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Full text of "Manor"


FAIRFIELD 
UNIVERSITY 



About me Senior Staff 







Ken Jordan 

Sports Editor 

B S Management 

"Shng Jordan satisfied the physical require 
ants of yearbook Sports Editor "They were 
looking for someone with a beer belly." Jordan 
said 




Kim Mann 

Nostalgia 
B S Marketing 
Mann, known in the underground as Kim Manzoni, 
acquired a lengthy criminal record at Fairfield for 
parking violations Her future ambition is to be 
legal 




Ass't Senior 
Section 
B.S Marketing 
Smith sported a punk haircut until this year, when 
she was forced to change her look and assume a 
new identity as an illegal townhouse resident 




Jim Fitzpatrick 
Dean. University 
Activities 
Fairfield '70 
Fitzpatnck has been the Manor Advisor since 
1973 He also teaches a Fine Arts course at 
Fairfield. "Mr Potato Head I " 



T 





M 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/manor88unse 




A Chronicle of the 

Undergraduate 

Experience at Fairfield 

University in the 

Academic Year 1987-88 

Dedicated to Professor Arthur Riel Jr, 



FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 
FAIRFIELD, CT 06430 



Herff Jones, Inc. 
Gettysburg, PA 




CONTENTS 



Taking the LEAD 6 Fairfield Strides 



Whatta YEAR 22 Events in excess 



Outta your MIND 88 The Academic Gamefield 



Belonging: CLUB 98 Member since 1987 



What's done is PAST 113 History, pal 



Having a BALL 130 Hey y Sport o 



Call it HOME 150 Makeshift 



Class of 1988 194 "Underrated." 



DUMP 284 Ads and Index 



SLIPCOVF.R PHOTOS Quad photo by Terry Sullivan; Michael Courtmanche. BACK: President Aloysius Kelley, S.J., talks with sisters 

Hutchence of INXS by John Courtmanche; Senior Andrea Crossman in Kathleen and Diedre Donohue, Class of 1990 and 1991, respectively, at 
the Stag-Her, photo In John Courtmanche, Baseball photo by John Orientation 1987. 

( ourtmanche, rr Bill Cullen, SJ., plays Vanna White, photo by John 
2 



Manor Advisor 

JIM FITZPATRICK 
University Activities Dean 

Manor Editors 

JOHN COURTMANCHE 

Editor-in-Chief 

JOAN NINE 

Managing 

BEN DE LA CRUZ 

Associate 

KAREN MASCHIO 

Copy 

PETER WITKOWSKY 

Ass 't Copy 

SEAN FLYNN 

Co-Layout 

KATIE BELCHER 

Co-Layout 
BRIAN RUSSELL 

Photography 

VINCE CERVONI 

Sports Photography 

KEN JORDAN 

Sports 

RIC BROWN 

Ass 't Sports 

CHRIS MCSHERRY 

Clubs 

CLAUDINE KIFFER 

Current Events 

REGINA SMITH 

Ass't Senior Section 

KIM MANN 

Nostalgia 

DIANE NAUGHTON 

Nostalgia 

TRACEY RUSSO 

Photo Identifications 

Manor Staff 

TERRY SULLIVAN 

GENE TIERNAN 

DEVIN SULLIVAN 

Jacks-of -all-Sections 

MARC BELANGER 

ADRIANA RADWANSKI 

MICHAEL BELCOURT 

Photography 

ANGELA FEDERICI 

STEFAN MURRAH 

Layout 

Manor Contributors 

MARIANNE WALSH 

Senior Correspondent 

FRANK CARROLL 

BETH GILLIN 

Junior Correspondents 

and MARK BROWNING, ANNE 

LYNCH, BRIAN HOLDEN, PAUL 

HOLLAND, DOUG MCINTOSH, 

THOMAS KELLER, LISA MURATORI, 

SHERI LAMONT, ROBERT 

AMOROSO, GARETH CHARTER, 

ANDREA WHITEHOUSE, EVA 

BELLAFIORE, KAI MILDENBERGER, 

MIKE MCCLAIN. 




if-' ** 



i i 



r — 



ANOR 88 




Now 
Playing 



The Community 
Theater helped the 
Manor kick-off the 

taping of Fairfield's first 
video yearbook. Ben tie 
la Cruz phalli 



To our readers in the Fairfield University Community: 

Each member of the Manor staff came to the first meeting with a preconceived idea of what a 
yearbook looks like. Designing this book, we wanted to avoid that yearbook stereotype. We hope 
this book looks different from what you expected. 

Anyone who has seen previous Manors will immediately notice changes in this yearbook. First, 
we included photographs of all undergraduates by place of residence. We walked to all floors in 
every dorm; we grouped townhouse residents by building; and we walked to every beach house 
(we found no other realistic way to group beach residents). 

This was a special process for us. Fairfield's student handbooks stress a small undergraduate 
population. Walking from dorm to townhouse to beach house, we realized the unique opportunity 
to meet every one of our classmates. A student at a university with five, ten, or twenty thousand 
undergraduates can't know half of his classmates. The Manor staff contacted all Fairfield 
undergraduates, some for only a few minutes, others for enough time to start a friendship. 

Previous Manors were exclusively for the senior class. Yet, the previous Manors excluded 
events such as Orientation, Dorm Life, the Underclass Experience — in other words, 75% of college 
life. We want the class of '88 to remember everything about Fairfield. We want the classes of '89, 
'90, and '91 to remember everything about Fairfield. We want everyone to remember each other. 
Then we'll all be happy. Happiness is a good thing. 

So we sold more books, made more money, added more pages, and we added more color. After 
all, it's 1988. In 1988, in the back of our phone books, even our yellow pages contain a full color 
section. Our daily newspapers have color. One issue of the USA TODAY contains more color 
than all Manors combined, excluding this one. No kidding, we counted. It's 1988. 

We wrote articles. Sure, pictures tell a thousand words, but words inspire a thousand pictures. 
Quite a relationship. This book contains more subliminal words and pictures than the mind can 
comprehend. No kidding, we counted. 

Then we attached a video. 

In September 1987, we estimate that 2-5% of students at Fairfield knew what a Manor was. Now 
97%+ know what a Manor is. That's only one estimate. Another estimate, from a competitive 
estimator, is 100%. 

Frankly, the only conclusive evidence we have is that 100% of all students who ordered a Manor 
know what a Manor is. Well, except for one guy from Loyola. Until this book arrived in the mail, 
he was wondering what had happened to the money his mom sent him last March. 

Hey Loyola guy, we knew you were drunk, we said "invest in your future" and you thought you 
were buying into the party that night, we took your money anyway. We didn't want you to be the 
only kid on the floor without a 1988 Manor. 

You're welcome. 



John Courtmanche, Editor-in-Chief, for the Manor Staff 



"Vi *••*? 



»«. 



5* 



iw 













INTRODUCTION 



There's an emotion with no 
word attached. The feeling 
surfaces occasionally on 
the streets of New York or 
Boston, on the shores of the 
Atlantic, on a silent winter night, 
after the snow, beneath the stars. 
You are simultaneously numb; 
excited; exhausted; thrilled; burnt 
out; intense; overwhelmed by the 
sense experience. The chill slices 
through your body, carrying 
wonder, fear, exhiliration — a little 
of everything. You feel more alive 
than ever. Aware, like a sponge. 
Afterwards, you want only to 
relax and relive. 

College is a stimulus. Every year 
before Thanksgiving break, 
Christmas break, three-day 
weekends. Spring Break, Easter 
Weekend, and finally, summer 
vacation, you think, "Just in time. 
I need this break. Whatta year, I 
know, but I have to go home for a 
while, watch TV in 48 hour 
marathons, relax. Do you mind? I 
need a break." 

The reasons for this 
phenomenon at college are 
numerous. As you carve a life in 
your makeshift home, you meet 
many new people. Students from 
across the Northeast, the country, 
the world. People with different 
accents and different expressions. 



Hundreds of introductions every 
week. 

You're doing your own laundry 
and solving you own problems. 
With the power of the long 
distance call, mom and dad might 
as well be in the next room, but 
you realize that's not what college 
is about. 

Meanwhile, adults with years of 
experience and education are 
broadening your mind (or driving 
you out of your mind with 
assignments). When the lecture in 
history relates to the lectures in 
philosophy and business, you 
wonder if it's coincidence or part 
of the University's master plan, or 
if that's just the way the world 
works. 

Any student who has crammed, 
pulled consecutive all-nighters, 
and felt the stress of finals week, 
knows just how overwhelming the 
sense experience at college can be. 

When you put your books away 
at the end of the day, you 
compete in a sport or belong to a 
club. Whether a varsity basketball 
player or a FUSA Cabinet member, 
Ski Club President or intramural 
flag football captain, you find 
fultillment in the dedication, 
teamwork, and friendships. 

Hanging out in the dorm, 
checking your mail, eating at 



Seller's, partying at the 
townhouses or beach, attending 
Harvest with the perfect (or not- 
so-perfect) date, enjoying a 
concert or lecture, studying in the 
lounge, studying/socializing in the 
library, watching Letterman — even 
your leisure time is jammed with 
activities. 

If you are a member of the 
Class of 1988, Fairfield's most 
recent graduating class, you will 
spend plenty of time remembering 
your college experience. You can 
recall any one incident but you 
cannot separate it from the whole. 

Regardless of your class, if, 
during the year 1988, you thought 
the sense experience 
overwhelming, now is the time to 
look back. In the following pages, 
you might begin to understand the 
magnitude of the undergraduate 
experience at Fairfield University 
in relation to the world, and to 
your life. 

If you're lucky, though, you'll 
see straight to the freedom, the 
chaos, the coming-of-age, the 
learning of the twenty-five hour 
days and the eight-day weeks, the 
best years of your life, the time 
when everything was larger than 
life. 

John Courtmanche 



Homework? 

Pete Bolger '89, 
(opposite), Dan 
Busby '89, (top 
left), and Debbie 
Schif '88, (top 
right), play on 
Campion Field. 
Terry Sullivan pho- 
tos. 

5 



■ 






<*«. 



fC 





K. 



FIELD 
RtDES 

.. asked what the weather wa_ 

t, will not remember. But in twenty 




Bush for 
Prez! 

Nancy James. Charles 

Bergin, and Paul 

Holland embrace 

Vice President 

George Bush at a 

convention in New 

Hampshire. Photo 

courtesy of Paul 

Holland 




The Large Picture 

When looking for reasons for 
this positive attitude, our only 
challenge is listing them all. The 



1988 Overview: A young 

University with everything 

going for it 



handbooks show the large picture. 
Trends include rises in the number 
of applying high school seniors, in 
SAT scores of incoming freshmen, 
in the number of out-of-state 
residents enrolled (which means 
mi teasing recognition!. The 
nation's selective guides to 
colleges rate Fairfield highly, and 
in October, 1987. US News and 
World Report included Fairfield 
in its list of the top 10 
comprehensive universities in the 
East. I airfield was the second 
most si In tive i ollege in its 
categor) since it accepts onl) J8 
percent ol the high school 
students who applj . Finally, the 
I niversit) underwent a successful 
iluation by the New England 
Association <>t Schools and 

( olleges, from wliu h I airfield 



receives accreditation. 

The University is raising more 
money from sources other than 
tuition. The annual fund raised an 
institution record in 1986-87 — over 
$4 million — and the chances of 
breaking that record in 1987-88 
were good. 
Campus Design 

The bad news for the year was 
the July fire which caused nearly a 
million dollars damage to the 
Bannow Science Center. But the 
good news far outweighed the bad 
in terms of campus changes. Five 
new sets of townhouses opened 
for juniors and seniors. Also, 
students returning to school in 
September found a new road 
separating Nyselius Library from 
Kostka dormitory, built in 
anticipation of the planned 
construction of a chapel and a 
theater-art center. In addition, 
plans were underway to close the 
road which travels between the 
Campus Center and Canisius, and 
to Lay grass and walkways. The 
Class of 1988, with assistance from 
Alumni Relations' revitalized 
Senior Giving campaign, raised 
enough money to purchase a clock 
tor the new lawn. 

In other areas of campus 
ges, the administration 
discussed the future of student 
residence at Julie 1 [all, which the 
1 niversit) leases from the Sist< rs 
.a Notn I tame. The lease expired 
at the end of the academic year. 



Finally, the Fairfield University 
Student Association discussed 
plans for a walkway from Regis to 
Canisius, and the administration 
considered constructing an 
addition to the Campus Center to 
expand the crowded student 
dining facilities. 
Sports 

The Fairfield University Sports 
Department flourished, especially 
with the recent successes of the 
men's and women's basketball 
programs. 1988 was a year for the 
women's team, though, as they 
travelled to the NCAA's for the 
first time in school history. Also, 
the volleyball team received a new 
head coach. In other sports, FUSA 
and the Athletic Department 
defined jurisdiction in the funding 
of Club Sports— FUSA accepted 
responsibility for recreational 
sports, the Athletic Department, 
for competitive sports. Finally, 
students felt the absence of 
football on campus, this being the 
first year with no football club. 
Discussion to reorganize the club 
ended with no action. 
Jesuit Education 

Following the 
recommendations of the 1985 
I ive-year plan, the University 
stressed the importance of 
Campus Ministry and the virtues 
of faith, service, and justice, the 
foundations of Jesuit Education. 
Besides the forementioned plans 
foi a new Campus chapel, the 



University offered a new Faith, 
Peace, and Justice minor to 
reinforce the University's religious 
commitments. Service 
organizations had a banner year, 
with the support of a regrouped 
Service Council, the student 
council which oversees all service 
organizations. Debates on campus 
focused on injustice in Central 
America, homelessness, AIDS, 
and racial integration. There was a 
general feeling that Fairfield's 
religious integrity was as strong as 
ever. 
Academics 

Big changes occurred in the 
academic arena when Dr. Robert 
Stepsis took over as Academic 
Vice President, and Francis 
Hannafey, S.J., became his 
assistant. Stepsis stressed the 
centrality of the undergraduate 
mission of the school, led the 
search for new professors to fill 
positions in the School of 
Business, and worked to reverse 
the trend of declining enrollment 
in the School of Nursing. 



Elsewhere, the Communications 
Arts Program organized under a 
new leader, Dr. Mark Cox, as the 
University announced the closing 
of the Graduate School of 
Communications. Finally, Dean 
David Danahar of the College of 
Arts and Sciences continued to 
oversee the review of the core 
curriculum, the first review since 
1979. The reevaluation was 
expected to last until the 1988-89 
academic year. 
Student Organizations 

Among student organizations. 
The Fairfield University Student 
Association, the student 
government, cruised with strong 
leadership and increased 
membership. Successes included 
more events for students, stronger 
class councils, and a stronger 
budget. 

The new Fairfield University 
Glee Club was in the spotlight all 
year, as controversy raged during 
the first semester over the merge 
of the men's Glee Club and the 
Chamber Singers. The merge 





created dissension among a large 
portion of the University 
community, and a new club was 
formed, the Fairfield 
Ambassadors of Song, a male 
choir not recognized by Fairfield 
University but consisting of 
students, alumni, and members of 
the community. 

Four other organizations which 
monopolized the spotlight this 
year were the Council of Student 
Organizations (COSO), which 
oversees and unites all clubs on 
campus and which this year 
increased its commitment to the 
clubs; the Manor Video, the 
university's first video yearbook; 
Circle K, for running the blood 
drives and other events to aid 
local organizations; and the Irish 
Society, which worked beyond 
their traditional Luck of the 
Roommate dance and sponsored 
an Irish pub night and other 
campus-wide events. Finally, new 
club of the year honors go to 
Roteract, affiliated with a local 
branch of Rotary International. In 
its first year, Roteract ran a food 



drive, volunteered at a Fairfield 
soup kitchen, and raised money 
for Fairfield's Drive for Five 
scholarship program. 
The Class of 1988 

On an individual basis, two 
seniors who didn't receive much 
credit this year but deserve it are 
Carmine Anzalone and Carole 
Brown. Anzalone served as 
President of the Connecticut 
Student Association and New 
England Representative to the 
United States Student 
Association. Brown served as 
Secretary for Circle K. 
International. Both Anzalone and 
Brown frequently travelled to 
student conventions in other 
states, carrying with them the 
image of Fairfield's Class of 1988. 
They did us proud. 

Many of the year's successes 
can be attributed to a strong 
senior class. Each member of the 
Class of '88 contributed to the 
class personality. That personality 
shapes Fairfield University forever. 
John Courtmanche 



Fun and games in '88 



Left top: Time just 
about runs out on a 
turn in Pictionary, the 
year's favorite board 
game. Left: John 
Shea drives a pizza to 



Kostka as part of 
Seller's new pizza 
delivery service. 
Above: Mike Dunne, 
Cyndi Striebel, Tom 
Keller, Jane 



McCarthy, and 
Donald Gomber do 
their impressions of a 
Stag. John 
Courtmanche photos 

11 



Scenes From 

A Jesuit 

University 

When we leave our homes and join the 
Fairfield University community, we 
quickly familiarize ourselves with 
names that forever will be synonymous with our 
college experience: Canisius, Jogues, Regis, 
Campion, Loyola, Kostka, Claver, And Gonza- 
ga. All students become aware eventually that 
these buildings were named after Jesuit saints 
and scientists. However, some might not realize 
that a deeper Jesuit experience lies behind the 
names of the buildings. Looking beyond the 
names unveils the true character of a university 
deeply rooted in the Jesuit tradition. From Ori- 
entation And Senior Week to academics and 
dorm life, we discover that our college exper- 
ience is uniquely 'Jesuit." 














Above: Fr. Hill Cullen talks with Karen Beedenbender. Right: The 
((.suits offer Christmas M.iss lot the university community in Alumni 
Hall. John Courtmanchi photos 



12 








* 



HHHHHH^H 













Fr. Christopher Mooney. S.J., in 
his address to the faculty three years 
ago expressed concern that not all 
of the lay faculty and students of 
Jesuit universities understand the 
essence of Jesuit coals and philos- 
ophy. The uniting force and moti- 
vation which infuses the "Jesuit- 
:nto everything .it I airfield 
University is concentrated in one 
phrase which explains that the Jesu- 
( committed today to the ser- 
vice of faith, of which the promo- 
tion of justice is an absolute re- 
quirement." (Jesuit Mission 
State! 

This commitment has chal- 
lenged the Jesuits to develop a pro- 
gram which would prepare students 
for the demands of the contempo- 
rary marketplace and also instill in 
them moral and spiritual values. 
There are several ways which the 
Jesuits have sought to fulfill their 
commitment: the core curriculum, 
the prominence of Jesuits in the 
university community, and the 
campus ministry. 
Scene one: The Core Curriculum 

Registration day. The line at the 
registrar's office extends into eter- 
nity, or so it seems to undergrad- 
uates at Fairfield University. It is 
registration day. A student throws 
her hands down, exasperated with 
her search for a philosophy or reli- 
gion class to fulfill her core require- 
ments. She confides to her friend, "I 
can't believe I'm torturing myself 
just to get into classes that I'll never 
really use.'' 

Many students might not recog- 
nize the importance of certain 
courses in the core curriculum, but 
as Dr. Leo O'Connor, chairman of 
the American Studies Department 
states, "The core is critical to under- 
standing the assumptions of Jesuit 
education. Many alumni as well as 
graduating seniors have reported to 
me that they look back at those 
required courses with apprecia- 
tion." 

The broad accusations levelled 
at the tore curriculum usually stem 
from the course's perceived "non- 
practical" value. While no one can 
deny the importance of "practical'' 
courses, overlooking other fields 
which strengthen our moral fiber 
and awareness of others such as lit- 
erature, philosophy, religion, and 
the arts, would undermine the suc- 
cess in a student's specific field. 

I r Hill Cullen, S.J., reaffirms this. 
II' My! In some sense, they are 





Above: Fr. Laurence O'Neil, S.J.. participates in the bi-annual blood 
drive. John Courtmanche photo Left: Fr. Simon Harak, S.J. Brian Russell 

photo 



right in that they may never make 
money with it. But yes. it is practical 
in that they will use the courses to 
think, write, speak, and under- 
stand." 

When the Jesuits instituted the 
core curriculum, they were not iso- 
lating themselves from the contem- 
porary needs of their students. The 
Jesuits have been constantly adapt- 
ing the core to meet practicalities. 
When the core was first created in 
the 1940's, students had few elec- 
tees to choose from, unlike the 
graduating class of 1988 did. The 
students in those days had to take 
24 credits of philosophy, 16 credits 
of theology. 

Fr. Bill Cullen says that with the 
dawn of the space race, beginning 
m the late I950's when Russia 
launched Sputnik, the first earth 
satellite, the Jesuits revised the core 
and made it more st lente-onented. 
Then in 1970, the core was re-evalu- 
ated by the Curriculum Committee 



which asked itself whether the core 
was giving the best educaton possi- 
ble. The answer was" no," and re- 
forms took place that required only 
three philosophy courses and two 
theology courses, down from five 
philosophy couses and four theol- 
ogy courses. 

One of the most recent develop- 
ments in the core's emphasis is the 
expansion of the fine arts program. 
Fine arts is a typically strong Jesuit 
tradition, but was put on hold in the 
early years of Fairfield University to 
meet the "practicalities" that the 
challenge of educating the incom- 
ing Catholic immigrants demand- 
ed. Times have changed, however, 
with the Jesuits's success in secur- 
ing the basics of education at Fair- 
field, resulting in rapid capital 
growth and an excellent academic 
reputation. Today, the Jesuits have 
the resources and time to concen- 
trate on the fine arts. Within the 
next few years, Fairfield will con- 
struct a new fine arts building. This 
facility will provide a center for the 
fine arts program to develop. This 
modern facility will include a stage 
for dramatic performances which 
are currently produced at the Play- 
nM.se, and musical performances 
which are currently held in the Oak 
Room. This facility will also serve 
as a place to showcase student and 
faculty art work, currently dis- 
played in the library, Campus Cen- 
ter, and the Center of Financial 



Studies. 

With respect to the curriculum in 
general, new majors and minors 
such as the new Faith, Peace, and 
Justice minor, are being developed 
to strengthen students's awareness 
of the Jesuit mission. While Har- 
vard University boasted of its 
adopting a core curriculum, the Je- 
suits never left the core. 
Scene two: Thejesuit Presence. 

Fr. Joseph MacDonnell. S.J., 
sribbles some math formulas which 
resemble Chinese to the student 
with the gaping mouth. But Fr. 
MacDonnell is patient and goes 
over the process once more until 
the student's mouth closes, at least 
slightly. Another Jesuit is found in a 
makeshift jail in the Campus Center 
lobby trying to raise money for a 
worthy cause. He demands. "Set me 
free!" Students respond by drop- 
ping some coins in a can. These are 
two places where the Fairfield stu- 
dent encounters the presence of the 
Jesuits, the second unique feature 
of a Jesuit education. 

Although the Fairfield Universi- 
ty community might view these fa- 
miliar scenes as normal, they are 
none the less important. As Dr. 
O'Connor states, "At a Jesuit Uni- 
versity the presence of the Jesuits 
themselves is important because 
they give witness to their own tradi- 
tion." The Jesuits's loyalty to this 
tradition seems endless. 

With his usual smiling disposi- 



. 1 1 




ion, Fr. Cullen says, "To promote 
he individual for God, there are 21 
esuits living in the mayhem of the 
lorms. They choose to live in the 
lorms because of love for the indi- 
'idual." Then he continued, "I love 
he kids, but sometimes they just 
lrive me nuts." 

In the dorms, the Jesuits interact 
vith the students in a more person- 
.1 way than in the classroom. In 
ulie Hall's weekly dorm Mass giv- 
n by Fr. Simon Harak, S.J., the stu- 
lents introduce themselves to any 
lewcomers at the beginning of the 
4ass, and during the Mass, hugs 
re exchanged by everyone as a sign 
>f peace. After the Mass, Fr. Har- 
k's soothing voice holds the stu- 
lents's attention, "I'm sorry about 
he brownies this week, but I didn't 
save them in long enough." A stu- 
lent whispers to the person sitting 
iext to her, "He always gives out 
•rownies, and they're great!" The 
lapkins and brownies are passed. 

Besides the dorm Masses, the Je- 
uits also help coordinate the dorm 
ouncil which raises money for 
worthy causes and plans dorm ac- 
ivities such as dances in the Stag- 



Her Inn, dorm picnics, and Secret 
Santa during Christmas, when stu- 
dents share in the joy of the season 
by giving each other small gifts 
anonymously. 

The message of the Jesuits is not 
only intended for the students. The 
Jesuits also hope to share their ideas 
with the lay faculty. In a 1985 Fair- 
field University publication, Uni- 
versity Planning Committee Long 
Range Report, the Jesuits recognized 
the need for communication be- 
tween the faculty as vital to the fu- 
ture success of Jesuit higher educa- 
tion. The number of Jesuits enter- 
ing the order is decreasing. 
Assuming that this trend continues, 
the Jesuits are preparing for the 
time when only a handful of Jesuits 
will be a part of the 27 Jesuit univer- 
sities across the United States. 

Fr. Bill Cullen says, "There are 
only four Jesuits in the New Eng- 
land province being ordained this 
year as opposed to 31 when I was 
ordained in 1954." He adds that the 
greatest growth for the Jesuits is 
coming from the Third World na- 
tions, the biggest influx from Afri- 
ca. 




The Jesuits's effort to maintain 
the "Jesuitness" of Fairfield Univer- 
sity is focused on the articulation of 
the Jesuit ideals on education to the 
lay faculty. This is the purpose of 
"Jesuit Evenings" sponsored by Fr. 
MacDonnell, during which mem- 
bers of the faculty are invited to a 
dinner to discuss Jesuit ideas. These 
evenings are held throughout the 
year to include all of the faculty. 
"Our goal is to educate the educa- 
tors in the Jesuit vision. This is the 
purpose of the faculty development 
days," Fr. Cullen says. 

Dr. Morris Grossman of the Phi- 
losophy Department says, "A mu- 
tual exchange of ideas is always ap- 
propriate in a university. In any par- 
ticular instance the lay faculty or 
Jesuits may benefit, depending on 
the quality of the ideas." 

"There are many faculty who 
share in the ideals of the Jesuit tradi- 
tion," Dr. O'Connor says, "and they 
have voluntarily aligned themselves 
with the Jesuits." 




Top Left: Hadaelena Messia 
and Katie Belcher prepare a 
meal at a soup kitchen in 
Norwalk. Top Right: President 
Aloysius Kelley, S.J., addresses 
an Oak Room audience. Ben de 
la Cruz photos Above: Fr. Bill 
Cullen, S.J., gives ashes to 
Cheryl Pavolisi. Brian Russell 
photo 



15 



The Campus Ministry. 

- the 

-.ipped 

of the 

• 

exper- 
Roc- 

Other favorite restaurant. 
Here, the clientele <lo not walk in 
with long dresses or starched white 

and Bass Weeguns, ready to 

spend their money. Instead, the 

people walk in alone, some worn 

and shabby. Carrying all their pos- 

ons with them. Homeless, 

people come from the streets. 

Their meal tonight ompli- 

ments of Fairfield University's 

: us Ministrj soup kitchen. The 

ill students. The students 

along with some advisers prepare 

all ot the food and arrangements. 

'hat the food and the 

service is superb. 

The Campus Ministry offers a 
varietj of programs from soup 
kitchens to general counseling for 
troubled students. Dr. Rudolph 
Landry o( the English department 
the major difference between a 
Jesuit university and a non-sectarian 
university like Harvard or Yale is 
the vital role the campus ministry- 
plays in student life. 

Presently, the Campus Ministry 
offices are located on the bottom 
floor of Loyola Hall. The Jesuits 
have plans to make it more accessi- 
ble to students by relocating it to 
the new University Chapel and 
Campus Ministry Center, which will 
be built behind the Campus Center. 
This new I niversity Chapel and 
Campus Ministry Center will also 
aid the Jesuits by giving them a 
place to center themselves in the 
future, when possibly only I few 
Jesuits will be part of the universiu . 
It will also provide the Jesuits and 
students with a common place of 
worship. It will be a visible symbol 
of the Jesuit influence on the uni- 
vers • 

The strength of I airfield s ( 
pus Minism is its abilm to involve 
the students on a personal level m 
the liturgy and in the faith , I 
and Justice coalition. The I airfield 
I 'rnvcrsity community, by design, is 




a small community, with only 2800 
undergraduates. The students and 
the Campus Ministry staff can easi- 
ly get to know each other and begin 
working together. With this advan- 
tage, the Campus Ministry does not 
just stand by until students have 
emotional or spriritual crises before 
it makes an attempt to know the 
student. It is always reaching out by 
providing retreats and activities 
such as soup kitchens or opportuni- 
ties where students can work with 
mentally retarded children. The 
symbiotic relationship between the 
student's active participation in the 
Campus Ministry's programs and 
the Campus Ministry's active role in 
trying to personally know the Fair- 
field students is the critical differ- 
ence that has enabled the Campus 
Ministry to succeed in fostering the 
Jesuit ideals of faith and peace 
through justice. 

The final scene: Commencement. 
Today, students are dressed in 
long gowns and caps. They stand in 
a procession. Each is reminiscing: 
the last four years seem like a long 
journey because of alt of the hard 
work and long nights; the last four 
years seem like yesterday because 
of friendships developed with the 
facult) and fellow students. The 

Fairfield I niversit) experience is 

over for these seniors However, the 
of their Jesuit experience will 



hopefully be a part of the graduate's 
character forever. 

As Fairfield University students. 
we might wonder what we are ex- 
pected to come away with, besides 
the names of the dorms where we 
and our friends lived. But for most 
of us, the message is securely in- 
stilled. We are expected to realize 
and exercise a "commitment to ser- 
vice of faith, of which the promo- 
tion of justice is an absolute re- 
quirement," a commitment that is 
bonded with every major from fine 
arts to biology to accounting. 

Putting it more succinctly. Fr. 
Simon Harak concludes, "If a gra- 
duate came back to me and said 



that he was making $75,000, and h 
showed no concerns other thai 
this, then I would say to myself tha 
I had failed. But if a graduate cam 
to me and said, 'Father, I think 
have a solution to feed the hungr 
using left over restaurant food, 
would be very happy." 

Ben de la Cm 



Top: Fr. Walter Smith. S.J.. talks with Johr 
Chiaia in the Campus Center. John 
Court mancht photo Above: The Jesuits 
celebrate Parent's Weekend Mass. Ben dt I 
thoU Ri^ht Bellarmine Hall, named, 
after the university s patron saint. St. 
Robert Bellarmine. a 16th century 
theologian and champion of spiritual 
values. Annt Lynch photo 



16 



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Staff 

Member 

of the 

Year 

Security Officer Mick 

Grassi receives the 

Manor's "Staff Member 

of the Year" award for 

1988. After reviewing a 

list of nominations 

which included Seller's 

workers, maids, 

maintenance crew, and 

secretaries, the Manor 

staff selected Mick for 

the honor. 

According to Manor 

Associate Editor Ben 

de la Cruz, Mick was 

selected for his 

visibility on campus and 

for his character. "If 

you need Mick for 

something, you always 

know where to find 

him," said de la Cruz. 

Some students know 

Mick only as the man 

who won't let us park in 

the Campus Center 

parking lot. Others know 

him as a kind man and 

even as a friend. Either 

way, Mick is as much a 

part of the Fairfield 

experience as beach 

parties. 

In this picture, 

classes were cancelled 

and Mick enjoys the 

lack of traffic. John 

Courtmanche photo 





i l 



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[ 








OUR TOWN 



Since the opening of the 
university in 1947, both the 
campus and county 
community have provided each 
other with a beneficial exchange 
>'t ideas, scruces, and 
responsibilities. The relationship 
between the two is inseparable. 

The history of the town of 
1 airfield begins early in the 1600s 
as the original colonies were first 
settled. Upon the sixth anniversary 
of the settlement in 1645, the 
town adopted the name of 
I airfield. By 1756, it had grown to 
become the fourth most populous 
county in the colony. 

•tunately in 1779, during the 
Revolutionary War, the British 
burned it to the ground. However, 
the county was rebuilt and 
prosperity grew again. In 1942, the 
• Jesus bought land here 
and established Fairfield 
I nnersity. In the years that 
followed, both school and town 
have developed, offering many 
great opportunities for all. 

I airfield University takes 
advantage of the many services 
that the town has to offer. The 
lairheld student has often made 

' stores like Grand 
I 'nion and Brooks Pharmacy 
which may be found only a 
shuttle ride away. Likewise, a 
vanet\ of stores are located on 
Black Rock Turnpike. If a break 
from Seller's is needed (which it 

'■' ■ P //,< 
luddrutker s. or SideTraxx can 
■ Kind ( lose by. And to 
relieve those 10 o'clock hunger 

Si • ' Eleven and 
I imothy's Ice i ■ m to be a 

'Id student s solution 
' are also plates in the 
town ot 1 airfield that ( ater to 
life tl,< Seaf.rape and 

u. ood'i End hit tl .< 

iist ( )r it students prefer to host a 

social gathering on campus Super 



Discount Liquors is often their 
first stop. 

Also, the exchange of services 
between the university and the 
town has long been a Fairfield 
tradition. The numerous clubs and 
organizations such as Circle K, the 
Student Nurses Association, and 
the Cardinal Key Society, to name 
just a few, have been vital parts of 
the Community service programs 
of the area. Events such as the 
canned food and clothing drives, 
the Special Olympics, and the Red 
Cross Blood drive have been, and 
will continue to be, great successes 
in contributing to the well being 
of Fairfield and the surrounding 
communities. 

The cultural exchange between 
the University and town has also 
been a benefit over the years. This 
year's Evenings of Music in the 
Oak Room, lectures by prominent 
leaders and speakers, art exhibits 
in the Financial Studies Building, 
and a number of quality foreign 
and domestic films shown in 
Gonzaga Auditorium, have all 
been well received by members of 
the community. 

The educational experience 
between Fairfield and the school 
has always been very strong. The 
University offers many 
educational programs for the 
students and community 
members, including undergrad and 
graduate classes, lectures, and 
educational films. The Nyselius 
library is widely used by the 
community. And the Media 
Center, once home to Connecticut 
Public Television, still offers many 
of its servi< is 

In addition, the Jesuits have 
been an important presence in the 
I airfield community. Masses are 
celebrated daily, and residents of 
I airfield are invited to attend. 

Sean Fly tin 





Juniors Helen Lovely and Terry Markham. Brian Russell photo 



AJ l lJ_ 




I 



About the 



■ 



IV- v_JVwlllWl UlUU 





FUSA 



— j USA President Chris Ritchie, kind and 
results-oriented, has received much 
credit for the accomplishments of this 
year's student government. Who can forget in 
April 1987, when Ritchie publicly stated, "My 
cabinet members and I will resign if, by next 
November, our goals are not accomplished, 
and if the legislature finds the organization 
lacking." 

Looking back, the boldness of that statement 
fades. For the Fairfield University Student 
Association, this Fortieth Anniversary year 
was enormously successful. You could credit 
Ritchie, but the Politics major from Trumbull, 
Connecticut, whose favorite expressions are 
"Sure" and "Thank You", will insist that the 
credit extend deep into the lower positions of 
his cabinet. 

What do you know, the guy's humble too. 







■ I <> 




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About the 


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Government for the stu 
dents by the students 



26 




The senior class was largely re- 
sponsible for effective program- 
ming and smooth administration in 
FUSA this year. Seniors in the cabi- 
net were Vice-Presidents Marianne 
Walsh, Kerry Pollicino, and Ken 
Caisse; Accountant John Chiaia and 
Treasurer Tony Minnefore; Direc- 
tor of Films Tina Bugara. Director 
of Info Systems Lisa Shook, Direc- 
tor of Promotions Tina Maciag. 
Sam Faillace ran Travel and Recrea- 
tion, Terri Durso ran the Student 
Entertainment Commission, and 
Shireen Rustom administered Pub- 
licity. Also. Jean Halloran and 
Stephanie Lisk served as senior offi- 
cers in the student Legislature. 

On the list of accomplishments, 
budget control sits at #1. Ritchie's 
cabinet assumed their positions in 
Spring '87. in the middle of a FUSA 
recession. At the time, FUSA had 
nearly run out of money, and the 
spring semester lacked events. This 
year, though, with tighter control 
ol tin.' budget and a better sense of 
student desires, the student associ- 
ation followed a full Fall program 
with a full Spring program. Stu- 
dents even gained access to spend- 
ings, as FUSA published frequent 
budget reports in the Mirror. 



FUSA knew student desires — the 
association polled students and 
avoided events which failed in 
1986-87. Programming peaked. 
Tina Bugara helped increase the 
number of films, introducing din- 
ner theaters and brunch cartoons to 
the list of activities. Sam Faillace 
planned bus trips and ski trips and 
plane trips and spring break trips. 
Junior Rusty Magner headed a new 
Athletics Division to publicize 
sporting events and arouse morale 
for campus teams. Terri Durso 
landed the INXS contract. Junior 
Beth Gillin started the Adopt-a- 
Frosh program. 

Also. Junior Karen Beeden- 
bender strengthened the Council of 
Student Organizations (COSO) for 
the benefit of the clubs. Juniors 
Maria Orabona and Nicole Dam- 
men ran the popular Comedy 
Nights series, and booked live 
in usual entertainment for the Stag- 
Her. Junior John Kane organized 
the lectures, including William I 
Buckley and Walt Frazier. Juniors 
Charlene Sorvillo and Bridget 
Moran planned special events such 
.is Battle of the Bands. Junior Mike 
Boynton initiated the Fire Alarm 
Task I one. And all those neat signs 



i the Campus Center walls — they 
;re designed by Shireen Ruston. 
The list does not stop there. In 
5 area of Academics, junior Mark 
etz arranged for the publication 
the faculty evaluations and for an 
tra reading day during finals in 
ay. Junior Frank Carroll served as 
tchie's right-hand man and won 
■ Presidential elections in Febru- 

A few programs deserve special 
:ognition. Adopt-a-Frosh, in its 
it year, matched upperclassmen 
:h freshmen as big brothers/sis- 
s. The program had a bumpy first 
ir, but gained support from ad- 
nistration and students and 
>mised to grow in effectiveness 
it year. 

Fhe Council of Student Organi- 
ions pledged a stronger commit- 
nt to clubs, publishing newslet- 
> and scheduling training and in- 
mative lectures for student 
ders. 

Ilass Councils grew with assis- 
ce from Alumni Relations. Both 
SA and Alumni Relations 
>ught each class should develop 
ense of unity, starting freshman 
r. 



^■■^■■■■■■■■■a Opposite top: Mark Dietz mans the Spotlight at [NXS. Opposite bottom Ken < aisse uses the services 

of the Info Desk. John ( ourtmanchi photo: Below Kerrv Follicino announces the next comedi 
Perhaps a key to the Success of Comedy Night. Bottom left Ni< ol( I >..mmen and Maria Orabona joke with comedian V. ., ' 



programs was advertising and pub- 
lic relations. Ritchie stressed the use 
of a new computer for designing 
snazzy posters, newsletters, and 
memos. From dormroom to class- 
room, a campus building wasn't 
complete without a large, bright, 
glossy FUSA poster. 

Special mention goes to FUSA's 
commitment to video as an effec- 
tive tool for publicity; the new se- 
mester passes which saved the 
freshman a lot of standing in line, 
increased money for FUSA and in- 
creased attendance at events; the 
new mailbox outside of the office, 
which, even if hardly used, showed 
FUSA's desire for better communi- 
cation with students; and finally, 
FUSA's proposal to raise the stu- 
dent activities fee $10 to $35, which 
is still about $20 below the average 
at the country's Jesuit universities. 

FUSA's Fortieth Anniversary 
year was a grand one. Ritchie's get- 
things-done drive spread through a 
receptive and imaginative cabinet — 
the combination produced a year of 
well-earned high-fives. 

John Courtmanche 



Brian Russell photos Bottom upper right Terri Durso gets to know her "little brother" at the Adopt-a- 
Frosh Ice Cteam Social. Bottom ri^ht Sam I aillace checks I.D.s of Lisa Panico and Carolyn Jai I 
the entrance CO the Stag-] Ic r drinking se< tion Ben Je la Cruz photos 





Above: Theresa Leah) steers Right: Joanne Anastasiadou 

freshman belongings to a dorm. Top straightens the "Welcome" banner. 



2H 





Welcome Class of 1991 




FIRST 
IMPRESSIONS 

You should've just brought white 
sheets," John Cliggett says to his mom 
on the first day of Freshman 
Orientation, September 6, 1987. John, J.T. to 
his friends, hands the designer sheets back to 
his mother. The last thing any freshman wants 
to see is that his mom brought funny-looking 
sheets for the bed. 



3ottom Right: Campion R.A.s Tina 
Ruggiero and Jen Smith distribute 
room keys. John Courtmanche photos 




4 A 



<^N 










Deans, faculty, staff, and 
students join to welcome the 
Class of 1991. 



Readying the 
forces 

Dire f <,r ol ( Mentation Jeanne 
DiMuzio pu-s the Orientation 
Asm 1 -: oming pep talk.John 

Courtmanchi photo 
30 






John inspects his new room. 
Gonzaga 311. "It's bigger than the 
one we saw when we visited over 
the summer," his mom says. John 
was accepted to Boston College. 
Providence, and Villanova. Ac- 
cording to his dad. Fairfield was 
always John's first choice. 

The Cliggetts are from Long 
Beach, NY, 65 miles from Fairfield. 
John heard about Fairfield from an 
older friend, a 1987 graduate who 
worked with John as a summer life- 
guard. John is one of about ten 
graduates from Chamanade High 
School's Class of '87 who came to 
Fairfield. They are among the 750 
freshman who participated in the 
three-day fall orientation program, 
run by Orientation Director Jeanne 
DiMuzio, with much assistance 
from the Student Services statf (in- 
cluding Resident Advisors, or 
K As i. Dean of Freshmen Henry 
Murphy, S.J.. Co-Chairs Beth Gillin 
and Brian Kavanaugh, and 260 
members or the Junior class (the 
< l.iss ol '89). 

1 airfi* LI is big on first impres- 
sions. "Orientation can make or 
break a freshman's st.i\ at college." 
|i anne DiMuzio says No one else 
in the country does the mow in 




fm 



\ 





process. 

The process appears simple. The 
( Liggett family arrives on campus, 
and a few waving, smiling juniors 
direct them to the Campus Center 
parking lot. There. Lisa Babaian. a 
member or the junior class, guides 
the family to the Campus Center 
stairs, where Beth Gillin and Brian 
Kavanaugh are greeting freshmen. 
Beth and Brian meet the Cliggett 
family, and tell John that if he needs 
anything this year, just call. Lisa 
then leads the family into the Cam- 
pus Center. 

Meanwhile. Junior Michael Har- 
ding drives the Cliggett family car 
(with permission from the Cliggett 
family, of course) to Gonzaga, 
form's dormitory. A half-dozen ju- 
niors load John's belongings from 
the car into supermarket Carriages, 
steer the carriages to the elevator. 
and up to John's room to unload. 

At the Campus Center. John re- 
ceives a ke\ to his room, a mailbox 
assignment, an orientation packet, a 

complimentary box of shaving 
cream and cosmetic accessories, 

and greetings from the Fairfield 
Universit) Student Association 

M SA) President Chris Ritchie. 

who stands at the I I SA table with 



USA Academics Director Mark 
)ietz, handing out free posters and 
amphlets. 

Next, Lisa guides John to Gon- 
iga Auditorium for an I.D. picture, 
0001, then to the front of Gonzaga 
mere John meets the Gonzaga 
L.A.s, specifically the R.A. for 
ronzaga III, Brian Russell. The 
roup walks to John's room, mom 
nd dad express happiness that 
Dhn's stuff has been accounted for, 
r. Bill Cullen, S.J., the Gonzaga III 
;sident Jesuit, says hello to every - 
ne, and after a few minutes of 
hat, the family is left alone to un- 
ack. Mrs. Cliggett pulls out the 
esigner sheets. 

Every year after Orientation, 
resident Aloysius Kelley, S.J. re- 
vives notes from parents. "Some 
arents write that they've moved 
vo or three older children into 
ther colleges," he says, "And Fair- 
eld is the only school with such an 
Ktensive program." 




Co-Chairs Beth Gillin and Brian Kavanaugh greet freshman and parents. John 
Courtmanche photo 



According to Jeanne DiMuzio, 
parents love the program because 
they can spend so much quality 
time with their children. 



Later that Sunday, the Drama 
Club performs on the Campus Cen- 
ter patio, the Glee Club, in the Oak 
Room. The Jesuits conduct a mass 



in 1. inula Chapel. Then. President 
Kellej and other administi 
greet parents 

John studies the freshman orien- 
tation schedule. It says he will 
spend muc li of the next two da 
meetings — floor meetings conduct- 
ed by Ins R.A.. academii meei 
with the deans of the schools, infor- 
mative meetings with the Student 
Services staff. There's a comedy 
night and a dance, and on Tuesday 
afternoon, freshman Olympics. 

Late Sunday afternoon, Mr. and 
Mrs. Cliggett leave for Long Beach. 
John heads for Seller's with his new 
roommate and floormates. 

John Courtmanche 




ampion R.A.s Jen Smith, Terry Sullivan, and Tom Duggan orientate Lauren Capello. _/o^« Courtmanche photo 



tvrH*"9«» 



f 






OPEN FOR (PARTY) 
BUSINESS 




I once heard them called 'The 
Cadillacs of Residence Halls'", 
Rich Rossi said to a group of 
parents at Parent's Weekend. This 
year, Fairfield bought a bunch of 
new Cadillacs. The new six-person 
townhouses opened on September 
6, 1987. 

The contractors rushed to open 
the townhouses on time. Students 
who arrived on campus a day or 
two early found themselves sleep- 
ing on the living room floor at 
friend's four-person townhouses. 
When the six-person units opened, 
residents sensed that the contrac- 
tors had rushed to complete them. 
Maybe it was the wet rugs, or the 
leaking pipes and sprinklers. It 
could have been the layer of water 
in the basements. Other clues to the 
rushed completion were hot water 
in the toilet and faulty showers. 

Still, the problems were small 
and understandable. Immediately, 
the new townhouses affected life 
on campus. One change was the 
nature of McAuliffe Hall. Once 
thought as the haunted building in 
the woods. McAuliffe's reputation 
changed. It became the haunted 
building next to townhouse build- 
mg IV 

Another change was the creation 
I >t .1 tull-time Student Services posi- 
cion CO oversee the townhouses. 
Theresa Scott filled the position in 



its first year. She helped strengthen 
the Fairfield University Townhouse 
Association (FUTA). the student 
group committed to developing the 
townhouse community. 

The six-person townhouses also 
affected the social structure of Fair- 
field. Change occurred with regard 
to residence of under- and upper- 
classmen, the population of the 
beach, the format of the townhouse 
lottery, and social life. 

The new townhouses affected 
dorm life. Kostka and Claver, pre- 
viously known as the quiet dorms 
for on-campus juniors and seniors 
tired of quad life, became a lively 
freshman residence. Most on-cam- 
pus juniors and seniors were acco- 
modated by the new townhouses. 

The population of the beach de- 
creased by about 30 students, ac- 
cording to Rich Rossi. Rossi fore- 
sees the continuance of that trend. 
"Landlords are renting houses to 
tenants on a full-year basis," Rossi 
says. Fewer owners are offering 
houses to students; fewer Fairfield 
students are seeking beach houses. 

The Undergraduate Housing Of- 
fice necessarily reviewed the town- 
house lottery process. In 1986-87, all 
Senior groups who sought town- 
houses were accomodated. But in 
the January 1988 lottery, three or 
four senior groups were disappoint- 
ed. Theresa Scott organized a sur- 



vey of students in February for atti 
tudes about the 70%-30% senior-ju 
nior split. "We have the option o 
offering townhouses only to SenioB 
groups."' she said. 

The new townhouses affectec 
the social life at Fairfield. Abou 
thirty new spacious concrete base 
ments were used by residents fo 
social gatherings. I'nderclassmer 
flocked across Campion Field tc 
mingle with Fairfield's jet set. Ever 
the Floating Naut drifted to the 
townhouses on a few nights, but 
the tradition of beach parties was 
never threatened. 

Townhouse partyers saw campu; 
security patrolling the area by car 
but Undergraduate Housing easec 
restrictions, and few parties wer( 
disrupted by head residents and se 
curity officers. 

Overall, the new Cadillacs were 
roomy and offered a smooth ride 
Juniors and Seniors rode them hare 
for the first 20.000 miles, but ironi 
cally. as the January lottery indicat- 
ed, their resale value has increasec 
with ace 

John Courtmatich( 

Above: Townhouses. old and new. Aunt, 
Lynch photo Lett Claire Sampieri and Helen 
Lovel] christen the new townhouses with 
ihtving cream Rijjht In a dav. the back- 
wards went from mud to gnu. John Court -\ 
•K.ivJn photos 



32 












■*»"*» 



PODIUM TALK 



Academic Vice-President 

Robert Stepsis hosts a 

forum. John Courlmanche 

photo 



Many Fairfield organiza- 
tions and academic de- 
partments, as part of 
their educational services, sponsor 
outstanding lectures on campus. 
This year was no exception. Invita- 
tions were extended to prominant 
speakers who addressed a wide vari- 
ety of topics. 

FUSA began its Arts and Lecture 
series for the 1987-1988 year with a 
lecture on September 17 by William 
F. Buckley Jr. John Kane, Co-Chair- 
man of the Arts and Lecture com- 
mittee, introduced Mr. Buckley to a 
sold-out Oak Room. 

Buckley, author, journalist, and 
founder of the New York conserva- 
tive party, first spoke about Ameri- 
can liberty. "Instead of considering 
the problems of other countries," 
Buckley stated, "We should reflect 
on our own personal and political 



evolution." As the United States 
celebrates the 200th anniversaty of 
the signing of the Constitution, 
Buckley pointed out that the liber- 
ties we now take for granted are 
actually quite new to our country. 
Next Buckley spoke about the Nu- 
clear Arms race between the U.S. 
and the Soviet Union. Buckley said 
that disarmament was only worth 
discussing if it meant leaving nei- 
ther country with enough weapons 
to harm the other. "A great idea," 
Buckley stated, "But completely 
unrealistic." 

Finally, Buckley pledged support 
for the U.S. development of a de- 
fensive shield in space. He conclud- 
ed that as Americans we must be 
willing to pay for the liberty we 
enjoy and realize that nuclear arma- 
ment is a portion of that expense. 

After his lecture, Buckley took 



questions from the audience, 
alumnus of Fairfield asked how i 
conservative students of the U 
versity should deal with "oppr 
sion from the teachers." Buckley 
sponded that liberal ideals are co 
mon among University facu 
across the nation, and because 
their authority, little can be done 
directly oppose them. Howe\ 
Buckley urged that students ct 
centrate on holding onto the beli 
they have. 

Challenging Buckley's lectui 
and beliefs. Senior Nathaniel Fan 
ham commended the faculty's pH 
gressive attitude and reiterated 
liberal stand of non-aggression. M 
Buckley seemed unaffected by tl 
criticism, as if he receives a lot of i 

Fl T SA also hosted basketball sti 
Walt Frazier as a guest speaker. Ai 
though the lecture was original! 



34 




illed as "Drugs in Sports," this 
outhern Illinois graduate and sev- 
n-time All-Star and Defensive 
layer of the Year delivered a 
)eech about success in the world 
)day. Frazier outlined in his lecture 
le keys to success. Frazier also 
iked about current issues such as 
cercise and fitness, peer group 
ressure, drugs and drug policies in 
rofessional sports, and, of course, 
>me of his fondest memories of 
isketball. Frazier later took ques- 
ts from the audience and, before 
parting, signed autographs. 
Other FUSA-sponsored lectures 
>ok the form of debates. On Feb- 
ary 8, 1988 Ambassador Ralph 
irle, former chief U.S. negotiator 
the SALT II Talks in Geneva, and 
mbassador Louis G. Fields, a top 
pert on terrorism, discussed the 
in Contra Affair. In addition to 




Walt Frazier signs an 
autograph for Jean 
Halloran.y<>£« 
Courtmanche photo 



addressing this timely subject, 
FUSA also hosted a debate on 
"Aids in America" on March 29 in 
the Oak Room. 

A Black Scholars Lecture Series 
was held on campus as well. A high- 
light of this series was the discus- 
sion on Caribbean politics. Dr. 
Alma H. Young, Associate Chan- 
cellor for academic affairs at the 
University of New Orleans, ad- 
dressed her topic, "The Caribbean 
at the Cross-Roads: Authoritarian- 
ism or Democracy." This speech in- 
cluded an analyzation of how the 
United States shapes the Caribbean 
governments. 

Other University lecture series 
included Bellarmine Lectures and 
People's Forum Lectures. A lecture 
program in Environmental Studies 
was also sponsored by the Olin Cor- 
poration. Guest speakers included 



Dr. William A. Niering, a professor 
of Botany at Connecticut College, 
and Dr. Gary Brewer, a professor of 
Resource Policy and Management 
at Yale University. They each ad- 
dressed significant topics including 
energy conservation, environmental 
resource management, and environ- 
mental hazards. 

The Humanities Institute spon- 
sored the final lecture series of the 
year, entitled "Novelist's America." 
The lectures took place in April and 
featured renowned American writ- 
ers William Styron, E.L. Doctorow, 
Wilfred Sheed, and Alfred Kazin. 

Lisa Muratori, Sean Flynn, Karen 
Maschio 



William Buckley 

autographs one of his 

books for Dan Knapik. 

John Courtmanche photo 




nc >'t the greatest benefits 

the college years seem to 

offet students is the pecu- 

>rm o( night -life made avail- 

»> them. KiMilciit students at 



bettei opportunity to experience 
tins phenomenon than those still 
iivmt; .it home, .iltlu>ni;li lommiit- 



lust ili.it 111 the dorms 



i»! stiu 



wherever .1 

ts m.i\ be 



takes on special meaning. During 
the day, students are often too 
caught up in .1 stead) stream ot 
v lasses, appointments and othei ob- 
ligations to do anything ver) inter- 
esting. To .1 large extent, the same 
in.u be said »)i must weeknights, 
. 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 ; ; 1 1 birthdays, holidays and 



)nce the weekend rears its head, 
owever, there appears to be a gen- 
ral si till of relict, and students all 



(wnhouse and beach parties which 
rop up regularly, a number ot spe- 

ial events vie tor student attention 
n certain weekends. One ot the 



ppearance of James Mapes in the 
>ak Room. This was not the hyp- 
otist's first performance at Fair- 
eld, so that even before the show, 
uhusiasm ran high. Mapes pro- 
r.im was one which included in- 
■nse audience involvement, begin- 
ing with the entire crowd, al- 
lOugh narrowed down to a select 
:w. Participating students were 
iven a wide variety ot hypnotic 
iggestions, ranging from those 
lat made them passengers on a fu- 



turistic space ship, to those that 
brought them hack in time more 
than 15 years. The show was an im- 
mense success, and even those who 



had expressed doubt from the start 
seemed CO have been impressed by 
what they had witnesed. 

Another successful event taking 
place in the Campus Center was the 
annual Beach Party. "Under the 
Boardwalk", as it was called this 
year, consisted ot dancing and oth- 
er amusements, including simulat- 
ed black-jack (complete with fake 
money). 

Less extensive activities have 
shown to be popular as well. A se- 
ries ot movies — both classics and 
more recent releases — were 
screened on campus, sponsored by 
various groups. "The Untouch- 
ables" is an example of a film which 
was attended by a lari;e number of 



Students. Of course, social activity 
is not totally confined to the Uni- 
versity grounds. Students might 
also opt to view a movie in town, or 
visit a local restaurant or dance 
club. Yet whether they choose to 
spend their evenings being hypno- 
tized by a visiting speaker, or cjiiiet- 
ly "at home" with a group of 
friends, it can rarely be said that 
they had no choice. Such freedom 
is a distinguishing feature in the life 
of a Fairfield University 
student. Peter Witkotcsky 



Lett: James Mapes hypnotizes 
Diane Foster. Ben de la Cruz photo 
Right: Hugh Lambert counts his 
"Under the Boardwalk" winnings. 
Spread: The Guad. Brian Russell 
photos 










DAYTIMES 



Studying in the Mezz. 
Vince Cervoni photo 



Fairfield's campus is an active 
place during the day. With 
classes letting out at regular 
intervals and with students stop- 
ping to have lunch or to pick up 
something at the bookstore, one is 
bound to see many familiar faces at 
every turn. For some, when classes 
are finished for the day — or at least 
for an hour or two — their time is 
truly their own. They may choose 
to check their mailboxes or mail a 
letter themselves. They may feel 
obliged to wait in a very long line to 
have an ID validated or to buy a 
ticket of some sort. Some students 
visit the RecPlex and spend a cou- 
ple of hours on the courts or in the 
pool. Many go home, and tht\ lie 
down on the sofa to watch their 
favorite soap, or catch up on some 
sleep. 

Studying is one of the less attrac- 
tive possibilities made available in 
planning an afternoon. When the 
better part of a day has been spent 
in note-taking or class discussion, 
one is tempted to put off work for a 
while. Campus Center staff mem- 
bers have apparently gotten wind of 
such trends, anil with help from 



FUSA's Campus Center Program- 
ming division, they arranged several 
successful mid-day activities this 
year. Early in the fall semester, The 
Jabberwocks performed in the 
Campus Center Lobby. An a capella 
quintet, the group hails from Bos- 
ton and has sung at colleges across 
the country. 

Nor was Jabberwocks the only 
source of daytime entertainment in 
the Campus Center. Junior Terry 
Sullivan made several appearances, 
singing popular tunes to lunch-time 
crowds and accompanying himself 
on the guitar and harmonica. Of 
course there were non-musical pre- 
sentations as well. Early in March a 
public forum was held to deal with 
the problem of homelessness. A 
number of outside speakers were 
featured to generate interest and to 
answer questions. Later that month 
an alcohol awareness program was 
sponsored by the Peer Counselors. 

On a less serious note, a local 
caricaturist, a tarot card reader, and 
an organ grinder with his perform- 
ing monkey also appeared on cam- 
pus to entertain students. The mon- 
key was a real crowd-pleaser, catch- 



ing and throwing a rubber ball, and 
making jump shots into a tiny 
hoop, among other things. In a ver- 
sion of the shell and pea game, a 
volunteer from the audience was 
asked to hide the pea beneath one 
of the shells as the monkey's eyes 
were covered. When he succeeded 
to choose the correct shell, the 
monkey was told to kiss the volun 
teer. Unfortunately, things got 
slightly out of hand at one point, 
and two students were bitten. Nei- 
ther injury was serious. 

In addition to being a stage for 
these various performers and speak- 
ers, the Campus Center seems a nat 
ural place for Fairfield students to 
meet, either between classes or at 
the end of the day. On almost any 
day of the week one is likely to 
come across one group or another, 
promoting its activities or encour- 
aging new membership. The Cam- 
pus Center is an important part in 
the lives of most students. It is a 
source of information and enter- 
tainment, and the place where many 
daily activities of a Fairfield student 
originate. 

Peter Witkowsky 



38 



- "-— - ' ^ 



COMMON 
DEDICATION 



V 



While you spent your Saturday leisurely 
anticipating the Harvest dance, a group 
of students ran around the Campus Cen- 
ter, hanging streamers, inflating balloons, carry- 
ing tables, chairs, and band equipment. While you 
ate dinner before your club meeting, the club offi- 
cers discussed the meeting's agenda and planned 
the next club event. Hours of preparation are in- 
vested in every floor meeting/activity. For this, 
Fairfield's student leaders deserve credit. 

On the weekend of October 3 and 4, University 
Activities in conjunction with the Council of Stu- 
dent Organizations (COSO), sponsored a "Lead- 
ership Weekend" at Camp Mohawk in upstate 
Connecticut. Unfortunately, a number of students 
who should have attended couldn't. So this large 
group picture is only a sampling of the students 
who invest much time and energy into student 
activities. 

Unfortunately, Camp Mohawk is a summer 
camp and its meeting and residence buildings are 
not heated. Unfortunately, a freak October snow- 
storm blanketed Connecticut that Sunday morn- 
ing, and the retreat was cut short. 

Nevertheless, the three days and two nights of 
programming and training sessions were helpful, 
and these student leaders returned to Fairfield 
with a better sense of how to run your Harvest 
dance, your club meeting, and your floor activi- 
ties. 








Left: Rich Rossi conducts an informative session on leadership. Above: The Camp 
Mohawk crew. Top Row: Maria Orabona, Louise Moon, Chris Bermmgham. Ken Caisse, 
Rcna DiBernardi. Debbie Schif, Steph Grabler, Matt Dmnan, Beth Gillin, Theresa Scott, 



--— 







^^^— 




Laura Keenan, Linda Williams, Chris Costanzo, Suzi Steblein, Hugh Lambert, Rob Barber, 
Kevin Nee, Diane Vanina; Second Row: Eva Bellafiore, Dilanthi DeSilva, Brad Runyon, 
Ed Flanagan, Frank Carroll, Leslee Aquavia, Karen Beedenbender, Ben de la Cruz, Brian 



Barry, Claudine Kiffer. Andrea Carella, Nicole Dammenjoann Chung, Suzie Holsey; 
Kneeling: Chris Ritchie, Regina Mauro.John Courtmanche. John Courtmanche photos 



41 



* 



W P 




? 



THE MANOR GOES VIDEO 

We should have seen it old Brantley, who weaves through The Manor Video staff uses Media citement is a ; 
coming. When all the two opposing players for a dunk; Center equipment. ten and twen 

families in the neigh- Voices: Dr. Leo O'Connor lee- We are searching for ways to im- show the vide 



We should have seen it 
coming. When all the 
families in the neigh- 
borhood invested in VCRs; when 
Uncle Ray and Uncle John started 
taping the family Christmas parties 
with their own video camcorders; 
when, to record her wedding day, 
Aunt Sue payed both a still photog- 
rapher and a small video produc- 
tion company, we should have seen 
it coming, approaching Fairfield 
University. 

A video yearbook. The concept 
is self-explanatory — a student-ori- 
ented compilation of video foot- 
age, complete with interviews and 
music, which attempts to capture 
the sights and sounds of the aca- 
demic year. 

Like a print yearbook, a video 
yearbook is not thrown together — 
ideally, it should be based on a 
script and it should present a theme. 
Like a print yearbook, a video year- 
book needs structure, trained per- 
sonnel, and financial backing. Un- 
like a print yearbook, a video year- 
book presents movement, voices, 
sounds, and music. 

Movement: Troy Bradford drib- 
bles upcourt. feeds the ball to Har- 



old Brantley, who weaves through 
two opposing players for a dunk; 

Voices: Dr. Leo O'Connor lec- 
tures his students about the forces 
which influence American society 
today; 

Sounds: an engine rumbles as the 
shuttle pulls away from the Campus 
Center; 

Music: the Fairfield University 
Glee Club sings the school's Alma 
Mater. 

The first video yearbook in the 
country was produced by Bob Levi- 
tan, a senior at Duke University in 
1983. Since graduating, Mr. Levitan 
has opened a successful video year- 
book production company, pat- 
terned after the print yearbook pub- 
lishing companies. His company 
produces U) college and high 
school videos throughout the 
country*, including those of Yale 
and Boston College. Soon, video 
yearbooks will be as vital to the 
college experience as. well, as year- 
books. 

Luckily. Fairfield University 
boasts a competent Media Center. 
The town of Fairfield is, after all, a 
suburb of New York City, a center 
for worldwide communications. 



The Manor Video staff uses Media 
Center equipment. 

We are searching for ways to im- 
prove the video for the future. This 
year, the video budget came from 
the print yearbook budget. Obvi- 
ously, attaching costs to the print 
yearbook, which breaks even finan- 
cially every year, can be harmful to 
both yearbooks. 

Also, the Manor Video could 
not afford to rent professional vid- 
eo equipment from the Media Cen- 
ter. So we taped with machines 
much like the ones Uncle John 
brings to the family Christmas par- 
ties. Tape quality is only passable. 
In the future, as the video yearbook 
becomes an established part of the 
undergraduate experience, we hope 
to afford professional equipment. 

The establishment of a video 
yearbook on campus is significant 
for a number of reasons. First, the 
message we are sending to the com- 
munity is that Fairfield is growing 
with, if not faster than, the times. 
The Stamford Advocate. The Bridge- 
port Post, and the Fairfield Citizen- 
News each published feature stories 
about the Manor Video. Second, 
students on campus are excited. F.x- 



citement is a good thing. Third, in 
ten and twenty years, alumni can 
show the video to friends and chil- 
dren, introducing them to the un- 
dergraduate experience of Fairfield 
University in 1988. 

We should have seen it coming. 
John Courtmanche 



— r-rr.-r.- • — ."T" 



.eft: John Courtmanche and Tracy Patterson tape a Stag-Her Coffeehouse. 
iai Mildenberger photo Below: Tracy Patterson and Wendy Walukiewicz 
et up outside of the Community Theater. Bottom: David Savage inter- 
iews Kim Sutherland and Mary Pat O'Brien at 188 Nights. Right: John 
Courtmanche. Ben de la Cruz photos 



N- 




\ 



SHOW-ING OFF FOR PARENTS 



This year's FL'SA-sponsored 
Parent's Weekend, October 
and 18, was a great way 
tor the parents to see what it's like 
to be a Fairfield student. A large 
number of students helped during 
many of the presentations and con- 
tributed to the weekend fun. 



On Saturday, the parents were 
treated to bus tours, lectures and 
discussions ranging from the study 
abroad and career programs to life 
at the Fairfield beach. Many Fair- 
field sports teams competed on 
fields throughout the campus. Fol- 
lowing a buffet lunch, the Drama 



Club performed on the Campus 
Center patio, while open houses 
were held in the classroom build- 
ings. Campus Ministry sponsored a 
Weekend Mass in Alumni Hall for 
the parents, and afterwards Presi- 
dent Kelley greeted them in the 
Oak Room. 



The highlight of the weekend for 
many was the parent's dance in the 
Campus Center. This is when par- 
ents exhibit the old styles of dance 
for the entertainment of the stu- 
dents. 

On Sunday, the Glee Club per- 
formed in Gonzaga Audiorium. To 




dose the weekend, Alpha Sigma 
Nu, the Jesuit Honor Society, 
Droudly inducted its new members 
for this year. 

Sean Flynn 



Below: Drama Club members 

Jessica Galligan and Debbie 

O'Donovan perform for parents. 

Varden photo Right top: Carla 

Supersano and Dad at the Parent's 

Dance. Right center: Jeanine 

Pollitt and Dad at the Parent's 

Mass. Right bottom: A walk 

through campus. Ben de la Cruz 

photos 




gr ^" *> - 




LEISURE TIME NOTE-TAKING 



No one complains of a lack of 
diversity on the music scene 



Fairfield offers something to 
satisfy everyone's musical 
tastes. A student doesn't 
have to go far to find classical, jazz, 
or rock and roll music. Be it in the 
Oak Room, Gonzaga Auditorium. 
Alumni Hall, Alumni Field, the 
Stag-Her Inn, a townhouse base- 
ment, or the beach, live entertain- 
ment is abundant at Fairfield. 

If Classical Music is to your lik- 
ing, the University sponsors classi- 



cal music from around the world. 
The 1987-88 Evenings of Music se- 
ries brought us such talented pia- 
nists as Fei-Ping Hsu and Christo- 
pher O'Riley. Other Classical music 
was performed by such well-known 
musicians as the Arden Trio, the 
Lydian and Brodsky String Quar- 
tets, lutenist Anthony Rooley, and 
violinist Robert Dandovici with 
pianist Steve De Groote. 

Locally, professor Orin Gross- 



man shared many a Sunday after- 
noon with us, both solo and with 
the chamber players. Students take 
part in such groups as the Glee 
Club, the Chamber Singers and the 
all-male Ambassadors of Song. 
They entertain throughout the year 
and at many special events, most 
notably the Christmas and spring 
masses. Students also take part as 
the Folk Singers and the Flute 
Choir. Clearly, classical music plays 
a strong role here at Fairfield. 

Jazz lovers are not forgotten ei- 
ther. On Super Bowl Sunday we 
were treated to the Newport Jazz 
Festival All-Stars. With such greats 
as George Wein on piano, Scott 
Hamilton, Noms Turney, and Har- 
old Ashby on woodwinds, Warren 
Vache on coronet, Oliver Jackson 
on drums, and the legendary Eddie 
Jones on bass, no Jazz lover could 
feel unfufilled. As if that is not 
enough, Fairfield sponsors the 




Good Talk and the Great Jazz Lec- 
ture series at the Westport Fine Arts 
center. 

However, the favorite of Fair- 
field University is Rock and Roll 
Fairfield played host over the past 
four years to such big names as 
John Cafferty and the Beaver 
Brown Band, The Romantics, the 
Hooters and INXS. To find big 
names off campus, one needs not 
travel far. Toad's Place is the place 
to go for the best new music. The 
Palace for the classic blues and rock 
artists, and the New Haven Colise- 
um for the big names. 

Fairfield has also been the birth- 
place for some great bands. We 
have had the pleasure of partying 
with such student bands as Shut l'p 
and Drive, Say When, Broken Bot- 
tles, Split Decision, Humidifier, 
Prescription and Charlie Doesn't 
Surf to name a few. The Stag-Her 
provides the stage during many of 




Left: Split Decision 
at the Stag-her. Kai 
Mi/Jenherger photo 
The Chamber Players. 
Mike Be/court photo 



.heme nights and coffee houses. 

•e friends gather to hear many of 

.campus bands, as well as outsid- 

who shared their music with us. 
A Fairfield student always has 

ir stereo locked on their favorite 
sio station. We can pick up radio 
irions based in New York City 

I Long Island as well as in Con- 
jcticut. Heavy Metal, light rock, 
fsic rock, rap and punk fill the air 
rves and are as far as the nearest 

io. Our own WVOF increased 
>100 watts as well as adding AM 

t this past year. 

With the recent grouth in popu- 
\ty of compact discs, cleaner and 
iiarer music is heard. The favorite 
I'thod to hear music at parties is at 
»1 volume, with the T.V. on. If it 
i,esn't have to be shouted over, it's 
't loud enough. Fairfield students 
ye their music. 

Gene Tiernan 




Right: Classical guitar 

concert in the Oak 

Room. Below: The 

Flute Choir. Mike 

Belcourt photos 





47 




K 



THE 
DANCE 
CYCLE v^ 

ids lortfe to -get dressed up for those™ 
special events like their first date or^' 
their first dance. Girls, especially, de- 
sire to look "grown up," and its not easy for 
them to resist with all the gels, mousses, lip- 
stick colors and flavors, hair sprays and hair 
dyes, barrettes and clips, eye liners and 
rouges, and powders and perfumes bombard- 
ing them. Boys, on the other hand, are just 
glad they do not have to cfeal with any items of 
the preceding list. Tlj£ complex decisions for 
what beauty tiptt>useai|dwhen to use it bend 
the boy's mi ngT* ^^^^ 

At Fairfield, the scenario is the same, al- 
though now the motives of a collegian for 
dressing up may be different. 





Opposite: Pete Holland dips 

Kristine Potensky. Left top: Carrie 

Diaz, Wendy Plosky, and Karen 

Renaud. Left center: Eva Bellafiore 

dances with Paul Lukas. Left 

bottom: Deanna Esposito and 

date. Ben de la Cruz photos ^^k 

^# // i 



Afc 



- «■ 









« 



/ 



g " 





*s^ 



I 



The Seasons bring Chances 
for Romances at Dances 



Following Fairfield tradition, the 
Harvest Dance once again began 
the cycle of semi-formals held here 
on campus. This FUSA-sponsored 
dance, planned by Nicole Dammen 
and Maria Orabona, was scheduled 
to take place in the Main Dining 
Room on October 24. The event 
was later extended to the Oak 
Room due to the overwhelming 
success of ticket sales. Decorations 
for the dance included fall murals 
keeping with the theme of "Harvest 
in New England." 

The changing of seasons brings 
with it a winter dance called Sadie- 
Hawkins. This event is a little dif- 
ferent from Harvest. For Sadies, the 
women have to extend the invita- 



tions to the men! But the students 
seem to have no problem with that. 
The dance this year, held on De- 
cember 5 in the Main Dining 
Room, was well attended. Couples 
danced to music provided by a 
New York band called "The 
Keep." And David Breiner, Presi- 
dent of Alpha Epsilon Delta, 
worked with his club to decorate 
the dining room with black and 
white balloons, tableclothes, and 
candles. 

One traditional dance — Snow- 
ball — was part of Fairfield's dance 
cycle until only a few years ago. 
Held in January or February, the 
absence of this dance in recent 
years has left a hole in the cycle. A 
student seeking fun and romance 
during the cold days of winter must 
hope for a chance romantic en- 
counter while waiting for a cheapie 
at the deli, or while studying in the 
library. As freshmen, the Class of 
1988 experienced the final Snowball 



dance of recent years. 

More fun is always in store for 
students in the month of March. 
The Luck O the Roommate Dance 
offers students the opportunity to 
set their roommates up with the guv 
or girl of their dreams. Luck O the 
Roommate, known more popularlv 
as Screw Your Roommate, yields 
interesting combinations and the 
best gossip. Unfortunately. 
"Screw" also yields the best horror 
stories. This year's dance, coordi- 
nated by the Irish Society, Patick 
Doherty and Molly O'Brien, Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, was held 
on March 19. Musical entertain 
ment was provided by "Cross 
Winds," a band which had just rt 
cently released an album. 

The final and most extravagant 
dance of the cycle is Dogwoods, 
held in April in Alumni Hall. More 
on that later. 

Karen Maschio, Ben de la Cru: 
John Courtmanchi 




Opposite: Upstairs at Harvest. Left: Rich 
Mourry and Bob Housler discuss the night's 
progress. Top: Jacqui Brisco and Todd 
Raymond dance. Above center: Mike Whalen 
and Beth Gillin. Above: "Orange you glad I 
didn't say banana..." Ben de la Cruz photos 






>s/ 






\Jk 



/ 






\\ 



■ 






r 



& 



KICK! 






- allucinate Desegregate mediate allevi 
ate," the Orwellian video screens echo 

^ as the Jim Morrison-esque singer fash- 
ions the Dylan-like rhymes and flops his hair 
from one side of his head to the other with a 
casual cadence. The stage is black except for the 
screens and the spotlit singer. From the audi- 
ence, shrills of delight bounce off the Alumni 
Hall ceiling. 



Left: Mike lluuheme 



Below: Kirk Penpillv blast 
What You Need". John 



tf 




INXS arrived and MTV 
followed — the band 
members, dressed in 
black, walked the green 
campus with fans in close 
pursuit 



At 9:25 on a brisk October even- 
ing, after a opening set by the Bran- 
dos, the progressively-potent but 
bouyantly-biting band-of-the- 
eighties (INXS) took the stage in 
1 I s own Alumni Hall. INXS 
charged onto the stage to kick into 
their "Kick" tour with the song 
"Kick." They went on to play their 
rock hits, "Don't Change," "Need 
You Tonight," "What You Need," 
and "Send a Message," to name a 
few. Lead singer Mike Hutchence 
stole the show with his erotic arro- 
gance that aroused the arena. 

The event was organized by 
V especially Terri Durso, Di- 
rector of the Student Entertainment 
Commission. The concert sold out 
in only three days. Though not a 6- 
hour Springsteen-like sell-out of a 
football stadium, tickets sold very 
quickly compared to past FUSA 
concerts. The Student Association 
hooked a winner for this fall con- 
cert, as was seen when INXS con- 
quered America in the months fol- 
lowing their Fairfield show. 

Terry Sulln an 




54 




Opposite: Elaine Boyle and Carol 
Gorman get psyched. Student security 
Robert Paolella, Drew Deraney, and 
Gerard Casale relax during the 
Brandos's set. Opposite bottom: 
Preparing to rush the stage are Mary 
Beth Janson, Mark Page, George 
Tyner, unidentified, and Karen 
Dimpel. John Courtmanche photos 



' - "^*»— -. 



o 






The "Sold Out" sign was added only 
three days after ticket sales began. 
Top: Souvenirs of the show sold at 
high prices. Above: Christine Hong, 
Sonia Lamens, and Lisa Notaroberto 
"kick" up their heels. John 
Courtmanche photos 



55 








TCJrVfA 




I'i^^^V 



<T 




w 



< 



v 




t r ^* ^^#!!*m 



last row. Kellie Cosgrovc Philip ! t< i Bolgfr, Paul Berchkal, Aim Punka. Maria Ornhona. Marv Beth Mullaney, 

penbcrg, William Da\oun. Uni Knaoik. Mark Maralyn. Paul l.uk'a.s, Karen M. UnJc P&bb'rah Da'git, We.iA Resident 
Pi. .pan. C.hrisroj.l.iT McPadden. Foun row? Claudia lijsa Dt.tfiHo sei . . v., K ■"Bubbles"). Tom 



R.A.s 



Hci'it/. I'ranl ( mill. Michael fitlcourt, Moran, Du^an/J 

Maura C.ei. ;|i naii , s| l( , 

Tern Sullivan Mark Kuje. Brian Russell ]d)-r: ( auipbvll D 

II. i.: Residi r*\ Cruil Mast i.u,i..ni.i I lead Restdem ; :p court 
1 >< bra ( rritfei .. Robin Kingston \\ 



. .- . V\eill Nicole Dam men. Bai 
I V'ot.d > TrOni row: Student Services 

• ■ • K ' ssi. and Suzanne S^eMein. < 

/ Stk.ltnt Seniles \ 






aaf 



fff-- 




■ 



&8m 




' - 






>^ 



I 



r 




_ 



u 



niversity Resident Advi- 
sors strike fear into the 
hearts of the hallway par- 



Fighters for truth, justice, 
and the Fairfield way 



tier, while instilling a sense of calm 
into homesick freshmen and trou- 
bled floor members. Many anec- 
dotes accompany an R.A. as he or 
she thinks back upon the previous 
year. Trivia ranges from the delight- 
fully humorous to the profoundly 
gross. Picture a metal trash can hur- 
tling violently from a second floor 
Regis window. Now picture it load- 
ed to the rim with a good dose of 
Saturday evening vomit. 

Thankfully not every night con- 
tained these thrilling adventures. 
R.A.S fill many positions, including 
friend. Whether a simple schedule 

Mark Page and 
Tom Duggan after a 
flour fight. Terry 
Sullivan phalli 

58 



question, or a major emotional 
trauma, R.A.s respond with mind 
and heart. The narrow definition of 
disciplinarian is often assigned to 
the position, but it includes much 
more. 

Programs run by the R.A.s 
throughout the year include every- 
thing from guest speakers on alco- 
holism, to snow football, to contro- 
versial AIDS programs. Hours of 
preparation culminate in a success- 
ful program. Often the hardest part 
is getting the students in line to 
attend. 

For example, one program fea- 
tured a recovering alcoholic as a 
speaker. It was like attempting to 
loosen a child's grip on his favorite 
toy to get hall members to attend. 
But the twenty people who did re- 
spond were taken by surprise. Floor 
programs can indeed be fun and 
interesting. Another successful pro- 
gram run by R.A.s included a trip to 
the Irancesca house in New Jersey. 
The house, run by nuns, provides 
shelter and support for homeless 
women and their children. A group 
from Regis volunteered to make re- 
pairs on the house. Money and 
clothing were also donated. 



An R.A. is a rock and a pilhi 
who must prevail against the stoi 
of Student Services and dorm 
dents. "Liason" fits the descript 
but is not complete. An R.A. w 
a fine line between being a stud' 
and being an employee of the 
versify, and more than once an R 
is placed in the difficult position 
showing allegiance to one grou 
the other. 

The year began on August 
Thirty-seven R.A.s gathered 
meet the bosses and begin training. 
Mismatched room keys and bor; 
lectures were intermingled wn 
great lectures and fun. Happy Da; 
were here again as the Jogues mu: 
room entered a time warp. Sudd 
ly the 1950s reigned. Korea 
over and Vietnam had yet to begin. 
Let the music play. Ritchie Valence 
and Buddy Holly were alive and 
kicking. 

Hordes of freshman arrived. 
With an alcohol write-up before 
classes had even started, it became 
offi< ial. We were R.A.s. 

Brum Russili 



Left: Barbara Sheehan takes charge at the Battle of 
the Dorms. Brian Russell and Nicole Dammen pass 
the orange, chin-to-chin. Terry Sullivan photos 




59 





DRESSED TO KILL 



Halloween at Fairfield is 
more than a chance to act 
insane in disguise. It's a 
chance to act insane in disguise and 
to get away with things you don't 
normally get away with, because 
R.A.s can't recognize you. No, 
that's not it. Face it, Halloween is 
just another reason to party. 

Theme parties come in many 
forms — hawaii parties, safe sex par- 
ties — well, Halloween is a self-ful- 
filled prophecy. The Halloween 
theme party involves the entire 
campus. 

This Halloween, the David Let- 
terman psychic prediction rumorO) 
(about murders on the campus of a 
Jesuit college with a pond in South- 
ern New Fngland, in case you 
hadn't heard) made the rounds, and 
freshmen girls locked their doors at 
unusually early hours. A few floors 



sponsored dorm dances or parties, 
such as the Gonzaga party in the 
Stag-Her. 

The "killings" in the townhouses 
continued as houses such as 38, 44, 
and 53, welcomed the bewitching 
hours. The "creatures from the first 
hump" lurked by the Grape and 
made many appearances at beach 
houses, including parties at Up the 
Creek, the Fishbowl, and the Guy's 
Duplex. FUSA threw in its two 
movies with those horror classics, 
The Night of the Living Dead, and 
The Shining at Gonzaga Audito- 
rium. 

Whether you spent hours on 
your costume or just stopped at 
Grand Union for some blue gooky 
stuff and a tarzan mask, you could 
find a Fairfield party everywhere on 
Halloween. 

Sean Flynn, John Courtmanche 



60 




Top: Gonzaga residents 
join the Conga line at their 
dorm dance in the Stag- 
Her. Brian Ruisell photo 
Above, right, and opposite: 
Julie's own Tripp Tyner — 
"Tripp or Treat?" John 
Courtmanche 










***** 












«> 



\ 



$ 




1 



ONE HOUR OFF BROADWAY 



Above Berlin to Broadway" cast 
members John Schratwieser. 
Christian Schrader, Mike Hegley, 
Maura Rowe, Tara I.ucano and 
Sue Quinn. Andrea Whitehouse 
photo Opposite Anthony 

McKiernan. Dennis Ileftern. 
Maura Rowe, and Steve Angelo 

perform in "The Crucible." John 
Courtmanchi photo 

62 



Fairfield University's Play- 
house, like so many times in 
the past, provided the Uni- 
versity community with outstand- 
ing dramatic and musical entertain- 
ment. This year the Playhouse pro- 
duced four plays: Berlin to 
Broadway with Kurt Weill: a musi- 
cal voyage. The Crucible, 1959 Pink 
Thunderbird, and 1940' s Radio 

Hour. 

In a new experiment, the Play- 
house presented a series called The 
Playwright's the Thing, in which a 
play-in-progress was performed 
with the playwright in attendance. 
After the reading, the audience dis- 
cussed the play with the playwright. 
Tom Zingarelli, Coordinator and 
Artistic Director of the Playhouse, 
said of the project, "The public has 
the opportunity to converse with 
professionals not only about their 

( raft, but about a work that is cur- 
rently m progress It is exciting to 
be present at the birth of a play." 
Berlin to Broadway opened the 
tall season with a musical voyage 



telling the story of composer Kurt 
Weill's trip from his homeland of 
Germany to the United States. Di- 
rected by Tom Zingarelli, the play 
provided a combination of street 
and cabaret music of Berlin with 
American jazz. The atmosphere of 
the musical was further enhanced 
by the cabaret-style seating arrange- 
ment provided by the Playhouse. 
CAST: Tara Lucano, Sue Quinn, 
Maura Rowe, Christian Schrader, 
John Schratwieser, Debt Perkins, 
And) DuFau/t, and Michael Hegley. 

The Crucible, an Arthur Miller 
play set in the late 1600's in Salem. 
Massachusetts, dramatized the Sa- 
lem witch trials. It was directed by 
H. Edward Spires. CAST: Steven 
Angelo, Mike Habetz, Kara Cal- 
lender, Shruti Rajan, Anthony 
MiKiernan, Dennis Me f fern, Jen 
in, Maura Rout. Michael Heg- 
ley. 

1939 Pink Thunderbird, set in 
Texas in the 1960s, depicts the 
problems of men, women, relation- 
ships, and the longing tor nostalgia 



Directed by Tom Zingarelli. tne 
play featured characters' reminiscH 
ing about the glory days, with the 
Pink Thunderbird serving as the 
central symbol. CAST: Kara Cal-\ 
lender, Tara Lucano, Linda IF/V- 
liams. Michael Hegley, Scan /..,. 
Lee Hegley. 

1940s Radio Hour transformed 
the Playhouse stage into a *>.000 
watt New York City radio station. 1 
The musical, written by Yale gnl 
duate Walton Jones and set in De- 
cember, 1942. was produced in 
April and ended a great season of 
Playhouse productions. Mark Gra- 
ham directed. CAST: Mikt 
McLaughlin, Cliff Kozer. Michem 
Hegley, David Mast, James Culled 
Sean Lawless, Maura Rowe, Anm 
Hargraves, John Schratwei en 
\tian Schrader, Tara Lucano, 
Lewis, Peter Holland. Linda 
Chekman. Kara Callender, BraM 
Kronen. 

Sean /7i«« 




. 



V* 








Top: Joan Betchkal and Sue 
Sillechia. Opposite top: Judith 
Kenncy. Christine Taylor, and 
Denisc Hallowell. Left: Kevin 
Kuryla and Moira Conway. Far 
left: Pete Holland. John 
Coulter, and Paul Holland. Bt>i 
./• /./ Cru: photos 




188 NIGHTS 



The Manor consulted the Class 
or l<-)88 concerning this second 
event to mark the countdown to 
graduation. Unfortunately, no 
one's memory was complete, and 
we were only able to compile this 
interwoven list or images: 
Juniors buying tickets.' Friday. 
November 20: 
pre-parties. cocktails 
ties, jackets "this look all right.''' 
blouses, dresses "hook-up" jewelry 
school bus. back seats, shiny 
shoes. TH turnaround, beach park 
convergence, seniors, "all aboard 
destination: delirium 
95 North 
chatter, bus loudspeaker — music 



checked excitement 

Stratford. Pinecrest 

unload, enter 

video, find a table 

two bars, lew -tenders "94 drafts. 

9-4 mixed = 188" 



settle, explode, buttet. food toss 

old friends, new friends, snapshots 

women in men's room 

DJ. dance 

fling, crush, scoop 

happ\ drunk 

Stand By Me. Jet Airliner 

post-parties 

All seniors did agree, however, 
tl.nit tin da) after IHH Nights— Day 
W— never happened, it does nm 
exist in realit) as part of history. 




Jm* ^** HEME 






Hi 




Until the Battle of the 
Bands in November, 
many students thought 
Broken Bottles a band set in the 
classic rock mold. With the excep- 
tion of U2 and Georgia Satellites, a 
Broken Bottles set consisted of 
songs made famous by such bands 
as The Who, the Beatles, Led Zep- 
pelin, and the Rolling Stones. 

Anyone who knew Terry Sulli- 
van thought differently. The Junior 
English Major showed dynamic ar- 
tistic talent. His hands were al\va\s 
filled with a guitar, painting easel, 
camera, or just a pen for writing 
something creative, usually a song. 
His drawings appeared in the Mir- 
ror, especially in the form of his 
political cartoon, Heraclitus. He 
has written for the Mirror, served 
on FL'SA Cabinet, written a novel, 
served on the Manor staff, served as 
Senior Week Co-Chair '88, and, 
most significant here, written al- 
most one hundred songs in his 
young music career. 

With Sullivan as creative force 
and lead singer, Pete Grennan on 
guitar, Bill Van Wart on bass, and 
Gene Tiernan on drums, Broken 
Bottles possessed the musical talent 
to pull off a set of convincing rock 
originals and beat four bands in the 
year's Battle of the Bands. 

Theirs was a hard-earned victory. 
Despite the absences of senior class 
favorite Split Decision and defend- 
ing champion Say When, the Bot- 
tles competed against Humidifier, 
Metropolis, Charlie Doesn't Surf, 
Prescription, and Towel the Door. 
In the Energizer-sponsored Battle, 
originality faired highly in the judg- 
ing — Humidifier and Metropolis 
played twenty minutes of original 
music. The other bands opted to 
cover popular songs. 

Despite strong vocal perfor- 
mances by Lee Hiltgartner.Jen Gla- 
vin, and Amy Hargraves, Metropo- 



lis succumbed to the drawbacks of 
technology as their sequencer failed 
early in the set. Humidifier, sup- 
ported by a large "ponk" following, 
performed a WVOF-style set of 
powerful original music but placed 
somewhere below second in the 
standings. After the concert, fans 
complained of unfair judging. 

Ballsy lead singer Christian 
Schrader led Charlie Doesn't Surf 
through an energetic set. the low- 
point being Schrader's attempt to 
match Bono's vocal range in U2's 
Pride (In the Name of Love)"; the 
high point, a promising original 
called "Scenery ". Towel the Door 
played Grateful Dead music, and 
played it well. 

Prescription, behind lead singer 
Jim Hannon, performed a fun set of 
popular music to place second. 
Hannon paraded in bunny ears, and 
Prescription pleased the crowd 
most with a cover of Bachman 
Turner Overdrive's "Takin' Care of 
Business." 

Broken Bottle finished the night 
with the most promising set, con- 
sisting of six Sullivan songs and one 
written by bassist Van Wart. Gren- 
nan showed musical expertise with 
his guitar solo in "The Nothing," 
and Tiernan assisted Sullivan be- 
tween beats with background har- 
monies. 

Between sets, masters of ceremo- 
nies Tina Bugara and Mark Dietz 
entertained an almost-full Oak 
Room. In an interesting move, 
FUSA combined the Battle with 
the Laugh-A-Lot Auction. While 
the bands were setting up, auction- 
eer Louise Moon took bids for such 
items as dinners-for-two at area res- 
taurants, a faculty/taff parking 
sticker, and FUSA President-for-a- 
day. FUSA Cabinet members Brid- 
get Moran and Charlene Sorvillo 
engineered the entire evening. 

John Courtmanche 





BAND BATTL 
THE REST 




Left; Humidifier's "ponk specialist John Km^ Man Bdangtr photo Above 
Broken Bottles's Pew Grennan, Gene Tiernan, Bill Van Wart, and Terry 
Sullivan John Courtmanche photo 



VEEDS BEST FROM 



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67 




%V ***J 



CELEBRATIONS 



Christmas begins early at 
Fairfield. Even before the 
department stores lay out 
their holiday stock, a student is like- 
ly to hear the muted sounds of fa- 
vorite Christmas carols coming 
from rooms scattered all across 
campus. Once Thanksgiving has 
passed, however, holiday spirit 
emerges in full force. 

Yet, there is always something 
about this time of year which seems 
rushed or forced. Christmas falls at 
the end of a very busy period for 
college students. In studying for ex- 
ams or completing term papers, stu- 
dents have little time to become 
caught up in the feeling. Holiday 
preparations are sandwiched be- 
tween very real obligations, and 
moments of rest are frequently 
spent in tired anticipation. 

Regardless, Christmas continues 
to provide students with an area of 
common ground — no matter how 
it is celebrated — and a chance for 
fun. In many respects, Christmas at 
Fairfield is marked by tradition. 
Highlighted by a special mass at 
Alumni Hall, those last weeks at the 
end of the semester remind observ- 
ers of the religious significance of a 
festive season. The annual Christ- 
mas concert makes it possible for 
members of the community to 
gather in an atmosphere of Christ- 
mas music. With an expanded Glee 
Club, this year's Christmas concert 
received special praise. Brightly lit 
trees, ribboned wreaths and the 
simple manner on the Oak Room 
Patio lend the perfect touch to a 

68 



busy campus. 

Of course, students have estab- 
lished a Christmas spirit distinctly 
their own. Parties form around fa- 
vorite television specials — "The 
Grinch," "Charlie Brown," and 
"Rudolph," to name a few. In addi- 
tion to brightening their rooms 
with lights and trinkets, students 
often produce group projects such 
as a dorm tree. Inevitably, some stu- 
dents are more intoxicated by the 
season than others. Mesmerized by 
wartime movies and humbled by 
the voice of Bing Crosby or Nat 
King Cole, they tend to infect those 
around them. 

It is not very difficult to under- 
stand what lies behind such Christ- 
mas spirit. Kept at school during a 
time generally spent with families, 
Fairfield students must find new 
ways to approach the holidays. Re- 
moved from the source of all tradi- 
tion, they develop new practices, 
carrying with them fragments from 
the past. If setting aside time for 
cartoons and eagerly awaiting snow 
(there is nothing like a white Christ- 
mas, after all) seem typical of young 
minds, then it is not a bad thing. 
Besides being one of the most pi- 
ous holidays of the year, Christmas 
becomes a time to put aside the 
cares and worries of an adult world. 
( )nc is given the opportunity to en- 
joy life as only a child can. 

No one should be suprised that 

Christmas is special at Fairfield, 

what with a reindeer for a mascot... 

Peter Witkowski 





Top left The Glee Club performs a set of Christmas songs in the CC Lobby. Above: The 
I I Tii\<rsit\ l)r.mia Club, assisted by a young dancer from Bridgeport, presents the 
Liturgical Movement at the annual Christmas Mass. John Courtmancht pholoi 




•WW 






♦. 



STAG-HER STAND-UP 



Live comedy lures students 

to the Campus Center on 

Thursday nights 



One of the most successful 
events of the year was a 
series of Comedy Nights. 
FUSA's Maria Orabona and Nicole 
Dammen, Co-Directors of Campus 
Center Programming, booked a 
number of comedians throughout 
the year. 

On September 24, John Weiss 
and Wayne Cotter performed to an 
S.R.O. crowd. The two comedians, 
veterans on the Long Island circuit, 
mocked college life and sent the 
upper- and lower-classmen into fits 
of laughter. One of the high points 
of the evening was when Weiss ridi- 
culed the high cost of college and 



Top Tom Rooney joins the 
audience in a COmed) warm-up. 
John Oross sings Caribbean 
Queen. Aula domes laughs 
along Opposite top: Wayne 
(otter. Center: John Weiss does 
Miner I udd. Bottom: John 
(ribbons loses a round of 
Make Me Laugh. Fat Right: 
Barbara Shcehan Hoi t/i la 

Cruz, lir/t/n Russell, and John 
Court mancht /•• 

70 



suggested going to a community 
college, where you can use student 
loan money to buy a BMW. 

The next comedy extravaganza 
took place on January 25 when 
Wally Collins and Anthony Clarke 
walked onto the Stag-Her-Inn ris- 
ers. This was the best show of the 
series. Collins was an impressive 
warm-up act for Clarke, who 
opened his show with an impres- 
sion of Ethel Merman singing 
Whitney Houston's hit "I Want To 
Dance With Somebody." His rendi- 
tion of a high school cheerleader — 
"Shut uppp!" in a "valley girl" 
voice — was repeated by students 
for months afterwards. To end the 
night, the two comedians were 
joined by a guest comedian, and 
the three did an improvisational 
sketch of a strip dentist joint, com- 
plete with audience participation. 

On February 20, the "We Can 
Make You Laugh" performers en- 
tertained about two hundred stu- 
dents in the only Oak Room Com- 
edy Night. Each of the three come- 
dians presented a ten-minute 
sketch, then the group called stu- 



e rot 
eepi 

med 



dents to the stage to comp<. 
$25. Any student who could keep 
straight face for three minui 
while the comedians perfor 
won the money. Two student 
walked away with cash. 

On February 25. John Pinnettt 
and John Gross performed in the 
Stag-Her. Again, the place was 
packed. Laughs for Gross peaked 
high on the Richter scale as the hef- 
ty comedian sang about singles 
night at supermarkets to the melo 
dy of Billy Ocean's "Caribbean 
Queen." 

The last performance of the se 
ries took place on March 24 and 
featured the act "Comedy Sports, 
which was less of a success thai 
previous acts. 

The success of the Comedy 
Night series was important this yew 
not only because it provided great 
entertainment to all ages, but also 
because it rejuvenated campus pro- 
gramming as an alternative to ac- 
tivities off-campus. 

Joan Nine, Terry Sullivan 





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EVOTION 



lumni Hall — we climb the hollow wooden steps and our footsteps 
echo through the unseen metal supports below. An overflow of our 
L classmates spills into the aisle. We find a seat among one thousand 
our closest friends, one hundred feet from the court below. 
We wear the proper attire for the evening: red shirt, or red pants, or at 
ast red-striped socks. A wave in the Red Sea, we settle in. 




Stagmania has all the 

mixings: hope, hysteria, 

pride, passion, unity. 



A student to the right raises a red 
plastic parade horn to his lips. The 
horn is three feet long, skinny as 
bamboo, funnel-shaped at the end. 
As he blows we hear his spit, gur- 
gling with a loud, nerve-splitting 
noise, not music. 

A few students wave pom-pom 
sticks, red and white spaghetti. At 
the bottom of the stands, Superfan 
leads a cheer. He wears a red and 
white striped cape-towel and a 
Stag-hat with antlers. He holds Ins 
hand over his head and shakes them 
until we do the same; as he claps, 
we clap, faster, faster, and everyone 
loses tune in a clap fren/\ 

( )n the right side of the court, 
the pep band plays the theme from 
Rocky, and Superfan runs up the 
left .i s sic- to the top of the stands. 




across the top to the left aisle, and 
down the aisle. He concentrates as 
he runs — the steps shake — and once 
on the court, if the band is still 
playing his song, he'll run for the 
right aisle again and a second lap. 

At the base of the student seat- 
ing section, three male cheerleaders 
dressed in slick, red and white 
sweats hold bullhorns to their lips 
and yell "Defense." Next to them 
on the court, seven female cheer- 
leaders dance on their toes, and 
their red mini-skirts bob, revealing 
the most desired thighs at Fairfield 
University. 

The pep band, students from 
Fairfield University and Fairfield 
Prep, plays "When the Saints Go 
Marching In" a lot. The drummer 
beats the drum on time with the 
clapping of hands and the stomp- 
ing of feet among fans. Sometimes 
we get a drummer with no rhythm 
who likes to show-off. and students 
yell nasty remarks about his beat- 
keeping. 

I airfield is a Catholic University, 
but the fans still curse the referee 
and the opponent, for a bad call or 
.1 bad play, respectively. When a 
player for our Stags breaks for the 
basket and dunks, we high-five 
each other in the stands. 



A good game of basketball will 
easily arouse our excitement, but 
we're not a troublesome crowc 
That is. unless a group of fans for 
the opposing team sits in our sec- 
tion. A fight started this year for 
that reason, at the Marist game, and 
security asked all of the opposing 
team's fans to leave our section, 
foreseeing a riot. Raw passion, 
that's all. 

During timeouts and pau^ 
play, we see a few campus celebri- 
ties on the left side of the court, 
where the teams sit. Fr. Bill Cullen. 
S.J.. the team chaplain. pra\s to- 
special guidance for our team — Fr. 
Bill has all the connections. The 
head coach. Mitch Buonaguro. 
jumps crazily as if each game is lift 
or death — and each game is, in fact. 
because we all fear for the health of 
Mitch's heart. Mr. Jim Fitzpatrict, 
Director of University Activities 
• announces each game, and he has 
for more than fifteen years. 

Whether the Stags are in a win- 
ning or losing season, we will be 
sitting above the court. At Alumni 
1 [all, the traditions are as strong as 
the metal supports beneath the 
stands. 

John Courtmancht 





4^ 




Carl Hummel. 



CAMPUS ISSUES 






It certainly wasn't the late Sixties 
or the early Seventies, but the Fair- 
field community this year did ex- 
perience some protest and, more 
importantly, some action to resolve 
injustices on campus and around 
the world. The Manor has isolated 
six issues, two small and four large, 
which monopolized the headlines, 
the lecture topics, and the debates. 

The two "small" issues are small 
only in comparison to the large. 
The issues of hunger and nuclear 
disarmament stimulated sympathy 
and passion. Donations from Ox- 
fam America aided the world 
hungry, but more importantly, 
made students consider the prob- 
lems on a personal level. Commen- 
tator and author Peter Loeb lec- 
tured about "Living With the 
Bomb," while freshmen Masey 
Amara and Nicole Calandro orga- 
nized Future, a Fairfield University 
chapter of United Campuses to Pre- 
vent Nuclear War. 

The "large" issues of AIDS, Di- 
versity, Homelessness, and Central 
America deserve elaboration. 



Brian Holder) photos 



AIDS 

The Fairfield University commu- 
nity's most blinded sensibilities are 
not shielded from the contents of 
Pandora's Box. AIDS, Acquired 
Immune Deficiency Syndrome, 
strikes fear into uninformed minds. 
The university community sought 
to debunk any rumors about the 
lethal disease. 

In the December 3, 1987 issue of 
the Mirror, ten seniors with supervi- 
sion from Fr. Walter Smith, S.J., 
published an article entitled, "The 
Truths and Myths about AIDS." 
Their intention was to free the com- 
munity from the unnecessary fears 
and prejudices about AIDS. The 
thrust of the article related how the 
disease is transmitted and how to 
prevent the disease. 

The Fairfield University adminis- 
tration, however, had reservations 
about informing the community. In 
late January, the administration 
stalled Resident Advisors for about 
six weeks from showing an AIDS 
awareness film which the R.A.s had 
seen during their training period. 



This action sparked campus 
support for the student's right u> 
know, especially since it concerns | 
the matter of life and death. 

During the time when thi 
ministration was stalling, Fr.josepl 
MacDonnell, S.J., and Fr. \\ 
Smith, S.J. took action. They ad- 
dressed the Kostka residents on the 
relevant facts about AIDS. Ac- 
knowledging, finally, the universit) 
community's right to know, the ad- 
ministration formed an AIDS Edu- 
cational Task Force on March 18. 
with Anne Babb, R.N., of the Stu- 
dent Health Center as the appoint- 
ed Chairperson. The task force tea 
tured lectures given by universit) 
experts such as Fr. Smith, and out- 
side experts such as Randy Shilts 
who was the reporter who first 
broke the AIDS story by conduct- 
ing extensive interviews all over the 
world with AIDS researchers and 
victims. 

The AIDS Educational Task 
Force did a thorough job informing 
the students about general facts 
about AIDS as well as its preven- 




76 




n by abstinence and the use of 
,idoms. Probably the main differ- 
r :e between Fairfield's education- 
programs on AIDS and a non- 
tholic university's educational 
jgrams on AIDS was the distri- 
.tion and availability of condoms 
j campus for the students. Fair- 
Id University did not distribute 
make available condoms to the 
idents, while at Vassar College, 
( ' example, condoms were avail- 
}e in food vending machines, and 
American University, each stu- 
nt received one free condom. 
versify 

"Apathy was the word of the 
ir in 1986-87," Junior Joe Devito 
d." This year the word was diver- 
r." 

The University Planning Com- 
ttee warned in 1985 "We have 
t been able thus far to achieve an 
equate degree of diversity." 
hile minority enrollment 
opped from 3-6% in 1977 to 2.3% 
!s year, the University acted to 
ferse the decline. The Visiting 
ack Scholars program, initiated in 



1986 to compensate for the inad- 
equate amount of minority profes- 
sors at Fairfield, continued 
throughout the year. More impor- 
tant though, was the appointment 
in February of Larri Mazon to the 
newly created postion of Minority 
Relations Director. 

Mazon's former position, Direc- 
tor of Student Academic Support 
Services, was expanded to include 
his new responsibilites. These in- 
clude developing programs to in- 
crease the number of minority stu- 
dents, strengthening the Universi- 
ty's ties with the state's minority 
population, and helping to attract 
more minority employees. 

In addition, the University 
awarded the Bellarmine Medal of 
Honor to Dr. Benjamin Hooks, Ex- 
ecutive Director of the National 
Association for the Advancement 
of Colored People. The medal is 
presented to those "who by their 
humanizing example, achievement, 
and leadership have brought en- 
lightenment to the world that it my 
prosper in peace." 




In February, Rose Marie Pace 
Barone, wife of University Provost 
John Barone, donated nearly 
$300,000 for a scholarship for mi- 
nority students. 

Matching the obvious commit- 
ment from other sources of the 
University community, students 
channeled their worries towards 
change. Riding the crest of cam- 
pus-wide discussions and Mirror ar- 
ticles and editorials, Seniors Clint 
Lewis and Chris Ritchie started in 
February the Inter-Racial Aware- 
ness Council. The Council has a 
three-fold purpose: to educate the 
campus community about inter-ra- 
cial issues and topics; to increase 
the cultural diversity among stu- 
dents, faculty, and administration, 
and to address the concerns of mi- 
norities at Fairfield. 

Among Jesuit colleges, Fairfield 
currently has one of the lowest mi- 
nority enrollments in the country — 
a statistic many are working to 
change. 
Homelessness 

About twenty Fairfield students 



Hadaelena Messia and 
Lynne Staropoli. 



Denis Saulnier and 
Michael Boucher. 




Professor Walter Petry and 
an unidentified protester. 



77 




sleep outside the Campus Center in 
a cardboard city. The weather is 
clear, 40 degrees. They are lucky 
compared to the real life players of 
this drama who endure daily the 
bitter winter season. 

It is March 28, 1988; hints of 
spring emerge with the large patch- 
es of grass turning from brown to 
green. The students wear blankets 
around them, and a battery- 
powered radio plays for the entire 
cardboard city to enjoy. The mate- 
rials for the "city." cardboard boxes 
and plastic garbage bags, were re- 
ceived from Bonny Electric, a elec- 
trical supply store going out of 
business. The soul and compelling 
force behind the idea of this over- 
night vigil came from a few stu- 
dents who recognized the moral 
imperative to educate the university 
community about the seriousness 
of the homeless problem. 

Homelessness commanded a 
great amount of media coverage 
during the year. The United Na- 
tions proclaimed 1987 as the Inter- 
national Year for Shelter for the 



Benjamin Hooks 
Andrea Whitehouse photo 

Homeless. In February, 1988, the 
tradition of Homelessness Aware- 
ness Month began. On campus, lec- 
tures and even musical perfor- 
mances fleshed out the deprived 
quality of life for the homeless. 

Director of Special Events Chris 
Sinagulia concerned herself with 
raising the awareness of homeless- 
ness. She reserved 100 free Oak 
Room concert tickets for the stu- 
dents and faculty in exchange for 
donations to Project Hope, which 
aids the hungry and homeless in 
Fairfield. 

On February 25, the Faith, Peace, 
and Justice coalition, along with Al- 
pha Sigma Nu, the National Jesuit 
Honor Society, sponsored "Crises 
U.S.A.." This lecture offered in- 
sight into the causes of homeless- 
ness, relating personal causes and 
also some external forces such as 
the spending cuts on housing by 
the Reagan administration from 
$32 billion to $7.5 billion. 

On February 29, a forum enti- 
tled, " The H.E.A.RT. of the Mat- 
ter." with H.E.A.R.T. standing for 



"Homelessness: Education, Awarl 
ness, Responsibilty. Teach-in. wjj), 
held in the Campus Center lobbfl 
The forum again was sponsored bH 
the Faith, Peace, and Justice coalH 
tion and Alpha Sigma Nu. 'Foil* 
Cornell, a Fairfield graduau 
founded the Gaudalupe Houm. u I 
directs a soup kitchen in \\..:t-- 
bury; community leaders represent! 
ing Operation Hope. Christian 
Community, the Welfare Reforri 
Project, and others; held the forunj 
as a call to action for any interested 
members of the university commu- 
nity to start a Task Force on Homej 
lessness. 

The students involvement durl 
ing the year was evidenced durina 
Social Awareness Week, sponsored] 
by the Faith, Peace, and Justice coj 
alition. The students in an effort ta 
raise social awareness for the home 
less held Hands Across The Quad 

The sun is rising now, and the 
first shadows are cast from the 
cardboard city. But there would be 
no shadows if it was not tor the 
concern and planning of Fairfield 





I.arn M.i/oi\ 

John Courtmancbt photo 



i^rtrtf^W* 



\SLlS\.i 



m 




A formative meeting of the InterRai ial 
Awareness Council. ( lot kwise Glenn 
Crawford (back to camera), F r. James 
Hayes, SJ . Larri Mazon, Ya< I I 
( lii i -. Km In. < linton Lewis Rich 
Rossi, ( ornelia Dinnean. John 

Courlmancht photo Below I airfield 
stmlents volunteer at a Norwalk soup 
kitchen. Ben de la Cruz photo 



'"dents Lynne Starpoli and Mike 
'>ucher. They spent four weeks 
Titacting different groups with 
i help of Campus Ministry. Star- 
: li and Boucher were inspired by 
\ "Under The Bridge" lecture 
-en in early February by Farns- 
'>rth and Baker, who chronicled 
I homeless experience by living 
e them for a year. Lynne Starpoli 
/s, "The event overall was a suc- 
ss in that we raised the conscious- 
ss for many on campus, but this is 
5t the beginning. We hope for a 
rmanent program on campus." 
antral America 
The year was a turbulent one in 
ntral America, and the ripples 
used commotion on campus 
long staff and students. In Octo- 
r, the Legislative branch of FUSA 
nsidered "The Contra Bill," a stu- 
nt resolution of support to end 
aid to the Contras. Debate on the 
;islative floor led to the Legisla- 
e's decision to poll students. 
Chris Bermingham, Government 
>erations Legislator, said, "Cam- 
s reaction was split, half seemed 



for aid, and half seemed against it." 
On December 1, a bill drafted by 
Tom Pellegrino, Government Op- 
erations Chair, was passed by the 
Legislature. It stated that there is a 
great diversity of opinion by the 
Fairfield population, and no one 
opinion could be stated that would 
accurately reflect the entire student 
body. 

Meanwhile, the Commentary 
pages of the Mirror showed the 
depth of the debate. Writers such as 
Nathaniel Farnham, Brad Runyon, 
Gary Thomann, Jim Sheridan, Scott 
MacDonald, and Kim Genova ar- 
gued from all sides for justice. 

On Saturday, January 30, protes- 
ters from on- and off-campus gath- 
ered at Gonzaga Auditorium for a 
rally in support of the Central 
American Peace Plan. The rally was 
sponsored by the Faith, Peace, and 
Justice program, the Latin Ameri- 
can and Caribbean Studies pro- 
grams, and area churches and civic 
groups. At the rally, pro-contra 
picketeers protested the protestors. 
Dr. Edward Dew of the Politics De- 




%+f 






*.' 




f 



4* 



Hands Across the Quad 
Terry Sullivan photo 



partment moderated the rally which 
was held to stop funding the con- 
tras. Speakers included students, 
professors, and members of com- 
munity organizations such as the 
Pledge of Resistance and Sanctu- 
ary. Congressman Chris Shays at- 
tended, while Connecticut Senators 
Chris Dodd and Lowell Weicker 
sent letters of support. 

Then in March, the University 
honored Central America Week. A 
play called "Flight of the Quentzel" 
was performed on March 20 in 
Gonzaga Auditorium. The play is 
about an innocent North American 
who is led to see that all people in 
Central America suffer from the 
war. On March 22, Professor Wal- 
ter Petry lectured about "Nicaragua 
Revisited — 1988." Petry has visited 
Nicaraqua six times. The central 
event of the week was a mass held 
on March 24 by Campus Ministry 
to commemorate the martyrdom of 
Archbishop Romero of El Salva- 
dor. Romero was murdered on 
March 24, 1980. 
John Courtmanche, Ben de la Cruz 




Chris Ritchie and Clint 
Lewis. 
John Courtmanche 




CHANGE OF THE GUARD 



Early in the second semestei 
change occurs on campus — 
at first it's a mood, then it's a 
preparation period, then it's an ob- 
vious evolution. The university 
rears itself for the coming academic 
vear. Students take part in lotteries 
for places of residence and for fall 
registration. Orientation co-chairs 
are selected, anticipating entrance 
of the Class of 1992. Seniors hunt 
for jobs and consider life after 
graduation, leaving the responsibil- 
ity of the student organizations to 
juniors and underclassmen. The 
most publicized of these changes is 
the election of a new FUSA Presi- 
dent. 

On February 2, Fairfield students 
elected Frank Carroll to the presti- 







I 



gious position. Carroll, a h 
major with a minor in Sp. t 
served FUSA for most of the y 
Executive Director under Chri-, 
chie. Carroll, an R.A. in Claver. 
the election with 581 votes. Pl.iJ 
second was FUSA's Directed 
Academics Mark Dietz. Last r| 
ute write-in candidates i 
McGoldrick and Paul Vigna p a 
a distant third and fourth, re 
lively. 

Carroll named Maria Orabd 
Rusty Magner, and Karen Beta 
bender his Vice-Presidents, 
roll's inauguration ceremony 
held in Bellarmine Hall on Ap 
He took the reigns of the Stut 
Association, $100,000 budget 
all, and prepared for 1988-89, ii 
ing for another successful vear 
Sean F/ynn, John Courtmanche 



Frank Carroll. Terry Sullivan photo 




Left center: A student considers voting in the FUSA Presidential Elections in February. Ben de la Crui 
photo Left: Candidates Mark Diet? and Frank Carroll meet with Mirror Features Editor Joe DeVito afti 
the Al/rror-sponsorcd debate. Brian Russell photo Above: Casting a vote. Btn de la Cruz photo 



80 



PRING 



pring Break is solely a colle- 
ie concept, embedded into the 
ege schema. Florida, Puerto 
o, the Bahamas, Jamaica, Can- 
, Vermont. The educated are al- 
ed four Spring Breaks in a life- 
f. Spring Break Senior Year is 
, primary of the tour, the final 
: ! dom. 

vJone of this is rational really, 
I as the great Chinese philos- 
.er Wen Do Chen (the guy who 
tes the proverbs on Seller's Lip- 
'< Tea tabs) once said, "College 
lition as rational as duck soup." 




BATHING SUITS 
OPTIONAL BEVOND 
THIS POINT 




Jmtf^i 



Sam Faillace and John Zaterka in Jamaica 



BREAK 



Manor photographers were ini- 
tially assigned to travel with groups 
ot Fairfield students to various va- 
cation spots during the week of 
March 7-11, but our advisor in- 
formed us that Spring Break 
allowances were not written into 
the yearbook budget. So the Manor 
staff members stayed home that 
week, and on March 1 t. when ev- 
eryone returned, the Manor spon- 
sored a Spring Break photo contest. 
Here are the best Spring Break pic- 
tures. 
















-■..'■ ^fti 




kiS ^K 9^9 








■» 


1 jfp. ^Lt ' ■L^^VjHB 








i • air' , T JHL.^1 


\m 






i" 






fl&^l f. 














Top left: Denise Riordan, Michele Menzo, Monica Copertino, Wendy 
D'Angelo, Amy Sargeant, and Maria Calvano in the Bahamas. Top right: Eileen 
Devenny and Marcia Gulino at the Grand Canyon. Center left: Laila Rhee and 
Val Schevon in the Bahamas. Center right: Tom Filippone, Brian Dimpel, 
Kevin Dolan,Jim Lynch, Peter Holland at the Sea Grape in Jamaica. Left: The 
Appalachian Volunteer Corps in Appalachia: (top row) Laura Keenan, Maura 
Rowley, Alison Scavuzzo, Debbie Griffin, Kim Maguire, Nancy Judge (middle 
row) Chris Kinsella, Kristen Sinnes, Regina Mauro, Catherine McCabe (front) 
Paul Kloppenberg, Michelle Monsour, and Don. 




REVERSALS 



[eanette Rabbat fright) with 
her brother and sister at Seller's. 
John Courlmanche photo Right: 
Take me where the wind blows. 
Kdams and Jean-Ma- 
rie Matthews contemplate the sor- 
rows ot Graduation in the wake ol a 
Market ( r.ish to the tune ot 
Queen's Bohemian Rhapsody". 
Their band, I oster's Lagers, ; 

d in Airbands hh. Mm </< la 
Cru: photo 

82 




It was a weekend tor pretending. 
Boys and girls pretended to be col- 
lege students, while college stu- 
dents pretended to be rock n roll 
and Hollywood superstars. Sibling 
Weekend. April 22-24, brought 
younger brothers and sisters to 
campus to participate in special 
events and to watch the main event 
of the weekend. Airbands. 

The Sibs were treated to dis- 
count meals at Seiler's. a movie, 
games in the Campus Center Mez- 
zanine and on Campion field, and 
Airbands. Airbands, the American 
contest craze ol the decade which 

was made into the television show 

"Puttin On The Hits," featured 
groups ol students lip-svnehing 
populai soul's while performing 
choreographed skits. Six bands per- 
formed but Onl) three made it to 

the finals: 1 ost< i 5 I agers, Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtles, and Word 
I. in I p. 

In the finals, the eventual third- 
pi. l< e winner, \\ ord Em I p, pei 
formed a mcdle\ of TV tunes. The 

highlight was .i version of the 1 la- 
wan Five-O theme, as three student 



surfers rode three human sun 
boards across the wooden Oi 
Room stage. 

Foster's Lagers, who placed sti. 
ond. performed the popular Mei 
loaf tune "Paradise by the Da.sl 
board Light.'' The highlight v.; 
when Joe Rella donned a Mets un 
form, slid into thitd base, an 
pulled a pair ot women's pantii 
from his sleeve Diane Foster, 
four-year Airbands vetc ran. led tli 
group of seniors 

The winner of Airbands 88 I 
the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtlei 
who performed John Cougar Mel 
lencamp s Everyone Needs a 1 l.n 
to Hold On To" in the finals. TH 
Turtles, a group based in Gonzad 
Hall, had performed crowd-pleaS 
mg skits in both tin lust and sec] 
ond rounds with The I arewe! 
Soul; trom the musical Th\ Souni 
of Mmic, and Michael Jackson 
"Man In The Mirror." The Turtle 
« i insisted ol ( hristine O'Connor 
Kristin Morelli, Darrell Ponzio 
Paul Johnson. Waldo. Sean Reillj 
and Bill Peet. 

John CourtmaaM 



.1 





Left: The infant on Molly 
O'Bryan's lap seems a bit taken 
aback by Seiler's offerings. Top: 
Julie Soden (left) and her sister 
show the effects of sisterhood. 
Center: A game of "Duck, Duck, 
Goose" in the Campus Center 
Mezzanine. Above: Third place 
winners Word Em L'p perform 
"Soul Man" at Airbands. Ben de la 
Cruz photos 



83 




Big Spring for the Class 
of 1989 



COUNT 
DOWN 
400, 399... 



Top Senior Week volunteers raise a 
mural to the root of Alumni I [all as 
a decoration for the Senior Semi- 
Formal W/£< Btlcourt photo Right: 
Rust) Magnet and I ice at 

((X) Nights. Marianm Walsh photo 

84 




Spring '88 featured two signifi- 
cant Fairfield events for the junior 
class, the Class of '89. The first was 
■400 Nights, the party to mark 400 
nights until Graduation day. The 
second event was their involvement 
with Senior Week, a responsibility 
which occupied a good portion of 
the second semester. 

The countdown to Graduation 
began on Fridaj afternoon, April 
13, at the point. The party area 
stretched from the Guv's Duplex to 

the Covenant House, and every- 
where in between. With otfu ial 
cups in hand, juniors were served 
In generous bartenders from the 
( lass ol 1990. The party lasted 
through the midnight hours tor 
thoS( who < Ould stand all the ex- 
citement. It was definitely a unify- 
ing experience tor the class. 

Later that spring, hours of prep- 
aration and hard work culminated 



in a successful Senior WeeH 
week ot events for the Class of I 
before Graduation. The ev« 
were run by approximately 2J 
members of the junior class 
administrative assistance from Fra 
Gencarelh and the office of I'niva 
sity Activities, from the first ever 
on Ma\ I. the Senior Jesuit 5 
through Pub Night, the Picnic, til 
Semi-Formal, and the Paren: 
Dance on May 21. the Class of 'w 
created an unforgettable t 
a\va\ present for their friends intra 
graduating class. Co-Chairs 
lene Sorvillo and Tern Sulliva 
wert thankful for the dedication! 
the sub-chairs and committee 1 
Throughout the week, juniors ri 
minded each other of their acquire 
status: [lie new senior class at Fail- 
field University 

Terry Sulliva' 




Left: Proud bartender Chris Ber- 
mingham empties the kegs at the 
Senior Week picnic. Mike Be/court 
photo Top: A view of 400 Nights 
rom the deck of the Lighthouse. 
Marianne Walsh photo Center: Bil 
O'Shea and Stephen Reale empty 
the soda cooler after the Senior Pic- 
nic. Mike Be/court photo Above: Ju- 
niors mingle on the deck of the 
Lighthouse. Marianne Walsh photo 



85 



SPRING 
DANCE 



Spring arrives in Fairfield County 
with the blossoming o( dogwood 
trees, and I'ndergrads celebrated 
spring on April 29 and 30 with the 
annual Dogwoods dance and May 
Day festival. The dance on Friday 
night was the only dance of the \ car 
held in Alumni Hall. 

On Saturday, the May Day festi- 
val was forced inside due to a rain 
threat. Approximately twenty 
booths run by clubs were set up 
inside Alumni Hall. Clubs sold 
items such as cotton candy. Fair- 
field boxer shorts, and tie-dye t- 
shirts. The two most popular 
booths were Star Traxx. to record 
your voice to a popular song, and 
the silh string and water pistol 
booth. 

At Ma\ Da) Split Decision 

played their final gig as a band, as 
tour members prepared for gradu- 
ation. Broken Bottles performed 
without their former lead singer 
Sullivan, due to a sc( ond se- 
mester schism. The wack) obstai le 
course was a popular event. Mark 
Diet/ posting the fastest time I p 

perclassmen mingled in the beer 

tent and chatted about finals and 
graduation, just 23 da) 5 awa) . May 

•■as the final event of th( 
den 




Top left fohn Coulter and Don masks in line with Dogwoods's Mas with a voice compatible with tha 

In r at Dogwoods. Top right: Ca- querade theme. Above The band at female. Varden Studios photoi 

millo Fontana tries on Laura Keenan's Dogwoods was The Touch, whose 

mask. All the women received tree male lead singer ama/cd the erowd 



Left: Two beautiful 
women in disguise. 
Varden photo Below: 
Nine hundred 
Dogwoods tickets 
sold out in one 
on April 22. These 
students were- an 
the hundreds who 
were turned awaj , Ben 
dt la Cm Below 
chat I )iane DeLillo, 
Mike Maxson. Mark 
Diet/, and Jeannine 
lloert/ pla) (.lub 
MTV. Varden photo 




APRIL SHOWERS 



Rain threatened the April events 
of tOO Nights, Sibling Weekend. 
Maj Da\. and even continued 
through tlie Ma\ events of Senior 
Week and Graduation. April's 
were didn't brii .. owers 

until attcr Ma\ 22; luckily, the ad- 
ministration had ordered lots of 
flowers and landscaping for the 
commencement ceremony anywaj 
But Fairfield students become ac- 
customed to strange weather pat- 
terns and the unreliable reports of 
I V S weather experts. The weather 
is a trademark of life in glorious 
New England. 

People travel for hours to see 
New England's fall foliage. Au- 
tumn features strong winds and 
hurricane watches. The winter's 
snow promises class cancellations, 
and has students listening to the 
radio at 8 a.m. tor word on early 
classes. The spring teases with a mix 
of sun and rain. Many areas of the 
country suffer from boring weath- 
er. In Connecticut, the dynamic 
change of seasons and the corre- 
sponding wild weather match the 
spirit of college life at Fairfield. 



XX 




lop: A long, wet walk from the 

townhouses to the center of campus. 

John Courtmanche photo Above: Passing 

beneath the Campus Center Patio. Right: 

The inclination to skip a class is a little 

stronger on rain) days. Ben dt la Cruz 

photos 



' . 



SPRING MASS 



Sharing prayers for a year Bill Cullen, S.J.. brings out the 

gone-by. May 8, L988. Mike smiles, as always. Below: The 

Belcourt photos. Left: Balloons Loyola Folk Singers perform the 

were handed out as the central choral music. 
symbol ot the mass. Below: I r. 





Above left: Lisa 
Hughes presents a 
balloon. Above: 
Christine Phelan. Left: 
Nature, the perfect 
cathedral. 



89 




of 
es 
el. 

lis 



THE 

ACADEMIC 

GAMEFIELD 



People frequently suggest Fairfield's resemblance 
golf course or country club. This year, chough, 
for the first time in the school's short history, people 
remarked about Fairfield's resemblance to a 
public park. These comparisons stem from the erec- 
tion o( the "Gamefield." 

Tamm.i ( ) Mara. Rec Flex Director, administered 
the construction of the Gamefield. co-sponsored by 
Norwalk Hospital. The Gamefield is a jogging 
course through the campus. It features numerous 
games or exercises tor the participant at Stations 
along the course. Because of the overwhelming re- 
sponse to the Gamefield by students, the adminis- 
tration decided to erect a second course, this one 
called the "Academic Gamefield.'' 

A few prerequisites are necessary before a student 
can attempt Fairfield University's Academic Game- 
held. First, a student must be taller than the wooden 
girl erected at station §1. Second, a student must 
have earned a high school diploma and have scored 
above 950 on his/her SATs. As with any Gamefield, 
certain groups of people must be cautious. Those 
students who scored below 950 on their SATs might 
be turned away from the Gamefield. Also, pregnant 
students should not attempt, unless married. Lastly, 
I airfield's Academic Gamefield is recommended 
for students who tell in the top 596 of their graduat- 
ing classes, so Public Relations can upgrade its 
statistics in handbooks and press releases. 

Here are the games, in order, with instructions: 

WARM-l'P GAMES 

Station 1 • Registration Game 

Location: Registrar's Office 

Rules: Find Lottery Number. Curse. Visit Advis- 
er. Visit Dean. Ask friends which teachers and 
courses are easy (known as blowoff courses). Regis- 
ter for five courses, three of them blowoffs. 
Station 2 - Course List Game 

Location: Mailroom 

Rules Receive course list with only one course 
listed. The sheet sa\s. The minimum number of 
credits allowed per semester is 12. You're only regis- 
tered tor three credits, stupid.'' 
Station 3 - Drop/Add Game 

Location Registrar's Offii I 

Rules Visit adviser. Visit Dean. Beg professors 

.'.low you into tull courses Stand in line to re- 
register. 
Station 4 - Book-Buying Game 

Lot ation Bookstore 

Rules St.md behind mob ol classmates. Push to 

the lists ol books Circle corresponding shelf num- 
bers Stand in line for an hour Spend 1200 on books 
II never open ( r\ when yOU realize \ou could 





Top: A few stations of the Gamefield, the jog- 
ging course co-sponsored by the RecPlex and 
Norwalk Hospital. John Courtmanche photo 
Center: Chris Brown appears to be a well-con 
ditioned academic athlete. Ben de la Cruz 
photo Above: Early first is one of the most 
challenging stations along the Academic Ga- 
mefield. Brian Russell photo 



have bought four kegs instead. 
CONDITIONING GAMES 
Station 5 - Core Classes Game 

Location: Various Classrooms 

Rules: Take classes in Mathematics. Natural Sci 
ences, History. Social Sciences. Philosop\. Rcli 
gious Studies. English, Fine Arts, and Modern Lan 
guages; courses which begin with the word "Genet 
al" (i.e. General Psychology) and "Introduction 
(i.e. Introduction to Music), or which specitv. lo 
Non-Majors." Try to tit these classes among ttj 
classes you reallj want to take, while simultaneous! 
trying to fulfill all core requirements before semo 
year. Understand what they mean when they sa 
that the core curriculum provides a well-rounde. 
education: you have to run around in circles tryirj 
CO fulfill it. 
Station 6 - Term Paper Game 

Location: Library. Bedroom. Faculty Offii 
Building 

Rules: Go to Library, find ten books on subjec 
Sit down, begin research. See a friend, chat. Sc 
another friend, walk with her to the Stag-Her for 
coke. All your friends are at the Stag-Her; you sta' 
Return to library at 12. Take out 6 of the books Pi 
them on shelf until the night before due date < 
paper. Pull an all-nighter. Phone rings constantl 
Fart \ in the hall. Type tour pages of a ten-paj: 
paper. Visit professor before class, ask for an extei 
sion. Ucilize the skills you've learned as the proi. 
owner of credit cards. Professor, it \ ou accept th 
papei late, I'll make- it CWO pages longer than r< 
quired." Profess,.! says, "The interest rate tins wee 

is foui pages Apec to the professors terms On 
week later, hand in l l-page papet set in Lai 

with two-inch margins and a two-inch header at tli 
top ol each page, and tour footnotes per page 
Station 7 - Declare a Major Game 
I.oi ation 1 ... \i h \ ( >ffi< e Building 



92 




bove left: The climb to the upper floors of Above right: Students risk the rocky shortcut 
anisius. Top right: Fr. Thomas McGrath, behind the Campus Center. Right: The final 
J., collects exams. Ben de la Cruz photos station. John Courtmanche photos 



Rules: Visit the Chairperson of the appropriate 
epartment. In a bold voice, say "I am a 
major!" 



tation 8 - Exams Game 

Location: Various Classrooms 

Rules: Cram the night before exam, while simul- 
aneously stressing out. Go to class with an A- 
verage. Professor hands out blue books and exams, 
itare at questions while everything you read last 
light becomes jammed at a convolution some- 
where inside your brain. Shake your head to loosen 
he ball of information. Notice that the person 
ou've had a crush on all semester is sitting next to 
ou. Your nose starts to run, you don't have a tissue. 
develop sweaty palms, drop pen. Write the first 
hing that comes to mind. One week later, receive 
:xam in mailbox. Reread what you wrote: the lyrics 
o the latest Debbie Gibson song, a song you hate 
>ut you couldn't get it out of your head on exam 



day. Your class grade falls to a C-. 

COOL-DOWN GAMES 

Station 10 - CL'M Game/Graduation 

Location: Registrar's Office 

Rules: Receive grades. Missed Dean's List by .01. 
Juggle grades to find what combination will look 
best on resume (i.e. Received a 4.0 in all classes 
taken the summer between freshman and sopho- 
more year which dealt with music). Qualify for one 
or more of the following: acceptance into an honor 
society, an academic award, academic mediocrity, 
the chance to give the valedictorian speech at 
Graduation, academic probation, the opportunity 
to have any variation of Cum Laucie printed next to 
your name in the Graduation program, the chance 
to Graduate at all, the necessity to stress the impor- 
tance of extracurriculars in your college education, 
the title "Social King/Queen." 

John Courtmanche 




93 




DEDICATION 



Professors Arthur Riel and Paul Davis. Ben de la Cruz photos 



Arthur Riel Retires 



Most students know Arthur Riel Jr. as the 
professor who writes frequent letters to 
the Mirror, the student newspaper. On 
October 15. 1987, he wrote: 

"Last year's student graduation speech did not 
suit the occasion. Let the students choose a gradu- 
ation speaker." 

Some students know Professor Riel as the "old" 
professor, the one who has been at Fairfield since 
the first day of classes in 1947. In a Mirror letter 
published October 1. 1987, he wrote: 

I am pleased to see the renewed interest in 
peace and justice' on the campus. It used to be part 
ot the core curriculum and deeply studied by all 
senioi 

Last vear. when I airfield University's magazine, 
ftiirfiilJ Sou-, needed reflections about the early 
.led Arthur Riel Jr. After 10 years as a 
professor at I airfield. Riel is retiring. 

Riel, 68, walks slowh to his office on the first 
floor of the I acuity Office Building. He slouches a 
bit, his hair thin and grcv. the clothes he wears were 
in st\le a tew years ago. 

His office walls are decorated with large, framed 
color photos a teenage girl on a horse; a man 

standing in an offi< e. 

I wo of m\ children. Riel says. 
Kiel took most of the photos himself — photo- 
grap) is one ot his hobbies. I le didn't take the black 



and white photo of a woman standing on the steps 
ot a one-room school house in Agawam. Massachu- 
setts. 

"That's my mom," Riel says. "She was a teacher 
too." 

Next to the picture of his mother hangs a metal 
plaque which used to hang in his Dad's hardware 
store. 

Riel keeps a crucifix on the wall above his desk. 
When asked the importance of religion in his life. 
Riel responds. "Nothing else is important." In a 
November 5. 1987. Mirror letter. Riel writes: 

"Nothing in faith is contrary to reason, but 
knowing the Faith is a gift of God. a fragile gift.... 
We prefer our official skepticism and agnosticism 
to the responsibility of really knowing something." 

Above the crucifix, books line three wall-length 
shelves. Files of dittos are scattered about the office. 
He searches for a particular ditto — it concerns reli- 
gion. Another is an article about Christ. These are 
saved in Ins (. omputer. 

The computer on his desk is portable, collapsa- 
ble, brand Tandy from Radio Shack. On a green 
sticker attached to the plastic shell of the computer, 
Kiel has written Printer" with an arrow pointing to 
the right. 

"You're supposed to turn the printer on with the 
computer." he explains. "I keep forgetting." 

Ri< 1 indi< ates one of the computer's features. "It 



has an alarm," he says, "Which I set for fourth 
period on Fridays." A few years ago, the university 
changed the schedule from (XSoOo to 0660). and 
since then Riel often misses his fourth period class. 

Word processing is another of Riel's hobbies. He 
complains that people are being payed to write un- 
readable computer program manuals. The writing is 
too technical, he says — it isn't tit tor ordinary peo- 
ple. 

Riel happily places himself into the "ordinarv 
people" category. In his freshman English course, he 
tells his students not to write for scholars, but to 
write for ordinary people. "Pretend you're telling; 
the story to a friend." Riel says. 

He prefers to be called not an "English teacher 
but a "Writing teacher." English teachers s.r, jyou 
can learn about life from reading books. Riel says tc 
learn about life bj working, travelling — by living. 

Riel retired this year and the Universit) respond 
ed with a grand show ot appret i.inon for his dedica 
tion to Fairfield, his devotion to his students. The 
faculty and administration held a dinner in his hon 
or. President Kelle\ str.ived from the agenda of the 
1988 ( ommencement Ceremony to thank Riel foi 
Ins service, and the crowd responded with a stand 
mg ovation. The 1988 edition ot the Manor is dedi 
i ated to Arthur Riel Jr. 

John Courtmancht 



94 



STUDY 
HABITS 



The act of studying is personal by nature. Basically, 
lere are two kinds of studyers: those who study in quiet, 
ad those who study amid noise. (Note: In this analysis, 
je've excluded a third category: students who don't study 

all.) There are variations on the above. Some people 

efer studying alone, some prefer studying with others. 
Dme people prefer studying at the library, others, in their 

drooms. 

Still, a few patterns of studying behavior are difficult to 
iderstand. One is the osmosis studyer, who falls asleep 
ith his nose in the crease of the book, hoping the facts 
ill seep through his cranium. Another eccentric studyer is 
at student who studies in the library while wearing a 
'alkman and listening to rock music through the head- 
lones. Regardless of style, students who study are ac- 
ipting the challenge for a more personal understanding 

the material. The Manor has captured a number of 

dents and their style of study. 





F. Madalone uses a computer. B. Russell photo 



B. Peet, before a lecture. B. de la Cruz photo 




»ve Ciampi in an empty classroom. 



Commuters get a private lounge. 



Lounges in dorms are convenient. T. Sullivan photo 




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!(he sun lures studyers outside. T. Sullivan photo L. Keenan, M. Dietz, and M. Scarpetti on a blanket. K. Attridge at the point. J. Courtmanche photos 




\. Correa settles for stairs. 8. Russell photo 



Shakespeare on video is a helpful too 



HEROES 

& 
HERO 
INES 

i compiling a list of friendships initiated in 
college, no doubt a few protesse>r s and administra- 
tor s names will appear on an\ Student's list. These 
are the people we learned from and respected, who 
helped us see the world in a different light, who 
grew with us in and out of the classroom and office. 

The Manor asked a few students to name their 
tuvonte professor and to pinpoint the professor's 
impact. 
Eric McLaughlin '88 

Fr. Albert Reddy. S.J.. is one of the few teachers 
that actually took the time to get to know me 
outside of class. He has shown me that individuals 
are important and that time should be taken to 
know them. 
Hugh F. Coyle III 88 

In a university with students so primarily con- 
cerned with material success (i.e. money), King Dy- 
keman. through the philosophy courses he teaches, 
opens minds to different ideas and allows a needed 
escape from the conformist environment here at 
I airfield. 
Maryrose Verdile '88 

Laura Ress always is available for advice and help 
with school work — and she influenced important 
decisions concerning my future. She is a very intelli- 
gent, understanding and generous woman, and Fair- 
field needs more professors as dedicated as she is. 
Diane Vanina '88 

Suzanne Lyngaas's classes were well organized 
and structured effectively. She was easy to approach 
it vou didn't understand a concept and would take 
however much time you needed to get the concept. 
I ler enthusiasm, both within the classroom and out, 
Seemed to rub off on her students. She has been an 
involved faculty member of this campus. I have 
tremendous respect tor Professor Lyngaas and be- 
lieve she is a role model for many students at I air- 
field. 
Michelle Went/el '88 

Arthur Anderson has given me enormous unbi- 
ased insight to contemporary problems affecting us. 
He also is an outstanding lecturer, a motivating 
teacher and an incredibly interesting person. 
Jimmy Biondi '88 

Richard Tyler puts things into actual perspective; 
he does not overwhelm the class with theories, but 
in fact represents the material ver\ well in real life 
situations 
Meghan Griffin '88 

Richard Regan lias inspired me to Study Shake- 

speare beyond reading. 
96 





Top: William Scimpf and Jim Fitzpatrick enjoy a bas 
ketball game. John Courtmanche photo Center: John 
Orman hosts music trivia, Brian Russell photo Above: 
Morris Grossman talks with a student. Sen de la Cruz 
photo 



Carol Sujecki '88 

Lisa Maniero has not only provoked me into 
learning abe>ut management but has made the careej 
so exciting. I have changed m\ career ge>als due toi 
her teaching and her enthusiasm. 
Lee Hilgartner '88 

Lik Kuen Tong's teaching style, in Existentialism! 
in particular, has brought out more new ideas th.it 
keep the student interested. He is one professor that 
most students scramble te) get into his courses. 
Kimberly Mann '88 

Robert DeMichiell's determination, integrity and 
fairness have influenced me greatly. I have great 
respect for a teacher who can both be at ease in his 
class, as well as maintain complete control of his 
students' individual learning processes. 

NAMES TO REMEMBER. 1988 
Administration 
Kelley. Higgins, Barone 
AcacL 

Stepsis, Savage, Danahar. V. Murphy, Martin, Con- 
ine. Porter, II. Murphy. Russo. Bryan. Flvnn. Mar- 
chelli. Dinnean 
Student Sen 'in i 

Schimpf. O'Keil, Scholan. Mazon. DiMuzio. Fitzpa 
trick, Coyne-Maxwell, Re>ssi. Steblein. Menninger 
O'Mara 

Campus Ministry 
Pusateri, Cullen. Palmer 
Finance 

Lucas, Maccarone, Boccardi 
Advancement 
Diffley, Wheeler, Farber 
Faculty 

College of Arts and Sciences 
American Studies. 
O'Connor 
Applied Ethics 
I,. Newton. Coelho 
Asian Stud it I 
A Kat/ 





mogy 

B'>usseau, Combs, F. Rice, Ross, Bongiorno, 

I un, Poincelot, M. Barone, Blogoslawski, Canuel, 

■•'sell, Galiger, Hope-Ross, M. Rice 

I 'mistry 

[v Jarone, Boggio, Elder, MacDonald, O'Connell, 

('"nan, Sarneski, Weddle, Oakes 

Ynmunication Arts 

lc, Ryan, Maresco, Reinberg 

mmics 

ak, Walters, Buss, Lane, Miners, Devine, Gan- 

! fi, Kelly, Peterson, Nantz, Noiset 

mation 

ka 

vineering 

binski 

Wish 

;rone, Farnham, M. Regan, Riel, N. Rinaldi, 
ney, Jenkins, Landry, McDonnell, Mclnerney, 
dy, Stepsis, Wells, D. Lynch, Menagh, Mullan, 

^Regan, Beard, Bender, Bozzone, Brown, dejen- 

s, Kasdan, Krauss, McQueeney, Meli, Miller, 

ss, J. Rinaldi, Ross, Smith, Spector, Sweeney, 

ivos, Vollmer, Whitaker 

>th, Peace, and justice 

ssidy 

ie Arts 

ierich, O. Grossman, P. Eliasoph, Gish, Heath, 

cherland, Borck-Hart, Cafferty, Coyne-Maxwell, 

' Davis, Dunne, R. Kaplan, Marr, E. Mutrux, 

Keefe, Ress, I. Ryan, Savage, Shillea, Sill, Slepian, 

inman, Sumrow, Zingarelli, Bednarsky, Evanish, 

rilli 

eek and Roman Studies 

rlley, Rosivach 

istory 

xzek, Danahar, DeAngelis, A. Abbott, W. Ab- 



Left: Biology Professor Donald Ross was 
named Teacher of the Year in 1988 by the 
University's chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu, 
the national Jesuit honor society. A mem- 
ber of the faculty since 1950, Dr. Ross has 



bott, Baehr, Costello, Coury, Davis, Kazura, Petry 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 
Panico 

Mathematics and Computer Science 
Fine, MacDonnell, Shaffer, Wong, Ben-Avi, Bolger, 
Dennin, G. Lang, Spoerri, Wyzkoski, Bernhardt, 
Mulvey, O'Neill, C. Cron,J. Cron, DeCesare, Levai, 
Messman, Money, E. Rowe, M. Simon, Turechek 
Modern Languages 

Bukvic, Fedorchek, Leeber, Panico, Hill, Garcia- 
Devesa, J. Kolakowski, Stabile, Webster, Arnn, 
Cousins, Y. Eliasoph, Goggin, Khadjavi, M. Kola- 
kowski, Kuepper, Ortiz, Perrotta, Prulletti, Ratch- 
ford, Roman 
Philosophy 

Grassi, M. Grossman, Long, L. Newton, Tong, Dy- 
keman, Johnston, Cardoni, Carr, Coleman, Pitre, 
Perricone 
Physics 

Hadjimichael, McElaney, Zabinski, Beal, V. New- 
ton, Winn 
Politics 

Dew, Donnarumma, A. Katz, Orman, Cassidy, 
Greenberg 
Psychology 

Boitano, Braginsky, Gardner, McGrath, Salafia, 
McCarthy, V. Murphy, Smith, Worden, Burlhis 
Religious Studies 

M. Lang, Mooney, Thiel, Benney, Burns, Hum- 
phrey, Lakeland, Harak, Jackson, Topel, Purvis, 
Sher 
Sociology 

Anderson, Fay, Hodgson, Schlichting, Harris, Lind- 
sey, Rodrigues, Wyckoff 
School of Business 
Martin, Conine, Berkowitz, Cavallo, DeMichiell, 



served as the Health Professions Advisor to 
students since 1 960. Above: A group of pro- 
fessors wait for the 1988 Commencement 
Ceremony to begin. Brian Russell photos 




Politics Professor Carmen Donnarumma. Vince Cervoni 
photo 

Demotses, Fischer, Jensen, A.I. Katz, Madden, Mo- 
han, Ryba, Schurdak, Agrawal, Allinger, Bhalla, 
Chepaitis, Eldridge, Holland, L. Katz, Kenney, Kra- 
vet, Lyngaas, Mainiero, McEvoy, Mis, Ross, Tyler, 
Kreninsky, Khingra, Hannafey, Kapadia, F. Kelly, 
Maccarone, Mannion, Marsalisi, Savage, Tellis, 
Topper 

School of Nursing 

Porter, Fasano, Lippman, MacAvoy, Sideleau, Co- 
laianni, Cryan, Dudac, Fleitas, M. Martin, Mohr, 
Obrig, Pomarico, Bourdon, Kilanowski, McEvoy. 
Rich, Stout 

97 



Fairfield University Student Association; Chris Ritchie. Presiding Officer 



FUSA Legislature; Len DelGallo. Presiding Officer 
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Activities Fairs take place at the beginning o 
every semester. New students and upperclass 
men can meet officers from campus studen 
organizations to ask questions or to join th< 
club on the spot! Photographer Andrea White 
house was at the September Fair. Above: CKJ 
President Stephanie Spann watches as Appc 
lachian Volunteer Corps President Maura Rov, 
ley sells her club to Kathy O'Rourke. 



ccounting Club: Rob Whitmore, Presiding Officer 



History Club; Lara Wolters, Presiding Officer 




\bove: Freshmen Jill Stiegler and Kelly Anne Con- 
jisk consider the Photography Club. Right: Human 
billboard Paul Flanagan plays follow the leader. 



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The choral program at Fairfield experience 
major overhaul this year. The talents of 
Men's Glee Club, the Woman's Chor 
and the Chamber Singers were combined to fo 
the Fairfield University Glee Club. Carole Ai 
Coyne-Maxwell assumed control of the new gr< 
The merge was the result of a lengthy debate 
ing an attempt to improve the university's choj 
croups. 

Pre-merge statistics showed a large decrease I 
the number oi participants in both the Men - C I 
Club and the Women's Chorale. For this reason 
administration opted to appoint a committee t 
evaluate the programs. Members of the comma 
included the chairman ot the academic departm 
of Fine Arts, the faculty moderators of the W< 
en s Chorale and the Men's Glee Club, an alumi u 
from both the chorale and the glee club, and twJ 
undergraduate students chosen bv the student gol 
eminent. The committee attempted to decide tr» 
besi interests of the students and the universitj 
Their decision to merge the groups met some opw 
sition. 

Petitions were signed and letters were written td 
the Mirror to debate the merge. Past and preser* 
members of the Men's Glee Club expressed anger: 
because the Men's Glee Club was the first student 



Alpha Sigma Nu (Jesuit HS), Karen O'Rourke 



.iding Officer 



Association of Honors Students; Jennifer Samor. Presiding Officei 



mproved) Glee Club 



CLCJB 
PORTRAIT 



organization established at the university. The 

merge ended .1 strong tradition. Also, some people 
want< 1 1 the name oi the new group to be something 
besides "Glee Club," again cur ol respect for the 
Men's Glee Club. 

Dissatisfied members of the original Glee c lub 
formed a new all-male singing group, the Fairfield 
Ambassadors ol Song, based off-< ampus but featur- 
ing students, alumni, and members ol the commu- 
nis . 

Despite the first semester debate, though, the 
Fairfield University Glee Club emerged as a largei 
stronger, and better student organization. Their Au- 
tumn, Christmas, and Spring concerts were well- 
attended and well-received. The Spring semester 
brought some talk of a new name for the group — 
the Fairfield University Bellarmine Choir — but no 
announcement was made before the end of the year. 
A new tradition had been started, and most students 
were content. 

Joan Nine 





Phi Alpha Theta (History); Melissa Small, Presiding Officer 



Pi Mu Epsilon (Math); Jill Christensen. Presiding Officer 



WVOF: Paul Donovan. Presiding Officer 



Young Democrats; Bill Good. Presiding Officer 




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Intra murals 



Trivia question #1. Intramurals are: 

a) A way tor student athletes to show off th 
creativity b\ making up clever team ru 

b) An athlete's last chance tor tame in the wor 
o( competitive sports before getting old and £u 

c) A means to prove that one's high school spoi 
awards were not earned in competition against t 
local school tor the blind. 

d) Something tO do between classes, partus, .i 
sleep. 

e) An important part of one's college lite in win 
the physical competition ot athletics is combin 
with social and intellectual development to produ 
•a well-rounded individual before graduation. 

Any of the above answers may be correct c 
pending on one S view of the intramural program 
Fairfield. Thanks to the tine organization ol < i 
Mi Padden and staff, the program produced sot 
fine athletic moments tor hundreds of participate 
students. 

At the intramural sports banquet in April, t 
yeai S award winners were announced. All -Intra it" 
ral Most Valuable Players wen Frank Madalo 
m\l\ Elizabeth Fergusson. The Intramural Spor 
manship Award was presented to Kevin Kur\ 
1 In st .in tin year's highlights; 

l!u 69ers came awaj with a 26-20 OT victt 



Appalachian Volunteer Corps; Maura Rowley, Laura Keenan, Presiding Officers 

I 



Cardinal Key Society; Stephanie Spann, Presiding Officer 




!)ver Zipperhead in the Flag Football champion- 
ship game on Jim Norris's third down Kansas Tie- 
breaker TD. The women's division crown went to 
Khe Taliswomen, who defeated the Double-Strap- 
pers. 

)l The Basketball season ended with a Super Sat- 
urday Championship Feast. The Lemon Heads start- 
ed the festivities with an upset over defending 
rhamps Tee Shirt II, 38-36, in the women's division. 
The Lemon Heads were led by Yvonne Connors, 
K.im Zagajeski, and Jeanette Rabbat. The "D" 
n^eague game followed and Swish easily dispatched 
ihe Chosen Ones 40-25 behind Jerry Liptak's 15 
points. 

I In the "C" League, the Would Have Beens and 
ipld Style battled to a 4-4-44 tie. The Would Have 
iBeens rode the second half shooting of Art Jureller 
itnd the inside play of Frank Pasini into the overtime 
Deriod. But Bob McGuinness and John Lucas hit 
!wo quick hoops in OT and Old Style won the 
championship, 49-47. In the next game, Bukkit 
itlaimed the "B" crown with a 55-50 win over the 
Misfits. Kevin Crowley threw in 26 points for Buk- 
jtcit, while Sean Power led the Misfits with 19. 

In the "A" league contest, Kool and the Gang 
'ode the hot shooting of freshman Jim Ryan to a 20- 
4 halftime lead over the Has Beens. I'nfortunately, 



the Has Beens' season leader, Jim O'Meara, missed 
the game due to an eye injury. Point guard Frank 
Madalone provided offensive spark for the Has 
Beens, but the team of seniors fell to the young, 
dynasty-bound Gang 48-37. Jim Ryan finished the 
game with 20 points. John Coulter led the Has 
Beens with 15. 

The intramural program provided sports fans 
with tour different versions of Volleyball. In beach 
volleyball the Kamikazees led by Chris McPadden, 
Chris Parelli, Caroline Carucci, and Don Schipf won 
the championship. Elsewhere, Los Bellacos, led by 
McPadden and Jaime Fuertes. copped the men's 
crown tor the twelfth straight year. Fuertes and 
McPadden seemed to have a monopoly on volley- 
ball championships as they led their team Jim- 
browski to the co-ed crown in the spring. Finally, in 
women's volleyball. Penthouse, led by Janet Vil- 
lano, took their division crown. 

In Co-ed Waterpolo. Crocodile Rock won the 
championship tor the second year in a row by dis- 
patching Face Down 15-7. Face Down complained, 
"We were distracted by the hot chicks in bikinis 
falling out of their inner tubes, and Kevin had water 
in his eyes, and Ben was intimidated by their girls 
who were brutes, and Chris had a bad shoulder, and 
Mike had a tight with his girlfriend earlier....'' Edi- 



tor'} note: The writer of this article knows the members 
of Face Down on a personal basis, though embarrassed 
to admit it. 

In Soccer, the Bun^holes led by seniors Craig 
Maloney, Bob Pacca, Rob Amoroso, Chris Cook, 
Kevin Kuryla, Bob Carangelo, and Greg Tole made 
their parents proud despite the team name as they 
kicked and headed their way to the men's cham- 
pionship. In the women's division, the members of 
Shots on the I'pper Deck made like Pele to win 
their championship game. As their name suggests, 
this team consisted of dedicated athletes who never 
smoked nor drank nor practiced any popular col- 
lege vices, and their abstinence paid off accordingly. 

In Softball, the Shotguns took the women's 
championship in a splendid spring showdown of 
Softball supremacy. Dawn Henderson and Jeanette 
Rabbat led the winners with several key hits and 
earned a free meal at the annual intramural banquet. 
Roadkill, the men's championship team, was led by 
Jim Norris, Frank Madalone, Ken Arnold, and Art 
Jureller, who finished their intramural careers at 
Fairfield assured of a Softball championship ring 
and a special place in the hearts of females every- 
where. 

Ric Brown 



105 



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A Good Rea 



Thursday mornings are special at Fair: 
Suddenly, this placid suburban campuj 
jumps with debate, information, entertain 
ment, and zaniness. The Fairfield Mirror hits the 
newsstands ever) Thursday. 

Though Fairfield has no journalism program, stu- 
dents or all majors enjoj writing, reporting, photos;- 
raphy, layout, and practicing business or advertising 
skills in a deadline situation. Also, a writer can 
experience the excitement of a published article or 
essaj in a newspaper with a circulation of S,5QoJ 
which includes students, faculty, administration, 
alumni, and the board of Trustees 

This year, the university was luck\ to have proh- 
abK the largest congregation of Mirror veteraj I 
ever on one staff. Many experienced seniors sat i 
ficed a significant amount of tree time during the I 
final year at Fairfield to work tor the paper. Seniors' 
on this year's staff were: 
Melissa Campanelli. Editor-in-Chief 
John Courtmanche. Production Manager 
Connie McKenna. Managing Editor 
Robert Amoroso. Arts and Entertainment 
Hadaelena Messia, ( ommentary 
Gareth Charter. Sports 
Ken Jordan. Assistant Spoils 
Andrea Whitehouse. Photograph) 
Sam Faillace, Advertising Manager 
Shen Lamont and Chris Costan/o. Business Manag- 
ers 

On Thursdavs. devout readers immediately 
turned to a favorite column, such as Boos and] 
Cheers. WonderOUS Stories, or Stag Tracks Letters 
CO the Editor and Commentary articles were \:\ 
abundance this vear. as students realized the powtn 
of a written opinion in public. Though the Mirror \i 
the official student newspaper of Fairfield Timers. - 
ty. the paper is tor the most part an independent 
production. Editorial content is the responsibility of 
the student editors. 

According to Melissa Campanelli, Editor-in 

Chief, "Our paper is independent of the school, we 

are incorporated. Still, the university has a sa\ in it 

is< we have a contract with Student Services. 

Student Services pays the Mirror $20,000 a year to 




06 



in Fellowship; Bob Barry. Presiding Officer 



Deli. Ruth Dawe. Presiding Officer 



)n Thursday Mornings 



CLCJB 
PORTRAIT 




publish ten issues a semester, with the understand- 
ing chat the editorial board will read and edit if 
necessary ever) article that is published. The Mirror 

costs about SI 500 per issue. Campanelli says, and is 
distributed tree tor students. With the mone) from 
the universit) and advertising revenue, the Mirror is 
able to publish more than the number of issues 
established in the annual contract with Student Ser- 
vices. 

Over the years, many changes have advanced the 
production of the Mirror. According to Campanelli. 
in 1985, Editor Stephen Humes implemented com- 
puters tor typesetting and editing. Then in 1986, 
Editor Joe Draper leased a professional computer 
typesetting system tor the office. The system is 
better than those used by some professional news- 
papers, for instance, the Bridgeport Post. Since 
then, the Mirror lias expanded the use of computers 
so that even the layout is done in the Mirror office 
on computers. Desktop Publishing, as it is called in 
the publishing world, has helped the Mirror gain 
control over the design of the newspaper, a respon- 
sibility formerly left to a hired commercial printer. 

Of course, Campanelli has a simpler reason for 
using computers. "They help to cut down the 
work," she says. 

The articles are typed into the computer on Sun- 
da)' night and Monday, and a few on Tuesday. 
Layout begins Monday night and continues inter- 
mittently until Wednesday morning (sometimes all 
night Tuesday), when the pages are printed at the 
Mirror office. On Wednesday, the editors drive to 
Milford, Conn., to a commercial printer who inserts 
the photos, makes 3,500 copies, and delivers them to 
the Campus Center Thursday morning at 7 a.m. 
Then a Circulation Manager delivers the papers to 
the academic buildings, for students to read in early 
morning classes as an alternative to listening to the 
professor. 

T. Michael McClain 



Left top: Theresa Piscitelli catches up on the week's 
campus news. John Courtmanche photo Left: The 
Fairfield Mirror: Melissa Campanelli, Presiding Officer. 



Faith and Justice Coalition: Patty Sacker, John Cardinali, Presiding Officers 



International Students: Photoula Markou. Presiding Officer 



Irish Society; Pat Doherty. Presiding Officer 



Italian Club; John DelBallo. Presiding Officer 




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In Service 

Students at Fairfield maintain the Christian virtu 
of semce through a number of organizations. Ii 
addition to the student-run clubs, Campus Mini! 
trj 's Faith and Justice Coalition services loca 
needs. The Coalition is most concerned with tin 
problems of hunger and homelessness; participating 
students volunteer at area soup kitchens. Other 
provide religious instruction for youngsters at are 
parishes, or assist the disabled and retarded. Tli 
group has sponsored numerous food and clothe 
drives, and has coordinated the Oxfam fast for 
number of years. As a Christian organization, th 
Faith and Justice ( oalition puts spec ial emphasis 01 
education and on the hturg\. 

( )l those groups operated primarily by students, 
few are branches of larger organizations. A higfj 
vocal group committed to justice in internatiotji 
affairs, Amnesty International was initiated 
campus hi L986. A number of successful entertainer 
have public K endorsed the organization i)n the in 
t( ni.iiioh.il level, Through its asso< iation with I an 
field and other colleges, Amnestj informs student 
<•! problems in the world. Wnte-a-Thons in th 
( ampus ( en« i have been most effective to this enl 

The campus chapter of Save The Children i 



I stography Club: Eva Bellafiore, Presiding Officer 



UMOJA; Carlton Michael. Presiding Officer 




3sely affiliated with the Westport branch of that 

me. Although somewhat dormant in recent years, 

Swas revived this year by Regina Mauro. The group 

'concerned with increasing the public's awareness 

f and providing aid for the world's needy children. 

he Knights of Columbus is similarly in tune with 

je objectives of its originating group. United in the 

unciples of charity, unity, fraternity, and patrio- 

\m, Fairfield Kniirhts concentrate on one fun- 

'aiser and a few social gatherings each semester. 

1 This year, a local branch of Rotary International 

eated a campus club, Roteract. Student members 

jere allowed to choose the club's direction. Activi- 

ps included a food drive for Operation Hope, the 

!>up kitchen/shelter in Fairfield, and assistance to 

[USA's Drive For Five program. Drive for Five 

isists students who have financial need. By spon- 

jring the Split Decision/Broken Bottles concert in 

inuary, Roteract contributed more than $1,000 to 

ne cause. Craig Maloney, Roteract President, has 

xpressed enormous expectations for the future of 

he group. 

1 Two on-campus organizations are geared to the 
pvice of the university community. Approximately 
|00 students volunteer time as Tour Guides for 
>rospective students and their families. Each guide 
onducts about three tours a semester, during which 
f ie or she familiarizes the visitors with the campus, 
nd responds to questions. The Peer Counselors 
arget students already enrolled at the university. 



Their main goal is to educate students about the 
dangers of drug abuse, particularly alcoholism. Peer 
Counselors on each floor of the dorms make them- 
selves available to any student in need of advice. 
They train to foster better listening skills, as well as 
to improve their ability to recognize problems. 

Honored at the Student Leadership Banquet in 
April as the Student Organization of the Year, the 
Appalachian Volunteer Corps provides direct 
assistance to struggling families in Appalachia. Dur- 
ing school vacations, students travel to the area to 
work with its people. Services by the Corps consist 
primarily of construction and tutoring. Due to in- 
creased interest in the program from national volun- 
teer organizations, the Appalachian Volunteer 
Corps ran two trips this year. 

The Big Brother/Big Sister program pro- 
vides companionship for area youngsters. Associat- 
ed with the Bridgeport office, the campus group 
looks for students to spend time with children who 
may not have anyone to look up to. Members plan 
activities for their "siblings," and some relationships 
continue beyond graduation. Although the need for 
Big Sisters fluctuates annually, the need for male 
role models has remained high. 

Known primarily for their work in a successful, 
bi-annual blood drive, Circle K members also 
dedicate time to New Haven's Ronald McDonald 
House and to the Special Olympics. Recently, the 
group has become involved with the Kiwanis Pedi- 



atric Trauma Institute for young burn victims. 

The Cardinal Key Society, begun in 1959 as 
part of a network of service organizations at Jesuit 
schools, sponsored a canned food drive in Novem- 
ber for the benefit of Operation Hope. Also, mem- 
bers have initiated visitation and entertainment pro- 
grams tor the Sisters of Notre Dame. 

With so man} 1 service organizations on campus, 
their activities overlap. The University Service 
Council, re-grouped this year, helps to coordinate 
the activities of all campus groups to insure that no 
cause is overlooked. The group, which consists of 
the vice-president from each service organization, is 
compiling a booklet about the different campus 
service clubs. In addition, the council itself hopes to 
raise money and manpower on behalf of the "Hole 
in the Wall Gang," Paul Newman's summer camp 
for terminally ill children. 

Peter Witkowsky 



109 





tm£ 



a o 








Club Sport? 

Club sports teams at Fairfield University i\ 
not the most prestigious teams for wl 
one could play. They don't get much mi 
attention, they don't get the accolades ot ot 
teams, and the\ don't get much fan support A 
comparison to varsit) sports. Club sports are pla\q 
In student-athletes because of an enjoyment anjJ 
love of the game. In a sense, they are the purest fctJ 
ot athletic competition on the college level in Arr el 
ica. They don't have high-budgets. There art ■ 
scholarships, there are no television contracts, then 
are no sneaker endorsements. Because of this laci 
>>t fiscal benefits, it is also safe to say that c J 
athletics are not tainted b\ the cheating which s< 
often places a black mark on the college athletics q 

It is true that the money and the attention are nc 




The Fencing Club hosted a national championship meet 
in Alumni Hall this year. Thirteen college teams 
attended. Sen de la Cruz photo 




Rugby Club; Hank Blaney. Presiding Officer 



Sailing Club; John Lazzari. Presiding Office 



Worries Around 



qual to that of varsity sports, but money does not 
ecessarily bring strong competition, dedication to 

team, or desire to win. These are the important 
[tangibles which are the driving forces behind suc- 
;ssful club sports programs. Fairfield has several of 
lese successful programs including men's and 
omen's lacrosse, women's soccer, and rugby. 

These teams are competitive and the players' 
edication to their teams is shown in their desire to 
lay hard and win. Club sports teams do not cut 
layers, therefore anyone who wants to play for a 
•am and works hard for that team, will get a uni- 
)rm and a chance to play. 

i For years, this area of athletics was juggled be- 
veen the athletic department, the recreation de- 
irtment, and the Fairfield University Student Asso- 
,ation. This year, in a move to organize the pro- 
ram, a position was created in the athletic 
apartment: Club Sports Coordinator. The depart- 
ent has acted on the university's commitment to 
hletics. 

Likewise, in the next few years, the athletic de- 
irtment may begin an annual, end-of-year club 
>orts banquet, like the one for varsity athletes. This 
;ar, though, the Alumni Association assumed re- 
>onsibility for honoring club sports athletes. Two 
udent athletes received awards this year for their 
volvement in club sports. Kathy O'Rourke was 
snored for her work with the women's lacrosse 
am, and Hugh Coyle, tor his work with the men's 
crosse team. 
H The men's lacrosse team provided Fairfield fans 
ith some outstanding performances this spring. 
le guys finished with an outstanding 11-1 record, 
eluded in those eleven wins was a hard-fought 8-6 

tory over Boston University, last year's New Eng- 
id club champions. Although the Fairfield team 
d not play in the New England Club Champion- 
ips, it was well-justified in laying claim to the 
ew England crown based on their fine perfor- 
ances this past season. 

Offensively, coach Andy Scheffer's club was led 
■ Hugh "Skeets" Coyle, Brian Dempsey, Bob Sulli- 
n, Al Vandemark, Tim Murphy, Joe Sargent, John 
illegari, and Breck Masterson. The goaltending 




chores were shared masterfully by Rich "Scoop" 
McDonough and Rob Wood. On the defensive 
side, Steve Hatton, Bill Peet, Bill Walsh, Kevin 
Kuryla. Mike Peet, and Bill Madden led a stingy 
defense which helped the laxmen to achieve their 
many victories. 

There was hardly a dull weekend at Fairfield 
when the Rugby Club was in action. The Fairfield 
Red Ruggers continued their tradition of showcas- 
ing their outstanding athletic talents and drinking 
abilities. Their "A," "B," and "C," squads provided 
athletic competition throughout the autumn and 
spring for those hearty spirits who endeavored to 
take part in the rough and tumble world of scrum- 
ming and rucking. But this was not just any year. 
The Red Ruggers celebrated their 25th Anniversary, 
and the "A" squad rolled to a 8-3 record. As always, 
when the battles were over, there was plenty of the 
sweet nectar provided by the world's most noted 
breweries to soothe defeat or to aid in the celebra- 
tion of victor) 1 . 

The women's lacrosse team came into their 
own this year and broke the hearts of several other 
New England lax teams who invaded Barlow Field 
with hopes of inflating their winning percentages. 
More often than not the laxwomen sent their New 
England counterparts home suffering from a severe 
case of defeat. The laxwomen were led offensively 
by Ann Grimaldi. Ellen Meagle, Maureen Mooney, 
Kathy O'Rourke, and Tricia Hanley. On the defen- 
sive side Chris Ezelius, Barbara O'Rourke, Jen 



The Fairfield Rugby Club celebrated their 25th 
Anniversary this year. Here, Matt Aiken feels the heat 
from the opposition. Brian Russell photo 



O'Malley, and Kristen Vanderlinde kept the oppos- 
ing offenses scampering while Maura Shine consis- 
tently thwarted the opposition in goal. The wom- 
en's lax team, who finished the year with an impres- 
sive 5-3 record, proved this year that Fairfield girls 
not only want to have fun, they want to win too. 

The women's soccer club finished their 1987 
campaign with a 5-4-1 record. Although only in its 
fourth season, this club team held its own against 
formidable varsity competition by coming up with 
victories over the likes of Fordham, Bridgeport, and 
Post. The team was led this past season by Karen 
O'Rourke, Sue Ferrarotti, Ellen Meagle, Barbara 
O'Rourke, and Kristen Sheekey. The team graduat- 
ed only one senior this past year and with ten starters 
returning next year, the future looks bright for the 
women's soccer club. 

Aside from these teams Fairfield was represented 
at the club level in skiing, boxing, cycling, fencing, 
karate, sailing, and track. 

Ric Brown 




1 



Soccer Club (Women); Karen O'Rourke, Presiding Officer 



Club group pictures were 
taken Sunday, February 7 ', 
by Terry Sullivan, Marc 
Belanger, and John 
Courtmanche. 



in 



Manor-isms 



Ycr . picallv publish a page ot statt 

fulfilling practice. But the Manor 

: trticularl) good fear, so even it some other 

r« responsible lor publishing the yearbook, 

if! still might receive special mention 

work on the yearbook. I'nderstandablv. we 

cuiltv about printing pictures ot ourselves be- 

H vvt Jon t want people to sa\. I lev . did you 

88 Manor.' All the pictures are ot the staff 

and their tnends. Those stinkers. Members ot the 

- editorial board wish to avoid a public image 

which even remotclv portravs us as stinkers. So 

we've set aside this page tor some statt pictures. 

Pictures ot us which appear on other pages were 

included onl) out ot respect tor our parents. 



CLUB 
self-PORTRAII 





Top left: Katie Belcher. Top right: Ben de la 
Cruz and Tracey Russo. Center: Gene Tiernan. 
Above left: (bottom row) Gene Tiernan, Diane 
Maughton, Kim Mann, Katie Belcher, John 
Courtmanche; (top row) Wendy Walukiewicz, 



Terry Sullivan, Joan Mine, Sean Flynn, Vince 
Cervoni, Ben de la Cruz. (Missing from photo: 
see staff box, page 3.) Above right: Sean Flynn 
and Peter Witkowsky. John Courtmanche 
photos, including the one in which he appears, 



for which he attached the camera to a tripo 
triggered the self-timer, and ran to the prec 
termined empty space next to Katie Belch 



112 




The past. It sits like a cat, inconspicuouslv on the window sill, 
unless you close the window on its tail and it screeches 

We remember the past with help from images, words, sounds, and 
smells. Between this hook and the video, the Manor presents images, 
words, and sounds. For smells, we considered a scratch and sniff 
page. At first, we couldn't decide which smells to include. The smell 
behind the Campus Center near the Seller's trucks.' Loyola Pit? We 
considered perfume or cologne to help remember special dances But 
nobody wants the yearbook to smell like an ex-boyfriend or ex- 
girltriend. So we opted for the least expensive smell. Scratch this 
page. Yes, anywhere. Now smell it. It should smell something like a 
new college textbook. 

This special section has two parts: Historj and Nostalgia, The 
History part includes World and National News. The Nostalgia part 
includes everything Fairfield-related. 



HISTORY 





jp Right: President and Mrs. Reagan greeted Pope 
ul II when he arrived in Miami to begin a nine-city U.S. 
ur. Above: Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North was a key 
Ificial in the plan to finance anti-government rebels in 
icaragua with money from arms sales to Iran. AP Pho- 



NFL talks resume with optimism 

Reagan May Consider Tax Changes to Cut Deficit 

Reagan's AIDS Battle Assailed as Inadequately^ BoilO doesn't let 

Apartheid: 'A Slippery Slope' fall bring down show 

The Bork Battle** 8 """ 1 ™ 

Should the Hopes focus on harmo nic convergence 

Sandinistas THE CHALLENGE TO AQUINO John Paul ' s charms pave the 

Be Trusted? Interview: The Coup Leader in Hiding for his u.s. tour 

At I Mtii I act T 'ta n > c raises sea of controversy 

Ml LUng LClOlj Biden Was Charged With Plagiarism 



Miserabl 



BUT NOT ON BRIBE 



an Arms DeaU^ M il^^i t ir^Hiv ■;!, esposuo 

Death of Bob Fosse saddens entertainer s ' CONVICTED ON G! 

UC oi*%1^o? Sides TradeBias Charges 
.O. SinKSr In the Howard geo^/t Trial 

Iranian boats^Mi In Deeper 
after attack 10^\n the Gulf 



113 



Billy Joel: 
Doing the 

Kremlin |{«i<> 



Los Angeles quake kills three 

'Max Headroom' — it did not compute 

200,000 march for gay rights, MDSfigh] 
Reports chip away at Jessica Hahn's image] 

-"" BOYSHtOMWW . Sfl So New Star Trek ' Series 

, Calls Cease-Fire; Rebels oay fe &f ^ Post . Klrk Era 

D 9 U TPANELV0TE AGAINST BORK Deat h squads 
SENDS NOMINATION TO SENATE ^^ y S . 

4 MID PREDICTIONS OF DEFEAT p h j,jpp |n es 
Falwell, board members quit PTL m rm ,, HF" ,w 

Reagan reaffirms Negotiators Move Closer 
support of contras To Ending N.F.L. Strike 

Dow plunges record 95.46 



Oie Dam K>nes industrial stock average dro;» 
*>08 points, the largest in history, on October 19. "H| 
Monday' stripped $500 billion from the market valud 

^uritics. Bottom: A 24-day strike by the 
players ended in mid-October when the union capitj 
ed and went to court instead of crying to fight the 
owners at the bargaining table. AP Photos 



m\ 'V twin 



A»l> 



&&A 




NOVEMBER 1987 





In an effort to keep the Persian Gulf open to 
;ation. the United States cleared the area of mines 
;scorted vessels to protect them from Iran. Above: 

McClure holds his 19-month old daughter Jessica, 
had fallen down a well and was trapped there for 



Cubans approve deal to release 27 hostages 
PTL'S flash, Cash Extending AIDS Patients' Lives 



THEDEflCiTDILEIIHA 



After Ginsburg admits using marijuana, his 
Supreme Court nomination goes up in smoke 



A Pbll on Higher Ttoes vs. SpendingO^ 

form Black Monday's Cuban exiles 
Gr °?uU «e"»gn of Terror meet iranates 

L-rf p^YJ^ 4 Tankers Are Reported Attacked # # 

» U * By Iranian Speedboats in the Gulf [ft AttfUltci jail 

Whiteheads Divorce and Cite Battle * 

For Baby M, NotPregnancy, as Cause ^eagan reported stiuig 

Political headquarters bombed b > "an-contra finding 
in pre-election violence in Haiti Typhoon^ 

North goes before grand jury Philippines 



Gorbachev Talk 
Before Congress 
Raises Concern 



Good News for Baby Jessica Kennedy f OP the COUrt 

Sandinistas block Contra leaders' visit 



With Bork 
Out, Reagan 
Starts Over 



i is 



MARCH By 200.000 
IN CAPITAL PRESSES 
SOVIET ON RIGHTS 



2 LEADERS DISCUSS VOTING CANCELED 
LONG-RANGE ARMS AS HAITI IS CAUGHT 
AND AFGHAN WAR in WAVE OF TERROR 

6 U.S. sailors 
wounded in 

USO attack A Treacherous Paradox: AIDS Tests 
CONTRAS RELEASE Korea: A Three-Way Tossup 



DECEMBER 

1987^ 



MODNSSflH 



CEASE-FIRE PLANS 



BKOADCAST NEWSgH 



e Washington 
Summit 




ii 



i 



i 



The Homeless, at Suppertime 
Iranian Gunboats Raid Two Tankers South Africa Black Police Revolt 

The Price of Ivan Boeskys Greed 

Iran fires near 2 U.S. helicopters The inf Treaty 

Howard Beach Jury Gets Case fleagan on Gorbachev: "We Can Get Along" 

Jobless rate dips to B^^^S^HT. 

Chicago Fued Erupts Over Choosing a Mayor spoil the Democrats' 

Persian Gulf mine sweep completed chances? 






President Reagan talks with Soviet leader Mikhail G 
bachev during arrival ceremonies ai the White Hoi 
I hi two superpower leaders held a three-da} sun 
meeting in December and signed a nuclear arms com 
lent. AP Photo 



13> ^ 



V 




he six years since Americans first heard of a mysteri- 
immunity-robbing disease from which no one recov- 
AIDS has killed nearly 25,000 Americans. AP PhotOi 



988 
JANUARY 



False signatures 
plague Jackson 



Fairfield's Nolan 
cops 200th win 



HEART ATTACK RISK 
FOUND TO BE CUT 
BY TAKING ASPIRIN 

New York to Give Welfare Grants ISRAEL'S W AT Hi 

In Cash to Single Homeless People Confrontin g a New Arab C! 

A Limit on the Student Press^ m ™ , 

Now it's aii the news that fits the principal * Sound Bite Sidelines Jimmy the Greek ^C 



NASA gears up for new flights | 

Bush wins Mich, caucuses: ^banks' 

. . , ,. . . reel from © 

Hart set for first debate stoc k drop 3" 

|i Afghan resistance may be cracking g 



c/> O 

CD C 
O CD 

CD C 
E0Q 

IS 



Pg3cg Now 

S £ Bush mired in Iranscam issue Pay Later ' 

-^ "" Vice president's vagueness on his role has crippled his_ 



0X3 n 
CO Q 



Reaching a cease-fire 
in Central America 



Doctors test laser ^oncos, Keaskins ready 

to kill AIDS in blood Elway, Williams duel in Super Bowl 



117 



Round-the-world flight raises spirits, 

^LSnmT^ 3118611 suffers sister's death and loss 
™uimi mmm MN Rush DoJe scQre 

The Phantom ^"rejected ' iti 
Hits Broadway 6VAPPEALSC0yRT SyFL^Glu g L 

Soviets get hockey revenoejJ; . dM . Mes 

r* S uth Africa Bans Most s\nu ^y 

Robertson suoDorts Swaeeart A Sex Scandal Breaks 

Panama president EsJiaa Over Jimmy Swaggart 

DISMISSES NORIEGA QQS> Th «> Homeless: A Horror Story 

'Star wars' gets 1st big test in space ds finds 6 states 

Catering to a Couch Potato's Every Need F JjSKl, 

U.S. getS lSt gOld byMDeclsion wmB r ee d Con f us,on 
Boitano triumphU.S. Seen as Confident of Afghan Pullout by boviet 

Panama chief indicted in drug scheme 

Kennedy takes seat on court today Crack Wars in DX. 



FEBRUAR 

198 



Mon Evangelists Jim and Tamm\ 1 .m Bakkc 
farewell to tin- PTL ministry m March. Jim Hakk 
signed aftei confessing to .1 - unter » 

\ounj; woman Tamni\ Bakker bowed out 
i. cms to undergo treatment for druj; depcndenq 





mite, 




WHO „ 

weazpf 




-jczr 





Bloom County and The Far Side, created by Berke 
Breathed and Gary Larson respectively, replaced Doones- 
bury as the most popular comic strips among college 
students. G.B. Trudeaus Doonesbury still communicated 
the attitudes of the Baby Boomers, but the artistic bold- 
ness of Breathed's Bloom County and the visual one-liners 
of Larson's The Far Side appealed to the younger genera- 
tions.. Top and Center: Isolated frames from Bloom 
County. Above: The Far Side. 



MARCH- 
APRIL 



T<ar»lrcrm tnriC Masters and Johnson Pardons 
tJdVlvMJII lUira have a grim warning 

1 1 # for straight society Ol iNortfl, 

DUKAKIS War on drugs escalates admiral 
Ul Michigan ■iMm u. uinn,uij ..i.uj predicted 



Hart isn't in it anymore! 



hMJKS? HOeTppROVES han ' fra< l shift atta cks from cities 
$47 MILLION TO AID 



2&SSSKSB Bush gets head start 
in new tour Mssss on Super Tuesday 

Chambers 'Last Emperor' leads pack 
cops plea in SUhST ? vanBoesk 7 could **> 

F . . . . *£iZL. ""Provepnsonconditions 

preppie trial Dukakis 



Iran-Contra Affair Indictments 



Sandinista-ContraMeetingBegins DEMOCRATS PRESS GrailimV %t 30 
WithAccordonTemporaryTruce MEESE TO RESIGN; Sandinistas agree to talks 
Superconductivity HeatS Up HE VOWS TO STAY with Contras in Nicaragua 

KSffPUYRftLLL 

Kuwaiti Jet Is Hijacked to Iranian City _ 

Not the insurance companies, if they can help it 

Bruce is tough but smooth ^^^ mn 

CEASE-FIRE IN NICARAGUA ^fakis Capitalizes on His Rivals ' Weaknesses 
&e the Contras Finished? To Eecome the Safe Choice in New York Primary 

$48M Contra aid 
gets Reagan's OK 

Big city puts out smokers' lights 

U.S. to beef up Panama force 



119 



HISTORY/NOSTALGIA 



PONDEROUS STORIES 
By 

This article is appearing in your yearbook because the editor asked me to write a 
spc^ > S -.>ries' column. ..If my wishes are honored, my name will be 

withheld. ..The year in music from March 1987 to March WSS...In March 1987. l"2 
put the \ ear in full swing with the release of The Joshua Tree.. .Coincidentally. back 
in September 198 1. Orientation tor the Class ol '88, I 2 released The 1'tiforgettabh 
Fin ...few bands match l'2's intensity either live or on record. .. The Grammys 1987 
brought S wood and Paul Simon back in the spotlight. ..As the year rolled 

on, we experienced the 1986 spillover popularity ot Bon Jovi and The Beastie 
Boys Bon |ovi, a New [ersey heartthrob, proved that cuteness could lead to rock 
success. ..The Beastie Boys will be a trivia question in 2000 A.D....In April, Prince 
released Sign of the Time .(...Bryan Adams, a Canadian light rocker, released Into the 
Fire, a commercial disappointment. ..As the summer kicked in. Boston took to the 

d tor the first time in eight years. ..The Beatles' Sgl. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club 
Ban J turned twenty years old. ..Madonna, generally posing as a Marilyn Monroe 
wanna-be, toured football stadiums. ..David Bowie also took to the road with his 
stage resembling a glass spider.. .Billy Joel toured the U.S.S.R....an album and 
cable special followed. ..The Grateful Dead (many times with Bob Dylan) toured 

-ipport their In tht Dark IP ...Fleetwood Mac released Tango in the Night- 
...Metal bands like Motley Crue. Whitesnake. and Poison kept things (relatively 
speaking i noisy.. .Ol course, one could never forget the summer songs. ..Suzanne 
Vega's "Luka ...Los Lobos' remake of Richie Valens' "La Bamba "...Bob Seger's 
"Shakedown "...Tom Petty's Jammin' Me "...The Cure's "Why Can't I Be 
You "...Europe's Carrie' ...Heart's "Alone "...Cutting Crew's "I Just Died In Your 
Arms". ..these should stir the memories just a bit. ..As the summer came to a close, 
phenom Whitney Houston released her second album. ..Hard rock mainstays Def 
Leppard released Hysteria. ..An<i. of course, the hype machine rolled for Michael 
Jackson's Bad. ..As Michael tried to look tough, the public laughed. ..But musical 
quality brought Jackson acceptance in musical circles.. .back to school. ..On the 
doorstep of September was R.E.M.'s Document. ..The Cars released Door to Door, 
toured, and called it quits soon alter. ..Pink Floyd released A Momentary Lapse of 
Reason without Roger Waters, their enigmatic leader.. .Mick Jagger's song "Let's 
Work" climbed the charts and no one really knew why. ..Squeeze released Bablyon 
and On. and toured. ..The surviving members of Lynyrd Skynyrd toured in tribute 
to their lead singer Ronnie Van Zandt, who passed away in a 1977 plane 
crash. ..John Cougar Mellancamp toured and gave the world a slice of Heartland. 
l'.S.A....As October rolled around, Bruce Springsteen released a reflective Tunnel 
of Love... Bruce played a large role in the past four years at Fairfield. ..In 1984-85, 
Born in the USA crowded the air waves. ..Bruce released a five record set of live 
music just in time for the Christmas 1986 rush. ..Though he became a megastar, I 
don't think he ever "sold-out" with his lyrics. ..The Dirty Dancing soundtrack 
exploded. ..An Australian band named INXS released Kick and performed in our 
Alumni Hall. ..lor trivia buffs, the opening band at this INXS show was the 
Brandos. ..As November rolled around, so did Tiffany. ..Sting released Nothing 
Likt tin Sun and kept his career in motion. ..George Michael released Faith. ..How 
could one forget the controversial "I Want Your Sex". / ... George Harrison uplift- 
ed his rollercoaster solo career with Cloud Sine. ..In December, A Very Special 
Christmas was released, featuring Bruce. Y2. Run DMC, Sting, etc. ...Thankfully, 
not too many deaths occurred in l°K7...Liberace died of AIDS. ..Peter Tosh 
passed away at age H... After Christmas, David Lee Roth, the wildman who 
departed from Van Halen, became the tirst act to release something major. ..then 
Michael Jackson started a large-scale American tour. ..Bruce took his E Streeters 
with him on the road. ..A bright young face emerged in early 1988 under the name 
ol I >ebbie Gibson.. .She could be a star for \ears... Stranger things have happened- 
tor the record, the number one song lor the week in which I wrote this article 
w.is Rick Astley s "Nevei Gonna Civc You I p "...The LP will soon be a thing of 
the |\ist The ( I) made ma|or inroads in 1987-88...AS 1988 segued into March, 
the Grammys awarded Paul Simon (again I and Bruce Almost fittingly, though, 
leaned up ...Surprisingly, they were present tor the glitzy affair. ..Who knows 
where the future of music lies ..Safe to say that rock music has become a 
permanent entitv over its tlnrt\ plus years ot existence. ..Permanent is something 
this column is not So tor the final time. Be well. ..And Tempus I'ugit. 






STAG TRACKS 
By Gareth Charter 

Sports Illustrated does "The Year in Sports" their way. ..this is my way. ..if thcjl 
Saturday afternoon Rugby clashes didn't make your Fall weekends then thej 
announcement that ESPN would carry live N.F.L. games at 8 p.m. on Sundayl 
nights should have. ..yet after just a few weeks of couching it for the one o'clock! 
game, and then the eight o'clock game. Satan reared his ugly head. ..the Footb, 
Strike lett us with the choice of "scab" games or .MTV or any movie on any mo\i 
channel or The Weather Channel or just about any possible idea anyone came u 
with not to go to the library. ..as a public service. I reported the sttike-relie 
activities of a few. ..remember Parents' Weekend when Ted "of course it's big. I 
from Philly" Murphy refused to go out to dinner unless his dad rolled his pan 
up.. .and Louis took his parents to Wood's End. ..thank God the strike ende 
cause I think a tew people started to ask where the library was. ..and I was runnin 
out of friends. ..Baseball Finished up with a Mets' choke job that should have 
pleased all true sports fans. ..but what a strange World Series. ..the winners cam 
from a state called Minnesota. ..they played in a stadium called the Metrodome, 
where no one else could win. ..and guys called Brunansky. Hrbek, and Gaetti 
became stars. ..perhaps at the Class of 88's 25th reunion someone will remind us 
that the Minnesota Twins won the World Series our senior year. ..we'll all realize 
that it was just a joke someone thought up to see if we ever sobered up enough to 
catch it. ..Winter brought forth another punishment from the sportsgod. ..just as 
he dethroned the Mets to scold the bandwagon fans of a year before, so did he 
give the N.J. Giants an 0-5 start and absence from the N.F.L playoffs.. .Elwav anc 
the Broncos' return to the Super Bowl seemed to promise some excitement but 
the Washington Redskins turned it into a yawner before halftime... the winter o 
'88 also brought us the Olympics and all those official products. ..no real surprises, 
our hockey team provided the only excitement, but were unable to reproduce the 
1980 miracle. ..then again, we may never see a sports feat like that again in our 
lifetimes. ..looked real scary for a few days that our only gold medal winner woul 
be a male figure skater from San Francisco.. .the sportsgod would never be tha 
cruel. ..kind of interesting that although George Steinbrenner hasn't had a winne 
with the Yankees in the 80s, he was asked to help find out why we don't « 
more at the Olympics. ..George bought Jack Clark in the winter wheeling 
dealings while the Red Sox stole ace reliever Lee Smith in a deal that some said 
could be the trade of the century. ..bottom line is that everyone anticipated a 
heated pennant race 'tween the Sox and the Yanks. ..that's perfect for the New 
England-New York mix of Fairfield. ..Musberger's March Madness helped fill the 
void left after the Super Bowl and Stag Hoops. ..Georgetown lost early which 
proved that the sportsgod is just. ..I". R.I. made for the perfect Cinderella but 
midnight came too early. ..Kansas' upset of Oklahoma in the final was a great 
game but the David slaying Goliath claims were overdone. ..the true Goliath of 
college hoops, (Danny Manning), played for the Davids.. .after the NCAA Tour- 
nament and before Baseball's Opening Day we were treated to quite a variety 
...Hulk Hogan lost his WWF title, then Randy "Macho Man" Savage won it in 
Wrestlemania IV. ..Mike Tyson, who don't forget is the same age as students in 
the Class of '88. killed Larry Holmes but Holmes admitted he was laughing all the 
way to the bank. ..then Tyson beat up a blubbery Tony Tubbs... nothing seemed to 
have changed in either pro hoops or hockey but as Spring came the Knicks 
looked light years ahead of where they were when INXS played Alumni Hal- 
L.and in the N.H.L. Playoffs the New Jersey Devils not only made it, but 
knocked off the NY. Islanders. ..as the Class of '88 graduated, Tyson was prepar- 
ing for his first real challenge from Michael Spinks on June 27; Utah, Boston. 
Atlanta, Detroit. Chicago. Dallas, Los Angeles, and Denver entered the N.B.A 
semifinals; and the Boston Bruins and the Edmonton Oilers battled for the 
Stanley Cup. ..thus, we return to baseball, the only sport which starts just as our 
year ends and finishes as school gets going again. ..that is, for those lucky enough 
to be returning. ..hopefully my classmates and I will have jobs before the World 
Series. ..on May 22. the Mets were in first place in the National League East; the 
Yankees were in first in the American League East. ..too early to predict the 
Subway Series we've all been waiting for. ..it's only right that my Sportsman of tht 
Yen go to a senior. ..so for being such a good sport, and having the RecPlex 
renamed in his honor. ..it has to go to the Stork. ..hope this college stuff has been 
.is spec i.il tor you as it has for me. 



120 



NOSTALGIA 



I FAIRFIELD WERE A NOVEL, THESE ARE THE CLIFF NOTES 

c entation, lectures, fusa, professors, classes, studying in the lounge, living in the 
■Inge, studying in the library, heat in the library, harvest, sadies, the red sea, 
% ;erleaders, the maac championships, mitch, stagmania, watching sports match- 
p volleyball, soccer, rugby, lacrosse, tennis, swimming, intramurals, flag foot- 
■1, water polo, college bowl, fencing, karate, the stag, the stag-her, the adminis- 
tition. regis, gonzaga, jogues, campion, loyola, kostka, claver, the townhouses 

I I and new four and six, townhouses with funny Jesuit names, parties at the 
1 ich, the mayor, quarters, the seagrape, grand union, tommy's, route 1 in 
vstport, movies in the oak room, 188 nights, parent's weekend, inxs, dogwoods, 
Lmino's pizza, stag-her pizza, seller's, first dates, small refrigerators and hot 
I ,tes. life cereal, the mailroom, empty mailboxes, the bookstore, glee club lunch 
I urs in the cc lobby, the mirror on thursday mornings, roommates and floor- 
iiites and housemates and bedmates, joining a club, club meetings, bannow 
li'rd floor lounge, r.a.s, parking tickets, getting written up, bellarmine, canisius, 
In, mcauliffe, Julie, the cult behind julief.'). appointments with professors, 

,mputers, cheapies and the deli, cepacol/sudafed/cough syrup at the infirmary, 
;(ident services, the quad, registration, townhouse lottery, drop/add, battle of 
ife bands, battle of the dorms, 88 nights, senior week, course booklets, gradu- 
ion, adopt-a-frosh, ice cream social, halloween, water fights, shaving cream 
[hts, playhouse, bonfires, dorm masses, campus ministry, job interviews and 
reer planning, leadership weekend, the game room, used books, murph the 
ysical comedian, may day, campus bands, say when, split decision, broken 
ittles, humidifier, charlie doesn't surf, johnny and the favorites, laugh-a-lot 
action, friends, thanksgiving parties, Christmas parties, Christmas specials on tv, 
ristmas lights, the barney machine, catch the wave, the beach and townhouse 
?uttle, the community theater, the info booth, student art show, photography 
jb, Asian students association, kegs, new year's, master's, wood's end, black 
ck, dorm bathrooms, fall in new england, winter in the same, credits and gpa, 
iia, lsat, gre, qpa, meat, majors and minors and concentrations, b.a. or b.s., 
rking spaces, mid-terms, ice cream bar, all-nighters, 8:20 classes, service organi- 
tions, soup kitchens, appalachia, study abroad, internships, messy rooms, cir- 
s, drama club, brunch cartoons and dinner theaters, evenings of music, coffee- 
■>uses. fairfield sweatshirts, weightroom, aerobics, walking fromthe railroad 
ation, avoid the noid, secret santa, assasin, bon jovi posters, the boss, rem, u2, 
cernative music, vof, shout, the big chill, twist and shout, spring break, diversity, 
kathy, wonderous stories, security, the pit, prep students, friends, cramming, 
ading days, moonlighting, couch potato, letterman, budweiser, beer balls in 
)rms, floating naut, snow days, co-ed, screw your roommate, parietals, th 
isements, lack of basement in townhouse 131, fire alarms, laundry, persiflage, 
x>s and cheers, college i.d., summer, A. bill, trying to park in the Campus Center 
t, shit happens, superfan, long-distance phone calls, mom and dad, airbands, 
bling weekend, toga parties, dorm picnics, honor societies, the duplexes, Jesuits, 
11, diners, photo albums, irish catholics, borrowing clothes, food fights, campi- 
i field, doing jane tonda, lottery numbers, stressing-out, gonzaga gust, the 
iffalo club, ex-es, homecoming weekend, overdue library books, credit cards, 
ps, broken photocopy machines, snowball fights, blackouts, hurricanes, mod- 
n art on campus, exit 22, exit 44, spring mass, predictions of murder at a 
)rtheastern Jesuit university, rec plex, alumni hall, special dinners, floor meet- 
gs, dorm council, peer counseling, superbowl parties, Olympics, world series, 
gistering parties with more than 24 people, fairdale, the point, decorating the 
iom, country club, golf course, 1,100 average s.a.t.s, junior ivy league, fans of the 
ets, giants, Celtics, knicks, islanders, rangers, yankees, red sox, jets, devils, 
itriots. books by professors, scruples, student telephone address guide, graduate 
hool, picking up ny times in the bookstore, heat on high with windows wide 
Den, hansen's, bluchers, levi's 501 blues, aviator and denim jackets, sweats, cable, 
mote control, corsages and boutonnieres, semi-formals, theme parties, neon 
;er signs, phone bills, super discount, fuddrucker's, cocktails, mocktails, term- 
ipers, computer rooms, biology labs, cum laude, magna, summa, valedictorian, 
)medy night, dean's list, pets in townhouses, sleep in, pictionary, getting sick- 
sassing out due to excessive drinking, maintenance personnel, scuba classes, 
ets in dorm rooms, trying to make it home after a TH party, avoiding security 
i.s while drinking, blowing off exams, study abroad, living it up, reggae nights, 
ternational students, floor t-shirts, sherwood island, dorm Olympics, dorm 
cnics, registrar lines, quad, language labs, schedules, lost i.d.s, tray-dropping, 
ay-sledding, i.d. validation, bursar's office, firehouse deli, tcby, senior week, 



tuition increases, simon sez, the mezz, road trips, debbie gibson, stag-her rats, 
buybacks, "used" stickers, bioheads, super discount, ride board, lady with kid- 
napped dog, fusa elections, green campus-mail envelopes, student guestionnaires. 
cardboard city, ox-fam, one-way arrows, academic probation, sunbathing in 
quad, diets, lines for tickets, lines for ice cream, Jennings beach, crates, quarters 
for laundry, desk drawers, hall payphones, Jesuit volunteer corps, study lamps, 
m&m sales, club raffles, teacher evaluations, #2 pencils, rugby games/parties, 
knapsacks, homecoming weekend 

COST OF COLLEGE LIVING Compiled by Gene Tiernan 

Slice of pizza $1.00 

1/2 keg of Bud $47.50 

Suitcase of Bud $10.99 

Compact Disc $15.00 

Suzuki Samurai $7299.00 

Cheapie $1.00 

Air Jordan Sneakers SH5.00 

F.U. Parking Ticket $5-25.00 

Big Gulp $.89 

Leather Jacket $200.00 

Gallon Unleaded Gas $.97 

Shuttle Pass-Beach $50.0()/semester 

F.LI. Hooded Sweatshirt $48.00 

Screw-Your-Roommate Tix $15.00 

Fairfield Notebook $1.99 

Phone Call (Conn.) $.10 

Student Ticket to Stag Basketball Free 

Late Ticket to Stag Basketball $6.00 

Rent at Beach (Person Month) $300-450.00 

Milk (1/2 gal.) $1.19 

Eggs (doz.) $.89 

Chopped Meat (lb.) $1.59 

Doritos (3/4 lb. bag) $2.29 

Haircut at Paul's (Flat Top) $4.00 

Supercuts $8.00 

McDLT $1.99 

Draft at Stag-Her $1.00 

Box of M&M's $.50 

Concert Ticket $18.50 

Fairfield Mirror Free 

Train fair to NYC (weekends round trip) $12.50 

Manor Yearbook w/ Video $40.00 

Fairfield Police Disturbance Fine $67.00 

Dorm Room & Board (1987-88) $4250.00 

Tuition (1987-88) $8100.00 

Attending Fairfield 1984-88 $44,370.00 

Toad's Place Cover Charge $2.00 

Pictionary $17.00 

FAIRFIELD DICTIONARY 

RUGGER - One who enjoys drinking and inflicting great pain upon others in a 

game called Rugby. 

BRARY -Place full of books where one is supposed to do school work. Is 

often confused with social club or sauna. 

GRAPE - Place to hang out and spend tremendous amounts of money. 

STONER - Person unaware of termination of 1960s. Often carrying many 

dead brain cells. 

YUPPIE - Students determined to make $80,000/yr. before age of 25. 

COOLBEANS - Expression of approval. 

DUDE - Anyone whose name you have forgotten. 

PACKIE - New England term for liquor store. Etymology unknown. 

CARDED - What happens to an underage person trying to sneak into bar. 

S HAPPENS - Expression of recognition that life is absurd. 

DEAD - Saddest form of a keg known to man. 



21 



NOSTALGIA 



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W W 



OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS 



Dear 



FAIRFIELD 
UNIVERSITY 

FAIRFIELD. CONNECTICUT 06430 ■ (203) 255-541, 

March 26, 1984 



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On behalf of the Committee on Admissions, I am happy to 
inform you of your acceptance into the Freshman Class at 
Fairfield University for the 1984-85 academic year. Welcome 
to Fairfield University. You have been accepted into the 
Bachelor of Science program in the School of Business. 

You have prepared well for a Fairfield education, and we 
would like to congratulate you on your fine achievement. We 
expect, of course, that you will continue to do quality 
academic work in the final months of high school. Your 
acceptance is contingent upon the successful completion of 
your high school program. 

We hope that you decide to join us at Fairfield University 
where you will be exposed to a variety of challenging 
academic courses in a community of scholars. Since you will 
be residing on campus, we especially want to welcome you to 
our community. 

We would ask you to acknowledge your acceptance by submitting 
the $100 non-refundable tuition deposit (to be credited to 
your tuition for the 1984-85 academic year) and the $100 
housing deposit (also non-refundable) in the enclosed 
self-addressed envelope. In order that you can be assured a 
place in the Freshman Class, your deposit must be received in 
the Admissions Office by May 1, 1984 . Please note that our 
deadline is a firm one. If you need additional information, 
please contact our office at (203) 255-5411, extension 2424. 
We hope that you will decide to join us at Fairfield 
University . 

Sincerely, 

David M. Flynn 
Dean of Admissions 



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A student spends weeks anticipating the artival of 

this letter. A reason to party as a high school senior, j 

Op-Scan sheet 

As freshmen and sophomores, filling in all those 

little circles was useless; out of five desired classes. 

two might have been open. 

Course Booklet 

The step before filling in all those little circles. 

Student Opinion of Teaching 

A few professors expressed contempt for these 

forms, but students loved the chance to praise their 

favorite teachers and take it easy for fifteen minutes 

of a class. 

Examination Book or Blue Book 

A pile of these made students shake and develop 

sweat) 1 palms. 

Arts & Sciences Awards Competition notice 

Every spring, signs like these would appear as the 

university elicited entries from its exceptional 

achievers. 

Used sticker 

Some students would peel these from the bindings 

of their books, hoping to raise the r~ 

buy-back price at the bookstore. Complaints such as 

"But I bought this book new," and "Do you know 

how much I payed for this book.''" never worked — 

the bookstore offered only one sum for a book, 

whether new or used. At the end of each semester, 

students always left the bookstore with less cash 

than they had hoped. 

Book list 

Early semester mobs gathered near the bookstore to 

see this lengthy, intimidating list. 

Course schedule "Less than 15 hours" meant 

drop/add and a long wait at the Registrar's office. 






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I 10 I 1987 

FAIRFIELD 
NIVEPSITY 
PRESENTS 

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Battle of the Bands promotional doorknob 
sign (bottom-half) 

The promotional idea of the vear was to hang signs 
from the doorknobs of dormrooms and town- 
houses. One complaint was issued, though, when a 
student's "Do Not Disturb" sign was covered b\ a 

Battle of the Bands'' sign, and his roommate 
walked in and caused much embarrassment for 
those involved. 

Battle of the Bands wrist ticket 
Proof-or-pavment was not in the form of a stub, but 
a bracelet. Vim could tug. pull, bite, but you could 
not remove these plastic bracelets from your wrist. 
Certificate of Membership 
Fairfield still does not support fraternities, and 
probablv never will, but a student could join this 
juke frat. and receive this official certificate, by 
purchasing a Tappa Kegga Dei t-shirt. 
Men's Basketball ticket 

Much debate surrounded the new student ticket 
rules and the corresponding price increase which 
ultimate!) discouraged students who had forgotten 
to pick up their free tickets. But Stagmania rolled 
on... 

Pom-Pom strings 

A student just wasn't a complete fan without a mini- 
pom-pom to wave. 
Class Picnic sign 

When students at Fairfield packed a class picnic 
basket, thej were probably headed for Sherwood 
Island. 

Sibling Weekend sign 
When kills are college people too. 
Soccer sign 

The biggest game of the season for the progressing 
men's soccer program. Many teams realized this 
year that advertising a game helped to draw a stu- 
dent crowd. 

Fall Athletic Schedule 
A must for any wallet. 
Drive For Five promotional tent 
Another smart advertising idea, these tents (flat- 
tened to one dimension here) sat on tables in Seller's 
and in the Stag-Her. 
88 Nights ticket 

Included here for seniors who forgot what the ticket 
looked like. 
Crucible ticket 

The first step was to find out where the pla) house IS. 

The second step was to reserve a ticket before the 
limited seating had run out. The third step was to 
see one of tour terrific playhouse productions. 




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AIRFIELD 
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1987 
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Seller's Menu 

The contents of this menu look deceivingly tasteful. 
That "Cycle 1" at the top is a ploy to make students 
believe that every week. Seller's changed its offer- 
ings. 

S.T.A.G. 

Published by FUSA. The ultimate reference book, 
more vital than the Freshman Record. 
I.D. 

A Fairfield I.D., preferably red, was a cherished 
thing. When students wanted to eat, take out a 
library book, check their student numbers, or go to 
a bar. they'd whip out this trusty companion. 
Interview Schedule 

The Career Planning Center sponsored many Real 
World activities for seniors. 
Used Book ad 

They're marked with someone else's yellow high- 
lighter, but hey. they're cheaper... 
Mike's Pizza menu 

This menu was one of many in students' top desk 
drawers. Other favorite take-out restaurant menus 

e Tai Jaing's and Luigi's. Noone needed a menu 

Domino's. 

aving Fun" sign 

nt source of embarrassment, these photo- 

ied signs appeared often in the Campus Center 
Canisius. For birthdays, anniversaries, or just 

ause the photo was perfectly embarrassing, a 
student would run to the library, make thirty copies 
of photo and corresponding message, hang them 
rly in the morning, and hide from the victim for as 
ong as possible. 
Textbook Order Form 

t runner always returned with bad news: "We 



jon't have this book, you'll ha\ 



">ack in a 
ur." The 



few days and wait in line for another hour." The 

■hier brought worst news, 
rnone Bill 

Two of the worst feelings in college: seeing the 
telephone bill in the mailbox, and opening it. 
Pictionary drawing 

Everyone saved a bunch of these from each game. 
', don't laugh. If Van Gogh played Pictionary. he 
would have lost. i ~,-i 



NOSTALGIA 



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Campus Map 

Received from security when registering car. Most 
students referred to map once, then parked wherev- 
er they wanted tor the rest of the year. 
Parking Sticker #01068, Off-Campus Boarder 
Parking stickers allow parking in designated areas, 
.md entrance into the University after 11:30 p.m. 
without a hassle from the checkpoint officer. 
Notice of Violation of Traffic Regulations 
(known also as a "ticket") 
Tickets are given for only the most severe traffic 
violations, such as parking in a fire lane with the 
ha/ard lights on for two minutes to carry a couch 
into a dormitory. Some students suspect that the 
number of tickets issued at the university in a week 
is directly related to the si/e of paychecks for offi- 



cers. Other students ga\e up collecting baseball 
cards to start collecting traffic tickets. All students 
agree that getting a ticket is a humorous experience. 
Appeals of traffic tickets go to the Traffic Court, 
then disappear until a week before Graduation, 
when students are notified of a $247 compiled fine 
which, if left unpaid, prevents graduation; at which 
point a student has two options: pay the fine, or give 
any secunt\ officer the collected tickets and a six- 
pack of Heineken. 
Shuttle Schedule 

Referred to frequently by townhouse residents who 
are too lazy to walk, and beach residents who aren't 
cunning enough to acquire a car from their parents. 
Ride Needed form 
Posted near the bookstore on the bulletin boards 






beside the Ride Offered forms. On the whole 
more rides were needed than offered. Rides wi 
needed most often to nearby colleges or cities 
Boston. Providence. Syracuse. Philadelphia. Busies 
time: before Christmas vacation. Parents say, T 
to find a ride before we drive to get you.' 1 
board. Nothing offered. Post "Ride Needed " fori 
After two days, no Calls. Look through STAG I 
seniors who live in vour hometown. Call them. Car 
arc full. Call Parents. Take a train. 
Pamphlet of Parking and Traffic Regulations 
When students appeal tickets (see "Notice i I 
tion of Traffic Regulations' . above), the « 
officer says, "Did you read this.'" No stud; 
Then the officer opens the pamphlet, and circles tl.i 
regulation which has been violated. 



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8:00 am 
8:10 
8:20 
8:30 
8:45 
9:05 

9:15 J. H. Only 
9:25 TH Only 
9.45 
10:05 

10:15 J. H. Only 
10:25 TH Only 
10:45 
11:05 
11:15 
1 1 .25 
1 1 .40 
11:50 
12.05 
12.25 
12:50 

1:20 

1.35 

1:50 

2:10 

2:20 

2:30 

2:40 

3:00 







[AIRFIELD 1987- 

V UNIVERSITY PARKING & TRAFFIC REGULATIONS JL \J U M 

(AIRFIELD 1987- 

V UNIVERSITY PARKING & TRAFFIC REGULATIONS -*- CtU M 



Nostalgia 
EXTRA 

Fairfield's 

First 

Celebrity 

Withdraws 

n 1986, Quaker's Life Ce- 
1 ad campaign said Mikey 
;w up. Actor John Gilch- 
[, the boy who made the 
itious "Mikey" character 
nous, grew up also — he 
'ered Fairfield University 
a freshman in September, 
186. Unfortunately, he 
yed for only one year. 
The reason for withdraw- 
according to campus gos- 
, was Gilchrist's academic 
rubles. The Manor was un- 

Ile to confirm this with the 
gistrar's office. 
The Manor did confirm, 
wever, that bubble-gum 
p singer (and songwriter!) 
ebbie Gibson is not en- 
Ued in Fairfield's Class of 
92. A secretary at the Un- 
;rgraduate Admissions of- 
:e received numerous calls 
om boys (all in mid-puberty 
' living at Man-Boy-Love) 
ho wanted the truth about 
.tie Miss Gibson. The truth 
, Debbie toured the cam- 
tis, and was ready to apply 
mil she asked to see the Jo- 
ues music rooms. Fairfield's 
lusic program, even with 
)rin Grossman, is no chal- 
mge for a pop rock vir- 

JOSO. 

At this point, then, we 
now that Fairfield's only ce- 
ebrity withdrew, but we 
lon't know his reason. We 
an only hope of his one year 
t Fairfield that he liked it. 





132 



■I 




FALL SPORTS 



The 1987 Fall Sports schedule in- 
cluded Field Hockey, Soccer, Vol- 
leyball, Men's and Women's Cross 
Country, Women's Tennis, and the 
cool temperature/short seasons for 
Baseball, Golf, and Men's Tennis. 

The Women's Tennis squad 
proved to be the most successful in 
the fall, the first of three seasons for 
Fairfield sports. Women's tennis 
posted an 8-3 record. The male and 
female versions of the Cross Coun- 
try team together produced a 4-2 
mark, and they also competed in 
several regional championship 
matches. 

Though the fall season was a dis- 
appointing one for the rest of the 
Stag athletes, hints of future suc- 



cess shine through the season's 
highlights. 




\bove: Joe Solimine prepares to apply the tag on a gunned-down would-be score:. John Courtmanche photo 
I"op right: Debbi Dunne fights for the loose ball. Varden photo Right: Second sacker Dan Buchanan turns 
wo for the Stags. John Courtmanche photo 










BASEBALL 

This year the Stags Baseball team 
got of f to a slow start and ended the 
fall season with a 3-8 record. High- 
lights included a doubleheader 
sweep of Long Island University 
and a thrilling comeback victory 
over Quinnipiac College. The 
games were always exciting, but 
too many disappointments plagued 
the Fall. 

Leading the team were junior 
shortstop Matt McLaughlin I 70) 
catcher Joe Solomine (7 RBI's). and 
senior co-captain Jose Fere/ (2-1 
2.81 ERA). Other bright spots in the 
Stags lineup included the ever- 
threatening force on the bases 
sophomore Dan Buchannan. senioi 
defensive star ( hns Cook, and the 
all-sophomore outfield of Sean 
Loom Daw Arnott. and Darren 
link. 



Fairfield hard-ballers look for 
strong contributions in the future 
from sophomores Mike Svab, Igna- 
cio Jaca, Matt Gardner, and Tom 
Murray, as well as freshmen Wally 
Klein, Rob Banasiak, and Steve 
Becker. 

Graduating seniors: Chris Cook, 
fose Ferez, Brian Tousignant 
SOCCER 

Despite a disappointing 3-12-2 
season and a sixth place finish in the 
MAAC(2-5),the 19H7 Men's Soccer 
Team had several highlights worthy 
of note. 

On Columbus Day. while most 
Fairfield students were returning 
from a three-day weekend, the male 
kickers played host to the Duke 
Blue Devils, then the defending 
\( AA Champions and the sixth- 
ranked team in the country. Solid 

defensive play, led bj senior co- 



captain Jim Roche and sophomore 
goalie Jim Kallio. kept the game 
scoreless for the first twenty min- 
utes. However, the Blue Devils held 
true to their championship form, 
and went on to post a 5-0 victory. 
Acknowledging Duke's national 
ranking and their superior talent, 
Roche was hoping for an early 
Christmas present when he said, 
"We know they're the defending 
champs, but we were hoping for an 
upset. It was a great game." 

Duke was one of only three 
teams to score more than two goals 
in a game against the peskv Stags. 
The stingy defense and Kalho's net- 
minding helped keep Fairfield com- 
petitive against the toughest sched- 
ule in the program's historj 

Senior co-captain Tim Mahonej 
led the team in si oring with i goals 
and two assists wink promising 



freshman Jack DiNicola added 3 
tallies. Kallio finished the season 
with a 1.7 goals against average, i 
shutouts, and 1 29 saves in 1 5 games. 

Graduating seniors: Faul Carroll, 
Tim Mahoney, Jim Roche 
VOLLEYBALL 

The {'airfield University Volley- 
ball Team, under the direction of 
first-year head coach Arnetha 
Eaddy, struggled through a long 
and very disappointing season. Pla- 
gued by injuries before the season 
was even underway, the Lad) Spik- 
ers finished the 1987 schedule 5-19. 

Eaddv. a former All-American at 
the I niversin of New Haven, was a 
hard-driving coach who had her 
players on the court in August be- 
fore classes had even started, and 
conducted two and a halt hour 
tices daily throughout the sea- 
son. Missing from those early prac- 



134 



Left: Co-Captain Tim Mahoney runs down a loose ball for 
the Stags. John Courtmanche photo Below: Rochelle Deach 
cruises the Fairfield campus. Bottom: Cheryl Cronin tunes 
up for her next opponent. Kevin Wolfthal photos 




tices and subsequently from the en- 
tire season, however, was captain 
Sue Silecchia. A back injury left her 
unable to perform, and teammates 
missed her enthusiasm and aggres- 
siveness on the court. 

Newly appointed co-captains 
Diane Dahle and Jane McCarthy 
were charged with the responsibil- 
ity of motivating a young team and 
also adjusting to the coaching style 
of their new coach. Despite many 
close matches and several come- 
from-behind efforts, mid-season 
victories over Connecticut-based ri- 
vals Quinnipiac and Bridgeport 
proved to be the lone bright spots 
going into the MAAC Champion- 
ships at Holy Cross the first week of 
November. 

More than doubling their regular 
season victory total, the ladies gave 
a strong showing in the tourna- 
ment. Predicted to finish last, Fair- 
field came through with victories 
over Iona, Manhattan, and St. Pe- 
ter's, and provided eventual tourna- 
ment champion Army with quite a 
few headaches during their match. 
Coach Eaddy and her players, led 
by second-team All-Tournament 
selection Doreen Spears, emerged 
with a fifth place finish, and hopes 
for a strong 1988 campaign. 

Graduating seniors: Diane 
Dahle, Valerie Dunton, Anne Kup- 
ferschmid, Jane McCarthy 
WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY 

The Women in Plaid finished the 
1987 season with back-to-back shu- 
touts to produce a 6-8-2 record, 
their best since 1984. 

Leading the way for the Lady 
Stags was senior Beth Fergusson, 
who recorded 5 goals and 1 assist. 
Maureen Mooney was second in 
scoring with two goals and two as- 
sists, while senior EllenMary Martin 
also netted two goals. Junior goal- 
tender Karen Merchant allowed 
only 19 goals while facing 150 
shots, a save percentage of .873. Her 
1.20 goals against average and 5 
shutouts provided Fairfield with a 
solid defensive edge. 

The highlights of the season in- 
cluded a tough fought battle 
against nationally-ranked Provi- 
dence (which ended in a 1-0 loss for 
Fairfield), a shutout tie with peren- 
nial power Maine, and shutout vic- 
tories over Western Connecticut, 
Connecticut College, and Holy 
Cross on the last day of the season. 

Graduating seniors: Liz Cambria, 
Debbi Dunne, Beth Fergusson, El- 



len Mary Martin 
CROSS COUNTRY 

Under rookie coach MaryAnn 
Palazzi, who doubles as an assistant 
coach for the Lady Stags' basket- 
ball team, the Men's and Women's 
Cross Country teams finished with 
identical 2-1 dual meet records, im- 
proving their performance from 
previous years. 

The men, led by senior co-cap- 
tains Pat Doherty and Tom Dug- 
gan, defeated Pace and Hofstra in 
the Fairfield University Invitational 
for their victories. They were led by 
freshman Dan Isleib, who finished 
the 5-mile Invitational in a blister- 
ing 27:49, and junior Russ Paquette, 
who crossed the finish line in 29:05. 
Also, the team finished 3rd in the 
prestigious Vassar College Invita- 
tional. 

The women's squad, led by 
sophomore captain Michele Tan- 
nian, defeated Hofstra and Albertus 
Magnus for their triumphs. Tannian 
produced the best time of the year 
for the women in their 3-1-mile trek, 
with a time of 20:55. Kyla Shea fin- 
ished the same distance in 21:59. 

The young teams, losing only 
Doherty and Duggan to gradu- 
ation, struggled in the MAAC 
Tournament, with the men finish- 
ing 8th and the women 7th. 

Graduating seniors: Pat Doherty, 
Tom Duggan 
WOMEN'S TENNIS 

While the men's team went 0-2 in 
its abbreviated fall schedule, the 
women's squad had a very success- 
ful season, going 8-3, including a 
4th place finish at the MAAC 
Championships. Led by #1 singles 
player Joan Dolan, the lady raque- 
teers posted convincing shoutout 
victories over MAAC opponents 
Iona and Manhattan, and placed 
four of their six singles players in 
the semifinals at the MAACs. 

As an added highlight, in their 
first contest of the season, with the 
score tied at 4-4 against Bridgeport, 
the doubles team of Trish Arciero 
and Maura O'Callaghan rose to the 
occassion by blowing out the 3rd 
doubles team from our cross town 
opponents, 6-0, 6-0. The same tan- 
dem advanced to the semifinals in 
the MAACs, only to lose to Holy 
Cross. 

Graduating senior: Cheryl Cro- 
nin 

Ken Jordan; baseball summary by 
Sean Flynn 

135 





Above left: Co-Captain Jane 
McCarthy ^ets set to deliver one 
of her monster serves. Above: It 
takes two to tan^o with Fair- 
field's Missy Folcik. Jim Kai- 
.1 hi a ii photos 



Cross Country Team. 

Coach: Mary Ann Palazzi. PR Phou 



Volleyball Team. 
Coach: Ametha Baddy. PR Photo 



Field Hockey Team. 
Coach: Melissa Falen. PR Photo 




Women's Tennis Team. 

Coach: Tamma O'Mara. PR Photo 




Men's Soccer Team. 

Coach: John Barrett. PR Photo 








WINTER SPORTS 



The 1987-88 Winter Sports sea- 
son can best be remembered for the 
success or the Lady Stags in wom- 
en's basketball and the national me- 
dia exposure given to Head Coach 
Mitch Buonaguro and the men's 
basketball team stemming from the 
MAAC Tournament first-round 
contest against St. Peter's. 

A perfect mix of eager freshman 
and experienced seniors paved the 
wa\ for the Lady Stags' first-ever 
appearance in the NCAA Tourna- 
ment. Three straight victories in the 
MAA< Tournament, including the 
final win over nationally-ranked La- 
Salle. gave Head Coach Dianne 
.Nolan and her squad a well-de- 
served shot at the nation's elite. 

ah Ted Fiore and his Pea- 
cocks ot St. Peters used a techni- 
cality in the rule book to thwart any 
hopes the men s basketball team 
had ot entering The Big Dance 
themselves 

Despite a long and grueling sea- 

• .it produced Only six victo- 
ries, the Ice Hockev Team debuted 
a Strong set ot freshmen skaters. 
and certainly view the future with 
much anticipation. 

I he Men s .mil Women's Swim- 
ming Teams combined to finish 

138 



just under the .500 mark. The wom- 
en had a strong showing, going 9-5. 
including a second place finish at 
the Metro-Atlantic Relays. 
ICE HOCKEY 

After a promising 2-0 start, the 
Fairfield University Ice Hockey 
team lost 19 of its last 24 games to 
finish at 6-19-1 overall and in the 
I. (AC North/South. 

A bright spot for the future of 
the team, however, was that four of 
the top five scorers for the Stags 
were freshmen. Frosh Bobby Mac- 
Donald set the pace with 13 goals 
and a team-leading 15 assists. Fresh- 
man Craig DePodesta, one of only 
four players to see action in all 26 
games, led a three-way tie for sec- 
ond place in scoring with 24 points. 
Fellow freshman Brian Stalzer also 
contributed 24 points, as did senior 
tri-captain Brian O'Connor, who 
finished Ins skating career with 62 
points. I irst-year player Mike For- 
rest led the team in goals with 16 in 
onlv L8 games, while also recording 
7 assists Seven Stags registered in 
double figures in scoring this win- 
ter. 

Senior goaltender John Cardinali 
played in 19 *>f the Stags' 26 gam< s, 
.iiul finished with an .869 save per- 



centage, a strong showing consider- 
ing he faced 846 shots, or 45 per 
game. Cardinali saved his best per- 
formance for the last game ot his 
career, as he shut out Scranton Uni- 
versity for two periods before hang- 
ing up his mask. The Stags defeated 
Scranton 8-1. with hopes of future 
success on the horizon. 

Graduating seniors: Ken Arnold. 
Dave Brady, John Cardinali, Joe Fe- 
lice, Tim Fitzgerald. John Mathes. 
Chris McKeon. Brian O'Connor 
SWIMMING 

The 1987-88 season for the 
Men's and Women's Swimming 
Teams was marked by a series of 
first-time appearances in several 
tournaments. Despite their rookie 
status, the aquatic athletes respond- 
ed with some fine individual and 
team performances. 

After their initially strong show- 
ing in the Metro-Atlantic Relays, 
where they placed second, the lady 
swimmers, after two losses, came 
back to win three in a row befon 
both teams travelled to Notre 
Dame for the National Catholic 
Championships. The five day trip 
proved rewarding, as the men fin- 
ished tenth and the women ninth 
out of sixteen teams. The diving 
team ot Erin O'Brien and Captain 
l.cslec Aquavia placed second in 
their event. 

The women's team went on to 



win five dual meets in a row before 
the MAAC Championships, while * 
the men struggled, winning only 
two matches in that same span. 

At the MAACs, the women's 
squad produced their best results 
ever, scoring s50 points and placing 
fifth overall. Freshman Katie Hell- 
er, the recipient of the Coach's 
Award, had a fourth place finish in 
the 2(X) meter fly. The men finished 
in seventh place. 

Yv lule the ladies travelled to the 
New England Championships at 
1 lol) Cross, the guvs had an impres- 
sive outing at the Metro-Atlantic 
Championships at the Merchant 
Marine Academy, their first ever 
appearance there. As part ot the six- 
team eastern division. Fairfield's 
men placed second. Jim Turnej . the 
team's MVP. won outright the 1650 
meter freestyle and the 5(X) meter 
freestyle. 

The men finished the sc.imti 
with a 4-9 record, while the women 
dosed with a best-ever 9-5 mark. 
Both teams expressed their heart- 
felt thanks to Fr. Victor Leeber. 
who accompanied the teams on 
their numerous )ourne\s and COl* 
tinually provided his encouraging 
support. 

Graduating seniors: I.eslee 
Aquav i.i. Ken Caissc 
Ken Jordan 



• 




Opposite: The Swim Team 
provides support to a 
streaking Stag. Left: Co- 
Captain Leslee Aquavia 
prepares to disrupt the 
glassy surface of the 
RecPlex pool. John 
Courtmanche photos Below: 
Chris McKeon fights an 
Amherst skater for the loose 
puck. Kevin Wolf thai photo 
Bottom: Hockey Team. 
Coach: Dr. John McCarthy. 
Right and Right Center: 
Men's and Women's Swim 
Teams. Coach: Rick Lewis. 
PR Photos 







I 




STAGS LED BY BRADFORD 



Fiore insures that Fairfield 

doesn't see third straight 

MAAC title 



lEN'S BASKETBALL 

The 1987-88 season for the Fair- 
field University Men's Basketball 
team proved to be a rebuilding one, 
as identical 4-10 records inside and 
outside the MAAC conference left 
head coach Mitch Buonaguro the 
unenviable task of improving a 
team that lost 20 games. However, 
several bright spots during the past 
year, along with a good recruiting 
effort by the coaching staff, should 
make Mitch's chore a little easier. 

At the head of the list of bright 
spots was junior co-captain Troy 
Bradford, the Stags' leading scorer. 
The 5'10" guard poured in almost 
23 points a game, good enough to 
rank him in the top twenty five in 



the nation. While maintaining a po- 
sition in the top twenty in scoring 
for most of the season, Bradford 
also reached the 1000 point plateau 
for his career. His 614 points in one 
season ranks him second all-time at 
Fairfield behind Tony George, who 
had 630 in the 1985-86 season. 

Fellow co-captain Tom Squeri, a 
sophomore forward, finished sec- 
ond in scoring and rebounding for 
the Stags, with 10.5 points per game 
and 6.6 rebounds. Forward Ed Dun- 
can had a fine sophomore cam- 
paign, averaging about 10 points 
per contest, while fellow second- 
year player Marvin Walters began 
to show his stuff late in the season, 
coming on to average 7 points and 



Opposite: Marvin 
Walters nets two for the 
Stags. Above: Coach 
Mitch Buonaguro gives 
Fairfield fans a clue to 
the future destiny of the 
Stags. Ben de la Cruz 
photos 




handing out 120 assists. 

Rounding out the starting five 
was freshman center Harold Brant- 
ley, who showed everyone why he 
was so highly touted as a high 
school senior. Despite the deceiv- 
ingly bandaged knees, Brantley 
skied in the defensive end of the 
court, averaging a team-leading 6.7 
rebounds per game and swiping 44 
shots. His rapidly-improving offen- 
sive game also produced 9 points 
per contest. For his efforts, he was 
named to the All-Rookie Team in 
the MAAC. 

Freshmen Mike Rodgers, Ed 
Newman, Steve Hagis, and Rob 
Hill showed much first-year prom- 
ise. Rodgers played in all but two of 
the Stags' games, started six, and 
handed out 37 assists. Newman, 
Hagis, and Hill could be future 
stars in the frontcourt for Fairfield. 

After a thrilling 3-overtime victo- 
ry over Manhattan in the last game 
of the regular season, thanks to 



Bradford's and Walters' heroics, 
Fairfield entered the MAAC Cham- 
pionships. Playing second-seeded 
St. Peter's as 15 point underdogs, 
the Stags took the lead at 60-59 on a 
Brantley lay-up with one second to 
play. However, in a scene few of us 
who saw it will forget, an elated 
Mitch Buonaguro let his emotions 
get the better of him, and his on- 
court celebration afforded him a 
technical foul, and St. Peter's the 
eventual victory. As all of us who 
have been fortunate enough to be a 
part of Fairfield basketball the past 
three years can attest to, however, 
Mitch has certainly done more 
good than bad for our Stags, and 
we only hope that he continues to 
coach in the same manner we know 
he's best at — except maybe within 
the confines of the coach's box. 

Graduating seniors: Andy 
Woodtli; also, Jim Kaishian (our 
beloved Stag), Teresa Moran 
(Cheerleader) Ken Jordan 



Right: Troy Bradford 

rises to the roof of the 

New Haven Coliseum. 

Mike Belcourt photo 




- r* 




Top left: Walters delivers one of 

his team-leading 120 assists 

against MAAC rival Fordham. 

Vince Cervoni photo Top right: 

Bradford shows the form that 

produced 23 points per game. 

Kevin Wolflhal photo Above: 

Freshman Harold Brantley powers 

his way to the hoop. Right: Eddie 

Duncan displays his shooting 

touch. Mike Be/court photos 



T 




M 

H| B ! 1 




I 






Top: Men's Basketball Team. 

Coach: Mitch Buonaguro. 

Above: Women's Basketball Team. 

Coach: Dianne Nolan. 

PR Photos 



LADY STAGS TAKE MAAC 




Avenge earl 

season lossel 

to LaSalle 

with victory 

in final 






Head Coach Dianne Nolan shouts instructions to her floor general Trish Barrett just prior to the Lady Stags' 14-2 
point run against LaSalle that brought the MAAC crown to Fairfield. Kevin Wolfthal photo 



LADY STAGS BASKETBAL1 

As if to say "Since the mtri 
team didn't make the NCAA Toi 
nament this year, we'll have to cc 
tinue the tradition,'' the 1987 
Women's Basketball team went q 
and did just that. After an impr^| 
sive 16-9 record in the regular St. 
son (8-4, 3rd in MAAC) agaiiij 
some of the toughest teams in t!l 
nation (Washington. Notre Dann 
Utah), the Lady Stags entered tH 
MAAC Tournament with one goi 
in mind — picking up where tl 
men's squad left off. 

After first and second roum 
blowouts over Fordham and Hoi 
Cross, the Lady Stags took tr) 
MAAC crown by defeating powei 
ful LaSalle 55-50. then a recent entr 
into the nationally-ranked Toj 
Twenty. Facing a six-point defic 
with four minutes to play in tlf 
game, Fairfield held the Explore? 
scoreless the rest of the way, whiB 
pouring in eleven points them 
selves. 

With the victory over LaSalle 
the Lady Stags earned an automatii 
bid into the NCAA Tournament, 
Fairfield drew St. John's in the firs 
round, and travelled to the B 
East's version of Alumni Hall ti 
play the Lady Express. Despite I 
strong effort and the encouraging 
support of their loyal fans, the Ladj 
Stags came up short, 83-70. 

The loss to St. John's marked thd 
final court appearances in Fairfielq 
red and white for senior guards 
Trish Barrett and Dana Pellegnndj 
and senior forwards Tasia Turkalq 
and Terry Voegler. That all thei^ 
hard work and dedication over foul 
years should culminate in ai 
NCAA appearance was certainly J 
tribute to them and a fitting end tdj 



144 




;ir Fairfield careers. 
jCo-captain Pellegrino finished 
jr career with 1530 points, good 
r third place on the Lady Stags' 
n-time scoring ladder. She aver- 
Ked 16 points per game in her sen- 
} campaign, but more importantly 
pvided the constant intensity and 
jdership that kept the Lady Stags 
nning. Co-captain Barrett aver- 
ied almost 8 points per game, and 
ir steady play at point guard 
lped keep Fairfield in control. 
t)-captain Turkalo averaged 14 
iints per game in her final season, 
rd finished with 1356 for her ca- 
i:r, right behind Dana in fourth 
iice on the all-time list. Terry 
3egler, who made the team as a 

lk-on freshman year, provided 
mny solid minutes for coach 
ianne Nolan throughout her ca- 

r, including perhaps her finest 
ime against LaSalle for the 
iiAAC Championship, when she 
jored 8 points in only 14 minutes 

play. 

Despite the loss of these four ter- 
tic players to graduation, Coach 
Jolan will surely continue her 
iring of seven consecutive winning 
asons with the likes of Lisa Mike- 
: (Rookie of the Year in the 



MAAC, First Team All-MAAC 
Tournament Selection), Tricia 
Sacca (All-Rookie Team in MAAC, 
First Team All-MAAC Tournament 
Selection), Shanna Lewis, Kathy 
Gailor, Renita Pritchett, and Cheryl 
Trumbo. 

Graduating seniors: Trish Bar- 
rett, Dana Pellegrino, Tasia Tur- 
kalo, Terry Voegler 
Ken Jordan 

Top: The Lady Stags show who's 

#1 in the MAAC for 1988. Left: 

Tasia Turkalo brought fear to 

many an opponent's face during 

her senior season. Kevin Wolfthal 

photos 




145 




SPRING SPORTS 




Top left: Stephen Patterson tees 
"it I up right: Len DelGallo 
backhands it during warm-ups. 
Kevin Wolfthal photoi Above: A 
Lad) Stags pitchet unleashes .1 
powerful pitch. Vinct Cervoni photo 



The 1988 Spring Sports Season 
was highlighted by the Women's 
Softball Team, which finished with 
its best record ever at 22-15 and a 
third place showing in the MAAC 
Tournament. Senior Dana Pelle- 
grino and freshman Kim Zagajeski 
paved the way for Fairfield. 

The Baseball Team, despite a 
disappointing 1 s-25 season, dis- 
played some fine individual perfor- 
mances, led by senior first baseman 
Chris Cook, senior pitcher Jose 
Fere/, and sophomore outfielder 
Mike Svab. 

Despite struggling to a 2-9 re- 
cord, the Golf Team finished fifth 
in the MAAC Tournament and 19th 
out of S8 teams in the New England 
Invitational Goll Association. 

The Men's Tennis Team posted 
a 6-8 mark, and finished the yeai 
strong at the New England Tour- 
ney. 

The efforts of the spring Squads 
helped to place Fairfield in fifth 
place in the Commissioner's (up 
standings, which is emblematic of 

Overall excellence in athletics with- 
in the MAA( I he Stags and Lad) 

Stags combined to finish ahead oi 
theii i counterparts from Si Peter's, 



Iona. and Manhattan. 
BASEBALL. 

The Men's Baseball Team post- 
ed a spring record of 13-25, high- 
lighted by several outstanding indi- 
vidual performances. 

Opening their season down 
south during Spring Break, the Stag 
Nine struggled to a 2-7 record. Re- 
turning home to the friendly con- 
tines oi Alumni Field and other 
northern parks. Fairfield completed 
the season with a 6-9 record in the 
MAA( 

Senior first baseman Chris Cook, 
continuing his steady improvement 
from freshman year, finished the 
spring season by setting a Stag re- 
cord for doubles (15) and tying the 
record for hits ( 19). He was second 

on the team in total bases _ i»' ti« d 
tor first in runs i 28), se< Ond in bat- 
ting average (.353), and StfCOnd in 
RBIs 

Cook failed to claim the team 
lead in other categories due to the 
efforts of sophomore Mike Svab. 
Svab was Fairfield's Triple ( rown 
winner, leading the sejuael in batting 
average (.359), home runs (5), and 
RBI s (32) I Ic u.is also firsi in total 
bases (71), walks I 25 ( . on base per- 



centage i _ ~ . slugging percental 
(.555). and tied for first in run 
Svab belted three home runs in ol 
game against St. Peter's, and al: 
stole 10 bases in 1 1 attempts, 
those impressive statistics led i 
Svab's being named to the L988 A 
MAAC Baseball Team. 

Senior hurler Jose Perez led tl 
pitching staff with three victorie 
and was named MAAC Pitcher 
the \X eek for both the first and 1.. 
weeks of the season. Included in h 
three victories was a dazzling Id 
shuteiut Over perennial powerhou: 

Yale. John Dieli contributed n 

victories and two saves. 

Other noteworthy performance 
were turned in b\ Rob Banasiak i i 
hits, .296 HA i. Dan Buchanan (- 
hits. 13 of H in stolen base ..: 
tempts i. Matt McLaughlin (36 hit 
and John Mitchell I ii hits. ! 
oi F9 stolen bases) Th< Stags wer 
su< i e ssful on 55 ol 62 base -stealin 

attempts, and the) also turned a tfi 
pie pla) during the season 

Graduating seniors ( hns C e>ok 
Jose Perez, Brian Tousignant 
sol I HALT 

A sting) pitching staff, led b] 
freshman Kim Zagajeski, and a po 



146 



il 



it offense, headed by Zagajeski 
J the familiar Dana Pellegrino, 
mbined to give the Women's 
ftball Team their best finish ever 
22-15, and third place in the 
AAC Tournament. 
The Lady Stags began the season 
:h a 1-0 victory over New Haven, 
ended the season with the 
AC Tourney in late April. The) 1 
ered the tournament with a 16- 
record and hopes of a champion- 
p crown. 

After being shut out in the open- 
game by Holy Cross, 2-0, Fair- 
Id came on to win two in a row 
identical shutout scores, 11-0, 
r Fordham and Iona. They con- 
ued with a 5-1 revenge victory 
r Cross before succumbing to 
ntual champion Army in a heart- 
aker, 2-1. Fairfield placed two 
yers on the All-Tournament 
am: Senior catcher Beth Fergus- 
\i, who hit .400 with three RBFs, 
senior outfielder Dana Pelle- 
no, who hit .571 (to lead the tour- 
[ment) with three stolen bases. 
The Lady Stags ended their sea- 
n with a team batting average of 
3, led by Pellegrino's .463 mark, 
llegrino also paced the team in 
s, doubles, triples, and stolen 



bases. Zagajeski, showing her tre- 
mendous versatility, was second on 
the team in hitting with a .398 aver- 
age. She led the team in runs and 
walks. 

Senior Chris Prespare held the 
team lead in home runs with four 
and in RBFs with 33- She was also 
third on the team with a .389 bat- 
ting average. Beth Fergusson hit 
.340 for the year, while senior Jen 
Tessier batted .317 to round out the 
.300 hitters. 

Zagajeski. a double threat either 
at the plate or on the mound, paced 
the pitching staff with a 15-6 record 
and a 1.08 ERA. She had 124 stri- 
keouts in 129 innings while hurling 
three shutouts. Senior Ellen Mary- 
Martin produced a 4-8 mark, yet 
pitched better than her record indi- 
cates, finishing with a 2.49 ERA. 

Graduating seniors: Beth Fergus- 
son, Ellen Mary Martin, Michele 
Menzo, Dana Pellegrino, Chris Pre- 
spare, Jen Tessier 
GOLF 

Led by senior co-captains Joe 
Carella and Kevin Christine and 
senior Greg Germain, the Golf 
Team finished with a 2-9 spring re- 
cord. Of the team's eight matches, 
the three seniors combined to be 



the low medalists (lowest score tor 
their team) in six of them. Carella 
was low medalist three times, Ger- 
main twice, and Christine once. 
Freshman Dave Dunn was the low 
medalist in the first match against 
Manhattan. 

The linksters did place fifth in 
the MAAC Tournament, and fin- 
ished 19th in the 38-team field at the 
New England Invitational Golf As- 
sociation. Germain also represented 
the Stags on the MAAC All-Aca- 
demic Golf Team for the 1988 sea- 
son. 

Graduating seniors: Joe Carella, 
Kevin Christine, Greg Germain 
MEN'S TENNIS 

The Stag netmen finished their 
spring season with a 6-8 record, 
winning their final two matches 
over Vassar and New Paltz. Rolf 
Troha, the senior captain, had an- 
other strong year for Fairfield. 
Troha was the number one singles 
player for the Stags over the past 
two years. The team finished the 
season at the New England Tourna- 
ment, where they had a great show- 
ing. 

Graduating senior: Rolf Troha 
Ken Jordan 




Above: Dana Pellegrino led the 

Softball team with a .463 batting 

average. Vince Cervoni photo Left: 

Matt Gardner follows through. 

John Courtmanche photos 




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147 



Men's Tennis 

Coach: Joe Grassi 

Golf 

Coach: Garth McGrail 

PR Photos 




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Softball 
Coach: Bob Zito 

Baseball 

Coach: John Slosar 

PR Photos 



Far left: A view of the quad from 
Gonzaga III. Brian Russell photo 
Left: Jill Stiegler participates in a 
game of Assassin. Mike Belcourt 
photo Below: Loyola R.A. Robin 
Kingston conducts a floor 
meeting. John Courtmanche photo 




DORM 
LIFE 



As a freshman, a Fairfield student is assigned a 
dorm and a corresponding alias tor the remaining 
three years of college: "She's a Gonzaga II girl," 
or "He's a Jogues IV guy." The dorm status stays, 
as do many of the friendships. The community 
which exists in a dorm, though a culture shock for 
many entering students, inspires fun and 
challenge, insomnia and craziness. Far left: A full 
six-pack is a rarity at Fairfield, as Dave Arnott 



discovers. He's down to his last three haircare 
products. Terry Sullivan photo Above left: Martin 
Tyrrel and Bill Delgaudio check out the quad 
from their room in Campion. Brian Russell photo 
Above right: Winter ended suddenly with this 
sunny day, and pairs of shorts were quickly- 
removed from boxes in closets. Terry Sullivan 
photo 



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Not the hallways, the bathrooms, nor the bedroom 
could sur\i\e a weekend of wildness. but God sen 
the maids on Mondays. Below top: Chris Dimaur 
washes up. center: A Campion hallway on a Sunda\ 
Terry Sullivan photo bottom: Mike Pompeo cleanJ 
om. Brian Russell photo Right: Eva Bellafiord 
anticipates a bn; check trom the insurance com] 
pain . tor damage to her room caused by ajulie Hall 
tornado. John Courtmancht photo 




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Far left: A game of pictionary in 
the lounge. Brian Russell photo 
Left: John McHugh and Bob 
Hargrove play portable ping-pong. 
Below: A game of Nerf basketball 
in Kostka lounge. Terr) Sullivan 
photos 








FREE 
TIME 



Studying's important, sure, but so is leisure time. 
After all, once you're out of college, you never 
have to study again, but for the rest of your life 
you have to find creative ways to keep yourself 
occupied. So in fact, leisure time is more 
important than studying in college. Far left: Bill 
Peet and Sean Reilly pump iron. Brian Russell 



photo Above left: Rob Malloch breaks in a match 
against John Kearney. John Courtmanche photo 
Above right: Doing the Jane Fonda workout are: 
Larry Daly, George LeClair, Kevin Nee, John 
Moriarty, Kevin Riordan, Mike Pompeo, and Joe 
Pereira. Brian Russell photo 



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FREE TIME (con'tl 

A Fairfield student once said. "College is like sne.il 
ers hanging from a telephone wire.' which is qui: el 
coincidence, because Photo Editor Brian RussJ 
photographed sneakers hanging trom a wire iJ 
rween Gonzaga and Loyola. The owner of 
sneakers attempted to walk the wire, but with '1 
current style ot sneaker-wearing (with the laces uJ 
tied and the sneaker tongue (lopping around lik: 
dog's tongue on a hot summer day), his laces i> 
Came tangled and he fell to the ground one hundiel 
feet below. He survived the fall. Below A wan 
the dangers ot sneaker-wearing. Mark Page donatJ 
his pair to these hamsters. Terry Sullivan photo 







A Fairfield student once said. "College is like a penny buried of the table." This flour fight took place at the Battle of the 
beneath a mound of flour, and two teams are blowing in opposite Dorms. Terry Sullivan photo Above: Students have a pass behind 
directions, each team trying to blow the penny off the other side Regis. Brian Russell photo 



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SECGRITJ 

Good Guy:; 

o 
Bad Guys 

Below: Assistant Director of Security Todd Pela J 
Head Resident Lisa DeTullio. and Officer If 
Schwatlow investigate the throwing of water I J 
loons from a townhouse window._/o/j« Courtman\ 
photo Right: Behind every speeding motorist ( 
Mclntyre) is a campus security car. Brian Ru \ 
photo 




Left: Frank Ficko waits out ms 
temporary assignment, distributing 

parking stickers in the Campus 
Center lobby. Below: Bob Rit/ 
patrols a guiet, snowed-in campus. 
John Courtmanche photo 




Campus security officers are sometimes viewed with with students for causes such as detering vandalism student at Orientation '87. John Courtmanche photos 

animosity by students. They are the givers of traffic in hallways, enforcing necessary parking regula- Above right: Gonzaga students wait outside the 

tickets and the killers of parties, the puppets of tions, and insuring fire safety on campus. Opposite dorm as security investigates a late-night fire alarm, 

sobering administrative policy. More often than left: Arnetha Eaddy tickets a car parked in the incor- Brian Russell photo 

not. though, the department of security is aligned rect lot. Above left: Mike Lauzon pretends to frisk a 



161 



Schedule 

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INFIRMARY 

Nursing our Colds 
and "Ale"-ments 

Left: The Doctor's Schedule at the Infirmary has inconvenienced many 
Fairfield students who have preferred the privilege of "sleeping in" until 10 
or 1 1 a.m. According to the schedule, the best day to get sick is Wednes- 
day, because the doctor is in until noon. Otherwise, a student battles the 
9:45 rush to Loyola. Below: Ed Duncan pays a visit. Mike Belcoitrt photos 




rmary trivia selection #1: The Fairfield Statistics a small pharmacy. Infirmary trivia selection #2: 81% A student receives cough syrup and other cold rem- 

Dartment reports that if a member of the Class of of students, when considering a visit to the Infirma- edies. Above right: Paul Lukas and Lisa Schweitzer 

had saved the medicine he received from the ry, first ask this question: "Am I suffering from a wait their turns. Mike Belcourt photos 

rmary for four years, his supply of Cepacol, Su- fatal, incurable sickness, or a hangover.-'" Opposite: 

ed, and cough syrup would be sufficient to open D.R. Goven has his temperature taken. Above left: 



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CAFETERIA 

STAG-HER 

DELI 

Far Left: The cafeteria, or Sellers 
tor short. Left: A student digs lor a 
scoop of ice cream. Terry Sullivan 
photoi Below: Greg Curlev and Joe 
Periara enjoy a special dinner in the 
Faculty Dining Room. Brian Rus- 
sell photo 




FOOD FOR THOUGHT 



Every conscientious Fairfield student knows 
that diet affects academic production. The 
cafeteria is. if not the most popular choice, at least 
the most convenient. Most students in their first 
two years at Fairfield climb the long flight of 
stairs in the middle of the Campus Center, flash a 
meal ticket number, and retrieve their all-you-can- 
eat meals. 

Besides the cafeteria, Fairfield University boasts 
a combination snack bar and pub, the Stag-Her 
Inn, as well as a student-run deli. These operations 
are particularly helpful to students who can not 
participate in the meal plan, such as townhouse 
residents, off-campus boarders, and commuters. 
The Stag-Her is an ideal stop for students in the 
continuing education and graduate programs, as 
well as visitors. 

Both the cafeteria and Stag-Her are managed 
>posite: Clark Curtis has two problems: one. the through Seller's Food Service, a company based 
ise in Seller's inhibits studying; and two. Seller's near Boston. The university has done business with 
esn't stock toothpicks. Brian Russell photo Above: tne organization for the past six years. In addition 
chelle Graveline leads the salad bar line. Terry to operating the student and faculty dining rooms, 
Tivan photo Seller's oversees a catering service which ranges 

from coffee and pastry for a handful of people, to 
full dinners of two hundred or more. This service 
is made available to professors and organizations 
on campus, and is responsible for many 
memorable occasions in the Oak Room and 
elsewhere. 



In addition to a full-time staff. Seller's employs 
between 20 and 25 students. Seven managers 
supervise the preparation of meals and create 
menus of various combinations which they hope 
will appeal to students. They try to provide a 
constant variety for students. The dishes are 
arranged into a four-week cycle, and reviewed 
weekly so as not to repeat specific dishes too 
frequently. To mark special occassions such as 
holidays, Seiler's creates special dishes and 
decorates the cafeteria accordingly. 

Of all the meals a student eats at Fairfield, the 
favorite meals have been the special dinners. By- 
floors, students are treated to meals prepared in 
smaller sizes and served in the faculty dining room. 

For those not participating in the meal plan, the 
same entrees served in the main dining room are 
prepared in the Stag-Her on weeknights. This is 
done principally to accomodate those whose 
schedules make it more convenient for them to 
remain on campus at meal time. Besides this, the 
Stag-Her offers a variety of fast food. Its informal 
atmosphere makes it a popular spot at night. 
Monday through Thursday, when the Stag-Her is 
separated into drinking and non-drinking sections 
and serves draught or bottled beer for students 21 
and over. The Stag-Her even provides 
entertainment at night; a large video screen for 
Monday Night Football or other televised events. 





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CAFETER 
STAG-Hi: 
DEI 

Below; Jen Flvnn comes through with the late 
snacks at the Del,. Brian Russell photo Uppe 
torn: Ed Flanagan and Michael OConnell relJ 
•ore a Comedj Night in the Stag-Her. John C 
manche photo Lower bottom: Frank Pasini takt-L 
vantage ot , Stag-Her booth to talk. Bo, ./< la I 
photo 



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Far left: Paul ( onforti molds .1 
Stag-Her pizza. John Courtmancht 
phalli Left: A Deli worker takes an 
order. Below. The Dating Game in 
the Stag-Her features an unidenti- 
fied bachelorette vying tor a date 
with the most desired bachelors on 
campus: Phil Treacy, ( hris Ritchie, 
Rusty Magner, and Frank Carrol 
She picked bachelor #1. Brian Rus- 
sell photos 





FOOD 
(con't) 



or even a campus band or comedians. 

The most exciting change in the Stag-Her menu 
for the year was pizza. Many students believed the 
quality of pizza even rivalled Domino's. A pizza 
delivery service was initiated, with Seller's realizing 
there was money to be made by students who 
crave late-night snacks. 

The most convenient source for a quick snack 
for campus dwellers, night or day, was the 
Fairfield Student Market, popularly known as The 
Deli. It was founded seven years ago and was 
originally operated out of dorm room in Kostka. 
University officials soon put a stop to this, but 
recognized the popularity of such a service. Space 
in Gonzaga was subsequently made available. 

The Deli offers a variety of sandwiches, as well 
as snack food and beverage, including its 
trademark, the Cheapie Cheese. The Cheapie 
consists of four slices of cheese, American, Swiss, 
or Provolone. as well as lettuce, tomato, mayo, 
and mustard, and costs SI, except when the 
lettuce crop fails in the Midwest, then it's SI. 10, 
which is still a great price for a famished student 
on a college budget. 

Peter Witkowski 



167 



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WATER FIGHT!!! 



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Floor pictures were taken by John 
Courtmanche, Ben de la Cruz, Marc 
Belanger, Brian Russell, Joan Nine, 
and Kevin Wolfthal (Public Rela- 



tions). 






WATER FIGHT 

Opposite page, both photos: Regis 
forces. Left: A direct hit. I ai li fi 
The Regis stairwell provides .1 pro- 
tected, front-row view of the battle- 
field. Far left bottom ( ampion 
forces refill their cups with water 
poured out of the second floor 
bathroom window. Bottom: A 
trained C ampion marksman re- 
leases her ammunition. Below: 
Hand-to-hand combat on the front 



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Legis vs. Campion is a life or versity. Other major forces: Gon- "The water keeps splashing out 

eath confrontation. Winners get zaga, Jogues, Loyola. On the ori- of the bucket before we reach the 

ragging rights. Losers get writ- ental front, Kostka takes on center of campus." John Court- 

2n-up and water-in-the-ear. Bat- Claver in the Battle of the Private manche photos 

le began 9/87. The Bright Side? Bathrooms. Julie claims neutral- 

ree lawn-watering for the uni- ity because, as one resident says, 



.71 




TOWN HOUSES 



John Courtmanche photo 



173 



TOWN- 
HOUSES 

Far left: Clint Lewis and Glenn 
Crawford get psyched to wash .1 
week's worth ol dishes. John 
Courtmanchi photo Left: Hugh 
Lambert displays his lottery 
number at the Townhouse I. otters, 
eld in January in the Oak Room. 
Below: Townhouse socialites. 
Brian Russell photos 




The Cadillacs of Residence Halls' 

•e related feature, page 32 j year, they'd improve their lifestyles considerably six -person townhouses shared this view in Septem- 

me parents have joked that their kids are leading also. Maybe they'd be living the high life like their ber, until the sod was planted. Above left: Andy 

:ter lifestyles at college than the parents are at kids. But that's improbable. A thriving community Woodtli enjoys the spring sun while Dave Besegai 

me, with the kids living in the townhouses, in a of 20-22 year olds is a phenomenon that cannot be plays catch. John Courtmanche photos Above right: 

urity-patrolled neighborhood. Of course, if the explained or reproduced in the real world, not even The fifteen townhouses and McAuliffe Hall (fore- 

ents invested that extra SI 5,000 in themselves in a by modern science. Opposite: Residents of the new, ground). Anne Lynch photo 



175 








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A COwnhouse parts is a bi-level affair, the human' 
traffic (lowing between the living room and the 
basement. Partying in a townhouse basement is par-l 
tying at its most primitive. The stark concrete walls. 
the pipes, the insulation, and the water heater pro- 
vide An immediate rock and roll party atmostphere 
Clubs in New York ( it\ wish their decorating was 
tins easj And look at the advantages. Almost noth- 
,;i get broken in the basement. The close sur 
roundingS and the bod) heat insure high tempera- 
tures and high perspiration levels) in the winter. 



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TOWN- 
HOUSES 

Far left: Seniors and Juniors mix it 
up at the 17 Nights party. Left: 
Gene Tiernan and Fete Crighton. 
Brian Russell photos Below: These 

underclassmen catch a breather in 
a townhouse living room. John 
Court menu h< photo 





'ARTYING TOWNHOUSE 

STYLE 

with the heat turned off. The spilled beer mixes form, the concrete throws the noise around the 

yesterday's rain on the basement floor and room, so the deafening rock music inside is hardly 

es an indescribable mildew/stale beer smell, but audible to passing security cars. With a band like 

loor is concrete and it's easy to mop. For those Humidifier, though, there can be one danger: peo- 

hosts who convince a campus band to per- pie start thrashing and slamdancing, and a student 




^ 



might slam into a concrete wall at 30 mph and die. 
But that's only one disadvantage against all those 
advantages. Above far left: Tom Filipone and Tina 
Bugara. Above center: The Leather Boys: Pat Scully, 
Kevin Nee, Brian Russell, Kevin Crowley, and Paul 
Zimny. Above right: Jeff Pia, Rich Cimmino, Brian 
Dimpel. Jeft Campbell, and Jim Norris. Brian Rus- 
sell photos 







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Townhouse pictures were taken 
Sunday, November 22 ', by John 
Courtmanche, Ben de la Cruz, and 
Donna D' Angel li (Varden Studios). 



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Above: At .1 cownhouse p.irt\ . fohn fahne passe stli 
quarter across the cable as an unidentified guej 
(center) and Devin Sullivan look on. A cownhoua 
table, with its smooth finish, was perfect tor .1 gan 
■ Q larters. One oi the primar) measures of a pat 
t\ 's sue ( ivs .a I airfield wis the qualit) ol the gam 

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QUARTERS 



John Courtmanche photo 



ollege Party Game of the Decade 



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BEACH 
LIVING 



The Fairfield Beach: a Charlie 
Brown world with no adults and 
little responsibility. Above: M 
nighttime view of the path at thl 
Point. Ben de la Cruz photo Left: I 
kite belonging to the Fishbowl wave 
in the wind, attached to a post in th 
sand. Right: A spring day at th 
Point. John Courtmanche photos 




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Waiting for 
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Foi car-less beach residents, relying on the shuttle 
can be an inconvenience. But the ( ampus ( entlt 
provides opportunities to pass the time, lop rig|( 
Reading the bulletin hoards oi checking tor mail 
withdrawing cash from Barnej . shooting pool in the 
Game Room Terr) Sullivan photos Top left: Relax- 
ing in the sun. John Courtmanchi photo Above let! 
Buying gum at the Bookstore. Mikt Belcourt phki 
Right: Studying or talking in the Mezz. Brian Ru> 
I ina Cervoni, Brian Russell photoi 




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The phrase I .ilc s a Beach" appeared this year on items from t- 
shirts to BOSK rS Whoever mined the phrase knew as much about 
lite as Fairfield students, which is a lot. If Life is in fact A Beach. 
I airfield students know as much about life as any university 
student in the country, and e\en more about life than students at 
inland colleges. Alter all. Life is not A Farm With A Fodder- 
Filled Silo. Life is not An In-The-Ground Pool At The Ramada 
Inn. Life is not A Hot Doj; Vendor On A Gt\ Street. Life is not 
I .ike Snow On A Beginner Ski Slope, and Life is not A Do- 
mino's. A Ben and Jerry's. And Cow-Tipping In A College Town 
inHicksvilleU.S.A.LIFEISABEAC H'W offof 

our suntanned chests Below Lauren Zarclli. two-listcd. Btn dt la 
Cm photo Rij;ht: Party at the Green Turtle. John Courimanche 
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With s "i ott -i .hi i pi is boarders living in 98 houses along the 

suit sin us then there's 

( addyshack I, beat h parties wen frequent and potent occasions 

Above |ackie Mom and Kevin < hristine Ri^lu Liz Hanrahan 

: fim Fitzgerald ]ohn Courimanche photoi 



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e Officer, breaking up a party at the Guy's Duplex, shines his flashlight 
the camera. Ben de la Cruz photos 



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BEACH 
PARTY 



Your first thought may be that the photographer 
returned to the keg line one too many times. Actual- 
ly, Manor photographers, when on assignment, are 
forbidden to consume alcohol. Here, photographer 
Eva Bellafiore presents a different perspective on 
beach parties. Below: Kathy Flinn and Susan Mur- 
phy party at the Fishbowl. Right: Mark Browning 
and John Courtmanche at the House Next To the 
Guy's Duplex. Far Right: Party at the Doghouse. 







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THE FLOATING NAU 



Before the SeaGrape. there was the Nautilus. The Naut was a 
primiti\c bar Mam Fairfield alumni tell horror stories about 
havn 'he bathroom there. Cherished by students for 

s The Naut closed on December 2. 1985. which left a hole in 
hearts and social lives. Soon after, a few students began the 
tradition of the Floating Naut: parties at beachhouses (this year at 
townhouses also). Mondav through Thursday during the year. 
Some members of the Class of 1988 remember the Nautilus, 
which closed during their sophomore year. But most students 
todav and in the future will attend the Floating Naut with no 
sense of the real meaning of the occasion. The Floating Naut is a 
memorial to j great college bar. lost in the name of public health 
and safety. Right: Jackie Mead and Erik Olesen hold official 
Floating Naut cups. Far right: Birgitta Mayer. Lisa Sottile. Diana 
Hernandez, Rich the Mayor, Hans Blaakman. Marty Kellaher. 
Kerrie O'Brien. Dave Gallagher, and Jim Eschmann at the Float- 
ing Xau'.Jobn Court manche photos Below: The April. 1988, calen- 
dar. 



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life 






A Theme Party is te 



A Fairfield student could find a party am night of 
the week, it he or she looked hard enough. With so 
main options in a vear. the party scene might have 
become boring it not tor the minds of creative hosts 
who, by adding a theme, promised a party like no 
other. Theme parties have been consistently unfor- 
gettable OCCassions; some have even become Fair- 
field traditions. 

Parties in dorms were limited due to strict rules 
against kegs and underage drinking. However, most 
underclassmen in the dorms realized that rules are 
made to be broken, and kept the faith bv risking on- 
Campus privileges tor a good time. This year as in 
the past, the dorms were notorious for Round the 
World parties. Who could forget the Pearl Harbor- 
/Kamakazi parties.-' Other theme parties which have 
been held in the dorms: Sink-Aid. the Grain Train, 
and Pool parties. I'pperclassmen will never forget 
the Hurrican Gloria Blackout parties in 1985. The 
Come As Your Roommate part)' have always been 
good for a laugh. 

There were more dorm theme parties. Morning 
people enjoyed Breakfast Club parties, tor the rare 
breed ol student who has seen Seiler's in the morn- 
ing. Attending Kegs and F.ggs or a Wake and Bake 
have been substitutes for jogging for many under- 
grads. 

Both on- and off-campus, music lovers celebrat- 
ed at Southern Rock, Grateful Dead, and Led Zep- 
pelin parties. Psychedelia parties brought out 
strangeness at Fairfield. Disco lovers could pay tri- 
bute to the dancing trend of the 1970s at the Andy 
Gibb Memorial or the Saturday Night Fever/Club 





Ken Jordan and Chris McPadden ai 17 Niches Don O'Meara and fina Bugara before a ["ransvestiti 

Brian RuiitU photo Center lefi Kur\ Hanratry, Lynni Staropoli, x| ■ eft: An ifter the Adios Amicos party 

Rum. .mi .it tin I hiss in Hl.uk part} Centei right ,( " 'I" ( lass <>i 1988 lin.ni Rutttll photo \bovi center 



arty with a Twist 






fier members Jim Wilbur and John King heat up a 
use party. Above right: Winners of the Suitcase party, 
iallagher and his guest leave for a free weekend trip to 



Carmine party. 

Dressing up for a party can be an appealing twist. 
Students dressed for Hawaii or Surf/Beach parties, 
or a Dress in Black party. Other dress-up theme 
parties have been Toga, 70s, and Boxer Short (Drop 
Pants at Door) parties. Still more dress-up parties 
were the Tacky Ball, Guido, Great Gatsby, and 
Dress Like Dad parties. 

Fairfield parties which have become traditions: 
the Transvestite, Clam Jam, and Aristotle's Birthday 
parties. 

Attending a young, fast-paced university, Fair- 
field students reached high levels of innovation with 
the 9 in 1 Golf party; and the Suitcase party, where 
students bought raffle tickets and brought their 
suitcases, hoping to be one of two lucky winners of 
a free weekend trip to California. There was also 47 
Nights, the Nyselius Library party, the Great Fair- 
field Pig Hunt, and End of the World parties. 

As Fairfield students evolve into adults, sophisti- 
cation and maturity take over at the socially-con- 
scious Safe Sex party, the Corporate Buzz Cocktail 
Party, and the Poker parties, cigars and all. 

The Floating Naut is theme enough to party on 
any given night. Keg Races aroused the competi- 
tiveness in each of us. 

At the end of the year, the SeaGrape Cafe spon- 
sored an Adios Amigos party, a goodbye party for 
the Class of 1988. The best end-of-year theme par- 
ties, though, were the private ones where friends 
partied together in tribute to a great year and gradu- 
ation. 

Gene Tiernan 




L.A. Charlie Dunne, right, is their chauffeur to the airport. John 
Courtmanche photo 




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Beach House pictures 
by John Courtmanche 
and Ben de la Cruz. 



Top: A spring get-together on thj 
deck at the Fishbowl. John Court 
manche photo Center: Sign at the Poinl 
Marianne Walsh photo Above: An aeriJ 
shot of The Point. Anne Lynch photo\ 






BEACH 
LIVING 

Why a thousand college students were allowed to 
control an affluent beach neighborhood in Fairfield 
county, we'll never know. We never asked. We were 
spoiled with end-of-summer sun, autumn storms, the 
waves splashing against the sand, at night, the rain 
and salty air against the old wooden windows. 
Shouting rugby players, panty raids, kegs, "set me 
up", pizza boxes, beer cans, walk to the Grape. 
Floating Naut, pretty women, crushes, sleeping on 
couches in neighbor's houses. 

Houses with personality and names to match. 
Where else could you live somewhere called the 
"Shithouse" and still be respected? Or "Fishbowl"? 
What's "Ri-Ma-La" anyway — sounds like a ride at 
Walt Disney World. Where's the Mayor live? What's 
his real name? How do they feed the fish at the 
Grape? 

Band practice at the Guy's Duplex. Cold winter 
drafts, police disturbance fines. Sunrises/sets, stars 
and full moons. Nature. Romance. 

Parties seven nights a week. Friends and homes 
where we were always welcome. Long walks on 
sandbars. Pseudo-studying on roofs and decks in the 
Spring, but there was always something going on, and 
it was all too beautiful to miss. John Courtmanche 

Marianne Walsh photos 



193 



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Lynette Accardo 
Economics 
5 Susan Circle 
Johnston Rl 02919 

theouterlimit 'si 
sof'thelimifbeac 
hfrontprptycampio 
n323ee + lasunlampv 
ictim86400colaand 
smiledisneyworldm 
cmjmginternoverno 
wilymdl 



Jennifer Adams 

Finance 

18 Cannon Road 

Wilton CT 06897 

unofficial5th sb8 

7 /caddy sonnym&cs 

/"jan"/ timesq pau 

lie seaport nye86 

champagne uvm mez 
z stag u2 88 grap 
e/ visa prunes? 



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Nancy Agovino 

Politics 

161 Wampum Lane 

West Islip NY 1 1795 

greasepolemaniare 

gisifashionconsul 

tantsalitergivicl 

arakriskathy + lisa 

thl 15olivershitlas 

tresortl88nts88nt 

s + whowereyouwith? 

iloveyoumomanddad 



James Aiken 

History 

3 Seminole Road 

Canton MA 02021 



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Edmondo Alberico 

Economics 

710 Long Hill Road 

Middletown CT 06457 



David Ambrose 

Economics 

1 19 Farmingdale Rd. 

Wethersfield CT 06109 



Carmine Anzalone 

Marketing 

2 Sandpiper Lane 

Northport NY 1 1768 



Louis Apoldo 
Politics 
605 John Anothy St. 
West Chester PA 19382 
mama. mama, many 
worlds i've come since i 
first left home.ron dave 
thl4l tuesday's beef- 
steak's rock & roll i'll do 
it my way! 






Leslee Aquavia 

Mathematics 

48 David Street 

Naugatuck CT 06770 

th- 106. house shots, 

swim team. n.d.. fort lau- 

derdale, pete 1 1 22. 

houston bound, roomie- 

skiiing mt.tom, jen den- 

ise les-dumb nerds!! 



Jennifer Arato 

Biology 

81 Lakeside Avenue 

Lake Grove NY 1 1755 

mcdfamilykland2kb 

mcmkcmldent46blos 

erth65bch88guidog 

dgnadsflaskeeveju 

iceebart400nwaili 

ngboysbiogeekmada 

conewastedquadste 

verhondabobbgum20 




Ronald Bailey 
Accounting 
64 Derbyshire St 
Derby CT 06418 



Kenneth Arnold 

Marketing 

187 Villanova Drive 

Paramus NJ 07652 

theboysninerscham 

pslakegeorgeparty 

bargemetsstrawven 

tura400newrosouth 

padrestpatsdayhor 

nsrollinshockeygl 

oriafrimorganshal 

loweenv 




Rebecca Baker 

Nursing 

26 Ridgewood Drive 

Burlington VT 05401 



Sheri Artiglere 

Economics 

80 Spring Valley St. 

Green Village NJ 07935 



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Carolyn Barba 

Business 

81 Bentley Drive 

Franklin Lks NJ 07417 



96 



I Scott Adams 
Finance 

419 Wyldhaven Road 
Rosemont PA 19010 
toallmyfriends:yo 
uguysaregreatthan 
ksforallthegreatt 
imes-paulcharlien 
eil-thebestoffrie 
nds:tomyfamily-th 
anksforallthesupp 
ortovertheyears 



Karen Attndge 

Economics 

16 Woodpond Lane 

Old Saybrook CT 06475 



THE JOB SEARCH 




Senior year features important 
decision-making — what to do after 
college, what are my priorities, 
what do I want out of life, that 
sort of thing. The Career Planning 
Center is the source of answers for 
many students, especially Business 
majors. Corporations arrange 
interviews through the school, and 
the CPC assists seniors in 
interviewing etiquette and the job 
search. 

Other students search for jobs 
on their own, or pursue graduate 
school. Still others plan to travel, 
or avoid the reality of graduation 
until the last possible moment. 

Mark Browning, an Accounting 
major, used the Career Planning 
Center to find a job with one of 
the Big Eight accounting firms. 
Here, he shows the form which 
landed him a job. Ben de la Cruz 
photo 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 







Robert Amoroso 
English 


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462 Old Country Road 
Melville NY 11747 


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Susan Anderson 

English 

75 Soundview Lane 

New Canaan CT 06840 



Victor Autore 

Finance 

10 Chipping Lane 

Norwalk CT 06854 



Glen Balamaci 

Physics 

281 Church Hill Road 

Fairfield CT 06432 



Kenneth Balog 

Biology 

47 Dell Dale Road 

Fairfield CT 06430 



197 







Bonnie Beagan 

Nursing 

Walden St. 

Somers NY 10589 



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Angela Barbarito 
Mathematics 
686 Hope St 
Bristol Rl 02809 

mathwl.j.c.d.h.a 
jg 1 &3 / phoneS baha 
maswcw&ipm.stagh 
erwljtdjm + ewdrop 
w &m&m,longdista 
ncefa|th64wd.a.c 
get a job?? srwee 
k/ 22may 



Charles Bergin 

Politics 

93 Northfield Rd 

Longmeadow MA 01 106 

g3,fr.bill,petedr 

dimple, pacca, blue 

balls, stagbasketb 

all, deadheads, qua 

dbonfires/tagman 

ia/jackym/orienta 

tion86/88nts/th1 1 

5/bestofluckto88! 



Bernadette Barrett 

Biology 

48 Pleasant Ridge 

Poughkeepsie NY 12603 

campiongals " 1rm 

ieschnitzphillske 

evesjanusstrep5am 

xmascardsskiteamm 

agsbiohelljeddoda 

ncesealuvuth82val 

luclaikostkamlfrd 





Karen Bernard 
Mathematics 
1 1 1 Rte. 39 

New Fairfield CT 06812 
thill /briar patch /lin- 
da mathnerds /the 
cave /John & jd /night- 
hawks 'boston /ailing I 
mets /helpme! /the 
sheraton /jess /mary / 
deb/andy/gret 




Karen Bek 

Economics 

18 Mountain Laurel 

Kings Park NY 11754 

c4grtingsholyphe 

adsjadcmcmlmklsil 

yshhappns88syr86p 

jlilywndows-ahden 

isewrwtchinguwalj 

uicinfacilcgrapes 

keevslothjamaicje 

smissu thanksm&d' 



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Seniors wait for free career 
booklets after a seminar 

sponsored bj the ( areei 

Planning (enter. Ben dl la 
Cruz photo 



Sin [la Perkinson looks into her 
future. John Courtmancht photo 



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Patricia Barrett 
Sociology 

5441 Whitwood Rd. 
Baltimore MD 21206 
thanks mom & dad; i 
love you;tim you're the 
best! Dana, I'm gonna 
miss you: you're awe- 
some; and to the 87-88 
stags; i'll never forget 
you guys 




Mary Berardi 

Nursing 

478 Westland Ave. 

Cheshire CT 06410 

memsofvt8687sprbk 

87srwkvslkcp th65 

1581 clniclloyla 

haassombdyelsguym 

ulryheadkmluvyalo 

tsmrnjcheapygrape 

loftja-bartlwaili 

ngchubyilymom&dad 



Kelly Ann Barry 
Sociology 
83 Donna Dr. 
Fairfield CT 06430 



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Robert Barry 

Religious Studies 

180 Far Mill Dr. 

Stratford CT 06497 

oneoffourreligiou 

sstudiesmajorsand 

alowlifelonghaired 

commuterandchris 

tianfellowshippre 

sidentandhonorsse 

minarworkslaveand 

gettingoutofhere 




John Berner 

Finance 

932 Euclid Ave. 

Winnetka IL 60093 




David Besegai 

English 

2305 Arborwoods Dr. 

Alpharetta GA 30201 



Joan Betchkal 

Management 

19921 Fairmount Blvd. 

Shaker Heights OH 441 18 




Colleen Swift and Loretta 

Rigney talk with a corporate 

representative. Ben de la Cruz 

photo 



Joan Barrett 

Politics 

1 1 Davenport Ct. 

Old Tappan NJ 07675 



James Biondi 
Management 
81 Glenside Ave. 
Scotch Plains NJ 07076 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



!99 



Boy Meets Girl 

Right: Denise Carroll and Paul 

Snisk\ . Below: Joe Rella and Tara 

Lucano. Ben de la Cruz photos. 






Henry Blaney 

Finance 

Cedar Hill Rd. 

Bedford NY 10506 



Gregory Booth 

Management 

186 Gregory Blvd. 

E. Norwalk CT 06855 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



David Brady 

Politics 

44 Arnoldale Rd. 

West Hartford CT 06119 



Lucy Bossid 
Psycholog 
73 Blackman Rd. 
Ridgefield CT 0687 
imazelle newro mcsor- 
lys togas hw85 beach 
moneypit fleetwood 
cape88 brownies 400n 
sw87 sb88 nye87 uconn 
msg I, j, j, m, e, z - i'll 
never forget 




Cathy Breen 

Finance 

141 Baywoods La. 

W. Bay Shore, NY J1700 

dh/jk/cm/do/lz, r309- 

kg, r324, 791 -triplets, / 

83, bahamas. 

bamachme. Jamaica, 

boston, de, bdbh, ac„ 

love ewes, suspenders, 

thanks mom! 










Carole Brown 

Economics 

16 Driscoll Rd. 

Branford CT 06405 

ckis • floridamo - ar- 

krocky mountain cho 

rale - england '86 

chocolate calvin red 

gram rose maclab good 

bar 3am campion 4- 

kostka2: de th92: mer. 

las, jmm. 



200 



Lynda Birgler 

Marketing 

RD8 BX241 Overlook 

Mahopac NY 10541 

g2girls1 /2g3maxim 

ussessionsbahamas 

hic'sohojailcancu 

nrimalotpw 18waad 

jnhoodwudallntdcw 

lambchopohsylviav 

oyagerlaverneodie 

thebirg 






Hans Blaakman 

Biology 

562 East Brooke Ln. 

Rochester NY 14618 




Christine Bouchard 

Biology 

394 Thompson Ave. 

East Haven CT 06512 

th57+theholy12!!t 

ricolorednoodles, 

sweetness.jmnewye 

arsths4724shoppin 

gat mid-night 88n 

ights I cant beli 

eve its over! wha 

t a year! 




jiiL 



Thomas Brady 

Finance 

19 Thru-Way Dr. 

Bridgewater NJ 08807 



Elaine Brassard 

Psychology 

1 1 West Granby Rd. 

Granby CT 06035 




Pasquale Brino 

Finance 

19 Rourke Ave. 

Southington CT 06489 

k3theBoysenzocdkc 

mlmpmtplsddlosauc 

ebioheadyazswissc 

hserenityimbecile 

88nitesahaheetuki 

tukilglorialdtiam 

o90drjpamicialway 

sthxm + d 




John Bowen 

Psychology 

267 High St. 

Willimantic CT 06226 

kostka3glorianamn 

inersroadkilloutt 

here4hourspartyba 

rgehamptonbeachu2 

atmsgohsurerafora 

day400nightsbeach 

partiesintheoakrm 

thebonepsychclub 




Steven Brigande 

Biology 

280 Guyon Ave. 

Staten Island NY 10306 

mahatdogsofwarber 

nieboboniceridebh 

mepanamaniansk12 

3iguanau2kirbyth6 

1 hammerhousesicpt 

morgansswoodhaveb 

eenswalt&thedenlo 

rithanksmom&dad 



Janet Broer 
Biology 

20999 Sydenham 
Shaker Heights OH 44122 
to the holy 1 1 tor taking 
me in to the family, 
thanx to chris the best 
'best friend' ever, i love 
you all! the twelfth 



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Christopher Brown 
Accounting 
23 Berkshire Dr. 
Princeton June NJ 08550 
thats not a joke k. win- 
dow showerpaper red- 
plague later buttheads- 
tn tr pm js kf rs bh ts jb 
dr-thanks-bgklw 
mwjakbnbjd r&jb m&kb 
go bears 






Eileen Browne 

English 

19 Beech Ct. 

Chatham NJ 07928 



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Christopher Borjes 
Marketing 
Scott Circle 
Purchase NY 10577 



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Michael Bratti 

Management 

4123 North Ridgeview 

Arlington VA 22207 

loyalalaxh-5sebas 

tian inlet 12jeepp 

lazzaejdhmobhouse 

gonzagaflyingboat 

cherokeegreatwhit 

emother87semester 

atseatrkhitalianu 

2devilinsideski 




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Anne Brown 
Marketing 
13 Todd Rd. 
Nashua NH 03060 
kam dec7 latenight na- 
chos florida bahamas to 
my friends, i'm glad i 
met you to my family, i 
love you 



Boy Meets Girl on the dance floor 



From left Carla Supersano and John O'Brien. Bob Follis and Susan Flynn. Rich Occhiuto and Terri Durso. Ben de la Cruz 
[on) Minnefor and Marianne Walsh. Mike Be/court photo 





MaryLou Browne 

Accounting 

53-35 Bell Blvd. 

Bayside NY 11364 

thehostile thehav 

en.superd.c&l/nyc 

,th16-tlhov.hoy!. 

blottos.daytona87 

-iforget.cuz'amon 

o.maac87,g2-lu,ch 

ichis-newbeg.baha 

mas86-gimmesoca! 



Timothy Buckley 
English 
137 Barlow Drive So 
Brooklyn NY 11234 
one sott infested sum- 
mer must end. tojean- 
nie. deirdre. jim, todd, |i 
m and at printing time, 
to eileen. but how I wish 
you were here 




Mark Browning 
Accounting 
209 Prospect Ave. 
Oradell NJ 07649 
college tour 1984-88 
rpi-qc-fu living proof you 
can go to 3 schools and 
graduate on time honai! 
k3bucknellcar my 
thanks th 131 



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Tina Bugara 
English 
59 Garfield Street 
Fall River MA 02721 
iggnth 102 ween ke 
er waaze cbjzsfcg 
sdbvwjcjwmtkhlh 
humidifier deano i 
II love you all 
forever! girlsonl 
yanaiswho 7 bahamas 
11 13 Oh mr weet! 



Karen Buggy 
English 

5 Hillman Dr 
Hyde Park NY 12538 
to the mamacitas in 
th37-thanx for fun & 
friendship tv-great soph 
year jp-thanx for every 
thing to other friends & 
class of '88-good luck! 






Anthony Butler-Perez 

Sociology 

390 Broad St. 

Bridgeport CT 06604 



Eileen Buturla 



Economics 

468 Latham Rd. 

Mineola NY 11501 

tothefishbowilove 

eiballwhatisthisa 

convention?9-9:30 

that'sokright?yah 

think?salt$29sold 

dahgimpsterlbleib 

alljustrelaxgoodg 

odmagnum 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Mark Byers 
Marketing 
8 Brandy Ln. 
Trumbull CT 06611 



Marybeth Calianese 
Marketing 
824 Ellis PI. 
Oradell NJ 07649 



John Bucci 

Marketing 

400 Eastfield Drive 

Fairfield CT 06432 




Wendi Cain 

Nursing 

4 Malchiodi Dr. 

Wallingford CT 06492 




Kenneth Caisse 
Politics 

505 Birchwood Dr. 
Nashville NC 27856 
fusa swim team class 
88 pat joe chris thanks, 
good luck & success! 
partied laughed imbibed 
loved lost sighed cared 
shared cried dared 
feared tried; thanks 
mom & dad 




Kelly Callanan 

Finance 

21 Balfour Ln. 

Ramsey NJ 07446 

swasuemareuptopfr 

eshmenanimalsdjto 

p10at2LBI beerbq9 

4lrf9687blurmdigb 

tchblklondon86 up 

thecreekbeachsunr 

oofmidniteblu123s 

mile! 



203 




Jeffrey Campbell 

Marketing 

52 Kennedy Dr. 

Enfield CT 06082 



Kathleen Campic 

EnglM 

1653 GlendolaoRc 

Wall NJ 0771t 

life is a series of hello; 

& goodbyes i'm afraic 

it's time for goodbye 

again - 1 love you mom .- 

dad, kar, and boo thxgk 

bye big girls. 





John Cardinali 

Psychology 

154 Greenaway Rd. 

Rochester NY 14610 




Natalie Campisi 

Finance 

311 Walton St. 

W. Hempstead NY 11552 

themayor?londongd 

csmolsonhuff&puff 

shuttleturnoversn 

achosdoritosolymp 

icgroupprojectsbr 

aindeadinterviews 

uvmmunchkinsgrape 

ciao!! 



^^•i 



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Joseph Carella 

Psychology 

36 Brooklawn Dr. 

East Windsor NJ 08520 

steelcage/ilostmy 

rap/ sleepout-nh/t 

obysinn/nkt4of5cl 

asses!oh-hi 

ettu 

ce/ 10thholeeyes 

ostatths ichaels 

/ohfosters/ giants 

/wellyoureright 



Michele Carpentier 

Biology 

1 16 Louis St. 

N. Massapequa NY 11758 

c4k2n8 1 5uguysimno 

tadiz.hangingupfl 

ippingoutkb.de, mk 

.Is.ml.ja.dw.skee 

vessmanguidosfdmi 

ssubi?shthapenscb 

elt.ggnadsldswacti 

onlmdnkiluvu! 




Robert Carangelo 

Economics 

140 Braeside Dr. 

Hamden CT 06514 

gizmovetteslamgos 

sipkinghornydetec 

tvebdshotsrolling 

bjsluge beach2ndh 

ome shack&greg-n 

eato gleeclbwjbx 

Idystags" 1 luvtou 

pthecreek 



%* -^1 



Denise Carroll 

Psychology 

20 Heyward Lan. 

Rockville Ctr NY 11570 

g2girlsvolumecatch 

it20kegsnhoodwatc 

hpwkendhighseasrh 

inoplastycancunba 

hamaseympyesmick 

yowhatanightcupca 

kesorrybgloveyari 

malotdc 




Richard Carella 

Biology 

85 High St. 

Portland CT 06480 

regisgr»9crpers s 

adieskmyeeahtdkeg 

s&tapsmerjoz4semp 

robth47&40break86 

elbormjgmmnovamw7 

03tmjdtabmdoghous 

e154shidassscamti 

psacdinnerchubby 



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Caroline J. Carucci 
Finance 
34 Country Club Dr. 
Manhasset NY 11030 
th35 dietcoke oniondip 
m&m's dancing on ta- 
bles boxershorts dirty- 
dancing tvpizza km df 
sa wimps mom, dad, 
pat, sam: thanks i love 
youl 



John Caruso 

Economics 

812 Garden St. 

Hoboken NJ 07030 



1 *X /* 



Lisa Caruso 

Mathematics 

21 Queach Rd. 

Branford CT 06405 

kevin 9/21 84; 88 

nights; th 1 4 1 rocks; 

guido; al; cyn; g 105; nit- 

san 300zx; bar hopping; 

midori sour; mckenzies 

bar; spuds crew; may 22 

mcmlxxxvni 



204 



Elizabeth Cambria 
Nursing 
20 Polly Dr. 
Huntington NY 11743 




Donald Carbone 

Economics 

172 Lindberg St. 

Torrington CT 06790 




Paul Carroll 

Finance 

140 Lincoln Ave. 

Elberon NJ 07740 

clavernoval3maacc 

hampsth985guyslou 

dhousendwkendjoey 

sthurstonpintocub 

ansmellyscrodmurp 

hrannoroonsioloun 

gecutthroatprhanx 






Boy Meets Boy 

Dave O'Brien and Marty Kellaher. 
Mike Belcourt photo 



Two Boys Meet One Girl 

Mike Mandazza, Cindi Striebel, 
and Rob Gallois. Ben de la Cruz 

photo 



205 




Gareth Charter 

English 

6 Masefield Rd. 

Nashua NH 03062 

mblh / 968 + bbq / stoo 

chin wbb,shthse + c 

hkbrd h- ungeonsund 

ays/ sunriseatbb/o 

rangewip-H&faval 

e / winnebago / great 

estguys.greatestt 

imes/ejm 



Joseph Check 

Biology 

61 Hedgehog Rd 

Trumbull CT 06611 



Kevin Christine 
Marketing 

4010 School House 
Plymouth Meet. PA 19462 
thanks to all, mom, dad, 
family, friends if we 
couldn't laugh we would 
all go insane 





Boy/Girl 

Brad Runyon. John 
Courtmancht photo 



Boys Will Be 
Boys 

Lauren Xarclli and Koh 

McMahon W/'/b 

urt photo l ileen 
Browne and John 
Berner. Ben Je /,.■ i 

photo 



* 



John Chiaia 

Management 

34 Grandview PI. 

North Caldwell NJ 07006 



Jane Clapprood 

Biology 

68 Highland Terr. 

Stafford Springs CT 06076 

th81vlb&th82ilyal 

Ueververmontnonu 

keslthanxfrharakc 

ampn4crocodileff 

1stcroix87inxsnhw 

/nocarmortmpo(ily 

)dp2iloveyoumom&d 

ad(t&a2) 



i 






I 


{% 




V / 





206 



Dawn Cautillo 
[Psychology 
1819 Caroline Ave. 
Linden NJ 07036 



John Ceruzzi 

Economics 

72 Maple Vale Dr. 

Woodbridge CT 06525 

whatayr4woodesjdr 

dferbcurdlesnonkl 

027v81211yteeskid 

linwhiticekristru 

nsjulcondolgtelca 

llsgpvinenlscontr 

oltweaksoutrageou 

szekee 



Christine Chagares 

Finance 

109 Elmwood PI. 

Wyckoff NJ 07481 




Suzanne Clark 

Economics 

3950 Bedford Ave. 

Brooklyn NY 11229 

muskosforever,c43 

0,pheads,45,mauli 

st.happyhrs.lotho 

useloveschalkbrd, 

brownies, weirdwal 

I,srwk87,mugchug, 

wg1 1,188lyplada2a 

rdjenbye! 



Jill Christensen 

Mathematics 

2103 Landings Way 

Raleigh NC 27615 

imazelrdtrpsnewro 

nycvailsugarbushb 

ahamasfleetwdstma 

rtinorleans:thank 

stothebestfamilyi 

ntheworld&dieijaq 

joanlizlushellyda 

vhartly 




Gregory Christian 

Management 

313 Britt Rd. 

North Wales PA 19454 

loyola315billy + th 

eskidshurricanewk 

ndhoustonnewroont 

hursmaacchampgame 

sswinheads858687s 

pringfeverrugbyga 

mesbeachlifethank 

xmom&dad 





Jennifer Cole 

Accounting 

20 Sand Spring Dr. 

Eatontown NJ 07724 



Michael Celentano 

Economics 

14 Randall Dr. 

North Haven CT 06473 




Jennifer Chianese 
Communications 
85 Bayberry Ave. 
Garden City NY 11530 



Michele Chmelo 
Accounting 
6 Louden St. 
Greenwich CT 06830 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



207 



OH BOY 

Tina Bugara and Sam Faillace. 
John Courtmancbe photo 



Brian Cook 

Economics! 

20814 Brantley Rd ■ 

Shaker Heights OH 44122, 




John Courtmanche 

English 

276 Harbor St. 

Branford CT 06405 

k3mkjkstdcalilpsa 

ywhen2 / 6annemirro 

rjdscrew:amdarkrm 

coxfitzbenvideotp 

germanschevyth53j 

nts123rml31mbcljc 

gcdo'bbeachpix 

troyal thxm + d 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Christopher Cook 

Finance 

1159 Stratfield Rd. 

Fairfield CT 06432 



^'k 



Andrea Crossman 

English 

47 Breezy Knoll Rd. 

East Longmeadow 

MA 01028 

dave bride fag du 

nkin'donuts veres 

st. limo mamma mi 

nas atm6am aerobi 

cs murray farber 

elaine's sauce li 

ggets phone bill 

cats 78volare 



208 



|;elly Comcowich 
English 
>0 Box 180 
.eadville CO 80461 




Mary Kate Conte 
Psychology 
15 Pawson Landing 
Branford CT 06405 
c4 Is mc dc ml kb action 
cadetskeeve guido 
k2lounge psych jmo86 
red sea s87 sh thap- 
pens 400beachgrape 
188redhouse pasta 
england thanks! 



Moira Conway 

American Studies 

1690 Ridge Rd. 

No. Haven CT 06473 

g2lastresortowlhe 

artattackngrysadi 

essherwoodntbeerb 

allsmedlysphalowe 

nifrenchmaidsyale 

uconidmmkageapefr 

anceratsxmasbreak 

21iminautillmis88 



Christopher Costanzo 

Accounting 

233 Cedar St. 

stagfootball25sm 

urfbackstolencorv 

etcommuter?softba 

lldisastrhardhatc 

vsgbigclittlec to 

closepals&goodtim 

esthanxmom&dad.go 

dbewithyoudad 



Monica Copertino 

Politics 

16 St. Johns Dr. 

Trumbull CT 06611 

r338khraclintgumb 

boobscinhhineykoo 

niceeggrollulook 

hotghcl201honorsu 

ghlibjmwathuconng 

a55todesasn6/ 13dr 

ckkonnichiwamaria 

dejmmbh88wdasmmdr 






!** 



IS*,- 



■A 




John Coulter 
English 

252 Boulevard 
campion2 duplex-s 
lack'n dr-keepons 
will'n pete-eatyo 
urham! mike's-kj, 
ck,dglondon'86mets 
'86-jr! hasbeenst 
hanxmomily Imr-il 
y $100,000 + ! 



Linda Cortina 

Mathematics 

173 Merrimac 

Trumbull CT 06611 




/ 



Denise Courcy 

Finance 

P.O. Box 841 

Marshfield, MA 02050 

c4-action-syrm-ho 

lypheads-boca-k2gui- 

dos-086-ap-jam 

-400-cape-815shit 

happens-188-ski-g 

rape-88-lsmcmlmkc 

kb-ja-cj-nandp-bd 

-momnick-iloveu 



+M 



Brian Creegan 

Economics 

Box 149 

Amawalk NY 10501 

riggeddaleride?31 

3switchmbayva4hrs 

Idberni66rvfletch 

arpblondebptdrubb 

ing4watvsscannedt 

uesbh?rudugykirby 

outinyourcorner35 

Oespumo 



Hugh Coyle III 
Management 
10136 Falls Rd. 
Brooklandvlle MD 21022 
live your life the way you 
choose, find the ones 
who laugh with you. time 
to play the game, 
thanks mom,dad + co. 
G'day mates, stay casu- 
al 





Catherine Crichton 

Economics 

517 Brownsaddle Rd. 

Houston TX 77057 



Glenn Crawford 

Management 

27 Valley Circle 

Bridgeport CT 06606 

kapsicl319fr42st 

nycsojpcqoesdowns 

nowftballclintstu 

diodelrioravenjrg 

leemfranktrilogypi 

ranhaskruegepsrit 

soverkeisha,,wakeu 

pfuth 1 31 phinupi 



C* 





Cheryl Cronin 

Politics 

2285 Ridge Rd. 

North Haven CT 06473 

dad, thanks for all 

you've given me,i love 

youito the women of the 

big house:thanks for all 

the support, i'll miss you 

all! 



Denis Cummings 

Finance 

1 1 Meadow Run Rd. 

Skillman NJ 08558 




Mark Cummings 

Finance 

Box 62 

Old Lyme CT 06371 



209 



j f^naC 






CLASS OF 1 988 TIMELINf 



e 



>p€ 



rc/e * Sponsors 



FRESHMA 



n* 



1965-67 

I iiNuspecting 

members of 

Fairfield's ( lass of 

1988 are born 

throughout the 

world 



1967-82 

A series of 
necessary initiation 
ceremonies, from 
"toilet training" to 
"finger painting", 
"puberty" to 
"secondary 
education" 



1983-84 

Senior year of high 
school. Tour the 
Fairfield campus 
with mom and dad. 
Apply. Interview. 
Receive acceptance 
letter. Celebrate. 



Sept. 2-4, 1984 

Freshmen 

Orientation 



Sept. 4. 1984 
Second set of 
townhouses open 



■ II live 

Sept. 5, 1984 
First dav of classes 



tty Sacke 

an N e 

om were 

t school seen* 



Beats 



3 100W 3 

o >. f\es\^ s 






W*2t J 








Christopher Curran 
Management 
246 Wolf Hill Rd. 
Melville NY 11747 




Greg D'Abate 

Economics 

77 Birdseye Rd. 

Farmington CT 06032 



Denise D'Alessandro 



Communications 

76 Glenroy Rd. 

Fairfield NJ 07006 



Wendy D'Angelo 

Economics 

653 Hill Rd. 

Harwinton CT 06791 

a-d-3m-r new hvn hard 

habit tbreak ding + bat 

tommy capecod david b 

r326 transitive property 

ell 10 printshop debbi- 

baham 88 Jeffrey mack- 

enzies th54 



Justine Davey 

Psychology 

19 Teapot La. 

Smithtown NY 11787 



C 








Jacqueline Day 
Finance 
Taylor La. 
Harrison NY 10528 




mtm 




^^^ ^^H 



Michele Day 

English 

274 Hawthorne Dr. 

Fairfield CT 06432 






210 



JL* 



14 90 A 



IRTH THROUGH 



EAR 






:t. 19-20, 1984 
arvest. Concert by 
icky Fingers and 
ickstreets. 



April 4, 1985 
Mitch Buonaguro 
named men's 
basketball coach 



April 11, 1985 
First "Wonderous 
Stories" published 
by Robert Amoroso 



*to 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



James Dalton 
Biology 
22 Cali Dr. 
Shelton CT 0648' 



William Damore 

English 

68 Tesiny Circle 

Bridgeport CT 06606 



Matthew Davis 

Accounting 

12 Robin Rd. 

Glastonbury CT 06033 



► ♦. 



\^-> 



r+> 



j- 5P? »*■ 



Ruth Dawe 

English 

409 B 138th St. 

Belle Harbor NY 11694 

thank you mom and dad 



Christopher Davidson 

English 

9 Sparta Way 

Andover MA 01810 



Deborah Dagit 
Finance 

1534 Briar Hill Rd. 
Gladwyne PA 19035 
to late nights early 
mornings and every- 
thing in between! To 
mom.dad.karan the 
girls, mark doug and jim: 
thanks-i love you all a 
lot 



Rita Dahan 

Politics 

RD 5 Box 455F 

E. Stroudsburg PA 18301 



Diane Dahle 
Marketing 
11 Halsey PI. 
Valhalla NY 10595 



Jhristopher Deach 
Management 
10025 Bankside Dr. 
Roswell GA 30076 



Kevin Dean 
Information Systems 
99 Madison Ave. 
Cresskill NJ 07626 
rah, dart, purplesox, 
campion, ludlow, dun- 
kindonuts, athena, 
north&south, hoovah, 
syr'85, phikaps, 1 1785, 
capecod, kc, branford, 
ihop, aa + co.l 



«*■ - 



^M 



Diana Debartolomeo 
Nursing 

343 Westport Ave. 
Norwalk, CT 06851 
the time flew, hey mom- 
two heads in every car. 
John m. u r the best, 
craig, rudge, and mom- 
&dad-thanks. nonsense 
chris! had fun dp, meh, 



21 




Vincent DeLucia 

Accounting 

48)5 Madison Ave. 

Trumbull. CT 0661 1 



Stephen Dempsey Jr. 
English 
150 Overlook Ave. 10F 
Hackensack NJ 07601 
fare-the-well now. let 
your life proceed by its 
own design. let the 
words be yours i'm done 
with mine cassady to 
kerouac 




Dawn DeNardi: 

Englrsr 

41 Beechwood Or 

No. Haven CT 06472 




Carol DeNatale 
Finance 

19 Meadowbrook Rd 
Syosset NY 11 791 
"the outer limit" beach 
front property "key" 
west visa motel6 thank 
you: la. mg. Im. js. mw — 
i had the time of my life 
and iowe it all to you! 



Martha Deneen 
Politics 

55 Nook Farms Rd. 
Windsor CT 06095 
loyola girls. 735 fairfield 
beach, digger caddy- 
shack. th44. eek&sheil. 
splitend. other house, 
newro. mcsorley's, the 
cape.p in attic, goodbye 




Maria Deriu 

Nursing 

9 Comly Heights 

Greenwich CT 06830 

jill chris Jackie oct 1 7 '87 

jm "d" nj jc apr 10 

87 ga fall '87 th 

42cars rides i- 

95summer '87 njtpki'll 

miss you guys and the 

fun we had 1 



Brian Dimpel 

Economics 

32 Highland Circle 

Bronxville NY 10708 




Eileen Devenny 

Economics 

224 Van Orden Ave. 

Leonia NJ 07605 



Donna Despenzire 

Finance 

108 Crest Dr. 

Belleville NJ 07109 

willneverforgetth 

eresejennyveresst 

tinhouseth62andal 

waysmichael.bestt 

imesinclude3 2 85 

maxswailstailsbah 

amasacapulco400ni 

ghtsandsnowball. 




Gisele Dion 
Accounting 

18 Hazelwood Rd. 

Hudson NH 03051 




Alejandro Diaz 

Economics 

39 Crocus La 

Avon CT 06001 

9 1 1 86 remember? 

cb. bg. Ig. js. ss youre 

the best kostka2 and 

juhe.too with all my 

heart, sue. thanks stay 

forever. te amo law? 



Therese DeStefanc 

Accounting 

3794 Niami St 

Seaford NY 11783 

dannydonnaweenkee 

rteenlijenny.jogu 

esg.d&dmtes.max 

swannago?bahamama 

mas.acapulco.beac 

h.th88.mac&chez.s 

eagrape.redblueru 

g.sneakalcinseil 



\ ; 



Joseph Distel 

English 

405 Rex Ave 

Philadelphia PA 191 18 

"o. call back yesterday. 

bid time return, "it's a 

long way up " you know 

who you are. and i thank 

you. goodbye. 



Carolynn DelSignore 

: Biology 

I 17 Laurelwood Dr. 
Bolton CT 06040 
loyola1735ffldbch 
rdalumwknd86newro 
40018888nightsnau 
tcwcaseraceppmpfh 
delihbphchtreetti 
talfestnycthepoin 
tsprbrk87elgrapec 
ccmmsehdlpgshack! 




Cheryl Derby 
English 

41 North Oxford St. 
Auburn MA 01501 
loves: loyola th 
97/32/33/34/56 + tj 
+ Id. tx mom, dad + 
chicki. louis, youre the 
best! likes: th pets / 
marriot wknds /Chinese 
food /work 




Rena DiBernardi 
Biology 

220 Reservoir Rd. 
Middletown CT 06457 
the best of times: the 
"holy" 12", nyc + dc, 
pizza + icecream, stu- 
dying + partying, amar- 
etto + daiquiris, th46, 
38, 24, 57, 21 stay- 
close! 




400 NIGHTS 



Top: A view from the roof. 
Above: Colleen Swift and Michele 
Horn. Left: Dana Pellegrino and 
Paul Holland. Marianne Walsh 
photos 




213 




James Doherty 
Management 
44 Elmer Rd. 
Dorchester MA 02124 
to the doghousegood 
luck tony torn rich bill 
sh-t-as- dogwoods'87 
regis ground wanna 
drink? yeah? punta 
sam87 thanks mom- 
+ dad I made it! 



Mary Dolan 

Finance 

6 Dean Rd. 

Mendham NJ 07945 

jg2beerbqstudyabr 

oadlondonvisaupto 

p94 1 undergroundbl 

urmdoslatenitesan 

imalupthecreekfla 

85&87stcroixthanx 

swasuzkelchrisyka 

thn.m&d 



Christina Dominguis 

Sociology 

700 Columbus Ave. 

New York NY 10025 

Depressions '87sp 

ies-like-us th42/ 

cruisin'njmidnite 

cravings&rides jac 

kie"d"jillitsover 

carsmoviesdiditdi 

sco cuzbbsing9/ 16 

/87-b&c- 4e 



Charles Donahue 
Communications 
328 Unqua Rd 
Massapequa NY1175& 




188 NIGHTS 





I. dt Gavin O'Connor and M.ir\ Beth ( alianese. Above: Jean Halloran, Beth Cambria. Jody 
Kenney, Mike Egan, and Kim Sutherland. Right: Hank Blaney and Matt McGuire. Ben de 
hi Cruz photos 



L 



214 



loretta Doherty 
sychology 
4 Coach Ln. 
airfield CT 06430 



Janna Dressel 
Nursing 

455 Ellis Place 
Wyckoff NJ 07481 
bighouse - biggirls: hou- 
separties, phonebill dig 
gossip eh: thanks! Ibi86 
roomate talk bed sb 87- 
88 nice major! m&d: love 
& thankstim - 9/3/88 
143! 







Patrick Doherty, Jr. 
English 

952 Meredith Ave. 
Elizabeth NJ 07202 
duplex, grape, mas- 
ter's, nova, aj'sshot, 
th103, 91, 76, regis4, 
ncaas, ayyylnads, d, r, 
s, funnels, thankyou- 
house, ind.n.c.maac- 
champs! 



Keith Donovan 

American Studies 

54 Merrywood Lane 

Short Hills NJ 07078 

donalbain; one more 

shot, i'll be dead; i feel 

the need; r u up for it; the 

lostweekend, memory- 

?good luck '88, 

thanx;thank you mom, 

dad, made it 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



215 







Anthony Fable 

Information Systems 

629 9th Ave 

New York NY 10036 



Nathaniel Farnham 
Philosophy 
8 Raymond Place 
Westport CT 06880 
the existence of forget- 
ting has never been 
proved we only know 
that some things do not 
come to our mind when 
we want them to nietz 
sche 



Lisa Esposito 

Politics 

20 Spring Hill Rd 

Mt Vernon, NH 03057 



2I6 



^^nAiriMi 



Thomas Duggan 

Finance 

17 Pheasant Run 

Wethersfield CT 06109 




Peter Dunlap 
Marketing 
570 Norfolk St. 
Holliston MA 01746 
jogues3, 4 greenturtle u 
guys r the best! thnx 
pudge to mrs? god 
we've grown thnx m + d 
+j + cj has anyone seen 
4 years? 



S9+ 



Kathleen Dunn 

Politics 

260 Center St. 

West Haven CT 06516 




Theresa Durso 
Accounting 
1301 Old Northfield 
Thomaston CT 06787 
steph & trish inxs, feb 
20-peter, th94-lr&k, so 
how do you feel about 
that?, rw-the rat, kim, 
jeanna&deb, nyc, gian- 
na's, slobones, sum- 
mer; 87, k&c's 



Debra Dunne 

Accounting 

RFD 7 Longfellow 

Carmel NY 10512 

the fun never ends! 

f. hockey; fla86; 

hhead88; midnite 

laughs; sleep? kjd-best 

friend material - live for 

your dreams & good 

luck-thanxm&d 





Denise Ebert 
Nursing 

103 High Mountain 
Ringwood NJ 07456 
thank you mom, dad, lin- 
da, al, kevin, and kayla. 
we've made it through 
these four years-glen. 



Valerie Dunton 

Information Systems 

203 Manning Ave. 

River Edge NJ 07661 




^ 7\ 



Rosaelena Echanique 
Nursing 

56 Wilson Place 
Irvington NJ 07111 
hey bith the girls pacino 
the grape mira i dunt du 
yew? pelicans do not 
use on windows i'm call- 
ing the police it's start- 
ing again acklm! 




Michael Ernst 

Chemistry 

51 1 Wolcott Ln. 

Orange CT 06477 



Eric Ellert 

English 

40 Prospect Park W. 

Brooklyn NY 11215 

elvis died fat see you at 

the iron horse pub! or 

not!! 





« — r- 



\ 



IJ 



Deirdre Errity 
Communications 
165 Deerfield Dr. 
Hamden CT 06518 
thanks to my fami- 
ly. you're the bestlto my 
friends-no initials need- 
ed-you know who you 
are. esp. jmmandtb! 
thanks for the memo- 
ries! 



Eileen Ellis 

Marketing 

229 Ocean Ave. 

Massapequa NY 11762 

c323laeelloftcall 

nino/tom9786tompe 

achtreeppnye86th8 

2paulisb87caddype 

nrodswillymnosoon 

21!doritosrnezzsta 

gshuttlelawemadei 

tkids! 







Alison Eschmann 

Nursing 

107 10th St. 

Garden City NY 11530 



\ 



Samuel Faillace 

Marketing 

569 Wyckoff Ave. 

Mahwah NJ 07430 

samiamregisgonzmo 

bhousholdontowken 

dclubpsychesuprar 

dtripslbiperhaps? 

vofpartyidiotsski 

mirrfusamknumusic 

nycelebrate88succ 

essffldfrnds4ever 



Maura Farrelly 
Biology 
87 Killian Ave. 
Trumbull CT 0661 1 
regis 3 + 4 be, dc + hc; 
mono alarms + bio; vb 
mary vanessa kathi and 
mary vanessa kath! and 
cristina - you're excel- 
lent! 400 nights 188 + 
88 nights! momanddad - 
thanks - i love you! 







4 



IP' 



3 3 



<*\ 



Regina Fay 
Communications 
491 Westchester Ave. 
Crestwood NY 10707 



^5 * 



Joseph Felice 
Management 
3295 Country Club 
Bronx NY 10465 
potent! gear-up rage! 
slackin'jolly dacters 
nova, awe awe! im con- 
vinced da bronx 69ers 
vegas/fla. oyeecomfy 
weak she's fierce #2 



Debra Fiore 

Accounting 

27 Centerbrook Rd. 

North Haven CT 06473 



Scott Floegel 
Politics 

21 Birch Run Ave. 
Denville NJ 07834 
sailingohyeahhasb 
eensiona87patsche 
viousreggievSl 47 
padretaffyn d neu 
tergillyregisbonn 
purse400huge161s 
t.43msgg'towngamb 
ledevinetmf mbw 1 52 



Elizabeth Fisher 
Nursing 
194 Bayberry Trail 
South Windsor CT 06074 
cheers to th 107 Smir- 
noff, sue, mary, kelly, 
lars, fencing, senior 
year and things yet to 
come. Smirnoff, get out 
of the window!!!! 



Timothy Fitzgerald 
Accounting 
20989 Colby Rd 
Shaker Heights OH 44122 
caddyshach, 36 "eflag- 
ship, c&l, I8cavs, myld, 
kidd, fatman, thecity, 
beefsteaks, fla, no$. se- 
curity, erworm, thanx- 
mom&dadj4, shame. $, 
sudsbudsheadout 






Christine Flynn 

Information Systems 

1043 North 7th St. 

New Hyde Pk NY 11040 

androidspopoidsri 

chardarorahilclon 

eqecobolej2fiste 

dstressloftcurli 

ngironshotslaxten 

nishorsebackridin 

gneetsgnirps57he 

nry4holy12 






188 
NIGHTS 




Clair Flynn 
Economics 
186 Fort Lee Rd. 
Leonia NJ 07605 



Susan Flynn 
Physics 

24 Woodvale Ave. 
Kings Park NY 11754 
white russians scrod du- 
pree nyctree crazy hap- 
pymeals hadjmonster 
newport rudabega -su- 
shi 



219 




Robert Fox 
Marketing 
3 Wesskum Wood Rd. 
Riverside CT 068?8 
goodtimes. friends, par- 
ties, smallh, fishbowl. 
th112+115, diehards, 
london, europe. sttho- 
mas, ineedavacation, 
nomoney, thanxtamily, 
imadeit! 



James Galligan 
Accounting 
20 93rd St. 
Brooklyn NY 11209 
davey crocket was 
wrong/ "saoirse" cried 
the mire cat while play- 
ing a game that repre- 
sents life/ fudge dain- 
ties anyone?accounting 
is fun 



Christopher Fogarty 

Politics 

Mill River Rd. 

Oyster Bay NY 11771 







Toni Gallo 

Modern Languages 

91 Ridgecrest Rd. 

Briarcliff Mr NY 10510 



Robert Gallois 

Biology 

1 1 Hartland Ave 



Emerson NJ 07630 
gonzo, gergy;and 
topher, th75, dj, spring 
break 88 horizontal 
merger, nkt, camo, 
clams, feb161985 g's 
island, golf snooze, 
grain, Ip jen v, babe, 
wood 



U 



Melanie Garger 

Economics 

75 Stark St. 

Laconia NH 03246 

"theouterlimit 'fu 

nwlimit-stwpplisa 

bloodmotel6"key"w 

estdisneyworld87f 

feenosecampioncho 

oches400colaandsm 

ilelainternoverth 



Nancy Gannon 
American Studies 
106 Long Hill Rd. 
Wallingford CT 06492 
regisrunaways /ondra- 
sis /ocsummers /ko / 
dogwoods '86 /marriot 
/paul /jg /cl306 /ne- 
whaven u2 /th87 I- 
l/healthclub /euro- 
pe'88/tx m&dilu xo 




220 



h«i 



Diane Foster 
English 

27 Beatrice Ave. 
Syosset NY 11791 
th35 budnboxers 
squids: cc rd ns mer sa 
km ko'k c3mktv creative 
scheduling G diet coke 
mapes gertie r-ball- 
hoops maulers airbands 




221 




Claudia Gaumond 
English 
462 East St. 
Plainville CT 06062 

itsawonderfull 
ifew otheresadia 
neyoursailorwillc 
omelmagsbaiejan 
elucymplaurie — h 
elp!!!janethisis 
it!..dec24.letsst 
epintothefuture. 



Kimberly Gaunt 
Psychology 
Buena Vista Terr. 
Cent. Valley NY 10917 
baba-beethovens5, 
mauling, winecoolers, 
theduplex, swimmin- 
g/megdlamdttm! to 
allmy friends-esp. jen-i 
love you guys! thank you 
mom&dad-ily! 



Holly Gerber 
Economics 
146 Church Rd. 
Great River NY 11739 




Gregory Germain 

Biology 

95 Old Oaks Rd. 

Fairfield Ct 06432 

Jill toph rollo gonzo can- 

dy'sroom saunders 

15thhole airbands pan- 

chos decoysoap little 

guitars 5:30 clamming 

bora dotheshot sussu- 

dio omaha 



William Gerth 

Biology 

12007 Eddie and Pk. 

Crestwood Mo 63126 




John Gibbons 
Accounting 
139 Kilburn Rd 
Garden City NY 11530 
hey! sh-t happens! if you 
don't like it flush it. 



r^ • 1 



Kevin Gilligan 

Marketing 

One Hall Court 

Park Ridge NJ 07656 





222 



r 

Cynthia Geann 

English 

2558 Corte Facil 

Pleasanton CA 94566 




Monique Geissler 

Economics 

77 Primrose Ave. 

Yonkers NY 10710 




s of the jungledenys w/ 
a y vtmoleman rugh- 
eadscarlet kg tp kl be&c 
bhms cowpig sr misst 
jpbueller 103mrlee pick- 
ing out a thermos 4u. 








job? 


\ } 1 




^ 




Catherine Girard 

Marketing 

20 Johnny Cake La 

Glastonbury CT 06033 



f^ 



Robert Gerwien Jr. 

Biology 

8 Harvest Hill Dr 

Trumbull Ct 06611 




Frank Giacobetti 

Biology 

2553 South 3rd St 

Philadelphia Pa 19148 



Regina Godlin 

English 

261 Ponus Ridge 

New Canaan Ct 06840 






Victor Geraldi.Jr. 

Finance 

44 Harvey Ave. 

Rochelle Pk NJ 07662 

alexoxaleth154ace 

rickytrexdupreedo 

gstanycsrwk87bull 

etsbbash88harvest 

153boys1812tpcspy 

klOOyrwoodshootch 

loupeenycarla4eve 

rthanxmomdad-vic 



Donald Gomber 

Finance 

40 Fairhaven Dr 

Allendale NJ 07401 

joguesground-chiv 

lalversboot.illst 

and-c2-solonely,a 

ndthenyousayitsme 

Ils-th67-kenschic 

ks,itsexc!-th88-y 

mbsymsd.waitingfo 

rvern-47-helleau 




George Giacco 

Biology 

130 Lambert Ave 

Meriden Ct 06450 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



188 NIGHTS 



223 



John Tuohv. Lisa 

Panico, and Anne 

Weyman. 





1 ■ »v 




188 NIGHTS 


3 
- 1 


Iff l c ▼^.7 '^-fl 
1 ^f * : ^V*i^V fl 




■ 

■ 1 jj 


■Vl =r- JI>iAi1 




■ ''. i-h 


1 1 ^ 


Gregg Ward and Tim 
Zichelli. 




r r •/* ^ 




)ef( Campbell. Frank 

Madalone, Brian 

Dimpel, and John 

Perrotti. Ben de la 

Cruz photos 



Jamie Gormican 

Finance 

2 Stone Dr. 

Weslporl CT 06880 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Marcia Gulino 

Marketing 

20 Tanager Rd 

Attleboro MA 02703 



Kathi Gould | 
Fine Arts | 
83 Sill Ln. 
Old Lyme CT 06371 




Eileen Guinan 

Nursing 

7270 Post & Rail 

Cincinnati OH 45243 



224 



iida Gomes 
ccounting 

7 Brockett Farm Rd. 
o. Haven CT 06473 
i101 & baseball, sun- 
ets.paul, long walks, 
/ 17, caffeine, "this 
gear's major"cm4sei- 
lerscoping, bahamas, 
firehse, kegs, forever 
friends lr,dm,mh... 




William Good 
Psychology 
109 Stoddard Rd. 
Waterbury CT 06708 
"Telling the truth is one 
thing; being believed is 
another"-magilla goril- 
la. 



Kathleen Goodrich 

Politics 

34 Bull Ave. 

Wallingford CT 06492 




Dorothy Gregory 

Nursing 

136 Pinewood Trail 

Trumbull Ct 06611 



Vanessa Grey 
English 

1298 South Ave 
Stratford Ct 06497- 
th 155:mo, trace, mary, 
greg, cris, kathi..md- 
!.. chambers: ireland- 
cookies, jean, John, 
chuck, london - kristin, 
sue, mc'n.r4.400, 188 & 
88 nights. 



Joel Gray 
Economics 
807 Winding Way 
River Vale NJ 07675 
R. Ground, We're drink- 
ing, corpse, 
mnf&schmidts, ftlaud, 
diorio, drugsleft, boo- 
zeright, metmobile, 152, 
vinnyraids, s. padre, san 
diego here i come 




#^ 



fe 



Mary Griffin 
English 

66 Ridge Street 
Greenwich Ct 06830 
"behold the fruit of pen- 
sive nights and labori- 
ous days. .."-Sherlock 
holmes 




<aren Guckert 

Marketing 

1267 Taft Ave. 

A. Merrick NY 11566 



Mary Guerin 

English 

267 Oxford Rd 

New Rochelle NY 10804 



Michael Guglielmo 
42 Arlington Rd 
W. Hartford CT 06107 
regis 4.th 141. It, mk, 
be: thanks for 4 great 
years!. 8/24. fun at pul.a 
special thanks to my 
parents for their love 
and support. i've made 
it! 




225 



Say When performing tonight at Stag 

THE CLASS OF 1 988 TIMELINE 



,He Takes Shape 



.Summer 1985 
Live- Aid; 

Springsteen plays a 
week B1 the 
Meadowlands 



July, 1985 
Drinking Age 
changed to 21. 



Sept. 26, 1985 
Shut Up and Drive 
performs at the 



Sept. 2^, 1985 
Hurricane Gloria 
hits Fairfield 



University plans for Stag-Her 



change in I.D. 
distribution — red 
for legal, blue for 
underage. 






Oct. 24, 1985 
Joel Gray and Bill 
\\ "ebb are kicked 
off the air at 
WVOF.Station is 
shut down for a 
week. 



Oct. 26, 1985 
President Reagan 
uses Barlow Field 
as a heliport. 



rll 



the 



tfatf* 



Bool 




'WVOF wattage increase 

ore changes reroute student 



traff 






LK* 



' **% l^r^ 1^1 



Gregory Heard 

Marketing 

54 Oxen Hill Rd. 

Trumbull CT 06611 



Denise Hallowell 
Economics 
19 Quincy Rd. 
Basking Rdg NJ 07920 
nevs sweet pea cath jod 
col-lyregis naut bah 87 
jam88 beach luv ewes 
b.a.mach dungoaway sr 
wk thanks m + d dw- 
miss ya in nj 




Catherine Heflernan 
Psychology 
82 Lake Street 
West Haven CT 06516 
heff 007 soul mate 
bolge boo gernina 
breakfast club th stairs 
not really great adven- 
ture lean on me cool 
man the voice ireland 
super man chunky -feet 



Christina Hanophy 
Communications 
33-22 157 St. 
Flushing NY 11354 
lucy & ethel the hostile 
& haven newattitude 
comradory/ superd 
'tlhov 16 701 s 87 i for- 
got /bahamas 86 soca 
/jukebox/ saveit/provi 
dedhumor thanks mom 
& dad 




Mark Heidelberger 
Finance 

20 Wareham Road 
Dumont NJ 07628 
wvof88.5/ sparky 
thirsty? jr '73 maverick 
c2th62 sm ra ml hihihi 
peewee barbados kost- 
kastag - her thanks for 
the food, ed '86 mets 



Jennifer Hennessy 

English 

500 Codfish Hill 

Bethel CT 06801 



Brian Henry 
Finance 

712 Boston Blvd. 
Sea Girt NJ 08750 
yeah bud! regis 2 morn 
ptys drink - throw new 
ro-road house ya know 
it smooth I.e. ysms bad 
sneakers and they say 
they dgladly do it all 
over again ... itgitc see 



Hem 



Ska n 



OPHOMORE YEAR 




t. 26-27, 1985 Dec. 2, 1985 

rvest. Romantics The Nautilus closes 



g 



to 
*k< 



rform. 



' 



to the public (the 
public consisting 
primarily of 
Fairfield students) 



March, 1986 
Stags win MAAC, 
then lose 75-51 to 
Illinois in NCAA 
Tournament 



May, 1986 
SeaGrape opens 



i» 



S» 






i 




c * 



%$£»*»». 



£**«* 



?*««* 



fe 



',?**'* 



*»t> 



£*s 



o\ 



atherine Hayes 



Rochelle NY 10804 
icturesequinoxid 
n'tskihangeritma 
;hesmyeyeslesmiz 
mexalfieshopping 
159160holy12th24 
'omenbluetoothyan 
eethemanthemyth 
cbound 






orchester MA 01606 




i* ; 



Kathleen Healy 
Management 
8606 Cromwell Dr. 
Springfield VA 22151 
hullo right over 2hump 
walk on beach nite 
class 3 grape mezzd 
oritos london 87 hope- 
less & helpless mrb 
confusion montreal 
gdcstheadventurecon 



Claudia Heintz 

Economics 

272 Forest Drive S 

Short Hills NJ 07078 

good friends tina wendi 

val scott dave italy 87 2 

yr ra harvest 87 loyola 

Julie tempo gh chorale 

mike the most special 

part of senior yr 




Deborah Henley 

Biology 

One Bay Way Walk 

Breezy Pt. NY 11697 



Lee Hilgartner 
Communications 
Dover Neck Road 
Dover NH 03820 
by my green candle, i 
could be the king ... th 
104, do the dishes? 
vacuum/ 18 st John st ... 
york, uk ... miss cyndi ... 
my favorite troll. 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Dennis Heffern 

Politics 

278 Paramount Pkwy. 

Buffalo NY 14223 



Susan Healy 

Sociology 

15 Yowago Ave. 

Branford CT 06405 

j 203 j 215 bbq london 

regents 941 under 

ground sueswakelmar 

peaches fitness up the 

creek luvu st croix cave 

women pitbul thru it all, 

ajn, thanks 




Paul Holland 
Economics 
Greenhaven Road 
Pawcatuck CT 06379 
g3r3padrethprts 
beach life rocks in win- 
dowsfusaprtsbeach 
prtsflotrmobhousefire 
house laugh with the 
sinners don't cry w/the 
saints good luck all esp. 
uaida 



227 




Peter Holland 

History 

5C Barrington Dr. 

Wethersfield CT 06109 




Ellen Hollfelder 
Nursing 

85 Tremont St. 
Newington CT 061 1 1 
bighouse - beach par- 
ties gossip 'dig jd - 
roommatetalkbcd • 
thanks! lb I86 sb 87 4 88 
"f'bombsf-big girls Idla 
"the memories will last 
a lifetime" 



^~ • 



Michele Horn 

Marketing 

32 Plymouth Rd. 

Pt.Washingtn NY 11050 

it's been a great four 

years, the memories will 

last a lifetime, i'll miss 

you all. 



Brian Hounhan 

Marketing 

106 Fieldstone PI. 

Wayne NJ 07470 




William How 

Economic 

37 Primrose D 

Trumbull CT 066i 



Heather Hunt 
Politics 
5 Beverly St. 
Enfield CT 06082 
thanks. ..to kl wm kh ap 
for friendship and laugh- 
s,to sm for dc-the good 
times were great, tocph 
and mjk.for everything! 




Angela Iglesia 
Nursing 

73 Carleton Ave. 
Bridgeport CT 06604 
hey bith adahdahdah 
Ohlord! chevy pelican 
the wall amazon rugburn 
tb th94 it's right there 
cam mm you're terrible 
nobody's home 



Michael James 
English 
121 Wepawaug Dr. 
Milford CT 06460 
to grnd dogs, dead- 
heads, lostwee- 
kendsspringtours, k I in - 
gow, the cave, buds and 
babes, good friends and 
good times, cheers! 




Carolyn Janton 
Psychology 
121 Vernon Rd. 
Bolton CT 06040 
goodbye big girls, i 
won't forget u!pd our- 
"saga" ends. or is this 
just the beginning? bob- 
sey pollocks thnks 
mom + dad! 4 yrs al- 
ready? 




Deanne Jasor 

Mathematics 

3 Pearl Dr 

Monsey NY 10952 

j2 pp sndbx karan al ger 

mich utc peg ron-fbesi- 

luvualPfl bbqmaac Ibi 

naut mathnerds ck u2 

flmac rem boss nova 

har'86sgp*f 'well f 'dale' 




Nancy Judge 

Marketing 

22 Belltower Lane 

Scituate MA 02066 



Christine Jones 

Accounting 

44 Prospect St 

S. Easton MA 02375 




Arthur Jureller 

Management 

65 Rollingwood Ln. 

Williamsville NY14221 

thsk39ersrdklspbk 

flaskivtnovaionan 

ewrogloriachescts 

ats400captdewinco 

veu2kajnfmfmjojpj 

Isfj6bwmmjlbdjbfp 

jfbvboysdpthanxmo 

manddad 



Kenneth Jordan 
Management 
34 Alexander Ave. 
Farmingdale NY 11735 
47 its excellent senior 
weekhelleaucheesy 
mirror manor parent 
weekend manw /the 
plan covenant houseth 
88565554151638447 
51031235 jc thanks 
for the memories 



James Kaishian 

English 

720 Redding Rd. 

Redding CT 06896 



!Mary Hope 
Nursing 
30 Sharon Dr. 
Shelton CT 06484 
when god closes a door 

somewhere he 

opens a window! 



Teresa Joyce 
English 

9 Bennett Place 
Middletown NJ 07748 
chris sep 24 12 ks cr cd 
hm vw rk toads lock 
stock be fish th33 adc- 
dem Ip moe chevys th 
84m&msshopgooper 
fits tears for fears u2 
cbab 357 magnum II 
boston showers ct 










Every Who 
down in Who- 
ville, the tall 
and the small, 
was singing! 
Without any 
presents at 
all! 



Top: Denise Carroll. 
Carolyn Schloth, and Erik 
Olesen. Far left: Jean 
Scarperi and Bob Follis. 
Left: Greg Tole, Bob Casey, 
and Michael Raneri. Ben de 
la Cruz photoi 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Robert Hubregsen 

English 

1076 Hulls Hwy. 

Southport CT 06490 



Thomas Januszewski 

English 

40 Dennis Drive 

New Britain CT 06053 

read, tuna, frank, mar- 

ianchinese?, mac, save, 

entre.lasagna.sospace 

kristen blue muff watch- 

thisspace.arizona?, 

beach, wing, lovehaten- 

iceshirthanksooh 



Jennifer Kaczmarcyk 

English 

502 Prospect St. 

Torrington CT 06790 



229 



Mark Karangekis 

Politics 

15 Cheslon Circle 

Welhersfield CT 06109 



a 



Christopher Keating 
English 
4 Barbara Dr. 
S Farmmgdale NY 11 735 
j ground bungholes 
cheesy xlvii ammo 
waiting for vern /Ion- 
don /kens chicks /th88 
remote control /dg 
helleaubohenynes 
bit thanx mom and dad 
now what? 



w<? -- 1 



Martin Kellaher 

Info Systems 

25 Chestnut Hill 

W Simsbury CT 06092 

loud house 13 nd-usc 

scab vangolf houston 

skids maac tourneys 

nyc naut 400-188-88 

sac beach grape baha- 

mas snore take a drop 

m + d-thanks 




Maura Kelly 

Nursing 

1 1 N. Cobblers Ct. 

Niantic CT 06357 

nsgheads make special 

friendslpaeecaw-it was 

worth the trip Jogues 2 

big girls iluv u guys! 

Iproomies from day 1 

thepitemlpmkdig 

thanks mom + dad! 



Judith Kenney 



Economics 
128 Ember Ln. 
Carlisle MA 01741 
luv ya cb dh /cm do I 
lz-ct,mt.791jjgar 
bagecheck783,bah87. 
iam88, ba machine, sus- 
penders 85, bdbah ta- 
pelovetop vand times in 
the campus center thx 





Left: Alison Eschmann and Beth Cambria. 
Above: (front) Jim Lynch, Rodney Ralph, Joe 
I elite, Kevin Dolan, Brian Dimpel, Andy 
McCabe, Kim Sutherland, (back) E.J. Driscoll 

and Dennis lletlern. John Conrlmanche photos 



Janet Kaminski 
Economics 
476 Brewer St. 
E.Hartford CT 06118 



Deborrah Kampf 
Psychology 
8 Putnam Rd. 
Hyde Park NY 12538 
duchess, genesis, folk- 
group, biolab campion- 
fire - alarms, Java, jdcal- 
phasigma, th76 applica- 
tions, taprep, amadeus, 
drgrossman, volvosooh- 
rahednily, db 



»i*F 



James Kaoud 
Management 
22 Tulip Tree Ln. 
Woodbridge CT 06525 
chief 




Michele Kerepesi 
Finance 

9 Hanford Place 
Norwalk CT 06854 
right behind the grape, 
trinrest, theamazinggrif- 
fraff, bahamas & trish 
85, kenj, 1/24/87 luv u 
zoole 



Thomas Keller 
English 
206 Puritan Road 
Fairfield CT 06430 
guys thanks for: senior 
week we're not getting 
along happiness is 
/was its apossibility 
ohmy! you lose its ex- 
cellent tax man 47 nites 
new years eves best 
best of? 




Jt: 



William Kiley 

Marketing 

25 Palisade Avenue 

Trumbull CT 0661 1 



James Kelly 

Marketing 

48-53A 58th Place 

Woodside NY 11377 



T*^- 



Robin Kingston 
Communications 
802 Oak Avenue 
Westfield NJ 07090 
as, wd, mc, ap, cs — 
we'll smile when we re- 
call we had it all. .for just 
a moment. rg3 ra-IY2 
henutoads mh ak pf 
pmkthanks mom & dad I 
luv you 





Scott Adams and Caroline Carucci. John 
Courtmanche photo 



Christine Keenan 
English 
139 Miro St. 
Fairfield CT 06430 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish, 

Black fish, blue fish, old fish, new fish, 

This one has a little star 

This one has a little car 

Say! What a lot of fish there are. 



23: 




Today is gone, today was fun, tomorrow is another one. 
Every day, from here to there, funny things are everywhere. 



232 




Dean Kontul 

Finance 

1853 Tamarack Ct N 

Columbus OH 43229 

fr dj dean, goodbye, to 

the box clubj was pres 

no lie. to the cl88. to 

partying on fr.thru the 

wkend, than on wed 

starting again 



Ronald Kowalski 
Politics 

264 Lynnfield St 
Lynn MA 01904 
ambassadors of song: 
pres. 1988; glee club: 
Pres. 1986-1987; cam- 
pus minstrels: director 
'87'88; 1988 klein con- 
cert chairman 




-> 



Anne Kupferschmid 
Modern Languages 
78 Cider Mill Rd. 
Ellington CT 06029 
mo'b the real o'b cock- 
tailparties jryr amm'87 
rathouse srwk 400 
nights 88nights volley- 
ball littlejane training 
room dinners mainell- 
bean 3x 



Elaine Kokoska 

English 

126 Woods End Rd. 

Fairfield CT 06430 




Debra Krayeski 
Economics 
291 Wedgewood Dr. 
Naugatuck CT 06770 
from j2 to big girls-i love 
u guys (esp. u room) 
thnx hose, b + s - no 
more pb+j / "all good- 
bye means is that we 
have to say hello 



Lisa Koury 

Sociology 

671 Woodland Ave. 

Pottstown PA 19464 

nothing gold can stay 

but memories r ours 

4ever /luv & thnx big 

girls & all who made 

these yrs golden 

/thnxpoop + weasy, 

ste -iluvu! 




Kevin Kuryla 

Management 

66 Linden Dr. 

Milford CT 06460 



Christine Kolar 
Mathematics 
24 Pembrook Dr. 
Mineola NY 11501 
loyola 1,2 85 rhoda 
dave hg, md, Ig, md, cf, 
cd, cs, co, so, mg, pi, 
ed: i love you all 



Eric Kruger 

Management 

16 Hunts Point Rd. 

Cp Elizabeth ME 04107 

johnny, 4 years together 

and no same classes. 

babs, thanx for the 

laughs. 




mbler PA 19002 



Cynthia Lambur 
Psychology 
46 Ramsgate Dr. 
Palos Park IL 60464 
to the fishbowl hey you 
guys ditch it big pigs co- 
mmand it's lites out to 
the dupe etc. thanks for 
a great year! caroly and 
gina love you always 
1/2 way house tootp 
rules 



f 




Sheri Lamont 
Accounting 
4 Mason Court 
Trenton NJ 08690 
mike th 24 campion kost 
kaacct phone bills littl 
esh — concert new 
years dance suitemate 
s softball mirror comp 
lab crutches fl friends 
holy 12 camaro 



Jennifer Lane 

Marketing 

1 17 Westfield Avenue 

Ansonia CT 06401 

3-14-85rlb!!kimle 

enshel2jsiu/fusac 

domeflafumlrc12sb 

br87baw23gb'stwin 

s188-88toadsndkmd 

58chasj's16jbenyr 

87tmrm17tauconnth 

xm&dluj 



Marian Langzettel 

Psychology 

65 Groveside Road 

Portland ME 04102 

conanandreamooshi 

dreamt idancedonso 

ultrainteenrobtom 

4states,1nightdrs 

youwindbagrosepau 

liwogbillscarypho 

toofweekdavewanda 

dadjoshmm.am.rd 



5ft 



\~J 




MH 




Suzanne Larkin 


^^HH 




Marketing 


^^^lvM 




40 James Dr. 


m^^ 


V 


Havertown PA 19083 


■/L 


kl 


104 you're great luv ya 
th88; life at the grape 






like; incredible; psycho 


^^^H 




hilo; nance; drinkypoo 
thanx mother and dad 


i 4 

<& 


T 


samjohn cu soon 


Beth Leiner 




Marketing 




153 Newton St. 


^W 


Meriden CT 06450 


— 






Jean Lenihan 
Economics 
9 Sound Ave. 
Stamford CT 06902 
fishbowl:mug, larry, 
eiof, fran, gimp: luvu al- 
most as much as bache- 
lors123! taylor readit! 
967 fiascos! bewareof 
chinburnlsalt, toad, 
hopes, blvinky 



Peter Latour 
Finance 

219 Bickford Hill 
Gardner MA 01440 
nd-scab van g-town pr- 
loudhouse the box club 
kb force hey mon capri- 
there's no substitute the 
party is over thanks 
mom&dad! 




Kathleen Lenox 

Modern Languages 

1028 Mayflower Ct. 

Martinsville NJ 08836 

annhhwenheffimso 

confused friends 4ever 

thl 13 billth 59 iluvu 

great adventure bolge 

love dog impatient intol- 

erantabsolutkenbarbie 

thnx mom dd 







234 



Left: Rob Gallois, John O'Brien, 
Carol Sujecki, Tom Keller, Loretta 
Doherty.Joe Carella, and Chris 
Cook. Eileen Lavan photo Below: 
Kerrie MacDonald, Georganne 
Stohr, Andrea Sobinski. John 
Courtmanche photo 



And today the great Yertle, that 
Marvelous he, is King of the Mud. That 
is all he can see. And the turtles of 
course... all the turtles are free as 
turtles and, maybe, all creatures 
should be. 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Mark Leonard 
History 
6 Mayfair Dr. 
Fairfield NJ 07006 
5am wakeup nice car 
vodka n it e-fishingacci- 
dent iowa dflowered 
gyros york uk no i dont 
want to teach th82-you 
guys r glorious 




Richard Letter 
Economics 

21 Benezet St. 
Philadelphia PA 19118 
thanks to everyone who 
helped & supported me 
at fu inc:the frat.my 
friends, teachers & es- 
pecially my parents love 

richard. peace! 



John Lazzari 
Psychology 
55 Greenwood Ln. 
Valhalla NY 10595 
cl3 18, shawn, pete/ 
seilers oonfulp 
urpose,sue-Q/73bu 
g/sailing,gleecl 
ub, prison, ambassa 
dors[all/th104, 
kevin, lee, pear, th 
102 ardigras88 





Clinton Lewis 

Biology 

132 Elmwood Ave. 

Hempstead NY 11550 

kapsiochoriosnov. 

23f86# 1,8:45pm. 

glenncl319studion 

yc42stjpcfrO'cf.k 

ruegerv.delriorav 

enjggrcheezclubsno 

wfutbolfecth131gle 

emgoldkeishaphinupi 



John Leahy 
Economics 
4612 Marshall Dr W 
Binghamton NY 13903 
has beens gilbertis t- 
hall may day plex gtown 
harley south padre i95 
ragu siena ride 400 d- 
wood moon thank you 
mom and dad swish 




Stephanie Lisk 
Biology 

634 Armanini Ave. 
Santa Clara CA 95050 
ter - nice 2 meet u! ca? 
why 'dugo 2fu? robe& 
duckwalks-quotable- 
quotes! nh & ny - llxll - 
julie3-heels on the 
beach! he 8 my earring! 
back east-missu&sfu 



Michael Lohle 
Info. Systems 
38 Laura Ln. 
Park Ridge NJ 07656 
donna, gegger, bobel, 
markus, scottym, joey, 
doc, mick, kostka2, 
400nts, morgan, mor- 
ningwood, yessi, boink, 
yugug, tostitos, ecoman 




Kathleen Lonergan 
Accounting 
63 Moore St. 
Chelmsford MA 01824 
i always knew that look- 
ing back at my crying 
would make me laugh, 
but I never knew that 
looking back at my 
laughter would make me 



235 




Paul Loumeau 

Marketing 

15 Locust St. 

Floral Park NY 11001 

drinkingbuddysroa 

dhouseregis2damag 

edmanshakyeeegsma 

rctressemonsterno 

rmdaveharryfriday 

hanknorgemattsmoot 

hpleasure&malley 

you'rethebest 




Frank Madalone 

Biology 

5 Piedmont Ave. 

Stat Island NY 10305 

k3tfcoveswedishgl 

oriahabninersbeen 

srdklhalloween3ki 

ngroadtripcollips 

nutsolutherunderr 

atedvmanhewhewdar 

tthanksmomndadalr 






Kerrie MacDonald 

Psychology 

40 Elderwood Ln. 

Melville NY 11747 

g2-1stdayminims4 

yrsqclilbitboflo 

ftstlippymonolon 

donnmgamensslast 

resortpointratro 

achsquirelhallow 

eenpatsrmsibsren 

tsyuconnpuntascam 

•tbot! 




Tara Lucano 

Fine Arts 

66 Poplar St. 

Garden City NY 11530 



Thomas Mafale 
Management 
38 Henderson St. 
Bristol CT 06010 
muff-dog /the dog- 
house l-myway '79t. a. 
big? beach-grape regis- 
ground thanks boys /liz 
and mom /dad 



Christine Lopol 

Chemistry 

67 Wood Rd. 

New Britain CT 06053 

joey /may 23. 1987 loy- 

ola 224 mart ha /there 



James Lynch 
Accounting 
1 Ashwood Dr. 
Suffern NY 10901 
du plexslacki n reef 
house 69ers gear up th 
47/153 kim comfy Ja- 
maica shcaff. studying 
is worth while when you 
know you will be mul- 
len's boss. 



Scott MacDonald 
Politiics 

20 No Pearson Dr. 
Warwick Rl 02888 
hh-awesome indc&in 
the closet trusty buick 
up to parr peewee bar- 
bados th62Raml mh 
c2h20 gabriel in nh co- 
leman can't read this 
toads 






.1 



Joy Maher 

Economics 

38 Eileen Way 

Edison NJ 08837 




Bridget Mahoney 

Biology 

2 Fairway Ct. 

Albany NY 12208 






Timothy Mahoney 

Management 

61 Vanderbilt Ave 

St. James NY 11780 

skidsnewromaaccha 

mpsswisssaclesslO 

63reefloudhouseth 

98beachnautgrapew 

oodsflalaricolse3 

90400,1 88, 88night 

smmgdkplsrjfusocc 

ergrad 




Craig Maloney 

Finance 

33 Edward St. 

Fairfield CT 06430 



Lisa Maloney 

Politics 

2807 Oakford Rd. 

Ardmore PA 19003 



Mark Mancini 
Biology 

33 Somerset Dr. 

Berlin CT 06037 
friends research-got no- 
where dr ross "it's get- 
ting worse!" "jim, we've 
established that "st 
croix 1/2mi swims lec- 
tor aed t h 2 i great 
times 



Jeanine Lotufo 
Management 
54 Teeter Rock Rd. 
Trumbull CT 06611 
loyola /m&m / 
dchlcccshhe /ccsun- 
rise /eijane mcroomie / 
seniorwk /orient /owl 
/bates /naut /grape / 
shack/ happyhourts 
tdalmd/mom sd shug 
dom /pennis /88 




Tina Maciag 

Marketing 

19 Camdus PI. 

Wayne NJ 07470 



Kathryrn Malley 
Accounting 
282 Lafayette Ave 
Westwood NJ 07675 
regis 1 /red door & roof 
/hgloria /jpiloveya /tail 
sorb-neverlikedu /new 
years/grape /naut 
/bullets /lohateem / 
closets /beach /had 
thetime of my life! 








1 ■ ■ 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 




Top: Jean Halloran. Tara 
McManus, and Kim Gaunt. 
Above: Donny O'Meara and 
Kerry Pollicino. Ben de la Cruz 
photos 



I could not 
would not 
on a boat, 
I will not 
will not 
with a 
goat. I will 
not eat 
them in 
the rain, I 
will not eat 
them on a 
train. Not 
in the dark, 
not in a 
tree, not in 
the car, 
you let me 
be. I do 
not like 
green eggs 
and ham, I 
do not like 
them Sam 
I am. 

237 



ileen Mangan 
English 

34 Merriam Place 
3ronxville NY 10708 
salndomnedschifface 
2allnitetalks nighttime 
-egistrar no thankyou 
[mint jfksartreoprah surf- 
Isupermanjesus pustule 
inithisisthetime88 



*=- M 



Todd Manglass 

Sociology 

107 Wheaton Ave. 

Fishkill NY 12524 




Kimberly Mann 

Marketing 

262 Lakeview Terr. 

Teaneck NJ 07666 

k166th53monerrace 

yregdiwallysueion 

asweetsuiteshared 

idspaulmylove + myb 

estfriendluv + than 

ksmomdad + michaelt 

hememorieswillliv 

eforever 



Susan Marshall 

Accounting 

135 Walnut St. 

W.Barnstabl MA 02668 




Ellenmary Martin 
Marketing 
29 DeForest Drive 
N.Branford CT 06471 
time and distance may 
keep us apart, but what 
we've shared will re- 
main at heart. Take car- 




John Mathes 

Economics 

18 Fairview Dr. 

Southborough MA 01772 




William Matits 
Marketing 
89 Central Ave. 
N. Haledon NJ 07508 
remembers dogs guido 
s154 boys reach, think 
big tony regis chix cock- 
tails dylan scam, wohop 
cruizinw/ace, yourea 
great friend thanx mom 
and dad 



Jean-Marie Matthews 
Mathematics 
9 William St. 
Bedford MA 01730 




And, finally, 
when all of the 
pulling was 
done, Gertrude, 
behind her, 
again had just 
one... That one 
little feather she 
had as a starter. 
But now that's 
enough, 
because now 
she is 
smarter. 

Far left: John Chiaia and Bob 
Scesa. Center: Eileen Mangan, 
Anne Kupferschmid, and 
Suzanne Serianni. _/o/w 
Courtmanche photos Right: Tim 
Buckley and Jim Kaishian. Ben 
de la Cruz photo 



Breck Masterson 
Economics 
East Hills Rd 
Watch Hill Rl 02891 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 




239 



'MEAT SHEET 

The Class of 1988 Freshmen Record, published 
in 1984, was used more times each semester per 
udent than any reference book in Nyselius li- 
. Most copies were worn after one semester, 
especially around the times of dances. Printing 
the page below, the Manor makes no judgements 
of degree of "meat"ness of those pictured — we 
only wish to show how much the Class of 1988 has 
changed in four years. 





JAMES MC AULIPFE 

Franklin Lakes. NJ 
Basketball. Fishing 
KARAN MC BRIDE 
Watertown. CT 
Art. Tennis 

ANDREW MCCABE 
New Hyde Park. NY 

JOHN MCCANN 

Milford. CT 
Computers. Yearbook 



JANE MCCARTHY 

Norwood. MA 
Basketball. Skiing 
MICHELE MC CARTHY 
Fairfield. CT 
Swimming. Travel 
KAREN MC CORMACK 
Fairfield. CT 
Dancing. Music 
COLLEEN MC DONNELL 
Fairfield. CT 
Dancing. People 



DEN1SEMCELHINNEY 

Mahopac. NY 
Crafts. Swimming 
MEGHAN MCGANN 
Monmouth Beach. NJ 
Music. People 
PATRICK MC GLYNN 
Brooklyn. NY 
Baseball. Reading 
MATTHEW MC GUIRE 
Granby. CT 
Basketball. Hockey 



GLENN MC INTYRE 

Verona. NJ 

Basketball. Hockey 

CONNIE MCKENNA 

West Lebanon. NH 

Running. Student Gov't 

CHRISTOPHER MC KEON 

North Haven. CT 

Golf. Hockey 

ERIC MCLAUGHLIN 

Winchester. MA 

Politics, Soccer 



Andrew McCabe 
History 
82 Evans St. 
N.Hyde Park NY 11040 
andy th 47 commuter 
resident hearts hot rod 
comfy schaff trek mul- 
Iensteinc2thebrairpin 
head 



Liberal Arts 
Pre Med 

Business 

Nursing 

Fine Arts 

Business 

Journalism 

Mathematics 
Nursing 
Business 
Business 

Computer Science 

Business 

Political Science 

Business 



Karen McCormack 

Management 

201 Wilson St. 

Fairfield CT 06432 




Douglas Mcintosh 

English 

452 West Shore Tl. 

Sparta NJ 07871 

quest ce qu'on peut 

dire? thank you mom 

and dad 



James Mclntyre 

Management 

701 Elmwood 

Wilmette IL 60091 



Mark McKenna 

Economics 

415 Mine Hill Rd. 

Fairfield CT 06430 



Connie McKenna 

Marketing 

5 Chandler St 

W.Lebanon NH 03784 

conan, tarponmanor. 

mirrorhouse, th84, an- 

draka, moosh, kuchie, 

mags, nhhalloween, ail- 

verbullet. catallergy, 

moi, laurel/hardy, lo- 

veoctlOpat 



!40 



I Joseph Matthews 
Business 
275 Clark St. 
Bridgeport CT 06606 




James McAuliffe 

English 

854 Scioto Dr. 

Frankln Lks NJ 07417 




Karan McBride 
Biology 
465 Davis St.' 
Oakville CT 06779 
thehgangthebioheads 
regis 2 in 87th 121. my 
20th. th 81 + 82 
"rack", the regis family 
of8zstandbyme. frank 
deb, sweens, the girls, 
kb. mom and dad thanx 
+ i love u 




John McCann 

Communications 

18 Point Lookout 

Milford CT 06460 



kkt; 



Jeffrey McDonald 
Marketing 
89 Mayfair Rd. 
Fairfield CT 06430 
dogwoods 85 sue ibe 
back eco buss di chick- 
en 7 days ftld new year 
seve 88th 53 jenuvm 88 
i95intothetrees kostk 
& th parties porsche 
reg & beaver thanks Ma 





Jane McCarthy 

Nursing 

247 Ridgewood Dr. 

Norwood MA 02062 



Colleen McDonnell 

English 

98 Stratfield Rd. 

Fairfield CT 06430 




Denise McElhinney 
Mathematics 
Cortlandt Rd Bx281 
Mahopac NY 10541 
the weenie /mary /den- 
ise /karen /the boys / 
cd's /jogues 31 1/ new 
years eve /fordham 
/gym parties /the tour 
/flapping tongues 




Timothy McGovern 

Biology 

RD #2 Kimble Ln. 

Sparta NJ 07871 



Patrick McGlynn 

Finance 

2142 East 13th St. 

Brooklyn NY 11229 






Matthew McGuire 

Finance 

8 Tennyson Dr. 

Granby CT 06035 





Glenn Mclntyre 

Economics 

31 East Reid.PI. 

Verona NJ 07044 






Christopher McKeon 

Politics 

31 Coach Dr. 

No Haven CT 06473 




Eric McLaughlin 
Finance 
52 Squire Rd. 
Winchester MA 01890 
what else can i say? 
thank you, one step be- 
yond-kristen, coach, 
and especially mom and 



m <z?\ 




241 



JD 



dweiser. 

TE OF THE WEE 



Hale 



id 



/"V^N 




THE CLASS OF 1 98 



Mc 



JiFD 



Aug. 31-Sept. 2, 

Orientation 19N6 
— Four years with 
the Red, W hite, 
and You". Jackie 
Mead, Charlie 
Bergin, Co-Chairs 



Sept. 20, 1986 
Hooters at Alumni 
Hall 



rHOR/«-COMW 



Sept. 1986 
Administration 
restricts Stag-Her 
programming on 
Thursday 



Oct. 1, 1986 
Football Club 
s 



Ft 



^ disband 

nigh,, -hpf 



Oct. 25, 1986 Nov. 13, 1986 

"World Series" Notice of TH party 

Harvest — sixth registration for 

game of Mets/Red parties of 16 + 

Sox series shown people. Maximum 

on large-screen in occupancy set at 50. 
Campus Center 
lobby 



rtj°° 



.untnaoW^rcNpveS 



k V\oOse 



STAGS UPSi 



Robert McMahon 
Mathematics 
76 Hiller Or. 
Seekonk MA 02771 
sarge tull green ma- 
chine, opel 13-the fir 

w b . th96&34, 

shark sleeping, water 
guns, erector set- 
&cracked heads cello 
fan club scoppalives 




Tara McManus 
Management 
14 Montvale Rd. 
Worcester MA 01609 




Michael McVeigh 

Management 

5 Stonelea Dr. 

Princetn Jnc NJ 08550 




Michele Menzo 

Management 

1 1 Mount Pleasant 

West Haven CT 06516 

r3Tjfitzmmtoadswh 

atitis??sb3rdralp 

hbuddyralphclsunk 

enscaledkwhatyoue 

xpect??th54dec487 

angusralphbasemen 

t I4bahamas88thank 

s2mcaswddrrkohno 



Jacqueline Mead 

Computer Science 

156 Longwood Ave. 

Westbury NY 11590 



Hadaelena Messia 

History 

24 Halladay Ave 

Suffield CT 06078 



MaryAnne Meehai 
Nursint 
4 Lake Drive V\ 
Wayne NJ 0747C 
th244657.charhbi 
zzbuzz.tacpkysco 
ebbcmdotgqsnewye 
rse dolawconcert: 
theholy 1 2youwomei 
arebeautifulmissy 
aAnd'ireallymeani 
I"thm4< 



242 



, w 



"* ^tDllf/M 



IMELINE: JUNIOR YEAR 



!#** 



an. 25, 1987 
r <ew York Giants 
vin Super Bowl. 



Feb. 3, 1987 
Students elect Chris 
Ritchie for FUSA 
President 



\ 



Feb. 7, 1987 

Say When wins first 

annual Battle of the 

Bands. Split 

Decision places 

second. 



March 2, 1987 
Stags win second 
MAAC 

championship. 
Second Quad 
uprising 



March 21, 1987 
Split Decision 
raises money for 
Jamaica food 
program 



Senior Week 
1987 — 

"Outrageousness". 
Shireen Rustom, 
Marianne Walsh, 
Co-Chairs 




Mb disbands 



-fe*.** 



"blisf, 



giub 



Dirt 



m g 




tooo/. 

WRE SECOND MAAC CROWN ' * 




243 







Laura Mitchell 

Psychology 

47 Kristin Rd. 

Plymouth MA 02360 

c4droidstequilawi 

tbakmdayu2reoclon 

eExrampejonk 1 5960 

rat4cshelpsychoki 

ller'njbkfstclubd 

cplo400leanonmeth 

5724heffallniters 



Mary Miller 
Nursing 
55 Val Dr. 
Stratford CT 06497 




Suzanne Miller 

Sociology 

66 Spring Ave. 

Bergenfield NJ 07621 



MaryLouise Molanphy 

Management 

59 Princeton St. 

RockvilleCtrNY 11570 



Wendy Monte 
Modern Languages 
36 Miles Standist 
West Hartford CT061O: 
g2espanath22klhhk 
. .hthx4lttngmebmebs 1 
kobarcelonain'92''l 
thl I3ilyagypsy.wri: 
ome?!kmtjdretdadii 
mymskily buenasue 
rteclassof'88 







Teresa Moran 




■m 


Kim Morano 








English 








Finance 


w^ ^ 


w 




128 Ruth St. 








87 Thoma Ave. 


w 


f m 


fc 


Bridgeport CT 06606 






A 


Maywood NJ 07607 


I 


V 9 


$1 








3L 




W «4i 


f % 

4 


V 














Mary Morris 


Richard Motyka 








Deenna Moyhet 


Fine Arts 
108 Connors Dr. 


^M 


Chemistry 
7 Knox Terrace 




*<\> 




Nursing 
29 Brookwood Ln 


Oak Ridge TN 37830 


w ^^% 


Totowa NJ 07512 


ki 






Huntington CT 06484 


'we have art, in order 






\ 


V >- 


•* v 




that we may not perish 


f JT 




1 


Pi ' 




from the truth' - nietz- 
sche 


Hi 


• 


\ 




r 








Alexander Muliero 






Patrick Mulkern 






^■fc 




Mathematics 


^ 


% 


Marketing 




^^W 


J^^^ 


i 


850 Ixora Dr 


^r 






84 Bartlett St. 


J 




m 




Jensen Beach FL 33457 








Chelmsford MA 01824 


1 




7 IT - 


J 


thebest vicaceric 










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m ^ • 


♦ 


kylitlmanmarkdogs 










■ ^ 




u 




upperdeckpals 153b 




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oyswebbpepethinkb 
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twoodspykpamtdoc 










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JR 


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simi$uvuannie 


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Maura Mullen 

Communications 

42 Cove Rd 

Huntington NY 1 1743 

...timeofmyhfeg2 

lastresort799part 

ysunendkegs400188 

88nightsftlflaac 

ulpulcoioweitallt 

oyou mskmasntgs.o 

wlsrmluptshackgtb 

c19h&phil iluvya 




Thomas Mullen 

Finance 

46 Mohegan Dr. 

W. Hartford CT 06117 

beaver grades mean 

nothing duplex where 

do I live th47 gear up 

sailing? realman 

wackus comfy dew- 

ars spring 87mia ve- 

gas "i need that'' 

slackin' 



Eileen Mulry 

Psychology 

6 Rosewood Place 

Plainview NY 1 1803 

Iaurderbsalith323 

4al'svienna3mange 

niuscl4volleyball 

sundaybowlersburp 

vowelschamberskar . 

anmarykevfreshnc 

hbnmair&cotomdeb 

mulryheadthanksu 



244 



Anthony Minnefor 
Business 
12 Bahama Rd. 
Morris Pins NJ 07950 
tammany hall high-fives 
the has beens are ya up 
for it? noodle fusa the 
ground brutal hound dog 



V 



Elizabeth Morgan 
English 

39 Waltham Rd. 
Wayland MA 01778 
the woods are dark, lo- 
vely and deepbut i have 
promises tokeepand 
miles to go before i 
sleep ilym + d, biggirls 
roma, gc-nothing worth 
whileis ez 



Eric Mullai 

Economics 

41 Rocky Ridge Rd. 

Trumbull CT 06611 




88 NIGHTS 




Most seniors list 88 Nights among the top three events of their college career. Same's 
Manor in Milford was classy — sure, they didn't let us in the room until exactly 7 p.m., 
but with two bars, a sit-down dinner, a big dance floor, chandeliers and gold trim 
(did someone forget to tell the manager who we were?), seniors enjoyed the royal 
treatment. 

We were sober for the chicken, but by the time the mousse arrived for dessert... 

The line to the women's room was long as usual, but a few lucky seniors found the 
secret bridal bathrooms. The DJ.s played "China Grove" and "Paradise by the 
Dashboard Light," among other songs. We danced and danced. The pictures on the 
following pages capture the Patrick Swayzes and Jennifer Greys who came out of the 
closet that night. Everyone was picture happy, including the Manor. Junior Mike 
Belcourt took the Manor photos. 



245 




Thomas Murphy 

Management 

423 Newbold Rd. 

Jenkinlown PA 19046 

thanks (airfield for the 

great times and the 

great friends- it was too 

short! thank you mom 

and dad, love, ted 




Daniel Myers III 

Sociology 

14 Academy Rd. 

Morris Pins NJ 07950 




Marlene Nadp 

Economics 

77 Savin ParkW~ 

Haven CT 0651 1 




Nancy Nawojchik 
Finance 

86 Northwoods Rd. 
Manhasset NY 1 1030 
campion 4 luvto lora, liz. 
mr, ab, be, spring break 
86 thanks sam. london 
stan hope derek + liz, 
kiwis, sainsburys, 3 cor- 
sicansinnice. camels, 
trinrest i luv all 




Martin Neary 

Marketing 

10 Scatacook Trail 

Weston CT 06883 





Left: Rodney Ralph, junior Chris Peters. 
Sue Silecchia, and Joe Felice. Above: Denise 
Hallowell and her little Patrick Swayze. 



'ennifer Murphy 

I.nglish 
1913 Fawn Ridge 
?eston VA 22094 




Joseph Murphy 
Accounting 
92-15 70 Ave. 
Forest Hills NY 11375 




Christine Narad 
Nursing 
3 Colony Rd. 
Westport CT 06880 
thanks mom and dad! 
diana no more non- 
sense, now we are real 



Robert Nighan 
Management 
5 Thayer Rd. 
Manchester CT 06040 
karen, you're my one 
and only, cam and car- 
mine spring break '88. 
lime to face the world. 



V / 





Marianne Walsh. 



247 




James Norr 

Accountir, 

133 Seacord Rfl 

N. Rochelle NY 1080«I 

k3theboysgloriach 

ichinghasbeensnine 

rschampslkgeorge 

hamptonsthallgary 

snovabcutah400mg 

htsgoslagsnutsogo 

bigredbeachpartyt 

hnxguys* 



Mary Pat O'Brien 

Psychology 

433 Oradell Ave 

Oradell NJ 07649 

zellefunny?!lizjo 

anhavadaysrwkreel 

hseroadhsetotally 

coolcampionscotti 

tsthesweatrpallii 

anebgjettytonyflo 

rida'88bjoelsting 

ytgitc 



^. " 



Gavin O'Connor 

Finance 

66 Brooktree Rd 

East Windsor NJ 08520 



Del i S • Suzanne Serianni, and Eileen 

M.niL-.in Lefl John ( Oultei and Rob Amoroso. 



( harlie Bergin 



248 



Eric Nordin 
Biology 

3 Plaskon Dr Ext 
Shelton CT 06484 
going to class is like the 
law of diminishing re- 
turns - the more you go, 
the less you get out of it. 
•the invisible man 



fa 




David O'Brien 

Economics 

725 Chestnut Ave. 

Wilmette IL 60091 



Thomas Nydegger 

Sociology 

287 Gardner Rd. 

Ridgewood NJ 07450 

jogues may'87 the gray 

ghost k201 kostka new 

years '88 howbout 1806 

toothbrush up and down 

campm in th 1 13 au 

010a floyd the husses 

400 188 88nites 




Christopher Norman 

Politics 

17 Hanover Dr, 

Medford NJ 08055 



Deirdre O'Brien 

Economics 

227 Seville Blvd. 

Sayville NY 11782 

dh, cb, Iz, jk, cm, mt, ct- 

lydt fr regis mg /ft. laud 

85 /bah 87 /jam 88 scm 

ccod m-man ewes-av? & 

bch jr/ sr our house sr- 

wk thanx m&d 




Carey O'Brien 

Sociology 

75 Bain Bridge Rd. 

W.Hartford CT06119 

loyola the point london 

pcm europe th44 nyc 

mcsorleys new rochelle 

grape naut rugby games 

morning events mike 

thanks mom & dad 




Harry Norman 

Mathematics 

165 North Elm St. 

Beacon NY 12508 

reg218monsterkp14 

shots-2thingskami 

kazedaverobwomeno 

nrg2-normdidscary 

!5/5/87tokyo-hous 

ereckchinatown-no 

rge188nightsjgltl 

bspringbreakpill 



John O'Brien 
Management 
40 Play Rd. 
Enfield CT 06082 



Mary Theresa O'Brien 
Accounting 
375 Scarsdale Rd. 
Crestwood NY 10707 
i cannot leave as i came 
because my friends 
have become a part of 
me. i have won and i 
have lost but most of all 
i have grown. 




Mary O'Hara 

Economics 

1960 Little John Ln. 

Allentown PA 18103 



fa 



Shannon O'Connell 

Nursing 

57 Phelps Drive 

Hamden CT 06514 



^r 



Lauren Occhipinti 
Management 
105 St. Germaine Dr. 
Clark NJ 07066 
hey bith tv heads. ..and 
a bell! chacharone 
idunt.du yew? play- 
Land, 87 mira hurricanes 
comin' pelican do not 
use on windows! (oops!) 



c> 



l« 



Kenneth O'Keefe 

Economics 

12 Priscilla Ln. 

Poughkeepsie NY 12603 




Brian O'Connor 

Politics 

1237 Valley Rd. 

Fairfield CT 06432 




249 




Left: Mike Dowling. Below: 
Ken O'Keefe, Shireen Rustom, 
and Nancy Nawojchik. 




Erik Olesen 
Communications 
Eight Donna Dr. 
Oyster Bay NY 11771 




Mary O'Malley 
Computer Science 
46 Thornton St. 
Springfield MA 01104 
didn't lose fencing 
champs! compiler ag- 
ony, talk ative sue I 
dancing beth /pull In 
■kelly /th107 forever! 



Lucia Onofrio 

Biology 

304 Elizabeth St. 

Derby CT 06418 

19S8'th8 1 ilybjvly 

th82lrruitln?frbi 

osharkcm4val.hear 

tsahaheetookitook 

i'87vtearly1stsnr 

yrareucrazy?!snoo 

zealarmfriendsfor 

everglo 




Karen O Rourke 
Computer Science 
15 Saturn Blvd. 
Hauppauge NY 11788 
tripleplaypensandbox 
trans always the prob- 
lem dj •'•' 1 roomie 
•gcsoccerdancepal ' 
jglastcallpal * jmsea- 
portsummer " zels- 
fleetwdfun ' a & a * sis 
barb ' luv 2 all! 




Kathleen O'Rourke 
Marketing 
57 Saxony Rd. 
Farmingham MA 01701 
thx for the memories: 
regis 1 +3 espana lax 
soccer capesummers 
wndsrfn montego bay 
disney rdtrip th1 15 lelw 
givwkpnabrlyg spclxmtv 
thx m + d 



Lisa Pappano 
Finance 
304 Jeffrey Ln. 
Newtown Sq. PA 19073 
kiko/jv tc/gd cs 
ockh |&I sg 88 
cancun th44villan 
ova/hulmazatlan 

oza boston see 
nery this is goin 
g to be a mission 
night thanksm 4 d 



Dea Paoletta 

Marketing 

64 Hickory St. 

Bridgeport CT 06610 

lothousmauilistjp 

ayfirsthapyhrfloa 

tnautgrape gdplex 

halowen87clamjamp 

headsajbeachvballb 

joeljamaicacmspsc 

ecthnx4great times 

thxm&d 




250 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Christopher Parrelli 

English 

2120 Raritan Rd. 

Westfield NJ 07090 



Sheila O'Malley 
Sociology 

512 North Grand St. 
W. Suffield CT 06093 
nyc, mcsorley, valient, 
loyola2&3,am event, 
beach, grape, th44 
scandel w/ pat, rugby 
games, london, back- 
packing, greatfriends + 
times!! 




Donald O'Meara.Jr. 
Communications 
234 Vernon Ave. 
Glencoe IL 60022 




James O'Meara 

Marketing 

158 Forest Ave. 

New Rochelle NY 10804 




Lisa Panico 

Nursing 

640 Still Hill Rd. 

Hamden CT 06518 

sw10/ 19youmadeit 

allworthwhile- il 

oveu/biggirlsfore 

ver k4yrs-bestro 

omiensgitwasallwo 

rthit! aeawecmkwe 

madeit!the"pit"-l 

p mkem/thanksm + d 



Alicia Parachini 

Accounting 

20 Prospect Ave. 

Montvale NJ 07645 



Luke Palacio 

Economics 

31 Apple Dr. 

Spring Lk Ht NJ 07762 

cuban/ sac/loudho 

use = moneypit/notr 

edame,aerostar/40 

Oblacknights/rico 

/th98/ smelly = clu 

eless / 88nights / we 

ightwatcher/johnn 

yK/ sa 




Jessica Parsons 

Finance 

12 Oxford St. 

Bethel CT 06801 



251 




Tracy Patterson 
Communications 
10 Acorn Dr. 
Niantic CT 06357 
th155, mo'h. mkf, vg, 
cb. kmg, eg, jc, r4, an- 
chor, ch.3. d&p. cam, 
vt'85, video, fee, 
squeeze, 400, 188, 
88nts ., sssexdance, 
leanonme, ???, 

seeyouatthereunion 




Laura Perini 

Psychology 

100 Rea Ave. Ext. 

Hawthorne NJ 07506 

l2l333geniuspopit 

al'spalomino mole 

rderbinannebreeme 

?nachos27fzynavel 

snyc fmgruchksdbt 

heguysnextdoorthm 

ybro bbq rtbballt 

hespot88nad love 






Ann Pianka 
Nursing 
South Great Rd. 
Lincoln MA 01773 
mom, dad & marcy 
thanx - your love & sup- 
port mean everything to 
me. i love you very 
much, to my friends-u r 
all special & i'll miss you 
much! 



Francis Pasini 

Biology 

1 1 Oxford Dr. 

Enfield CT 06082 

southpadregobigre 

diu3rddowngoaltog 

ootlakegeorgethes 

hotinfrontvietnam 

boardybarnroadkil 

lshannonssallys69 

ersthehorncollipp 

swhosrunninnutty 



Dana Pellegrino 
Politics 

45 Nedellec Dr. 
Saddle Brook NJ 07662 
snailmates trish "4 sow 
oy 1 bball blowouts naut 
loymp's pr kb md87 
400n's Ip ga-chinese 
mgdessert elev. rides 
sbtrips - jtcobbrlk 1 fan 
m & d 



John Perrotti III 
Physics 
P.O. Box 55 
Cheshire CT 06410 
theboys k3 to th153 kb 
69ers champions road- 
kill physics sarasota 
lake george indiannapo- 
lis pc vu catrick sallys 




Linda Paul 
Mathematics 
34 Hazel Ln. 
Needham MA 02194 
adven.w/kb, nihockga, 
"thecave", jd, jackn'fr., 
"helpme" wkends da- 
cin' at the patch; good- 
times, workin'atsher, 
shotsoftq, dc, what- 
chathink? 



3^ 



Sheila Perkinson 
o 

English 

12704 Huntsman Way 

Potomac MD 20854 

lothousep-headsmu 

skoscamp4 th45fra 

tpoker nautmaulli 

stchalkboardxlax v 

inbdaybettrnsvhap 

pyhrjamaica hawk, 

m&d xxoo 




Magalie Pierre 

Economics 

1676 Fairfield Ave. 

Bridgeport CT 06605 



Louis Pellegrino 
Economics 
100 Adla Dr. 
Hamden CT 06514 



Larisa Petriano 
Fine Arts 

734 Belvidere Ave. 
Westfield NJ 07090 




Joseph Peccerill(j 

Biology 

25 East Ninth St, 

Derby CT 06418 

hangerswisschtvya 

z'smajor?napsljen 

trprsemikeyaaeeto 

okitooki!ilydmd88 

nitesthpasqualemo 

m + dadymtplopmmmls 

ddcdkcthingsglori 

a4~ lyrs 






Jeannine Perret 
Marketing 
61-44 148 Place 
Flushing NY 11367 
ap ds nr cc ds tb kd eg 
sd jogues 2&3 christ- 
mas'84 groundhogs 
poker the picnic beach 
bums lee's car new ha- 
ven thl02 th64 love you 
always 




Theresa Piscitelli 
Psychology 
76 Emmett Ave 
Derby CT 06418 
yaz photo ml joe pat 
chris ken lora dawn 
goodtimesgoodfriends 
88 nights boppers pop- 
corn that's special I'm 
so confused your mom 
called go scratch 



252 



John Patterson 

Politics 

1 10 Tappan Landing 

Tarrytown NY 10591 

reg213greenglobsm 

ellinsdoortgakola 

rsdraw.tnafugez.c 

one,my587tatianat 

okyodavjailbirdmo 

nsteracdcties,926 

85kmwvu,mccjloooo 

moskippymreggsout 



Jose Perez-Vega 
Finance 
170 Kildare Rd. 
Garden City NY 11530 
freshman year gonza- 
ga3 toads masters new 
york baseball north 
Carolina th15sopine- 
creek melting pot 
thanks mom dad george 




Christine Phelan 
Psychology 
122 Frost Rd. 
Waterbury CT 06705 



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Top: Mary Lou 
Browne and Chris 
Ritchie. Center: Gina 
Vendola and Terri 
Durso. Left: 
Hadaelena Messia and 
Doug Mcintosh. 



253 




Kerry Pollicino 
Communications 
93 Summit Dr. 
Manhasset NY 1 1030 



Christine Prespare 

Management 

22 Butternut Ln. 

Simsbury CT 06070 



* 



Douglas Ranno 
Management 
70 Burma Rd. 
Wyckoff NJ 07481 
glegle /cl 4/400 
/abroad /check box 13 
IUA /dsb /th98 /nova 
/nd /romona /loud 
house + roons /thks m 
+ d /vt /pr /alumni 
/400s /88 /4 years had 
to love it /fb9. 




Maureen Quinlan 
Accounting 
99 Hillview Ave. 
Yonkers NY 11704 
th 465724, holy 12 cc Ij 
kl ms tr dm, k1c 4 fire 
drills, u2 billyjoel, piz- 
zain georgetown, 
ghdays, thur nights sub- 
way rides w /c Shake- 
speare in cp the end 



Christine Portante 
Physics 

918 Ashland St. 
Valley Ctge NY 10989 
halcyon days, blinded 
me with science, sea 
ranch, mas, elton, vc, so 
amused, gb, dosometh- 
ing, s-pot move, njb, 
work?, allforareason, 
thanks! (mdr) 



Corrie Rapillo 
Nursing 

44 Harvester Rd. 
Trumbull CT 06611 
campion4, 530am alrea- 
dy'dark elevator, hall at 
7am-g'night, dunkin 
donuts, athena, kd me 
too you!, jellies. 
th66sotb, natenq85, 
apor, ilymdggsjdr 



1 



Market 

9 Parkview 

Commack NY 1 17 

annabelle th97 

lo/aliaura/ha: 

I306tb,jt9-14-fi 

chrisb-scorpioi 

ikey/wq alone 

la/ekim/kd th9E 

ys/jgnavy/"beginr 

ings' 




Jay Post 
Economics 
707 Shadowlawn Dr. 
Westfield NJ 07090 
to th38 & an Occasional 
roommate /my friends 
from regis, the book- 
store, ibm lab& espe- 
cially rena-thanks for 
the good times-later 




Rodney Ralph 

Finance 

149 Greenwood Ave. 

Waterbury CT 06704 

rodthebob, k3, k2ab, 

cm, ch, ra-ly3, rg, rs, 

mm, '88gear-upth47, jf, 

bv, am, duplex, bd, tm, 

jl, th53, dn, jn, km, r- 

plexjd, md, sure shots 

love all class '88 



Kristine Potensky 
Politics 
Monmouth Rd. 
Clarksburg NJ 08510 
4funyrs:vicagogil 
arkolealiterkmdds 
cottarakddcmrylst 
rsrtnautalamolall 
yylebocamontegoba 
ymom,dadthanks-i 
luv ya.ily2pete i 
'II miss "it" all! 



HFS 



Michael Raneri 
Economics 
59 Mistletoe Dr. 
Southbury CT 06488 
jogues4, greenturtle, 
frruggerswtfaw!, Swit- 
zerland, newro, baha- 
mas, carey, rutgers- 
tourney, ndtryp, eco, 
ftlaud, thepoint, naut, 
spring88! 



Joseph Potvin 

Biology 

50 Pearl St. 

Hudson Falls NY 12839 



a 



Thomas Reagan 
Biology 

201 Tipton Rd. 
Newport News VA 23606 
the running puma, yel- 
low bomb, snake bites. 
John torn torn pat chris 
kevin bill Janet the hus- 
boys and th 22 girls. 
wiedies and miclight. 




Denise Reichenbacher 

Marketing 

33 Stagecoach Rd. 

Hingham MA 02043 



Deborah Reichheld 
Communications 
10 Heritage Dr. 
E.Greenwich Rl 02818 




Terry Ralston 
Fine Arts 
447 Stratfieid Rd. 
Fairfield CT 06430 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



ft: Dancer and DJ. (and 
>nner and Blitzen). Above: 
e bartenders, Joe Carella, 
b Follis, Kevin, and Karen 

ggy- 



Mike Whalen and Rich Letter. 




Mights ended with a bang 
jzard We exited S&nte's 
: red but satisfied, and 
>ne inch of snow on the 
with more tailing. The 
[-95 \>..is slow — 
:.iwled along the break- 
l to .in oid accidents. 
Inside the bus. we chatted 
quietly. The bus C.B.'s carried 
5 of an accident, and some- 
thing about some seniors get- 
ting sick. Those of us who sur- 
\i\cd the ride found post-ss 
Nights parties at the town- 
houses and beach, as if partying 
with ""GO classmates for six hours 
• enough. 

Right: Marts Kellaher and 

Christine Chagares. Below: 

Ken Jordan, Chris Keating, 

Don Gomber, and Tom 

Keller. Bottom: Mary Lee 

Miller and Pat Brino. 








Laila Rhee 

Biology 

396 Leslie Ln. 

Uniondale NY 11553 

bahamas thanxbioh 

eads/th81.82/vt p 

ictionry-H's/h + s 

inthedk/ 13mihike 

halloween 

amp4du 

bonetkamikaz fogh 

rn/gq/u2/asa/k/th1 H 

01 thanxpopcar 





Nelida Rivera 

Marketing 

20 Mt. Vernon Ave. 

Waferbury CT 06708 

big house girls i 

t's been great 

uv my roommates-Ik 

,cc/ never forget 

my favorite guysjd.tm.rk 

oves-mg 

/thanks mom & dad 

- i made it! 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Pamela Revak 

Finance 

294 Toilsome Hill 

Fairfield CT 06432 




Marcello Rotino 

Economics 

41 Alexander Dr. 

West Haven CT 06516 



T 



David Reilly 
Economics 
10 Oakdale Rd. 
Branford CT 06405 
th112bd, cr, rf, rm, tj, 
eg, ire, kf, cb, Laura, g3, 
j4, bubba, rm, pie, geor- 
gepeterich, turk, califor- 
niaearthquakeyos, otra- 
palach, marian, scary, 
ths, m & dimi 





Karen Ricci 
Accounting 
70 Glenmoor Dr. 
East Haven CT 06512 
hey bith chacharone it's 
a major award hurri- 
canes comin' we're ex- 
pecting friends mira 
move! do not use on win- 
dows (oops) th 94 



KelliJean Riley 

Economics 
36 Bunce Rd. 
Wethersfield CT 06109 




Joseph Rella 
English 
29 Priory Ln. 
Pelham Manor NY 10803 
snappers jo-ann ammo 
barbados ml sm mh sr 
meh dm jc mer k2 db 
hellieu c2 hoops rang- 
ers pec mets'86 "joer- 
ella" thanks mom&dad! 



Loretto Rigney 
Accounting 
4 Kimson Ct. 
Plandome NY 11030 
gigglebox ft lauderdale- 
bus 86 londonflat #2 
stanhopepub cider mo- 
rocco holes nice ob1 
104 behind grape-luv 
Uguys + ? dh + s europe 
88 nn? 





Patricia Robinson 

English 

1334 Stafore Dr. 

Bethlehem PA 18017 



James Roche 
Economics 
02 Forest Ave. 
Verona NJ 07044 
cm1 soccer w.palm 
clubhouse 400 nights 
u2'87 moira (hasn't- 
beenthesamesince) 
darkalelstepbeyond 
coach thin walls late- 
kegs thanks mom and 
dad 



"5* -*. ** 



Thomas Rooney 
Accounting 
1 135 Korfitsen Rd. 
New Milford NJ 07646 
jgs 4 msg/pba / double 
gombo / greenturtle / 
loudhouse / houseacct 
/ 400 / caddo/alumni/ 
sackless / nurse/ 
dishes/wheatbread / 
redbarn /mom dad/ 






Kelly Reynolds 
Psychology 
87 East St. 
Hicksville NY 11801 




Christopher Ritchie 
Politics 

143 Beardsley Pkwy. 
Trumbull CT 06611 
fusa, regis ground, 
kostka 3th91, fk, jm, 
mm, kp, mw, kc, ragu, jc, 
jc, fc, jg, mr. fitz, fran 
thanks, i love you jazz 




Anthony Ross 
History 

57 Broadlawn Park 
ChestnutHill MA 02167 
time of my life jg dland 
154 bonds-pyk,al + an- 
nie, vic + cjan, ace, 
mark, ricky, dogs + u- 
deck sadies'87 + kris- 
ten thanks uncle, aunt, 
mom, marv — tr.oss 




Maura Rowley 

Nursing 

14 Adrienne Dr. 

Canton MA 02021 

it won't be long before 

another day we gonna 

have a good time and 

noone's gonna take that 

time away you can stay 

as long as you like jt 



^^ :*m* ^*< 



Mary Ellen Roy 

Economics 

21 Hintz Dr. 

Wallingford CT 06492 

th 92 herb quotes pas- 

tarum & diet coke vi- 

sackis /diand she was 

airbands /mobbballdc / 

jrella/ kenaug6 /mom 

dad tj, s, j, r, k, g, d 

thanks i love you 




A 




Elizabeth Ruggieri 

English 

1412 Rene Rd. 

Villanova PA 19085 



Concetta Ruggiero 
Computer Science 
423 Boston Post Rd. 
Rye NY 10580 

shrumpandtuna / rac 
quetball ch vd wc 
st jv dk Is dr do 
n'teverlosetouch/ 
iloveyouguys/ spa 
rkyiwalyma/i'llmi 
ssyoucampion4 goo 
d-byetu 



Stephen Rutkowski 

Biology 

1 Sunset Ave. 

Bayonne NJ 07002 

tk sayyousayme de 
d2nysept5bigba 
nana/r22/hj/br.mt 
n lick dml jl ba 
ir dreams dances 

fr b devineeco 9 
89 pulito mom.dad 



fz) 



Elizabeth Ryan 

Psychology 

26 Overlook Rd. 

White Plains NY 10605 



Robert Saracino 
Marketing 
27 Lincoln St 
Trumbull CT 0661 1 





Amy Sergeant 
Management 
137 West Side Dr 
Hamden CT 06514 
r3ward grayzoneda 
nee demerys zbroa 
dway e6yalevirgin 
ia 3mth54youcango 
homenowtransitive 

propa&w bestroom 
iestiger bahamasS 
8shem thanks m + d 



Patricia Sacker 
Mathematics 
P.O. Box 813 
Mattituck NY 11952 
john ( pjbpccs,urbanre- 
treat house orville cook- 
ie monster new york city 
blessedsacrament 807 
brewster st Stamford 
high school 5am florida 



^k.i 



258 



HANDELIERS 



:Jim Kaoud, Gareth Charter, and Charlie Smith. Kai 
denberger photo Below: Alison Eschmann, Nancy Agovino, 
itine Potensky, and Jody Kenney.Jo/w Courtmanche photo 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Salvatore Rubano 
Accounting 
224 Rimmon Rd. 
Woodbridge CT 06525 



Annette Sally 

Markeffhg 

145 Webber Ave. 

N.Tarrytown NY 10591 



radford Runyon 

inance 

357 Oakwood Ave. 

ighland Pk IL 60035 

sh dewdropinnsc 

Ichwhatareyou.nu 

>?pitmanvoterebu 

licanlnyc + cancun 

nnotmakingfunofy 

urmother.persel' 

icuttingclasstjsb 

icmbj 



m&'~ 




eborah Saya 

ccounting 

6 Jockey Ln. 

lew City NY 10956 



Lora Saltis 

Marketing 

62 Russell St. 

Mystic CT 06355 




Caroline Russo 

English 

32 Dover Rd. 

Congers NY 10920 

84-88fulloflove'n 

memoriesthanxtoth 

'37kbcmmw/urthebe 

stt-smilealwaystv 

'member'rtalksscr 

ew'85bpk2dscmcp18 

8jcacapulcoflabed 

-checks 




r\m 



Jean Scarperi 
Marketing 
12 Gressinger Rd. 
Wayne NJ 07470 
babbler stager at power 
convosth 16 london 87 
ny nye thanks everyone 
for the great times good 
luck love you mom & dad 



Kenneth Santopietro 

Accounting 

91 Ransom Hall Rd. 

Wolcott CT 06716 

regis2 gonzaga3 th 

72/93halloween86 

mar10'87 mirror, fusa, 

a + g, ltd, many wkends 

home w/lucy - they 

were worth it! iluvu 

thank you mom + dad 



Shireen Rustom 
English 
69 Fox Place 
Hicksville NY 11801 
and in the middle of here 
and now, don't you think 
that we might see each 
other once or twice?- 
richard bach- "we all 
had a terrific time" 



Alison Scavuzzo 

Biology 

276 Vitmar Place 

Park Ridge NJ 07565 




Lynn Schnitzer 

Mathematics 

2086 H Elder St. 

Reading PA 19604 

hcross /c 4 cadets 

screw yr 87 88 /mkc, 

ml, kb, dc, mc, jm /rob- 

nyc, asours /rbygms, 

skeevesgrape, lookout 

/ verona/amerpie tk- 

shore '87 /mom & dad • 

loveu 



Normington Schofield 

Biology 

16 Van Buren St. 

Beacon NY 12508 



Valerie Schevon 

Biology 

246 Oakwood Dr 

Paramus NJ 07652 

mbevrybdyduzltbio 

sharksombdylsguyc 

ploftlallth8l)cbb 

lomorthallwsmashn 

onukesmxsbahamal 

rfssvtrcmskidmreu 

2trainsniteshar 

akispeace 



G 




David Schmitt 

Marketing 

6 Bolin Rd. 

Coram NY 11727 

davey"d"theracew. 

endnewrosalvejogu 

es164044ckhairban 

dthursluvabirthty 

sonbucaacfootball 

r.dmcphelmetsbudm 

aacpharborfu stupid 

bccthanxmom&dad 



fa 




Carolyn Schl 



70 Ridge ( 
New City NY 109Se 
g2pp( + mrshoemax" 
ussgdancersessi 

sbbngeditthatci 

sterhighc'slandi 

nsterw-birdnma 

I40018888ltestgt 

my "family "Ibdcl 



V* ' F 



Michael Schroeder 

Management 

155 Metcalf Rd. 

Tolland CT 06084 

roadhouselauderda 

lelondonacupulcod 

rinkandthrowmorni 

ngpartiesr2colgat 

ewiedemannslboxsa 

cnewrophilgexcess 




Susan Selinka 

Biology 

116 Kenilworth Rd 

Ridgewood NJ 07450 



Suzanne Serianni 

Marketing 

504 Marks Rd. 

Oreland PA 19075 

saldomanetschifer 

Mateniteclangcla 
ngclanglgagerides 

soberlgruffintheb 

ufllotzoflovelnwh 
ippersonny&surela 

Iwayssisterchrist 



John Seylaz, Jr. 

Sociology 

131 Cottage PI. W 

Gillette NJ 07933 

husseserme tj c 

b/pm/webbh/rs/ squ 

id / janet920newyea 

rseve87/ernie-one' 

drinklrunpumafloy 

d/goodlucktoall-w. 

emadeit family-be 

st + thanx 



2M) 



Deborah Schif 
Psychology 
1 12 Meadowmere Rd. 
Stratford CT 06497 
thanx: nettes, ei, sue for 
the laughter & tears, 
grew from it all, fu-im not 
the same person, mom 
& dad for the support & 
encouragement, god for 
everything. 




Michael Schneider 

Marketing 

70 Hollydale Rd. 

Stratford CT 06497 








THE CLASS CLOCK 



They named the gift-giving categories after 
beers — Michelob Club, Budweiser Club, and for the 
most generous seniors, the Heineken Club. Still, 
raising $10,000 for a clock like the one pictured at 
right wasn't easy. Private donations didn't go over 
as well as fund-raising events — Senior Night at the 
Grape, and the Senior Bash in April. The 
committee elicited S5 from every 88 Nights ticket. 

Eileen Devenny and Rob Carangelo were in 
charge of the Senior Gift committee, overseen by- 
Alumni Relations. The clock will be erected within 
the next two years, when the University paves the 
road and lays new lawn between Canisius and the 
Campus Center, shown above. 

Senior Brian Gallagher considered donating 
some money that he won to the gift, but Debbie 
Henley convinced him to buy something nice for 
himself instead. John Courtmanche photos 



261 



I 



Frances Sgambati 

English 

423 Park Ave. 

Mechanicville NY 121 18 

(ishbowlmoirashop 

'newrochelleeibal 

lit'samanboything 

hallo weenrobertsa 

Itlarisailuvthegi 

mpjeanmugbethyuht 

hink?188lizzie... 



f^i 



Edward Shaughnessy 
Physics 

53 N. Sylvan Rd. 
Westport CT 06880 
i came to lu with many 
questions. i leave with 
even more but now i 
know what questions 
are worth asking and 
what answers are worth 
knowing 




Nancy Shore 
Nursing 
6 Windsor Ct. 
Fairfield NJ 07006 
will always remember 
friends from fu-esp. ruth- 
roommate of 4 yrs. 
thanx! love - u - marcello 
most important-thanks 
to my family, iluvu! 



Suzanne Silecchia 

Management 

92 Riverside Or. 

Rockville Ctr NY 11570 



Thomas Slev 

Marketir 

8 Sierra Tei 

Wayne NJ 074i 





Barbara Sheehan 
English 

158 A Chestnut St. 
3oonton NJ 07005 
hanksforthememor 
es,luvyajd,rk,nb 
ap,cf,mr,kb,taly 
2ks2raorangejuice 
Isnookumsbardroses 
Jaughcabbagepatch 
|optometryringbruc 
leiloveyoulcookie 



Peter Sheft 

Marketing 

6 Fairview Dr. 

N. Caldwell NJ 07006 



• 



Lisa Shook 

Mathematics 

5261 Meadowbrook Dr. 

Mechanicsburg PA 17055 

th92-bestfriendss 

urprisepartyherbb 

acardi&dietcokeck 

isquoteboard/de-c 

apecod/lc-88night 

s/kms-widdlebrudd 

erfairfieldlove/m 

&d-love 



Melissa Small 

History 

125 Lakeview Ave. 

RockvilleCtr NY 11570 



Charles Smith 
Economics 
1 1A Bayberry Ln. 
Scarborough ME 04074 
mblh, sunrise at turnar- 
ound, Sundays in the 
dungeon, are you afraid, 
catfish never, dies, 
frank, afsthanks, 
ckboard, daytona, cctv, 
madeit. 



Theresa Smith 

Economics 

224 Ohio Ave. 

W Springfield MA 01089 

417fdrillsguyoukn 

Dwhweengqbudheffl 

jmpsleepg&t'sinli 

37&7slammerssickf 

sh400ecostandbym 

3u2fwh12th46fties 

l88trashed88wondr 

ulworld thanks. 



,XZM 



Veronica Smith 
Nursing 

31 Pondview Dr. 
Congers NY 10920 
guinan.. vna "i think you 
girls are confused!" 
shamrock pub; 

lunches!! th81 thanx, 
th122 tuna & noodles; 
thanx for everything!! 
roadtrips; Ik! cp, jc, eg, 
bye! 



> 



Susan Smorto 
American Studies 
40 Tower Rdi 
Brookfld Cen CT 06805 
kostkathesweetsui 
te:ionapineapplep 
artycrayons-thank 
sgirlslsinceorien 
tation84ilyalex!t 
hanksforcomingtoj 
uliejblca.on to o 
nel! . 



Kevin Shubert 
Management 
PO Box 2296 
Huntington CT 06484 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 






Up and Down 
the River 

Far Lett: Joe Carella. Laura 
Perini, and Alice Ann 
DuBoyce. Left: Tom Mullen, 
Mary Guerin. Kristine 
Potensky, Peter Holland. 
Marianne Walsh, Karen 
Attridge. John Cot/rtmanche 
photos. 



263 




Sink the Ship 

Top: Tom Roonev, Tom Brady, the 

mouth, and John Tuohy. John 

Courtmanche photo Center: Caroline 

Carucci, non-student, and Joy Maher. 

Ben Je la Cruz photo Bottom: Ken 

Jordan and Alison Scavuzzo. John 

Courtmanche photo 




William Stracher 

Economics 

16 Thunderhd Box 79 

Mahwah NJ 07430 




Mark Sprankel 
Finance 
131 Highwood Ave 
Leonia NJ 07605 ; 



Liselte Sweitzer 

Marketing 

416 South Ave. 

New Canaan CT 06840 




Maureen Spillane 

Accounting 

62 Griffith PI. 

Pearl River NY 10965 

g2lastresort-ptkm 

daylqrtsflipymann 

gem-rdtpmsgrtacar 

spbkoct3lgrpepatm 

iwnilbibest-k&san 

imalslndncportwhm 

iniirekingtonshack 

ayboston-missya 



Georganne Stohr 

Marketing 

423 Westchester Ave. 

Yonkers, NY 10707 

g2softballsophsms 

gbahamasnyclanmke 

ammbeachlbicancun 

voyagers acapulco 

88grape sweet seas 

ons on my mind it 

sure does appeal 



Cynthia Striebel 

Nursing 

64 Palmer Dr. 

S.Windsor CT 06074 

yeahcollegeth55th 

anksm + ddancesmoo4 

yearstubingr&cjan 

eroadtripmemories 

foreversprbrk'86' 

87'88regis3goober 

s-specialtimeswit 

hspecialfriends! 



Kirk Stephen 

Economics 

45 Mill St. 

Fairfield NJ 07006 

iamkirok!campion2 

france86rome87th4 

5mkdsmlesjvmanshe 

reallydigsyou.get 

outofthehouselwha 

t?"greedisgood"lo 

vesbasia + familyli 

velong + prosper 



fex C " 



9 



John Sturtevant 

Psychology 

42 Washington Manr. 

West Haven CT 06516 




Kim Sutherland 

Psychology 

111 Waters Edge 

Congers NY 10920 

campionreefhouseg 

uyspooplexitsthes 

weaterkrleeslinky 

extappahellbtchla 

lalandmpobjnbbzel 

sdl's jim! whatal 

ongstrangetripits 

been 




Elizabeth Sweeney 
Modern Languages 
316 Bassett Rd. 
Watertown CT 06795 



^ 



Colleen Swift 

Accounting 

167 Waters Edge 

Congers NY 10920 

to yous: thanks for all 

the great times we have 

shared together... the 

laughs and even the 

tears-from regis 3 to 

happiness was. 



CI 



Rhonda Symonds 
Psychology 
134 Ponus Ave. 
Norwalk CT 06850 
i love you nick, for al- 
ways! august 1 1 1984! 
thanks mom, bonkers, 
donnarumma, katz, dad, 
bev & the kids, olga& 
tim 2/ 13/88 -michael 
jackson -3/5/88! 



Matthew Sweeney 

Economics 

13 Gable Rd. 

New City NY 10956 



^2* £ 



BHJHB 





Pasquale Taddei 

Finance 

64 Mountain Top Ln. 

New Haven CT 06513 



Nicole Tenbekjian 

Politics 

479 Ridgewood Ave. 

Glen Ridge NJ 07028 

g2lastresort-ptmc 

gkmameg-loftmsga- 

gravation-london 

puntascamoct3 1 pa 

t'sroomyale-uconn 

Ibilasadiesdogwoo 

d86whit ney - it a ly - 

scoops-400 18888 





Jill Tenhor 

Finance 

88 Central Ave. 

N. Haledon NJ 07508 




Jill Taloni 

Fine Arts 

3 Honeyhill Rd. 

Norwalk CT 06851 

"san","k","jack"t 

hanx4themems!gad' 

86ca'87withandge, 

th42early istsscnd 

Isberlyhaloweenwk 

nd87ca'88thank-um 

Sdnetwemadeit!!!! 

love2wtc,myd-v! 




Brian Terry 

Finance 

374 Park Ave 

Yonkers NY 10703 




2b h 




THREE 

MAN 

Far Left: Regina Smith and 
Joan Nine. Left: Pat McGlynn, 

Bob Casey, and Pete Dunlap. 
John Courtmanche photos 



Ihristine Taylor 
nglish 

1 Deer Path Rd. 
Iranford CT 06405 
egis/cj/ skippy/n 
iut/morningpartie 
/beach/967and581 
grape/coors/mall 
i-ineverlikedyoue 
ther/ sanefriend 
;!/ saucy/pleasur 
i/yeswearetwins 




Maureen Taylor 
Biology 

21 Deer Pat^Rd. 
Branford CT 06405 
denise where are my 
keys? the weenjamma 
spray god would I love 
to go sailing! turn off the 
tv and turn up the stereo 
we're not twins?! 




DonnaJean Tedesco 

Finance 

10 Rochelle Dr. 

New City NY 10956 

searanch/ stelmos/ 

" misled" /dls/gonza 

ga/jello/ soup/yaw 

anna/loft/bbnight/ 

loyola/certs/toads 

/isls/newrochelle/ 

goodtimes.goodfrie 

nds 





Gregory Tole 
Sociology 
17 May PI. 
Nutley N J 07110 
jgsgr/halfway/toe 
cheese/greenturtl 
e/gonzagagirls/cc 
/redruggers/ caddy 
shack /loudhouse/b 
ungholes/rutgers/ 
gizmo /maactourney 
s momdad 




Mary Toole 

English 

39 Southview Dr. 

Berkeley Hts NJ 07922 



767 



1 




William Toomey 
Biology 
33 Abington Ave. 
Peabody MA 01960 
th82 greattimes sovi 
Steve mark turkhul85 
kt~2 400nites big- 
brochristine68 aed 
westward wind barb ha- 
waii no worries p&p kev 
tbfs 



Gianine Tortorello 

Economics 

96 Stewart Ave 

Garden City NY 11530 

regis 1 thU5nankp 

viclakoliterral o 

lino 1 naut-grape-b 

eachkegsroma-lurc 

allyyaleuconnfbowl- 

ny I novawknd 1 1 

88 + 88nts/jamaicaa- 

lamo loveyam + d 




Elizabeth Tracy 

English 

1400 Enfield St. 

Enfield CT 06082 

jcstealthepizzamw 

youinhaledit?lbts 

ifgetoffthatphone 

egsunshinecanoesj 

gthebigonenewrods 

centerpiecehnmiss 

edthetrainimazelle 

moneypitnyc tly 



Christian Tresse 

Marketing 

3158 Amelia Dr. 

Mohegan Lk. NY 

10547 

who are we?? 

Illoveboxes!! 






Rolf Troh) 
Philosophy 
1410 Glenwood Avei 
Joliet IL 604. 



^mm 




Joseph Vetrano 

Biology 

25 Jacqueline Dr. 

Bristol CT 06010 




Stephen Villano 

Biology 

70 Bulmer Dr. 

Stratford CT 06497 

...change-college 

roommatesk2biomai 

orsruleth38new'st 

angbahamasaedasnt 

h82bestfriendsfio 

rebillmarkthegirl 

s-thanks clubmeds 

chool?-change. .. 



<C 



Teresa Voegler 

Finance 

821 Jerusalem Ave. 

N Merrick NY 11566 






Brian Tousignant 

English 

12 Highland Rd. 

Oak Ridge NJ 07438 

murph/bes/lee/twi 

ns/loudhouse/ sut 

ter'smill/dcfiasc 

os/boston/loudafa 

ce2x/up thecreek/ 

jose/ eldog/quadf 

iressuttersmill/a 

bclounge/ sutter's 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Philip Treacy 

Marketing 

330 Muttontown Rd. 

Syosset NY 11791 



MaryRose Verdile 

English 

7 Whitman Ct. 

Troy NY 12180 



TOWERS 



Extreme Top: Rodney Ralph, 
Diane Naughton, Donna-Jean 
Tedesco, Beth Fergusson, Jen 
Tessier. John Courtmamhe photo 
Above: Victoria Walsh, Kristine 
Potensky. Lisa Esposito, Lara 
Wolter, Nancy Agovino, Kathy 
O'Rourke, and Gianine Tortor- 
ello. PR Photo 



Christine Voytek 
Economics 
60 Sassacus Dr. 
Milford CT 06460 
friendsfunlove + la 
ughter marlesmags 
uchhouseragth par 
ties-oursrcqtball 

stressthanks mom 
+ dad rudyroo the 
walM88mylovemyli 
fe 




Mark Voytek 
Economics 
489 Ezra St 
Bridgeport CT 06606 
mom, dad-thankyou-ot- 
ter, chip, nan-pop. mis- 
syou-bonita. mylove-vt- 
bri, we're no v-men-ibm- 
the links dew drop inn 
farm mobile-bc-g3-the 
naut-eco 




Brian Walsh 
Politics 
9 Blueberry Ln. 
Oyster Bay NY 11771 




Ellen Walsh 

Economics 

22 Terrace PI 

Hicksville NY 11801 



Marianne Walsh I 
Politics | 
10 Shadow Ln 
Woodbury NY 11797 | 
jm jm ka mg kr my best . 
buddies onders tloridar- I 
edlion halfwayhouse 
xmas party 400 88 nites 
myhardguy oolala m & d 
love & thanks good luck 
to all 




William Walsh 
Economics 
8 Michigan Rd. 
Bellrose VIII. NY 11001 
tobg/bt/lou/cm/cm 
2/mw/thanx!/toj4/ 
sink/bad/todances 
/hurricane/ beef st 
ks/aa/wall/hrvrdl 
aw / panties / wreath 
/ jvshirt / shthous 
e/m&d/2much2say! 



Wendy Walukiewicz 

English 

400 Plains Rd. 

Milford CT 06460 



5f 




MFXICAIN Above: Joe Felice, Tom Mullen, Brian Dimpel, and Jim Lynch. Right: Fran Sgambati. Sue 
(lark. Larisa Petriano, Christine Gardner. John Courtmancht photos 



JJ 



270 



Mary Wachter 
Accounting 
7 Coach Dr. 

Brookfield Ctr CT 06805 
th1 1 1 /jess/ sandy/deb 
/karen /linda /regis 4/ 
'88 nights /bahamas'87 
booze cruise /re /par- 
anoid /tx /nj c /egg 
tray /happy hour 
/bimbo /ca /lasvegas 




X 



Mark Walsh 
Mathematics 
81 Witherbee Ave. 
Pelham Manor NY 10803 
154 victor alex little man 
ace ricky pyk dog house 
uppereck couch potato 
demolitionderby har- 
vest 88 woods imi Sroad 
trip dave 72 all nighters 
beach days -later 



Dennis Wagner 
Marketing 
24 King Ct. 
Hillsdale NJ 07642 







Politics 

Elm Hill Rd. 

Center Sandwich NH 03227 

regis 1 naut grape lally 

blvd Imh th1 15 kris, gigi, 

nan, lis, ko, lara, ali, ter, 

you're great! Jamaica fla 

rdtrip Iz lax beach-kegs 

thanks mom + dad 



Maureen Waller 

Economics 

18 Saxon Rd. 

Farmingdale NY 11735 

smurfcabugdebtvtm 

,ds-thanxfor4grea 

tyears!th37k2crew 

.capecodlondonbag 

ladiescan'tbeboth 

eredpassportevile 

yefla/acapulconut 

house 




Sandra Watrous 

English 

115 River Rd. ' 

Pawcatuck CT 06379 



Laurence Wahl 

English 

5 Bridlewood Trail 

Honeoye Falls NY 14472 



Tracy Walsh 

Accounting 

17 Balance Rock Rd. 

Seymour CT 36483 



PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 




PHOTOS UNAVAILABLE 



Andrew Woodtli 

Business 

5714 Via Ligera 

Tucson AZ 85715 



Timothy Zichelli 

Marketing 

73 Edgemont Rd. 

Upper Mtclar NJ 07043 

huh-you mean there was 



m * j 



Joseph Zampano 

Communications 

38 Sunnyside Dr 

Shelton CT 06484 



272 



William Webb 
Communications 
2444 Asbury 
Evanston IL 60201 
regisocbearsvofd 
wyermsgxxmaacst.p 
ats87kphihohasbee 
nsjordannyc 188400 
nights 153letterma 
njbxradscoxvmarsb 
usterwhoneedsthan 
ksguysmd 



Mary Whelan 

English 

61 Merrymount Dr. 

Warwick Rl 02888 




Michelle Wentzel 
Mathematics 
129 Hany La. 
Vernon CT 06066 
sr + soyrs * dogwdsw / 
tod'thegrape'zel 
les'srwk'87'stmaa 
rtenw/jillombo-jd 
*faw'd + h*app.sb87 
'roadtrips'fleetw 
oodmac * stmywthr-m 
pbeach'jjlle-tly 




Anne Weyman 

Nursing 

78 Laurel Crest Rd. 

Madison CT 06443 

nursing-m 

, a/ajo 

gues 2 lucky 22! 

playpen/ sandbox 

dj/kar/al luv u u 

2 ilbv happy hour 

s bbq dances upth 

ecreek bighouse s 

t.croix/jm/boston! 



w 





Andrea Whitehouse 
Communications 
9812 Oceancrest Dr. 
Huntington Bch CA 92646 
conan, moosh, mags, 
noodles, gorillas, super- 
man, tarpon manor, 
3muskateers, nur- 
?photo by, cpc, mirror 
house, umb-rella, laurel- 
&hardy,thanx m,d,b-i. 




Robert Whitmore 
Accounting 
1270 Ringwood Ave. 
Haskell NJ 07420 
c + l-nyc/ftlaud86- 
7penrodscaddyee,j 
a/harv85lo + i/ syr 
86/ snwk87/ 188-88 
/mapes/grape/ sta 
g/th21+66/phikaps 
/t+t/y + r/cm/ summ 
er87/europe! 





Alison Williams 

Marketing 

1 14 Nassau Blvd. 

Garden City NY 11530 



Susan Wolfe 
Finance 
4 Haddam Dr. 
Avon CT 06805 
j2 semstrinlndnbe 
erbqs jones'r941u 
ndrgrnd doslateni 
tes blurm1573utc 
kllngtnuptop cpor 
t flakelsswascary 
kw animaltreshmen 
sluvya! 




Lara Wolter 

History 

River Rd.Box 177 

East Haddam CT 06423 

th1 15klgvnkbatmyo 

uregreatthanxm + ds 

angriabchptykegsm 

adridvivayalepink 

oalghstydaddelaly 

bvdnoalptybahamai 

bnknhnydcitsbeenf 



Catherine Wolczek 

Accounting 

7 Mariner Circle 

Trumbull CT 06611 

bj house shot 106 bout: 

2grads together wine 

coolers he's not at ffld 

rolling the keg english 

sailors thanx guys-love 



r^ 



f 




*'i 



Sayaka Yamamoto 

Accounting 

602 W Lyon Farm Dr 

Greenwich CT 06831 



X> 



Lauren Zarelli 

English 

1517 Ashbrook Dr. 

Scotch Pins NJ 07076 

dh /cm /jk /do /cb /vw 

/gt l\el ko-ily! mt, ct- 

bblips fla 86 /montego 

88- admit it you loved by 

tunes! thanks mom + 

dad luvya! 



t. 



John Zaterka 

Marketing 

9 Orchard Circle 

Northborough MA 01532 

turk wvof pgmdrdj 

wpeardrnk4frecvn 

olve johnyzbbandj 

dmetroectscrmhapb 

ad kptnaclbiwsrfv 

Ignycflsbjamcjrgm 

obhinxdchad sahje 

e88.5 61 thx ly 






SOFT SOUNDS IN 
OPEN SPACES 

think of die Quad. I hear songs plaving 

m windows; Bruce Springsteen, Led 

[oei, or I 12, echoing betwei ;i fogues, 

ampion, Regis, and Loyola. It 

ed from the Orient, the townhouses, or 

. could hear the mil 

Fr. Simon Harak, S.J., socializes with Mary 
Berardi at the Senior Jesuit Social. Ben de 
la Cruz photo 



Remember UK) Nights, April 10. 1987? Atter a junior y< 

feu hours, everyone was speaking loudly to each 38 Nights, ss Nights, and suddenly it's 

other, almost yelling, as if they were competing with Week. Time sped bj at I airfield bee. 

a loud stereo. A lew drinks and the whole class loses alwi ching to do. College was an insai el 

aring. I the academic search tor rationality and the >J 

Turning 21 will always b( .i trip to the SeaGrape quest tor chaos. All the end-ot-vear Senior 



Michelle Wentzel, Lucy Bossidy, Eileen Guinan, Jill Christensen, and Mary Pat 
raise their mimosas in toast to four great years. Ben de la Cruz photo 



O'BrisI 




ere fun with a shot of sadness mixed in, starting on 
lay ^ with the Senior Jesuit Social, better known as 
Get Drunk with the Fathers." The Social turned 
ut to be the only official, end-of-year senior event 
ith good weather. 

The unofficial kick-oft to Senior Week was the 
)+ kegger at the Big House, Upper Deck, Shith- 
jse, and Ri-Ma-La, on Saturday, May 14. This was 
le party to end all parties: the underclassmen had 



left for home after finals and were not to be found; 
some non-Fairfield guy tried to steal shirts from the 
Shithouse and then picked a fight with the entire 
senior class; the beach blazed with the warmth of 
burning couches and tables; Johnny and the Favor- 
ites played "Brown-Eyed Girl" and other favorites 
from the deck of the Ri-Ma-La. If we were gonna 
go. we were gonna go in style. Then on Sunday, the 
SeaGrape hosted "Adios Amigos," one last stand 
for seniors at the bar which had been the center of 
our social lives as upperclassmen. 

The official Senior Week, "Let The Good Times 
Roll," began on Wednesday morning. May 18, with 
a meeting in Gonzaga concerning Commencement 
etiquette. Academic Vice-President Robert Stepsis 
was the host, while Marshal-In-Chief Carmen Don- 



rife - 



* 



narumma stole the show with an inspiring pep talk 
about appropriate behavior on Graduation Da) 

After the meeting. Seniors met with Faculty in 
the Oak Room for a champagne prep before the 
Senior/Facult) Brunch. The occasion was a lesson 
in individual dress codes, from shorts and sneakers 
to jackets and ties, and dresses. Was this the same 
administration we'd always known, now serving us 
mimosas on empty Stomachs? Did they think sen- 
iors would drink just one each.' Then we climbed 
the stairs to the Main Dining Room for brunch. 
Many of us hadn't eaten at Seller's for two years, but 
the food was exactly as we remembered it. 

continued on next page 



Maryrose Verdile mingles with English Professor 
Arthur Riel. Ben de la Cruz photo 



Skeets Coyle talks with Information 
Systems Professor John Krenisky. Ben 
de la Cruz photo 



^ 



I 'St I 



r< 






n de la Cruz photo 



* 



1 



_i_ 



<=^ 



Above: Pub Night in the Campus Center Lobby. John Coratola 
photo Right: Jackie Mead munches out on popcorn. Ben de la 

Cruz photo 






SENIOR WEEK 

At the Picnic. Scott Thomas is oblivious to the 
fact that the purse he's carrying clashes with his 
outfit John Courtmanche photo 



1 




\\ ednesday night, we were treated 

CO Pub Night in the Campus Center. 

irs complained that it wasn't open 

bar. but the administration knew that it 

we had to pa) tor our beers we 

wouldn't drink as much, and we all had 
a better chance ot living and graduat- 
ing. The jukebox in the lobby p 
better music than the disco dj in the 
( )ak Room, but we would have danced 
to anything that night, even the "Ho- 
ke\ Poke\. Crazj as it ma\ sound. 



The Senior \\ eek Picnic on 1 h 
was forced inside due to inch id 
weather. But The Trend was a A 
1 iftiesand Sixties band, the Class ifj 
cooked up some great burgers 
slipped us some tree beers, and J 
again uc were on the dance 
YX hen the Picnic ended we all wt i| 
private parties at friends' houses 

Friday and Saturday nights fet 
two Senior dances. The Semi-F< r] 
on Friday was the final chance for ii 




Joe Peccerillo boogies with Pat Brino and 
Photoula Markou. John Coratola photo 

276 



' '^MI M. ii 1*. llA 



The Class of '88 shares memories of Fairfield during the Senior Slide Show. Ben 
de la Cruz photo 




drink together as a class, because Sat- 
urday our parents were coming and 
Sunday was Graduation. When our 
parents arrived on Saturday, we attend- 
ed the inspiring Baccalaureate Mass 
behind Bellarmine, then went to dinner 
at any or the popular restaurants on 
Route 1 in Fairfield and Westport. and 
finally we arrived at the Parent's 
Dance. The dance was staged in Alum- 
ni Hall, the Main Dining Room, and 
was extended to the Oak Room due to 



a demand tor tickets, a credit to the 
spirit of participation in the class. The 
Parents Dane e was an appropriate final 
event before Graduation. Members of 
the class who had parned together tor 
four years suddenly had to behave and 
remain sober (relatively-speaking i. We 
peaked into each other's pre-Fairf'ield 
life, and saw that we all resemble our 
parents, even in the way that we dante. 
continued on next page 



Left: Tony Anzalone and his mom at the Parent's Dance. Below: 
Carrie Fitzmaurice, Eileen Devenny, Cindy Lambur, and Bill Webb all 
try to squeeze into one picture. Ben de la Cruz 




Above: Greg Tole, Nancy Agovino, and Nicole 

Tenbekjian keep the festivities alive. Right: 

Marianne Walsh and her dad. Ben de la Cruz 

photos 



277 



from beach and 
. m. The Facuit) 

and tassle procedures. 
»b) pins to keep the taps 
llianx 
Dl ' and 

Mace Bearer Robert Russo led the 



ssion, with Marshall-in-Chief Carmen Donnar 
uinina. Facuit) Marshals. Graduate students. ( 01 
tinuing Ed students, and approximately 700 under 
grads in tow. The trustees, administration, and hon 
orar\ decree recepicnts sat on Bellarmine's patio 

The morning was cloud) and the fog clung to Bel 
larmine's loft\ towers Cameras were everywhere 



the Media ( enter shot the Commencement \ idl 
while parents, relatives, and friends leaned in- > 
aisle or maneuvered towards Bellarmine's stei s 
snaps' 

continued on next t 



Below: Rob Whitmore, Sue Wolfe and Andy Woodtli. Right: Lynette Accardo, the first 
undergraduate (alphabetically), receives her scroll from Pres. Kelley. Ben de la Cruz pho 



Below: Marshal-ln-Chief Carmen 
Donnmarumman; Mace Bearer Rob 
Russo. Ben de la Cruz photos 




Vanessa Grey Ben de la Cruz photo 



Proud graduate Mary Guerin. Ben de la Cruz photo 




ed our names and we ascended the Karen O'Rourke, who received the Loyola Medal it Education, relating how a limited numb 

i outstretched hand, 'or outstanding University service, and tor Peter notes can yield unlimited arrangements of melt 

. the >tcps carrying a blank scroll. Holland, who earned the privilege to give the Vale- Honoran degrees were awarded to Ger. 

of the diploma we d get if we returned our dictonan Address 1 lolland used his experience as a Johnson for her work as a teacher in the Bridg 

inisius. The pop of an un- saxophone player to draw musical analogies tojesu- school system; to Ernest I.orch. attorney and 

igne bottle echoed across Bellarmine — ^^~— 

i laughter and applause. Diane Foster extends written thanks to her parents. Brian Rust 

. tor all of us. but especially so for photo 

etti, who received the Bellarmine 
• ie inchest academic average, tor 







essman who has run the nationally-recognized 
auth basketball program at New York City's Riv- 
-side Church for 28 years; to George Taylor, Chair- 
lan. President, and CEO of Citytrust bank; and to 
imothy Healy, S.J., President of Georgetown Uni- 
srsity. Father Healy also gave the Commencement 
ddress. Many seniors were discouraged that this 
as the second year in a row in which a Jesuit gave 



• ■' I 






k •" 






Fairfield's Commencement Address, but Healy 
spoke with wisdom about the power of the laity and 
the future of the Catholic Church, at least until the 
rains came. Reverend Philip Pusateri, University 
Chaplain, said the Benediction, the rain stopped and 
we were alumni. 

continued on next page 



Left: Henry Blaney shifts his tassle; Brian 
Russell photo A show of excitement from 
Don Carbone; Ben de la Cruz photo Ken 
Arnold gives the thumbs up. Below; Michele 
Day. Brian Russell photos 



* » 



Pete Holland, Karen O'Rourke, and Frank Giacobetti. Cruz photo 



COMMENCEMENT 



Fairfield 

University's 

Thirty-Eighth 

Commencement 

Ceremony 



Tara Lucano and family. Ben de la Cruz ph 



Paul Holland; Fr. Timothy Healy 
S J Brian Russell photos 




Reading or sleeping? Ben de la Cruz photo 






m 



m 



m 



iv. 



h 






■ 






s» 



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•>, 



<\yp* 



^ 



We searched the crowds for our relatives whi i 
wanted pictures of us in full Graduation garb, 
but a greater worry was how to saj goodbye to 
all of our friends and classmates. There were just 
too many. Luckily, as with every Fairfield event, 
post-parties transpired at the townhouses and 
beach and lasted through the night. A dj spun 
the tunes at the point, and we let the good times 
roll, hoping the)' would not stop. 

Everyone moved out the week after Gradu- 
ation. Some seniors went home, some left for 
vacations to Furope or elsewhere, some started 
work. The emptiness and the quiet were often 
unbearable; but we saw our close friends soon 
enough, and you know it, wherever you go vou 
run into someone from Fairfield. 



Marcello Rotino adjusts his cap. Ben de la 
Cruz photo 



■■ 



«w ^ 






t: John Courtmanche. Above: Mark 
)wning and Mary Lou Browne. Ben de 
Cruz photos 



Joan Nine and Bob Nighan. B. Russell photo 



In our lifetimes, we belong to a number of 
communities: peer groups, town communities, a 
national community, a world community. May- 
be a universal community. For the Class of 1988, 
Fairfield is common ground, the point of refer- 
ence. Ours is an intimate class, united by a spirit 
which was affirmed at Graduation. Heck, Chris 
Ritchie's still our President. He initiated the 
post-Graduation countup with a booze cruise, 88 
Nights after Graduation. Then there's 188 
Nights after, 288 Nights. 400 Nights, 1,988 
Nights, 10 years, 20 years, 88 years. Fairfield's 
Class of 1988 has just begun to party. 

When we meet again for the first time some- 
day, it will be much easier. Until then, you can 
close your eyes and listen to the voices of the 
Class of '88. echoing from beneath the light in 
the center of the Campus Center Lobby, as they 
always have. 

283 




2X4 







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1 IBI IC» |l 




*3 


1 


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f 


■ 

V 





SIZING UP 

Any larger than life experience is derived from a 
cumulation of smaller pleasures. 



285 



INDEX 

to, Lynette 196. 278 
••'imfer 196 

Btt 82. 196. 231 
•^ancy 196. 259. 269. 276 
:mes 196 
Matt 1 1 1 

Edmondo 196 
[)avid 196 
so Robert 104. 106. 196. 

:Jou. Joanne 28 
>on. Susan 196 
Angelo. Steven 62 
Antmoro. Matt 86 
Anzalone, Carmine 10. 196 
Anzalone. Tony 196. 276 
Apoldo. Louis 196 
Aquavia. Leslee 40. 138. 196. 219 
Arato. Jennifer 196 
Arciero. Trish 134 
Arnold. Kenneth 104. 138. 196. 280 
Arnott. Dave 134, 152 
Artiglere. Sheri 196 
Attridge. Karen 95. 196. 263 
Autore. Victor 196 
Babaian. Lisa 30 
Babb. Anne 76 
Bailey. Ronald 196 
Baker. Rebecca 196 
Balamaci. Glen 196 
Balog. Kenneth 196 
Banasiak. Rob 134. 146 
Barba. Carolyn 196 
Barbarito. Angela 198 
Barber. Rob 40 
Barrett. Bernadette 198 
Barrett. Joan 198 
Barrett. Patricia 145. 198 
Barry. Brian 40 
Barry. Kelly Ann 198 
Barry. Robert 106. 198. 274 
Beagan. Bonnie 198 
Beatty. Mark 198 
Becker. Steve 134 
Beedenbender, Karen 12. 26. 40. 80 
Belcher. Katie 14. 112 
Belcourt. Michael 56. 162 
Beldy. Karen 198 
Bellafiore. Eva 40. 49. 108. 154 
Berardi. Mary 198. 274 
Berger. Richard W. 198 
Bergin. Charles 10. 198. 219. 243. 
249 

Bermingham. Chris 40. 76. 84. 108 
Bernard. Karen 198 
Berner. John 198. 207. 223 
Besegai. David 174. 198 
Betchkal. Anne 56. 104. 162 
Betchkal. Joan 64. 198 
Biondi. James 96. 198 
Birgler. Lynda 200 
Blaakman. Hans 188. 200 
Blaney. Henry 1 10. 200. 215. 280 
Blute. Joanne 84 
Bolger. Peter 5. 56. 154 
Booth. Gregory 200 
Borjes. Christopher 200 
Bossidy. Lucy 200. 274 
Bouchard. Christine 200 
Boucher. Mike 76 
Bowen. John 100. 200 
Boyle. Elaine 54 
Boynton. Mike 26 
Bradlord. Troy 42. 141. 142 
Brady. David 138. 200 
Brady. Thomas 184. 200. 217. 265. 
273 

Brantley. Harold 42. 141. 142 
Brassard. Elaine 200 



Bratti. Michael 200 

Breen. Cathy 200 

Bremer. David 50. 102. 200 

Brigande. Steven 200 

Bnno. Pasquale 200. 257. 276 

Brisco. Jacqui 50 

Broer. Janet 200 

Brown. Anne 200 

Brown. Carole 10. 200 

Brown. Christopher 92 

Brown. Christopher 200 

Browne. Eileen 200. 207 

Browne. Mary Lou 202. 253. 282 

Browning. Mark 186. 197. 202. 282 

Bruckmann. Catherine 202. 278 

Bruno. LeeAnn 74 

Bucaria. Theresa 202 

Bucci. John 202 

Buchanan. Dan 132. 134. 146 

Buckley. Timothy 202. 239 

Bugara. Tina 26. 66. 176. 190. 202. 

209. 233 

Buggy. Karen 202. 255 

Busby. Dan 5. 56. 164 

Butler Perez. Anthony 102. 202 

Buturla. Eileen 186. 202 

Byers. Mark 202 

Cahill, Diane 202 

Cahill. William 202 

Cain. Wendi 202 

Caisse. Kenneth 26. 40. 138. 202 

Calianese. Mary Beth 202. 215 

Callanan. Kelly 202 

Callegari. John 1 1 1 . 204 

Callender. Kara 62 

Calvano. Maria 81. 204 

Cambria. Elizabeth 134. 204. 215. 

231 

Campanelli. Melissa 106. 204 

Campbell. Jeffrey 56. 162. 176. 

204. 221. 225 

Campion. Kathleen 204 

Campisi. Natalie 204 

Capello. Lauren 30 

Carangelo. Robert 104, 204, 223, 

261 

Carbone. Donald 204, 280 

Cardinali. John 106. 138. 204 

Carella. Joseph 146. 204. 235. 255. 

263 

Carella. Richard 204 

Carpentier. Michele 204 

Carroll. Denise 201. 204. 229 

Carroll. Frank 26. 40. 56. 80. 154. 

166 

Carroll. Paul 134. 204 

Carucci. Caroline 104, 204, 231. 265 

Caruso. John 204 

Caruso. Lisa 204 

Casale. Gerard 54 

Case, Gary 206 

Casey. Robert 206. 229. 267. 274 

Cautillo. Dawn 206. 276 

Celentano. Michael 206 

Cenci. Maura 56. 170 

Ceruzzi. John 206 

Cervoni. Vince 1 12 

Chagares. Christine 206. 257 

Charter. Gareth 106. 206. 259 

Check. Joseph 206 

Chiaia. John 16. 26. 206. 239 

Chianese. Jennifer 108. 206 

Chmelo. Michele 206 

Christensen. Jill 102. 206. 274 

Christian. Gregory 206 

Christine. Kevin 146. 184. 206 

Chung. Joann 40. 106 

Ciampi. Dave 95 

Cimmino. Rich I 76 

Clapprood. Jane 206 

Clark Suzanne 206. 271 

Clarke. Denis 206 



A 



Cliggett. John 28 

Cole. Jennifer 206 

Comcowich. Kelly 208 

Conforti. Paul 166 

Conlisk. Kelly Anne 100 

Connors. Yvonne 104 

Conte, Mary Kate 208 

Conway, Moira 64. 208 

Cook. Brian 208 

Cook. Christopher 104. 134. 146. 

208. 235 

Copertino. Monica 81. 208 

Correa. Marissa 95 

Cortina. Linda 208 

Cosgrove. Kellie 56. 160 

Costanzo. Christopher 40. 106. 208 

Coulter. John 64. 86. 104. 208. 249 

Courcy. Denise 208 

Courtmanche. John 40. 106. 186. 

208. 282 

Coyle. Hugh 96, 1 10. 208. 274 

Crawford. Glenn 78. 174. 208 

Creegan. Brian 208 

Crichton. Catherine 208 

Crighton. Pete 176 

Cronin. Cheryl 134. 208 

Crossman. Andrea 208 

Crowley. Kevin 104. 176 

Cummings. Denis 208 

Cummings. Mark 208 

Curley. Greg 164 

Curran. Christopher 210 

Curtis. Clark 164 

D Abate, Greg 210 

D'Alessandro. Denise 210 

D'Angelo. Wendy 81. 210 

Dagit. Deborah 56. 170. 210 

Dahan. Rita 210 

Dahle. Diane 134. 210 

Dalton. James 210 

Daly. Larry 156 

Dammen. Nicole 26. 40. 50. 56. 70. 

156 

Damore, William 210 

Davey. Justine 210 

Davidson. Christopher 210 

Davis. Matthew 210. 273 

Davoren. William 56. 168 

Dawe. Ruth 106. 210 

Day. Jacqueline 210 

Day. Michele 210. 280 

De la Cruz. Benedict 18. 40. 112 

Deach. Christopher 210 

Dean, Kevin 210 

Debartolomeo. Diana 210 

DeBlock. John 212 

DeGiovine. Christopher 212 

DelBallo. John 108 

DelGallo. Len 100. 146 

Delgaudio. Bill 152 

DeLillo. Diane 86 

DelSignore. Carolynn 212 

DeLucia. Vincent 212 

Dempsey. Stephen 212 

DeNardis. Dawn 212 

DeNatale. Carol 212 

Deneen. Martha 212 

DePodesta. Craig 138 

Deraney. Drew 54 

Derby. Cheryl 212 

Deriu. Maria 212 

DeSilva. Dilanthi 40 

Despenzire. Donna 212 

DeStefano. Therese 212 

DeTullio. Lisa 56 

Devenny. Eileen 81. 212. 261. 276 

Devito. Joe 76. 80 

Diaz. Alejandro 212 

Diaz. Carrie 49 

DiBernardi. Rena 40. 212 

Dickinson. Laura 56. 168. 212 

Dieh. John 146 



Dietz. Mark 26. 30. 66. 80. 86. 9 i 

Dimauro. Chris 154 

Dimpel. Brian 81. 176. 212. 225. 

231. 271 

Dimpel. Karen 54 

DiNicola. Jack 134 

Dion. Gisele 212 

Distel. Joseph 212 

Dixon. Marie 214 

Doherty. James 214 

Doherty. Loretta 214. 235 

Doherty. Patick 50. 108. 134. 214 

Dolan. Joan 134 

Dolan. Kevin 81. 214. 231 

Dolan, Mary 214 

Dominguis. Christina 214 

Donahue. Charles 214 

Donovan. Keith 214 

Donovan, Kristina 214 

Donovan. Paul 104. 214. 251 

Dower. Jacqueline 214 

Dowling. Michael 214. 251 

Dressel. Janna 214 

Dressier. Lawrence 214 

Driscoll. Elliott 214. 231 

Drisdelle. Carmen 214 

DuBoyce. Alice Ann 214. 263 

DuFault. Andy 62 

Duggan. Thomas 30. 56. 134, 152 

216. 280 

Duncan. Ed 141. 142. 162 

Dunlap. Peter 216. 267 

Dunn. Dave 146 

Dunn. Kathleen 216 

Dunn. Michael 10. 216 

Dunne, Charlie 190 

Dunne. Debra 132. 134. 216 

Dunton. Valerie 134. 216. 280 

Durso. Theresa 26. 54. 203. 216. 

221. 253 

Ebert. Denise 216 

Echanique. Rosaelena 216 

Egan. Michael 215. 216 

Ellert. Eric 216 

Ellis. Eileen 216 

Ernst. Michael 216 

Errity. Deirdre 216. 223 

Eschmann. Alison 216. 231. 259 

Eschmann. Jim 188 

Esposito. Deanna 49 

Esposito. Lisa 216. 269 

Ezelius. Chris I 1 1 

Fable. Anthony 216 

Faillace. Samuel 26. 81. 100. 106. 

108. 209. 216 

Farnham. Nathaniel 34. 76. 216 

Farrelly. Maura 216. 273 

Fay. Regina 218 

Felice. Joseph 138. 218. 231. 247. 

271 

Fergusson. Elizabeth 104. 134. 146 

218. 269 

Ferrante. Anne 218 

Ferrarotti. Sue 1 1 I 

Fihppone. Thomas 8 1 176. 218 

Fiore. Debra 218. 223 

Fisher. Elizabeth 218 

Fitzgerald. Timothy 138. 184. 218. 

273 

Fitzmaurice. Carrie 218. 276 

Flanagan. Edward 40. 166. 218 

Flanagan. Paul 100 

Flinn, Kathy 186 

Floegel. Scott 218 

Flynn. Christine 218 

Flynn. Clair 218 

Flynn. Jen 166 

Flynn. Karen 218 

Flynn. Sean I 12 

Flynn. Susan 203. 218 

Fogarty. Christopher 220 

Folcik. Missy 136 




287 



INDEX 

Robert 203. 220. 229. 255 

imillo 86 
Diane 36. 82. 220. 280 

- >bert 220 

s Jaime 56. 104. 160. 220 
Kathy 145 
'20 
i 220 
ner Brian 190. 220 

;ner. Dave 188 
Joan 220 
- 220 
essica 44 
Tom 220 
-is. Robert 205. 220. 235 
Gannon. Nancy 220 
Gardiner. Neil 220 
Gardner. Christine 220. 271. 282 
Gardner. Matt 134. 146 
Garger. Melanie 220 
Garnett. Louise 220 
Garwacki. Helen 220 
Gaumond. Claudia 222 
Gaunt. Kimberly 222. 237 
Gearin. Cynthia 222 
Geissler. Monique 222 
Genova. Kim 76 
Gerber. Holly 222 
Geraldi. Victor 222 
Germain. Gregory 146. 222 
Gerth. William 222 
Gerwien. Robert 222 
Giacco. George 222 
Giacobetti. Frank 222. 280 
Gibbons. John 70. 222 
Gilligan. Kevin 222 
Gillin. Beth 26. 30. 40. 50 
Girard. Catherine 222 
Glavin. Jen 62. 66. 104 
Godlin. Regina 222 
Gomber. Donald 10. 86. 222. 257. 
276 

Gomes. Aida 70. 224. 280 
Good. William 104, 224 
Goodrich. Kathleen 224 
Gorman. Carol 54 
Gormican. Jamie 224. 280 
Gould. Kathi 224 
Goven. D. Robert 162. 224 
Grabler. Stephanie 40. 106 
Graveline. Michelle 164 
Gray. Joel 224 
Gregory. Dorothy 224 
Grennan. Pete 66 
Grey. Vanessa 224. 278 
Griffen. Debra 56. 81 
Griffin. Mary 224 
Griffin. Meghan 96. 224 
Gruccio. Denise 224 
Guastamachio. Gregory 224 
Guckert. Karen 224 
Guer.n. Mary 224. 263. 278 
Guglielmo. Michael 224 
Guinan, Eileen 224. 274 
Gulino. Mama 81. 224 
Habermeier, Ellen 224 

Steve 141 
Holloran, Jean 26. 34. 215. 224. 237 
Hallowell. Deniae 64, 226. 247 
Henley rricia ill 
Hannon, Jim 66 
Harmon, Nancy 282 
Hanophy ' hnstma 226 
Hanrahan I u 1 84 

Hanratty Kfrry 190 
Harding M« hael 30 

Amy 62. 66 
Bob 156 
H-itton. Steve I 1 I 



Hayes. Kathenne 226 

Healy. Kathleen 226 

Healy. Susan 226 

Heard. Gregory 226 

Heffern, Dennis 62. 226. 231 

Heffernan. Catherine 226 

Heidelberger. Mark 226 

Heintz. Claudia 56. 162. 226 

Heller. Katie 138 

Henderson. Dawn 104 

Henley. Deborah 226 

Hennessy. Jennifer 226 

Henry . Brian 226 

Herlihy. Eileen 226 

Hernandez. Diana 188 

Hilgartner. Lee 66. 96. 226 

Hill. Rob 141 

Hoertz. Jeannine 86 

Holland. Paul 10. 64. 213. 226 

Holland. Peter 49. 62. 64. 81. 228. 

263. 280. 282 

Hollfelder. Ellen 228 

Holsey. Suzie 40 

Hong. Christine 54 

Hope. Mary 228 

Horn. Michele 213, 228 

Hourihan. Brian 228 

Housler. Bob 50 

Howe. William 228 

Hoyt. Jackie 184 

Hubregsen. Robert 228 

Hughes. Lisa 89 

Hunt. Heather 228 

Iglesia. Angela 228 

Isleib. Dan 134 

Jaca. Ignacio 134 

Jacques. Jennifer 228 

Jahne. John 178 

James. Michael 228 

James. Nancy 10 

Janson, Mary Beth 54 

Janton. Carolyn 26. 228 

Januszewski. Thomas 228 

Jason, Deanne 104. 228 

Johnson. Paul 82 

Jones. Christine 228 

Jordan. Kenneth 106. 190. 228, 

257. 265 

Joyce. Teresa 228 

Judge. Nancy 81. 228 

Jureller. Arthur 104. 228 

Kaczmarcyk. Jennifer 228 

Kaishian. James 74. 141. 228, 239 

Kalchthaler. Robert 230 

Kaldawi. Jacqueline 230 

Kallio. Jim 134 

Kammski. Janet 230 

Kampf. Deborrah 230 

Kane. John 26. 34 

Kaoud. James 230. 259 

Karangekis. Mark 230 

Kavanaugh, Brian 30 

Kearney. John 156 

Keating. Christopher 230. 257 

Keenan. Christine 230 

Keenan. Laura 40. 81. 86. 95. 104. 

106. 108 

Kellaher. Martin 188. 205. 230. 257 

Keller. Thomas 10. 230. 235. 257 

Kelly. James 184. 230. 273 

Kelly. Maura 230 

K.-nney. Judith 64. 215. 230. 259 

Kerepesi. Michele 230 

Klffer, Claudine 40 

Klley, William 230 

King, John 66. 190 

Kingi ion Robin 56. 152. 166. 230 

Kms.-ll,). Chris 81 

Klein. Wally 134 

Kloppenberg, Paul 56. 81. 158 

1 Brian 232 

Knapik. Dan 34. 56. 166 



M 



Kokoska. Elaine 232 

Kolar. Christine 232 

Kollar. Matthew 232 

Kontul. Dean 232 

Koury. Lisa 232 

Kowalski. Ronald 232 

Krayeski. Debra 232 

Kruger. Eric 232 

Kryspin. Teresa 232 

Kupferschmid. Anne 134. 232. 239 

Kuryla. Kevin 64. 104. 111. 232. 

233 

Lambert. Hugh 36. 40. 174 

Lambert. Kevin 232 

Lambur. Cynthia 232. 276 

Lamens. Sonia 54 

Lamont. Sheri 106. 232 

Lane. Anne 232 

Lane. Jennifer 232 

Langzettel, Marian 232 

Larkin. Suzanne 217. 234 

Latour, Peter 234 

Lawless. Sean 62 

Lawther. Elizabeth 234 

Lazzan. John 1 10. 234 

Leahy, John 234 

Leahy. Theresa 28 

LeClair. George 156 

Leiner. Beth 234 

Lenihan. Jean 186. 234 

Lenox. Kathleen 234 

Leonard. Mark 234 

Letter, Richard 234. 255 

Lewis. Clinton 76. 78. 174, 234 

Lewis. Lisa 62 

Lewis. Todd 234 

Lisella. Michelle 234 

Lisk, Stephanie 26. 221. 234 

Lohle. Michael 234 

Lonergan. Kathleen 234 

Longofono. Michael 102. 236 

Looney, Sean 134 

Lopol, Christine 236 

Lotufo. Jeanine 236 

Loumeau, Paul 236 

Lovely. Helen 20. 32 

Lucano, Tara 62. 201. 236. 282 

Lucas. John 104 

Lucca. Carolynn 186 

Lukas. Paul 49, 56. 162 

Lynch, James 81. 231. . 236. 271 

MacDonald. Bobby 138 

MacDonald. Kerrie 235. 236 

MacDonald. Scott 76. 236 

MacDonough. Richard 236 

Maciag. Tina 26, 236 

Madalone, Frank 95, 104. 225. 236 

Madden. Bill 1 I 1 

Mafale, Thomas 236 

Magner. Rusty 26. 80. 84. 166 

Maguire. Kim 81 

Maher. Joy 236. 265 

Mahoney. Bridget 236 

Mahoney. Timothy 134. 236 

Malley. Kathryrn 236 

Malloch. Rob 156 

Maloney. Craig 104. 108. 236 

Maloney, Lisa 236 

Mancini. Maria 236 

Mancini. Mark 236 

Mancini. Mary 238 

Mandazza. Mike 205 

Mander, H<ii minder 238 

urn. Eileen 238. 239. 249 
Manglass. Todd 238 
Mann, Kimberly 96. 112. 238 
Ml ii, i. tin Mark 56. 168 
Markh.im 1 ciry 20. 104 

Marko. I athei Ine 238 
Markou. Photoula 106. 238. 276 
Marron. Mary 238 
Marshall Susan 238 



Martin, Ellen Mary 134, 146, 238 

Martinez, Melinda 238 

Mary. Yasmine 238 

Masciantonio. Gail 56 

Masterson, Breck 111. 238 

Mathes. John 138. 238 

Matits. William 238 

Matthews. Jean Marie 82. 238 

Matthews. Joseph 240 

Mauro. Regina 40. 81. 106. 108 

Maxson. Mike 86 

Mayer. Birgitta 188 

Mayor, the 188. 193 

McAuliffe. James 221. 223. 240 

McBride. Karan 56. 168. 240 

McCabe. Andrew 231. 240 

McCabe. Catherine 81 

McCann. John 240 

McCarthy. Jane 10, 134. 136. 240 

McCormack. Karen 240 

McDonald. Jeffrey 240 

McDonnell. Colleen 240 

McDonough. Rich 1 1 1 

McElhinney. Denise 240 

McGann, Meghan 240 

McGmnis. Laura 240 

McGlynn, Patrick 120. 240. 267 

McGoldrick. Mike 80 

McGovern, Timothy 240 

McGuire. Matthew 215. 240 

McHugh. John 156 

Mcintosh. Douglas 240. 253 

Mclntyre. Glenn 240 

Mclntyre. James 160. 240 

McKenna. Connie 106. 240 

McKenna. Mark 240 

McKeon, Christopher 138. 240 

McKiernan. Anthony 62 

McLaughlin. Eric 96. 240 

McLaughlin. Matt 134, 146 

McLaughlin. Mike 62 

McMahon, John 108 

McMahon. Robert 207. 242 

McManus, Tara 237. 242 

McNulty. Dean 242 

McNulty. Kathleen 242 

McPadden. Christopher 56. 58. 104 

158. 190. 242 

McVeigh, Michael 242 

Mead, Jacqueline 188. 242. 243. 

274 

Meagle. Ellen 1 1 I 

Meehan. Mary Anne 102. 242 

Mega. Jacqueline 219. 242 

Meloro. Chris 242 

Menzo. Michele 81. 146. 242 

Merchant. Karen 134 

Messia. Hadaelena 14. 106. 242. 

253 

Messina. Frank 242 

Michael, Carlton 108 

Middleton, Kimberly 242 

Mikelic, Lisa 145 

Miller, Keith 242 

Miller. Mary Lee 244. 257 

Miller. Suzanne 244 

Minnefor. Anthony 26, 203. 244 

Mitchell, John 146 

Mitchell, Laura 244 

Molanphy, MaryLouise 244, 269 

Monsour, Michelle 74. 81 

Montei. Wendy 244 

Moon. Louise 40. 66 

Mooney. Maureen 111. 134 

Moran, Bridget 26. 56. 66. 1 54 

Moran. Teresa 141, 244 

Morano. Kim 244 

Morelh. Kristin 82 

Morgan. Elizabeth 244 

Moriarty. John 156 

Morris. Mary 244 

Motyka. Richard 244 



BEST OF LUCK TO THE 
1988 GRADUATES 

Compliments of 

UNITED ART 
COMPANY 



operators of the 

FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 

BOOKSTORE 



289 



INDEX 

n 50 

-i. Deenna 244 

■Mexander 

\ 244 

• . Mary Beth 56. 164 
'•' iura 

is 244 263. 271 

! ••• n 
. Lisa 246 

. Christine 246 
ifdnor 246 
.nnifer 246 
ly, Joseph 246 
Murphy. Michael 246 
Murphy. Susan 186 
Murphy. Thomas 246 
Murray. Tom 134 
Myers, Daniel 246 
Mappi. Marlene 246 
Narad. Christine 246 
Naughton. Diane 1 12. 246. 269 
Nawojchik. Nancy 246. 251 
Neary. Martin 246 
Nee. Kevin 40. 156. 176 
Nighan. Robert 246. 282 
Nine. Joan 1 12. 246. 267. 282 
Nobile. John 246 
Nolan. Dianne 143. 145 
Nordin. Eric 248 
Norman. Christopher 248 
Norman. Harry 100. 248 
Norris. James 104. 176. 248 
Notaroberto. Lisa 54 
Nydegger. Thomas 248 
O'Brien. Carey 188. 248 
O'Brien. David 205. 248 
O'Brien. Deirdre 248 
O Brien. Denys 233 
O Brien. Erin 138 
O Brien. John 203. 235. 248 
O'Brien. Mary Pat 42, 248. 274 
O'Brien. Mary Theresa 219. 248 
O'Brien. Mollie 50 
O Bryan. Molly 82 
O'Callaghan. Maura 134 
O Connell. Michael 166 
O'Connell. Shannon 248 
O'Connor. Brian 138, 248 
O'Connor. Christine 82 
O'Connor. Gavin 215. 248 
O'Donovan, Debbie 44 
O Hara. Mary 248. 273 
OKeefe. Kenneth 248. 251 
OMalley. Jen 111 
O Malley. Mary 250 
O Malley. Sheila 250 
O Meara. Donald 190. 237, 250 
O Meara. James 104, 250 
O'Neill, Charles 56. 156 
O Rourke. Barbara 1 1 1 
ORourke, Karen 102. 1 10. Ml, 
250. 280 

ORourke. Kathleen 100. 110, 111. 
250. 269 
O Shea. Bill 84 
Occhipinti. Lauren 248 
OcchiutO, Rirhjrd 203. 248 
Olesen. EriK 188. 229. 250 
Onofno. Lucia 250 
Orabona. Maria 26. 40. 50. 56. 70. 
80. 158. 160 

Pacca, Robert 74. 104. 250 
Page. Mark 54. 56. 152. 158 
Palacio. Luke 250 
Palazzi. MaryAnn 134 

) 26. 225. 250 
• 54 
[>ea 250 



Pappano. Lisa 250 

Paquette. Russ 134 

Parachini. Alicia 250 

Parrelli. Christopher 104, 250 

Parsons. Jessica 250 

Pasini. Francis 104. 166. 252 

Pataky. Kevin 252 

Patterson. John 252 

Patterson. Stephen 146 

Patterson. Tracy 42. 252. 273 

Paul. Linda 252 

Pavohsi. Cheryl 14 

Peccenllo. Joseph 252. 276 

Peet. Bill 82. 95. 111. 156 

Peet. Mike 1 1 I 

Pellegrino. Dana 145. 146. 213. 252 

Pellegrino. Louis 252 

Pereira. Joe 156 

Perez Vega. Jose 134. 146. 252 

Periara. Joe 164 

Perini. Laura 252. 263 

Perkinson. Sheila 199, 252 

Perret. Jeannine 252 

Perrotti. John 225. 252 

Peters, Chris 247 

Petnano. Larisa 252, 271 

Phelan. Christine 89. 252 

Pia. Jeff 176 

Pianka. Ann 56. 166. 252 

Pierre. Magalie 252 

Piscitelli, Theresa 106, 252 

Plosky. Wendy 49 

Pollicino. Kerry 26. 237, 254 

Pollitt, Jeanine 44 

Pompeo. Mike 154. 156 

Portante, Christine 254 

Post, Jay 254 

Potensky. Kristine 49. 254. 259, 

263. 269 

Potvin. Joseph 254 

Prespare. Christine 146, 254 

Pritchett. Renita 145 

Propati. Nazaro 56, 170 

Quinlan, Maureen 254 

Rabasca. Anne 254 

Rabbat. Jeanette 82, 104 

Rajan, Shruti 62 

Ralph, Rodney 231, 247. 254, 269 

Ralston, Terry 254 

Raneri. Michael 229. 254 

Ranno. Douglas 184. 254 

Rapillo. Corrie 254 

Raymond, Todd 50 

Reagan, Thomas 254 

Reale, Stephen 84 

Reichenbacher, Denise 254 

Reichheld, Deborah 223. 254 

Reilly. David 256 

Reilly. Sean 82. 156 

Rella. Joseph 82. 201. 256, 274 

Renaud. Karen 49 

Revak, Pamela 256 

Reynolds. Kelly 256 

Rhee. Laila 81. 256 

Ricci, Karen 256 

Rigney. Loretto 199, 256 

Riley. KelliJean 219, 256 

Riordan. Kevin 156 

Ritchie, Christopher 24, 30. 40. 76. 

80. 100. 166. 243. 253. 256. 282 

Rivera. Nelida 256 

Roberts. Lisa 256 

Robinson, Patricia 256 

Roche, James 134. 256 

Rodgers. Mike 141 

Rooney. Thomas 70. 256. 265 

Ross. Anthony 256 

Rotino. Marcello 256, 282 

Rowe. Maura 62 

Rowley, Maura 81. 100. 104. 256 

Roy, Mary Ellen 256 

Rubano. Salvatore 258 



M 



W 



Ruggieri. Elizabeth 258 
Ruggiero. Concetta 258 
Ruggiero. Tina 28. 56. 152 
Runyon. Bradford 40. 76. 207. 258 
Russell. Brian 30. 56. 58. 156. 176 
Russo, Caroline 258 
Russo. Tracey 1 12 
Rustom. Shireen 26. 190. 233. 243. 
251. 258 

Rutkowski. Stephen 258 
Ryan. Elizabeth 258 
Sacca. Tricia 145 
Sacker, Patricia 106. 258 
Sally. Annette 258 
Saltis. Lora 258 
Samor. Jennifer 102 
Sampieri, Claire 32 
Santopietro. Kenneth 258 
Saracino. Robert 258 
Sargeant. Amy 81. 258 
Sargent. Joe 1 1 1 
Savage. David 42 
Saya, Deborah 258 
Scarperi, Jean 229. 258 
Scarpetti. Maria 95 
Scavuzzo. Alison 81. 258, 265 
Scesa. Robert 239, 260 
Schevon. Valerie 81, 260 
Schif, Deborah 5. 40. 56. 156. 249, 
260 

Schimenti. Kim 260 
Schipf, Donald 104. 260 
Schloth. Carolyn 229. 260 
Schmeer, Ellen 260 
Schmitt, David 260 
Schneider. Michael 260 
Schnitzer. Lynn 260 
Schofield. Normington 260 
Schrader. Christian 62. 66 
Schratwieser. John 62 
Schroeder. Michael 260 
Schultz. Karen 260 
Schweitzer. Lisa 162 
Scranton. Elizabeth 260 
Screen, Joanne 260 
Scully, Pat 176 
Selinka, Susan 260 
Serianni, Suzanne 239, 249. 260 
Seylaz. John 260 
Sgambati. Frances 262. 271 
Shaughnessy. Edward 262 
Shea. John 10 
Shea. Kyla 134 

Sheehan. Barbara 56. 58. 70, 164. 
262 

Sheekey. Kristen I 1 I 
Sheft. Peter 262 
Shine. Maura 1 1 1 
Shook. Lisa 26. 262 
Shore, Nancy 262 
Shubert. Kevin 262 
Silecchia. Suzanne 64. 134, 247, 
262 

Sinnes, Kristen 81 
Slevin. Thomas 262 
Small. Melissa 102. 219. 262 
Smith. Charles 259, 262 
Smith, David 262 
Smith. Jen 28. 30. 56. 152 
Smith. Regina 56. 154. 262. 267 
Smith, Theresa 262 
Smith, Veronica 262 
Smorto, Susan 262 
Sobinski, Andrea 235. 264 
Soden. Julie 82 
Solimine. Joe 132, 134 
Sorvillo. Charlene 26, 66. 84 
Sottile. Lisa 188 
Soviero. Fiore 264 
Spann. Stephanie 100. 104 
Spears. Doreen 134 
Spillane. Maureen 264 



Sprankel. Mark 264 

Squeri. Tom 141 

Stalzer. Brian 138 

Staropoli. Lynne 76. 108. 190 

Stefursky. Sondra 264 

Stephen. Kirk 264 

Stiegler. Jill 100. 152 

Stohr, Georganne 235. 264 

Stracher. William 264 

Striebel. Cynthia 10. 205. 264 

Sturtevant. John 264 

Sujecki, Carol 96. 235. 264 

Sullivan. Bob 1 1 1 

Sullivan, Brian 264 

Sullivan. Devin 178 

Sullivan. Terry 30. 38. 56, 66, 84, 

112. 152 

Supersano. Carta 44, 203, 264 

Sutherland. Kim 42. 215. 231. 264 

Svab. Mike 134. 146 

Sweeney. Elizabeth 264 

Sweeney, Matthew 264 

Sweitzer, Lisette 264 

Swift, Colleen 199, 213, 264 

Symonds, Rhonda 264 

Taddei. Pasquale 186. 266. 278 

Taloni. Jill 266 

Tannian. Michele 134 

Taylor. Christine 64. 266 

Taylor, Maureen 266 

Tedesco. DonnaJean 266, 269 

Tenbekjian. Nicole 266. 276 

Tenhor. Jill 266 

Terry. Brian 266 

Tessier. Jennifer 146. 266. 269 

Thayer. Matthew 266 

Thomas. Scott 266. 276 

Thompson. Michael 266 

Tiernan. Gene 66. 112. 176 

Tita. Debora 266 

Tole. Gregory 104. 229. 266. 276 

Toole. Mary 266 

Toomey, William 268 

Tortorello. Gianine 268. 269 

Tous. Yael 78 

Tousignant. Brian 134. 146, 268 

Tracy. Elizabeth 268 

Treacy. Philip 56. 164. 166, 268 

Tresse, Christian 268 

Troha. Rolf 146. 268 

Tropasso. Traci 268 

Trumbo. Cheryl 145 

Tuohy. John 225. 265. 268 

Turkalo. Tasia 145. 268 

Turney. Jim 138 

Tutino. Mark 268 

Tyner, George 54. 60 

Tyrrel. Martin 152 

Vaccaro. Jennifer 268 

Vallario, Debra 268 

Van Wart. Bill 66 

Vanadia. Robert 268 

Vandemark. Al 1 1 1 

Vanderlinde, Kristen 1 1 1 

Vanina. Diane 40, 96, 268 

Vendola, Jeanna 253. 268 

Verdile. Maryrose 96. 268. 274 

Vetrano, Joseph 268 

Vigna. Paul 80 

Villano, Stephen 268 

Voegler. Teresa 145, 268 

Voytek. Christine 270 

Voytek. Mark 270 

Wachter. Mary 270 

Wagner, Dennis 270 

Wahl, Laurence 270 

Waller. Maureen 270 

Walsh. Brian 270 

Walsh, Catherine 186 

Walsh, Ellen 270 

Walsh. Marianne 26. 203. 243, 247 

270, 276 




FAIRFIELD UNIVERSITY 
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 
Bruce M. Howard '73, MA'79 

PRESIDENT-ELECT 
Joseph F. Berardino '72 

TREASURER 
Mary-Margaret Walsh '84 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ALUMNI PROGRAMS 
Eugene J. Fabbri '75 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT RELATIONS 
Janet Canepa '82 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION 
John S. Pavlik '56 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR FUNDRAISING & SPECIAL PROJECTS 

Robert K. Monk * 60 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE AND CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Barbara Stuart, MA'78, CAS ' 80 



291 






BEST OF LUCK TO THE 
1988 GRADUATES 



RAY BROWN & SONS 



ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Wiring 

185 Greystone Road 

Bridgeport, Ct. 06610 

372-8971 



292 



Congratulations 

and 

Best Wishes 

to the Class of 1988 

NEALY 
VENDING 

Stamford, Ct. 

Supplier of all 

game room equipment 



293 



Compliments 





When youre ready to demand more 
from a bank. 



294 



HU» 





a-Cola and Coke are registered trademarks whic 
ntify the same product of The Coca-Cola Company 



295 



NDEX 

Mark 270 
'70 
269. 270 

• iiidm 111. 270 
'•jrvin 141. 142 

• i ... I) 42. 112. 270 
Gregg 225. 270 

" .tqatfH 270 
.,s. Sandra 270 
l.am 272. 276 
■■' chelle 96. 272. 274 
• an Anne 225. 272 

■■'.< hael 50. 255. 272 
Whalen Stephen 272 

>ln. Dana 272 
Chelan. Bill 110 
Whelan. Mary 272 
Whitehouse. Andrea 106. 272 
Whitmore. Robert 100. 272. 278 
Uieder. Steven 272 
Wilbur. Jim 190 
Williams, Ahson 272 
Williams. Linda 40, 62 
Witkowsky. Peter 1 12 
Wolczek. Catherine 272 
Wolfe. Susan 272. 278 

Lara 100. 269. 272 
Wood. Rob 111 

Woodth. Andrew 141, 174. 272. 278 
Yamamoto. Sayaka 272 
Zagajeski. Kim 104. 146 
Zampano. Joseph 272 
Zarelh. Lauren 184. 207, 272 
Zaterka, John 81. 100. 272 
Zichelh. Timothy 225. 272 
Zimny. Paul 176 



The Manor staff extends our thanks to 
the following people for their help with 
the 1988 Manor: 



BEA STANEKO 

MATT DINNAN 

FRAN GENCARELLI 

CC GRAD ASSISTANTS 

WILLIAM SCHIMPF 

RICH ROSSI 

SUZI STEBLEIN 

TERESA SCOTT 

JEANNE DIMUZIO 

MAE BLATT 

STUDENT SERVICES STAFF 

ALOYSIUS KELLEY, S.J. 

JOHN HIGGINS, S.J. 

BILL CULLEN, S.J. 

CAMPUS MINISTRY 

CHRIS RITCHIE 

MARIANNE WALSH 

KEN CAISSE 

KERRY POLLICINO 

FRANK CARROLL 

CARMINE ANZALONE 

KAREN BEEDENBENDER 

FUSA CABINET 1987-88 



MAILROOM STAFF 

BOOKSTORE STAFF 

MURRAY FARBER 

KEVIN WOLFTHAL 

PUBLIC RELATIONS STAFF 

MELISSA CAMPANELLI 

MIRROR EDITORIAL BOARD 

1987-88 

PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB 

JERRY ZUFELT 

VIC D'ASCENZO 

TRACY FLYNN 

ATHLETIC DEPT. STAFF 

REC PLEX STAFF 

ROBERT STEPSIS 

MARY SMITH 

ALUMNI RELATIONS STAFF 

SECURITY DEPARTMENT 

PRINT SHOP STAFF 

MEDIA CENTER STAFF 

R.A.s 1987-88 

HEAD RESIDENTS 1987-88 

PHYLLIS FITZPATRICK 



PAT DANKO 

All the Kind and Wonderful 

FAIRFIELD SECRETARIES 

KOSTKA MAIDS for cleaning 

our office 

OUR PROFESSORS for 

acknowledging fhe 

importance of this 

extracurricular activity 

THE CLASSES OF 

1991,1990,1989 

THE CLASS OF 1988 for 

smiles and support 

DAVE O'NEILL and HERFF 

JONES 

PAUL and STAN and VARDEN 

STUDIOS 

OUR PARENTS 

and especially to our advisor 

JIM FITZPATRICK for his trust 

and understanding. 



Additional copies of the 1988 Manor can be ordered 
through the Campus Center office. 




Fairfield Will Miss You 

On behalf of Fairfield Undergraduates, the Manor 

wishes good luck to the following people who are 

leaving Fairfield University. We are thankful for 

their contributions to student life, and we will mis 

them: 

Bea Staneko, Campus Center Office 

Suzi Steblein, Undergraduate Housing 

Teresa Scott, Undergraduate Housing 

Fr. Walter Smith, Associate Professor of 

Psychology 

Fr. Simon Harak, Ass't. Professor of Religious 

Studies 

Fr. Phil Pusateri, University Chaplain 

Fr. Bill Cullen, Associate University Chaplain 






Fr Phil Pusateri 



Bea Staneko 



9 






. — _ 



: c 
le 
le 
hi 



I 



About the 
Senior Staff 




John Courtmanche, Editor-in-Chief 

Courtmanche graduated with a B.A. in English. 
Soon after Graduation, doctors discovered a vi- 
deocamera stuck to his eyeball. Surgery was too 
risky. "Having a videocamera for an eye took 
some adjustment," Courtmanche said, "But I'm 
fine now. I just have to remember to focus." 




Ben de la Cruz, Associate Editor 

De la Cruz '89 has been named Editor-in-Chief of 
the 1989 Manor. He's studying American Studies 
and English. His long-term goal is to be a model, 
or to just look like one, or at least to change his 
name to Richard. 



F 



airfield University in 1987-88 had everything to do with our late- 
Twentieth Century interpretations of the world community and the 
American Dream. We're American CJndergrads 



and we share a vision of life. When we turn 
18, we cast our first educated American 
votes. We buy state lottery tickets, hoping to 
win a million. We turn 21 and legally enter 
our favorite bars. We're street-smart — Main 
Street, that is. We bank on theories of equal 
opportunity. If we throw a frisbee for days, 
we can be immortalized by the Guinness 
Book. If we propel objects from our navels, 
we can appear on Letterman. We drive on 
I- 95 with french fries in the left hand, a 
cheeseburger and a stick-shift in the right, 
and a Pepsi or a Coke between the legs. We 
protest if our potato chip bags are filled with 
a lot of air — we're consumers amidst 
capitalism; we are the government in this 
great American Democratic Experiment. We 
decide the next President; we battle AIDS; 
we protest the war in Central America; we 
cheer for America in the Olympics. We sing 
songs of spiritual desolation with TJ2, and 



watch from our living rooms as our rock 
heroes ham it up for the cameras. With 
remote control in hand, we switch from 
courtroom dramas to talk shows to baby 
boomer sitcoms to weather and sports and 
movie channels. When we're sick of TV, we 
make our own videos with Dad's camcorder. 
We get chills anticipating New Year's Eve 
1999." American Express, Chrysler, and 
student loans teach us credit-spending. Our 
deficit-laden government shows us how not 
to credit-spend. Here at Fairfield, someone's 
always offending someone with dirty words 
like "Real World", but hey, each year they 
orientate one class and graduate another, 
and Mom gets the 8x10 senior portrait. 
Some people say we're too young to know 
about life, but we can tell you a thing or two 
about life. We're Fairfield Undergrads. Life 
at Fairfield's as good as it gets.