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Full text of "The Manors of Suffolk : notes on their history and devolution"

The 



Manors of Suffolk 



Notes 



on 



Their History and Devolution 



The Hundreds of Samford, Stow, andThedwestry 

With some Illustrations of the Old Manor Houses 



BY 



W. A. COPINGER, M.A., LLD., F.S.A, F.RS.A. 

Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-law, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Law in the 

Victoria University of Manchester, Sometime President of the Bibliographical Society, Author of 

"County of Suffolk : Its History a* Disclosed by Existing Records," &c. 



VOL. 6. 




Pritely Printed 
and obtainable only by Subscribers 

from 

TAYLOR. GARNETT, EVANS. & CO., LTD. 
MANCHESTER 
1910 



SAMFORD HUNDRED. 



SAXTON, 
1576. 




SPEED, 
1610. 




BOWEN, 
777. 




THE 



MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




SAMFORD HUNDRED. 

HIS Hundred is in the Deanery to which it gives its name, in 
the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, and Diocese of Norwich. It 
is of an angular figure, and its western side is about nine 
and each of its other sides fourteen miles in length. It is 
bounded on the south by the Stour, which separates it from 
Essex ; on the west by Babergh and Hartismere Hundreds, 
on the north by Bosmere and Claydon Hundred and 
the Borough of Ipswich, and on the east by the Orwell. It is generally 
of a rich and loamy soil, and is a picturesque district, the south-eastern 
portion forming a fertile peninsula between the estuaries of the Orwell 
and Stour, terminating at the confluence of those broad arms of the sea, 
opposite Harwich. 

In 1465 the fee of this Hundred was in Sir Robert Willoughby, Knt., 
who died seised thereof, when it descended to Sir Robert, his son and heir, 
whose descendants inherited the same until their failure in male issue, 
when Catherine, the heir general of that house, brought it to the Suffolk 
family in 1528 by her marriage with Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk. 
She re-married Richard Bertie, and by him had a son named Peregrine, 
who in his mother's right was summoned to Parliament as Lord Willoughby 
of Eresby, and was father of Robert, the 1st Earl of Lindsey, ancestor of 
the Duke of Ancaster. The fee of the Hundred is now in the Crown, and 
the government in the Sheriff and his officers. 

It consists of 48,549 acres, in 28 parishes and 77 manors, as follows : 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Belstead, Gt. 



Belstead, 

Little 



Bentley . . 



Gt. Belstead or 

Washbrooke. 
Amer or Hamer, or 

Amor Hall. 



Little Belstead. 



Bentley Hall. 

Old Hall, Bentley 

Church House. 
Bentley Fastolfs. 
. Dodnash. 



Bergholt 

(East) 



Brantham . 



Burstall 



Illarius al. NewHall. 

Old Hall or Adehall. 

Spencer's. 

Commandry's al. 
St. John's. 

Brantham Hall. 

Braham Hall 
in Cattiwade. 

Bridge Place. 

Brokes Hall. 

Harrold's or 
Harrold's. 

Langston's, Lang- 
ton's or Lingston's 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Capel St. 

Mary 



Chattisham.. 



Chelmon- 

diston. 



Copdock 

Erwarton . , 
Freston . . . 

Harkstead . 



Boitwell Hall or 

Boyton Hall with 

Groats or Grots R don 
Deny s and Het- 

house lands at. 

Beanies. 

Churchford Hall. Shelley 
Thorney. 
Castel's. 
Rembrow. 



Chattesham or 
Chattisham Hall. 

Chelmondiston. 

Copdock with 

Barons. 
Copdock Hall. 

Erwarton. 

I Freston. 
Bonds or Bonds 
Hall. 



Harkstead. 
Bruckley Bond. 
Brandeston or 

Brampston. 
\ Netherhall. 



Shotley 



Sproughton 



Higham 



Hintlesham 



Holbrook . . 
Holton 



Higham Hall. 
Minoth or 

Minetts. 
Raven's Hall or 

Reymes. 

Hintlesham. 
Priory Manor of St. 

Peter's or Manor 

le Lyesnes. 
Hintlesham Priory 

called Veyseys. 

Holbrook. 

Holton. 

Boy ton's in Holton. 



Stratford 
St. Mary 



Stutton 



Tattingstone 

Wenham 
Magna 



Wenham 
Parva 



Wherstead 



Woolverstone 



MMMH 



Raydon or Raydon 

Hall. 
Mark's 
Sulveyes or Sullies 

or Martyns and 

Sulveges 
Shelley Hall. 
Shotley Hall or 

Kirkton. 
Overhall with 

Netherhall. 
Thirkleton or Thor- 

kleton al. Stecke. 
Sproughton called 

Lovedays. 
Dangevilles. 
Bordeshaw or Brad- 

shaw or Bosford 

Hall al. Boss Hall. 
Necton'sor Netton's. 
Northwood's. 
Stratford Hall. 
Vesey's or Bonhall 

Payses. 
Overhall. 
Spanbies. 
Stutton Hall. 
Creping Hall. 
Argents. 
Crowe Hall. 
Alton Hall. 
I Rectory of Stutton. 
Tattingstone. 
Wenham Magna or 

Brend Wenham. 
Boyton Hall. 

Wenham Parva. 
Vaux, Germans or 

Jermyn's. 
Stodhaugh. 
Caltham. 

Wherstead Hall. 
Pannington Hall. 
Bo wen Hall. 
Thorington Hall. 

I Woolverston o r 
Woolverston Hall. 



GREAT BELSTEAD. 
BELSTEAD (GREAT} OR WASHBROOKE. 




HERE were in Saxon times five manors in Belstead, probably 
three in Great and two in Little Belstead. The main 
manor was held in the Confessor's time by Aluric de Weinhou 
with 3 carucates and 40 acres of land. There were 12 
villein tenants and 3 bordars, 5 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, 8 ploughteams probably belonging to the men, 
6 acres of meadow, and wood for 60 hogs. A church with 

34 acres of free land. The worth was 8, and Aluric had the soc. By the 
time of the Norman Survey the value had decreased to 6, and there had 
been various alterations in the details. There was then i serf in lieu of 5, 
i ploughteam in demesne instead of 2, and 5 in lieu of 8 belonging to the 
men, and wood for 20 hogs only, but there were actually 27 hogs and 

35 sheep. This manor was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt yd. The Domesday tenant in chief was the Countess of 
Albemarle. 1 

Another manor was held in the Confessor's time by Godwin Alsies 
Sone, Queen Edith's thane, with 2 carucates of land. There were 8 
villeins, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 4 ploughteams belonging 
to the men, 10 acres of meadow, i mill, 2 rouncies, n hogs, and 100 sheep. 
Godwin had the soc, and the value was 4. By the time of the 
Domesday Survey there was but i ploughteam in demesne, i rouncy, 30 
sheep, and the mill had disappeared. The value was lobs. The extent 
of the manor was half a league long and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid 
in a gelt <\\d. The Domesday tenant in chief was Robert Malet. 2 

A small manor was held by Aluric under the Bishop of Bayeux. It 
consisted of 30 acres only, and 2 bordar tenants with i ploughteam, and 
was worth 55. 3 The only other holding mentioned in Belstead in Saxon 
times was that of Olf , a freeman under commendation to Ansgar, and he 
had the estate still at the time of the Survey. It consisted of 80 acres, a 
villein, 2 bordars, a ploughteam (reduced to half a team when the Survey 
was taken), and 2 acres of meadow. Also a mill which had disappeared, 
and the fourth part of a church, the value being IDS. (reduced to 75. at 
the time of the Survey). The soc was in Bergholt." 

AMER OR HAMER OR AMOR HALL MANOR. 

One of tne manors has been usually known as Amer or Hamer Hall 
Manor. The main manor formed part of the estate of Odo de Campania, 
Earl of Champaign, in France, and Earl of Albemarle and Holderness. He 
was nearly related to the Conqueror, being grandson of Maud, daughter 
of Richard, Duke of Normandy, the wife of Odo, Earl of Blois and 
Chartres. From this time to the time of William de Fortibus, 7th Earl 
of Albermarle, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Clopton 
Hall, in Clopton, in Carlford Hundred. 

The manor was given by a member of the family to the abbey of 
Albemarle or Aumerle or Aumale, in Normandy. On the Patent Rolls in 
1353 is a pardon to John de Ufford for acquiring in fee without licence the 
manor from the Abbot of Albemarle and his convent. 5 At the 

'Dom. ii. 4306. *Dom. ii. 4116. 

'Dom. ii. 306. 5 Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. ii. 8. 

3 Dom. ii. 378. 



4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

dissolution of the alien priories it was, together with the impropriation of 
the church of the hamlet of Felchurch (or Velechurch), granted to the 
nunnery of Dartford, in Kent. In 1371 it was released by the prioress 
of Dartford to the King, who restored it to the convent in 1375, and the 
house retained the same until the Dissolution, when it passed to the Crown, 
and was in 1538 granted to Sir Percival Hart, and on his death in 1581 
passed to George Hart. In 1650 the manor vested in Sir Thomas Beding- 
neld, and in 1658 belonged to Sir Henry Bedingfield, of Darsham, Knt. 
It subsequently passed to De Grey, of Merton, in Norfolk, and Thomas de 
Grey held the manor in 1764, and died seised of it in 1766. From this 
time the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Copdock.inthis 
Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees of the late John Hales Tooke, 
of Holt, co. Norfolk, who died in 1899. 




m 



AMOR HALL. 




LITTLE BELSTEAD. 5 

BELSTEAD (LITTLE). 

|NE of the manors of Little Belstead was held by Tocha, a 
freeman, holding by commendation only, and consisted 
of 80 acres. There were 2 villeins, i ploughteam, 2 acres 
of meadow, and i mill worth i6s. By the time of the Domesday 
Survey the 2 villeins had become 2 bordar tenants, the 
value had decreased is., and it was held by Fermeus under 
Aubrey de Vere. The soc was in Bergholt. 
Another manor of 80 acres was held by Turgisus,a freeman, by com- 
mendation only. There were 2 villeins and i bordar tenant, i ploughteam 
which lately had disappeared, 2 acres of meadow worth i6s., but later is. less. 
The soc of this manor also was in Bergholt. These last two manors were 
5 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt 6%d. They were taken 
by judgment from Ralph Taillebosc and Phin into the King's hand, and 
later Aubrey de Vere received them without livery of seisin. 1 

Another manor was held by Turi with 80 acres. There were 3 villein 
tenants and two bordars, i ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the 
men, 2 acres of meadow, and the fourth part of a church, and the worth 
was 235. The soc was in Bergholt. The Domesday tenant in chief was 
Robert de Stratfort.' 

LITTLE BELSTEAD MANOR. 

Robert Malet gave to his good knight, Hugh de Goldingham, and to 
his heirs all his lands in the town of Belstead, lying between the fee of the 
King and the lands of the Earl of Albemarle, which lands were held of the 
Honor of Eye. 

Little Belstead Manor (probably by coalescence of the two Domesday 
manors of Little Belstead) was vested in the time of John and Hen. III. 
in William de Goldingham, and in 1251 in Alan de Goldingham, for this 
year he with Alice his wife were plaintiffs in a fine against Thomas de 
Kerdison as to the manor. 3 The Goldinghams originally came from 
Norfolk. In 1206 William de Weston released the lordship of Thorp Parva, 
in Norfolk, to Alan Pictairensis, afterwards called Alan de Goldingham, 
and in 1256 Daniel de Beccles held it of the said Alan by the service of 
one knight's fee. 

A lordship in Kethill in the same county, called Goldingham's Manor, 
was. granted by Hugh Bigot to Alan de Goldingham, with view of frank- 
pledge and assize of bread and ale of all the tenants, and in 1285 another 
Alan de Goldingham brought an action against Edmund de Wimundhale 
and Maud his wife (Alan's mother, it is supposed) for waste committed in 
that part of this manor which the said Maud held in dower of his inheritance. 
In 1315 John de Goldingham, son of Sir Alan, owned it, and held part of 
it of the Honor of Eye and the other part of the Earl of Norfolk. This 
John de Goldingham was in holy orders, and in 1331 we find an order 
authorising him to retain the manor on granting other lands. 4 

In 1377 Sir John de Goldingham and Margaret his wife levied a fine of 
the manor and the advowson of the church in which John Rokwod and 
Thomas Hughe were respondents. 5 Ultimately the manor vested in 
John Goldingham, who died in 1518. This John Goldingham was buried 
with Jane, his ist wife, daughter of - - Lowthe, and with Thomasine, 

'Dom. ii. 4186. "I.Q.D., 5 Edw. III. File 216,4. 

*Dom. ii. 4456. 5 Feet of Fines, i. Rich. II. 2. 

3 Feet of Fines, 25 Edw. I. 15. 



6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

daughter and coheir of Robert Listen, of Badingham, John's 2nd wife, in that 
parish church. On his monument he is shown in globular cuirass and other 
armour of that date, ban-headed, with hair reaching nearly to the shoulder, 
and centrally parted, his face shaven, and hands joined in prayer. On a 
shield over hU lu ad arc his arms. The effigies of his two wives, Jane and 
Thomasine, appear on either side, bunchy figures in kennel headdresses, 
and gowns looped up by fastenings over the hips, showing an underskirt. 
Each lady cat m > at her girdle a long rosary and two pendants. The ist 
wife wears a paitlet, and over her head is the shield of Goldingham impaling 
Lovth, while over tin _nd wife is Goldingham impaling Liston and Carbonel 
quartered. Two inscription plates have been lost, and the 2nd wife's figure is 
broken across. The brass lies on the north side of the nave before the screen. 

\\ . i-ver mentions the following interments in this church : " Margaret, 
late wife of John Goldyngham, Knt., died in an. 1413 " ; " John Goldingham, 
Esquire, son to John, dyed in an. 1420 " ; " Elizabeth, late wife of John 
Goldingham, Esquire, died in anno 1429." 

John Goldyngham, who died in 1518, was succeeded by his son, John 
Goldingham, who married Elizabeth Spelman, of Norfolk. 

Blomefield gives the following inscription from a brass plate in Nar- 
burgh church, Norfolk : " Hereunder lyeth buried Elizabeth Goldyngham 
who departed this present world the 4 Day of February, 1556, whose 
Sowle God pardon." 

On the death of this last John Goldingham the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Christopher' Goldingham, and a fine was levied against him 
by Elizabeth Goldingham, wid. in 1544. * Christopher married ist Alice 
Fernham, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Sir William Rous, of Dennington, 
Knt., and on his death in Sept. 1559, the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Goldingham, and a fine was levied against him by Anne Goldingham 
in 1563. J Thomas married Dorothy, daughter of Henry Chetting, of 
Wortham, and on his death the manor devolved on his son and heir, 
Christopher Goldingham, who resided at Goldingham Hall, in Essex, and 
married Elizabeth Alleyn, of Hatfield Peverell, co. Essex, and on his death 
was succeeded by his son and heir, Edward Goldingham. 

In 1566 Henry Reynolds (but how he became entitled does not appear) 
sold to William Plumbe, 4 and he to Thomas Blosse, a clothier, of Ipswich. 
He married Joanna, daughter of Robert Canham, of Swaffh,am, in Norfolk, 
and died in 1580,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Blosse. He married Mary, daughter of -- Bowde, and widow of -- Barker, 
and died nth Sept. 1632, without issue, when the manor passed to his 
rii-phew, Thomas Blosse, son of Tobias Blosse and Elizabeth his wife, daughter 
of Thomas Sicklemore, of Ipswich, which Tobias had died 6th Jan. 1630. 
Thomas Blosse married twice ist Mary, daughter and heir of William 
Cage, of Ipswich, and 2ndly Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir Robert Darcy, 
of Dartford, in Kent, Knt. 7 In the church of Belstead is a large marble 

'Morant says Christopher succeeded his 6 He was married at St. Lawrence, Ipswich, 

grandfather. Essex ii. 311. 2oth Sept. 1591, and his will is 

Fine. Trin. 36 Hen. VIII. dated I3th July, 1630, and 

proved nth Feb. 1631. 

Fine, Hil. 20 Eliz. 7 Martin adds from her monument " whose 

He was buried at St. Laurence Church, father was servant unto ye Hopefull 

Ipswich, 20th Dec. 1580. Add Prince Henry, whose Grandfather 

MSS. 19119; Harl. 156 F. 282; was Sir Edward Darcy, Knt., 

1169 F. 100. servant to Queen Elizabeth." Eliza- 

beth Blosse died 8th Dec. 1653. 



LITTLE BELSTEAD. 7 

slab in the floor incised with arms of Blosse and Darcy impaled, with Cage 
in pretence, per pale Gu. and Az. a saltire Or, and an inscription referring 
to Thomas Blosse and his ist wife, by whom he had five children. There is 
also a marble monument on the east wall, surmounted by an emblazoned 
shield, Blosse, impaling Darcy, Az. three cinquefoils betw. nine crosslets 
(3, 3 and 3) Arg. and on a scutcheon of pretence Cage arms. It is to the and 
wife Elizabeth, who died 8th Dec. 1653, leaving two sons and three 
daughters. After the above particulars the words : 

" In this same grave my body lies at rest 
Till Christ my King shall 

raise it to be blest, 
For at His Coming I am sure to see 
This Righteous Judge 
my Saviour 
for to be." 

Beneath are small kneeling figures of Blosse and his wife and children 
carved in relief. The boys are in loose breeches, buttoned doublets, and 
cloaks with deep falling bands or collars ; the girls in plainly-made gowns, 
over which the youngest wears a broad kerchief. 

Thomas Blosse died 5th March, 1662, and was succeeded by his son 
and heir, Thomas Blosse, who died in 1695, when the manor devolved on 
his grandson, Thomas Blosse. He married ist Cecilia, daughter of Edmund 
Tyrell, of Gipping, by whom he had one son and one daughter, Tobias and 
Cecilia. He married 2ndly Elizabeth,- daughter of Laurence Rous, of 
Badingham, by whom h'e left one daughter only, Elizabeth. He died 23rd 
May, 1722, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Tobias Blosse. He 
died ist Nov. 1737, aged 40, without issue, and the manor passed to his 
sister and heir, Cecilia Blosse, who sold the same to Robert Harland. 
He was a distinguished naval officer, acquiring considerable reputation on 
various occasions in the wars of 1740 and 1755. He obtained the rank of 
Admiral 28th Oct. 1770, and was created a baronet igth March, 1771. He 
sailed for the East Indies as commander-in-chief of the fleet and plenipo- 
tentiary to the Nabob of Arcot, returning to England in 1775. In 1778 he 
was appointed second in command of the fleet under Admiral Keppel, 
and in 1782 made one of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. Ill- 
health forced him to retire from the service in 1783, and he settled on his 
estate at Sproughton, to which he considerably added and improved, by 
purchasing the Belstead estate and also the estate and manors inWherstead, 
belonging to Thomas Wenham Cooke. 

Sir Robert married ist I5th May, 1736, a Miss Marlow, of Ipswich 
(who brought him a fortune of 20,000, and by whom he had no issue), 
and 2ndly in 1749, Susannah, daughter of Col. Rowland Reynolds, of 
London, and granddaughter and heir of Col. John Buncombe, with 
whom he had a fortune of 40,000, and by whom he had issue, i, Frances 
married to Count Edward Dillon ; 2, Marianne Dorothy, married to Major- 
Gen, the Hon. William Dalrymple, only brother of the 6th Earl of 
Stair; 3, Susanna Edith, married to Sir William Rowley, of Tendring Hall; 
4, Robert. Sir Robert Harland died 2ist Feb. 1784, aged 69, and the manor 
passed to his son, Sir Robert Harland, 2nd Bart., a cornet in the Royal 
Regiment of Dragoons, who sold out on the death of his father. He served 
in the West Suffolk Militia, and obtained his Lieut .-Colonelcy. Between 
the years 1790 and 1794 he pulled down his residence at Sproughton, which 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



had been purchased by his grandfather, a d built a handsome house on his 
Whersteaa estate which his father had purchased. In May, 1801, he 
married Arethusa, daughter of Henry Vernon (elder brother of Earl Ship- 
brooke), of Great Thurlow, sister of John Vernon, of Orwell Park, and died 
in 1848. 

Upon Sir Robert Harland's death the manor passed to his widow, who 
was lady of the manor in 1855. The manor subsequently passed to Captain 
George Astley Charles Dashwood, cousin of the Rev. Charles Vernon, D.D. 
Mr Dashwood married the Hon. Harriet Anne, daughter of William, ist 
Lord Bateman, and on his death in 1863 the manor passed under his will 
to* his trustees, who were lords in 1885, and the lordship is now vested in 
the testator's eldest son, Charles Edmund Dashwood, of Wherstead Park. 

Arms of GOLDINGHAM : Arg. a bend varry Gu. Of BLOSSE : Gu. 
three dragons passant, in pale Ermine (granted by William Segar (Coll. 
Arms, E.D.N. 57 fol. 35). Of HARLAND : Or, on a bend wavy betw. two 
sea lions Sable, three bucks' heads cabossed Arg. 




BENTLEY. 9 

BENT LEY. 

N the time of Edward the Confessor Earl Guert held, and 
afterwards Earl Ralph the Staller joined to it a manor in 
King William's time as a hamlet with 2 carucates of land. 
There were 18 villeins, 3 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, 8 belonging to the men, 8 ploughteams which might 
taking demesne and villeins together be replaced, 8 acres of 
meadow, wood for 12 hogs, 8 beasts, 7 hogs, 42 sheep, and 
half a park, and the whole was worth but 6d. By the time of the Domesday 
Survey the value does not seem to have been altered, but there were 5 
villeins less, and apparently no serfs, and the ploughteams in demesne 
were reduced by half. This manor was then held by the King, and Aluric 
Wanz had the charge. 1 

Another manor in Bentley was held in the Confessor's day by Edmund, 
a freeman, of Robert Wimareson, with 40 acres, and it was worth IDS. The 
Fair Edith had the soc, and it was held in the time of the great Survey by 
Furic of Earl Alan as tenant in chief. 1 

A third manor in Bentley was held in Edward the Confessor's time by 
Tostin with 40 acres, I bordar, and half a ploughteam, worth 55. 4^. By the 
time of the Domesday Survey the property had improved ; there were 2 
bordars, a whole ploughteam, and the worth was then 6s. This manor was 
held by Aluric the priest of Earl Alan. 3 

In all, Bentley was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and paid in 
a gelt $d. 

These manors were later represented by the Manor of Bentley Hall, 
Old Hall, Bentley Church House, Bentley Fastolfs, al. Langstones Manor, 
and the Manor of Dodnash and Charles. 

BENTLEY HALL MANOR. 

This was the holding of Alan, Earl of Brittany, at the time of the 
Domesday Survey, and in the time of King John was held by Hugh Talmache 
by serjeanty. 4 In the time of Hen. III. the lordship was held by William 
Talmache, being then stated to be held by the service of a fourth part of a 
knight's fee. The family is said to have held lands in the parish of Bentley 
in Saxon times, but the early history of this family is not to be relied on. 
It is purely fictitious, and has been severely criticised by the late Professor 
Freeman in an article on " Pedigrees and Pedigree Makers," in the "Con- 
temporary Review " for June, 1877. 5 The first " real man " in the pedigree, 
according to Mr. Freeman, is one Hugo Talmashe, who lived in or about 
the time of Hen. I., and this view is amply supported by- the Public Records. 

William Talmashe was succeeded by Hugh, who had a grant in Bentley 
in 1236. He claimed to have warren, view of frankpledge, and assize of 
bread and beer in Bentley. 6 There is a fine as to a third of the manor by 
Margaret, who was wife of William " Talmache " in 1253 against Hugh 
" Thalemache," no doubt her son. 7 

'Dom. ii. 287. knight's fee, and in another place, 

2 Dom. ii. 2956. Ib. 283, half a knight's fee. 

3 Dom. ii. 2956. 5 Vol. 30, pp. 27-9. 
4 i2io-i2, Red Book of the Exchequer 6 H.R. ii. 177, 189 ; Q.W. 723. 

1326; T. de N. 295. His holding is 'Feet of Fines, 37 Hen. III. 196. 
here stated to be by the service of a 



xo THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

He was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Hugh Tallemache, who died 

in i*)7 an.l was succeeded by his widow Mam, who dying ; in 1301, 

nYnor pa^-,1 to h, -r son. lliu;h 1 all.-mache. On the Patent Rolls in the 

Ume of fcdw. 1 1 1 . is a ,H t it ion of Robert de Coppedok showing that Hugh .son 

of Hugh " TaU -UKH 1, '.- .It-iuised to Geoffrey de Dodenes for life the j Manor 

tentfey with thcadvowson of the church of Copdock pertainnm thereto, 

1 n 1 ,;.( ,( l-Mw. I., and afterwards Hugh acknowledged the advowson 

t be"h "right of Robert de Coppedok, grandfather of the petitioner who 

was his hei?, and surrendered same to him by fine without the licence of 

the King.' 

Hugh Tallemache in 1310 settled the manor on himself for life then a 
moietv for his wife Katherine, and subject thereto on ^.^ J?* 
the heirs of the body of the said John, with remainder to the right heu 
of the settlor, who retained the reversion of a manor in Oulton held by 
Hawfee, late wife of Hugh, the settlor's father.' A fine was levied of the 
manor in support by Hugh Tallemache and Katherine h* wife = and John 
their son v William le Gros, clerk/ This son, John Tallemache, settled 
the manor subject to his mother's life interest in a moiety on himself and 
Katherine his wife with remainder to Richard their son in tail. 

The licence for this settlement will be found amongst the Patent Rolls 
of Edw III. It is for John, son of Hugh Tallemache, to enfeoff Richard 
de Tendryng, parson of the church of Burgate, and Thomas de Norton of 
a moiety of Bentley Manor, and of the reversion of the other part of 
manor expectant on the demise of Katherine, late wife of Hugh Tallemache, 
and for them to regrant these, which were held in chief, to him, Katherine 
his wife Richard their son, and to the heirs of the body of the said Richard, 
with reversion to the right heirs of the said John. 6 Hugh Tallemache the 
settlor, died the year of his settlement, and Sir John in 1341 , when his widow 
Katherine, according to the terms of the second settlement, held amoi ;ty 
for life. 

On the Close Rolls in 1341 will be found an order for the delivery to 
Katherine, late wife of Sir John Tallemache, and to Richard their son as 
not held in chief, the Manor of Bentley. The manor in his order is stated 
to be held by the service of a fourth part of a knight's fee. 7 On her death 
in n6i * Richard Tallemache her son had the whole. He died "V 1 ^. 2 , 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Tallemache, who died m 
1437 9 when the manor passed to his nephew and heir, John TaUemaci 
There is an inquisition as to manors of Bentley and Copdock of ajo 
"Tallemache or Tolemache.'" John Tollemache died in 1477, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir, John Tollemache, who died 
Feb. 1510-1," when the manor passed to his son and heir, Lio 

IPM, 29 Edw. I. 17. Extent of 'See I.P.M. 11 Edw. III. 2nd. Nos. 7 ; 

the manor will he found both in 15 Edw. III. 11 ; I.Q.D., n Edw. 

the inquisition after the death of HI. File 239, 7. 

Hugh Tallcmache, 25 Edw. I. 16, 6 Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 32; 

and of his widow, 29 Edw. I. 17. Edw. III. 78. 

Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. III.pt. 11.40; I.Q.D. 'Close Rolls, 15 Edw. III. pt. m. 6. 

4 Edw. II. File 83, 2 ; 0. 4 Edw. III. I.P.M., 35 Edw. III., 2nd pt. 69. 

lg. 9I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 21. 

Pat.Rolls,4Edw.II.pt.ii. 12 ; Originalia, "I.P.M., 36 Hen. VI. 18. 

4 Edw. II. 20. "I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 19. 

'Feet of Fines. 5 Edw. II. 39; see I.Q.D. "I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. 52- 

6 Edw. II. File 92, 20. 



BENTLEY. n 

Tollemache,' who died in 1553, and was succeeded by his son and heir, 
another Lionel Tollemache, who died in 1571, from which time to the 
time of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., the manor descended in the 
same course as the Manor of Helmingham Hall, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred. In 1586 a fine was levied of this manor and the Manors of 
Oldhall, Fastolf, Churchhouse, Dodnash, &c., by Leonard Craston and 
others against Sir William Sprynge and others. 2 

Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., in 1668, disposed of the manor 
to John Cudworth, who held his first court 2nd July this year. Until 
recently the Tollemache family had nothing in Bentley save woods, which 
were of considerable extent and value. A curious story is told of the manner 
in which the family was left without any farms here. One of the Tolle- 
maches is said to have had such an inveterate rage for gambling that having 
one night lost all his money, he staked his landed property at Bentley and 
lost it. It was, however, afterwards discovered that when he risked this 
property upon the cast of the die, he called it only his farms in Bentley. 
This was construed not to include the woods, and they, of course, still 
remained in the family. 

This manor was in 1895 purchased by the Hon. Stanhope Tollemache, 
of North Leigh, Ipswich, son of the ist Lord Tollemache, of Helmingham. 

OLD HALL BENTLEY, CHURCH HOUSE MANOR. 

This manor, too, was at the time of the Domesday Survey vested in 
Alan, Earl of Brittany, or at least he then held the lands of which it was 
subsequently composed. 

At the beginning of the I5th century the manor was held by the 
Fastolfs, who acquired by marriage with the Holbrooks. 3 This appears 
from the inquisition of John Fastolf, who died in 1405, which includes this 
manor, and runs thus : " John Fastolf in right of his wife." 4 Sir Hugh 
Fastolf, son and heir of John, was the next lord, and he died in 1418, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, John Fastolf, who died in 1447,' and 
was succeeded by his son Thomas, 6 on whose death it passed to his son and 
heir, John Fastolf. 7 In 1532 it was vested in the Crown, and Edw. VI. 
made a grant of it to Lionel Talmach, from whom it passed to. his son and 
heir Lionel, who died seised in 1571, from which time the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Helmingham Hall, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred, until the time of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., who sold the 
manor in 1662 to Sir Philip Meadow. 

In 1798 the manor was held by Benjamin Keene, who died in 1823, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Benjamin Keene, and on his death in 
1828 to his son and heir, Benjamin Keene, who died in 1841, when it passed to 
the Rev. Charles Edmund Keene, of Swyncombe, co. Oxford, son of Benjamin 
Keene (of Westoe Lodge, co. Cambridge, who represented that county in 
Parliament) by Mary his wife, only daughter and heir of George Ruck, of 

There is amongst the State Papers a 'Fine, Trin. 28 Eliz. 

licence for this Lionel "Talmage" 3 See Holbrook Manor, in this Hundred. 

to alienate this manor (S.P. 24 4 1. P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 34. 

Hen. VIII. 1598, (6). And there is 5 I.P.M., 26 Hen. VI. 15. 

an order on the Memoranda Rolls 6 There was a suit concerning this manor in 

in 1538 for Lionel Talmage to show 1456 (Add. Ch. 17244). 

title to this manor and the manors 7 See Manor of Langston, in Burstall.inthis 

of Dodnash and Charles in Bentley. Hundred. 

(30 Hen. VIII. Memo. Rolls, Pash. 

Rec. Rot. 2.) 



12 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

S\\ynrombe, \vhi< h Benjamin Kerne was the son of the Right Rev. Kclinuiul 
l\t . in-, I).h., Hi-hup of Kly. 'I lie Rev. Oiarles H. Krnir iiiairiril ;nl April, 
1821, Rebecca l-'iamis, _'iul (laughter of Sir (ieorp- Shitliu-r, 1st Hart., of 
Coombe, Sussex, and by royal licence igth July, 1841, assumed the sur- 
name of Ruck in addition to his patronymic Keene. On his dearth in 1888 
the manor passed to his 3rd son, the Rev. Benjamin Rwk-Keene, rector 
of Copford, Colchester, who had in Aug. 1855, married Edith Alice, daughter 
of the Rev. Ralph Berners, and is father of the Rev. Edmund Ralph Ruck- 
Keene. 

There is a fine of a " Churchehouse Manor " levied in Mich, term 
3 Mary I. by Nicholas Bacon against George Wright and others which 
included tenements in Walsham. 

BENTLEY FASTOLFS. 

This manor also Davy considers to have been part of the holding of 
Alan, Earl of Brittany. In the time of Hen. III. it was vested in Richard 
de Holbroke, son of William de Holbroke, and he had a grant of free warren 
in 1253 and 1267,' and in 1286.' 

Alicia, wife of John de Holebrok, apparently held the manor, of which 
there is an extent, and died seised in 1310, 3 being succeeded by John de 
Holbroke, who died in 1316, from which time to the time of Sir John 
Fastolf, who succeeded his father in 1418, the devolution of the manor is 
the same as that of Holbrook Manor, in this Hundred. 

Sir John Fastolf died in 1448, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir Thomas. John his son followed him, and on his death in 1508 the 
manor passed to George Fastolf, who conveyed the lordship in 1509 to 
Richard Long, William Jones, John Longe, Richard Reynolds, and Thomas 
Powell, who were probably trustees. 4 The manor shortly afterwards 
seems to have become vested in the Brokes, for Sir Richard Broke 5 died 
seised of it 6th May, 1529, leaving a son and heir Robert, then aged 34, to 
whom it passed. 6 The manor with Bentley Hall was included in the fine 
levied in 1586 by Leonard Craston and others against Sir William Sprynge 
and others. 7 The manor was in 1662 acquired by Sir Philip Meadow, and 
subsequently passed as Old Hall, Bentley. 

DODNASH MANOR. 

This manor in 1292 was held by William Charles, son of Edward Charles, 
who had a grant of free warren here,' and in 1315 Sir Edward Charles had 
the lordship. It is said that it passed into the possession of Dodnash 
priory, which had a grant of free warren in 1307," but it is probable that 
the manor did not pass to the priory until somewhat later, for we meet 
with an authority for Sir Edward Charles in 1315 expressly to retain this 
manor on settlement of other property. 10 

On the suppression of the religious houses the manor reverted to the 
Crown, and was in 1525 granted by Hen. VIII. to Cardinal Wolsey, who 
made it part of the foundation of his college at Ipswich." In 1529, on 

'Chart. Rolls, 37 & 38 Hen. III. pt. i. 6 I.P.M. 2 Edw. V. 60. 

14, 70; 51 Hen. III. 5. "Fine, Trin. 28 Eliz. 

'Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. I. 27. 'Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 45. 

I. P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51. 'Chart. Rolls, i Edw. II. pt. i. n. 

'Fine, Mich, i Hen. VIII. "I.Q.D. 8 Edw. II. File 109, 6. 
'See Broke Hall Manor, Nacton, Colneis "See S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1833. 
Hundred. 



BENTLEY. 13 

Wolsey's fall, it reverted to the Crown, and in 1530 was granted to Lionel 
Tollemache and others. Davy says this same year Robert Downes had 
licence to grant to Lionel " Tallemach," and amongst the State Papers 
for this year we do meet with a licence to Robert Downes to alienate lands 
in Bentley. 1 The following year, however, Thomas Alverd had a grant 
from the Crown, and in 1544 Lionel " Tollmach " also had a grant from 
the Crown. This grant seems to have been more effectual than the previous 
ones, for Lionel died seised of the manor in 1553, when the manor passed to 
his son Lionel, being held of the castle of Framlingham by the 4th part of a 
knight's fee. On the death of Lionel in 1571 it devolved in the like course 
as the Manor of Helmingham, in Bosmere and Clay don Hundred, until 
the time of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., who died in 1669, though we 
do find it stated that, in 1601 there was a grant of the manor from the 
Crown to William Chambers and John Still. 

Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., sold the manor in 1662 to Sir Philip 
Meadow, who by deed 2ist Nov. 1679, conveyed the same to Tollemache 
Duke. 

In 1798 it was vested in Benjamin Keene, who died in 1823, fro m 
which time the devolution is identical with that of Old Hall Manor, in 
Bentley, already given. 

The manor was included with the main manor in a fine levied in 1586 
by Leonard Craston and others against Sir William Sprynge and others. 2 
Davy has another Manor of Bentley styled " Manor of Altamounton 
Spettel or Bentley," and the lords' names given are Sir Andrew Windsor, 
Lord Windsor, William, Lord Windsor, who had licence to alien it in 1557 
to Sir Robert Rochester, Knt., Sir Edw. Waldegrave, William Cordell, 
and Anthony Brown, probably by way of settlement, as subsequently 
Davy states the manor came to Edward, Lord Windsor, son and heir of 
William. No further information can be discovered. 



'S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 220, 4. 'Fine, Trin. 28 Eliz. 




I 4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BERGHOLT (EAST}. 

|ERGHOLT was held in Edward the Confessor's time by 
Harold with 13 carucatcs of land. There were 42 villeins, 
5 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne, 20 belonging 
to the men, 12 acres of meadow, wood for 1,000 hogs, i 
mill, i horse, 80 beasts, 29 hogs, 85 sheep, and 26 goats, 
and to the manor belonged a hamlet, Sceveley, having 2 
carucates of land in King Edward's time. There were then 
10 villeins, 7 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 8 belonging to 
the men, 16 acres of meadow, i mill, i rouncy, 4 beasts, 7 hogs, and 23 
sheep. 

By the time of the Great Survey there was one more villein and there 
\\cre 22 bordars, while the serfs were reduced by 2. The ploughteams 
in demesne in the manor proper were I less, and in the hamlet also I less, 
while those of the men had in the former case been reduced from 20 to 10, 
and in the latter from 8 to 4, a very considerable reduction. The land 
\vus held in King William's hands, but entrusted to Aluric Wanz as steward.' 

Bergholt in all was a league and 2 quarentenes in length and I league 
in breadth, and paid in a gelt Sd., and Sceveley was 8 quarentenes in length 
and 3 in breadth, and paid in a gelt ^d. 

Aubrey de Vere held a socman of Bergholt having 4 acres worth I2d. 
He held him at Aldham. The Survey states that those freemen who in 
King Edward's time belonged to the Bergholt jurisdiction each gave to 
the prepositus annually a gratuity of 4^. only, and rendered soc dues as 
the law required, and when Roger Bigot first had the shrievalty his officers 
ordered that they should render 15 annually, which they did not do in 
the Confessor's time. And when Robert Malet had the shrievalty his 
officers increased them to 20. And when Roger Bigot had them again in 
like manner they gave 20, and at the time of the Survey Aluric Wanz 
held them by the like custom as in the Confessor's time. 2 

" The men of Beck-holt, in the county of Suffolk, say that in the time 
of King Henry, grandfather of our Lord the present King (Henry III.) 
they used to have this custom that when they would marry their daughters 
they used to give to the Lord, for licence so to do, two ores, which were 
worth thirty- two pence. 

" Here these ores, which were Saxon coins, are declared to be in value 
of our money, sixteen-pence a-piece, but after, by the variation of the 
standard, they valued 2od. a-piece. And this fine for the tenants marrying 
their daughters (pro filiabus suis maritandis) was, without doubt, in lieu ot 
mercheta mulierum, or first night's lodging with the bride, which the Lord 
anciently claimed in some manors." Blount's Tenures. 

Mr. Astle is of opinion that this kind of intercourse between the lord 
and his female villeins never existed, but was a fine paid by a socman, or a 
villein, to his lord, for a licence to marry his daughter, to indemnify him 
for the loss of his property ; and in process of time, this composition was 
thrown into the aggregate sum of quit rents. 

Many years ago there were in East Bergholt four public-houses, known 
by the names of the Bear, the Eagle, the Ship, and the Three Cups, and so 

1 Dom. ii. 287. Dom. ii. 2876. 



BERGHOLT. 15 

successful were these important institutions that a competitor was allured 
into the field. He opened an alehouse, which he styled the White Horse, and 
underneath a sign intended to represent an animal of this description were 
written the following lines : 

My new White Horse shall kick the Bear 

And make the Eagle fly ; 
Shall turn the Ship right bottom up 

And drain the Three Cups dry. 

Mine host of the White Horse, perhaps by his extraordinary verse, or 
maybe by better quality of the ale, discomforted his competitors according 
to his threat, for certainly their establishments have passed away, while 
the White Horse still remains, now only opposed by a Red Lion, the Hare 
and Hounds, and the King's Head. 

There were in early times four manors here the Manor of Illarius al. 
New Hall, Oldhall, Spencer's, and Commandry al. St. John's. 

Philip de Orebyn was lord of Bergholt in 1315. 



MANOR OF ILLARIUS al. NEW HALL. 

This manor belonged in the i4th century to Philip Tilney, of Boston, 
co. Line., who died in 1453, from which time to the time of Edmund Knevitt, 
who died in 1546, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Cowling, in Risbridge Hundred. 

The third part of the manor was the subject of a fine in 1519 levied by 
Robert Coke and others against Robert Sheffield. 1 The whole manor was 
also included in a fine levied in 1538 by Robert Reignold and others against 
Richard Cole and others ; 2 and upon the marriage of Edmund's son and 
heir, John Knevitt, with Agnes, daughter of Sir John Harcourt, the Manors 
of Horham, Thorp Hall, and this manor were settled on them, and by 
indenture 2Oth Jan. 34 Hen. VIII. (1542), they sold this manor described 
as " Illarys al. Newall in Estbergholt," and also the Manors of Stratford, 
Wenham Magna, Capel, Butley, Holton, and Brantham to Robert Reynolds, 
of East Bergholt, a fine being levied for a third part. 3 

There is an action for forcible ejectment from copyholds and felling of 
trees at East Bergholt in the time of Hen. VIII. between Robert Cole and 
Robert Reynolds and others. 4 

The manor later vested in Thomas Lambe, son and heir of Richard 
Lambe, of Trimlcy. He married Winifred, daughter of William Grislinge, 
of London, and had issue Thomas, Edward, Henry, Elizabeth, Thomas, and 
Winifred. He died i5th May, 1570, when the manor seems to have passed 
to his 2nd son Edward, who held his first court 27th April, 1584. In 1589 he 
conveyed by deed to trustees a schoolhouse and piece of land in the parish, 
part of the Manor of " Illarys,' ' to the intent that a free school should be upheld 
in East Bergholt. He died in 1617, and in the chancel of the parish church 

'Fine, Mich, n Hen. VIII. 4 Star Chamber Proceedings, Hen. VIII., 

"Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. Vol. 10, 109-110. 

J Fine, Trin. 35 Hen. VIII. 



16 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

is a monument to his memory with the following singular epitaph engraved 
in two columns, each word beginning with the initial of his name : 

Edwarde Lambe 

Ever Lived 

Envied Laudably 

Evil Lord 

Endured Let 

Extremities Like 

Even Life 

Earnestly Learne 

Expecting Ledede 

Eternal Livers 

Ease Lament. 

Which a correspondent in the Gentlemen's Magazine for 1788 thinks may 
be read thus, by the alteration of one word, Icdedc, into he died : 

" Edwarde Lambe ever lived envied, laudably evil endured. Lord, 
let extremities like even life learn. He died earnestly expecting eternal 
ease. Livers lament." 1 

The manor then passed to Edward Lambe' s nephew John, son 
of Edward's eldest brother, Thomas Lambe, by Ann, daughter of John Poley , 
of Badley, and he held his first court I2th Oct. 1619. On his death it 
passed to his son and heir, John Lambe, who died in 1708-9. His daughter 
and heir Elizabeth married John Acton, of Bramford. John Acton died 
in 1685, and his widow held a court I5th Nov. 1709, and died in 1717, when 
tl\e manor passed to their 3rd son and eventual heir, Nathaniel Acton/ 
who held his first court 8th April, 1728, and died in 1745, when the manor 
went to his 3rd son, Nathaniel Acton, who held his first court 24th Sept. 
1 747, and died in 1795, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Nathaniel 
Lee Acton, who held a court I4th Oct. that year, and sold the lordship to 
John Reade in 1796. John Reade held his first court 3Oth Dec. 1796, and 
died in 1804, when the manor vested in Sarah Roberts, widow, who held a 
court 7th Dec. 1804. At her death in 1811 the manor was purchased by 
Peter Godfrey. He married Arabella, daughter of Sir Joshua Rowley, 
ist Bart., of that house, and sister of Sir William Rowley, Bart., of Tendring 
Hall, and on his death in 1837 the manor passed to his son and heir, Edward 
Godfrey. In 1833 he married Susan Elizabeth, Countess of Morton, 
daughter of Sir Francis Buller, of Lupton, in Devonshire, Bart., and 
widow of George, I7th Earl of Morton, who had died in July, 1827. 
Edward Godfrey died in 1842, when the manor passed to his widow, 
the said Susan Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Morton, who held her first 
court this year. 

On her death the manor passed to her son and heir (by her 2nd husband), 
Peter Godfrey, who was lord in 1855. It was then acquired by Francis 
Thomas Cuddon, who in 1862 sold the same to William Sidney Calvert, of 
East Bergholt, who still holds. 

MANOR OF OLDHALL OR ADEHALL. 

This was the lordship of Harold in Saxon times and of William the 
Conqueror later. In the middle of the I4th century it was held by Sir 
John de Sutton, of Wyvenhoe, son of William Sutton, and in 1349 ne with 

1 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 17. 'See Manor of St. Margaret's, Cretingham, 

in Lots Hundred. 



EAST BERGHOLT. 17 

Margaret his wife, levied a fine against Amflesia, daughter of Thomas 
Baldewyne, and Walter de Barkworth and Katherine his wife of a moiety 
of the manor,' and the same year levied a fine of a third part of the manor 
against John Wolf, of Mauntre, and Joan his wife. 2 In 1360 the same 
pelents levied a fine of a fourth part of the manor against William de 
Waldingfield and Amflesia his wife, John Wolf and Joan his wife, and 
Katherine who was wife of Walter de Barkworth. 3 

Serjeants' Accounts of lands of this Sir John in East Bergholt in 1355 
will be found amongst the Ministers' Accounts in the Public Record Office. 4 
In 1365 Sir John gave 10 marks for licence to acquire certain lands in East 
Bergholt. 5 From Sir John the manor passed to his widow Margaret, 
daughter and coheir of Sir John de Whelnetham, he probably having 
been the previous owner of this manor. She died in I384, 6 and 
was succeeded by her son and heir, Sir John Sutton, M.P. for Suffolk in 
1377. He married Alice, daughter and heir of Sir John de Reyden, of 
Overbury Hall in Layham, and widow of Sir Andrew de Bures. He also 
married a daughter of Sir Michael Poynings on the death of Alice. 

Sir John de Sutton died in 1393, and in his inquis. p.m. will be found 
an extent of Oldhall and 4 messuages, 70^ acres of land, 19 acres and 32 
acres of meadow, 52 acres and I rood of pasture, one fishery, and 175. $d. 
rent. 7 

He was succeeded by his brother, Sir Richard de Sutton, then aged 60, 
and the same year a fine was levied of the manor against him by Thomas 
Cogesale, Edmund Brokesbourne, Gilbert de Debenham, Roger Wolferston, 
John Boys, Thomas Monchasy, Ralph Chamberleyn, and Peter Westwode. 8 
Sir Richard Sutton died without issue, and the manor reverted to his niece 
Margery, daughter and sole heir of the last-mentioned Sir John Sutton, 
married to Richard Walton, whose heir-general, Joan Walton, wife of Sir 
John Howard, was the next holder, and on his death in 1409' she remarried 
Sir Thomas Erpingham. 

The manor, however, passed on Joan's death in 1425' to Elizabeth, 
her daughter and heir by Sir John Howard, married to John de Vere, I2th 
Earl of Oxford. It was found by inquisition in 1425 that Joan, late wife of 
Sir Thomas Erpyngham, was seised at her death in fee of a messuage, i6 
acres meadow, 80 of pasture, 155. 4%d. rent, a rent of 4 cocks and 5 hens 
in East Bergholt, held in chief in socage by render of 2os. called " Claunche- 
ferme," and she had before death enfeoffed John Alderford, John Swan, 
and Peter, parson of the church of Athilburgh, who survived, and others 
in fee, and a licence was granted them to hold." 

The manor seems to have passed to Elizabeth de Vere's son and heir, 
John de Vere, I3th Earl of Oxford, 12 and on his death in 1512 passed to his 
son and heir, John de Vere, I4th Earl of Oxford, and from him to his 
son and heir, John de Vere, I5th Earl of Oxford, who held his first court 

'Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 6. M.P.M., 17 Rich. II. 51. 

"Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 5. 8 Feet of Fines, 17 Rich. II. 20. 

3 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 22. 'I.P.M., 10 Hen. IV. 36. 

4 2Q and 30 Edw. III., Bundle 991, No. 12. IO I.P.M., 3 Hen. VI. 19. 

5 O. 39 Edw. III. 29. "Pat. Rolls, 3 Hen. VI. pt. ii. 18. 

'Extent, of Eldhall or Adehall, in East- "See Manors of Earls Hall, Cockfield and 

bergholt, and also 4 messuages, Lavenham, in Babergh Hundred. 

70^ acres of land, 19 acres and 32 

of meadow in Eastbergholt (I.P.M. 

8 Rich. II. 33). 

C 



i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

2ist Jan. 1537-8- He died in 1539, when it passed to his son and heir, 
John de Vere, i6th Earl of Oxford, against whom a fine was levied in 1548 
by Edward, Duke of Somerset, and others.' 

In 1550 this John, Earl of Oxford, was called upon to show by what 
title he held East Bergholt, and kept a court leet and view of frank- 
pledge, &c.' 

In 1564 the manor was in the hands of Sir Robert Dudley, K.G., during 
the minority of Edward, Earl of Oxford. Amongst the Chancery Proceed- 
ings of the time of Elizabeth is an action by Robert Cole against the Earl of 
Oxford and others touching parcel of Oldhall Manor, 3 and another between 
James NYhet ley and Joan his wife against John Swayne touching copyhold 
of the same manor. 4 Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, sold the manor in 
1579 to Thomas Walton and Robert Derehaugh, 3 who i2th April, 1580, 
held their first court. 

A little later, probably the following year, Robert Derehaugh granted 
the manor to William Cardinall, who held his first court in 1582. He or 
his son levied a fine of the manor in 1588 against Hugh de Vere. 6 From 
William it passed to his son and heir, William Cardinall. He married 
Anne, one of the daughters and coheirs of James Derehaugh, of Gedgrave, 
near Orford, and was slain at the Battle of Edgehill (being in the Life Guard 
of Robert, Earl of Essex) in 1642, when the manor passed to his sister Anne, 
wife of Henry, and son of Sir Calthorpe Parker, of Erwarton/ and Henry 
Parker held his first court i7th Sept. 1653. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions in 1663 will be found an action 
as to this manor and metes and bounds and customs by this Henry 
Parker against John Clark. 8 

Henry Parker died in 1 68 1, when the manor passed to his brother, 
Nathaniel Parker, who died in 1684, when the manor passed probably to 
a trustee (for a court was held on I5th Oct. 1684, by Philip Gurdon), and 
ultimately to Henry Parker's son, Henry 9 who died in 1701, when the manor 
went to his sister Mary, married to Joseph Chaplin, which Joseph held a 
court 23rd July, 1702, though a court held by him gth Oct. 1705, is called 
a first court. 

In 1725 he left an estate now consisting of a cottage, barn, and 16 acres 
of land, to his son-in-law, Henry Hankey, and his heirs in trust to apply the 
rents thereof in providing coats and shoes for five poor men, and gowns, 
petticoats, and shoes for five poor women, such as receive no alms. This 
charity estate used to be let for 35 a year, and the number of objects had 
been increased beyond that specified by the donor. 

On Joseph Chaplin's death the manor passed to Henry Hankey, who 
had married his (Chaplin's) daughter, and he held his first court 8th April, 
1730. On nth Oct. 1 737, Sir Joseph Hankey held his first court ; on 22nd 
Aug. 1770, Joseph Chaplin Hankey his first court; but in 1774 Katherine, 
the widow of Joseph Chaplin Hankey, had, as guardian of Joseph Chaplin 
Hankey, her son, an infant, held a court ist Aug. that year. 

1 Fine, Easter, 2 Edw. VI. 6 Fine, Trin. 30 Eliz. 

'Memoranda, 4 Edw. VI. Mich. Rec. Rot. 7 See Manor of Erwarton, in this Hundred. 

73. '15 Chas. II. at Bergholt. 

C.P. Ser. ii. 3, xliii. 10. 'Court Rolls of this Manor, 1690-1699 

*Ib. B. clxxxvi. 13. written on 9 skins of parchment, 

J Fine, Hil. 21 Eliz. u inches wide, and 24 inches 

long, 8 skins written both sides, 
were offered for sale by Coleman 
in 1890 for 3. zos. 6d. 



EAST BERGHOLT. 19 

The manor was then sold to Richard Rigby, of Mistley Hall, Essex, 
Paymaster of the Forces, and son of Edward Rigby, of St. Paul's, Covent 
Garden, London, who held his first court 22nd Oct. 1777. He died without 
issue 8th April, 1788, when the manor passed to his brother and sisters, 
Fred. Hale Rigby, Lieut. -Gen. Barnard Hale, governor of Chelsea Hospital, 
in right of his wife Martha, and Anne Rigby, spinster, who held a court 
2Oth Oct. 1788, and the manor was in 1799 vested, probably under some 
arrangement between the parties interested, in the said F. Hale Rigby and 
Martha Hale widow, for 23rd January this year they held a first court. 
Lieut. -Gen. Barnard Hale died I3th Mar. 1798. 

On the opening of the igth century the manor had passed to Sarah 
Roberts, who held her first court 7th Dec. 1804, and the manor subsequently 
passed as the main manor to Susan Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Morton, 
and is now vested in W. S. Calvert, of East Bergholt. 

Amongst the Duchy of Lancaster Proceedings in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth will be found an action as to the diversion of a watercourse from 
a ditch called the Old Raye. Oldhall Manor and Brantham Mill. 1 

In this manor the custom of Borough English prevails. 

Arms of CARDINAL : Sa. a fesse betw. 3 hinges, Arg. Of DEREHAUGH : 
Or on a bend cotised Sa. 3 martlets displayed of the 1st. 

MANOR OF SPENCER'S. 

This was vested in the early part of the i3th century in Roger Dakeny, 
and in 1254 m J an Dakeny. A little later the manor was held by John 
Dakeny/ and in 1286 by John de la Mare, from whom it passed to his son 
and heir, Sir John de la Mare, who died in 1313, 3 when a moiety passed to 
his widow Eleanor for life, subject to which it passed on her death in 1324* 
to Florence, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Mare, married to Philip de 
Oneby. She died in 1344, and was succeeded by her son and heir, Sir John 
de Oneby, who died in 1353, when it went to his daughter and heir, married 
to Henry de Percy, whose daughter and heir Mary married Sir John de 
Roos de Hamlake, who died without issue in 1394, when the manor passed 
to his brother and heir, William, Lord Roos, of Hamlake, at whose death 
in 1414 it passed to his son and heir, John, Lord Roos, who died without 
issue in 1421. 

There were several fines levied of the Manor of Bergholt, but of which 
of the several manors of this place it is not possible to say positively. It 
is probable, however, they were levied of Spencer's Manor. There were in 
1319 (i) John Daundely v. Adam de Grymesharewe and Sibilla his wife of a 
third part ; 5 (2) John Daundely v. Wm. de Tendring and Margaret his 
wife of a third part ; 6 (3) John Daundely v. John de Louches and Isabella 
his wife of a third. 7 A fourth fine was levied by Walter Baldewene and 
Joan his wife v. Sir Nicholas Fraunceys and Florence his wife and is not 
stated to have been of a part only. 8 There is an inquis. p.m. of Joan, wife 
of Walter Baudwyne, as early as 1324, but it does not apparently relate to 
more than one messuage, 20 acres of land, 6 of meadow, and 10 of pasture. 9 

'Duchy of Lancaster, Cal. to Pleadings 5 Feet of Fines, 13 Edw. II. 8. 

32 Eliz. 2. 6 Ib. n. 

5 He claimed to have privileges here 7 Ib. 13. 

(H.R. ii. 189). 'Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III. 43. 

M.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 20. 9 I.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 50. 
4 I.P.M., 18 Edw. II. 47. 



20 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

There is also an inquis.p.m.of a Walter Baldwyne in 1346, but it seems 
to be more of a messuage, 16 acres, &c., in East Bergholt, than of a manor.' 
There is an order to the escheator the following year not further to inter- 
meddle with a moiety of East Bergholt Manor, but to restore to Joan, late 
\vift- of Walter Baldewyn and mother of Thomas, Walter's son, the same 
being held jointly with Joan, wife of Nicholas Fraunceys, at fee farm. 
Thomas Baldewyn was declared to be the next heir of the age of four years. 1 

There is an order on the Close Rolls this same year to deliver to Joan 
late wife of Walter Baldewyn and mother of Thomas, Walter's son, a 
messuage, 16 acres of land, 4 acres of meadow, 5 acres of pasture and 55. 
rent provided Joan answered at the Exchequer for the same, it being 
held of the King for 2os. yearly. The premises were held in chief by free 
socage as of the King's ancient demesne. 1 The order referred to as made in 
1341 was no doubt in connection with the fine levied three years previously 
by Richard le Spenser, of Bergholt, and Katherine his wife, against Wm. 
de Tendringe and Margaret his wife of a third part of the manor, which in 
the fine is stated to be held by Sir Nicholas Fraunceys for life. 4 

The other fines were in 1342, 1344, and 1381. The first was levied by 
John, son of John de Louches, of Gersyngdon, and Margaret his wife, 
against Roger de Shyrynton and Sibilla his wife, and related to a third 
part of the manor, which Sir John Daundelyn held for life. 5 The second 
was levied by Sir Roger Hillary and John his son against John de 
Louches, of Gersyngdon, of two parts of the manor which Sir John 
Daundelyn held for life. 6 The third fine was levied by John, son 
of Sairus de Rochefort, junr., and Alice his wife against Sir Roger Hillary 
and Margaret his wife, without specifying any particular part. 7 

Somewhat later the whole manor vested in Margery, the widow of John, 
Lord Roos, who was the daughter and heir of Sir Philip le Despenser. She 
died in 1477. 

In 1513 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Robert Brewse 
and others against Robert Fremleand Rosa his wife, 8 and in 1548 with one 
levied by Richard Walker and others against Robert Reynold.' 

We next find the manor vested in Thomas Lambe, who died seised of 
it in 1570, after which it passed in the same way as the main Manor of 
I liar ins to Susan Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Morton, and is now 
vested in W. S. Calvert, of East Bergholt. 

MANOR OF COMMANDRY'S al. ST. JOHN'S. 

This was given by King Hen. II. to Peter Liscamp, who gave the same 
to the Knights Templars. The entry showing this in the Testa de Nevill is 
to the effect that Hen. I. gave to Roger de Teoni 20 of land in East Bergholt 
of his demesne on marriage with the daughter of the Earl of Henon, and 
retained C.in his own hand, of which Henry gave to Peter de Liscamp iiij/*., 
and these Peter gave to the Templars. 10 The Templars claimed warren, 
view of frankpledge, and assize of bread and beer in this manor," and there 
is notice on the Patent Rolls in 1281 of a suit by Thomas Fitz Michael 

'I. P.M., 14 Edw. III. 23. rFeet of Fines, 5 Rich. II. 2. 

'Close Rolls, 15 Edw. III. 40. spine, Easter, 5 Hen. VIII. 

s Close Rolls, 15 Edw. III. pt. i. 40. Fine, Trin. 2 Edw. VI. 

Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. III. 33. '<>T. de Nevill, 295. 

'Feet of Fines, 16 Edw. III. 25. "QAV. 728. 
/&. 18 Edw. III. 7. 



EAST BERGHOLT. 21 

against the Master of the Knights Templars in England and others touching 
a tenement in East Bergholt.' The manor was later vested in the 
Hospitallers of Battisford, and then in the Preceptory there. 

At the dissolution of the religious houses the manor passed to the 
Crown, and was granted for the benefit of Cardinal's College, Oxford/ and 
subsequently granted in 1544 to John de Vere, i6th Earl of Oxford. He died 
in 1562, when the manor was for a time in the hands of Sir 
Robert Dudley, K.G., Earl of Leicester, as farmer of it during the 
minority of Edward, iyth Earl of Oxford, and he held a first court for the 
manor in 1565. The I5th March, 1572-3, Edward, iyth Earl of Oxford, 
held his first court, and sold the manor in 1579 to Thomas Walton and 
Robert Derehaugh. 3 They held their first court I2th April, 1580. 

Thomas Walton and others were in 1580 called upon to show title to 
the manor, 4 though it is stated by some that the i7th Earl of Oxford sold 
in the time of Queen Elizabeth to William Cardinall, sen. Wm. Cardinall, 
however, probably acquired the manor from Robt. Derehaugh as he did 
the Manor of Oldhall, and held his first court " die Merc. px. post fest. 
Pash. 1582." The manor subsequently passed in the same course as that 
manor to Susan Elizabeth, Countess Dowager of Morton, and is now vested 
in W. S. Calvert, of East Bergholt. 

Philip Gurdon held his first court I5th Oct. 1684 ; Henry Hankey, his 
8th April, 1730 ; Joseph Chaplin Hankey, gth Oct. 1776 ; the Right Hon. 
Richard Rigby, 22nd Oct. 1777 ; Francis Hale Rigby, Barnard Hale in 
right of his wife Martha, and Anne Rigby, theirs I7th April, 1789 ; John 
Reade, his 24th July, 1804, and Sarah Roberts, nth June, 1805. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings there are two actions probably 
relating to this manor. One is by Henry Clarke against William Cardinall 
and Christopher Boroughe for admittance to copyholds held of Bergholt 
Manor, defendant Cardinall being lord, 5 and the other is of copyholds of 
the manor against Wm. Cardinall, sen., lord, " who had purchased of 
the Earl of Oxford," to establish fines certain on admittances." 6 

There is an extent of the Manor of East Bergholt in the inquis. p.m. 
of Isabella de Maydenhath in 1318.' 



'Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. wd. 5 C.P. i. 205. 

'State Papers, 17 Hen. VIII. 1834 ( 2 )- 6 C.P. ii. 214. 

3 Fine, Hil. 21 Eliz. ?I.P.M., 12 Edw. II. 37. 

4 Memoranda Rolls, 22 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 
101. 




22 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BRA NTH AM. 

|N Saxon times there were four manors in this place, which in 
thr Survey is stated to be altogether a league long and half 
a league broad, and to pay in a gelt iSd. 

One manor was in the time of the Confessor held by 
Godwin, a freeman with 35 acres, and this at the time of the 
Survey was held by him of Earl Alan. There were 2 
bordars, half a ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow valued 
at 45. And the Earl also held in demesne i carucate and n acres of 
land, 2 ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, and one salt pan, valued at 22$. 8d., 
which had been held in the Confessor's time by eight freemen. The soc of 
this was in Bergholt.' 

Another manor was at the time of the Survey held by Hubert of Robert 
Malet. It consisted of i carucate and 20 acres of land, 3 bordars, i plough- 
team in demesne, and 2 acres of meadow, worth 2os., which had formerly 
been held by Godwin, Alsies' son, Queen Edith's thane, with 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, the said Godwin having the soc. 2 

Two other manors are mentioned amongst the estates of Robert 
Grenon. One consisting of 60 acres was held at the time of the Survey by 
William de Aln, of Robert Grenon, having in the time of the Confessor 
been held by a freeman named Grim. Attached to the manor in Saxon 
times were one bordar tenant, half a ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued 
at los. 8d.,but at the time of the Survey, when there were but 2 oxen in 
place of the half ploughteam, valued at 55. Robert Grenon claimed this 
manor by exchange with Hugh de Montfort's land, and Harold had the soc. 

The second manor consisted of 30 acres, i bordar tenant, half a 
ploughteam, and I acre of meadow, valued formerly at 55., but at the time 
of the Survey at 35. This manor paid in a gelt 6%d., and in the time of the 
Confessor had been held by Tela, a freewoman. 

William de Aln also held of Robert Grenon 5^ acres, worth 12^., which 
had been held by a freeman Mawa by commendation only, and Harold 
had the soc. 1 The only other holding in Brantham specified in the Great 
Survey was that which Roger held of Ralph Ilger's brother. It had been 
formerly held by Aluric de Wenhou, who had the soc under Harold, and 
consisted of 2 carucates of land. In Saxon days there had been attached 
to this extensive holding 4 villeins, I bordar, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, and I belonging to the men, wood sufficient for the maintenance 
of 12 hogs, 5 acres of meadow, i salt pan, i mill, i rouncy, 12 beasts, 
24 hogs, and 60 sheep, valued at 405. By the time of the Survey the villeins 
were only 2, and the serfs i, but the bordar tenants had increased to 8, 
the ploughteams in demesne had come down to i, and the rouncy had 
disappeared. 4 The Domesday Survey mentions that the Bishop of Bayeux 
had here three freemen -Brun, Siric, and Godestan. 5 

MANOR OF BRANTHAM HALL. 

This manor was held about the year 1300 by John de Holbrook, and 
passed to his widow Alicia, who died in 1309.' It was later held by another 
John de Holbrook, and in 1330 Margaret his widow claimed a moiety in 
dower. A hundred years later it appears to have been vested in Roger 

'Dom. ii. 296. 4 Dom. ii. 425. 

'Dom. ii. 306. } Dom. ii. 378. 

J Dom. ii. 419*. 420. *I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51. 



BRANTHAM. 23 

Spice, John Samson, John Tavener, and others, for they in 1435 sold it to 
John Cornwallis, Thomas Terrell, John Fastolf, of Badingham, John Lan- 
caster, Walter Clovile, and Thomas Fastolf. 

In 1540 Edward Cornwallis held a third part which passed to his 
brother, William Cornwallis. The next lord was Sir Humphrey Wingfield, 
Knt., : the i2th son of Sir John Wingfield, of Letheringham, who fixed his 
seat here. He married Anna, daughter and heir of - - Wyseman, of Essex, 
and widow of Serjeant Gregory Edgar, and died 23rd Oct. 1545, 2 when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Wingfield, who married Bridget, 
daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Pargiter, of London, Knt., and in 1556 a 
fine of the manor was levied against him and others by William Merkant. 3 
Another fine was also apparently levied against him and others by Robert 
Bogas in 1557.* On Robert Wingfield' s death the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Humphrey Wingfield, who married Elizabeth, daughter and 
heir of Sir Thomas Nevill, of Owldholt, in Essex, and dying in 1579 the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Humphrey Wingfield, who married Anne, 
daughter of Sir John Brewse, Knt., and on his death in 1612 the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Wingfield, who married Mary, daughter 
of - - Herick, of London, and on his death in 1655 vested in his son and 
heir, Humphrey Wingfield, from whom it devolved on his son and heir, 
John Wingfield. 

The manor was offered for sale by public auction at the Coach and 
Horses, in Ipswich, 2oth Sept. 1790, with I55a. 3r. i6p. of land, also a 
good farmhouse called " Brantham Hall." 5 

MANOR OF BRAHAM HALL IN CATTIWADE. 

This lordship was held in the time of Edw. I. by William de Braham, 
and from him passed to Roger de Braham, who claimed warren, view of 
frankpledge, and assize of bread and beer here. 6 He died about 1286, 7 and 
was succeeded by his son and heir, William de Braham. 

This William de Braham asserted his fishery rights in an action in 
which he sued Richard Gernain and six others for fishing in his several 
fisheries at Brantham, the defence being that there was no individual 
right, as the place was an arm of the sea. 8 This may have been the same 
William de Braham who with his wife Amplesia levied a fine of the manor 
against Henry de Suthflet and Nicholas de Hoo in 1316.' To William 
succeeded his son and heir, Roger de Braham, and to him his son and heir, 
Sir John de Braham, who married Margery, or Margaret, daughter and heir 
of Sir Robert Tye, of Barsham, and they in 1364 levied a fine of the manor 
against Sir William de Sondynge and Lionel de Bradenham. Sir John's 
will was dated in 1375, and was proved gth Oct. 1375. He was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Sir John de Braham, who died in 1420. In 1425 
William de Braham was lord, and prior to 1432 John Braham seems to have 
been lord, for his widow Joan died seised of the manor this year. 10 In 1460 Sir 
John Braham, of Braham Hall, in Cattiwade, is mentioned, and afterwards 
John Lancaster, of Cattiwade, who married Elizabeth, daughter and heir 
of Sir John Braham. John Lancaster died in 1469, and he by his will 

1 See Manor of Creping Hall, in Stutton, in > Ipswich Journal 4th Sept. 1790. 

this Hundred, and Dallinghoo Manor, 6 Q.W. Rolls, 722. 

in Loes Hundred. 7 I.P.M. 15 Edw. I. 17. 

I.P.M., i6th Jan. 1545-6. 8 (o.e.) Abbr. of Pleas, 33 Edw. I. East 18. 

'Fine, Mich. 3 Mary I. Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. II. 22. 

'Fine, Mich. 4 Mary I. IO I.P.M., 10 Hen. VI. 30. 



24 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

dated 2Oth Nov. this year devised his share in Boyton Hall Manor, in the 
parish of Capel.to his younger sons, John and Henry, and after the death 
of Elizabeth hi> wife and William his eldest son, they were also to have 



his >liai of tin- Manor of Braham Hall, in Cattiwade, in fee. Elizabeth, 
the Br.ilium hrin-ss, lived till 1478, and appears to have remarried one Cator, 
for by that name she is found to have died seised of the above estate. 

William Lain a-t-T, of Cattiwade and Brisingham, married Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of William Notteme, by whom he had an only daughter 
Benedicta, who married Edward Bolton, of Boyton Hall, in Brisingham. 
about the year 1505. This is probably the " Braham " Manor in respect 
of which we inert with a fine levied in 1573 by Sir Christopher Heydon and 
John Blrm ihasset, 1 and in 1575 by John Pretyman against Thomas 
Blenerhassett and others. 1 

A little later we find the manor vested in Robert Bogas, who probably 
acquired it under a fine levied in 1567 against Humphrey Wingfield and 
others. 1 Robert Bogas was the son of Robert by Elizabeth his ist wife, 
daughter of Thomas Mowse, of Needham Market. Robert Bogas the son 
married Anne, daughter and coheir of John Tanston, of Great Claxton, 
Essex, and died 27th March, 1586, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Bogas, who married Anne, daughter of William Tendring, al. 
\\ hippie, of Dickleborough, co. Norfolk. Robert was living in 1597, and is said 
to have died the following year, but this can hardly be correct, as his son 
and heir Robert was found to be nine years of age in 1611. 

Amongst the Calendar to Pleadings of the Duchy of Lancaster in 
the time of Elizabeth (? 43rd year) there is a suit as to a relief for a messuage 
and suit and service of Court, Layton v. " Boggas." The manor was offered 
for sale at the Coach and Horses in Ipswich, igth July, 1825, with 332 
acres of land and 2ia. 26p. of wood. 4 The manor was described as " all 
that manor or reputed Manor of Braham Hall with the capital farm called 
Braham Hall, situate in Brantham and East Bergholt." In 1839 the manor 
was vested in Walter Clerk, of East Bergholt, for he died seised this year, 
having devised the manor to his son, Walter Finnen Clerk. In 1855 Peter 
Godfrey was lord, and in 1885 Sir Thomas S. Western. 

Court Rolls of the manor for the 38 Hen. VIII. will be found in the 
Public Record Office, 5 and there is a note of the descent of the manor in 
1597 amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian. 6 

MANOR OF BRIDGE PLACE. 

In the time of Hen. VII. this manor was vested in Simon Wincenan, 
of Brantham, and passed on his death to his daughter Anne, married to 
Gregory Adgore, who died seised in 1507, leaving two daughters, Alianor 
and Dorothy. The widow of Gregory Adgore, however, remarried Sir 
Humphrey Wingfield, Knt., and on his death 23rd Oct. 1545, ' the manor 
vested in his son and heir, Robert Wingfield, and on his death in his son and 
heir, Humphrey Wingfield. He levied a fine of the manor in 1574 against 
William Calybutt and others, 8 and the following year had a fine levied 
against himself by Ralph Scryvener. 9 Humphrey Wingfield died in 1579, 
when the manor vested in his son and heir Humphrey, on whose death in 
1612 it devolved on his son and heir, John W 7 ingfield. 

'Fine, Trin. 15 Eliz. 6 Rawl. B. 319. 

Fine, Mich. 17 and 18 Eliz. 'I.P.M., i6th Jan. 1545-6. 

J Fine, Trin. 9 Eliz. "Fine, Mich. 16 and 17 Eliz. 

4 lpsu>ick Journal, l8th June, 1825. 'Fine, Hil. 17 Eliz. 
'Portfolio, 203, 77. 




BURSTALL. 25 

BURST ALL. 

[HERE were several small manors in Edward the Confessor's 
time in Burstall hamlet. One was held by Godwin, a free- 
man, of Archbishop Stigand, with 30 acres. There were 
i ploughteam and i mill, reduced at the time of the Domes- 
day Survey to half a mill. The manor at this time was 
vested in the Bishop of Bayeux, and was held by Roger 
Bigot of the bishop, and by Ralph de Savigni of Bigot, and 
the sac, except for the house and for 3 acres, was in Bergholt. 1 

The bishop also held here 37 acres, half a ploughteam, and 4 acres of 
meadow, worth 8s., of which the soc was in Bergholt. This estate had been 
formerly held by three freemen Godine, Ulmar, and Alviet, one in commenda- 
tion to Guert, another to Aluric, and the third to Scalpi, the three freemen 
having thus a whole ploughteam. 2 

The bishop also held 14 acres which had been held in the Confessor's 
time by a freeman Ailbern. A church with 26 acres, half a ploughteam, and an 
acre of meadow, formerly valued at ios., but at the time of the Survey at 
8s. 4^. Also 14 acres and half a ploughteam and an acre of meadow whicn 
had in the Confessor's time been held by Ailric, a freewoman. The value 
had been 55. 4^., but at the time of the Survey 45. The bishop also held 
2 acres, valued formerly at $d. but then at 6d., which had been held in the 
Confessor's time by Ulvey, a freeman, under the King. The township is 
stated to have been 8 quarentenes long and a quarentene and a half 
broad, and paid in a gelt 6%d., the King and the Earl having the soc. 3 

Another manor was in Saxon times held by Aluric, Stari Guert's man, by 
commendation, with 40 acres. There were 2 bordar tenants and i plough- 
team and 2 acres of meadow, which ploughteam was at the time of the 
Norman Survey reduced to half a team, and the value was 8s., and held by 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. 

Amongst the lands of this same Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, was a 
holding of Ulmar consisting of 17 acres, worth 35., which had in the Con- 
fessor's time belonged to Leuric by commendation to Earl Algar. This 
Richard claimed as belonging to Fin's land. The soc was in Bergholt. 4 

Another manor was held by Turchill the thane in King Edward's 
day, and at the time of the Norman Survey by Ralph de Savigni of Ranulph 
Peverell. It consisted of 28 acres only and 2 acres of meadow. There were 
in it 2 bordars, I ploughteam in demesne, I rouncy, I beast, and 14 
sheep, which by the time of Domesday had increased to 30, with the addition 
of 20 hogs. 5 

These manors subsequently are represented by three one known as 
Brokes Hall, another as Harrold's, and the third known as Langton's. 

MANOR OF BROKES HALL. 

This was a member of Bramford in the time of William the Conqueror, 
and was held by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. We learn nothing respect- 
ing it, and the only owners mentioned by Davy are Lady -- Catesby and 
Mr. -- Broke, who held of the Honor of Clare. 

'Dom. ii. 377. Dom. ii. 395. 

J Dom. ii. 377. 5 Dom. ii. 417. 

3 Dom. ii. 375, said to be in Bosmere 
Hundred. 



26 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF HARROLD'S OR HORROLD'S. 

This was the manor held by Godwin, a freeman, of Stigand, and in 
Norman days by the Bishop of Bayeux. We meet with Harrold's 
Manor in the time of Edw. III., when Laurence Horold, of Ipswich, held 
lands in Burstall,and the property was greatly increased by his son, Thomas 
Horold, after whom probably this manor was called.' 

The land which Thomas Horold had and which passed to Isabella 
his wife, including the manor, was granted subject to this life interest by 
Sir Pain Tiptot and William Andrews, of Stoke by Ipswich, in whom the 
reversion was vested to St. Peter's priory, Ipswich, by deed 5th Sept. 16 
Rich II.' Sir Pain Tiptot was evidently the superior lord, for on a grant 
the same year made by this William Andrews, also to the priory of St. 
Peter's, Ipswich, of the reversion in a messuage, land, and rent in Burstall, 
Bramford, and Sproughton, then held by Isabella, late wife of Thomas 
Horold, for life, 1 we find a licence by him to Andrews enabling the grant to 
be made. 4 This manor was, with lands in Burstall, granted to Wolsey 
on the dissolution of the priory 1528,* and by the Cardinal conveyed to 
St. Mary's College, Ipswich, the following year. 6 

The manor subsequently reverted to the Crown, and was in 1551 granted 
to Thomas, Lord Wentworth. Thomas, Lord Wentworth, in 1581 sold 
the manor to Reginald Barker/ and passed to Fynch (? Lynch), who married 
the heir of Barker. 

MANOR OF LANGSTON'S, LANGTON'S, OR LINGSTON'S. 

This was the manor of Turchill the thane in the Confessor's time, and 
was held by Ralph de Savigni of Ralph Peverell at the time of the Domes- 
day Survey. It passed later to John de Holbroke, and then to his widow 
Alicia, and on her death in 1309 vested in John de Holbrook, and from his 
death in 1316 passed in the same course of devolution as the Manor of 
Holbrook, in this Hundred, to the time of Sir Hugh Fastolf, who died in 
1417, when this manor went to his widow Matilda in dower, and on her 
death about 1436' passed to Sir Hugh's son and heir, Sir John Fastolf, 
from whose death in 1445* the manor passed in the same course as that of 
Kirkley, in Mutford Hundred, to George Fastolf, who in 1510 sold the same 
to Richard Longe, William Jones, John Long, Reynold, and Thomas Powell. 
They were possibly trustees for Sir Richard Brooke, for he clearly held 
the manor about this time. He was the father-in-law of George Fastolf, 
George having married the Chief Baron's daughter Bridget. Sir Richard 
Brooke died 6th May, 1529,'" and was succeeded by his son and heir Robert, 
who seems to have sold it to Stephen Bull. In 1574 it was vested in John 
Bull, of Sproughton, who died seised this year, when it passed to his son and 
heir, Anthony Bull." In 1804 the manor was vested in Sir Robert Harland, 
Bart. 

Ancient Deeds, 5 Edw. III. A. 3373 ; S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 5280 ; Fine, Mich. 20 

7 Edw. III. A. 3716; 23 Edw. III. Hen. VIII. ; Easter, 21 Hen. VIII. 

A. 3436. See also the following 7 Fine, Mich. 23-24 Eliz. 

ancient deeds in the Record Office: 'I. P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 37. 

A. 3352. 3383, 3384. 3478, 3543. 9I.P.M. 26 Hen. VI. 15. 

3726. 3752. 3820, 3896, 3969- "I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 60. 

'Ancient Deeds, A. 3478. "See Boss Hall, Sproughton, in this Hun- 

1 Ancient Deeds, 16 Rich. II. A. 3875. dred, and Glevering Hall Manor, 

4 A. 3877. Hacheston, in Loes Hundred. 
S.P. Hen. VIII. 4424. 



BURSTALL. 27 

A covenant for recovery of this manor in 1629 will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters of the British Museum. 1 One of the manors (but 
which we are not able to say) known as " Bursthall Manor," is included in 
the inquis. p.m. of Anna Bourchier, widow, who died 25th July, 1520, when 
Andrew Sulyard was found to be her next heir, namely, the son of John 
Sulyard. 2 Lieut.-Col. Robert H. L. Anstruther, of Hintlesham, is now 
the lord of this Manor of Burstall. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas 
Holbrook, who died in 1360 , 3 of John Holbrook in I37&, 4 and of John 
Fastolf in 1405. 5 



'Add. Ch. 9790. "I.P.M. 50 Edw. III. 31- 

"I.P.M. 12 Hen. VIII. 14. 5 I.P.M. 7 Hen. IV. 34. 

'I.P.M. 34Edw. III.75- 




28 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CAPEL ST. MARY. 

HE entries in this place mostly appear under the head 
I Boyton, which formed part thereof, and had a manor 
of this name in early days. Three manors appear as 
in Boyton in the Great Survey. The first was held in Saxon 
times by Ulestan, a freeman of Edith's, and consisted of 
50 acres, 2 bordars, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of 
meadow, worth 8s., the soc being in Bergholt. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held by Ulestan of Earl Alan, and there 
was i ploughteam. 1 

The second manor was held by Suain Suart, and consisted of a carucate 
of land, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men ; 
also 5 acres of meadow, valued at 405., the soc being in Bergholt. At the 
time of the Survey this land belonged to Robert de Stratford, and the 
bordars were increased to 6. 

Robert de Stratford had another manor here formerly held by Brixi, 
a freeman, consisting of a carucate of land, a bordar (increased to 2 at the 
time of the Survey), a ploughteam in demesne (and at the time of the Survey 
a rouncy and i sheep), worth 2OS. It was 7 quarentenes long and 6 broad, 
and paid in a gelt i^d. The soc was in Bergholt. Others had holdings 
here. 

The third manor was that of Godwin, a freeman, and consisted of 60 
acres, 3 villeins, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the men. 
Also wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, and the fourth part of a church 
with 6 acres. The value was 2os. At the time of the Survey this manor 
belonged to the Bishop of Bayeux. 3 

Another estate in this place was that of Levestan, Fin's freeman, by 
commendation, consisting of 50 acres, 3 bordars, a ploughteam (reduced to 
half at the time of the Survey) and 3 acres of meadow, the value being los. 
(increased at the time of the Survey to us. 5^.) the soc being in Bergholt. 
This estate belonged at the time of the Survey to Richard, son of 
Earl Gislebert. 4 

MANOR OF BOITWELL HALL OR BOYTON HALL WITH GROATS OR GROT'S. 
DENY'S AND HELHOUSE LANDS al. BEAMES. 

The manor was held in the time of Hen. III. by Jeffrey de Capell of 
the Honor of Heningham by the service of half a knight's fee, and in 1353 
was vested in Sir John Braham. From him it passed to John de Vere, 
Earl of Oxford, who held in 1360. In the time of Hen. VI. the manor was 
vested in John Fastolfe, of Ipswich, and passed to his heir, Thomas Corn- 
wallis. A John Cornwallis held in the reign of Hen. VII., and in the time 
of Queen Elizabeth the manor had passed to the heirs of Thomas Woolward, 
and to John Tarver, who held jointly. 5 Davy, however, says that in 1316 the 
manor was the lordship of William Fitz Ralph, and passed to his son and 
heir John, and from him passed to his son and heir, Sir John Fitz Ralph, 
who released to Sir John Sutton and others, who held (probably as 
trustees) in 1388. In 1428 Joan Fitz Ralph, widow of Sir John, held. 
She died in 1432, when the manor went to Sir John Braham, Knt., who 
held in right of Joane his wife, widow of Sir Thomas Visdelieu. 

' Dom. ii. 296. Dom. ii. 395. 

'Dom. ii. 4456. sRawl. MSS. Bodleian B. 319. 

'Dom. ii. 378. 



CAPEL ST. MARY. 29 

He further states that in 1548 the manor was vested in the Master of 
Queen's College, Cambridge, and gives the following list : 

William May, LL.D., ejected. 

J 553- William Glynn, D.D., Bishop of Bangor. 

1555. Thomas Peacock, B.D., ejected. 

J 559- Wm. May, restored. 

1560. John Strokys, B.D. 

1568. William Chadderton, D.D. 

1579. Humphrey Tyndale, B.D. 

1614. John Davenant, D.D. 

1622. John Mansel, D.D. 

1631. Edw. Martin, D.D., ejected. 

1644. Herbert Palmer, B.D. 

1647. Thomas Home, D.D. 

1660. Simon Patrick, D.D., ejected. 

1660. Edward Martin, restored. 

1662. Anthony Sparrow, D.D., Bishop of Exeter and Norwich. 

1667. William Wells. 

1675. Henry James, D.D. 

1717 John Davis, LL.D., Bishop of St. Asaph. 

1731. William Sedgwick, B.D. 

1760. Robert Plumptre, D.D. 

1788. Isaac Milner, D.D. 

1820. Henry Godfrey. 

The manor is still vested in Queen's College, Cambridge. 

CHURCHFORD HALL MANOR. 

In Saxon times this manor was held by Scapi, Harold's thane, and 
consisted of a carucate of land, 6 villeins, 4 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, ij belonging to the men, and 7 acres of meadow. Also 2 
rouncies, 6 beasts, and 140 sheep, which had disappeared at the time of 
the Survey. The whole was worth 605. When the Survey was taken the 
manor was held by William de Aln of Robert Grenon, and there were 4 
villeins, 3 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the 
men, also a mill, and the worth was 405. It was 6 quarentenes long and 
2 broad, and paid in a gelt 4^. Scapi had held the soc under Harold. 1 

The manor was later held by Ralph de Pebemarsh, from whom it 
passed to William, his son and heir, and in 1329 we meet with a fine levied 
of the manor (except the advowson) by Thomas, son of William, son of 
Ralph de Pebemarsh, against William, son of Ralph de Pebemarsh and 
Matilda his wife. 1 

A Ralph de Pebemarsh had a grant of free warren here in 1339. 3 In 
1417 the manor was acquired by John Fitz Ralph, and we meet with a 
fine levied of the manor in 1417 by this John Fitz Ralph against William 
Raynforth and Alianora his wife/ 

From John Fitz Ralph the manor passed to his daughter and heir 
Elizabeth, married to Sir Robert Chamberlain, Knt., but this seems 
doubtful ; for on the Patent Rolls for 1476 we find a grant of this manor 
and of Netherhall, in Little Waldingfield, together with the advowson of 

'Dom. ii. 419*. 3 Chart Rolls, 12 Edw. III. 9. 

2 Feet of Fines, 19 Edw. II. 20. Feet of Fines, 4 Hen. V. 33. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Capel St. Mary, to Sir Robert Chamberlain without fine or fee.' From 
the time of this Sir Robert Chamberlain to the time of Fitz Ralph 
Chamberlain the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Gedding, in Thedwestry Hundred. 

In 1581 it passed from Fitz Ralph Chamberlain, being then acquired 
by Thomas Appleton, and we meet with a fine of the manor and of 
tenements there and in Capel, Wenham Magna, &c., levied by the said 
Thomas Appleton against the said Fitz Ralph " Chamberleyne," William 
Carnage, and others.' 

The manor was included in a fine levied in 1586 by Leonard Craston 
and others against Sir William Sprynge and others. 3 

In 1653 the lordship was vested in Ralph Appleton, and subsequently 
in Sir Ralph Appleton, Knt., who died about 1683. 

In 1686 it seems to have been vested in Bezaliel Sherman, for this year 
he held his first court, and from him it passed to his widow Anne, who two 
years later held her first court. 

In 1762 the manor was vested in one Fielding, and afterwards in the 
Everett family. Isaac Everett 4 of Churchford Hall, formerly of Hadleigh, 
died 8th August, 1777, aged 69, and was succeeded by his son Isaac, who, 
dying in 1821, aged 82, was succeeded by his son Isaac, who removed to 
\\ ix Lodge, Essex, leaving his son Isaac at Churchford Hall. The last- 
mentioned Isaac Everett died 7th March, 1855, aged 46. In 1845, 27th 
Aug., the manor was offered for sale by the representatives of Isaac Everett 
together with Churchford Hall estate containing 231 acres of land. 5 This 
manor, with the Manor of Vaux and Jermyn's, was in 1855, vested in J. 
Ansell, and later in the Rev. William Brooke. In 1885 they were vested 
in his executors, and are now vested in Charles James Grimwade, of 
Hadleigh. 

MANOR OF THORNEY. 

Lionel Talmash died seised of this manor about 1553, when it passed 
to his son and heir, Lionel Talmash, who died seised in 1571, when the 
manor went to his son and heir, Sir Lionel Talmash, Bart., who died in 
1612, when it vested in his son and heir, Lionel Talmash. 6 

CASTEL'S MANOR. 

We find that this manor was vested in Sir Robert Chamberlain, 
married to Elizabeth, daughter and heir of John Fitz Ralph. Elizabeth, 
the widow, died seised in 1517, when the manor went to her son and heir, 
Sir Ralph Chamberlain, who died in 1541, in the same way as the Manor 
of Churchford Hall. 

Vaux and Jermyns Manors are mentioned in some places as in Capel 
St. Mary, but are treated of under Great Wenham. 



1 Pat. Rolls. 15 Edw. IV. pt. i. 9. 

'Fine, Trin. 23 Eliz. 

'Fine, Trin. 28 Eliz. 

4 He was ancestor of Robert Lacey Everett, 
M.P., of Rushmere, brother of the 
late Prof. Joseph David Everett, 
F.R.S., M.A.. D.C.L. ; of the late 
Right Hon. Sir John Barnard 
Byles, Knight, Judge of the Com- 
mon Pleas ; of Judge Philbrick, 



K.C. ; of Charles Partridge, M.A., 
F.S.A., F.R.G.S. ; of the late Prof. 
Edward Byles-Cowell, of Cambridge, 
friend of the poet, Edward Fitz- 
gerald, brother of the Rev. Maurice 
Byles-Cowell, Vicar of Ashbocking. 

5 Ipswich Journal, Qth Aug. 1845. 

See Manor of Helmingham Hall. in Bos- 
mere and Claydon Hundred. 



CAPEL ST. MARY. 31 

REMBROW MANOR. 

All we learn of this manor is that so far as is known, the lords were 
the same as those of Thorn ey Manor, in Capel. 

A Court book of the "Manor of Capel St. Maty," 1593-1673, is amongst 
the Additional MSS. in the British Museum. 1 




CHATTISHAM. 

HE only entry in Domesday as to this place is that it was 
8 quarantenes in length and 6 in breadth, and paid in a 
gelt 



MANOR OF CHATTISHAM OR CHATTISHAM HALL. 

In 1275 the lordship was held bv the priory of Wykes 
in Essex, 3 and apparently continued in this house until 
the Dissolution, when the manor vested in the Crown, and 
was in 1525 granted to Cardinal Wolsey, 4 who the same year vested 
the same in the Dean of Cardinal College, Oxford, who three years 
later transferred the manor to the Dean of Cardinal College, Ipswich. 

On Wolsey's disgrace, the manor passed again to the Crown, and was 
granted by King Hen. VIII. to the Provost and Fellows of Eton 5 in exchange 
for St. James', Westminster, and they are the present lords. 

Court Rolls of the manor 9, 10 Hen. V., 2 Hen. VI., 3 and 5 Edw. IV., 
and 15 Hen. VIII., will be found in the Public Record Office, 6 and the 
customs and demesne of the manor are referred to in the State Papers in 

I525- 7 



1 Add MSS. 21043-21044. 

2 Dom. ii. 2876. 

3 Serjeant's Accounts of lands of the Priory 

here, 13 to 14, and 14 to 15 Edw. III. 

will be found amongst the Ministers' 

Accounts in the Record Office, 

Bundle 992, Nos. i, 2. 



S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1833. 
5 SP. 23 Hen. VIII. 406. 
'Portfolio, 203, 20, 21. 
7S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1834 (2). 




THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CHELMONDISTON. 

N Saxon times there was one manor held in this place by 
Suwart, a socman of Stigand, a freeman, consisting of 
30 acres in the jurisdiction of" Bercolt." It was included in 
the valuation of Hintlesham, and appears in the Survey 
under the name " Canapetuna.'" 

The only other holding mentioned here was that of 
Brunwin, a socman of the King's Manor ot Bergholt, con- 
sisting of 4 acres worth i2d. at the time of the Survey, belonging 
to Aubrey de Vere.' 

This place was 5 quarentenes long and 2 broad, and paid in a gelt 6$d. 

MANOR OF CHELMONDISTON. 

In the time of Edw. I. both the lordship and impropriation of Chelmon- 
diston were in the Crown, and the latter so continues. Both Roger de 
Lopham and Hamon de Wolferston had considerable holdings in Chel- 
mondiston, and obtained a grant of free warren, the former in 1481, 3 and 
the latter in 1483.' It does not, however, appear that either of them had 
the lordship. On the opening of the I4th century this was apparently in 
the Crown, but a little later is found vested in Sir Johnde Holbrook, Knt., 
who died seised of the manor in 1316, from which time it passed through 
the Holbrook family in the same course as the Manor of Holbrook, in this 
Hundred. 

In 1749 Samuel Lucas was lord, and this year died seised of the manor. 

In 1841 it was vested in Archdeacon Berners, from which time the 
manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of Erwarton, in this 
Hundred. All the copyholds in Chelmondiston have been enfranchised, 
and the reputed manor is now vested in Charles Hugh Berners, of Woolver- 
stone Park, Ipswich. 



1 Dora. ii. 296. 
' Dom. ii. 4186. 



'Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. 54. 
4 Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. i. 




COPDOCK. 33 

COPDOCK. 
MANOR OF COPDOCK WITH BARONS. 

|N 1272 Peter de Ryngesale and Margery his wife sued 
Geoffrey de Dodenesse for a third part of this manor, and 
in 1286 we find the whole vested in Robert Copedoc,' who 
was apparently succeeded in the lordship by Richard de 
Coppedoc. Davy put this Richard de Coppedoc as lord in 
1316, and yet makes John de Holbrook also lord, and he died 
this very same year. 

In 1330 Margaret the widow of John sued Thomas de Holbrook, son of 
John, for a moiety of this manor as part of her dower, and subject to this 
claim Sir Thomas de Holbrook inherited the same. He died in 1360.' 

It is quite possible that the Holbrooks had not this manor at all, but 
were lords of another manor in Copdock for as late as 1351 we meet 
with a fine levied of the manor by William Copedok and Beatrice his wife 
against John de Ketene, parson of Copdock Church. 3 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth we find the manor vested in Lionel 
Talmash, who died in 1571, when it passed in the same way as the Manor 
of Helmingham Hall, in Helmingham, in the Hundred of Bosmere and 
Claydon, until the death of Sir Lionel Tollemache, 3rd Bart., in 1668. 

In the middle of the i8th century the manor was vested in Thomas de 
Grey, of Merton, co. Norfolk, M.P. for that county, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of William Wyndham, of Felbrigge, co. Norfolk, and 
dying in 1765 the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas de Grey. He 
married i2th August, 1745, Elizabeth, 3rd daughter of Samuel Fisher, of 
Bury St. Edmunds, but died without issue, 23rd May, 1781. He had, 
however, in his lifetime sold the manor to his younger brother, William 
de Grey, a lawyer of eminence, who was made i6th Dec. 1764, Solicitor- 
General to Queen Anne, and was reappointed to the same office by King 
George I., being subsequently Attorney-General, 6th Aug. 1766, and Chief 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas 26th Jan. 1771, when he received 
the honour of knighthood. Sir William de Grey resigned his judicial office 
8th June, 1780, and was advanced to the peerage i7th Oct. by the title of 
Baron Walsingham, of Walsingham, in Norfolk. He did not long enjoy 
his honour, for he died Qth May, 1781, leaving by Mary his wife, daughter 
of William Cowper, of The Park, co. Hertford, whom he had married i2tn 
Nov. 1743, an only surviving son, Thomas de Grey, 2nd Baron Walsingham, 
to whom the manor passed. This Thomas married 3Oth April, 1772, 
Augusta Georgiana Elizabeth, only daughter of Sif William Irby, ist Lord 
Boston, and for 20 years filled the office of chairman of the Committee 
of Privileges of the House of Lords, and upon his retirement in 1814 was 
granted a pension of 2,000 per annum for life. His lordship was also 
comptroller of the first-fruits and tenths. 

He died i6th Jan. 1818, and the manor passed to his son and heir, 
George de Grey, 3rd Baron Walsingham, who i6th May, 1804, married 
Matilda, eldest daughter of Paul Cobb Methuen, of Corsham, but had no 
issue. His lordship held his first court for the manor " Copdock with 

'Q.W. 736. 3 Feet of Fines, 24 Edw. III. 15. 

2 See Manor of Holbrook, in this Hundred. 



34 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Barons," and also for Great Belstead, i4th July, 1820,' and having been 
unfortunately burnt to death, together with Lady Walsingham, at his 
house in Harley Street, 26th April, 1831, the manor devolved on his brother, 
the Rev. Thomas iU- (irt-y, 4th Baron Walsingham, Archdeacon of Surrey, 
Prebendary of Winchester, and Rector of Fawley, Hants., and of Merton, 
Norfolk, who married I2th Aug. 1802, Elizabeth, youngest daughter of the 
Hon. Right Rev. Brownlow North, Bishop of Winchester, and dying yth 
Sept. 1839, th e manor probably passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas de 
Grey, 5th Baron Walsingham, who married ist 6th Aug. 1842, Augusta 
Louisa, eldest daughter of Sir Robert Frankland Russell, 7th Bart, of 
Thirkleby, and 2ndly 25th Oct. 1847, the Hon. Emily Elizabeth Julia, 
eldest daughter of John, 2nd Lord Rendlesham. 

This Lord Walsingham about 1850 exchanged this manor and the Manor 
of Washbrook with the Rev. James Tooke Hales, for certain other manors. 
This James Tooke Hales was the son of James Hales, a solicitor of the 
city of Norwich, youngest son of Robert Hales, of King's Lynn, by 
his wife Ann, daughter and coheir of Sir John Turner, Bart., of Warham 
Hall. James Hales's wife was Barbara, daughter of John Greene Baseley, 
of Norwich. The Rev. James Tooke Hales assumed the additional surname 
of Tooke on inheriting from his maternal uncle the property of Thompson, 
in the county of Norfolk. He died unmarried in 1875, and the manor 
passed to his brother, Baseley Hales-Tooke, who died unmarried in 1892, 
and was succeeded by his next brother, John Hales Tooke, M.R.C.S.,E., of 
Copdock and Washbrook, who married ist i6th Sept. 1846, Sarah, only 
child of John Clark, of Holt, co. Norfolk, who died 8th Aug. 1895, and 
2ndly, 4th Nov. 1895, Isabel J., youngest daughter of John P. Ballachy, 
of Edgefield Mount, co. Norfolk. 

Arms of DE GREY : Barry of six, Arg. and Az. on a chief of the first 
three amulets Gu. 

COPDOCK HALL al. FITZ RAFFES. 

This probably was the manor of Fitz Ralph's, of which there is a 
descent, 1597, amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian." In 1263 
the manor was held by William de Montchensy of the Honor of Hedingham 
ad Castrum, in Essex, by the fourth part of a knight's fee. From him 
the manor passed to John Baron, of Copdock, who held in the time of 
Edw. I. In the time of Edw. III. the manor was vested in John Fitz 
Raffe, but in the same reign passed to John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, and 
then to Richard Dogette. The manor was, however in 1418 granted by 
deed by Alicia, Countess of Oxford, to Robert Fitz Raffe. In the time of 
Queen Elizabeth the manor was vested in William Forster, in which family 
the manor continued for several generations. William Forster was the 
2nd son of Richard Forster, of Iveletle, Shifmal, and Margaret his wife, 
daughter of Michael Sellman, of Morton, co. Stafford. William Forster 
married Maryon, daughter and heir of William Spencer, of Ipswich, and 
was succeeded by his son and heir, Robert Forster, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Christr. Goldingham, of Belstead, and died in 1591, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, William Forster, from whom it devolved 
on his son and heir Henry, who parted with the inheritance. We find two 

1 Ipswich Journal, ist July, 1820. 'Rawl. B. 319. 



COPDOGK. 35 

disputes as to the manor, or copyholds of it, amongst the Star Chamber Pro- 
ceedings in 1518, and amongst the Exchequer Depositions in 1577. The 
one is an action between Thomas Harman and William Spencer and others, 1 
and the other is a suit between Thomas Harman, of Grantham, and William 
Harman, of Bentley, twin brothers, and Thomas Harman, of Copdock, eldest 
son of Thomas Harman, of Bentley, as to certain lands held freely by 
William Spencer, his grandfather by the mother as of Copdock Manor. 2 

We meet with a fine levied in respect of rents issuing from the manor 
in 1550 by Edmund Wythepowle and others against Peter Moone and 
others. 3 

Of " Copdock Manor " we meet with two fines in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth ; one in 1576 was levied by Robert Forster against Francis 
Symond,* and the other in 1597 by Richard Bradon and others against 
Sir John Scott and others. 5 

It may also be the main manor in respect of which Thomas Bedingfield, 
of Gray's Inn, compounded, and which he had in 1648 " lately purchased of 
Henry Forster, 6 his debtor, a recusant, two thirds being sequestered for 
his recusancy." 1 We find that in 1570 a William Foster rendered an 
account to the Queen as to courts leet and view of frankpledge within 
Copdock. 8 In 1855 and 1885 the manor was vested in W. J. Deane. 



'Star C.P. 10 Hen. VIII. Bundle 19, 394. 6 See a legend of Copdock Hall and the 
*Exch. Dep. 577 at Capell. connection of the Forsters or 

3 Fine, Hil. 3 Edw. VI. Fosters therewith, in the East 

4 Fine, Easter, 18 Eliz. Anglian Notes and Queries, vol. 

5 Fine, Easter, 39 Eliz. vi. 25. 

7 S.P. Cal. of Comp. 1648, p. 1867. 

8 Memoranda, 12 Eliz. Trin. Rec. Rot. 61. 




36 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



ERWARTON. 

|\VO manors were held here at the time of the Survey by 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. The first was formerly of 
Phin's land, and held by Turi, the King's thane, and con- 
sisted of ij carucates of land, 8 villeins, 4 bordars, i plough- 
teams in demesne and 4 ploughteams in demesne. Also 
3 acres of meadow, the third part of a fishery, a rouncy, 6 
beasts, 20 hogs, and 80 sheep, worth 405., the soc belonging 
to Turi. At the time of the Survey Roger held this manor of Richard, 
and some of the details had changed ; the villeins were reduced to 3, the 4 
ploughteams in demesne to I, but the bordars had increased to 7, and there 
were in addition 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 26 hogs, and 4 goats, valued at 305. 

The second manor was formerly held by Ailbern, a freeman, and 
consisted of 60 acres and half a ploughteam, worth 8s.' 



MANOR OF ERWARTON. 

This was at the time of the Great Survey the estate of Richard, son ol 
Earl Gislebert, but in the time of Hen. III. was the lordship of Bartholomew 
Davillers,* and in that reign passed from him to his son and heir, Richard 
Davillers. Richard was in the custody of Cassandra, his mother, by 
grant of Hugh de Burgh, justiciary, with whom she compounded for 205. 
The possessions of this Richard which lay in Shelfhanger, in Norfolk, and 
in Brome and Erwarton, in Suffolk, were then worth 40 per annum, and 
were all held by serjeanty, viz., by the service of conducting the foot 
soldiers of the two counties of Norfolk and Suffolk for 40 days at the King's 
summons from St. Edmunds' ditch (now called Devil's ditch, on Newmarket 
Heath) to the King's army in Wales, for which he was to have qd. of each 
for conduct money, and the rest of their maintenance was to be at the 
King's cost, and by this tenure it always passed. The abbot at first was 
to do this service till granted this part chargeable with it. In 1253 Richard 
Davillers and Beatrix enjoyed the manor. He died in 1269, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Bartholomew Davillers, who died in 1276,* 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Bartholomew Davillers, and on 
his death in 1287* passed to his son and heir, Sir John Davillers, and on his 
f loath in 1288' passed to his son and heir, Sir Bartholomew Davillers, Knt., 
who in 1315 settled the manor on himself, Joan his wife, and his heirs, 6 
and in support levied a fine of it against John Murieus, 7 and died in 1330. 8 
The manor then passed to Sir Bartholomew's daughter and coheir, Isabel, 
who married Sir Robert Bacon, Knt. He died in 1375, when the manor 
passed to their son and heir, Sir Bartholomew Bacon, Knt., who died 
without issue in 1381, when, subject to his widow Joan's life interest by 
way of dower, it passed to his sister and heir Isabel, married to Sir Oliver 

'Dom. ii. 3946, 395. 4 I.P.M., 15 Edw. I. 16. 

'1210-12, Red Book of the Exchequer, 132 M.P.M., 16 Edw. I. 22. 

B. 1253; Chart. Rolls 37-38 Hen. 'I.Q.D. 8 Edw. II. File 101, 18. 

III. pt. i., n, 57. 7 Feet of Fines, o Edw. II. 12. 

'I.P.M., 4 Edw. I. 70. "I.P.M., 5 Edw. III. 76. 



ERWARTON. 37 

Calthorpe, of Calthorpe, in Norfolk/ and on their death to their son and 
heir, Sir William Calthorpe. 2 From this time to the marriage of Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of Sir Philip Calthorpe (who died in 1549), with Sir 
Henry Parker, the devolution of the manor is the same as that of the 
Manor of Brome Hall, in Hartismere Hundred. 

Elizabeth Calthorpe and Sir Henry Parker were succeeded by their 
son and heir, Sir Philip Parker, who was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1578, 
and in that year received the honour of knighthood from Queen Elizabeth 
on her progress through this county. 

It is stated in some places that in 1577 the manor was purchased by 
this Sir Philip Parker of Sir Drue Drury, but we have not found any evidence 
of this. It is true we meet with a fine levied of the manor in 1566 by Sir 
William Cordall and others against Drue Drury and others, 3 but this does 
not afford sufficient justification for the above statement. 

Sir Philip Parker married Catherine, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, 
of Winchendon, in Bucks., Knt., and on his death the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Calthorp Parker, who was knighted by King Jas. I. before 
his coronation. He married Mercy, daughter of Sir Stephen Soame, Knt., 
and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Philip Parker, 
who received the honour of knighthood igth Nov. 1624, and was knight 
of the shire for Suffolk in 1640. He married Dorothy, daughter and heir 
of Sir Robert Gawdy, of Claxton, in Norfolk, Knt. (by Winifred his wife, 
daughter and coheir of Sir Nathaniel Bacon, of Stiffkey, in Norfolk), and 
dying 22nd June, 1675, the manor passed to his only surviving son and 
heir, Philip Parker, who was advanced to the dignity of a baronet 13 Car. II. 
He married twice ist Rebecca, daughter of Walter, sistei and eventual 
heir of Sir Walter Long, of Whaddon, in Wiltshire, Bart., and 2ndly, 7th 
Nov. 1661, Hannah, daughter and heir of Philip Bacon, of Woolverstone, 
widow of Thomas Bedingfield, son of Sir Thos. Bedingfield, of Darsham, 
Knt. 

Sir Philip Parker died in 1690,* when the manor passed to his eldest 
son by his first wife, Sir Philip Parker, 2nd Bart. 

He married I3th Mar. 1680-1, Mary, daughter of Samuel Fortrey, of 
Byall Fenn, in Cambridgeshire, and on his death about I7OO 5 the manor 
passed to his only son, Sir Philip Parker, who assumed the surname of 
Parker-a-Morley in lieu of Parker. He was in both Parliaments of K'ng 
Geo. I. and in the first Parliament of King Geo. II., as member for the 
borough of Harwich, in Essex. 

He married, nth July, 1715, Martha, daughter of William East, of 
the Middle Temple, and dying 2oth Jan. I74O-4I, 6 aged 58, without male 
issue the title in the family became extinct, and the manor passed to his 
eldest daughter and coheir Martha, married to John Thynne Howe, 2nd 
Lord Chedworth, who died 3oth Nov. 1775, without issue. 

On the death of Lady Chedworth the manor was purchased by William 
Berners, of Woolverstone, son of William Berners, by Mary his wife, daughter 
of Henry Bendysh, of South Town, Yarmouth, great-great-granddaughter 
of Oliver Cromwell. He married, nth June, 1765, Katherine, daughter 

'Pat. Rolls, 14 Hen. VI. pt. i. 14. 'Fine, Mich. 8 Eliz. 

"See Riveshall Manor, Hepworth, Black- 4 Will proved March, 1690. 

bourn Hundred, and Brome Hall, 'Will proved July, 1700. 

Hartismere Hundred. 'Will proved 1741. 



38 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of John Laroche, of Egham, M.P.for Bodmin, and dying in 1815 the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Charles Berners, of Woolverstone Park, who 
>ln l unmarried igth Aug. 1831, aged 61, when the manor passed to his 
brother, the Ven. Henry Denny Berners, Archdeacon of Suffolk, who in 
July, 1799, married Sarah, daughter of John Jarrett, of Freemantle, co. 
Hants., and dying in Jan. 1852, the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Berners, who in 1832 married Mary Henrietta, daughter of the Rev. Joshua 
Rowley, rector of East Bergholt, and niece of Sir William Rowley, 2nd 
Bart., and on his death the manor passed to his brother, Captain Hugh 
Berners, R.N., who 2gth Oct. 1832, married Julia Alice, daughter of John 
Ashton, of The Grange, near Northwich, Cheshire, and on his death, 7th 
May, 1891, passed to his eldest son and heir, Charles Hugh Berners, of \Vool- 




ERWARTON HALI. 



verstone Park, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff in 1895, who 2Oth June, 1867, 
married Mary, 2nd daughter of Sir Ralph Anstruther, 4th Bart., of Balcaskie, 
Fife, N.B. 

Erwarton Hall is situated on a point of land at the junction of the 
Orwell and Stour, commanding a fine view of these rivers. The house, 
which is a gabled mansion of brick in the Elizabethan style, with 
mullioned windows, stands pointing to the south, the ground rising 
gently, and slightly both on the east and west of it. At the back 
towards the north is a courtyard enclosed by a brick wall, and the 
entrance was here through the gateway, with numerous cylindrical 
turrets, which has been engraved by Grosse and others. The house 
was rebuilt by Sir Philip Parker, and partially reconstructed in 1858 
from a wing of the Old Hall, which had fallen into decay. It is now leased 
by the Admiralty as the official residence of the captain commanding the 
Royal Naval Training establishment at Shotley. The rooms are loftv 
and large, and the stairs is still in its original state, the balustrades of oak are 
now become of a dark hue, and are very massive and substantial. By the 
arms over the porch door on the north side, which are Morley impaling 
Cal thorp, it would appear that the house was erected by Sir Henry Parker, 



ERWARTON. 39 

Knt., son and heir apparent of Henry Parker, Lord Morley, who married 
for a second wife Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Philip Calthorpe, of 
Norwich, Knt. He died in 1550 before his father. 

The gateway of this mansion has attracted considerable notice. 
It has been urged, from the whimsical taste of its construction, that 
it must have been erected in the time of Elizabeth or Jas. I., when 
architecture seems to have been at its lowest ebb, the buildings of 
those days being neither Grecian nor Gothic, but an unnatural and 
discordant jumble of both styles. 1 

There is a tradition here that Queen Anne Boleyn visited and slept 
at the hall ; and some say her heart was after her death deposited in the 
parish church. Mr. H. W. Birch, in a communication to the East Anglian 
Notes and Queries, in 1899, 2 says that during some repairs to the fabric in 
1837 a heart-shaped leaden casket containing a handful of dust was found 
built in the north wall. 

Arms of DAVILLERS : Az. a fesse between three leopards' faces Or or 
Arg. three escutcheons two and one, Gu. Of PARKER : Argent, a lion pas- 
sant, Gules between two bars, Sable, thereon 3 bezants, 2 and i in chief, as 
many Bucks' heads caboshed of the third. Of BERNERS : Quarterly Or 
and Vert. 



'Grosse's Antiq. vol. 5, p. 52, Excursions "Vol. viii. p. 108. 
in Suffolk, vol. i., p. 149-150. 




40 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

FRESTON. 

MANOR was in Saxon times held here by Robert, son ot 
Wimarc. It consisted of 6 carucates of land, 24 villeins, 4 
bordars, 2 plough teams in demesne and 8 belonging to the 
men. Also 8 acres of meadow, a mill, some sort of a church, 
ii beasts, 40 hogs, and 140 sheep, worth 8. The soc 
belonged to Robert. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, the ploughteams 
belonging to the men were reduced to 6, the beasts were only 3, also the 
hogs, and there were 101 sheep ; the value of the whole had, however, 
increased to i i . IDS. It was a league in length and half a league in breadth 
and paid in a gelt iod.' 

The only other holding in this place was that of Robert, who also had 
the soc. It consisted of 30 acres in demesne, a ploughteam, and an acre 
of meadow, worth los. At the time of the Survey Ernulf held this estate 
of Suane, of Essex.' 

MANOR OF FRESTON. 

In 1234 the hall, manor, and advowson were held by Philip de Freston, 
who was admitted a free burgess of Ipswich at this time, and in 1316 by 
John de Freston, who in 1319 had a grant of free warren here. 3 

According to Davy, however, John de Holbroke died seised of the 
manor in 1316,' and Margaret his widow had a part in dower in 1330, being 
succeeded by her son and heir, Sir Thomas Holbroke, Knt. But the 
manor appears to have continued in the Freston family for at least a century 
later, until Margaret, daughter and heir of Thomas Freston, married Thomas 
Wolferston, of Freston, who died before 1458. On Thomas Wolfer- 
ston's death the manor passed to his daughter and heir Elizabeth, who 
married William Latimer, of Freston, and after his death took as a 2nd 
husband Robert Thorpe. He died in 1480, and the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Wm. Latimer, who married Anne, daughter of Edmund 
Bocking, of Ash Bocking, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Edward 
Latimer, who married Mary, daughter of Christopher Thwaites, of Man- 
ningtree, and died and was buried at Freston 23rd May, 1540, when the 
manor went to his son and heir, Christopher Latimer, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Richard Wingfield. 5 

In 1553 the manor was sold by Christopher Latimer to Thomas Gooding, 
of Ipswich, 2nd son of Matthew Gooding, of Blaxhall, and the sale was 
effected by a fine levied in Easter term this year. 6 We meet with a fine of 
the manor again in 1577 levied by Richard Patrycke and others against 
the said Thomas Gooding and others, 7 but this was probably by way of 
settlement. 

Thomas Gooding married ist a daughter of Robert Harlwyn, of Camp- 
sey Ash, and 2ndly Dorothy. He was a portman of Ipswich in 1560. His 
will is dated loth April, 1595, and was proved I3th Nov. the same year. 8 

By his will he gives to Robert Gooding his eldest son, and to his heirs, 
a yearly rent charge of 265. 8d. out of his lands in Kesgrave, to the intent 

1 Dom. ii. 3956. 5 She died 5th March, 1557. 

'Dom. ii. 402. 6 Fine, Easter, i Mary I. 

'Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. II. 'Fine, Hil. loEliz. 

4 See Holbrook Manor in this Hundred. ' I. P.M., 38 Eliz. 



FRESTON. 41 

that he or the owners of Freston Hall shall bestow the same upon the poorest 
inhabitants of Freston from time to time. Also he gave to the said Robert 
Gooding and his heirs for ever another yearly rent charge of 20$. out of his 
said lands to the intent that he or they should yearly procure therewith 
some honest, learned, and godly preacher to make four sermons in Freston 
church. 

On his death 3Oth Oct., 1595, the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Robert Gooding. He married Margaret, daughter of James Radcliffe, of 
Norwich, sister of William Radcliffe. His will is dated 23rd Dec. 1601, and 
it was proved loth Feb. 1602. He was buried at Freston 23rd Jan. 1601, 
and the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Gooding. He married 
Mary, daughter and heir of Thomas Burlz, of Debden, by his ist wife 
Dorothy, daughter of William Cresswell, of Prittlewell, co. Essex. He 
made his will nth Aug. 1624, an d it was proved i4th Oct. following. He 
died I2th Aug. 1624,' and the manor passed to his eldest surviving son, 
Robert Gooding, aged 12 at his father's death. 

This Robert Gooding 2 in 1635 sold the manor to John Havers, of 
Stockelston, co. Leicester. 3 There were Chancery Proceedings over this 
sale which was made in consideration of 2,175, the purchaser alleging 
that subsequently to the contract the vendor had cut timber and that the 
estate was encumbered. Particulars of the suit will be found in Muskett's 
Suffolk Manorial Families.* 

The manor was later vested in the Wrights. It was held by John 
Wright, who married Rachael, eldest daughter of John Fuller, of Ipswich, 
and died the nth Feb. 1723. The Wrights separated the manor and 
advowson, and sold their possessions to the Thurston, Tacon, and other 
families. 

The manor was then acquired by Charles Berners who died in 1815, 
from which time the manor has devolved in the same course at the Manor 
of Erwarton, and is now vested in Charles Hugh Berners, of Woolverstone 
Park. 

One of the most interesting objects upon the banks of the Orwell is 
Freston Tower, belonging originally to the manorial estate. " It is a strong 
quadrangular brick building, about ten feet by twelve, with a polygonal 
turret at each angle. It is six storeys high, and contains as many rooms, 
one above another, communicating by a winding staircase, which, on the 
exterior, forms the principal face of the edifice, having three sides and 
numerous windows. The best apartment seems to have been on the fifth 
storey; it is higher than any of the others, and was probably hung with 
tapestry, as the small nails yet left in the wood seem to indicate. The 
top is formed by a number of open arches, and each of the small turrets 
at the angles terminates in a pinnacle. The windows are square, and 
except in the principal apartment very small. In this building there is 
but one fireplace, which is on the ground floor, and even that seems to be of 
recent construction, and to have no chimney ; whence it is probable that 
this place was rather an occasional pleasure retreat, or watch-tower, than 

1 1. P.M., i Car. pt. ii. 94. and was succeeded by his son and 

2 Davy makes Mary Burle wife of this heir, Thomas Burle, but this does 

Robert Gooding, and states that not seem to be correct. 

on his death Jermyn Burle, the 3 Fine, n Chas. I. pt. iii. 55. 

brother of this Mary, became lord, Vol. i. p. 206-7. 



42 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

designed for the purpose of permanent habitation. Excepting a farm- 
house, at the distance of a few yards, no trace of any building appears 
near the towi-r." 

" As there is among the records of the manor," says the Suffolk 
Traveller, " a very exact and particular account of the manor-house, and 
all thv outbuildings and offices to it, in Henry the VI I. 's time, and no 
mention is there made of the tower, it is pretty certain it was not then built ; 
so that it is reasonable to suppose it to have been the work of the Latymcrs. 
From the smallness of the windows in all the other rooms, it looks as if they 
were built chiefly for the support of the uppermost room, which, having 
large windows on three sides of it, seems to have been contrived by some 
whimsical man for taking rather a better view of the river Orwell than can 
be had on the neighbouring hill." 1 

Arms of FRESTON : Arg. on a chevron, Sab. 3 cinquefoils, Or. Of 
GOODING : Or, a fesse between six lions' heads erased Gules. Of WRIGHT : 
Or,on a chevron betw. 3 greyhounds courant Sab. as many trefoils striped Arg. 
Of BERNERS : See Erwarton Manor, in this Hundred. 

BONDS OR BONDS HALL MANOR. 

\Ye find that Nicholas Bonde, had a grant of free warren here in 1330,' 
and the manor was subsequently held by Simon Sampson of Kersey. 

In the time of Queen Elizabeth Thomas Gawdy, 3 who was afterwards 
a knight and Judge of the Common Pleas, was owner of this manor, and also 
of VVoolverstone and Tattingstone, into which parishes it extended. He 
died ist Nov. 1588, and Henry Gawdy, his son and heir, was created a 
Knight of the Bath at the coronation of King Jas. I. 

By 1609 the manor seems to have passed to Leonard Fillet, and in 
1646 to Benjamin Cutler, who died in 1664. 

Subsequently we find it vested in the Rev. Charles Beaumont, who 
died seised of it in 1756, when it passed to his widow Elizabeth, and on her 
death passed to her daughter and heir, Elizabeth, married to Philip Bowes 
Broke, of Nacton. He died in 1801, and she in 1822, when the manor 
vested in Philip Bowes Vere Broke, afterwards Sir Philip, and has since 
devolved in the same course as the Manor of Broke Hall, Nacton, 
in Colneis Hundred. 



'Excursions in Suff. vol. i. p. 146. 'See Manor of Weybread Hall, in Hoxne 

'Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. 111.41. Hundred, and Benhall St. Robert's 

Manor, in Plomcsgate Hundred. 




HARKSTEAD. 43 

HARKSTEAD. 

HREE manors were held in this place in Saxon times. The 
principal one was that of Harold, and was held as a hamlet 
of Brightlingsea, co. Essex. It consisted of 5 carucates of 
land, 21 villeins, 13 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 8 of the men. Also 4 acres of meadow, a church, 
a horse, 3 beasts, 7 hogs, and 12 sheep. When the Survey 
was taken Peter de Valoignes held this manor in charge for 
the King, there being 8 villeins, while the ploughteams of the men were 
gradually decreased to 2 and then to i. The estate had formerly been 
valued at 6 by number, and at the time of the Survey 6 by weight, and 
305. by number. It was 12^ quarentenes long and 12 broad, and paid in a 
gelt 30^.' 

The second manor was held by Edith the Fair, and consisted of 7 
carucates of land, 17 villeins, 8 bordars, a serf, 3 ploughteams in demesne 
and 5 belonging to the men, also 8 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to 
support 30 hogs, and a mill. There was also a church with 24 acres, 4 
beasts, 24 hogs, 40 sheep, and 27 goats, the whole worth 10. At the time 
of the Survey this manor belonged to the Countess of Albermarle, the serf 
was not mentioned, the ploughteams in demense were reduced to 2, and the 
value was 14. It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in 
a gelt i^d. 2 

The third manor was held by Ahrric, a freeman, in commendation. 
It consisted of 30 acres, half a ploughteam (at the Survey reduced to 2 
of oxen), and half an acre of meadow, valued at 55. When the Survey was 
taken the manor was held by Robert Grenon, and was worth 42^. only. 3 

MANOR OF HARKSTEAD. 

This was the estate of Edith the Fair in the days of the Confessor, and 
of Adeliza, Countess of Albermarle, sister of the Conqueror, at the time of 
the Great Survey. From this time probably till the time of William de 
Fortibus, 8th Earl of Albermarle, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Clopton Hall, in Clopton, in Carlford Hundred. 

In the latter part of the reign of Hen. III. the manor vested in Baldwin 
de Ripariis or Redvers, Earl of Devon, son of Baldwin de Ripariis, Earl of 
Devon, by Amicia de Clare his wife, daughter of Gilbert, Earl of Gloucester. 

He was lord attendant on Hen. III. to France in 1262, and married 
Margaret, Countess of Ribourg, daughter of Thomas, Count of Savoy, and 
dying at Paris in July, 1262, apparently without issue, a third of the manor 
passed to his widow Margaret. 

In 1275 the lordship was held by William le Breton, 4 and in 1286 by 
Nicholas le Breton, who claimed view of frankpledge and assize of bread 
and beer here. 5 

From Nicholas the manor passed in 1295 to his son and heir, Nicholas 
Bretun, a minor, and we find the King presenting in 1295 Henry de 
Langeton to the living of Harkstead church in consequence of the custody 
of the land and heir of Nicholas le Bretun being in his hands. 6 

1 Dom. ii. 2866. T. de N. 285. 

2 Dom. ii. 4306. 5 H.R. ii. 189; Q.W. 723. 

3 Dom. ii. 4206. 6 Pat. Rolls, 23 Edw. I. 2. 



44 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Davy states that in 1316 William de Bretun or Bretton had the manor, 
and that in 1327 William Hemcsted held a seventh part of a fee here 
" formerly Bretton' s," rather implying that the latter held the manor, but 
the Breton family were holding lands in Harkstead till a much later date, 
for we find from the Originalia Rolls in 1369 that at this time Laurence 
Breton held part of a fee here.' 

Further, we meet with a fine of the manor levied in 1358, which certainly 
goes to show that it had not passed from the family at that date. It was 
levied by John, son of Nicholas Breton (probably the above-mentioned 
minor of 1295) and Lora his wife against Thomas Bonde and John Denbeney.' 

In 1380 we meet with another fine of the manor and advowson by Ralph 
de Tendryng and Katharine his wife against Nicholas Breton, of Leyre- 
breton/ and another in 1410 of both manor and advowson levied by Wm. 
Tendryng against John Constantyn and Katherine his wife. 4 

The Beaumont family seem next to have held the manor, and in 1536 
we meet with a fine of it levied by John Beaumont and others against 
John Paryent and others of a third part. 5 

In 1557 we find George Foster and John Freelove each holding a moiety 
of the manor. Freelove's moiety passed on his death 2gth April, 1569," 
to his son and heir John, and to him succeeded Richard Freelove, who gave 
his moiety to Richard Coningsby. It is not at all clear how these moieties 
passed. The following is Davy's statement : 

" Richard Freelove gave a moiety to Richard Coningsby 

Anne Beaumont. 

Richard Coningsby held a moiety late Anne Beaumont's, the other 

moiety of the gift of Richard Freelove d. 1591. 
1591. Beaumont Coningsby, son and heir. 
1609. John Osborne, Esq., held a moiety. 
1609. Thomas Clenche, Esq., held a moiety. 

1625 (?). Dorothy, wife of John Cox, held a moiety. She was the 
daughter and heir of Beaumont Coningsby, and died 22nd 
March, 1625. 

John Cox, son and heir of Dorothy. 
1697. John and Peter Cox, gents., presented." 

We meet with the following fines, presumably of this manor or of parts 
thereof : - 

1564. Henry Golding v. Robert Waldegrave and Maria his wife of 

one- fourth of the manor, and tenements in Erwarton, Holbroke, 
and Chelmondeston. 7 

1565. Henry Goldynge and wife v. Henry Peryent and wife of one- 

fifth of the manor. 8 

1 5&5- John Freelove v. Henry Goldyng of moiety of manor. 9 
1569. Richard Conyngesbye v. Anne Beaumont, widow, of a moiety 

of the manor, and tenements in Erwarton, Chelmondeston, 

Holbroke, Shotley, Kirton, Freston, &c. 10 

'O. 42 Edw. III. 28. 6 I.P.M. ( Ipswich, 2nd Aug. 1569. 

'Feet of Fines, 31 and 32 Edw. III. 27. 'Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

1 Feet of Fines, 4 Rich. II. 29. Fine, Trin. 7 Eliz. 

4 Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. IV. 22. 'Fine, Mich. 7 Eliz. 

'Fine, Mich. 28 Hen. VIII. "Fine, Trin. n Eliz. 



HARKSTEAD. 45 

1589. John Clenche and others v. J. Freelove of the manor, &c.' 
1601. George Cox and others v. John Clenche and others of the 

manor. 2 
1601. John Clenche and others v. John Freelove and others of the 

manor, &c. 3 

About the year 1729 Knox Ward, Clarenceux King-at-Arms, purchased 
the manor from Cox. He died in 1741, and his son and heir sold it to 
Thomas Staunton, many years M.P. for Ipswich. A little later the manor 
was acquired by William Berners, of Woolverstone, who died in 1783, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Charles Berners, who died in 1815, from 
which time the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of 
Erwarton, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Charles Hugh Berners, 
of Woolverstone Park. 

Arms of BRETON : Quarterly, Or and Gu. a bordure Az. 

BUCKLER'S BOND MANOR. 

In the early part of the i6th century this manor was held by Nicholas 
Bond, who in 1530 had a grant of free warren here. 4 Five years later we 
learn from the Patent Rolls that he had licence to crenelate a chamber to 
be built in his dwelling-house here. 5 

Davy states that Lora Bond held here. Now we find in 1336 that 
William le Bretoun and Lora his wife levied a fine of the Manor of Hark- 
stead against Richard de Berkyngg, parson of the church of Lyere Bretoun, 
and the advowson of the church, so it does not seem unlikely that Lora 
(not so common a name) was the daughter and heir of a Bond. 6 

In 1428 John Sampson held a quarter of a fee, and subsequently 
Simon Sampson, who died in 1563, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Robert Sampson, from whom it passed to George Sampson. 7 

BRANDESTON OR BRAMPSTON MANpR. 

A manor existed here in Saxon times and was held by Edwin in Edith 
the Fair's soc. It consisted of a carucate of land, 4 villeins, 5 bordars, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, also an acre of meadow, 
worth 135. At the time of the Survey this manor was worth i6s., and was 
held by Godnc with the Manor of Dodnash of Earl Alan. 8 

In the time of Edw. III. the manor was in the Crown, and was granted 
by that monarch to the nunnery of Dartford in Kent, where it continued 
until the dissolution of that house in 1539, when it was granted the following 
year by the Crown to Sir Percival Hart, Knt. 9 

It subsequently belonged to the Cox or Cocks family, and to Knox 
Ward, and passed in the same line of descent as the main Manor of Hark- 
stead. 

NETHERHALL MANOR. 

This was the lordship of Nicholas Bonde in the early part of the I4th 
century, and he had a grant of free warren here in 1330. 10 Lora Bonde 

1 Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 6 Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. III. 9. 

"Fine, Easter, 43 Eliz. 7 See Manor of Netherhall, in Harkstead. 

s Fine, Trin. 43 Eliz. 8 Dom. ii. 2956. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. III. 41. S.P. 1540, 282 (15). 

s Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. pt. i. 24; Close I0 Chart Rolls, 4 Edw. III. 41. 
Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. i. 



46 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

later held a fourth part of a fee here which was in 1428 held by John or 
Simon Sampson, who was succeeded in the lordship by Simon Sampson, 1 
and he on his death in 1563 by his son and heir, Robert Sampson, from 
whom the manor passed apparently during his lifetime to his brother, 
George Sampson, who died in 1580, leaving the manor to his widow Margaret 
during the minority of George, his only son, who survived only six years, 
when it devolved on his sisters and coheirs Elizabeth, wife of John St. 
Poll, Frances, Susan, and Margaret. Margaret married Robert, 2nd son 
of William VYhittell, citizen and merchant tailor, of London, and younger 
brother of William Whittell, of Ampton, and they purchased all the other 
shares, becoming legally seised of the whole manor. Robert Whittell 
died about 1607, and his widow remarried Francis Colby. Some litigation 
took place between the widow, her 2nd husband, and William Whittell, 
respecting money transactions, which were, however, ultimately amicably 
settled by the sale of this Netherhall estate in 1618 to Richard Sutton, of 
Acton, in Middlesex. A little later the manor became vested in John 
Ashfield, one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber, son of Sir Robert 
Ashfield, of Stow Langtoft, by Anne, daughter of Sir John Tasburgh, of 
Flixton. He was created a baronet 2Oth June, 1626, being the first person 
so created by Chas. I. He married in 1627 Elizabeth, daughter and heir 
of Sir Richard Sutton, one of the Auditors of the Imprest, and widow of 
Sir James Altham, of Oxey, co. Herts. He died in 1635,* when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Richard Ashfield, 2nd Bart., Sheriff of Glou- 
cestershire, 1668-9. He married 1st a daughter and coheir of Sir Richard 
Rogers, of Eastwood, co. Gloucester, and 2ndly, 20th Feb. 1673-4, Dorcas 
Burchett, widow, daughter of James Hore, of the Mint in the Tower of 
London. He died about 1684,* when the manor passed to his son and 
heir by his ist wife, Sir John Ashfield, 3rd Bart., who married Anne, 
daughter of James Hore, the sister of his stepmother. He was buried gth 
March, 1713-4, at St. Giles-in-the-Fields. 

We meet with a fine of the manor levied in 1594 by John Clenche 
against John Sampson. 4 



1 See Manor of Sampson Hall, Kersey, in 
Cosford Hundred. But an inquis. 
held at Wickham Market, loth 
Dec. I Hen. VIII. after the death 
of Thomas Sampson, sen., found 
that he died last Jan. 24 Hen. VII. 
seised of the Manor of Harkstead 



called Netherhall "held of the King 
as of the Honor of Wasbroke, parcel 
of the Duchy of Lancaster, by one- 
fourth of a knight's fee." 

"Admin. 30th Nov. 1638. 

5 Will proved 1684. 

4 Fine, Hil. 36 Eliz. 




HIGHAM. 47 

HIGH AM. 

)UR manors were held here in Saxon times, the first by 
Godric, a freeman, consisting of i carucate of land, a villein, 
2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne, and 6 acres of meadow. 
Also 4 acres of church land, the value being 2os. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held of Richard, son of 
^ Earl Gislebert, by Osbern, and was worth 255. The Survey 
says : "Of all these freemen Phin, the predecessor of 
Richard, had nothing in King Edward's time, except of one alone by com- 
mendation only. The soc of the whole is in Bergholt, and Richard holds 
them (as belonging) to the Honor of Phin.'" 

The second manor was held by Asseman as freeman in commendation 
to Robert, son of Wimarc, and consisted of a carucate of land, a villein, 3 
bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men. Also 7 acres 
of meadow, wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs, a mill, part of a church with 
2 acres (and at the time of the Survey 3 beasts), 8 hogs, 6 sheep, and 8 goats. 
When the Survey was taken this manor was held by Gondwin the chamber- 
lain, the bordars were reduced by i, the ploughteams in demesne having 
disappeared had risen again to i, and that belonging to the men had 
come down to half. The value was formerly 305. but at the time of the 
Survey was 2os. though it was let to farm for 305. It was 8 quarentenes 
long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt I2d. The soc was in Bergholt. It is 
stated that others had holdings here. 2 

The third manor was held by Ledmar, a freeman, and consisted of a 
carucate of land, 2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne, 6 acres of meadow, 
the fifth part of a church with 4 acres, and 24 - - worth ros. in Saxon 
times, but at the time of the Survey when held by Ralph de Marci of Earl 
Eustace worth 2os., the soc being in Bergholt. 3 

The fourth manor was that of Siric, a freeman, and consisted of 30 
acres and half a ploughteam, worth 55. At the time of the Survey the 
manor was held by Garenger of Roger de Raimes, and was worth 8s. Harold 
formerly had the soc in Bergholt. 4 

There was one more holding in this place, that of Edric, a freeman, 
consisting of 60 acres, a bordar, and 2 ploughteams, worth IDS. When the 
Survey was taken this was the estate of the Bishop of Bayeux ; there was 
only i ploughteam, but the value had gone up to 145. 5 

MANOR OF HIGHAM HALL. 

This was the estate of Siric in the time of the Confessor, and of 
Roger de Reymes or Raimes at the time of the Survey. It long con- 
tinued in the same family, for in 1270 we find William de Reymes, probably 
son of Gilbert de Reymes, lord of Wherstead Hall, 1203-1240, which 
Gilbert was probably the son of Robert, son of William Reymes, 6 lord in 
1281, his son and heir, John de Reymes (born 2Qth Sept. 1252) in 1316, 
another John de Reymes, who had a grant of free warren here in 1335, 7 
and in 1363 yet another John de Reymes or Raimes, son and heir of 
the last-mentioned John. 

' Dom. ii. 3956. * Dom. ii. 378. 

z Dom. ii. 4366. 'I.P.M., 54 Hen. III. 14. 

'Dom. ii. 3036. 'Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. 111. 2. 
4 Dom. ii. 423. 



48 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1383 the manor had gone to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 
who being constituted Chancellor to King Rich. II., obtained from him a 
special charter to hold a court leet in his lordship here. 1 

In 1433 John de Reymes and others held fees here of John, Duke of 
Norfolk.' Davy informs us that in the beginning of the i6th century 
the manor passed to Richard Welbeck, of Oxenheath, co. Kent, who died 
2Oth Jan. 1516,' when it passed to his son and heir, Richard Welbeck, 
subject to the life estate of his mother, the widow of Richard Welbeck, sen. 4 
who remarried William Cotton. The next lord was William Welbeck, 
grandson of the last Richard, son of Leonard Welbeck, by Frideswold 
Latton his wife, who held in 1566. William Welbeck married Susan, 
daughter of John Starling, of Colchester, and on his death the manor 
passed to his daughter and heir Mary. A fine of the manor was levied in 
1568 by John Dyster against William Welbeck. 3 

One would have thought that it was under this fine that the manor 
passed to John Dyster, but an inquis. p.m. taken in 1488 after the death of 
John Braham, who died 4th Oct. 1487, shows that a certain tenement 
called " Skynners in Higham," worth 5 marks, was held of Thomas Dyster 
as of the Manor of Higham Hall by fealty and I2d. rent, 6 so that there may 
be doubt whether the manor was vested at this date in the Welbeck family. 
We find, however, a fine levied of the manor in 1584, which would show 
that it had not left the family at that date. It was levied by Anna Revett 
against William "Welbecke" and others. 7 

The manor in 1680 belonged to Maurice Shelton, and passed under his 
will dated 3rd Oct. this year. 

In 1811 the manor was held by William Mannock; subsequently, 
according to Davy, by James Stutter, but this seems to be an error, for 
what Stutter held was apparently not the manor but Higham Hall, with 
180 acres which was sold by the trustees of his will 4th June, 1847. ^ n 
1855 the manor was held by P. P. Mannock, in 1885 by John Dawson, and 
in 1896 by Mr. Squire Dawson. 

Arms of REYMES or RAIMES : Sable, a chevron between 3 lions ram- 
pant Argent. Of WELBECK : Arg. on a chevron Gu. betw. 3 lozenges of 
the 2nd as many martlets Or. 

MANOR OF MINOTTS OR MINETTS. 

Page says that the lordship of Higham was granted by Maud de 
Munchensi in the time of Hen. III. to the priory of the Holy Trinity, in 
Ipswich. It does not seem to have been the Manor of Higham Hall, so 
may possibly be this Manor of Minotts which he refers to. 

The first lord we find mention of is Roger Mynoth, to whom we learn 
from the Abbreviation of Pleas in the time of King Edw. I. the King granted 
by deed warren in all his demesne lands here and handed the deed to the 
said Roger. 5 John Withermersch seems to have had the lordship in 1395, 
when he was succeeded by his son and heir, Richard Withermersch. Richard 
in 1396 conveyed the manor to Thomas Moor. 

1 Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 10. 5 Fine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

'I.P.M., ii Hen. VI. 43. 6 I.P.M. 3 Hen. VII. 312. 

sI.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 69. 'Fine, 26 27 Eliz. 

'She was Margaret, daughter and coheir 'Ahb. of Pleas, 17 Edw. I. Trin. 4. 
of Richard Colepeper. 



HIGHAM. 49 

But in 1458 the manor was certainly vested in William " Mynett," and a 
century later in Robert Crane, who died seised of it in 1550, when it passed 
to his son and heir, Robert Crane, who dying I2th Sept. 1591,' it passed 
to Sir Robert Crane, of Chilton, Bart., as the Manor of Chilton, in Babergh 
Hundred. 

MANOR OF RAVEN'S HALL OR REYMES. 

This was the lordship of John Reymes or Raimes in 1433, but by 1464 it 
had passed to. John Mannock who died in 1476. 2 From this time to the death 
of Sir George Mannock in 1787 the devolution of the manor is identical 
with that of Gifford's Hall, Stoke by Nayland, in Babergh Hundred. On 
the death of the 8th Bart, the manor went to William Mannock, and we 
hear nothing further respecting it. 



' I.P.M., Bury, 23 Sept. 1595. "I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 

G 




50 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HINTLESHAM. 

,VO manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Stigand, and consisted of 10 cacucates and 40 acres 
of land, 25 villeins, 17 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and 16 belonging to the men, which latter number, however, 
at the time of the Survey had come down to 12. 

Also 10 acres of meadow, wood for the maintenance 
of 30 hogs, a mill, and a church and a half with 35 acres of 
free land. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies (reduced to i at the time of 
the Survey), 8 beasts, 30 hogs, and 200 sheep, worth 10. When the 
Survey was taken this was amongst the lands of Stigand, kept in hand for 
the King by William de Noers, and the value was 22 by weight. It was 
a league and 2 quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt i&d. 

In the same villa was a holding of 8 socmen, consisting of a carucate 
and 70 acres of land, a villein, 3 bordars, 4 ploughteams, 3 acres of meadow, 
and a salt pan, the whole included in the above price. The soc and sac 
belonged to Stigand. 1 

The second manor was that of Suwart, a socman of Stigand, consisting 
of a carucate of land, 3 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 
i belonging to the men. Also 4 acres of meadow, worth 405. The soc 
belonged to Stigand. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by 
Earl Alan.' 

HINTLESHAM MANOR. 

This in Saxon times was the estate of Stigand, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, and at the time of the Survey it was in the King's hands. We next 
find the manor held by \\ illiam Denvers. 

From the Red Book of the Exchequer we learn that King John, after 
the death of Richard Scharchenebeye (or Escorcheveile) who held 10 
land here, gave the lands to William Talebot or Talbot. 1 The Testa de 
Nevill says that " Richard ' Scorchevellie ' held a moiety of the manor of 
the King in chief by the service of a knight's fee." 4 And in 1213 we meet 
on the Close Rolls with a command to the sheriff to let William Pipard 
have all the land which belonged to William Talebot in Hintlesham. 5 

Testa de Nevill says in one place that William Talbot held a knight's 
fee of the King in chief here,' and in another place that he held half a 
knight's fee only, 7 and that a moiety of the manor was escheat to the King, 
and William Talebot held the same as his bailiff, the value being xv/t.' 

In 1223 William Talebot had paid his scutage concerning one knight's 
fee here, as on the Close Rolls for that year there is an order to the Barons 
of the Exchequer stating this. 9 On the same Rolls the following year 
there is an order to give seisin to William Pipard of lands in Hintlesham. 10 

In 1224 the manor was held by Walter (? William) Talbot. He 
probably held a moiety, for the Talbots and the Pipards seem to have had 
the lordship between them for some time." 

'Dom. ii. 288. 6 T. deN. 291. 

*Dom. ii. 296. 7 T. de N. 283. 

' Red Book of the Exchequer, inquis. cone. 8 T. de N. 300. 

Serjeanty. 'Close Rolls, 8 Hen. III. pt. ii. 18. 

T. de N. 295. '"Close Rolls, 9 Hen. III. pt. i. 16. 

'Close Rolls, 17 John, pt i. 5. " H.R. ii. 177 ; Q.W. 723. 






HINTLESHAM. 



Talbot lived at the Old Hall still so called, and in parts very ancient, 
while Pipard lived at the Hall. 

Both William Pipard and William Talbot claimed franchises here in 
the time of the compiling of the Hundred Rolls, 1 and Talbot, son of William 
claimed warren, view of frankpledge, and assize of bread and beer in 
Hintlesham/ and in 1227 we find it stated that Walter Pipard was lord, 
when his interest seems to have passed to his son and heir, William Pipard. 

Amongst the Ancient Deeds in the Exchequer and Treasury of the Receipt 
now in the Record Office will be found a release by this William " Pypard " 
to the lady Basilia, the prioress, and to the nuns of the priory of Wykes, 
of their suit at his court of Hintlesham Manor in 1257 . 3 William Pipard, who 
is said to have held a moiety in Hintlesham by the service of half a 
knight's fee 4 died in 1267, 5 when to this moiety Edmund Pipard succeeded, 
and on his death in 1272,* Thomas Pipard, probably a brother of Edmund, 
and certainly a son of William Pipard, succeeded. The inquis. of 1252 
g ves an extent of the manor and advowson which were held of the 
King in chief by the service of one fishhawk (nisi) and knight's 
service, so that the King had always the wardship of the heir, but the 
inquisition states that the jury did not know whether it owed foreign 
service to the King. 

On the Close Rolls in 1272 we find that Nicholas de Kirkham sought 
to replevy to Thomas Pipard the latter's land in Hintlesham, taken into 
the King's hands for Thomas's default against Margaret, late wife of 
Edmund Pipard. 7 

On the death of Thomas Pipard in 1282" his moiety passed to his son 
and heir, William Pipard, on whose death in 1301' it passed to Margery 
Pipard. Sir Thomas Pipard then seems to have had the moiety, which 
passed to his widow Margery for life. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1341 we find a licence for Sir William " Pypard " 
"to grant in fee to Geoffrey Gilbert " I0 the reversion of the manor and the 



H.R. ii. 177. 

7 Q-W. 723. 

3 A. 3563. 

<T. deN. 283. 

sI.P.M., 51 Hen. III. 68. 

6 I.P.M., 56 Hen. III. 2, or File 42 (19). 

7 Close Rolls, I Edw. I. $d. 

"I.P.M., ii and 12 Edw. I. 26. 

"I.P.M., 29 Edw. I. 41. 

10 The family of Gilbert or Gilberd resided at 
Hynthe Place, in Hintlesham. 
Hierome Gilbert, Recorder of Col- 
chester, who died in 1583, was 
father of the celebrated Dr. William 
Gilbert, President of the Royal 
College of Physicians, 1599, styled 
" the father of electrical science," 
and author of the famous book 
" De Magnete." Hierome removed 
to Colchester, where he built the old 
house " Tymperleys," in Trinity 
Street, no doubt called after the 
Timperleys, of Hintlesham. This 
house passed to Dr. Gilbert's step- 
mother after his father's death, and 
on her death in 1589 to the great 



doctor himself, who occasionally 
resided there. The doctor, follow- 
ing his father's example, called his 
London residence " Wingfield 
House," after his stepmother who 
was a Wingfield. The house was in 
Peter's Hill, near the College of 
Arms. It is not known where the 
discoverer was born, though local 
tradition marks out Hintlesham 
Hall as the place of his birth. The 
Gilberts were apparently cousins of 
the Timperleys, and it was probably 
owing to the connection between 
them and Queen Elizabeth that he 
wasin 1601 appointed her physician, 
and is the only man mentioned by 
name in her will. This statement 
rests on the assertion of Morant, 
quoted by Sir B. W. Richardson 
in the Asclepiad, 1887, p. 218, for 
no will of Queen Elizabeth is known 
to exist. He was physician in chief 
to King James I. and died probably 
at Colchester, 3oth Nov. (loth Dec.) 
1603. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



advowson dl Hintlesham, said to be held in chief, then held in dower by 
Margery, late wife of Thomas Pypard, and for Geoffrey to regrant to 
\Villiam and Margaret his wife in tail male with remainder to Robert le 
Fit* Elys and Margaret his wife in tail, and reversion to the right heirs 
of William. 1 

Sir William Pipard and Margaret his wife levied a fine of the manor 
and advowson in 1344 against Geoffrey Gilbert, 2 and Margery Pipard died 
the same year, 5 when the manor passed to William Pipard, and was con- 
firmed to him in I348. 4 

This year we find the entry in the Originalia : William Pipard, relative 
and heir of William Pipard, paid 30$. to the King in respect of 15 of land 
in Hintlesham. 5 

On his death in 1349* the moiety of the manor passed to his widow 
Margery, and on the Close Rolls is an order to take fealty of Margery, 
" late wife of William Pippard," and not to interfere further with the manor 
as the King learnt by inquisition that she held jointly with William and for 
the heirs male of their bodies in chief by the service of a nest or of 2s. yearly. 7 
Margery died in 1364," when her moiety passed to William's two daughters 
and coheirs Margaret, wife of SirWarinde Lyle, Knt., who died in 1378,' 
and Maud, wife of Osbert Hamelyn. 

On the Originalia Rolls we find an order in 1377 to take fealty and 
deliver seisin to Warin " del Isle " and Osbert Hamelyn and Matilda his 
wife, one of the daughters of Sir William Pipard and Margery his wife, of 
part of Hintlesham Manor and the advowson of the church. 10 

These parties sold to John Haddely, a citizen of London, and the 
details of the transaction are clearly disclosed on the Patent Rolls in 1381, 
where we find a pardon to the said John Haddely and Margery his wife 
and others for acquiring in fee one moiety of the manor and the advowson 
from Osbert Hamelyn and Matilda his wife, tenants in chief, and the acquis- 
ition by the said John Haddely alone first in reversion by grant of Gerard, 
son of Warin del Isle, and subsequently in fee, by release of the said Warm's 
interest of the other moiety, whereof the latter was tenant for life by curtesy 
after the death of Margaret his wife." 

The assurance referred to above was a fine levied in 1381 by John 
Haddely against Gerard, son of Sir Warin del Isle, 11 and by John Haddely 
and Margaret his wife, Robert Ellerker, clerk, John Romesey, clerk, against 
Osbert Hamelyn and Matilda his wile of a moiety of both manor and 
advowson.' 3 

The advowson had been granted by King Edw. III. to King's College, 
Cambridge, with licence to appropriate the church, and we find on the 
Patent Rolls in 1380 an authority from the King enabling the college to 
grant the advowson to the said John de Haddely, who it is stated then had 
the manor in fee.' 4 The release by the college was duly made, and the 
same year the release was duly confirmed.' 5 



1 Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. ii. 32. 

'Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. III. n. 

M.P.M., 17 Edw. III. 24. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. III. 18. 

S O. 21 Edw. III. 64. 

6 I. P.M., 23 Edw. III. 8. 

i Close Rolls, 23 Edw. III. pt. ii. 12. 

I.P.M., 38 Edw. III. 35. 



s I. P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. i. 73. 
O. 50 Edw. III. 40. 
1 Pat. Rolls, 5 Rich. II. pt. i. 30. 
'Feet of Fines, 5 Rich. II. 3. 
' Feet of Fines, 5 Rich. II. 6. 
Pat. Rolls, ii Rich. II. pt. i. 34. 
5 Pat. Rolls, ii Rich. II. pt. i. 33. 



HINTLESHAM. 



53 



As to the Talbot moiety, Walter (? William) Talbot seems to have been 
succeeded by his son and heir, known simply as Talbot de Hintlesham, 1 
and on his death in 1285* the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Fitz Talbot, who in 1305, as we learn from the Patent Rolls and the 
Originalia, had a pardon together with Joan his wife for having acquired 
to them and the heirs of Thomas this manor from Talbot de Hintlesham, 
and ordering restitution thereof. 3 

Probably the acquisition had been under some settlement, for we find 
that Thomas Fitz Talbot and Joan his wife had at the same time acquired 
from Talbot de Hintlesham the manor of Rickinghall for themselves and 
the heirs of their bodies. 4 Thomas Talbot died the same year, 5 and the 
manor passed to his son, Thomas Talbot, who died in I3I4/ and on the Close 
Rolls for this latter year we find an order to deliver to Joan, late wife of 
Thomas, son of Talebot, this manor, as she and her husband were jointly 
enfeoffed by the late King's licence, the manor being held in chief by the 
service of one knight's fee. 7 The Talbot moiety passed on Joan's death 
in 1362,* to her son and heir, Peter Talbot. And on the Originalia Rolls 
we find an order to accept from him security for a reasonable relief in respect 
of a moiety of the manor then said to be held of the King in chief by the 
service of a fourth part of a knight's fee. 9 Peter died in 1377,' and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Edmund Talbot, then 30 years of age. 

Two years later Edmund Talbot enfeoffed Robert de Boxford and 
others of his moiety of this manor," and they conveyed to Sir Godfrey de 
Stratton, Clement Spice, Roger de Wolfreston, and Roger Cavendish, who 
conveyed to John Haddeley, who had acquired the other moiety of the 
representatives of the Pipards. The whole transaction as to this moiety 
is disclosed on the Patent Rolls for 1387, where we find a pardon of the 
trespass of John Haddeley and Margery his wife in acquiring in fee from Sir 
Godfrey de Stratton and his co-feoffees, and of the trespass of Sir Godfrey 
and his co-feoffees in acquiring in like manner from Robert de Boxford 
and others, and they for acquiring from Edmund Talbot this moiety of 
the manor.' 2 The pardon hardly seemed necessary in one case, for on the 
Patent Rolls four years earlier we find a licence for the said Sir Godfrey de 
Stratton, Clement Spice, Roger de Wolfreston, and Roger Cavendish to 
grant the manor called " Talbote " held in chief to John Haddeley and 
Margery his wife, Robert Ellerkar, clerk, and John Ramsey, clerk, in fee 
simple.' 3 

John Haddeley died in i4io' 4 when the moiety passed in moieties to 
his daughters and coheirs Katherine, married to William Wingfieldjun./ 5 
who died in 1419, 1<s when his widow remarried Sir William Wolf, Knt., 
and died in 1446 ;' 7 and Joan married to Sir John Pecche, the father of Sir 



1 See Fakon's Hall, Rickinghall Superior, in 

Hartismere Hundred. 

2 Extent I. P.M. 14 Edw. I. 28. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 34 Edw. I. 16, O. 34 Edw. I. 

Rv. 7. 

4 I.Q.D. 34 Edw. I. File 62-3. 
'I.P.M. 34 Edw. I. 210. 
6 I.P.M. 8 Edw. II. 50. 
? Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 27. 
8 Moiety Extent I. P.M. 39 Edw. III. pt. i. 

55- 

O. 36 Edw. III. 8. 
"Extent Half I.P.M. i Rich. II. 36. 
" I.P.M. 3 Rich. II. 97. 



12 Pat. Rolls, ii Rich. II. pt. i. 36. 

a Pat. Rolls, 7 Rich. II. pt. ii. 2. 

14 Extent, one moiety called " Piperdes " 
and another " Talbot." (I.P.M., n 
Hen. IV. 28.) 

'5 Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings 
is an action by William Wyngefeld 
against John Frenssh, bailiff of 
Hartismere Hundred, as to en- 
croachment on the liberty of 
Hintlesham Manor (E.C.P. Bundle 

69, 393-) 

16 1. P.M., 6 Hen. V. 20. 
7 Extent, I.P.M., 24 Hen. VI. 38. 



54 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John Pecche, the father of William Pecche, which William Pecche eventually 
held both moieties about 1448. 

The following year a fine was levied of the manor and advowson in 
which Sir John Fortescu, Sir Edmund Hungerford, Sir Edward Hull, Sir 
Robert Corbet, Richard Quatermayne, Henry Fortescu, Philip Malpas, 
of London, Stephen Forester, Thomas Yonge, Richard Chok, Roger 
Huswyf, clerk, Thomas Nicoll, and John Gogh, were petents against William 
Pecche, son and heir of Sir John Pecche, and Beatrice his wife were de- 
forciants. 1 

In the year 1487 John Timperley purchased the manor. The 
Timperleys appear to have been in Hintlesham before this time, and probably 
held the manor farm near Ray don. This house was later used as the 
dowager residence, and is a picturesque place of a Tudor elevation with 
remains of older buildings. 

John Timperley the purchaser was the son of John Timperley, of 
Cheshire, by Margaret, daughter and heir of - Mantell, of Yorkshire, 
which John Timperley was the son of Thomas Timperley, of Cheshire, and 
Mary Wentworth. John's father John had removed from Cheshire to 
Hintlesham, and was buried there in 1460. 

A settlement of the manor and advowson was made by John Timperley 
the son in 1487, the same being effected by an assurance by John Timperley, 
Richard Southwell, William Holand, and Roger Timperley to John, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, John, Bishop of Ely, William Timperley, son of the 
said John Timperley the father, Christopher Willughby, Knt., John Sulyerd, 
Knt., Richard Skipton, clerk, and others, and their heirs for ever." 

John Timperley, the purchaser of Hintlesham, was M.P.for Yarmouth 
in 1467, and married, according to Page, Margaret, daughter and heir of 
- Raydon, but according to the Suffolk Visitation of 1612, Elizabeth, 
daughtei and coheir of -- Clifton, of Norfolk. According to the Timperley 
pedigree in the Davy MSS. this John Timperley, or Sir John as he is called, 
married ist Joan, 3rd natural daughter of the ist Duke of Norfolk, so 
created 28th June, 1483, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter and coheir of 
Robert Lyston, of Badingham, who survived her husband, and died I3th 
Jan. 1526. By his ist wife he had a daughter and heir Elizabeth, who 
married Firmin Rookwood, of Euston, and died I3th May, 1583, being 
buried at Weston, co. Norfolk. Sir John Timperley died i8th Dec. 1491. 
The inquis. p.m. of 1491 states the manor to be worth 20, one moiety being 
held of the King in chief by service of a fish-hawk or 2s. for all services, and 
the other moiety held of the King in chief by the service of one knight's 
fee. 1 

As Sir John Timperley left an only daughter Elizabeth, as stated 
above, the manor now seems to have passed to Sir John Timperley 's 
nephew, William Timperley, son and heir of Nicholas Timperley, 4 2nd son 
of John Timperley, and brother of Sir John by Agnes his wife, daughter 
of Richard Gould. 

Tnis William Timperley was of Hintlesham Hall, and married Margaret, 
daughter of Thomas, 3rd Duke of Norfolk. She was aunt to Queen Anne 
Boleyn and Queen Katherine Howard, and subsequently married Edward 
White, and as a 3rd husband Sir Henry D'Oyley, of Pond Hall, and dying 

1 Feet of Fines, 27 Hen. VI. 26. * His 2nd son and namesake died May 

'Pat. Rolls, i Hen. VII. pt. i. r (26). 20th, 1489, and is buried in 

5 1. P.M., 8 Hen. VII. 809. Buxhall church. 



HINTLESHAM. 55 

ist April, 1528, was buried at Hintlesham. 1 The manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Timperley. In 1551 this Thomas Timperley was called 
upon to show by what title he held court lete and view of frankpledge 
within Hintlesham. 2 He was M.P. for Yarmouth in 1562, and married 
ist Audrey or Etheldred, eldest daughter and coheir of Sir Nicholas Hare A 
of Bruisyard, Master of the Rolls, who died in 1558, and was buried at 
Hintlesham. Thomas took for a 2nd wife a person of the name of Katharine, 
who is buried at Hintlesham. He died I4th Jan. 1593, and the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Nicholas Timperley. 

He was a recusant, and we find amongst the State Papers in 1607 a 
grant to Capt. Thomas Allen of the benefit of his recusancy. 3 Two years 
later we learn from the Exchequer Depositions that there was a suit between 
this Thomas Allen and Nicholas Timperley, the headings of which are : 
" Alleged recusancy of defendant Timperley and collusion of Paget, and 
his obtaining from Bishop of London a certificate of compounds of Timper- 
ley, harbouring of Jesuits, recusants." 4 Nicholas Timperley married 
Ann, daughter and coheir of William Markham, of Little Oakley, Northants. 

A fine was levied of this manor and the manors of Boyton Hall and 

Hadleigh in 1599 by Thomas Lovell and others against this Nicholas 

' Tymperley " and others. 5 This was probably on some settlement of 

the property, for we find that on Nicholas Timperley' s death, ist Jan. i624, 6 

the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Timperley, Knt. 

Amongst the Chancery Papers referred to in the 43rd Report of the 
Deputy Keeper, 7 is a lease for 21 years made in 1626 of Hintlesham Hall, 
to Charles Grimston, stated to be part of the lands of Sir Thomas 
Timperley, recusant. The result of the recusancy of Sir Thomas and his 
son Michael may be seen in 1649 amongst the State Papers. 8 

Sir Thomas Timperley married ist Elizabeth, daughter of John Shelley, 
of Mychell Grove, co. Surrey, and 2ndly Dorothy, daughter of Edmund 
Church, of Withington, co. Essex, and widow of Philip Dobs, of Bedford. 
Sir Thomas Timperley died 2gth April, 1651, and was buried at Hintlesham, 
where there is an inscription on the north side of the chancel of the church. 

" Time is as precious as ye Pearl that shines 
And here a Timperley this Grave confines 
As precious to his friends whose every eye 
Bewail' d their losse such worth as destinie 
Nor Death observes maugre oblivious spight (?) 
Vertue's a glowwerme and still shines by night. 
This monument or small tablet rather 
Of love and duty to his honoured father 
Humbly a sonne presents which to each eye 
Hintes what we all must owne mortalitie 
Els nothing owne, " Dear Father rest in peace 
You have (I have) of lands and life a lease." 

The manor passed to his son and heir, Michael Timperley, who married 
Frances, daughter of Sir Henry Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, in Norfolk, and 
dying 7th July, 1653, the manor passed to his son, Henry Timperley, of 

'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 15. 'Fine, Mich. 41-42 Eliz. 

* Memoranda, 4Edw. VI. Hil. Rec. Rot. 28. 6 He is buried at Hintlesham. 

3 S.P. 1607, 384. 7 App. i, p. 34. 

4 Exch. Dep. 1609, at Stowmarket. 8 Cal. of Comp. 2133-16501. Ib. 395. 



56 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hintlesham, and of Colkirk, co. Norf., who married ist a daughter of 
Charles Burneston, of Hackney, and 2ndly Audrey, daughter of Sir William 
Mannock, of Stoke by Nayland. 

In 1680 Sir Philip Parker, Bart., John Hodges, and John Jermy held 
their first court for the manor, no doubt as trustees, and in 1690 Sir John 
William Mannock, Bart., and Henry Timperley held the manor. In 1699 
the manor was held by Susannah Timperley, widow, mother and guardian 
of Henry Timperley, who in 1710 appears as lord. Henry Timperley was 
ruined by the South Sea scheme, and sold the manor in 1720 to Richard 
Powys. He died in 1723, and is buried at Hintlesham, when the manor 
passed to his son, Richard Powys, M.P. for Oxford [in 1734]. He appears 
to have been a most extravagant man, and at length found an end in a 
grave at Hampton Court, provided by royal charity. It has been 
suggested that this was a fitting conclusion to the life of a man who found 
a Tudor house and converted it into a Georgian mansion ! The 2nd Richard 
Powys's widow sold the manor in 1743 to Sir Richard Lloyd, one of the 
Barons of the Exchequer in 1759. On Sir Richard's death 6th Sept. 1761, 
at the age of 63, the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Savage Lloyd, 
M.P. for Totnes, 1759-1761, on whose death in April, 1810, it passed to 
his son and heir, Richard Savage Lloyd, and on his death 6th Aug. 1818, 
at the age of 50 unmarried, went to his surviving sisters and coheirs, 
Elizabeth Savage Lloyd and Harriet Lloyd, the former of whom died 
unmarried i6th Feb. 1828, aged 71, and the latter of whom died unmarried 
I4th Jan. 1837, at the age of 77, leaving the manor by her will to her cousin 
and heir, Capt. James Hamilton Lloyd-Anstruther, 2nd son of Sir Robert 
Anstruther, of Balcaskie, co. Fife, 3rd Bart., by Charlotte Lucy, his wife, 
only daughter of Lieut. -Col. James Hamilton (grandson of James 4th Duke 
of Hamilton) by Lucy his wife, daughter of Sir Richard Lloyd, the Baron 
of the Exchequer. 

Miss Harriet Lloyd left by her will 10 a year for the education of five 
poor children, and 10 a year to provide coals for poor parishioners. Capt. 
Anstruther married ist, 6th Dec. 1838, Georgiana Charlotte, eldest daughter 
of the Hon. Lindsey Merrik Peter Burrell, 2nd son of Peter, ist LordGwyder, 
and brother of Peter Rober, 2Oth Lord Willoughby d'Eresby, and 2ndly, 
ist Nov. 1847, the Hon. Georgiana Christiana Barrington, daughter of 
George, 5th Viscount Barrington, and dying 24th Dec. 1882, the manor 
passed to his son and heir by his ist wife, Lieut. -Col. Robert Hamilton 
Lloyd Anstruther, D.L., J.P., of 37, Eccleston Square, London, S.W. He 
married 5th July, 1871, Gertrude Louisa Georgiana, daughter of Francis 
Horatio Fitz Roy, of Frogmore, Hants., and has issue. 

The manor was originally offered for sale with the Hintlesham estate 
as a whole, consisting of 3,7133. or. 26p., the i6th June, 1908, in London. 
The free rents of the manor amounted but to i. i8s. 6d., and the quit 
rents to 2s. 8d. 

In April, 1909, the estate of Hintlesham was sold and again resold 
to many of the tenants, Mr. Walter Turner buying Northlands, the Mill 
Farm, and the Old Hall, the Old House ; Mr. Horace Turner buying the 
Priory, Norman Farm, and Wolf's Farm. The hall was sold with part of 
the park and the manor to Mr. G. Ryan, and Mr. Fox Haggar bought the 
Fen Farm and the Cherry Ground. 

Hintlesham Hall is a fine large building erected by Thomas Timperley 
about 1570. He incorporated part of the earlier mansion, and the house 



HINTLESHAM. 57 

was much injured and shaken by an earthquake. A beam in the quad- 
rangle at the back wall has the date 1513 on it. Powys, about 1735, built 
the two quadrangles forming the kitchens, offices, and stables. The hall 
is a deep Elizabethan mansion in the half " H ',' fronting to the west, and 
stands in a well-timbered park of about 150 acres. The exterior elevation 
of the hall is red brick with tiled roof, and the house has some interesting 
gables and chimneystacks. In the front is a colonnade enclosed with 
windows which form a conservatory ; the middle room is a very large, 
lofty, and handsome hall used as a summer room, but fitted up for even a 
comfortable winter residence ; on the left side of it is a very large and 
good dining-room, and on the right a library', in which were formerly some 
scarce and valuable old books. The staircase is of mahogany, massive 
and handsome. On the left hand at the landing is a good-sized drawing- 
room, the ceiling ornamented with flowers, &c. Through the library is a 
small room ; beyond that another rather larger (forming the extremity 
of the right wing) which was formerly fitted up as a museum. The Misses 
Lloyd here formed a considerable collection of natural and artificial 
curiosities with some antiquities, amongst which was a pair of massive 
steel spurs thickly studded, and in complete preservation. These spurs 
were found in Ixworth Abbey, and presented by Mr. Cartwright. There 
was also a kind of bodkin of bronze, with a loop at the end, about 4 inches 
long, which was found in 1824 at Stutton. The park about the house 
extends to 150 acres, but is flat, and the country certainly not of a 
picturesque description. 

Tom Martin, in his " Church Notes," says : " By an elegant plan of 
the Hintlesham Estate, which was shown to me 3ist Dec. 1821, it appears 
that it consists of 3,056a. 3r. 8p., the roads 37a. or. i6p., 633 acres in 
hand which includes the park of 155 acres, and a wood of 154 acres." 

The property was of considerable length, reaching from the borders of 
the parish of Sprpughton to beyond Hadleigh, with very little, if any, 
interruption, but it was narrow. A map of the estate formerly hung in 
the hall. 

The hall contained a valuable collection of paintings by Vandyke, 
Gainsborough, Sir Peter Lely, and other eminent, artists, when lately 
occupied by John Taylor. 

Arms of PIPARD : Quarterly Az. and Arg. in each a lion rampant 
counterchanged. Of L'IsLE : Gu. a lion passant Arg. crowned Or. Of 
TIMPERLEY : Gules, a lion party per bend Ermine and Ermines. Of 
LLOYD : Sa. three nags' heads erased, two and i Arg. Of ANSTRUTHER : 
Arg. three piles issuing from the chief Sa. quartering Erskine, Hamilton 
Powell, and Lloyd. 

PRIORY MANOR OF ST. PETER'S OR MANOR LE LYESNE'S.' 

This was the estate of Suwart, a socman, of Stigand, the archbishop, 
in the Confessor's day, and formed part of the possessions of Earl Alan 
of Britanny, at the time of the Survey. 

In 1329 it became vested hi the priory of Ipswich, and in 1525 was 
granted to Cardinal Wolsey/ who in 1529 granted the same to William 
Capon, dean of Cardinal College, Ipswich. 3 

'Miss Deane, of Hintlesham, who has *S.P. 17 Hen. VIII. 1834(2). 

kindly perused this account, states 3 S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 4424, 5280. 
that this is the College farm and 
not the Priory ; still it seems to have 
borne the name here given. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



The manor in 1530 had come to Robert Dormos, for this year he had 
licence to alienate it to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. 1 But amongst 
the State Papers in 1538 we find an account of the " priories " in Hintlesham 
" sold and purchased by the Duke of Norfolk."' 

Lionel Talmash next appears as lord, he dying seised of the manor 
25th June, 1552,' when it passed to his son and heir, Lionel Talmash, 
who died in 1571, when it went to his son and heir, Sir Lionel Talmash, 
Bart. 4 

MANOR OF HINTLESHAM PRIORY CALLED VEYSEYS. 

This manor anciently belonged to the Abbot of Bury. It later was 
held by the small priory which was in 1527 suppressed for the purpose of 
Cardinal College in Ipswich, being then probably held by Wyck or Wix 
abbey, in Essex. On Wolsey's disgrace the manor came to the Crown, 
and the King granted it to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, who sold it to Thomas 
Vesey, ist Sept. 1539.' Thomas Vesey had land in Hintlesham prior to 
this, for we find from the State Papers ten years earlier a complaint that 
he distressed all his tenants at Hintlesham and kept their cattle to the 
value of 40.' 

Thomas Vesey had licence in 1546 to alienate this manor to William 
Vesey. He was the son of Robert Vesey, of Hadleigh, a clothier, and lord 
of the Manor of Wix Abbey, in Essex. 7 He married Joane, daughter of 



'S.P. 22 Hen. VIII. 220 (3). 

2 S.P. 1538, ii. 1215(2). 

J I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 64. 

4 Sec Heliningham Hall, Helmingham, in 
Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

J S.P. 31 Hen. VTII. 116 ; Add. Ch. 14999. 
Miss Deanc, of Hintlesham, states that 
the priory was a nunnery and 
belonged to the abbey of Wyke or 
Wix, in Essex, the vicarage of 
Chattisham being attached to it. 
In the reign of Henry II. the 
prioress and the vicar of Chattisham 
were had up for killing a buck in the 
park of Hintlesham Hall, then held 
from the King, and were fined. She 
adds that at the suppression Wolsey 
gave the manor to the Duke of 
Buckingham, Hot Norfolk. After a 
time Wolsey quarrelled with Buck- 
ingham and he was executed. 
Vesey in the meantime had married 
a daughter of Buckingham and 
resided at the priory. Wolsey 
wished to regain possession, but 
Thomas Vesey held fast. The Car- 
dinal sent an order for re-delivery, 
and this being disregarded it is said 
Wolsey obtained an order of 
excommunication from the Pope, 
and sent a posse commitatus from 
his College in Ipswich, but Thomas 
Vesey armed 40 men of Hintlesham 
with bows and arrows and drove 
off the Cardinal's forces and sat fast 
for 300 years. Miss Deane further 



adds that the descendants of the 40 
Hintlesham men, Dales, Greens, &c., 
still work on the priory farm. 
We regret not being able to accept 
implicitly this interesting account, 
(i) Because Wolsey could not have 
given the manor to the great Duke 
of Buckingham at the suppression 
as the Duke was executed in 1521, 
and- before the suppression took 
place. (2) The Duke had three 
daughters only Elizabeth, married 
to Thomas Howard, Duke of Nor- 
folk ; Katherine, married to Ralph 
Nevill, Earl of Westmoreton, and 
Mary to George Nevill, Lord Ber- 
gavenny. He had no daughter 
married to Thomas Vesey, neither 
do we find any record of such an 
illustrious marriage, and Thomas is 
usually described as " farmer." (3) 
We have the authority of the State 
Papers that Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, sold the manor to Thomas 
Vesey in 1539, and the deed itself 
is still in existence, and has been 
examined by the writer. (Add. 
Ch. 14999.) There can be no mis- 
take as to the manor ; the descriptive 
words are " Manerium voc. Le 
Priory et terras in Hintlesham et 
Aldham in Com. Suff." 

6 S.P. 1529, 6034. 

T Will nth Oct. 1539, proved 7th May, 
1561, P.C.C. 



HINTLESHAM. 59 

Robert Cutler, of Ipswich, and widow of John Walton, of Hadleigh, for his 
2nd wife. She was half-sister to Robert Deshaugh. His will is dated 
3rd June, 1575, and was proved i8th Nov. 1577. He died 4th July, 1577,' 
and the manor passed to his widow Joane, after whose death in 1586 it 
vested in their son, William Vesey/ who had married in May, 1576, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Reynold, of Holton. In 1582 we find a 
Chancery action brought by William Veysey against Robert Sucklinge 
and wife for an examination of witnesses as to a will having been left by 
plaintiff's father relating to Hintlesham Priory Manor and tenements in 
Hadleigh, and the Manor of Cockerells, in Buxhall. 3 His will was dated 
loth April, i6i6/ and the manor passed to his eldest son Charles, who 
had livery the year of his father's death. 

He married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Edmund D'Oyley, of 
Shottisham, co. Norfolk, by Ann, daughter of Sir John Goodwin, and the 
following deed was executed on such marriage : ' ' Whereas Charles Voisey, 
of Hintlesham, Gent., my brother by an Recognizance bearing date the 
thirtieth day of October in the Third year of the rainge of Kinge James 
sealed and acknowledged before S r John Popham knight Lord Chief e 
Justice of the Kinges bench standeth bound unto William Veisey o r ffather 
in the some of Twoe thousand poundes of lawfull money of England as in 
and by the Recognizance more at large appeareth. And whereas there 
are Indentures of Defesance made the day and yeare aforesayd that if 
the sayd Charles Veisey shall permit and suffer the seyte of the Manner 
called the Priory in Hintlesham in the Countie of Suffolk And all the 
landes meadowes pastures rents and hereditaments in Hintlesham aforesayd 
to the same appertaining as part and percel of the same And the Manner 
of Cockerells w' h the Tenement Gunnells in Buxall and Ratleston in the sayd 
Countie of Suffl. And all the lands Tenements woodes Rents Reversions 
Courts Leetes and hereditaments whatsoever to the sayd Manner or Tene- 
ment appertayning to descend and goe affter his death to the next heires 
males of the bodie of the sayd William Veisey o r ffather if the sayd Charles 
Veisey should happen to die without heires male of his bodie lawfullie 
begotten without discontinuinge or altering the estate in Tayle male by 
William Veisey o r Grandffather, then the sayd Recognisance of twoe 
Thousand pound to be voyde or else the same to remayne in force and 
vertue, And whereas the sayd William Veisey the Cognise made his will 
and named me William Veisey his second sonne executor and died. And 
Whereas Thomas Veisey my nephewe sonne and heire of my sayd Brother 
Charles Veisey is to take to wife Marie Bull the daughter of Thomas Bull 
of fflowton in the Contie of Suffs. Gent. And that in respect and considera- 
tion of the portion of monie w qh the sayd Charles Veisey shall receive ffrom 
the sayd Marie Bull or her ffrends in Marrage a competent iounture there 
uppon is to be made her out of those landes Tenements and other the 
prmisses before mentioned in Buxhall and Ratlesdene. Nowe this writing 
wittnesseth that I the sayd William Veysey brother of the sayd Charles 
Veisey doe hereby promise unto the sayd Thomas Bull and my sayd brother 
Charles Veisey affter the sayd marriage not to take any advantage of the 
sayd Statute for the settling of a competent Joynture uppon the sayd Mary 
Bull but that the sayd Mary may have and quietly inoye for her Joynture 
the Mannor of Cockerells w th the Tenement Gunnells, w th all the lands 

'I.P.M., 19 Eliz. 3 C.P. iii. 203. 

"Robert and John Vesey were sons of 4 Proved i5th July, 1616; I. P.M.. 14 
William by a first wife. James I. 



60 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Tenements woods Rents Reversions Courts Leets and hereditaments 
whatsoever in Buxhall and Ratclelesden aforesayd in case the sayd Marie 
shall survive the sayd Thomas Veisey. And further that I the sayd William 
Veisey will be redy to ioyne in any further acts for the essertinge thereof 
as shall att any time be reasonably required, so as affter the sayd Joynture 
the same lands of Joynture may be settled againe according to the 
former entayle made by William Veisey the Grandffather. In Witnesse 
whereof I the sayd William Veisey have hereunto set my hand and seale 
the Six and Twentie day of May in the Sixt yeare of the Rayne of our 
Soverayne Lord Charles by the grace of God of England ffrance Scotland 
and Ireland Kinge defender of the fayth &c. 1630. 

William Veisey. 
Witnesseth Edm. Cremer 
William Parmenter 

Charles Vesey died 2nd June, 1657, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Vesey, who married Mary, daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Bull, of Flowton. 

Thomas Vesey 1 made his will dated 2Oth Feb. 1670," and died in 1679, 
when the manor passed to his eldest son, Charles Vesey, who married 
Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve. Charles's will was dated 26th 
May, 1681, and was proved ist July, 1685. He had a son, Dudley Vesey. 

In an action in 1691 between this Dudley Vesey, an infant, and William 
Panton and Frances Vesey, defendants, the defendant Frances Vesey made 
an affidavit which throws much light on the condition of Charles Vesey's 
estate just before his death. The following is a copy : 

" The said Defendant Frances Vesey maketh oath that whereas Charles 
Vesey this Deponents late Husband and this deponent did by their Indenture 
dated the i June, 1683, sell to the defendant Panton and Benjamin 
Tudman the messuage called the Priory Knaps and Gunnells for the term 
of 99 years which therein is mentioned to be to the intent that the 
defendant Panton and Benjamin Tudman might receive the rents and profits 
to pay 500 (which is mentioned to be the consideration thereof) and all 
such just debts as the said Charles Vesey did or should owe. And whereas 
the said Charles Vesey and this Deponent did levy a fine and by indenture 
dated the 2nd June, 1683, covenanted that the same should be to confirm 
the said estate for 99 years, and that the reversion should be to several 
other uses therein mentioned. And by another Indenture dated the I3th 
of July, 1683, did agree that the said fine should be for the satisfying of 
300/1. more to the said Panton as well as the former 500/1. and all such other 
sums as Panton and Benjamin Tudman should raise and furnish by the 
order of Charles Vesey and the Deponent or either of them with interest, 
or to that effect, as by the deeds more at large appeareth. This Deponent 
saith that there was no money really and actually paid to the said Charles 
Vesey or this Deponent or any other for their use as the Consideration of 
their Executing the said Deeds and fine but only 100 or some such sum 
told over and Colourably paid to the said Charles Vesey in the presence of 
Sundry Witnesses at sundry places and was . . . immediately after- 
wards Delivered back again to the Defend"" 5 Panton. And the said Charles 
Vesey and this Deponent going over to Roan in France soon after their 

'See Cockerell's Hall, Buxhall, in Stow 'Proved 2Oth Nov., 1679. 
Hundred. 



HINTLESHAM. 61 

Executing of the last of the said deeds were forced to pawn their plate for 
5o to pay the Charges of their Journey. And this Deponent saith that the 
true intent of executing the said Deeds was to protect and save the said 
estate from coming into the hands of the Brothers of the said Charles, Vesey 
in the said Charles Veseys absence, or in case he should happen to die and 
to secure the said Panton that he should be reinburssed for what money or 
goods he should remit to them in France. And this Deponent further saith 
that not long after the said Charles Vesey and this Deponent were in France, 
the Defendant Panton wrote to Charles Vesey insinuating that unless 
his Estate were clogged with a greater sum than the said 6oo 
in the aforesaid Deeds mentioned that the said Charles Veseys Brothers 
would get the said estate out of his the Defendant Panton's hands by laying 
down the said 6oo or to that effect, and therefore advised that they should 
come over in to England to Charge the Estate of the said Charles Vesey 
with a further sum of money. And accordingly the said Charles Vesey 
and this Deponent did come over into England and Executed another Deed 
to the said Panton bearing date on or about the 23rd of February 1683 
wherein the consideration money is mentioned to be 6oo which is thereby 
to be repaid to the said Panton with interest but saith that the said Panton 
did not advance levied (? levy) or pay the said Charles Vesey any money 
as the consideration of the said Deed, but did enter into a bond to one John 
Tudman bearing date on or about the 28th of February 1683 of 2,ooo 
penalty Condiconed for the payment of 2,ooo on the first of March 
1648 which was declared to be in trust for this Deponent, but this Deponent 
is informed that the Defendant hath since got away the said Bond and Can- 
celled the same. And this Deponent saith that she is informed and verily 
believes that by money and merchandize which were remitted to the 
Defendant Panton from France and by rents which the said Defendant hath 
received out of the estate of the said Charles Vesey, 500 at least over and 
besides great quantities of Timber which he hath felled and sold from off 
this Deponent's Jointure lands as she is credibly" informed. And this 
Deponent saith that she doth not know or remember that any Conveyance 
or Incumbrance hath been made by Charles Vesey and this Deponent or 
by either of them of any part of the estate of the said Charles in the County 
of Suffolk to any person or persons, except the deeds in the defendant 
Panton's answer to the Plaintiff's bill mentioned and a mortgage made by 
this Deponent of her Jointure lands to Margaret Rix for 150 and interest 
which was received by the Defendant Panton and a Conveyance of part of 
the said estate by Lease and Release dated the 2nd and 3rd of December 
intant. 

ffrances Vesey. 

Jurat gth December 1691, 

Miles Cooke. 

In 1698 an Act of Parliament was passed for the sale of the estate of 
Dudley Vesey, in Hintlesham, for the payment of his debts, 1 but it seems 
doubtful if this manor was sold. 

By an agreement dated 3ist March, 1699, John Tudman, guardian 
of Dudley, the infant son of Charles Vesey and Frances his wife, and John 
Littell, of London, drugster, of the one part, and William Vesey, of Elmset, 
gent, and Shelley Wankford, of the other part, John Tudman agreed to 
sell to Shelley Wankford "All that Capital messuage or tenement in Hintles- 

1 10 and ii Will. III. c. 29. 



62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ham called or known by the name of Hintlesham Priory And all the 
messuage or tenement in Hintlesham called or known by the name of 
Knalts and all the edifices holdings lands meadows Pastures woods under- 
woods and appurtenances to the said two messuages or tenements or to 
either of them belonging or appertaining as the same are now in the occupa- 
tion of John Page his assignee or assigns," and the parties covenanted to 
levy a fine. The purchase money was to be 1,200, and it was part of the 
arrangement that the said William Vesey and Shelley Wankford should 
relinquish any claim to the " lands and tenements of the said Dudley 
Vesey lying in Buxhall . . . late in the occupation of the widow of 
Waspe or her assigns." 

It should be explained that this William Vesey, of Elmsett, was a 
brother of Charles Vesey, whose will was dated in 1681, and therefore the 
uncle of Dudley Vesey. William married Katherine, daughter of Nicholas 




HINTLESHAM HALL. 

Bacon, and had an only daughter and heir Elizabeth. She married Shelley 
Wankford or Wangford, of Wheatfield (? house), co. Essex, who was the 
purchaser under the above agreement. 

By another agreement dated 6th June, 1699, it was agreed between 
William Vesey and Shelley Wankford, as follows : 

(1) William Vesey to settle all his freehold lands and tenements in 
Elmset and Flowton in the occupation of William Gooch upon Shelley 
Wankford and his heirs and then Shelley Wankford to settle the said 
freehold estate and all the other freehold lands and tenements of the said 
Shelley Wankford in Elmset and Flowton aforesaid in the occupation of 
John Draine or his assignes And also to settle Hintlesham Priory and 
Knotts, and all the lands thereunto belonging in the occupation of John 
Page in Jointure upon Elizabeth, the wife of the said Shelley Wankford 
and to such other uses as Stamborn Hall and the lands thereunto belonging 
are now settled in the Jointure that is already made thereof. And also 
the said William Vesey to settle all his copyhold lands in Elmset to the 
same uses as the said freehold jointure is now to be made and settled. 

(2) If Shelley Wankford has an heir male by Elizabeth his present wife 
that such heir male shall be christened Wankford and shall be obliged by 
a clause in the said Jointure that is to be made to only retaine the name 
of Vesey for his surname without any other addition. 



HINTLESHAM, 63 

(3) Shelley Wankford and the said Elizabeth his wife to levy a fine on 
Stamborn Hall and to settle the same upon Shelley Wankford and his heirs. 

(4) Shelley Wankford to settle a rent charge of 45 out of Stamborn 
Hall to be payable to William Vesey for life and during life to board him 
and keep him a horse. 

William Vesey made his will in 1713, and died shortly afterwards. 
Shelley Wankford and Elizabeth Vesey had four sons i, Shelley Wankford, 
who died without issue ; 2, William Wankford, who, according to the 
arrangement of 1699, assumed the name of Vesey and took this manor ; 
and 3, Robert, and 4, Thomas. 

In 1825 John Hayward Buckingham held the manor, and he sold it 
in 1830 to the Misses Lloyd, but remained tenant till 1844. The manor 
now belongs to Horace Turner. 

Arms of VESEY : Ermine, on a cross Sable five martlets Or. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



HOLBROOK. 

||NE manor only was held here in Saxon times by Godman 
in commendation to Edith, and consisted of i carucate of 
land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne 
(which later disappeared and at the Survey was back 
again) and i belonging to the men. The value was 
2os. but at the time of the Survey 155., when it was held by 
Odo of Earl Alan. 
The jurisdiction was in Bergholt.' 




MANOR OF HOLBROOK. 

In 1240 the lordship was held by Earl Warren, and in 1271 by 
Richard de Holbroke or Holbrook, who had view of frankpledge 
here." In 1281 it was held by John de Holbrook, and in 1288 by 
Richard de Holbrook, who died in 1290. It subsequently passed 
apparently to John de Holbrook as his widow Alicia died seised of 
it in 1309,' when it passed to his son and heir, John de Holbrook, 
who died seised of it in I3i6, 4 and he was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Thomas de Holbrook. He would appear to have been an infant 
at the time of his father's death, for on the Close Rolls in 1324 we find 
an order not to meddle further with the manor and to deliver the issues to 
Robert de Aspale and Robert de Canteraria, executors of the will of Alice, 
late wife of Roger le Bygot, Earl of Suffolk, and to deliver to them the 
custody of the heir of John de Holbrook. 5 

Thomas Holbrook the minor was, on coming of age, sued by his 
mother Margaret, the widow of John de Holbrook, for part of the manor 
as dower. In 1336 the then Sir Thomas Holbrook and Margaret his wife 
levied a fine of this manor and the Manors of Tattingston, Langeston, 
Nacton, and Foxhole against William le Neweman, parson, of " Tatyngeston " 
church, and Nicholas Bonde. 6 

Sir Thomas de Holbrook died in 1360, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John Holbrook, who married Maud, and died in 1376,' when 
the manor passed to his daughter and coheir Margery, married to 
John Fastolf. Margery died in 1387 and Sir John Fastolf in 1406,' 
when the manor passed to their son and heir, Sir Hugh Fastolf, Knt. 

From Sir Hugh Fastolf, who died in I4i8, 9 the manor passed 10 to his 
son and heir, John Fastolf, who released it in 1419 to Elizabeth Wolverston, 
daughter and heir of Ralph Fitz Ralph and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and 
coheir of Sir John de Holbrook. Elizabeth Wolverston died seised in 1420." 

In 1458 Thomas Wolverston, son and heir of Elizabeth, died seised, 
and this year a fine was levied of the manor and advowson by Thomas 



1 Dom. ii. 205. 
'H.R. ii. 190. 
'I.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51. 
4 I.P.M., icEdw. II. 77. 
'Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 20. 
Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. III. 28. 



'I.l'.M.. 50 Edw. III. 31. 
"I.P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 34. 

O T T\ II _ TT \T 




in Colncis 



HOLBROOK. 65 

Fulthorp and Beatrice his wife, and William Frevyll and Anne his wife 
against Elizabeth Tendryng. 1 

In 1477 John Bemey, of Wichingham, died seised. Davy, from whom 
we have the above particulars, next mentions Thomas Tendring as lord, 
and in 1500 Margaret Tendring as lady. Margaret was probably the 
widow of Thomas Tendring, for in 1543 we find John Renyn, lord in right 
of Dorothy, his wife, daughter and heir of the said Thomas Tendring. 

Page says : " John Nevill, Lord Latimer, who was in the Rebellion 
called 'the Pilgrimage of Grace,' in the time of King Hen. VIII. married 
ist Dorothy, daughter and coheir of John Vere, Earl of Oxford, and 2ndly, 
Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Parr, Knt., and the said Catherine 
afterwards married to King Hen. VIII. In the 35th of that reign John, Lord 
Latimer, his son, had livery of this lordship with Chelsworth, Walsham, 
and Preston (? Freston) in this county, with divers other manors in various 
counties, most likely through the interest of the said Catherine with her 
Royal Consort. He married Lucy, daughter of Henry, Earl of Worcester, 
and died 2oth of Queen Elizabeth, 1577 [22nd April] without male issue, 2 
so that by the marriage of his four daughters and coheirs, his large estate 
became divided." 3 

Page is not quite correct, for John, 3rd Lord Latimer's ist wife, whom 
he married 2oth July, 1518, was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Richard Mus- 
grave, of Hartland, co. Westmoreland. Dorothy was his 2nd wife, and 
she was sister and coheir of Sir George Vere and sister and coheir of John, 
i4th Earl of Oxford. The 3rd wife was Katharine Parr, widow of Edward 
Burgh, Lord Burgh. John, 3rd Lord Latimer, died in 1543,* and his widow 
within a few months became the 6th and last wife of King Hen. VIII. 

Lord Latimer, however, had probably disposed of the manor in his 
lifetime, for we find that in the beginning of the reign of Elizabeth it had 
passed to Sir Robert Southwell, Knt., as he died seised of it about 1558, 
when it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Southwell. 5 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find an action by John Markes against Margaret and Thomas Southwell 
touching copyholds of this manor. 6 From Thomas Southwell the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Southwell, and he and his wife 
Elizabeth sold the manor in 1589 to John Clench, first Recorder of Ipswich, 
1574, Baron of the Exchequer 1581, and Justice of the Common Bench 
1589 and of the Queen's Bench 1591-1607. 7 A fine was levied of the 
manor the same year between Thomas Clenche, son and heir of John 
Clenche, and others against Sir Robert Southewell, 8 and two years later 
by Thomas Clenche and Robert Bence. 9 Sir John Clenche the judge resided 
here, and a portrait of him by Hollar may be seen in Sir William Dugdale's 
" Origines Juridiciales," published in 1666. He 10 died igth Aug. 1607, 
and was buried in the parish church of Holbrook, where there is a fine 
monument to his memory and to the memory of his wife and children. 
The life-sized effigy of the judge shows him reclining on an altar tomb, 
robed in his scarlet gown and ermine-lined mantle, supporting himself on 

Feet of Fines, n Hen. VI. 26. 6 C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxxvii. 16. 

2 1. P.M., 19 Eliz. Admin, ist May, 1577. 7 Add. Ch. 25416. 

3 Hist, of Suff ., pp. 22, 23. " Fine, Hil. 31 Eliz. 

4 Will i2th Sept. 1542, proved 15th 'Fine, Hil. 33 Eliz. 

March, 1542-3. IO See Manor of Greeting All Saints, in 

5 See Manor of Hoxne, in Hoxne Hundred. Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

J 



66 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his left elbow. He wears the coif and square cap, and has a scroll in his 
hand. In a panel above is this inscription in Roman capitals : 

In obitvm Colendissimi sviq* temporis antiqvissimi 
Ivdicis Johannes Clenche, qvi obiit xix die 

Avgvsti Anno Salvtis 1607. 
Ecce iacet secto venerandus Marmore ivdex 

Terram terra petit, puluere corpus inest 

Ast anima ad superos sumiq' palatia caeli 

Fertum et aeterni viuit in arce Dei. 

At a lower level, in the front of the tomb, lies the figure of a lady in a 
similar position, with her elbow on an embroidered cushion and holding a 
book in her right hand. She wears a " French hood " with pendant 
liripipe, in front of which the hair is drawn up or stiffened on supports 
in a sort of puff. Her gown is well extended at the hips, and the sleeves 
set in with a puff at the shoulder. 

Besides the Judge's effigy are sculptured kneeling figures of four sons 
and eight daughters in elaborately got-up ruffs. Below, by the lady, 
kneel two boys and three girls in stiff plain ruffs. 

Over the middle of the monument are these arms : Gu. three gemel 
rings pendant, two and one, Or, and a chief of the second, Clench. On each 
side is a smaller shield thus emblazoned, Clench, impaling quarterly first 
and fourth, per fesse nebuly Az. and Sa. three martlets Or, a canton Ermine 
(should be Sa.) of Barker, second and third, Arg. three pallets Gu. over all 
a fesse Vert. 1 

The manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Clench, who served 
the office of Sheriff of Suffolk in 1606. He married ist Margery, daughter 
of John Barker, of Ipswich, by whom he had three sons and two daughters, 
and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of -- Risby and widow of Henry 
\\ingfield, of Crowfield, by whom he had no issue. Thomas Clench died 
in 1624, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Clench, who 
served as sheriff in 1639. He married Mary, daughter and coheir of John 
Mott, of Braintree, co. Essex, and on his death the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Robert Clench, Knt. He married Elizabeth, one of the 
daughters of Sir Thomas Holland, of Quidenham, in Norfolk, Knt., and 
Mary his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Richard Wigmore, Knt. Elizabeth 
died Qth April, 1659, and Sir Robert Clench, gth Jan. 1661, aged 49, leaving 
three daughters Meriall, Frances, and Thomasin. 

The manor then vested in Thomas Thurston, of Ipswich, and amongst 
the State Papers in 1729-30 we find a petition from him/ and from him 
the manor passed to his only surviving sister and heir, who in 1764 married 
Thomas Staunton. 

The manor subsequently was acquired by Charles Berners, of Wool- 
verstone, who died in 1815, from which time the manor has devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Erwarton, in this Hundred, and is now vested 
in Charles Hugh Berners, of Woolverstone Park. 

A fine was in 1518 levied of Holbropk, Herlestede, and Netherhall 
Manors by John Spelman and others against John Peryent and others, 3 
and another fine in 1536 of the manor by Sir William Sydney and others 

'E. A. N. & Q. vol. viii. 117. 'Fine, Mich. 10 Hen. VIII. 

*T. B. S. P. 1729-30, 509. 



HOLBROOK. 67 

against Robert Southwell. 1 In 1583 we meet with a fine of the manor 
levied by Geoffrey Gate and others against Robert Southwell. 2 

A Holbrook Manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas 
Gawdy, who died ist Nov. 1588. 3 

The custom is to the youngest son ; tenant by the curtcsy ; gives 
dower ; heriot service is the best beast and it is generally mentioned in 
the admission to be heriotable. A recovery suffered, fol. 492, although it 
is said in the beginning of the Court Book " No recoveries ever suffered." 

Arms of HOLBROKE : A chevron between 10 cross crosslets Gules. Of 
CLENCH : Gules, 3 gemell rings Or, pendant 2 and i. A chief of the 
second ; or Sa. 6 annulets Or, conjoined in pairs, 2 pair in chief, and one in 
base, a chief of the second. 



'Fine, Easter, 28 Hen. VIII. 3 I.P.M., gth Aug. 31 Eliz. 

- Fine, Trin. 27 Eliz. 




68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HOLTON. 

IN Saxon times a manor was held in this place by Ansgar, 
consisting of 2 carucates of land, 13 villeins, 2 bordars, 
4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the 
men, also 24 acres of meadow and a church. Of live stock 
there were 2 rouncies, 2 beasts, 12 hogs, and 60 sheep. 
The manor was valued at 6os., Ansgar having the soc. At 
the time of the Survey it was held by Geoffrey de Magnaville, 

the serfs were reduced to 3, the ploughteams belonging to the men to 3, 

there was i rouncy only, the hogs were reduced to half, the sheep were 

increased to 74, and the value had gone down to 405. 

This manor was 6 quarentenes in length and 4 in breadth, and paid 

in a gelt yd. 1 

MANOR OF HOLTON. 

The manor was in 1258 apparently vested in Robert Ray don, who 
had a grant of free warren here that year, 2 and one of his descendants, 
Robert Raydon, had a like grant in 1310. 3 He died in 1322,* but it is 
doubtful if he were seised of the manor, as the advowson at this time seems 
to have been appendant to the manor, and it is clear this was vested in 
1309 in Alicia, wife of John de Holbrook, she dying seised of the same 
this year. 5 The advowson was likewise vested in Thomas Holbrook, 
who died in the time of Edw. III. 6 

No doubt the manor was about that time vested in the Holbrokes. In 
the time of Hen. VI. it belonged to a branch of the Fastolfes, of Caistor, in 
Norfolk, and was afterwards sold to the Mannocks, 7 of Gifford's Hall, 
in Stoke, and John Mannock died seised of the manor and of the advowson 
in 1476,' when they passed to his son and heir, George Mannock, from which 
time to the time of Sir William Mannock, 3rd Bart., the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Gifford's, in Stoke by Nayland, Babergh 
Hundred. 

Sir William Mannock, 3rd Bart., seems to have sold the same to Sir 
John Williams, who claimed the right of presentation to the living in 1719,' 
and later the manor passed to Sir William Rowley, and now belongs to 
the Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. 

The manor was offered for sale by auction loth Feb. 1789, with two 
farms called Holton Hall Farm and Stringes Farm, the whole amounting 
to 344 per annum. 10 

MANOR OF BOYTON'S IN HOLTON. 

This lordship became early vested in the family of Boyton, and William 
de Boyton held it in the reign of King Edw. I. He had a grant of free 
warren here in 1294." 

It seems prior to have been held by Robert de Stratfort. William de 
Boyton died in 1302, and was succeeded by his son and heir, William de 

1 Dom. ii. 411. 'For their alliances, see Gifford's Hall 
"Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. i. Manor, Stoke by Nayland, in 

3 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 18. Babergh Hundred. 

4 I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 63. 8 I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 76. 

sI.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51. 9 Tanner, xx. 17. 

See I.P.M., 7 Hen. VI. 58. I0 Ipswich Journal, I7th Jan. 1789. 

"Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. 24. 



HOLTON. 69 

Boyton. He died about 1325, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Osbert de Boyton, and on his death in ^345 went to his son and heir, John 
de Boyton, who was living in 1358.' In the time of Hen. VI. the manor 
passed to Richard Withermarsh under a fine levied by him in 1428 against 
John Reymes and Robert Fitz-Ralph and Margaret his wife. 2 

Sir William Waldegrave 3 seems to have held the lordship in 1553, for 
on the Memoranda Rolls we find that he was called upon to show title for 
keeping court lete and view of frankpledge, and for having goods and 
chattels of felons, &c., in Holton, 4 and William Waldegrave 20 years later 
was called upon to show title in like manner, 5 and again in I578. 6 

Later we find the manor passed to the Mannock family, and has 
apparently since passed in a like course with the main manor. 

Arms of BOYTON : Az. 6 escallop shells Arg. 3, 2, i. 



1 See Boyton Hall Manor in Great Fin- 3 See Manor of Smallbridge, in Bures, in 
borough, and Manor of Netherhall, Babergh Hundred, 

in Old Newton, both in Stow 4 M. i Mary, Mich. Rec. Rot. 44. 

Hundred. 5 M. 15 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 56. 

1 Feet of Fines, 6 Hen. VI. 33. 6 M. 20 Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 64. 




70 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



RA YDON. 

HERE were five manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by Ednod, a freeman, and consisted of a carucate 
and 100 acres of land, 3 villeins, 6 bordars, i ploughteams 
in demesne and i belonging to the men. Also 4 acres of 
meadow, wood enough to support 8 hogs, and the fifth 
part of a church with 5 acres, the whole worth 3. At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held of the Bishop of 
Bayeux by Roger Bigot, and the value was 4, but it was let to farm 
for 6. The soc was in Bergholt. 1 

The second was held by Edwi, a freeman, and consisted of a carucate 
of land, 4 bordars, a ploughteam, 5 acres of meadow, a mill, and the fifth 
part of a church being 5 acres, worth 305. At the time of the Survey it 
was still worth 305., but was let to farm for double. It was a league long, 
and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 30^. Others had holdings 
here. In the same township was a manor held by Alwin, a freeman, con- 
sisting of 60 acres, a bordar (but had disappeared by the time of the Survey), 
a ploughteam, 4 acres of meadow, and the fifth part of a church with 5 
acres. At the time of the Survey there were 4 beasts, 13 hogs, and 36 sheep. 
The whole was formerly worth 2os., reduced to 155. at the time of the Survey. 

Another manor was held by Smeri, a freeman by commendation to Aluric 
Capin, predecessor of Eudo Dapifer, consisting of 30 acres, a bordar, half a 
ploughteam (gone by the time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow, 
worth 55. Another estate consisting of 30 acres, 2 acres of meadow, a 
bordar, half a ploughteam (reduced at the time of the Survey to two oxen), 
worth 5s. was held by Ulwin, a freeman. 

Another manor was held by Aluric, a freeman, and consisted of 30 
acres, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, worth 55., doubled at the 
time of the Survey. The soc was in Bergholt. All these manors and estates 
were the property of the Bishop of Bayeux when the Survey was taken." 
The bishop also had a small property of 5 acres held by a freeman, 
Aluric, which contributed to the assessment of Ray don. 3 

The fourth manor was held by Leuric, a freeman, and consisted of 30 
acres, half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, worth 55. When the 
Survey was taken it was held in demesne by Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 
and was valued at us. 5^.* 

The fifth manor was held by Angar, and consisted of 2 carucates of 
land, 8 villeins, 3 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 7 belonging 
to the men (which were reduced to 4 at the time of the Survey). Also 
6 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance of 16 hogs. There were 2 
rouncies (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 5 beasts, 12 hogs, and 30 
sheep (increased to 50 at that period), the value being 8 when the Survey 
was taken ; it was held in demesne by Geoffrey de Magnaville. Of the 
same land Alured held a villein with 30 acres worth 55., the soc belonging 
to Angar, and Gislebert the priest held a villein with 30 acres and half a 
ploughteam, worth 35. 5 Another holding of Geoffrey de Magnaville 
was formerly that of Edwin and Brictmar, freemen, under commendation 

1 Dom. ii. 3776. 4 Dom. ii. 395. 

1 Dom. ii. 378. 5 Dom. ii. 411. 



RAYDON. 



to Ansgar, consisting of 15 acres and half a ploughteam worth 55., the soc 
being in Bergholt. 1 

Another small holding was formerly that of Suerting, a freeman, 
consisting of 17 acres, worth 35., held at the time of the Survey by Osbern 
of Eudo Dapifer. The soc was in Bergholt. 2 

Another holding mentioned was that of Erniet and Alwort, two free- 
men, consisting of 40 acres, half a ploughteam, and a bordar, worth zos. 
At the time of the Survey it was the estate of Ralph Pinel, who held it by 
the King's gift, but from it Geoffrey de Magnaville received service. The 
soc was in Bergholt. 3 

The only other holding here was that of Ulveva, a freewoman, con- 
sisting of 12 acres and half a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the 
time of the Survey). This was included in the valuation of Stanfield (?) 
The soc was in Bergholt, and at the time of the Survey this was the estate 
of Earl Eustace. 4 

MANOR OF RAYDON OR RAYDON HALL. 

This was the estate of Ednod, a freeman, in the time of the Confessor, 
and of the Bishop of Bayeux at the time of the Survey. 

In 1258 the manor belonged to Robert de Reydon, who had a grant 
of free warren here that year. 5 He married ist Alice, daughter and heir 
of Robert de Reymes or Raimes. In 1310 Robert de Reydon had a grant 
of a market and fair here, 6 and in 1313 authority to retain the manor for 
life on granting other land. 7 

Amongst the ancient deeds in the Court of Chancery preserved in the 
Record Office is a sale in 1322 by Sir Robert de Reydon, Knt., to Sir William, 
rector of Reydon, and Sir Roger, Robert's son, rector of the church of 
Clenchesvarten, of all his goods and chattels in Suffolk in his manors, &c., 
saving to his wife Margery the things belonging to her and his chamber, 
with vessels, silver spoons, &c. 8 Sir Robert de Reydon died 2nd Feb. the 
same year without male issue, leaving Margery his wife surviving, and the 
manor passed to Walter de Reydon, son of the said Sir Robert by his ist 
wife. The following is a translation of the inquis. p.m. 9 

An Inquisition taken at Ipswich, in the county of Suffolk, before the 
Escheator of the Lord King this side of Trent, the 2o,th day of June in the 
sixteenth year of the reign of King Edward son of King Edward according 
to the form of the writ therefore directed and annexed to this inquisition 
by Thomas de Wolfreston, Fulk Baroun Richard de Coppidhock, Stephen 
de Braunford, Robert de Batingham, Richard Dil, Hil' Mayner', clerk, 
John Cheseman, William Seman, William Adgor, Richard de Boyton and 
Seman the fuller, jurors. Who say upon their oath that Robert de Reydon, 
deceased, held no lands or tenements of the Lord King in chief in the 
county aforesaid or elsewhere on the day that he died ; but they say that 
the same Robert and Margaret [" Marger "] his wife held together to them 
and the heirs male of their bodies lawfully begotten, by a fine levied in the 
court of the Lord King, the manor of Reydon with the appurtenances 



'Dom. ii. 4116. 
"Dom. ii. 403. 

3 Dom. ii. 437. 

4 Dom. ii. 3036. 

5 Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. i. 



'Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 18. 
M.Q.D. 7 Edw. II. File 100, 6. 
"C. 2987. 
s Chan. Inq. p.m. 16 Edw. II. No. 63. 



72 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

together with divers lands and tenements in Brendwenham, Hadleygh, 
Leyham, Heygham, Holeton, Capele, Wenham Parva, and Benetleygh, of 
Petronilla de Nerford for the service of one knight's fee for all service. 
And they say that there is there a certain capital messuage which is worth 
yearly in all issues 6d. beyond reprises. And there are there of arable 
land 417 acres and they are worth in all issues yearly 6. igs. the price of 
an acre 4^. And there are there 20 acres of meadow that could be reaped, 
and they are worth yearly in all issues 405. the price of an acre 2s. And 
there are there of several pasture 30 acres, and they are worth yearly 30$. 
And there are there 58 acres of wood whereof may be cut down every fourth 
year 14 acres and a half, and they are worth in all issues yearly 58$. the 
price of an acre 4$. And there are there 20 acres of alder groves whereof 
may be cut down every fourth year 5 acres, and they are worth yearly los. 
the price of an acre 2S. And there are there of rents of assize at the feasts 
of St. Michael, St. Andrew, Easter and St. John the Baptist by equal 
portions 4. The -aforesaid jurors say also that the same Robert and 
Margaret held together to them and the heirs male of their bodies lawfully 
begotten, by a fine levied in the Court of the Lord King, the manor of 
Wherstede with the appurtenances, of Robert de Todenham as of his manor 
of Newetone by Ipswich, by the service of the fourth part of one knight's 
fee for all service. And there is there a certain capital messuage which 
is worth nothing yearly beyond reprises. And there are there 200 acres 
of arable land, and they are worth yearly in all issues 335. <\d. the price of 
an acre zd. And there are there 8 acres of meadow that could be reaped 
and are worth yearly in all issues i6s. the price of an acre 2s. And there 
are there 10 acres of several pasture, and are worth yearly IDS. the price 
of an acre I2d. And there are there 16 acres of alder grove whereof may 
be cut down every fourth year 4 acres and are worth yearly 8s. the price of 
an acre 2S. And there are there 40 acres of several heathland and they are 
worth yearly 2od. the price of an acre one halfpenny. And there are there 
505. of yearly rent at the feasts of St. Michael, St. Andrew, Easter and St. 
John the Baptist by equal portions. And they say that the same Robert 
died about the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the 
year above said [2 Feb. 1323]. And the aforesaid Margaret is still alive, 
and they had no male issue between them, and for want of issue all the 
aforesaid tenements after the death of the same Margaret by the form of 
the fine aforesaid will remain to Walter de Reydon son of the same Robert 
and the heirs of the same Walter. In testimony of which thing the afore- 
said jurors have affixed their seals to this inquisition. Dated as above. 

Sum of the whole extent of all the aforesaid tenements 23. i6s. 6d. 
[Endorsed.} 

m the l6th ear of Edw " IL 6 3' 



The manor passed from Walter de Reydon to his son and heir, Sir John 
Reydon, and on his death to Sir Robert Reydon, who dying without issue 
the manor passed to his sister and heir Alice, married to Sir Andrew de 
Bures, Knt.' who had a grant of free warren here in 1335, and four years 
after had licence enabling him to assign to Henry de St. Ositha, parson of 
the church of Reydon, a messuage in Reydon adjoining the rectory there. 1 

1 See Manorsof Acton, in Babergh Hundred, '0. 12 Edw. III. 78; Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. 
and Overbury Hall, in Leyham, in III. pt. i, 10. 

Cosford Hundred. 



RAYDON. 73 

He died in 1360,' when the manor passed to his widow Alice, who remarried 
Sir John Sutton, and on her death in 1392," devolved upon Sir Andrew's 
son and heir, Sir Robert de Bures, who died about 1393, from which time 
to the death of James Butler, Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire, in 1457, 
without issue, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Acton, 
in Babergh Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Alice, wife 
of Sir Guy Brian, in 1435. 3 Also in the inquis. p.m. of Humphrey, son and 
heir of John, Earl of Arundel, and Matilda his wife, daughter of Elizabeth, 
wife of Robert Lovel, three years later, 4 and of Amicia, wife of James, 
Earl of Wilts, in 1457.' 

There would appear to have been some dispute as to the owner- 
ship of the manor. Amongst the Harleian Rolls is an indenture of 
agreement between Sir Thomas Waldegrave and Robert Reydon and Thomas 
his son as to the recovery and conveyance in trust of lands in Reydon, &c., 
subject to an annuity to Alexander Cressener. It is dated 4th May, 4 
Edw. IV. [1464]. On the back are instructions for the rectification and 
enrolment of the document and a draft copy of the letter sent as intended 
to be sent to Sir Thomas Waldegrave by the said Robert Reydon after 
recovery of the Manor of Reydon from the said Sir Thomas. 6 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is a copy of a deed dated i6th June, 
i Hen. VII. [1486] by which 20 marks, the issues of this manor for a half 
year, are deposited with James Hobberd, gent., until the said James Hobberd 
and John Froste shall have determined the title to the said manor between 
Thomas, Lord Ormond, and Thomas Reydon, Esq. 7 Lord Ormond was 
the brother of James, and the determination would appear to have been in 
his favour, or at least we find that after his restoration he had the manor, 
for on his death in 1513 he left it by his will to Henry Bures, son of Robert. 
We find amongst the Harleian MSS. a receipt dated 28th Nov. 1516, for 30 
of Sir William Waldegrave, being a year's rent for the Manors of Reydon 
and Wherstead by John Fitz James, the elder, one of the executors of Thomas, 
late Earl of Ormond. 8 

Henry Bures died 6th July, 1527,' leaving four daughters and coheirs, 
Joan, Bridget, Anna, and Maria. 10 Maria who had a fourth married 
Thomas Barrow, and died in 1590, when it passed to their son and heir, 
William Barrow, who died in 1623, when his interest vested in his son 
and heir, Maurice Barrow, who dying without issue in 1666 left, by his 
will dated i6th Nov. 1665, the manor to his cousin, Maurice Shelton. 1 ' 

Maurice Shelton made his will dated 2nd Jan. 1665-6, and thereby 
devised all his manors and lands in Suffolk to his trustees to pay his debts 
and legacies. His eldest son upon his marriage charged the Manor of 
Reydon, &c., with 2,500 as a provision for daughters and after that made 
a settlement of his whole estate upon himself for life with remainder to 
his ist and every other son in tail male, with remainder to Henry and 
Charles his brothers in tail male reserving a power of revocation. By 



'I.P.M. 
'I.P.M. 

3 I.P.M. 

4 I.P.M. 

5 I.P.M. 



34 Edw. III. 60. 9 I.P.M. 20 Hen. VIII. 87. 

16 Rich. II. 25. I0 Sir Geo. Somers seems to have been called 

13 Hen. VI. 34. before in 1541 to show title to the 

16 Hen. VI. 50. manor (M. 33 Hen. VIII. Pasch. Rec. 



35 Hen. VI. 16. Rot. 36.) 

Harl. O. 33. "See Manor of Newton Hall, in Babergh 

Harl. 54 E. i. Hundred, and Barringham Manor, in 

8 Harl. 99. Blackbourn Hundred. 

K 



74 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his will 3rd Oct. 1680,' Maurice Shelton the son revoked the settlement as 
to Fakenham Wood, and charged both this and the Manor of Reydon with 
an additional portion of 2,500, and devised Fakenham Wood and other 
lands in Norfolk to be sold for payment of debts and legacies, and died, 
leaving no issue male, and but one daughter, who married Lissle Harkett. 

Fakenham Wood being a great ornament to the seat, Henry Shelton, 
the next heir in tail, permitted the trustees to sell the Norfolk estate and 
pay the debts as far as it would go ; but, intending to preserve Fakenham 
Wood to his family, paid divers of the debts of his brother Maurice out of 
his money, and gave security lor many of them, and did not sell the wood. 
He (Henry) by his will 23rd April, 1688, having no other way to secure the 
payment of his debts, devised the wood to be sold, and died in 1690, leaving 
Maurice and Henry his sons infants. The legacies of old Maurice unpaid 
and the debts of Maurice the son and Henry with the 5,000 portion amounted 
to about 13,000, and consequently an Act of Parliament was obtained 
for the purpose of selling Reydon Manor in order to pay the portion first, 
and the debts so far as the proceeds would go, and to enable the trustees 
to mortgage Fakenham Wood for the residue, and the inheritance of that 
to be settled on the heir of the family in lieu of Reydon. It was hoped by 
that means to secure something for the infant Maurice, who was then but 
seven years of age, and by the accumulations of the rents during his minority 
to pay off the mortgage by the time he came of age. 

There is an interesting letter of Robert Kemp to his nephew Henry in 
1690. It is endorsed : " These to Henry Shelton, Esq., Leave this w lh 
Mr. Rich. Bokenham att y" sign of the Catt in Paternoster Row, London, 
W lh Speed." 

The letter is as follows : 

Nephew, 

I have a Copy of Mr. Barrow's your father's and brother's wills 
by me and whereas your Brother's will bearing date the 3rd of October 
1680 mentions an Indenture tripartite of ye 2nd of April 1680 (that is the 
grand entail) w ch I have by me. As to the Indenture tripartite which 
your brother's will takes notice of to be dated ye 25th of May (72) that was 
your sister, Shelton's Jointure, and I never had it in my hands. This deed 
provides two thousand five hundred pounds, part of the portion to your 
neece.the other is provided for by the will, and this deed Mr. Shelden says 
he can produce. There was a recovery suffer' d of Roy den before my Lord 
Chief Justice Vaughan att Westminster y I3th of February the 23rd 
Caroli 2 d doubt not but ye title will be clearly made out and a power of 
sale by S r Robt. Baldock, who hath been of Counsell from first to last in 
all things, and a Trustee in most things, and is now all good leisure to give 
assistance. The thing I perceive that pends you most is your own debts, 
and though otherwise Commendable, you are too eager in the discharge of 
them, even to the prejudice of your other estate, which makes you upon 
all occasions now of late over forward in the under Sale of Royden, notwith- 
standing you have lately enter'd in your Almanack from me the too 
reasonable a sum you may demand for it. The advice I should give you 
is this y/. you haste down with all speed, which when you do, I will upon 
notice meet you att S r Robt. Baldock's, and Consult how far your own 
debts may be taken care of, as well as those in the Trusts, you clearly 

1 Proved nth November, 1680, at Norwich. 



RAYDON. 75 

making a discovery of them. If you now consult Mr. Coleman I esteem 
him a prudent man and if he come with you to S r Robert Baldock's wee 
will confer together y' so, if haste require, wee may see how wee can stop 
gaps with mortgages, till wee can sell to y* worth, not that I would negligeict 
of selling one day, but not making more haste then good speed, for Royden 
must fetch att a very great penny-worth, above, 10000 att ye rates entered 
in your Almanack which I need not particularize since you have them 
there by you. I am willing you should sell to clothe work, but not by 
under selling to spoil y e work, for the great assistance you are to have 
must be by the considerable sale of that Estate. Let Mr. Coleman or 
whoever is your present confident see what I have written and he must 
conclude y' till wee meet altogether at S r - Robt. Baldocks, nothing will be 
done but beating the air. Therefore the most considerable thing you can 
doe is to speed down as aforesaid and assure your self I will be as hearty 
and as quick in easing you, and getting rid of the trusts as I lawfully can, 
and you will find y' if it be possible by any body it must be S r Robt. 
Baldock and nobody else that can do it effectually, though I desire y' 
whoever is your present confident may be then present for I will not bear 
the burden of your censure who you know have helped you to y r estate. 
If these which I hope are solid reasons will not induce you to come down 
suddenly or if you do come down and our Counsells be not agreeable to your 
mind you may this very next term prefer a bill in Chancery against me, 
and the rest of y e Trustees, which will be fairly and clearly answered so as 
the business may soon come to an issue that way if it do not the other, 
w ch I hope it will, but how far any of these notions will prevail according 
to y e present sentiments you have, I cannot tell. It is not probable these 
extemporary essays of yours and thy sudden journey should be propitious 
or well grounded. I wish I may be mistaken. Mr. Hacketwas lately here 
in good humour and tho' he did not promise, yet I fancy the reasons I gave 
him will prevail with him to rest quiet till Michaelmas term if wee should 
need his forbearance so long. I was in hopes Mr. Keen's sisters would 
have done the like and that I might have given satisfaction to their nephew 
Pemberton whose letter I answered relating to that affair. But Mr. 
Shewer tells me their agent has left a subpoena att your house. I bid 
Mr. Shewer tell some of your creditors, y' I believe if they would forbear 
prosecution till Michaelmas term a way might be found out for quieting 
of all differences. My troubled head and Infirm body will give me leave to 
say no more, but only to add this hint y' if Mr. Coleman or whoever acts for 
you, will go and show this letter to Mr. William Betts Attorney att Law 
att his Chambers att Bernard's Inn, who managed the late decree, and next 
S r Robt. Baldock knows much of our affairs, he will be able to give you 
some useful advice, also if you will be rul'd by me, go to him, and he can 
inform you of some considerable purchasers for Royden ; if you give him 
not a particular, send me word and I will, for by my consent he that will 
give most shall have it, which is all att present from 

Your old Uncle 

ROBT. KEMP. 
Ubbeston May ye igth, 1690. 

Mr. Covel's valuation for 320 acres of Fakenham Wood considering 
the soil wth. ye growth of the underwood and timber was laid att 18 p. 



76 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

acre customs att 20 p. acres and Royden is valied as good att an easy price 

the two forms come to 6000.00.00 

The Timber in ye woods only 2149.00.00 

The soil but att six shillings p. acre 1920.00.00 

The underwoods but att 405. p. acre 0640.00.00 

The Timber in ye Pastures enough left 0135.05.00 

The free and quitt Rents and Doubled 0725.00.00 

The gift of the living 0120.00.00 

Att these low prices it comes to 11,689.05.00 

If after all this information, which I pray show Mr. Betts, you will 
too much undersell yr. estate, your misery will be owing to yr.selfe not to 
me." 

In 1756 we find the manor vested in John Rush. He was the son 
of Samuel Rush, of Benhall, and Geldham Hall, Essex, the son of Samuel 
Rush, of Clapham, son of William Rush, of Colchester. John Rush died 
unmarried i2th May, 1767, when the manor passed to his brother 
Samuel, who dying also unmarried 24th June, 1783, devised his estates 
to his kinsman, Sir William Beaumarice Rush, Knt., of Wimbledon. 
Sir William was the son of William Rush and Mary his wife, daughter 
of George Smith, of London, which William, who died i6th July, 1779, 
was the son of Samuel, son of William, the brother of Samuel, the father 
of the John and Samuel previous lords of this manor. Sir William B. Rush 
married loth April, 1782, Laura, daughter of Cremer Carter, of Southwark, 
and died 8th July, 1833, at the age of 85. 

The manor is included with Acton and Wherstead in the three several 
fines levied by Sir Nicholas Bacon in 1562 of fourth shares as mentioned in 
the account of Acton Manor, in Babergh Hundred. One levied against 
Sir William Butts, another against Anne Bates, widow, and the third 
against Thomas Butts and others.' 

Arms of RUSH : Quarterly Gu. and Arg. on a fesse per pale, Vert and 
Or, between three horses courant as many roundles counterchanged. 

MANOR OF MARK'S OR MERK'S. 

This was the estate of a freeman named Leuric in Saxon days, and was 
included in the possessions of Richard Fitz Gislebert (de Clare) at the time 
of the Norman Survey. 

In the time of Edw. I. the manor was vested in Adam de Hakebech in 
right of his wife Mary, and he had view of frankpledge and assize of bread 
and beer. 1 In some places we meet with the name Margaret for 
Mary, and in one place Mariota. Thus on the Patent Rolls in 1276 we find 
an action by Richard, son of Robert Acelyn, against the above-mentioned 
Adam de Hakebech and Mariota his wife and Roger de Canterbury touching 
a tenement in Reydon. 3 Mary, Margaret, or Mariota was apparently the 
mother of Andrew de Mark, who held in 1286, and who was succeeded by 
Juliana de Mark. Thomas Mark was next lord, and in 1324 a fine was levied 
of the manor by Robert de Welle and Lora his wife against Ralph, son of 
Thomas de " Merk." 4 

In 1338 William de la " Marshe " and Alice his wife held the lordship. 

1 Fines, Hil. 4 Eliz. 'Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 4, 6d. 

*H.R. ii. 190 ; Q.W. 723, 730, 731. 4 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. II. 24. 



RAYDON. 



77 



In 1357 the manor passed to Sir Andrew de Bures, Knt., under a fine 
levied this date by him against John Waryn and Maria his wife. 1 Andrew 
de Bures died in 1360, 2 when the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Acton, in Babergh Hundred, until forfeited by James Butler, 
Earl of Ormond and Wiltshire, in 1461. 

In 1365 we meet with a release of the manor by William Wingfield 
and others to John de Roke wood and Alice, wife of Sir John de Sutton, or 
rather of all their right in it, lately granted them by Sir John de Sutton, junr., 
and the manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Alice, wife 
of Sir John de Sutton, in 1392. 3 In 1461 the manor was granted by King 
Edw. IV. to Sir Thomas Waldegrave, Knt. At the beginning of the i6th 
century it is said to have passed to Sir Henry de Bures, Knt., who died 
in 1528, and subsequently passed in the same line of devolution as the main 
manor. We have some doubt as to this in view of two fines levied of the 
manor in the time of Queen Elizabeth. The first is in 1576, and is levied 
by Thomas Chapman against Philip Tylney, 4 and the second is in 1603, 
levied by Edmund Blewett against John Britten. 5 

MANOR OF SULVEYES OR SULLIES OR MARTYNS AND SULVEGES. 

The lordship was vested in early times in John Sulvey. The name 
appears under various forms. In 1293 we find a grant by Alfred de Solemy 
to his son John in tail of all the lands in Reydon which the grantor inherited 
from John de Solemy his uncle, 6 and three years later we find amongst the 
ancient deeds in the Exchequer Treasury of the Receipt, now in the Record 
Office, a release by Petronilla Pascal, of Reydon, to John de Solemy, son 
of Sir Alfred de Solemy, of his messuage, land, and tenement in Reydon. 7 
In 7:306 we find also a release by Alexander Tost, of Burnt Wenham, to 
John de Sulny, of land in Reydon. 8 In 1311 we find a grant by Robert 
Edwold, of Estokysa la Weyward, to John de Sulny and Isabel his wife of 
a piece of land of the said Sulny's fee in Reydon, 9 and the same year a 
grant by John le Spenser, of Bergholt, to John de Sulny and Isabel his wife 
of all the land in Reydon which the said John de Sulny acquired from 
Petronilla " Paschal," of Reydon, in Reydon.' Later Sir John Sutton, Knt., 
and Alice his wife, who was the daughter and heir of Sir John de Raydon, 
Knt., conveyed this land to Roger de Wolferston, John Brook, parson of 
Polstead, and others who demised and granted it in 1397 to William Sampson 
and Margaret his wife, daughter of Sir Andrew de Bures." 

To them succeeded their son and heir, Thomas Sampson," who died 
in 1439, when the estate passed to his son and heir, George Sampson, who 
died in 1458, when it vested in his son and heir, Thomas Sampson, who 
died in 1 483, ' 3 leaving a son, Sir Thomas Sampson, who died without issue 
8th Jan. 1511-12." Towards the end of the i6th century we find the 



'Feet of Fines, 30 Edw. III. 43. 
'I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 60. 
3 1. P.M., 16 Rich. II. 25. 
4 Fine, Easter, 18 Eliz. 
3 Fine, Hil. 45 Eliz. 

6 A. 3878. 

7 A. 3497. 

8 A. 34 Edw. I. 3581. 
'A. 3747- 

10 A. 3705. 



" Serjeants' accounts of lands late of Alice 
de Sutton in Raydon, 15 and 16 
Rich. II. will be found amongst the 
Ministers' accounts in the Record 
Office (Bundle 1003 No. 21). She 
died in 1392 (I.P.M., 16 Rich. II. 

25)- 
"See Manor of Playford, in Carlford 

Hundred, for these Sampsons an<? 

their marriages. 
sI.P.M., i Rich. III. 35. 
'*I.P.M., Stowmarket, 7th Aug. 1512. 



78 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor vested in Thomas Barrow, who died in 1590, from which time it 
descended in the same course as the main manor through the Sheltons. 

About 1720 it was vested in John Stubbin, son of Josiah Stubbin, of 
Offton, and Elizabeth Grimwade his wife. John Stubbin married in 1714 
Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Richard Partridge, of Holton St. Mary, 
and died aoth June, 1757, at the age of 80,' and the manor subsequently 
vested in Sir William Beaumaurice Rush. On his death the manor passed 
to his daughter and coheir Charlotte, married to John Marten Cripps, and 
was sold in 1875 to Charles Thomas Partridge, now of Stowmarket, nephew 
of Charles Partridge, of Shelley Hall. 



1 Will P.C.C. 25th Feb 1757. 




SHELLEY. 79 

SHELLEY. 
SHELLEY HALL MANOR. 

T the time of the Domesday Survey Shelley was a Herewith 
to Bergholt, and was part of the King's demesnes. In the 
time of Hen. III. the lordship was held by William, son of 
Hervey, and in 1272 Robert de Tateshall held it of the 
barony of Tibenham, in Norfolk. This Robert was the son 
of Robert de Tateshall and Mabel his wife, one of the 
sisters and coheirs of Hugh the last Albini, Earl of Arundel, 
by which marriage he acquired the Manor and Castle of Buckenham, 
in Norfolk. It is stated in the Hundred Rolls that the view of frank- 
pledge in Shelley was at the date of those returns in the hands of this 
Robert de Tateshall the son. 1 

Robert de Tatshall or Tateshall is said in 1269 upon the partition 
of the lands of Ralph Fitz-Ranulph, lord of Middleham, co. York, to have 
held in right of his wife Joan, one of the three daughters of the said Ralph, 
the Manor of Wells and a moiety of the woods belonging to the lordship of 
Snape. 

Robert had summons to Parliament called by the King's writ to meet 
in London in 1260, and died in 1273,* seised of Buckenham with the castle, 
and also of Tatshall with the castle, and of this manor, leaving Robert de 
Tatshall, his son and heir, then 24 years of age, who, doing his homage, had 
livery of his lands. This Robert is mentioned to have been summoned to 
Parliament in 1295-6-7, and the name of Robert is also contained in the writ 
equis et armis to Carlisle the 26 Edw. I., where he is designated a baron, 
those then summoned being all distinguished by their respective rank of 
comitis vel barones. He is said to have married Joan, 2nd daughter and 
coheir of Sir Thomas Nevill or Fitz-Ranulph, of Middleham, co. York, and 
died in 1297-8, leaving Robert, his son and heir, then aged 24 years, who 
in his childhood took to wife Eve, daughter of Robert de Tibetot, and in 
the year of his father's death, doing his homage, had livery of his whole 
inheritance, saving to Joan, his mother, her reasonable dower. He had 
summons in 1299, 1300, and 1302, and was one of those who in the Parlia- 
ment at Lincoln in 1301 affixed his seal to the letter to the Pope, being then 
styled " Robertus de Tateshalle, Dominus de Buckenham." 

He is said to have died in 1303, leaving Robert his son and heir, 15 
years of age. There is evidently some error here. Dugdale 3 makes Joan 
Fitz Ranulph in one case to be the wife of the Robert who died in 1298, 
and in another place the mother. 4 

Banks 5 says : " Now, if Robert was only 24 years of age at his father's 
death the 26 Edw. I. [1298] he could only have been in his thirtieth year 
at the time of his own decease the 31 Edw. I. [1303] when to have left a 
son aged 15 years must have been a very nimble course of generation." 
The 15-year old son died unmarried in 1305-6, leaving his three sisters 6 his 

1 H.R. ii. 190. 5 Baron. Angl. Concent, i. 430. 

'I.P.M., I Edw. I. 4. 6 Thc author of the "Complete Peerage" 

3 Baron, ii. 440. says "great-aunts, the sisters of 

4 The author of the " Complete Peerage " the ist baron or their descendants" 

assigns this particular wife to the (vol. vii. p. 370), and refers to 

Robert who died in 1298 (vol. vii. pedigrees in Coll. Top. et Gen. vii. 

p. 370). p. 144- 



8o 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



coheirs, viz., (i) Emma, married to Sir Osbert Caily, father of Sir Thomas 
Caily, Baron of Buckenham, in right of his mother ; (2) Joan, married to 
Sir Robert Driby, whose daughter and heir Alice married Sir William Bernake 
of Hethersett, whose son John was father of William, who, dying without 
issue in his minority 7th Dec. 1359, left Maud, his sister and heir, wife to 
Ralph de Cromwell ; and (3) Isabel, married to Sir John Orby or Orreby. 

In 1316 we find John de Appleby holding one-third during the minority 
of a Thomas de Cailly, and in 1334 John de Driby holding a third part.' 
Sir Thomas de Cailly died in 1316 without issue, and his interest passed to 
his only sister Margaret, married to Sir Roger de Clifton, on whose death 
her interest vested in her son and heir, Sir Adam de Clifton. 

In 1341 we find upon the Patent Rolls a licence for this Sir Adam de 
Clifton, who had married Eleanor, daughter of Sir Robert Mortimer, of 
Attleburgh, to grant to his son Constantine, Katharine his wife, daughter 
of William de la Pole, and the heirs of their bodies with reversion to Adam 
and his heirs a third part of the manor then held in chief.' Katharine, 
wife of Constantine de Clifton, died seised in I364, 3 and her one-third share 
vested in Constantine's son and heir, John de Clifton. John de Clifton 
was of Buckenham Castle, and was found to be heir to Margaret de Cailly 
in 1368, being then aged 15, and eight years later was summoned to Parlia- 
ment as a Baron by writ directed to " John de Clyfton " ist Dec. 1376. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of Ralph Cromwell, Lord 
Cromwell, and died loth Aug. 1388, when his interest in the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Constantine de Clifton, Lord de Clyfton, who was 
summoned to Parliament I3th Nov. 1393, to aoth Nov. 1394. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir John Howard, of Wigcnhall, co. Norfolk, and 
died in 1395, his interest in the manor passing to his son and heir, Sir John 
de Clifton, only one year old at his father's death. He married Joane, 
daughter and coheir of Edmund Thorpe, of Ashwell Thorpe, and widow 
of Sir Robert Echingham, and had an only daughter Margaret, who married 
Sir Andrew Ogard, of Buckenham Castle, but died in his father's lifetime 
without issue. The interest of Sir John de Clifton in the manor, on his 
death in 1447,' passed to his sister Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Knyvett. 5 

In the time of Hen. IV. John de Orby and Adam Blyston held the 
manor of the King in chief at the annual rent of 2od. as " formerly belonging 
to Robert de Tateshale." It subsequently vested in Robert Harleston, 
who was attainted in 1462, when the manor was forfeited to the Crown, 
and granted by Edw. IV. to his brother Richard, Duke of York. 

In 1466, however, John L'Estrange, of the City of Norwich, son of 
Roger and grandson and heir of John L'Estrange, of Hunstanton, in 
Norfolk, and Alice his wife, daughter of Nicholas Beaumont, of Pakenham, 
and of Eleanor his wife, sister of Nicholas Pike, of Colchester, in Essex, 



1 Extent, I.P.M., 8 Edw. III. 32. 

'Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. ii. 33. 

Jl.P.M. 37 Edw. III. 17. 

4 Will i6th Aug. 1447, proved 8th Sept. 

1447- 

'The third of Isabel Orby had passed to 
her son Philip, and from him to his 
son John, who died in 1352, and from 
him to his daughter and heir, Joan 
married ist to Sir Henry Percy, and 
2nd to Sir Constantine Clifton. Her 



daughter Mary married Sir John 
Roos, of Hamlake, and died without 
issue in the lifetime of her mother. 
In 1394 we meet with a writ to 
divide lands between Constantine 
de Clifton and Maud, wife of Sir 
Ralf Cromwell, Knt., cousins and 
heirs of Mary, widow of John, Lord 
Roos, of Hamlake, daughter and 
heir of Joan, daughter and heir of 
John de " Orreby." 



SHELLEY. 81 

released all his right in this manor to John King, citizen of London, Sir 
John Howard, Knt., John Clopton, and others in trust. 

We find a suit amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings by Nicholas 
Pike, described as of Colchester, against John Twyer and Alice his wife, 
niece of the plaintiff, tor" falsely noising " that this manor was entailed. 1 
John L'Estrange died 3oth April, I46y, 2 without issue, and Henry 
L' Estrange his brother succeeded. 3 He married Catherine, daughter of 
Roger Drury, of Hawstead, and died 25th Nov. 1485,* seised of manors in 
Pakenham and Stowlangtoft, as well as of this manor. The Kings owned 
Shelley Hall between the Cliftons and the Tylneys, actually residing in the 
hah 1 , but whether they held the manor at any time is doubtful. John 
King, described as of Shelley, gent., in 1493 married Rose, daughter of 
Sir Edmund Jenney, of Knodishall, and there was formerly in Shelley 
church a brass for " William King Arm. fil. Joh. King de hujus Ville 1500." 

In 1510 the manor appears to have been in Edward Cornwallis, who 
died 3rd Sept. that year, leaving William his brother and heir. 5 In 1517 
we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Sir John Bourchier, Lord Berners, 
and others against Thomas Eylmer and Rose his wife. It includes tene- 
ments also in Leyham, Hadleigh, Polsted, Edwardeston, Raydon, and 
Stoke juxta Nay land. 6 

The manor subsequently vested in Sir Philip Tilney, Knt. He 
married ist Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas Brewse, of Little Wenham ; 
2ndly, Joan, daughter of Thomas Tey by Margaret his wife, relict of John 
Fincham, of Fincham ; and 3rdly, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Jeffery, 
of Stansfield, co. Suffolk, who afterwards remarried Francis Framlingham, 
of Crow's Hall, in Debenham. Sir Philip Tilney died 8th Jan. I532-3, 7 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Tilney, 8 who married 
Margaret Barrett. From Thomas the manor passed to his grandson, 
Philip Tilney (whose father, Frederick Tilney, of Kelsale,married Margaret 
Buck, of Long Melford, and died 26th Jan. 1540-1). The marriage settle- 
ment of Philip Tilney on Anne, daughter of Sir Charles Framlingham, of 
Crow's Hall, Debenham, gth Oct. 1561, will be found amongst the Egerton 
MSS. in the British Museum. 9 It is referred to also in the Historical 
MSS. Commission Reports. 10 On nth Aug. 1561, Philip Tilney entertained 
his kinswoman, Queen Elizabeth, at Shelley Hall. His only son Charles 
was executed in 1586 for his share in the Babington Conspiracy." 

On Philip's death, I3th March, 1601-2, the manor passed to his first 
cousin and heir, Emery Tilney, 12 who married Winifred Davis, and 
on his death in 1606 went to his son and heir, Thomas Tilney, 
Sheriff of Suffolk 1611, who married Elizabeth Gosnold. 13 On Thomas 
Tilney 's death' 4 the manor passed to his son and heir, Philip Tilney, 
who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Needham, of Barking, 
Knt., and sold the estate about 1627 to Thomas Kerridge, a sea- 
captain, who married Susan, daughter of Thomas Simonds, merchant and 

'E.C.P. Bundle 16, 245. "Will proved P.C.C. I4th June, 1559. 

"Blomefield says in 1476. 9 Eger. 2713. 

3 See Manor of Thorpe Morieux, in Cosford ' 10 Rep. pt. iii. 4. 

Hundred. "State Trials, i. 126-135. 

4 Will 1483. "Philip's only son Charles had been exe- 
'I.P.M., 2 Hen. VIII. cuted 2Oth Sept. 1586. 

"Fine, Easter, 9 Hen. VIII. 3 Buried at Shelley, nth April, 1646. 

'I.P.M., 26 Hen. VIII. 66 ; Will 8th Dec. '< His will proved 1620. 

I 532, proved 8th Oct. 1533. 

L 



82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

alderman of London-, by Mary his wife, daughter of William Hales, of Bildes- 
ton, who, after his decease, was married to Sir Martin Lumley, of Bardfield 
Magna, Essex, Knt., sometime Lord Mayor of London, and died I3th 
June, 1650, aged 75. Thomas Kerridge served the office of High Sheriff 
of Suffolk, in 1647, an d died 2oth Dec. 1657, aged 72, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Kerridge, who died at Cambridge (being 
fellow commoner of Queen's College), 3rd September, 1661, aged 18 years, 
when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Samuel Kerridge. He 
married Mary, daughter of Sir Thomas Garrard, Knt. and Bart., by whom 
he had two sons, Thomas and Samuel, and two daughters, Sarah and 
Mary. He died at Naughton, 3rd Nov. 1678,' aged 33, when the manor 
went to his son and heir, Thomas Kerridge. He married Jane, daughter 
and heir of Richard Porter, of Framlingham, and died in April, 1743, leaving 
an only daughter and heir, Cecilia Kerridge, who died in June, 1747, 




SHELLEY HALL. 



leaving her right in this manor to William Folkes, of Chancery Lane, London, 
and of Hillington Hall, Norfolk, father of Sir Martin Browne Folkes, ist 
baronet. By deeds dated 2oth and 2ist August, 1756, William Folkes 
disposed of the Shelley estate to Samuel Rush, of Benhall (son of Samuel 
Rush, of Benhall, and of Veldham Hall, Essex), who died unmarried 24th 
June, 1783, devising by will 7th April, 1781, his estates (including this 
manor) to his kinsman (afterwards Sir) William Beaumaurice Rush, of 
Wimbledon House, Surrey, who the previous year had married Laura 
Carter, and died 8th July, 1833, when the manor passed to his 3rd daughter 
and coheir Charlotte, married to John Marten Cripps, of Stanton Manor, 
near Lewes, Sussex, on whose death, 2nd June, 1873, it was sold. 

Shelley Hall 3 stands on the west side of the valley through which runs 
the river Brett, at the distance of about a quarter of a mile south-west of 
the church. It is immediately on the edge of the meadows, and in front 



1 Amongst the manors enumerated in the 
will of Maurice Shelton, 3rd Oct. 
1680, proved at Norwich, nth 
Nov. 1680, and stated to have been 
settled by an indenture dated 25th 
May, 1672, is " the Manor of 
Shelley." 



' Will P.C.C. 283 Strahan. 

3 The following description is taken from 
Davy's Suff. Collections, Brit. Mus. 
Add. MS. 19105. This Suffolk anti- 
quary visited Shelley Hall, 
August, 1828. 



SHELLEY. 83 

of it is a moated garden, which is part of the marshes. Part of the old 
house built by the Tilneys still remains, and forms a good farmhouse. On 
the north side of it was the entrance porch now closed, but on each side 
of the doorway above is in red brick the crest of Tilney a griffin's head 
erased. The doorways of this porch front nearly east and west. On the 
north side of it in the wall is a square piece of stone, on which are the arms, 
crest, &c., of Tilney, as follows : 

A chevron between 3 griffins' heads erased quartering Thorpe. 
3 crescents. 

Crest : Out of a ducal coronet, a plume of feathers and issuing there- 
from a griffin's head. 

Supporters : Two griffins segeant. 



Motto in old French in the form of 



ESPOIRMA COMFORT. 



On the sides of this is a sort of ornamented border which does not 
appear at the top or bottom. At the back are other remains of the old 
house, and, on a part of it, the arms of Tilney without the crest, 
supporters, &c. ; this is in red brick. 

In one of the bedchambers over the chimney is a frame of wood hand- 
somely carved on which are the following shields, &c., of Tilney, and his 
quarterings, viz., of 7 coats. 

(1) Tilney. 

(2) Rochford : Quarterly i and 4 Rochford. Quarterly in a border 
charged with roundels 2 and 3 an eagle displayed. 

(3) Bereford [? Hillary]. Seme' of cross-crosslets fitchee, 3 fleurs-de- 
lis or 3 fleurs-de-lis betw. 9 cross-crosslets fitchee. 

(4) Thorpe. 3 crescents 2 and I. 

(5) Rosse. 4 bars over all a bend engrailed. 

(6) Baynard. A fesse between 2 chevrons. 

(7) Aspal. 4 chevrons. 
Supporters. 2 griffins as above. 

Crest as on the stone above-mentioned. 

Around this grand shield are 7 other smaller shields, one in the centre 
above, the other 6, 3 on each side, as follows: 

i. In the centre above, Tilney. 



sinister 



4. Bereford [? Hillary]. 

5. Thorpe. 

6. Baynard. 



7. Aspall. 

On each side of this large panel is a smaller or rather narrower one, 
also carved ; that on the dexter has in the centre the head of a female in 
a circle, the head covered with a hat ; above and below it are various carvings, 
on the sinister panel, in the middle, is the head of a man in a circle, on his 
head a helmet, and attached to the lower part of the circle is armour for 
the body, above and below carvings as on the dexter side. 

At the back of the hall the ground rises rather abruptly, and is a good 
deal broken, and from the top of this rise a very extensive prospect is 
obtained both up and down the river. 



84 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Shelley Hall was occupied for nearly 120 years by the Partridge family.' 
In 1681 Thomas Partridge, great-grandson of John Partridge, who married 
Bridget Bringlove, at Bradfield St. Clare, in 1543, died at Shelley. In 1758 
Arthur Partridge succeeded John Spells at Shelley Hall, and a few months 
later married his third cousin, Sarah, daughter and coheir of Robert 
Partridge. Arthur died there in 1789, and was succeeded by his son 
Robert, who, dying there in 1854, aged 81, was succeeded by his son Charles, 
who lived there until 1875. His grand-nephew, Charles Partridge, M.A., 
F.S.A., F.R.G.S., District Commissioner in Southern Nigeria, is collecting 
materials for a history of this parish. 

Arms of TATESHALE : Cheque, Or and Gules, a chief Ermine. Of 
TILNEY : Argent, a chevron between three griffins' heads, erased, Gules. 
Of KERRIDGE : Sa. on a pile, Arg. a mullet of the first (granted iTth June, 
1620, to Capt. Thomas Kerridge, for his good services in the Great Mogul 
country). 



1 See Muskett's Suffolk Manorial Families, ii. 168, 400. 




SHOTLEY. 85 

SHOTLEY. 

N Saxon times there was one manor in this place, held by 
Earl Guert. It consisted of 2^ carucates of land and an acre 
worth 2d., 12 villeins, 2 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne and 4 belonging to the men ; also 4 acres of 
meadow, a rouncy, and 40 sheep. When the Survey was 
taken this was the land of the King, held in charge by 
Aluric Wanz, the villeins were reduced to half and the 
serfs to i, there was only i ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to 
the men, but 4 might be restored. To this manor belonged in the Confessor's 
time 210 socmen, who were reduced when the Survey was taken to 119, 
having 22 J carucates of land, less 30 acres, and 42 bordars, 29 ploughteams 
(reduced at the Survey to 27), and 24^ acres of meadow ; also 2 churches 
with 62 acres. Of the men who remained upon this manor, Harold had 
not even commendation in the Confessor's time except of four Ulnod, 
Estmunt, Aluric, and Wistric ; and Guert, Harold's brother, had com- 
mendation of two Man and Alviet. They were all in commendation 
to other barons in the time of the Confessor. The Survey continues as 
follows : " Of i Malet's predecessor had commendation, and Robert, son 
of Wimarc, of 4. But Harold always had jurisdiction over the aforesaid 
manor of Bergholt, to wit, with that which belonged to it, and with 
jurisdiction of the Hundred and a Half (of Samford). It rendered in 
King Edward's time 24. And Guert's two manors aforesaid, which 
were added to this farm, then rendered 9. And when Robert Malet 
had it, the whole together rendered 60 by weight, and 8 by number 
as gersum, and so much only it rendered to Roger Bigot, as the prepositus 
himself says. But Roger says that it rendered 405. more by number 
and one marc of gold. But Aluric, the prepositus, contradicts (him) 
and Roger will prove (his saying) by those men who were present at his 
agreements. The said Aluric now renders 60 by weight, and he so holds 
of the King by such agreement that he is bound to make the King (payment 
of) 60 out of the profit, and of this he vouches the King to warrant. So 
he says himself. And he says too that (nothing) remains in so much as 
he does not make that profit." 1 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Celeolt, by commendation 
to Aluric, and consisted of 60 acres, a villein, a bordar, and half a plough- 
team, worth ros. At the time of the Survey Roger Bigot held it of Richard, 
son of Earl Gislebert. The soc was in Bergholt. 2 

Three manors were held in Kirkton (Cherchetuna), one in Saxon times 
by Edmund, a freeman, consisting of 60 acres, half a ploughteam, and 
an acre of meadow, worth 2os., increased when the Survey was taken to 
235. zd. ; the other by Strangulf, a freeman, consisting of 60 acres and 
half a ploughteam, worth 45. 

The third manor in Kirkton was held by Turi, a freeman of Guert, 
consisting of 60 acres, 4 bordars, and half a ploughteam, worth los. 
(increased when the Survey was taken to us. 5<1). These three manors 
formed part of the possessions of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, at the 
time of the Survey, and he also had an estate here of 15 acres and 2 teams 
of oxen, worth 8s., the soc being in Bergholt, which had formerly been 

'Dom. ii. 2876. *Dom. ii. 3946. 



86 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



held by two freemen, Huna and Godric, when it was valued at 55. It 
was 6 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt .}</.' 

MANOR OF SHOTLEY HALL OR KIRKTON. 

Davy seems to think that this was the estate of Celeolt under the 
protection of Aluric in the days of the Confessor, and formed part of the 
possessions of Richard Fitz Gilbert, held by Roger Bigot at the time of 
the Survey. This small estate may have formed part of the lands sub- 
sequently held with the manor as it subsequently devolved, but could 
only have been a portion. 

John de Visdelon or Vicedeliew was lord of Shotley shortly after 
the date of the Survey, and he was succeeded by his son and heir, Walkelin 
de Visdelieu, who in the time of King John was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Humphrey de Visdelieu, who was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Sir Guy de Visdelieu, who was succeeded by his son and heir, Ralph de 
Visdelieu, who was succeeded by his son and heir, Guy de Visdelieu, 
who in 1286 claimed here wreck of the sea, view of frankpledge, and other 
manorial franchises. 2 In 1297 William de Visdelien married Rose, 
daughter and heir of John de Shotisbroke, 3 by whom he left an only son, 
Sir Thomas Visdelieu, Knt. 

In 1303 we find William de Visdelieu had a grant of a market and 
fair here, 4 and in 1310 had licence to alienate the manor, probably by 
way of settlement, 5 for in 1313 he had a grant of free warren here.' 1 

In 1344 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by this Sir Thomas 
Visdelieu and Katharine his wife, against Robert de Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk, and Sir Peter de Ty. The fine included the advowson also of 
the church. 7 

Sir Thomas was succeeded 8 by his second son, Sir Thomas de Visdelieu, 
executor to his father. He seems to have died without issue, leaving his three 
sisters and coheirs Margery, married to Thomas Mossell, or Moswell ; 
Margaret, married to \Yilliam Lampet, of Thorndon ; and Isabel, married 
to Sir John Verdon, of Shelf anger. 

Gipps, Davy, and Page all make different statements as to these 
daughters. According to Davy, Isabel married William Lampet, whose 
daughter and coheir married Thomas Mosele, and Joan, 2nd daughter 
of Thomas, married John Chapman de Felton. 

Yet another variation is that of Page, who says the lordship descended 
to Margaret, the elder daughter, who married Thomas Mossell, 9 and 
they, having no male issue, it descended to their youngest daughter, Joan, 
who married John Felton, and he inherited the property in her right. 
We know not whence Page's information was derived as to the enjoyment 
of the property by John Felton, but if correct the duration must have 
been short, for Sir William de Loudham, Knt., according to Davy, died 
seised of the manor in 1376, which was the year after the death of Sir 
Thomas de Visdelieu. 

Another authority makes Thomas Visdelieu (as he is called) leave 
by his wife a daughter of Spring, two daughters Margaret, married to 



1 Dom. ii. 395. 

'Q.W-723. 

'0. 25 Edw. I. 6. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 31 Edw. I. 12. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 51. 
Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 49. 



7 Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. III. 18. 

Will 1375, proved 8th Oct. 1375. 

9 On the Patent Rolls in 1429 we find a 
pardon of outlawry to Thos. Mossell, 
of Shotley, gentleman ; Pat. Rolls, 
7 Hen. VI. pt. i. 20. 



SHOTLEY. 87 

Thomas Mossell, and Isabel, married to Sir John Felbridge, Knt. Thomas 
Mossell left two daughters, Joane and Margaret, the former married to John 
Felton' and the latter to William Stratton, the father of William Stratton, 
the father of Joane Stratton. Sir John Felbridge left a daughter 
and heir, Marjory, married to Thomas Sampson, the father of Thomas 
Sampson, of Playford, the father of Mary, who married Robert Felton, 
the son of Sir John Felton, who married Joan, daughter and heir of Thomas 
Mossell. 

Page is correct as to the eldest daughter of Sir Thomas, only she 
was Margery and not Margaret, having married Thomas Mossell and 
having daughters. These were three Joan, married to John Felton, 
father of John Felton, of Shotley ; Anne, married to Fitz-Lewis ; and 
Margaret, married to Edmund Stratton, of Pluckley, and became the 
mother of Jane, who married Richard Herbert alias Yaxley. 

Sir William Loudham certainly had the manor, and he was succeeded 
by his heir, Walter de Stratton, who died about 1392, his will being dated 
this year. In 1428 Augustine de Stratton held, and in 1478 Edward 
Stratton, son of Walter, died seised/ being that year succeeded in the 
lordship by his son and heir, Augustine Stratton, clerk, who married Mary, 
daughter of - - Goldingham, and died about 1430, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, George Stratton, who died in 1498, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, George Stratton. 

George Stratton died in 1548, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Stratton, of Levington, who married Cecily, daughter of Thomas 
Felton, of Playford, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas 
Stratton, who had livery in 1567. He married Dorothy Nichols, and 
on his death in 1587 the manor passed to his son and heir, John Stratton, 
who was living in 1608. 

The above devolution of the manor is that given in the Davy MSS. 
but we suspect it is altogether delusive. The manor as "Shotthall Manor 
in Kirkton " is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Elizabeth Wolverston 
in 1420. 3 

The manor subsequently vested in Sir John Leman, Knt., who died 
in 1631. 

In 1805 the manor was vested in Ann Reynolds, widow, Mary 
Reynolds, Patty Lucas, and Walter Manning Brooke; in 1840 in William 
Lucas, of Bumfield Place, Chelmsford ; in 1855 m the heirs of William 
Lucas; and in 1885 in J.Berners, from which time it has descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Erwarton, in this Hundred. Davy says 
the manor as early as 1811 vested in Charles Berners, and passed to his 
brother and heir, the Rev. Henry C. Berners. 

Arms of VISDELIEU : Arg. 3 wolves' heads couped Gu. 

MANOR OF OVERHALL WITH NETHERHALL. 

This was the estate of Earl Guert in the time of the Confessor, and 
of the King at the time of the Great Survey. The lordship subsequently 
vested in Sir William de Loudham, and later in John Felton, alias John 
Chapman, who died in 1498, when it passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Chapman or Felton, who married Mary, daughter and heir of Thomas 

1 9 Hen. VII. 3 1.P.M., 7 Hen. V. 50. 

'I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 34. 



88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sampson, of Playford, and on his death passed to Thomas Felton, who 
married Sisley, daughter of Thomas Seckford, of Seckford, from whom 
it passed to his son and heir, who in 1556 paid a relief for the manor. He 
married Mary, daughter of Sir Richard Gernon, Knt., and died in 1577. 

In 1573 Robert Downes had licence to alienate to John Felton, who 
had licence in 1574 to alienate to George Home and others to the use 
of Katharine his wife and their heirs. All these alienations 
were no doubt by way of settlement, as the manor throughout remained 
in the Felton family, and passed as specified in the Manor of Playford, 
in Carlford Hundred, until Sir Thomas Felton, 4th Bart., died seised in 
1708-9, when the manor passed to his only daughter and heir, Elizabeth, 
married to the Right Hon. John Hervey, first Earl of Bristol, from which 
time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, 
in Thingoe Hundred, and is now vested in the present Marquis of Bristol. 

Arms of FELTON : See Playford, in Carlford Hundred. 

An " Overhall Manor," or rather a moiety of it, is included in a fine 
levied in 1349 by Sir John de Sutton, of Wyvenho, and Margaret his wife 
against Amflesia, daughter of Thomas Baldewyne, and Walter de Barkworth 
and Katherine his wife, 1 and in another fine levied of a 3rd part the same 
year by the same petitioner against John Wolf, of Manntre, and Joan 
his wife. 1 

MANOR OF THIRKLETON OR THORKLETON al. SHECKE. 

Of this manor George Stratton died seised in 1498, when it passed 
in the same course as the main manor until John Stratton, who died about 
1597. We meet with a fine levied of the manor in 1544 by Sir Humphrey 
Wyngfeld and others against George Stratton. 5 



1 Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 'Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 

Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 5. 




SPROUGHTON. 89 

SPROUGHTON. 
SPROUGHTON MANOR CALLED LOVEDAYS. 

HIS was held in 1286 by Roger Loveday. There was a 
trial in 1275 of considerable importance in which this Roger 
de Loveday was engaged. It seems that he obtained a 
grant from William, son of Osbert de Sprouston, of all the 
lands of the latter in Sproughton and Burstall, and it was 
alleged that Roger de Loveday had obtained this grant by 
coercion. The point was tried and it was decided in the 
negative, the jury finding that there was no coercion on the part of 
Roger. 1 

The following year William, son of Osbert de Sprouton, seems to 
have attempted a different course of action. He brings an action against 
Hervey le Serjeant on the ground that he coerced him into making a grant 
of one carucate of land in Sproughton to Roger de Loveday, but this 
action was dismissed on the ground of res judicata, and judgment was 
given for Hervey le Serjeant and three others in the matter. 2 

Roger de Loveday had a grant of free warren here in 1280 ; 3 and 
the same year an action was brought against him by one Andrew Gaunsel 
touching a tenement in Sproughton, 4 and another action by one Hugh 
de Wyeham as to another tenement in the same place. 5 

He died in I287, 6 when the manor, which was then held of the Honor 
of Lancaster, passed to his widow Sibilla, who remarried William de 
Ormesby. Ultimately his son, Richard Loveday, held, and on his death 
in 1319, the manor passed to his four sisters in the same way as the Manor 
of Great Bricett, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

In 1328 we meet with a fine levied of a 4th part of the manor by John 
de . . . against Roger de " Ticheburne " and Katherine his wife. 7 

Another fine the following year was levied of a further 4th of the 
manor and advowson by John de Aspale against Richard Hacoun and 
Anna his wife. 3 The following year another was levied, this time of the 
3rd part of the manor, by John de Aspale against Thomas Duraunt and 
Margaret his wife. 9 

In 1345 another fine was levied of both manor and advowson by the 
said John de Aspale against John Burdoun and Isabel his wife/ and in 
1349 a ^ so f both manor and advowson by Sir John de Aspale and Elizabeth 
his wife against Gilbert de Debenham and Walter Hert, chaplain." 

The same year we meet with a fine of the Manor of " Sproughton " 
only, levied between Sir Thomas de Grey, Knt., John de Bradefeld, parson 
of Hawstead church, Gilbert de Debenham, and Walter Hert, chaplain, 
against John, son of Thomas Gernoun. 12 

'(o.e.) Abbr. of Pleas, 3 Edw. I. in Oct. 'Feet of Fines, 2 Edw. III. 21. 

Mich. 4. 9 Feet of Fines, 3 Edw. III. 18. Richard de 

2 Abbr. of PI. 4 and 5 Edw. I. min. rec. Tychebourne and Katherine his wife 

Mich. 6, and in Oct. St. Mich. 7. and Richard " Hakoun " and Anna 

3 Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 20. his wife, app. clam. 

4 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. i^d. IO Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 26. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. id., 9 Edw. I. 27<*. " Feet of Fines, 22 Edw. III. 28. 
6 1. P.M., 15 Edw. I. 35. "Feet of Fines, 22 Edw. III. 17. 
7 Feet of Fines, i Edw. III. 8; Roger de 

Tichebourn and Katherine his wife, 
and Richard Hacun and Alina his 
wife, app. clam. 



go THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1376 we meet with another fine of the manor only levied by John 
de Pyshall and Adam de Leveryngton, clerk, against George de Felbrigge 
and Margaret his wife. It includes the Manor of Dangevilles and the 
advowson of the church of that manor. 1 

The manor later seems to have vested in Sir George Felbrigg, son of 
Roger le Bigod, who had a grant of free warren here in 1384.* From this 
time to the present the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Playford, in Carlford Hundred. 

The advowson is in the present Marquis of Bristol, but the manor 
belongs to Major Robert Phillipps, J.P. 



MANOR OF DANGEVILLES. 

This manor was the lordship of Robert de Angervile, a Norman. In 
1204 we find an order on the Close Rolls as to the value of lands held by 
Robert de Angervile in Sproughton, 3 and he forthwith granted to Roger le 
Bigod a knight's fee here which had formerly belonged to Robert de 
Angervile. 4 The grant of this manor to Earl Bigot is in practically the 
same terms. 5 

An action was pending in 1227 between W. Earl Warren and this 
Robert de Angervile as to a tenement in Sproughton, 6 and another in 1229 
between the said Robert de Angervile and Hamo Lenveisie concerning 
a knight's fee in Sproughton. 7 

Notwithstanding this grant the manor seems to have continued in 
the Angervile family, and in 1265 Hughde Angervile, a brother or nephew 
most likely -of Robert, held. In 1319 John de Angervile had a grant of 
free warren here, 8 and in 1334 Thomas Angervile, clerk, had a like 
grant. 9 

In 1344 the manor was held by Roger de Angervile, and there is an 
order this year authorising him to retain the manor on granting other 
lands. 10 In 1376 a fine was levied of the manor as well as of the main 
manor by John de Pyshall and Adam de Leveryngton, clerk, against 
George de Felbrigge and Margaret his wife." Margaret Sampson died 
seised of this manor in 1477, l2 and Sir Thomas Sampson seems to have 
died seised 2nd Jan. 1511, leaving his nephew, Thomas Felton, son of 
his sister Margaret and of Robert Felton, his heir. The manor is mentioned 
in the inquis. p.m. of the said Thomas Felton, who died loth Feb. 1533, ' 3 
leaving Thomas his son and heir. 

Sir John Felbrigg, Knt., subsequently had the lordship, from which 
time it has passed in the same course as the main Manor of Sproughton, 
and is now vested in the Marquis of Bristol. 

Arms of ANGERVILE : Gu. a cinquefoil Erm. in a bordure Sa. bezante. 

1 Feet of Fines, 49 Edw. III. 36. 'Close Rolls, 13 Hen. III. i$d. 

'Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 8. " Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. II. 24. 

J Close Rolls, 6 John. 14. Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. III. 46. 
Close Rolls, 6 John 6, 34; Pat. Rolls, 8 ">I.Q.D..i8 Edw. III. File 269. 13. 

John, 3. " Feet of Fines, 49 Edw. III. 36. 

'Close Rolls, 6 John 14, 147. "I. P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 48. 

6 Close Rolls, ii Hen. III. 14, in dorso. -J I.P.M., 26 Hen. VIII. 3. 



SPROUGHTON. 



9 1 



MANOR OF BORDESHAW OR BRADSHAW OR BOSFORD HALL al. Boss 

HALL. 

The lordship was in the time of Hen. III. vested in Edward de 
Bordeshawe, who resided at Boos Hall, and in whose family it remained 
for several generations. Robert de Bordeshawe was lord in 1275. Amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum we find in 1386 letters by 
which Clemens Spice and Henry de Olton, clerks, quit claim to Margaret, 
sometime wife of Sir Thomas Visdelieu, of this manor and lands in Sproughton, 
Stoke, Bramford, Whitton, and in the hamlet of Brokes. It is dated 
2nd May, 9 Rich. II. 1 And by a deed dated 7th May in the same year 
the said Margaret granted the same manor and lands to Roger de Wolferston, 
John de Staverton, Thomas Sampson, Gilbert de Boulge, Robert Walleys, 
and Robert de Wolferston. 2 By a deed dated Thursday next after the 
feast of St. Michael, 10 Rich. II. [1386], the said Roger de Wolferston and 
others demised the manor to the said Margaret Visdelieu for the term 
of her life. 3 

By another deed dated 4th March, 13 Rich. II. [1390], Robert Waleys, 
John de Staverton, Roger de Wolferston, Gilbert de Boulge, Thomas 
Sampson, and Robert, son of the said Roger, granted the reversion of 
the manor after the death of Margaret Visdelieu to John Slegh, chief cup- 
bearer to the King, William Parker, citizen and mercer, of London, and 
John Stapulton. 4 In 1395 we find letters by which the said William 
Parker quit claim to John Stapulton the manor. This is dated 24th July, 
19 Rich. II. 5 

In 1480 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by John, Bishop 
of Rochester, Nicholas Goldewell, clerk, and John Bulman, clerk, against 
Ralph Illyngworth and Agnes his wife. 6 This fine includes land in 
Sproughton, Wyke, Ufford Wyke, Stoke-juxta-Ipswich, Bramford, Whitton, 
and Brokes-juxta-Ipswich. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1423 by Nicholas Dyxson, clerk, 
Thomas Holgye, John Darell, William Darell, Thomas Stokdale, and 
Thomas Delamore against Thomas Charlton, of London, and Alice his 
wife. 7 

Account of service due to this manor in 1427 will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 8 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is an indenture 
dated I2th Dec. 27 Hen. VI. [1448], by which Thomas Holgill and Thomas 
Stokdale demised to Thomas Charlton, mercer and alderman, of London, 
and to Alice his wife, this manor, with remainder to the right heirs of the 
said Alice, 9 which shows pretty clearly that the manor had been acquired 
by Thomas Charlton through his wife. 

Alice Charlton survived her husband, and in 1453 granted the manor 
to William Blyton and Thomas Fox, son of John Fox.' The deed is dated 
24th March, 31 Hen. VI. By a deed dated two days later the said William 
Blyton and Thomas Fox demised the manor to Richard Illyngworth and 
Alice Charlton for the term of their lives." 

'Add. Ch. 9660. 
'Add. Ch. 9661. 

3 Add. Ch. 9662. 

4 Add. Ch. 9666. 
'Add. Ch. 9670. 

6 Feet of Fines, 19 Edw. IV. 13. 



of Fines, i Hen. VI. 4. 
8 Add. Ch. 9698. 
"Add. Ch. 9715. 
10 Add. Ch. 9720. 
"Add. Ch. 9722. 



92 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1479 we find that John Goldewell recovered seisin of the manor 
against John Russell, Bishop of Rochester, Nicholas Goldewell, clerk, 
John Bulman, clerk, and the said Richard Illyngworth. 1 

Shortly afterwards the manor became vested in Sir Philipp 
Tylney, Knt., who, by deed dated 4th Nov. 18 Hen. VII. [1502], sold the 
same to Sir John Audeley, Knt. 1 

In the time of Hen. VIII. the lordship was vested in Thomas Spring. 
He and others levied a fine of the manor in 1516 against Richard Parcyvall 
and Margaret his wife.' Thomas Spring died seised of the manor in 1523* 
when it passed to his son and heir, Sir John Spring, Knt., of Hitcham. There 
is a precipe on a covenant concerning this manor, John Spring to George 
\\right, in 1544, amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 5 

John Spring devises the manor by his will, which is dated 8th June, 
1544, but between this date and the date of his death, i2th Aug. 1547, 
namely in 1545, he sold the manor to John Bull, 6 and the same year a 
fine was levied by George Wright against the said John Spryng. 7 A 
little later we find the manor vested in Thomas Bull, who died seised 8th 
April, 1574, when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Bull, of 
Hacheston, who died loth Sept. 1574, when it passed to his 3rd son, 
Anthony, 8 who built or rebuilt the hall, and was portman of Ipswich in 
the time of James I. He died 24th Sept. 1615,' when the manor passed 
under his will dated 3Oth Aug. 1610, to his widow, Elizabeth, during 
widowhood, and then to his nephew, Thomas Bull, son of his brother, 
Roger Bull, in tail male. 

An indenture dated 6th April, 16 Jas. I. [1618], between the said 
Elizabeth Bull of the first part, the said Thomas Bull of the second part, 
and Francis Colman, of Hacheston, of the third part, was executed for 
the suffering of a common recovery of this manor. 10 Thomas Bull left 
three daughters Jane, married to Benjamin Cutler, of Sproughton ; Mary, 
married to Charles Vesey, of Hintlesham ; and the third to Serjeant-Major 
John Moodie, of Ipswich, in 1655. 

The manor later passed into the Broke family, of Nacton, and was 
sold by them to Thomas Kersey, of Whitton, who was succeeded in the 
lordship by his son and heir, Clement Kersey. 

The manor was offered for sale at the Golden Lion, Ipswich, 23rd 
Aug. 1817, described as : " The reputed manor or lordship of Boss Hall 
and capital freehold estate, comprising 236a. ir. 26p., upwards of 30 of 
which are pasture."" When the sale of the manor and estate are announced 
later the quantity seems to have diminished to 1973. ir. ip., which sold 
for 5,000." 

Arms of BULL : Arg. 3 bulls' heads erased Sa. 

MANOR OF NECTON'S OR NETTON'S. 

Henry de Necton, son of Nicholas, son of Walter, held the lordship 
in 1266, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Henry de Nekton, who 

Add. Ch. 9735. 8 See Glevering Hall Manor, Hacheston, in 

'Add. Ch. 9743. Loes Hundred. Davy makes 

'Fine, Easter, 8 Hen. VIII. Anthony the brother of John. 

His will is dated I3th June, 1523, and 'Buried in the chancel of the church at 

it was proved 3rd July, 1524. Hacheston. His will was proved 

'Add. Ch. 25267. i8th Nov. 1615. 

6 Fine, Hil. 37 Hen. VIII. "Add Ch. 9787. 

'Fine, Mich. 37 Hen. VIII. "Ipswich Journal, 2nd Aug. 1817. 

"Ipswich Journal, 3oth Aug. 1817. 



SPROUGHTON. 93 

about 1283 was succeeded by his son and heir, William de Necton, and he 
by his son and heir, Giles de Necton, who died in 1363. From Giles the 
manor passed to his daughter and heir, Margaret, married to John Crulle. 

The manor later vested in Sir Thomas de Nawton, Knt., who by will 
dated 1374 gave the same to Margery his wife, or at least gave to her 
all his goods in the Manor of Sproughton. 

In the time of Hen. VIII. the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Sampson, 
who died seised of it the 2nd Jan. 1511, when it passed to his nephew/ 
Thomas Felton, who died seised of the same loth Feb. 1533, 2 leaving 
Thomas his son and heir, who died in 1534, from which time the manor 
has passed in the same course of descent as the main Manor of Sproughton. 

NORTHWOOD'S MANOR. 

This manor was in the time of Edw. I. vested in William de Northwode, 
of Sproughton, and we find amongst the ancient deeds in the Exchequer 
and Treasury of the Receipt a release by this William de Northwode, 
described as son of Robert de Northwode, to the canons of SS. Peter and 
Paul, Ipswich, of all his right in land in Sproughton, which he claimed 
by writ of right. 3 On William de Northwode's death about 1275, the 
manor passed to his widow, Christian. 

In 1439 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Robert Crane, 
Thomas Denys, Thomas Fastolf, John Felawe, John Wytton, and Richard 
Courtely, parson of the church of St. Stephen's, Ipswich, against Robert 
Asshefeld and Cecilia his wife, Simon Fyncham and Elizabeth his wife, 
Robert Morton and Alice his wife, and John Braham and Anna his wife. 4 

In the time of King Hen. VIII. the manor became vested in Thomas 
Felton, who died in 1534, from which time to the death of Sir Anthony 
Felton, Knt., in 1613, it passed in the same course as the main Manor 
of Sproughton. But we meet with a fine in 1554 by Thomas Gawdy 
against William Southall. It includes lands in Belstead, Sproughton, 
Copdock, Whitton, &c. ; 5 and two other fines both levied in 1564, one in 
Easter term 6 Eliz. by Edward Flowerdewe against William Southall, 
and the other in Mich, term 6 Eliz. by William Barbor against the said 
William Southall and wife. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find an action between William Southall and Robert Sayge touching 
a mortgage of this manor. 6 A fine of the manor was levied in 1580 by 
John Smyth and others against Thomas Laurence and others. 7 

In the time of King Jas. I. the manor was vested in William Parker, 
who died in 1615, when it passed to his son and heir, William Parker. 

One of the manors of Sproughton is now, it is believed, vested in 
Major Robert Phillipps. 

Anna Bourchier, widow, died seised of the " Manor of Sproughton " 
25th July, 1520, and Andrew Sulyard was next heir, viz., son of John 
Sulyard. 8 To which of the manors of Sproughton this relates we are 
unable to say with certainty. Also amongst the Chancery Proceedings 
we find a claim by Thomas Fellgate against Robert Ede and Johan his 
wife as heir by the custom of Borough English to lands in Sproughton 
held of Sproughton Manor, late the estate of John Fellgate, deceased. 9 

1 See Playford Manor, in Carlford Hundred. 6 C.P. ser. ii. B. clxiv. 3. 

"I.P.M., 26 Hen. VIII. 3. 'Fine, Easter, 22 Eliz. 

3i3th cent. A. 3847. "I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 14. 

'Feet of Fines, 17 Hen. VI. 8. 9 C.P. i. 300. 
'Fine, Easter, 2 Mary I. 




94 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

STRATFORD ST. MARY. 

|N Saxon times there was one manor in this place, held by 
Robert. It consisted of 3 carucates of land, 20 villeins, 
and 8 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 10 
belonging to the men, also 16 acres ot meadow, wood for 
the maintenance of 16 hogs, a mill, a church, with 20 
acres of free land, half a ploughteam, 6 beasts, 36 hogs, 
and 50 sheep, the whole worth 6. 
When the Survey was taken the manor was held by Robert of Suane, 
of Essex, Suanc having the soc. The bordars were increased to 10, tin- 
serfs had disappeared. There was one ploughteam in demesne and 5 
ploughteams belonging to the men, and 5 might be restored. This manor 
was 7 quarentenes in length and 5 in breadth, and paid in a gelt gd.' 

MANOR OF STRATFORD HALL. 

In Saxon times this was the estate of one Robert, the son of VVimarc, 
and passed to his son and heir, Suane, of Essex, who held the same at 
the time of the Survey. Suane, whose ancestors had settled in England 
before the Conquest, is supposed to have been of Danish extraction, and 
joining the Conqueror on his arrival, he had his estates restored or confirmed 
to him. Robert de Essex is supposed to have been his son and Henry 
his grandson. The last was hereditary standard bearer to King Hen. II., 
and being with that monarch in an engagement against the Welsh about 
the year 1163, an unmanly panic seized him, and he threw down the 
royal standard and ran away ; in consequence of which the enemy being 
encouraged and animated, the English army thrown into confusion by a 
belief that the King was slain, were completely defeated. For this high 
misdemeanour he was charged with treason by Robert de Montfort, and 
in a solemn trial by battle clearly vanquished, and ought to have suffered 
death by the law ; but the King spared his life, and he was shorn a monk 
in the abbey of Reading, the combat having been performed in that town. 
His mother's name was Cicely, and by his wife Alice, sister to Alberic 
de Vere, the ist Earl of Oxford, he had two sons, Henry and Hugh. The 
family inheritance thus forfeited to the Crown was an Honor, the 
dependencies upon which were unusually numerous. 

We find that shortly after the above forfeiture Hubert de Munchensy 
held the manor, and in the reign of Hen. III. Roger de Munchensy is stated 
to have held half a fee here, as did his successor, William de Munchensy. 
On the Patent Rolls in 1280 is notice of an action by Walter Baudewyne 
against this William de Mont Chesny and John Mandut touching a 
tenement in Stratford St. Mary. 1 He died in 1286, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, William de Munchensy, who died in 1292. 

In 1316 John de Stratford is said to have held the lordship, but by 
1334 it was vested in John de Hadleye, though probably only as trustee, 
as the same year we find John, son of John de Stratford. From him the 
manor passed to John de Stratford and Alice his wife, who held the manor 
in 1361. This same year, however, Roger, rector of Stratford, William 
de Boyton, and Richard Gosselyn, no doubt as trustees, appear on the 
Rolls as lords. In 1391 John Coalyng, parson of the church of Stratford, 
held the manor, which by 1407 was vested in Gilbert Debenham, William 

'Dom. ii. 402. Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. I. 8d. 



STRATFORD ST. MARY. 95 

Godmerston, and Simon Sampson. The manor passed subsequently to 
Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Stratford, from whom it went to John 
Brame and Geoffrey Brame, who held a court in 1478. 

In 1502 the manor was in the Crown and granted to Chas. Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, who in 1538 regranted it to the King by way of exchange, 1 
who granted the same in 1539 to Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, who 
was beheaded 28th July, 1540, when the manor again passed to the Crown, 
and was the same year granted by Hen. VIII. to Anne of Cleves for life. 2 
She died in 1557. 

Three years later we find the manor vested in John Sulyard, William 
Pechenham, clerk, and others, as cofeoffees, and in 1501 Sir John 
Sulyard, Knt., who was High Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1556, 
appears as lord. 

From this time to the time of Sir Edward Sulyard, who succeeded 
his father in 1626, the devolution of this manor is identical with that of 
Haughley, in Stow Hundred. 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1578 by Thomas Heydon and others 
against this Sir Edward Sulyard, 3 no doubt by way of settlement. 

Sir Edward Sulyard is generally said to have sold the same in 1657 
to Major-General Sir Philip Skippon. 

The purchase was, however, made ten years previously by Nicholas 
Philips from Sir Edward and Ralph Sulyard for the life of Sir Edward 
" in fee." The following abridgment of an entry on the State Papers in 
1647 showed this to be the case. Nicholas Philips and two others petition 
that having purchased of Sir Edward and Ralph Sulyard for the life of 
the said Sir Edward the fee of the Manor of Stratford, worth 209 a year, 
and the Manor of Haughley (except the park, &c.), worth 93 a year, 
they may compound for two-thirds of the said manors sequestered for 
his (Sir Edward's) recusancy. It is mentioned that there is a yearly 
charge of 110 payable into the Exchequer for the said lands. 4 Probably 
Nicholas Philips was a trustee, for he sold to Sir Philip Skippon, son of 
the Rev. Luke Skippon. 

Sir Philip Skippon took a conspicuous part in the army under Oliver 
Cromwell, by whom he was appointed Governor of Bristol, and commanded 
the infantry at the Battle of Naseby, where he was severely wounded. 
He was also one of the Protector's Council of State, and had 1,000 per 
annum in lands assigned him by the Parliament for his services. 

He died about 1660, 5 when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Sir Philip Skippon. He married ist April, 1669, ist Amy, daughter of 
Francis Brewster, of Wrentham, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Barnardiston, of Ketton, Bart., and died 8th Aug. 1691, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Philip Skippon, who held his first court for 
the manor the same year, and died in 1717. 

Philip Skippon, however, during his lifetime sold the manor, which 
somewhat later we find vested in William Deane, of East Bergholt, on 
whose death about 1812 it passed to his son and heir, the Rev. William 
Deane. In 1855 it was vested in W. J. Deane, in 1885 in A. W. Deane, 
and is now vested in Major Clare Charles Anthony Deane, of Webbery 
House, Alverdiscott, co. Devon. 

'S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. n, 1182 (i8a). 4 S.P. Cal. of Comp. (1647) 1759. 

*S.P. 1541, 503 (32). 5 Will 2oth Feb. 1659, proved 25th Oct. 

'Fine, Hil. 20 Eliz. 1660. 



96 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Court Rolls of the manor, 1319 to 1606, will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum.' Amongst the Duchy of 
Lancaster Cal. to Pleadings in 1602 we find an action by John Lay ton 
against Edward Sulyard as to relief and suit and service of court for the 
defendant's manor, which he claimed to hold of the Lord of Hunsdon as 
of his Honor of Rayleigh.' 

Arms of SKIPPON : Gu. 5 annulets Or, 2, 2, & i. 

MANOR OF VESEY'S OR BONHALL PAYSES. 

This, too, probably formed part of the estate of Robert in Saxon 
days, and of Suane of Essex in the time of the Conqueror. 

In 1377 * ne manor was vested in Sir Simon de Burley, who had a 
grant of free warren this year in the manor. 3 

In 1379 he levied a fine of the manor against Robert Crull, clerk, 
William Reade, clerk, and John Chaumberleyn, chaplain. 4 

In 1382 we find the manor vested in Michael de la Pole, who had 
a grant for a market here in 1384,* and had a charter to hold a court leet. 
He died an outlaw in Paris in 1389,' and on the Patent Rolls for this 
year we find a commission to enquire touching the value and profits of 
the Manors of Benhale and Veyses in Stratford St. Mary, and a mill there, 
late of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, all forfeited. 7 In 1397 Michael's 
son and heir, Sir Michael de la Pole, obtained the annulment of the judgment 
against his father, and upon the accession of Hen. IV. was fully restored 
to his estates and also to the Earldom ot Suffolk. In 1406 he, with Michael 
his son, levied a fine against Sir John Cornwalle and Elizabeth his wife, 
of this manor. 8 He died I4th Sept. 1415, at the siege of Harfleur, 9 when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Michael de la Pole, 3rd Earl of Suffolk, 
who lost his life a few months after his accession to his father's honours 
and estates at the Battle of Agincourt, the 25th Oct. 1415, leaving three 
daughters only, and the manor passed to his brother, William de la Pole, 
4th Earl of Suffolk, 10 K.G., created Duke of Suffolk 2nd June, 1448, and lost 
his life 2nd May, 1450." 

He had, however, settled the manor in 1430 on his marriage with 
Alice, Countess of Salisbury, daughter ot Thomas Chaucer. We find 
an indenture dated I2th Oct. 9 Hen. VI. amongst the Harleian Charters, 
by which William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, Robert Boltone, clerk, Robert 
Bolton, and others make estate to Sir John Shardelow, Knt., Thomas Hoo, 
John Roys, and others of all the castles, manors, lands, &c., late belonging 
to the father and grandfather of the said Earl, including this Manor of 
Veysey's, to the intent that on the requirement of Thomas Chaucer, after 
the espousal of the said Earl and Alice, the said Earl and Countess may 
be enfeoffed in the same on specified conditions. ia 

We find the manor in 1450 in John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk. 
In 1601 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Francis Choppin against 
John Ungle and others.' 3 



'Add. Ch. 26876, 26891. 7 Pat. Rolls, 12 Rich. II. pt. i. 

'Duchy of Lancaster Cal. to Pleadings, "Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. IV. 19. 

44 Eliz. 6. "I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 486. 

3 Chart. Rolls, I Rich. II. 5. '"See Manor of Wattisfield, in Blackbourn 

4 Feet of Fines, 3 Rich. II. 13. Hundred. 
'Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 10. " I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 
See Manor of Hurts, in Saxmundham, in "Harl. 54 I. 9. 

Plomesgate Hundred; I. P.M., 12 '3 Fine, Hil. 44 Eliz. 
Rich. II. 179. 



STRATFORD ST. MARY. 97 

In 1609 the manor was vested in the Crown. In 1855 the manor 
was vested in Sir J. R. Rowley, from which time it has descended in the 
same course as the Manor of Nayland, in Babergh Hundred, arid is now 
vested in Sir Joshua Thellusson Rowley, Bart., of Tendring Hall. 

MANOR OF OVERHALL. 

This was the lordship of Sir Richard Walton, Knt., who died seised 
of it in 1409,'' when it passed to his sister and heir, Joan, ist wife of Sir 
Thomas Erpingham, Knt., and widow of John Howard. 

She died seised in 1424,' when the manor passed to her daughter and 
heir, Elizabeth Howard. 

MANOR OF SPANBIES. 

This manor was vested in the Sulyards in the 15 th century. We 
first meet with it as the subject of a fine levied in 1482 by John Sulyard 
and William Pykenham against Alice, who was wife of Thomas Stampe, 
and the fine included lands in Stratford-juxta-Bergholt, Holton, Capel, 
Higham, and Bergholt. 3 The manor was vested in 1574 in Sir John 
Sulyard, Knt., for this year he died seised thereof, from which time to 
the present it has apparently devolved in the same course of descent as 
the main manor, at least to the time of Sir Philip Skippon in 1691, and 
passed later to William Deane and his son the Rev. William Deane, and 
is now vested in Major Clare Charles Anthony Deane, as is that manor. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find a claim by William 
Hubbard and Margaret his wife against Edward Sulyard and Thomas 
Hall to be admitted to lands in this manor held of the Manor of Stratford, 
of which defendant Sulyard was lord, and claimed by the plaintiff Margaret 
as sister and heir of Henry Arnold, deceased. 4 

The manor is now known as the Manor of Spanbies-Sulyard. 



'I. P.M., 10 Hen. IV. 36. 3 Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. IV. 17. 

'I.P.M., 3 Hen. VI. 19. <C.P. i. 412. 

N 




98 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

STUTTON. 

N Saxon times there were five manors in this place, two 
under the head Stutton and two under the head Alsildeston, 
in the Survey. The first was that of Edwin, a freeman, 
and consisted of 60 acres, half a ploughteam, 3 bprdars, 
and an acre of meadow, included in the valuation of 
Brant hram (?). At the time of the Survey it was 
held by Earl Alan.' 
The second manor was held by Scalpi, Harold's thane, and consisted 
of 2 carucates of land, 8 villeins, 4 bordars, 6 serfs, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 2 belonging to the men ; also 5 acres of meadow, wood for 
the maintenance of 16 hogs, a mill, 2 salt pans, and half a church with 
15 acres. Of live stock there were 2 rouncics, 16 beasts, 40 hogs, and 
190 sheep, worth 6. The soc was held by Scalpi under Harold. At 
the time of the Survey this manor was held by William de Aln of Robert 
Grenon, and there were 5 villeins, 5 bordars, 3 serfs, i ploughteam in demesne, 
the rouncies had disappeared, there were only 2 beasts, 14 hogs, and 35 
sheep, the value being 6os. It was 6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and 
paid in a gelt ^d* 

The third manor was held by Eatnod, a freeman in commendation, 
and consisted of 60 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to half at the time of 
the Survey), and an acre of meadow, worth formerly ios., at the time 
of the Survey only 8s., when it was held by Robert Grenon. 3 

The first of the two manors under the head Alsildestuma was held in 
Saxon times by Alnold, a freeman, and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 
a bordar (increased to 5 at the time of the Survey), and 2 ploughteams 
in demesne, reduced to i at the time of the Survey. Also i acres of 
meadow, and a mill, the value of the whole being 255. It was 6 quarentenes 
long and 3 broad, and paid 2.\d. in a gelt. The Domesday tenant was 
the Bishop of Bayeux. 4 

The other manor was held in Saxon times by Alwin, a freeman in 
commendation to Aluric, the predecessor of Robert Grenon, and consisted 
of 30 acres of land and half a ploughteam, worth 45. The soc belonged to 
Harold. At the time of the Survey William de Aln held this of Robert 
Grenon. 5 

MANOR OF STUTTON HALL. 

In the time of William the Conqueror Robert Greno or Grenon had 
three manors in Stutton, one of which was Alsildeston or Alton Hall, and 
the other two uncertain. This manor was in 1265 granted by Reginald 
de Paveley and Orfianisa his wife by fine to Nicholas de Bassyng and 
Agnes his wife. 

In 1275 Roger Paveley claimed free warren here, but in 1311 the 
manor passed from the Paveley family to the Visdelieu under a fine levied 
this year by William Visdelieu and Rose his wife against Reynold, son 
of Walter de Paveley and Alice his wife. 6 

In 1313 this William Visdelieu had a grant of free warren. 7 From 
William the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Visdelieu, Knt., 

'Dom. ii. 5 Dom. ii. 420. 

2 Dom. ii. 4196. Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. II. 41. 

3 Dom. ii. 420. 'Chart. Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 49. 

4 Dom. ii. 378. 



STUTTON. 99 

who in 1344, with Katherine his wife, levied a fine of this manor and of 
Shotley Manor and of the advowson against Robert de Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk, and Sir Peter de Ty.' From Sir Thomas the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Thomas de Visdelieu. 

This Sir Thomas died in 1375, when the manor passed to his daughters, 
as stated in the account of the Manor of Shotley Hall, in this Hundred. 
In 1404 a fine was levied of a 3rd part of the manor, and the advowson 
by Nicholas Andre we, parson of the church of Stutton, and Jacob 
Andrewe, against Thomas Mosyll and Margery his wife. 2 

Subsequently the manor vested in William Curson, of Brightwell, 
who died in 1476,' when it passed to his daughter and heir, Margaret, 
married to Sir Thomas Tey, Knt., whose daughter and coheir, Margaret, 
married Sir John Jermy, 4 K.B., and carried the manor into that family. 

In 1527 a fine was levied of the manor by Sir Anthony Hopton against 
Sir Thomas Tey and others, 5 and in 1528 by John Jermy and others against 
the said Sir Thomas Tey and others (except of the advowson). 6 In 1542 
we meet with another fine levied of the manor, and including also the 
Manors of Brightwell and Rivershall, by Thomas Bawdy against the 
said Sir John Jermy and Margaret his wife. 7 

Sir John Jermy died in 1560, and the manor passed to his 2nd son, 
John Jermy, who married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Edward 
Isacke, of Well Court, in Kent, and dying in 1592, the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Isaac Jermy, of Stutton, Knt., who married Jane, 
daughter of John Palgrave, of Barkingham, in Norfolk, by Frith, daughter 
of William Saunders, of Ewell, co. Surrey. She died 7th Jan. 1623, aged 
58. On Sir Isaac's death the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Jermy. He married Mary, daughter and heir of Sir William Rowe, Knt. 
The inscription on his monument in Holbrook church states that " he 
lived religiously and spent his time laboriously in writing many Divine 
and learned manuscripts for his own comfort and for the benefit of those 
that should succeed him." He died at the age of 61 in 1662. Besides 
his " Divine and learned manuscripts," John Jermy seems to have indulged 
in poetry, for he is said to have written the following verses in memory 
of his wife a little before his death : 

Martha's cheek for neglect of Christ's pure word 

Mary for her love too's on Record 

This my dear Mary had no less regard 

Unto the Sacred words of God's Herauld 

Another Anna I may truly say, 

For her fastings and prayers night and day 

Simeon like the longer that she liv'd 

The sweeter breath and more spiritualiz'd 

Not spider like figuring Vanity 

But like the silkworm seeking verity 

This pious matron stood upon her guard 

Resisting him who else would her have marr'd. 

On the poet's death the manor passed to his son and heir, William 
Jermy, of Stutton. He married ist Mary, daughter of Philip Bedingfield, 

'Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. III. 18. 'Fine, Hil. 19 Hen. VIII. 

2 Feet of Fines, 5 Hen. IV. 8. 6 Fine, Mich. 20 Hen. VIII. 

3 I.P.M., 16 Edw. IV. 10. 7 Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. 
4 See Manor of Metfield, in Hoxne Hundred. 



ioo THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Ditchingham, in Norfolk, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Sir John 
Boys, Knt., of Bonington, in Kent, and died 5th Oct. 1669, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir by his 2nd wife, John Jermy, on whose 
death in 1662, the manor passed to his son and heir, William Jermy, of 
Stutton, who died in 1669, when it went to his son and heir, John Jermy. 

We next find the manor vested in John Haynes, who died in 1713, 
when it passed to his brother and heir, Hezekiah Haynes. Page says 
the manor was afterwards the property of the Mays, and was sold by 
Thomas May to Lionel Tollemache, 2nd Earl of Dysart, who died in 1770, 
from which time the manor has passed in the same course of descent as 
the Manor of Helmingham Hall, Helmingham, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred. 

In 1844, however, the manor belonged to J. Tollemache, and it now 
belongs to James Oliver Fison, J.P., who resides at Stutton Hall. He 
is the eldest surviving son of Joseph Fison, of Stoke, near Ipswich, who 
died in 1878, by Anne, 2nd daughter of William Ridley, of Hartford End, 
Essex, and in 1889 married Lucy Maud, 3rd daughter of the Rev. F. Gifford 
Nash, vicar of Clavering, Essex. 

Stutton Hall is a mansion in the Elizabethan style, thoroughly 
renovated in 1892. It is remarkable for its ornamental brick chimneys 
and gateway. We meet with a description of it about ioo years ago as 
follows : " The house was formerly the residence of the family of Jermy, 
and still retains some remains of its original consequence. On the north side 
is a garden walled in, and opposite to the centre of the House a small 
gateway for foot passengers only, built of red brick somewhat in the style 
of the gateway at Erwarton. It is very evidently of nearly the same 
date and has similar chimney-like turrets at the angles, at the corners 
also of the walled court, and in other parts of the hall are other similar 
turrets. The old windows of the house still remain and are very curiously 
wrought, no two of them alike. The south part, except the chimneys, 
has little marks of antiquity, but the first room you enter shows its date 
and origin. It was probably the old hall or part of it, and is now used 
by the family as their sitting room. The remains, however, most worthy 
of notice, are in a room above stairs over the hall. This is wainscoated 
with chesnut or walnut tree, and ornamented with numerous and curious 
carvings. In different parts of it are Corinthian pilasters at the base of 
which are emblematic figures carved into the sculptures over them in 
some, though I could not find out that they were in all, allusive to the 
carvings. The house stands on a rising ground looking over a handsome 
grove upon the Manningtree river. This grove extends down to the 
water's edge and contains some very fine ash and other trees. I measured 
one at about 4 feet from the ground and found it nearly 10 feet in circum- 
ference. Nothing can be more desirable than the situation of this estate, 
which must in its perfect state have been a most delightful residence." 
There was formerly a Court Roll of this manor 18 Hen. VI. in the Chapter 
House, and it is probably now in the Public Record Office. 

Arms of HAYNES : Arg. 3 crescents barry undee, Az. and Gu. 

CREPING HALL MANOR. 

This manor seems to have been the property of William de Creppinge 
in 1275, and he claimed here view of frankpledge and assize of bread and 



STUTTON. 



101 



beer. 1 He died in 1286, when Saier de Creppinge seems to have held it 
of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and after this Walter de 
Creppinge. Somewhat later Elizabeth Wolferston, widow of Rater, had 
the manor, for by her will in 1417 she eventually gave it to Beatrice, her 
daughter. 

Beatrice married Thomas Fulthorp, who was seised in right of his wife 
in 1428. A fine in 1.434 was levied of this manor by Richard Dagworth, 
parson of Tattingstone church, against Thomas Fulthorp and Beatrice 
his wife and others, 2 and two years later we meet with another fine levied 
of the manor by the said Thomas Fulthorp and Beatrice his wife and 
Richard Dagworth, parson of the parish church of Tattingstone, against 
Margaret Warde, daughter of Thomas Mannyng, 3 and in 1449 a fine was 
levied of the manor by Sir Thomas Fulthorp, Sir Alexander Nevyll, William 
Hardyng, Nicholas Blakeston, and John Peghan, against Thomas Laurens 
and Katharine his wife. 4 

John de Vere, i3th Earl of Oxford, was cousin and heir of Walter 
de Creppinge, and in 1437 had a grant of free warren here. Davy seems 
to think he was lord. 

The manor then seems to have vested in the priory of Earl's Colne, 
in Essex, and on its suppression passed to the Crown, by whom in 1537 
it was granted to Sir Humphrey Wingfield, Knt., in tail male. 5 

Humphrey Wingfield died 23rd Oct. 1545," when the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Brantham Hall, in this Hundred, to 
the time of John Wingfield, who succeeded his father Humphrey in 1612. 
The manor is specifically included in a fine levied between Thomas Seckford 
and Robert Wingfield in I562. 7 This was evidently an assurance made 
on some settlement or charge, for in 1577 Thomas Seckford had licence to 
alienate the manor and release it to Humphrey Wingfield, and the manor 
passed under a fine levied this year between the said Humphrey Wingfield 
and Thomas Seckford. 8 A claim was made by the Crown in 1578 on 
Humphrey Wingfield for forfeiture of this manor. 9 

The manor was next vested in George May, son of Nathaniel May, of 
Stutton, and Elizabeth his wife. George May married Qth May, 1734, 
Mary Chenery, of Ipswich, who died 23rd Nov. 1761. George died gth 
Feb. 1764, at the age of 59, when the manor passed to his daughter 
Mary, married to Gill Badeley, of Bath. Badeley died 26th Nov. 1815, 
and his widow survived and held the manor until 3Oth Aug. 1821, when 
the manor devolved upon her unmarried daughter and coheir, Sophia 
Badeley, who died a spinster in 1839. 

The hall is now the property of William Isaac Graham, who resides 
here. It stands on sloping ground, looking upon the river, and is in a 
fine position. It is a modern red-brick mansion of small dimensions. 

In Davy's time this manor was said to have become extinct. The 
tenants all claimed to be free, and, as he says, there are no court books, 
but he adds : ' Within the memory of some now or lately living there 
were regular courts held and admissions taken." 



'Q.W. 723. 

2 Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. i. 

3 14 Hen. VI. 27. 

4 Feet of Fines, 27 Hen. VI. 27. 

5 S.P. 1537, ii. 191 (53). 



I.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 74. 
7 Fine, Easter, 4 Eli/. 
"Fine, Trin. 19 Eliz. 
9 M. Hil. Rec. Rot. 17. 



102 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF ARGENTS. 

In the middle of the I3th century this manor was vested in William 
Honton, and passed in 1286 to William Argent, of Argents, and in 1295 
another William Argent held. In 1344 we find on the Patent Rolls a 
pardon to John Argent, of Stutton, for the death of John and Roger, his 
sons, in a pang of madness. 1 

In 1342 John and Joan Riis or Rees, of Argent, seem to have held, 
and in 1380 William Riis or Rees conveyed to John Thormod. 

In 1414 William Sampson conveyed the manor to Robert Pike, jun., 
and William Butts. In 1537 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by 
John Richer and others against William Gerard and others, 2 and in 1616 
the manor was conveyed to Henry Butts. 

Subsequently John Littel seems to have held, and after him Thomas 
Littel, D.D., Prebendary of Norwich, who died in 1731, when the manor passed 
to his daughter Mary. The manor, on her death, vested in Elliston 
Barrington, of Chelmsford, husband of Mary's aunt, and passed to his 
daughter and heir Mary, married to Giles Mills, of London, on whose 
death in 1746, it passed to his son and heir, William Mills, 3 and on his 
death in 1790 to his son and heir, Thomas Mills, of Saxham, on whose 
death in 1834 it passed to his son and heir, William Mills. 

The manorial rights have long been lost, and it is now merely a farm 
consisting of about 185 acres, and the name of Argents is not known upon 
the spot, all traces of the manor and its possessors having disappeared. 

Arms of LITTEL : Sable a column between 2 wings emanating from 
the base of the column and surmounted by a clerical coronet, Or. 

MANOR OF CROWE HALL. 

Giles de Playz died seised of a manor of Stutton in 1303, and it was 
not unlikely this lordship. 4 The manor subsequently belonged to Sir 
John de Coggleshall, Knt., who died seised of it in 1362, 5 when it passed 
to his son and heir, Henry de Coggleshall, afterwards Sir Henry. Later 
the manor vested in Sir Thomas Smith, Knt., whose only daughter and 
heir, Elizabeth, married Thomas Harlakendon Bowers, on whose death it 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bowers, who died in 1747-8. 

The manor was in 1821 purchased by George Reade, who repaired 
the mansion-house of Crowe Hall, and added a drawing-room finished 
in the style of Henry VII. 's chapel in Westminster. The hall, which is in 
the Tudor style, is said to have been erected by one of the Latimers in 1605. 
It overlooks the Stour and commands a view of Harwich Harbour and 
the ocean. George Reade married Eliza, daughter of George Routledge, 
of Windlestonet, co. Durham, and died in 1825, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, John Page Reade, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff, in 1865. 
He married ist, Qth April, 1829, Helen, daughter of Sir John Colquhoun, 
3rd Bart., of Colquhoun and Luss, and dying 28th Sept. 1880, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, James Colquhoun Revell Reade, of the Middle 
Temple, barrister-at-law, who married, 4th Feb. 1891, Florence Sophia, 
eldest daughter of M. Hardy Voss, of De Montford House, Surrey. 

Arms of READE : Arg. a saltire Vair between 4 Cornish choughs ppr. 

'Pat. Rolls, 17 Edw. III. pt. i. 31. 4 I.P.M., 31 Edw. I. 37. 

'Fine, Mich. 29 Hen. VIII. 'I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 54. 

See Manor of Great Saxham, in Thingoe 

Hundred, for marriages and other 

particulars of the Mills family. 



STUTTON. 103 

ALTON HALL MANOR. 

In the time of William the Conqueror this was one of the manors 
of Robert Grenon, from whom the families of Cavendish and Montfitchet 
descend. 

In 1275 Thomas de Freston held lands here. In 1319 John de Freston 1 
had a grant of free warren here. 2 All the information we meet with sub- 
sequently for some time is of four fines levied of this manor in 1565, 1583, 
1596, and 1598. The first was by Richard Martin and others against 
William Waldegrave ; 3 the second was by John Gurdon and others against 
Nicholas Gislingham and others ; 4 the third was levied by Edward Newporte 
against Richard Johnson and others; 5 and the fourth by the said Edward 
Newporte against Christopher Bedyngfeld and others. 6 

Later the manor was in James Sewell, who was High Sheriff of Suffolk, 
and died in 1805, when it passed to his daughter and coheir, Elizabeth, 
who had married William Deane 6th May, 1794. She died i6th May, 
1840, and he 3rd Feb. 1844, aged 81, when the manor was sold. 

The hall is now the property of Roger Kerrison, of Tattingstone Place, 
and is now occupied by William Clarke, a farmer. 

Alton Hall stands in a pleasant acclivity about a mile north of the 
Stour, near the Holbrook rivulet, upon which are two corn mills. It 
belonged about 1650 to Robert Sparrow, and was sold by his trustees to 
Joseph Beaumont, D.D., Master of Peterhouse, the author of " Psyche," 
who by his will dated 2ist Nov. 1699, devised the same to his grandson, 
Joseph Beaumont. 

THE MANOR OF THE RECTORY OF STUTTON. 

There is also a rectory manor here. In the time of Edw. I. Henry, 
son of Nicholas, rector of Stutton church, claimed wreck of the sea, view 
of frankpledge, and assize of bread and beer in Stutton. 7 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find an action by John Jermy 
to establish his right as patron, and by John Dawes his rights as parson 
of the rectory of Stutton, to which rectory pertained a manor called the 
Manor of the Rectory of Stutton. 8 

A manor of Stutton called " Quarhams," is mentioned amongst the 
Early Chancery Proceedings. The action in which it is involved is by 
Alice Sampson, niece of Richard Doget, against Roger Rokewode the 
younger, feoffee to the uses of the will of the said Richard, and is as to 
this manor said to have been sold by Jane, executrix and late the wife 
of the said Richard Doget to the said Alice Sampson. 9 



'See Freston Manor, in this Hundred. 5 Fine, Hil. 38 Eliz. 

'Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. II. 23. 6 Fine, Trin. 40 Eliz. 

3 Fine, Hil. 7 Eliz. but doubtful of this 7 Q-W. 724, 732. 

manor. &C.P. ii. 108. 

4 Fine, Hil. 25 Eliz. sE.C.P. Bundle 41, 16. 




104 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

TATTINGSTONE. 

HERE were three manors here in Saxon times. The first 
was held by Turgot, a freeman, and consisted of 60 acres. 
a ploughteam, and ij acres of meadow, worth los. At 
the time of the Survey it was held by Roger Bigot of the 
Bishop of Bayeux, and was worth only 45., all the soc 
being in Bcrgholt. 1 

Trumuin and Ulsi, freemen, held by commendation 
1 20 acres as two manors in the Confessor's time. There were also a 
bordar, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 
2 acres of meadow, worth ios., reduced to 8s. when the Survey was taken, 
and it was held by Robert Grenon. 2 

The last manor mentioned was that of Aluric, a freeman in commenda- 
tion, and consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, half a ploughteam (at the time 
of the Survey 2 of oxen), and an acre of meadow, worth 40^., increased 
to 42<f. at the time of the Survey, when the tenant in chief was Robert 
Grenon. 3 

MANOR OF TATTINGSTONE. 

This was the lordship of the Bishop of Bayeux at the time of the 
Norman Survey, and later passed to William de Holbroke. In 1253 it 
was vested in Richard de Holbroke, son of William, who had a grant of 
free warren here this year, 4 and again in 1267.' 

In 1277 there is on the Patent Rolls a quit claim to this Richard de 
Holbroke from the Crown of the advowson of the church of Tattingstone, 
in return for his courtesy (curialitati) in assenting at the King's instance 
to the presentation thereto of Thomas Meron, clerk, the contention between 
the King and the said Richard touching the said advowson having been 
lately moved in the King's Court by writ. 6 

From this time to the time of Elizabeth Wolverton, daughter and 
heir of Ralph Fitz-Ralph and Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir of 
Sir John de Holbroke, in 1419, the devolution of the manor is the same 
as the Manor of Holbrook, in this Hundred. 

In 1286 a Richard de Holbroke had a grant of free warren here. 7 

In 1309 the manor is specifically mentioned and an extent given in 
the inquis. p.m. of Alicia, wife of John de Holbroke,' and two years later 
in that of the said John de Holbroke. 9 

From the Patent Rolls in 1327 we learn that John de Holbrook made 
complaints that Benedict de Braham and others assaulted him at Tatting- 
stone, bound him to a tree, and cut off his right hand." The manor is 
included in the fine levied in 1336 and mentioned under the account of 
Holbrook Manor, and is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Holbroke 

in I37 6 -" 

The manor in 1433 seems to have vested in Thomas Fulthorp and 
Beatrice his wife, for we meet with a fine of it this year levied by Elizabeth 
Tendryng and William Frevyll and Anna his wife against them, 12 and the 

'Dom. ii. 378. 'Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. I. 27. 

'Dom. ii. 420. M.P.M., 3 Edw. II. 51 

3 Dom. ii. 420. 'I.P.M., 10 Edw. II. 77. 
'Chart. Rolls, 37 and 38 Hen. III. pt. i. '"Pat. Rolls, i Edw. III. pt. i. 

14,70. "I.P.M., 50 Edw. III.3I. 

'Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. 5. Feet of Fines, n Hen. VI. 27. 

The King, Windsor, 1st June, Pat. Rolls, 

5 Edw. I. m. ii. (25). 



TATTINGSTONE. 105 

following year there is a fine not only of this manor, but of the Manor of 
Creping, in Stutton, levied by Richard Dagworth, parson of Tattingstone 
church, against the said Thomas Fulthorp and Beatrice his wife, Thomas 
Salisbury, Alexander Anne, John Horsley, Robert Thorneff. It relates 
to lands in Tattingstone, Holbrook, Braham, East Bergholt, Reydon, 
Wenham, Capel, Chelmington, Thurston, Heigham, and Sutton, and the 
advowson of Tattingstone church and the free chapel of Holbrook. 1 

Ten years later we meet with another fine of this manor, levied by 
John Christofer, Thomas Fulthorp and Beatrice his wife, and Thomas 
Dale and Joan his wife/ The manor then vested in John de Vere, Earl 
of Oxford, who was attainted in 1461, 3 when it passed to the Crown, and 
was granted by King Edw. IV. to his brother Richard, Duke of York. 
In 1477 the manor was granted to Gilbert Debenham, and the heirs of 
his body. The grant, which is on the Patent Rolls, includes lands in 
Tattingstone, Brantham, Bergholt, Holbrook, " Wolverton," Freston, and 
elsewhere in the Hundred of Samford, with all members and advowsons 
of church of Tattingstone and free chapel of St. Margaret, Holbrook, 
knights' fees, &c., described as late of Earl of Oxford, and in the King's 
hands by forfeiture to hold by the services of as many knights' fees and 
other rents and services as they were held by before the i Edw. IV. 4 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings is a suit by Gilbert Nycoll, 
of Ipswich, against Roger Stainer and John Goss, bailiffs, of Ipswich, 
touching an action of trespass brought by Gilbert Debenham, Esquire, 
against complainant for levying a distress in Tattingstone Manor, the 
right to which manor was said to be in dispute between Debenham and 
Sir Thomas Wyngfeld, Knt. 5 

Gilbert Debenham 6 died in 1481, 7 when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Gilbert Debenham, who was attainted in 1487. The 
Manor was, however, restored to his cousin, Robert Brewse, son of his 
father's sister 8 Elizabeth, in 1507, she having married Sir Thomas Brewes, 
Knt., of Whittingham Hall, in Fressingfield and Wenham, in this Hundred. 
Both Sir Thomas Brewes and his wife, Elizabeth Debenham, are buried 
in Woodbridge Priory. 

We next find the manor vested in the De Veres, Earls of Oxford, 
and in 1548 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Edward, Duke of 
Somerset, and others, against John, Earl of Oxford. 9 This fine includes 
the manor of Earl's Hall, in Cockfield, Lavenham, and other manors. 
John de Vere, i6th Earl of Oxford, held the manor at the time of his death 
in 1582, when it passed to Edward de Vere, I7th Earl of Oxford, who 
alienated it by fine in 1581 to Jerome Spring and Edward Spring, 10 and 
in 1582 Jerome Spring and others alienated to Clipsby Gawdy and Sir 
Thomas Gawdy, Knt. 

Sir Thomas Gawdy died seised ist Nov. 1588," leaving Henry Gawdy 
his son and heir, who in 1595 alienated to William Bland by fine. 12 William 

' Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. i. 'I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 48. 

2 Feet of Fines, 22 Hen. VI. 7. 8 One MS. pedigree says Elizabeth was 

3 See inquis. p.m. of John, Earl of Oxford, daughter of the attainted Sir Gilbert 

15 Edw. IV. 28. Debenham. 

4 Pat. Rolls, 16 Edw. IV. pt. i. 18 ; O. 'Fine, Easter, 2 Edw. VI. 

Rot. 21. IO Fine, Mich. 23-24 Eliz. 

5 Certiorari E.C.P. Bundle 47, 278. " I. P.M., Qth Aug., 31 Eliz. 

6 See Manor of Vaux, in Little Wenham, in "Fine, Mich. 37 and 38 Eliz. 

this Hundred. 



106 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Bland in 1621 alienated to Matthew Brownrigg, portman, of Ipswich, 
on whose death the manor passed to his son, Robert Brownrigg, on whose 
death in 1626 it passed to his only daughter and heir, Elizabeth Brownrigg. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1638-9 is a petition of this Elizabeth 
Brownrigg by her guardians to suffer a recovery of the manor.' 

A fine was accordingly levied by Elizabeth, gth July, 1641." The 
fine included the advowson also. 

Elizabeth Brownrigg married Joseph Beaumont, D.D., Master of 
Peterhouse, Cambridge (son of John Beaumont, of Hadleigh, and Sarah, 
sister and devisee of Edward Clarke, of East Bergholt, High Sheriff of 
Suffolk), who in her right was lord in 1657. He died in 1699, when the 
manor passed to his son, Charles Beaumont, D.D., who made his will 
2gth April, 1725,* and died in 1726. 

Charles Beaumont was not, however, the eldest son and heir of Joseph 
Beaumont, and Joseph, in his will dated 2ist Nov. 1699,* expressly says : 
" I leave to my eldest sonne John Beaumont and his heirs the Manor of 
Tattingston in Suffolke, with the perpetuall Patronage of the Rectory." 

The manor was then purchased by Thomas White, who rebuilt the 
mansion house and erected near it an ornamental building in the form 
of a church, commonly called " Tattingstone Wonder." He married 
Olive, 3rd daughter of Maximillian Western, of Abington Hall, Cambridge, 
and died in 1742, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
White, who died 4th Sept. 1808, leaving the manor by his will to Thomas 
Western, 2nd son of Thomas Western, of Great Abington, co. Cambridge, 
by Jane, his wife, daughter of Felix Culvert, of Albury Hall, co. Herts, 
M.P. for Wendover. Thomas Western was Rear-Admiral and Knight 
Commander of the Royal Portuguese Military Order of the Tower and 
Sword. He married in 1794 Mary, daughter of Thomas Burch, of Bermuda, 
in the West Indies, and died 26th Dec. 1814, aged 52, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Burch Western, who was created a 
baronet 2oth Aug. 1864. He was Lord Lieutenant and Gustos Rotulorum 
of Essex, and of Felix Hall and Rivenhall Place, Essex. He was M.P. 
for North Essex in 1865, and married in 1819 Margaret Letitia, 4th daughter 
of William Bushby, of Kirkmichael and Lamphits, co. Dumfries, and 
dying 3Oth May, 1873, the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas 
Sutton Western, 2nd Bart., Colonel of E. Essex Rifles, and M.P. for Maiden, 
who married in 1848 Giulietta Romana, eldest daughter of Sir Edward 
Manningham Buller, Bart., M.P., of Dilhorne Hall, Staffs., and dying 
gth June, 1877, in his 56th year, the manor passed to his only son, Sir 
Thomas Charles Callis Western, Bart., of Felix Hall, Essex. He married 
Elizabeth Ellen, daughter of I. Newton, and was lord in 1885, but must 
have disposed of this manor shortly afterwards, for in 1896 we find it 
vested in Roger Kerrison, who then resided at Tattingstone Place, which 
stands in a well-wooded park containing a large lake and extensive 
fishponds. 

A plan of the parish 5 will be found amongst the Additional MSS. 
in the British Museum.' 

1 S.P. 1638-9, pp. 337, 379. Proved 23rd Dec. 1699. 

'Fine, 17 Chas. I. pt. ii. 17. 5 i8th century. 

Proved 2oth March, 1726. 'Add. Ch. 21057. 



TATTINGSTONE. 107 

A fine of the Manor of " Tattingstone " was in 1301 levied by Peter 
de Tatyngston against William de Beckles,' and there is an authority 
in 1313 for a William de Rungeton to retain " the Manor of Tattingstone " 
said to have been " acquired from William de Bovill.'" 

Arms of WHITE : Gu. a chevron betw. three boars' heads erased Arg. 
Of BROWNRIGG : Argent, a lion rampant, Sable, gutty Or, langued and 
armed Gules, between 3 crescents of the same. Of BEAUMONT : Azure, 
semee of fleurs-de-lis, a lion rampant Or. 



1 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 33. 2 1.Q.D. 7 Edw. II. File 94, 24. 




io8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WASHBROOKE. (See GREAT BELSTEAD.) 
WEN HAM MAGNA. 

HERE were five manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by Ansgot by commendation to the fair 
Edith, and consisted of a carucate of land, 3 villeins, 3 
bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging 
to the men ; also 4 acres of meadow, part of a church, 
8 beasts, 35 hogs, and 71 sheep, worth altogether 6os., 
which had decreased by the time of the Survey to 405. 
The soc belonged to Edith, and at the time of the Survey this manor was 
held by Ermiot of Earl Alan. It was 6 quarentenes long and 3 broad, 
and paid in a gelt 4<2.' 

Earl Alan owned another small estate here when the Survey was 
taken, formerly held by Ansgot. It consisted of 15 acres and an acre 
of meadow, worth zs. 6d., the soc belonging to Edeva. 2 

The second manor was that of Algar, a freeman, consisting of 24 
acres, worth 45., the soc being in Bergholt j and in the same township 
were four freemen Brictuolt, Osgot, Ledmer, and Godric, with 50 acres 
and 6 bordars, worth ios., the soc also in Bergholt. This manor and 
estate belonged at the time of the Survey to the Bishop of Bayeux. 

The third manor also belonged to the Bishop of Bayeux, held of him 
by Roger Bigot at the time of the Survey, and was formerly held by 
Tuneman, the Confessor's thane, Harold's man by commendation. It 
consisted of a carucate of land, 7 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 serfs [and the fourth 
part of a church] ; also 2 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to 
the men, 6 acres of meadow, wood enough to maintain 8 hogs, and 6 acres 
of church land. Of live stock there were i rouncy, 4 beasts, 24 hogs, 
and 60 sheep, worth 6os. When the Survey was taken some of these 
details had varied ; the villeins were reduced to 2 and the bordars had 
increased to 17, there was i serf, and 2 ploughteams in demesne. Of 
live stock there were 2 rouncies, the beasts had disappeared, there were 
40 hogs and 70 sheep. The manor was 6 quarentenes long and 2^ broad, 
and paid in a gelt 4^. 

The fourth manor was held by Uluric, a freeman. It consisted of 
40 acres and a ploughteam (but had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 
worth 55., and at the time of the Survey 6s. The soc belonged to Harold. 
The manor was held at the time of the Survey of the Bishop of Bayeux 
by Roger Bigot. 3 

The last manor mentioned in this place was that of Auti the thane, 
and consisted of 3 carucates of land, 9 villeins, 4 bordars, a serf, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 5 belonging to the men, n acres of meadow, wood 
enough to support 10 hogs, a mill, a church with 20 acres of free land and 
half a ploughteam ; also 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, and 20 hogs, worth 6. 
Auti had soc over his own demesne, and the soc of the villeins was in 
Bergholt. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Robert, 
son of Corbution, the villeins were reduced to 6, there were 14 bordars, 
half a ploughteam only in demesne, those belonging to the men having 
been reduced to 4 were now 3, the wood for the support of the hogs had 

'Dom. ii. 295. 3 Dom. ii. 3776. 

J Dom. ii. 296. 



WENHAM MAGNA. 109 

disappeared, and the only live stock were 23 sheep, the whole worth loos. 
Girard held of this manor at the time of the Survey 30 acres, worth 5$., 
and they were part of the same assessed rent. 

A holding added to this manor was that of Godwin, a freeman, con- 
sisting of 10 acres, worth 2S., the soc being in Bergholt. It was 12 
quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 2s.' 

WENHAM MAGNA MANOR OR BREND WENHAM. 

Tumenan, a thane of the King under Harold's commendation, held 
the estate in Saxon times, and Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, at the time of the 
Survey". In 1281 the lordship of the parish was held by Petronell de 
Holbroke, but in the same year the manor passed to the priory of Leighs, 
in Essex. We meet with a fine of " Brend Wenham Manor " in 1371 
levied by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale, Philip Deneys, Roger Wolferston, 
William Berard, and John, late parson of Parva Wenham church, against 
Sir William de Cosyngton and Elizabeth his wife. 2 

It vested in the Crown on the dissolution of the religious houses, and 
was granted in 1536 by letters patent of Hen. VIII. to Sir Richard 
Cavendish, Knt., in tail male. 3 He died i2th March, I554, 4 when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, William Cavendish, and on his death 
to his son and heir, William Cavendish, who died without issue, 
when it devolved on his brother and heir, Thomas Cavendish, 5 who 
sold it in 1587 to Henry Seckford and others. In 1591 it was vested in 
Humphrey Seckford and John Wentworth under a grant of the reversion 
from the Queen. And this year a fine was levied of the manor by the 
said Humphrey Seckford against Thomas Caundyshe. 6 

Sir John Wentworth, Knt., had licence to alienate to Thomas Soame 
and Richard Withe. In 1672 the manor was vested in Maurice Shelton, 
and he by indenture 25th May that year conveyed the manor, with others, 
to trustees to the use of himself for life, with remainder to Martha his 
wife by way of jointure, with remainder to trustees for 500 years to raise 
2,500, portion for his daughter Martha in case of failure of issue male by 
him, the ultimate remainder being settled by an indenture dated 2nd April, 
1680. Maurke Shelton's will is dated 3rd Oct. 1680, and was proved 
at Norwich the nth of the following month. 

The manor subsequently passed to Nathaniel Parker, 3rd son of 
Sir Calthorpe Parker, and on his death, 5th Aug. 1684, in his 7ist year, 
devolved upon his nephew, Sir Philip Parker, ist Bart., 7 and on his death 
in 1696 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Philip Parker, 2nd Bart., 
on whose death it went to his son and heir, Sir Philip Parker-a-Morley-Long, 
3rd Bart, and last, who died without male issue 2Oth Jan. 1740-1. In 
the British Museum is a map of Sir P. Parker's estates in Great Wenham 
in 1724." On Sir Philip Parker's death the manor vested in his eldest 
daughter and coheir Martha, married to John, 2nd Viscount Chelworth, 
who died without issue. In 1764 the manor and advowson belonged to the 
heirs of Sir Philip Parker. 

The manor in 1855 and 1885 belonged to T. F. Robinson. 

' Dom. ii. 4256. 6 Fine, Easter, 33 Eliz. 

'Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 41. 7 See Erwarton Manor, in this Hundred. 

3M. Mich. Rec. Rot. 13 ; S.P. 1536, p. 385. 8 Add. MSS. 21057. 

4 I.P.M., 2 Mary, 95. 

5 See Grimston Hall and Stratton Hall, 

Trimley St. Martin, in Colneis 

Hundred. 



[10 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 
BOYTON HALL MANOR. 



This manor is mentioned as in Wenham Combust in the inquis p.m. 
of Joan, wite of John Braham, in 1432,' and also in a fine levied in 1535' 
by William Bygott and others against John Fastolf and others. This 
fine is, however, of but a third part of the manor, and includes lands also 
in Brantham, Boyton, " Hamelett de Catnade," Eastbergholt, Bentley, 
and Lenton (?). 




LITTLE WENHAM HALL. 



1 1.P.M., 10 Hen. VI. 30. 



'Fine, Mich. 27 Hen. VIII. 




WEN HAM PARVA. in 

WENHAM PARVA. 
WENHAM PARVA MANOR. 

HIS was the estate of Auti, the thane, in the days of the 
Confessor, and of Robert, son of Corbution, at the time of the 
Great Survey. Sir John de Vallibus died seised of the 
manor in 1270, then held by him with the advowson in one 
knight's fee, leaving Joan aged 24 and Euphemia aged 20 
his sisters his heirs.' In 1272 Richard de Brewse and 
Alice his wife apparently held, but in 1267 Robert de 
Brewse, of London, was concerned in the manor jointly with Emma his 
wife, who was one of the coheirs of Roger de Holbroke. This could hardly 
be the Roger Holbroke who claimed free warren here in 1276, and sued 
divers persons for hunting in his free warren here. 2 

In 1296 we find a judgment that John, son of William de" Holebrok," 
recover seisin from John, son of Richard de Holebroke, and three others, of 
3 messuages, 2 carucates of land, 15 acres of meadow, 20 acres of wood, and 
loos, rent in Little Wenham, Brend Wenham, Holeton, Bergholt, Stratford, 
Raydon, and Tattingstone ; and John, son of Richard, was mulched in 
40 marks damage. 3 

In 1316 Petronilla de Holbroke held the manor, according to Davy, 
who queries whether she was not a daughter of Sir John de Vaux. If so, 
apparently her 2nd husband was William de Nerford, 4 a Baron in Parlia- 
ment. John de Nerford, son and heir of Petronilla, died seised of the 
manor in 1329, without issue. 

it seems that in 1336 John de Brewse, then parson ot the church of 
Stradbrooke, and William de Brewse, parson of the church of Little Wenham, 
settled the manors of Little Wenham and of Brent Wenham, and the 
advowson of the church of Little Wenham, on William de Holbroke and 
Amicia his wife in tail male, and in default on the heirs of W r illiam de 
Holbroke ; and the object was effected by a fine levied by the said William 
de Holbrok and Amicia his wife against the said John de Brewse, parson of 
the church of Stradebrok, and William, parson of the church of Parva 
Wenham. The fine included the advowson of Parva Wenham church. 5 

In 1432 the manor was vested in Sir Edward Hastings and William 
Pers or Parson, of Otley, for by a deed dated at Westminster ist June, 
10 Hen. VI., they conveyed it to Gilbert Debenham and Margaret his wife, 
daughter of Sir Edward Hastings, of Gressenhall, co. Norfolk, Knt., 6 and 
the assurance was fortified by a fine levied of the manor the following year 
by the said Gilbert Debenham and Margaret his wife against this Sir Edward 
Hastings and William Parson, 7 from which time until the death of William 
Brewse in 1677-8 the manor descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Vaux, in Wenham Parva, except that on the death of Sir John Brewse, 
in Feb. 1584, this manor passed under his will dated ist Aug. 1582, to his 
widow Cecily for life and subject to her interest to his heirs male, and con- 
sequently vested in his eldest son, Thomas Brewse. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Humphrey Brewster, of Wrentham, and died 3rd March, 

'I.P.M., undated, but probably 54 4 See Manor of Wisset, in Blything Hundred 

Hen. III. File 45 (16). 'Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. III. 4. 

1 Abbr. of Pleas, 4 Edw. I. Trin. 2 in dorso. Add. Ch. 25259. 

3 Abbr. of Pleas, 24 and 25 Edw. I. 41. 7 Feet of Fines, n Hen. VI. 28. 



ii2 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1593,' when leaving two daughters only the manor passed to his brother, 
\\ illiam Brewse, and then descended with the Manor of Vaux. The manor 
\\.is, the 27th June, 1843, offered for sale by the executors of F. Josselyn 
deceased, at the Golden Lion, Ipswich. 1 

Little \Venham Hall is a fine specimen of the domestic architecture 
of the I3th century, and its construction exhibits the earliest instance 
known of the use of Flemish bricks in this country. The following is a 
description of the building given by Mr. Vincent Redstone, in a paper 
read before the Suffolk Institute on their visit there in 1901 : - 

" The extensive earthworks of Offton and the circular moats of Denhain 
were never protected by embattlements, and the castellated manor houses 
of Mettingham, Southwold, and Little Wenham never had their defences 
tested as did the Royal and Baronial castles of Bungay, Framlingham, 
Walton, and Orford. A monumental inscription within the church states 
that Sir Thomas de Brewse was lord of the manor, and resided at Wenham, 
in 1500. It is probable that his son Robert, who succeeded him in 1514, 
made those alterations of the building which are of the perpendicular style 
of architecture. The abundant use of Flemish bricks, ' wall tiles,' and 
bricks stamped with the cross crosslet of the Brewses, mark the work of 
still earlier alterations than those alluded to in the legend over the west 
door, ' Cecy fait a 1'aide de Dieu Tan de Grace 1569.' In making an 
inspection of the outer walls, proceeding from the west door northwards 
we pass a narrow lancet window, and the massive buttress on which the 
lines of the old sundial are faintly visible. Upon the buttresses, corner- 
stones, and throughout the castle, three distinct marks are frequently 
repeated one is a Z running from right to left, and from left to right, or in 
combination ; another is a W, with the final stroke converted into the 
figure 6 ; and the third is a triangle, with the right side produced downwards. 
The window of the Sovereign room has its dripstone of the same character 
as those over the church windows. Above may be seen the narrow window 
of the chapel corresponding to the " low window " of the church. The 
flint and stone used in the construction of the walls resembles the seashore 
stone of which Orford Castle is built ; in places the weather has acted upon 
the stone that it is fretted and branched like coral. The banqueting room 
(40 feet in length), with its Tudor recess, wherein the massive gold and silver 
plate used at the feast was washed in sight of the lord, the extensive hearth 
with its charred beam, the windows with deep recesses, used as seats, the 
glazed tiles of the floor, once strewn with reeds and rushes, and its fine oak 
ceiling, attract attention ; but the most charming spot is the chapel, with 
its piscina and sedilia, its vaulted roof and carved figure in the vesica, 
with uplifted hands, in the act of benediction. Wenham is worthy of a 
pilgrimage to see this room alone. An approach is gained to the roof by 
passing through the chapel and ascending a winding staircase. Through 
the loopholes an extensive view may be obtained oi the surrounding country, 
and a close inspection of the curious chimney may be made." 3 A "Cecy 
fait a 1'aide de Dieu 1'an de Grace 1569, R.B " view of the hall is engraved 
in " Davy's Suffolk Antiquities," 1627, an d two views in the " Excursions 
through Suffolk." 

" Little Wenham Hall " and about 15 acres was included in the settle- 
ment made the i8th June, 1660, between Wm. Brewse, son and heir of Sir 

'His will is dated 22nd Feb. 1593-4, and 'Ipswich Journal, 23rd June, 1843. 

was proved i6th March, 1593-4, at 3 Suffolk Institute, vol. xi, pt. i. pp. 73, 74. 
Norwich. 



WENHAM PARVA. 113 

John Brewse, Knt., deceased, and Dorothy his wife, and John Brewse, 
2nd son of the said Sir John Brewse, of the first part ; Christopher Milton, of 
Ipswich, and Edward Sheppard, of Ipswich, of the second part ; Benjamin 
Culler and Robert Sparrow, of Ipswich, of the third part. 

The hall with the Little Wenham estate became separated from the 
manor in 1682. The estate was mortgaged by John Brewse by deed dated 
28th Oct. 1685, to Mary Mason, of Dedham, in Essex, and again by indenture 
dated the iQth and 2oth May, 1687, in which John Brewse is described as 
of Woringford, in Essex, subject, of course, to his mother Dorothy's life 
interest, and then by indenture of the 25th and 27th April, 1691, the said 
John Brewse sold the reversion to John Mason, of Dedham, son of the 
above Mary Mason, who having then remarried, by indentures dated the 
1st and 2nd Jan. 1694-5 transferred her interest to the said John Mason 
under a series of deeds dated the 24th Sept. 1695, 25th and 26th Sept. 1695, 
4th Oct. 1695, and 4th Jan. 1696-7, and a fine levied in Michaelmas term 
1697, under which the Little Wenham estate became vested in Joseph Thurston, 
of Colchester, and the same was included in the settlement made by indentures 
dated the I3th and i4th May, 1698, on his marriage with Mary, eldest 
daughter of Sir Isaac Rebow, of Colchester, Knt., Recorder of that town. 
Joseph Thurston died at Colchester the i6th Oct. and was buried at Little 
Wenham the 22nd Oct. 1714, aged 42, his will being dated the I2th Aug. 
1712.' The estate passed to his son, Joseph Thurston, who dying without 
issue the 22nd Dec. 1732, it went to his brother and heir, Thomas Thurston. 
He sold the estate for 5,500 to Philip Havers by deeds dated the 22nd 
and 23rd Nov. 1765. Philip Havers married Anne Lowe, and made his 
will the I7th June, 1767. " On his death the estate passed to his son and 
heir, Philip Havers, who married Lucy, daughter of John Alefounder, of 
Colchester, and died i7th Jan. 1778, when he was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Philip Havers, of Great Donyland Hall, in Essex, who married Mary 
Anne, eldest daughter of Edward Sage, of Wivenhoe, co. Essex, and died 
the 8th Nov. 1856,' when the estate passed to his son and heir, Philip 
Havers, of Colchester, and of Wenham, who died the I3th Oct. 1874.* 

The estate now belongs with the castle to G. E. Crisp, of Play ford 
Hall, who has recently restored the old hall. 

MANOR OF VAUX, GERMANS OR JERMYN'S. 

This was the estate of Ansgot by commendation to the fair Edith 
in Saxon days, and was part of the possessions of Earl Alan of Brittany 
at the time of the Survey, Ermiot holding it under him. In 1199 Robert 
de Vaux held the lordship, which at his death passed to his son and heir, 
Robert de Vaux, 5 and from him on his death without issue to his brother, 
Oliver de Vaux. In 1211 he paid 500 marks and 5 palfreys for licence 
to marry Petronilla, widow of William de Longchamp and of Henry de 
Morn, and daughter and heir of Guy de Crouri.. Oliver de Vaux was one 
of the barons who made a stand against King John, and was living in 
1245. His son and heir, Robert de Vaux or Vallibus, who seems to have held 
a quarter of a knight's fee here of Margaret de Ripariis,* died without 
issue, being succeeded by his brother and heir, William de Vallibus, who 

'Proved P.C.C. ist Dec. 1714. 4 Will dated isth Sept. 1874, proved 

2 Proved P.C.C. i6th June, 1769. P.C.C. igth May, 1875. 

3 Will dated 6th Nov. 1844, proved P.C.C. 5 See Manor of Barsham, in this Hundred. 

March, 1857. 6 T. de N. 290. 



H4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

married Alianora, daughter of William de Ferrers, Earl of Derby, one 
of the heirs of William Marshall, sometime Earl of Pembroke, having 
married without the King's licence. He obtained a pardon only on 
payment of a fine of 200 marks. He died before 1253 without issue, when 
the manor passed to his brother, Sir John de Vallibus. 

Sir John de Vallibus was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and Steward 
of the Duchy of Aquitaine in 1283, having an allowance of 2,000 per 
annum for his support in the latter office. He died in 1288, leaving two 
daughters and coheirs, Petronilla, wife ist of Holbroke, and 2ndly of 
William de Nerford, and Maud, wife of William de Ros, and there was 

Erobably a partition of the manor. Davy says that in 1330 Margaret, 
ite wife of John de Holbroke, sued Thomas de Holbroke for a moiety 
of the manor as dower. 

Without being able to offer an explanation, the Manor of " Brende 
Wenham " was included in a fine levied in 1336 by William de Holebrok 
and Amicia his wife against John de Breouse, parson of the church of 
Stradebrok, and William, parson of the church of Parva Wenham. 1 It 
is possible, of course, this was merely a fine levied for effecting some settle- 
ment of the property, for the manor certainly seems to have been vested 
in Sir Fulk de Vallibus, and from him to have passed to his son, Robert 
de Vallibus. And on the Close Rolls in 1339 we find a grant by Robert, 
son of Fulk de Vallibus, Knt., and John his son to Lora, daughter of 
William de Denardeston, of Hadleigh, of the manor and its appurtenances 
in the towns of Wenham Combust, Little Wenham, Reydon, Hintlesham, 
Chattisham, Shelley, and Washbrook, 2 and the same year a grant by 
the said Lora to Thomas, son of Sir Benedict de Cokefield, of the same 
premises. 1 

A fine was levied of the manor under the name " Germie Manor in 
Capel " in 1354 by Sir William Germie and Isabella his wife against Geoffrey 
Fausebroun, parson of the church of Mose, and afterwards of Buxhall, 
who resided at Fasbourn Hall (called after him), in the last-named place. 4 

In 1432 the manor was vested in Sir Edward Hastings, Knt., and 
William Pers or Parson, of Ottley, and they this year conveyed it to Sir Gilbert 
Debenham and Margaret his wife, daughter of the said Sir Edward Hastings. 5 
On Gilbert Debenham's death in 1449 the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Gilbert (called by Blomefield Sir Giles), who married Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of Sir Thomas Holebrook, Knt. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings recorded between 1474 and 1480 
is an action between Richard Clerk, of Wenham, and the bailiffs of Ipswich, 
as to imprisonment for a year pending an action of debt brought by this 
Gilbert Debenham and Sir Gilbert Debenham, Knt., his son, for the rent 
of the manor corpus cum causa.' Sir Gilbert Debenham died in 1481, 
when the manor passed to his son, Sir Gilbert Debenham, 5th in succession 
of that name. He married Katherine, daughter of Sir William Plumpton, 
of Plumpton, co. York, and widow of William, Lord Zouche, of Harring- 
worth. She died in 1470, and Sir Gilbert was attainted in I487, 7 and 
died in 1493, or, according to the Davy MSS., 1500,' without issue. It 

1 Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. III. 4. s Add. Ch. 25259 ; Feet of Fines, n Hen. 

'Close Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 19**. VI. 28. 

'Close Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. ii. 23</. 'E.G. P. Bundle 64, 661. 

Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. i. "I. P.M., 8 Hen. VII. 

"Add. MSS. 19126. 



WENHAM PARVA. 115 

seems that in 1486 the King granted the custody oi the manor for 24 years 
to Sir John Audley, Knt., but the last-mentioned Sir Gilbert Debenham's 
nephew and heir, Robert Brewse, son of Sir Gilbert's sister Elizabeth, the 
2nd wife of Sir Thomas Brewse, Knt., son of Sir Robert Brewse, of Topcroft, 
in Norfolk, by Ela his wife, daughter of Sir Miles Stapleton, of Ingham, 
in Norfolk, Knt.,' appears to have succeeded to the lordship notwithstanding 
the King's grant. 

Robert Brewse married Katherine, daughter of Sir John Wingfield, 
of Letheringham, K.B.,and dying 7th Dec. 1513, 2 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Thomas Brewse, of Topcroft Hall, Norfolk, and Wenham 
Parva, who married Jane, daughter of Sir Richard Scroope, of Bentley, 
Knt., and died 6th Nov. 1514. 3 He was buried in Little Wenham church, 
where, on a large marble slab before the altar rail are the effigies of himself 
and wife in brass, standing in the posture of prayer under a double canopy. 
The male figure is in armour, plain cuirass with skirt of five taces, under 
which appears a further defence of chain mail, visible also at the neck, 
armpits, and ankles. Tuiles or plates to protect the thighs depend by 
straps from the taces. Jambes of plate armour cover his legs, and his 
feet are encased in ungainly sabbatons, with spurs attached. The sword 
is suspended on his left side. His shoulders are guarded by pauldrons 
of unequal size, the left being the largest. He is bareheaded, and clean 
shaven of face, his hair worn long. The lady is habited in a close-fitting 
gown cut low at the neck and falling in straight long folds to the feet, 
where it ends in a fur border, collar and deep reflexed cuffs being formed 
of the same material. From her girdle a chain reaches almdst to her 
feet, ending in an ornamental pendant. The headdress is of the prim 
" penthouse " form then prevalent, with long diapered lappets. Her 
three daughters are engraved on a small plate beneath, dressed similarly, 
except that as befitted maidens, their hair is worn unconfined, and their 
girdles and headdresses plain. In the midst of the canopy over her 
head, a small circle contains a female head with flowing hair, that over 
her husband being a bearded man's head. 

The size of brass is 87 by 36 and of effigies 28 by 9. Round the edge 
of the stone ran a fillet bearing this inscription, in Gothic letters, now 
mutilated : 

". . . Brewse Esquyer, sumtyme lord of this maner and patron 
of this churche,and Jane his wyf the whiche Thomas decessed the VI. 
day of Novembre in the yere of our Lord God Mo. Vc. xiij in the 
se . . ." 

In the angles above the canopy and within the border inscription 
are two shields : 

I. Brewse quartering Debenham, impaling Scrope quartering Tibetot. 

2. Brewse impaling Stapleton. 

Below the figures are two more : 

3. Brewse impaling Wingfield quartering Boville. 

4. Brewse impaling Debenham. 4 

On Sir Thomas Brewse's death the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Sir John Brewse, who held his first court for the Manor of " Wenham 

1 For his descent from Sir William Brewse 3 His will is dated 5th Nov. 1514, and was 
t. Henry III. see Hasketon Hall proved 5th Feb. 1514-5; I.P.M., 

Manor, in Carlford Hundred. 7 Hen. VIII. 146. 

* His will is dated gth Feb. 1502-3; I.P.M., 4 East Anglian N. & 6. vol. viii.'p. 220. 
6 Hen. VIII. 40. 



n6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hall cum membris " in 1533, and subsequent courts the 32, 38 (2) of 
Hen. VIII., 24th April and 6th Nov. i Eliz., and 3rd. Nov. 5 Eliz., but 
the Court Rolls do not contain the name of the lord holding these courts. 
Sir John Brewse married ist, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Charles Wil- 
loughby, of Parham, Knt., and 2ndly, Cecily, daughterof John Wilton, of 
Topcroft, co. Norfolk, and died i3th Feb. 1584-5.' He was buried in the 
church of Little Wenham, where there is a square marble panel with an 
inscription to his memory, and in the centre above the pediment over 
the figure is a shield quarterly of six, viz. : First, Arg. crusilly of crosslets 
Gu. a lion rampant double-tailed of the second, crowned Or, Brewse ; second 
Sa. a bend between two crescents, Or, Debenham ; third, Or, a chevron 
between ten crosslets (six and four) Gu. Holbrook ; fourth, Arg. a chevron 
Gu. between three crosslets fitchy Azure, Shardelowe ; fifth, Gu. a cross 
Arg. St. Philibert ; sixth, Az. a chevron between six crosslets, Arg. Latimcr. 
At the sides are two small shields : (i) Brewse impaling quarterly (first 
and fourth) Az. a bend Or, Scrope ; (second and third) Arg. a saltire engrailed 
Gu. Tibetot ; (2) Brewse impaling Wingfield. Two more shields are placed 
beneath the effigy : (3) Brewse impaling Willoughby (Ufford quartering 
Becke) ; (4) Brewse impaling Gu. on a chevron Arg. three crosses patte 
fitch^e (?) of the field, Wilton. On each side of the lower part of the monu- 
ment is the badge, a crosslet Gu, encircled by a ribbon with the motto 
" Come Diev plaist." Between them is inscribed " Vivit post fvnera 
virtys." 3 On Sir John Brewse's death the manor passed under his will 
to his widow Cecily for lite, and subject thereto to his son William. He 
married Mary, daughter of George Brooke, of Aspall, and dying 5th Aug. 
I 599/ the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John Brewse. He was 
an infant at the time of his father's death, and six courts were held by 
Gawdy on his behalf. They were as follows : nth Oct. 1603 ; 22nd 
April, 1606 ; i8th April, 1610 ; 28th April, 1612 ; 7th June, 1613 ; 2Qth 
Aug. 1614. Sir John Brewse held his first court 2O.th July, 1619, and courts 
subsequently 2ist Sept. 1620 ; Sept. 1624 ; 26th April, 1627 ; I4th May, 1630 ; 
2Qth Nov. 1631 ; 2nd April, 1634. ^ n the headings of the Rolls of the 
Courts held as above, Sir John is named as lord. He also held the following 
courts, but is not named in the Rolls as then lord : 25th Oct. 1634 ; igth 
Oct. 1636; 3rd Nov. 1637; I3th June, 1639; I4th June, 1642; nth 
Nov. 1642 ; 3ist Jan. 1642. 

Sir John Brewse married in 1618 Susanna, daughter of Sir John Peyton, 
of Iselham, co. Cambridge, Bart., and dying, was buried at Wenham 
gth Feb. 1642-3,* when the manor passed to his widow Susanna, who 
held her first court loth June, 1646, and subsequent courts I3th Sept. 
1650 ; 16 Sept. 1652 ;* 2nd Nov. 1652 ; i6th Oct. 1655 ; 7th June, 
1659. On the death of Susanna, who was buried at Little Wenham 2Oth 
April, 1660, the manor passed to Sir John Brewse's and her own son and 
heir, General William Brewse, who held his first court 2ist July, 1660, 
and subsequent courts 2oth Jan. 1661 ; igth Jan. 1664 ; 3rd June, 1670 ; 
I2th Aug. 1675 ; nth Jan. 1675 ; 3Oth March, 1676. He married 
Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Hobart, of Norfolk, Bart. The manor 
was included in a settlement dated i8th June, 1660, made by William 

'His will is dated ist Aug. 1582, and was 4 His will is dated ist Feb. 1642-3, and 
proved P.C.C. 22nd Feb. 1584-5. was proved at Norwich, i8th April, 

'East Anglian N. & Q. vol. viii. 220. 1644. 

'His will is dated 3rd Aug. 1599, and was 5jst > n English, 
proved P.C.C. roth Aug. 1599. 



WENHAM PARVA. 117 

Brewse and Dorothy his wife, and was called " Manor of Jermyns in Capel," 
192 acres. The manor house called " Little Wenham Hall," with 15 acres, 
was also included. William Brewse died i4th Jan. 1677-8,' aged 57, 
and the manor did not pass to his widow Dorothy for life, for she survived 
until gth Feb. 1710, but passed to her son and heir, John Brewse, who 
held courts for the manor 24th April, 1679 '> T 8th Oct. 1679 ; 26th July, 
1681 ; and i7th April, 1682. He married Jemima, daughter of Samuel 
Bigg, of Alphamstone, co. Essex. 

John Mason probably acquired the manor from John Brewse in 1682, 
for he held his first court igth Sept. 1682, and subsequently courts as 
follows : 22nd May, 1684 ; loth Oct. 1685 ; 23rd Dec. 1689 ; 2nd July, 
1691 ; 24th Dec. 1691 ; 5th Oct. 1692 ; 2ist May, 1694 ; 3Oth April, 
1695 ; 27th May, 1695 ; 2Oth Aug. 1697 ; 5th Dec. 1700 ; 4th May, 1705 ; 
8th April, 1706 ; i6th April, 1706 ; 5th June, 1706 ; i6th April, 1707 ; 
3rd Jan. 1708 ; 3ist Oct. 1709 ; 23rd Nov. 1709 ; 3rd April, 1710 ; 27th 
Oct. 1710 ; 29th April, 1713 ; 22nd Aug. 1715 ; 2nd April, 1717 ; 2ist Oct. 
1717 : i2th Nov. 1718. John Mason then appears to have died and to 
have been succeeded in the lordship by another John Mason, for such 
held a court styled " the first court of John Mason " 4th Jan. 1720, and 
subsequent courts 23rd May, 1722 ; i6th Sept. 1726 ; 25th Nov. 1729 ; 
nth June, 1736 ; I7th Nov. 1736 ; I2th March, 1738 ; 22nd July, 1741 ; 
I5th Nov. 1742 ; and 3rd Oct. 1746. John Mason then sold the manor 
to Robert Freeman, of Ardleigh, co. Essex, who held his first court 2gth 
June, 1750, and subsequent courts i4th June, 1754 ; 8th July, 1756 ; 
2Oth June, 1759 ; 22nd Nov. 1759 ; and 28th Feb. 1760. He, by will 
dated 2o,th June, 1759, devised the same to his son-in-law, John Cook, 
of Thorrington Hall, in Thorrington, co. Essex, for life and after his decease 
to his (testator's) daughter Mary, wife of the said John Cook, for life, 
and then to his grandson, Robert Cook, son of the said John Cook and 
Mary his wife for life, with remainder to Robert, ist son in tail male with 
divers remainders over. Certain annuities for life and legacies were 
charged on the property. 

Robert Freeman's will was proved in the Prerogative Court of Canter- 
bury 15th Sept. 1760. 

John Cook held his first court 3ist July, 1761, and subsequent courts 
27th Oct. 1769 ; I2th Aug. 1771 ; 4th Sept. 1771 ; 6th Aug. 1772 ; 5th 
Jan. 1773 ; nth Aug. 1774 ; nth Dec. 1776 ; 28th May, 1777; 2ist July, 
1778; 6th Jan. 1779 ; 8th Oct. 1781 ; 2nd Nov. 1781 ; 5th June, 1782 ; 
25th Sept. 1782 ; and 6th Feb. 1786. 

Robert Cook held his first court 28th May, 1789, and subsequent 
courts I2th Aug. 1789; 25th Aug. 1790 ; 3ist Oct. 1791. Robert Freeman's 
grandson, Robert Cook, had an eldest son, Robert Freeman Cook, who 
lived at Little Wenham. He purchased the life interests of his parents for 
3,000, and by virtue of indentures of lease and release dated 4th and 5th 
Feb. 1805, and a recovery suffered in Hilary term 49 Geo. III., an indenture 
dated 25th March, 1806, made between the said Robert Freeman Cook of 
the one part, and Thomas Sketter, of Ipswich, of the other part, and a fine 
duly levied in Easter term, 46 Geo. III. the manor became vested in the said 
Robert Freeman Cook in fee simple. 

By indentures dated 3rd and 4th Nov. 1826, Robert Freeman Cook 
in consideration of 3,000 sold the manor to James Josselyn, of Little Belstead, 

'His will is dated gth Aug. 1652. 



n8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

who for 3,300 sold again to Firman Josselyn, formerly of Leiston but then 
of Saxmundham, and the conveyance was effected by indentures dated 
8th and Qth September, 1828. 

Firman Josselyn by his will dated 24th March, 1840, being therein 
described as of Little Blakenham, devised the manor to his wife Sarah and 
George Josselyn, of Ipswich, upon trust for sale, and dying 2nd March, 
1843, his will was proved at Canterbury I3th April following. 

Sarah Josselyn died 2Oth July, 1843, and by an indenture dated igth 
Oct. 1843, George Josselyn, the surviving trustee, sold the manor for 
445 to Joseph Ansell, son of Thomas Ansell, of Great Wenham, by Elizabeth 
Kemball his wife, and grandson of Robert and Mary Ansell, of Milden. 
In this deed the description of the manor is : " All that the manor or 
manors of Little Wenham Vaux and Jarmans otherwise Jermyns with 
view of frankpledge courts leet courts baron and customary courts fines 
quit rents reliefs heriots issues fees amerciaments forfeitures deodans waifs 
astrays goods and chattels of felons and fugitives and felons of themselves 
commons heaths fisheries rights royalties jurisdictions franchises liberties 
profits ways waters easements commodities emoluments perquisites 
privileges advantages and appurtenances whatsoever to the said manor or 
manors of Little Wenham Vaux and Jaimans otherwise Jermyns issuing 
out of or arising within any of the towns or parishes of Great Wenham Little 
Wenham Washbrook Copdock Capel Hintlesham Raydon Holton Bentley 
Stratford and East Bergholt in the said County of Suffolk or any other town 
or towns there near or belonging or in any wise appertaining therewith or 
with any part thereof held used occupied or enjoyed or therewith accepted 
reputed deemed taken or known as part parcel or member thereof or of any 
part thereof." 

Joseph Ansell, by his will dated 3rd Feb. 1854, after bequeathing two 
sums of 7,000 and 1,300 amongst various legatees, devised this manor 
(amongst his residuary estate) charged with the legacies to his son, Robert 
Ansell, in fee. Testator died I7th March, 1855, and his will was proved 
2Oth August following. 

Robert Ansell in 1868 sold the manor to John Frederick Robinson, of 
Hadleigh, from whom the manor has passed to and is now vested in Charles 
James Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

Arms of NERFORD : Gules, a lion rampant, Ermine. Of DEBENHAM : 
Sable, a bend between 2 crescents Or. Of BREVVSE : Ermine, a lion rampant, 
Gules. 

MANOR OF STODHAUGH. 

This manor was vested in Robert Brewse, who died in 1513,' when it 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Brewse, on whose death 6th Nov. 1514," 
it passed to his son and heir, Sir John Brewse, who died in 1584-5. By 
his will dated ist Aug. 1582, Sir John leaves this manor, if it be the same as 
" Stodhaugh in Laxfield," to his son Robert. 

MANOR OF CALTHAM. 

So far as we know, the lords were the same as the lords of the last 
manor. 

1 See Manor of Vaux, in Great Wenham, in ' I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 146 
this Hundred. 




WHERSTEAD. 119 

WHERSTEAD. 

N Saxon times there were several manors in this place. The 
first was that of Edmund, a freeman of Robert Wimarcson, 
consisting of a carucate of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, a 
ploughteam in demesne, which disappeared later, and at 
the time of the Survey was half a team, also 5 ploughteams 
of the men, and 3 acres of meadow, valued at 205. The 
soc was in Bergholt. At the time of the Survey this manor 
was held by Earl Alan.' 

The second manor also belonged to Earl Alan, held of him by Aluric 
the priest, and formerly was held by Tostin, consisting of 40' acres, a plough- 
team (reduced when the Survey was taken to half a team), and a salt pan, 
worth 55., the soc belonging to Edeva." 

The third manor was that of Toli, a freeman under commendation to 
Robert, and consisted of a carucate of land, a bordar, a ploughteam, 3 
acres of meadow, 5 hogs, 30 sheep, and 14 goats, worth IDS. This manor 
was held in demesne at the time of the Survey by Suane of Essex. 3 

Two manors under the head of Pametuna were in Wherstead. The 
first was held in Saxon times by Tostin, consisting of 60 acres, 2 villeins, a 
ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, worth 8s., the soc belonging to Edeva. 
At the time of the Survey Aluric the priest held it of Earl Alan. 4 

The second manor was held by Robert, and consisted of 2 carucates of 
land, 3 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i as the time of the 
Survey), 3 ploughteams belonging to the men (which had apparently gone 
at the time of the Survey), and 10 acres of meadow. Also 3 acres of free 
land belonging to the church at the time of the Survey, a salt pan, and of 
live stock 8 beasts, 20 hogs, 80 sheep, and 28 goats. The estate was 
formerly worth 405., but at the time of the Survey, when held by Algar, of 
Suane of Essex, was worth 305. The soc belonged to Robert. It was 5 
quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt 4^.' 

TORINTUNA. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Alwin, a freeman of Stigand, 
and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 6 villeins, 2 bordars, 2 serfs, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 3 belonging to the men. Also 20 acres of meadow, 
a mill, a church with 50 acres of free land (a rouncy at the time of the 
Survey), and 6 beasts. There were also 4 hogs, 20 sheep, and 30 goats, 
the whole worth 505. When the Survey was taken this manor was held 
by Gifard of Robert, son of Corbution, and some of the details were altered 
there were 4 villeins, 5 bordars, a serf, 2 ploughteams belonging to the 
men, and 30 hogs. The same man had the soc under Stigand. It was 
6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt $d. 6 

Amongst the lands of Earl Alan was a manor under the head " Beria." 
This is in Wherstead. It was held in the Confessor's day by Edith. There 
were 2 carucates, i bordar, 2 ploughteams in demesne, and i acre of meadow, 
i mill, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 20 hogs, 100 sheep, and 12 goats, and worth 
405. At the time of the Survey Humfrid held of the Earl, and the plough- 
teams in demesne had come down half, there was but i rouncy and i beast, 

'Dom. ii. 2956. 4 Dom. ii. 2956. 

*Dom. ii. 2956. 5 Dom. ii. 402. 

3 Dom. ii. 402. 6 Dom. ii. 426. 



120 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



but the hogs had gone up by 20. The Survey states that : " It is 8 
quarentenes in length and 6 in breadth, and paid in a gelt 5^." Edith 
had the soc. 1 

WHERSTEAD HALL MANOR. 

This was the estate of Edmund, a freeman of Robert Fits Wymore, 
and held at the time of the Survey by Aluric under Alan, Earl of Brittany. 

In 1203 the lordship was held by Gilbert de Reymes or Raiines. He was 
admitted a free burgess of Ipswich, and compounded for an exemption from 
toll, custom, &c., for his villeins in Wherstead. Upon his death the manor 
passed to his grandson, Roger de Reymes, who was lord in 1270. He 
was succeeded by Hugh de Reymes,* and he by Robert de Reymes, 
whose daughter and heir Alice married Sir Robert de Reydon, 3 to 
whom a grant of freewarren was made in 1316.* 

Amongst the ancient deeds in the Court of Chancery we find a release 
in 1296 by Albreda, daughter of the late Gilbert de Reymes, to this Sir 
Robert de Reydon, Knt., of all right which accrued to her after the death 
of Sir Robert de Reymes, his brother, formerly rector of the church of Easton 
Gosbeck, in lands, &c., in Wherstead, Freston, Woolverstone, Chemonton, 
Brent Eleigh, Copdock, Ipswich, Caldewell, Coddenham, Alrys, Wester- 
field, and Heigham.* And a similar release for Nicola, another daughter 
of the said Gilbert de Reymes. 6 In 1318 Sir Robert had authority to 
retain this manor for life on granting other lands. 7 

He died in 1322,* and the manor passed, like the Manor of Raydon 
Hall, in this Hundred, to his son and heir, Walter de Reydon who was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert de Reydon, who dying without 
issue the manor passed to his sister and heir Alice, married to Sir Andrew 
de Bures, Knt., who had a grant of free warren here in 1335,' and died in 
1360,' from which time to 1441, the time of the forfeiture by James Buller, 
Earl of Wilts, the devolution is the same as the Manor of Acton, in Babergh 
Hundred. 

The same year the manor was granted by the Crown to Sir John 
Harwood, Knt., afterwards ot Norfolk." In 1485 the Earl of Wiltshire, 
brother and heir of Sir Thomas Buller, Earl of Ormond, was restored, and 
he gave the manor to Henry, son of Robert Bures, of Acton. 

We find amongst the State Papers in 1526 a lease by this Henry Bures 
and Dame Anne Causton, of Wherstead Hall and lands in Freston." Henry 
Bures died 6th July, 1528, u when the manor passed to his four daughters 
and coheirs. The manor is included in the three fines levied of one-fourth of 
the manor in 1567 by Sir Nicholas Bacon against Anne Buttes, widow, 



'Dom. ii. 295, 2956. 

"There is the greatest difficulty as to the 
descents of these de Reymes, and 
we are unable to verify some of 
the entries, but it is apprehended 
that the branch of the Wherstead 
family ceased, so far as Suffolk is 
concerned, shortly after the pur- 
chase by Robert, son of Hugh de 
Reymes or Raimes, of a moiety of 
the Manor of Bolom, co. Northum- 
berland, about 1288 (De Banco Rolls, 
2Edw. 1 1. No. 178). 



3 See Layham Hall, Newton, in Babergh 

Hundred. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 18. 
'24 Edw. I. C. 171. 

6 c. 517- 

7 I.Q.D. 7 Edw. II. File 100, 6. 
* I. P.M., Extent, Robert de Reydon and 
Margery his (no doubt 2nd) wife, 
16 Edw. II. 63. 
'Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. 37. 
"I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 60. 
"See O.R. v. 582. 
"S.P. iSHen. VIII. 2844. 
JI.P.M., 20 Hen. VIII. 87. 



WHERSTEAD. 



121 



Sir William Buttes, and Thomas Buttes, as mentioned in the account of 
Acton Manor, in Babergh Hundred. 

The manor passed in fourth shares amongst these, as is clear from the 
inquis. p.m. as late as 1594, of Bridget, wife of Thomas Buttes, the 2nd 
daughter, when it was found that she held one-fourth of this manor at her 
death, 7th Feb. 1572,' but it ultimately came to and was acquired by the 
representative of the daughter Mary or Maria, who married Thomas 
Barrow. From this time till the time of Maurice Sheldon, 1666, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Newton Hall, in Babergh 
Hundred. 2 

In the early part of the igth century the manor was vested in John 
Vernon, 3 who died seised of it in 1818, and left it by will to his sister and 
heir Arethusa, married to Sir Robert Harland, 2nd Bart., from which time 
the manor has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Little Belstead, 
in this Hundred, and is now vested in Charles Edmund Dashwood, of 
Wherstead Park. 

A survey of the manor in 1641 will be found amongst the MSS. in the 
Cambridge University Library. 4 This manor will be found specifically 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Alice, wife of Sir John Sutton, in 1392;' 
of Alice, wife of Sir Guy Bryan in 1435, and an extent given ; 6 and in that of 
Humphrey, son and heir of John, Earl of Arundell, and Matilda his wife, 
daughter of Elizabeth, wife of Robert Lovell, three years later. 7 Also in 
those of Amicia, wife of James, Earl of Wilts, in 1457," and James, Earl of 
Wilts, in 1462.* 

The Manor of Wherstead is mentioned in the I. P.M. of Roger le 
Chaumberlyn in 1319,' but we cannot say with certainty which manor is 
intended. 

PANNINGTON HALL MANOR. 

This was the estate of Robert in Saxon times and of Suane of Essex 
under whom Algar held in the time of William the Conqueror. 

In 1 202 the lordship seems to have belonged to Gerard de Wachesham, 
who gave the advowson of Wherstead to the priory of St. Peter, Ipswich. 
The manor probably went to them at the same time, and at the Dissolution 
it passed to the Crown. In 1528 it was granted to Cardinal Wolsey," who 
granted the same the following year to St. Mary's College, Ipswich. 12 

On Wolsey's disgrace the manor reverted to the Crown, and 2nd Sept. 
1532, was granted by King Hen. VIII. to Sir William Butts, Knt., M.D. 13 

Sir William Butts died 22nd Nov. 1544, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, William Butts,' 4 who had livery of this manor the 7th Nov. 
1546. l5 He died either 2Oth Nov. 1580, or 3rd Sept. I583,' 6 and the manor 



1 i3th Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iv. 409. 

2 See also Reydon Hall, in this Hundred, 

and Brent Eleigh Manor, in Babergh 
Hundred. 

3 See Manor of Rish angles, in Hartismere 

Hundred. 

4 M. in II. 19 (2314). 
5 I.P.M. 16 Rich. II. 25. 
6 I.P.M. 13 Hen. VI. 34. 
7I.P.M. 16 Hen. VI. 50. 
"I.P.M. 35 Hen. IV. 16. 
9 1. P.M. i Edw. IV. 29. 
'"I.P.M. 13 Edw. II. 6. 



"S.P., 20 Hen. VIII. 4424. 

"S.P., 20 Hen. VIII. 5280; Fine, Mich. 
20 Hen. VIII., 21 Hen. VIII. 

'3 See Acton Manor, in Babergh Hundred ; 
i3th Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iv. 406 ; O. 
24 Hen. VIII. Rot. 27; S.P. 24 
Hen. VIII. 1370, except advowson 
of Wherstead church and rectory. 

Ml.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 75. 

'5 i3th Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iv. 408. 

16 Ib. 406; I. P.M., at Swaffham, I7th Sept. 
26 Eliz. [1584]. 



122 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



passed to his brother and heir, Thomas Butts, who in 1592 sold the same 
to Sir Nicholas Bacon and Nathaniel Bacon.' Amongst the Additional 
Charters in tin- British Museum is an exchequer acquittance to Peter 
\\ ilcox and William Wynne for redemption of this manor in 1596 ;' and 
amongst the State Papers the following year we find a grant in fee farm to 
John Athowe and Henry Beck of the manor at tin- rent of 6. 135. 4^.' 

This is probably the Manor of Wherstead intended and included in the 
fine levied in 1599 by Sir John Townsend and others against Sir Nicholas 
Bacon and others. 4 

The manor subsequently vested in John Vernon, who died seised of it 
in 1818, since which time it has gone with the main manor. 

MANOR OF BOWEN HALL. 

This appears in Domesday as Beria and was held in Saxon times by 
Edith, and at the time of the Survey by Humfrid under Earl Alan. 

It later vested in the priory of St. Peter, Ipswich. Amongst the State 
Papers in 1513 we find a grant of the issues of this manor to Thomas 
Goodwyn, prior-elect of St. Peter's, Ipswich. 5 The religious house at 
Wherstead was suppressed by Bull and annexed to the college at Ipswich 
in I528. 6 

The grant of this manor to Cardinal Wolsey was made the same year, 
and is also mentioned in the State Papers. 7 The following year the manor 
was conveyed by Cardinal Wolsey to St. Mary's College, Ipswich. 8 

On Wolsey's disgrace the manor again went to the Crown, and was in 
1530 granted to Thomas Hall, of Ipswich and Coggeshall, 9 who did homage 
for it in 1533, and died 6th July, 1534, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Bartholomew Hall, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of 
Queen Elizabeth will be found an action respecting copyholds of the manor 
by John Payne against this Bartholomew Hall. 10 Also an action by 
Christopher Alderman against Prudence Merells as to lands held of this 
Bartholomew Hall as of this Manor of " Birne Hall " in Whersted." 

Bartholomew married Christian, daughter of Richard Broke, Lord 
Chief Baron, and had a grant of arms in 1587. He was buried at 
Wherstead i6th Feb. 1601, and the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Thomas Hall, who had livery in the 7th year of Jas. I. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Clench, Justice of the King's Bench, and 
died in 1616." 

He did not, however, retain till his death, for we find that in 1609 a 
grant of the manor was made to Sir Edward Coke, Knt., Robert Bulleyne, 
and John Pepes, who alienated in 1622 to Sir Francis Cooke, Knt., and Henry 
Curzon. 

By the opening of the igth century the manor vested in John Vernon, 
who died seised of the same in 1818, from which time it has passed together 
with the main manor. 

Arms of HALL : Erm. 6 bars Gu. and 3 inescutcheons Or, 2 and i. 



1 13th Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iv. 431. 

"Add. Ch. 25658. 

3 State Papers, 1597, 349. 

< Fine, Mich. 41 and 42 Eliz. 

S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 4768. 

S.P. 20 Hen. VIII 4259 (21). 

'S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 4424. 



S.P. 20 Hen. VIII. 5280 ; Fine, 20 Hen. 

VIII. Easter, 21 Hen. VIII. 
S.P. 1530, 6363 (22). 
IO C.P. ser. ii. B. cxliv. i. 
"C.P. i. 6. 
"Will 29th Sept. 1616. 



WHERSTEAD. 123 

THORINGTON HALL MANOR. 

In Saxon times this was the estate of Alwin, a freeman under the 
Archbishop Stigand, and at the time of the Norman Survey was vested 
in Robert, son of Corbution, under whom Gifard held. 

In the time of Edw. I. the manor was vested in Bartholomew Davilers, 
who died in 1276,' and from this time until the death of Sir Philip 
Parker, Bart., in 1696, the devolution of the manor is identical with that 
of Erwarton Manor, in this Hundred. 

By the opening of the igth century the manor had passed to John 
Vernon, who died in 1818, and from that date to the present time the manor 
has passed as and with the main manor. 



1 1.P.M., 4 Edw. I. 70. 




124 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WOOLVERSTONE. 

Saxon times there were two manors in this place. The 
first was held by Tostin, in Edith's soc and commendation, 
and consisted of a carucate of land, 5 villeins, 2 bordars, 
ij ploughteams in demesne and half a ploughteam belonging 
to the men, also 2 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to 
support 15 hogs, a church with 10 acres, 5 rouncies, 8 beasts, 
20 hogs, 60 sheep, and 36 goats, the whole worth 2os. When 
the Survey was taken it was held by Aluric the priest of Earl Alan ; there 
were 2 ploughteams in demesne, 7 rouncies, 12 beasts, 30 hogs, and 100 
sheep, valued at 305. The manor was 8 quarentenes long and 3 broad, 
and paid in a gelt 2%d.' 

The second manor was held by Aluret by commendation to Scalpi, 
and consisted of 80 acres, 3 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne, and an 
acre of meadow, worth i6s. At the time of the Survey Robert Grenon 
held it in demesne, and there was only half a team, the whole worth ios. J 

WOOLVERSTON MANOR OR WOOLVERSTON HALL MANOR. 

The two manors of the Survey appear to have merged in one at an 
early date. Page says that in the time of King Edw. I. the estate appears 
to have been Crown demesne. In 1291 Hamon de Wolfreston had a grant 
of free warren here, 3 and in 1310 Robert de Reydon had a like grant. 4 

In 1316 the manor was in the King's hands, but at the same time 
Sir John de Holbroke, Knt., is said to have been lord, and he died in 1316. 
From this time to the time of Elizabeth Wolverston the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Holbrook, in this Hundred. Elizabeth 
Wolverston died in 1420,' when the manor passed to her son and heir, 
Thomas Woolverston, who died about 1458, when the manor went to 
Robert 6 Woolverston. His will is dated 1492, and dying the same 
year, the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Woolverston, 
of Culpho. He died 22nd Aug. 1516, 7 when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Richard Woolverston. 

The manor next passed to Edward Woolverston,' who died seised 
loth Oct. 1537, 9 when it vested in his son and heir, Philip Woolverston, 
who married at Woolverstone, i6th Oct. 1557, Frances Haward, and sold 
the manor to Sir Thomas Gawdy in 1580. 

We meet with four fines of the manor in the time of Queen Elizabeth. 

1. 1573. Thomas Bulbecke and others v. John Kyllegrewe and 
others." 

2. 1573. Thomas Baxter v. Philip Wolverston and others." 

3. 1580. Sir Thomas Gawdy v. Philip Wolverston and others." 

4. 1580. Sir Thomas Gawdy v. T. Bulbeck and others.' 3 

' Dom. ii. 2956. MS. substitutes Thomas for 

J Dom. ii. 420. Edward, giving Thomas as a wife 

'Chart. Rolls, 19 Edw. I. i. Maud, daughter of Sir Humphrey 

4 Chart. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. 18. Stanley [of Pipe, co. Stafford]. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. V. 50. M.P.M., 30 Hen. VIII. 33. 

6 In some places " Richard," and in others '"Fine, Mich. 15 Eliz. 

" Roger." " Fine, Mich. 15 Eliz. 

7 I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 60. " Fine, Trin. 21 Eliz. 

Davy makes Philip the son of Richard '3 Fine, Hil. 23 Eliz. 

and omits the Edward. The Blois 



WOOLVERSTONE. 125 

Sir Thomas Gawdy, Knt., died 5th Nov. 1588, and the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Henry Gawdy, then 36 years of age. 1 The next lord was 
Richard, eldest son of Richard Catelyn, serjeant-at-law, by Barbara his wife, 
daughter of John Spencer, of Rendlesham. He married, according to the Davy 
MSS. and Blomefield's " Norfolk," Dionysia, daughter of Thomas Marsh, 
Clerk of the Star Chamber. In the Harleian Society " Le Neve's Pedigrees 
of the Knights," she is called Dionysia, daughter of - - Sydney. He died, 
according to Blomefield and Davy, the nth March, 43 Eliz. [1600], but 
probably in July, 1596, when it is not clear that the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Philip Catelyn, 2 who married Dorothy Laurence, of Cambridge, 
a granddaughter of Sir John Pasgrave, Bart., and died in 1632. He is 
described as of Woolverston Hall, but on his father's death this manor seems 
to have passed to his widow Dionysia, who remarried Thomas Hitchcoke, 
who seems to have held in 1609. The Catelyns sold to Philip Bacon, 2nd 
son of Edward Bacon, of Shrubland Hall, who died seised of the manor 
26th July, 1635. The manor passed to Anne, sole daughter and heir ol 
Philip Bacon, who married Thomas Bedingfield, son of Sir Thomas Beding- 
field, of Darsham Hall. She married 2ndly Sir Philip Parker, Bart., who 
died in 1655, when the manor passed to Thomas Bedingfield, who died 
without issue in 1684. 

The manor subsequently vested in John Tyson, who was lord and 
became bankrupt in 1720, when John Ward, of Hackney, whom Kirby 
styled " the infamous John Ward," claimed the manor in right of a mortgage 
which he had upon it. The matter was brought before the Court 
of Chancery!, and upwards of half a century the cause remained undecided. 
In 1728 Knox Ward appears as lord, and amongst the Tanner MSS. in the 
Bodleian is a letter from him to Tanner proposing to exchange private 
lands for others belonging to Woolverston church. 3 

The estate of Woolverstone was hired by Mr. William Berners for 30 
years of Mr. Ward. Knox Ward died in 1741. About the year 1773 the 
property was ordered by the Court to be sold, and it was purchased by 
William Berners for 14,000. 

The estate then consisted only of the house and park, the former of 
which stood where the stables now stand. The present house was begun to 
be built about 1778. The obelisk in the park cost 2,000, and the number 
of deer in the park in 1823 was about 300. The additions to the house 
made by Mr. Berners in 1823 were made under the direction of Mr. Hopper, 
the architect. 

William Berners died in 1783, from which time to the present the manor 
has devolved in the same course as the Manor of Erwarton, in this 
Hundred, and is now vested in C. H. Berners, of Woolverstone Park. 

The hall or manor house is built of Woolpit brick, with stone dress- 
ings, &c., and has a pediment in the centre of the principal front supported 
by four Ionic columns. The wings are connected with the centre by 
colonnades. 

It stands in a delightful situation on the western bank of the Orwell 
with a fine view from the park (which consists of 450 acres) of the opposite 
shore of Nacton, through the trees which abound there. 

1 1.P.M., gth Aug. 31 Eliz. s Tanner xx. 54. 

2 Thomas Catlyn is proved to be his son 

and heir, but he probably died under 

age ; see E.A. N. and Q. vol. ix. 47. 



i. >6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The stables, which are an ornamental building, stand detached from 
the house on the spot occupied by the old mansion. The present hall 
was erected by William Berners, the purchaser in the Chancery 
action. He was well known as the proprietor of the street off Oxford 
Street, in London, called after him. 



The places in the Domesday Survey entered under the Hundred ol 
Samford, which we have not been able to identify are the following: 

BELNEI (?) 

The only holding here was that of Burcheric, a freemen, and at the time 
of the Survey it belonged to the Bishop of Bayeux. 1 

CALO-WETUNA. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Tostin, and consisted of 
40 acres, a border, and half a ploughteam, worth 55. 4^., the soc held in 
the same way. At the time the Survey was taken Aluric held this manor 
of Earl Alan. 1 

EDMINESTUNA. 

Two manors were held here in Saxon times. The first was held by 
Godric, a freeman, and consisted of 30 acres, and half a ploughteam, valued 
at 55. At the time of the Survey it was held by Richard, son of Earl Gisle- 
bert, and was only worth 35. The soc was in Bergholt. 

And in the Hundred at the time of the Survey a Richard held three 
freemen Godric, Edwin, and Leuric, having 33 acres and half a ploughteam, 
worth 55., which at the time of the Survey was worth 6s. 6d. The soc was 
in Bergholt. 3 

The second manor was held by Spiet, a freeman by commendation, 
and also consisted of 30 acres, and in Saxon times of half a ploughteam 
as well, worth 55. The value of this manor at the time of the Survey was 
only worth qzd. 

In this Hundred was a holding in demesne by commendation of seven 
freemen, consisting of 120 acres, and 3 ploughteams, worth 205., the soc 
belonging to Harold. At the time of the Survey this holding was worth 
255., and it and the manor belonged to Robert Grenon. 4 

GUTHULULVESFORDA. 

A manor was held here in the Confessor's time by Edith, who also had 
the soc. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, a villein, 6 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams belonging to the men (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 
3 ploughteams could be restored. Also 8 acres of meadow, wood to main- 
tain 20 hogs and a mill. At the time of the Survey the manor was held by (the 
Countess of Albemarle). And in her holding was also included the third 
part of a church with 8 acres worth 3. The manor was 8 quarentenes 
long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt s3. s 

1 Dom. ii. 378. 4 Dom. ii. 4206. 

2 Dom. ii. 2956. 5 Dom. ii. 431. 

J Dom. ii. 395. 



UNIDENTIFIED PLACES IN DOMEDAY. 127 

MANESFORT. 

A manor was held here when the Survey was taken by William de 
Aln of Robert Grenon, and had formerly been held in demesne by St. 
Benet, of Ramsey. It consisted of ii carucates of land, 2 villeins, 4 bordars, 
2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men, 3 acres of meadow, 
and a mill. Of live stock there were 2 rouncies, 5 beasts, 15 hogs, and 30 
sheep, valued at 405., the soc belonging to St. Benet. When the Survey was 
taken there were 5 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne, the rouncies had 
gone, there were 3 beasts and only 5 hogs, the value being only 2os. It 
was 6 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt 



PURTEPYT (?). 

In the time of the Confessor a manor was held here by Osbern, Aluric's 
freeman, and consisted of 60 acres, 3 villeins, 2 bordars, 2 serfs, half a plough- 
team in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, worth IDS. The same Osbern 
held it of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, at the time of the Survey, the soc 
being in Bergholt. 2 

SCOTTUNA. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Fribern, the King's thane. 
It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 10 bordars, 2 serfs (which had 
disappeared at the time of the Survey), a ploughteam in demesne and i 
belonging to the men, also 4 acres of meadow, and the third part of a church 
worth 15 acres. Of live stock there were at the time of the Survey 7 beasts, 
and formerly 2 hogs (increased to 13 at the time of the Survey), 60 sheep, 
and 2 hives of bees, also a salt pan, the whole worth 405. The soc 
belonged to Fribern. At the time of the Survey this manor was held by 
Rainelm of Geoffrey de Magnaville. It was 6 quarentenes long and 4 
broad, and paid in a gelt ^d. 3 

STANFELDA. 

A manor was held here in the Confessor's time by Aluric, a freeman, 
consisting of a carucate and 15 acres of land (at the time of the Survey 4 
bordars and a villein), a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the men, 
also 7! acres of meadow. The manor was formerly worth 205., but was 
doubled at the time of the Survey when held by Hato of Earl Eustace. 4 

TORP. 

A manor was held here in the Confessor's time by Osbern, Aluric's 
freeman, and consisted of 100 acres, 3 bordars, a ploughteam, and 3 acres 
ol meadow, worth 205. At the time of the Survey the same Osbern held 
it of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, the soc being in Bergholt. 5 

TOFT. 

The only holding mentioned in this place was that of Alwm, a freeman 
under commendation to Esgar Stalre, consisting of 20 acres. In the same 
township Aluiet, a freeman, had an estate of 8 acres with half a ploughteam 

1 Dom. ii. 4196. 4 Dom. ii. 3036. 

2 Dom. ii. 3946. s Dom. ii. 3946. 

3 Dom. ii. 4116. 



128 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

worth 55., at the tinu> of the Survey worth 2Os., when it was the estate ot 
Richard, son ol Earl Gislebert. The soc was in Bergholt. 1 

TURCHETLESTUNA. 

driin, a timnan, held in commendation a manor here in the time of 
the Confessor, consisting of a carucate of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, a 
ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), and 2 
parts of a fishery. Also a ploughteam belonging to' the men, the whole 
valued at 40$., reduced at the time of the Survey to 385. The soc belonged 
to Harold. When the Survey was taken it was held by William de Aln 
of Robert Grenon, and Robert claimed it by exchange with Hugh de 
Montfort's land.* 



1 Dom. ii. 395. * Dom. ii. 420. 



STOW AND THEDWESTRY HUNDREDS. 



THED WAKJVSTRE 

HV 



e: *_J 



SAXTON, 
1576. 



SPEED, 
1610. 



J&HfCri 

<xl * a? \ 



nfrfcvtAn Hill ltd ~ . ~~-^ 



tow oe 



I) R E - J 



BOWEN, 
777. 





STOW HUNDRED 

a fertile and picturesque district lying in the centre of the 
county, and averaging about seven miles in length and 
breadth, bounded on the north by Hartismere ; on the west 
by Blackbourn and Thedwestry Hundreds ; and on the 
south and east by Cosford and Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundreds. It is in the Deanery to which it gives its name, 
and was in the Archdeaconry of Sudbury till 1837, when it 
was added to the Archdeaconry of Suffolk, so that it is still in the Diocese 
of Norwich. 

The fee of this Hundred was in the Crown till John of Eltham, Earl 
of Cornwall, obtained a grant of the same from his brother, King Edw. III., 
which he held at the period of his decease. It was afterwards given to 
Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and settled on him by special tail for his 
good services. He left it to his grandson William, who died seised of it 
in 1381, but having no male issue his estate passed to his three sisters and 
their heirs. In 1415 it was vested in Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 
who died at the siege of Harfleur this year, and left it to his brother and 
heir William, who died seised of it, and left it to his son and heir, John de 
la Pole, and his heirs. 

The Hundred consists of 21,965 acres, in 14 parishes and 32 manors, 
as follows : 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Buxhall .. 
Combs 



Greeting 
St. Peter's. 



Dagworth 
(ham) . 



Finborough 
(Gt.) 



Finborough 

(Little) 
Gipping ... 
Harleston . 
Haughley . 

R 



Buxhall. 
Cockerells Hall. 
Leffey Hall. 
Fenn Hall. 
Combs. 
Bavents. 

Greeting St. Peter's. 
Brasin's or Brasier's 
Hall al. Thorney 
Mumpers. 

Dagworth and 
Sorrells in Dag- 
worth. 
Gt. Finborough or 

Finborough Magna. 
Finborough al. Ar- 

den's al. Arder's al. 

Adder's. 
Cantilupes al. Cante- 

lowesa/. Cantelos. 
Boy ton Hall. 

r Little Finborough. 

Gipping. 

Harleston. 

Haughley. 



Old Newton 



Onehouse 



Shelland . . . 



Stowmarket 

with 
Chilton and 
Stow Upland. 



Wetherden 



Old Newton. 
Netherhall al. 
Barrards. 

Onehouse. 

Caldecotes now 
joined with One- 
house under the 
title of Onehouse 
with Caldecotes. 

Shelland. 
Rocky 11s. 

Stowmarket al. 

Abbott's Hall. 
Columbine Hall al. 

Thorney Colom- 

bers. 
Thorney Hall 

(Moundevilles). 
Thorney Campsey. 
Thorney Keebles. 
Clements. 
Gardens, Thorney 

Lizons, and Liesnes. 
Wetherden Hall. 
Pulham Hall. 



130 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BUXHALL. 

|\\'O manors existed here in Saxon times. The main manor 




held in Edward the Confessor's time by Lewin Croc 
with 2 carucates of land. There were 4 bordar tenants, 
3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 16 acres of meadow, half 
a mill, 2 rouncies, i beast, 53 hogs, and 28 sheep. A church 
living with 30 acres of land and half an acre oi meadow, and 
the value was 6os. Lewin Croc had soc and sac over the 
hall, and the bordars. Under Croc there were seven freemen and a half 
by commendation, and the soc was in the Hundred. They had 37 acres 
and employed 2 plough teams, had i acre of meadow, and the value was 
IDS. To this manor Norman, son of Tancred, added three freemen under 
the King by commendation and soc with 24 acres, and they had i plough- 
team, and the value was 40^. By the time of the Domesday Survey the 
3 serfs had disappeared, the 53 hogs had been reduced to 16, and the 28 
sheep increased to 30. The 2 ploughteams of the seven freemen were 
reduced to half a team, and the ploughteam of the three freemen had come 
down to a team of 2 oxen. This manor was then held by Roger Pictaviensis. ' 

The other manor was held by Frodo, the Abbot of St. Edmunds' 
brother. Twenty-five freemen who held 3 carucates of land and a half in 
the King's soc (with their lands) had been delivered to Frodo as a manor. 
There were 5 bordar tenants and a half. In King Edward's time and even 
after the Conquest, there had been 7 ploughteams among them all, but in 
the time of the Domesday Survey these had come down to 2 in demesne 
and 3 belonging to the men. There were 10 acres of meadow, 6 beasts, 
formerly 6 rouncies then only i, but there were 22 hogs and 36 sheep, 
while none of these creatures were noted as existing there in Saxon times. 
The old value was 6os., but the value had then increased to loos. The 
King and the Earl had the soc.* 

The dimensions (no doubt of the whole township) were a league long 
and 8 quarentenes broad, and it paid in a gelt 25^. whoever was the tenant. 
A small estate of 40 acres, i ploughteam, and 5 acres of meadow, valued at 
2os., was held by a freeman under the Abbot of Ely in the Confessor's time 
by commendation only in the jurisdiction of the Hundred. By the time 
of the Survey the ploughteam had disappeared and the value was reduced 
to half. This estate was held at the time of the Survey by Roger Bigot, 
and the Survey states that he received it " to make up the value of 
Baylham in another Hundred. But the Hundred had seen neither writ 
nor livery." 1 

Another holding in this place was that of Ingelric in the Confessor's 
day, but in the time of the Survey the estate of Earl Eustace. It consisted 
of i carucates of land, 7 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 2 socmen 
with 4 acres, 8 acres of meadow, I beast, 30 sheep, which by the time of 
the Survey had increased to 40, and additionally there were n goats. In 
Saxon times and later the value was 405., but at the time of the Survey 4.* 

Another holding was that of the Abbot of Ely, consisting of a socman 
with jo acres of forfeited land, and i bordar with 5 acres, valued at iod. 5 

The last holding mentioned in the Survey was that of William de 
Varennes, who had Humfrey for a tenant, holding what Monulf the priest, 

'Dom. ii. 350. 4 Dom. ii. 303*. 

Dom. ii. 3556. J Dom. ii. 3826. 

J Dom. ii. 336. 



BUXHALL. I3 r 

a freeman by commendation under the Abbot of Ely, in the King's soc, 
had formerly held, namely, half a carucate of land and 30 acres, 7 bordars,' 
i ploughteam in demesne, 2 oxen belonging to the men, and 2 acres of 
meadow. In Saxon times there had been only 2 bordars. This land was 
held by William de Varennes by reason of the Lewes exchange. There 
were also four freemen under the said Monulf by commendation holding 2 
acres, the whole valued at izs.' 

The land before the time of Edw. I. had become divided with four 
manors BuxhaU Hall Manor, Cockerells Hall Manor, Leffey Hall Manor 
and Fenn Hall Manor. 



MANOR OF BUXHALL. 

Sir William Esturmy held three knights' fees in BuxhaU and Iken 
of the Honor of Lancaster in 1210-12, * and was also lord of the Manor of 
Buxhall. Testa de Nevill explains that really William de Esturmy held 
two knights' fees in respect of which his ancestors were wont to make service 
of three knights, but Hen. III. excused the service of one knight for a 
certain fishery in Orford which the King then held in his own hand. 3 The 
Manor of Buxhall had passed to the Crown on the banishment of Roger 
Pictaviensis, the Domesday holder in 1102, and from that time remained 
in the Crown till the time of Hen. II., when about 1176 it was granted by 
that monarch to Roger de Esturmy, probably a son of Richard Esturmy 
or Sturmy, a son of the Esturmy, whose name appears on the roll of 
Battle Abbey. It passed in 1210 to Sir William, son of Roger, who was 
iigh Sheriff for Norfolk and Suffolk in 1214, and died about 1225, when he 
was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert Esturmy, who died in 1244 
and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Roger Esturmy, who died in 
1253." He was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir William Esturmy, then 
aged 30. Sir William Esturmy was custos and keeper of the city of 
Norwich in 1262, and in 1267 together with William, son of Robert Sturmy, 
of Long Stratton, levied a fine by which the manor 5 was settled on William' 
son of Roger, the great-grandson of Sir William, the High Sheriff. Roger 
was succeeded in 1297* by Sir William, his son and heir, who died about 
1366, and was succeeded by his daughter and heir, who married William 
Clement, of Stow, and left an only daughter Emma, married to John 
Cakestreet, and died leaving an only daughter and heir, married to John 
He died leaving an only daughter and heir Anne, married to John 
Copmger, of Buxhall, whose family had long previously been seated at 
Fasbourn Hall in the parish. 

The following letter from the herald, Robert Dale, written from the 

College of Arms, 3rd Aug. 1717, is preserved amongst the Cullum MSS. : 

Copmger. By another Writ 8th Feb. 1290, 19 Edw. I. I find Geffry 

Copmger of Waketon in Norfolk and Walter Copinger required to answer 

'Dom. ii. 398. 'Blomefield says "four virgates of land 

the Exchequer, 132 B. and the advowson of Buxhall and 

many quit rents, &c., in South- 
bourne, Butle, Orford, Wanesdene, 

Extent I.P.M., 38 Hen. III. 23; New Tunstall, Blakeshall, Helmete! 

ef. bile 15 (17). Tycesbrigg, Lelleseye, Dunwich and 

Cassenhall." 
6 I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. 51. 



132 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Stephen son of John de Stowmarket for an assault, proving the antiquity 

of Copinger 

" Sir your obliged humble Servant 

" Robert Dale." 
" To Ambrose Kedington, Esq., 

41 at Acton nr. Sudbury, Suffolk." 

John Copinger died about 1428, and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, William Copinger, who by his will made at Buxhall 3rd Sept. 1436, 
left the manor and advowson of Buxhall to his brother, John Copinger, 
for life, with remainder to John's son William in fee. John Copinger, 
brother of William died in 1441,' when the manor and advowson passed! to 
John's son, William Copinger, who dying about 1450 was succeeded by his 
brother, Walter Copinger, to whom Fasbourn Hall and other hereditaments 
in Buxhall had been devised by his father. Amongst the Early Chancery 
Proceedings we find an action by this Walter Copynger against John 
Howard, clerk, feoffee, as to both the manor and the advowson.' We find 
also a suit between Thomas Salter and John Salter the younger, feoffee to 
uses in which the manor is involved. 3 Walter Copinger married Alice, 
daughter of Petytt, and died about 1483, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John Copinger. 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings is an action by John 
" Copyngere " against John Salter and Thomas Salter as to the detention 
of deeds relating to the manor called " Buxhall Hall." 4 From the calendar 
the date of this action should be between 1483 and 1485. 

John Copinger died in 1517, 5 when the manor passed to his brother 
Walter Copinger. He married Beatrix Ashurst, of Gloucester, and had 
from Hen. VIII. in 1513, a grant of a right " to use and wear his Bonet 
on his said head, as well in our presence as elsewhere at his liberty," by 
reason of his being " so diseased in his head that without his great danger 
he cannot be conveniently discovered of the same." Under the will of 
his younger brother, Sir William Copinger, Lord Mayor of London in 1512, 
which will is dated 22nd Nov. 1512,' he acquired Fasbourn Hall, which had 
apparently been left to him by his father Walter. He died loth March, 
1532, and was buried in the church of Buxhall, together with his wife 
who had died 2nd Feb. 1512, with the following inscripton : 

' Walter Copynger, gent., which died the x. of Marche. An. M.D. 
xxxii. and Beatrix his wife the second of February, M.D. xii." 

The manor passed to Walter's eldest son, John Copinger. He was 
Lieutenant of the Tower, Master of the Mint, Groom of the Robes, and 
Senior Gentleman Usher to Hen. VIII. He married Jane, only daughter 
and heir of William Bond, of London, Clerk of the Green Cloth to Hen. VII. 
by Anna Alphage, only daughter and heir of John Alphage, of Boresplace, 
co. Kent, by Isabella, daughter and heir of Rice Petty t, in consequence of 
which marriage the Copingers quartered the arms of Bond, Alphage, and 
Pettyt. John Copinger died 26th March, 1540, having by his wiU dated 

'Will I4th July, 1441, proved 4th Dec., 'E.C.P., Bundle 54,40,62,369; and another 
1441. action between John Salter and 

'E.C.P., Bundle 19, 393, 28-31 Hen. VI. Thomas Salter, Ib. 62, 411. 

1450-1452. ' 4 E.C.P., Bundle 65, 169. 

5 D.L.I.P.M., vol. ii. No. 113, S.D. 
Proved ist March, 1513. 



BUXHALL 133 

7th May, 1539,' devised the manor to his son and heir, Henry Copinger, 
who mostly resided at All Hallows, Hoo, co. Kent. Henry Copinger 
purchased of the heirs of Symons the Davington Court estate in that county. 
In 1569 he presented his 3rd son Ambrose to the living of Buxhall, and 
the following year, on Ambrose's resignation, George Dickenson. He 
married about 1543 Agnes, 7th daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn, Knt., of 
Rushbrooke, by Anne his wife, daughter of Thomas Spring, of Lavenham. 
By the settlement made on this marriage the manor was settled upon 
Agnes for life, and after her death upon Henry Copinger and the heirs male 
of the body of the said Agnes, and in default of such issue on the said 
Henry Copinger in tail male. 2 Henry Copinger died at All Hallows I3th 
Sept. 1570, 3 and was succeeded by his widow Agnes, who survived till 1600, 4 
when she was succeeded by her grandson, Sir Francis Copinger, son of her 
eldest son, Thomas Copinger, and Frances Brooke, only daughter of William, 
Lord Cobham, K.G., by Dorothy, daughter of George Nevil, Lord Aber- 
gavenny. 5 Sir Francis Copinger held his first court 4th Nov. 1601, Agnes 
Copinger his grandmother having held her last court I3th March, 42 Eliz. 

By deed dated i6th Jan. 1602, Sir Francis Copinger then described 
as of St. Giles in the Field, London, conveyed the manor and advowson to 
his uncle, Henry Copinger, who was then rector of Lavenham by way of 
exchange for all right and interest which Henry had in the Manors of 
Dawley and Hartington in the county of Middlesex. A fine was accordingly 
levied this year by Henry Copinger against Francis Copinger and others. 6 
This fine included "Buxhall, Cocksall, Old Newton, and Fasebornes manors," 
the manor being actually settled upon Henry Copinger for life with remainder 
to his son, William Copinger, in fee. This Henry Copinger was. a man of 
note in his day. 7 He was a Fellow of St. John's, Cambridge, and elected 
Master of Magdalen College, Cambridge, under a mandate from Queen 
Elizabeth, but resigned at her request to avoid a question of title with the 
Earl of Suffolk. He married at Buxhall, igth Aug. 1579, Anne, daughter 
and coheir of Henry Fisher, of Lynne, co. Norfolk, and was an intimate 
friend of the eminent scholar and well-known wit, the Rev. George Ruggle, 
Fellow of Clare Hall, Cambridge, the author of " Ignoramus." Henry 
Copinger was in 1591 promoted to a prebendary stall in the Cathedral 
Church of York, being collated the 4th Dec. that year. He died 2ist Dec. 
1622, and is buried in the chancel of the church in Lavenham, where there 
is a well-known monument to his memory, and to that of several members 
of his family. 3 His will is dated 3ist Dec. 1621,' and he is the subject of 
some lines on Lavenham church, beginning : - 

" The great good Copinger whose godly ways 
'Twere well to imitate in modern days 
Maintain'd a character which grac'd our land, 
And for its meed a laurel might demand." 

He was succeeded by his son, William Copinger, who married gth Oct. 
1610, at Kettlebaston, Mary, daughter of Richard Goodday, of Kettle- 

1 Proved 26th January, 1540. "Fine, Hil. 44 Eliz. 

2 Court Rolls, 5 Edw. VI. r See Carter's Hist, of Cambridge, p. 295; 
M.P.M., 13 Eliz. pt. i. No. no. Fuller's Church Hist. 

4 Will 7th Feb. 1599, proved 27th Nov. 'See Copinger's Hist, of Buxhall, p. 108. 

1600. 'Proved Jan. 1623. 

'Articles of marriage of Thomas Copinger 

with Frances Brooke, Harl. MSS. 98. 



134 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

baston, and had two sons and six daughters. On the marriage of his son 
and heir, Henry Copinger, with M.irv, daughter and coheir of Henry Herries, 
of Shenfield, co. Essex, by Mary his wife, daughter of Sir Harbottle 
Grimston, Bart., he executed a settlement dated jth (><t i () 47, of the 
manor under which it was settled on William Copinger the settlor and his 
wife Mary for their lives, then on Henry Copinger in tail male, with remainder 
to William C'opinger, the 2nd son in f< I he property included in the 
settlement was (inter nliti) "The manors of Huxhall alias Buckeshall 
Cokesall alias Cockesalls ould Notions and ffasebounes together with the 
perpetual advowson and right of patronage of the Church of Buxhall." 

William Copinger the father died I3th Jan. 1648, in his &7th year, 1 
and the manor passed to his widow Mary, who continued lady of the manor 
until her death 4th March, 1663,' when the manor devolved upon Henry 
Copinger, the son, who in 1668 barred the estates tail under the settlement 
of 1647, and by deed dated ist Nov. 1668, declared the use of the fine 
levied to be to himself for life, then for his wife Mary for life, and then to 
his heirs male by his wife Mary, with remainder to himself in fee. Henry 
Copinger died 4th Dec. 1675, having by his will dated 3rd Dec. 1675, 3 
devised the manor to trustees in trust for sale for the raising of certain 
charges and subject thereto to his son, Henry Copinger, in fee. Mary, his 
widow, succeeded. Henry Copinger the son in March, 1680, barred the 
entail created by his father's settlement of 1668, and limited the manor to 
himself in fee, and the next year by deed 7th June, 1681, purported to sell 
the same (i.e., his estate expectant on her decease) to his mother Mary. 
In 1686 he married Sarah Goodday, only daughter and heir of George Good- 
day, and by a settlement dated 25th May, 1689, in which his mother joined, 
the manor was settled after certain limitations to secure an annuity to the 
mother Mary, and a term for the benefit of incumbrances, on himself in fee. 
Goodday advanced money on the property and various complications 
arose, and proceedings ensued. Henry Copinger died in July, 1691, 4 
and his mother Mary the following month of October. Henry Copinger 
left his widow surviving and one daughter only, Sarah Copinger, an infant 
of three years. By a deed in 1708 the manor was vested in trustees to the 
use of Mary Copinger (a sister of Henry Copinger who had advanced money 
to her sister-in-law) for 2,000 years for securing the sum owing to her, with 
remainder to Sarah Copinger in fee. By articles of agreement on the 
marriage of Sarah Copinger the younger, the only daughter of Henry Copinger 
and Sarah his wife, with Dr. Thomas Hill dated 2Oth Dec. 1709, it was agreed 
that the manor should be settled, and that he should pay off Mary Copinger's 
charge, or if not Sarah his wife would on attaining 21, convey the manor 
to Mary in fee. By a deed dated 22nd December, 1710, on Sarah attaining 21, 
according to the agreement Thomas Hill and his wife conveyed the manor to 
Mary Copinger in fee, and she retained the same till her death igth May, 1720. 
By her will dated 2Oth June, 1719, she devised the manor to Thomas 
Hill, eldest son of Dr. Thos. Hill, and Sarah his wife in fee. Thomas Hill 
by his will dated 5th July, 1746, confirmed the settlement he had made 
of the manor on his wife Lydia, and devised the manor to her for life, with 
remainder to his only daughter Lydia. Thomas Hill died 5th Sept. 1746, 
and his widow 4th May, 1748, at the early age of 23, leaving her only child 
Lydia, who died 8th May, 1759, at the age of 13, unmarried, when the 

'Will 4th Oct. 1647, proved 22nd Jan. 'Proved 27th Jan. 1676. 

1648. 4 Will ist Aug. 1690, proved gth Jan. 1693. 

'Will proved 7th Jan. 1665. 



BUXHALL. 135 

manor passed to the Rev. Henry Hill, brother of Thomas, and then rector 
of Buxhall. He married Susan Hulton, and by his will dated I2th Sept. 
J 775> devised the manor to his wife Susan for life with remainder to his son 
Henry in fee. Susan, the widow, by a deed dated 2Qth Sept. 1776, conveyed 
it to her son Henry free from her life interest. 

Henry Hill by his will dated 28th July, 1826, devised the manor to his 
wife, Elizabeth Tweed, for life, with remainder to trustees for the term of 
21 years from testator's death in case his nephew, Copinger Gooch, should so 
long continue and be a Fellow of Corpus Christi College upon the trusts 
therein mentioned, and upon the death of his widow and the expiration 
or determination of this term to his nephew Copinger Gooch in fee. 

Elizabeth died 3rd Mar. 1831, when the Rev. Copinger Gooch, who 
had assumed the name of Hill in place of Gooch, succeeded to the lordship. 
He married in July, 1830, Emily, daughter of the Rev. George Pyke, of 
Baythorn Park, co. Essex, and died I3th May, 1870, when the manor 
passed to his eldest surviving son and heir, the Rev. Henry Hill, who i4th 
Aug. 1862, married Eleanor, daughter of Matthew Chamley, of Warcop, 
co. Westmoreland. 

In 1899 the manor was sold by the incumbrancers of the Rev. Copinger 
Hill, and of his son, the Rev. Henry Hill, to Walter Arthur Copinger, of 
Manchester and Buxhall, who is the present lord of the manor. 

The original mansion house of the manor was no doubt the residence 
now known as Fasbourn Hall, for its surroundings pretty clearly indicate 
the fact. In later times, and when the manor was held generally by the 
rector, an edifice known as " Buxhall Hall " was erected near to the church, 
and in a meadow now known as the " Old Lawn," and became the manor 
house. An avenue of trees still points to its site, for exactly 200 years ago 
it was taken down and the present rectory erected in its stead. Fasbourn 
Hall is approached by an ancient bridge, double arched, much after the 
style of the Abbot's Bridge at Bury St. Edmunds. This leads to a fore- 
court which is still in a good state of preservation. There have evidently 
been at least three houses on the site at various times. The second house 
was probably erected in the time of Edw. III. or Rich. II. In the time of 
Anne, or a little later, a wing of the old black and white edifice either fell 
down or was pulled down, and a facing of brick given to that part left 
standing, the mansion being necessarily much reduced in size. A considerable 
amount of water is still stored within the moats, and at a short distance 
behind the edifice are the ancient fish ponds mentioned in the will of John 
Copinger in 1441. 

The mount at Fasbourn was no doubt erected for the defence of the 
estate of Buxhall held by the great landowner in that part. In the dawn 
of the feudal system these mounts are found to have been erected at the 
head-quarters of the lord, where stood the Aula or hall of the Saxon thane, 
and when the estates passed to the Normans the strong places for their 
defence would naturally hold the same relation as before and become the 
caput or head of the estate of the baron.' The hall was for some 
time known as Copinger Hall or Copinger Court, the family having 
been resident here as far back as 1240, when Alice Copinger, the wife of 



' Wall on Ancient Earthworks, p. 70. 



136 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Adam Copinger, was murdered. The following is the entry on the De 
Banco Rolls : 

Assize Roll, No. 818. 

Note. This is a Suffolk Assize Roll containing " Assizes " and " Pleas 
of the Crown." The latter commence on m. 45. 

m. 45. " Placita corone capta apud Gypewicu coram Willo Ebor fiposito Beu'laci 
HenFde Bathon 1 sociis suis Justic Itin in CofhSuff. anno F Reg Hnf fil Reg Jotes xxiiij 1 " 
a die Pascti in tres Septimarias." 

- 47. " Veredictum Hundredi de Stowe venit p xij 1 * 

Agnes q fuit uxor Ade kopenger inuenta luit occisa in domo Ade kopenger in Bukeshale, 
Thomas Copenger p'm* inventor venit 1 no malecdit'. Et Clairicia de Buckeshale 
q fuit in ea<J domo 1 tune ligata fuit venit 1 no malecdit' n* sciut qui occidunt earn. Et q 
villata de Buckeshal n6 leuauit utes n c fecit sectam. Jo in mTa Et Thomas fil ordmeri 
un' vicinox qui attact* fuit p morte ilia no venit 1 fuit atacti p Jotem copeng' Adam 
t yk mud Jo in mfa. Et q xij r flo p' sentanunt Engl j-o in mTa. 

In 1332 Geoffrey Fausebroun, the then rector of Buxhall, resided here 
until his death in 1361. 

Fasbourn Hall is mentioned in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Buxhall 
in the times of Queens Mary and Elizabeth as " the tenement Fasborne," 
and in both cases is stated to be in the hands of the lord. 

It is specifically mentioned in the will of John Copinger in 1441, and 
in 1512 formed part of the estate of Sir William Copinger, Lord Mayor of 
London, being by his will devised in the following terms : " I woll that 
my brother Walter Copynger and Beatrice his wife haue all my lands and 
tene'ts, rents and s'uices, called ffawsebornys, w' all their appurces sett, 
lying and beyng in Boksall, Hecham, and Bretnam, in the countie of Suff. 
To haue and to hold all the foresaid lands, tene'ts, rents and s'uices, w' the 
appurces to the foresaid Walter Copynger and Beatrice his wife during 
their naturall liffe, and the lyves of euery of theym longest lyving. And 
after the decesse of the saide Walter and Beatrice I woll that all the said 
lands and ten'ts and other the premes, w' the appurtenances, holly remayn 
vnto the said John Copynger, son and heyre of the said Walter, and to 
his heyres male of his body lawfully begotten. And for defaulte of such 
yssue, the remayndre therof to the heyres generall of the said Wall 
Copynger my broder, to haue and to holde vnto theym and to theire heyres 
and assignes in fee for euermore." 

The hall was evidently enjoyed with the rest of the Buxhall property 
by the Copingers, and was their place of residence. In the will of John 
Copinger, dated igth July, 1441, after giving to his brother Walter all his 
lands and tenements, rents, and services in Buxhall, subject to certain 
payments, is the following provision : " And that the said Alicia " (she 
was testator's wife, and an annuity had previously been given to her) 
" have the chamber called the chapel chamber situate in the tenement 
called Fausebrounys with a certain vaulted chamber thereto annexed for 
her proper use, with free egress and regress to the same as often as she 
pleases for the whole life of the said Alicia, together with the utensils in 
the kitchen of the said tenement and likewise egress and regress to the hearth 
and to thr pool there for drawing and having water with power to use the 
same and fish therein, and with liberty of going into the garden there for 
taking fruit and herbs according as she pleases." 



BUXHALL. 



137 







138 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Certainly Henry Copinger, lord of the manor, who died in 1675, lived 
here, for the fact is clearly to be deduced from the terms of his will. And 
that it continued to be held along with the other Buxhall property as late 
as 1692 is evidenced by depositions taken under Commissions 8 Will. III. 
June I3th, 1698, at Stowmarket ; June I7th, 1696, at Bury St. Edmunds, 
and preserved in the Exchequer. The plaintiffs were Sir Edward Ward, 
knt., Lord Chief Baron of the Court of Exchequer ; Samuel Ranstorne, 
merchant ; John Walker ; and the defendants George Goodday, Sarah 
Copinger, widow and relict of Henry Copinger, and Sarah Copinger (an 
infant under the age of twenty-one years, and daughter and heir of the said 
Henry Copinger), by Henry Ball, her guardian. The subject matter was : 
" Towns, fields, and parishes of Buxhall, Rattlesden, Great Finborrow, 
Little Finborrow, Hitcham, and Brettenham, in the county of Suffolk ; 
and a capital messuage called ' Faseborne Hall ' and a tenement called 
' Cogmans,' situate in Buxhall, ' or any other of the said parishes,' &c. 
Also touching a messuage, &c., called ' Cogsett Gardens/ &c., &c. Metes 
and bounds, mortgages," &c., &c. 

Another deposition by Commission is also preserved in the same suit 
November 7th, at Bury St. Edmunds, and November loth, 1696, at Stow- 
market. The subject matter as appearing in the forty-first report of the 
Deputy Keeper of the Public Records is " Capital messuage called Fare- 
borne Hall, alias Fareborne's Hall in Buxhall (Suffolk) and the lands 
belonging, and a farm in Buxhall aforesaid called ' Cogsett Garden,' &c., 
formerly belonging to Thomas Everson and Edward Everson, and since to 
Henry Copinger, and William Wade and John Pettit," &c. 

It seems that in 1681 Henry Copinger, being entitled subject to his 
mother Mary's life interest, sold to her his interest in remainder in Fas- 
bourn Hall with other property in Buxhall absolutely. The deed bears 
date June 7th, 1681. In 1686, upon his marrying, the Fasbourn Hall 
property was settled. It appears, however, that previous to this settle- 
ment on the 3rd Oct. 1681, Mary and Henry Copinger had mortgaged the 
property to Richard Peryfor 1,534. P erv died, having by his will dated 
26th Jan. 1684, appointed William Pery and John Pery his executors, 
who by deed 3ist Aug. 1685, transferred the mortgage which was for a 
term of 500 years to one Butler Buggin. By deed 2Oth Aug. 1690, it is 
recited that Butler Buggin was but a trustee for Sir Edward Ward, Lord 
Chief Baron of the Exchequer, but at that time a barrister of the Inner 
Temple, and a transfer of the security was made to Sir Edward, he making 
a further advance raising the mortgage debt to 1,696. 

The mortgagee, Sir Edward Ward, entered into possession and received 
the rents from 1692 to Michaelmas, 1694, as appears from the account 
rendered by his agent, Mr. Cocksedge.' 

The Fasbourn Hall estate did not therefore pass into the Hill family, 
and was not included in the settlement made by the two Sarah Copingers 
on the marriage of the latter with Dr. Thomas Hill in 1709. 

The estate, which consists of 191 acres, including what was formerly 
known as " Cogsetts Garden " and " Petits," was held in 1809 by one 
Holleck, when a Robert Ward (presumably not a descendant of the Lord 
Chief Baron, its former owner) was the tenant, and afterwards passed to 
the Hillhouse family of Finsbury Square, London, and was about five and 

'Copinger's Hist, of Buxhall, pp. 192 and 193. 



BUXHALL. 139 

twenty years ago sold to Mr. Cockrill, who mortgaged the same to Mr. 
Goodridge. On his death the property was sold by the executors, and has 
since been acquired by W. A. Copinger and added to his Buxhall estate. 

The manor called " Buxhall Hall" is the subject of three fines 
levied, two in the reign of Edw. III. and one in that of Rich. II. The 
first two are both in the year 1366, and in one Simon Badele and Richard 
Wylde are petitioners and John Ruly and Margaret his wife are deforciants, 
and in the other the same Simon De Badele and John Austyn are petitioners 
and the said John Ruly and Margaret his wife deforciants. 1 

The third fine was levied in 1384, Isabella de Hedersete being 
petitioner and the said John Ruly or Rugley and Margaret his wife being 
deforciants. 2 This latter was of the advowson as well as of the manor. 

Arms of ESTURMY : Quarterly, Gules and Or upon a bend Azure three 
plates. Of COPINGER : Bendy of six, Or and Gu. on a fesse Azure 
three plates. Of HILL : Gules, 2 bars, Erm. in chief a lion passant, Or. 

MANOR OF COCKERELLS HALL. 

The manor is so called after many generations of holders. The 
demesne lands were before the Conquest the inheritance of Ingelric the 
priest, and shortly after the Conquest were bestowed on Count Eustace, 
who married in 1050 Goda, the only daughter of King Ethelred II. by 
Emma, of Normandy, and sister by the father's side of Edward the Con- 
fessor. Eustace, the 3rd Count, was the Domesday tenant. The manor 
passed from him to his only daughter Matilda, Countess of Boulogne, 
who was married to King Stephen, at whose death it passed to his daughter 
Maud, who was abbess of Romsey. She was married under a dispensation 
from the Pope to Matthew, a son of the Count of Flanders, but no doubt 
the property passed into the hands of Hen. II. when Count William of 
Boulogne fell in the Toulouse campaign in 1159 fighting in the King's 
service. 

The manor seems to have passed by grant from Hen. II. to the 
Cantelins, and in 10 Rich. I. we find Emma de Cantelin lady of the manor, 
when it passed from her to Adam de Cockerell. He was succeeded by Sir 
William Cockerell, Knt., and he 9 Edw. I. by Sir Robert, his son 
and heir. 3 Sir Robert was succeeded by his son William. 4 

Robert Cockerell was the next lord, and was succeeded by Adam, 
and he in the time of Rich. II. by Robert Cockerell, who in 1397 settled 
the manor. 

The settlement is amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum, 
and is dated at Buxhall Tuesday next after the Feast of the Exaltation of 
the Sacred Cross, 17 Rich. II., and by it Robert Cockerell .described as of 
Buxhall, grants to Master John de Norton, clerk, John Spencer, parson of 
Drinkstone, and Robert de Aisshefeld " the Manor of Buxhall " (that is, 
of course, this manor of Cockerells Hall in Buxhall), and lands and tenements 
in Buxhall and Rattlesden. The deed is witnessed by Rob. Capel, Rob. de 
Neketon, Robt. Aldwick, Rob. fil. Rob. Capel, Joh. de Halle, Rob. Hervy. 

The next lord met with is John Cockerell, but whether son or grandson 
of Robert is uncertain. John Cockerell, son of Robert was lord in 1474. 

'Feet of Fines, 40 Edw. III. 29, 31 'Ancient Deeds, 15 Edw. I. A. 5487. 

'Feet of Fines, 8 Rich. II. 18. 4 Rolls of Parl. i. 4796. 



140 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and the Roll of a Court held by him this year is amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum. 1 

John Cockerell seems to have parted with the manor in 1525, for we 
meet this year with a fine levied of it by Ralph Symonds and others against 
him. It included not only the manor but also lands and tenements in 
Buxhall, Rattlesden, and Finborough. 1 William Betts, by his will 6th 
August, 1551, wherein he describes himself as of " Boxwell," leaves the 
Manor of Cockerells to his son, John Betts, and his heirs, and in default 
of heirs to his daughter Agnes. The will, which is at Norwich, contains 
this peculiar direction as to the manor : " My Manor in Boxall called 
Cokerells to be let for three years to pay my debts. I will that John my 
son shall have it at the same price George Saulter hiered it of Master 
Symonds and all my corn and cattell to my son John to pay my debts 
with the farm of the manor and my wife's dowry. If son John die and no 
will made then my daughter Agnes to enjoy the same and if die then William 
Betts of Hadnam to be the lease (sic) of the Manor and corn and cattell." 
Possibly William Betts acquired from Ralph Symonds, and John Betts the 
son sold it, or the Betts may have been merely lessees of the manor. In 
1557 the manor was vested in John Thurston and others, and a fine was this 
year levied against them by James Revett, to whom the manor accordingly 
passed. 3 

Davy says Sir John Spring held the manor in 1547, and that on his 
death I2th Aug. 1547, it passed to his son and heir, Sir William Spring, of 
Pakenham, but this is very doubtful. We meet with a fine of the manor 
in 1575 levied by Henry Frenche against Charles Wurliche and others, 4 
but it is clear that this very year the manor was held by William Vesey, 
of Hintlesham, son of Robert Vesey, of Hadleigh, as in his will dated 3rd 
June, 1575, he specifically mentions it and devises it to his younger son 
Charles, 5 and to the heirs of his body, and in default of such issue to his 
(testator's) son William and the heirs of his body with divers remainders 
over. The two brothers, Charles and William, were sons of the testator by 
his second wife Joane, daughter of Robert Cutter, of Ipswich, and widow 
of John Walton, of Hadleigh. William Vesey 6 the father held his first 
court 7th Sept. i Eliz. [1559], and died 4th July, 1577. Charles died without 
issue, and William his brother came in under the entail, and in 1596 a fine 
was levied of the manor against him by Robert Derhaugh and others. 7 
William Vesey held his first court ist Sept., 43 Eliz. [1601], and the roll of 
this court is preserved amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum, 8 as is also the roll of a court held by him in 1603.' He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Reynolds, of Holton. 

By a recognizance dated 3oth October, 1605, acknowledged before Sir 
John Popham, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, Charles Vesey, 
the eldest son of William Vesey, bound himself in 2,000, the defeasance 
being that " if the said Charles Vesey permit and suffer the scyte of this 
Manner called the Priory in Hintlesham . . . And the Mannor of 
Cockerells w lh the Tenement Gunnells in Buxall and Ratlesden . . . 

'Add. Ch. 26177. 'See Hintlesham Priory Manor, in Samford 
'Fine, Hil. 17 Hen. VIII. Hundred. 

'Fine, Mich. 4 Mary I. 'Fine, Easter, 38 Eliz. 

4 Fine, Easter, 17 Eliz. 'Add. Ch. 26198. 

'I.P.M., 29 Eliz. Add. Ch. 26200. 



BUXHALL. 141 

to descend and give after his death to the next heires male of the bodie of 
the sayd William Veisey, the father of the sayd Charles Veisey should 
happen to die without heire male of his bodie lawfullie begotten without 
discontinuinge or altering the estate in Tayle male by William Veisey the 
Grandfather." In other words, the bond was given to debar as far as 
possible Charles Vesey from cutting off or barring the entail. William 
Vesey, by his will dated loth April, 1616, proved at Norwich, isth July, 
1616,' appointed his 2nd son William executor. Charles Vesey succeeded 
his father, and had livery of the manor in 1616. He held his 
first court 3rd Oct. 1623. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Edmund 
Doyly, of Shottesham, co. Norfolk, and by deed dated 2nd August, 1625, 
on the marriage of his son and heir, Thomas, with Mary, daughter and coheir 
of Thomas Bull, of Flowton, covenanted to settle the manor as a provision 
by way of jointure. 

In 1630 William Vesey, the brother of Charles, in order that Charles 
and Thomas might effectually jointure the wife of the latter agreed that he 
would not, after the marriage, take any advantage of the bond or 
recognizance above so far as the Manor of Cockerells with the tenement 
Gunnells was concerned, in case the said Mary Bull survived the said Thomas 
Vesey. This consent he gave by deed dated 26th May, 1630-. 

Charles Vesey died in 1657, an d was succeeded by his son, Thomas 
Vesey. Thomas Vesey died in 1679,* and was succeeded by his son, Charles 
Vesey, who married Frances, daughter of Sir George Wenyeve, of Bretten- 
ham Park, and of Christian, daughter of Sir Dudley (afterwards lord) 
North. Charles Vesey died in France 5th October, i684, 3 leaving an only 
son, Dudley (so called after his great-grandfather, Lord North), who died 
about 1700 under age, and without issue. Subject to the interest of Frances, 
the widow of Charles Vesey, who had married John Tudman, of Hammer- 
smith, doctor of physic, the manor passed to William Vesey, of Elmsett, 
brother of Charles, and he by deed dated 2Oth April, 1710, sold it to Gregory 
Copinger, then living at Norton, but subsequently at Bromehall House, co. 
Norfolk. Gregory Copinger married Elizabeth Kirkham, and died loth 
Feb. 1724, at the age of 65, being buried at Weting St. Mary, in Norfolk. 
By his will dated i8th Oct. 1724, he devised the manor to his son, Gregory 
Copinger, for life, with remainder to his (testator's) grandson Gregory in 
tail male, with remainder to his nephew, Thomas Copinger, in fee. Gregory 
Copinger the son was High Sheriff for Suffolk, 1724, and resided at Cockerells 
Hall. He died in 1743, and was buried at Buxhall 1st Oct. and by his will 
dated 22nd Dec. 1739, devised the manor to his wife for life and after her 
decease to his daughter Sarah in fee. No doubt his son Gregory had died 
in his father's lifetime without issue male. Probably, however, he had 
attained 21 and barred the entail. 

In 1745 Sarah Copinger, Gregory's daughter, married Thomas Moyle, 
of Bury St. Edmunds, and by a settlement made on this marriage, dated 
8th Dec. 1745, the manor was conveyed in strict settlement subject to 
Sarah Copinger, the widow's, life interest. Sarah Moyle died I7th June, 
1764, and her husband Thomas, 4th May, the same year, leaving three 
children Thomas Copinger Moyle, Mary, and Isabella. Thomas Copinger 

1 1. P.M., 14 Jac. 3 Will 26th Ma> , 1681, proved ist July, 

'Will 2oth Feb. 1678, proved 20th Nov. 1685, P.C.C. 

1679. 



142 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Moyle became entitled under the entail created by his mother's marriage 
settlement, and the entail was barred in Jan. 1769. Sarah, widow of 
Gregory, died in 1772, and was buried at Buxhall i4th Feb., and Thomas 
Copmger Moyle 26th May, the same year, sold the manor to Thomas Garner, 
of Eldon. He died I3th March, 1803, having by his will dated gth Jan. 
1800, appointed his property to be sold by his executors, and they sold 
to James Webster, of Powis Place, Great Ormond Street, London, 5th 
Nov. 1812. Webster sold the manor 20th April, 1832, to the Hon. and 
Rev. Henry Leslie, of Wetherden, afterwards Sir Henry Leslie, Bart. 

He was the son of Sir Lucas Pepys, Bart., M.D., physician to King 
Geo. III., by Jane Elizabeth Leslie his wife, Countess of Rothes, and was 
consequently cousin-german of Lord Cottenham, and of Dr. Henry Pepys, 
Bishop of Worcester. Sir Henry married isth Feb. 1816, Elizabeth Jane, 
daughter of the Rev. James Oakes, of Tostock, but became a widower on 
the 1 2th of the following December. At the period of his decease he was 
rector of Sheephall, co. Herts, and Wetherden, Suffolk, prebendary of 
Exeter, and one of the Queen's chaplains-in-ordinary. His only sister, 
Lady Harriet Leslie, was the first wife of the Earl of Devon. Sir Henry 
Leslie died at his residence, Juniper Hill, Mickleham, co. Surrey, gth Dec. 
1849, and having no issue the baronetcy devolved under the limitation 
of the patent on the then Lord Chancellor, who was the heir male of the 
Pepys family, and who was already in possession of a baronetcy. The 
manor was sold by the trustees of Sir Henry Leslie's will (dated 2Oth Aug. 
1840), to Edward Bennett by deed dated I7th Dec. 1853. He by deed 
dated 23rd June, 1855, conveyed the manor to the trustees of his marriage 
settlement, Frederick Harrison and G. Alderson, who ist Feb. 1869, sold 
to Thomas Jonathan Loch, who i7th Nov. 1870, sold to the Rev. Henry 
Hill, rector of Buxhall. 

The manor and estate were sold by the incumbrancers of the said 
Henry Hill I7th Dec. 1897, to Walter Arthur Copinger, of Manchester and 
of Buxhall, who is the present lord. 



MANOR OF LEFFEY HALL. 

This at the time of the Domesday Survey was the property of William 
de Warren, a follower of the Conqueror, who died in 1089. In the time of 
Edw. I. the manor belonged to Sir Thomas Weyland, Knt., the eldest son 
of Sir John Weyland. He was Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench, 
and his unfortunate history is too well known to be here repeated. 1 He 
died in 1290, shortly after he had been transported beyond the seas, and 
his widow Margery succeeded him. He left issue three sons, William, John, 
and Richard, and the last succeeded his mother in 1315. 

He died in 1319, leaving an only child Cecily, married to Sir Bartholomew 
Burghersh, 4th Baron one of the most eminent warriors of his day, and one of 
the original Garters. He partook of the glories of Poictiers, and surviving 
his wife died in 1369. He was succeeded by his only daughter Elizabeth, 
married to Sir Edward le Despenser, K.G., Baron de Spenser, 1357. He 
died in 1375, and Elizabeth in 1409. Her daughter Anne married 
ist, Sir Hugh Hastings, of Elsing, and 2ndly Thomas Morley, 

1 See Manor of Brandeston, Loes Hundred. 






BUXHALL. 



143 



4th Baron, 1 and the manor thus passed into the Morley family. Thomas 
Morley, 4th Baron, died at Calais 24th Sept. I4i6/ and his eldest son Robert 
who had married Isabel, daughter of John, Lord Molines, having died in 
his father's lifetime, the manor devolved on Robert's son, Thomas, 5th 
Lord Morley, then 17 years of age, who married Isabel de la Pole, daughter 
of Michael, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, and died in Dec. 1435. Their son, Robert 
Morley, 6th Baron, married Elizabeth, daughter of William, Lord Roos, 
and died in 1442-3, and Robert's daughter and heir Alianore married William 
Lovel, 2nd son of William, 7th Baron Lovel, of Tichmersh. 

This Alianore brought to her husband William the baronies of Morley, 
Marshall, Heagham, and Rhie, together with the office of hereditary Marshal 
of Ireland, and he was summoned to Parliament in 1468 by the title of 
" William Lovel de Morley, Chevalier," and was again called by writ to 
the Parliament intended to be held at York, 22nd Sept. in the 9 Edw. IV., 
but before the day assigned, viz., on the 7th of the same month, he received 
a new writ from the King suspending his former summons because, as 
the record affirms, there was need of immediate recourse to arms for 
resisting that invasion of the French and Scots with which the Kingdom 
was then threatened ; and again was summoned to the Parliament held 
at Westminster 10 Edw. IV (and 49 Hen. VI.) by the same title. He died 
23rd July, 1476, and his widow not many days after, namely, 28th Aug., 
leaving one son, Henry Lovel, 8th Lord Morley, and one daughter, Alice. 

Henry Lovel, Lord Morley, was then little more than 10 years old. 
When quite a young man he was sent into Flanders with Lord Daubiney 
and others in aid of Maximillian, King of the Romans, whose subjects 
in those parts had then rebelled against him, and he was there killed by a 
gun shot at Dixmude, from whence his body being carried to Calais, was 
there interred in 1489. 

He had married Elizabeth, daughter of John de la Pole, Duke of 
Suffolk, by the Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet, sister to King Edward IV. 
and King Richard III., by which alliance this Henry Lovel, Lord Morley, 
became nephew to the kings last named and cousin german to King Henry 
VII., who married the daughter of King Edward IV. His lady Elizabeth 
was also heiress (by the failure of issue of all his brothers and sisters) of 
John de la Pole, Earl of Lincoln, her brother, who was declared heir to 
the cousin by King Richard III., his uncle. The operation of the settlement 



1 He was the son of William, Lord Morley, 
who died in 1380 (by his wife Cecily, 
daughter and eventually heir of 
Thomas, Lord Bardolf), by his wife 
Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir 
John Damorie, Knt., by his wife 
Elizabeth de Clare, widow of John de 
Burgh, Earl of Ulster, and daughter 
of Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Glou- 
cester, by his wife Joan Plantage- 
net, surnamed Joan of Acres, daugh- 
ter of King Edw. I. Which Thomas, 
Lord Bardolph, was son of Hugh, 
Lord Bardolf (who died in 1304) by 
his wife Isabel, daughter and coheir 
of William, Lord Aguillon, by his 
wife Margaret de Ripariis, Countess 
of Down, daughter and coheir of 
Warrin FitzGerald, Baron of Stoke- 



curcy, co. Somerset, which William, 
Lord Morley, was son of Robert, 
Lord Morley, who died in France in 
1360 by his wife Hawisia, sister 
and sole heir of John, Lord Mare- 
schal, Lord Marshal of Ireland, and 
daughter of William, Lord Mare- 
schal (who died in 1315), son of 
John, Lord Mareschal, son of 
another John, Lord Mareschal (bro- 
ther of William Mareschal, the 
great Earl of Pembroke) by his 
wife Aliva, daughter and heir of 
Hubert, Lord Rie, who died in 
1171, which Robert, Lord Morley, 
was son of William Morley, sum- 
moned to Parliament 2oth Dec. 
1299. 
Admin, at Lambeth, 3rd March, 1416-7. 



144 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

which brought this family so near to the succession to the Crown was, 
however, prevented by the revolution which established Hen. VII. upon 
the throne. 

Elizabeth survived her husband many years, and though it is said 
she was a woman of uncommon beauty, she resisted all temptations to 
a second marriage, leading a most exemplary life of virtue in a state of 
widowhood till her death. She was buried in the church of Hallingbury 
Morley, Essex, where a monument was erected to her memory bearing 
the following inscription : 

Elizabetha, Ducis Suffolciae filia, atque inclyti viri Henrici Lovel, 
Morlei Domini Uxor, tanto Maritum amore prosequebatur, ut in praelio 
contra Gallos ictu pilae aeneae mortuo, de secundis nuptiis, ut cogitaret 
nunquam postea adduci potuit, sed florenti etate, corporisque non mediocri 
pulchritudine ad mortem usque viduam permanere voluit : Aliis Mulieribus 
rarissimum castitatis exemplum Vixit Ann. 51 Ob. Anno Benemerenti 
posuit Henricus Parker, nepos, Eques Auratus, Morlei Dominus. 

Henry Lovel, Lord Morley, dying without issue, the manor passed 
to his sister and heir Alice, who married, ist, Sir William Parker, Knt., 
and Lord Morley in her right. For his valour and conduct in the wars 
in Scotland he was knighted by King Edw. IV. and was made King's 
Counsellor and standard-bearer later to King Rich. III. Upon 
the accession, however, of Hen. VII., he fell into disgrace, and was not 
summoned to Parliament or allowed to assume the office of Marshal of 
Ireland, but lay imprisoned in the Tower during that whole reign and 
until 1510, in which year he died by violent means, as his epitaph in the 
church of Hallingbury declares : 

Epitaphium Gulielmi Parkere", praeclari. Equitis Aurati, 

Morlei Domini. 

En qui secur procedis menti parumper 
Hospes, siste gradum, verbaque pauca lege. 
Hie jaceo, ut cernis, Gulielmus nomine Parker, 

Eques praeclaris nobilitatus avis, 

Dum vixi, vixi multis praecharus amicis, 

Vi tamen heu perii Quantum inimicitiae ! 

Conquerar, an taceam mecunque ut luserit olim 

Fortuna instabili dum stetit ilia rota ? 

Nil querar, O hospes, pateant mihi limina cli 

Accedant votfe, fac tua vota precor. 

Vixit Ann. 56 Ob. Ann. 1510. 
Patri bene merenti gratissimus films, 
Henricus Parker, Eques Auratus, 
Morlei Dominus posuit. 

Alice Lovel, Lady Morley, after the death of Sir William Parker, married 
Sir Edward Howard, K.G. (and son of Thomas, 2nd Duke of Norfolk), 
Admiral of the Fleet, who was killed shortly afterwards before Brest, 
in Brittany, 25th April, 1513.' 

She herself died in 1518. In her will dated Qth April, 1518, and proved 
22nd Feb. following, she orders her body to be buried in the parish church 
of St. Andrews, of Hingham, in Norfolk. She bequeaths to Henry Parker, 
Lord Morley, her son and heir, her bed of cloth of gold and tawney velvet, 
also her best bason and ewer of silver and parcel gilt, a bowl gilt, with a 

'Will 1512, proved i8th July, 1513. 



BUXHALL. 145 

cover gilt with her lord's arms and her's upon it ; a standing cup with a 
cover, gilt, that was gotten by her ancestors, and all the ornaments of her 
chapel, with other parcels of plate, also various other legacies to her two 
daughters, Jane and Alice Parker, and to Sir Thomas Lovel, K.G., then 
treasurer with the King's grace, &c. 

Most probably in pursuance of this will she was at first interred in the 
church of Hingham, but Henry Parker, Lord Morley, her son, erected 
a marble monument in the church of Hallingbury-Morley, which, as her own 
epitaph recites, he designed for the common place of burial of his family, 
and caused the bones of his grandmother, of his father and mother, and of 
his wife to be there entombed, at which time doubtless he removed the 
body of Alice Lovel to the same church of Hallingbury, where her epitaph 
was in these words : 

Nobilis heu tristi concessit faemina fato 

Cujus in hoc tumulo condita membra jacent, 

Morlei dicta Donima cui Alicia nomen 

A Lovello fuit. Vivat ubique precor. 

Maribus nituit claris, et stemmate clara, 

Aurea nunc inter sydera clara nitet. 

Corpus terra tenet, sed spiritus alta polorum 

Regna tenet felix. Hoc Deus ipse velit. 

Vixit Ann. 60 Ob. Ann. 1518. Matri beneerenti 

posuit filius gratissimus Henricus Parker, Eques 
Auratus, Morlei Dominus. 

Henry Parker in 1513 was summoned to Parliament by the name of 
" Henry Parker de Morley Chivalier," and I5th April, 1523, as Lord Morley. 
In 1534 he had a controversy with Lord Dacre,of Gillesland, for precedence, 
which was adjudged to him. He married Alice, daughter of Sir John 
St. John, of Bletso, co. Bedford, and had by her a son Henry, created a 
Knight of the Bath at the coronation of Anne Boleyn. This son died before 
his father, leaving by Grace his wife, daughter of John Newport, of Brent 
Pelham, co. Herts., a son Henry, who succeeded his grandfather on his 
death in 1555,' as Henry, nth Baron Lord Morley. 

The manor in the time of Edw. VI. belonged to Sir John Spring/ who 
is called Lord of Leffey in the Buxhall Court Rolls of that reign. The 
manor, however, was shortly afterwards acquired by Thomas, Duke of 
Norfolk, who in 1568 sold it to Robert Rychars. 3 Robert Richars died 
in 1589, leaving his son and heir John, who sold in 1596 to Sir Robert 
Houghton, a serjeant at law and one of the Justices of the King's Bench. 4 
Sir Robert was the son of John Houghton and Agnes his wife, daughter 
of Robt. Play ford, of Brinton. Sir Robert married Mary, daughter of 
Robt. Richars, of Wortham, in Kent, and died in 1623, his widow sur- 
viving him nine years. The manor passed to their son and heir, Francis 
Houghton, who married Helen Armiger, and died in 1629, wnen the 
manor passed to his son and heir Robert. Robert Houghton, who lived 
at Shelton, Norfolk, by his will 1660 directed his executors to sell his 

'Admin. 24th Jan. 1561-2. 3 Fine, Trin. 10 Eliz. 

'See Manor of Pakenham, Thedwestry 4 Fine, Mich. 38-39 Eliz. 
Hundred. 



146 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

estates for payment of debts. He died leaving an infant heir Charles, 
and his father's creditors obtained a decree for sale of Leffey Manor and 
other estates. 

In 1693 Sir Edward Hungerford was lord. In the early part of the 
i8th century the manor passed into the possession of Joshua Grigby, 
town clerk of Bury, who in 1723 married Mary, daughter of Richard Tulby, 
of Brockdish, co. Norfolk, High Sheriff of that county in 1729, by Frances 
his wife, niece and coheir of Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
who died in 1715. 

Joshua Grigby died in 1771, and his only son, Joshua Grigby, one of 
the knights of the shire for Suffolk in 1784, succeeded. He married Jane 
Bird, of Coventry, 1 and had three sons and five daughters. 

He died 26th Dec. 1798, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Joshua Grigby. The courts held by the Grigbys were as follows : 5th July, 
1725 ; 4th Nov. 1732 ; I7th Dec. 1733 ; 23rd Oct. 1740 ; I4th Jan. 1743 ; 
25th Aug. 1746 ; 3rd Dec. 1746 ; 6th Aug. 1747 ; 8th Feb. 1747 ; 30th 
April, 1750 ; 2nd May, 1752 ; 2Oth March, 1756 ; 3oth July, 1759 ; 22nd 
July, 1762 ; 25th June, 1765 ; 24th May, 1768 ; I2th Aug. 1771 ; 24th 
June, 1774 ; 3Oth June, 1776; i6th July, 1776; 1st Sept. 1783; 23rd Sept. 
1783 ; I4th Oct. 1783 ; 3Oth Jan. 1784 ; 1st Nov. 1787 ; I7th Dec. 1790 ; 
27th April, 1796 ; 22nd Nov. 1798 ; I2th May, 1800 ; 3oth Sept. 1800. 

In 1801 by indentures of lease and release of the I2th and I3th Oct. 
Joshua Grigby, who is described as " of Drinkstone, the eldest son and heir- 
at-law of Joshua Grigby, then late of the same place, Esq., deceased and 
also devisee in fee named in his last will and testament of all his real estates 
and which said Joshua Grigby the father was only son and heir-at-law 
and devisee in fee named in the last will and testament of Joshua Grigby 
formerly of Bury St. Edmunds, Gent., and also brother and heir-at-law, 
of Mary Grigby, of Bury, aforesaid, spinster deceased intestate," sold the 
manor to Robert Fuller, of Buxhall. 

Robert Fuller held his first court 23rd July, 1803, and held other courts 
23rd Aug. 1803 ; 4th Nov. 1803 ; 23rd June, 1807 ; ist July, 1809 ; 8th 
Nov. 1811. 

Robert Fuller made his will dated 24th Nov. 1812. After giving an 
annuity of 50 to his wife Susan for life, he devised the manor to his great 
nephew, John Fuller, for life with remainder to his sons successively in 
tail male, with remainder to the said John Fuller's daughters as tenants in 
common in tail with cross remainders between them, with remainder to his 
great-nephew, Thomas Fuller for life, with remainder as in the case of 
John Fuller, and in default to Robert Fuller Osborn, the father, and the 
heirs of his body, and in default to his (testator's) own right heirs for ever. 
By a codicil dated 3rd Jan. 1813, Robert Fuller gave another annuity of 
50 to his wife. The will and codicil were proved nth May, 1813, in the 
court of the Archbishop of Canterbury. 

John Fuller held his first court 30th Dec. 1814, and subsequent courts 
7th Nov. 1825 ; 28th April, 1826 ; 22nd June, 1827 ; 2ist Oct. 1831 ; 5th 
Sept. 1832 ; 2gth Nov. 1833 ; ist Nov. 1848 ; 7th Feb. 1852 ; 2nd July, 
1852 ; 22nd June, 1854 ; 2ncl J an - ^57 ; 3rd Sept. 1858. 

Robert Fuller Osborn the father died 2oth Sept. 1817, without barring 
his estate tail in remainder, leaving Robert Fuller Osborn, commonly 

' She died in Bedford Street, Covent Garden, 22nd May, 1789. 






BUXHALL. 147 

called Robert Osborn Fuller, his eldest son and heir-at-law, him surviving, 
and he by an enrolled deed dated 7th Dec. 1842, duly barred the entail. 
Susan, the widow of Robert Fuller, died in 1820. Thomas Fuller died 
January, 1844, without issue. John Fuller died a bachelor June, 1862 ; 
and 22nd Jan. 1865, the mortgagee of the estates, William James Owen 
Holmes, of Scole House, Norfolk, who then held securities to the amount of 
9,050, sold the estates and the manor as a separate lot, the purchaser of 
the manor being Charles Harper, of Hadleigh. From him the manor was 
acquired by Richard Newman, of Hadleigh, who held his first court 6th 
Nov. 1868, and subsequent courts 2Qth Dec. 1868 ; 7th Jan. 1869 ; 23rd 
Jan. 1869 ; agth Jan. 1869, and then by nine deeds of enfranchisement, 
enfranchised all the copyholds, and all his remaining interest was acquired 
from his representatives by Chailes James Grimwade, of Hadleigh, and 
whatever was left is now equitably vested in Walter Arthur Copinger, 
the holder of the main Manor of Buxhall. 

The Court Rolls from 1725 to the present time are in the possession 
of the said Walter Arthur Copinger. 

Arms of HOUGHTON : Arg. on a bend Sa. 3 eagles displayed Or. 



MANOR OF FENN HALL. 

This formed part of the holding of Frodo, brother of the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, at the time of the Domesday Survey. In 1281 it belonged 
to Sir John Tendring, from whom it passed to William Tendring, who had 
a grant of a market at Stoke by Nayland in 1303. 

At the end of the I4th century the manor was owned by Sir William 
Tendring, who married Katherine, daughter and heir of William Mylde, 
of Clare, and widow of Sir Thomas Clopton, of Kentwell. From Sir William 
Tendring the manor passed in 1421 to his only child Alice, who married 
Sir John Howard, Knt., direct ancestor of the Dukes of Norfolk. She 
made her will as Alice Howard, I3th Oct. 1426,' devising her Manor of 
Buxhall (should be " in Buxhall ") to her son, Robert Howard. Sir 
Robert Howard married Margaret, eldest daughter of Thomas de Mowbray, 
Duke of Norfolk, and was succeeded by his son, Sir John Howard, created 
in 1470 Lord Howard, and in 1483 Duke of Norfolk. He fell at Bosworth 
Field under the banner of Rich. III., and the usual forfeitures followed. 
In 1544 the manor was vested in Sir John Spring/ and he devised it by his 
will dated this year to his executors for n years with remainder to his son, 
William Spring, in tail male. Sir John Spring died in 1547, and William 
Spring, to whom the estate tail was limited, managed to bar this, for in 
1573 he sold the manor to James Ryvett, of Bricet, a lawyer, who married 
Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Soame, of Wantisford. In 1587 an action 
was brought in the Court of Chancery by Robert Webbe against Robert 
Gages and Henry Gages to complete a purchase as to lands in Buxhall and 
Shelland Manor and an outhouse held by Robert Gages of this James Rivett 
as of his Manor of Fennhall and of the Manor of Shellands agreed to be sold 

1 Proved October 25th following. 2 See Manor of Pakcnham, in Thedwestry 

Hundred. 



148 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



to the plaintiff.' James Rivett died 3oth Jan. this same year, and was 
buried at Rattlesden with the following inscription : 

Here lyeth James Ryvett Esqier and 

Dorothy his wiefe. He was Councellor 

in ye lawe Gustos Rotulorum and Justis 

of Peace and Quorum in ye County of Suff. 

He departed this liefe the 30 of January 

A.D. 1587. She the 23 of Augst 

1617. 

Paternes of Virtue, imytable ever 

Yet ymytated sild but equalld never 

an orphane chyld woth or meed or merit 

(onely her hopes their virtues to inherit) 

This to her Parents Fame so dedicates 

That their renowne might overlive their Fates 

Pia Proles Unicaq : Filia 

S.L. 

Hoc monumentum Posuit 
memoriae ergo. 

James left an only son, Thomas Rivett, of Rattlesden, to whom the 
manor passed. He married Catherine, daughter of William Cotton, of 
Penfield Hall, in Essex, and died seised of Fenn Hall Manor in 1610. 
Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth we find 
an action brought by William Seyer against this Thomas Rivett and his 
mother Dorothy for relief against forcible entry and possession of lands 
parcel of Fennhall Manor being the complainant's inheritance. 2 

His eldest son, James Rivett, having died in his father's lifetime, 
Thomas Rivett was succeeded by his (James's) son and heir, another Thomas 
Rivett, of Rattlesden, who married Joan, daughter and coheir of John 
Savill, of Netherton, in Yorkshire, and died in 1625 without issue, when 
the manor passed to his brother, Edward Rivett, 3 who married ist Anne, 
daughter of Sir Christopher Heydon, Knt., and andly Anne, daughter of 
Thomas Ayghe, and died in 1660. 

In 1798 Sir William Rowley was lord, having probably purchased 
the manor in 1781. From this time to the present the manor has passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Nayland, in Babergh Hundred, and 
is now vested in Sir Joshua Thellusson Rowley, 5th Bart., who is the present 
lord of this manor. 



1 C.P. iii. 280. 

'C.P. iii. 26. 

3 He is described as Sir Edward Rivett in 
an admission by Frank Hedge, of 
Richard Pearl, of Rattlesden, to 



land of the manor, dated 27th Oct. 
1648, but in the admission of Richard 
Pearle, son of John, to the same 
lands, i4th Oct. 1659, ** " Edward 
Rivett, Esqr." 




COMBS. 149 

COMBS. 

HE one manor in this place was held at the time of the 
Domesday Survey by Robert, Earl of Moretaigne. 

It consisted in Saxon times of 2 carucates, 12 villeins, 
8 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne, 5 ploughteams 
belonging to the men, 2 mills, wood sufficient to support 16 
hogs, 12 acres of meadow, 2 horses, 24 beasts, 16 hogs, 
121 sheep, and 60 goats. 

At the time of the Survey the serfs were reduced to 2 and the 5 plough- 
teams of the men had come down by degrees, first to 3 and finally to i. 
This manor was held by Woolnough, a freeman under the Confessor. Under 
the said Woolnough were 50 freemen having a mill, and later they were 
under Count Brien, the predecessor of Earl Robert, as to commendation 
only, in the King's soc. They had under them 7 bordars with 8 carucates 
of land, and 16 ploughteams which at the time of the Survey were reduced 
by half. In the time of the Confessor there were 62 freemen. 

In Saxon times and later this Manor of Combs had been valued at 10, 
but at the time of the Survey it rendered 16, though it could scarcely yield 
the rent. 

The value of the 50 freemen in Saxon times was 16, but at the time 
of the Survey 31. The Survey, not very lucidly, adds : " but it could not 
be collected without a disturbance " (non possunt sufferre sine confusione). 
Earl Robert's predecessor Brien evidently shared somewhat of the resisting 
spirit of the freeholders, for it is recorded that since he had acquired the 
manor he had paid no dues to the Hundred court. 

Combs was stated to be 2 leagues long and i broad, and to have paid 
in a gelt 37^. 

Half a mill was held by Hugh de Montfort, which mill had belonged 
to a freeman holding of the manor in Brien's time, and claim was made by 
Hugh for the livery as belonging to the fee of his predecessor, but the view 
of this Hundred was that it never so belonged. 1 

There is the following entry in the Domesday Survey as to the high- 
handed dealings of one Nigel, a sergeant of Earl Robert de Moretaigne in 
reference to lands in Combs. It states that he " seized n acres belonging 
to Stow church, and added them to the Manor of Combs. But he is dead 
and there is none to make answer thereupon. And the Hundred testifies 
that they were alms lands belonging to the church, and 12 socmen in Combs 
used to be parishioners in Stow church, but now they are in Combs church. 
The said Nigel took them from Stow." 3 

The manor subsequently became divided into two manors, as Manor 
of Combs and Manor of Bavents or Bavent Combs. 

MANOR OF COMBS. 

This was the manor of the Saxon freeman Woolnough, after him of 
Count Brien the Norman, and at the time of the Domesday Survey was 
held by Robert de Burgh, Count of Moretaigne, in Normandy, brother to 
Odo, Bishop of Bayeux, and likewise half-brother to the Conqueror. He 
was created Earl of Cornwall soon after the Conquest, and is conspicuous 
in the Bayeux tapestry, but William of Malmesbury, gives him the 

'Dom. ii. 291, 2916. J Dom. ii. 2916. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

character of being dull and indolent " crassi et hebetis ingenii hominem." 
He married Matilda, youngest daughter of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of 
Shrewsbury. He died in 1091, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William, Earl of Moretaigne. He took part in a rebellion against King 
Hen. I., and being taken was kept prisoner for life and deprived of all his 
possessions in England. 

The manor was next held by Ralph Avenel, a Norman. 

In 1206 Bartholomew de Glanville held the manor, for he granted the 
same to Sir Robert de Creke and Agnes his wfe, daughter of William de 
Glanville. Possibly the whole lordship did not pass,' but 2 carucates of 
land in Combs certainly were settled on Agnes and her heirs. In 1209 the 
Countess Gundreda sued the said Robert de Creke for a reasonable dower 
in a free tenement, &c., late of Roger de Glanville's, her husband, in Middleton, 
Yokesford, and Bacton. Agnes had a son Bartholomew, 2 who in the time 
of King Hen. III. gave lands to the monastery of St. Osyth, in Essex, for 
the soul of Hervey de Glanville, his mother's grandfather. 

He also gave to the prioress of Campsey 155. yearly rent in Combs, 
and Margery de Crek gave a certain tenement to the prioress of Flixton 
with a water mill in Combs which Margery held of the King in chief. 3 
Amongst the Stowe Charters in the British Museum is a grant in 1275 by 
this Margery de Crek, described as a widow, to the priory of Flixton of a 
messuage and lands in Combs, with the advowson of the church, except a 
yearly rent payment of 22s. 4 

Bartholomew de Creke is said in the Testa de Nevill (300) to have held 
the manor of Ralph Avenel, but his rent of 22/t. and \ mark escheated to the 
King.' He died about 1232. He (Bartholomew de Creke) married Margery, 
daughter and heir of Geoffrey de Anos or Hanes, of Hillington, lord of 
Uphall and Netherall Manors, co. Norfolk, and had issue by her three sons 
and one daughter, namely, Robert, Geoffrey, John, and Sarah. 

The manor, on the death of Bartholomew de Creke, passed to his widow 
in dower, and on her death in 1252* went to the eldest son, Robert de 
Cieke, 7 who died without issue about 1288.* Geoffrey de Creke the 2nd 
and John the 3rd son also died without issue, 9 and Sarah married Roger 
Fitz Peter Fitz Osbert, and eventually succeeded to this estate. Amongst 
the Bodleian Charters is a grant by Richard de Boyland and Matilda his 
wife to Roger Fitz Peter fitz Roger Fitz Osbert and Sarah his wife of a 
rent of 285. $\d. arising from lands, &c., in Combs and elsewhere. 10 

Sarah dying without surviving issue in 1292 (Margaret her only daughter 
having died in her lifetime), Roger Fitz Peter fitz Osbert held the lordship 
by the curtesy of England, and there is an authority in 1303 for him to 
retain this manor on resettlement of the Manors of Watheand Somerleyton." 
Roger died in 1306 without issue, 1 J and the descendants and heirs of Margaret, 
one of the sisters of Bartholomew de Creke and aunt to Sarah, and the 
descendants of Isabel, sister to Margaret, were found to be the coheirs of 
Sarah and inherited this lordship. 

'See Close Rolls, 2 Hen. III. pt. ii. 13. "I.P.M., 17 Edw. I. 16. 

*T. de N. 283. "He had a grant of free warren here in 

'H.R. ii. 192. 1285 (Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. I. 54) 

4 Stowe Ch. 361. see Harl. 58 1. 37 ; I.P.M., 22 Edw. I. 

'1324-5, R.P. i. 419. IO C. 1280 Bodl. Suff. Ch. 1286. 

'I.P.M., 36 Hen. III. 55- " I-Q-D. 31 Edw. I. File 44, 20. 

7 T. de N. 295. "I.P.M., Extent, 34 Edw. I. 58. 



COMBS. 151 

Margaret the eldest married Sir John de Thorpe, and in 1324 Alice, 
widow of John de Thorpe, grandson of Sir John,' who had died i6th May, 
1323,* had the King's writ directed to John de Blomvill for dower to be 
assigned to the said Margaret out of certain knights' fees which she inherited 
with her sister Isabel. The assignment of dower may be seen on the 
Close Rolls for I324- 3 There is also on the Close Rolls this same year an 
order to deliver in dower to this Alice the advowson of Combs church, to 
which John de Thorpe, her late husband, was wont to present on alternative 
occasions. 4 

It will be well first to trace this moiety, which may be called the Thorpe 
moiety, of the manor. On John de Thorpe's death he was succeeded by 
his son, Robert de Thorpe. He married Beatrice, daughter of Sir Edmund 
de Hengrave, and died in 1330, and an extent of the moiety of the manor will 
be found in his inquis. p.m. 5 

There is an order amongst the Originalia in 1331 to retain in the King's 
hand a moiety of Combs Manor, of which Robert de Thorpe died seised, as 
John de Thorpe his son was aged 14 years only, 6 and the same year we find 
on the Patent Rolls a grant to Ralph Sefoul of the custody during the 
minority oi John, son and heir, of two parts of a moiety of the manor late 
of Robert, son of John de Thorpe, tenant in chief. 7 John de Thorpe died 
in 1339," leaving Edmund his brother and heir, 9 and on the Close Rolls 
for 1340 we find an order to pay to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, arrears 
of 11. 35. ^d. rent and 155. of a certain yearly scutage, which John, son 
of Robert de Thorpe, was wont to render to the King for a moiety of the 
manor, and which the King had granted to the Earl in tail male, and John 
being dead the moiety was in the King's hands. 10 The moiety is mentioned 
in the Estreats (Edmund de Thorpe) in 1346." Margaret's sister and coheir 
Isabel had married the Lord John Valoins, and had a son Robert, whose son 
Robert, Lord Valoins, left two daughters and coheirs Roesia, who married 
Sir Edmund de Pakenham, and Cecily, the wife of Sir Robert de Ufford, Knt., 
and between the heirs of the two sisters of Bartholomew and aunts of 
Sarah de Creke was this lordship divided. We meet in 1310 with authority 
for Edmund de Pakenham and Roesia his wife to grant their fourth part 
of this manor to Robert de Ufford and Cecily his wife and their heirs in 
exchange.' 2 

Sir Robert de Ufford was summoned to Parliament as a baron in 1308, 
and on his death in 1316 Cecily held a moiety of the manor, for Sir Robert 
de Ufford and Cicely his wife had acquired from Sir Edmund de Pakenham 
and Roesia his wife their right in the manor and advowson, as we have 
already stated, in exchange for a moiety of Uphall Manor, at North Creak, 
in Norfolk.' 3 Cecily de Ufford held until her death in 1325, ' 4 when her interest 
passed to her son and heir, Sir Robert de Ufford, 2nd Baron, K.G., who 
served in the wars of Saxony in the reign of Edw. II., and in the beginning 
of the reign of Edw. III. obtained a grant for life of the town and castle of 

'See Thorpe Hall Manor, Horham, Hoxne, 8 I.P.M., 14 Edw. III. 

and Booking Manor, Helmingham See I. P.M., "John, son of Robert de 
in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. Thorp," 23 Edw. III. 164. 

2 1.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61 ; see R.P. i. 420. "Close Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. ii. 14. 

3Qose Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 77^. "20 Edw. III. (2nd nos.) 25. 

Close Rolls, 18 Edw. II. 7. "I.Q.D., 4 Edw. II. File 85, 12. 

sI.P.M., 4 Edw. III. 34. '3 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. II. pt. ii. 22. 

6 O. 5 Edw. III. R'lis 2-4. '* I. P.M., 19 Edw. II. 74. 

'Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. pt. i. 2. 



152 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Orford. On the i6th March, 1336, he was created Earl of Suffolk in right 
of his grandmother, Sara de Vesey, the heiress of the Glanvilles. He 
distinguished himself in the wars of Edw. III. 1 

Davy states that the manor on the death of Sir Robert de Ufford, the 
ist Baron, and Cecily his wife, passed to Sir Edmund de Ufford, their 3rd 
son, and was held by him till his death about 1374. This statement is not 
quite accurate, for not only does the inquis. p.m. of Cecily de Ufford, but 
also the Originalia Rolls in 1325, show that Cecily de Ufford the deceased 
held a moiety of Combs Manor in socage at fee farm of 11. 35. 4^. and 155. 
for a scutage, but that Robert de Ufford was her heir, and there is an order 
as to security for relief. 1 Further, three years later, in 1328, we find an 
entry on the Patent Rolls of a grant to Queen Isabella for life of 15 yearly 
out of the fee farm of 23. i6s. Sd. payable by Robert de Ufford and Robert 
de Thorpe for Combs Manor in recompense for the fee farm of 15 released 
with her consent to Mary de Janeto Paulo, Countess of Pembroke, and a 
further grant to her for life of the residue of the said farm. 3 Also in 1338 
is an order on the Close Rolls to discharge Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, 
from the future payment of a rent of 11. i8s. ^d. (sic) which he was bound 
to render to the Exchequer for a moiety of the manor. 4 This Ufford moiety 
did come to Edmund de Ufford ultimately, for in 1342 we find the licence on 
the Patent Rolls for Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, to enfeoff Edmund de 
Ufford, his brother, Peter de Ty, and Adam de Scakelthorp of 11. i8s. $d. of 
rent in Combs, and a moiety of the manor said to be held in chief. 5 On the 
Patent Rolls in 1351 is a licence for Edmund de Thorpe to enfeoff Edmund 
de Ufford " le frere " and Adam de " Shakelthorp, " tenants in fee of the King 
in chief, of one moiety of the manor, and 11. i8s. 4^. of rent in Combes, 
of the other moiety of the manor, and the advowson of the church, and for 
them to grant to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, the whole Manor of 
Combs, and the said rent and advowson with the exception of 2 acres of 
land in the manor. The Earl was to hold for life with remainder to Walter 
his son in tail male, with remainder to the right heirs of the Earl. 9 Sir 
Edmund de Ufford died in 13757 when the manor passed to William de 
Ufford, his nephew, he being the son and heir of Robert de Ufford, ist Earl 
of Suffolk, who was the eldest brother of Sir Edmund ; and on the 
Originalia Rolls is an order that fealty be taken and seisin given to this 
William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, " son and heir of Robert de Ufford, 
late Earl of Suffolk, and brother of Edmund de Ufford deceased," of the 
manor and advowson of the church, which they held of the King in free 
socage. 8 

William de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Sufiolk, died in 1382, when the manor 
passed like that of Parham, in Plomesgate Hundred, to his nephew, Robert 
de Willoughby, son of his sister Cecily, and the 3rd Lord Willoughby, and 
on his death in 1396 the share passed to his son and heir, William Willoughby, 
Lord Eresby. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is a writing by which William Philippe, 
Thomas de WYoxham, knights, Robert de Asshefeld, and Henry Sergeaunt 
constituted Henry Lesingham, John Bernard, of Ipswich, and John 
Burghard to deliver seisin of this manor and the Manor of Bawdsey to the 

'See Manor of Bawdsey, in WilfordHun- } Pat. Rolls, 16 Edw. III. pt. ii. 20. 

dred. 6 Pat. Rolls, 25 Edw. III. pt. ii. 23. 

'0. 19 Edw. II. 3. H.P.M., 49 Edw. III. pt. ii. 55. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. III. pt. i, 2. "0. 49 Edw. III. 4. 
* Close Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 35. 



COMBS. 153 

said William Willoughby, Lord Eresby, together with the advowson of 
the church of Combs. The deed is dated at Bawdsey die. Dom. prox. 
post fest. S. Valentine, i Hen. IV. [1400]. On William Willoughby's 
(Lord Eresby) death in 1410 the manor went to his widow Joan, afterwards 
wife of Edward, Duke of York, and subsequently of Sir Henry Bromflete, 
Knt. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is an indenture 
dated ist Jan. 9 Hen. VI. [1430], by which Sir William Tyrwhite, William 
Pastone, John Kyme, John Wyles, Richard Yerdeburgh, and John Preston 
grant to Sir William Oldhalle and Margaret his wife, sister of Robert, Lord 
Willoughby, for her life for good service rendered to the said Robert, an 
annual rent of 40 out of the Manors of Roughtone, Walcote, Westhall, 
Chadgrave, and Whiteacre, in Norfolk, and a like rent of 40 out of the 
Manors of Ufford, Bawdsey, Wykes Ufford, Bradfield, and this Manor of 
Combs/ The year previous to this Robert Willoughby had granted to 
the above grantors and to Thomas Ward and others the Manors of Walcote, 
Westhall, Roughtone, and Chadgrave, in Norfolk, and lands in Parham, 
Bradefeld, Ufford, Orford, Combes, Baudeseye, and Wykes Ufford, in 
Suffolk, and the appointment by which Sir Robert de Willoughby con- 
stituted Henry Lesyngham, Adam Fraunceys, William Nesebytt,and William 
Wryght to deliver seisin pursuant to such grant, will be found amongst 
the Harleian Charters in the British Museum." 

Both Sir Henry Bromflete and Joan, Duchess of York, his wife, were 
living in 1434, for we find by an indenture dated 24th Jan. that year they 
demised to Sir William Tirwhit, John Kyme, Richard Yerburghe, John 
Willis, Robert Firman, and Henry Lesyngham the Manors of Walcote, 
Westhale, Rughtone and Chategrave [Roughton and Chedgrave], in the 
County of Norfolk, and the manors of Beadfeld (sic), Combes, Bawdsey, 
and Wikes Ufford, in the County of Suffolk, for the term of the natural 
life of the said Duchess. 3 

On Joan Bromflete's death the manor passed to her son and 
heir, Robert de Willoughby, Lord Willoughby de Eresby, who died in 1452, 
when the manor passed to his nephew, Robert Willoughby, of Parham. 
We find, however, amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum, 
a deed dated 2Oth August, 35 Hen. VI. [1456] confirming the manor to 
William de Willoughby. 4 However, it does seem subsequently to have 
gone to Sir Robert, who died seised in 1465, 5 when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Robert Willoughby, who died under age in I4&7, 6 
when it devolved on his brother and heir, Christopher Willoughby, and on 
his death in 1498 passed to his widow Maria for life, and on her death i6th 
May, 15157 vested in William, Lord Willoughby, son and heir of Christopher, 
and by an indenture dated i8th June, 8 Hen. VIII. [1516], Sir Edmund 
Jenney in execution of the last will of Sir Christopher Willoughby, Lord 
Willoughby de Eresby, transferred to the said William, Lord Willoughby, 
this manor with the Manors of Ufford, Sogenhoe, Kettleburgh, Wynderbyle, 
Woodbridge, Bredfield, Orford, and Wykes Ufford. 8 

Under the will of William, Lord Willoughby, in 1526, the manor went 
to his widow Mary for life, and subsequently to his daughter Katherine. 

'Harl. 57 A. i. 'I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 

'Harl. 58 B. 17. 'I.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 37. 

3 Harl. 47 C. 44. 'I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29. 

Harl. Ch. 43 E. 46. 'Harl. 52 B. 10. 



154 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

She married ist Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk (being his 4th wife), 
who inherited in her right, and 2ndly Richard Bertie, and their inheritance 
passed to their son and heir, the Hon. Peregrine Bertie, Lord Willoughby 
de Eresby, who being born in foreign parts was forced to obtain an Act of 
Parliament for his naturalization. On his death the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Robert, Lord Willoughby. 

A moiety of the manor continued in the Thorpe family for several 
generations. In 1323 John, grandson of the above named Sir John de 
Thorpe, and Margaret his wife (?) held the same of the King in capite, in 
socage, by the fee of 11. 35. 4^., and by a certain annual rentage of 205. 
for all services. In 1330 Robert de Thorp, his eldest son and heir, 
died seised of the same. 1 

John de Thorp, his eldest son and heir, succeeded, who in 1338 paid 
rent to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, for the moiety of his manor in 
this parish. In 1340 he granted to the abbess and nuns of St. Clare, in 
the Minories of London, and her successors, an annuity of 20 marks per 
annum out of the lands in Combs and Helmingham ; he deceased the same 
year without issue. 

Edmund de Thorp his brother inherited, who in 1349, settled 100 
marks annuity on Robert de Thirning, rector of this parish, and other 
trustees ; and in 1358 he enfeoffed his manors, &c., to raise 100 marks 
per annum for 21 years to discharge his debts, and raise portions for his 
daughters. 

As to the other moiety, this remained with the Uffords and their 
descendants.* 

The manor subsequently became vested in Sir Thomas Gresham, 
who with others sold it in 1570 to Sir Nicholas Bacon, 3 from whom it passed 
to Nathaniel Bacon, who with his wife were in 1579 called upon to show 
title to the manor. 4 Sir Nathaniel Bacon had licence to alienate to Thomas 
Dandy, 5 a grandson of Edmund Dandy, of Ipswich and Cretingham, in 
Loes Hundred. He resided at Combs Hall, and was lord of the manor 
and patron of the living. He married Martha, daughter of John Poley, of 
Badley, by whom he had issue four sons and five daughters, and dying 
I4th Aug. 1607,' was succeeded by his son and heir, Edmund Dandy. 
Edmund was a minor at the time of his father's decease, and the first court 
of the manor after Thomas's death was held 26th April, 6 Jas. I. by Martha 
his wife as the guardian of the person and land of her son. Edmund 
Dandy married Mary, daughter of Sir Ralph Shelton, Knt., and upon her 
decease married Susan, daughter of Robert Reeve, of Thwaite. Thomas, a 
son by his ist wife, had a son, Thomas Dandy, living in 1656, who in 1667 
sold the manor to William Bridgman. He was the son of the Bishop of 
Chester and nephew of Sir Orlando Bridgman, Keeper of the Great Seal 
in the reign of Chas. II., Clerk of the Council in the reigns of Chas. II. and 
William and Mary. On William's death the manor and property passed to his 
son and heir, Orlando Bridgman, who rebuilt the hall. Orlando Bridgman 
died in 1731, and the manor was purchased by Ambrose Crowley, 7 son of 

'See Manor of Thorpe Hall, Horham, in ' Memoranda, 21 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 54. 

Hoxnc Hundred. 5 See Manor of Wattisham, in Cosford 

'Blomefield mentions that the manor was Hundred. 

one of those of which Sir Michael de 'There is a brass to him in the church of 

la Pole, Lord Chancellor of Eng- Combs measuring 23in. by 61lin. 

land, died seised in 1414 (? I4th 7 See Manor of Barking Hall, in Bosmere 

Sept. 1415). and Claydon Hundred. 

'Fine, Easter, 12 Eliz. 



COMBS. 155 

John Crowley, of Greenwich, in Kent, and on his death, 22nd May, 1754, 
aged 36, without issue, passed to his brother and heir, John Crowley, and 
from this time to the present has passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Badley, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred, and is now vested in the 
present Earl of Ashburnham. 

In the Public Record Office is a parliamentary petition of Robert, son 
of John de Thorpe, respecting this manor, 1 and there is a bequest of 
goods, &c., in Combs Manor by M. de Crek in 1282. 2 Amongst the Star 
Chamber Proceedings in 1529 is an action as to Combs Manor by Thomas 
Wolsey, Cardinal Archbishop of York, and others against Sir Christopher 
Willoughby and others. 3 

A survey of the manor taken the 6th July, 1533, is in the Public Record 
Office, 4 and a grant for life was made in 1540-1 to Lady Anne of Cleves 
out of the Augmentation Office of a rent of 23. 6s. 8d. out of the manor. 5 

Combs Manor is one of those said to have been forfeited by the de la 
Poles, and is specified as one of the manors restored to Sir Edmund de la 
Pole under the terms of a deed with King Hen. VII. dated 26th Feb. 1492, 
set out at length on the Rolls of Parliament in 1495, when the deed was 
confirmed. 6 We find also amongst the Harleian Charters a deed dated 
2ist Feb. 1508, whereby King Hen. VII. granted the Manors of Combs 
and Swannes, formerly held by Edmund de la Pole, to Sir George Nevylle, 
Lord of Bergavenny. 7 

MANOR OF BAVENTS. 

In the time of Edward I. this manor was held by the family of Bavent. 
Adam de Bavent married the daughter and heir of William de Westoneston 
or Wiston, and had issue a son Adam, who was lord of the Manor of Clapkin 
and of other manors in Sussex temp. Edw. I. In 1285 he was lord of this 
manor and had a grant of free warren in Combs, 8 and from him no doubt 
this manor derived its name. He married Alice, daughter and heir of 
Peter Escudamore, son of Maud, wife of Geoffrey Escudamore, one of the 
aunts of John, the last Lord Gifford, of Brimsfield, and had issue Roger 
Bavent. He married Lettice, and in 1328 enfeoffed his son Roger and 
Hawise his wife of the manor. 

Banks says of this family that the several pedigrees are so variant 
from each other that to endeavour to reconcile them with the records 
would be an almost indefinite task, unless for anyone who in the character 
of heir-general may conceive a baronial claim to be derivable under, and 
by virtue of the writs of summons he cites. 9 

Shortly afterwards Robert Hovel held it for life with remainder to 
Sir Roger de Bavent, Knt., who granted it to the King in 1344. 

On the Patent Rolls this year is an appointment to receive seisin in 

the King's name of the reversion of the manor then held for life by Robert 

' Howel," and all other lands of Roger Bavent, Knt., he having granted 

same to the King in fee.'" However, four years later, in 1348, we find the 

'No. 8100 D.K.R. 34 App. p. 145. 6 R.P. vi. 474. 

2 Campb. iii. i. 7 Harl. 51 H. 18. 

'Star C.P. 21 Hen. VIII. Bundle 19, 241. " Chart. Rolls, 13 Edw. I. 28. 

4 Exch. ist Rep. on Public Records, 1800, 9 Banks's Baronia Anglica Concentrata, 

p. 188. vol. i. p. 118. 

3 State Papers, 1540-1, 1500. 'Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. III. pt. ii. 30. 



156 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger Bavent, his son, and Hawise 
his wife, 1 and in 1352 an order on the Originalia Rolls that the manor 
In Id by Roger Bavent should be freed to William Wodcrowe, parson of 
\\Vston church, and William de Carleton. 1 

We also find in the inquis. quod damnum this same year a statement 
that John Dengayne occupied the manor which Roger Bavent held for life. 3 
The following year a commission was issued to Robert de Hadham and 
Robert de Assh to find by inquisition who had occupied to that time the 
manor " which Roger Bavent held for life, by grant of the King, and lately 
surrendered into the King's hands," and the keeping of which the King 
on the I4th May, 1351, committed during pleasure to William W r oderowe, 
parson of the church of Weston, and William de Carleton, citizen of London, 
and by what title and in what manner, also who had taken the profits and 
what was the yearly value of the manor. 4 Later the same year a commission 
was issued to the same parties to make inquisition touching the alleged 
withdrawal of a large number of services due to this manor. 5 

Eleanor, widow of Sir Roger de Bavent, who remarried John Dengaine, 
held the manor for life. But we find that in 1362 Hawise, relict of Sir 
Roger de Bavent, released to the prioress of Dartford, in Kent, who in 
1371 released to the King, who in 1372 regranted to the prioress. 

The Manor of Combs, probably meaning this manor, is mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of John Broughton, 6 who died 24th Jan. 1517, when it 
passed to his son and heir, John Broughton. 7 The manor was granted in 
1543 by the Crown to Sir Richard Gresham, and particulars of the farm of 
the manor for this grant are still preserved in the Public Record Office. 8 
On the death of Sir Richard Gresham, 2ist Feb. 1548, the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Sir John Gresham, 9 who gave the manor in marriage 
with his illegitimate daughter Anne to Sir Nathaniel Bacon. 

They do not appear to have kept it long, for in 1587 we find a William 
Gresham and Elizabeth his wife alienating it to John Barker, of Ipswich. 
On John Barker's death in 1609 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Robert Barker, of Trimley. This is the statement we usually find, but it 
should be mentioned that the fine under which it is natural to infer the 
manor passed from the Gresham to the Barker family was levied in 1588 
directly by Robert Barker against the said William Gresham. 10 Robert 
Barker died in 1618, when the manor passed to Sir Thomas Barker, youngest 
son of Sir Robert." 

In 1692 the manor was vested in John Beaumont, who held courts 
from 25th Jan. 1692, to nth June, 1699, and it subsequently vested in 
John Wenyeve, of Brettenham, who held courts for the manor 23rd Sept. 

'I.P.M., 22 Edw. III. 21. son and heir of Sir Richard Gresham, 

1 0. 26 Ed. III. 5. and in another place that Anne 

J I.Q.D. 26 Edw. III. 9. was the natural daughter of Sir 

Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. i. 27^. Robert Gresham. 

s Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. ii. ^^d. '"Fine, Hil. aoEliz. 

See Cowling Manor and Denston Hall "See Manors of Oflton Monks and Ring- 
Manor, in Risbridge Hundred. shall, in Bosmere and Claydon 
'I.P.M., 10 Hen. VIII. 148. Hundred 
35 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 217. 
I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 77. Davy in one 
place stated that Thomas was the 






COMBS. 157 

1701, and 2Oth Oct. 1702, and the manor passed to Sir George Wenyeve 1 
(son of Edward), M.P. for Sudbury in 1685, who held his first court ist Sept. 
1703, and died 26th May, 1706, when the lordship had vested in his son 
and heir, John Wenyeve, for he held the court 23rd Sept. 1706. 

The manor in the early part of the last century became vested in 
Henry Offord, and on his death was offered for sale in September, 1848.' 

The manor now belongs to Thomas Daniels, of Thrigby, in Norfolk. 



'See Manor of Brettenham, in Cosford 2 Ipswich Journal, 26th Aug. 1848. 
Hundred. 




158 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

GREETING ST. PETER'S. 

\T must be remembered that in 1086 the parish of Greeting 
All Saints was in Stow Hundred, but at present only St. 
Peter's Greeting is included for civil purposes and All Saints 
is in Bosmere. The church division, however, remains. 
Consequently the entries for the Domesday Survey here 
given included Greeting All Saints as well as St. Peter's. 

Three manors were held here at the time of the Domesday 
Survey. One was the lordship of Geoffrey de Magnaville. It consisted of 2 
carucates of land within the jurisdiction of the King and Earl. And 
Geoffrey had the estate as a manor by gift of the King. Under him it was 
held by William de Boville, but did not belong to the fee of Ansaga, the 
predecessor of Geoffrey. 

Belonging to the estate were 6 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne 
and half a ploughteam belonging to the men (which last did not exist at 
the time of the Survey), 5 acres of meadow, a fourth share of a mill, a half- 
share of another mill, 2 horses at th.e hall, 5 beasts, 8 hogs, and 20 sheep, 
which had increased to 30 at the time of the Survey. The value was. 405. 

This estate, but apparently not as a manor, was held in the time of 
the Confessor by Witgar, a freeman under the Abbot of Ely, by commen- 
dation only.' 

Geoffrey de Magnaville had also two other holdings here. The first 
was of 9 acres within the jurisdiction of the King and Earl, and half a 
ploughteam valued at 2s. formerly held by five freemen under the said 
Witgar by commendation only. The second consisted of 16 acres, i bordar, 
and half a ploughteam and an acre of meadow, valued at ^6d., held in Saxon 
times by a freeman under Edric, the predecessor of Robert Malet, by com- 
mendation only ; and at the time of the Survey by William de Boville 
under the said Geoffrey. 2 

Two other holdings here belonged at the time of the Survey to Walter 
de Saint Valery. The first consisted of ij carucates of land, 2 villeins, 9 
bordars, 2j ploughteams in demesne, i ploughteam belonging to the men 
(which by the time of the Survey had become reduced to half a team), wood 
sufficient for the support of 40 hogs, all of which had gone at the time of 
the Survey, i mill, 6 acres of meadow, halt a church with 10 acres of free land, 
5 beasts, 9 sheep, and 12 hogs, valued at roos. It was held by Aluric, a 
freeman in the time of the Confessor under Edric, the predecessor of Robert 
Malet, by commendation only. The Survey adds that 'Robert, i.e., 
Robert Malet, held here but was afterwards disseised." Walter's second 
holding consisted of loj acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 35., formerly 
held by Walter, a freeman under Tooley by commendation. 3 

The second manor was the lordship of the Bishop of Bayeux, and held 
of him by William de Boville. It consisted of i carucate of land in the 
King's soc, 5 bordars, i serf, I ploughteam in demesne and half a plough- 
team belonging to the men, a third share of a mill, 4 acres of meadow, 4 
beasts, 8 hogs, and 8 sheep (which by the time of the Survey had increased 
to 20). The value was 205. It was one league long and half a league 
broad, and paid in a gelt 30^. 

'Dom. ii. 411. 3 Dom. ii. 4326. 

Dom. ii. 411. 






GREETING ST. PETER'S. 159 

This manor was held in the time of the Confessor by Aluric, son of 
Broun, a freeman under Wisgar by commendation only. 

There were also five freemen under Aluric by commendation only 
with 1 8 acres and half a ploughteam, valued as 2s. The Survey states 
that these were delivered with the manor. The soc and sac belonged to 
the King and Earl.' 

Another holding in Greeting was that of Robert Malet, and at the time 
of the Survey consisted of i carucate of land in the soc of the King and 
Earl, 6 bordars, i ploughteams, half a ploughteam belonging to the men, 3 
acres of meadow, a fourth share of a mill, and 2 horses. By the time of 
the Survey the details had somewhat altered, for the one ploughteam 
and a half had come down to half a team, and then risen to 2 teams, the 
horses had disappeared, but there were additionally 4 beasts, 14 hogs, 
and 43 sheep. 

This estate was held by Robert de Glanville under Robert Malet, and 
had belonged in the Confessor's time to Lewin, a freeman under Edric, 
the predecessor of Robert Malet, by commendation only, and there were 
six freemen under the said Lewin by commendation only, with 12^ acres, 
and half a ploughteam among them. And in the same township was i socman 
under Edric, with 20 acres and half a ploughteam. In Saxon times and 
later the entire value was 2Os., but at the time of the Survey 305. ' 

Another holding here in Saxon times was that of seven freemen, 
five were under Alfleta by commendation only, and two under com- 
mendation to the King with soc and sac over all of them in the Hundred. 

They held 30 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at 2os. Roger de Poictou 
was the Domesday tenant in chief of this estate, and he also held here a 
socman with 3 acres of forfeited land. 3 

Another holding was that of the Abbot of Bernai, and consisted of 
20 acres (formerly held by a freeman), half a church with 10 acres, i villein, 
2 bordars, i ploughteam among them all, and 2 acres of meadow valued 
for rent in Greeting in another Hundred. 

The abbot also held here a freeman with 5 acres valued in like manner. 
The King gave this holding out of Hardwin's fee. 4 Amongst the lands of 
Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, we find i carucate, 2 villeins, i ploughteam 
in demesne and half a ploughteam belonging to the men, 4 acres of 
meadow, 7 beasts, and, 12 hogs, valued at 2os. This in the Confessor's 
time had been held by Woolnough, a freeman under King Edward, Brien's 
predecessor, but at the time of the Survey was held by Saint Mary of 
Gresten, of Earl Robert, with soc and sac. 5 

MANOR OF GREETING ST. PETER'S. 

This was the estate held in Saxon times by Witgar, a freeman of the 
Abbot of Ely. Geoffrey de Magnaville was the Domesday tenant in chief, 
William de Boville holding under him. The manor passed from Geoffrey 
to his son and heir William. The lordship was held by John de Boville 
in 1275, and we learn from the Hundred and Quo Warranto Rolls that he 
claimed warren, view of frankpledge, and assize of bread and beer in West 
Greeting. 6 

1 Dom. ii. 374. 4 Dom. ii. 389. 

'Dom. ii. 304, 3046. 5 Dom. ii. 2916. 

5 Dom. ii. 3506. H.R. ii. 191 ; Q.W. 731. 



i6o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

William de Bovillo, probably the nephew of John, held the lordship 
in 1302, from whom it passed to his son, Sir William de Boville. 1 In 1306 
it is said that a fine was levied by Joan, daughter of W'illiam de Boville, 
against William de Boville of the manor and advowson of the church.' 
From William de Boville the manor seems to have passed in his lifetime 
(probably by settlement on her marriage) to his daughter Mary, married to 
Thomas Latimer, who held in 1316. Three years later Sir William de 
Boville recovered the manor from Thomas le Latimer, and from Sir William 
it passed on his death to his son and heir, John de Boville, from which time 
to the death ot John Carboncl, 1431-2, the manor passed in the same course 
as that ot Badingham, in Hoxne Hundred. It is specifically mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert Carbonel, who died i4th Sept. 1397,* and of 
Sir Richard Carbonel who died in 1429.* 

The manor then vested in Sir John Wingfield, who died in i48i, 5 
and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir John Wingfield. Shortly 
afterwards we find the manor vested in George Fastolf, of Ipswich, for he 
conveyed it in 1509 to W'alter Champion, citizen of London, Thomas Young, 
LL.D., and others, probably as trustees, for we find that the Wingfields 
sold the manor to William Ferneley, a mercer of London, in the early 
part of the reign of Queen Elizabeth. He married Agnes, daughter of 
Robert (? Edmond) Daundy, of Ipswich. A fine was levied of the manor 
in 1541 by William Ferneley and others against Sir Anthony Wingfield. 6 

This William Ferneley was a man of note in his day, and his daughters 
made remarkably good matches. Jane, one of the daughters, married 
Sir Nicholas Bacon, Lord Keeper ; another, Anne, married William Read, 
merchant of London, and afterwards Sir Thomas Gresham, Knt, founder 
of the Royal Exchange. 7 On William Ferneley's death, the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth is 
an action by this Thomas Ferneley against Richard King and others to 
recover lands of this manor forfeited to the plaintiff as lord, for being let 
for a longer term than allowed by the custom of the manor. 8 

Thomas Ferneley married ist Dorothy, daughter of Robert Holdich, 
of Ranworth, in Norfolk, and 2ndly Jane Cooke, of London, and on his 
death i6th Oct. 1591, the manor passed to her son and heir, John Ferneley. 
He married Temperance, daughter of Sir Miles Corbet, Knt., of Sproston 
in Norfolk, and died in 1621, when the manor vested in his son and heir, 
Miles Ferneley. Miles Ferneley married Eleanor, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Bendish, of Bumstead, Essex, Bart, and in 1633 sold the manor to his 
brother, Edmund Ferneley. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry 
Sheldon, and his estate was reckoned to be worth about 200 a year. From 

1 See Manors of Badin^liam Hall, in Hoxne, 7 Sir Thomas had a son Richard, who seems 

and Letheringham, in Loes Hun- to have died in his father's lifetime, 

dred. as it is stated in Ward's Lives of the 

"Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. I. 39. Gresham Professors, that Sir Thomas 

J I.P.M., 21 Rich. II. 14. left no child except a natural 

4 1. P.M., 10 Hen. VI. n. daughter (by a woman at Bruges, 

5 1. P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. in Flanders) named Anne, who was 

'Fine, Trin. 33 Hen. VIII. married to Nathaniel Bacon, 2nd 

son of the Lord Keeper, Sir Nicholas 
Bacon. Sir Thomas Gresham died 
from apoplexy 2ist Nov. 1579. 
"C.P. i. 321- 



GREETING ST. PETER'S. 161 

Edmund Ferneley, who died in 1664, the manor passed to his son and 
heir Edmund. He married Anne, daughter of Thomas Waterhouse, rector 
of West Greeting, and died 3rd Oct. 1684, when the manor devolved on his 
son and heir, John Ferneley, who married Isabella, daughter of John Cuton, 
of Bramford, and died in Sept. 1723, when the manor passed to his daughter 
Isabella, married ist to William Glover, of Frostenden, and subsequently 
to John Daniel. 

The manor was offered for sale at the Swan, Needham Market, 3ist 
Jan. 1759, " with the extensive Royalty of a fine River," the annual quit 
rents then amounting to 310.' It is noted that there was one fine of 50. 

In 1764 the manor belonged to one Bragrove, and in 1798 to Thomas 
Bragrove, in 1838 being vested in Sir William Beauchamp Proctor, Bart., 
of Langley Park, in Norfolk, in right of his wife, daughter and heir of 
Thomas Godfrey, and niece and heir of Thomas Bragrove. 

The manor in 1885 belonged to Edward Thompson Smith, and in 1896 
to J. Smith, of Colchester. 

Arms of FERNELEY : Or, on a bend Vert, three bucks' heads cabossed 
Arg. attired of the field. 

MANOR OF BRASIN'S OR BRASIER'S HALL al. THORNEY MUMPLIERS. 

This manor was held by John Moumplers in the I4th century. He 
died about 1395, when it passed to Thomas Moumplers. The manor 
subsequently vested in Richard Felaw, who left it to his wife Agnes for lite, 
with remainder to their children, with remainder to James Hobart, who 
conveyed it in 1501 to Agnes, late wife of William Timperley, formerly 
wife of Richard Felaw. Later we find the manor in Sir James Hobart, 
who sold it in 1515 to Humphrey Wingfield, from whom it seems to have 
passed to Robert Broke, who died in 1578, from which time to the time of 
Sir Robert Broke, of Nacton, created a baronet in 1661, the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Nacton, in Colneis Hundred. 

In 1835 we find the manor vested in Edward Beck, and in 1837 m 
Mrs. Beck. 



1 Ipswich Journal, I3th Jan. 1759. 
W 




1 62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DAGWORTH. 

HERE was no manor here at the time of the Survey, but 
among the lands of Hugh de Montfort were four holdings. 
The first consisted of 2 carucates of land within the juris- 
diction of the King and Earl, 17 bordars, 5 ploughteams 
(which had become 4 by the time of the Survey), wood 
sufficient to support 12 hogs, and 8 acres of meadow, valued 
at 455. It was held in demesne under Hugh by seven 

freemen whom Goodmund, the predecessor of Hugh de Montfort, had held 

by commendation only. 

The second holding of Hugh de Montfort in this place consisted of i 
carucate and 4 bordars, 3 ploughteams (which at the time of the Survey 
had come down to 2), and 5 acres of meadow. The value was 305., which 
was reduced to 2OS. by the time of the Survey. Also half a church living 
with 25 acres of free land. Roger de Oberville held in demesne 6 socmen 
belonging to Thorney, the King's Royal manor, with all customs. These 
six socmen were claimed by Hugh de Montfort, he having received livery 
of seisin of them. The township was I league long and half a league 
broad, and paid in a gelt 30^. whoever was the tenant. 

The third holding consisted of ij carucates delivered to Hugh de 
Montfort and half a carucate in exchange as mentioned in the Survey. The 
soc belonged to the King and Earl. There were also n bordars, 3 serfs, 
2 ploughteams in demesne, 2 ploughteams belonging to the men (which 
by the time of the Survey had been reduced to i), wood sufficient to support 
60 hogs, 9 acres of meadow, i mill, 13 beasts (reduced by the time of the 
Survey to 10), 12 hogs, 16 sheep, and 40 goats. There was a church with 
30 acres of land and ij acres of meadow. The value of the holding was 6os. 
and it was held under the Confessor by Breme, a freeman, who was killed 
at the battle of Hastings. In the same manor was Bremer, a freeman by 
commendation only, having n acres, i bordar, and half a ploughteam, which 
had disappeared by the time of the Survey. The value was 35. and it was 
held by William, son of Gross, of Hugh de Montfort. 

Hugh de Montfort's third holding was a half freeman having 20 acres, 
valued at 35.' 

The last holding specified in the Survey in this place was that of Walter 
the Deacon, consisting of 60 acres, i bordar, and i ploughteams (reduced 
to 2 oxen by the time of the Survey), wood sufficient to support 10 hogs, 
and 3 acres of meadow. It was held by a freeman named William, of whom 
Theodric, of Bacton (Walter's predecessor) had half commendation only, 
and Goodmund, the predecessor of Hugh de Montfort, had the other half. 1 

MANOR OF DAGWORTH AND SORELLS IN DAGWORTH. 

In the Confessor's time the land composing this manor was held by 
Breme, a freeman of the King, who was killed at the battle of Hastings. 
At the time of the Survey the land was held by William, son of Gross, 
under Hugh de Montfort. The place was anciently held by a distinguished 
family who originated and assumed their name from the township. Walter 
de Aggeworth or Dagworth and Aveline his wife held lands here in the time 
of King John, and in 1216 this Walter was dead, and Robert his son and 

' Dom. ii. 4086, 4096. a Dom. ii. 427. 



DAGWORTH. 163 

Aveline his mother held the manor. Harvey de Dagworth succeeded, 
and to him his son, Osbert de Dagworth, who in 1253 had a grant of free 
warren here.' 

He is said to have held of Henry de Essex as of the Honor of Raleigh/ 
There is an inquis. p.m. on Osbert de " Daggord," in 1262 which includes 
the Manor of " Daggord," probably this manor. It is, however, there 
stated to have been held of Baldwin Filiol and his heirs, and John, son of 
Richard Filiol, who was heir of the said Baldwin. It is further stated that 
Isabel de Daggord held Daggord Manor in dower, and died on Friday after 
the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 46 Hen. III., and because the heir of the 
said Osbert was within age and in the wardship of the said John Filiol, 
the Manor of Daggord of right pertained to the said John only because he 
was intermediate between the King and the heir. It appears that 
Richard de Dagworth being within age, the King, because of some 
offence done by Baldwin Filiol, gave the marriage and wardship to Sir 
William de Huntingfeld, who married the said Isabel his daughter to the 
said Richard, and afterwards the said Baldwin made peace with the King, 
and the said William made peace with him for having the wardship. Thus 
the said Isabel was dowered after the death of Richard her husband ot 
Daggord Manor, and died seised thereof. After the death of the said 
Richard, the steward of the Earl of Cornwall intruded upon the manor 
for three or four days, but Richard, father of John Filiol, forthwith ejected 
his men, and sold the wardship and marriage of the said Osbert, son of the 
said Richard, to the said Isabel, who sold them to the Archbishop of York, 
and he had the marriage of the said Osbert. John Filiol however is stated 
to have had the wardship of the heir of the said Osbert de Daggord. 3 

On Osbert's death the manor passed to his son and heir, John de Dag- 
worth, who claimed here gallows and assize of bread and beer, and warren. 4 
From him the manor passed about 1272 to his son and heir, Sir John de 
Dagworth, a minor, who was in the King's wardship, and in 1307 his mother 
Maud died seised of the office of Usher of the Exchequer in her own right 
and left it to Sir John Dagworth, her son and heir. The office had belonged 
to Simon de Scaccario, who left three sisters and coheirs Maud, married to 
John de Dagworth ; Lora, to William Peyforer ; and Beatrix, to John Peverel. 
Sir John de Dagworth the son inherited Lora's share, and purchased that 
of Beatrix and John Peverel, and sold the whole to John of Gaunt by the 
King's licence. Sir John Dagworth was a knight of the shire in 1322. 
He married Alice, daughter and coheir of Alice de Beaumont, and died in 
1331,' seised in his demesne as of the fee of the Crown of one messuage 
and a garden, a coppice, and 303 acres of arable land in Dagworth by the 
service of three long arrows when demanded, and the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Nicholas de Dagworth. This Nicholas was seised of the office 
of Marshal to the Itinerant Justices, and in 1334 gave for his relief to the 
King for certain lands and tenements here three fletched arrows, feathered 
with eagles' feathers which John his father held of the King in capite by 
the same service to be paid annually. He was also Usher of the Exchequer, 
and in high esteem with King Rich. II., as he had been with his predecessor 
on the throne. 6 

We learn from the Patent Rolls in 1335 that he obtained licence to 
enfeoff Henry de Elyngham and John de Hadisco of this manor, then 

'Chart. Rolls, 37 and 38 Hen. III., pt. i. I. 4 H.R. ii. 191 ; Q.W. 723. 
2 T. de N. 291. 5 I.P.M., 6 Edw. III. 35. 

3 I.P.M., 46 Hen. III. File 26 (16). "Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 531. 



164 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

stated to be held in chief, and for them to regrant to the said Nicholas de 
Daggeworth and Margaret his wife and the heirs of their bodies, with 
remainder to his own right heirs,' and there is a fine levied of the manor 
the same year between Nicholas de Dagworth (Daggeworth) and 
Margaret his wife against this Henry de Elyngham, chaplain, and John 
de Hadisco, chaplain, for effectuating the settlement. 

Nicholas de Dagworth died in 1351,' and the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir John de Dagworth, and on the Originalia Rolls in 1353 we find 
a licence enabling him to give this manor and the Manor of Thrandeston, 
in Hartismere Hundred, to Thomas, Bishop of Durham, and Robert de 
\Vatford, 4 and for them to grant the same to the said Sir John and Thomasia 
his wife in tail with remainder to his right heirs. 5 

On Sir John's death in I363 6 the manor passed to his daughter 
Thomasine, married to William, Lord Furnival. It does not appear that 
Sir Nicholas de Dagworth, who died in 1401, and is mentioned both by 
Blomefield and Page, ever had the manor, though both these writers state 
that Thomasine was his sister and heir. 

Banks, in his " Baronia Anglica Concentrata," 7 and Cockayne, in his 
" Complete Peerage," make Thomasine, who married William, Lord 
Furnival, the daughter of Thomas de Dagworth 8 by Eleanor or Alianor, 
daughter of Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford, and widow of James 
Butler, Earl of Ormond, which Thomasine was sister of Sir Nicholas de 
Dagworth. who married Eleanor or Alianore, daughter of Walter, sister and 
coheir of Sir John Rosall, ol Shropshire, and died in 1401 without issue, and 
of Eleanor, married to Walter, Lord Fitz Walter. 

Thomasine de Dagworth and William, Lord Furnival, had an only 
daughter Joan, to whom the manor passed in 1382.' Joan married Thomas 
Nevil, brother of Ralph, Earl of Westmoreland, and had two daughters 
and coheirs Maud, married to John Talbot, afterwards Earl of Shrewsbury, 
and Joan, married to William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk. Mr. Hollingsworth 
says of this John Talbot : " John Talbot was one of the bravest of the brave 
in the French wars. His heart never knew fear nor ever neglected a 
courtesy. The Lady Maud, however, could not have been attracted by his 
personal appearance, for it is said of him by one who, surprised at his fame, 
was yet more surprised at his person : 

" This is a child, a silly dwarf, 

It cannot be, this weak and writhled shrimp 
Should strike such terror to his enemies." 

Shakespeare's First Part of Hen. VI., Act 2. 
He says of himself : 

No, no ; I am but shadow of myself." 

" His great talents were in command, his courage and qualities were mental, 
and the physical force of others wielded by a soul that would not know fear, 

'Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. pt. i. 38; 6 I.P.M., 37 Edw. III. i., in which he is 

O.g Edw. III. 38; I.Q.D., 8 Edw. stated to hold the manor of the 

III. 70; N.R. File, 229,12. King in chief by the service of one 

= Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. III. 14. ^ arrow a year. 

Jl.P.M., 25 Edw. III. 33. 'Vol. i. p. 176. 

<O. 27 Edw. III. 24 ; I.P.M., 27 Edw. III. "Summoned to Parliament 21 and 22 

(2nd nos.) 17 ; 31 Edw. III. (2nd Edw. III. who died 1339. 

nos.) 46; 37 Edw. III. 20. 'See I.P.M., 6 Rich. II. 41. 

s Pat. Rolls, 27 Edw. III. pt. ii. 15. 



DAGWORTH. 165 

was in him what it has been in another of our great warripr statesmen, 
Wellington, the impulsive power of one heroic mind over the minds and 
bodies of others." 1 

John Talbot was in 1413 Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, where he took 
Donald McMorrough, a great rebel, and brought him to the Tower of 
London. On the 2Oth May, 1442, he was created Earl of Shrewsbury, 
being at that time Governor of Anjou and Maine, in France. He had 
been installed Knight of the Garter in 1424, and was general of the English 
army in France in 1428. In 1443 he was ambassador in France, and in 
1445 was again 1 Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. The ijth July, 1446, he was 
created Earl of Wexford and Earl of Waterford, and had a grant of the 
Barony of Dungarvan, together with the stewardship of Ireland to him 
and the heirs male of his body. In 1452 he was made Admiral of the 
English Fleet, next year Lieutenant of Aquitaine, where he took the 
garrison town of Bordeaux, upon which several other cities submitted, 
but marching to relieve Castillon he was killed by a cannon ball, and 
his army routed 2Oth July, 1453- 

The Earl's son, Sir John, Viscount Lisle, was slain with his father. 
Upon this battle the whole Duchy of Aquitaine, containing four arch- 
bishoprics, twenty-four bishoprics, fifteen earldoms, two hundred and two 
baronies, one thousand captainaires, and bailiwics revolted to the French, 
after it had been in the possession of the English for three hundred years. 
The Earl, who was a Marshal of France, was buried at Rotten, together 
with his eldest son, as appears from an inscription, which translated runs 
thus : " Here lieth the right noble knight John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, 
Earl of Wexford, Waterford and Valence, Lord Talbot of Goodrich and 
Orchenfield, Lord Strange of Blackmere, Lord Verdon of Acton, Lord 
Cromwell of Wingfield, Lord Lovetot of Worsop, Lord Furnival of Sheffield, 
Lord Faulconbridge, knight of the noble order of St. George, St. Michael, 
and the Golden Fleece, great marshal to King Henry VI. of his realm of 
France who died in the battle of Bourdeaux 1453." His remains were 
afterwards brought over to England and interred at Whitchurch, in Shrop- 
shire, where on a monument was placed the following inscription : 

Orate pro anima prsenobilis domini 
Johannis Talbot, quondam comitis Salopiae, 
Domini Furnival, domini Verdon, domini 
Strange de Blackmere, et mareschalli Franciae, 
Qui obiit in bello apud Burdews, vii Julii MCCCCLIII. 

Probably the manor was allotted on partition between the daughters 
of Thomas Nevil to Joan, the wife of William de la Pole, for though in 1433 
Thomas Mistertone seems to have been seised of the manor, which he 
apparently devised to his wife Margaret, yet it is certain that in 1450 
William de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, died seised of it, 1 when it passed to 
his son and heir, John de la Pole, 2nd Duke of Suffolk, 3 who died in 1492. 

The elder son and heir apparent of John, Duke of Suffolk, namely, 
John, Earl of Lincoln, had been attainted of high treason, and his lands 
forfeited ; but by an agreement made 26th Feb. 1492, between Hen. VII. of 
the one part and Edmund de la Pole, Knt., the 2nd son of John, late Duke 
of Suffolk, certain manors were restored to Edmund, who was to bear the 

1 Rollings worth, Hist of Stowmarket, p. 97. 3 See manor saved to him 1487, R.P. vi. 
'I.P.M., 28 Hen. VI. 25. 400. 



166 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

title of Earl instead of Duke, and certain manors were to remain in the 
Crown. This arrangement was confirmed in 1495 on the petition of Sir 
Edmund de la Pole, and under it the Manor of Dagworth Sorells vested in 
the Crown. 

The manor was granted by King Hen. VIII. to Charles Brandon, 
Duke of Suffolk, who regranted it to the Crown by way of exchange in 1538,' 
and in 1546 was granted by the Crown to Sir Thomas Darcy, and in 1549 
was by the Crown given to the Bishop of Norwich. 

Davy says this Lord Darcy had licence to alienate to Edward Gilbert, 
but in 1588 he makes it again to be in the Bishop of Norwich where, he says, 
it still is. Page, however, says, after referring to the ownership of the 
De la Poles : " It (the manor) subsequently became vested in the Bishop 
of Norwich ; of whom the family of Alexander leased Dagworth Hall and 
Manor ; and James Alexander, gent., bought of the Long Parliament the 
fee simple of this estate, when the Bishop's lands were sold, and the tenant 
had the first offer. His estate was about 300 per annum, which he devised 
to his children. His wife was daughter of Captain Flack, of West Greeting, 
who held some interest in this estate ; and their sons sold the whole to 
John Clerke, gent., of Bury St. Edmunds. Dagworth Hall is now the 
estate of the Rev. George John Haggit, of Bury St. Edmunds." 3 

We find from certain Exchequer Depositions taken at Stowmarket in 
1618 that a suit was then pending between Robert Salmon and John 
Draper respecting the manor said to have been then late in the possession 
of Robert Dawes, and as to his (Robert's) debts, and touching an extent 
acknowledged by plaintiff to Robert Dawes. Reference is also made to a 
conveyance of the manor to Robert Flick and James Alexander, and a 
distraint for rents out of the manor payable to the Bishop of Noiwich. 
There is amongst the MSS. in the Cambridge University Library a Survey 
of the manor made in i64i. 3 The sale referred to by Page as made to 
Alexander, was to James Alexander in 1647, and particulars of the transac- 
tion will also be found amongst the MSS. in the Cambridge University 
Library. 4 

Poor Mr. Hollingsworth is quite pathetic over the old hall of Dagworth. 
He says : " In King John's reign, during one of his itineraries, he spent 
(in March, 1216) the nth at Dagworth, coming there from Cambridge on the 
loth, and being at Framlingham on the i2th and I3th, at Ipswich on this last 
day, and at Colchester on the I4th. The whole court rode very frequently 
at a brisk gallop during these journeys, and sometimes travelled 50 miles 
in the day. What would be now thought of the court with 50 ladies 
and gentlemen on horseback, and 50 attendants sweeping at a gallop 
through the quiet streets and along the winding country roads of our 
counties ? . . The ancient hall, which long maintained its venerable 
existence amid these bright meadows, has yielded at last to the innovations 
of the age and not to the hand of time. The greater part of it was pulled 
down after having served as a farmhouse." 1 

The manor is now vested in George Gudgeon. 

Arms of DAGWORTH : Ermine on a fesse, Gules, three bezants. 

'S.P. 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8). 4 Ib. 

' Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 531. ' Hollingsworth, Hist, of Stowmarket, p 97. 

'C.imb. Mm. ii. 19 (2314). 




FINBOROUGH. 167 

FIN BOROUGH. 

HERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times, held by 
Leveson, a freeman under Goodmund, the predecessor of 
Hugh de Montfort, by commendation only, and consisted 
of 2 carucates of land, 4 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 
wood sufficient to support 12 hogs, 16 acres of meadow, i 
mill, i rouncy, 8 beasts, 20 hogs, and 30 sheep. There 
was a church living with 30 acres of free land, and i acre of 
meadow. At the time of the Survey it was held by Roger de Oburville, 
and some of the derails had altered. The bordars were then 3, the rouncy 
had disappeared, the hogs had come down to 6, while the sheep had increased 
to 100. The value in Saxon times was 4, which after having fallen to 2, 
by the time of the Survey had gone up to 6os. It was one league long 
and 8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 22^. 

In the same manor was i carucate of land within the soc of the King 
and Earl, 3 ploughteams (which were reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
and 3^ acres of meadow. It had been held by 18 freemen under the said 
Leveson by commendation only. Roger had them in exchange as men- 
tioned in the Survey. 

Another holding consisted of 65^ acres of land, i bordar, 3 plough- 
teams among them (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 3 acres of 
meadow. It had been held by 6 socmen belonging to Thorney, the Con- 
fessor's manor, with commendation, sac, soc, and summage. They were 
held by Roger in exchange as mentioned in the Survey. 

Another holding among these lands of Roger de Oburville was of 80 
acres within the soc of the King and Earl, and i ploughteams which 
gradually disappeared. 

It had been formerly held by two freemen under Goodmund, Hugh's 
predecessor, by commendation only. Roger de Oburville held these also in 
like manner. 

Another holding of Oburville's was of 4 acres formerly held by a freeman 
under commendation under the predecessor of Eustace, and another of 4 
acres formerly held by a freeman under Leuestan de Losa by commendation 
only. 

Another estate consisted of 20 acres, half a ploughteam, and i acre of 
meadow, which had formerly been held by a freeman under the King by 
commendation, the sac and soc being in the Hundred. 

Roger de Oburville also had another small estate of 30 acres, i villein, 
i ploughteam (which had disappeared by the time of the Survey), and 2 
acres of meadow. It had been held by a freeman under Wisgar, the pre- 
decessor of Richard, the soc being in the Hundred. Oburville's last holding 
in this place was of 16 acres, and i ploughteam (which gradually disappeared). 
It had been held by 4 freemen, the soc being in the Hundred. In Saxon 
times and later all these freemen were valued at 4, but by the time of the 
Survey at 405. only.' 

Among the lands of Earl Ralph kept by Goodrich the steward in the 
King's hand was a small holding of 25 acres and half a ploughteam. It had 
formerly been held by two freemen under commendation to Edith, within 
the soc of the Hundred, and belonging to Norton. The rental value was 
included in that of Norton/ 

At the time of the Survey Earl Eustace had two estates in this place. 
The first consisted of z\ carucates of land in the soc of th/e King and Earl, 

'Dom. ii. 4036. a Dom. ii. 285. 



i68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

9 bordars, 6 serfs, 3 plought earns in demesne, 18 acres of meadow, i beast, 
and 8 hogs. At the time of the Survey the serfs had disappeared, the 
plought i>u i us were reduced by i, but the beasts were increased to 2. 

Tht value originally was 505., but by the time of the Survey the value 
was double. It had been held in the time of the Confessor by Ingelric, 
the predecessor of Earl Eustace. 

The second holding consisted of 30 acres of land in the King's soc and 
i ploughteam, formerly held by seven freemen under the said Ingelric by 
commendation. Their rental value was included in the iocs, above.' 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely were 34 acres of land held by 3 
socmen valued at 45. This property was held of the abbot by Roger de 
Oburville. 

In the same township were 7 acres belonging to Berking demesne, 
the sac and soc belonging to the abbot. 1 

Amongst the encroachments against the King we find the following 
entry relating to Finborough : "In Finborough is a freeman of whom 
the predecessor of Roger had half commendation Eustace the other half 
of the commendation and later the Earl of Moretaigne held over him. 
But Roger held over him when he left the land, Roger the engineer under 
him. Now Roger Bigot holds him in hand for the King, until proof of 
right be made. And he has 15 acres of land. Then half a ploughteam, 
now none at all. Valued at 3s." ; 

The Anglo-Saxon ode or song on the Battle of Brunanburgh preserved 
in the Chronicle edited by Bishop Gibson, is well known. It has been 
translated and commented on by more than one antiquary. The Fragment, 
although little inferior to that well-known composition, and preserving 
the memory of a contest recorded in no other historical document, has 
failed to attract the notice it deserves. It was published by the scholar 
Hickes, who discovered it on a single leaf, bound up with a MS. volume of 
Homilies, preserved in the Archiepiscopal Library of Lambeth, who printed 
it without a translation in the first volume of his " Thesaurus Linguarum 
Septentrionalium." Unfortunately the poem is imperfect both at the 
beginning and end. It appears to have been written in commemoration 
of the successful defence of the town or fortress of Finborough, garrisoned 
by a Saxon force under the command of a leader named Hengist against 
the attack of some enemy. The first assault upon the fortress, which 
probably occupied the site of Finborough Hall, appears to have taken place 
by night, and the subsequent siege to have lasted five days ; at the expira- 
tion of which, the chieftain of the besieging party, being wounded, they 
were constrained to retreat without effecting their purpose. We are 
unable to say by whom the rendering has been made, as the extract is taken 
from a book in the writer's possession containing scraps from various 
sources, and evidently collected about 1838, but the transcriber introduces 
his version in the following words : " The style in which the Event is detailed 
resembles that of the Ode rather than of regular Epic Composition, a 
remark which will equally apply to many of the more poetical parts of the 
reputed Caedmon. The Commander of the besieging army is represented 
as addressing and receiving an answer from the Leader stationed at the 

'Dom. ii. 303. 3 Dom. ii. 4486. 

2 Dom. ii. 382*. 



FINBOROUGH. 169 

principal gate of the fortification, in a manner which may faintly remind the 
reader of some of the dialogues which Homer has occasionally put into the 
mouths of his contending heroes. I have only a few words to add concerning 
the version of this curious Relique. In this, I have retained the whole matter 
of the original witBout addition or transposition. The most remarkable 
expressions, I have endeavoured, where they admitted of it to translate 
literally. In other cases, the extreme conciseness of the Anglo-Saxon 
has rendered it almost impossible for me to present any intelligible copy of 
it without using considerable amplification. If, on the one hand, the 
style has, by this liberty, been rendered more perspicuous and agreeable to 
our received notions of poetic diction, I fear that, on the other, it has lost 
much of the fire and vigour which result from the abruptness and com- 
pression of the original- one of the long-neglected monuments of the genius 
and language of our forefathers. 



THE FIGHTE OF FINBURGHE. 

I. 

'The sun had climb'd the eastern sky- 
But not by day the Youthful Band 

May hear their Leader's battle cry, 
Nor yet on Finburghe's fatal strand, 

"The Warrior's winged serpent fly : 
Pauses from blood the foeman's hand, 

Nor strives he yet to fire yon HALL'S proud canopy. 

II. 

Sweetly sung the birds of night, 

The wakeful cricket chirrup' d loud, 
And now the moon, serenely bright, 

Was seen beneath the wandering cloud. 
Then rous'd him swift our deadly foe, 
To deeds of slaughter and of woe, 
Now beneath the jav'lin's stroke 

The buckler's massy circle rung. 
Anon the chains of slumber broke 

Our Chieftain great and good, 
He, whose high praise fills ev'ry tongue, 

First in valour as in blood, 
The matchless Hengist to the battle woke. 

'The exact meaning of the first clause 2 The metaphor by which the arrow is 

is somewhat obscure. Its general described in this line, may remind 

purport, however, appears to be the classical reader of a similar 

either that no warlike demonstra- expression in the splendid passage 

tions were made during the day- which jEschylus has put into the 

time ; or that the enemy, while mouth of Apollo in his Eumenides, : 

preparing for, and marching to its vr * \ o ~ " > "^ 

nocturnal attack (the sun not M, * X<tfo^ ITI^V a/>y*rr.,v o*iv. 

having appeared in the east) pro- 
ceeded at first silently and without 
violence. 



i;o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

III. 

Uprose in that eventful tide 

Full many a warrior brave, 
And don'd his armour's golden pride, 

And girt his glittering glaive. 
At the high HALL'S portals wide, 
Foremost of the noble Band, 
Sigvart and Mha proudly stand. 
Where other pass the foe might find, 
Ordlaf watch'd with Guthlaf joined. 
Garulf next with fiery speed 
Rous'd Guthere from the slumberer's bed. 
No care of dress their steps delay' d, 
Each grasp' d in haste his shining blade, 
And fierce the brother warriors flew 
To guard the HALL'S high avenue. 
He that prides him in the fight 
Had joy'd to see that gallant sight. 

IV. 

And now in accents loud 

Our foeman's Chieftain, bold and proud, 

Sought what Thane or Battle Lord 

At the high Gate kept watch and ward. 

" Sigvart is here " (the champion cried) 

" Sigvart oft in battle tried, 

" Known to all the warrior train 

" Where spreads the Saxon wide domain. 

" Now, Chieftain, turn thee to the fight, 

" Or yield thee to the Saxon might." 



V. 

Soon the tented Halls among 

Loud the din of slaughter rung, 

Closer now each hostile band 

Grasp' d the shield with eager hand, 

And many a Chief is doom'd to feel 

Through helm and head the griding steel. 

First in that disastrous Plain 

Guthlaf s valliant son was slain, 

Where Garulf lies untimely dead 

Many a fated hero bled. 

There to seek his destin'd food, 

The dark and willow- pinion' d raven stood : 

And far around that Field of blood 

The sword's dread radiance beam'd to heaven. 

It seem'd as though that morn had given 

All FINBURGHE to the rav'ning flame. 

Ne'er heard I yet of fight might claim 

A nobler or a sadder name. 






FINBOROUGH. 



171 



VI. 

At the high HALL a chosen band, 

Leaders brave that shine afar, 
Full sixty sons of victory stand 

In all the golden pomp of war ; 
Little think they to forego 
The Hall of Mead for that proud foe. 
Five live-long days the battle's sound 
Was heard by FINBURGHE'S EARTH-RAIS'D MOUND. 
Yet undiminish'd and unquell'd 
That hero Band the Portal held, 
Till bleeding from the Saxon blade 
Our foeman's Lord his fear betray 'd, 

And told in accents of despair, 
How broken helm and corslet reft 

Defenceless to the stroke had left 
His head and bosom bare. 
Then sought the vanquish' d Foe relief, 
And safety for their wounded Chief. 

MANOR OF GREAT FINBOROUGH OR FINBOROUGH MAGNA. 

We do not know much of this manor in early days, but we find that 
Robert Musgrose died seised of it in 1254,' leaving John Musgrose his son 
and heir, then aged 21 or 22. From a presentation made in 1258 by the 
Hundreds of Suffolk it appears that Gilbert le Poor, steward of the Earl of 
Gloucester, soon after the battle of Evesham was seised of the manor, and 
afterwards transferred it to John Hovell, parson of Wyverstone, and that it 
was afterwards delivered into the King's hands, who gave it to John Giffard, 
brother of Osbert Giffard, to hold in farm of the Dictum of Kenilworth. 2 

We meet with a fine levied in 1389 of Finborough Magna Manor by 
Sir Thomas Mortymer, William Ford, clerk, and William Skreyve against 
Sir Stephen Lescrop and Marjory his wife. 3 A William Skreyve was lord 
of Finborough, and in 1459 Alice, daughter and heir of Nicholas Benman/ 
who had for her ist husband John L'Estrange, and for her 2nd John Twyer, 
is said to have died seised, when the manor passed to Elizabeth, daughter 
of John L'Estrange. This Alice had been married to William Skreyve as 
her 3rd husband. It is not possible that he was the William Skreyve mentioned 
in the fine in 1389, but it is possible that he was the son or grandson, and that 
Alice his wife took the manor under a gift from him. In 1475 Sir Robert 
Chamberlayne, Knt., had a grant of the manor from the Crown, but under 
what circumstances does not appear, and in 1497 Simon Digby had likewise 
a grant. 

He was the 2nd son of Sir Everard Digby, who was killed at the battle 
of Towton in 1440. Sir Everard was eldest son of Sir Simon Digby, of 



'Extent I.P.M., 38 Hen. III. 39, New 
Ref. File, 16 (6). 

*Q.W. Rolls, i. 54 Hen. III. 2. 

'Feet of Fines, 13 Rich. II. iz. 

4 Blomefield says: "by Maud his wife, 
daughter and heir of John Pike 
and Eleanor his wife, daughter and 
heir of Sir William de Rushbrook, 



by Joan his wife, daughter of 
Walter Wells, lord of Rayne, in 
Essex, by Isabel his wife, sister of 
Edmund de Kemscop, lord of 
Samford and of Felstead, in Essex, 
who died 19 Edw. II. and was 
descended of the noble family of 
Lord Wells, in Lincolnshire. 



172 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Tilton, co. Leicester, and Drystock, co. Rutland, by Joan his wife, daughter 
of Sir James Sellers, which Sir Simon was the son of Robert Digby by 
Catharine his wife, daughter and coheir of Simon Pakeman, which Robert 
was the son of John Digby by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Walter de 
Oleville, which John was the son of John Digby, the son of Sir John Digby, 
in the time of Hen. III., and of Arabella his wife, daughter of Sir William 
Harcourt, of Stanton Harcourt, and widow of Sir Fulke Pembrugge, Knt., 
which Sir John was eldest son of Robert Digby and Ida his widow, daughter 
of John de Fitz Herbert, which Robert was the eldest son of Robert Tilton, 
who becoming owner of an estate at Digby and residing there assumed 
that surname, which Robert was the and son of William Tilton, of Tilton, 
the son of Sir Everard Tilton and Amicia Bretton his wife, the said Sir 
Everard being the son of Almans, who held lands and resided at Tilton, in 
Leicestershire, in the time of William the Conqueror. 

Simon Digby, to whom the grant of this manor was made, had been 
knighted by King Edw. IV. in 1477. Upon the landing of the Earl of 
Richmond he with his brothers joined and fought for the Earl in the decisive 
battle of Bosworth, and in reward for his services was in 1485 made steward 
of the lordship of Uppingham, Preston, Barrowden, Esenden, and Gretham, 
in the County of Rutland, with all the other lands in that county then late 
the estate of George, Duke of Clarence, to hold for life ; and also steward 
and receiver of the Manor of Bedall, in Yorkshire. In 1486 he was a 
commander at the battle of Stoke, and in consideration of services there 
rendered the King in 1487 gave to him and his heirs male the Manor of 
Ravysbury, in Surrey, and in 1488 appointed him comptroller of the petty 
customs in the Port of London, and confirmed to him the forestership of 
Thornewoods. In 1495 the King by letters patent dated" at Westminster 
23rd Dec. granted to him and his heirs male the lordship of Coleshill, in 
Warwickshire, upon the forfeiture of Sir Simon Montfort, and this then 
became the principal residence of the Digby family. He held many posts 
of importance, and died 27th Feb. 1519-20,' being buried in the chancel ot 
Coleshill church. By his wife Alice, daughter and heir of John Walleys, 
of East Ruddon, co. Devon, h,e left a son and heir, Reginald Digby, to whom 
this manor passed. Reginald Digby was sheriff of the County of 
Leicester in 1534 and 1544, and married Anne, daughter and coheir of 
John D'Anvers, of Calthorpe, co. Oxford, and dying 25th April, 1549, the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Digby, of Coleshill, who married 
Anne, eldest daughter of Sir George Throgmorton, of Loughton, co. Warwick, 
Knt. (by his wife Catherine, daughter of Nicholas, Lord Vaux, of Harrowden) 
and dying 15th Nov. 1558, the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir George 
Digby, who was knighted in 1586 by Robert, Earl of Leicester, for his 
bravery at the siege of Zutphen. He married Abigail, daughter of Sir 
Arthur Heveningham, of Ketteringham, co. Norfolk, knight-banneret. 
George Digby sold the manor to Henry Gilbert, who also had a grant or 
confirmation of it from Queen Elizabeth. 

In the time of Hen. VIII. we find proceedings in the Star Chamber 
as to a messuage and lands held of this manor by this Henry Gilbert 
(Gylberd) against Robert Jower, Henry Jower, Thomas Smyth, Grace 
Crosse, and Joan Crosse, 1 and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the 
time of Queen Elizabeth is an action by Robert Jower and Elizabeth his 

'I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 61. 'Star C.P. Hen. VIII. Bundle 24, 352; 

Ib. Edw. VI. Bundle 8, 12. 



FTNBOROUGH. 173 

wife against this Henry Gilbert and Robert Smith to obtain admittance 
to a copyhold messuage and lands held of the defendant Gilbert of his Manor 
of Finborough. 1 

Henry Gilbert or Gyleberde seems to have acquired the manor from 
George Digby in 1572.' 

He was a goldsmith of London, and married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Howe, of Stowmarket, by whom he had a son, Sir John Gilbert, who 
succeeded his father in the lordship of this manor in 1594. He rebuilt 
Finborough Hall, and married twice ist Dorothy, daughter of Robert 
Gosnold, of Ottley, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Arthur Heven- 
ingham, of Heveningham, and left three daughters and coheirs. The eldest 
married Sir William Forthe, of Butley Abbey, Knt., and after his decease 
took as a 2nd husband Gresham Parkin (? Perkins), and finally as a 3rd 
husband William Tyrrell, of Bury Abbey. She is interred in the church 
of Stowmarket. The youngest daughter was married to Sir John Poley, 
of Stowmarket, Knt. ; Elizabeth, 2nd daughter, married Sir Roger North, 
of Mildenhall, son of Sir Henry North, son of Robert, Lord North, 3 and 
the manor passed to him with Finborough Hall, where Sir Roger North 
resided in the time of King James and King Chas. I. 

Elizabeth died in 1612, and Sir Roger North took for a 2nd wife 
Thomasine, 2nd daughter of Thomas Clench, of Holbrook. He had no 
issue by his 2nd wife, but by his ist had two sons, Henry and Dudley North, 
and a daughter Mary. Sir Roger North died in 1651, and his 2nd wife 
i8th Feb. 1655. Henry North the son, afterwards Sir Henry North, Bart., 
(so created in 1660), succeeded, and in 1656 by deed dated igth November 
that year with his son Henry sold this estate to William Wollaston, son 
of Henry, of Shenton, co. Leicester, for 10,000. 

The property as described in this deed is : " All those the manors of 
Finborough al. Finborough and Cantelupes al. Cantelewes, Finborough 
Magna al. Ardens al. Arders al. Addens with the appurtenances in Great 
Finborough, Little Finborough, Buxhall, Combs, Hitcham, and Onehouse, 
in the County of Suffolk ; and all that capital messuage or mansion house 
called Finborough Hall, with the yards, &c." Also various farms of 117 
acres, 104 acres, 155 acres, 90 acres, 43 acres, 13 acres, and 16 acres. A 
fine was levied in Easter term 1657. 

William Wollaston married Anne, daughter of Humphrey Whitgrave, 
of Bridgeford, and died loth Dec. 1666, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir William, who married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Francis 
Cave, of Ingersby, and died igth Aug. 1688, leaving the manor by will 
dated 2oth April, 1688, to his cousin, the Rev. William Wollaston, for 
life, with remainder to his ist and other sons in tail male, with remainder 
to Thomas Wollaston, of London, for life, with remainder to his sons in 
tail male, with an ultimate remainder to testator's own right heirs. This 
William Wollaston was the 2nd son of William Wollaston. of Great Blox- 
wit.h, co. Stafford, son of Thomas, the brother of William Wollaston, father 
of the testator. The Rev. William Wollaston was the author of that 
well-known work, " The Religion of Nature Delineated," issued anony- 
mously in 1724, but privately printed in 1722, and of which upwards of 

'C.P. ii. 100. 'See Badmondisfield Manor, Wickham- 

2 Fine, Trin. 14 Eliz. ; Hil. 16 Eliz. ; Mich. brook, in Risbridge Hundred ; also 

17-18 Eliz. Burl's Manor, Laxfield, in Hoxne 

Hundred. 



174 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

10,000 copies were sold within a few years after its publication, though it 
exposed the author to the censure of many zealous Christians, many of 
whom considered him as belonging to Dr. Clarke's 4th class of deists. He 
upheld " the intellectual theory of morality.'" He resided at Finborough 
Hall, and married 2nd Nov. 1689, Catherine, daughter and heir of Nicholas 
Charlton, citizen and draper of London. He died 2gth Oct. 1726,* being 
buried in the parish church of Finborough. The manor passed to his son 
and heir, Charlton VVollaston, who died a bachelor 6th Aug. 1729, aged 39, 
when it passed to his brother and heir, William Wollaston, M.P. for Ipswich. 
He married Elizabeth Fanquier, and by deeds dated 6th and 7th Jan. 
1740, barred the estate tail, recoveries being suffered in Hilary term, 1740. 
William Wollaston died 2Oth June, 1757, 3 aged 64, when the manor vested 
in his son and heir, William Wollaston, who was Colonel of the Eastern 
Battalion of Suffolk Militia, and represented the borough of Ipswich in 
Parliament in three successive sessions, viz., in 1768, 1774, and 1780. He 
married Blanche, sister of Sir Thomas Hyde Page, and died gth Nov. 1797, 
aged 66. Three years, however, before his death he retired to Bath, 
where he lived in the Upper Crescent, and he sold the manor and estate to 
Roger Pettiward, of Putney, in Surrey, the son of Roger Mortlock, D.D., 
who had assumed the name of Pettiward in 1749, and died in 1780.* Roger 
Pettiward was originally a partner in the well-known firm of Wright and 
Gill, wholesale stationers, but was not for many years in business. 
Immediately after his purchase of the Finborough estate Roger Pettiward 
began thte erection of the present mansion under the direction of Mr. F. 
Sandys. It is of Woolpit brick, and in the centre of the front is a projecting 
bow, adorned with a pediment, supported by four columns, likewise of 
brick, formed in moulds made expressly for th'e purpose. The park com- 
prises about 200 acres, and gently slopes from the mansion into a valley 
which nearly forms a circle from west to south, and is watered by a rivulet 
which takes its rise in Rattlesden and divides Finborough from Buxhall, 
when after a winding course it joins the Gipping below Stowmarket. Beyond 
the rivulet the park again rises to the north, and is skirted by a wood 
diversified by clumps of trees of considerable age. 

Finborough Hall in recent years has been much improved by the late 
proprietor. Roger Pettiward 5 was a man of considerable ability and 
highly esteemed by his contemporaries. In 1788 he was elected a Fellow 
of the Society of Antiquaries, and in 1791 attempted to sell this lordship 
and that of Stowmarket as well as Finborough Hall by private contract. 8 
He does not, however, appear to have effected a sale. He was in 1811 
elected to serve the office of Sheriff of the County, and in 1831-2 elected 
Master of the Stationers' Company. He married ist May, 1800, Jane 
Seymour, daughter of Francis (? Thomas) Colman, of Hillesdon, co. Devon, 
and died, according to Davy, 3pth July, 1833, " at Trafford Park, co. 
Lancaster, aged 78," but according to other accounts " died I4th Nov. 
1833, at the Angel Inn, at Bury St. Edmunds, on his way to London, 
aged 68, and was interred in the family vault at Putney, Surrey," when 
the manor passed to his widow, who resided at Finborough Hall, and 
remarried at Finborough 25th June, 1835, Sir William Hotham, K.C.B., 

'D.N.B. Ixii. 310. 'Accounts of Almshouses at Putney 

'Will 8th July, 1714. kept by John Pettiward, 1683-1708, 

'Will 26th Feb. 1754, Codicil i8th Feb. will be found in the British Museum. 

1755- ( Add - MSS - 347I8-34720). 

4 See Manor of Onehouse, in this Hundred. * Ipswich Journal, 23rd April, 1791. 



I 



FINBOROUGH. 175 

Admiral of the Blue. On Lady Hotham's death the manor passed to her 
ist husband's great-nephew, Robert John Bussell, only son of Robert 
Bussell, of Bath, by Frances, only daughter of the Rev. Henry Eyre, of 
Landford, co. Wilts., who had married J5th Nov. 1786, Frances, elder 
sister of the said Roger Pettiward. He was born in 1819, and assumed by 
Royal licence 22nd Jan. 1856, the surname and arms of Pettiward under 
the will of his great-uncle, Roger Pettiward, and was High Sheriff for the 
County in 1867-8, and sometime major in the West Suffolk Militia. He 
married in 1855 Lady Frances Catherine Nelson, daughter of Thomas, 
2nd Earl Nelson, and had by her, who died in 1877, nme daughters. 

Robert John Pettiward died in February, 1908, when the manor being 
entailed on the next male heir vested in Charles Terry, son of the Rev. 
Terry, who has taken the surname of Pettiward. 

Arms of DIGBY : Azure, a fleur-de-lis, Argent. Of GILBERT : Azure, 
a chevron engrailed, Ermine, between three eagles displayed, Or. Of 
NORTH : Azure, a lion passant, Or, between three fleurs-de-lis, Argent. 
Of WOLLASTON : Argent, three mullets, Sable, pierced of the field. Of 
PETTIWARD : Arg. a cross ragulee, Sa. charged with five etoiles 
of the first. 

MANOR OF FINBOROUGH al. ARDEN'S al. ARDER'S al. ADDER'S. 

This was the holding of Leveson in Saxon times and of Roger de 
Auberville or Oberville or Othurvill at the time of the Domesday Survey. 

Roger held 18 lordships in the counties of Essex and Suffolk, and his 
brother William held Barley in Herts by grant of the Conqueror. These 
Aubervilles were Barons by tenure. To Roger succeeded Hugh de Auber- 
ville (the son and heir of William), who was the founder of Butley priory. 
The lordship is said subsequently to have vested in Ranulph de Glanville, 
the well-known Justiciar of England, and descended in shares to his 
daughters. His daughter, Maud de Glanville, married William de Auber- 
ville, who was the son and heir of the Hugh above-mentioned, and in 1236 gave 
a moiety of the manor and of the advowson of the church of Great Fin- 
borough to the priory. The other moiety was given to the priory by 
Thomas de Ardern, the grandson of Amabel, another of the daughters of 
Ralph de Glanville. Were it not for one moiety of the manor having been 
vested in Amabel, one would suspect the holding of Ralph de Glanville 
to be fictitious. It does not seem at all probable that the manor was 
vested in Hugh de Auberville, who died in 1212, and then passed to the 
father of the wife whom Hugh's son married. 

With the priory the manor remained until the Dissolution, and passed 
to the Crown under a fine levied by the King in 1538.' It was in 1540 
granted by the Crown to Anne of Cleves. In 1563 the manor was held by 
Walter Fyshe, and on the Memoranda Rolls this year we find an acquittance 
to him in respect of the issues of the manor to the death of Lady Anne 
of Cleves.* 

In 1569 Walter Fyshe appears to have sold the manor to Edmund 
Withepole, 3 who in 1575 sold it to Henry Gilbert. 4 

'Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 3 Fine, Hil. n Eliz. Edmund Withepole v. 

2 M. 5 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 92. Walter Fyshe and others; Fine, Hil. 

12 Eliz. Edmund Wythypoles v. 

Z. Wyseman and others. 
4 Fine, Trin. 17 Eliz. 



176 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



In the middle of the iyth century the manor was vested in Sir Henry 
North, who sold it in 1656 to William \Yollaston, from which time it has 
di-volved with the main manor. 

The following advertisement appeared in a catalogue in 1893 : " Court 
Rolls. The Original Rolls of the Manor of Finsborowe-cum-Cantelawe 
and Adders Hall, in the County ot Suffolk, nicely written on four skins of 
parchment, 13$ inches wide and 33 inches long 1665 to 1682, inclusive, 
the whole in perfect state for 305.'" 



MANOR OF CANTILUPE'S al. CANTELOWES al. CANTELO'S. 

This was the lordship of Emma de Cantelon or Cantelupe who also 
held the Manor of Cockerells Hall, in Buxhall, in the time of Rich. T. Hugh 
de Cantelupe held one fee in Finborough and Buxhall of the Honor of 
Boulogne in 1210-1212, according to the Red Book of the Exchequer (132 B). 
Another entry in this same Red Book is that Emma de Cantilupe held 
lands in Finborough and Buxhall of the Honor of Boulogne which the heirs 
of Adam Kokerel held 1210-12." 

Hugh de Cantilupe forfeited the manor for felony, when it vested in 
the Crown, and was granted by Hen. III. in 1227 to Ralph Fitz-Nicholas, 3 
who had view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer here. 4 He 
died in 1273,' and was succeeded by a younger son, Ralph Pipard, of 
Rotherfield Pipard, co. Oxford. 

Ralph Pipard had summons to Parliament as a baron from the 25th 
to the 3Oth Edw. I. In the year 1297 he had summons to Carlisle equis et 
armis, and in the writ was styled a baron ; the earls and barons then sum- 
moned being distinguished by their respective ranks. Three years later 
he was one of the barons who in the Parliament at Lincoln subscribed 
the letter to the Pope, being then designated " Radulphus Pypard Dominus 
de Lanford." In 1302 he was made Governor of Bolesover and Hareston 
Castles, co. Derby. He died about 1309,' and was succeeded by his son 
and heir, Sir John Pipard, then aged 30, who about 1309 sold the manor 
to Edmund le Botiller sometime called Earl of Carrick. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1309 is a pardon to Edmund le Botiller for having 
acquired in fee without licence this manor from John Pypard, and licence 
is granted him to regrant to the grantor for life with reversion to himself 
and his heirs. 7 

Edmund le Botiller was the son of Theobald le Botiller or Butler by 
Joan his wife, daughter of John Fitz John, who had a grant of free warren 
here in 1315.* He was appointed under the style of Lord Keeper, Chief 
Governor of Ireland in 1312, in 1314 Chief Governor under the title of 
Lord Justice. He married in 1302 Joan, daughter of John Fitz Thomas 
Fitz Gerald, ist Earl of Kildare, and died i3th Sept. 1321, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, James Butler or le Botiller, 2nd Earl of Carrick. 
He married Eleanor, 2nd daughter of Humphrey de Boh'un, 4th Earl of 
Hereford and Essex, by Lady Elizabeth Plantagenet, daughter of King 
Edw. I., and was created by Edw. III. the 2nd Nov. 1328, Earl of Ormond. 



'E.A.N. & Q. vol. v. p. 159. 

' Red Book of the Exchequer, 150. 

'H.R. ii. 191. 

Q.W. 7 . 



5 I.P.M., i Edw. I. 19. 
6 I.P.M.,3Edw. 11.25. 
7 Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. II. 22 ; Add. Ch. 10644. 
Chart. Rolls, 9 Edw. II. 13. 



FINBOROUGH. 



177 



He had a grant of free warren here in 1328,' and died 6th Jan 1337-8, 2 and 
the manor passed to his widow Eleanor. On the Close Rolls in 1338 is an 
order to deliver the manor to Eleanor, late wife of James le Botiller, Earl 
of Ormond, because they held jointly for themselves and the heirs of their 
bodies by a fine levied, and the manor was held in chief by knights' service. 3 
The widow remarried Thomas de Dagworth, Lord Dagworth, and died 
in 1363, 4 when the manor passed to her elder son James, 2nd Earl of Ormond, 
called the Noble Earl by reason of his being greatgrandson of Edw. I. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Darcy, of Flatten, co. Meath, 
Lord Justice of Ireland in 1359, and 1360 was himself appointed Lord 
Justice. He held this lordship of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, son 
of King Edw. III. 

In 1361 Lionel, Duke of Clarence, 3rd son of King Edward III., being 
made Lord Lieutenant, he attended him thither, having for himself 45. 
per day for retinue, 2s. each for 2 knights, I2d. each for 27 esquires, 6d. each 
for 20 hoblers armed and 4^. each for 20 hoblers unarmed, and in 1364 
was appointed deputy to the said Duke. 

He died I3th Oct. 1382, 5 when the manor passed to his widow Elizabeth 
in dower, and on her death in 1389 vested in her son and heir, James 
Boteler or Butler, 3rd Earl of Ormond. He purchased in 1391 the castle 
of Kilkenny from the heirs of Sir Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Gloucester, 
a fine strong edifice erected in the beginning of the I3th century by William, 
Earl Marshal, and which he made his chief place of abode. He was three 
times Chief Governor of Ireland, and married Anne, daughter of John de 
Welles, Lord Welles, by Margaret, daughter of John de Mowbray, Lord 
Mowbray, and dying 7th April, 1405,' was succeeded by his elder son 
James, 4th Earl, usually called the " White Earl," and esteemed for his 
learning. He it was who prevailed upon King Hen. V. to create a King 
of Arms for Ireland by the title of " Ireland King of Arms," altered by King 
Hen. VIII. to " Ulster King of Arms." 

He was Lord Justice of Ireland in 1407 and 1440, and married ist 
Elizabeth, daughter of William Beauchamp, Lord of Bergavenny, by Joane, 
daughter -of Richard Fitz Alan, of Arundel, and 2ndly Joan, widow 
of Jenico Grey, daughter of Gerald Fitz Gerald, 5th Earl of Kildare, by 
Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir John Rochfort, and on his death 22nd 
August, 1452, the manor passed to his son and heir by lu's ist wife, James 
Butler, 5th Earl of Ormond, generally known as " Sir James Ormond." 

He had been elevated to the peerage of England in his father's lifetime 
by letters patent dated 8th July, 1449, as Earl of Wiltshire. He was 
Governor of Calais in 1450, and a staunch supporter of the House of 
Lancaster. He was Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1453 to 1456, and 
in 1455 Lord Treasurer of England. In 1454, with the Earl of Salisbury 
and some other great lords, he undertook the guarding of the seas from the 
3rd April for the space of three years, receiving the tonnage and poundage 
to support the charge thereof. He was with King Henry in the first battle 
of St. Albans, where the Yorkists prevailing, he fled and cast his harness 
into a ditch. Nevertheless, in 1459 he Had the place of Lord Treasurer 



1 Chart. Rolls, 2 Edw. III. 13. 
'Extent, I.P.M., 12 Edw. III. 43. 
'Close Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. i. 18. 
4 I.P.M., 37 Edw. III. 24. 



5 Will dated 3ist Aug. 1379, and proved at 
Canterbury 28th April 1386 ; I. P.M., 
8 Rich. II. 15. 

6 I.P.M., 13 Rich. 11.5. 

'I.P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 19. 



178 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



again conferred upon him, and in 1460, by reason of his constant assistance 
to the King in those turbulent times, obtained a grant of the Keepership 
of the Forest or Park of Pederton, in the County of Somerset, then in the 
Crown by the forfeiture of Richard, Duke of York ; as also of Craneborne- 
Chase, lying in th.e counties of Wilts, and Dorset. 

Dugdale says : " After which (the same year) coming with the Lords 
Scales and Hungerford to Newbery (a Lordship belonging to the Duke of 
York, and there making Inquisition for those who had adhered to that 
Duke), he caused some to be hang'd, drawn and quartered ; and plundered 
the rest. Thence went to Southampton ; where, under colour to surprize 
the Earl of Warwick, he arm'd five great Carricks of Genoa, and mann'd 
them with Soldiers ; taking up Victual at the King's price, without paying 
any money. And so, carrying a great part of his Treasure with him, sailed 
into the Netherlands. 

" Howbeit, after this, before the end of that year, he returned, and 
was in the Battel of Wakefield ; where the Duke of York being slain, the 
Lancastrians obtained a very great victory. But soon after that, being in 
the Battel at Mortimers Crosse (1461) against the Earl of March, where the 
Victory fell to the other side, he fled. So Likewise upon the loss of the 
day at Towton-field, which hapned within a short space after (29 March, 
1461). But was taken by Richard Salkeld Esq. ; and thereupon beheaded 
at Newcastle, upon the first of May [1461].'" 

The beheading is not so clear, for it appears from other sources that 
the Earl was living as late as 1475. He married twice 1st Avicia, daughter 
and heir of Sir Richard Stafford, step-daughter of John, Earl of Arundel, 
by Maud, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert Lovell. She died without 
issue the 3rd June, 1437. 2 He married 2ndly Eleanor, eldest daughter of 
Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, and sister and coheir of Henry and 
Edmund Beaufort, Dukes of Somerset, but died without issue, and being 
attainted by Parliament 4th November, 1461, all his manors became 
forfeited. His next heir was his brother John, who was also attainted 
for Lancastrian principles, but was subsequently restored in blood by 
King Edw. IV. soon after 1472, and in 1476 the attainder by the Irish 
Parliament was repealed, whereby he became the 6th Earl of Ormond. 

The manor seems, however, to have passed from the family, and was 
vested in Alice, wife of John L'Estrange, on her death in 1459, 3 and then in 
her daughter Elizabeth, wife of William Skreyve, and in 1474 Sir John 
Skreyve, who died without issue, was owner of the manor.* We do not 
find anything authoritative until 1475, when Sir Robert Chamberlayne had 
a grant of the manor from the Crown to hold to him and the heirs male of 
his body by fealty only.' 

There is, however, another grant in 1495 from the Crown in favour of 
Simon Digby, from which time the manor has devolved in a similar course 
with the main manor, and is now vested in Charles Pettiward, of Finborough 
Hall. 

The sale from George Digby to Henry Gilbert was made in 1574.' 

Account of knights' fees in this manor will be found in the Harleian 
MSS. in the British Museum. 7 



235- 



1 Dugdale Baronage, p. 
"I.P.M., 36 Hen. VI. 
M.P.M., 38 and 39 Hen. VI. 41. 
4 1.P.M., 14 Edw. IV. 42. 



5 Pat. Rolls, 15 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 17. 
'' Fine, Mil. 16 Eliz. 
7 Harl. 370 



FINBOROUGH. 179 

A Commission touching temporal and spiritual possessions of Finborough 
Manor and rectory 13 Jas. I. will be found on the Memoranda Rolls, 1 and 
amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian is a particular of the manors 
of "Alders and Canteleous," with lists of tenants, rents, apparently in 
the latter half of the lyth century, " offered for sale at 14,000.'" 

Arms of BOTILLER or BUTLER : Or, a chief indented, Az. a label of five 
points, Arg. 

BOYTON HALL MANOR. 

This is in both Combs and Finborough. We find in 1294 William de 
Boyton had a grant of free warren here, 3 and in 1302 by an inquisition 
ad quod damnum the jury presented that it would not be to the King's 
prejudice if Sir William de Boyton granted i messuage, 50 acres of land &c., 
in Old Newton, held in chief of the King to William, his son and heir then 
of age. Sir William the father died this same year, and from his inquisition 
post mortem the extent of his lands in Combs and Finborough appears to 
have been i messuage, 140 acres of land, 15 of wood, 2 of meadow, and 4 
of pasture. 4 The manor passed to his son and heir, William de Boyton, 
who was living in 1314. He seems to have died about 1325, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Osbert de Boyton, who died seised of 
the manor in 1345, 5 when it passed to his son and heir, John de Boyton. 

In 1481 the manor appears to have passed to the Timperley family 
under a fine levied that year by John Timperley against John Ive and 
Alice his wife and John Colby and Isabella his wife, daughter of John 
Ive and Alice. 6 The fine included lands in Finborough Magna, Combs, 
Onehouse, Stowmarket, Hitcham, Buxhall, and Felsham. 

From this John Timperley to the death of Thomas Timperley in 1655 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Hintlesham, in 
Samford Hundred. 

The 25th Sept. 1794, the manor was offered for sale by public auction 
at the White Hart Inn, Stowmarket, under the description of " a capital 
messuage or farm all freehold called Boyton Hall, otherwise the Manor of 
Boyton Hall, situate in Great Finborough and Combs, containing 2953. 
2r. 26p. 7 

In 1804 th e manor was in Mary Roper, and in 1808 in Thomas Clark, 
though probably the last was but a lessee. The manor was offered for sale 
2gth July, i83p, 8 and again at the Auction Mart, London, ist June, 1838. 
The property in this last sale was described as " The Manor of Boyton 
with the fines and quit rents and the capital and most desirable freehold 
estate called Boyton Hall, containing together about 300 acres of fine 
arable and pasture land, and a portion of which is a fine hop garden, now 
in the occupation of a respectable tenant at the low rent of 345 p. a." 9 

MANOR OF LITTLE FINBOROUGH. 

The lordship of the parish of Finborough Parva was vested in the time 
of Hen. III. in Hugh de Cantilupe, and was granted on his forfeiture by 
the King to Ralph, son of Nicholas, being then of the yearly value of x". 10 

'M. Trin. Rec. Rot. 279. 6 Feet of Fines, 20 Edw. IV. 16. 

Rawl. D. 1481. 7 Ipswich Journal, 6th Sept. 1794. 

'Chart. Rolls, 22 Edw. I. 51 ; Add. Ch. 8 Ipswich Journal, loth July, 1830. 
6337. 9 Ipswich Journal, i^th April, 1838. 

*I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 106. ">T. de N. 300. 

'I.P.M., 19 Edw. III. 18. 



i8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In the middle of the I3th century it was vested in Robert de Insula, who 
was living in 1264,' and passed to his son and heir, Sir Warm de 
Insula and Alice his wife, and from them in 1298* to Robert de Insula 
their son. On the Close Rolls in 1297 we nn d an order not to intermeddle 
further with this manor, as the King learned by inquisition that Alice, 
late wife of Warm de Insula, was cnfeoffed thereof jointly with the said 
Warin with remainder to the heirs of the said Warin, and that Alice peace- 
fully continued seisin thereof from the time of the fepffment until Warin's 
death, and after his death until the manor was taken into the King's hands 
by the escheator. 1 

In 1340 a line was levied of the manor by Robert, son of Robert de 
Insula, and Thomas his brother against Sir Robert de Insula. 4 Robert de 
Insula the son died in 1342. 

The manor, with the advowson, seems to have gone to the priory at 
Bricett, which with the other alien priories was suppressed by the Parliament 
of Leicester in the 2nd year of King Hen. V., and the impropriation and 
this manor were granted by King Hen. VI. in 1426 to King's College, 
Cambridge, to whom the living still belongs, though probably the manor has 
long since ceased to exist. In 1658, however, it seems to have been held by 
William Keble, rector of Ringshall, son of Gibles Keble, of Old Newton, 
and of Anne his wife, sister and coheir of Jeffrey Went, ot Woodbridge. J 



1 He had view of frank pledge here (H.R. Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 6. 

ii. 192). See Manor of Nedging, in * Will. P.C. C. 132, Nabbs 1659, cited from 
Cosford Hundred. Muskett's Manorial Families of 

'I. P.M., 26 Edw. I. 29. Suffolk, vol. ii. 279. 

3 Close Rolls, 25 Edw. I. 20. 



GIPPING. 181 




GIPPING. 

T is a hamlet of Old Newton, and no doubt in the time of 
William the Conqueror was included in the description of 
land in that parish. We find, however, one small holding 
under the head Rodeham, which was, no doubt, Rokeyard 
Hall, in Gipping. It was an estate of 10 acres held by 
the Bishop of Bayeux, within the jurisdiction of the 
Hundred, and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s. Roger Bigot held it 
of the Bishop, and Ralph de Savigny under him, it having been held 
in the time of the Confessor by a freeman by commendation under Saxo, 
who held under the Abbot of Ely.' This Saxo had very large possessions 
before the Conquest in Stonham and Debenham, where, Mr. Hollingsworth, 
the historian of Stowmarket, thinks he probably resided. The same 
gentleman mentions that one of the principal roads in Stowupland leading 
from Stowmarket towards Stonham, formerly a broad green way and 
bordered with trees, is still called, and is described in all the old deeds as 
Saxham Street that is, Saxoham Saxo's name Street. He conjectures 
that this roadway was made by the great landholder from his seat (or ham) 
in Stonham to Stow, and bore his name. 3 



MANOR OF GIPPING. 

In 13*6 this manor was held by Arnold de Mountensey, and from him 
in 1374 passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Mountensey. In the time of 
Hen. VI. the manor passed to the Tyrell family, a family the chief of which 
in a direct line for more than six centuries enjoyed the honour of knighthood. 

The Gipping family descended from Sir Walter Tyrell, a Norman 
knight, who soon after his arrival in England became tenant of the Manor 
of Langham, in Essex, which he held at the Domesday Survey under 
Richard de Tonbrigg. 

The earliest member of the family having the lordship of Gipping was 
William, 2nd son of Sir John Tyrell, of Heron, Knt., Treasurer of the House- 
hold of King Hen. VI., who was I2th in direct descent from the Sir Walter 
Tyrell whose arrow slew King William Rufus. 

'Dom. ii. 374. 2 Hist. of Stowmarket, p. 61. 



i8a THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The following is the descent : - 

Sir Waller Tyrell. Knt , Adelaide, daughter of Richard de Clare, 
lord of Poix, and third of hit by his wife Kohes*. dau. of Walter Giffard 

name who occur as lords. the elder . 

and with his wife " Adelice" 
founded the Abbey of St. 
Pierre de Selincoart. He 
probably died about 1139 



I \ 

Hugh Tyrell. Sir Henry Tyrell I. Hen. I. 
theCrc&aler. 

Sir Richard Tyrell 

Sir Edmund Tyrell. Knt., t. Hen. II. 
Sir Jeffrey Tyrell, Knt. 
Sir Lionel Tyrell, Knt. 
Sir Edward Tyrell, Knt. Matilda Ann, dau. of B. Burgate. 



Sir Hugh Tyrell, = Joan, dau. and coheir of James Flambert. 

of Great Thorndon, Essex, 
Governor of Carisbrook 
Castle in 1377. 



Sir James Tyrell, = Margaret, dau. and heir of Sir William Feron, 
of Heron, Knt. of Essei, Knt. 

Sir Walter Tyrell, Knt, = Joan, dau. and coheir of Sir Emma Rich. Enefield. 

William Swinford. 

Alice, dau. of Adeleigh = Sir Thomas Tyrell = Eleanor or Elizabeth, dau. and coheir of John Flambert. 

Sir John Tyrell, = Alice, dau. and coheir of Sir William de Coggesball. 
Treasurer of the House 
to Hen. VI. 

William Tyrell, of Gipping. 

William Tyrell, the first Tyrell lord of Gipping, was High Sheriff of 
Suffolk and Norfolk in 1446, and married Margaret, daughter of Robert 
Darcy, of Maiden, in Essex. 

Sir James Tyrell, Knt., was William's eldest son and successor. He 
was Captain of Guisnes, in France. He married Anne, daughter of Sir 
John Arundel, Knt., of Lanherne, in Cornwall, by the daughter of Lord 
Morley. Sir James Tyrell was Master of the Horse to Rich. III. after his 
first coronation, and is noted for the part he is supposed to have taken in 
the murder of the two princes in the Tower. 

" Speedily after his coronation," says Sir Thomas More, " the King 
made a progress through part of his dominions ; taking his way to Gloucester 
he resolved upon fulfilling the thing which he before intended, whereupon 
he sent one John Grene, whom he specially trusted, with a command to Sir 
Robert Brakenbury, the constable of the Tower with a letter that he should 
in any wise put the two children to death. This John Grene did the errand 
to Brakenbury, kneeling before our Lady, in the Tower ; but Sir Robert 
plainly answered that he never would put them to death, to die himself 
therefore. With which answer Grene returned to the King who took such 
displeasure, that the same night he said to a secret page of his, ' Ah, whom 
shall a man trust, those that I have brought up myself, even these fail me ? ' 



GIPPING. 183 

' Sir,' quoth the page, ' there lieth one on your pallet without (meaning Sir 
James Tyrell) who I dare say will do your grace's pleasure ; the thing were 
right hard which he would refuse.' This man (Sir James Tyrell) had 
an high heart and sore longe upwards nott rising yet so fast as he had before. 
Upon the page's words King Richard arose, and calling up Tyrell secretly 
spake his mind in this mischievous matter." 

Stowe, in his Annals, says of this Tyrell : "He was a man of right 
goodleye personage and for nature's gifts worthie to have served a much 
better Prince if he had well served God and by grace obtained as much 
truth and goodwill as he had strength and wit." 

Stowe gives further details : ' Upon this page's words, King Richard 
arose (for this communication had been sitting at the draught, a convenient 
carpet for such a council) and came out into a pallet chamber on which he 
found in bed Sir James and Sir Thomas Tirell, of person alike and brethren 
of blood, but nothing of him in conditions. Then saide the King merrily 
to them ' What Sirs, bee ye in bedde so soone ' and calling by Sir James, 
brake to him secretly his mind in this mischievous matter in which he found 
him nothing strange." The next day James was sent with a letter to 
Brakenbury desiring the governor to deliver up the keys and command 
of the Tower for one night to Tyrell, with which request Brakenbury 
complied. 

Sir James Tyrell took with him two ruffians Miles Forrest, "a fellow 
flashed in murder aforetime," and John Dighton, "a bigge broad, square, 
strong knave." 

William Slaughter or Slater seems merely to have been one of the 
keepers, and to have had no further share in the business than in pointing 
out the princes' apartment. 

1 Then," says Stowe, " all the other being removed from them, this 
Miles Forrest and John Dighton about midnight (the seely children lying 
in their beds) came into the chamber and sodainely lapping them up 
among the clothes, so to be wrapped them and entangled them, keeping 
downe by force the feather bed and pillows hard unto their mouths, that 
within a while, smothered and stifled their breath failing they gave up to 
God their innocent soules into the joyes of heaven, leaving to the tormentors 
their bodies dead in the bed. Which after that the wretches perceived, 
first by the struggling with the paines of death, and after long lying still 
to be thoroughly dead, they laid their bodies naked out upon the bed and 
fetched Sir James to see them, which upon the sight of them, caused those 
murderers to bury them at the stake foot, meetely deep in the ground under 
a great heape of stones." 

It is said that King Richard, displeased at the place of his nephews' 
interment, gave orders to have the bodies removed into consecrated ground, 
which was supposed to have been performed by the chaplain of the Tower, 
but as that person died soon after, the place of their burial remained un- 
known. In the reign of Chas. II. [1674] m consequence of an order to clear 
the White Tower for the reception of a large quantity of records from the 
Six Clerk's office, a new pair of stairs was ordered to be made, and the 
labourers digging at the foot of the old stairs, the very spot which was 
mentioned as the precise place of the first interment of the princes, found, 
covered over with a heap of stones, the bones of two persons, exactly 
corresponding in size with the ages of Edward and his brother. They were 



184 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

concluded at the time to be certainly the remains of the young princes, 
and were solemnly interred in Westminster Abbey, and a monument with 
a suitable inscription placed over them. 

Many writers have endeavoured to throw doubt on the murder, but 
it is said that in the time of Hen. VII. both Tyrell and Dighton confessed 
the fact. The veracity of the particulars has been questioned on the 
ground that the writ is purported to be signed by the King in London when 
he is represented to have been in Gloucester ; but, of course, the presence 
of the King was immaterial. The first defender of Richard against the 
charge was Buck, who wrote in the time of Chas. I., and the historian Carte, 
in his elaborate work, seems to have palliated most of King Richard's 
crimes. He says : " The story of the murder in the Tower will hardly 
bear an impartial examination." Certainly he makes a good point on 
Sir James Tyrell's position. He says : " Sir James Tyrell was undoubtedly 
a very brave man, and of great abilities, descended of an ancient and 
honourable fame, and had a good estate of his own, besides what he enjoyed 
in right of his wife Anne, who was daughter and heir of Sir John Arundel, 
of Lanherne, in Cornwall. He was before this pretended commission so 
much in favour with his master that he had entrusted him with the custody 
of the Archbishop of York,' when arrested on June I3th, in the Council 
Chamber ; and if Richard should be supposed to act so inconsistently with 
his own character as to unbosom his grief to a page, Sir James stood 
in little need of the page's recommendation. The story says, however, 
that he executed the order, and confessed the fact ; but if this were so, 
how came he to be employed by Hen. VII. to have clauses of exception 
in his favour, added to acts of resumption -to be made the governor of 
Guisnes and to be sent ambassador to the Emperor Maximilian ? Was 
it for the honour, either of the first of these princes to be represented by a 
regicide, or of the latter to treat with an assassin ? Dighton is likewise 
said to have made the same confession ; yet he was not either punished 
or prosecuted, but left with Forrest and Slaughter to God Almighty's 
judgments, which, in defect of Hen. VII. 's justice, writers, picking up 
every idle tale, have taken care to inflict. It was Henry's interest to bring 
the affair to light ; his title to the Crown depended on the death of the 
young princes ; yet he never thought fit either to examine into a point of 
so much consequence, or to prove it upon Richard ; and it is owing entirely 
to his neglect that it was at that time and remains still a mystery." 1 

Horace Walpole's " Historic Doubts " are ingenious, but the masterly 
refutation of Hume is a truly magnificent piece of reasoning. Another 
defence of King Richard is to be found in a dissertation by Laing inserted 
in Dr. Henry's " History of England," but his arguments have been 
demolished by Dr. Lingard. 

There can be no doubt of the murder, but the details as given by Sir 
Thomas More, so far as they relate to Sir James Tyrell (and we are not 
concerned with much more than these) are most certainly inaccurate. 
It wholly misrepresents Sir James's position. Gairdner, the historian, 
points out that he was not only a knight long before this affair, but had in 
the preceding reign been a commissioner for executing the office of Lord 
High Constable -that a year before the murder he was created by King 

'Pol. Vergil N. 537. See Rolls of Parl. "Hist, of England, vol. ii. 820. 
4 Hen. VII. n. 12. 



GIPPING. 



185 



Richard himself a knight banneret for his distinguished services during the 
Scotch campaign, and was at the time also Master of the Horse. 

Sir James is supposed to have acted under the instructions of the King 
in carrying off and conveying to the north the widow of the Earl of Warwick, 
when she left Beaulieu Sanctuary as far back as 1473.' As to the confession 
of Tyrell and Dighton this is not of any weight, and Tyrell was subsequently 
executed for a wholly different offence. Let it be remembered, too, that the 
murder was not laid to the charge of Rich. III. in the Act of Parliament 
that attainted him. 

Sir Thomas Tyrell, brother to this Sir James, is mentioned as Master of 
the Horse to the King. He probably held the appointment in succession 
to his brother, and not the other way about, as Mr. Hollingsworth endeavours 
to show. 

Mr. Hollingsworth mentions that there is a room in Beauchamp's 
Tower in the Tower of London, which was formerly used as a prison for 
State criminals. It is now a guard-room, and on its conversion to this 
employment in 1796 a number of inscriptions were discovered, made by 
the unhappy prisoners with nails in the walls. Amongst these is one of a 
William Tyrell (supposed to be of this family) in Italian. 

It may thus be translated : 

Since fortune hath chosen that my hope 
Should go to the wind to complain ; I wish 
The time were destroyed ; my planet being ever 
Sorrowful and discontented. 

The chapel at Gipping was built originally, it is supposed, by the 
fraternity of St. Osythe, at Stowmarket, for the abbot in 1340 possessed its 
patronage, and received as rector its fees and offerings. But the present 
building is a more recent erection, and was no doubt erected or rebuilt by 
Sir James Tyrell, of Tower fame, about 1490.* Mr. Hollingsworth says : 
" If Sir James was not beheaded (as some historians assert) then it is likely 
the chapel may have been intended as a mark of humility and repentance. 
To favour this supposition there is a legend in carved stone over the door 
into a room (which cannot have been intended as a vestry) or cell for 
private devotions, 'Pray for Sir James Tirell and Dame Anne his wife." 
The historian of Stow seems to be labouring under a delusion as to the 
beheading of Sir James Tyrell, rather inferring that if the execution took 



1 Paston Letters, iii. 92, 93. See Gairdner's 
Hist, of Rich. III. 

3 The chapel is a small but handsome build- 
ing in the architecture of the age, 
and possesses many curious mono- 
grams, rebuses and mottoes, with the 
arms of the family by intermarriage 
and single, carved in stone around 
the walls. It originally had a 
beautiful painted eastern window, 
and much of the glass remains, 
although it is mutilated, having 
been broken by the Puritan Dissen- 
ters, and then patched together 
again without any reference to legs, 
arms or heads. The crest of the 



family (a peacock's tail in the 
mouth of a bear) in a large com- 
partment remains, and three good 
figures are almost perfect, which 
appear to have been Dame Anne, a 
son of Sir James, and an abbot, 
perhaps that of St. Osythe, as 
passing over to him the patronage of 
the chapel at its re-edification. 
The family have always been buried 
in Stowmarket church, and the 
chapel and north aisle contain their 
remains for more than 400 years. 
(Hollingsworth's Hist, of Stow- 
market, p. 105). 



i86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

place it had some connection with the tragic occurrence in the Tower. But 
there is no reasonable doubt as to the execution of Sir James Tyrell, though 
it had no connection whatever with the murder of the young princes. 
Sir James was accused of aiding and abetting Edmund de la Pole, Earl of 
Suffolk, and his brother Richard in their flight from the kingdom into 
Flanders, and was taken, and with Sir John Windham executed for so-called 
treason, on Tower Hill 6th May, 1502, nearly 20 years after the Tower 
tragedy. 

On the I3th April, 1504, Sir James TyrelTs son and heir, Sir Thomas 
Tyrell, had a special pardon, and igth April, 1507, had restitution in blood 
to all his estates. He married in 1529 Margaret, daughter of Christopher, 
Lord Willoughby, of Eresby. He made his will i2th June, 1551, and dying 
the same year, 1 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir John Tyrell, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Munday, Knt., and Mayor of 
London in 1522, and died in 1573. He was buried in the family chapel in 
the parish church amongst the bones of his ancestors 23rd July, 1573. 
His tomb was covered with an effigy in brass, but the Puritans destroyed 
it in 1645, " and found doubtless," says Mr. Hollingsworth,* " much pleasure 
in thus barbarously maintaining their testimony against Rome by violating 
the sanctity of a dead man's tomb who had been a sincere believer in the 
persecuting creed of that church of error." Hollingsworth, quoting from 
the Churchwardens' Accounts, says : " He was not unpopular in the town, 
for the stone laid over his grave and its brasses were paid for by both 
parishes, and the parishioners in this manner gave a public testimony of 
their respectful regard for his memory." On his death the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir John Tyrell, who married ist Anne, daughter of Sir 
John Sulyard, of Wetherden, Knt. He married 2ndly Mary, Lady Corbett, 
widow of Sir Richard, daughter of Sir William Drury, of Hawsted, and in 
1589 a fine was levied of the manor against him by Sir Thomas Cornwallis 
and others, no doubt on some settlement of the property being effected. 3 
Sir John Tyrell died without issue in 1590, .when the manor devolved on 
his brother, Thomas Tyrell, who married Mary, daughter of John Gray, of 
Gosfield, in Essex. A fine of the manor was levied against him in 1590 by 
George Broke and others. 4 He died in 1606,' and was succeeded by his 
son and heir, Thomas Tyrell, who married Ann, daughter and heir of 
William Keable, of Stowmarket, and on his death in April, 1637, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Tyrell, who married Harriet, daughter 
of William Yelverton. 

Thomas Tyrell, the eldest son of Thomas, seems to have got into 
difficulties, and his father had to find for him a sum of 1,060, for which 
the son gave his father a bond ; ultimately Edmund Tyrell, of Heigham, 
near Norwich, found the money necessary for Thomas the son to pay off 
the father's debt and other debts which the son had incurred, and Thomas 
the son conveyed Gipping to Edmund Tyrell in fee by an indenture dated 
the I2th June, 1676. The parcels of these deeds are: "All that 
the Manor of Gippinge w' h all and singular its rights mem bes and 
appurtenances And all that Capital Messuage or Mansion-house 
called Gippinge-Hall situate in Gippinge aforesaid and alsoe all 
and singular the Messuages Lands tenem 15 houses edifices buildings 

'I.P.M., 4 and 5 Edw. VI. D.K.R. 10, 'Fine, Easter, 31 Eliz. 
App. ii. p. 129. 4 Fine, Easter, 32 Eliz. 

J P. 124. 3 Inquis. p.m. 24 Sept. 4 Jac. I. 



GIPPING. 187 

barns stables dovehouses orchards gardens meadows pasture crofts 
feedings comons wasts waters fishings ponds marshes woods und r woods 
rents revertions services royaltys profits comoditys and hereditam' 5 
whatsoever to the said Manner or Manorhouse belonginge or in 
anywise appertaininge And alsoe all those two inclosures of land or pasture 
called the Paysy Feilds in Gipping aforesaid in the tenure or occupacon 
of the said Thomas Tyrell the father or his Assignes together alsoe with 
one pightle sometime pcell thereof now called the Orchard Pightle now in 
the tenure or occupation of Thomas Clerke or his Assignes And alsoe all 
that messuage or tenm' 5 in the occupacon of Samuell Blague together 
w th the Close and yards adjoyninge to the same messuage or tenm' in the 
occupacon of Thomas Clerke and sometime in the tenure or occupacon of 
Edward Roper And alsoe all that close or closes of land or pasture now or 
heretofore called Brookes als Whiney Close together w tb the severall 
inclosures and peeces of meadow now called Brookes Meadow and peece 
taken out of the Whiney Close together w th the meadow called Cookes 
meadow neere adjoininge And alsoe all that messuage or tenm' farme and 
lands meadows and pastures in the farme tenure and occupacon of Thomas 
Mills or his Assignes together w th the Wood therein included called Greenes 
Wood And alsoe all that messuage or tenm' and lands called Catts scituate 
and lijnge in Mendlesham in the County of Suff. now in the occupacon of 
Thomas Hunt or his assignes neere adjoyninge to the said farme in the occu- 
pacon of the said Thomas Mills And alsoe all that messuage or tenm' 
farme and lands now in the tenure or occupacon of John Roper heretofore 
Pallants Farme And alsoe all that messuage or tenm' farme tenm' 5 lands 
meadowes pastures feedings and hereditam 15 in Gippinge and Old Newton 
in the County of Suff. now in the tenure or occupacon of John Jarrald or 
his assignes And alsoe all and singular that messuage or tenm' farme 
lands meadows pastures feedings and hereditam" in Gippinge aforesaid 
now in the tenure farme and occupacon of the said Thomas Clerke or his 
Assignes And alsoe all that messuage or tenm' wherein William Janings 
now doth dwell together w th the yard thereunto belonginge and the lands 
pastures and feedings called the Little Greene And alsoe all and singular 
those closes lands meadows pastures tenm' 5 and hereditam" called Greate 
Marecroft Trundledge and Trundledge Wood in Gippinge aforesaid together 
w' h the Woods or Groves called Smithfeild Wood in Newton aforesaid 
and Samford Wood in Gippinge aforesaid now in the tenure or occupacon 
of the said Thomas Tyrell the father or his Assignes And all and singular 
those woods comonly called Suiting and Cockshott in Gippinge aforesaid 
now alsoe in the tenure or occupacon of the said Thomas Tyrell the father 
And alsoe all and singular other the messuages or tenm' 5 farmes lands 
tenrnen'* meadows pastures feedings woods und r woods and heredita- 
m' s whatsoever of him the said Thomas Tyrell the sonne pty to these 
presents scituate lyinge and beinge in Gippinge aforesaid Mendlesham and 
Newton or in any of them or in any other towne or townes hamblet or 
hamblets pish or pishes there neere adjoyninge." 

Thomas Tyrell the son had married Keziah, daughter of Sir William 
Harvey, of Hengrave,in 1650, and died in his father's lifetime, leaving two 
daughters only, Susan and Keziah. After their father and grandfather's 
death 1 by indenture dated 24th March, 1678, these two daughters and 
coheirs, then residing at Bury St. Edmunds, in consideration of the full 
satisfaction by their uncle, Edmund Tyrell, of all sums due to them under 

1 Thomas Tyrell, the grandfather, was buried 23rd Oct. 1678. 



i88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

any settlement of their father and grandfather, released the Manor of 
dipping to the said Edmund Tyrell. 

The following is a copy of the inventory of the goods at Gipping of 
Thomas Tyrell, who died in 1678, and is interesting as a specimen of these 
documents in former times : - 

AN INVENTARY 

of all and singuler the Goods and Chattells Rights and Credits of Thomas 
Tyrell late of the hamblet of Gipping in the County of Suff. Esq r . deceased 
as they were vallued and appraised the Nine and twentieth day of October 
Anno Dni 1678 by us whose names are subscribed followeth viz. 

In the Parlor 

Imprimis three tables and Eleaven cushion Stooles, One Couch 

and Nine cushion chaires . . . . . . . . . . v" xv 1 

Item twelve small pictures . . . . . . . . . . xij 1 

Item foure large Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . iiii 

Item severall Bookcs . . . . . . . . . . . . ij'' x' 

Item carpets cushions and curtaines . . . . . . . . ij'' 

Item Brasse Obirons Tongs five pan Doggs and some small 

things . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ij'' 

In his Closet next the Parlor 
Item a chaire a Table and other things . . . . . . i" 

In the old hall 
Twoe Tables Formes and a Brasse candlestick . . . . i" 

In the kitchen 

Item all the Pewter . . . . . . . . . . . . v' 1 

Item twoe Iron Potts a Jack and severall Spitts . . . . ij'' x 1 

Item a Gunn a Case of Pistolls and a sword . . . . ij'' 

Item Cobirons Doggs Trammells Poles Tongs five pan and other 
Irons for the fire and Bellowes and severall other things and 
Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i" x' 

Item kettles Stellets Frying panns Dripping pans and some 

Utensells used about the Cookery . . . . . . . . iiij'* 

In a Room neare the kitchen 

Item a Cupboard twoe warming pans six greate Brasse Candle- 
sticks and other Candlesticks and Lumber.. .. .. iij" 

In the Butteries 

Item seaven hoggsheads and foure vessells . . . . . . ij'' x 1 

Item a Table a Napkin Prcsse, Glasses a hutch a Brasse Candle- 
stick als Hooks and Lumber . . . . . . . . i'' x' 

In the new Hall 

Item twoe Tables a Sadie a Bridle Pictures Candlestick and 

other things.. .. .. .. .. .. ij A xiij' iiij 1 * 



GIPPING. i 

In the Wash house 

Item a Copper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i'* x' 

Item Tongs Firepan Trammell a Tubbs, a Table and 

.Llll ll DCi * 

In his Lodging Chamber 

Item One Downe Bed twoe Feather Beds with the 

Curtaines and other furnishments . . . . . . . . xx" 

Item twoe Tables twoe chaires a Trunk a close stoole and 

Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i" x s 

Item all his weareing Apparrell . . . . . . . . . . xx rt 

In the Butlery chamber 

Item more Beds with their furnishm' 3 . . . . . . . . x" 

Item a Presse three Trunks and Lumber . . . . . . i" 

In the old kitchen chamber, a chamber next it and in the Gatehouse 

chamber 

Item twoe Bedsteads curtaines and other furnishments as they 

stand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x" 

Item a Table chaire stooles and Lumber . . . . . . i" x s 

In the Groomes chamber 

Item a Bedstead, Bed with its furnishments, a Table, a Chaire 

and Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ij" x 1 

In the Porter's Lodge 
An old bed and Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . i" x s 

In the Brewhouse 

Item a Copper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v" 

Item the Brewing Vessells.. .. .. .. .. .. iij" 

In the Storehouses and Garden 

Item a Powdering Tray and Tubbs a Table hutches a keepe and 

Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i" 

In the new hall chambere with the Gallery adjoyning 
Item twoe Beds as they stand with their furnishments . . xx" 
Item three Tables Curtaines and Carpet twoe Presses three 

Trunks and some other things . . . . . . . . iij' 

In the new kitchen chambers 

Item twoe Bedsteads with Beds curtaines and other furnish- 
ments as they stand xx'* 

Item three Tables three chaires three Stooles and a Case of 

Drawers ii" x' 

In the Nursery Chamber 

Item Twoe Bedsteads and Beds with their furnishments and 

Lumber . . vi" 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In the other 

Item one Bed twoe Bedsteads and Lumber iij" x' 

Item all the household Linnen xx" 

Item the Plate xl" 

Item in Ready Money and Money due to him from his Tennants cl" 

In the Mill house 

Item a Mill and Lumber . . . . . . . . . . . . iij'' 

In the yards and Outhouses 
Item twoe Carts twoe Tumbrells and the harnesse foi the horses vij" 



Sume Totall . . . . . . . . . . cccxcviij' 1 x' iiij 



Inventory made 3oth Dec. 1678 for Edmund Tyrell Esq. one of 
the Executors, &c. 

Edmund Tyrell had married Grace, daughter of Wiseman Bokenham, 
of Thornham Magna, in 1662, and in consideration of 1,000 paid as a 
portion by her father, Edmund Tyrell, by deed dated 7th Oct. 1662, con- 
veyed certain property in Bury St. Edmunds and in Gipping but not, of 
course, the manor, which was not then his to trustees to the use of Edmund 
Tyrell until his marriage and afterwards to him and his wife during their 
joint lives and the survivor for life with remainder to the heirs of the said 
Edmund Tyrell. Edmund Tyrell died, and was buried at Stowmarket, 
4th Sept. 1689, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Tyrell. 
He married Anne, daughter and coheir of Sir Edward Duke, of Benhall. 

He mortgaged Gipping Manor to James Gibson, of Ipswich, for 300 
by deed dated 2Qth June, 1698, and from time to time executed certain 
mortgages on his estate, but hardly sufficient to justify the following note 
which his son Edmund made in 1742 on a further charge dated I4th July, 
1732, for the whole of the charges did not amount to more than 1,600. 
This is the note : " Let these mortgage deeds which I have redeemed be a 
monument of Terrour to succeeding generations of the Tyrells never to 
involve their estates and Heirs in such difficulties as my Father did me which 
often proves the Ruin and destruction of men and Familys and let them 
remember that if they do recover their ancient Inheritances after fresh 
involvements 'tis only and solely the Hand of Heaven which helps them 
out of such and all other difficultys. Laus Deo. Edmund Tyrell 1742." 

Thomas Tyrell's will is dated igth Sept. 1732, and he was buried at 
Stowmarket 2nd Feb. 1735, his will being proved at Sudbury 3oth Jan. 
1740. 

The manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund Tyrell, who married 
ist Mary, daughter of Robert Sparrow, of Kettleburgh,' and 2ndly Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Bright, of Netherhall, in Pakenham. 

On the death of Edmund Tyrell, in October, 1749, the manor went to 
his son and heir, Edmund Tyrell, who died unmarried, and was buried at 
Stowmarket the 8th April, 1799. The manor then went to his cousin and 

1 Their marriage settlement was dated ijth July, 1738, but it did not include the 

Manor of Gipping. 






GIPPING. 191 

heir Charles Tyrell, of Gipping and Thurston, son of Jenny, sister of the 
last Edmund's father, who had married her cousin, Edmund Tyrell, ot 
Weston Market. 

In 1808, by deed dated the ist January, Charles Tyrell granted a 
lease of Gipping Hall for seven years (subsequently renewed for four years) 
to Sir John Shelly, Bart., at a rent of 367. The parcels of this lease 
are interesting as showing what the lessor had. They are as follows : 

" All that Capital messuage called Gipping Hall with the Brew House 
Offices Outhouses Stables Coach Houses Cow House, Dove House and Hot 
House with the yards, gardens orchards and appurtenances thereto 
belonging. And also the free use and wear of all the goods furniture Dairy 
and Brewing utensils Implements of Household, Gate Hurdles and other 
things belonging to the said Charles Tyrell which are now in upon or about 
the said demised messuage outhouses yards gardens and premises and 
which are particularly mentioned and set forth in a Schedule or Inventory 
thereof signed by the said parties or their agents and also all that Inclosure 
of Meadow or pasture ground called the Lawn containing by estimation 
65 acres adjoining the said messuage and also the piece of pasture ground 
called the Chapel Yard and also the tenement or cottage called the Game- 
keeper's House now occupied by John Coleman with the yard garden and 
appurtenances thereto belonging and which premises are situate in Gipping 
aforesaid and were late in the possession or occupation of the said Charles 
Tyrell his undertenants or assigns together with all royalties liberties and 
privileges belonging to the said Charles Tyrell as lord of the Manors of Gipping, 
Mendlesham and Thorney Hall in the said County of Suffolk of Hunting 
Hawking Shooting Coursing Sporting and Fishing in over or upon the 
said Manors and the Bounds and Precincts thereof with free liberty for the 
said Sir John Shelly and his friends Gamekeepers or other persons by his 
order to kill and take Game thereon and also to take Fish out of the Ponds 
in the said Lawn or Chapel Yard And also in the Rivulet and Water near 
the Farm House in the occupation of Mrs. Elizabeth Hunt for his and their 
use and at his and their Will and Pleasure Except and reserved out of 
this lease unto the said Charles Tyrell his heirs and assigns a Garret in the 
said Messuage called the Lumber Room and part of the yard called the 
Timber Yard and the shop thereto adjoining with free liberty for the said 
Charles Tyrell his heirs and assigns or his and their servants and Workmen 
to lay and convert timber thereon And also all timber Trees and the Bodies 
lops and Tops of Pollards and other Trees and all Thorns Wood and 
Bushes, &c." 

Charles Tyrell married Elizabeth Baker, and died in 1811, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Charles Tyrell, of Gipping, High Sheriff 
of Suffolk in 1815, M.P. for the county in 1830 and 1834. He married 8th 
June, 1801, Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Richard Ray, of Plash- 
wood and Haughley, in whose right he became possessed of the Plashwood 
estate. He died 2nd Jan. 1872, and was buried at Haughley, the manor 
passing to his eldest son, Charles Tyrell, of Plashwood, who dying unmarried 
ist August, 1887, the manor passed to his brother and heir, Walter Robert 
Tyrell, Lieut .-Col. ist Battalion Royal Suffolk Volunteers, who died un- 
married 23rd June, 1891, aged 80, when the manor passed under his will 
to his nephews, Charles Alexander Browne, R.N., and Walter William 
Browne, Staff Commander, R.N., the sons of Louisa Jane Tyrell, sister of 
the said Walter Robert Tyrell, and wife of William Browne, Lieut, in the 
nth Regiment of Foot, 2nd son of the Rev. Alexander Browne, rector of 



IQ2 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK 

Flempton, co. Suffolk, and Branton, co. Northumberland. Charles 
Alexander Browne is unmarried, but the said Walter William Browne, 
24th March, 1880, married Elizabeth, daughter of William Henry Dobie, 
of Ayr, N.B., and they have issue two daughters, Dorothy and Cecily. 

Gipping Hall is situate in a spacious lawn surrounded by extensive 
woods. The mansion has undergone various alterations by its respective 
occupants, but the site has continued the same. The River Gipping has 
its source at this village. Running in a south-east direction, it waters Ipswich ; 
and assuming below that town the name of Orwell proceeds to meet the 
Stour opposite Harwich. It was made navigable from Stowmarket to 
Ipswich, in 1793, a distance of sixteen miles, and has fifteen locks. The 
total expense incurred in the undertaking was 26,380.' 

Arms of TYRELL : Argent, two chevronels Azure, within a bordure 
engrailed Gules. Of BROWNE : Sa. three lions pass, in bend argent 
between two double cottises of the last. 



Page's History of Suffolk, p. 538. 




HARLESTON. 193 

HARLESTON. 

HOLDING in this place was that of the Abbot of St. Edmund, 
and consisted of i carucate and 20 acres of land held by 
Aelons of the abbot, and 20 acres by Peter. Thtere were 
also 2 villeins, n bordars, 2 serfs, i plough teams, and 8 
acres of meadow. It had formerly been held by two free- 
men under the abbot. Under them were n freemen with 
23 acres, and 2 ploughteams (which were reduced to half a 

team at the time of the Survey), also a church having 25 acres of free land. 

The entire holding was valued at 26s. 1 

MANOR OF HARLESTON. 

This manor formed part of the estates of Ranulph de Glanville, and 
passed to his daughter Amabel, married to Ralph de Ardern, and Thomas 
de Ardern, their son and heir, gave it to the Angustine or Black Canons of 
Butley Priory 1 where it continued until 1538. The manor passed under a 
fine levied that year by the King against the Bishop of Ipswich, then prior, 
to the Crown, 3 and the following year Charles Brandon, then Viscount 
Lisle, obtained a grant of it from the Crown. 

Particulars for the grant are referred to in the Qth report of the 
Deputy-Keeper of the Public Records. 4 

The manor shortly afterwards passed to William Page, for he in 1546 
had licence to alienate the manor to Henry Muskett, son of Richard 
Muskett, of Haughley, and Joan his wife, daughter and coheir of William 
Abel, of Woolpit. In 1576 he obtained a grant or rather confirmation of 
arms from the College of Arms. The grant is as follows : "To all and 
singular as well nobles and gentles as others to whom these psents shall 
come. Rob. Cooke, esq. als Clarencieux, principal heraulte kinge of armes 
of the South Est and West partes of this realme of England from the river of 
Trent Southwards, sendithe greetinge in owre Lord God everlasting. And 
whereas aunterrtly from the beginning the valiant and virtuous actes of 
worthy persons have been comended unto the world with sundry monuments 
and remembrances of their good desertes amongst the wh. the chefest and 
most usual hath byn the bearing of signes in shields caulled armes wh. are 
not other than demonstrations of prowis and valoire diversely distributed 
accordinge to the qualities and desertes of the persons that such signes and 
tokens of the diligent, faithful, and courageous might appeare before the 
negligent, coarse, and ignorant, and be a sufficient cause to move, stirr and 
enkindle the soules of men to imittation of virtuous noblesse. And yet is 
continually observed to the intent that such as have done comendable 
service to their prince or country ether in war or peace may therefore both 
receive due honour in their lives and also derive the same successively 
to their posterity after them. And being required of Henry Muskett, 
of Halston, in the county of Suffolk, gent, to make serche in the registers 
and recordes of my office for such armes and crest as he may lawfully 
have ; whereupon at his request I have made search in the registers and 
recordes of my office for such armes and crest as he may lawfully have ; 
whereupon at his request I have made search accordingly and do find 

'Dom. ii. 360. 3 Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 

'H.R. ii. 191 ; Q.W. 722. 4 App. ii. 203. 

AI 



194 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

that he may lawfully have the arms and crests hereafter followinge- 
that is to say, silver, two bars, belwene six leopards heads gules. And to 
his crest or cognizance upon the healume on a wreathe silver and gules out 
of a crown with a chaine sables, a demy Antehpp, gould-ntouthcd gules, dubbed 
silver as more playnly appeareth deputed in the margent, the which armes 
and crest and every parte and parcel thereof the sayd Clarencieux kinge 
of armes by power and authority unto my office annexed and graunted by 
letters patente under the greate scale of England have ratified, confirmed, 
and allowed, given and granted unto and for ye above sayd Henry Muskett, 
gent, and to his posteritie with their due differences to use have and showe 
in shields or armour, or otherwise, without impediment, lett, or interruption 
of any person or persons. In witnesse whereof I the sayd Clarencieux 
kinge of armes have signed these presents with my hand and thereto sett 
the scale of my office the I3th day of September in the year of our Lord 
God 1576, and in the 23 yeare of the reigne of our soveraigne Lady Elizab. 
by the grace of God Queene of England Ffrance and Ireland Defender 
of the Faith. 

"Rob. Cooke, alias Clarencieux, Roi Darmes." 

We find from the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
that an action was brought against this Henry Muskett by John Edwards 
and others touching oppression of copyholders of this manor. 2 Henry 
Muskett died in 1595, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard 
Muskett. In 1596 it seems Richard Muskett had licence to alienate to 
William Webbe and John Mallowes, and the assurance was effected by 
a fine levied in 1597 by William Webbe and others against the said Richard 
Muskett. 3 William Webbe and John Mallowes had the following year 
licence to alienate to Richard Muskett, who died in 1606. The next lord 
appears to have been Richard Muskett, grandson and heir of the last. 
He married Mary, daughter of William Cooke, of Waldingfield, and died 
in 1627, when the manor passed to his son and heir, William Muskett, 
and from him passed to his son and heir, Richard Muskett, who in 1631 
was "of the age of 12 years. In 1642 Sir Roger North', Knt., of Great 
Finborough, presented to the parish church, but whether he had the manor 
is not clear, but a few years later this was certainly vested in Lady Penelope, 
daughter of Thomas, Earl Rivers, for she settled and confirmed it by her 
will 3oth Aug. I356, 4 upon Henry Gage, her 4th son by her 2nd husband, 
Sir John Gage, of Firle, in Sussex, Bart. He married, nth Feb. 1655, 
Henrietta, daughter of Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrookc, brother of Henry, 
Earl of St. Albans, and had a son, John Gage, of Pencethorp, Norfolk, 
who died without issue, 5 when the manor passed to the Hcngravc branch 
of the Gage family, vesting in Sir William Gage, who died 8th Feb. 1727, 
from which time to about the middle of the i8th century the manor devolved 
in the same way as the Manor of Hengrave, in Thingoe Hundred. 

About 1743 R. Ray had some idea of acquiring the manor, and the 
following interesting letters on the subject from his father give particulars 
of it : 

Dear 

Inclosed is a Particular of y* Harleston Estate Mr. Reeve is my 
Intelligencer of what I wanted to be informed of so y' it maybe depended 

'Had Lib. 2146; Hollingsworth's Hist. 4 Proved 2nd July, 1661. 

of Stowmarket, p. 125. 5 Will isth Jan. 1718, proved 28th Mar. 

J C.P. ser. ii. B. Ixi. 4. 1723. 

'Fine, Trin. 39 Eliz. 



HARLESTON. 195 

on but as he would not care to have it known as it may be to his prejudice 
I desire it may be a secret. 

Mr. Reeve p e ass . . . . . . . . 155 o o 

The manor Rents . . . . . . . . i 13 i 

The groove . . . . . . . . . . 5 oo o 

161 13 i 
Out goings Quit rents to } 

TT 1 " 1_ \J\J -*-\J t 

Hawhegh . . . . j 

Wetherden . . . . 20 

Dagworth . . . . 31 

Land Tax at least . . . . 32 o o 

Repairs . . . . . . 6 10 o 



39 5 3 



remains 122 07 



I have only to add our Blessing w th proper complim' 5 to all Friends 
We drank all y r Healths yesterday. 

I am 

My dear 

y r most affect. Father 

R. RAY,* 

Y r Mother knows of no Relation 
of y e name of Gilbert y' lived at Cotton 
Mr. Ralph Gilbert who was cousin german to 
y r Mother and Father lived at Fold Hall ab' three 
miles from Uttoxater Who he left it to I don't know 
Fold Hall is in Checkley Parish 

y* Letter was charged at Lingle. 

My Dear 

I h'ave now fully informed myself of the value of Harleston Estate, 
w h by no means answers y e opinion I had of it. It has within a few years 
been stript so clean of y e Timber, y' Little, very Little more is left than 
y e necessary repairs of y e Estate will call for. The House, Barns, and 
Outhouses, tho' by Mr. Reeve care kept tolerably decent to y e Sight, are 
but in a ruinous State, y e Roof of y e House quite bad, and decayed w th 
meer age w h is y e Case of y e Barns and Out-houses also w h in a few 
years must consequently be attended \v th an heavy charge and in y e mean 
time y e annual expense of their Repairs will be considerable at p'sent 
They are a constant charge of six or seven pds a year. 

The Rent Mr. Reeve pays is p r ah. 155 but He is not under a Lease, 
and tho offered and pressed to take one, never would do it. The Contents 
of y e Farm, exclusive of y e two groves is reckoned 280 acres i.e. some- 
what better than us p r acre ; y e greatest part of w h is worth Little more 
than half y e Rent, w ch must make y 8 whole very dear, so dear, y' in case 
Mr. Reeves should leave it it would not be an easy matter to get a good 
and able Tenant at y e Rent it is now Lett at. The Land Tax is another 
bad Article y e Estate has been long in y e Family of y e Gages, who being 
Roman Catholicks y e Estate is doubly taxed and tho' upon its coming into 
y" Hands of one y' takes y e Oaths, it should be eased of that Burden, y e 
misfortune is, y' y' Parish is so small and already charged so high to y e Land 
Tax, y' tho' in such case every Estate in y e Parish be assessed at y 6 Sack 
rent, They will fall short of y e Sums they are to raise. 



196 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

A. Callow-fields is a Parcel of Land lying part in Hawleigh, part in 
Harleston -y' Land ordinary and neither wood or Timber on it, worth 
notice by Computation it is reckoned 40 acres, abt 8 of w h are Copyhold. 
I was offered it at 4QO/ but as it lay not convenient for me, chose not to 
meddle w" 1 it, and I suppose Mrs. Gage bought it at that price. 

B. The least of y' 2 groves contain 4 acres J it Lyes at a distance 
in y' Parish of Stowmarket, and is so pillaged by y' Poor there, y 1 Little 
is made of it. The greater grove lies nearer y' House and escapes better- 
it contains 9 acres J y" Timber in y e groves is small but thrifty and growing. 

C. The Farm House y 1 Lambert lived in, who occupied y' 40 
plan is converted into a Cottage of two Tenemts w h Mr. Reeve has y* 
profit of, and y' Landlord y' Burdon of maintaining and keeping in Repair. 

At my first coming to Hawleigh, as I told you in my Last and for 
some years after 1 y e Estate was in the Occupation of 2 several Tenants 
viz : 

Jn. Munnings who held y Hall Farrn_at p r an. . . 70 o o 
C. Phil. Lambert y* other Farm at p r an . . . . 40 o o 

After Lambert Death Munnings held both y e Farms 

at y" Rent p r . ah. of . . . . . . . . . . no o o 

Upon Munnings failing, Mr. Reeve hired y e Estate and 
A. Mrs. Gage having bought gallowfields Laid it to y* Farm 

at p r ah. 25 o o 

w h w lh an advance of Rent p r an. . . . . . . . . 20 o o 



makes up just y e Rent Mr. Reeve pays^ viz. . . . . 155 o o 

The Quit rents of y' mannor are p r ah. . . . . . . i 13 i 

B. The two groves contain together 14 acre and exclusive 

of y* Timber not worth more than p r ah. . . . . 500 

161 13 i 

Out goings is in my last s. d. 

To y* mannor of Hawleigh a Copyhold Rent . . 10 2 
To Wetherden . . . . . . . . ..20 

To Dagworth . . . . . . . . . . ..31 

15 3 
Upon y e whole I cannot value y e Estate but at Little more than 3,000. 

In 1764 Sir William Gage, Bart., is returned as patron of the living, 
and subsequently, it is said, Robert Joseph Rokewood. This, however, is 
strange, as Robert Joseph Gage did not assume the name of Rokewood 
until 1799, and both manor and advowson are asserted to have been vested 
in the Rev. Roger Pettiward, D.D., at the time of his death, loth March, 
1780, when they passed to his widow Douglas, who died in 1810. On her 
death the manor vested in her 3rd but eldest surviving son, Roger Pettiward, 
from which' time it has devolved in thfe same course at the Manor of Great 
Finborough, in this Hundred. 

Lady Hotham rebuilt the hall in the Elizabethan style some years ago. 

Hollingsworth says that Harleston belonged during the wars of the 
Roses to the Duke of Suffolk, who always sided with the Duke of York. 
But when Hen. VII. obtained the hitherto bloody crown it was forfeited 
and given by him to John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who had been stripped 
of all his possessions by the opposite party in Edward IV. 's reign. 

Arms of MUSKETT : Argent, two bars between six leopards' faces, 
Gules, 3, 2, i. 




HAUGHLEY. 197 

HA UGH LEY. 

HERE was one manor held here in Saxon times. It consisted 
of 8 carucates of land with soc and sac over the hall demesne 
only, 32 villeins, 8 bordars, 10 serfs, 4 ploughteams in 
demesne, 24 ploughteams belonging to the men, wood 
sufficient to support 200 hogs, and 42 acres of meadow. 
Also a church with 31 acres of free land and half an acre 
of meadow. The live stock consisted of 6 horses at the hall, 
18 beasts, 80 hogs, 146 sheep, and 80 goats. It was held by Goodmund 
under the Confessor, and under him in demesne were 6 socmen whose soc 
was in the Hundred, and they had not the power to sell the land. They 
held half a carucate and 20 acres of land with 2 ploughteams, which had 
later disappeared. At the time of the Domesday Survey the tenant in 
chief was Hugh de Montfort, and the details of the manor were slightly 
altered. The villeins had decreased by two, the serfs were gradually; reduced 
from 10 to 6, and finally to 3, and the ploughteams belonging to the men 
had come down to 8. The value of the entire holding was formerly 16, 
and later 12, but by the time of the Survey had increased to 20. 

Of this manor Hervey held i carucate and 30 acres, valued at 635., 
Ralph held i carucate at 2os., Thorold i carucate at 305., Pesserara half a 
carucate at ios., Robert 20 acres at 55., Richard 30 acres at 55. All this 
was included in the rental value of the manor. It was i league long and 
half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 



MANOR OF HAUGHLEY. 

This was the lordship of Hugh de Montfort at the time of the Norman 
Survey, having been the estate of Goodmund in Saxon times, who probably 
erected the hall or mansion-house on the mound still existing at Haughley. 

Haughley Castle was no doubt strengthened and fortified by Hugh de 
Montlort, who made it his principal seat. It was one of the seignories or 
lordships termed Honors on which other manors were dependent or held by 
the performance of certain customs and services. At one time these Honors 
were very limited in number, consisting of four only in the kingdom, which 
were Bononia or Boulogne, Dover Castle, Hagoneth or Haughley Castle, 
and Peverell, in Nottinghamshire. Others were subsequently created, and 
several by Act of Parliament, for in the reign of Hen. VIII. he was empowered 
to create four several Honors. 

Mr. Wodderspoon gives the following description of the castle and its 
fortunes in his " Historic Sites of Suffolk " : 

" This ancient fortress, now reduced to a few strong walls, the remains 
of a deep moat, and artificial embankments, stands near Haughley a 
village situated a few miles beyond Stowmarket. The line of the Bury 
road runs through the place. This castle, which was believed to be one of 
the strongest holds of the nation in the time of Hen. II., was razed to the 
ground by Blanchmains, Earl of Leicester, who with a large body of 
Flemings fought with Ralph Broc, the keeper of Haughley, and worsted 
him in the encounter. The date of the demolition of the building is 1173. 
It was afterwards rebuilt and fortified by Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and did 
good service to the family. Kirby, in his ' Suffolk Traveller ' [1744] 

'Dom. ii. 4086. 



198 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

says that in his time the remains of Haughley Castle in figure inclined to a 
square, having a moat, and was fortified with rampart walls on all sides, 
except the north. On the north side stood the keep, which from its peculiar 
situation and great means of defence was capable of protecting itself. A 
portion of the foundation of this tower yet exists, and shows that the keep 
was erected in a circular form, and most probably rose to a considerable 
height. The extent of ground occupied by the castle and its necessary 
fortifications is estimated at seven acres. 

" The battle which gave the castle into the hands of Leicester was fought 
upon the ajth of October. The assailants had previously issued from the 
Castle of Framlingham, and swept the country from that place to Ipswich, 
and from Ipswich to Haughley. This excursion was made for the purpose 
of showing the immense body of Flemings brought over by Leicester to aid 
the cause of the King's rebellious sons the country in which they were to 
do battle, and the valour of the enemy about to become their antagonist. 
The siege was bloody. A large number of the foreign forces bit the dust, 
and the dead were gathered into heaps, and inhumed near the scene of 
slaughter. The fortune of the day, however, notwithstanding the English 
valour shown during the encounter, declared for Leicester, and the castle 
was demolished. The victor retired after this success to his fastnesses at 
Framlingham, and issuing from which to proceed into the north, when his 
declining cause needed assistance, he was surprised at Fornham St. 
Genevieve by the King's troops, and completely routed, with a slaughter 
amounting to ten thousand men, himself being taken prisoner. There was 
anciently a curious tenure attached to the holder of the impropriation of 
this place, namely, that of erecting and keeping a gallows in repair in a piece 
of ground called Luberlow Field, or be amerced in a fine of forty shillings. 
Certain lands in the parish were also retained by the service of providing a 
ladder by which criminals hung at this gallows could mount to their doom.'" 

Hugh de Montfort, the Domesday tenant in chief, lost his life in a 
duel with Walcheline de Ferrers, and his son Hugh succeeded to his estate, 
and retained the Honor of Hagenet or Haughley until the year 1160, when 
having favoured the cause of Robert against his brother Hen. I. he lost his 
estates, and departed on a crusade to the Holy Land. Mr. Round, in a 
note on Robert de Vere in his " Geoffrey de Mandeville," 3 points out that 
Robert de Vere was not as usually supposed a younger brother of Aubrey 
de Vere, the Chamberlain, and uncle of the 1st Earl of Oxford, but a son 
of Bernard de Vere. " He owed his position," says Mr. Round, " to a 
marriage with Adeline, daughter of Hugh de Montfort, as recorded in the 
Pipe Rolls of 1130. By this marriage he became possessed of the Honor of 
Haughley (' Haganet '), and with it (it is important to observe) of the office 
of constable, in which capacity he figures among the witnesses to Stephen's 
Charter of Liberties [1136]. In conjunction with his wife he founded on 
her Kentish estate the Cluniac priory of Monks Horton. They were 
succeeded in their tenure of the Honor by the well-known Henry of Essex, 
who thus became constable in his turn. As supporting this view that the 
Honor carried the constableship, attention may be drawn to its compotus 
as ' Honor Constabularie ' in 1189- 90,' just before that of the ' Terra que 
fuit Henrici de Essex.' ' Mr. Round adds further : " The fact that Henry 
of Essex was appealed of treason and defeated in a trial by battle by a 

1 Wodderspoon's Historic Sites of Suffolk, * P. 326. 

p. 187. J Rot. Pip. i Ric. I. pp. 14, 15. 



HAUGHLEY. 199 

Robert de Montfort [1163], suggests that a grudge on the part of a 
descendant of the dispossessed line against himself as possessor of their 
fief, may have been at the bottom of this somewhat mysterious affair." 

From a statement made on the Pipe Rolls for 1169 and cited by Mr. 
Redstone in a paper read before the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology 
in iox>3, it appears that Gilbert de Gant, a grandson of Alice de 
Montfort, daughter of Hugh de Montfort, the first holder, held Haughley 
Castle and Manor. He was a firm supporter of King Stephen, with whom 
he was captured at the battle of Lincoln in 1141. When a prisoner he 
was forced to marry Rohais, daughter of William, Earl of Lincoln, and 
niece of Ralph, Earl of Chester. Hen. II., on his accession, resumed his 
right over the Haughley lands, and upon the marriage of his daughter 
Matilda with Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony, demanded an aid of 2os. 
from the town. 1 

The manor was placed out to ferme by Hen. II. to Robert Fitz Isilie 
and Ralph of Rochester, and! in 1185 to William de Assheford and Robert 
de Wells, when it brought into the Treasury a revenue of 55. i8s. 8d. 
The manor was given by Rich. I. to Count Thos. de Perche on his marriage 
with the King's niece, Matilda of Saxony, and upon the count's death, at 
the Fair of Lincoln in 1218, the manor formed part of his possessions then 
forfeited to the Crown. Two unfortunate persons, Henry de Essex and 
Hubert de Burgh, the great Justiciary, had thte manor of the King's gift, 
the yearly value being 40. * Hubert de Burgh had a grant of the manor 
with the constableship in 1227, 3 and a grant of a market here in 1231.* The 
manor came to the Crown again during the lifetime of Hubert de Burgh, 
the celebrated Earl of Kent, for he did not die until 1243, and before this 
date apparently Hen. III. had bestowed the manor upon his brother Richard, 
Earl of Poictou and Cornwall, King of the Romans, for in 1241 we find in 
the Abbreviation of Pleas, judgment in his favour on a claim to the 
advowson of Haughley on the ground that the King h&d granted him all 
that he had in the manor. 5 The statement in the Red Book of the 
Exchequer 6 is that "Earl Richard, brother of the King, held Haughley 
Manor, which was Earl Perchia. Value per an. 40." 

Richard Plantagenet had great attainments. He is said to have been 
expert in war, and so solid in council that what fortune denied him in battle 
he supplied by his conduct and advice. He acquired large sums of money 
by farming the mint, and it is related that he purchased the kingdom of 
the Romans as an investment, hoping to have reimbursed himself out of 
the revenues, but the experiment was not successful, and he after much 
trouble and vexation returned to this country a poorer King than he went 
out an earl. 

In the time of the great disaffection of the barons, he firmly adhered 
to King Henry, and commanded the body of the royal army in the unfor- 
tunate battle of Lewes, being there taken prisoner. After a varied 
experience in sunshine and cloud he departed this life at his Manor of 
Berkhampstead, in Hertfordshire, in 1272, and was buried in the abbey of 
Hales, of which he was the founder. He married three times 1st Isabel, 
3rd daughter and coheir of William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke, by whom 
he had four sons who all died young, and a daughter. He married 2ndly 

'S.P. xi. 303. */&. 15 Hen. III. pt. i. 7. 

2 T. de N. 300. 5 Abbr. of Pleas, 25 Hen. III. 23. 

3 Chart Rolls, n Hen. III. pt. i. 25. 6 Inquisitions concerning serjeanty. 



200 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sanchia, daughter and coheir to Raymond, Earl of Provence, by whom he 
had a son, Richard, who died young, and Edmund, his successor. His 
3rd wife was Beatrice, niece to Conrade, Archbishop of Cologne, who 
survived him, but by her he had no issue. 

Edmund, who succeeded his father, had the government of England 
intrusted him in the absence of Edw. I. beyond the sea ; and also a second 
time, when that monarch went to meet Philip, King of France. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Richard, and sister to Gilbert de Clare, Earl of 
Gloucester ; but died without issue in 1300,' and was buried by the side of 
his father in the abbey of Hales. The manor then passed to the Crown, 
and in 1301 the King assigned it to Margaret, widow of the said 
Edmund, for the payment of 500 per annum. Haughley Manor was 
extended at 79. 8s. 6$d. yearly. 1 In 1313 the manor was in the King's 
hands, for on the Close Rolls this year is an order to the keeper of Haughley 
Manor to pay to Edmund, son of Hugh de Treie, 455. 6d. yearly which 
the keeper had refused to pay, as Edmund claimed to hold to him and 
the heirs of his body the custody of the park by charter of Edmund, late 
Earl of Cornwall, 3 and the same year we find also on the Close Rolls an 
order to deliver Haughley Manor to Gilbert de Risshton, according to the 
King's grant of the custody during pleasure. 4 In 1318 on the Close Rolls 
is an order by the King committing the manor to Nicholas de Fairford as 
maintenance for Margaret, Countess of Cornwall. 5 

The order is somewhat strange, as we learn from the Patent Rolls that 
two years earlier the King had granted the manor and the castle and Manor 
of Eye, the hamlets of Dalinghoo, Alderton, and Thorndon to the same 
Margaret his niece for life, 6 arid the following year the manor was granted 
to Hugh de Audley and Margaret his wife, late wife of Piers de Gavaston, 
Duke of Cornwall. In 1319 the manor passed to Isabel, Queen of England, 
by grant in exchange for other manors/ and she regranted to the King 
in 1330, when it was granted by him to John of Eltham, Earl of Cornwall, 
his brother, in tail general. John of Eltham died in 1336 without wife 
or issue, and was buried in St. Edmund's chapel, in Westminster Abbey, 
where his monument still remains. The following year the manor was 
granted by the Crown to Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, in tail male. 
On the Patent Rolls in 1343 we find a commission to inquire as to the 
withholding of fees and services which will revert to the King if Robert de 
Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, die without male heirs. 8 Robert did leave male 
issue, and on his death in 1369' the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William de Ufford, 10 Earl of Suffolk, and on his sudden death in the House 
of Lords, I5th Feb. 1381," went to his widow Isabel his 2nd wife, daughter 
of Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, and widow of John le Strange, 
of Blackmere, in dower. The following is a copy of the inquis. p.m. of 
William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, so far as it relates to Haughley : - 

Inquis. cap't apud Eye in Com Stiff coram Jotle Reed Ese dm Regis in Com Suff 
quinto die Marcij Anno Regni Regis Rici scdi quinto virtute cujusdam Iris dni Regis eidem 
Ese directi et huic Inquis consul p sacrift Willi Skeet, Jonis Fakoun, Ade Dun Walter Rocke 

' I. P.M., 28 Edw. I. 44 (29). Pat. Rolls, 13 Edw. II. 27 and 27 Schedule. 

'Close Rolls, 29 Edw. I. 14. 8 Pat. Rolls, 17 Edw. III. pt. ii. 27**. 

'Close Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 28, 3. I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. ii. 38. 

4 Close Rolls, 7 Edw. II. 23. See Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate 

s Close Rolls, 12 Edw. II. 31. Hundred. 

6 Pat. Rolls, 10 Edw. II. pt. ii. 26, 7, pt. i. "I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 

2, I. 



HAUGHLEY. 



2OI 



JoTiis Dun Andr Syf Rogli Apeltweyt Giltri Fringe, Henr Musket, Jotiis Westbrom, Rici pker 
et JoTiis Kyng. jur. Qui dicunt sup sacrfn sun quod Willius de Ufford Comes Suff defunct 
tenuit die quo obiit in dnico suo ut de feodo talliato ex dono et concessione dm E nup Regis 
Anglair Regis nuc Robto de Ufford nup Com Suff pri dci VVilli Comitis sibi et heredits suis 
masculis de corpore legitime exeunt fcis diversa Manlia terras et ten subscripta videlicet. 

Haghle. Itm Man'ui de Haghle cum ptin in Com Suff pdco in quoquidfn Manlio est 
und capitle mesuagin quod nichil val p anno ultra repris Itm dicunt qd situs Manlij p'dci 
cu fructibs gardini ejusdem val p annu ij. s. Itm sunt bin cccc acr terr arrabil que val 
p annu cs. p'c acr iij. d. Itfn sunt ibfn x x x vj. acr pti q val p annu Ixxij. s p r c acr ij. s. Itfn 
sunt ibfn xviij.acr pastur q val p annu xij. s p r c acr viij. d". Itfn ibfn unus pcus cujus agistam 
ultra sustentac perasz bestiarz ibfn val p annu x x. s. solvend ad festa sci petri Advincul et 
sci MicTiis Arctii. Itfn ibfn xviij. acr bosci un quoit anno possunt amputari iij. acr q val p ann 
vj. s. p'c acr ij s. Itfn dicunt qd nichil de bosco p'dco potest amputari hoc anno et q d totus 
boscus p'dcus amputabatur in scoto and ult anno p'cedn Itfn est ibfn unu Molendinu 
ventriticu quod val p annu ultra repris vj. s. viij. d. Itfn ibfn de redditu ass cum firm terras 
xxxiiij. ii solvend ad festa Natal dfii pasch Nativitatis sci JoTiis Bapte et sci MicTiis Arctii 
equis porcoitz Itm de redditu iiij. gallin ad fm Natal dm' que val p annu vj. s. viij. d p r c gallin j. 
d Itfn ibfn c ad e t'm que val p ann iiij. d" Itfn ibfn ex. opa arrur que val p annu xx s. 

p'c opis iiij. d. Itm sir 1 opa yemal et estimal que val p annu xlj. s. viij. d p'c opis 6b. 
Itfn Mercatu tenend p diem sabbi qualt sept que val p annu xx. s. et Nundin in festo 
Assumpc be Marie que val p annu xx s. Itfn p'it et pquis cur val p annu xl. s. Itfn leta 
tenend die Jovis in septimana pentecost q val p annuxx s. Itfn tenuit hundreda de 
Htismere et Stowe in com p'dco cu ptin que valent p annu xiiij. ii. Itfn dicunt quod dca 
Manrui de Haghle et Hundreda de Htismere et Stowe tenentur de dno Rege in Capite p 
quod s'vicui ignorant Et qd idem Willius de Ufford Comes Suff obijt x' die Febr ult p'tlit 
sine tied masclo de corpore suo legittie exeunte ob cujus deccm exitus mascul dei Willi 
Comitis Reversio dcoz Man'ui et Hundredoz cu ptin ad dum Regem et Tiedes suos spectant 
set dicunt utrum Isabell que uit ux dci comitis sit p'gnans an non ignorant. 

In 1385 the reversion in the manor, subject to Isabel's life estate, was 
granted by the Crown to Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, 1 and in 1400 
we find on the Patent Rolls a confirmation by Hen. IV. of the grant in 
favour of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, son of Michael, and the heirs 
male of his body of a yearly sum of 123. 75. g%d. until the reversion of the 
manors of Haughley and Thorndon should fall in on the death of Isabel, 
Countess of Suffolk. 2 She did not die until the 2gth Sept. 1416. 

From the death of Michael de la Pole in 1415 to the time of VVm. de 
la Pole, 4th Earl of Suffolk, the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Hertz, Saxmundham,in Plomesgate Hundred, and from that time 
to the death of Edmund de la Pole, Duke of Suffolk, in 1513, as the Manor 
of Gyfford's, Wattisfield, in Blackbourn Hundred. 

Haughley was one of the manors expressly named in the deed of 26th 
Feb. 1492, made between the King and Edmund de la Pole and restored 
to him. 

In 1510 we find from the State Papers that a grant had been made by 
the Crown of the manor to Sir John Heydon and others during the life of 
Edmund de la Pole, then attainted. 3 In 1513 on the death of her husband 



1 R.P. iii. 208. 

'Pat. Rolls, I Hen. IV. pt. iv. 15. 

B I 



3 S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1281 ; Originalia Rot. 
34. Notice of grant, S.P. 5 Hen. 
VIII. 4254. 



202 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a petition was presented to the throne on the behalf of Margaret de la 
Pole, daughter of Richard, Lord Scroop, stating that she had a life interest 
in this estate, Westhorpe, and several other manors in Suffolk, and these 
manors were assigned to her accordingly. She died in 1515, in which year 
\\v find that Sir Thomas Tyrell was appointed keeper of the park of Haughley,' 
and the manor was granted by King Hen. VIII. in tail general to Charles 
Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, who in 1538 exchanged it with the Crown for 
other property.* It is stated in every account of the manor we have seen 
that the manor was granted to the Sulyard family by Queen Mary in the 
person of Sir John Sulyard, but this does not seem to be correct. It was 
granted by Hen. VIII. immediately upon the exchange with Charles 
Brandon, to Andrew Sulyard, 2nd son of Sir John Sulyard, of Wetherden, 
Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. He married Margaret, daughter 
and one of the heirs of John Lyston, but died without issue ist March, 
1538, and the manor is mentioned in his inquisition post mortem, 3 it then 
passing to his nephew, Sir John Sulyard, son and heir of John Sulyard, 
3rd son of Sir John Sulyard, the Lord Chief Justice. It is quite true this 
Sir John Sulyard, grandson of the Lord Chief Justice, did have a grant from 
Queen Mary, for the grant is entered on the Originalia Rolls both in the 
ist year of Queen Mary and the 3 and 4 of Philip and Mary, 4 and the grant 
was made, or the estate confirmed, to him in return for his active services 
in her cause. From the Exchequer Special Commissioners mentioned in 
the 38th Report of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records, we find the 
grant of 3 and 4 Philip and Mary to John Sulyard referred to. It is there 
stated that in 1614 Haughley Manor and park were supposed to be escheat 
on account of defective title. 5 Sir John Sulyard erected the present fine 
mansion in Haughley Park, and removing from the adjoining parish of 
Wetherden made it his future residence. 

" Sir John Sulyard," says Mr. Hollingsworth, " was a stiff Roman 
Catholic, and his loyalty was tainted with the bigotry of his religion. His 
recusancy under Elizabeth would not have been noticed severely if he had 
not made himself so obnoxious by assisting at the death of the Protestants 
in this reign. He was much trusted by Queen Mary. She gave him an 
unlimited order to do what was needful for her service, of which the follow- 
ing is a literal copy : 

" ' Mary the Queen, 

" ' Henry Bedingfield, 

' These are to require and command you to give most faithful 
and assured orders to this bearer our trusty and well-beloved s'vient Sir 
John Sulyard, and in any wyse as ye love us and tender our favour not to 
fayle to accomplish and putte into execution that which he shall declare 
unto you from us to be our pleasure, so fare ye nartylie well. From 
Framlingham the 23 of Jun.' ' 

In 1559 he was called upon to show by what title he held the 
manor, as we learn from the Memoranda Rolls. 6 He married three times 
ist, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, of Oxburgh, Knt., 
and had issue Frances, married to Thomas Garneys, of Kenton ; 2ndly, 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Jerningham, of Somerleyton, and had 

'Add. Ch. 16573. 4 Originalia, i Mary, 4 Pars. Rot. 7 ; sand 

'State Papers, 30 Hen. VIII. ii. 1182 (i8a). 4 P. and M. 4 Pars. Rot. 37. 

M.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 5 D.K.R. 38 App. p. 94. 

M. i Eliz. Trin. Rcc. Rot. 6. 



HAUGHLEY. 203 

issue Edward, son and heir, Thomas, Ann married to John Tyrell, 
Margaret married to Sir Henry Tyrell ; and 3rdly Alice, daughter of 
Humfry Carvell, of Wignall St. Mary, in Norfolk. He died 4th March, 
1574, and was succeeded by his son and heir Edward. Edward inherited 
the religion, but had obtained a more enlightened attachment to the throne. 
He declares himself " bounden and radie as becometh a true and dutiful 
subject,with boddy,lands,and goods,to defend her Highness (Queen Elizabeth) 
against the force of any Prince, Pope, Potentate, Prelate," &c. 24 Oct. 1588. 
The following is a transcript of the declaration : " I, Edward Sulyarde of 
Suff. Esquier, doe acknowledge our most gratious Sovreigne Ladie Queene 
Elizabeth, to be our undoubted lawfull and onlie Queene of Englande and 
Irlande, and no other forreyne Prince, notwithstandinge any Excommunica- 
tion, under whose Power are all Persons both Ecclesiasticall and Temporall, 
with in any her Majesties Dominions. And also by this doe manifest 
myselfe bounden and readie, as becometh a true and duetifull subject, with 
Body, Lands, and Goodds, to defend her Highness against the Force of 
any Prince, Pope, Potentate, Prelate, or whatothersoever her Majesties 
Enemies, which God grannte she may overcome, and longe contynue her 
prosperous Raigne over us. Written in the xxiiij th of October 1588 

" By me Edwarde Sulyarde." 

Declarations of the same tenor were signed by divers other knights and 
gentlemen of the same communion ; amongst others, Edward Rookwood, 
whose family was related to that of the Sulyards. This declaration was 
made in the face of the Spanish Armada by many Roman Catholics, and 
others armed themselves and fought on board the fleet. But a large body 
remained secretly and sullenly passive, awaiting with a feverish hope coming 
events, and praying earnestly for the restoration of Papal power. Many 
of these gentlemen for two years before this invasion had been compelled 
by the government to live in London, nor could they visit their estates 
without licence from the privy seal. This was a necessary precaution under 
the threats of invasion, and when such violent councils prevailed at Rome. 
Mr. " Siliarde " petitioned the council (in 1586) for leave to go down to 
Wetherden and attend to his family concerns, and feelingly enlarges on the 
hardship and loss he should suffer by " bringing his wife, children, and 
familie to London, which he could not bring to passe in any reasonable 
sorte, but to his greate charge, extrame losse, and hindrance, which in no 
wise he can long endure, but in short tyme will be his utter overthrowe 
and undoing." He speaks of " vi fatt oxen " sent up to London to pay a 
fine of fifty pounds due to the exchequer, five of which were seized on their 
journey by her majesty's surveyors and no allowance had been made for 
them. He had paid 1,760 already in fines on his estates for his suspected 
loyalty, and as a part of that uneasy reputation he obtained with his 
religion from his father. 

" And in this case of Mr. Sulyard's we may perceive from the following 
answer to his petition, that levity and security were the rules by which the 
measures of the court were actuated : 

' Whereas Edward Syliarde of Wetherden in the county of Suffolk, 
gent, having been a long tyme restrayned of his libertie for matter of 
religion, was lately for certain considerations permitted to remayne near 
his house in Suffolk, and yet notwithstanding, as it is informed, hath synce 
that time been troubled and molested onely for recusancy. These are in 
her majesty's name to will and require you, and every of you to whom it 



204 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK 

may appertaync, to forbear to sue or trouble him any further with respect 
to his said recusancy untill you shall understand her majesty's further 
pleasures herein, and these shall be his sufficient warrant in that behalf. 
Dated at my house at Barnelmes the 19 of June, 1586. Fran. \Yalsingham, 
L.S. '" 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is a cross bill by Edward Sulyard against William Parker the elder and 
William Law, as to a close containing 32 acres called " Sheepcott Field " 
in Haughley Manor.' A bond of this Edward Sulyard, recusant, in 1589, 
will be found amongst the State Papers for this year. 1 

Edward Sulyard married* 1st the daughter and heir of Thomas Haydon, 
younger brother of Sir John Haydon, and had issue Sir John, and Ann married 
to Henry Martin, of Chester ; and 2ndly Ann Dawney, of Yorkshire, and 
had issue Elizabeth. Edward Sulyard died loth May, 1605, and the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir John Sulyard, who was knighted by King 
Jas. I., and had all penalties and fines remitted. Under King Charles 
the family devoted themselves to the Crown. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
will be found an action by John Marks against this Sir John Sulyard. 5 

Sir John Sulyard married Philipa, daughter of Ralph Sheldon, of 
Beoly, in Worcestershire, and had issue Edward, Ralph, and John, and 
dying in 1626 the manor passed to his eldest son, Sir Edward Sulyard. 
He, under Cromwell, was imprisoned, and two parts of his estate sequestrated. 
He became a wanderer and exile. On the Restoration he recovered his 
former possessions and manors, but still continued a firm adherent to the 
faith of the middle ages as taught by Rome. Sir Edward Sulyard married 
the daughter of William, Lord Sturton, but dying in 1673 without issue 
his estate descended to his brother Ralph, who married Elizabeth, the 
daughter of James Willford, of Wandsworth, and by her had a numerous 
issue. To him succeeded Edward, his eldest son, who married Penelope, 
the eldest daughter of Sir Edward Gage, of Hengrave, and by her had 
many children. At the Revolution it does not appear that this gentleman 
at all suffered, but continuing firm in his religion was left out of the Com- 
mission of the Peace. His next brother, Lieut. -Col. Thomas Sulyard, 
followed King Jas. II. abroad, and subsequently entered into the Dutch 
service, married a lady of Boisledne, in Brabant, and there died, leaving 
descendants still living in Flanders. 6 

Edward Sulyard, son of Edward, held the manor, and dying in 1744 
it passed to his son and heir, Edward Sulyard, who died 28th April, 1785, 
at the age of 78, when it passed to his son and heir, Edward Sulyard, who 
married ist Susanna, daughter of George Ravenscroft, of Spalding, co. 
Lincoln, and 2ndly Sarah Dalton, but died 24th Oct. 1799, without male 
issue, at the age of 55, leaving three daughters and coheirs, namely : Sophia, 
married to John Carey, of Lincoln's Inn ; Lucy, married to Hugh Smyth, 
of Acton Burnell, in Salop ; and Frances, married to Sir George W. Jerning- 
ham, of Cossey, in Norfolk, Bart., who having proved his descent from Sir 

1 Hollingsworth's History of Stowmarket, 4 He is stated in Blomefield's Norf. to have 
p. 112. married Frances, relict of Sir 

*C.P. iii. 23. Babthorpe. 

'Acts of Privy Council, 286; and see 5 C.P. ser. ii. B. cxxviii. 41. 

Kawlinson, MSS. B. 319. 'Hollingsworth's History of Stowmarket, 

p. 114. 



HAUGHLEY. 



205 



William Howard, Lord Stafford, attainted in 1680 for high treason, and 
beheaded, and the King in the year 1824 having been pleased to recommend 
to Parliament the reversal of that unjust attainder, was restored to his 
inheritance, and became Lord Stafford. 

In 1811 an Act of Parliament' was passed enabling the coheiresses of 
Edward Sulyarde and their husbands to pay the sum of 3,000 for the 
benefit of his Majesty in satisfaction of his claim to the manor and estates 
in Haughley. The result was the property was sold. In Oct. 1811, the 
Manor of Haughley, extending over 2,442 acres, 22 dwelling-houses, and 
28 messuages, with the mansion house and offices, and a park of land contain- 
ing about 396 acres, realised 27,840 exclusive of timber. The purchaser 
was William Crawford, on whose death in 1835 the property passed to his 




HAUGHLEY PARK. 



son and heir, the Rev. William Henry Crawford, and on his death in 1868 
the manor was sold to John Hayward, by whom the copyholders were 
enfranchised. 

Page mentions that the Manor of Haughley? Castle in the time of King 
Charles was Stephen Offwood's, in which family it continued for some 
generations. 

The manor is large and its court was arbitrary and had much power. 
The lord of this manor formerly possessed a jurisdiction of Oyer and 
Ter miner, trying all causes in his own court, of which instances are on 
record as late as the nth Elizabeth. At a court held in 1475 the lands, 
tenements, &c., of John Buxton, of Stow, were seized, for that he had 
vexed one William Turner by the writ of our Lord the King, contrary 
to the ancient custom of the manor that no tenant should prosecute any 
other tenant in any court saving this. At another court in the same year 
it was ordered that the Abbot of Hales, in Gloucestershire, who was impro- 
priator of Haughley and Shelland, should erect a new pair of gallows in 
Luberlow field, under a penalty of 405. (had he cut the old ones down ?), 
and the field still bears the name of gallows field. 

'51 Geo. III. c. 68 (local and personal and not printed). 



2 o6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

One Buxtyn (? Baxtcyn) also held lands under the service of finding a 
ladder for this gallows. The copyholds were subject to arbitrary fines. 
It has been said that in ancient times this was a market town, but this, 
as we have already said, does not appear to have been the case. It is true 
we find that in 1463 William Hoxon, of Stow, was fined for lying in wait 
near the town of Haughley and buying chickens, eggs, and the like, and in 
1539 the butchers of the former place were amerced 35. 4^. because they 
sold meat out of the market on a market day, contrary to the custom of 
this manor. In th;e following year the amercement was doubled. The 
village had a fair yearly, on August ifjth, being the Assumption of the 
Virgin Mary, to whom the church is dedicated. 

Haughley Park and the old Sulyard mansion house were purchased in 
18 by Arthur Charles Pretyman, youngest son of the Rev. George Thomas 
Pretyman, Chancellor of Lincoln, by Amelia, daughter of Christopher 
T. Tower, of Weald Hall, Essex. He married 26th Oct. 1858, Mary, 
daughter and coheir of Henry Baxter, of Idvies, co. Forfar. Arthur Charles 
Pretyman died in 18 , leaving his widow who still resides at the mansion 
house, and has a son, Frederick Henry, and three daughters, Emily Arabella, 
Agnes Mary, and Arabella surviving. 

The manor in 1896 was vested in C. H. Capon, but is now vested in 
George Frederick Beaumont, of the Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex. 

As to the Sulyard family, see N. & Q. 7th ser. xi. 306, and the Pretyman 
family, Burke L.G. 1297. 

Letters of Edward Sulyard, of Haughley Park, to Michael Hicks, 
1584, will be found in the Lansdowne MSS. in the British Museum,' and to 
cousin B. Gawdy, 1595, in the Egerton MSS.' Both Sir Edw.- Sulyard, 
recusant, and his brother Ralph are referred to in 1647 m * ne Calendar of 
Compoundus State Papers [1759]. 

In order better to show the extent of this manor as late as the middle 
of the i8th century we give here a rental of the rents payable to the manor 
for one year ending at Michaelmas, 1731, when Edward Sulyard was lord : 

A Rental of the Rents payable to the Manor of Hawleigh cum membris 
for one whole year ending at Michaelmas, 1731 : 

New Street. 

i s. d. 

John Baldry (late Brook's), per Rt. Button 105 

Elizabeth Bradstreet, per Wm. Button. . . . . . . . 026 

Sarah Raffe, W'idow (late Rouse Raffe) per se . . . . . . o 13 2 

Sam. Bird (late Damant's) per se . . . . . . . . o 14 2 

Sam. Bird (late Harrison's) per se.. .. .. .. 138 

Martin Lovel (y e White Horse), per Thos. Balles . . . . 004 

Mr. John Boggas y e Bushes per se .... Free .. 024 

Mr. Edwd. Boggas, per Mr. John Boggas . . 0511 

Abraham Chenery, per Robt. Serjeant . . . . . . . . o i o 

Mr. Thomas Crispe, per Thomas Brooke . . . . . . 142 

Mannings at Moorbridge, per Jno. Steygall . . 034 

John Harrison (late Driver's) per James Harrison .. .. 096 

606 
'Lansd. 43,3. "Eger. 2713. 



HAUGHLEY. 



207 



8 
6 
o 



Hawleigh Street. 

Plashwood, per R. Ray 

Mr. Robt. Offwood the castle, &c. ..2 18 

Weeding Hill 03 

Oakeys . . . . . . . . 02 

Richard Edgar, per Jacob Green .. .. .. Free. 

Widow Bloome (late Thos. Buttons), per Edwd. Bloome 

The King's-arms, per Robt. Bloome . . . . Free. 
Bushey Close, per Robt. Bloome. . 
John Potter (late Thomas Thrower's) per se 
Robert Bloome (late John Glanfield's), per Wid w . How 
John Burroughs (late Everson's) per se. . 
William Hayward (late Wm. Baker's) per Thos. Barnes 
Thos. Barnes (Cuckstall Fields, late Muskett's) per se 

Clarke of Wortham, per Benjn. Stannard 
Daniel Lambert, per Christopher Palmer, &c. 
James Raymond (late Thrower's, olim Wincks), per se 
Mr. Charles Knipe, late Soame's 

Muskett's 

Goodrich's 

Everson's 

Pratt's 

Chinery's Hills 

Garnham's 

Cuthbert's 

Bassock's (late Clark's) 

Mr. Henry Muskett 

J -^ J 1 1 ^ 3 

Wright's 

Clopton's 

Carters 

Follows 

Mr. Richmond (late Thomas Glanfield's) per James Raymond 
Thomas Barker's daughter, per Robt. Lyng . . 064) 

for Wright's o I 6 J 

Thomas Wright (late Sam. Wright's), per Jas. Raymond . . 
Sam. Wright (late Abr. Clark's), per Nathl. Jacob 
Robt. Bloome, for Glandfield's, per John Green 



I 


19 


i 





8 


o 





8 


O ' 





7 








o 


5 


o 


7 


o 





3 


4 





o 


6 


o 


2 


o . 


I 


17 


ii 





3 


10 





5 


6 





ii 


o I 


I 


o 


9 





i 


/ 



f, s. d. 

I 18 2 

342 

O I O 

038 

012 
028 
028 
O O 

o o 

026 

090 

005 

009 

035* 



I 



400 

075 
o 7 10 

036 
006 
006 



Hawleigh Green. 

Thomas Carter (Walsacks) in Right of his wife, Relict of 

Robert Lyng 

William Ward (Old Bell's) per Joshua Enefor 
Mr. Thos. Churchman (late Smyth's) per Jno. Goddard 

for Creasy 's, per James Rowland 
Mr. Robt. Goodrich, of Folsham, per Thos. Adams 
Mr. Robt. Goodrich, of Bury, per Thos. Adams 
Mr. Robt. Goodrich, of Bury, per Wm. Enefor 
Widow Robinson, per Robert Poarlc 
Mrs. Howell, per John Coe 



15 5 "i- 



044 
0160 

294 
003 

121 

o 13 10 

124 

008 

023 



a .s 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Sycr 



Josiah Rodwode (Spencer's), per . 
Mr. Thos. Bacon, late Carter's.. 

Darkin's 

Oxal Closes 

Eastling's-in-Newton 

Mr. Stephen Bacon (Young Bell's), per Robt. 
Pierson 

Rowland's, per .... Smith . . 

Cooper's-in-Newton 

Stannard's 

Keble's, per Jno. Wright 

Late John Day's 

Clement's (the Crown). . 

Part of Robt. Lyngs 19 acres 
Mr. Robert Hampson 

Pratt's 

Coppin's 

Hall Gardens (late Rosiear's) 

Late Covel viz 1 . Rowland's 

Link Fields 

Cutchey's 

Underwood, or Osborne's 

George Collison's 

Pyman's House 

To Mr. Muskett the Township 
Mr. John Sayer (the How), per Geo. Read . . 
Mr. Robt. Prior, per Wm. Martin 

for Mrs. Ann Prior 






5 


o 


o 


I 


4 


o 


3 


9 


o 


I 


4 / 






^ 


2 


I 


10 





I 


8 


O 


I 


2 








6 





o 


6 


o 


3 


o 








6 





2 


o ' 





14 


6 v 





8 


3 


o 


19 


8 


I 


o 


6 


I 


4 





I 





6 





4 


6 


o 


7 


6 


I 


3 


o 








3 





4 


8 ' 



I s. d. 
088 



o ii 5 



2 II 2 



774 



196 
I 14 4 
006 



20 14 o 



Tothill. 

Mrs. Adams (late Bunell's), per Sam. Wright . 

for Bradwoll's 

Thomas Gram's, per Francis Bird 
Mrs. Williams, per Francis Bird 
Gallow-nelds, per Jos. Drane 
Mr. Wm. Bacon, per Mr. Danl. Bacon 

for Wright's 

Simon Brunwin (Sorrells), per Jas. Welham . 
Mr. Martin (Martin's Fen), per Jas. Welham 
Edmund Griggs (late Boggas), per . . Frost 
Mr. Wm. Rayment (late Speers), per Thos. Chinery 



. . 


o 18 


6 


. . 





6 


. . 


o 19 
o 6 


IO 

6 


* 


O IO 


2 


o io 6 ) 
030} 


o 13 


6 


. . 


I 19 

o 8 


4 






o 6 


2 


icry 


2 






Chilton. 

Mr. Jno. Boggas (late Baily's), per R. Shepherd 

for late Layer's, at Tothile 
Richard Osborne (Dawos) 
Mr. Roger Turner, for Wid w . Turner's, per se . . 

for Adamson's 

for late Eyre's 



i 19 o 
o 6 10 




646 

2 5 10 
090 

212 






HAUGHLEY. 



209 



Mrs. Martin, Wid w ., part of Wid w . Turner's 

Mr. Martin of Greeting, for Hobart's 

Mrs. Ward, per Wm. Thinge 

Thomas Barker's Daughter, per Wm. Thinge 

Mr. Gurdon (late Petit's, olim Geo. Luffe's) per se 

Stowmarket Town Lands 

Mr. Edwd. Lynch (late Thompson's), per Roger Turner, Jun. r 

for Patches (late Cook's, olim Firmin's) per Mr. 

Nath. Fairclough 
Mr. Robt. Cook, for olim Hobart's 

for Wicke's is. 6d., Hayward's yd... 
Wm. Goodal, per Robert How.. 



Old Newton and Gipping. 



o 
o 



Thomas Tyrell, Esq r . per se 

Netherhall Mr. Jn. Harvy, per Thos. Manby . . 

in the Right of Susan, Wife of Captain 
Harvy 

for Mrs. Martha Harvy's 
Mr. James Harvy's Heir, for a Messuage and 

Lands (late of John Shys) called 

Demseys or Farmers 

for Part of Conoid's 

for James Roper's 
Geo. Gooday, Esq r . (late Prety man's), per Thos. Cooper 

late Clowton's 

late Booth's, in the Occupacon of Wm. Ward 
Mr. Sam. Robinson, late Wade's 

for Wid w . Sare's, late Wade's 

for Simond's in Hawleigh 
Mrs. Harvy, Widow of Mr. Jno. Harvy, for late Conoid's 



i 12 o 



046 

059 
0160 

O 12 6 

o 3 10 

I O 

1 17 8 

022 
059 

O 2 I 
015 

988 



038 

i 16 8 






7 


4 





II 


IO 


o 


2 


i 








o 


2 


5 








T 


er 


2 


2 


6 






O 


8 


8 


a i 


d 


O 


2 


i 


o 


ii 


O 








(j 


5 


II 


o 


19 


7 


o 


2 


8 








)k 


I's 


o 


8 


4 



Late Breame's. 

Thos. Cooper, late Jo. Cooper's 
Thos. Cooper, late Edwd. Cooper's 

Mr. Marlow, of Ipswich, per Robt. Hunt 

John Richers, late Mark's 

Mr. Blomfield, per Sam. Durrant 

Mr. Wm. Rayment (Cloversand Hoggars), per Thos. Hay ward 

Thos. Fullor, in Right of his Wife, late Emoden's.. 

Mr. Wm. Bacon (Clovers) 

Mr. Robt. Cook, late Purle's, per ... Cockerill 

per James Cooper 
Robt. Pierson 

Baxter (late Clark), per Jas. Cooper 



o 
o 



o 
3 



099 
008 
066 
006 
052 

O I IO 

040 
006 
006 
006 

856 



CI 



210 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Wetherden. 

Mr. Herne, per Wid w . Sheafe .. .. .. .. .. 042 

Lady_ Hammer (Phillets & Viners) 040) per Thomas | 



Pike Meadow in Hawleigh o 8 O| Sheafe. 

John Wyard .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 023 

John Edgar, per se .. .. .. .. .. .. 020 

Robt. Skipworth, per se.. .. .. .. .. .. 004 

Stephen Offwood (Wicks Hill), per se . . . . . . 020 

Robert Muskett, per se . . . . . . . . . . . . 087 

Mr. George Pretyman, per . . . Blakes . . . . . . o 10 9 



Bacton. 

o 6 
o 4 
Mr. Edwards, per . . . Gooch . . . . . . . . 003 

Widow Syret, late Roger Bardwell's . . . . . . . . 008 



Mr. George Pretyman (late Susan Brock's) j ^~~~. I'll o o 10 



Onehouse. 

Mr. Pettyward, per Mr. John Smith . . . . . . . . o i 6 

Duffield Offwood, per James Chinery.. 080 



096 
Harleston. 

Lady Hamner, for Horse Closes, &c., per Isaac Pammant... o 14 2 
Mr. Andrews, per Thomas Bradley . . . . . . . . 056 

Mr. Pettyward (late Thos. Mannings) per . . Alderton . . 0127 



i 12 3 
Shelland. 

Harbord Harbord, Esq r ., per Sam. Ront . . . . . . 060 

Mrs. Codd, per . . . Simpson (olim West's) . . . . 006 



066 

i ^^^ 

Buxhall. 

Mr. Francis Beales (late Mr. Rich d . Brown's) per Mr. 

Wm. Sulyard .. .. .. .. .. .. 020 

Dormisden. 
William Acton, Esq r ., late Mr. John Acton's . . . . 040 



HAUGHLEY, an 

Debach. 
Lord Rochford, late Wingfield's i o o 



New Street .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 606 

Hawleigh Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 5 n 

Hawleigfi Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 14 o 

Tothill .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 646 

Chilton .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 988 

Old Newton and Gipping .. .. .. .. .. 856 

Wetherden .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 221 

Bacton .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 019 

Onehouse .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 096 

Harleston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i 12 3 

Shelland .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 066 

Buxhall .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 020 

Dormisden .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 040 

Debach i o o 



71 17 



Hawleigh Common Fine .. .. .. .. .. 168 

Newton and Wetherden do. .. .. .. .. .. 034 

Stow do. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 040 



i 14 o 

Arms of SULYARD : Argent, a chevron gules, between three pheons, 
Sable. 




212 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

OLD NEWTON. 

(HERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times. The 
first holding was that of Roger de Poictou, and consisted of 
70 acres of land within the soc and sac of the King and 
Earl, 2 bordars, ij ploughteams (which had disappeared 
at the time of the Survey), valued at 305., decreased 
to 2os. at the time of the Survey. It had formerly been 
held by two freemen under Alsi, nephew of Earl Ralph, by 
commendation only. 1 

Another holding here was that of the Bishop of Bayeux, at the time of 
the Survey. It consisted of 80 acres of land in the soc of the King and 
Earl, 2 bordars, ij ploughteams in demesne, and 3 acres of meadow. Of 
live stock there were 6 hogs and 40 sheep. At the time of the Survey the 
bordars had become reduced to i, the ploughteams having disappeared had 
risen to i, and there were 2 beasts, also a sixth share of the advowson of a 
church with 10 acres of free land. The whole had been valued at 305., 
but was reduced to 2os. and by the time of the Survey had again increased 
to 405. It was formerly held by two freemen under Alsi by commendation 
only, and at the time of the Survey Roger Bigot held it of the Bishop under 
Roger Warenger. 

Another two holdings were those of Hugh de Montfort and consisted 
of one freeman with half a carucate of land, held in exchange by Hugh de 
Montfort, and under him 2 bordars. Also i ploughteam, i acres of 
meadow, and 3 hogs, and at the time of the Survey 40 sheep, the whole 
valued at 405. It had formerly been held by Alwin de Mendlesham in 
demesne. 

The second holding of Hugh de Montfort was of two freemen, of whom 
the jurisdiction was in the Hundred, having 27 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 55. It had formerly been held in demesne by Hugh de Montfort 
in exchange through a writ of liberate. 1 

MANOR OF OLD NEWTON. 

In 1161 Sir Robert de Mounteney held of Richard de Lucy one knight's 
fee in this parish in frankpledge with Dionisia, daughter of the said Richard, 
whom he married. 

Sir Robert de Mounteney was succeeded by Robert de Mounteney, 
who died in 1252, and was succeeded by his son and heir, John de Mounteney, 
at whose death in 1277 his son and heir, Robert de Mounteney, succeeded, 
and died in 1287. Robert was succeeded by his son and heir, Arnold de 
Mounteney, and he by his son and heir, John de Mounteney. John, son 
of William de Cleydon, seems to have died seised of the manor in 1350. J 

In 1360 a fine was levied of the manor by Sir Robert de Bures, Richard 
Bakere, of Wickhambrooke, Richard Bresete, Geoffrey Fausebrown, parson 
of Buxhall church, Thomas Cat, parson of Okholt church, and John de 
Cakestrete, of Finborough, against Thomas de Felton and Joan his wife. 4 

The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Anna, wife of John Neve, 
in 1460, and an extent given of it in towns of Old Newton, Stowe Market, 
Haughley, and Gipping. 5 

' Dom. ii. 3506. 4 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 8. 

J Dom. ii. 4096. 'I.P.M., 38 and 39 Hen. VI. 34. 

M.P.M., 24 Edw. III.So. 






OLD NEWTON. 213 

Davy says that in the time of Hen. VI. the manor was vested in William 
Mikelfeld, son of Thomas and Anne, who died in 1460, and was succeeded 
by his grandson and heir, Richard Mickelfeld ; but as William was more 
probably the son of Richard (though we are aware one pedigree does make 
him son of Thomas), and he certainly died in 1439, and not 1460, reliance 
cannot be placed on the statement. 1 

We do find, however, the manor in the Myldefeld family in the time 
of Hen. VI., for it is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. in 1460 of Anne, who 
was wife of John Neve, and which Anne held jointly with William Mickle- 
field, her husband. The manor was held of the King in capite by knight's 
service. 

John Myklefeld died seised of the manor about 1509, leaving Bartholo- 
mew Myklefeld his son and heir. The manor then passed to Sir Thomas 
Bedingfield, who levied a fine of the manor in 1535 against Sir Philip Bothe 
and others/ and died seised of the manor I5th March, 1538. 3 

It is strange that Sir Thomas Bedingfield should have acquired the 
Manor of Old Newton, as he was already lord of the Manor of Newton 
juxta Ipswich, but it will be seen that both the manors are specified in his 
inquis. p.m. The manor then passed to Robert Bedingfield, the brother 
and heir of Sir Thomas. 

In 1543 " Robert Pratyman, yeoman," or Pretyman, purchased the 
manor of Sir Edmund Bedingfield, and held his first court in 1544. He 
was the son and heir of Thomas Pratyman, of Howlots and Old Newton, 
yeoman, who was buried at Bacton i6th July, 1543, and of Johanne his 
wife, daughter of John Gernoun, of Bacton, great -great-grandson of Robert 
Gernoun, of Wickham Skeith, who purchased lands in Bacton in 1421. 
Robert Pretyman, the purchaser of this manor, married Margaret, widow 
of Thomas Gernoun, of Cotton. On Robert Pretyman's death in 1562 the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Pretyman, who married Agnes, 
daughter of John Banninge. He died in 1566,* when the manor passed to 
his widow, who married 2ndly John Stubbs, and retained the manor until 
her death in 1586, when it vested in her son and heir, Thomas Pretyman, 
who held his first court in 1587. He married Dorcas, daughter of Thomas 
Goodall, of Stonham, and died I4th Aug. 1615,* when the manor passed to 
his eldest son and heir, Thomas Pretyman, who died without issue, and was 
buried at Bacton nth Jan. 1617,' when the manor devolved on his brother 
and heir, Robert Pretyman, who held his first court 26th Oct. 1631. He 
died unmarried and was buried at Old Newton 3oth April, 1659, having 
by his will 25th April, 16597 devised the manor to his kinsman, George 
Pretyman, of Howlots, Bacton, then lord of the Manor of Cotton, in Hartis- 
mere Hundred. 

From the time of George Pretyman's death in 1688 the manor has 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Bacton, in Hartismere Hundred, 
and is now vested in Capt. Ernest George Pretyman, D.L., of Orwell Park. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the will of Robert Pretyman, 
2oth April, 1659," and of Jane Pretyman, nth June, 1737.' 

'See Manors of Blythford and Cravens, in 5 Adm. 1615 ; I.P.M., 13 Jas. 

Henham, in Blything Hundred. 'I.P.M., 1618. 

Fine, Trin. 27 Hen. VIII. 'Proved i6th July, 1660. 

'I.P.M., 31 Hen. VIII. 5. "Proved i6th July, 1660. 

* Will 4th Aug. 1566, proved loth Aug. at 9 Proved Arch. Sudb. 1738. 

Norwich. 



214 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Newton Hall belongs to H. Rebow. 

" Newton Manor " was included in a fine levied by John Staverton, 
John Cokerell, of Orford, John Berton, clerk, and Simon Blyant, against 
Sir Reginald Braybrook, and Joan his wife, in 1404.' 

MANOR OF NETHER HALL al. BARRARDS. 

This manor was the lordship of Roger de Boy ton in the time of Hen. III. 
he holding the tenth part of a fee." It was held of the Honor of Haughley. 5 

William de Boyton died seised of the manor in 1302,* his holding being 
but of I messuage and 50 acres of land, and 10 acres of wood. He was 
succeeded by his son, William de Boyton, and on the Patent Rolls in 1303 
we find a licence for William de Boyton to enfeoff William, son of William 
de Boyton, of a messuage and 50 acres in Old Newton, and for him to 
demise so that the same should be held for the lives of the said William de 
Boyton and Margery his wife, with reversion to the heirs of William, son 
of William. 5 

In the following reign William de Boyton was one of the knights of the 
shire for this county, in three Parliaments, and sued in 1281 Alexander de 
Clavering, Sheriff of Suffolk, for 275. and odd pence, his wages as knight, 
and recovered it, the jury finding that Clavering had levied the money for 
the county. Osbert de Boyton died in 1345,' and John de Boyton was his 
son and heir, aged n years. 

In 1 358 Sir Bartholomew Bateman, who had a grant of a rent charge of 
20 marks per annum issuing out of this manor and Langford, in Norfolk, from 
Osbert de Boyton, released by deed all his right therein to John his son, 
and Sir Thomas Felton, knt. Two years later a fine was levied by Sir 
Thomas Felton against this John de Boyton and Margaret his wife. 7 

In 1428 another John de Boyton was lord. In 1516 we meet with a 
fine of " Barrardys" Manor, which may relate to this manor. It was levied 
by Sir Andrew Wyndefore against Thomas Eylmere and Beatrice his wife. 8 
A moiety of the manor is the subject of a fine in 1521 levied by William 
Waldegrave and others against William Cracherode and others, 9 and the 
other moiety the same year by Sir William Waldegrave and others against 
Nicholas Courtnawke and others. 10 The manor must about this time 
have vested in Thomas Spring, for he died seised of it 2gth June, 1523," 
when it passed to his son and heir, Sir John Spring. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth is 
an action by James Dowlyng against John W r age touching copyholds of 
this manor." 

In 1576 a fine was levied of the manor by Robert Rolffe and others 
against John Heigham and others.' 3 Towards the end of the same century 
the manor was vested in Henry Gilbert,' 4 who died seised of it in 1594, when 
it passed to his son and heir, John Gilbert, who was succeeded by John 

'Feet of Fines, 5 Hen. IV. 4. 'Fine, Trin. 8 Hen. VIII. 

'Red Book of the Exchequer, cxxxv. 'Fine, Trin. 13 Hen. VIII. 

rider c. I0 Fine, Trin. 13 Hen. VIII. 

3T. de N. 290. " I.P.M., 15 Hen. VIII. 7. 

I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 106. "C.P. ser. ii., B. liii. 15. 
'Pat. Rolls, 31 Edw. I. 31 ; Originalia, 31 '^Fine, Easter, 18 Eliz. 

Edw. I. in Schedule. 'See Manor of Finborough Magna, in this 

'I.P.M., 19 Edw. III. 18. Hundred. 
7 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 15. 



OLD NEWTON. 215 

Coggeshale, 1 who dying in 1599 was succeeded by his son and heir, George 
Coggeshale. 

In 1609 the manor was vested in John Mallows and John Mannock. 

The manor was offered for sale at Garraways igth May, 1825. * The 
property included a farm house and about 65 acres of arable and pasture 
land and also the rectorial or great tithes of the parish or hamlet of Old 
Newton and Dagworth (except two farms), comprising about 1,900 acres 
of which 1,100 were arable. The quit rents amounted to i. js. od. The 
property was stated to have sold for n,98o, 3 but this was contradicted, 
and the estate was evidently bought in. 4 The property was again 
offered for sale loth May, 1827, at Garraways, 5 and 26th June, 1828." 
The i3th Jan. 1840, the manor and farm of Netherhall alone were 
offered for sale at the King's Head, Stowmarket. 7 

The manor was in 1885 vested in the Rev. James Coyte, and in 1896 
in C. A. Capon. 



1 For his marriage, and that of his son, see *Ib. May 2ist, 1825. 

Manor of Fornham St. Genevieve, in May 28th, 1825. 

Thedwestry Hundred. * Ib. March 29th, 1827. 

2 Ipswich Journal, April gth and 23rd, 6 Ib. May 24th, 1828. 

1825. 'Ib. Jan. 4th, 1840. 




216 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ONE HOUSE. 

HERE was one manor in this place, as well as several smaller 
holdings. Among the lands of Ranulf Peverell at the time 
of the Survey we find two estates, one being the manor. 
This consisted of ij carucates and 20 acres with soc, 8 
bordars, 4 serfs, 3 ploughteams in demesne, i ploughteam 
belonging to the men, 12 acres of meadow, wood sufficient 
to support 6 hogs, i rouncy, 6 beasts, 16 hogs, 40 sheep 
and 22 goats. These were slightly altered at the time of the Survey. The 
ploughteams in demesne were reduced to 2, the hogs had increased to 30, 
and the sheep to 87. There was a church with 3 acres of free land. The 
value was formerly 405., increased to 505. by the time of the Survey. It 
was 5 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt fyd. It had formerly 
been held by Ketel, a thane of the Confessor. 

The second estate consisted of 26 acres held by Osbert Masculus as 
belonging to Stow Church. He had held them before Ranulf Peverell had 
the Manor of Onehouse. 1 

Another estate here was that of Humphrey, son of Aubrey. It con- 
sisted of 60 acres of land, i bordar, and 2 ploughteams (which at the time 
of the Survey had become i), and 3 acres of meadow, valued at IDS. It 
was formerly held by 10 freemen under Ketel by commendation only. The 
soc belonged to the King and Earl." 

Among the lands of Robert, Earl of Moretaine, was an estate which, 
under the Confessor, was held by Withmer. It consisted of i carucate of 
land, 3 bordars, 2 serfs, i ploughteam in demesne, 4 acres of meadow, and 
2 socmen with 3 acres of land which they could sell without licence. The 
details of the holding were slightly altered at the time of the Survey, for 
the bordars were doubled, and the serfs had entirely disappeared. In the 
same township a freeman held 9 acres whom Nigel held under Earl Robert, 
but Frodo was seised before him, claiming livery, the Hundred not knowing 
the rights of it. The entire holding was valued at 205., and was in the King's 
soc. When Brien acquired it, it rendered no customs duty in the 
Hundred. 3 

Another estate was that of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted 
of half a carucate of land, 3 bordars, i ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow, 
valued at 2os. It had formerly belonged to a freeman under the abbot. 

In the time of the Confessor the sac, soc, and commendation over all 
the men belonged to the abbot, being the gift of the Confessor as shown by 
the writs and seals of the abbot. In later times King William allowed the 
gift. The Survey, however, says : " But the King's provost had four 
shillings on account of the soc of one of them, neither the abbot nor his 
ministers knowing whether it were rightly or wrongly the case. And the 
Hundred testifies that the Court knew not that the abbot had been at a 
later time disseised (of the soc) after King Edward gave it." 4 

ESCEFELLA. 

This adjoined Onehouse wood, and under it appears an entry amongst 
the estates of Robert Blunt. It is of 3 acres held by one bordar and 
rendering I2d. i 

'Dom. ii. 4166, 417. 4 Dom. ii. 3606. 

'Dom. ii. 436. 5 Dom. ii. 

*Dom. ii. 291. 



ONEHOUSE. 217 

MANOR OF ONEHOUSE. 

This was probably the land of Ketel 1 prior to the Conquest, and was 
held by Ranulph Peverell as Domesday tenant in chief. In 1234 the lord- 
ship was held by Margery de Moese and Richard her son. In 1270 Henry 
de Caldecotes is said to have had a grant and a market and a fair here, 
and also free warren. 

Davy, who gives the last piece of information, says : " 1272 Fairfax- 
Teddington (?) 1272 Parnell." It is presumed he intends these as lords ; 
but it seems not unlikely that as to Caldecotes the entry belongs to the 
other manor in Onehouse, and that the lordship did not pass from the de 
Moese family until Margery, daughter of Thomas de Moese, married Thomas 
de Weyland, the well-known Lord Justice of England. It is possible, how- 
ever, the lordship, which was certainly vested in Sir Thomas de Weyland 
when he abjured the realm, may have come to him from the Alneto grant 
after mentioned. William de Alneto held a knight's fee here of the abbey 
of Bury in the time of John or Hen. III., and this passed to his son, Robert 
de Alneto, who held certainly in the reign of the latter monarch.' His son, 
Adam de Alneto, in 1282 gave by deed to Thomas de Weyland, Margery 
his wife, and Richard their son, all the lands, &c., which came to him on 
the death of Edward his brother in Onehouse, Rattlesden, Buxhall, and 
Wetherden, to hold to the heirs of the said Richard which he gave in 
exchange for other lands. 3 If not the manor, the lands were added thereto. 
From the Abbreviation of Pleas 4 we learn that Thomas de Weylaund having 
renounced the realm for felony, Margery his wife and Richard his son did 
not have seisin of the Manor of Onehouse, to wit, in Rattlesden and Wether- 
den, except 60 acres of land and 6 acres of meadow, and that the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds claimed to be chief lord of the said manor. There is certainly 
a statement on the Rolls of Parliament in 1290,' that the wardship of One- 
house Manor belonged to the Abbot of Bury. Margery the widow held 
until her death in 1315, when the manor passed to her 3rd son, Richard de 
Weyland. The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of the 2nd son, 
John de " Werlaunde "in 1312, but it does not appear that he ever was 
seised in possession. 6 Richard de Weyland died in 1319,' when the manor 
passed to his daughter Cicely, married to Sir Bartholomew de Burghersh, 8 
4th Baron Burghersh. 

Sir Bartholomew had a grant of free warren here in 1349,' an ^ on his 
death 4th April, 1369, the manor went to his daughter and heir Elizabeth, 
married to Edward Le Despencer. He died in 1375, and she in 1409.' 
The manor, however, seems in 1377 to have belonged to one Lawney, and 
amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings we meet with three actions as to 
the manor. The first is by Edward Lemsey (? Lawney), son of Rose, 
daughter of William Rykhill, brother of Anneys, mother of William Skrene, 
father of John Skrene, Esquire, father of Sir John Skrene, Knt., against 
Thomas Bibbysworth, William Essex, and Richard Parnell." The second 

' See Papers published by Norfolk and 5 R.P. i. 53. 

Norwich Archaeological Society, vol. 6 I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 34. 

3, pp. 253-5. Ketel's will is also in 7 I.P.M., 13 Edw. II. 17. 

Kemble's Codex Diplomaticus, No. "See Manor of Brandeston, in Loes Hun- 

1339, vol. 6, p. 199. dred. 

[\ de N. 291. Chart. Rolls, 23 Edw. III. 3. 

3 Abbr. of Pleas, 10 Edw. I. the isth day I0 See Manor of Blaxhall Hall, in Plomesgate 

of East. 30. Hundred. 

4 i8 Edw. I. Trin. 46. "E.C.P. Bundle 55, 159. 

D I 



218 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



i- by Richard Ayston, son of Isabel, sister of William, father of William, 
father of John, father of Sir John Skrene, Knt., against Thomas Bibbys- 
worth, William Essex, and Richard Parnell. 1 And the third is by Thomas 
Hampden, brother of Philippe, mother of Sir John Skrene, Knt., against 
the same three defendants as above.' 

Sir John Skrene certainly held the manor, and died in 1474 seised of it. 3 
Two further actions in the Court of Chancery followed immediately on Sir 
John Skrene's death, one by Thomas Bybbysworth, as legatee of the said 
Sir John, against William Essex and Richard Parnell, feoffees to uses, 4 
and the other by Elizabeth, widow of the said Sir John, against the same 
defendants. 5 

In the time of Hen. VII. Roger Drury' held the lordship, and on his 
death in 1500 it passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Drury, and on his 
death 2nd March, 1535, 7 passed to his son and heir, Sir William Drury, 
of Hawsted, who the same year suffered a recovery of the manor. He died 
nth Jan. 1557-8,* when it passed to his grandson and heir, Sir William 
Drury, who seems to have sold it to William Deane in 1580.' 

William Deane, who was son of John Deane by a daughter of Roger 
Nowell, of Read, co. Lancaster, purchased an estate at Great Maplestead, 
of which place he is usually described. He married twice, ist Anne, 
daughter and heir of Sir John Wentworth, of Gosfield, co. Essex, who died 
without issue 5th Dec. 1580, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of Thomas Egerton, 
of Rynehill. William Deane died 4th Oct. 1585, when the manor passed 
to his son, Sir John Deane, who was High Sheriff of Essex in 1610. He 
married 27th August, 1600, Anne, 2nd daughter of Sir Drue Drury, of 
Linstead, co. Kent, and of Riddlesworth, co. Norfolk, and died i7th Feb. 
1615, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Drue Deane, born 
3ist Jan. 1606. He married Lucy, and daughter of George Goring, Earl of 
Norwich, but the manor does not seem to have passed to his son Anthony, 
who was father of Sir Anthony Deane, lord of Monk Soham, in Hoxne 
Hundred. 



In 1627 we find the manor vested in Roger Pettiward, of St. Dunstan, 
London City, and Salter, son of John Pettiward, of Bury St. Edmunds, and 
of Agnes Cock, his wife. This John Pettiward had been married at St. 
James, Bury, 5th Aug. 1565, and had departed this life in 1595. Roger 
Pettiward married Martha, daughter of George Munne. Both husband and 
wife died in 1639, the former I3th May and the latter 28th Jan. he aged 71 
and she 62. They were buried together at Plunnbridge, Herts. The 
manor passed to their son and heir, John Pettiward, who resided at Putney, 
in Surrey, and had a grant of arms i6th July, 1660. He married Sarah, 
daughter and heir of Henry White, of Putney, and on his death in 1671 
the manor passed to his son and heir, John Pettiward, who was Sheriff of 



1 E.C.P. Bundle 55, 164. 

'E.C.P. Bundle 55, 161. 

3 1.P.M. 14 Edw. IV. 42. 

E.C.P. 13 Edw. IV. Bundle 55, 167. 

s E.C.P. Bundle 55, 165. 

'See Manor of Hawstead, in Thingoe 
Hundred. 

- I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24. 

"Copy of his will, dated 26th Dec. 1557, 
may be seen in Cullum's Hist, of 
Hawstead, ist ed., 125, where in a 



note Sir John Culluni informs us 
that the examining fees of office, 
and a gratuity to the transcriber 
cost one guinea, besides thirteen 
sixpenny stamps upon the three 
sheets of paper. Considering the 
length of the will such a charge in 
these days would be deemed ex- 
tremely moderate. 
Fine, Hil. 22 Eliz. 



ONEHOUSE. 219 

Surrey in 1689, and married Honor, daughter of John Dawes. John 
Pettiward presented to the living in 1708, and died in 1716, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Daniel Pettiward, who presented to the 
living in 1729, and married 26th Oct. 1732, Anne Lant, of Putney. He 
died in 1749 without issue, when the manor apparently passed to his nephew, 
Roger Mortlock, D.D., vicar of Skelbertswell, co. Kent, and residential 
canon of St. Paul's, son and heir of George, son of Henry Mortlock, which 
George had married Elizabeth Pettiward, 5th daughter of John Pettiward, 
and sister of Daniel Pettiward, who died in 1749. 

Roger Mortlock on succeeding to this estate took the name of Pettiward, 
and loth March the same year married Douglas, daughter and heir of James 
Sandwell, of London. He died at Putney loth March, 1780, and his widow 
Douglas survived until I2th June, 1810, when she departed this life at the 
age of 86, the manor devolving on their 3rd but eldest surviving son, Roger 
Pettiward, who purchased the Manor of Great Finborough. 

From this time the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Great Finborough, in this Hundred. 

Various Court Rolls of the manor have been offered for sale by Mr. 
Coleman, of Tottenham, and in 1884 he offered the Original Court Book 
of this manor with Caldecote's, covering a period from Oct. 1733 to 1773, 
and consisting of 58 pages for 2is.' 

MANOR OF CALDECOTE'S NOW JOINED WITH ONEHOUSE UNDER THE TITLE OF 

ONEHOUSE WITH CALDECOTES. 

This was the lordship of Henry de Caldecote in 1270 when he had a 
grant of free warren here, and the right to hold a market and fair. 2 The 
next lord was William de Caldecotes, and on his death the manor passed 
to his widow Joan, who died in 1331, when it passed to her son 
and heir, John de Caldecotes.' There are three actions relating to this 
manor amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings one by William 
Laurier (? Lawney) against Peter Pepper, vintner, of London ;* another by 
Sir John Fastolf, Knt., against Gilbert Debenham who had been enfeoffed 
by John Lawnay, Esquire ;' and a third by Henry Wove and Anne his 
wife, daughter of William "Laweney" against Sir Thomas Brewes, Knt., 
and others feoffees. 6 

In the time of Queen Mary the manor was vested in Sir William Drury, 
who died seised of it in 1557, from which time to the present the manor has 
devolved in the same way' as the main Manor of Onehouse, and is now 
vested like the Manor of Great Finborough in Charles Terry. No doubt 
the parish derived its name from the one house which stood there, a house 
in a singularly picturesque and solitary situation. The greater part of this 
parish two centuries ago was a wood, except a narrow strip declining to the 
south east, near this large distinguished mansion, which was beautifully 
seated upon a rising ground, gently sloping into a valley, with a rivulet 
winding through it. In the base court on the outside of the moat, towards 
the east, which is a square of half an acre, formerly the milking yard of the 
farmhouse, there was growing in the year 1776 as many ashen trees as 
contained upwards of 1,300 solid feet of timber. 7 

1 Cal. clxvi. 104. 4 E.C.P. Bundle 7, No. 134. 

'Chart. Rolls, Hen. III. ; H.R. ii. 192. s E.C.P. Bundle 11, 214. 

3 See Manor of Caldecot Hall, Fritton.in * E.C.P. Bundle 40, 291. 

Lothingland Hundred. 'Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 546. 



220 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The great hall was pulled down, and its site is now the flower garden 
of Onehouse Hall. Page, writing in 1847, says : "'A farmhouse has been 
built on the site of the old hall, which was encompassed with a moat 
upon whose earthern bank an oak is now growing, and apparently sound, 
the circumference of which, at the smallest part of the bole, is sixteen feet, 
and twenty-four feet at the height of three yards from the ground. Not- 
withstanding one of its principal leading arms, with several other mossy 
boughs on the north side, have been broken off by tempests, it contains 
at present upwards of four hundred and ninety feet of solid timber, by 
measurement, in its stem and branches. About sixty yards to the south- 
ward of this venerable tree, is a broad-leafed elm, whose boughs in the year 
1781 extended fifty-four feet towards the north, and near forty upon its 
opposite side, measuring each way from the centre of the trunk." 1 

Hollingsworth says : " The direct descendants of Ketel the thane, of 
Onehouse, were until very lately residents in the Hundred as farmers, and 
are still living in an adjoining parish. It is a pleasing reflection that the 
circular bell tower, the church, and part of what must have formed the 
kitchen of Onehouse Mansion still remain and may have been erected by 
Thane Ketel." He adds that Onehouse Hall stands yet on part of the old 
foundation of this ancient thaneship. Mr. Hollingsworth' s imagination 
is invariably vivid, and his faith in what some might feel inclined to 
characterise his own fanciful suggestions decidedly invigorating in these 
days of scepticism ! 

Queen Elizabeth in one of her progresses through the county break- 
fasted at Onehouse. 

About two hundred yards to the north of the moat stands the church, 
which is small and has a font of unhewn stone. It appears to have been a 
Saxon building, but a part of the north wall only, extending about 10 yards 
from the tower, which is circular, is all that remains of the original structure. 

In the chancel of the church lies buried, but without any inscription, 
the Rev. Charles Davy, author of Letters upon the Subjects of Literature, 
in two volumes 8vo. In the preface to the work he says : " Most of these 
little essays were written many years ago ; they have been collected from 
detached papers and revised for publication as a relief to the author's 
mind during a confinement of more than eighteen months' continuance. 
It seemed good to the Supreme Disposer of all things to reduce him in a 
moment, by an apoplectic stroke from the most perfect state of health 
and cheerfulness to a paralytic permanent debility, a debility which has 
not only fixed him on his chair, but brought on spasms, so exquisitely 
painful and frequently so unremitted as scarcely to allow a single hour's 
repose to him for many days and nights together. Under the pressure of 
these afflictions, God hath graciously been pleased to continue to him his 
accustomed flow of spirits, and to preserve his memory and his under- 
standing in some degree of vigour. These alleviating blessings have 
enabled him to borrow pleasure from past times in support of the present, 
and to call back the delightful and instructing conversations he enjoyed 
in a Society of worthy and ingenious friends, and to resume those studies 
and amusements which rendered the former part of his life happy." 

The following lines are extracted from a translation of a Latin poem 
by the Rev. Charles Davy, written in the reign of Jas. I., entitled Mdas 

1 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 546. 




ONEHOUSE. 221 

Solitaria. " I shall," says he, "Japply them to the spot where it has 
pleased the Divine Providence to place me, in which I hope to close the 
evening of my life." 

" No gilded roofs here strain the gazer's eye, 
No goblets'flow^with noxious luxury : 
Sleep, balmy sleep, here'rests his downy wings, 
Nor waits the purple pomp of gorgeous coverings. 
No gems here dazzle th' offended sight, 
No trilling airs inspire our chaste delight, 
No servile bands with crouching necks appear 
Nor Flattery's self can find admission here. 
But lofty groves of beauteous forms are seen. 
The builder Oak, the Fir for ever green ; 
The tow'ring Ash, whose clust'ring tops receive 
The rising sun, and deck the ruddy eve, 
The Adder brown, that loves the coat'ry vales, 
The Asp light quiv'ring to the summer gales ; 
The Willow pendent o'er the mazy stream. 
The Poplar huge, the Elm's extended beam ; 
Their different colours here display and vie 
In all the tints of varied harmony ! 
No sordid views deprive the soul of rest, 
No passions here disturb the lab'ring breast ; 
Save Grief that sickens at another's woe, 
And bids the melting sorrow sweetly flow. 
Far from the madding people's furious strife, 
Far from the anxious cares of busy life ; 
Beneath this straw-thatch' d roof, this humble cell, 
Calm Peace, and Friendship pure, delight to dwell." 




222 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

SHELLAND. 

MONG the lands of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, was a small 
holding of 23 acres, 4 bordars, half a ploughteam, and 2 
oxen, valued at 55., which had formerly belonged to Phin, 
Richard's predecessor. 1 

MANOR OF SHELLAND. 

This lordship was held by Sir Ingebranch de Belet, Knt., and Lora his 
wife about 1300. He died in 1312,* when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Belet, who died in 1322. i The manor then vested in Robert 
de Scales, and on his death in 1332' passed to his son and heir, Robert de 
Scales. It then seems to have vested in Roger de Scales, 4th Baron, from 
whom it apparently went to Sir William Bourchier, for there is a deed dated 
loth April, 12 Rich. II. [1386] preserved amongst the Additional Charters 
in the British Museum, whereby Eleanor, the widow of Sir William, who had 
died in 1365, grants this manor together with others to John Spicer, vicar 
of the church of Dunmow, John Busset, John Digche, clerk, and William 
Atte Fen, no doubt by way of settlement. 5 In the Bourchier family the 
manor remained, devolving in the same course as the Manor of Hopton, in 
Blackbourn Hundred, and is specifically mentioned in the inquisition p.m. of 
Henry Bourchier, created Earl of Essex in 1461, who died 4th April, 1483,' 
when the manor passed to his grandson and heir, Henry, Lord Bourchier. 7 
He was summoned to Parliament I4th Oct. 1495, K.G. 1496. He married 
Mary, eldest daughter and coheir of Sir William Say. He died without 
male issue I3th March, 1539-40, being thrown from his horse at his Manor 
of Basse, co. Herts., and was buried at Little Easton, Essex. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1538 is a letter of this Henry, Earl of 
Essex, touching this manor.' On his death the manor devolved on his 
only daughter and heir Anne, married to Sir William Parr, Knt., created 
2oth Dec. 1543, Earl of Essex, and i6th Feb. 1546-7 Marquis of Northamp- 
ton, mother of Queen Katharine Parr. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1541 by William, Earl of Southampton, 
and others against Sir William Parre, Lord Parre, and others. 9 

The marriage between Anne, the Bourchier heiress, and Sir William 
Parr was annulled by Act of Parliament I7th April, 1543, and the issue 
thereof bastardised. Anne died 28th Jan. 1570-1, and Sir William Parr 
ist August, 1571 . The manor passed to Anne's cousin, Sir Walter Devereux, 
Vise. Hereford, Lord Ferrers, and Lord Bourchier, son and heir of Richard 
Devereux. 

Walter Devereux was 4th May, 1572, created Earl of Essex, and installed 
a Knight of the Garter 23rd April, 1573. He married Lettice, eldest 
daughter of Sir Francis Knollys, K.G., and sister to William, ist Earl of 
Banbury, and died in Dublin, where he was residing as Earl Marshal of 

1 Dora. ii. 3926. 'Add. Ch. 7906. 

"I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 28. "I.P.M., i Rich. III. 31. 

3 I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 44. 7 See Manor of Hopton, in Blackbourn 

4 I.P.M., 6 Edw. III. 75. Scales' estate in Hundred. 

Shetland was a fourth part of a 8 S.P. 1538, App. 10. 

2oth part of a knight's fee (Origina- > Fine, Hil. 33 Hen. VIII. 

lia, 6 Edw. III. 13). 



SHELLAND. 223 

Ireland, 22nd Sept. 1576, aged 35,' when the^manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Robert Devereux, K.G., 3rd Viscount Hereford, and 2nd Earl of 
Essex, Earl Marshal of England 1597-1600, and Chancellor of the University 
of Cambridge 1598, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, March to November, 1599, 
the celebrated and unfortunate favourite of Queen Elizabeth. He married 
Frances, daughter and heir of Sir Francis Walsingham, Secretary of State, 
and widow of the celebrated Sir Philip Sidney, and a fine was levied of the 
manor against him in 1591 by John Weaver and others, probably when 
effecting some settlement. 2 

Robert, Earl of Essex, was executed on Tower Hill in the 34th year of 
his age 25th Feb. i6oo-i, 3 but must have parted with the manor during his 
lifetime, for we find that by a deed dated i3th June, 43 Eliz. [1601], the 
manor was sold by Sir James Scudamore, of Holmebury, co. Hereford, Knt., 
and Sir Phillipp Scudamore, Knt., by the name of Phillipp Scudamore, of 
London, for 800 to Reginald Burrough and Cuthbert Garner, and the 
covenant against incumbrances in the deed of conveyance refers to claims 
and charges made by Sir James Scudamore, Robert, late Earl of Essex, 
James Anton, George Anton, John Weaver, Peter Haughton, citizen and 
alderman of London, and Nicholas Daverous, citizen and " habberdasher 
of London." By deed dated 3oth May, 1604, and enrolled in the Court 
of Chancery, Reginald Burrough, of St. John's, and Cuthbert Garner, of 
St. John's, sold the manor for 1,600 to Sir John Deane, John Henson, of 
Drinkstone, a lessee of Shelland hall, joining in the conveyance. 

Sir John Deane, then of Great Maplestead, co. Essex, and Anne his 
wife, by deed dated 3ist March, 1615, sold the manor for 1,800 to Edward 
Alston, of Polstead, clothier. 

He was the son of William Alston, of Newton, and of Margery Holm- 
stead his wife, which William was the eldest son of Edward Alston, by 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Coleman, his ist wife, which Edward was the 
son of William Alston, of Newton, who was buried there 30th Jan. 1564, 
and whose will was dated i8th Oct. 1563, and proved at Bury St. Edmunds 
ist Mar. 1563-4. Edward Alston the purchaser, married Anne, sister of 
Joseph Ardley, and died 22nd January, 1617,* when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Joseph Alston, who died in 1643. Joseph Alston lived 
at Washbrooke, and married Mary Warner. He made his will i8th Dec. 
1643, which was proved nth January following ; he left this manor to 
his daughter Mary by the following devise : " I give and bequeath unto 
my sayd Daughter Mary all that my Manno and Messuage called Shelland 
Hall with all my houses buildings yards gardens orchards lands tenem" 
meadowes_ pastures feedings and hereditam' 8 whatso r now in the tenure 
or occupaion of Joseph Isaac aforesayd situate lyeing or being in Shelland 
Rattlesden and Woolpit or in any other town there nere adioyning to have 
and to hold for the sayd Mary my Daughter her heires and assignes for 
ever She to enter the same premises at her Age of one and twenty years 
or day of Marriage which shall first happen And my will and meaning is 
that if my sayd Daughter Mary shall happen to departe this Life before her 
sayd Age of one and twenty yeares and be unmarryed then my will and 
meaning is and I doe hereby give the same manno and messuage called 

'Will I4th June, 1576, proved I2th Nov. 3 Adm. Feb. 1662-3 Court of Delegates, and 

1576- again, C.P.C. 8th July 1676. 

'Fine, Mich. 33-34 Eliz. 4 Will zist Jan. 1617, proved in Prer. Court 

9th Feb. 1617-8. 



224 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Shelland Hall together with all other the aforesayd Lands Tenem" and 
Prmses herein formerly given my sayd Daughter Mary unto Susan my 
Daughter To have and to hold to her the sayd Susan my sayd Daughter 
her hfires and assignes for ever She to enter the same Pmises at such time 
as my sayd Daughter Mary should have entered the same. And my will and 
meaning is that my sayd Loveing wife Mary shall in the meantime receive 
the rents issues and profitts and all the Emolum" and advantages ariseing 
of the sayd Manno Messuages Lands Tenem" and Pmises or any part 
thereof for and towards the maintenance of my sayd Daughters and their 
educacon until such time as they shall have received their severall portions." 

Mary the daughter married Sir John Hanmer, of Whittingham Hall, 
Knt., and by deed dated 22nd May, 1662, in consideration of 1,710 sold 
the manor to William Cropley, of Shelland. 

The description in the deed is as follows : " All that the Mannor or 
Lordshipp of Shelland with the appurtenances, now or heretofore comonly 
called or known by the name of Shelland Hall or by what other name or 
names soever the same is called or knowne lyeing and being in the said 
County of Suffolk, And all Messuages houses Edifices buildings Barnes 
Stables Courtyards Orchards Gardens Cartsides and all other Easements 
Comodities heraditaments and appurtenances whatsoever to the said Mannor 
or Lordshipp belonging or in anywise appertayninge or therewith now used 
or occupied or reputed taken or knowne as part parcell or member of the 
same, Together with all and every the severall parcells of Land meadowe 
pasture wood and wood ground hereafter particularly expressed and 
specified lyeing and being in Ratlesden Shelland and Woollpitt or any of 
them in the said County of Suffolk or in any other towne in the said County 
of Suffolk there neere adioyninge now or late in the occupacon of Joseph 
Isaac or his Assignes That is to say, the site of the Mannor and Lordshipp 
aforesaid with the yards gardens and Orchards thereunto belonginge 
conteyninge by estimation eight acres, one ffeild sometyme an Rood and 
now or heretofore divided into severall parcells consisting of Arrable and 
pasture ground and now or heretofore called or knowne by the name of 
knights ffeild or by any other name conteyninge by Estimation fforty 
acres, One other ffeild of Errable ground and pasture now or heretofore 
called or knowne by the name of Mellfeild or by any other name conteyning 
by Estimation Twenty Acres, Two other peices of Errable Land conteyning 
by Estimation seaventeene Acres and now or heretofore called or knowne 
by the name of Halfe Pightells or by any other name or names, Two other 
peeces of pasture now or heretofore called or knowne by the name or names 
of Great Synorls and little Syriorls or by any other name or names vvith a 
Grove conteyninge halfe an Acre adioyninge to one of them conteyninge 
altogether Seven and twenty acres bee they more or lesse, Two other ffields 
of Errable land and pasture now or heretofore called May close or by any 
other name with a little Pigthtell thereunto adioyninge conteyning by 
Estimation Eight acres bee it more or lesse, ffouer other severall closes and 
peeces of Errable and pasture ground now or heretofore called or knowne 
by the name of Lynere feilds or by any other name or names conteyning by 
Estimation fforty Acres more or lesse, Together with all Messuages houses 
Barnes Stables Edifices and buildings now standinge and being in and upon 
any of the said ffouere peeces of ground or any part thereof, Two other 
pieces of pasture ground now or heretofore called or knowne by the name 
or names of Stony Lands and Cobbs) Pightells or byjany. other name or 
names conteyning by Estimation Eighteen Acres bee they more or lesse, 



SHELLAND. 225 

One meadow now or heretofore called great meadow or by any other name 
lyeing over against the close aforesaid called Clay close conteyninge by 
Estimation Seaven Acres bee it more or lesse, Two Pightells of Arrable 
Land now or heretofore comonly called the Pond Pightell and Spring 
Pightell or by any other name conteyninge by Estimation Nyne Acres more 
or lesse, And two other Pightells adioyning to the said Pightell now or 
heretofore called Pond Pightell which conteyne both togeather three acres 
bee they more or lesse." 

William Cropley married ist Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir of 
Arthur Dowe, of Dallinghoo, by whom he had two sons Thomas and Robert, 
who both died unmarried, and one daughter Margaret married to Thomas 
Smith, of Norton. William Cropley's 2nd wife was Katherine, daughter of 
Sir Charles Harbord, Knt., widow of Thomas Wright, of Kilverstone, co. 
Norfolk, by whom he had five daughters and one son. His 3rd wife was 
Judith, daughter of John Kendall, of Thetford, and widow of Roger 
Kerington, of Rougham. William Cropley died 28th May, 1717, at 
Haughley Park, aged 82. 

Later the manor was purchased with other estates by the Rev. Francis 
Astry, the conveyance being made by the Earl of Buckingham, Lord 
Hobart, and Sir W. Harbord to Dr. Astry. There is a post fine of Easter 
term in the 26th year of King Geo. II. dated 2gth May, 1754, as follows : 
" Of Francis Astry, D.D.,to attorn with John, Earl of Buckingham, for 
the manors of Rockell otherwise Rockylls and Shelland otherwise Shelland 
Hall, and 10 messuages, 10 gardens, 10 orchards, 330 acres of land, 80 acres 
meadow, 160 acres pasture, 80 acres wood, and 100 acres Furze and heath 
in Shelland, Rattlesden, Woolpit, Wetherden, Hawleigh, Harleston, One- 
house, and Buxhall, and all manner of Tythes yearly arising in Shelland 
aforesaid and the advowson of the Church of Shelland." Dr. Astry then 
conveyed the manor to Messrs. Hill and Gurdon, the trustees of the will 
of Lady Sanderson, by way of settlement, the purchase being effected 
pursuant to the terms of her will. 

Of the estate purchased, the Rev. Francis Astry was entitled to three- 
eighths and Richard Ray, of Haughley, to the remainder. By deed dated 2Oth 
Sept. 1757, Richard Ray purchased the share and interest of Dr. Astry in 
consideration of an annuity of 375 and a bond was given for the payment. 
Dr. Astry died 3Oth Oct. 1766, when, of course, the annuity ceased. Richard 
Ray was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, was a member of Lincoln's 
Inn and a Bencher, and married Elizabeth, only surviving child and heir of 
John Lock, of Mildenhall, by Elizabeth, daughter and heir of William 
Dixon, citizen and mercer of London, and dying i6th Feb. 1811, was buried 
at Haughley the 23rd of the same month. His widow Elizabeth died 2ist 
June, 1815, and was buried at Haughley 28th June following. Richard 
Ray left an only daughter and heir surviving, and she married Charles Tyrell, 
of Gipping, and Plashwood, son of the Rev. Charles Tyrell, of Gipping and 
Thurston, by Elizabeth his wife. Charles Tyrell was High Sheriff of Suffolk 
1815, M.P. for the County 1830 and 1834, an d died 2nd Jan. 1872. 

From this time to the present the manor has descended in the same 
course as the Manor of Gipping, in this Hundred. 

Arms of ALSTON : Az. ten etoiles Or, 4, 3, 2, i. 

Arms of DEVEREUX : Arg., a fessc Gu., in chief three torteaux. 

E I 



226 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF ROCKYLLS. 

This is probably the " Shcnelaunds Manor " included in a fine of 
Drinkstone and Felsham Manors levied in 1314 by Thomas de Loveyn and 
Joan his wife against Matthew, parson of Drinkstone church, and Richard 
de Dunmosore, parson of Parva Erstangg church. 1 In the early part of 
the I5th century the manor belonged to the Bures family, and in the time 
of Hen. VI. there are several Chancery actions relating to it. The first in 
1444 was by Richard, son of William Burys, against Roger Dancourt or 
Deyncourt and John Felde, feoffees for Richard and Margaret Felde 
deceased. 1 Another action was by William Bures against Roger " Den- 
court " and John Felde feoffees. 5 

In 1460 Alice, daughter and heir of wife of Charles 

Nowell, by her will dated 1460 gave this manor to her husband for life, and 
afterwards to be sold for the benefit of her two daughters, Margerie and 
Agnes. Sir Robert Drury, Knt., appears to have acquired a fourth of a 
moiety of the manor by virtue of a fine levied in 1521 by him against 
William Norman and Katherine his wife. 4 Sir Robert seems subsequently 
to have acquired the other shares, and to have died seised 2nd March, 
1535-6,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William Drury, 6 
who died in 1557. Later it appears vested in Sir Robert Drury, from 
whom it was acquired in 1564 by Drugo Drury, 7 who the same year parted 
with it to John Webbe. 8 

From John Webbe 9 the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Webb, 
and on his death in 1 602 devolved on his son and heir, J ohn Webb, and amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth this same year 
we find an action by John Webb, an infant, described as son and heir of 
Robert Webb, against Thomas Spinke, sen., Thomas Spinke, jun., and 
Richard and George Barker to redeem freehold land in Shetland. 10 In 1609 
William Cropley was lord. He died about 1635, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Thomas Cropley, who married Margaret, daughter of 
Richard Prctyman, of Bacton,"and died gth April 1659, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, William Cropley. He married 1st Elizabeth, 
daughter and heir of Arthur Donee or Dom, of Dallinghoo, and 2ndly 
Katherine, daughter of Sir Charles Harbord, Knt., and widow of Thomas 
Wright, of Kelverstone, in Norfolk. 

William had two sons and a daughter by his ist wife, and a son by his 
2nd marriage. From the time of William Cropley to the present the manor 
has passed in the same course as the main Manor of Shelland. 

Arms of CROPLEY (a grant is made I2th May, 1633) : Parted per 
Pale, Gu. and Arg. 3 owles of the 2nd. 



1 Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 37. 8 Fine, Mich. 6 Eliz. 

"23 Hen. VI. E.C.P. Bundle 13, 165; see 9 The manor is apparently included in the 

Bundle 1519. I. P.M. of Sir Richard Gresham, who 

3 E.C.P. Bundle 16, 188. died 2ist Feb. 1548, leaving Sir 

'Fine, Easter, 13 Hen. VIII. John Gresham his son and heir. 

'I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24. I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 77. 

See Manor of Hawstead, in Thingoe IO C.P. iii. 295. 

Hundred. " She died loth Feb. 1676, aged 63, and is 

7 Fine, Hil. 6 Eliz. buried at Shelland. 




STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 227 

STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 

OT only under the heading Stowmarket but also under the 
heading Thorney we find the following entries as to the lands 
of the King in the keeping of Roger Bigot : 

i. At Thorney King William holds what King Edward 
held as a manor, and as 5 carucates of land. Always 36 
villeins, and 18 bordars. Then 6 serfs, later i, now none. 
Then and later i ploughteam in demesne, now none ; but 
in King Edward's time, there could have been 2 besides that i. Then 
and later 45 ploughteams belonging to the men, now 19. Then wood for 
30 hogs, now for 6. Then 14 acres of meadow, later and now 12. Then 
2 mills, later and now i. (At Thorney) also there is a market. There was 
in King Edward's time a church with one carucate of free land. But 
Hugh de Montfort has 23 acres of that carucate and claims it as belonging 
to a certain chapel which 4 brothers, freemen under Hugh, built on land 
of their own hard by the cemetery of the mother church. And they were 
settled out of the parish of the mother church, because it could not take 
in the whole of the parish. The mother church had always a moiety of 
the burial fees, and had by purchase the fourth part of other alms-offering 
which might be made. And whether or not this chapel were consecrated 
the Hundred doth not know. In this carucate of the church there were 
5 bordars and i villein. Always 2 ploughteams. In the manor there were 
in King Edward's time 40 socmen owing every kind of custom. After 
Roger received (his office) they were all removed but 7. These always 
had 58 acres, and half a ploughteam. But in King Edward's time there 
was a ploughteam among 4. But the bailiff of this manor held 26 acres 
in the King's soc in King Edward's time. When this manor was undivided 
its annual value was 15 by tale, 1 when Roger took it over 35, now 40 of 
silver. 2 Thorney is i league long and i broad. And (pays) 15^. in gelt, whoso 
may be tenant there. Of this manor Hugh de Montfort has 20 socmen, and 
Earl Robert 6. Roger de Otburville 4. Frodo has 2. Roger de Poictou 3. 

The second entry is as follows : Among the lands of Roger de Poictou: 
In Thorney a freeman under King Edward with soc and sac and after 
King William came in like manner, and Norman received (the freeman) 
from this manor without livery of seisin, and afterwards Gerald held him, 
after Gerald Roger de Poictou had 60 acres. Then i ploughteam, and 
later half a team, now i ox. Then valued at ios., now it scarce renders 55. 

The third among the same lands is as follows : In Thorney are 34 
acres and i bordar, and they belong to Stonham Hall. 

The third entry is among the lands of Hugh de Montfort. In Chilton 
and in Thorston (?) Hugh holds in demesne by livery of seisin as he says 
16 soc-men who used to belong to Thorney. King Edward's manor with 
every (sort of) custom as the Hundred testifies, and they had I carucate 
of land and 7 bordars. Then and later 4 ploughteams among them all, 
now 3 teams, and 6 acres of meadow. Then and later valued at 505. now 
at 305. The whole is 4 quarentenes long and 3 broad. And (pays) 8^. in 
gelt. And all these freemen with commendation and soc were delivered 
so all Hugh's men say as 2 manors with 5 carucates of land. 

The fourth entry among these lands of Hugh de Montfort : In Thorney 
Roger de Chandos holds i carucate of land of Hugh, which was demesne 

' Or about 675 per annum. "About 1,800. 



228 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

land in the King's manor and jurisdiction in King Edward's time, but it 
was delivered as i carucate of land. -This land Ralph the Staller had in 
pawn from Toli the Sheriff as the Hundred heard say ; but the Court neither 
saw the writs nor the King's officer made livery of seisin, and (Ralph) 
held on the day of King Edward's death ; and later Ralph his son. And 
he has 4 villeins and 3 bordars, and 2 serts. Then 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, now I. Always 2 ploughteams belonging to the men. And 4 
acres of meadow. And I mill, wood lor 4 hogs. Now 10 hogs. And 30 
sheep. Always valued at 6os. 

And in the same (township) the said (Roger) holds 2 freemen having 
20 acres. Then and later i ploughteam, now half a team. Valued at 40^. 
-This is by the exchange. 

The fifth entry is among the lands of Hervey de Berri : In Thorney 
Evan holds of Hervey I carucate of land which Brictric Black held under 
\\ itgar the fore-goer of Richard de Clare and he might not sell without 
his licence. Now Hervey holds (it) by the King's gift. Then 6 bordars, 
later and now 3. Then 2 ploughteams, later none, and now I team. And 
4 acres of meadow. Then 2 ploughteams belonging to the men, later and 
now none. Then valued at 315. now at 47$. The King and the Earl have 
soc. 

The Manor of Thorney possessed also land and tenants in some of 
the neighbouring parishes. From Ultun or up-hill or up-town, being much 
smaller than its extent now, from the Thorney Green still retaining its name 
as attached to Thorney, and the extent now corresponding with what it 
was then, Mr. Hollingsworth concluded that Torne Manor or parish then 
embraced the land from the boundary of Finborough to Thorney Green in 
length, and from the mill on the river to the bounds of Newton and the 
other parishes in breadth. 

The parish or hamlet of Eruestuna, or Torstuna, was probably Totshill 
joining unto Chilton, and these two hamlets are mentioned together as 
forming the N.W. boundary of the Royal Manor. Tun in Saxon is town, 
and dun is hill. Thorshill is easily corrupted into Tots-hill, and Chiltun 
or Chilton retains its original name. The length and breadth of these 
two hamlets, as stated in Domesday, will then correspond with what they 
are now. Thor's hill is also a name of easy derivation, because it is from 
thence in coming on the North road you first catch sight of the market of 
Stow, or Thorna, as it was then called. 

The other places in which we find description of lands in the Survey 
belonging to Stowmarket are Chilton, Erveston al. Torstun al. Tot's Hill, 
a hamlet by Stowmarket, and Ultuna al. Upland. As to Chilton, amongst 
the lands of the Abbot of Ely specified in the Domesday Survey was a small 
holding here of 36 acres held by 2 socmen (who had no power to sell without 
licence of the abbot) and I bordar. In Saxon times there was I plough- 
team and half an acre of meadow, but at the time of the Survey the plough- 
team had disappeared. The value was 55.' Hugh de Montfort also held 
an estate in Chilton and Thorston in demesne by livery according to his 
own account. It consisted of a carucate of land, 7 bordars, 3 ploughteams, 
and 6 acres of meadow, valued at 305. It had formerly been held by 16 
socmen who used to belong to Thorney, King Edward's Manor, with every 
sort of custom as the Hundred testified. In Saxon times and even later 

' Dom. ii. 382. 



STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 229 

there had been 4 ploughteams, and the value had been 505. The whole was 
4 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt 8d. All these freemen, 
with commendation and soc, were delivered, as Hugh's men said, as 

2 manors with 5 carucates of land. 1 

There is only one holding in Erveston, a hamlet by Stowmarket. It 
was held by Hugh de Montfort, and consisted of half a carucate of land 
within the jurisdiction of the King and Earl, 2 bordars, 3 ploughteams 
(which had been reduced to scarcely i at the time of the Survey), and 
4 acres of meadow. The value was formerly 205. reduced to half at the time 
of the Survey. There was a church with 10 acres of free land. The holding 
was 10 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt lod. whoever was 
tenant. It had formerly been held by 10 freemen under Goodmund, the 
predecessor of Hugh, by commendation only. 

Ultuna, a holding in this place, was enumerated amongst the lands of 
Hugh de Montfort, and consisted of half a carucate of land within the 
jurisdiction of the King and Earl, 13 acres, 3 bordars (which were reduced 
to one at the time of the Survey), i ploughteam, 4 acres of meadow, and i 
mill. Half was claimed by the Earl of Moretaigne, and the Survey states 
that the Hundred testified in his favour. The value was I2s. This estate 
had formerly been held in demesne by 3 freemen under Goodmund by 
commendation only.* 

There is an entry under Thorpe which also probably belongs to this 
place. It is amongst the lands of Hugh de Montfort, and consisted of i 
carucate of land within the jurisdiction of the King and Earl. There were 

3 ploughteams, reduced by the time of the Survey to i, and 3 acres of 
meadow, valued formerly at 305., but at the time of the Survey scarcely 
at IDS. This estate had been formerly held by 16 freemen under Hugh's 
predecessor by commendation only, and they had 2 bordars under them. 
It was 5 quarentenes long and 3 broad, and paid in a gelt Sd. whoever 
might be the tenant. 

MANOR OF STOWMARKET al. ABBOT'S HALL. 

This was granted by King Hen. II. to the abbey of St. Osyth in Essex, 
and the abbot had a grant of free warren here in 1268. 3 This abbey had 
its origin in a nunnery dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, erected by 
Ositha, daughter of King Frithwald, and married to Sighere, King of the East 
Saxons. She lived there as a religious person, but was martyred by the 
Danes in the year 653, in one of their bloody ravages. Before the year 
1118 Richard de Belmeis (or Rufus I. consecrated Bishop of London 25th 
July', 1108, died i6th January, 1128) built a house for canons in the same 
place, in honour of the same Apostles and Ositha, who was then canonised. 
The martyred queen now became Saint Osith, and the monastery was 
inhabited by canons of St. Augustine, who were considered the living 
memorials of her piety and martyrdom. When Hen. VIII. dissolved the 
monasteries this abbey was endowed with 677. is. 2d., of annual revenues, 
and its lands, possessions, advowsons, and buildings were granted first 
to Thomas, Lord Cromwell, and after his attainder the despoiling hand of 
Edward's government conveyed it with real estates in other places for 

'Dom. ii. 'Chart 'Rolls, 52 Hen. III. 6; 21 

"Dom. ii. Edw. III. 23. 



230 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1,500 to Sir Thos. Darcy, who was created a baron by the title of Lord 
Darcy, of Chick. 

The fortunes of the parish and its hamlets, as a Royal manor and borough, 
are closely bound up with the monastery for several hundred years. As 
early as the time of Henry I. the churches of St. Peter and St. Mary in Stowe, 
and one statement says of another, called St. Paul, were granted to the 
abbey of St. Osith.' This grant was confirmed by Hen. II., and again 
reconfirmed by Edward I. in 1290. Hen. II. gave the church of Stowmarket 
with all its chapels, lands, and all its rights and liberties, with soc, sac, 
thol, theam, and infangenthof, to the abbey (pro salute animae meae - 
Deo et Ecclesiae S.O. de Chicke, &c.) He also bestowed free warren in the 
lands of Birch and Stowmarket, with the privilege of hunting the hare and 
fox by two greyhounds and four beagles, with a prohibition against anyone 
sporting in their manors unless leave was first obtained of the abbot (et 
duos leporarius et quatuor brachetos ad capiendum leporem et vulpem, 
et nullus in eis fuget, nisi per licentiam eorum). He also transferred to them 
all his rights in bridges and highways, freed them from all military service, 
and only imposed the providing of one soldier in time of war from Birch. 
The abbot thus became the patron of the living, and the manorial right 
held by the King were granted at the same time. 

In the reign of Edw. II. a further grant of a water mill (de molendino 
aquatico) in Stowmarket to the abbey was made by the King. And having 
thus obtained the corn tithes, they now received the means of grinding 
them into bread. This mill, it is likely, is that situated at the bridge on 
entering the town from Ipswich, which belonged to the King, as 
lord of the town, and is very ancient. Disputes, however, now 
arose between Sir Amondeville, who claimed under the King a 
part of the manorial rights, and the abbey. The market rights were 
contested and exclusive possession of them asserted by both these 
parties. After several hearings before Edw. III. in 1348, it was 
solemnly determined that the abbot should enjoy the sole privilege 
of holding the fair and market with the town itself (apud Stow mercatum) 
which became the property of the abbey. This was confirmed and enlarged 
by Hen. IV. in 1405, who granted the Manor of Stowhall in Stowmarket 
(or Abbot's Hall thence called from the residence of the chief of the 
monastery) to the abbey of St. Osyth. And in their hands it continued 
till the dissolution of these establishments in 1538, when it was granted by 
the Crown, as we have said, and became the property of Sir Thomas Darcy, 
Knt. 

The ancient manorial rights of Thorney, which formerly extended 
at the Conquest as held by Edward the Confessor over both these parishes, 
were now divided. The Manor of Stowmarket was created out of the 
former, and the relics of both remain to this day.* 

In 1321-2 the Abbot of St. Osiths complained of the seizure of the 
manor by the Constables of Stow Hundred, and Parliament ordered the 
restoration. 5 

The particulars for the grant to Sir Thos. Darcy of the manor are 
referred to in the gth Rep. of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records. 4 

'10 Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iv. 451. 3 R. of P. i. 413. 

'Hollingsworth, Hist, of Stowmarket, p. 4 App. ii. p. 199. 
71, 72. 









STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 231 

They were prepared in 1546. -Sir Thomas Darcy had licence in 1556 to 
alienate the manor to Edward Gilbert and his heirs, and had licence in 1557 
in favour of John Howe, one of the wealthy clothiers of Stowmarket. The 
sale was effected by a fine levied in 1560.' John Howe died in 1586, when 
the manor passed to his cousin and heir, Richard Howe, who had licence 
to alien the manor to Peter Witherpole and Thomasine his wife, possibly, 
however, by way of a mortgage or settlement, 2 for we find subsequently a 
licence to Richard Howe, son and heir of the above Richard Howe, in 1608 
to alien to Sir John Poley, who with Richard Howe had licence to alien 
the manor to John Howe, son of Richard Howe. This John was called upon 
to show title to the manor in 1612. 3 

In 1610, however, the manor had passed to Richard Broke, who died 
in 1613, and from him it passed to his son and heir, Robert Broke, who was 
High Sheriff in 1623, and died 25th March, 1626. 4 Later we find the manor 
vested in Edward Lynch, of Ipswich, whose 2nd wife was Anne Moose. 
He died 2gth April, iy38, 5 when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
William Lynch, a captain in the Militia. He died 27th June, 1797, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir Henry, who died without issue gth 
Nov. 1806, when it devolved on his youngest brother, William Lynch. 
The manor subsequently vested in Mr. Marriott, and on his death went to 
his widow, and in 1836 was vested in John Edgar Rust. He married Ann 
Sarah, 3rd daughter of Thomas Rant, of Stowmarket, and died 3rd March, 
1840. The manor was offered for sale by auction 2ist Aug. 1840, being 
described as " The Manor of Stowmarket otherwise Abbot's Hall with 
the Court Leet and other manorial rights attached thereto. The quit rents 
amount to upwards of j a year, and with fines have averaged for the last 
6 years clear of all deductions 70 a year." 4 His widow survived until 
I4ih March, 1851, attaining the age of 84 years. His son, the Rev. Edgar 
Rust, was rector of Drinkstone, and married Anne Dioness, daughter and 
heir of the Rev. Nathaniel D'Eye, rector of Thrandeston, and had a son, 
Edgar D'Eye Rust, who died 3rd May, 1839, at the age of 16, in the life- 
time of his grandfather. In 1853 it was in the Rev. Richard Daniel, of 
Combs rectory, but has since passed to and is now vested in George 
Frederick Beaumont, of Coggeshall, in Essex. 

Rights of Thorney Manor are referred to in the Had. MSS. in the 
British Museum, 7 and Court Rolls, 20 Rich. II. are in the Public Record 
Office. 8 

Arms of RUST : Arg. a saltire Az. betw. 2 fasces in pale ppr. and as 
many crosses pattee fi tehee in fesse Gu. 

MANOR OF COLUMBINE HALL al. THORNEY COLUMBERS. 

This manor was anciently held by Philip de Columbus, from whom it 
derived its name. In 1514 it was held by H. Harwell and a little later 
belonged to James Tyrell, son of the Sir James Tyrell, of Gipping, who was 
beheaded in 1502," and on his death 7th Sept. 1538, passed to his son and 
heir, John Tyrell.' John Tyrell mortgaged the manor to Thomas Stam- 

' Fine, Easter, 2 Eliz. 5 Will 4th Dec. 1737. 

2 Fine, Easter, 28 Eliz. 6 Ipswich Journal, 8th Aug. 1840. 

'Memoranda Rolls, 10 Jac. I. Pas. Rec. r Harl. 4626. 

Rot. 226. 8 Portfolio 204, 21. 

4 See Manor of Brakes Hall, Nacton, in 'See Manor of Gipping, in this Hundred. 

Colneis Hundred. I0 1. P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 22. 



232 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

bridge who in 1559 sold the same to John Gardiner, 1 and a suit was 
instituted in the Court of Chancery in the time of Elizabeth by the purchaser, 
John Gardyner, against the mortgagor, John Tyrell, and Hunebamt Hales 
to establish the title to the manor and lands in Stowmarket, Newton, and 
Gipping. 1 John Gardyner and his wife Agnes certainly held in 1567, for 
the writer has a deed dated i8th March, 10 Eliz., by which they granted 
land in Thorney, parcel of this manor to William Keble, son of John Keble, 
of Stowmarket. In 1582 a fine was levied against the said John Gardiner 
and others by John Madyson. 3 In 1587 John Gardiner settled the manor 
by fine upon himself and Agnes his wife for their lives, with remainder 
to William Carey and his heirs male, and for want thereof to Robert Carey 
and his heirs male, and for want of such issue to their father in fee. In 
Carey's memoirs we read of a suit respecting this settlement : ' The cause 
was as followeth : There was an old gentleman in Suffolke, that had 
an old wife, his name was Gardiner." 4 " They were childless. This man 
in recompense of some favour my father had done him (after his own life 
and his wives') made an estate of a lordship of his called Columbine Hall, 
in Suffolk, to my brother William, and his heirs male, and for want thereof 
to me and my heires male, and for want thereof to my father and his heires 
for ever. 

" My brother marries, and by fraudulent means privately cutts me off 
from the intailes and by the consent of Gardiner and his wife, makes his 
own wife a jointure of this lordship. My brother died without children. 
Then it came out that this land was given in jointure to his wife. I com- 
menced suit of law with her, my eldest brother took her part, by reason that 
if she had prevailed, after her life the law had cast the land upon him. 
My sister-in-law and I had proceeded so farre in chauncery, that the cause 
was to be heard and decided that Michaelmas term at St. Alban's. Those 
that I put in trust to follow my law business wrote to me in plaine words, 
tnat neither they nor anybody else durst follow the cause, they were so 
bitterly threatened by my brother's agent, who did assure them my brother 
would be there himself, to see that his sister-in-law should have no wrong, 
and then they should see who durst appear to contradict him. 

" Thus did my brother by lu's power mean to overthrow my right in 
my absence, for hee assured himself I durst not come too neare the court 
having so lately offended the Queen, and most of my friends by my marriage. 
But he was deceived, for I having heard this by my servant, that I putt in 
trust to follow my businesse, I presently resolved to come to St. Alban's 
and to do my best to defend my own cause. I had not been there two days 
but in the lodging where I lay, my brother's man came in to take up a 
lodging for his master. I asked him were my brother was ? He told me 
he was within two miles of the towne and was come expressly out of the 
Isle of Wight for no other cause but a businesse in law, wherein he made 
sure account to overthrow his adversary that terme, but against whom it 
was hee knew not. Hee took horse againe, after hee had provided a lodging 
to meet his master. Hee mett him not a mile from the towne and told him 
that hee had found mee there, and that I lay in the same house that hee 
was to lye in. My brother at this newes was much troubled, and stood 
musing with himself a good space, at last of a sudaine he turned his horse's 

1 Fine, Trin. i Eliz. 4 The Gardiners appear in all the Stow 

J C.P. i. 381. papers for a series of years, and 

3 Fine, Mich. 24-25 Eliz. took an active interest in the affairs 

of both parishes. 



STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 233 

head, and came not at all to St. Alban's, but went to Windsor, and trusted 
others to follow the cause. My cause was so just that I ended the businesse 
that terme, overthrew my sister's jointure and had the land settled as it 
was in statu quo prius.'" 

The action was by Sir Robert Carey against John Gardiner and Agnes 
his wife, Martha Carey, and Sir George Carey, and will be found amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth. 2 

Carey made an effort at this time to regain the Queen's favour by 
appearing in a tournament as the forsaken knight. His outfit cost him 
for horse, armour, &c., 400. But it was unsuccessful. He was, however, 
fortunate in regaining her favour at another period. Hollingsworth says : 
" Mr. Gardiner died in 1562 and his wife in 1565," and he cites from the 
Parish Registers, but for all this it seems doubtful. The manor vested in 
Robert Carey, afterwards Duke of Monmouth. 

There are five other actions respecting this manor in the time of 
Elizabeth Thomas Tyrell and Thomas Stanbridge and another and Anne 
Tyrell v. the same defendants as the last action, 3 and Thomas Standbrigge 
(sic) v. Thomas Hales. 4 John Keble and others v. John Gardener touching 
copyholds of the manor, 5 and Henry Keble v. John Gardner and another. 6 
There is yet a 6th action, but it relates to parcel of a manor only, and is 
between Henry Smithe and John Maslyne. 7 

We also meet with four fines levied of the manor in the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, (i) In 1587 by Sir Edmund Carey and others against William 
Carey and others ; 8 (2) in 1589 by David Bullevard and others against 
William Carey and others ;' (3) in 1590 by Sir John Heigham and others 
against William Carey and others ;' (4) in 1602 by W. Josey against Sir 
Robert Carey and others." 

Some years after, during the reign of Chas. I., this ancient manor-house 
with its moat and substantial red-brick walls, its venerable oak trees, and 
peaceful meadows, became the property of Sir John Poley/ 2 and continued 
in that family for many years. Its moated enclosures, a good part of the 
original house, and some very fine oak trees still remain in excellent 
preservation. 

Sir John Poley, of Columbine Hall, was son of Edmund Poley, by 
Jane, daughter of Thomas Grove, which Edmund was a younger brother 
of John Poley, of Badley. He was knighted in Ireland by Robert Devereux, 
the second of that surname, Earl of Essex. He married Ursala, the youngest 
daughter and coheir of Sir John Gilbert, of Great Finborough, Knt., by 
whom he had an only child, Henry Poley, who died without issue. In the 
latter part of his life Sir John erected a house in Stowmarket, and removing 
from Columbine Hall made it his residence. On his death without leaving 
issue the manor passed apparently to his cousin, Edmund Poley, of Badley, 
son of Sir John's father's brother, John Poley, and then in the same course 
as the manor of Badley, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. In the middle 

'Hollingsworth, Hist, of Stowmarket, p. 'Fine, Mich. 29-30 Eliz. 

127. 'Fine, Easter, 31 Eliz. 

2 C.P. i., 216. IO Fine, Easter, 32 Eliz. 

3 C.P. ser. ii., B. clxxix. la, B. clxxxi-4. " Fine, Trin. 44 Eliz. 

4 Ib. B. clx. 15. " For family, see Badley Manor, in Bosmere 

5 C.P., ser. ii., B. cvi. 13. and Claydon Hundred, and Box- 

6 Ib. B. cviii. 5. stead Hall Manor, Boxstead, in 

7 C.P., ser. ii., B. clx. 35. Babergh Hundred. 

F I 



234 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the i8th century the manor was vested in Ambrose, eldest son of John 
Crawley.who died seised in 1754 without issue, when it passed to his sister 
and coheir Theodosia, married to Charles Boone, and Elizabeth married 
to John, 2nd Earl of Ashburnham, ist Lord of the Bedchamber and Groom 
of the Stole to Geo. III. 

From this time to the present the manor has passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Combs, in this Hundred, and Badley, in Bosmere and 
Claydon Hundred, and is now vested in the Earl of Ashburnham. 

MANOR OF THORNEY HALL (? MOUNDEVILLE'S). 

This was the Royal manor of the King, and was given by Hen. II. 
to Richard de Lucy. Somewhat later we find it the lordship of Robert 
Brito, and in the time of Edw. I. held by William le Bretun and Robt. de 
Mounteny, and the heirs of Richard de Munfichet and John Odinel de 
Umfravile.' In 1287 Nicholai, daughter and coheir of William le Bretun, 
had this manor for her share. She married ist Robert de Maundeville 
or Amoundeville, and 2ndly Roger de Huntingfield. 

Roger de Huntingfield and Nicolai his wife claimed view of frankpledge, 
gallows, and assize of bread and beer here in the time of Edw. I. 1 

In 1288 we meet with a fine of the manor levied by Joan de Hunting- 
field against Roger de Huntingfeud and Nicholai his wife. 3 

In 1316 the manor was held by Sir Richard Amoundeville or Mandevill 
and Elizabeth his wife, passing from the former to the latter in 1322,* and 
in 1332 to their son and heir, Richard de Amoundeville, who had a grant of 
a fair and market here in 1338.' A market existed in this town at a very 
early period, and is the only one connected with Stow Hundred mentioned 
in Domesday. The right to the market appears to have been never dis- 
puted, and to have remained in the abbot, who received from the King's 
grant the principal manor, until Sir Richard de Amoundeville claimed the 
fair and market in this town. The abbot presented a petition to Parliament 
of which the following is the entry on the Rolls : 

" An're Seignour le Roi and a son Conseil monstre 1'Abbe de Seint Osith, 
q come il tient le Manoir de Stowmarket, en le Counte de Suff* , ove les 
appurtenances, en franche Almoigne, desdons and confermentez des 
Auncestres nre dit Seignour le Roi q'U avoit le dit Manoir de Stowemarket, 
la ou il n'avoit unqs Manoir ; and p tiele fause suggestion purchacea de 
nre dit Seignour le Roi chre, and Faire, and Marchee en fon Manoir de 
Stowmarket, lequel Marche il on fon temps p force and maintenance tient 
en le foil du dit Abbe deinz son Manoir avant dite la au il n'avoit riens a 
laire, and Richard son fitz and heir uncore fait continuance de mesme le 
tort. Dont il prie Brief, de faire garnir le_dit Richard fitz Richard de venir 
en Court, and monstrer purquoi la dite Chre issint p fauce suggestion en 
deceite de la Court and pjudice and desheriteson du dit Abbe purchace, ne 
dort etre repellez. 

Eit Brief en la Chauncellerie, de garnir le dit Richard q'il foit enjmesme 
la Chancellarie a certein jour, a monstrer illoeqs purjuoi la dite Chre ne 
doit estre repelle, and q'il eit ove lui adonqs mesme la Chre." 



T. de N. 295. 'I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 26. 

"Q-W. 730, 732 ; see H.R. ii. 191. 'Chart. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. 8. 

s Feet of Fines, 16 Edw. I. 4. 



STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 235 

The cause was pleaded at Westminster. The abbot showed that he 
held the original market rights, in right of the Manor of Thorney (in pure 
Eleemosyna) and had therefore priority of possession. Amoundeville 
asserted that the abbot was only rector, and not lord. The suit determined 
in favour of the abbot. Richard de Amoundeville died about 1350, and 
the manor seems to have passed to his daughter and heir Margery, married 
to Nicholas Fastolf. 1 

In 1347 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by - - against 
Edmund de Shelton, parson of Combs church, and John Spakkyng, chaplain/ 
and in 1350 by Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and Edmund his brother, 
and Adam Scakelthorp, parson of Causton church, against William de 
Middleton and Isabella his wife, not only of Thorney Manor but of heredita- 
ments in Stowmarket, Haughley, Old Newton, Gipping, Newton, Creting, 
and Combs. 3 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Edward Ufford, Earl of 
Suffolk, who died 4th May, 1513, it being then stated to be held of the 
King by fealty, and of the value of 9 per annum. 4 But it seems that the 
Earl had by indenture 12 Hen. VII. granted the manor in fee to Sir Robert 
Drury, Sir John Heydon, and Edmund Galgett, and others ; for in 1513 
we find amongst the State Papers a commission issued to make inquisition 
to statements to that effect made on petition of the grantees. 5 

A recovery of the Manor of " Mundeville " in 1537-8 is mentioned in 
the Egerton MSS. in the British Museum. 6 

The manor was apparently in 1537 vested in Thomas Woodhouse, 
for this year a fine was levied of it against him by William Woodhouse and 
others. 7 The manor then passed to Francis Framlingham, who died 
seised of it 2Oth Sept. 1544." The manor subsequently vested in Henry 
Reppes, being held of Sir John Tyrell, Knt., as of the Manor of Ipswich, 
and of the value of 10. Henry Reppes was of Mendham, and appears to 
have been the son of Henry Reppes and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of 
Sir John Jermy, of Metfield, which Henry was son of Henry Reppes, of 
Thorpe Market, co. Norf., and Anne his wife, daughter of Richard Holdiche, 
of Ranworth and Didlington, co. Norf., which Henry was son of Sir Henry 
Reppes, Knt., and Joan his wife, daughter of Sir John Fastolf, which Sir 
Henry was son of Sir John Reppes living in 1373, son of Nicholas Reppes 
and Agnes his wife, which Nicholas was the son of Sir Robert Reppes, 
valet to Sir John de Warren, Earl of Surrey, 22 Edw. II., and of Sibile his 
wife, daughter and coheir of Laurence Reppes and Joan his wife, which Sir 
Robert was the son of Ralph, son of Bartholomew, son of Sir Robert de 
Reppes, son of Bartholomew, son of Ralph de Reppes, who lived 
in the time of William the Conqueror. Henry Reppes married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Grimston, of Rishangles, and died 
seised of the manor 26th March, 1557, when it passed to his grandson, 
John Reppes, son and heir of Francis, who had died in his father's lifetime, 
and of Catherine, Francis's wife, daughter of Thomas Lemman, of W r alpole. 9 

John Reppes married ist Margaret, daughter and coheir of Henry 
Smith, and 2ndly Thomasine, daughter of Thomas Derham, and died 25th 

'See Manor of Okenhill Hall, Badingham, 5 S.P. 5 Hen. VIII. 4254. 

in Hoxne Hundred. 6 Eger. 2713. 

2 Feet of Fines, 21 Edw. III. 13. 'Fine, Mich. 29 Hen. VIII. 

3 Sir John le Fitz Wanter App. clam. (Feet 8 1.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 92. 

of Fines, 24 Edw. III. 16.) 9 I.P.M., 5 and 6 Ph. and M. 48. 
4 I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. i. 



236 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

March, 1561, leaving a son, Henry Reppes. He married ist Dorothy, 
daughter of Sir Christopher Jermy, of Cressingham, Norf., and 2ndly 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Francis Lovell, of Harling, Norf. It is stated 
that in 1572 Bassingbourne Gawdy, who had married " Anne late wife of 
Henry Reppes," was lord, and this we are unable to explain, for the manor 
seems to have passed to Henry's son, John Reppes, who married ist Anne, 
daughter of Sir Henry Wooton, and 2ndly Mary, daughter of Richard 
Lambert, and had a son Henry who married Ann Cotterell, and died in 
1628. This Ann, a widow (if she did not die in her husband's lifetime) 
in 1628, could not have given title to a 2nd husband in 1577, and the 
evidence of John Reppes holding in 1577 is a fine levied against him this 
year by James Hartestong and others. 1 In 1591 we meet with another 
levied by William Tyffyn and others against John Gardiner and others.* 
In 1655 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Bendish, Knt., and in 1668 
in Robert Jacob. 

In 1808 the manor was vested in Charles Tyrell, of Gipping. The 
custom of the Manor of Thorney Hall is gavelkind according to a note in 
the writer's possession made by the steward there in 1739. 

Arms of REPPES : Erm. 3 chevrons Sa. 

MANOR OF THORNEY CAMPSEY. 

This manor was given at an early date to the Abbess of Campsey, and 
it remained in the abbey until the Dissolution, when it vested in the Crown, 
and was granted by King Hen. VIII. in 1545 to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, 
who the same year had licence to alien it to Robert Downes. Particulars 
for the grant to the Duke of Norfolk are referred to in the loth Report of 
the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records. 3 Robert Downes died seised 
of the manor 26th Feb. 1547,* when it passed to his son and heir, Francis 
Downes. It then seems to have been acquired by Lionel Talmash, for he 
died seised of the manor 25th June, 1552, when it passed to his son and heir, 
Lionel Talmash. 5 

Ten years later we find the manor vested in Stephen Keble, of Earl 
Stonham, son of Gregory Keble, of Earl Stonham, and Joan his wife, 
daughter of Robert Harlewyn, of Ash next Campsey, and amongst the 
Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth, is an action respecting 
this manor by Robert Baldrey and Thomas Kebell, against the said Stephen 
Kebell or Keble. 6 Stephen Keble had licence to alien in 1595 to John 
Gibson and others, probably by way of settlement, for we find that Richard 
Keble and Elizabeth his wife had licence the same year to alien to Nicholas 
Turner, and this last licence was effectuated by a fine levied the same year 
by the said Nicholas Turner against Richard Keble and others. 7 Nicholas 
Turner had licence to alien in 1598 to Sir Stephen Soame, Knt. He died 
23rd May, 1619, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William 
Soame, 8 Knt., Sheriff of Suffolk 1632, who died in 1655. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in William Villiers, Earl of Jersey, who 
died 28th Aug. 1769. It was subsequently vested in John Bailey Tailor, 
who died about 1817, when the manor was sold. 

1 Fine, Mich. 19-20 Eliz. 'See Manor of Helmingham Hall, Hel- 

* Fine, Trin. 33 Eliz. mingham, in Bosmere and Claydon 

3 App. ii. p. 242. Hundred ; I. P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 64. 

4 I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 62. C.P., ser. ii. B. vii. 37. 

7 Fine, Mich. 37-38 Eli/,. 

8 See Little Thurlow, in Kisbridge Hundred 



STOWMARKET AND STOWUPLAND. 237 

The next lord was Charles Tyrell. 

Arms of VILLIERS : Arg. on a cross Gu. 5 escallops Or. 

MANOR OF THORNEY KEBLES. 
(Probably same as Thorney Campsey.) 

Of this manor Sir Stephen Soame, Knt., died seised in 1619, when it 
passed to his son and heir, William Soame, and John Bailey Tailor, who 
died in 1816, appears to have been lord, but we have no further information 
respecting it. 

MANOR OF CLEMENT'S. 

This seems to have belonged to the Clement family, and Richard 
Clement held it in the time of Edw. III. 

In 1338 a fine was levied of the manor under the title " Thorney 
Manor," by Robert le Hotot and Anici or Avice his wife against Richard 
Clement.' 

On the death of Robert " Hotot " or Houtot we find in 1345 an entry 
on the Patent Rolls to the effect that the manor was held by Avice late his 
wife, and had been held by the said Robert in chief, when it was granted in 
fee to Richard Clement, who regranted the same to the said Robert and 
Avice in tail. 

It was found by inquisition that the manor (5 acres excepted) was held 
of the Bishop of Norwich of the Manor of Battisford, by the service of 405. 
a year, and by another service of IDS. paid to the Bishop for the said manor 
at the castle of Dover, and the 5 acres were held 3 of the Abbot of Lesnes, 
one of Richard de Mundevill, and one of John de Mounteneye by divers 



services." 



James Tyrell died seised of the manor 7th Sept. 1538, when it passed 
to his son and heir, John Tyrell. 3 

MANOR OF CARBON'S. 

All we gather of this manor is that it belonged to James Tyrell, who 
died 7th Sept. 1538, and that it then passed to his son and heir, John 
Tyrell. 4 

MANOR OF THORNEY LIZON'S AND LIESNES. 

In 1543 Robert Downes held this manor, and died seised of it 26th 
Feb. 1547, 5 when it passed to his son and heir, Francis Downes, who had 
licence shortly afterwards to alien to Robert Staunto (?), who in 1555 
sold it to John Keble, son and heir of Robert Keble, of Stowmarket. John 
married Elizabeth, daughter of John King, and is said to have sold the 
manor to Giles Keble. Of course this is possible, but Giles Keble, who 
was of Old Newton, was the 2nd son of John, and was probably better off 
than his father, for he had married Anne, sister and coheir of Jeffrey Went, 

1 Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. III. 37. 4 I.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 22. See Manor of 
*Pat. Rolls (4th May, 1345), 19 Edw. III. Columbine Hall, in Stowmarket, in 

pt. i."i3<*. ; see I. P.M., 20 Edw. III. this Hundred. 

(2nd nos.) 55. ' I.P.M., 2 Edw. VI. 62. 
3 I.P.M.,32Hen. VIII. 22. 



238 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Woodbridge. In 1576 we find the manor vested in this Jeffrey Went 
and Robert Keble, probably as trustees, and on them a claim was made 
by the Crown for forfeiture. 1 This same year a fine was levied against 
Giles Keble and others by Geoffrey Wente and others. 1 Giles Keble 
had licence to alien, and sold in 1606 to Robert Broke. He died in 1626, 
from which time the manor devolved in the Broke family in the same 
course as the Manor of Brokes Hall, Nacton, in Colneis Hundred, certainly 
until the death of Robert Broke in 1714. The manor was in 1749 vested 
in William, Earl of Jersey, who held a court by Edmund Tyrell, his steward, 
the 22nd Dec. this year. In 1835 the manor was vested in Edward Beck. 

The customs of this manor will be found on the Kent Rolls in the 
Bodleian, 3 and the Court Rolls of the manor from i Hen. VII. to 7 Hen. 
VII. amongst the same Rolls. 4 

For Particulars of farms and rents in this place see grant to John 
Eyre. 5 

Arms of KEBLE : Barry nebulae of six Argent and Sable, a canton 
Gules. 

MANOR OF THORNEY MUMPLIERS WITH BRAZIERS. 

The manor in the time of Queen Elizabeth was styled Brasiers al. 
Thorney Momplers. It was in 1626 vested in Robert Brooke, who 5th April 
this year held a court for the manor by Robert Hamby, his steward, and 
the manor probably descended in a like course with the Manor of Thorney 
Lizon's, for in 1750, like that manor, we find it vested in William, Earl of 
Jersey, who held a court by Edmund Tyrell, his steward, 2ist Dec. that 
year, and again I4th Feb. 1752. 






1 Memoranda, 18 Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 147. 4 Roll 3. 

'Fine, Easter, 18 Eliz. '35 or 36 Hen. VIII. ; D.K.R. 9 App. ii. 

3 Roll 4. p. 207. 



WETHERDEN. 239 

WETHERDEN. 




MONG the lands of Hugh de Montfort was an estate in this 
place. It consisted of 2 carucates of land within the juris- 
diction of the King and Earl, formerly held by 17 freemen 
in demesne under Goodmund, the predecessor of Hugh, by 
commendation only. There were 10 bordars, 5 ploughteams 
(which later decreased to 4, but by the time of the Survey 
had increased again to 8), wood sufficient to support 4 hogs, 
and 6 acres of meadow. Also half a church living with 15 acres of free 
land and i acre of meadow. The value was formerly 505., reduced to 405. 
at the time of the Survey. It was I league long and half a league broad, 
and paid in a gelt 25^., whoever was the tenant. 1 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds had in Wetherden 20 freemen in the 
Confessor's time, holding 2 carucates of land, with 5 ploughteams. There 
were also 8 acres of meadow and half a church living, with 15 acres and 
i acre of meadow. At the time of the Survey the lands remained with 
the abbot as tenant in chief, but half a carucate was held of him by Ralph 
and 40 acres byErnulf. There were then 13 bordars and 7 ploughteams, 
and the value was 405., as against 305. in Saxon times." 

Another estate here was that of Walter the Deacon, and consisted of 
5 acres valued at 12^., formerly belonging to a freeman within the juris- 
diction of the Hundred. 3 

Another small estate here belonged to Walter the Deacon, and appears 
under the head Weledana. It consisted of 15 acres of land belonging to 
William, a freeman, and 2 acres of meadow. It had been formerly valued 
at 2os., but at the time of the Survey its value had decreased to 55. This 
land Theodric, the predecessor of Walter the Deacon, had without livery 
of seisin as the Hundred testified. The soc and sac belonged to the King 
and Earl." 

MANOR OF WETHERDEN HALL. 

The first lord after the Domesday tenant in chief we meet with is 
Hubert de Burgh, but in the time of Hen. II. the ancient family of Scalariis 
or De Scales held the lordship. Roger de Scales had the manor in this reign, 
and on his death it passed to his son and heir Robert, who by a fine levied 
in 1198 granted to the abbey of St. Edmunds the advowson of this parish 
church or rather a moiety of the advowson. Roger de Scales, son and heir 
of this Robert, paid 59 for scutage in 1211, and in 1219 a fine was levied 
between Maud, wife of William de Beauchamp, late wife of the said Roger, 
and Robert their son, of property at Middleton, in Norfolk, and two marks 
rent in this parish, claimed as dower. Roger died about 1219, and his son, 
Robert de Scales died about 1275, leaving issue by Muriel his wife, a son and 
heir, Robert de Scales, who in 1276 being in the expedition then made into 
Wales had scutage of all his tenants who held their lands by military service ; 
after this he took part in several expeditions into France and Scotland. 
Robert was summoned to Parliament as Lord Scales, and held the manor 
of the Honor of Hagoneth (or Haughley) Castle. 5 In 1290 Robert de Scales 
obtained a grant of free warren here, and in 1297 he held one knight's fee 

'Dom. ii. 408, 409. 4 Dom. ii. 426. 

2 Dom. ii. 360. 5 T. de N. 290 ; H.R. ii. 192 ; Q.W. 721. 

3 Dom. ii. 427. 



240 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

in this parish in capitf. He died in 1305, and from this time to the time of 
Elizabeth, only surviving child of Thomas de Scales, 7th Baron, who died 
in 1460, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Worlingham 
Scales, in Lackford Hundred. 

There is an order on the Close Rolls in 1314 to the escheator not to 
intermeddle with Wetherden Manor, taken into the King's hands for tres- 
pass by Robert de Scales, father of Ralph de Scales, who at the time of the 
order held it, it having been acquired by Robert de Scales in the time of 
Hen. III. as of the Honor of Boulogne. 1 And we find on the Close Rolls 
in 1325 an order to deliver to Egelina, late wife of Robert de Scales, in 
dower a fee in Wetherden which Ralph de Scales held, of the yearly value 
of 10.' 

The manor then became vested in Sir John Sulyard, Lord Chief Justice. 
He seems to have acquired the manor in 1463 by virtue of a fine levied this 
year against Walter Bradley and Joan his wife. 3 Sir John Sulyard had a 
grant of free warren here in 1468, and the estate he held here appears to 
have been that formerly belonging to Roger de Scales, for the form which 
is given on the Patent Rolls is " confirmation to John Sulyard, then seised 
of the undermentioned warren and tenant of the lands, of a charter granting 
to Roger de Scales that he and his heirs should have full warren in 
all their demesne lands of Wetherden." 4 A fine was levied against 
him of the manor in 1575 by Sir Thomas Cornwallis and others, no doubt 
on some settlement of the estate. 5 He married ist Anne, daughter and heir 
of John Humgate, and 2ndly Anne, daughter and coheir of John Andrews, 
of Baylham, and dying i8th March, 1487, the manor passed to his eldest 
son, Andrew Sulyard, by his 2nd wife, for it had been settled and stood 
limited to Sir John Sulyard and Anne his wife, who survived, and the heirs 
of their bodies, with remainder to the heirs of his body, with remainder to 
his right heirs. 6 The manor was then worth 10, and was held by John, 
Earl of Oxford, and William Tyndale, by quarter of a knight's fee. From 
the time of Andrew Sulyard to the time of Edward Sulyard, who died in 
1797, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Haughley, in 
this Hundred. 

In 1596 a fine was levied of this manor, and also that of Pulham Hall, 
by Sir Thomas Cornwallis and others (no doubt trustees of Sir Edward 
Sulyard's settlement of 1575) against Edward Sulyard and others, this 
Edward Sulyard no doubt being the heir-at-law of the settlor Sir Edward. 7 

The following is a rental for the manor in 1750 when belonging to 
Edward Sulyard, then held with Pulham Hall : 

A Rental of the Rents payable to the Manor of Wetherden Hall with 
Pulham Hall in Wetherden for one whole year ending at Michas. 1750 : 

s. d. 

Ambrose Kedington, in Trust for Arthur Heigham, Esq., per 

George Osborne .. .. .. .. .. .. ..027 

more tor Free Lands .. .. .. .. ..116 

Mr. Abraham Cocksedge, late Underwood's, per Thomas Bum- 
stead .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..038 

'Close Rolls, 7 Edw. II.3 ; I.g.D. 8 Edw. 5 Fine, Mich. 17-18 Eliz. 

II. File 101-10. 'I.P.M., 4 Hen. VII. 439, which finds that 
'Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 33. Edward, aged 28, is son and heir 

3 Feet of Fines, 3 Edw. IV. 4. of Sir John. 

4 Pat. Rolls, 8 Edw. IV. iii. 6. 7 Fine, Hil. 38 Eliz. 



WETHERDEN. 241 

i s. d. 

more for formerly Kemball's . . . . . . ..030 

more for Free Lands .. .. .. .. ..006 

Samuel Bird, late Harrison's .. .. .. .. ..070 

more for late Durrant's . . . . . . . . Free 014 

George Osborne, late Harrison's .. .. .. .. ..034 

Naner Pretyman, clerk \ R , <, , . . . . o i 8 

....more for Free Lands ) P 6 .. . . o 3 n 

John Fenn, late Chenery's, per Wm. Raffe . . . . Free 023 

George Pretyman, clerk, late Codd's, per James 

Rowland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Free o 2 10 

Martha Haywell, widow ) T u -c- 064 

....more for Free Lands j Per Joshua Enyor .. o o 6 

.... Martin, per John Tricker . . . . . . . . Free 050 

Edmund King, late Groom's f Free o o 10 

Edmund Edgar, late Raffe's . . . . . . . . Free 014 

Daniel Meadows, late Marlow's . ") T 

.... more for Free Lands . . j P er J ames Rowland IO 

John Frewer, in Right of his wife late Mary Fuller, for Castrick's, 

per T. Hawkins 024 

S r Wm. Bunbury . ) ~, , c , , 017 

.... more for Free Lands I P er EdwcL Sheafe . . ..025 

Nathaniel Gurdon Esq r . per Thos. Smy . . . . Free 020 

.... Heron, widow, per Jno. Shave . . . . . . Free 014 

Henry Thorpe, late Rosier's .. .. .. .. ..oio 

Pett, per John Rust . . . . . . . . . . Free 004 

Brook, per Ro. Rodwell . . . . . . . . Free o 2 10 

Elizabeth Rowland, late Firmin's . . . . . . ... o o ^ 

James Rowland, late Codd's . . . . . . . . . . o o 10 

John Bishop, late Bloom's . . . . . . . . Free 005 

Phillippa Sulyard, now the Lord's, per Ann . . . . 4<i. 

S r Wm. Harbord, per Saml. Rout . . . . . . Free o i o 

S r Wm. Gage, per John Reeve . . . . . . . . Free 020 

John Goodrich Free 023 

.... Fitters, late George Pretyman . . . . . . Free o o 10 

Samuel Smith, per Munnings Free 014 

Ann Annis, late Williams . . . . . . . . . . Free 005 

Robt. Pryor, late Dumeld's Free o o n 

Samuel Tanner, late Wyard's . . . . . . . . Free 004 

John Firmin, late Bruce's Free 002 

.... Marsh, widow . . . . . . . . . . . . Free 002 

Town Lands of Wetherden . . . . . . . . . . Free 006 

Kedington . . . . . . . . . . . . Free 047 

John Edgar Free 006 

George Bogges, per Richard Shepherd . . . . . . ..028 

Lydia Foster, late Coleer, per Saml. Wright . . . . . . o i o 

.... Emerson, late Grossman's . . . . . . . . Free 020 

.... Bright, per .... Reynolds . . . . . . . . Free 020 

Blomfield, per Doo of Tostock . . . . Free 030 

5 10 10 

A 

G I 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1809 Sir George Jerningham, Bart., was lord, he having married 
one of the daughters of Edmund Sulyard. In 1847 the manor was vested 
in the Right Hon. Edw. Thomas Hovell Thurlow, 3rd Baron Thurlow, of 
Ashfield. 

Wetherden Hall was an ancient mansion, but pulled down in the time 
of Hen. VII., when the present mansion was erected by Sir John Sulyard. 
He also erected the porch of the parish church, and a large aisle con- 
tinued from it to the chancel. Round the porch of the church and along 
the chancel are carved the arms and quarterings of the family of Sulyard to 
the period when the aisle was built. 

Arms of SULYARD : See Haughley, in this Hundred. 

MANOR OF PULHAM HALL. 

Probably this was the lordship of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The 
abbot claimed free warren here in the time of King Edw. I. 1 The extent 
and customary of the lands of the abbey in Wetherden in 1357 will be found 
amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum. 1 

From an inquis. p.m. in the time of King Hen. VII. we learn that this 
manor, called " Pulham Hall, " and a tenement called " Westbrom's," 
in Wetherden and Haughley, worth 8, held of the Abbot of Bury by fealty 
only, stood limited to the use of Sir John Sulyard and Anne his wife, who 
survived, and the heirs of their bodies, with remainder to the heirs of his 
body, with remainder to his right heirs. 3 From this time the manor seems 
to have devolved in the same way as the main Manor of Wetherden Hall. 



1 Q.W. 733- ' I.P.M., 4 Hen. VII. 439. 

'Add. 14840. 



THEDWESTRY HUNDRED 



in the Deanery of Thedwestry, Archdeaconry of Sudbury, 
Diocese of Ely, and Liberty of St. Edmund. It is about 
12 miles in length and six in breadth, and is bounded on 
the west by the borough of Bury St. Edmunds and Thingoe 
Hundred ; on the north by Blackbourn Hundred ; on the 
east by the latter and Stow Hundred ; and on the south 
by Cosford and Babergh Hundreds. 
It is a fertile district rising in bold undulations, and watered by many 
rivulets which rise within its limits and form or swell the sources of the 
small rivers Gipping, Lark, and Brett. The fee is in the Crown, and the 
government in the sheriff and his officers. The Hundred contains 40,851 
acres, in 24 parishes and 50 manors, as follows : 




Parishes. 



Manors. 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Ampton 

Barton 
(Great) 

Beyton 

Bradfield 
Combust 

Bradfield 
St. Clare 

Bradfield 
St. George 

Drinkstone 



Felsham 

Fornham St. 

Genevieve 
Fornham St. 

Martin . . 

Gedding 

Hessett .... 

Livermere 
(Great) . . 



Ampton. 
Gt. Barton. 
Necton Hall or 

Conyers Hall. 
Beyton. 
Bradfield Combust 

al. Roos. 
Sutton. 

Bradfield St. Clare. 

Bradfield St. 
George or Monks 
Bradfield. 

Drinkstone Hall or 
Lovayne's. 

Halls al. Timper- 
ley's. 

Felsham Hall (or 
Capel's). 

Brook Hall. 

Maiden Hall. 

Fornham St. Gene- 
vieve. 

Fornham St. Martin. 

Gedding al. Gedding 

Hall. 
Hessett. 
Livermere Magna al. 

Upphall al. 

Brome Hall. 
Livermere Magna or 

Grange. 



Pakenham 



Rattlesden 



Rougham 



Rushbrooke 

Stanning- 
field 



Pakenham Hall. 
Newhall al. Malkin- 

shall al. Beau- 

monts. 
Netherhall al. Ladies 

Hall. 
Red Castle. 

Rattlesden Hall. 
Woodhall. 
Rattlesden Castle or 

Thurmodes. 
Clop ton Hall. 
Stanham's or Ston- 

ham's. 

-Rougham Hall. 
Elde al. Oldhall al. 

Oldhaugh and Le 

Hoo. 

Lawney's. 
King's Hall. 
Chavents. 
Lee Hoo. 
Sudburyes al. 

Druryes. 
Netherhall or 

Netherplace. 

Rushbrooke. 

Stanningfield Hall. 
Coldham Hall. 
Saxies. 



244 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manor*. 




Thurston. 




i Whelnetham Magna. 


Thurston .... 
Timworth . . 


NetherhaU or 
Netherplace. 

Timworth. 


Whelnetham 
(Great) 


Ticklesmere or 
Tygelsmer. 
I Copdock's or Cob- 
( does or Copdoes. 


Tostock .... 


Tostock. 
Tostock Hall or 


Whelnetham 
(Little) 


Whelnetham Parva 




Berdewell's. 


Woolpit .... 


Woolpit or Cold Hall 







AMPTON. 245 

AMPTON. 

T the time of the Domesday Survey there were 22 freemen 
with two carucates of land here. Robert held of the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds half acarucate of land and i ploughteam, 
valued at 205. On the abbot's demesne, for he was the 
tenant in chief of the whole, were always 5 ploughteams 
and 2 acres of meadow, and these freemen could give and 
sell their land, so that the soc remained in the abbot's 
possession and services in Ingham. The value of the abbot's holding in 
Saxon times was 205., but at the time of the Survey 305. There was also 
a church here with 8 acres of free land. The length of the whole was 6 
quarentenes and the breadth 4, and it paid in a gelt jd. 1 

AMPTON MANOR. 

In 1203 Alan, son of Hamon de Flemeton, held jointly with Peter de 
Livermere, a knight's fee in Livermere and Ampton, and had also the gift of 
this parish church. In the next reign the manor and the advowson seem 
to have vested wholly in the Flemeton or Flempton family, for in 1269 
we meet with a fine levied of both by William de Bokenham, parson of the 
church of Tynewith, and Johanna, daughter of Philip Nowel, against 
Richard de Flempton. 2 In 1334 we meet with a fine of the manor and the 
advowson levied by William de Ingham, parson of the church of Ampton, 
and Edmund de Rysby, chaplain, against Stephen de Ampton and Alice 
his wife. 3 

A little later the manor passed to the family of Strange, from which 
it passed, in the reign of Rich. II., to the Hethe family, they having acquired 
from John Strange, of Brockley, " which late were Edmond's of Ingham." 
William Berdewell, who had married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Hethe, 
only son of Robert Hethe, of Little Saxham, had in 1397 a release from the 
said Thomas Hethe and his uncle, Richard Hethe, of Bury, all their right 
in the manor and advowson, and a fine was levied the following year. 

This seems to have been subject to the life interest of Anne, the widow 
of Thomas Hethe, who had remarried Sir Walter de Trumpington. Under 
a partition in 1484 the manor and advowson were allotted to Sir Thomas 
Darcy, of Maldur, and Margaret his wife, daughter of John Harleston by 
Elizabeth or Margaret his wife, only daughter of Sir William Berdewell. 
As early, however, as 1403 another Sir William Berdewell and Margaret 
his wife 4 had granted the manor and advowson to Sir Roger Drury, Nicholas 
Rys, Nicholas Drury, and others, probably by way of settlement, 5 and the 
manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Elizabeth, wife of John 
Harlyston, in 1464.' 

A writer in the " Collectanea Topographica and Genealogica " 7 says 
that the family of La Bole afterwards inherited, from whom it passed by 
marriage to the Cokets, for an account of whom he refers to the Gentle- 
men's Magazine for 1831.' The marriage was that of John Coket with 

'Dom. ii. 363. Elizabeth, died in 1440, and was 

2 Feet of Fines, 53 Hen. III. 38. the son of John, son of Thomas, 

3 Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. III. 10. son of John, by his ist wife. 

4 Sir William Berdewell, whose wife was 5 Add. Ch. 15551. 

Margaret de Palmer, died in 1434. 6 I.P.M., 4 Edw. IV. 23. 

He was the son of William, son of r Vol. vii. p. 292. 

John, by his 2nd wife, whereas 8 Pt. i. 417. 
William Berdewell, whose wife was 



246 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Alice, daughter and heir of Richard le Bole, but neither the 1& Bole or 
Coket family seem to have held the manor. They were probably lessees 
of it. 

In the time of Hen. VII. the manor became vested in the Wentworth 
family, and in 1511 Thomas Wentworth granted a lease of part of the 
manor to John Gere, of Ampton, in the following terms : - 

" This indenture made the 22nd day of September in the 3rd year of 
the reign of King Henry the Eighth [1511] between Thos. Wentworth of 
Bury St. Edmunds, in the County of Suffolk, gentleman, on the one part, 
and John Clere of Ampton, in the said County, husbandman, on the other 
part. Witnesseth that the said Thomas hath demised, granted, and to 
ferme let to the said John, parcel of the manor of Ampton, that is to 
say the manor place, with all the houses thereto belonging, and all the 
arable land with all the rent to the said manor pertaining. To hold to 
the said John and his assigns from the feast of St. Michael the Archangel 
next ensuing of the date of this indenture, unto the end and term of five 
years from thence next and immediately following and full complete. 
The sheep's pasture always to the said Thomas or his assigns reserved, 
yielding and paying therefore yearly during the said time to the said Thomas 
or his assigns for the ferme of the premises six pounds of lawful money of 
England, at two times hi the year, that is to say, at the feast of Easter and 
St. Michael the Archangel, by even portions ; moreover the said John 
bindeth him for to discharge the said Thomas of the rent due to the general 
hundred yearly during the said term ; moreover the said John bindeth 
him by these presents to find half the straw for thatching of the houses and 
the carriage of half the clay to be occupied at Ampton aforesaid, which 
the said Thomas is bound to do. Also the said John shall pay the shepherd 
and his page their wage and corn, that is to say, i6s. of lawful money of 
England, 4 quarts and i bushel of rye, 4 quarts and i bushel of barley, 
I bushel and a half of peas, i bushel and a half of oats every year during 
the said term. Also the said John shall find hurdles sufficient for the fold 
during the said term. Also the said John shall carry two loads of hay of 
the said Thomas every year during the said 5 years in to the barn of Ampton 
before rehearsed to lie to the most profit of the said Thomas and if shall 
fortune the same John to have any of the land belonging to Ingham Hall, 
he to pay for the same. Also the said Thomas granteth that the said John 
shall have 40 sheep, called ewe sheep, going in the flock of the said Thomas 
in the said town and field of Ampton during the said term. Also the said 
John Clere shall have to his proper use all loppings and shreddings of the 
woods and underwoods there fermerlike yearly during the said term. Also 
the said John shall have the herbage and feeding for his cattle in all the 
pasture there, and over (moreover) that the said John shall have his working 
horses going inCachefache in every convenient season for the pasturing 
during the said term. Also the said John shall have his land folded with 
the sheep of the said Thomas in every convenient season in the aforesaid 
field of Ampton. Also the same John shall leave all the land pertaining to 
the said manor in such condition as they were at his entering at the end of 
his said year. Also it is agreed between the said parties that the said 
John Clere shall ' ere ' and break up 20 acres in Dalmer by the space of 
two years. And that two years the said John shall lay 20 acres in Cache- 
fache for the sheep's pasture, and then to break up and ' ere ' the said 20 
acres in Cachefache, and then to lay the 20 acres in Dalmer for the sheep's 
pasture and so every ij year likewise forth during the said term. Also 






AMPTON. 247 

the said Thomas granteth that the said John shall take as many furs as 
he shall need to occupy for his own expenses upon the said ground in Ampton 
as other fermors have had in time past during the said term. And if it 
hap the said ferme of 6 to be behind and not paid in part or in all by the 
space of 4 weeks after any day of payment above written that ought to 
be paid, that then it shall be lawful to the said Thomas, or his assigns, 
in to the said manor with the appurtenances, and in to every part 
thereof to enter and distrain, and the distresses so taken to bear, lead, 
drive, and carry away, and to retain in to the time the said yearly 
ferme of 6, and every part of it, together with the arrears, damage 
and cost be that occasion had to the said Thomas or his assigns be fully 
content and paid. In to witness hereof to the indenture the parties above 
said interchangeably their seal have put. The day and year above written." 

Nine years later the manor seems to have been vested in Sir Thomas 
Wyndham, Knt., and Elizabeth his wife, for they made a lease of a manor 
to Alice Wentworth and John Croft. Possibly Thomas VVentworth was a 
trustee, for there can be no doubt the manor was vested in Roger Darcy, 
who died 3rd Sept. 1507, leaving a son and heir Thomas, 1 and a widow, who 
remarried Sir Thomas W3'ndham, Vice-admiral and one of the Privy 
Council to Hen. VIII. This accounts for their grant of the second lease 
above referred to. There is an endorsement on it, as follows : 

" That Edward Coket hath, since the death of Sir Thomas Wyndham, 
covenanted with Dame Elizabeth Wyndham, Alice Wentworth, and John 
Croft, gentleman, for this aforesaid indenture for and all the covenant in 
the said indenture expressed, wherefore the said Edward Coket gave my 
lady Wyndham five marks, and to Alice Wentworth and John Croft 5, 
and to John Clere, their fermor, 40^. Witness Doctor Navor executor 
of Sir Thomas Wyhdham, Edward Wygathe, squire. And march with 
both ye of Sir Thomas Wyndham's servants." 

Thus the lease was transferred to Edward Cocket/ and held by him 
and Anthony his son until 1542, when the latter resigned all claims held 
by virtue thereof to Sir Thomas Darcy, Knt., son and heir of Dame Elizabeth 
Wyndham, Countess of Bath, by Sir Roger Darcy her ist husband. 

" By an indenture dated loth June in the same year [1542], Sir Thomas 
Darcy bargains and sells unto John Crofts, Esq., ' all that the Manor of 
Ampton with the appurtenances in the County of Suffolk,' with the advow- 
son of the parish church of Ampton, and all those messuages, lands, tene- 
ments, rents, reversions, and services, liberties of fold and sheeps pasture 
and other hereditaments and commodities with their appurtenances in 
the towns and fields pf Ampton, Timworth, Ingham, and Livermore Magna 
and Livermore Parva, Barton, and Culford in the said county, which have 
been at any time before the date hereof taken or esteemed to be any part 
or member of the said manor, which the said Sir Thomas at the date hereof, 
hath in possession or reversion, or in any wise hath right or is entitled unto. 
For which the said John Croft covenanteth to pay, or cause to be paid 
to the said Sir Thomas the sum of 500 marks, 20 pounds sterling." A fine 
was levied accordingly in 1542 between John Crofts and Sir Thomas Darcy. 3 

'I. P.M., 24 Hen. VII. 80. Anne, daughter and coheir of 

'He was the son of John Cocket and Thomas Froximere, of Wych, in 

Margaret his wife, 2nd daughter Worcestershire. He died in 1542. 

and coheir of Sir Rich. Walden, 3 Fine, Mich. 34 Hen. VIII. 

of Erith, in Kent, and married 



248 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

It appears by a letter of one Anthony Ashe, written to William 
Spalding, that this manor with the advowson in 4 and 5 Phil, and Mary 
were holden of the Queen as of the Barony of St. Edmund, by the fourth 
part of a knight's fee ; that the messuage called Coket's, 40 acres of land, 
2 acres of meadow, 10 acres of pasture, and 4 acres of wood, were holden of 
the Queen as of the Hundred of Blackbourn by fealty, and that the tene- 
ment called the Chantry House was holden of Richard Codington, as of 
Ixworth by fealty. John Crofts, to whom the manor was conveyed, was 
the son of John Crofts and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Thomas Hervey, 
of Ickworth, and grandson of John Crofts, who had married Joan, daughter 
of John Coket, of Ampton. He, John Crofts, then Sir John, died seised 
i.5th Jan. 1558,' and his son and heir dying seised I4th Feb. following' 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Crofts, then aged 18. 

In the inquis. p.m. taken at Stowmarket 4th June, 4 and 5 Philip 
and Mary, the jurors found that the said Edmund Croft es was seised of 
the manors of Ampton, Little Lyvermere otherwise called Myryelles, and 
of the Manor of Calthorp Hall, in Barnham, and of one tenement called 
Cokettes, in Ampton, with 40 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, 10 acres of 
pasture, and 4 acres of wood, to the said tenement belonging, and the 
advowsons of the churches of Ampton, Little Livermere, and St. Andrew 
in Barnham, and liberty of three faldages in Little Livermere, Ampton, 
and Barnham, and a free fishery in Barnham. And by his will be declared 
as follows : " I will and bequeath all my manors, lands, &c., called Ampton 
Hall, Sampsons, Muriells, and Cokettes, and all other my lands in Ampton, 
Little Livermere, Great Livermere, Ingham, and Timworth, and my Manor 
of Calthorp Hall, to my executors for 16 years from the date hereof towards 
the payment of my debts and fulfilling this my will." The jurors further 
found that the manors of Ampton with the advowson of the church and 
liberty of one faldage in Ampton, were held of the King and Queen as of their 
barony of St. Edmund by one quarter of one knight's fee and worth per 
annum 13. 6s. Sd. And the Manor of Little Lyvermere with the 
advowson and liberty of one faldage in Little and Great Lyvermere, were 
held of the King and Queen as of their same barony by half a knight's fee, 
and worth per annum 10 marks. And the Manor of Calthorp Hall, with 
the advowson of St. Andrew, in Barnham, and liberty of one faldage and 
free fishery were held of the heirs of Peter de Theltham as of his Manor of 
Theltham, but by what services the jurors knew not, and worth per annum 
10. And the tenement called Coketts, &c., were held of the King and 
Queen as of their Hundred of Blakborne by fealty and suit of court, and 
worth per annum 535. 4^. 

The manor then passed to the family of Coell. The indenture by 
which Thomas Crofts, of West Stow, in Suffolk, conveys this manor, 
advowson, &c., to Thomas Coell, of Bury St. Edmunds, gent., bears date 
the 6th of September 42 Eliz. [1600]. 

Mr. Coell resided upon his estate here, and in 1609 married Susan, 
daughter of Thomas Jermyn, of Depden, a member of the Jermyn family, 
who were owners of considerable property at Depden, in this county, which 
Mr. Coell afterwards inherited, and where he and his descendants continued 
to reside until the death of Thomas Coell, of Depden Hall, son and heir of 
Sir John Coell, Knt., when the male line became extinct. He died 5th 
Oct. 1698, leaving Frances, his daughter by Cecily his ist wife, daughter 

'I.P.M., 4 and 5 P. & M. 54. "I.P.M., 4 and 5 P. & M. 21. 



AMPTON. 249 

of Sir Henry Crofts, of Little Saxham, Knt., sole heir to his estate. She 
married Richard Thornhill, of Ollantigh, in Kent. 

By a deed dated 2Oth May, 1615, Thomas Coell, of Ampton, grants to 
William Whettell, of Thetford, the manor, advowson, &c., of Ampton. 
He was the eldest son of William Whettell, citizen and merchant-taylor, 
of St. Peter's Hill, in the parish of St. Peter and Benedict, in Paul's W r harf, 
London. In 1657 Robert Cooke, Clarencieux, King of Arms, granted him 
the following coat armour, namely, Gules, a chevron Ermine between three 
hounds' heads erased Or ; and for his crest, on a wreath Argent and Gules, 
a hound's head couped Or, the ear and collar Argent. 

In or about 1600 Mr. Whettell married Anne, relict of Eustace Tyrrell, 
of Boyland Hall, in Bressingham, co. Norfolk, and resided at Thetford 
until about 1619, when he removed to his estate in this parish. He served 
the office of Sheriff for this county in 1622, and continued to reside here 
until his death, which took place igth Feb. 1628, and his remains were 
deposited in the chancel of Ampton church, on the north side of which is 
a handsome mural monument, bearing the following inscription to his 
memory : 

Mihi Christus est in vita et morte lucrum. 

Hie jacet corpus clarissimi viri Gulielmi Whetteli 

armigeri, qui fuit in adolescentia optimis disciplinis 

extritus, in virili aetate Socius collegii Setae 
Trinitatis in Academia Cantabrigiensi in senili 
Eirenarcha et Vicecomes in comitatu Suffolciensi 

civis bonus, magistratus melior, vir optimus 
Fefor. 19 An Dni 1628, aetatis suae 67, ad Caelites migravit. 

" Henricus Calthorpe, armiger qui duxit in uxorem Dorotheam 
neptem (suam) solus executor dicti Gulielmi et illi devinctissimus, posuit 
hoc monumentum." 

W'illiam Whettell died without issue, and the said Henry afterwards 
Sir Henry Calthorpe, inherited this property, for an account of whom, and 
his descendants, see " Gentleman's Magazine " for 1831, pt. ii., p. 406, 
and 1832, pt. i. pp. 109, 585. 

He was the 2nd son of Sir James Calthorpe, of Cockthorp, in Norfolk, 
Knt., and had married Dorothy, daughter and coheir of Edward Humphrey, 
who had married the sister of William Whettell. He was successively 
Common Sergeant, Recorder of the City of London, Solicitor-General to 
Queen Henrietta Maria and Attorney-General of His Majesty's Court of 
Wards and Liveries. He died ist August, 1637,' and was succeeded by 
Sir James, his 3rd and only surviving son, then a youth of n years of age. 
He served the office of High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1656 during the pro- 
tectorship of Cromwell, by whom he was knighted at Whitehall loth Dec. 
in the same year. He married the 2nd daughter of Sir James Reynolds, 
of Castle Campo, co. Cambridge, sister of Sir John Reynolds, Knt., 
Commissary-General in Ireland, on whose death she became his sole heiress. 
The marriage contract bears date loth May, 1645, by whjch Sir James 
covenants to give his daughter a portion of 800, for the payment of which 
he conveys over an estate called Gouldstons in the parish of Ashdon, Essex. 
Mr. Calthorpe died in July, 1658 , and was buried in the chancel of the 

'Inquis. at Norwich I4th Sept. 1637. 
HI 



250 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



parish church here the ist Aug. The manor passed to his eldest son James, 
the munificent founder of the Boys' Hospital, in Ampton.' He died un- 
married 2nd May, 1702, and was succeeded by his next brother Christopher. 
He married in 1681 Elizabeth, one of the daughters and coheirs of Gardiner 
Kettleborough of Elmswell, and died 3rd Feb. 1717, when the manor passed 
to his eldest son James. He was appointed Deputy-Lieutenant of the 
County 2Qth Dec. 1727. By virtue of a warrant from Charles Fitzroy, 
Duke of Grafton, Lord Chamberlain, he was sworn into the office of Gentle- 
man Usher Quarter Waiter-in-Ordinary to His Majesty ist Oct. 1731, and 
i6th Feb. 1742, appointed Yeoman of the Removing Wardrobe. He died 
unmarried nth March, 1784, and was buried in the family vault at Ampton. 
The manor passed to Henry, eldest son of Sir Henry Gough, of Edgbaston, 
in Warwickshire, Bart., by Barbara his wife, only daughter of Reynolds 
Calthorpe,of Elvetham, in Hants., M.P. for Hindon in Wilts, in 1698 and 1713, 
to whom the same had been devised on condition of his assuming the name 
of Calthorpe. This he did by Royal licence dated 7th May, 1788, and by 
patent dated isth June, 1796, was created Baron Calthorpe, of Calthorpe, 
in Norfolk. He married Frances, youngest daughter and coheir of General 
Benjamin Carpenter, and dying of a fever in London, i6th March, 1798, 
the manor passed to his son and heir Charles, 2nd Baron, who died 
unmarried 5th June, 1807, when it went to his brother George, 3rd 
Baron, on whose decease in Sept. 1851, the manor devolved on his 
brother, Frederick Gough Calthorpe, 4th Baron, who married Charlotte 
Sophia, eldest daughter of Henry Charles, 6th Duke of Beaufort, and sold 
the manor and advowson in 1860 to John Paley, of Langcliffe, co. York, 
High Sheriff 1889 and 1890, who married I2th Sept. 1871, the Hon. 
Clare Emily Charlotte Strutt, only daughter of John James, 2nd Lord 
Raleigh, and on his death 4th Oct. 1894, the manor passed to, and is now 
the property of, his eldest son and heir, George Arthur Paley, of Langcliffe, 
and of Ampton Hall. 

A Court Roll of 1363 will be found amongst the Additional Charters 
in the British Museum, as will also a deed entailing the manor in 1380." 

Arms of COKET or COCKET : Party per bend, Argent and Sable, three 
fleurs-de-lis in the same counter charged. Of COELL : Arg. a bull passant 
Gules, in a bordure Sab. bezante"e. Of WHETTELL : Gu. a chevron, Erm. 



'This charity was founded by a deed 
27th March, 1692, James Calthorpe 
conveying to Sir John Poley, Knt., 
and from other trustees his manor 
of Aldeby, called Aldeby Hall, in 
Norfolk, with the messuages, lands, 
and tenements belonging to the 
same, including a messuage and 
orchard in Ampton in trust for the 
erection and support of a Hospital 
in the parish of Ampton for the 
maintenance, clothing, and support 
of six poor boys, and the payment 
of a suitable salary to the school- 
master, 20 a year to the minister 
of Ampton, and 5 a year to the 
parish clerk. The donor directed 
that in cases of equal circumstances 
the children of Ampton should be 
prepared, but none of them of the 



time of admission to the school 
should be over seven years of age, 
nor partake of the charity longer 
than the age of 14, and that they 
should wear blue caps and blue 
coats with the letters " J.C." 
affixed on the breast part of the 
coats. At a meeting of the trustees 
in 1713, the first six boys were 
admitted ; at another meeting held 
in 1829 two additional boys were 
admitted, and at a subsequent 
meeting held in 1836, the trustees 
came to the determination of in- 
creasing the number of boys to 
nine. Aldeby Hall farm comprises 
380 acres, and the profits of the 
Manor of Aldeby until recently 
averaged about 10 per annum. 
'Add. Ch. 91111, 18667. 



AMPTON. 251 

betw. 3 hounds' heads erased Or. Of CALTHORPE : anciently Ermine 
a maunch Gules ; later cheeky, Or and Azure, a fesse Ermine. Of 
GOUGH : Gules, on a fesse, Argent, between three boars' heads couped Or, 
a lion passant Azure. Of PALEY : Gu. a bend vaire, doubled cotised Or, 
between 8 crosses-croslet of the last. 




252 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BARTON (GREAT). 

ARTON was held in Saxon times by the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
Bishop Theodred having given one part ; Edwin, a man of 
wealth, another part ; and Eric the Provost the remaining 
part to this abbey. The estate consisted in the time of 
Edward the Confessor of 5 carucates of land, 22 villeins, 
5 bordars, 4 ploughteams in demesne, 6 belonging to the 
men, n thralls, 3 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for 
the support of 4 hogs, 4 rouncies, 18 beasts, 44 hogs, and 402 sheep. The 
details had altered by the time of the Survey, for the ploughteams in 
demesne had come down to 3, the thralls to 4, but 2 hives of bees had 
been added. There. were also here 72 freemen who held 2 carucates of 
land and having among them 18 ploughteams. They had also 2 bordars 
and i acre of meadow. Over these the abbot had soc and sac and all 
customs, and all belonged to the abbot except 3. To the church there 
were 50 acres of free land as alms. The total value was 16, but by the time 
of the Norman Survey it had risen to 20. The total length of the manor 
was a league and 2 quarentenes and the breadth a league, and it paid in 
a gelt 2jd. 1 

GREAT BARTON MANOR. 

This manor remained with the monastery of St. Edmund until its 
dissolution, when it passed to the Crown, where it remained until the last 
year of Edw. VI. But from the State Papers we learn that in 1542 a grant 
was made from the Augmentation*pfnce to Richard Tyrell of sheep pasture 
upon the manor,* and in the same year a lease was made to Sir Anthony 
Wyngfeld of grain rent out of the manor. 3 The manor was held in 1554 
by Thomas Audley, nephew of Thomas, Lord Audley, of Walden, K.G., 
Chancellor of England, and by Katherine his wife, daughter of Sir Robert 
Southwell, Knt., of Wood Rising, in Norfolk, and they were in 1565 called 
upon to show title to the manor, of which they had held the first court in 
the first year of Queen Mary. 4 Thomas Audley died in 1572, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Robert Audley, who married Katherine, 2nd 
daughter of Edward, 3rd Lord Windsor, by the Lady Katherine de Vere, 
only child of John, i6th Earl of Oxford, by his first wife, Dorothy Neville, 
daughter of Ralph, 4th Earl of Westmoreland. This Robert Audley died 
in 1624, and by inquis. p.m. i Car. was found to have died seised of this 
manor said therein to have been held from the late King James in chief 
and by knight's service. It is thought that this Robert Audley built the 
New Hall or New House, as it is called in an old map of the time 
of Jas. I. The manor, rectory, and advowson, and some lands in the 
parish remained in the Audley family till 1704, when Henry, son of Sir Henry 
Audley, Knt., and grandson of the above Robert Audley, sold the whole 
under an Act of Parliament to Thomas Folkes. He was a lawyer by pro- 
fession, and elder brother of the father of the celebrated Sir Martin Folkes, 
President of the Royal Society. His only child Elizabeth married Sir 
Thomas Hanmer, Bart., in 1725, whose first wife Isabella, Duchess of 
Grafton, died in 1722-3. Under the settlement made on his marriage 
with Miss Folkes, Sir Thomas became entitled to the manor, which he 
devised on his death in 1746 to his nephew, Sir William Bunbury, Bart., 

'Dom. ii. 361*. >Ibid. 

'State Papers, 1542, 1258. 4 M. 7 Eliz. Rec. Rot. 155. 



GREAT BARTON. 253 

who was the 2nd son of Sir Henry Bunbury and Susan his wife, sister of 
Sir Thomas Hanmer. 

From the time of Sir William Bunbury, who died in 1764, to the 
present time the manor has passed in the same line of devolution as the 
manor of Mildenhall Hall, in Lackford Hundred, being now vested in Sir 
Henry Charles John Bunbury, loth Bart. 

This manor is said in the Baker MSS. in Cambridge to have been 
bought by the University of Cambridge." 

Arms of AUDLEY : Erm. a chevron Gu. Of FOLKES : Per pale, 
Vert and Gules, a fleur-de-lis Argent. 

NECTON HALL OR CONYERS HALL. 

Necton Hall or Conyers Hall is probably the Manor of Berton, of which 
John Maunsell was found to have died seised in 1271, 2 and subsequently 
it vested in the Nectons and passed to the Conyers. Nicholas Conyers 
held the lordship in 1375, and from this time to the death of Edmund 
Cotton, who died in 1585, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor 
of Finningham, in Hartismere Hundred. 

In 1403 we find a fine by Peter Crulle, Roger Haldenby, clerk, John 

Kenune, clerk, Thomas Melreth, Stephen Ingelset, Edw. Rich 

and William Kelet v. John Crulle and Rich. Conyers and Joan his wife 
of 405. rent issuing out of this manor and the Manor of Hepworth. 3 The 
manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Conyers in 
1480. 4 

Edmund Cotton, who died in 1585, apparently left his son Edmund an 
infant, for he does not appear to have had livery of the manor until 1595, 
in which year he parted with the same to Thomas Laurence. 5 

The manor house stood near the church, where a farmhouse now stands, 
but Necton Hall was situated on the edge of an extensive tract of common, 
called up to the time of the enclosure of the waste lands of the parish 
Conyers Green. This common was bounded on the west by the parishes of 
Fornham and Timworth. Page mentions that a farmhouse encompassed 
by a moat, which was bought by Sir Charles Bunbury from Dr. Ord, together 
with certain lands, stood on the site of old Necton (or Conyers) Hall. 



'Baker, xli. 220. "I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 74. 

I.P.M., 57 Hen. III. 159. 'Fine, Hil. 37 Eliz. 

'Feet of Fines, 4 Hen. IV. 29. 




254 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BEYTON. 

HE only entry in the Domesday Survey which could well belong 
to this place is " Begatona," and one estate is enumerated 
here. It was held in the Confessor's time by a freeman under 
Edith the Rich, and consisted of 40 acres with half a plough- 
team, valued at 55. At the time of the Survey the estate 
belonged to Hugh de Montfort, he having taken it in ex- 
change for other lands. 1 

BEYTON MANOR. 

Bey ton Manor was first heard of as the lordship of Roger de Ratlesden, 
and in 1276 belonged to Adam de Ratlesden, after whom it passed to Henry 
de Beyton, and in 1316 was held as parcel of the possessions of the Abbey 
of Bury. At the Dissolution it, together with the advowson, became the 
property of the Crown, and seems for a time to have been in the Bacon 
family, John Bacon, of Hessett, having at one time the possession. In 
1764, however, it was the lordship of the Crown, and so continued in 1855. 

In 1885, however, we find it stated to be vested in Walter Thomas 
Walpole, with whom it remains at the present time. 



BRADFIELD. 

JN the Confessor's time a manor here was held by the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds with 3 carucates of land. There were 15 
villeins, 18 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 4 belonging 
to the men, I thrall, 7 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 10 
beasts, 28 hogs, and 99 sheep. 

By the time of the Great Survey there was i more plough- 
team in demesne, 5 more thralls, and 80 goats. There were also 
three freemen with 24 acres of land and i plpughteam and i acre of meadow. 
Over these the abbot had commendation with soc and sac as to all customs, 
and they could not give or sell their lands without the abbot's licence. 
There were also nine freemen with a carucate of land, 2 bordars, 3 plough- 
teams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 6s. These had power to give or 
sell their lands, but the soc would remain with the abbot and their services 
also whoever might buy the land. To the church were attached 10 acres 
and a half of free land as alms. The manor was in Saxon times valued 
at 6, but by the time of the Survey at 8. It was a league long and 4 
quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt $d. 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds also had in Bradfield evidently not the 
same Bradfield as the last mentioned, but whether Bradfield St. Clare, 
Bradfield St. George, or Bradfield Combust, cannot be stated with certainty 
10 freemen with 2 carucates and a half of land, of which Rorie held of the 
abbot a carucate and a half. Falc the remaining half carucate. To the 
estate were attached 4 ploughteams and a half, and the value was 545. 
over and above their payments. These men had 12 bordars, with 6 
ploughteams and 8 acres of meadow. They could give or sell the lands, so 

'Dom. ii. 










BRADFIELD. 255 

that the soc remained in the abbot. The value in King Edward the 
Confessor's time was 2, but at the time of the Survey 3. 

This Bradfield was 10 quarentenes in length and 3 in breadth, and 
paid in a gelt 5^.' 

The only other holding mentioned in the Domesday Survey is amongst 
the lands of Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, who held here 20 acres which in 
the Confessor's time had belonged to a freeman under commendation to 
Bishop Aylmer in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The estate had 
then attached to it half a ploughteam, reduced by the time of the Survey 
to i ox only. The value was 2s. 2 

BRADFIELD COMBUST al. Roos MANOR. 

The place is called Brent (or Burnt) Bradfield, according to Page, on 
account of the destruction of the hall by fire in 1327, the period of the 
violent attack made by the townsmen of St. Edmunds, Bury, on the abbey 
and its possessions. The manor was probably the estate before the Con- 
quest of Ulfketel, Earl of the East Angles, of which he gave a part 
to the monks of Bury, but the lordship seems to have been reserved, 
for it is found in the hands of divers persons after the Conquest. 
First we find it in Adam de Illey, then in Thomas Verdon, and in 
1234 m Robert Peche and Agnes his wife. In 1314 the manor is 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Fitz-Talbott and Joan his 
wife. 3 A little later it was the lordship of Bartholomew de Badlesmere, 
of Badlersmere and Chilham Castle, in Kent, son and heir of Gunselm 
de Badlesmere, justice, of Chester, by Johanna, daughter of Ralph 
Fitz-Bernard, of Kingsdown, in the same county, aunt, and on her issue 
heir to Thomas, Lord Fitz-Bernard. Bartholomew served in the Scottish 
wars in 1303 and 1304, and was Governor of Bristol Castle in 1307, being 
summoned to Parliament as a Baron 26th Oct. 1309. He had a grant of 
Leeds Castle, and was steward of the King's Household. Notwithstanding 
the favours he received at the King's hands, he joined the rebellion of the 
Earl of Lancaster and was defeated with him at Boroughbridge i6th March, 
1322, attainted and executed at Canterbury I4th April, 1322. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Thomas de Clare, a younger son of Richard, Earl 
of Gloucester, and aunt and coheir of Thomas de Clare. On the attainder 
of Lord Badlesmere his estates were forfeited to the Crown. They were, 
however, restored to his son, Giles de Badlesmere, on his obtaining a reversal 
of his father's attainder in 1329, and though then a minor he had livery of 
his father's estates in 1333. He was summoned to Parliament as a Baron 
22nd June, 1335-6, and married Elizabeth, daughter of William Montacute, 
ist Earl of Salisbury, but died without issue in 1338,* when the manor 
passed to his widow Elizabeth for life in dower. She took for a second 
husband Hugh le Despencer, Lord Despenser, and died before 1342.' The 
estates of Lord Badlesmere were divided between his four sisters, this 
manor falling to his sister Margery, who had married William, Lord Roos, 
of Hamlake, 3rd Baron. 

On the Close Rolls in 1341 we find an order to cause William de Ros 
and Margery his wife, eldest sister and coheir of Giles de Badlesmere, 
tenant in chief, to have seisin of a third part of certain lands and of this 

'Dom. ii. 362, 3626. 4 I.P.M., 12 Edw. III. 2nd nos. 54. 

2 Dom. ii. 291. 'I.P.M., 15 Edw. III. and 23 Edw. III. 42. 

'I.P.M., 8 Edw. 11.50. 



256 . THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor which Thomas de Verdon held for life extended at 19. 175. 
yearly. 1 Lord Ros died in 1342, and his widow survived till 1363,' when 
she was succeeded by her son, Thomas de Ros, 5th Baron, his elder brother 
William, 4th Baron, who had the distinction of leading the second division 
of the English army at the celebrated battle of Cressy, and had married 
Margaret, daughter of Ralph Nevill, having died in 1362 without issue in 
the lifetime of his mother. 

Thomas, 5th Lord de Ros, married Beatrice, widow of Maurice 
Fitz-Maurice, Earl of Desmond, and daughter of Ralph Stafford, ist Earl 
of Stafford, and died in 1384, when the manor passed to his widow Beatrice, 
who survived until 1414. 3 On her death the manor seems to have passed 
to John de Ros, 8th Baron, the eldest son of William, 7th Baron, by Margaret 
his wife, daughter of Sir John Arundel. The eldest son of Thomas de Ros, 
5th lord, namely John, 6th Baron, had undertaken a pilgrimage to Jerusalem, 
and died at Paphos in 1394, leaving no issue, and his brother, William de 
Ros, successor in the title as 7th Baron, had died ist September, 1414. 
Consequently neither the 6th nor the 7th Barons had enjoyed the lordship 
of this manor unless, indeed, the latter did for a few months. Sir William 
de Ros, 7th Baron, did, however, in 1400, levy a fine of the manor against 
Robert Scales, 4 so that his mother must have either previously released 
her life interest or the fine could have affected the reversion or remainder 
only. 

John de Ros, 8th Baron, married Margaret, daughter and heir of Sir 
Philip Despencer, but had no issue. He was killed in battle in France 
while serving under the Duke of Clarence in 1421,* and the manor passed 
to his brother, Sir Thomas de Ros, gih Baron, who died in 1431, 6 and was 
succeeded by his son Thomas, loth Baron, who for his fidelity to Hen. VI. 
had his estates confiscated in 1460. Amongst the Early Chancery Pro- 
ceedings is an action by Sir William Botreaux, Knt., and Margaret his 
wife, daughter of Thomas, then late Lord Roos, against Sir Thomas Cha- 
worth, Knt., and Robert Weman, Esq., feoffees of the said Lord Roos, as 
to the manor. 7 

The Crown granted a lease of the manor for life to John Gerveys, of 
Bury, in 1465," and another lease for life to William Hatclyff in 1467," 
and on Hatclyff s death to George Cheynewe in 1480. 10 

In 1497 upon the petition of Sir Thomas Lovell, who had married 
Isabel, one of the sisters of Edmund, Lord Ros of Hamlake," an Act of 
Parliament was passed which, after reciting an Act of 1485, which was a 
reversal of the attainder of Thomas, loth Baron, the father of the said 
Edmund, and the restoration of his estates, enacts that " forsomoche 

'Close Rolls, 15 Edw. III. 62. "The statement that Sir Thomas Lovell 

* Extent, I.P.M., 37 Edw. III. 62. was the husband of Isabel, one of the 
'I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 44. sisters of Edmund, nth Lord Ros, 
4 Feet of Fines, i Hen. IV. 5. seems doubtful, for Dugdale, Nico- 
'I.P.M., 9 Hen. V. 58. las, and Burke all state that Isabel 
'I.P.M., 9 Hen. VI. 48. was married to Thomas Grey, 
7 E.C.P. Bundle 26, 461. youngest son of Sir Ralph Grey, of 

Pat. Rolls, 5 Edw. IV. pt. i. 7. Werke. She died without issue, and 
'Pat. Rolls, 7 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 18. her sister Margaret remarried, when 

10 Pat. Rolls, 20 Edw. IV. pt. ii. i and 5. George Manners, son and heir of 

the 3rd daughter Eleanor, who had 
married Sir Robert Manners, in- 
herited the honours of the house of 
Ros of Hamlake. 



BRADFIELD. 257 

that the said Edmond is not of sufficient disscrecion to guyde himself 
and his lyvelode, nor able to serve his Highness after his duetie . . . 
enacteth . . . that Thomas Lovell, Knyght, have the guydyng and 
governaunce of the said Edmond from the Fest of Seynt John Baptist in 
the second yere of the Reigne of our Sovereign Lord, as well of the said 
Edmond as of all the said . . . Lord Shippes, .... heredita- 
ments and possessions ... to the said Edmond as is afore rehersed 
restored . . . and that the said Thomas Lovell ymmediatly after 
the decesse of the said Edmond shall mowe entre into all the . . . 
lordshippes ... to his own use, during the lyfe of the said Thomas 
Lowell." 

Two rents of 40 were limited out of this manor and other lands to 
the said Richard Roos " Squier " for life, and Elizabeth, Duchess of Norfolk, 
the latter to the use of the marriage of Mary and Elizabeth, daughters of 
the said Richard Roos. Edmund de Ros died unmarried I3th Oct. 1508. 

Finally, in 1539,' a grant of the manor was made to Sir Thomas Jermyn, 
and particulars for the grant are still preserved and referred to in the gth 
Rep. of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records. 2 This Thomas Jermyn 
died 8th Oct. 1552, 3 from which time to the time of Sir Thomas Jermyn, 
who succeeded his father in 1614, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Rushbrook, in this Hundred. Sir Thomas Jermyn sold the 
manor in 1620 to Arthur Young. From him it passed to his son and heir, 
Arthur Young, who died nth March, 1690, his wife Elizabeth, daughter of 
Bartholomew Canham, surviving him for 14 years. On her death 25th 
Oct. 1704, the manor passed to their son, Bartholomew Young, who died 
i2th Aug. 1724, at the age of 68, when the manor passed to his son, Arthur 
Young, LL.D., for 40 years rector of the parish and prebendary of the church 
of Canterbury. 4 He dedicated to Dr. Wilcocks, Bishop of Rochester, in 
1734, a work entitled " An Historical Dissertation on Idolatrous Corrup- 
tions in Religion." He married Ann Lucretia, daughter of John Couss- 
maker, of Weybridge, co. Surrey, and died 26th June, 1759, aged 66, 
leaving his widow, Ann Lucretia, who survived till 6th Oct. 1785, when 
their younger son, Arthur Young, the celebrated agriculturist, became 
lord. ' 

Arthur Young was a prolific writer, a man of keen observation, who had a 
profound knowledge of the character of soils and their adaptability for the 
purposes of agriculture. His works dealing with agricultural and political 
economy were translated into most of the important languages of Europe, 
and his indefatigable exertions in the promotion of agriculture and the 
amelioration of the surroundings of the country labourer stand as an 
imperishable memorial to his name. He was secretary to the Board of 
Agriculture, and a member of the Royal Society for nearly half a century. 5 

He married Martha, daughter of Martha Allen, of Lynn, who died 8th 
April, 1815, at the age of 75. Arthur Young died 20th Feb. 1820, at the 
age of 79. During the last 10 years of his life he was blind, but with the 
aid of an amanuensis he still devoted his time to the cultivation of his 
favourite pursuits, and was succeeded by his only son, the Rev. Arthur 

1 A fine of the manor seems to have been 2 Anp. ii. p. 212. 

levied by Thomas Jermyn, senior, ' I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 66. 

and others in 1529 against Thomas, 4 D.N.B. Ixiii. 357. 

Earl of Rutland, and others (Fine, 5 D.N.B. (1909) xxi. 1272. 
Mich. 21 Hen. VIII. 

JI 



258 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Young. This gentleman compiled for the Board of Agriculture in 1807 
" A General Report on Inclosures," and in 1808 the " Survey of the 
Agriculture of Sussex." 

Page informs us that Mr. Young on more than one occasion gave 
expression to some very singular ideas on politics, and soon after the peace 
published a declaration in the newspapers saying that he had purchased 
lands in the Crimea, where no tax-gatherer is seen, and inviting his country- 
men to emigrate with him to that blissful region. He was on his return 
through Russia from selling this tract of country, said to amount to 10,000 
acres, purchased by him in 1810 (after drawing up " A Statistical and 
Agricultural Survey of the Government of Moscow," by the appointment 
of Alexander, Emperor of Russia, in 1805), when his death occurred at 
Kaffa, in the Crimea, 24th Sept. 1827, in the 57th year of his age, 1 when his 
estate devolved on his sister, and was recently vested in the late Arthur 
John Young, who in 1857 erected the present Bradfield Hall on the site 
of the old mansion house. 

Arms of YOUNG : Argent, a bend cottised, and lion rampant Sable. 
Of BADLESMERE : Arg. a fesse betw. 2 bars gamelles Gu. 

SUTTON HALL MANOR. 

This was vested in Thomas, Lord Roos, at the time of his attainder 
in 1461, and was the same year granted by the Crown to John Gerveys 
or Jervase, and passed to Jernace, his daughter and heir, who married Robert 
or Thomas Russell, brother of John, Earl of Bedford, and their daughter 
Jane married Edmund Wright. This manor, according to Davy, was in 
1575 vested in William Spring, and in 1609 in Robert Cutter. 

Another Manor of Bradfield was in the time of Rich. II. held by William 
de Ufford, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, who died in 1382 without issue, 2 when it 
passed to his three sisters and coheirs Cecilie, married to John, 3rd Lord 
Willoughby de Eresby ; Catherine, married to Robert, Lord Scales ; and 
Margaret, married to William, Lord Ferrers, of Groby, but eventually this 
manor seems to have fallen, probably in division on partition to the 
Willoughby family, and may have been enjoyed by John, 3rd Lord 
Willoughby, in right of his wife, but certainly was by their son, Robert de 
Willoughby, 4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby, nephew and one of the 
coheirs of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk. From this time to the time 
of Christopher de Willoughby, 8th Lord Willoughby, the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate Hundred, this 
manor being specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Elizabeth, 3rd 
wife of the 4th lord in I396, 3 and of the widow of the 5th lord in 1433.* 

Sir Christopher, 8th Lord, on his marriage with Margery, daughter of 
Sir William Jenney, of Knoddishall, made a settlement of this manor in 
1476. The licence for Sir Christopher to grant for the purposes of this 
settlement will be found on the Patent Rolls for 1476. It authorises the 
grant to be made of the manor held in chief with the exception of one acre 
to William Jenney, Edmund Jenney, and others in fee to hold to themselves 
and the heirs of the said Edmund. 5 

On Sir Christopher's death he was succeeded by his widow Margery 
or Maria, who died i6th May, I5i5, 6 and was succeeded by Sir Christopher's 

' Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 708. 4 I.P.M., 12 Hen. VI. 43. 

I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 5 Pat. Rolls, 16 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 10. 

'I.P.M., 20 Rich. II. 54. I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29. 






BRADFIELD. 259 

eldest son William, who inherited the Barony of Willoughby de Eresby 
as gth Baron on the death of Joane Welles, daughter of Robert, 5th Lord 
Welles and 8th Lord Willoughby, in 1506. He died in 1525, and his 
widow, Lady Mary Salines, held the manor during her life, and upon her 
decease it passed to Katherine, their only daughter and heir, who married 
Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and afterwards Richard Bertie, of 
Bersted, in Essex. 

This manor was in 1855 said to be vested in the Rev. Jas. William Wenn. 

A fine was levied of a moiety of the manor in 1517 by John Horsman 
and others against Robert Barrelland Joan his wife. 1 It included the 
advowson of the church of Bury St. Edmunds. There were four fines 
levied of this moiety of the manor during the reign of Hen. VIII. one in 
1526 by John Spencer, clerk, against Robert Wright and others ; a a second 
in 1526 by John Spencer and others against Robert Barell and others ; 3 
a third in 1539 by Richard Spencer and others against Robert Barell and 
others ; 4 and a fourth by Anne Wright against Edmund Wright. 5 Two fines 
of the manor were levied in the time of Queen Elizabeth, one in 1570 by 
William Spring against Edmund Wright and others, 6 and the other in 1594 
by Robert Cutler against William Sprynge and others. 7 

BRADFIELD ST. CLARE MANOR. 

The manor was so called from the St. Cleers or De Sancto Claro, who 
were its ancient lords. It was vested in Gerebert de St. Cleer in 1207. 
Of this family was Hamo de St. Cleer, mentioned in the Pipe Rolls in the 
ist of King Hen. II. and also in the register of the Abbey of Colchester. 
The chief seat of Gerebert de St. Cleer was situated in this parish, within 
a noble park. He lived in the reign of Rich. I. and in 1207 sold lands at 
Marlingford, in Norfolk. In 1232 he conveyed lands in this parish to John 
de St. Cleer, probably his son, who died in 1253," when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, John de St. Cleer.* The manor was held of the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds by service of I J knights' fees, i^d. hidage,6s. o^d. to the guard 
of Norwich Castle, and half a load of oats to the abbot. 

We find also in 1256 stated on the Patent Rolls that John de St. Clare 
held 2 knights' fees in Bradfield St. Clare and Wattisfield of the abbey, 10 
and in 1302 John de St. Cleer did homage to the abbot for this manor. 
The St. Clare family was a family of great honour and antiquity, and came 
in with the Conquest. Hugh was one of the witnesses to King Stephen's 
charter in 1136. In 1317 the manor, with the advowson, was passed by 
John de St. Cleer to William de Montechensy, of Edwardstone." 

William de Montechensy died in 1337,' "when the manor passed to his 
son and heir Thomas, who was followed by John Rattlesden, son of Sir 
John Rattlesden, whose daughter Joan married ist Robert Hovel, and 
2ndly Robert de Monceux, who held the manor in her right in 1393, 
according to Blomefield. There is a fine levied in 1362 by Sir Thomas 
Mounchesy, Knt., John Harecourt, parson of the church of Osemundeston, 

'Fine, Easter, 9 Hen. VIII. 7 Fine, Mich. 36-37 Eliz. 

2 Fine, Easter, 18 Hen. VIII. 8 I.P.M., 37 Hen. III. 63, or File 15 (4). 

3 Fine, Easter, 18 Hen. VIII. i Extent, 12 Edw. I.; Add. 14849. 

4 Fine, Trin. 31 Hen. VIII. '" Pat. Rolls, 40 Hen. III. 13. 

'Fine. Hil. 2g Hen. VIII. " Feet of Fines, n Edw. II. 53. 

6 Fine, Mich. 12 Eliz. "I.P.M., i Edw. III. 18; 13 Edw. III. 26. 



26o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

William de Walsokene, clerk, and William Berard, which included not 
only the manor but the advowson of Bradfield church and the chapel of 
Leleseye.' 

However this may be, the manor was certainly vested in Sir John 
de St. Clere, son of Sir John de St. Clere, in the reign of King Hen. IV., 
and passed to his son, Sir Philip de St. Clere,' who died in 1408, leaving a 
widow Margaret, daughter and at length heir of Sir Michael de Loyyne, 
of Burston, Surrey, and two sons John, who died in 1423 without issue, 
and Thomas, who died in 1434, leaving three daughters and coheirs, Elizabeth, 
Alianora, and Editha. 

The manor subsequently became vested in the Jerveys or Jarneys 
or Gervys by purchase from John Badwell. Roger Jerveys died seised 
3Oth Sept. 1493, John Jerveys aged 2 1 being his son and heir. In the inquis. 
p.m. of this Roger Jerveys, 3 which includes " Bradfield Sender Manor and 
advowson and Manor of Capellys al. Felsham Hall ist worth 10. 2nd 
worth 405. held of the Abbot of Bury by knight service," and it is stated 
that John Legat and Robert Crasche being seised gave to said Roger 
Jervys in tail, with remainder to Katherine and Anne, his sisters, in tail, 
remainder to Thomas and John Jerveys, his brothers, successively in 
tail, remainder to Agnes Braybroke in tail, remainder to Stephen Fabyan 
and John Resshbroke in fee to use of the will of John Jerveys his father. 

The manor and the advowson passed to Sir Thomas Jermyn in 1536 
by fine levied between himself and Robert Barfote and others 4 and Sir 
Thomas died seised in 1552, from which time to the death of Sir Charles 
Davers, Bart., without issue in 1806 the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Rushbrook, in this Hundred. The manor was, however, 
settle4 I4th Nov. 1566, on the marriage of Sir Ambrose's son, John Jermyn 
with Margaret Stanley, daughter of Edward, Earl of Derby. 5 The manor 
subsequently became vested in the Wenyeves, of Brettenham, and in 1764 
John Wenyeve was lord, who dying in i8oi, 6 it passed to his son and heir, 
George Weneyeve, and on his death in 1814 went to his sister and coheir 
Henrietta, married to Lieut.-Col. John Carnac. In 1829 the manor was 
vested in the Rev. Robert Davers, natural son of Sir Charles Davers, and 
his (Robert's) trustees apparent still hold the manor or until recently 
exercised manorial rights here. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions taken at Bury St. Edmunds in 
1669 we find particulars of an action between Thomas Constable and William 
Rose and others relating to this manor and the advowson of the church, and to 
" Bringley's Grove," ' Rawood," " Chinsall Wood," and " Mumses Park," 
and as to whether manor and woods were parcel of the late monastery of 
Bury and also as to tithes. 

Arms of St. CLEER : Az. a sun in his glory, proper, differing apparently 
from the branch at Withersfield, in Risbridge Hundred, though the same 
family. 

BRADFIELD ST. GEORGE OR MONK'S BRADFIELD MANOR. 

This was so called because the Abbot and monks of St. Edmunds were 
owners of the manor and advowson by the grant of Earl Ulfkettel and 

1 Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 42. 4 Fine, Mil. 28 Hen. VIII. 

'See Manor of Withersfield , in Risbridge 5 This John Jerrayn died without issue. 

Hundred. 6 See Manor of Brettenham in Cosford 
3 8 Hen. VII. 813. Hundred. 






BRADFIELD. 



261 



Bishop Alfric. At the Dissolution the manor and advowson were granted 
in 1540 to Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrooke. The grant included the 
Manor of Stanton and divers woods in Felsham, Bradfield Monks, and 
Bradfield St. Clare, and the advowsons of the churches of Bradfield St. George 
and Stanton, belonging lately to the monastery of Bury. 1 

The manor subsequently passed to the Davers, with the Manor of 
Bradfield St. Clare, in the same line of devolution as the manor of Rush- 
brooke, in this Hundred. 

It is now vested in Adolphus G. Maskell, of Chelmsford, in Essex. 



'S.P. 1540, 436(3i). 




262 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

DRINKSTONE. 

[HERE were three separate estates in this place in Saxon 
times. The first was held by a freeman under the Abbot 
of Ely by commendation in the soc of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and consisted of a carucate of land, 8 bordars, 
2 thralls (which were reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
ij ploughteams, and 4 acres of meadow, the whole valued 
at i6s. The Domesday tenant was Robert, Earl of Moretaigne. 1 

The second was held by n freemen, and consisted of a carucate of 
land, 6 bordars, 3 ploughteams, and 8 acres of meadow, valued at IDS. 8d. 
In the time of the Confessor they could give and sell their lands so that the 
soc over the land remained in the possession of the abbot. At the 
time of the Survey this estate belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 1 

The third was the land of the Abbot of Ely, and consisted of 2 carucates 
of land, and a church advowson with 12 acres, 15 bordars, 6 thralls, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging to the men. Also wood sufficient 
to support 100 hogs, 6 acres of meadow, 2 horses at the hall, 10 beasts, 32 
hogs, 30 sheep, and 8 goats valued at 405. When the Survey was taken 
some of these details had been altered ; there were only 7 bordars, 4 thralls, 
and i ploughteam belonging to the men, while the value was then 6os. 
but it was let to farm at loos, and could not render so much. The whole 
estate was 8 quarantenes long and 7 broad, and paid in a gelt n<2. 3 

MANOR OF DRINKSTONE HALL OR LOVAYNE'S MANOR. 

In the time of Hen. III. the lordship was held by Matthew de Lovaine 
or Loveyne, 4 and on his death in 1262 it passed to his widow Muriel, who 
had a market, pillory, and ducking-stool, and view of frankpledge here in 
1267,' also a fair. 8 On her death the manor passed to her son and heir, 
Matthew de Lovaine, who died in 1302. 7 From this time to the time of 
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, the celebrated favourite of Queen 
Elizabeth, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Bildeston, 
in Cosford Hundred." Amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum is a deed dated loth April, 12 Rich. II. [1386], by which Alianora, 
who was wife of Sir William " Bourgchier," Knt., grants to John Spicer, 
vicar of the church of Dunmowe, John Basset, John Digche, clerk, and 
William atte Fen certain manors in Essex and the Manors of Drinkstone, 
Shelland, and Felsham called Swaynes, and the advowson of the church 
of Drinkstone. 

This manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Henry 
Bourchier, ist Earl of Essex, who died 4th April, 1483,' and amongst 
the State Papers in 1538, a year before the death of Henry Bourchier, 
2nd Earl of Essex, we find a letter of his saying that Thomas Wrenn never 
had any lease of the Earl's Manor of Drinkstone. His only interest in it 
was under a lease made to his uncle, John Wrenn, deceased, which was 
forfeited before his death by laws of the realm. Moreover, since his uncle's 



'Dom. ii. 291. 

2 Dom. ii. 362*. 

5 Dom. ii. 3816. 

H.R. ii. 153. Hundred. 

5 H.R. ii. 196. "I.P.M., i Rich. III. 31. 



6 Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. 4. 

'I.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 37, Extent. 

See, too, Hopton Manor, in Blackbourn 

Hundred. 
'I.P.M., i Rich. III. 31. 



DRINKSTONE. 263 

death he had felled, stabbed, and stocked 800 oaks as presented in the 
manor court, for which he had been indicted at the assize, &c. Neverthe- 
less he had felled and stocked additional 100 oaks, as would be seen by 
letter of Sir George Somerset, the Earl's steward. 1 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1541 by William, Earl of Southampton, 
and others against Sir William Parr, Lord Parr, and others,'' and in respect of 
" Drinkstone, Shelland, and Lovaynes Manors," in 1591, by John Weaver 
and others against Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex. They both related 
also to tenements in Woolpit and Rattlesden and elsewhere. 3 Robert 
Devereux, 2nd Earl, married Frances, daughter and heir of Sir Francis 
Walsingham, and widow of Sir Philip Sidney, and losing his head on the 
scaffold 25th Feb. 1600, the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, K.G., in 1638. He died I4th Sept. 1646, and 
was interred with national obsequies in Westminster Abbey, the two 
Houses of Parliament attending the funeral. He married ist Lady Frances 
Howard, daughter of Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, from whom he was divorced, 
and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Paulet, of Eddington, co. 
Wilts., one of the natural sons of William, Marquess of Winchester, and 
had a son Robert, who died in infancy. 

Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, seems to have disposed of the 
manor during his lifetime, for it was held in 1609 by Sir James Skudamore, 
Knt. 

The manor, to which the advowson was appendant,was subsequently 
held by George Goodday, of Fornham All Saints, from which time to the 
time of John Moseley in 1840 the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Rattlesden, in this Hundred. 

This manor and that of Rattlesden were in Sept. 1829, offered for sale 
in London, with two farms of Rattlesden Hall and Drinkstone Hall, and 
three other farms there, and at Gedding and Felsham, adjoining parishes, 
containing woods and plantations about 1,070 acres. 4 The same properties 
were again offered for sale I4th Aug. 1838. The Drinkstone Hall farm 
was stated to contain 3093. 2r. 24p., the rent being 295. 55. per annum, 
also na. 3r. i6p. of wood and plantations. The Manor of Drinkstone 
with Lovanes was stated to consist of 2,000 acres producing 99. 145. 3^. 
a year. Land tax 22. 95. a year. The White House farm was stated 
to be 373 acres, cottages and gardens. The Rattlesden Hall farm was 
stated to consist of 155 acres, and the manor to produce 119. 4$. a year. 
High Town Green farm of 102 acres. The total contents were 1,041 acres. 
The property was knocked down for 32,100, the timber to be paid for in 
addition at a valuation. As a matter of fact, the property was bought by 
the owner, John Moseley. 5 A sale was effected in 1841 of Drinkstone 
Hall, apart from the manor, with 232a. or.36p. of arable land, 65a. 2r. 22p. 
meadow and pasture, and na. 3r. i6p. of wood and plantation, to James 
Gudgeon, solicitor, of Stowmarket, for John George Hart, for 7,000. 

At the sale referred to, which was on the 26th Oct. 1841, the manor 
was bought in at 2,400. The fines, which are arbitrary, were stated to 
have averaged in the 10 years preceding 1838 82. 2s. per annum, and the 
quit and free rents to 17. 125. 3jrf., making a total arising from the manor 
of 99. 155. &d. per annum. 6 



1 S.P. 1538 i. 364. Ib. App. 10. *Bury Post, 26th Aug. 1829. 

'Fine, Hil. 33 Hen. VIII. 5 Ipswich Journal, i8th Aug. 1838. 

3 Fine. Mich. 33-34 Eliz. 6 Ipswich Journal, 3oth Oct. 1841. 



264 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The advowson was purchased by the Rev. Henry Patteson, and has 
since been acquired by John Edgar Rust. In 1855 the manor was still 
vested in John Moseley. White states that about 1760 the Rev. Richard 
Moseley, a rector and lord of the manor, built here a large and handsome 
house for his residence, and it was then called the Rectory House, and 
occupied by the incumbent ; but it did not belong to the living. This no 
doubt is the Richard Moseley who left 700 to be invested in the Funds 
for the support of day and Sunday schools for teaching poor children of 
Drinkstone and Rattlesden to read and write, which legacy was laid out 
in the purchase of 1,091. 35. 6d. 3 per cent, consols, the dividends being 
employed in supporting schools in the two places last named. 

The manor is mentioned in a fine levied in 1550 by William Rysby 
against Sir Nicholas le Strange. 1 

HALLS al. TIMPERLEY'S MANOR. 

In 1402 the lordship was held by John Hall. He was a party to a 
feoff ment made in 1395 by Richard Parmounter and John Nykeman, of 
Rattlesden, to William Copynger, " clericus " of Buxhale, John Chetilbere 
and John Goodwyf, of Drinkstone, of all the lands in Drinkstone which 
they lately held by feoffment of Henry Helle and John Carter, of Cokefeld, 
on payment of 5 marks yearly for the next five years." 

The lordship was held of the Manor of Combs and subsequently 
passed to William Timperley, of Hintlesham Hall, son of Nicholas Timperley, 
who died seised of it 1st April, 1528, 3 from which time to the time of Nicholas 
Timperley, who succeeded his father in 1593, the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Hintlesham, in Samford Hundred. After this 
the manor is difficult to trace, and there are various conflicting devolutions. 
In 1612 the manor is said to have been vested in Isaac Mootham, from 
whom in 1658 it passed to Isaac Mootham, on whose death in 1663 it went 
to another Isaac Mootham, who died in 1703. Another account states 
that the manor had before this passed to Thomas Wood, D.D., 
Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, son of Thomas Wood, of Hackney, and 
younger brother of Sir Henry Wood, of Loudham Hall, and that he died 
seised i8th April, 1692, leaving the same by his will dated nth Nov. 1690, 
to his nephew, Henry Webbe, 4 he having to take the name of Wood. The 
only matter of certainty is that both these accounts of the devolution are 
inaccurate. In the great deed of partition of the estates of Sir Henry 
Wood 5th Dec. 1747, a deed of 23rd May, 1671, is recited, in which Sir 
Henry Wood is shown then to have held the manor under the name of 
" Drinkston-cum-Temperley," and in fact he conveyed it by this recited 
deed to trustees. The devolution would then be as the Manors of Dunning- 
worth, in Plomesgate Hundred, and Staverton.in Eyke, in Loes Hundred, 
until 1747, when by the partition this manor was allotted, with the Manor 
of Whepstead, in Thingoe Hundred, to Penelope, wife of Timothy Lee, 
and widow of John Pryte, 5 of St. Paul, Covent Garden, surgeon. 

Henry had a son, Henry Webbe, who died without issue. 

Extracts from Court Rolls of this manor, 1563, will be found amongst 
the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 6 

1 Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. 5 In the account of Blythford Manor, in 
* 19 Rich. II., Stowe Ch. 240. Blything Hundred, by mistake (p. 

'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 15. 20, line 15) printed " Prim." 

4 See Manor of Elmswell. in Blackbourn 'Add. Ch. 10535. 
Hundred. 



FELSHAM. 
FELSHAM. 



265 




N estate consisting of 3 carucates of land was held here in 
the Confessor's time by 25 freemen. To it were attached 
a villein and 5 bordars. At the time of the Survey a caru- 
cate and a half of land were held by Adelund, and 4 carucates 
by eight freemen, valued at 505. Also among them all 
were 8 ploughteams and 5 acres of meadow, and they could 
give and seU their lands, the soc remaining in the possession 
of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, to whom the estate belonged when the Survey 
was taken. The value was formerly 305., but was doubled at that time. 

There was also a church advowson with 10 acres of free land in alms. 
It was 8 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 5^.' 

FELSHAM HALL MANOR (OR CAPELS ?). 

This was the estate of Ulfketel, Earl of the East Angles, which he granted 
to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and at the time of the Survey was held by 
Adedelung of the abbot. 

It was later held by Robert de Pinges, and in 1268 by William Peche, 
who this year had a grant of a market, a fair, and free warren here. 2 He 
was succeeded about 1313 by Edmund Peche, and this year a fine was 
levied of the manor by Hugh de Morieux and John his son against the said 
Edmund Peche and Margaret his wife. 3 

Davy states that in 1344 Gilbert Peche was lord, but it is apprehended 
that under the above fine the manor passed to the Morieux family, and in 
X 333 Sir Thomas de Morieux, son of Hugh, apparently held this and Maiden 
Hall Manor. This year [1333] Sir Thomas levied a fine of the manor against 
Walter de Navetton and Joan his wife. 4 Sir Thomas Morieux, son of 
Sir Thomas, from whom it passed to his daughter and heir Mary, married 
to Sir Richard Walkfare, and from them to their daughter and heir Eleanor, 
married to Sir John le Strange. The manor passed from them to their 
son and heir, John le Strange, from which time to the death of Sir Thomas 
le Strange in 1544 the manor descended in the same course as the Manor 
of Thorpe Morieux, in Cosford Hundred. The manor is specifically 
mentioned in the fine levied by William Rysby against Sir Nicholas 
le Strange in 1550. 5 Davy, however, states that John Jervois died seised 
of the manor in 1493, when it passed to his son and heir, John Jervois. 

In 1827 the manor was vested in John Haynes Harrison, a major in 
the army. He was the son of the Rev. John Harrison, rector of Faulk- 
bourn and Earl Hanningfield, in Essex, and Anne his wife, daughter of 
the Rev. Thos. Bernard. John Haynes Harrison married Sarah Thomas, 
daughter and heir of the Rev. John Fiske, rector of Thorpe Morieux, and 
granddaughter of Samuel Thomas, of Lavenham. He resided at Copdock 
Hall, in Essex, and died 2nd Dec. 1839, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Fiske Goodeve Fiske Harrison, who married at Paris 27th March, 
1826, Jane, daughter of James Goodeve Sparrow, of Gosfield Place, Essex. 
The manor is now vested in Haynes Thomas Harrison. 



'Dom. ii. 3626, 369. 

2 Chart. Rolls, 52 Hen. III. pt. i. 10. 



KI 



3 Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. VI. ,32, Gilbert, son 
of John Peche, app. clam. 

4 Feet of Fine, 6 Edw. III. 6. 

5 Fine, Easter, 4 Edw. VI. 



ttf 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



A fine was levied of a moiety of the " Manor of Felsham " (apparently 
of this manor) and Thorp Morieux.and of the advowsons in 1414, by William 
Clopton, William Rokewood, Thomas Hethe, of Mildenhall, Edmund 
Wynter, Thomas Hethe, of Saxham, Giles de Perge, and Walter .... 
against Richard Hethe and Elizabeth his wife. 1 

A fine was levied of " Felsham Hall Manor " in 1565 by William Harwell 
against Robert Grene.' 

Sir John Cullum has a note on the occupiers of the principal mansion 
house of Felsham, which is of interest. He says: "John Reynolds, Esq., 
who lived in the Capital Mansion in this Parish (Felsham) thought differently 
from all men whilst he lived and resolved to continue this absurdity after 
he was dead : and was therefore buried in a mausoleum which he had 
erected in a Field at the back of his house. [This rather looks as if he had 
been not merely occupier but owner of the Mansion.] He died in August, 
1759, aged 85, and left his estate to a Dr. Scott, of London (almost a stranger) 
upon condition that he also sh d be buried in the same, but he was buried 
at Norwich in Dec. 1769. It is said this Scott foretold precisely the day 
of his death, and mentioned it in his will. Joseph Nichol Scott, brought 
up to succeed his father as a Calvinist divine, became an Arian and a 
Physician. He dreamed one night, as it is said, that he should die that 
day 12 months, of which he made a memorandum, but forgot it till the day 
came, when he was reminded of the day of the month, and this dream 
recurred to his memory at a tea party. He died at 9 p.m. of an apoplexy. 
He was very corpulent, and the hearse broke down as he was carrying to 
the Old or Independent Meeting house at night." 

MANOR OF BROOK HALL al. LOVAYNES. 

This was the lordship of Matthew de Lovaine in the time of King 
Edw. I. He died seised of the manor in I3O2, 3 when it passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas de Lovaine. He and Joan his wife in 1314 levied a fine 
of the manor against Matthew, parson of Drinkstone church, and Richard 
of Dunmowe, parson of Parva Erstangy church. 4 Thomas de Lovaine 
died without issue, and was succeeded by his brother, Matthew de Lovaine, 
on whose death in 1320 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas 
de Lovaine, who died in I345. 5 

The overlordship of the manor was in 1382 vested in William de Ufford, 6 
Earl of Suffolk, and Joan his wife, for in the inquis. p.m. of the former this 
year it is found he died seised of one knight's fee here called "Old Halle and 
another called Le Brookhalle." ; 

Davy says that in 1379 tne manor was in Thomas de Morieux, who died 
in 1392, when it passed to his sister and coheir Mary, married to Sir Richard 
Walkfare, and from him passed to his daughter and heir Alianora, who 
married Sir John L'Estrange. We meet with a deed dated loth April, 12 
Rich. II. [1386] amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum, by 
which Alianora, who was wife of Sir William " Bourgchier," Knt., grants 
this manor under the name of the " Manor of Felsham called Lovaynes," 



1 Feet of Fines, 2 Hen. V. 10. 
"Fine, Easter, 7 Eliz. 
M.P.M., 30 Edw. I. 37. 
4 Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. II. 37. 



19 Edw. 
Manor, 



III. 



in 



44. See 
Cosford 



'Extent, I.P.M., 

Bildeston 

Hundred. 
'See Parham Hall Manor, in Plomesgate, 

and Combs Manor, in Stow Hundred. 
'I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 



FELSHAM. 267 

to John Spicer, vicar of the church of Dunmowe, John Basset, John Digche, 
clerk, and William atte Fen. 1 

Sir John L'Estrange was of Hunston or Hunstanton, in Norfolk, and 
died seised in 1418, from which time to the death of William Risbie in 1687 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Thorpe Morieux, 
in Cosford Hundred. 

On the 24th Jan. 1645, we meet with a petition of Thomas Brundishe, 
of Felsham, that Sir Nathaniel Brews may be ordered to institute him to 
the rectory of Felsham church upon the presentation of John Risby the 
patron. 2 The order desired was ultimately made. 3 

MAIDEN HALL MANOR. 

This was apparently the lordship of Hugh de Morieux in 1234, and in 
1332 his son, Sir Thomas de Morieux, held, as this year he presented to the 
living. In 1379 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas Morieux, son of Sir 
Thomas, his holding here consisting of a fee. On his death the manor 
passed to his daughter and coheir Mary, married to Richard Walkfare, 
and from them to their daughter and heir Eleanor, married to Sir John 
L'Estrange, of Hunston or Hunstanton, who died in 1418. From this time 
the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Thorpe Morieux, 
in Cosford Hundred, through the L'Estranges to the Risbies. The manor 
is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John " Straunge " and Alice 
his wife in I436, 4 and in that of Henry " Straunge " in 1485. 5 And we 
find amongst the State Papers in 1608 a licence to William Risby and his 
heirs to keep a market and two yearly fairs at Maydenhall, in Felsham. 8 



'Add. Ch. 7906. 4 I.P.M., 15 Hen. VI. 52. 

2 6th Rep. Hist. Com. 95. 5 I.P.M., i Hen. VII. 52. 

3 2i Car. 4.; House of Lords Journal, viii. 6 S.P. 1608, 406. 
122. 




268 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



FORNHAM ST. GEN EV I EVE. 

HAMLET was held here in the Confessor's time by the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, and again when the Survey was 
taken, consisting of 2 carucates of land. It is not very 
distinctly put in the Survey, which says : " Peter has of 
them 2 carucates. Forty acres he holds from the Abbot, 
2 villeins and 2 bordars have one carucate of them. And 
the Hall to which they belong is in another Hundred." 

At the time of the Survey Ralph held from the abbot 12 acres of the 

2 carucates, 8 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging 
to the men, 3 thralls, 4 acres of meadow, 3 mills, i rouncy, and 100 sheep. 
Further, six freemen, a villein, and 5 bordars had a carucate of land and 

3 ploughteams, and had power to give and sell their lands, the soc and 
service remaining in the abbot's possession. They were valued at los. 
There was also a church advowson with 14 acres of free land for alms. 

The hamlet was valued at 4. It was 9 quarentenes long and 4 broad, 
and paid in a gelt 3d.' 



FORNHAM ST. GENEVIEVE MANOR. 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds had a villa here and a water mill for corn, 
and the estate was known in early times by the name of Abbot's Mill. On 
the suppression of the religious houses the manor was granted in 1539 by 
King Hen. VIII. to Sir Thomas Kytson, Knt., of Hengrave Hall, who 
on account of his extensive commercial transactions was styled " Kytson 
the merchant." The manor passed from Sir Thomas the father to Sir 
Thomas the son. 1 Davy says the latter had licence to alienate the manor 
to John Coggeshall in 1587. He married 1st Elizabeth, daughter of George 
Bacon, of Hessett, and 2ndly Ann, daughter of John Wright alias Reve, of 
Thwaite, and died in 1599, when it passed to his son and heir, George 
Coggeshall, who married Anne, daughter of Edwin Owinge, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and had licence to alienate in 1606 to George Gipps, who died in 
1617. It is true a fine was levied in 1588 of the manor by John Coggeshall 
against Sir Thomas Kytson. 3 But the probability is that the interest of 
the Coggeshalls was legal only and not beneficial, for it seems that on the 
death of Sir Thomas Kytson's son in 1602 this estate became tHe property 
of the family of Darcy, Baron Darcy, of Chiche, and in the next generation 
passed into the hands of Sir John Gage, Bart., of Firle, Sussex, who married 
Penelope, daughter and coheir of Thomas, 3rd Baron Darcy, afterwards 
created Earl Rivers, and it was subsequently held by the Gipps family. On 
the death of George Gipps the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard 
Gipps. 4 

On his marriage with Margaret, daughter of Valentine Pell the elder, 
of Lune, co. Norfolk, he settled the manor by deed dated 4th April, 1616, in 
consideration of 500 paid by the father of the bride, under the description 

1 Dom. ii. 362. 4 These Coggeshalls held also the Manor of 

1 See Hengrave Manor, in Thingoe Hundred. Nether Hall, Old Newton, in Stow 

3 Fine, Hil. 30 Eliz. Hundred. 



FORNHAM ST. GENE VIE VE. 269 

of " All those the Manors or Lordships of Fornham St. Geneveve and the 
priory with the appurtenances in the County of Suffolk with the Mansion 
House with the appurtenances situated there in the tenure of George 
Coggeshall and all other the lands tenements and hereditaments with the 
appurtenances therein particularly expressed abbuttalled and mentioned 
situate in Fornham St. Martin, Fornham St. Genevese and Fornham All 
Saints which George Gippes deceased father of the said Richard Gippes 
purchased respectively of George Coggeshall of Fornham St. Genevese 
gent. William Mason of Gray's Inn Middlesex gent., John Coggeshall 
(therein expressed to be deceased and father of George Coggeshall) to the 
use of Richard Gippes until marriage then to the use of him and the 
said Margaret for her jointure and of the heirs of the body of the said 
Richard Gippes upon the body of the said Margaret and in defaullt of such 
issue to the use of George Gippes one of the brothers of the said Richard 
and the heirs of his body and in default to the use of Thomas Gippes, 
youngest brother of the said Richard and his heirs and in default to the 
right heirs of the said Richard for ever." 

The marriage took place on the 8th April, 1616. Richard Gippes died 
about 1644, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Gipps, 
on whose death about 1666 it passed to his son and heir, Sir Richard Gipps. 
He was knighted at Little Saxham 2Oth Oct. 1676, and married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Edmund Poley, of Badley. He died 28th Sept. 1681, and 
she in Nov. 1715, when the manor passed to their son and heir, Richard 
Gipps, of Badley, a major in the army. He is described in a deed by which 
he mortgaged the manor for 1,000 to Edward Ventris, of the Inner Temple, 
by deeds dated igth and 2Oth Feb. 1706, as of " Little Hollingshearth alias 
Horringer." This mortgage was paid off and a reconveyance taken 3rd 
March, 1720. He sold the manor in 1721 to Edward Whitaker, serjeant- 
at-law, of whom Samuel Kent purchased the same in 1731. Mr. Kent 
represented the borough of Ipswich in Parliament for several years, was 
surveyor to Chelsea Hospital, and High Sheriff in 1730. He was the son 
of Thomas Kent, of Christchurch, Southwark, an eminent Norway merchant. 
Samuel Kent is described in leases in 1717 as of " St. Saviour, Southwark, 
distiller," afterwards of Vauxhall, where he carried on business as wholesale 
distiller with his son Thomas. By his will he settled his estates in strict 
settlement and died 8th Oct. 1759, his will being proved P.C.C. igth Oct. 
1759. He married Sarah, only daughter of Richard Deane, citizen and 
distiller, of London, and left an only daughter surviving, Sarah, married 
to Sir Charles Egleton, Knt., son of John Egleton, citizen and goldsmith, 
of London, High Sheriff of the City of London in 1743, her marriage 
settlement being dated 26th Jan. 1742. Sir Charles's will and codicils, 
dated 6th July, 1765, loth Sept. 1766, and 8th July, 1768, were proved 
P.C.C. i8th May, 1769. He left an only child, Charles Egleton, who 
assumed the name of Kent in compliance with the will of his grandfather, 
and was created a baronet in 1782. He married 2Oth May, 1771, Mary, 
daughter and coheir of Josias Wordsworth, of Wordsworth, co. York, and 
the marriage settlement is dated 7th and 8th May, 1771. Sir Charles Kent 
sold the manor in 1789 to Bernard Edward Howard, who in 1815 succeeded 
his cousin to the dukedom of Norfolk as I2th Duke. He married in 1789 
the Lady Elizabeth Belayse, 3rd daughter of Henry, last Earl of Fauconberg 
(from whom he was divorced in 1794). He was a Knight of the Garter, 
and died i6th March, 1842, when the manor passed to his only son, Henry 
Charles, the I3th Duke of Norfolk. 



270 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In July, 1843, the estate, comprising the mansion house called Fornham 
Park and pleasure grounds, the manors of Fornham St. Genevieve, Fornham 
St. Martin, with the advowson of the rectory of the last-mentioned of 
these places, two villa residences, a water corn mill, forty cottages, and about 
i, 600 acres of wood, pasture, and arable land, were sold by public auction 
for 75,500, exclusive of the timber, to John Thomas Manners Sutton, 
Baron Manners, of Foston, co. Lincoln, son of Thomas Manners-Sutton, 
Baron Manners, sometime Lord Chancellor of Ireland. 1 Lord Manners 
married 28th Sept. 1848, Lydia Sophia, 3rd daughter of Vice-Admiral 
William Bateman Dashwood, R.N., and in 1862 sold the manor to Sir 
William Gilstrap, Bart., for 85,000. Sir William Gilstrap died in Feb. 
1896, when the manor passed to his relative, George Espec John Manners, 
of Fornham Park, J.P., the present lord. 

Fornham Hall was almost entirely rebuilt by the I2th Duke of Norfolk. 
Though pleasantly situated, the surrounding country is not much to boast 
of. 

A transcript made in the I5th century of deeds relating to the manor, 
rentals, &c.,' will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British 
Museum. 3 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John Curson in 1471. 4 
Arms of GIPPS : Az. a fess between 6 stars Or. 



'Ipswich Journal, 27th May and 22nd 3 Add. MSS. 34689. 

July, 1843. 4 I.P.M., ii. Edw. IV. 32. 

Will. I. 1442. 



FORNHAM ST. MARTIN. 271 

FORNHAM ST. MARTIN. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, and consisted of a carucate of land, 3 villeins, 
4 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne (increased to 2 at the 
time of the Survey), 4 thralls (decreased by i at that time), 
2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 80 sheep, and at the time of the Survey 
12 hogs, and 10 freemen and 6 bordars held 30 acres of land 
with a ploughteam. These were wholly under the abbot 
as to all customs and as to the fold. 

In this place was also an estate of a freeman consisting of 12 acres, 
which land he could give and sell, so that soc, sac, and commendation 
remained in the abbot's possession, and 16 acres of free land in alms 
belonged to the church of this township. The Domesday tenant of the 
manor and estate was the Abbot of St. Edmunds, the value being 4 as 
against the value of 3 in the Confessor's time. 

It was 9 quarentenes long and 7 broad, and paid in a gelt 




MANOR OF FORNHAM ST. MARTIN.. 

This manor, like the Manor of Fornham St. Genevieve, on the 
suppression of the religious houses was granted by the Crown in 1539 to Sir 
Thomas Kitson, Knt., and from this time to 1707 when it passed to Sir 
William Gage, the devolution is the same as that of the Manor of Hengrave, 
in Thingoe Hundred. 

In 1717 Sir William Gage sold this manor to Philip Holman, who sold 
it by deeds dated 24th and 25th April, 1760, to Sir Charles Egleton as 
executor of his father-in-law, Samuel Kent, from whom it has descended 
in the same course of devolution as the Manor of Fornham St. Genevieve, 
and is now vested in George Espec John Manners. 

The manor and advowson were included in the purchase made by 
Lord Manners as mentioned in the account of the Manor of Fornham St. 
Genevieve. 

A I5th century transcript of deeds relating to the manor, rentals, &c., 
Will. 1-1442, will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British 
Museum, 1 and the manor, like that of Fornham St. Genevieve, is also 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John Curson in I47I. 3 

Livery of the manor and advowson was in 1630 made to Thomas, 
Earl Rivers, in right of Lady Mary his wife, daughter of Elizabeth, Lady 
Kitson. 4 



'Dom. ii. 3576, 3616. 'I. P.M., n Edw. IV. 32. 

"Add. 34689. 4 Chancery D.K.R. 43, App. i. p. 155. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



GEDDING. 




\O holdings in this place are mentioned in the Survey. 
The first was formerly the estate of 13 freemen, and con- 

s ' ste( * * 55 acres * ' an d a "d h a 'f a ploughteam. The 

nu>n could give and sell their land, provided the soc 

remained with the abbot. 

The value was formerly i6d. increased to 2s . when the Survey 

was made, at which time the estate was held by the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. There was also a church with 6 acres of free land in alms. 
The Survey says : " It," probably the township, " was 3 quarentenes 
long and 2 broad, and paid in a gelt ^d." Others had holdings here.' 

The second estate was formerly that of 2 freemen under the com- 
mendation and soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of 60 acres 




GEDDING HALL. 

of land, 3 bordars, a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of 
the Survey), and 5 acres of meadow, valued at 55. It was held at the time 
of the Survey under the Lewes exchange by William de Varennes.' 

GEDDING MANOR al. GEDDING HALL MANOR. 

This formed part of the possessions of William de Warren at the time 
of the Survey. The ancient family of Geddyng derive their name from 
the parish of Gedding, and in the time of Rich. I. we find a Gedding holding 
this lordship. A little later in 1196 Adam de Gedding held the fourth 
part of a knight's fee here. The advowson was apparently held with the 
manor, and in the time of King John [1199-1216] we find it recorded that 
William, son of Peter, Archdeacon of Rochester, claimed the right of 
presentation to Gedding church against Robert de Walsham and Basilia 
his wife. The jurors found that William presented on the last vacancy, 
and gave him a writ to the Bishop to admit his clerk, the same being then 
vacant. It is, however, not unlikely that this claim related not to the 



'Dora. ii. 363. 



: Dom. ii. 398. 



GEDDING. 



273 




274 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK, 

advowson of the Suffolk Gedding church but of Gedding in Kent. The 
manor continued during the I3th and well into the I4th century in the 
Gedding family. 

At the close of the I3th century the manor was vested in Robert de 
Gedding, and passed on his death about 1308 to his son and heir, Edmund 
de Gedding. He was succeeded, according to Davy, by Nicholas de 
Gedding, and he by Edward de Gedding, who had a grant of free warren 
here in 1327.' We find, however, that the presentation to the church 
in 1312 was made by Sir John de Geddyng. 

A fine was levied in 1341 of a moiety of this manor by Richard Freysel 
against William de Stonham, of Hegeseth, and Joan his wife with a moiety 
of the advowson of Gedding church.' 

In 1364 the manor appears to have been vested in William de Pen- 
brigge, who presented to the living loth Feb. 1364, 28th Nov. 1374, 4th 
Feb. 1376, and 2Oth Feb. 1379. That the whole manor was vested in him 
is evidenced by a fine levied in 1365 by William Steel.Archdeacon of Toton, 
Thomas de Gildesburgh, parson of the church of ... geham, John 
de Lakyngheath, and Peter de Aldewyk, chaplain, against the said William 
de " Penbrugge " and Margaret his wife. This fine related to the Manor 
of Geddyng, and i messuage, 400 acres of land, 30 acres of meadow, 80 acres 
of pasture, 20 acres of wood, and 405. rent in Magna Welnetham and Parva 
Welnetham, Ratlesden, Falsham, Bradefeld Monachorum, Drenkeston, 
Bradefeld Combusta, Stanefeld, Hawstede, and Lausele, and the advowson 
of the church of the said manor. 3 

In the time of King Ed'.v. III. the family of Chamberlain were resident 
in Gedding, and Ralph Chamberlain, eldest son of Roger Chamberlain, 4 of 
Stoke by Nayland, held the manor in 1357. On Ralph's death the manor 
passed to his widow Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Roger Deneys, Knt., of 
Tannington, who presented to the church 28th July, 1428. She was 
succeeded by her son and heir, Sir Roger Chamberlain, who in 1429 pre- 
sented to the church, and was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1441. He 
again presented to the church in 1448, and married Margaret, daughter 
and heir of John Martin, Justice of the Common Pleas. On Sir Roger's 
death in 1464, the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Chamberlain, 
Knt., who married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of John Fitz Ralph. 

Sir Robert Chamberlain was attainted and beheaded in 1491, when the 
manor passed to the Crown, and in 1495 was granted by the Crown to 
Sir Roger Ormeston, who had married Elizabeth, widow of the said Sir 
Robert Chamberlain. 

Sir Roger Ormeston died in 1500, and his widow 23rd May, 1517,' 
when the manor passed to her son and heir, Sir Fitz Ralph Chamberlain, 
and on his death 4th March, 1523," without issue, went to his son and heir, 
Sir Edward Chamberlain, Knt. The manor was at that time held of the 
Bishop of Ely, and valued at 10 per annum. The statement in the 
inquisition is that Edward was son and heir of Sir Fitz Ralph Chamberlain, 
but the Norfolk Visitation, 7 and also the Davy MSS., state that Sir Fitz 

'Chart. Rolls, i Edw. III. 50 mentioned ; 4 See Manor of Chamberleyns in Stoke by 

Pat. Rolls, i Rich. II. pt. vi. 27. Nayland, Babergh Hundred. 

'Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 19. 5 I.P.M., 9 Hen. VIII. 117. 

'Feet of Fines, 38 Edw. III. 30. 'I.P.M., 14 Hen. VIII. 106. 

'Harl. 1552- 



GEDDING. 275 

Ralph Chamberlain died without issue, and that Sir Edward Chamberlain 
was his brother and heir. Sir Edward Chamberlain married Jane 
Starkey (the Davy MSS. say Anne Storky), and in 1528 presented to 
the church, dying i5th July, 1541, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir Ralph, afterwards Sir Ralph Chamberlain, who attended 
Hen. VIII. on the Field of the Cloth of Gold, and was knighted in Oct. 1553. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Fienes, Knt., and 
presented to the church in 1572. Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in 
the time of Queen Elizabeth is an action respecting copyholds of this manor 
by William Nunne against Sir Ralph Chamberlain and others. 1 Sir 
Ralph Chamberlain was succeeded in 1575" by his son and heir, Fitz Ralph 
Chamberlain. 3 He married Dorothy, daughter of Robert Dacres, of 
Hertford, and had a son named Thomas. Amongst the Chancery Pro- 
ceedings is a bill by John Colton against this Fitz Ralph Chamberlain and 
others for quiet possession under an extent as to this Manor of Gedding 
Hall and the manors of Thurnewood and Stoneham in Gedding, Felsham, 
Rattlesden, Drinkstone, Hitcham, and Thorpe Morieux, the inheritance of 
defendant Chamberlain. 4 A fine was levied of the manor in 1582 by William 
Cavendyshe against this Fitz Ralph Chamberlain and others. 5 

By 1599 the lordship of the parish had passed to Robert Page, of 
Gedding, yeoman, who 4th Sept. that year presented to the church of 
Gedding. He appears again to have presented 24th May, 1603, and the 
manor to have subsequently passed to Philip Page. He died in 1619, 
and was buried at Gedding 2nd Feb. 1619. In 1651 the lordship was held 
by Philip's son, John Page, and Margaret his wife. They 7th July, 1651, 
mortgaged the manor and advowson to Francis Theobald as security for 
500. In 1653 John Page was still lord, but before 1658 the manor and 
advowson had passed to Robert Page, who sold the advowson to Jeremiah 
Catlyn, minister, of Wickham Market, whose will dated 3ist Jan. 1694, has 
the following gift : " Item, I doe hereby give the perpetual patronage and 
right of nomination and presentation of a Clerk unto the Rectory of Gedding 
in Suffolk, to the Corporation of Ipswich in the same County in which I was 
born, to be disposed of freely by the Bailiffs of the same for the time being, 
together with the eldest Portman who is not one of the Bailiffs, the Recorder, 
the Town Clerk, or the greatest number of them, whensoever it shall be 
void by the death or otherwise of my nephew Thomas Ramsford, to whom 
I have given the next advowson after the advoidance thereof by death or 
otherwise of the present Incumbent, and I will that the writings of the 
alienation thereof from Robert Page, Lord of the Manor be accordingly 
delivered to them." 6 The advowson remained with the Corporation of 
Ipswich until 1843, when it was sold to William Sorsby, of Doncaster, whose 
trustees presented in 1872-3. In 1881 it was purchased by the Rev. R. 
Townson, who the following year exchanged livings with the then rector 
John Hammersley. In 1884, however, Mr. Robert Townson presented 
another, and a second time in 1895. In 1897 the advowson was purchased 
by the present lord of the manor, Mr. Arthur Wakerley, and thus after an 

'C.P. ser. ii. B. cxxxii. 85. 4 C.P. i. 219. 

2 He was buried at Gedding, 3rd June, 1575. 'Fine, Easter, 24 Eliz. 

3 A " Ladye Elizabeth Chamberleine " was 6 S. Pickering's MS. Coll. iii. fol. 50, cited 

buried at Gedding, I3th May, 1586. E.A. N. and Q., 3rd Ser., vol. xi, 

She was no doubt the widow of Sir 172. 

Ralph. A Robert Chamberlain 
was baptised at Gedding, 2oth 
Sept. 1545. 



276 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

interval of about 250 years the patronage has again become linked with 
the lordship of the parish. Mr. Wakerley (with the consent of the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury) presented the Rev. Joseph Hind, rector of Felsham, 
to the living in 1903. 

In 1658 the manor was held by Leonard Goodburne, and shortly after- 
wards became vested in Thomas Bokenham, of Bury St. Edmunds, Doctor 
of Physic, who was probably the son of Reginald Bokenham, of Wortham, 
and Alice his wife, and brother of Henry Bokenham, M.D., who died in 
1696 at the age of 80, and was buried at St. Gregory's, Norwich. Thomas 
Bokenham in 1664 married Mary, daughter and heir of Timothy Birchmore, 
of Hertford, and died I4th Nov. 1682, being buried at St. James's, Bury. 
His will was proved 26th Dec. 1682, by his two daughters, Mary and 
Dorothy. The latter died in 1686, and was buried in the chancel of St. 
James's church, Bury, her will being proved in 1686 by her sister Mary, 
who was sole executrix. The manor passed to the elder daughter of Dr. 
Thomas Buckenham, Mary, who died igth Sept. 1691, and by her will, in 
which she describes herself as of Bury St. Edmunds, spinster, refers to 
her sister Dorothy deceased and to her cousins Thomas Buckenham, of 
Norwich, Roger Seaman and Frances his wife, Mary and Dorothy Burton, 
daughters of Thomas Burton, of Diss, Frances Burton, and Buckenham 
Brown. She devises : " To my cousin Thomas Buckenham, Mercer, City 
of Norwich," amongst other property, " all my Manor of Gedding with 
Thurmond." The will was proved in November, 1691. The cousin, 
Thomas Bokenham, was the son of Henry Bokenham, M.D., who died in 
1696, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Francis Nicholson, of Ipswich, 
which Henry Bokenham was the son of Reginald Bokenham and Alice 
Derehaw, of Oulton Hall, in Suffolk, the brother of Thomas Bokenham, the 
father of the testatrix Mary Bokenham. Thomas Bokenham was of Thorpe, 
co. Norfolk. He lost no time in settling in life so soon as he received his 
cousin's benefit, for by an indenture dated 23rd Jan. 1691, between himself 
described as " Thomas Bokenham of the City of Norwich, Merchant," of 
the first part, Henry Bokenham, of the same city, Doctor of Physic (no 
doubt Thomas's father), and Hamon Lestrange, of Pakenham, in the County 
of Suffolk, Esq., of the second part, and Judith Lestrange, one of the daughters 
of the said Hamon Lestrange, of the third part, the Manor of Gedding was, 
with other properties in consideration of a marriage and the payment of 
certain moneys settled by Thomas Bokenham for the benefit of his wife. 
Thomas Bokenham and Judith were accordingly married at Barton Magna 
26th Jan. 1691-2. She died 7th June, 1739, aged 76, and was buried at 
St. Gregory's, Norwich. Thomas Bokenham held his first court ist Jan. 
1740, and died in 1743, and was buried also at St. Gregory's, Norwich. He 
seems to have had six children (i) Rev. L'Estrange Bokenham, M.A., 
baptised at St. Gregory's 3ist Dec. 1693, but died unmarried in his father's 
lifetime, nth May, 1719, being buried at Regrave St. Mary ; (2) Thomas, 
baptised 24th July, 1694, died 22nd July, 1698 ; (,3) Henry, baptised 
igth June, 1695 ; (4) Judith, baptised igth Jan. 1692-3 ; (5) Mary, 
baptised 6th Dec. 1699 ; (6) Elizabeth, baptised ist Dec. 1700. Henry 
the son seems to have died in his father's lifetime, or at least soon after, 
for the three daughters, Judith, Mary, and Elizabeth, held their first court 
23rd April, 1747. All these sisters were living and spinsters in 1760, when 
I7th Nov. that year they held a court, but four years later Judith and 
Elizabeth had died, and the survivor, Mary Bokenham, made her will 
dated gth Oct. 1764, and bequeathed the manor of " Gedding Hall with 



GEDDING. 277 

Thurmwoods" to her cousin Mary, the wife of Samuel Johnson, of Norwich, 
Esquire, appointing him her sole executor. The will was proved 5th June, 
1766. 

Mary Johnson was daughter of Hamon L'Estrange, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and Christian Isabella his wife, daughter of C. J. Harvey, of 
Cookfield. This Hamon L'Estrange was son of the above-mentioned 
Hamon L'Estrange, by Barbara, daughter of James Bullock, of Faulkbourne, 
co. Essex, his and wife. 

Samuel Johnson died shortly afterwards, i8th Aug. 1766, and Mary 
Johnson, described on the Rolls as a widow, held her first court i8th Aug. 
1767, and her last court 3rd June, 1808. She left two daughters, Caroline 
Isabella Johnson and Anna Maria Johnson, and the manor appears to 
have passed to the elder daughter, who held her first court for the manor 
2gth June, 1810, and her last court in 1830. On her death about 1830 
the manor passed to Thomas L'Estrange Ewen, J.P., of Dedham, who had 
married her niece Mary, the only child of her sister Anna Maria and her 
husband, the Rev. Thomas Greene, rector of Offord Darcy, co. Hunt. 
This niece was the wife of Thomas Glove Ewen, and on her death the manor 
passed to her son and heir, Thomas L'Estrange Ewen, of Dedham. He 
held his first court for the manor 2nd Nov. 1840, and died in 1879, an d 
letters of administration with the will annexed were granted nth Aug. 
1879, an d the sole acting trustee under the said will agreed i6th Jan. 1889, to 
sell the manor to C. H. T. Marshall and Mr. Potter, of Colchester, from whom 
it was purchased by the present lord, Arthur Wakerley, of Gedding Hall 
and Leicester. 

TheJWakerleys were at an early date connected with Leicestershire 
and Northamptonshire, and the name, we understand, has been said by 
Professor Skeat to be one of the rarest of English surnames. It is practically 
limited to a small area, comprising adjacent portions of the counties of 
Leicester, Northampton, and Rutland, and is found in these but rarely. 

In a tallage roll of 1269 for the assessment of four score marks from the 
Borough of Leicester, Galf de Wakirle makes a payment of 6d. 

In a list of Gild entries in the same borough 1311-12 occurs the name 
of Hugo de Walkerleye. 

Probably the rarity of the surname is accounted for by the fact that 
many of its members were clerks in holy orders ; for example, William de 
Wakerlee was rector of North Kil worth, Leicestershire, 1288 to 1297 ; 
and in Bridge's "Northamptonshire" the following institutions are recorded : 
Roger de Wakerle, incumbent of Braybrooke, 1292 ; Henry de Wakerle, 
Higham Ferrers, 1365, and of Hargrave, 1639 ; Henry Wakerle, of 
Stowe, 1386, and Laur. Wakerley, of Flore, 1421. 

Sir John La Warre, in his will dated nth August, 1345, mentions John 
de Wakerley, Hawise de Wakerley, and John her son. John de Sutton, sen., 
citizen of Lincoln, in his will in 1391 refers to Johanna de Wakerley. This 
will was made at Wakerley in Northants. At the same place Sir Roger 
La Warre made his will dated 28th April, 1368, in which he styles himself 
" lord of the Manor of Wakerle." Elizabeth, wife of Sir Edmund Bacon, 
also made her will at Wakerley in 1323, and John Huntingdon in 1409. 

In 1425-6 John Wakerley was High Sheriff of Northamptonshire. 1 
In 1442 licence was granted by the Bishop of Lincoln to John Wakerley, 

1 Henry Pyell, Archdeacon of Northampton, in his will dated i5th April, 1379, refers 
to Alice, wife of William Wakelyn, of Northampton, and to Agnes, her sister, giving them 
x, li. each. These were not unlikely of the same family. 



278 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Catherine his wife, John VVakerley their son, and Margaret his wife, for 
the celebration of mass and other divine offices in a low voice within the 
manor house at Walton, in the parish of Paston, by a proper capellan in 
the presence of their children, servants, and friends. 

The will of a William Watryley was proved at Bury St. Edmunds ist 
June, 1488. 

From the Archdeaconry Court of Northampton among the wills filed 
at Peterborough Registry is that of Erne Wakerley, of Peterborough, 
" wedowe," dated nth Aug. 1556, in which she directs " her body to be 
buried within ' the Cathedral Church of Peterborough nyghe unto her 
brother Lord Byshoppe of the said Cathedral Church.' 

A family of the name of Wakely is met with in the County of Cork, in 
Ireland, in the early part of the i8th century, and a Samuel Wakely 
was a churchwarden of Christ Church, Cork, with one John Terry, in 1730. 

From John VVakerley who was living at Twyford, co. Leicester, in 
1583, Arthur Wakerley, lord of the Manor of Gedding, is the 8th in descent, 1 
being the 2nd son of the late John Wakerley of Melton Mowbray, the 
other two sons being the Rev. John E. Wakerley, Ticehurst, co. Suffolk, 
and Mr. Joseph E. Wakerley, J.P., Melton Mowbray. 

Mr. Wakerley's mother was a Smith, of Wyfordby, the family whose 
remarkable vicissitudes from Michael Carington, standard bearer to 
Richard Coeur de Lion, has been dealt with by the writer in his book on 
the Smith-Carington family. 

Mr. Wakerley, born at Melton Mowbray in 1862, is an architect by 
profession, is a J.P. for the County Borough of Leicester and for the County 
of Suffolk. He was Mayor of Leicester 1897-8. In the general elections 
of 1895 and 1900 he waged strenuous warfare against the House of Rutland 
for the representation of the Melton Division in the House of Commons, 
on the latter occasion being defeated by 392 votes. At this juncture the 
Manners family decided to abandon the contest, and Mr. Wakerley was 
compelled to retire through ill-health. He married in 1886 Bertha Elizabeth, 
daughter of T. J. Gunn, of The Lodge, Stoneygate, Leicester, by whom he 
has living one son and four daughters. 

A representation of the manor will be found amongst the Lansdowne 
MSS. 1 The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Anthony Wing- 
field, who died 2Oth Aug. 1552, 3 leaving Robert his son and heir. A fine 
was levied of " Gedding Hall Manor " in 1565 by Thomas Hamond against 
Robert Peyton and others. 4 

Gedding Hall is a fine old moated mansion erected in the I3th century 
by the Geddings and rebuilt by the Chamberlains in the I5th. The hall 
has been recently repaired and rebuilt by the present lord. The ancient 
gatehouse is now incorporated with the mansion, but the foundations and 
walls of a larger house or castle are still visible. 

Rickman writing in the early part of the igth century describes it 
as one of the best examples of brick architecture in the county. An 
interesting feature is a water door to the moat, and a detail believed to 

1 From the birth of John, John Wakerley's the unusual length for a generation 

son, in 1504 to that of Arthur average of over 38 years. 

Wakerley in 1862 is 268 years, "106, 41. 
covered by seven lives, which gives S I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 65. 

4 Fine, Mich. 7 v Eliz. 



GEDDING. 279 

be unique is the ball flower in brick. In the hall windows are the arms of 
De Geddynge, Chamberlayne, and Bokenham, impaling L'Estrange. 

In the park at Gedding is preserved the sole remaining herd of the 
ancient breed of Suffolk cattle known as Suffolk Dun Polls. They were 
purchased in 1904 from Lord Iveagh, of Elveden, having previously passed 
through the hands of His Highness Prince Frederick Duleep Singh and Mr. 
Capel Lofft respectively. The latter purchased them from the executors 
of the late Sir Thomas Thornhill, of Riddlesworth, co. Norfolk. As 
anciently there flourished a family of " De Riddlesworth," who bore for 
their arms a golden bull on a green ground it is possible that this is an 
allusion to these cattle, their colour being mostly of a creamy or golden hue. 
Of their origin nothing certain is known, but it is claimed that they are a 
survival of the Roman occupation. 

Arms of GEDDING : Chequy, Argent and Gules on a fesse Azure, 
three buckles Or. Of CHAMBERLAIN : Argent, fretty, on a chief Sable, 
three torteaux. Of EWEN : (?) Sa. a chevron between 3 fleurs-de-lis Or. 
Of WAKERLEY : For a very long period the Wakerley family has not claimed 
the right to bear the arms of their ancestors. From time immemorial they 
have followed the art or craft of master masons, builders, or architects, and in 
1809 Joseph Wakerley, of Melton Mowbray, grandfather of the present lord of 
the Manor of Gedding, had manufactured in Staffordshire a large earthen- 
ware pitcher, still in the possession of the family, upon which is painted not 
only his name with date, but on one side the representation of a building 
in course of construction, and on the other a shield upon which are quartered 
many of the tools and implements used in building. These are probably 
the arms assigned by Burke to the Wakerley family : " Sa. three mortars 
Arg. in each a pestle Or." 

The following is an abstract of the court rolls made the 22nd Jan. 
1607 : 

GEDDING. An Abstract of the Court Rolls of the Manor then made the 

xxiij day of June A 1607 in the fifth year of King James of England. 

WITHERSDEN AND xiiij Acres of Ffree Land by estimation called Withersdens and 

LIVERFELDE. Lybcrfelde by the service of ijs. viijrf. and halfe a pound of pepper 

per arm : and 

John Cage acknowledged and made ffealty A 16 Hen. viii. 
William Berry acknowledged certaine Lands by estimation viij acres 
of Land lying in Lyverfelde called the Almes-land by ye rent of ijs. 
vii]d. and / pound of pepper A 12 Henry viii. The Executors of 
Michael Sharpe hold Lyverfelde aforesaid in And Grome 

holds Wethersden. 

Rent xxijrf. Rent xxijrf. going out of ye Lands and Tenements in Rattlesden in 

times past of Thomas Smyth. 

A 16 H. viii. It appears the Bayliffe distrained for arearages. A distress appears 

A 15 Hen. viii. for the rent aforesaid. 

THURMWOODS. One Close conteyning by Estimation ij Acres of Land and Pasture 

late in the tenure of W" 1 - Atwood lying in Rattlesden between the 
Land of the Manor of Thurmswood on ye one part, and ye Lands of 
John Coppings on ye other, And abutts upon ye Wood of ye said 
Manor towards ye West, and upon ye King's way leading from Bylston 
towards Woolpet towards ye East. 

Rent xxijrf. John Atwoode of acknowledged by ye rent of xxijrf. and 

and made ffealty A 6 Hen. viii. 

Peter Atwoode held of ye Dale of John Atwoode by ye rent of xxijrf. 
A distress appears A 28 Henry viii. Now Nun of Wood holds. 



ago 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



BELPHIN'S TENEM' 
Rent xiijrf. 



HODS. 

PAKENHAMS. 
Rent vrf. 



HOBBYS. 

Rent lod. 

10 ACRES NEXT 
MILKER'S. 



HODS. 
RATTLESDEN. 



Coko Street. 
Rent i)d. 



PERTRECROFT. 
Rent id. ob. 



BLACKSALTES. 
PYKESCROFT. 

Rent i pound of 
and i Capon. 

WENT'S TENEMENT. 
Rent xijd. 

BRIGGS TENEMENT. 
Rent vjs. iiijrf. 

WHITEBREDFELD. 
Rent iijs. \\i\d. 



WENT'S TENEMENT. 
BAGGES TENEMENT. 



One tenement and Land called Belphin's tenement by ye rent of 
xiijrf. per ann : 

Belphins A 15 Hen. viii. in times past of Thomas John Scarpe ought 
to pay and delaines it. A distress appears A 16 Hen. viii. John 
Scarpe holds A 15 Hen. viii. 

Lands of ye Lord of this Manor called Hods next ye land of Agnes 
Boll A 15 Hen. viii. 

Lands and ffrec tenements in times past of Thomas Pakenham held 
by ye annual rent of vd. 

A distress appeares A 16 Hen. viii. A distress appears A 15 
Hen. viii. 

One Close called Hobbys conteyning by Estimation x Acres lying 
beneath. 

Ten Acres of Copy Lands purchased of Robert Nun held by ye annual 

rent of xd. and it lyes between ye Land of George Nun called 

ye March on ye East, and ye Land of Agnes Boll Widowe called 

Myllners on ye West A 18 Hen. viii. 

Robert Welbury sold to Rob'. Nun A 17 Henry viii. 

Robert Nun tooke it to him and his heires of ye surrender of Robert 

Welbury by ye rent of xd. A 18 Hen. viii. 

Rob 1 . Welbury tooke it to him and his heires out of ye hands of ye 

Lord by ye rent of xd. and A 6 Hen. viii. 

Now in ye tenure of Martin Nun late of Richard Nun of ye surrender 

of George Nun Son of ye said Richard. 

One Copy Croft called Hods. 

Agnes Boll occupies and encroach't without title A 17 Henry viii. 
therefore . 

One acre of Land lying in Ratlesden in a certaine Croft called Ratlesden 
Croft between the Land of Thomas Spring on ye South, and ye lands 
of divers men on ye North and abutting upon the Street called Coko 
Street towards ye East, and upon ye Croft called Lavenham Croft 
towards ye West. 

Augustina Seman Cofeoffee of Thomas Spring and his Attorney acknow- 
ledged by ye rent of i]d. 

Late of Agnes Boll and made ffealty A xij Hen. viii. 
One rood of Land lying in a certaine Croft called Pertrecroft in Ffelsham 
held by ye rent of id. ob. per ann. 
A distress appears of W m . Harmyn, A 2 Ed. vi. 
A distress appears of W". Hamiyn, A 37 Hen. viii. 
A distress appears of W 1 ". Harmyn, A 2 Ed. vi. 
A distress appears Thomas Harmyn in ye premises A 2 of King 
James, and in One Messuage and One Croft of Land to ye same 
adjoyning, called Starlings, late of William Harmyn, by ye rent of 
id. A 37 Henry viii. 

One tenement called Blacksaltes built with one close adjoyning 
contayning by estimation iiij acres, and lyes between ye Land ot 
ye Manor of Gedding called Pykescroft on ye East, and ye Land of 
ye same of Robert Tripp and the Common towards ye West 

and abuts upon the way leading from towards ye Manor of 

Gedding towards the North of ye rent of xiiijrf. p. ann. i pound of 
and i Capon. 

One tenement called Wents with divers parcells to ye same belonging 
in Gedding by ye rent of xi\d. 

One messuage late built and other parcells of Land late of William 
Scarpe called Briggs Highfield and Whitebredfeld with ye appur- 
tenances in Gedding by ye rent of vjs. iiijrf. 

One Medow lies next Whitebredfeld with ye appurtenances in Gedding 
in times past of Thomas Bond by ye rent of iijs. iii]d. 
Roger Tripp son and heire of Robert Tripp took it to him and his 
heires by ye rent aforesaid A 3 Edward vi. 

One messuage called Went's and One tenement called Bagges with 
divers Lands to ye same belonging. 



GEDDING. 



281 



BEARN CLOSSE. 



BUXHALL YARDE. 
Rent i Ib. Wax. 



HOBBYS. 



TURNORS. 

BRADFELD. 
Rent viijs. 



HOGGES MEADOWE. 
Rent xxijrf. 



EDERYDES. 
MELFELD. 

MELLCROFT. 



Rent xv)d. 

RYDNALLS. 
M I 



One Close called Beam closse contayning 4 acres of Land and pasture 

and one Meadowe by ye rent of xs. iiijrf. i Ib. of Wax, and i Capon 

p. ann. and 

A distress appears John Harrys Brother and heire of Phillip Harrys 

for relief and fealty in ye premises A 30 Eliz. 

Now of Thomas Bomsted. 

One messuage with One Close of Land called Buxhall Yarde late of 

Petronill Babon by ye rent of i pound of Wax. 
A distress appears Margaret Grome daughter of John Grome who 
ye aforesaid to Margaret for term of her life A 3 Edward vi. 
Roger Grome who dyed held ye premises. A distress appears of ye 
heires thereof for fealty. A 44 Eliz. 
Now ye heires of Roger Grome. 

The Tenement called Hobbys containing by estimation ten acres 
with the appurtenances in Rattjesden as it lies between ye Land of 
James Nun called ye Marsh towards ye East and ye Land late of 
John Harmyn now of Margaret Harmyn Widowe and held of John 
Harmyn called Myllner on the West A 30 Eliz. 
James Nun Son of Robert Nun tooke it to him and his heires of ye 
surrender of George Nun one of ye Sons of George Nun ye elder by ye 

rent of xd. A 30 Eliz. ye said Robert upon condition A 2 

Edward vi. 

Richard Nun tooke it to him and his heires of ye surrender of George 

Nun one of ye sons of George Nun ye elder by ye rent of xd. 

A 30 Eliz. 

John Nun, Robert Coppinger, George Nun and Martin Nun tooke it 

to them and their heires according to ye effect of ye Testament of ye 

aforesaid Richard Nun of ye surrender of ye said Richard by ye rent 

of A 4 King James. 

Now of Martin Nun. 

One Close of Arable Land called Tumor's of ye Hill and one pightell 

to ye same adjoining, containing in ye whole viij acres 

i Rood with ye appurtenances in Monk Bradfeld parcel of ye tenement 
called Tumor's tenement by ye rent of vijs. 

Henry Gooth holds of ye sale and surrender of Clement Smyth A i 
and 2 Phil. & Mary by ye rent of viijs. 

Henry Gooth and Catherine his wife tooke it to them and their heires 

of ye said Henry by ye rent of viijs. and of xxijrf. of ye surrender 

of Clement Smyth A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

Katherine Gooth holds by right growing after ye decease of ye said 
Henry Gooth by ye rent of viijs. A 3 Eliz. 

Rob'. Barker acknowledged and sold ye premises in right of ye aforesaid 
Catherine his wife, by ye rent of viijs. Enquire who sold. Now ye 
Executors of John Smyth holds. 

Certain Lands and pightell called Hogges Meadowe by ye rent 

of xxijrf. p. ann. 

Henry Kembold acknowledged and made fealty by ye rent aforesaid 
A 34 Henry viii. 

Mark Salter acknowledged and made fealty A i of King James. 

Three Closes called Ederidds Melfeld and Mellcroft lying together 
contayning by estimation xx acres of Land more or less, of 

ye Lordship of this Manor. 

One pightell of land to ye said Closes adjoyning, likewise of ye said 

Lordship. 

Margaret Harmyn Widowe tooke it out of ye hands of ye Lord to 

remaine to William her Son. 

A 34 Henry viii. by ye renx of xv]d. seised into ye hands of 

ye Lord. A i Edward vi. for waste there made. 

Margaret Harmyn dies thereof seised A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 
Two Closes with one pightle of Land containing vij acres by estimation 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Rent i\d. 



Rent iiij/. xiijs. 
iiijd. 



BANTONFELD. 



STONE WELLS. 



5 ROODS WITH A 

COTTAGE. 
Rent 

STONEHAM'S. 
Rent 



Rent 



MANFELD. 
Rent ijs. ixd. 

I Ib. Wax. 

WOODHALL. 

Rent iiijs., i Ib. Wax, 
4i 

COCKENS R id. 



BALDMANSCROFT. 



which said Close and pightell in times past were Rydnalls and afterwards 

in ye occupation of Robert of ye Lordship of this Manor 

lying in Rattlesden. 

Thomas Goodwyn took it to him and his heires out of ye hands of 

ye Lord by ye rent of ixd. p. ann. A 34 Henry viii. 

Beatrice Goodwin took it for term of her life of ye surrender of ye 

aforesaid Thomas Goodwin A 4 Eliz. by ye rent of 

Roger Goodwin took to him and his heires after ye decease of ye 

aforesaid Beatrice his mother by ye rent of ixd. A 30 Eliz. 

Certain Lands Meadowes and Pastures with One Wood adjoining lying 

and being divers pieces in Ratlesden and late in the tenure 

of John King the Father of 

Rob'. King of Bretenham tooke it to him and his heires out of ye 

hands of ye Lord by ye rent of iiij/. xiijs. iiijd. (ye yeare is wanting). 

Eight acres of free Arable Land lying in Ratlesden in Bantonfeld 

by ye rent of vijs. and i Ib. of Wax. 

W m . Beryalb Awsten purchased of Margaret Warren Widowe and 

made fealty by ye rent of vijs. (the yeare wanting). 

William Beryalb Awsten acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A xij 

Henry viii. Now John Moor. 

One Tenement with the Appurtenances containing by estimation 

Eight Acres of Land called Stonewells in Ratlesden A i & 2 Phil. 

& Mary. 

William Dobbes of Bretenham is supposed to occupy without title A. 

William Stonewell Son and heir of John Stonewell took it to him 

and his heires A X H8 (Henry VIII.). 

William Stonewell Son and heire of John Stonewell tooke it to him 

and his heires A 18 Henry VII. 

Michael Stonewell Son and heir of William Stonewell took it to him 

and his heirs A 21 Henry VII. 

Anne Stonewell Sister and Heire of ye aforesaid Michael Stonewell 
took it to her and her heirs A 3 Henry viii. 

Roger Salter and Margaret his Wife took it to them and their heires 

of ye said Margaret upon condition of payment of ye surrender of 

Eliz. Widow A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. Now Anthony 

Scarpe. 

One Cottage with a Close adjoining containing by estimation five 

roods lying in Rattlesden by ye rent of xviijrf. and 

Walter Amor purchased it of John Grome and made fealty A. 

Divers parcels of Land called Stoneham by the rent of xviijrf. One 
Messuage and certaine Lands called Stoneham in times past Rush- 
brooks late of by ye rent aforesaid A i & 2 Phil. & Mary 
and i; Capons. 

Divers parcels of free Land late of John King of Brettenham by ye 
rent of A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One acre late of Stephen rent p. ann. i Ib. of Wax. A 

i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

Certain parcels of Land of ye tenement called Manfeld by ye rent 
of and i Ib. of Wax. 

One Messuage with certain Lands called Manfeld late of William 
Edwards by ye rent aforesaid A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

Certain Lands, parcel of ye Manor of Woodhall by ye rent of iiijs. 
i Ib. of Wax, one Messuage called Woodhall and certaine 

Lands to ye same belonging late of John Ward by the rent aforesaid 
Ai&2Phill.&Mary. 

Certain Lands called Cockens by ye rent of id. p. ann. 

Certain Lands late of George Haman in times past of Thomas p. ann. xd. 

A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

ij acres of Land in Baldmanscroft late of Alexander p. ann. 

i]d. A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

John Spring of Loneham made fealty for ye premises by ye rent 

aforesaid A 23 Henry VII. 



GEDDING. 



283 



WOODHALL. 

TOWNEMEADOWE. 
BOMSTED'S TEN T . 
BERELANDES. 
HARDHEDS. 
WHYTESCROFT. 



SLYESTOFT. 
BUXHALL. 



RAMSEY'S 

TENEMENT. 
Rent iijs. iiijrf. 



RAMSEY'S 



WHITEBREADFELD. 



UPON YE KING'S 

WAY. 



One messuage called Woodhall by ye rent of iiijs. i Ib. Wax, and other 
parcels of Land late of John Spring, Knight, held by ye rent of 
xxixs. ixd. ob. iiij Ib. of Wax, I Ib. of Comyn & 2 Capons p. ann. and 
A distress appears of Wm. Spring Esqre upon ye for ye rent aforesaid 
A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One Meadow called Towne Meadowe late of James by ye rent 

of vijs. v]d. A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One Messuage and certain Lands late of John Bumpsted afterwards 

of John Seaman by ye rent of ijs. iiijrf. A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One Close of Land called Berelands late of George Seaman by ye 

rent of vi]d. A i & 2= Ph. & Mary. 

Certain Lands called Hardheds late Lompkyn p. ann. vijd. i Ib. Comyn 

A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One Croft of Land called Whytescroft late of George Seaman p. ann. 

ij Ib. of Wax. 

Certain Lands late of Simon Brend p. ann. iiijs. iiijrf. ob. 

One pightell of Land called Slysetoft late of ye said Alexander and 

late Baldwin id. Cookhedge, and One Croft of Land in Brettenham 

called id. Cookins late of Walter Wright p. ann. i\d. 

A distress appears of Thos. Rydett Gent, Son and heire of James 

Rydett Esq. to make fealty A 32 Eliz. 

Certain Lands in Jacob's Croft late of W 1 ". Edwards p. ann. vj. 

A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

One Barn called Buxhall's bam late Lompkyn before that of Rich d . 

Rushbrooke by ye rent of xvjd. ye yeare aforesaid for ye whole 

29$. 2d. ob. 4 Ibs. of Wax and i Ib. Comyn. 

A distress appears of W m . Spring Esq" upon ye premises late of 

John Spring K nt for a release A i & 2 Phil. & Mary, and 

a distress appears of the said W m . Spring A 4 Eliz. A 6 Eliz. W m . 

Spring Eliz. by W m . Povie his Attorney acknowledged ye premises 

by ye Rent aforesaid and made to ye Lord fealty. 

One free Tenement late of William Ramsey. 

William South purchased of Isabell Rushbrook wife of John Rushbrook 
A i H viii. 

William Sowth made fealty free by Charter by ye rent of iijs. iiijrf. 
A 3 and A 3 H 8. A 12 H 8 The Wife of William 

Sowth acknowledged to hold free of ye Lord certaine Land and 
tenem" free in Gedding by ye rent of iijs. uijd. 

A 12 H 8 also saith that William Sowth dyed since ye last Court 
who held of ye Lord free by Charter certain Lands and tenements in 
Gedding but the quantity they know not therefore a day is given to better 
enquire against ye next Court by Knight. 

One Tenement with divers Lands and pastures to ye same belonging 
in Gedding called Ramsey's containing by estimation xxij acres. 
Thomas Sowth acknowledged to hold free by ye rent of iijs. ii\]d. and 
made fealty. 

Two pieces of Land lying in the field called Whitebreadfeld and one 
piece of Meadow whereof the first piece of Land contains i acre and 
an halfe by estimation and lyes in Geddinge betweene ye Land of ye 
Lord on ye East and ye free land of Roger Tripp before of Robert Tripp 
his Father on ye West and abutts upon ye Land of ye said Lord towards 
ye North and upon ye Water Course towards ye South. 

The seconde piece contains three acres of Land by estimation and 
lyes between ye free Land of ye said Robert Tripp late of Roger Tripp 
on the East, and ye Land of Thomas Strange Knt now of Wm. Risbye 
Gent, on ye West, One head abutts upon ye Copy Meadowe of 
Robert, late of ye said Roger Tripp towards ye South and upon ye 
King's way towards ye North : and ye aforesaid piece of Meadow 
contains iij roods and lyes at ye South end of ye said piece of Land 
between ye Copy Land of ye aforesaid Thomas Strange now William 
Risby towards ye South and ye aforesaid iij acres of Land towards 
ye North. One head abutts upon ye free land of ye said Robert 



284 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



BLACKSALTS. 
Rent ijs. iiijrf. and 
i Capon. 

Rent xviijrf. 



LE DOWNE. 
Rent vjrf. 



BR ANTON FELP. 



BRODEWAYE. 



late of Roger Tripp towards ye East and upon ye Copy Meadowe 
late of John Harwyn now Abraham Harwyn called Reynes towards 
ye West. 

Rob'. Tripp and Roger Tripp ye Sonne took to them and their heires 
out of ye hands of ye Lord by ye rent of 

for free Land abutting by ye rent of iijrf. 

Roger Tripp sonne of ye aforesaid Robert Tripp acknowledged 
ye by ye rent aforesaid A 3 E. vi. 

Appears after ye death of Roger Tripp A 4 Elir. 

Thomasin Wife of Rob'. Daniell, Johanna Tripp, Susan Tripp, Rose 
Tripp ye daughters and heires of Roger Tripp are admitted to them 
and their heires A 4 Eliz. by ye rent of nijs. \i\]d. 
William Tripp brother of Roger Tripp the Father's brother and heire 
of Elizabeth Tripp took ye fifth part of ye after ye death of 

ye said Elizabeth A 6 Eliz. 

Robert Daniell and Thomasine his Wife, Johanna Tripp, Susan Tripp 
and Roger Tripp ye daughters and heires of ye aforesaid Roger Tripp 
took to them and their heires A 5 Eliz. by ye rent of viijs. viijrf. 
Walter South took to him and his heires of ye surrender of Henry 
Oilman who had ye of ye surrender of Richard Daniell and 

Thomasine his Wife A 32 Eliz. 

A 42 Eliz. appears for made by Walter 

South and ye , ye same year. 

Thomas South took to him and his heires by ye rent aforesaid of ye 
surrender of ye aforesaid Walter South A 2 King James. 
One messuage and certain Lands to ye same belonging called Blacksalts 
in times past by ye rent of ijs. iiijrf. i Capon. 

Roger Tripp acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A 12 Henry viii. 
A 23 Hen. viii. now Thomas or Tho s . Symonds. 

One free tenement with iij roods of Land by estimation by ye rent 

of xviijrf. and 

Robert Beamond acknowledged and made ye Lord fealty A 

xx Henry viii. 

Forty yards of free Land by estimation by ye rent of vs. vi]d. and 

p. ami. 

John Grome acknowledged and made fealty A xx Hen. viii. 
Three acres of free Land lying in ye field called Le Downe in times 
past of Alice Abell by ye rent of v\d. p. ann. and John Moore. 
Ten acres of free Land late purchased of William Abury by ye rent 
of vijs. and i Ib. of Wax p. ann. 
Now John Moore. 

John Grome acknowledged and made fealty to ye Lord A 20 Hen. viii. 
Eight acres of free Land lying in Brantonfeld by ye rent of vijrf. I Ib. 
War. 

W m . Beryall Awsten acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A 12 
Henry viii. 

It appears a distress George Grome son and heire of John Grome 
for a relief and fealty after ye death of ye said John by ye rent aforesaid 
A 3 Edward vi. Now Jno. Moore holds. 

Two Closes of Copy Land contayning by estimation xxvj acres of 
Land and pasture Salter. 

John Sadler purchased to him and his heires of Rob 1 . Nun A 22 
Henry viii. Now Gyles Keeble. 

xxvj acres of Copy Land lying in Ratlesden in a certain field called 
le whereof one Close lyes between ye Land of John Springe 

Esquire on ye East and ye land of Agnes Campe on ye West and one 
head abutting upon ye Land of ye Lord toward ye North and ye other 
head upon ye Land of ye said John Spring towards ye South. Now 
Edward Skott. 

Another close lying between ye King's way called Brodewaye towards 
ye East and ye Lands of ye Lord towards ye West. The North head 
abutting upon ye Land of ye Lord and towards ye South upon ye 
Land of ye said John Springe in part and upon the said Close of ye 
said Robert Nun towards ye South. 



GEDDING. 



285 



Rent xiiij<i. 



BRIGGESCROFT. 
BRIGGIS HIGHFELD. 



DEBONS. 

Rent I Ib. of Wax. 



BALDEMANSCROFT. 
Rent i)d. 

BUBSALYSCROFT. 



COLMANS 
BUSHOPPESCLOSE. 



Rent iijs. iiijrf. 



John Salter Sen' and Edmund Salter his Son took it to them and 
their heires of ye surrender of Robert Nun A 22 Henry viii. by ye 
rent of xiiijrf. p. ann. and 

Robert Barwell tooke one Close called late into ye hands of 
ye Lord out of his hands A x Hen. viii. late of Richard Torrington. 
John Salter took to him and his heires by ye rent of xiii)d. of ye sur- 
render of Edmund Salter A i Edward vi. 

Elizabeth Salter took ye aforesaid xxv acres of Land until John Salter 
should come to his age of xxij yeares of ye surrender of John Salter 
by ye rent of xiiijrf. A 3 Eliz. 

Roger Grome held certain Copy Lands upon condition of payment 
of of ye surrender of John Salter. 

Thomas Py Esq re took ye of ye sale of John Salter and 

Dorothy daughter of George Grome deceased Son and heire of Roger 
Grome and of ye release and surrender of ye said John Salter A i 
of King James. 

Baggescroft A 15 Hen. viii. 

A certain messuage and Land called Briggescroft containing by estima- 
tion ij acres and halfe of Land. Now Thomas Bomsted. 
One field called Briggis Highfeld held by ye annual rent of iijrf. Now 
Thomas Bomsted. 

A distress appears Roger Tripp and John Skarpe upon ye for 

ye rent aforesaid A 6 Henry viii. 
A distress appears A 17 Henry viii. 

A distress of ye Tenants aforesaid for ye rent of ii]d. aforesaid 
A 18 Henry viii. A distress appears Robert and John Skarpe for 
ye rent of \\}d. and for thereof for 13 yeares xxxixrf. 

A 20 Hen. viii. A 15 Henry viii. A distress appears. 

Land called Debons late of Alice Wentworth Widowe held by ye 

rent of i Ib. of Wax. 

It appears ye Bailiff distrayned ye Tenants of ye Land aforesaid for 

of rent aforesaid. A 16 Henry viii. 

John Sampson dyed seised thereof A x Hen. viii. Now John Cooke, 
Gent holds. 

Two acres of free Land lying in ye field called Baldemanscroft held 
by ye annual rent of \\d. 

A distress appears A 16 Henry viii. 

One Croft called Bubsalyscroft p. annual rent of i Ib. of wax, and 

The wife of William Crofts Gent, daughter and heire of Alice Wentworth 
Widowe holds a distress appears for a relief and fealty after ye death 
of ye said Alice A 17 Henry viii. Now John Cooke. 

Two acres of free Land held by ye rent of v\d. 

Robert Warreyn died seisen William Warreyn to his son and heire. 
A distress appears A 17 Hen. viii. 

A distress appears William Warren for ye rent afores'd and for 
fealty A xx Henry viii. 

Two acres of Copy Land in times past William Colmans and late of 
John Smyth (Jenkyn) lyes next ye close called Bushoppesclose 
between ye Land of ye said Robert Yaxley on both parts. 

Robert Yaxley Gent holds without Title therefore appeares 
A 17 Henry viii. 

Appears and issues \\d. A 18 Hen. viii. into ye hands of 

Robert Yaxley. 

Issues i]d. seised into ye hands of ye Lord ye first proclamation A 3 
Ed. vi. and likewise in issue A 2 Ed. vi. 

The were seised into ye hands of ye Lord and in issue A i 

Ed. vi. in issue A 4 Eliz. Now William Colman. 

Which Land and tenements William Sowth holds free by Charter in 
Gedding by Kn l service and rent of iijs. iiijd. p. ann. A 13 Henry viii. 
One piece of Land containing v acres of Land and iij roods of Meadow 



286 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

KENVS ALS: KINGS, called Kenys (Keyings) with ye appurtenances in Gedding whether 
more or less lying next ye land of (now Geffery Bury) Thomas Strange 
Knight on ye East and ye Land of John Abbott of Bury St. Edmunds 
called Cartheward and ye Land of ye said John Harmyn towards ye West 
and abutting upon King's way leading from Gedding towards Bury 
St. Edmunds towards ye North and upon ye Land of ye said Thomas 
Strange K' and ye Land of W Ostler afterwards of John Harmyn 
towards ye South. 

A 15 Hen. viii. from Rob' Justin and others to Stephen for 

life to remain to Ralph Chamberleyn Knight and his heirs. 
A 34 Eliz. 7 April Edward Rookwood and others gave ye aforesaid 
piece by rent of of 8 acres by ye rent of \]d. to Robert Beane 

and his heirs viijrf. 

A 35 Eliz. Edward Rookwood covenanted with Rob' Page that it shall be lawful for John 

Harmell and his heires to perfect Robert Beane's estate in ye Copyhold. 

John Harmyn took to him and his Assigns out of ye hands of ye Lord by ye rent of viijs. 

A 24 Hen. viii. 

Margaret Harmyn took to her h her assigns after ye death of John Harmyn A 4 Eliz- 

The eighth of October A xvj Eliz. it is found that Abraham Harwell xxi April last sold 
ye aforesaid Land called Kenes to Ralph Chamberleyn Lord of ye Manor and his heires and 
ye aforesaid Abraham surrendered ye premises to ye said therefore 

i October A xvj Eliz. it is found that Abraham Harwell about ye Feast of ye Purification 
last sold to Robert Barker and his heires certain Copy Lands called Kenes and that the 
said Robert Barker the first of April last sold ye premises to ye said Ralph Chamberleyn 
Knight and his heires. 

John Harmyn surrendered ye same to ye use of Margaret his Wife for life, remainder to 
John her Son and his heires. 

John Harmyn desired to be admitted into his remainder after ye decease of ye said Margaret 
but because upon ye premises was made by one Robert Beane who clayms ye 

premises free by Charter therefore ye Lord will be advised. A 42 Eliz. and A 44 Eliz. 

Two acres of free Land in Gedding. 

Thomas Bacon Gent purchased of John Attwood Sheppard A 28 

Henry viii. 

Alice Atwood Widowe holds of ye Sale of Thomas Bacon gent A 28 

Henry viii. 

Rent xd. Two acres of free Land in Gedding by ye rent of xd. and John Grome 

purchased of Walter Amor and made fealty. 

Rent xd. Two acres and i Rood of Land by estimation in one piece by ye rent 

of xd. 
John Grome acknowledged A 12 Henry viii. 

COWPER'S CROFT. One Croft of Land called Cowper's Croft lying in Ratlesden as appears 

Rent xvjd. A 13 Ed. iv. 

Robert King and Johanna his Mother took to them and their heires 
of ye said Robert as Son and heire John King out of ye hands of ye 
Lord upon showing his Copy of A 3 Ed. iv. aforesaid A x Hen. viii. 
and A 19 Hen. vii. ye like 

Robert King acknowledged by ye rent of xvj<*. A xij Hen. viii. 
Now Stephen Downing. 

HOBHAUNCELLS. Nine acres of Arable Land parcell of ye tenement called Hobauncells. 

PELLEYSWHITE One acre of Land called Pellers lying in White Street. Now Thomas 

STREET. Brandish. 

John Bomsted's Son took to him and his heires of ye surrender of 
John Bomsted A x Hen. viii. and likewise A 18 Henry vii. 

TURNOR'S TENEMENT. One tenement called Tumor's with xv acres iij roods and halfe a rood 
Rent xm)d. of Land, Meadowe and pasture in Munck Bradfeld. 

Clement Smith and Marion his Wife took for terme of their lives of 
ye surrender of ye said Clement to remain to John Smith Son and 
heire, gent, A i & 2 Phil. & Mary by ye rent of xiiijrf. parcell of 
xxijs. besides viijs. residue of ye aforesaid xxijs. to be paid by Henry 
Gooth and bonds iiijs. annual rent to be paid to ye Lord and his heires 
by ye assent and command of Thomas Jermyn Kn l A i & 2 Phil, 
and Mary. 




GEDDING. 



287 



BRADFELD 
(now Rob' 
Barker) 

GIPPESFELD. 

HELLS. 

Rent iiijs. vjd. 



BOGEYS. 
SOUTHFELD AND 
ROMBRYDGE. 



SOUTHFELD. 
Rent i]d. 

MELCROFT. Rent id. 
WHYTEBREADFELD. 



PARKMEADOWE. 
Rent v']d. 



SHEPPARD'S TEN T 
Rent iiijrf. 

SOUTHFELD. 
Rent ii]d. 



LEVERFELDE. 
Rent ijs. v]d. 
i Ib. pepper. 



COWARD'S CROFT. 



Anno 34 Eliz. John Smith obtayned to pay xxjs. for of rent 

of a certaine tenement called Tumor's and xv acres iij roods and a 
halfe of meadow and pasture for one year and a halfe ending at ye end 
of ye last year past xiiijei. p. ann. but because it appears 

that he paid xviijrf. p. ann. therefore ye Lord will advise A 34 Eliz. 
Lawrence Whytaker, George Hunt, John Buckenham, and Henry 
Wright jun r . Executors of ye Testament of John Smyth took ye 
premises for xij yeares of ye surrender of ye said John A 2 of King 
James. 

Eight acres of Land in Bradfeld and lyes between ye Land 

of ye Manor of Bradfeld on ye one part and ye Land of ye Manor 
of parva of ye other A 2 of King James. 

Two acres of Land called Gippesfeld. 

One rood of Meadow called Hell's Hill late of John Tonny held by 
ye rent of iiijs. v]d. and 

A distress appears Ambrose Jermyn Kn* after ye death of Thomas 
Jermyn K* for rent rel. aforesaid A i & 2 Phil. & Mary. 

The distress aforesaid appears A mbrose Jermyn Kn' upon ye by 

ye rent aforesaid A 3 Eliz. 

A distress appears Robert Jermyn fC' A 2 of King James. 
One called Bogeys and contayns Land called and 

ij pieces of Land called Southfeld and Rombrydge with ye appur- 
tenances in Felsham by ye rent of ijs. vjd. and 
A distress appears Robert Risby Gent A i et 2 Phil. & Mary after 
ye decease of William Risby of his father. 

A distress appears of ye Tenants of ye Land of Robert Risby upon 
ye for fealty A 4 Eliz. 

A distress appears W m . Risby Gent A 2 of King James. Now 
William Risby Esquire sold. 

Anno i Eliz. enquiry made who held a certain piece of Land in times 
past of the heires of Thomas Norrys 
It lies in ye field called Southfeld held by ye rent of ijd. 
One Croft called Melcroft by ye rent of id. in times past of Geffory. 

One Croft of Land enclosed contayning by estimation iij roods in 
Gedding parcell of Whytebreadfeld between ye Copy Land of ye 
Lord of this Manor in ye tenure of Thomas Knopwood on ye East 
and ye Lands of ye Manor of Felsham on the West and abutting upon 
the King's way leading from Gedding to Bury towards ye South and 
upon ye Meadow of ye Lord called ye Park Meadow towards ye North. 
Thomas Knopwood took to him and his heires out of ye hands of 
ye Lord by ye rent of vjd. A 4 Eliz. Now in ye tenure of Rob'. 
English without title there appeares A 44 Eliz. 

It appears to be seised A 2 King James, held by ye rent of vjd. 
Now Poskill sold. 

One free tenement and i Garden with a in times past of 

Walter Sheppard afterwards of Thomas by rent of iiijd. 

Halfe an acre of Land in Southfeld in times past of Thomas Sheppard 

and before of Thomas Wood by ye rent of iijr/. late of James 
before of Robert Maiden. 

Robert Barker acknowledged and made fealty A 14 Eliz. by ye rent 
aforesaid. Now Anthony Sharpe holds. 

Divers Lands in ye field called Le Berfeld (Leverfeld). Now in ye 
tenure of Michael Sharpe Copy Tenant of ye rent of ijs. vjd. i Ib. of 
pepper. 

The same Michael is to show at ye next Court A 44 Eliz. 

Distress John Scarpe Sonne of Michael Scarpe deceased for a relief 
and fealty A i of King James. 

A distress appears ye aforesaid John Scarpe A 2 King James. Now 
John Skarpe. 

One free pightell called Coward's Croft containing by Estimation 
ij acres in Gedding, lies between ye Land of Thomas Strannge K' on 
ye East, and ye Land late of Robert Heyward on ye West and abutts 



J8S 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



LB WATERCOURSE. 
Rent iiij and i Ib. 
pepper. 



WOODHALL. 

Rent iiijrf. i Ib. Wax. 

HARDHEDS. 

R. vi]d. i Ib. comin. 

BUXHALL BARNE. 

Rent xvj;/. 



Rent vs. 
divided. 



George Grome 

ijs. vjrf. 
Roger Grome 

iijs. id. 



A 5 Eliz. 
BUXHALL LANE. 
Rent xxd. 



Rent xd. 



NUN PLACE 
part of 
WOODHOUSE LAND. 



Rent xd. 



STONEHAMS. 

Rent xvti]d. 

ij Capons. 



upon ye King's Way leading from Gedding to Ffelsham towards ye 
South and upon ye Watercourse towards ye North late of John Scarpe 
by ye rent of iiijrf. and one Ib. of pepper A 30 Hen. vii. 
A distress appears Jeronomas Heyward for release and fealty A 2 
of King James; now Jeronomas Heyward. 

Certain Lands in Ratlesden called Woodhall by ye rent of iiijrf. and 
i Ib. of Wax. 

One Tenement and Containe free Lands in Ratlesden contayning 
50 Acres called Hardheds by ye rent of vijd. and i Ib. comin. 
Contains liree Lands called Huxhall barne held by ye rent of xvjd. 
There appears a distress for release and fealty Thomas Pyvett Esquire 
after ye decease of James Pyvett Esq're A* 2 of King James relief 
vs. xjd. i Ib. of Wax and i Ib. of 

The effect of ye agreement of George Grome and Roger Grome for 
ye rent of one and one acre of meadow lying near unto Bond's 

Croft with xxxiiij acres of Land medow and pasture called Coldham 
lying in Ratlesden late Cage's and George Nun, and after John Grome 
holden by ye rent of vs. vijrf. p. aim. because ye said John Groome 
was owner of all ye and He did give part of ye said Coldhams 

with an acre of meadow and an to Grome and ye other part of Coldhams 
to Roger Grome all ye said John Grome bought of one John 

Nun by estimation xx acres. 

It is agreed that ye said George shall pay for his part of ye said rent 
ijs. v]d. p. ann. and ye said Roger to pay for his part iijs. id. p. ann. 
and ye said George and Roger have at this Court paid ye said rents 
each of them according to ye said division and done their fealty to ye 
Lord A 6 Eliz. 

A 6 Eliz. The Jury aforesaid say that Walter South Son and heire 
of W* South who held of ye Lord of this Manor certain Lands and 
Tenements by Knights service is of full age viz xxi years. And because 
therefore it appears the Bailiff distrayned ye aforesaid Walter 
against ye next Court to make to ye Lord homage and fealty. 
See deposition to proove ye way of ye Lord from Ffelsham to Drinkston 
called Buxhall Lane. 

Thomas Callowe Son and heir of Thomas Callowe 
held A 44 Eliz. A distress appears lyes in Brettenham by ye rent 
of xxd. A 44 Eliz. 

And Lands Robert Cobbold holds A 44 Eliz. ij acres free in 

i pightell in Ratlesden which he purchased of Azaria Ramp ton by 
ye rent of xd. as appears A 44 Eliz. Appears a distress 

Reynold Cobbold Son and heire of R 1 Cobbold for rent and relief 
xxd. A 2 of King James. 
All the Customary Lands held of that Manor. 

John Browne surrenders to ye use of Rob 1 . Thompson and his heires 
A 19 Eliz. Now Thomas 

Andrew Hawes and George Hunt tenants of this Manor upon 

ye homage A 19 Eliz. 

Anno 19 Eliz. there say that the place called Nun parcel of ye 
Woodhouse Land doth abutt from ye Ash standing on the South end 
into a maple, ye North side ye Westhead abutting upon ye Queen's 
Land and ye East upon the Queen's highway leading from Ratlesden 
to Bylston and contains by estimation ij acres more or less and that 
this abutt all hath been altered at ye West end before 
this time, and that William Elye continues the same conversion and 
altering of ye bounds until this present. 

ij Acres of pasture with ye appurtenances by ye annual rent of xd. 
Ralph Nun Son and heire of Martha Elye late Wife of Ralph Nun 
of Woodhouse made reliefe and fealty A 30 Eliz. Now ye Wife of 
Tho. Norman. 

One Tenement with the appurtenances called Stonehams. 
Robert Rushbrooke Son and heire of John Rushbrooke made fealty 
by ye rent aforesaid A 19 Henry vii. 



GEDDING. 



289 



HODGES CLOSE. 



MANOR OF 

TURNEWOODS. 
Rent xxi\d. 



WALLMANS. 
Rent \}d. 



ROBERT WARREN. 

JUXTA RIVOLUM. 
id. 



JUSTANS. 

Rent xd. 
DOWES CLOSE. 



MELLCLOSE. 
Rent id. 

LEHAWE. 
Rent i)d. 
Rent v\d. 
ALICE BELL. 
LEDOWNE. 
xijd. 



LE SEATE. 



Rent xxxiijs. i 



COLDHAMS. 
Rent vs. vi]d. 

GEORGE NUN. 



NI 



Robert Rushbrooke, Son and heire of John Rushbrooke of Ratlesden 
desired to be admitted and acknowledged to hold by ye rent of xx 
and ij Capons p. ann. A 10 Hen. viii. Now of Anthony Skarpe. 
One close of Land and pasture called Hodges lying in Ratlesden 
between ye Land of ye Manor of Thornwoods on ye one part and ye 
Lands of John Coppinger, now of Henry Coppinger, on ye other part, 
and abutts upon ye Wood of ye Manor towards ye West and upon 
ye King's way leading from Bylston to Woolpit towards ye East by 
ye rent of xxd. A 4 Eliz. 

John King of Brettenham made fealty A 16 Hen. vii. 
Cecilia Kimbald Widow acknowledged and made fealty by ye rent 
of xxijrf. A 4 Eliz. Now Mark Salter. 
Certain Lands called Wallmans. 

2 acres of Land in times past Wallmans, before Parker's. 

By ye rent of v]d. A 22 Hen. vii. J" Rushbroke did fealty. 
Thomas Spring of La purchased of John Rushbrooke A 5 Henry viii. 
Thomas Goode dyed seised of Wallman's Croft held by ye rent of 
xviijd. A 5 Eliz. 
iij Acres of free Land 

held of ye sale of John A 5 Henry viii. 

One Meadow contayning i acre and a halfe by ye rent of id. lying in 
Ratlesden next ye River on ye North A 12 Henry viii. 
Thomas Rushbrooke held by ye homage A i Hen. viii. and 
acknowledged. 

Thomas Rushbrooke acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A 12 
Henry viii. 

Two pieces of Land called Justans by ye rent of xd and John 

Cage acknowledged A i Henry viii. Now Roger Groome 
Cocksedge. 

One Close called Dowes Close contayning vij acres lying in Ratlesden 
A 12 Henry viii. by ye rent of xiiijrf. 
Thomas Rushbrooke acknowledged A i Henry viii. 
Thomas Rushbrooke acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A 12 
Henry viii. and other Lands and Meadows in Ratlesden by ye rent 
of xd. Now Richard Baker. 

One close called Mellclose by ye rent of id. A 16 Eliz. This Croft 
is presented to be in ye hands of John Harwell of Ffelsham by ye 
rent of id. 

One acre of Land lying in Lehawe by ye rent of i\d. 
John Boll acknowledged by ye rent aforesaid A i Henry viii. 
Three acres of free Land held by ye annual rent of vj^. 
Died, and held a distress appears A 18 Henry viii. 
Three acres of free Land lying in ye field called Ledowne together 
with Robert Warren by ye rent of xi\d. p. ann. and 
Alice Abell Widow by William Abury also William Austin made 
thereof fealty A 15 Hen. viii. by ye rent aforesaid xi]d. 
xxx acres of Copy Land by estimation called Le Seate. Robert 

Nun dyed and surrendered to ye use of Robert Nun and his heires 
A 18 Henry viii. 

One Close called Le Sete as it lies together in Ratlesden. 
Robert Nun tooke to him and his heires of ye surrender of George 
Nun by ye rent of xxxiijs. iii)d. p. ann. A 18 Hen. viii. 
One field called Le Sete. 

John Bowden and George Nun tooke to them and their heires of 
ye surrender of Thos. Harwell A 21 Henry vii. 
George Nun held to him and his heires and assigns out of ye hands of ye 
Lord after seisure by ye rent of xxxiijs. iiijrf. A xij Henry viii. 
xx acres of Land and pasture free called parcell of Coldhams by ye 
annual rent of vs. vij^. per ann. together with another parcell of ye 
same pasture called Coldhams in ye tenure of Henry Cage, 
held and dyed A 18 Henry viii. divers parcells of free Land called 
Coldhams held by ye rent of vs. v]d. 

Henry Cage Son of W m Cage made thereof fealty by ye rent aforesaid 
A 20 Henry vii. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



COLDHAM LAND. 
Rent xd. 

Rent xvrf. ob halft 
a pound of Wax. 



SKABBCROFT. 
Rent iiijs. 



CHIRCHES. 
JONES CLOSE. 
GOODWINSCROFT. 
BULLSMEADOWE. 



OXENEY. 

Rent xijrf. 



OXENEY'S. 
Rent \}d. 
WHYTEBREDFELD. 
Rent vjs. viijrf. 

MELFELD. 
Rent ixs. 
EDRYERS. 
Rent vijs. 

PELLERS PIGHTLES. 
Rent ijs. iiij 



There appears a distress George Grome Son and heire of John Grome 

(or one and for another after ye decease of Martha 

Grome late ye Wife of ye aforesaid John Grome A 6 Edward vi. 

Three acres of Land late of Rob' Juxton called Coldham Land with 

one Croft contayning ij acres of Land by ye annual rent of \d. and 

Four acres of Land in times past of John Colvy and before of William 

Comayn by the rent of xvd. ob and halfe a pound of Wax. 

Anne Rushbroke Widowe acknowledged to hold ye premises by ye 

rent aforesaid A 15 Henry viii. 

Ten Acres of Customary Land. 

W m Abury sold to John Grome A xix Henry viii. issue iijs. iiijrf. 

A 19 Henry viii. 

xx acres of free Land held of Henry Cage. 

John Nun sold to John Grome A 19 Henry viii. 

One tenement with iij acres of free Land. 

Margery Amor sold to Rob' Beamont A 19 Henry viii. 5 acres of 

Land called Skabbcroft by ye service of iiijs. per ann. 

Peter ( lain field acknowledged to owe to ye Lord of ye ffee aforesaid 

for xiiij yeares vjs. A 19 Henry viii. 

A" 19 Eliz. They say that the way leading through Skabbecroft 

at ye North end thereof is parcell of ye Lord's Customary ground, 

and that that Croft doth extend to ye ditch beyond ye trees. Now in ye 

tenure of Robert Dynes. 

vj acres of Land late of John Atmor ye Ffatherin times past Chirches 

by ye rent of xxd. 

John Atmor Son made ffealty by ye rent of xxd. A i Henry viii. 

One Close contayning xx acres by estimation called Jones Closes. 

Thomas Hunt tooke to him and his heires out of ye hands of ye Lord 

by ye rent of xxijs. A i Henry viii. 

One Croft of Land contayning by estimation one acre of Land called 

Goodwingscroft lyes between ye Land of this Manor on ye one part 

and ye Land of Thomas Harwell on ye other and abutts upon ye 

Meadowe called Bull Meadowe towards ye East and upon ye Land 

of ye said Thomas towards ye West. 

Thomas Harwell tooke to him and his heires out of ye hands of ye 

Lord A 3 Henry viii. 

Six acres of Land lying in Ratlesden in a field called Oxeney in times 

past of Peter Motheham. 

Robert Warren acknowledged by ye rent of xijrf. per ann. Anno xij 

Henry viii. 

One pightell called Oxeneys in Ratlesden by ye rent of \\d. 

Robert Skarpe made fealty by ye rent of vjrf. A i of King James. 

One acre of Land and meadowe in Whytebredfeld. 

Robert Scarpe acknowledged to hold at farm by ye rent of vjs. viijrf. 

A xij Henry viii. 

One close called Melfeld by ye rent of ixs. 

One tenement called Endryers by ye rent of vijs. 

Margaret Harwell and John Harwell took to him and his assigns 

out of ye hands of ye Lord A 2 Henry viii. 

Two acres of Land called Peller's Pightles. 

William Ridnall acknowledged in right of his Wife and made fealty 

by ye rent of ijs. n\]d. A 22 Henry viii. 

Robert Pryse and Johanna his Wife tooke out of ye hands of ye Lord 

to them and their Assigns by ye rent of ijs. \\\}d. A 3 Henry viii. 

One Piphtle contayning ij acres called Pellers protell. 

William Brome took to him and his heires of ye surrender of Robert 

Pryse by ye rent of ijs. iiijrf. A 12 Henry viii. 

Robert Thompson tooke to him and his heires of ye surrender of 

John Brome A 22 Eliz. by ye rent of ijs. iiijrf. 

Thomas Brandish and Agnes his Wife tooke to them and their heires 

of ye said Thomas of ye surrender of Robert Thompson A 4 of King 

James. 



GEDDING. 



291 



LE SETE. Containe Lands called le Sete contayning xxxv acres of Land Copy 

lying in Ratlesden between ye Land of John Springe Esquire on ye 
North and ye Copy Land of John Salter which were part of le Sete 
on ye South and one head abutts upon ye King's way leading from 
Woolpit to Bylston towards ye East, and ye other head upon ye 
Land of John Crofts Son in part and upon ye Land of Agnes Campe 
widow in part towards ye West late of George Nun as appeares in 
ye Roll A 18 Henry viii. 

Rob' Nun took to him and his heires of ye regrant of ye Lord by ye 

rent of xijs m]d. per ann. A 22 Hen. viii. 

Rob' Nun tooke to him and his heires of ye regrant of ye Lord by 

ye rent of xixs. iiijd. per ann. A 23 Hen. viii. 

William Nun Son and heire of Rob' Nun was admitted to him and 

his heires by ye rent of xixs. \i\\d. 36 acres A i Eliz. 

One tenement built called Le Seate and divers Closes in Ratlesden 

contayning together by estimation xxx acres parcell of xxxvj acres. 

Edmund Skott jun r tooke to him and his heires of ye surrender of 

Edmund Skott, Sen., of ye rent of xixs. iii]d. A 4 of King James. 

One tenement with ye appurtenances called Woods by ye rent of ii]d. 

John Awoode of Ffelsham acknowledged and made fealty A 20 

Hen. vii. 

One messuage with certain Lands Copy lying in Ffelsham and Gedding. 

John Awoode acknowledged free by ye rent of i\\d. A 12 Henry viii. 

Eight acres of free Land by estimation lying in Ffyschcroft and 

Welymarshe. 

John Amor acknowledged by ye rent of xxd. A 12 Henry viii. 

One close with a parcell of Meadowe called Ffysheroft lying in Gedding 

held free by ye rent of xd. 

Two acres of ffree Land lying in Ratlesden by ye rent of xd. 

Azarias Rempton Purchased of Rob' Grome. A distress appears A 

44 Eliz. 

One acre and a halfe Copy by estimation lying in le Highfelde. 

John Amor acknowledged by Copy by ye rent of xi]d. A 12 Henry viii. 

John Springe Gent for Lands and tenements called Woodhall for 

Lands called Stonehams i\]d. in times past of Robert Rushbroke for 

a certaine meadow for Lands and tenements called Biimsteds n]d. 

for Lands called Manfelds ii]d. for Lands called Berelands for Lands 

called Berdhedds \\]d. for Lands called Whyttecroft u\d. for Lands 

called Bulls iijrf. for Lands late of Stephen Wymbysch ii\d. for Lands 

late of Thomas u]d. and Alice Spring widow for Lands 

called Brend's place iijrf. for Lands called Cockins \\]d. for Lands 
called' Kinges of Brettenham ii]d. and for Lands late of Godwine 
Cokkyssage Chey A 16 Hen. viii. 

One messuage with certain free Lands called Woodhall by ye rent of iiijs. i Ib. Wax. 

One messuage with certain free Land called Stonhams by ye rent of \vi\\d. and 2 Capons. 
Towne Meadowe by ye rent of vijs. v\d. 

One messuage with certain Lands late of John Brumpsted by ye rent of ijs. iiij^. per an. 

One messuage with certain Lands called Manfelds by ye rent of ijs. ixd. and i Ib. Wax. 

One close called Berelands by ye rent of vi]d. per ann. 

One messuage and certain Lands called Hardhead, by ye rent of vi\d. and i Ib. 

One Croft called Whytecroft by ye rent of i Ib. Wax and ye feast 

One acre late of John Boll called Bollys by ye rent of \\d. 

Certaine Lands late of Stephen Wymbysch by ye rent of ixd. ob i Ib. Wax. 

Certaine Lands late of Thomas Illes by ye rent of xd. 

Rent xxis. John Spring Esqre by William Brett his Attorney acknowledged to 

hold ye premises after ye death of Thomas Spring Esqre and made 
to ye Lord ffealty and gave release xxis. A 18 Hen. viii. 
W m Spring Esqre by W 1 " Poley his Attorney acknowledged and 
made fealty A 6 Eliz. 

There appears a distress of Thomas Pyvett gent Son and heire of 
James Pyvett Esqre for a release iiijs. A 30 Eliz. 



Rent xijs. \i\]d. 



LE SEATE. 



WOOD'S TENEMENT. 

Rent \\}d. 
Rent i\\d. 

WELYMARSHE. 
FFYSCH CROFT. 
Rent xxd. 
FFYSHCROFT. 
Rent xd. 
Rent xd. 



HIGHFELDE. 
Rent x\]d. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Kent id. Ffolsham. 



Bl'LLESMEADOWE. 



HlGHFELDE. 

Rent x\\d. 



Rent x\]d. 
Rent xd. 

LE DOWNE. 
Rent v\d. 

BADGECROFT, 
BRYDGES 

HlGHFELDE, 

WHYTEBREDFELDE. 
Rent ijs. 

BRIDGEHIGHFELD. 

\\HlFEBREDFELD. 

Rent iiijs. iiij</. 



HlGHFELD. 

Rent y.\]d. 



PYSSERS TENT. 



One messuage and one Croft adjoyning with ye appurtenances in 

Ffelsham by ye rent of id. per ann. 

Margaret Harwell Widow acknowledged and made fealty by ye rent 

aforesaid A 16 Henry vni. 

One Croft of Land by estimation j acre lyes between ye Lands of ye 

Lordshipp and this Manor of ye one part and ye Land of ye said Thomas 

Harwell of ye other part and abutts upon ye meadowe called Bull 

Meadowe towards ye East and upon ye Land of ye said Thomas towards 

ye West. 

Robert Harwell Son and heire of Thomas Harwell who was of ye 

age of xvj years took by Margaret his Mother during his minority of 

age to his age took to him and his heires ye premises A 7 Henry viii. 

ij pieces of Customary Land contayning by Estimation ij acres of 

land more or less. 

Ann ye Wife of Geoffrey Barker ye daughter and heire of John Amor 

son tooke to him and his heires after ye decease of ye said John A 22 

Henry viii. 

John Almor tooke to him and his heires of ye surrender of John Atmor 

his Ffather A 21 Henry vii. 

It is put to ye homage to enquire by what right William Bowie 

occupies ye premises A 4 Eliz. 

John Barker Son and heire of ye aforesaid Anne Barker tooke to him 

and his heires A 30 Eliz. 

John Barker Son and heire of John Barker tooke to him and his heires 

A 4 of King James. 

Certaine ffree Lands which they know not viz x acres of Land and 

Meadowe called Highfelde by ye rent of xijd. A 30 Eliz. 

Ann ye Wife of Geffery Barker daughter and heire of ye aforesaid 

John Amor is heire thereof. A distress appeares A 22 Henry viii. 

John Barker made thereof fealty by ye rent of xi]d. A 30 Eliz. 

Anne Barker late Wife of John Barker made fealty and relief by ye 

rent of xi)d. A 4 of King James. 

One Croft of ffree Land contayning vj acres in Ratlesden late of John 

Grome his Ffather by ye rent of xd. 

One ffree tenement and one piece of Land called Le Downe in Ratlesden 

by ye rent of vjd. of John Grome ye Ffather. Roger Grome made 

ffealty A i et 2 Phil. & Mary by ye rent aforesaid. 

One messuage, empty, called Badgccroft, Bridges Highfelde and 

Whytebredfelde whereof ye aforesaid void messuage contayns by 

estimation i acre and a halfe of Land. 

A certaine piece of Land contayning iij acres by Estimation late 

parcell of Whytebredfeld with ye appurtenances in Gedding, lyes 

between ye Land of ye Manor of Ffelsham on both parts by ye rent 

of ijs. per ann. and 

One field called Bridges Highfeld contayning by Estimation ij acres 

and an halfe. 

A certaine piece of Land parcell of Whitebredfeld contayning by 

estimation iij acres and an halfe with ye appurtenances in Gedding by 

ye rent of iiijs. ui]d. 

Upon agreement between ye Lord and Roger Tripp and Robert 

Heyward made ye same Tenants made to ye Lord ffealty and 

attorned by ye rent aforesaid A i Phil. & Mary. 

vj acres ffree Land called Highfeld Croft contayning vj acres held 

by ye rent of xij<*. 

John Warde dyed thereof seised and gave ye premises to Agnes Warde 

his Wife for terme of life, ye remainder to George Warde his Son and 

heire, and made ffealty, A 5 Eliz. 

One tenement of late built called Pyssers with a gardine adjoyning 

and one Shopp, and one ffabrik to ye same tenement annexed. 

One piece of Meadowe or pasture enclosed called Pyssers Meadowe 

lying next ye said tenement contayning by estimation one acre in 

Gedding. 

Said tenement with ye Gardine adjoyning is situate and lyes between 

ye Common way leading from Ffelsham to ye Manor of Gedding 






GEDDING. 



293 



WALLMANSCROFT. 



SOUTH MEADOWE. 

MEADOWE. 
Rent xxs. 

HlGHFELDE. 



on ye West of ye said meadowe called Pyssers Meadowe towards ye 

North and upon ye Common way leading from Ffelsham to Ratlesden 

towards ye South. 

And ye aforesaid Meadow lyes between ye Land late of Roger Tripp 

on ye East, West, and South parts and ye said Common way from 

Ffelsham to Ratlesden on ye North by ye rent of xxxiijs. iiij^. per ann. 

Michael Bumpsted tooke out of ye hands of ye Lord to him and his 

heires by release by ye rent aforesaid, A 16 Eliz. 

Thomas Bumpsted tooke to him and his heires of ye surrender of ye 

aforesaid Michael A 35 Eliz. 
ROGEN'S TENEMENT. One Messuage with one acre of ffree Land lying in Ratlesden called 

Rogens by ye annual rent of xvii]d. and suits in times past of Johanna 

Grome. 

Walter Amor dyed and held A 18 Henry viii. 

John Rushbroke made thereof ffealty by ye rent of xviijd. A 23 

Henry vii. 

Walter Amor acknowledged by ye rent of xviijd. A 12 Henry viii. 

One tenement with acres called Wallmanscroft. 

Alice Beamont Widow holds A 18 Henry viii. 

Thomas Goode died seised of one Croft called Wallmanscroft held by 

ye rent of xviiid. A 5 Eliz. 

One Copyhold Meadowe called Southmeadowe contayning ij acres of 

Meadowe with ye appurtenances in Gedding and Ffelsham. 

One acre of Meadow late of Henry Peyton lying in Gedding aforesaid. 

iiij acres of Arable Land lying in divers pieces in ye Towne aforesaid 

in ye field called Highfield late in ye tenure of Peter Drought by ye 

rent of xxs. per ann. 

And Sutc 

Thomas Bedge Rector of ye Church of Ffelsham holds therefore appears 

seisure A 18 Henry viii. He held for term of xxiij years. 

Thomas Knopwood holds without title after ye terme of xxiij years 

ended by ye Feast of ye Annunciation of Mary A 17 Henry viii. As 

it is presented A 20 Henry viii. 

One acre of ffree Land lying in Le Shone between ye Land of ye B f 

of Ely in ye tenure of Thomas Springe late of John Bomsted on ye 

South and ye Land of ye said John Boll on ye North and abutts upon 

ye Land of ye B p of Ely towards ye West and East. 

Agnes Boll Widowe late Wife of John Boll of Bablyshew made ffealty 

and acknowledged to hold by ye rent of \]d. and of Court A 6 

Henry viii. 
BIGGONS TENEMENT. One tenement with ye appurtenances, hedges and ditches situate in 

Gedding between the demesnes of this Manor on both parts and abutts 

upon ye Land of ye Manor towards ye North and upon ye Land of 

ye said Manor towards ye South. 

Robert Scarpe acknowledged and made ffealty by ye rent of iii]d. 

and A 7 Henry viii. 

Thomas Knopwood made ffealty for one tenement late of Thomas 

Biggon and afterwards Robert Scarpe by ye rent of iiijrf. A 28 

Henry viii. 

Robert Scarpe acknowledged free by ye rent aforesaid one messuage 

in which he abides and containing Lands to ye same belonging A 12 

Henry viii. 

Certaine Lands ffree late of Robert Scarpe held by rent of iiijrf. 

Robert Heyward purchased of Rob' Scarpe by ye rent of iiijrf. A 

distress appeares A 28 Henry viii. 



LE SHONE. 
Rent \}d. 



Rent iiij^. 



Rent iiijrf. 




294 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HESSETT. 

HERE were two estates in this place mentioned in the Survey. 
The first was formerly that of six freemen under com- 
nu'iidation to the Abbot of Ely in the soc of the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, consisting of a carucate of land, a bordar, 
3 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
and an acre of meadow, valued at 6os. When the Survey 
was taken this was the estate of Frodo, the abbot's brother, 
and was worth only 2os.' 

The second was held by the Abbot of St. Edmunds at the time of the 
Survey. It consisted of 5^ carucates of land and 6 bordars, formerly held 
by 60 freemen. At the time of the Survey half a carucate, 2 bordars, and 
a ploughteam were held by Berard, and valued at 2os. over and above his 
payment (?). Among the freemen were 6 ploughteams and 5 acres of 
meadow, and these freemen were able to sell and give their land, the soc 
remaining in the abbot's possession, and they owed all services in Rougham. 
All except 6 belonged to the abbot's fold, and 12 acres belonged to the church. 
The value of this estate was 405. It was 8 quarentenes long and 7 broad, 
and paid in a gelt i8d. whoever had the lands." 

MANOR OF HESSETT. 

This manor with the advowson was given to the Abbot of St. Edmunds 
by Earl Ulfketel, and continued with the abbey until the suppression of 
that house by King Hen. VIII., who in 1540 sold and conveyed the manor 
to Thomas Bacon. 

The assurance included the advowson of the church of Hessett, Chevins 
Wood, and Monkes \Vood, and other lands and hereditaments in Hessett, 
Beyton, Bury, Thurston, Drinkstone, and Monks Bradfield, and were to 
be held of the King in chief by the service of the twentieth part of a knight's 
fee and a payment of 2. 75. annually. 3 

The Bacons had long been settled in Hessett, certainly from the time 
of Edw. I., when we find Robert, 2nd son of Adam Bacon living here. 
The Crown grantee, Thomas Bacon, was the son of John Bacon by Margery 
Tyllott, which John was the son of Stephen Bacon who died in 1444. 

Thomas Bacon married ist Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Jarvis, of 
Long Stratton, and 2ndly Ann, daughter of Henry Rows, of Dennington, 
who after his death remarried Robert Gosnold, of Otley. 

Thomas Bacon 4 died 2nd June, 1547, 5 wnen the manor passed under his 
will dated in 1546* to his eldest son, Edmund Bacon, who married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Page, of Weelley. He made his will in 1553, and says : 
" I will have dealte the day of my burialle to the poore and nedye people 
of the same towne twentie shillings. Item, 1 will have dealte and given 
to the poore people of that same towne that day xii months twentie shillings. 
And so fourthe by the space of fyve yeres every yere twentie shillings." 
He gives to Johne Bacon his eldest sonne his " best goun of chamblet 
furred with foynes," or tooynes. 

In Canon Cooke's " Materials for a History of Hessett," 7 he says : 
" He (Edmund) leaves the larger part of his lands with the manor and 

1 Dom. ii. 355. Francis Bacon, the celebrated Lord 

*Dom. ii. 3626. Verulam. 

'Harl. 1232; S.P 1540, 436 (58). 'I.P.M., I Edw. VI. 29. 

4 He was the great-grandfather of Sir 6 Liber Alen, p. 41 , P.C.C. 

T Suff. Inst. vol. v. p. 85. 



HESSETT. 295 

advowson of Hessett to his wife Elizabeth for her life : other lands to 
his eldest son John ; and bequests of land and money to his son William, 
to his son Fraunces, at this date under twenty-one years of age, to his 
daughter, Marie Fuetner, who is called Mary Fuller in the will of his widow, 
and to his brother-in-law, Robert Kene ; and mentions ' one Anne Gosnolde 
my mother-in-law,' (once in the will by a clerical error called brother-in-law) 
' now the wife of Robert Gosnolde of Ottley gen tilman ' ; and he names 
' one annuitie of sixe poundes by yere, which I am bounde to pay to the 
said Anne during her lief naturalle ' ; i.e., bound by his father's will. 
And it seems that he had called two sons by the name of John, as is made 
clear in his widow's will : for he makes this bequest : ' Item I give and 
bequeathe to John Bacon my son of Callys three score pounds sterling.' " 

The name in the will is distinctly " John of Callys," but it ought to 
have been written either Gatles, as in the will of John Bacon the elder, 
or Catelys, as in the inquisition taken at the death of John Bacon, the eldest 
son of this Edmund, " omnia ilia terras tenementa . . . vocata seu 
cognita per nomen de Cateleis." 1 

The testator died loth Oct. 1553, ' and the manor passed under his 
will to his widow Elizabeth for her life, with all the lands both free and bond, 
meadowe, pastures, rents, and services, and also the "capital house in which 
he was dwelling as well as the lands which he had purchased lately of Sir 
Thomas Jermyn." By an inquisition made at Bury 2nd of June, 1554, 
he was found to hold of the King in capite by service of the twentieth 
part of a knight's fee and a rent of 95. id. the Manor of Hessett, with the 
advowson of the church, two woods, Chevins and Monks, six messuages 
with 760 acres of land in Hessett and Monks Bradfield : to hold of the King 
in socage three messuages with 519 acres of land in Thurston, Drinkstone, 
Bayton, and Tostock : to hold by fealty only, of the Manor of Lytton in 
Norton, one messuage called Barton Mere, with 248 acres of land ; and to 
hold of the King in socage as of his Hundred of Thedwastre one messuage 
and 228 acres in Thurston at a rent of ios. 3 

John Bacon, son and heir of Edmund Bacon, who resided at Troston, 
never came into possession of the manor, for he died I3th Jan. 1566-7* 
three years before his mother's death. He had married twice, ist Barbara, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrook, and 2ndly Katherine 
Perient, and dying I3th Jan. 1567, intestate, 5 the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Edmund Bacon. By the inquis. p.m. of John Bacon, 26th 
May, 1567, he was found to have had the reversion of all the manors, 
messuages, lands, and tenements which formed the jointure of his mother ; 
and to have held of Sir Nicholas Bacon, the Lord Keeper, as of his Hundred 
of Blackbourn, lands and tenements in Troston, Great and Little Livermere, 
Ixworth Thorpe, Sapiston, and Honington. His son and heir was declared 
to be Edmund, who on the day of his father's death was of the age of 13 
years and 13 weeks. His widow Elizabeth died in 1570. 

Edmund Bacon married Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Cornwaleys, 
of Shotley. He obtained from the King authority to alienate this manor 

'Liber Tasche, fol. 20, P.C.C. "I. P.M. at Bury, 26th May, 1567. 

"I.P.M. at Bury, 7th March, 1553-4, 5 The inquis p.m. of this John Bacon 
i Mary, 112. from the Harl. MSS. 639, 145, is 

3 Suffolk Inst. vol. v. p. 52. printed at length in the Suff. Inst. 

v. 86-88. 



296 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

in 1606, and in hisVill dated in 1624 he states that he had already made 
conveyances of his manors, lands, tenements, and hereditaments according to 
his mind and good liking. His first bequest is as follows : " ffirst and 
above all things I commend my soule into the most mercifull hands of 
allmightie God, assuredly trustinge, that by the death and meritts of my 
sweet Saviour Christe Jesus, I shall have free remission of all my sinnes and 
transgressions, and that I shal be pertaker of the heavenly ioyes prepared 
for his elect ; my bodie I comitt to the earth from whence it came." He 
leaves to the poor of Hessett, Woolpit, and Drinkstone twenty shillings 
and to the poor of Beyton ten shillings ; to one servant ten pounds ; to 
each of four other servants, six pounds thirteen and fourpence ; and to 
each of other, three pounds. He makes provision for the poor of Hessett : 
" Item I will that soe soon after my death as convenientlie maie bee my 
executors shall deliver into the hands of six men or moe of the honest 
inhabitants of the toune of Hedgessett aforesaid five pounds of lawf nil English 
money to bee imployed to some profitt and to remayne in a stocke for the 
releife and benefitt of the poore of y c said towne of Hedgessett for ever, 
and the same five pounds to be so disposed of from tyme to tyme and at all 
tymes as that some six or moe of the honest inhabitants of the said towne 
of Hedgessett for the tyme beinge in all tymes to come maie allwaies have 
the government of the same five pounds and the disposition of the profitt 
which shall be raysed thereof at all times to the benefitt of the most poore 
and needy people of the saide towne of Hedgessett. . . . Item I 
will that soe soone after my death as convenientlie may bee my executors 
shall deliver ten pounds into the hands of those honest inhabitants of the 
saide towne of Hedgessett which shall have the government of the aforesaid 
five pounds given for a stocke for the poore there as aforesaid and they to 
have the government of the saide tenn pounds for the releife and benefitt of 
Jane Jennings my poore servant duringe all her life and out of the same ten 
pounds and of the profite which maie bee made thereof by some ymploy- 
ment thereof to bee made to give what shalbe needful towards the mayntenance 
releife and comfort of the said Jane duringe her life. And after her decease 
the saide ten pounds or what shalbe left thereof unspent by the said Jane 
to goe and bee alwaies imployed to the increase of the aforesaid stocke 
given for the benefitt of the poore in Hedgessett as aforesaid and to bee 
alwaies imployed as I have appoynted the said five pounds to bee for the 
releife of the poore in the said toune of Hedgessett." 

He mentions that his eldest son Edmund has deceased, and names 
ten of his children who are alive. He calls " the wife of his loveinge 
brother Robert " the Lady Harris ; to her, to Robert Bacon, and to the 
wife of his son Lionel " for a remembrance of his love and hartie affeccyon," 
and to each of his ten children " in remembrance of his love " he gives " a 
peece of plate of the value of five pounds, to bee bought and delivered to 
every of them " by his executors. He leaves his plate and household 
stuff, mentioned afterwards in his will, to his well-beloved grandchild, 
Edmund Bacon, " the sonne and heire of his eldest sonne Edmund Bacon 
deceased when he shall attayne to the full age of twentie and one yeres ; 
and if the saide Edmund his grandchild shall die before the age of twenty- 
one to his grandchild Thomas the brother of the said Edmund his grand- 
child, to be delivered to him at his full age of twenty and one yeres." The 
plate named by him is " my best bason and ewer of silver parcell giult, 
my nest of bowles with the cover to the same silver and gilt, my standinge 



HESSETT. 



297 



cuppe silver and gilt, my silver salt gilt, my trencher salt of silver and gilt, 
my dozen of apostle spoones of silver parcell gilt." 1 

The above is taken from the will as printed in the paper of Canon 
Cooke, to which we have already referred. 

Edmund Bacon was buried 2 in Hessett, against the south wall of the 
chapel of which is a rectangular tablet of black marble in a white-flowered 
border of Jacobean character bearing an inscription in capital letters : 

HERE LYE INTERRED THE BODYES OF EDMUND 

BACON ESQ. AND ELIZABETH HIS WIFE DAUGH 
TER OF RICHARD CORNWALEYS ESQ. WHICH 

EDMUND AND ELIZABETH LIVED HAPPILY 
TOGETHER IN VVEDLOCKE BY THE SPACE OF 
LII YEARES AND HAD ISSUE VIII SONNES AND VIII 
; DAUGHTERS. ELIZABETH DYED UPPON THE 

XXV OF DECEMBER 1624 AND EDMUND UPP 
ON THE IX OF FEBRUARY NEXT FOLLOWING. 

Above are the arms of Bacon impaling Cornwallis. The crest is broken, 
but sufficient remains to show it to be on a torse, a talbot passant holding 
in his mouth a deer's leg. 

The manor passed to Edmund Bacon's grandson and heir, Edmund 
Bacon, son of Edmund Bacon (who died in 1617 in his father's lifetime) 
by his wife Phoebe Marsham, youngest daughter and coheir of John 
Marsham, of Badwell Ash. 

Edmund Bacon died in 1627, and the manor passed to his brother and 
heir, Thomas Bacon, who died i8th Dec. 1635, without issue. The manor 
then passed to Henry Bacon, the uncle of Thomas, the 3rd son of Edmund 
and Elizabeth, who died without issue in 1651, when it went to Lionel 
Bacon, the 5th son of Edmund, who also died without issue in 1653, when 
the estate became the inheritance of the surviving sisters and coheirs. 
Elizabeth, the eldest, married Calibut Walpole, of Houghton, in Norfolk, 
ancestor of the Earls of Oxford. Ann, another daughter, married John 
Aldrich. The manor or a moiety passed to Robert Walpole, the grandson 
of Elizabeth and Calibut Walpole. This Robert Walpole died in 1700, 
when his interest vested in Sir Robert Walpole, his son. 

In 1708 Aubrie Porter appears as lord and patron, and his nephew, 
John Porter, and others sold the manor and advowson in 1724 to Thomas 
Le Heufe, 3 by whom they were settled on Michael le Heufe his son on his 
marriage with Elizabeth Gery in 1729. Thomas Le Heufe died 26th Dec. 
1736, at the age of 69, and was buried in Hessett, where at the east end 
of the chancel is a marble mural monument to his memory and that of his 
wife, who died 24th Dec. 1725. Michael was secretary of the presentations 
to the Lord Chancellor, and died seised of the manor 23rd July, 1749,* when 
it passed to his son and heir, Michael le Heufe. He married in 1755 
Merielina, one of the daughters and heirs of Thomas Discipline, and died 
9th April, 1792, aged 60. His wife predeceased him six days, and the 
inscription on the wall of the north aisle towards the westward in an oval 
tablet of white marble states : " They were lovely and pleasant in their lives 



' Suff. Inst. vol. v. 90 and 92. 
'I.P.M., Bury, I3th April, 1625. 



01 



3 Thomas Le Heufe does not seem to have 
purchased Thomas Aldrich's moiety 
until 1730. 

*24th July, Gent. Mag. 1749, p. 332. 



298 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and in their death they were not divided." The manor passed to his son 
and heir, Michael William le Heufe. He married a Waddington, and on 
his death 22nd June, 1809, the manor went to his only son, Michael Peter 
le Heufe, who died loth Dec. 1837, without surviving issue (his only child 
Merielina Agnes, married to Michael Peter Carpenter, having died 2Oth April 
preceding her father's decease), when the manor passed to the issue of 
Merielina Agnes, Michael Peter le Heufe's sister, wife of the Rev. Thomas 
Ellis Rogers, rector of Hessett and Lackford, namely, their only son, 
Michael Edward Rogers. 

Canon Cooke, writing in 1873, says that upon the death of Michael 
William Le Heufe in 1809 the manor and advowson passed to his two 
daughters, Mrs. Rogers and Mrs. Cocksedge, and were then in the joint 
possession of their representatives, the families of Marshall and Tinling. 
Mrs. Rogers died I2th May, 1816, at the age of 25. 

In 1853 the manor belonged to Mrs. M. E. Rogers and Mr. Charles 
S. Tinling, in 1885 to C. T. Tinling and the Rev. J. H. Marshall, and in 
1896 to Thos. Tinling and Mrs. White, and now to Mrs. Tinling and Mrs. 
White. 

Page says that the family mansion of the Le Heufes in Hessett was 
destroyed by fire and never rebuilt. They afterwards resided at Bury 
St. Edmunds. 1 

Arms of BACON : Argent on a fesse engrailed betw. 3 escutcheons Gu. 
3 mullets of the field. Of LE HEUFE : Gules, three bee-hives, beset with 
bees, diversely volant, Or. 



'Page's Hist, of Suff. p. 722. 







LIVERMERE. (GREAT) 299 

LIVERMERE (GREAT}. 

HE Abbot of St. Edmunds had the only estates in this place 
mentioned in the Survey under Thedwestre. 

The first consisted of a carucate of land, 3 ploughteams, 
and 2 acres of meadow, formerly held by 10 freemen who 
could both give and sell their land so long as the soc 
remained to the abbot. The value was IDS. 8d. 

The second was held when the Survey was taken by 
Frodo, and consisted ot 12 freemen with 2 carucates of land and 5 plough- 
teams, valued at 6os. 

The third was also held by Frodo, and consisted of a freeman formerly 
under Edric, of Laxfield, with 2 carucates of land, and his wife under the 
abbot. There were also two villeins, 8 bordars, 2 thralls, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, and 4 acres of meadow. The men 
could give and sell their lands, but the sac, soc, and commendation over 
the woman had to remain in the abbot's possession. The man's land the 
King received from the abbot and gave to Gernon de Peiz, who later by 
the King's licence becoming a monk, gave back the land. The value of it 
was 405. There was also a church advowson with 12 acres of land. This 
estate was 10 quarentenes long and 8 broad, and paid in a gelt I2d.' 

Under Lackford we find the following entry of lands in Livermere : 
In Saxon times a manor was held in this place byGoodmund under the Abbot 
of Ely, and he could not sell it. It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 
villeins, 3 bordars, 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to 
the men, 4 acres of meadow, a fishery, a horse, 3 beasts, 10 hogs, and 160 
sheep. At the time of the Survey the manor was held by Hugh de Beverda 
of Hugh de Montfort, and the serfs were reduced to i, the ploughteams 
belonging to the men to i, the hogs to 3, and the sheep to 100. The soc and 
sac belonged to the Abbot of Ely. And the said Hugh de Montfort held 
80 acres which three freemen under Goodmund by commendation and by 
soc and sac under the Abbot of St. Edmunds had formerly held, and half 
the commendation of one freeman (?) with the land which the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds had in the time of the Confessor. Among them all were 2 
ploughteams and an acre of meadow. The manor was valued at 405., 
and the freemen at 135. It was 6 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid 
in a gelt 4^.* 

There were two other holdings in this place. The first estate belonged 
to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and was held by Fulcher. It consisted of 
two freemen with 20 acres of land, a bordar, half a ploughteam, and half 
an acre of meadow. These men could give and sell their lands, but the 
sac, soc, and commendation remained in the possession of the abbot. The 
value was 35.' 

The second estate was held by three freemen under the Abbot of Ely, 
by commendation only, in the soc of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and con- 
sisted of 29 acres of land and half a ploughteam, valued at 55. It was held 
at the time of the Survey by the Abbot of Ely.* 

MANOR OF LIVERMERE MAGNA al. UPHALL al. BROME HALL. 

The abbot and convent at Ely held a manor in Great Livermere in 1045, 
and Wilfric, the 6th abbot of that house, privately made over the same 

'Dora. ii. 3636. 3 Dora. ii. 

2 Dom. ii. 4 Dom. ii. 



300 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to his brother Gudnund. The monks re-claimed the same, and Thurston, 
his successor, prosecuted their claim and came to an agreement that 
Gudnund should enjoy it for life. In the interval the Norman invasion 
occurred, and Hugh de Montfort, who accompanied the Conqueror as 
standard bearer, obtained possession of the 'manor and withheld it from the 
monastery. Under Hugh de Montfort, Hugh de Bemda held. 

The manor was vested in Matthew de Thelnetham in the reign of 
Hen. III. 

Peter de Thelnetham held a fee here in 1240, and in 1274-5 Matthew 
de Thelnetham was lord. A Court Roll of his will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum. 1 In the time of Edw. II. 
Sir John de Thelnetham was lord. The manor no doubt descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred. 

In 1318 a fine was levied of the manor by John de Thelnetham and 
Matilda his wife against Edmund de Gunvill, parson of Russheworth church, 
and Peter, son of Robert de Hoo, of Bernham. 1 The fine included also 
the advowson of the church of Magna Livermere. Davy says that Peter 
de Thelnetham, his son and heir, was the next lord, and that his daughter 
and heir Juliana succeeded, and married Hugh de Bokenham, but this is not 
exactly correct. 

In 1339 the manor and the advowson were in Matthew de Thelnetham 
and Margaret his wife, for this year they levied a fine of them against Robert 
Peyvere, parson of the church of Magna Livermere and William Payn, 
parson of the church of Flemton. 3 The manor continued with the family 
of Thelnetham until it passed to the Bokenhams in the person of Juliana, 
daughter of Peter, and sister and heir of John de Thelnetham, widow of 
Hugh de Bokenham, of Snetterton, in Norfolk, 4 who had died in 1373. 

It is said Juliana concurred with her trustee in 1385 in settling the 
manor on Hugh de Bokenham, her son, on his marriage with Joan, daughter 
of Robert Ashfield, but as John de Thelnetham, Juliana's brother, is said 
not to have died until 1399, an< ^ J oan . tne w ^ e f Hugh de Bokenham, 
died about 1393, it is not easy to see how this could be. Amongst 
the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is a lease of Brome Hall 
Manor with the advowson, &c., dated i8th Rich. II. [1394.] It is a demise by 
Robert de Aisshefeld to Hugh Bokynham and Joan his wife, daughter of 
the said Robert, and includes 5 acres of land and 2 acres of pasture in Great 
and Little Livermere, and 7 rent in the same manor. 5 

In 1399 the trustees of Hugh de Bokenham covenanted to settle the 
manor on Hugh and Joan, daughter of Sir John Brewse, Knt., and their 
heirs male, reserving Juliana's life interest in it. 

Hugh de Bokenham, died before 1425, and from this time to the time 
of Sir John Carry 11, son of Thomas Carry 11 and Dorothy Bokenham (which 
John had livery of the manor in 1577), ^ passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Thelnetham, in Blackbourn Hundred. This manor is specifically 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Bokenham, who died in 1484,' of 
George Bokenham, who died the 2ist Sept. 1523,' of Thomas Bokenham, 
who died 9th Dec. 1534,' and of John Bokenham, who died ist Aug. 1551.* 

'Add. Ch. 9096, 9007. 5 Harl. 45 D. 27. 

Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. II. 39. M.P.M., 2 Rich. III. 7. 

'Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. III. 38. H.P.M., 16 Hen. VIII. 44. 

4 See Thelnetham Manor, in Blackbourn M.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 26. 

Hundred. M.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 56. 



LIVERMERE (GREAT). 301 

A fine was levied of this manor and of the manors of Furneux, What- 
field, Worlington, Hethese (?) and Mildenhall in 1558, by Richard Nye 
against Thomas Carill and others. ' 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1588 by Henry Campyon against 
Sir John Carill, 2 and he levied one in 1590 against Edmund Buckenham, 3 . 
but he does not appear to have retained the manor long, as before the end 
of Queen Elizabeth's reign we find it vested in Hamon Claxton. 

Page gives an account of this family, in which he says that Hamon 
Claxton was the 2nd son of William Claxton, of Chediston, in Blything 
Hundred, and of Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Throgmorton, of 
Allhallows, in South Elmham. He married Anne, daughter of Thomas 
Clarke, of Oakley, in Somersetshire. She died in 1605, and the property 
(Page rather infers the manor) passed to their son and heir, Hamon 
Claxton. 

Davy does not give this devolution of the manor, but states that it 
passed from Hamon Claxton, who died in 1592, to his son and heir, John 
Claxton, and that two other John Claxtons succeeded, being sons of those 
formerly holding the lordship. This devolution of Davy is verified by one 
of the Rawlinson MSS., in the Bodleian, 4 where it is stated that in 1597 
John Claxton was the holder of the Manor of Uphall, and we find that in 
1613 John Clayton (no doubt an error for Claxton) was called upon to 
show title to the manor and the advowson. 5 

The descent of the manor is perfectly clear. On Hamon's death 
2oth Aug. 1594,* the manor passed to his widow Anne, and on her death 
in 1605 went to Hamon's son and heir, John Claxton. He married 
Bridget, daughter of Thomas Barrow, of Shipdam, in Norfolk, and dying 
was buried 26th Jan. 1619, when the manor passed to his son and heir 
John, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Newtas, of Ham, in 
Middlesex. On his (John Claxton's) death, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Hamon Claxton, who married Philippa, daughter of Sir Robert 
Bacon, of Redgrave, Bart., and died igth June, 1671, his widow surviving 
until I3th Jan. 1683. On her death their son Maurice succeeded to the 
lordship. He married Dorothy, youngest daughter of Sir Henry Felton, 
of Playford, Bart., and died in i687without surviving issue, his only daughter 
Elizabeth having died in 1683, and leaving his widow, who remarried Sir 
John Poley, of Boxstead, and died in 1713. 

The manor subsequently became the property of Baptist Lee by pur- 
chase. He died in 1768, and devised the same to his grandson, Nathaniel 
Lee Acton, who died in 1836, from whom the manor has descended, and 
passed in the same way as the Manor of Lawshall, in Blackbourn Hundred, 
and is now vested in Lord De Saumarez. 

Court Rolls of the Manor of Great Liver mere in 1295 and 1309 will 
be found amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 7 

A fine was levied of the manor under the head of " Bromhall Manor 
and Advowson " in 1387 by Margaret Mareschall, Countess of Norfolk, 
Richard Upton, parson of Shimpling church, Robert Hotot, John 

'Fine, Mich. 6 Mary, I. 'Memoranda, 10 James I.; Mich. Rec. 

'Fine, Mich. 30-31 Eliz. Rot. 195. 

3 Fine, Trin. 32 Eliz. 6 I.P.M., at Bury, i8th July, 40 Eliz. 

4 B. 3 i9- [I598]- 

7 Add. Ch. 9096, 9097. 



302 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Roughened, jun., and William, parson of Thelnetham church. 1 The Manor 
of " Uphall," in Great Livermcre, is included in the inquis. p.m. of John 
Smith in 1482.* 

Another fine was levied of the same manor under the head " Uphall 
a/. Magna Lyvermere Manor," in 1554, by Nicholas Ridley against Thomas 
Clarke and others. 1 And the same year of the same manor by William 
Watson and others against Henry Clarke and others. 4 

There would appear to have been two separate manors of Uphall and 
Bromhall, not, as Davy makes out, one manor indifferently called the one 
or the other, for amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of 
Hen. VIII. we find an action by William Cok and Thomas Symond against 
Thomas Bromwich and George Bokenham, in which the customs of the 
" manors of Uphall and Bromhall " are involved. 5 Bromhall was evidently 
the manor of the Bokenhams. This view, too, is fortified by the Rawlinson 
MSS. in the Bodleian, in which the descent of the " manors of Brom-hall 
and Up-hall," in 1597, are given. 6 

LIVERMERE MAGNA OR GRANGE. 

This manor was held in 1198 by the abbot and convent of Warden, 
in Bedfordshire, where it remained until the dissolution of the religious 
houses, when it passed to the Crown, and was granted in 1546 to Richard 
Taverner and Roger Taverner, who had licence the same year to alienate 
to Nicholas Rookwood, who 10 years later had licence to alienate to John 
Dowvys, and a fine was levied of the manor in 1557 by the said John Dowvys 
against Nicholas Rokewood and others. 7 The fine included lands in Wang- 
ford, Brandonferry, and Lakengheath. John " Dawys," no doubt the 
same man, was called upon in 1559 to show title to the manor. 8 

John Doubs or Dowvys died in 1577, when the manor passed to his 
daughter and heir, Anne, married to William Barwick, and they in 1597 
sold the manor to Thomas Wright. 9 

From this time the manor seems to have devolved on the Wright 
family in the same course as the Manor of Wangford, in Lackford Hundred. 



'Feet of Fines, n Rich. II. 23. B. 319. 

M.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 30. 'Fine, Trin. 4 Mary I. 

3 Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. "M. i Eliz. Mich. Rec. Rot. 121. 

'Fine, Easter, 2 Mary I. 'Fine, Easter, 39 Eli/. 

'Star C.P. Hen. VIII. vol. 17, 72. 




PAKENHAM. 303 



PA KEN HAM. 

LL the land mentioned in this place at the time of the Survey 
belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The first estate 
was a manor held by the abbot, also in the time of the Con- 
fessor, and consisting of 7 carucates of land, 44 villeins, 23 
bordars, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 23 belonging to 
the men, 6 thralls, 26 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient 
to support 100 hogs. Also 2 mills, 3 rouncies, 48 beasts, 
65 hogs, and 190 sheep. When the Survey was taken some of these details 
had changed ; there were 4 ploughteams in demesne, 9 thralls, i mill only, 
but additionally 8 hives of bees. Another holding was that of 31 freemen 
and a bordar, in the time of the Confessor, consisting of 2 carucates of land, 
ii ploughteams, and 3 acres of meadow. All these belonged to the abbot 
with sac and soc and all customs, and to the abbot's fold. 

In the same township was an estate formerly of three freemen con- 
sisting of 30 acres of land, a ploughteam, and wood sufficient for the main- 
tenance of 4 hogs. The freemen could give and sell the land, the sac, soc, 
and customs still remaining to the abbot. 

In the same township in the Confessor's time was a freeman with a 
carucate of land, and the Survey says : " He got the Abbot's consent to 
lease him half a carucate of land on condition that the whole of his land 
wheresoever it might be should remain in the Saint's possession after his 
death." And at the time of the Survey out of this freeman's land a caru- 
cate lay in Pakenham in demesne. There was also a ploughteam as well 
as 5 bordars, 2 thralls, and a winter mill. The abbot had commendation, 
sac, and soc over the freeman. To the church lay 30 acres of land as alms. 
The value of the whole was 10, increased to 25 at the time of the Survey. 
It was 16 quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt 



MANOR OF PAKENHAM HALL. 

This was given by Edward the Confessor to the abbey of St. Edmunds. 
In 1199 Abbot Sampson assigned one-third of the demesne and tithes of 
Pakenham to St. Saviour's Hospital, Bury. The lordship remained with 
the abbey. 

We learn from the Consuetudinary of Sampson the abbot that Pakenham 
owed many customs to the abbey, and amongst others that of keeping 
watch and ward in the town when required. This consuetudinary contains 
a list of the Pakenham tenants. One of the entries is : 

" In 1256 Abbot Edmund de Walpole, reserving the advowson of the 
vicarage, appropriated the church of Pakenham to the maintenance of 
hospitality at Bury, the Vicar being allowed to retain the church manse 
and land, with the tithes thence proceeding (which last he now has to pay 
to the Abbot's successor) with all altar dues, the tithes of grist, hay, lambs, 
calves, poultry, milk, and all other small tithes, oblations, and obventions, 

'Dora. ii. 3616 (bis). 



304 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

from which it is clear that the Vicar's income ought to be independent of 
the price of wheat, barley, and oats, upon which it has been made to depend 
entirely.'" 

The lordship remained with the abbey until the dissolution of the same, 
when it reverted to the Crown, and was 27th Sept. 1545, granted to Robert 
and Thomas Spring, his son. The grant will be found on the Originalia 
Rolls 37 Hen. VIII.,* and particulars for the grant are still preserved in the 
Record Office. 1 

The name and origin of the family of Spring is presumed by some to 
be derived from an ancestor seated at Houghton-le-Spring, in Durham, 
but we first meet with the family in Suffolk in the town of Lavenham, 
where they were eminent merchants. Thomas Spring, son of Thomas and 
Agnes, has a monument erected to his memory in Lavenham church, and 
his effigies and those of his wife and children in brass. His father died in 
1440, as appears by Baldwin's MS. Register. In the inscription on his 
monument it is stated that he built the vestry of the church where he lies 
interred. Thomas Spring died 7th Sept. 1486, and left by Margaret his 
wife two sons, Thomas and James, and a daughter Cecilia. James, the 
2nd son, was slain in a fight between Lavenham and Brent Eleigh in 1493, 
and lies buried in Lavenham vestry. Weever mentions a James Spring, 
probably the same, who, he says, died in 1483, and he gives the following 
inscription : 

" Orate pro anima Jacobi Spring qui obiit iij die Augusti 
MCCCCLXXXIII. cujus animo propitietur Deus, Amen." Thomas, 
the eldest son, was a great benefactor to Lavenham church, and built the 
greater part of the steeple, the great chapel on the south, and afterwards 
the carved chapel on the north where he lies interred. His will is dated 
I3th June, 1523, and it was proved 3rd July, 1524. By his 2nd wife Alice, 
daughter of Thomas Appleton, of Little Waldingfield, by Margery, daughter 
and heir of Robert Crane, of Stonham Parva, he had two sons, Sir John 
Spring, Knt., of Hitcham, and Robert Spring, the purchaser of this manor. 
Robert Spring lived at Lavenham, and married ist Ann, daughter of 
Thomas Eden, of Lavenham and London, but originally seated at Sudbury, 
and andly Emma, daughter of Parris, of Linton, in Cambridgeshire. He 
died 3rd April, 1550,* when the manor vested in his son and heir, Thomas 
Spring, who married ist Alice, daughter of Thomas Appleton, of Little 
Waldingfield, and 2ndly Juliana, daughter and heir of John Payer, sheriff 
of London, and died I5th Jan. 1556, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir Robert, of Icklingham. He married ist Joane, daughter and coheir 
of George Foster, of Essex, and widow of Peryn, and 2ndly Anne Hogan, 
of Norfolk. 

A fine of the manor was levied by Robert Spring against Thomas Poley 
and others in 1572, and he had licence to alienate the same in 1573 to his 
cousin, Sir William Spring, Knt., of Pakenham, 5 the son of Sir John Spring, 
of Hitcham, amd of Dorothy his wife, daughter of Sir William Waldegrave, 
of Smallbridge. This Sir John Spring was the son of Thomas Spring, of 
Lavenham. 

'Cited Sufi. Inst. vol. x. 172. 'I.P.M., 3 Edw. VI. 141. 

O. 6 Pars. Rot. 38. 5 Fine, Trin. 15 Eliz. 

'D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 276. 



PAKENHAM. 305 

Sir William Spring was knighted by Queen Elizabeth by the title 
Sir William Spring, of Pakenham, and was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1578 
and 1596 ; but a claim for forfeiture of this manor had been made upon 
him the very year he acquired it. 1 He married ist Anne, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Kitson, of Hengrave, and 2ndly Susan, daughter of Sir Ambrose 
Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, and widow of Lionel Tallemache. Letters of Sir 
William to B. Gawdy before 1596 and in 1598 will be found amongst the 
Egerton MSS. in the British Museum. 2 He died 3rd Feb. 1599, and the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Spring, of Pakenham, who married 
Anne, daughter of J. Trelawney, of Minn, in Cornwall, and sister of Sir 
Jonathan Trelawney. Letters of his to B. Gawdy in 1589, 1591, and 1600 
will be found amongst the Egerton MSS. in the British Museum. 3 He 
changed the arms of the family by leaving out the three cinquefoils Or 
with which the chevron had been charged, and bore only a chevron engrailed 
between three mascles Gules. 

A fine was levied of the manor against him in 1601 by Sir Jonathan 
Trelawney and others, probably by way of settlement. 4 He died i4th 
Nov. 1601, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William Spring, 
Knt., who was High Sheriff 18 Jac. I., and M.P. for Suffolk, knighted by 
Jas. I. at Theobalds, Feb. 1610-11. There is a letter to Sir William Spring 
from Lord Hunsdon [1603-1617] amongst the Egerton MSS. 5 He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir William Smith, of Mounthall, in Essex, a colonel in 
the army serving in Ireland, who died I2th Dec. 1626, aged 76. Sir William 
died in 1637-8, at Gawdy Hall, Redenhall, the residence of his son-in-law, 
and was buried at Pakenham. The manor passed to her son and heir, 
Sir William Spring, Knt., of Pakenham, who was baptised at Stanton i3th 
March, 1613, created a baronet nth August, 1641, the same year in which 
he was High Sheriff for Suffolk, and in 1646 he was M.P. for Bury. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Hamon L'Estrange, Knt. and Bart., of 
Hunstanton, co. Norfolk, and died I7th Dec. 1654,' and is buried in 
Pakenham church, with the following inscription to his memory : 



Hie jacet 

Dns. Gulielmus Spring, Baronettus, 

In Deum ") 

In Parentes Pietate spectabilis 

In Patriam ) 

Mira dulce dine morum omnibus charus 
Elizabetha mvereus insignis amoris ergo 

P 
Obiit 17 mo die Decembris 1654. 

Sir William's widow survived for 24 years, and died 2ist March, 1678-9, 
and is buried at Pakenham, where there is a monument to her memory, 

'M. 16 Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 71. 4 Fine, Trin. 43 Eliz. 

2 Eger. 2713. 5 Eger. 2715. 

3 Eger. 2713, 2714. 'Will i8th Oct. 1653, proved 1655. 
PI 



306 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

with the following inscription under a shield bearing the arms of Spring, 
with an escutcheon of Ulster impaling L'Estrange : 

Domina Klizabetha Spring 

nata Hamoni Le Strange militi 10 Martij 

1613 Uxor Gulielmi Spring, Baronetti, 

Mater Gulielmi Spring, Baronetti, 

Et Dorofheae nuptae Christophoro 

Calthorp militi Balnei quos solos 

ex octo liberis sui superstites 
reliquit femina aequis dotibus 
corporis ingenii gratiae a Deo dum 
vixit ditata ab omni bono colenda 
nunc pie lugenda post 64 annos 
quibus vitae hujus aerumnas 
fortitudine vere pia, vere Christiana 
toleraverat in beatam assumitur 

21 die Martij, 1678 

Cujus Memoriae Sacrum hoc 

marmor posuit Domina Sarah 

Spring mums digna, et omni pio 

Seculo Memoranda. 

The manor passed to Sir William's only surviving son and heir, Sir 
William Spring, 2nd Bart., who married ist Mary, daughter of Dudley 
North, brother of Lord North, who died 23rd Oct. 1662, leaving a son, 
William Spring, who died in infancy, and 2ndly Sarah, daughter of Sir 
Robert Cordell, of Long Melford, ist Bart., who died 2nd Aug. 1689. Sir 
William Spring died 3oth April, 1684, and was buried at Pakenham 3rd 
May following, where in the chancel of the church is a flat stone with the 
following inscription : 

Memoriae Sacrum 
Domini Gulielmi Spring Boronetti 

Ingenti Ingenio 

Suavissimis moribus viri 

Qui die Maij, 1642 natus 

et 30 Aprilis 1684 denatus 

His jacet sepultus 

vxores ducit 
Primam Mariam Dudlei North 

De Kirtling Baronis 
Filiam natu maximam 
Faeminam lectissimam 
Alteram Saram Roberti Cordell 

De Melford, Baronetti, 
Filiam etiam natu maximam 

conjugem optimam 

Quae non Integra conjugis superstes 

Hoc mcerens posuit. 

The Manor passed to Sir William's son and heir, Sir Thomas Spring, 
3rd Bart., baptised at Pakenham I2th Dec. 1672, and married at Rush- 
brooke 28th May, 1691, to the Hon. Merolina, 5th daughter and coheir of 



PAKENHAM. 307 

Thomas, Lord Jermyn, 2nd Baron,' and dying 2nd April, 1704,* the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir William Spring, 4th Bart., baptised at Paken- 
ham, Jan. 1696-7, and died unmarried, and was buried at Pakenham, 22nd 
Mar. 1735-6, and his estate valued at 1,500 a year descended to his two 
sisters and coheirs Merolina, married to Thomas Discipline, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, and Mary, married to the Rev. John Symonds, D.D., rector of 
Horningsheath, and as a portion of the estates in 1748 this manor and the 
advowson were allotted to Thomas Discipline. 

Thomas Discipline died i8th April, 1752, and his widow 6th Nov. 1761, 
aged 66. They had issue two daughters, the eldest of whom, Delariviere 
or Delaverie, married John Godbold, and died without issue in 1788 at the 
age of 53, and the other, Merolina, married I4th Aug. 1755, to Michael 
William Le Hemp, of Hessett. Michael William Le Hemp died April gth, 
1792, aged 60, and was buried at Hessett, leaving issue one son and two 
daughters. The son died without issue, the elder daughter married Martin 
Cocksedge and had issue, and the younger married the Rev. Rogers, 
rector of Lackford, who left one son, married to Emily, daughter of Sir 
James Blake, Bart., and had issue. The manor was, however, sold by 
John Godbold and his wife Delaverie in Sept. 1786, to Sir Henry Gough, 
who assumed the surname of Calthorpe on inheriting in 1783 the estates of 
Elvetham, in Hampshire, from his uncle, Sir Henry Calthorpe, K.B., and 
was elevated to the peerage in 1796 by the title of Baron Calthorpe, of 
Calthorpe, co. Norfolk. 

At this time the fines and quit rents amounted on an average 
to 37. IQS. 6d. per annum. 3 From this time to the time of Frederick Gough 
Calthorpe, 4th Baron, the manor passed in the same course as that of 
Ampton, in this Hundred. On the death of the 4th Lord Calthorpe, 2nd 
May, 1868, this manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Frederick Henry 
William Gough Calthorpe, 5th Baron, and on his death in 1893 passed to 
his brother, Augustus Cholmondeley Gough Calthorpe, 6th Baron. He 
married in 1869 Maud Augusta Louisa, younger daughter of the Hon. 
Octavius Duncombe. 

A rental of the manor t. Hen. VIII. is preserved in the Public Record 
Office. 4 

Arms of SPRING : Argent, on a chevron, between three mascles Gules, 
as many cinquefoils Or. 

A " Pakenham " Manor belonged to Henry le Strange, whose will is 
dated 1483. 

MANOR OF NEWHALL al. MALKINSHALL al. BEAUMONTS. 

This manor belonged at the time of the Norman Survey to the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds, and the chief lordship at least continued with the great 
abbey until the dissolution of the religious houses, when it passed to the 
Crown. We say chief lordship, for we find that Henry le Strange died 
seised of the manor called " Bemans Manor, in Pakenham," held of Thomas, 
Abbot of Bury, in 1486, and apparently this is the same manor with New 
Hall. It was then found that Roger, his son and heir, was then aged 17. 5 

'She died zgth Aug. 1727, aged 52, and 3 Ipswich Journal, 2Qth July and 26th 

was buried at Pakenham. Aug. 1786. 

*Adm. 20th Sept. i7io and 28th Nov. 4 Exchequer, ist Rep. on Pub. Rec. (1800), 

1727. p. 195. 

S I.P.M., i Hen. VII. 52. 



308 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

This Roger, afterwards Sir Roger le Strange, died seised of the manor 23rd 
Oct. 1505, leaving John, his son and heir, aged 4 years.' In 1545 the manor 
was granted by the Crown to John Seaman al. Turner. Particulars of farm 
of the manor for this grant are still preserved in the Record Office." 

A John Holle held his first court for the manor on Thursday in Easter 
week i Eliz. [1559]' but probably on behalf of Richard Turner, son of John, 
who died 24th Nov. 1551.* The impression of this Richard being an infant 
at the time is rather strengthened by the fact that he did not have livery 
of the manor until 1562.' He died in 1588, when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Richard Turner, who held his first court in 1591, and had 
licence about 1598 to alienate to John Pretyman. Pretyman had licence 
to alienate in 1615 to Anne Drury, widow, and she had licence to alienate, 
and bequeathed the same to her brother, Nicholas Bacon. The manor 
was shortly afterwards acquired by Paul D'Ewes. Amongst the Harleian 
Charters is a memorandum of the expenses attending a plea of Paul D'Ewes 
for this manor in i624- 6 Also an acquittance in 1623 of 505. 4^. for the 
homage of Anne Drury, and other acquittances in 16247 Paul D'Ewes 
died in 1630, when the manor passed to his son and heir, the celebrated 
antiquarian, Sir Symonds D'Ewes, and amongst the Harleian Charters we 
find acquittances in respect of this manor by him in 1632, 1633, I 634, an d 
1637.' And in the last-mentioned year a lease by him described as of 
Stowhall, to William Sire, of Langham,for 15 years, of the Manor of Malkin's 
Hall, and various pasture called Laywood, in Pakenham, at the yearly 
rent of 92, if Robert Clarke, yeoman, then holding the lease, would yield 
up possession under certain circumstances. 9 The following year by deed 
dated 20th Jan. 14 Car. I. [1638] the lease seems to have been granted to 
the said William Sire at the same rent, but for 21 years. 10 

From this time the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Stowlangtoft, in Blackbourn Hundred, until the death of Sir Jermyn 
D'Ewes, 4th Bart., unmarried, in 1731. 

The manor subsequently vested in Thomas Browne Tonns, of Norwich, 
who sold the same to Sir George Wombwell, Bart., and it was later pur- 
chased by Henry Wilson, from which time the manor has descended in the 
same course as the manors of Stowlangtoft and Langham, in Blackbourn 
Hundred, and is now vested in Arthur Maitland Wilson, of Stowlangtoft 
Hall. 

A survey and rental of this manor will be found referred to in the 
ist Rep. on Public Rec. [1800] p. 193, as being preserved in the Exchequer. 

Court Rolls of Malkins Hall Manor, 1316-1393, 1596-1667, are amongst 
the Harleian Rolls in the British Museum." 

Extracts from Court Rolls of the manor in 1559 will also be found 
amongst the Harleian Charters. 12 

MANOR OF NETHERHALL al. LADIES' HALL al. RICHARDSHALL. 

This is situate partly in Pakenham and partly in Thurston. It was 
the lordship of the Abbot of St. Edmunds at the time of the Survey, and in 

'I.P.M., 31 Hen. VII. 107. See Manor of "Karl. 58 H. 30. 

Thorpe Morieux, in Cosford Hun- 7 Harl. 49 F. 41, 42; 49 E. 14. 

dred. "Karl. 49 E. 35, 37, 38, 48. 

37 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 267. Harl. 49 E. 44. 

'Hart. 58 F. 10. l Harl. 49 E. 50. 

4 I.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 88. "Karl. Rolls, K. 15, 21. 

'Fine, 4th May, 4 Eliz. 44. "Harl. 58 F. 10. 



PAKENHAM. 309 

the time of Hen. III. was vested in John de Pakenham, steward to the 
Bishop of Ely in 1253. Of this individual Blomefield, the Norfolk historian, 
relates the following : " That coming into the Exchequer Court, where the 
King himself was sitting, he claimed a monstrous fish, taken in one of the 
Bishop's wards, whose ancestors claimed wreck at sea : the King himself 
made answer, and ordered him to produce the charter by which he claimed, 
which being done, it was then asked if the sea fish was taken on the land, 
or in the sea ? and it was answered in the sea, not far from the land, 
and taken alive ; when the King replied, that since it was acknowledged 
that the fish was taken alive in the sea, it could not be wreck and he would 
further consider of it, and the cause was adjourned to the Parliament." 

This happened in 1255. Upon which the said author notices: "First 
that the King himself sate in the Exchequer at this period, asked 
questions, gave answers and judgment; secondly, that no persons could 
claim wreck but by charter ; and thirdly that the cause was adjourned 
to the Parliament. Query may be made if this word Parliament occurs 
in any record prior to this time." 

This may be the same John, son of John Pakenham, to whom about 
1260 Simon, Abbot of St. Edmunds, gave lands. He was lord of the manor 
of Dersingham, in Norfolk. 

John de Pakenham had a grant of free warren here in 1265,' an d on 
his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William de Pakenham. 
Of him we hear that about 1275 he held Bishopscroft, near the church in 
Pakenham, and in 1281 an action was brought against him by Henry de 
Pakenham relating to common of pasture in Pakenham.* He had a 
grant of free warren here in I292. 3 He seems to have died this year, for 
we find that in 1292 John, son of William, son of John de Pakenham, 
settled this manor on his brother, Edmund de Pakenham, and his heirs. 

We find from the Abbreviation of Pleas in 1306 that Edmund de 
Pakenham, son and heir of Sir William de Pakenham, renounced to Lord 
Henry de Staunton, the clerk, all lands in Pakenham, Thurston, Stowlang- 
toft, Ixworth, Barton and Forton (?) which belonged to John, son of William, 
son of John de Pakenham, and Matilda, mother of the said John, son of 
William, 4 and amongst the Bodleian Charters will be found an agreement 
in 1308 between the abbey of St. Edmunds and Sir Edmund de Pakenham 
as to the rents of lands in Pakenham, Barton, and Rougham. 5 On the 
death of Sir Edmund Pakenham in 1332 the manor passed to his widow 
Rose, daughter and heir of Robert de Valoines, 6 for life, and on her death 
in 1353' passed to their son and heir, Sir Edmund de Pakenham. He 
married Mary, daughter and coheir of Sir Edmund Comyn, of Scotland, 
and died in 1352. His widow Mary survived until 1359 or I 3^ I > but her 
eldest son Edmund having died in her lifetime without issue, her 2nd son, 
Sir Thomas Pakenham (who also died in his mother's lifetime in 1356), 
gave the manor to his mother, and she gave the same to Richard de 
Pakenham, cousin to her son Thomas, and the reversion to the Abbot of 
St. Edmund's by Ralph de Hemenhale. 8 Richard de Pakenham was the 
son of John, the elder brother of Sir Thomas's grandfather, and of Margery 
his wife, daughter of Robert de Northwold. He married Joan, the heir 

'Chart. Rolls, 49 Hen. III. 6. 'See Manor of Walsham, in Blackbourn 

'Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. 26d. Hundred. 

'Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 22. 7 I.P.M., 27 Edw. III. 64. 

*Abbr. of Pleas, 34 and 35 Edw. I. Mich. 62. "Feet of Fines, 43 Edw. III. I. 

5 Bodl. Suff. Ch. 96. 



3io THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the Cricketots, and died in 1383,' leaving an only daughter and heir 
Anne, then aged n years. She probably died under age, and the limitation 
to the abbot took effect, for from this time to the dissolution of the monastic 
houses the manor remained with the abbey of St. Edmunds. The abbot, 
however, in 1385 (possibly on the death of the heir Anne) levied a fine of 
the manor against John de Pakenham, son of Theobald de Pakenham, no 
doubt with the object of strengthening and conferring the estate of the 
abbey.* 

It passed on the Dissolution to the Crown, and in 1544 was granted to 
Thomas Bacon and George his son. The particulars for the grant were 
made out for George Bacon alone. 5 Thomas Bacon died 2nd June, 1547,* 
leaving Edward his son and heir, but the manor survived to George Bacon, 
who died in 1579, when it passed to his son and heir, John Bacon, and we 
find amongst the Chancery Proceedings a bill to recover copyholds in 
Thurston held of the Manor of Netherhall, sometime the estate of Thomas 
Betoune, the plaintiff's grandfather, by Agnes Bright, against " John 
Bacon, lord of the manor," who claimed them as forfeited. 1 John Bacon 
had licence in 1586 to alienate to Thomas Bacon and others. 

In 1601 John Bacon, gent., Elizabeth his wife, and George Bacon 
gent., their son and heir-apparent, were licensed to alienate the Manor of 
Netherhall, with its appurtenances, 3 messuages, 3 tofts, i dovecote, 100 
acres of land, 20 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 20 acres of wood, 
20 acres of marsh, 100 acres of firs and heath, situated in Pakenham, 
Thurston, Great Barton, Stowlangtoft, and Tostock, together with the 
advowson of the church of Thurston, held by the Queen in capite, to Robert 
Bright, citizen and sadler (salter), of London. The following is an abstract 
of the deed of conveyance, which is dated i6th Dec. 1601 : 

" Indenture between John Bacon, of Westham, co. Essex, Gent., 
son and heir of George Bacon, and Margaret his wife, and Elizabeth, wife 
of the said John and their son George, heir-apparent, of the one part, Robert 
Bright, of London, citizen and salter, of the other part. Said Bright to 
pay to Bacon 3 ,800 for the Manor of Netherhall, otherwise called Pakenham, 
in the parishes of Pakenham, Thurston, Barton, Bayton (Beyton), Norton, 
Rougham, and Gorton, in the county of Suffolk, with the right of patronage 
and advowson of the vicarage of the parish church of Thurston, also lands 
in Stowlangtoft and Ixworth which were lately purchased of William Sterne, 
late of Pakenham, Gent., by the aforesaid George Bacon, father of John, 
who had lands purchased by the said Bacons, father and son, of Robert Page, 
Robert Cobbold, and William Pryor. The deeds to be delivered to Robert 
Bright at his dwelling-house in Candleweeke Street, London." 

Robert Bright, the purchaser, was son of Thomas Bright the elder, and 
Margaret Payton, his wife. A fine was levied of the manor the same year 
against John Bacon and others. 6 

Davy informs us that the manor next vested in Sir John Ashfield, Bart., 
and from him passed to his son and heir, Sir George Ashfield. This, how- 
ever, was not the case, for ist, Sir John Ashfield, Bart., had no son and heir 
George ; 2nd, Sir John Ashfield had no connection with this manor, but with the 
Manor of Netherhall, in Harkstead, in Samford Hundred ; 3rd, at the 
time referred to this manor was vested in the Bright family. That Robert 

'I.P.M., 7 Rich. II. 62. I.P.M., i Edw. VI. 29. 

'Feet of Fines, 9 Rich. II. 27. 'C.P. i. 142. 

336 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 161. 6 Fine, Hil. 44 Eliz. 



PAKENHAM. 311 

Bright then held the manor is clear, and there is a record in existence to 
the effect that on the ist August, 1627, it was vested in him, and that Thomas 
Bright was the son and heir-apparent, William Bright and Henry Bright' 
being two other sons. The writer has a deed of 1627 in which these facts 
are stated. The will of Robert Bright is dated ist Oct. 1630. 2 He was 
buried at Thurston 24th Dec. 1630. 

Thomas Bright, the son, about 1622 was married to Agatha, daughter 
of Edmund, and sister of Borodale Milson, of Norton. Thomas Bright 
was the first of four successive lords of this name. He was probably born 
in London, and in the parish register of St. Saviour's, Southwark, we find 
the following entry : " Baptised Dec. I2th, 1585, Thomas, son of Robert 
Brighte, grocer." He was mentioned in the will of his grandmother, Margaret 
Brighte, of London, in 1597, with the other children of her son Robert. 
The will of Thomas Bright, the first of the name, was proved at Thurston 
8th August, 1661. He had the arms confirmed to him as the " eldest son 
of Robert, the 2nd brother of Thomas Bright, of St. Edmundsbury, by Sir 
John Borough, 2Qth July, 1641, and seventeenth year of the reign of Chas. I." 

Thomas and Agatha his wife had nine children. Thomas, the son, was 
baptised at Thurston 28th Feb. 1629. He seems to have been engaged in 
a law-suit with his neighbours, Sir William Spring and Lady Spring, for 
laying violent hands upon him in church. This seems to have hung over 
the parties some years between 1668 and 1672. Thomas Bright, the second, 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Clement Heigham, one of the intended 
Knights of the Royal Oak, and descended from Sir Clement Heigham, who 
was Speaker of the House of Commons under Queen Mary, and died in 
1570. He, in 1711, executed a deed by which he conveyed to his son 
Thomas this manor and all his other lands in Suffolk ; this son was already 
in possession of Netherhall, the father at the time residing with his son-in- 
law, John Risby, at Thorpe, 3ist Jan. 1711. The deed is as follows : 

" Know all hereby : yt I Thomas Bright Senr. of Thorpe Morieux, in 
ye County of Suff : Esq. in consideracon of ye Naturall loue and affection 
wch I bear unto my son Thomas Bright, lunr, Haue remised released and 
for ever Quit-claimed : and by these presents, do remise, release and for 
ever Quit-claim unto my sd son Thomas Bright (being now in ye full and 
peaceable posson and seism of ye Manor Messuages, Lands, Tenemts and 
hereditamts herein-after mencond, or intended to be released) and his 
heirs, All my right, title, interest, claim, property and demand whatsoever, 
of, in, and to all yt ye Manor of Netherhall in Pakenham in ye sd County 
wth every ye services, rents, fines and appurtncies thereunto belonging : 
and all yt ye Manor-house or Capitall-Messuage calld Netherhall : wth all 
ye Outhouses, buildings, barns, stables, yards, gardens to ye sd Capitall- 
Messuage, in any wise appurteining, now in ye posson of my sd son : And 
all those two Messuages in Pakenham and Thurston in ye sd County : wth 
all the Outhouses, buildings, lands, meadows, pastures, woods, and 
appurtncies : to ye sd two Messuages or either of them belonging : or wth 
ye same now used : as they are in ye respective Tenure's : of Thomas 
Bowls, and George Betts, or their undertenants : And all other ye 
Messuages, lands, Tenements and hereditaments vttsoever, late or now of 
me ye sd Thomas Bright Senr. in Pakenham and Thurston aforesd, or in 

1 He was buried at Pakenham isth March, "Proved at Norwich, ist March, 1631. 
1653, having married Martha, eldest 
daughter of William Fiske, of 
Norton. 



312 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

any other Town or Towns wth in ye sd County, wth every their appurtnces : 
To Haue and Hold all and singular ye sd premises : wth every their sd 
appurtncies to him my sd Son Thomas Bright and his heirs To ye use only 
of him my sd son Thomas Bright his heirs and assigns for ever. In Witness 
whereof I ye sd Thomas Bright Senr. haue hereto sett my hand and seal 
tliis one and Thirtieth day of January in ye year Seaventeen hundred and 
Eleven. I7ii. 

" Thomas Bright Senr (Seal). 
" Sealed and deliverd in ye psence of 

"Jo. Darren (?) 
" J. A. Harvey." 

The extent or value of the farm called Batlie or Barelies, to which so 
many of the letters relate, is not stated ; but this farm was situated in the 
village of Rougham. This property was settled on the father of Thomas 
Bright, sen., by his father Robert, in 1621, on the marriage of the son, and 
was retained by the latter after he gave possession of Netherhall to Thomas 
Bright, jun. 

He made his will dated 4th May, 1713, under the style of " Thomas 
Bright the Elder." He recites that his son, Thomas Bright, had by his 
note obliged himself to lay out 100 in the purchase of land for the benefit 
of the poor of Thurston and Pakenham as should be directed by his (the 
testator's) will directed the rents thereof to be given to twelve such poor 
men and women, or children of the said parishes, as should most want or 
deserve the same. In satisfaction of this charity, 5 a year is laid out in 
articles of clothing by the owner of the Netherhall estate." 1 

He was buried in Thurston church 8th June, 1713, at the age of 
84, and his will was proved at Bury St. Edmunds i8th Nov. 1713. Thomas 
Bright the son, and third of the name, was baptised at Barrow 5th Jan. 
1660. He married Mary Grigson, of Forncett St. Peters, co. Norfolk. 
He made his will 26th Dec. 1713, a few weeks after his father's will was 
proved. It was as follows : 

" This is the last Will and Testament of me Thomas Bright of Pakenham 
in ye county of Suffolk, Gent, bearing date ye twenty e six day of December 
in ye year of our Lord 1713." 

" Impris I give all my estate wtsoever, that is not in Joynture, towards 
ye payment of my just debts and desire my Extrix hereinafter named to 
see them punctually paid and when ye sd debts are fully satisfyed and dis- 
charged by sale or otherwise as my Extrix seeth most fitt I give all my said 
estate to my dear wife as an addicon to her jointure and upon sure trust 
and confidence yt she will allow to my only son Thomas such a competent 
maintenance as his growing in up in years shall be necessary and convenient 
till he arrives at age and yt she will manage ye sd estate for ye best advan- 
tage to ye benefit of my son to whom at ye age of twenty one years I give 
all my estate both real and personall (viz) to him and his heirs forever 
provided my debts be in ye first place satisfied and paid and that my wife 
has what psonall estate necessary for her during her life. I give unto ye 
poor of Thurston tenn pounds to be distributed as my Extrix shall appoint 
within two months or ye Christmas following or at severall times after my 
decease as my Extrix shall find most proper. I desire my Extrix to take 
care of my father's will relating to ye Charity to ye poor of Thurston and 

'Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 732. 



PAKENHAM. 313 

Pakenham be exactly pformed and land settled at as convenient opportunity 
for ye securing ye sd Charity. I nominate and appoint my deare wife 
sole Extrix of this my will and desire my brother-in-law Mr. William Grigson, 
to be supvisor hereof and to see and take care that this my will be in every 
respect observed and executed according to ye true intent and meaning 
thereof, and I give to my said supervisor ten pounds for his trouble. In 
witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal declaring and publish- 
ing this to be my last Will and Testamt. containing one sheet of paper ye 
day and year abovesaid, all written with my own hand. 

Tho. Bright. 

" This acknowledged to be my last will signed and sealed in ye psence 
of Richd. Mosely. Tho. Taylor. Sam. Fisher Junr." 

Aug. I4th, 1718. 

" Memorandum. Since ye writing of my will above specifyed, it has 
pleased God to bless me with a daur nam'd Mary, for a maintenance and 
support of my sd daur I give fifty pounds pr ann to ye time of her marriage 
and at her marriage I give her One Thousand pound in money for her 
portion and I hereby charge and engage all my lands that are not in jointure 
for ye payment of ye said fifty pound pr ann to be paid half yearly, and ye 
said One Thousand pound on her marriage, relying also upon my dear 
wife that she will giue Winterton farme to my said daur as she has 
promised me. 

' Witness my hand and Seal hereunto this being added to my will as a 
codicil with my own hand. 

"Tho. Bright. 
" Richard Mosely. Tho. Taylor. Sam. Fisher Junr. 1 

He died ayth April, 1727, at the age of 54, and was buried in Thurston 
church. On the floor and near the chancel is a stone with the following 
inscription : 

"Here Lyeth the Body of 
Thomas Bright of Netherhall Esqre." 

The remainder of the inscription is covered by a pew, but is given in 
Sir John Cullum's MS. Ch. Notes thus : 

"Who departed this Life 
Upon the 27th Day of April 
In the year of our Lord Christ 
1727 and in the 54 year of his 
age. 

The family arms are on a slab empaling those of Grigson. The stone 
placed over the remains of the wife is near those of the husband. 

Mary Bright, the widow, survived her husband 17 years, and her 
only son 8 years, leaving a daughter to inherit the estates. Her will, 
executed in 1743, is as follows : 

In the name of God Amen. I Mary Bright of Pakenham in the county 
of Suffolk, Widow, do make, ordain and declare this my last will and 
Testament in manner following that is to say. First I do hereby order and 
direct that my body be interred within the parish church of Thurston in 
the said county of Suffolk as near the remains of my late son as conveniently 
may be, and that a stone be laid over my grave of the same sort as is laid 
over the grave of my said late son. Item I give and bequeath to the poor 
of the said parish of Thurston the sum of ten pounds, to be distributed 

1 Proved by the widow May 4th, 1727 

QI 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

amongst them in such manner as to my Executor shall seem meet, within 
two months after my decease. I (cm I do hereby order and direct that the 
sum of One hundred pounds be laid out by my said Executor at such time 
and manner as he shall think proper towards rebuilding the messuage or 
Farm house in Pakenham aforesaid now in the tenure or occupation of 
Charles Jennings. 

Item I give and bequeath unto my brother Mr. William Grigson 
the sum of ten pounds to buy him mourning. Item I give and bequeath 
all the rest and residue of my personal estate and effects of every sort (after 
payment of my just debts, funeral charges and probate of this my last will 
and testament) unto my daughter Mary Bright, but my mind and will is 
and I do hereby order and direct that the same shall be paid to such person 
or persons as my said daughter notwithstanding any coverture and whether 
she shall be covert or sole shall by writing under her hand direct and appoint 
and in default of such direction and appointment into the proper hands of my 
said daughter to the intent that the same may be for her separate use and 
disposition and may not be subject to the disposition or engagements of 
Edmund Tyrell Esq. her intended husband or any other after taken husband 
and for which the receipt or receipts of my said daughter or of such person 
or persons as she shall appoint to receive the same, shall be a sufficient and 
effectual discharge, and I do hereby nominate and appoint my said brother 
William Grigson sole Executor here of, and I do hereby revoak all former 
Wills by me made. In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and 
seal the sixteenth day of August in the year of our Lord, one thousand 
seven hundred and forty three. 

M. Bright. 

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said testatrix Mary Bright, 
as and for her last will and testament in the presence of us who in her 
presence subscribed our names as witnesses thereto. Mary Skulthorp, 
John Betts, Neale Ward. 

Octo. i6th, 1744. 

Mary the wife of Edmund Tyrell, Esq. was sworn adratrix with will annext 
by reason of the death of the Extor, before me 

John Bridge Surro. 

The testatrix died igth Sept. 1744, aged 56. The manor had passed 
under the will of the 3rd Thomas Bright in 1727 to his son, the 4th Thomas 
Bright, who died 2ist Dec. 1736, at the early age of 23 unmarried and 
intestate, when the manor passed to his sister Mary, married to Edmund 
Tyrell, of Gipping. She survived her husband some years, and died at 
the age of 37, being buried in Stowmarket church i8th Sept. 1753, when the 
manor passed to her son and heir, Edmund Tyrell, of Gipping Hall. He 
was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1774, and died unmarried 3Oth March, 1799. 
His will is dated 25th August, 1798,' and by it he devised his estates to his 
cousin, the Rev. Charles Tyrell, rector of St. Peter's Church, in Thurston, 
the son of Edmund Tyrell, of Stowmarket, and Jenny his wife, the latter 
being the sister of the testator's father, and a cousin of her husband, the 
Rev. Charles Tyrell, who sold the manor to George Chinery, 1 of Bury St. 
Edmunds, from whom it passed to his widow, and later to his nephew, the 
Rev. William Bassett, rector of Thurston, from whom it passed to his son, 

1 Proved in the Prerogative Court, London, * Possibly the manor was purchased by 
3ist July, 1799. Chinery from Edmund Tyrell before 

his death in 1799. 



PAKENHAM. 315 

William Chinery Bassett, who succeeded under an entail, and was residing 
here in 1857. I* 1 J 885 Edmund Greene was lord, and in 1896 the manor 
was vested in Sir Edward Walter Greene, of Nether Hall, a fine mansion 
of brick in the Queen Anne style standing in a well-kept and wooded park. 

A survey of the manor in 1620 was made by Henry Bright, son of 
Robert Bright, the purchaser from the Bacons, with a map 19 by 27 inches. 
It had on one corner an outline sketch of the old hall, and a facsimile of 
this is given in the History of the Brights of Suffolk, p. 116. Some paintings 
were up to 1858 preserved in the hall, and of these Mr. J. B. Bright, in his 
history referred to, says : " Several paintings which adorned Netherhall 
when it was the residence of the Brights, still remain as ornaments of the 
manor house. The present proprietors point out four portraits of the 
Brights on the staircase of the hall ; but there are at present no means 
of determining what members of that family they represent. Two of 
the portraits, half length, are of ladies, one of them apparently about 
eighteen, the other from thirty to forty years of age. The other two 
are portraits of gentlemen, and of the same size, one of them being in 
armour, about fifty years of age ; the other somewhat younger. Those 
of the gentlemen are finely executed, and, from the costume, supposed 
to be of the time of James II. At that period, or in 1685 the commence- 
ment of that monarch's reign Thomas Bright, of Netherhall, the second 
of that name, and the proprietor at the time, was fifty-six years old, and 
though the age answers to the description, yet as he was educated a merchant, 
and not a soldier, it is doubtful if it were intended for his portrait. We 
think it more likely to be that of Captain John Bright, of Talmach Hall, 
who was in the Parliamentary army, and died in 1660 ; and that the 
other, representing a person somewhat younger, is a portrait of Thomas 
Bright. His son Thomas, but twenty-five years of age in 1685, and his 
brother Borodale, who disappears after 1666, if then living, were the only 
male members of the family, and too young to answer the description. 
The portraits of the females are possibly those of Elizabeth (Heigham) 
Bright, the wife of Thomas Bright, sen., whose age is unknown, and of 
one of their daughters, Agatha, aged twenty-two in 1685 ; or Mary, aged 
eighteen years. In the drawing-room are two full-length portraits of 
gentlemen, represented as masterpieces, once the property of the Brights, 
one of which is said to be an original portrait of William III., and the 
other, that of an unknown personage. On the corner of one of these 
paintings is ' Murrey pinxt. 1698.' We are not informed how or when 
they came into the possession of the Bright family." 

Arms of PAKENHAM : Quarterly Or, and Gules, in the first quarter, 
an eagle displayed Vert. Of BRIGHT : Sable, a fesse Argent between 
three escallops Or. 

MANOR OF RED CASTLE. 

We know nothing of this manor (which is not mentioned by Davy) 
save the statement in a paper read before the Suffolk Institute in 1899 that it 
was one of the manors of Pakenham and then belonged to Prebendary 
H. Jones. 




316 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

RATTLESDEN. 

EVERAL estates in this place are mentioned in the Survey. 
The first was formerly that of a freeman under the Abbot 
of Ely by commendation and soc, and he could not sell. It 
consisted of 60 acres, a ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow, 
valued at los. The Survey says : " And now Heltret holds 
(the freeman) under Earl Eustace, who encroached upon 7 
acres of Saint Etheldreda's demesne in the same township, 
as belonging to the fee of Earl Eustace." 1 

Another was formerly held by a freeman, and consisted of half a 
carucate of land and 4 bordars and a ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, and 
enough wood to support 4 hogs. The value was formerly ios., but at the 
time of the Survey was double, when it was held by Peter of the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. The freeman had power to give and sell his land, so that 
the soc remained in the abbot's possession. 2 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely at the time of the Survey were 
three holdings in this place. The first consisted of 6 carucates of land, 18 
villeins, 20 bordars, 6 thralls, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 12 belonging to 
the men. Also wood sufficient for the maintenance of 24 hogs, 16 acres of 
meadow, 5 rouncies, 12 beasts, 90 sheep, and 40 hogs. When the Survey 
was taken some of these details had changed : there were 27 bordars, 4 
thralls, 3 ploughteams belonging to the men, and n goats. The value at 
both periods was 10. There was also a church advowson with 24 acres, 
and at the time of the Survey 15 acres were held by Hunfrid, William de 
Varennes' man, and 2 by Goscelen, the Earl of Moretaigne's man. This 
estate was 16 quarentenes long and 10 broad, and paid in a gelt 2od. The 
soc belonged to the abbot. 

The second holding was that of a freeman under the Abbot of Ely by 
commendation and soc in the Confessor's time, consisting of 3 acres valued 
at 6d. 

The third was also that of a freeman under the Abbot of Ely by soc and sac, 
and consisted of 8 acres valued at 2s. The Survey goes on to say : " Falco, 
Saint Edmund's man, had these 8 acres while the Abbey of St. Etheldreda 
was in the King's hand, and has held them up to this time ; but he denies 
that he withheld the service." 1 

Another holding in this place was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, 
who held 7 acres valued at I2d. which had formerly been held by 2 socmen. 4 

Another holding was that of two freemen under the Abbot of Ely, and 
they had the sac and soc. One could sell the land and the other could not. 
The one who could sell had 40 acres and 5 bordars, and the other had 60 
acres, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 2os. 
At the time of the Survey Humfrey,son of Roderic, held this of William de 
Varennes, who had obtained the estate under the Lewes exchange. 5 

The last holding mentioned was that of a freeman under commendation 
to and in the soc of the Abbot of Ely, and consisted of a carucate of land, 
a bordar, and a ploughteam, valued at ios. The Domesday tenant was 
Robert, Earl of Moretaigne. 8 

'Dom. ii. 303. 4 Dom. ii. 391. 

'Dom. ii. 363. 5 Dom. ii. 398. 

'Dom. ii. 3816. 'Dom. ii. 291. 



RATTLESDEN. 317 

RATTLESDEN HALL MANOR. 

Elfwara, a noble lady, gave this lordship to St. Etheldred between 
981 and 1020. We learn from the Close Rolls in 1204 that permission was 
given to the bishop if he could purchase up to 20 acres in Rattlesden to 
enclose the same for a park, and for this permission he rendered two palfreys.' 
The Bishop of Ely, Hugh de Northwold, had a grant of free warren here in 
1251, 2 and an inquisition as to the lands of the bishop in Rattlesden in 1356 
will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum. 3 

In 1561 Queen Elizabeth took the manor, then valued at 34. iys. id., 
in exchange for the pension of 135. 75. 3\d., and granted the bishop 
several impropriations in Cambridge and the tenths of the diocese of Ely. 4 

Rattlesden Hall and Woodhall, partly in Rattlesden and partly in 
Buxhall, were purchased of Queen Elizabeth by James Revett, who became 
seated here. He was a Gustos Rotulorum and a man of importance in 
this county. He is supposed to have been honoured with a visit from 
Queen Elizabeth during her well-known progress through Suffolk in 1578. 
He died 3Oth Jan. 1587, and from this time to the death of Edward Revett, 
in 1660, the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Fenn Hall, 
in Buxhall, in Stow Hundred. 

The manor was then acquired by William Pooley, who presented to 
the living in 1671. Later the manor passed to George Goodday, 5 of Forn- 
ham All Saints, who presented to the church in 1711, 1731, and 1747. He 
died unmarried in 1758, and by his last will dated ist June, 1735,* left his 
Manor of Rattlesden Hall to his mother Sarah, daughter of Richard Moseley, 
and wife of George Goodday, for her life, and it subsequently devolved on 
his (George Goodday's) sister and sole heir Sarah, married to Thomas, son 
of Thomas Moseley, of the City of London, which last-mentioned Thomas 
was a younger brother of Richard Moseley, of Ousden, the father of Sarah 
Goodday, the mother, 7 and she held also the patronage of the rectory. 
Thomas presented to the living in 1763 and died 8th Dec. 1776, at the age 
of 86, when the manor passed to his son and heir, William Moseley, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham Cocksedge, of Drinkstone, and 
died i7th Feb. 1785, when it went to his son and heir, John Moseley, of 
Glemham House, who married Charlotte, daughter of Stephen Payne 
Galway, of Tofts, co. Norfolk. 

The manor was offered for sale 26th Oct. 1841, described as " the Manor 
of Rattlesden extending over the greater part of the parish of Rattlesden 
with the rights and royalties." The fines, which were arbitrary, averaged 
during the 10 years preceding 1838 100. 195. per annum, and the quit 
and free rents amounted annually to 18. 155. The property was not sold, 
but bought in at 2,980." 

The manor was, however, disposed of two years later to Henry Le 
Heup Cocksedge. He was the 2nd son of Martin Thomas Cocksedge and 
Mary Susanna his wife, daughter of Michael William Le Heup, of Hessett, 
which Martin Thomas was the son of Thomas Cocksedge, of Bury, and Mary 

'Close Rolls, 6 John, 21, 6. 'See Manor of Ousden, in Risbridge 

"Chart. Rolls, 35 Hen. III. i. Hundred. 

3 Add. 6165. Proved London, I4th June, 1758. 

* See 37 Eliz. Exch. Spec. Com. D.K.R. 7 See Manor of Ousden, in Risbridge 
38 App. p. 54. Hundred. 

*lpswich Journal, 3oth Oct. 1841. 



3i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Garnham his wife. The purchaser, Henry Le Heup Cocksedge, married 
Mary Carolina, 4th daughter of Lieut.-Col. Rushbrooke, of Rushbrooke. 

Particulars of a survey of the Manor of Rattlesden from an Extent 
of 1277 is amongst the Cottonian MSS. in the British Museum. A trans- 
lation of this interesting document made by the Rev. J. R. Olorenshaw, is 
given in the East Anglian Notes and Queries, Vol. X., p. 334. 

A survey of the manor in 1601 and rental in 1602 will be found amongst 
the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian, 1 and a survey of the woods, &c., of 
the manor the 2 Jac. I. is still in existence. 1 Estreats of the manor 25 
Eliz. will be found in the Public Record Office. 3 

Abstracts of the Court Rolls of Rattlesden Manor, 1344-1595, will be 
found amongst the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian, 4 and a rental of the 
manor, six skins in length, 34 Hen. VI., is referred to in the 1st Report on 
Public Records [1800], p. 185. 

The woods belonging to the manor in the time of Elizabeth are men- 
tioned in the Exchequer Special Commission. 5 

MANOR OF WOODHALL. 

In the time of Hen. III. this was the estate of Roger de Ratlesden, 
who held half a fee of Hugh de Plaiz, who held of Earl Warren. 6 Hugh 
de Plaiz married Philippa, one of the sisters and coheirs of Richard de 
Montfichet, and 2ndly Beatrice de Say, and 3rdly a wife named Alice. 
By his ist wife he had three sons, Ralph, Hugh, and Richard, the last 
succeeding to the lordship of this manor. Richard married a wife named 
Isabella, and died in 1268, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Giles de Plaiz, who was summoned to Parliament 22 and 25 Edw. I., and 
died seised of the manor in 1303. 7 At this time it appears that Simon de 
Ratlesden held the manor under the said Giles de Plaiz. On Giles's death 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Richard de Plaiz, who had summons 
to Parliament from 1317 to 1321-2. From him it passed on his death in 
1337 to his son and heir, Giles de Plaiz, who died under age and unmarried 
before 1334, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Richard de 
Plaiz, who with Margaret his wife, daughter of Sir Walter de Norwich, are 
stated to have held one fee here. He died in Oct. 1359." This Richard 
seems to have parted with the manor, for we find it vested in Richard Buk 
in 1342, as he then enfeoffed William del Touse, Robert le Gardener, and 
John Lanthcolde. The feoffment was probably made to these feoffees as 
trustees, for we find that Agnes, daughter and heir of Richard Buk, subse- 
quently held the manor. Davy then mentions John Holgate as lord, he 
holding what was formerly the estate of George de Halle, and that in the 
time of Hen. VI. John Jerveys had a knight's fee in Rattlesden near Woolpit, 
in his occupation, called Wode Halle, of the Countess of Oxford. 

The beneficial interest in the manor was vested in Thomas Spring at 
the time of his death, 28th Sept. 1486, trustees being seised to his use in 
fee of a " tenement called Woodhall worth 6 marks held of the Bishop of 
Ely as of the Manor of Ratylsden Hall by fealty and 2s. rent," and the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Spring, then aged 30.' 

'Rawl. B. 427. 'D.K.R. 38 App. p. 70. 4 

*Exch. Spec. Com. D.K.R. 38 App. p. 74, 6 T. de Nevill, 292. 

ser. 107, no. 'I.P.M., 31 Edw. I. 37. 

'Court Rolls, Portfolio 203, 104 "I. P.M., 34 Edw. III. 43. 

4 Rawl. B. 426. I.P.M., 2 Hen. VII. 234. 



RATTLESDEN. 319 

The manor passed on the death of Thomas Spring in 1523 to his son 
and heir, John Spring.' 

No doubt in the exchange made by the Bishop of Ely in 1561 with 
Queen Elizabeth of the chief lordship, this manor was included. It was 
granted by the Queen to James Rivett, who died in 1587, and from this 
time to the death of Edward Rivett in 1660 passed in the same course of 
descent as the Manor of Fenn Hall, in Buxhall, in Stow Hundred, and the 
main Manor of Rattlesden. The descent of the manor is given in the 
Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian. 2 

In 1591 a fine was levied of the manor by Valentine Saunders and others 
against Thomas Rivett and others. 3 

Early in the last century the manor passed to Sir Joshua Ricketts 
Rowley, who married loth Aug. 1824, Charlotte, only daughter of John 
Moseley, of Great Glemham House, and was subsequently acquired by 
Col. Windsor Parker, and is now vested, like the Manor of Clopton Hall, 
in Rattlesden, in his son and heir, Duncan Parker, of Clopton Hall. 

MANOR OF RATTLESDEN CASTLE OR THURMODES. 

On the opening of the I3th century Hubert Thurmod held the fourth 
part of a knight's fee here of the Bishop of Ely. 4 

About this time Roger Thurmood held a fee here, and he was succeeded 
by Henry Thurmood. 

In 1428 the manor was vested in Robert Marchant, who held what was 
formerly the estate of Henry Thurmode. Somewhat later the manor vested 
in Sir Robert Chamberlain, Knt., who was attainted and beheaded in 1491, 
when the manor was forfeited to the Crown. The Chamberlain family 5 had 
been interested in lands in Rattlesden at a much earlier date, for amongst the 
Early Chancery Proceedings between 1407 and 1457, we meet with a suit 
between Sir Roger Chamberlain and William Man as to messuages and lands 
here. 6 

In 1495 Sir Roger Ormeston, who had married Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of John Fitz Ralph, and widow of Sir Robert Chamberlain, had a 
grant of the manor. She died in 1516. In 1548 the manor was held by 
John Clark or Cheke. Probably these were not grants in fee, but limited 
to the lives of the grantees or during some other period. In 1604 Philip 
Tyse and William Blake had a grant in fee farm of the Manor of Rattlesden 
and other lands at the suit of Lord Southampton. 7 This entry Davy 
assigns to the main manor, but it probably belongs to this. 

This manor now belongs to Arthur Wakerley, and is attached to the 
Manor of Gedding. 

MANOR OF CLOPTON HALL. 

At the time of the Survey this manor was held by Peter under the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds, and reverted to the Crown on the dissolution of the religious 
houses. The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of John Broughton, 
who died 24th Jan. 1517," leaving John Broughton, his son and heir, and it 

'See Manor of Netherhall , Little Walding- 4 Red Book of the Exchequer, 1210-1212, 

field, in Babergh Hundred, and 140^. 

Pakenham Manor, in this Hundred. 'See Manor of Gedding, in this Hundred. 
'Rawl. B. 319. 6 E.C.P. 8 Hen. V. ; 35 Hen. VI. 16, 344. 

3 Fine, Trin. 33 Eliz. 7 S.P. 1604- 175. 

"I.P.M., i2th Oct. 10 Hen. VIII. 148. 



3 20 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



no doubt descended in the same course as the Manor of Stansfield, in 
Risbridge Hundred, John, Lord Russell, obtaining a grant or confirmation 
from the Crown in 1539. Particulars for this grant are still preserved in 
the Public Record Office. 1 

Lord Russell had licence in 1540 to alienate it to John Smyth, junior, 
and Anne his wife, who had licence to alienate in 1543 to George Smyth, 
who did homage for it, and had licence to alienate in 1558 to John Waller 
and James Wood to the use of Elizabeth his wife for life. She remarried 
William Castleton, 1 of Bury, who in 1565 levied a fine of the manor with 
others against John Smyth and others. 3 He died 24th May, 1616, having 
sold the manor to William Fiske, of Pakenham. He was the 2nd son of 
John Fiske and Joan Cooper his wife, which John was the 4th son of William 
Fiske and Margaret Bull his wife, which William was the son of Thomas, 
the son of William, son of Simon Fiske, of Studhaugh, in Laxfield. William 
Fiske, the purchaser, married Ann Hart, and died in 1648,* when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Lieut.-Col. John Fiske. He married Alice, 
daughter of William Hare, of Beeston, in Norfolk, and died i4th June, 
1684, at the age of 75, when the manor passed to his 3rd son, Thomas 
Fiske, 5 who died ist Nov. 1688, and subsequently to his (Col. John's) 4th 
son, Samuel Fiske, who died I3th Sept. 1691. 

The manor was sold by the Fiskes to Adam Chadwick. We find the 
manor advertised for sale by auction 28th Aug. 1805, at the Angel Inn, 
Bury St. Edmunds. The property was then described as " The Manor 
or Grange of Clopton, in Rattlesden, together with two-thirds of all tithes 
to the same manor belonging, annual quit rents, fines, &c., and mansion- 
house and offices, fore court, garden, orchard, dove house, farm yard, &c., 
large fish ponds, &c., and surrounding rich meadow, pasture, arable land, 
containing about 147 acres within a ring fence, in the occupation of F. W. 
Wootton, Esq. The estimated value about 350 per annum." 6 Adam Chad- 
wick died in 1832, when the manor was again offered for sale by his executors 
24th May, 1833. The estate had by this time swollen to about 600 acres 
let to tenants at rents amounting to about 700 per annum. 7 The estate was 
said to have sold for 13,340, the purchaser being William Parker, of 
Hardwicke, co. Gloucester. He married Anne, daughter of William 
Windsor, and on his death in 1834 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Colonel Windsor Parker, High Sheriff in 1854. 

He served at the siege and capture of Bhurtpore in 1825-6, was aide- 
de-camp and interpreter to Field-Marshal Viscount Combermere, and 
Major of Brigade to the Troops in Malwa and Lucknow 1829-36, M.P. for 
West Suffolk 1809. In 1830 he married Elizabeth Mary, daughter of Gen. 
Alexander Duncan, and dying in 1892, the manor vested in his son and heir, 
Duncan Parker, the present lord. He in 1877 married Margaret Fanny, 
daughter of Henry Leheup Cocksedge, of Drinkstone House, and has with 
other issue a son, Windsor Duncan Parker, born in 1878. 



'31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 263. 

"By other authorities, however, this 
William Castleton, who died in 
1616, son of John Castleton by 
his 2nd wife, a daughter of one 
Clement, of Kent, and father of 
Sir William Castleton, created a 
baronet, gth Aug. 1641, man in I 
Anne, daughter of William Hill, of 
Bury. 



3 Fine, Mich. 7 Eliz. 

4 Will 20th March, 1648, proved gth Jan. 

1649. 

5 Not verified. 

6 Ipswich Journal, July, 1805, ar| d April, 

1806. 
7 Morning Herald, ist May, 1833 ; Ipswich 

Journal, i8th May, 1833. 



RATTLESDEN. 321 

Arms of CASTLETON : On a bend Or, 3 adders (or snakes) wound up 
of the first. Of FISKE : Chequy Arg. and Gu. on a pale Sa. 3 mullets Or. 

MANOR OF STANHAM'S OR STONHAM'S. 

In 1205 we find that John de Stanham held a free tenement here, and 
there was an assize of novel disseisin between Richard de Benges and himself 
as to this free tenement.' By the time of Edw. I this free tenement had 
apparently developed into a manor. John de Stanham was succeeded by 
Robert Stonham, who married Katherine, daughter and coheir of Sir Wm. 
Burgate, and died in 1397." The manor passed to his son and heir, Robert 
Stonham. A settlement was made of the manor in 1416, as we gather from 
the Feet of Fines this year. The fine was levied by this Robert Stonham 
and Mary his wife (daughter of Sir John and sister and coheir of Edmund 
Bernake), plaintiffs, against John Spenser and Katherine his wife deforciants, 
whereupon the said John and Katherine granted the manor to the said 
Robert and Mary and to the heirs of their bodies for ever, and in default 
after the decease of the said Robert and Mary to the heirs of the body of 
the said Robert for ever, and in default thereof to remain to Eleanor, wife 
of Robert Asshefield, sister of the said Robert Stonham, and to the heirs of 
her body for ever, and for default the said manor to remain wholly to the 
right heirs of the said Robert Stonham for ever. On the acknowledgment 
and fine the said Robert and Mary granted to the said John and Katherine 
100 marks of silver. 3 On Robert Stonham's death the manor passed to 
his daughter and heir Elizabeth, married to John Broughton, who held the 
manor, then valued at 5 marks, of the Abbot of Bury by a service said to 
be unknown. He died 23rd July, 1489, when the manor passed in the 
same course as that of Denstons, in Risbridge Hundred/ to the time of John 
Broughton, who died in 1529. 



' Abbr. of Pleas, 7 and 8 John, 2. See Manor of Denston Hall, in Risbridge 

J Will 26th Nov., proved i6th Dec. 1397. Hundred. 

J Feet of Fines, 3 Hen. V. 22. 

Ri 




THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ROUGH AM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and consisted of 5 carucates of land, 15 villeins, 
4 bordars, 3 ploughteams in demesne and 2 belonging to the 
men, 6 thralls, 4 acres of meadow, 3 rouncies, 22 beasts, 25 
hogs, and 55 sheep. At the time of the Survey there were 
also 90 freemen with n bordars, a thrall, 5 carucates of land, 
18 ploughteams, and 3 acres of meadow. These were held 

under the abbot by commendation, and all customs, and as to the fold. 

To the church of this township lay 40 acres of free land in alms. The 

whole was valued at 14, increased to 16 when the Survey was taken. 

It was 1 6 quarentenes long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt 2od.' 

MANOR OF ROUGHAM HALL. 

The principal lordship of the parish of Rougham was given by Earl 
Ulfketel to the Abbey of St. Edmunds, and continued with this house until 
the Dissolution, when it was granted by the Crown, Davy says, to Thomas 
Howard, Duke of Norfolk, who the same year had licence to alienate the 
same to John Drury, 2 of Rougham, son of John Drury and Margaret his 
wife, daughter of Sir William Felton, who married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Golcfingham, of Belstead, Essex, one of the three coheirs of her mother, 
Thomasine Listen, by whom he had three sons and two daughters. Robert, 
the eldest son, married Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas Tay, of Layer de la 
Hay, in Essex, who was afterwards married to Edmund Gooding, of 
Thurston, and had two sons, Robert and John. John Drury, of Rougham, 
died 3rd Aug. I556, 3 and his eldest son, Robert Drury, having died in his 
father's lifetime he was succeeded by his grandson, Sir Robert Drury, Knt. 
He had licence in 1564 to alienate to Elizabeth, widow, Lady Drury, and 
Henry Drury her son. 

The manor next vested in Charles Drury, grandson of Robert, and on 
his death in 1623 passed to his son and heir, Seckford Drury, who died in 
1634 without issue, when it went to his uncle, Roger Drury, who also died 
without issue, when it devolved on his three sisters, Anne, Cecily, and 
Elizabeth. Anne married Charles Alexander, youngest son of the Earl of 
Stirling ; Cecily married George Douglas, D.D. ; and Elizabeth married 
the Rev. William Wells, rector of Rougham. There is a bargain and sale 
dated igth Sept. 1645, between Jeffrey Burwell and Nicholas Burwell of 
the first part, Robert Wells, son and heir of William Wells and Elizabeth 
his wife of two-thirds of Rougham Hall, and Mr. S. Le Blanc gave it as his 
opinion 23rd Aug. 1788, that by this assurance the manor had not passed. 

The manor passed to Edmund Burwell, who married Mary, daughter 
and coheir of Jeffrey Pitman, of Woodbridge. He died in 1652, and was 
buried in the chancel of the parish church of Rougham. Sir Jeffrey Burwell, 
Knt., their son, succeeded, and died 6th July, 1684, and was also buried 
there. By a deed in 1671 Sir Jeffrey Burwell settled a messuage and 4 
acres of land in this parish, in trust, to employ the yearly rents towards the 
clothing of poor women. This estate comprises four cottages with gardens, 
and about 4$ acres of land, let together for 25 a year, which is expended in 

'Dom. ii. 362. 3 I.P.M., 3 and 4 P. and M. 141. 

'See Weston Market Manor, in Black- 
bourn Hundred. 



ROUGHAM. 



323 



the purchase of stuff for gowns ; and the clear residue of the same is applied 
in the payment of interest upon, and part liquidation of, a debt incurred in 
erecting two of the cottages ; the sum of 80, bequeathed by Sir Jeffrey 
Burwell, to purchase 4 per annum, to be applied towards placing out 
apprentice a poor child, &c ; the same was expended in the purchase of 
135. IDS. iod., Old South Sea annuities ; the dividends of which are 
applied, subject to the payment of 2os. a year to the parish 
clerk in binding out a poor child apprentice, from time to time. 1 Sir 




ROUGHAM HALL. 



Jeffrey Burwell left issue by Elizabeth his wife, the only daughter of Thomas 
Derehaugh, an only child Mary, wife of Robert Walpole, of Houghton, in 
Norfolk, mother of Sir Robert Walpole, Prime Minister to King Geo. I., 
afterwards Earl of Oxford. Robert Walpole succeeded to the lordship 
upon the decease of Sir Jeffrey Burwell, and sold the same to Sir Robert 
Davers, Bart., who having acquired a considerable fortune in Barbadoes, 
returned to this country and purchased various estates in Suffolk. Sir 
Robert Davers married Eleanor, sister of Geo. Luke, and died in June, 
1684,' and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Robert Davers, 2nd Bart., 
who married 2nd Feb. 1681-2, the Hon. Mary Jermyn, eldest daughter and 
coheir of Thomas, 2nd Baron Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, by which marriage 
he acquired one-fifth, and purchased of his wife's sisters the remaining 
parts of that property upon the death of Lord Jermyn in 1703. 

Sir Robert Davers, between 1705 and 1710, sold the manor to his son- 
in-law, Clement Corrance, of Parham, who represented Orford in Parlia- 
ment from 1708 to 1714, and from this time the manor devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate Hundred, to 1792. 
Upon petition of the Corrance estates the manor was appropriated to William 
Castle, the son of William Castle, the husband of Mary, the daughter of 
Clement Corrance, and sister of John Corrance, which William Castle the 
son left an only daughter Catherine, who married in 1788 Edward Bouverie, 



'Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 757. 



'Will, 4th to I7th July, 1679, proved 
2Qth June, 1688. 



324 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Delapre Abbey, in the County of Northampton. They sold the manor 
(with the mansion-house known as Rougham Place, which had been erected 
by Sir Robert Davers, ist Bart.) to the Rev. Roger Kedington, son of 
Henry Kedington, and Sarah his wife, daughter and coheir of Thomas 
Martin, of Burrards Hall, in Whatfield. Roger Kedington, by his will in 
1702, directed 200 to be laid out in lands to be vested in trustees, to apply 
the rents in binding out a boy apprentice every two years, to be chosen 
alternately from poor boys born within this parish, or the parish of St. 
Mary, in Bury St. Edmunds, one at the end of two years, from each parish 
by turns. 

This legacy was laid out, with some addition made to it, by the testator's 
niece, Martha Cooke, in the purchase of an estate at Barningham, conveyed 
to trustees in 1758 ; it comprises 2ia. 3r. igp. of land, and lets at 35 
per annum. 1 

Sir John Cullum, in his MS. Ch. Notes says : " Roger Kedington 
succeeded to the Estate of Rougham Hall, in Suffolk, by the Will of Ann 
Neden, relict of Gerard Neden, D.D., rector of Rougham, and daughter 
and sole heiress of John and Martha Cook, which Martha Cook was daughter 
and sole heiress of Martha Westhorp, sister of Roger Kedington, of Rougham 
Hall, who was High Sheriff for the County of Suffolk in 1690." 

The Rev. Roger Kedington married three times : ist Jane, daughter 
of Robert Butt, rector of Long Melford and Glemsford ; zndly Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of John Brandish, rector of L. Cressingham and 
Didlington, in Norfolk ; and 3rdly, Wilson, the relict of Russell. He had 
issue by his ist wife only a daughter Jane Judith, born 2Qth April, 1775, 
just a month before her mother's death. This daughter, I2th June, 1794, 
married Philip Bennet, of Tollesbury Lodge, co. Essex, to whom Roger 
Kedington, on his death, 26th Aug. 1818, devised the manor. Philip Bennet 
forthwith erected a new mansion situated on a gentle eminence, as Page 
expresses it, a short distance northward from Rougham Place. On Philip 
Bennet's death the manor passed to his son and heir, Capt. Philip Bennet, 
who married Anne, 2nd daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Pilkington, 
Bart., of Prevet, and had a son Philip born i6th Dec. 1837. 

The manor was later acquired by E. J. Johnstone, son of the 
editor of the " Standard." In 19 the manor was sold to G. W. 
Agnew, M.P., &c. 

On the Memoranda Rolls we find that Sir Hamon L'Estrange and his 
wife were in 1611 called upon to show title to Rougham Manor. 2 On a 
survey taken in 1630 it appeared that there was one manor of Rougham 
called the Manor of Rougham Hall and Rougham Place, of which manor 
the mansion house of Rougham Hall was then considered as the manor 
house. In 1843 a case was laid before Counsel to advise whether upon the 
division of the Rougham estate the conveyance of the site of the manor 
with the demesne and other land belonging to Rougham Hall in 1645, 
and the payment of the King's rent for the same, and the appointment of a 
gamekeeper (which appeared to have been the only manorial right actually 
exercised), the owners of Rougham Hall acquired such a right in part of 
the manor as to enable them to authorize a person to kill game upon the 
demesne and other lands comprised in the conveyance of igth September, 
1843- 

'Page, Hist, of Suff., p. 737. 'M. 8 Jac. Trin. Rec. Rot. 169. 



ROUGHAM. 325 

Arms of KEDINGTON : The following note on the arms and family of 
Kedington made by the well-known genealogist, Robert Dale, is preserved 
in the Cullum MS. Church Notes : " Arms of Kedington are Erm. on a 
bend Az. 6 Battleaxes Saltierwise Arg. hilted and pomelled Or. Crest on a 
wreath of the colours, a demi Lion proper gutt. de sang : crouned or 
holding in his right paw a Cuttelax, as in the Arms. Motto Virtus coronat 
opus. N.B. The antient Arms of Kedington are : ar. 3 piles Gu. (Pedigree). 

" These are the Arms and Crest of Ambrose Kerrington alias Kedington 
of Acton in the County of Suffolk Gentleman whose Father Mr. Ambrose 
Kerrington alias Kedington late of Acton aforesaid, was the second Son 
and surviving Heir of Roger Kerrington alias Kedington of the same place, 
who inherited his Father Roger's Patrimony at Lavenham in the said 
County : which Roger was born at Reed in the said County, A.D. 1567 
and buried at Lavenha aforesaid Anno 1659 an ^ was the youngest Son by 
the first Wife of Robert Kedington alias Kerington who was born at Reed 
aforesaid in the Year 1536, and buried at Risby in the said County in 1615, 
and had a good Estate in Lands within the Parishes of Reed, Cheteboe, 
Brockley, Stansfield, Wickhambrook, Stanefield alias Stanningfeld, Thorp 
Morieux, Lavenham, &c., in the said County of Suffolk, which he gave in 
his lifetime, and by Will at his Death, to his Sons, besides considerable 
Legacies in Money to some of them as also to his Grandchildren, being the 
eldest Son and Heir of Henry Kedington of Reed aforesaid who was buried 
there anno Dom. 1559 the Ancestors of which Henry were originally of 
Kedington Hall in the Parish of Kedington commonly called Ketton in 
the said County, and extracted from an Antient Family of Gentry Two 
whereof viz. Robert de Kedington of Kedington Hall aforesaid and Philip 
Kedington his Son, lived in the successive Reigns of King Edward the 3rd 
and King Richard the 2d. having fair Possessions in the several Parishes 
of Kedington, Wethresfield, Wickhambrook, Chevington, Cheteber and 
Reed beforementioned in the County of Suffolk ; as well as in the Parish 
of Ashdon in the County of Essex, as by the said Robert de Kedington's 
Will in the Prerogative Office dated 4 June, 1391, and other antient 
Records, Wills, Public Registers and Authorities may appear. 

" 30 Aug. 1709." 

MANOR OF ELDE al. OLDHALL al. OLDHAUGH AND LE Hoo. 

This was a grange belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and remained 
in the possession of the abbey until the Dissolution, when it was granted by 
the Crown in 1542 to Sir Arthur Darcy, Knt. Just prior to this grant, 
and in the same year, we find amongst the State Papers note of a lease by 
the Crown for 21 years to Sir Anthony Wyngefeld of pasture for 600 sheep 
upon " Rougham Manor or grange of Eldawe which belonged to Bury 
monastery," at 3 rent. 1 In 1545, however, the manor was granted by 
the Crown to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, who had licence the same 
year to alienate the same to Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrooke, Knt., and 
from him the manor devolved in the same course of devolution as the Manor 
of Rushbrooke Hall, in this Hundred, to Sir Thomas Jermyn, Knt., in 1614. 
Sir Thomas Jermyn and his wife Katherine had licence to alienate to 
Sir William Povery and others, probably by way of settlement for we find 
that the manor descended to Thomas Jermyn, son and heir of Sir Thomas, 
on hjs death in 1644-5, an d <> n the death of Thomas Jermyn in 1659 passed 

'State Papers, 1542, 714 (18), 1358. 



326 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to his son and heir, Thomas Jermyn, who was created Lord Jermyn, and 
died in 1703, when the manor passed to Sir Thomas Spring, of Pakenham, 
who had married Merilrna, the 5th daughter and coheir of Lord Jermyn. 
Sir Thomas Spring died in 1704,' when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir \Ym. Spring, on whose death unmarried in 1736 it passed to his 
2nd sister and coheir Mary, married to the Rev. John Symonds, D.D. He 
died in 1757, when it passed to hiss on and heir, John Symonds, who sold 
the manor to Thomas Cocksedge, of Bury St. Edmunds, on whose death 
in 1811* it passed to his son and heir, Martin Thomas Cocksedge, who 
dying in 1824* it devolved on his son and heir, Martin Thomas Cocksedge, 
who married Anne \\Trale, and was burnt to death 5th May, 1846, at the 
age of 31. 

MANOR OF LAWNEYS. 

This also formed part of the gift of Earl Ulfketel to the Abbey of 
St. Edmunds, and on the Dissolution of this house passed to the Crown, 
and was granted to Sir William Drury, Knt., who died about 1450,* when it 
passed to his widow Katherine for life. She died in 1479, when it vested 
in their son and heir, Thomas Drury, who died I2th Dec. 1487,' when it 
passed to his son and heir, John Drury, who died in 1498, when it passed in 
the same course of descent as the main manor until the death of Seckford 
Drury in 1634. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Drury, 
who died 3rd August, 1556, leaving Robert, son of Robert his grandson, 
his heir. 8 We next find the manor vested in John Corrance, who died in 
1742, from which time it apparently has devolved in the same course as 
the main manor, being like that manor, on the petition of the Corrance 
estates, allotted to the Castle family. 

MANOR OF KING'S HALL. 

This manor was also vested in the abbey of St. Edmunds from Saxon 
times to the dissolution of the religious houses in the time of Hen. VIII. 

On the opening of the i8th century we find the manor vested in Edward 
Crispe, of Bury (son of Edward), who died i2th June, 1709, when it passed 
to his son and heir, Edward Crispe, who was murdered by his brother-in- 
law, Arundel Coke, in 1746, and was buried roth Sept, 1746. Crispe dug 
a moat at King's Hall. 
In 1810 Mr. Cropley was lord. 

MANOR OF CHAVENTS. 

In 1271 this manor was held by Peter de Chauvent, and he had a grant 
of free warren here in I289, 7 and died in 1293. He no doubt held under 
the Abbot of Bury as chief lord. 

In 1364 we find the lordship held by 1 Walter Beneyt and others under 
the abbot. 

A lease was in 1394 granted by William, the abbot, and the convent 
of St. Edmunds, to John Bacon, of Hessett, of the Manor of Hessett, 

1 See Pakenham Hall Manor, in this 4 See Weston Market Manor, in Blackbourn 

Hundred. Hundred. 

2 Davy says 2nd Feb. 1833, at the age of 5 I.P.M., 3 Hen. VII. 305. 

84. 6 I.P.M., 3 and 4 P. & M. 141. 

3 See main Manor of Rougham. 'Chart. Rolls, 17 Edw. I. 7. 



ROUGHAM. 327 

with two parts of this Manor of Chavents for eight years from Michael- 
mas 18 Rich. II. 1 But about this time the manor, and probably 
some time previously a third of it, became vested in Sir Thomas 
de Naunton, 3rd son of Hugo de Naunton and Eleanor his wife, daughter 
of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford. Sir Thomas de Naunton granted 
a rent charge of 2os. out of his lands in Monewden to the Abbot 
of Sibton in 1367 in exchange for a mill in Tostock. His only daughter 
and sole heiress Margery married Sir Roger Drury, Knt., son of Nicholas 
Drury, of the adjoining parish of Thurston, and of Joan his wife, 
daughter and heiress of Sir Simon Saxham of the same parish. He died in 
1418, his lady in 1405, and were both interred at the east end of the north 
aisle of Rougham church, where a brass still remains to their memory, an 
etching of which appears in the " Gentleman's Magazine " for 1813, 
part 2, p. 17. 2 

From the time of Sir Roger Drury the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Weston Market, in Blackbourn Hundred, through 
the Drury family .certainly to the time of John Drury, who died in 1556. 

MANOR OF LEE Hoo. 

This was anciently held by James de Gedding, and passed to his son 
and heir, John de Gedding, who seems to have given the same in 1293 to 
Robert, son of Thomas de Bradfield and Cecily his wife, who about the 
same time, or a little later, had a gift of lands in Rougham from Sir Robert 
de Hoo, Knt. Robert de Bradfield granted all his lands in 1318 to Peter 
Osborne, rector of Thorp Abbots, who had licence to grant the reversion 
after the death of Robert and Margaret his wife to the abbey of St. Edmunds 
to the use of the sacristan. 3 The whole transaction appears clearly in 
the licence for alienation in mortmain to the abbey, which is on the 
Patent Rolls in 1318. It is given to Peter Osborne, parson of Thorpe 
Abbots in respect of a remaindership in a messuage, a mill, 360 acres of 
land, 6 of pasture, 12 of wood, i6s. <\\d. rent, and a rent of lib. of cummin, 
and a hen, in Rougham, Rushbrook, and Whelnetham, held of the abbot, and 
worth 7. 55. 6%d. a year as appears by inquisition on death of Robert, 
son of Thomas de Bradefeld, and Margaret his wife, to whom he was also 
licenced to grant the said messuage, land, &c., for their lives to hold to 
the abbey for the maintenance of the office of their sacristy. 4 

With the abbey this manor continued until the Dissolution, when it 
was granted by the Crown in 1545 to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, 
who had licence the same year to grant it to Sir Thomas Jermyn, from whom 
it descended to Robert Jermyn, his grandson, in 1577, like the Manor of 
Elde al. Oldhall. 

MANOR OF SUDBURYES al. DRURYE'S. 

This was vested in Sir Roger Drury, Knt., of Thurston, and afterwards 
of Rougham, who died in 1418, from which time to the death of John Drury 
in 1498, it descended in the same course as the Manor of Chavents, and as 
is given in the account of Weston Market, in Blackbourn Hundred. Lands 
and tenements called Druryes or Sudburyes are specifically mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of Katharine Drury in 1480.' But eight years later in 
the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Drury the entry is of the " Manor of Sudburyes 
al. Drurye's, in Rougham," then held of the Abbot of Bury. 6 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch. no. 'Pat. Rolls, 12 Edw. II. pt. i. 6. 

'Page, Hist, of Suff., p. 734. 'I.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 37. 

J Add. MSS. 19109. 6 I.P.M., 3 Hen. VII. 305. 



328 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 
MANOR OF NETHERHALL OR NETHERPLACE. 



This manor was vested in John Drury, who died seised of it 3rd Aug. 
1556,' from which time to the death of Seckford Drury in 1634 it devolved 
in the same course as the main manor. On the death of Seckford Drury 
the manor passed to his uncle, Roger Drury, who died without issue, 
when it devolved on his sisters and coheirs Anne, Cecily, and Elizabeth. 
Anne married Charles Alexander, youngest son of the Earl of Stirling ; 
Cecily married George Douglas, D.D., and Elizabeth married the Rev. 
William Wells, rector of Rougham. 



Abstracts of various deeds relating to Rougham Hall will be found 
amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian. 2 



'I.P.M., 3 and 4 P. & M. 141. 



'Tanner, cclxxxiv. 35. 




RUSHBROOKE. 329 

RUSHBROOKE. 

|HE main holding mentioned here was that of 22 freemen, 
and consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 bordars, 4 ploughteams 
among the men, and 2 acres of meadow. These freemen 
might give and sell their land so long as the soc remained in 
the abbot's possession, and the service in Rougham. At 
the time of the Survey they all still belonged to the abbot's 
fold except three. The value was in Saxon times i6s., but 
at the time of the Survey had gone up to 2os. 23^. The Domesday tenant 
was the Abbot of St. Edmunds. The estate was 7 quarentenes long and 
4 broad, and paid in a gelt jd. 1 

MANOR OF RUSHBROOK. 

The lordship was at the time of the Survey vested in the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, under whom at a later date a family held here who derived 
from Scotland, of Scotland Hall, in Polstead, who assumed the name of 
Rushbrook. In 1180 Scotland de Rushbrook held lands in Rushbrook, of 
Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, and in 1244 Walter, son of Walter de 
Saxham, granted to Thomas, son of Michael de Rushbrook, i8a. 3r. of arable 
land in Little Saxham. On the Patent Rolls in 1276 we find an action by 
Nicholas de Rissebrok against Lucy, daughter of Michael de Rissebrok 
and others touching a tenement in Rushbrooke/ Thomas, son of Michael, 
was grandson of Scotland de Rushbrook, arid from him the property held 
here passed to his sister and coheir Agnes, wife of Thomas, father of John 
Jermyn, of Rushbrook. Isabella, the other sister and coheir, married 
William le Large. 3 John Jermyn and William le Large were tenants in 
1286, but the lordship does not seem to have been in the Jermyn family 
until a later date. At least, there is the difficulty that we meet with a lordship 
of " Rushbrok," in 1359, vested in Sir William de Russhebrok and Joan, 
these having this year levied a fine against John de Cavendyssh, 
Michael Bures, Ralph de ... and William de Rakelound, 4 and 
Sir William by his will proved in 1383, gave the manor to his son, 
Thomas Rushbrook, whose sister Alice married Hugh Hunt, of 
Rushbrook, and the manor was inherited by their son and heir, Robert 
Hunt. Amongst the early Chancery Proceedings 15 Rich. II. to 10 Hen. VI. 5 
we find an assize of novel disseisin of a rent on the manor granted by Sir 
William de Russebrok. The action was between Henry Hunte and Thomas 
Ewelle and William Page, bailiff and only bailiff of Bury St. Edmunds, 
and in 1458 William Holcot, son and heir of Margaret, one of the sisters of 
the above-named Robert Hunt, and George Holcot his brother, released 
to John Green and others. 

The Manor of Rushbrook, however, was clearly vested in Thomas Jermyn, 
the father of Sir Thomas, in 1496, for it is dealt with by him specifically 
in his will made partly I2th Jan. 1466-7 and partly 6th July, 1503, and 
proved in London 4th Nov. 1504.' After making certain specific devises 
of manors and lands he wills " that all myn other lands, &c., remayne to 
Merget my wif forhir life to the entente that she shall kepe my children 
and fulfill my will, if she kepe hirself soole and unmaried. And if she be 

'Dom. ii. 3636, 369. 'Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. 16. 

'Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 22d. 'Bundle 7240. 

'See Large's Manor, in Little Saxham, 'P.C.C. 39 Holgrave. 

Thingoe Hundred. 
SI 



330 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

marled, then I will that the said londes remayne to myn executors to the 
entente that they shall yerely pay to the said Margetmy wif XX at IIII. 
times in the yere by even portions .... And after the decesse of 
Margete my wife I will the Manor of Rasshebrok . . . and all other 
lands that I have within the said toune of Rasshebrok, Rougham, Wel- 
nctham magna, Welnetham parva, Bradfeld monachorum, Hawsted 
Nowton, Bury Seynt Edmund, ffornham Marteyti and Berton (except the 
said manor of litell VVhelnetham as is before rehersed) remayne to Thomas 
my son and the heires male of his body, " the remainders are to Robert and 
Francis and their heirs male successively. " And if it fortune my sones 
to dye without heirs male I will that the said manors &c. remayne to Agnes, 
Alys, and Mary my doughters and to the heires male of their bodyes. And 
for defawte of such yssue male of my III. daughters I will that the said 
manors, &c., be sold by myn executors and the half dell of the money thereof 
comyng to be distributed betwixt my childerns childern if any ther be, 
and the other half to be distributed for the wele of my soule and of Mergete 
my wif, and the soule of our faders and our moders, and for the soules of 
Dann John Swaffham sexteyn of the monastery of Bury Seynt Edmund 
and Thomas Edon the elder, and for the soules of all my frendes and of all 
other that I am most bounde to praye for." 1 

The ancestry of this Thomas Jermyn will best appear from the following 
pedigree on opposite page, which we find amongst the Howard MSS. and 
stated to be copied from " Suffolk Collections in Ipswich Museum," with 
a few additions from other sources. 

Thomas Jermyn the son held in 1532, for there is an indenture of sale 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum which bears date 
gth Dec. 24 Hen. VIII., by which Thomas Jermyn sells to Thomas Snellyng, 
of Drinkstone, lands in Drinkstone, on condition that the said Thomas 
Snellyng makes a ceiling and wainscot to a room at the Manor of Rush- 
brooke. The 4th Feb. 1535-6, the manor was transferred by Sir Thomas 
to his son, Sir Thomas. In 1530-1 Thomas Jermyn had been Sheriff of 
Norfolk and Suffolk, and 2Qth May, 1533, was made a Knight of the Bath, 
this being a few days before the coronation of Anne Boleyn. The Duke 
of Norfolk, writing to Cromwell from Colchester, loth Oct. 1536, says : 
' The King has commanded divers gentlemen, abbots, and priors of the 
county to send men. I am steward and founder of most of the houses of 
religion, and under me many of the gentlemen have the rules of them, as 
of Bury, Sir Thomas Germyn." In 1539 Sir Thomas was appointed one 
of the Commissioners to search and defend parts of the coast. 

In March, 1540, some of the manors of the abbey of St. Edmunds were 
granted to Sir Thomas Jermyn in consideration of the sum of 1,305. us. Sd. 
These were the manors of Monks Bradfield and Stanton, divers woods 
which are specified in Monks Bradfield, Bradfield St. Clare, and Felsham, 
the advowson of the churches of Monks Bradfield and Stanton, and all 
the appurtenances of the said manors in Monks Bradfield, Tostock, Hessett, 
Little VVhelnetham, Barton, Drinkstone, Felsham, Thorpe, Norton, Gedding, 
Rougham, Bradfield St. Clare, Bradfield Combust, Pakenham, Wetherden, 
Rushbrook, Stanton, Over Stanton, Nether Stanton, Ixworth, Bardwell, 
Stowlangtoft, Wattisfield, Walsham, and Hepworth, all which premises 
belonged to the abbey ; also other possessions of the abbey in Monks 

1 Rushbrooke Parish Registers, by the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey, Woodbridge, 

1903, p. 122-124. 



Micha 



Scotland of Rushbrooke c. 1180. 
I 



Beatrice = Michael = 2nd wife 
1st wife. I de Rushbrooke 



1 


Thomas de Rushbrooke, Agnes = 
living 1229. 
d.i.p. 


= Sir Thomas Jermyn, 
son of Hugh, son 
of John Jermyn. 


Isabel = William le Large, 
of Little Saxham. 



Sir William = Joan 
d.s.p. 


John 1 
living 1289. 


Alice William 


Henry 


Thomas 


1 
John 
t. Edw. I. 
1 




Hugh, = 
living 1 327. 


= Mary. 




Hugo, = 


Maud 

Joan, dau. of 
Walter Weller, 
of Rayne Parva, 
co. Essex. 

= Joan, 
ndrew 


1 1 1 
John = Joan Edmund Hugh 
Jermyn. 1 


1 ! 

Agnes Alice 

Christian 
d. 1432- 

>. 
4OI. 

= Margaret Layman, 
9. of Ickworth, or 
Ipswich. 


living 1 
26 Edw. I. 

Sir William 
Rushbrooke, living 
34 Edw. III. Will 
8 Rich. II. Proved 
I7th Dec. 1383. 


Sir Thomas = 
Jermyn, 
living 1374. 


= Margaret, 
dau. of 
William 
Hare, of 
Bozstead. 


William = 
of Barking, 
co. Essex, 
d. 1434- 

Johr 


Thomas Rushbrooke 
of Rattlesden. Will 
roth Oct. 1496. 

A 


Eleanor, 
m. W. Karne or 
Raynham. 


| living I 
Anne | 
m. Valentine Thomas 
Bayly ff. living 147 



I. Katharine, dau. and Thomas = 
coheir of Sir John Will 1497. 
Bernard, of Aken- 
ham. 



2. Margaret. 



Benet, 

of Little Barton. 
Will 8th June, 1546. 



= Joan. 



Wil 



Villiam, = 
of Great Barton, 
d. 1598. 



Margery. 



William, 
of Great Barton and 
Bardwell. Will proved 
1623. 



Mary. 



Thomas, 

of Great Fakenham, 
d. 1655- 



Robert, 

of Honington, 

d. 1674. 



; Prudence, 
dau. of John Frost. 



Mary, 

dau. of William 
Thurston. 



Robert = Susannah Barlow. 



1 Add. Ch. 10533. 



Harham 



obert. 



of Rush brook 
Park, J.P., D.L., 
and M.P. for West 
Suffolk, d. 1829. 



Elizabeth Edwards, 
of Westowe Hall. 



= 1779. Mary Grubb, 
of Horsenden, co. 
Bucks. 



Col. Robert, 
of Rushbrooke Park, 
J.P., D.L., and 
M.P. for West Suf- 
folk, d. 1845. 



23rd May, 
Frances, ill. dau. of 
Sir Charles Davers, 
Bart. 



Robert Frederick Brownlow 
Rushbrooke, of Rushbrooke Park. 



332 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Bradfield and Stanton, and all those parcels of land then in the possession of 
Sir Thomas Jermyn, parcel of the Manor of Olde Hall, a tenement called 
Le Sextens, the grove of wood called Northland grove in Rushbrook which 
belonged to the abbey. 1 

Sir Thomas Jermyn 1 married ist Ann, daughter of Thomas Spring, of 
Lavenham, and 2ndly Ann, daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead, 
and widow of George Waldegrave, of Smallbridge, and died 8th Oct. 1552.' 

His will is dated 26th Sept. 1552, and was proved in London, i6th 
Dec. following. 4 The will contains the following devise of the manor : 
' To Ambrose Jermyn, my sonne and heyre apparunte, I give my manors 
of Rushebroke and Owldhall, to him and his heyres with all my flocke of 
shepe now pasturing and going in Roshebrok, which ben nowe knowen or 
reputed for my flocke of Roshebrok also my flocke of shepe going uppon 
my manor of Owldhall, my best carte horses and my best carte with all 
thereto belonging. And one ploughe with the horses and harnes belonging 
thereto. Also two my other plowes with all thereto belonging, as horses, 
geldinges, cart trassys, plowys, harrows, tomberelles, with all incydentes 
to them belonging. Also all the apparell of my chambers in the newe 
works, as well all the chambers above as those that be beneth next the 
grounde, together with all th" apparell and forneture as they be nowe 
appoynted, with all other thinges therein conteyned, together with all my 
kytchyn stuff at Roshebroke and all things in the backhouse, brewhouse, 
wynhouse, buttery, pantry, and the deyehouse, with all my hogges and 
swyne. Also my best basson and yewer of silver parcell gilt, my best 
stonding cuppe with a cover all gilt (except the stonding cuppe and cover 
which is before bequeathed to my wief), two sylver gobletts with one cover, 
with a knope which were my fathers being parcell gilt ; two saltes all gilte 
with one cover, both the saltes being of one fasshion ; elevyn spones of 
sylver with woodhousses at thende, and one spone of sylver more to make up 
the dosson ; a litle pott with two eares having a cover of gilte. Also all 
my hanginges and other implementes being in my hall and parlour in 
Roshebroke ; and a chalice with a cover all gilte, and the hangings abowte 
the chamber called the bell chamber, except such as has been bequeathed 
to my wief. Also all my mylche beastes now going with them that occupie 
and kepe my plowes in Roshbroke and Wheltham. Also mylche neate now 
in Roshelbroke. Also all my grayne and corne as well being nowe so wen 
as in my barns except as moche rye and malte as is above bequeathed 
to the householders in Roshebroke. Also all my chappel stuf both that 
which is nowe in my chappel at Roshebroke and that which is in my 
chapell chamber with one chalyce of sylver and gilt. Also my lease which 
I have of the medowe callyd Syclesmere medowe, and two of my geldinges." 

The manor passed to Sir Thomas's son, Ambrose Jermyn. He was 
knighted soon after the coronation of Queen Mary, 2nd Oct. 1553, " at 
Westminster Palace before her in her chamber of presence, under the 
cloth of estate by the Earl of Arundel who had of her Highness commission 
to execute the same." 5 His will is dated 28th March, 1577, and was proved 
ist May following. It contains devise of this manor as follows : " I gyve 

'S.P. 1540, 436 (31). P.C.C. 33, Powell. A copy of the will 

'See further as to the Jermyns, Bardwell appears in the Rev. S. H. A. 

Manor, in Blackbourn Hundred. Hervey's Rushbrooke Parish Regis- 

M.P.M., 7Edw. VI. 66. ters, p. 128. 

'Stryp Eccl. Mem. Hi. pt. ii. 181. 



RUSHBROOKE. 333 

unto Robert Jermyn my eldest sonne all those my mannors etc. lying in 
Rushbrooke, litle Wheltham, Brent Bradfeild, Ouldhall in Rowgham, 
Stanton, Hepworth, Wattesfeild, Bardwell with the reversion of all those 
other my mannors etc. lyinge in litle Horningsheath, Monckes Bradfeild 
and Bradefeild St. Clare, imediatlie after the deceasse of my wieff and the 
Ladye Magrett Poyntes, to whom the three last mannors ben sett over in 
consideracion of Joyncture. To have and to hold to the said Robert and 
the heirs male of his bodye ; with remaynder successively to Ambrose 
Jermyn, my second sonne ; Edmund Jermyn, my third sonne ; Anthony 
Jermyn, my fourth sonne; William Jermyn, my youngest sonne ; my brother 
John Jermyn, my brother, Thomas Jermyn ; them and their heirs male, 
with remainder to me Ambrose for ever." 

The testator married ist Ann, eldest daughter and coheir of George 
Heveningham, 2nd son of Sir John Heveningham, and 2ndly Dorothy, 
daughter of William Badby,of Laymarney, in Essex, and widow successively 
of Sir George Blagge, who died in 1551, and Richard Goodrick, who died 
in 1562. He died 5th April, 1577, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Robert Jermyn, who was High Sheriff of the county and was 
knighted in one of the progresses of Queen Elizabeth at Bury St. Edmunds, 
the ist Aug. 1578, and afterwards represented Suffolk in Parliament in 
1584 and 1586, and East Looe in Cornwall. 

There are numbers of letters from the Privy Council to Sir Robert 
Jermyn in the State Papers, and letters amongst the Hatfield MSS. Full 
particulars will be found in the notes on Sir Robert Jermyn attached to 
the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey's Rushbrooke Parish Registers. Sir Robert 
married Judith, daughter of Sir George Blaze, Knt., and died in April, 
1614. His will was made in April, and proved in London in June, 1614.' 
The manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Jermyn, who was M.P. 
for Bury St. Edmunds from 1621 until disabled in 1644. He was knighted 
by the Earl of Essex before Rouen, in 1591, and of him Gipps says: "He was 
a gallant and loyal gentleman, a faithfuU Subject to his Prince and a true 
Lover of his Country. He joined with King Charles ist against his rebellious 
Parliament, and served him faithfully both in Council and on the Feild, 
till he was murder'd by his own Subjects, and then was forc'd to compound 
with these bloody Murderers for his estate." He was Comptroller of the 
Household and a Privy Councillor to King Chas. I., and in 1640, on the death 
of the Earl of Suffolk, was appointed Lord Lieutenant of the County jointly 
with the new Earl next of age. He married ist Catherine, daughter of Sir 
William Killigrew, and 2ndly Mary, daughter of Edmund Barber, and widow 
of Thomas Newton, of Edgfield, Norfolk, and his will is dated 4th Jan. 
1644, and proved 24th of the same month. 2 He died in January, 1644-5, 
and the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Jermyn, who was one of 
the Grooms of the Bedchamber to Prince Charles in 1639, and was colleagued 
with his father in the representation of Bury St. Edmunds in the Long 
Parliament. He married Rebecca Rodway, afterwards wife of Henry, 
3rd and last Viscount Brouncker. He seems to have followed the Royal 
family in exile, and we find that 6th May, 1646, the House of Commons 
ordered that the proceeds of two-thirds of the estates of Sir Thomas Jermyn, 
deceased, and his son Thomas in Suffolk, not exceeding 1,500 a year, be 

1 P.C.C. 56 Lawe. A copy may be seen in *P.C.C. 23 Rivers, 
the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey's Rush- 
brooke Parish Registers, p. 150. 



334 



TIIE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



paid by the County Committee to the Earl of Stamford for his support 
and subsistence, and the remaining one-third to the use of the county. 
If the two-thirds did not amount to 1,500, the amount was to be made 
up from some other sequestered estate. In 1649 he returned to England 
and compounded for his estates. The amount paid was apparently 2,750. 
By his will dated gth Nov. 1659, he gives " unto Thomas Jermyn my 
eldest sonne all the hangings, bedding, lynnen, woollen, brasse, pewter, 
pictures, books, and household stuff now at my house at Rushbrooke where 
I sometymes dwell ; or in my house att Bury where I now dwell ; provided 
that Rebecca my wife shall have the use of them for the term of her naturall 
life." This will was proved loth Jan. 1661.' The testator died nth 
Nov. 1659, aged 58, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Jermyn. He represented Bury St. Edmunds in Parliament in 1679, and 
4th Jan. 1683-4, succeeded his uncle Henry, Lord Nalbans, in the title of 
Lord Jermyn.* He was Governor of Jersey, and married Mary, daughter 
of Henry Merry, eldest son of Sir Henry Merry, of Derbyshire, and grand- 
daughter of Sir John Gage, and by her had an only son Thomas, who 27th 
Dec. 1692, being then in his i6th year, met his death by the fall of the mast 
of a ship which the seamen were raising on a stormy day behind Beaufort 
house ; and four surviving daughters, coheirs to their father. There were 
five daughters, one dying in her father's lifetime. Thomas,Lord Jermyn died at 
Old Spring Gardens, London, ist April, 1703, at the age of 69, and was 
buried at Rushbrooke, 7th April. His will is dated igth Jan. 1702, and was 
proved, with two codicils, in London, 29th April, 1703. 3 Of the daughters, 
Mary married in 1682 Robert Davers, of Rougham, Henrietta Maria 
married Thomas Bond, 2nd son of Sir Thomas Bond, of Peckham, ist 
Bart., Comptroller of the Household to Henrietta Maria. Delariviere 
married Sir Symonds D'Ewes, 3rd Bart., of Stowlangtoft. Penelope 
married in 1700 Grey James Grove, of Pool Hall, in Shropshire. Mere- 
Una married ist in 1691 Sir Thomas Spring, of Pakenham, 3rd Bart., and 
2ndly Sir William Gage, of Hengrave, 2nd Bart. 

The 2nd Aug. 1703, Sir Robert Davers, husband of Mary, one of the 
coheirs, bought out the interests of the other four coheirs and became 
possessed of the Manor of Rushbrook, and removed to the manor house from 
Rougham Place. The grounds and park were valued and let at 600 per 
annum, and were charged with 60 a year to Mr. Agas for serving the cure 
of Rushbrook, and with 25 a year to one Mistress Margaret Orthington 
for life. The purchase was effected under the provisions of a private Act 
of Parliament in 1704. The value put upon Rushbrook Hall, great stable, 
garden, advowson of Rushbrooke and Little Whelnetham and the park 
was 180 a year. 

Sir Robert Davers frequently represented Suffolk in Parliament during 
the reigns of Queen Anne and King Geo. I. In 1683 he was appointed 



'P.C.C. 6 Laud. A copy is given by the 
Rev. S. H. A. Hervey in his Rush- 
brooke Parish Registers, p. 156. 

'Henry Jermyn, 3rd son of Sir Thomas 
Jermyn, K.B., of Rushbrooke, had 
been Vice-Chancellor to the Queen 
Consort and Master of the Horse 
to the said Queen in 1639, an ^ 
Colonel of the Queen's regiment of 
Horse Guards in 1643, being for 



his services in the Royal cause 
created 8th Sept. 1643, Baron 
Jermyn, of St. Edmundsbury, and 
ayth April, 1660, Earl of St. Albans. 
The idea adopted by Hallam as a 
fact, of his private marriage to 
Queen Henrietta Maria, is mythical. 
3 P.C.C. 69 Degg. A copy of the will is given 
by the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey in his 
Rushbrooke Parish Registers, p. 161. 






RUSHBROOKE. 335 

Baron of the Court of Exchequer and Court of Pleas of the Crown in 
Barbadoes. 

His will is dated I4th March, 1714, administration granted I3th Dec. 
1722, to Sir Robert Davers, Bart., son of the deceased, Dame Mary Davers, 
the executrix, being dead.' In the will testator gives " to my wife for her 
life my capital messuage or mansion house called Rushbrooke Hall wherein 
I now live, with the gardens, grounds, parks, &c., thereto belonging and all 
my lands, woods, farms, &c., in Rushbrooke, and the towns adjoining, 
late parcel of the estate of said Lord Jermyn .... which estate 

I purchased under Act of Parliament passed after said Lord 

Jermyn's death, which last-mentioned devises are made to my wife under 
condition that she releases to my son Robert all such sums of money as 
are charged for her use upon those and other estates by the said Act of 
Parliament. And I request that my wife will keep the houses and gardens 
in Rushbrooke in such good repair as I shall leave them to her, to the end 
that my son Robert may find them well repaired when it pleaseth God they 
come to him." 

Sir Robert Davers, 2nd Bart., died ist Oct. 1722, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Davers, 3rd Bart., Auditor of the 
Excise, who died unmarried 2Oth May, 1723, at the age of 39. By his will 
dated 28th Nov. 1722, he gives all his manors, messuages, &c., within the 
kingdom of Great Britain, the office and place of Chief Steward of the 
Liberty of Bury St. Edmunds, all his plantations, houses, miles, negroes, 
grounds, &c., in the island of Barbadoes, and all other his real estate to his 
brother, Jermyn Davers, and his heirs for ever, but subject to the payment 
of all the legacies given in the will of his late father. The will was proved 
in London with two codicils i8th July, 1723, by Sir Jermyn Davers, 
executor.* 

On Robert's death the manor passed to his brother and heir, Sir Jermyn 
Davers, 4th Bart. He had been elected M.P. for St. Edmunds Bury, in 
1722, and was chosen Knight of the Shire for Suffolk in 1727 and 1734 and 
1741. He married at Rushbrooke, Oct. 2ist, 1729, Margaretta, eldest 
daughter and coheir of the Rev. Edward Green, rector of Drinkst one, and 
died 2oth Feb. 1742-3, at the age of 56. His will is dated 30th Aug. 1740, 
and was proved, with a codicil, in London, 3ist Oct. 1743. 3 After declaring 
amongst other things that the goods, plate, and furniture at the mansion 
house at Rushbrooke both within doors and without should be looked upon 
as real estate and go with the said mansion house, and requesting that his 
wife would live in the mansion house until his eldest son Robert 
should be of age, and that she would keep up the house and park and 
furniture in good condition, the charges being paid out of his Suffolk estate, 
he says : " As to my estate in Suffolk with the furniture and plate in my 
mansion house at Rushbrooke, I give them to my eldest son Robert subject 
to the charges herein mentioned, and after his death to his eldest son law- 
fully begotten and to all his sons successively in tail male, with remainder 
to his brothers Henry, Charles, and Thomas in like manner, with remainder 

1 P.C.C. 234 Marlboro'. A copy of the will Hervey, in his Rushbrooke Parish 

is given in the Rev. S. H. A. Registers, p. 176. 

Hervey's Rushbrooke Parish Regis- J P.C.C. 308 Boycott. A copy is given in 

ters, p. 174. the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey's Rush- 

' P.C.C. 142 Richmond. A copy of the will brooke Parish Registers, p. 177. 
is given by the Rev. S. H. A. 



336 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



to my brother Thomas and his sons hi like manner, with remainder to my 
natural sons, James Davers and Jermyn pavers, in like manner, with 
remainder to my two daughters Mary and Elizabeth and their heirs equally 
between them." After appointing his wife sole executrix, and beseeching 
her to carry out his directions strictly, he begs she will live at Rushbrooke 
and keep up his house, park, and estate in a proper manner, the charges of 
which and of the cxecutorship to be allowed out of the rents and proms. 

The manor passed to Robert Davers, 5th Bart., the eldest son, who 
appears to have been killed by the Indians near Lake Huron, in Canada, 
in June, 1763. He died unmarried and the manor went to the next brother, 
Sir Charles Davers, the 3rd son of Sir Jermyn Davers, who succeeded as 
6th Bart. He represented Weymouth and Melcombe Regis, in Parliament, 
and was Chief Steward of the Liberty of St. Edmunds, for which borough 
he was returned representative in five successive Parliaments. In 1802 he 
retired to private life, and received the unanimous thanks of the corporation 
for his steady and upright conduct during the several sessions he represented 
them. He died 4th June, 1806, aged 69, unmarried, 1 when the title became 
extinct, and the manor passed to his only surviving sister Elizabeth, married 
to Frederick, 4th Earl of Bristol, and Bishop of Derry, whose eldest son 
and heir, Frederick William Hervey, 5th Earl of Bristol, afterwards ist 
Marquis, succeeded to his estate as heir-general of the Davers family, and 
upon the marriage of Robert, son of Robert Rushbrooke/ by Mary Grubb 
his wife, of the family of Grubb, of Horsenden, co. Bucks., with Frances 
Davers, one of the natural daughters of Sir Charles Davers, 23rd May, 1808, 



'Charles is stated to have married when 
in America the daughter of a 
miller, by whom he had one son, 
who served as a private soldier in 
the American army, and is said 
to have married and had a family. 
By Frances Treice, of Bury St. 
Edmunds, he had eight illegitimate 
children. 

: This Robert Rushbrooke was the son of 
Barham Rushbrooke. The present 
Rushbrooke family apparently assert 
that Michael, of Rushbrooke, had 
by a second marriage a son, Henry, 
from whom they descend (see 
Burke's L. G. " Rushbrookes, of 
Rushbrook "), but this would leave 
unaccounted for the fact that the 
manor went to a daughter, who 
carried it into the Jermyn family. 
It is far more probable that Henry 
was a younger brother of Michael. 
The course of descent of the 
Rushbrookes from Henry is as 
follows : He had two sons, Thomas 
and John ; John had a son, Hugo, 
who by Maud his wife was the father 
of Sir William Rushbrooke, living 
34 Edw. III. His will is dated 
8 Rich. II., and it was proved I7th 
Dec. 1383. He married Joan, 
daughter of Walter Weller, of 
Reyne Parva, co. Essex, and was 
the father of Thomas Rushbrooke, 



of Rattlesden, whose will is dated 
loth Oct. 1496, and proved at 
Bury by his wife Joan in Nov. 1497. 
He was succeeded by his son 
Andrew, and he by his son Bennet, 
of Great Barton, whose will was 
dated 8th June, 1546, and was 
proved at Bury the same year. 
His son, by Joan his wife, William, 
succeeded, and his will was proved 
at Bury in 1598, he being buried at 
Great Barton in June the same 
year. By Margery his wife he had 
a son William, whose will was 
proved at Bury, 1623. He was 
succeeded by his son Thomas, of 
Great Fakenham, who married 
Prudence, daughter of John Frost, 
and was buried at Fakenham in 
Sept. 1655. His will was proved 
in 1657 (P-C.C.). His son and 
successor, Robert, of Honington, 
married Mary, daughter of William 
Thurston, and was buried at Honing- 
ton in Sept. 1674, being succeeded 
by his son, Robert Rushbrooke, 
who by Susannah Barham was the 
father of Barham Rushbrooke, who 
married Elizabeth Edwards, of 
West owe Hall, and was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Robert Rush- 
brooke, who in 1779 married Mary 
Grubb, as above, and was the 
father of Col. Robert Rushbrooke. 



RUSHBROOKE. 337 

an arrangement was effected between Lord Bristol and the Rushbrooke 
family, whereby the latter received Rushbrooke in exchange for their estate 
in Little Saxham. 

Robert Rushbrooke was a J.P., D.L., and M.P. for the Western Division 
of the County of Suffolk. He was first elected in 1835, the period of Sir 
Robert Peel's short-lived cabinet, in conjunction with Henry Wilson, and 
again in 1837 with Mr. Logan, and at the election in 1841 was returned 
without opposition. He was strongly attached to Conservative principles, 
and deeply interested in the matter of agriculture. He had entered the 
Suffolk Militia as Captain in 1803, and in 1809 was appointed Lieut .-Col. 
Commandant of Suffolk Militia. Mr. Hervey says of him :' "He was a 
man of many accomplishments. The books bought by him show him 
to have been a scholar and a linguist. He had a turn for music, drawing, 
and acting. His special delight seems to have been in wood carving. The 
seats in Rushbrook church, which are arranged chapell wise, are all of his 
carving. An old inhabitant of Rushbrook, who once lived in service at 
the hall, has told me that he has spent half his nights at work in the church. 
But one cannot help wishing that his industry and skill had found some 
other vent. The church has not been improved by his work, and rooms at 
the hall have been dismantled to furnish him with material." Col. Rush- 
brooke died I7th June, 1845, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Robert Frederic Brownlow Rushbrooke, a major in the Scots Fusilier 
Guards, who married ist in 1844 Albinia Maria, daughter of Thomas Evans, 
of Lyminster, Sussex, which marriage was dissolved in 1853. He married 
2ndly, in 1854, Violette Emily, 2nd daughter of John Alfred Trimmer, of 
Haslemere, Surrey, and 3rdly in 1859, Eliza Catherine, daughter of W. W. 
Rav, of Boxford, and dying I4th Aug. 1870, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert Wyndham Jermyn Rushbrooke, of Rushbrooke Park, who in 
1885 married Constance Julia, eldest daughter of the Rev. John Beridge 
Sparrow, of Algarkirk Hall, co. Lincoln, and dying in 1908, left with 
other issue a son, Robert Basil \Vyndham Rushbrooke, born in 1886, who 
is the present lord of the manor. 

Rushbrooke Hall is a fine moated mansion situate on an eminence 
surrounded by a park of about 150 acres, skirted on the west by the river, 
which supplies the moat and a lake of 7 acres. It forms three sides of a 
quadrangle, the front facing south. It is said that the east wing was erected 
in the time of King John, but the west wing undoubtedly belongs to the 
Elizabethan period, and was no doubt erected by Sir Robert Jermyn. 
No further description is needed here. The hall is fully and accurately 
described, with an excellent ground plan and various views by the Rev. 
S. H. A. Hervey, in his " Rushbrooke Parish Registers " (Woodbridge, 1903), 
a work which should be in the hands of every lover of his county, if alone 
as an example of what can be achieved by a combination of learning, 
accurate investigation, and sound judgment. 

Queen Elizabeth was hospitably entertained here by Sir Robert 
Jermyn in 1578.' Views are given in the Suffolk Institute, vii. 328, 329. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a covenant 
for repairs to the manor house in 1532.* 

Lord Jermyn's almshouse comprises four tenements, occupied by three 
poor women and one poor man, and it is endowed with two annuities, or 

1 Rushbrooke, page 393. J Add. Ch. 10533. 

2 Sufi. Inst. vii. 330, 331. 

TI 



338 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

yearly rent charges, of 15. 8s. $d. and 5, some pieces of land, and the 
sum of 125, 3 per cent. Consols. The first is payable out of a house in 
St. James's Square, London, now belonging to the Marquis of Clanricarde, 
the other out of the moiety of the Manor of Thorpe Hall, in West Wrotham, 
in Norfolk, belonging to Wyrley Birch, Esq., which has not of late 
been duly received. The land is in three pieces lying in the parish of St. 
Mary, in Bury, containing together loa. 2r. I3p. ; rent 8 per annum. 
An allowance of fuel, and 2s. a week to each of the almspeople, and occasional 
supply of clothing. Another almshouse in this parish, consisting of four tene- 
ments, was erected by Sir Jermyn pavers, Bart., in or about the year 
1724, but is unendowed. The building is kept in repair by the owner of 
the Rushbrooke estate for the time being, and is occupied by poor families 
rent free. 1 

Arms of RUSHBROOKE : Sable, a fesse between three roses, Or. Of 
JERMYN : Arg. a crescent between two mullets in pale Sa ; or Sa. a 
chevron between two mullets in pale Arg. Gipps says Sa. a crescent 
between three estoyles in pale Arg. Of DAVERS : Argent, on a bend 
Gules, three martlets Or. 






'Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 740. 




STANNINGFIELD. 339 

STANNINGFIELD. 

HERE were three estates here at the time of the Survey. 
The main estate here was that held by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and formerly by n freemen. It consisted of 
ij carucates and 12 acres of land, and at the time of the 
Survey Gaurine held of the abbot 80 acres and i plough- 
teams, valued at 2os. On the abbot's demesne were 5 
bordars, 4 ploughteams, and 9 acres of meadow, and 
they might give and sell their land so that the soc and service 
should remain in the abbot's possession. The value of this estate was I2s. 
There was also a church advowson with 16 acres of free land in alms. The 
township was 8 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt lod. 
Others had holdings here.' 

The second estate was held by Ralph Baignard, and in the Confessor's 
time by Elflet, a freewoman under the Abbot of St. Edmunds. This con- 
sisted of a carucate of land, a bordar, 2 thralls, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 
and 5 acres of meadow, valued at 305. When the Survey was taken this 
estate was held through the exchange by Baignard, and there were 3 bordars 
only, i thrall and i team in demesne only, it having been reduced to half a 
team first. There was also a mill, and the whole was valued at 405. In the 
same township three freemen under Elflet by commendation held 30 acres 
of land in the abbot's soc, a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, valued 
at 55. : 

The third was held by Robert, Earl of Moretaigne, and formerly by a 
freeman under commendation to Bishop Aylmer in the soc of the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. It consisted of 60 acres of land and a ploughteam (reduced 
at the time of the Survey to half a team). The value was formerly ios., 
increased at the time of the Survey to 305., but scarcely returned so much. 
All this was delivered to Earl Brien, Robert the Earl's predecessor, as 2 
carucates and 40 acres of land. 3 

MANOR OF STANNINGFIELD HALL. 

This was the estate of Elflet, a freewoman under the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds in Saxon times, and at the time of the Survey formed part of 
the possessions of Ralph Baignard. 

The Honor of Baynard's Castle becoming forfeited in the loth year 
of Hen. I. by the treason of William Baynard, his estate, including the lands 
of his ancestor in Stanningfield, was given by the King to Robert Fitz- 
Walter, and upon the defection of William, Earl of Moreton, the fee in 
Stanningfield of his father became either immediately or at all events 
after subsequent escheats, vested in St. Edmund, half a knight's service 
being due in respect of the Baynard fee, and the same service from that of 
St. Edmund. 

Before the close of the reign of Hen. II. five suits were due to the 
Hundred in Stanningfield ; that is to say, from the lands respectively of 
Baynard, William de Coi, Aveline, Godfrey, and the socmen. William de 
Coi and Simon his brother held half a knight's fee of Robert de Presseney, 
and he was tenant of Robert de Cokefeld. 

1 Dora. ii. 3636. 3 Dom. ii. 291. 

"Dora. ii. 4156. 



340 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Belet, Richard Fitz-Saxey, Gocelin, Langlif, Fulch miles, Hereward, 
Wudard, and other socmen, held 60 acres of land and 48 acres de wara, 
rendering warpenny and other rents and services to the sheriff and the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds respectively. 

Robert de Presseney appears to have united in himself the fees of 
Baynard and of St. Edmund, in Stanningfield, and was living in 1200. 
Thomas de Presseney succeeded Robert. In 1230 Geoffrey de Felsham 
conveyed to John de Presseney 40 acres of land in Stanningfield. In 1286 
Richard Presseney held here a messuage and 60 acres of land, 2 acres of 
pasture, and 3 acres of wood, of the Abbot of St. Edmund, by the service 
of the eighth part of a knight's fee. 

Although the family of de Presseney continued owners of lands here 
in the time of King Edw. I., the whole of the Baynard fee in Stanningfield 
and Holmehale had passed from them during the preceding reign, to the 
family of de Illeigh or Illey, who also had acquired part of the lands in 
Stanningfield, holden of St. Edmund. 

In 1267 by a fine levied between Benedict de Blakeham and Edmund 
de Illeigh and Joan his wife, the manor and advowson of Stanningfield 
were granted to Benedict for his life, nevertheless, so that from the 
Feast of All Saints he should hold for 18 years without other service than 
was accustomed to be done to the lord of the fee, and after the term pay 
during his life a rent of 40, and if he died during the term his heir was to 
hold for the remainder of the term, and after his decease, and subject to 
the term, the manor and advowson were to remain to Edmund and Joan 
and her heirs. 

From the tenor of this instrument it may be presumed that Joan, wife 
of Edmund de Illeigh, was the heiress of Thomas de Presseney. 1 

It is clear that in 1286 Edmund de Illeigh was chief lord of Stanningfield, 
and held in demesne of Robert Fitz Walter as of his fee of Baynard by 
half a knight's service, and of the Abbot of St. Edmunds of his barony 
respectively, a messuage and 260 acres of land, 7 acres of meadow, 7 acres 
of pasture, 18 acres of wood, and a windmill, with right of boar and bull, 
and the villeins of the lord held 65 acres of the same fee respectively, and 
the cottagers an acre of land. The said Edmund also held the adowson 
of the church of Stanningfield, to which belonged 50 acres of land, 2 acres 
of meadow, an acre of pasture, and an acre of wood, with which the church 
had been endowed by the ancestors of Thomas de Presseney. Edmund 
de Illeigh died about 1290, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas de Illeigh, who married a wife named Agnes, and died in 1312, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Edmund de Illeigh. 

We find that this same year Sir Edmund dc Illeigh, then Edmund de 
Illeigh, son of Thomas and Alice his wife, daughter and heiress of John de 
Plumpstede, settled the Manor of Hale Hall on themselves in tail, subject 
to the dower of Agnes, widow of Thomas de Illeigh, and in 1341 this Sir 
Edmund, grandson and heir, as it is presumed, of Edmund, first-named, 
obtained free warren in his manors of Holme-hale and Stanningfield. 

In 1343 he was summoned by the Sheriff of Norfolk, among the 
knights-at-arms, to attend the King at Westminster, and in 1346 was rated 
to the aid for knighting the King's son in respect of half a knight's fee in 
Stanningfield held of John Fitz-Walter. Sir Edmund died in 1349, 

'Stiff. Inst. vol. Hi. p. 299. 



STANNINGFIELD. 341 

leaving three sons, Sir Richard, Sir Robert, and Alan ; and was buried 
with Alice his wife in the church of Hale, as appears by a brass on a grave- 
stone near the reading desk : * 

Vous que cette Tombe boies, pour les ames Edmond Illeye Chevalier, 
et Alice sa femme et les Enfans priez.' 

Sir Richard de Illeigh, the eldest son and heir, in 1359 sold his Manor 
of Stanningfield to John, afterward Sir John de Rokewode and Joan his 
wife, the advowson being then appendant to the manor. This Sir John 
was of Stoke by Nayland, and was the son and heir of Sir Robert de Roke- 
wode and Margaret, daughter of Sir Michael de Bures, son and heir of Alan 
de Rokewode by Elizabeth, sister and coheir of John de Clerebecke, in 
whose right Alan Rokewode was seised of lands in Acton in 1302. From 
the time of the purchasing of this manor in 1359 ^Y J onn de Rokewode to 
the time of Sir Robert Rookwood, who was knighted by King Jas. I. in 
1624, the descent is identical with that of the Manor of Scotland Hall, in 
Stoke by Nayland, in Babergh Hundred. In 1612 we find that the King 
demised to William Asheton two parts of this manor, the property of 
Elizabeth Rokewood, widow, a recusant. She was Elizabeth, daughter of 
Robert Tyrwytt, and widow of Ambrose Rookwode, who had been executed 
at Tyburn for participation in the Gunpowder Plot in 1605. On the death 
of Sir Robert Rookwood, who was buried in Stanningfield church loth 
June, 1679, the manor passed to his son and heir, Ambrose Rookwode, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of -- Cardwell, of Cantys, in Dunton, 
co. Essex, and dying in 1693 was buried 6th Dec. in Stanningfield church. 
The manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Rookwood, who died without 
issue, when the manor devolved upon his brother and heir, Thomas Rookwode, 
who married ist Tamworth, daughter of Sir Roger Martin, of Long Melford, 
Bart., and 2ndly Dorothy Maria, daughter of Compton Hanford, of Woollers 
Hill, in the County of Worcester. Thomas Rookwode died 2ist Aug. 
1726, and the manor passed to his only daughter and heir, Elizabeth Rook- 
wode, who 7th Jan. 1717, married John Gage, 2nd son of Sir William Gage, 
of Hengrave, Bart. He died 2oth July, 1728, and was buried at Stanning- 
field, and she died 3Oth Jan. 1759, and was buried here 5th Feb. following. 

The manor passed to Sir Thomas Rookwode Gage, of Hengrave, Bart., 
who previous to the death of Sir William Gage had used the name and arms 
of Rookwode only pursant to the conditions of a settlement executed in 
1728 of the Rookwode property by Elizabeth his mother. He married 
ist, in 1746, Lucy, daughter and heir of William Knight, of Kingerby, co. 
Line., and 2ndly in 1783 Mary, daughter and coheir of Patrick Fergus, of 
the Island of Montserrat. Sir Thomas died in 1796, and was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Sir Thomas Gage, Bart., who married ist, in 1779, 
Charlotte, daughter of Thomas Fitzherbert, of Swinnerton, co. Staff., and 
2ndly, in 1796, Charlotte, daughter of John Hook Campbell, of Bangerston, 
co. Pembroke, Lord Lyon of Scotland, and dying in 1798 the manor passed 
to his 2nd son, Robert Joseph Gage Rookwode, of Coldham Hall, who 
assumed the surname of Rookwode by virtue of the King's sign manual 
dated the I2th April, 1799. He married ist, in 1804, Mary, daughter of