt. Do not turn them 
on the griddle until they are thoroughly cooked through, as it 
requires more time than for common griddle cakes. Fry in butter. 
This batter can be dropped into hot lard and fried, thus making 
corn fritters. Mrs. Ralph. 



SALADS. 

" It is a Spanish proverb that four persons are necessary for the 
proper preparation of salad — a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vine- 
gar, a counsellor for salt, and a madman to stir it." 

Note. — A salad should come to the table fresh and crisp. 

All kinds of meats and fish used for salads should be cut in 
small pieces and set on the ice in a marinade of two teaspoonfuls of 
vinegar, one of oil, one of salt, and one-fourth teaspoonful of white 
pepper. The French Dressing may be used as a marinade. 

Rubbing a cut onion around the inside of a salad bowl is suffi- 
cient when only a slight onion flavor is desired. Lettuce should 
never be cut, but broken or torn apart. 

The garnishes should be of the lightest and freshest kind. In 
arranging a salad, handle it very lightly and never use pressure to 
get it into form. The white leaves of the celery, the small leaves 
from the heart of a lettuce head, or the new leaves of the nasturtium, 
make pretty garnishes. Small round radishes may be arranged in 
a dish with lettuce salad; points of pickled beets or of lemons made 
by quartering slices of either, may be placed at the base of a salad; 
and wild roses, buttercups, nasturtiums and water-cresses are suit- 
able for garnishes, if not used too freely. 

Tarragon Vinegar for Salad Dressing. — Put green tarragon in a 
bottle, fill it with cider vinegar, place in a sauce pan of cold water 
and let it gradually come to a boil. Remove and cork. 

Mrs. Beman. 

Cooked Mayonnaise Dressing.— Add the well-beaten yolks of five 
eggs to five tablespoonfuls of vinegar, cook until stiff, be careful to 
stir clean from the sides of the bowl while cooking. Remove from 
the fire, add one tablespoonful of butter and stir until cool and per- 
fectly mixed. When quite cold season to taste with salt, pepper 
(also mustard when making this dressing for cabbage salad), then 
with whipped cream to the required consistency, just before using. 

Mrs. Edward Lawrence. 



SALADS 



57 



Mayonnaise Dressing, No. 1.— For three persons take the yolk of 
one egg-, beaten very stiff; add oil slowly until very stiff; then add 
two teaspoonfuls of powdered mustard; salt and pepper to taste; 
after this, one tablespoonful of vinegar, and last of all the w^hites of 
two well-beaten eggs. If it should curdle, beat in another q:^^ very 
slowly. Use o^^^ beater. Mrs. Calvin Skinner. 



Mayonnaise Dressing, No. 2. — To the yolks of three or four eggs, 
raw, add a few drops of oil at a time, alternating with an occasional 
drop of lemon; stir constantly in a deep bowl, with a wooden spoon, 
in one direction; stir constantly, and add the oil gradually, putting 
in the lemon when it tastes of too much oil; add, at last, a little salt, 
mustard and red pepper. To three or four eggs, add half a bottle 
of oil, to one and one half lemons; a whole bottle to three lemons. 
When finished it should be thick and creamy. 

Mrs. L. C. Wead. 



Mayonnaise Dressing, No. 3. — To the yolks of three eggs (raw) 
add a little oil, a pinch of salt, beat with silver fork on platter until 
it thickens. Repeat this until you have it salt enough and quite 
thick (as the vinegar will thin it). Add the oil gradually, beating 
all of the time. Add at last juice of lemon or vinegar wuth a little 
mustard and red pepper to taste. Then add two tablespoonfuls of 
cream, whipped. Put in a cool place until ready to use. 

Mrs. Breed. 

Cream Dressing, No. 1.— Two eggs, one teaspoonful of salt, one- 
fourth of a teaspoonful of mustard, one-fourth of a teaspoonful of 
white pepper. Butter the size of a lemon. Three tablespoonfuls of 
vinegar. Cook until it thickens, stirring all the while. Add one 
cup of sweet cream whipped before pouring over the salad. For 
cabbage salad use one-half a cup of vinegar and cook cream in the 
dressing. Mrs. W. H. King. 

[51 



^8 SALADS 

Cream DressiHg, No. 2.— The yolks of two eggs, one cup of vine- 
gar, one teaspoon each of mustard and salt, three teaspoons of 
sugar, butter the size of an egg. Stir all together and steam until 
the mixture thickens. When cold add beaten whites of the eggs 
mixed with one cup of whipped cream. Florence C. Mallon. 

Cream Dressing, No. 3.— One-half cup of vinegar (if strong add 
two tablespoonfuls of water), two tablespoonfuls of butter, two tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, a little red pepper. Heat the vinegar hot, add the 
butter, pepper and salt, put in three well-beaten eggs, stirring 
quickly. When thick set away to cool. When ready to serve the 
salad, add one cup of cream, whipped. Mrs. H. D. Thompson. 

Salad Dressing with Lemon.— Put three cups of milk in double 
boiler with a piece of butter size of a walnut. When hot add the 
yolks of two eggs and one tablespoonful of flour beaten thoroughly 
and cook until of the consistency of cream. When cold add one level 
teaspoonful of mustard, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, two teaspoon- 
fuls of salt, the juice of one lemon and a half a cup of vinegar. 
Strain through a fine sieve. This makes about one quart of dressing 
which will keep for weeks in a cool place. Add whipped cream 
when using. Mrs. Marshell. 

French Dressing. — One saltspoon of salt, one-half saltspoon of 
pepper, three tablespoons of oil, and one tablespoon of vinegar or 
lemon juice. Mix salt and vinegar thoroughly before adding oil. 

Chicken Salad.— Take equal parts of cold boiled chicken and 
celery. Cut in dice shape. Marinate meat and when read3^ mix 
with celery and pour over it mayonnaise or cream dressing. Lettuce 
may be used in place of celery. Use cream dressing No. 1. 

Mrs. W. H. King. 

Veal Salad.— Same as chicken. 



SALADS 



59 



Sweetbread Salad. — Two sets of calves' sweetbreads cooked until 
tender in slightly salted water, take off and put into cold water until 
cool, remove all outside covering- and break into small pieces and set 
on ice until thoroughly cold. Then mix with this as much celery, 
cut into small pieces, as you have sweetbreads. One teacupful of 
English walnuts chopped small. Mix with regular Oil Mayonnaise 
Dressing. Mrs. Edward Lawrence. 

Shrimp Salad.— Take shrimps from the can and throw into ice 
water for a minute; reject all discolored ones; break into pieces, not 
too small (or do not break at all). Pour over them a French dress- 
ing and let stand in the ice-box one hour— drain and put on a bed of 
lettuce leaves; pour over a mayonnaise and garnish with pickled 
beets, chopped olives and sliced cucumbers, or an equal amount of 
celery may be added to the shrimps, then mix all cafefully with 
mayonnaise and put on lettuce leaves. 

Lobster Salad. — Cut the lobster into small pieces; season it well 
with salt, pepper and vinegar; let it stand an hour; then drain well 
and mix with small leaves of lettuce, not too fine; pour over your 
dressing just before putting on the table. Put small lettuce leaves 
around the salad. 

Lobster Salad, East Indian.- -Cut the meat in blocks half an inch 
square. Chop a medium sized onion with twelve capers, half a 
green pepper, a cucumber, six stoned olives. Mix with the lobster; 
also some shredded lettuce. Rub to a paste the yolks of two hard- 
boiled eggs, saltspoon of salt, teaspoon of curry, three tablespoons of 
oil and one of tarragon vinegar. Mix wuth the lobster and garnish 
with lettuce. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Fish Salad.— Take any cold, boiled, fresh fish and separate 
carefully; stir lightly with a little mayonnaise; make nests of crisp 
lettuce leaves, put a large spoonful of the mixture on each leaf with a 
spoonful of mayonnaise on top. 



6o SALADS 

Oyster Salad. — Boil twenty oysters in their own liquor five 
minutes; drain; wash in cold water; dry and leave until very cold. 
Then mix with one-half cup of mayonnaise and serve on crisp salad 
leaves. Table Talk. 

Potato Salad, No 1. — Cut one dozen cold boiled potatoes into dice; 
add cold beef, chicken or turkey — chopped — not too fine, and cover 
with mayonnaise. Should be made two hours before needed. 

Mrs. George Williamson. 

Potato Salad, No. 2. — Use cream dressing* No. 3. Cut two quarts of 
boiled potatoes in cubes. One cup of celery, four hard-boiled eggs, 
a little onion (scraped). Put these in alternate laj^ers with the 
dressing, mix with a silver fork. (This will serve twelve people). 

Mrs. H. D. Thompson. 

Vegetable Salad. — Two sliced tomatoes, two sliced cucumbers, 
one sliced onion, a cupful of Lima beans, four good sized stalks of 
celery, a little chopped tarragon and parsley. Serve with French 
dressing. 

The ShurtlefF Salad. — "I cut the cold potato in small pieces, I 
chop some cold beets or a few pieces, quite fine. One small onion, I 
also chop fine; then I put the potato, beet and onion all together on 
a dish large enough to allow for mixing up. Then I put in salt, 
pepper, a little vinegar and a good deal of oil and mix thoroughly 
together. I then taste of it and if it doesn't taste just as I like it, I 
add salt or oil or whatever ^it seems to need. In their season I add 
thinly sliced cucumbers." Keene Valley. 

Note.— It oil in dressing is objectionable, boiled dressing may 
be used, but hard-boiled egg should be cut up with the potato. 

Cabbage Salad. — Cut cabbage, one head, very fine, put in a dish 
and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Take one egg^ one cup of 
cream, one cup of vinegar and a small piece of butter, beat all 
together, and let boil, then while hot pour it on the cabbage. 

Mrs. S. E. Buttolph. 



SALADS 6 1 

Egg Salad. — Boil one dozen eggs hard; cut in halves and take out 
eg-g-s carefully; mash eight yolks; add an uncooked &^^, and beat 
well; then add, slowly, two tablespoonfuls of oil, and, as slowly, the 
same quantity of butter; beat in pepper, mustard, salt and curry, to 
taste. Then add one and one-half tablespoonfuls of vinegar. Chop 
half the breast of a boiled chicken; mix well together; fill your eggs, 
and place them on lettuce leaves. Mrs. Calvin Skinner. 



Egg Salad.— Remove the shells from six hard-boiled eggs, cut 
them into halves and put each half on a lettuce leaf and arrange 
neatly on a platter. Chop fine two olives, one gherkin and a table- 
spoon of parsley. Make French dressing of five tablespoons of olive 
oil, two of tarragon vinegar, half a teaspoon of salt, saltspoon of 
pepper and half a teaspoon of grated onion. Sprinkle over the eggs 
the chopped gherkin, parsley and olives, pour over the dressing and 
stand in a cold place for fifteen minutes before serving. 

Jean Hawkins. 



Lettuce Salad. — One head of lettuce, one hard-boiled ^^^, one- 
half teaspoon of salt, a small mustard spoon of mustard, two good 
tablespoons of oil, one tablespoon of vinegar, tablespoon of mashed 
potatoes. Rub the yolks and potato to a powder, add salt, mustard 
and oil, beat well in the vinegar, cut the lettuce in a bowl with a 
thin slice of onion and the white of the &g^- Add the dressing and 
mix by tossing with a fork. Mrs. H. E. King. 

Note. — Lettuce can be used with French dressing. 



Waldorf Salad. — ^Pare, core and cut into dice four large tart 
apples. Add to them one quart of celery cut into cubes; mix all 
together with cream or mayonnaise dressing. Arrange on a salad 
dish and garnish with celery tips, equal parts of apple and celery 
is a good proportion. Litz Dustin. 



62 SALADS 

Waldorf ChifFonade Salad. — One head of lettuce, one head of 
chicory or escarolle, two small beets, two hard-boiled eg-g-s, two 
boiled potatoes cut in pieces, a little celery sliced thin, two fresh 
tomatoes sliced on top of the dish. Pour over French dressing just 
before serving. Mrs. William Breed- 

Asparagus Salad. — Select tender stalks of asparagus, boil, set 
away to cool. Just before serving, pour over French or mayonnaise 
dressing. 

Celery Salad. — Cut in inch lengths crisp celery. Let it be cold 
and just before serving mix with cold mayonnaise or cream dressing. 

Miss M. E. Parmelee. 

Cucumber Salad. — Pare and cut cucumbers in thin slices; put in 
cold water until ready to serve. Drain and place in bowl with ice; 
serve with salt, pepper and vinegar or French dressing. Thinly 
sliced onions may be mixed with the cucumbers, if desired. 

Cucumber Boats. — Pare medium sized cucumbers and cut 
through the center lengthwise and scoop out the seeds; place in a 
pan of ice water until ready to serve. Prepare a salad of tomatoes 
and cucumbers, cut in small cubes, with cream dressing No. 1 and 
fill the boats with the salad just before serving and garnish with 
nasturtiums. E. McClary. 

Bean Salad. — Arrange lettuce leaves in dish, put in the center a 
pint of French beans. Cover the top with English walnuts (cooked 
if you prefer). Pour over enough French dressing to make as moist 
as you like. Mrs. Breed. 

Peas and Fruit Salad. — One can of French peas, one coffee cup 
of Malaga grapes (seeded), one coffee cup of English walnuts broken 
into small pieces, two tablespoonfuls of olive oil, one tablespoonful 
of Tarragon vinegar over this. Stir lightly together and let stand 
one hour. Before using put cooked ma3^onnaise dressing over all 
and serve immediately. Mrs. Edward Lawrence. 



SALADS 63 

Banana Salad. — Slice bananas on lettuce leaves or in the skin of 
the banana (cutting- leng-thwise one side and taking- out the fruit 
very carefull^O- Put English walnuts over the fruit and French 
dressing made with one tablespoonful of vinegar, heaping- saltspoon- 
ful and a half of salt, dash of cayenne pepper, (stir this until the 
salt is dissolved) add five tablespoonfuls of salad oil, small teaspoon- 
ful of grated onion. Whip with a silver fork until emulsified. This 
salad must be prepared just before serving. Mrs. Breed. 

Fruit and Savory Salad.— A small ripe pineapple is peeled and 
shredded, a cupful of finely chopped celery and diced red peppers 
mixed. Marinate this with a little French dressing. Put on ice for 
fifteen minutes, after which toss through it with a silver fork a little 
mayonnaise dressing-, then a half cupful of stiftly whipped cream. 
Serve on lettuce leaves. Mrs. William Breed. 

Fruit Salad. — Cut three bananas, three oranges and one-half 
pound of Malaga grapes into small pieces, add one pint of fresh or 
canned pineapple cut in cubes. Mix with a cream dressing and 
serve very cold. Winifred Dustin. 

Nut and Celery Salad.— Put one cup of shelled walnuts in a 
sauce pan, add two slices of onion, one-half teaspoon of salt, one bay 
leaf and a blade of mace. Cover with boiling water and boil ten 
minutes; throw into ice water to blanch, then dry on a towel. Cut 
into small pieces enough crisp celery to make one pint. Mix all 
together with cream or mayonnaise dressing. Jean Hawkins. 

Orange and Nut Salad.— Prepare nuts as above. Peel oranges 
and separate the sections into small pieces. Mix the oranges and 
nuts and pour over a French dressing. 

Nut and Olive Salad. — Take a cup of walnuts and blanch as 
directed. Cut two dozen of large olives in strips, hard boil four eggs 
and cut in quarters lengthwise. Mix together nuts and olives and 
marinate with a French dressing. Put on a dish that has been 
lined with lettuce leaves and garnish with the eggs. 

Table Talk. 



64 SALADS 

Tomato Salad, No. 1. — Cut six ripe tomatoes in slices, sprinkle 
on each layer a little pepper and salt and pour over them a mixture 
of oil and vinegar in the proportion of two tablespoons of oil to one 
of vinegar, sprinkle a very little chopped onion over the top and leave 
them in the dressing two hours. Serve. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Tomato Salad, No. 2. — Cut ripe tomatoes, when peeled, into 
thick slices; have them very cold; place on a salad plate and pour 
over a mayonnaise dressing. 

Tomato Salad, No. 3. — Peel firm, medium-sized tomatoes; cut a 
slice from the stem end, carefully remove the seeds and fill the cavity 
with the following: Pare one or two crisp cucumbers and a small 
onion; cut all fine and mix with a mayonnaise or cream dressing. 
Place tomatoes on lettuce leaf and pour over a dressing. French 
dressing may be used if preferred. The tomatoes maybe filled with 
celery cut fine and mixed with dressing. Jean Hawkins. 

Salad in Green Peppers. — Take six good sized peppers, cut in 
half, scoop out seeds and put the peppers in ice water to soak for 
two hours. Drain and fill with any preparation of fish or meat 
salad and put on top a spoonful of mayonnaise. 

Sweetbread Salad. — Cut cold cooked sweetbreads into dice and 
mix with an equal quantity of celery. Cover with mayonnaise or 
cream dressing and garnish with lettuce. 

Tomato Aspic. — Put one can of tomatoes, one slice of onion, two 
bay leaves, a few celery tops, teaspoon of salt, half a teaspoon of 
paprika in a sauce pan. Bring to the boiling point and add three- 
quarters of a box of gelatine, which has been soaked in half a cup 
of cold water for half an hour. Stir until dissolved, add the juice of 
half a lemon and strain. Poirr into cups or fancy molds. Stand 
on'ice for four or five hours. When time to serve turn out on a lettuce 
leaf. Serve as you would a whole tomato with mayonnaise dress- 
ing. Enough for twelve people. Mrs. John Lincoln. 



SALADS 65 

Chicken Salad in Aspic— Pour aspic jelly into small cups, when 
set take out the center and fill with chicken salad; melt the jelly 
taken out and pour over the tops of the cups. When ready to serve 
tip out of the cups on to a lettuce leaf and garnish with mayonnaise. 

Aspic Jelly. — Five cups of rich consomme, one tablespoon of lemon 
juice, tv^^o tablespoons of tarrag-on vinegar, one box of gelatine. 
Soak the gelatine in some of the consomme one hour, ♦^hen add to the 
remainder of the consomme, and put over the fire, when well dis- 
solved stir for five minutes. Then strain through a flannel bag into 
any mold desired. Aspic jelly is used as a garnish for cold meats, 
fish or salads. 



EGGS. 

" 6>, egg! ivithin thine oval shell 

What palate-tickling joys do dwell.'''' 

Eg-g-s should be boiled by putting- into cold water. Gradually 
bring" the kettle to a strong heat. When the water comes to a boil, 
it is sufficient for rare eggs. For hard boiled, twenty minutes 
should be given. 

To Shaker Eggs. — Boil four minutes; take from the water; let 
stand long enough to cool sufficiently to handle; rem.ove the shell, 
keeping the eggs from breaking by taking the skin with the shell; 
as fast as you get them ready, drop into a covered dish to keep hot; 
then add butter, pepper, salt, and a spoonful or two of sweet cream; 
dress it over the eggs, and serve for lunch or tea in side dishes. 

Mrs. J. S. Phillips. 

Scrambled Eggs. — Put a tablespoonful of butter into a hot frying 
pan, have ready half a dozen eggs broken in a bowl, mixed slightly. 
Turn them into the hot butter and stir briskly one way until they 
are cooked. Be careful that they do not get too hard. Many add a 
little milk to the eggs. 

Creamed Eggs. — Boil six eggs twenty minutes. Make one pint 
of cream sauce. Have six slices of toast on a hot dish. Put a layer 
of sauce on each, then the whites of the eggs, cut in thin strips; and 
over this the yolks rubbed through a sieve. Place in the oven for 
about three minutes. Garnish with parsley and serve. 

Miss M. E. Parmelee. 

Egg Timbales. — Beat eight eggs without separating, add one 
rounded teaspoonful of salt, one-half of a teaspoonful of white 
pepper, one tablespoonful of chopped parsley, one teaspoonful of 
onion juice and a pint and a half of milk. Stir nicely together and 
fill small buttered timbale inolds two-thirds full. Set the molds in 



EGGS 67 

a deep pan partly filled with water, covered with buttered paper 
and place in a moderate oven until firm in the center, which will 
take from ten to twenty minutes. Serve with tomato sauce. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Eggs a la Newburg.— Boil hard four egg-s, throw them into cold 
water for a minute and then remove the shells. Cut into halves and 
arrange on a heated platter, white side up. Put into a sauce pan 
one tablespoonful of butter and one of flour. When creamed add two- 
thirds of a cup of hot milk. When boiling- take from the fire, add 
the well-beaten yolks of two eggs, bring to a scalding point again, 
add a small teaspoonful of salt, a dust of cayenne. 

Lucy King Allen. 

Baked Eggs. — For six people use eight eggs, one cupful of milk, 
one generous tablespoonful of butter, one teaspoonful of flour, half a 
teaspoonful of salt, pepper to taste, and one teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley. Put the butter in a frying pan, when melted put in the 
flour and stir until smooth and frothy; draw the pan back, and add 
gradually the cold mill<:, then the seasoning, after boiling up once, 
pour the sauce into a deep plate. Break the eggs carefully and drop 
into the sauce, and sprinkle over parsley. Place in a moderate oven 
and bake till the whites are set, say five minutes. Serve immedi- 
ately, in the dish in which they are baked. Mrs. Breed. 

Omelet — ^Five eggs, beaten separately; five tablespoonfuls of 
milk; to the yolks add the milk, a pinch of salt, then the ^whites, 
beaten lightly; have your omelet pan ready with a large table- 
spoonful of melted butter; cook carefully on the top of the stove, and 
when well set put it in the oven to brown; fold it, and serve. Some 
say the salt should not be put in, as it takes from the lightness of 
the eggs. William H. Barney. 

Asparagus Omelet. — Boil tw^o pounds of asparagus in a little 
water with a little salt, or steam until tender; chop fine; mix with 
five yolks and three whites of eggs well beaten; add two tablespoons 
of sweet cream; fry, and serve hot. Mrs. C. L. Hubbard. 



68 EGGS 

Bread Omelet. — Soak a teacup of bread crumbs in a cup of 
sweet^milk over nig-ht; three eggs beaten separately; yolks with the 
bread and milk; stir in the whites, and fry brown; sprinkle over 
salt and pepper just before t,aking up. Sufficient for six persons. 

Miss W. Childs. 

Meat Omelet. — Beat six eggs quite light; have ready minced meat 
of ham, tongue, cold chicken or veal; put this into a dish with a 
little butter to warm through, but not fry; turn the eggs into a 
spider in which you have previously heated the butter; let the omelet 
brown lightly on the lower side, and the upper forming a thin 
custard; season to taste; put in the meat; fold the omelet over, and 
take up quickly; serve immediately. Mrs. Farnham. 

Poached or Dropped Eggs. — Have one quart of boiling water and 
one tablespoonful of salt in a frying pan. Break the eggs, one by 
one, into a saucer and slide carefully into the salted water. Dash 
with a spoon a little water over the ^^^ to keep the top white. The 
beauty of a poached o.^^ is for the yolk to be seen blushing through 
the white, which should be only just sufficiently hardened to form a 
transparent veil for the &^^. Cook until the white is firm and lift 
out with a griddle cake turner, and serve immediately. Muffin 
rings may be placed in the water and an ^%^ dropped into each ring. 

Mrs. Belding. 

Eggs with Tomato Sauce. — One-half of a small onion sliced, 
fried in half a tablespoon of butter. Add one-half a can of tomatoes, 
two cloves, salt, pepper, one tablespoon of flour rubbed with one-half 
a tablespoon of butter. When thick pour into a deep platter, drop 
on the sauce poached eggs and serve. This sauce is sufficient for 
six eggs. With graham gems this makes a nice course by itself. 

Mrs. Breed. 

Deviled Eggs. — Put five eggs into cold water and boil twenty 
minutes, then put into cold water. When cool remove the shells and 
cut in two lengthwise. Take out the yolks and press through a 
sieve. Add one tablespoonful of olive oil or butter, salt, pepper, 
mustard and vinegar to taste. Fill the whites with the mixture. 



EGGS 69 

Eggs StufPed with Sardines.— Boil twelve eggs steadily for fifteen 
minutes, then cover with cold water and set aside to cool. Cut a 
small slice off each egg large enough to remove the yolks without 
breaking the white. Take one medium sized can of boneless sar- 
dines, mash to a paste with the yolks of tlie eggs, add a little salt 
and the juice of a fresh lemon. Refill the whites and arrange the 
eggs in a nest of lettuce leaves. Mabel Lawrence. 

Scalloped E?gs. — ^One tablespoonful of corn starch, one table- 
spoonful of butter, one saltspoon of salt, one pinch of red pepper. 
Put these into one pint of boiling cream and stir until thick and 
smooth. Pour this sauce over one-half dozen deviled eggs, and bake 
lightly. Lucia F. Gilbert. 

Egg Puffs for Tea. — Break as many eggs as would be required, 
keeping the yolks each in a separate dish, add salt to the whites and 
whip; butter an iron griddle on which drop a spoonful of the whip, 
then place a yolk on each one. Season with salt and pepper, cover 
with whip, and when a nice brown, turn with a pan cake turner, 
brown and take up. Do not have the griddle too hot. 

Mrs. F. E. Taylor. 
Scotch Woodcock. — One tablespoon each of flour and butter 
rubbed together, six or seven hard boiled eggs chopped fine, one 
pint of milk, one small teaspoonful o'f anchovy paste, a little mustard. 
Serve on small squares of buttered toast. 

Mrs. Frank Haven. 



CHEESE DISHES AND SANDWICHES. 

"Bachelor's fare— bread and cheese and kisses."— ^ze///?, Polite 
Convei'sations, I. 

Cheese Straws, No. 1.— Roll puff paste thin, sprinkle well with 
grated cheese and a little cayenne pepper, fold, roll out and repeat 
the process. Let it stand in a cool place for a time; then roll very 
thin; cut strips about one-fourth of an inch wide and three inches 
long- and the same number of small rings. Bake in a slow oven ten 
or fifteen minutes. When done hang the rings on the sticks; the 
rings may be omitted and the sticks piled cob-house fashion on a 
fancy plate. Serve hot or cold as a course at dinner, or with the 
salad, or whenever a cheese course is allowable. 

Cheese Straws, No. 2.— One cup of grated cheese, two table- 
spoonfuls of melted butter, yolk of one &gg, a pinch of salt, a dash of 
cayenne pepper, two tablespoonfuls of cold water, one-half teaspoon 
of baking powder, one-half cup of flour. Roll and cut in strips and 
bake to a nice brown. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Cheese Fondu.— Melt two tablespoons of butter, add four table- 
spoons of flour and mix until smooth. Add one cup of milk or 
cream, stir continually until it cooks and becomes quite thick; take 
from the fire and add the beaten yolks of three eggs. Mix throughly, 
then add four tablespoons of grated parmesan cheese. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stift' dry froth, add 
carefully to the mixture; butter a baking dish and bake in a quick 
oven twenty-five minutes or it may be put in souffle dishes and 
baked ten minutes. Litz Dustin. 

Cheese Ramakins.— Put two ounces of bread and a gill of milk 
over the fire; when hot add two tablespoons of butter, four heaping 
tablespoons of grated cheese (more if domestic cheese is used) and a 
dash of red pepper; take from the fire and add the yolks of two eggs 
and the well-beaten whites of three. Turn into ramakin dishes and 
bake in a quick oven ten minutes. Mrs. Breed. 



CHEESE DISHES AND SANDWICHES 71 

Croutons with Cheese. — Cut slices of bread about one-half an 
inch thick and remove crusts. Then cut in any shape desired and 
toast a delicate brown. Have ready a cheese sauce made as 
foUov^rs: Scald half a pint of milk; rub one generous tablespoon of 
butter and two tablespoons of flour together and stir into the milk. 
Stir until it thickens, add yolk of one Q^^, two large tablespoons of 
grated cheese and a palatable seasoning of white pepper and salt. 
Put a large teaspoon of the sauce on a crouton and serve with cream 
soups or salads. Mrs. J. E. Taylor. 

Cottage Cheese, No. 1.— Take a pan of curdled milk and set on 
the stove or over hot water, heat thoroughly, but do not scald. Put 
a clieese cloth in the colander and pour in the curd. When well 
drained or slightly squeezed add a little salt and moisten with sweet 
cream. Make into balls. Mrs. W. C. Orcutt. 

Cottage Cheese, No. 2. — Have a pan half full of thick, sour milk, 
fill the pan with boiling water and let it stand two or three minutes, 
then drain in a colander pressed with a plate and a weight over it 
for a while, then add salt and cream or butter, and a little sage; 
make into balls. Mrs. McClary. 

Welsh Rarebit. — In a sauce pan put one-half of a cupful of milk 
and set over the fire; when hot add two cupfuls of grated or chopped 
rich cheese and stir until it melts. Add quickly one teaspoonful of 
made mustard, one-quarter of a teaspoonful of salt, one-half of a 
teaspoonful of paprika or a dash of cayenne and two well-beaten 
eggs. Stir for a moment until the mixture begins to thicken, pour 
o^^er toast and serve at once. Table Talk. 

Sandwiches may be made of white, graham or brown bread and 
should be of fine grain and a day old. When the bread is read^', 
the butter should be spread on the loaf, and then a slice cut ofi" 
evenly. 

"They who have little butter must be content to spread thin their 
bread." 



72 CHEESE DISHES AND SANDWICHES 

Lettuce Sandwiches.— Spread the bread with mayonnaise dress- 
ing-. Put between the slices from which the crust should be cut, 
small crisp lettuce leaves. Trim and shape the sandwiches before 
putting- in the lettuce that it may not have to be cut. Serve as soon 
as possible after preparing. Mrs. J. E. Taylor. 

Celery Sandwiches.— Cut the celery fine and mix with a little ice. 
Butter the bread; dry the celery on a cloth; mix with mayonnaise; 
spread it on the slice, cover it with another, and cut into the desired 
shape. 

Egg Sandwiches.— Put the eg-gs into cold water, bring- gradually 
to the boiling point and boil for forty-five minutes. This long boil- 
ing makes the yolks very mealy. Put into cold water, when cool 
remove the shells and put through a potato press or fine sieve. To 
each &^^ allow one-half teaspoonful of soft butter, a little vinegar, 
pepper and salt to taste. Mix to a paste; spread on the bread and 
use small crisp lettuce leaves between the slices. 

Mrs. J. E. Taylor. 

Watercress Sandwiches.— Wash the cress and dry in a cloth. 
Pick the leaves from the stems and season with salt. Lay the cress 
thickly on the buttered slice, cover with the other and press together. 

Spanish Sandwiches.— Spread buttered graham bread with 
mustard; then with a layer of cottage cheese; and then with a layer 
of chopped olives mixed with mayonnaise. 

Cheese Sandwiches.— Cream one roll of Neufchatel cheese. If 
a little hard, as it is apt to be, put in it a spoonful of milk or cream. 
Add a little salt and a dash of red pepper or paprika. Paprika, 
by the way, should always be used with cheese, as it develops the 
flavor better than any other pepper. Mix with the cheese half a cup 
of chopped or pounded nuts and spread on slices of rye, graham, 
whole wheat or Boston brown bread. The mixture loses half its 
delicious flavor if spread on white bread, and the brown breads are 
much more nourishing. Rye is the bread par excellence to use with 
this filling, a rye sandwich of this kind being enticingly appetizing. 



CHEESE DISHES AND SANDWICHES /j 

Sardine Sandwiches. — One small box of sardines, yolk of one 
hard boiled egg, juice of one lemon and a little cayenne. Drain the 
sardines, remove skin and bones and mash with a fork. Add the 
<i^^ yolk rubbed through a sieve, the lemon juice, cayenne and 
enough melted butter to make a paste. Do not butter the bread, but 
spread the paste directly on it. 

Nut Sandwiches.— Chop the nuts very fine, making a mixture of 
one-half almonds, one-quarter English walnuts and the remainder 
hickory nuts. Butter the bread, slice, put on it a thin layer of the 
chopped nuts, a dust of salt, a sprinkle of grated cheese and cover 
with another slice. 

Peanut Sandwiches.— Take one quart of freshly roasted peanuts, 
remove the outer shells and the inner red skins and pound to a paste. 
Add sufficient mayonnaise to enable you to spread it on the loaf, 
then cut in thin slices and press together. 

Olive Sandwiches.— Butter slightly round thin slices of bread* 
lay between each sandwich one or two lettuce leaves and sliced 
olives, very thin, which^have been prepared a few hours and kept on 
ice. Cover the lettuce and olives with cream salad dressing. Serve 
as soon as possible after preparing. E. McClary. 

Ham Sandwiches. — Chop cold boiled ham very fine, and to every 
cupful allow one tablespoonful of melted butter, the yolks of two 
hard boiled eggs, one teaspoonful of lemon juice, one-fourth of a tea- 
spoon of dry mustard and one-fourth of a teaspoon of paprika. 
Pound all to a paste. 

Cheese for Crackers or Sandwiches.— One-quarter of a pound of 
cheese cut in small pieces and put into a double boiler; add one- 
quarter of a teaspoon of salt, same of mustard, pinch of cayenne 
pepper, small piece of butter, one ^^^ and one-half cup of milk. 
Allow the cheese to melt, mix q^^, milk and other ingredients, add 
to the cheese, cook to the consistency of thick cream. This will 
curdle if cooked too long. Use cold. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 

rci 



74 CHEESE DISHES AND SANDWICHES 

Sweet sandwiches are often served at five o'clock teas. They 
are made from preserved fruits or fig's, dates, etc. When made of 
the latter, the fruit must be chopped fine and moistened with orange 
or lemon juice. The fruits may be used separately or mixed, using 
those that blend. Cut the bread in fancy shapes, spreading the fruit 
thin. Nut sandwiches are best served with meat salads. 

Orange Marmalade Sandwiches.— Toast, butter and spread with 
marmalade thin slices of bread. Place two together, cut in strips 
one inch wide. Serve hot. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES. 

" Nolu for the tea of our host, 
Now for the rollicking bun, 
Noiv for the muffins and toast, 

And now for the gay Sally Lunn.''^ 

Hint for Making Bread. -During- the cold weather all flour 
should be thoroughly warmed before mixing. Frost-bitten or chilled 
yeast wall surely make black bread, and the fresher the j^east is the 
better the bread will be. The dough should be thoroughly kneaded, 
and care taken that it does not get chilled during the process of 
rising. Ladd & Smallman. 

Yeast. — Take six good-sized potatoes, pare and grate them; steep 
a small handful of hops in one pint of water and pour over the 
potatoes; then turn on boiling water until it thickens; add one-half 
cup of sugar, one tablespoonful of salt, one of ginger. When luke 
warm add one cupful of good yeast. This will make one gallon of 
yeast. Mrs. E. A. Webster. 

Bread.— One and one-half quarts of luke warm water, into which 
put one heaping tablespoon of sugar, add a little flour, and beat 
well; then stir in three-fourths of a cup of yeast, and enough flour 
to make a thick batter (in summer make a little thicker) and give it 
a good beating. In the morning add one tablespoon of mixed melted 
butter and lard, and an even tablespoon of salt, then add all of the 
flour necessary to knead; knead the dough sufficiently to work in the 
flour, then let it remain on the board covered by a pan until it rises 
some, perhaps fifteen or twenty minutes (by doing this it is much 
easier to knead into velvety and elastic dough); then knead about ten 
minutes and let rise until double its bulk. Then knead just enough 
to take out the air bubbles and put in the tins, let rise and w^hen 
ready bake in a moderate oven. Mrs. John Law. 



y6 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

Bread. — Take one pint of milk, one tablespoon each of butter 
and lard and let come to a boil; add one pint of water, tablespoon of 
sugar, salt, a yeast cake or one cup of home-made yeast; flour 
enoug-h to rnould from one-half to three-quarters of an hour. Knead 
as little as possible in the morning; shape into loaves and let rise 
before baking. Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Franch Bread. — One pint of milk, six eggs, one-half cup of 
butter, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, one-half cup of yeast, flour 
enough to knead all together. In the morning knead again; cut in 
strips, braid and when light bake. Mrs. Ralph. 

Parker House Rolls. — Scald one pint of sweet milk, and when 
partly cooled melt in it one-half cup of white sugar and one table- 
spoon of lard or butter. When luke warm add one-half cup of yeast 
and place the mixture in the center of two quarts of flour. If for 
tea, set to rise early in the morning. When light mix and knead 
thoroughly, let rise again, then knead again for ten or fifteen 
minutes, then roll out thinner than for biscuit, cut out as for biscuit, 
and spread butter over half the surface, fold it upon the other, place 
upon tins so as not to touch each other. Let it rise again, and when 
light bake fifteen or twenty minutes. Miss H. E. Keeler. 

Meacham Rolls. — One cup of warm milk, one-fourth cup of 
butter, two tablespoons of sugar, one-fourth of a small cup of yeast, 
flour to knead at night softly and in the morning turn carefully on 
to the moulding board and roll out one-half inch thick; cut with 
biscuit cutter and spread with warm butter, fold these over half 
way; let rise very light and bake. If warm rolls are desired for 
supper leave the dough in a cool place until about three o'clock and 
then roll and cut as stated. The' above makes eighteen rolls. 

Mabel Earle Selkirk. 

Cinnamon Rolls.— Take from bread dough in the morning the 
amount required for one medium loaf of bread and mix in one-half 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 77 

cup of soft butter, put in a cool place until about three o'clock in the 
afternoon, then roll out thin and spread with warm butter and sugar. 
Sprinkle with cinnamon; then cut off strips three inches wide, and 
roll over until one and one-half inches in width; cut off slices and 
place in long- gem tins to rise ver}' light. Bake in a medium hot 
oven. For lemon rolls turn a little lemon extract into your hand and 
rub with the sugar and butter over the dough and then roll and cut 
the same as for the cinnamon rolls. Mabel Earle Selkirk. 

Rolls. — One quart of sweet milk, three eggs, one cup of butter, 
one-half cup of sugar, two-thirds cup of yeast, flour for a thick 
batter. Let remain over night and mix for rolls as biscuit in the 
morning. Mrs. D. F. Soper. 

Breakfast Rolls. — One quart of flour, a pinch of salt, butter the 
size of an ^^^ rubbed in the flour, one-half cup of baker's yeast or 
one-fourth home-made yeast; mix with water and knead hard. Let 
it rise over night. In the morning make into rolls and let rise again. 
Bake twenty minutes. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Rolls for Tea. — One ^g^, one-half cup of butter, scant, one-half 
cup of sugar, one cup of milk, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
flour enough to stift'en, so that it will drop from a spoon into hot gem 
pans. Bake in a very quick oven. The same recipe makes good 
graham rolls for breakfast, omitting the sugar. 

Mrs. J. E. Barry. 

Finger Rolls. — Use any good recipe for rolls, and when read}- to 
put in the tins take off pieces about the size of an o^^^ and shape into 
narrow rolls about four inches long and place in tins. If a crust is 
liked all around place an inch apart, when light bake in a quick 
oven. 

Crescents or Horse-Shoe Rolls. — Use recipe for Parker House 
rolls. When ready to put in tins roll the dough out to about one-half 
an inch in thickness, spread lightlj' with butter and cut in six-inch 



78 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

squares, then each square across, making two triangles; commence 
at the longest side and roll towards the point and fasten, then bend 
in crescent shape and place on tins a little ways apart. When light 
bake in a quick oven and just before they are done brush lightly 
with a little sweet milk. 

Bread Sticks. — Scald one pint of milk and while hot add two 
ounces of butter. When luke warm add a teaspoon of salt, one of 
sugar, and about one quart of sifted flour. Beat vigorously for five 
minutes, add a half yeast cake dissolved in half a cup of luke warm 
water, or half a cup of good yeast. Mix, cover and stand in a warm 
place over night. In the morning add the white of an &^^ beaten to 
a stiff froth, and sufficient flour to make a soft dough. Knead for 
five minutes, then pound until soft and velvety. Put back in a bowl 
until very light, then take a very small piece of the dough and roll it 
out into a long strip about the size of a thick lead pencil. Place on 
greased pans, when light brush them with a little white of an ^^^ 
and water mixed, and bake in a quick oven ten or fifteen minutes. 

Table Talk. 

Raised Biscuit. — One pint of sweet milk, one-half cup of butter, 
one cup of home-made yeast, one tablespoon of sugar. Let the 
butter, milk and sugar come to the boiling point, then cool, sponge 
and add flour and the yeast. Let rise three times. This rule makes 
about one dozen and a half biscuits. Mrs. F. W. Lawrence. 

French Rolls.— Three cups of sweet milk, a teaspoonful of salt, 
one-half cup of yeast or half a cake of compressed yeast, one cup of 
melted butter, add flour enough to make a stiff dough. Let it rise 
— better over night — and then add two well-beaten eggs; knead thor- 
oughly, and let rise again. Make into balls about the size of an 
^^^, then roll between the hands to make long rolls (about three 
inches). Place close together in two even rows on well-buttered 
pans. Cover and let rise again. Bake in a quick oven to a delicate 
brown. Mrs. T. Hawley. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 79 

Whole Wheat Bread.— Scald one cup of milk, add a teaspoon of 
butter, one of sugar, one of salt, and one cup of water. When luke 
warm add one-half a yeast cake dissolved in one-half cup of water; 
stir in three cups of whole wheat flour, and beat until light and 
smooth; let rise over night. In the morning add two or three cups of 
flour or enough to make a soft dough. Knead well and be careful 
not to add too much flour; let it rise till double its bulk. Shape into 
loaves. Put in tins and let rise. Bake forty-five minutes in a mod- 
erate oven. Table Talk. 



Buns. — One pint of sweet milk; one-half cup of yeast; half a cup 
of shortening; two-thirds of a cup of sugar; one small teaspoon of 
salt; raisins or English currants. Knead with flour to make the 
proper consistency. Mrs. Clinton Stevens. 



German Coffee Cakes.— Add half a cup of butter to a pint of 
luke warm milk, sift enough bread flour with a teaspoon of salt to 
make a batter as stiff as you can stir. Beat in half a cup of home- 
made yeast or half a yeast cake, and a cup of sugar, add two eggs 
and beat the batter until it blisters. In summer the dough should 
rise from eight to ten hours. In the morning add merely enough 
flour to roll out the dough. Let it rise two hours, then roll out until 
it is a little less than half an inch thick, cut into small cakes and 
let rise one-half hour, then bake for about twenty minutes in a quick 
oven. When they are cooled a little, break in halves and pile with 
their soft side up in a large dripping pan. Put them in a hot air 
oven for a day or two to become thoroughly dry. 

Florence C. Mallon. 



CofPee Bread.— One quart of flour, four teaspoons of baking 
powder, one-half cup of sugar, a piece of butter half the size of an 
Qgg, two well-beaten eggs, a little salt and enough milk to make a 
stiff' batter. Mrs. Frank Haven. 



8o BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

Graham Bread. — One cup of bread sponge; one and a half cups 
of sweet milk; a little less than half a. cup of molasses; one even tea- 
spoonful of soda; a little salt and ging-er; stir with a spoon; add the 
amount of graham flour needed; let it stand until very light, and 
bake thoroughly. Mrs. Hiram French. 

Graham Bread. — One cup of sweet milk, one-half cup of New 
Orleans molasses, two tablespoons of sugar, one cup of bread 
sponge, one-half teaspoon of soda, one-half teaspoon of salt; stir in 
graham flour until stiff and smooth, and let rise over night or until 
light. Turn into baking pan without moulding or stirring, let rise 
a second time even with the top of the pan. Bake slowly one hour. 

Nellie Scully. 

Steamed Graham Bread. — Two cups of sweet milk, one of sour 
milk, one-half cup of sugar, one-half cup of molasses, five cups of 
graham flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one of salt; steam three hours. 

Miss H. E. Keeler. 

Steamed Brown Bread. — Two cups of sweet milk and one of sour; 
two cups of corn meal and one of graham flour. Into the milk put 
one teaspoonful of soda and one-half cup of molasses; salt; then add 
the meal and graham flour. Steam three or four hours. The batter 
will be very thin. Mrs. McClar3^ 

Brown Bread. — Two cups of graham or r3"e meal; one cup of 
Indian meal; stir together; add one large half cup of molasses; one- 
half cup of raisins, stoned; two cups of sour milk and two teaspoon- 
fuls of soda; butter the dish thoroughly, and boil five or six hours. 

Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Baking Powder Biscuit, No. 1.— One quart of flour; two heaping 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder; two tablespoons of butter. Sift 
baking powder with the flour; rub in the butter, and add one coft'ee 
cup of sweet milk; bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. Mallon. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 8i 

Baking Powder Biscuit, No. 2.— One quart of floar; three tea- 
spoons of baking- powder, a little salt, butter the size of a small egg; 
mix with sweet milk very soft. Mrs. Spann. 

Soda Biscuit.— Put into one quart of flour two teaspoonfuls of 
cream of tartar and a little salt; add two tablespoonfuls of cream or 
one of butter; dissolve and add one teaspoonful of soda in a little hot 
water; mix the whole soft with milk. Mrs. C. L. Hubbard. 

Raised Graham Rolls. — One cup of water, one tablespoon of lard 
or butter, a little salt, half a cup of yeast, half a cup of flour; add 
graham flour to make a stiff batter. Let it rise over night and in 
the morning add one ^^^, three tablespoonfuls of molasses, half a 
teaspoonful of soda and one-third of a cup of Indian meal. Beat 
thoroughly, put in the roll pans to rise, and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. H. K. White. 

Graham Gems, No. 1. — Two cups of sour milk, one teaspoonful 
of soda, a little salt, melted butter the size of an O:^^, and graham 
flour until quite thick. Bake in hot iron gem moulds. 

Mrs. C. A. Wood. 

Graham Gems, No. 2. — Four large cooking spoons of thick sour 
milk and two of cream or one of butter; one-half teaspoonful of 
soda, one-fourth cup of sugar, one ^^^, a little salt; one-fourth 
cup of flour and three-fourths cup of graham flour; make rather 
soft and bake in gem pans. Above makes eight or ten rolls. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Scotch Biscuit. — One cup of thick sour cream; one and one-half 
cups of sour milk; one teaspoon of soda; salt. Knead with flour 
and roll out thin. Spread with sugar (white or maple). Roll like 
jelly cake; cut oft' the size of biscuit; bake quickl}'. 

Mrs. F. White. 



82 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

Pop Overs, No. 1. — One scant cup of flour, one cup of milk, one 
6g"g"- ^^^ 3-11 together and beat hard for fifteen minutes. Have 
cups very hot with plenty of butter. Mrs. Breed. 

Pop Overs, No. 2. — Two cups of sweet milk, two scant cups of 
flour, three eggs, salt. Beat eggs light; then add milk and flour 
and beat all five minutes. Pour into hot gem irons and bake in a 
quick but not scorching oven. Mrs. A. Munger. 

Raised Muffins. — One pint of milk; a piece of butter the size of a 
butternut; three tablespoonfuls of yeast; add flour to make a thick 
batter, let rise over night; in the morning, add two well-beaten eggs, 
and bake in rings. Mrs. C. A. Wood. 

Muffins, No. 1. — One Qgg, three-fourths of a cup of sugar, one- 
half cup of milk, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one cup of 
flour, pinch of salt, one teaspoonful of baking powder mixed in the 
flour. Bake about fifteen minutes. Carrie King Hall. 

Muffins, No. 2.— One pint of flour; one cup of milk; one egg', one 
large tablespoonful of sugar; one teaspoonful of cream tartar; one- 
half teaspoonful of soda; butter the size of a walnut, melted with the 
soda in a little warm water. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Rice Crumpets. — One cup of cold boiled rice, one cup of sweet 
milk, one cup of flour, two eggs, one heaping teaspoon of baking 
powder, one and one-half tablespoons of melted butter, pinch of salt, 
one even tablespoon of sugar. Bake in piping hot gem pans in a 
quick oven. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 

Laplanders.— Two eggs, beaten; one pint of milk; a little salt; 
one pint of flour; three tablespoons of melted butter. Heat the irons 
quite hot and grease them. Pour the mixture in and bake in a quick 
oven, in French roll irons, fifteen or twenty minutes. This makes 
two dozen. Mrs. B. Webster. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 83 

Nantucket Corn Pudding. — Grate twelve ears of uncooked corn, 
add two or three eggs, milk, a little powdered cracker, salt; mix 
about as thick as Indian pudding; bake in a deep dish; eat hot, 
with butter, for tea. Mrs. Richardson. 

Corn Caiie,No. 1.— One &^^\ one cup of sour milk; one-half cup 
of sugar; one cup of flour; one cup of meal; one-half teaspoonful of 
soda; one teaspoonful of baking powder; one tablespoonful of 
butter; work the butter and sugar together, then beat in the ^^^. 

Mrs. C. L. Hubbard. 

Corn Cake, No. 2. — One-half cup of sour" cream, three-fourths 
cup of sweet milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda (in the cream), one 
Q.^^, one heaping tablespoonful of sugar, one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
one small cup of meal, the same of flour. Mrs. Breed. 

Parker House Corn Cake. — ^Mix one cup each of flour and 
Indian meal, one and one-half teaspoonfuls of cream tartar, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, and a little salt, together. Mix one o.^^, one-half a 
cup of sugar, butter the size of an ^^^, and one cup of warm sweet 
milk together; then pour the liquid into the dry mixture; beat well 
and bake. Miss Childs. 

Washington Cake for Breakfast. — One ^^^, beaten; one small 
coffee cup of sweet milk; small half cup of yeast; butter the size of 
an ^^^\ flour to make stiff, but not too stiff. Put in a tin and let 
rise over night. Bake for breakfast fifteen or twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Helen Knapp. 

Sally Lunn, No.l. — One quart of flour, one generous pint of milk, 
two tablespoons of sugar, three of butter, two eggs, one teaspoon of 
salt, half a cup of yeast. Have the milk blood-warm, add the butter, 
the eggs well beaten and the yeast, then the flour, salt and sugar; 
beat all together and pour in greased pans to the depth of two or 
three inches. Let rise and bake. 



S4 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

Sally Lunn, No. 2. — Two eg-gs, two and one-half small cupfuls of 
flour, one cupful of sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls of cream tartar, 
one teaspoonful of soda, three tablespoonfuls of butter. Bake in a 
shallow tin. Mrs. H. E. King. 

Berry Tea Cakes. — One-half cup of sugar, one ^^^-^ three-fourths 
cup of milk, one level teaspoon of baking powder, piece of butter one- 
half the size of an ^^^. Flour sufficient for a stiff batter. Into this 
batter stir one cup of fresh berries or the canned ones without the 
juice. (Dried berries can be soaked for the same purpose). 

Mrs. McClarj'. 

Blueberry Cake. — One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, four 
cups of flour, two cups of blueberries, one-half cup of milk, three 
eggs, one teaspoon of cream tartar, one-half teaspoon of soda. Roll 
the blueberries in the flour and put them in the last thing. 

Mrs. W. H. King". 

German Toast. — One egg-; one cup of milk. Dip into this slices 
of bread; butter a hot spider and brown the bread in it. 

Mrs. Thorndike. 

CoFFee Cakes. — One quart of flour, butter one-half the size of an 
^^^■, three teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one teaspoonful of salt, 
mix as soft as can be rolled, cut in ring-s and fr3' in deep hot lard 
like doughnuts. Serve for breakfast with coffee. 

Mrs. Leroy W. Hubbard. 

Toast in Camp.— First, take plenty of crackers; second, have a 
g-ood fire; third, put your cracker on a forked stick; (be sure and 
have your stick long- enoug-h) brown one side to the color of half- 
forgotten autumn; fourth, turn your cracker without dropping- it in 
the ashes, and brown the other side till you can smell the fragrance 
of all the summers that are gone; fifth, butter slightly, and reclining 
on the boughs or against a mossy log, eat slowly and dream that life 
has only beauty and sweetness in it— the beauty of the deep woods, 
the sweetness of your toasted cracker; sixth, toast another. 

M. S. Parmelee. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 85 

Griddle Cakes. — Two eg-g-s, two cups of sour milk, one and one- 
half teaspoons of soda, butter the size of an eg-g-, one-halt teaspoon of 
sLig'-ar and one of salt; flour to make a thin batter. Cakes mixed the 
nig-ht before. Put in a cool place and in the mornng- let stand in a 
warm room ten or fifteen minutes before frying-. If any batter is 
left, it can be used when making- more cakes. Mrs. Ralph. 

Wheat Griddle Cakes. — One pint of sour milk, one teaspoon of 
soda or sweet milk and tw^o teaspoons of baking- powder, two table- 
spoons of butter; salt; two eg-g-s beaten lig-ht; flour for a batter; 
beat all thoroug-hly; fry on a g-riddle g-reased with a piece of salt 
pork. 

Green Corn Griddle Cakes. — Grate the corn from twelve ears of 
boiled corn; two eg-g-s, pepper, salt and a very little butter; one-half 
tea cup of flour; one-half tea cup of milk; stir well together and fry 
on a griddle. Mrs. Clinton Stevens. 

Buckwheat Cakes. — One quart of luke-warm water; make a 
batter with the buckwheat flour; salt; three-quarters of a cup of 
yeast; let rise over night; in the morning- add a teaspoon of soda 
and a little milk, which browns them. Mrs. Parmelee. 

Corn Meal Griddle Cakes. — Beat one egg light, add one cup of 
sweet milk, one-half teaspoon of salt, one cup of corn meal and two- 
thirds of a cup of white flour sifted together with two heaping tea- 
spoons of baking powder; beat well, lastly add one tablespoon of 
melted butter and beat again. Mrs. W. A. Short. 

Waffles, No. 1. — One pint of sour milk; one pint of flour; two 
eggs beaten separately; one level teaspoonful of soda in the milk; 
one tablespoonful of melted butter; two-thirds of a teaspoonful of 
salt; stir in the whites of the eggs last, lightly. Cook in watfle 
irons over a hot fire. Mrs. Barney, 



86 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

Waffles, No. 2. — One pint each of milk and flour, one tablespoon 
of butter, three eggs, two teaspoons of baking powder, a little salt, 
beat the eggs separately, very light. Mrs. Belding. 

Ginger Bread, No. 1. — One cup each of molasses, sugar, sour 
milk and butter, two eggs, two teaspoons of soda, two scant tea- 
spoons of ginger, three and one-half cups of flour. To be eaten 
warm. Makes two sheets in biscuit tins. Mrs. Belding. 

Ginger Bread, No. 2. — One cup each of sour milk, sugar and 
molasses, three-fourths of a cup of butter, two eggs, one teaspoon of 
ginger, one heaping teaspoon of soda, three cups of flour. 

Mrs. S. Greeno. 



Plain Ginger Bread. — One cup of warm water; into this put 
shortening the size of a large egg, one cup of molasses, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, one teaspoonful of ginger, a little salt, and flour 
sufficient to make a thick batter; bake in a shallow tin. To be 
eaten warm. Mrs. McVickar. 



Molasses PufF. — One Qgg, one cup of molasses, one-third 
cup of sugar, one cup of sour cream, salt, or scant half cup of 
butter, and one cup of sour milk, two and one-half cups of flour, two 
teaspoons of cinnamon, one even tablespoon of soda. Bake in 
shallow tins and cut in squares. 

Fritters.— Two eggs, two cups of sour milk, a little salt, 
one teaspoon of soda, flour to make a batter quite stiff; drop by 
spoonfuls into hot lard. Mrs. Wells S. Dickinson. 

Doughnuts, No.l. — One cup of sugar, one egg, two tablespoons of 
cream in a cup filled up with milk, one teaspoon of cream tartar, 
one-half of soda, flour to roll soft. Mrs. J. P. Morse. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 87 

Doughnuts, No. 2. — One cup of sugar, butter half the size of an 
egg, scant, two eggs, three-fourths of a cup of thick sour milk, three- 
fourths of a teaspoon of soda, a little nutmeg, a pinch of salt, flour 
to roll out soft. Mrs. Frank Haven. 

Doughnuts, No. 3.— One ^^^, one cup of sugar, one cup of sweet 
milk, two tablespoons of melted butter, two teaspoons of baking 
powder, a little salt. Put sugar, &^^ and melted butter together 
and beat well. Put baking powder in about three-fourths of a pint 
of flour at first, then put in more if necessary. Put through a sieve 
to get out the lumps, do not work it much. Put milk in last and 
then let stand a few minutes, then cut out before frying. 

Mrs. S. Robinson. 

Plain Doughnuts, No. 1.— Three tea cups of thick sour milk, one of 
sour cream; add flour for a thick batter at night; in the morning add 
four small teaspoons of soda dissolved in a little milk, two teaspoons 
of salt, one &^^ beaten into the batter thoroughly. The dough must 
not be too stiff with flour. Mrs. Clinton Stevens. 

Plain Doughnuts, No. 2.— One cup of thick sour milk, one table- 
spoon of sour cream, half a teaspoon of soda, pinch of salt, flour to 
roll soft. Miss Mary Meehan. 

Plain Doughnuts, No. 3.— One cup of sour cream, one teaspoon 
of soda, one ^^^. Put the soda into the cream, beat the &^^ and 
pour into that, then beat together, putting in about one teaspoon of 
salt. Flour to roll out. Cut in strips and twist. Mrs. Vilas. 

Aunt Susan's Raised Doughnuts.— One quart of milk; one cup of 
butter; two cups of sugar; two eggs; one small cup of yeast. 
Prepare the sponge with flour at night. 

Raised Doughnuts, No. 1.— Sponge at night by putting one and 
one-half pints of flour in a deep bowl. One pint of milk (scalded 



88 BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 

and cooled), one-half cup of yeast or one yeast cake, one small tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-half cup of butter and lard mixed cold into the 
sponge, and one Qgg well beaten. In the morning work in flour 
enough for medium stiff dough. Knead well and cut with a knife. 
Let this rise, when light, knead slightly, roll out, cut into cakes, put 
on a board and when sufficiently light, fry in lard. 

Mrs. McVickar. 



Raised Doughnuts, No. 2. — Three medium sized potatoes, boiled 
and mashed, then beaten with a silver fork until light and creamy, 
add a little cold water if necessary to make them so. One quart of 
water, lard one-half the size of an egg, one tablespoon of sugar, one 
teaspoon of salt, and one yeast cake. Make a sponge of the above at 
night. In the morning beat three eggs very light, and add them to 
one and one-half cups of sugar and beat again; melt together equal 
quantities of lard and butter, and take two-thirds of a cup, add it 
to the sugar and eggs, beat all thoroughly, then stir this into the 
sponge, add flour and knead thoroughly, and set to rise; let rise 
until very light, then knead carefully— just enough to take out the 
air bubbles. Roll out about as thick as for soda doughnuts and cut 
into doughnuts. Let rise again. Be sure and keep at the same 
temperature, air blowing on them will spoil them. When frying put 
the side next the board next to the lard. Do not have the lard as 
hot as for soda doughnuts. Mrs. Thomas Adams. 

Sour Cream Doughnuts.— Two eggs, two heaping teaspoons of 
cream tartar, one heaping coffee cup of sugar, nutmeg, all stirred 
together. Full two-thirds of a cup of sour cream, one and one-half 
coffee cups of sweet milk, one small teaspoon of salt, two teaspoon- 
fuls of soda, throw in dry before the flour. Mrs. Belding. 

Crullers No. 1.— Three eggs, three tablespoons of melted butter; 
five of sugar, one-fourth of a teaspoon of soda dissolved in a little 
milk; season with nutmeg. Flour to roll soft. Mrs. Abbott. 



BREAD, BREAKFAST AND TEA CAKES 89 

Crullers, No. 2. — Two eggs well beaten, one cup of sugar, one 
cup of sweet milk, two heaping tablespoons of thick sour cream, one 
teaspoon of soda, two of cream tartar, one-half teaspoon of salt, 
flour to roll soft. Cut in three-inch squares, make three slits in 
center of each square with cheese straw cutter. Fry in hot lard 
and sprinkled with pulverized sugar if desired. 

Mrs. W. H. King. 

Rosettes. — Three tablespoons of butter, three of sugar, stirred to 
a cream; three eggs yolks and whites beaten separately; flour to roll 
quite hard; cut the dough into strips eight or nine inches long, one 
inch wide, and on one edge make cuts with a sharp knife one- 
third of an inch apart; form into rosettes; fry on under side; turn 
carefully, and brown lightly the upper side; sprinkle over sugar. 

Mrs. McClary. 



r^i 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



' Praise us as wc tasted, 
Allocv lis as we prove.'''' 



Pastry for One Pie. — One heaping cup of pastry flour, one salt- 
spoon each of salt and baking- powder, and from one-third to one- 
half cup of lard and butter. Stir baking powder and salt in flour, 
then work in the lard and mix stiff with cold water; roll in butter 
—roll up like jelly cake, divide in two and use. 

Pie Pastry. — Two cups of flour sifted twice, a little salt, large 
half cup of lard rubbed into the flour thoroughly. Water, very cold, 
say enough to mix, not soft, but have it hard; roll out the crust, put 
on plates; when filled put on the upper crust previousl}'^ spread with 
butter, sprinkle with flour; then take it to the cold water faucet and 
let the water run over the pie, holding it slanting. 

Annie Sheehan. 

Fine Puff Pastry. — One quart of sifted flour — a little more for 
rolling pin and board; one cup of lard; same of butter; cut the butter 
and lard through the flour into small, thin shells, and mix with 
sufficient ice water to roll easily. Avoid kneading it, and use the 
hands as little as possible in mixing. 

Mince Meat, No. 1. — Five pounds of beef, one pint of chopped 
suet. For one quart of chopped meat take two quarts of chopped 
apples, three pounds of brown sugar, one quart of molasses, two 
quarts of boiled cider, four pounds of seeded raisins, two pounds of 
currants, one-fourth of a pound of citron, one-fourth of a pound of 
orange peel, one-fourth of a pound of lemon peel. Chop the fruit 
very fine, add four tablespoonfuls of cinnamon and two of cloves. 
This makes about five gallons. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 



PIES AND Pi DOINGS 



91 



Mince Meat, No. 2.— Salt and pepper the meat and measure 
when chopped fine. For each quart of meat add one pint of raw 
chopped suet, three quarts of chopped apples (not chopped too fine), 
two quarts of sugar, one and one-half pints of molasses, one pint of 
boiled cider, four nutmegs, two teaspoons of ground cloves, two of 
Jemon extract, three tablespoons of cinnamon, three pints of seeded 
raisins, (citron and currants if liked), one pint of the meat broth or 
water. Two and one-fourth pounds of good meat make one quart 
when chopped. Mrs. Spann. 

Apple Pie. — Line a plate with pastry, making edges as for 
custard pie. Pare tart, juicy apples; cut into quarters, dividing 
again if the apples are large; dip them in water and place on the 
bottom crust, putting them closely around the edge. Add one cup of 
sugar, cinnamon and bits of butter. Wet the edge of the bottom 
crust and put on the cover, pressing the two together with the palm 
of the hand. Mrs. McClary. 

How to Cook a Pumpkin.— Use the small sugar pumpkins. 
Remove the soft part and the 'seeds, cut into small pieces, put in a 
porcelain kettle with a little water, cover and cook slowly until 
tender, then remove the cover and cook a long time until dry. Press 
through a colander and it is ready for use; this pumpkin can be kept 
for winter use hy spreading on plates and drying slowly in the 
heater. Maggie O'Connor. 

Pumpkin Pie.— One cup of strained pumpkin, one-half cup of 
sugar, one q^^, two tablespoons of molasses, small half teaspoon of 
ginger, one teaspoon of cinnamon, one pint of sweet milk. Line a 
plate with pastry and pour in the mixture. Bake carefully about 
three-quarters of an hour. Maggie O'Connor. 

Squash Pie.— Made the same as pumpkin. 



92 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 



Sweet Potato Pie. — When the potatoes are dry and mealy take a 
quart, after they have been pared, boiled and mashed, a quart of 
milk, three or four eggs, salt, nutmeg, cinnamon and sugar to taste; 
bake the same as a squash pies. If the potatoes a.re very moist, use 
less milk. Miss Parloa's Cook Book. 

Prune Filling. — Stew one pound of prunes in cold water about 
three hours; when nearly done put in one cup of sugar, and stir most 
of the time, take off and put through a colander hot; the mixture 
must be thick. Annie Sheehan. 

Lemon Meringue Pie. — One and one-half coffee cups of sugar, 
grated outside and juice of one lemon, five eggs, whites of three 
reserved for meringue, two good tablespoons of flour and three- 
fourths of a cup of hot water, a pinch of salt. Beat the flour, sugar 
and eggs together: add the water to the lemon juice and stir with 
the flour, etc. Make the meringue with the whites of the eggs and 
two tablespoons of sugar. Pour into a crust previously baked. 

Mrs. Belding. 

Lemon Pie, No. 1. — One large or two small lemons, the yolks of 
four eggs, eight tablespoons of sugar and one of butter. Make a 
meringue of the whites of the eggs and four tablespoons of sugar. 

Alice L. Hyde. 

Lemon Pie, No. 2. — One cup each of sugar and boiling water, 
one lemon, piece of butter the size of a butternut, two tablespoons of 
corn starch, the yolks of two eggs. Put in a double boiler and cook 
until thick, stirring most of the time. Pour into a crust previously 
baked. Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs. 

Mrs. Julia Noland. 

Lemon Pie, No. 3.— Juice and grated rind of one lemon; one tea 
cupful of sugar; two eggs; two large crackers (or three tablespoon- 
fuls of corn starch) and one large cup of water; a small piece of 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 93 

butter; put the water and sugar on the stove to boil; pound the 
crackers fine and mix with the water and sugar, then the yolks of 
the eggs; make one rich crust and bake; then fill wuth the boiling 
custard. Have ready the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth 
with one tablespoonful of sugar; spread over the top and brown in a 
hot oven three minutes. Mrs. Dv^'ight Dickinson. 

Lemon Pie, No. 4. — Mix the juice and grated rind of one lemon 
with one-half cup of chopped raisins and one tart apple chopped 
fine. Roll one cracker fine and mix with one tablespoonful of 
melted butter. Beat the yolks of three eggs very light and the white 
of one, then beat all together, adding one large cup of sugar and a 
little salt. Pour into a pie plate lined with pastry, and bake until 
the crust is done. Then cover with the meringue made from the 
remaining whites of the eggs and return to the oven to brown. 

Mrs. Franklin S. Cooley. 

Currant Pie. — One cup of mashed currants, one cup of sugar, 
one &gg, one tablespoonful of flour, and one tablespoonful of water. 
Place in double or tart crust. Mrs. J. W. Leighton. 

Pieplant Pie, No. 1. — One tea cup of chopped pieplant, one good 
cup of sugar, one egg, butter the size of a large walnut, one table- 
spoonful of flour, four tablespoonfuls of water, one teaspoonful of 
lemon extract. This is better with a top crust. 

Mrs. James Sawyer. 

Pieplant Pie, No. 2. — One cofl'ee cup of chopped and drained pie- 
plant, one of sugar, one tablespoon of flour, yolks of two eggs, 
butter the size of a walnut, and juice of one lemon. Use whites of 
eggs for meringue. Mrs. Belding. 

Orange Pie.— The juice of two large oranges, grated rind of one, 
one cupful each of water and sugar, two level tablespoons of corn 
starch, a little salt, two eggs. Make custard and meringue same 
as for lemon pie. 



g4 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Jumble Pie. — One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, five eggs, 
three cups of dried stewed apples — strained; spice to taste; bake 
like a tart pie. Miss Greeno. 

Raisin Pie. — One cup of raisins, chopped, one-half cup of water, 
one lemon, two tablespoonfuls of flour; frost with the whites of 
eggs. • Mrs. R. S. Brown. 

Marlborough Pie. — Six tablespoonfuls of stewed apple, six table- 
spoonfuls of sugar, .three eggs, one-half a cup of sweet cream, and a 
little cinnamon; leave out the whites of two eggs for frosting. The 
juice and grated rind of a lemon are sometimes added, and in the 
place of the cream the same amount of butter may be used. 

Mrs. Botham. 

Cocoanut Pie. — One and one-half cups of desiccated cocoanut; 
one quart of swee<- milk; three eggs, reserving the white of one &g^; 
one-half a cup of sugar; season, bake and frost. One cup of rolled 
butternut meats may be substituted instead of cocoanut. 

Mrs. O. L. Ballard. 

Cranberry Pie. — One cup of cranberries, one cup of sugar, one 
cup of cold water, one cup of seeded raisins, one teaspoon of flour in 
a little water, cook all till it thickens, when cold add one teaspoon 
of vanilla. Bake with two crusts. Mrs. George Furness. 

Custard Pie. — One pint of milk, three eggs, pinch of salt, three 
and one-half tablespoons of sugar, flavor to taste. Bake carefully. 

Miss Meehan. 

Meringue Custard Pie. — Yolks of four eggs, sugar to taste, pinch 
of salt, and milk to fill a medium-sized plate. Line a plate with 
pastry and put in the custard. Bake carefully. Grate nutmeg on 
the top when taken from the oven. Test by inserting a knife in the 
center; if no custard adheres the pie is done. Make meringue of 
whites of four eggs, and brown carefully. Mrs. Gurley. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 95 

Cream Pie. — Scald together one and one-half cups of milk and 
one-half cup of sug-ar; piece of butter the size of a walnut; add to 
this one-half a cup of milk, one tablespoonful of starch, yolks of two 
eggs, and a very little salt; season with lemon; when about as thick 
as cream put into the crust, which has been baked first, and brown 
in the oven. Mrs. W. C. Stevens. 

Chocolate and Cream Pie.— Line a deep pie plate with good 
paste. Prick in several places with a fork to prevent blistering 
and bake a delicate brown. For filling put over the fire in a double 
boiler one large cup and a half of sweet milk, in which put a piece 
of butter as large as an English walnut. Stir together one-half a 
cup of sugar, one small half cup of flour, a small half cup of milk, 
and the yolks of two eggs, well beaten. Mix well and add to the 
milk above. When it boils, stir until it thickens and is well cooked. 
Take off the iire, flavor with one teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat with 
a silver fork hard for five or ten minutes, which greatly improves the 
custard. Fill the baked crust with the custard. Beat the whites 
of the eggs stiff, add two tablespoonfuls of sugar, flavor with lemon 
or vanilla. Spread over the custard and brown lightly. For choc- 
olate pie use the above receipt, adding two tablespoonfuls of choco- 
late, melted. Miss E. J. Flanders. 

Chocolate Pie. — The yolks of three eggs, two blocks of chocolate 
grated, two heaping tablespoonfuls of corn starch, butter the size of 
an Q^^^i one cup of sugar, two cups of sweet milk; beat the whites to 
a stiff froth; sweeten, and flavor with vanilla, and frost over the top. 
This will make two pies. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Dutch Pie. — One cup of rich sweet cream, one-half a cup of 
sugar, two heaping tablespoons of flour; mix the flour and sugar, 
add the cream, and stir until smooth. Line a plate with pastry, 
making edges as for a custard pie. Pare, core and quarter enough 
tart apples to half fill the crust; steam or cook the apples until they 
soften without losing their shape, then place them in the crust and 
pour over the cream mixture. Bake until the cream thickens in the 
center of the pie; cool a little and serve. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 



96 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Cherry Pie.— Line your pie plate vvitti good crust, fill half full 
of ripe cherries which have been stoned, sprinkle over them about a 
cupful of sugar, a teaspoon of sifted flour and a few bits of butter; 
now fill the crust full of the cherries. Cover with the upper crust 
and bake. 

Cherry Pie with Whipped Cream.— Line a pie plate with a rich 
crust, prick it with a fork and bake quickly in a hot oven; when 
rather cool spread with a layer of preserved cherries and cover with 
sweetened whipped cream flavored with vanilla. Jellj^ or jam may 
be used in place of cherries. Mrs. McClar3^ 

Apple Puffs. — Take good puff paste; cut round, using the same 
cutter for both upper and under crust; moisten the edge of the under 
crust with cold water, and put on a little of the filling; then take 
the upper crust and work with the fingers, so as to enlarge the 
center without changing the form of the edge, giving it somewhat the 
shape of a hat; put it over the under crust, pressing the edges 
together. 

For the Filling. — To a quart of stewed apple — stewed with as 
little water as possible— take a tablespoonful of butter; sugar, nut- 
meg and cinnamon to taste. This must be done the day before the 
puffs are made. In summer put upon ice. Mrs. C. Skinner. 

Note. — To prevent the syrup of juicy pies escaping take a strip 
of muslin one inch wide, wet in cold water, and la}- it around the 
pie half upon the pie and half upon the plate, pressing it either side. 
Remove as soon as the pie is taken from the oven. 

In making berry pies it is well to sprinkle powdered cracker 
over the berries instead of flour. 

Tart Crust. — One cup of lard, one tablespoonful of white sugar, 
the white of one &^^, beaten to a froth, three tablespoonfuls of 
water, and a little salt. Mrs. H. R. Thompson. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 97 

Lemon Tarts.— Bake a rich'crust the same as for other tarts. 

For Fillitig. — The juice and grated rind of one and one-half or 
two lemons, one cup of sug-ar, three eg-g-s. Cook in a double boiler 
until of the rig-ht thickness. When cool fill the shells. Make a 
meringue of four tablespoons of powdered sugar and the whites of 
two eg-g-s. Carrie King- Hall. 

Cherry Tarts.— Fill tart shells with thick cherry preserves. 

" Sweet lad3^ tell me— can you make a pudding- ? " 

Fruit Pudding. — One cup of raisins, stoned and chopped, one cup 
of chopped suet, one cup of molasses, one cup of sour milk, one tea- 
spoonful of soda, a pinch of salt, four cups of flour, cinnamon and 
cloves; steam three hours; serve with a rich sauce; see "Sauces." 

Mrs. Hiram H. Thompson. 

Suet Pudding, No. 1.— One cup of suet chopped, one cup of 
molasses, two cups of chopped raisins, one cup of sweet milk, four 
cups of flour, one Qgg, one teaspoonful of salt; boil or steam three 
hours. Mrs. Willard. 

Suet Pudding, No. 2.— One and one-half cups of chopped suet, 
one and one-half cups of sweet milk, one cup of molasses, one tea- 
spoon each of salt, cloves, cinnamon and soda, two cups of raisins, 
one-half a cup of citron, two cups of sifted flour. Mix in the order 
named, place in a two-quart pudding- mould and steam four hours 
continuously. A melon mould is a good shape. Mrs. Hawkins. 

English Plum Pudding.— One-half pound each of bread crumbs, 
raisins and Eng-lish currants; one-fourth pound each of citron and 
suet; one coffee cupful of sug-ar, a teaspoon of cinnamon, an even one 
of ging-er, one nutmeg-, one pint of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of 
baking- powder, five eg-g-s, well beaten, stirred into the milk and 
added last, with one-half a cup of coffee or any desired flavoring-. 
Steam six hours. Serve with a rich sauce. 

Libbie Rog-ers McKenan. 



g8 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Woodford Pudding. — Beat the yolks of three eg-gs well, add one 
cup of sug-ar, one-half a cup of butter rubbed to a cream, one cup of 
flour and one cup of jam (blackberry) or preserves, one-half a salt- 
spoon of cinnamon and whites of three eggs, beaten stiff, and one 
teaspoonful of soda dissolved in three teaspoonfuls of sour milk. 
Put in a pudding dish and bake slowly in a moderate oven from 
thirty to forty minutes. Serve with plain or whipped cream. 

Miss Mary Fay. 

Forest Pudding. — One cup of cold water, one-half a cup of 
molasses, dissolve a teaspoon of soda in a tablespoonful of boiling 
water and mix with the molasses; one-half a cup of brown sugar,. 
one-half a cup of suet, one cup of raisins, flour to make the thickness 
of cup cakes. Steam two hours. Mrs. James Sawyer. 

Fig Pudding. — One cup of molasses, one cup of milk, one-half a 
pound of raisins, one-half a pound of figs, chopped a little, one scant 
cup of butter, one teaspoon of soda, one-half teaspoon each of cinna- 
mon and cloves, three cups of flour. Steam two and one-half hours 
in a tin with a tube in the center. Serve with any kind of sauce 
desired. Mrs. McClary. 

Graham Pudding, No. 1.— One and one-half cups of graham 
flour, one cup of sweet milk, one of molasses, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, one tablespoonful of melted 
butter; steam three hours and serve with a rich sauce. To the above 
may be added, if desired, a good half cup of raisins and one ^^^. 

Mrs. Abbott. 

Graham Pudding, No. 2.— One ^^^, one cup of sugar, one-half a 
cup of molasses, three tablespoons of melted butter, one cup of not 
very sour milk, one and two-thirds of a cup of graham flour, one cup 
of raisins, one teaspoon of soda, and one teaspoon of baking powder- 
Steam three hours. Mrs. F. W. Lawrence. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 99 

Blueberry Pudding.— One quart of flour, three pints of blue- 
berries, one pint of molasses, one teaspoonful of soda, one teaspoon- 
ful of salt. Steam three hours. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Thomas Havvley. 

Puff Pudding.— One pint of flour, two teaspoons of baking- 
powder, a little salt, milk to make a stift' batter. Put one-half of 
the batter in a pudding- dish; then a g-enerous layer of fruit with a 
sprinkling- of sugar, then the remainder of the batter. Steam one 
hour. Serve with whipped cream and sugar or sauce. 

Roily Polly.— Take g-ood soda biscuit crust, roll one-half inch 
thick and spread with any kind of fruit— fresh, preserved or dried. 
Roll over and over, fastening- the ends so the fruit will not escape. 
Steam one hour and a half. Serve with cream and sugar or sauce. 
Dried fruit must be first soaked in water. 

Coffee Pudding. — Moisten one quart of bread crumbs with coffee, 
one cup of brown sugar, one cup of chopped raisins, two tablespoons 
of flour, three eggs beaten light, season with one-half teaspoon of 
cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon of cloves, one-fourth teaspoon of nut- 
meg. Steam one hour. Mrs. Capron. 

Cranberry Pudding.— One-half cup of sugar, piece of butter the 
size of a walnut, one Qgg, one-half a cup of milk, one and one-half 
cups of flour, one teaspoon of baking powder, one-half pint of cran- 
berries. Steam three-quarters of an hour. See sauces. 

Mrs. Marshall Howard. 

Steamed Cottage Pudding.— One cup of sugar, one egg, two 
tablespoonfuls of melted butter, one cup of sweet milk, two cups of 
flour, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda. 
Steam one hour. To be eaten with a sauce. Equally good baked. 

Mrs. Munger. 

LofC. 



loo PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Raisin Puffs. — One-half cup of butter, one of sugar, one of sweet 
milk, and two of flour, two egg-s, two teaspoons of baking powder, 
one cup of raisins, stoned and chopped. Cream the butter and 
sugar, add the eggs well beaten; mix the flour and baking powder 
and add the flour and milk alternately to the above mixture, then 
add the fruit with a little flour sprinkled over it. Steam in cups 
three-quarters of an hour. Place the cups in a steamer when the 
water is boiling and do not take off the cover until the pudding is 
cooked. Serve with whipped cream. Mrs. Chesle,v. 

Date Puffs.— Two eggs, one cup of sugar, one-fourth cup of 
butter, one-fourth cup of milk, one teaspoon of baking powder and 
flour to make a thin batter. Stir in one cup of stoned dates. Fill 
muffin cups half full and steam thirty minutes. Serve wath liquid 
sauce. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 

Vevy Pudding. — One cup of New Orleans molasses, one cup of 
sweet milk, one-quarter of a cup of butter, two and one-half cups 
of flour. One teaspoon each of cinnamon and soda. One-half tea- 
spoon of cloves. Steam two hours. See sauces. 

Faith Chipperfield. 

Parlamo Pudding. — One cup of sugar, two eggs, one cup of sour 
milk, two-thirds of a cup of cream, or one-half of a cup of butter, one 
cup of chopped raisins, one teaspoonful of soda; spice to taste; flour 
to make thickness as for cake. Steam one and one-half hours. 

Mrs. Spann. 

Boiled Indian Pudding.— Sift a scant pint of Indian meal and 
mix with it a half teaspoonful of salt; boil a pint of milk; pour it 
gradually over the meal, stirring and boiling well and smoothly; 
while hot stir in one-half cup of broken butter; add and heat well a 
half cup of molasses. Dissolve one-half a teaspoonful of soda in a 
little water and beat quickly into the pudding; then turn without 
delay into the double boiler, cover tight and boil steadily three 



PIES AND PUDDINGS loi 

hours; turn out carefully. It is improved by adding dried fruit, 
such as berries, currants, raisins, etc. Serve with cream or butter, 
or better, maple sugar. Mrs. A. E. Clark. 

Baked Indian Pudding.— Four tablespoonfuls of meal, one-half a 
cup of molasses, a piece of butter the size of a walnut, one and a half 
pints of milk, one-half cup of raisins, one ^^^. Scald one pint of 
the milk, stir in the meal, then molasses, butter, salt and one ^^^. 
Cook in a double boiler, turn into a pudding dish and bake one hour, 
stirring in the remainder of the milk occasionally. 

Carrie King Hall. 

Baked Apple Dumplings.— One pint of flour, two small teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, two tablespoonfuls of shortening, a little salt, 
water enough to make a soft dough. Roll out and cut into six pieces, 
fill with apples, sprinkle over a little sugar, a little cinnamon, fold 
in shape, press the edges well together, make a little opening in the 
center for the steam to escape, place in a baking tin and pour over 
them one cupful of boiling water. Sprinkle each one with sugar 
and bake in a quick oven one-half hour. Serve with cream. Any 
kind of fruit may be used. Addie Stevenson. 

Steamed Apple Dumplings. — Pare tart, mellow apples; remove 
the cores and fill with sugar; take one quart of flour, three teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder and one tablespoonful of shortening; mix 
with sweet milk or water as soft as possible; roll out and cut in 
squares of sufficient size to roll the apples in; put on a plate and 
steam half an hour in a steamer. Mrs. A. G. Crooks. 

Peach Cobbler. — Two cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder, one-half teaspoonful of salt, two tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one Q-^^, three-fourths of a cup of milk, one quart of peeled peaches. 
Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt, rub in the butter. 
Beat the ^^^ to a cream and add to the milk. Mix all together, turn 
on a floured board, roll gently until about a quarter of an inch. 



I02 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

thick. Line the sides of a pudding dish with a strip of the paste, 
invert a teacup in the center of the dish and place the peaches 
around it. Sprinkle liberally with sugar, put on the top crust and 
bake one-half hour in quite a hot oven. When the pudding is cut 
the cup will be found filled with a most delicious syrup, which is 
used for the sauce. It is best to invert the pudding on a deep 
platter. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Strawberry Shortcake. — One cup of sour cream, one of milk; one 
teaspoonful of soda; one-half a cup of butter; flour enough to knead 
about like biscuit. This will make two cakes, and when cut open 
makes four laj^ers. Mrs. Breed. 

Currant Shortcake.— Into one pint of flour rub butter the 
size of an Q^^\ two teaspoons of baking powder, a little salt. 
Moisten with sweet milk. Roll out in two parts and cut the size of 
the baking plate or tin. Spread softened butter over the bottom la3^er, 
put the other over it and bake. The layers will cleave apart when 
baked, which avoids cutting. Pack with ripe currants, sweetened. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Apple Kooker. — Take one-half a pint of sifted flour, three teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder; rub in butter the size of an ^^^. Add sweet 
milk or water for a stiff batter. Put into a baking tin, slice apples 
on top with sugar and bits of butter. Season with salt, nutmeg 
and cinnamon. Sprinkle with a little water. Bake in a hot oven 
and serve immediately with sugar and cream. Mrs. Beman. 

Baked Apple Pudding. — Pare, core and quarter apples to cover 
a shallow baking tin. Take one pint of flour, rub in butter the size 
of a lemon and two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Add one cup of 
milk for a batter and pour over the apples. Turn it out into a plate, 
having the apples on top. Serve wdth whipped cream. 

Mrs. McClary. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 103 

Fried Apple Turnovers.— One cup of sweet milk; one teaspoonful 
of cream tartar; one-half teaspoonful of soda; or one cup of sour 
milk and one-half teaspoonful of soda; salt; one egg, well beaten; 
flour to roll like biscuit; roll out and cut the size of a bowl; flour 
the upper side ver}' lightly, fold through the center and fry in fresh 
lard; just before serving open carefully and put in cider apple sauce, 
sweetened and spiced. Mrs. McClary. 

Brown Betty.— One cup of bread crumbs, two of chopped apple, 
one of brown sugar. Butter a deep dish; put in the apple, then the 
sugar, reserving a little to put with the bread crumbs; add bits of 
butter. Season wdth cinnamon and nutmeg; then add bread crumbs; 
bake very brown. Serve with "Fairy butter." See sauces. 

Mrs. House. 

Sponge Pudding.— Ten eggs— beat the whites and yolks separ- 
ately; to one pint of boiled milk add one cup of flour and one-half 
teaspoonful of salt; let this cool; add 3^olks of eggs, one cup of sugar, 
and then the w^hites; put paper in the bottom of the tin; bake slowly 
three-quarters of an hour. Serve with foaming sauce. 

Mrs. Flanagan. 

Angel Food Pudding.— One loaf of angel food cake cut through 
the center, one pint of cream partly whipped, to which add one scant 
tablespoonful of gelatine dissolved in water, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla, four tablespoonfuls of sugar. Let it stand in a cool place 
until it gets firm. Spread between the cake and over the top, 
sprinkled with chopped almonds and candied cherries. 

Mrs. William Breed. 

Minute Pudding.— One quart of milk, six tablespoons of flour, 
one-half cup of sugar, saltspoon of salt and one Q^^. Stir flour, 
sugar and salt into a little of the cold milk. Heat the remainder of 
the milk and when at the boiling point stir in the flour. Cook ten 
minutes and just before taking from the stove stir in the &^^ beaten 
lightly. Pour into the dish in which it is to be served. To be eaten 
with maple sugar and cream. Hattie Knapp, 



104 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Corn Starch Pudding. — One pint of milk, the whites of three eggs, 
two tablespoonfuls of corn starch, three of sugar, and a pinch of 
salt; when the milk boils add the sugar, salt and the corn starch, 
dissolved in a little cold milk, and when cooked take from the stove 
and stir in the beaten whites of the eggs; pour into a mould or cups. 
Make a boiled custard of the yolks and a pint of milk; flavor it with 
vanilla when cool, and pour over the pudding when served. This 
may be varied by adding cocoanut or grated chocolate, flavored with 
vanilla, to the pudding. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Corn Starch Meringue. — One quart of milk, three tablespoons of 
corn starch dissolved in a little of the milk, three-fourths of a cup 
of sugar and the yolks of four eggs. Scald the milk; add corn starch' 
and when cooked the well-beaten yolks. Flavor with lemon. Put 
in a pudding dish and cover with a meringue of the whites of the 
eggs and two tablespoons of sugar; brown in the oven. To be 
eaten cold with whipped cream. Libbie Rogers McKenan. 

Banana Pudding.— Arrange one dozen of lady fingers or small 
squares of sponge cake in a fancy china or glass pudding dish. 
Upon these slice two good-sized bananas and sprinkle over them two 
tablespoonfuls of sugar. Make a custard of one pint of new milk, 
one teaspoonful of corn starch, one whole ^^^ and the yolks of two, 
and one half cup of sugar. While slightly warm pour over the 
bananas and cake. Make a meringue of the remaining whites of 
two eggs and heap on the top, sprinkle a tablespoonful of sugar over 
it and place in the oven to brown and crisp. 

Mrs. Franklin Cooley. 

Cocoanut Pudding.— One quart of sweet milk, ten tablespoonfuls 
of grated cocoanut, one cup of sugar, the whites of five eggs; bake 
one hour. Serve cold with sugar and cream. Mrs. Austin. 

Baked Batter Pudding.— Four eggs well beaten, eight tablespoons 
of flour stirred in carefully, one quart of milk added slowly and a 
pinch of salt. Bake one-half hour. Serve with sauce. 

Mrs. Belding. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 105 

German Puffs.— One pint of sweet milk, five tablespoonfuls of 
flour, one tablespoonful of melted butter, six eg-gs (leaving out the 
whites of three ) well beaten; bake in buttered cups, half filled, 
twenty minutes in a hot oven. 

For Sauce.— ^Q^^t the whites of three eggs to a stifi" froth; add a 
cofifee cup of powdered sugar and the juice of two lemons. 

Mrs. Rufus Lowe. 

Bread Pudding.— Three-fourths of a pint of bread crwvah^, grated, 
one and one-half pints of milk, two eggs, one tablespoon of melted 
butter, three tablespoons of sugar, a pinch of salt, one teaspoon of 
vanilla. Serve with sauce. See sauces. Mrs. Griswold. 

Queen of Puddings.— One pint of bread crumbs, which should 
be dried thoroughly in the oven and crushed before using; one full 
quart of milk, yolks of three eggs, one cup of sugar, and a little salt; 
after baking spread a little jelly on the top; then a frosting made 
from the whites of the eggs; brown a few minutes in the oven. 

Mrs. Amos B. Keeler. 

French Charlotte.— Line a deep buttered dish with bread crumbs 
wet with melted butter; fill it heaping with layers of cranberry 
jelly and stewed apples— ^^'?az«<?^; sprinkle with a little powdered 
clove; cover with bread crumbs wet with melted butter; brown in the 
oven; turn out on a platter, and serve when nearly cold with pow- 
dered sugar or sweetened whippfed cream. Mrs. Richardson. 

Chocolate Pudding. — Two cups of scalded milk, one cup of bread 
crumbs, one square of chocolate ( or two tablespoons of cocoa ), one- 
third of a cup of sugar, one q^^, a pinch of salt, one teaspoonful of 
vanilla. Scald the milk, then add the bread and let it become soft, 
then add the chocolate. Beat the &^^ slightly, add the sugar, salt 
and vanilla, mix thoroughly and add this to the milk and bread. 
Bake twenty-five minutes. Serve with hard sauce. 

Anna Watterson. 
[81 



io6 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Rice Pudding, No. 1.— One and a half cups of cooked rice, two 
cups of milk, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, one eg-g well beaten, three 
fourths of a cup of raisins, stoned. Bake about one-half hour. 
Serve with hard sauce. Amelia Russell. 

Rice Pudding, No. 2. — To one quart of milk add two tablespoons 
of rice — place on the back of the stove for one hour. Then sweeten, 
salt and flavor with vanilla to taste. Put in the oven and bake 
slowly from two and one-half to three hours. Run a spoon in at the 
side a few times to mix the rice from the bottom with the milk, being 
careful not to disturb the surface of the pudding. When taken from 
the oven it must be very moist, so when ice cold it will be creamy. 
Nutmeg may be put on top if desired. Mrs. C. W. Breed. 

Rice Custard. — One quart of milk, one-half cup of rice, a little 
salt; steam one and a half hours. Just before taking up stir into it 
the yolks of four eggs beaten with four tablespoonfuls of sugar; turn 
into a pudding dish, spread the beaten whites of the four eggs over 
the top, and brown slightly. Mrs. Hiram French. 

Manioca Pudding. — Three tablespoonfuls of inanioca, one quart of 
milk, a very small piece of butter, and a little salt; soak the manioca 
in a pint of milk over night ; in the morning add the other ingredi- 
ents; cook in a kettle of water, stirring all the time, until it thickens; 
then pour in a pudding dish to cool. When cool put the beaten 
whites of two eggs sweetened a little over the top, and drop on 
currant jelly, which improves the taste as well as the looks. Serve 
with cream, sweetened and flavored with lemon and a little vanilla; 
whip cream enough to thicken. Mrs. S. Greeno. 

Tapioca Pudding, No. 1.— Soak four tablespoonfuls of tapioca over 
night in one quart of sweet milk; in the morning set the pail in a kettle 
of hot water on the stove and let come to a boil ; stir frequently ; add 
one tumbler of sweet cream, half a tumbler of sugar and extract of 
lemon ; beat the yolks and whites of four eggs separately and stir 
them in; bake three-quarters of an hour. Good warm or cold. 

Mrs. Austin. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 107 

Tapioca Pudding, No. 2. — Six tablespoons of tapioca, one quart 
of milk, three eggs; soak the tapioca over night, sweeten and flavor 
to taste. Heat the milk and tapioca moderately and bake one hour. 
Serve with sauce. Mrs. C. J. Lawrence. 

Peach or Apple Tapioca Pudding.— Soak one-half pint of tapioca in 
cold water for two or three hours, then set on the stove until it boils. 
Sweeten with white sugar. Peel and slice ripe peaches or apples 
to nearly fill a baking dish, and sprinkle over them white sugar ; 
pour over the tapioca and bake slowly one hour. To be eaten with 
cream and sugar. Mrs. Robert Miller. 

Pineapple Tapioca. — Put three-fourths of a cup of tapioca in one 
quart of water, soak over night. Let it cook slowly on the back of 
the stove until tender, adding more water if necessary. Then add 
the juice of one lemon, sweeten to taste. Stir in a fresh pineapple, 
chopped, or add the canned pineapple. When done stir in the beaten 
whites of three eggs. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

Hattie H. Webster. 

Strawberry Tapioca. — Soak half a cup of tapioca over night. 
Place half of it in a deep pudding dish and sprinkle with sugar. 
Then put a layer of a pint of strawberries, then the rest of the tapi- 
oca, then another layer of strawberries, sprinkle each layer with 
sugar. Fill the dish full of water and bake until perfectly clear. 
Serve cold with cream and sugar. Mrs. Temple. 

Date Tapioca.— One and one-half pounds of dates, one cup of 
tapioca; one-half cup of sugar. Cook the tapioca in water until it is 
clear. Add stoned dates and sugar and bake three-quarters of an 
hour. Nita Dustin. 

Tapioca Caramel Pudding. — Soak one cup of tapioca in a generous 
quart of water over night, add three cups of brown sugar and bake 
slowl}'' one and one-fourth hours, stirring occasionally. When done, 
add the juice of one lemon and one teaspoon of vanilla. Serve with 
cream. Mrs. W. C. Short. 



io8 PIES AND PUDDINGS 

Omelette Souffle. — Six whites and three yolks of eggs, three 
tablespoons of pulverized sugar. Beat the yolks and sugar to a light 
cream, add a little flavoring, beat the whites to a very stiff froth. 
Put the yolks and sugar in a deep bowl, pour the whites over and 
mix carefully. Turn into a baking dish slightly buttered, smooth 
over the top, sprinkle with sugar, bake in a moderate oven about ten 
minutes. Serve immediately. Mrs. Breed. 



Custard Souffle. — Two scant tablespoonfuls of butter, two table- 
spoonfuls of flour, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, one cupful of milk, 
four eggs. Let the milk come to a boil. Beat the flour and butter 
together ; add to them, gradually, the boiling milk, and cook eight 
minutes, stirring often. Beat the sugar and yolks of eggs together ; 
add to the cooked mixture, and set away to cool. When cool, beat 
the whites of eggs to a stiff froth, and add to the mixture. Bake in 
a buttered pudding dish about twenty-five minutes in a moderate 
oven. Serve immediately with creamy sauce. Mrs. Haw^kins. 



Prune Pudding, No. 1. — A little over a pint of milk heated to the 
boiling point, one tablespoon of corn starch, sugar to taste; three 
well-beaten eggs, let come to a boil and add one cup of stewed prunes 
without stones, pour into a buttered dish and bake fifteen or twenty 
minutes. Serve with sauce or cream. Mrs. Frank Haven. 



Prune Pudding, No. 2. — One pound of prunes stewed until tender 
and the water well boiled down; put them through a colander. Beat 
the whites of five eggs stiff; add two cups of sugar to the prunes and 
two tablespoons of lemon juice, then the beaten whites, and mix all 
thoroughly and bake twenty minutes in the dish in which it is to be 
served. Serve immediately. Use any pudding sauce. 

Miss Alice J. Watkins. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 109 

Orange Marmalade Pudding.— One cup of fine breadcrumbs, half 
a cup of sugar, one cup of milk or cream, four eg-gs, two teaspoon- 
fuls of butter, one cup of orang-e marmalade ; put the butter and 
sugar together, add the yolks well beaten, the milk, bread crumbs 
and the whites whipped to a froth. Put a layer of this in the bottom 
of a well-buttered mould, spread thickly with some thick marma- 
lade, then another layer of the mixture until the mould is full, 
having the custard mixture at the top. Bake in a moderate oven 
about one hour, turn out of the mould upon a dish and serve with 
sweetened cream or custard. Mrs. Estes. 



PUDDING SAUCES. 

"// is sometimes pleasant ejwiigh to consider the different 
notions which different persons have of the same thing.'" 

— Addison. 

Foaming Sauce. — One-half cup of butter; one cup of sugar; 3'olk 
of one eg-g- beaten to a cream, one-half a tablespoonful of flour or 
cornstarch; add one cup of boiling" water; place in a kettle of boiling 
water until it thickens ; add the beaten white of one ^^g and flavor- 
ing after removing from the fire. Mrs. VV, L. Collins. 

Pudding Sauce, No. 1. — One cup of sugar; one &^z^ white and 
yolk beaten separately; stir three tablespoonful s of boiling milk in 
just before serving; flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. Hiram H. Thompson. 

Pudding Sauce, No. 2.— Butter the size of an &^^, rubbed with 
one tablespoon of corn starch, three tablespoons of sugar, one pint 
of boiling water, flavor with vanilla or lemon. Put in a double 
boiler and simmer one hour or until clear. Mrs. Ralph. 

Pudding Sauce, No. 3.— Butter the size of an ^^^, one-fourth of a 
pound of sugar, one ^^^. Cream the butter and sugar thoroughlj', 
into this drop the &^^ unbeaten, then beat all well; add two table- 
spoons of boiling milk, a little nutmeg and stir to a good foam. 

Mrs. Griswold. 

Pudding Sauce, No. 4. — One cup of sugar, one half a cup of 
butter, one ^^^. Stir the butter and sugar to a cream, add the 
beaten yolk and then three tablespoonfuls of boiling water, mix in 
a bowl and set in a dish of hot water until ready for use, then add 
the beaten white of an ^^^. Flavor to taste. 

Luc}-^ King Allen. 



PUDDING SAUCES ui 

Pudding Sauce, No. 5. — Add grated rind and juice of one lemon to 
yolk of one egg-, beat lightly; one cup of pulverized sugar, white of 
one egg beaten stiff, two cups of whipped cream beaten thoroughly. 

Mrs. Capron. 

Fairy Butter or Hard Sauce. — One cup of powdered sugar, one- 
half cup of butter, the white of one o.^^^ Beat all together until light 
and ream}'. Flavor with nutmeg. 

Cream Sauce. — Cream one cup of powdered sugar and one cup 
of butter together, add one-half a cup of cieam. Place bowl in hot 
water just before going to the table. It does not want to cook, just 
get hot and dissolve. Miss Mar}'- Fay. 

Strawberry Sauce, No. 1.— Make a hard sauce as directed above ; 
add the whipped white erf one &^^ and a cupful of strawberries mashed 
to a pulp. Any fruit may be added in the same way and makes a 
good sauce for fruit puddings. Mrs. Belding. 

Strawberry Sauce, No. 2. — Two cups of sugar, one tablespoon of 
butter, one quart of strawberries, mix the butter and sugar, then mash 
in the strawberries with a spoon and stir well together. Eaten with 
rice boiled in milk this makes a delicious dessert. 

Vevy Sauce. — One cup of powdered sugar and one-half cup of 
butter creamed together. Add one well-beaten &^^ and two table- 
spoons of boiling water. Flavor with vanilla. 

Faith Chipperfield. 

Sour Sauce. — One cup of sugar and two tablespoonfuls of butter 
rubbed to a cream ; one-half cup of vinegar ; one o.^^ well beaten; 
add one-half cup of hot water, stirring all the time. 

Mrs. Whittelsey. 



112 PUDDING SAUCES 

Caramel for Flavoring.— Put one cup of granulated sugar into a 
dry frying pan. Stir until it not only melts but turns dark. Be 
careful not to burn. If it is to be used at once, heat whatever is 
used with it before adding to the caramel. If for future use, add 
one cup of boiling water to the caramel, simmer five minutes and 
bottle when cool. Mrs. J. E. Taylor. 

Velvet Sauce. — Yolks of two eggs, one cupful of sugar, one table- 
spoon of butter, and one cup of milk. Beat the eggs, butter and 
sugar together. Heat the milk and add to the eggs, then place on 
the stove and stir till it comes to a boiling heat. Flavor with vanilla 
or whatever you wish. 

Sauce for Cranberry Pudding.— One cup of sugar, one &^g, one- 
half cup of milk. Scald the milk, beat the ^gg and sugar together 
a long time, pour the milk in. Flavor and serve immediately. 

Mrs. Marshall Howard. 

Cream Sauce. — One cup of powdered sugar, one ^^^, two cupfuls 
of whipped cream ; beat the white of the &^^ to a stiff froth; add the 
yolk and sugar, and beat well; flavor and add the cream last of all. 

Molasses Sauce. — One cupful of molasses, half a cupful of water, 
one tablespoonful of butter, a little cinnamon, a little salt and three 
tablespoonfuls of vinegar; boil twenty minutes. 

Lemon Sauce. — One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of butter, one 
^^% beaten light, one lemon, juice and grated rind, or one tablespoon 
of vinegar, half a cupful of boiling water ; put in a tin basin and 
steam. 

Maple Sugar Sauce. — Boil one-fourth of a pound of maple sugar 

and a half a cup of water until it begins to spin a thread. Take 

from the fire and add the juice of one lemon. Beat the whites of two 

eggs until frothy, add the syrup gradually beating all the time ; 

when well mixed stir in one-half cupful of cream and serve. 

Table Talk. 



DESSERTS. 



Fed by the dainties which 
Are bred in a book.''' 



Ambrosia.— Eight fine sweet orang-es peeled and sliced, half a 
grated cocoanut, and half a cup or more of powdered sugar; arrange 
the oranges in a dish ; then a layer of sugar ; then cocoanut ; then 
sugar, and so on until the dish is full. A layer of pineapple adds 
much. Mrs. Barney. 

Pineapple Ambrosia. — Soak one cup of tapioca over night in one 
quart of water. In the morning put on the back of the range with 
one cup of sugar and a pinch of salt. Cook until clear. Remove 
from the fire and while hot stir in one can of grated pineapple. Put 
in a mould and when cold serve with whipped cream. If fruit is 
used, chop, and put in more sugar, and cook ten or fifteen minutes 
after the fruit is in. Mrs. Beman. 

Charlotte Russe, No, 1. — One-half a box of gelatine, one cup of 
sugar, nearly one quart of milk, one pint of whipped cream, three 
eggs; dissolve the gelatine in the milk ; when hot add the eggs, well 
beaten ; when nearly cold add whipped cream ; season with vanilla. 
Line the moulds with sponge cake. Mrs. D. W. Lawrence. 

Charlotte Russe, No. 2.— One pint of cream whipped light, one- 
half an ounce of gelatine dissolved in a gill of hot milk, whites of 
two eggs beaten to a stiff froth, one small teacupful of powdered 
sugar, one small teaspoonful of vanilla, a few drops of almond; mix 
the cream, eggs, and sugar ; flavor and beat in the gelatine last ; it 
should be quite cold before added. Line a mould with slices of 
sponge cake or lady fingers; fill with the mixture, and set on the ice 
to cool. This quantity will fill two moulds. Mrs. L. C. Wead. 



114 DESSERTS 

Charlotte Russe, No. 3. — One ounce of isinglass, ( two and one- 
half sheets) one-half pint of milk, three eggs, one and one-half cups 
of sugar. Melt the isinglass in the milk on the back of the stove, 
stirring often. Beat the eggs and add the sugar; when the isinglass 
dissolves pour over the eggs and beat well ; whip one and one-half 
pints of cream, flavor with vanilla and add to the above mixture. 
Line moulds with slices of sponge cake and fill ; this will make two 
moulds. Mrs. Delia H. King. 



Mock Charlotte Russe. — Moisten two tablespoonfuls of corn 
starch in a quarter of a cup of cold water; pour over it a half pint of 
boiling water, boil one minute ; add half a cup of sugar and pour 
while hot over the well-beaten whites of three eggs; add a teaspoonful 
of vanilla or other flavoring and turn into a mould to harden. Make 
a sauce from the yolks of the eggs, beaten with four tablespoonfuls 
of sugar and one pint of scalded milk, cooked together for a moment 
but not allowed to boil or it will curdle. Mrs. Macintosh. 



Cup Custards. — For six cups of custard take one pint of milk, 
three tablespoonfuls of sweet cream, three eggs; three tablespoonfuls 
of maple sugar — scraped — beaten with the eggs, and little nutmeg. 
Fill the cups, set in a dish of hot water and bake half an hour. 

Miss Chambers. 



Caramel Custards. — Put four tablespoons of granulated sugar in 
a clean frying pan, and stir over a moderate fire till it melts, being 
careful not to let it become too dark. Divide this into six small cups, 
turning each so that the bottom and part of the sides may be coated 
with the caramel. Make a custard of three eggs, and four table- 
spoons of sugar, one pint of milk and one teaspoon of vanilla. Pour 
this mixture into the cups, set them in a pan of hot water and bake 
in a moderate oven till firm in the center. Serve ice cold. 

Addie Stevenson. 



DESSERTS 115 

Cup Caramel. ^T wo cups of sweet milk, two tablespoonfuls of 
corn starch, two cups of brown sugar, one-half cup of English walnut 
meats. Place the sugar in an iron spider and melt to a smooth 
paste. Heat the milk and thicken with corn starch. Slowly pour 
the thickened milk over the sugar, stirring constantly to prevent 
lumps. Add the nuts, which have been broken into pieces. Pour 
into cups for serving. When cold serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. L. F. Hodge. 

Coffee Custard. — Boil one quart of milk with five tablespoonfuls 
of sugar; add one cup of very strong, hot coffee, four beaten eggs, 
one-half a cup of corn starch in a little cold milk ; stir till smooth ; 
put into cups and when cool ornament with beaten whites. 

Mrs. John King. 

Chocolate Blanc-mange. — One-quarter of a pound of chocolate, 
one-half a box of gelatine, one quart of milk, one cup of sugar; put 
all in a dish, set in a kettle of boiling water and boil one hour; when 
nearly cold turn into a mould. Flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. John King. 

Bavarian Cream. — Soak one-half box of gelatine in one-half cup 
of water, beat the yolks of four eggs until creamy, then add one 
small cupful of sugar. Scald one pint of milk in a double boiler, 
and pour slowly on the beaten eggs, stirring all the time. JReturn 
to the stove a moment to set the eggs; add the soaked gelatine, one 
teaspoonful of vanilla, stir until the gelatine is dissolved, then 
strain; when it is cold and beginning to set, mix in lightly one pint 
of cream whipped. Pour into a mould to harden. 

Judge Peters .—To two-thirds of a box of gelatine add one pint 
of cold water, dissolve with one pint of boiling water, add two cups 
of sugar, the juice of four lemons, and strain. Arrange in layers 
three bananas, two oranges, six brazilian nuts shaved, live figs, 
eight dates. When the gelatine is cold pour over the fruit and place 
on ice to harden. Serve with whipped cream. Whip one pint, 
sweeten to taste. Flavor with vanilla. Miss Mary Fay. 



ii6 DESSERTS 

Tutti Frutti — One-half box of g-elatine, one cup of sugar, juice 
and rind of two lemons. Soak the gelatine in one-half pint of cold 
water one hour. Then pour one pint of boiling water over it, add 
the lemon and sugar, strain into moulds, let it stand until it begins to- 
harden, then stir into it carefully the following fruit, cut small: 
Two oranges, two bananas, six figs, nine dates, ten nuts. Let it 
harden and serve with whipped cream. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 

Coffee Cream. — One-half pint of boiling water, one heaping 
tablespoon of coffee, one-fourth box of gelatine, one-half cup of sugar. 
Pour the water on the coffee and let stand closely covered for fifteen 
minutes, then strain over the gelatine. When cold stir in the sugar 
and one pint of cream, which has been previously whipped, beat 
lightly and pour in mould. 

Spanish Cream — Take one-third of a box of gelatine and dissolve 
in a pint of milk; boil twenty minutes ; add one cup of sugar ; beat 
the yolks of four eggs and pour them in the hot milk, stirring 
briskly; again cook a little, as for custard; beat the whites stiff and 
pour the boiling custard on them ; stir fast. Flavor with one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla. Pour around the mould a pint of sweetened 
whipped cream. Mrs. William Orcutt. 

Coffee Jelly. — One-half box of gelatine dissolved in one cup of 
cold water, one cup of boiling coffee, one cup of boiling water, one- 
half cup of sugar ; vanilla ; let it come to a boij; strain and set in. 
moulds to cool. To be eaten with cream and sugar. 

Mrs. L. C. Wead. 

Grange Souffle. — Four oranges sliced and sprinkled with sugar 
a short time before dinner; one pint of milk; three eggs, leaving out 
the whites of two for frosting; small half cup of sugar and one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla; make the same as boiled custard, and when cold 
pour 'over the oranges; make the whites of the two eggs into frosting 
with four tablespoonfuls of sugar; put over the top and brown in the 
oven. Mrs. F. S. Channell. 



DESSERTS 117 

Orange Float. — One quart oi milk, juice and pulp of two lemons, 
one coffee-cup of sugar; add four tablespoonfuls of corn starch, mixed 
in boiling- water; let it boil fifteen minutes, stirring it ; when cool 
pour it over four sliced oranges; spread over the top the beaten 
whites of three eggs ; sweeten, and add a few drops of vanilla; serve 
with cream. Mrs. B. Webster. 

Banana Float.— Soak one-third of a box of gelatine in a little 
■cold water. Scald a pint of milk and a scant half cup of sugar 
together. Pour a little of the hot milk over the gelatine and stir 
until dissolved, then stir this into the rest of the milk and boil a few 
minutes. When cool stir in two bananas broken in small pieces; 
mix well, pour into a mould and set on ice to cool. Just before serv- 
ing take from the mould and pour over whipped cream sweetened and 
flavored. Addie Stevenson. 

Orange Charlotte.— Make a jelly of one-half a box of gelatine, 
one pint of orange juice and one and one-half cups of sugar, the 
juice of one lemon and one and one-half cups of water. When 
the jelly begins to thicken add slowly the well-beaten whites of four 
eggs, stir until the eggs and gelatine are thoroughly mixed. A pint 
of whipped cream may be used instead of the eggs. Line a mould 
with sections of oranges and fill with the mixture. For a change 
the above may be moulded and garnished with whipped cream and 
oranges or piled in a glass dish and garnished with bright jelly and 
orange. 

Apple Charlotte.— One-third of a box of gelatine, one-third of a 
cup of cold water, one-third of a cup of hot water, one cup of sugar, 
juice of one lemon, one cup of chopped apples, whites of three eggs. 
Soak the gelatine in cold water, then add boiling water, sugar, 
lemon and apples and set it in a dish of ice water and stir until it 
becomes thick, then add the beaten whites of the eggs. Line a 
mould with lady fingers and pour this into it. Set in ice and serve 
with whipped cream. Nora McCarthy. 



ii8 DESSERTS 

Snow Pudding. — Cover one-half box of gfelatine with a little cold 
water and let soak one-half hour, pour over it one pint of boiling- 
water, add two cups of sug^ar and juice of three lemons, strain into- 
a tin basin, place this in a pan of ice water and let stand until 
cold. When cold beat with an egg- beater until white as snow. 
Beat the whit< s of four eggs to a stifif froth and stir into the pudding, 
pour into a mould to harden. Serve with boiled custard made from 
one quart of milk and the yolks of the four eggs or whipped cream. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



Bivou. — Whites of four eg-gs, five tablespoonfuls of posvdered 
sugar, two tablespoonfuls of gelatine. Beat the eggs to a stiff 
froth, then add the sugar. Pour a little water on the gelatine 
to soften, then place on the fire and let it dissolve. When boiling- 
hot pour over the sugar and eggs. Beat for about twentj^ minutes 
after putting in the gelatine. Flavor with one teaspoonful of vanilla. 
Serve with plain or whipped cream and strawberry preserves. 

Mrs. William Breed. 



Devonshire Junket. — One quart of new milk, warmed to blood' 
heat only. One tablet dissolved in a teaspoonful of the milk. Two 
teaspoonfuls of sugar; nutmeg (or any other flavoring, coffee, 
chocolate, fruit juice. If using the last named, a half cupful, and of 
milk one-half cupful less must be used. ) Stir as little as possible and 
set aside to coagulate. Then cool in the ice box. 

Mrs. W. S. Lawrence. 



Orange Baskets. — Take oranges and cut them around in the 
shape of a basket with a sharp knife. Take out the pulp carefully 
with a spoon; make a gelatine jelly with the juice of the oranges 
and fill the baskets with this, after they are placed on cups or 
tumblers, and when firm place them on the dish from which to serve 
and pile upon them whipped cream. Mrs. McClary. 



DESSERTS 



119 



Orange Jelly.— For each pint of juice allow one-half box of 
gelatine, one-half cup of cold water, one cup of boiling- water, one cup 
of sugar and the juice of one lemon. Proceed as for lemon jelly. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Lemon Jelly. — ^Two cups of sugar, one cup of lemon juice, one 
quart of boiling water, one cup of cold water and one box of gela- 
tine. Soak the gelatine in cold water two hours; then add boiling 
water, sugar and lemon juice. Strain and mould. 

Miss Fleming. 

Raspberry Gelatine. — One-half a box of gelatine dissolved in one- 
half pint of cold water, add one-half pint of boiling water, one pint 
of raspberry juice, sugar to taste. Beat in one pint of whipped 
cream when the above is partly set, and place in a mould. 

Nora McCarthy. 

Grape Fruit. — The grapefruit is served at breakfast or as a first 
course at luncheon. The center must be taken out with a sharp 
knife, the pulp separated from the thin, bitter skin (which separates 
the sections) taking great care not to cut through the peel. Fill with 
powdered sugar. The pulp and juice is eaten with a spoon from 
the peel, one-half the grape fruit being served to each person. When 
preferred put on ice. 



FROZEN DESSERTS. 



Then farewell heat and welcome frost. ''^ 

— Merchant of Ve?iice. 



Ice Cream, No. 1 . — Put one quart of milk into a pail and set into 
a kettle of hot water; add three-quarters of a pound of sugar and let 
this scald; wet one tablespoonful of corn starch in a little milk and 
scald until smooth; beat the yolks of three eggs and add just as you 
take the milk from the stove; strain through a gravy strainer; one 
coffee-cup of cream beaten to a froth; whites of three eggs beaten stifif ; 
stir with the cream and add to the custard when cool; flavor. 

Miss Meeker. 



Ice Cream, No. 2. — Make a custard in a double boiler of one 
quart of milk, three even tablespoons of corn starch, and one-half 
cup of sugar; when cold stir in two quarts of cream, one coffee-cup of 
sugar, two tablespoons of vanilla, one of lemon; after thoroughl3' 
mixing put in a freezer. Do not stir much for five minutes, after 
that the more it is stirred the finer the cream. 

Lib.bie Rogers McKenan. 



Vanilla Ice Cream. — For four or five quarts of ice cream take 
two quarts of milk and three small cups of sugar. Let come to a 
boil in a double boiler. Stir in gradually two heaping tablespoon- 
fuls of corn starch, which has been thoroughly mixed with cold milk. 
Cook about thirty minutes or until of the consistency of cream. When 
cold, add two quarts of thick cream, slightly whipped. Flavor 
with vanilla and a little lemon to your taste. Strain and put into 
the freezer. If desired the whites of two eggs well beaten can be 
added just before freezing. Mrs. W. H. King. 



FR OZEN DESSER TS 121 

Hot Chocolate Sauce for Ice Cream, No. 1.— To one-half cupful of 
boiling- water add one cupful of granulated sugar and stir until dis- 
solved, then boil without stirring until it threads. Add one square of 
Baker's chocolate or four level tablespoonfuls of Huyler's powdered 
chocolate dssolved in two tablespoonfuls of boiling water. Let it all 
boil up again until it threads and serve immediately. 

Mrs. Belding. 



Hot Chocolate Sauce, No. 2. — Melt four squares of chocolate over 
the teakettle, add four tablespoonfuls of sugar, and stir till smooth. 
Add gradually one scant cupful of hot water and boil it slowly ten 
minutes, then add one-half cupful of cream, one-half teaspoonful of 
vanilla. If desired a teaspoonful of arrow root to thicken. 

Mrs. Estes. 



Maple Sugar Sauce for Ice Cream.— One pint of maple sugar 
syrup, boil until it thickens; one-fourth of a pound of English 
walnuts chopped fine. Serves twenty people. " 

Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 



Banana Ice Cream. — Two quarts of cream, one of milk, one even 
teaspoon of corn starch, one coffee-cup of sugar, nine bananas cut in 
small pieces. Make a custard of milk and corn starch ; strain and 
when cold stir into the cream, slightly whipped. Put all together 
and freeze. Libbie Rogers McKenan. 



Chocolate Ice Cream. — One quart of cream, one pint of new 
milk, two and a half cups of sugar, two eggs beaten very light, six 
tablespoonfuls of chocolate wet with a very little hot water, one tea- 
spoonful of vanilla ; make a custard of the milk, sug-ar, eggs and 
chocolate; when cold stir in the cream and vanilla and freeze. 

Mrs. F. S. Channell. 
f91 



122 FROZEN DESSERTS 

CofPee Ice Cream.— Six tablespoonfuls of coffee, one-half white 
of an egg placed in a muslin bag and cooked in one pint of hot or 
cold water; when done strain through a muslin bag and add to this 
one pint of milk, three cups of sugar, yolks of three eggs, and strain 
in a double boiler. When cold add the beaten whites of three eggs 
and from one pint to one quart of whipped cream. 

Mrs. McClar3^ 

Strawberry Ice Cream. — One quart of cream, two cups of sugar, 
one and one-half quarts of strawberries. Put one-half the cream 
and one Cup of sugar on to boil in a double boiler ; when the sugar 
is dissolved set aside to cool. Add the remainder of the sugar to the 
berries and after letting them stand an hour, strain through cheese 
cloth. Add remaining half of the cream to sweetened cream and 
freeze ; when nearly frozen add the fruit juice, beat thoroughly and 
finish freezing. Mrs. Chipperfield. 

Caramel Ice Cream, No. 1.— Put one-half cup of sugar in an iron 
frying pan and stir over the fire until it melts and becomes brown, 
being careful not to burn ; add to it one pint of boiling milk ; stir a 
minute longer and stand awa}^ to cool ; w^hen cold add a quart of 
cream, a cup of sugar and a tablespoonful of vanilla and freeze. 

Caramel Ice Cream, No. 2.— One quart of milk, scald three- 
fourths of the milk, one quart of cream, one-third of a cup of flour, 
with one cup of sugar mixed through it, then wet slowly with 
remaining one-fourth of milk, add two eggs well beaten, and beat all 
until smooth. Then stir in scalded milk for custard. Melt one cup 
of sugar in a thin skillet and when brown stir in briskly ( a little 
at a time ) in custard while on the fire. Strain. When cold add the 
cream and freeze. Mrs* William Breed. 

Almond Ice Cream. — One quart of cream, one cup of sugar, one- 
fourth pound of shelled almonds, one tablespoonful each of caramel 
and vanilla. Blanch and roast the nuts and pound to a smooth 



FROZEN DESSERTS 123 

paste. Put the sugar and half the cream on the fire and stir till 
the sugar is dissolved, then add the rest of the cream and almonds ; 
when cold add the caramel and vanilla and freeze. Walnut ice 
cream is made the same way— using one-fourth pound of shelled 
walnuts. Mrs. Rorer. 

Maple Ice Cream.— Make a steamed custard of one quart of milk, 
one and one-half cups of soft maple sugar, two eggs beaten light. 
When cold add one pint of cream beaten a little. 

Alice Redmond. 

Peach Ice Cream.— Put into a double boiler one quart of milk, 
one and a half cupfuls of sugar ; boil until the sugar is dissolved; 
add one heaping tablespoonful corn starch, which has been thoroughly 
mixed with cold milk. Cook about thirty minutes. When cold add 
one quart of thick cream, one dozen peaches pared and mashed, one 
fourth of a teaspoonful of almond extract, strain and freeze. 

Mrs. Breed. 

Lemon Ice. — Eight lemons, whites of six eggs, two quarts of 
water, sugar to taste. Cut and squeeze the lemons— let the rinds 
stand in water ten minutes. Strain all through a colander, press- 
ing out all the juice. Sweeten and strain through flannel. Beat 
the eggs to a stiff froth. Pour the water into the freezer, add the 
eggs and stir thoroughl}^ Then freeze. Mrs. Ralph. 

Orange Ice. — Six or eight oranges, juice of two lemons, two 
quarts of water and sugar to taste. Squeeze juice of oranges, 
grate outside of three and pulp of all, not using the white skin. 
Proceed as for lemon ice. Mrs. Ralph. 

Strawberry Ice.— One quart of strawberr}' juice, one quart of 
water, juice of five lemons; strain through a flannel bag. One pint 
of sugar. When nearly frozen add the whites of three eggs well 
beaten. Libbie Rogers McKenan. 



124 FROZEN DESSERTS 

Milk Sherbet. — One quart of milk, one pint of sugar, four lemons; 
mix the lemon juice and sugar and let it stand ; chill the milk and 
just before freezing add the sugar and lemon. One pint of cream, 
beaten, improves it. Mrs. Richardson. 

Sicilian Sherbet. — The juice of eight oranges, one quart can of 
apricots, press the fruit through a sieve ; dissolve a heaping table- 
spoon of gelatine in a little water, then add the juice and fruit ; 
sugar to taste and freeze. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Peach Sherbet. — Pare one dozen large mellow peaches, chop fine 
with a silver knife and press through a sieve, add one pint of orange 
juice, a pound of sugar. Dissolve one heaping tablespoon of gela- 
tine in one-half cup of cold water, add to the mixture and freeze. 
Any combination of fruits may be used that blends nicely. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 

Pineapple Sherbet.— One tablespoonful of gelatine, one and one- 
half cups of sugar, two quarts of water ; boil ten minutes; let cool, 
add one can of chopped pineapple or cooked fresh pineapple if 
desired, and freeze. Mrs. John Robb. 

Orange Sherbet. — Soak one tablespoonful of gelatine in one-half 
cup of cold water. Wash and soak the skin of two oranges in one 
cup of water. When some of the flavor is extracted, put this and 
one cup of sugar and one pint of orange juice into a pitcher. Dis- 
solve the gelatine in the boiling water, and add to the mixture. 
Strain into a can and freeze. A little cream is an addition. If you 
do not use the extract from the skin of the oranges add one tea- 
spoon of extract of orange. Mrs. S. A. Beman. 

Mousse. — One pint of whipped cream, sweeten and flavor with 
bitter almond, add one-half pound of macaroons, color green and 
freeze, then pack in cups with cherries on top. 

Mrs. Frank Haven. 



FR OZEN DESSER TS 125 

Note. — For mousse the cream is alvva^'^s whipped before mixing- 
with other ingredients ; put into a packed and chilled mould ; must 
not be stirred. It requires more salt to freeze than ice cream. 
About four pounds of salt to a three-quart freezer. 

Biscuit Tortoni — .Boil one cofteecup of granulated sugar and the 
same quantity of water together for twenty-five minutes, draw to one 
side of the fire and stir into the syrup the whites of three eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth, beat the three 3^olks well and add to the 
mixture. Place the sauce pan in another pan of boiling water and 
cook for ten minutes, stirring all the time. Remove from the fire 
and add two dozen finely powdered macaroons (about a cup and a 
half ) and set away to cool. When cold add two and one-half or 
three teaspoons of vanilla and a quart of cream well whipped. 
Pour into a mould, pack with ice and a good deal of salt for four 
hours. ( Two tablespoonfuls of finely- chopped almonds are very 
nice). Mrs. Breed. 

Mousse Cafe. — Proceed as in recipe for Biscuit Tortoni, sub- 
stituting half a pint of strong coffee for the macaroons. 

Pineapple Mousse.— One pint can of grated pineapple, juice of 
one lemon, one-half box of gelatine and one quart of cream, sugar to 
taste, perhaps half a cup. Soak the gelatine in half a cup of cold 
water for fifteen minutes, add the sugar and lemon juice to the 
pineapple. Whip the cream, add one-half a cup of hot water to the 
gelatine and strain it into the pineapple. Put this in a basin and 
stand in a pan of cracked ice and stir till it begins to thicken. Then 
add carefully the whipped cream. Put the mixture in a melon 
mould and pack in salt and ice. 

Maple Mousse. — One cup of maple sugar boiled about as you 
would for packing a cake; pour into this the lightl}' beaten 3'olks of 
two eggs; stir until cold and when ready pack for freezing and add 
one pint of cream, whipped. Mrs. Marshall. 



126 FROZEN DESSERTS 

Vanilla Glace. — Whip one pint of cream stiff. Beat the yolks of 
two eg-gs lig-ht. Beat both tog-ether. Beat in one cup of powdered 
sugar well. Flavor with one and one-half teaspoonfuls of vanilla. 
Pour into a melon mould and pack in ice for four hours. Sufficient 
to serve eight people. Mrs. Breed. 

Maple Parfait. — Take enough good maple sugar to make one cup 
of syrup. When the syrup is cold add it to one pint of cream. Stir 
together, chill and whip. Then put it in a mould and pack in salt 
and ice. Let stand three hours. Parfait may be made from any 
flavoring or fruit desired, the parfait taking the name o'f flavoring 
or fruit used, as strawberry, grape parfait, etc. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 

Cafe Parfait. — One-half pint of cream, one-half cup of sugar, one- 
fourth cup of clear strong coffee; mix all together, chill and whip. 
Put the mixture in a mould, cover with paper to prevent water 
getting in and pack in salt and ice. Let stand three hours without 
stirring. Or in place of coffee use one tablespoon of melted chocolate. 

Alice J. Watkins. 

Cafe Frappe. — Prepare coffee according to directions ; add 
cream and sugar as for drinking, only making much sweeter. 
Turn into a freezer and work slowly until slightly frozen. Serve in 
glasses. Nice for warm summer evening. Mrs. Breed. 

Frozen Peaches. — Cut into small pieces one can of peaches. Boil 
one quart of water and one pint of sugar five minutes. When cold 
add the peaches and freeze. When beginning to harden, add one 
pint of whipped cream. Apricots, cherries, pineapples and straw- 
berries may be used. Mrs. Chipperlield. 

Nesselrode Pudding. — One pint each of large chestnuts, cream 
and water, yolks of six eggs, one pound of sugar, one-half pint of 
grated pineapple or one-half can drained, one pound of mixed candied 



FROZEN DESSERTS 127 

fruit and one cup of almonds. Shell the chestnuts and put in boiling- 
water for five minutes, then throw into cold water and remove skins. 
Cook the blanched chestnuts till tender and press through a sieve. 
Boil the sugar and water together for five minutes, beat the yolks of 
the eggs till creamy and add gradually to the boiling syrup ; take 
from the fire and beat continuously until thick and cool. When cold 
add the cream slightly whipped, the chestnuts, one tablespoonful of 
vanilla and the almonds which have been previously blanched and 
pounded. Put into a freezer and freeze. When frozen remove the lid 
of the freezer and stir in the finely chopped fruit. Replace the lid 
and turn the freezer for another five minutes. Then put the cream 
in a mould and pack in ice and salt till ready to serve. Serve with 
whipped cream or the following- sauce: Beat the yolks of two eggs 
and two tablespoonfuls of sugar to a cream; then stir over hot water 
till the eggs are a little thickened, remove froni the fire and con- 
tinue to beat till cold; add two teaspoonfuls of lemon juice and then 
mix in lightly one-half pint of cream whipped to a stiff froth. 

Frozen Pudding. — One quart of cream, one pint of milk, two eggs, 
one-fourth of a cup of flour, two tablespoons of gelatine, two cups of 
sugar, one-half tablespoon of vanilla, one-half tablespoon of lemon, 
one pound of candied cherries, one pound of candied pineapple, one 
pound of English walnuts. Beat the flour, eggs and one cup of 
sugar together and stir into boiling milk, cook twenty minutes, then 
add the gelatine. When cool add the other cup of sugar, cream and 
flavoring. Freeze and when it begins to stiffen add the fruit. 

Mrs. Fred Amsden. 

Frozen Fig Pudding. — One quart of milk, one cup of sugar, four 
eggs, one tablespoon of gelatine, one tablespoon of vanilla, one-half 
pound of walnuts, one-half pound of figs. Soak the gelatine in a 
little water, then make a custard of the sugar, eggs and milk. 
Dissolve the gelatine in the custard, add the fruit and nuts, chopped 
fine, flavor and freeze. Mrs. W. C. Short. 



128 FROZEN DESSERTS 

Frozen Pineapple Souffle.— Pare and grate two medium pine- 
apples, the pulp should measure one pint ; add to this the juice of 
one lemon and a pint of sugar ; cover a half box of gelatine with a 
half cup of cold water and let it soak one-half hour. Beat the yolks 
of six eggs until creamy, then add them to the pineapple and mix 
well. Put the gelatine over hot water and when dissolved add it to 
the pineapple. Turn this mixture into a tin basin and stand in a 
pan of cracked ice ; stir carefully until it begins to thicken, then 
add quicklj^ one pint of cream, whipped ; turn this into a mould, put 
on the lid and bind the seam with a piece of muslin dipped in butter. 
Pack in salt and ice and let stand two hours. Canned pineapple 
may be used instead of fresh. Mrs. Hawkins. 



CAKES. 

' ' Wottldst thou have thy cake 
And eat it toof 

Hints for Making Cake.— Measure the flour after sifting unless 
otherwise stated. Sift the baking- powder or cream tartar with the 
flour. Eggs will beat more quickly if cold. Grease cake pans with 
butter. Line the bottoms of cake tins with paper; la3'er cake tins 
and patty pans also. In mixing cake, first beat the butter to a 
cream, add the sugar and beat light ; next beat in the eggs, add the 
milk, the flavoring and spices ; then the flour, and if there is fruit, 
roll it in a little of the flour saved from the measure and stir in last. 
If the eggs are beaten separately add the whites alternatelj' with 
the flour. 

White Cake, No. 1.— Whites of eight eggs, two cups of sugar, 
one-half cup of butter, three-fourths of a cup of sweet milk, two and 
one-half cups of flour, two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; 
flavor to taste. Mrs. D. W. Lawrence. 

White Cake, No. 2.— One cup of granulated sugar, scant half 
cup of butter, a good one-third cup of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of 
cream tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda, whites of four eggs beaten 
ver3^ stiff, one and one-half cupfuls of flour. Flavor with almond 
carefully or one teaspoonful of vanilla. Mrs. Breed. 

White Cake, No. 3.— One-half cup of butter, one and one-half 
cups of sugar, one-half cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, two 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder; stir the butter and flour to a smooth 
paste by adding the milk a little at a time; add the sugar by 
degrees; then the baking powder in a little of the flour; last add the 
whites of five eggs beaten stiff. Mrs. P. H. Shields. 



/JO CAKES 

White Cake, No. 4.— One cup of sugar, one-half cup of butter 
beaten to a cream, to which add the whites of four eggs well beaten, 
mix thoroughly and add two-thirds of a cup of sweet milk, two cups 
of flour, two heaping teaspoonfuls of baking powder, one-third of a 
teaspoonful of rose flavoring. Mrs. Fred Amsden. 



White Cake, No. 5. — One and one-half cups of sugar, same of 
flour, one-half cup of corn starch mixed with one teaspoonful of 
cream of tartar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of milk, one- 
half teaspoonful of soda, whites of six eggs. Flavor to taste. 

Mrs. Henry Foote. 



Silver Cake.— Beat one-half of a cupful of butter to a cream; add 
one and one-half cupfuls of sugar, beat again. Now add one cupful 
of cold water and two and one-half of flour. Beat thoroughly and 
continuously for five minutes, and then stir in two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Have ready the well-beaten whites of four eggs; 
stir them carefully in and bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



Chocolate Caramel Cake.— For one loaf of white cake, baked 
and left remaining in a long tin, take the white of one egg, three 
tablespoons of cold water, one-half teaspoon of vanilla and enough 
sifted confectioner's sugar to make thick enough to spread over the 
cake; then one hour afterwards melt one-fourth of a cake of 
chocolate, and spread this over the cream with a knife. If pre- 
ferred, in place of this make the following: Two cups of sugar, 
one-half cup of sweet cream or one-half cup of milk and a piece of 
butter the size of a walnut. Boil together about five minutes. 
Remove from the fire, flavor with vanilla and stir to a cream. Cover 
with the melted chocolate or chopped walnuts. Mrs. McClary. 



CAKES 131 

Flake Cake. — One-half cup each of molasses, sugar, butter and 
sour milk, two cups of flour, 3'olks of two eg-gs, one teaspoon each of 
soda and vanilla, and a scant half teaspoon of cloves. Makes three 
layers. Pack with boiled frosting, made from the whites of the 
eggs, two cups of sugar, and one-half teaspoon of citric acid. 

Jean Hawkins. 



Potato Cake. — Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one-half cup 
of milk, four eggs, two cups of flour, one cup of mashed potato, four 
sticks of grated chocolate, two teaspoons, of baking powder, one 
teaspoon each of cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves, one cup of chopped 
walnuts. Bake in a loaf. Mrs. J. H. King-. 



German Chocolate Cake. — One cup of sugar, one small table- 
spoonful of butter, two eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, 
one small cup of milk, two large teaspoons of baking powder, two 
cups of flour, add filling while hot. 

Take one-half cake of Baker's chocolate, one-half cup of milk; 
one cup of sugar, yolk of one Qgg. Cook all together until it thickens 
and add it to the cake. Bake in four layers, and put together 
with boiled frosting. Can add one square of melted chocolate to the 
frosting. Flavor with vanilla. Mrs. John King. 

Cocoanut Cake.— Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one cup 
of corn starch, one cup of sweet milk, whites of four eggs, one-half 
teaspoon of cream tartar, one-fourth teaspoon of soda, two cups of 
flour; beat the starch, cream tartar and milk together. Whites of 
four eggs for frosting with cocoanut. Mrs. M. H. Barry. 

Layer Cake, No. I. — One-half cup of butter, one and one-fourth 
cups of sugar, one cup of milk, two and one-half cups of flour and 
two teaspoons of baking powder; whites of four eggs; flavor with 
lemon. Mrs. D. W. Lawrence. 



132 CAKES 

Layer Cake, No. 2. — One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half 
cup of butter, one cup of milk, whites of three eg-gs, two heaping 
cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder, flavor to taste. 

Mrs. Lincoln. 

Orange Cake. — Two cups of sugar, two cups of flour, one-half 
a cup of cold water, pinch of salt, a teaspoonful of cream tartar, 
one-half teaspoonful of soda, four eggs, the juice and grated rind of 
one large orange; beat the yolks and sugar together ; dissolve the 
soda in the water ; sift the cream tartar in the flour; add the beaten 
whites of two of the eggs ; bake as for jelly cake. For the icing put 
nearly' a pound of sugar with the beaten whites of the other two eggs 
and add the juice and grated rind of another orange. 

Mrs. Gilbert. 

Harlequin Cake. — One cup of butter creamed, two cups of sugar, 
one cup of sweet milk, yolks of three eggs, three cups of pastry flour, 
one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda, or three 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, whites of three eggs. Mix in the 
order given, then divide into four equal parts. Have two parts the 
color of the dough, color the third with one square of melted choco- 
late, color fourth part with pink coloring — one-half teaspoonful 
of cochineal, one-half as much alum, the same of cream tartar, put 
it in two tablespoonfuls of warm water, let it stand and then strain 
through a cloth. Bake in pie tins, chocolate layer first, second 
white, third pmk, fourth white. Mrs. George Furness. 

One Egg Cake. — One egg, one cup each of sugar and sweet milk, 
two cups of flour, three tablespoons of melted butter, two teaspoons 
of cream tartar, one teaspoon of soda. Bake in two or three layers. 
Excellent with whipped cream as a filling. Hattie B. Warner. 

Nut Cake, No. 1. — Two cups of flour ; four eggs, one small cup 
of butter, one cup of sugar, one cup of cold water; one teaspoon of 
soda, tv^'o teaspoons of cream tartar ; one cup of hickor}' or butter- 
nut meats. Mrs. John Kobb. 



CAKES 



133 



Nut Cake, No. 2. — Two cups of sug-ar, one cup of butter, not too 
full, four whole eg-gs and one yolk, two thirds of a cup of milk, three 
cups of flour, three even teaspoons of baking- powder, two teacups of 
walnut meats, chopped fine. This quantity makes two loaves. 

Mrs. George Hale. 

Ribbon Cake. — ^Take nearly one-third of white cake batter and 
add to it one cup of raisins, one cup of currants, one-fourth pound of 
citron, cinnamon and cloves to taste, two tablespoonfuls of molasses; 
bake in a layer and the rest of the batter in two layers; put the 
three together with jelly, having the fruit loaf in the center. 

Mrs. Annie Morgan. 

Rolled Jelly Cake.— Four eg-gs, yolks and whites beaten separ- 
ately, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, one and one-half teaspoons of 
baking powder, three teaspoons of cold water, one cup of flour. 
Bake rather slowly in a heavy tin or dripping pan ( size 18 x 10 
inches ), when baked turn on a cloth, leaving the bottom side up, 
and spread with jelly which has been beaten with a fork and roll 
the cake lengthwise while warm. Mrs. McClary. 

Chocolate Cake.— Shave one-half a cake of Baker's chocolate, 
pour over it one-half a cup of boiling- water and let it dissolve, two 
cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of thick sour milk, 
one-half teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons of vanilla, two eggs, two 
even cups of flour; put the chocolate in before the flour. 

Mrs. Frank Haven. 

Chocolate and Nut Loaf Cake. — Two and one-half cups of sug-ar, 
one cup of butter, one cup of sour milk, one teaspoon of soda, five 
eggs, one and one-half squares of Baker's chocolate melted, two and 
one-half cups of flour, one cup of English walnuts chopped, not too 
fine. Stir the butter and sugar, add the beaten yolks of the eggs, 
then the sour milk, to which the soda has been added, add the beaten 



134 CAKES 

whites of the eggs, mixing- alternatel}' with two and one-half cups of 
flour, add a good pinch of salt and two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, 
adding last two-thirds of a cup of nuts, using the remainder in the 
icing. This makes two sheets. Mrs. O. S. Lawrence. 

Spice Cake, No. 1. — One cup of sugar, one-half cup of molasses, 
one-half cup of butter, one-half cup of sour milk, two and one-half cups 
of flour, one teaspoonful of soda, 3'olks of four eggs, one teaspoonful 
of cloves, allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg. 

Mrs. William C. Orcutt. 

Spice Cake, No. 2. — Two eggs, one and one-fourth cups of sugar, 
one cup of sour cream with a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in it, two 
cups of chopped raisins, two teaspoonfuls of cinnamon, a pinch of 
salt and two cups of flour. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Clove Cake. — One cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
molasses, three cups of flour, three eggs, one dessertspoon of salera- 
tus, raisins, about a dessertspoon of cloves. 

Mrs. Albert Andrus. 

Citron Cake. — One cup of sugar, one-third of a cup of butter, 
one-half a cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, two eggs or the 
whites of four, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder ; when for a loaf 
add citron and a cup of raisins. Mrs. A. Williamson. 

Quick Cake. — Break two eggs into a small teacup and fill up 
with thin, sweet cream; one teacupful of sugar, one coftee-cup of 
flour, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one-half teaspoonful of soda; 
measure your sugar and put in a pan ; then pour in the eggs and 
cream; measure the flour and sift in; then the soda and cream 
tartar; beat all together. Mrs. AVhittelse}'. 

One Egg Cake. — One ^^^i one cup of sugar, a piece of butter the 
size of an &^^, one cup of sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls of cream 
tartar, one teaspoonful of soda, two cups of flour. Mrs. Swift. 



CAKES 



J35 



Bread Cake. — Two cups of light bread sponge, one and one-half 
cups of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of butter, two eggs, one cup of 
flour, one teaspoonful of soda, one cup of raisins, cinnamon and 
nutmeg. Mrs. S. W. Gillett. 

Old Fashioned Cream Cake.— One cupful each of sour cream 
and sugar; two eggs, two cups of flour, one-half teaspoon of soda, a 
pinch of salt and a little nutmeg. Better when eaten fresh. 

Mrs. Belding. 

Angel Cake. — The whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half cups 
of granulated sugar, one cup of pastry flour, measured after being 
sifted four times; one teaspoonful of cream tartar, one teaspoonful 
of vanilla. Sift the flour and cream tartar together. Beat the sugar 
into the eggs, after beating the eggs to a stifl" froth; add the season- 
ing and flour, stirring lightly. Beat until read}' to put in the oven; 
bake forty minutes in a moderate oven. Use a pan that has little 
legs at the top corners, so that when the pan is turned upside down 
on the table, after baking, a current of air will pass over and under 
it. Do not grease the pan. Miss Parloa. 

Note. — If the oven is too hot place a tin of cold water inside to 
reduce the temperature. 

Gold Cake.— Yolks of eight eggs beaten light, one cup of sugar, 
one-half cup of sweet milk, three tablespoonfuls of softened butter, 
one and three-fourths cups of flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking 
powder. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Sunshine Cake, No. 1. — ^Whites of seven and yolks of five small 
eggs, one cup of granulated sugar, two-thirds of a cup of flour, one- 
third of a teaspoonful of cream tartar and a pinch of salt. Sift, 
measure, and set aside the flour and sugar, as for an angel cake. 
Beat the 3'olks of the eggs thoroughly, then affer washing the beater, 
beat the whites about half ; add cream tartar and beat until ver}-. 



7j(5 CAKES 

very stiff. Stir in the sugar lighitly, then the beaten yolks thor- 
oughly; add the flour; flavor and put in tube pan and in the oven at 
once. Bake from thirty to fifty minutes. Mrs. Van Deusen. 



Sunshine Cake, No. 2. — Beat the yolks of four eggs until thick 
and light, add gradually one and a half cups of powdered sugar 
and beat ten minutes longer. Stir in lightly the whites of eleven 
eggs, which have been beaten stiff, add one cupful of flour in which 
is mixed one teaspoonful of cream tartar; sift both five times. 
Mix gently and add one teaspoonful of vanilla or the grated 
rind of one lemon and a teaspoonful of the juice. Turn into an 
ungreased tin and bake three-quarters of an hour or until done. 

Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Sponge Cake, No. 1. — Two eggs beaten hard, one cup of sugar, 
beat the eggs and sugar thoroughly w^ith a beater, add one cup of flour 
— measure first and then sift twice — one-half cup of boiling water, a 
little salt, one teaspoonful of baking powder, vanilla. Moderate 
oven at first ; bake about forty minutes in angel cake tin; cut 
with a cake knife. Sadie M. Thompson. 

Sponge Cake, No. 2.— One tumbler each of sugar and flour, five 
eggs and a pinch of salt, flavor with lemon. Beat the yolks and 
sugar light, add the beaten whites, then beat all fifteen minutes, 
stir in the flour lightly, and bake immediately. 

Mrs. McVickar. 

Sponge Cake, No. 3.— The yolks of three eggs, a small cup of 
sugar, three tablespoonfuls of cold water in the eggs and sugar. 
Beat until stiff with a Dover beater. Beat the whites to a stiff froth. 
One full cup of flour, beat all in carefully. One teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder added to the flour and a little salt added to the eggs. 

Mrs. D. W. Lawrence. 



CAKES 137 

Sponge Cake, No. 4. — Two eggs, two-thirds of a cup of sugar, 
one-third of a cup of cold water, one even cup of flour, one teaspoon- 
ful of baking powder, a little salt, season with vanilla and almond 
flavoring, mixed if desired. Beat the eggs to a froth, add the sugar, 
then beat five minutes, stir in the flour and water lightly. Bake 
very slowly. Mrs. N. Porter. 



Cream Sponge Cake. — One pint of pulverized sugar, the yolks of 
six eggs beaten with the sugar fifteen minutes, one-half cup of cold 
water; beat the whites, and mix with the sugar and yolks; lastly, 
one full pint of sifted flour with two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; 
stir in quickly; bake in two long pans. 

For the Filling. — Three-fourths of a pint of sweet cream, two 
heaping teaspoonfuls of corn starch ; cook until it thickens ; add a 
little salt and vanilla. Sweeten to taste. 

Icing. — To the juice of one lemon add enough pulverized sugar 
so it will not run. Mrs. Spann. 



White Sponge Cake.— Two-thirds of a cup of sugar, one-half 
cup of flour, whites of five eggs, one teaspoonful of cream tartar ; 
sift the cream tartar and flour four or five times together. 

Mrs. Caldwell. 



Snowballs.— Two cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one 
cup of sweet milk, three cups of flour, three teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder, whites of five eggs. Bake in deep, square tins. 
The following day cut in two-inch squares, taking the outside oft' so 
as to leave it all white ; take each piece on a fork and frost upon all 
sides, and roll in freshly grated cocoanut. These may be varied 
by rolling in chocolate frosting prepared thickly enough to give a 
rough surface. Miss M. E. Parmelee. 

flO) 



138 CAKES 

Fruit Cake, No. 1. — One pound of brown sugar; one and one- 
fourth pounds of butter, one pound of iiour, two and one-half pounds 
of raisins, the same of currants, two pounds of citron, ten eggs, one- 
half cup of molasses, one tablespoon of cinnamon, one of mace, one- 
half tablespoon of nutmeg, teaspoon of cloves, one teaspoon of soda 
just before going into the oven. Mrs. Belding. 

Fruit Cake, No. 2. — One pound of butter, one pound of flour, one 
pound of currants, one pound of sugar, two pounds of raisins, one 
tablespoonful of cinnamon, one teaspoonful of cloves, one-half tumbler 
of molasses, soda the size of a pea, ten eggs. Put the butter and 
sugar together and stir to a cream ; then add the molasses, then the 
eggs, fruit, spices, liour and soda last. Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 

Cream Fruit Cake. — One cup of sour cream, one cup of sugar, 
one cup of chopped raisins, two cups of flour, one teaspoonful of 
soda, two eggs; flavor with spices. Aunt Susan Andrus. 

White Fruit Cake. —One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three 
cups of flour, whites of eight eggs, half a wine glass of rose water, 
one teaspoonful of baking powder, quarter of a pound of citron, half 
a pound of almonds blanched, one cup of grated or desiccated cocoa- 
nut. Mrs. T. Davidson. 

CofFee Cake. — One cup of coffee prepared as for the table, one 
cup of sugar, one of molasses, one of butter, four of flour, one egg, 
one coffee-cup of raisins, one teaspoonful of soda, two of cream tartar, 
three tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one of cloves and one of nutmeg. 

Mrs. W. N. Ames. 

Spanish Bunns. — Two cups of sugar, one cup each of butter and 
sweet milk, two heaping cups of flour, four eggs, two teaspoonfuls of 
cream tartar, one of soda, and two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon. Bake 
in sheets, frost and cut in squares. Mrs. M. C. Abbott. 



FILLINGS FOR LAYER CAKES. 

A ''Wilderness of Sweets/' — Paradise Lost. 

Note. — Care is necessary in the preparation of syrup for icings, 
etc. Confectioners recognize six or eight degrees in boiling sugar, 
but for our purposes a knowledge of three will be enough — the second 
degree or "thread;" the fourth or "ball;" and the sixth or "-fruit 
glace.'" One cup of granulated sugar and one-half cup of water 
will boil to "the thread" in ten or fifteen minutes; to the "ball" in 
twenty minutes; and a little longer is necessary for a "■fruit glace.''' 
Test by dipping the thumb and forefinger in cold water and taking 
a drop of syrup between them and drawing apart. If it threads the 
second degree is reached; when it forms a soft ball by rolling 
between the thumb and finger we have the fourth degree ; and when 
the syrup dropped in cold water is brittle, the sixth degree is 
reached. 

Boiled Frosting.— Take one pound of granulated sugar, put in a 
pail and pour over just enough boiling water to dissolve; set in a 
kettle of water ; beat the whites of three eggs a very little; put into 
the pail and beat until it thickens ; remove from the stove and beat 
until cold. This is sufficient for a layer cake and a loaf. 

Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Boiled Milk Frosting. — One cupful of sugar, one-fourth of a cup- 
ful of milk, cook until it comes to the boiling point; take from the stove 
and beat until white. While warm add to the cake. This makes a 
soft frosting. Mrs. W. S. Lawrence. 

Confectioner's Sugar.— Take equal parts of white of ^^^ and 
water, beat lightly ; then stir in sifted cbnfectioner's sugar until the 
frosting can be spread without running. Flavor to taste. 



I4.0 FILLING FOR LAYER CAKES 

Icing. — One cup of sug-ar with water to dissolve, boil until it 
waxes soft in water and add to the whites of two eg-gs well beaten. 

Mrs. Fred Amsden. 

Chocolate Icing.— Break the white of one egg- into a glass, add 
an equal measure of cold water, stir into this pulverized sugar until 
it is the right consistency. Three or four tablespoonfuls of grated 
chocolate melted over the teakettle and stirred in with the ^^^ and 
sugar. Flavor with vanilla. If a little too stiff to spread, add a 
few drops of boiling water. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Maple Sugar.— Two cofifee-cupfuls of maple sugar and one-fourth 
cupful of water; cook to "the ball;" then pour it on the beaten white 
of one &^^ and beat hard. Mrs. E. W. Knowlton. 

Note. — Chopped walnuts ma3^ be added with the maple sugar if 
desired. 

Apple Jelly. — One large sour apple pared and grated, juice of 
one lemon ; one cupful of sugar. Stir all together and cook three 
minutes. Stir in the beaten white of one egg- after removing the jelly 
from the fire. 

Almond. — Blanch one pound of almond meats; reserve sufficient 
whole ones for the top layer; split in two or three parts,, lengthwise, 
the remaining ones. When the cake is baked stick the nuts into 
the layers one inch apart and pour over plain or boiled frosting. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Walnut. — Chop fine one-half pound of English walnut meats. 
Put into boiled frosting after it has cooled a little. 

Butternut. — Take the whites of two eggs beaten with one-half a 
cup of sugar; spread over each layer one cup of butternut meats, 
peeling the large pieces for the top layer. 

Mrs. John'C. Williamson. 



FILLING FOR LAYER CAKES 141 

Lemon. — One cup of sugfar, scant, one-fourth cup of butter, 
grated rind and juice of two lemons, yolks of four eg-gs; cook until it 
thickens, stirring all the while. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Raisin, No. 1. — One cup of raisins, stoned and chopped fine and 
stirred into boiled frosting when partly cooled. 

Mrs. A. B. Keeler. 

Raisin, No. 2. — One and a half cupfuls of raisins, one and a 
half cupfuls of sweet cream, one cup of sugar, one tablespoonful of 
butter, two scant tablespoonfuls of corn starch, pinch of salt, cinna- 
mon, nutmeg, cloves, or other flavoring to taste. Boil twenty 
minutes, spread when cool. This maj' be used for pie filling with 
meringue on top, with cocoanut. Mrs. W. S. Lawrence. 

Fig, No. 1. — Eight figs and one-half cup of raisins, chopped very 
fine ; beat the white of one &^g with three tablespoonfuls of sugar ; 
stir the figs and raisins in ; then add about half as much chocolate 
as for a large chocolate cake. Mrs. F. White. 

Fig, No. 2. — One pound of figs chopped fine; stir in jelly or fruit 
juice until it will spread easily; add sugar if necessary. 

Mrs. W. Crooks. 

Fig, No. 3. — ^Take three-fourths of a pound of figs, chop fine and 
put into a stew pan on the stove ; pour over them two cups of water 
and a large cup of sugar. Cook all together until soft and smooth. 
When cold spread between the layers of the cake. 

Mrs. Horrigan. 

Tutti Frutti. — One cup of sugar, one-fourth cup of water, white of 
one &^^, one-fourth cup of figs, one-fourth cup of cocoanut, one-fourth 
cup of walnut meats. Make boiled frosting of sugar, water and eggs, 
then add the fruit chopped fine. Miss Alice J. Watkins. 



1^2 FILLING FOR LAYER CAKES 

Chocolate Custard.— Yolks of five egg-s, two teaspoonfuls of grated 
chocolate, one-half cup— small cup— of sugar, four tablespoonfuls of 
milk; flavor with vanilla; put in a bowl and place in hot water until 
it begins to thicken ; make two tins of white cake; grate two table- 
spoonfuls of chocolate and mix in with the other two tins of cake. 

Mrs. R. W. Cantwell. 



Chocolate Cream.— Add three tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate 
to whipped cream. 

Note. — One square of Baker's chocolate, grated, makes four 
level tablespoonfuls of Huyler's powdered chocolate. 

Chocolate, No. 1.— One and a half cupfuls of sugar, grate one- 
fourth of a bar of Baker's chocolate, six tablespoonfuls of boiling 
water, cook to the ball. Beat the whites of two eggs, on them pour 
the syrup while hot, beating all the time until it is thick enough to 
spread on the cake. Hattie H. Webster. 

Chocolate, No. 2.— Place two blocks of chocolate, without grat- 
ing, in a basin over steam ; when melted stir into it the following : 
One Q^^ or 3'olks of two beaten light, with nearly one cup of sugar, 
four spoons of cold milk; steam until smooth. Flavor with vanilla. 

Cocoanut. — Take the whites of four eggs; allow one cup of sugar 
to each ^g^\ one pound of desiccated cocoanut; one pound either of 
English walnuts or blanched almonds; dissolve the sugar in a little 
water and boil a few minutes ; have the eggs beaten ; stir in the 
sugar ; beat until light and flavor. Miss Klohs. 

Banana.— Pack cake with boiled frosting, and over each layer 
slice bananas a short time before serving. Also used with whipped 
cream. Mrs. H. E. King. 



FILLING FOR LAYER CAKFS 143 

Peach. — Cut up peaches in thin slices ; prepare cream by whip- 
ping and sweetening- ; flavor with vanilla ; put layers of peaches 
between the sheets of cake and pour the cream over each layer and 
the same on top. Mrs. Caldwell. 

Whipped Cream. — Put nearly one pint of cold swee<- cream in a 
bowl and beat with an egg beater until thick ; then sweeten and 
flavor to taste. The beaten whites of two eggs ma}'^ be added if 
there is not the amount of cream required. 

Sour Cream, No. 1. — One cup of sour cream, one-half cup* of 
sugar, one tablespoonful of flour. Beat all together and cook till it 
thickens. When cold add one cup of chopped walnuts. 

Mrs. Wm. Tobey. 



Sour Cream, No. 2.— One coft"ee-cup of sour cream, the same of 
sugar, and one pound of English walnuts chopped fine; cook all 
together until it thickens. Spread when cold. Mrs. Breed. 

Ice Cream Filling. — Two cups of pulverized sugar ; add one- 
half a cup of water to dissolve the sugar, and boil to " the thread ;" 
beat the whites of two eggs, and on these pour the sugar while hot, 
beating all the time; add one-half a teaspoonful of lemon acid. 

Mrs. Parmelee. 

Marsh Mallow Filling.— Two cups of sugar, one cup of water, 
whites of two eggs, one-half pound of marsh mallows. Heat the 
marsh mallows in the oven or over steam, reserving a few to chop for 
the top. Boil the sugar and water to a syrup until it threads. While 
hot pour it on the stiffly beaten whites, stirring all the time. Add 
the melted marsh mallows and beat until smooth. Flavor with 
vanilla. When almost cool spread on layers. 

Mrs. William Breed. 



SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES. 

"6>/ Small Cakes it may be said in general, thai age cannot 
wither nor custom stale their infinite variety. " 

Cookies, No. 1. — One cup of sugar, one cup of sour cream, one 
teaspoonful of soda, a little salt. Flavor with nutmeg and essence 
of lemon. Mix very soft. If the cream is not very rich add a piece 
of butter. Bake in a medium oven. Add caraway if you choose. 

Mrs. S. A. Beman. 

Cookies, No. 2. — One cup of butter, one cup of sugar, two eggs, 
four tablespoonfuls of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of cream tartar, 
and one-half teaspoonful of soda. Aunt Susan Andrus. 

Cookies, No. .1. — One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three eggs, 
one teaspoonful of baking powder, one tablespoonful of lemon, one- 
half cup of milk; roll out the dough and sprinkle with desiccated 
cocoanut and fine sugar. Mrs. O. L. Ballard. 

Cream Cookies. — Two eggs, two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, 
two cups of sour cream, one teaspoonful of soda; spice to taste; beat 
well. Mrs. Croft". 

Sour Cream Cookies. — One cup of sugar, one ^^^^^ one cup of 
sour cream, one teaspoonful of soda, a little salt. Make stiff enough 
to drop from the spoon and bake without rolling out. Flavor with 
lemon and vanilla or nutmeg. Maggie Binan. 

Ginger Cookies, No. 1. — Three cups of New Orleans molasses, 
eight tablespoonfuls of butter, two tablespoonfuls of boiling water, 
two tablespoonfuls of saleratus, one tablespoonful of ginger, one 
tablespoonful of alum ; dissolve the alum in boiling water; mix soft; 
bake quick. Mrs. Wells S. Dickinson. 



SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES 145 

Ginger Cookies, No. 2. — One cup of shortening- and one cup of 
sug-ar creamed, two eggs, one cup of New Orleans molasses, three 
teaspoonfuls of g-ing-er, three level teaspoonfuls of soda, one-half 
cup of sweet milk, flour to mix soft. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Soft Ginger Cookies, No. 1. — Three-fourths cup of molasses, one 
cup of sour milk, one-half cup of sug-ar, one heaping cup of butter, 
two teaspoonfuls of soda, two teaspoonfuls of ginger ; put the 
molasses and milk together ; stir in the soda, then add the butter, 
ginger, etc. Do not make too stiff with flour ; mix soft ; roll half 
an inch thick and cut in square pieces. Mrs. McVickar. 

Soft Ginger Cookies, No. 2. — Two-thirds of a cup of butter and 
the same of New Orleans molasses, one and one-fourth cup of sugar, 
one cup of thick sour milk, two teaspoonfuls of soda, one and one-half 
of ginger. Flour to make very soft. Mrs. W. H. King. 

Molasses Cookies. — One cup of New Orleans molasses ; one cup 
of sugar, one cup of butter, one eg-g, a teaspoonful of ginger and one 
of soda; mix hard and roll out. Mrs. Bliss. 

Fruit Cookies. — One cup of butter, two cups of sug-ar stirred to a 
cream, two egg-s, one cup of chopped raisins, two level teaspoonfuls of 
soda dissolved in one-half cup of cold water, flour enough to mix 
soft. Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Graham Cookies. — One egg-, one cup of sour milk, one-half cup of 
butter, one cup of sugar, one-half teaspoonful of soda; thicken till 
quite thick with graham flour, and drop on tins. 

Mrs. C. A. Wood. 

Graham Crackers.— Blend three-fourths cup of sugar, one-fourth 
cup of butter, and one-fourth cup of lard. Stir in the beaten white 
of one eg-g, add four tablespoonfuls of water, with one (even) tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in it. Mix stiff with unsifted graham 
flour, roll thin. Bake in a medium oven. Mrs. Ransom. 



1^6 SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES 

Maple Sugar Cakes. — One cup of sour cream, one and one-half 
cups of maple sugar, one eg-g-, one teaspoonful of soda, one-half tea- 
spoonful of cinnamon; roll soft and bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. R. W. Cantwell. 

Dominoes. — Bake any kind of sponge cake in a thin sheet. Cut 
this into small oblong pieces the shape of a domino. Frost the top 
and sides of them. When the frosting is hard, draw the cross lines 
and make the dots with a small brush that has been dipped in melted 
chocolate. These are particularly good for children's parties. 

Jumbles. — One ^^^, one cup of sugar, one cup of butter, two 
teaspoonfuls of sweet milk, one-half teaspoonful of cream tartar, one- 
quarter teaspoonful of soda. Cut round with a hole in the middle; 
sprinkle with sugar before baking. Miss Amelia Greeno. 

Hermits. — One and one-half cups of sugar, one cup of butter, two 
eggs, one cup of currants or chopped raisins, one teaspoonful of soda 
in one-fourth cup of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of cloves, one of 
cinnamon, nutmeg or allspice to taste. Put in flour as for cookies; 
roll thin; sprinkle with sugar before baking. 

Ginger Snap?. — One cup of sugar, one cup of molasses, one-half 
cup of butter, one-half cup of lard, one tablespoonful of ginger, one 
tablespoonful of soda, one tablespoonful of vinegar, two tablespoon- 
fuls of water, one tablespoonful of alum; boil ten minutes; put in the 
soda after boiling; stir the flour in wiiile warm. 

Mrs. Durkee. 

Ginger Wafers. — One-half cup each of butter, sugar and 
molasses, one heaping- teaspoonful of ginger, a little salt. Let this 
come to a boil. Take from the fire and immediately add one tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in a little water; while foaming add the 
flour to make very stiffs. Roll thin as paper. 

Carrie B. Stevens. 



SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES 147 

Fruit Drops. — One eg-g-, one-half cup each of molasses, sug-ar and 
sour cream, one teaspoonful each of vanilla and cinnamon, one-half 
teaspoonful each of cloves and salt, two cups of flour, one-half cup of 
raisins, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a little cold water and 
added the last thing. Drop in small spoonfuls and bake in a quick 
oven. Mrs. G. H. Hale. 

Vanities. — Beat two eg-g-s; add one-half teaspoonful of salt, and 
flour to make a stift' doug-h; roll it as thin as possible, and cut in 
small diamonds; fry in lard; turn them the moment the^^ come to the 
surface, and take out when the least brown; sprinkle with sugar or 
fill with jelly. Mrs. R. D. Hunting-ton. 

Nut Jumbles. — One-half cup of butter, one cup of sugar, one egg, 
one teaspoonful of baking powder, two cups of flour, a pinch of salt, 
three-fourths cup of walnut meats coarsely chopped, about one-third 
cup of milk. Beat together the butter and sugar, add the egg well 
beaten, then the flour, salt and baking powder sifted together, add- 
ing the milk gradually so as to prevent the mixture becoming too 
dry. Mix the nuts well in and drop in spoonfuls some distance 
apart. Bake in a quick oven about ten minutes. 

Katharine L. King. 

Sponge Drops. — Beat to a froth three eggs and one cup of sugar. 
Stir into this two cups of flour in which one teaspoonful of cream 
tartar and one-half teaspoonful of soda have been thoroughly mixed; 
flavor with lemon. Butter tins and drop by the teaspoonful two 
inches apart. Esther H. Taylor. 

Lady Fingers. — Beat the whites of three eggs until stiff and dry. 
Add gradually one-third of a cup of powdered sugar. Beat the yolks 
of two eggs until thick and lemon color. Add to the first mixture. 
Fold in one-third of a cup of flour mixed and sifted with one-eighth 
of a teaspoonful of salt; flavor with one-fourth of a teaspoonful of 
vanilla or lemon extract. Bake eight or ten minutes in a moderate 
oven. The above will make two dozen. 

Boston Cooking School. 



1^8 SMALL CAKES AND COOKIES 

Walnut Macaroons.— One pound of powdered sugar, one pound 
of nuts chopped fine; the unbeaten whites of five eggs, two small 
teaspoonfuls of baking powder, two tablespoonfuls of flour. Mix 
these ingredients together and add more flour if necessar3' to make 
quite thick. Drop from a teaspoon upon buttered paper or baking 
tins, a little distance apart, and bake a light brown in a moderate 
oven. Leave in tins until quite cool before taking out. 

Mary E. Parmelee. 



Strawberry Puffs. — One-quarter pound of butter, one-half pint of 
water, two teacupfuls of flour; boil water and butter together; while 
boiling stir in the flour. Take off, and when cool stir in five eggs 
and one-half teaspoonful of soda; drop the batter the size of a hen's 
^^^ into pans; bake thirty minutes; split open and put in sugared 
strawberries or boiled custard. Mrs. Beman. 



Cream Puffs. — One cup of water, small half cup of butter; let 
this come to a boil, then stir in slowly one cup of sifted flour. 
Remove from the stove, stirring until perfectly smooth. When cool 
beat in three eggs, one at a time and beat the whole five minutes. 
In dropping on the tin by spoonfuls pile as high and roughly as 
possible. Bake in a steady hot oven until nicely brown. When cold 
open and fill with custard or whipped cream. This makes one 
dozen. 

Filling for Cream Piijfs. — Two eggs, two or three spoonfuls of 
corn starch, sugar and vanilla to taste, one quart of milk. Cook 
till it thickens. Mrs. G. H. Hale. 



Marguerites. — Make a boiled frosting flavored with vanilla, frost 
square wafers, then sprinkle over with English walnuts chopped 
fine, frost again, place on a board or tin and set in the oven a few 
minutes. Mrs. W. A. Short. 



SMALL CAKES AND COCKLES 149 

English Banbury Cakes. — Make a Banbury filling- as follows: 
One cup of seeded raisins, four figs, a piece of citron the size of an 
English walnut, rind and juice of one lemon, and one cup of sugar. 
Chop the fruit and lemon rind fine, then add the juice and sugar; 
mix well. Make a good pastry, roll out thin and cut in rounds, 
about four inches across. Place a small dessert spoonful of the 
filling upon each round; wet the edges and fold over one side of the 
paste and pinch the edges together. Prick the top with a fork and 
bake about twenty minutes. The pastry may be cut into diamond 
shape and the filling put on one piece and covered v^^ith another, 
having moistened the edges, and just before putting in the oven they 
may be brushed over with egg beaten up with sugar. 

Chocolate Eclairs. — Make a paste as for cream puffs, drop on a 
pan in oblongs about four and one-half inches long and two inches 
apart. Bake in a rather quick oven till a delicate brown. As soon 
as baked, ice with chocolate icing. When cold open on the side and 
fill as cream puffs. 

Icing. — Melt gradually, being- careful not to scorch, four table- 
spoonfuls of grated chocolate, then stir in three tablespoonfuls of 
milk or cream and one of water; mix well and add a scant cup of 
sugar; boil about five minutes. Mrs. G. H. Hale. 



PICKLES AND RELISHES. 

' ' Cook, see all your sauces 
Be sharp and poynant in the palate 
That they may commend you.'"' 

Note.~K\V pickles should be stirred frequently. 

Pickled Pears. — To seven pounds of pears, steamed, take three 
pounds of sug-ar (maple preferred), one quart of strong cider vinegar, 
one pint of water, three cloves in each pear, cinnamon and allspice. 

Mrs. Georg-e Sabin. 

Pickled Sickle Pears. — Allow enough vineg-ar to cover the pears. 
Make a syrup in proportion of one pint of good strong- vinegar to 
three pounds of sugar, brown and maple, two ounces of ginger root, 
a small bag of cloves, stick a clove in each pear. Cook in the syrup 
until easily pierced with a fork. When finished, pour the syrup 
over the pears. Mrs. Belding. 

Pickled Plums. — Seven pounds of fruit, three pounds of sugar, 
one pint of vineg-ar, spice if preferred. Miss Childs. 

Pickled Blackberries. — Seven pounds of blackberries, three of 
sug-ar; one pint of vinegar; cook all together until it boils, then 
remove the berries and let the vinegar and sugar boil for half an 
hour. Remove from the stove and pour over the berries. 

Mrs. E. A. Webster. 

Piccalilli. — Slice one peck of green tomatoes; put on them one 
cup of salt and let stand over night; chop, and let them drain; put 
on vinegar enough to cover and cook until soft. Chop six green 
peppers and four onions; grate one cup of horse radish; put in, also, 
two cups of sugar, one tablespoonful each of cloves, cinnamon and 
allspice; cover with vinegar and let come to a boil. 

Mrs. House. 



PICKLES AND RELISHES /j/ 

Pickled Peaches. — Make a syrup of vinegar and sugar — one pint 
of vinegar to three pounds of sugar— put one clove in each peach; 
cook in the syrup until tender; place in air-tight jars; pour over 
scalding syrup, and seal; add a little cinnamon and mace, if you 
choose. Mrs. R. A. Delong. 

Peach Mangoes. — Seven pounds of peaches, four pounds of sugar, 
one-half ounce of green ginger root, one pint of vinegar, one teaspoon- 
ful of ground cloves, two teaspoonfuls of allspice, one-half teaspoonful 
of ground mace put in two bags for this quantity. Rub the fur off 
from the peaches, halve them and remove the pit. Fill with equal 
parts of grated horse radish, and light and dark mustard seed. Tie 
firmly with a string. When the syrup boils put in a few at a time ; 
be sure and not cook too much. Use peaches not too ripe. Draw off 
the juice for two or three mornings and pour over hot. 

Mrs. F. J. Seaver. 

Cucumber Pickles, No. 1.— One gallon of water; one pint of 
good vinegar ; one cup of molasses ; one-half cup of salt; a piece of 
alum the size of a walnut. Gather the cucumbers in as large 
quantities as possible ; wash and put them into the above ; when the 
jar or tub is full scald the brine nine mornings in succession and 
pour, while hot, over the cucumbers ; then put them into sharp vine- 
gar, sweetened and spiced (spices put in bags ); add two or three 
horse radish roots. Mrs. House. 

Cucumber Pickles, No. 2.— Scald cucumbers for nine mornings 
in a hot brine made fresh each day. Then take good vinegar, not too 
strong, and a piece of alum, scald and pour over the cucumbers, letting 
them remain in it three days. Then take enough of the best cider 
vinegar to cover the pickles, season with mixed spices and sugar to 
taste, also a piece of horse radish, and pour over the cucumbers 
while hot. Cover the pickles with horse radish leaves. 

Mrs. H. E. King. 

Brine for Cucumbers.— Two pails of water ; six quarts of salt; 
one pound of alum ; two ounces of saltpetre ; keep the cucumbers 
under the brine with a weight. Mrs. J. P. Morse. 



152 PICKLES AND RELISHES 

Green Tomato Pickles. — Slice one peck of green tomatoes and 
allow them to remain in salt and water twenty-four hours ; rinse in 
clear water and drain; cook until tender in weak vinegar. Prepare 
a liquid according to the following proportions: Two quarts of vine- 
gar ; four pounds of sugar ; one cup of horse radish ; three table- 
spoonfuls of cloves; three of cinnamon; one of pepper. Boil and pour 
over the tomatoes. Mrs. O. P. Ames. 

Cabbage Pickle.— Six quarts of chopped cabbage, nine large or 
twelve small red peppers, one quart of small onions; chop all fine 
and sprinkle w^ell with salt, let it stand four hours, then drain off 
all liquor. 

Dressing. — Three quarts of vinegar, one pound of sugar, one- 
half cup of celery seed, one-fourth cup of white mustard seed, the 
same of black mustard seed, one-half ounce of turmeric powder and a 
small piece of alum. Let all boil in the vinegar and pour over the 
cabbage hot. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Pickled Onions. — Peel and put in strong brine for four days, 
changing the brine twice. Then put the onions in cold milk and 
w^ater and let come to a boil ; take out, wipe dry, put in a jar and 
pour over hot vinegar to which has been added a little sugar, whole 
mace, pepper and cloves. Mrs. Carr. 

Ripe Cucumber Pickles. — Pare and slice lengthwise the cucum- 
bers, put in an earthen dish, first a layer of cucumbers, then a thin 
layer of salt, another of cucumber and salt, etc. Let stand twenty- 
four hours. Pour off the brine, rinse and put on cold water. Let 
stand another twenty-four hours. Then cook in vinegar and water 
until clear. Take four pounds of sugar, part maple and part 
granulated, to one quart of vinegar, add one ounce of cinnamon 
broken in pieces, one-half ounce of whole cloves ( a few allspice if 
you wish). Put all in a cheese cloth bag. Cook the cucumbers in 
this a few minutes, then take out and cook the vinegar until it tastes 
of the spices. Pour all over the cucumbers. Mrs. Ralph. 



PICKLES AND RELISHES 153 

Watermelon Pickle. — Take the thickest rinds you can get ; pare 
off the green skin and cut out all the pink pulp. Put the rind to 
soak in a brine of salt and water strong enough to bear an o^^^. 
Let them lie in this brine three or four days ( or more if not conven- 
ient to make up at once ). Then put them in fresh water for three or 
four days, changing the water every day. Then weigh them and 
boil in equal parts of vinegar and water until easily pierced with a 
fork. Skim out on a platter to cool. Prepare a pickle of three- 
quarters of a pound of sugar and a tea-cup of good strong vinegar 
for every pound of the rinds. Then put in the rinds and boil until 
they look clear. Skim them out and put in the jar in which they 
are to remain. Put into the boiling vinegar a small handful of 
whole allspice, half as much of whole cloves, two or three blades of 
mace and a few sticks of cinnamon. Then turn the whole hot over 
the rinds. Thev will be ready to use in two or three days. 

Mrs. J. R. Flanders. 



Oil Pickles. — Slice quite thin two dozen large size pickling 
cucumbers, sprinkle with salt and let them stand over night. Pour 
oft" all liquor and pour over them one cup of salad oil, one-half cup 
of black mustard seed, three ounces of white mustard seed, one 
ounce of celery seed and one quart of vinegar. No cooking. Stir 
the pickles occasionally. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Spanish Pickles.— Chop fine one peck of green tomatoes and four 
large onions ; sprinkle well with one-half pint of salt. Let stand 
twenty-four hours; then put in a colander; pour over cold water and 
drain thoroughly. Chop fine one head of cabbage and three green 
peppers and add to the above. Cook in vinegar until tender ; then 
drain off all vinegar. Put one pint of molasses, one tablespoonful 
of cinnamon, one-half tablespoonful of cloves, three-fourths table- 
spoonful of allspice and two of grated horse radish into fresh vinegar; 
cook all together and pour over the pickles while hot. 

Mrs. E. W. Knowlton. 

[11] 



154 PICKLES AND RELISHES 

Chow-Chow. — One quart each of small onions, cauliflower, 
cucumbers, and small pieces of ripe cucumber, one large green 
pepper. All except pepper to remain in salt and water over night. 
In the morning drain and cook in weak vinegar, then put all in the 
following dressing: 

Dressijig. — One quart of vinegar, six tablespoonfuls of mustard, 
one cup of sugar, one-half cup of flour, one-fourth ounce of turmeric 
powder, the same of curry powder. Boil five minutes. If a less 
pungent pickle is desired, omit the curry and use only three meas- 
ures of mustard. Mrs. Hawkins. 



Tomato Catsup, No. 1. — Boil until tender one peck of ripe toma- 
toes. Strain and add one tablespoonful each of cinnamon, cloves, 
mustard and salt, one teaspoonful of allspice, one pint of vinegar 
and one cup of sugar. Boil gently until of the consistency of cream. 
Bottle while hot. Mrs. John Law. 



Tomato Catsup, No. 2. — Cook one-half bushel of tomatoes and 
five or six onions until tender. Strain and add one quart of vinegar, 
one small tea-cup of salt, two tablespoonfuls of cloves, one table- 
poonsful each of allspice and black pepper, one-fourth teaspoonful 
of cayenne pepper. Then boil until reduced one-half. Bottle when 
cold. Miss Greeno. 

Shirley Sauce. — One dozen ripe tomatoes, two large onions, two 
large peppers, one tea-cup of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, 
one of salt ; chop the vegetables and boil one hour or more ; seal at 
once. Mrs. S. C. Williamson. 

Chili Sauce. — Thirty ripe tomatoes, five large onions, three green 
peppers, three tablespoonfuls of sugar, three of salt, four cups of 
vinegar; boil two and one-half hours. Mrs. Sweet. 

Note. — Cinnamon and cloves may be added to the above. 



PICKLES AND RELISHES 135 

Cucumber Catsup. — Pare and remove the seeds from large green 
cucumbers, let them remain in cold water for two or three hours. 
Take them from the water and grate. Then drain the pulp thor- 
oughl3^ — pressing out all the water. Turn the pulp into an earthen 
dish and Season well with pepper and salt. Use a little red pepper 
if liked. Add enough cider vinegar to cover; bottle and seal. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 

Tomato Butter. — Nine pounds of ripe tomatoes ; boil till thick ; 
then add three pounds of white sugar, one pint of vinegar, a table- 
spoonful each of allspice, cinnamon and cloves ; boil again until 
thick, stirring often. Mrs. Clark Dickinson. 

Spiced Currants. — Five quarts of currants ; one pint of vinegar ; 
three pounds of sugar; one tablespoonful each of cloves, cinnamon 
and allspice. Boil an hour or until quite thick. 

Mrs. VV. H. King. 

Spiced Gooseberries. — Seven pounds of gooseberries with the 
blossoms removed ( the stems will not harm), five pounds of sugar, 
one scant pint of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon, one of 
cloves and one-fourth of allspice. Cook about two hours. Twelve 
quarts of gooseberries make seven quarts of the relish. 

Spiced Grapes. — Six pounds of fruit, four pounds of sugar, one- 
half pint of vinegar, one teaspoonful each of ground mace, cloves, 
allspice and cinnamon, one-half teaspoonful of ginger. Seed the 
grapes as for preserves. Boil all together one hour. 

Mrs. John Spann. 

Cucumber Sauce. — Thirty good sized green cucumbers ; pare 
and remove the seeds ; four onions chopped together, one small tea- 
cup of salt ; drain twelve hours, then add one cup of white mustard 
seed, one-third of a cup of pepper, vinegar to cover. 

Miss Meeker. 



PRESERVING, CANNING AND JELLIES. 

'■'■Good housewife provides ere a sickness do come. 
Of sundry good things in her home to have sonie^ 
Conserves of otanges, qimices and such, 
With sirops that easeth the sickly so much.'''' 

Strawberry Preserves.— To one quart of strawberries, take one 
pound of sugar, put on the stove and cook until the berries are cooked 
through, skim out the berries, put into jars, have the jars a little 
more than half full, cook the syrup until it will almost jelly when 
cold. ( Try in a saucer ). Add the berries. Put the jars on their 
sides to let the berries thoroughly mix with the syrup, 

Mrs. Ralph. 

Raspberry or Strawberry Jam. — For each pound of fruit allow a 
pound of sugar. Mash the fruit in the kettle. Boil hard for fifteen 
minutes; then add the sugar and boil five minutes. 

Mrs. W. H. King. 

Quinces. — Pare, quarter and core the fruit, taking out the hard 
place around the core ; boil in clear water, or steam, until tender. 
For one pound of fruit allow three-fourths of a pound of sugar, and 
one pint of water for three pounds of sugar; when the S3^rup is boil- 
ing hot put in the fruit, and cook very slowly ; equally good with 
part sweet apples. 

Preserved Pears.— To one pound of fruit allow one-half pound of 
sugar, three-fourths cup of cold water. Let simmer slowly, say 
several hours, until a golden brown, after which put in glass jars. 

Chipped Pears. — Eight pounds of pared pears sliced vety thin, 
eight pounds of sugar, one-fourth pound of preserved ginger cut into 
small pieces, juice of three lemons, the yellow rind pared thin and 
cut in tiny bits, and one pint of water. Boil slowly till thick. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



PRESERVING. CANNING AND JELLIES 157 

Pear Compote. — Seven pounds of pears, six pounds of sugar, 
one-fourth ounce of g-inger root, juice and rind of four lemons (more if 
you wish). Slice the pears very thin after paring, grate the rind of 
the lemons and slice them very thin, bruise the ginger root, put all 
together and boil slowly three or four hours or until thick. 

Mrs. M. H. Bigelow. 

Preserved Peaches. — ^Pare the peaches. For every pound of fruit 
take three-fourths of a pound of sugar. Make a syrup with one cup 
of water to each pound of sugar ; boil and skim. Add the peaches 
and cook until they look clear and transparent. Fill the cans at 
once. Preserved peaches are much better left whole, especially if 
the flavor of the pits is liked. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Cherries. — Allow one-half or three-quarters pound of sugar to 
one of fruit. Make a syrup of one-half pint of water to three pounds 
of sugar. Pit the cherries, leaving in a few stones to flavor the fruit. 
Cook and seal as usual. 

Preserved Apple and Ginger. — To one pound of chopped, sour 
apples allow one pound of sugar ; to every two pounds of sugar, 
two lemons and one-half ounce of ginger root. Chop the lemons, 
grate the ginger root. Put all together and cook slowly two and one- 
half hours. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Grape Preserves. — Press the pulp from the skins ; put the pulps 
in a preserving kettle and boil them a few moments, then strain 
through a colander to separate the seeds — add the pulp to the skins 
and weigh ; allow three-fourths of a pound of sugar to one pound of 
fruit. Cook slowly from one- half to three-fourths of an hour. 

Preserved Plums. — Preserve plums the same as peaches. 
Remove the skin from them or not; if left on it is likely to crack open 
and come off if boiled too long. To prevent this, in a ineasure, prick 
the plums in several places with a fork before cooking. 

Mrs. Belding. 



IS8 PRESERVING, CANNING AND J E LUES 

Pineapple. — Grate or chop the pineapples iine. For each 
pound of fruit add three-fourths of a pound of sug-ar. Boil ten 
minutes and then can. This is nice for sherbet or punch. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Mock Pineapple. — Take partially ripe watermelons, pare and cut 
in small squares and steam until tender. Make a rich syrup of white 
sugar, and put in enough fresh or canned pineapple for flavoring, 
simmer ten minutes, then add the watermelon and simmer fifteen 
minutes more. Can while hot. Mrs. Nellie Graham. 

Currants and Fruit. — Six pounds each of currants and sugar, 
three large oranges, one and one-half pounds of raisins. Mash the 
currants and cook slowly one-half hour, then add the juice, pulp and 
finally the chopped rind of oranges and cook one hour; then add the 
raisins which have been seeded and chopped fine. Then cook one- 
half hour. Now add the sugar, stirring well, and cook one-half hour, 
making two and one-half hours in all. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Cold Strawberries. — Pick over firm, fresh berries, rinse and drain 
well. To three cups of berries take two of sugar ; put into a large 
earthen bowl ; mix well and put into the refrigerator until morning ; 
then stir well, but not deep. Take off all bubbles ; put into cans ; 
press out the air ( it will take a long while ), seal, wipe off the can 
and at once roll in two or three thicknesses of paper so no light will 
touch the fruit. Put in a dark cellar. Mrs. McClary. 

To Can Raspberries. — Make a syrup in the proportion of one and 
one-half pounds of sugar to one quart of water; let it boil hard 
twenty-five minutes, then skim and let the syrup cool. Fill the cans 
with fresh garden berries, then add syrup to cover the fruit, put on 
the covers without rubbers and fasten; place the cans on a rack in a 
wash boiler ; fill with water to within two inches of the top and let 
boil one minute. Take the cans from the water, take off the covers 



PRESERVING, CANNING AND JELLIES 159 

and add more hot syrup if needed, put on the rubbers and covers 
and the next day store them in a cool dry place. All fruits may be 
canned in the same way, but for acid fruits like plums use two 
pounds of sug-ar to one quart of water and cook longer. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 

Cold Raspberry. — Put the berries in a new tin or earthen disii 
and jam with a potato masher ; add one pound of sugar for each of 
fruit; stir thoroughly, and put into cold cans; seal tight. Will keep 
two years as fresh as when canned. Mrs. McClarj^ 

Canned Peaches. — Pare and place them on a plate in the steamer 
over boiling water, keeping them tightly covered; steam till the}^ can 
be easily pierced with a fork ; put them into heated cans, keeping 
the cans in hot water until sealed ; make a syrup in the proportion 
of one pint of water to each pound and a half of sugar, and allowing 
three-quarters of a pound of sugar to each of fruit. Pour over the 
fruit the hot syrup and seal. Pears put up the same way allowing 
but one-half pound of sugar for each of fruit. Mrs. McClary. 

Gooseberries or Currants. — Four pounds of fruit, three of sugar, 
one pint of water; cook until they commence to break. This quantity 
will fill four pint cans. Mrs. George Sabin. 

Currants, Cold. — To one pound of fruit allow one of sugar. Mash 
the currants, stir in the sugar thoroughly and let stand over night ; 
in the morning put into cold glass cans, fill to overflowing-, put on 
the rubbers and seal. 

Baked Apple Sauce. — One cup of sugar and one quart of apples 
pared and cut in quarters. Bake in a stone jar in the oven one and 
one-half or two hours. Mrs. McClary. 

Canned Apple Sauce. — In the fall take ripe apples, pare, core 
and cook to a pulp ; while hot fill the cans full — shaking the cans to 
settle the apple ; seal when hot. For pies in the winter. 



i6o PRESERVING, CANNING AND JELLIES 

To Can Tomatoes, No. 1. — Pare firm medium-sized tomatoes 
cold, then place them in a colander, cover and place over a kettle of 
boiling water, do not let it touch the water, steam until thoroughly 
heated,. perhaps fifteen or twenty minutes. Have some sliced toma- 
toes cooking. Put the whole tomatoes in hot jars and fill with the 
strained juice from the cooked tomatoes. Seal. 

To Can Tomatoes, No. 2.— Scald the tomatoes ; peal and slice ; 
put in a porcelain ketttle and boil thirty minutes or longer ( some 
prefer them only well heated, others like most of the wattr evapor- 
ated ). Put them boiling hot into the jars ; put on the rubbers and 
lids and fasten, and when cold keep in a dry, dark closet. 

Canned Corn. — Select fresh corn, shave one layer from the ear 
and then press out the rest of the pulp with the knife; fill the cans 
with the corn, packing it solidly ( cob may be used for this) to break 
any air bubbles ; fill the cans so the milk will flow over the tops ; 
put on the rubbers and lids — not screwing- perfectly tight. Put a 
rack in the bottom of a wash boiler, put in the cans and pour in 
sufficient cold water to nearly cover. Put on the cover of the boiler 
and boil steadily for three hours. Then remove the cans and tighten 
the covers and when perfectly cold put in a dark dry place. 

Excellent Recipe for Currant Jelly, No. 1.— Coddle the currants, 
squeeze out the juice and put it into the preserving kettle. Boil 
briskly, take off the scum, add the sifted sugar and stir till it is 
melted. Instantly it is melted put it in the pots and set it to cool. 
You must not boil it a minute after the sugar is melted or 3^ou spoil 
the color and flavor. To every pint of juice put a pound of sugar 
and not one scrap over or your jelly will be spoiled. 

Mrs. Roosevelt (President's mother). 

Currant Jelly, No. 2. — To one heaping quart of fruit put a small 
half cup of water. Put the fruit in a preserving kettle and cook to 
a pulp ; then put in a bag and drain — do not squeeze. To each pint 
of juice allow one pound of sugar. Cook from three to eight minutes. 

Mrs. Jane Jones. 



PRESER\'ING, CANNING AND JELLIES i6i 

Currant Jelly, No. 3. — Use when the}^ first ripen ; jam them and 
drain through a bag twice without squeezing; allow a pound of sugar 
for a pound of juice; when the juice boils put in the sugar and let it 
thicken; then pour into glasses. Mrs. R. D. Huntington. 



Spiced Jelly.— To one quart of currant jelly add one teaspoonful 
of cinnamon and one-half teaspoonful of cloves. 

Grape Jelly.— Take grapes before they are thoroughly ripe, put 
them in a porcelain kettle and mash with a spoon ; when soft put in 
a bag and press out the juice. Allow a pound of sugar to a pint of 
juice ; boil the juice twenty minutes ; put in the sugar and stir till 
dissolved and boil a moment. If the fruit is over ripe it will never 
be a firm jelly. It is difficult to make jelly of some grapes but sour 
apple juice added will make the jelly firmer. Mrs. Hawkins. 

Crab Apple Jelly. — Remove the stems and blossoms from the 
fruit ; cut in two and put in a porcelain kettle with water to nearly 
cover ; cook until soft; put in a flannel bag and drain ; for each pint 
of juice allow one pound of sugar ; boil the juice ten or fifteen 
minutes; skim thoroughly; heat the sugar in the oven and add to the 
juice, then let it just come to a boil and strain into glasses. 

Mrs. Brennan. 

Note. — Transcendent apple makes the best jelly. 

Other Jellies.— Jellies can be made from quinces, peaches and 
plums by following the directions for crab apple jelly. 

Marmalade.— Cut up peaches, crab apples or quinces without 
paring, cover with water and boil until tender ; rub through a sieve 
and to every pint of pulp add one pint of sugar ; boil two hours, 
stirring often. 



1 62 PRESERVING. CANNING AND JELLIES 

Crab Apple Marmalade. — Partly peal the apples, then quarter 
and core them. Use one pound of sugar to a pound of fruit and let 
stand together over night. In the morning put on the stove and let 
come to a boil ; then set back and let it simmer for three hours, stir- 
ring occasionally. To every eight or ten pounds of fruit add, when 
you put on the stove, two cut-up lemons. Take the crab apples 
when the}^ are first ripe and juicy. Mrs. W. H. King. 



Orange Marmalade, No, 1. — Six oranges and three lemons sliced 
very thin. Add one quart of water to each pound of fruit and set 
away for a day in an earthen bowl or jar; then cook till tender and 
weigh, and allow to each pound one pound of sugar. Boil slowly 
until it thickens. Makes about twelve glasses. 

Mrs. Hawkins. 



Orange Marmalade, No. 2. — Take thin skinned oranges, take 
out the pulp with a teaspoon and add it to the peel chopped very fine. 
A pound of sugar to each orange, a quart of water to every two 
oranges, one lemon added to every four oranges. Put the water on 
after the fruit is chopped and let it stand thirty-six hours. Then put 
on the stove and let boil ( not too hard ) an hour, then add the sugar 
and cook until the juice begins to jell when tried on a cold saucer. 
If the oranges are sweet do not hesitate to use more lemons. 

Mrs. E. W. Knowlton. 



Orange Marmalade No. 3. — Two bitter oranges, two sweet 
oranges, two lemons. Slice the fruit very thin, add three pounds of 
water to each pound of fruit. Let stand ( in earthen or porcelain 
ware ) twenty hours. Boil one hour ( uncovered ). Let cool, then 
weigh the mixture and to each pound add three-fourths of a quart of 
sugar. Boil one hour, then pour into glasses. Fills about twelve. 

Mrs. Ransom. 



PRESERVING, CANNING AND JELLIES 163 

Sugared Orange Peel.— Cut the peel into narrow strips with 
scissors. Boil in plenty of water, till tender, changing the water 
after the first ten minutes. Drain as dry as possible. Make a 
syrup of one and one-half cups of sugar and three-fourths cup of 
water. Put in the peel and cook slowly until the syrup is absorbed. 
Spread on a flat dish and sprinkle over it a handful or two of pow- 
dered sugar. Mrs. Shaw. 

Candied Orange Peel.— Soak the peel of the oranges over night 
in salt and water, one-half teaspoonful of salt to one quart of water. 
Drain this brine off and put on fresh water enough to rinse the peel. 
Cut the peel into narrow strips and boil in three waters until tender. 
After draining off the last water, boil in a syrup made of the same 
amount of sugar as fruit. When the peel has entirely absorbed this 
syrup it will be crystalized and ready to eat. 

Mrs. Wallace C. Short. 

Frosted Fruit. — Dip the fruit in the beaten whites of eggs ; then 
in pulverized sugar ; put white paper in tins and lay on the fruit to 
dry in a very cool oven. Mrs. R. D. Huntington. 

Note. — In canning fruit use the extra juice that cannot be put 
into the jars to make a jelly. Add enough dissolved gelatine to the 
juice to make it mould when cold ; serve it with whipped cream and 
you have a delicious dessert. 



COFFEE, TEA AND OTHER BEVERAGES. 

'■'■Though we eat little flesh and drink no wine. 
Yet leVs be merry: zve'll have tea and toast. " 

Coffee.— Allow a heaping tablespoonful to each person and one 
extra; use half of one egg for six persons, and mix it with the 
coffee; then moisten thoroughly with cold water; just fifteen minutes 
before it is to be served pour on boiling water, allowing a coffee- 
cupful for each person and one extra ; let it boil about five minutes, 
stirring it when the coffee rises to the top ; place on the back of the 
stove to settle or add a tablespoonful of cold water. 

Mrs. S. S. Whittelsey. 

Another Way. — Prepare the coffee and Qgg as above, put the 
mixture into cold water in a tightly covered vessel, and boil five 
minutes, or have a pot or can that fits into the tea kettle, and steam, 
keeping the water in the tea kettle boiling all the time. Two- 
thirds Java and one-third Mocha makes a nice flavored coffee. 

Coffee for One Hundred. — Take three pounds of coffee ; beat in 
six eggs, with their shells ; put in first enough cold water to mix 
well; then pour over boiling water; cover tight. Mrs. Gallnow. 

Tea. — For moderate strength use one teaspoonful to half a pint 
of water ; pour on boiling water, leaving the pot standing where it 
will be at the boiling point yet will not boil, for from three to five 
minutes, keeping tightly covered. 

Note. — To have first class tea, you must have freshly boiled 
water. 

Iced Tea. — Make tea by recipe already given. Strain into an 
earthen pitcher and when cool set in an ice chest until wanted for 
use. To serve, put two lumps of sugar with cracked ice and a slice 
of lemon into a glass and fill with cold tea. 



COFFEE, TEA AND OTHER BEVERAGES 165 

Iced Drinks. — Mid-summer brings compensation for heat in the 
many iced drinks which can be prepared from fresh fruits. The 
simplest of these are prepared by crushing- the fruit, adding suffi- 
cient sugar to sweeten and, after a few hours' maceration, pressing 
ofiF the clear juice. This, before serving, is mixed with an equal 
amount of ice water. A small amount of lemon juice — about one 
tablespoonful to the pint — will intensify and improve the flavor of all 
fruit while a well made lemonade used in some, such as pineapple, 
strawberry, raspberry and currant, in place of iced water, makes an 
agreeable drink. For those who desire iced beverages at meals, 
cocoa, tea or coffee may be used. The cocoa should be made with 
boiling water, sweetened and cooked for a few minutes, then chilled 
and served with cream, whipped or plain. Coffee should be clear 
and freshly prepared before icing, and it is usual to sweeten it 
slightly before cooling. Tea is steeped and strained in the orthodox 
manner; some prefer to serve it hot and of unusual strength, pouring 
it into glasses filled with cracked or crushed ice, thus chilling it 
instantly. 



Chocolate, No. 1. — One square of W. Baker's chocolate grated,^ 
stir with this two teaspoonfuls of sugar and one tablespoonful of cold 
water, add one-half pint of boiling water and boil five minutes. 
Scald one-half pint of milk and add to the chocolate the last moment 
before serving. Add one small spoon of whipped cream to each cup 
just before it is served. For fifty medium sized cups one pound of 
chocolate is required, with one and one-half cups of sugar, four 
quarts of water, the same of milk and one pint of cream. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Chocolate, No. 2. — A famous Washington recipe. — Break up the 
chocolate and place in a warm spot to melt; put in a farina kettle 
and pour on boiling milk; stir while pouring in the milk and stir 
constantly while cooking; let it boil some minutes and serve with 
whipped cream. 



i66 COFFEE, TEA AND OTHER BEVERAGES 

Raspberry Shrub. — Cover the berries with vinegar and let them 
stand over night in an earthen bowl. Then mash them a little and 
strain through a bag. To every pint of juice add one piound of white 
sugar. Boil twenty minutes and bottle when cool. When served 
add the juice of one lemon to one quart of the prepared shrub. 

Mrs. McClary. 



Blackcap Shrub. — Made the same as raspberry 



Soda Cream.— Two and one-half pounds of white sugar, two 
ounces of tartaric acid^both dissolved in one quart of hot water; 
when cold add the beaten whites of three eggs, stirring well; jflavor 
to taste; bottle for use. Put two tablespoonfuls of this into a glass 
of cold water and stir in one-fourth teaspoonful of soda. 

Mrs. Willard. 



Lemonade.— Good lemonade can be made with half a pint of 
lemon juice, three pints of water, and a generous pint of sugar. 
Strain ; water and sugar may be boiled iiv*e minutes before adding 
to the juice. 



Orangeade. — Oranges with lemons in the proportion of one and 
one-half cups of orange juice to one of lemon. Water and sugar to 
taste. 



Punch. — For fifty punch glasses take four quarts of water and 
the strained juice of two dozen lemons and three oranges, one quart 
can of chopped pineapple, one pint bottle of stoneless cherries. Add 
the peel of the three oranges chopped fine. Sweeten to taste. If 
desired add one pint of raspberry shrub. 

Mrs. S. T. Carpenter. 



COFFEE, TEA AND OTHER BEVERAGES 167 

Fruit Punch.— The juice of eighteen lemons, one quart can of 
pineapple ; put it tog-ether with two cups of sugar and let it stand 
one-half day. Then dilute with water and sweeten to taste. Strain 
and add whole grapes, sliced bananas and a few small pieces of 
lemon. If red color is liked use one can of strawberries or rasp- 
berries. Mrs. E. G. Mason. 

Unfermented Wine. — Three pounds of grapes, two of white sugar, 
three quarts of water ; scald the grapes and water slowly; then 
mash and strain ; add the sugar ; boil and seal as for canned fruit. 

Mrs. Dwight Dickinson. 

Grape Juice. — One peck of Concord grapes taken from the stems 
and cooked in three quarts of water. When tender strain through a 
jelly bag, being careful not to press any of the pulp through with th"e 
juice. Add two-thirds of a cup of sugar to each quart of juice. Let 
it come to a boil. Skim carefully and can or put in bottles, sealing 
air tight. Mrs. McClary. 



CHAFING DISH. 

''The frivolous work of polished idletiess.'" 

Kromanskies.— A Russian standby, are becoming a part of the 
bill of fare in many American households. They are particularly 
nice for luncheon or for Sunday night tea. For the latter they may be 
prepared the day before and tried in the chafing dish when wanted. 
To make them cut bacon into very thin regular slices and place on 
each a little finely minced cold meat of any kind, having seasoned 
with salt and paprika ; add also a bit of cream. Roll each lightly. 
Place them on the ice. Fry a golden brown. Use skewers with 
kromanskies. Mrs. Richardson. 

Chicken with Mushrooms. — One good sized chicken boiled, cut 
into dice, one can of mushrooms, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
tablespoonful of flour, one-half pint of cream, one gill of chicken 
broth, the yolks of two eggs, salt and pepper. Make sauce of the 
flour, butter, cream and broth, add the chicken, cook three minutes, 
add the mushrooms and cook two minutes longer. Add the beaten 
eggs very slowly, stirring all the while. Mrs. John Cantwell. 

Creamed Chicken. — One pint of minced chicken, one pint of 
sweet milk, one tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of flour, 
season with salt and pepper. Place the butter in the pan and allow 
it to melt. Rub the flour into the melted butter and add the milk. 
Stir constantly until the milk comes to the boiling point. Add the 
chicken, continue stirring, allowing the chicken to boil three or four 
minutes. Serve immediately on crisp crackers or toast. 

Mrs. L. F. Hodge. 

Chicken Wiggle.— One can of chicken — a coffee-cupful — one 
coffee-cupful of cream, one coffee-cupful of milk, yolks of three hard 
boiled eggs, (put through a potato ricer), one heaping tablespoonful of 



CHAFING DISH 169 

flour, one-half cofl^ee-cupful of French peas, one-eighth pound of 
butter. Place the butter in the chafing- dish with the chicken and let 
them heat thoroughly together. Mix the eggs and flour until smooth 
with a little milk. Add to the chafing dish milk and cream, then 
the thickening and the peas just before serving. Salt and pepper to 
taste. Serve on toast. Litz Dustin. 

Shrimps a la Newberg. — Pick over carefully one can of shrimps. 
Melt four tablespoonfuls of butter, add one tablespoonful of flour and 
stir until smooth. Add one-quarter of a cupful of cream and the 
shrimps, and stir very gently until heated. Add the beaten yolks of 
two eggs gradually, stirring all the while. Salt and pepper to 
taste. Jessie Marshall. 

Panned Oysters. — Place oysters in the dish with a tablespoonful 
of butter and a little salt. Cover closely and light the lamp. Stir 
occasionally and w^hen the oysters are plump and the gills curled 
they are ready to serve. One-half cup of thick sweet cream may be 
poured over them if desired before taking up. E. McClary. 

Lobster. — Melt four tablespoonfuls of butter, add three table- 
spoonfuls of flour and a liberal seasoning of salt and pepper. Pour 
in one and a half cups of milk and stir till creamy, then add one 
cup of lobster meat and one cup of canned peas from which every 
drop of liquor has been drained. Bring just to the boiling point, 
then serve. Shrimps may be used instead of lobster if one likes 
their flavor. 

Creamed Lobster.— Melt three tablespoonfuls of butter, add four 
tablespoonfuls of flour, and pour in one and a half cups of milk. 
Season with salt and paprika. Stir with a wire whisk till the 
sauce is creamy, then add one pound of lobster meat and two tea- 
spoonfuls of lemon juice. Serve with sandwiches of graham or 
brown bread. 

ri2i 



ijo CHAFING DISH 

Scrambled Eggs. — Beat five eggs till slightlj^ blended, add a 
dust of white pepper, half a teaspoonful of salt and half a cup of 
milk. Melt two tablespoonfuls of butter in the chafing dish, pour 
in the ^^^ mixture and cook till it is creamy, scraping it from the 
bottom of the pan as it becomes thick. Scrambled eggs are nice 
accompanied by saltine wafers. 

To Make a Good " Rabbit ".—Use a chafing dish. In the 
upper pan put enough milk — I don't know just how much — half a 
cup or a little more. Put in about two pounds of cheese cut up fine 
or mashed with a fork. Put in butter depending on the richness of 
the cheese, say butter the size of an ordinary hen's ^^^, set up 
machine, with hot water for a starter in the bottom pan and set 
flame agoing. Turn over the cheese occasionally, only do not stir. 
In a glass or other dish as seems necessary, mix up red pepper, 
mustard and any other seasoning that you may want. In another 
dish beat up one or two eggs, depending on how much of the stuff 
you are making. When the cheese is all melted ( this is a critical 
point ) put in the seasoning and mix. Put in the ^^^ and beat 
well. If there seems to be too little milk in the solution, put in a 
little before the ^^^ is added and allow to become heated. When the 
^^^ has been beaten well into the mess, cover and allow to thicken, 
stirring occasionally. N. F. McClar3^ 

Tomato Fricassee. — One-half quart can of tomatoes, one heaping 
tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper to season very highly, and 
one pinch of soda. Simmer fifteen minutes, add three well beaten 
eggs and take from the fire the moment it begins to thicken. Pour 
over toast. Jessie Marshall. 

Tomatoes and Rice. — Put into a chafing dish a half cupful of 
tomatoes, add a bay leaf, a few drops of onion juice, pepper and 
salt to taste. Let them cook until tender, then remove the bay leaf 
and stir in as much boiled rice as can be well coated and moistened 
with the tomatoes. Serve with cracker biscuits. 



CHAFING DISH 171 

Italian Spaghetti. — Fill the pan with enough salted water to cover 
the spag-hetti. Bend the sticks into the water slowly so as not to 
break them. Cook until tender — about twenty minutes. Serve on 
hot plates and cover v^ith Italian sauce and grated Parmesan cheese. 

Sauce. — One cup of tomato soup, butter the size of a walnut, one 
eup of chopped olives, three or four chopped mushrooms, paprika, 
cayenne, salt, to taste. The sauce is improved by being made 
few hours before using. S. H. B. Clark. 

Fudge. — Two cups of granulated sugar, piece of butter one-half 
the size of a walnut, one-half cup of water, one-half cup of sweet 
cream, one square of Baker's chocolate. Place the butter, water 
and chocolate in the chafing dish. Allow it to boil, stirring only 
when necessary to prevent burning. As soon as a few drops of the 
mixture will form a soft ball in cold water add the cream and boil 
until the same degree of consistency is again reached. Remove the 
pan and allow the candy to cool thoroughly. Flavor with vanilla 
and stir vigorously until the candy is set. Pour on buttered pan 
which is not more than six inches square, as the fudge is delicious 
when thick. Nuts may be added soon after the stirring is begun if 
desired. Mrs. L. F. Hodge. 



CANDY. 

'■'■ Come, give us a taste of your quality.'"' 

Fondant. — Put two cups of granulated sugar and one of hot water 
(pinch of cream tartar if you wish) in a sauce pan on the fire and 
stir rantil the sugar is dissolved, not a moment longer. Watch while 
boiling, carefully wiping off the crystals which form on the sides of 
the pan, with a cloth wet in cold water, as these crystals dropping 
into the syrup will cause it to granulate when cooling; remove any 
scum which may appear. When it has boiled about ten minutes 
begin to test it. Chill the fingers in ice water, then dip them 
quickly in the syrup and back in the water. When the syrup picked 
up with the fingers forms a soft ball, pour it out on a greased 
platter (do not scrape out the sauce pan). When nearly cool begin 
to stir it with a fork or wooden paddle; stir continuously and rapidly 
until it is white and creamy; when too stiff to stir, knead till soft 
and smooth. This fondant forms the base of many candies. 

Nut Candy. — One cup of sweet cream; two cups of maple sugar, 
melted together; boil until it begins to grain, avoiding much stirring; 
put butternut meats in a tin and pour over them the syrup; cut in 
squares. Mrs. Pitman. 

Chocolate Caramels. — One cup of grated chocolate, one cup of 
molasses, one cup of brovi^n sugar, one cup of milk, a piece of butter 
the size of an ^^^. Put the ingredients in a kettle, adding one table- 
spoonful of glycerine, and boil fast. When nearly done, add the 
chocolate; test by dropping into cold water, and pour into buttered 
pans. When cool make into blocks with the back ofJ[a knife. 

Hoarhound Candy.— Steep one tablespoon of hoarhound in a half 
cup of water, strain and add one pint of sugar and one tablespoon 
of vinegar. Boil without stirring, and when brittle pour into 
buttered pans. Mark off into squares while warm. 



CANDY 173 

Stuffed Dates. — Remove the stone from the date, place a half 
walnut meat within the fruit, press tightly together, and roll in 
granulated sugar. Mrs. N. Porter. 

Note. — Preserved ginger in place of walnut meats is delicious. 

Pinoche. — One large cup of milk to one pound of coffee C. sugar, 
a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Boil until it will mould into a 
soft ball when tried in water. Just before taking from the fire stir 
in half a pound of chopped English walnuts and stir briskly until it 
begins to thicken; pour in buttered pan. Anna Lincoln. 

Fudge. — One cup of milk, two cups of sugar, one-fourth cake of 
Baker's chocolate, butter the size of a walnut. Cook over a hot fire. 
When it becomes a soft ball, add one teaspoon of vanilla, and stir 
briskly. Just before pouring on a platter add chopped walnuts, 
when almost cold cut into small squares. Katharine L. King. 

Vassar Fudge. — Put into a sauce pan four tumblers of sugar, 
two of milk. Grate into this one-half cake of chocolate, and add a 
piece of butter the size of a walnut. Cook over a hot fire and stir 
constantly. When it becomes a soft ball, add about one-half tea- 
spoon of vanilla, and remove from the stove. Stir until it becomes 
like thick cream. Pour on a large piece of white paper; when 
almost cold and before it becomes hardened, cut into small squares 
and put into dishes for serving. Gertrude L. Chesley. 

College Candy. — Two cups of maple or brown sugar, one-third 
of a cup of sweet cream, one-half pound of English walnuts. Boil 
the sugar and cream until it forms a ball when dropped in water, 
stirring constantly. Remove from the stove and add the walnuts 
chopped fine; stir until the mixture begins to whiten, turn into pans 
and when cold cut into squares. E. McClary. 

Peanut Candy. — Two cups of white sugar, one cup of vinegar, 
two quarts of peanuts; let the sugar and vinegar boil until hard, 
testing by dropping into cold water; flavor a little with vanilla and 
add the peanuts; pour into flat tins, and just before hardenuig cut 
into squares. Mary E. Parmelee. 



174- CANDY 

Macaroons. — Blanch one-half pound of almonds; when dry pound 
them fine; beat the whites of three egg-s to a stiff froth; add one-half 
pound of white sugar and the almonds; flavor with extract of bitter 
almonds; drop a small teaspoonful in a place on buttered paper; 
sift sugar over them and bake slowly half or three-quarters of an 
hour. Mrs. R. D . Huntington. 

Cream Candy. — Three cups of sugar, one-half cup of water, one 
tablespoonful of vinegar; boil fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. George Sabin. 

Chocolate Creams. — Shape the fondant into balls and have the 
chocolate melted over steam. To cover the balls lay them, one at a 
time, upon a silver fork and pour over them the melted chocolate 
with a teaspoon and place the balls upon oil paper. 

Mrs. John Lincoln. 

Peanut Brittle.— Three cups of granulated sugar, one cup of 
crushed peanuts. Put the sugar in a frying pan and heat gradually, 
stirring constantl^s until the sugar is all melted. Do not let it 
scorch. Have your tins buttered. Stir the peanuts into the melted 
sugar and pour in tins. Other nuts may be used. 

Mrs. A. H. Proctor. 

Kisses. — ^Beat the whites of four eggs to a very stiif froth; stir in 
half a pound of powdered sugar; flavor with rose or lemon; continue 
to beat until very light; spread white paper over a board half an 
inch thick; drop the mixture by spoonfuls on the paper, having them 
one inch apart; place in the oven, watching carefully until they 
have a golden tint; lift from the paper with a thin knife blade and 
stick them together at the base by twos. Mrs. Munger. 

Peppermint Drops.— One cup of sugar, a very little water, boil 
until it hairs. Remove from the stove, add a pinch of cream tartar 
and three drops of oil of peppermint, stir until the mixture begins to 
whiten. Drop with a spoon on buttered paper. Wintergreen oil 
may be used instead of the peppermint and cochineal may be used 
to color them pink. E. McClary. 



CANDY 175 

Molasses Candy, No. 1. — One cup of New Orleans molasses, one- 
half cup of white sugar; boil until it cracks in water, then add one- 
half teaspoonful of soda; pour on a buttered tin or marble ; pull as 
soon as it is cool enough until hard. L. V. Hubbard. 

Molasses Candy, No. 2. — Two cups of molasses, one cup of 
sugar, a piece of butter the size of an &gg, one tablespoon of 
glycerine. Boil twenty or thirty minutes until brittle. Stir in one- 
half teaspoonful of soda, and pour on a large platter. When cool 
enough, pull on a hook until white. Draw into sticks and cut with 
shears. Mary E. Parmelee. 

Molasses Candy, No. 3.— Two cups of New Orleans molasses, 
one cup of sugar, four tablespoons of vinegar, butter the size of a 
small Q^^. Boil until when dropped in cold water you can pull it. 
Pour on buttered platters, and let stand until you can handle it, not 
until too cool. Miss Cahill. 

French Cream. — Break in a bowl the white of one or more eggs; 
add an equal quantity of cold water. Then stir in confectioner's 
sugar until it is stiif enough to mould into shape with the fingers. 
Flavor to taste. 

Chocolate Creams. — Mould French cream into small cone-shaped 
balls. Let them harden several hours and then cover with melted 
chocolate. 

Fig Candy. — To half a pound of fondant add one-fourth of a pound 
of figs chopped fine, roll the mixture out on a board into a flat cake 
cut into oblong pieces and dust with confectioner's sugar or cover 
with melted chocolate. If liked, raisins may be substituted for the 
figs. E. McClary. 

Walnut Creams. — Make a ball of French cream about the size of 
a walnut and place a half nut meat upon either side of the ball, 
pressing it into the cream. Other nut creams may be made by chop- 
ping the meats fine and working into French cream, and cutting 
into bars. 



176 CANDY 

Butter Taffy. — Take two heaping cups of sugar, and of water 
only one, and put them in a kettle on the fire; of molasses half a 
cup, and — before you take it up — all the butter the family can spare. 
Now you stir it, and you mix it, and you watch it all the time, and 
j^ou boil the whole concoction till it hairs. Then you tr3^ it on a 
plate (it will surely be first rate), and you pour it into pans and cut 
it into squares. 

Salted Almonds.— Shell the nuts and pour boiling water over 
them; let them stand in the water a minute or two, and then throw 
them into cold water, and rub between the hands. To every cupful 
add one even tablespoon of melted butter or olive oil and let stand 
a while. Sprinkle with a level teaspoon of salt. Place in a moder- 
ately hot oven and bake until brown, stirring occasionally. Peanuts 
ma3^ be salted in the same way. E. McClar3\ 

Salted Peanuts. — Select raw peanuts. Blanch hy pouring over 
them boiling water. Heat lard enough to cover the peanuts nicelj', 
the same as for frying doughnuts. Put the peanuts in and let them 
cook, stirring constantly, until they are as brown as you wish. 
Remove and let drain in a sieve, then put them on several brown 
papers until all the lard is absorbed. When this is done, salt to 
taste. Mrs. A. H. Proctor. 



FOR THE SICK. 

" Simple Diet is best; for- many dishes bring many diseases. " 

Sleeplessness.— This may be relieved by laying a cold wet cloth 
on the back of the neck, with a dry cloth outside. 

Beef Tea, No. 1. — Take a pound of the juicy round of beef steak; 
cut into thin strips an inch long-; put into a sauce pan, and first 
cover with cold water; set over the stove where it will warm grad- 
ually; when it comes to a boil let it boil five minutes; pour ofiF, and 
put in salt. Mrs. M. K. Wead. 

Beef Tea, No. 2.— Cut up the beef in small pieces, place in a 
bottle or glass can; set in a kettle of cold water and cook slowly 
until the juice of the meat is extracted. Add salt after it is done. 

Mrs. McClary. 

Chicken Jelly.— Half a raw chicken pounded with a mallet to 
break the bones; put in about a quart of warm water; let it simmer 
in a covered vessel until the meat is in rags and the liquid reduced 
one-half; strain through a coarse cloth, return to the fire, and season 
to taste; simmer live minutes longer; when cool skim the oil from the 
top. Keep on ice. 

Indian Meal Gruel.— Stir two tablespoonfuls of the meal to a 
smooth paste with cold water and put into one pint of boiling water. 
Let this boil for one-half hour, stirring often as it burns easily; if 
too thick add a little water. Season to taste. 

Farina Gruel. — Add one saltspoonful of salt to one cupful of 
boiling water; when boiling sprinkle in one teaspoonful of farina; 
cook for ten minutes; add one cupful of milk, cook five minutes and 
serve. 



178 FOR THE SICK 

Sago Gruel. — A heaping tablespoonful of sago, washed in several 
slightly warm waters; put this into a coffeecup of water; when 
boiled up clear put in half a teacup of milk; as soon as scalded take 
off, and add one or two tablespoonfuls of thin cream; salt to taste. 

Mrs. M. K. Wead. 

Oat Meal Blanc Mange. — Cook to a jelly; strain through a fine 
sieve, and mould; salt while cooking. Mrs. C. B. Beardsley. 

Mutton Broth. — One pound of lean mutton or lamb, cut small; 
one quart of cold water; a small tablespoonful of rice, soaked in a 
little warm water; add a little milk if preferred; salt and pepper to 
taste. 

Corn Tea. — Brown and pound in a mortar one cup of sweet dry 
corn; pour on two cups of boiling water, and steep fifteen minutes. 
This is light and nutritious, and can be taken when the patient is 
very weak. 

Toast Water. — Slices of bread dried thoroughly and nicely 
browned; pour over enough boiling water to cover them; let them 
steep until cold, keeping closely covered; strain, and sweeten to 
taste; put a piece of ice in a glassful. 

Hot Milk is both nourishing and stimulating, when one is 
weary it is more easily digested than cold milk. Should be taken 
slowly in sips. 

For Indigestion. — Sprinkle cayenne pepper over food. 

Flaxseed Lemonade.— Four tablespoonfuls of flaxseed, one quart 
of boiling water, let remain in a covered dish three hours. When' 
cold add the juice of two lemons and sweeten to taste. Take ice cold. 
This makes a soothing drink in throat and lung troubles. 



FOR THE SICK 179 

Kumyss. — Put into a self-sealing- pint bottle one tablespoon of 
sug-ar, and one-sixth of a Fleischman's yeast cake; fill the bottle to 
within three inches of the top with new milk and seal. Let it 
remain in a warm place nine hours— shaking frequently, at least 
once an hour. Then let it stand in a cold place for three hours, 
when it will be ready for use. An excellent and nourishing drink. 

Mrs. J. S. Phillips. 

Cough Mixture, No. 1. — Two ounces of flaxseed, one-fourth pound 
of rock candy, one cup of sugar, three cents worth of hoarhound, one 
stick of black licorice, two lemons boiled whole, cut and squeezed 
after boiling; one quart of water. Simmer all except the sugar and 
licorice for two hours — then strain, pressing the juice from the 
lemons; add the sugar and licorice and stir over the fire until the 
licorice is dissolved. L. C. Wead. 

Cough Mixture, No. 2.— Make a syrup of one pound of white 
sugar and one pint of water; dissolve two ounces of licorice ball in 
one pint of water; one-fourth ounce of opium in eight ounces of 
alcohol; let it stand over night; one ounce of anise oil in two ounces 
of alcohol; one-half ounce of pulverized blood root steeped in one pint 
of water and strained; mix the ingredients; take one-half teaspoonful 
as often as the case may require. Mrs. Gurley. 

Cough Syrup. — One ounce each of licorice root, flaxseed, thor- 
ough wort, slippery elm and anise seed; steep until all the strength 
is extracted; strain and a^d one pint of molasses and one pound of 
white sugar; simmer to a quart. Excellent for children. 

Mrs. House. 

Mustard Plaster.— Mix thoroughly flour and ground mustard in 
the proportions required — usually one-third mustard to two-thirds 
flour or mustard and flour equal parts — add hot water in sufficient 
quantity to make a thick paste. Spread on cotton cloth and cover 
with cheese cloth or old linen. Mixing with the white of an egg 
will prevent blistering. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

''A storehouse of comical oddities 
That have niver been neighbors before."" 

Entertainment Supplies for Fifty Guests.— For chicken salad 
allow five medium-sized chickens and twelve heads of celery. One 
hundred sandwiches; two loaves of loaf cake and three of layer. 
One and one-half pounds of coffee and three pints of cream for the 
same; two gallons of ice cream; two moulds of jell3^ 

Church Supper Supplies for One Hundred Guests. — For chicken 
pies use fifteen medium-sized chickens. For escalloped oysters allow 
two gallons of oysters, four pounds of crackers, two pounds of butter. 
For hash, ten pounds of corned beef with double the quantit}^ of 
potato. With any two of these allow ten dozen biscuit; five pounds 
of butter; twelve pounds of ham before cooking; six quarts of cab- 
bage salad; twelve heads of celery; five dozen boiled eggs for egg 
salad; seventy-five doughnuts; three pounds of cheese; three loaves 
of white cake, two of dark, four of la^'^er; three pounds of cofifee and 
three quarts of cream for the same. 

To Make Sandwiches. — Butter the bread before cutting the slices 
from the loaf. In this wa3' they can be made much thinner. 

To Cut Warm Bread.— Heat a thin bladed knife on the stove or 
in boiling water. 

To Cook Dried Fruits. — All fruits should be well washed and 
soaked in cold water twelve hours before cooking. Cook slowly in 
the same water. 

To Stone Raisins. — Pour over them boiling water and the seeds 
can easily be removed. It also improves them for a cake or pudding. 



MISCELLANEOUS i8i 

Sharp Vinegar. — Put West India molasses into cold'water until 
the mixture will bear up an egg-, showing a piece of the o.^^ shell 
as large as a five cent piece; set in the sun or a warm place. 
Remove the mother when it forms. 

Vanilla Extract. — One vanilla bean, five tonka beans; ten ounces 
of alcohol, six of water, three of sugar; break the beans in small 
pieces; put all together and shake every day for six weeks. 

Mrs. H. H. Thompson. 

To Clean Straw Matting. — Wash with a cloth dipped in clean salt 
and water, then wipe dry at once. This prevents its turning yellow. 

Filling for Cracks in Floors. — Thoroughly soak newspapers in a 
paste made of one-half pound of flour, three quarts of water and 
one-half pound of alum mixed and boiled until like putty. 

Bouquet of Herbs. — Four leaves of parsley, one of celery, one of 
bay leaf, one of thyme, and two cloves; fold together and tie with a 
string. 

To Remove Paint from Window Glass.— Put sufficient pearl-ash 
into hot water to make a very strong solution; saturate the spots of 
paint with this and let it remain until nearly dry; then rub off with 
a woolen cloth. Mrs. Caldwell. 

Ink and Iron Rust Stains. — Such stains can generally be removed 
from white cloth with oxalic acid. Wash immediately. 

Mildew.— Take lemon juice mixed with an equal weight of salt, 
powdered starch and soft soap; rub thickly on the spots, renewing 
two or three times a day until the spots disappear; strong soft soap 
alone will often do as well if placed in the sun. 

To Make Good Starch.— Mix the starch with cold water; add 
boiling water until it thickens, then add a dessert spoon of sugar 
and a small piece of butter or lard. This makes a stiff and glossy 
finish. 



1 82 MISCELLANE O US 

Paste. — Three level tablespoonfuls of flour with enough water 
for a smooth paste, one-fourth teaspoonful of powdered alum, one- 
half cup of cold water. Stir constantly and cook until well thick- 
ened; then add twenty drops of oil of cloves and pack in a glass jar. 
When mounting pictures apply the paste with a piece of soft cloth. 

Mrs. McClar3\ 

Shirt Polish. — One cup of starch, one and one-half ounces of 
spermaceti, three-fourths of an ounce of paraffine, one and one-half 
ounces of white wax, one teaspoonful of gum arable, one quart of 
warm water. Mix, and boil ten minutes. Put one teaspoonful of 
the mixture to each pint of starch. 

To Starch Mull or Lace. — Into a teacupful of water put a small 
teaspoonful of dissolved gum arable; dry the goods after starching 
and dampen before ironing — will make them look like new. 

To Wash White Flannel. — Dissolve borax, one tablespoonful for 
each three quarts of warm water. Let the goods soak in this an 
hour, turning over frequently. If much soiled, add a little white 
soap to the water and rub with the hands. Rinse and shake out 
well. 

To Wash Calicoes. — Put a teaspoonful of sugar of lead into a 
pailful of water and soak fifteen minutes before washing. For 
stiffening navy blue cambrics use dark glue instead of starch. 

Wash Goods liable to fade should be washed in a strong solution 
of salt, allowing a cup of salt to a quart'of hot water. While the 
water is warm put the material in and let it lie for a time; then take 
out and wash in the usual way. 

To prevent the salt from absorbing the dampness and becoming 
hard in the salt cellars during the summer season mix a little corn 
starch or rice flour with the salt, using one spoonful of starch to six 
of salt. 



MISCELLANEOUS 183 

Hard Wood Floors. — First fill the wood. Then put on three or 
four coats of white shellac, letting each coat harden, after which put 
on a good floor wax. Rub the wax on with a cloth, letting it stand 
for an hour or more. Then polish with a weighted floor brush, first 
lengthways, then across. To keep in good order wax every month. 
Never put the wax on thick. 

If hard wood floors are properly finished when laid the}' require 
but little attention to keep them looking well; a rubbnig over with 
gasoline every two or three months will be all the^^ require, and a 
broom covered with cotton flannel, the nap side out, is the best kind 
of a duster to use on them every morning. 

Hard Soap.— Six pounds of sal soda, in crystal; three pounds of 
unslacked lime; four gallons of water; put all in a kettle and boil 
until dissolved; then let it settle; pour off the liquid and add to it 
seven pounds of clean grease (if tallow, six pounds); boil to the 
thickness of honey; pour into a wash tub and cut in bars. 

Soft Soap. — Ten pounds of grease, six pounds of washing soda, 
eight gallons of hot water; let it stand for several da3's— until the 
grease is eaten up; if too thick add more water; stir every da}'. If 
wood ashes are used instead of soda boil the mixture. 

To Clean Coffee and Tea Pots.— The black coating which 
collects inside the coffee and tea pots may be easily removed. 
Throw a handful of cooking soda in the pot, fill it with boiling 
water, let it stand on the back of the stove for five or six hours and 
then wash and rinse it in boiling water. Be careful to clean out the 
spout. This process will make the inside of an old coffee pot bright 
and sweet. 

To Remove Coffee, Tea, Chocolate and Fruit Stains.— Place a 
bowl on the table, spread the stained part over it, pour boiling water 
on it from a height so as to strike the stain with force. 



/ 84 M ISC ELLA NEO US 

To Clean Lamp Burners. — Put the burners into water in which 
beans have been soaked or parboiled and boil one hour, then clean 
with sapolio or bath brick. Mrs. F. W. Lawrence. 

How to Keep Flatirons Clean and Smooth.— Rub them first with 
a piece of wax tied in a cloth, and afterwards scour them on a paper 
or cloth strewn with coarse salt. 

To Wash Chamois. — Two quarts of moderately warm water, two 
heaping teaspoonfuls of borax, let soak for about ten minutes, then 
wash. Then take two quarts of water with one teaspoonful of borax, 
and wash again, rinse well, pull out smooth; when partly dry rub 
with the hands. Mrs. Ralph. 

Furniture Varnish. — One pint of Japan, five cents worth of 
asphaltum varnish, one tube of Indian red. Thin the mixture with 
spirits of turpentine and apply with a cloth. 

Dents in fine Polished Furniture.— They may be removed in the 
following manner: Lay a number of layers of moistened brown 
paper over the dent, and put a warm iron over them. The steam 
will gradually cause the wood to swell and to fill up the dent. It 
sometimes requires patience, but slight dents that are a considerable 
mar to furniture can be raised in this way. 

To Renew Black '^\W.—^\x\. on d, perfectly smooth ^\xxi'ACQ.\ sponge 
with clear, cold water until it sticks to the board and leave until 
thoroughly dry. Mrs. Mallon. 

To Restore Velvet that has been Wet.— Dampen it thoroughly on 
the wrong side; then hold it over a very hot iron, being careful not 
to let it touch the iron. 

For a Burn. — Apply common baking soda; there is nothing better. 

Mrs. C. B. Beardsley. 



MISCELLANEOUS 185 

Antidote for Poison.— For any poison swallow instantly a glass 
of cold water with a heaping teaspoonful of common salt and one of 
ground mustard stirred in. This is a speedy emetic. When it has 
acted swallow the whites of two raw eggs. Marion Harland. 

Spermaceti Salve. — One ounce of spermaceti, three of white wax, 
six of olive oil; melt the spermaceti and wax together; heat the oil 
and put all together, stirring until cold. 

To Remove Discoloration from Bruises.— Apply a cloth wrung 
out in hot water and renew frequently. Or, apply a piece of raw 
beef. 

To Keep Roses.— Lay them, their full length of the stems, in a 
pan of cold water, and place them in a cool place during the nights 
and they will keep for many days. 

Each recipe is true and tried, 
And sofne good housewife'' s honest pride — 

Soiue home's delight; 
And should your effort bi'itig no prize, 

I' II say not where the trouble lies, — 
' Twere impolite. 

" There are other days still, and other things we shall say.'^ 



ri3i 



[14] 



INDEX. 



Advertisements, 


217 


Beans — Contin ued. 




Almonds, salted, 


176 


Soup, . . . . 


12, 13 


Apples, 




String, . 


49 


Brownies, 


54 


Beef, 




Charlotte, 


40, 116 


A la mode, 


24 


Delmonico, 


40 


And onions smothered, 


25 


Dumplings 


101 


Chipped, 


26 


Fried, . 


40 


Chopped, 


27 


Fritters, 


54 


Corned beef hash, . 


27 


Jelly, for cake, 


140 


Dried, 


26 


Kooker, 


103 


Hamburg steak. 


25 


Pie, 


91 


Hash balls, . 


27 


Preserves, 


157 


Packing, 


26 


Pudding", 


102, 117 


Potted, . 


26 


Puffs. . 


96 


Roast, . 


24 


Puffs, filling- for, 


96 


Steak, roast, . 


26 


Sauce, baked. 


159 


Steak, to broil, . 


25 


Sauce, canned. 


159 


Stock, . 


11 


Turnovers, 


103 


Tea, 


177 


Antidote for poison. 


185 


Tongue, . 


26 


Asparagus, 


52 


Yorkshire pudding, 


24 


Asparagus, with 


cream 


Berry Tea Cake, 


84 


sauce, . 


52 


Biscuit, 




Aspic Jelly, 


65 


Baking powder, . 


SO, 81 


Bacon and Liver, 


31 


Raised, . 


78 


Bananas, 




Scotch, . 


81 


Baked, . 


40 


Soda, 


81 


Filling for cake. 


142 


Bisque, Corn, . 


16 


Float, 


117 


Black silk, to renew. 


184 


Fried, . 


40 


Blueberry Cake, 


84 


Ice cream. 


121 


Boudnis, . 


36 


Pudding, 


104, 117 


Boudins, a la reine, 


3() 


Salad, 


63 


Bouillon, . 


12 


Banbury Cakes, 


149 


Bread, hints for making. 


75 


Beans, 




Bread, . 


75, 76 


Baked, with pork. 


54 


Brown, . 


80 


Boston baked. 


54 


Brown, steamed, . 


80 


Salad, . 


62 


Coffee, . 


79 


Shelled, . 


49 


French, . 


76 



204 



INDEX 



Bread — Continued. 

Graham, ... 80 
Graham, steamed, . 80 
Sticks, .... 78 
Warm, to cut, . . 180 
Whole wheat, . . 79 
Brine for cucumber pickles, 151 
Bruises, to remove discolora- 
tion, .... 185 
Bunns, ... 79, 138 
Burns, remedy for, . 184 
Cabbag-e, fried, . . 49 
Calico, to wash, . . 182 
Cake, hints for making, . 129 
Angel, .... 135 
Bread, ... 135 
Chocolate, ... 133 
Chocolate and nut, . 133 
Chocolate caramel, . 130 
Chocolate, German, . 131 
Citron, ... 134 
Clove, . . . . 134 
Cocoanut, . . . 131 
Coffee, . . . . 138 
Cream fruit, ... 138 
Cream, old fashioned, . 135 
Cream, sponge, . . 137 
Flake, .... 131 

Fruit 138 

Fruit, white, . . 138 

Gold, .... 135 

Harlequin, . . . 132 
Layer, . . . 131, 132 
Nut, . . . 132, 133 
One Egg-, . . 132, 134 

Orange, . . . 132 

Potato, .... 131 

Quick 134 

Ribbon, ... 133 

Rolled Jelly, . . 133 

Silver, . . .• . 130 

Snowballs, . . . 137 

Spanish bunns, . . 138 

Spice, .... 134 



Cake — Continued. 




Sponge, 


136, 137 


Spong-e, cream, 


137 


Sponge, white, 


137 


Sunshine, 


135, 136 


White, . 


129, 130 


Candy, 


172 


Butter Taffy, 


176 


Chocolate Caramel 


s, . 172 


Chocolate Creams, 


174, 175 


College, 


173 


Cream, . 


174 


Cream, French, 


175 


Dates, stuffed, 


173 


Fig, 


175 


Fondant, 


172 


Fudge, 


171, 173 


Fudge, Vassar, 


173 


Hoarhound, . 


172 


Kisses, . 


174 


Macaroons, 


174 


Molasses, 


175 


Nut, 


172 


Peanut, 


173 


Peanut Brittle, 


174 


Peppermint Drops 


174 


Pinoche, 


173 


Walnut Creams, 


175 


Canning, 




Apple Sauce, 


1.59 


Corn, 


160 


Extra juice. 


163 


\ Peaches, 


159 


Raspberries, 


158 


Tomatoes, 


160 


Caramel for flavoring 


?, . 112 


Catsup, 




Cucumber, 


155 


Tomato, 


154 


Cauliflower, 


49 


Celery with cream sj 


luce, 53 


Chafing Dish, 


168 


Chicken, creamed, 


168 


Chicken wiggle, 


168 





INDEX 


205 


Chafing- Dish — Continued 




Chocolate, 


165 


Chicken, with mushrooms, 1(58 


Chocolate Eclairs, 


149 


Eggs, scrambled, 


170 


Coffee, . . . . 


164 


Kromanskies, 


168 


Bread, . . . . 


79 


Lobster, 


169 


Cake, . . . . 


138 


Lobster, creamed. 


169 


Cakes, . . . . 


84 


Oysters, panned, 


169 


Cakes, German, . 


79 


Rarebit, * 


170 


Cream, . . . . 


116 


Shrimps a la Newberg- 


169 


Ice Cream, 


122 


Spaghetti, Italian, 


171 


For one hundred, . 


164 


Tomatoes and rice. 


170 


Pudding, 


99 


Tomatoes, fricassee, 


170 


Consomme, 


11 


Chamois, to wash, . 


184 


Cookies, . . . . 


144 


Cheese, 




Cream, . . . . 


144 


Cottage, 


71 


Fruit, . . . . 


145 


Croquettes, 


44 


Ging-er, . . . ] 


144, 145 


Croutons, with, 


71 


Ging-er, soft. 


145 


Fondu, . 


70 


Graham, 


145 


For crackers or sand 




Maple sug-ar, 


146 


wiches, 


73 


Molasses, 


145 


Ramakins 


70 


Sour cream. 


144 


Rarebit, 


71 


Corn Cake, 


83 


Sandwiches, 


72 


Bisque, 


16 


Straws, 


70 


Cake, Parkerhouse, 


83 


Chicken, 




Cakes, . 


55 


Boudins, 


36 


Canned, 


160 


Broiled, 


33 


Griddle cakes. 


85 


Creamed, 


168 


Pudding-, 


83 


Creamed with mushrooi 


ns, 


Soup, 


16 




33, 168 


Succotash, 


50 


Croquettes, 


42 


Tea, 


178 


Curry of, in rice border 


34 


Cottage Cheese, 


71 


Fricasseed, 


33 


Coug-h Mixture, 


179 


Fried, . 


34 


Cough Syrup, 


179 


Jelly, . 


177 


Crabs, deviled. 


22 


Pie, 


34 


Cranberry Jelly, 


40 


Pressed, 


35 


Cranberry Sauce, 


40 


Salad, . 


58 


Croquettes, 


41 


Salad, in Aspic, . 


65 


Note for frying-. 


41 


Smothered, 


34 


Cheese, . 


44 


Terrapin, 


35 


Chicken, 


42 


Wig-g-le, 


168 


Macaroni, 


43 


With mushrooms, . 


168 


Oyster, 


. 42, 43 


Chili Sauce, 


154 


Potato, 


43 



2o6 



INDEX 



Croquettes— Con f I Nued. 




Rice, 


43 


Rice and Meat, 


43 


Royal, 


44 


Sauce for. 


41 


Sweetbread, 


42 


Veal, 


42 


Croutons with cheese. 


71 


Crullers, . 


88, 89 


Crumpets. 


82 


Dates, stuffed, 


173 


Desserts, 


113 


Ambrosia, 


113 


Ambrosia, Pineapple, 


113 


Apple Charlotte, . 


117 


Banana float. 


117 


Bavarian cream, . 


115 


Bivou, 


118 


Caramels, cup, 


115 


Charlotte Russe, . 


113, 114 


Charlotte Russe, mock. 


114 


Coffee cream. 


116 


Coffee jelly, 


116 


Chocolate Blanc Mange 


115 


Custards, 




Caramel, . 


114 


Coffee, 


115 


Cup, . 


114, 115 


Rice, . 


106 


Date tapioca. 


107 


Judge Peters, 


115 


Junket, 


lis 


Lemon jelly, 


119 


Orange baskets, 


118 


Orange charlotte, . 


117 


Orange float. 


117 


Orange jelly. 


119 


Orange souffle, 


116 


Raspberry gelatine. 


119 


Snow pudding, 


118 


Spanish cream 


116 


Strawberry tapioca, 


107 


Tapioca, 


106, 107 


Tutti Frutti, 


116 



Dominoes, . . . 146 

Doughnuts, . . .86, 87 

Plain, .... 87 

Raised, . . .87, 88 

Raised, Aunt Susan's, 87 

Sour cream, . . 88 

Dressing for fish, . . 17 

Fowl, .... 32 

Fowl, oyster, . . 32" 

Pickle, . . 152, 154 

Salad, .... 56 

Drinks, iced, . . . 165 
Duck, roast, ... 33 

Dumplings, 

Apple, 

For meat, 
Eggs, 

A la New burg. 

Baked, . 

Boiled, 

Creamed, 

Deviled, 

Dropped, 

Omelet, 
Asparagus, 
Bread, 
Meat, 

Poached, 

Puffs, . 

Salad, ... 61 

Sandwiches, . . 72 

Scalloped, ... 69 

Scotch woodcock, . . 69 

Scrambled, . . 66, 170 

Shaker, 

Stuffed with sardines, 

Timbales, 

With tomato sauce. 
Egg-plant, 
Fading, to prevent, . 
Filling for layer cake. 

Almond, 

Apple jelly. 

Banana, 



INDEX 



207 



Filling for layer cake — Con. 

Butternut, ... 140 

Chocolate, ... 142 

Chocolate cream, . 142 

Chocolate custard, . 142 

Cocoanut, . . . 142 

Cream, whipped, . 143 

Cream, sour, . . 14.3 

Fig-, .... 141 

Ice cream, . . . 143 

Lemon, . . . 141 

Maple, .... 140 

Marsh mallow, . . 143 

Peach, . . . 143 

Raisin, . . . 141 

Tutti Frutti, . . 141 

Walnut, ... 140 
Fish, 

Broiled, ... 19 

Codfish and potato, . 19 
Codfish balls, . . 18, 19 

Codfish, creamed, . 18 

Codfish fried in butter, 19 

Dressing-, ... 17 

Escaloped, ... 21 

Finnan haddie, . . 20 
Halibut, 

A la Flamande, . 20 

Broiled, ... 20 

Timbale, ... 23 
Mackerel, 

Broiled, . . . 19 

Salt, .... 19 

Salad, ... 59 

Salmon, 

Boiled, ... IS 

Wiggle, ... 23 

Shad roe, ... 20 

Trout, 

Adirondack, . . 17 

Baked, ... 17 

Brook, . . . 17 

Lake, ... 17 

Turbot a la creme, . 18 



Flannel, to wash, 


182 


Flatirons, to keep clean, 


184 


Flaxseed lemonade, 


178 


Floors, 




Filling for cracks, 


183 


Hard wood, . 


183 


Fritters, . 


86 


Fritters, apple, 


54 


Frosting and icing-. 




How to make. 


139 


Boiled, . 


139 


Boiled milk. 


139 


Confectioner's sugar. 


139 


Icing, 


140 


Icing, chocolate, . 


140, 149 


Frozen desserts, 


120 


Biscuit Tortoni, 


125 


Cafe Frappe, 


126 


Fig pudding, frozen. 


127 


Frozen peaches. 


126 


Frozen Pudding, . 


127 


Ices and Ice Cream, see 


below. 




Mousse, . 


124 


Mousse, cafe. 


125 


Mouse, maple. 


125 


Mousse, pineapple. 


125 


Nesselrode Pudding, 


126 


Parfait ,cafe, 


126 


Parfait, maple. 


126 


Pineapple souffle, 


128 


Vanilla glace. 


126 


Fruit drops, 


147 


Fruits, dried, to cook. 


ISO 


Fruit, frosted, . 


163 


Furniture, to remove dent 


3, 184 


Gems, Graham, 


81 


Ginger bread, . 


86 


Ginger bread, plain. 


86 


Ginger cookies, . \ 


44, 145 


Ginger cookies, soft. 


145 


Ginger snaps, 


146 


Ginger wafers, 


146 


Goose, roast, 


33 



208 


INDEX 






Graham bread, 


80 


Jam, 


Graham bread, steamed, 


80 


Raspberry, . 


Graham cookies, 


145 


Raspberry, cold. 




Graham crackers, . 


145 


Strawberry, 




Graham gems, 


81 


Jelly, 




Graham pudding-, . 


98 


Apple, for cake 




Graham rolls, raised, 


81 


Aspic, 




Grape fruit, 


119 


Chicken, 






Grape juice. 


167 


Coffee, . 






Gravy, 


37 


Crab apple. 






Griddle cakes. 


85 


Cranberry, 






Buckwheat, 


85 


Currant, 






Corn meal, 


85 


Grape, . 






Green corn, . 


85 


Lemon, 






Wheat, 


85 


Mint, 






Gruel, 




Orange, 






Farina, 


177 


Spiced, 






Indian meal. 


177 


Other kinds. 






Sago, 


178 


Jumbles, . 






Ham and eggs, 


30 


Jumbles, nut, 






Ham, baked, 


30 


Junket, 






Ham, boiled. 


30 


Kisses, 






Hamburg steak. 


25 


Kumyss, 






Head cheese, 


30 


Lace, to starch, 




Herbs, bouquet of, . 


181 


Lady fingers. 


. 


Hermits, 


146 


Lamb, 


Ice cream. 


120 


Crown of, with peas. 


Almond, 


122 


Roast, . . . . 


Banana, 


121 


Lamp burners, to clean. 


Caramel, 


122 


Laplanders, 


Chocolate, 


121 


Lemonade, . . 1 


Coffee, . 


122 


Liver and bacon. 


Maple, . 


123 


Macaroni, 


Peach, 


123 


Croquettes, 


Strawberry. 


122 


Italian, 


Vanilla, 


120 


Soup, .... 


Sauces for ice cream. 




With cheese. 


Hot chocolate, 


121 


AVith tomato sauce, 


Maple sugar. 


121 


Macaroons, 


Ices, see Sherbets and Ice 


-s, 


Macaroons, walnut. 


Indigestion, to relieve, 


178 


Marguerites, 


Irish stew. 


25 


Marmalade, 


Iron rust, to remove. 


181 


Crab apple, 




. 



60, 



166, 





INDEX 


209 


Marm3i\a.de—Conhmied. 




Oysters — Continued. 




Orange, 


162 


Salad, . 


60 


Peach, 


101 


Soup, 


15 


Quince, 


161 


Stewed, 


14 


Mayonnaise, 


57 


Paint, to remove from win- 


Mayonnaise, cooked. 


56 


dow glass. 


181 


Meat puffs, 


27 


Parsnips, 


48 


Mildew, to take out, 


181 


Partridges, to dress, 


35 


Milk, hot, 


178 


Paste, 


182 


Mince meat. 


. 90, 91 


Pate de fois gras, Mock, 


35 


Mint jelly. 


40 


Peanut Brittle, 


174 


Mint sauce. 


H7 


Peanut candy, 


173 


Miscellaneous, 


180 


Peanuts, salted. 


176 


Molasses puff, 


86 


Pears, 




Muffins, 


82 


Chipped, 


156 


Muffins, raised. 


82 


Compote, 


156 


Mull, to starch, 


182 


Preserved, 


156 


Mushrooms, 


50 


Peas, 


49 


Mustard plaster, 


179 


Peppers, green, stuffed. 


53 


Mutton broth, . 


178 


Pickles, 




Mutton, ragout of, . 


28 


Blackberries, 


150 


Nantucket corn pudding. 


83 


Cabbage, 


152 


Oat meal Blanc Mange, 


178 


Catsup, cucumber. 


155 


Omelet, 


67 


Catsup, tomato, 


154 


Asparagus, . 


67 


Chili sauce, . 


154 


Bread, . 


68 


Chow chow, . 


154 


Meat, 


68 


Cucumber, 


151 


Onions, 




Cucumber, brine for. 


151 


Escaloped, 


50 


Cucumber, ripe. 


152 


Spanish, baked, . 


51 


Cucumber sauce, 


155 


Orangeade, 


166 


Oil, . . . 


153 


Orange peel, candied, 


163 


Onions, 


152 


Orange peel, sugared, 


163 


Peaches, 


151 


Oysters, 




Peach mangoes, . 


151 


Cocktail, 


21 


Pears, . 


150 


Creamed 


21 


Pears, sickle, 


150 


Croquettes 


42, 43 


Piccalilli, 


150 


Dressing for fowl. 


32 


Plums, 


150 


Escaloped, 


21 


Shirley sauce. 


154 


Fricasseed, 


21 


Spanish, 


153 


Fried, . 


21 


Spiced currants. 


155 


Panned, 


169 


Spiced gooseberries. 


155 


Pigs in blankets, . 


23 


Spiced grapes. 


155 


Raw, sauce for, . 


39 


Tomato butter, 


155 



210 


INDEX 


Pickles — Continued. 




Potatoes au Gratin, 


Tomato, green, 


152 


Croquettes 


Watermelon, 


158 


Delmonico, 


Pies, 




Escaloped, 


Pastry, 


90 


Escaloped, raw, . 


Pastry, fine puff, 


90 


Fried, French, 


Apple, . 


91 


Fried, Saratoga, . 


Apple puffs, . 


96 


Hashed and browned, . 


Cherry, . 


96 


Lyonnaise, 


Cherry with wl 


lipped 


Potato puff, . 


cream, 


96 


Salad, . . . . 


Chocolate, 


95 


Soup, . . . . 


Cocoanut, 


94 


Stuft'ed, . . . . 


Cranberry, 


94 


Sweet, browned, . 


Cream, . 


95 


Sweet, glazed, 


Currant, 


93 


Sweet, Southern way, . 


Custard, 


94 


Warmed up, . 


Custard meringue. 


94 


Whip, . . . . 


Dutch, . 


95 


With ham. 


Jumble, . 


94 


Pots, coffee and tea, to 


Lemon, . 


. 92, 93 


clean. 


Lemon meringue, . 


92 


Preserves, 


Lemon filling for 


tarts, 97 


Apple and ginger. 


Marlborough, 


94 


Cherries, 


Mince meat for. 


. 90, 91 


Currants, 


Orange, 


93 


Currants and fruit. 


Pieplant, 


93 


Currants, cold. 


Prune filling for. 


92 


Gooseberries, 


Pumpkin, 


91 


Grape, . . . . 


Raisin, . 


94 


Peaches, 


Squash, . 


91 


Pears, . . . . 


Sweet potato. 


92 


Pears, chipped. 


Tart crust, . 


96 


Pears, compote. 


Tarts, 




Pineapple, 


Cherry, . ' 


97 


Pineapple, mock. 


Lemon, 


97 


Plums, 


To prevent syrup 


from 


Quince, 


escaping, 


96 


Strawberries, 


Pillau, 


54 


Strawberries, cold. 


Poison, antidote for, 


185 


Prune filling for pie, 


Popovers, . 


82 


Pudding sauces. 


Pork and beans, 


54 


Puddings, 


Pork, fried, 


31 


Angel food, . 



103 





INDEX 


211 


Pudding-s — Continued. 




V\xd.^\n^^— Continued . 


Apple, baked, 


102 


Rice, 


106 


Apple dumplings. Baked 101 


Rice custard. 


106 


Apple dumplings, 




Roily Polly, 


99 


Steamed, . 


101 


Short cake, 


102 


Apple kooker, 


102 


Snow, 


118 


Apple turnovers, fried, 


103 


Sponge, . 


103 


Banana, 


104 


Suet, 


97 


Batter, baked, 


104 


Tapioca, 


106, 107 


Blueberry, 


99 


Apple, 


107 


Bread, . 


105 


Caramel, 


107 


Brown Betty, 


103 


Date, 


107 


Caramel tapioca, . 


107 


Peach, 


107 


Chocolate, 


105 


Pineapple, 


107, 113 


Cocoanut, 


104 


Strawberry 


107 


Coffee, . 


99 


Vevy, . 


100 


Corn starch, 


104 


Woodford, 


98 


Corn starch meringue, 


104 


Puffs, 




Cottage, steamed. 


99 


Apple, 


96 


Cranberry, 


99 


Cream, 


148 


Custard souffle. 


108 


Date, 


100 


Date puffs. 


100 


German, 


105 


English plum. 


97 


Raisin, . 


100 


Fig, 


98 


Strawberry, 


148 


Forest, . 


98 


Pumpkin, how to cook, . 91 


French Charlotte, 


105 


Punch, 


166 


Frozen 


127 


Punch, fruit. 


167 


Fruit, 


97 


Raisins, to ston 


e, . . 180 


German puffs, 


105 


Rarebit, . 


71, 170 


Graham, 


98 


Rice, 




Indian, baked. 


101 


Boiled, . 


53 


Indian, boiled, 


100 


Croquettes, 


43 


Manioca, 


106 


Crumpets, 


82 


Minute, . 


103 


Custard, 


106 


Nesselrode, 


126 


Pudding, 


106 


Omelette souffle, . 


108 


Soup, 


11 


Orange marmalade. 


109 


Southern way 


of boiling, 53 


Parlamo, 


100 


Rolls, 


77 


Peach cobbler. 


101 


Breakfast, 


77 


Pineapple, 


107, 113 


Cinnamon, 


76 


Prune, . 


108 


Crescent, 


7*7 


Puff, . 


99 


Finger, . 


77 


Queen of. 


105 


French, . 


78 


Raisin puffs. 


100 


Graham,, rais 


2d, . . 81 



INDEX 



Rolls— Contimied. 




Salad Av^^^xr^^— Contimied. 


Horseshoe, 


77 


French, . 


58 


Meacham, 


7C 


Mayonnaise, . 


57 


Parkerhouse, 


76 


Mayonnaise, cooked. 


56 


Tea, 


77 


With lemon, . 


58 


Roses, to keep, . 


185 


Sally Lunn, 


83, 84 


Rosettes, . 


89 


Salt, to prevent hardening, 182 


Salads, directions for, 


56 


Salve, 


185 


Asparagus, . 


62 


Sandwiches, to make. 


71, 180 


Aspic jelly, . 


65 


Celery, . 


72 


Banana, 


63 


Cheese, 




72 


Bean, 


62 


Egg, 


. 


72 


Cabbage, 


60 


Ham, 


. 


73 


Celery, . 


62 


Lettuce, 


. 


72 


Chicken, 


58 


Nut, 


. 


73 


Chicken in aspic, . 


65 


Olive, 


. 


73 


Cucumber, 


62 


Orange marmalade, 


74 


Cucumber boats, . 


62 


Peanut, . 


73 


Dressing for. 


56 


Sardine, 


73 


Egg, 


61 


Spanish, 


72 


Fish, 


59 


Sweet, . 


74 


Fruit, 


63 


Watercress, . 


72 


Fruit and savory, . 


63 


Sauces for fish and meat 


37 


Green peppers, 


64 


Apple, 


40 


Lettuce, 


61 


Banana, 


40 


Lobster, 


59 


Bechamel, 


39 


Lobster, East Indian, 


59 


Butter, . 


37 


Nut and celery, 


43 


Caper, . 


39 


Nut and olive. 


43 


Cranberry, . 


40 


Nut and orange, . 


43 


Cream, . 


37 


Oyster, . 


60 


Drawn butter. 


37 


Peas and fruit, 


62 


Grav3^ brown, how 


to 


Potato, . 


60 


make . 


37 


Shrimp, 


59 


Hollandaise, . 


39 


Shurtlefie, 


60 


Horse Radish, 


39 


Sweetbread, . 


59, 64 


Maitre d' hotel, . 


38 


Tomato, 


64 


Mint, 


37 


Tomato aspic. 


64 


Mint jelly, 


40 


Veal, 


58 


Mushroom, 


38 


Vegetable, 


60 


Oysters, raw. 


39 


Waldorf, 


61 


Piquante, 


38 


Waldorf Chiffonade, 


62 


Tartare, 


38 


Salad dressing. 




Tomato, . 


38 


Cream, . 


57, 58 


White, 




37 





INDEX 


213 


Sauces, pudding-, 


110 


Soup — Con tin ucd. 




Caramel, 


112 


Beef stock. 


11 


Cream, 


111, 112 


Bouillon, 


12 


For cranberry pudding. 


112 


Celery, cream of, . 


15 


Fairy butter, 


111 


Consomme, 


11 


Foaming-, 


110 


Corn, 


16 


Hard, . 


111 


Corn bisque, . 


16 


Lemon, . 


112 


Macaroni, 


11 


Maple Sug-ar, 


112 


Oyster, . 


15 


Molasses, 


112 


Oyster stew, . 


14 


Sour, 


111 


Pea, 


13 


Strawberry, . 


111 


Pea. green, cream of, 


16 


Velvet, 


112 


Pea, split, 


13 


Vevy, 


111 


Potato^ . 


14 


Sausage, . 


30, 31 


Rice, 


11 


Scallops, deviled. 


22 


Tomato, . 


14 


Fried in batter. 


22 


Turkey, . 


15 


Sherbets and ices. 




Turkish, 


15 


Cafe Frappe 


126 


Vegetable tomato, . 


12 


Milk, 


124 


Velvet, . 


16 


Orange, . 


124 


Vermicelli, 


11 


Peach, . ... 


124 


White stock for, . 


15 


Pineapple, 


124 


Spaghetti, Italian, . 


171 


Sicilian, 


124 


Souse, 


30 


Lemon ice, 


123 


Spiced currants, 


155 


Orange ice, . 


123 


Spiced gooseberries, 


155 


Strawberry ice, . 


123 


Spiced grapes, . 


155 


Shirt polish, 


182 


Spinach, . 


49 


Shirley sauce, . 


154 


Sponge drops, . 


147 


Short cake. 




Squash, baked, 


48 


Currant, 


102 


Stains, to remove. 




Strawberry, 


102 


Chocolate, 


183 


Shrub, black cap, . 


166 


Coffee, . 


183 


Raspberry, . 


166 


Fruit, 


183 


Silk, black, to renew. 


184 


Ink, 


. 181 


Sleeplessness, to relieve. 


17? 


Iron rust. 


181 


Soap, hard. 


183 


Tea, 


183 


Soft, 


183 


Starch, to make. 


181 


Soda cream. 


166 


Straw matting, to clean 


181 


Soup, general directions. 


11 


Stock for soup. . 


11 


Asparagus, . 


16 


Beef, 


11 


Barley, . 


11 


White, . 


15 


Bean, 


13 


Succotash, 


50 


Bean, black, . 


12 


String beans, . 


. . 4D 



214 

Supplies, church supper, 
Sweetbreads, directions for, 

Creamed, 

Croquettes, 

Fried, . 

Salad, . . . 59, 

With mushrooms 
Table service, 
Tapioca, . . . 106, 

Apple, . 

Caramel, 

Date, 

Peach, . 

Pineapple, 

Strawberry, 
Tarragon vinegar 
Tarts, crust for, 

Cherrj', 

Lemon, . 
Tea, . 

Iced, 
Timbales, 

Egg, 

Halibut, 
Time required for cooking 
Toast, German 
Toast, in camp 
Toast water. 
Tomato sauce, 
Tomatoes, 

Catsup, 

Fricasseed, 

Fried, . 

Pickled, 

Salad, 

Scalloped, 

Soup, 

Stewed, 



INDEX 




180 


Tomatoes — Co7ifinued. 




31 


Stuffed, . 


51 


32 


With rice. 


170 


42 


Tortoni, biscuit, 


125 


32 


Tripe, 


31 


64 


Turkey, to cook. 


32 




Dressing for. 


32 


8 


Turnovers, 




107 


Apple, fried, . 


103 


107 


Vanilla extract. 


181 


107 


Vanities, . 


147 


107 


Varnish, furniture, . 


184 


107 


Veal, 




107 


A la sweetbreads, 


29 


107 


Balls, . 


29 


56 


Blanquette of. 


29 


96 


Boudins, 


36 


97 


Croquettes, 


42 


97 


Cutlets, . 


28 


164 


Pate de veau. 


29 


164 


Pot pie, . 


28 




Salad, 


58 


66 


Stew, 


29 


^? 


Vegetable oyster. 


48 


7 


Vegetables, to cook. 


45 


84 


Velvet, to restore. 


184 


84 


Venison, 


28 


178 


Vinegar, sharp, 


181 


38 


Vinegar, tarragon, . 


56 




Waffles, 


85, 86 


154 


Washington cake, 


83 


170 


Wash goods. 


182 


51 


Woodcock, Scotch, . 


69 


152 


Weights and measures 




64 


table of. 


() 


51 


Wine, unfermented . 


167 


14 


Yeast, 


75 


51 


Yorkshire pudding, . 


24 






ADVERTISEMENTS. 



V V V V V ¥ 



' ' Wis do w is good zvith inheritance, and by it there is profit 
to them that advertise.'" 



ALL our friends are requested to read the 
advertisements contained in this book and 
reciprocate the kindness of these enterpris- 
ing business men, who thus help us, by 
patronizing and recommending them on 
all possible occasions. 



A D VER riSEMEN TS 21 j 

SYMONDS 4 ALLISON COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Confectionery. 



Coffee Roasters 



^^Y Q^^ T ALLY=HO 

MOCHA AND JAVA COFFEE, 

A CUP THAT CHEERS 

A blend of high grade selected coffee, giving the consumer a 
delicious drink, combining strength, quality and flavor. 



Packed in One Pound Cans 
..BY.. 



SYMONDS ^ ALLISON COMPANY 



31 W. Main and 4 Amsden St. 

Malone, N. Y. 



2i8 ADVERTISEMENTS 

E. J. VA/OOD ^-^HRjN 

STOVES, RANGES and FURNACES 

Paints, Oils and Varnishes 

HOT WATER HEATING AND PLUMBING 

A SPECIALTY. MALONE, N. Y. 

MISS McDonald, 

School Supplies and Stationery, 

4 W. MAIN STREET, MALONE, N. Y. 

COPELAND cfe KIPP 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 



MAKKRS OF AT A T r^TVTTT. TIT XT 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS MAJ^OJMli, i\ . Y. . 

F. A. ELDREDGE F. E. MASON 

ELDREDGE & MASON 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 

Carriages, Buggies, Sleighs, Double 
Wagons, Harness, Robes and Blankets 

MILL STREET 'Phone 35. MALONE, N. Y. 



AD VER r IS EM EN TS 21 g 



Don't Blame the Cook. 

Impure Cream Tartar and Bicarbonate Soda, fraud flavor- 
ing Extracts, adulterated Mustard and Ginger, are responsible 
for many a failure in pastry making. 

Our Cream Tartar is absolutely pure, being powdered from the 
pure crystals. 

Our Soda is the best grade of Bicarbonate Soda, none better. 

We Manufacture Our Own Extracts. 

Our Vanilla. Real Genuine Vanilla Extract is seldom found. It 
seems hard for extract makers to understand that it pays to give people what 
they pay for. We use nothing but the finest Mexican Vanilla Bean — and plenty 
of it. The extract has unusual strength and has a rare and peculiar delicacy. 

Our Lemon and Strawberry are made from the fruit and are; 
as good as our Vanilla in every respect; we also have an Almond and Rose 
Extract. 

Olive Oil. We have the very finest Oil which can be imported. One 
trial will convince you. Use no other. 

Huyler's Cocoa Powder. We have this most delicious of all 
Cocoa or Chocolate Powders. You can buy any quantity you wish from one 
ounce to a pound. It has no equal. 

Our Ginger and Mustard are absolutely pure z.xi^ go twice as 
far as the ordinary stuff usually sold. — 



C. W. BREED cS CO., 

Druggists 

61 E. MAIN ST. M ALONE,. N. Y 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



SMITH'S f^^°«^^«T««« 

FRUITS. CONFECTIOIVERY 
AND ICE CREAM 

Cor. Main and Peakl, Streets MALONE, N. Y 

The Oldest Music House in Northern New York 



Do you know that SLASON has the best piano m the market for $175.00, 

just as sure as he has the best piano for $500.00 ? 
Everyone knows that the best pianos are to be found at SLASON 'S but all do 

not know we can give you the best at any price. 
Let us show you what we have before you make a purchase. 

M. SLASON cS SON. malone 



M. N. FILLL 



Dealer 



Stoves, Furnaces and Tin^pvare 

House Furnishing Goods, Etc. 

Gas Fitting and Plumbing a Specialty. 

Store and Office in Mulholland Block. KfATnKIlT VI V 

Second Store West End of Bridge. ra^l-,wmil^, i^ . X . 



J. J. FLANAGAN, 

i>i:ax.£:r in 

FINE CLOTHING, HATS, CAPS 

AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS, 

second store ,, ^^ ^^ 

t<:ast of post office MALONE, N. Y. 



AD VER T IS EM EN TS 



WALLACE C. SHORT. 



C. W. WILDING. 



J. MERT CHASE. 



SHORT, WILDING 4 CO. 

WHOLESALE HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE. 



keep the best line of 

Paints, Oils, 
Varnishes, 
M u n s c o , 
Cutlery. 



HARDWARE, 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



TRY 



BEN HUR FLOUR 



MUNGER'S FEED STORE. 
W M. P. LYNCH 

DEALER IN 

GENERAL. MERCHANDISE. 

GRASS SEED AND HOP SUPPLIES. 
40 WEST MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 

Why is the New York Life the leading Com- 
pany in the world to-day? 

INQUIRE OF HADLEY GENERAL AGENT 

HOWARD BLOCK. 

JAS. T. WELCH, 

Tailor^ Clothier and Hatter 

36 EAST MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 



ADVER T IS EM EN TS 223 

THOS. T. BUTTRICK, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 

School Books, 

Miscellaneous Books, 

Base Ball and Tennis Supplies. 



LAW BLANKS, COMMERCIAL, SOCIETY 
AND MISCELLANEOUS STATIONERY. 

.MALONE, N. Y. 



224 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



To secure the best results from the recipes in this book, 
you must use Pure Spices, Cream Tartar, Soda, Etc., and the 

BEST FLAVORING EXTRACTS 
all of which can be procured of 

THE HYDE DRUG COMPANY, 

Mail orders promptly attended to. MALONE, N. Y. 

MRS. P. S. PHILLIPS, 

STYLISH MILLINERY 



95 MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 

p_OA FINE TAILORING call at 

PADDOCK & HASKELL'S, 

86 EAST MAIN ST, MALONE, N. Y. 

Attorney at Law 

53 EAST MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 



A OVER TI SEMEN TS 215 

Do You Know All 

That is done and all the lines of goods that are sold at 

ROBBINS' ? 

He would like to tell you. 



HE DOES 

Printing of ail kinds, and none are better equipped; Picture Framing; 
Bicycle Repairing; Sewing Machine Repairing; Umbrella and Parasol 
Repairing; Umbrella Re-covering; Lock Repairing; Key Making for all 
Locks; Gun and Revolver Repairing; and, in fact, Repairing of all kinds. 

HE, SELLS 

Sevi^ing Machines, such as the Standard, White, Nev7 Home, and many 
others; Seveing Machine Needles and Supplies for all Machines; Bicycles, 
nearly all makes, also over 60 Second Hand ones in good repair; Bicycle 
Tires and Sundries; "Wellington Typewriters— the modern perfected peer 
of all, most powerful manifolder, every convenience of $100.00 machines 
and in addition is an entirely visible writer, costing but $60.00— sold on 
weekly payments if desired. Also Artists' Materials; Mounting Board in 
all colors; Passepartout Bindings, Hangers, etc. 

HE RENTS 

New Style Sewing Machines, with all attachments, at $1.00 per month. 
Easy payments on sales. Bicycles rented by the hour, day, or week. 

AT HIS CIGAR STORE 

He sells everything you want in the tobacco line; — 21 brands of 5c. 
cigars; 15 brands above 5c. ; 7 brands small cigars, 10 in a package; 
11 brands cigarettes; 33 brands package tobacco; 21 brands plug 
tobacco. Pipes from penny clays and cobs to high grade case goods. 

E. N. W. ROBBINS, lO and 36 West Main St. 



226 AD VER TISEMENTS 

THE PLACE TO BUY FRUIT 

AT™"NICK'S" FRUIT HOUSE 

40 WEST MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 

SMART CLOTHES, YOUNG BROS. HATS. 

MONARCH COLLARS and SHIRTS. 

Clark's Clothing Wardrobe 

MA LONE, N. Y. 
DRESS GOODS. 

Early buyers are ever on the alert for new things in gown stuffs. 
They like to pick and choose from the new weaves. Such buyers will 
hail with much pleasure the news that we have received a larger spring 
stock than ever before. 

Donovan & Looby 

HORTON BLOCK. MALONE, N. Y. 

R. M. MOORE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW, 
MALONE. N. Y. 



AD VER TISEMENTS 227 

THE LAWRENCE = WEBSTER CO. 

Manufacturers of 

The MoMilun Pants 




FOR MEN and BOYS 



Knee Pants and Boys* Suits 

in sizes from 4 to 16 years, 



Buy your boy a suit or a pair of knee pants made from 
the famous 

McMillan Cloth 

and you will never use any other make. 



FOR SALE BY 

MALLON <S PRATT 

MALONE, N. Y. 



228 ADVERTISEMENTS 

COOKS AND SHOES. 

s"b°s'b^l°l°# good shoes 

SHUFELT & DONALDSON. 



JOHN P. KELLAS JOHN ^V. GENATV^AT 

COTJNSELORS AT LAW MALONE, N. T. 

HAWKE,S CUT GLASS 

The finest Cut Glass Made in the World 
FOR SALE BY 

E#rne:st E.. Muller 

The Leading Jeweler MALONE, N. Y. 

Connecticut General Life Ins. Co., 

^ Hartford " 

)OHN H. DULLEA, General Agent, MALONE, N. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 229 



Endrus » IRobinson 



Compan!p 



llJlboksalc 6rocers 



Aialone, fl. V- 



2J0 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



D. Dickinson <S Co. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs and Hops 

Best Dairy Salt and Butter Packages. 
46 W. Main St. Malone, N. Y. 



= GO TO = 

LOUIS RUSHFORD'S MARKET 

. . FOR . . 

Choice Groceries, Meats, Vegetables and Fish 
MALONE, N. Y. 

ELIAS KOORY SALIM KOORY 

E. & S. KOORY, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers 

Dry Goods^ Fancy Goods and Groceries* 

BOOTS, SHOES AND RUBBERS* 

p. O. BOX 1073. MALONE, N. Y. 

Hunting! en's 
Furniture Store 

Baby Carriages, Hat Racks, Sideboards, Couches, 
Bookcases, and a General Line of Seasonable Goods. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 231 



THE OLD ADAGE. 



"You will never miss the water 
'Till the w^ell runs dry," 

MIGHT BE APPLIE.D TO 



Fire Insurance 



You will never miss Insurance 
*Till your buildings burn. 

And then you will wish that you had it. 



THE BEST INSURANCE! 



Is w^hat you want alw^ays, 
and the place to get it is at 



S. B. SRinner*s Agency, 

Main Street, Malone, N. Y. 



232 AD VER riSEMEN TS 

=WE SELL= 



FLOUR, MEAL, PROVENDER, MIDDLINGS, 
BRAN, ETC, ETC. 

LADD 6 SMALLMAN. 

MRS. C. H. BERRY 

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S 

FURNISHING GOODS 

ART EMBROIDERIES AND MATERIALS. 

MALONE, N. Y. 



FOR- 



Cut Flowers and Fine China 

. . GO TO . . 

Meldon's 5 and 10 Cent Store 

Hayes Block MALONE, N. Y. 

B. W. BERRY 

Attorney and Counseeor at Law. 

ROOMS OVER F. W. LAWRENCE & CO.'S Stoke. 



AD VER TISEMENTS 233 

ChannelVs 
Insurance Agency 

ESTABLISHED IN 1850 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

If you desire Good Insurance, 

As well as a good Cook Book, 

Call at No. 27 East Main Street, 

Malone, N, Y\ 

And be made cheerful and happy. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 
Respectfully yours, 

F. S. Channell. 

[2] 



234 ADVERTISEMENTS 

OPEN DAY and NIGHT 

The Star Lunch Room 

F. C. ANDREWS, Proprietor 

MALONE,, N. Y. 
LEATHER AND FINDINGS 

JOHN LINCOLN 

HARRISON PLACE 

H. D. HICKOK, D. D. S., 
Dental Parlors 

Over People's National Bank. MALONE, N. Y. 

We Keep everything to be found 
in a first=class Dry Goods Store 

Mulla.rney 6 Holland 

31 East Main St., Malone. N. Y. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 23s 



Malone Light and Power Co. 

Do all kinds of electric wiring, furnish electroliers, 
gas chandeliers, and gas stoves at very reasonable 
prices. 

Also Dealers in Coal 



The best Hard and Soft Coals constantly on hand. 
We guarantee our coal free from dirt and every 
ton full weight. 

^ ^ ^ 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS SOLICITED 

-Office, 25 Amsden Street 



236 AD VER TISEMEN TS 

SAFE AND oUlv£r. When looking about for a place to put your money, 

just call at the 

SPOT CASH GROCELRY 

And get a supply of our goods — just the kind to prolong life. A sack of Pastry or Bread 

Flour from us will make the cook look pleased and the family always happy. 

Our Teas and Coffees are not of the trashy sort, but will carry 

you to good old age. If not satisfied with purchase 

you may return the same and get 

your money back. 

Twentieth Century Block. COOLEY and TALLMAN 



GORDON H. MAIN 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW 

Malone, N. Y. 

A. B. PARMELEE 6 SON 

Adirondack Lands and 
General Real Estate Business 

CEO. W. DUSTIN, Manager 

A. N. HENDERSON 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

23 W. Main Street 'Phone Malone, N. Y. 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



237 




A Timely Arrival 

Life Insurance comes at a time when other circumstances might 
break the heart and make the misfortune a real calamity. 

A POLICY IN 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company 
===of New Yorh= 

RICHARD A. McCURDY, President 

Robs misfortune of its sting, and gives to the memory of the past a sweetness 
and beauty which is priceless. 
This Company has paid to policy-holders since its organization more than 
Five Hundred and Ninety Millions, 
and has now invested over 

Three Hundred and Eighty Two Millions 
of dollars for the protection of its policy holders. Write for rates. 

ALTON C. DEAN, 

District Manager. Malone, N, Y, 



238 AD VER TISEMENTS 

H. P. CARROLL. city market 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Chicago Dressed Beef, 

Fresh Salmon, Fish, Oysters and Wild Game. M ALONE, N. Y. 

FAYETTE B. ESTES 

Manager 

Aetna Life Insurance Co, 

of Hartford, Conn. 

MALONE, N. Y. 

R. N. PORTER, D. D. S., 

21 EAST MAIN STREET 

Over Cantwell's Jewelry Store 

Office Hours: MATDNF N Y 

8 to 12 A. M. 1 to 5 P. M. 1S\.1\\^\JI\ IL, IN . I . 



BADGER & CANTWELL 

COUNSELORS AT LAW 

MALONE, N. Y, 



ADVERTISEMENTS 239 

MONAGHAN 6 RICE 

PLUMBING and METAL ROOFING 

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS 

STOVES AND RANGES 



Heating by Hot Water, Hot Air and Steam 



91 W. MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 

E. y^, KKOWLTON 

JEWELLER 

Dealer in Watches, Diamonds, Fine Gold and Plated 
Jewelry, Solid Silver and Plated Ware, Fine 
French and American Clocks, Fine China 
and Fancy Goods, Kodaks. Special 
attention given to the repair- 
ing of fine and compli- 
cated watches. 

SPECTACLES AND EYE GLASSES A SPECIALTY 



240 ADVERTISEMENTS 

THE BEST THE SOUNDEST 

NORTHERN NEW YORK DISTRICT AGENCY 

WASHINGTON LIFE INS. CO., 

OF NEW YORK. 

Office, M ALONE, N. Y. FLOYD E. ROCK, Dist. Agent. 

PROMPT RELIABLE LIBERAL 



(The ifai'inci's IHational 18anb 
—^= of yiftalone ^=^= 

FOR FINE, MILLINERY go to 

Mrs. M. J. McCormick 

COR. MAIN and WASHINGTON STS. 

CHARLES H. TURNER 

Adirondack Spruce, Pine and Hemlock Lumber 
IN WHOLESALE LOTS ONLY 

MALONE, N. Y. 



AD VER TISEMEN TS 2^, 



C. L. CAPRON 

PHARMACIST 
PURE SPICES AND FLAVORING EXTRACTS 

The value of spice depends on its strength and flavor. The same may 
be said of flavoring extracts. That spices and flavoring extracts are 
largely adulterated is certainly a deplorable fact. As quality in medi- 
cine should be of the utmost importance, so ought the articles used in 
preparing the food which sustains life, to oe of a pure quality and of 
full strength. I have facilities for testing the purity of spices, and guar- 
antee the ones I sell to be STICTLY PURE, free from adulteration 
and of EXTRA full strength. The Flavoring Extracts of Vanilla, 
Lemon, Orange, Almond and Rose are of my own manufacture and 
are guaranteed to be pure and Extra strong. All spices and flavors 
are sold in bulk and at reasonable prices. I solicit a share of your 
patronage, believing you will be pleased after a trial. Respectfully, 
C. L. CAPRON, PHARMACIST. 

STRENGTH =^malone, n. y ^— PURITY 

BEFORE TAKING 

BEFORE making use of any of the recipes in this book, sen- 
sible people will come to my office on East Main Street, and 
attend to the making of their Last Wills and Testaments. 



AFTER TAKING 

AFTER making use of any of the recipes in this book, 
Icindly suggest to your heirs that I make a specialty of looking 
after estates. 

M. E. MCCLARY, 

ATTORNEY. 



242 



AD VER riSEMENTS 




SARGENT'S GEM FOOD CHOPPER is an article for kitchen use, intended 
to take the place of the chopping bowl and knife. It is carefully made and nicely tinned; 
it has self- sharpening steel cutters that cannot break ; also cutter for making Nut Butter. 

YOU NEED THE GEM IN YOUii KITCHEN. It chops all kiad9 of meat, both raw anil cooked, fish, clams, fruit, vegetables an^ 
other articles of food. Chops quickly, quietly and easilr; is easy to take apart, easy to put together, easy to adjust, easy to use. It sare* 
tims, trouble and strength and greatly simplifies the making of mince pies, hash, Hamburg steik, croquettes, fish balle, salads and 
other farorite dishes without limit. Uiiliiei "left-overs" which can be made into attractire and appetizing dishes by using thi Gem. 
Cloth-bound Gem Chopper Cook Book, containing oyer i!00 valuable recipes, free with each chopper. 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



243 




THE GUM CHOPPER. 



No. 20 small, chops 2 lbs. per minute, $1.00 
No. 22 medium, " 2 1-2 '* " " 1.25 

No. 24 large " 3 " " " 2.00 



Sold Exclusively by 



H. D. Thompson ^ Co. 



Jobbers of 



UP = TO = DATE, HAR DW ARE 

MALONE, NEW YORK. 

GREENO 4 AUSTIN 



55 East Main Street, 



MALONE. NEW YORK. 



DRY GOODS and 
Novelties in Women's Wear. 



24^. ADVERTISEMENTS 

Catpet0, iRus0, Qgattings, paper !^anging0, 

2DiI Clatf)0, iLfnDleum0 

2^inDato ^|)aDe0, JLace Curtains 

Brp (S^ootis anti Crockerp 

(lBa0t 90ain Street* 

Sole Agents for the Famous McMillan Pants 

Men's and Boys' Suits 

Also Hats, Caps and Furnishing Goods of every descrip- 
tion at Low Prices. 



AD VER TISEMENTS 



245 



To get good results from any recipes 
in this book, good material and good 
work are necessary. The same rule 
appHes to anything made. It is be- 
cause J. 0. BALLARD & CO. follow 
this rule that '' MALONE PANTS " 
are so widely and favorably known. 



A. G. CROOKS iSL CO. 

MALONE, N. Y. 



Oldest Wholesale Grocery 
House in Northern New York 



G. W. CROOKS. Wm. A. CROOKS. W. B. CROOKS. 



246 AD VER TISEMEN TS 

F. W. LAWRENCE & CO. 

115 EAST MAIN ST. 

M A L O N E 

Fine Dry Goods, Ladies' Suits, Waists, Laces, Embroider- 
ies, Dress Trimmings, Etc. 



OFFICE OF 

DRS. R. J. & A. G. WILDING. 



S. C. COLEMAN 

DENTIST 
Over Hyde's Drug Store. 

Hours: 9 to 12; 1.30 to 5.30. 

BENJ. L. WELLS 

LAWYER. MALONE, N. Y. 



Second Entrance East 

OF Peoples Bank MAIN STREET. 



A D VER TISEMEN TS 247 



O. S. LAWRENCE 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Flour, Grain and Mill Feed, 
Baled Hay and Straw. 

ICE CREAM AND ROCK SALT, LINSEED MEAL, ETC. 

PILLSBURYS BEST FLOUR, SfwulfouYS"^ rd'of.=l: 

I have a large quantity of BODY BIRCH and MAPLE 
WOOD which will be cut up to suit the purchaser. 

O. S. L A WRENC E 



SOROSIS SHOES 



ONCE A WEARER; ALWAYS A WEARER 



HOIT & HASKELL 



EXCLUSIVE DEALERS. MALONE, N. Y. 



248 AD VER TISEMENTS 

Howard House 

S. J. 6 J. A. FLANAGAN, Proprietors 

Malone, N. Y. 

J. J. MURPHY'S 

42 MAIN STREET 

HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Ladies' and Children's Cloaks, Suits and Separate Skirts. 
A complete line of Ladies' Fine Dress Shoes. 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE "ULTRA" SHOES. 

MADAME MARGUERITE 

Fine Millinery 

EAST MAIN ST. MALONE, N. Y. 



Geo. H. Nickelson 



Office and Residence 
44 West Main Street 



Funeral Director and 
Practical Emb aimer 

Both Telephones 

oid67D. New 75 Malone, N. I, 



AD VER TISEMEN TS 249 

H i 11^ lii MM m i — m » ^ \\\\ im m ^ m ' " "H 

Made From % 



Gfeant Tariz^r 
and Soda 

with the added produtfl 

Sugar of nilk 

(Crystalized from 
Cows' Milk) 

WHICH IS 

Entirely Converted 

— INTO— 

Leavening Gas 

— AND A — 

Rich. Food Flavor 

Without a 

Grain of Lossm 



Thatcher's Baking Powder 



Dissolves Clear as Crystal 

— IN HOT WATER — 

And is Purest and BesU 

Write for Cook Book, etc., H. D. Thatcher & Co., Potsdam, N. Y. 

L miiii^ ill ^ li II mm II II ■■■■ iiii MB m i I I I im b J 




230 ADVERTISEMENTS 

FRED O'NEIL G. H. HALE 

ESTABLISHED 1878. 

O'NEIL & HALE 

FIRE AND LIABILITY 

INSURANCE 

MALONE, NEW YORK 

PUTNAM'S 

DEPARTMENT STORES 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



WALL PAPER 



AD VER TISEMENTS 251 



The Tuttle Company 

Fine Stationery and 
Printing House 

11 and 13 Center Street Rutland, Vt. 



Card Plate and 
Steel Die Embossing 



Wedding Invitations 
Stationery 
Address Dies 
Visiting Cards 



Miscellaneous, and 
Blank Books 



Prompt attention given to the exe= 
cution and delivery of all orders 



252 AD VER TISEMENTS 

THE 

PEOPLE'S NATIONAL BANK 

OF MALONE 

CAPITAL $150,000. SURPLUS $160,000. 

Malone Cook Book 

FOR SALE AT 

THOS. T. BUTTRICK'S 

63 EAST MAIN STREET MALONE, N. Y. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Symonds & Allison, 
E. J. Wood, . 
Miss McDonald, . 
Copeland & Kipp, 
Eldredge & Mason, 
C. W. Breed & Co., 
Fred Smith, . 
M. Slason & Son, 
M. N. Fell, . 
J. J. Flanagan, . 
Short, Wilding & Co., 
M. J. Munger, 
William F. Lynch, 
A. C. Hadley, 
James T. Welch, . 
T. T. Buttrick, . 
C. W. Hyde & Co., 
Mrs. P. S. Phillips, 
Paddock & Haskell, 
William L. Allen, 
E. N. W. Robbins, 
A. J. Nicholson, . 
Clark & Son, 
Donovan & Looby, 
R. M. Moore, 
Lawrence, Webster & 
Shufelt & Donaldson, 
Kellas & Geneway, 
Ernest E. Muller, 
John H. Dullea, . 
Andrus-Robinson Co., 





217 


D. Dickinson & Co., . 


. 230 




218 


Louis Rushford, . 


. 230 




218 


E. & S. Koory, . 


. 230 




218 


R. D. Huntington, 


. 230 




218 


S. B. Skinner, 


. 231 




219 


Ladd & Smallman, 


232 




220 


Mrs. C. H. Berry, 


. 232 




220 


M. J. Melden, 


232 




220 


B. W. Berry, 


. 232 




220 


F. S. Channell, . 


. 233 




221 


F. C. Andrews, . 


. 234 




222 


John Lincoln, 


. 234 




222 


H. D. Hickok, 


. 234 




222 


Mullarney & Holland, 


. 234 




222 


Malone Light Co., 


. 235 




228 


Cooley & Tallman, 


. 236 




224 


Gordon H. Main, 


. 236 




224 


A. B. Parmelee & Son 


; . 236 




224 


A. N. Henderson, 


. 236 




224 


A. C. Dean, . 


. 237 




225 


H. P. Carroll, 


. 238 




226 


Fayette B. Estes, 


. 238 




220 


R. N. Porter, 


. 238 




226 


Badger & Cantwell, . 


. 238 




226 


Monaghan & Rice, 


. 239 


Co., 


227 


E. W. Knowlton, . 


. 2.39 




228 


Floyd E. Rock, . 


. 240 




228 


Farmers National Ban 


k, . 240 




228 


Mrs. M. J. McCormick 


. 240 




228 


C. H. Turner, 


. 240 




229 


C. L. Capron, 


. 241 



254 



INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 



M. E. McClary, . 

H. D. Thompson, . 242, 

Greeno & Austin, 

J. H. King, .... 

Mallon & Pratt, . 

J. O. Ballard, 

A. G. Crooks & Co., . 
F. W. Lawrence & Co., 
Drs. R. J. & A. G. Wilding, 
S. C. Coleman, 

B. L. Wells, .... 
O. S. Lawrence, . 



241 


Hoit & Haskell, . 


247 


243 


Howard House, 


248 


243 


J. J. Murphy, 


248 


244 


Madame Marguerite, . 


248 


244 


George H. Nickelson, . 


248 


245 


H. D. Thatcher & Co., 


249 


245 


O'Neil & Hale, . 


250 


246 


H. A. Putnam, 


250 


246 


The Tuttle Company, . 


251 


246 


People's National Bank, 


252 


246 


Malone Cook Book, 


252 


24*: 







VJG 



1.4 \903 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS