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I PRESENTED TO 

I'HE ENGLISH LIBRA( 

OF THt 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIQAN 

BY 
THE PUBLISHERS. 




' ^ f I 



) 



p 



MANUAL 



ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION 



SPELLING: 



4 PULL ALPHABETICAL VOCABULAEY OP THE LANQUAQB 



UPOHITION OF ENOUSH 0BTEO£PI AKD OSTHOaEAFUYt 



RICHARD SOULE, 



williaIi a. wheeler, 

«B O* WIBITIB'* DUmOSABUa 



Boston: 

LEE AND SHEPARD. 



BUmd ux-ording to Act of CoDgraw, in the year I84t, Oy 

RlCIUIU> SoDLt, Jr , Ann WiLUAM A. Wheelbk, 

(b Ika ClKk'i Office of the Uiitrict Conit of Um DislrkI oT Mev^tiaMtft 



PREFACE. 



Tm iesign of this work is to provide a convenient 
nbanup) br consultation, whenever a doubt arises in regard 
to the pronunciation or the spelling of anj word now 
ix^mmoxJj or occasionally used in English speech, or often 
met with in modem writings ; and also to furnish a text- 
book for teaching English pronunciation and orthography 
in a more systematic and thorough manner than has here- 
tofore been possible by the use of the common spelling- 
books alone. 

So difficult is it to become thoroughly versed in either of 
these branches of learning, that an English dictionary is 
probably quite as oflen consulted to ascertain the pronun- 
ciation or the spelling of a word, as to learn its meaning. 
As works of reference for this purpose, the smaller dic- 
tionaries are oflen found to be defective in their vocabu- 
lariel^ and the larger ones are too bulky for convenient 
use. In order that this volume might contain a very full 
vocabulary, and at the same time be kept within a small 
compass, definitions have been omitted, except when they 
seemed to be required for some purpose of distinction, as 
in the case of words pronounced alike but dififerently 
spelled, or of words spelled alike but differently pro- 
nounced. 

The words which it has been thought best, as a general 

rule, to omit from the Vocabulary are all such as are obso- 
« cm) 



/f -\ ♦■ V .—•, '-'' Ok 



lete, most of those that are very rarely used, or are ex- 
clusively technical and not Anglicized, and many deriva- 
tives ending in -«r, -iih, -ly, -leit, -like, -net*, or -ship, which 
present no difficulty either of pronunciation or of Bpellinfj;. 
Most of the words compounded with the prefixes aU-, 
counter-, in-, out-, over-, tub-, guper-, ««-, uniUr-, as they 
are attended with no difficulty that is not explained unihr 
their simple forms, have also been omitted. 

The Introduction contains a description of the orgnn^ 
of speech, preliminary definitions of a few terms, and un 
account of the elenienlary sounds of the language, wilh 
a statement of the views in respect to the}<e sounds, held 
by the most eminent orthoopbts, and of the various ways 
in which they are represented by the letters of the alpha- 
bet. It also embraces, under distinct heads, a succinel 
treatment of the following topics; namely, syllables, the 
seat and the influence of the accent, the causes which 
render words liable to be tni)" pronounced or misspelled, 
compound words, prefixes, and .lyllabication. 

A marked feature of the plan is, that, though the words 
of the Vocabulary are arranged in alphabetical order, the 
more important of them are classified according to some 
prominent characteristics, eilher of pronunciation or of spi'll- 
ing, hy means of figures referring them to the sectiftis of 
the Introduction in which those characteristics are described 
and exemplified. This method of reference, so far a.* it 
relates to pronunciation, waa introduced by Nares, in his 
" Elements of Orthoepy," and has been adopted by Walker. 
Smart, Worcester, and CJoodrich. Smart remarks : " I 
have . . . copied from Walker the method of referring, 
throughout the Dictionary, to principles of pronuncia- 
tion laid down at the commencement ; I believe his Dic- 
tionary owes its reputation to the obvious excellence of this 



PREFACE. V 

plan** The attempt has not hitherto been made to apply 
the same method of reference, in a full alphabetical vocabu- 
larj of our language, to preliminary statements of the prin- 
ciples and difficulties of its orthography. It has been a 
gratifying result of such an attempt, on the part of the com- 
pilers, to find how easily the great mass of English words 
may be grouped under a comparatively few principles, and 
how readily the difficulties in the way of learning to spell 
may be overcome by classifying these difficulties and ex- 
plaining their causes. 

Particular attention has been paid to those words in re- 
gard to the pronunciation of which good authorities are 
at variance, and the method suggested and applied by 
Walker, and more completely and ingeniously carried out 
by Worcester, of exhibiting the different modes of pronun- 
ciation preferred or sanctioned by such authorities, has 
been adopted in this work. It has not been thought advisa- 
ble, however, to record the opinions upon this point of 
others beside Walker and Smart, among English orthoe- 
pists, and Webster, Worcester, and Goodrich, among 
American orthoepists. A careful examination of their 
Dictionaries has been made with reference to the purposes 
of this Manual, and no pains has been spared to report 
accurately their modes of pronunciation, wherever there is 
any essential difference, though, in a very few cases, the 
precise sound intended by them may not be adequately 
represented by the notation used, which is, in some re- 
spects, different from theirs. 

Of the English writers upon orthoepy, Walker and 
Smart are the most eminent. The authority of the for- 
mer, at the time he wrote, was very great ; and, though 
polite usage in the pronunciation of some words has since 
much changed, and though later writers have shown 

a* 



thftt he was in error on sevend points, etill hla opin- 
ion in regard to the proper mode of pronotincing modl 
words, founded, aa it was, upon an attentive studj of 
the analogiee of the language, ia too valuable to be alto- 
gether neglected. Smart is one of the most recent writers 
upon this subject, and, by general consent, is rogarded as 
the highest single authority, at the present day, upon Eng- 
lish orthoepy and Englbh usage in the matter of pro- 
nunciation. 

Of American writers who have g^vea a careful attention 
to the subject of pronunciation, Dr. Webster stands Bret in 
point of time, and probably first, also, as regards the ex- 
tent to which the influence of authority upon this subject 
has prevailed in the United Slates, if we may judge from 
the lai^e circulation in this country of his Dictionary and 
his Spelling-book. But it is to be observed that both these 
works have been subjected to considerable revision by their 
editors, since Dr. Webster's death, in 1843, with respect 
both to pronunciation and to orthography. In order, there- 
fore, to ascertain the mode in which Dr. Webster himself 
pronounced word.^, the compilers of thi» Manual have exam- 
ined very carefully the edition of his Dictionary published 
iu 1841, which was the lost issued during hie lifetime. To 
this was appended, in 1843, shortly after the author's death, 
a Supplement of new words, which was prepared by his 
own hand, and which has accordingly been examined with 
the same objecL By comparing this edition with that of 
1859, edited by Dr. Goodrich, the changes of pronunciation 
introduced by the latter have been determined. They 
were made, according to the statement of Dr. Goodrich in 
reply to a letter addressed to him on the subject, in con- 
5)rmity with Dr. Webster's known principles, and in con- 
cuttMion with his son, Mr. William G. Webster, who had 



PREFACE. ^11 

been associated with him in his literary labors. ^' We sup- 
posed ourselves," says Dr. Gk>odrieh, " to be well acquaint- 
ed with ih^ principles on which he would have wished such 
a revision to be conducted. . . . It is matter of mere 
conjecture how far he might have been satisfied with each 
individual alteration. I am not certain he would have 
rejected any of them. I am sure he would have embraced 
nearly all, had he lived to understand the progress of the 
public mind as we have endeavored to do in his behalf. A 
dictionary, from the nature of the case, is a progressive 
thing. As the language is in a state of slow but continual 
progress, the volume that records it must &om time to 
time undergo corresponding changes." 

As it is chiefly the editions edited with eminent ability 
by Dr. Goodrich that are now much used or circulated, 
and that are regarded by the public as Webster's Diction- 
aries, it has not been deemed important to record pronun- 
ciations which, though originally adopted by Dr. Webster, 
were subsequently altered by his editor, with the view of 
conforming, as nearly as could be judged, to the principles 
by which the author himself would have been guided. 
Whenever, therefore, the name of Webster is given as an 
authority for pronunciation, it is accompanied with that of 
Groodrich, to show that the latter made no change ; and 
whenever that of Groodrich is unaccompanied with that 
of Webster, it is to be inferred either that Dr. Goodrich 
introduced a change which he supposed Dr Webster would 
have sanctioned, or that the word in question was added by 
the editor. It is to be observed that the pronunciation of 
some words, as noted in the abridged Dictionaries of the 
series edited by Dr. Goodrich, does not correspond* with 
that of the same words, as noted in the unabridged edition 
of 1859 ; but this, being the most recent and the most 



important work of the series, ha.s been laken as the stand- 
ard of reference. 

To Dr. Worcester, tJie other disiinguished American 
authority quoted for pronunciation, is justly awarded the 
praise of having bestowed gre^t care upon this subject, and 
of having given the results of his extensive research in ii 
condensed and simple form, well adapted lo make them in- 
telligible and useful. His method of exhibiting the opin- 
ions of various orthoepists about words of disputed pro- 
nunciation is particularly valuable, as it enables an inquiicj- 
to select, without the labor of looking into many volumts, 
that mode of pronouncing any of these words which seems 
to be Busl^ned by the greatest weight of authority. An 
English writer, Mr. Alexander J. Ellis, who has himself 
made the subject of orthoepy a special study, truly remarks 
of what Dr. Worcester has contributed to this department 
of learning, that it is " deserving of great attention." 

It should be slated that in most of the «ases in which the 
name of Worcester appears, as quoted, to stand alone in 
support of any mode of pronunciation, his decision has ap- 
parently been influenced by the opinions of orthoepists or 
leiricographers whose names he uses as authorities, but 
which it has not been thought advisable to cite in this 

In regard lo words of various orthography there seemed 
lo be no belter rule lo follow than to record in their differ- 
ent forms all such, and only such, as are variously written 
by respectable English and American authors at the pres- 
ent day. There is not much difference of usage between 
England and the United States in the mode of spelling 
words, except in reference to a few words, mostly of 
French origm, which are still generally spelled, in Eng- 
land, with the termination our, as colour, hotiow, &c., in- 



PREFACE. IX 

Stead of or, which is now the termination given to this 
class of words ahnost universally in the United States ; 
and except, also, as respects those words in the orthog- 
raphy of which Dr. Webster made changes that have been 
extensively adopted in the United States, but which have 
not found equal favor in England. The number of words, 
however, which have a peculiar spelling in the latent 
edition of Webster's Dictionary, is comparatively small, 
amounting in all to only about two hundred and eighty.* 
In the case of about sixty of this number, the spelling found 
in the Dictionaries of Walker, Smart, and Worcester, is 
allowed as an alternative mode ; and of the rest^ about one 
hundred and seventy are derivatives of words ending in 
^ not accented on the last syllable. In regard to Webster's 
mode of spelling these words, without doubling the /!, on 
adding a syllable beginning with a vowel. Smart, Worces- 
ter, and almost all other recent lexicographers, though they 
do not consider that the prevailing usage warrants them in 
adopting this mode, agree that it is more in accordance 
with analogy than the practice by which the / is doubled. 
All the words referred to as having a peculiar spelling in 
the latest edition of Webster's Dictionary will be found 
recorded in this Manual in the same manner as other 
words are recorded in regard to the orthography of which 
there is any difference of usage, and they may be known 
by the abbreviations for the names of Webster and Good- 
rich which follow them. 

The proper mode of joining the constituent parts of 
compound words is a subject necessary to be considered, in 
connection with that of spelling, in a complete and system- 
atic exhibition of the principles of English orthography. 
This difficult subject has received special attention in this 
work. It has not been deemed advisable, however, to swell 



X PREFACE. 

the Vocabulary with words of this clasn, which may be 
coined aknost at will, and which exist, unregistered, by 
hundreds or thousands, in books of every description. 
Were the Grerman method of writing compound words, 
without the hyphen, uniformly followed in our own lan- 
guage, such words would have no peculiar claim to be con- 
sidered at all in a manual of orthography ; but, as we com- 
pound words, sometimes with, and sometimes without, the 
hyphen, it is a matter of no small difficulty to know when 
to use this connecting mark, and when to omit it The 
statement, in the Introduction, of a few simple rules of 
extensive application, and deduced from the best sources by 
a careful examination and comparison of authorities, has 
rendered it unnecessary to insert the greater number of 
compound words, while the exceptional cases, which are 
comparatively few, are entered in their proper alphabetical 
places. A few compounds of regular formation and very 
common occurrence have been retained for the purpose of 
illustrating the rules, in conformity with the general plan. 

In this part of the work, and in what relates to the 
mode of joining prefixes, and to the principles of syllabi- 
cation, — topics also concisely treated of as connected with 
orthography, — much assistance has been derived from 
Mr. John Wilson's valuable " Treatise on English Punc- 
tuation,'' in which the usage of the best writers of the pres- 
ent day, as ascertained by the ample observation of a prac- 
tical printer and corrector of the press, is fully and clearly 
set forth. 

It will, perhaps, be sufficiently obvious, without much ex- 
planation, how the present work may be used as a text-book 
for teaching English pronunciation and spelling. All the 
principles and all the difficulties which relate to either are 
stated, in distinct sections, in the Introduction, with illus- 



PREFACE. Zi 

trative examples. In order that pupils may make extended 
lists of such examples, and thus classify the more impor- 
tant words of the language for special studj, according to 
their analogies of pronunciation or of orthography, these 
words in the Vocabulary are referred to the group to which 
they belong by having figures affixed corresponding to the 
figures prefixed to the section in which some characteristic 
of this group is treated of. In many cases, a word is thus 
distinguished by more than one numerical reference, for the 
reason that it has characteristics which ally it with differ- 
ent groups. 

After pupils have become familiar, by careful study, 
with the principles contained in the earlier portions of the 
Introduction relating to the elementary sounds and the 
modes of representing them, and to the influence of accent 
on the vowel sounds, their attention may be called to what 
relates to pronunciation in Parts VL and YII., or to what 
pertains to spelling in Parts YIII. and IX., as may be 
thought best In either case, the mode of study recom- 
mended is, that, at first, the pupils should take up a single 
section at a time, either in its order or otherwise, as the 
teacher may direct, and, after committing it to memory, or 
reading it so attentively as to be able to repeat the sub- 
stance of it, should turn to certain pages of the Vocabula- 
ry assigned for each exercise, and selecting there, by the 
aid of the figures corresponding to this section, the illus- 
trative words, eopy them on a slate or on paper. 

In the lists copied for pronunciation, the accents and all 
other diacritical marks should be omitted, and the pupils 
should be required to pronounce the words from the lists 
by inspection merely of the forms which they ordinarily 
have in books. The lists copied for spelling are to serve 
the purpose, primarily, of training the eye to determine 



die correct orthographical forms of worda i but, in order to 
impress these forms more distinctlj on the memory, the 
words should also be given out bj the teacher, either from 
the copied lists or from the Vocabulary itself, to be spelled 
orally. The words that are particularly difiicalt to spell, 
and which the teacher, thp-tfore, would do well to assign 
most frequently for special attention, are those referred to 
by the figures 162, 169, 170, and 171. The classes of words 
referred to hy the figures 160 and 161 will be especially 
useful in esemplifyiug the different modes in which the 
elementary souuds are represented by the letters of the 
alphabet. 

Occasionally, the pupila may he separately called upon 
to copy words upon the blackboard to be used in a gener- 
al exercise for the whole class or the whole school. The 
teacher, for example, may direct a pupil to copy upon the 
blackboard such words as may be found in any assigned 
portion of the Vocabulary having the reference figures 
153, that is to say, words which afford examples of unau- 
thorized or vulgar pronunciations. When the list is fin- 
ished, this pupil, or any other, may be required to point out 
what errors are apt to he made in pronouncing these 
words. To take another example, some of the words 
distinguished by the numerical reference I5a, as being of 
disputed pronunciation, may be advant^eously copied in 
the same way, and made the subject of remark as to which 
mode is to be preferred. As an example of a similar ex- 
ercise in spelling, the teacher may call out, or dictate, from 
the Vocabulary some of the words having the reference 
figures 171, as among those particularly difficult to spell, 
and any pupil, or several pupils in turn or aimullaneously, 
may be required to write them down as they are uttered. 

By this method of studying pronunciation and orthogra- 



" / 



PREFACE. XiU 

phj, besides the advantage arising from the interest which 
the pupils will take in preparing lists of words for them- 
selves, — thus making, in fact, their own Spelling-book, — 
they will also have the benefit of practice in writing them, 
which, so far as spelling is concerned, is the only sure way 
of becoming skilful in this difficult art. And it should not 
be forgotten that it is for the purpose of writing, chiefly, that 
spelling needs to be made a part of education. In order 
to insure a repetition of this practice, and to awaken anew 
the interest and attention of the pupils, it will be well to 
lay aside or to erase the lists, after they have once served 
the purpose of recitation, and to recur, at intervals, to the 
same exercise under each of the sections, or under such of 
them as relate to matters of the most importance. 

The mode of study may be varied by taking up certain 
words which have figures affixed, and occasionally, also, 
some of those which are not so distinguished, and by condd- 
ering them in reference to the several principles or points 
which they exemplify. For an examination of the pupils 
in order to test their knowledge of the subjects treated of 
in the Introduction, this method will perhaps be found to 
be the best. The teacher may accomplish the same ob- 
ject by writing words upon the blackboard, and requiring 
the pupils to refer each of them to the group or groups to 
which it belongs. 

The sections in Parts X., XI., and XIL, on Compound 
Words, Prefixes, and Syllabication, should be carefully 
read, and questions should be put to the pupils from time to 
time in regard to them, — though it has not been thought 
advisable to multiply references to these sections. Only a 
few compound words have been inserted, these having been 
selected, as before stated, merely for the sake of illustra^ 
tion. The matter of syllabication, it is obvious, may be 



amplj exemplified b^ the words found on any page of the 
Vocabulary. 

In the Table of Contents, a pretty full analysis of ihe 
seTeral sections of the Introduction is given, not only to 
serve the purpose of an index, but to aasbt teachers in 
framing questions suitable to be put to their pupils in ref- 
erence to the various matters treated of. Discretion must 
be used as to which of these should receive the most at- 
tention, or which maj be most fitly studied by any dasH 
of pupils. The anatomical structure of the vocal organs, 
for example, need not be dwelt upon any farther than a 
natural curiosity prompts inquiry in regard to it. These 
oi^ans are described, not in the belief that the processes of 
speech will be any better performed by knowing how they 
are performed, but merely with the view of explaining, to 
those who desire the information, the wonderful mechanism 
by which the phenomena of spoken language are produced. 

A list of the principal works made u^e of in the prep- 
aration of the volume is appended to the Preface, both 
for the purpose of acknowledging indebledness to their 
authors, and of furnishing the inquirer with the means of 
verifying any of the statements made by the compilers, 
or of examining the ground oyer which they have passed. 
Brief critical notices of such of these works as may not 
be generally known are quoted, to show in what estima- 
tion Ihey are held by good judges. 

Boston, March, ISSI. 



A LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL WORKS USED IN THE 
PREPARATION OF THIS MANUAL. 



Bbll, Alex. M. A new Elucidation of the Principles of Speech 
and Elocution. 8to., pp. viii, 311. Edinburgh, 1849. 

Bell, Sir Charles. Article on the Organs of the Human Voice, 
in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society 
of London, for the year 1832. Vol. 132, pp. 299-334. 

B&owK, GooLD. The Grammar of English Grammars. 8vo., 
pp. XX, 1070. New York, 1867. 

Ellis, Alex. J. The Alphabet of Nature. Svo., pp. v, 194. 
Bath, 1844-45. 

** An excellent aoooant of the rcBearohoa of the moBt dis- 
tinguJBhed phyfllologists on the human voice and the for> 
malion of letters [sounds] is found In ElJis, The Alphabet 
of Naturtf a work fVill of accurate observations and original 
tnouffht."— Prof. Max Affiller of Oxford^ Proiwsals Tor a 
Missionary Alphabet. Appendix D. III., vol. 2 of Cher. 
Butuen^s Outlines of the rliilosophy of Universal History. 

Ellis, Alex. J. The Essentials of Phonetics. 8vo., pp. xvi, 
275. London, 1848. 

" Mr. Ellis's work. The EssentiaU of Phonetics^ [is] by 
Ikr the most complete and aocnrate of all. . . . Those who 
delight in phonetic investigations will find the subject 
almost exhausted in tills treatise. ... An invaluable work 
to those Interested in the scicntiflc part of the question." — 
Westmitister Revieto, April, XhVd. 

Ellis, Alex. J. A Plea for Phonetic Spelling, [with an Appen- 
dix showing the inconRistencies of the common or- 
thography.] 8to., pp. ix, 180. London, 1848. 

Ellis, Alex. J. English Phonetics. 12mo., pp. 16. London, 
1854. 

Ellis, Alex. J. Universal Writing and Printing with Ordinary 
Letters. 4to., pp. 22. Edinburgh and London, 1856. 

** The very able wfitings of Mr. Alexander John Ellis, on 
phonetics, have done much to enlis'hten the pablic, and to 
awaken the attention of men of sdence to the alphabet of 
sounds as a practical Question." — Richard CuU, Address 
to the Ethnological Society of London, 1664. 

(XT) 



XVi LIST OP WORKS OSED. 

Fowler, W. C. The English Language in ica Elements and 
Forms. 8vo., pp. mii, 7fi4. New York, 1867. 

OooD&lCH, C. A, A Pronouncing and D^Qning Dictionar; ot 
the EngliHh Language, abridged from Webster's 
Anerion DictioD«iy. 8vo., pp. xzir, 610. Phila- 
delphia, 1S66. 

Goodwin, D. R. The North American Review, No. CLIV. Ar- 
ticle I., pp. 1-21. Boston, ISS2. 

" A paper In the North Anierlcui Rerlew (Jan., IRK) 
when thp »unde or the Eut-llah, and In general of llie 
TeotoDlo and Peluiglo UngiiBfreB, are thoTouehly and nd- 
entlBfJiUy treated."— Pmf. f7J. Child, Arivcrtl»™i«H la 
the iofwad American edJtIon or Latham't filementarj Knj^- 
llBb Ununmar. 

Obat, Henrt. Analomj, Descriptive and Surgical. Svo., pp. 
IX»ii. 7S0. London, 1858. 

Udht, Jambb. A Manual of the Philosophjr of Voice and Speech- 
12mo., pp. ivi, 422. London, 1859. 

JiKiruoN, James. Lessons in Orthocp)'. 16mo.. pp. 6S, 1856. 

Prinlrd tar use In Harvnrd rolleef, but not puhll>hi-d. 

except lu Iht> farm of an Inlroduclluu to HlllacdV lleadiTh. 

LaTKAM, R. O. A Handbook of the English Language. 12nio., 
pp. xiiv, 398. London, 1851. 

"The . . . part ... on the Phonolo^ of the Enellih 
UngiinEe in a mo"[ •alualile, at.d. In BOme rvtirmuis, ■ hl^-lily 
orMniil.eontrJbution to IIilB branch of Enelieh grammatical 
ielcnoc." — liev. Dr. D. R. Ooodwin. 

HcLLBB, J. Elements of Phfsiolog]', translated from the Oerman. 
by William Baly. 2 vols. Svo. Vol. L, pp. 848 : 
Vol. n., pp. 889, 

Phralooicai. SociETT. pTOceedtngs for 18G0-S1, and 1861-52. 
Svo. London, 1864. 

QnAiR, JoNBS, and Wii.son, W. J. E. A Series of Anatomical 
Plates. Third Edition, Revised, with Additional 
Notes, by Joseph Pancoaat, M. D. 4to. Five 
Parts, pp. 92, 101, 100, 88, 64. Philadelphia, 1S4S. 

RttiH, Jamu. The Philosophy of the Buman Voice, (fifth edition, 
enlai^ed.) 8vn., pp. Ut, 677. Philadelphia, 18S9. 

" For the advanee which has been made lu clocattonar? 
■clpncc In modem tlmen, wc are Indphted to I1i<' naefnl 
labors of Steele, Odell, Walker, Tholivell. Chapman. Bmarl, 
and Jliah, especially to the last, who ban done mucji to piT- 
l^cl what wae brtma by othem, and whose ' Philosophy 
nr thp Hiiin.n Vnlne ' rantslns a more minute and satis&e- 
•objiTt than la to be found In any other 



UST OF WORKS VSEB. XVli 

AvHBLL, WiLLUV. Orthophony, or the CultiTntion of the Voice 
in Elocution. [With a Supplement on Puritf of 
Tone, by O. J. Webb.J 12mo., pp. 300. Boston, 
1855. 

Smart, B. H. A Practicsl Onunmar of Engli^sh Pronunciation. 
8vo., pp. XV, 397. London, 1810. 

Smart, B. U. Walker's Pronouncing Dictioiiaiy of the Eiiglieh 
Language, adapted to the present state of Litera- 
ture and Science. Fifth Edition. 8vo., pp. ciiTiii, 
792. London, 1857. 

filuxT, B. H. Pronouncing Dictionary of the English Language 
Epitomized, (second edition, revised.) lOmo., pp. 
xxxi, eS4. London, 1846. 

Smxrt thnn illadei to tils owa qnallfloitlonB for (Kllttng * 
PronooDCiug- Dlellooarj of llie KngllHh Luigusei; : " I pre- 
tend to reBect the oral naage or£Bi-lteh, nucG hi [I li at 
pmeiiI[1HM]unoiig the Bcneible uidwell-educKied In tbe 

the ion of a Ixmrioncr, nurt Lve llii-crneBrlj nil my life hi 
LoadoD. Mr earlj dart ncrv spent In nn-niirlnii toT a Itt- 
entj prort^H^lnn ; and a ' rrnclicnl Grammxr o? Kngllnb 

erldenoe or the length of time during vlJebmj altentlon 
bu b«n Sxcd OB the suUcM-t In tIcw. It hu been said thft 
the Ciuntplc of pronunt-Lition should be taken not exelu. 
■tTelrfrom thOK whomovi'only in thchlglieBtdrFlei,nor 
ret Crom tboH who devote hII their limi' to teaming. I 

teaeher of the Kagllsii liitig<iii;.i' aiid Ulerature, 1 ban bim 
ailmttted into aomc of thellrxl rBmllies of the kingdom ; iiii 
one partial to bouki, I have eome much Into contact «llh 
booki»h men ; wlule, ■■ a niiWIp H.»iLpf an.l Iprtiinr. I hav 
been obhgcd to fashion 
or the day. Thu> prep 

Here that my opinion _, 

who seek the opinion of another to regulate their pro- 

SrvsKEix, WiLiiAii. The Elementary Sounds of the Engliah 

Language and their ClassiGcationa. 12ino., pp. 23. 

CarmBTthen, IBSO. 
Stbabns, Ediv. J. A Practical Guide to English Pronunciation. 

12mo., pp. lux, 65. Boston, 1857. * 

Stoddakt, Sib John. Glossology, or the Historical RelatioDs of 

Idnguagea. Svo.,pp.387. London and GlaBgow,18£S. 
ToBV, ROBBHT B. The Cycloptedia of Anatomy and Phyfioloffv. 

4 vols. Sva. London, 1839-1853 ; and Supplement: 

I vol. London, 1859. 



XVIU LIST OP WORKS USED. 

Todd, Robert Bentlet, and Bowman, William. The Physio- 
logical Anatomy and Physiology, of Man. 2 vols. 
8vo. Vol. I., pp. xv, 448 ; Vol. II., pp. xxiv, 660. 
London, 1866. 

Walker, John. A Critical and Pronouncing Expositor of the 
English Language. 4to., Introduction, pp. 87, Vo- 
cabulary, pp. 263. Fourth Edition. London, 1806. 

49* This edition of Walker's Diotionary was the last that 
was published during his lifetime. 

Walker, John. A Rhyming Dictionary, ... in which the 
whole Language is arranged according to its Termi- 
nations. (A New and Revised Edition.) 12mo., pp. 
xxiv, 684. London, 1851. 

Webster, Noah. An American Dictionary of the English 
Language. 2 vols. 8vo. Vol. I., pp. Ixxvi, 938 ; 
VoL n., pp. 1004. Nsw Haven, 1841. 

Webster, Noah. The same, [vrith a Supplement by the author, 
first published in 1843, after his decease.] 2 vols. 
8vo. Vol. I., pp. Ixxvi, 944 ; Vol. II., pp. 1020. 
Springfield, 1845. 

Webster, Noah. The same, revised and enlarged, by Chauncey 
A. Goodrich. (Pictorial Edition.) 4to., pp. ccxxxvi, 
1512. Springfield, 1859. 

Willis, Robert. Article on the Mechanism of the Larynx in the 
Transactions of the Cambridge Philosophical Society 
for the year 1829. Vol. IV., pp. 313-352. 

** We strongly recommend any one who wishes to under- 
stand the operation of the muscles of the larynx, and the 
production of vocal sound by the glottis, to read Professor 
Willises paper with great attenUon." — Alexander John 
EUiSt Essentials of Phonetics. 

Wilson, Erasmus. A System of Iluman Anatomy, General and 
Special. Fourth American, from the last London 
Edition. Edited by Paul B. Goddard. 8vo., pp. 
xxiv, 576. Philadelphia, 1857. 

Wilson, J'ohn. A Treatise on English Punctuation. 12mo., pp. 
xii, 334. Boston, 1855. 

"We have a beantifhl mono^aph on Punctuation, by 
John Wilson rBoflton, 1850). It is thorougfh, so as to em- 
brace his whole topic, and critical, so as io exclude what 
does not belong there." — Prof. J, W. Oibbs. 

Worcester, Joseph £. A Dictionary of the English Language. 
4to., pp. Ixviii, 1786. Boston, 1860. 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTION. 



I. DESCBIPTIOW OF THE ORGANS OP SPEECH, AND - Page. 
PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS, 1 to U 

f 1. Of what Speech oonglsts, 1 

( 2^ OrgftiiB of Speech ; Lungs ; Trachea, • . . . . 1 

Thyroid Gland ; Larynx, 2 

Cricoid Cartilage ; Thyroid Cartilage ; Adam's- Apple, 3 

Thjrro-hyoid Membrane ; Epiglottis, 4 

Arytenoid Cartilages; Cuneiform Cartilages; Thyro-aryte- 

noid Ligaments, or Vocal Chords, 5 

False Vocal Chords ; True Vocal Chords ; Ventricles of the 

Larynx ; Laryngeal Pouch 6 

Glottis ; Extrinsic and Intrinsic Muscles, 7 

Posterior and Lateral Crioo-arytenoid Muscles; Arytenoide- 

us Muscle; Crioo-thyroid and Thyro-arytenoid Muscles, 8 

Pharynx; Mouth; Palate; Urula; Arches of Palate, 9 

Tonsils ; Tongue ; Hyoid Bone ; Nasal Passages, 10 

f 3. Definition of Whisper^ 10 

(4. Definition of Voice^ 10 

S 5. Definition of Vowel Sound, 11 

(6. Definition of Compound Vowel Sound, or Diphthong, 11 

f 7. Definition of Consonant Sound, 11 

f8. Definition of Z>i^TapA, 11 

(9. Definition of Elementary Sound, ii 

n. ELEMENTARY SOUNDS, 12 to 35 

Table of Elementary Sounds, 12 

Rbuarks on tub Elementary Soundp, 13 to 36 

1. Simple Vowel SoundB. 

i 10. (1) Sound of a in and (short a), 13 

§11. (2) Sound of a in /ixr (Italian a) 14 

Note. — Cases in which a has, and those in which it has not, 

thin sound, before r, 14 

1 12. (3) Sound of a in fagt (intermediate a), 14 

1 13. (4) Sound of e in m« (long e), 15 

1 14. (5) Sound of e in there, 15 

fl5. (6) Sound of e in fAen (short e), 15 

(16. (7) Sound of i in i;; (short Oi 15 



CONTENTS. 

1 17. (8) Soand of o In orb (of aw in awl^ of a in faUt brotd a, or 

German a), . . . 16 

§18. (9) Soand ofo in on (abort o), 10 

Note. — Sound of o before /, «, th, n, ng, in the aame ayUabie, 16 

i 19. (10) Sound of oo in food, 16 

§20. (11) Sound of oo in foot, 17 

§21. (12) Sound of « in urn (tbe no/tcrcU vat0e/)» 17 

Note. — Sound of e, ea, t, and y before r in oertain caaea, ... 17 

(22. (13) Sound of 1* in up (abort tt), 18 

2. Oompound Vowel Sounds. 

(23. (14) Sound of a in (Oe (long a), 18 

§24. (15) Sound of o in o^d (long o) 18 

(25. (16) Sound of < inltffM (long ft), 19 

(26. (17) Sound of 1* in tMe, cude (long tt), 19 

(27. (18) Sound of oft' in oiZ, 20 

(28. (19) Sound of ott in cmno«< 21 

Note A.— Organic Relation of tbe Vowela to each other, . . 21 

3. Aspirate Bound. 

( 29. (20) Sound of ^ in hornet 22 

4. Ck>n8onant Bounds. 

(30. (21) Sound of p inpet, . 22 

(31. (22) Sound of 6 in 2>e<, 22 

(32. (23) Sound of m in man, 22 

(33. (24) Sound of toft in tchen, 22 

( 34. (25) Sound of w in tren, 23 

(36. (26) Sound of / in /fee/, 24 

( 36. (27) Sound of v in vealt 24 

(37. (28) Sound of th in tJUn, 24 

(38. (29) Sound of <ft in this, 24 

( 39. (30) Sound of 8 in seal, 24 

Note. — Sound of s preceded by that of it, repreaented In some 

words by 0?, 24 

(40. (31) Sound of « in Mol, 24 

Note. — Sound of e preceded by that of g, represented in 

some words by a;, ^. 26 

(41. (32) Sound of t in tale, 26 

(42. (33) Sound of d in da/e, 26 

( 43. (34) Sound of n in name, 25 

(44. (35) Sound of ch in church, 26 

Note 1. — Substitution of the sound of ch for the sounds of 

t and consonant p, in some words, 26 

Note 2. — The digraph ch after I or n sounded by Walker as «ft, 26 

(46. (36) Sound of i In iiw<, ."^^^ .... 26 

Note. — Substitution of the sound of J for the sounds of d 

and consonant y, in some words, 26 

(46. (37) Sound of ift in shaU, • V 



CONTENTS. XXi 

NOTB 1. ~ Sound of »h preceded by that of ir, represented in 

■ome words by j:, 27 

Note 2.— Substitution of the sound of tft for the sounds of^ 

9 and consonant y, in many words, 27 

S 47. (38) Sound of z in ostire, 27 

Note. — Substitution of the sound of ^A, In English words, for 

the sounds of « and consonant y, 27 

1 48. (99) Sound of r in roamt florid (trilled r, or rougph r), . . . . 28 

f 49. (40) Sound of r in nor, tort (untrillcd r, or smooth r), . . . . 28 
Note. — English mode of sounding r between two Towels, the 

first of which is long ; as in aeriouSy piraUt iory, /Ury, , . 21) 

$50. (41) Sound of I in low, 29 

f51. (42) Sound of y in ye«, t 90 

Note. ~ Sound of consonant y heard, in an aspirated form, be- 
fore long u preceded by A, 30 

f 52. (43) Sound of i: in i-iU, 31 

Note. — Sound of k followed by that of s sometimes repre- 
sented by X, 31 

$ 53. (44) Sound of g in go (hard g), 32 

1 54. (46) Sound of ng in ntig^ 32 

Note l. — Opinion of Webster and Goodrich as to the sound 

of ni;, 32 

Note 2. — Sound of n in such words as longer, stronger, Ac, 32 

Note B. ~ Classifications of the Consonants, 33 

Table showing these Classifications, 34 

Seuark 1. — Liquid (Consonants, «,m,n,r 34 

Remark 2.— Explosive Consonants, p, 6, <. d, k, g, termed 

mutes, ^ 

Remark 3. — The Ck)nsonant8 1, r- (rough;, -r (smooth), m, n, 

ng, all vocal only, in English Speech, 34 

Note C — RelaUon of Aspirate and Vocal Consonants, ... 34 

III. NUMBER OF SOUNDS REPRESENTED BY THE SEV- 
ERAL LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET, OR BY COM- 
BINATIONS OF THESE LETTERS, 35 

156. Nnmber of Vowel Sounds represented by the Letters a, e, i, 

o,u,y, , . • • • • ^ 

166. Number of Vowel Sounds represented by the Combhied Let- 
ters a, ai, ao, au, aw, awe, ay, aye, ea, eau, ee, ei, eo, eoi, eu, 
ev, ewe, ey, eye, ie, ieu, lew, oa, oe, a, cm, oi, oo, ou, ow, owe, 

oy,va,uay,ue,ui,uy,ye,yew,you,yu, 35,36 

Remark The Digraphs ay, ey, oy, uy, merely final forms of 

ai,ei,oi,ui, ^ 

§57. Single Sound represented by the Aspirate Letter h, ' 36 

f 58. Number of Consonant Sounds represented by the Letters b, 

e,d,/,g,j,k,l,m,n,p,q,r,8,t,v,w,x,y,z, . 3» 

§59. Number of Consonant Sounds represented by the Combined 



{ 



XXll CONTENTS. 



Letter! bb, ce, cA, ei, ck, cq, dd, dg^ di^ff^ gg^ ghy khi U, mm, 
nn, ng, ph, pp, rr, «c, «cA, «ct, «6, «A, si, M, <cA, th, ti, wh, ti, 

zz, 36 

Remark. — One letter of a Digraph, in mtaxj cases, to be con- 
sidered as signifloant of its Sound, while the other is silent ; 
in some oases, both Letters Jointly represent its Sound, . . 37 

Note D.— Effect of certain Letters which have no Sound in 
themselves, 37 



\ 



IV. SYLLABLES, '-iS 

i 60. Of what a Syllabic consists, 38 

$ 61. One Vowel So^d or one Liquid Sound, at least, in a Syllable. 38 

$ 62. An Aspirate Sound cannot, alone, form a Syllabic, 38 

$ 63. Two Vowel Sounds not forming a Diphthong cannot occur in 

the same Syllabic «... 38 

i 64. Consonant Sounds in a Syllable arranged according to an in- 
variable Law, 38 

§ 66. The closest contact or the smallest opening of the Organs of 

Speech, a point of separation between Syllables, 38 

Note. — Exception to this Kule, 38 

$ 66. Half of a Consonant Sound between two Vowels belongs to 

one Syllable, and half to the other, 39 

Note. — Only one contact of the Organs of Speech in such a 
case, though the final and initial Effects arc sometimes sep- 
arated, 39 

1 67. Distinction in the Pronunciation of such Words as pair, payer, 

hire, higher, &c., 39 

Note.— General Principle to be observed in such Cases, ... 39 

V. INFLUENCE OF ACCENT ON THE VOWEL SOUNDS, . 40 

$ 68. Primary and Secondary Accent, 40 

$ 69. Vowel Sounds sometimes indistinct in certain Particles, ... 40 
$ 70. Distinctness or Indistinctness of Vowel Sounds in Unaccent- 
ed Syllables, . 40 

§ 71. Sounds of the Vowels in Unaccented Syllables best learned 

by the Ear 41 

A in an Unaooented Syllable. 

1 72. Sound of a when final ; its Sound when not final ; its Sound 

when followed by h, 41 

§73. Soundofain the Final Syllabicate, 41 

f 74. Sound of a in the Final Syllable ar, 42 

E in an Unaooented Syllable. 

§ 76. Sound of e when final and not silent, 42 

§76. Sound of e in a Syllable ending in a Consonant, 42 

577. Sound of c in the Final SyUable er 42 



CONTENTS. XXili 

I in an ITnaooented Syllable. 

S 78. Sound of < when final, and Immediatelf following an Accent- 
ed Syllable, 42 

§79. Sound of i when final, and immediately preceding an Ac- 
cented Syllable, 42 

§ SO. Sound of { in a Syllable ending in a Ck>n8onant, 42 

§ 81. Sound of i in the l-'mal Syllable ile, 42 

f82. Sound of • in the Final Syllable {ne, 42 

f83. Sound of i in the Final Syllable tte, 43 

S»4. Sound of s in the Final Syllabic tve, 43 

§85. Sound of »' in the Fhial Syllable <r, 43 

O in an ITnaocented Syllable. 

1 86. Sound of o when final ; its sound when not final, ^3 

§ 87. Sound of o in the I^^nal Syllable offue^ 43 

§88. Sound of o in the Final Syllable or, 43 

U in an Unaocented Syllable. 

$80. Sound of i* when final, 43 

1 00. Sound of u before any Consonant except r, in a Syllable end- 
ing with silent «, ."* 44 

$91. Sound of u before r in a Syllable ending with silent e, . . . . 44 

§92. Sound of tt in the Final SyUable ur, 44 

Y In an Unaccented Syllable. 

S 03. Sound of y except in the Final Syllable of Verbs, 44 

$94. Sound of y in the Final Syllable of Verbs, 44 

S96. Sound of y in the Final Syllable yr, 46 

AI in an Unaccented Syllable. 

S 00. Sound of the Digraph ai in an Unaccented Syllable, 46 

EI in an Unaocented Syllable. 

§ 97. Sound of the Digraph e« in an Unaccented Syllable, ..... 45 

£7 in an Unaccented Syllable. 

§98. Sound of the Digraph ey in an Unaccented Syllable, 46 

IE in an Unaccented Syllable. 

§ 00. Sound of the IMgraph <e in an Unaccented Syllable, 45 

OU in an Unaccented Syllable. 

S 100. Sound of the Digraph ou in an Unaccented Syllable, .... 45 

O'W in an Unaocented Syllable. 

§ 101. Sound of the Digraph oto in an Unaccented Syllable, .... 46 

VI. SEAT OF THE ACCENT, id 

f 102. Seat of the Accent governed by General Laws, 4« 



J 



XXIV CONTENTS. 



103. Seat of the Accent in Words of two Syllables, 46 

104. Seat of the Accent in Verbs ending in en, er, ishy om, ont op, 

ry,le, ^ 46 

106. Seat of the Accent generally on the Antepenult, in VTords 

of more than two Syllables, 46 

106^ Derivatives generally follow the Accent of their Primitives, 47 

107. Accentuation sometimes determined by Ease of Utterance, . 47 
106. Words of certain terminations having the Accent on the An- 
tepenult, 47 

109. Words of certain terminations having the Accent on the Pe- 

nult, 48 

110. Seat of the Accent in Words ending in e-an, 48 

111. Seat of the Accent in Words ending in e-um, 48 

112. Words the last Syllable of which begins with the Sound of 

shf zh, or y, accented on the Penult, 9i 

113. Seat of the Accent in many Words from the Classical Lan- 

guages, 40 

114. Seat of the Accent in many Words from the French, .... 40 

115. Accent transferred when Words are used antithetically, . . 60 
110. Effect of the Secondary Accent, and the Mode of determin- 
ing its Place, 49 

117. Interval which separates the Primary and Secondary Accents, 40 

118. Primary Accent placed upon Prefixes or Sufllxes when 

Words are used antithetically, 60 

119. Primary and Secondary Accents change places when Words 

are used antitlietically with respect to a Syllable, 60 



VII 



CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MISPRONOUNCED, 50. 

120. Attention to be directed to particular Classes of Words, . . 50 

121. Some Nouns and Adjectives accented on the Second Syllable, 50 

122. Many Words of three or more Syllables not accented on the 

Ant(>penult, 50 

123. Some Derivatives not accented like their Primitives, .... 51 

124. Words of the ^ame Spelling but of different Meanings and 

Accentuation, 61 

126. Words from the Classical Languages which retain their 

original Accent, 61 

126. Secondary Accent sometimes used when it should not be, 

and sometimes improperly made to change places with the 

Primary, 51 

127. One Vowel Sound sometimes substituted for another, ... 51 

128. The Vowel «, or the Digraph ew, sometimes improperly 

sounded, 51 

129. An affected Pronunciation sometimes given to e, <, and ea be- 

fore r, 61 

130. The Sound of long o improiierly shortened in some Words, . 61 

131. Words in which a is sounded as in fast t 52 

132. Bounds of Vowels sometimes improperly suppressed, ... 62 



CONTENTS. XXV 

i 183. Sonnd of short u improperly interposed between m and 2, f , 

OT th, 62 

f 134. Sound of t somettmcs Improperly changed into that of dk, 
and the Sonnd of d sometimee improperly changed into 

that of J, ^ 52 

f 136. Errors with respect to pronouncing smooth r, 52 

§ 136. Errors in pronouncing s ; cases in which f has the Sound of «, 52 

§ 137. Errors in pronouncing x ; General Rule, 52 

§ 138. Words in which g is hard before e, <, or y, 53 

§ 139. Words in which h is silent, and those in which it is sounded, 54 

§ 140. Words in which th has its Aspirate or its Vocal Sound, . . 54 

§ 141. Some Consonant Sounds apt to be confounded, 54 

§ 142. Consonant Sounds sometimes improperly omitted, ..... 55 
§ 143. Dcrivativ^es in which a short Vowel answers to a long one in 

the Primitive, 55 

§ 144. Two Syllables sometimes improperly blended, 55 

§ 146. Words sometimes divided into too many Syllables, .... 55 

§ 146. Sound of Consonant y wrongly interposed in some Words, . 55 

§ 147. Words of the same Spelling, but of different Pronunciation, 55 

§ 148. Words nearly alike in Spelling, but differently pronounced, 55 

§ 149. Words ending in c/, en, il, in, an, 55 

f 150. Words ending in ed, and Words formed by adding ly or nes$ 

to this Termination, 55 

§ 161. Words in which final i is long, and those in which it is 

short, 5S 

§ 162. Words ending in tie, ine, Ue, 66 

f 163. Vulgar Errors, or unauthorized Modes of Pronunciation, . 66 

§ 154. Pronunciation of Foreign Words, 57 

§ 155 Words of disputed Pronunciation, 67 

f 156. Words especially liable to be mispronounced, 57 

Vin. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MISSPELLED, . 68 

f 167. Difficulties in Spelling, result fW>m various Causes, 68 

§158. Several Letters or Combinations of -Letters represent the 

same Sound 68 

§ 160. The same Letter or Combinations of Letters used to repre- 
sent different Sounds 58 

f 160. Words pronounced alike, but differently spelled, 58 

§161. Words spelled alike, but differently pronounced, 58 

§ 162. Words in which silent Consonants occur, 69 

§103. Finale; its usual effect ; exceptions, 59 

§ 164. Words ending in ble, de, die, fie, gle, kle, pie, tie, zle, re, . . fiO 

§ 166. Words ending in e<2, 60 

§ 166. The Vowel e silent in the termination ea, 61 

§ 167. The Vowels e, i, o, silent before n, and e, i, silent before /, . 61 

§ IflS. The Digraph tee silent in some Words, 61 

§ 109. Classes of Words that, fbr sx>ecial reasons, are difficult to 

spell, 61 





XXVI CONTENTS. 

Note. — Rnle for obvlatiiig the difflcultf of epelliiig words In 
which the sound of long e is represented by ei or ie, ... 62 

S 170. Words difficult to spell on account of the different Modes of 
representing a Consonant Sound between two Vowel 
Sounds, 02 

§ 171. Words peculiarly difflcnlt to spell, 02 

IX. BULES FOR SPELLING CERTAIN CLASSES OF WORDS, 63 

§ 172. (1) Words at the end of which I is doubled, 63 

§ 173. (2) Words at the end of which/ is doubled, G3 

f 174. (3) Words at the end of which 8 is doubled, 63 

§ 175. (4) Words at the end of which b, d, g, m, n, r, f , or z, is 

doubled, 63. 

§ 176. (5) Coses in which the Final Consonant of a Primitive Word 
is to be doubled on adding a Syllable beginning with a 
Vowel, 65 

§ 177. (0) Exceptions to the Rule for doubling the Final Consonant 

in Derivatives, 64 

9 178. (7) Derivatives formed by adding a SylUible to Words that 
end in a Double Consonant ; exceptions in such Deriv- 
atives ftt>m Primitives ending in //, 64 

f 179. (8) Derivatives formed by prefixing a Syllable to words that 
end in a Double Consonant \ exceptions in such Deriv- 
atives IVom Primitives ending inU^ 65 

§ 180. (9) Compound Words generally retain all the Letters used 

in the simple Words that compose them ; exceptions, 65 

§ 181. ( 10) Sound of k generally represented by ek at the end of 

Monosyllables ; exceptions, 66 

§ 182. (11) The letter k inserted after c in most Monosyllables, . 66 

§ 183. ( 12) Silent final e omitted in Derivatives formed by adding 
a Syllable beginning with a Vowel, except in certain 
cases, 66 

§ 184. (13) Formation of the Present Participles of Verbs that end 

ini^, 6C 

§ 185. (14) Silent final e retained in Derivatives formed by adding 
a Syllable beg^innlng with a Consonant, except in cer- 
tain cases, OTi 

§ 186. (15) The final y of a, Primitive, when preceded by a Conso- 
nant, generally changed into i on adding any termina- 
tion except one beginning with <; exceptions, .... CfCt 

§ 187. (16) The final y of a Primitive, when preceded by a Vowel, 
unchanged, in most cases, on adding any termination -, 
exceptions, Cu 

§ 188. (17) Letter or Letters representing a Vowel Sound at the end 
of a Word generally retained on adding a Syllable be- 
ginning with a Vowel, 67 

§ 189. (18) Regular Formation of the Plural of Nouns, 07 

§ 190. (19) Plural of Nouns ending in y preceded by a Consonant, 07 



CONTENTS. XXVU 

f 191. (20) Pland of Nouib ending in i, 67 

§ 192. (21) Plural of Nouns ending in o, 68 

§198. (22) Plural of Nouns ending In/ or /e, 68 

§ IM. (23) Plural of brother, die, pea, penny, formed in two wafs, 68 
§ 196. (24) Plural of child^ foot, goose, louse, man, mouse, ox, tooth, 

vfoman, 68 

fi 196. (25) Plural of Words ending in man, 68 

§ 197. (26) Plural of Compounds consisting of a Noun and an Ad- 
jective, , 69 

fi 198. (27) Plural of Nouns from Foreign Languages, 60 

fi 199. (28) Words ending in or, or our, 00 

fi 200. (29) Words of two or more Syllables ending in <c, 09 

fi 201. (.30) Words variously written with the Prefix en or in, ... 00 

fi2Q2. (31) Verbs ending in i^re or i«e, 69 

§ 203. (32) Words in the Spelling of which usage is divided, .... 70 

Note E.~ Peculiar Modes of Spelling in Webster's Dictionary, 70 

X. COMPOUND WORDS 72 to 75 

fi 201. Of what a (impound Word consists, 72 

Bales for writing Compound "WordB. 

fi 206. I. H]rphen used when both parts are accented, 72 

EXCEPTIONS. 

1. Compounds beginning with the prepositions over, under, . 72 

2. A few common Compounds, 72 

3. Compounds terminating in monger, 72 

fi 206. n. Hyphen not used when only one part is accented, .... 72 

EXCEPTIONS. 

1. Compounds in which the first part ends with the same Let- 

ter or Digraph as that with which the second begins, . . 72 

2. Compounds of which the first part ends, and the second be- 

gins, with a Vowel, 72 

S. Compounds, the Meaning or the Pronunciation of which 

would be obscured if the parts were written continuously, 72 

4. Compounds formed of a Verb with an Adverb, a Preposi- 

tion, or a Noun ; end Compounds ending in book, or tree, 72 

5. O>mpound Ac^octlves, 72 

'Words which are, and Words which ore not, Compounds. 

fi 207. Difficulty of determining whether Words form a Compound 

or not, 73 

fi 206. How two Words are written when they are in apposition ; 

exception, 73 

fi 200. How two Nouns are written when they are not in apposi- 
tion, or when the first may be placed after the second with 

a pseposition interrening, 73 



XWlll CONTENTS. 

f 2ia How two NoanB are written when both are accented, and 
when the first is used a4}cctivcly to denote the substanoe 
of which the thing designated by the second is made, ... 73 

§ 211. How two Nouns are written when the first takes the place of 

an Adjective, 74 

S 212. How two Words are written when both are nsed acUectively, 74 

( 213. How two Nouns are written when the first is in the posees- 

sivc case, though no idea of Property is conveyed, .... 74 

f 214. How two nouns are written when the first is in the posses- 
sive case, both being used literally, and only one acocnt<Ml, 74 

f 215. How two Words are written when the first ia a Verb, and 

both Jointly convey the idea of a single Noun, 74 

§ 216. How an Adjective and a Noun are written, when used Joint- 
ly to convey the idea of a single Noun, or of a single Ad- 
jective, 74 

f 217. How to write two Numerals ; a Numeral followed by /bld^ 
penny t or pence ; Fractional Terms, and Expressions in 
which hnffj quarter, &c., are used, 76 

§ 218. How to write Epithets formed of an Adverb ending in ly, and 

a Past Participle, 75 

§ 219. How to write an Adverb and a Participle, or a Preposition 

and a Parti liplc, when placed after a Noun, 76 

f 220. How to write Words that form a Phrase or Idiomatic Ex- 
pression, 75 

§ 221. Precise rules for all cases impossible ; General Bule of Goold 

Brown, 75 

il. PREFIXES, 76 

§ 222. How to write a Prefix when it ends with a different Letter 

ft-om that with which the Radical Word begins, 76 

Note. — Exceptions in the cases of the Prefixes ex and rie«, . 76 
f 223. How to write a Prefix when it ends, and the Radical Word 

begins, with a Vowel, 76 

Note.— Disercsis sometimes used ; Prefixes bi and tri excepted, 76 
f 224. How to write a prefix when it ends with the same Consonant 
as that with which the Radical Word begins ; and, also, 
Prefixes of rare oconrrenoe, 76 

Xn. SYLLABICATION, 76 to 79 

§225. What constitutes a Syllable, 76 

f 226. Definition of syllabication ; Importance of a practical ac- 
quaintance with this subject, 76 

Bules for Syllabioation. 

§ 227. (1) How to separate Compound Words at the end of a line, 77 
( 228. (2) Prefixes, Suffixes, rnd Grammatical Terminationa, to be 

separated from the Radical Words, in moat cases, . . 77 



CONTENTS. XXIX 

Note. — One am of this rule; Mode of scparmtiiig^ the Suflix 
of Bome Words at the End of a Line different inordinary Writ- 
ing and Printing from the Mode practised in Dictionaries, of 
separating the Syllables so as to distinguish the SufDz from 
the Boot; Mode of separating Grammatical Terminations 
when the Final Consonant of the Radical Word Is doubled, 77 
{220. (3) Two Vowels coming together, and not forming a Di- 
graph or a Diphthong, to be separated, 77 

§ 230. (4) How to separate the Syllables when two or more Conso- 
nants come between two Vowels, 78 

1 231. (5) How to separate the Syllables when a single Consonant 
or a Consonant Digraph comes between two Vowels, 

of which the first is under the Accent, 78 

Note. — Effect of the Consonant or Consonant Digraph, in 

this case, 78 

f 232. (6) How to separate the Syllables when a single Consonant 
or a Consonant Digraph comes between two Vowels, 

of which the second is under the Accent, 78 

Exception. — The letter x Joined to the former Vowel, ... 78 
f 233. (7) How to separate the Syllables when a single Consonant 
oomes between two Vowels, neither of which is under 

tiie Accent, 78 

Exceptions. — When the latter Vowel begins a termination, 
the Consonant is Joined to the former ; when e succeeds an 
accented Syllable and is followed by r, the two I<etters are 

Joined, 78 

f 234. (8) The Terminations cearii dan, cial^ &c., not to be divided, 79 
§ 236. (9) Some words not capable of being so divided at the End of 

a Line as to show their Pronunciation, 79 

f230. (10) Letters forming a Syllable not to be separated, .... 79 

Note F. — Syllabication different according to the ends pro- 
posed by it, • •.... 79 

Explanations, 80 



VOCABULARY, 83to4f,7 



i 



INTRODUCTION. 



I. DESCRIPTION OF THE ORGANS OF SPEECH. AND 
PRELIMINARY DEFINITIONS. 

f 1. Speech consists of a series of significant sounds pro- 
duced by emissions of breath, yariously modified, and in the form 
either of whisper or of yoice. 

{2. The Oboans of Speech are the hmff^, the trachea or tprnd- 
pipe^ the larynx^ the pharynx^ the moutht and the natai pataagety 
with Tarious appendages. The organs more directly concerned 
in modifying the sounds of which speech consists are the lips, the 
Umgue^ the teeth^ the hard pdUUe^ and the uvula^ which are parts 
of the mouth. 

The two Iwtffi, which are the essential organs of respiration, are 
placed one in each of the lateral cavities of the chest, separated 
from each other by the heart and the large arteries and veins con- 
nected with it. They are alternately dilated and compressed for 
the inspiration and expiration of air by the action of the dia- 
phragm and certain muscles of the ribs. 

The trachea, or windpipe, is a cartilaginous and membranous 
tube in the anterior part of the neck, extending from the lower 
part of the larynx downward about four inches to a point oppo- 
site the third dorsal vertebra, where it divides into two bronchi, 
or branches, which connect it, one with each lung. It is from 
three quarters of an inch to an inch in diameter, and is composed 
of from sixteen to twenty imperfect, elastic rings formed of car- 
tilage and fibrous membrane, one above another, and separated by 
narrow strips of membrane. The cartilaginous and cylindrical 
portion of the rings occupies about two thirds of the circumfer- 
ence in front and on the sides, and the remaining part behind ia 
nearly flat» and consists principally of fibrous membrane and a 

1 (1) 



INTRODUCTION. 



fine, Tery regular layer of muscular fibres on the outside. This 
structure enables it, while serving the purpose of an air-tube, to 
accommodate itself to the motions of the head and neck, and to 
yield, in the act of swallowing, to the distended cesophagus, ot 
gullet, which is situated behind it. The thyroid gland — so called, 
though it has no excretory duct— is a firm, vascular substance, 
lying, like a cushion, in two lobes across the upper part of the 

trachea, to which it is capable 
of being braced by four flat 
muscles that pass over its sur- 
fSetce. Its function is generally 
stated to be unknown ; but Sir 
Charles Bell supposes that it 
is designed to check the vibra- 
tions of sound, ** and so im- 
pede the motions originating 
in the larynx from being prop- 
agated downward.** The thy- 
roid gland is always larger in 
the female than in the male 
sex, and it is occasionally of 
an enormous size, constituting 
the disease called gaitre, or 
bronchocele. 

The larynx, which is the im- 
mediate seat and instrument 
of sound, is situated between 
the trachea and the base of the 
tongue. It is a complex piece 
of mechanism, resembling, in 
its general form, a kind of 
box, or an irregular hollow 
body triangular at top, but ap- 
proaching nearly to a circle at 
its junction with the trachea, 
gj,^ It is composed of nine carti- 

lages ; three single, namely, the cricoid (or ring-shaped) cartilage, 
the thyroid (or shield-shaped) carftZaye,. and the epiglottis ; and sii 
in pairs, namely, two arytenoid (or pitcher-shaped) cartilages, tw« 




PiX* H- Vront Tiew of the Larynx 
and « part of the Trachea. 

1. Epi«IoWi. — ff. lliyrotd cRrtHafP. — 
8. Cifoo-ChjTold membrane. — 4. Cricoid 
earttlage. — S. Thjrold gland. — S. Tim- 




INTRODUCTION. 



termed eomietUa JaryngU (or little horns of the larynx), and two 
eyneiform (or wedge-shaped) cartilages. 

The erieoid cartilage, situated at the base of the lar3mx, which 
it supports, is thicker and stronger than the other cartilages, and 
is in the form of a ring slightly elliptical, and considerably deeper 
at the posterior part than in front. It is connected below to the 
first ring of the trachea 
by ligaments and mucous 
membrane, and is articu- 
lated posteriorly on the 
outer sides with the thy- 
roid cartilage, and, on the 
upper margin, with the 
arjTtenoid cartUages. 

The thyroid cartilage is 
the largest of the cartilages 
composing the larynx, and 
partially embraces the cri- 
coid cartilage, with which 
it is articulated, and also 
otherwise connected by 
muscles and ligaments. It 
consists of two lateral, 
four-sided plates, or wings, 
open behind, but imited at 
an acute angle in frx)nt, 
forming a vertical ridge, 
and terminating above in 
a prominence called the 
poptum Adamif or AdaTn*8' 
apple, which is more de- 
veloped in the male than 




Fiff. ITT . Prinolpal Oartllaffea of the 
Iiarynz and upper part of the Tra- 
chea, aeen trom behind. 



. ^v # 1 r\ -^ l.Epiglottii. — 2. Thyroid cartilage. -8,8. Aryt- 

m the lemaie sex. Un its ^„old cartUagei.-4. Cricoid cartU«ge.-fi. Tra- 

four posterior angles, are ****^ 

situated four comua, or horns, two superior and two inferior. 
The superior horns, being longer than the inferior, are called 
great hom», and are connected with the bone at the base of the 
tongue (lingual bone, hyoid bone, or o» hyoides) by ligaments. 
The lateral and front portions of the upper border of the thyroid 



4 INTRO DDCnON. 

cartilage are connected with the wme bone bjr what is called the 
Ihyro-hyoid mmtbrtme. The wfeiior honu are carred forward, 
and are artieulated at their extremilies to the cricoid cartilage by 
obliqne planes directed forward and inward. The thrroid car- 
tilage overlapi the cricoid cartilage on each aide, but in front 
there ia a space between the two, otci which the erito-thyroid 
mtmbrana extendi. Tbii space na; be easilj (elt on tqiplying 
the flngei U the upper ftnd front part of the neck. 

,^.. The tpiglotti» ia a 

J':'}~~' thin, flexible plate of 
2 cartilage, having shal- 
low pita upon its nir- 
&ce, and shaped like 
a cordate lea£| with a 
broad, rounded upper 
extremity, which ia free 
to move. It is placed 
behind the tongue, to 
... 4 the bone of which it is 
connected by an elastic 
ligament, and it is at- 
tached below by a long, 
narrow ligament to the 
receding angle between 
Q the two plates of the 
thyroid cartilage. Dur- 
ing respiration, its direc- 
tion is nearly vertical, 
its free extremity curv- 
ing forward towards the 
base of the tongue, 
above which it projects ; 
I It Men but, when the btrynx 
Uiitbi^ i* drawn upward in 
V' I'liZ '''* *^ '^ swallowing, 
Thrieii the epiglottis is carried 
*""" downward and back- 
ward, so as to serve 
the purpose of a valve and completely dose the glottis, or open- 
ing of the larynx. 




71* IT. Tertlssl •■aHOQ of th* lArjnz 






0. TbTTOld gluiiL 



\ 



I INTBODncnON. 5 

Tlie two arytenoid eartUaget are situated on the pQSterior inner 
and upper margin of the cricoid cartilage in such a manner ai 
to resemble, when approximated, the mouth of a pitcher, from 
which circumstance they take their name. They are of an irreg- 
ular shape, but may be considered as having the form of a pyra- 
mid with a broad base, and presenting surfaces for the attachment 
of muscles and ligaments. The posterior surfaces are triangular, 
smooth, and concave, and give attachment to the arytenoidem 
muscle. The anterior sur&ces are somewhat convex and rough, 
and give attachment to the thyro-arytenoid muscles and to the 
•aperior, or fidse, vocal chords. The interior surfaces are nar- 
row, smooth^ and flattened, and form a part of the lateral wall of 
the larynx. Of the three oomtrt of the bases, the external one is 
abort, rounded, and prominent, and gives attachment to the pos- 
terior and lateral erieo-arytenoid muscles; and the anterior one, 
also prominent, but more pointed, gives attachment to the true 
vocal chord. The apex of each of these cartilages is pointed and 
carved backward and inward. The two small cartilages termed 
eormeula laryngis are situated on the apexes of the arytenoid car- 
tilages, with which they are sometimes united, and serve to pro- 
long them backward and inward. 

The cuneiform cttrHlages are two small, elongated bodies, placed 
one on each side in the fold of mucous membrane which extends 
from the apex of the arytenoid cartilage to the side of the epi- 
glottis. 

The cavity of the larynx is divided into two parts, with a 
narrow, oblong opening between them, by the thyro-arytenoid 
Uyttments, or tfoctd ehonbt on each side, and the thyro-arytenoid 
musdes parallel with these chords, both of which are enclosed in 
folds of mucous membrane, stretched between the sides of the 
epiglottis and the apexes of the arytenoid cartilages, and are 
attached in front to the thyroid cartilage at the angle formed by 
the meeting of its two plates, or wings, and behind to the aryte- 
noid cartilages. The form of this cavity is broad and triangular 
at top, and becomes gradually narrower downward towards the 
vocal chords, below which it becomes gradually broader and 
nearly cylindrical, its circumference coinciding below with the 
inner part of the ring of the cricoid cartilage. The vocal chords 
are in pairs on each side, one over the other. The superior 




6 nmtoDucnoH. 

chords (called Ilie fatie vocal chorda, becaiue the; are supposed 
Dot to be concerned, or to have only a subordinate part, in ILe 
pioduction of voice) are delicate, narrow, fibrous bands, enclosed 
in thick folds of the mucoua membrane, and attached, in front, to 
the receding angle of the thyroid cartilage below the epiglottia, 
and behind, to the intcrioT sur- 
face of the arytenoid cartilage. 
The inferior tocbI chords (called 
the Imc vocal chordt, because thrj 
are chiefljr concerned in the pro- 
duction of Toice by their vibra- 
tions) are two thick and strong 
fibrous bands, covered eitemally 
by a thin and delicate mucous 
membrane. They are attached, in 
£roDl, to the centre of the depres- 
sion between the two plates or 
wing; of the thyroid cartilsge, and 
behind, to the anterior angle of 
the base of the arytenoid cartilage. 
Od theii outer sides, they are con- 
nected with the thyro- arytenoid 
muscles. The lower borders of 
ItBH. the superior vocal chords have the 

tana of a crescent, and constitute the upper boundaries of the 
xtatrida of tht larynx, of which the lower boundaries are the 
•uperior straight borders of the inferior vocal chords. 

The Tentriclet of the larynx ore two oblong, oval cavities be- 
tween the superior and inforior vocal chords, extending nearly 
their entire length, one on each side, and foimed by the folding 
inward of the mucous membrane which covers them. The chief 
office of these cavities is to afford sufficient space for the vibra- 
tioas of the inferior, or true, vocal chorda. 

Each of the ventricles of the larynx leads upward on the 
outer aAs at the superior vocal chord into the taccuba laryiigia, 
or laryngeal pouch, which is a membranous sac of a conical fbrra, 
and of a variable size between this chord and the inner sur&ce of 
the thyroid cartilage. 
The narrow opening between the inferior, or true, vocal chorda 



ric. T. IDUMOT 



I. ThrfDijMrtni*^— ■ 









INTRODUCTION. 




2 
4 
6 



is called the glottis^ or ehirik of the glottis. Its length in the adult 
male is rather less than an inch, and it varies in hreadth at its 
widest part from a third of an inch to half an inch. In the female, 
these dimensions are somewhat less. The form of the aperture is 
variable. In a state of repose, 
or that of ordinary respiration, 
it is triangular, or narrower in 
front than behind, dilating some- 
what during inspiration and con- L 
tracting during expiration. In 3.. 
the act of producing voice, as ^- 
in speaking or in singing, the 
glottis is nearly closed, the true 
vocal chords being brought into 
a nearly parallel position, and 
separated only about one tenth 
of an inch by the approxima- 

tion of the anterior angles of the '* 7 J/^ ""' "f o^;t5'':r 
bases of the arytenoid cartilages 
to which they are attached. The 
breath being forced through the 
glottis when these chords are in 
this position, causes them to vi- 
brate and produce a sound, the 
pitch of which depends entirely 
upon their tension. The aperture 
between the superior, or false, vocal chords is sometimes called 
Hbe fiUse glottis. 

The mucous membrane of the larynx is continuous with that 
which lines the pharynx and mouth above, and it is prolonged 
downward through the trachea and bronchial tubes into the 
lungs. The whole apparatus of the larynx, being suspended 
loosely in front of the pharynx and the CBsophagus, may be moved 
freely up and down in the neck, approximating to, or receding 
from, the lower jaw by means of what are called the extrinsic 
muscles, while the movements of its various segments are con- 
trolled by what are called the intrinsic mtaeles. 

The intrinsic muscles are arranged symmetrically, and are 
attached to corre^'ponding points on each side of the glottis. 



Uie Larynx, the true vocal 
chords beinff nearly parallel, 
or in a position to vibrate. 

1-2. Line through the niperior or 
(alae vocal chorda and IUm glottis. — 
8-1. Line through the ventricles of the 
larynx. — 5-6. LJne through the infe- 
rior or true vocal chorda and true 
glottia. — 7, 7. Section of the thyroid 
cartilage. — 8, 8. Section of the cricoid 
cartilage. 



8 INTRODUCTION. 

Those of them which open or close the glottis, or regulate the 
tensioii of the vocal chords, are the following : the potterior 
crico-arytenoidf the lateral enco-arytenoidf the aiytenoideus, the 
crieo-thyroid, and the thyro'arytenoid. 

The two potterior crico-arytenoid mttaclet are attached to the 
posterior sur&ce of the cricoid cartilage, and passing obliquely 
upward and outward, converge to be inserted into the outer 
angles of the bases of the arytenoid cartilages. They open the 
glottis by drawing the bases of the arytenoid cartilages outward 
and backward. 

The two lateral cricO'arytenoid mttseles arise from the upper bor- 
ders of the sides of the cricoid cartilage, and passing obliquely 
upward and backward, are inserted into the outer angles of the 
bases of the arytenoid cartilages in front of the posterior crico- 
arytenoid muscles. They close the glottis by drawing the bases 
of the arytenoid cartilages inward and forward. 

The' arytenoidetu mtucle is single, though it consists of three 
planes of fibres, two oblique and one transverse. It fills up the 
posterior concave surface of the arytenoid cartilages, arising from 
the posterior surface and outer border of one of them, and being 
inserted into the corresponding parts of the other. It approx- 
imates these cartilages* and thus closes the glottis. 

The two erieo-thyroid muscles arise from the front and lateral 
parts of the cricoid cartilage, and diverging, pass obliquely up- 
ward and outward, to be inserted into the lower and inner 
borders of the thyroid cartilage from near the median line in front 
as fiir back as the inferior horns. They stretch the vocal chords 
by rotating the cricoid cartilage on the inferior horns of the 
thyroid cartilage. 

The two thyro'arytenoid muscles are broad and flat, and lie 
parallel with the outer side of the true vocal chords. They are 
attached in front to the receding angle of the thyroid cartilage, 
and passing horizontally backward and outward, are inserted 
into the bases and anterior and outer surfaces of the arytenoid 
cartilages. They approximate the anterior angles of these car- 
tilages, and thus close the glottis. According to Willis, they 
also draw the arytenoid cartilages, together with the cricoid 
cartilage, forward, and thus shorten and relax the vocal 
chords. 



INTBODUCTION. 9 

The pharynx is a kind of dilatable bag, and consists of all that 
fminel-Bhaped cavity, lined with mucous ihembrane and acted on 
by many muscles, which ia situated in front of the cervical ver- 
tebrae behind the nose, mouth, and larynx, and above the cesopha- 
gus, with which it is continuous. It is about four inches and a 
half in length, extending from the base of the skull to a point 
between the cricoid cartilage in front and the fifth cervical ver* 
tebra behind. There are seven openings communicating with it, 
namely, the two posterior nares or nostrils, the two Eustachian 
tubes (canals leading from the tympana of the ears), the mouth, 
the larynx, and the oesophagus. The pharynx exercises a con- 
siderable influence on the modulation of the voice ; and, accord- 
ing to Sir Charles Bell, it is a very important agent in the artic- 
ulation of the consonants, especially the explosive consonants. 
Being dilated at the moment when the articulating organs come 
in contact, it "is prepared," he remarks, **to give an appulse 
by its muscular action, exactly in time " with the separation of 
these organs. The guttural murmur which is heard before the 
mouth is opened to pronounce certain consonants, as 5, d, and 
ff, is due, in the opinion of this author, to the vibration of the 
vocal chords by the ascent of air from the lungs in consequence 
of the dilation of the pharynx, the nasal passages being closed 
by the soft palate. In the process of articulation, ** this smaller 
cavity [the pharynx]," he remarks, " is substituted for the larger 
cavity of the chest, to the great relief of the speaker." 

The mouth is a nearly oval-shaped cavity, bounded in front by 
the lips ; laterally by the internal surface of the cheeks ; above 
by the hard palate and the teeth of the upper jaw ; below by the 
tongue, by the mucous membrane stretched between the lower 
Buxfiice of the tongue and the inner surface of the lower jaw, and 
by the teeth of this jaw ; and behind by the toft palate^ which is 
a movable fold of mucous membrane containing muscular fibres 
and glands suspended from the posterior border of the hard palate 
between the mouth and the pharynx. Hanging from the middle 
of its lower border, is a small, rounded process called the uvula. 
Passing outward from the uvula, on each side are two curved 
folds of the mucous membrane called the arches of the palate, or 
the piUart of the palate. The anterior arches run downward and 
forward from the base of the uvula to the sides of the base of the 



10 INTRODUCTION. 

tongue. The posterior arches approach nearer to each other, are 
longer than the anterior, and run downward and backward from 
the base of the uvula to the sides of the pharynx. In the tri- 
angular intervals between the arches of the palate are situated the 
tonsiU, one on each side. These are glandular organs, varying in 
size in different individuals. When enlarged firom inflammation, 
they give to the voice a peculiar nasal tone. 

The tongtte, being chiefly composed of muscular fibres, and 
having a thin, flexible tip and a large, fleshy root, is capable of 
taking a great variety of positions and shapes. It is connected 
by muscles to the soft palate, to the hyoid bone, and to the 
lower jaw. It is also connected by the mucous membrane with 
the soft palate, as well as with the epiglottis and the pharynx. 

The lingual bone, or bone at the base of the tongue, — called 
also the os hyoidea, or hyoid bone, on account of its resemblance 
to the Greek letter v, — consists of a bony arch, with a curvature 
nearly approaching a parabola, convex in front and concave be- 
hind. Situated in an almost horizontal position behind, and 
rather below, the lower jaw, it performs the triple office of a 
basis of the tongue, a point of support to the larynx, and a ful- 
crum by which the contractions of the intrinsic muscles of the 
tongue and the larynx may be impressed on these organs. It is 
not immediately joined to any other bone, but the muscles and 
lif^aments which converge to it from different directions effectually 
prevent its displacement. Being thus suspended between the 
tongue and the larynx, it impresses on each the movement of the 
other, and is the medium by which these two organs are so inti- 
mately associated. 

The naaal passages consist of several channels among the bones 
of the head in front, terminating externally in the anterior sores, 
or nostrils, and internally in the posterior nares, or nostrils, which 
are two nearly oval apertures opening into the pharynx, and 
capable of being closed by the soft palate. 

{3, Whispeb is the soimd, or series of sounds, produced by 
an emission of breath through the larynx, when the vocal chords 
are relaxed, or in snch a position that they will not vibrate. 

{ 4. VoicR is the sound, or series of sounds, produced by an 
emission of breath through the larynx, when the vocal chords are 
tense, or in a position very nearly parallel to each other, so as lo 
be made to vibrate. 



INTRODUCTION. 1\ 

{ 6« A TOWEL BOUND is a sound produced by an unobstructed 
utterance of the breath (as in whispering), or of the voice (as in 
speaking aloud), more or less modified by the position of the 
tongue, the soft palate, and the lips, or by the motions of the 
lower jaw in yarying the cayity of the mouth. The letter which 
represents such a sound is called a vowel ; but this term is some- 
times applied to the sound itself. 

} 6. A COMPOUND TOWEL SOUND, Or DIPHTHONG, CODSlstS of 

two simple Towel sounds connected by a glide, or continuous 
emission of the breath or the voice, while the organs of speech 
are rapidly changing from their position in forming the first to 
that necessary for forming the second. 

§ 7. A CONSONANT SOUND is a 8ound produced by the partia? 
or the total obstruction of the breath or the voice, on passing 
through the mouth or the nose, by the contact or the approxi- 
mation of two of the organs of speech, as the two lips (b, toh, m), 
the lower lip and the upper teeth (/, r), the tip of the tongue 
and the upper teeth (M as in thirit th as in this), the tip of the 
tongue and the hard palate (ah, zh), the back of the tongue and 
the soft palate (g, ng) \. or it is a sound produced by an utterance 
of the breath at the moment of separating two of these organs 
(A, p, t). The letter which represents such a sound, and some- 
times the sound itself, is called a consonatvt (from the Latin con^ 
tonana, meaning literally sounding ioith), a name probably sug- 
gested by the fact that a vowel sound is usually joined with a 
consonant sound in forming syllables, though not meant to im- 
ply^ as some writers seem to have supposed, that no consonant 
sound can be uttered without being joined with a vowel soimd. 

§ 8. A Dio&APH is a combination of two letters to represent 
a single sound ; as, «a in fear, ei in vein, ow in alow, oh in church, 
th in thin, this, ng in thing, 

§ 9. An ELEMENTABY BOUND, or element of speech, is a sound 
which is, in itB nature, essentially simple, or which cannot be 
shown to conaifft of any other Bounds. 



12 



INTRODUCTION. 



n. ELEMENTARY SOUNDS. 



The following is a Table of the Elementary Soimda of the 
English Language, with the letters or characters used in this 
work to indicate them : — 



1. Simple Vowel Sounds. 

1. Sound of a in and, indicated by d . . 

2. 

3. 

4. 

6. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10 
11. 
12: 
13. 



" a 

•• a 

" 

" 

" e 

" t 

«• o 

t* o 



" /or, 

" fast, 
•« me, 

** there, 
" then. 



tt 
«< 
«( 

«« 



" d (before r, by a) 

" d 

" * 

" « 

"I 

** orb, (or a in aU) aw, d (before r, by o) 

" on, 
00 " food, 
•• 00 " foot, 
** u •' Mr», 
*• u " ifp, " " ft 



(« 



«< 
i« 
It 
•I 



" 00 



** So 

•• tth (before r, b/ m) . 



2. Compound Vowel Sounds. 
14. Sotitid of a in ale^ indicated by A . . 



16. 


ti 




" 


o«, •« 




d . . 


16. 


«( 




i " 


time, " 




{ . . 


17. 


(1 




u «• 


u«e, cude, 




ft, or yoo 


18. 


!• 




oi " 


o»/, " 




oi, or oy 


19. 


I( 




ou " 


ounce, " 




ou, OT ow 



3. Aspirate Sound. 
20. Sound of A in home, indicated by h 



§ 10 
§11 
i 12 
\ 13 
\ 14 
I 15 
§ 16 
§17 
§ 18 
§ 19 
§20 
§21 
§22 



§23 
§24 
§ 25 
§ 26 
§27 
§28 



§ 29 



4. Consonant Sounds. 

21. Sound of /> in pet, indicated by p ......§ 30 

22. " " b " bet, " •• 6 § 31 

23. '• •» m " man, " " m § 32 

24. •* *• tch •• when, " «' irA § 33 

25. " " w ** wen, •* " w § 84 



INTBODUCnON. 13 

26. Sound of/ in /»0^ indicated by / } 35 

27. " •* V " veal, " •• r § 36 

23, t* .. th «• Min, «• " M § 37 

29. " " th " this, " " M § 38 

30. " •♦ 8 *< seal, «• " « § 39 

31. " " z " geal, " «• « § 40 

32. " " t " taie, " " « § 41 

33. " " d " dbZ9, " " rf § 42 

34. •« " n " fkzfn^, «« •• n § 46 

35. " •• ch *« churtht «• " cA § 44 

36. " •• J " Ju8t, «• " > § 45 

37. «♦ " 9h " <Aatf, «« •* «A $46 

38. «• •• t " ozuTtf, «« *♦ M § 47 

39. " " r " roam, florid, " r § 48 

40. " «« r " «or, jort, " r § 49 

41. " " / " hw, •« " / § 50 

42. «• ** y " yet, •* •• y § 51 

43. " " * •• kiU, «* ** k } 52 

44. " " g " go, " •• ^(before#,f,ory,by^A) § 53 

45. " •• ng " sing, " ** ng {54 

Remabks on the Elementabt Sounds. 

In the follo^wlng remarks, the elementary sounds are treated 
in the order in which they are giyen in the Table, and the modes 
in which they are represented in the established system of orthog- 
raphy, as they occur in monosyllables or in accented syllables, 
are illustrated by examples. ^ 

1. Simple Vowel Sounds. 

{ 10. (1.) The soimd of a in and (short a, marked d). 

This sound, which is peculiarly English, is commonly reckoned 
the short form of a in far (No. 2, { 11), differing from it only 
in duration ; but between these two sounds, as Bell remarks, 
"there is a great organic difference," the tongue being raised 
higher for the former than for the latter. Smart says of a in 
and, that " it differs in quality as well as in quantity both from 
a [in ale] and a [in far]. It is much nearer the latter than the 
fimner/' According to Ellis, the long, or protracted, sound of 

2 



14 INTRODUCTION. 

this element occurs as a provincialism in the west of England, in 
Ireland, and in New England. — See No. 6, § 14. 

It is represented by a, and also by ai {^plaid), -^ See {11, Notb. 

§ 11. (2.) The sound of a in far (the Italian a, marked d). 

This sound is represented by a before h in the same syllahle 
(oA), and before r (car, cart, martyr), except in the cases men- 
tioned in the Note ; also by au (aunt), ea (h«art), and %uk (guard). 
— See § 72. 

NoTS. — The Yowel a reprcsentn the sound of a in far before r in a 
monosyllable or an aoccntcd syllable of some words, and in their deriv- 
atives (as in star^ star'Ty^ tar, tar'ry, de-bar*t de-bar*ring) ; but when a 
comes before r in an accented syllable of a word not a derivative, and is 
followed by a syllable commencing with another r or with a vowel, it 
has its short sound (as in tnar'ry, ar'id). 

{ 12. (3.) The sound of a in fast (intermediate a, marked a). 
There is a class of words, mostly monosyllables, ending in 
aff, aft, ass, ast, ask, asp, with a few ending in €ince and a»it, 
(as staff, graft, glass, fast, btisk, grasp, dance, chant) in the pro- 
nunciation of which good usage, both in England and in America, 
is fieir from being uniform, some speakers giving them the long, 
full sound of a in far (No. 2, { 1 1), while others — including 
most of the ortho/»pists — pronounce them with the extreme short 
sound of a in and (No. 1, § 10). According to Smart, as stated 
by Goodrich, the sound of a in and is, in such words, ** at 
present [1856] the pronunciation of well-educated London people 
under sixty-five or sixty years of age." Ellis, however, main- 
tains that " it is usual," in such words, «• to pronounce the clear 
vowel ah,** not only in London, but throughout the sooth of 
England, and that the sound of short a is ** seldom or never 
heard" instead of it. This conclusion he arrived at, he say<, 
•• after many observations on the pronimciation of different speak- 
ers, instituted solely with a view of discovering whether this wns 
or was not the case." Bell remarks ; " The extreme pronuncia- 
tions [a in and, and a in far] are, af the present day [1849], com- 
paratively seldom heard. The precise quality of the prevailing 
intermediate sound cannot be correctly noted ; for it ranges 
among different speakers through every practicable shade within 
these limits." The orthoCpists Fulton and Knight regard this 
intermediate sound as a shortened form of the Italian a (No. 2, 



INTRODUCTION. 15 

(11), and Worcestet and Goodrich adopt substantially the same 
view. 

This sound is always represented by a, as in the class of words 
above 'mentioned («to/f, grcut, danee, &c.). 

i 13. (4.) The sound of in m« (long e, marked e). 

This sound is represented by e and also by a (C<esar), ea (seal), 
et (see), ei (s^tze), eo (people), ey (ktf^), % (ravine), ie (field), a 
(f«tu8), uay (quay). — See No. 7, § 16. 

§ 14. (5.) The sound of e in there (marked i). 

This sound is heard, in English, only before that of r (No. 
40, \ 49) in the same syllable, and it is considered by Walker, 
Smart, and most orthoCpists, to be the same as that of long a 
(No. 14, § 23). Worcester characterizes it as the sound of long 
a " qualified by being followed by the letter r." But Bell and 
Spurrell regard it as a lengthened form of short e (No. 6, § 15). 
The former remarks: <*An ear unaccustomed to analyze vocal 
souncb may possibly, at first, fiiil to recognize the same vowel 
formation in the words eU, ere^ air, heir, arising from its com- 
bination in the [three] latter words with the open r" (No. 40, 
{ 49) ; <* but close observation and careful experiment will satisfy 
the demurring ear of the correctness of our classification." Rus- 
sell describes the sound in question as *< approaching to the e in 
end," and Smart, though he maintains its identity with that of 
long a, approves, according to the statement of Goodrich, the 
mode of obtaining it by ** prolonging our short e before r." It is 
a common practice in some parts of the United States to substi- 
tute for the true sound of the first e in there a protracted sound 
of a in and (No. 1, } 10) ; but this pronunciation is countenanced 
by no good authority. 

This sound is represented by e, and also by a (fore), at (air), 
aye (prayer, in the sense of a petition), ea (bear), and ei (heir). 

} 16. (6.) The sound of e in then (short e, marked i). 

This sound is merely a shortened form of the first e in there 
(No. 6, § 14). 

It is represented by e, and also by a (any), a (diuresis), at 
(sat'd), ay (says), ea (head), ei (heifer), eo (leopard), ie (friend), 
or (asafiFtida), u (bury), and tie (guest). 

i 16. (7.) The Boimd of i in ill (short i, marked I). 

This sound has been considered by many writers to be an ex- 



1 



16 INTRODUCTION. 

tremely shortened form oi e m me (No. 4, f 13) ; but by Rush, 
Bell, Ellis, and Goodrich, it is regarded as a distinct element. 
Bell remarks: **The shortest utterance of e [in me] will be a 
distinctly different sound from this [short t]. . . . Ther^is no 
longer form of this yowel [I] in English, than that of the word 
hinge; but the prolongation of the sound is, of course, quite 
practicable. . . . The tendency of all vowels la to open in pro- 
longation ; but * short t ' is more open than #, and would not, 
therefore, naturally be lengthened into e. On the contrary, if 
any person, guided by his ears, and not by preconceived classifi- 
cations, strive to lengthen the generally short vowel t, as in 
ruion, him, iU^ &c., he will find that the tendency of the pro- 
longed sound will be towards a [in cUe] rather than e [in me]. 
This may be well tested by singing the words to long notes." 
Ellis notices the fact ** that almost all English orthoCpists, as 
Walker, Smart; and Worcester, confoimd [long] and [short] i, 
in unaccented syllables." 

This sound is represented by t, and also by e (pretty), eau 
(beaufin), ee (been), ie (sieve), o (women), u (busy), ui (guilt), and 
y (myth). 

§ 17. (8.) The sound of o in or5 (or of oto in atolf or of a in 
fall, called broad a, or German a, marked d). 

This sound is represented by o (before r), and also by a (fall), 
ao (extraordinary), au (haul), ato (atel), atoe (awe), eo (georgic), 
oa (broad), and ou (ought). 

§ 18. (9.) The sound of in on (short 0, marked 0). 

This sound is the shortened form of o in orb (No. 8, } 17). 

It is represented by 0, and also by a (wash), ou (cough), and 010 
(knowledge). 

Note. — According to the marking of most orthocplsts, this short 
sound of o occurs before the sound of /, 9, or th in the same syllable 
(as in off, cough, soft, cross, cost, broth), though some authorities give to 
o in this situation its broad sound of o in orb (the same as that of mo 
in awl. No. 8, % 17). In regard to the pronunciation of words of this 
class, Smart remarks that ** a medium between the extremes is the prac- 
tice of the best speakers." Worcester observes that "this sound [S] 
is somewhat prolonged also in gone and begone, and in some words end- 
ing in ng, as, long, along, prong, song, strong ^ thong, throng, wrong,** 

i 19. (10.) The sound of 00 in food. 

This sound is represented by 00, and also by eu (rhetmiatism), 



INTEODUCTION. 17 

ew (brew), e (do), oe (shoe), ceu (manomyre), ou (Mtip), u (rule), 
ue {true), and ui (fru?t) ; the digraphs eu, etc, ue, and ui, having 
this sound when that of r immediately precedes them, and the 
▼owel u having this sound when it is immediately preceded hy that 
of r, and followed hy a consonant and a silent e final, or when it 
is immediately preceded by the sotind of ah («ure). 

§ 20. (11*) The sound of oo in foot (marked oo). 

This sound is the shortened form of oo in food (No. 10, { 19). 

It is represented by oo, and also by o (wolf), ou (could), and 
u (f«ll). 

§ 21. (12.) The sound of u in urn (called the ruUurcU vowel). 

This sound is heard only before that of amooth r (No. 40, { 49). 
By most orthofipists it ia not distinguished from the sound of u 
in 19) (No. 13, § 22). 

It is represented by «, and also by o (work), and ou (journal) ; 
the vowel u having this sound before r in a monosyllable or an 
accented syllable of some words and in their derivatives (as in 
fur, fwr'ry, in-cva', in-cur'rin^) ; but when u comes before r in an 
accented syllable of a word not a derivative, and is followed by 
another r, in the next syllable, it has its short sound ; as in eur'ry^ 
huHry, 

Note. — Acoording to the oommoii prmctioe In the United States, the 
sound of u in urn is represented also in monosyllables, and in accented 
syllables, before r (when not occurring before another r, In a word not 
a derivative, as In mer*rff, or before a vowel, in the next syllable, as 
in mer'tO, by e (trtin, sn-'vant, defer', de-fcr'ring), by ea (earth, «ir'ly), 
by i (girl, trk'Bome, stir'ring), and by y (myrrh, myr'tle). But the best 
English speakers give a somewhat different sound to the vowels e, I, 
and y, and the digraph ea, when they occur before r, as stated above. 
Sheridan, Walker, Knowlcs, and some other writers, erroneously identify 
this peculiar English sound with that of e in tlum (No. 6, $ 15). Good- 
rich considers it as intermccliate between the sound of e in then, and that 
of « in up (No. 13, i 22), or rather of u in urn (No. 12, § 21), which is 
merely a lengthened quantity of u in up. " In a correct pronunciation,'* 
he says, ^* the organs are placed in a position for forming the short e, and 
then open instantly (as the sound begins to form) into the short u [or the 
n In ftm], thus making (as Smart observes) * a compromise between tht 
two.'** Smart speaks of this peculiarity of English pronunciation as 
a delicacy which prevails only in the more refined classes of society. 
*' Even in these classes,** he says, " tur, duri, burd, &c., are the current 
pronunciation of Hr, dirt, bird, Ac. ; and, hideed, in all very common 
words it would be somewhat affected to insist on the delicacy rclbrred 
to.** «*lt is only very careful speakers,** says Ellis, "who make this 

2» 



18 INTRODUCrnON. 

distlnctioii ; ud only a very tmall minority of those who do make It at 
all, keep up the distinction in unaccented Byllables." In the ophiion of 
Worcester, ** there is little or no difference '* in the vowel sounds of auch 
words as her, §am, Jlr, /Ur, myrrh ; and Spnrrell says that " the distinc- 
tion, if any, la so alight that writen of the beat authority diaregard it."— 
See No. 40, $ 40. 

{ 22. (13.) The sound of ti in t^y (short «, marked ft). 
This sound is the shortened form of u in urn (No. 12, § 21). 
It is represented by w, and also by o (son), oe (does), oo (blood), 
and ou (touch). — See { 21. 

S. Ck)mpomid Vowel Sounds. 

{ 23, (14.) The sound of a in aiSs (long a, marked d). 

This sound is generally regarded by English orthoepists as a 
■imple element ; but Rush, Smart, Goodrich, Bell, Spurrell, and 
some other writers regard it as ending in a brief sound of in me 
(No. 4, § 13). Spurrell, moreover, considers its initial or radical 
part to be the sound of the first e in there (No. 6, \ 14). Bell 
remarks that the omission of the " vanishing sound " of ^ is "a 
marked provincialism, and is one of the leading features of the 
Scottish dialect." .Ellis, on the contrary, asserts that the addition 
of this vanishing sound ** is a peculiarly English mispronuncia- 
tion," and maintains that the vowel should be ** kept pure " ; 
though he admits that ** it is very common to let it glide almost 
imperceptibly into the distinctive vowel e ." 

This sound is represented by a, and also by at (atm), ao (gaol)« 
au (gauge), ay (day), aye (aye), ea (great), « (veil), and ey (they). 

i 24. (15.) The sound of o mold (long o, marked 6), 

This sound is regarded by some writers as simple, by others as 
ending in a slight sound of 00 in food (No. 10, { 19). The former 
view is that taken by Walker, Ellis, and most other writers ; the 
latter that adopted by Rush, Smart, Bell, Russell, Spurrell, Good- 
rich, and others. Ellis allows that the sound of o is often made 
to taper off into that of 00, but this practice he characterizes as an 
error. Bell, on the other hand, remarks that *< with less or more 
distinctness, its compound quality should be heard in every com- 
bination, in careful reading." Smart and Goodrich observe that 
the final 00 sound is omitted in imaccented syllables; asino-pin'ion, 
to-bac'co, fellow. 

It is a very common practice, in the United States, to shorten 



INTRODUCTION. 19 

the sound of long o in some worda, chiefly, if not ezcluBiyely, the 
following : boat, bobter, boU^ bone, both, broke, broken, choke, c/ioo^ 
eloee (the adjective), coach, coat, colt, comb, dolt, holster, home, homely, 
hope, jolt, load, molten, mouU, only, open, poultice, road, rode, rogue, 
smoke, spoke, spoken, stone, throat, toad, uphot^erer, whole, whoUy, 
wholesome, wrote. The effect thus produced is due, in the opinion 
of Goodrich, to the omission of the brief sound of oo, which 
should properly be preserved. The shortening of long o in the 
words here enumerated, is contrary to English usage, and is not 
sanctioned by any orthoepist. 

This sound is represented by o, and also by au (hautboy), 
eau (beau), eo (yAiman), ew (8«to), oa (oak), oe (£00), 00 (brooch), 
OM (soul), ow (snmr), owe (owe). 

i 26. (16.) The sound of i in time (long t, marked i). 

With regard to the composition of this sound, considerable 
difference of opinion exists. Some vrriters, as Smart, consider it 
to be compounded of « in urn (No. 12, } 21) and em me (No. 4, 
{ 13). Ellis resolves it into a in an«; (No. 1, i 10) and t in itf 
(No. 7, i 16). But Walker, Bell, and most other orthoepists 
maintain that it is composed of a in far (No. 2, § 11) and in fn« 
(No. 4, § 13). 

It is represented by i, and also by at (atsle), ei (hm'ght), ey 
(eying), eye (eye), ie (Ue), ui (gutde), uy (buy), y (by), and 
ye (rye). 

i 26. (17.) The sotmd of u in use, cube (long u, marked €), 

All orthoepists, except Webster, agree that this sound termi- 
nates in the sound of 00 in Jbod (No. 10, § 19), and a majority 
of them agree that, when it begins a word or a syllable, its initial 
element is the sound of consonant y, being equivalent, in that 
case, to the syllable yoo. As to its composition when it follows a 
consonant in the same syllable, there is a difference of opinion, 
some writers, as Smart, Bell, and Goodrich, considering that its 
initial element remains, as before, the sound of consonant y slightly 
uttered, and others, as Walker and Spurrell, that it is rather the 
sound of long e. The former orthoCpists, however, admit that 
the initial element y is heard less distinctly after some consonants, 
as J and / (Jew, lute), than after others, as e and m (cube, mute). 
Smart describes the sound which is properly heard as the initial 
element of long « after J and /, as ** a slight semi-consonar ymad 



20 INTRODUCTION. 

[noted in his Dictionary by an apostrophe ( ' )] between I [short- 
ened quantity of €] and y consonant, — a sound so short and 
slight as to be lost altogether in the mouth of an unpolished 
speaker, who says loot,joo, &c., for Foottfoo, &c/* ** On the other 
hand," he adds, *< there are persons who, to distinguish them- 
selves from the vulgar, pronounce y consonant distinctly on the 
occasions which call for this slighter sound. ... To say lutef 
la'cidf lu'natic, with the u as perfect [i. e. with the consonant 
element y as distinct] as in cUbe, eH^bic, is Northern or laboriously 
pedantic in effect ; and the practice of good society is Fooi, Foofcid, 
roefna-tic, &c. ; avoiding, at the same time, the vulgar extreme 
lootf locfcid, loo'na'tic, &c." It is, perhaps, not of much practical 
importance whether the initial element of long «, after a conso- 
nant, be considered as the sound of consonant y or as that of the 
vowel i, since, in either case, it is only slightly pronounced, and, 
especially, since these sounds are nearly alike in their organic 
formation. (See No. 42, i 61.) It is more important to observe 
that the compound sound of long u is not properly heard after 
the sound of either r, cA, or «A, the letter u taking, when so situ- 
ated, the simple sound of oo in food^ or in foot. The words rule, 
truihf chetD, aure, nigar, for example, should be pronounced rcol, 
trootht choot ahoor, thobg^ar. 

According to Webster, the sound of long tc, when it follows a 
consonant in the same syllable, is not compound, but a distinct 
and simple element. " Dr. Webster," says Goodrich, *• did not 
consider it to be diphthongal, except at the commencement of a 
syllable, as in unite. In all other cases, he regarded our long u 
as a distinct elementary sound." 

The sound of long u is represented by u, and also by eau 
(beauty), eo (feodal), eu (fmid), ew (fete), ewe (etce), ieu (Lieu), iew 
(vf^), ue (du«), ui (suit), yew (yetr), you (youth), and yu (ytde). 

} 27. (18.) The sound of oi in oil. 

This sound is compounded, according to Smart, Bell, Spurrell, 
and most orthoCpists, of that of o in or6 (No. 8, § 17), and that 
of e in me (No. 4, § 13). Some writers, as Walker and Worcester, 
consider its final element to be the soimd of t in iO, which, 
however, they regard as only a shortened quantity of long €. — 
See No. 7, } 16. 

It is represented by oi, and also by oy (boy), and eoi (burgwM). 



IMTRODUCTnON. 



21 



} 28. (190 '^^ sound of ou in tmnce. 

The final element in this compound sound, as all orthoepists 
agree, is the sound of oo in food (No. 10, i 19), or its shortened 
form in fiot (So. 11, { 20); and most writers, as Smart, Bell, 
Spurrell, and others, consider its initial element to be the sound 
of « in Jkr (No. 2, { II). But, according to Walker and Worces- 
ter, its mitial element is the sound of o in orb (No. 8, 417); 
according to Russell, the sound ot u in up (No. 13, { 22) ; and, 
according to Ellis, the sound of a in and (No. 1, { 10), or of « in 
up (No. 13, { 22). Bell characterizes the combination ti-oo as 
peculiar to Scotland. 

This sound is represented by mi, and also by ow (now), and oo 
{MacLeod), 

Note A. — The preeedliig Towel Mimdf may be arranged In sneh a 
manner as to Bhow their organic relation to each other. We may eonsider 
them as forming two aeries extending (1) ttom the palate to the throat, 
and (2) from the throat to the lips. The vowels which derive their char- 
aeteristic quality ttom the Influence of the pharynx and posterior part of 
the mouth may he termed guttural (L. guttur^ the throat) i those which 
receive their peculiar modification ftom the gradual elevation of the tongue 
towards the palate may be termed palatal t and those which are due, in 
some meaaure, to the position of the lips, may be termed ktbiaL The 
fiollowing diagram will make this classification more evident. It will be 
observed that the short forms of some of the vowels, namely, oo in foot 
(db), o in on (5), tf in ^p (11), a in fcui (a), e in then (<>), — shortened forms 
respectively of oo in food (oo), o in orb or a in all (&), u in om (uh), a in few 
(a), and e In there (fi), — are not represented, regard being had to the qualiijf 
of the sounds, rather than to simple diflTerences of quantity. The vowels 
a (No. 14, f 23) and 6 (No. 15, $ 2k) are included in this scheme, because, in 
foreign languages, they represent simple sounds, and because they are con- 
sidered to do ao, in Kngllsh also, by many orthoSplsta of high authority. 




»*hiii. 



22 INTRODUCTION. 

3. Aspirate Bound. 

§ 29. (20.) The sound of A in home. 

As no contact of the articulating organs is necessary for the 
formation of this elementary sound, it is clearly distinguished 
from the consonants. It is a mere aspiration, or, as Bell describes 
it, ** simply a breathing of the vowels " ; and, in forming it, *< the 
organs," he says, <* are adjusted to the Yowel position before the 
breathing of A is emitted." 

It is always represented by A. 

4. Oonsonant Bounds. 

} SO. (21.) The sound of p in pet. 

This sound is formed by a firm contact of the edges of both 
Ups, and a compression of the breath within the mouth and 
pharynx, followed by a sudden separation of the lips, allowing 
the compressed breath to escape. — See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by p, and also by ph (difiAthong), gh (hicoou^A), 
and pp (stef:pe). 

} SI. (22.) The sound of h in bet. 

This sound differs in the mode of its formation from that of p 
in pet only in a slighter contact of the edges of the lips, and in 
the compression of the voice, instead of simple breathy within the 
mouth and pharynx, causing a muffled sound or murmur to pre- 
cede the separation of the Hps. — See Rbm. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by 6, and also by hb (e66). 

{ 32. (23.) The sound of m in man. 

In the production of this sound, the lips are closed as for b, but 
the nasal passages are uncovered, and the voice, instead of being 
compressed within the mouth and pharynx, flows continuously 
through the nostrils. — See Rem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by m, and also by mm (rammed). 

} 33. (24.) The sound of tcA in tohen. 

In the digraph tcA, the h is regarded by many orthoCpists as 
representing a simple aspiration preceding the sound of to, as if 
the letters v>h were written, according to the original Anglo-Saxon 
mode, hto. But by Rush, Ellis, Bell, Spurrell, and some other 
recent writers of high authority, this digraph is regarded, with 
good reason, as representing a simple elementary sound which 



INTRODUCTION. 23 

consists of a mere emission of breath when the lips haye been 
placed in a position to sound v (No. 26, { 34), the yoiee not 
being heard till the following vowel is commenced. ** We doubt 
not," says Dr. D. R. Goodwin, *' that, if a man will obserre 
carefully for himself how and with what difference he pronounces 
teit and whit, he will be satisfied that the h is really pronounced 
neither before nor after the v, but in a sort of constant combina- 
tion with it. Whether the h, therefore, should be printed before 
or after the io, is a matter of indifference, except so far as con- 
sistency in the notation of a giyen alphabet is concerned. Wh 
is certainly the most consistent with the rest of the English alpha- 
bet." Upon this subject, Bell remarks: **This element [wh] is 
a whispered form of to. In its formation, the lips are closely 
approximated, and then rapidly separated : the breath is not 
obstructed." 

This sound is always represented by toA. 

i 34. (20.) The sound of to in toen. 

This sound nearly resembles that of oo in food (No. 10, § 19), 
and by some writers, as Lowth, Webster, and Latham, is consid- 
ered identical with it. But in forming it the lips are more closely 
approximated than for the sound of oo. Besides, it is to be 
obsenred that the sound of to occurs in some words before the 
sound of oo in the same syllable, as in woof, wood ; and it is gen- 
erally admitted that two and the same Towel sounds cannot occur 
in succession without forming two syllables. ** This letter [to]," 
says Bell, ** has been called a vowel by some orthoSpists, by others 
a consonant, and by others both. When before a vowel, it is 
unquestionably an articulation [or consonant] ; and when in other 
situations, it is either a redundant letter, as in flow, or merely an 
auxiliary mark to make up the writing of some sound which has 
no fixed simple symbol." Smart remarks in regard to to, when it 
occurs before a vowel, that it ** is a consonant having for its basis 
the mo^t contracted of the vowel sounds, namely oo, which sound, 
being partially obstructed by an inward action of the lips, and 
then given off by an outward action, is changed from a vowel to 
a consonant." — See No. 42, { 61. 

This sound is represented by to, at the beginning of a word or 
a syllable, and also by u, when q precedes it {quit), and, in some 
words, by ti, when g or 8 precedes it (anguish, persuade). 



24 INTBODUCnON. 

f 35. (26.) The80\mdof/in/!e^ 

ThU sound ia fonned bj placing the under lip against the edges 
of the upper firont-teeth» so as partially to intercept the passing 
of the breath. 

It is represented by /, and also by ff {^ff)t gh (lau^A), and 
ph (sylpA). 

§ 36. (27.) The sound of « in veal. 

The formation of this sound differs from that of / in feel only 
in the substitution of voice for breath. 

It is represented by v, and also by / (in the word of, only), and 
by ph (in the proper name St^Aen). 

} 37. (28.) The sound of eA in thin. 

This sound is produced by placing the tip of the tongue against 
the inner surface of the upper front-teeth, while the brea.th escapes 
over the sides of the forepart of the tongue. 

It is always represented by th, 

i 38. (29.) The sound of th in Mm (marked th). 

The distinction between this sound and that of th in thin con- 
sists only in the substitution of voice for brecUh, producing a spoken 
instead of a whispered articulation. 

It is always represented by th. 

k 38. (30.) The sound of « in eeai. 

In the formation of this sound, the tip of the tongue is rounded 
and brought near the upper front-teeth, while its sides are pressed 
firmly against the inner surface of the upper side-teeth, leaving a 
yery narrow channel for the passing of the breath. 

It is represented by <, and also by m (gra^s), by c (called soft e) 
before 0, t, or y in the same syllable (cent, nice, cite, cyst), or be- 
tween two vowels the second of which is c, t, or y (racer, facile, 
spicy) ; and also by s when it follows the soimd of t (waits). — 
See NoTB C, p. 34. 

Note. — The sound of «, oombined with that of it before it, is repre- 
sented, in some words, by x, as In wsx (prononnoed waJu). — $ee § 40, 
Note, and § 52, Note. 

§ 40. (31.) The sound of e in zeal. 

To form this element, it is necessary only to place the tongue 
in the proper position for making the sound of a, and allow the 
passing of voice instead of breaih. 

It is represented by 2, and also by tz (buzs), c (suffice), 9 (ha«). 



INTBODUCnON. 25 

9e (difcem), m (hucMur), and, at the beginning of words, bj z 
(Xenophon). 

Note. — The sound of s in xealt combined with that of ^in ^o pre- 
ceding it, is represented by x at the end of a syllable, in some words, 
before an accented syllable beginning with a vowel, as in ear-act' (e^r^-act'), 
IttX-a'ri-ous (lu^z-u'ri-ons). It is also represented by «, Inunt'diutcly after 
the Bonnd of n^, in the word anx-i'e-ty (an^-2i'e-ty).— See $ 39, Note, and 
§ 52, Note. 

{41. (32.) The sound of « in to/^. 

This sound is produced by placing the margin of the forepart 
of the tongue firmly against the inside of the upper teeth, so as 
perfectly to obstruct the breath, till, by continued pressure, it 
removes some part of the obstructing edge, and thus escapes. — 
See Bem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by <, and also by U (buf^), by d (Iooke<{, pro- 
nounced lookr. — See Note C, p. 34), and by th (Myme). 

{ 42. (33.) The sound of dm dale. 

This element differs from that of ^ in tale^ just as h does from p ; 
that is to say, voice instead of breath is compressed within the 
mouth and pharynx, while the organs remain in the same position 
as for t, — See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

It is represented by <i, and also by dd (odd), 

i 43. (34.) The sound of n in name. 

In the formation of this element, the tongue is placed in the 
aame position as for t and d, but the nasal passages are uncovered, 
and the voice, instead of being compressed within the mouth and 
pharynx, passes freely through the nostrils. — See Bem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by n, and also by rm (inn). 

{ 44. (35.) The sound of cA in church. 

This sound has been regarded by most orthoGpists as com- 
pounded of the sound of t and that of ah. But this view seems 
not to be correct. «* It is produced," says Goodwin, •« by placing 
a certain portion of the tongue near the tip, but not the tip itself, 
against a certain part of the palate, and, after pressure, suddenly 
withdrawing it with a violent emission of breath. It has no t- 
sound in its composition, for neither the tip of the tongue nor the 
teeth are used in its production. Neither does it end in an «A- 
sound ; for, in that case, it could be prolonged ad libitum^ which 
the true English ch cannot be. Moreover, it does not begin with 

8 



26 INTRODUCTION. 

any one sound and end with another, but is the same simple 
sound throughout its whole extent." 
It is represented by cAiandalso by fcA(la/eA).—SeeNoTED, p. 37 

NoTB 1. — When the aspirate sound represented by t Immediately pre- 
cedes, in an accented syllable, the sound of consonant y (as represented in 
long «, or by one of Ihc letters e, i) in the next syllable, the two sounds 
are apt to be exchnng^cd for the similar aspirate sound represented by 
cA, as in the words mit'ure (nEt'yur), right'tou* (rit'yus), Chrut'ian 
(Chrlst'yan), which are often pronounced, and, according to some ortho- 
epists, correctly pronounced, fia'chur^ ri'chuSf Chria'chan. This substi- 
tution of ch for ty, is due to the difficulty with which, in rapid utterance, 
the tongue passes fVom its position in sounding t (with the margin of the 
forepart against the inside of the upper teeth) to its position in sound- 
ing p (being raised toward the hard palate and dilated against the upper 
aide-teeth), and the greater ease with which it assumes the intermediate 
position necessary for sounding ch (with its upper surfkce, near the tip, 
against the upper part of the hard palate). — See § 45, Note ; f 46, Note 2 ; 
and § 47, Note. 

Note 2. — When the digraph ch is preceded by 2 or n, as in belck, 
bench, filcA, finch, it is marked with the sound of sh by Walker and 
some other orthoepists, as if pronounced belsh, b&nsh, fiUA, fin«A ; bat 
by Smart, Worcester, Webster, Goodrich, and most other authorities* 
the regular sound of ch in church is given to words of this class. 

{46. (36.) The somid of j in just. 

This sound is produced in the same way as that of ch, and 
differs from it only in being vocal instead of aspirate. It has been 
regarded by most orthodpists as compounded of the soimd of (I in 
dale (No. 33, { 42), and that of « in azure (No. 38, { 47). Bui 
**it may be shown," says Goodwin, **by a similar experiment 
and proof [referring to his remark, above quoted, in regard to 
the sound of ch] that J is a simple elementary sound.*' 

It is represented by j\ and also by ch (sandwich), dg Qudgment), 
di (soldier), g (called soft g) before e, t, and y (^em, a^e, ^be, 
lej^on, gyye), and by gg (exa^yerate). 

Note. — When the vocal sound represented by d immediately precedes, 
in an accented syllable, the sound of consonant y in the next syllable, the 
two sounds are apt to be exchanged for the similar vocal sound repre- 
sented by j, for the same reason that the sounds of t and y, when so 
situated, are apt to be exchanged for the corresponding aspirate sound 
represented by ch -, as in the word grand'eur (grand'yur), which is often 
pronounced, and, according to Walker, rightly pronounced, gran'Jur. So 
the word soldier may be supposed to have been orlgiually pronounced 
sold'yur, and, for the reason Indicated, to have subsequently taken the 



INTEODUCnON. 27 

pronnncUtioii M'Sur, as at present suictloned bj all the orthoSpista 

See f 44, NoTBl; f iO, Notb2; and f 47, NoTB. 

{ 46. (37.) The sound of tA in shalL 

This sound is produced by drawing the tip of the tongue inward 
from the position it takes to sound s in seal (No. 30, { 39), slightly 
enlarging the aperture through which the breath issues, while, at 
the same time, the middle of the tongue rises within the arch of 
the palate. 

It is represented by jA, and also by c (acacia); by c«, ci, m, 
n, tci, ti, before a yowel in a syllable following an accented 
syllable (o'esan, so'ctal, nau'Mous, pen'non, con'«ctence, ac'^ton), 
by t before or « (nau'je-a, «u'gar, in-mre'), by ach (schist), and 
by ch, especially in words derived from the French (cAaise, cha- 
rade', ay'a-lancAe). 

Note 1. — The sound of ah in ahaU (No. 37, ( 46), oombined with that 
or I; in bill preceding it (No. 43, $ 52), is represented by x in the words 
anz'ious, nor'ions (angk-«AuB, nok-fAns), and their derivatiTes. — See 
§ 40, Note, and $ 52, Note. 

Note 2. — It is sng^^ested by Smart, Lathun, Ellis, and others, that the 
■onnd of ah may have replaced, in many words, the sounds of a and con- 
■(mant 9, in the same manner, and for the same reason, that ch tends to 
replace t and y. Thus,the words noxioiM, ocean, apcial, notion, aure, may 
bare been originally pronounced noka'yua, Oa'yan, ada'yal, nda'yun, ayoor, 
and subsequently have come to be pronounced, as at present, noVahua, 
o'akan, ao'ahai, no'akun, akoor. — See § 44, Note 1, { 45, Note, and § 47, 
Note. 

{ 47. (38.) The sound of 2; in azure (indicated by zh). 
This sound differs from the preceding in a manner analogous to 
the difference between the sounds of a and z. (See No. 30, § 39, 
and No. 31, } 40.) It is never found at the beginning, or at the 
end, of any purely English word. 

It is represented by z, and also by at, ti, zi before a yowel in 
a syllable following an accented syllable (fu'^ton, tran-si'/»on, 
gla'zier), by g (rou^e), and by a (mea'«ure, u'«u-al). 

Note. — It is suggested by Smart, Latham, Ellis, and others, that the 
sound of zh may have replaced, in all English words, the sounds of z and 
eonsonant y (the former occurring in an accented syllnble immediately 
before the latter in the next syllable), in the same manner, and for the 
same reason, that j tends to replace d and y, when so situated. Thus, the 
words brazier^ glazier, pleaaure, vision, may have bet-n originally pro- 
Boonoed br^yur, gUz*yur, flez'yur, viz'yun, and subsequently have come 



28 INTRODUCTION. 

to be pronounced, as at present, l»ra'zhur, gla'zhurt pledk'ur, vtelk'tm.— 
Sec { <H, NuTK 1 ; § 45, NOTE; and $ 46, NOTE 2. 

i 48. (39.) The sound of r in room, Jhrid (called trilled r, or 
rough r). 

This sound is produced by a more or less forcible vibration of 
the tip of the tongue against the inner gum of the upper teeth. 
It occurs only before vowels, or between two vowels of which 
the first is short, and is thus distinguished from the sound of r in 
nor, sort (No. 40, { 49). — See Hem. 1, p. 34 ; see also $ 66. 

It is always represented by r. 

{ 49. (40.) The sound of r in ncr, aori (called untrilled r, or 
amooth r). 

This sound, which occurs only after a vowel in the same syl- 
lable, is much softer than that of initial r (No. 39, { 48), and is 
regarded by all the best modem orthoSpists as a distinct element. 
As to its true nature and its proper position in the scale of sounds, 
authorities are widely at variance. By Bell it is considered to be 
a vou>eL ** When the tongue is so placed," says this writer, ** as 
just to feel the passing stream of air, not yield to it^ we have the 
condition of the Jlnal r. The aperture for the emission of the 
voice is so free that the vowel quality of the sound is scarcely — 
if at all — affected. . . . The formation of this vowel differs but 
slightly from that of vowel [u in um, No. 12, { 21] ; and the 
difference between these sounds is, therefore, though clearly ap- 
preciable, not very strongly marked. This leads to a confusion, 
on the part of ordinary speakers, of such words as Jir and JuTf 
earn and urn, &c., but the audible distinction, though slight, 
should always be preserved." [See § 21, Note.] Bell states 
that the visible difference between the formation of this element 
and that of u in urn (No. 12, {21) is "a alight depression of die 
posterior peart of the tongtte, which directs the breath against the 
palate somewhat farther back for the latter than for the former." 
Ellis regards the final r as a consonant sound produced by a 
greater or less elevation of tlie tongue, and an indistinct or very 
slight vibration of the uvula ; but he admits that the sound par- 
takes so much of the nature of a vowel as to form distinct sylla- 
bles. ** The letter r," says Smart, ** is sometimes a consonant, as 
in ray, tray, stray, &c., and sometimes a guttural vowel sound 
[i. e. when it follows a vowel, as in the terminations or, er, ir, or, 



INTRODUCTION. 29 

ir, yr, are, er$^ ire^ ore, tare, oor, ower]. In the former capKcity, it is 
formed by a strong trill of the tongue against the upper gum ; in 
the latter case, there is no trill, but, the tongue being curled bach 
during the progress of the yowel preceding it, the sound becomes 
guttural, while a slight vibration of the back part of the tongv 
is perceptible in the sound.*' This author, accordingly, speaks 
the TOWcls, when followed by r, as <* terminating in guttural 
ribration." •« A vowel," he says, •« terminating in this manner, 
according to the idiomatic pronunciation of the English language 
as heard in well-bred London society, is properly considered as 
a single, though not a simple, element [i. e. though of a com- 
pound nature, going to form one and the same syllable]. ... Of 
this blending of the r with the previous vowel, it is further to 
be observed that the union is so smooth, in polite utterance, as 
to make it imperceptible where one ends and the other begins." 
Smooth r is represented by r, and also by rr (err), 

KoTB.— It is a marked peculiarity of English usage, as statod by Smart, 
Bell, Ellis, and Spurrell, that the letter r, when It is foUowed by a vowel, 
and is, at the same time, preceded, In an accented syllable, by a long vowel 
or a compound vowel, has always both its final and its initial value, or, in 
other words. Is pronounced as if it both ended the former syllable with 
Its smooth sound and began the latter syllable with its rough, or trilled, 
aoond. To use the language of Smart, " the r,** in this situation, " be- 
sides blendhig itself with the prevloua vowel, is also heard [with its 
initial value] in the artioolation of the vowel which begins the following 
syllable." Thus, the words eerious, pirate, tory, fury, are pronounced, 
aocording to this orthoVpist, as if spelled glr*ri-ous, piHrate, tdr'ry, 
fitr*ry. In such cases, the omission of the final or smooth r, in the pro- 
nimciatlon, Is, aocording to him, " deddedly provincial " ; and Ellis states 
that it is a Scottish peculiarity. Yet, fai the United States, it is, in many 
words, — chiefly primitives, — the common practice to sound the r, thus 
aitnated, as if it had merely its initial value, or was united only to the 
ibllowing syllable; for example, the words above mentioned are here 
nsoally pronounced $t'riotu, pVrate, td'rf/,*Jfk'ry, The best speakers in 
this country, however, follow the English usage in pronouncing a few 
prfanitive words of this class, as fairy, parent, apparent, transparent, and 
especially almost aU words derived fVom primitives ending in the sotmd 
of smooth r, as detirom (fVom desire), poring (ft>om pore), nourish (Orom 
eanr), Ac, giving the r tx>th its final and its initial value ; thus, fir*ry, 
pir*rewt, ap-pir'rent, trans-ptr*rent, dn-air'rous, pdr'ring, sour'rish, 

i 60. (41.) The sound of I in low. 

This sound, which Smart characterizes as being ** the most 

cxf the consonants," is produced by a simple contact 

8« 



30 INTBODUOneN. 

between the tip of the tongue and the upper g^m, while the odes 
of the tongue remain free for the continaoua passage of the Toice. 
— See Rem. 1, p. 34. 

It is represented by /, and also by B (ba/7). 

i 61. (42.) The sound of y in yet. 

In forming this element, the tongue is raised toward the hard 
palate and dilated against the upper side-teeth, being placed yery 
nearly in the same position as for the vowel i, with which, by 
some writers, it has been confounded, as w has also been with oo. 
(See No. 25, { 34.) But the tongue is brought closer to the palate 
for y than for €, and the aperture through which the Toice passes is, 
in consequence, still further diminished. In relation to the sounds 
of y and to, Goodwin remarks : *< In yarn, wit, we may giye first 
the full sounds ee^-am^ oo*-it, where, between the initial vowel 
sounds, ee, oo, and the following vowel sounds, the organs pass 
through a certain momentary but definite position, which gives 
the character of a consonant sound, and which we have denom- 
inated a fulcrum or pivot. If now the vowel part, the ee or 
oo sound, be reduced to a minimum, and we begin immediately 
upon this pivot or fulcrum, and pronounce yard, wit, we shall 
have y and 10 representing sounds of a proper consonant char- 
acter." 

This sound is represented by y, when it begins a syllable before 
a vowel, and also by t, when it begins an unaccented syllable im- 
mediately following an accented syllable (JiPial, pin^ion), and by 
J in hallelujah. 

Note. — In the opinion of most ortho^plsts, the sonnd of consonant y 
is heard as the iTdtlal element of long u, especially when long ti begins 
a word or a syllable. Aooordlng to Bell, Ellis, and Spurrell, it is also 
henrd, in an aspirated form, before long u preceded by h at the beginning 
of a syllable, as in hfte, hu'mid, poat'humoua, where u, as has been already 
explained (See § 26), is equivalent to poo ; and. In this form, it is regarded 
by them as a distinct element of the English language, and is represented 
by the digraph yh, which bears the same relation to y that wk bears to tr. 
(See § 33). By some authorities, however, the compound sound of long 
u is, in all situations, resolved into the elements B-oo, and this analysis 
would make u preceded by A to be equivalent in sound to he-oo. As this 
diversity of opinion respecting the composition of long u aCTects the ques- 
tion of tlie existence, in English speech, of such a sound as yh, no aspirate 
correspondent of y is given in the Table of Elementary Sounds, on p. 12. 
but it is recognized in the tabular classification ou p. 'M. 



INTRODUCTION. 31 

{ 52. (43.) The sound of k in kiO. 

This sound is fonned by bringing the back of the tongue into 
dose contact with the posterior part of the palate, and then 
separating it by a continued pressure of the breath. — See Bbm. 
2, p. 34. 

When the sound of k (or of the corresponding vocal element g. 
No. 44, {63) precedes the sound of Italian a (No. 2, {11), of 
long t (No. 16, } 25), or of e or i before r in certain cases (§ 21, 
Note), (as in the words card, guard, kind, %ky, guide, kerchief, 
girl), many speakers suffer a yery delicate and slight sound, which 
resembles that of y in get (No. 42, {51) or of in tne (No. 4, 
{13), to interyene between the sound of the consonant and 
Ihat of the following vowel ; and this practice is sanctioned by 
the authority of some eminent orthofipists, as Bell and Smart. 
By some speakers, a full and distinct sound of i or of consonant 
y is interposed between the sound of k or of g and that of the 
following Yowel (as ktard, ghidrd, or k-yard, gh-gard, &c.) ; but 
this style of speech — though sanctioned by Walker as **a polite 
pronunciation " — is strongly condemned by the best orthoCpists 
at the present day. Ellis, indeed, asserts that ** it is now con- 
ndered better to pronounce the pure k, g," in all such words, — 
by which he means that neither long e, consonant g, nor any 
sound approximating to either of these, should be allowed to 
slide in between the sound of A or y and that of the succeeding 
TOwel. The best American usage inclines to the easy and natu- 
ral way of pronouncing words of this class indicated by ElUs, 
though some speakers go so &r as to adopt the affected mode 
recommended by Walker. 

This sound is represented by k, and also by ck at the end of a 
word or a syllable (dock, ftoliek-'mg), by c at the end of a word 
(arc), at the end of a syllable when the next syllable begins with 
the sound of a consonant (flac'cid, hcc'tic), and before a, o, u, /, r, 
and final t (cat, cot, cup, cloud, crown, act), by kh (A:^an), by 
q before u (?uail, pi^ue), by cq (lacker), by ch (cAasm, echo, 
bald a-cAin, and other words of Greek and Italian origin), and 
hy gh (louyA). 

NoTK.— The Boimd of k, combined with that of s in seal (No. 30, S 39) 
fbllowlng it, Is reproficnted In some words by x, m in war (pronouDced 
wait«).— See f 30, Note, and § 40, Note. 



82 INTRODUCTION. 

{ 63. (44.) Tlie sound of ^ in ^o (called hard g). 

This soand is formed by the same contact of the tongue and the 
palate as that for the Roundoff, with the substitution of an effort of 
voice instead of simple breath. — See Rem. 2, p. 34. 

The views of orthoCpists respecting the pronunciation of words 
in which g precedes the sound of the Italian a, of long t, or of 
e or t before r in certain cases, are given in the preceding section* 
as they apply equally to words in which the corresponding aspi- 
rate element k precedes any one of these sounds. 

This sound is represented by g^ and also by gg (egg), ^ 
(^Aerkin), and, in combination with the sound of s in eecU (No. 
31, § 40) following it, by x, in certain words. — See § 39, Notb, 
and } 40, Note. 

i 64. (45.) The sound of n^ in sing. 

This sound, which never occurs at the beginning of a syllable, 
is related to the sound of ^ in go (Xo. 44, { 63) as that of m 
(No. 23, { 32) to that of b (No. 22, } 31) and as that of n (No. 
34, § 43) to that of d (No 33, { 42). (See Table, p. 34.) In its 
formation, the back of the tongue is applied to the soft palate, 
but the voice, instead of being retained and compressed in the 
pharynx, is allowed to pass freely out of the nostrils. 

It is represented by ng, and also by n before the sound of k, in 
a monosyllable (drink) or in an unaccented syllable (lar'ynx), 
and at the end of an accented syllable (except in words in which 
this syllable is one of the prefixes in, turn, or tm) before the sound 
of k or of hard g at the beginning of the next syllable (trin'ket, 
ben'quet, con'cord, an'gle, hun'ger). 

NOTB 1. — By Webster and Goodrich, the letters nk ooenrring In the 
same syllable are oonsldered to reprcBent " a simple elementary soimd,** 
or a sound entirely distinct from that represented by ngk. " It is, there- 
fore," says the latter, " nndesirable to respell such i^rords as Hnk, brink, 
by the nse of ng [singk, bringk]. They are not bo pronounced." But this 
view is supported by no other authorities. 

Note 2. — In most words formed by adding the terminations «r, ing, y, 
Ac, to primitives in which ng is final, the ng retains itB simple sound 
as in hang'er (fh>m hang), ring'ing (iVom ring), spring'y (from ttpring). 
But in the following words of this class, the n alone is made to represent 
the sound of ng, while the second letter of this digraph is pronounoed 
with the next Byllable; namoly, lon'ger, etron'ger, youn'ger, lon'geat, 
eiron'gest, youn'gett, diphrthon' gal, triph4hon'gaL Tliese words would 



INTRODUCTION. 33 

malogleally be pronomioed long^er^ ttrong^er^ young^er^ fto., and Walker 
itatM that in Ireland this is the ciutomary pronunciation. 

Note B. — Tbe consonants are capable of four distinct classifica- 
tions : — 

L They may be classed according to the organs by which they are 
formed. 

Those hi pronoondng which the lips are nsed, are called ldbiai$. They 
are p, 6, wh^ to, m. 

Those in forming which the lower lip touches the npper teeth, are 
called lahin-dentals. Tliey are /, v. 

Those in forming which the tongue touches the teeth, are called den^ 
tal$. Tbej are th, th. 

Those in pronouncing which the tongue touches the upi>er gum at 
rarious points between the teeth and the hard palate, may be called dento- 
palataU. They are t, d, «, 2, n. 

Those formed near the roof of the mouth are called paiaiaU. They are 
^«it *K ^Af r- (rough, or trilled), I, yh^ y. 

Those formed in the throat are called gutturals. They are Ir, ^, -r 
^smooth, or untrilled), ng, 

2. They may be classed according to the channel through which 
the air from the lungs passes in pronouncing them. 

Those in pronouncing which the air passes through the mouth, are oral 
consonants. They are p, 6, f, <<, cA, J, k, g, icft, tr, /, v, th, th, s, «, sA, th, 
r- (rough, or trilled), I, yh, y, -r (smooth, or untrilled). 

Those in pronouncing which the air passes through the nose, are naMX 
consonants. They are m, n, ng. 

3. They may be classed according to the manner in which they are 
pronounced. 

Those which are incapable of tnUng pronounced continuously, the air 
being first stopped in its passage, and then issuing with a sort of burst, 
may be called explosive consonants. They are p, 6, t, d, eh,j, k, g. 

Those in pronouncing which the sir passes continuously may be called 
continuous consonants. Most of them have more or less of a hissing or 
buzzing sound. They are wh, to, f, v, th, |&, s, t, sh, zh, r- (rough, or 
trilled), /, yh, y, -r (smooth, or untrilled). 

4. The consonants may again be classed into those which are 
formed without any vibration of the Tocal chords, and those which 
are foiped with a yibration of these chords ; that is, those in which 
the whisper, or pure breath alone ({ 3) is heard, and those in which 
the Toice ({ 4) is heard. They may be distinguished by applying 
the term aspirate to the former and the term vocal to the latter. 

The aspirate consonants are p, t, ch, k, wh,/, th, s, sh, yh. 
• The vocai consonants are h, d, J, g, w, v, th, «, tshf r- (rough, or trilled), 
l9y,-r (smooth, or nntrilled), m, n, ng. 



34 



INTRODUCTION. 



The following Table exhibits the four ■jstenu of cUsBiflcation at one 
▼lew:— 







ORAL. 


NASAL. 


CLASSES. 


EXPLOSIVE. 


CONTINUOUS. 


CONTINUOUS, 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Aspirate. 


Vocal. 


Labial. 


P 


b 


wh 


w 


— 


m 


Lablo-dentaL 






f 


V 








[Dental. 






th 


t& 








Dento-palatal. 


t 


d 


s 


B 


— 


n 


"il 


Palatal. 


eh 


J 


sh 


zh 






1 


« 






— 


r- 






c 


«« 






— 


1 


V 






«i 






7li 


y 








Guttnral. 


k 


8r 




-r 


— 


nfir 



Remarks. — 1. The consonant elements 2, m, n, r, which are both oon- 
ttaiuous and Tocal, are often called UquitUt firom their smooth and flowing 
sound. 

3. The explosire consonants p, 6, t, d, k, ff, are frequently termed 
mutei. For the vocal forms 6, d, g, the voice is heard only while the air 
from the lungs is compressed in the month and pharynx, and all soand 
ceases as soon as the articulating organs separate. For the aspirate 
forms p, i, k, the breath only is compressed, producing no sound till the 
articulating organs are separated (hence these three last consonants are 
termed pure mutes)^ when it issues as simple whisper, if the consonant is 
final, as in ^p, tUt eke, or as vocalized breath, or voice, if followed by a 
vowel, as in pair, too, key. 

3. The oral consonants I and r- (rough, or trilled, r), and the three nasal 
eonsonantB m, n, and ng, are, in English speech, all vocal. In some lan- 
guages, however, as the Welsh, I and r-have corresponding aspirates, 
produced by prononndng them forcibly with the breath alone. It is pos- 
sible to whisper m, n, ng, in like manner, but the breath passing freely 
through the nose, without the voice, would be both very indistinct and 
incapable of variation. Yet the aspirates of these sounds, though not 
acknowledged elements of any language, are, as Rush remarks, ^* con- 
stantly used before the vocality of m orn or ng, as the inarticulate aymbol 
of a sneer.'* The vocal element -r (smooth, or untrilled), which, indeed, 
Is by some writers considered to be teuly a vowel, has no related aspirate 
whatever. — See § 49. 

Note G. — The aspirate and vocal consonants are so related that gen- 
erally two of the same class are more easily united in pronunciation than 
two of a different class. In English, the difficulty of pronouncing an 



INTRODUCTION. S5 

aapinte and a rocal consonant together to so groat that when they meet 
in a word, one it often ehanged from vocal to aspirate, or the rercne, to 
anit the sound of the other. Thus, the letter s, in the third person singu- 
lar of verbs, and in the plural of nouns, is pronounced as s or as 2, accord- 
ing as it to preceded bj an aq>irate or a vocal consonant. In the verbs 
teqM, beaU, and the nouns eaps^ hat», for example, the t to sounded as » 
in aeai (No. .10, § 39), because it follows an aspirate consonant ; but in the 
v^rbs rob$, tfids, and the nouns titbt, bag$, the s is sounded as « hi xtnl 
(No. 31, ( 40), because it follows a vocal consonant. So also in the past 
tense and past participle of verbs, when either ends in d after a silent e, 
thto eottsonant takes the sound of tor of d according as it is preceded by 
an aspirate or a vocal consonant. It takes the sound of t, for example, 
in teaUbed, wukedt because it Ibllows the aspirate sounds represented by 
k and $h ; and in judged, moved, it retains the sound of <f, because it fol- 
lows the vocal sounds represented by J and v. 

The dililculty experienced in pronouncing consonants of opposite char- 
acters is much less when an aspi^te follows a vocal than when it pre- 
cedes it j and less after some vood consonants than after others. The 
words width, hreadth, Ac, in which the d is vocal and the tk aspirate, are 
easily pronounced ; and such combinations as Ip (heiCp), h (fii/«e), U (bett), 
MP (hemp), m (Ofice), ni (wenO« ngk (ink), rs (curse), rt {mart), together 
with various others, are of very Ik^uent occurrence. 



m. NTTMBER OF SOUNDS REPRESENTED BY THE 
dEYERAL LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET, OR BY 
COMBINATIONS OF THESE LETTERS. 

The following summary includes only such of the representa- 
tires of vowel sounds as are uttered distinctly in monosyllables 
or in accented syllables. — See Influence of Accent on the Vowel 
Sounde, p. 40. 

f 55. Of the Yowels, a has 8 sounds (and, ale, far, fast, fore, 
fiilU wash, any) ; e, 6 {me, there, then, pretty, mercy) ; t, 6 (ttme, 
til, trksome, raytne, filial) ; o, 9 (old, orb, on, do, work, son, wolf, 
wonen, one) ; «, 8 (use, r«le, urn, tip, full, bt«ry, busy, quit) ; 
y, 3 (by, myth, myrtle). 

f 50. Of the combinations representing vowel sounds, a has 
3 sounds (Ctfsar, ditpresis) ; at, 6 (atm, otr, satd, platd, atsle) ; 

I, 2 (gaol, extraordinary) ; au, 4 (haul, aunt, gauge, hatitboy) ; 

, 1 sound (ofol) ; atM, 1 (avoe) ; ay, 2 sounds (day. aayB^) \ oi^% 



36 INTBODUCnON. 

2 (ay«, prayer) ; m, 6 (seaU head, hear, earth, great, heart) ; eou, 3 
(beauty, beaif, beaufin) ; ee, 2 (see, been) ; et, 5 (seize, height, Tetl, 
hetr, hetfer) ; eo, 6 (people, yMman, leopard, georgic, feodal, 
Macleod) ; eoi, 1 sound (burgeots) ; eu, 2 sounds (feud, rhetcma- 
tism) ; eio, 3 (bretr, fete, seie) ; eiee, 1 sound (eiee) ; ey, 3 sounds 
(they, key, eying); eye, 1 sound (eye); m, 4 sounds (field, tte, 
friend, sieve) ; ieu, 1 sound (lieu) ; iete, 1 (viete) ; oa, 2 sounds 
(oak, broad) ; oe, 3 (foe, does, shoe) ; cb, 2 (fisetus, asafoptida) ; ceu, 1 
sound (manonrvre) ; oi, 2 sounds (oil, choir) ; oo, 4 {food, foot, blood, 
brooch) ; ou, 8 (oimce, soup, soul, touch, ought, could, journal, 
cough) ; oie, 3 (note, snote, knoieledge) ; owe, 1 sound (owe) ; 
oy* 1 0>oy) ; ua, 1 (guard) ; uay, 1 (quay) ; ue, 3 sounds (due, 
true, guest) ; ui, 4 (suit, fruit, guide, guilt) ; uy, 1 sound (buy) ; 
ye, 1 (rye) ; yew, 1 (yew) ; you, 1 (jfou) ; yu, 1 (yule). 

Remark. — The oomblnatfons ay, ey, oy, and uy should not he regarded 
as distinct digraphs, bat efanply as the forms which at, ei, oi, and ui take 
respectively, when written at the end of a word, the vowel i not being 
nsed at the end of any word purely English. 

§ 67. Of the aspirate letter, h, there is but one sound (Aome). 

{ 68. Of the consonants, b has 1 sound (6et) ; e, 4 sounds 
(eat, cent, suffice, acaeia) ; d, 2 (dale, lookeci) ; /, 2 (fsel, of) ; 
y« 3 (yo, yem, rouye) ; J, 2 (^ust, halleli^ah) ; k, 1 sound (Aill) ; 
I, 1 (low) ; m, 1 (man) ; n, 2 sounds (name, drink) ; p, 1 sound 
(pet) ; q, 1 (juail) ; r, 2 sounds (roam, nor) ; e, 4 (eeal, hae, 
sugar, meaeure) ; t, 1 sound (fale) ; v, 1 (veal) ; te, 1 (teen) ; 
X, 4 sounds (wao;, Xenophon, exsLCt, anxious) ; y, 1 sound (yet) ; 
z, 3 sounds (ceal, azure, waltz). 

• i 59. Of the combinations representing consonant sounds, 
bb has 1 sound (e66) ; ee, 1 (ocean) ; eh, 4 sounds (cAurch, cAaise, 
eAasm, sandwieA) ; ei, 1 sound (social) ; ck, 1 (dock) ; cq, 1 (lacquer) ; 
dd, 1 (add) ; d^, 1 (judgment) ; di, 1 (soldier) ; ff, 1 (stAf) ; yy, 
2 sounds (egg, exayyerate) ; yA, 3 (yAerkin, hiccouyA, lauyA) ; AA, 
1 sound (AAan) ; U^ 1 (ba//) ; mm, 1 (rammed) ; nn, 1 (inn) ; ng, 
1 (siny) ; ph, 3 sounds (pArase, StepAen, dipAthong) ; pPt 1 sound 
(steppe) ; rr, 1 (err) ; ec, 1 (di«cem) ; ecA, 1 («cAist) ; set, 1 (con- 
science) ; «e, 1 (naueeous) ; eA, 1 (eAall) ; ei, 2 sounds (pension, 
fueion) ; as, 2 sounds (grass, hueear) ; tch, 1 sound (latch) ; th, 3 
sounds (Min, Mis, thyme) ; <i, 2 (ac^n, transihon) ; loA, 1 sound 
(foAen) ; tt, 1 (bu/Q ; xz, 1 (bu«). 



INTRODUCTION. 37 

Remark. — Vi/lien the sound expressed by m digraph is the same as 
that which either of its letters is generally ased to represent ulone, that 
letter may be regarded as signifleant of the sound, and the other as silent. 
Thna,tfae letter h^Ting the diacritical mark in each of the digraphs ai, en, 
f'e, oe, «t, as they occur in the words Aim, plaids siait Mad, tu, frUnd^fflet 
t^U, gtade, may be taken to signify the vowel sound which that digraph 
has in those words. So also in the consonant digraphs 66, dt, dd, jy, gg, 
as Uiey occur in the words e66, dock, add, *iqf, egg, only one of the letters 
is to be taken as signifleant of the sound intended, the other being neccssa. 
rily silent. Some digraphs, it is to be observed, express simple sounds 
quite different from the sound regularly expressed by either of their let- 
ters taken singly ; aa,€i in vesZ, ey in they, th in tJUn, thit, wh in when, 
ng in ting. 

Note D. — In some words, certain letters of the English alphabet, 
though not in themselves representing any sound, have an effect ui>on 
the sound of another letter that precedes any one of them in the same 
syllable. Thus, a silent final e, when it follows a single consonant, a 
ecmsonaut digraph, or the combined consonants s< in a monosyllable, 
or an accented syllabic, lengthens the preceding vowel, as in 6a6e, bathe, 
jMUte, thbaUf (See f 163), and when it follows c or g, it gives to each 
its ■oft sound, as in voice, peaceable, tcarce, trance, stage^ changeable, 
georgie, range, surge. A silent final e also prevents the letter $ follow- 
ing a liquid consonant from taking the sound of z, as in else, nurse, 
rinse', and it always gives to th its vocal sound, as in btxthe, breathe^ 
biUhe, except in the word withe. In which most ortho^'pists give to th 
its aspirate sound, to distinguish this word from the preposition with. 
In some words, as 6rotiTse, lapse, tease, the final e appears at first sight 
to be useless, yet, without it,the s would seem to be the sign of the plu- 
ral number. So the letter k after c and before e or <, as in trafficker, 
trafficking, the letter u after e or g, and the letter h after g and before e 
or i, as in biscuit, guest, guide, gherkin, may be regarded as mere ortho- 
graphical expedients to keep the c or the g hard. In some words which 
have the termination gue, as fugue, plague, vogue, both e and u, though 
silent, have the Influence referred to, the e serving to lengthen the vowel 
that precedes g, and the ti serving to keep g hard. 

In the combination tch used to represent the sound of eh in church, the 
f serves to prevent this sound l^m being changed into that of Ir (as in 
aeke), or of «A (aa in cartouch), 

4 



88 iNTBODuenoN. 



IV. SYLIABLE8. 

{ 60. A syllable consists of an elementary sonnd or a eom- 
bination of elementary sounds uttered by a single impulse of the 
voice, and forms either a word or a part of a word. — See § 65. 

Note. — A word of ono syllable Is called a monotyttaMet of two sylla- 
bles, a dUsyUable ; of three syllables, a trUyllable i and of more than three 
syllables, a polytyUable. 

\ 61. Every syllable must contain at least one vowel sound, 
— either simple or compound, — or one liquid sound, befiore and 
after which may be placed various combinations of consonant 
sounds ; as, «, an^ fntm^ tev-en (sev-n), a-ble (a-bl), en'O-bied (en- 
a-bld), re-voketTtt (re>voktst), plunged (plunjd), ttrength, ttoelfthi* 

{ 62. An aspirate sound cannot, alone, form a syllable. ^ 

§ 68. Two vowel sounds cannot come together in the same 
syllable, unless they form a compound vov^el, or diphthong (§ 6). 
^ See i 229. 

§ 64« The consonant sounds in a syllable are arranged ac^ 
cording to a determinate and invariable law; namely. Aspirate 
consonants precede vocal consonants, in beginning a syllable, and 
follow them in closing one ; as, Jtedst, shrunk, strength, 

\ 66. In general, the closest contact, or the smallest opening'^ 
of the organs of speech that occurs in uttering any combination 
of elementary sounds, is a point of separation between syllables. 
Thus, in priest-fy, joy-otu, the consonant t and the final element 
of the diphthong ey (No. 18, } 27) respectively require for their 
enunciation a closer contact and a smaller opening of the organs 
than either the sounds which immediately precede or those which 
immediately follow; hence the voice, or vocal sound formed in 
the larjmx ({ 4), instead of flowing freely and continuously through 
the throat and mouth, is more or less interrupted in its passage, 
and issues in the separate impulses which form the essential 
characteristic of syllables. 

Note. — In one class of cases, the principle laid down in this seotloD 
does not hold tme. It has already been stated (§62) that an aspirate 
sound cannot, of itself, form a syllable : it follows, therefore, that such a 
word as casks consists of one syllable only, though a closer contact of tb» 
articulating organs is necessary for the sound of k than for that of <• 



DITfiODnCTION. 39 

} 66. When a consonant sound, whether represented bj a 
single letter, a double letter, or a digraph, occurs between two 
▼owels, half of the sound belongs to one syUable and half to the 
other. Thus, in hap-py^ the first syllable is ended by the closure 
of the lips which is necessary to form the articulation of p, and 
the next syllable begins with the opening of the lips which gives 
to j9 its peculiar explosive character. 

Note. — It must be obserred that. In sach cases, there is but one con- 
tact of the oi^^ana of speech. The reduplication of the tonaonant in the 
written word, as in happy, is a mere orthographical expedient to keep the 
preceding rowel short, which otherwise would be liable to hare a long 
aonnd given to it. But in compound words, in which one word ends with 
the same consonant sound as that with which the next begins (as in book- 
aue, boot-treejJUh-sk<^)i and in most derivatires having a prefix of Eng- 
lish origin that ends, or a sufSx of English origin that begins, with the 
same consonant sound as that with which the primitive respectively begins 
or ends (as in miMpdl, outtalk, aoulleM, mearmeas, vUely), though there is 
still but one articulation, or contact of the organs, yet, as the sound of 
the consonant, or the contact necessary for its formation, is dwelt upon 
for some little time, the final and initial elTects are clearly separated, and 
the division of the written syllables accordingly fiUls between the two 



f 67. When the consonant called *< the smooth r," which 
partakes largely of the nature of a vowel (See § 49)» is inime- 
diately preceded by the sound of a long vowel, the combination 
is uttered by one impulse of the voice, and forms, or helps to 
form, a single syllable ; as in pair, hire, more. If, however, the 
sound of " the natural vowel " (u in urn. No. 12, § 21) intervenes 
between the smooth r and a preceding vowel, it becomes impos- 
sible to avoid a dguble impulse of the voice, and the combination 
is therefore resolved into two syllables; as in pay-er, high-er, 
tnow^er. 

Note.— These doubtM oombinationB may obviously be made, as Smart 
remarks, to ** pass on the Car as either one or two syllables.** JHenoe it is 
important to observe that derivative words, like payer, higher, mower 
(from pay, high, mow), are properly pronounced as dissyllables. But 
primitive wordn, like ewer, flower, tower, should be pronounced, in pro«e, 
as monosyllables. By the poets, however, they are sometimes made to 
form two syllables. 

4^ For the Ilples which govern the division of words into syllablesi 
in writing and printing, see pp 76 to 79. 



40 INTBODUCnON. 



V. INFLUENCE OF ACCENT ON THE VOWEL 

SOUNDS. 

{ 68. In the English language, every word of more than 
one syllable is pronounced with a stress of the voice, called 
accent, upon one of its syllables, and many words, besides thi« 
primary accent, have a slighter, or secondary, accent upon another 
syllable or uppn two other syllables. Thus, the words cab'in, 
C'VerU^t ar*dent, ob'Sctwe', va'cate, de-cide', have one accent ; the 
words ad"ver^tMe', com'^pre-hend*, con^'tro'vene', eig'ri^ciUt"ure, 
al'a'bas"ter, and oPi-gar^'chy, have two accents, one primary 
and one secondary ; and the words %n"eom-pat*H-biVi-ty and 
in'Com"pre-hen"8i'bil*i'ty have three accents, one primary and 
two secondary, — the mark ( ' ) being used in this Introduction to 
denote the primary accent, and the mark ( " ), to denote the sec- 
ondary accent. 

i 69. The vowel sounds are always uttered with distinctness 
in those syllables of a word which have an accent either primary 
or secondary ; and they are also uttered distinctly in mono- 
syllables, except some of the particles, as, a, ati, the, and, at, of, 
&c., the vowel sounds of which are usually pronounced somewhat 
indistinctly in ordinary discourse. ^ 

{ 70. When a syllable has no accent, its vowel sound is, in 
some cases, uttered distinctly, and, in others, it is pronounced 
with BO much indcfiniteness as hardly to be distinguished from 
some other vowel sound. Thus, the sounds of the vowels are 
uttered distinctly in the unaccented syllables of the following 
words : dd-vert', aa'pict^ H-aect', brah6, cav'U, clas'sic, graph^lte, 
e'pdct, prO'vide', vnd'Ow, But the sounds of the vowels a and e, 
and of the digraphs at, ei, ia, and ie, in the unaccented syllables 
of the words cab'baye, coVlege, fount'ain, fbrfeU, car'riaye, cit'ies, 
ire scarcely distinguishable from the sound of t in the word 
ves^tige. And in the terminations ar, er, ir, or, ur, yr, of final 
Inaccented syllables, all the vowels are sounded exactly alike : 
IB in doPlar, mem'ber, na'dir, au'thor, suPphur, mar'tyr, **Un- 
iccented sounds," says Smart, ** will generally verge towards 
other sounds of easier utterance, and this will take place in a 
greater or less degree according as the pronunciation ia colloquial 
or solemn."' 



INTRODUCTION. 41 

{ 71- It is obviously impossible to give precise rules for the 
proper sounds of the vowels in all cases when not under the 
accent, or to express all these sounds accurately by any system 
of notation. They can be learned only by the ear from the lips 
of good speakers. "Those who wish to pronounce elegantly," 
as Walker truly remarks, ** must be particularly attentive to the 
unaccented vowels, as a neat pronunciation of these forms one 
of the greatest beauties of speaking." Though the ear must be 
chiefly trusted in attaining this accomplishment, some assistance 
may be derived from the following general rules and remarks 
drawn from writers of the highest authority upon this subject. 

A in an unaccented syllable. 

{ 72. The vowel a, when it is final in a syllable not having 
an accent primary or secondary, and is followed, in the next 
syllable, by any consonant except n and r, or when it is at the 
end of a word, has the sound of a in far (Italian a, No. 2, { 11) 
somewhat shortened ; as in a-bound^, tra-duce', txg'gro'Vate, x-de'a, 
com'ma. This shortened sound of the Italian a, as commonly 
uttered, resembles very nearly that of short u (No, 13, { 22). 

When a, at the end of an unaccented syllable, is followed, in 
the next syllable, by n or by r, it has nearly the sound of short e 
(No. 6, { 16) ; as in mis'cel'la-ny, cua^tom-a-ry. When it is fol- 
lowed by a vowel in the next syllable it has the sound of long a 
(No. 14, { 23) somewhat shortened, or without its vanishing ele- 
ment # ; as in a-e'ri-cUf cha-^ic. 

When a is not final in an unaccented syllable, it is apt to 
faU into the sound of short u (No. 13, { 22) ; as in hag^gard^ 
mor'al, ty'rant, ttom'an. 

When the aspirate h follows a in a final unaccented syllable, 
as in Je-hohah, Mea-ai'ah, this vowel is considered by all the 
orthoCpists, except Worcester, to have the same sound as when 
final in a syllable. Worcester remarks that ** a unaccented at 
the end of a word approaches the Italian sound of a," but adds 
that ** ah final partakes still more of the Italian sound." 

} 73. In the unaccented final syllable ate, the vowel a has gen* 
erally a shorter sound, — approaching that of short e (No. 6, § 16), 
— in adjectives and nouns than in verbs. Thus, it is shorter in deVi* 
eaU, m'lri'Caief pri^maU^ than in catcu-late, dedH-cate, reg'u'late. 



{ 



42 INTRODUCTION. 

{ 74. In the unaccented final syllable or, the vowel a has 
the sound of u in urn (No. 12, } 21), but less prolonged; as in 
doPlar, pUflar, achoPar, 

B in an unaooented syllable. 

{ 76* The Towel «, when final in an unaccented syllable, and 
not sUent, has the sound of in m« (No. 4, } 13), but less pro- 
longed ; as in e-ject\ ce-merU^, pre-fer*, ap'pe'tite^ ePe-gani, 

} 76. The vowel 0, in an unaccented syllable ending in a 
consonant, has properly, in most cases, the sound of in then 
(No. 6, § 15) ; as in ab'aentf express, proVlemy pre'feet : though, in 
some words, it is liable to be sounded like short t (No. 7, { 16) ; 
as in hel'met, du'el, box^es, 

{ 77. In the unaccented final syllable <r, the vowel e has the 
sound of u in urn (No. 12, § 21), but less prolonged ; as in 
bar'ber, offer, rob'berf ntffer, 

I in an unaooented syllable. 

§ 78. The vowel t, when final in an unaccented syllable that 
immediately follows an accented syllable, has the sound of t in 
iU (No. 7, § 16) ; as in a-hiVi-ty, difji-dent, fal'U-ble, wit'ti-eum. 
— See §16. 

{79. The vowel t\ when final in an unaccented syllable that 
immediately precedes an accented syllable, is sometimes short, or 
has the sound of t in ill (No. 7, § \^) ; as in di-geat', di-min'tah^ 
fi-deVi'tyt I-taVian : and sometimes it is long, or has the sound 
of t in time (No. 16, § 25) ; as in dl-op' tries, dl-uHnal. In the 
prefixes hi and tri, it is generally long. 

{ 80. The vowel i in an unaccented syllable ending in a con- 
sonant is short ; as in art'ist, claa'sict pump'kifi, viv'id. 

i 81. The vowel i in the final syllable ile, when not under the 
primary accent, is generally short ; as in ferUilot kos'tile, rep'tite^ 
ntb'tile. It is long only in a few words ; as in e'dile, ex'ilet gen'tUe^ 
cham'o-mile, 9-clH'pile^ rec'on-cile, 

{ 82. The vowel i in the final syllable ine, when not tinder 
the primary accent, is generally long in words accented on the 
antepenult ; as in ctaH-nine, crys'tcU-line, tur*pen-tine : but in many 
words, — especially those accented on the penult,— <• it is short, 
as in dia'ci-pUne, her'o^ine, doe'trine, de-ter^nUne, 



INTRODUCTION. 43 

I 83. The TOwel • in the final syllable ite, when not under the 
primary accent, ia long in some words ; as in ac'o-nUs, ap'pe'tite^ 
par'a-sUe: and in some words it is short; as inde^t-iiite* /a'ror- 
fte, op^po-nte, 

{ 84. The Towel • in the unaccented final syllable ive is short ; 
as in ae^twe^ pat^she, ad'jec'tivt, gen't-tive, 

f 86. In the imaccented final syllable tr» the yowel t has the 
sound of « in tint (No. 12, $21), but less prolonged ; as in e-Ux'tr^ 



O in an unaooented syllable. 

i 86* The Towel o, when final in an unaccented syllable, has 
its long sound (No. 15, } 24) without the yanishing element ooi 
as in croc'o-dile, he'ro, mot'to, o-bey^, ayPlo-gitm^ to-bae^eo, vd-cahto. 
But before the final syllables ny and ry this modified sound is 
so much shortened as to resemble the sound of short u (No. 13, 
\ 22) ; as in tu^ri-mo-ny^ te/ri-to-ry. When not final in an un- 
accented syllable, it is apt to faU into the sound of short u ; as in 
hig'ot, edr'olt wan'Um, 

{ 87. The Towel o in the unaccented final syllable oyue has its 
short sound (No. 9, { 18) ; aa in di'a-ldguet qt't-ldyue, fnon'o-ldyue, 
praPdgue. 

} 88, In the unaccented final syllable or, the Towel o has, in 
most words, the sotmd of u in urn (No. 12, { 21), but less pro- 
longed; as in ttuHhar, eHror, fer'vor^ la'bor, ter'ror. ** This sound 
[or unaccented]," says Smart* ** which, under the remission of 
accent always verges towards iir, in most cases sinks completely 
into it." '* We may be justified," he adds, ** in saying ea'tor^ 
ttufpor^ ftc, with that attention to the final syllable which pre- 
•erres the soimd ; but the same care would be pedantic or 
puerile in mtot, orator, &c.' 



»> 



U in an unaocanted syllable. 

{ 89. The Towel u, when final in an unaccented syllable, has 
its long sound (No. 17, § 26), and when it forms a syllable by 
itself its initial element y is very distinctly pronounced, except 
when the preceding syllable ends with r ; as in hu-coVic, cu-ra'tar, 
mPu'eate, nai'u-rtU^ u-turp'. When this yowel forms a syllable 
by itself and the preceding syllable ends with r, it has its long 
sound, according to Smaft, with the initial element y very slightly 



44 INTRODUCTION. 

• 

pronounced ; as in er^u-dite^ vir'u-lent, ** It is not possible," 
says this author, ** to give the distinct sound [yoo to the vowel u 
BO situated] without pedantic effort, and an approach to the sound 
signihed by 'oo is all that correct utterance requires." (See { 26.) 
But some writers are of the opinion that the vowel u in this 
case has the simple sound of oo in food (No. 10, } 19), precisely 
as it does when r precedes it in the same syllable. 

{ 90. The vowel ii, when it precedes any consonant in an 
unaccented syllable ending with a silent e, except the consonant r 
in such a syllable immediately following an accented syllable, has 
generally' its long sound (No. 17, { 26); as in dePttffet fort'tute, 
atatfvte^ lit'er-a-ture. The only exceptions are the words fer^rule^ 
let'tucey min'ute, in which u has the sound of short t (No. 7, § 16), 
and the word ar^que^huse (spelled also ar'qw-hus)^ in which this 
Towel, according to most orthoepists, has its short sound (No. 
13, i 22). 

§ 91. The vowel u, when it precedes r in an unaccented sylla- 
ble ending with a silent e and immediately following a syllable 
that is under the accent, primary or secondary, has a sound con- 
sidered by Smart and some other orthoSpists to be identical in 
quality with that of long u (No. 17, { 26), though somewhat 
shortened in quantity; as in ^'ur^, ten'ure, verd^ure, ar^chi-tecVure, 
This shortened sound of long u resembles the shortened sound 
of u in urn (No. 12, } 21) with the sound of consonant y pre- 
fixed, except when the sound of j, «A, or zh precedes the u, in 
which case that of y is omitted ; as in Mjure^ cen'surct treas'ttre. 
The same remark applies to derivatives, although the final e of the 
syllable ure is omitted on adding a syllable beginning with a vow- 
el ; as in ad-venl'ur-er, man'U-/act'ur'er, pleas' ur-a-ble. 

{92. In the unaccented final syllable ur the vowel u has 
the sound of t* in ttm (No. 12, § 21), but less prolonged; as in 
mur'murt aul'phur. 

7 in an unaccented syllable. 

} 93, The vowel y in an unaccented syllable, except the cases 
noticed in §§94, 95, has the sound of short t (No. 7, § 16); as in 
a-ncWy-aiSf a-pocfry-pha^ ap'tt-thy^ pify^ o*nyXt phar^ynz. 

§ 94. The vowel y in the unaccented final syllable^ of verbs 
has the sound of long t (No. 16, § 26) ; as in dar'i'fy^ grat'i-fy. 




INTRODUCTION. 45 

p^ri-fy, tea'ti'fy. The vowel y has also the sonnd of long t in 
the unaccented final syllable of the following verbs; namely, 
mutti-ptyy oc^cu^y, proph'e-ay. 

{96. In the unaccented final syllable yr^ the vowel y has 
the sound of « in vm (No. 12, § 21), but less prolonged; ^s in 
mar'tyrf zepk*yr. 

AI In an unaooented syllable. 

\ 96. The digraph at in an unaccented syllable has the sound 
of short t (No. 7, } 16} ; as in cap^tain^ cer'tain^ cuHtaint fount'ain, 
wtounrcuHm 

£1 In an unaocented syllable. 

{ 97. The digraph «t in an unaccented syllable has the sound 
of short t (No. 7, { 16) ; as in oounHer-feii^ for'eign, for'eign'ert 
for'feUf muPleinf ntr[feU. 

SY in an unaooented syllable. 

{ 98. The digraph ey in an unaccented final syllable has 
the sound of short t (No. 7, { 16) ; as in eWlei/f gaPley, hon'ey, 
jour'ney, num^ey, vaPley, The noun attr'vey (sur'vd^, as pro- 
nounced by most orthoepists with the accent on the first sylla- 
ble, is an exception to this rule. 

OS in an unaocented syllable. 

{ 99. The digraph »0 in an unaccented final syllable, as in 
the plurals of nouns ending in y preceded by a consonant, and in 
the third person singular present tense, and the imperfect tense 
and past participle of most of the verbs that end in y preceded by 
a consonant, has the sound of short t (No. 7, { 16) ; as in cit'ies, 
du^tiet, carfries, mar^ried. But in the third person singular pres- 
ent tense, and in the imperfect tense and past participle of verbs 
ending in fy^ and of the verbs multiply^ occupyt prophesy f this di- 
graph has the sound of long t (No. 16, { 25). 

OU in an unaooented syllable. 

{ 100. The digraph ou in the unaccented final syllable out 
has the sonnd of ti in t^y (No. 13, § 22) ; as in cai'hus, /a'mou$, 



46 



INTRODUCTION. 



OW in an nnaooented syllable. 

{ 101. The digraph 010 in an unaccented final syllable has the 
sound of long (No. 15, { 24), without the vanishing element 00; 
as ia/tOr'fvWf/fPknOf tdr^roWf win'dow* 



VI. SEAT OF THE ACCENT. 

i 102. The. Beat of the accent in English words is goyemed 
by the following general laws or prin^niiies, of which sometimes 
one predominates and sometimes another. 

{ 103. Of words of two syllables, nouns and adjectiyes, for 
the most part, have the accent on the first syllable, and verbs on 
the second syllable. Thus, some nouns and some adjectives are 
distinguished from verbs of the same spelling by this difference of 
accent, as the following : — 



Kouns. 


VerbB. 


A4}ectitfe9, 


VmU, 


Ac'cent 


ac-cent' 


Ab'sent 


ab-sentf 


Con'duct 


con-duct^ 


Com 'pound 


com-poundf 


Con'tract 


con-tract' 


Con'crete 


con-crete' - 


In'sult 


in-sult' 


Fre'quent 


fre-quent' 


Tor'ment 


tor-ment' 


Pres'ent 


pre-sent' 



§ 104. Verbs of two or more syllables having the following 
endings are accented on the penult, or last syllable but one; 
namely, en (fright'en, en-light'en) ; er preceded by a consonant 
(alter, differ, con-sid'er, &c., except a few ending isifrr, as de-fer*, 
pre-/er*, &c., nUn'U'ter, reg'ia-ter^ and de-ter') ; iah (per'ish, 
es-tab'lish) ; om (&th'om, ac-cus'tom ) ; on (beck'on, a-ban'don) ; 
op (gallop, de-vel'op) ; ry (car'r)) ; le preceded by a consonant 
(am'ble, as-sem'ble, cir'cle, cur'dle, sti'fle, strug'gle, in-vei'gle, 
pickle, grap'ple, bot'tle, puz'zle^ &c., except a few derived 
from nouns or adjectives, as ar'ti-ele, chron'i-de, man'a-ele, 
guad'np-ple), 

i 106. Words of more than two syllables have the primary 
accent, for the most part, on the antepenult, or Ust syllable but 



JNTBODUCnON. 47 

two, this being, as Walker expresses it, " the fayorite accent of 
the language" ; astdts^jm-tant, efjiu-ence, in'thu'try^ post'hu-numtt 
cen^trifu^ffol, een'trip^e-tal, in-ter^po-laU^ mis-anUhro-py, 

\ 106. Words derived from other words in the language 
generally retain the accent of their primitiyes. Thus, the deriya- 
tiyes «er'i7»ee-a-Me, ser'viee-a'ble-neu, hap'pi-neaM, un-hap'pi'tteu, 
mufckiev-mut adfrni-ral-ty, »im'i'lmr'fyf have the accent respec- 
tiyely on the same syllable as the primitiyes aer'vice, hap'py, 
mia'Meff a^nu-ral^ HmH-lar, 

{ 107. With regard to some words, in the accentuation of 
which there is at any time a diversity of usage, that mode is 
most likely to prevail which most favors ease of utterance. 
Urns, aa stated by Goodrich, the mode of accentuating the 
words aefeept't^hlet re^'epi-O'Cle, and u'ien-M on the first sylla- 
ble, — a pronunciation fiuhionable in the time of Walker, — has 
given place to the easier accentuation on the second syllable 
(ae-«^'a-M8, re-e^tt-de, U'ten^sil), So, for the same reason, 
there is a strong tendency to transfer the accent from the first 
syllable of the words au'cea-tral, dia^crep-an-ey, ex^em-pkh-iy, t»'- 
vat-to-ry, — as they are pronounced by most of the orthoepist% 
— to the second syllable (an-^tt'iralf dda'-erep'on-ey, ex'-em^phrry^ 
in-ven'to-ry^. 

i 108. Words which have a common termination, such as 
i-ble, ie-al, lo-gy, ic, tiortf &c., generally have the primary accent 
on the syllable which precedes this termination or which marks 
tlie limit where it begins. 

Words of more than two syllables, haviag the following end- 
ings, take the primary accent on the antepenult, thus conform- 
ing to the general rule ({ 106) ; namely, ete-al (he-li'ac-al) ; 
era-^ (de-moc'ra-cy) ; e-Jy (rftr'e-fy) ; e gate (del'e-gate) ; e-wu 
(ez-tra'ne-ous, ftc, except when the ^und of tk or of g mtfl 
precedes out, as in enU'ta'eeotu, cawr-aJgeoui) ; vr-aL (gen'er-al) ; 
MT'oU (mod'er-ate) ; er^cut (gen'er-ous) ; e-tude (qui'e-tude) ; e-ty 
(so-ci'e-ty) ; fiu-ent (af flu-ent) ; flu-oua (su-per'flu-ous) ; go-nal 
(di-ag'o-nal) ; ga-ny (cos-mog'o-ny) ; gret-pher (bi-og'ra-pher) ; 
pu-pMit (chi-rog'ra-phist) ; gra-^hy (ge-og'ra-phy) ; i-ae (ma'- 
ni-ac, ftc, except, according to some ortho^pists, el-^-gi'ae) ; 
t-ots (ra'di-ate) ; i-hle (cred'i-ble, ftc, except effi-gi-bU, in-efi- 
fi-^le, n^urU-i^te, eortH-gi-ble) ; ic-ai (log'ic-al) \ i-oote ^dft^V 



48 IHTEODOCnOH. 

cats, ftc., Mtcept ni^i-fi-caU) ; i-cide (hom'i-cide) : i-dale (can'<U- 
date) ; i-denee (dif S-dence) ; i-dent (ac'ci-dent) ; i-Jbrm (u'qi- 
*•*"") '• '-/y (P''^''-f)') i '•ya'« (nav'i-gfite) ; i-late (»en'ti-late) ; 

\ (Bn'i-mBte) \ i-meitt (con'di-ment) ; i-nate (cul'mi-nate) ; 

e (em'i-ncnce) ; i-neni (per'ti-nent) ; in-mu (om'in-ou*) ; 
(in.hab'i-tant) ; i-late (ag'i-cate) ! i-(tr« (gen'i-tivp) ; i-ly 
(a-bil'i-ty) ; i-um (o'di-um) ; b^-gtr (os-trol'o-ger) ; bt-gitt (ge- 
ol'o-gist) ; to-jy (phi-lol'o-gy) ; lo-gug (col'lo-quy) ;* ma-chji 
(lo-gom'tt-chj) ; ina-fAy (po-ljm'ft-thy) ; me-ter (ba-rom'e-ter) ; 
me-lry (gc-om'c-try) ; no-my (e-con'o-my) ; o-la (pB-riib'ti-la) ; 
or-out (rig'oT-oua, &c., except ca-na'rmu, to-no'rout, and, accord- 
iag to name orthofpiats, de-co'roui and in-de'Co'roui) ; pa-Ttitu 
(o-TJp'a-iDus) ; path-y (ho-mm-op'a-tliy) ; pho-ny (eyra'pho-ny, 
&c., ciccpt, according to some orthoCpiBta, coPo-pho-Ry) ; teo-py 
(a-e-Toa'co-py) ; po-teai (om-mp'o-t«nl) ; to-nant (con'ao-aant) ; 
ttro-phe (n-pDB'tro-phe) ; ia-my (a-nat'o-my) ; u-oi (an'nu-al) j 
u-aum (af flu-cnce) ; u-aU (con'flu-™t) ; u-fa (neb'u-Ia) ; u-lar 
(sec'u-lar) ; u-joto (ciT'cu-latc) ; u-lenf (op'u-lcnt); u-bui (faVu- 
lotu) ; u-oui (eumpc'u-ouB) ; u-nii (nat'u-ral) ; u-tivt (coQ-sec'u- 
tive, ftc, except con'tti-Kt-ive) ; y-m (a-nal'y-sis). 

{ 109. Warda of more than two ByllablEB, haying the follow, 
ing endings, take the primary acctnt on the penult, or last aylla- 
ble but one ; namely, ent-al (or-na-mcnt'al) ; te (an-gel'ic, &c,, 
eicept a^ar-ic, Ar'a-bic, a~rilh'niB-tic, nHje-nic, the noun, btih'- 
ap-rie, eath'o-lie, e^cPtr-ie, cli-mac'lar-ie, tm'pir-ie, the noun, — M 
tbe last two are often pronounced, — e-p/iem'e-ric, har'e-lic, im~ 
po/i-lic, lu'na-tic, poPi-tie, rl>et''i-iic, tchu'mat-ie, — as BomGorthoe- 
pigta pronounDe the mum, — iplen'e-lic, tur'mer-ie) ; iet (me-char'- 
ica, ftc, eiccpt poFi-lia) ; o-m {a-naa-to-nio'sis, &e., except 
ap-c-the'o-Hi and. met-O'mor'plio-iii) \ liee (ad-he'sive). — See } 104. 
{ 110. Of the words ending in e-an, aome haye the primary 
accent on the penult, as,ii<J-a-inan-(e'an, Al-lan-le'aii, eo-lca-te'att, 
em-py-re'ait, ep-t-eu-re'an, Bu-ro-pe'an, hy-mt-nt'an, pyg-me'an ; 
and some on the antepenult, as,cr-ru'te-an, htr'eu'U-aa, Med-i-ttr- 
ro'ne-an, «ui-(<r-ro'nt-on, tar-ta'rt'an. 

\ 111. Of the words ending in t-um, some have tbe primary 
accent on tbe penult, as, ^-cs'iun, nuu-to-fe'um, inu-a«'i»n i and 
■ome on tbe antepenult, aa,oat-to'Ti-wn, itK-et-da'ttt-UTTi^ ptr-i- 




INTRODUCmON. 49 

^ 112. Woxds the last syllable of which begins with the 
sound of sh (except when ch has this sound, as in ma-chine'), 
of 2 as in a'zttre {zh), or of y consonant, constituting a Tery 
large dass, have the primary accent on the penult (ab-lu'tion, 
ad-di'tion, ac-ces'sion, a-tro'cious, pro-vin'cial, mu-si'cian, ere- 
ta'ceous, ez-plo'sion, se-clu'tdon, de-ci'bion, ez-p6a'ure, ci-yil'ian, 
oom-pan'ion). 

} 113* Many words, especially scientific words derived from 
the Greek or the Latin with no change or only a slight change of 
orthography, retain the accent given to them by the rule accord- 
ing to which those languages are pronounced by modern scholars ; 
namely, that words of two syllables are invariably accented on 
the first syllable ; and that, in words of more than two syllables, 
if the penult Is long, it is accented, but if the penult is short, the 
accent falls upon the antepenult. The following are examples of 
words which belong to this class : a-cu^men, a'St^lum, bi-tu'men, 
de-et/mmf ho-ri'zont eat-a-chreftia, ex-e-ge'sis, par'tt-gt^ge, proi-O' 
pO'PiB'ia, But the analogy of the English prevails over what 
may be termed the classical accent in many words of common 
oocurrence ; as, au'di'tor, or'a-tor, min^is-ter, sen'o-tor, 

) 114. Many words derived without change of orthography 
from tlie French are accented on the last syllable ; as, an-tigue', 
htU'Hy, bour-geois', cha-teau', cor-vette*, Jl-neste*, gi-raffe', eAer-o- 
her*, ctd-ras-aier'f gon-do-lier', 

i 115. When two words, which differ only or chiefiy in one 
of their syllables, are used antithetically, the primary accent is 
transferred to that syllable. Thus, the accent of the words for' 
bearding, m-Jus'tiee, un-done', is transferred to the first syllable 
when JoHhear^ing is contrasted with hearting, in'jua'tioe with 
Jut'tiee^ tm'done with done. 

i 116. With respect to the secondary accent, Smart remarks 
that, though it is not indispensable, ** its effect is very generally 
felt in the rhythm of the word, and still more generally in the 
distinctness it gives to the syllable under it." The place of this 
accent may, in most cases, be easily determined by the ear, when 
that of the primary accent is known. 

\ 117« The secondary accent is generally separated from the 
primary by the intervention of an unaccented syllable or of two 
unaccented syllables ; as in ac^'ci^dent'ol^ cdH^i'Oa^twrf? • "Eut lObf^ 

• 6 



60 INTBODUCnON, 

two accents are sometimes consecutiye ; as in the words a^^men\ 
co^'e'quali re^'ech'o, and in those with a negatiye prefix in the 
following lines: — 

And, doubly djring, Bhall go down 

To the vile dust from whence he sprang, 

Un''wept', im"hon'ored, and on^sung'. 

{ 118. When two words are used antithetically with respect 
to their prefixes or suffixes, the prefix or the suffix takes a pri- 
mary accent, and the syllable which is ordinarily accented takes 
a secondary accent ; as, in'ereaae" when opposed to de*crease", 
jrro'ceed'f to pre'eede^'i im'puP'aion to ex^pul'^sion^ ex'te^ri-or to 
in'ie"ri'Or ; de-pend^'ant' to de-pend^'ent^ lea'Ueef to fe»"«or'. 

i 119. The accents primary and secondary sometimes change 
places when two words are used antithetically with respect to a 
syllable which ordinarily has the secondary accent ; as in pwph' 
n''tion when opposed to prep'o-n'UioUf aPkMiu'^tion to elfo-cu^'tion, 
prob'o'inPU-ty to plaua'i'lnP'i'tif, 



VU. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MIS- 

PRONOUNCED. 

§ 120. In acquiring a correct pronunciation, attention should 
be directed especially to such words as form exceptions to any 
of the general principles in regard to the seat of the accent, or to 
such as, being exceptional under one law, are embraced under 
another. It will be well to point out, also, for particular con- 
sideration, all other words or classes of words in pronouncing 
which errors of any kind are apt to be made. 

{121. Some nouns and adjectiYes accented on the second 
syllable, contrary to the principle stated in } 103, are often mis- 
pronounced ; as, ca-nine^, oon-dign^ am-jtmct', mo-rcua^, re^oeM', 
research'^ re-aource', rO'mance^f nh-huat^^ ver-hoaef, 

k 122. Many words of three or more syllables, not accented 
on the antepenult according to the principle stated in § 105, are 
liable to be mispronounced ; as, mon-ti-mt^', mar'fno^aet*^ mag't^ 




INTRODUCTION. 51 

ctfw', jMm-to-fooru' ; eon-tem'plate, de-monUtreUe, ex-po^nent, cp-po'- 
nent ; leg^U'ldi-ure^ oHtAo-e^pyt per^emp'tO'ry, 

\ 123. Some derivatiye words are frequently mispronounced 
on account of not being accented like their primitiTes, in conform- 
ity with the principle stated in § 106 ; as,cAa«'<w0-men/, com'pct-ra' 
ble, dia^pu-ta'hle, lam'tnt-a-ble, 

i 124. Care should be taken to discriminate by the right ac- 
cent two such words as, being of the same spelling, have different 
meanings, or are classed under different parts of speech ; as, can'- 
jure and eon-jur^, pre-dd^eiU andpre^'e-dent. — See {103. 

i 125. Persons unacquainted with the classical languages are 
apt to mispronounce such words as, being derived from these lan- 
guages, retain the accent given to them in the original by scholars ; 
as, ag-no^men^ al-hur*num^ ca-nofrouSf fy-ce'vm, mU'Se'um, — See 
{ 113. 

i 126. The secondary accent is sometimes placed upon a syl- 
lable which should properly have no accent, as in dif^fi-cuV'tyy 
mem'bra'^runu, pen't'trafble, ter'n-to^ry ; and sometimes it is very 
improperly made to change places with the primary, as in o/^a- 
bas'ter, in^ter-est'inff (properly aTa^boB^'ter, in'ter-est^Hng), 

{ 127. It is a common error of pronunciation to substitute 
one vowel sound for another ; as in saying dn'gel for dn'gel, crik 
for creek, cu'pa-Ui for cufpo-la, dif for diaf^ jest for justt par'a- 
grdph for par^a-grdph, pUt for plAitt nlunt for ai'lent, ieru for «tnce, 
«ddf» for *(xw, to8*sel for taa'tel, yttPur for yeVUtw^ yis for yet, 

i 128. The vowel «, or the digraph «p, when it follows the 
sound of r or of »A, is sometimes erroneously pronounced with 
the sound of long « (No. 17, § 26), instead of its proper sound of 
«>. Thus, the words nde^ truSf shrew, are sometimes pronounced 
as if they were written r-yoolt tr-yoo, ahr-yoo, or reool, trtoo, shreoo, 
and not, as they should be to represent their correct prommcia- 
tion, root, troo, akroo, 

{129. An affected pronunciation is sometimes given to 0, 
I, and ea before r ; as in saying nUHcy for mer*qf, sir'vant 
for terfvant, virt'w for virt'ue, iam for earn, irth for earth. — 
Bee i 21, Notb. 

{ 130. The practice, common in the United States, of shorten- 
ing the sound of long o in some words, as coat, home, atone, &c., is 
condemned by the best orthofipists. — See { 24. 



52 INTRODUCnCW. 

{131. Particular attention should be paid to those words 
in which the vowel a is sounded as in fast (No. 3, } 12). 

{ 132. It is a common error of careless speakers to suppress 
the sounds of vowels in unaccented syllables ; as in saying comf- 
ia-ble for com'/ort-a-ble, dea'praie for dea'per-ate, ev'ry for ev'er-y, 
his'try for hia'to-ry, memory for mem'o-ry, part'ci-ple for part^i- 

ci'ple. 

§ 133. The sound of short u should not be interposed be- 
tween that of a final m and that of /, », or th which precedes it ; as 
in saying hePhtm for Ae/m, ehazfum for chaam, rhyth'um for rhythm. 

i 134. The sound of «, when it immediately precedes in a 
syllable immediately following an accented syllable, is sometimes 
improperly changed into the sound of ch ; and the sound of d, 
when so situated before e or •*, is sometimes improperly changed 
into the sound of j; as in pronouncing the words bounteouat plen^ 
taoua, hideous, odUma, as if they were written hown'che-ua, plen'che- 
ua, hife-uat o'ji-us. This mode of pronouncing these and similar 
words was sanctioned by Walker, but it is now generally agreed 
that he was in error ; inasmuch as such a substitutioil of ch for t 
and of y for d cannot take place, in conformity with the principle 
by which the sounds of t and consonant y, or of <f and consonant 
y are sometimes properly exchanged for the sounds of ch and j 
(See { 44, Notb 1, and § 45, Note), without making e or t do 
double duty, in representing the sound of consonant y, and at the 
same time retaining its vowel character. An error equally great, 
and of which the like pernicious influence may be observed in 
some modern mispronunciations, was made by Sheridan, as point- 
ed out by Walker himself, in allowing the sound of t to be changed 
into that of eh when it occurred before long u in the same sylla- 
ble, as in the words tune^ Tuea'day^ tu'mulit which, according to 
Sheridan, should be pronounced ehoon, ehooz'dd, choo^muU. 

{ 136. The smooth r (No, 40, { 49), should never be trilled, as 
in saying /aw-rm for /orm, iouh-rld for world; nor should it be sup- 
pressed, as in saying fato instead of for^ cawd for cord, latod for 
lord, nua for nurae ; nor sounded where it does not properly be- 
long, as in saying lawr for law, aawr for aaw, 

{ 136, The consonant a is frequently sounded like a in aetU 
when it should have the sound of z in sea/; as in dis-arm* (dis- 
arm'), JUm*ay (flun'cy), greatly (greaz'y), na^scU (na'zal), poa»ae$a^ 



INTBODDCnOK. 53 

(pox-ieB'). It will be well to remember that t ima always the 
■oimd of ( ; 1st, wbea it immediately follows a local consonant 
or B vocsl consonant end a silent t in the same sjUable, as in tubt 
(tub>), dragi (drags), fada (fKdz) ; 2d, when it comes immediately 
before the liquid consonant ra in the same ejllable, as in thaim 
(kozm), prion (priim) J 3d, iu the additional syllable e> forming 
the plural of nouns and the third person singular of verbs, as in 
bo^t* (boks'ei). prti'M (prls'ei), pitat'a (pUz'ei) ; 4th, at [he end 
of all plural nouns whose singular ends with the sound of a vowel, 
as in oj/er'at (op'cr-az), thoet {abooi} ; in the final syllable of 
verbs that end in k preceded by u, as in a-butt' (a-baz'), oc-cuw' 
(ak-kuz') ; also of verbs that end in it preceded by i, as in ad-vM 
(ad-vlz'), de-tpit' (de-Bpls'), except mor'tite, prac'liie, prom'ite; 
and in the third person singular of verbs that end with the sound 
of a vowel, aa in be-tra^i^(be-ati'), tea (sez) ; fith, in some verbs, 
in order to distinguiah them &om nouns of the same spelling, as 
in the verbs to frtatt (grii), to houtt (howz), to uae (Qz). 

The letter ■ has the sound of s, generally, when i< follows aa 
accented syllable ending with a vowel or a liquid; as in ea'tg 
(fi'if), n/tg (to'zy), c&on'iy (Uum'iy), pdJ'jy (pSl'iy), ta»'tf 
(Ijn'zy). 

Thi<i letter has also the sound of z in the preRic dU, according 
to Smart, when the following syllable is accented and begins with 
a vocal consonant, or n-ith any vowel sound eioepl thatoflongw; 
as in rfijt-j(«('(diB-gust'), i*rf-<nnt'(diz-On'). dii-hon'or (diz-on'ur). 
Walker gives substantially the same rule ; and Worcester follows 
it in marking the pronunciation of those words to which it ap- 
plies. But Perry, Knowlca, Webster, Goodrich, and some other 
orthoepiats, not adopting this rule, pronounce du as du in a very 
few words only. 

The conM)nant j is also sometimes sounded like t when it should 
have its aspirate sound ; as in saying ad-Mziv for ad-h^Ace, nut- 
a-moi'phdi for nat-a'Vi/ir'plioie, prt-ciz'!;/ for prt'ciie'Iy, 

{ 137. The consonant z is sometimes sounded like ki when it 
should have the sound of ^. The general rule is, that x has the 
•onnd of A> when it endi an accented syllable, as in ei^er-eiit (eks'- 
er-sii), ex'e-crate (eks'e-kril), and when it ends an unaccented 
syllable, if the next syllable is accented and begins with a conao- 
nant, as in n-ttutf (eks-kOs'), ex-pemt' (eks-pens'} ; and that it 



54 INTOODUCnON. 

has the sound of gx when it ends an unaccented syllable, and the 
next syllable, having the accent, begins with a vowel or the let- 
ter kt as in ex-am'ple (egz-am'pl), ex-ert' (egz-ert'), ex-hort^ (eg>- 
hort'), luX'U'ri'Oua (lugz-yoo'ri-us). The word ex^em-pla-ry, pro- 
nounced egz'em-pla^ry according to most orthoCpists, and the word 
eX'Udle't pronounced eks-^d', are exceptions. 

§ 138. Care should be taken to note those words in which g, 
usually sounded like j before e, t, or y, has its hard sound, or the 
Kound of ^ in po (No. 44, { 53), before any one of these vowels ; as 
in geaff geeae, geto'gaw^ gib'ctU, gib'bous, brag'ger, rag'ged^ drvg'gUt, 
rig'ging^ crag''gy^ fog'gy. This consonant has necessarily its hard 
sound (See § 66) when it occurs, as in the last six examples, at 
the beginning of a syllable before «, t, or y, in consequence of be- 
ing doubled at the end of a word, in which it has its hard sound* 
on adding a termination that begins with any one of these vowels. 
— See} 176. 

{ 139. The cases in which the letter h is silent at the begin- 
ning of a word, as in tunar (our), hon'or (on'or), should be care- 
fully discriminated from those in which it is sounded, as in hos'pp- 
ial, hos'tage. It is to be observed that h must always be sounded 
when it begins a syllable not initial, as in ab-hor', he-hest', per- 
haps', ve'he-ment ; and that it is always silent when it does not be- 
gin a syllabic, as in ah, eh, Brah^ma, Mes-n'ah. 

{ 140. It is important to distinguish those words in which the 
digraph th has its aspirate sound (M in thin, No. 28, § 37), as in 
path (singular), truth, truths (singular and plural), breath, &c., 
from those in which it has iU vocal sound {th in this. No. 29, } 38). 
as in beneath, breathe, Uthe, paths (plural). The plural of truth 
should be especially noted in respect to the sound of th, as it is 
frequently mispronounced by giving to th the same vocal sound 
which it properly has in the plural of path (paths). 

§ 141. Some consonant sounds are apt to be confounded; as 
those of sh and s in saying srink for shrink, srub for shrub ; of d 
and g, in saying dloom for gloom ; of t and k, in saying tlaim for 
claim; of ph (equivalent to f) andp, in saying ty'pxis for ty'pliua ; 
of th and gh (equivalent to /). in saying troth for trough {trof) ; 
of wh and tr, in saying weth'er for wheth'er ; of n and ng, in saying 
ting'in for sing'ing, and van'quish for vang'quish ; of ir and r, in 
saying betreen for between. 



INTRODUCTION. 55 

§ 142. Consonant sounds are sometimes omitted where they 
should be heard ; as in saying con-dem^er for eon-dem'ner^ eastward 
for east'toardt F^'u-a-iy for /«6'ru-a-ry, han*ful for hand^fid, 

§ 143. Derivatiye words that have a short vowel in one syl- 
lable answering to a long one in the primitive are apt to be mis* 
pronounced; as in saying hih-o^iney hl'ro-iam (from h€*fxi) instead 
of ker*o-iney hir'o-iimy and in saying tialfU, ziafotu (from Ual) 
instead of zictPot, zlaVous, 

§ 144. Some words are erroneously pronounced in conse- 
quence of blending two syllables into one ; as in saying an'ti-podet 
for an^tip^o-deSf ex-tem'pore for ex-tem'po-re, se'riea for sefri-ea. 

{ 146. Some words are mispronounced by dividing them into 
more syllables than properly belong to them ; as in saying brev'%' 
a-ry for brev'ta-ry (brev'ya-ry), en'gin-er-y for en'ffine-ry, aai/o- 
ger-y for sav'txye-ry, 

i 146. The sound of y consonant is sometimes wrongly inter- 
posed between that of one of the guttural consonants, k (or c 
hard) and g, and that of a in fat (No. 2, § 11), i long, er or ir; 
as in saying e-yctr for car, k-yind foj kind^ k^yer^ chief for ker' chief, 
y-yirl for girl. — See § 62. 

} 147. Mistakes are sometimes .^ade in pronunciation through 
inattention to the meaning of two words which though spelled 
alike, are differently pronounced ; aSfCUan'ly and cUan'ly, hin'der 
and hittd^er, sidv'er and sldv'er. — See {161. 

{148. Words nearly alike in spelling are sometimes con- 
founded in pronunciation ; as^corpa (kdr) and corpse, nap and nape, 
etalk and ttork, subt'le (sut'l) and aub'tile, — See { 67. 

{149. Of words ending in el, en, il, in, or on, the cases in 
which the vowels e, i, and o ought to be sounded, as in eiv'il, kiich^- 
en, roa'in, ten'don, trav'el, should be carefully discriminated from 
those in which they ought not to be sounded, as in ba'ain (ba'sn), 
buiUon (but'n), e'vil (e'vl), ha'zel (ha'zl), often (of n). 

{ 160. Of words ending in ed it should be observed that the 
e is generally f^uppressed in those which are verbs or participles, 
the root of which does not end in the sound of d or of t ; as in 
blamed, framed, believed, poatessed. When the root ends in d or in 
tt the e is necessarily sounded before d following it, as in ac- 
ceded, eol-leet'ed, ex-pect'ed, because two consonant sounds ut- 
tered through the same position of the organs cannot be easily 



^ 

i 



56 INTRODUCTION. 

blended. The of this termination is sounded in most adjectires, 
as afgedt crab'bedt dog^ged^ na'kedt rag'ged, toretch'ed; unless it is 
preceded by / and another consonant, when it is suppressed, as in 
brin'dled, cir'eled^ dim'pled^ freek'led, mot' tied, griz'zled. It is sound- 
ed also in a few participles used as adjectives, as be-hv'ed, bleas'ed, 
crook'ed, leamfed, air^ak'ed, wing'ed. Thus, the e of the termina- 
tion ed is suppressed in the past tense and past participle of the 
yerh pick, as in the expressions, ** He picked his men," •* A hun- 
dred picked men " ; but it is sounded in 'the adjective piekfed 
(point'ed), as in the phrase, ** A picked stake." So, also, it is sup- 
pressed in the word beloved, used participially, as in the sentence, 
** He is much beloved " ; but it is soimded when the same word 
becomes an adjective, as in the expression, ** A be-lov*ed son." 

The termination ed is sometimes soimded as a distinct syllable 
in poetry, for the sake of the metre, though the word in which it 
occurs is not so pronounced in prose ; as in the following lines : 

ArriyM there, the little house they fill. Spenser. 

*TiB mlg^htiest In the mightiest ; it beoomes 

The throned monarch better than his crown. Shakespeare' 

In notes, with many a winding bout 

Of linkM sweetness long drawn out. Milton. 

Or hear old Triton blow his wreathM horn. Wordsworth. 

In a derivative formed by adding either of the syllables fy, n&ss, 
to a word ending in ed, this termination is pronoimced as a dis- 
tinct syllable, though the e is suppressed in the primitive ; as in 
con'fess'ed-lg, de-sign' ed-ly^ blear* ed-ness, pre-par'ed-ness. 

{161. Of words which have an unaccented syllable ending 
in the vowel t immediately preceding an accented syllable, the 
cases in which t is long (No. 16, { 25), as in bl'lin'gual, cft-om'tf- 
ter, v\-vip'a'rous, should be carefully discriminated from those in 
which it is short (No. 7, { 16), as in bl-tu men, di-vide*, qvX-nine^, 

§ 162. Of words ending in He, ine, and ite, the cases in which 
the vowel t, when not under the accent in these terminations, is 
long (No. 16, § 25), as in ac^o-nite, crys'tal-line, gen' tile, should be 
carefully discriminated from those in which it is short (No. 7} 
{ 16), as in defi-nite^ doc'trine, fer'tile, 

{ 153. No pains should be spared to correct such vulgar er- 
rors, or unauthorized modes, of pronunciation as these: oramf' 




INTRODUCTION. 67 

4er-fy for entn'her-ry, scars for scarce (sk^rs), saht for sduce, voVhmt 
for ti'o'lent, win'dur for win'dOw, ad'uU for a-duW, ad-verstf for 
adfveraet a-men'a-ble for a-m^na-ble^ &c. ; and all word:» that ex- 
emplify this kind of pronunciation should be carefully noted. 

i 154« With regard to the pronunciation of foreign words 
sometimes used in English speech, as those from the French and 
the Italian, Smart remarks : ** At their first introduction, such 
words are pronounced, or attempted to be pronounced, without 
oormption of their original sounds ; by being much used, they 
gradually resign their foreign cast, and some of them at length 
become quite Engli^sh. It must therefore hap^ien, while in transi- 
tion from one of these states to the other, that they will be neither 
English nor foreign, — a condition it were bootless to complaiii 
of, injudicious to alter by going back to the original pronuncia- 
tion, and quixotic to amend by reducing them at once to the state 
of English words/' The same author says: *<Wiih regard to 
Latinized names in modem science, many of which have a form 
half Latin, half English, it is absurd to tie them to any classical 
law : their current will be their proper pronunciation, be it, in 
other respects, what it may." 

\ 166. There are many words in regard to the pronunciation 
of which both good speakers and the best orthoCpists differ. In 
such cases, indiyidual taste must be consulted, or, if that is dia- 
tmsted, the safest course will be to adopt that mode of pronuncia- 
tion which seems to be supported by tu« greatest weight of authority. 

In estimating authorities, cautioL bhould be observed with re- 
spect to the name of Walker, whose peculiarities of pronuncia- 
tion, or the modes recommended by him, in certain cases, have 
been condemned by the best modem ortho^pists. — See {} 62, 107, 
134. 

\ 166. The number of this section (156) is affixed to such 
words in the Vocabulary as may, for any of the causes enumerated 
in the preceding sections, or for any other cause, be especially 
liable to be mispronounced. 



58 INTRODUCTION. 

Vm. CLASSES OF WORDS LIABLE TO BE MIS- 
SPELLED. X 

{ 157. The difficulties usually experienced in learning to spell 
English words correctly, arise from various causes. These are 
separately enumerated in the following sections, with examples 
illustrating several classes of words. Other examples may be 
collected from the Vocabulary by means of the numbers which 
refer to the corresponding sections of this Introduction. 

i 158. Several letters or several combinations of letters are 
used to represent the same sound ; as, a, at, ao, au^ ay, aye, ea, ei, 
and ey to represent the sound of long a, respectively, in the words 
ale, aim, gool, gauge, day, aye, great, veil, they. Numerous simi- 
lar examples for each of the elementary soimds, especially the 
vowel sounds, may be collected from the Vocabulary by means of 
the numbers there inserted corresponding to the sections in which 
the several elementary soimds are treated of. 

(159. The same letter or the same combination of letters is 
used to represent different sounds; as, the letter o for the different 
sounds it has in old, on, orb, do, work, ton, toolf, toom'en, and the 
combination ou for the different sounds it has in ounce, soup, four, 
touch, ought, could, Jour'nal, cough. So the letter x is sometimes 
equivalent in sound to ks (war), sometimes to ksh (anjr'ious), 
sometimes to gz '(ex-act'), and sometimes to z (ana:-i'e-ty). 
Other examples may be found in }^ 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, and more 
may be added to these by a comparison of the words noted by 
numbers in the Vocabulary as illustrating the several elementary 
sounds. 

} 160. There are many pairs or groups of words pronounced 
alike, but differently spelled ; as, ai/ and ale; all and awl; cere, 
tear, and seer. Similar examples are noted in the Vocabulary by 
the number of this section (160). 

(161. There are several pairs of words spelled alike but dif- 
ferently pronounced ; a9,lead (l£d) and lead (led) ; slough (slou) 
and slough (sluf ). — See {147. 

i 162. There are many words in the orthography of which 
silent letters occur, that is, letters which represent no sound ; as, 
b in debt and doubt, s in island, eh in yacht. The consonants, 



INTRODUCTION. 59 

Bmgle OT combined, \vhich are sometimes silent are b (dedt), e 
(Yifft'uals), d (Werfnes'day), y (fei^, ^at), h (gAost, Aour), k 
(Anife), / (ta/k, saAn'on), m (mne-mon'ics), n (hymu, con-temn'), 
p (psalm), 8 (ifland), t (often, cas'de), to (trrite), eh (dracAm), 
gh (ri^At), ph (pAthis'ic), rh (myrrh), 

•* When two consonant letters," says Smart, ** come together 
that are articnlated by contact in the same part of the mouth, as 
m and b [lamb], m and p [ademption], / and n [ki/it] ; or that are 
sounded in the same region, as m and n [hymn] ; or that are fol- 
lowed by a sound that more readily joins itself to the former of 
the two consonants than the latter, as / when it follows sc or 
H [muM^le, bu4de], m or » when it follows/^ or at [Chnstmas, 
chestnut], ff when it follows rt [morf^age], and o when it follows 
aw or tw [atcord, tioo] ; — in such cases the latter of the two con- 
sonants is generally dropped in the pronunciation." 

From similar causes having reference to ease of utterancQi 
and from the tendency, in adopting foreign words, to make the 
combinations of consonant sounds conform to English analogies, 
the former of two consonants, as the same author remarks, is 
dropped in pronouncing some words ; as. 6 in &<fellium, de6^ ; 
e in czar, indicf ; g in ^Tiome, phle^, si^ ; k in Aneel ; I in 
caim, fo2^, \»Xk ; m in mnemonics ; p in p«alm, receipt ; a in de- 
mesne, i«fe. 

Silent letters, especially silent consonants, may be traced, in 
most cases, to the original languages from which the words con- 
taining them were derived. Thus the silent 6 in the words debt 
and doubt may be traced to the Latin words debitum and dubito, 
in which 6 is sounded. 

{ 163. Of the vowels, e is always silent at the end of words, 
except a few derived from the Greek, the Latin, or other foreign 
languages ; as, apocope, apoatrophe, catastrojihe, epitome, recipe, 
timile, ayaiole, ayncope, anime, cicerone, protegd. The usual effect 
of the final e, when it follows a single consonant, a consonant 
digraph, or the combined consonants at, in a monosyllabic or in 
an accented syllable, is to lengthen the preceding vowel; as in 
babe, here, mile, bone, lute, InUhe, paate, a-bate', com-plete', re'Vokef, 
tra-duee', im-bathe', dia-taate'. The reason of this is, as Smart 
remarks, •* that the e was originally sounded, and made with the 
consonant a distinct syllable, leaving the previous vowel final in 



60 V INTRODUCTION. 

the foregoing eyilable. Thus, too, the Towel is long in ehatte, 
ttuUt &c., because the words were originally chd-ste, td-atet &c. ; 
so, likewise, in bathe, &c., because the consonant is double only 
to the eye." 

The following monosyllables are exceptions to. the lengthening 
effect of final e preceded by a single consonant ; namely, are, axe, 
bade, eome, done, dove, give, ghve, gone, hate, live, love, none, one, 
sate (as the past tense of sit is sometimes spelled), shove, some, 
were, and withe. In the accented syllables of the words a-bove', 
be'Come', for-bade*, for-give', and in the unaccented syllables of 
many other words, as doc* trine, fer'tile, pas' site, op'po-site, the final 
e does not show the quantity of the preceding Towel, being, as 
Smart expresses it, **idle as well as silent." 

{ 164. There is a large class of words in which the vowel 
e final is silent after the combined consonants bl (bi'Me), d 
(cir'cfe), dl (bri'cKe). fl (tri'fle), gl (ea'^fe), kl (pic'Afe), pi (ap>fe), 
tl (hot'tle), zl (puz'rte). 

When e terminates the last syllable of a word after r, this 
syllable is pronounced as if 0, or its equivalent before r, the 
natural vowel u (No. 12, { 21), preceded the r, as in ht'ers 
(lultur), o'chre (o'kur), o'gre (o'gur), sa'bre (sa'bur), the'a'tre 
(the'a-tur). Webster and Goodrich recommend that words of 
this class should be written with the e preceding the r, except 
when the e would thus be made to follow e or ^, as in lu'ere, 
ofgre, which, if written lu'cer, o'ger, would be liable to be mis- 
pronounced by giving to c and g their soft sound. 

§ 165. The vowel e is usually silent in the termination ed of 
the imperfect tense and the past participle of regular verbs that 
do not end with the sound of <f or of ^ ; as in caused (kauzd), 
d^-e0»v«f''(de-sevd'),^an«-^eM^'(tran8-gre8t'). But it is sounded 
in most adjectives, in some participles used as adjectives, and 
sometimes also in poetry for the sake of the metre. — See { 150, 

A few words, derived regularly from primitives ending in tf or in 
ss by adding ed, are also written by dropping this termination, as 
well as the final consonant of the primitive, and substituting t\ 
%&,tpelled, blessed, which are frequently written spelt, blest. When 
the sound of d, which is vocal, follows that of s, which is aspirate, 
it is naturally changed into the sound of t, (See Note C. p. 34.) 
But when the sound of d follows that of /, as these sounds are 



INTRODUCTION. 61 

both Tocal, tbej may be easily uttered together ; though the 
m>und of 4 being liquid as well as vocal, may also be easily 
made to blend with that of t» So, too, when the termination ed 
follows the liquid and yocal consonant n, in the regular form 
of a yerb, there 'is a tendency to replace the sound of d by that 
of ^ ; as in the words burned, learned, which are also sometimes 
written burnt, learnt, 

\ 166. The vowel e is silent in the termination ea of the plu- 
ral of nouns and the third person singular of the present tense 
of verbb, as in lake* (Uks), apples (ap'plz), hasten (hasts), craves 
(kravz), trem'bles (trem'blz) ; except when it follows a conso- 
nant that does not blend with the sound of « or of « (as c 
toft, p soft, s and x), as in ra'ces (ra'sez), sia'ges (sta'jez), 
^as'ea (gas'ez), box'es (boks'ez). 

{ 107 • The vowels e, i, and o are silent before n in the final 
syllable of some words, as in heaven (hev'n), cous'in (kuz'n), 
button (buT'ti) ; and the vowels e and t are also silent before / in 
the final syllable of some words, as in shov'el (shuv'l), e^vil (e'vl). 

\ 168. The digraph ue, when final, is silent in some words 
after g and after ^ ; as in tongue (tung), u-nigue' (u-nek'). 

f 169. There are numerous classes of words difficult to spell 
on account of the resemblance in sound of syllables or parts of 
fyllables tliac are spelled differently, or on accoimt of the indis- 
tinctness of tHe vowel sound in the penultimate syllable ; as. 

Words beginning with the following syllables : — 

Ante, anti (on^acedent, antithetical ; antepenult, on/tchristian) 

Cer, eir, ser, eur (certain, circle, ««rvant, sumAme). 

De, di (dehaxe, divide ; decUne, diy'ine ; (2<?ception, (diplomacy). 

Fer,fir, fur (/ertile, ^rkin, ywtive ; /ervid, ^rman, ^/umace). 

Mer, mur, myr (7n«rchant, murmur, myrtle). 

Per, pur {perfect, pttrpose ; pervBde, pursue), 

Ter, twr (terminate, turpentine ; tertiary, A^rbinate). 

Words ending in the following syllables : — 

•^^f ^«> i^fg^* idge, ige (adage, college, marriage, porridge, vesttye). 

Anee, ence, (abundamv, residence ; utterance, diffcre/ice). 

Ant, ent (attendant, impendent ; supplian/, rocipienO* 

Ar, er, ir, or, ur, yr, re (dollar, miller, tapir, sailor, sulphur, 
aepbyr, lustre). 

(kde^ ceedf sede (iseeede, succeed, aupersede), 

6 



62 INTRODUCTION. 

Cial, aial, tial (beneficio/, controvernoA providen^ui/). 

Cian^ aiorif tion (politictan, appreheimon, satisfac^tbn). 

Ceous, eiotu, tunu (heibBeemu, sagacioiM, TexsUiaua), 

City, Hty (Atrocity, yeihosity ; felicity, necesnVy). 

Cy, ay (policy, hereay ; secrecy, courte«y). 

Ear, eer, ere, ier (appear, engineer, persevere, brigadter). 

Geotu, gioua (couxageoua, reliyioua ; outra^eoM, contagious). 

Ice, iae, is (bodice, treatMe, trellu ; offtce, promwe, basis). 

Om, ome, um (atom, welcome, alum ; idiom, lonesome, vacuum). 

Otu, us (porotM, chortM ; odiot», radiue ; periloiM, nautilut). 

Phe, phy (apostxqpAe, philosctpAy ; catastrqpAe, biograpAy). 

Sy, xy (daijy, la^y ; easy, breezy; drowsy, blow^ry). 

F, ey (lady, barley ; study, honey ; sandy, turkey). 

Words in which the penultimate sjUable is unaccented and ends 
in a, e, or i, or in r preceded by e (laudable, edible, ornament, 
tenement, liniment, rarefy, clarify, vitreous, various, solitude, 
quietude, laity, piety, delegate, profligate, culinary, millinery). 

Words in which the sound of long e is represented by ei or ie 
(seize, piece, weird, chief, receive, believe, conceit, besiege). 

Note.— It will obviate most of the difficulty of spelling words in 
wliich the Boand of long e is represented by ei or ie, to remember that ei 
la always used for jibls purpose rather than ie, when this sound ooeurs 
Immediately after c ; and that ie is used rather than H after most other 
consonants. The words in which ei represents the sound of long e alter 
other consonants beside c, are chiefly the following, — inveigle, leisure, 
neither, seignior, seine, seise, weird, and such other words as are derira- 
tives of any of these. 

§ 170. A doubt frequently arises as to the proper mode of 
8|felling a word in which a consonant sound occurs between two 
vowel sounds in different syllables ; a consonant sound so situ- 
ated being, in some words, represented by a single letter, as in 
ur^id, hig^ot, pan^el, trip'le, and, in others, by a double letter, as in 
ear*ried, fag*got, chan*nel, rip'ple. — See §} 66, 176. 

} 171. The number of this section (171) is affixed to such 
words in the Vocabulary as may, for any of the causes enumer- 
ated in the preceding sections, or for any other cause, be pecu- 
liarly difficult to spell. 



INTRODUCTION. 63 



IX. RULES FOR SPELIJNG CERTAIN CLASSES OF 

WORDS. 

§ 172. (1.) The letter I, when preceded by a single vowel, is 
always doubled at the end of a monosyllable ; as in 6atf, bell, dell, 
mill, shall, will, 

{ 173. (2.) The letter /, when preceded by a single vowel, is 
generally doubled at the end of a monosyllable ; as in Huff, cUff, 
^^ff^ jmff, »nuff, ttuff. The words clef, if, and cf are the only 
exceptions. 

§ 174. (3.) The letter *, when preceded by a single vowel, 
tnd when it is not the sign of the possessive case or of the plural 
of a noun, or of the third person singular of a verb, is generally 
doubled at the end of a monosyllable ; as in hraaa, class, dress, 
glass, kiss, moss, press. The following words are the only excep- 
tions, — as, gas, has, his, is, pus, this, thus, uf, voas, yes, 

} 176. (4.) The only consonants, except /, /, and s, that are ever 
doubled at the end of a word, are ; b in abb, ebb; d in add, odd, 
rudd ; g in egg ; m in lamm, mttmm (verb) ; n in bimn, inn ; r in 
burr, err, murr, parr, purr, shirr ; t in butt ; z in buxz, fuzz. These 
consonants are doubled^ when final, only in the words enumerated. 

i 176. (6.) In a derivative formed by adding a syllable begin- 
ning with a vowel to a monosyllable, or to a final accented sylla- 
ble, ending in a single consonant (except h, and also s in the de- 
rivatives of g<u, as gaseous, gasify) preceded by a vowel soimd 
represented by a single letter, that consonant is doubled ; as in 
rcVber, propeVUng, quit' ted, formed by adding the syllables er, ing, 
ed to rcb, propel, quit, respectively. In the last of these words 
(quit), the letter u, it will be observed, is a vowel to the eye only, 
being really equivalent to consonant to. If the primitive ends in 
two consonants (as in act, refomC), or if, though ending in a single 
consonant, this Consonant is preceded by a vowel sound represent- 
ed by a digraph (as in boil, feel, con^ceaf), the final letter is not 
doubled in the derivative. So also if the accent is not on the final 
syllable of the primitive (as in big'ot, profit, lim*it), or if the ac- 
cent of the primitive is thrown back in the derivative (as in refer- 
enee from rc'fer'), the final consonant is not doubled in the deriv' 
ative, except in the cases mentioned in the next section. 



64 INTRODUCTION, 

The reduplication of the consonant, according to the mle here 
giyen, is obviously an orthographical expedient to keep the pre- 
ceding vowel short, in conformity with the general principle that 
the vowels have their short sound when followed by a consonant 
in the same syllable. If the final consonant of the primitives 
were not doubled in robber^ propelling^ quitted^ for example, these 
words would be liable to be mispronounced in consequence of 
having their syllables wrongly divided ; thus, ro^ber^ pro-^Ung^ 
ftii^ted, 

i 177. (6.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable begin- 
ning with a vowel to most words that end in /, this letter is 
doubled, by most writers, in conformity with a practice long prev- 
alent, though the final syllable is not accented ; as in trav'el-ler, 
irac' el-ling t travelled (from trav'el). But many persons in the 
United States now write the derivatives of such words with one 
^ as recommended by Lowth, Perry, Walker, Webster, and Good- 
rich, who justly maintain that this mode is more in accordance 
with analogy than the other. Both parties, however, agree in 
writing the derivatives of par^cU-M with one /. There is a diver- 
sity of usage, also, with respect to doubling the final consonant in 
the derivatives formed by adding a syllable beginning with a vowel 
to the words &»'a«, car'bu-ret, com^pro-mit, sttTphu'rett and teor'sh^. 
The derivatives of kid'nap are uniformly written with thep doubled. 
The word excellence (from L. excellentia) is uniformly written with 
the I doubled, though the accent is on the first syllable. Smart 
remarks : <* The double /i in worshipped^ tcorshipper, &c., the double I 
in tnxvettingt traveller ^ &c., are quite unnecessary on any other acore 
than to satisfy the prejudices of the eye," — See Note E, p. 70. 

i 178. (7.) Derivatives formed by adding a syllable to worda 
that end in a double consonant generally retain both consonants ; 
BSjbhas'Jul, gruff ly^ stilVtiesa, There are some exceptions in the 
derivatives of words ending in II. W^hcn the syllable less or Ig is 
added to a word of this termination, one / is omitted by all lexi- 
cographers, — as in skiTlesSf fiWlgt — in order to prevent the meet- 
ing of three letters that represent the same sound. So also in the 
derivatives formed by adding the syllable ful or ness to the words 
dull, full, skill, will (dullness, ful'ness, skiVful, wiVfuC), and in those 
formed by adding the syllable ment to en-roW, in-staW, in^tkraff, 
or the syllable dom to thraU (m-rol'ment, in^stal'ment, in-tkrafmmit 



INTRODUCTION. 65 

ikrafdom), one /, according to Worcester, and most other lexi- 
cographers, should be omitted; but, according to Webster and 
GkxMlrich, these words should be spelled with the / doubled, as 
in the primitiyes. The deriTatiyes of pontiff, which have only 
one/, as pon-ttfi'eaif are also exceptions. 

§ 179. (8.) Deriyatiyes formed by prefixing a syllable to words 
that end in a double consonant generally retain both consonants, 
^Bthe-faW, un^weB', de-presa' ; though some of this class of deriya- 
tiyea from primitiyes ending in II are spelled in some modem 
dictionaries, as Smart's, with one 4 as? ^'fc^t tn-roP, fore-teP, 
m^thraP, The words dis-tiP, ful-fiV, in^tHP, and vn-tiP, are gen- 
erally thus written with one /; but, according to Webster and 
Goodrich, all of these, except the last, should be spelled with 
the / doubled. 

{ 180. (9.) Compound words generally retain all the letters 
which are used in writing the simple words that compose them ; 
aSio/^irtM, toeU-bred, The exceptions are some of the compounds 
of off ; as, al-miffhty, tUmost, already, also, although, altogether, 
akoayg, withal, therewithal, wherewithal ; the word wherever (where- 
erer) ; the words chilblain, welfare, Christmas, candlemas, and others 
compounded with the word mass ; the words artful, awful, sinful, 
and an others similarly compounded with the wordyuA; and, 
iocording to most lexicographers, the words fulfil and instil, 
though, according to Webster and Goodrich, these should be writ- 
ten with the / doubled in conformity with the general rule. 

§ 181. (10.) The letter e is generally followed by A to repre- 
sent the sound of k at the end of a monosyllable ; as in hack, 
hriek, thick, sick. The words are,fisc, lae, marc, ore, sac, tale, zinc, 
are exceptions. 

f 182. (11.) In deriyatiyes formed by adding a syllable 
tieginning with or • to a word ending with e, the letter k is 
inserted after c, in order to preyent it from taking the sound of 
«; as in trafficker, trafficking, trafficked (from traffic). 

J 183. (12.) In deriyatiyes formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a yowel to words that end in a silent e, the e is 
omitted, except when it serves to keep e or ^ soft, or when its 
omission would obscure the pronunciation or the meaning. Thus 
it is omitted in comHng, hOp^ing, sen'si-ble, spi^ey, suUng (from come, 
hope, sense, spiee, sve) ; but it is retained in peaee^a-ble, chang^a^ 

6» 



66 JNTRODUCnON. 

Ub (from pMce, ehattge), because, otherwise, e and g, coming imme- 
diately before a, would baye their hard sound. It is also retained 
in hoe'inpf shoe'ing (from Am, shot), to prevent the doubt that might 
arise about their pronunciation, if these words were written htrittf, 
thaing ; and in dye^ing, nnge'ing, tpringe'ing, twinge^ing, tingtfimg 
(from dye^ »inge, apringe, attinge^ tinge), in order that these parti- 
ciples may not be confofinded with dyeing, aing'ingt apring^ing, 
awing'ing, ting'ing (from dis, ting, apring, awing, ting). The e is 
generally retained in the word mikage ; and it was retained by 
Johnson and Walker in the derivatives formed by adding able to 
the words moi^, prove, and aale, but these derivatives are now 
more oonmionly written according to the rule, movable, provable, 
aalable, 

{ 184. (13.) In the present participles of verbs that end in m, 
not only is the final e omitted on adding the syllable ing, but the 
f is changed into y ; as in dy'ing, ig'ing, tg'ing, vy'ing (from die, 
ke, tie, pie), 

i 186. (14.) In derivatives formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a consonant to words that end in a silent e, the e is 
generally retained; as in peace^fid, tuntfltaa, move^ment, vile'lg. 
There are some exceptions ; as. aw'fiU, ar^gument, a-bridg'meni, 
ae'knowVedg'tnent, judgment, du'ly, tru'lg, tohoPlg, nura*Ung, tpiv'- 
dom, and such words as are derivatives of any of these. The words 
abridgment, acknowledgment, and the word judgment, with its de- 
rivatives, are, however, by Walker, Smart, and many others, con- 
formed to the rule, and spelled abridgement, acknowledgement, 
judgement, adjudgement, misjudgement, prejudgement. The word 
lodgement is thus spelled, with a silent « in the first syllable, by 
Johnson, Walker, Smart, Worcester, and most other lexicog- 
raphers ; but, by Webster and Goodrich, the « is omitted in this 
word as well as in the others just enumerated. 

i 186. (16.) In derivatives formed by adding any termination, 
except one that begins with t, to words that end in y preceded by 
a consonant, the y is generally changed into • ; as in ed'i-JSeaf ed^i* 
Jied, ea^ai-lg, eafai-er, fan'ei-fid (from ed'i-fg, ea'ag, fanfey). The 
derivatives of dry, ahy, and aky retain the y, as in dry*ly, ahy'neaa, 
aky^ey. In the derivatives of aly, the y is retained by Worcester 
and some other lexicographers ; but Smart, Webster, and Gk>od- 
fieh spell these words with t instead of y. The y is also retained 



nffTBODUcnoN. 67 

wben an apostrophe and the letter < are added to form the poa- 
fleaaiTe case singular of nouns ; as in eiii^s, dau^$t aky'i, 

§ 187* (16.) In deriyatiyes formed by adding any termination 
to words that end in y preceded by a Towel« the y remains, in 
most cases, unchanged ; as in dit-playedf^ tfoy'^* de-layi'. The 
words, dmify, laid, torn, §aiih^ gaid (from day, lay, say), and siaid 
(the past tense and past participle of atay, — written also stayed), 
together with their compounds, are exceptions. 

i 188. (17.) In deriyatiTes formed by adding a syllable be- 
ginning with a yowel to words that end in any yowel sound, the 
letter or letters representing this sound are generally retained ; as 
in iub'pai'naed, a-gree'iny, a^yree'a-ble, em-bar'goed, wooed, 60- 
stawedf. When, howeyer, the syllable ed is added to yerbs that 
end in ee, one e is omitted ; as in a-greed?, de-ereodf, freed, 

\ 189. (18.) The plural of nouns is formed regularly by add- 
ing the letter s to the singular, when ending in a yowel, or by 
adding the letter s, or the syllable es, when ending in a consonant 
The letter s only is added, when the singular ends in a sound 
which will blend with that of « ; as in adieus, ideas, sohs, toys, 
ears, eaees, ctiffs, ducks, hiOs, keySf lads, pans, paths, 1006* (See Nots 
C, p. 34). The syllable es is added, when the singular ends in a 
sound which will not blend with that of i , as in boxes, hushes, 
ekmehes, erosses ; but in case the singular ends in a silent e pre- 
ceded by soft e, by soft g, or by s, the final e is sounded to form 
the syllable es ; as in/ae«f, stages, vases. Letters and figures used 
as notms plural, and words so used without reference to their 
meaning, commonly haye the plural form indicated by an apostro- 
phe and the letter i ; as in the expressions, <* Dot your Tt " ; <* In 
44 there are two 4'< " ; •• You use too many also's" 

i 190. (19.) The plural of nouns that end in y preceded by 
a consonant or the sound of a consonant, la formed by changing 
y into its, as iaftneies, ladies, mercies, eoUoquies (from fancy, lady, 
mercy f eoUoquy) ; but the plural of nouns ending in y preceded by 
any yowel (except u sounded as to, as in colloquy) is formed regu- 
larly by adding s to the singular ; as in boys, days, attorneys, jour^ 
neys, moneys, vaUeys, Nouns which now end in y formerly ended 
In M, as, ladiSf moreie; so that the plural termination ies was once 
regular. 

§ 191. (20.) The plural of nouns that end in t is generally 



68 INTRODUCTION. 

fonned by adding es to the Bingular, as in alkaket, raibiet (from 
atkalif robin) ; but some writers add a cmly. 

{ 192. (21.) The plural of nouns that end in o is formed reg- 
ularly by adding < to the singular, when the o is preceded by a 
Towel (See { 189), as in cameos, foUoa (from cameOt /oUo) ; but, 
when the o is preceded by a consonant, the plural is sometimes 
formed by adding a only, as in bravof, centos, zeroe, and some- 
times by adding m, as in eaiyoes, echoee, mottoes, potatoes, 

{193. (22.) The plural of the following nouns is formed by 
changing the final /or fe into ves; namely, beef, calf, elf, half, 
knife, leaf, life, loaf, se^, sheaf, shelf, thief, wife, wolf (beeves, 
calves, elves, &c.). The plural of staff (staves) is formed by 
changing jf into ves ; though the plural of its compounds is regu- 
lar, as in flagstaffs. The plural of wharf, according to English 
usage, is wharfs, but in the United States it is generally written, 
as well as pronounced, wharves. All other nouns ending mf,ff, 
or fe have the plural formed regularly by the addition of « to the 
singular. 

{ 194. (23.) The plural of the nouns brother, tfto, pea, and 
penny is formed in two ways, to distinguish different meanings. 
Thus, that of brother is brothers, when children of the same parent 
are referred to, but brethren, when the reference is to members 
of the same society, or congregation, or of the same profession ; 
that of die is dies, when used in the sense of stamps for coining, 
but dice, if implements for playing are meant ; that of pea is 
peeue for the fruit taken collectively, but peas for a number of 
individual seeds; that of penny is pennies, when a number of 
individual coins is spoken of^ but pence, if reference is made to an 
aggregate simi, or to a coin, equal in value to a certain number 
of pennies. 

{ 196. (24.) The plural of the following nouns is irregularly 
formed ; namely, child (children), fbot (foet), goose (geese), huse 
(lice), man (men), mouse (mice), ox (oxen), tooth (teeth), womam 
(women). 

§ 196. (25.) The plural of compounds of which Uie word 
man is the final constituent is formed, after the analogy of this 
primitive, by changing man into men, as in freemen, DiUehmen 
(from freeman, Dutchman") ; but nouns not compound, and ending 
m the syllable man, have the plural formed regularly by adding s 




INTBODUCnON. 69 

to tiie wngqlar ; mB^Germam^ MtmnUmant, eaymant^ JSrmana (from 
German^ MmBtuhum, cayman, firman). 

§ 197* (26.) The plural of oompounds coniUting of a noun 
•nd an adjecdTe is generallj indicated by the same change in the 
noun which it imdergoes for the plural when single ; as in knight- 
errant (knightf-errant), aon-in-law (sona-in-law). But those com- 
pounds of which the adjective yt<i7 — as^a suffix, written yW/ — 
constitutes the last part, have their plural formed by adding « to 
the adjective ; hathandftd (handfuk), apoonfid (spoonfub). 

t 198. (27.) Some nouns from foreign languages retain 
thdr original plural, as, antithetia (antithesas), axis (ax«8), 
eherub (cherubtm), Jbau (foci), larva (larv«), ttratum (.strata), 
wumneur {meuieura) ; and some nouns of this class have two 
plurals, one after the foreign form and the other after the Eng- 
lish form, hAf formula (formulcs or formula*), mediiun (media or 
mediunu), miemorandum (memoranda oi memorandums), $erapk 
(seraphtm or seraphs). 

} 199. (28.) There is a class of words, whidi it was formerly 
the general usage to write with the termination our, that are now 
commonly written in the United States with the termination or^ 
the « being omitted ; as, candor, color, error, honor, rigor^ Many 
of these words, however, are still written in England with the «. 

} 200. (29.) Most words of two or more syllables which 
were formerly written with the termination ick are now written 
with the termination ic, the h being omitted ; as, mimic, mtote, 
public, traffic. When, however, a syllable beginning with e or t 
is added to any of these words in forming a derivative, the letter 
k is inserted to keep the c hard. — See { 182, Rule 11. 

i 201. (30.) Several words derived from the Latin through 
the French are variously written with the prefix en or in ; as, 
enquire or inquire, endoee or incloee, endoree or indorse, — the prefix 
en being the French form of the Latin m. 

§ 202. (31.) There is a diversity of usage in regard to the 
mode of spelling the last syllable of many of the verbs which 
terminate in the sound of t preceded by that of long t ; some 
writers spelling this syllable ize, and others, iee ; as, catechize or 
eateehiae, patronize or patroniee, recognize or recogniee. As a gen- 
eral rule, though with a few exceptions, those verbs of this class 
which are derived from Greek verbs ending in iCu (izo), or which 



70 mTRODucnoN. 

are fonned after the analogy of these verbs, hate this final 8jII»- 
ble spelled ise, and in those derived from the Fieiiflkverb jtrendn 
or its participle pris or prwe, it is written ise, 

{ 203. (32.) With respect to those words in the spelling of 
which usage is divided at the present time, both forms, or, if there 
are more than two, the various forms, are given in this work with 
references from one to the other; and those modes of spelling 
which seem to be least supported by usage and by the weight of 
authority are indicated by printing the words in spaced letters 
within brackets; though, in some eases, it is very difficult to 
determine whether one form or another is to be preferred. 

NoTB £. — It 1b well known that Dr. Webster, In his DictkHiary of the 
English Language, made changes In ttte orthography of many words, some 
of which he advooated oo the ground of etymology, others on that of 
analogy. Dr. Goodrich, his aoo-in-law and the editor of the levised edition 
of that work* pablished in 1817, ibar years after the death of Dr. Webster, 
candidly states that such of these changes as were based <m etymol<^7 
(e. g. brideffoom for bridegroom, JHher for fsaiher) were neTOr reoeired 
with favor by the public, and that. Dr. Webster having restored the old 
orthography in a considerable number of cases after an experiment of 
twelve years (1828 to 1810), he himself had restored it, in the revised 
edition, to nearly all that remained. Most of ttiose changes of orthogra- 
phy which seemed to Dr. Webster to be desirable on the ground of analogy 
have been retained in the editions of hi& Dictionary published under the 
editorial care of Dr. Goodrich. They have been extensively adopted in the 
United States, but they cannot yet be said to have the sanction of any con- 
siderable portion of the British public. The following is a brief state- 
ment of the modes of spelling whldi oonstitate peonUar ftatures of the 
latest edition of Webster^s Dictionary, edited by Qoodrioh, and published 
in 1850, and of the reasons assigned for them. 

1. Words terminating in r/>, as centre, theatre, have the termination 
changed to er (center, theater), except acre, chancre, massacre, and ogre, 
in which the change would lead to an erroneous pronunciation. Words 
of this class, however, are given in both modes of spelling, a preference 
only being expressed for the termination cr, on tiie groond that other 
words of like termination, as chamber, aider, have already undergone this 
change. 

2. Most of those words which by long U8.nge have formed exceptions to 
the general rule that a final consouaut preceded by a single vowel in the 
primitive is not doubled in the derivative, on adding^ a syllable be$rinning 
with a vowel, unless the accent Is on the last syllable, as the derivatives 
of trav'el (usually spelt trav'el-ler, trav^elling, irae*eUed^ fto.) and about 
fifty other words ending m f, together with the derivatives of bffat, 
caHdUrTSf, oom'promU, nU'phu-rei, and wor'ehip, are spelled without 



IIITBOD0CTION. 71 

doabling the flnal oauoftant Of tbe pilmitiTe, in order thst thej may eon^ 
form to the general. rule. (See § 176.) The final conBonaat, howerer, U 
doubled in the derivativee of kidnap. It ahould be obaerred that some 
worda in which the letter I ia doubled are derived from other languages, 
aa tranq^hty (from L. Iran^ui^Mtoa), erffttalUze (from Or. cp6#r«AA«c), 
dumceUor (from L. etmeeUariut, through the French), and do not, there> 
ftire, oome under the operation of the rule referred to, which ^>pliea onl j 
to English formatiTea. 

9. The words enrottmentj ittttaUmeni, inthntlt^ inthnattment, tkralld&m, 
are spelled in this manner, with a double I, for the reaaon that. If spelled 
with a single I, thej are liable to be mispronounced by giving to the vowel 
that precedes this letter ita short sound. 

4. The words dittiil^ inttUU/ulfiU, are spelled in this manner, with a 
double 2, beeanse their derivativea, as dUiiUer, instilling, fidfiUed, &c., mnat 
be written with the f doubled. 

6. The derivativea of dtdl^J^tOy iKO, and wiU are spelled with double 2, 
aa in dullness, fullness, skiUfiU, wO^fM, to prevent the inconvenience of 
exeeptiona to a general rule. <~ See $ 178. 

6. The worda d^enss^ qfense, and pretense are thus spelled, with f 
fw»flaH of e, because s Is used in the derivativea, aa in difensioe, c^'ensive^ 
pretention, and becanae the same dumge haa already been made In the 
worda expense, licetue, and reoompoue. 

7. The verb practice la thua spelled, with e instead of s belbre the final e, 
1st, because similar verbs, aa notice, apprentice, in which the accent is not 
on the last syllable, are eo spelled ; 2d, because a distinction of spelling 
between a noon and a verb of like origin belonga properly to worda 
aeeented on the laat ayllable, aa device, n., devise, v. ', 3d, becanae sueh a 
distinction in spelling this verb with an f {practise) leads to a wrong pro- 
nunciation, the termination ise in verbs being usually sounded the same aa 
iae. Though this spelling {jpractice) is proposed aa the preferable one, tbe 
other fbrm {practise) ia also given. 

8. The words mould and mcuU are given in this spelling, but a prefbr- 
«iee is expressed for the ibrms mold and molt, on the ground ^at they 
belong to the same class of words as hold, eolt, fold, gold, Ao., In which 
tjie « haa either been dropped or was never introduced. 

8. Drought and heig/ht are given aa the. established orthography of 
theae words, but the forms drouth and Mght are, on some aoooonta, eon- 
siderad proferable, and are given aa alternative modes of spelling. 



72 iMiBOoucnoN. 



X. COMPOUND WORDS. 

{ 204. A compound word is one that consists of two or more 
liniple words, each of which is separatelj current in the lan- 
guage. The simple words of which a compound is formed aze 
either consolidated in writing or are joined hj a hyphen. 

Boles tor writing OomiK>und Words. 
9 205. I. When each of the parts of a compound word is 
pronounced with a distinct accent, they should be joined with a 
hyphen ; ELS,fetloio-cr»i'tur«, mam! twen'tjf-onef. 

Exceptions. 

1. Compounds beginning with the prepositionB over, viuier, unless the 
second pnrt of the compound commences with the letter r; as, o'verbear'- 
ingt un'dertak'ingt o'ver-rul^^ un'der^rate', 

5. A few compounds, mostly pronouns or adverbs, of very common 
occurrence ; as, here'upon'^ nev'ertheUu'y what'soev'er, 

3. Compounds terminating in tnonger ; as, ir^anmon'ger. 

§ 206. n. When one of the words of which a compound is 
formed is pronounced 'wHthout a distinct accent, no hyphen should 
be inserted between them ; as, blaek'smiiht deHgynum^ earih'guake, 
ink*stand» 

Exceptions. 

1. Compounds in which the first word ends with the same letter or 
digraph as that with wliioh the second begins } as,^sA'-«Aop, Jktg'-gnuSt 
htad'-dress, hop'-pole, posf-town^ $a4V-U)ftt anow'-white, stair'-rod, 

2. Compounds in whidi the first word ends, and the second begins, 
with a vowel ; as,<<>re'-app2e, palef-eyedj waf<gg, 

3. Compounds whose meaning or pronunciation would be obscured by 
writing the parts continuously i as, gtu'-holder, loop'-hoU^ pot'-hotue^ tea'- 
chest. In the first three of these words, if the hyphen were omitted, the 
letters «-&, p-h, t-h, might be mistaken for the dl^aphs f4, ph, th, and 
the words he improperly pronounced gash'oldery loo'phole^ poth'aute. In 
the last of the examples, the omission of the hyphen would confound the 
word intended with the second person singular of the present indicative 
active of the verb to teach (teach'est). 

4. Compounds formed by uniting a verb with an adverb, a preposition, 
or a noun; also those ending in book or tree', BM^get'-off^ make/'Mft, 
pla'ning^iU, set'-to -, htankf-book^ btutf-book, •crap' -book -, fir>treie, palm'' 
frsf, pituf- tree* 

6. Almost all compound adjectives of whatever mode of formation ; 




INTBODUCnON. 73 

M, Godf'JhiMringt heart' -tick^ HP-hredj knee^-€letp, oddf-looking, one^-eyed^ 
makopeiP-for, voom'-cut. But racli a4)ectiTes aa are formed flrom oom- 
povnd noana of one accent, either by the addition of ed or ingt or by 
digng«wtg er into one of theae terminationa, or which end with one of the 
worda Jixeed, eomingt like^ follow the general rule, and omit the hyphen ; 
u eoi/webbed (from cot/toeb), slavefholding (flrom slane^holder), bare'/aced, 
forWeoming^ hird'Hke, &e. 

DistinotioiiB between words which are, and words which are 
not, to be considered as Compounds. 

i 207. It is sometimes difficult to determine whether certain 
words should be compounded or written separately; and the 
decision of the question is often made more difficult by the 
conflicting practice of printers and authors, particularly lexi- 
cographers, who are not only at variance with each other in 
innumerable instances, but, from their frequent inconsistencies, 
8eem to have consulted only their fancy or their convenience in 
regard to words of this description. The remarks which follow 
are intended to aid the reader in discriminating between com- 
binations of words which are, and those which are not, properly 
written as compounds. 

{ 208. When two nouns, or a pronoun and a noun, are in 
apposition, and either of the two is separately applicable to the 
perscm or thing designated, they are to be regarded as not con- 
stituting a compound word ; as, King Davids Lord Byrtm, Viscount 
Paimertton, the poei Wordsworth, I Paul, &c. 

SxcEPTiON. — The pronomis he and she, uied merely to express sex, 
are united by a hyphen to the nouna which they precede and qualify ; as, 
he-calf , sh^4>ear. 

{ 209. Nouns not in apposition, and of which only one is 
separately applicable to the person or thing designated, — or of 
which the first may be placed after the second with a preposition 
or phrase expressing the relation of the two words, — are prop- 
erly regarded and written as compound words ; as, bedtime, the 
time for going to bed ; bookseller, a seller of books ; corkscrew, a 
screw for drawing corks ; wine'tnerchant, a merchant who deals in 
wine ; workshop^ a shop for work. 

{ 210. When the first of two nouns is used adjectively to 
express the matter or substance of which the thing designated by 
the second is made, each word preserving its proper accent, 
tfaey are to be regarded as not forming a compound word; tis^ 



74 INTRODUCTION. 

brau key, cotton ehih, gUua dish, gold ring, gtone Jar, HXk dren^ 
tin pan, 

{ 211. When a noun, either nmple or compound, is oaed 
before another noun, instead of an adjectiye, or to supply the 
place of one, the two nouns are properly written as distinct 
words ; as, 011^0/ vititant (for angetie vintant), ekureh govemmeni 
(for ecelesicutical government), a eustom-houte officer, noondag wn 
(for meridian ntn), party hatred, summer Jlowera, 

^212. Two words, of which- the latter is a noun, though in 
their usual construction separate, are compounded with a hyphen, 
when put before a noun which they qualify, but are se^ apart 
from the word qualified ; as, a bMFt-eye view, a JSret-daae hotel, 
higk'Ujater mark, Bowdoin'tquare church, New^England voeaetj, 
New-London bridge. 

{ 213. If a noun in the possessiTe case, and the noun govern- 
ing it, no longer retain the idea of property or ownership which 
the words, when literally taken, convey, they should be written 
as a compound word, with an apostrophe and a hyphen; as, 
bishop* 9'Cap, king^a-evil, ladg'a-Jinger, Solomon* i-teal. But such 
phrases as Baffin* a Bay, Blackfriara* Bridge, King*a CoUege, Regenfa 
Park, St. James* a Palace, and other titles of honor or distinction, 
are properly written as separate words. 

{ 214. If a noun in the possessive case, and the noun governing 
it, are used in their literal sense, and at the same time have but one 
accent, they should be written as compound words, without a hy- 
phen and without any apostrophe ; Bs,beesieax, doomsday, townsman. 

§ 216. Compound nouns are sometimes formed by uniting 
with a hyphen a verb and an adverb, preposition, or noun ; as, 
a break-down, a piUling-up, a take-off, a spelling-book. 

{216. Adjectives are frequently compounded with nouns, 
when the compound thus formed admits of but one accent. If 
the adjective precedes the noun, the two words are properly writ- 
ten continuously, or without a hyphen ; as, black^bird, blue'bell, 
foreground, red'breast, strong'hold, wiUPfire. When the adjective 
follows the noun, the two words should be joined with a hyphen ; 
as, €m'kle-deep, blood'-red, foot'-sore, stone'-cold, except words end- 
mg with one of the adjectives faced, coming, like, (See { 206, 
Exc. 6.) But when the noun and the adjective which qualifies it 
are pronounced each with a distinct accent, the two words should 
bs written separately (as, cAurcA visitant, common aense, high aheriff, 




INTBODUCnON. 76 

UJk eiemai^ prime mtrtisler), unless they are used as epithets ; as, 
eomumon taue, in the phrase eommon-aense philosophy. 

{ 217. Two numerala expressing a number which is the sum 
of the two are connected with a hyphen (aBtthirty-four) ; other- 
wise, no hyphen is used, and the two numerals are written as 
separate words ; aa^faur hundred. Monosyllabic cardinal numer- 
als denoting more than on«, and followed by either of the words 
pM or penny ^ are consolidated with it ; as, threefold^ threepenny : 
if of more than one syllable, they are joined with a hyphen ; as, 
tixteen-fM, nxteen-penny. Pence, preceded by a monosyllabic 
numeral, is consolidated with it ; as^ eiipenee, ninepenee : if pre- 
ceded by a numeral of more than one syllable, the two words arc 
written separately ; br, fourteen pence, Sucli fractional terms as 
ene'half, faur-Jtfthe, Jtve-aeventhe, &c., are commonly written with 
a hyphen, as compound words; so also such expressions as a 
half-doUar, a guarter'boxj ftc. 

{ 218. Epithets formed of an adyerb ending in /y, and a. past 
participle, are generally xmtten as two separate words ; as, a ctm- 
nm^y contrived scheme, a newiy married man, a poorly huilt house. 

{ 219. When an adverb and a participle, or a preposition and 
a perticsple, are placed after the noun they qualify, they should 
be written separately, as distinct words ; as, the sentence above 
eiied, a passage much admired, a matter toon settled, 

{ 220. When words form only a phrase, — an idiomatic ex- 
pression, or a compound term in which each word ii taken literally, 
— they should be written as separate words (astofler aU, by and by, 
far ever, hand m hand, on^9 self, on hipK), unless they are used 
adjectively and placed before the nouns they qualify, when they 
should be joined by the hyphen ; as, the never-to-be-forgotten hero, 
an out-of'the-teay place. 

( 221. It is impossible to lay down principles by which the 
inquirer may be enabled, in evpry case, to decide whether words 
should be compounded or not; but, as most anomalous compounds 
are given in their proper places in the Vocabulary, it will be suf- 
ficient to remember the following general rule given by Goold 
Brown, in his «* Grammar of English Grammars " : •* Words 
otherwise liable to be misunderstood, must be joined together or 
written separately, as the sense and construction may happen to 
require." Thus, neyro-merehant will mean a merchant who buys 
and sells negroes, but m^^rv merchant, a merchant vr\xo \s ^ xw^^gc^ 



76 INIBODUCIION. 



XI. PREFIXES. 

{ 222. When a prefix ends with a different letter from that 
with which the radical part of the word begins, the combination 
thus formed should be written continuously, as one unbroken 
word ; as in contradiee, prttematural, aubstantialf tranMciion. 

Note. — The prefixes ex and vice sre sometimes followed by a hyphen, 
as in ex-presideni, vice-legate^ vice-preeiderU ; but vic^er^ntj vioegereney^ 
vioetx^y, viceroyal, vieercyaUy^ follow the mle. 

§ 223. When a prefix ends with a Towel, and the radical 
word with which it is combined begins with a vowel, the hyphen 
is used between them to denote that both vowels are pronounced 
separately ; as in oo-^ipenUe^ fbre-ardainj pre^oanqty^ re-intUUe, 

NoTK. — Instead of the hyphen between the afUsoent vowels, in sneh 
eaaeB, many printers and authors use a diaereaia over the aeoond vowel. 
The prefixes hi and tri are exempted firom tiie operation of this rule ; as 
in biennialf triune, 

i 224. When a dissyllabic prefix ends with the same con- 
sonant as that with which the radical part of a word of several 
syllables begins, it is followed by a hyphen ; as in counter' 
revolution, inter-radUd, The hyphen is also used after prefixes 
of rare occurrence ending vrith a vowel, even when the radical 
word begins with a consonant; ^eleGtro^ma^netic^ centro-UnimUt 
muooto^taccharine. 



Xn. SYLLABICATION. 



§ 225. A syllable, in the spoken language, has already (§ 60) 
been defined to be an elementary sound or a combination of 
elementary sounds uttered by a single impulse of the voice. A 
syllable, in the written language, is a letter or a combination of 
letters representing a syllable in the spoken language. 

{ 226. Syllabication, in writing and printing, is the art of 
arranging the letters of words in groups corresponding to the 
natural divisions of the spoken words caused by the action of the 
organs of speech. A practical acquaintance with this subject is 



INTRODUCTION. 77 

Teiy necessary, in order to be able to divide words correctly at 
the end of a line, when, from want of space, one or more syllables 
mnst be carried over to the beginning of the next line. The fol- 
lowing rules are observed, in this case, by the best writers ; and 
ttnej are also generally obaenred, in this work, in dividing words 
into syllables for the purpose of eiEhibiting their exact pronancia- 
tion. — See Notb F, p. 79. 

Boles Ibr ByllaUoatlon. 

}^27. (1.) Compound words should be separated, at the 
end of a line, into the simple words which compose them ; a*, 
tfple-iree (not eqh-ple»tree), no-body (not nobod-y), i^htU-ever (not 
wkatev-er), 

i 228. (2.) Prefixes, suffixes, and grammatical tenninations 
shonld be separated from the radical words to which they be- 
long, whenever this can be done without misrepresenting the 
pronunciation ; as in trana-ndt, lead-er, rend-tn^ (not tran^mitf 
lea-der, ren-cim^). 

Note. — The appUestion of this nile frequently enables us to dis- 
tfagnith words of like spelling but of onlike pronnndation and mesn- 
kig; ss,r»jwMMon (to petition again) and rep-etUion (iteration) ; bles§-ed 
{M^eetive) and bk$ied (past tente tmd ptut pariicipU of the verb to 
bless) ; hind-er (in the rear) and hin-der (to retard). 

In ordinary writing and printing, when a raflix or a grammatical terml- 
natSon beginning with a vowel follows a single ooneonant preceded by a 
single vowel having its long eound, the ooneonant is attached to the sniBx 
or termination, in order that the preceding vowel may not seem to have 
its short eonnd ; as in IVa-fner, gn-eest, tB.-Mh, vi-fiy, wa-^n^, advl-^ory. 
In aome pronouncing dictionaries, however, which indicate the various 
sonndfl of the vowels and oonaonants by means of diacritical marks, the 
sbIBx is generally separated (h>m the consonant, in order that the root of 
the word nuy be more clearly presented to the eye. 

When a snflix or a grammatieal termination beginning with a vowel is 
added to a word of one syllable ending with a single consonant preceded 
by a single vowel (as glad, pUin)^ or to a word of more than one syllable, 
ending m the same manner, and aooented on the last syllable (as aOot'^ 
begin*), that consonant is doubled according to § 176, and the latter of the 
two eonsonants mnst be Joined to the suffix or the termination; as m 
glad-<ier, glad-desf, plsn-ner, p]an-nes<, pUn-neth, allot-fed, begin-nfn^.~ 
Bee Bale 4, i 230. 

{ 229. (3.) Two Towels coming together, and neither form- 
ing a digraph nor representing a compound vowel sound (See ^ 6^ 



78 INTBODUCJnON. 

mufit be divided into separate ejllablee ; as in a-orta, euri-oaUy, 

{ 230. (4.) When two or more consonants, capable of begin- 
ning a syllable, come between two vowels of which the first is 
long, they are joined to the second (as in fa-Ms, tri-Jte, be-«^ruie), 
unless the second vowel begins a suffix, when they are joined to 
the first vowel (as in wajf-ed, wa«<-ing). (See Rule 2.) "When 
the consonants are not capable of beginning a syllable, or when 
the vowel preceding them is short, the first consonant must 
be joined to the former vowel ; as in an-^1, bai»-iier, cam-dric, 
fer-dle, oc-tave, sym-tel ; pe<-rify, sae-rament, Tain-ttreL 

{ 231. (5.) When a single consonant or a consonant digraph 
occurs between two vowels, the first of which is under the accent, 
it is joined to the former vowel, if that is short, as in h&^'-it, 
prqpA'-et, vio'-id, l|p"-iddm'-ic, except when the consonant and 
the following vowel have together the sound of «A in ahall (No. 
37, i 46), or of s in amre (No. 38, § 47), as in of-fl'etal, vl'tton. 
(See { 234, Rule 8.) If the former vowel is not short, and is un- 
der the accent, the consonant or digraph is joined to the latter 
vowel ; as in &'Mer, ffe'ver, vi'tal, h6'ly, da'tj. 

Note. — In til the oases embraeed by this mle, the single consonant or 
the oonsonant dlgr^>h between two Towels has the effect desolbed in $ 6A. 

{ 232. (6.) When a single consonant or a consonant digraph 

occurs between two vowels, the second of which is under the 

accent, the consonant or digraph is joined to that vowel ; as in 

a-fide', be-neath', de-mve*, epi-clem'ic, e-pAem'eraL 

Exception.— The letter op, so sltaatedjls Joined to the Ibrmer rowel 
(as fai lux-ft'ri-inu), both to keep the vowel In its short soand, and becanse 
this consonant, when Initial, always represents the sound of s in zeal.-^ 
Beef 40. 

i 233. (7.) When a single oonsonant occurs between two 

vowels not under the accent, it is joined to the latter ; as in 

ni'ce-fy, mem'o-ry, mod"i'/i-caMon. 

Exceptions.— If the latter rowel begins a termination, the oonsonant 
Is Joined to the preceding rowel ; as In rigfor-out. (See Role 2, § 228.) 
When the rowel e snooeeds an accented syllable, and is followed by the 
single oonsonant r, these two letters are Joined in the same syllable ; as te 
lit'cr-al, gcn'er-al, mis'er-y, Ao. These words, as Walker remarks, «*esn 
nerer be prononneed literal, gen-«-ral, mls-e-ry, Jfcc, without the appear- 
anoe of affectation." 




INTBODUCnON. 79 

{ 234. (8.) The terminatioiis eean, dan, eial, tiai, eeous, eious, 
geouB, tiouM, naUf ticn, and others of simiUir fonnation, must not 
be dirided ; as in the words o-cean, physi-oan, so-cio^ par-^to^ 
preda^^aoiif, gr^'Ciout, coura-^eoitf, ambi-^uHM, man-tion, na-^»ofi. 

{ 235. (9.) Some words cannot he so divided, at the end of a 
line, as nnequivocally to show their true pronunciation ; as, acid, 
docile, huing, miry, poring, register. It is, therefore, desirahle to 
BToid the division of such words. 

{ 236. (10.) The letters which form a syllable must never, 
from want of space, be separated at the end of a line. 

Note F.~ As the word eyttahU (6r. nXXefi^i, from aip, with, together, 
and Ao^U'avw, to take) literally means only a coUecHon, it is not neoeasarily 
restrieted either to a combination of sounda prodnoed by a single impulse 
of the Toioe, or to the ooUeetion of letters by which andi a oombination of 
aoimda is re pr ese nted. SylUbieation may, therefore, be a very dilTerent 
operation, according to the diUbrent ends proposed by it. In spelling- 
books, in which the sound of words forms a main otjeot of attention, the 
division into syUablea Is intended to represent the true pronunciation as 
aeeorately as possible, no regard being paid to the derivation or mode of 
composition. EtTmologieal syllabication is a different operation ; it is a 
divtsion of words into such parts as serve to show their origin and pri- 
mary meaning ; BM,or1ho-gr(i^y, thdo4ogff, fto. In the division of words 
at the end of a line, the etymological principle of syllabication is gen- 
erally allowed to prevail over the orthoSpical, unless the pronunciation 
Is misrepresented by it. The rules generally adopted, in this case, by 
AflMriean writers and printers, are those given above ; and it will be 
observed thst, in every instance in which an etymological division would 
eormpt or obscure the pronnndation, the orthoSpical mode prevails over 
it. In English practice, however, the etymological principle is followed 
to a somewhat greater extent than in the United States, derivative words 
being resolved into their primitives (as apo-etrcphe, eami-voroue), and a 
single consonant or a consonant digraph between two vowels being Joined 
to the latter (as ba-tence, 1»^«1, spi-rit, pro^Aet, sy^nod, mo^no-po-ly). 
The letter x, however, and single consonants belonging to the former part 
of a compound or derivative word, are exempted from the operation of 
the latter rale (as er-ist, iy»-on,diMvm). 



80 EXPLANATIONS. 



EXPLANATIONS. 

In addition to what appears in the Table of Elementary Sonnda (p. 12) 
and in the key-line at the bottom of each page of the Vocabulary, the fol- 
lowing explanations will be needed for understanding the notation made 
use of in this Mannal : — 

Words are not respelled for pronnnoiation except when the sound of a 
letter or of letters in the ordinary orthography is liable to be mistaken for 
some other sound ; and often, when such a case occurs, the single syllable 
only which presents the difficulty is respelled. 

As e final is, in most cases, silent, and usually haa the effect, when fol- 
lowing a single consonant, to lengthen the vowel that precedes it, as in 
ale, glebe, aite, tone, tune, words and syllables in which a silent e final fo)» 
lows a single consonant and a single vowel are not generally marked nor 
respelled for pronunciation, except when the vowel that precedes the con- 
sonant is short. 

When one letter of a vowel digraph Is marked, It is to be considered as 
representing the sound of that digraph, and the other letter is to be 
regarded as silent ; as in gain, ddp, pldid, briad, die, Mteve, bOwl, /9ttr, 
d6or, tffie, /ead. No mark is used for the digraph ee for the reason that 
its sound is almost Invariably that of long e. 

The combined letters ou and ow, when unmarked, and when the word 
in which they occur is not respelled, are sounded as in our, now. 

As it is a general rule of the language that the vowels a, e, i,o,u,f 
have their long sound at the end of an accented syllable, as in /ii'tai, 
Ufgal, Won, to'tal, tu'tor, ty'rant, and their short sound when followed 
by a consonant in the same syllable, as in an' tic, hel'met,fin'i$h,J)roi'ie, 
mui'ket, mya'tic, they are not generally marked in either of these sito- 
ations, except in cases that do not conform to the rule. 

The letter e is hard, or haa the sound of k, before a, o, u, I, and r, and 
also before I when final ; as in ceqf, cold, cup, cloak, crag, act: it is hard at 
the end of a word, and also at the end of a syllable unless the next syl< 
lablc begins with e,^{, or y as in arc, hav'oc, sec'ond. It is soft, or has tiie 
sound of 8 before e, i, or y in the same syllable, and also at the end of a 
syllable, if the next syllable begins with any one of these letters, in whidi 
case it is represented by p ; as in cent, cUe,Jhce, ejf*pre$t, fan' eg, af*id. 

The letter g Is hard, or has the sound of g in go, before a, o,u,h,l^ r, 
and to I it is hard also at the end of a word and at the end of a syllable, 
unless the next syllable begins with e, i, or y. It is soft, or has the sound 
of J, before e, i, or y, unless the respelllng Indicates a different sound. 

The letter q has always the sound of k, and it is always followed by «; 
and these letters have together the sound of kw, as In quail (kwal), quU 
(kwit), except in some words fh>m the French In which the u is silent, as 
in pique (pek), oo-quettef (ko-kef). 

The letter x has the sound of ifcf , aa in tax, uhxx, except when the 
respelllng indicates a different sound. 

The digraph ph has generally the sound of /, as in phrau, aeraph. The 
Aw wordB in which it has not this aound are respelled. 



EXPLANATIONS. 



81 



Tbe ajUable iion is generally pronoonoed «Aim, as In na'tion -, and the 
■yllable Hon has also the aame sound, except when it is preceded by a 
Towel, in which case it has the sonnd of zhun, as In e-va'Houy ad-hefHon^ 
de^dftionj ex-plo'nant eonrfu'tUm. 

The vowels e, », and y^ before r in a monosyllable or in an accented sylla- 
ble, are sounded as in her, mer'cy, vir'tue, tayr'tle. — See $ 21, Note. 

The combined consonants ng are used, in the respelllng of French 
Tords, to replace n or m, as a mere sign of nasality in the preceding vowel 
sound. The French nasal vowel sounds differ from the sounds of the En- 
f7lishByllabIesfin^,dn^,9n^, fifi^, hi being formed by allowing the voice 
to pass simultaneously through the nose and the mouth, and without any 
contact of the tongue and the soft palate. • 

Words fh>m foreign languages, often used in English, but not thor- 
oughly Anglicized, as Ennvi, Verbatim, are printed in Italics. 

Spaced Boman letters are used, within brackets, to distinguish 
modes of spelling that are not so generally prevalent or so well authorized 
as the other form given in the Yocabulary, but which are sanctioned or 
recorded as modem by one or more of the eminent lexicographers whose 
flames are given below in the list of abbreviations. (See Abridgement.) 
A ibw words, in regard to whidi there may be a doubt whether one or 
the otbtfT of two modes of spelling them is the more common or the 
better authorized, are printed in both forms, ~ in spaced letters within 
bradcets, ks well as in close type without brackets. (See Apophthegm and 
Apothegm. 1 

A heavy hyphen ( - ) is used to distinguish such compound words as 
should have their parts connected by a hyphen in ordinary writing and 
printing ; wA^tO'^momno. Such derivative words as have prefixes that are 
commonly Joiued to the primitive by a hyphen are distinguished in the 
same way ; mB^oo^operate, 

The exhibition of authorities for the different pronundations of a word 
spplies to all the derivative or related words, unless some intimation is 
given to the contrary. 

The figures whicA follow words in the Yocabulary refer to correspond- 
big sections in tb0 IntrodnotioiL 



ABBBEYIATIONS. 



...... a4}eotive. 

ttdv. . . • adverb. 
ootU . . . colloquial. 
v>nj. . . . ooi^unction. 

nv. • • . English or 
England. 
Kxe, . . • exception. 
pern. . . • ifemintne. 

imi inteijection. 

•MIS. . . .masculine. 
«. • . . . noun. 



Jr. • • 


. .note. 


part. 


. . partidple. 


pL . 


. .plural. 


prg>. 


. . preposition 


pron. 


. . pronoun. 


Ii€$n% • 


. .Bemark. 




• . verb. 


Ar, . 


. .Arabic 


.FV*. • 


• • French. 


Oer, , 


. . German. 



Or C^eek. 

Heb Hebrew. 

It Italian. 

L Latin. 

Sp Spanish. 

Od Goodrich. 

Sm Smart. 

Wb Webster. 

Wk Wslket. 

Ifr. . • . .TJOTCt^Xftt. 



MANUAL. 



OF 



ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION 



AVD 

SPELLING. 



AABONIC 

Aft-ron'ic (a-fion'tik),109. 
AA-ron4c-«l, 106, 171. 
Ab'a-ca,72. 

A-lHusk'. 

Ab'a-cnB, 106, 170. 
Abaft', 12, 131. 
Al>41'ien-«te (A/'yen-). 
AlHiPleii^tred, 183,228. 
Ab-il'ien-at-in^. 
Ab4I-len-a'tioa, 40, 112. 
Aten'don, 80. 
A-bsn'doned (-dund)^ 
A-ban-don-ee^, 122. [106. 
A-ban'doo-er, 77. 
A-ban'don-ing. 
A-baa'don-ment. 
Ab'^net, 170. 
Ab-ar-tic-a-la'tioii, 112. 
A-baae', 23. 
A-ba»ed' i-b&ttf). Note 

C, p. 3*. 
A-baae'ment. 
A4Mah', 10. 
A4M8h'm6iit. 
A-bas'ing, 183. 
A-bat'a^e, IM, 183. 
A-bate', 23. 
A-bat'ed, 183. 
A-bate'ment. 
A-bat'er, n. one wbo 

abates. [See Abator, 

lflO.1 
A-barlnflf. 
AbaiU (Fr.) (ahfatU or 

alha-t€*, 164) (161), n. 



a kind 
ment. 



of intrench- 



A-ba'Ufl (161), n. an offl- 

oer of the stabloa. 
Ab'a-tiaed {-tlzd), 
A-bat'or, n. one who 

i^teB. [Law term. 

See Abater, 160.] 
Abattoir (Fr.) (alha- 

tuHyH). 
Abb, 31, 176. 
^6'ba(Heb.),60, 72. 
Al)'ba-CY, 169, 170. 
Ab-ba'tial (-ba'ahal), 46. 
Ab-batao-ai. 
Abbi (Fr.) {ab'bH). 
Ab'besB. 
Ab'bey, 98. 
Ab'bot,66.86. 
Ab'bot-Bhlp. 
Ab-bre'vl-ate: 
Ab-bre'Ti4lt-ed, 183. 
Ab-bre-vi-a'tion. 
Ab-bre'vi-aror, 88. 
Ab-bre'vi-a-to-ry, 86. 
Ab-bre'vl-a-ture. 
Ab'dalB (-do/«), Note C, 
Ab'de-rite, 106. [p. 34. 
AbMeBt. 
Ab'di-cant. 
Ab'di-cate, 73. 
Ab'di-oat-ed, 183. 
Ab'di-cat-ing. 
Ab dl-ca'tion, 112. 
Ab'dl-cat-Ive [so Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; afdi-ka-tiv 

or ab-dWa4iv, Gd. 

1661. 
Ab'dl-to-ry, 86. 
Ab-do'mcn [so Wk. 



ABHOBBENCE 

Sm. Wr.; ah-do*men 
or ab^do-meni Gd. 

166]. 
Ab-dom'ln-al, 228. 
Ab-dom-in-os'oo-py. 
Ab-dom'in'Ofts. 
Ab-daoe'. 26. 103. 
Ab-duoed'f-dA^tO, Note 
Ab-du'oeni. [(^,p. 31. 
Ab-da'oinff. 
Ab-duct'722, 108. 
Ab-duo'tion. 
Ab^uct^or (L.). 
A-b&u-'anoe. 14, 169. 
2-be-oe-da'rl-an, 49, N. 
A-be-oe'da-ry, 72. 
A-bed', 16. 
A-bele'. 

A-bel'iiin (-biVyan)^ 61. 
A'bel-ite, 83, 162. 
A-bel-o'nl-an. 
A'bel-mosk. 
A-ber'de-vme, 21, N. 
Ab-^r'ranoe, 170. 
Ab-^r'ran-oy, 109. 
Ab-^r'rant. 
Ab-er-ra'tion, 112. 
Ab-e-nin'oat-or(-r«fM^), 
A-bet', 16, 103. [64. 

A-bet'tal. 176. 
A-bet'ted. 
A-bet'thig. 
A-bet'tor, 88, 169. 
A-bey'ance i-ha'ana). 
A-bey'ant(-W-),23, 160. 
Ab-hor', 17, 136. 
Ab-horred', 166, 176. 
Ab-hdr'rence, 169. 



a, «, i, 5, n, f , Umg ; ft, ^,1, 5, tt, f, 9hort , Htuin far, kae in ftst, % a* in 
flUi } 6 (M Ml there \<Sba»in foot ; 9 as in facile ; gh as g in ^ ',^ <u intJUA. 



ABHORRENCY 



84 



ABSTRACTLY 



Ab-hSr'reii-^y, 03. 
Ab-hor'rer. 
Ab-hdr'rl-ble, 48, 164. 
Ab-hor'rlng, 176. 
A-bid'anoe, 183. 
A-bidiy, 25. 
A-bid'er, 228. 
A-bldMng-. 

A'bi-es (L.) {a'bi-iz), 
A-bi'e-tlne, 152. 
Ab'i-gall, 70, 170. 
A-Wn-ty, 108, 169. 
Ab-in-tes'tate. 
Ab-ir-ri-U'tion. 



Ab'j 

Ab 

Ab 

AlK 

Ab: 

Ab-. 

Ab-, 

AlK. 

Ab-. 

Ab, 

Ab- 



ect, a. & n. 161. 

ect', r. 103. 

ect'ed-nesB. 

eo'tion. 

u-dl-ca'tion. 

a-ra'tion,40, N; 112. 

ure', 26. 

urea'. 

ur'cr, 77, 183. 

uT'ing. 

ac-ta^on, 112. 
A^a-quc-a'tioii [ao 
Wk. Wr. ; ab-lak-we- 
a'-8hun, 8m. Wb. Gd., 
155J. 
Ab-la'tion. 
Ab'la-tlve (81) Fnoteb'- 

1-tIv, 132, 163J. 
Ablaze', 23. 
A'ble, 164. 
Ab'lep-ay, 169. 
AbMu-ent, 88, 106. 
Ab-lu'tlon, 112. 
Ab-lu'tion-a-ry, 72, 171. 
Ab-lu'vi-OD. 
A'bly, 93. 
Ab'ne-gate. 
Ab'ne-gat-ed, 183. 
Ab'ne-g^at-ing;. 
Ab-ne-ga'tion, 112. 
Ab'ne-ga-tTve, 106. 
Ab-norm'al. 
Ab-norm'i-ty, 108. 
A-bdard', 24. 
Abode', 24. 
A-bolMah, 66, 104, 170. 
A-bolMsh-a-ble, 164. 
Abol'i8hed (-i»A/),Note 
A-bolMsh-er. [C, p. 34. 
A-bol'ish-lng. 
A-bol'lsh-ment. [112. 
Ab-o-lT'tlon (-lUh'un), 
Ab^-lI'tiOD-iam (-lish'- 

un-izm), 133, 136. 
Ab-o-lI'tioD-ist. 
A-bom'i-na-blc, 164, 169. 
A-bom'i-na-bly. 
A-bom'i-DAte. 
A-bom-i-na'tion. 



Ab-o-rigr'in-al (-r<;-). 
AlhOHHg'inti (L. pi.) 

{rii'iniz). 
A-bor'tlon, 112. 
A-bor'tlve, 84. 
A-boand', 28. 
A-bound'ed, 228. 
A-boimd'ing. 
A-bout', 28. 

Above' {a-buv'), 22, 163. 
Xb-ra-ca-dab'ra, 72, 116. 
Abrade', 23. 
A-brad'ed, 183. 
A-brad'inff. 
A-bra-hanrlc. 109. 
A-bra-ham-it'lc-al, 108. 
A-bran'chi-aD (-^rang^- 

ibi-ati), 62, 54. 
A-bran'ohi-ate (hranff'- 

ki-). 
Ab-ra'slon {-ra'zhun), 

112. 
A-brAum', 17. 
A-br^ast', 15, 232. 
Abreuvoir ( Fr.) {<Uhruk- 

vwor*). 
A-brldge' (-bti)'), 16,46. 
Abridged' (-6rvd'>,183. 
A-bridg'er, 77. 
A-bridg'ing. 
A-bridg'ment (171, 185) 
[A bridge men t,203J. 

i9* The preTaiUng vrntgc 
li to omit the e after the g 
In this word, aa alao in ac- 
iatowledgmentj judgment, 
though itii inMrtion is more 
In accordance with anal- 
ogy. Todd, in his edition 
or Johnson's Dictionary, 
restores the e to these 
words fVom which John- 
son had omitted it. " in or- 
der,** as Smart remarks, 
"that they may not ex- 
hibit the otherwise unex- 
ampled irregularity of a 
■ofl l>efore a consonant" 
For the same reason Smart 
spells thcee words In Ills 
Dictionary with an e Al- 
lowing g. 

A-brdach', 24. 
A-broach'ment. 
A-bro&d', 17. 
Ab'ro-gHte, 73. 
Ab'ro-giit-ed, 183. 
Ab'po-gfit-ing. 
Ab-ro-ga'tion, 112. 
Ab-rupt'j 22, 121. 
Ab-nip'tlon. 
Ab'scesB (o^fM), 162. 
Ab-8cind'(-«imj';, 162. 
Ab'BciBB (-^) [pi. o^'- 

tciss-es], 17i. 
AbscU'ta (L.) {ab- 



tWa) [pi. Ab-9CU'HB^ 

198.1 

Ab-BciB'Blon (-tieft'ttn), 
112, 162, 171. [5m 
TranBltion.] 

Ab-800nd', 18, 109. 

Ab-Boond'ed. 

Ab-Boond'lng^. 

Ab'aenoe. 

Ab'aent. a. 108, 161. 

Ab-aent', r. 103, 161. 

Ab-Ben-ta'tion, 112. 

Ab-sent'ed. 

Ab-8ent-ee'. 122. 

Ab-Beut-ee'iBm (><em)» 

Ab-sent'er, 77. [13^ 

Ab-eent'ing. 

Ab'BlDthe {-HniK), 

Ab-Bln'thl-an, 160. 

Ab-Bin'thl-at-ed. 

Ab-Bin'thYne, 152, 171. 

Ab'Bo-lute, 106. 

Ab-BO-la'tiOD, 112. 

Ab'so-lut-ism (-i«in). 

Ab'BO-lut-iBt, 106. 

Ab-Bol'u-to-ry_(86) [bo 
Wk. 8m. Wr. ; ab^- 
so-iu-to-ry or <uh»oV- 
u4o-ryi Gd. 1651. 

Ab-8oIv'a-to-ry, 86, 171. 

Ab-Bolve' (zaivf), 40. 

Ab-Bolved {-zolvan. 

Ab-Bolv'ing {-zolv'ing\ 

Ab-8orb', 17, 103. [183. 

Ab-8orb-a-bil'l-ty, 108. 

Ab-Borb'a-blc, 164, 169. 

Ab-Borbed' (absorbd')t 

Ab~8orb'ent. [ 166. 

Ab-Borb'ing. 

Ab-Borp'tion, 112. 

Ab-Borp'tlve, 84. 

Ab-8tam', 23, 103. 

Ab-Btalned', 166. 

Ab-Btaio'lng. 

Ab-Bte'mi-OQ8, 171. 

Ab-Bterge',21, N. ; 129. 

Ab-Btergcd', 165. 

Ab-Bter^gent, 183, 171. 

Ab-Bter'ging, 183. 

Ab-Bter'Bion. 

Ab-Bter'Blve, 84. 

Ab'sti-nenoe, 171. 

Ab'ati-nent, 109. 

Ab-8tract', r. 103, 161. 

Ab'Btract. a. A n. 103, 

Ab-Btract'ed. [161. 

Ab-Btract'er, 77. 

Ab-stract'lng. 

Ab-Btrae'tloii, 234. 

Ab-Btract'lTO, 84. 

Ab'stract-ly, or Ab- 
stract' lyfo^'rtrottWy, 
Wr. Wb. Gd. } ab- 



a, S, i, d« u, y, long i A, €, Ii 6, &, f, thort ; Has in fkr, it m in fut, ktuin 



ABSTRACTNESS 



85 



ACCOUNTING 



ttrakt'lyt Wk. Sm. 

1561. 
Ab'BtractHDess, 106. 
Ab-fltruse' (alhMroos*), 

19, 121. 
Absurd', 21, 121. 
Ab-surd'i-ty, 169, 171. 
A-ban'danoe, 169, 230. 
A-ban'dant, 109. 
A-base' (-^fis'), r. 136, 

161. 
A-base', n. 161. 
Abased' i-b^zd'), 183. 
A-bus'er (-6fi«'-). 
A-bus'lng {-IfQz'-). 
A-bo'sWe, M. 
A-bat', 22. 
A-bat'ment. 
A-but'tal. 176. 
A-but'ted, 171. 
A-bot'ter. 
A-bot'tiDfir. 
Abyss', 16, 171. 
Ab-f s-Bin'i-Bn, 171. 
A-ea'ci-a (L.) (ka'ahX-), 

46. 
A-ca'cUm (-to'tAon), 46. 
Ao-a-dem'ic, 52, 109. 
A<^«-dem'ic-aI, 108. 
Afr-a-de-ml'dan (-mUh'- 

an), 171. 
A-esd'e-mf [so Sm.Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; a-kad'e-my 

or afa-dem-y, Wk, 

1551. 
Ae-a4e'pluin, 35, 122. 
A-4Sia-y'cTne, 82, 152. 
Ao-a-ljcM-DO&s, 39, 171. 
Ae-a-Da'oeoas (-«AtM), 
A-can'tha. 72. ril2. 
A-oaii-tha'oeoll8(<«A««), 

112 109. 
A-oan'thbie, 82, 152. 
A-ean-tho-oeph'a-lan, 

35^116. 
A-ean'tho-pod. 
A-can-thop-te-iyg'i-otts 

(ri/'i-ia), 116, 171. 
A -can' thus (L.). 
A-oir'di-ac, 108. 
A-c&r'i-dan, 169. 
A-car'poQs. 
Ada-rut (L.) fpl. Ada- 

H, 1981. 
A-«at-a-Iec'tio, 109. 
A-oat'a-lep-sT, 109. 
A-cat-arlep'tfc, 109. 
A-caa-les'oent, 171. 
A-oao'Une, 82, 152. 
A-«aa'lo&s, 100. 
Ao-oede', 39, 169. 
Ao-oed'ed, 183. 
Ao-oed'ing. 



Ac-ceFer-ate, 171, 233. 
Ao-cel'er-at-ed. 
Ao-cel'ei-at-ing. 
AoK3eI-er-a'tioQ, 112. 
A<M5el'er-at-Ive, 84, 106. 
Ac-cel'er-a-to-ry, 86,106. 
A<H3end-i bil'l-tr, 108. 
A(HX?nd'i blc, 108, 104. 
Ac'cent. n. 103, 161. 
Ao-oeDr, v. 103, 161. 
Ao-eent'ed. 
Ao-oent'iog. 
Ac-«eDt'or, 88, 109. 
Ao-eent'u-al, 89. 
Ao-oent'u-ate, 73, 89. 
Ac-oent-u-a'tion, 112. 
Ao-oept', 15, 103. 
Ac-eept-a-bil'i-ty, 108, 

171. 
Ao-«ept'a-ble (169) (so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. , 

akf»ept-a-bUW\iA^], 
Ao-oept'a-bly, 93. 
Ao-cept'ance, 169. 
Ac-cept-a'UoD, 112, 228. 
Ac-cept'ed. 
Ao-oept'er, n. one who 

accepts. [ See Aooept- 

or, 1601. 

Ac-OGpt'lDg. 

Ac-oept'or, n. one who 
accepts a draft, &c. 
[Law term. — See Ac- 
cepter, ICOl. 

Ac-cess', or Ac'oess [so 
Wr.Gd.;al:-»ea',Wk. 
Sm. 155]. 

Ac'oes-sa-ri-lf , 106. 

Ac'oes-sa-ry (?2) [Ac- 
cessory. 203.] 

Ac-ces-si-bu'i-ty. 

Ao-ces'si-ble, 104, 171. 

Ac-oes'si-bly, 93. 

Ao-ces'sion, 112. 

Ao-oes'Hion-al. 

Ac-cess1ve. 84. 

Ao-ces-so'ri-al. 

Ac'oes-so-rl-ly. 

Ac'oes-so-ry ?86) Ac- 
cessary, 203]. 

i^ ** Aeeemorp clalmi a 
•light etgrmologickl prefer- 
tnee, but is mm utiud.'* 
Smart. 

Ac'ci-dence, 106, 171. 
Ac'd-dent. 
Ac-d-dent'al, 228. 
Ao-cip'i-trtne, 82, 152. 
Ao-claim', 23, 52. 
Ac-cla-ma'tion (112). 
[ See Aocllmation,148. J 
Ac-clam'a-to-ry, 86. 
Ac-cli'mate, 122. 



Ao-cli'mat-ed, 183. 
Ao-cli'niat-lag^. 
Ac-cli-ma'tioD. f.S'ee Ao- 

ciamatlon, 148. J 
Ao-eli'ma~tize, 202. 
Ao-oll'ma-tized, 165. 
Ao-cli'ma-tiz-ing, 183. 
Ao-cUv'i-ty, 108. 
Ao-cli'Yofls. 
Ac-eo-lade', or Ao-co- 

lade' [so Wr. ; olr-o- 

Idd', Wb. Gd.i oiH}' 

Hid, Sm. 155]. 
Ac-com'mo-date, ITOi 
Ac-com'mo-dat-ed. 
Ac-com'mo-dat -ing. 
Ac-com-mo-da'tion, 116. 
Ac-eom'mo-ddt Ive, 84. 
Ac-com'mo-dat -or, 88 
Ao-com'pa-nled (-nid), 

171, 186. 
Ac-com'pa-ni-er( kum' -) 
Ao-eom'pa-ni-meut 

{-kum'), 109. 
Ac-eom'pa-ni8t< kum' ), 
Ac-com'pa-ny (-kum'}, 

171. 
Ao-com'pa-ny-ing 

(-kum^ ' * 
Ao-com'pUoe, 169, 171. 
Ao-com'plish. 
Ac-com'plish-a-ble, 164. 
Ac-com'plished (-Jeom'- 

plUht), Note C, p. 34. 
Ac-com'pllBh-er. 
Ac-eom'pIiRh-ing. 
Ao-com'plish-ment. 
Ac-eord', 17. 
Ac-cord'anoe, 169. 
Ac-oord'ant, 169. 
A<M5ord'ed. 
Ac-cord'ing. 
Ac-cord'i-on, 171. 
AcHsSst', 18. Note. 
Ao-odst'a-ble, 164. 
Ao-cdst'ed. 
Ac-c5st'ing. 
Accouchement (Fr.) ak- 

koosh'mong, 154). 
Ac-count', 28. 
Ao-count-a-bil'i-ty. 
Ac-count'a-ble, 164, 171. 
Ao-count'ant. 

tlST SometimM ipelled 
Aeoomptant when 
cwed in a technical lenee, 
•■ in the term AcconivtatU- 
OenertU, an officer in the 
EngUih Coort of Clutne*- 

»y- 
Ao-oonnt'-bdbk, 206, 

Exc. 4. 
Ac-count'ed. 
AoKJOunt'tng. 



&Ui 6 Of in there-, &i as in footiqasin flusile; gh a»gingo\\^a»in thii. 

8 



\ 



AOCOUPLE 



86 



ACaUERE 



^o-oottp'le l-kupf^, 

IM. 
AiM»ni>'led (kup'ld). 
Ao-oottp'le-meot (-Inq^'- 

l-ment). 
Ac-<sotlp'hng(-tup'Ung) 
Ao-oou'tre {ax-law tur), 

n6», 171) [Accou- 

ie r preferred by Wb. 

and Gd. — 5ee Note 

E, p. 70.J 
Ao-cou'tred (-terd). 183. 
Ac-cou'tre-ment {-koo'- 

tur). 
AG-cou'tring(-koo'-hVSi 
Ac-credMt. 
Ac-cred'lt-ed. 
Ao-orc8'conce. 
Ac-«reB'ceat, 171. 
Ac-cre'tioD, 112. 
Ac-cre'tlvc. ft*. 
Ac-crue' (-kroo'), 9i, 
Ao-crued' (JlTOoa'), 183. 
Ac-cru'lne^ (-i-roo'-). 
Ac-cu-ba'tlon. 
Ao-cum'bcn-cy. 
Ac-cam'bent, J09. 
Ac-ou'mu-lnte, 73. 
Ac-ca'ma-lat-od . 
Ao-cu'mu-lat-ing, 183. 
Ac-cu-mu-bi'tion, 112. 
Ac-cu'mu-lat-Ivc, M. 
Ac-cu'mu-lat-or, 160. 
Ac'cu-ra-cy, 100, 171. 
Ao'cu-rate, 73, 80. 
Ac-carscS 21, 103. 
Ao-cursed' {ak-kur»V)^ 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ao-curs'lns'. 
Acv-cus'a-ble (-*««'-)» 

IM, 100. 
Ao-ou-sa'tioii {'Za'- 

Bhun)t 112. 
Ac-cu 8'a-tlve {-Ic^z^ -) ,84. 
Ao-cua'a-to-ry, (-Jtfl^'-) 

86. 
Ao-cuBe' (-Iftsr'), 26. 
Ac-cus'er (-ifJc'er), 183. 
Ac-cas'ing {-kaz'ing). 
Ac cus'tom, 80. 
Ac-cus'tom-a-rl-ly, 72, 

100. 
Ac-ouB'tom-a-ry, 72,100. 
Ao-cuB'tomcd {-ku^- 

tumd\ 105. 
Ac-cuB'tom-ing. 
Aoe, 23, 30. 

A-oelMa-ma (Heb.), 72. 
A-ceph'a-lan, 35. 
A-«eph'a-lodB, 35, 171. 
Aoe'point, 200. 
A-cerb' 21, Note. 
A-cerb'1-ty, 78, 108, 100. 



Ao-er-OBo' (233, Exe.) 
[BO Sm. Wr. ; as'er- 
««, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Af'er-ofis. 

A-oeB'oen-«y, 160, 171. 

A-oea'oeDt, 171. 

A9-«-ta'ri-o&8. 

A5'e-ta-ry, 72, 160. 

AQ'e-Ute, 171. 

A-oet'ic, or A-oe'tlc [a- 
sd'iky Sm. Wr. ; a-se'- 
tik, Wb. Gd. 155.1 

A-oet'i-fied, or A^t'tl- 
f ied, 105. 

A-cet'i-ty, or A-oe'ti-(y, 
04,108. 

A-oet'i-fy-lng, or A-oe'- 
ti-fy-Jner. 

A9-e-tim'e-ter, 100. 

Ag-e-tim'e-try. 

A^'e-tone, 160. 

A9-«-t08e'. 

A-ce'totta, 171. 

A-chB'an (a-ke'an) (62) 
[Achean, Wb. Gd. 
203.1 

A-cha'ian (aka'yan)^ 
52, 51. 

Ache (aib), 52,171. 

Ached {&kt)t Note C, p. 
34. 

Ach'Ing (dk'ing)y 183. 

A-che'ni-um {a-k^ni- 
um), 100. 

Ach'e-ron (oJb'e-ron). 

A-«hidT'a-ble, 109, 183. 

Achieve'. 13, 171. 

A-chieved', 150. 

A-chieve'ment, 185. 

A-chiev'er. 

A-chiev'Ing, 183. 

ich'ing {akfing), 183. 

A'ehor {a'kor). [See 
Acre, 148.1 

Ach-ro-mat^c {ak-ro-\ 
or A-chro-mat'ic («'- 
kro) (171) \ak-ro- 
mat'ik, Wr. Gd. ; «- 
kro-mat'ik^ Sm. 155. J 

Ach-ro'ma-tJsm (aJb-ro'- 
ma-tizm)j or X-ohro'- 
ma-tism (Ji-kro'vaa- 
tizm) [ak-ri^ma-tizm, 
Gd. ; d-kro'tna-tixnit 
8m. Wr. 155.] 

Aoh-ro'ma-tlzc (aJfc-ro'-) 
or A-chro'ma-tize (&- 
kro'-), 202. 

A-cio'u-lar, 80, 108, 171. 

A-dc'u-late, 73, 80. 

A-cio'u-11-form. 

A5'Id, 30, 171, 235. 

A^-Jd-iTer-otts, 108. 



A-ddM-n-a-ble, 100. 
A-dd-i-fi-ca'tion. 
A-dd'I-ned, 171. 
A-cJd'i-fi-er. 
AHdd'i -5, 04, 108. 
A-dd'i-ly ing. 
A9-id-lm'e-ter, 100. 
Ay-ld-lm'e-try, 170. 
A-cid'i-ty, 171. 
A-cld'u-Iate, 73, 80. 
A-cid'u-lat-ed. 
A-dd'u-lat-iug. 
A-dd-u-la'tlon, 112. 
A-cid'u-lo&B, 80, 108. 
A9'i-form, 100. 
A94-na'oeottB {-fui'ahus) 

112, 160. 
Af-i-nac'i-form, 171. 
A-dn'i-form, 100. 
Ao-i-nose' [bo Wr. ; atf' 

i-n59, Sm. Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Af'l-no&B. 
Ac-kn6wl'edge(-no/'< 

171. [<^< 

Ao-kndwl'edged (- 
Ao-knSwl'edg-er. 
Ac-kn6wl'edg-ing. 
Ao-kndwredg-ment 

(171, 185). ISet 

Abridgment.] 
Ac'me, 103. 
A-ool'o-gy. 108. 
A-coro-thlat. 
Ac'o-lyte. 
Ac'o-lhh, 170. 
A-con-dy-loBc'. 
A-oon'dy-lotta. 
Ac'o-nite, 83, 152. 
A'oom. 
A'comed, 150. 
A-co-tyl-«'don, 122. 
A-oo-tyl-o'don-otGia [so 

Sm.'Wb. Gd.; A-c6t- 

p-led'o-nu8t Wr. 165.] 
A-cou'ohy {a-koo'ehff). 
A-oouB'tic, 28, 100. 
A-cous'ticB, 28, 100. 
Ao-quaint', 34, 171. 
Ac-qualnt'ance, 160. 
Ao-qaalnt'ed. 
Ac-qualnt'ing. 
Ac-queBt', 34. 
Ao-qui-«»oe' (oJr-trl-es'), 

102, 163, 171. 
Ac-qui-<?«ood' (-e»<')» 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ac-qui-es'oenoe, 171. 
AiMiui-es'oent. 
Ac-qui-€8'Ging. 
Ao-quir-a-bill-tr, 
Ao-quirVble, IM. 
Ac-qulre', 25. 



i, fi, 1, 0, n, y, Icm^ ; A, »,\, 6, tit ft ihort-, K <u <n far, 4 cm ill ftst, & m in 



ACaUIBED 



87 



ADHERING 



Ae^tiired', ISO. 
Ao-quire'ment. 
Ae-qoir'erf 77, 160. 
Ao-quir'mc;-. 
Ao-<iDl-8i'doii {ak-nfl- 

ziih'un)f 171. 
Ae-quiB'i-tlTe ikwiz'%-), 

10&, 171. 
Ac-quii'i-tifTe-nees (ac- 

Ae-quitS 16, 34. 

Ac-quit'tal, 176. 

Ac-quit'Unoe. 

Ao-qoit'ted. 

Ac-qiiit'ting. 

Ac'ra-Bf n6i>) [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd.; a'crasy, 

Sm. 156.] 
A'cre(a'bur) (IM, 171). 

r.S^ Achor, 148.] 
A'cre-age (a'kur-). 
A'cred ia'kurd), 165,183. 
Ae'rid, 10. 

Ao-ii-mo'ni-ottB, 171. 
Aiyrl-ma-nf , 86, !», 171. 
A-erit'ic-aL 
A<yri-tiide, 160. 
Ac-ro-A-mat'io, 109. 
Ae-ro-a-mat'ic-al, 106. 
Ao-ro-a-mat'ic8. 
Ac-ro-at'ic 
Ac-ro-at'ic8. 
Ae'ro bat [go Gd. ; Ac- 
robat e, Wr. 203.1 
Ae-ro-ce-rau'ni-an, 171. 
Ac'ro-een. 

Ae-ro^e-notts (-frj'-). 
Ac'ro-lith. 
A-crol'ith-an. 
A-cnymi-al. 
A-€ro'inl-on, 160. 
A-€ron'ic. 
A-cron'j-<»l [ A c r o n i - 

eal,2(n.] 
A-cron'y-cal-ly, 93. 
A-erop'o-lis, 170. 
Ac'ro-spire. 
Ac'ro-epired, 165. 
A-cr68B'. 18, Note. 
A-croB'tic, 109, 171. 
A-eroB'tio-al. 
Ac-ro-te'ri-um (L.) [pi. 

Ac-ro-tefri^ 108.] 
Aet, 10, 68. 
Aet'cd. 
Ac'ti-an. 
Aet'insr. 
Ac4in/t-a (L.) [pi. Ac- 

Hn'i-ce, 108.] 
Ae-tin'i-fonn, 160. 
Ae-tin'io. 

Ac'ttn-iBm Uzm), 133. 
Ao-tin'o-gnph, 127. 



Ac-tin'o lite. 
Ao-tin-o-llt'ic 
Ao-tin-ol'o-gy. 
Ac-tin -om'e-tcr, 108. 
Ac'tion, 10, 46. 
Ac'tion-able, 164. 
Ac'tioii-A-bly, 93. 
Ao'tion-a-ry, 72. 
Ac'tion-ist. 
ActTvc, 84. 
Ao-tiv'i-ty. 
Act'or, 88, 100. 
Act'resB, 228. 
Act'u-al. 80. 
Ac^u-al'i-ty, 160. 
Act'u-al-ize, 202. 
Act'u-al-Iy, 93. 
Act'u-a-ry, 72. 
Act'u-ate, 73, 89. 
Act'u-at-ed, 183. 
Act'u-at-ing. 
A-cu'le-ate. 
A-ca'le-at-ed. 
A-cu'le-o&B. 
A-ca'men, 113, 125. 
A-cu'min-ate, 171. 
A-cn'min-at-ed. 
A-cu'min-at-ing. 
A-cu-min-a'tion. 
A-cu'mln-ofiB. 
Ac-a-punct-u-ra'tion, 

112. llf. 
Ac-a-pimct'are, 91. 
A-cute', 26. 
A-dac'tyl. 
Ad'ag«, 160. 
Ad'a-mant, 171. 
Ad-a-roant-e'aii, 110. 
Ad-a-mantlne, 84, 162, 

171. 
Ad-am'lc, 100. 
Ad'am-ite, 162. 
Ad-am it'io, 100. 
Ad'am'B-Ap'ple, 213. 
A-dapt', 10, 103. 
A-dapt-a-bU'i-ty, 108. 
A-dapt'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Ad-apt-a'tion, 112. 
A-dapt'ed. 
A-dapt'er, 160. 
A-dapt'ing. 
A-daptlve, 84. 
Add. 10, 175. 
Ad-aen'dum (L.) [pi. 

Ad-den' da, 198.] 
Ad'der, 66, 170. 
Ad-dl-bil'i-ty. 
Ad'di-ble, 164, 160. 
Addict', 16, 103. 
Ad-dlct'ed. 
Ad-dic'tion. 
AdrtMng, 228. 
Ad-dit'a-ment, 160. 



Ad-di'tion (-dUh'un^ 

112, 171, 231. 
Ad-di'tioQ-al (-dish'un-) 
Ad'dlc, irr4. 
Ad'dle-head'ed, 205, 

Exc. 5. 
Ad'dling.230. 
Ad-dresB', n. & v. 
Ad-dressed' {-dreiV), 

165, Note C, p. 34. 
Ad-dress'er, 77, 169. 
Ad-drcBs'lng. 
Ad-ducc', 26, 103. 
Ad-duced' {-d^V), Note 

C, p. 34. 
Ad-du'oent. 
Ad-du'cer. 
Ad-du'ci-ble, 164. 
Ad-du'ciug. 
Ad-duc'tion. 
Ad-duc'tTve, 84. 
Ad-duc'tor. 88, 160. 
A-del'o-pod, 105. 
A-demp'tion. 
Ad-e-noc-'ra-phy, 108. 
Ad'e-nold. 
Ad-e-no-loiF'ic-al 

(-to/-). 
Ad-e-nol'o-gy. 108. 
Ad-e-no-phyVlo&B, or 

Ad-e-noph'yl-loQs [bo 

Wr.] 

0^ WoroMler Is tht oo- 
Ij lexicographer, except 
Rnowlei, who It unifbrm 
In hit mode of pronotmo- 
ing wordi that end in phvl- 
low. Knowlea pbccfl tiie 
accent on the antepcnnlt. 
Of the fottrtetsn word» of 
thli class fbund in Smart's 
Dictionary, nx are accent- 
ed on the antcpennlt, and 
eioht on the pen nit. Of 
the $eventefn fbund in the 
Ust edition of Webster's 
Dictionary, edited by 
Goodrich, /^tten have the 
accent on the antepenult, 
and two, which are added 
in the Appendix, on the 
penult 

Ad-e-nose' [bo Wr.; 
od'e-nfiB, Sm. Gd.l55.J 
Ad'e-nofis. 
Ad-e-not'o-my, 108. 
A-dept', 15, 232. 
Ad'e-qua-cy, 160, 171. 
Ad'e-quate, 73. 
Ad-es-se-na'ri-an, 40, N. 
Adhere', 13, 103. 
Ad-hered', 165, 183. 
Ad-hgr'ence, 160, 183. 
Ad-her'ent, 160. 
Ad-her'er. 
Ad-her'ing, 183. 



fall; 6 Of lit there ; Ob a< in foot; ^ofinfticUe; gfa cm g In go ; tb 'i' ^ thisi 



ADUfiBlON 



88 



AOV£NTUAL 



Ad-he'sion (-he'zhun), 

112. 
Ad-he'stTe, 84. 
Ad-hor'ta to-ry, 233. 
A-dieu' (a^u'), 26. 
Ad-l-po^'er-ate. 
Ad-I-po5'er-at-ed. 
Ad-l-pof'er-at-ingp. 
Ad-l-po9-<3r-a'tion, 171. 
Ad'i-po-<i«Jr€, IW, 171. 
Ad-i-po5'cr-oti8, 171. 
Ad-l-pose' [so Wr.i ad'- 

i-pfi», Sm. Gd. 155.] 
Ad'lp-87, 109. 
Ad'it, 170. 
Ad-Ja'oenoe. 
Ad- a'oen-cy, 109. 
Ad-Ja'oent, 171. 
Ad'jec-tlve, 8*. 
Ad'jec-tiv-al [ao Wr.; 

ad-jectlv'al, Gd. 155.] 
Ad-Join', 27, 103. 
Ad joined', 166. 
Ad-joln'ine. 
Ad-loum' 7nd-^m');2i. 
Ad- oumed' {-jumd'). 
Ad-, oum'ing^ (jum'-). 
Ad- oum'mentr-jttm -). 
Ad; udge' (-jvj'), 45. 
Ad-; udgt^d^ iJwd'), 165. 
Ad-ludg'ing (-J^^'•hm. 
Adjuds^'ment (185). 

'' See Abridgment.] 
Ad-Ju'dl-<sate, 73, 108. 
Ad-; u'di-cat-ed, 228. 
Ad-; a'di-cat-lng. 
Ad; a-di-ca'tion. 
Ad- u'di-cat-or, 109. 
Adjunct, 103. 
Ad-Junc'tion. 
Ad-junct'Ive, 84. 
Ad-junct'ly, 93. 
Ad-ju-ra'tion. 
Ad-ju'ra-to-ry, 86. 
Ad-jure', 26, 103. 
Ad-3ured', 150, 166. 
Ad; ur'er, 77, 183. 
Ad; ur'lng. 
Ad; U8t', 22, 103. 
Ad; U8t'a-ble, 164. 
Ad; ust'ed. 
Ad-just'er. 
Ad-lust'ing. 
Ad; uBt'Tve, 84. 
[Adjutage— iSw 

AJatage, 2a3.] 
Ad' u-tan-cy, 169. 
Adjutant, 169, 171. 
Ad Ou-tant- General , 

216. 
AdMu-rant [bo Wk. 8m. 

Wr. ; adju'vantf Wb. 

Gd. 165.J 



Ad-meaa'ure-ment (ad- 

mezh'ur), 91, 171. 
Ad-min'i8-ter, 77, 170. 
Ad-min'is-tcrcd, 165. 
Ad-min-iB-tc'ri-al, 116. 
Ad-min'iB-ter-ing. 
Ad-min-is-tra'tion, 112. 
Ad-min'i8-trat-or, 228. 
Ad-min-is-tra'trix. 
Ad-mi-ra-bll'i ty. 
Ad'ml-ra-ble, 122, 143, 

164. 
Ad'ml-ra-bly, 93. 
Ad'ml-ral, 105. 
Ad'ml-ral-ty, 106, 145. 
Ad-mi-ra'tion, 112. 
Ad-mire'. 25, 103. 
Ad-mired', 165, 183. 
Ad-mir'er, 109. 
Ad-mir'ing. 
Ad-mis-Bibil'i-ty, 170. 
Ad-miB'Bl ble, 78, 164. 
Ad-mlB'si-bly, 93. 
Ad-mia'aion {-miah'un)^ 

46. 
Ad-mJs'BO-ry, 86, 93. 
Admit', 16, ia3. 
Ad-mit'tancc, 176. 
Ad-mlt'ted. 
Ad-mlt'ter. 
Admit'ting. 
Ad-mix', 16, 103. 
Ad-mixed' (ad-mixt'). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ad-mlx'ing. 
Ad-mlx'tion (ad-mika'- 

chun), 44, Note 1. 
Ad-mixt'ure, 91. 
Ad-mon'iBh, 104. 
Ad-mon'ished (-^A<), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ad-mon'isn-er. 
Ad-mon'ish-lng. 
Ad-mo-ni'tion (-nish'- 

ttn), 46, 171. 
Ad-mon'i-tlve, 108. 
Ad-mon'i-tor, 78. 
Ad-mon'i-to-rv, 86, 93. 
Ad-mor-ti-za'tlon. 
Ad-nas'cent, 171. 
Ad-nate', 121. 
Ad-nom'in-al. 
Ad'noun. 
Ado' {a-doo')t 19. 
Ad-o-les'cence, 171. 
Ad-o-lea'oen-cy, 169. 
Ad-o-leB'oent. 
Ad-o-ne'an, 110. 
A-don'io. 
A-dopt', 18, 103. 
A-dopt'ed. 
A-dopt'er. 
A-dopt'ing. 



A-dop'tion, 46. 
A-dopt Ive, 84. 
A-dor'a ble, 49, N. ; lOi 
A-dor'a-bly. 
Ad-o-ra'tion, 112. 
A-dore', 24, 103. 
A-dored', 160, 183. 
A-dor'er. 
A-dor'ing. 
Adorn', 17, 108, 1.35. 
A-domod', 165. 
A-dom'ing. 
Ad-oB-cu-A'tion. 
A-down', 28. 
A-drlft', 16. 
Ad-ro-fi^'tion. 
A-droit', 27. 
A-dry', 25. 
Ad-8ci-»'tiofiB l-Artith'- 

iM), 46, 171. 
Ad' script. 
Ad-u-laHion, 112. 
Ad'u-lato-ry, 86, 171. 
A-dult' [nofad'olt, 153.] 
A-dal'ter-ant. 
A-duI'ter-ate, tr. ft a. 73. 
A-dal'ter4it-ed, 183. 
A-dul'tcr-at-ing. 
A-dul-ter-a'tion. 
A-dul'ter-er. 
A-dul'ter-ess. 
A-dul'ter-ine [bo Wk. 

Sm. Wr.; a-duPter- 

<n, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
A-dul'tcr-ofiB. 
A-dul'ter-y, 233. 
Ad-um'brant. 
Ad-um'brate. 
Ad-um'brat-ed, 183. 
Ad-um'brat-ing. 
Ad-um-bra'tion, 112. 
A<lun'ci-ty, 109. 
A-dun'oo&8 {a-dwug^- 

kus\ 64. 
A-duBt', 22. 
A-dust'lon {-yun)^ 61. 
Ad-Tance', n.ft r. 12.131. 
Ad-yanoed' (-r4n«<';. 
Ad-vimoe'ment. 
Ad-Yan'oer, 183. 
Ad-van'cing. 
Ad-Tan'clYe. 
Ad-van'tage, 70, 131, 

109 
Ad-vkn'taged, 150, 183. 
Ad-van-ta'geottB (-la'- 

jua), 45, 169, 171. 
Ad-yan'ta-glng. 
Ad-yene', 13, 103. 
Ad'yent, 10, 103. 
Ad-yen-tl'tioaB {-tUhf- 

tM), 46. 171. 
Ad-yent'a-al, 89. 



a, «, i, 6, a, y, Umg i A, «i 1, 6t tt, Xt «*ort } ii a« In far, 4 a< In ftat, & a« <fi 



ADVENTURE 



89 



AFFIXTURE 



Ad-rent'are, 91. 
Ad-reat'ored, 165. 
Ad-Tcnt'are-ral {-/dbl), 

180. 
Ad-vent'ur-er, 91, 183. 
Ad - vent ' are-«ome 

Aa Tent'ar-ing, 91, 183. 
Ad-vent'ur ooB. 
Ad'rerb, 10, 103. 
Ad-Terb'i-aU 123. 
Ad-ver-wi'ri-a (L. pi.). 
Ad'ver-sa-rr, 72, 93. 
Ad rer'Mi-tive, M. 
Ad'veree [not ad-yene', 

153.J 
Ad'Yerse-ly [bo 8m. 

Wk. Wb. Gd.; ad- 

vers'lv, Wr. 155.1 
Ad-rer'Bi ty, 21, N. ; 93. 
Advert', 21, Note. 
Ad-vert'ed. 
Ad-vert'enoe, 169. 
Ad-vert'en-cy, 169. 
Ad-vert'ent. 
Ad-vert'lDg[. 
Ad-ver-tise*, or Ad'ver- 

tiae (-rta) (1.36, 202)r8O 

Wr. ; ad-per-az',Wk. 

Wb. Gd.; €ui'ver-tlZt 

Sm. 155.1 
Ad-ver-tJsed' (-«««'). 
Ad-ver'tlsc-mcnt (-ttz-\ 

or Ad-ver-timrment 

i-az) JTso Wk. Wr. ; 

ad-ver^tz-tnent, Sm. 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Ad-ver-ti8'er( -fl«'-).183. 
Ad-ver-tia'ing {-(Iz'-). 
Ad- vice', 25. 
Ad-vig-a-bil'i-tv (-rl«-), 

116. 
Ad<v!8'B-ble {t^a-bt)t 

40, IM. 
Ad-vifl'a-bly (jod-vi^a- 

Ad-viae' ('-rU'), 103, 136, 

202. 
Ad-vised' (-vfsd'), 165. 
Ad-viB'er (^Ver), 183. 
Ad-via'ing {-fmz'ing). 
Ad'vo-ca-cy, 169. 
Ad'vo-catc, n. A r. 105. 
Ad'vo-cat ed,228. Note. 
Ad'va^t-lng. 
Ad-vo-ca'tioQ, 112. 
Ad-vow-ee', 122, 171. 
Ad-vow'aon, 28. 
Ad-7-nam'lo [»o Wr. ; 

a-dy-nafli'Or, Wb. Gd. 

156.] 
Ad-y-nam'ic-al. 
Ad'y^umih.) \^\.Ad'- 



p-toy 1981 [80 Wr. ; 

a-dy'tum, Wb. Gd. 

165.J 
Adze {adz), (10, 40) 

[Ad I, 203.1 
.£'dile(e'-),(l3)[Edlle, 

203.1 
^-ge'an (e./c'an), 110 
.£'ii-lop8 iefJi-loitH)^ or 

.^['i-Iops {(j'i-lop3) 

l&ji-lopst Sm. wb 

Gd.; ^'i-lops, Wr. 

155.1 
JE'gii (L.) ie'jis). 
^•ne'ia (c-ne'irf), or 

^'neid (jefne-id) [so 

Wr. ; «-ne'id, Sm. (Jd 

155.1 ri^°eid,20:).] 
JS-o'li-an {e-o'li-an) 

[Eolian, 203.1 
JE-ol'io, {e-oVik) fE o 1 '- 

ie, 203.1 
.ffl-ol'i-plle (e-ol'i-pU) 

[Eollpile,203J 
^on le^on) [Eon, 

203.J 
A'cr-ate, 233. 
A'er-at-ed, 183. 
A'er-at-ing. 
A-er-a'tton. 
A-e'ri-al, 78, 171. 
Ae'rie («'r^), or A'er-le 

Oa^-») L"0 Wr. ; e'ry, 

Wk. am.; a'er-y, or 

«'ry, Gd. 155.1 [A y - 

ry,Eyry, 203.1 
A-er-i-fl-ca'l3on, 116. 
A'er-l-form [so Wb. 

CW. ; dr^i-form, Sm. ; 

a'errirform, Wr. 155.1 
A'er-l-fv, 91, 169. 
A-er-o-ay-nam'ic8, 116, 

171. 
A-er-og'ra-phy, 108. 
A'er-olite, 152. 
A-er-olit'ie. 
A-er-o log'lc (io/'i*). 
A^J^-o log'i-cal(-/o/'i;b-). 
A-er ol'o-g^gt. 
A-cr-ol'o-gy, 108. 
A'cro man-cy, 122, 169. 
A-er-om'e-ter, 108. 
A-er-o-met'ric. 
Aer-om'e-try, 93. 
A'er-o-nftut, 122. 
A-er-o-niut'lc, 109. 
A cr-o-n&ut'ic-al, 106. 
A-er-o-nftut'ic8, 109. 
A'er-o-phyte, 171. 
A -er-oa'co-py, 93, 108. 
A'er-o-Btat. 
A-cr-o-8tat'ic, 109. 
A-er-o-Btat'ic-al, 106. 



A-er-o-Btat'lc8, 109. 
A-er-08-ta'tion. 
^-ru'gi-nofis {e-ro&ji. 

nutt) [Eruginons, 

203.] 
^B thet'lc {ea-thet'ik) 

(171) [Esthetic, 

^B-t'het'ic-al (ea-thet'- 

i-kal). 
iBBthet'lcB {ezthef- 

iks), 109, 171. 
[Estivation.— See 

Estivation, 203.] 
A «-the-og'a-mous, 116. 
A-far', 11. 

Af-fa bil'i-ty, 106, 169. 
Af fable, 60, 164, 170. 
Af fk broOB [so Wk 

Wr.; affa,'bru9,%m, 

155.1 
Affair' (q/';/»r'), 14, 66. 
Af-foct', 15, 108. 
Af fect-a'tion, 228. 
Af-fect'ed. 
Af-fect'er. 

Af-fect-i Wl'i-ty, 116. 
Af-lbet'i-ble, 161, 109. 
Af-fcct'lng. 
Af-fec'tion. 
Af-fec'tion-al. 
Af-fec'tion-ate, 73. 
Af-fbc'tioned (q/ye**- 

»hund), 165. 
Af-fec'tlve, 84. 
Af-fear'. 
Af-fSar'er. 
Af-fear'ment. 
Affer-ent. 
Af-fi'anoc, 122. 
Af-fi'anced i-JVaiMt), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Af-fi'an-cer. 
Af-fi'an-cing. 
Af-fl-da'vit, 170. 
Af-fied'. 
Af-fil'i-ate, 73. 
Af-fil'1-at^, 183. 
Af-fll'i-at-lng. 
Af-fll-i-a'tton, 170. 
Af fin-age. 
Af-fln'1-ty, 171. 
Affirm', 21, Note. 
Af-firm'a-ble, 169. 
Af-firm'ant. 
Af-flrm-a'tion. 
Af-firm'a-tlve, 108, 171. 
Af-firmed', 165. 
Af-firm'er, 77, 169. 
Af-firm'ing. 
Affix', r. 161. 
Affix, n. 161. 
Af-flxt'ore, 91. 



ftll y%a$in there ', (fbatin foot , 9 a« in fiusile ; gh a< g in go ; tj^ cm in this. 

8* 



\ 



APPLATION 



90 



AGRARIAN 



Af-fla^on. 

Af-Jla'tM (L.) (125) [not 

af<flrtu8, 1&3.] 
Af-flict', 16, 52, 103. 
Af-fllct'er, 77, 189. 
Af-flict'ing. 
Af-fllc'tlon. 
Afflictive, 84. 
Afflu-enoe, 106, 109. 
Af flu-cnt, m. 
Afflux. 
Af-flux'ion {-Jluk'shun) 

46, Note. 
Afford', a*, 103. 
Af-ford^ed. 
Af-fdrd'ing. 
Af for'est, 170. 
Af-fiir^stna'tion. 
Af-fran'chlse (-/Wn'- 

chlz)y 202. 
Af-fran'chlBe-ment (q/"- 

frin'chU-ment), 123. 
Affray', 23. 
Af-frefj?ht' {af-frtLV), 

162, 171. 
Af-fright' {af'frW), 162. 
Af-fright'ed (-/r«'crf). 
Af-fright'ing (-/rK'-). 
Affront' (f^/runt'), n. 

(22). [ See Afront, 148.] 
Al-fVont'ed {-/runt'ed). 
Af-ih)nt'lng {af-frunf- 



ing). 



Af-fuse' i(tf-.niz'\ 26, 40. 
Af-fli'iion (./%t'«Attn),47. 
At-fy'j 25. 
Af-iy'ing. 
Afghan, 53. 
A-fire', 26. 
A-float', 24. 
A-f(5bt', 20. 
A-fore', 24. 
A-fore'nand. 
A-fore'iaid (-/iir'ted). 
A-fore'thougot 

{-thawt), 
A-fore'time. 
Afoul', 28. 
A-fttUd', 23. 
A-fresh', 16. 
Afric, 10. 
Afric-an. 
A-front' (a-/H»n<')t ad- 

[See Affront, 148.) 
Aft, 12, 131. 
Aft'er. 

Aft'er-mOBt, 206. 
Aft'er-noon. 
Aft'er-plece. 
Aft'er-ward. 
Aft'er- wards i-wardz)t 

Note C, p. 34. 
Again' (a-ghen') (15, 



171) [not a-gan', 127, 

153.J 
A-gainBt' (a-ghen»t') 

(15, 171)rno<a-gan8t', 

127, 153.] 
Ag'af-loch i-lok)f 52. 
A-gal'lo-chum (-hum), 

52. 
Ag'a-mist, 170. 
Ag'a-mo&B. 
Ag'a-pm (L. pi.) (op'o- 

P«). , 
A-g&pe'fM) Wr.Wb.Gd.: 

a-gUp', Wk. Sm. 155.1 
Ag'a-rlo, 109, 170. 
[ A g a 8 1 .—Set Aghast, 

Ag'ate, 73, 170. 
Ag'a-tize, 202. 
Ag'a-tized, 150, 166. 
Ag'a-tiz ing, 1^. 
Ag'a-ty, 93. 
Age, 23, 46. 
A°ged, 150, 166. 



Pronounced a'^ed, 
except in compound 
worda, H /vllogtd, in 
which It la pronounced 

A'gen-cy, 169. 
A'gent, 23, 45. 
A'gent-ship. 
Ag-ger-a'tion (q/'er-). 
Ag-glom'er-ate, 73. 
A*j-glom'er-at-ed, 228, 
Ag-glom'er-at-lng. [N. 
Ag'glom-er-a'tion, 116. 
Ag-glu'ti-nant, 169. 
Ag-glu'ti-nate, 78. 
A^-glu'ti-nat-ed. 
Ag-glu'tl-nat-ing. 
Ag-gla-ti-na'tion, 112, 

Iltf. 
Ag-gla'ti-nat-Ive, 84, 

Ag'gran-dize (202) [not 
ag-gran'dize, 153.] 

Ag^gran-dized, 165. 

Ag'gran-dlze-ment, or 
Ag-gran'dlze-ment 
[ 80 Wr. ; ag'aran-dlz- 
ment^ Wk. Sm. ; ag- 
gran'dtz-ment, or ag'- 
gran-dlz-ment, Gd. 
155.] 

Ag'gran-diz-ing, 183. 

Ag'gra-vate. 

Ag'gra-vat-ed. 

Ag'gra-vat-lng. 

Ag-gra-Ya'tion. 

Ag'gre-gate, a. ft 0. 73, 
170. 

Ag'gre-gated. 



Ag'gre-gat-ing. 
Ag'gre-gat-Ive, 84. 
Ag'gre-gat-or, 160. 
Ag-gress'. 
Aggressed' {,ag-grtst'\ 

165. 
Ag-gress'ing. 
Ag-gres'sion {-grah'- 

un), 46. 
Ag-gressire, 84. 
Ag-gress'or, 88, IflO. 
Ag-grieve'. 13, 171. 
Aggrieved', 165. 
Ag-griev'ing, 171, 18.^. 
Ag-group' i-groap'), 19. 
Ag-groupt' i-groopt'). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ag-group'lng igroop*- 

tna). 
A-ghast' (12, 53, 131) 



[Aga8t,203.] 
Ag'fle ((^yU), 45, 152, 
A-gil'i-ty, 109. [171. 




Wr. 165.] 

A-gl8t'. 

A-giBt'ment. 
A-gi8t'or. 

Agitate (a;'<-««), 169. 
Ag'i-tat^ (<U'<-), 183. 
Ag'i-tat-ing (q;'<-). 
Ag-i-ta'tion (qf-i-). 
Ag'i-tat Ive (qj'*-). 
Ag'i-tat-or, 109. 
Ag'letf Aiglet, 203.] 
A-gl6w', 24. 
Ag^nail. 
Ag'nate. 
Ag-nat'io, 109. 
Ag-na'tion. 
Ag-no'men (L.^, 125. 
Ag-nom-in-a'tfon. 
Ago', 24. 
A-gog', 18. 
A-going. 
A-gon'ic. 
Agonist. 170. 
Ag-o-ni8t'ic, 109. 
Ag-o-nist'io-al, 106. 
Ag-o-nist'ics. 
Ag'o-nize, 202. 
Ag'o-nized, 150. 
Ag'o-niz-iiig, 183. 
Ag'o-ny, 170. 
A-gou'ti {€hgoo*tg), 1^ 

A-gra'rl-an, 49, Note. 



a, 6, 1, 5, u, y, long } i, C, I, », tt, h «*o»^ j a « <n far, * o# <n flist, ktuin 



AGRARIANISM 



91 



ALGEBRAIC 



A-gra'ri-an-ism C-izm), 

A-gra'ri-an-ize, 202. 
A-gree*, 13. 
A-gree-a-bU'i-ty, 106. 
A-gree^a-ble, 104, 171. 
A-greed', 188. 
A-gree'ing. 
A-gree'ment. 
A-gre«'tlc 
A-greB'XiG-al. 
A-giic'o-liBt, 106. 
A-gric'o-lo&B. 
Ag'ri-colt-or, 88. 
Ag-ri-cult'u-ral, 80. 
A^rf-eult-ure, 91. 
Ag-ri-cult'or-ist, 91. 
Ag'ri-mo-nT, 86. 
Ag-ro-nom'ic 
Ag-ro-Dom'ic-«l. 
A-gron'o-my, 108, 
Ag -roi-tog'n^phy . 
Ag-ro»-toPo-gy, 108. 
A-groand', 2fct. 
A'gue, 171. 

A'gned, 183. [5. 

A'gue-proof, 206, £zo. 
A'gu-ish. 

A-b&'. 

A hi', 72. 

A-h^ad% 15. 

Ahold'. 

A-hoy', 27. 

A-hnll'. 

A,kl,23. 

j»ide-de-camp {Tr.UM- 

dekdng, IM) [so Wr. ; 

A i d-de -cam p ,Wk. 

Sm. Wb. Gd. 203.1 
Xid'ed. 
XM'er, 160. 
Xid'fol {-/dolj 180). 
Aid'ixig. 
' itrlet.— 5ee Aglet, 



''!^. 



I 



Xi'gret. 

AU, r. to be ill. [See 

Ale, 160.1 
Ailed, 166. 
AJl'ing. 
Airment. 
Aim, 23. 
Aimed, 166. 
Aim'er, 160. 
Aim'ing. 
Aim'leftB. 
Air (^) (14), n. the at- 

rooephere. [See Ere, 

Heir, 160.] 
Aired (Srd). 
Air'er (ir'ur). 
Air'-hole (Sr'faD, 221. 
Alr'i-ly {ir*i-ly), 78, 93. 



Air'l-neas (^r'*-), 171. 
Air'ing (ir'ing). 
Air'pump (*r-), 206. 
Air'tight (ir'tlt), 216. 
Air'y {ir'y), 9:J. 
Aisle (10 ( 16:^), n. a walk 

in a church. [See Isle, 

160.1 
Ajar', 11. 

AJ'u-tage [Adju- 

tage, 203-1 
A-kim'bo, 86. 
A Un', 16. 
Al'a-baa-ter (131, 170) 

[not al-a baa'ter, 163.1 
Alick'. 
A lac'ri-ty, 171. 
Ji-la-mode' (Fr.) [so 

8m. ; a/-a-mfld', Wb. 

Gd. Wr. 165.1 
A'hu-, 160. 
A hurm', 1.35. 
Alarmed', 166. 
A-Iarm'ing. 
A-larm'isC 
A-lAr'um [so Sm. ; o- 

ter'wm, Wr. Gd. 156.] 
A -las', 12, 131. 
A'late, a. 161. 
Alate', ad. 161. 
Alb, 10. 
Al'ba-core [so Wr.; 

Albicore,Gd.203.j 
Al-ba'ni-an. 
AI'ba-troBs, 171. 
Al-be'it, 17, 171, 180. 
Al-bes'oent. 
Al-bi-gen'sis v'' pl«) 

(jen'stz) 
Al'bin-lsm [-tzm) [so 

Gd. ; al-bi'nizm, or 

(U'bin-izm, Wr. 155J 
Al-bi'no [so Sm. Wb. 

Crd. ; ai-bl'no, or al- 

Wno, Wr. 166 
Al-bi'no-ism r-f«m), 133, 

1.36. 
Al-bu-gin' e-otts. 
Afrbu'qo (L.) [pi. v4*- 

fea'^-nftr (-n«2), 198. 
Al'bum. 
Al-bu'mm (L.) [not al'- 

bu-men, 125, 153.] 
Al-bu'men-ize, 202. 
Al-bu'min-oQs, 171. 
Al-hur'num (L.), 125. 
[Alcadc.— 5«« Al- 

cald, 203.] 
[Alcahest. — 5ec Al- 
kahest, 203.] 
Al-ca'ic. 
Al-caid' [Aloade, 

203.] 



AUcaVde (Sp.) {cdkaf- 

dd). 
AUhem'le ( Aem'O-). 
Al-chem'ic-al {^-kem'ik). 
Al'che-mist {ke-miit)y 
Al'che-my (Jt«), 171. [52. 
Al'co-hol, J71. 
Al'co-hol-ate. 
Al-co hol'ic, 109. 
Al-oo hol-I-2a'tlon, 116. 
Al'co-hol-ize, 202. 
Al-co-hol'me-tor. 
Al -eo-hol-met'rio-al,l 16. 
Al'co-ran [Alkoran, 

203.] 



__ **OrientalIfto gen- 
erally pronounce thia word 
o^Aro-ratm'." Smart. 

Al-eo-ran'ic, 109. 
Al'oo-ran-iBt [so Gd. ; 

al-co-ran'tstyWrAbH.] 
Al'cove, or Al-«ove' [so 

Gd.;flrf-*«r',Wk.Sm. 

Wr. 165.] 
Al-de-ba'ran [so Cki.: 

ai-deb'a-rany Wr.l56. J 
Al'de-hydc, 171. 
Al'der, 17, 169. 
Al'der-man, 196. 
^l-der-man'ic. 170. 
Al'dlne, or Al'dlne [aP- 

rfln, Wr. (5d. •, a/'drin, 

Sm. 155.] 
Ale (23),n.a liquor made 

fW>m fermented malt. 

[See Ail, 160.] 
A-leak', 13. 
Al'e-a-to-ry, 86. 
A-lec'try-o-man-cy, 160. 
A-lee', 13. 
Ale'hoof, 206. 
Al-e-man'nic, 170. 
A-lem'bie. 
A-lem'broth, 122. 
A-lert', 21, Note. 
Al-eu'ro-man-cy (-fi'ro-) 
A-leii'ti-an [so Sm. 

Wr. ; a-lu'shanj Wb. 

GKl. 155.1 
A-leu'tic. 
Alc'wife, 206. 
Al-ex-an'drTne [so Sm. 

Wr. ; al-exan'drlHy 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
A-lex-i-phar'mic. 
A-lex-i tfir'ic, 
A-lex-i-t€r'io4a. 
A-lex-i-tgr'ics. 
AVga (L.) [pi. Al'ga 



(-j«), iw.] 



Al'ge-bra (72) [not 

le-bra, 15:<.] 
Al-ge-bra'io, 109. 



fiOl; 6<u In there; db twin foot; y a« in facile ; gh a« g <n go ; ^ <u In thi» 



ALGEBRAICAL 



92 



ALLUDING 



Al-ge-b»'io4a, 106. 
Al^e-bra-ist Tso Sm. 

Wr. ; al^e^^ra'Ut, 

Gd. 165.] 
Al'ge-neb, 

Al-ge-rine' (-rfn')f 171. 
Al'gol. 
Al'go-rab. 
Al'gfo-rithm, 133. 
Al'gua-zll {aPga-zMl) 

[so Sm. Wr. } al-gwa- 

zM\ Wb. Qd. 155.] 
Al-ham'bra (Ar.). 
A'H-a» (L.), 
AVinbi (L.). 
Xl'lGD iHVyen), 23, 51. 
XL-ien-a-baa-ty (A^ 

yen-). 
IPien-flrble (a^'yen), 

171. 
ll'ien-ag« (A^'yen-o/). 
Al'ien-ate (aVyen-iU). 
Al'ien-at-cd {-yen)^ 183. 
Al'ien^t-ing (HVyen). 
Al-ien-a'tion (dZ-yen-). 
Al'len-at-or (fl/'ycn-). 
AMene' (a/-y«nO, 51,171. 
Al-ien-ee' (-ye?»-), 122. 
Al'ien-ism (aj'yen-ism). 
Alienor' (dl-ien-or'), 
Al'i-form, 78. [122, 

A-Hgrht' (a-/i<0> 1<K. 
A-Ujjht'ed (-««'-). 
A-llgrn' {,<i4Mn% 102. 
A-lign'ment (-Rn'Oflfle. 
A-Uke', 25. 
Ari-ment, 170. 
Al-i-ment'al. 
Al-i-ment'a-rv, 72, 170. 
Al-i-ment-a'tion. 
Al-l-mentlye-neBB. 
Al-i-mo'nl-o&B, lOtf. 
Al'i-mo-ny, 126. 
A'U-oth [80 Wr.i (d'i- 

othy QcT. 155.1 
Al'lped. 
Al'i-quint [bo Sm. Wr. 

Wh. Gd. ; aVi-kw6iU^ 

Wk. 156.] 
Al'l<quot, 170. 
Ai'lBh, 183. 
A-Uve', 26. 

All2'a-rlne [A li sa- 
ri n, Sm. 203.] 
Al'ka-heBt [Alca- 

heBt,203.] 
Al-ka-heBt'io. 
Al-ka leB'oen-cy, 171. 
Al'ka U, or AlOcali Tso 

Wr.; o/'to-ft, Wk. 

Sm. ; aVka-tit or al'- 

ka-n, Gd. 155.] 
Al'ka-U-na-ble ( 116)[80 



Wb. Gd.; al-kal'i-ft' 
a-bl, Wr. 165.] 

Al'ka-U-f ied, IHO. 

Al'ka-U-f? m) [bo Wb. 
Gd.; al-kalH/y, Sm. 
Wr. 165.] • 

Al'ka-11-fy-ingr, 110. 

Al-ka-llg'e-nottB (-^'O. 

Al ka-lim'eter, 108. 

Al kal-imet'ric. 

Al-kal-i-met'ric-al. 

Al-ka-lim'e-try, IdO. 

APka-Une, or AFka- 
Une [bo Wr. ; cU'ka- 
nn, Wk. Sm. ; oI'Ibo- 
An, or al'ka^lln, Gd. 
165.1 

Al-ka-lin'l-ty, 171. 

Al-ka'li^>iiB. 

Al'kaUze. 202. 

Al'ka-loid. 

Al'kBr-net. 

Al-keWmes (-miz), 21, 
Note. 

[Alkoran.— ;Se0 Al- 
coran, 203.] 

AlU 17,l72,)a.the whole. 
ISee Awl, 160.] 

AVlah (Ar.), 72. 

Al-lan-to'ic, 100. 

Al-lan^toid, or Al-lan- 
told' [BO Wr. ; al-lan- 
toid'f Wb. Qd. 155.] 

Al-lan'to-lSjOr Al-lan- 
tolB' [BO Wr. } tU-tan- 
<of«', Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Al-Uy', 23, 170. 

Allayed', 165. 

Al-lay'er. 

Al-lay'ing. 

Al-le-ga'Son (170). [See 
Alligation, 148.J 

Al-ldge'(a/-i^').45»171. 

AMCge'a-ble, 171, 183. 

Al-I6ged' (-idd')t 166. 

Al-loi'er i-l^'-), 183. 

Al-le'giance (al-i&jans) 
[Bo Wk. Wr.; ai-le<- 
ffi-ans, Wb. Gd. 156.J 

■^ Smart rMpcIlt thli 
word thui, airifjUxnctx the 
apofltiophe being lued by 
him to reprMent a aUf ht 
. lonnd reiembUng that of 
oonaonant y^Sau k SS. 

Al-leg'lnfl[(-«<j7'-),171. 

Al-le-gdr^c, 48, 109, 170. 

Al-le-gOr'io-al, lOS. 

Al" 

Al 

Al 

Al 

Al 



Ic-go-riBt, 126. 
le-go-rize. 202. 
le-go-rizea, 166. 
le-go-riz-er. 
le-go-ria -ing. 



Al'le-go-ry, 86, 170. 
AlU^ret'to (it,). 
Al-k/gro (It.), 164. 
[AUeluiah, AUe 

lujah. — 5«e Halle- 

liUah, 203.] 
Al-le'Yl-ate, 169, 170. 
Al-le'Tl-at-ed, 183. 
Al-le'yi-at-ing. 
Al-le-yi-a'tioB. 
Al'ley, 98, 160 [pL Al'- 

leys, 187.] 
Al-Ii-a'ceous (-4x'«A««), 

112,170. 
Al-U'anoe. 
Allied', 186. 
Al-li-ga'tion (170) [See 

Allegation, 148.] 
Al'li-ga-tor, 116, 170. 
Al-U'Bion i4Wun), 47, 

234. 
Al-lit<er-a'tion, 170. 
Al-lit'er-a4lTe. 
Al'la<sate. 
Al-lo-ca'tion. 
Al-Uhca'iur (L.). 
Al'lo^hro-ite i^taro^tt!) 

IBO Sm. Wb. Gd. ; al- 
jVro-U, Wr. 166.] 

Al-lo-cu'tlon [See Elo- 
cution, 148.] 

Al-lo'dl-al, 160, 170. 

Al-lo'di-nm, 78, 160. 

Al-longe' (a^/ttn;'),22. 

Al-lo-path'io, 126, 170. 

Al-lop'a-thist. 

Al-lop'a-thy (106) [fiot 
al'lo-p&th-y, 163.J 

Al'lo-phane. 

Al-lotS 18. 

Al-lot'ment, 

Al-lo-tFop'ic 

Al-iot'ro-pism (-piem), 

A14of ro-py, 03. [136. 

AUot'ted, 176. 

Al-lot'ting. 

Allow', », 66. 

Al-low'a-ble, 164. 

Al-low'anoe. 

Al-low'anoed {-<mafU 
Note C, p. 34. 

Al-low'an-dn^. 

Al-lowed. [^ Aloud, 
148,] 

Al-low'er, 77. 

Al-low'ing. 

Al-loy', 27. 

Al-loy'age, lOOL 

Alloyed', 188. 

All'spioe, 171, 206. 

Allude', 26. 

Al-lud'ed, 168. 

Al-lud'ing. 



ft, 6, 1, 5, u, y, km^ ; &, £, I» 5, A, t* «Aor« ; K a« <n far, 4 a« <» ikit, A of i» 



ALLURE 



98 



AMBASSADOE 



Al-lnred', 183. 
AJ-lore'ment. 
Al-lnr'er, 77. 
Al-lnr'ing. 

Al-lo'slre, 84. [112. 

Al-la'BO-nr, 93. 

Al-lo'TiHJ, 7S, 109. 

Al-la'ri-on. 

Al4u'vi-um {L.) [pL Al- 
lu'vi-<i, 19S.] 

Al-lj', n. k, V. [pi. of n. 
AJ-IieBS 190] [not 
ml'lr, al'Ue«, idS-f 

Al-lj^ing. 

AJ'mJH^eflt. 

XX'marnac (171) Jm Wk. 
Wr. Gd. ; aPma-nae, 
Sm. 155.1 [Alma- 
nack, 203.] 

Al'mim-aJiie [so Sm. 
Wr. ; iPwuinrdHhyfh, 
Gd. 156.1 

JU-miffhtT-neM {atcl- 
mHV-)^ 162, 171. 

Xi-mi^t' J (-mat'y), 162. 

ll'mond (jrmtiMO) [so 
Wk. Sm. Wr.j dl>- 
mmnd, popularly, 
tf'flnimf, Wb. Gd.156.1 

Xl'mond-U-ce (^iafmund- 
trt)^ 206, Exe. 4. 

AFmo-ner. 

Al'mon-rj, 93. 

irmoat, 18a 

Xlma (amzy, 162; Note 

iLlmrhoaae (dmg'haut), 

206. 
Al'ii*-ger [Alnagar, 

Aolnaffer,203.] 
Al'de (170) [pL Al'Oef 

Al-o-et'ic 
Al-o-€t'i<^^ 
Al-o-efiea. 
A-kiftS 18, Note. 
Al-o-gof ro-phj f §o 

Wr. ; al'lchgo-tr6-pkif, 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Al'o-man-cy, 170. 
A-lone'.21. 
A-ldiu^ 18, Note. 
Aloof , 19. 
AFo-pe-ey, 169, 170. 
Alp, 10, 30, 50. 
Al-pae'a, 145, 170. 
Arpka (Gr.), 35. 
Al'phanbet, 35. 
Al-pha-bet-a'ri-an, IIG. 
Al-pha-bet'ic 109. 
AI-pha-bet'lcHd, 108. 



Al-pbe'nle [w Wr. ; A 1- 

phenix, Wb. Gd. 

203.1 
Al-phit'o -man-cT. 
Al-phon'ain, n. [so Wb. 

Gd. Wr.; Alphon- 

8ine,Sm. 203.] 
Al-pbon'slne, a. [so 

Sm. Wr. ; Alphon- 

8iQ,Wb.Gd. 203.1 
ATpIne, or Al'pine [so 

Wr.;a/'p1n.Sm.;a^'- 

plft, or aPptn, Gd. 

155.] 
Xl-rimd'j, 93, 180. 
ll'so, (180) [not 6Vw), 

145, 153.] 
Al'tar, n. a place for 

aacrifloes. [.§ee Alter, 

160.] 
ll'tar-age, 160. 
Al'ter, r. to ohange. [ See 

Altar, IGO.] 
Al-ter-a-bil'i-tT, 171. 
Al'ter-a-ble, 164. 
Al'ter-ant, 160. 
Al-ter-a'tioD, 112. 
Ai'ter-a-tlve, 84, 171. 
Al'ter-cate, 73. 
AFter-cat-ing, 183. 
Al-ter-ca'tioQ [not ftl- 

ter-ka'shun, nor dl- 

ter-ka'ahim, 153.] 
Al-tem'. 
Al-tem'a-cj, 169. 
Al-tem'ate, a. 73. 
Al-tem'ate, or Ai'tem- 

ate, V. [so Wr. ; <U- 

tem'&t, Wk. Sm. ; ai'- 

tem-At, Gd. 155.] 
Al-tcm'at^, or Al'- 

tem-at-ed. 183. 
Al-tera'ate-ly, 93. 
Al-tem'at-ing, or Al'- 

tem-at-ing. 
Al-tem-a'tion, 112. 
Al-tem'a tlve, 84, 171. 
A\-the'A[AlthcBaiL.), 

203.] 
Al-thoofiTh' (tjflf), 162, 

171, 1§). 
Al-tim'e-ter, 160. 
Al-tim'e-try, 93. 
Al'ti-tnde, 108, 171. 
Al'to (It.;. 
ll-to-getJb'er, 180. 
Al'u-del, 89. 
Al'om, 169, 170, 231. 
A-lu'mi-na, 78, 171. 
A-lu'mi-nate. 
AFu-mlne, 89, 152. 
A-lu-mi-niTcr-oOi, 108, 
A-la'mi-oite. [116. 



A-lu'mi-notta, 160. 
A-lu'mi-num. 
Al'um-ish. 
A-lum'nus (L.) [pi. A- 

lum'ni, 198.] 
Al've-a-ry. 72. 
Al've-at-ea. 
Al've-o-lar [so Sm.Wb. 

Gd. ; al-ve'o-tarf or 

al've-o-lar, Wr. 155.] 
Al've-o-la-ry, 72. 
Al've-o-late fso Wb. 

Grd. ; al-ve'o^atf or al'- 

ve-o-lat, Wr. 156.] 
Al've-o-lite. 
Al-ve'o-luB (L.) [pi. Al- 

ve'o-li, 198.1 
Al'vlne [so Sm. Wr.; 

o7'rin, Gd. 155.] 
Al'way, 230. 
Al'ways (wAz), 180. 
Am, 10, 32. 
Am-a-dou' (Ft.) (am-€h 

doo') fso Wr. ; am'a- 

doo, Gd. ; am'a-dow, 

Sm. 155.1 
Amain', 23. 
A-mal'gam, 17L 
A-mal'gam-ate. 
A-maJ ^lixn-ktr^. 
A-mal ^^un-dt-ing. 
A-mal-gam-a'tion, 112. 
A-maii-u-€!n'8l8(L.) [pi. 

A-man-u-«n'i68 (-en'- 

atz\ 198.1 
Am'a-rantD, 170. 
Am-a-ranth'Ine, 171. 
A-mass', 12, 131. 
A-mass^' (a-rndsf). 

Note C, p. 34. 
A-mass'ing. 
A-mass'ment. 
Amateur (Fr.) (a/w-o- 

Wr', or a-ma-tur') 

[so Wr. ; amrit-tUr', 

Wk. Wb. (3d. ; a-ma. 

tur*, Sm. 154, 155.] 
Am'a-tTve-ness, 156. 
Am-a-to'ri-al. 
Am'a-to-ry, 86. 
A-maze', 23. 
A-mazed', 165, 183. 
A-maze'ment. 
A-maz'ing, 183. 
Am'a-zon, 170. 
Am-a-zo'ni-an. 
Am-bas'sa-dor (86, 170) 
[Embassador,203.J 



Smart fayt, **Sit^ 
bamador !■ coniiatent with 
enOxutif. bat U not utual.** 
Worcester rcmarka, "The 
Immediate derlTEtioii of 



fUl, 6<tf JAtbere; di>a<<n foot; 9 m in facile ;gha< gin go >^ at intbik 



A11BA8SADREBB 



94 



AMPULLA 



tiM word ftom tilt French 
is ft reaion for preferring 
ambamador." Webster and 
Goodrich allow that am- 
bamttdor la more common, 
bat they prefer «mba$$culor 
for the reaaon that thla 
form oorreaponda with eatr 



Am-bas'ta-dreBS, 170. 
Am'ber, 10, 77. 
Am'ber-gris {am'ber- 

gris), 156, 171. 
Am-bi-dex-ter'i-tf , 116. 
A m-bi-dex' tro&s. 
Am'bi-ent, 169. 

Am-big^e-nal(-6</'-), 171. 

Am-bi-gu'i-ty. 

Am-big^u-o&s. 

Am'bit, 230. 

Am-bi'tion (-bish'un), 
171. 

Am-bi'tiou8 i-bUh'u8). 

Am'ble, 10, IM, 164. 

Am'bled {am'bld), 171, 

Am'bler, 77. [183. 

Am'bling. 

Am'bly-gon, 171. 

Am-blyg'on-al. 

Am'bly-o-py, 122, 126. 

Am-bro'»i-a (L.) (am- 
hrofOa-a) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. : am-bro' - 
zha, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Am-bro'si al (-zft1-),171, 

Am-bro' Bl-an (-2A1-). 

Ajn'bro-type, 106. 

Am'bry, VW. 

XmbB'aoe (dinz'ds) [so 
Sm. Wb. Gd.; Hmz- 
««', Wk. Wr. 155.] 
[A menace, 203.] 

Am'bu-lanoe, 169. 

Am'bu-lant, 169. 

Am'bu-la-to-ry, 86. 

Am'bu-ry, 89, 93. 

Am-buB-cade% n. & v. 
[bo Wk. 8m. Wr. J 
am'btu-k&dt Wh. Gd. 
155.] 

Am-bu8-oad'ed. 

Am-bu 8-cad'ing* 

Am'busb (am'oobsh). 

A-mel'io-rate (-m«/'yo-), 
51, 171. 

A-melMo-rat-ed (-yo-)» 

A-mel'io-rat-iug C-yo-). 

A-mel-io-ra'tion l-yo-). 

A-menSl6,23, 117, 2:W. 

A-me-na-bil'i-ty, 108. 

A-me'na-ble (164) [not 
a-meu'a-ble, 153.] 

A-mend', 15, 232. 

A-mend'a-ble, 164. 



A-moid'a-to-ry, 86, 171. 

A-mend'cd. 

A-mend'er. 

A-mcnd'ing. 

A mend'ment. 

A-mendB' (^-mendz'), 16, 

72, Note C, p. 34. 
A-men'i-ty (169) [not 

a-me'nl-ty, 163.] 
Am'ent, 166, 170. 
A-menVum (L.) [pi. A- 

ment'a^ 196.] 
Am-en-ta'oeouB (-la'- 

8hus), 112, 160. 
A-meroe% 21, Note. 
A-merce'a-bie, 164, 183. 
A-meroed' (-mersf). 
A-meroe'ment, 186. 
A-mer'cer. 
A-mer'dxig. 
A-m^r'i-can, 78. 
A-mSWi-can-ism (-iam), 

133. 
A-m^r'i-ean-ize, 902. 
[Amesaoe. — See 

Ambsaoe, 203.] 
A-met- a-bo'U-an. 
Am'e-thyst, 170. 
Am-e-thyBt'Ine, 84, 162. 
Ami a-bll'i-ty, 106. 
A'mi-a ble, 164, 171. 
A'mi a-blv, 93. 
Am-i-an'thi-fonn, 169. 
Am-i-an'thu8, 170. 
Am-i-ea-biruty, 116. 
AmM-ca-ble, 164, 171. 
Am'i-ca-bly. 93. 
AmToe {am'is), 169, 170. 
Amid', 16. 
A-mldaf, 232. 
Am'Tde[Ammid 20A1 
Am'i-dlne, ffl '6^ 
A-mid'abips 
A-mi88', 16. 
Am'l ty, 93, 170. 
[Ammld,203.— iSte 

Amide.] 
Am-mo'ni-a, 169, 170. 
Am-mo'ni-ac, 108. 
Am-mo-ni'ac-al, 108,171. 
Am'mo-nitc, 162. 
Am-mo'nl-um, 106. 
Am-mo-ni'u-ret, 105. 
Am-mu-ni'tion {-niah'- 

«n), 112, 170. 
Am'nea-ty, 93. 
Am'ni-on, or Am'ni-OB. 
Am-ni-ot'lc. 
Am-<B-be'aii (am-e-bef' 

an), 110, 171. 
A-mong' (a-mtin^')» 22. 
A-mongst' (a-mungsf). 
Am'o-ro&B. 



A-mor'pbism (-JUrm)^ 

A-moWphoQs. 

A-morr. 

>A-mor'tl8e (a^mor'tig) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

{a-mor'ttz), Wb. Gd. 

165.] [Amortise, 

201.] 
A-mor-ti-za'tlon. 
A-mor'tifze-ment. 
A-mount', 28. 
A-mour' {-moor*), 114, 

171. 
Am'per-aand. 
Am-pblb'i-an, 36. 16^ 
Am-phib-i -o-l<^lo-«l 

i'lqf'ik-al), 116. 
Am-pbi-boro-gy, 106. 
Am-phib'o-loba. 
Ajn'pbi-brach iam'Jl' 

brak), 35, 62. 
Am-pblc-ty-on'ic, 171. 
Am-phic'ty-o-Dy,93,171. 
Am-phio'ty-ona i-onz), 

136. 
Am-phig'a-mo&B. 
Am-pbl-hex-arhe'dnl, 

116. 
Am-phil'o-finr, 106. 
Am'pbi-pod. 
Am-phip'o-dotta. 
Am-phip'ro-Btyle. 
Am-phia-bae'na (5e'iia), 

171. 
Am-phl'scian (-Jlah'an), 

171. 
Am^pht'aci-l (L. pi.) 

(am-Jlah'i-l). 
Am-pbi-the'a-tre (110, 

164, 171) [Amphi- 
theater, prelerred 

by Wb. and Gd. ~ See 

Note E. p. 70.1 
j^m-phi-tne-at'ne. 
Am-phi-the-at'rio-«L 
Am-phit'ro-pal. 
Am'pho-ra (L.) [plw^m'- 

pho-ra, 198.J 
Am'pho-ral. 
Am-pho-tfir'ie. 
Am'ple, 10, 164. 
Am-plex'i-dlul, 100. 
Am-pU-fi-oa'tion, 112, 

116. 
Am'pli-fl-oa-trre, 116. 
Am'pU-f ied, 180. 
Am'pll-fl-er. 
Am'pU>fy, 94, 106. 
Am'pli-fy-ing. 
Am'pli-tode, 106, 171. 
Am'ply. 10, 93. 
Am-puVla (L.) [pL Am- 

pui'lm, 108.] 



a, e, i, 5, u, y, long ; &, £, I, d, &, f, ahort ; Hat in fitr, ka$ in fkst, tiaiim 




AMPULLACEOU8 

Am-pnl-U'ceoliB (-2a'- 

JLm'pn-tate, 89. 
Am'pa-tat-cd, 183. 
Am'pn-tat-in^. 
Am-pa-ta'tJon. 
Am'o-let, 170. 
A-ma«'a-ble (o-moya- 

60, 160, 183. 
Amue' {a-mMz*), 40, 

130. 
A-miued' (a^mAzdf),l«i. 
A-mnse'meot i-miU'-). 
A-mus'er {-mlU'). 
A-mas'in^ (-mAz*-). 
A-ma'alve, 84. 
A-mrg'da'Ute. 
A-mrrdA-llDe, 152, 171. 
A-mrK'dji-loid, 171. 
Am-fnA'oeoiu (-thuM), 

112. 
Am'^le (om't/), 171. 
Am'jl-Ine, 152. 
An-a-bap'tism (-tizm) 

133, 136. 
An-a-bap'tist, 170. 
An-a-bap-tist'ic, 100. 
An-abap-tiBt'ie-al, 106, 

116. 
An-a-car'dic, 17a 
AnHt-ca-thar'tic. 
An-a-cqth-a-lcB-o'tit 

(Gr.i {cm-asef-a-le-o'' 

§it)l%o Gd. : em-a-sef- 

a4eu>^it, Sm. Wr. 

155.1 
An-aen'ro-niBm (an-ak'' 

rtMUzm), 52, 133. 
AD-ach-ro-nist'ic (-ok-). 
Aa-aeh-ro-nist'io-al 

(-airO, 108. 
An-a-clas'tic. 
As-a-clas'tlc8. 
An-a-oo-Iu'thic. 
An-a-co-lu'thon (6r.). 
An-a-oon'da. 72, 170. 
A-nac-re-on'tic 
As'a-dem. 
A-nad'ro-mofis. 
An-<B»-ihif si-a (Gr.Xofi- 

ea-the'zhi-a). 
An-es-thet'ic (afi-€«-), 

171. 
AnVg^lyph, 35, 170. 
As-a-^l7ph'ic 
An-»^Iyph'ic-al. 
An-a-glfp'tic. 
An-a-^I/P'togr'ra-phy, 

93, 108, 110. 
An'a-go-gi (Or.), 163. 

An-a-go^ict (goj'-). 
As'a-gram, 170. 



95 

An-a-gram-mat'ic. 

An-a-gram-mat'io-aL 

An-a-gram'ma-tisin 

{-tizm). 
An-a^^ram'ma-ti8t, 170. 
An-a-gram'ma-tize, 202. 
An'a-gr&ph, 35, 170. 
An-a-iec'tic. 
An'a-leeta, 170. 
An^a4em'ma (L.) [so 

Wr. ; an'o-lem-mot 

8m. Wb. Gd. 165.] 
An-a-lep'sy, 109. 
An-a-lep'tfc 
An^-log'iival i-lof-), 
A-nal'o-gism (-jizm^ 

133. 130. 
A-nal'o-gist, 170. 
A-nal'o-gize, 202. 
A-nal'o-go&B. 
An'a-ldgue, 87, 166, 171. 
A-nal'o-gy, 170. 
A -nal'y-Big, 171. 
Vn'a-Iyst (171), n. one 

skilled in anal v sis. 

[5^ Annalist, 160.] 
An-a-lyt'lc, 109. 
An-a-lyt'lc-al, 106. 
An-a-ljt'icB. 
An-a-Ijrz'a-ble, 164. 
An-a-lfz-a'tion. 
An'a-Iyze (171), r. to re- 

solTe by analysis. 

[See Annalize, 160.] 
An'a-lyzed, 165. 
An'a-l^z-er, 109. 
An'a-lyz-infi^. 
An-a-mor-pno'Htj or 

An-a-mor*phf>-n»(GT.) 

[so Wr. ; an-a-mor- 

/o'fiSj Wk. J ofMX- 

mor'/o-sis, Sm. ; an- 

a-mor-fo'sis, or an-a- 

mar'/o-»i*y Gd. 154, 

165.] 
A-na'nas. 
A-nan'droQs. 
An'a-pest [Anapsst, 

203.] 
An-a-pest'lc. 
An-a-pest'io-al. 
A-narch'ic {a-nark'ik)y 

52. 
A-narch'lo-al (•nark'ik-) 
An'arch-ism {-ark-izm)y 

133,136. 
An'arch-ist (-ark-ist). 
An'ar-chy (an'ar-KyU 

62,93. 
An-ar'throtts. 
An-a-sar'ootts. 
An-a-stal'tio, 109. 
An-a-stat'lc. 



ANCHYLOSING 

A-nas'to-mose (^mSz). 
A-nas'to-moscd (-/o- 

mOz(t)y 150. 
A-nas'to-mos-ing (-md»^ 

ing). 
A-fuu-to-mo'tit (Gr.), 

154. 
A-nas-to-mot'ic. 
A-naM'tro-phHGr.)y 163. 
Au'a-tase, 170. 
A nath'e-ma, 169, 171. 
A-nath-e-mat'ic-al, 110. 
A-nath'e-ma-tism 

{-tizm)y lai, 136. 
A-nath-e-mat-i-za'tion , 

116. 
A-nath'e-ma-tize, 202. 
A-nath'e-ma-tizcd, 165. 
A-nath'e-ma-tiz-er. 
A-nath'e-ma-tiz-ing. 
An-a-tirer-oQs, 108, 233. 
An-a-tom'ie, 109. 
An-a-tom'ic-al, 106. 
A-iiat'o-mlst, 170. 
A-nat~o-mi-za'tion. 
A-nat'o-mize, 202. 
A-nat'o-my, 93, 106, 170. 
An-a-trep'tic. 
An-a-trip-Bol'o-gy, 108. 
An'a-tron, 170. 
A-nat'ro-poOs. 
An'bu-ry. 

An'ccs-tor, 105, 109. 
An-oes-to'ii-al. 
An'ces-traI(107)[BO Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; an-ces'tral, 

Wb. (3d. 165.] 
An'oes-tress [so Wr. ; 

an-ces'treSj Gd. 155.1 
Anch'or (anak'ur) (52, 

54), n. an instrument 

to hold a vessel. [ See 

Anker^ 160.] 
Anch'or-a-ble (angk'-), 
Anch'or-age (angjfur- 

«7), 171. 
Anch'ored {angk'urd)y 

165. 
Anch'o-ress (angk'-). 
Anch'o-ret (angk'-). 
Auch-o-ret'ic (angk-). 
Anoh-o-ret'io-alCan^ib-). 
Auch'or-ing (angk-). 
Anch'o-rite (anaV-). 
An-cho'vy (44) {not an'- 

cho-vy, I53.J 
Anch'y-lose (angk'i- 

16»). 
Anch'y-losed (angk'i- 

lost) [bo (M. ; angk'i- 

IdzdyWr. 155.] 
Anch'y-lds-lng (angVi- 

l6i-). 



Ikll \^atin there \<Sba9in foot; 9 cm <» fadle ; gh a< g in go i V^a% in tSoSA. 



ANCHYLOSIS 



96 



ANNOYANCE 



Aneh-7-lo'8is (angk-i-) 
im) [AnkyloBiB, 

Anch-7-lot'ic (angk-i-). 
An'cient ian'aheni), 46, 

Note 2; 171. 
An'clent-rf (dn'shent-). 
An'dl-l»-ry, 72, 171. 
An-dp'l-tal, 109, 171. 
An-cip'i-tofis. 
An'oon, 230. 
An'oone. 
And, 10, 42, 43. 
An-de'an (110, UW) rso 

Wr. ; an'de-an, Gd. 

155.] 
And'i-ron (afkl'I-tim), 

171. 
An-dra-nat'o-my, 108. 
An-drog'y-nal {-droi'i-), 
An-drog'y-nofiB (-arqf'- 

i-nlU). 
An'droid. 
An-droid'6s f^iyjidiz) 

[bo Gd. ; an-dro'i-iUzj 

Wr. 155.] 
An'dron. 
An'drofitr. 
An'ecMldt-al. 
An'eo-dote. 170. 
An-ec-dot'ic, 143. 
An-eo-dot'io-al. 
Ao'ec-dot-iBt. 
A-nel'li-dan [Annel- 

lidan, Anneli- 

dan,203.] 
An-e-mocf'ra-phy, 106. 
An-e-mol'o-gy, 108. 
An-e-mom'e-ter, 109. 
An-e-mom'e-try. 
A-nem'o-ne, (163, 170) 

[not an-e-mo'ne, 153.J 
A-nem'o-80ope. 
An'er-old, 170, 233. 
An'eu-ilBm (an'u-rizm) , 

13.3. 
A-new' Ca-nu')y 26. 
An-fl*act'u-OBe. 
An-fract-u-OB'i-ty, 106. 
An-fract'u-ofls, 80. 
[Angelography. — 

See Angiography, 

203.1 
An'gcl [not ftnMcl, nor 

an'jl, 127, 16:3.] 
An-gel'lc, 100, 170. 
An-gel'Jc-al. 
An'gel- winged (-jel- 

trtn^d), 206. Exo. 5. 
An'ger (ang'gur) (64, 

138), n. wrath. [See 

Angor, 148.] 
An-gi-o-car'po&B. 



An-^-og'ra-phy (106) 
rAngelography, 

An-gl-ol'o-gy. 
As-gi-o-mon-o-Bperm'- 

OOB, 116. 
An'gl-o-Bpenn. 
An-gi-o-Bperm'ofiB. 
An-gi-ot'o-my, 108. 
An'gle (ang'gOy 54, 164. 
An'gled {ang'gld). 
An'gler {ang'glur), 54, 

77. 
An'gll-can (ang'-)^ 54. 
An'gU-can-ism (^-vem)^ 

An'g'u-cl (L.) (angf). 
An'gli-cism {-stztn), 136. 
An'gli-cize, 202. 
An'glo*Sax'on, 224. 
An'gor (^ang^gawr) (SS), 

n. Intense pain. [See 

An'gor, 148.] 
An'gn-ly {ang^-), 171. 
An'gry (anp'-), M, 93. 
Au-guil'li-form C-gwU-), 

34,178. 
An'g^Bh (^ang'gwish)t 

4j4, o4. 
An'gu Ur (ang'gu-), 89. 
An-gu-lftr'1-ty, 64, 108. 
An'gu-lat-ed {ang'gu-), 
An-har-mon'io. 
An har-mon'lc4d. 
An-he-la'tion, 112. 
An-hy'drofis. 
An'il, 170, 231. 
An'ile, 81, 152. 
A-nn'i-ty, 143, 169. 
An-i-mad-ver'elon, 116. 
An-i-mad-vert', 122. 
An-l-mod-yert'cd. 
An-i-mad-vert'er. 
An-1-mad-Tert'ing. 
An'i-mal, 109, 170. 
An-l-mal'cu-lar, 109. 
An-1-mal'cu-Une, 152. 
An-i-mal'cule. 
An-f mal'cu-liBt, 89. 
An-l-mcU'cu-lum( L.)[pl. 

An-i-mcU'cti-la.] 

tsr The plural fbrin, 
AHimaicuUr, M>mctimei 
lued, !■ errooeoua. 

An'i-mal-ism (-t2in),133. 
An-i-malM-ty. 108, 169. 
An-i-mal-I-za'tion, 116. 
An'i-mal-ize, 202. 
An'i-mate, 170. 
An'i-mat-ed, 183. 
An'i-mat-ing. 
An-i-ma'tlon, 112, 170. 
An'i-mat-lTe, 84. 



An'i-mat-or, 169. 
An'i-me (Sp.), 163. 
An'l-mism (-fni^m), 136. 
An'i-mist. 

An-i-moB'i-ty, 106, 171. 
An'i-on. 

Anise, 169, 170, 231. 
AnTse-Boed, 206, £xc^ 
An-i-geite' (Ft.), 114. 
An'ker {ang'kur) (54. 

77), n. a Dutch liquia 

measure. [See An- 
chor, 160. J 
An'kle (ang'kl), 64, 164. 
An'kle-deep. 216. 
[Ankylosis. — See 

AnchyloBlB, 203.) 
An'nal-lBt (170), n. a 

writer of anrnds. [ See 

AnaijTBt, 160.1 
An'nal-ize (170)* n. to 

record in axmalB. [See 

Analyze, 160.1 
An'nalB {an'nalz), 136, 

230. 
An'nata. 170. 
Anneal', 13, 103. 
An-nealed', 165. 
An-nSal'ing. 
[Annelidan, An- 

nellidan. — See 

Anellidan, 203.1 
An-nex', 15, 39, Note. 
An-nex-a'tion, 170. 
An-nexed' (-next*),'Noie 

C, p. 34. 
An-nex'ing. 
An-ni'hi-U-ble, 164. 
An-ni'hi-late, 171. 
An-nlHii-lat-ed. 
An-ni'hi-lat-ing. 
An-ni-hi U'tion, 112,116. 
An-ni'hi-lat-or, 169. 
An-nl-rer'sa-rv, 72, 171. 
An'no-tate, 17u. 
An'no-tat-ed, 183. 
An'no-tat-lng. 
An-no-ta'tion. 
An-no-tat'or, 109. 
An-no'ta-to-ry, 66. 
An-not'i-no&s, 106, IflO. 
An-not'to (170) [An- 

notta, Anotta, 

Arnotto, Arnot- 

ta, Arnatto,203.] 
An-nounee', 28, 39. 
An-nounoed' (-nounsV)^ 

Note C, p. 34. 
An-nounce'ment, 186. 
An-noun'cer, 183. 
An-nonn'cing. 
An-noy', 27. 
An-noy'anoe, 160. 



ft, e, 1, 5, u, y, long }&,£,!, 6, fi, f, short i'lkaein fiir. katin fkst, & at in 



ANNOYED 



97 



ANTHY8TEBIC 



An-Boyed', l<t6. 
An-noy'er. 

Annoy'ing* 
An'nu-al, 170. 

An'nu-al-ly, 03, 170. 

An'DU-ent, 91, 109. 

An-na'i-tant, 170. 

An Du'i-tj, 93, !<», 170. 

Annul', 22, 170. 

An'nu-Ur, 109. 

An'nn-Iate, 73. 

An'na-Ut-«d, 183. 

An-nu-U'tion. 

An'na-let, 170. 

An-nolled' i-nuld'), 176, 

An-nul'ling, 170. [iSi, 

An-nurmcnt. 

An'nn-lose [so Gd. ; an^ 

1*^498*, Sm. Wr. 165.] 
An-na'mer-ate, 73. 
An-non'ci-ate (oft-nun'- 

»ke-M) (46) [80 Sm. 

Wr. ; tM-nun'shM, 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
An-nim'ci-at-ea (-ski-). 
An-niin'd-4t-in^ (-«J^1-). 
AD-oiin-ci-a'tion (-#Al- 

d'shun). 
An-nnn'oi^t-or (^ht-), 
An-ntm'ci-ft-to-ry'(-#Al-) 
An'ode, 170. 
An'<>-d|iie, 170. 
An'o-djn-o&i, 106. 
A-noint', 27. 
A-noint'cd. 
A-noint'er. 
A-noint'ing. 
A-noint'ment. 
Ano'liB, 156. 
A-nom'a-li-ped. 
A-nom'ft-llnn (-Utm), 

133. 
A nom-ft-list'ic, 109. 
A-nom-a-list'ic-al, 106. 
A-nom'a-lo&s, 170. 
A-nom'a-lj, 93, 170. 
A-non', 18. 
A-no'na. 

A-non'y-motGls, 171. 
A-norm'al. 
An-oth'er (aiMil^'er), 

22, 156. 
[Anotta. — See An- 

notto, 203.] 
An'ser-at-ed. 
An'ser-ine, 82, 162. 
An'awer (on'MM*), 162, 

171. 
An'iwer-«-ble (-«vr-), 

171. 
An'swer-trblT (-«w-), 

93. 
An'swered (-eurd), 165. 



An'swer-cr ( fttr-«r),77. 

Ant (12, 131), n. an em 

met. ISee Aunt, 160.1 
An'ta (L.) Fpl. An'ta, 

198.] 
Ant-a^'id, 235. 
An-tag'o-nism (nizin)t 

ia3, 136. 
Aji-tag'o-nist, 170. 
An-tag-o-nist'ic, 109. 
An-tag-o-ni0t'ic-al, 108. 
Ant-aPric, 171. 
Ant-al'ka-U, or Ant-aP- 

ka-li. 
Ant-an^-ffo'gl (Or.), 

163. 
Ajit-aph-ro-dl'Bi-ac (-q^- 

ro-aiz'i-ak). 
Ant-aph-ro-dit^c 
Ant-ap-o-plec'tic. 
Ant-arc'tio, 142. 
Ant-ar-thrit'lc. 
Ant-asth-mat'io (-ast' 

imat'ik), 162. 
Ant-a-troph'ic. 
An'te (L.), »rg>. before. 

[SMAnti, 160.) 
An-te-ce'dence. 
An-te-«e'dent, 169. 
An-te-cea'sor. 
An'te-cham-ber. 

t^ SoinetiiQef inooi^ 
reetly written Anti- 
chamber. 

An'te-chap-cl. 
An-te'dan (te'*han),iA. 
An'te-date. 
An'te-dat-ed, 183. 
An'te-dat-ing. 
An-te^niuM-an, 169. 
An't€-Jix-<B (L. pL), 198. 
An'te-lope f A n t i - 

lope, 203.J 
An-te-lu'can, 169. 
An-te-me-rld'l -an. 
[Antemetic. ~ See 

Antiemetic, 203.] 
An-te-mun 'dane. 
An-te-mu'ral. 
An-te-ni-oene' [ so WTc. ; 

af»-<e-ni'cCn, Od. 156.] 
An-ten'na (L.) [pi. An- 

ten' TUB, 106.] 
An-ten-idf er-ofiB, 170. 
An-ten'nl-form, 170. 
An-te-nup'tial(-#Aa/)»46. 
An-te-paa'ohal (-£»/} ^2. 
An'te-paat, 12, 131. 
An-tc-pe-nult'. 122. 
An-te-pe-nnlt'i-mate, 

116, 169. 
Ant-ep-i-lep'tic. 



An-te-po-«T'tion (-«itA'- 

ttn), 40, 112. 
An-te-pre-dic'a-ment. 
An te'rl-or, 49, Note. 
An-te-rl-or'i-tf , 93. 
An'te-room, 109. 
Anthei'i-on (Or.) [pt 

Ant-hH'i^f \96.] 
Anthe'llx. 
An tbel-min'tic [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; ant-hel- 

min'tikj Wr. 155.) 
An 'them, 10, 37. 
An'ther, 10, 37, 77- 
An'ther-al. 
An-ther-irer-ofia, 106. 
An'ther-oid. 
An tho'dl-um, 108, 169. 
An-tho-log'ic-al (-/<?;'-). 
An thol'o-gr, 108, 170. 
An-tho-phyrlite,or An- 

thophVl-Ute [so Wr.; 

antKopWyl-me, Gd. 

155.] 
An'tho-rism (-riem) [ao 

Sm. Gd. ; caWho-rizmy 

Wr. 155.] 
An'thra-clte, 171. 
An-thra-cit'ic. 
An-throp'o-elot. 
An-thro-po^ra-phy. 
An-throp'o-lite. 
An-thro-po-loe'ic-al 

{-loi'ik). 

An-thro-poFo-gist, 106. 

An-th^o•pol'o-gy^ 108. 
An'thro-po-man-cy [so 

Qd.jjkn-thro-fom'an- 

cy, Wr. 155.] 
An-thro-pom'e-try. 
An-thro-po-mor'phlBm 

{-mor'flzm)^ 116, 133. 
An-thro-po-mor'phiat. 
An -tbro-po-mor'phite. 
An-thro-po-mor-phit'io 
An-thro-po-mor'phlt- 

lam (-morVf^i^1n), 116. 
An-thro-po-mor'pho&s. 
An-thro-pop'a-tbf. 
An-thro-poph'a-gi,n.p<. 

198. 
An-thro-poph'a-gofiB . 
An-thro-poph'a-gy, 93. 
An-thro-poB.'o-pny. 
An-thro-pot'o-my. 
Ant-hyp-not'ic [ A n t i - 

hypnotic, 203.1 
Ant-hyp-o-chon'dri-ac 

ihip-<hhm' ) (108,116) 

fAntihypochon- 

driao,a03.] 
Ant-hyB-ter'io [Anti- 

hysterio,2u3.] 



Ul}6<ulfttliere;0&a«<nlbot} 9 a< in ftdle ; gh cm g <n go ; (It a< in this. 

9 



ANTI 



98 



APKX 



An'n (Gr). prfp. 
ag^ainst [See Ante. 

iSo.l 

Anti-a^'id. 

An-ti-anth-mat'lc (-ast- 
tnat' ), 

An-H-bae-rM'ua (h.) 
(ixtkkVus) [80 Wr. , 
an-H-bak'tX-ttay Sm. 
Gil. 155.1 

An-ti-brac-Vl-al {-brak'- 
<-/i/, or -bra'kiai) 
[braVi-ah Gd. ; bra'- 
li-al, Wr. 155.] 

An'tic, 10, 52, 'm. 

[Antlchamber. — 
Sfe Antechamber, 
2a3.| 

An'tl Christ {krUt), 62, 
IGO. 

An tlch'ro nlsm {-tik'- 
ro-uizm). 

An-ti9M pant. 

An-tl9'i pate, IflQ, 171. 

An ti^'i-pit-ed, 183. 

An-tic'i pdt-lng^. 

An-tJ? i pa'tion, 112,171. 

An-tl9'i-pat-Ive. 

An-tl9'i-pat-or, 88. 

An-ti9'l -pa-to-ry, 80. 

An-ti-oli'max. 

An-tl-cli'nal, 109. 

An'ti-oor. 

An-ti'cofts. 

An-tidot'al, 228. 

An'ti dote, lOU. 

An-ti-d6t'ic-al [bo Wr. ; 
an-ti-ddt'ik-al, Gd. 
165.] 

An-ti-dys'u-ric I «o Gd. ; 
nn-ti-diz'u-rik, Wr. 
155 1 

An-tl-fcb'rTlo (bo Wk. 
8m. Wr. ; an-ti fe' 
brU, or an-ti/cb' rU, 
Gd. IS.*).] 

An-ti-fed'er-al, 233. 

An-ti-fed'er al-ism 
{-€U-izm)y 13<i. 

An-ti-fed'er-nllst, 171. 

An'tl-CTftph, 35. 

An-ti-nyp-not'ic f A n t - 
hypnotic, 203.] 

An-ti-hYp-o-clion'dri-ac 
(-ton'-) f Ant hy po- 
oh ondrlac,2a3.j 

An ti-hys-terMc [ Ant- 
hysteric, 203.] 

An-ti-log'a-rithm, 133. 

An-U-loPmic 

[AntiIope.— 5ee An- 
telope, 203.J 

An'ti-mMk. 



An-ti-ma'Bon (-ma'an). 
An-ti-ma-6on'io, 109. 
An-ti-ma'8on-ry, 93. 
An-ti-tne4ab'olt (Gr.), 
An-tim'e-ter, 170. [103. 
An-ti-mo'ni-al. 
An-ti-mo'ni-ate. 
An-ti-mon'ic. 
An-ti-mo'ni-otts. 
An'ti-mo-ny, 109, 171. 
An-tl-ne-phrit'ic. 
An-ti-noMni-an, 109. 
An-tl-no'mi-an-iam 

(-izm)j 130. 
An'ti-no-my [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; an-tin'o- 

my, Wk.; an'ti-no-my, 

or an-tin'o-myt Wr. 

155.] 
An-ti-o'chi-an (-o'Jtl-). 
An-ti-o-don-tal'gic, 109, 

110. 
An-tl-pathMe. 
An-tlp'a thy, 171. 
An-ti-pe-ris'ta-Hg (Gr.). 
An-ti-phlo-gis'tic. 
An'ti-phou. 
An-tiph'o-nal, 35. 
An-tiph'o-na-ry, 35, 72. 
An-tl-phon'ic-al. 
An-tipn'o-ny, 35, 93. 
An-tiph'ra-sis, 35. 
An-ti-phras'tlc. 
An-ti-phras'tic-al. 
An-tlp'o-dal, 170. 
An'ti-podc, 109. 
An-ti-po'de-an, 110, 109. 
An-tip'a-di» {-diz) (L. 

pi.), 150. 
An-tip4o'8ia (Gr.), 109. 
An-ti-qua'ri-an, 49, N. 
An-ti-qua'ri-an-ism 

( t>m), 130. 
An'tl-<iua-ry, 72, 171. 
An'tl-quate. 
An'tl-quat-ed, 183. 
An-ti-qua'tion. 
An-tiquc' (an4ek'), 114. 
An-tiqne'nesB ^tek'-). 
An-tiq'ui-ty(-<tJk'ioc-<y), 

171. [40. 

An-tl'Bcian {-tUh'an), 
An-a'aci'l (L.pl.) (tUh'- 

M), 171. 
An-tl-8cor-bu'tio [not 

an-ti-Bkor-but'ik, 153.] 
An-ti-Bcript'u-ralf 91. 
An-ti-Bep'tic 
An-tl-BlaT'er-y. 233. 
An-tis*tangi8 (Gr.). 
An-tWtro-phi(Qr,),l(Q. 
An-ti-Btroph'ic. 
An-tith'e-«iB (Gr.) [pi. 



An-tith'e-i«8 i-e-*ii\ 

198.] 
An-ti'-thet'ic, 109. 
An-ti-thet'ic-al. 
An-tit'ro-pal. 
An-tit'ro-po&B. 
An'ti-type, 109. 
An-ti-typ'ic-al, 14.^ 
Ant'ler, 10, 77. 
Ant'lcred (^ant'lurd), 
Ant'like, 13, 131. [ tr)& 
A n-to-no-ma'n-a ( L.) 

(an-4o^no-wta'zhi-a) 

I BoWr.: an-to^no-ma'- 

tha, Gd. 155.] 
An'ril, 10, 230. 
Anx-i'e tj(ang-zi'e-ty), 

40, N. ; 171. 
Anx'ioua (angk'skuf), 

40, N. ; 171. 
An'y (en'y\ 15, 93 [See 

Note nnder Many.] 
An'yhow (en'y-), 
An'j'Wh&e (e»'if-)t 15- 
An'y-wiBe(^'|f-iPU),34. 
A-o'nl-an, 72. 
A'o-rist. 
A^>-riBt'ic, 109. 
A-o-rl8t'io-al, 106. 
A-or'ta, 72. 
A-or'tal. 
A-or'tlc. 

Ap'a-go-gl (Gr.), 103. 
Ap-a-oog'ie-al (•i<9*ik-% 

14.1, 171. 
Ap'a-nage [Appa- 
nage, Appanage, 

203!] 
Ap-a-rUh'me-9i$ (Gr.). 
Apart', 11. 
A-part'ment. 
Ap-a-thet'ic, 109. 
Ap-a-thet'io-al, 106. 
Ap'a-thiBt, 170. 
Ap-a-thist'io-al. 
Ap'a-thy, 93, 170. 
Ap'a-tite [See Appetite, 

148.] 
Ape, 23. 
A-peak', 13. 
A-pel'lottB, 170. 
Ap'en-nine, 152, 170. 
A-pep'ey (100) [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; ap'qt-9y, 

Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Ap'cr, 183. 

A-pe'ri^nt, 40, N. ; 109. 
A-p«r'i-tlTe, 84, 170. 
Ap'er-ture, 170. 
A-pet'a-lofis, 170. 
A'pex [L. pi. Ap'i^s 

(stz) ; Eng. pi A'pex- 

ee (4f«).l 



a« ^, !, 5, Q, ^ long ; 1, 6,1, 0, fi, f, thori ; K a< <n far, 4 a« <n Ikit, & a« <» 



APfl^RESIS 



99 



APPEAR 



A-phcr'e-fiiii (a-fli^e- 

fM)r«)Wk.Wr. Gd.; 

a-fert-sUy Sm. 1S5] 

[Aphere8i8j203.] 
A-pfae'U-OD f so Wk.Sm. 

Wr. ; a-jiVyon, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] [pi. A-phe'- 

li-«, 19B.] 
A-phid'i-an, 35, 160. 
Aph-i-Un'thro-py. 
A^phia [pi. Aph'i^dea 

{-(Uz)t 198.1 
Aph-lo-^is'tic. 
Aph'o-nofis, 35. 
Aph'o-nj, .35, 93. 
Aph'o-riBm (-rtzm), 133, 

136. 
Aph-o-ris'mto (-ris^-). 
Aph'o-riflt. 
Aph-o-rist'ic, 109. 
Aph-o-riBt'ic-«l, 106. 
Aph'rite, 35, 152. 
Aph-itMn'Bi-AC i-dUhfi- 

ak). 
Apb-itMU-si'ac-Al (•«<'- 

oJb-). 
Aph'ra-dlte,35, 152. 
Aph'thae (L. pi.) (qf- 

thi). 
Aph'tboDi^ Cap'thong) 

[eo Sm. Wr.; qf- 

thong, Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Aph'tnofis. 
A-phjl'lou8, or Aph'- 

yl-Ioas [See Adeno- 

phyllooB.] 
A-pia'ri-an, i9, N. 
A'pia-rist. 
A'pl-»-ry, 72. 
A^i-cSa (L. pL) (aj^i- 

«««) [<See Apex.] 
A-pie'u-late, 89. 
A-pic'a-l&t-ed, 183. 
A-pieoe', 13. 
A'pi-Ine, 152. 
A'pisiL,.-). 
Ap'iHb, 23, 183. 
Ap-U-nafio. 
A-plfts'tic 
Aylome [bo Gd. ; o- 

ptlhH'y Wr. 156.] 
A-pIot'o-my, 108. 
ApluM'tre (L.), 164. 
A-poc'a-lj^fle, 171. 
A-poc-«-lyp'tic. 
A-poc-a- lyp' tic-«l. 
Ap-o-car^ttB. 
A-poc'o-pate. 170. 
A^podo-pi (Gr.), 168. 
Ap-o-cruB'tIc 
A-poo'ry-phaj 171. 
A-poc'ry-phal. 
A-poc'r7-pbal-l]r,03,171. 



Ap'o-dal, 170. 
Ap'ode. 
Ap-o-dlc'tic 
Ap-o-dic'tio-al. 
Ap'o-don (L.) [pL Ap'o- 

day 196.1 
A-pod'o-aU (L.), 170. 
Ap'o-gee, 170. 
Ap'o-grftpb. 
A-po^ra-phal. 
A-pol-ll-na'ii-an, 40, N. 
A-pol16- Bel-Te-d€re' 

(216) [soGd.; A^poV- 

lo'Bet've-dirt Wr. 

155.1 
A-pol'ly-on. 170. 
A-pol-o-get'lc, 100, 170. 
A-pol-o-getMc-al, 108. 
Apol-o-get'icfl, 100. 
A-pol'o-gist, 170. 
A-pol'o-gize, 170, 202. 
Ap'o-ldgue, 87, 170. 
A-pol'o-gT^, 170. 
Ap-o-me-oom'e-try. 
Ap-o-neu-rog'ra-phy. 
Ap-o-neu- roPo-gy . 
Ap-o-ne^ro'aia (Gr.) 

[pi. Ap-o-neit^ro'aia 

(-»««), 198.1 
Ap-o-neu- ror ic 
Ap-o -neu-rot'o-my . 
Ap-o-pemp'tic. 
A'poph'orsii (Gr.) [pi. 

A-poph'ar9i$ (-«»), 

198.] 
Ap-o-phleg-mat'io [so 

am. Wb. Gd. ; ap-o- 

fleg'ma-tiky Wk. Wr. 

155.] 
Ap-o^pbl^'ma-tiam, 

\-tizm). 
Ap-o phleg-mat'i-xant, 

116. 
Ap'oph-thegm {ap^o- 

them) (l62)rApo- 

thef ;»:,203.] 



Both mode* of ipeU- 
Ing thii wotd luiTe the 
•auction of good anthoiity. 
Apophthegm la AiTored by 
the etymology (Or. dndip- 
Ocyfio)* but Apothegnt, 
■ayi Worcester, **l» per- 
hape beet mpportcd by 
eominon onge.** 

A-popb'y-fi[e, 163. 
Ap-o-phyinite, or A- 

popn'yl-llte Ybo Wr. ; 

OnpofUntlty Gd. 155.J 
Ap-o-plec'tic, 100. 
Ap-o-plec'tic-al, 108. 
Ap'o-plex-y, 93, 170. 
A-pos'ta^y, 160. 



A-poB'tate. 

A-po8'ta-tize, 202. 

A-poB'ta-tized, 183. 

A-poB'ta-tiz-in^. 

Ap'o-Bteme, 170. 

A-poB'til. 

A-pos'tle {-poa'8t)j 163, 

171. 
A-poB'to-late. 
Ap-os-tol'ic. 
Ap-OB-tol'ic-al. 
A-poB-to 119'i-ty. 
A-po8'tro-ph§, 163, 171. 
Ap-08-troph'ic. 
A-poB'tro-phize, 202. 
A-poB'tro-phlzed, 183. 
A-poB'tro-phiz-iiLD^. 
A-poth'e-ca-ry, 72, 171. 
Ap'o-th^mi {ajp'o-them) 

(162) [Apoph- 

ihegm,203.J 



Set Note under 
Apophthegm. 

Ap-o-theg-mat'ic. 

Ap-o-thcg-mat'iG-al. 

Ap-o-theg'ma-tiBt, 171. 

Ap-o-thefi^'ma-tize, 202. 

Ap-o-the'o-siB, 109. 

Ap-o-the'o-Bize, 202. 

A-pot'o-mS, 163. 

Ap'o-zem. 

Ap-b-zem'io-al. 

Ap-pa-la'chl-an, 170. 

Ap-p&U' (17) [Appal, 
Sm. 203.1 

Ap-p&lled^ 166. 

Ap-pftll'ingr. 

[Appanage. — Set 
Apanage, 203.1 

Ap-pa-n/tuB (170) [pi. 
Ap-pa-ra'tuB, or Ap- 
pa-ra'tus-es, 198.] 

Ap-pftr'el, 170. 

Ap-pftr'elled (p&r'eld) 
(177) [Appareled, 
Wb. Gd. 20.3.— 5ec 177, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

Ap-p&r'el-ling [Ap- 
pareling, Wb. Cfd. 
203.] 

Ap-par'ent (ap'ptr'ent) 
(14, 171) [not ap-pa'- 
rent, 153.] 

Ap-pa-rT'tion (^fiih'un)^ 
46, 170. 

Ap-pftr'1-tor. 

Ap-peal', 13. 

Ap-pcal'a-ble, 164, 160. 

Ap-pealcd', 166. 

Ap-peal'er. 

Ap-pcaFing. 

Ap-pSar', 13. 



iUl; 6 CM M there; db <tf in foot ;$ a< in flidle ; gh (M g <n go ; tj^ a« in this. 



APPEARANCE 



100 



APSIb 



Ap-pear'anoe, 109. 
Ap-peared', 165. 
Ap-pSar'inff, 40, N. 
Ap-peas'a-ole (^-pez'-). 
Ap-pease' (-9&r)» iO, 

136. 
Ap-peaaed' (-p9ad^), 166. 
Ap-pease'meDt C-piz'). 
Ap-pcaa'er {'piz'ur)^ 77, 

183. 
Ap-pcaslre (■j»«a'-), 
Ap-pcl'lant, 170. 
Appellate, 170. 
Ap-pel'la-tlve, 170. 
Ap-pel'la-to-ry, 86. 
Ap-pel-lee', 122, 170. 
Ap-pel-lor'( 118) [ io Wb. 

Go. ; ap-pel'lor, Sm. ; 

ap-pel'lor^ or ap-pel- 

lot^, Wr. 165. 1 
[Appenag3,:A)o.— £Bee 

Apanaffen 
Ap-pend", lo, 103. 
Ap-pend'age, 171. 
Ap-pcnd'ant, 109. 
Ap-pen'di-cle. 164, 109. 
Ap^>eii-dic'a-iate. 
Ap-pen'dlx (^170) [pi. 

Ap-pen'dl-oeB (stz), 

or Ap-pen'dlX'6B,196. J 
Ap-per-oep'tion, 170. 
Ap-per-tiin', 122, 170. 
Ap'pe-tenoe, 160. 
Ap'pe-ten-ov, 109. 
Ap'pe-tite (152, 170) 

[^ Apatite, 148.1 
Ap'pe-tl-tire, 84, 170. 
Ap'pe-tize, 170, 202. 
Ap'pe-tiz-er, 183. 
Ap'pi-an. 160, 170. 
Ap-pl&nd', 17, 103. 
Ap-plAad'ed. 
Ap-plftud'er. 
Ap-plAud'ing. 
Ap-plinae' {-plaiwz'\ 17. 
Ap-pl&a'BYve, 156. 
Ap'ple (<9>'0, JO, 164. 
Ap'ple-tree, 206, £xo.4. 
Ap-pli'a-ble, 164. 
Ap-pU'anoe, 160. 
Ap-pU'an-or. 169. 
Ap-pU-oa^bUa-tT, 171. 
Ap'pU-oa-ble, 164, 170. 
Ap'pU-oan-07, 169. 
Ap'pU-cant, 170. 
Api)li-cate. 
Ap-pU-ca'tlon, 112. 
Ap'pU-ca-tlve, 84. 
Ap'pli-oarto-17, 86. 
Ap-pOed', 186. 
Ap-pli'er. 
Apply'. 26. 
Ap-ply'ing. 



AppogiaSura (It.) (t^- 

pqi-a-to&ra). 
Ap-point', 27. 
Ap-point'a-ble, 164, 109. 
Ap-point'ed. 
Ap-point-ee', 122. 
Ap-point'er. 
Ap-point'ing. 
Ap-point'mcnt. 
Ap-por'tion, 67. 
Ap-por'tioned (■p6r'- 

ahund.) 
Ap-por'tion-er. 
Ap-pdr'tion-ingf. 
Ap-por'tion-ment. 
Ap-pos'er (-p6z*-). 
Ap'po-ritc (-«U), 83, 170. 
Ap-po-al'tion (-aicA'un), 

40. 
Ap-pos'l-tiTe ('fN»e'-). 
Ap-praise' C-prltz'), 40, 

43,136. • 
Ap-prilsed' i-prAzd')y 

166. 
Ap-praise'ment (-prfla'- 

meni.) 
Ap-prais'er {-prUaf-). 
Ap-praiB'inff {^frax'-). 
Ap-pre'ci-fr'Dle {■pre'- 

ahi-a-bl), 46, 160, 171. 
Ap-pre'ci-ate (ap-pry- 

8hi-dt) (171) [90 Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; ap-pre'shiU, 

Wb. GKl. 156.] 
Ap-pre'ci-at-ed (-«M-). 
Ap-pre'oi-«t-inff (-«iM^ 

«.). 
Ap-pre-ci-a'tion {-pre- 

ahi-a'ahun), 171. 
Ap-pre'ci-«-tlye(-«AY-a-) 
Ap-pre'd-a-to-ry( -aAl-)* 

86,03. 
Ap-pre-hend', 170. 
Ap-pre-hend'ed. 
Ap-pre-hend'er. 
Ap-pre-hend'lnc^. 
Ap-pre-hen'fd-bTe, 164. 
Ap-pre-hen' BiooL. 
Ap-pre-hen'sYve. 
Ap-pren'tlce, 160, 171. 
Ap-pren'tloed {-Hat), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ap-pren'ti-clng, 183. 
Ap-preBBed' (-preat')f or 

Ap-preBt'. 
Ap-priBe' (-»*<«') (26, 

1.36), V. to inform [See 

Apprize, 160.1 
Ap-prize', V. to set a 

pnce upon [See Ap- 
prise, 160.] 
Ap-prized', 150. 
Ap-prize'ment. 



Ap-priz'er. 

Ap-prdach', n, A v. 24. 
Ap-proach'a-ble, 164. 
Ap-prdached'(<jMi0dM'), 

KoteC.p. S4. 
Ap-prda(»rer. 
Ap-prdach'ing. 
Ap'pro-bate. 
Ap'pro-bat-ed, 183. 
Ap'pro-bat-in^. 
Ap-pro-ba'tion, 112. 
Ap|pro-bat-lTe [so 8m. 

Wb. (M. ; iuyprihba- 

n«,Wr. 165.] 
Ap'pro-barto-rr, 86. 
Ap-pro'pri-«-ble, 104> 
Ap-pro'pri-ate, 171. 
Ap-pro^ri-at-ed, 183. 
Ap-pro-pri-a'tion. 
Ap-pro'prt-a-tlre, 84. 
Ap-pro'pri-at-or. 
Ap-projjpri-e-ta-iy (72) 

[BO Wd. Gd. ; ap-pro- 

pri'e^orry. Wr. 155.1 
Ap-proT'a-Die {-proov- 

a4>0* 100. 
Ap-proT'al (-proov'oOi 

183. * 
Ap-proTC' {,-proov')i W« 
Ap^royed' (-prootxl')i 

Ap-proye'ment (cq^ 
proor'-), 186. 

Ap-proy'cr (■proor'iir). 

Ap-proy'ing {-proov'-). 

Ap-prox'i-matc, a. A; « 

Ap-prox'i-mat-ed. [73. 

Ap-prox'i-mat-in^. 

Ap-prox-i-ma'tion, 112. 

Ap-prox'i-ma-IIye. 

Ap-pulBe' [bo 8m. YFb. 
Gd. ; ap^pulty Wk. ; 
ap'puU or <q>^mte', 
Wr. 166.] 

Ap-pal'Bion. 

Ap-pul'Blye. 

Ap-par'te-mmoe, 169. 

Ap-pur'te-nant, 72, 169. 

2'pri-oot(171) [not ap'- 
ri-cot, 153.1 

A'pril, 23, 230. 

A'pron (171) (a'picm or 
a'prun)[fio Wr. ; o'- 
pum, Wit. Gd. ; o'- 
pruny ooUoqidallx 
a'ptim, 8m. 166.1 

A'pro]ied(a'pwnuO,17 1 . 

Ap'rofoe (Fr.) («>'rt>- 
po) [BO 8m. Ga. ; op- 
ro-po'y Wr. 156.] 

Ap'Bl-dal. 

Ap'sie (Gr.) [pi. Ap^ti 
I <i£»(-tfe«), 108.] 



i>99it6»ii>ft<<»V> &tS>Y,<^ttt>J^9«Aor<i E « <» fkr, 4 m <» Awt, ft oa <» 



APT 



101 



ABCHITRCrURE 



Apt,10,ap,4L 
Ap'ter^, 233. 
Ap^ter-an. 
Ap^ter-oOa. 
J^ter-tx, 171. 
Apt'i-tade, 100, 171. 
Ap'tote, 230. 
l-pj-ret'ic [lo Gd. ; ap- 

V^rtfie, Wr. 155.] 
Ap'y-rex-y, «3, 171. 
Ap'j-roilfl [so Wr. j a'- 

ptr-^ut, Sm. ; tihpi'rut, 

Gd. 155.1 
A' qua (L.) (a'ktDa). 
A-qoA^ri-al, i9, N. 
A-qua'ri-an, 109. 
^-OMa'r^M (L.) [pi. 

A-qua*ri-a, 108.] 
^-^na'fi-tM (L.). 
A-quat'ic. 
A'ana-tint. 

Aa'ae-daet (<iJb'ioe-),171. 
A'qne-olis, 171. 
A'qai'form (a'jhol-) [bo 

Wb. Gd. ; ak^we- 

forrn^ Wr. 155.] 
Aq'id-Une iafwi-tin), 

or Aq'ni-Iine (a/fwi- 

On) [so Wr. Gd. ; aV- 

wi4ln^ Wk. Sm. 156.] 
Aq'iii-lon {afwi4on). 
iPab or L'nb (170) [so 

Wr. ; dr^ab, Gd. 165.J 
Ar-«-besqiie'r-&e«Jk'), 168. 
Ar-a-besgoed' {-beakt'). 

Note C, p. 34. 
A-ra'bi-an, 78. 
AT^a-bic, 109, 150, 170. 
A-rab'io^ 108. 
AWa-blne [At a b i n , 

203.1 
JUr'a-blsm (-b%zm)» 
Ar'a-bist. 
Ar'a-ble, IM, 170. 
A-ia'oeons (-ra'jAtM). 
A-racb'ni-dan (-fiol:'-), 

62. 
A-raeh'noid (^-rak'-). 
A-raeh-nol'o-glst (-ml;- 

noi'-), 108. 
A-raclHioro-gy C^rak-)^ 

106. 
Ar'a-gon-ite [ A r r a - 

gonite,20C).) 
Ar-a-nue'aii (^-me'an), 
Ar-a-ma'ic. 
Ar-a-ne'i-daiL. 
Ar-a-ne'l-form, 106. 
A-n'ne-oiLa. 
A-ra'tion. 
ArOMl-lst. 
Ara>al4ft-er. 
ArOii-ter, 77. 



Ara>l-tra-ble, IM. 
Ar-bit'rarment [ A r - 

bltrement, 203.1 
Ar'bi-tra-ri-ly. 
Ar'bi tra-ry, 72, 08. 
Ar'bi trate, 73. 
Ar'bi-trat-ed, 183. 

Ar'bl-traMiur. 
Ar-bi-tra'tion. 
Ar'bi -trat-or. 
Ar'bi-trat-rix [so Sm. 

Wr. ; ar-hi-triUfrix, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
[Arbitremont.— 

See Arbitrameat,203.] 
ArHil-tresB. 
ArOwr (11, 100) [Ar'- 

bonr.Sm. 109,203.] 
Ar'bored (arfburd). 
Ar-bo're-oAs, 100. 
Ar-bo-res'oent, 171. 
Ar'bo-rct. 

Ar-bor-i-eolt'oi^al, 01. 
Ar-bor-i-calf lire, 01. 
Ar-bor4-oalt'a ' -Ist. 
Ar-b5r'i-fonn, 143. 
Ar'bor ist. 
Ar-bor-l-»^tloii. 
Ar'bor-ofis. 

Ar-bus'cle (-tef«'«0, 102. 
Ar-bus'ca-lar, 106. 
Ar-bastlTe. 
Ar'bate, 11, 26. 
Ar-bu'te-an, 110. 
Are (11, 40, 52), n. apart 

of a droamfbrenoe 

[See Ark, 100.] 
Ar-isade', 11, 23. 
Ar-cad'ed, 183. 
Ar-ca'di-an, 100. 
Arch, 11, 44. 
Ar-chB-og'ra-phT (-ifce- 

og'-), 1&, 
Ar-chie-o-lo'gi-an (ar- 

ker). 

Ar-chK-o-Ioff'ic l-ke-c- 

ku'ik), 
Ar-^hae-o-loff'io-al (-ke- 

o-tofik), 
Ar-chj»-ol'a-ffl8t (-ke- 

d'-), 108. 
Ar.ehaM>l'o-ffr (-ifc«-)f 

108. [Arcnaiolo- 

Ar-cha'lo {-ka'ik), 52. 
Ar'eha-ism (ar'kaAzm). 
Arch-an'gel {ark-), 171. 
Arch-an-gel'lo (•ark). 
Arch-a-pos'tle {-pog'sl). 
Aroh-bish'op. 
Arch-bish'op-ric. 
Arch-«hem'io (arch- 
kem'ik), 44, 52. 



Arch-dte'ooii (-tfe'AnX 

107. 
Arch-dte'oon-iy (-dt*' 

Jb»-),03. 
Aroh-di'o-oSae (-<H}Ks), 
Arch-da'eal. [171. 

Aroh-dadh'eas, 44. 
Arch-dnch'r, 44, 03. 
Aroh-dake'. 
Arcb-dake'dom. 
Arched {archt, or arckf- 

ed), 150. 
Ar-ohel'o-gy i-kel'o-J^). 
Arch'or, 77. 
Arch'er-esB. 
Arcb'er-f , 03. 
Ar-che-typ'al (ar-ke-), 

183. 
ATfche'ijpe(ar'ke-)A7L 

Ar-che-t7p'itval(ar-jbe-). 
Aroh-flend', 200. 
Ar-chi'a-ter (or-H'o- 

tur) [so Wr.; oWH- 

(i4ur, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
ATch'ie-Bl (ark'ik-). 
Ar^shI-dj-a4/o-iial (ar- 

W-). 
A-chi-e-pis'oo-pa-c7(ar- 

kV-), 171. 
Ar-chl-e-pis'oo-pai (or- 

Jtl). 
Ar'chil {ar'chU or ar*- 

kU) [so Wr. J ar'chil, 

Sm. J arVU^ Wb. Gd. 

156.1 
Ar-chi-lo'chi-an {ar-ki- 

lofH-an), 52, 171. 
Ar-chl-man'drite (ar- 

Arl). 
Ar-chhn-e-de'an (-Un»- 

e-), 110, 171. 
Areh'ing. 
Ar-chi-pe-lagMc {ar-kt- 

pe-lt^^ik),!?!, 
Ar-chl-pera>g^ (ar i1- 

pel'arao) (171) [not 

arch-f-pel'arg^, l&i.] 
Ar'chi-tect {aHki-Ukt) 

n7n [not arch'i-tckt, 

Ar-chl-tectTve (ar-Z-l-)- 
Ar-chi-tec-tou'ic {nr- 

*!-). . 
Ar-ohi-tcc-ton'ic-al (ar- 

ki), 
Ar'chl-teet-ress {ar'kl- 

tekt-res) [so Wr. ; ar- 

kX-tekfres, Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Ar-cm-tect'iir-al {ar- 

kt-). 
Aychi-tect-ure (or'*l- 

tekt-yur) (52, 01, 171) 



All} dof in there; db at in foot ; $ as in ftdle ; gh as g <n go ; ^ a< in this. 

0* 



ARCHITRAVE 



102 



ASOUS£ 



inoi aroh'l-tect^/ur. 
63.1 
Ar'chI-traTe(ar'*l-),171 , 
Ar-chiv'al {ar-i^v'cU) ' 

[so Wr. ; arfi-val, 

Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Ar'ohlvefl {<»r*kivz) [noi 

ar'chivz, 163.1 
Ar'chl-vlBt (arai-; 
Ar'chl-volt (ar'kV) 
Ar'chon (arkan). 
Arch-preB'by-ter 

(,-priz'-) [so Wk.Wr. ; 

arch-pres'l>tf-tur, Gd. 

166.] 
Arch prcB'by-ter-y, 

(-»r*«'-), 171. 
Arch-priest', 5^06. 
Arch-pri'mate. 
Arch'stone, 24, 200. 
Arch'way, 20(5. 
Arch'wise {-wizy 
Ar'oo-CT&ph. 
Aro-ta'tion. 
Arc'tic, 49, 62. 
Arc-tu'rus, 40, N. 
Ar'cu-ate, 80. 
Ar-ou-a'tion. 
Ar'ctt-bal-ist. 
Ar-cu-bal-ist'er, or Ar- 

cu-bal'iBt-^T {so Wr. ; 

ar-cu-bai-ist'urt Sm. ; 

ar-cu-bal'Ut-urf Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Ar'den-cy, 160. 
Ar'dcnt, 109, 230. 
Ar'dor (11, 88) [Ar- 
dour, Sm. 190, 2a3.] 
Ard'u-ofis [so Sm. Gd. ; 

ar'du-usy Wr. j ar'ju- 

1M, Wk. 165.1 
Are (dr), 11, m. 
A're-a, 40, N. j 171. 
A-reek'. 
Ar-e-fac'tion. 
Ar'e-fy, 04, 109. 
A-re'na, 171. 
Ar-e-na'coouR (-«a'- 

«Au«), 112, 100. 
Ar-^-na'rl-otis, 49, N. 
Ar-e-na'tion. 
A-ren-l-lIt'lo. 
Ar-e-nose'. • 
Ar'e-nons. 
A^e'o-ki (L.) [pi. A-T^- 

A-re'o-lar, 74. 

A-re'o-latc, 73. 

A-re-o-la'tioa. 

A-re-om'e-ter (40, N.) 
[so Sm. Wr. J Hr-e- 
om'B-tur, Wb. Gd. 

A-re-o-met'ric. [166.] 



A-re-o-met'rlc-al. 

A-re-om'e-try. 

Ar-«-op'a-giBt. 

Ar-e-op'a-gite [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.j flr-«- 
op'a-JUt Sm. 166.1 

Ar-e-op'a-guB (170) [so 
Wr. Wb, Gd. ; «r-e- 
op'ehffutt Sm. 166.J 

Argal. 

Ar'gand. 

Ar'gent. 

Ar-gent'al [bo Gd.; ar*- 
jeiU-alj Wr. 165.] 

Ar-g^ntMo. 

Ar-gen-tifer-o&s. 

Ar'gent-ine [so Wr.Gkl.i 
ar'JefU-ln, Sm. 155.] 

Ar'fifil, 171. 

Ar-gil-la'oeonfl C-shiuB), 
m, 171. 

Ar-gil-lifer-o1i8. 

Ar-gil'lo-cal-ca're-ofis. 

Ar-gil'lotis [bo Wk.Wr. 
wb. (5d.; ar'jU4uSt 
Sm. 165.] 

Ar'gol. 

Ar-gol'lc. « 

Ar'go-n&at. 

Ar-g^-n&ut'io, 108L 

Ar'g^-sy, 100. 

Ar'gue. 

Ar'gHed, 183. 

Ar'gu-er, 77, 89. 

Ar'gn-lng, 

Ar'g^-ment. 

Ar-g^-ment-a'tion. 

Ar-gii-ment'a-tifve, 171. 

A'rT-an, 40, N. ; 100. 

A'rl-an-ism (-{«m), 133. 

Ar'ld, 60, 170, 231. 

A-rid'1-ty, 108, 171. 

A'rir^ (L.) (a'ri-iz), 

A-right> ia-i^t')t 102. 

Ar'iT, 170, 231. 

Ar'll-late. 

Ar'U-Ut-ed. 

Ar'i-ose, 170. 

A-rise' (Ortiz'), 26, 40. 

A-ris'inar (a-rU:'»n^), 183 

Ar'ls-tarch (4ark), 

Ar-is-tarch'l-an 
(torfc'-). 

A-ris'tate. 

Ar-ls-toc'ra-cy, 108, 160. 

A-ris'to-crat, or Xr'is- 
to-crat [so Wr. ; ar- 
U-to-krat't Wk. ; ar*- 
ia-to^arat, Sm. ; ar'ia- 
to-knU or a-ria'to- 
krat, (3d. 166.] 

AT-ls-to-crct'lc, 109. 

Ar-i8-to-<:rat'lc-al, 106. 



Ar-l84o-te'U-8n [so Wr. 
^ Wb.Gd.;ar^-<o^ei'- 
^ yon, Sm. 156.] 
Ar-ls-to-tePio, 170. 
A-rith'man-oy f 109) [so 

Wk. Wr.; arfUh-mem- 

sy, Sm. ; ar'Uh-man- 

atf or o-ritik'fnan-sy, 

(k. 166.] 
A-rith'me-tic, 100, 171. 
Ar-ith-met'ic-al, 106. 
A-rith-me-tl'dan (-IttJI'- 

an), 40, 112,171. 
Ark (11,40, 62),n.akind 

of resseL {See Arc, 

100.] 
Arm, 11.32,40. 
Ar-m&'da (Sp.). 
Ar-ma-dU'lo (170) [pL 

Arma-dil'los (4d«). 
Ar^ma-ment. [102.] 

Ar'ma-tiire, 171. 
Armed, 106. 
Ar-me'nl-an [See Ar^ 

mln'i-an, 148.] 
Arm'ful i-fdol) (180, 

107). 
Arm'll-larry, 72, 170. 
Arm'ing. 
Ar-min'iaii (ar-min'' 

yan) [See ArmeoJaii, 

14o.J 

Ar-mm'ian-ism i-min'- 
ffan-izm), 133, 130. 

Arm'is-tloe, 100, 171. 

Ar'mor (11, 88) [A r m* 
oar, Sm. 109, 203.] 

Ar'mor-er, 77, 88. 

Ar-mo'rl-al. 

Ar-mdr'ic, 100. 

Ar-mdr'lc-an. 

Arm'o-ry, 80, 03. 

Arms {Urmz), 130. 

Ar'my, 08. 

Ar'ni-oa, 100, 171. 

[Arnotto. — -See Ad- 
notto, 203.] 

A-ro'ma, 72, 171. 

Ar-o-mat'lc, 100, 170. 

Ar-o-mat'ics. 

A-ro'ma-tize, or Ar'o- 
ma-tize (202)ra-ro'fna- 
tlz, Sm. Wb. Gd.i 
dr'o-tna-ilz, Wk. ; ar"- 
o-matlz or d^ro'ma- 
Uzy Wr. 165.] 

A-ro'ma-tii-er, or Ar*- 
o-ma-tiz-er. 

A-ro'ma-tofis. 

A-rose' (a-rOz'), 130. 

A-round', 28. 

A-rouse' (chrouz*), 28» 
130. 



a, S, i, 0, n, JTi hrtff } &» £9 It d, fX, ft ahort i Viae in flu-, a <m <n tut, kaeim 



AROUSED 



103 



ASCI AN 



A-rouaed' (a^rotudf), 

16&,183. 
Arons'ixi^a-roM«'ifi^). 
A-royiit',27. 
Ar-peg'ifio CD (or- 



ir-ika'gio (If 



Ar'pent. 
Ar-que-bii»-«dfr . 
Ar'qae-b&ae {or kwe- 

but) [so Wk. Wr. ; 

ar'kwe-b^, Wb. Gd. : 

ar^kwe-bdoz, Sm. 155.] 
Ar-que-bua-ier^iar-kwe- 

frtt»^r'), 114, 100. 
Ir-nck' (170) [so Wk. 

Wr.Wb.(W.; ir'ak, 

Sm. 155.] 
[Arragonlte,203. — 

See Aragonite.1 
Ar-raign' (orrHw), 1(52, 

171. 
Ar-ffiigned' {a-rdnd'). 
Ar-imign'ing (o-rAn'- 

Ar-imign'ment (-rAn'). 
Ar-ra^e', 46, 66, N. ; 

170. 
Ar-ranged', 165, 183. 
Ar-nnge'meiit. 
Ar-rin^ger. 
Ar-ran'ging. 
ir^rant, 48, 170. 
Ar'ras, 170. 
Ar-riy', n. A p. 
Ar-rayed', 150, 187. 
Ar-ray'er. 
Ar-raj'ing. 
Ar-r^ar', 171. 
Ar-rear'age, 169, 171. 
Ar-recf. 
Ar-rest', 15, 100. 
Ar-rest'ed. 
Ar-regfer, or Ar-reat'- 

or, 77, 88. 
Arrit (Ft.) {ar-ret' or 

mr^V) fio Wr. ; or- 

refy Gd. 154, 155.] 
Ar-riMre' (Fr.) {ar-rir'). 
Ar'ria, 170. 
Ar-riv'al, 228. 
Ar-riTc', 25. 
Ar-rired', 165, 183. 
Ar-riv'lng. 
Ar-r&ha (Sp.). 
Ar'ro-ganoe, 170. 
Ar'ro-gant, 170. 
Ar'ro-gate, 73. 
Ir'ro-gat-^, 183. 
Ar'ro-gat-ing. 
Ar-ro-ga'tion. 
Ar'ro-ga-ttve, 84. 
Am»Mi98emeni (Fr.) 

{ar-ron'dlB-nuing). 



JLvfrdw, 48, 66, N. ; 

170. 
Ar'r6w-root. 
Ar'rdw-Blu»ped(-«Aap<), 

215. 
Ar'r6w-7, W. 
Ar^Be-nal, 171. 
Ar-se'ni-ate. 
Ar'sen^ n. (161) [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd.; ars'- 

rUk, Wk. ; ar'sen-tk 

or ars'nikfWr. 156.] 
Ar-seii'le, a. 161. 
Ar-fien'ic-al. 
Ar-sen'i-cate. 
Ar-se'ni-oas, 160. 
Ar'se-nite, 
Ar-Be-ni'u-ret. 
A r-se-ni'u-ret-ted. 
[ArBeniareted,203] 
AWboq, 171. 
Art, 11.41,4gi 
Ar-te'ri-ac 
Ar-te'ri-al, 49, N. 
Ar-te-ri-al-I-xa'tion, 112. 
Ar-te'ri-al-Ize, 202. 
Ar-te-ri-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Ar-te-ri-oPo-gy, 108. 
Ar-te-ri-ot'o-my, 108. 
Ar'ter y, 93, 233. 
Ar-te'Biaii {ar-te'zhan)^ 

112. 
Art'fiil (arffdoT). 
Ar-thriVlc. 
Ar-thH'ti» (Gr.). 
Ar-throd'ic. 
Ar-thro-dyn'lo. 
Ar-throl'o-gy, 108L 
Ar'ti-choke, 171. 
Ar'ti-cle, 78, 164. 
Ar'ti-eled lair'ti-kUl), 

165, 183. 
Ar'ti-cling, 183. 
Ar-tic'u-lar, 80. 
Ar-t|c'u-late, a. ft v. 72. 
Ar-tic'u-lat-ed. 
Ar-tlc'a-lat-ing. 
Ar-tic-u-la'tion, 112. 
ArtM-Hce, 169, 171. 
Ar-tlfl-cer. 
Art-i-n'dal (fish'af) 

(169)[BoWk.Wr.Wb. 

Gd. J art-ljish'yaly 

Sm. 155.1 
Aj-tl-n-cl-al'i-ty {-fis?^ 

%-al'Uy)y 108, 116. 
Ar-til'ler-iBt, 170. 
Ar-tU'ler-y, 93, 170. 
Art'i-Ban (-zan) [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd, J artH-zan', 

Wk. ; art'i-zan or 

art^zan*, Wr. 165. J 
ArtMat, 80. 



Artiste (Fr.) (ar4i8t'), 

Art-lst'ic, 109. 

Ar-to-car'po&s. 

Ar-un-del'ian (ttr-un* 
diVyan) Tbo Sm. (M.j 
dr-un-diHi-an, Wr. 
155.) 

Ar-nn-dif er-ofiB, 108. 

A-run-di-na'ceoaB {ria'- 
8hu9)y 169. 

A-run-din'e-ofiB. 

A ruB'pTcc, 169. 

A-rus'pi-cy. 169. 

A ryt'e-noia. 

A8 (L.) (161), n. a Ro- 
man coin. 

As (oz) (161), (id. & coiy. 
In the manner that ; 
because. 

Ab -a-fcBt'i-da [ A b b a < 
f OB t Ida, 203.] 

nor Walker, Smart and 
Goodrich, prefer the flrrt 
form ; Worcecter the sec- 
ond. Goodrich give* alio 
the fDnni Aaafetlda, 
and Aiiafetlda. 

As-bes'tfc. 
As-bes'ti-form, 171. 
AB-bes'tlne, 82, 162. 
As-beB'toid. 
As-bes'toB, or As-bes'- 

tuB, 203. 
At'ca-ris (L.) [pi. As- 

car'i-des i-dCz), 196.] 
As-ocnd', 39, 230. 
As-cend'a-ble, 161. 
AB-cend'an-€y F A b - 

cendency,2u3.] 
A»-cend'ant [ A 8 c e n d - 

ent,203.J 
As-eend'ed. 
As-oend'en-cy [ A b - 

cendancy,203.] 
As-oend'ent [Ascend- 

ant,203.] 
As-ccnd'ing. 
As-cen'sion, 171. 
As-ccn'8ion-al. 
As-cent', n. act of ris- 
ing [See Assent, 160.; 
As-cer-taln', 171. 
As-cer-tain'a-ble, 169. 
AB-cer-tained', 165. 
Ae-cer-tain'er. 
As-ccr-tain'lng. 
A 8-ccr-tain'ment. 
AB-cet'lc, 39, 171. 
As-cct'l-cism (_-9izm) 

133, 136. 
As'ci-an (^tuh^-an) [so 

Gd. i cwVyan), Wr. 

155.] 



lUl , d <u in there -, 6b as in foot ',qasm facile ; gh a« g in go ; t]} a« in this 



A8CID1AN 



104 



A8SOCIABLE 



As-dd'i^ui, lfl9. 
A»'ei-lCh. pi.) (a«*'l-l) 

fso Wr. Gd. i ath'yh 

8m. 15ft.] 
AB-dt'io. 
AB-d-tl'cioas (-tith'tu), 

100, 231, Exc 
As-oie'pi-ad. 
Aa-crib'a-ble^ 16i. 
Afl-cribe', 25. 
As-crlbed', 105. 
As-crib'ing, 183. 
AB-«iip'tion. 
A-sep'tic 
Ash, 10, 40. 

A-Bhamed' (a-^Amd'), 
ABh'en. [150. 

Ash'er-j, 03, 233. 
Ash'es (Mh'ez), 40, 46. 
ABh'lar, or Asli'ler, 74, 
Ash'Ier-ing. [77. 

A-Bhore', 24. 
ABh'y 93. 
A'slan (a'*«Aan) [so Wb. 

Gd. ; d9h'yan, Sm. 

Wr. 165.] 
A'ai-arch (a'shl-ark). 
2-Bi-at'io (ashi-at'ik), 

100 
A-Bi-at'l-d8m (dshi-ai'- 

\-9izm), 133, 130. 
A-BideS 25. 
AB'i-ninc, 78, 170 
Ask, 12, 131. 
A-sk&noe', 11. 
A-Bki&nt', 11. 
ABked ^ki), 150, Note 

Ask'er. 

A-Bkew' (<w*w')i 86. 
Aflk'ing. 
A~Blant', 11. 
A -sleep', IS. 
A-Hlope', 24. 
As-mo-ns'an (-n/j'aw) 
. [ABmoiiean,2a3.] 
Asp, 12, 131. 
As-pftr'a-g:u8 (170). 

O^ Thic word hu been 
Tulffarly corrupted Into 
tparrou>-araM». Walker ro- 
marki of thla form of tho 
word : '* It may be ob- 
served that audi words aa 
the vulgar do not ki.pw 
how to tpell. and which 
convey no definite idea of 
the thinff, are frequently 
changed dj them into tucn 
worda oa they do know 
how to apell, and which do 
convey some definite Idea. 
The word in question is an 
Instanoe of it.^ 

A^B'pect, 10. 



As'pcii, 10, 149. 

AB-peWi-ty, 160, 170. 

A-Bpenn'oQB. 

AB-perBe', 21, Note. 

As-peraed' (-/>«r«f')*165, 
Note C, p. .34. 

AB-pera'er, 183. 

AB-perB'ing. 

AB-per'Bion, 171. 

A8-perBlve, 84. 

A8-phalt', 121. 

AB-phalt'ic, 35. 

Aa-phal'tum, 35. 

AB'pho-del. 

AB-phyx'i-a, 16, 171. 

A8-phyx'7, 93, 160. 

AB-pir'ant (49 N.) [bo 
Sm. Wb. (^. ; as- 
plr^antf or as'pi^tU, 
Wr. 165.] 

AB'pi-rate, n. A v. 73. 

Aa'pi-rat-ed. 

AB'pi-rat-ing. 

As-plre'. 25. 

AB-plrea', 165, 183. 

AB-piHing, 40, Note. 

A-Bquints 34, 52. 

Abb, 12, 131, 174. 

rA88af(Btlda,203.— 
See AsafoBtida.] 

A8-8ail', 23. 

A8-Bail'a-ble, 104. 

As-safrant, 160. 

As-sailed', 166. 

AB-sail'er. 

AB-Bail'ing. 

As-BaB'sln, 170, 230. 

AB-Bas'Bln-ate, 100. 

As-Bas'sin-at-ed, 183. 

As-Bas'ain-at-iag. 
AB-aaa-Bin-a'tion. 

AB-saa'sin-at-or. 
Aa-saalt', 17. 
Aa-alalt'ed. 
Aa-BAult'er. 
A8-8ilalt'inQ[. 
As-Bay', n. & V. 23. 
Aa-sayed', 165. 
As-say'er. 
Aa-say'ine. 
As-Bcm'bUgfe. 
A8-Bem'ble, 164. 
AB-Bcm'bled (-6W), 183. 
As-Bcm'bler. 
As-Bem'bllnff. 
As-aem'bhr, Kl. 
As-sent' (15), n. afifrce- 
ment: — v. to agree; 
to consent. [See As- 
cent, 160.1 
As-acnt-a'tion. 
As-sent'ed. 
As-sent'er. 



Aa-sen'tient (-a^k«iiO, 46 

Ae-aent'ing. 

Aa-aert', 21, Note. 

Aa-aert'ed. 

Aa-aert'ing. 

As-ser'tion. 

As-Bertlve, 84. 

As-aert'or, 100. 

Aa-sert'o-ry [ao Sm. 
Wb. Gd.; tu'ter-to- 
ry, Wr. 165. 1 

Aa-aess', 15, 1/4. 

Aa-BOBB'a-ble, 164. 

AB-seaaod' {-9eai% 166» 
Note C, p. 34. 

Aa-aeas'ing'. 

Aa-sea'sion-a-ry {-*esk'- 
i«n-), 46, 72. 

Aa-aesa'ment. 

Aa-sesB'or, 160. 

As'sets, 170. 

Aa-aey'er-ate, 72. 

Aa-aev'er-at-ed, 183. 

Aa^aev'er-at-ingf. 

Aa-Bey-cr-a'tlon. 
Aa'ai-dent, 160, 170. 
AB-al-du'i-ty, 108, 170. 
Aa-sfd'a-o&B, 01. 170. 
Aa-Big^n' (<u-9ln'), 162. 
A8-Big'n'a-ble(-4ln'a -dOt 

162, 164. 

Assianat (Fr.) (as-sin- 

pv)[w> Sm.; &8-in-ya', 

or dg-iff-tuU' tWr.; aa'- 

Hg-ruU, Gd. 154, 165.] 

As-aigf-na'tion, 170. 

AB-sIgned' (-tinrf'), i«. 

Aa-slgn-ee' (-*ln-c'),l22, 

162. 
As-sign'er (sJn'ur). 
Aa-Bign'lng (sln'ing). 
Aa-Bign'ment (-«ln'-). 
Aa-algn-or' (-«1n-or'), 
(118, 122) [correlative 
of Ataignee.] 
Aa-Bigna' (a«-«ln«'),136. 
Aa-sim'i-la-ble, 164. 
Aa-sim'i-late, 100, 170. 
Aa-slm'i-lat-ed. 
Aa-aim'i-lat-ing'. 
Aa-alm-i-la'tion. 
As-Bim'l-la-tlre, 84. 
As-alm'i-la-to-ry. 
As-Blst', 16. 
AB-Blst'anoe, 169. 
As-alsfant, 160. 
AB-Biet'ed. 
AB-BiBt'ing. 
A8-Bize',%. 
Aa-Biz'or, 183. 
As-BO-ci-a-bil'i-ty (ao- 

AB-Bo'cl-a-blc {-to'sM-a- 



a, e, i, 5, u, f , long ; ft, ^, I, 5, fi, j^, »hort ; a cw m far, k at in faat, A as in 



ASSOCIATE 



105 



ATTACk 



W; [bo Wk. Sm. Wr.; 

{a»-so'»ka4d),Wh,Gd. 

155.1 
As-8o'd-ate, n. A v. 

(so'iM-M) [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr.; aa-^o'shai^ 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Aft-Bo'd-it-ed (-«M-^-), 

183. 
AB-Bo'd-at-ing (-^1-4^) 
AB-BO-d-a'tioo(-«M-a'-). 
AB'BO-Dnnoe, Iffi), 170. 
As'so-nant. 
Ab Bort', 17, 103. 
AB-Bort'ed. 
AB-Bort'ing^. 
AB-Bort'ment. 
AB-Buage' (a<-«va/'), 34, 

45, 171. 
AB-Biuged' {-mo^HdfX 

1G6. 
AB-Buig'er(-n04; /tiSS. 
AB-Buiff'iiig (-«v4f -). 
AB-siia?aIve (-newt'-), 

171. 
AB'sue-tade (o^'noe- 

<«d), 174. 
A»-8ume', 20, 103. 
AB-flumed', 166, 183. 
AB*Bam'er. 
AB-Bam'ing. 
A8'8ttmp*8U (L.). 
AB-flump'tioii C-mm'-), 

162. 
AB-Bomp'tSve (-<«m'-), 

162. 
At-Bur'anoe ia-ahaor''), 

171. 
AB-rare' f<i-«Aoor'), 46. 
AB-Bared' (a-^toord'). 
ABMBur'ed-iy ia-shoor*- 

ed-lp), 150. 
AB-Bor'er (a-shoor^er). 

As'te-inn (-ism), 136, 

169. 
AB-te'riHit-ed, 49, N. 
Afl'ter-iBk, 171. 
Afl'ter-iBm (-tsm), 133. 
AB'ter-ite, 162. 
A-8tern', 21, N. 
As'ter-oid« 171, 233. 
AB-ter-oid'al. 
AB'the-nr. 
AB-then'ic 
ABth'ma iast'ma), 41, 

72, 171. 
Asth-maf ie (tut-). 
A-Btir', 21, N. 
AB-tonMsh, 104. 
AB-ton'iBhed (-iahi). 
AB-ton'iBh-ing. 



AB-ton'iBh-ment. 

AB-touad^ 28, 103. 

As-tound'ed. 

As-tound'log. 

A-Btmd'dle, IfH. 

A$-trcefa CL.) {oM-trefa) 

As'tra-gal. 

As'tral, 10, 230. 

A-8tray', 23, 232. 

AB-tric'tion. 

As-tric'tlve. 

A-Btride', 25. 

As-trin'gen-oj, 169. 

AB-trin'K«nt. 

AB-trog'ra-phy, 108. 

As'tro-ite, 152. 

ALfl'tro-labe. 

A»-troI'o-ger. 

Aa-tro-lo^ic (^ lay He), 

As-trol'o-gy, 93, 108. 

AB-tron'o-mer, 170. 

As-tro-nom'ic, 109. 

AB-tro-nom'ic-al, 108. 

As-tro-nom'io-al-ly. 

AB-tron'o-my, 170. 

AB'tro-Bcope. 

AB'tro-the-ol'o-gy, 224. 

A-Btrut'. 

Astute', 26. 

A-Bun'der. 

A-sy'lum (125, 171) [not 
BB'y-lam, 153.1 

A-Byrn'mo-tral, 160, 170. 

As-Tm-met'rio-al, 116. 

A-syrn'me-try. 

AB'ymp-tote {aa'im-), 
162, 171. 

AB-ymp-tot'ic (as'im-). 

As-ymp-tot'ic-al (tu'- 
im-). 

Asvn'def&n (Gr.) [pL 
A-wti'de-ta, 198.] 

At, 10. 

At'a-bal, 170. [203.] 

At'a-&rhaii[ Y a tag n an, 

A-taxMc. 

Ate («, or St) [bo Wr. ; 
at, Wk. Wb. GKl. } «, 
Sm. 203. J 

At'e-lene, 170. 

Atelier (Fr.) (oi'te-fl), 
IM. 

A-thal'a-mo&B. 

Ath-a-na'siaa {(Uh-a- 
TM'shan, or ath-a-na'- 
zhan) [ath-a-na'shan, 
Wb. (id.; ath-a-na'- 
zhan, Wr. ; ath-<$- 
nAzh'i^nj Sm. 155.] 

A'the-ism (-izm), 1^3. 

A'tho-Ist. 

A-theist'ic, 109. 

A-the-ist'io-al, 108. 



Ath-e-fUB'um (L.V, or 

Ath-e-ne'um (Eng.) 

(Ill) [L. pi. Ath-e- 

na'a-, £ng. pi. Ath- 

e-ne^ums, 1VI8.J 
A-the'ni-an. 
A-thirst', 232. 
Ath'lete, (171, 231) l so 

WT.Qd.iaih-Ut',Sm. 

155.] 
Ath-let'Ic, 170. 
Athwart', 17, 171. 
A-tllt'. 

At-lan-te'an, 110. 
At-lan'tis i4iz) (L. pi.). 
At-lan'tic. 
At4an'H-di$ (-dlz) (L. 

pi.). 
At'las. 

At-mom'e-ter. 
At'moB-pherc, 35, 171. 
At-moB-ph^r'ie, 143. 
At-mo8-ph6r'io-al. 
At'om. 169, 170. 
A-tom'ic, 109. 
A-tom'iC'al, 108. 
At'om-lsm l-izm), 
At'om-ist. 
At'om-izc, 202. 
At-om-ol'o-gy, 108, 
Atone', 24. 
A-toned', 165, 183. 
A-tone'ment. 
A-ton'cr. 
A-ton'ic. 
A-ton'lng. 
At'o-ny, 93, 170. 
A-top'. 

At-ra-bil-a'ri-an. 
At-ra-bil-a'ri-ottB, 171. 
At-ra-bU'Ia-ry (-bU'tfa- 

ry). 
At-ra-bIl'iou8 (-bil'yus), 
At-ra-ment-a'ceou8 

(•shus), 112. 
At-ra-ment'al. 
At-ra-ment-a'ri-ofiB. 
At-ra-ment'ofiB. 
Atrip'. 
A-tro'douB (shtu), 46, 

169, 171. 
A-tro^'l-ty, 39, 171. 
Afro pWed (-fid), 171. 
At'ro-phy, 93, 170. 
A^tach', 10, 103. 
At-tach'a-ble, 164. 
AttarM (*>.) (tU-tor- 

A^tached' (-tacht'), 165, 

Note C, p. 34. 
At-tarh'ing. 
At-tach'mcnt. 
At-tack', n. A v. 10, 52. 



Mi', ^ as in there ; <Sbtuin foot ; 9 as in fadle ; gh a« g m go } ^ 08 in thla. 



ATTACKABLE 



106 



AUTHORESS 



At tack'a-ble, 164. 
At tack'er. 
At talnS 23. 
At-taia'a-blc, IM. 
Attain'der. 
Attained', 105. 
Attlin'ing. 
At-taln'ment. 
At-tUnt', 23. 
At-taint'ed. 
At-taint'lngf. 
At-taint'ment. 
At-tuint'ure i-yur)^ 01. 
f Attar, 2a3.— 6>eOt- 

tarami Otto.J 
At-tem'per. 
At-tem'pcred {-pwrd), 
At-tem'per-ing. 
At-tera'per-ment. 
Attempt' {-temV), l«L 
At tempt'ed (temt'-). 
At tcmpt'ing (4«m<'-). 
Attend', 15. 
At-tend'ance, 109 
At-tcud'ant, 160 
At-tend'cd. 
At-tcnd'cr. 
At-tend'lng. 
At-tent'. 
At-tcn'tion. 
At-tcn'tlvc, 84. 
At-ten'u-ant, 91. 
At-ten'u-at«, a. A v, 73. 
At-ten'u-StHMl, 183. 
At-ten'u-at-ing'. 
At-tcn-u-a'tion. 
At-tCBt', 16. 
At U>fit-a'tion, 112. 
At-tCBt'ed. 
At-tcBt'er, or At-tcst'- 

or, 169. 
At-test'lng. 
At'tlc, 170. 

At'ti-eiftm (-9izm), 133. 
At'tl-oize, 202. 
At-tlro', n. A v. 
At-tlrcd', 165, 183. 
At-tir'cr. 
Attir'lng. 
At'tl-tmle. 
At-ti-tu'dl-nal. 
At tol'lcnt, 170. 
Attorn' (at-tum')[A t - 

turn, 203.] 
At tor'noy(-/Mr'ny),16«. 

rpl. At-tor'neys, 190.] 
At-tor'ney-gen'er-al, 

216. 
At tract', 10. 103. 
At tract a Ml'i-t] 



At-tract'lng. 
At-trae'tion. 
At-tract'Ive, 04. 
At-tract'or. 
At'trarhimt [bo Wk. 

8m. Wr J at-trafhent, 

Wb. Gd. 165.1 
At-trib'u-U-ble, 161. 
At'trl-bute, n. 161. 
At-trib'ute, r. 161. 
At-trib'ut-cd, 183 
A^t^ib'ut-i^g. 
At-tri-bu'tion. 
At-trlb'u-tlve. 
At-trite'. 
At-trl'tion (-trish'un)^ 

112. 
At-tnne', 26. 
[Atturn,203. — iSte 

Attorn.] 
A-typ'lc. 
Au'bum, 17, 171. 
Auc'tion, 17. 
Xuc'tion-a-ry 72. 
Xuc-tlon-eer', 122, 169. 
Aa-da'ciou8 (•da'ahtu)^ 

112, 169. 
An-dac'f-ty, 160, 171,236. 
Au'di-ble, 16f, Hi 
Au'di-bly, 93. 
Au'di-enoe (169) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j oir'Jl- 

erw, Wk. 134, 165.J 
Au'dit, n. A v. 
Au'dit-ed. 
Au'dft-ing. 
Au'di-tor, 88, 169. 
Au-di-to'ri-al, 49, N. 
Au'di-to-ry, «6, 93. 
Au'di-tresB. 
Au-ge'an, 110. 
Au'ger {auf'gur) (138), 

n. an instrument for 

boring. {See Augur, 

160.] 
Aught (oW) (162), fiMij 

thing. 



i-ty. 
,164. 



At-trw^t'a-blo 
At-tract'i»d. 
Attract'fic, 152. 



' Incorrcctlx written 

O u g h t . — 5m Ought. leO. 

An'gite, 45. 
Aug'ment. n. 103, 161. 
Aug-ment', r. 103, 161. 
Aug-ment'a-ble, 164. 
Aug-ment-a'tion. 
Aug>ment'a-tTTe. 
Aue^-ment'er, 77. 
Au'gur (169), n. a sooth- 

aaver : — r. to foretell. 

[See Auger, 160.] 
An'gured {aw'gurd)^ 

Au'gur-er. 



Au*gn'ri-«1. 

Au'gu-ry, 91, 93. 

Au'gust, n. 101. 

Au-gu8t', a. 161. 

Au-guB'tan. 

Au-gufl'tlnea (tlnz)^ it 

Auk, 17. [pL 

Au-la'ri-an, 40, N. 

Au'Uc. 

Auln {awn) (162), n. an 
ell. [See Awn, 160.1 
[Aune, 203.1 

Aul'na-ger {mc'na-jur) 
(162) [Anlnager, 
203.— .Sec Alnager.] 

Aunt(fiiin(in, n. a fe- 
male related to a per^ 
son by being the bIb- 
ter of that person'B 
ikther or mother. [ See 
Ant, 160.] 

Au'rate. 

Au'rat-ed. 

Au're-ate, 160. 

Au-re'li-*, 

An-re'li-«n. 

Au-re^o-la (L.). 

An'ric 

An'ri-cle. 164. 

Au-ric'u-lar, 89, 108. 

Au-ric'u-late. 

Au-ric'u-lat-ed. 

Au-rif er-otts, 108, 171. 

An'ri-form, 160. 

Au-ri'gal. 

Au-rig'ra-phy, 108. 

Au'ri-Bcalp. 

Au'rist. 

Au'rochs (otr'roitf), 171. 

Au-ro'ra, 49. N. ; 72. 

Aus-cul-ta'tion. 

AuB-cul-ta'tor, 169. 

AuB-cul'ta-to-ry, 86, 93. 

Au'spi-cate. 

Au'Bploe, 169. 

Au-BpT'ciottB (-9piMU9)t 

112, 169, 171. 
Au-Btere', 169. 
Au-Bt€r'l-ty, 143. 
Aa'Btral. 
Au-8tra'li-an. 
AuB'trl-au, 78, 109. 
Aus'tro-man-cy, 169. 
An-then'tic. 
Au-then'tlc-al. 
Au-then'ti-cate, 169. 
Au-then'ti-oat-ed, 183. 
Au-then'tl-cat-ing. 
Au-then-ti-ca'tion. 
Au-then-ti^'l-ty, 171. 
Au-then'tic8. 
Au'thor, 88, 169. 
Au'thor-eBB. 



a, §, i, d, ii, y, long \ i, £, T, d, U, y> thort ; a a« in far, katin fast, kfuin 



AUTHORITATIVB 



107 



AXIOM 



lu-thdr'l-U-tlTe, 171. 

Att-thdp'l ty, 169, 170. 

Au'thor-i2-»-ble, 183. 

Au-thor-iz-a'tion. 

Au'tbor-ize, 202, 

Au'thor-ized, 166, 183. 

Au'thor-iz in^. 

Aa'thor-Bhip. 

Au to-bi-og'ni-phcr. 

A u-to-bi-o-graph'ic. 

Au-to-bi-o-ffraph'io-al. 

Au-to-bi-og'ni-phy, 108. 

Au-to-car'potts. 

J»-Uyrh'tkon (Gr.) (auf- 
tok' ) [pi. Au-tochr- 
tho-nlt \^niz\ 198.1 

Au-toch'tho-nal {-toV-), 

la-toch'tho-nofta 

An ■toc'nMT, 108, IflO. 
Aa'ta-crat. 
Aa-to-cratMc, 100. 
Aa-to-crmt'io-al, 108. 
Aa-ti>c'ra-trlce, 100. 
Aa-toc'rA-trix. 
JhOo-deu/e (PortOjCoM^- 

UhdA-jn') [^i.Autot- 
,da-fe^ 198.1 
Jhito-de-fe (Sp.l {mofto- 

M-/Jk') [pL jiuio»-<U- 

/«,198.J 
Ao-tog'e-no&B (-^''e-). 
An'td-grftph, 171. 
Au-ta-§raph'lc. 
Aa-to-graph 'ic-al. 
Aa-to^ra-phy, 108. 
Aa'to-matb. 
Aa-tD-mat'ie, 100. 
Aa-to-mat'io-«l, 106. 
Aa-tom'a-tiflm {-tizm). 
Ao-tom'a-ton (170) [L. 

pi. jau-4om'a-ta ; Eng. 

pi. Au-tom'a-tons 

{-tom)t 198.] 
Autom'a-tofif. 
Au-tom'c-ter, 108. 
Aa-to-Dom'ic. 
Aa-ton'o-my. 
Aa-top'sic. 
Ao-top'tic-al. 
Aa'top-sy, IdO. 
Au'tanm (aw'tum), 162. 
Au-tum'niu, 171. 
Aax-il'iar {awg-zWyar). 
Aux41'la-ry {awg-zW- 

9a-rv), 40, N. ; 171. 
A-Tail% 23. 
A-rail-a^bil'i tr. 
A-ryi'a-ble, 16^ 
A railed', 165. 
A-vaU'lng. 
Ar-a-IMnclie' (ov-o- 

/aiMA')(171) [BO Wr.; 



av'a-idngsht Sm. ; av- 
a4anch\Wb. Gd.\55.] 

Avant-courier (JY.Wa- 
vikng'koo-rir) Fbo Wr. 
Grd. J dv-6ng'lcoo-r^t 
8m. IM, 155.1 

A-vint'gulird (a^itnt'- 
gdrdj or a-vitng'gdrd) 
la^dnt'giird,Wb.Gd.i 
a-vdtU'gdrdt or a* 
vdng'gdrdf Wr. j o- 
vdnt'adrd. Wk. ; a- 
vong'^gdra, Sm. 164, 
155.] 

Av'arfloe, 160, 170. 

Av-a-rf'ciouB (-ri«A'tM), 
169, 171. 

Av-a-tar' Tbo Sm. Wr. ; 
ar-<^ter, or chvilftar, 
Gd. 164, 156.1 

A-vaunt', 17. 

A'vi (L.). 

Ar'eu-agc. 

A-veng^, 16, 46. 

A-yenged' (-«en/<r),106, 
183. 

A-vengf'er (-€?«»/->. 

A-reng'iiiff l-vea^i 

Ar'eoB i^mzY 

AWen-tail fAYen- 
taile,203.J 

A-Yent'u-rine. 

Av'e-nue, 169, 170. 

A-ver', 21, N. 

Av'er-age, 170. 

A-rer'ment. 

A-verred' (-c«rd')» JM, 

A-rer'rinsr. [17«. 

A-Y€r'ro-&t. 
AY-«r-run-ca'tor. 
A-Ycrse', 21, N. 
A-Yer'slon, 171. 
A-YcrtS 21, N. 
A-Yert'ed. 
A-Yert'ing. 
A-Yld'l-tY, 170. 
AY-o-ca'tion, 170. 
AY'o-ca-tlve [so Sm. ; 

a^vok*a-tlv, Wr. ; o- 

vofka-rivt Wl). Gd. 

166.1 
A-YOid', 27. 
A-YOid'a-ble, 164. 
A-Yold'anoe, 109. 
A-Yold'ed. 
A-Yoid'er. 
A-Yoid'lng. 
AY-oir-du-pola' (of^4«r- 

dU'poiz', 171). 
AY'o-Bet, 170. 
A-YOuch', 28. 
A-Youcbed' (-90ticAI')t 

166 i Note C, p. 34. 



A-Youch'er. 
A-Youch'ing. 
A-Yow', 28. 
A-Yow'al. 
A-Yowed'. 166. 
A-YOw-ee', 122. 
A-Yow'er. 
A'YOw'rY 

A-vul8ed'*(-ri«W), Note 
C, p. 34. 

A-YuVBion. 

A-vun'cn-lar C-rutwr'-), 
64, 108. 

Await', 23. 

A-wait'cd. 

A-wait'ing. 

A- wake', 23. 

A-wa'ken {-wa*kn\ 140. 

A-wa'kened {-wa'iend). 

A-wa'ken-ing (-tca'im-). 

A-wArd', 17. 

A-wird'ed. 

A-wArd'er, 

A-wird'ing. 

A-ware' (a-wir')^ 14. 

A-wiY' (SS, 160i, ad, at 
a (Ustanoe. [See A- 
weigh.1 

Awe (oir), 171. 

A-w&ith'er. 

A-weigE' (u-v)a') (23, 
102), ad. denoting the 
position of an anchor 
when it is raiaed fh>m 
the ground and is 
hangwg by the oabla 
[See AwaY, 160.] 

Awe'-Btnick, 216. 

Aw'ful (-fSbl), 180, 186. 

Aw'ftil-Iy (-/S3<-), 93. 

A-while', 25, 33. 

Awk'ward, 171. 

Awl (17), n. a Bmall 
linted iuBtrument to 
tre holea with. [See 
AU, 160.J 

Awn. 

A-woke', 24. 

A-wnr' (-rtO, 1«2. 

Ax'al. 

Axe (oa?) [Ax, 203.1 

Axe'h^ad, 206. 

Ax'i-iU. 

Ax-lfer-ofiB, 106, 233. 

Ax'il, n. 160. 

AxTle, a. 160. 

AxAl'la (L.) [pi. Ax-U'- 
IcB, 198.] 

Ax'il-U-ry, 72, 93. 

Ax'ln-Tte, 152. 

Ax-in'o-man-cy. 

Ax'i-om laka'i-um)^ or 
Ax'iom {aMyum) 



poi 

DOI 



fidl; i CM in there; <M> m in ibot ; 9 m <n fkdle ; gh m g <n go }^a< in this. 




AXIOMATIC 

[akt*i^um, 8m. ; ofa'- 
«MM, Wr. Wb. Od.; 
Ifikum, Wk. 166.] 

Az-i-o-mat'io, 109. 

Ax-1-o-mmt'io-al, 108. 

Ax'iB, 10. 

Ax'le (ak9'l)y 171. 

Ax'le-trce, 20A. 

Ax'led laWtd), 183. 

Ax'o-lotl, 171. 

Xy, or Xye (fly), n. A 
od. (160), yeB. [pi. of 
n. Xys, or Ayes (aU).] 

Aye (fl), ad. (100), al- 
ways. 

[Avry, 203. — 5teAe- 

A-za'Ic-a. 

Ai'i-muth, 160, 170. 
Ax'i-muth-al [so Wb. 

Gd. i az-i-mu'thalt 

Wr. 165.J 
A-so'io. 
Az'ote, or A'zoto [<»«'- 

0<, Sm. Wr. i a'ziitf 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
A-zot'io. 
Ai'teo. 
Az'ure (a«A'ur)i or Az'- 

nre razA'ur) (47, 171) | 

[so Wr. ; Azh'uTf or , 

i'zhur, Wb. Gd. ; a'- ; 

«Aflr, Wk. ; a'zh^oor, j 

Sm. 20, 165.1 I 

Az'ured (a«*'i«rd), or ' 

Az'ured (d^Vwro). 
Az'y-grofis. 
Az'y-miU', 170. 
Az'y-moQs. 



B. 

B&a (bd)f n. ft V. 
lia'al. 

Bab'ble, 10, IM. 
Bab'bled {bab'bld), 183. 
Bab'bler, 170. 
Bnb'bling^. 
liabc, 23. 
Bii'bcl. 
Bab'cr-y. 

liab-oonS 121, 171, 231. 
Ba'by, 03. 
Ba'by-hdbd. 
Ba'by-ish. 
Bab-y-lo'nl-aii, 171. 
Biib-y-lon'lo. 
Iteb-y-IonMo-al: 
Dab-y-lo'nish. 
Bac, ft. a brewer's nt. 
[5m Back, 160.] 



108 

Bao-oarlin're-ate, 180. 
Bac'eate. 
Bac'oat-ed. 

Bac'oha-nal (-to-), 171. 
Bao-cha-na'li-an (-Jbi-). 
Bao'ehant f-tofU) (100), 

n. a priest of Bacchus. 
Bao'chante (-Ixmi) ( 160), 

n, a priesteat of fiao- 

ohns. 
Bao'chlo (-kik\ 68. 
Bac'chio-al (-His). 
Bac-cirer-oat, 108, 148, 

171. 
Bac-dT'o-roas, 106, 148. 
Bach'el-or, 169, 171. 
Back (10), n. the i>art of 

the body in which the 

spine is. [ See BaclOO.] 
Back'bar. 
Back'bite. 
Back-bit'er, 183. 
Back-blt'ing. 
Back-bit'ten (bWn), 
Back'bdne. 
liaok'ddor C-dOr), 206. 
BAcked (Mk), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Back'er. 

Itaek-gam'mon, 170. 
Ilack'g^und. 206. 
Itack'hand-ed, 206. 
Back'inflr. 
Back'laski, 206. 
Back'sigrht (^fU), 162. 
Back-slid'. 
Back-slide'. 
Back-slid'er. 
Back-slid'lof. 
Back-BUd'den (-sUd^n). 
Back'stay. 

Back'sword (-«0rd), 162. 
Back'ward. 
Back'wards (-vardt), 
Ba'con (ba'kn), 140. 
Ba-oo'ni-an. 
Bad ( 10, 160) ,a.not good. 
Bftde, 9. (160),didbid. 
liadge (bai)j 10, 46. 
Badg'er (bqj'ur), 160. 
Ba-oig^'oD (ba-dif'un) 

[bo Sm. Wr. ; bad-i- 

Von, Wb. Gd. 165.J 
Bad-i^nllge'(TT.) (bad-4- 

nOzh'). 
BaTfle, 164. 
BarHed ihqfjid), 183. 
Baffler. 
Baffllnff. 
Bag, 10, 31, 6.1. 



Ba-gitMtef (FrA. 
Bag<hiiUe^ (Fr.), 
Bag'gage, 170. 



171. 



BALk 

Bagged {hagd\ 166, m 
Bag'glng {-akimg), 
Bag'pipe, 2(56. 
Ball,!!, soiety. [ See Bale, 

160.J 
Bail'a-ble, 164. 
Bailed, 166. 
Bail-ee', 121. 
Bail'er [Bailor, 20:{] 
Bail'iff, 171. 
Bailing. 
BaiI'ment. 
BaU'or, or Ball^>r'. 

9^ It ia pronovcce^t 
haUror^ when contruted 
vith bmhttr, 11& 

Biit, r. to pat food ap- 
on, as upon a hook to 
lure fish : — ». a lure. 
{See Bate, 160.] 

Bait'ed. 

Bailing. 

Baize, n. a coarse wool- 
len atuif. [SieeBays, 
160.] 

Bake, 23. 

Baked {b9kt\ 183. 

Bake'house, 206. 

Bak'er, 171, 183. 

Bak'er-y. 

Bak'ing. 

Bak'smh (At.) (6aJf- 
«Aee«A)r^pukshish, 
Back Bill sh, and 
Buck Shi sh, 203.] 

Bal'a-«h5ng. 

Bal'anoe, 170. 

Bal'anced (baVaiut). 

Bal'anQ-ing. 

Bai'co-nled (-nid). 

Bal'co-ny, or Bal-co'ny 
[so Wr. Gd. ; bal'ko- 
nv. Sm. : bat-ioo^nM, 
Wk. 166.f 

B&ld, a. without hair on 
the head.[S;ee Bawled, 
160.J 

BalMa-ohin (nU»). 

B&l'der-daah, 171. 

Bftl'dric, 171. 

Bale, n. a bundle. [ f>re 
Bail, 160.] 

Bal-e-a'ri-an. 

Bal-e-ArMo, 170. 

Baled, 166, 183. 

Ba-leen', 121. 

Bale'nil (-/SiD^ 180. 

Baring, m. 

[Balfster, 203. — At 
Ballister.l 

Ba-lize' (ta-tfV), 121. 

B41k, n. it V. (hawk) 
(162) [the noun and 



a. «, i, 6, it, y, lofv ; i,«,!,0,<i,t««'kor<; X <u <» flur, 4 « ^ fhst, A m «■ 



BALKED 



109 



BABBFOOTED 



rerb tre Bometimefl 
written Baulk; the 
noan also B a a k , and 
Bawk, 203.1 
B&lked (bmckt)t 165, 

Note C, p. 34. 
Baik'er (bavk'er), 
BAIk'ing (bmck'-), 
Bftil, n. any thing glob- 
ular. [See Bawl, 160.1 
Bal'lad, 170. 
Bal'lad-mong'er (4a<(- 
mung*gher), 54, N.; 

Ral'lan, 170. 

Kal'hist, 170. 

Bai'last-ed. 

Bal'laat-ing. 

BiiroDck,206. 

Bal'let (Fr.) (bal*la, or 

baVlet [hal'lAf Sm.; 

bal'Ui.Wb.Qd.} bal- 

I«',orfrar<e<,Wr.l65.] 
Bal'U-age, 170. 
Bal-Uala (L.) [pL Bal- 

IWUb, 108.] 
Bai-lia'ter [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; haVHi^twry Wr. 

155.1 
Bal-Us'tie. 
Bai-Us'tica, 109. 
Balloon', 121, 171. 
Bd-loon'ist. 
Bal'lot, 170. 
Bai'to-tikie (Fr.)[BO Sm. 

Wr. ; baVlo-tad, Wb. 

Gd.l55]rBalotade, 

203.1 
Bal'lot-box, 209. 
Banot-ed. 
Ballot-ing. 
BaU'room, 206. 
Bilm (6tfm), 162, 171. 
Balm'y (frdm'y), 93. 
rBalotade,203.— See 

BaUotade.] 
BU'aam, 171. 
B&l-sam'ic. 
Bil-sam'ic-aL 
rui-Bam-iTer-ona, 106. 
BAi-um-Ine', 162. 
R&i'tic 

Ral'us-ter, 170. 
Bal'us-terKl, 166. 
Bal'us-trade, 170. 
Bal-za-rine' i-rln'^^ 122. 
Bam-boo^. 
Bam-boo'zle, 104. 
Bam-boo'xled( -boo'zld), 
Bam-boo'sllng, 183. 
Ban, 10. 
Ba-ni'na, or Ba-ni'na 

{ha^nUfna, Wb. Gd.; 



ba-nH'na^ Sm.; ha-inA'- 

na, or 6a-fui'na, Wr. 

I55.J 
Band, 10. 
Band'age, 160. 
Ban-dan'a, or Ban-dan'- 
Band'box, 206. [na. 
Band'ed. 
Ban'de-roie [ B a n d r o I , 

203.1 
Ban'di-coot. 
BandMng. 

Ban'dled Ihan'did)^ 186. 
Ban'dit. 

Ban-dit'tl, n.irf. 170. 
BanMog, 206. 
Ban-do-leer'(122} [B an - 

doiier,m] 
Ban-dore' [bo Wr. ; 

han'ddr^ Gd. 1551 

[Pandore,203.] 
Band'rdl[B a n d e r o 1 e, 

203.1 
Ban'djr. 
BanMj-lng. 
Ban'dy-leg, 206. 
Ban'dy-legged {4egd)y 

206, Exo. 5. 
Bane, 23. 

Bane'ftd {-fSbl), 180. 
Bang, 10, M. 
Banged (bangd)^ 166. 
Bang'ing. 

Ban^gle(dafi^'oO«64,164. 
Ban'Ian (bawyan^ or 

Ban-ian' (&an-ffan') 

[ban'pan, Wb. Gd.; 

han-yan', Wk. Sm. 

Wr.l65][Bannian, 

Banyan, ^03.1 
Ban'ish, 170. 
Ban'iBhed (4tAI), 150. 
Ban'ifh-ing. 
Ban'ifhment, 170. 
Ban'iB-ter. 

O^ Thb word is a oor- 
mpoon of Babuter. 

Ban'Jo [BAnJer,203.1 
Bank, 54. 
Bank'a4>le, 169. 
Banked {Umgkt)^ Note 

C, p. M. 
Bank'er. 
Bank'tng. 
Bank'rupt. 
Bank'rupt^, 169. 
Ban'ner, 170. 
Ban'nered {-nurd)y 166. 
Ban'ner-et. 
Ban'ner-di. 
[Bannian, 203. — 5ee 

Banian.] 



Ban'ning, 176. 

Ban'nock, 170. 

Banna (6afu), n. pi. 136. 

Ban'quet (banffkwei)^ 

Ban'quet-ed. [54, 171. 

Ban'quet-er. 

Ban'quet-ing. 

Banquette (Fr.) {hang- 

Ban'tam. \ket). 

Ban'ter, 10, 77. 

Ban'tered, 166. 

Ban'ter-er. 

Ban'ter-ing. 

Bant'ling. 

[Banran, 203.— See 
Banian.] 

Ba'o-bab. 

Bapb'o-met, 35. 

Bap'tism {-tizm)^ 183, 

Bap'tiBt-er-y, 171. [136. 

Bap-tiBt'ic, 109. 

Bap-tiBt'ic-al, 106. 

Bap-tiz'a-ble, 104. 

Bap-tize', 202. 

Bap-tized', 166. 

Bap-tiz'er, 183. 

Bap-tiz'ing. 

Bar, 11, ^. 

Barb, 11, 49. 

Bar'ba-can [Barbi- 
can. 203.] 

Bar-ba'di-an. 

Bar-ba'ri-an, 49, N. 

BarbAr'ic 170. 

Bar'ba-rlBm (-ritm^tlSd. 

Bar-bftr'i-ty, 108, 170. 

Bar'bar-ize, 202. 

Bar'bar-oAB. 

Barlwte. 

Bar'bat-ed. 

Bar'be-cue, 171. 

Bar'be-cued, 165, 171. 

Bar'be-cu-hig, 183. 

Barbed, 165. 

Bar'bcl. 

Bar'bel'late, 170. 

Bar'ber, 77, 169. 

Bar'bered {-burd). 

Bar'ber-ry, 93. 

Bar'bet. 

[Barbican, 203.— Sm 
Barbacan.] 

Barb'ing. 

Bar'bule. 

Bard (ll),n. apoet. [See 
Barred, 160.] 

Bard'io. 

Bare (6#r), a. naked. 
[See Bear. 160.] 

Bared (5#rrf), 165, 183. 

Bare'ftced (6^/a«l),200 

Bare'fdbt (Mr), 206. 

Bare'fdbt-ed {btr*-y 



lUl; tof iMtliere; dbcwiRfoot; 9 « <n ikdle ;gh cm gin go ;y}<u in thiB. 

10 



BAREGE 



Bartg€ (Pr.) (ha-rHzhf). 
Bar' gain {harqhin\\7i, 
Bar'spalncd l-gMnd), 
Bar-g^ainW, 122. 
BaWgain-or. [See 



gamor.1 



Bar- 



Bar'^n 
Bar-pdn-or^. 

9(9' So written and pro- 
Bounced, when contraMed 
with Bargainee, 

Barge, 11, 45. 
Ba-rlFla, 170. 
Bar'lng (^lir^ing), part, 

making bare. [See 

Bearing, 160.1 
[Baritone, 2(0.—5ee 

Barytone.] 
Ba'ri-am, 78, 160. 
Bark, 11. 
Bar'kcep-er, 200. 
Barked {barki), 166 
Bark'ar. 
Bark'er-7, 03. 
Bark'lng. 
Bark'y, 03. 
Bar'ley, 06, 160. 
Barm, 11, 135. 
Bam, 11, 135. 
Bar'na-cle, 164. 
Bttr'o-Iite, 152. 
Ba-rom'e-ter, 170. 
Bftr-o-mot'rlc, 109. 
B&r-o-mct'rio-al, 108. 
Bftr'on, 170. 
B&r'on-Rge. 
B&r'on-esB. 
BAr'o-net, 170. 
BAr'o-net-i^. 
BAr'o-net-cy, 160. 
Ba-ro'nl-al, 70. 
B&r'o-ny, 03, 170. 
B&r'o-scope. 
BAr-o-BOopMo, 100. 
BAr-o-Boop'ical, 106. 
B4r-o-»el'e-nite. 

Ba-roache' (6a-roMA')» 
150, 171. 

B&r'ni-oan. 

B&r'rack, 170. 

Bftr-ra-coon', 122. 

B&r'ras. 

B&r'ra-tor, 160, 170. 

B&r'ra-trofis. 

BAr'ra-try, 170. 

Barred ibar(l)(l7(i)rpart. 
did barTiSetf Bard,lG0.] 

Bftr'rel. 

Bftr'relied (166) [Bar- 
reled ,203.— S:'e 177, 
and Note £, p. 70.] 

B&r'ren, 140, 171. 

B&r'rcn-ness, 170. 



110 

BXr-rl-oade', n. ft v. 170. 
BAr-ri-cad'ed, 183. 
BAr-ri-cad'ing. 
Bftr'ri-er, 170. 
BUr'ring, 176. 
BAr'ris-ter, 170. 
BAr'row, 101. 
Bar'ter, n. ft v. 
Bar'tered, 166. 
Bar'ter-er. 
Bar'ter ing. 
Bar'ti-zanTso Gd. : 6ar- 

ti-zan't wr. 165.] 
Ba-ry'ta, 171. 
Ba-ry'teB (,-tiz). 
Ba-ryt'ic. 
BSr'T-tone, 03, 170. 
Ba'sal. 
BarR&lf (171) [BO Sm. 

Wr. J ba-zdWt Wb. 

Gd. 165.1 
Ba 6&ltMc [BO Sm. Wr. ; 

ba-zSWik, Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
BarB&lta-fbrm [hcL-M'- 

H-formj Wr. ; ha-zdU^- 

i/ormj Gd. 155.] 
Ba-B&ltlne, 152. 
BaB'a-n]te(6a»'a-nlO[80 

Sm. Gd. } bas'a-iatt 

Wr. 166.] 
Base (23), a. n. ft V. [See 

Bass, 160.] 
Based (M«0, 166, 183. 
Base'ment. 
Ba-8hawS 121. 
Bash'ftil i'fS&Oi 180. 
Ba'sic 

Ba'Bi-n-er, 186. 
Ba'Bi-f^, 04. 
BaB'il (bazfil). 
BaB'i-lar (baz'i^ar) [bo 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 6«'<- 

tor, Wr. 155.] 
Bas'i-la-ry (baz'i4a^) 

[so Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

fxts'Ua-ry, Wr. 165.1 
Ba-8il'ic(-^'iit),n.fta. 
Bh Ril'l<sal (zUftk'). 
Ba-Bil'i-ca (-ziV%4M), 
Ba-ail'i-oon (zill-kon), 
Baa'i-lisk (baz^-), 78,171. 
Ba'sin (ba'sn)^ 149. 
Ba'sls (L.) [pi. Ba'sea, 

108.1 
Ba-Big^o-Inte. 
lUsk, 12, 131. 
liasked (bdskt), 166, 183. 
BaB'ket, 131. 
Bask'ing. 

BAsqoe (Fr.) (baik). 
BasB, 12, 131, 161. 
BaBB (161), n. the low- 



BATTEL 

est part in harmony. 

rSometimes written 

Base, 160, 203.] 
BaB'aet, n. & v. 
BaB'net-ing, a. ft n. ITOl 
BaB-BOon', 66, N. ; 121. 
BaB-BOon'ist. 
BfiaB-re-lief (-»/')• 
BiBB-vl'ol, 206. 
liA88'w<Sbd, 206. 
Bftst. 

Bas'tard, 131. 
Itea'tard-ize, 202. 
Bas'tard-izcd, 166, 183. 
BaB'tard-iz-iug. 
Baa'tard-j, 03. 
Baste, 163. 
Baat'ed. 

Bas-tUe/ (ba$-tiP), 121. 
Bas-ti-nade', 122. 
Baa-ti-na'do, t». ft r. 70 

[pi. of n. Baa-ti-oa'- 

oToeB {-doz).] 
BaB-ti-na'dded, 188. 
BaB-ti-na'do-ing. 
BastMng. 

BAst'ion {ba$Vyun)^ 51. 
Bas^le Oxu'il), 171. 
Bat, 10. 

Bat'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Ba-ta'taa. 
Batdi, 10, 44. 
Bate, «. to alMte. [See 

Bait, 160.] 
Bath [pl.Bii|hB(6aA«).] 
Bathe. 

BatHed, 166, 183. 
BatH'or. 
BatE'ing. 

BatE'lng*room, 216. 
BaHbhoB. 
Bat'ing, 183. 
Batiste' (Fr.) (hat-Utf) 

[Bati6t,203.] 
Bat'let. 
Ba-ton' rFr.) {Jba-t6ng*) 

[wo Ga.\ ha-t6ng' or 

hat'on^ Wr. ; bd't^ng, 

Sm. 164, 166.1 
Ba-tra'chi-an l-tra'kl-), 
Baf rarohite (-m). []7i. 
Bat'ra-choid {4Do%d), 
BAt-ra-cbdm-y-om'a- 

chy {'hSm-i-om'a-ky), 

116, 171. 
Bftt-ra-coph'a-gottB 

(-*»/'-). 
BatB'man, 214. 
Bat-tal'ia {-UVya\ 156. 
Bat-tal'ion i-Mffwn), 

171. 
Bat-tal'ioned (-mmkI), 
Bat'tel, 140. [16& 



l,^\,^^,hlimg\}^^,lt^^^,f,9hori\%Q9intu,kaeiHfUit^Mlm 




BATTELLER 

BBt'tel-ler [Batelcr, 

Wb. Gd. Sfe 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.— Bat - 

tlcr,J«».J 
Bat'teD, n. & v. {bat'n), 

149. 
Bat'ten-ing {bat'n^). 
Bat'ter. 
Bat'tered, 105. 
Bat'ter-er. 
Bat'ter-ing. 
Bat'ter-7, 93, 170. 
Bat'ting, 170. 
Bat'tiBb, 170. 
Bat'tle, 104. 
fiat'tled (6a<7d},104,183. 
Bat'tle-door (-<ter). 
bat'tle-ment. 
[Battler, 203.— Ste 

BattoUer.] 
Bat'tling. 
BaX-toVo-gj, 106. 
[Bauble. 203.— Sto 

Bawble.1 
[Bank, Baalk, 208. 

— See Balk.] 
Ba-ra'rl-an. 
Bay'a-roy [ao Wb. Gd. ; 

bav-a^row', Wr. 155.] 
Bar'in. 

fiaw'ble[B aa b le ,203.] 
Bawd. 
Bawd'i-ly. 
Bawd'rj. 
Bawd 'v. 
[Bawk, 2m. — See 

Balk.] 
Bawl, V. to make a clam- 

oroas outcry. [See 

Ball, 100.] 
Bawled, 105. 
Bawl'er. 
Bawring. 
Bar (23;, n. an Inlet of 

tbeaea. [£toeBey,160.] 

[pi. BMJB.'-See Baize, 

IflO.J 
Bdff^^ere* (Fr.) (114) 

[so Gd. ; ba'ya-dirj 

Sm. Wr. IM, 155.J 
Rnj'ard. 
Bay'bcr-ry. 
Bar'o-net [to Wr. (5d. ; 

ba'jfun^, Wk. Sm. 

156.] 
Bayou (Fr.) (Woo) [so 

Gd.; Woo^ or 6l'0, 

Wr. 155.] 
Ba-xiar' (-«ar'), or Ba- 

sar'. [171. 

BdeU'lnm (<ie/'yi(m).102. 
Be (13), r. to exist. [See 

Bee, 100.] 



Ill 

I Beach,ii. the ahore. [See 
Beech, ICO.] 

Beach'y, 03. 

Bea'con (Jbe'kn), 140. 

Bea'ooned {be'end). 

Bea'ooning {befkn-). 

Bead, 13. 

Bea'dle, 104. 

Bead'rdU, 200. 

BeadB'man ibldz-), 214. 

Bea'ele, 104. 

Beak, 13. 

Beaked {beH). 

Beak'er, 13, 77. 

Bvam. n. &v. 13. 

Beam'ftil (-/d50. 

Beam'ing. 

Beam'y. 

Bean, 13. 

Bdar, n. & v. (14). [See 
Bare, 100.] 

Bdar'a-ble, 104. 

Beard, n. ft v. 13. 

B^ard'ed. 

Bgard'ing. 

Bter'er, 14, 77. 

Bdar'ing, part, anp- 
porti^. [.See Baring, 

B&r'iBh. [100.1 

Bdast. 13. 

BeaBt'll-nesB, 78, 171. 

BeaBfly,03. 

Beat (13), r. to strike: 
— n. a stroke. [See 
Beet, 100.1 

Beat'en (6«^n), 140. 

Beafer. 

Be-*-tif ic, 109. 

Be-a-tif io-al, 106. 

Bd-at-I-fl-ca'tion, I7i 

BS^'l-ff,79,94. 

Bdat'ing. 

B«-at'l-tude,17J. 

Beau (Fr.) (M), n. a gal- 
lant. l^SeeBoWymi] 
[Vr. pi. beaux (bUz)', 
Kng. pi. Beaux, or 
BeauB (60»), 196.' 

Beau'fet (6o7»). ' 

Beauf in (6(rtn) [bofjln, 
Wr.] 

i^EIBf i^t, ** There 
It no dcmbC at to the pro- 
nuneiation [&t/*'<'>l>'* and 
that the word is often 
•pelted Biffin. 

Beau ideal (Fr.) (ftO-e- 
dd'U^ot bc-l-de'al)[w} 
Wr. ; 6«-e-<fa'ttZ, 8m. ; 
b9-l-de'al,Wh. (M.154, 
155.] 

Beaumonde (Fr.) (bo- 
mdnd', or bo-m8na')' 



BEDROOM 

Beau'te-o&8 (bu'te-us) 
[8oWr.Grd.;fru'feHM, 
or but'tmtj Sm. ; bu'- 
cfce-tM,Wk. 134, 155.] 

Beau'ti-f ied, 180. 

Beau'ti-f I-er (6fl'-). 

Beau'ti-ftil {bu'ti/ool). 

Beau'ti-f^ fbfl'-), W. 

Beau'ti-fy-ing. 

Beau'ty (ba'tp), 20, 03. 

Bea'rer, 13, 77. 

Beo4i-fl'co (/t'ko). 

Be-oalm' (4^m'), 162. 

Be-oiUmed'(-A;ttfiul' ), Ui5. 

Be-oiUm'ing i-kitm). 

Be-came'. 

Be-cause' (-kawz'). 

B-cbanoe'. 

Biche de Tner( Fr .) (6d«A- 
duh^nir'). 

Beck. 

Beck'et 

Beck'on (beVn), 140. 

Be-cloud', 28. 

BeHX>me' i-kum');i2^iei. 

Be-eom'iJiei-kum'-)j 183. 

Bed, 15. 

Ue-dab'ble, 104. 

Be^ag'gle, 104. 

Be-darkMBu (-dark'h). 

Be-d&sh'. 

Be-dAub'. 

Be-daz'zle, 104. 

Bed'ddtheB (klOtht) [so 
Sm. Wb. Gd.; bed'- 
kUz,W\i.ib€d'klOtkZj 
or bed'kUzy Wr. 155. J 

t^ Smart inri that the 
pronnnoiatioa oe*fkl&z ic 
eothquiai, Aa Clothes. 

Bed'ded, 176. 
Bod'ding. 
Bed'e-guarr-^or) [B e d- 

egar, 203.J 
Be-dew' (be-du'). 
Be-dewed' (-dlltf'), 105. 
Be-dew'lng. 
Be-di'zen (6e-rfl'«n), or 

Be-diz'en (be-diz'n) 

[be-dl'znt Wk. Sm. 

Wr.; be-diz'ny Wb. 

Gd. 155.J 
Bed'lam. 
Bed'lam-Ite, 152. 
Bed'ou-ins {bed'oo-lwf) 

[80 Gd.; 6ed'oo-1n«, 

Wr. 155.] 
Bed'plate, 200. 
Bed'poBt. 
Bed'quTlt. 
Bed'rid. 

Bed-rid'den (-rid'n). 
Bed'room, 200. 



fldlj Sob in there; «bM<nlbot; 9 a« in facile ; gh a« g in go ; ^ ob in this. 



BBDSTEAU 



112 



BEMUSED 



Bed'ttead. 
Bed'ward. 
Boo (13), n. An insect 

that makes honey. 

[See Be, 160. J 
Beech (13), n. a forest 

tree. [See Beach, 100.] 
Beef. 13. 

Beorsteak (-ttak)^ 14, 
Bee'hive. [171. 

Be-«l'ie-bub, 171. > 
Been (Mn), [not b^n, 

153] part, of Be. [See 

Bin, 160.] 
Beer ( 13), n. a fermented 

liquor. [See Bier,160.] 
BccB'wax ibez'-)t 214. 
Beet (13), n. a kind of 

vcc^ctable. [See Beat, 

Bce'tie (164), n. a oole- 

opterons insect. [See 

Betel, 160.1 
Bec'tling, liO, 
Beeves (bivz), n, pi. 

Note C, p. M. 
Be-mV [Befal, Sm. 

203.1 
Bo-Allen' i-Jinoln'), 
Be-f&U'ing. 
Be-fit'. 

Be-fit'ted, 170. 
Bc-flt'tlng. 
Befool', 19. 
Be-mre', 24. 
Befriend'. 
Be-iri6nd'ed. 
Be-fri^nd'ing. 
Beg, 16. 
Be-gan'. 

Beget' i-ffhet'), 138. 
Be-get'ter, 176. 
Be-gct'tlng. 
Beg'gar, 160, 170, 171. 
Bc<r'gRr-y, 93, 171. 
licinred (begd)^ 176, 183. 
ItegWg i-gJiing), 138. 
Bc-gfiard', 121. 




(M. 156.] 
Be-got'. 

Be-got'tcn (-got'n), 149. 
Begrime'. 
Bo-grimed', 160, 183. 
Be-grim'ing. 



Be-gmdge', 45. 
Be grudged', ISO, 183. 
Be-gnidg'iiig. 
Beguile^ (-«rA«'), 171. 
Be-guiled' (-ghlld'), 
Bc-guil'lng {-ghlV-). 
Be-guil'er (-^AU'-). 
Biouin (Fr.), n. mtu. 

(pA-aang't or beg- 

wirv), 
Btguine (Fr.), n. /em. 

(pli-ghBn'). 
Be-gun'. 

Bo-halT (-*«/'), 1«2. 
Behave'. 
Be haved', 166. 
Be hav'ing, l&t. 
Bc-hav'ior (-AAv'yiir) 

[Behaviour, 8m. 

199, 203.] 
Be brad', 15. 
He-hr-ad'ed. 
Be-hCad'ing. 
Beheld'. 
Be'he-moth, 166. 
Be'hen. 
Be-hest', 122. 
Be-hind', 25. 
Rc-hdld', 24. 
Be-hdld'en(-A62{f'n),140. 
Be-h61d'er. 
Bc-hold'ing. 
Behoof, 19. 
Behoove' [BehOTe, 

203.] 
Be-hooved',160, 183. 
Be-hoov'ing. 
[Behove, 203.] 



._ Property mitten 
Behoove, iimart. 

Be'ing. 

Be-la'bor, 169. 

Be-Ia'bored {-la'burd). 

Be-Ia'bor-ing. 

Bc^laid' [Belayed, 
203.] 

Be-liired. 

Bo-lay'. 

Belayed' C\8;:) [Be- 
laid, 203.] 

Be-lay'uig. 

Belch, 16, 44, Note 2. 

Belched (bdcht), Note 
C, p. 34. 

Belch'ing. 

Bel'dftm. 

Be-lea'gner (4e'^Aer), 
171. 

Be-lea'guered, 150. 

Be-lea'gner-ing. 

Be-lem'nite, 1&2. 

Beleg'prit (Fr.) (bdes- 
pr8') [pi. Beaux es- 



priU {bd» et-pre*}, 

198.] 
Bel'lry, 98. 
Bel'gf-an, 78. 
Bol'gic. 
Bel'ial lbtVwU)/)r Be'U 

al [6d'yaZ, Sm. ; be'h- 

airWr, Wb. Gd. 156.J 
Belie', 26. 
Belied', 166, 183. 
Bo-ligF, 13, 171. 
Be-U«T'arble, 164. 
Be-lieveS 13, 171. 
Be-lieved', 166. 
Be-Uer'er, 183. 
Be-liev'ing. 
Be-lit'tle. 164. 
Be-lif tied, 166. 
Be-Ut'tUog. 
hell (15), n. a hollow 

vessel used for mak> 

ing a ringing sound. 

r.^ Belle, 160.] 
Bel-la-don'na, 72, 170. 
B^lle i>. a gay yoiinfi 

huiy. rs^Beii, leoT 
Belles-lettres (Fr.) (6el 

let'tur) [so Sm. Gd. ; 

bel-let'r,^T, i 6el-/A'. 

tur, Wk. 164, 165.] 
Belll-oose [so Gd. ; 6<l 

«6«', Wr. 166.] 

Bellied (M'icI). 186. 
Bel-Ug'er-ent (-l<>'-),171 
Bell'-met'al {^tnet'l^ ot 

me<'aO> 206. 
Bel'low, 101. 
Bel'lowed, 166, 188. 
Bel'16w-er. 
Bel'low-taig. 
Bel'IowB (bel'tu), 171. 
Bel'ln-ine, 152. 
Bel'iy, n. A v. 
Bel'ly-ing. 
Bel'o-man-CT, 160. 
Be-ldng', 18, N. 
Be-16nged'(-loiiprf'),166. 
Be-ldng'ing. 
Bo-loved' (be-lwd')^ 

part, 160. 
Be-lov'ed (fie4uv*ed), 

pari, a, 150. 
Bo-ldw', 24. 
Belt, 16. 
Bel'tane [Beltein, 

Beltin, 903.1 
Bclt'ing. 
Be-ly'ing. 
Bel've-^re, 171. 
Be-m5an', 24. 
Be-moaned', 166. 
Be-m6an'ine. 
Be-mused' {-muzd'). 



ft, 6, i, 6, tt, ft long ; i. «. I. «» flf f* »*o^' ; ii o# <n far, a a« <n Ikst, kasin 



BEN 



113 



BETTER 



Ben, 15. 

Bcn'-DUt, 6A, N. ; 209. 

Bench, 15, 41, Note 2. 

Bench'er. 

Bend, 15. 

Bcnd'a ble, 164, 100. 

Bend'ed. 

Bend'er. 

Bend^ae. 

Bend'let. 

Bend' J, 93, 109. 

Beneath', 38. 

Ben'e-dTct, 171. 

Ben-e^iet'Ine, 152. 

Ben e^lic'tion, 171. 

Ben-e-dic'tTve, M. 

Ben-e-dic'to-ry, 88. 

Ben-e-fac'tion, 171. 

Ben-e-&e'tor. 

Ben^-fkc'tretfl. 

Ben'e-noe, 100, 171. 

Ben'e floed iJUt). 

Be-nefi-cence, 170. 

Be-neri-oent, 171. 

Ben-e-n'cUl (,-/Uh'at)t 

40, N. 2; 171. 
Ben-e-n'cia-iy ( ./CaVmo- 

ry) [so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

hen^-JUh'a-ry^ Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Ben'e-flt, 170. 
Ben'e-flt-ed, 170. 
Ben'e-fit-ing. 
Bener'o-lenoe, 100, 171. 
Be-ner'o-lent. 
Ren-gal-ee', 122. 
Bcn-gal-ese' (-«^), n. 

ting. A pi. 
Be nig^ht' (nW). 102. 
B«»-night'ed {-nlt'ed). 
Be ni^ht'ing^ (-nWiiu^); 
Be-oi^' (6e^ln0i 1<K^ 

171. 
Be-nfg'aant, 100. 
Be-nig'ni-ty, O:}, 171. 
Ben'nct, 170. 
Bent, 15. 

Be-nnmb' f&e-mimO,102. 
Be-nnmbed' (-n«f?W)i 

165. 
Be-nnmVmentC-imm'-). 
Ben-zo'ic. 100. 
Benzoin', 21, 121. 
Ben'zole. 
Ben'zo-Dne, 152. 
Be-qaeath', 38, 140, 171. 
Be-qn^atEed', 165. 
Be-qo^atH'er. 
Be^neafE'ing. 
Bequests 34, 52. 
Be-rate', 23. 
Be-rat'ed, 183. 
Be-rat'ing. 



Ber'ber-Tne, 152. 
[BerberrT,203.— 5«« 

Barberry.] 
Be-re'an, 110. 
Be-rSave', 13. 
Be-r^ved', 150, 183. 
Be-reave'ment, 185. 
Be-reav'cr. 
Be-reav'lng. 
Bereft'. 

Ber'ga-mot, 21, N. 
rBurg^amot,203.] 
Ber'gan-dcr. 
Ber'Un fao 8m. Wb. 

Gd. J ber-lin\ Wk. ; 

her-lin'^ or ber'Un, 

Wr. 155.] 
Berme (6erm), 21, N. 
Ber'nard-Ine, 152. 
Bfir'o-e (L.), 103. 
B^r'rled (6«r'irf), o.hay- 

\ng berriea. [ <See Buri - 

eClOO.] 
B£r'ry, n. a flmall fhiit. 

[^MBury, leo.] 
Berth (21 N.), n. a place 

in a ship to nleep in. 

[See Birth, 160.1 
B^r'yl, 170. 
B€r'yl-llne, 152. 
Be-say le'. 
Be-seech', 13, 44. 
Be-scech'tng. 
Be-seem'. 
Be-seem'ing. 
Be- set'. 

Be-set'tin?. 176. 
Be-8hrewV6e-«ilroo'), 10. 
Be-«ide'. 
Besides' {sldz'). Note 

C, p. 31. 
Be-siege'. 13 
Be-sieged', 150, 183. 
Be-sieg'cr (-««/-), 183. 
Be-sie^'ing (-ttf-). 
Be-smear', 13. 
Be-smeared', 150. 
Be-smear'ing. 
Be'8om(6e'zum), 40,171. 
Besot', 18. 
Be-sot'ted, 176. 
Bc-sot'ting. 

Be-soaghv (-«ato<'), 162. 
Be-sparter, 170. 
Be-spat'tered, 150. 
Be-spat'ter-ing. 
Be-speak', 13. 
Be-sp^ak'er. 
Be-spCak'ing. 
Be-spoke', 2^. 
Be spdk'en (9pdk'n)jl49, 
Be-Bpr^ad'. 
Best, 15. 



Best'ial {hegfual) (156) 
[H0Wr.Wb.Qd.;6«»r- 
*-a/, 8m. ; bes*cki-€U, 
Wk. 134, 155.1 

Best-ial'i-ty {bett-yal'l- 
ty)\%oWh.Gd.',bent- 
Vafl-tjf,Sm. J bestyl- 
al'1-iy, Wr. } beM-chi- 
al'Uv, Wk. 134, 165.1 

Best'ial-ize (fiett'yal-U). 

Bestir', 21, N. 

Be stirred', 150, 176. 

Be-stir'rlng. 

Be stow', 24. 

lie-fitow'al. 

Bestowed', 150, 188. 

Be-st6w'cr. 

Bo-Btow'ment. 

Be-strew' (bestroo', or 
6€«<ra') [soWr. Gd.; 
be-stroo'f 8m. ; be- 
8tr6'y Wk. 155.] 

Be-strew'ing. 

Be-strid'. 

Be-strid'den (-ffrid'ii), 
167, 170. 

Be-stride', 25. 

Be-strid'ing. 

Bet, 15. 

Betake', 23. 

Be'tel {be'tt) (140). an 
aromatic snmb or the 
East Indies. [See Bee- 
tle, 160.] [Betle, 
203.] 

Beth'el. 

Bethink'. 

Bethink'ing. 

Bethought" (thawi')j 
162, 171. 

Betid', 16. 

Betide', 25. 

Betimes' {•ttmz'). 

[Bctle, 203. — .^M Be- 
tel.] 

Be-to ken (-<o'lm), 140. 

Beto'kened i-to'knd), 
160. 

Be-to'kcn-faig (-to'Jbt-). 

Bct'o-ny, 03, 170. 

Bc-tJbk', 21. 

Be tray', 23. 

Be-tray'al. 

Betrayed', 150, 187. 

Be-tray'er. 

Be-tr6th', 18, 37. 

Be-trdth'al. 

Be-tr5thed' {4r{Uhi'), 
Note C, p. 34. 

Be-trdth'li^. 

Be-trdth'ment. 

Bet'ted, 176. 

Bet'ter, a. oomparatire 



till it as in there ; 06 m <n foot ;^asin ikdle ; gh a< g in go ; t]^ a< <n thla. 

10* 



BETTERED 



114 



BILS 



of good, [Set Bettor, 

lew!] 

Bettered, 160. 

Bet'ter-ing. 

Bet'ter-ment. 

Bet'ting. 

Bet'tor, n.one who bets. 

[.<?ce Better, 160.] 
R't'ty, 170. 
B^j-twfcn', 13. 
Betwixt'. 
Bov'el [Wk. Wr. Wb. 

G<1. ; hev'U Sin. 155.] 
Bev'elled (160) f Bev- 
eled, Wb. G<i. 203. 

— .5cc 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Bev'el-ling [Bevel- 

Ing.Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Bcv'cr-age, 170, 
Bev'y, 03, 170. 
Be-wiiil', 23. 
Be- wailed', 150. 
Be-wiil'er. 
Be-wall'ing. 
Beware' (Hr#r'), 14. 
Be-wil'der. 
Be-wil'derod (-durdh 

150. 
Be-wil'der-lng. 
Bewitch', 44. 
Be-witohed' {-vHchV), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Be-witch'er. 
Be-witch'er-y, 213. 
Be-witch'ing. 
Be-witch'ment. 
Bewray' (frc-ra'), 1(112. 
Bey (&a), n. a Turkish 

or Tartar governor. 

[Sec Bay, 1(H).] 
Beyond', 18. 
Bezant' [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; btz'awt, Sm. 155.1 
Bez'el (bwr'e;, or bez^l) 

r»o Wr. ; bez^ely Wb. 

Gd. ; bezH, Sm. 155.] 
Be-zoar', 24, 171. 
Bez-o-ar'dic 109. 
Bi'as. 
Bi'assed, or Bi'aaed {bV- 

aat). Note C, p. 34. 

vr ** Thlt {bitUHref} li 
the common ■pellinar. but 
it should be btaned." SnuMrt. 

Bi'as-Bing, or Bi'as-ing. 
Bidu-ricMi-Iate, 110. 
Bi-ax'al, 39 N. ; 79. 
Bib, 16, 31. 
Bi-ba'dous (-ha'skut), 

109. 
Bib'ber, 170. 
Blb'l-to-ry, 86, 170. 



Bi'ble, 25, IM. 
Bib'ler. 

Bib'lic-al, 106, 109. 
Bib'U-ciBt, 78, 171. 
Blb-li-og'ra-pher. 
Bib-U-o-graph'ic. 
Blb-ll-o-gn4>h'io-fll. 
Bib-li-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Bib-li-oPa-try, 170. 
Bib'li-o-lite, 152. 
Bib-U-o-log'lc-al (-toj'-). 
Bib-U-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Bib'Ii-o-man-ey. 
Blb-ll-o-ma'nl-a. 
Bib-ll-o-ma'ni-ao, 116. 
Bib-ll-o-ma-ni'ao-al . 
Bib-U-o-ma'ni-an-ism 

(izrm), 136. 
Bib-11-o-peg'ic (-p^'ik). 
Bib-11-op'e-gy. 
Bib'Ii-o-phile. 
Bib-li-oph't-lTBrnC-^um). 
BibU-oph'i-ll8t. 
Bib-Ii-o-pho'bi-a. 
Blb-ll-oiyo-lar. 
Bib'li-o-pole. 
Bib li-op'o-lism {-lUm). 
Bib-li-op'o-Iiat. 
Bib-li-op-o-Iist'ic. 
Bib'U-o-theke. 
Bib'Ust, 16. 
Bib'u-lollB, 89, 108. 
Bi-cal'cor-ate, 79. 
Bi-eap'su-lar, 79, 89. 
Bi-car'bon-ate, 73, 79. 
Bice, 25. 
Bi-ceph'a-lofiB. 
Bi-chro'mmte (-kr9'-). 
Bi cip'i-tal, 78, 169. 
Bi-cip'i-toiiB. 
Blck'er. 

Bick'ered (,-urd)t 150. 
Bick'er-er, 77. 
Bick'er-ing. 
Bick'em {-urn). 
BT-con'Ju^te 
Bi-eom'oQB. 
Bi-cor'po-ral. 
Bi-cm'ral (-kroo >. 
Bid, 16. 

Bidden (Mrf'n), 149. 
Bid'der, 176. 
Bid'ding. 
Bide, 25. 
Bi-dent'al, 79. 
Bi-dent'ate. 
Bi^ent'a^ed. 
Bl-det' (Ft.) (6l-drt', or 

A1-da' [BO Wr.; M- 

det', Wb. Od. ; M-da', 

Sm. 155.] 
Bl-en'nl-al, 170. 
Bier (13), n. a Und of 



flrame for carrying a 

dead body to the grave 

ISee Beer, 160.1 
Biest'inga {-ingz). 
Bi-fk'ri-o&B. 
Birer-ottB. 
Bif fin [B e a n II n .— See 

BeaoBn, 203.] 
H'fld. 

BiPi-date, 170. 
Bifi-dat-ed. 
BlTi-lar. 
Bi'lold. 
Bi-fo'U-ate. 
Bi'fo-rate [bo Sm. WU 

Gd. J bl^o'rat€j Wr. 

155.] 
Bifo-rlne [Biforiu, 

203.] 
Bi'fbrm. 
Bi 'formed, 150. 
Bi-ftont'ed (-/run/'-). 
Bi-ftir'cate. 
Bi-for'eat-ed. 
Bi-fhr-ca'tion. 
Bi-f^r'coQB. 
Big, 16. 

Big'a-mist, 170. 
Big'a-my, 93, 170. 
Big'e-ner {bii'-). 
Big'gin(^Wn), 138. 
Bitfht (bit), n. a small 

inlet of the sea. [ See 

Bite, IGO.] 
Big'ot, m, 170. 
Big'ot-ed, 176. 
Big'ot-ry. 

Bi^on'try (bi-thoo'trp). 
Bi-Ju'gate. 
Biju'goOs Jbo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; hi'ju-gtu, Sm. 

155.1 
BMa'bi-ate, 78, 169. 
Bi-lam'el-late. 
Bi-Jam'el-lat-ed. 
Bil'an-der. 
Bi-lat'er-al. 
Bil'biJr-ry. 
BU'bo [pi. Biia>oeB (bW- 

bOz, 192).] 
BUboquei (Fr.) hU'bo- 

Jta, or bil^bo-krt) [bW- 

bo-kA.Wr. ; bWba-ketj 

Wb. Gd. 154, 155.] 
BUd'stein. 

Bile, n. the fluid secret- 
ed by the liver. 
ffile, n. a painfiil tumor 

[Bo 11, 203.] 

wr or these tiro fonm 
of ■polling thic word, bik 
li more in conformity with 
111 •tpaciogj (Anglo-Sav* 



a, S, i, 6, o, y, long ; i, «, T, d, tt, ft Mhori -, JkaiinUt,kaain fast, ka$in 



BILGE 



115 



BITTING 



or bOe), and tt is M 

la the c4<le«t Eng- 

etioiuuies. Johnson 

¥alker give both 

bat prefbr bile. 
Webfter, and Oood> 
irB the preferenee 
'Woreeiter sayi. 

[fonna] are atlii 



r leaa In nac ; ** and 
larka alao that the 
I **iiiore eommonlj 

ibmd), 150, 183. 
f ibU'ua-rv). 

ruist {lH-Ung'- 
^o6b (bl-Ung'- 

p-al, TV. 

5. 

ibOkt), Note C, 

?• 
,172. 

>k,206. 

{btld)f a. haying 

. [See Bi]ild,160.] 

dowe(Tr.)(ba'le- 
pl. BWUis-doux 

',-dooz'), 198.1 

ed, 176. 

Ing. 

d (bWwird), 

de 0)U'yardz)i 

71. 

rg-fipate (-Unaz-). 

I rWI'ywn), 171. 
170. 

, 101. 

ite [soWr. Wb. 
frr^a-eKi^e, Sm. 

d.l66. 
i-lar, 79, 80. 
'a-laie. 
la. 
e. 

lofis, 79. 
'gin- ate. 

n-al[BoWr.Wb. 
bl-mid'ff€U, 8m. 

'mL 

'trial. 

th'l7 i-munih'-), 

)9. 

n, n. a chest or 

for grain. [See 

,1«0.] 



Bi'na-ry, 72, 171. 

Bi'nate. 

Bind, 25. 

Bind'er. 

Bind'er-y, 93, 233. 

Bind'iofi^. 

Bi-nerv^ate. 

Bin'na-cle, 148, 164, 170. 

Bln'o-cle. 148, IM, 170. 

Bi-noc'u-lar, 74, 89. 

Bi-no'mi-al, 79, 169. 

Bi-nom'i-nofiB. 

Bi-not'o-noiiB. 

Bi'noQs. • 

Bl-nox'id [Binoxjd, 

203.— 5ce Oxide. J 
Bi-09'el-late, 170. 
Bi-o-dy-nam'ics. 
Bi-og'ra-pher, 108. 
Bi-o-graph'ic. 
Bi-o-gr^h'io-al. 
Bi-o^ra-phy, 79,108,171. 
Bl-oPo-gy, 108. 
Bi'o-tlne, 152. 
Bip'a-rofis. 
Bi-part'i-ble, 164. 
Bip'ar-tne [bo Gd. : 61- 

par'nUy Wr. 155.1 
Bi-par'tient {-par^snent) 
Bip'ar-tite. 171. 
Bi-par-tl'tion {-tUh'un). 
Bl-pcc'tin-ate. 
Bi'ped, 25. 
Bi-pd'tate. 
K-pen'nate, 170. 
Bi-pen'nat-ed. 
BT-pct'al-ottB, 170. 
Bi-pin'nate, 170. 
Bi-pin-nat'i-fid. 
Bl-pli'cateTBO Gd. ; 61'- 

pn-cM, Wr. 155.1 
Bf-plic'i-ty, 171. 
Bl-po'lar, 74, 79. 
Bi-po-14r'i-ty, 108. 
Bi'pont. 
Bi-pontTne, 152. 
Bi-pnnct'a-al. 
Bi-pa'pil-Iate, 170. 
Bi-quad'rate (bl-kwad'- 

rOt) [BO 8m. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; bl-kwaw'driU 

Wk. 155.1 
Bi-quardrario. 
Bl-quin'tlle, 152. 
Bi-ra'di-ate. 
Bi-ra'di-at-cd. 
Birch, 21, N. 
Birch'en (Mrch'n), 149. 
Bird, 21, N. 
Bird'-like, 216. 
Bird'Iime, 206. 
K-rhom-boid'al (^rom-)t 

162. 



Bi-roB'trate. 

Bi-roB'trat-ed. 

Birth (21, N.), n. a com- 
ing into life. [See 
Berth, 160.1 

Birth'day, 206. 

Bis'co-tin. 

BiB'cuit (6m'H0, 171. 

BUe (Ft.) {bez). 

Bi-sect', 15, 79. 

Bi-sect'ed. 

Bl-sect'lng. 

Bi-Beo'tion. 

Bl-seg'ment. 

Bi-se'ri al, 49, N. 

Bi-B^r'rate, 170. 

BT-se'toBe. 

Bi-Re'to&B. 

Bi-sex'a-al, 89. 

Bish'op, 171. 

Bish'op-rio. 

BiBk. 

Bls'mnth (biz*-), 171. 

BJs'muth-al {biz'-). 

Bis'muth-ic {biz'-), 106. 

Bi'Bon (149) [bo Wb. 
Gd. j biz'uTiy Sm. ; bi'- 
$on, or biz'un, Wr. 
155.] 

Bisque (Ft.) (bisk). 

BlB-Bex'tlle (171) [bo 
Wk. Sm. Wr.; 6At- 
seks'tlL Wb. (Jd. 155.1 

Bi-stip'nled (^Old). 

BiB'tort. 

BiB'tou-ry (bis'too-), 

BiB'tro (164) [BiBter, 
Wb. Gd. — 5€e 164, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

Bf-8ul'cate. 

Bf-BurcoQB. 

Bi-Burphateu 

Bit n6), n. a part of a 
bndle; a tool for 
boring, &o. [See Bitt, 
160.] 

Bitch, 16, 44. 

Bite (25), V. to wound 
with the teeth. [See 
Bight, 160.] 

Bit'er, 183. 

Bi-tem'ate, 21, N. 

BIt'ing, 183. 

Bitt, n. a piece of tim- 
ber projecting perpen- 
dicularly from a deck. 
r.J^€e Bit, 160.] 

Bft'ted, 176. 

Bit'ten (bU'n)y 66, 149. 

Bit'ter, 170. 

Bit'tem, 66, N. ; 170. 

Bit'terB (6»<'ur«), 76. 

Bit'ting, 176. 



a« in there; db<u<iifoot; 9<u{nflMsUe; gh <u g <n go ; tb m <n this. 



BITUMEN 



116 



BLISTER 



Bl-tu'men (L.)« 125. 

BT tii'mi-nate, 171. 

Bl-ta'mi-nat-ed, 183. 

Bl-tu'mi-nat-ingf. 

BT ta-mi-nif er-oQB, 106. 

Bl-tu'mi-nlzc, 202. 

Bl-tu'ml-nlzed. 

BT-tu'mt-aiz-iiig. 

BT-tu'mi-noQs, 171. 

BI'vaire. 

BT-valv'ottB. 

Bi-valv'u-lar, 80. 

Bi-vault'ed. 

Bi-ven'tral. 

Biv't-oAB, or Bi'rl-ottB 

[ftiVi-u*, Wb. Gd. ; 

6l'ri-iM, 8m. Wr.liiS.] 
Biv'ouact n. (Fr.J (6iV- 

ioak,OT blv'oo-€tk)[btv- 

wakt Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

blv*oo-ak<, Sm. 155.] 
[Bisantine, 203.— 

See Byzantine.] 
Bizdrref (Fr.). 
Blab, 10. 

Blabbed (6Ia!»{<), 166,176. 
Blab'bcr. 
Blab'blnsr. 
Black. 10, 181. 
Black'a-moor [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd.i blak'- 

OrfnOry Wk. 155.] 
Black'bail, n. & v. 
Blaok'baUed i-bawld), 

165. 
Blaok'b&ll-ing. 
Blaok'b£r-iy. 
BUck'blrd, 206. 
Blaok'bdard. 
BUck'oap. 
Blacked (blakt)j 105 i 

Note C, p. 34. 
Black'en (blak'n), 140. 
Black'ened (blak'nd). 
Black'en -ingr ibUik'n-). 
BUck'en-er (fikik'n-ur)^ 

77. 
Black'-eved (-U), 171. 
Blaok'fish, 206. 
Blvik'g}iiirdiblag'gard) 

171; «oteC,p.34. 
BUok'in^. 
Black-lCad' [bo Wr. ; 

blakntd, Gd. 155.] 
Black'-Iet'tcr, a. & n. 
Black'Bmith, 206. 
Blad'der, 170. 
Blad'der-y, 03. 
Blade, 23. 
Blad'od, 183. 
Blain. 23. 

Blam'a-ble, 164, 183. 
Blam'arbly, 03. 



Blame. 23. 
Blamed, 166. 
Blam'er. 
Blarae'wor-thy {-vmr- 

thy), 215. 
Blanch, 12, 131. 
Blanched(6Mn<:A<),Note 

C D 34 
Blanch-im'e-tcr, 170. 
Blanch'ing^. 
Blanc-mange ) /«. \ 
Blanc manger] ^"^ 

(btd^movj') Tbo Wr. ; 

bUmg-mongzh' f Sm. ; 

bto-mof^'.Wb. Gd.l&4, 

165.J 
Bland, 10. 
Bland'lBh, v. 1(H. 
Bland'lBhed i-Uht)^ 

Note C, p. 34. 
Bland'lBh-In^. 
Bland'igh-ment. 
Blank, 10, 54. 
Blanked (6tafi^M), Note 

C, p. 34. 
Blank'et, 64. 
Blank'et-ed, 176. 
Blank'et-ing. 
Blank-verBe' (216) [bo 

Wr. i bUmk'vwra^ Gd. 

155.] 
Blare (fttfr), 14. 
Blar'ney, 08. 
Blaa-pheme'. 36, 171. 
Blas-phemea', 150, 183. 
Blas-phem'er. 
Blas-phem'inc^. 
nias'phe-moQB, 171. 
Rlas'phe-my, 03, 171. 
Blast. 
Blast'cd. 
Bias-te'ma (Gr.). 
Blas-te'mal. 
Blast'cr. 

Blast'-Air-naoe, 200. 
Blast'ing. 
Bl&fl -to-ou^pofiB. 
BlaB'to-dcrm. 
Bla'tant, 160. 
Blay, 23. 
Blaze, 23. 
Blazed, 160, 183. 
Hlaz'er. 
Blaz'ing. 

Bla'zon (bla'sn), 140. 
Bla'zoned (6/a'cful),166. 
Bla'zon-er (bla'zn-). 
Bla'zon-ing (bla'zn-). 
Bla'zon-ry (6to'*»i-),171. 
Blea'b5r-ry. 
Bleach, 13, 44. 
Bleached ibUcht), Note 

C, p. 34. 



Blte(0h'er-7,93. 

Bleach'ing. 

Bleak, 13. 

Blear, 13, 67. 

Bleared, 150. 

Blear'-eyed (-td). 

Bleat, 13. 

BlSat'ed. 

Bieat'ing. 

Bleb, 15. 

Bled, 16. 

Bleed, 13. 

Bleed'inff. 

Blem'lBb, 170. 

Blem'iBhed (-OM). 

Blem'iBh-ing. 

Blench, 16,^, Note 2. 

Blend (15), v. to ndn- 

fl^le. [iS^ee Blende. 160.1 
Btende, n. Bulptittret 

of xino. [See Blend, 

160.1 
Blend'ed. 
Blend'inflr. 
Blend'oi^, 183. 
Blen'ny, 170. 
Blent, 15. 
BleBB, 16, 174. 
Bleased {ble*t)^partAa. 
Bless'ed, a. 150. 
BlesB'er, 160. 
BleBB'ing. 

Blest. [ SlM BloBBed.] 
Blet, 16. 
Ble'ton-iam (-Um)^ 133, 

136. 
Ble'ton-irt. 
Blet'ting, 176. 
Blew, r. (6ttl), did blow. 

[See Blae, 160.] 
BU^ht (bttt), 102. 
Bbght'ed (bht'ed). 
Blig^ht'ing (bUfing). 
Blind, 25. 
Bllnd'ase. 
Blind'ed. 
Bllnd'er, 77. 
Blind'fold. 
Blind'fold^. 
Blind'fold-ing. 
Blmd'ing. 
Blind'Bido (206) [bo Sm. 

Wr. Gd.; banded* ^ 

Wk. 166.1 
Blink (5Ufi^ifc), 16,64. 
BUnk'ard. 
BUnked (bUngki), Note 

C,p. 34. . 
Blink'er, 77. 
BUnk'ingr. 
BliBB, 16, 174. 
BliBB'flU C-fobt)t 180. 
Blla'ter, 16, 77. 



a, e, i, 5, ii, y» lonff i &« S« h ^i Q> ft »^rt ; a m <n ikr, a of ii» last, katiu 



BUSTERED 



117 



BOLTED 



Blifl'tered, 150. 
Blis'ter-inLg. 

BUthe, 25, 38. 
BIitBe'iome (blW^'tum). 
BlomX (24. 130), v. to 
sweU. rSeeBlote,160.] 
Bloat'ed. 
Bloat'er. 
Bloat'ing. 
Blob, 18. 
Blob'ber, 170. 
BlobOwr^lipped (-/tpO. 
Block, 18, 181. [215. 

Blockade'. 
Block-id'ed, 183. 
Block4ui'iiig. 
Block'hSad, 206. 
Block'ing. 

Bloek-tm' r20Q)[BO Wr.: 
blofHn,Wh.(idAbi.] 

Blom'a-ry {bloom'-) (?4 
rBloomary, 203.1 

Bfond, a. 18. 

BltnuU, n. CFt.) {bland). 

Blood {Uud)y 22. 

Bloodied (MtM/^). [200. 

Blood'hoand (6A<d'-), 

Blood'My, 171. 

Blood'i-Desg {blud'-). 

Blood'ing {blud' ). 

Blood'root (blud' ), 206. 

Blood'ghed {blwV ). 

Blood'shot {hind'-). 

Blood'ihot-ten {blud'- 
Mhot-n), 149, 171. 

Blood' -ves-sel, 209. 

Blood'wort(6/tMf'truH). 

mood'y {blud'y), 93. 

Bloom, 19. 

Bloom'a-rr [Bloma- 
ry,203.] 

Bloomed, IfiO. 

Bloom'er. 

Bloom'ing'. 

Bloom'7, 93, 160. 

BloK'sora, 170. 

Blos'somed {■'twnd),\fSO, 

Bloi)'M>m-ing. 

Blos'som-y. 

Blot, 18. 

Blotch, 18,44. 

Blote, V. to dry and 
8moke[5ee Bloat,160.] 

Blot'ted, 170. 

Blotter. 

Blot'ting. 

Bloaie (Jblouz) 
[Bio wze, 203.1 

Blow, 24. 

Bldw'er. 

Bldw'ing. 

Bldwn. 



Blowze (28) [Blouae, 

203.] 
Blowzed (Plouzd). 
Blowx'y. 
Blub'ber, 170. 
Blub^bered, 166. 
Bluiyber-ine. 
Blad'geon (&2t^'«n),171. 
Blue (26), n. a kind of 

color. [See Blew, 160.1 
Blue'bfir-ry, 206. 
Blue'bird. 
Blue'y, 03, 171. 
Hluff, 22, 173. 
BluiTy, 93. 
Blu'ine, 183. 
Blu'igb, 171. 
Blun'der. 

Blun'dered {-dwrd)^ 150. 
Blun'der-er, 77. 
Blun'der-ing. 
Blunt. 22. 
Blunred. 
Bluut'ing. 
Blur, 21. 
Blurred, 150, 176. 
Blur' ring. 
Blurt, 21. 
Blush, 22, 46. 
Blushed (6(utiU), Note 

C, p. 34. 
Blnsn'ing. 
Blus'ter, 22, 77. 
Blus'tered, 150. 
Blus'ter-er, 77. 
Blus'ter-ing. 
Boar, n. the male of the 

ho^. [See Bore, 160.] 
Bdara, n. a thin piece of 

sawed timber. [Su 

Bored, 160.] 
Board'a-ble, 164. 
Board'ed. 
Board'er. 
Boord'ing. 
Boast, 24. 
Boast'ed. 
Bdast'er. 

Boasf ftii (-/o60» 180. 
B6att'ing. 
Boat, 24. 130. 
BdaVa-ble, 169. 
Boat'biU, 200. 
Boat'-bnlld'er {AtOd'- 

ur), 209. 
Boat'mg. 
BoafBwain (Msn, in 

teaman's langua^O 

[BO Wh. Gd.; fc«'- 

«t0An,oolloquiaJly bo'- 

«n, Sm. ; 60<'«iran, or 

bo'tn^ Wr. 155.] 
Bob, 18, 31. 



Bobbed (6oM), 150, 17& 
Bob'bin, 170. 
Bob-bhi-et' [ao Gd.j 

bob'bi-net, Wr. 155.] 
Bob'bing. 
Bob'o-Unk, 171. 
Bob'stay, 206. 
Bob'tail. 

Bob'tailed (-tdid), 150. 
Boc'a-Blne, 152. 
Bock'ing. 
Bock'land [Book- 

land, 203.] 
Bode, 24. 
Bod'ed. 

Bodice (ftod'i*), 169,171. 
Bodied ibod'id),9M, IbO. 
Bod'i-less, 160, 171. 
Bod'i ly, 78, 93. 
Bod'lng. 
Bod'kin. 

Bod'iei-an (4«-)» 171. 
Bod'y, 93, 170. 
Bod'y-ing. * 

B<B-o'tian (be-o'than). 
Bog, 18. 
Bo«,r'gle, 164. 
hog'ir\cd {pog»ld), 106. 
liog'gler. 
Bo«^'y:ling. 

B<>(?%'y (-^*y). 138. 

Bo-liea' fM-M'), 171. 

Bo-he'ml-an. 

Boil, V. 27. 

Boil, n. [Bile, 203.— 
See Bile.] 

Boiled, 150. 

Boil'er. 

Boll'er-y. 

Boiling. 

Bois'ter-oOB. 

Bola-nr, 72. 

Bold, (24ja.daring. fear- 
less. [See BowlM, 160] 

Bold'-faoed {-f^t), 210. 

Bole, n. a kind of min- 
eral. [See Boll, an<t 
Bowl, 160.] 

^o/cro. (Sp.) {hol&'ro). 

Boll, n. the capHuleol a 
plant. [See Bole, ami 
Bowl, 100.] 

Bollard. 

Boiling rso Wr. ; bW 
I/J.7, Gd. 165.] 

Bo-logn-ese' {b6-lon- 
yizf), 171. 

Bo-lognlan (40n'yan), 

BT.l'ster. [171. 

Bol'stcred (-sturd)^ 15a 

Bol'ster-ing. 

l^lt, 24, 130. 

Bolt'ed. 



ML i i at in there ; Cbaain foot'> 9 a* in facile j gh (M g in go *, ^ cm in W\\t^ 



BOLTER 



118 



BOTARGO 



Bdlt'er. 

Bolt'iug. 

Bo'lus. 

liomb (bum)t 162. 

Uoin'bHnl, n. (Jb\ 

bard), 161. 
Bom-bard', v. (&un»> 

6ord')» 161, 171. 
Bom-bord'ed {bum-). 
Bom-bard-ier' (buinr 

bard-ir'), 169, 171. 
Bom-bard' ing' (6um-). 
Itom-bard'mcnt {bum-). 
[Uombasin, 203.— 

See Bombazine. 1 
Bom'baiit ibum'-\ or 

Bom-basy {bum-), n. 

[bum'baaty Wk. Wb. 

Lrd. ; bum-bast', Sm. ; 

&um-&<t«^'. or bum'- 

bdst, Wr.j 

09" Walker proDoancc« 
this word, when uMtl aa an 
atljective, tmnt'baW. 

Bom-baet'ic {bum), 100. 

Bom-l>a-zette' {bum-). 

Bom-ba-ziuc' {bum-ba- 

zin') (l?l) [Bomba- 

8 in, 20:}.] 
Bom'bi-late. 
Bomb'-shell {bum-). 
Bom-by9'i-noti8, 171. 
Bom' by X (L.). 
Bo-na-part'c-on, 110. 
Bo'na-part-ism {-izm) 

(133, 130) [80 Gd. ; bo- 

na-part'izm, Wr.l55.] 
Bo-na'suB. 
Ban'bon (Fr.) {bong'- 

bong). 
Bon-chret'ien (Fr.)(6an- 
Bond, 18. IknA'yen). 
Bond'a^e. 
Bond'ou. 
Bond'ing. 
Bond'man, 206. 
Bonds'man (bonds'- 

man), 136, 214. 
Bone, 21. 
lioncd, 150. 
Bone' Bet. 
Bone' get-ting, 176. 
Bon'flre. 
BOn'inff, !»?. 
ifo-m'fo (Sp.) {bo^ne^to). 
Bon-mot' (Fr.) {bong- 

mo'). 
Bdn'net (^170) [not bun'- 

et, IM.J 
Bdn'net-ed. 
Bon'njr. 
Bon'ny-clab'ber, or 

Bon-ny-clap'per 



Bon-ton' (Fr.) {hong- 

tong'). 
Bo'nuB. 
Bon^-v€mt'(FT.) {bong- 

ve-vUng'). 
Bon'T, fiO. 
Boo'uv 
Bdbk ('20), n.' ft v. [bo 

Sm. Wr. Wb. '^ 



book, Wk. 166.] 



(sa.; 



•• My jirototype 
Walker. I am mfomicd. 
wa« a Yorkshiremani and 
the information muat be 
correct, or aureW he would 
not have markea all worda 
in 00k, — book, cook, look, 
Ac, — to be pronounced 
with the long aonnd of the 
Vowel dlrraph, aa In fbod, 
pool, boot, tec., and not, ai 
we alwava hear those 
worda in London, with the 
abort aound, aa in good, 
wool, Ibot. i»c.** Smart.— 
Yet Walker 11^1 of him- 
aelf, — " To a man bom, 
as I « as, within a few miles 
or the capital [at Colney- 
Ilatch, county of Hiddle- 
scxj, living in the capital 
almost my whole life, and 
exercising myself there in 
public speakmg Ibrmany 
vears, — to such a person, 
if to any one. the true pro- 
nuncirfuon of the language 
muat be veiy fkmlliar." 

B<K>k'bTnd-er, 206. 

Book'bind-er-y. 

Bdbk'bind-ing. 

Bobk'case, 66, N. 

BC<5k'-keep'cr. 

Bobk'-keep'ing. 

Bdbk'land [Bock- 

land,203.] 
B<K>k'mon-ger {-mung- 

gher). 
Bobk'scll-er. 
B^k'seli-lng^. 
B<5bk'worm(-tw«rm). 
Boom, 19. 
Boomed, 150. 
Boom'er-ang, 233. 
Boom'lng. 
Boon, 10. 
Bo'opB. 
Boor, 10. 
Boose {booz) [Bouse, 

Booze, 203.1 
Boo'87 {boo'zy) [Bou- 

sy. Boozy, 2b3.] 
Boot. 19. 
Boot'ed. 
Boot-ee', 121. 
Bo-o'tia (L.) (-<««). 
Booth, 10,38. 



Boofi-Un. 171. 
Boo'ty, 19, 03. 
[Boozo, 203. — See 



203. — iSM 



Boose.] 

[Boozy. 
Boosy.] 

Bo-peep'. 

BoiVble, 164, 183. 

Bo-ra^'io, 235. 

Bor'a^e {huHqi) (171) 
[8oWk.Wr.Wb.(M.; 
hor^qj, Sm. 156.] 

Bo'rate, 49, N. 

Bo'rax, 24. 

Bor'der. 

Bor'dered {-durd), 150. 

Bor'der-er, 77. 

Bor'der-ing. 

Bor'dure. 

Bore, V. to perforate br 
giving^ to some point- 
ed inBtroment a dreii- 
lar motion. [See Boar, 
160.] 

Bo'rc-a],49,N.i 169. 

Bo're-aa (L.). 

Bored (bOra), part, of 
Bore.[See Board, 160.] 

Bfir^el, 170. 

I^Her, 49, N. 

lior'ing. 

Bom, part, of Bear, to 
bring forth. 

Borne, part, of Bear, to 
carry [See Bourn, 160.] 

Bo'ron, 24. 

Bor'ongh (baWfl), 22, 
162, 171. 

B6t't6w, 101, 170. 

Bdr'rowed {b0r*r9d)tVB8 

B6r'row-er, 171. 

BoB'cage. 

Boah. 

Bo8k'et[BuBket,203.] 

BoBk'y. 

Bos'om (booz'um^^or 
boo'zum) [so Wr.; 
bdbz'um, Sm. ; boo'- 
zum, Wb. (xd. 155.] 

BoBB. 18, 174. 

Bob 8 acre. 

BoBsed (6d<f ), 150 ; Note 
C, p. 34. 

Bob' By. 

Bot, 18. 

Bo-tan'ic, 109, 170. 

Bo-tan'io-al, 106. 

Bot'a-nlBt. 

Bot'a nize, 202. 

Bot-a-nol'o-gy. 

Bot'a-no-man-oy. 

Bot'a-ny, 171. 

Bo-tar'go. 



&, S, i, 0, a, filongi ft, & 1, 6, ii, f, short i H <u in far, kaain tut, H cm <n 



BOTCH 



119 



BRAGOAfiT 



Botch, 18, 44. 

Botched (bockt), 150; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Boteh'er. 
Botoh'er-y. 
Botch'7, 93. 
Both, 24, 37. 
Bdth'er. 
BdtGi'ni-an. 
Bdth'nic 

Bof ly-oid, 03, 171. 
Bot-ry-oid'aL 
Bot'ry-o-lite, 152. 
Bot'tle, l&l. 
Bot'tled ibot'ld), 183. 
Bot'tling. 
Bot'tom. 

Bot'tomed (bot'tund), 
Bot'tom-ing. [150. 

Bot'tom-rr, 171. 
Bouchet ((V) (Jboo~9hA'y 

or hoo-iKet[). 
Boa-doir' (Fr.) (Poo- 

dwor*), 171. 
Bough ijbou) (ie2, 171), 

n. a branon of a tree. 

[See Bow, 160.1 
Bought (&ai0<Xlo2, 171). 
Bov^ (Fr.) {boo-zhM') 

[■o Gd. ; hwPzhtj Wr. 

154 155.1 
ZTotiik (Fr.) ipool-yi^). 
BouUUm (Fr.) (6ool- 

Bdul^r (boVdur) 
[Bowlder, 203.] 

Boiulecard (Fr.) {bool'e- 
var^ or boo'le-vard, 
154). 

Bounce, 28. 

Bounced (bouiwO* 150. 

Boun'cer, 183. 

Boun'cing. 

Bound, 28. 

Bonnd'a-ry, 72, 171. 

Bound'ed. 

Bound'en (bound'n) [no 
Sm. Wb. 6d. ; bcutid'- 
e»h Wk. Wr. 155.] 

BoundMng. 

Bonn'te-ofiB [bo Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; boun'te-u$, 
or bcnini'yuSf coUo- 

Suialij, baunt'che-ft$t 
m.; boun'che^ust Wk. 



IM, 155.] 
I'ti-ftil 



(-/<»0» 78, 



Boun' 
171. 

Bonn'ty, 28, 03. 

Bomquet (Fr.) (boo-ka') 
[io Wb. (3dj hoo-ka'y 
or boofkOf Wr. ; 600'- 
io, Sm. 154, 166.] 



Bour'bon-i8m(6oor'5on- 

i^m). 
Bour^bon-ist Tfcoor'-). 
Bourgeois (Fr.) (6oor- 

2At0dO(161)i »• • citi- 
zen. 

Bour-geoiB' (bur-jots') 
(161), ft. a kind of 
printing type. [Bur- 
geois, 203.1 

Bourgeoisie (Fr.) 

(6oor-2Aird-2«0' 

Bourn (bOm) [bo Wk. 
Sm. Wb. (W. ; 6tfm, 
or 600m, Wr. 155], n. 
a limit. [See Borne, 
160.] 

Bourse f Fr.) (6oor«). 

BouBC (booz) [Boose, 
203.1 

Bon-Biro-phe'don [so 
Wr. (}d. ; bou-stroph'- 
e-dotij Sm. 155.] 

[BouBy, 203.— See 
BooBy.J 

Bout, 28. 

Bouts^mis (Fr.) (boo- 
r^-mH'), 

Bo'vate. 

Bo'vine, 152. 

Bow (28), n. an inclina- 
tion of the head or of 
the head and* body in 
token of respect, or of 
rooognitioa : — the 
round part of a ship's 
Bide forward. [See 
Bough, 160.] 

Bow (bo)^ n. an iuBtru- 
mcnt for shooting ar- 
rows. [See Beau, 160.] 

Bow'els (^-€lz)y 28, 136. 

Bower (bour)^ 67. 

Bower'y (bour'-). 

Bdw'-knot (-noth 206, 
Exc. 3. 

BOwl (6d2), n. a vessel 
to hold Uquids:— a 
ball of wooa used for 
play. [See Bole, attd 
Boll, 160.] 

Bowl'der {bdl'dur) 
[Boulder, 203.] 

Bowled ibOld)j v. did 
bowl. [5«« Bold, 160.] 

Bow'-legged {b<^legd)y 
206, Exc. 4. 

Bdwl'er. 

Bdw'Une (fro^fln) [so 
Sm.;6o'/ln,Wb. Gd.; 
bou'nnt Wk. ; bo'liny 
or bou'tltty Wr. 155.] 

BowI'lng. 



166; 



Bdwl'ing-alley, 206. 

Exc. 4. 
Bow'-oar, 200, Exc. 3. 
Bow'pen, 206. 
Bowse. 

Bow'sprit, 171. 
Bow-win'dow, 206, 

Exc. 1. 
Box, 18, 39, N. 
Boxed ibok8t\ 150. 
Box'en (6oib«'n), 140. 
Box'er, 77. 
Box'haul. 
Box'h&ul-ing. 
Box'ing. 

Box'-tree, 206, Exc. 4. 
Box'w<5<>d, 206. 
Boy, 27. 
Bqyau (Fr.) (6oy'o) [so 

Wb. (M. ; bo-ya'y Wr. 

\^Mp\.Boyaux {poji 

Boy'hibd. 

Boy'ish. 

Brac'cate, 170. 

Brace, 23, 39. 

Braced (5ra<0, 
Note C, p. 34. 

Brace' let. 

Bra'oer, 183. 

Brach'i-al (5raJfc'1-a/), or 
Bra'chi-al {bra'k\-al) 
[5r4jfl-a/, Wb. Gd.\ 
brU'kl-al, Sm. ; brUk'- 
ualy Wk. } brUk'ycU or 
br&'kl-<Uy Wr. 155.] 

Brach'i-ate (brak'-). 

Brach'i-o-pod (5raJb'-). 

Brilchy-cat-a-lec'tio 
ibrak-)t 116. 

Bra-chyg'ra-pher 
(-W-J. 

Bra-chyg'ra-phy ( -X 

Bra-chyPo-gy (im'-j 

Bra-chyp'ter-oiSs (- " 

Bra-chys'to-chrone 
(-Hs'to-kr6n.) 

Bra'cing. 

Brack'et. 

Brack'et-ed. 

Brack'et-ing. 

Bract, 10, 52. 

Bract'e al, 160, 171. 

Bract'e-ate. 

Bract'e-o-late. 

Brad. 10. 

Brad'y-pod, 171. 

Brag, 10. 

Brag-ga-do'ci-o (-shto) 
(170) [so Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; brag-a-do'sho, 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Brag'gart, 170. 




Ul ; 6 a« <n there t^btuin foot ], ^asin fiicile ; gh a« g in go ; th a< in this. 



BRAGGED 



120 



BREVIPENNATE 



Bragged {bragd)^ IfiO, 

Brtg'grer (-our), 138. 
Uns*gine l-ghing). 
BraH'ma [ B r a m a, 203.] 
Brah'min [Bramin, 

203.] 
Braid (brdd) (23), r. to 

weave together. [See 

Brayed, 100.] 
Brail, 23. 
Brain, 23. 

Brained {brAnd)^ 150. 
Brait, 23. 
Brake (23), n. an appa- 

ratuB for checldnip the 

motion of a wheel. 

[.See Break, 100.] 
Brakesman, 206. 
Brak'y, 03. 
Bsani'^blc, 104. 
Brani'bling, 183. 
Bram'bly. 
Bra'min [Brahmin, 

2a3.] 
Bra-mln'io-«l, 108. 
Bran, 10. 
Brimch, 131. 
Branched (brdncht),lliO. 
Bran'chl-al (brang'- 

k\-)j M, 171. 
JBran'chi-€B (h.Xbrang*- 

ki-i). 
Branching. 

Bran'chi-o-pod (brang'- 
Branoh'y, tt3, 109. [«-). 
Brand, 10. 
Brand'ed. 
Brand'er. 
Brand'ing. 
Bran'dish, 104. 
Bran'diBhed(-f;{«A/),150. 
Brau'dlsh-ing. 
Brand'ling. 
Bran'dr, 10, OT. 
Bran'gle (brang'gl)tbii 

IM. 
Brang'orled {bran'gid). 
Bran'gler {brang'-). 
Bran'^llng {brang'-). 
Bnin'lln. 
Bran'ny, 170, 170. 
Brant, 10. 
Brash. 
Brassier (bra'zhurX171) 

[Brazier, 2a3.1 
Brass, 12, 131, 174. 
Bras' Bart. 
Bras'set. 
Jiras'si-ca (L.). 
BrasBM-ness, 100. 
Brass'y, 93. 
Brat, 10. 



Bra-vaMo [not bra-yi'- 

do, 153.] 
Brave, 23. 
Braved, 150, 183. 
Brav'er-y, 171. 
Brav'ing. 
Bra'vo, or Bra'vo, <»- 

terj. [so Wr. ; brd'vo, 

Wb. Gd. ; frrfl'tw, Sm. 

155.] 



_ M <p|, J proper Emtf- 
Ush ezcUiniiUon U *Oh! 
b»T«I' or 'Brmvel OP" 
HmtMrt, 

Brii'vo, or Bra'vo, n. [so 

Wr.; brd'vot Wk.; 

br&'vof Sm. Wb. Gd. 

155.] [pi. Brayoes, 

(-ra«), 192/1 
Jira-vu'ra (It.). 
Brawl, 17. 
Brawled, 150. 
Brawl'er. 
Brawl'ing. 
Brawn, 17. 
Brawn'y, 03. 
Bray, 23. 
Brayed (briid), v. did 

brav. [;.9e6 Braid,lG0.] 
Bray'er. 



[BrayFe, 203. — See 
Brail.l 

Braze, 23. 

Bra'zen, (fttio'^n), 140. 

Bra'zen-faoed {ora'zn- 
fdstu 216. 

Bra'zier {bra'zhur) 
[Bra8ler,203.] 

Bra-ail'-wObd Ibra-zW- 
wdbd) [so Wb. fid. ; 
bra-zeruH>6d,WT. 155] 

Braz'ing, 183. 

Breach (13), n. a frac- 
ture, r See Breeoh,100.] 

BrCad ( 15), n. food made 
of grain. [See Bred, 
IGO.i r34. 

Bn^adth, 15, Note C, p! 

Break (br&k), v. to rend. 
[See Brake, 100.] 

Bn.»ak'age. 

Break'er. 

Brgak'fast (ftrcJf -), H3, 

Break'fast-ed. [171. 

Br(^ak'faBt-iiig. 

Break'water, 206. 

Bream. 13. 

Bream'lng. 

BrJ^ast ibrest), 15. 

BrSast'od. 

Br^ast'fEtst. 

BrOast'lng. 



Br«ast'-wheel. 
Br^ast'work (brett'- 

wurk)t 206. 
Bri^ath, 15. 
Breath'a-ble, 16i. 
BrgatHe, 13, 38. 
BreatEed, 150, 183. 
BreatH'er. 
BreatH'ing. 
Brec'cia (It.) {brtt'cka) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; brekf- 

aha, Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Brec'ciat-ed {brek'ikAt- 

ed) [so Sm. Wb. Gd.j 

brek'ahl-^-^y Wr. 

155.] 
Bred, v. did breed. [ See 

Broad, 160.] 
&«ech, n. the thick end 

of a firearm behind 

the bore. r<S^« Breach, 

160.1 
Breeched (frrCcAl), Note 

C iJ. 34. 
Breech'es*(6ric;*'fts),171. 
Brcech'ing {bnch'ing)^ 
Breed, 13. [171. 

Broed'er. 
Brced'ing. 
Breese ^r««) (160), n. 

the gadfly. [Breeze, 

Brfze,203.] 
Breeze (160), n. a gentle 

gale. 
Breez'y, 93. 
Brent, 15. 
Bret, 15. 
Breth'ren (127, 145) [pi. 

ofBrother, 10*.] 
Breve (brlv). 
Bre-vet', n. [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. } bre-^et' or ftrer*- 

e<, Wr. 155.1 
Bre-vet', a. [pre-wf', or 

brev'et, Wr. } brev'et, 

Sm. 155.] 
Bre-vet', v. 
Bre-vet'ted, 176. 
Brfe-vet'tlng. 
Brev'ia-ry (briv'ya-Ty) 

[so WTt. Sm. Wr. . 

5r«'t>1-a-ry, Wb. Gd 

155.] 
Bre'vi-ate [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; briv'yat, or brf. 

vl-4Uj Wr. 155.] 
Brc'vi-a-ture [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd.j brlv'pa-tur, 

Wr. ; br9v'ya-chArf 

134, 155.1 
Bre-vier' (bre-v9r*). 
Brev'i-pea. 
Brev-i-pen'nate. 



a, e, I, d, ii, 9, long ; ft, (^, 1, 0, Q, jF, short ; tiastn tkr, a cu in &st, ft as in 



BREVITY 

Brer'i-ty, 1«&, 171. 
Srew ibfyx)), 19. 
Krew'age (ftroo' ). 
Srewea (6rood), v. did 
brew. [ ^fc Brood,lGO.] 
JJrew'er ibroo-), W, 77. 
Brcw'er-y fftroo'-), 171. 
ISrew'ing- (oroo'-). 
Urew'is ibroo'-), 
CBrlar,*^(Xi.— See Bri- 
er.] 

Bri-a^re-An, 110, 100. 

Bribe, 25. 

Bribed, 150, 183. 

Bribing. 

Brib'er. 

BriVer-y, 171. 

Brick, 16, 181. 

Brick'Uln (wWZ), 102,171. 

Brick'liy-ing. 

Brick'mak-er. 

Brick'work (nrurifc}. 

Brid'al [ See Bridle, 148.1 

Bride, :ai. 

Bride'sTOom, 20G. 

Bride'miid. 

Bride'maa. 

Bride'well. 




Bri- 

BriMied dri'dld), 183. 

Bri'dler. 

Bri'dlingr. 

Bri-doon', 121. 

Bri^, 13. 

Bri'er. (160) [Briar, 
203.] 

Brl'ered (-wrd), 150. 

Bri'er-y, 171. 

Bri^, 16. 

Brl-gade', 121. 

Brig-a-dier', 122,160,171. 

Brigand. 150, 170. 

Bris'an-dine [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; hrig'- 
an-dlrif Sm. 155.] 

Brifi^'an-tine [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; br^g'- 
an-ftUt Sm. 155.] 

Bright (bnt)t 162. 

Bright'en {brU'n), 149, 
m, [150. 

Brfght'ened (br^rnd), 

BrighVen-ing {brfVn- 

Bnght'-eyed {btM'ld), 

2W, Exc. 6. 
Brill, 16, 172. 
BrlU'ian-ey(-yaia-sy),171 



121 

Briiriant (yafU), 171. 

Brim, 16. 

Brimmed {brimd), 150, 

Brlm'flil (-/o5/). 

Brim'mer, 176. 

Brim'ming. 

Brim'stone, 130. 

Brind'ed. 

Brin'Uled (6nVdW),171, 

Brine, 25. [183. 

Briug, 16, 64. 

Bring'er. 

Brinish, 183. 

Brink, 16, 54. 

Brin'y, 93. 

Brisk, 16. 

Brisk'et. 

Bris'tle (brU'D, 162, 171. 

Bris'tled {bris'ld). 

Bris'tlkig (bri»'ling\ 

162. 
Bris'tly {brUny)^ 171. 
Brit, 16. 
Bri-tan'ni-a fso Wr.; 

bri-tan'ya^ Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Bri-tan'nic. 
Brit'isb, 170. 
Brit'on. 

Brittle {-brWD, 164. 
Britz'ska {brM'ka), 171. 
BrizeTBreese, 203.1 
Broacn, v.to pierce. [ See 

Brooch, 160.] 
Broached {pr^cM)^ 160. 
Brdach'er. 
Broach 'ing. 
Broad {brawd)^ 17, 171. 
Broftd'&xe, 171,206. 
BroAd'cast. 
Broid'ddth, 18. 
Brofld'cn {brawd'n),\i9. 
BroAd'dide. 
Brob -dig-na'gi-an. 
Bro-cade', 121. 
Bro-cad'ed, 183. 
Bro'cage [Brokage, 

«».] 
Broc'co-U, 170. 
Bro-chur^ (Fr.) {bro- 

shikr'). 
Brod'e-kln [so Wb. Gd.; 

brOd'kinyWr. ; brdd'- 

e-kifit Sm. 155.] 
Bro'gan. 

agr Bn>-i/tm', u It li of- 
ten pronoanced. It not 
sanctioned by any oithotf- 
pift. 

Brogue (&r0^), 168. 
BroU, 27. 
Broiled, 150. 



BROUGHAM 

Broiring. 
Broke, 24, 130. 
Brok'en (&r0if n),24,14A 
Bro'ker, 24, 77. 
Bro'ker-age. 
Bro'ma. 
Bro'mal, 72. 
Br6-m»-tol'o-gy [so 

Gd. ; brSm-a-iol^o-oyi 

Wr. 155.] 
Bro'mlde [Bromid, 

203.f 
Bro'mine, 152. 
Bron'clii-a, n. pi. 

(brOng'k%-a). 
Bron'chi-al (brong^k^-). 
Bron'cliT-K {brong'k%-€\ 
Bron-chi'tiR (broft-kV. 

tii) [not brong-ke'tis, 

153.] 
Bron'chus (brong'kwi\ 

[pi. Bron'chi {brong'- 

)bl, 198.] 
Brdnze, or Bronze, n. 

& r. [so Wr. Gd. ; 

br^nZf Wk. Sm., 156.J 
Br5nzed, 165, 183. 
Br5nz'ing. 
Brooch (&r6cA), n. an 

ornamented pin nsed 

to fasten parts of a 

dress. [<S^ee Broach, 

160.1 
Brood, n. the young 

birds hatched at one 

time by the same 

mother. [Sf Brewed, 

160.1 
Brooa'ed. 
Brood'ing. 
Brdbk, n. A v. [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; brook, 

Wk. 155. — A'ec Book.] 
BnJbked {Jbrobkt), I^ote 

G, p. 34. 
Brobk'ing. 
Broom, vi. 
Broom-stick, 206. 
Broom'y, 93. 
Brose. 
Broth (J)rawthj or brUth) 

[so Wr. ; bratctht Wb. 

Gd. ; brdtht Wk. Sm. 

155.] 
Brdth^el, 149. 
Broth'el-ler [Broth- 
el er,Wb. Gd.— 5e« 

177, and Note E, p.70.] 
Broth'er (brutJifur) 

(171) [pl.Broth'crs, or 

Breth'rcn, iff.] 
Broth^r-h«Jbd. 
Brough'am (&roo'am,or 



^ ; £ Of <it there iifyasin foot } o <u in ladla ; gh m g «n go : th m m this 

11 



122 



BUNGALOW 



6rv^>M., CM. 155], «. a 

kind of curiftu'v. 
Br\»uj;^ht .. hnnrt " . i»V»,ir 1 
Brow. 2^ [pi. Brovs 

/»r»»irr\ riti. — See 

BroMTsie, IOul] 
Brow'Uat. 

Brow tvAt-ra (-Mi-N). 
llrv»w'tK-4t-in^. 
Brown, .£>. 
Bro willed, ISO. 
Brown in^. 
Browse ^^'rotr:\ r. to 

uibbK* c< Brow.lfirt.] 
Br«>ws«>i 'roirrtr, 15o. 
Brows or /•r.»irc'ur"'. 
Brows iu^ ^t,r\Mrz'iHg\ 

1st. 
Bru in (f'm«>'in\ 19. 
Brui*»' ^>'n>.;\ !«.», 17!. 
Bruistxl ,''r.*^jc«/^,l jii,l5CJ 
Bruiser J'n^^z'tir^ 
Brui s ' iu:r ^ ^ n*..; ' in^j) 
Bnitt (^n »<»/), II. a ru- 
mor. [>Ve Brute, ICO.] 
Bru'mal ,.6riN»'m ?/\ 
Bni aett*.** {brvo net')y 

121. 
BruQ'ion ffrrttn'yr/n'^ [jso 

Wr. (tu. , trrooiryuii, 

Sm. 155.] 
Brunt, a. 
Bnijih, il, 4«. 
Brushi:^! {brushi). 
Brutih'iuiT. 
Brush'-wheel. 
lim.t'fHf {Fr.) [broosk). 
Bru'Uil .^ru.)'^//). 
Bru-tai'i-ly (brvo), 108, 

109. 
Bru'tal izp (5nx> ), 202. 
Bru'tal-ixed {bro<*-)t 150, 

ISJ. 
Bru'tal-iz-ing' (ftroo-). 
Bru'tal-ly {hn>o)y l«. 
Brute (6'roo/), n. an ir- 
rational animal. [ 6'^ 

Bruit, liX>.l 
Bru'ti fied (6roo'-), 186. 
Bru'ti (v (broo'-), »H. 
Bru'ti-ly-lnt' (broo'-). 
Brut'ish {brvot'-). 
Bry'o-ny, U3, 171. 
BuVble, 1(H 
Bub'bled (6u5'2(Oi 183. 
Bub'blinc:. 
Bub'bly. 
Ba'bo. 
Bu-bon'o-oele [so Wk. 

Wr. Gd. ; bu'bo^no- 

Hl, Sm. 165.] 
Bao'cal, 170. 



Boe-ca-aeer', 122, 109. 
Boe-ea-iieer'iiig, 170. 
Bnc-cel-la'tion. 
Bac'd-Dal, ?;<, 109. 
Ba-cent&ar [m> Wb. 

Gd.; bm*»fn4dury Sm.; 

bm-^H'iAmr, or bu'sa^ 

Umr, Wr. 155.] 
Ba'ce-ros. 
Bark, 23, 181. 
Bodu'et, ZL 
Bnck'inor. 

BaelL\e ifrnt'l), IM. 
Boc'kled {brnfld}, ISO. 
Back'ler. 
Bac'klmg. 
Bnck'ram. 
Buck'eUn, 308w 
Back'wh«at. 
Bn-col'ic, 100. 
Bu-col'ic-al, 108. 
Bud, 22. 
Bud'ded, 176. 
Buddh'a {bood^a) [so 

Wr. ; hmd'a, Gd. 155.1 
BnddhMsm {bood'ism) 

[bo Wr. ; bid'tzMt 

Sm. ; b^'izm^ Gd.] 
Bnddh'iot (bood'ist),171. 
Buddh-ist'ic {bood). 
Bud'din^, 176. 
Bnd'dle, 161 
Budsn> OhO), 22, «. 
Budlird ibuj<l), 150. 
Bu.lir'et ibfif'et). 
Budget. 
Buff, Zi, 173. 
Bur fa-Id, 170. 
BuPfel, 17a 
BurfCT, 170. 
Buffet. 
Bnrfot-ed, 176. 
Buffet-er. 
Buffet inff. 
Buffoon', 121. 
Buf-foon'cr-y. 
Buf-foon'ing. 
Buffy. 
Bu^, 22. 
Bug'bter. 
Bugr'gi-neBB (-phi-), 78. 

Bungle, 161. [138. 

Bu'glosB. 

Buhl (Mi), 162. 

Buhl'work (bQi'ufork). 

Buhr'-stone. 

Build (hild) (16, 171), V. 

to coDBtruct. [See 

Billed, 160.1 
BuTld'Gd. 
BuTld'cr. 
Bulld'ing. 



Baltt, 16, 171. 

Bulb, 22. 

Bulbed, 150. 

Bulb-iTer-ottB, 108 

Bulb'let. 

Bulb'o&B. 

I»rb&l, 22. 

Bul'bule. 

Bulge, Zl, 45. 

Bulgetl, 150, 183. 

Bulg'ing {bul}'-). 

Bu'n-my. 

Bulk, 22. 

Bulk'hiHMl. 206. 

Bnlk'i-ness. 

Bulk'y, 03. 

Bull (Vm/), 20, 172. 

Bul-lan'tic (6M^), 170. 

Bul'Ia-ry ({mw^}, 72. 

B&riate. 

BuU'-doe. 

Bui' let (&»re<), 170. 

Bul'le-tin {booVe^iny or 

bAl'e-itn) (171) [so 

Wr. ; bocTe-teny Sm. ; 

bool'e-an, Wb. (M. 

155.1 
Bull'-fight (boil'fU). 
Bnll'-frogr (b^l'-). 
Bullied iboil'id), 9?, 

186. 
BuIKion {bioVyun)y 171. 
Buirionist (bSi»l'wun-). 
Bull'ist ibobVisi), 
BuFlock bdbl'ok), 171. 
Buirs-eve (6ck./s'I),214, 
Bull'y (&«/», ftl. 
Bullying {bool'p-)y 18a. 
Bul'nish (6M»r-), 171. 
Bulse (MUc). 
Bal'tcl. 

Bul'tow (beoI*t6). 
Bulwark (boot'-), 171. 
Bnm'ble-bee {bnm'bl-). 
Bum'boat. 
Bum'kin, n. a short 

boom. [See Bumpkin, 

118,] 
Bump, 22. 
Bumped {bunqtt), 150, 

Note C, p. 3*. 
Bump'er. 
Bomp'kin, n. a cIowb. 

[See Bumkin, 148.] 
Bun[Bunn,a03.] 
Bunch, 22, H. 
Bunch'l-nesB, 78, 171. 
Bunch'y, 93. 
Bnn'dlc, 164. 
Bun'dled (bunfdld), 183. 
Bua'dling. 
Bun£^, 22, 54. 
Bun'ga-low (^bung*-). 



a, e, i, 5, n, y, tong ; A, ($> X> d, ft, f, gkori i Jiasin fiu*, a cm in fiut, Jkatin 



BUNG-HOLE 



123 



BUTYKIC 



Ban^-hol«, 20A, Exe.3. 
Bun'^le {bung'yl), M, 

104. 
Ban' g\ed{hung* aid) J 183. 




[Bunyon, 203.1 
Bank (bungk), 22, M. 
Baon [Buii,203.J • 
Bant, 22. 
Buntlne, 82, 152. 
Bunt'ing. 
Bunt'llne [so Wr. ; 

frtm<'Ufi,Wb.Gd.l55.] 
Ban'fon [Bunion, 

203.] 
Buoy ibway), 171. 

W^ ** On board of ihip, 
vhere the word /woy ii u- 
wsTi occarrins. it is called 
a * ooy,* thoDgh the ilow, 
oorrcct pronunciatioo U 
dvof.** SatarU 

Buoyed {bwopd), 150,188. 
Buoy'agpe {bwoy'-f. 
Buoy'ttn-cy {bwcy-), 171. 
Buoy'ant {bwov), 1G9. 
[B u r , 203. — 1^ Burr.] 
BurOwt. 

Bur'den {JbuHdn), 149. 
Bur'dened {hur'dnd), 
Bur'den-in^ {bur'dn-). 
Bor'dcn-some {hur'dn- 
Bur'dock. \aum.) 

Bu'remi (Fr.) (&u'rtf, or 

tm^rof) [frtfVo, Wb. 

Gd.; fru-ro', Wk.Sm.} 

bu^r&y or bu'roy Wr. 

155.] [Ft. pi. Bttn 

reaux (-rdz) ; Eng. pi. 

Bureaus (-rd2), 106.J 
Bu-reaa'cra-«y (-ro'-)i 

109. 
Bu-re«u-crat'ie i-ro-). 
Ba-rean-<7at'io-iil (-ro-). 
Bu-reftu'crat-ist (-w-). 
Bu-rttte' (f>.). 
[Burg, 203. — iS^ 

Burgh.] 
Burg'age. 
Bnr^g&Il. 
Bur'ga-mot [ B e rg a - 

mot, 203. — See §er- 

j^amot.l 
Bur-gee* (§o Gd. ; hur'- 
Je, Wr. 155.] 
[Burgeois,203.— ;$^ 

Bourgeois.] 
BuHgesB. 
Burgh ihurg) (162) 

[Burg, 208.] 
Burgb'er {burg'), 171. 



Burgh'ist (burg*-). 

Borg'lar. 

Burg-la'rl-oQB. 

Burg'la-ry, 72, 171. 

Burg'mote. 

Bur'go-mas-ter. 

Bur-goo', or Bur -gout' 
(-^oo'-) [bo Wr. •your'- 
goo, WB. Gd. 155.] 

Bur'grave. 

Bur'gun-dy. 

Bur^i-al (Wr't-), 171. 

Buried {btr'id) (18fl), 
part, put into a grave, 
or covered with earth. 
[See Berried, 160. J 

Bur'I-er (6*r'1-). 

Bu'rin, 2i6. 

Burke (burk). 

Burked {burkt), 150, 
Note C, p. 34. 

Burk'er, 1»3. 

Burk'ing. 

Burk'ism (-t«iii),133,136. 

Burl. 21. 

Bur'iap. 

Bur-lesque* (4mF), 121. 

Bur-leBqued' (-Uikt'), 
166. 

Bur-leBqu^faig (letk'- 
ina). 183. 

Bur'li-neBB, 78, 171. 

Bur'ly. 

Bum, 21. 

Burned, 150. 

Bum'er. 

Bum'ing. 

Bar'niHh, 21, 104. 

Bur'nished {-mUht)^ 150. 

Bur'nish-er. 

Bur'nish-ing. 

Burnt, 21. 

Burr (21, 175) [Bnr, 
203.] 

Biir'rel, 170. 

Bfir'rook, 170. 

BOr'rdw (170), n. a hole 
in the ground for rab- 
bits, £c. [See Bor- 
ough, 160. J 

BQr'rOwcd, 150, 188. 

BQr'rdw-ing. 

Burr'y, 93. 

Bur' Bar. 

Bur'sa-ry, 72. 

BuTMch ((xer.) (boarsch) 
[pi. Burtch'ent 198.] 

Burst, 21, 49. 

Burst'ing. 

Bur'then (bur'thn), 149. 

Bur'ton (6t«r'<n), 149. 

Bur'y (Mr'y) (171), v. 
to put into a grave: 



— to cover with earth. 

[St^ Berry, 160.] 
Bur'y-ing (oir'yHng). 
Bush (6ou«A), 20. 
Bush'el {b6o9h'el), 149. 
Bush'el-agc (buosh-). 
BuBh'i-neB8 {bubsh-)^ 78. 
Bush'iug {booHh'ing). 
Bush'man {bobsh'-)y 206. 
Bush'y {bobih'y). 
Bus'Ied {bWid\ 171, 186. 
Bus'i ly ibiz'%-). 
Business {biz'nes), 171. 
Busk, '22. 
Busk'et. 
Busk'in. 

BuskTned (-ImO* 150. 
Busk'y, 93. 
Buss, 22, 174. 
Bust, 22. 
Bus'tard. 

Bus'tle ibuB'l), 162, 164. 
Bus'tled (btu'ld), 183. 
BuB'tler (bus'lur). 
Bus'tUng (btM'ling). 
Bus'y ilnz'y), 171. 
But (22), coni. on the 

other hand : — prep. 

excepting: — n. end of 

any thing. [.See Butt, 

Butch^er (bdoch'ur), 20, 

77. [160. 

Butch'ered (bobch'urd), 
Butch'er-ing (^ibch'-). 
Butch'er-y (booch'-). 
But'-hlnge. 
But'ler. 
But'ler-age. 
But'ment. 
Butt, n. a mark to be 

shot at : — r. to strike 

with the head. [5ee 

But, 160. 1 
Butt'ed. 
But'ter, 170. 
But'tered, 150. 
But'ter-cup, 206. 
But'ter-fly. 
But'ter-y, 170. 
But'tock. 

But'ton {bufn), 149. 
But'toned {but'nd). 
But'ton-ing {but'n-). 
But'tress, 170. 
But'tressed ibut'rest)t 

150. 
But'tresB-ing. 
Bu-ty-ra'ceouB i-ra'- 

shus) [so Sm. Wr. ; 

MU-y^a'shuSi Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Bu-tyr'lc. 



(Ul } 6 a« if» there -, Cboiin foot ; 9 im <n facile } gh a« g <n go } |ha« in this. 



BUTYRINE 



124 



CAKING 



BuHyr-Ine, 152. 

Bu'ty-rofta [so Sm. Wr.; 
dM'y-riM, Wb. Gd. 

Bux'c-o&B. [156.1 

liux'lne, 152. 

Bux'om, 100. 

huf (b%){l7\),v.topur^ 
vUnt^e. [See By, 160.] 

Biiy'tT W-). 

Buy'ini? ( V). 

Buzz, '^2, 175. 

Buz'zanl, 170. 

BuzztsI {buzd)t 150. 

Buzz'ing. 

By (^f, ooUoquiaily 61), 
/wep.through or with, 
Ac. [See Buy, 160.] 

By, or Bye, n. Bome- 
thing aside fVom the 
main subject. [See 
Bye, 160.] 

Bye, n. a village. [See 
By, 160.] 

By'-gdnc, 206, Exc. 4. 

By'-law. 

By 8' sine, 152. 

By»'8u» (L.). 

By'word {-wurd). 

By-zan'tian {-ghan). 

Byz'an-tlne, a. ic n. [so 
Wr. ; hyz-an'tin, Gd. 
156.] 



c. 

Cab, 10. 

Ca-bal',n. ft V. 121. 
Cab'a-Ia, 72. 
Cab'al-iara {-izm\ 136. 
Cab'al-i8t. 
Cab-al-lBt'ic, 100. 
Cabal iafic-al, 108. 
Ca bal'Ier, 170. 
Cab'al-Iiiie, a. & n. 82. 
Cab'a-ret (^kah'a-r^ or 

kah'a-ret) [so Wr. ; 

kab'a-rdj Sm. ; kab'a- 

rety Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Cab'bage, 70, 170. 
CabMn, 170. 
CabMned (-Iwd), 150. 
Cnb'i-uct, 170. 
Cab'in-ing. 
Ca-Mr'i an, 78. 
CabTr'ic. 
Ca'ble, 104. 
Ca'bled (ifca'6W), 183. 
Ca'bling. 
Caboose' (121) [Cam- 

boose, Cobooae, 

203.] 



Cab'ot-age. 
Cab-rMei' (Fr.) (kab- 

Cab'ums {-urm). 

Cao'a- " 

Ca' 




Cach'a-Iot {kash'orlot) 
[bo Wr. ; kach'a4otf 
Wb. Gd. 166.] 

Cache fFr.) (kaah), n. a 
holeang in the ground 
for concealing and 

f reserving provisions 
See Cash, 160.] 

Ca-chet'ic (-*e*'-), 100. 

Ca-chet'ic-al (-*e*'-),108. 

Ca-chex'y (ka-tex'y) 
[so Sm. Wr. Wb. Ga.; 
JtaJf dt-«y, Wk. 165.] 

Cach-in-na'tion (Xroit-). 

Cach'o-long (kash'-). 

Ca<iqwf( Fr.) (te^«JL-'). 

Cack'er-el. 

Cac'kle Ckakll), 1(H. 

Cac'kled {jkak'ld), 150, 

Cac'klcr. [183. 

Cnc'kllng. 

Cac-o-chym'lc (-Jtim'-). 

Cac-o -chym'lc-alf -JWm'-) 

Cac'o-chym-y {-Jnm-y), 

Gac-o-de'mon. 

Cac-o-e'thes (L.) (^4hiz)i 
113. 

Ca-cog'ra-phy. 

Ca-col'o-gy. 03. 

Cao-o-phon'ic, 100. 

Cac-o-phon'io-al, 108. 

Cao-o-pho'ni-ofis. 

Ca-ooph'o-ny, 108. 

Cao-o-tech'ny (-Wf-). 

Ca-cot'ro-phy. 

Cac-ta'ceous {-ihnui), 

Cac'tus. 

Cad, 10. 

Ca-aav'er-otts. 

Cad'dlcc(ifcad'it) [Cad- 
dis, 203.] 

Cad'dis [so spelled in- 
variiU)ly when it 
means a kind of rib- 
bon ; but, in the sense 
of a caae-'ioarm, it is 
written also Cad- 
dice, 203.] 

Cad'dow, 101. 

Cad'dy, 03. 

Cade, 23. 

Ca'dence, 100. 

Ca'denoed {-derut), 150. 

Ca'den9-ing, 183. 

Ca-det', 121. 

Ca'dew (ka'du). 



Cadge ikqf)j 45. 
Cadg'er (ix^'«r)[BO Sm 

Wt. Wb. Gd. J kei'ur, 

Wk. 166.] 
Ca'dl (At.). 
Ca-dil'lao. 
Cad-me'an, 110. 
Cad'mi-a. 
Cad'ml-um, 160. 
•Cad-n-cc'an [so Sm. 

Wr.; ka-du'c€-an^Wh. 

Gd. 155.] 
Ca-du'ceus(h.) (kehdu'- 

shits) [so Wr.; ka-du'- 

ahe-uij Wk. Sm. ; ka- 

du'ce-u8,Wh,Gd. 165.] 
Ca-du'oo&s. 
Cas'cum (se'cum). 
[Cesarean, 203. — 

See Cesarean.] 
CAs-pi-tose' (**«-)• 
Cie-su'ra (^ae-zu'ra) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr j sezu'- 

ra, or te-«u'rat Gd. 

155.] [Cesnra,Sm. 

203.1 
C«-«u'ral (ae-zu'rat). 
Cafi (Fr.) (to^jfa). 
Caf-fe'io, 100. 
Caf-fe'Ine [Caffein, 

203.] 
Carfre {hafur), 1«4. 
Cag[Keg,203.] 
Cage, Z\. 
Caged, 150, 183. 
Cao^'ing (i-4/'-). 
CvSiier (*>.) (*«'«-»«) 
so Sm. Wr. j ka^fr', 

~d. 165.J 
Cahoot'. 
[Caic, 203.— 5m 

Caique.] 
[Caiman. 203. — iSte 

Cayman.] 
Cairn (kirn), 
Cais'son [so Sm. Gd.; 

ka-toon'^, Wr. 155.1 

[Cai s BO o n , Sm.203j 



{S 



' When ipelled caif- 
toon^ Smart pronounce* it 
ka-toon. 

Cai'tiff, 23. 

Csj'e-put, 100. 

Ca-jolc'. 

Ca-lolcd', 150, 183. 

Ca-jorer. 

Ca-lol'er-y. 

Ca-jol'ing. 

Cake 23. 

Caked (k&kt), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Cak'ing, 183. 



a, e, 5, 6, u, y, lang ; «, ?, T, 6, tl, f , short ; S ru {n far, a m <n fiwt, kaain 



CALAB.\SH 



125 



CALUMNIATORY 



Oal'a-tMMh. 

Oal'a-boose, 160. 

OJ-tt-nuui'co (-mang'ko) 

Cal'a-ma-ry, /2. 

C«l'ani-bac. 

Cal-«-mirer-ofis, 106. 

Cml'a-mlne Tbo Sra. Wb. 
Gd. ; kal'a-mlnj or 
kal'a-min, Wr. 155.] 

Cara-mite. 

Ca-lam'i tofiB. 

C"a lam'i-tf . 108, 100. 

Cara-mus [L. ol. Cala- 
mi'^ Kog. pi. Cal'a- 

Ca lashS 121. 
C'al'car. 
ralcar-atc. 
C'*l-ca'^e-oal^ 109. 
Cal'ne-at-ed [so Sra.Wr. 
Wb. Gd.; kal'$he-4U- 
edy Wk. 134, 155.] 
Cal'oe-don. 
[Calcedonr, 203.— 

See Chalceaonv.] 
Cal-ce'i-form, 100. 
Cal-rifer-ottii, 108. 
CM'ci-form, 109. 
Cal-cin'a-ble (164) [so 
Sm. Wb. Od.; kfU- 
rtn'abl^ or kal' si-no- 
6/, Wr. 156.] 
Cal-d-na'tion, 112. 
Cal-dn'a-to-rT, 8ft. 
Cal-cine', or Cal'dne [so 
Gd.;to/-»ln',Wk.Sm. 
Wr. 155.] 
Oal'dte. 

Cal'd-am [to Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; kartKe^mt Wr. 
134, 155.] 
'Oalc'-sin ter [no Gd.: 
kalk-^n'tur, Wr. 155.1 
Oalc'-spar, 224. 
Calc'-tftff. 
Cal'en-la ble, IM. 
f:al'ca-la-ry, 72. 
Cal'culate. 
ral'cn-lat-ed, 183. 
Cal'cu lat-ing. 
ral^cu la'tion, 112. 
Cal'cM iHt Tve, 84. 
(^'cu Lir-or. 
r'al'cu la-to-ry, 86. 
Cal'culus rL.pl. Cal<m- 
li (uBOci when the 
word has iti medical 
.lenae of a morbid con- 
cretion) ', Eng. pi. Cal- 
oalasea (wed when 
the word mcann a 
method of computa- 
tion)^ 108.] 



Cai'dron, 17. 

Ca-Uche' ( Fr. ) {ka4d8h') 

Cal-e-do'ni-aD, 109. 

Cal-e-fa'cient i-fa'shent) 

Cal-e-fao'tion. 

Cal-e-fac'to-ry, 86. 

Cai'em-bourg (Fr.) 
i-boorp). 

Cal'en-dar, n. a register 
of the year. [See Cal- 
ender. 100.] 

Cal'en-aer,n.a hot press 
for cloth: — v. to 
dress, as cloth, by hot 
pressing. [5ee Calen- 
dar, 100. J 

Cal'en-dered (-(l«rrf),150 

Cal'en-dcr-ing. 

Cal'cn-drer. 

Cal'cnds {-endz), 136. 

Cal'en-ture. 

Ca-les'oence. 

CiOf {kdf) (162) [pi. 
Calves (Jkdvz), 193.1 

CalM-ber, or Cal'l-bre 
Qeal'irbur) [so Wr. 

oar Walker and Wtb- 
>tcr ffire thii word only in 
the flrBt apelUng. Smart 
ipella it caliber, when it 
meani the bore of a gtuij 
and catibri', when it meane 
mental cauacity. In the 
flrBt Torm he prononnccc it 
kari-fMor, and in the leo* 
ond ta-k^br. 

Cal'ice (-i«), 169. 
Cal'i-co [pi. CaTi-ooefl, 

192.1 
[Calif, 203.— 5te« Ca- 

Uph.] 
[Califate, 203. — STm 

Caliphate.] 
Calipash' or Cal'i- 

Msh [kal-i-pash' t Sm. 

Wr. J kal'iijoshy Wb. 

Gd. 155.] [Calli- 

pash.203.] 
Cal-i-pcc', or Calfi-pee 

[kali-pt', 8m. Wr.: 

kal'ipe, Wb. Gd. 156.1 

[Callipee,203.] 
CaiM-pers (-purz)t 78, 

136rCallIpers,202.] 

CalMph-ate [Califate, 
Kalifate,203.] 

Cal-is-thenac Inot Cm- 
lis'then-ic, 163.][Cal- 
Iisthenlo,2a3.] . 

Cal is-thcn'ics. 

Cal'i-ver. 



[Calix,203. — 5MCal 

jx.] 
Calk (kawk) (148, 161, 

162) [Caulk, 2U3.] 
Cftlk, 161. 
Cilked ikawkt). Note C, 

p. 34. 
CAlic'er (itotrlr'er). 
Cal'kin, or CtlkMn 

(kal'kin, or kawk'in) 

[so Wr. ; kal'kinj vul> 

srarly katck'in^ Sm. ; 

)batrJb'f*n,Wb.Gd.l55.] 
Caik'ing(ifcoirit'»iiflr),102. 
can, 17, 172. 
CAlled, 150. 
Cail'er. 

Cal-lig'ra-pher. 
Cal-U-graph'ic, 109. 
Cal-li-graph'ic-al, 108. 
Cal-lig'ra-phist. 
Cal Ug'ra-phy, 108. 
CaU'ing. 
Cal-li'o-pe, 170. 
[CaIIipash,203.— 5ee 

Calipash.] 
[Callipee, 203. — 5ee 

Calipee.] 
[Callipcrs,203.— 5e« 

Calipers.] 
[Callisthenic, 203. 

— See Calisthenlc] 
Cal los'l-ty, 78, 169. 
Cal'lofis. 
Cal'lOw, 170. 
Calm (Xrtfm), 162. 
Calmed (kdrnd), ISO. 
Calm'er (kdin'-). 
Calm'ing {kdm'-). 
Ca-log'ra-phy, 108. 
Cal'o-mel. 
Ca-16r'ic [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd.j ka-U/rik, 0m. 

155.1 
Cal-o-riPic, 109. 
Ca-ldr-i-n-ca'tion. 
Cal-o rim'e-ter, 108. 
Ca-l6r-i mo'tor [so Gd. ; 

ka-ldr'i-mo-tort Sm. ; 

kal-ori-mo'tor, Wr. 

165J 
Cal'o-tvpe, 170. 
Ca-loy'er. 
Calp, 10. 
Cal'trop. 
Ca-lum'ba. 
Cal'u-met, 89. 
Ca-lom'ni-ate, 78. 
Ca-lum'ni-at-ed, 183. 
Ca-lum'ni-at-ing. 
Ca-lum-ni-a'tion, 112. 
Ca-lom'nl-at-or. 
Ca-lam'ni-a-to-ry, 86. 



ftU i %a»in there ; <M> <u <n foot \^aiin fkoile ; gh a« g <n go ; th a« 'n this. 

II* 



CALUMNIOUS 



126 



CANONIC 



Ca-lum'ni-otts. 
Cal'nmny, U3. 
CaI'va-ry, "2. 
Ciilve (k<tv)t 162. 
Calved ikdvd), 150. 
Calv'lnff (kdv*-), IKl. 
Cal'vin-isni (-imi), 133, 

Cai'vIn-lHt. 
Cal vin-ist'lc, 100. 
Cal-vlu ist'ic-al, lfl«. 
Calx (L.) [L.pl. Calcfn-j 

Eni^. pi. CalxoB, HK] 
Calyc'inal [bo Wb. 

Gd.; tol-i-«'mi/,Wr. 

Cal'v-iane [so Wr. Wb. 
Go. ; kcUyaiUy Sm. 
155.1 

Cal'y-cle {kaVi-kl)y 1(H. 

Cal'y-clcMl (ita/'»-W</), l«3 

Ca-lyc'u-late. 

Ca-lyc'u-Ut-od. 

Ca-lyp'tra [Calyptcr, 
ao3.J 

Ca-lyp'trl-forra. 

Ca'lyx [L. pi. CaVy-cB» 
i-9lz)\ Eng. pi. Ca'- 
lyx-os, 198.] 

Cam (10), n. a contriv- 
ance to produce al- 
ternating motion. [iS'm 
Cham, mi.] 

Ca-ma'ieu (-mo'yoo), 171. 

Cam'ber. 

Cam'ber-lng. 

Cam'bI-alTl09- 
Cam'bist. 
Cam'bi-um. 
Cam-booBe'[C a b o o B e, 

203.] 
[Cambrel, 203. — 5ee 

Gambrel.] 
Cam'bri-an. 
Cam'bric. 
Came, 23. 
Cam'el, 170. 
Ca-meMe-on, 100. 
Ca-mcl'o-pard, or Cam'- 

el-o-pard [so Wr. Gd.; 

ka-mel'o-pardy Wk. j 

ham'el-o-pard, 8m. 

165.] 
Cam'e-a, 170. 
Cam'e-ra. 
Cam-e-ra-llBt'le. 
Cam-c-ra-list'lcB. 
Cam'er-at-ed. 
Cam-er-a'tion. 
Cam-iB-ade'. 
Cam-i-Ba'do. 
CamM-Bat ed. 
Cam'let. 



[C a m o m 1 1 e, 203.— See 

Chamomile.] 
Ca'mofiB. 
Camp, 10. 
Cam-pag'nol. 
Cam-paTgn' (-pdti')t 1^ 
Cam-paign'er (-pAn'-), 
Cam-paiPi-form, 100. 
Cam pa-ni'KK -n«'/«),163. 
Cam-pa-nil'i -form, 
r^am-pa-nol'o-gist. 
Cam-pa-nol'o-gy, 108. 
Cam -pan'u -late. 
Cam-pen'tral. 
Cam-pos'tri-an. 
Cam-phcnc' [bo Wr. ; 

XMzm77n,Sm. Wb.Gd. 

155.] 
Cam'pho-gen. 
Cam'phor. 
Cam'phor-ate. 
Cam'phor-at-ed. 
Cam'phor-at-ing. 
Cam'pi-on, 100. 
Can ( 10), n. a veBBel for 

liquor : — r. to be able. 

[See Khan, 100.] 
Ca'naan-ite (,-nan-), 171. 
Ca-naan-it'ish (-nan-), 
Ca-na'dl-an, ino. [183. 
Canaille (Fr.) {ka^U'U) 

[HoSm.;iL-a-nA/',Wk. 

Wr. 154, 155.] 
Can'a-Un. 
Ca-nal'. 
[Canal-coal, 203.— 

See Canncl-ooal.] 
Can-a-lic'u-late. 
Can-a-lic'u-lat-ed. 
Ca-na'ry. 
Can'ccl. 
Can'ccl-late. 
Can'ocl-lat-ed. 
Can-cel-la'tion, 112. 
Can'oelled l-sdd) [C an- 

celed, Wb. Gd. 208. 

— See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Can'oel-ling [Cancel- 

ing,Wb. (>d.203.] 
Can'oer. 
Can'ccr-ate. 
Can'cer-at-ed. 
Can-«cr-a'tion. 
Can'ocr-ite. 
Can'cer-ofiB. 
Can'cri-form (kang'-)M 
Can'crTne {kemg'-). 
Can'crite {hing'-). 
Can-de-Wonim fL.) 

• [L. pi. Can-d€4a'ora \ 

£ng. pi. Can-dela'- 

brums, 106.] 



Can'dent. 
Can-des'oenoe, 171. 
Can'did, a. honeBt. [Set 

Candied, IGO.l 
Can'di-da-cy, 171. 
Can'di-date, 78, 100. 
Cau'died {-did\ a. in- 

omsted with auL'-ar. 

[See Candid, 160.1 
Can'dle, 104. 
CanMle-mas, 180. 
Can'dor [Candour. 

8m. 100, 'JUJii.] 
Can'dy, 03. 
Cane, 23. 
Caned, 160, 183. 
Ca-nic'u-lar. 
CanM-cole. 
Canine', 121, 156. 
Can'lng, 183. 
Can'iB-ter, 170. 
Can'ker (ton^'-), M. 
Can'kered ikang'kurd)t 

160. 
CanHcer-ing (tang'-). 
Can'ker-oQs {kang'-). 
Can'ker-rash, 206, 

Exc. I. 
Can'ker-y (kang*-). 
Can'nel-coal [Canal- 

ooal,203.] 
Can'nl-bal, 78, 170. 
Can'ni-bal-ism (-irm). 
Can'non ( 1 70), n. a groat 

gun. [See Canon, 160.] 
Cui-non-ade', n. ft r. 
Can-non-ad'ed, 183. 
Can-non-ad 'ing. 
Can-non-oer', or Can- 

non-ier', 122. 
Can'not, 170. 

ii^ According to "Web- 
■ter and Worcettrr it would 
be more analof^od to vritc 
ecm and not wparateiy. 
But to join them is mor* 
eonniteni with their luual 
pronunciation aa a aiinplv 
word (can'oQ. the two i<> 
haring the cmet dcacnU d 
ln§flC 

Gan'mt-Ior, 80. 

Can'ny, 08, 170. 

Canoe' (noo'), 10. 

Can'on (170), n. a riil^ 
or law. [ See Cannon, 
160.] 

Gatlon (Jbon'yvn) (Sp.), 
n. a deep gorge worn 
by a water-course. 
[See Canant 161.] 
[Canyon, 208.J 

Can'on-esB, 170. 

Ca-non'ic, 100. 



a, e, i, 0, ii, y, long > ft, Ci Yt 5, fi, j^, short ilka$in fkr, kasin fkst, katin 



CANONICAL 



127 



CAPTIOUS 



C«-iioii'1e^, 106. 
Oa-non'i-cate, 73. 
Can'on-idt. 
Cui-on-ist'ic 100. 
C^an-on-T-za'tion, 112. 
Qui'on-izc, 20:i. 
Can'on-ized, 150, 183. 
Can'on-tz-ing. 
Can'o-pled {-pld), 99. 
Can'o-py, «, 170. 
Can'o-py-ing^, 18<5. 
Ca-no'roQs, 125. 
Cant, 10. 
Can-ta'bri-an. 
Can ta-brig'i-an(-6r</'.). 
[Cantalnrer, 20S. — 

See Cantilerer.] 
Can'ta-loupe (^-loop). 
rCantaleup,203.] 
Can-tan'ker-ofis 

i-tang*-). 
Ckm-U'taj or Can-td*ta 
(It.) [so Wr. ; tan-ta'- 
<a, Wk. 8m. ; kan-tdf- 
lOj Gd. 155.] 
Canrta-tri'ce (It.) (-to- 
tri^chi) [BO Wr.;fcan'- 
ta4rig, Gd. 155.] 
C:«nt'ed. 
Ca]i-t«en% 121. 
Can'tel [Cantle, 203.] 
|;Caiiteliver, 203.— 

See Canttlcrer.] 
Can'ter. 

Can'ter-bar-y (-Wr-y). 
Can'tered, 150. 
Can'tcr-ing>. 
OBnUhfirrtt (Gr.) [pi. 
Om-thAr'i^dU {-diz), 
198.J 
Cto'tf-cle, 104. 
Can'ti-late [Cantil- 

late, 203.] 
Can-ti-la'tfon [ C a n t U < 

latlon, 203.] 
Can'ti-le-vcr [ao Wr.; 
kan-tiA^vur, Sm. : 
ion'/t-Jev t(r, Gd.155.] 
rCantallTer, Can- 
telirer, Canti- 
HTer,2Q3.] 
Cant'hig. 
Caii'Ue(164) [Cantel, 

203.] 
Oan'to [pi. Can'tda 
^(-/ff2),192.] 
Can'ton. 
Can'ton-al. 

Can'toned (fttiul), 160. 
Caa'ton-ing. 
Cm'tOD-ize, 202. 
Can'ton-meiit. 
Cm'yaa, ». a eoarse 



doth of hemp or of 
flax. [See (3anvaB8, 
160.] 

Can'vaas, v. to exam- 
ine:— to diacasB: — 
to solicit votcB. [iiee 
Canras, 160.] 

Can'raBBed, 150. 

Can'raBB-er. 

Can'vaBB-lng. 

Ca'ny, 93. 

Can'yozi [Canon, 203.] 

Can-zofni fit.), 163. 

Can-zo>net'. 

Caout'choac(^oo'cft<9&it) 
[bo 8m. Wr.; ko</- 
chookj Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Caont'chou-dne {koo'' 
choosin). 

Cap, 10. 

Ca-pa-bil'ity, 106, 169. 

Ca'pa-blc, 164. 

Ca-pa'douB (-«AfM), 112. 

Ca-pa9'i-tate. 

Ca-paf 'i-tat-ed, 183. 

Ca^pag'i-tat-ing. 

Ca-pay'i-ty, icg, 169. 

Ca-pftr'i-son, 78, 169. 

Carpftr'i-aoned {-tund), 
150. 

Ca-pir'i-Bon-ing. 

Cape, 23. 

Cap'e-Ion, 169. 

Ca-pcI'la, 170. 

Cap'el-let [ao Wb. Gd. ; 
kap'd-et^ or ka-peVet, 
Wr. 155.) 

Ca'per. 

Ca'pered (-purd)^ 160. 

Ca'per-er. 

Ca'per-lng. 

Cap-11 lalre' (-/«r), 154. 

Ca-pil'la-ment. 

Cap-il-iar'i-ty, 170. 

Cap'il-la-ry, or Ca-pil'- 
la-ry [bo Wr. Gd.; 
kapfU-OrTyi Wk. Sm. 
155.1 

Ca-plTll-fonn, 78, 169. 

CapM-tal, a. (169) relat- 
ing to the head : — n. 
the upper part of a 
pillar. {See Capitol, 
160.] 

Cap'i-tal-iBt. 

Cap'i-tate. 

Cap-T-ta'tlon. 

Cap'i-tol, n. a public ed- 
ifice fbr a legiBlative 
body. [See Capital, 
160.] 

Cap-1-to'li-an. 

Cap'l-tol-ine. 



Ca-pifn-lar, 80. 

Ca-plt'u-la-ry, 72. 

Ca-pit'u-late. 

Ca pit'u-lat-iKi, 183. 

Ca-pit'u-Iat-lng. 

Ca-pit-u-la'tion. 

Ca-pit'u-Iat-or. 

Ca-pit'a-liim. 

Ca-pi'yi {-pe'vt) [Co 

paibtf,203.—,$ce Co- 
paiba.] 
Cap'lin. 

Cap'no-man-cy. 
Cap'no-mor. 
Ca'pon Ika'im), 149. 
Ca-poch' {-pooch*) [Ca- 

pouch,203.] 
Caponniere (Fr.) {kap- 

o-ner') [Capo nie re, 

203.1 
Ca-poV. 
Capote'. 
Ca-poach'(-poocA')[C a - 

poch,203.] 
Chapped Ocapt)^ 176, Note 

C, p. 34. 
Cap'per, 176. * 

Cap'ping. 
Ca-pre'o-late [so Wr. ; 

ka'pre-o-Utj Sm. ; 

kap're-o-mt, Wb. (Jd. 

155.1 
Ca:prioe'(-»r«<') [80 Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd.; kor 

prfs', or kttp'rest Wk. 

156.1 
Ca-pri'dons (-pri8h'u9\ 

112, 231, Exc. 
Cap'ri-com, 78, 169. 
Cap'rid. 

Cap-ri-fl-ca'tion. 
Cap'ri-form. 
Ca-prig'e-nofiB (-pr(/'-)« 
Cap'rine, or Ca'pnn«, 

[BO Wr.; kap'riut Gd.; 

la'prlnj Sm. 155.1 

Cap'ri-ole [bo Wr.Wb. 

Gd. ; ka'pri-dlf Sm. 

165.] 
Cap'ro-mj^B. 
Cap'ai-cum, 78, 169. 
Cap-size', r. 
Cap'size, n. 
Cap' Stan. 
Cap'Bu-lar, 72, 80. 
Cap'su-la-ry, 72. 
Cap'sn-late, 73. 
Cap'sn-lat-ed. 
Cap'sule. 
Cap'tain (tin), 96. 
Cap'taln-cy i-ttn), 160. 
Cap'tion. 
Cap'tiofis (-«Aua). 



ftU ; 6 Of tfa tbere ; ^ cm in foot ; qa$ in facile ; gh oa g tn go ; tb ^ '^ this. 



CAPTIVATE 



128 



CARPET 



Oip'ti-rate, 73. 
Cap'ti-viit cd, 183. 
Cap'tl-vat-ing. 
Cap-ti va'tion. 
Cap'tlve, W. 
Cap-tiv'i-tv, 108, 160. 
Cap'tor, 88. 
Capt'urc (-yur), 91. 
Capt'urcd (-yurd)^ 150, 

183. 
Capt'ur-ing (-vwr-), 01. 
Cap-u-chln' (-shln')t 48. 
Cap'u-Iot. 
Car, 11. 
CAr'a-bme [so Wb. Gd.; 

karfa-bint Wr. 155.] 

[Carbine, 203.] 
CftT-a-bi-ncer', 122. 
CAr'ack rCarac,203.] 
C&r'a-cai, 170. 
C&r'a-<x>le [Caracol, 

2a3.] 
Car'a-co-ly [C a r a c o 1 i, 

203.] 
[Cara^hecn, 203. — 

SW, Carraijeen.] 
Ca^-mel [Caromel, 

2a3.] 

C&r'at, n. a weight of 
four graina. [See Car- 
rot, KW.l 

Cir-a-ran', or Cftr'a-van 
(170) r Wr-a-rau', Wk. 
»m. wr. ; kdr'a-van, 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Cllr-a-yan-eer'. 

Cftr-a-van'sa-ry (72) 
[CaraTanacra, 

Cftr'a-vel [Carvel, 

203.] 
Cir'a-way(170) [Car- 

raway ,2a3.J 
Carabine {so Sm. Gd. ; 

kar-bWy Wk. ; kar*- 

6ln, or kar-bln', Wr. 

155.j[Carabine,203] 
Car-bl-neer'. 
Car'bdn. 
Car-bon-a'ceous (^hut)t 

112. 
Car'bon-ate, 73. 
Car'bon-at-ed. 
Car-bon'ic. 109. 
Car-bon-irer-ouB, 108. 
Car-bon-1-za'tioQ. 
Car'bon-ize, 202. 
Car'bon-izcd, 160, 183. 
Car'bon-iz-ing. 
Car'boy. 

Car'bun-eIer-5uii^-itO,M 
Car'bun-clea (^-bfing-kld) 
Car-biin'cu-lar(-*t«nflr'-). 



Car-bim-«a-la'tioii 

{-tmng-). 
Car'bu-ret-ted [C a r b u - 

reted, Wb. Gd.203.] 
Car'oa-Jou (-Joo), 
Car'ca-net. 
Car'eaaa [Careaae, 

203.] 
Car-ol-no'ma. 
Car-d-nom'a-tofia. 
Card, 11. 
Car'aa-mJne, 152. 
Car'da-mom. 
Card'ed. 
Card'er. 
Car'dl-a. 
Car'dl-ac, 78. 
Car-di'ao-al (108) [bo 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

karfdi-ak-aliSm. 155.] 
Car-dl-ag'ra-phy, 108. 
Car-dl-aPgl-a. 
Car'dl-al-g-y. 
Car'dl-nal, 78, 169. 
CarMi-nal-ate. 
Card'lnjr. 
CaHdi-oid. 
Car-di-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Car-di'tla. 
Car-doon', 121. 
Care (Wr), 14. 
Cared (it^rrf), 165, 183. 
Ca-rcen'. 
Ca-reen'agc, 169. 
Ca-rceneo, 150. 
Ca-reen'ing. 
Ca-reer', ifl. 
Carc'ful (ktr'/Sol), 
Ca-reaa'. 
Ca-rcsacd' (kthrcBf), 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ca-ress'inff. 
Ca'rct, 49, N. 
Ctfre'wdm f WH). 
Car'go [pi. Car'goea, 

192.] 
Car'ffooae. 
Car'Ib. 

C&r-ib-be'aQ, 110. 
Cdr'i-bou {4>oo) (Fr.) 



[Cariboo, 203.1 
Cftr'i-ca-ture, n.(lOl) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

kdr-i-ka-tilr*, Sm. ; 

k&r-i-ka^hHr'y Wk. 

134, 155.] 
Car-i-ca-ture', r. 122,161. 
Car-I-ca-tured', 165, 183. 
Cfir-i-oa-tur'ing-. 
Cftr-i-ca-turMst. 
(^ftr-l-cog-'ra-phy, 108. 
Car'l-cofiB, 170. 
Ca'rl-ea (-f«), 171. 



Cftr'Illon[8oWb. Gd.; 

ka-rWan, Wr. 155.] 
C&r'i-nate, 16tf. 
C4r'i-nat-ed. 
Car'insr (Wr*-), 183. 
CAr'i-olc. 
[C a r i o p 8 i 8, 203.— 5ef 



Caryopsia.] 
Ca-ri-oa'i-ty, 



108,109. 
Ca'ri-ofia, 78. 
Car'llnga (-Ungz)^ n. pi. 
Car'lock. 
Otr-lo-yiii'el-an. 
Car'manj 196. 
Car'mel-itc, 83. 
Car-min'a-tlw, 84, 170. 
Car'mine, or Car-mine' 

[so Wr. ; ter'mln, 

VR). Gd.; iar-mfM% 

Wk. Sm. 155.] 
Car'nagc, 169. 
Car'nal. 

Car-naia-ty, 108. 
Car-na'tion, 112. 
C^-na'tioned (-^JbtMwf). 
Our-neFian (-yon), 51. 
Car'ne-o&a. 
CSar'ney, 98, 160. 
CJar-ni-fi-ca'tion. 
Or'ni-f fed, 186. 
C:ar'ni-5, 78, 94. 
Car'ni-fy-inff. 
Car'ni-valTTeo. 
Car-nir'o-ra, n. pi. 
C^ar-niy'o-rofiB, 108. 
Car-noae'. 

Car-noB'i-ty, 106, 169. 
Car'ol, 170. 
Cftr-o-iln'i-an, 100. 
Car'oUed (-«^ (150) 

[Caroled, Wb.Gd. 

203.1 
Cftr'oI-lli« rCaro- 

llneTWb. Gd. a03.1 
C»r-o-Iyt'lc [Carolil- 

ic,203.] 
[Car omal , 203. — SIm 

Outunel.J 
(^-rot'ld, 170. 
Ca-rona'al (-rottz'-), 72, 
Ca-rouse' (-row*'). 
Carp, 11. 
Car'pal, 72. 
Car-pa'thi-«n. 
Carped {karpD^ Note C, 

p. 34. 
C^r'pel. 

Car'pel-la-ry, 72. 
C^-pel'lum, 170. 
Car'pen-ter. 
Car'pen-try, 03. 
Carp'cr. 
Carpet. 



a, e, i, 9, a, y, long \ ft, ^, Y, d, tt, ^, short ; Viasin far, koi in fkst, ft cm in 




CARPETED 
Car'pcl-ed. 

C>r'phol'a-g7. 

Cuni'iiiE. 
Dir'pi>-nie, 83. 
Ca-poL'o-gifl, IDS. 
Cur-pol'o-gy, in*. 
CifFA-nwa (-ffkin) 

[Ct.rr.w.T.aa—SM 
Canwtj.y 



CA8T0SEC/M 



(-rtfl. 1 



Ctr'rUn 

car-ri-er, i,u. 
C»r'rl4n, 170. 
Or'rani. 

Clr'rot ( 170), M. a dUd 

[.S«0»'«t, IflO.] 
(Sr'rot-)', 93. 
dt'rT, 170. 
Cir'D-ill, M«, Exc. 3 
CWtjlag. 



Carte^iafi 



. . ,1*') r«o Sn 

tartbltncli', Wi 
<tiirt-UaiuA',Gd. 1 



Csrtel'.>i.(ioWk.Bm, 
Wr. ( kar-M', or jtar'- 

Mj Gd. las.] 

Cu'^e'Btu (lAon), 112. 
C»r-lhs^[ln'l*ii. 
Car'ttu-nillie, 82. 
Cu-tbu'sUa f-z*nn). 
rVIl.Uee. 1*. 
rar-tt-l^l-BOBi (-A</'-l. 

Car-b^n-phcr, lOB. 
Cir-to-grmph'ii:. 
Cjir-to-B™pb'fo-«l . 
(^■toffri-phj. 



Ir'n^k^.' 



le[*M-*i),lH. 



Cu-red, IW, 183. 



DU-y-it'Is, W. 

Cir r-*t'i-<l«a (-<Ui), H. 

Cb-VWh-Tl-U'eeona 
l-af-U-a'tkiu), 171, 

CKr-jr^phrl'laDi, or 
Car-r-opb'Tl-louii[ Sh 
AdniopliTUanii.l 

ar-T-opiila, or Ci-ry- 
0[i>.l. [»Wr.ii.r. 
y-ap'm, Brn. ; Hl-ry- 
qp'iii, Gd, IK.I 

Cu'«-bel, 
CmKsde', IZI. 
Cu-a-rtl*U, 170. 

Cued (ttit). UO, 183, 

Not* C, p. 31. 
Cue'hird-en (-ikanl-n). 
Cuerhai^-eDKl (-Aord- 

Cue'turd-cn-ingt-ikard- 



(In Ihe H 



Ciiqua 



iie[C.I 



n.WlJ I ( 



CkoVft. 

t(?.ik.M3.1 
Cas'aa-dn, or Cu-n'd« 
[Wo^ib, Wk. Sm. 
Wb.Gd.iliu4'dci,Dr 
itnt'a.({a, Wr. 155.) 

vi,aos.] ' 

Cm'm,»«, or Cw-M'vn 
■ t&n'iww, Gd, ; kai- 

I IM.l' iaM.i 

rCmi.di.Caiaivl 
Cai'iia (jbuft'M) [m 
Sm, Wb. Gd. i tofV- 
ift*a, Wk, Wr. 156.1 
CM-sld'e-olli. 
C.i'.Hlo.iij, 170. 
Cm'«1 mere [m Wr.Wb. 
,Lrd, ; kat-i-ntr', Bm. 

^M-.r-o-pe'a. 10», 170. 



Cut'mit-^d, I 

CMtv'meBt{kas'-nunt,OT ' 
toj'niflif) {kit'meni, 
Wk, 8m. Wr. ; M.'- 
mml. Wb, Gd. IM.l 
C*,'tK-tMt [lOWb. Gd.;' 
lsa'«.u, or fci'tft* 
Wr, 1 kB'ih'iu, I 



""'" "'»■] ""■ 



C»-»hew' ffaj-.ftoo'), or 

l»«i', Wk, Sm.i ia. 

t(i.(i''ii, Wb. G^. im'.! 

lioWb.Qa.itaiStr-, 
Wk. Bm. Wr. tSS.J 

C»-»!il*r' (tojiir'), r. 
IWk.Sm.WT.-.ktuh- 
ir', Wb. Gd. 1S4.I j 

Cn-iihl^Kd' l-tWnJ'], 

Ca-ihlfr'liiE (.aJklr'-). 

C»h'ineT«(l7l)rioWl>. 
Od.i liuA'nilr, or 
tiulh-n«r', Wr. I6S.1 

Cub'oo. 



, ' Cm-U']1-«il 

. C««.U-ll«'JJrC»>'U-IKt 
I \taM-la-ncl',Sin.,k^'- 
1 ln.i«<, Wk. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. IK.] 



Cai'll-gmle,78, 109. 
CM'tl-itit-ing. 



, Cint'-i-ron (-1*™). 
Cai'lle jtou'i), 102, IM 
Cri>'tl«d (kiu'Li), 
f;^'t!f rj- (fcu-I-n,). 



bUj tof taUMni «i(utnft>atitatlnftetle',2bius'tgo:l])af fnthU. 



CA8TORINE 



130 



CAUSEY 



Cls'to-rfnc [C a ■ t o r 1 D, 

203.] 
CiB'tor-oil, 200, Exc. 3. 
CAB -tra-mc -taction. 
CAs'trato. 
CAn'trat-ed, 
CA8'trat-iu£^. 
CAB-tra'tiou. 
C&8'trfl[Ke litre 1,203] 
Cau'u-al {kazh'-), 47. 
CaB'u-al-ty (kazh'-), 171. 
Cag'u-ist {kazh'-). 
Cus-ii-lBt'ic (kazh-), 109. 
Cn8u iHt'ic-al (.kazh), 

lOS 
Chh'u l8t ry (i-aJsA'-), 171 
Cat, 10. 
Cat-a-(iiuii'tic. 
Cat-a^hrc'Blii {kre'-), 
Cnt-a-clires'tlc (Jtrc*'-). 
Cat-a-chrea'tic-al. 
Cat'a-cly8ra(-««m),136. 
Cat'n-comb ritOm), 102. 
Cat-a-cou8'ticA, 28. 
Cat-a-di-op'tric. 
Cat-a dl-op'trlo'al. 
Cat'a-<iromc. 
Cat-a/ai'co (It.). 
Cat^t-falquef (Fr.) 

Cat-a<r-niatMo. 
Cat'a-CTaph, 127. 
Cat'a-Ian. 
Cat-a-lcc'tic, 109. 
Cat-ti-Icp'sls. 
Cat'a-iep-sv, M». 
Cat-a-lep'tic. 
Cat'a-lrtgue, 87. 
Cat'a-loj;iic<l (-logd),\^. 
Cat'a-ldgu-ing i-log)i 

183* 
Cat-a-lo'ni-an, 109. 
Ca-tal'pa, 72. 
Ca-taI'y-Bl8, 171. 
Cat-a-lyt'lc, 109. 
Cat-a-ma-ran', 122. 
Cat-a-me'ni-a. 
Cut-a-mc'ni-al. 
Cnfa-mitc. 
Cat'a-mount. 
Cat-an-ad'ro-moiiR. 
(^at'a-paam (-pozrm), 130. 
Cat-a pelt'io. 
Cat-a-pet'a-lofia. 
Cat-a-phon'ica. 
Cat'a-phract, 35. 
Cat'a-phract-fid. 
Cat-a-phract'ic. 
C:it'a-pla8m(-/)^um),l3G 
Cat'a-pult. 
Cat-a-pultMc, 109. 
Cat'a-rftct. 
Cat-arract'ofis. 



Ca-tHrrh' (-Wr'),lfl2, 171. 

Ca-tarrh'al (-WH). 

Cat'ar-rhine, 1(12. 

Ca-tarrh'otkR (-tar*-). 

Cat a-Btali'ic. 

Ca-taa'ter-iam (Azm). 

Ca-tas'tro-phe, 103, 109. 

Ca-taw'ba. 

Cat'cAU. 

Catch, 10, 44, Note D, p. 

Catched (kaclU). [37. 

Catch'er. 

Catoh'fly, 200. 

Catch'ing. 

Catch'pen-ny. [203.] 

Catch'up [Catsup, 

Cat-e-chet'lc (-*c<'-),171. 

Cat-e-chet'ic-al {-kei'-). 

Cat'e-clilne (-«»). 

Cat'e-chise (ku) (109) 
[Catechize, 202,203] 

Cat'e-chlsed (-klzd)^ 183. 

Cat'e-chis'er (-kiz'-). 

Cat'c-chis-ing {-klz-). 

Cat'e-chism {-kizm), 130. 

Cat-o-cUis'mal (kiz'-). 

Cat'e-chist (-H«n. 

Cat-e^hlat'ic, 10!). 

Cat-e-chist'io-al, 106. 

Cat'e-chu (-ii<). 

Cat-c-<^hu'inen (-ku'-). 

Cat-«-chu-incii'ic (-ku-), 

Cat-c-chu-menMc-al 
i-ku-), 

Cat-e-g6r-€-raat'io. 

Cat-c g6r'ic-al. 

Cttt'e-go-nr, 171. 

Cat-e-na'rf-an, 109. 

Cat'e-na-ry, 72. 

Cat-e-na'tion. 

Ca'ter. 

Ca'tcred, 106. 

Ca'ter-er. 

Ca'tcr-lng. 

Cat'er-pil-lar, 170, 171. 

Cat'er-w&ul. 

Cat'er-wiuled, 105. 

Cat'cr-w&ul-ln^. 

Cates, n. pL 

Cat'fiah, 200. 

Cat'gut. • [n. pi. 

Cat'harp-ings (^ngz)t 

Catharsis. 

Ca-thar'tio, 

Ca-thar'tic-al. 

Ca-thar'tlne [Cathar- 
tin,203.] 

Cat'hftad. 

Ca-the'dra, or Cath'e- 
dra (L.) [ao Wr. ; 
kath'e-dra, Wb. Gd. 
155.1 [See Ex cathe- 
dra.] 



Ca-the'dral. 

Cath'e-ter, 109. 

Cath-«-tom'e-ter, 106. 

Catb'odc [so Sm. Wr. ; 
kat'ady Gd. 1&5.] 

Catli'o lie, 109. 

Ca-thol'l-cism (Km) 
[so Wk. Sm.; ka-thoV- 
i-Hzm^ or katk'oAi- 
tizm, Gd. 155.1 

Cath-o-ll9'I-ty, 109, 171. 

Ca-thol'i<con. 

CatM-lin-lsm (-<zm), 171. 

Cat'Un. 

Cat'Ung. 

Cat'mint. 

Cat'nip. 

Ca-to'ni-an, 109. 

O-top'ter. 

Ca-top'trio, 100. 

Ca-top'tric-al, 106. 

Ca-top'tro-man -cy . 

Ca-top'tron. 

Cat'stick, 200. 

Cat'sup [Catchup, 
203.] 

Cat'tish, 170. 

C^t'tle ikat'tl), 104. 

C&u-ca'sfan {-than). 

Cau'cus, 109. 

C&u'dal. 

C&u'date, 73. 

CUlu'dat-ed. 

C&u'dle, 104. 

Cftu'dled (Irote'dlti), Ifia 

CAu'dUae. 

C&uf, 17. 

[Caufle, 203. — Ste 
Coffle.] 

caught (kawt), 102. 

C&uk, n. [Cawk,203.] 

C&ul ( 17), n. a membrane 
covering the intes- 
tines. [See Call, 100.] 

C&u-lea'cent. 

C&u'li-cle, 1G4. 

C&u'li-cule, 78. 

Cau-lif er-otts, 106. 

C&u'll-flow-«r. 

CAu'li-form, 100. 

C4u'Une(84) [Caalin, 
203.1 

[Caulk, 203. — iSm 
Calk.] 

C&u'sal (-zal), 130. 

Cau-sal'I-ty (-«a/'-), 106. 

CAu'sal-ty {-zal-). 

Cau-aa'tion (-«a'-). 

Cau'sa-tlve (-«a-). 

cause (ktnDZ\ 17. 

caused (ibvir^rf), 150,183. 

Caus'er (Jk(wrz'-). 

Cau'sey {kaw'zy), 06. 



a, S, i, 5, u, y, Umg ; &, e, I, 5, ii, j^, ihort ; ii m <n far, 4 m <n ikst, kaaim 



CAUSEWAY 



131 



CENSORIAL 



Ctn'seyed {haw'zid). 
OLa-«id'io-al {-zid'-). 
Cias'ing ikttwz'-). 
C&us'tio. 
C&ns^ti^'i-ty, 171. 
Cftu'ter-ant. 
Cia'ter-ism (-izm). 
Otu-ter-i-za'tion. 
Ciu'ter-ize, 202. 
Cau'ter-ized, 150, 183. 
Cia'ter-iz-iiig. 
Ciu'ter-y. 
CAa'tion. 

C&a'tion-a-ry, 72. 

C&a'tioned i-shund)tlSO. 

€&a'tk>n-er. 

OLu'tion-ing. 

CAa'tioAs {-shiu). 

CaT-al-cade' [bo Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; kav'aUddj 
Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Car-al-ier', 114, 122, 100. 

CaT'al-rr. 

Ca-Tas8' (Turkish), 121. 

OiTe, 2:1. 

Ca're-at. 

Cared, 150, 183. 

CiT'er. 

CaT'em. 

CiT'emed (-nrnd), 

CaT'em-ofis. 

Car'ea-Bon (170) [Cav- 
ezoD,203.] 

Ca-Tet'to. 

[CaTezon, QfXi. — See 
Careaaon.] 

Ca-riare' {ha^ir'f_OT 
kar-ytr')_ [go Wr. j 
*a-c#r',Wk. Gd. ; kav- 
yhr*^ Sm.] 

0^ Goodrich givn alio 
the ronn CsTiar, which 
he pronounces kxnfi-iMr. 

Otif'i-eOTtL. 

CaT'il, 170. 

Cav'illed_{150) [Cav- 
iled, Wb. Gd. 203.— 
Sm 177 and Note £, 
p. 70.1 

Cav'U-ler [Carller, 
Wb. Gd. 177, 203.1 

CaT'il-lfag VCavil- 
ing,Wb.Gd.l77,203.] 

Car'm, 170. 

CiT'ing, 183. 

CaT'i-ty, 78, 108, 100. 

Ca'ry, 98. 

Caw, 17. 

Cawed, ISO. 

Caw'iii?. 

Cawk[Cauk,203.] 

Cax'oa {kaks'oo). 



CSy-cnne' {knin') [«o 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; Icd- 
yin'y Sm. 155.1 

Cay 'man (196) [Cai- 
man. 203.] 

Ca-zique' (-zekf) [Ca- 
zic,203.] 

Ceaae («e«), 13. 

Ceaaed («e«0» 1^* 183. 

Ceaa'ing. 

Cec-chin' {che-ktn') 
[Chequin, Se- 
quin, Cec bin, 203.] 

Ce'd-ty [BO Sm. Wb. 
Gd.; ae»'i-<y, Wk. ; 
sea'i-ty, or fe'ti-ty, 
Wr. 156.] 

Ce'dar, n. a genus of 
trees. [See Ceder,160.] 

Ce'dared {-dard)y 150. 

Ce'dam. 

Cede, V. to yield. [See 
Seed, and Seid, 1<M).] 

Ced'eT,n.one who cedes, 
or yields. [See Ce- 
dar, 160.] 

Ce-dii'la, 170. 

Ced'ing, 183. 

Ce'drat. 

Ce'drlne [so Sm. Wr. 
Gd. ; se'driih Wk. 
166.] 

Ce'dry. 

Ceil, V. to corer, as the 
upper surftce of an 
apartment. [See Seal, 
and Seel, 160.] 

Ceil'ing, n. the upper 
surf^ of an apart- 
ment. [See Sealing, 
160.] 

Cel'an-dlne, 152. 

Cel'a-ture. 

Cel'e-brate, 109. 

Cel'e-brat-ed, 183. 

Ccl'e-brat-ing. 

Cel^-bra'tion, 112. 

Cel'e-brat-or. 

Ce-leVri-ty. 

Ce-le'ri-ac. 

Ce-l?r'i-ty, 106, 169. 

Cel'er-y, 233. 

Co-lest^ial {4e9t'yaX), 

Cel'es-tln, n. one of an 
order of monks. [See 
Cclestine, 160.] [Cel- 

estlne, Wr. 2030 
Ccl'eB-tlne [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd.; se4es'tinf Sm. 

166.] n. sulphate of 

strontia. [See Celes- 

tln,160.][0elestin, 

203.J 



[Celiac. 203. — ^iee 

Ccoliac.] 
CeFi-ba-cy(169) [so Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; »evi-ba-cy, 

or se-lib'orcyt Gd.l55.] 
Cel'i-bate, n. ft a. 160. 
Cel-i-dog'ra-phv, 108. 
Cell, ft. a small apart- 
ment. [See Sell, KH). ] 
CJel'lar (iVo), n. a room 

under a house, [oi'ee 

Seller, 160.] 
Cel'lar-age, 160. 
Cel'lar-et. 
Cel'lar-lst. 
Cel'lu-lar, 74, 89, 108. 
Cel'lu-lat-ed. 
Cel'lule. 

Cel-lu-lif er-otts, 108. 
CelMu-Une, 82. 
Ccl'lu-lose. 
Celt, 16. 
Celt-i-be'ri-an. 
Celt'ic. 

CeltM-dsm (-»izm). 
Celt'lsh. 
Cem'ent, or Ce-ment', 

n. [aem'ent, Wr. Wb. 

Qd. ; se-ment't Sm. ; 

sefmcnt, Wk. 155.] 
Ce-ment', v. 
Cem-en -taction. 
Ce-ment'a-to-ry. 
Ce-ment'ed. 
Ce-ment'er. 
Ce-ment'ing. 
Cem-en-ti'tiouB {AUW- 

us), 169. 
Cem-e-te'ri-al. 
Cem'e-ter-y. 171. 
Cen'a-to-ry [so Wk.Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; s^nortwr-y, 

Sm. 166.] 
Cen'o-bite, 171. 
Cen-o-bit'ic, 109. 
Cen-o-bit'ic-al, 108. 
Cen'o-bit-ism \-izm). 
Cen-o'bi-um, 169. 
Ce'no-by [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; se'no-by, or »en'- 

o^, Wr. 165.] 
Cen'o-taph, 35, 127, 171. 
Cense, r. to perfiime. 

[S'ec Sense, 100.1 
Censed {senst), 16O. 183. 
Cen'ser, n. a vessel for 

burning incense. [See 

Censor, 160.] 
Cens'ing. 
Cen'sor (88), n. a oen- 

surer. [See Censer, 

160.] 
Cen-so'ri-al, 40, N. 



ftll ; 6 CM in there -, <Sba$%n foot \«ia9in fkcile ; gh a« g in go ; th a« <n this. 



CENSORIOUS 



182 



CHAGREEN 



Gen-80'ri<oai, 160. 

Cen'8u-al, a. relating to 
aoensuB. [See Sensu- 
al, 160.] [164. 

Cen'Bur-a-ble (-«Jkttr-)> 

Cen'Bure (-shur,) 

Cen'surea {-thurd), 

Cen'8ur-er {'»hw). 

Cen'sur-ing (-*Ai«r-)» 

ren'8U8. 

Cent, n. a hundredth 
part of a dollar. [5ee 
Scent, and Sent, 10O.J 

Cent'age. 

Ccn'taur, 171. 

Cen'tau-ry, 171. 

Cen-te-na'ri-an, 160. 

Cen-te-na'rl-oti8. 

Cen'te-na-ry, 72. 

Cen-ten'ui-al, 169, 170. 

Cen-tes'i-mal, 78. 

Cen-tes-i-ma'tion. 

Cen-ti-cip'l-to&B, 160. 

Cen-tin-dofls. 

Ceu-ti-fo'li-ofis. 

Cen'ti-grade, 169. 

Cen'ti-gramme (Fr.). 

Cen-ti-li'tre iTT.){»itng- 
H-le'tr) [Centili- 
ter (8en-tiVi4ur)i 
Wb. Gd. 20}.] 

Cen'time (Fr.) (8ttn^- 
tlm'). 

Cen-tim'e-ter.ioe. 

Cen-ti-mitre{¥T.) (adng- 
ti^ma'tr). 

Cen'ti-ped [Centi- 
pede ( sen'ti-pld) , 

Cent'ner. [203.] 

Cen'to [pi. Cen'toB, 192] 

Cen'to-uism {-nizm)fVm 

Cen'tral, 72. 

Cen'tral-ism (-irm), 133. 

Cen-tral'i-ty. 108, 160. 

Cen-tral-1-za'tion. 

Cen'tral-ize, 202. 

Cen'tral-ized, 183. 

Cen'tral-iz-ing. 

Cen'tre (IM) fC e n t e r , 
Wb. Gd. 2a3. — See 
Note E, p. 70,] 

Cen'tred (-<erd),164,183. 

Cen'tric. 

Cen'tric-al. 

Ccn-tric'i-ty, 160. 

Cen-trif u-gal, 80, 170. 

Cen'tring. 

Cen-trip'e-tal, 160. 

Cen-tro-b&r'ic, 

Cen-ium'vir (L.) [pi. 
Cen4um'vi^lt 108?] 

Centnm'vi-rate. 

Cen'tu-ple, 164. 



Cen-ta'ri-al. 
Cen-tu'ri-on,40,N.; 160. 
Cen'tu-ry, 171. 
Ceph-a-lal'glo, 100. 
Ceph'a-lAl-gy. . 
Ce-phal'io, a. A n. 
Ceph-arli'ti8. 
Ceph-a-lol'o-gyt 160. 
Ce-phal'o-pod [so Sm. 

Wr. ittf-iU'a-pod^ Gd. 

165.] 
Ceph-al-o-pod'io. 




Ce-ra'oeoa8 (shus)^ 112. 
Ce-ram'ie, 100, 170. 
Cdr'a-olne [Ceraein, 

203.] 
Cer'a-Bite,83, 162. 
Ce'rate. 
Ce-rit'ed, 183. 
CCr'a-trine [Cert- 

trin,203.] 
Cer-be're^an, 110, 160. 
Cer'be-rtu (L.). 
Cere, n. the naked Bkin 

that covers the base 

of the bill of some 

birds ; — r. to cover 

with wax. [See Sear, 

Seer, Sere, 160.J 
Ce're-al, 40, N. j 160. 
Cir-e-bel'lum (L.) [pi. 

Ctr-e-bel'la.] 
CPr'e-bral, 166. 
Cir'e-brwn (L.). 
C^re'doth, 206. 
Cere'ment, 171. 
C^r-e-mo'ni-al, 160. 
Cfir-e-mo'nl-otts. 
C^r'e-rao-ny, 171. 
Ce'reofis, a. waxen. 

[See Serious, 160.] 
Cefr^B i-riz) (L.). 
Ce'rine[Cerin,a08.] 
Ce'rite. 
Ce'ri-um, 160. 
CeWnu-oUs. 
C6r-o-graph'ic. 
C^r-o-graph'io-al [so 

Wr. J se-ro-grafik-ait 

Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Ce-rog'ra-phist. 
Ce-rog'ra-phy, 108. 
C6r'o-man-cy. 
Ce-roon' [Seroon, 

Seron,203.] 
Ce-ro-plas'tic 
C€r'ri-al, 170. [06. 

Cer'tain (-««n), 21, N. ; 
Cer'taln-ty («er'«n-). 
Cer-tif i-oate, 160. 



Cer-ti-fi-oa'tloii. 
Ger'ti-f ied, 186. 
Cer'ti-fi-er, 
Cer'ti-f?, 78, 04, 160. 
Cer'tl-ff-ing. 
Ce-ru'l^an, 110, 160. 
Ce'ruae (-rooa) [so Sm. 

Wr.} «<'ra«,Wk.Gd 

166.] 
Ce'rused (-nxwf). 
Cer'vl-cal, 110, 160. 
Cer'vine (82, 162) (^so 

Sm. Wb. Gd.j acHrtn, 

Wr. 165.] 
Ce-sa're-an i-za'), 160. 
Ce8-pl-t1'tlouB(-««A'tt«). 
Ces'pi-tose. 
Ces'pi-tofiB. 
Ces-sa'tion. 
Ges'sion (geih'un), n. 

the actor ceding. [See 

Session, 160.] 
Ges'sion 41-ry {seth^un-), 

160. 
Ces'sor, 88. 
Cess'pool [Sesspool, 

208.] 
Ces'tuB. • 
[Cesura. 203.— 5ee 

Caesura.] 
Ce-ta'oo<a {-she-a), 171. 
Ce ta'oean {shan). 
Ce-ta'ceous (-«Jto«), a. 

relating to the Ccta- 

oea. [See Setaceous, 

160.] 
Ce'tYnc [Get in, 208.] 
Ge-to-log'ie-al i-U^^-), 

108. 
Ce-tol'o-glst, 108. 
Ce-tol'o-gy, 108, 170. 
Cey-lon-ese' (-*«')• 
Ghab'a-Bie (kab'a-^ or 

Bhabfa-si) [so Wr.j 

kdb'a-»i, Wb. Gd.; 

shafa-st, Sm. 165.] 
Chab'a-site (^kab'-). 
[Chad («Aa<f).Sm. 203. 

— ^ee Shad.] 
Chafe, 23. 
Chafed {eha/t), Note C, 

^l34. 
afer. 
Chaff, 12, 131. 
Chftf fer, 170. 
Chftf fered (->Vrd), 160. 
ChRffer-er. 
Ch&Tfer-ing. 
Chftf finch, 170. 
Chaffy, 131, 170. 
Chafing, 183. 
[Chagreen, 203.-> 
See Shagreen.] 



a, §, i, 5, n, y, kmg }&,£,!, 5, ft, j^, thort , H at in Ikr^ k oi in fkst, katin 



CHAGRIN 



133 



CHAJIACTERISTICAL 



Cha-grin' (gha-ffrin') 

[§o Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

Bha^\n\ Wb. Gd. 

155. J n. Texatlon. {See 

SliAgreeii, 160.] 
Cha-gTined'(«Aa^refufO 
Cha-grin'iiig («Aa- 

gr9n'-). 
Cbain, 23. 
Chained, 150. 
Cbain'ing. 
Chain'-pump. 
Chair (dUr), 14. 
Chatred (jehird). 
Chair'inan (dUr'-)f !206. 
Chaise (.Mh&z), 46. 
Cha-Uze' (to-). 
Cha-la'sa (to-). 
€hal-ecKlon'ic(tol-),109. 
Chal-«ed'o-n7, or Chal'- 

oe-dd-ny («a/'-) fw) 

Wr. Gd.; kaised'a- 

H§f, Sm. 155.] 
Chal-oog'ra-pher (to(2-), 

106. 
Chal-cog'ra-pUBt (to2-). 
Chal-oog'ra-pby (to/-)- 
Chal-daMc (to^), lOtf. 
Chal'da-iam (kal'da- 

12111) • 

Cbal-de'an (to^), 110. 
Chal-dee' (tol-), 121. 
Chal'der. 
Ch&l'dron, or Chftl'dron 

[chawl'dron,_ Sm. ; 

chal'drcn^ Wb. Gd. ; 

ckawl'drcn, or dk^tf'- 

dnw, Wr. 156.] 
Chal'ice (ckai'tM), 100. 
Chal'iced icHai'Ut). 
ChUk (ctoiffit), 162. 
Ch&lked (ekaickt)t Note 

C, p. 34. 
Chilk'i-nesB (ehawk'-), 

169. 
Chilk'ing ichawk'-). 
Cbilk'T (ctotri/y), 03, 

171. 
Challenge, 170. 
Chal'lenge-a-ble, 183. 
Cbal'lengcd, 150, 183. 
Chal'lcn-ger. 
Cbal'len-fing. 
Cha-lyb'e-ate (to), 100. 
Cham (torn), n. the 

■OTerefgn:! of Turkey. 

[See Cam, 160.] 
da-made' (Fr.) («to- 

mad'). 
Chamlier. 

Cbam'bered {-burd)y\SO. 
Cham'ber-er. 
Cham'ber-lalii (-/in). 



[Chambril (torn-), 
203. — See Gambrel.j 

Cha-me'le-oii (to-)> IGO. 

Cham'fer. 

ChamTered (-/Wtf), 150. 

Chamois (Fr.) («tom^, 
or «to-mmO Tso Wr. 
Gd. ; ^tomoT, Wk.; 
sham'wUt Sm. 154,155.] 
rShamoi8,203.] 

Cnam'o-mile (torn'-) 
[Camomile, 203.] 

CMmp, 10, 44. 

Cham-pagne' (sham- 
pAn')tn. a light apark- 
lingwlne. [^eeCliam- 
palinD, and Champain, 
1607) 

Cham-paign' {»ham- 
j>dnOf n. a flat, open 
ooontry. [.See Cham- 
pagne, ana Champain,- 

Cham-pain', n. a mark 
of diahonor in an es- 
cutcheon. [S^eeCham- 
pa£;nc, and Cham- 
pa%n, 160.] 

Chftmped (chdn^t). 

Chftm'per-tor (sham'- 
per-tor) [so Sm. Wr. j 
cham'per-toTjWh. Gd. 
156.1 

Cham^per-ty (jtomjper- 
iv) {so Sm. Wr. ; 
cnarn'oer-ty, Wb. Gd. 
155.J 

Cham-pifffi'on (Fr.) 
(8ham--pin'yun). 

Cham'pl-on, 78, 109. 

Chance, 12, 131. 

Chanced (cJUim^), Note 
C, p. 34. 

Ch&n'cel, 171. 

Chan'cel-lor, 170. 

Chan'oer-y, 131, 171. • 

Chanc'ing. 

Chftn'cre {ahang'kur), 

Chftn'crotks (shang'-), 

Chttn-de-lier (anan^de- 
Ur*), 100. 

Chand'ler, 131. 

Chand'ler-y. 

Change, Zl. 

Change-a-bil'1-ty, 183. 

Change'a-ble, IM. 

Change'a-bly. 

Changed. 183. 

Change'Ril (-/So/), 180. 

Change'Iing. 

Chang'er (chdf^'-\ 183. 

Chang'lng (ch&nj'-). 

Chan'nel, 170. 



Chan'nelied (150) 

[Channeled, Wb. 

Gd. 203.— 5e« 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1^ 
Chan'nel-llngrc h a n - 

neling, Wb. (M. 

203.] 
Chant. 12, 131. 
Chant^ed. 
Chant'er. 

Chant'i-deer, 150, 160. 
Changing. 
Chant'ry. 
Cha'08 (a»'-)» 52. 
Cha-ot'lc (to-), 100. 
Chap, (chapt or cAop), 

r. [so Wr. Gd.; cluipf 

Sm.; chop, Wk. 155.] 
Chap (chapt or chop), n. 

a cleft. 
Chap (chop), n. the Jaw. 
Chfip, n. a boy. 
Chafe. 
Chapeau (Fr.) (8hap'o) 

[pi. Chapeaux (ihap'- 

hz), 198.] 
Cbap'el. 

Chap'el-la-ry, 72, 170. 
Chap'el-ling [Chapel- 

ing, Wb. Gd. 155.— 

See 177, and Note E, 

p. 70.1 
Chap'ef-ry. 
Chap'er-on (Fr.) (Bhap'- 

er-Ong) [bo Sin. ; 

thtxp-er-oon' J Wk. ; 

Bhap'er-on, Wr. Gd. 

155.1 
Chap^Uen {chop'- 

fawln). 
Chap'i-ter, 160. 
Chaplain {-Un\ 171. 
Chap'laln-cy (-«»-), 160. 
Chap'let. 
Chap'man. 
Chapped {chapt, or 

ctwpt). 
Chap'py, 170. 
Chaps {aiop8) [Chops, 

203.1 
Chap'ter. 
Chap'trel. 
Char (161), n. a small 

fish : — r. to bum par- 
tially. 
Char {chir) (lOn, n. a 

small Job. [C n a r e , 

Chore, 203.] 
Chfcr'ac-ter (Wr'). 
Chftr-ac-ter-lst'ic (Wr-), 

100, 126. 
Chftr-ao-ter-ist'io-al 

tor-), 108. 



bll ; € oa in there j ^asin foot ', ^atin facile j gh as g in go j t^ (U in\3Q\:^ 

12 



CHAAACTERIZATION 



184 



CUfiMISTAY 



ClUr-ao-ter-i-M'tioii 

(tor), 112. 
Chir'ae-tor-ize (kar^-). 
Ch&r'ac-ter-lzed, 150,183. 
Chir'«c-ter-Iz-iug. 
Charade^ (Fr.) {iha- 

rAd'), 
Char'cdal. 
Chard, n. the blanched 

footstalk and midrib 

of the artichoke, &c. ; 

— the white beet. [ See 

Charred, 100.] 
[Chare, 203. — 5e« 

Char, and Chore.] 
Charjre, 11. 
Charjje-a-bil'i-ty, 183. 
Charge'a-blo, 1(4, 1(W. 
Charge'a-bly. 
Charjred {charjd), 150, 

183. 
Chargf'er {char}'-), 
Charg'iag {char}'-). 
Chara-ly(cA*r-) [so Wk. 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; ckir'- 

i-ly^ or cha'ri'lyj Wr. 

155.1 
ChAr'l-neBS (cfcdr*-), 100. 
Chftr'i-ot, 78. 
Chir-l-ot eer', 122. 
Cliir'i-ta-ble, 10*. 109. 
Chftr'i-ty, 78, 108, HiD. 
Cha-ri-va-ri (Fr.) {jthd- 

re-vd-re'). 
Char'la tan (shar^-). 
Char-la-tan'ic {shar-)^ 

109. 
Char-la-tan'io-al (shar-). 
Char' la-tan-ism (shar- 

la-tan-izm)t 131. 
Char'Ia-tan-ry (Bhar'-). 
Char'lock. 
Charflotte-Rtusef (Fr.) 

{ahar^lot-rooa'). 
Charm, II. 
Charmed, 160. 
Charm'er. 
CharmMng'. 
Char'nel. 

Char*pit{FT.) {nhar'pS). 
Charred (chard) (170), 

part, from Char. [See 

Chard, 160.] 
Char'ring, 11, N. 
Chiir'ry, 11, 170. 
Chart, 11. 

Char*ta (L.) {kar'ta). 
Char-ta'ceous (kar-ta'- 
Char'ter. [»hu$). 

Char'tered, 166. 
Ch.ir'tcr-er. 
Char'ter-par'ty. 
Chart'i8m(-i;m),133,1S0. 



Chart'Ut. 

Char'jr ichir'-) TiO Wk. 

Sm. CkL; cJMr*u, or 

chfi'ry. Wr. 166.J 
Chas'a-ble, lOi. 
Chaae, 23. 
Chased (chdst), part. 

from Chase. [See 

Chaato, IGO.j 
Clias'er, 183, 
[C h a Bible , 203. — 5ee 

Chasuble.] 
Clias'ing. [136. 

Chasm (Ixum), 62, 133, 
Chas-eeur' CFr.) (shaa'- 

ur) [so Wr.; shda'- 

Mdurj Gd. 155.] 
Chaste, a. pure. [See 

Chased, 160.1 
Chast'en (chlU'n), (102) 

[fwt chfts'n, 153.] 
Chast'ened {chfls'nd), 
Chast'en-er (chAs'n-). 
Chast'en-ing {chds'n-). 
Chas-tis'a-ble (-tW). 
Chas tlse' C-tlz'), 202. 
Chas-tised' (-ttzd'), 150, 

183. [143. 

Chas'Mse-ment (-m-), 
Chas tia'er (Uz'). 
Chas-tis'ing (-««'-). 
Chas'tl-ty, 169. 
ChaB'u-ble (chaz'-) 

[Chasible, Ches- 

ible,203.] 
Chat, 10. 
ChUeau (Fr.) {»ha-ta') 

[pi. Chateaux Isha- 

«««')» 1980 
Chat'ei-la-ny(»Ao<'-),72. 
Cha-toy'ant {sha-toi'- 

ant). 
Cha-toy 'ment (sha-toi'-) 
Chat'tel {chaVl) (VTO) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wb. 

A^.\chat'L or chat'- 

el, Wr. 155.) 
Chat'ter, 170, 
Chaptered, 160. 
Chat'ter-er. 
Chat'ter-ing. 
Chat'ty, 170, 
Chat'wdbd. 

Chaud'-med'loy(«fca<i'-) 
Ch&uffer [Chaufer, 

203.J 
Chay'en-der. 
Cheap. 13. 

Cheap'en ((^o'n), 140. 
Cheap'ened {<mfp'nd). 
Cheap'en-er {chfp'n-). 
Cheat, 13. 
Cheara-ble. IM, 169. 



ChSat'ed. 
Cheat'er. 
Cheat'ing. 
Che-bac'co. 

Check, n. [Cheque, 
203.] 

ly Somettmei writtea 
cheque, when usad in the 
wnM of OR order /or MCM- 
ep. 

Check, V. 

Check'-bdbk, 206,Exe.4. 
Checked {chekt)^ Note 

C, p. 34. 
Check'er [Chequer, 

203 1 
Check'ered (-«»!), 160. 
Check'ers (-«r«), n. pL 

[Chequers, 203.] 
Check'ing. 
Chook'mate, n. & v. 
Check'mat-ed. 
Chcck'mit-in^. 
Check'y. 
Cheek, 13. 
Cheer, 13. 
Cheered, 150. 
Cheer'ful {-/Sot) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; cAir'- 

fSoL or chir'/Soly Wk. 

165.1 
Cheer'l-ly, 78, 1». 
Cheer'i-ness. 
Cheer'ing. 
Cheer'y. 
Cheese (chiz). 
Choes'y {chix*v). 
Chef-d^ceuvreftr.) (aftA- 

doovr') [so Wr. ; 9htf- 

doovr*, Wh, Gd. 164, 

155.] 
[Cheger, Chegoe, 

Chegre, 20a.^See 

Chigre.] 
Chei-rop'ter-oftB (H-). 
Che-ko'a [so Wr. ; c*dt- 

o'aj Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Che-liPer-ofis (*e-), 108. 
(^hclM-form (trf'-), IflO. 
Chc-lo'ni-an (te), 100. 
Chem'lc {kern'-). 
Chem'ic-al (item'-) [See 

Chemistry.] 
Che-miaef (Fr.) («*«- 

miz'). 
ChenU-eette'i Fr.)(aJbeM- 

i-zet'), 
Chem'ist (kern'-). 
Chem'is-try {kem'is-try, 

or kim'U-trp) [bo Wr.; 

kim'i84rjf, or kem'ie- 

try, Gd.; Hm*i84ry, 



i, §, i, 6, u, y, Umgi At S» I* ^i &» f » 9hort ; ii aa in far, k<uin fast, a ae in 



CUEaUE 



135 



CHINTZ 



Sm. 155.1 [ChjmiB- 
try, aocj.] 

■ST* The prtmancuttion 
tiatu-iry It obriowt\y de- 
rived from the obaulete 
■ptllinc U^fmittrp. 

[Clieqae, 203.— 5e<; 

Cbeclcl 
[Chequer, TlOa. — See 

Checker.] 
[C h c qa e r 8 , 208.— See 

Checkers.] 
[Cheqain, iOQ. — See 

Ceoenln.] 
[Cherif, Tm. — See 

Sherif.J 
Cb^r'ish, 48, 6A. 
Cher'iflhed {-ishi), 
Ch^r'igher. 
Chgr'iBh-in^. 
Che-root' (Merooi'XlKO 

Gd. J ckt-root', Wr. 

156.] 
Ch.Vris, 170. 
ChiVry, 170. 
Clier'so-nene {her'-), 136 
Chert, 21, N. 
Chert'y. 
ChCr'ub, 170. 
Che rubble, 109. 
Che-ru'blc-al, 108. 
Chf^r'a-blm. 
Chr-r-u-bim'ic. 
Chr-r'ap. 
Hier'Wl. 
[Che Bible, 203.— :5to 

Chasuble.] 
Chess, 16, 174. 
Chest, 15, 44. 
ChcBt'ed. 
Chest'nut {chet'nut). 

(lfl2)rChe8nut,a03.J 
Cho'tah. 
Ckevaux-de-frise (FY.) 

{»hev'ii-f1un-friz')n.pl. 
CheT-«-ller'(»*«r-a-ttr') 

122,100. 
ChcT'en, 140. 
Cher'er-il. 
CbevM-BJinoe {shev'i- 

z<<n«). 
Cher'ron {shtr'ron). 
Cber'roncii {Khev'rond), 
Cher'ron el {*her'-). 
Chew {choo) [so Sm. 

Wr. ; cku, Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Chewed {chood). 
Chew'Ujff ichoo^-), 
ChlbOjal, 170. 
€DU-bouqtt^ (TarkiBh) 

{chebook'). 
Chl-canc' (»W ). 



Chi-cio'er {she). 

Chl-can'er-y {$he-), 

Chlc'co-ry, 170. - 

Chicli, 16, 44. 

Chich'linir. 

Chick, 16. 

Chick'a-dee. 

Chick'a-ree. 

Chick'en, 149. 

Chlck'Ung. 

Chick'pea. 

aiick'wced, 200. 

Chide, 25. 

Chld'ed, 183. 

Cliid'er. 

Chid'lng. 

Chie^ 13. 

Chief'tain {4in\ W. 

Chig're {chig'ur) (164) 
[Chifirffer, Chi- 
£f ua,Cnigoe, Che- 
go e,Cheger, Chc- 
gre, Jigger, 203.] 

Cmi'blttin, m. 

Child (25, 44), n. [pi. 
Children, 105.] a son 
or a daughter. [See 
Chllde, H».J 

Chnd'bed. 

Chlld'birth. 

Childe, or ChHde [so 
Wr.;fAlW,Gd.;cAl7rf, 
Sm. 155], n. the son 
of a noblcmaik. [See 
Child, 160.] 

Child'h<5bd. 

Child'ing. 

Chlld'isE. 

Childaike, 206, Exo. 6. 

Chil'dren, n. pi, 

ChT-lese' {-Uz>), 

Chil'i-ad {kiV). 

ChilM-a-gon {kU'-). 

Chil-i-a-hc'dron {kil-) 
[pi. ChU-i-ahe'dra, 
1U8.] 

Chil'i-arch {kU'i-ark), 
52. 

ChllM-archy(iWi-<irlr-). 

Chll'i-asm (hl'i-azm), 

Chll'i-ast (JWiM. [136. 

Chil-i-ast'ic {kil-), 

[Chilifactive, 203. 
— See Chyllfacttre.] 

Chin, 16, 172. 

Chilled, 150. 

[Chilli, 203.— 5m 
ChlUy, n.] 

ChilMi-nesB, 78, 160. 

ChiU'Ing. 

Chil'ly, n. the pod or 
fVuit of Capsicum. 
[Chilli, 20:j.] 



Chll'ly (178), a. oold. 
Chllo'ni-an {kl), 
Chl-lon'ic (itl). 
ChU'o-pod {kU'-), 
Chimb {chlm) (162), n. 

the edge of a cask. 

[Chime, Chine, 

203] [See Chime, 160. f 
Chime, n. harmony of 

many instruments ; 

a set of balls j the 

edge of a cask : — r. 

to sound in harmony. 

[See Chimb, 160.] 
Chimed, 150. 
Chira'er. 
Clii-me'ra {kl-). 
Chi-mi^rMc-al {kl-), 108. 
Cliim'in-age {ahim'-). 
Cliim'ing. 
Chlm'ncy (98, 160) [pi. 

Chimneys, 190.] 
Chim-pan'zee fso Wr. 

Wb. Crd. ; chim-pan- 

zB'y Sm. 155.] 
Chin, 16. 
Chi'na [so Sm. Wr. Wb. 

Gd.icha'ni, or chi'- 

noy Wk. 155.] 

tsr Though Walker 

Svei cha'ni u the moit 
■hionable pronunciation 
of this word in hit time, 
yet he aayi of It; — " What 
could induce us to no ir- 
regular a pronunciation of 
thu word ii tcarcely to be 
coneeired.** 

iChln'ca-pin {china'-) 
(M) [Chinkapin, 
Chinquapin, 203.] 

Chin-chU'la, 170. 

Chln'cough {-kof). 

Chine [Chimb (in the 
sense of the edge of 
a ca»k)y 203.] 

Chined, 183. 

Chinese' {-ntz'), 130. 

Chink (chingk), 54. 

[Chinkapin, 203.— 
See Chincapin.] 

Chinked {chingM). 

Chink'lng (chtngk'). 

Cliink'y {chingl-'y). 

Chinned {chind), 176. 



[Chinquapin, 203.— 

~ -ihi 
Chinse, r. to fill with 



See chincapin.] 



oakum, as a seam, 
r^ec Chintz, 148.1 
Chintz {chints) (Note 
C, p. 34), n. a kind of 
calico. 



148.] 



[Sec Chinse, 



"^ — ^ ^^ — -— — - I ■ — ■ ^ ■ — - ■ ^ 

Tall ', ^aain there , ^ at in foot i^atin facile ; gh a« g in go v t^'i* iiit\A% 



CHIP 



136 



CHRI8TEMN6 



Chip, 16. 

ChipWnk [Chip- 
nmnk, Chlpmuk, 

203.J 
Chipped ickipt}t ISO, 
Chip'per. [176. 

Chlp'plng, 176. 
Chip'pj, 
Chi-ra^gri (rt). 
Chi-rag'ric al (H-). 
Cln'ro-grtph (ilO, 127. 
Chi-rog^ra-pher («-). 
Chi-ro-graphMc («-),109 
Chi-ro-i^raph'ic-al (i-i), 

108. 
Chi-rog'ra-phlst (Irf-). 
Chi ro^'ra-phy (« ). 
Chi-ro-loK'ic-al (ki-ro- 

lof) 




Chi'to-man-^y (I'l'-) [so 
Sm. Wh. Gd.; kir'o- 
man-8y, Wk. ; H'ro- 
man-gyt or i'lHo-man- 
«y, Wr. 165.J 

Chi-ro-man'tic (i*!-). 

Chi-ro-man'tic-al d-i). 

Chi-ro-nom'Ic (Jrt-). 

Chi-ron'o-my («-), 108. 

Chi'ro-plast (il'-). 

Chi'ro-pod (W). 

Chi-rop'o-di8t (ii-)- 

Chi-roB'o-phlst (W ). 

Chirp, 21, N. 

Chirped (cfttrpOi Note 
C, p. M, 

Chirp'er. 

Chirp'tng. 

CWr'rup, 170. 

Chlr'rupcd (-rupt), 

ChTr'rup-ing. 

Chiu'el {chiz'el), 149. 

ChiB'cUed (chiz'eld) 
[Chiseled, Wb.(M. 
2m.— 5ec 177, and 
Note K, p. 70.] 

Chis'el-ling FChisel- 
ing, Wb.Gd.2aj.] 

Chisleu. 

Chia'ley {ehiz'hj). 

Chig'Rcls {chiz'zlz\ n. 
pi, [so Sm. } chiz'zelzy 
Wr. 156.] 

Chit. 

Chit'-chat, 206, Exc. 3. 

Chlt'ter-lingB, n.pl. 170. 

Chl-val'rlc (.nhl-viU'Hk), 
or Chtv'al-ric (j»AiV- 
al-rilA^ [shlvaVHk, 
Sm. Wr. ; ghiv'al-rik, 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 



CUr'al-rotts (ikiv'al- 
nw)[8oSm.Wb.Gd.; 
ckiv'al-rut, Wk. ; 
ikiv'al-rugf or chiv*- 
al-rui, Wr. 155.] 

ChiT'al-ry (ahiv^al-ry) 
[bo Sm. Wb. Gd.; 
dl«V<i^ry,Wk. ; •hiv'- 
al-rvt or ckit^al-ry^ 
Wr. 165.] 

Cilices {chlTz)y n.pt. 

Clilam'y-phore (klcuii'-). 

Chliyrai («©'-). 

Chlo'rate (klo'-). 

Chlo'ric iklo'-). 

Chlo'ride(tto'-)[Chlo- 
rid,2a{.l 

Chlo'rtne (iV) (82, 152) 
[Chlorin,203.] 

Chlo'rite (W-). 

Chlo-rit'ic (Wo-). 

Chlo'ro-form (iio'-),171. 

Chlo-rom'e-ter {kio-), 
108. 

Chlo-rom'e-try (Uo-\ 

Chlo'ro-phanc {klo'-)' 

Chlo'ro-phvl (klo'-), 

Chlo-roph'yl-llte (kUh), 

Chlo-ro'sis (klo-). 

Chlo-rot'ic (klo-). 

Chlo'rofis (klo-). 

Chlo'ru-ret (ifcto). 

Chock, 181. 

Choc^o-Ute, 132, 171. 

Choice, 27. 

Choir {kvfir). 

Choke, 24. 

Choked (eMkt), Note C, 
p. 34. 

ChSk'er, 183. 

Chok'ing, 

Chok'y. 

Chol'er (kol'ur)^ n. an- 
ger. [5ee Collar, 160.] 

Chol'erna {kol'-), 171, 
233. 

Chol'er-ic (kol'-). 

Cho-les'ter-Tne (ko-), 

Cho-li-am'bic (io-). 

Chon-drog'ra-phy(*on-) 

ChoD-droPo-gy (kon-). 




Choose (chooz). 

Choos'er (chooz'-), 

ChooB'ing (chooz'-). 

Chop, 18, 44. 

Chopin (chopHn, or cha- 
p8n') f BO wr. ; c*op'- 
in, Gd. ; cho-pin' M^- 
155.] 

Chopped (chopt), 176. 



Chop'per. 
Chop'ping. 
[ChopB, 908. — ^ 

Chaps.] 
Chop'Btick. 
Cho-rag'ic {ko^n^-). 
Cho-ra^ffus (L.) (ko-), 

Cho'ral (fa/-). 

Cho'ral-iBt (to'-). 

Chord {kord)t n. the 
Btrlng of a muaical 
inBtmmont ; — tones 
tliat harmonize ;— a 
right line Joining the 
two ends of an arc. 
[See Cord, 160.] 

Chord'ed {kord'-). 

Chord'Ing {kord'-). 

Chore [Caar , Chare, 
203.] 

Clio-re'a (ko). 

Cho-ree' (ko-), 12L 

Cho-re'us (ko-). 

Cho'ri-ant (toM. 

Cho-ri-am'bic (ko-). 

Cho-rl<tm'bu8(L..) (ko-) 

Cho'ri-on (kof-). 

Cho'rist, 21, N. 

Chor'ist-er [»o Sm. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; ^irlr'wt-ur, 
Wk. 155.1 [Qulrist- 
er,203.J 

Cho-r<^ra-pher (ko-). 

Cho-ro-graph'ie (*■«>-). 

Cho-ro-graph'ic-al (ko-). 
[so Wb. Gd. ; kor-o- 
gn^ik-al, Wr. 165.] 

Cho-rog'ra-phy (ko-), 

Cho'roid (ko'-). 

Cho'rus (ko'-)y 62, 16». 

Chose (Mz)^ 136, 161. 

Chose (Fr.) («Afi«), 161. 

Chos'en (chOz'n), 149. 

Cho&gh (ciMf) (35), i». a 
kind of bird. [See 
Chuff, 160.] 

[Choule, 203. — Sm 
Jowl.] 

ChouBe (ckou8\ 28. 

ChouBed (chouti). 

Chous'ing, 183. 

Chow'dcr, 77. 

Chre-ma-tis'tics (krt). 

Chres-tom'a-thy (krts) . 

Chrism (itriTin), i;i3,136. 

Chris'mal (i-rizM. 

Chrts'ma-to-ry (leriz'-). 

Christ-cross-row' 
(kri8-kro»-r9'). 

Christ'en (kris'n). 162. 

Christ'ened (kris'nd), 
150. 

ChriBt'en-lng (krU'n). 



a, £, i, 0, u, y, long ; &, ^, T, 5, Q, j^, thort \ lia$in far, k<uin fiwt, ft <u in 



CHRISTIAN 



137 



CIMBAL 



Chriit'ian (irwl'yan), 

44, Note 1 ; 51. 
Christ'iAD-Um ikrUt*- 

yan-izm). 
Christ-ian'i ty (trit«- 

vaa'i-ty) [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd.; l^-dil-an'i-ty, 

Wk.i krist-jfl-an'i-tyj 

Wr. 155.1 
Chri9t-ian4-za'tion 

{krUt^yan-). 
Christ'Unize {kriaf- 

yan-). 
ChriBt'ian-Ixed (kritt'- 

yan-lzd), 183. 
ChriBt'ian-ix-ing {Jhrist'- 

Cnrisrnus {kru'maa)^ 

lft2, 180. 
Chri»-tol'o-gy {kru-)t 

108. 
Chro'mAte (kro'-), 
Chro-mat'ic (Jtro), 109. 
Chro-mat'ics {kra-). 
Chro-ma-tog'r»-phy 
Akro-), 

Chro-ma-tol'o-snr(*ro-). 
(%rome (itr(Hii). 
Chro'mic {kro-). 
Chro'inJ-um (Irro'-), 160. 
Chro'mo-griph (kro'-). 
Chron'ic lkron'\ 
Chroa'ic-al {kr<m'-),\^. 
Chron'i-cle {Jknm'-)^^ 

Chroa'i-cled {kron'i- 

Chron'i-cler {kron*-). 

Chron'i-cles {kron'ir 

1:U\ 171. 
Chron'i-cUng (Ito»'-)i 
^,^183. 

Ohron'o-grftph {kron'-). 
C^hron'o-pnun Ocron'-). 
C!hron-o-gram-inftt'Ic 
Cl^liron-o-gram-mat' ic-al 

(irron). 
Vjhron -o-gram'ma-tigt 

(Irron-)* 
^]^ra-oog'ni-pher(Jtro-). 
^^ro-noff'rarphy \kro-). 
^hro-DoPo-ger {kro-), 
^hro-no-log'ic Ucro-no- 

TThro-no-log'ic-al (kro- 

no4qf'ik^ [bo Wk. 

Sm. Gd. ; kron-o4q)'' 

ik-al, Wr. 156.1 
Chro-nol'o-giBt (kro-). 
Chro-nol'o-gy (kro-). 
Chro-Dom'e-ter (kro-), 

106,100. 
Chro-no-met'rIc[80 Gd.; 



kron<Hmet'rik, Wr. 

155.] 
Chro-no-met'ric-al. 
Chro-nom'e-try (kro-). 
Cnron'o-soopc (kron'-). 
Chiyg'a-Ud (Jfcrw'-). 
ChTTB'a llB (krU') [pi. 

ChrvB-al'i-des (-diz)^ 

198.1 
ChryB-o-bgWyl (kris-). 
Chrys'o-col-la (kris'-). 
ChryB-og'ra-phy (kria-). 
ChryB'o-lite (kris'-). 
Chrys-ol'o-gy (kris-). 
Chrys'o pra»e (kriafo- 

prda) [BO Sm. Wr. ; 

kria'-o-prdz, Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Chub, 22. 
Chab'bed, 150. 
Chuck, 22, 181. 
Chucked (chukt). 
Chuck'iDg. 

ChucMcle {.ckukT), 164. 
Chuc'kled (c4i4Jk'U),183. 
Chuok'ling. 
Chu'fa (cAoo'-). 
Chuff, n. a down. [See 

Chough, leo.] 
Churfl-ly, 93, 170. 
Chuf fi-ne8s, 160. 
Chuffy, 93, 170. 
Chum, 22, U. 
Chump. 
Chunk. 
Chunk'y. 
Church, 44. 
Churched (churcht), 
Church'lng. 
Church'man, 206. 
Church'yard. 
Churl, 21, 44, 135. 
Churl'iBh. 
Chum, 21, 44. 
Churned, 165. 
Chum'ing. [171. 

Churrworm (-irurm), 
Chy-U'ocouB (il-l-to'- 
Chyle (kit). [ahu9). 

Chy-U faction (kl-). 
Chy-ll-fac'tlve (kl-). or 

ChyFi-fac-tive (kU'-) 

[bo Wr. ; kin-fac'tiv, 

8m.; kil'l-rac-iiv.Wk. 

Wb.Gd.l65.] [Chil- 

lfactlve,20.1.] 
Chy-lif er-oliB (kl), 108. 
Chy-li&c'tJon (kl-). 
Chy-lo-po-€t'ic (kl-). 
ChyFollB (kll'-). 
Chjrme (klm). 
Chf m-l-ll-ca'tlon (kim-). 
Chym'i-iy (klm'-), 94. 



[ChymiBtry, 203.^ 

See Chemistry.] 
Chvm'oQB (kltti'-). 
CT-ba'ri-o&B. 
Cib'ol, 170. 
Clbo'ri-um (L.)[pl. CU 

Wri-a, 198.1 
Ci-ca'da (h.) [pi. Cl- 

ca'diB, 198.] 
Cic'a-trifoe, m. 
Cic'a-tri-Bant (-zant) 

[Cicatrizant, 203.1 
Cio-a-tri'Blve. 
Cl-ca'trix (L.) [Cic-a- 

tn'cis (sez), life.] 
[Cicatrlzant,2a3.~ 

See Cicatrisant.] 
Cic-a-tri-za'tion. 
Cic'a-trize, 202. 
Cic'a-trized, 150, 183. 
Clc'a-triz-lnp. 
Cic'e-ly (8%s'e4y) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

na'ly, Wk. 155.1 
Cicerone (It.) (che-che- 

ro'ne, or sis-ero'ne) 

[BO Wr. Gd. ; chi-cM- 

ro'na, Sm. 154, 155.] 
Ci9-e-ro'ni-an, 109. 
Cic-c-ro'ni-au-iam 

(izm). 
Cich-o-ra'shuB (8ik-o- 

ra'ahus). 
Cich'o-ry («'jf .), 52. 
CI-dB'be-ism (-izm). 
Cicisbeo (It.) (che-chis- 

ba'o, or ae-sis'be-o) 
BO Wr. Gd. ; che-chis- 
I'o, Sm. 154, 155.] 
Cid, 16, 39. 
Ci'der, 25, 77. 
Ci'derist. 
Ci'der-kin. 
Ci-devant (Ft.) (se-de- 

vitng'). 
dirge (Ft.) (sery). 
Cl-gar' r8egar,203.] 
CiPi^ (L.) n. pi. 
Cll'la-ry (Hl'ya-ry). 51, 
Cil'I-ate, 169. [171. 

CilM-at-ed. 
CT-H'cian (-liah'an). 
CT n'oiottB (lish'ua), a. 

made of hair. {See Si> 

liciouB, 160.] 
Cil'i-o-grade. 
[Clma, 263.^5ee Cy- 

ma.] 
[Cimar,a03. — 5eeSi- 



[bc 
5a' 



mar.l 

Cim'bal, 

cake. 

160.] 



fi. a kind of 
{See Cymbal, 



fall \ tat in there i <fii}a»in foot ; muin facile ; gh cm g tn go ; |^ a« »n this. 



CIMBRIC 



138 



CITRINE 



Cim'brio. 

Clm'e-ter [Solmitar, 

203.] 
Ci'mlsB. 

Cim-mc'ri-Aii, 109, 170. 
Ciin'o-Dte. 
Cin-cho'na i-ko'-). 
Ciu-cho'ni-a {-ko'-). 
Cin'cho-ninc (-ko-), 
Cinct'ure, 91. 
CiQct'urvd (-ywrrf), 150. 
Cia'der, 171, 
Ciu'dcry. 
Ciu'droQs. 
Cin-e-fae'tion. 
Cin'er-a-rv, 72,171,233. 
Cia-er-a'tioa. 
CT-ne'ri oOb, 109. 
Cin-er-I'tious (uh'us'), 
Cin-<fa-lo8e' {-Uz), 
Ciu'ua-bar, 170. 
Ciu'na-bar-Ine, 84. 
Cin'na-mon, 170. 
Cinque (Fr.) (siiigk). 
Cinque'-foll {siiiffk'-), 
Ci'ou rScIou,J03.] 
Ci'pher, 25, 35. 
Ci'phercd ifurd), 160. 
Ci'phcr-ing. 
Cip'o-lin, 170. 
[Circscan, 203.~5e« 

Ciroean.] 
Cir-cas'Hian (sur4Msh'- 

an) [bo Gd. ; ttur- 

kash'i-any Wr. 155.] 
Cir^»'an (110) [Cir- 

CKan,2a3.] 
Cir-cen'slal ( shnl). 
Clr-cen'slan (shnn). 
Cir'cl-nal, 78, 109. 
Cir'ci-nate. 
Cir'cle, 21, N. ; 104. 
Cir'clcd {-kid), 160, 183. 
Clr'der. 
Clr'clct. 
Cir'cllng. 
Cir'cult (WO, 171. 
CJr'cuit-ed (kit). 
Cir-cult-eer' (WO, 122. 
Cir'cuit-er {-kit-). 
Clr-cu'1-tofle, 169. 
Cir-ou'i-ty, 108. 
Clr'cn-lar, 89, 108. 
Clr-cu-lftr'i-ty. 
Clr'cn-late, 171. 
CIr'cu-lat-ed, 183. 
Cir'cu-lat-ing. 
Cir cu-la'tion, 112. 
Cir'cu-la-tlve, 106. 
Cir'cu-la-to-ry. 
Cir-cum-am'bi-ent, 169. 
Clr-cunl-oell'ion (sel'- 

pun) [so Wb. Qd. ; 



tur-cum-Mel'i-on, Wr. 

165.] 
Cir'cum-clse (-«U), 202. 
Cir'cum-ciscd {sizd), 

160, 183. 
Clr'cum-cis-er {-Biz-). 
Cir'cum-cia-ing (-«!::-)• 
Cir-cum-d'aiou {-^tizh'- 

un), 
Cir-cum'fer-cnoe, 109. 
Clr-cum-fe-rcn'tial 

{-thai). 
Cir-cum -fe-pen'tor. 
Cir'cum-flcct. 
Cir'cum-flex. 
Clr-eum'flu-«aoe, 105. 
Cir-cum'flu-CQt. 
Cir-cum'flu-o&B. 
Cir-cum-fo-ra'nc-ofia. 
Cir-cum-fiiBo' (-/^'). 
Cir-cum-ftiBcd' {-Jikzd'). 
Clr-cum-fu'Blle. 
Cir-cum-fuB'lng {-J^z'-). 
Cir-cum-fu'sion {-zhun). 
Cir-cmn'gy-rate, 106. 
Cir-oam-gy-ra'tion. 
Cir-cum -ut'oence. 
Cir-cum-lo-cu'tion. 
Cir-cum-loc'u-to-ry. 
Cir-cum-miired'. 
Cir-cum-nav'i-ga-blc. 
Clr-cum-nav'i-g-atG. 
Cir-cum-iiaT'i-gHt-cd, 

183. 
Cir-cum-nav'i-gat-lng. 
Cir-cum-nav-l-pa'tion. 
Cir-cum-nav'i-gatror. 
Cir-oum-po'lar. 

Cir-cum-8ci8'BTle(-«VtO 

Cir-cum-Bcrib'a-blo, 183. 

Cir-cnm-Bcribe'. 

Clr-cum-Bcnbed'. 

Cir-cum-Bcrib'er. 

Ci r-cmn-Bcrib'inff . 

Cir-ciim-Bcript'i-ble,109. 

Clr-cum-scrip'tloQ. 

Clr-cum-Bcrlp'tlve. 

Cir'cum-Bpoct, 171. 

Cir-cum-spcc'tion. 

Glr'cnm-BtAnce, 171. 

Cir'cum-Bt&Qocd 

{-ttanst). 
Cir'cum-stanc-Ing. 
Cir-cum -Btan'tial {-Bftal) 
Cir-cum-Btan'tl-ate 

C-sht-at) [bo Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; sur-kutn-stan'- 

»hdt, Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Cir-cnm-8tan'ti-at-ed 

{-sM-at-). 
Cir-cum-atan'tl-at-iiig 

(-«AI-a^). 
Cir-cum-val'Iate, 170. 



Cir-cum-val-U'tlon 
Cir-cum-vec'tion. 
Cir-cum-vent'. 
Cir-oum-rent'ed. 
Cir cum-ven'tion. 
Cir-cum-Tent'lre, 84. 
Cir-oum-veat'. 
Cir-cum-YO-U'tion. 
Cir-cum- volve'. 
Cir-cum-volved',150, 183 
Cir-cum-volv'lng. 
Cir'cus [pi. CiT'eua-Gi 

Clr-riTer-oui, 108, 170. 

Clr'-ri-form, 169, 170. 

Or-rig'er-ofta {-ry'-), 

Clr'ri-ped, 78, 160, 170. 

Clr-ro-cu'mu-lua. 

CIHroBe. 

CIr-ro-Btra'tu8. 

CIr'ro&8 (170) a. haTlng 
tendiila. [5ee Cirrus, 
160.] 

Cir^rtu (L.),». [pi. Cir- 
ri, 9S] tk Xendnl, [See 
Cirrous, 160.] 

Clr'so-ct'le. 

CiB-alp'Inc [so Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; aiz-alp'in, Sm. 
156.] 

as-at-lan'tio. 

CiB-mon'tane. 

Cis'pi-dane. 

a^'soid, 170. 

CiBt, n. a place of in- 
terment. 

Cist, n. a pouch or sac. 
[CyBt,2a3.] 

CiBt'ed[Cy8ted,203.1 

CiB-ter'Gian {-than). 

ClB'tem, 171. 

CiB'tlc[Cystic,203.] 

Cit, 16. 

Cira-ble, 164. 

at'a-del, 171. 

Cit'al. 

Ci-ta'tion. 

Ci'ta-to-ry, 86, 93. 

Cite, V. to call: — to 
quote. ISee Site, 
Sight, 160.] 

at'ed, 183. 

CTt'er. 

CIt'ing. 

Clth-a-ris'tlc, 109. 

Cith'em [Cittern, 
203] 

at'i-xen i-zn), 78, 140. 

Cit'rate. 

Cit'rcne. 

Cit'ric. 

Cit'ril. 

Cit'rtne, 82, 152. 



a, e, i, d, ii, }, long >&,£,!, d, tt, f, thort; \katin fiur, kaain tut, kasin 




Ctt'tern flTO) [CIth 

Clf 7, m, 1^0, 190. 
Cii« (H«), IX. 



Cl-Tll'lui (-van), SI. 
ClT'U^lrt. 

a>'U-b->-ble. iftt. iiw. 
CIr-U-l-ia'tlaii, 112. 
Cli'l -Ih, 17D, as. 
aT'll-lied. UO, ISJ. 

ClI'U-5-"E8. 
CIt'U-It, W, 170, 
CUb^. 

Cbwfc, lei. 

CUeked (Uotl), Note 

C, p. 34. 
CUcfi'er. 

ClKk'lDE. 

CUd, iSr 

CUIm'B-ble, II 



at, n. ono whi 
a. [Sm CUmmiil 



CUIutal, ISO. 

ClUm'er. 

Clilm'lntr. 



Ulr-Tor'«ncc(ttfr-). 
Itlrvoj'uiHiUr.). 
^lun, n. A r. 10. 

(Stt CUImut, iw!p' 

Clun'bfred {.btinl),l90. 

Clumned (Siiiu/), UO, 



Ciun'mlncM, IW. 

Cl»n.'o/'(ci«iDoor 

Sni. l».Wl.] 
Clun'arcd l-vra), UO. 



[not kUn'dei-Un.lU. 
Cfnog, 10, M. 
CUnged (IJiiniKl], ISO. 



CUn'mr-otti (Uang'. 

Cba\(tlanet),10,H. 
Cltuietiiilangtt), Note 

CUnE'lng (tlangk:). 
CUimlah, 170. 
Clip, 10. 

Claii'MArd Itlal/btnl), 
SoteC,p.34. 

CUp'pcr-cl»w, 
Clip^plng, 170, 170. 

CUr^n«ui', or CUr- 

encleux' {*Ur.fli- 
rtoo'l r»o Wr. i t«r 
en^ix'; Od. i Mir- 

145.]' " 
CUrt-ob-MOre' ftWr-l. 
Clii'M, 170. 
Clir-l-obonl (-tord). 
CUr-l-a^t'ttOD, lUt 



CUr-l-iu 



Y-fng, J. 



iCIftrlo- 

Clir'i'-oM/w, 170) [M 
Sm. Wr. Gd. [ i«r'- 
VHB, Wk. 1S5.] 

cr.'rj,«,N. 

Clwbed ItlaM). 
Cliah'lDg. 

cUsp, la, 131. 

Cliaped (Mugrf), Kote 

C, p. 34. 
Cliap'er. 

Clup'liiff, 
CUap'-kolte. 
CUaa, 12, 131, 174. 
CliBKd ttlail). 
CUa*'l-ble, 1S4, ISO. 
ClU'aiB. 

CUi'alo-»l, we, 170. 
CUa'al-dtiD t.tizm),l3i. 
CUa'al-clat, lOB, 170. 
Clu-airic, 100. 



CUaae (tlana), 17. 
Cllua'tnl. 
CUai'u-Iir (tlowt'Oiloe 



CUT'|.ole, 104, 170. 
Cl»-.lc'ii-lir, 10B. 
ClfPitr lYi.) a-llf rt-a ) 



Cliv'i-gw. 

CI«-vla>er-0L.,,„ _ 
e/o'i*(L.)[L.j)LC&- 
!*• C^"*)! Eng. pL 
Clm'vy, 1 



iLCfa'- 



ciir, 23. 

Clawed, ISO. W. 
CUtm (jIVJi). 
CUj'ey, B8, IW. 
Clir'lng. 

morB,aa.] 
Clt^ad'inK. 
Clful. l-f. 
CWinod, 160. 
CKVun'lDC. 
Clfan'll-nra*, 1W. 
ClEiu'lT,a.(lSI) deu, 

C19Bil'i;, ad. tieu n«t- 

Cliaai'iwM,e«, H.; 170, 

230. 
CI«uiH (tlrm), IB. 
CI^(D*ed (tlaud), 1S3. 
Clr>uu'er jWeni-), 
Cl«uia'i-tile liiaa'-i, 

IM, i«a. 

Cl^ana'lns {ilnu'-]. 



CLeu'tDK. 
Clial, It 

Clf.aved, ISOl 



It belle ; gb <H E <" go i lb aa i* tlila 



CLEFT 

Wr. } kttf, Wb. Od. ; 
kt{f, Wk. Sm. 155.] 

•^ Though Walker 
|riT«i only the pronuncla- 
fion W, yet he nys,— 
** Eren without the plea of 
breTlty, ete/'to ehanmd by 
nuelcuuii lato el\f. 

Cleft. 

Clem'a-ti8. 

Clera'en-cy, 169. 

Clem'cnt, IQO. 

Clem'ent-Inp, 91, 152. 

Cle-op'ter-o6B. 

Clep'sf -dra [bo Sm.Wb. 
Gd. ; klqrsii-dra, or 
klq}-4y'dra.Wr. 155.] 

Cler'g^, 21, N. 

Clcr'gy-a-ble, 164. 

Cler'tfy-man, 196. 

Cler'lc. 

Cl^rMo-oI, 108. 

Clfr'i-gy, 169. 

Clerk (llerk, or klark) 
IklerkjWb.Qd.iklarky 
Wk, 8ra. ; klark, or 
klerk, Wr. 155.] 

O^The pronunciation 
Marc il the prevailing one 
In England, but iterk ii 
Terr generally preftrred in 
the United States. 

Cl€r'o-mnn-cy, 109. 

Clev'er, 77, 170. 

Clev'ls. 

Clev'y. 

ClcwrirM) (26) [Clue, 
203.1 

Click, 16, 181. 

CUcked iklikt). Note C, 
p. .14. 

CUck'er. 

Click'et. 

CUck'lnfir. 

CU'ent, 169. 

CU-ent'al. 

Cli'ent-ed. 

CliflT, 16, 173. 

Clift, 16. 

Cllm-ao-Wr'lc, or ClI- 
mac'ter-io, a. An.[EO 
Wr.j klim^ak-tgrrik, 
Wk. Sin.; ktimak'' 
ter-ikj Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Clim-ac-t4Vio-al. 

CU'mate, 73. 

ClI-matMc, 109. 

CIT-mat'lc-al, 106. 

Cli'ma-tize, 202. 

Cli-ma-tojr'ra-phy, 108. 

Cli-ma-tol'o-gy, 106. 

Cli'raax. 

Climb ikam) (162), v. to 



140 

mount by means of 

the hands and fbet. 

[See Clime, 160.1 
ClimVa-ble (-Wlm*-). 
Climbed (kttfnd), 
Climb'er (ifcftm'-). 
Climb'ing (i^m'-)< 
Clime, n. climate, re- 

i^ion. [S:eeCUmb,160.] 
CliDch, 16, 44. 
Clinched (iJ<neM),Note 

C, p.34. 
Clinch'er. 
Clinch'er^bnitt (-biU) 

[Clinker-built, 

203.] 
Clinch'ing. 
Cllnsr, 16, 64. 
Cllng^Btdne, 206. 
Cling'y, 93. 
Clinic 
Clin'ib^. 

CUnique {Fr.Xkiinrtkf), 
Clink (klingk), 16, 54. 
Clinked {kUngkt). 
Clink'er (klingk'-), 
[Clinker-built, 203. 

— See Clinoher-buUt] 
Clink'ing {kUngk''). 
Cli'noid. 

Cli-nom'e-ter, 106. 
Cli-no-met'ric . 
Cll-no-met'rie-al. 
Cli-nom'e-try, 10& 
Clip, 16. 

Clipped (kUpi), 176. 
Cllp'per. 170, 176. 
Clip'ping. 
Clique (Jr.) {kttt), 
Cllqu'iBh (kUk'-). 
CliquMsm ikllk^Um). 
Cli'vers (-vurz), 
CliT'i-ty, 169. 
Cloa'ca (L.) [pL CUh 

a'c€Bt 198.1 
CloHi'oal. 
Cl5ak, 24, 130. 
Cldaked {kldkt), 150. 
Cloak'ing. 
Clock, 18, 181. 
Clock'-work {-wwrk). 
Clod, 18. 
Clod'dy, 176. 
Clod'hop-per. 
Clod'pate, 206. 
Clod'pat-ed. 
Clod'poll [Clotpoll, 

203.] 
CldfffC lough, 203.] 
Clog, 18. 
Clogged ikloffd), 165, 

Clog'gi-nesB (-^M), 138. 



CLOVEN 

aog;glnff inking). 

Clois'ter-al. 

Clois'tered, 150. 

Clois'ter-er. 

CloiB'ter-ing. 

Clonic 

Cldse iktaz), 9, h n. 24, 

161. 
Close (JtiM), n., a. had. 

161. 
Closed (ladxd), 
Clos'er (JtWy-). 
Clos'et (kioz'-). 
Clos'et-ed {Hoz^-). 
Clos'et-ing {klotf-). 
Cl6s'ing(lWz'-). 
Clos'urc Iklaz'jfur), 91. 
Clot, 18 
CloVbur, 206. 
Cloth {kUth, or kUavth) 

08 N.) [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; Jfc/oM, Wk. Sm. 

155.] 
Clothe, 24, 38. 
ClotEed (klothd), 150. 
ClofEes {kJSthz) Fso 

Sm. ; kl9thzi or kuz^ 

Wr. Gd, ; kl9z, Wk. 

155.] 

ly Though Walker 

Sres only the pronunda- 
i>n i7oc. he •peaks of it aa 
** a corruption that ia nol 
Incarable." 

CIdthMer (klot^fpur)Jil. 

ClolH'ing. 

CloFpolI [Clodpoll, 

203.] 
Clot'ted, 66, N. ; 176. 
Clot'ting. 
aot'ty,W. 
Cloud. 28. 
C1oud'-c^>t. 
Cloud'ed. 
Cloud'1-ly, 169. 
CIoadM-nesB. 
Cloud'ing. 
Clood'y, in, 169. 
Clough ikh^ft or klof) 

iso Wr. ; kluf, Sni. ; 
•lof. (W. J kfou, Wk. 
156.] [Cloff(inthe 
sense of an aliowance 
in ireioAl), 203.] 

Clout, 2& 

Clout'ed. 

Clont'ing. 

Clout'-mUi. 

Clo'rate. 

Clove. 

Clo'yen (klo*vn), 149. 



A, e, i, 5, u, y, long ; i, <^, y, o, a, j^, short i Hazin flu-. ka$ in flut, ka$iM 



CLOVEX-FOOTED 



141 



CODLING 



Clo'Ten-ffSbt'ed. 

Clo'ver. 

Clo'vered (-«vr(f)» 150. 

Clown, 2a. 

Cloy, 27. 

Cloyed (kloid), 150. 

Clor'lnff. 

Club, 22. 

Clubbed ikhthdy, 150, 

176. 
aub'bUt, 170. 
Clab'-fiSbt. 
Cluck, 22, 181. 
Clacked (khikt). Note 

C,p. 94. 
Clnck'lng. 

[Clue, &0.— 5te Clew] 
Clump, 22. 

Clum'si-ly (-z%-), IflO. 
Clum'si-ncflt (-z%-), 78. 
Clom-sy (-ary), 100. 
Clunch, 22, 44. 
Clang, 22, 54. 
Cla'm-ftl. 
Clas'ter, 77. 
Clus'tcred, 150. 
Clas'ter-lng. 
Clutch, 22, 44. 
Clatebed {khOchi), 
Clutch'ing. 
Clat'ter, 170. 
Clattered, 150. 
Clut'ter-lng. 
Clyp'e-atc, 109. 
Clyf»'mi-an (kUz'-), 
Clys'mic (kliz*-), 
Clys'ter, 16, 77. 
Co-a-cer'vate. 
Cofteh, 24, 44. 
Cdftch'maii, 206. 
C5-ad'Jat4uit, 100. 
Co-«l-lu'tor. 122. 
CA-agrMi-Lft-ble, 104. 
Co-ag'u-Iant, 160. 
Co-ag'a-late, 73. 
Co-cfir'Q-lAt-ed, 183. 
Co-a^'u-lit-ing. 
Co-ftg-o-la'tion. 
Copula tire, 84, 106. 
Co-ogr'u-lit-or. 
Co-og'u la-to-nr, 86. 
Co-aff'u4um (L.). 
Co-aid', 223. 
rc o a k,203.— 5« Coke.] 
Cdal (24), n. a carbona- 

ceons pubstanoe. [See 

Cole, 160.] 
Cdaled (kdld), part. 

burnt to chareoal. 

[See Cold, 160.] 
C^-leaee' (-fe«')i 171. 
Cd-a>le0eed> (4e8i'), 
C6-ft>let'eiiig: (■Us'inff). 



Cd-a-lea'oence (-lessens). 

Co-a-les'cent (4es'ent). 

Coal'inff. 

Cd-a-U'tion (4i$h'un). 

Coal'y. 93, 160. 

Cdam'mfi^s. 

Co-ap-ta'tion. 

C5-arc-ta'tion. 

Cdarse (kdn), a. not 
fine. [iSee Conne, 
160.] 

CdMt,24. 

Cdaat'ed. 

Cdaat'er. 

Coaat'ing. 

Cdaat'wise (-trt^). 

Coat (94, 130), n. a kind 
of garment. [See 
Cote, 160.1 

Coat'ed. 

Cdat-ee', 121. 

Cdat'ing. 

Coax, 24. 

Coaxed (k6kgt). 

C6ax'er. 

Cob, 18. 

Co'bait, or CoONdt 
(■bdU) [ko^bawU, Sm.; 
ka'bdU, Gd. } kSbfalt, 
Wk. ; ko'bawU^ or 
kob'aU, Wr. 155.1 

Q^^\MAiAne{ko'bawU4n) 
[ko'bdUin, Gd.: kob'- 
alt-in, Wr, 155.] 

Cob'bing, 170. 

CobOile, V. 164. 

Cob'ble, n. [Co'ble (in 
the sense of a $maU 
JUhing boat), 203.] 

Cob'bled (koh'td), 150, 
183 

Cobniler. 

Cob^bling, 183. 

Cob'le (*o6'0 [Cob- 
ble, 203.] 

fCo boose, TOi.'^See 
Caboose.] 

Cob'web. 206. 

Col/webbed (-webd), 

Cob-web'by f Cob- 
web y, Gd.203.J 

Coc-agnt\ Fr.)(to*-an') 

CJoo-cff er-ouB, 108. 

Coc'cTX ikok^aiks). 

Cooh^-neal (78, 169) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; koch- 
Ulil'y, 8m.; kuch'i- 
nil, Wk- 155.] 

Cochae-an (Jfcoit^-), 1«>. 

Coch-le-a'rl-form {kok-). 

Cooh'le-a-ry flro*'-), 72. 

Cocb'le-ate (kokf), 

CoohaeatHBd {koV-). 



Coch'IIte (kok -). 
Cock, 18, 181. 
Cockade', 121. 
Cock4d'ed. 
Cock-a-too', 122. 
Cock-a-toon'. 
Cock'a-trTce, (171) [noi 

kok'a-tris, IM,] 
Cook'bill. 
Cock'bdat, 206. 
Cock'chaf-er. 
Cocked {kokt), 165. 
Cock'er. 
Cock'er-el. 
Cock'et. 
Cock'ing. 
Coc'kle, 164. 
Coc'kled (kok^ld), 165, 
Cook'llng. [183. 

Cock'ney, 96, 169, 190. 
Cock'ney-lsm (-n^-izm). 
Cock'pit, 206. 
Cock'rdach. 
Cook's-cdmb (-k(hn) 

niS) [Coxcomb, 

Codc'spur. 

Cook'swain (kok'awan)^ 
or kok^an) [so Wr. j 
kok'sicAn, ooll. kok*- 
#n, Wk. 8m.; kok*- 
swUn, contracted into 
kok'$n, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

ay Seamen alirayi pro- 
nounce this word cottH, 

Co'coa (ko'kd) (171) 

[Cacao, 203.] 
Co'coa-nat. 
OMXwn', 121. 
0>-coon'er-y. 
Coc'tlle. 
Coc'tion. 
Cod, 18. 
CodMle, 164. 
Cod'dled (kod'ld), 150. 
Cod'dUng. 
Code, 24. 
Co-de'ia (-de'wa). 
Co-deTno [Codein, 

203.] 
Co'dex (L.) fpl. Cod'i- 

ce» i-8iz), 198.] 
Cod'fish, 206. 
Cod'ger (koj'ur). 
Cod'f-eil, 169. 
Cod-i-cil'la-ry, 72, 170. 
Cod-i-fl-oa'tion. 
Cod'i-f ied, 186. 
Cod'i-fi-er. 
Cod'l-iy, 78, 94. 
Co^llW i-dW). 
Cod'ling. 



^ ; A 4M <» there -, Cbatin foot iqa$in fkcile ; gh cm g <n go *, ^<m lnthi%. 



COBPPICIENT 



142 



COLUHATION 



Co-ef-fl'dent (-JUh'eni), 

171. 
Cae'li-«o (•e'-) fC e li a e , 

203.] 
Co-emp'tloii ('em'-)tl(Si. 
Co-e'qoal. 

Ck>-erce' (-«r»')i 105, 171. 
Co-eroed'(-er«*'),l«)|183 
Co-er^M-ble, 104, IGO. 
Co-crc'lng-. 
Ck)-er'cion (-8hun). 
Co-er^lve, 84. 
Co-CB-sen'tial. 
Co-€R-een-tl-ari-tyC-«W- 

al'-) [so Wk. Sm.Wr.j 

ko-es-ten-shfil'i-tyf 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Co-e-ta'nc-o&H. 
Co-e-tcr'nal, 21, N. 
Ck)-e-ter'iil-ty, 108, 169. 
Co-e'val. 
Co-ex-lBt' (egz-), 
Co-ex-lst'ed {-egz-). 
Co-ex-ist'enoe {-egz-), 

109. 
Co-«x-iBt'ent( -^«-), 109. 
Co-cx-iat'ing i-€ffz-). 
Co-cx-ten'slve, t^. 
Corfee, 06, N. } 170. 
Coffer. 
Coffer-dam. 
Cofferer. 
Coffin, 170. 
Coffined (-/!mf), 150 
Coffln-ing. 
Coffle (164) [Can fie, 

203.] 
Cog, 18. 
Co'gen-cy, 109. 
Co'gent. 

Cogged (koffd), 170. 
Cog'ging, 138. 
Cog-rta-bil'i-ty (cqj-). 
Cog'i-ta-ble (co/-), 164. 
Cog'I-tate (coj'-\ 169. 
Cog'i-tat-ed {cof-), 183. 
Cog'i-tat-Ing {eaj'-). 




[Cogniac,203.] 
Cog'nate. 
Cog-na'tlon. 
Cog-nl'tlon (^Uh'un). 
Cog'nl-sa-ble (kog'ni- 

za-bly or kon'i-za^l). 
Cog'nl-zanoc (kog'ni- 

zans, or kowi-zans) 

[bo Wk. Wr. Gd. ; 

Kon'i-zan»t Sm. 166.] 
Cog'nl-zant, 78. 
Cog-ni-zee' (kog-ni-ze'i 

or ktmA-zv). 



Cog-iii-sor'(itM^<-eor', 

or kon-i-zoru 
Cog-no' men (L.), 125. 
Cog-nom'i-nal, 228. 
Cog-nom-i-na'tion. 
CQg-no9-cen't€ (It.) [pi. 

Ck>g-no»-cen't% (-«), 

198.1 
Cog-nos'd-ble, 164, 171. 
Cog'-wheel. 
Co-hab'it. 
Co-hab'lt-ant, 228. 
Co-hab-it-a'tlon. 
Co-hab'it-ed. 
Co-hab'lt-er. 
Co-hab'it-ing. 
Co'-hcir (-*r), 223. 
Co-here'. 

Co hered' (-A«nf')» IfiO, 
183. 

Co-her'enoe. 

Co-her'en-cy, 109. 

Co-her'ent, 49, N. 

Co-her'ing. 

Co-h<^Bl-Wri-ty. 

Co-he'ai-ble, 164, 109. 

Co-he' sion C-zhun), 

Co-he'slve, 84. 

Co'hort, 139. 

Coif, fi. ft V. (27) 
[Qnoif.2a3.] 

Coifed {ixHft\ 150. 

Coif fiire [botf^ooTj Sm. 
(See § 26) J koif/oor, 
Wr. 155.] 

Coigne (koin) (162), n. 
a corner ; — a wedge. 
fSee Coin, ICO.f 
[Coin, Quoin, 203.] 

Coil, 27. 

Coiled, 159. 

Coil'ing. 

Coin, n. a comer; — a 
wedge. rCoigne, 
Quoin, 203.] 

Coin, n. a piece of met- 
al used aa money: — 
V. to convert into 
money ; to invent. 
[See Coigne, 160.] 

Coin'age. 

Co-ln-cide'. 

Co-in'ci-denoe, 109. 

Co-in'ci-dent, 169. 

Coined, 160. 

Coin'er. 

Coir, 27. 

Coia'tril. 

C o i t , 203.— 5ee Qnoit] 

?o-I'tion (-Uh'un). 

Ck>ke (24) [C oak, 203.] 

Coked (kok), 

Cdk'ing. 



y 



CoPan-der {kvi') [ C n 1 

lender, 203.] 
Col-ber-tine' {kol-ber- 

tin') [so Wk. Sm.-, 

kol'ber-tiUjWr. i kol*' 

her rtn, Wb. (3d. 156.] 
Col'chi-cnm (-*!-), 171. 
Col'co-thar. 
Cold, a. not warm. [See 

CkMded, 160.] 
Cole (24), n. a plant of 

the cabbage family. 

[See Coal, 160.] 
Co-leoi>'ter-an. 
Co-le-op'ter-otts. 
Cole' seed, 206. 
Cole' wort (^-vurt). 
Col'ic, 170. 
Col'ick-y, 182. 
Col'in. 
Col-i-«e'um (111) rCol- 

osaeum. 203. j 
Col-lab-o-ra'tion. 
Coi-lab-o-ra'tor, 170. 
Col-lapse', 170. 
Ck>l-iapsed' (-i<9«f ). 
(>>l-lap8'ing. 
Col-lap'sion. 
0>l'lar, n. a neck-band. 

[See Choler, 160.J 
Col'Urcd {-htrd), 150. 
Coriar-ing. 
Col-lat'a-ble, 164. * 
Col-late'. 
Col-lat'ed, 183. 
Col lat'er^, 170. 
Col-lat'iug. 
Col-la' tion, 112. 
Col-la'tion-er. 
Col-lat'Ive, 84. 
Ck)l-lat'or, 228. 
Col'lfague (-tto), 171. 
Col-lecr, r. 161. , 
Col'lect, n. 101. 
Col-lec-4a'ne-a ( L. pi. ), 
Col-lec-ta'neotts. 
Col-lect'ed. 
Col-lect'i-ble, 104, 160 
Col-lec'tion. 
Col-lectlTe, 84. 
Col-lect'or. 
Col-leg'a-ta-ry, 72. 
CoI'lege i-t^), 109, 171. 
Col-le'gi-an. 
Col-Ie'gi-ate, 73. 
Col'Iet, 170. 
Collide'. 
Col-Ud'ed, 183. 
Col-lid'ing. 
Col'Uer {Sol'ifur), 171. 
Ck)l'lier-y (kol'vur-y). 
Col'li-mat-lng. 
Col-U-ma'tion, 112. 



4f 6, i, 0> u> yt long ; ft, «, 1, 6, tt, ft $hort ; K m <n far, kcuim fiat, ft cm m 



COLLIMATOE 



143 



COMMAND 



Col-li-mA'tor. 

Collin-e-a'tioti. 

Col-Un'gual, 170. 

Col ll-qaa'tion. 

Col Uq^ua-ttre (-Hk^toa-) 

O)] liq'ae-fac-don (-^U-'- 

•W-). 

Col U'ftion (-Hzhfun). 

Col'lo-cate, 170. 

Col'lo-dit-ed. 

Col'lo-dLt-tiig. 

Col-lo-ca'tloD, 112. 

Col lo'di-on, 169, 170. 

Col'lop. 

Col lo'qal-al. 

Col-lo'qai-«l-i8in (-izm). 

Col'lo-qaiat. 

Corio-qay, 170. 

Collude'. 

Col-lud'ed, 183. 

Col-lud'er. 

Col-lad'lngf. 

Col-lu'fllon i-zhun). 

Col-la'slve. 

Col-lu'so-ry. 

Col-iu'ri-iM {-4z) (L. 

ting. A pi.). 
Col'ly, 93, 160. 
Coi-lyr'i-um (L.) [pi. 

Ccilvfi-a.] 
Col'o-cynth, 171. 
Col-o-cjrnthlne [C o 1 o - 

CTDthin, 201.1 
Co-logne' (Jfco-Wn'). 
Co'lon. 
Colonel ikur'net), 171. 

iy*Tbc •pelling b 
Frmehi the pvoounda- 
tion romet from the Span- 
ish VortmeL" Snuut. 

Colonelcy (tur'nelsjf). 

Co lo'ni-al. 

Cbl'o-nlBt, 170. 

Coi-o-ni za'tion, 112. 

Col'o-nixe, 170, 202. 

Coro-nized, 150, 183. 

Col'o-niz-infi^. 

Col-on-nad^, 170. 

Col'o-njr, 170. 

Coro-pnon, 170. 

Col o-pho'nl-an. 

Col'o-pho-ny, or Co- 
loph'o-ny[fa>/'o->b-ny, 
W b. Gd. ; kol'o-/on^, 
Sm.; i»-lo/'o-ny, Wk.; 
ko4of<hn^, or koVo- 
fo-nif, Wr. 166.] 

Col-o-qninti-da. 

Col'or ilnWur) (22) 
[Colon r, Sm. 209.1 

Col'or-a-blj (lrt»/'-), 16*. 

Col'or-«-bly (!•«/'-). 

Col-orna'tlon {kul-). 



Col'or-a-ture (kul'-). 
Col'ored (l-uVurd), 171. 
Col-or-iflo (kul-ur-if*- 

ik) [BoSm. Wb. Gd.; 

kolor-ifik, Wk. Wr. 

165.] 
Col'or-ing (Ltd'-). 
Col'or-Ut(te'-) 
Corom (kui'urz) 
Co-los'sal, 170. 
Col-OB-se'an, 110. 
Cot-oB-tefum (L.) [C o 1- 

Iseam, 203.1 



Co-1ob' Blan (ito-2a«Van). 
- . . _ ._ J 

Co4o9'»\ ; £ng. pi. 



Co-1ob'rub (L.) [L. p! 



■I 



(-«), 



Co-lOB'BUB-eS 

198.J 
Col'port-age [so Gd. ; 

kot-p^rVajyViv. 155 1 
Col'p6rt-or [so W6. 

Gd.; kol-p9rt'ar. Wr. 

155.J 
Col'Btaff. 
Colt, 24. 

Colrer [C o a 1 1 e r,203.1 
Colt'B'-fdbt, 213. 
Col'u-ber. 
Col'u brine, 82, 162. 
Co-lam'ba. 
Corum-ba-ry (72) [io 

8m. Wb. Gd. ; ko- 

lum'ba-ry, Wk. ; kd'- 

um-b<i-ryt or ko^um'- 

ba-ry, Wr. 155,] 
Ck>-lum'bi-an, 109. 
Co-lnm'blc. 
O>l-um-birer-oa8, 106. 
Corum-bine, 62, 162. 
Col'am-bite. 
Co-lum'bi-um, 160. 
Col u mel'la, 170. 
CoFumn (-umX 102) [not 

kol'yum, 163.] 
Co-lnm'nar. 
Col'amned (-umd). 
Ck>-lum-ni-a'tion. 
Ck) Inre' n21) [noi kdl' 

yur, 163.] 
Col'za. 
Co'ma, 72. 
Co-mate', n, [bo Wk. 

Sm.Wr.; l-«^ma^ Gd. 

166.] 
Cdm'ate, a. [so Sm. 

Wr. ; ko'mdtj Wb. 

Gd. 166.] 
Co'ma-tOBC [bo Sm.Wb. 

Gd.; kom-a-t(iz\ Wk. 

Wr. 166.] 
Co'ma-to&B [bo Wb. 

Gd. ; kom'a-tus. Wr. 

166.] 



Cdmb {k6m)y 24. 162. 
Com'bat (kum'batt or 

kom'bat) [bo Wr. ; 

kum'bat, Wk. Sm. ; 

itom'6a<,Wb.Gd.l55.] 
Com'bat-a-ble (kum' - ,or 

kom'-) [bo Wr. ; kom- 

baVa-bl, Gd. 156.1 
Com'bat-ant (ittim'-, or 

k5m'-), 
Com'bat-er (Xrum'-, or 

kdm'-). 
Com'bat-Ire {kum'-^ or 

k5m'-). 
Combed ikimd). 
Cora-biu'a-ble, 164. 
Com-bi-na'tion. 
Com-bin'a-to-ry, 72. 
Com -bine'. 
Cora-biued', 160. 
Com-biu'er. 
Comb'ing (A«ro'-)- 
Com-binlng. 
Com-buBt', 121. 
Com-buB-tl-bU'i-ty, 
Com-buB'U-ble, 164, 160. 
Com-buB'tion {Amaf- 

ynn). 
Com-buB'tlre. 
Come (ittcm), 22, 163. 
Co-mc'di-an, 160. 
Com'e-dy, 171. 
Come'U-neBB(i'ttm'-))160 
Come'ly rifctim'-), 171. 
Com'er (i*um'-), 183. 
Com'et, 18, 170. 
Com-et-a'ri-um. 
CJom'et-a-ry, 72. 
Com-et-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Com'ilt (/turn'-), 22. 
Com'fl-turo {kum'-). 
Com'fort {kum'-), 135. 
Com'fort-a-ble (Arum'-), 

132, 164. 
Cora'fort-ed {kum'-). 
Com'fort-er {kum'-). 
Com'fort-lng {kum'-). 
Com'frey {kum'fry) 

[Cumfrey, Com- 

fry,203.] 
Com'ic, 170. 
Com'ic-al. 
Com'lc-al-ly, 170. 
Com'infir {kum'-). 183. 
Co-wil'«-a (L. pi.) (fto- 

mish't-a). 
Co-ml'Ual (mitVaZ). 
Com'i-ty, 169, 170. 
Com'ma, 170. 
Com-mand'. 

wr " Speaker* of the 
old achool, and the vnlnr, 
uniTenally pronounocwe 



lUl i %tuin itktn ] 6b at in foot ; 9 oj in ikcile ; gh m g in go ; tli a« in this. 



COMMANDANT 



144 



COMMUNING 



o broad [ai in far] in botli 
thew word* {command and 
demcotd]." Smart. Ttiey 
are verjr common 1/ pro- 
nouncad. In tlte United 
Btatsa, oom-mdMe and db- 
mnmt. 

Com-man-diint', 122. 

Com-numd'ed. 

Com-mand'er. 

Com-mand'er-y [Com- 
mandry,aa3.] 

Com-maiuring. 

Com-mand'ment. 

[Commandry, 203. 
— See Commandery.] 

Com-mat'ie. 

Com'ma-tiBm (-tizm), 

Com-m^as' ur-a-ble 
i-mizh'-), IW. 

Com-mem'o-ra-ble, 164. 

Com-niem'o-rate, 170. 

Com-mem'o-rat-ed. 

Com-mem'o-rat-iag. 

Com-mem-o-ra'tion. 

Com-mem'o-ra-tlve, 84. 

Com-mem'o-ra-to-ry. 

Com-meQ0ie'. 

Com-mcnoed' {•memt'). 

Com-mence'ment. 

Ck>iii-menc'ing, 183. 

Com-mena'. 

Com-mend'a-blefBO Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j lom'- 
men-da-blj or kom- 
mend'a-blt Wk. 107, 

Com-mend'a-bly. [165.] 

Com-men'dam (L.). 

Com-mend'a-ta-ry (72), 
a. holding: ^ oom- 
mendam. [See Com- 
mendatory. 148.] 

Com-mend-«'tion. 

Com-mend'a-tor. 

Com-mend'a-to-ry, a. 
bestowing commend- 
ation. [See Com- 
mendatary, 148.] 

Com-mend'ed. 

Com-mendMng. 

Com-men-an-ra-bll'i-ty 
(-«ftoo-). 

Com-men'BU-ra-ble 
i-shoo-), 1C4, 171 

Corn-men' sn-rate 
i-shoo-). 

Cora-m^n-BQ-ra'tion 
(-«Aoo-). 

Com'ment, v. [ao Wk. 
Sm. Wb. Gd. ; kofA'- 
ent, or kom-erU', Wr. 
155.] 

Com'ment, n. 170. 

Com'ment-«-ry, 72. 



Com'moit-a-tor. 

Com-ment'od. 

Com'menter [bo 8m. 
Wb. Gd. ; kom^ent'ur, 
Wk. ; kam'eni wr, or 
kom-ent'ur, Wr. 165.] 

Com'meroe {-murt\ 170. 

Com-mer'cial {-thai), 

Com-ml-na'tlon. 

Com-mln'a-to-ry. 

Com-min'gle (•ming'gt), 
64, 164. [aid). 

Com-min'gled {-mmg'- 

Com-min'gling l-ming'- 
gling), 

Com'mi-nate, 160, 170. 

Com'mi-nat-ed, 183. 

Com'ml-nat-lng. 

Com-ml-nn'tion, 112. 

Com-mis'er-a-bie 
C-niis'-), 164. 

Com-mia'er-ate (-miv'-). 

Com-mlB'er-at-ed 
{^miz''), 

Com-miB'er-at-ing 
(-mte'-). 

Com-mis-er-a'tion 
{^miz-). 

Com-mifl'er-a-tlye 
(-mfe'-). 

Com-mlB'er-at-or 
f-mia/-). 

Com-mis-sa'ri-ali 170. 

CommiMariat (Fr.) 
(kom-U-^r'e-ay or 
lmm^»-9a'ri<U) [bo 
Wr. ; lx>fi»4«-«dr'6-«(, 
Sm. ; kom-U-aa'ri-at, 
Wb. Gd. ; 164, 155 J 

Com'mis-sa-ry, 72, iTO. 

Com -mis' Bion (-mish'- 
un). [vfui). 

Com-miB'8ioned(-m{«A'- 

Com-mls'Bion-er 
{-mish'un-), 

Com-mis'sion-ing 
{-mUh'un-). 

Com-miBs'ure (-miik'' 
ytir), 91. 

Com-mit', 170. 

Com-mit'ment. 

Com-mit'tal, 176. 
I Com-mit'ted. 

Com-mlt'tee (161, 170), 
ft. a bodv of perBons 
appointea for any pur- 
pose. 

Com-mit-tee' (161). n. 
the person to whom 
the care of an idiot or 
alunatic iscommitted. 

Com-mit'ter (176) 
[Committor, 203.] 



Com-mit'tl-ble, 164, 109. 
Com-mit-tor', 118. 

■V* Thla word it thui 
■peUed and pronounced 
when it la eontraated with 
Cbm mit tM T . 

Com-mix'. 

Com-mixed' (-mO^ff ). 

Com-mix'ing. 

(}om-niixt'ion (-yirn). 

Com-mixt'nre (-fri«r},91. 

Com-mode' [bo Wk.Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; kfHn'mud, 
Sm. 165.1 

Com-mo'di-oOs [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. (3d. ; kom 
mo'di-uSf or k&m-mo'- 
jyw, Wk. 134, 155.] 

Com-mod'l-ty, 1(K), 170. 

Com'mo-dore (170) [so 
Sm. (M. ; kom'mo- 
dir, or kom-mo-dHr'f 
Wk. Wr. 155.] 

(}om'mon, 170. 

Com'mon-a-ble, 164,169. 

Com'mon-age. 

Com'mon-aTty, 145. 

Com'mon-er, 170. 

Com^on-nesa, 170. 

Com'mon-place. n. A a. 

Com-mon-place', r. 

Com'mon-plaee-bdbk, 
206, Exc 4. 

Com'mon-plaoed' 
i-pUUt'), 

Com-mon-pla^'lng. 

Com'mons {-munz). 

Com-mon-weal' . 

(}om'mon-wSalth, or 
Com-mon-wealth' [so 
Wr.; kom'm<m-u>etth, 
Wk. Sm.; kOm-mon- 
wetth*t Wb. (Sd. 155.] 

Com-mon-weaiths'man, 
171, 214. 

Com'mo-rance. 

Com'mo-ran-cy. 

Com-mo'tion. 

O>m-move' (-moor'). 

Com-mune', 170. 

Com-muned', 150. 

Com-mu-nl-oa-bil'i-ty'. 

Om-mu'nl-ca-biy, 164. 

Com-mu'ni-cant, 109. 

Com-mu'ni-cate, 73, 78. 

Com-mu'ni-cat-cd, 183. 

Com-mu'ni-cat ing. 

Com-mn-nl -caption. 

Com-ma'ni-cat4ye, 84. 

Com-mu'ni-cat-or. 

Com-mn'nl-ca-to-ry. 

Com-mun'ing, 183. 



a,g,i,6,n,^{on^; i, «, 1, 6, fi, f, «*orl ; Hatin fkr, 4 cm <n Ikat, A a« tw 



COMMUNION 



145 



COMFORTABLE 



Oom-munM<te (-yun). 
Com-miknMon-ist (-f^n). 
Corn'mn-nism {-nizm). 
Corn'mu-niBt. 
Com-ma-nist'ie. 
Com-ma'ni-ty, ItO, 
Commute biri-ty. 
Com-mat'a-ble, 1<H, 109. 
Com-ma-ta'tion. 
Com-mikt'a-tlve, 84. 
Com-mute'. 
Com-mat'ed. 
Com-mut'in^. 
Com-mut'u al, 91, 170. 
Co-mofle' [bo Sm. Wr. ; 

kofm^dM, Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Com'paet, n. 103, 101. 
Corn-pact', a. & V. 101. 
Com-pact'ed. 
Com-pactM-ble, lOi. 
Com-pact'lng. 
Com-pac'tion. 
Com-pa'gU (-jtz) [L. 

vng. A pi.] 
Com-pan'ion (-wun), 51, 
Com-pan'ion-a-Dle 

(•yv»-), 104, 109. 
Com'pa-07 (turn'-), 
Oom'pa-ra-ble (122) [notf 

kom-p^'a-bl, US3, 

153.] 
Com'pa-rites, n. pi. 
Com-p&r'a-tf ve, M, 170. 
Com-pare' i-pir), 14. 

Com-pared^(-i>«r(IO>l^> 
183. 

Com-par'cr (-pir*-). 

Com-par'ing (-pir). 

Com-p&r'l-Bon ikom- 

pdr'l-ntn, or kom- 

vlir^-sn) [to Wr. ; 

tom-pHr^i-mnj ooil. 

kom-pdr'i-$ny 8m. ; 

kom-p^r^i'iunt Wb. 

Od. ; komffdr'i-eny 

Wk. 150.] 
Corn-part'. 
Com-part'ed. 
Com-part'in^. 
Com-part'ment. 
Com'paaa (Inim'-), 22. 
Com'pasa-a-ble (Jrum'-), 

104. 109. 
Com'paitsed (kum'past). 
Com'pava-ea (kum'peu- 

e»)j n. pL 171. 
Com'pasa-ing {kum'-). 
Com-paa'aioii {-path'' 



). 
Com-paa'skm-ate 

{fkuh'un-). 
Coiii-paa'8ion4t-ed 

{•pash'un'). 



Cpm-pas' Bion-at-ing 



{-pofk'un). 

bil'i ty, 
Com-pat'i-blc, 104, 109. 



Com-paM bil'i ty, 169. 



Com pa'trl-ot [ao Wk. 

8m. Wr.; kompa'tri- 

oty or kom-pat'ri-oi, 

Gd. 155.1 
Com-peers 121. 
Corn-pel'. 15. 
Com-pel'ia ble, 104, 170. 
Com-pel-la'tioo, 112. 
Com-pel'la-to-rr. 
Compelled' (-peid'),160. 
Com-pel'ler 
Com-pel'lim^.- 
Com'pend, &. 
Com-pen'di-oQa [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; kom 

j7«n'i<-uf,Wk. 134,155.] 
Com-pen'di-am, 109. 
Com-poi'aate [so Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; kom-pen'- 

8(Uf or iom'pen-s&t^ 

Gd. 156.1 
Com-poi'aat-ed. 
Com-pen'sat-ing. 
Com-pen-aa'tlon. 
Com-pen'aa-tlve. 
Com-pen'aa-to-ry. 
Com-pete', 13. 
Com-p§t'ea, 183. 
Com'pe-tenoe. 
Com'i)e-teii-cy, 109. 
Com'pe4cnt. 
Com-pet'ing, 183. 
Com^pe4i'uoni-ii8h'un) 
Com-pet'i-tlve, 84, 109. 
Com-pet'1-tor, 171. 
Com-pi-U'tion, 112. 
Compile'. 25, 103. 
Com-pned', 150, 183^ 
Com-pil'cr. 
Com-pil'ing. 
Com-pla'oenoe, 171. 
Com-pla'oen-ey, 109. 
Com-pU'oent. 
Com-pla-oen'tial. 
Com-plain', 23, 103. 
Com-plain'a-ble, 104. 
Com-plain'ant. 
Com-pUUoed', 15a 
Com-plain'er. 
Com-plain'incr. 
Corn-plaint', 23. 
Com-plai-sance' (htoim') 

[§o Wk. 8m. Wr. ; 

kam'pta-zanttWb.Qd. 

155.1 
Com-pIai-Mmt' {-ztmf) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

hm'plA-zanit Wb.Gd. 

155.] 



.] 



kom- 



Com'ple-mcnt, n. ftil- 
nesB. [See Compli- 
ment, l<io.] 

Com-ple-ment'al, a.that 
completes. [Se^Com- 
plimental, 100 ] 

Com-ple-ment'a-ry, a. 
completing. [^e 
Complimental, 160.] 

Complete', 13, 103. 

Com-plet'ed. 

Com-plot'lng. 

Com-ple'tion. 

Com-plet'lve. 

Com-plc'to-ry, RO. 

Com'plex [tiot 
plex', 153, 150.] 

Com-plex'ion (-pleV- 
$hun). 

Com-plex'ion-a rj 
(-plek'shun-), 72. 

Com-plex'ioned (^-pleV- 
shund). 

Com-plex'i-ty, 109. 

Com-pli'a-ble, 104. 

Com-pli'anoe. 

Com-pli'ant, 169. 

Com'pli-cate, 73, 78. 

Com'pU-cat-cd, 183. 

Com'pU-cat-ing. 

Com-pU-ca'tion. 

Com-pU9'i-ty, 109, 17L 

Com-plled', 180. 

Com-pli'er. 

Com'pli-ment, n. an aot 
or an expression of 
civility. [See Com- 
plement, 160.1 

Com-pli-ment'al, a. im- 
plymg compliments, 
[itee Complemental, 
100.] 

Com-pli-ment'a-ry, a. 
bestowing compli- 
ment, [^ee Comple- 
mentary, 100.] 

Com'pli-ment-er. 

Com'pUne [C o m p li n , 
203.] 

Com'plot. 11. 101. 

Com-plot', V. 101. 

Com-plot'ted, 170. 

Com-plot'ting. 

Com-plu-ten'Bian 
(-«Aan). 

Comply', 25. 

Com-pone'. 

Com-i)o'nent [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; Icam-pa'- 
nentf or kom'po-nentt 
Gd. 155.1 

Com^)6rt'. 

Com-port'a-ble, 104. 



ftU; 0<u<n there; ObMfnfoot; ^cuinfkidXeigha8gingo\Q^a$inthiM. 

13 



COMPORTED 



146 



GONCOMITAM 



Com-pflrt'ed. 
Com-pdrt'ing. 
Com-pose' (-p««'), 24. 

183. 
Com-pos'er {-p9z' ), 
Com-pos'iii'j (-pflz'-). 
Com-pos'IU» (-poz'U) 

(83, 152) [not kom'po- 

zit, 15 K] [un). 

Com-po .uf'tion (-«mA'- 
Com-po»'l-tIve {-poz'-). 
Com-po8'i-tor {-poz'-). 
Com'poMt. n. 101. 
Compost', V. IW, 161. 
Com-pos'ure {-poz'-),9l, 
Cora'pote. 

Com'pound. a. A n. 161. 
Corn-pound', v. Ifll. 
Com poand'a-blc, 104. 
(ToiQ-pound'ed. 
Com-pound'cr. 
Com-pound'insf. 
Com-pro-hendS 122. 
Com-pre-hcnd'ed. 
Com-pre-hend'or. 
Com-pre-hcnd'in«;'. 
Com-pre-hen'8i-ble, 104. 
Com-pre-hen ' s l-bljr. 
Com-pre-ticn'HioQ. 
Com-pre-hen' sive. 
Corn-press', v. 103, 101. 
Com'presB, n. 101. 
Corn-pressed' (-prest'). 
Com-pres-si-bU'i-ty , 100. 
Com-press'ing. 
Comrpress'Ive. 
Com-proBs'or. 
Com-prcs8'aro( -prcslk'-) 
Com-print', v. 101. 
Com'print. n. 101. 
Com-print'cd. 
Com-prlnt'ing. 
Comprise' (-prt«'). 
Com-prised'C prtsri')l«) 
Com-pris'ing (-prl«'-). 
Com'pro-mise l-mlz). 
Com'pro-mised {-mlzd). 
Com'pro-mis-er {-fnlz-). 
Com'pro-mis-in^-mlz-) 
Com'pro-mlt. 
Com'pro-mit-tedTC o m- 

promited, Wb. Gd. 

177, 203.] 
Com'pro-inlt-tlnff 

rCompromiting^, 

Wb. Gd. 177, 203.1 
Gomp-troFler(ifco»-#ror- 

ur) [Controller, 

203.] 

oar This word If now 
written Comptrotter only 
when uaed In • techntou 



mnm to dmolt one «ffto 
eranttiiee lAc a ec otmi a </ 
other dffieen. 

Com-pul'sioii. 
Com-pol'slve. 
Com-pul'so-rj, 80. 
Com-ponc'tion 

i-pungk'-). 
Com-punc'tiotts 

( -pungk' tihu*). 
Com-pur-g^'tion. 
Com'pur-ga-tor [so 8m. 

Wr. ; kom-pur-ga'ior, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Com-put'a-ble, 104, 100. 
Com-pu-ta'tion. 
Com-pute', 20. 
Com-put'ed, 183. 
Gom-put'er. 
Com-put'in^. 
Com'rade [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. : kum'rAd, Wk. ; 

tom'r&d, or Aruin'rOd, 

Wr. 166.] 
Con, 18. 

Con-eat'e-nate, 100. 
Con-cat'e-nat-ed . 
Con-oat'e-nat-lng. 
Con-cat-e-na'tlon. 
Con'cave ikoJiff'-)^ 54. 
Con-oav'i ty, 108, 100. 
Con-ca'rofis. 
Con-oSal', 13. 
Con-oeal'a-blc, 104, 10.). 
Con-c(^aled', 106. 
Con-ceal'er. 
Con-ooal'ing. 
Con-cc>al'ment. 
Con-<5ede'. 
Con-ced'ed, 183. 
Con-ced'ing. 
Con^k'it'7l21, 100, N. 
Con-ceit'ed, 
Con-oeit'ine. 
Con-cciv'a-ble, 104, 100. 
Con'oelve', 100. 
Con-ceived', 166, 183. 
Con-celv'er. 
Con-ceiv'ing, 
Con-oent', n. harmony. 

[See Consent, 100.] 
Con-cen'trate. 
Con-cen'triit-ed, 183. 
Con-oen'trat-ing. 
Con-cen-tra'tioQ. 
Con-cen'tre [Concen- 
ter preferred by Wb. 

and Qd.^See Note 

E, p. 70.1 
Con-ocn'tnc, 100. 
Con-«cn'trlc-al, 108. 
C/On-cep'ta-cle, 104, 100. 
Con-cep'tion. 



Oon-oep'tloiMd-lBt 
Con-oem', 21, N, 
Con-oenioid' {'Semd')^ 
Con-cem'ing. [ 105 

Con-cem'ment. 
Con-ocrt', V. 103, 101. 
Con'oert, n. 103, 161. 
Con-oert'ed. 
Con-cert'ing. 
Con-cer*to (It.) [pi. Con- 

cerftds f-W«), 102.] 
Con-ces'sion (-aeM'uti). 
Con-oes'sion-a-ry, 72. 
Con-ces'slve. 
Con-ces'so-ry. 
Conch (kongk), 62, 64. 
Conch'1-fer {ixmgk* ), 

100. 
Conch-if er-otta (kongk' 

if). 108. 
Conch'itc {kongk'-), 182. 
Conch'oid {ktrngk^). 
Conch-oid'al (foongk). 
Conoh-o-log'ie-al 

{kongk-o^qj'-), 108. 
Conch-ol'o-gist^Jwn^t-> 
Conch-oFo-gy 

(konffk-)j 108. 
Conch-yl-l-a'oeona 

(kongk-U-i'a^»ku»)tlt2 
Conch-yl-i-om'c-try 

ikongk), 108. 
Conch-yri-otts (konak-) 
Om-d^erge (Pr.) (Jtoit- 

Con-cU'i-atc [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ko^ 
•Wyat, Wk. 166.] 

Con-<dl'i-at-ed, 183. 

Con-oil'i-at-ing. 

Con-cll-i-a'tlon. 

Con-cil'i-at-or. 

Con-cilM-a-to-ry[0O Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; k<m- 
$a*ya-ttkr^, Sm. 166.1 

Gon-dso', 121. 

Con'olaye ^kong*-)^ 54. 

Con'cla-vist (Xron^-). 

Con-olnde', 20. 

Con-dud'ed, 18Sw 

Con-clud'er. 

Con-clud'ing. 

Con-olu'sion {^-lihuny. 

Con-clu'slve, 84. 

Con-du'so-ry, 80. 

Con-coct', 103. 

Con-ooet'ed. 

Con^x>ct'in^. 

Con-«oc'tion. 

Con-ooc'tlTe. 

Gon-oom'i-tanoe, 78, 16iL 

Gon-com'1-tan-ey, 100. 

Con-oom'i-tant, 100, 17a 



a. 6, 1, 0, u» y, long } A, 6* X, 6, ft, j^, tkori } ft m <» ftr, 4 of to tu^, tMkk 



UNCORD 



147 



CONFISCATORY 



•d(ton^O,54. 

Hl'a-ble, l&i. 

rd'anoGy 160. 

rd'ant. 

■d'at. 

•d'lBt. 

me {hong'kdrs). 

(fl'cence, 171. 

is'd-ble, 16i. 109. 

rte', ©. 161. 

fte {kong*krBt)t 

y 8m. Wb. Gd. ; 

r«<',Wk.; kong'- 

orbm-krit'tWr, 

•fed, 183 
Visig. 
j'tion. 
/tioa-al. 
('tton-ariy, 72. 

bin-age. 

t)lii-a-ry, 72. 

bine(itoii^'-),M. 

pis-oenoe. 

nis-oent. 

r 21. 

i«d,'l60, 17». 

•'rence, 160, 170. 

i^rent. 

p'ring. 

i'8k>n(-ittMA'un). 

»'Blve, 84. 

am' {-dem')j 162. 

in'iia-ble,16i,100. 

n-na'lion. 

n'n»-to-iy. 

nned' {-deu^d'), 

n'ner [not kon- 



ir. 153.J 

nn'nlmnp I 



tn'ning {not kon- 

i-sa-biPi-tr. 

I'aa-ble, 164, 160. 

i-M'tion. 

I'sa-tlre. 

ISC'. 103. 

ised' {-den$V). 

is'er. 

is'ing. 

r, n. a pUot. [See 

or, 160.] 

0oend', 171. 

-soend'ed. 

aoend'ing. 

-toen'sion. 

ni' (HflnO. 121, 

Dient, 100. 
doo (-diUh'un), 
tioD-al (-4^'- 



Con-dl'tioned (-(M«A'- 

und). 
Con-do'la-to-ry, 86. 
Con-dolc% 103. 
Con-duled', 166, 183. 
Con-doie'ment. 
Con-do'lenoe (160) [not 

kon'do-lcns, 153.] 
Con-doFer. 
Con-doi'ing. 
Con'dor (S), n. a kind 

of vulture. [ See Con- 

der. 160.J 
Con-<luoe', 26. 
Con-duced' (-d^t')y 

Note C, p. 34. 
Con-du9'i-ble, 164, 160. 
Con-du^lve, 84. 
Con'duct. n. 103, 161. 
Coo-duct', V. 103, 161. 
Con-dnot'ed. 
Con-duct-l-bU'i-ty, 108. 
Con-duct'i-ble, 164, 160. 
Con-duct'ing. 
Con-duo'tioii. 
Con-ductlve. 
Con-dnct-Iv'i-ty. 
Con-duct'or. 
Con'dult (kun'dit, or 

kon'ditntvn'dUyWk. 

Sm. Wr. ; kon'dU, 

Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Con'djrle, 171. 
Con'dj-loid. 
Cone, 24. [ny.] 

rC o n e y , 208.-- 5ee Co- 
Con-fab^a-la'tioii. 
Con-Ar-re-a'tioo. 
Con-feot', V. 103, 161. 
Con'fect, n. 103, 161. 
Con-fect'ed. 
Con-fect'ing. 
Con-fbc'tion. 
Con-fec'tlon-er. 
Con-feo'tion-er-y, 160. 
Con-fed'er-a-cy, 169. 
Con-fed'er-ate. 
Con-fed'er-at-ed, 183. 
Con-fed 'er-at-er . 
Con-fed'er-at-ing. 
Con-fed-cr-ation. 
Con-fer', 21, N. 
Con'fer-ence, 176. 
Con-fer'ra-ble, 164, 170. 
Conferred', 150, 176. 
Con-fer'rer, 21, N. 
Con-fer'ring. 
Con-fees', 103. 
Con-feased' (-/fert'). 
Con-fess'ing. 
Con-fes'Bion {-/esh'un). 
Con-fes'aion-al {'fesh'- 

ttn-). 



Con-fts'sion-a-ry, 73. 
Con-feas'or, or Con'- 

fess-or [kon-fea'wr, 

Wb. Gd. J kfrn'/ea-ur^ 

Wk. Sm. J korvfes-ur^ 

or kon-/es'ur^ Wr.l07, 

165J 
Con-fl-dant' (160), n. 

mas. [bo Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; kon'fi-dantj 

Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Con-fi-dante' (l^Ot «•• 

fern, [bo Sm. Wr. ; 

kon'Ji-dant, Gd. 156.] 
Con-fide', 25. 
Con-f id'ed, 183. 
Con'fi-denoe, 7^ 160. 
Con'fi-dent, 160. 
Con-fi-den'tial {-ahal), 
Con-fid'er. 
Con-fid'lng. 
Con-flg-n-ra'tion. 
Con-f m'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Con-fine', v. (active), 

103, 161. 
Con'fine, v. (neuter) [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; hon- 

fln'y Wk. J kon-fin'f 

or kanf/m, Wr. 156.] 
Ck>n'fine, n. 103, 161. 
Con-fined', 166, 183. 
Con-fine'ment. 
Con-fln'er (161), n. one 

who, or that which, 

confines. 
Con'fin-«r (161), n. a 

borderer, [so Sm. 

Wb. CW. ; kon-flnfur, 

Wk. ; kon-fln'ur, or 

Iwnyr-nttr, Wr. 166.] 
Con-f m'ing. 
Con-firm', 21. N. 
Con-firm'a-ble, 164. 
Con-fir-ma'tlon, 112. 
Con-firm'a-tlve. 
Con-firm'a-to-ry, 86. 
0>n-firmed'. 165. 
Con-firm-ee' (122) [Law 

term.] 
Con-firm'er. 
Con-firm'ing. 
Con-firm-oi^ (118, 122) 

[Law term.] 
Con-fis'ca-ble, 164. 
Con-fis'cate, v. A a. [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; koth 

fia'kdt, or kon'JU-kU^ 

Gd. 155.1 
0>n-fiB'cat-ed, 188. 
Con-fis'cat-ing. 
Con-fls-ca'tion. 
Con'fis-cat-or. 
Con-fla'carto-ij. 



[fin there; 6ba9<iifoot;9a<<nlkcileighMg<i»gOi^M<nthlSb 



1 



CONPLAflBATION 
Con-flloP^. 103, ISI. 

cuu'mirt, n. 103, m. 

Cod-BJiiI'hI. 
Con-fllot'lng, 
Connlctlrs. 
Con'flu-eDoe, IW. 
Coa'tta-eut, a. hn. IK. 

Can form'. 

Con-form'k-ble, IM.IK. 
Conrann'a-bl*, 93. 
Con rann^'Uon. 
Con-rormed', tit. 

Con-ronQ'I»E' 
Can-fonn'J-tr, M. 

Con ftrand'ed. 

CaD-roBnd'Ing. 

CanO«-ter'id-t)', IN. 

Con-froDt^ t-fiMnt') [io 
Sm. Wb. lid. ; i<m- 
yMnC, Wk. i tan- 
n-aal', or ton-flSnt', 

Can-fnmVei (jVuni'-). 
COD-frant'er l/tvnl'-). 
Con-ftunt'lng [ -ffwU'-). 
CoD-fti'ciiui C-ilian}. 
Can-fnB'*-tile (^-), 

Oim-ftiw' {,*'). 
Con-niKd' (-/t!d'\ ISJ. 

Cou-fui'lDg (-^2'-)- 

Coa-ru'alon (thun). 
Cqp-fnt'»-ble, IM. 

Coa-fb-M'tloiL 

Con-ftit'i-tlTe. 

Con-fnt*', ae. 

Con-tLt'ed. 

Coa-Cat"'- 

Con-r^t 



148 
hm' J e Hmr, or hoi^itf- 

Con-ge^-il, 0r Con- 

Eon-ic'iii-a/, Wk. 8m. 
Wb. Gd. ISS.] 
Con-Be-nl-«l'l-tr, 108, 

CoD-gSD'l-tal, IN. 
Con'ger (tong'gMr), 

■Ing. ft pi. 144. 

Coa-gen'tA. 

Con-go>l'10D[-f<t<'|runt 

Con^gcrtlTe, S4. 
Con-glo'Se [to Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Grf-itoV- 

ffto-Mt, Bm. IW.I 
Con-glo'bil-cd, lei 
Con-glo'btt-lng. 



nut, Ttt, lett 
DBtcd, 18a. 






^□n-r^t'ing. 
Jon'ff* (ft.) [lO 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Ga. 1 ton- 

Cou'c?, H. ■ kind or 

mouldlDg. . 
Con'Ed, o.Tso Sm. Od.i 

iDii^. Wk. ; toB'W, 

orttrnJe-iWr. 164,1 
Oon«$>l>, 13. 
OoD^C'il'kUe, UM, IN. 

Con.gi'i1'liiK. 
COD-gi'u'nieiit. ' 
Con'geed, 188. 
Can'Kce.inK. 
Con gv IVtioii. 
Oon'gc-ncr [to Sm.Wb. 
q£; faffl^nw, Wk.; : 

ft, e, I, s, a, 7, iiMv i >i e. 1, e, u, f , tkon ; 



Coo'KTU-oto (*»•;'- 

C^?k,' 170. 
Con'lMl. 
Co-nirer.on(, 108. 
Co'Dl-fbrm, », IN. 
Co.nl-roa'tnl. 
CaD-Jcct'iir.t blc< -WW-), 
91, IN. 1183. 

-irwrf-fc 

i«r-'). 






Con'go (ioM'jrt). 

Con -gnl'B- late, KM. 

Con.grBt'a -Ut.lng. 
Con-gnt-n .li'tloo. 
Con.grst'u-Ut-or. 
Con-gmt'ii-li-to-iy, 171. 
Coa'gre-^le {kong'-), 

Con'gre-git-fd (fam^.). 
Con ' er*-Kal-lnef jtim^'-) 
Con-gTC-gB'tion(<t<ms-) . 
Con-gre-Eii'tion.«l 

Cod gre n'tlon4il-lam 

(.fam). 
Con-gre-sH'tloa-d -iit 

Con'givu (Jbmff'Oi A4. 
Con-grr«'»lon-«l 

(.ffrfiA'un-). 
Con'gTa-«D<e {konff- 

QoD^^mea-Bj (-jj™'-}. 



:on-lecl'nr-«l ( 
[^on-W'ore, 91. 
ron-Jeot'nreil ( 



n toloI'Tlil. 

a'agti.n. 
n . u-^mtc, 73. 

u' u-Bit-lnir. 



to qnjolii (OlemalT. 

Conlnte (tm'JBr) (m. 
ISI), e. W pracUn 

ConTnred', ISl, 1S3. 
CDalnral (Iwii^nf), 



Ij, [See Conjop 
CoD'jnr-er (tim'-UK 



Con-Dite' tvoWk. Sm. 
Wr. ; htm'at, Wb. Gd. 

Con-DHO', U, 103. 
In ftr, t M in hat, t « in 




CTED 



I [Con- 

208.] 

'} cn« 

kl), IfiO, 17A. 

on, 203.— 

ction.1 

'6. 

s, 109, 170. 

5,103. 

183. 



ir* (*V.) 
'',orl»ii-«- 
Wr.; kon- 
kon'U-aiVf 
^-»ur*t Son. 

, leo, 170. 

09. 
I, 106. 

(kong*kur) 
8m. Wr. ; 
Wb. Gd.; 

or hong'- 
.155.1 

)lc (kong'- 
169. 

kong'kwrd) 
I {hong'- 

{Jkoi^kur-) 
t>ngOape»t)y 

I'e-ofts, 109. 
Q'i-ty, 171. 
[-8hen»), 171 
1 (^-thenst). 
loiiB (-ml- 
not kon-Bl- 
», 150.] 

>n. 
, 109. 

Ml. 

er. 

ing. 

ion. 

e-ofis, 109. 
ft or Con- 
[kon'»ek4a- 
r.Wb. Gd.; 
ry, Sin.l55] 
m. 

enoe. 



149 

Con-w-neB'oen-«7. 

Con-flcnt', n. ooncnr- 
renoe:— 9. to agree.^ 
{See Conoent, 160.1 

Con-sen-ta'ne-ous, lo9. 

Con-sent'ed. 

Gon-0ent'er. 

Con-Ben'tient {-shent). 

Con-seat'lng. 

Con'se-qucQcc. 

Con'se-quent. 

Coa-«e-qaen'tlal (-ehal), 

Con-Bcrv'a-ble, IM, 109. 

Con-Berv'an-cj. 

Con-Berv'ant. 

Con-Ber-ya'tion. 

Con-Berr'a-tiBm (-Msm), 
130. 

Gon-Berr'a-tlye. 

Con'Ber-ya-tor, or Con- 
aer-va'tor '[kon'ser- 
vH-toTf Sm. wr.; kon- 
ew-va'tor, Wk. Wb. 
Qd. 165.] 

Con-Bcrr'a-to-ry, 80. 

Ck>a-Berve', v. 103, 101. 

Con'Bervc, n. 103, 161. 

Con-served', 150, 183. 

Con-Berv'er. 

Con-Benr'lng. 

Con-Bid'er, 104. 

Con-Aid'cr'a-blc,101,160. 

Gon-Hld'er-a-blj. 

Con-Bid'er-atc, 73. 

Con-Bid -er-a'tion. 

Con-sid'ered {-urt^t 150. 

Con-Bid'er-er. 

Con-«id'er-lng. 

Con-sign' (-#l»Of lfl8. 

Con-Bigned' (-^Ind')* 

Con-sign-ee' (-tin-), 118. 

Cou-sign'er (»ln'-). 

Con-sign'ing (-»ln'-). 

Con-Bign'ment (sin'-). 

Con-slgn-or' (kon-sln- 
or') TLaw term^ cor- 
relative to Constgnee] 

Consist', 10. 

Con-Bist'ed. 

Con-sist'enoe. 

Gon-Bist'en-oj, 109. 

Con-sist'cnt. 

Con-alst'ing. 

Con-sis-to'ri-al, 40, N. 

Con'sis-to-rj, or Con- 
sis'to-ry [so Wr. ; 
kon'»i8-to^, Wk. 
Sm. ; kon-Hst'o-rpy 
Wb. Gd. 165.] 

Con-so'ci-ate (-«AY-) (40. 
73) [BO Wk. 8m. Wr4 
k(mr8o'thAtt Wb. Gd. 
156.] 



CONSTITUTING 

Con-Bo'd-at-ed, (-$hi-), 

Con-Bo'ci-at-ing (-Ml-). 

Con-BO-ci-a'tion (-«A1-). 

Con-Bol'a-blc, 104, 160. 

Con-so-la'tlon. 

Con-Bol'a-to-ry, 80. 

Con-Bole', V. 101. 

Con'sole, n. 101. 

Consoled', 160, 183. 

Con-Bol'er. 

Con-sol'i-dant, 160. 

Con-Bol'i-date, 169. 

Con-Bol'i-dat-ed, 183. 

Con-Bol'i-dat-ing. 

Con-Bol-i-da'tion. 

Con-Bol'ing, 183. 

Con-sols', or Con'sols 
(sSlz) f BO Wr. ; kon- 
$Olz'y Sm. ; kon'aolz, 
Wb. Qd, 166.] 

tar ** The anlnltkted 
talk or MUiDg eo»'»oU, till 
they leern od the stock ex- 
change that the techuical 
pron an elation ie eon-eoii'.* 
Smart. 

Con'so-nanoe. 
Con'Bo-nan-cy. 
0>n'BO-nant. 109. 
Con-BO-nant'aL 
Con'so-nofiB. 
Con'sort. n. 101. 
Con-Bort', V. 103, 101. 
Con-Bort'ed. 
Con-Borfing". 
Con-Bpic'u-ofiB. 
Con-splr'a-cy, 109. 
Con-spi-ra'tion, 112. 
Con-splr'a-tor. 
Con-spire't 25. 
Con-spired', 150, 183. 
Con-spir'cr, 49, N. 
Con-spir'ing. 
Con'Bta-ble (Jtun'-), 22, 

104. 
Con-stab'n-la-ry, 72. 
Con'stan-cy, 104. 
Con'stant. 
Con'stel-late [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. J kon-ntel'lat, 

Wk. Wr. 165.] 
Con-steMa'tion, 112,170. 
Con-8ter-na'tion. 
Con'sti-pate, 109. 
Con'sti-pat-cd, 183. 
Con'sti-pat-ing. 
Con-sti-pa'tion. 
Con-stit'a-cn-cy, 109. 
Con-stit'u-ent. 
Con'sti-tutc, 78. 
Cou'stl-tiit-ed, 183. 
Con'stl-tut-er. 
Ck>n'Btl-tat-lng. 



there \<Siia»in foot ; 9 ae in fadle j gh a« g in go ; th at In tut. 



CONSTITUTION 



150 



CONTINENCV 



Con-ati-ta'tlon. 
Ck>ii-8ti-tu'tton-al. 
Coa-Hti-tu'tion-aMst. 
Con-8ti-tu -tion-al'i-^. 
Con-8ti-tu'tloned 

(^shutui), 171. 
Con-stl-ta'tion-Ut. 
Con'8tI-tut-Ive. 
Con-Btrain% 23. 
Con-Btrain'a-ble, 104. 
Con-8trainedS 160. 
Con-Btrain'er. 
Ck)n-8train'liig. 
Con-atraint'. 
Con-stiict'. 
Con-Btrlot'ed. 
Con-Btrict'ing. 
Con-Btric'tlon. 
Con-BtrictlTO, 84. 
Con-Btrict'or. 
Con-Btrlage'. 
Con-fltringod'(-*<r»n^O 
Con-8tring'ent (-etr%t\f'- 

mt)j 183. 
Goa-Btrlnn^'lng. 
Con-fltruct'. 
Con-Btruct'ed. 
Con-Btruct'er FC o n - 

Btructor,a03.] 
Con-Btruc'tion. 
Con-Btruc'tion-al. 
Gon-Btruc'tlon-iBt. 
Con-Btruct'Tve. 
Gon-Btruct'or fCon- 

Btrjioter,203.] 
Con'smie (kon'stroo) 

[bo Sm. Wr. ; kon'- 

ttruj VTb. Gd. ; kon'- 

itru, or kon'$tur, Wk. 

155.] 

«7-*'It if BMuidal to 
••minariei of learn inff, 
that the latter pronuncim- 
tion ntoii'tfurliinould pr»- 
▼aUihcre." Walktr. 

Con'Btraed (-ttrood),\Si 
Con'Btru-ing {stroo-). 
Gon-Bub-Btan'tial (-shal) 
Con-Bab-Btan-ti-ari-tj 

(-sM). 
Ck>n-Hub-8tan'ti-ate 

Csh%'&t) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; kon-gub-8tan'- 

8hat, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Con-Rub-Btan-ti-a'tion 

(ski). 
Con'Buc-tude (-«ire-),I71 
CoQ-Bue-tu'dl-iial(-BiM:-) 
Con-Buc -tu'dl-na-ry 

(-Jttw), 72. 
Coq'ruI, 18. 
Con'Bul-age. 
Con'Bul-ar [bo Sm. Wr. 



Wb. Gd.; kon'9ku4ar, 

¥rk. 166.] 
Con'BQl-ate, 73. 
Coa-Bult', V. 
Gon-snlt', or Con'Bolt, 

n. [bonsuUf^ Sm. Wb. 

G<i.; kon'nUt^OTkon- 

auU'y Wk. Wr. 156.J 
Con-Bolt^'tioii. 
Gon-Bult'ed. 
Con-Bult'er. 
Con-Bult'ing. 
Con-Bult^ve. 
Con-Bom'a-ble, 104, 100. 
Con-Biime'. 
Con-Bumed', 183. 
Con-Bom'er. 
Con-Bom'lng. 
Ck>n-8am'mate, v. [ao 

Wk. 8m. Wr.} ton- 

tum'atf or kon'ium- 

Al, Gd. 165.] 
Con-Biim'mate, a. 
Con-Bum'mat-ed. 
Coa-aam'mat-lng. 
Con-Bum-ma'tlon. 
Con-Bump'tion (-Bum'-), 

102. 
CoD-Bump'tlre (-Bum'-). 
Con'tact, 18. 
Con-taot'uHBl. 
Ck>n-ta'glon (-jun), 171. 
Con-ta'gion-iBt (-jun-), 
Con-ta'giofiB i-jtu). 
Contains 23. 
Con-Uin'a-ble, 104, 100. 
Con-taln'ant. - 
Con-talned', 160. 
Con-tain'er. 
Con-tain'ing. 
Gon-tam'i-nate, 78, 100. 
Con-tam'1-nat-ed. 
Con-tamM-nat-lng. 
Con-tam-i-na'tion. 
Con-temn' (-tem')t 102. 
Con-temned' {-temd'). 
Con-tem'ner. 
Con-tem'nJng. 
Con-tcm'plate (122) [bo 

Wk. Sm.; kan-tem*- 

pUUj or kim'tem-pldty 

Gd. 166.1 
Con-tem'plat-ed, 183. 
Con-tem'plat-ing. 
Con-tem-pla'tion. 
Con-tem'pla tire. 
Con-tcm'plat-or, or 

Con'tem-plat-or [bo 

Wr. ; kon-tem'pl&t-ort 

Wk. ; kon'tem-pl&t-ori 
%8m. Wb. Gd. 155.1 
Con-tem-po-ra'no-ouB, 

171. 



Con-tem'po-ra-iy (72) 
rCotemporarj, 

C^ Webfler and Good> 
lieh prefer co-ten^pororir. 
But Bm^ WoroMter, 
and most wrntn girc tb» 
DrefervocB to ccnr4gpfunf- 
"I pniw eon-lM- 
njrf Dr. Camp- 
o-tCMjMW ur y. Xu 
general uee in worda i 






pounded with the inacp- 
arable prepoeltion com la 
to retain the • iMfore a 
oonaonaat, and expunfe it 
befbre a rovel or an * 
mute." There are aaveial 
ezoeptiOBa to the rule r»- 
ftrred to by P-. Campbell, 
•a co-purtma-f eo^pareemtr, 
eo-rtgent^ eo-4idai, 



Gon-tempf, 16. 
Con-temp'tt-ble {b(m- 

tem'ti-bl) (104, 109) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr.i 

hm-temnt'i^lt Wb. 

Gd. 166J 
Ck)n-temp^ti4>l7 i-iem'-) 
Con-tempt'u-oaB, 80. 
Con4ena', 16. 
Con-tend'ed. 
Con-tend'er. 
Con-temd'ing. 
Con-tent', a. «. A m. 16. 
Con-tent'ed. 
Con-tent'ing. 
Con-ton'tlon. 
Con-ten'tiouB (-tkiu). 
Con-tent'ment. 
0>n-tent8S or Con'- 

tenta, n.pl^BO Wr. ; 

bon-terUs'f Wk. Sm. ; 

kon'tentSf or hm- 

tents', Gd. 166.] 

09* Walker ears of ttita 
word that It '* ia often heard 
with the accent oa the flnC 
lyUablB.'* 

Con-ter'ml'notta. 
Con-tCBt', V. 16, 108, 101. 
Con'teBt. n. 101. 
Con-teBt'a-ble, 104, 100. 
ConteBt-a'tlon. 
Con-teBt'ed. 
ConteBt'ing. 
Con'text, 18. 
Con-text'a-ral. 
Con-ttixt'ure, 01. 
Con-ti-euM-t7, 100. 
Con-tl^u-ofiB. 
Con'ti-ncnce, 78, 100. 
Con'ti-nen-cy. 



4, d, i, d, u, 7, long i i» C, X, d, tt, f, ikort ; Kot <tt fkr, kasin flut, Aof in 



CONTINENT 



151 



CONVEY ABLE 



Con'ti-iient, lOO. 
Con-ti-nent'al. 
Con-tin'genoe. 
Con-tin' gen-cj, 109. 
Con-tin'gt^nt. 
Con-tin'u^i bly, 164. 
Con-tin 'a-al. 
Con-tin' u-anoe. 
Con-tin-n-a'tion. 
Con-tin'u-a-tlve, 84, 106. 
Con-tin'ne C-yoo). 
Con-tin'aed (-yood), 183. 
Con-tiu'u-er. 
Con-tin'u-ingf. 
Con-ti-nn'i-ty, 169. 
Con-tin'n-ofis. 

Can-tour* (Fr.) {kon- 

toor*), 114, 121. 
Con-torf. 

Con-torfed. 

Con-tort'ing. 

Con-tor'tion. 112. 

Con'tra-band. 

Con tract', V. 103,161. 

Con'tract, n. 103, 161. 

Con-tract'ed. 

Con-tract-i-bil'i-ty. 

Con-tract'i-ble, 164, 160. 

Con-tractile, 81, 162. 

Con-tract'ing. 

Con-trac'tion. 

Con-tract'Ive. 

Con-tract'or. 

Con'tra-danee [Coun- 
try-dance. 203.— 
See Coantry-aanoe.J 

Con-tra-dict', 122. 

Con-tra-dict'ed. 

Con-tra-dict'er. 

Con-tra-diet'ing. 

Con-tra-dic'tion. 

Cou-tra-dictlve. 

Con-tra-dict'or. 

Con-tra-dict'o-nr, 86. 

Con-tra-dish tinc'tion. 

Con-tra-difl-tin'gnlsh 
{-tinfffgvH»h)j M. 

Con-tra-dis-tin'guiBhed 
(4ing'gvntht)j Note 
C, p. 34. 

Con-tra-dis-tin'^sh- 
ing- {-ting'gunsh-), 

Ckm-trcU'to (It.). 

Con-tra-mure', 122, 

Con'tra-rTes (-rl«), n.pl, 

Con-tra-rl'e-ty, 169. 

Con'toi ri ly, 171. 

Con'tra-ry, 72. 

Con'tr&gt, n. 103, 161. 

Con-triBtS v. 103,131,161 

Con-tr&st'ed. 

Contrast'laer. 

Con-tra-Yal-la'tion. 



Con-tra-rene', 122. 

Con-tra-vened', 165, 183. 

Con-tra-ven'er. 

Con-tra-ven'ing. 

Con-tra-Ten'tion. 

Con-trib'a-ta-ry (72) 
[Contributory, 
203.J 

Con-trib'ute [not kon'- 
tri-but, 153, 150.1 

Con-trib'ut^, 183. 

Con-trib'ut-ing. 

Con-tri-bu'tion. 

Con-trib'ut-lve. 

Con-trib'ut-or. 

Con-trib'u-to-ry [Con- 
tributary ,203.1 

Con'trite fgo Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gd.j kon-tf^t', 
8m. 165.] 

tar ** Thif word ought 
to have the accent on tlie 
last svllable." Waiker. 
- " This word le accented 
both way*, more common- 
ly on the flrat qrllable, 
more eonrietently on the 
last." Snuart. 

Con-tri'tion (triah'un). 
Con-triv'a-ble, 164, 169. 
Con-triv'anoe, 160. 
Contrive'. 
Con-trived', 166, 188. 
Con-triv'er. 
Con-triv'ing. 
Control', 24. 
Con-trol'la-ble, 164, 176. 
Con-tr6lled'(-*rflW'),lfl6 
Con-trol'ler [C o m p - 

troller. 203. — 5ee 

Comptroller.] 
Con-trol'linf. 
Con-tro-verBlal (^shat). 
Con'trover-»y, 160. 
Con'tro-vert. 
Con'tro-yert-€d. 
Con'tro-vert-lng. 
Con'tro-vert-iet. 

Con-tu-ma'cioup(-<Aw) • 
Con'tu-ma-cy, isa, 169. 
Con tu-me'li-ofts. 
Con'tu-me-ly, 122, 171. 
Con-tuie' (-tikz'). 
Con tused' (-/OscT'), 183. 
Con-tuB'ing (-tnz'-). 
0>ntu'Bion (-zhun). 
Ck>-nun'drum, 86. 
Con-va-lesoe' C-les'). 
Con-va-leBced' {-lest'). 
Con-Ya-les'oenoe, 171. 
Con-ya-les'oent. 
Con-va les'cing. 
Con-vec'tion. 
Con-v§n'a-ble, 164, 169. 



Con-rene', 13. 
Con-vcned', 165, 183. 
Con ven'er^ 
Conven'ience Cj/ens) 

(171) [io Wr. Gd.; 

leon-ve'ni-enSt Wk. 

Sm. 155.] 
C3on-v§n'ien-cy (-yen), 

160. 
Con-y£n'ient (-yenl) Jso 

Wr. Gd.; koh-v&ni- 

ent, Wk. 8m. 155.] 
Con'vent, n. 
Con-vcD'ti-cle, 164, 171. 
Con-Tcn'ti-eler, 183. 
Con-ven'tion. 
Con-ven'tion-al. 
Con-yen'tion-al-iBm 

(-f«m). 
Con-ycn'tion-a-ry, 72. 
Ck>n-yent'u-al. 
Con-yerge', 21, N. 
0)ii-verged', 165, 183. 
Con-verg'ence (verj'-). 
CoD-verg'en-cy (-«eW'-), 

160. 
Con-yerg'ent (-very'-), 
(3on-verg'iDjg {-verj'-), 
Con-ver'sa-Dle, 164, 160. 
Con'yer-sanoe [so Gd. ; 

kon'ver-MonSf or kon- 

ver^sanst Wr. 155.] 
Con'ver-Bant (109) [so 

8m. Wr. Wb. (M.j 

kon'ver-santf or kon- 

ver'sant, Wk. 156.] 
Con-ver-sa'tion, 112. 
Con-yer-sa'tion-al. 
Con-yer-sa'tion-ist. 
Con-yer'sa-tlye, 72, 84. 
ConverHtzione Tit.) 

Skon-ver-8iit-$e-o'n& ) 
pi. Convertazioni 
hon-ver-gUt-se-o'ni).] 

Con-verse', 21, N. 

Ck>u-ver8ed' (-ver«^),183 

Con-vers'er. 

Cou-vers'Ing. 

Con-ver'sion. 

Con-verslve. 

Con-vert', 21, N. 

Convert'ed. 

Con-vert'er. 

Con-vert-I-bU'i-ty, 160. 

Con-yert'i-ble, 164, 160. 

Con'vex [not kon-veks', 
153, 156.] 

Con-vex'i-ty, lOfi, 169. 

Con'vex ly (93) [so 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.i kon 
veks'ly, Wk. 155.] 

Convey' (-ra'), 23. 

Con-vey 'a-ble (va' -),169 



fiOl; 6 a# in there; dbMinfoot; fottnikcile; gh as g in go i\^<u in thia. 



i 



CONVEYANCE 



152 



CORDIAL 



Con-vey 'anoe( -va' -), 109. 
Con-vey'an^-cr (-ra')» 

183 
Con-vey'aii9-iiig (-va'-). 
Con-veyed' (-»4rfO, 160. 
Con-vey'er i-va'-). 
Con-vey'ing {-va'-). 
Convict', V. 10, 103, 161. 
Con'vict. n. 103, 161. 
Con-vict'ed. 
Con-vict'ing, 
Con-vic'tion. 
Con-vict'Tve. 
Con-vlnce'. 16, 103. 
Con-vinoecl' {-vimt'), 

106, 183. 
Con-vln^'er. 
Con-Tln9'i-blc, 104, 109. 



[80 

kon- 



CoQ-vlnc'inff. 

Cou-viv'ial (169) 
Sin. Wb. (id., 
viv'yal, Wk. 155. J 

Con-viv'i-al-ist. 

Con-viv-1-al'l-ty, 108. 

Con-vo-ca'tlon. 

Convoke'. 24, 103. 

Convoked' (-r«W)» 
Note C, p. 34. 

Con-vok'ing, 183. 

Con'vo-lute. 

Con'vo-lut-«d. 

Con-vo-lu'tion, 112. 

Con-volvc'. 18. 

Convolved' (-volvd'-), 
183. 

Con-vOlv'ing. 

Con-voy',r.27, 103, 161. 

Con'voy, n. 103, 161. 

Con-vnlse'. 22, 163. 

Con-vul sea' {-vttlst') , 

Con-vuls'ingr. [183. 

Con-vul'Bion. 

Con-vul 'eion-a-ry, 72, 

Con-vul'8Tve. 

Co'ny, or Con'v {kun'p) 
[80 Gd. ; ko'ny^ Sni. j 
Kun'y^ Wk. , kun'Vy or 
ko'ny, Wr. 155.] 



'It is firnitUarly pro- 
nounced cvn'eyx the for- 
mer or regular oronuncla- 
tion [ko'ny] It that proper 
for lolcmn readlog/'iJniarr. 

Coo, 19. 

Cooed (il'ood), 188. 

Coo'ing. 

C<Jbk (20) ISte Book.] 

Cdbked (kobkt)^ Note 

C, p. 34. 
Cabk'er-y, 93. 
C(5bk'ing. 
C<5bk'y, 93. 
Cool, 19. 



Cooled, 166. 

Cool'er. 

Cool'inff. 

Cool'ly, ad. 66, N. ; 148. 

Coo'ly, n. (148) [pi. Coo- 
lies, 190.] 

Coom, n. dirt. [See 
Comb, 160.] 

Coomb {koom)t n. (162) 
a dry valley. [See 
Coom, 160.] 

Coop, 19. 

Coo-pee' [Co a pee, 
203.] 

Coop'er, or C^per [bo 
Sm. Wr. ; hooper, 
Wk. ; fawp'Kr, Wb. 
Gd. 155.] 

Coop'er-age. 

Co-op'er-atc, 223. 

Co-op'cr-at-ed, 183. 

Co-op'er-«t-ing. 

Co-op-er-a'tion. 

Co-op'er-at-Ivc. 

Co-op'er-at-or. 

Coop'er-ingf. 

Coop'er-y. 

Co-or'di-nate, 223. 

Co-o r-<ii -na' tion. 

Coot, lU. 

Co-pai'ba (kopa'ba) [so 
Sm. Gd. ', ko-pe'oa, 
Wr. 155.] [Copal- 
va, Copayva, Co- 
pivi,Capivi,203.] 

Co'pal. 

Co-par'ce-na-ry, 72. 

Co-par'ce-ny, 169. 

Co-part'ner. 

[ C o p a V V a , 203. — iffee 
Copaiba.] 

Cope, 24. 

Coped ikept)j Note C, 
p. 34 

Co-per'ni-can,21, N.; 169 

Cop'Ied (-id), 99, 186. 

Ck)p'i«r [Copyer, 
203.] 

Cop'ing. 

Co'pl-ottB, 78, 169. 

[Copivl, 203. — 5ee 
Copaiba.] 

Copped {kopt). 

[Coppel, 203. — 5ee 
Cupel.] 

Cop'per, 66, 170. 

Cop'per-as, 171. 

Cop'pered {-purd), 166. 

Cop'per-ing:. 

Cop'per-plate, 206. 

Cop'per-y, 93. 

Cop'pis (kop'ia), 169. 

Cop'ple-crown. 



Cop'ro-lite, 63, 152. 

Cop-ro-lit'ic. 

Co-proph'a-gofis. 

Cdpse {kopa), 171. 

Cop'sy. 

Copt. 

Cop'tio. 

Cop'u-la (L.) [pL C<^'- 

u-l«, 198.] 
Cop'u-late. 
Cop'u-lat-ed. 
Cop'u-lat-in^. 
Cop-u-la'tion. 
Cop'u-la-tlve, 84, 89 
Cop'y, 169, 170. 
[Copyer, 203. — ^SSm 

Copier.] 
Cop'y-hold. 
Ck>p'y-ing, 186 
Cop'y-ist. 

Cop'y-rlgbt (-r«), 162. 
Co<iueV{ko-kef)^ r.l60. 
Co-quet'ry (-*<*'-), 166. 
Coquette' {ko-kef)t n. 

Co-quet'ted (-Art'-), 176. 

Co-quet'ting (-AeT'-). 

Cdr'a-cle, 164. 

Cdr'a-ooid. 

Cdr'al (170), n. a hard 
Bubstjinoe found in 
the ocean, and formed 
of the skeletons of 
certain polypes. [See 
Corol, 160.J 

Cdr-al-la'ccou8 (-«&im). 

Cdr-al-UPer-olis, 108. 

0>-ral'li-form, 169. 

Cdr-al-lig'e-noiiB {-iif'). 

Cfir'al-llne, 82, 152. 

C»r'al-lite, 83, 162. 

C6r-al-loid'al. 

Cdr'a-nachf-noJt) [C o r- 
anich, Coronach, 
203.] 

Corb. 

Corb'an. 

Cor'beil (kor^bei), n. a 
little basket to be 
filled with earth,— 
a term in fortification. 
[See Corbel, 160.1 

Cor'bel, n. a sculptured 
basket, — a term in 
architecture. [ See 
(>>rbcil, 160.] 

Cord, n. a small rope. 
[See Chord, 160.] 

Cord'agfe, 169. 

Cor'date. 

Cor'dat-ed. 

Cord'ed. 

Cor'dlal, or Cord'ial 



a, e, i, 6, u, y, long , &, C, I, d, Ik, f, ahort ', ti<uin far, ken in fast, & as in 



CORDIALITY 



153 



CORYBANTIC 



tiord'yal) [kor'<h<t^ 
&n. Wb. Gd. ; hard'- 
wal, or koT'di^yWr.; 
hor*ii^ Wk. 13i, 

Cor-di-al'l-tr, or Cord- 
Wi-tv {yaii-) [kor- 
dial'Uyy 8m. Wb. 
Gd. ; kardyi-aVi-ty, 
Wr. ; karOi-al'i^y, 
Wk. 134, 156.1 
Oor'di-form, 160. 
Oord'lng. 

Cior'don f Fr.) (kor'dony 
or kor'Mng)]kor'd<m', 
Wb. Gd.; korfd^nfft 
Sm. ; kor'dony or kor*' 
ddngy Wr. 154, 155.] 
Oor'do-van. 
O>r'da-roy [ao Sm.Wr.; 
kor-dt^^', Wb. Gd. 
155.] 
Cord'wiin-er. 
Core, 24, 163. 
Cored (k^rd), 165, 183. 

Co-ri-«'oeoat (-«Aiw),112 

Co-ri-an'der. 

Co-rin'thi-«ii, 78, 109. 

Cork, 17. 

Corked {korki)^ Note C, 

Cork'ing. [p. 34. 

Cork'*tree, 206, £xc. 4. 

Cork'7, 98. 

Cor'mo-nuit. 

Com, 17. 

Cor'ne-a, 75, 109. 

Corned {kornd), 166. 

CoHnel, 149. 

Cor'ner, 17, 77. 

Cor'nered ('nurd)t 166. 

Cor'ner-lng^. 

Cor'net. 

Cor'net-cy, 169. 

Com'fleid, 206. 

Cor'Dloe i-nit), 169. 

Cor'ni-ele, 78, IM. 

Gor-nie'n-late, 73, 89. 

Cor'ni-form, 16U. 

CoWnist. 

Com'-lawB (lawz), 

Oor-nu-co'pi-a (L.) [pi. 
Cor-nu-co'pi-ai^-pi-i), 
198.] 

Cor-nute'. 

Coni'7, 93. 

C6r'o-d7 [Corrodj, 
203.1 

CSr'oI, n. a corolla. 
[See Coral, 160.] 

Co-rol'la, 170. 

C6r-ol-la'oeou8 (-thut). 

Cftr'ol-la-ry (72)[80 Wk. 
Sm. Wb. Gd., kor*- 



o^-n-ry, or ko-rol'a- 

ry, Wr. 155.] 
Cor'ollate. 
Cor'ol-lat-ed. 
Cdr'ol-let. 
Co-ro'na (L.J fpL Co- 

ro'ne (-fi«).] 
[Coronach, 203.— 

See Coranach.] 
Cdr'o-nal, n. A a, [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; ko-ro'' 

nalj Wk. ; ko-ro^naly 

or k8rfo-naly Wr. 165. J 
Cor'o-na-ry. 72. 
C6r'o-nat-ea. 
Cdr-o-na'tion. 
Cfir'o-ner, 77, 170. 
Cfir'o-nct, 86, 170. 
Cdr'o-nct-ed. 
Co-ron'1-form, 78, 169. 
Cdr'o-noid. 
CdWo-nule. 
Cor'po-ral. 
Cor-po-ra'le (L.), 163. 
Cor'po-ral-lj, 170. 
Cor'po-rate, 73. 
Cor-po-ra'tion. 
Cor'po-rat-or. 
Cor-po're-al, 169. 
Cor-po're-al-ly. 
Cor-po-rc'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Cor'po-sant {-zant). 
Corps (Fr.) {kOr) (166), 

11. a body of troops. 

[See Core, 160.] [pi. 

Corps (it»rz).l 
Corpse (korps\ n, a 

dead human body. 

[See Corps, 148.] 
Cor'pu-lenoG, 169. 
Cor'pu-lcn-cy, 169. 
Cor'pu-lent. 
Cor-pas'cle (put'l), 162. 
Cor-pus'cu-lor, 108. 
Correct', 15, 105. 
C6r-rect'ed. 
C6r-rect'ing. 
C6r-rec'tion, 170. 
C6r-rec'tion-al. 
C6r-rect'Ive, 84. 
CJfir-rect'or. 
C6r-rect'o-ry, 86. 
CWr're-late. 
Cdr-re-la'tlon. 
C»r-rel'a-ttve. 84, 170. 
C6r-re-spond', 170. 
CJ6r-re-spond'ed. 
CAr-re-spond'enoe, 169. 
Cdr-re-spond'cnt. 
Cdr-re-spond'ing. 
Cor'ri-d6r, 78, ifo. 
Cdr-ri-gen'da (L.),n.p{. 
Cdr'ri-gent, 78. 



C6r-ri gl-bll'i-ty, 171. 
C6r'ri t'i-ble, 164. 
C6r-ri'val. 
C6r-ri'val-ry. 
Cor-rob'o-rant. 
Cdr-rob'o-rate, 170. 
C6r-rob'o-rat-ed. 
COr-rob'o-rat-ing. 
Cr>r-rob-o-ra'tion. 
Cor-rob'o-ra-tlve. 
C^jr-rob'o-ra-to-ry, 86. 
Corrode' 24. 
C6r-rod'ed, 183. 
C6r-r6d'cnt, 109. 
Cor-rod'lng. 
Cdr'ro-dy [Corody 

203.] 
Cdr-ro'sion (zhun). 
C^r-ro'slve, 84, 
Cdr'ru-gant, 170. 
Cdr'ru-gate, 66, 89. 
CiJr'ru gat-ed, 183. 
Cdr'ni-gat-ing. 
C6r-ru-ga'tion, 112. 
C6r'ru-gat-or. 
C6r-ru'gent (-roo'-)i 26^ 
C6r-rupt', 22- 
Cdr-rupt'ed. 
Cfir-rupt'er. 
C6r-rupt-I-bIl'I-ty, 169. 
C6r-rupt'l-ble, 78, 164. 
CJfir-rupt'i bly. 
CSr-rupt'lng. 
C6r-rup'tion. 
C6r-rupt'Ive. 
Cor'salr (-air), 171. 
Corse {kor8)j or Corse 

(kSra) [so Gd. ; Irors, 

Sm.; k6rs, Wk..-j k6r»t 

or korSf Wr. 156.] 
Corse'let (h>r$'-), 171. 
Cor' set. 
Cor'si-can, 78. 
C jrs'ned. 

Cor' tegei Fr . Xkor'tMzh). 
Corftes (Sp.) (ifcor'ttc), 

n.pL 
Cor'ti-cal, 78. 
Cor'ti-cate. 
Cor'ti-cat-ed. 
Cor-tl-cirer-ofis. 108, 
Cor-ti^'i-form, 78, 109. 
Co-nim'drum. 
Co<rus'oant. 
Co-nis'cate [so Sm. 

Wr, ; kOr'us-katj Wb^ 

(M. 155.] 
Co-rus'cat-ed, 183. 
Co-rus'cat-ing. 
C6r-us-ca'tlon. 
Corvette' (Fr.), 114,171. 
Cor'vTne, 82, 152. 
Cor-y-ban'tlc. 



ftll , C at <fi there ; ^tuin foot iqatin facile ,gha8gingOi^a»in thia 



CORYMB 



154 



COUNTERMAND 



Cdr'jrmb, 171. 
Co-rym'bl-ate. 
Co-rym'bl-it-cd, 
Cdr-ym-birer-ottB, 108. 
Cdr-ym-bo8e'. 
Co-rym'bott8. 
Co-rym'bu-lotta. 
Co-rym'but (L.). 
C<ir-yj)he'us (L.) [L. 

pi. Cor-y-ph4^% J Eng. 

pi. Cor-y-pbe'uB-et 

Co-fve'cant. 
CoB'en-age {kuz'en-) 

[LawU>rmJ [Conin- 

«g:e,203.J 
Co'sey {ho'zy) [C o § y , 

Cozy, Cozey, 203.1 
Co'Bi-ly ( jl), 78, 03. 
Co'sine, 152. 
Co8-met'lc (kox-). 
CoB-mct'ic-al {kat-, 
CoB'mlc (koz'-). 
CoB'mic-al (koz'). 
GoB'mic-«l-ly (koz'-). 
CoB-mog'o-nal (koz). 
CoB-mo-gon'ic {koz-). 
CoB-mo-g[oii'ic-al {koz-). 
CoB-mofpo-nlBt (koz-). 
CoB-mog'o -ny (koz-). 
CoB-mog'ra-pher (koz-), 

106. 
CoB-mo-graph'ic (koz-). 
Co8-mo-graph'io-fd 

(koz-). 
Co8-mog'r»-phy (koz-). 
CoB'mo-Iabe (Jboz'-). 
CoB-mol'a-try (lx)z-). 
CoB-mo-log'ic-al (koz- 

mo-loj'-). 
CoB-mol'o-giBt (koz-). 
CoB-mol'o-gy (koz-). 
CoB-mom'e-trv (koz-). 
Cob ino-pla«'tic (koz-). 
CoB-mo-pori-tan (koz-). 
CoB-mop'o-lite (khz-). 
CoB-mop'o-li-tlBm (koz- 

mop'o-H-tizm)^ 78, 136. 
CoB-mo-ra'ma (koz-). 
CoB-mo-ram'ic (koz-). 
CoB'mdB (koz'-). 
CoB'mo-Bphcre (koz'-). 
Cob' sack, 170. 
CoB'Bet, 170. 
CoB^Bct-ed. 
Cos'Bet-ing. 
Cost, 18, N. 
CoB'tal, 72. 
GoB'tard. 
CoB'tate, 73. 
CoB'tat-ed. 
CoB'ttve. 
CoBt'li-ncsB, 78, 109. 



CoBt'ly, 03. 
CoBt'ma-rv, 72. 
CoB-tume'^ n21) 



fm»< 



koB'tum, 1&3, 150.] 
[CoBY, 203. — 5te Co- 

Cot, 18. 

Co-tan'gent. 

Cote,n.aoot. [^eeCoat, 
160.] 

Co-tom'po-ra-ry (72) 
[Contemporary, 
2a3.~Ste Contempo- 
rary.] 

Co-t€-fHi lVr.)(k9-terr%') 
[bo Wk. wr. Gd.j 
kot-e-r€\ gm. 1M,155.] 

Co-thuni^te. 

Co-thum'at-ed. 

Co-tic'u-lar, 108. 

Co-tid'al. 

Co-tU'lon Oeo-m'yun) 
[bo Wr. Wo. Gd. ; ko- 
til'yOng, Sm. ; ko4ii- 

ItHng'rwk. 154, 156.] 
Cotillon, Cotil- 
lon, 203.] 
Cot'qnean. 
Co-truB-tee'. 
CotB'wold. 
Cot'tage, 70, 170. 
Cot'taged, 183. 
Cot'ta-ger. 
Cot'ter. 

Cot'ton (kot'n), 140. 
Cot'ton-gin (kot'n). 
Cot'ton-y (kot'n-if). 
Co-tyl-e'don (171) [bo 

Sm. Wb. Gd. } kat-y- 

Wdon, Wr. 156.] 
Co-tyl-e'don-ottB [so 

Oa. i kot-y-Ud'o-wUy 

8m. Wr. 166.] 
Co-tyl'l-form, 78, 100. 
Cot'y-loid. 
[Courage, 203.— 5ee 

Cownage.] 
Couch, 28. 
Couch'an-oy. 
Couch'ant, 160. 
Couched (koucht). 
Cou-chee'( Fr, Xkoo-Bhe') 
Couch'er. 
Coucli'lng. 
Cou'gar (koo'-). 
Cough (k9/)j 18, N. 
Coughed (k5Jt), Note 

C, p. 34. 
[Couhage, 203.— 5ee 

CowhagD.] 
Could (md)y 162. 
Cdul'ter[Colter,203.] 
Cdul'ter neb (*«' ). 



Coun'dl, n. an aBsem- 
bly for dehbcration » 
a body of advis<>rB. 
[See CottUBcl, liN.] 

Conn'cil-lor, n. a mem- 
ber of a council. [See 
CounBellor, 14vSj 
[Councilor, Wb. 
Gd. 20a.—See 177, and 
Note E, p. 70.1 

Coun'Bel, n. advice. [ See 
Council, 148.] 

Coun'Bclled (-aeld) 
[Counseled, Ml). 
Gd.203. — 5eel77,and 
Note E, p. 70. 1 

Coun'Bel-lmg fC o u n - 
Beling, Wb. Gd. 
203.1 

Coun'Bel-lor, n.one who 
fiiyes advice. [See 
Councillor, 148J 
[CottUBelor, Wb. 
Gd. 203.) 



tar The words Co 
eUlor and CotameUor hare 
often been need •■ sjiiob- 
ymoufl; but. u Worcester 
reroarke, ** the proper di«- 
ttnetion u now more U^ 
quentlj made than for- 
merij.'" 

Count. 28. 

Count^a-ble, 104, 100. 

Count'ed. 

Coun'te-nanoe, 100. 

Coun'te-nanced (^natut) 

Coun'te-nany-er. 

Coun'te-nan^-ing. 

Coun'ter. 

Conn'ter-act. 

Coun-ter-bal'anoe,r.l6l. 

Coun'ter-bal-anoc,fi. 161. 

tar '* We vaaj obaerrc. 
In wordfl composed of 
eotmttirAD erident tenden- 
or to that dittinction that 
obtidDf between the noun 
and the verb in diMTlla- 
bloc Thus the word to 
counUrbalance haa the ac- 
cent on the third lyllable. 
and the noun of the aame 
form on the ftrat. and to of 
the rest** WaUaer. 

Conn-ter-bal'anoed 

(-antt). 
Coun-ter-bal'an$ tng. 
Coun'ter-braoe, n. 
Coun'ter-fbit (-/W), 171. 
Coun'ter-felt-ed. 
Coun'ter-ffeU-€r. 
Coun'ter-felt-ing. 
Coun-ter-numd , r. 156, 

161. 



a, §, i, 5, ii, y, long ; &, <^, 1, 5, tt, f , skort ifkazin ftr, kaain ftst, kaain 



ITERMAND 



155 



COWSLIP 



•nuuid. n, 101. 
-mand'od. 
-maad'in^. 
•mareb', v, 101. 
march, n. 101. 
mark', v, 101. 
mark. n. 101. 
mine', v. 101. 
mine, n. 101. 
-mure', v. 101. 
•mure, n. 101. 
•pane, 
•part. 

plof, V. 101. 
■plot, n. 101. 
plot'ted, 170. 
plotting, 
point, 
poise' (-poisO* 

poise i-poiz), 

poised' 

), 166. 

pois'ing 

,183. 

sign' (-»fn'),r. 

■ 

sign (-«i/i), n. 
signed' [101. 
,165. 
sign'ing 

sink', tT.M,101. 
sink, n. 101. 
vail'. 

vailed', 105. 
vAil'in^. 
val-la'uon. 
weigh' (^waf), 
weighed' 
162, 165. 
wdgh'ing 

weight i-wdt). 



ied (Aun'-)i 

ikun'-), 22, 93. 
>danoe [C ou- 
nce, 203.] 

wUnt-datce U 
to be corrupted 
yntra-dmtee (a 
rhich th« parOei 
voaite to ono 
^M thoueh.** to 
orda of Trench, 
the dance of the 
Ik end rural die- 
contrasted with 
ille and waltz, 
artlflolal dancee 



CoOn'try-man (Inm'-). 

Coun'ty, 28, 93. 

Coup de main (Fr.) 

{bcxyduhrmang' ). 
C<mp dUUxt (Ft.) ikoof- 

dA-td'). 
Coupd'mV (Ft.) {hoo- 

duhU') [so Sm. ; koo- 

daV, Wr. Gd. 155.1 
Cou-pi f Fr.) (iroo-pa*). 
Cou-i)ee' (/too^«') 

[Coopee,2U3.j 
Ck)ftp'le (^•up'0' i^ 
Cofip'led i^kup'ld). 




CoftWage (ifcur'-), 109. 

Cofir-a^^uB (itttr-o'- 
it«), 171. 

Cou-rant' ikoo^drU') 
[so Wk. Wr. Gd.; 
Jtoo-rd/U', Sm. 155.] 

Cou'ri-er (Fr.) a-oo'r1- 
ur) [so Sm. Ga. ; koo- 
rirfy Wk.; koo^nr, 
Wr. 154, 155.] 

Cdurse (ikOr«), 24. 

Coursed {kOrst), 183. 

Cours'er (JfcOrs'-). 

Cours'ing (kdrs'-). 

Court (ifcOrO, 24. 

Court'ed. 

Court'c-o&s (ituH'e-tM), 
or Court' eo&s rjfc«W- 
pwt) [so Wr. ; kurt'e- 
U8, Gd. ; kHrt'jfuSy 
Sm. ; Arur'cA^Ht^, Wk. 
134,155.] 

Court'er. 

Co&rfe-san (kurt-e- 
zan'f or itiwre -^an) 
[kurt-e-zan'y Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; kuHtezany Wb. 
Gd. 155.J 

Cofirt'sled {Icurfsid)^ 
171 180. 

Colirt'e-S7 (Jtar'<e-«y) 
(148), n. civility. 

Courte'sy {kurt'ay) 
(148), n. a bending and 
depression of the oody 
by a woman or a girl, 
expressive of dviUty : 
— t;. to make a courte- 
sy. [Curtsy, 203.] 

CofirteV-ingr Uenrt'-). 

Cdurl'ier (Jcart'yur)\noi 
kort'i-nr, 145, 153.] 

Court'li-ness, 78, 109. 

CSurt'ling. 

Court'ly, 193. 



Cdurt'-mar'tial (-#Aa/)> 
205, 210. 

CotiS'in {kuz'n) (^149), 
n. one relatea to 
another, as the chil- 
dren of brothers and 
sisters. [See Cozen, 
160.1 

Co&s'm-gcr'man {kuz'- 
n-) [pi. Cous'ins-ger'- 
mau {^kuz'm-)^ 197.] 

Cove 5i4. 

Cov'e-naiit {kuv'-)y 109. 

Cov'e-nant-ed {kuv'-). 

Cov-e-nant-ee' {kuv-). 

Cov'e-nant-er {^kuv'-\ 
160. 

Cov'e-nant-ing {kuv'-), 

Cov'e-naut-or {kutf-), 
160. 

[Covenous, 203. — 
iSee Covinous.] [Law 
term.] 

Cov'er (kuv'ur)y 22, 77. 

Cov'ered {kuv'urd)^ 165. 

Cov'er-er {kuv' A. 

Cov'er-ing (kuv-), 

Cov'er-let (huv'-). 

Cov'ert (Jcuv'-\ 171. 

Cov'ert-ure (itut^-), 91. 

Cov'et {kuv'et), 22. 

Cov'et-a-ble (itut^-), 104, 

Cov'et-ed Cinir'-). [169. 

Cov'et-ing (Jttii?'-). 

Cov'ct-otts {kuv'-) [not 
kuv'e-chus, 153, 156.] 

Cov'ey {kuv'y), 22, 98. 

Cov'in {kuv'xn). 

Cov'ing. 

Co v'in-oQs [Coven, 
o u s , 203.] 

Cow, 28. 

Cow'ard, 72. 

Cow'ard-Ice (-fa), 109. 

Cowed {kou>a)t 165. 

Cow'er. 

Cow'ered (-«rd), 105. 

Cow'er-ing. 

Cow'hage [Conage, 
Co witch, 203.] 

Cow'ing. 

[Cowilch. 203.— 5e0 
Cowhage.j 

Cowl, 28. 

Cowled {kowld), 

Cow'llck, 200. 

Co-work'er {-wurk'-), 

Cow'-pox [Cow- 
pooK,203.] 

Cow'ry, 190. 

Cow'slip [Cow's-lip 
Ucowz'l^)y Wb. GKI. 



te there i<»i<uin foot ; 9 m in llMile ; gh m g in go ; |h cm <fi this. 



\ 



OOXOOMB 



156 



CBENELLB 



Coz'eOmb ikoti'k9m), 

99, N. i 162. 
Cox'oomb-rj (-I;0m-). 
Cox-oom'io-al. 
Coj,27. 
Cox'en ikuz'n) (149), v. 

to cheat. [6'e« Cous- 
in, 160.] 
Coz'en-age (kuz'n-), 
Coz'eneaikuz'nd). 
Coa'en-er {kuz'n-). 
Coz'en-ing (kuz'n). 
[C o ley , 2U3.— See Co- 

aej.] 
[Co»y, 203. -.5« Co- 

Bcy.l 
Crab, 10. 

Crab'-ap'ple, 205. 
Crab'bed, 66, N. ; 170. 
Crab'by, 

Crab'-tree, 206, Exo. 4. 
Crab'yaw. 
Crack, 10, 181. 
Cracked (krakt). Note 

C,p.34. 
Crack'er. 
Crack'ing. 

Crackle (kraWl), 164. 
Crack'leU(JbraA:'W), 183. 
Crack'Liog. 

Cra<o'vi-inne(Fr,),l71. 
CraMle, 164. 
Cradled (itra'cUd), 183. 
Cra'dUng. 
Craft, 12, 131. 
CraftM-ly, 78, 98. 
CraftM-nes8, 160. 
Craft'y. 
Crag, 10. 
Crag'ged i-ghed), 138, 

170. 
Crag'gi-noBR {-ghi-). 
Crag'gy (-ghi/), 138. 
Crani. 10. 
Cram'bo. 

Crammed {knund), 176. 
Cram'mer. 
Cram'ming. 
Cramp, 10. 
Cramped (Jbrampt), 
Cramp'ing. 
Cramp'I-ron (-I'um). 
Cram-poons' {•poonz)i 

n. pi. 122. 
Cran'age. 
Cran'ber-ry [not kram'- 

b«r-ry, 153, 156.] 
[Cranch, 203. — iSee 

Craanch.j 
Crane, 23. 

Cranes'bill (Jbrafu'-),214 
Cra'ni-al, 78, 169. 
Cra-ni-og'no-my, 106. 



Cra-iii-o-log'lo^(4Qf'-)- 
Cra-nl-oro-gUt. 
Cra-ni-ol'o-gT, 108. 
Cra-ni-om'e-ter, 106. 
Cra-nl-o-met'rlc-al. 
Cra-nl-om'e-try, 106,160. 
Cra-ni-os'oo-py, 106. 
Cra'nl-um, 78, 160. 
Crank (krangk), 10, 54. 
Crftn'kle {krang'kl)^ 54, 

164. 
Cran'kled (krtmg'kld), 

183. 
Cran'kllne {krana*-). 
Crank'y (tranalry). 
Cran'nled (kran'id),l71. 
Cran'ny, 66, 170. 
Crants. 

Crap'au-dlne, 82, 152. 
Crape, 23. 
[Crapnel, 203.— iSm 

Grapnel.] 
Cra'pu4a (L.) fso 8m. ) 

krap'u-la, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 154, 155.] 
Crap'u-lenoe, 160. 
Crap'u-lent, 106. 
Crap'a-lofiB. 
Crash, 10, 46. 
Crashed (AnuW), Note 

C, p. 34. 
Crash'lng. 
Crae'sa-ment, 170. 
Cras'si-tude, 160, 170. 
Cratch, 10, 44. 
Cratch'-Cra'dle (205) 

[Scratch-Cradle, 

203.1 
Cratco'es (-«2), n. pi. 
Crate, 23, 163. 
Cra'ter, 23, 77. 
Cra-t^r'i-form, 78, 169. 
Criunch {kr'dnch) 

[Cranch, 203.] 
Craunched iJerdndU). 
Crilanch'lng {kmnch'-). 
Cra-vat', 121. 
CraTe, 23, 163. 
Craved, 165. 
Cra'yen {}era*vn)t 140. 
Crav'er. 
Crav'Ing. 
Craw, 17. 

Craw'flsh [Cray- 
fish, 203.1 
Crawl, 17. 
Crawled, 165. 
CrawFer. 
Crawl'lng. 
[Crayfish, 203.— 5ee 

Crawfish.] 
Cray'on, 23, 86. 
Graze, 23. 



Cnsed. 166, 188. 

Cra'ai-ly, 78, 98. 

Cra'zl-nesa, 160. 

Craz'ing. 

Cra'zy, 160. 

Creak, v. to make iv 

bardi, gratinff noise ^ 

— n. a harsh noise.^ 

[See Creek, 160.] 
Creaked {krikt). 
Creak'ing. 
Cream, 1^ 
Creamed, 165. 
Cream'ing. 
Cream'y. 
(^re'anoe. 
Crease, 13. 
Creased (£rC«l), Note (^ 

p. 34. 
Cre-ate*. 
Cre-at'ed, 183. 
Cre-at'ing. 
Cre-a'tion. 
Cre-atlve, 84. 
CreWit'or, 228. 
Creat'ur-al (-ywr-), 91. 
Creat'ure(9n (Jfcr«'yw) 

[so Wr. Gd.} kre'ture, 

coll. kr€t'8h*oor, Sm. j 

krefdtikr, Wk. 26; 44, 

Note 1 ; 156.] 
Cre'denoe, 160. 
Cre-den'dum (L.) [pL 

Cre-den'da, 196,] 
Cre'dent. 

Cre-den'tial (-9hal). 
Crcd-I-bU'i-ty, 78, 160. 
Cred'i-ble, 78, 164. 
Cred'i-bly, 93. 
Cred'it, 15, 170. 
CredMt-a-ble, 164, 160 
Crcd'it-a-bly. 
Cred'lt-ed. 
Oed'lt-ing. 
Cred'lt^r. 
Cre-du'U-ty, 78, 93. 
Crcd'u-lo&s, 80. 
Creed, 13. 
CT«ek ( 13) [not krfk, 127, 

153], n. a rlTulet. [See 

Creak, 160.1 
Oeek'y, 169l 
Creep. 13. 
Creep'er. 
Creep'ing. 
Cre'nate. 
Cre'nat-ed. 
Cren'a-ture. 
Cren'cl-Ute, 170. 
Cren'el-lat-ed, 183. 
Cren'eMat-Ing. 
Cren-el-la'tioii. 
Cre-n6Ue'. 



a. & I. 6, a, y, long } &, S, T, 0, fi, jf, tftorf ; Iktuin flur, katin flwt, t oc <n 



•RENELLED 



157 



CROUCH 



-late. 

wte, 171. 

Doe. 

He. 

Ute, 109. 

tat-«d, 183. 

tat-lng. 

ta'tion. 

15. 

g'ca-lar, 89, 108. 

a'cnle. 

snt, 171. 

15, 174. 

!t, 170. 

15. 

>d. 

&llen i/awln). 

ng. 

ceoos (-«/ktM),112. 



AwmC-izm), 136. 
Me' (Tt.), 
se i-U), 160, 170. 
ikroo) (19) [pi. 
re (krooz). — dee 
se, 160.] 

!l (faw-), n. a 
of 7unorworBt- 
[lSee Cruel, 160.] 
ret, 203.~iSee 

ige, 170. 

d, 165, 176. 

ing. 

le, 161. 

led (kra>'ld)j 183. 

ling* 

•Ibnn, 78. 
xm-ite (krik-) [ao 
; kriehfton^,(^ 



' BomdioMi pit>> 
cd Arf roM-a, or cri'- 



!t,16. 

it-er. 

d [bo 8m. Wr. j 

o<(2, Gd. 155.1 

186. 

25. 

-nal, 143, 169. 
-nalM-ty. 
-oal-ly, 170. 
-nate, 72, 169. 
-oat-ed. 
-oat-ing. 
-na'tton. 



Crlm'i-Dit-Tre. 
Crim'i-na-to-ry, 86. 
Crimp, 16. 
Crimped (hrimpt). 
Crimp'ing. 
Crim'ple, 164. 
Crim'pled {krvn'pld). 
Crim'pUnc^. 

Crim'Bon (lrHm'«n),140. 
Crim'soDed (-^nd), 166. 
Crim'Bon-lng (krim'zn-) 
Cri'nat-ed. 
Cringe, 16, 45. 
Cringed {kHt\jd). 
Cringe'ling. 
Cring'er {fcrini'-). 
Crinfi^'lng {krinjf-), 
Crin^ffle CtHnMy «• 
Crin-r-cult'u-rair 
Cri-nlg'cr-ouB (-n«'-). 
Cri'nlfe. 

Crin'kle (XrHn^W), 54. 
Crin'kled {kring'kld). 
Crin'kling {kring'-). 
Cri'nold. 
Cri-noid'al. 
Cri-nold'e^an, 169. 
Crin'o-llne, 82, 152 [not 

krln'o-iin, 153.] 
Crip'ling (170), n. a 

inort Bpar used as a 

support. r<S'ee Crip- 

plfne, 160.J 
Crip'ple (kri>'l)j 164. 
Crip'pled {krtpfld), 
Crip'pllng (170), part. 

ftt>m Cr^le. [See 

Cripling, 100.] 
Cri'BlB, 25. 
CriBp. 16. 
CriBp'a^ed. 
Crisped {krispt), 
Crisp'er. 
Cris'pin. 
Crisp'ing. 
Cri«p'7, 93. 
CrisB-crdBB-rdw'. 
Cris'tate. 
Cris'taVed. 
Cri-te'ri-on (Gr.) [Or. 

pi. Cri-te^ri^i Eng. 

pi. Criterions, 196.] 

MT^Th* Greek pln- 
ril, eriteria. If moet com- 
monly need.** Woree$ter, 

Crit'io, 16, 170. 
Crit'io-al, 72, 108. 
Crit'io-al-ly. 
Crit'l-eise (-•I«),(78,202). 
[Criticise, 8m. 203.j 
CritM-cised (-$lzd}. 
Crit'l-ciB-cr (nfU). 
Crit'i-cis-ing {-Hz), 



n. one who 
[i9ee Croker, 



spened by Gd."-* 
lean, 



Crit'l-dsm C-fl^m), ia3. 

Cri-tique' (Fr.Xitr1-l«Jf 1 

121, 171. 
Cria'ael (kHz' I) (149) 

rCriaale, 203.1 
Cria'Ecl-ing {krizl-), 
C;rdak,24. 
Croaked (kr6kt). Note 

C, p. 34. 
Crdak'er, 

croaks. 

160.] 
Crdak^ing. 
Cro'at. 

Cro'ches (-cMz)^ n. pi. 
Cro-chet' (Fr.) (kro- 
Crock, 18, 181. [sha'). 
Crock'er-y, 233, Kxc. . 
Crock'et. 
Croc'o-dile (162) [bo 

8m. Wb. Gd. ; krok*- 

o-dU, Wk. : krok-o- 

da\oTkroV<hdU,WT. 

155.] 
Croc-o-dil'i-an [ao 

speDed by " ' 

Crocodlu 

Wr. 203.1 
CnMM)-dll1-ty, 169. 
Cro'cuB. 
Crdft, 18, N. 
Croi'scB (-«&). n. pi. 
Oo'kcr, n. a larane wa- 
ter-fowl. [iSee Croak 

er, 160.] 
Crom'lcch (-Wfc), 171. 
Crone, 24. 
Cro'ny, 190. 
Crdbk [See Book.] 
Crdbk'ed. 
Odbk'lng. 
Crop, 1& 
Oopped {kropf), 
Cro'sier (-«Aur), 47. 
Cro'siercii {-zhurd\ 166. 
Cros'let [CroBslet 

203.] 
Cross (18, N.). 
CroBs'oar, 200. 
CroBB'-btlled. 
Crossed {krUst), Note 

C, p. 34. 
CroBs'-*yed (-id). 
CroBs'ing. 

Ooss'-legged (-legd). 
CroBs'-trees {-tr9z). 
CroBs'wise (-toU). 
Crotch, 18, 44. 
Crotohed (krocht), 166. 
Crotch'et, 171. 
Ootch'et-ed. 
Crotoh-et-y. 
Cronch, 28. 



at in there; (Sba$in foot; 9a#<n'ftdlo ; ghat g<iigo ; tj^ot in this. 

14 



lup {troim), IB. 
ku'pl-er (kroo'pl 



'ffiT'' 



Criw, it. 
Crilwed ItrBd), I 
Crowd, & 



Crown'er. 
Crown'lDE. 
Crown'-wlicel. 

Cni'd-al liroo'lhi-al) 

IbrS'ikoJ.' Wi. Qd'. 

1U.1 
Cm'cf-ite (ItWrtt^) 

[BO Wk. Sm. Wr. i 

hri'iMl, Wb. Gd. 

1S6.] 
Cro'cf-ble (Jtbo"-), 78, 



Ctu'ii-fl-er (troo'-). 
Cni'cl-fii (troo'-), 7S, 

IW. 
Cro-cl-flK'ion (ItihmI- 

flk'flmn), 171. 
(Su'd-ronn (troo'-)- 
Cru'd-R Ikroo'-i, w. 
Cni'd-ft-'lng (itToo' ). 
Cru-elg'er-ohs (Jroo- 

»</'■?; JOB. 
Cni'Hic {troo'-). 
Cruiic a-rood), 19. 
Cru'iU-V(t™>'),78,«, 
Cru'el (jtroo'), a. un- 

fiwllDg. [Stt Crewel, 



Cru'of-t» (troo'-y. 
Cni'et (injo'-) [Crew- 



»:l. 



Cruise (trooi) [» 



Cnil»e,2oa.] 
rulse (troo-, 
kroog, 136, 163], 

fite (Crewf, p7Tf 

Crew, mo. I 
Cralsed (jtrooid), 1S3. 
Cnlt'tTlkraoi'), 



158 

Cruising (trooi'-)- 
CrumlCrumb.a 
Crumb fl:runi) 
ICrnm,aw.) 



Cmmb'lnG' IkT-uia'-) 

Crum'blcd (jbnin'AIif). 

Crum'int-fle, 1«, 170. 
Cmmmnl Itrurnd) < 

ICrnrabed.WS,] 
Crurn'ming (C r u m 



Cry'lDg, IS 
Crj-opt'o- 



-:*'.;: 



Crri-lsl-loj'n-phcT. 
CTy»-Ul-lo.gr»ph'lc, UA 
'*— -t Al-lo-graph'lp-al, 

Crrs^tal-log'nt^pbr, IM. 



Crum'pled (tniM'pId), 

CrnEa'pUng. 

Cnip^r (dfcruD'ur, or 
troop'ur) ntnui'iir, 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; trtip'- 
■r, Wb. Qi. IH.] 

Cm'rjl <jtroo'-). 

Cm-Bsde' (jtroo-), 121. 

Cru-iiM'er Ikroo), 183. 

Cnuid'iDg; (Itoo). 

;m«e, n. cirool) [not 
krooi, lad, IS.!.] 

Cm'iet (troo'.). 

Crush. 2^. 

Cmahod (btwU), Kote 



Cubbed (tua(t,)UO, 171 

Cub'blng. 

CuVb^-liola. 



i,u'oiMl,affl, 

Cu'bll-ed. 

Cu'bold. 

Cu-bold'd. 

Cuok'Inff-stool. 

Cock' aid. 

Curk'oo (bUfoo). W, 

Cu-wil'lite (170) [so 
, Wi. Sm, Wf. ; h^M- 

at, Wb. Gd. IM.j 
Cu-CBl'Uved [»o Wk. 

Sm. Wr.j tu'inJK- 

«f, Wb. Qd. lU.I 
On'oom-ber [«> 8m. 

Wr. Wb. dd. ; koKf- 



CUCUBBIT 



169 



CURTAINED 



Cn'ear-blt [Caour 

bite. 203.] 
Cn-ear-Dl-ta'oeoaf 

Cod, 22. 

Ciida»ear (-Mr), 17L 

Ciid'dle, 16ft. 

Cnd'dled {tudfld), 183. 

Cad'dling. 

Cud'dyTlTO. 

CDd'gel, 149. 




Note E, p. 70.1 
Cnd'gel-leriCadeel' 

cr, Wb. Gd. a03!j 
Cad'gel-Unff [Cudgel- 

ine,Wb.Gd. 203.1 
Cod'weed. 
Cue (M}, 20. 
Caff, 22, 173. 
Cuffed itH/t), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Curing. 
Cnl-imM IkwB-riiM', or 

kwf-HU] (171) _r§o 

Wr. ; faPl-ra*', Wk. 

Wb. Gd.} kwt'rlUy 

Bm. 15ft.J 
Cni-ns-eier', {kwi-ra»- 

•Cf^), 122, 171. 
Ciiish (i-MTif). 
Col-dee' (121) [ao Wk. 

Sm. Wr. } kuPdBf Wb. 

Gd. 156.1 
CD-Ii9'i-fonn, 78, 160. 
Coli-na-ry, 72, 171. 
Coll, 22. 
Called, 186. 
Cttiacn-der [Colan- 
der, 203.] 
Coll'er, n. one who 

enllg, or selects. [See 

Color.] 
Coll'ing. 
Coll'ion (^im). 
Coinis. 

Colly, 170, 190. 
Calm, 22, 133. 
Col-mlTer-olls, 108. 
Col'mi-nste. 
Col'ml-nit-ed, 183. 
QBl'mi-nat-ing. 
Col-mi-na'tlon. 
Col-pe-bU'l-tT, 106, 160. 
Col'iMrble, 164. 
Col'pritfSZ. 
Col'ti-TSrble, 164. 
Ciil'ti-Tat«rble, 164. 
Col'tt-rate, 160. 
Col'tf-Tated, 183. 
Col-tl-Ta'tlon, 112. 



Cnl'ti-Tii^)r. 
Col'trate. 
Cnl'trit^. 
Cal'tri-form, 160. 
Cult'ure, 91. 
Cul'ver-m. 
Cul'vert, 22, 
Cal'rer-taU. 
Cul'ver-tailed. 
Cum'bent, 160. 
Chim'ber, 104. 
Com'bered (-dufti), 166. 
Camn[>er-ing. 
Com'ber-Bome (-mmi). 
Cam'branoe, iflO. 
Cnm'bri-an, 109. 
Com'brofis. 
Cvmffnj (98, 160) 

[Comfre7,203.] 
Cnm'in, 170. 
Cu'mu-la-flTe, 81. 
Cn'mu-lose [bo Wb. 

<M.; ctt-mtf-»«', Wr. 

155.] 
Ca'ma-lo-cIr-r(^Btra'- 

tas. 
Chi'mn-lo-stra'toB, 224. 
Cu'mu4u9 (L.) [pi. Ctt'- 

mif-A. 196.1 
Ca'ne^l, 100. 
(3n'ne-ate. 
Cu'ne-at-ed. 
Co-ne'i-fbrm, 100. 
Ca'ni-form, 106. 
(Tnn'ner, 170. 
Chin'ning, 170. 
Cup. 22. 
Cop'board (teft'btwti) 

(Note C, p. 34) [so 

Wk. Wr. Gd. ; *i*'- 

Mrd, Sm. 155.1 
Ca'pel [C o p p e 1 , 208.] 
Cn-pel'Ia'tion, 170. 
Cup'i^l (-ySoOi 197. 
Cn-pWi-^, 170. 
Cn'po-la \not ka'pa-15, 

127, 153.] 
Copped (Jcupi), 176. 
Cop'per. 
Cop'ping. 
Co^pre-oQs, 170. 
Cn-prlTer-olks, 108. 
Co'pule. 
Co-po-lifer-ottB. 
Cur, 21. 

Cur^irbiia-tT, 160. 
(^'a-ble, 164. 
Co-rsr^da' QM-ra-9&) 

(171) [so Bm. Gd.; 

koo^ra-90', Wr. 166.] 
Co'ra-cy, 160. 
Co-ras'sow, 170. 
Cn'rate, 40, N. 



Cor'a-tlTe. 

Cu-ra'tor, 88. 

Carb, 21. 

Chirbed, 106. 

Curbing. 

Curb'roof, 206, Exc 3. 

Car-cu'li-o, 160. 

Cor'ca-ma. 

Cord, 21. 

Card'ed. 

Curd'l-ness, 100. 

Cord'ing. 

Cor'dle, 164. 

Cur'dled (teWdkl), 183. 

Cor'dling. 

Curd'7, 93. 

Cure, 26. 

Cored, 166, 183. 

Ciir'er 

Cur'few (-/li), 171. 

Curbing. 183. 

Cu-rl-o-log'io (-^'-) 

Cu-ri-os'l-t7, 108, 160. 

Cu'ri-o&B. 

Curl, 21. 

Curled (Jcurld)^ 106. 

Curl'er, 77. 

Cur'lew (4u), 171. 

Curl'i-ness, 100. 

Curl'ing. 

Curl'7793. 

Cor-mod'geon (MtcJ'- 

«n), 171. 
C&r'nmt (170) [bo Sm. 

Wb.Ckl.Wr.jWr'an, 

Wk. 155], n. 
Cttr'ren-cy, 169, 170. 
C&r'rent, a. 109. 
(}fti^ri'cle, 164, 170. 
Cnr-ri&^uin (L.) [pi. 

Ottr-rfc'»-to, 198.] 
Ctlr'ried ikajr'id), 186. 
Ctlr'ri-er, 169. 
Cur'rish, 21, 170. 
Cttr'ry, n.hv.ZL 
Ctir'ry-ing. 
Curse, 21. 
Cursed (Iwrsf), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Curs'ing. 
Cur'fllve. 
(3ur'BO-ri-l7, 100. 
(?ar'BO-ri-neBS. 
Cur'BO-ry, 93. 
Oirt,21. 
Cur-tall'. 
Cur'tail-dog. 
C^-taUed' l-i9ld% 106. 
(Tor-tall'er. 
Cnr-taU'ing. 
(Tor'taXn (lur'Mn) [nol 

kor'tn,] 153. 
Cor'taXned {4imi), 106. 



Mlj Oottotliere; 6&a#<iifoot;9a#<»ftdleigha«gtffigOiyiaf inthi* 



CURTATK 



160 



DAGGLE 



Cnr'tate. 
Cnr-ta'tioii. 
[Cnrtsy, 203. — See 

Courtesy.] 
Cu'nile (^root)t 10, 26. 
Cttir'ate. 
Conr'at ed. 
Curv'a-ture. 
Carre (kurv), 21, 163. 
Curyedikurvd), 166,183. 
Cur'^et, or Cur-vet', v. 

[kur^vet, 8m. Wb. 

Gd. ; kur-vet', Wk. ; 

kur-veft or kur'vei, 

Wr. 155.1 
Cur'vet, n. [BO Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; kur^vef, Wk.j 

kur'vetf or kur-vet', 

Wr. 155.] 
Cur-vi-UQ'e-al, 160. 
Cur-vl-lln'e-ar. 
Cunr'lng, 183. 
Cunr'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Cush'at ikoi,sh'at), 20. 
CtiBh'lou (kobsh'un), 171. 
Cash'loned {boo$h'uwi). 
Cush, 22. 
Cusp. 22. 
CuBp'i-date, 160. 
Cusp'i-dat-ed. 
Cus^tard, 135, 171. 
Cus-to'di-al. 
Cus-to'di-im, 160. 
Cus'to-df , 86, 93. 
Cus'tom, 22, 169. 
Cus'tom-a-ble, 104, 160. 
Cua'tom-a-ri-ly. 
Custom-a-ry, a. 72. 
Cus'tom-a-ry, n. fC u b - 

t u m a r y , 203.1 
Cus'tomed (-/vma), 171. 
CuB'tom-er. 
CuB'tom-house. 
[Cu8tumary,n. 203. 

— See Customary.] 
Cut, 22. 

Cu-ta'ne-ottfl, 160. 
Cu'tl-cle, IM. 
Cu-tic'u-lar, 108. 
Cut'lass, 171. 
Cut'ler. 

Cut'ler-y, 156, 233. Exc. 
Cut'let. 
Cut'purse, 206. 
Cut'ter, 176. 
Cut'thrdat, 206. 
Cut'tlng, 176. 
Cnt'tle-flsb. 
Cut'-wA-ter. 
Cy'an-ate. 
Cy<an'io. 
Cy'a-nide [C y a n i d , 

203.] 



Cy-«n'o-gen, 170. 

Cy-a-nom'c-ter, 108. 

Cy-an'u-ret. 

Cy-aa-u'ric. 

Cyc' la-men. 

Cy'de, 164. 

Cyc'Uc. 

Cyc'llo-al. 

Cy'clo-erftpb (127) [bo 

Sm. Wr. J nk'lo-graf, 

Gd. 155.1 
Cy'dold. 
Cy-clold'al. 
Cy-clold'l-an. 
Cy-clom'e-try, 108. 
Cy-cIo-pK'di-a (pe'-) 

JCyclopedia,203.] 
Cy-clo-pe'aii, 110. 
Cy-do-ped'ic, 109. 
Cy-clo-ped'i(^al, 108. 
Cy-dop'ic. 
Cyg'net, n. a yount 

swan. [Sw Signed 
Cyl-In-dcr, 171. [160. 
Cyl-ln'dric. 
Cyl-In'dric-al, 108. 
Cyl-in'dri-form, 109. 
Cyl'in-droid. 
Cyl-in-dro-met'ric. 
Cy'ma[Clma,203.] 
Cy-mar (I2i)r8imar, 

203.1 
Cym'bal, n. a kind of 

muBical instrument. 

[5e<;Cimbal, 160.] 
Cym'bi-form, 169. 
Cyme, 26. 
C^'mose, or Cy-mose' 

[•l'm««, Wb. Gd. J 

BVmOs't Wr. 155.] 
Cy'mo&B. 

Cy-nan'che {-nang'ki). 
Cy-nan'thro-py. 
Cyn-arc-tom'a-chy(-Jty). 
Cyn'ic. 
Cyn'ional. 

Cyn'i-clBm {-aizm)^ 136. 
Cy'no-Bure, or Cyu'o- 

Bure [so Wr. j si'no- 

arOr, or 8i'no-zh*oor 

(see § 26), Sm. ; Hn'o- 

«Mir, or sVno-BhUr, 

Wk. Gd. 155.] 

■V Though Walker 
pr«ftn mi'cHrtfir to sfno- 
Afir, he mjs. ** I am not 
tnre, howeT«r. that the 
b««t mage ia not agalnit 
me." 

Cyph'o-nlsm (nizm), 
Cy 'press (I71),n.akind 

of tree. [See Cyprus, 

148.] 



Cyp'ri-an. 
Cyp'rine, 82, 152. 
Cy^prus, n. a thin, 
^Mmsparent, bbu:k 
^tuff. [See Cypress, 
Cfr-e-Tii'ic. 148.] 

Cy-pe'nl-an. 
Cyr-i-o-log'io i4€g'-]. 
CyBtMiBt,203.] 
CystTc. 
Cys'to-oele. 
Cyst'ose. 
Cys-tot'o-my, 108. 
Cyt'i-Blne [(Sytisln, 

203.1 
Cyt'o-blast. 
Czar (air) [T a a r , 203,] 
Cza-ri'na (sa-r^'na)- 
Czftr'o-wltx (saWo- 

wUt). 

D. 

Dab, 10. 

Dabbed (dabd), 150, 176. 

Dab'bing. 

Dab'ble, 164. 

Dab'blcd idab'ld), 183. 

Dab'bler. 

Dab'bling. 

Daoe, 23. 

Dac'tyl, 171. 

Dac'tyl-ar. 

Dac-tyl'ic. 

Dac-tyl'l-o-glj^h 

[Dactyfoglyph, 

203.] 
Dac-ty l-I-og'rs-phy. 
Dac-tyFi-o-man-cy 

[Dactylomancy, 

Dac'^l-ist, 171. 

Dao-tyl'o-glyph [Dac- 
ty I i o gl y p h , 203.] 

Dac-tyl-oro-gy, 108. 

Dao-tyl'o-man-cy 
[Dactylioman- 
cy,203.J 

Dac-tyl-on'o-my, 108. 

Dad, 10. 

DadMy, 170. 

DS'do. 

Die'dal (de-) [Dedal, 
203.] 

Dc-da'li-an (df) (160) 
[Dcdalian,203.] 

Dsd'a-lofis ided'-) 
[Dedaloa8,203.] 

Daf-fa-dil'ly, 170. 

Daf fo-dil, 170. 



a, e, 1, d, ft, y, limg ; &, fi, I, d, ti, f , thori i Jiaain Far, katin fkst, kiuin 



DAGUERREIAN 



161 



DAZZLING 



[lo Gd^ Daeucr- 
^^rlan, Wr. 2037], 

{-ghir»-) \not d*«h«r'- 
e-o-tip, 153.] 

wr Ttilt wordCformed 
from the naiiM iH|k« in- 
TCBlor, Doffuerrt^k mott 
eoromonlj spelkd dagmer- 
rvDQfM, ■• pven by Good- 
rich in the Supplcmeat to 
Webster's DictionarT. But 
ia the Dictioiiariee of Smut 
■ad Woroeeler it \m spelied 
dagwtmttme. Smart pro- 
Boancee U da-ifwifo-np : 
Worcester and Goodrich, 



Dah'U-a [so Wr. ; did'- 
yo, Wb. Gd. ; dA'tl-a^ 
Sin. 155J [not dal'ya, 
153.1 

Diin'tl-ly. 

Dmin'ti-nets, 109. 

Diin'tj. 

Dii'ry, 49, N. 

Da'ii [so Sm. Wr.: 

<ia'if,orda«,Gd. 156.] 
Dii'sled (da'ztd). 
Dii'sy (da'zv), 109. 
Da'korrDakir,203.] 
Dale, 23. 

Dal'U-aDoe, 109, 170. 
Dal'Hed (-lid), 99, 186. 
Dal'U-er. 
Dal'ly, 93, 170. 
Dal'ton-ism (-/«m), 136. 
Dam (10), n. a female 

parent, — used of 

beasts; — a bank to 

confine water. [See 

Damn, 160.] 
Dam'age, 1A9. 
Dam'age^i-ble, 164, 183. 
Dam'aged, 165, 183. 
Dam'a-f^ing. 
Dam'as-oene, 171. 
Dam'aak. 

Dam'aaked (-askt), 
Dam'aa-keen, v. [so Sm. 

Wr.idam-a»-kin'jWb. 

Gd. 155J [D a m a s - 

ken, Damaskin, 

208.] 
Dam'aa-keeiied, 166. 
Dun'aa-keen^nff. 
Dtm'aa-Un, n. Tso Sm. 

Wb. Gd. : danPasklnt 

Wr. 155.] 
Dun'as-«in [so Wb.Gd.; 

da-mat'Hnt Wr. 156.] 
Dame, 23. 
Damn {dam) (162), v. to 



condemn. [See Dam, 

160.] 
Dam-nabil'1-ty, 169. 
Dam'na-ble, 164. 
Dam'na-bly, 72, 93. 
Dam-na'tion, 112. 
Dam'na-to-ry, 86. 
Damned (ctomd), pari. 

165. 
Dam'ned, a. 150. 
Damp, 10. 
Damped (dampO>*Note 

C, p. M. 
Damp'en {deanp'n)^ 149. 
Damp'ened {damp'nd). 
Damp'cn-ing {damp'n-). 
Damp'cr. 
Damp'ing. 
DamVl l-zel)i 136. 
Dam'son {.dam'zn)^ 136, 

149. 
Dance, 12. 131. 
Danced {Mnet). 
D&n^'er. 
Dane'inff. 
Dan'de-u-on, or Dan- 

de-li'on [dim'de-ll-on^ 

Wb. Gd. } dan-de-tl'- 

ofit Wk. Sm. Wr. 

155.1 
Dan'dl-prat, 109. 
Dan'dle, 154. 
Dsn'dled {dan'dld), 150. 
DanMler. 
Dan'dling. 
Dan'druff, 171. 
DanMy, 10, 93. 
Dane'geld {-gheXO) 

[Dane ere It, 203.] 
Dane' wort {-wurt). 
Dan'ger, 23, 77. 
Dan'ger-ofis. 
Dan'gle rdan'flr{), 54,164. 
Dan'gled {aang'gld), 

183. 
Dan'gler {dang'glur). 
Dan'gling {dang'gling). 
Dank {dangk), 10, 54. 
Dap'per, ifo. 
Dap'plc, 161. 
Dap'pled {dap'ld), 183. 
Dap'pUng. 
Dare (eWr), 14. 
Dared {dird), 183. 
Dar'er (<Wr'-). 
Dftr'Ic. 

Dar'ing {dtr*-), 183. 
Dark, 11. 

Dark'en {darVn)y 149. 
Dark'ened {darVnd). 
Dark'en-er {darVn-). 
Dark'en-ing {darkfn-). 
Dark' some (-Mini), 169. 



Dar'ling. 

Dam, 11. 

Darned, 166. 

Dar'nel. 

Dam'er. 

Damping. 

Dart, 11. 

Dart'ed. 

Darker. 

Dart'ing. 

Dar'troQs. 

Dash, 10, 46. 

Dashed (da«A<), Note C, 
p. 34. 

Dash'er. 

Dash'ing. 

Das'tara. 

Das'y-ure. 

Dafta f L. pi.). 

Da-td'ri-a [Gd. 154, 
155.] 

Da'ta-ry, 72. 

Date, 23. 

Dat'ed, 183. 

Dat'er. 

Dat'ing. 

Da'tlve, 84. 

Da' turn (L.) [pi. Da' to, 
198.] 

Da-taMa, 72. 

Da-tu'rine, 82, 152. 

Dftub, 17. 

DAabed {dawbd)^ 166. 

D&ub'er. 

DAab'ing. 

Dilub'y. 

DAugh'ter {daw'-), 102. 

Daunt {diknt) (11) [not 
dawnt, 15).] 

Dftont'ed {ddni). 

Daunt'er {ditnt'-). 

DauntMng {ddtU'-). 

Dftu'Dhiu, 17, 35. 

Da'vit [so 8m. Wr. ; 
dav'U, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Daw, 17. 

Daw'dle, 161. 

Daw'dled {daw'dld). 

Daw'dler. 

Daw'dling. 

Dawn, 17. 

Dawned, 150. 

Dawn'ing. 

Day, n. the time be- 
tween the rising and 
the setting of tlie 
snn ; the period of 
twenty-four hourtf. 
[Seeveyt 160.] 

Day'time, 206. 

Daz'zle, 164. 

Dax'xled {daa^ld), 183. 

Dax'iling. 



ftU; <a« in there; dbof Mlbot; yof <fifadle;gh<ug<iigO',^<uiKtbVr 



DEACON 



162 



DECIPHERED 



Dea'oon (de'kn), 140. 

Dea'oon-ry {de'kn-), 

D€ad, 15. 

Dtad'en (ded'n), 149. 

D«ad'Li-neB8, 160. 

Dead'ly, 03. 

Deaf (<«/) [so Wk. 8m. 
Wr. ; dl/in England, 
more oommunly dlf in 
America, Gd. 155.] 

■^ Di/; though com- 
mon In tne U. sT. !■ nol 
the pronunciation of the 
belt speakers In this 
country. 

Di^aPen (de/n) (140) [w 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; rf«/n, 
or defn, Gd. 155.] 

DMrcncd (defnd), 160. 

Doafcn-ing (d«/n-). 

Deal, 13. 

Dt'al'er. 

Dcal'ing. 

Dean. 13. 

Dean'er-f. 

Dear, a. costly, pre- 
doug. [See Deer, 100.] 

Dear'bom. 

Dearth (deWA), 21, Note. 

Dear'y. 

Death, 15, 37. 

De-bd'cU (Fr.) (dA-bd'- 
kl) [bo Sm. i de-ba'kly 
Wr.; de-baei, Wb. 
Gd. 154, 155.] 

De-bar', 11. 

De-barred' (-bard')^ 176. 

De-bar'ring. 

De-base'. '&. 

De-based' i-bAst'), 183. 

Dc-bas'er. 

De-bas'ing. 

De-base'ment. 

De-bat'a-ble, 164. 

Do-bate', 23. 

Dc-bat'ed, 183. 

De-bat'er. 

Do bat'inff. 

Dc-bauch^ 17, 44. 

De-bftuched' (-bawckt'). 

Dcb-au-ohoe' (-o-«A«')i 
122. 171. 

Dc-bauch'cr. 

De-b&uch'er-y. 

Do-b&uch'ing. 

De-bent'ure, 01. 

De-bent'ured i-yurd). 

De-bll'i-tate, 100. 

De-bil'i-tat-ed, 183. 

De-bil'i-tat-ing. 

De-bil'i-ty, 108, 160. 

Deb'it, 170. 

Deb'it-ed. 



DeVit-ing. 

De-bi-tu-mln-I-M'tion. 
De-bi-ta'min-ize, 202. 
De-bl-tu'min-ized, 183. 
De-bi-tn'min-iz-lng. 
Deb-o-nair' (-nir^), 122. 
De-bonch' (^)oosh')y 4<V. 
D^brU (Fr.) (da-bre'), 

n.pl. 
Debt (det)y 15, 162. 
Debt-ce' (det-€'), 121. 
Debt'or idet'ur). 102. 
Dibui (Fr.) frW-d«') [so 

Gd. j dA-b'o&^ Sm. 

(see § 26) ; dA-boo', 



Wr. 164, 155.] 
Fr.) 

Deo'a-cliord {-kord). 



Debutant 
titng' 



(Fr.) {dA-bu- 



Dec'a-dal, 72. 

Dec'ade, 171. 

De-ca'denoe, 122. 

De-ca'den-cy, 109. 

Dcc'a-gon. 

Dec'a-gram [Deca- 
gramme, 203.] 

Dec-a-gyn'i-an (-jt»'-). 

De-cae'y-noiis {-kc^'-). 

Dec-a-lie'dral. 

Dec-a-hc'dron [pi. 

Dec-a-he'dra, 108.] 

Dec-a-Wtre (Fr.) f-le'- 
ftir)[ Dec al I t fe r 
Idek'a-tt-tury Sm. ; d4- 
hU'i-tur, Gd.), 203.] 

De-cal'o-gist, 

Dec'a-ldgue {-log), 87. 

De-cam'cr-on, 106. 

Dec'a-mi-tre (Fr.) (^ne- 
tur) [D ecameter 
(de kam'e-tur, or ddt'- 
a-ml-tur), Gd. 203.] 

De-camp', 10, 103. 

De-camped' i4eampf). 

De-camp'lng. 

De-camp'ment, 185. 

Dec'a-nal [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; dek'a^nal, or de- 
ka'nal, Wr. 155.] 

De-can'dri-an, 160. 

Dc-can'drofis. 

Deo-an'gu-lar (-nnff'-). 

De-cants 10. 

De-cant-a'tion [so Sm. 
Wb. (M. ; dek-an-ta'- 
tion, Wk. Wr. 156.] 

De-cant'ed. 

De-cant'er. 

De-cant'ing. 

Dec-a-phyPlotts, or De- 
caph'yf-lous. [See 
Adenophyllous.] 

De-cap'i-tate, 160. 



De-eap'i-tat-ed, 183. 

De-cap'i-tat-ing. 

De-cap-i-ta'tion. 

Dee'a-pod. 100. 

De-cap'o-dobs, 105. 

De-car-bon4-za'tion. 

De-car'bon-ize, 202. 

De-ear'bon-ized, 183. 

De-car'bon-iz-ing. 

Dec'a-stlch {stik). 

Dec'a-style. 

Do-dy', 23. 

De-cayed' {-kAd'), 187. 

De-cay'er. 

De-cay 'ing. 

De-cease', 13. 

De-ceased' i-Hst*). 

De-C4la8'ing. 

De-o;at', i;^ 160. 

De-ceit'ful (-/Sol). 

De-ceiv'a-ble, 164, 160. 

De-ct'ive' (-s*r'),l.% 169. 

De-ccived' {sivd'), 183. 

De-ceiv'er. 

De-ceiv'ing. 

De-oem'bcr, 120. 

De-ocm'fid, 122. 

De-isem'tnr (L.) [pi. De- 
cern' v%rl, 108.1 

De-cem'vi-ral, 72. 

De-cem'vi-rate, 160. 

De'cen-cy, 160. 

De-cen'na-ry, 72, 170. 

De-cen'nl-al, 160, 170. 

De'ccnt, 171. 

De-cep'tion. 

De-oep'tlve, 84. 

De-cld'a-blc, 164, 183. 

De-dde', 25. 

De-cid'ed, 183. 

De-dd'er. 

De-cid'ing. 

De-cid'u-otls, 89. 

Def 'i-gram [D e 9 i - 
gramme, 203.] 

Dee'i-li-tre (Fr.) (-»- 
<ijr)[Declliterfde- 
8iVt4ur), Gd. 203.] 

De-cill'ion (^uun), 

De-cill'lonth (-yufUA). 

De^'i-mal, 171. 

Do^'i-mate, 73. 

De^'i-mat-cd, 183- 

De9'i-mat-ing. 

Dec-i-ma'tion, 112. 

Def'i-me-tre (Fr.) {-mt- 
tur) [Decimeter 
(de-Hmfe-turl, 8m. 
Wl). Gd. 203.] 

De-d'pher. 

De-ci'pher-a-ble, 164. 

De-d'phered (nrt'/krrf), 
150. 



* e, i, 6, u, y, lon{f ; ft, e, I, d, fl, f, short ; K Of in fU, kaiin Cut, koiin 



DECIPHBBER 



163 



DEFEATING 



D»-d'pher-«r, 77. 

De-cd'pher-ink' 
Dend'sion {-nzh'un). 
De-ci'dve, 84. 
Deck, 16, 181. 
Deok'ed (cieM), 149. 
Deck'ei. 
Deck'fng. 
De-€liim% 23, 103. 
De-diim'er. 
De-«lilm'iiiff. 
Dee-la-ma'tloii, 112. 
De-cbun'a-to-rr, 88. 
De-clar'ft-ble (-*Wr'-). 

Dee-U-ra'tion. 
De-cUr'a-tlve, 84, 143. 
De-cUr'a-to-nr, 86. 
De^dare' i-kUr'), 14. 
De<i\aTedf i-klSrd'), 183. 
DeHslar'er (iW^r'-). 
De-dar'tng: (-W«r'-). 
De-clen'sion. 
De^lln'a-ble, 164. 
Dec-li-ua'tion. 
Dee'U-na-tor. 
Dc-dJn'a-to-ry. 
D^^Oine'. 25, 103. 
De-eljn(Hl^ 166, 183. 
De-ciin'er. 
De^Iin'ing. 
Deo-U-nom'e-ter, 106. 
De-clin'ofia. 
De>«UT'i-tott8. 
De-clirM ty, 108, 160. 
De-eli'vofi8. 
De-ooct', 18, 103. 
De-ooct'i-ble, 164, 160. 
De-coo'tlon. 
De-eoctlre, 84. 
De-ool'late, 170. 
De-ool'lat-ed. 
De-ool'Iat-fng. 
De-ooMa'tion. 
De<oPor i-kul'-). 
De-ool'or-ant {-kul'-) 
De-col-or-a'tlon {-kul-). 
De-ool'ored (^-kul'ura), 

166. 
De-ool'or-ing (-kul'-). 
De-ool'or-ixe i-kul'-), 

202. 
D^ool'or-lzed (-kul'-). 
De-ool'or-iK-ing {-kui'-). 
De-«om-pd8'a-Dle 

i-p9z-), 164. 
De^m-poae' (-pd^O* 

122. 
De-oom-poMd' (-pOzd'). 
De-oom-pda'inflr {-pdz'-), 
De-eom-po-sl'tton 

{-zUh'un). 
De-oom-poiind', v. A a. 



Dec'o-rate. 
Dec'o-rat-ed, 183. 
Deo'o-rat-lng. 
Deo-o-ra'tion, 112. 
Dec'o-ra-tlve. 
Dec'o-rat-or. 
De-«o'roQ8, or Dec'o- 

rott8 [so Wr. Gd. j 

de-ko^rouB, Wk. Sm. 

125, 155.] 
De-oor'ti-cate. 
De-cor'tl-cat-ed, 183. 
De-cor'ti-<»t-lng. 
De-cor-ti -caption. 
De-oo^mm, 125, 160. 
De-coy', 27. 
De-coyed', 166, 187. 
De-ooy'lng. 
De-crlase^ i4eris')f 13, 

118. 
De-creaaed' (-kreMf), 

166. 
De-crea8'ing, 183. 
De-cree'. 
De-creed', 188. 
De^re'er. 
De-crce'ing. 
Dec're-ment, 106. 
De^crep'it [not de-krep'- 

id, 141, 153.] 
De-crep'i-tate, 160. 
De-crep'l-tat-ed. 
De-crep'i-tat-ing. 
De-crep-i-ta'tion. 
De-crep'i-tude, 160. 
De-cres'oent, 171. 
De-cre'tal [so 8m. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; de-kre'talt 

or dekfre-tal, Wk. 

166.] 
De-cre'ti8t. 
De-cre'tlve. 
Dec're-to-ry, 72, 122. 
De-cri'al. 
De-cried', 186. 
De-cry', 26, 
De-citm'benoe, 160. 
De-cum'ben-cy. 
De-cum'bent. 
De-cam'bl-tare. 
Dec'a-ple, a. n. ft v. 

164. 
Dec'n-pled (-pld), 183. 
Dec'a-pling. 
De-cu'ri-on, 160. 
De-cfiWrent. 
De-cur'Blve. 
Dc-cus'sate, 170. 
De-cuB'sat-ed. 
De-cns'sat-ing. 
De-cuB-8a'tloii. 
[Dedal. TXa. — See 

Daedal.] 



[Dedalian,203. — Set 

Daedalian.] 
[DedaIou8, 208. ~ 

See DaedalOQB.] 
Ded'i-cate, 100. 
Ded'i-cat-ed, 183. 
Ded'i-cat-ing. 
Dcd-i ca'tlon. 
Ded'i-cRt-or. 
Ded'i-ca-to-ry, 86. 
De-duce', 26. 
De-duced' (-dikst'). 
De-dug'ing. 
De-duf'i-ble, 164, 160. 
De-duct', 22, 103. 
De-duct'ed. 
De-duct'ing. 
De-duc'tion. 
De-ductlve, 84. 
Deed, 13. 
Deem, 13. 
Deemed, 166. 
Deem'tng. 
Deem'ster, 77. 
Deep, 13. 

Deep'en idip'n)^ 140. 
Deep'ened {dip'nd), 

150. 
Deep'en-ing (dep'n-). 
Deep'-8eat-ed, 206, 

Exc 5. 
Deer (13), n. a qnadro- 

ped 01 the eenns 

Cervtu. [See Dear, 

160.] 
De-faoe', 23. 
De-faced' (./8«l'), 188 
De-face'ment. 
De-fa9'er. 
De-fac'ing. 
De-fal'cate. 
De-fal'cat-ed. 
Dc-fal'cat-ing. 
De-fal-ca'tion [so 8m. 

Wb. Gd. ; def-al-ka'- 

$hun, Wk. Wr. 156.] 
Def-a-ma'tlon. 
De-fam'a-to-ry, 86. 
Dc-famc', 23. 
De-famed', 166, 183. 
Dc-fam'er. 
De-fam'ing. 
De-flult'7l7. 
De-f&ult'ed. 
Dc-fauU'er. 
De-fftult'ing. 
De-fea'sance (-zant), 

122. 
De-fea'si-ble (-/s'al-), 

164. 
De-f Sat', 13. 
De-feat'ed. 
De-feat'ing. 



ftU ;e CM <n there; dbotinfoot} fof influsaeighof g<ngoiy|M<iithla. 



DEFECATE 



164 



DELiaCTEaCINO 



Defe-oAte, IfW, 170. 
Defe-oit-ed. 
Defe-cat-ing. 
Def-e-«a'tioii. 
De-feot', 16. 
De-fec'tion. 
De-feot'lve, 84. 
De-fence' [Defense, 

Wb. GcL 203. — 5ee 

Note E, p. 70.J 
Defends 15, 103. 
De-fend'ant, 109. 
De-fend'ed. 
De-fend'er. 
De-fend'ing. 
De-fbn'sl-ble, IM, 109. 
De-fen'Blve, 84. 
De fer', 21, N. 
Defer-ence, 123, 109. 
Defer-ent. 
Def-«r-en'tial (-thai). 
Deferred', 165, 170. 
De-fer'rer, 21, N. 
De-fcr'ring. 
De-fi'anoe, 109. 
De-fl'ant. 

De-f T'cien-cy {-ilth'en-). 
De-f I'cient {-JUh'ent). 
ly^i-eU (L.). 
De-f led', 180. 
De-fl'er. 
De-file', v, 25. 
De'flle, or De-flle', n. 

[de'fU, 8m.; de-fll' 

Wk. Wr.Wb.Gd.l55.] 

VST " DtJUe^ u a noan, 
begins to loM iti French 
•eoent on the ultimate, 
which tiU within a few 
jean waa nnlTeisal." 

SuMrtm 

Def Tied', 105, 183. 

De-file'ment. 

De-fil'er. 

De-ni'lng, 183. 

De-f in'a-ble, 104, 169. 

De-flne', 25. 

De-nned', 166, 183. 

De-fin'or. 

De-fin'ing. 

Def 1-nIte, 152, 171. 

Def-i-nl'tion (-nioA'tin). 

De-fln'i-tlye, 109. 

Def-la-finra-bil'i-ty. 

Deria-gra-ble, or De- 
fla'firra-ble(154; [def- 
ia-grthhl, Sm\ ; de- 
f^gra-bl^ Wk. Wb. 
Qd. ; de-fla'ara-bl, or 
defla-gra-tHy Wr.j 

Derla-grate. 

Def la-grat-ed, 183. 

DefLa-grat-ing. 



Def-la-grra'tioii. 

Defla-grat-or. 

De-fiecf', 15, 103. 

De-flect'ed. 

De-flect'ing. 

De-flec'tfon. 

De-flo'rate, 122. 

Def-lo-ra'tion. 

De-flour', 28. 

De-floiired', 106. 

De-flour'er. 

De-flonr'ing. 

De-flax'ion(-;lta:'<Attn), 

40. Note 1. 
De-fo-li-a'tton. 
De-form', 17. 
De-formed', 106. 
De-form'er. 
De-form'ing. 
De-form'i-ty, 108, 109. 
De-fHlud', 17. 
De-fraud'ed. 
De-fr&ud'er. 
De-fHlud'ing. 
De-fray', 23. 
De-fraycd', 106, 187. 
De-fray'er. 
De-fray'ing. 
Deft, 15. 
De-fbnct', 22. 
De-fy', 25. 
De-ty'ing. 
De-gen'er-«rcy, 171. 
De-gen'er-ate, 73. 
De-gen'er^it-ed, 183. 
De-gen'er-at-ing. 
De-gon-er-a'tion. 
Deg-la-tI'tion( 4Uh'un), 
Deg-ra-da'tion. 
De-grade', 23. 
De-grad'ed, 183. 
De-grad'ing. 
De-gree'. 
De-hiace' (-hW). 
De-hisoed^ {-kUV), 
De-his'oence, 171. 
De-his'oent. 
De-bis'cing, 183. 
De-hor'ta-to-ry, 72. 
De'i-«ide, 109. 
De-if io, 109. 
De-if ic-al, 108. 
De-i-fl-ca'tion. 
De'i-ned, 180. 
De'i-fl-er. 
DeM-form, 160. 
De'i-f^, 94. 
Deign (<fAn), 23. 
Deigned {dand), 105. 
Deign'lng. 

DeTam (^«m), 133, 130. 
De'ist. 
De-iBt'ic, 109. 



De-iBt'ic-al, 106. 
De'l-ty, 109. 
De-Jeet', 16. 
De-iect'ed. 
De-lect'er. 
De-iect'ing. 
De-Jeo'tion. 
De-Ject'o-fy. 
D&)e^nery or D^ekni 

(Ft.) {dA-akvh-nd'), . 
De-lay', 23. 
De-layed', 165, 187. 
De-lay'er. 
De-lay'ing. 
DefU f LO, V, 
Del'e4>le (104, 109) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd.; cfa^te- 

M, Sm. 155.] 
De-lec'tSrble, 104. 
De-lec-ta'tioo fso Sm. 

Wb. Gd.; del-ektaf- 

9huny Wr. 155.] 
Del'e-gate, 109. 
Del'e-gat-ed. 
Del'e-gat-ing. 
Del-e-ga'tion, n. act of 

delegating ; persons 

delegateiC T^ee Del- 

igatlon, 100.1 
Del-e-te'ri-o&s, 109. 
Delft'-ware (-w«r). 
De'U-ao. 
De-lib'er-ate, 73. 
De-lib'er4it-ed, 183. 
De-lib'er-at-ing. 
De-llb-er-a'tion, 112. 
De-Ub'er-at-Tve [so Sm.; 

de-Ubfur^-H», Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Del'i-ea-ey, 171. 
Del'i-cate, 73, 100. 
De-ll'ciotls {U8h'u$)^\, 
Del-i-ga'Uon, n. a oind- 

^^ oP) — * term fa 

surgery. \8ee Dele- 
gation, 160.1 
De-light' (M), 102. 
De-light'ed (-ft*'-). 
De-light'fW (-ftl'ySW). 
De-light'ing (-W-). 
De-lin'e-ate, 109. 
De-lin'e-at-ed, 183. 
De-lin'e-at-ing. 
De-lin-e-a'tion. 
De-lin'e-at-or. 
De-lin'quen-ey {-Ung'-). 
De-lln'quent {4^-). 
Del-i-quesoe' (-mom'), 

171. 
Deli-quesoed' {-kwetV), 
Del-i-ques'oenoe. 
Del-i-ques'cent, 171. 
Del-i-ques'dng, 183. 



a, e, i, 0, u, y, long ;&,£,!, 0, fi, f , thorti ii m <n ikr, a at in ikai, & m in 



OEUaUIUM 



165 



DENOTING 



-Dr'i-oAB, 78. 
:K>e-lIr'i-iim, 109. 
'Myel -i-tes'oenee. 
:K)el-i-te8'oent, 171. 
:K>e-Uv'er, 104. 
:X>e-liT'er-a-ble, IM, 109. 
'De-Uv'er-mioe, 109. 

X»e-Ur'ered (Hird), 150. 

X)e-liv'er-er, 77. 

X>e-Lir'er-iiig. 

I>e-liT'er-3r. 

Xtell, 16, 172. 

T>erplii.«Q; 78. 

Del'phio. 

l>erplilne, 82, 152. 

Del'toid. 
De-lude', 20. 
De-lud'ed, 183. 
De-lud'er. 

De-lad'ing. 

Del'uge, 15, 90. 

Del'nied, 106, 183. 

Drf'osr-liig (-«^). 

De-la'uoii (-zkun). 

De-ln'slve, M. 

De-la'BO-iy, 80. 

Delre, 16. 

Delred {delvd), 165, 183. 

DeJr'er. 

Delr'in^. 

Dem'MOg-iBm i-iztn) 
[lo (xd. ; dem'a-qog- 
um, or dem'a-gojtzmj 
Wr. 165.] 

Dem'ft-gd^e (-gog), 87, 
171. 

De-nuin', or De-mesne' 
Ide-min') [so Wk.Sm. 
Gd. ; de^m&n't or de- 
min'fWr. 155.J [De- 
mean, 203/] 

De-mand' [»ee Com- 
mand'.] 

De-mand^ant 

De-mand'ed. 

De-mand'er. 

De-mand'ioflf. 

De-mar-oa'tion. 

De-mean^ v. 

[Demean, n. 203. — 
See Demain.1 

De-meaned', 165. 

De-mean'ing. 

De-mean'or. 

De-ment'ed. 

De-meph-i -tT-xa'tion. 

Demeph'1-tize, 202. 

De-meph'i-tized, 183. 

De-meph'i-tix-ing. 

De-m^r'it. 



De-mersed' (-merst'). 

De-mesne' (-mfn') [See 
Dcmain. 203.] 

DemM-eod. [109. 

DemM,K>hn (jan)^ 102, 

De-miB-a-bil'it7(-ml2^). 

De-mis'a-ble(-iniz), 164. 

De-mlse' (mlz')t n. it v. 

De-mjB6d'(-mizd')} 183. 

De-mis'ing {tniz'-). 

Dem'i-urge, 109. 

De-moo'ra-cy, 109, 171. 

Dem'o-crat. 

Dem-o-crat'io, 109. 

Dem-o-erat'ic-al, 106. 

De-mol'ish, 104. 

De-moFished (4fiU). 

De-moIMsh-er. 

De-mol'ish-ing. 

Dem-o-ll'tion XMsh'un). 

De'mon, 80. 

De-mo'ni-ac, 100. 

Dem-o-nl'ao-al. 

De-mo-ni'a-cism (-Htm) 

De-mo'ni-an. 

De-mo' ni-an-ism (-izm). 

De'mon-ism i-izm), 130. 

De^mon-ist. 

Dc'mon-ize, 202. 

De'mon-ized, 183. 

De'mon-ix-inef. 

De-mon-ol'a-fry. 

De-mon-ol'o-gy, or 
Dem-on-ol'o-gfy (lOR) 
[§o Wr. ; de-mon-ol'- 
o-gpt Wb. Gd. ; dem- 
<m-ol'o-gy^ Wk. Sm. 
155.] 

De-mon'strable, 104. 

De-mon'strate [bo Wk. 
8ra. Wr. ; de-mon'- 
itratt or dem'on-strlit, 
Gd. 155.1 

De-mon' gtrat-ed. 

De-mon' strat-ing 

Dem-on-8tra'tion. 

De-mon' Bta«-tlve. 

Dem'on-8trat-or, or De- 
mon' strat-or [bo Wr. ; 
dem'on-strat-ur^ Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; dem-on- 
ttrlU^urt or demon' - 
9trat-ur, Wk. 155.] 

•9" Smart and Walker 
acTM that when used in 
the generaJ $en»e of " one 
who demonitratea,** this 
word !• properly pro- 
nounced ae-mOHttrOf'Urx 
bnt Smart ipellA it, when 
thus a(ipd.D emonitrat- 
er. The ipelling demon- 
orator he reatricts to the 
lenee of ** one who exhib- 
its a matter of icience," and 



he DTODoancM It dem'on* 
ttHU-^mrx wherMC Walker 
pronounces the word, 
when It la need In thif 
MOM, dt m cm tt r ikCwr. 

De-mon'stra-to-ry, 80. 
De-mdr-al-T-ia'tion. 
De-mdr'al-iae, 202. 
De-mdr'al-ized, 183. 
De-mdr'al-iz-ing. 
Dem-OB-then'io. 
De-mot'io. 
De-mul'oent, 171. 
De-mor', 21. 
De-more', 20. 
De-mor'raffe, 170. 
De-murTe<r, 166, 170. 
De-mur'rer, 77. 
De-muWring. 
Demy', 121. 
Den, 15. 
2>e-na'rviw(L.) [pi. De- 

na'riAy 198.] 
Den'a-rv. -• 

De-nft'tfon-al-ize( -nosh'' 

tin-)[BO 8m. Wr.; -na'- 

«Attn-, or fMth'un^ Gd. 

155.] 
De-nftHion-allzed, 183. 
De-n&' tion -al-iz-ing. 
Den'dri-form, 109. 
Dcn'drite. 
Den-drit'ic, 109. 
Den-drit'ic-al, 106. 
Den'droid. 
Den-drol'o-gist. 
Dea-drol'o-jiry, 108. 
Den'guc (Sp.)(<iei^'pa). 
De-nPa-ble, 104. 
De-ni'al. 
De-nied', 180. 
De-nl'er. 
Den'i-grate [so 8m.Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; den'i-grat, 

or de^i'grOtt Wk. 

155.] 
Den'l-grat-ed, 183. 
Den'i-grat-ing. 
Den-i-za'tion. 
Den'i-zen (-«n), 149. 
De-nom'1-nate. 
Do-nom'i-nat-e<l, 183. 
De-nom'i-niit-lng^. 
I>c-nom-i-na'tion. 
Dc-nom-i-na'tion-al. 
De-nom'1-nat-Ive [Bt 

Sm. ; de-nom'i-na-tiv. 

Wk.Wr.Wb. Gd.l65.J 
De-nom-i-nat'or. 
De-not'a-ble, 104, 100. 
De-note', 24. 
De-n6t'ed. 
I De-not'ing. 



fiiU ; Of <n tliere i6ba»in foot ; 9 m tn facile ; gh m g in go *, ^ of in thii. 



} 



DENOUEMENT 



166 



DEPRESS 



Den-ou&menti Fr.)(d«n- 

oo-mdng') [soWr.Grd.; 

<ien•o<Hm^n£7^ Sm. 154, 

155.] 
De-noance'. 28. 
De-nounced' i-nowist'). 
De-nounoe'meiit. 
De-nounc'er. 
Dense (dens), 15; Note 

D, p. 37. 
Den'si-ty, 160. 
I)ent| 15. 
I>»n'tal. 
Den'tate. 
Deu'tat-ed. 
Dcn-ta'tion. 
Dcut'cd. 
Dcn'tl ole, KM. 
Dcn-tio'u-late, 73. 
Den-tlc'u-lat-cd. 
Den-tlc-u-la'tion. 
Den'ti-form, 78, 160. 
Den'ti-frloc (/rw) (160) 

[not den'tri-fis, 163.1 
Den'til. 
Den-ti-ros'tral. 
Den'tist. 15, 16. 
DcQ-tiBrio, 100. 
Den-tiBtMc-al. 
Den'tiflt-ry. 
Den-tl'tion (-tish'un). 
Dcn'toid. 
De-uu'date, a. 
De-nu-da'tion [bo Wk. 

Wb. Gd. } den^-da'- 

shun, Sm. Wr. 155.] 
De-nude', 26. 
De-nud'ed, 183. 
De-nud'inq:. 
De-nun'ci-ate {-sKt-At) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; de-nun' - 

shut, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
De-nun'ci-at-ed (-«M-). 
De-nun 'dating {-hM-). 
De-nun-ci-a'tiou {-shi-). 
De-nun'ci-at-or (-«/»!-). 
De nv', 25. 
De-OD'stru-ent. 
De'o-dand. 
De-o'dor-ize, 202. 
De-o'dor-ized, 18:}. 
De-o'dor-iz-er. 
De-o'dor-iz-ing. 
Dc-on-tol'o-gv, 108. 
De-ox'i-date f D e o x y - 

date,203.T 
De-ox'1-dat-ed. 
De-ox'i-dat-lng. 
De-ox-i-da'tion. 
De-ox'i-dlze (202) [De- 

oxydize,203.] 
De-ox'l dized, 183. 
De-ox'1-diz-ing. 



[Deoxydate, 203.— 
See Deoxidate.] 

[Deoxydize, 203.— 
See Deoxidize.] 

De-ox'y-gen-ate, 171. 

De-ox'y-gen-at-ed. 

De-ox'y-gen-at-lng. 

De-ox-y-gcn-a'tion. 

De.part', 11,135. 

De-part'ed. 

De-part'er. 

De-part'ing. 

De-part'mcnY. 

De-part-ment'al, 122. 

De-part'ure, 01. 

Depend', 15. 

De-pcnd'ant, n. [De- 
pendent, 203.J 

[Dependant, a. 203. 

— See Dependent.] 
De-pend'enoe, 160. 

De-pend'en-cy. 
De-pend'ent, a. [De- 
pendant, 203.] 
[Dependent, n. 203. 

— See Dependant] 
Dc-pend'er. 
De-pcnd'ing. 
De-phleg'mate, 36. 
Dc-ph Icg'mat-ed. 
De-phleg'mat-ing. 
De-phlcg-ma'tion [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. j def-teg- 
ma'shun, Wk. Wr.l66] 

Depict', 16. 

IX»-pict'ed. 

De-pict'ing. 

De-pict'ure, 01. 

De-plct'urcd (-ywrrf). 

De-pict'ur-ing (-yur-). 

De-pil'a-to-ry, 86. 

De-ple'tion. 

De-ple'to-ry, 86. 

De-plor'a-ble, 164. 

De-pl6r'a-bly. 

Dep-lo-ra'tion. 

Deplore', 24. 

Deplored', 165, 183. 

De-plor'er, 40, N. 

De-pl6r'ing. 

De-ploy', 27. 

De-ployed', 166, 188. 

De-ploy'ing. 

De-po'nent, 160. 

De-pop'u-late, 80. 

De-pop'u-lat-ed. 

De-pop'u-lat-ing. 

De-pop-u-Ia'tion. 

De-port', 24. 

De-por-ta'tion. or Dep- 
or-ta'tion [ae-p9r-ta'- 
shun, Sra.; d^-or-ta'- 
«Attn,Wk.Wr. Gd.l55J 



De-pdrt'ment. 

De-pds'a-ble(-p0«'-)>l<^' 

De-poa'al (-/>««'-), 183. 

De-poee' (-p6z'), 24. 

De-poaed' (-pdzd'), 183. 

De-poB'er {-pOz*-). 

De-poa'ing (-|i««'-). 

De-pfis'it (-/>«*'-), 170. 

De-po8'i-ta-ry (-p9z'-) 
(72) n. one with whom 
any thing is intrust- 
ed. [See Depository, 
148.] 

De-pos'it-ed (-p9z'-). 

De-pos'it-lng T-p9z'-). 

Dep-o-sT'tion {-zish'un) 
[so Wk. Wr. Wb.Gd.; 
ae-po-sish'unySm. 155] 

De-pos'it-or {-pdz'-). 

De-pos'i-to-ry (-p«e'-) 
(86),n.thc pla(% where 
any thing is dcpoait- 
ed. [See Depositary, 
148.] 




•9" Thii word la rttj 
often pronounced dFpo, 
In the United States. 

Dep-ra-va'tion. 

De-prave', 23. 

De-praved', 165. 

De-praT'er, 183. 

De-prav'ing. 

De-prfty'i-ty, 123, 160. 

Dep're-oa-ble, 164. 

Dep're-cate, 160. 

Dep're-oat-ed, 183. 

Dep're-oat-ing. 

Dep-re-ca'tion. 

Dep're-cat-or. 

Dep're-ca-to-ry, 72, 86. 

De-pre'ciate (-«A1-4I) 
[so Wk. Sm. Wr.: 
.pr«'sAa<,Wb.Gd.l55.J 

De-pre'ci-at^xl (-«A1-). 

De-pre'ci-at-ing f-^nlil-). 

De-pre-ci-a'tion (-sAl-). 

De-pre'ci-at-Tve (-**1- 
dt-) [bo Sm. ; de-pre*' 
sh%-a4iv,Wr.'y de-pre^- 
ska-iivy Wb. Gd.] 

De-pre'ci-at-or (^Al-). 

De-pre'ei-a-to-ry, (-«A1-) 

Dep're-date, 160. 

Dep're-dat-ed, 183. 

Dcp're^iat-ing. 

Dep-re-da'tion. 

Dep're-dat-or. 

Dep're-da-to-ry, 86. 

De-press', 16. 



a, §, i, 9, ft, y, long ', ii, S, Y, 5, ti, f , short iHasin far, a m in fiist, kasin 



DEPRESSED 



167 



DESt (CABLE 



^De-pressed' {-prest'), 
De-press'ing. 
T)c-pTeB'sion{-presh'un) 
X)e-pre88lve, M. 

De-preuB'or. 
-De-priv'a-ble, 164. 

Dep-ri-va'tion. 

Be-prive', 25. 

Deprived', 1G5, 18a. 

De-priv'er. 

De-priv'lngN 

Depth, 15,37. 

Dep'u-rate, 73, 80. 

Dep'u-rat-ed. 

Dep'u-rat-ing. 

Dt;p-u-ra'tloa. 

Dep'u rat-or. 

Dep'u-rft-to-ry, 86, 

Dep-a-ta'tioD. 

De puU'', 26, 103. 

De-piit'ed. 

De-pufing". 

Dep'u-ty, 89, 93. 

Q^> " This word i« often 
mUpronouDced [lUVtnt-ty] 
rren by good speAken.** — 
Walter. 

De-range', 23. 

De-ranged', 165, 183. 

De-rang'ing (^-rdnj'-). 

Ite-ringe'ment, 185. 

D Ve^lTct, 109, 171. 

r> r-e-lic'tion. 

De ride', 25, 103. 

Do-rid'ed. 

De-rid'er. 

De-rid'ing. 

De-rl'don ide-rizh'un)y 

171. 
De-ri'8lve, 84. 
De-ri'so-ry, 86, 93. 
De-rir'a-ble, 164. 
Di*r-I-Ta'tlon. 
Der-i-va'tioa-al. 
De-riv'a tlve, 84, 169. 
Do rire', 25, 10:j. 
De rived', 165, 183. 
De-riv'er. 
De-riv'ing. 
Derm, 21, N. 
Dcrm'al. 
Derm-at'ic. 
Derm'a-toid. 
Derm-a tol'o-gy, 108. 
Derm-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Derrn'oKl. 
Derm-ot'o my, 108. 
Di'T'o-gate. 
D»sr'o-gat-cfl, 183. 
D«'r'o-gat-ing. 
D5r-o-ga'tion. 
De-rog'a-to-ry, 86. 
Di'-r'rlck, 170. 



iDervise, 
,203,' 



Der'vis 

03.1 
Des'caut, n. ia3, 161. 
Des-cant', v. lai, 161. 

Q9~ By the po«ta it U 
often accented on the tint 
fy liable. 

DcB-cant'ed. 

Des-cant'cr. 

Dcg-cant'ing. [171. 

Descend' (-«cnrf'), 39, 

De-Bceud'ant, n. 148. 

De-scend'ed. 

De-8Cflnd'eut, a. 148. 

De-Bccnd'er. 

De-Boend i bil'i-ty. 

De-8cend'i ble, 164, 169. 

De-8cend'ing. 

De-Bcen'Bion, 171. 

De-scen'sion-al. 

De-8cent' (-<eni'), 15, 39. 

De-8crib'a ble, 164, 109. 

De Bcribe', 25, 103. 

Dc-8crlbed', 165, 183. 

De-Bcrib'or. 

De-8crib'ing. 

De- scried', 186. 

De-Bcrip'tion. 

De -scrip' tlve, 84. 

De-8cry'. 25. 

De-scry'lng. 

Des'e-crato, 109. 

Des'o-crat-ed, 183. 

Des'e-cnit-ing. 

Dc8-e-cra'tioii. 

Des'ert (dez'urt), a. 
waste; solitary: — n. 
an uninhabited place. 
[See De-Bort', n. & r. 
161.] 

De-serf {de-zert') (21, 
N.). n. that which is 
deserved : — v. to for- 
sake ; to leave. [See 
Des'ert, a. & n. 161, 
and Dcs-Bcrt', n. 148.] 

De-sert'ed (-zert'-). 

De-sert'er {-zert'-). 

De-sert'lng {-zeH'-). 

De-ser'tion (-zer'-). 

De-serve' (zerv')^ 21,N. 

De-8erved'(-2;errd'), 165. 

De-serv'ed-ly {-zerv'-). 

De-serv'er (-zerv'-). 

De-serv'ing (-zero'-). 

rDeshabllle, 203.— 
See DishabiUe.] 

De-Bic'cant, a. & n. 

De-sic'cate [so Wk. 8m. 
Wr. } de-sik'fkt, or 
des'ikat, Gd. 155.] 

De-sic'cat-ed, 183. 

De-slc'cnt-ing. 



Des-ic-ca'tion, 170. 
De-Bic'ca-tlve. 
De-sld'er-a-tTve. 
De-sid-er-a'tum (L.)[pl. 

De-sid-er-a'taj lus.j 
De-sign' {de-itJn\ or de- 

«!nO(162)rKoWr.Gd.; 

de-sln', Wk. Sm. ISo.] 
Des'ig-nate [not dez'i^- 

nat, Twr dc-sig'nal, 

153.] 
Dcs'ig-nat-ed, 183. 
D<'8'ig-nut-ing. 
Dos-ig na'tion. 
De-sig-ued' {-slnd', or 

-nnd'), 102. 
Dc-8l<m'er (-«ln'-, or 

-zlnf-), [-zln'-). 

De-sign'lng (-sin'-, or 
De-sip'i-ent. 
De-sir-a-bil'i-ty i-z%r-). 
De-8lr'a-ble (-^ir'-), 164. 
De-slr'a-bly {-zlr'-). 
De-sire' C-zlr'). 
De-sired' (-zlrd'), 183. 
De-8ir'liif? (-sir'-). 
De-8ir'ou8 (-zir'-). 
De sist', 16, ia3, 136. 
De-sist'ed. 
De-sist'iug. 
Desk, 15. 
Des'man. 
Des'o-latc, 136. 
Des'o liit-ed, 183. 
Des'o-lat-er. 
Des'o-lftt ing. 
Des-o-la'tion. 
Des'o-la-to-ry. 72. 
De-spair' (spir'^ 14. 
De-Bpairea' (sperd'). 
De-Bpair'ing {-ftpir'-). 
Despatch' f Dis- 
patch, 203.J 

HOT" The ■pellinfir df- 
tpatch !• moft in con for m- 
itj[ with the etymolopv of 
this M'ord (Fr. ilfpi'chcr), 
and is preferred by 
Wallcer, Smart, an'd 
Worcenten but Webster 
and Goodrich prefer tH*- 
fxifch. Worcester remorlcs: 
"Good usage, as well nK 
the dictionaries, is much 
divided." 

De-spatched' {-»pa^ht') 
[Dispatched, 2a'J.] 

Dc-spatch'iug [Dis- 
patching, 203.1 

Dos-pe-ra'do [pi. Dos- 
pe-rn'does (-f/oc),192.] 

Dcs'per-ate, 132. 

Des-per-a'tion. 

Des'pi-ca-ble (164) [not 
des-pik'a-bl, 153.] 



filli dMtn there; Cbasin Toot ; 9 ew in facile ; gh cu g in go ; t^ cu in this. 



DESPICABLY 



168 



DEVISE 



DcB'pI-ca-bly. 

I>e-8pifie' (-9plz')y 25. 

lki-»ini>cd' {-9p%zd')t 183. 

De-Bpis'cr (splz*-). 

De-Binz'iixg {-gplz'-). 

Do-Rpit4y, fi. &, prep. 

De-spoil', 27, 1U3. 

Do Mpollcd', 166. 

De-HiMil'er. 

I>c-(ipoil'iDg'. 

De-Hpond', 18. 

])e-i»pond'cd. 
« ]>e-fiiM>nd'eiioe, 160. 

Dc-spond'cn-cy. 

De-spond'cot. 

Dc-Hpoud'ing^. 

lX?H'pot. 

D<'8 iwt'ic, 100. 

DeH pot'ic al, 108. [136. 

DcM'pot-isiu (-»?m), 13:1, 

De-apu'inute [mo 8m. 
Wr. ; de^'pu^nOt, Wb. 
Gd. i&5.J 

De-8pu'inat-ed. 

Dc-Bpu'nint-in^. 

De8-pu-ma'tioa, 112. 

Di>B-<]ua-ma'tlon. 

Des-sert' (dez-zert'), n. 
a service of fhiJt. pas- 
try, &c., at a mcjd. 
[See Desert, n. it v. 
lis.) 

Dos-tf-na'tlon. 

Dos'tlne, 152, 171. 

Deg'tTai»d (-«nd), 183. 

IVn'tin-ing-. 

Dch'U ny, 100. 

PcB'tl-tute. 

DoB-ti-tu'tion. 

l)e-Htroy', 27. 

De-8troye<l', 165, 188. 

De-Btroy'cr. 

De-Rtroy'lng. 

De-Btruct i bll'i-ty. 

Dc-Btruct'i-bUs 104. 

De Btnic'tlon. 

Dc-8truct'Ive. 

Des-u-d«'tion. 

Des'iie-tude (trc-), 171. 

DoR'nl-to-ri-ly. 

Dct*'ul-to-ri-neB8. 

Des'ul-to-ry, 8fl. 

IX* tiich', 10, 44. 

Detached' {-tacht'). 

De-tnch'ing. 

I>e-tach'ment. 

Detail', V. 23. 

De-tail', or De'tall, n. 
[bo Wr. ; de-tdl', Wk. 
Wb. Gd. ; de'tal, Sm. 
155.1 

Dc-tiillcd', IftO. 

De-tail'er. 



De-Uil'ing. 
De-tain', S. 
De-taia'der. 
Detained', 166. 
De-tain'er. 
De-tain'ing. 
Detect', 15, 103. 
De-tect'a-ble, 164, 160. 
De-tcct'er. 
De-tect'ing. 
De-tec'tion. 
De-toctlve, 84. 
De-tent', 121. 
De-ten'tion. 
De-ter',21,N. 
De-terge'. 
Deterged', 165, 183. 
I>e tcrg^'eut (-terj'-). 
IXj-ter^'inif {-terj'-). 
De-te'n^-rate, 49, N. 
De-te'ri-o rat-ed. 
De-te'ri-o-rat-lng. 
De-te-ri-o-ra'tion. 
De-teHment. 
De-ter'mi-na-ble, 164. 
De-ter'ml-nate, a. 
De-ter-mi-na'tion. 
De-ter'mi-na-tlve. 
De-tcr'mlne. 
De-ter'nilned (-nilnd), 

150. 
De-ter'min-er, 183. 
De-ter'mln-ing. 
De-t^r-ra'tion, 170. 
Deterred', 1G5, 176. 
De-ter'ring, 21, N. 
De-ter'slve. 
De test', 14. 
De-teBt'a-ble, 164. 
Det-cB-ta'tion, or De- 

tcB-ta'tion [det-es-ta'- 

8hun, Wk. Wr. Gd. ; 

de-tes4a'$hunf Sm. 

155.] 
De-test'ed. 
De-test'er. 
De-test'ing. 
De-throne^, 24. 
De-throned', 165, 183. 
Dc-throne'ment, 186. 
De-thron'er. 
De-thron'ing. 
Det'i-nue [bo Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; de-tin'uy Wk. ; 

det'i-nuy or de-Hn'Ut 

Wr. 155.] 
Det'o-nate. 
Det'o-nat-ed, 183. 
Det'o-nat-Ing. 
Det-o-na'tion. 
Dot-o-nT-za'tion. 
Det'o-nize, 105, 202. 
Det'o-nlzed, 183. 



Det'o-nis-lng. 
De-tract', 10. 
De-tract'ed. 
[Detracter, 200.— 

See Detractor.] 
De-tract'ing. 
De-trac'tion. 
De-tract'Ive. 
De-tract'or [Detraet- 

cr,203.] 
De-tract'o-ry, 86. 
Det'ri-ment, 106, 160. 
Det-ri-meut'al. 
De-tri'tal. 

De-trf'tion {-trUh'un). 
De-tri'tus. 

De -trade' (-trood'\ 10. 
De-trad'ed(-/rood'-),183 
De-trad'iu^ {trood'-). 
De-trun'cate {-trung'A. 
De-trun'cat-ca( -truny'-) 
De-trun-ca'tion. 
De-tru'sion \^-troo' sAun) 
Deuce (diU) [Duse, 

20:i.] 
Deii-ter-og'a-mist, 108- 
Deu-ter-og'a-my. 
Deik-ter-on'o-my, 108. 
Deu -ter-op'a-thy . 
Deu-ter-os'oo-py. 
Deu-tox'Ide fso Wr.* 

du-tox'ld^ Sm. 156.] 

[Deatoxyd,203.] 
De-vap -o-ra'tion. 
De-vJUi'tate, or Dev'an- 

tate [de-rHs'Utt^ Wk. 

Sm. J dev'a84Ht, Wb. 

Gd. ; de-rdit*tdtj or 

dev'aa-tAt, Wr. 155.] 
De-vfts'tat-cd, or Dev'- 

as-tat-ed. 
De-yftB'tat-tng, or Dev'- 

as-tat-ing. 
Dey-as-ta'tion. 
De-vePop [D e y elope, 

203.1 
De-yel'opcd i-opt). 
De-vel'op-cr. 
De-vel'op-Ing. 
De-vel'op-mcnt. 
De-yeBt'[Diy 68 1,203.] 

AT- Written deveM u • 
technieal temi In law. 

Dc'yi-ate, 73, 78. 
De'vi-at-od, 183. 
I>e'vi-at-ing. 
De-vi-«'tion. 
De-ylce',25, 121. 
Dey'il (dev'l), 140. 
De'yl-ofis, 78. 
De-yi8'a-ble (-i»Ur'-), 164. 
De-yise' (-rl^), 25, 103. 



a, i, i, 5, n, y, long ; a, €, 1, 5, &, fj bhort jUaain far, kasin Ikst, & a$ in 



DEVISED 



Tised' i-vlzd')y 183. 
T-i-Bee' (-««')» 122. 
-ria'er (-rl^-), n. one 
who contrives. [See 
Devisor, ItiO.] 
Tis'ing (-rf^'-). 
?is'ort-rl2'-XlI8)[80 
8m. Wb. Gd. ; der-i- 
^or*, or de-vi'zur, Wr. 
155], n. one who be- 
queathes. [Law term, 
correlative of devUee, 
— Sue Deviser, IflO.] 
vit-ri-fi-ca'tion. 
-^^-void', 27, 121. 
.^}€voir ( Vt.) (dev-wor*). 
XDe-volve', !», 103. 
"Devolved', 165, 183. 
^De-volv'ing-. 
X>e-vote', 2*. 
T>e-vot'ed, 183. 
r>ev-o-tee', 122. 
T>e-v6t'er. 
De-v6t'ing. 
X>e-vo'tion. 
J)e-To'tion-al. 
De-vour', 28, 108. 
l>e-T<Mired', 166. 
De-Tour'er. 
De-vour'ing. 
De-vout', J». 
Dew (dft) (26) [not doo, 
153|, n. moisture de- 
posited in conse- 
quence of the cooling 
of the atmosphere. 
[See Dae, 160.] 
Dcw'drop (de'-). 
DewM-nesR (dfi'-), 160. 
Dew'Up (do'-), 206. 
Dew'point (dft'-). 
Dew'y (do'y), »3. 
Dcx-t^r'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Dex'ter-otts [ D e x - 
troa8,2a3.] 

■^ Th« fpelling dex- 
tgrtnu i« the only form 
riT«n by Walker and 
Smart; and it is preferred 
byWoreeater. WetMterand 
Goodrich, however, praftr 
the upelUnf dextrota, 

Dex'tral. 
Dex-tral'l tv. 
Dcx'trfne, 82, 162. 
Dex-tror'sal. 
Dex'tro&B fDexterouB, 

203. — See Dexterous.j 
Der (dd), n. a Turkish 

title of dk^ty. [See 

Day, ieo7 
[Dhurra, 203. — 5e€ 
Doura.] 



169 

Dia-be'tes {-Uz), n. 
ting. A pi. 

DiHi-bct'le. 

Di-ab'ler-y (233, Exc.) 
[so Gd.; dl-<i*'^rl, 
Wr. 165.] 

Di-a-bol'ic, 100. 

Dia-bol'io^d. 

Df-ab'o-Usm i-Uzm),l^. 

Di-aroa-thol'i-oon. 

Di-a-c&as'tie. 

Di-aoh'y-lon (-«*'-)[D 1 - 
achylum,203.] 

Di-ac'o-nal, 70. 

Di-ac'o-nate. 

Di-a-cous'tic, a, 28. 

Di-a-cous'tics, n. 28. 

Di-a-crityc. 

Di-a-crit'ic-al. 

Di-a-del'phi-an, 160. 

Di-a-del'phoQs. 

Di'ardem, 171. 

Di'a-demed (-d««nd),150. 

Di-«r'e-8iB {-ir'-) [pi. 
Di «r'e-ses(-««5),l9«.] 
JDicre8i8.203.] 

Di-ag-no'Kis, 126. 

Di-ag-nos'tic. 

Di-ag'o-nal, 70, 108, 170. 

Di'a-gram. 

Di'a-griph, 127. 

IM-a-graph'ic. 

Di-a-graph'ic-al. 

Di-a-gryd'i-ate. 

Di'al. 26, 72. 

Di'a-lect. 171. 

Di-a-lect'ic, a. it n. 

Di-a-lect'io-al. 

Di-a-lect'ic8, n. 

Di -a-lec-tI'eian(-M<A'an) 

Di'al-ing. 

Di'al-isf. 

Di-al'la-ee (161), n. a 
rhetorical figure by 
which arguments are 
placed In various 
points of view. 

Di'al-lage [so Wb. Gd. ; 
dl-aVUirSi, Sm. Wr. 
155] (161). n. a miner- 
al of a foliated struc- 
ture, whose Joints and 
fractures present dif- 
ferent lines. 

Di-al'o-gism (-Juiii),136. 

Di-al'o-gist, 170. 

Dl-al-o-gist'ic. 

DT-al-o-gist'io-al. 

Di'a-16gue (-log)y 87. 

Di-al'y-sis (171) [pi. Di- 
al'y-Bes {-»iz), 108. 

Di-a-raag-net'ic. 

Di-am'e-ter, 70, 108. 



DICEPHALOUS 



Di-a-met'ric. 
Di-a-met'rio-al. 
Di'a-mond (dt'o-momi, 

or di'mona) [so Wr. 

Gd. ; di'a-fnond, Wis.; 

di'a tnondf coll. di'- 

mondy Sm. 156.] 
Di-an'dri-an. 
Di-an'drofia. 
Di-a-pa'son (-«ttn), 156, 

171. 
Di-a-pcn'te, 163. 
Di'a-pcr, 77. 
Di-a-pha-ne'i-ty. 
Di-a-phan'io. 
Di-aph'a-noiiB i-€^f-). 
Di-a-phou'ic. 
Di-a-phon'ic-al. 
Di-a-phon'ic8. 
Di-a-pho-re'sis, 125. 
Di-a-pho-ret'ic. 
Di'a-phragm (-/ivm)^ 

106, 162. 
DT-a-phra£^-mat'ic. 
Di-a-po-re'sis, 122, 125. 
Di-a'ri-an(160) [so Sm. 

Gd. ; di-a'ri-ant Wr. 

155.] 
Di'a-rist. 
Di-ar-rhoe'a (-rt'a) (171) 

rDiarrhea,203.] 
Di-ar-rhoet'ic (-re^'-) 

[Diarrhetic,203.] 

■9" Walker. Smart, and 
Worcettvr give only the 
forms diarrhtra and dior- 
rhcetic. Webster and Good- 
rich give only the forma 
dieuThea and diarrhetic. 

Di-ar-thro'Bi8, 122, 125. 

Di'a-rv. 

Di'as-tase. 

Di-as'to-le, 163. 

Di'a-style. 

Di-a-tes'sa-ron, 170. 

Di-a-ther'mal, 21, N. 

Di-a-ther'ma-nofiB. 

Di-ath'e-sis. 

Di-a-ton'ic. 

Di'a-tribe fso Wb. Gd. i 

dt'o-trl-he^ Sra. ; di'rt- 

tribf or dl-at'ri-be, 

Wr. 155.] 
Dl-at'ro-biPt, 105. 
Di-a-zeu'tic (-«!*'-). 
Dib'ble, 164. 
Dib'bled (dfl>'W), 183. 
Dib'bler. 
Dib'bUng. 
Dib' stone, 206. 
Dice (25), n. [pi. of Die, 

104.]_ 
Di-ceph'a-lofis. 



&U; dot in there; <X> <m M foot j 9 a« in fiu$ile ; gb m g in go ; th as tn this 

16 



DICER 



170 



DIMIDIATE 



Di9'er, 183. 
Di-chla-rayd'e-oftt 

DT-chot'o-moO s ( -kot) . 
Di-chot'o-my (-kof). 
Di-chro ism (-kro-izm). 
Di-chro-mat'lc (-itro-)« 
Di?'lng. 
Dick'y. 
DI-co-tyl-eMon [so Sm. 

Wb.iM.'ytn kotyle'- 

don, Wr. 155.J 
Di-co-tyl-<»'don-otiii [so 

Sin. Gd. ; rfl-Ao/y- 

led'o-nus, Wr. 165.] 
Dip'tatc, Ifi, 73. 
l)ic'tat-ed, 183. 
Dic'tat injf. 
Dic-ta'tion, 112. 
Dio-tat'or. 
Dic-ta-to'ri-al, 100. 
Die tat'un' (Ul) [bo Sm. 

Wr. ; dikha-t^r, Wb. 

(M. 155.J 
Dic'tion. 
Dic'tion-a-ry, 72. 
Dic'tum (L.) [pi. Dtc'- 

<a, 19S.J 
Dl-dac'tic, 79, 108. 
DiHiac'tic-al, 100. 
DT-dac'tic-al-ly. 
Pi-dac'tyl. 
Di-duc'tyl-otts. 
DiJ-ap'iRT [80 Wk. Sra. 

Wr. ; dldttp'ur, Wb. 

(id. 155.] 
Did-a8-ojd4c [ro Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; dl daa-kaV- 

ik, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Did'dle, 104. 
Did'dled (did'ld), 183. 
Did'dlio^. 
Di-<lec-a-nc'dral. 
Di-dcl'phlc [Didcl- 

p h y c , Gd. 2(«.l 
Df-dcI'phyB [Dldel- 

phis, Gd. 303.] 
Di-dym'i-um. 
Did'y-mouH. 
DId-y-na'mi-an. 
Dt-dyn'a-moQB. 
Die ldl)t V. to cease to 

live. [See Dve, 1(K).] 
[Diecian, 203. — <SVc 

DioBcian.] 
[Dieciou8,203. — .See 

DioeciouH.] 
Died {did) (25, 180), 

part, from IMe. [See 

Dyed, 100.] 
[DiereBiH,203. — 5ee 

Disresis.] 
Dl'e-Bis.] 



Dl'et,25,76. 

Di'et-a-ry, 72. 

Di'et-er. 

Di'et-ed. 

Dl-e tet'ic, 109. 

Di-o-tet'ic-al, 106. 

Di-c-tet'lc8. 

Di'et Tne, 82, 152. 

Di'et-ing. 

Dl-filr-re-a'tion, 170. 

Differ, 10*. 170. 

Differed (-/wrd), 160. 

Dif fer-encc, 109. 

Dif fer-enocd {-etut)tisa. 

Dlffer-en9-inj^. 

Dif fer-eut, 12/, 109. 

Dif-fer-en'tial, {shal). 

Dif-fer-en'ti-ate (aAl- 

fl/). 
Differ-en-tl-a'tion 

{-sM-a'-). 
Dif li-cult, 78, 170. 
Dif fi-cul-ty, 128. 
Dif fi-denoe, 109. 
Dif tt-dent, 127. 
Dlfform. 
Diffract'. 
Dif-fract'ed. 
Dif-fractMng. 
Dlffrac'tion. 
Dif-fu8e' i-f^'), r. 161. 
Diffused' i/^zd'), 183. 
Dif-fijs'er (J^z'-). 
Dif-fti-Bi-biVi-ty {zt-). 
Dif-fiis'i ble i-/^'-h 

1(H, 183. 
Dif f fis'ing i-fBU'-). 
Dif-fu'sion {-zkun). 
Dif-fu'slve, 81, 130. 
Dig, 16. 

Di-gam'ma, 72. 
Di-j^aa'tric. 
Di'^,'e8t, n. 15, 25, 161. 
Dl gest', V. 161. 
Dl-gest'ed. 
Dl-gest'er. 
Dl-gest-i-blPi-ty. 
DI-geBt'i-ble, 104. 
Dl-gea'tlon {-jesVyun), 
Dl-gest'Ive, W. 
Differed {digd), 165, 176. 
Dig'ger {-gur , 138. 




). 
Dif,''it-ate (diy-). 

Dic,^'it-at-ed (VW'-). 
Dig it-a'Uon (d\i'-\ 
Dig'it i-grade (di^'-). 
Di'glypn. 
Dig'nified. 
Dig'nl-fy, 78, 94. 
Dig'n-fy-ing. 



Dig'ni-t»-rT, 72. 
Dig'nl-ty. 160. 
I)i(^'o-noa0« 
Di'graph, 127. 
Dl-greas', 79, 103. 

DI gre88ed'(-^r«t«'),l66- 
Dl-gress'ing. 

Dl-gres'sion (-^re«A'- 

nn). 
DI-gres'sion-Al {-grtsh'- 

un-). 
Dt-gres'slFC. 
Di-gyn'i-an {-Jin'-) 
Dig'y-nottB Cd</'-) [«»<> 

Gd. ; dVJy-nus, Wr. 

165.] 
Di-he'draL 
Di-he'dron. 
Dike 25. 
Diked (cfliU), Note C, p. 

34. 
Diking, 183. 
Dl-lapa-date, 73, 1«». 
Dl-lap'i-dat-ed. 
DMapM-dat-ing. 
DMap-i-da'tion. 
DT-lap'i-dat-or. 
DMatc', or Dilate' [so 

Wr. ; rfl /«', Wk. 

Gd.:<il-/A<', Sm. 155.J 
DMat^Dd, or Dilated. 
Dl lat'ing, or Di-IAt'ing. 
DI lat'or, or Di-Ut'or. 
Dil'a-to-ri-ly. 
Dil'a-to-ri-nesB 169. 
Dlfa-to-ry, 80. 
DMem'ma, or Di-Iem'- 

ma (170) [dllem'mn, 

Wr. Gd. ; dl-lem'ma, 

Wk. Sm. 155.] 
IHl-et4an'U (It.) (*/rw'- 

M) [pi. IHl-et-tan'ti 

(jtafC'te), 198.] 
Dil-et-tan'te-ism {-izm). 
Dil'i-genoe, 109. 
Difi-gent. 
Dill, 16, 172. 
Dil'u-ent, a. An. 
Dilute', a. ft r. 26, 104. 
Dl liit'ed, 183. 
Dllut'er. 
DI liit'ing. 
Dl-lu'tlon. 
DMu'vi-al. 
DMu'yi-an. 
D%-lu' vi-um (L.). 
Dim, 16. 
Dime, 25. 
Dl-men'sion, 79. 
Dim'e-ter [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; dl'me-tur^ Sm- 

155.f 
Dl-mld'i-ate, a. 



a, Cs i, o, Ui ft long ; &, £, I, d, &, f, thori ilkcuin far, kot in fiwt, katin 



UIMINI8B 



171 



DISBAND 



Df-min'Ish, 79, 1(H. 
m-min'iehed (-i«JU). 
D1 -min' ish-mg. 
I>ftin-i -auction. 
I>1-DiiD'u-tfve. 
Diin'iA-00-ryf 86. 
EHin'i ty, 1«W, 170. 
I>uniued (dimcO* 17d. 
Dun'ming'. 
EHm'niiBb, 170. 
EH-mor'pfaiflm (-Jlzm), 

136. 
I>i-inor'pbo&8. 
IMm'pIc, l(H. 
l>im'plcd {dim'pld), 183. 
r>im'pliiig. 
IMm'pIy, V^ 
I>fai, 10. 
XNoe, 25, 
jyixkBd, 165, 183. 
Ding, 16, M. 
I>in^ {dingd)y 166. 
I>iQ^-ne8B, 169. 
Dia'gj, 45, U3. 
Din'mg. 

Dm'ing-rooin, 215. 
Din'ner, 170. 
Din'ning, 176. 
Dint, 16. 

Di-09'e-MU], or Di-o-ee'- 
MO f BO Wr. ; dl-o$'e- 
zan^ Sm. j dt'ost-san, 
Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Di'o-Gese, or t>i'o-c69e 
[di'o-«i», Sm. Gd. j 
dk'o-at, Wk. Wr. 
155.1 [Diooess, 
205.] 
DiHB^dan {-^skan) 

jDiecian,203.] 
Di-ce'ciofis {-efthua) 

[DieciouB, 203.1 
Drop'tric. 
Di-op'tric-al, 108. 
IM-op'tric«. 

IM-o-ri'ma, or Di-o-rji'- 
ma [dl-o-rH'ma^ Sm. 
Wr. ; </l-o-ra'fiia, Wb. 
Gd. 155.1 
Di-o-ram'fc. 
Di-or-tho'sifl, 108, 125. 
Dip, 16. 
Di-pct'a-Iofi8. 
DiDh'thong . ^, 

[i«o Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 
dif thong, Wb. Gd. 
155.] 

•^ **Thcmffh SiibOay- 
yoi [dif-thong'ipu} WM the 
only way In wnich the 
word could be euily and 
grace fu lly pronounced by 
aa aadent Greek, it does 



not Ibllow that dif^tktmg if 
not a hanber and more 
uncouth pronunciation 
than dipftkotiif.^ — Smart. 

Diph-thon'gal {dip- 
thong'$at) (54, N. 2.) 
[bo Sm. Wr.j dif- 
thong'aaly Gd. 155.1 

Di-phyl'lou8, or Dipn'- 
yl-lo&8 {See Adcno- 
phyllous.] 

Dip'Io-^, 103. 

Dl-plo'ma, 79. 

Dl-plo'ma-cy (169) [so 
Sm. Wr. Gd. ; dip'lo- 
ma-ty, Wk. 155.] 

Dip'lo-mate, n. 

Dl-plo'mat-ed, or Dip'- 
lo-mat-ed, a. [so Wr. ; 
dlplo'm&t-ea, Sm. ; 
dip-lo'mat-ed^ Wb. 
Gd. 155.1 

Dip-lo-mat'io. 

Dip-lo-mat'ic-al-ly. 

Dip-lo-mat'ica, n. 

Dl-plo'ma-tist. 

Dipped idipt)j 105, 176. 

Dip'per, 170. 

Dip'ping. 

Dip'ter-al, 233, Exc 

Dip'tote. 

Dip'tych (-Hk). 

Di-ra-di-a'tion. 

Dire (25, 67, Note), a. 
dreadful. [See Dyer, 
160.] 

Direct', a. A v. 79. 

DT-nyt'ed. 

[Direoter,203. — iS^ 
Director.] 

DI -reefing. 

Dl-rectlve. 

Dl-rect'or [Directer, 
2a3.] 

Dl-rec-to'ri-al. 

Dl-rect'o-ry, 86. 

DI-rect're88. 

Dl-rect'rix. 

DireTul (-/Sol). 

Dirge, 21, Note. 

Dlr^-gent. 

Dirk, 21, Note. 

Dirt, 21. 

Dirtried (-id), 99, 186. 

Dirt'i-ly. 

Dirt'j-neBB, 169. 

Dirt'y, a. A v. 

DIrt'y-ing. 

Di8-a-biia-ty, 108, 169. 

DisVble (dis-, or dis) 
(136, 164) [diz-a'bl, 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; dU-a'- 
6/, Wb. €W. 155.] 



Dis-a'bled {diz-a'hld, or 

dU-a'bld), 1.36, 183. 
Di8-a'bliDg(d>>-,ord»«-> 
Dis-a-buse' (-^»0^'). 
Di8-a-bu8'iug (^^ftj'-). 
Dis-ad-van'tage, 131. 
Dis-ad-van-ta'geoua 

{'ju»\ 169. 
DiH af-fect'. 
Di»-af-fect'ed. 
Dis-af-fect'ing. 
Dis-af-fec'tion. 
Dl8-af-ilrm'. 
Dis-af-firm'anoe. 
Di8-af-firmcd', 165. 
Di8-af-ilrm'ing. 
Dia-a-gree'. 
Dia-a-gree'a-ble, 164. 
Dia-a-gree'a-bly. 
Di8-a-greed', 1^8. 
Di 8-a-gree' ment. 
Di8-a-gree'er. 
DiB-a-gree'ing. 
DiB-al-low', 170. 
Di8-al-lowcd', 166. 
Di8-al-low'iug. 
Dia-an-nul'. 
Di8-an-nulled', 105. 
Di8-an-nul'ling. 
Di8-ap-pear'. 
Dis-ap-pear'anoe, 169. 
Dis-ap-poared', 165. 
Dis-i^pear'ing. 
Di8-ap-point'. 
Di8-ap-point'ed. 
Di8-ap-point'ing. 
Dis-ap-point'ment. 
Dis-ap-pro-ba'tion. 
Dis-ap'pro-ba-to-ry, 86. 
Dia-ap-prov'al 

{-proov' ), 183. 
Dis-ap-prove' (-proot;')- 
Dia-ap-proved' 

{-proovd'). 
DlB-arm' fdiV), 1.36. 
Dls-armed (diz-armd'). 
Dis-arm'ing (diz). 
DiB-ar-rangcs 170. 
Dis-ar-raugiKl', 183. 
DiB-ar-range'ment, 186. 
DiB-ar-rang'ing 

i-rar^'.). 
Dis-ar-ray'. 
DiB-ar-rayed', 188. 
DiB-ar-ray'ing. 
DiB-as'ter (dtz). 
Dis-aB'tro&B {diz-), 
Di8-a-vow'. 
DiB-a-vow'al. 
DiB-a-vowed', 188. 

DiB-a-vow'iiiff^ — 

DiB-ban(r'(3t!i-, or dis-) 

(136) [diz-band', Wk. 



all; da«in there j db as in foot ; 9 a« tn facile ; gh m g in go ; y^ cm in this 



{ 



DISBANDED 



172 



DISCREET 



Sin. Wr. ; dU-hand*, 

Wb. (id. IW.] 
IH8-baxid't'ti(f/i^-,or(l«#). 
UiH-band'iuir (diz-, or 

dU-U 
Disbelief. 

DiB-be-lltve', 169. 

Dis be li, vid', 150» 183. 

Dis-be lirv'or. 

Dis-be-lJi-v'ing. 

Dis-bur'den {diz-hur*- 

dn, or dis t/ur'dn) 

(VM)[(liz^mr'dii, Wk. 

Sin. Wr. ; diM-hur'dny 

Wb. Gd. lio.j [DiB- 

burthcn, Jut.] 
Dis-bur'dencHl {dis- 

bur'dndf or dU-bur*- 

dnd), 
Dis-bur'den-ing {diz- 

bur'dn-ingy or dia- 

bur'dn-inij). 
Dii»-bursc' idiz-t or dis-) 

Idiz-lmrs*, Wis. .<in. 

Wr. ; dU-imr*', Wb. 

Gd. 165.1 
Dib-burseu' {diz-bursff 

or dis-biirst'). 
DiH-bursc'meut (diz-t or 

dw-). 
Dis-burs'er {diz-, or 

Di8-burs'iug {diz., or 

rfw-). 
fDisburthen, 203. 

— See Disburden.] 
Discard', 11, 103. 
DiH-eard'ed. 
Din-cyird'iug. 
Din-<»ern' {diz-zem'), 

40, l!H\. 
Dlii-ceruc»ii' {diz- 

zemd')j l.'»<». 
DiH-cem'or {diz-zem'-). 
Dis-wrn'i-ble {diz- 

zem'-)t UH. 
DiB-cem'i-bly {diz- 

zern'-). 
DiHoem'ing {diz- 

zern'-). 
DlfM?eni'inent {diz- 

zern'-). 
DiH-clinrH:e', 11. 
Dis-char^'od', 1S3. 
DiB-char«;'er {-char}'-). 
DiB'ci-forin, 78, llW. 
DiB-ci'ple, 164. 
DlB'ci-plin-a blc, 164. 
1 )i8-ci pli-na'rian,49, N. 
DisVi-pli-na-ry, 72. 
DiB'd-plIne, ts2, 16'i. 
Dih'ci-pUned {-ptind), 

383. 



I DlB^ci-pUn -ing . 

I Di8-claim% 43? 

I Dis-claimed'. 

I Dis-claim'er. 

I Dis-cliim'Ins'. 

I DiB-cloBc' (I-to*'), 24. 

Dia-cloBcd' {-kidtd'). 

Di8-cl68'er(-W«2'-). 

Dis-cloB'ing {kldz'-). 

DiB-cloB'ure r-Jttt*'.), 91. 

DiB'coid, a. dc n. 

Dis-coid'al. 

DiB-coI'or (-Jnrf'tir) 
[DiRColour, Sin. 

IWy 203.] 

Dis-ool-or-a'tioii 
{kul'-), 112. 

DiB-col'or«d {-kui'urd), 
150. [Discol- 
oured, 199,208.1 

Di8-ooFor>ing (-*«/'-;. 
[Di 8 CO 1 ouring, 
190, 203.1 

Dis-oom'flt (-*««•'-)• 

Dis-com'flt-ed {-kum'-), 
171. 

DiB-com'flt ing (Irufii'-). 

DiB-eom'flt-ure {kum'-S. 

DiB-comTort {-kum'-h 
l.iS. 

DiB -corn-mode'. 

DiB-eom-mod'ed, 183. 

DiB <3om-mddMng. 

Dl8-com-po8e' (-p*«'). 

DiB-oom-poBed' 
{pOzd'). 

DIb -com-poa'ing 

Di B-com-pds'ure 

(/>5z'-),91. 
DiM-con-oert', 21, Note ; 

171. 
DiB-con-oert'ed. 
DiB-con-oert'ing. 
DiB-con-cer'tton. 
Dis-oon-nect'. 
DlB-con-nect'ed. 
Dis-con-neot'ing. 
DiB-con-nec'tion. 
Dis-con'so-late, 73. 
Di8-con-tent'. 
DiB-oon-tent'ed. 
DiB-con-tent'ing. 
DiB-con-tin'u-anoe, 160. 
DiB-con-tin-u-a'tioii. 
Dis-con-tin'iie. 
DiB-con-tin'Qed (-fld), 

183. 
Di8-con-tiii'a-ing. 
Dis-con-ti nu'i-ty, 108. 
Di8-con-tin'a-o&8. 
DiB'oord. 
DiB-cord'anoe, 160. 



Di»-oord'an-cy. 

Dia-oord^ anti 

Dia 'count, n, 

Dia'count,or Dls-count', 
V. [bo Gd. ; du-kouul'^ 
Wk. 8m. Wr. 155.] 

^■»""Th« aocciit [on 
die last ■yllabfe] ii proper, 
but in the mercantile 
world the rerb i< very 
eoauBonly made to bear 
the aame accent •• the 
noun.'* — < 



DlB-count'a-ble, IM. 

DiB-coun'te-nanoe. 

DiB-coun'te-aanoed 
{-nanst^. 

DiB-coim'te-nanf-inff. 

DiB'coant-er, or IWt- 
count'er [dis'ttmnt- 
ur, Gd. ; dit-kount'- 
ur, Sm. Wr. 155.J 

Dis-co&r'age (Wr'O, 
22, 171. 

Dia-oo&r'aged (-MH-), 
183. 

Dis-coUr'age^nent 
(Wr'-), 186. 

DiB-cottr'a-ger. 

DiB-courac' ( -JWra*), 
n. A V. 

Dis-coursed' {-k6r$t')^ 
183. 

Dis-coura'er {-kfirt*-). 

Dia-coura'ing (-i?»ra'-). 

DiB-courBlvc, 84. 

Dis-cofirt'e-ods {dis- 
kurt'e-us), or Dis- 
cdurt'eoQ8 (dis-k6rt'- 
yus) [so Wr. ; du- 
Jeurt'e-U8, Gd. ; flU- 
k6ri'yus, Sm. *, dis- 
kur'ckus, Wk. 165.1 

Dis-oour'te-By {-kwr-), 
1G9. 

Dia'cofia, a. shaped like 
adiak. [See DiBcua, 
160.J 

DiB-cov'er {-kuv'-). 

Dia-cov'er-a-ble (Inir'-), 
164. 

DiB-cov'ered {-kuv'tird), 
150. 

Dis-oov'er-er {-kuv'-). 

DiB-oov'cr-ture {-knr'-). 

DiB-cov'er-v (-kuv'-), 
171, 233, Exc 

Dis-crcd'it. 

DiB-crod'it-a-ble, 164. 

Di8-cred'it-a-bly. 

Dia-cred'it-ed. 

DiB-crcd'lt-in 



DiB-creet' (13), a. priK 



t 



a, e, i, o, u, y, lanff ; ft, C, T, 6, &, y, $k4>rt i ft oa in far, a oa in tut, koiim 



DISCREPANUB 



173 



UiSUEA&TENED 



deat.*— ;Sm Discrete, 

iGa] 

u'cre^noe [so Wk. 
8ni- Wr. J dia-crtp'- 
<wu,Wb.Gd.l07,155.] 

Dia'cre-pan-cj Fbo Wk. 
Sin. Wr.; dU-krtp'- 
mtrty, Wb. Gd. 107, 
155.J 

DU'cre-jMnt [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr.; dis-krep'- 
anif Wb. Gd. loo.] 

INs-crete' (13), a. sepa- 
rate, distinct. [ See 
EHscreet, IGO.J 

I>i»-cr$'tioii {-kresh'un). 

Bift-crS'tioD-al {-kresh'- 
un-). 

Dis-crC'tion-a-ry 
(-fcrwA'im-), 72. 

IMs-cre'tlve. 

Dis-criin'i-nate, 73. 

Difl-crim'i-nat-ed, 183. 

Difr-crim' i-nat-in^. 

Dis-crim-i -na'tion. 

Dis-crim'i-na-tlve. 

Dis-crimM-nat-or. 

Dls-crlm'i-na-to-ry. 

Dis-crown', 28. 

Dis-erowned', 165. 

Dis-eor'slve, 5*. 

Dis-cur'so-ry. 

Dis'cns [L. pL DU'cl; 

£n^. pi. Dis'oas-es 

(-ez), lub], n. a quoit. 

[Set Discoas, 160.] 
Dis-cnss', 22, 103. 
DU-cassed' {-kwt'), 165. 
Dis-enss'er. 
Dta^mss'iii^. 
Dis-eas'sion (-ku^'un). 
Disdain' (di-rniAn')* 23, 

136. 
Dis^lalned' (diz-ddnd'), 

150. 
Dis-data'ftU (dishdan'- 

fSol). 
Dis-dain'ing {diz-). 
Dis-ease' idiz-*z'), 136. 
Dia-eaaod' (diz-izd'), 

183. 
Dls-eas'Ingr (-««'-). 
Dis-em-bark'. 
Dis-em -bark-a'tion. 
Dis-em-b&r'rass, 170. 
Dis-em-b&r'rassed 

(-nut)y 166. 
Dis-^m-b&r'raas-tiig. 
Dto-em-bodled (-id), 

171, 186. 
Ws-cm-bod'y. 
Dis-em-bod'y-ing. 



Dis-em-bogue' (-6(»y')» 

87, 171. 
Dis-em-bdened' 

i-bOgd'), 183. 
Dis-em-bdguc'ment 

i-bOg'-), 185. 
Dis-cm-bo^'ing 

i-b6g'-). 
Dis-cm-bow'el. 
Dis-em-bow'elled (-eld) 

[Disembow- 
eled, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— See 177 1 and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Dis-em-bow'el-ling 
Disembowel- 

ingr, Wb. Q<i.203.J 
Dis-em-broil'. 
Dis-em-broiled', 165. 
Dis-em-broil'ing. 
Dis-on-a'ble, 164. 
Dis-en-a'bled (-a'bld), 

183. 
Dis-en-a'bling^. 
Dis-cn-am'oiued 

(-am'urd). 
Di8-«n-chant', 131. 
Dis-en-chant'cd. 
Dis-en-chant'er. 
Dis-en-ehant'ing. 
Dis-en-chant'ment. 
Dis-en-cum'ber. 
Dis-ennnim'bered 

(-lyurd)tl(i6. 
Dis-en-cum'ber-ing. 
DJ s-en-cum'brance. 
Di9-<;n-gBge'. 
Dis-en-gaged', 183. 
Dis-cn-gage'mcnt. 
Dis-en-gag'ing (^«/-)- 
Dis-en-no'ole, KH. 
Di8-en-no'bled(-no'frM). 
Dis-en-no'bliog. 
Dis-en-slave'. 
DiS'Cn-Blaved% 183. 
Dis-en-slav'ing. 
Dis-en-tan'gle {-tang'- 

al), M, 1(H. 
Dfs-cn-tan'gled {4ang'- 



gld). 
Dls 



18-en-tan'gling 

{-tang'~). 
[Disenthrall, 203. 

— See Disinthrall.] 
Dis-es-teem'. 
Dis-€B-teemed', 166. 
Dis-es-teem'ing. 
Dis-es-ti-ma'tion. 
Dis-fa'vor [Disfa- 

y o a r , Sm. 199, 203.1 
Dis-fa'vored {'Vurd}^ 

166. 
Dis-ft'ror-ing. 



oi 
Wk 



Dis-flg-Q-ra'tion. 
DlB-flg'ure, 91. 
Dis-fig'urcd (-^rrf),183. 
Dis-fig'ure-muut. 
Dis-fig'ur-er (,-yur-)y 91. 
Dis-fig'ur-ing (-ywr-). 
Dis-fran'chTse (-cAlr) 

[not dis-fran'oliiz, 

163.] 
Dis-fVan'chXsed 

{-chizd), 
Dis-fran 'cliXse-ment 

{-chlz). 
Dis-gar'tiiHh, 101. 
Dis-gar'niHhed {-nU1ft\ 
Dis-g-ar'nish-lng. 
Dis-gorge' (tm-, 

di»-) Tdiz-gori\ 

Sm. vVr. ; dis-gorj'. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Dls-gorged' (ate-, o» 

dU-)y 105, 183. 
Dis-gorge'meut (diz-, oi 

dia-). 
Dis-gorg'ing (-gorf). 

Die-grace' {diz-* or dis-) 

[^z-grHs'y Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dis-grOa't Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Dis-gracod' (diz-grdsf, 

or dia-gr&xt'). 
Dis-gracti'ful {diz-arUa'- 

fSoly or dis-griuySbl). 
Dl8-gra9'lng. 
Dis-guJse' {diz-gh\z'y or 

disghW) (171) [diz- 

ghtz', Wr. ; dh-ghlz', 

Wb. Gd. ; dizff-yiz% 

Wk. ; diz-guHze^ Sm. 

20,53, 13n, 155.] 
Dis-guiHCHl' (ftiz-ghJzd'j 

or dig- ffhlzd')y 150,183. 
Dis-guie'cr (diz-ghlz'- 

Mr, or dh-gMz'nr). 
Dis-giilsMnff {ffiz-ffhl::'- 

ing, or dis-ghlz'lng). 
Dl«-gu»t' {diz-t or ais) 

[diz-gunf, Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dU-fpMf, Wb. 

Gd. 136, 155.1 
Dis-guBt'ed (diz-t or 

dis-). 
Dis-gust'ing (diz-y or 

dis-). 
Dish, 16, 46. 
Dis-ha-bllle' (-bU') (171) 

[Deshabille, 203.] 
Dish'ddth, 206. 
Dis-heart'en (-harfn)y 

149. 
Dis-heart'ened (-hart'- 

nd), 165. 



&Ui d Of iis tliere ; A>a«<fi foot; 9a«<fiikcile; gha«gingo*>y^<uiulldK 

15* 



DISHEARTENING 



174 



DISOBEYED 



Dis-heart'en-ing 

(-hart'n-i. 
^Dished idWU), Note C, 

D. 34. 
Df-'shev'el, 149. 
Dl-shev'clled (-eld) 

(105) [ Di 8 h c V - 

c 1 e d , Vb. Gd. 2Ki. 

— See 177, and Note 



E, p. 70.1 
DI-Bhcv'el ling 



[Di- 
\Vb. 



B h c V e I i n g, 

Gd. 2fKi.] 
Dish'ing. 
DlB-hon'cBt (diz-<m'-)j 

136, 139. 
Dis-bon'or (diz-on'-), 

(13A, 139) [Dishon- 
our, Sm. '^Xi.] 
DiB-hon'or-a-blo {diz- 

on'-), 1(H. 
Dis-hon'or-a-bly (diz- 

on'-). 
DlB-hon'or-a-ry {diz- 

cwi'-), n. 
Dis-hon'orcd {diz-an'- 

urd)t 166. 
DiB-hon'or-er (diz- 

on'')y 77, 88. 
Dis-hon'or-ing 

(diz-on'-). 
Di ft-i n-ol i-na'tlon. 
Dia-in-cUne'. 
DiB-in-olincd', 183. 
Dis-in-clin'lng. 
Dls-in-cor'po-rate, a. 

& V. 73. 
Dls-in-eor-po-rat-ed, 

183. 
Di 8-in-cor'po-rat-ing. 
Di8-in-<?or-po-ra'tion. 
DiB-in-fcct'. 
Dis-in-fect'ant, 
Dls-in-fwt'ed. 
Di8-in-fc<ytlon. 
DlB-in-gtm'u-ofiB. 
DiB-ln-firr'it. 
Dis-in-biT'it-od. 
DiR-in-her'it-ing. 
DiB-in'to-gra-ble, 164. 
Dls-in'tc-grntc. 
Dis ln'to-gr;\t-<jd. 
Dis-in'te-griit-ing. 
Dis-in-te-gra'tion. 
Disinters 21, Note. 
Di»-in'ter-€Bt-cd (r/t?-, j 

or dis-) [dlz-in'ter- 1 

&ft-ed, Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

dig-in'ter-ent-ed, Wb. 

Gd. 136, 155.1 
DlB-in-ter'ment. 
DJB-in-thrair [Disen- 
thrall, DlBin- 



thral, DlBcn- 

t h r a 1 , Sm. 203.1 
Dis-in-thrftUed', 166. 
DiB-in-thrill'ing. 
DiB-in-thr&l'ment 

[D is in t h ral I- 

ment, Wb. Gd. 155, 
_ 177.1 
Dl«-jom' (diz-.or dis-) 

[diz-join't Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dig-join', Wb. 

Gd. 1.36. 155.] 
DiB-Joincd' (diz-, or 

dis)y 165. 
DiB-join'ing (diz-t or 

dis-). 




Gd. 1.36, 155.1 
DiB-Jolnt'ed (diz-, or 

dis). 
Dis-Joint'ing (du-, or 

dis-). 
DlB-janct' {diz-, or 

dis), 136. 
Dis-Junotlve (d»-, or 

dis). 
DiBk, 16. 
Dis like' (diz-, or dis-) 

Idiz-ttj/, Wk. Sm. 

Wr.; dis-tfk', Wb. 

Gd. 136, 155.] 
DlB-liked' {diz-tlki', or 

dis-nkt'). 
Dis-lik'ing (diz-, or 

dis-). 
DiB'lo-catc. 
DiB'lo-cat^. 
Dls'lo-cat-Ing. 
Dis-lo-ca'tion. 
Dislodge' {diz-, or dis-) 

Idizlof, Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dis-ioj', Wb. 

Gd. 136, 155.] 
Dislodged' {diz-k^d', 

or dis-lojd'). 
Dis-lodg'ing (dfo-, or 

dis-), 183. 
Dis-loy'al {diz-, or dis-) 

[diz-loy'al. "Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dis.loy'al, Wb. 

CM. 136, 165.J 
Dis-loy'al-ly {diz-, or 

dis-). 
Dls-loy'al-ty {diz-, or 

dis-). » 

Dis'raal {diz'-), 136. 
DiB'mal-ly {diz'-), 136, 

170. 
Dis-man'tle {diz-, or 

dis) {diz-man'tl, Wk. 

Sm. wr. ; dis-man'- 



il, Wb. G4. 13^ 

155. 
Dis-man'tled {diz-man'- 

tld, or dis^man'tUl). 
Dis-man'tling (du-, or 

dU). 
DiB-masf {diz-, or dis) 

Idiz-nUsV, Sm. Wr.; 

dismdst', Wb. Gd. 

136, 166.] 
DiB-maflt'<Hl {diz-, or 

dis). 
Dis-maat'ing {diz-, or 

dis-). 
Dls-may' {diz-, or dis) 

[diz-mA', Wk. Sm. 

Wr.} dis-md', Wb. 

Gd. 136, 155.] 
DiB-mayed' {diz-mOtV, 

or dis-mUd'). 
DlB-may'ing {diz-, or 

dis-). 
Dis-mom'ber {diz-, or 

dis-) \diz-mem'b«r, 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; dis- 

mem'bur, Wb. Gd. 

13('», 155.1 
Dis-mcm'ucred {diz- 

mem'burd, or dis- 

mem'bttrd). 
Dis-mem'ber-ing {diz-, 

or dis-). 
DiB-mem'bcr-ment 

(diz-, or dis-). 
DiB-misB' {diz-mis', or 

dis^is*) Jdiz-TMS' 

Wk. Sm. wr. ; rf**- 

miV, Wb. Gd. W6, 

155.1 
Dis-miB'Bal (dtf-, or 

dis). 
Dis-miBBcd' {diz-mist', 

or dis-mis}'), 166 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
DiB-miBB'ing {diz-, or 

dis-). 
Dis-mis'sion {diz-mish'- 

un, or dis-mish'un). 
DiB-mount' (diz-, or 

di«-) (28) [diz-mMtnr, 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; d*'i 

mount', Wb. Gd. i:th. 

155.] 
Dla-monnt'ed (diz-, or 

dis-). 
DiB-mount'lng (diz-, or 

Dis-o-be'di-enoe, ll». 
DiB-o-be'di-ent. 
DiB-o-bey' (-*«'). 
DiB-o-beyed' {-b^')f 

188 
DlB-o-bey'er (-*«'-). 



a, $, i, d, u, y. long ; ft, S, T, 6, fi, 5', «Aor< , H as in Tt, k as im fast, & iw •« 



DISOBEYING 



175 



DISROBE 



r-da'-). 



80 Sm. 



or 



or 



>i»-o-boy'ing (- 
■*i«-o-blige' M 

Wr. Wb. Gd- i dis-o- 

bt^', or dis-o-bUf, 

Wk. 155.1 
':Jis-«>^bliged', 183. 
3iB-o-blJge'inent. 
JiB-o-blig-infi^ (.-hilf-Jf 
. >i8-or'der (<wur-, or dw) 

[diz-ar^durj Wk. Sra. 

Wr. J dia-or*dur, Wb. 

Gd. 1»J, 155.] 

ft-or'derod {diz-or'- 

durdj or dU-or'uurd)y 

ISO, 171. 

s-or'dcr-Ing ('K«-i 

dM). 
^H)i»-or'der-Iy (dt^-f 

dis). 
iNs-or-gan-i-zA'tioii. 

{diz-^ or dU), 112. 
'Dia-or'gan-ize (di^-, or 

4x9-) \diz-€frgan\z, 

Sm. Wr. ; dU-ttHgan- 

\z, Wb. Gd. 1.36, 155.] 
Dis-or'gan-UEed (clir-, or 

dis-). 
DI»-or'gan-i*-er (rfw-, 

or dw-). 
Dis-owu' {diz-fin'i or 

dw-Cn'Hdiz 6n', Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; dis-9n'j 

Wb. Oil. IW, )55.] 
Dis-owned' {diz-^nd\ 

or dis-^nd'), KI5. 
DIs-pftr'age, 70, 170. 
Dto-pftr'aied, 150, 183. 
Diii'P&r'agc-meiit. 
Dia-par'ft-gor. 
DiB-par'a-ging. 
Dls'pa-rat<n 
Difl-pAr'i-tj, 106, 169. 
Din-part'. 
Dis-part'od. 
DiR-part'ixig. 
DJs-pa£'8ioxi {-pash'- 

un). 
Di»-pa»'fiioii-ate {-p<uh'- 

un-). 
Dia-patch' [D o a - 

patch, 208. — Set 

Deapatch.] 
Dift patched^ i-pateht') 

[Despatohed, 

aoa.] 

Dia-patchMng TDes- 

patching,2o3.] 
Diaper. 

Dia-pelled'(p«M')* 170- 
Dift-pcIOing. 
Dia-pen'aa-rr, 72. 
Dla-penHM'tfon. 
Dia'pen-ai-tor [ao Sm. 



Wr. } dU-pen-ia'toTt 

Wk. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Dia-pen'aA-to-ry. 86. 
Dia-penae', 15 ; Note D, 

p. 3d. 
Dispensed' {-penat'). 

Note C, p. 31. 
Dis-pena'er. 
.Dispens'iQg, 183. 
Dis-i»oo'ple(-;>e'p/), IM. 
DIs pto'pled {-pi'pld), 

ISJ. 
Dis-peo'pler (pi'-). 
Dia-peo'pling l-pi'-). 
Di spcmi'ofis. 
Disperse', 21, Note. 
Dis-persed' (-per**'), 

166. 
Dis-pers'or, 183. 
Dis-pers'iag. 
Dis-por'sion. 
Dis-persTvc. 
Dis-pTr'it, 170. 
Dia-plr'it-ed. 
Dis-plr'it^ing. 
Dis-plaoe'. 
Dis-plaoed' (-pldstf), 
Dls-pUoe'ment. 
DiB-pl&9'ing. 
Dis-pIAnt'. 
Dis-pMnt'ed. 
Dis-pliint'ing. 
Dis piny', 23. 
Dis-plAycd', 165, 188. 
Dis-pliiy'or. 
Dis-play'ing. 
Dis-plCaae'T-prts'). 
Displeased' {-pllzd'). 
Dis-ploas'ing {-pliz'-). 
Dis-plf^as'ure {-pltzh'-)y 

91, 171. 
Dis-plode'. 
Dis plod'cd, 183. 
Dis-plod'lng. 
Dls-plo'slou (-zhwn). 
Dis-plo'stvc, 84. 
Dis-plumc', 26. 
Dis-plumod', 166. 
Dis-plum'ing. 
Dis-port'. 
Dis-port'ed. 
Dis-port'ing. 
Dls-pos'a-ble (-p««'-), 

1(H, IfiO. 
Dia-pOs'al {-pOz'-). 
DiB-po«e', 136. 
Disposed' {-pfizd'). 
Dis-pSs'or (-pfl«'-). 
Dis-pos'inu;, (-pas'-). 
Dis-po-sI'tTon {-zish'- 

un). 
Dis-po8-8cs«' {'POZ- 

zes') [so Wk. Sm. 



Wr. ; di$-poi-se*', 

Wb. Gd. 156. — See 

Posaeaa.] 
Dis-pos-sesaed' {-poz- 

zejit'). 
Dl8-i)08-Be88'ing (-poz- 
.^ze«'-). ^ 

Dispraise' (-prflc'). 
Disproof. 
Dis-pro-por'tlon. 
Dis-pro-por'tioii-a bio, 

104. 
Dis-pro -pdr'tlon-a-bl y . 
Dis-pro-por'tion-al . 
Dia-pro por'tion-al-ly. 
Di»-pro-p6r'tion-atr,' :;{. 
Di8-j)rov'a-ble {-proor' 

Dis-prov'al {proor'-). 
Di8-provc'f-/>r(K>r'-), I(». 
Dis-proved' {-proonV). 
Dis-prov'er (proor'-)- 
Dis-prov'ing {-proov'-). 
Dis'puta-bft (164) [bo 

8m. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

dig'puta-bL or dis- 

pu'ta^U Wk. 156.] 
Dis'pu-tant. 
Dis-pu-ta'tion, 112. 
Dis-pu-ta'tiofis {-shiu). 
Dls-piit'a-tYve, 84. 
DlH-pute',26. 
Dis-put'ed, 183. 
Dis-put'er. 
DiB-pufiiig. 
Dis-qaal i-fl-cation 

(kw6l-)y 112, 116. 
DlB-qual'i-ned (-Jfctoo/'-), 

186. 
Di8-qual'i-f y (ktooV). 
DiB-qual'i-fy-ing 

{-kwoV-). 
Di8-<iai'et. 
DiR-qui'et-ed. 
Dis-qui'et-ing. 
DiB-quI'c-tude, 108. 
Dis-qul-Bl'tion {-zisV- 

un). 
Dis-re-gard'. 
Dis-re-gard'ed. 
Dis-re-fjard'ful {fSol). 
Dia-rc-gjird'lng. 
Dis-n'riBh, 170. 
Dis rel'ished {-uht), 

166. 
Dis-rcrish-ing. ^ 

Dis-rep'u-ta-ble, 164. 
Dis-rcp'u-t«-bly. 
Dis-re-potc'. 
Dis-re-spect'. 
Dis-re-spcct'flil (-/»/)• 
Dis-robc' (diz-y or dis'-) 

[dizrdh\ Wk. Sm. 



\- 



f«U; diM in there; 66 <m in foot; 9 a< <ii fkoile ; gh m g <» go ; tl) a< M this. 



UlSEOBED 



176 



DISTBIBUnVB 



Wr.; da-r»6',Wb.Od. 

155.1 
Disrobed' (diz-rdbtP, 

or dis-r9bd\ 165, 183. 
Dis-rub'liur {diz-, or 

dis). 
Dis rup'tion (diz-^ or 

di*-) [diz-rvp'thnnf 

Wk. Sm- Wr. ; dis 

rup'ihun, W\k Gd. 

15.5. J 
Dis-Bat-iB-far^tion. 
Dis Mt-is-fao'to rjr. 86. 
DiB Mt'is-fk'd, IHG. 
Dis-sat'iA-fv, iH. 
Dis-sat'is-f^-ias'. 
Did-soct', 15, loi. 
Dis-80ct'ed. 
Dia-Boct'i ble, IM, 100. 
IMs-Boct'ing. 
Dis-BCc'tioQ. 
Diii-i»€?ct'or. 
Dis-siiB'in (•Hz'in), or 

Dis-Boiz'in. 
Dis-siizc', or Difl-Bciac' 

Di8-8<"*ized', or DIb- 

BeiiMHl' (-«#2d'),150,183 
DlB-Boiz'ino^, or Dlfl- 

Beis'ing' {-slz'-). 
Dis-Bt'iz-oe', 118. 
DiB-Bi'iz'or, 118. 
DiB-Bom'hlo, lf4. 
Dis-sem'bled (-««m'6M), 

183. 
DiB-sem'Wer. 
Dis-seni'bling^. 
Dis-sera'i-nato, 73, 170. 
Dis-Bein'l-nit-ed, 183. 
Dis-Bcm'i-nat-mg. 
Difl-Bem-i-na'tioQ. 
DiD-BcmM-nat-or. 
Dis-Bcn'sion. 
DiB-Bent', 15. 
Dis-Bent'ed. 
DiB-Bcnt'er. 
Dis-Ben'tient (-sft«n/), 

171. 
DiH-Bcnt'ing. 
DiB-sepM-ment, 100, 170. 
DiB-Bcr-ta'tion. 
DiB-Benre',21, N. 
Dis-serred', IftS. 
Dia-servlce, \m. 
Dia-Benrlce-a-ble, 101, 

183 
DiB-flerr'liig. 
I)i8-Bev'er. 
DiA-sev'er-anoe, 109. 
DiB-sev-cr-a'tion. 
Dls-Bcv'cred i^rd), 160. 
__nifl-Bev'er-iiig. 
S^B'sl-denoe, 170. 



k: 



Dia'al-dent. 

Dia-aU'i enoe (100) [ao 

Sm. Wb. Gd.; dis- 

n/'y«iM,Wk.idM-M/'- 

wenSf or dis-sU'%^n*i 

Wr. 155.] 
DiB-Bil'i^mt. 
Dis-aim'i-Ur, 100. 
DiB-Bim-i Ur'i-ty. 
DiB-si-mUM-tade, 100. 
Dis-Bim-a -la'tion. 

a'ai-pate, 73, 170. 

lis'si-pat-ed, 183. 
DiB'aipat-in^. 
DiR-si-pa'tioa. 
Dis-ao'd-ate {-*kiat) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

dUs&akAi, Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Df 8-8o'd at-«d(-«ft1-«l). 
Dis-Bo'd-at in^. 
Dis-BO-d-a'tion (-«>- 

<A1 ). 
DiB-BO-lu-bU'i-tf. 
DiB'BO-luble, 150, 104. 
Dis'Bo lute, 170. 
I>i8-8o-lu'tion. * 

DiB-Bolv-a-bil'i-ty {diz- 

zolv), 100. 
I>iB-aol^'a-ble((liz-2o/v'- 

a-bt)j 130, IM, 183. 
Dis-Bolve' {diz-zolv')^ 

136, 171. 
Dis-Bolved' (diz-zoUfd'h 

183. 
Dis Bolr'ent(rf«-«>/r'-). 
DiB~Bolv'in^(<<ur-20^v'-). 
Dis'so-nanec, 160. 
Dis'BO-nant. 
Dis-Buadc' (-ntdd'), 171. 
DiB-Buad'ed {swiid'-), 

183. 
Dis-Bwad'er (-#warf'-). 
I)i8-8uad'ing {-stedti'-). 

zhun). 

Dis-Bua'rfre (^swa'tir). 

I)i8-8vl-Ub'ic, 109, 170. 

DiB-syl'la-ble, or Dis'- 
BYl-la-ble (\<H) [bo 
Wr. Gd. ; dw^Ta W, 
Sm. , dit'tU^-bl, Wk. 
155.] 

DiB'taff, 171. 

DlB-tain'. 

Dis tained', 150. 

DiBtain'iug. 

DiH'tanoe, 109. 

Dis'tanoed {-tanst), 

DiB'tanc-iuif. 

DiB'tant. 

Dis-taate'. 

Dia-taBt'ed, 183. 



ty, 100. 



17ft. 



17«. 



DiBtaate'flil (-/Set). 
EHs-taat'iDji^ 
DiB-teoTper. 
Dia-tem'per-a-turr. 
DiB-tem'pered (-/mfYf), 

150, 165. 
Dia-tem'per-inff. 
Di8-tend% 15. 
Dia-tend'ed. 

DiB-tend'lniT- 
Dia ten-ai-bil'i 
DiB-ten'BlTC. 
IMB-ten'aiOD, 100. 
Dia'tich {4ik) [nof di«'- 

tich, 153.1 
Dis'tich-oika (-<tlr.). 
DiB-til'rDi8tlll,Wl>. 

Gd. 203. — See 179, and 

Note K, p. 70.] 
DiB-til'la-ble, 104, 17( 
DiB-til la'tion. 
DiB-tiria-to-rr, 86. 
Dis-tiUed' i-tUd'h 17< 
Dia-tll'ler. 
DIa-til'Icr-y, 170. 
IMa-tiiaiiif^. 

Dis-tiiict' i-Hngiff), M. 
Dia-tlnc'tion i-iingf). 
Dia-tinct'Ive. 
DiB-tin'guiah (4tM^- 

mpUh), 171. 
DlB-tiQ'ifuiBh'A-ble 

{'ting^ffwish-a-bt)^ lOOl 
Dia-tin'^Bhed (-ttna*- 

ffwisM), 106 i Note C, 

p. 34. 
Dia-tin'gnoiah-er i-iing'- 

DTB-tiu'ui-uiBh-tng 
i-tiug^ffiouh-), 
DlB-tort', 17. 
Dis-tort'ed. 
DiB-tort'in^. 
Dis-tor'tioa. 
DiB-tTM^t', IOl 
Dis-tract'ed. 
DiB-tract'in^. 
Dia-trac'tioD. 
Distrain'. 
DiB-traln'a-ble, IM. 
Dia-traiDed', 166. 
Dis-train'or. 
DiB-treaa', 15. 

Dis-trcBaed'C-^rert ' ).l<i6- 
DiBtreBB'ftd i-JSot). 
DiB-treaa'lnff. 
DiB-trib'u-U-ble, 104. 
DiB-trib'u-ta-ry, 72. 
DiB-trib'ute. 
DiB-trib'iit-er. 
DiB-trib'nt ing. 
DlB-tri ba'tion. 
Dia-trib'u-Uve. 



a, $, 1, 5, a, f, long, I, «, 1, 5, il, f, sAorf , A at in fu, k at im fiul, & m w 



DISTRICT 



177 



OOFFED 



IHs'tn/t (!6) [not deB'- 

trikt, ;j', IW.] 
THa'trict-ed. 
Dis'trict iDg. 
I>ta-tro8t', 22. 
IMs-trust'od. 
DU-trust'ful i-/5ol). 
Dis-trust'jng. 
Dl»-tiirb', 21. 
Dis-tiirb'aiioe, 109. 
IXiB-turbed', 166. 
Dis-tariyer. 
I>i»-turb'ing. 
Dts-un'ion ^An'Min )(51) 

[•o Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

^i«-w'n1-«in,Wk. 155.] 
Dis-an'ion-ist (^n'vfin- 

ist). 
IMs-a-nite', 80. 
Dis-u-nit'cd, 183. 
Dto-Q-nit'er. 
Di^-o-nit'mg. 
Dia-a'nl-ty, 106, 100. 
Dis-ofi'age (-«2'-), 70. 
Dis-nse'HlA'). n. 26, 161. 
Difl-Qse' f-ftcO, r. 161. 
Dis ased'(-«2d'}, 150,183. 
Diti us'ing (-««'-). 
Ditch, 16, 44 ; Note D, 

p. 37. 
Ditched itUehi), Note 

C, p. 34. 
DItch'er. 
Ditch 'ing. 

Di'tbe-iflm {-izm), 136. 
Di'the-int. 
Di thc-iut'ic, 100. 
Di thc^ist'ic al, 108. 
Dith'y nunb, 171. 
Dith y-ram'bic. 
Di'tone. 
Dit'ri-glyph [so Sm. 

Wr.i iOrtrig'lif, Gd. 

155.] 
Di-kt>'cbee (-ke), 79. 
Dit-tan'der. 
Dit'ta-nr. 
Dit'tled i-Hd), 99. 
Dlt'to, 170. 
Dit'ty, 98, 170. 
Di a-ret'lc, 109. 
Di-ar'nal, 72, 79. 
Dl ran', 121, 156. 
Di-vftr'i-eate, 73, 170. 
Di v»r'l-cat-ed. 
Di-vir'i-cit-iiig. 
Di-vftr-i-ea'tioii. 
Dire, 25. 
Dired, 166, 183. 
Div'er. 

Dl-Terge' 21,N.;79,156. 
Dl rerged', 166. 
W-rerg'enoe {-verj'-). 



DT-verg'ont (-vtrj'-) 
DI-ver«f'ing (-verj'-). 
Di'vera i-vurz)y a. 148. 
Di'veree (-vurs), a, 148. 
Di'verse-Iy, 106. 
DI-rer'§i fied, 186. 
Dl-ver'ni-form, 109. 
DI-ver'8i 5, 94. 
DT-ver'§i-fy-iiig. 
Dl-ver'sion, 21, N. ; 79. 
DI-ver'Bi-ty, 169. 
Dl-vert', 21, 79 
Dl-vert'ed. 
Dl-vert'er. 
Dl-vcrt'ing. 

D!-ver'tI§e-meiit (-tiz- 
mong). 

9^ Broart ipelli thli 
word Dlrertizement, 
•ad njt of U, "an old 
word In the language: but. 
a« a modem word, rerlTed 
with a half French pro- 
nunciation by maldng the 
bet lyllable naaal (-niofi^), 
to ngniAr a Aort ballet or 
other emiertautmemt between 
tkt acta qf longer piece*" 

DI-vert1re, 84. 
Dl-vest' (15, 79) [De- 

V e II t , 203. — 5e« Note 

under Devett.] 
Dl-vest'ed. 

Dr-vest'i-ble, 164, 169. 
Dl-vest'ing. 
DI-Tid'a-bTc, IM, 183. 
Di'vl-di'vi {fh-'L^-de'vt). 
DT vide', 25, 79. 
Dl-vid'ed, 183. 
Div'i-dend, 169. 
Dl-vid'er. 

Dl-vid'era (-urt)y n. pi. 
m-vid'Ing. 
Dly-I-na'Qon. 
DI-Tlne', a.n.Av. 25,79. 
DT-vmed', 165, 183. 
Dl-vin'er. 
Dl-vin'ing. 
Div'ing, lai. 
Div'ing-bell,216. 
Dl-vlnnty, 108, 169. 
Dl-vlB-l-bil'l ty (-nz). 
DI-vlB'l-ble i-viz'i-bl), 

164, 169. 
DI-viB'I-bly (-viz'-). 
DI-vT'Bion {-vizh'un). 
DI-vl'Bor (-zur), n. the 

nnmber by which the 

dividend is divided. 

r^ee DevlBcr, 160.] 
Df-voroe', 24, 79. 
DI-v6rced'(-<^«r*<'), 183. 
DJ-vSr^'cr. 
Dl-vdr^'i-ble, IM. 



Dl-vSr^'ing. 

DI-vor^'Tve. 

Divulge', 22, 4«. 

Divulged', 1IV5. 183. 

Dl-vulg'er {-vufj'-). 

Dl-vulg'ing (-tn*(>'-). 

Dl-vul'sion. 

IM-vul'Blve, 81. 

Diz'ziness, 109, 170. 

Diz'zv, 9:}. 

Do {doo), 19. 

[ D o a t . 203.—^^? Dotp] 

Do^'i-blo (ifrl) [feo \Vk. 
8m. Wr. ; d6^si-bly or 
do8'i4)l, Gd. 155.] 

Do^'Ile n52) Fbo Wk. 
8m. Wr. ; ao'gily or 
do8'U, Gd. 15511 a. 
teachable. [See Dos- 
bU, 160.] 

Do^il'l-ty, 169. 

Do9'i-ma-cy, 169. 

Dof-i-maa'tio, 109. 

Dock. 18, 181. 

Dock'age, 169. 

Dock'et. 

Dock'et-ed. 

Dock'et-ing. 

Dock'-yard. 

Doc'tor, 18, 88. 

Doe'tored, 166. 

Doc'tor-al. 

Doc' tor-ate. 

Doc'tor-ing. 

Doc'trin-al. 

Doc'trlne, 152. 

Doc'u-ment. 

Doc-n-ment'al. 

Doc-u-ment'a-ry, 72. 

Dod'der, 77. 

Dod'dered (-durd), 106. 

Do-dec'a-gou. 

Do-dec-a-gya'i-an 

Do-de-cag'y-notis 

i-kqj'-). 
Do-<lec-a-he'dral. 
Do-dec-a-he'dron. 
Do-de-can' dri-an. . 
Do-de-can'drofiB. 
Dodge (d8j\ 18, 45. 
Dodged id6jd)j 150, 183. 
Dodg'er. 



Dodg'lng. 
>6'clo, ». 



Do' 



Doe (dli)j n. a Bhe-deer. 

[.s:*^^ Dough, 160.] 
Do'er (doo'-), 19, 77. 
Does {dux) [not dooi, 

153.] 
Doe'Bkin (d0'-), 200. 
Doff, 18, in. [p. 34. 
Doffed idoft)j Note C, 



fidl; €a«<fi there; db M in foot ; 9 a« in flMile ; gb of g <fi go ; (b m <» thia. 



DOFFER 



178 



DO WELLED 



DolTer, 170. 

Doff'ing. 

Dog, 18. 

Do>;^'ciay,206. 

Dot,'e, 24, 46. 

^b'^^ (dogd) (Ifll), r. 

did dog; a. 138, 161. 
Dosj'gor-ei {-gur-el) 

fI)o<r}rrel,-JO.'J.] 
Do;;'gitih {-ghUh). 
Dog' ma, 72- 
Dog-mat'ic, 109. 
Dog mat'ic-al. 
Dog-mat'icB. 
Dog'ma-tism (-«2m),196 
Dog'ma-tist. 
Dog'ma-tizc, 202. 
Dog'ma-tlzed, lb3. 
Dog'ma-tiz-^r. 
Dog'raa-tiz-iug. 
Dog' star, 200. 
Dog' w<K>d. 
DoPly, 27, 93. 
Do'ing (doo'-)- 
Dolt, 27. 

Do-lab'ii-form, 109. 
Dole, 24. 
Dolod. 165. 
Dole'ftil (-/wO. 
Ddl'tng, 183. 
Dole' some i-mtm)% 160. 
D611, 18, 172. 
Dol'lar, 74, 17a 
Dol'o-mite. 
Do'lor, 88. 
Dol-o-rifcr-ottB, 108. 
Dol-o-rlflc. 
Dol'o-rotts, 170. 
Dol'phin, 18, 36. 
Dull, 24. 
Do-main', 23L 
Dome, 24. 
I>o-me8'tio. 
Do-mee'tic-ate. 
Do-mes'tic -at-ed. 
Do -mee'tlo-at-lng. 
Do-mcft-tio-a'tion. 
Dom'i-cllc, 152, 169. 
Dom'i-cllcd, 166. 
Dom-i-cil'la-ry (rtit'yan 

ry) (72, 171) [bo Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; dom-i-HVi- 

aryy Wb. Gd. 166.1 
Dom-i-dl'l-ate, 73. 
Dom-1-cil'i at-ed. 
Dom-i-<:il'i-at-ing. 
Dom-i-cil-i-a'tioii. 
Dom'i-cUlng, 183. 
Dom'i-nant, 160. 
Dom'i nate. 
Dom'i-nat-«d, 183. 
Dom'i-nat-ing. 
Donv-i-na'tion. 



Dom'l-nat-Ive [so 8m. ; 

dom'i-na-Wr, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Dom'i-nat-or. 
Dom-i-neer', 169. 
Dom-i-neered' (-nfrrf')* 
Dom-i-neer'ixiff. 
Do-min'i-cal, TZ. 
Do-min'i-oan. 
Do-min'lon {-yun\. 
DomM-no rpl. Dom'i- 

noB {-n6z)j 192.] 
Don, 18. 
Do'iiate. 
Do'nat-ed, 183. 
Do'iiat-ing. 
Do-na'tion. 
Dou'a-tlve, 84. 
Done {dun)j, pari, from 

Do [See Don, 160.1 
Do-nee', 118, 121. 
[Donjon, 203.— Slee 

Dungeon.] 
Don'key {donfffky), 96. 
Do'nor (-raoior), 17, 24. 
Doom, 19. 
Doomed, 165. 
Doom'iiu^. 
Dooms'day (doomz'-)t 

214. 
D6or («tor), 24. 
Door'-ket^-er. 
Dor [Dorr, 203.] 
[ D o r a , 203. — ^tff Dou- 

ra.] 
Do-ree', or Do'ree [no 

Wr.;<io-re', Wb.Gd.j 

do'rtf Sm. 155.] * 
[Dory, 203.] 
Do'rian, 49, N. 
Ddr'ic, 170. 

Ddr'i-cism (-«uin), 136. 
Dor'man-oy. 
Dor'mant, 17, 72. 
Dor'mer, 17, 77. 
Dor'mi-tfve, 84. 
Dor'mi-to-ry, 86. 
Dor'mouse, 206. 
[Dorr, 203.— .See Dor.] 
Dor'Bal, 17, 72, 148. 
I>or'Bel, 17, 76, 148. 
Dor'aer, 17, 77. 
Dor-Bif er-otts, 108. 
Dor-Bip'a-rofis. 
Do'ry (49, N.), n. a kind 

of fi8h.[Doree, 203.1 
Do'ry, n. a kind of Bmall 

boat. 
Dose, 24. 
Dm'bU (170), n. a lamp 

of lint, — a term ascd 

in surgery. [See Do- 

cUe, 1§).J 



Dost idust) [not ddtt. 
163], V. the leooDQ 
person singnlar of the 
present tense Indioa- 
tire, from Do. [See 
Dust, 160.] 

Dot, 18. 

Do'tage, 24, 109. 

Do'tal, 24, 72. 

Do'tard. 

Do-ta'tion. 

Dote r24) [Do at, 208.] 

Dot'ed, m 

Dot'er. 

Dot'ing. 

Dot'tard, 170. 

Dot'ted, ITOw 

Dot'ter-eL 

Dot'ting. 

Do&b'le (dubfi), 164, 171. 

Do&b'Ied (dub*id), IKI. 

Do^k»^rUendrc{dco¥' 
Irong-tong'dr.) 

Doflblet {dub'-\ 22. 

Do&b'ling Idub'-). 

Do&b-loon' (du^-), 121. 

Doubt (dotil), 28, 162. 

Doubt'a-blc {doui'a-bl). 

Doubt'ed (douV). 

Doubt'er (dout'-). 

Doubt' ful (dout'fSbl). 

Doabt'fiil \yidoui'fS6l-). 

Doubt'ing {dout'-). 

DoueeurTv r.)(doo eur^) 

Douche (Fr.) {doofh). 

D6ugh (dd) (102), n, 
flour or meal rooiBt- 
ened with water for 
making bread. ISee 
Doe, 100.] 

Dough'nut {do'-), 102. 

Dongh'ti-ly (dow'-). 

Dough'ti-nesB (doir'-). 

Dougli'ty (dow^-)t 162. 

Dough'y {d6'u\ 162. 

Dou'ra {doo^ra) {At.) 
[Dora, Dhurra, 
Durra,203.] 

Douse, 28. 

Doused {dowii). 

Dous'lng. 

Dove {duv), 22. 

Dove'tail (dtir*-), 171. 

Dore'tailed {duv'-)t 161. 

Doye'taillng (dtcr'-). 

Dow'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Dow'a-ger, 46. 

Dow'dj. 

Dow'el. 

Dow'elled ( tld) [Dow- 
eled, Wb. Gd. 208. 
— See 177, and Note 
£, p. 70.] 



a, o, i, 6, u, y, long ; t, (>, 1, 6, tt, j^, ihort} Hat In ttr, hat in fkst, & as in 



DOWELLING 



179 



DRESS 



Dow'el-liiij^ f Dowel- 
ing, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Dowser, 28, 77. 

IDowerr, 2fXi.~-See 
Dowry.] 

Down. 28. 

Down^cast, 131, 206. 

Down' fall. 

Down'haol. 

Down 'hi 11, a. & n. 

Down'i-ness, lfi9. 

Down'ri^'ht (rl/), 102. 

Itown'ward, 7'Z. 

Down' wards {-wardz). 

Down'y. 

Dow'ry [Dowery, 
20:J.l 

Dox-oro-gy, 108. 

Doze, 24. 

Doxcd (do2d)y 183. 

Dox'en^duz'n) n49)[pl. 
Dozen, mrety Doi- 
eo8.] 

Ddz'i-nesa, 171. 

Dox'ing. 

Doi'y. 

Drab, 10. 

Drab'ble, 164. 

Drab'blcd (dra6'2(f),183. 

Drab'bling. 

Drachm (dram) (102, 
171), n. a drachma -, — 
a certain part of an 
ounce. [ See Dram, 
100.] [Dram (in the 
last sense), 'JO-iA 

Orach 'ma (drak'-). 

Draff (12, 131, 173) 
[Draagh,203.] 

I>raft, n. a selection of 
men from a military 
body; — an order for 
the payment of mon- 
ey ; — a drawing^, or ' 
plan; — a written out- i 
line. [See Drau}jht, 
160.] [Draught, 20:1] 

is teldom utcd wnrn thit ' 
. word haa the flrtt two 
■ease* above giren. For J 
tb« other aenMS, the form 
<trt^fi IB kM proper than 
dnmgkt. 

X>nft, V. [Draught, 

203.] 

■^ When thia word !■ 
naed a« a Ter^ the apelling 
drauffht ia of rare occur- 
rence 

tDraftsman, 203.— 

See Draoghtaman.] 
Drag, 10. 



Dragcped (drtwd), 176. 

Dra^r^^ng i-ah'ng). 

Dra^r'j^le, ItV*. 

Draj,''«:leri(dra^'«), 183. 

Drag'«jliiig. 

Drag'net, 206. 

Drag'o-man [ph Drag- 
omans, 196.J 

Drag'on, 170. 

Drag'on-flr. 

Drag'on 's->blood(<lra^- 
unz-blud), 213. 

Dra-goon', n. A r. 

Drag-oon-ade'. 

Dra-gooned', 166. 

Dra-goon'ing. 

Drain, 23. 

Drain'a ble, 164. 

Drain'age, 169. 

Drain'ing. 

I>rake, 23. 

Dram (10), n. a certain 
part of an ounce ; — 
the quantity of spir- 
ituous liquor tiiat 
is drunk at once. 

tSee Drachm, 160. J 
Drachm (in the 
rst sense), 203.1 

Dra'ma, or Dram'a [so 
WIc. Wr. ; dram'a, 
Sm.; drd' ma, or drd'- 
ma, Gd. 155.] 

Dra mafic, 108. 

Dra-raat'ic-al, 109. 

Dra-mat'ic-al-Iy. 

Dram'a-tist. 

Dram'a-tize, 202. 

Dram'a-tizcd, 183. 

Dram'a-tiz-in^. 

Drank {drangk), 10, 54. 

Drape, 23. 

Draped (jirUpt), 183. 

Drap'cr. 

Dra'per-y. 

Drap'Ing. 

Dras'tic. 

[Draugh, 203.— 5«« 
Draff.] 

Draught {dr^)y n. act 
of drawing or pull- 
in;j i — capability of 
bemg drawn ; — that 
which is taken by 
drawing ; — the act of 
drinking ; — the liquor 
drunk , — a current of 
air ; — a drawing, or 

I dan ; — a written out- 
inc ; — a drain ; — 
depth of water in 
which a ship floats; 
— IkjvcI given to parts 



of a pattern;— a w- 
lection of men from 
a military body ; — an 
order for the pa3rmcnt 
of money, [d^f Draft, 
160.] [Draft, 20:}.] 

■T'The •pellinir drauyhl 
la mure proper than r//-fi/lt 
fbr all the senaea of tint 
word except the la«t two. 

Draughts (drdfts). >. pi. 

a land of guiu.-i — a 

mild vesicaUtrv. 
Dr4ught8'man(arayT«'-) 

[Draftsman, 203.] 
Draw, 17. 
Draw'back. 
Draw'bridge, 206. 
Draw-ee' (118) [so Wr. : 

dratr'e, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Draw'er, n. one who 

draws ; — a box in a 

bureau, Ac, to be 

drawn out. 
Draw'ers C-urz) [not 

drewz, 15hi]j n. vt. an 

under garment for the 

lower umbs. 
Draw'ing. 
Draw'ing*room. 
Drawl, 17. 
Drawled, 166. 
Drawl'in^. 
Drawn, 17. 
Dray, 23. 
Dray'age, 169. 
Dray'man. 
Dr^ad (dred), 15. 
Dr'ad'ed. 
Dri^ad'Ail (-Jobt). 
Dn^ad'ing. 

DrPad'nftught (-nawf). 
Dream (drim)y 13. 
Dreamed (drtmd), 166. 
Dr^am'er. 
Dream'ing. 
Dn^arat, 165. 
Dream'y. 
Drear {drBr), 
Drear'i-ness, 169. 
Drear'y, 93. 
Dredge, 15, 46. 
Dredged (drejd)^ 165. 
Dredg'er, 183. 
Dre<lg'ing. 

Drcg'f^ no«8 (H7ftl-),138. 
Dre<r'}^y (fjhtf). 
DrogB (dregz)y n. pi. 16. 
Drench, 15, 44. 
Drenched (drenchi). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Drench'ing. 
Dress, 15, 174. 



Ull, iasin there ; 6baain foot ; 9 a< <» facile ighoMgingoi^tuin this. 



DRESSED 



180 



DULCIFYING 



DresBed(<lr8fO[Dr est, 

DresB^er. 

Dress'iiiff. 

Drlb'ble, IM. 

Drlb'bled (dHfld), 183. 

Drlb'bllng. 

Drib'let. 

Dried, 186. 

Dri'er. 

Drift, 1«. 

Drift'ed. 

Drift'Ing. 

Drill, 16, 172. 

Drilled, 166. 

Drill'infl'. 

Drink (dringk), 16, 64. 

Drink'a-ble, 16i. 

Drink'er. 

Drink'inff. 

Drip, 16. 

Dripped (dript). Note 



Drip'p; 



9d (dfipt), 
. 34 ; 176. 
. plM, 170. 
Drive, ^ 
Driv'el (driv't), 149. 
Driv'elled (driv'td) 

[Driveled, Wb. 

Gd.203.— 5eel77,ULd 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Driv'el-ler, [Drivel- 
er , Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Driv'el-Ung [T)rivel- 

ing, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Driv'en {drtv'n), 149. 
Driv'er. 
Driving. 
Driz'zle, 164. 
Driz'zled (driz'ld), 183. 
Driz'zling. 
DroU, 24, 172. 
Dr6Il'er-T. 
Drom'e-da-iy {drum'-), 

72, 171. 
Drone, 24. 
Droned, 166, 18S. 
Drdn'liur. 
Drdn'idE. 
Droop (10), V. to hang 

down ; to langoish. 

[SeeDmoe, 160.] 
Drooped (aroopt), 166. 
DroopMng. 
Drop, 18. 
Dropped {drcpi) (Note 

C, p. Mi 160, 176) 

[Dropt,203.] 
Drop'ping. 
Drop'si-CAl. 
Drop'sy, 169. 
[Dropt, 203. — See 

Dropped.] 
Prosa, 18, 174. 



DroBs'i-ness, 171, 186. 
DrosB'v. 

Drought (drowt) (162) 
[Drouth, 203.] 

tgr ** Thii fPordii often 
pronoonoed m if written 
drotUk^ but Improperly." 
fTotter. **Our old au- 
thora, perhaps more cor- 
rectly, write and pro- 
nounce drouth." Umart, 

DroughtM-neBB 

(drowtf). 
Drouffht'y (drowfy). 
Droum [Drought, 

208.] 

■a^'Thle to nsnaHy 
written rfroivJU, after the 
Belglc dialect, bat im- 
properiy." Webater. "Thto 
{drmUKl wae the original 
word, and it it etiU used in 
Scotland, and, to a oon- 
aideraMe extent, tn Amer- 
ica." Ooodriek. 

Drove, 24. 

Drov'er. 

Drown, 28. 

Drowned, 166. 

Drown'lng. 

Drowse (drowz), n. A v. 

Drowsed (drowzd), 183. 

DrowsM-ljr (drowz'i-). 

DrowB'i-neBB((f nno^'i-). 

Drows'lng {drowz'-), 

Drows'y (drowz'jf). 

Drub, 22. 

Drubbed (druhd), 176. 

Drub'bing. 

Drudge, 22, 45. 

Drudged, 166, 183. 

Drudg'er. 

Drudg'ing. 

Drudg'er-7, 233, Exo. 

Drug, 22. 

Drugged (drtufd), 176. 

Pnig'ging (ffhing), 138. 

Drug'giBt i-ghitt^. 

Druad (droo'irf), 19. 

Dru-id'ic-al (droo-) 108. 

Dru'id-lsm {droo^id- 

izm)t 136. 
Drum, 22. 

Drummed (drumd), 176. 
Drum'mer. 
Drum'ming. 
Drunk (drungt), 23, 54. 
Drunk'ard, 54, 72. 
Drunk'en (drunffVn), 
Drunk'en-ness [149. 

(drungk'n-), 170. 
Dru-pa'oeous (droo-pa'- 

ihtts). 
Drupe (droop) (19), n. a 

fruit containing a nut 



or stone in which U 
the seed, [fite Droop, 
160.] 

Druse (droot). 

Dnised (droost). 

Dru'ses (droo'zez)tn.pL 

Dm'sy {droo'tjf). 

Dr^, 25. 

Dry'ing. 

Dry'-nurse, 206, Exe. 3. 

Dry'-rot. 

Du'al, 26, 72. 

Du'al-ism (imi), 136. 

Du'al-ist, n. one who 
believes in the doe- 
trine of dualism. [5ee 
DneUist, 148.] 

Dn-al-ist'ic 

Dn-al'i4y, 169. 

Du'Sr-chy (-*y). 

Dub, 22. 

Dubbed (<foM), 176. 

Dub'ber [Dapper, 
203.1 

Dub'blng. 

Du'bi-o&, 78. 

Du'bi-ta-ble, 164. 

Du'cal, 26, 72, 

DQo'at [not duOut, 153.J 

Duoh'ess. 

Dudley. 

Duck, 22, 181. 

Ducked (diiifcl), 166. 

Duck'ing. 

Duct, 22. 

Duc'me, 81, 152. 

Duo-tiri-ty, 109. 

Dudg'eon (dt<;'tm). 

Due7<li<), 26. 

Du'el, 26, 76. 

Du'cl-ling [Dnelinsr, 
Wb. <?d. 203. — ^ 
177, and Note E, p. 
70.] 

Du'el-Ust, n. one who 
fights duels. [ See Du'- 
afifl^ 148.] 

rp u e 1 i B t,Wb.Qd.203.] 

Du-en'na, 170. 

Du'et, 121. 

Duffel [D u f f 1 e , 203.] 

Dug, 22. 

Du-gong', 121. 

Duke (26) \not dook, 
nor look, 127, 134, 141, 
153.T 

DukeMlom. 169. 

Dul-ca-ma'ra, 72. 

Dul'oet. 

Dul-ci-fl-ea'tion. 

Dul'dHed, 186.* 

Dul'cl-fy, 78, 94. 

Dul'ci-fy-ing. 



a, d, i, 0, u, y, long ; ft, 9, 1, 5, ft, f, thort ; S m <n far, a m <n fast, & a< in 



DULCIM£R 



f81 



EARED 



Dnl'd-mer. 

DiiU,22,172. 

Dall'ard. 

Dolly, 60, N. ; 178. 

Dnl'neM h78) [Dall- 
ne«B, Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Dnlee, 22 ; Note D, p. 
37. 

Daar, 25, 03. 

Dnmb idum), 162. 

Dnm'foiind [Dumb- 
fonnd, 208!] 

Dnm'foiind-ed. 

Dom'fonnd-ing. 

Dnmp. 22. 

Duinp'Uag. 

Dnm'py. 

Dan (22), a. of a dark- 
brown color: — r. to 
KoUdt with impor- 
tonity : — n. one who 
dnna. [S^Done, 160.] 

Dttnoe, 22, 39. 

Dnnc'er-y. 

DonMer. 

Done, 26. 

Dnn'fiBh, 206. 

Dong, 22, M. 

Dunged idunQd)^ 166. 

Don'geon (-jun) (171) 
[Donjon, 203.] 

Dang/hill, 200. 

Dnng'ing. 
Ounfi^y. 

Dunnage, 160, 170. 
Dminea (dttfid), 176. 
X>aii'ner. 

thm'nlBh, 170. 
t>u-o-de-oen'nl-al, 170. 
t>a-o-de9'i-mal, 160. 
t>a-o^e9'iDi-fid, 171. 
I>a-o-doe'i-md (160) [pi. 
Da-o-de^'i-mos 
i-m6z), 102.1 
'K>ii'0^ee'n-pIe, 164. 
I>a-o-den'a-ry, 72. 
l>a-o-de'niun. 
rhi-o-Ut'er-al. 
I>op'anble, 164, 183. 
iHipe, 26. 
I>nped idapt). Note C, 

p. 34. 
"Dup'er-y, 233, Exc. 
Ba'pli-eate, 73, 160. 

Dn'pU-cat-ed, 83. 

Da'pU-cat-ing. 

Dn-pli-ca'tlon, 112. 

Da-plJ9'l-ty, 106, 160. 

Dap'per [Dab her, 
203.] 

Do-rarbU'I-ty, 160. 



Da'ra.ble,40,N.; 164. 
Du'ra-bly. 
Du'ranoe. 
Dn-ra'tion, 40, N. 
Dn'reBB [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; dtt-res', Wb. 

(3d. 155.1^[D a r e B se , 

Sm. 203n 
Dnr'lng, 40, N. 
[Durra. 203. — ;9ee 

Doura.] 
Durst, 21. 
[Duse, 203. — 5te 

Deuoe.] 
Dusk, 22. 
Du8kM-ly. 
DuBk'l-neas, 169. 

DUBk'T. 

DuBt (22), ft. earthy or 
other matter In the 
state of a dry pow- 
der : — r. to free Irom 
dust. [iSteDoBt, 160.] 

DuBt'ed. 

DuBt'er. 

DustM-neBB, 160. 

DuBt'ing. 

Dust'y, 03. 

Dutch, 22, 44. 

Du'te-oliB, 160. 

Du'tl-a-ble, 164. 

Du'tl-ful i-JSol). 

Du'tl-ftil-ly i-/Sol). 

Du'ty, 20, 03. 

Dur^m'vir (L.) [pi. Du- 
ttm'ri-H, 108.J 

Du-umM-ral. 

Dn-umM-rate, 73. 

Dwale,23. 

Dw4rf, 17, 171. 

Dwirfed {dwor/t), Note 
C, p. 34. 

Dwarfing. 

Dwell, 15, 172. 

Dwelled (dweld) (166) 
[Dwelt, 203.J 



Dwelt is now more 
eommonly nied than 
dwelled. 

Dwell'er. 

Dwelling. 

Dwelt (1&)[D welled, 
203.] 

Dwln'dle, 164. 

Dwhi'dled {dwin'dld), 
183. 

Dy-ad'ie. 

Dye ((21) (25), n. a col- 
oring liquor. [See 
Die, 160._f 

Dyed (did) (183), part, 
from Dye. [SeeVieAj 
I 160.] 



Dye'taig(183)jiNiH. from 
I>ye.lSee DTing,160.] 



Dy'er (67, N.;, n. one 
whoBe buBlneBB it ib 
to dye cloth, Ac [See 
Dire, 160.1 

Dye'Btuir, 206. 



Dy'hig (184), pari, from 

lHe[SeeVyeUig 
Dy-nam'e-ter, 10£ 



>yeing, 160.] 



Dyn-a-met'ric-al 

Df-namMo, 100. 

D^-nam'io-al, 106. 

Dy-nam'icB. 

Dyn-a-mom'e-ter, 106. 

Df-nas'tic. 

Dyn'as-ty, or Dy^nas-ty 
[din'as-ty. Sm. ; dt^- 
nastpy Wb. Gd. ; dl'- 
nas-tvj or din'a$-ty, 
Wk. Wr. 165.] 

aar* Although Walker, 
in deferonc* to the major- 
ity of orthoSipiati, puts the 
Sronundation di'ntufy 
nt, he Mve that ** anelo- 
gy ii clears fbr the Uet" 
[din'cwry.] 

DyB'crar§y. 160. 

Dys-en-tdr'ic. 

Dys'en-ter-y, 171. 

Dys-pep'Bl-a (L.). 

Dy B-pep'Bv ( 107)[BO Sm. 
Wb. (M.; dU'p^sy, 
Wk. ; dis'pohayt or 
dis-pep'spf Wr. 165.] 

Dys-pep'tlc, 100. 

Dys-pcp'tlc-al, 106. 

DyB'pha-gY. 

DyB-pho'rl-a. 

DyBp-noe'a (-n«'-), 171. 

Dyap-thet'lc. 

DyB*u-ry [so Sm. Wb. 
(M. ; dizh'u-ry, Wk. ; 
dizh'u-ry, or aia'u-ry, 
Wr. 156.] 

K 

fiaoh, 13, 44. 

Ea'ger (e'gnir), a. ar- 
dent, earnest. [See. 
Ea'gre, 160.] 

Ea'gle («'<70, 164, 171. 

Ea'gle-cyed {i'glld), 
206, Exo. 2, 5. 

P^t'glct. 

ILa'gre {I'gur) (164), n. 
a lido Bweltuig above 
another tide. [See Ea- 

^ger.lOO.] [Eger,203.] 

Rar (er), 13. 

eared (frd), 166. 



lidl; 6 M <n there ; Ob <M in foot ; 9 a« tn facile ; gh m gin gOi^<u<ntbia. 



EAEINO 



182 



EDUCATE 



Ktfl (erO, 21, N. 
BM'll-iiesa (er'-\ 171. 
Kar'ly («r'-), 21, N. 
Earn (,ern) (21, N.), v. to 

gain or to deserve by 

labor. [5ecUm, lOO.j 
Earned (emd)^ 166. 
Ear'ncBt ier'-). 
Eam'ing (em'-)* 
Kar'-riug:, 200, Exo. 1. 
Earth (erth)j 21, N. 
Earthed {ertht). Note 

C, p. 34. 
Earth'en (,erth'n)j 149. 
Earth'i-ness {erth'-), 

109, 18(». 
Eartli'ing {erth'-), 
Earth'quake {erth'-). 
Earth-worm {erth'- 

trurm), 200. 
Earth'v («r«4'y). 
fiar'wig^. 
£aae {iz), 13, 47. 
JUsed («£if), 106, 183. 
fia'ael je'zl) (149) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; ««'e/, Wb. 

Gd. 165.] 
fiaac'ment Ciz'-). 
fta»'i-ly {iz'-)t 100. 
Kas'i-nenB (Cj^-). 
iUst. 13. 
Saat'er, 77. 
I^ASt'ern. 
R&Bi'iikg. 
fiast'ward [not Sat'ard, 

142, 163.] 
ftas'y (Jiz'y), 13, 136. 
fiat («0t 13. 
fiat (eO> past tense and 

^iist participle from 

tar ** The preterite [of 
eolju nowaeldom •pclled 
ate I and ea/en fbr the 
participle, which lome 
yean ngo wa« the only 
■anctioned form, la giving 
vay to &K [etj." SutarU 

f.at'a-ble, 104. 

Eat'en («'n), 149. 

ftat'er. 

fiat'ins^. 

Eau de Cologne (Ft.) 

{o'duh-ko-lGn'). 
Eau de vie (Fr.) (o'duh- 

vi'). 
Saves («ra), n. pi. 171. 
ftaves'drop-per («»«'-). 
Ebb, 16, 175. 
Ebbod {ebd), 150. 
Ebb'iu 
Ebb- 



-tide. 



Eb'on, 15, 86. 

Eb'on-T. 

E-bracrte-ate, 73. 

E-bri'e-ty, 76, 160. 

E'bri-o&8. 

E-b&U'len-oy i^^en-)^ 51, 
171. 

E-blill'ient i-imU). 

Eb-ol-U'tion {-lUh'un). 

E-bnr'ne-an, 110, 169. 

Ec'ba-Bis. 

Ec-bat'io. 

Ec'bo-lc f Gr.), 168. 

Ec-cen'tnc [Ex cen- 
tric, 203.1 

Ec-cen'trio-al. 

Ec-cdh-tri9a-ty, 106, 160. 

Ec-chy-mo'sis (-*l-)i 
198. 

Ec-clc-8i-aa'tes (-kle-zi- 
tu'Uz), 171. 

Ec-cle-si^as'tic (-kle-zi- 
as'tik)[90 Sm. Wb. 
Gd. Wr.; ek-kle-zhX- 
at'tikt Wk. 166.] 

Ec-clc-Bi-aa'tic-al (^-kle- 
zi-iu'tik-)t 106. 

Eo-de-si-o-loB^'io-al (kle- 
zi^k^'ik-). 

Eo-cle-si-ol'o-giBt (-zl). 

Ec-cle-sl-ol'o-gy (-«!-)• 

£o-co-prot'ic. 

EcheUm (Fr.) {eth'e- 
Jon). 

Ech'1-nate (df) Tso Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; cAT-na/, or 
e-ki'nat, Wr. 165.] 

E-chi'mis (L.) (4n') [pi. 
E<hi'ni (W'-), 198.] 

Ech'o (e>f «) (52, 171) fpl. 
Ech'oes (ek'Oz)t 192.] 

Eeh'oed (eh'Od), 188. 

E-chom'e-ter (-Jfctwi'-), 
108. 

E-chom'e-try (-kom'-). 

Eclaircissement (Ft.) 
(eklir'sU-mdng) [bo 
Gd. ; ek'lir'sia-mHing, 
Sm. ; ek-Ur'siz-mentt 
Wk. ; e-kUHHa- 

miOng't or e-kUr'siz- 
metUt Wr. 164, 166.] 

Ec-lamp'sy. 

E-clat' (Fr.) («4:to', or 
e-i-to') Ja-fcV, Sm.; 
e-«a', Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 
e-klaufft Wk. 164, 166.] 

Ec-lec'tlc. 

Ec-leo'ti-cism (-»izm). 

EcMegm i-lem)t 102. 

E-cllpse', 75, 171. 

E-clipsed' i-kiip»t'), 183. 

E-clips'ing-. 



»'tio. 
Ec'ieSgne {-log), 87; 

Note D, p. 37. 
Eo-o-nom'ic, or fi-oo- 

nom'ic. 
Eo-o-nom'ic-al, or fi-co- 

nom'io-al [bo Wr. ; 

ek^o-nom'i-cal, Wk. 

Sm. ; i-to-nom^i-cal, 

Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Eo-o-nom'io-al-iy. or 

£-oo-nom'ic-al-ly. 
E-oon'o-mist. 
E-oon'o-mize. 
E-con'o-mized, 183. 
£-con'o-miz-ing. 
E-oon'o-mr, 108, 170. 
Ec-pho-ne'siB (Gr). 
Ec'bU-bt (169, 171) 

[EcBtacy, Exta- 

sy 203.] 
Ec-Btat'ic* [Extatio, 

203.] 
Ec-8tat'icnaL 
Ec'U-BiB. 
Ec-thlip'sig. 
Eo'ty-pal. 
Ec-Q-men'io-al [CE c a - 

m e n i c a 1 , 203.] 
E-da'cioas i-thut), 169. 
E-daf'i-ty. 
EdMa, 170. 
Ed'dled {-did), 99, 186 
Ed'dy, 170. 
Ed'dylnfir, 186. 
E-dem'a-iOBe. 
E-dem'a-tolU. 
E'den, 149. 
E-den'tate. 
E-den'tat-ed. 
Edge, 16, 45. 
Edged (ejd), 150. 
Edge'-rail. 
Edge'-tool. 
Edge'wise (htU) 
Edging, 183. 
EdH ble, 164, 169. 
E'dict, 13. 16. 
Ed-i-fi-ca'tlon. 
Ed'i-noe {-As), 160. 
Ed'i-f led, 99, 186. 
Ed'l-l?, 94. 
Ed'l-ty-ing. 
E'dne {162) r^dile, 

203.] 
Ed'it, 13, 16. 
Ed'it-ed. 
Ed'lt-lng. 

E-dl'tion {^Uh'un), 17L 
Editor, 86, 228. 
Edlto'rial. 
Ed'tt-cate, 45, N.; 73, 

89. 



a, e, i, d, u, f , long ; ft, 6,1, d, &, f , thort ; Has in far, kat in tut, % atin 



EDUCATED 



183 



ELATING 



Ed'u-eat-ed, 183. 

Ed'a-cat-lng. 

Ed-u-ca'Uou, 109. 

Ed-a-ea'tion-iil. 

£d'u-catK>r, 89, 228. 

E-duoe', 26, 75. 

E-duoed' {-d^t')- 

E-du^'ing. 

E-duc'tion. 

E-duc'tor. 

E-dul'oo-rate. 

E-dul'oo-rit-ed, 183. 

£-diil'oa-rat-iii<r. 

£-dul-<x>-ra'tioii. 

E-dul'co-rat-Tvc [so 
Sm. Wr. } €-dul'ka-ra- 
Hv, Wb. Gd. 155. J 

E-dul'oo-ratnor. 

Eel {It), 13. 

Ef-lkoe', 23. 

Ef-fiuse'a-ble, 164, 183. 

Ef-faoed' (-/itst')^ 183. 

Et-fi^'ing. 

Ef-feGt^ n. A v, 

Ef-fect'Ive. 

Ef-fect'or, 88, 228. 

Ef-fect'u-al, 160. 

Ef-fect'u-al-ly. 

Ef-fcct'uate. 

Ef-fect'a-at-ed, 183. 

Ef-fccfunat-ing. 

Ef-fem'ina-cy, 160. 

Ef-femM-nate, a. A v. 
73. 

Ef-fem'i-nit-cd, 183. 

Ef-fem'inat-ing. 

Ef-fer-vcBoe' (-r«Oi ^71. 

Ef-fer-TCsocd' (-«»*')• 

Ef-fer-voa'ccnoe, 171. 

Ef-fer-ven'oent, 

Ef-fer-ves'ci ble, 161. 

Ef-fete', 121. 

£f-fl-ca'cioas (-«AtMr), 
112, 160. 

Ef fl^sa-oy, 169. 

Ef-fl'dence {-Jlsh'erut). 

Ef-fl'cien-cy (Jhh'en- 
tp) [BO Wb. Gd. ; ef- 
/uM'\n-9yj Sm. {See 

Wk. Wr. 156.1 
Ef-fl'cicnt {-fiah'ent). 
Ef-fig'i-08 (L.) {-Ai'i- 

iz), 144. 
Ef ll-gy, 170. 
Ef-flo-rpsoe' (-re»'), 171. 
Ef-flo-resocd' {-rest'), 
Ef-flo-rea'eenoe. 
Ef-llo-reg 'oen-cy . 
Ef-flo rea'ocnt, 171. 
Ef-flo-rea'cin^, 183. 
Ef flu-ence, 105, 169. 
Effla-ent. 



Ef-fln'rl-um (L.) [pi. 

£f-fla'vi-a, 108.] 
Efflux. 
Ef-fluxMon {fluk'shun), 

46, Note 1. 
Effort, 135. 
Ef-front'er-y (-/H«n/'-)i 

233, Exo. 
Ef-fal'genoe. 
Ef-fui'gent. 
Kf-Aiae' {-mz'). 
Ef-ftiaed^ {-nizd'), 183. 
Ef-iuB'ing {fiz'-). 
Ef-fti'Blon {-zhun). 
Ef-fu'alve, 84. 
Eft, 15. 
E'ger {-gur) [E av r e , 

203. — See EagreTl 
E-gesVlon {•yun)^ 51. 
Egg, 15, 175. 
Eglantine, or Eg'lan- 

tlnefBoWr.Gd.; eg>- 

lan-tlnj Sm.: eg'lan- 

«n, wk. 156.1 
E'go ism {-izmh 133. 
E'go-iat. 
E'go-tism, or Eff'o- 

tism {-tizm) [so W r. ; 

e'gotiznit Wk. Wb. 

Grd. } eg'o-tizm, Sm.] 

tar Though Walker, in 
deference to all the author- 
ities of his time, pro- 
nounces this word ^go- 
(tsm, he say •, that, by anal- 
ogy. It ought to be pro- 
nounced effotizm. 

E'go-tigt. or Eg'o-tfst. 
fi-go-tist'lc, or Eg-o- 

tist'ic, 100. 
£-go-ti8t'io-al, or Eg-o- 

tiRt'ic-al, 108. 
E-greViotis (e-gre'j^u) 

[BO Wr. Wb. Gd. ; e- 

gre'H-uSt Wk. Sm. 

156.] 
E'grcBS, 76. 
E'gret. 

E-grp'tian {-jip'shan). 
Ki'der-down {Vdur-). 
Ei'dcr-duck {Vdur). 
Eigbt {at) (162;, a. ic n. 

twice four. (See Ate, 

160.J 
Eigh'ieen i&fUn). 

tar ** When we are 
eoontinff, f AiKteen, /owr'- 
feen, firtem, Ac. the Ibr- 
mer syllable will be ac- 
cented t but. In uslntf one 
of the words separatelr. ei- 
ther the last syllable will b« 
accented, or each ayllable 



will be prononnced •• a 
distinct word.** 3marL 

Eigh'teenth {a'Uivth). 
Eight'fold {Ht'-), 162. 
Eighth {Utth). 

tar In this word, the 
f presents the singular 
•nonaaly of strving ooth 
as the last lett4!r in tights 
and as the first letter in 
the digraph th. 

Eigh'ti-eth (fl'«-), 171. 
Eight'score («/'-)» 200. 
Eigh'ty {H'ty), 171. 
Eij^uc (a'»«, or d/t) [>i) 

Wr. i a'nii Sm. i fiii, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Ei'thcr {I'tJiur) [bo 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; «'««r, 

or Vtkur^ Gd. 155.J 



With regnrd to the 
pronuDciatiiin of the 
words either and tteiiAer, 
Walker remarks: "Anal- 
ofy, without hesitation, 
gives the diphthong the 
souud of long open e 
rather thm that of i;" 
and Smart says; "Usace, 
as well as regularity, n- 
Tors the sound e in 
these two words.'* 

E-Jao'n-late, 73, 89. 

E- ac'u-lat-«d, 183. 

E-jac'uUt-ing. 

E-lac-u-ia'tion. 

E; ac'u-la-to-ry, 86. 

E- ect', 15, 76. 

E- cct'ed. 

E-ject'Ing. 

E-jec'tlon. 

E-Jcct'ment. 

E Jcct'or, 88, 228. 

Kke, V, 

Eked («j»), Note C, p. 

34 
ek'i'ng, 183. 

E-lab'o-ratc, a. A v. 73. 
E-lab'o-rat-ed, 183. 
E-lab'o-rat-(ug. 
E-lab-o-ra'tlon. 
E-lab'o-rat or. 
E-UMn [so Sm. Gd. ; e- 

mn', or e-ld'inj Wr. 

155.] 
E-lapae'. 10. 
E-lapBed' {-lapnV). 
E-laps'ing, 183. 
E-laB'tio. 
E-lasti^'i-ty, 160. 
Elate', 23. 
£ lilt'cd, 183. 
E-lat'cr. 
Elat'ing. 



iall i 6 a« in there i (SiiOBin foot j^fuin facile ; gh a< g in go ; th m f n this. 



ELATION 

E-U'tion. 

El'bow, 16, 24. 

£l'bdwed (■blid)^ 188. 

El'bdw-inff. 

KFder, a. & n. 

KFdest. 

£l-Do-rSMo [so Sm. 

Wr. ; el-d<hr&'dOt Gd. 

155.] 
El-e-cam-pane', 122. 
Elect', a. & n. 
E lect'ed. 
E-lect'lng. 
E-lec'tiou. 
E Icc-tion-eer', 100. 
K-lec-Uoii-eered' (-«rd')» 

165. 
E-lec-tion-oer'inff. 
E-iect'lve. 
E-lect'or, 88, 228. 
Elcct'oral. 
E-lect'o-rate. 
E-kct o'rl-al. 
E-lec'trlc, 109. 
E-lec'tric-al, 108. 
E lec'tric-al-Iy. 
E-lcG-trl'Gian {4ri$h'' 

an). 
E-Iee-tri5'i-ty, 171. 
E-loc'tri-f i-«-ble, 164. 
E-lec-tri-fY-ca'tion. 
E-lcc'tri-fied, 99, 186. 
E-loc'tri-fy, 94, 109. 
E Icc'tri-ly-lng. 
E-lec'tro-chem 'i B-try 

(-kern'-, or -kim'-), 224. 
E-iec'tro-dy-nam'ic8. 
E-lco-trol'y-Bl8. 
E-lec'tro-lyte. 
E-lec-tro-lyt'ic. 
E-lec'tro-lyz-a-ble, 164. 
E-lec'tro-lyze, 171. 
E-loc'tro-lyzed, 183. 
E lec'tro-lyz-ing. 
E-lec'tro-mag'net, 224. 
E-lec'tro-mag'-nct'lc. 
E-Iec'tro-imag'net-ism 

(-izm). 
E-lec-troin'e-ter, 108. 
E-lec'tro-mo ttve. 
E-lec'tro-mo'tor. 
K-lec'tro-neg'a-tlve. 
E-lec troph'o-ru8 [pi. 

E-lec-troph'o ri, 198." 



E-lcc'tro-pliit'lng. 
E-lec'tro-po'lar. 
E-leo'tro-pos'i tlve 



] 



(-poz'-). 
K-lc 



E-lec'tro-8cope. 
E-lec'tro-type, n. & v, 
E-lec'tro-tvped i-tlpt). 
E-lcc'tro-typ-ing, 183. 
E-Iect'u-a-ry, 72, 89. 



184 

El-^e-moB'y-na-ry (e/i- 

moz'-), 72, 171. 
Ere-ganoe, 169. 
El'e-gant. 
El-e-gi'ao, or E-le'gi-ao 

(108) [el-€-jVak, Wk. 

Sm. Wr.; e-Wji-ak, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 

war **El'«-oi'ae U uioth- 
•r exceptioD [to the rule in 
I 108] from the undue 
weight of claMieal author- 
ity." Smart. — " E-legi- 
ae {• the senerttl pronunci- 
Btion or thii countiy 
[U. S.]." Ooodrieh, 

El'o-gist, 45. 
El'e-gy, 169, 170. 
El'e ment, 169. 
El-e-ment'al. 
El-«-mcnt'al-ly, 170. 
El-e-ment'a-rr, 72. 
El'e-ml. 
E-lcnoh' i-lmgk') [so 

Sm. ; e-tenJt', Wb. 

Gd. : e-lengk', or e- 

Unch'f Wr. 155.] 
E-lench'ic-al {-UrngV-). 
El'e-phant, 169. 
El-e-phan-tl'aHBis. 
El-e-phant'Ine, 152. 
Erc-phant-oid fso Wr. ; 

el-e-phan-tauP, Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
El-e-phant-oid'al. 
El-eu-sin'i-an {^u-tin'-). 
El'e-vate, 73. 
£l'evat-ed, 183. 
El'c-vat-ing. 
El-e-va'tion. 
El'e-vat-or, 88, 228. 
El'e-vat-o-ry, 86. 
E-lev'en (elev'n) (149) 

[not lev'n, I53.J 
E-lev'enth (e-lev'nth). 
Elf (16) fpl. Elves 

(e/r«), 193.J 
Elfin. 
Elfish. 
E-lic'lt, 171. 
Eli9'it-€d. 
E-lic'it-ing. 
E-lide'. 
E-lid'ed, 183. 
E-lid'ing. 
El-i-gi-bll'i-ty, 171. 
El'i-gi-ble, 108, 164. 
El'i-gi-bly. 
E-Um'i-nate. 
E Um'1-nat-ed, 183. 
E-llm'i-nat-ing. 
E-llm-i-na'tion. 
El-i-qua'tion. 
E-lI'sion i-lizh'un). 



ELUTRIAIING 

^UU (Ft.) iOrUr), 
E-lix'ir, 85. 
E-liz'a-beth-on [so Sm. 

Wr. i e-Uz-a^h'Mf 

Wb. (M. 155.] [not e- 

liza-be'than, 153.] 
Elk, 16. 
£11, 15, 172. 
El-Itpse', 171. 
£1 lip'sis (L.) [pi. El- 

lipases (-«fo), 198.] 
El-Iip'soid. 
EMip-Boid'al. 
£1 Up'tic, 100. 
El-lip'tic-al, 106. 
El-lip'ticHa-ly. 
EI-Up ti9'i-ty, 171. 
Elm, 15, 133. 
EVmen. 
Elm'y, 16, 93. 
£l-o-ca'tion (119, 170) 

[See Allocation, 148.] 
El-o-cu'tlon-a-ry, 72. 
El-o-cu'tion-ist. 
t-loge {Tr.) (a-tazh'). 
E-lon'gate (-/cm^'-), M. 
E-lon'gat-ed (-Unuf' ). 
£-loii'gat-ing (-lono*). 
£-lon-ga'tion {e-hma- 

ga'shun) [so Sm. Wd. 

Gd. t el-img-ga'shun, 

Wk. Wr. 166.] 
Elope', 24. 
Eloped' (4«pl'). Note G, 

p. 34. 
E-I5p'i'ng, 183. 
E-lope'ment, 185. 
E'lops. 

El'o-quenoe, 170. 
El'o-quent, 34. 
£l8e (e2»), Note D, p. 

.37. 
ElRc'wh6re ids'whlr). 
£-lu'ci-date. 
£-lu'ci-dat-ed, 183. 
E-lu'd-dit-ing. 
£-lu-d-da'tioii, 112. 
E-la'ci-dat-Ire, 84. 
E-lu'ci-dat-or. 
E-Iu'd-dit-o-ry, 86. 
Elude', 26. 
E-lnd'ed, 183. 
£ liid'i-ble, 164, 160. 
E-lud'ing. 
£-lu'Bion (-zhun).,n. act 

of eluding. [Seemn- 

sion, 148.J 
E-lu'sTve. 
E-lu'so-ri-ness. 
E-lu'so-ry. 
E-lu'tri-ate, 73. 
E-lu'trl-at-ed, 183. 
E-lu'tri-at-ing. 



a, S, i, 6, n, y, long ; ft, £, I, 0, Q, fj short i 'Acts in Tar, ktuin fast, keu in 



UTRIATION 



185 



EMBRYOLOGY 




-tri-a'tion. 
ielvz)^ pi. of Ey. 

~'si-an {e-Uzh'i-an) 
V ^fco Wk. Sm. Wr.j 
^-^izA'yan, Gd. 165.] 

V^o Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

'^-iizh'yumy Gd. 155.] 

C r.. pi. E-ly>si-a 

%^-lizh'l^)\ En^. pi. 

*2-15^'»l-um8 {e-tizh'i- 

^^-^mz), 198.] 

^-lyt'ri-form, lfi9. 

^I'y^tron [pi. El'y-tra, 

^'y-trum, or E Iv'- 
tmisk [so Wr. ; el'i- 
trtcm, Gd. ; eWtrumy 
Sm.l [pi. El'y-tra, or 
E-ly'tra, 188.J 
El'ze-vlr. 

£-inA'ci-ato (-<Al-aO [so 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; e^ma'- 
shAt, Wb. Gd. 155.1 
E ma'ci at-ed (sM-da). 
E-ma'ci-at-iiig(-Ml M-). 
£-ma-ciVtion {-shl-). 
Em'a-nant' (109), a. 
flowing from. [See 
Eminent, 148.] 
Em'a-nate, 169, 171. 
Em'a-nat-ed, 183. 
Em'a-nat-ing. 
Em-a-na'tion. 
Em'a-nat-Ive [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Ga.; em'a- 
na-ftv, Wk. 155.] 
E-man'd-pate, 73. 
E-man'ci-pat-«d, 183. 
E-man'd-pat-ing. 
E-man-ci-pa'tion. 
E-man'ci-pat-or. 
E-mar'gi-nate, v. A a. 
E mar'gi-nat-ed. 
E-mar'gi-nat-ing. 
£-mar-gi-na'tion, 112. 
E-mas'co-late. 
H-mas'cu-lat-ed. 
fi-maa'cu-lat-ing. 
^mas-ca-la'tion. 
Elm -bale'. 
Em-baled', 166, 183. 
Bm-bal'ing-. 
lim-biUm' (-bdm'), 162. 
Em balmed' (^dimi')- 
Em-balm'er {-bibn'-). 
Em-bJUm'ing (-bitm'-). 
Em-bank'ment {em- 
hangf-) Tlmbank- 
ment,2(».] 
[ E m b a r c a t i o n , 2a3. 
— See Embarkation.] 
^n-bar'go, n. & v. [pi. 



of ft. Em-bar'flToes 
(-y0«),192.] [Imtar- 
go,203.J 

Em-bar'goed (-gOd)t\8S. 

Em-bar'eo-ing. 

Em-barlr [I m bark, 
203.] 

Embarked' {-barkt'). 

Em-bark'ing. 

£m-bark-a'uou [ E m - 
bar cat ion, 203.] 

Em-b&r'rass, 170. 

Em-b&r'ra8Bcd {-rast). 

Em-b&r'raB»-ing. 

Em-b&r'rass-ment. 

Em-bas'sa-dor [Am- 
bassador, 203. — See 
Note under Ambassa- 
dor.] 

Em'bas-sy. 

Em-bat'tle, 161. 

Em-bat'tled {-bat'ld), 
183. 

Em-bat'tUng. 

Em-bed'rimbed,203.] 

Em-bed'ded, 176. 

Em-berl'ding. 

Em-bel'liRh, 170. 

Em-bel'liBhed i-lishi). 

Em-bel'Usli-ing. 

Em-bel ' li sh-ment. 

Em'bers i-burz)j n.pl, 

Em'ber-weck. 

Em-bez'zle, 164. 

£m-bez'zled i-bez'ld), 
183. 

Em-bez'zle-ment. 

Em-bez'zler. 

Em-bez'zling. 

[Embitter, 203.— 
See Imbitter.] 

Em-blaze'. 

Em -blazed', 183. 

£m-blaz'ing. 

Em-bla'zou (-bla'zn)^ 
149. 

Em-bla'zoned (-bla'znd) 

Em-bla'zon-er {-bla'zn-) 

Em-bla'zon-ing (-6to'- 
zn). 

Em-bla'zon-ry(-6io'«»-) 

Em'blem, 15, 76. 

£m-blem-at'ic, 109. 

Em-blem-at'ic-al, 106. 

Em-blem-at'io-ai-ly. 

Em'blc-ments {em'bl-), 

£m-bo*d'Ted (-W), 99. 
Em-bod' i-er. 
Em-bod'i-ment, 160. 
Em-bod'y, 93. 
Em-bod'y-ing. [149. 
Em-b61d'en (-ftOW'n), 



Em-bdld'ened(-e>dM'm/) 
Em-bold'en-ing {bdld'- 

Em'bo-lism {-lizm\ 136. 
Em-bo-Us'mal ( iiz^). 
Em-bo-Us'mic (-/«'-}. 
Em'bo-lus [pi. Em'bo- 

11, 198.] 
Embonpoint' (Fr.) 

( Una-bong-pw&ng' ) . 
[Eraborder, 203.— 

See Imborder.] 
[£ m b o s o m , 203.— 5ee 

Imbosom.] 
Em-boss', 18, 171. 
Em-bossed' {-bo8t>)j\G5 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Em-boss' lug. 
Em-boss'ment. 
Embouchure' (Fr.) 

(ctng-boo-sJioor'). 
Em-W) w'el [ I m b o w - 

el, 203.1 
Em-bow'elledr -€W)( 150) 

[Emboweled, Wb. 

Gd. 203.— -See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Em-bow'el-ler [ E m - 

boweler, Wb. Gd. 

203.] 
Em-bow'el-Ung TE m - 

boweling, Wd.(M. 

203.] 
Em-bow'el-ment. 
Em-brace', 23. 
£m-braced'(-6rd0t'),lG& 
Em-brag'er, 183. 
Em-bra5'er-y. 
Em-brac'ing. 
Em-bra'sure (-«Aflr, or 

zhur) [em-bra' zhtir, 

Wk. Gd.; em-bra-zQr', 

Sm. ; em-bra-zhoor' ^ 

or em-bra' zhur^ Wr. 

155.] 
Em'bro-cate, 73. 
Em'bro-cat-ed, 183. 
Era'bro-eat-ing. 
Em-bro-ca'tion. 
Em-broid'er. 
Em-broid'ered (-wrrf), 

150, 165. 
Em-broid'er-er, 77. 
Em-broid'cr-ing. 
Em-broid'er-y, 171. 
Em-broil', 27. 
Em broiled', 165. 
Em-broil'lng. 
Em-broil'racnt. 
Em'bry-6, 1(50, 171 [pi. 

Em'bry-os (-«?), 192.] 
Em-bry-og'ra-phy, 108. 
Em-bry-oPo-gy, lOR. 



fall; 6a«<» there} dbcu In foot; ^axtnfitudle; gh a« g <n go ; th e» in thia 

16* 



EMBRYONATE 



186 



ENACTOR 



Ein'bry-o-iiate, a. 
Em'bry-o-n«t-ed. 
Km-bry-on'ic, 109. 
Km-bry-ot'lc. 
Km-brf-ot'o-my, 106. 
[Eracer, 203. — 5ee 

Emir.l 
E-mends 15. 
E-mcnd'alti (-olz), n. pi. 
Eni-en-da'tioo. 
Em'en-dat-or. 
E-mend'a-to-ry, 86. 
E-mend'cd. 
E-mend'ing. 
Eni'er-ald, 170, 171. 
E-mor;re', 21, N. 
E-inerj^wl', 105. 
E-nier*(^'cnoo (-merj'-). 
E-meiv'ou-cy (-meo'-), 

leu, 183. 
E-merg'ent (-tnerj'-), 
E-mtw'ln^ l-merj'-). 
E-mi^rit-e<l. 
E-mlr'i-ttu (L.)^ a. & n. 

[pi. of n. a-tiUr't-a, 

108.] 
Em'er-oda {-odz). 
Em'er-oida. 



The two prvc«ding 
woitla ore corrupted from 
Htmorrhoid*. * 

E-mer'Rion (21, N.), n. 

act of enierjfing. [See 

Immersiou, 118.] 
Em'er-y, 93, 170. 
K-met'fe. 
E-met'ic-al. 
K-mct'ie al Iv. 
Em'e-tliic (15-^) [Eme- 

tin,2o:L] 
E'mcu (md) [Emew, 

Emu, 20.3.] 
kmeute (Fr.) («-*»«<')• 
Em'i cant. 
Era'i-^rant, lOQ. 
Em'i jp-atc, 73. 
Em'i grat od, 183. 
Em'i-gTut ing. 
Em-i gra'tiou. 
Em'i nenoc, 100. 
Em'i-nen-cy. 
Em'i-nent, a. conspicn- 

ouB. [See Emanant, 

li8.] 
E'mir [E m e e Tie-mir')^ 

203.] 
Bm'is-aa-ry, 72, 170. 
E-mis'sion {^-mith'un). 
E-mia'slvc, 84. 
Emit', 10. 
E-mit'tod, 170. 
E-mlt'tent. 
E-mit'ting. 



Em'met, 170. 

Em-ol-leM'ocnoe, 171. 

E-mol'Uate i-mol'yati 
[so Sm. ; e^mol'ut-Mj 
Wr. ; e-moVU-tt, Wb. 
Gd. 155.] 

E-mol'liat-ed i-mal'yllt) 

E-mol'liat-iiig {-mol'- 

E-mol'lient (•mol'pent) 
[80 Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 
e-mol'U-€nty Wb. Gd. 
155.1 

E-moFa-ment. 89. 

E-mol-u-ment'al. 

E-mo'tion. 

E-mo'tion-«l. 

E-mo'tlve, 84. 

Em-pale' 23. 

Em-paled', 183. 

Em-pale'mcnt. 

Em-pal'ing. 

Em-pan'ef [Empan- 
nel, Impanel, 
Impannel, 201, 
203.J 

Em-pan'elled (-dd) 
[Empaunelcd, 
Wb.Gd.203.— 5<!€l77, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

£m-pan'el-ling [ E m - 
panneling, Wb. 
Gd. 203.J 

Em-paBm'(7>(urm'), 136, 

Em'per-or, 171. 

Em'plia-sis [pi. £m'- 
pha-aes (-«2c), 198.] 

Em'pha-aize, 202. 

Em'pha-Bized, 183. 

Em'pha-aiz-ing. 

Em-phat'ic, 1(». 

£m-phat'io-al. 

Era phy-se'ma. 

Em phy-aem'a-tofiB. 

Em'pire. 

Em-pTr'ic, or Em'pTr-Ios 
n. [so Wr. ; em-plr*- 
ikt Sm. ; cmjwlr-u:, or 
mplr'Or, Wk. Gd. 
155.1 

Em-pir'lc, a. 109. 

£m-pir'ic-al, a, unwar- 
ranted by science. [5ec 
Empyric4il, 160.1 

p:m-plr'i-ci8m (-mm). 

Em-plr'l-cist, 

Em-plas'tic. 

Em-ploy', 27. 

Employi {FT.)(<ma-pM- 
o', or em-plot-a'\ 154. 

Em-ployed', 166, 187. 

Em-ploy'er. 

Em-ploy'ing. 



Em-ploy'ment. 

Em po'ri-um (L.) [L. 

pi. Em-po'ri-a ; Eiig. 

pi. Em-pc'ri-ums 

{-umz)y 198.1 
Em-pov'er-ian [I m - 

poyeriBh,208.J 
Em-poy'er-ished (-mJU). 
Em-poT'er-iah-cr. 
Em-pov'er-iah-ing. 
Em-pov'er-iah-ment. 
£m-pow'er [I m pow- 
er, 203.] 
£m-pow'ered(.«rrf)tl50. 
Em -po w'er-ink. 
Em'presB. ^ 
Emp'tled {em'tid)^ 162. 
Emp'ti-nesB {em'-). 
Emp'ty ^em'ty), 93, 162. 
Emp'ty-injj {em'ty). 
Emp'ty-lnga (em'ty- 

ingz), n. pi. [not em'- 

tings, 153.] 
Em-pur'ple, 164. 
Em-pur'pled {-pur'pid). 
Em-por'pling. 
Em-py-e^ma. 
Em-pyr'e-ah 
£m-py-re'an, or Em- 

pyr'e-an ( 1 10) [bo Wk. 

Wr.; twi-j^y-rraWtSm. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Em-py-ren'ma {-roo^-). 
Em-py-reu-mat'ic 

{-roo-). 
Em-py-rCQ-mat'ic-al 

{-TOO-). 

£m-pyr'ic-al, a. pertain- 
ing to combustion. 
[Set Empirical, 160.] 

[£mu, 203.— 5te 
Emeu.] 

Em'u-late, 73, 89. 

Em'u-lat-ed. 

Em'u-lat-ing. 

Em-u-la'tion, 112. 

Em'u-lat-Ive [so Wr.; 
em'u-la4iv^ Wb. Od. 
155.] 

£m'u-lat-or. 

E-mul'gent. 

Em'u-loQs, 106. 

E-mul'sion. 

£-mul'aIvc, &I, 109. 

£-munc'to-ry(-m«n0i'-] 

En-a'ble. 164. 

En-a'blcd {-a'bld). 

En-a'bling, 183. 

£n-act', 10. 

En-act'ed. 

En-act'ing. 

En-act'ment. 

En-act'or, 86, 228. 



a, e, i, d, Ut y, long ; A, £, I, d, Q, ft short , Has in fkr, katin fast, ft oi In 



ENALLAGE 



187 



ENDOBSEO 



L'la-ge(L.)(ld3)[M 
Sm. ¥rb. Gd. ; en-cU'' 
la-je^ Wk. Wr. 165.] 
Kn-aai'el. 

SD-4un'el-lar, a. resem- 
bUng enamel. [See 
Eauneller, 100.] [£ n - 
• melar, Wb. Gd. 
203.1 

Xift-«m'elled (-eld) [En- 
ameled, Wb. Gd. 
203. ^ See 177 j and 
Note E, p. 70.] 

En-am'eMer,n.one who 
enamels. [See Enam- 
elar, IGOJ [Enam- 
eler, Wb. Gd. 203.] 

£n-am'el-llng [ E n a m - 
eling, Wb.Gd.203.] 

En-am'or [E n a m o u r , 
8m. 199.1 

En-am'ored ('Urd)t iSO. 

En-am'or-big. 

Eo-anthe'sifl. 

En-armcd' (-armd')i a. 

ED-ar-thro'BJs. 

En-cage' (23) [I n - 
cage. 201, 203.] 

£n-c^g:edS 183. 

Kn-cag'ing (-!;«/-)• 

En-camp', 10. 

£ocamped' {-kampV). 

En-oamp'ing. 

£Q-camp'ment. 

[Encase, 201, 203.— 
See Incase.] 

^-cavc'. 
Cn-csved', 183. 
i)a-cav'ing. [sant^). 
^-i^Hnte (Ft.) {Ong- 
^-ce-pbal'lc 
^n-ohafe'. 
^o-chafed' (-cA«/»'). 
ICn -charing, 183. 
^n-chain', 23. 
Itln^hained', 166. 
Ign -chain Mng. 
:^:n-clutnt', 131. 
^n-<;hant'ed. 
li^n-cbant'er. 
Kn-chant'ing. 
£n-chant'ment. 
Kn-chant'ress. 
£n-cbase' (23) [In- 

cbase, 201,203.1 
Kn-chased' {-chiUt'). 
En-chas'ing. 
Kn-ehi-rida-on Jen-lSl-) 
(171)[soWr.Wb.Gd.; 
eng-klrid'i-im, Sm. 
156.] 



En-cho'ri-al (-W-), 171. 

En-cir'de ( 154) [ I n cl r- 
cle,201, 20:J.J 

En-cir'cled {sir'kld). 

En-cir'cling. 

[E n cl a 8 p , 201, 203. — 
See luclasp.] 

En-clit'ic, 109. 

En-cUt'ic-al, 106. 

Ein-clit'ic-al-ly. 

En-close' {-khz') [In- 
close, 201, 203. J 

tg^ Both fbrmi emelo»e 
and imclome are in good 
UM. Walker, Smart, and 
Worceater, prefer the flrtt: 
Wcbatcr and Goodrich the 



En-closed' (-««^d'),183. 
En-clos'ing {-kl6z'-). 
En-clos'ure (-kUz'\fur) 

[Inclosnre, 201, 

203.1 
En-co^ml-ast. 160. 
En-co-mi -ast'ic, 100. 
En-co-mi-ast'ic-al, 108. 
En^x>'mi-am (L.) (169) 

fL. pi. En-co'mira ; 

Eng. pi. En-co'mi- 

ums (-umz)f 198.] 
En-com'pasB (-/rum'-), 

171. 
En-com'passed {-kum'- 

past). 
En-com'pass-ing 



('k-um'-). 
(I'r. 



)iitng-k6r'), 



Encore 

n. & r. 
En-cored' {-Ung-kOrd'). 
£n-cor'ing \dng-k6r'-), 
En-coun'ter. 
En-coun'tered, 150. 
En-ooun'ter-ing. 
En-oofir'age, 70. 
En-oofir'agcd, 106. 
En-cottr'age-ment. 
En-colir'a-gcr, 183. 
En-cofir'a-ging. 
En-crl'nal, 72. 
En-cri'nic, 109. 
En-crin'it-al. 
En'cri-nite, 152, 160. 
En-cr6ach' (24, 44) [In- 

oroach, 203.] 
En-croached' (-At«cW), 

166. 
En-crdach'lng. 
En-crdach'mcnt. 
[E n c ru s t , 201, 203. — 

See Incrust.] 
En-cum'ber. 
En-cum'bered (-burd), 

150. 



En-cum'ber-lng. 
En-cum'brance (160) 
rin oumbrance, 

En-cyc'lic-al, 171. 
En-cy-clo-pae'di-a, 
£n-cy-clo-pe'di-a. 



_ Both modes of ipell- 
ing thU word are in good 
use. The former it pre- 
ferred by Worcegter; the 
latter by Walker. Smart, 
We hater, and Goodrich. 

En-cy-clo-pe'di-an. 
En-cy-cloped'lc. 
En-cy clo-ped'io-al, 
En-cy -cl o -pe'dist. 
En-cyst'ed, 171. 
End. 15. 
En-aan'gcr. 
En-dau'gered (-Jurd), 

150. 
En-dan'gcr-ing. 
En-dear, 13. 
En-deared', 166. 
£n-dear'ing. 
En-dear'ment. 
En-deav'or (-dev'ur) 

[Endeavour, Sm. 

199, 203.] 
En-dCar'ored (dev'urd). 
En-dSav'or-ing (-dev'- 
ur-). 
En-dec'a-gon. 
End'ed. 

En-deic'tlo (-dtk'-), 171. 
En-demMc, 109, 170. 
En-dem'ic-al, 108. 
[Endict, 201, 203.~ 

See Indict.] 
End'ing. 
[Endite, 201, 203.— 

See Indite.] 
En'dlve (M) [not en'- 

div, 153.] 
En'do-gen. 

En-dog'en-ofis (-dq}'-). 
En-do-phyriofis, or En- 

doph'yl-loDH [See Ad- 

enophyllous.j 
En-dorse' [Indorse, 

201, 203.J 



The two forma en- 
dorm and inttorfe, and 
their corresponding deriv- 
ative)!, are in good use. 
Walker gives only endorw, 
and Smart only imfurM-. 
Webster and Goodrich pre- 
frr indorte. Worcester na« 
both fonnsi but he indi- 
cates no preftrence for ei- 
ther. 

En-dorBed'(-rforrt'),18.3. 



fall, ifuinth&rei Ob m <n foot ; 9 m m facile j gb m g tn go ; t]^ <u in this 



ENDORSER 



188 



ENRAGED 



Kn-don'cr [Indors- 

er,aoi,ao3.] 

En-dorH'ing. 

Kn -dorse' meat fin. 

dor semen t, 203.J 
En'dos-moiie [so Sm. 

Gd ;in-€lot-m6g',Wr. 

155.] 
En'do-sperm. 
En'do-stome. 
Endow', 2S. 
En-dowed', 106. 
En-dow'cr. 
En dow'ment. 
Endue', aft. 
En-dued', 165, 183. 
En-du'ing. 
En-dur'a-ble, 164. 
En-dur'auoe, 183. 
En-dure'. 
En-dured', 183. 
En-dur'ing'. 
E-nc'id, or E'ne-ld Fso 

Wr. ; «-ne'W, Sm. Gd. 

165.] [iEneid,203.J 
£-ne'ma [bo Sra. Wb. 

Gd.; en'e-ma, Wr.165.1 

tg^ ** The ctutomary 
pronunciation ia aa ipven 
fe-ne'ina]: Greek qoantitr 
would nKiuire cn'e-mo." 
Soiart, 

En'e-my, 170. 
En-cr-jfct'lc, 45, 109. 
En-er-g-et'ic-al, 106. 
En-er-ffct'lc-al-Iy. 
Eu'er-glxe. 
En'cr prized, 183. 
Eu'er-jfiz-ing. 
En'er-ury, 170. 
E-ncrv^ate (21, N.) [not 

en'cr-vat, 153.1 
E-nerv'atH?.!, 183. 
Enerv'at-ing. 
En-er-va'tlon. 
En-fee'ble, 164. 
En-fee'bled (-/e'6W),lS3. 
En-fee'bliii'C- 
En-feoir i/Sfh 171. 



W'lkcr'i pronun- 
ciation if tH-fif'\ out, un- 
der /coif, he says that it 
ought to have l»evn tn-f^'. 

En-fr«offed' {-fefV). 
En-f^ofTinu: (-/ef-). 
En-f^oiTmeut (-/e/-). 
£n-fl-Iade', n. & v. [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

onaH-l(kd\ Sm. 165.) 
En-rt irtd'cd, 183. 
Kn-fl-lad'ing. 
[Enfold, 203. — 5e« 

Infold.] 



fire, 



En-fbroe', 24. 

En forced' (>««'). 160, 

183. Note C, p 34. 
En foroe'ment, 186. 
En fbr^'er. 
En for^'inff. 
En fran'cldse i<Mz) 

(166)[In franchise, 

201, 203.1 
En-fk-an'culsed {-chUd). 
En-fhin'chlse-ment. 
£n-fl*an'chTs-ing(-ciAU) 
En-gage', 23. 
En-gaged', 183. 
En-gage'ment 
En-gag'ing (-y^*'-)- 
En-gen'dcr. [160. 

En-gen'dered {-durd), 
En-gen'der-ing. 
En'glne i4in) (82, 162) 

[not en'Jin, 153.] 
En-gi-neer', 122, 109. 
En-gl-neer'ing. 
En'glne-ry [wA en'jtn- 

er-T, 146, 153.] 
En-glrd' {-gh%rd'\ 138. 
En-glrd'cd (-ghird'-). 
En-gird'ing {-ghird'-), 
Kn-glrt' (-ghirf), 138. 
Ku'gUsh (W), 54. 
En-gorge' [ I n g o r 

201, 20Ci.1 
En-gorged', 166, 183. 
En gorge'ment, 185. 
En-gorging. 
[ En graft, 201, 208.— 

See Ingraft.] 
En-graiiS 23. 
Enij^railed', 165. 
En-grail'lng. 
En-graiI'ment. 
En-grain' [Ingrain, 

201, 203.1 
En-grained', 166. 
£n-grain'ing. 
En-grave', Zi, 
En-graved', 166, 188. 
En-grav'er. 
En-grav'inff. 
En-gross', 24. 
En -grossed' {-grUtt'). 
En-grdss'ing. 
En-grdss'mont. 
[Engulf, 201, 208.— 

See Ingulf.] 
Eu-hance', 131. 
En-hanoed' i-hdnst'). 
En-hance'ment. 
En-han^'ing. 
En-har-mon'ic. 
En-har-mon'io-al. 
E-nig'ma, 72. 
E-nig-mat'ic, 109. 



E-nig mat'lo^d, 108. 

E-nig'ma-Uit. 

En-Join' (27) [Injoin. 
201, 203.1 

En-1oind% 166. 

£n- oln'ing. 

En-, oy', 27. 

En- 07'a-ble, 164. 

En- oyed', 166, 188 

En- oy'ing. 

En-joy'ment. 

£n-kin'dle, 164. [183. 

En kin'dled {-Hn'dld), 

£n-kin'dllng. 

En-lard' (U) [Inlard, 
201, 203.] 

En-lard'ed. 

En-lard'ing. 

En-iarge' (11) [In- 
large, 201,208.1 

En-iarged', 166, 183. 

£n-large'ment, 185. 

En-larg'ing (-Uirj'-). 

£u-light'en (-iVn), 149, 



En-light'ened (-tU'nd). 

En-light'en-ing(-A/'»-). 

En-list' (16) [InliBt, 
203.1 

£n-li8t'cd. 

En-list'ing. 

En-Iist'ment. 

En-Uv'en (-flr'n), 149. 

En-Iiv'ened (-/Ir'fwf). 

En-liv'en-ing (-flp'n). 

EnmasM {Ft.) {Ung- 
md*'). 

En'mi-ty, 98, 169. 

En-ne-a-oon-ta-he'dral. 

En-ne'a-gon, or En'ne- 
a-gon [so Wr. ; en-ne*- 
a-ffon, 8m. ; en'ne-a- 
gouy Wb. Gd. 155.] 

En-ne^an'dri-an, 169. 

En-ne-an'drotis. 

En-ne-a-pet'a-lofis. 

En-no'ble, 164. 

En-no'bled(-iio'Mtf)tl83. 

En-no'bling. 

En-nui' (Fr.) («n-ip«'). 

E-nor'ml-ty, 169. 

E-nor'mo&B. 

E-nottsrh' ( -»i«^), 35, 1 : 1 . 

£n-qu7re' [in quire, 
201, 203.] 



Both formt, enqtiirf 
and M^vtre, are uwi, but 
the preference ia ffiven to 
impart in movt of the die- 
tlonariea. 8i:e htquirt, and 
Ifei derivAtivea. 

£n-r«ge', 23. 
En-raged', 166, 183. 



a, c, I, 5, u, y, Umg ;&,£,!» 5. fi, f , ahort iViatin far, a a« tn fast, a as in 




AGING 

e, 01. 

ed (-yurd). 

-ing (^ttr-), 



ed C-itfA/). 
-ing. 
5, A. 

p. 34. 

Sit. 

A. 
165,183. 

. • 

Bnrol, Sni. 

(-r«W). 166. 

It [Enroll- 
Wb. Gd. 178, 

9. 

ne (-fono'- 

, 171. 

ned (sang*- 

n-ing (Banff*' 

,171. 

I' (skonst'). 

igr, 183. 

(141) [In- 
,203.] 
1% 166, 183. 

, 108, 169. 
in), 162. 
23. 
,166. 



i-tnir*) (14) 
re, 201, 203,] 



h forms, 
iitmare, are in 
Hroart prdkra 
WelMter and 
umore. WorcM- 
ither. 

(-anird'\ie6. 
i-anir'-). 
I {-tnirf'). 
.13,35. 
1', 165, 183. 

ro. 

d' (-$tampt'). 
ng. 



189 

En-raed', 165, 183. 

Kn-sn'ing. 

[Enaarance, 203.— 
See loBurance.l 

En-Burc' {shoorn [In- 
sure, 201, 203.J 



__ Thii word, accord- 
dinff to Smart, ihoold be 
■peUcd enture when it ia 
need in the general lenae 
to make cernnii, and im- 
tmrt when it ia uaed in 
the technical lenae to guar' 
tmtteagauu* lorn. 

En-Bored' (ahoord'). 
En Bor'er {-shoar'-'). 
En-surfing {-shoor*-). 
En-tab'U-ture, 171. 
En-taU', n. & v. 23. 
En tailed', 165. 
En-tail'ing. 
En-tail'ment. 
En-tanVle {-tang'gl)y 

54, 164. 
En-tan'gled (-iang'gld), 

183. 
£n-tan'gle-ment(-to7i^- 

gl-)' 
En-tan'gling. 
En'ta-9%s (Gr.). 
En-taa'tio. 
En-tel'e-chy (-«). 
En'ter, 15, 77. 
E;n'tered, 150. 
En'ter-ing. 
En-t^r'o-oele. 
En-ter-og'ra-phy, 108. 
En-ter-oFo-CT, 108. 
En-ter-om'pha-ldH [E n- 

terompbalu8,203] 
[Enterplead,203. — 

See Interplead.] 
En'ter-prise l-pr\z\ 136. 
En'ter-prisea {-prlzd). 
En'ter-pris-ing (-jwla-). 
En-ter-tain'. 
En-ter-tainod', 165. 
En-ter-tain'ing. 
En-ter-tain'ment. 
En-the-aa'tic. 
[Enthrall, 201, 203. 

— AStelnthraU.] 
En-throne', 24. 
En-throned', 183. 
En thron'ing. 
£n-thu' si-asm {-z'i^tzm) 

(136 , 171) [so 8m. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. J en-ihu'zh%- 

azm, Wk. 155.1 
En-thu'si-ast (-z\-). 
En-thu-si-ast'ic (-21). 
En-thu-si-ast'io-al (-zl) . 
En-th^-me-mat'ic. 
En-thyme-mat'ic-al. 



ENUMERATION 

En'thy-meme. 

Entice', 25. 

Enticed' (-«»«'), 183. 

En-ti9'er. 

En-ti^'ing. 

En-tire' (25) [In tire, 
201, 203.] 

En-tire'ty. 

En-ti'tle (164) [In ti- 
tle, 201,203.] 

En-ti'tled i-ti'ttd)^ 183. 

En-ti'tling. 

En'ti-ty, U3, 169. 

En-tomb' {-ioom') (162) 
[Intomb,201,203.] 

En-tombed' {-toomd'). 

En-tomb'ing (-toom'-). 

£n-tomb'mcnt {-toom'-) 

En-tom'ic, 109. 

Entom'ic-al, 108. 

En'to-moid. 

En-to-mo-log'io-al 

En-to-mol'o-gist, 106. 

En-to-mol'o-gy, 108. 

En-to-moph'a-go&s. 

En-to-mos'tra-caa. 

En-to-mos'tra-co&s. 

En-ton'ic. 

En-to-zo'on [pi. En-to- 

zo'a, 196.] 
En'trails (-frdfe), n. pi. 
En'trance. n. 161. 
En-trance', V. (131, 161) 

[Intrance, 203.1 
En-tranced' (-trdnsf). 
En-trano'ing, 183. 
En-trap', 10. 
En-trajmed' C-trapt')f 

165, Note C, p. 34. 
En-treat', 13. 
En-treat'ed. 
En-treat'ing. 
En-treat'y. 

Entrie (Fr.) (OngtrA'). 
EtUremetM (Fr.) (dng- 

truh-ma')t n. pi. 
Entrepot (Fr.) {dng- 

trun-po'). 
Entresol (FrA {dng^ 

trvh-ioV). * 
En'try (15, 93) [pi. En' 

tries i-iriz)y 99, 190.] 
[Entwine, 201,203.-- 

See Intwine.] 
E-nu'ole-ate, 73, 179. 
E-nu'de-at-ed. 
E-nu'cle-at-ing. 
E-nu-cle-a'tion. 
E-nu'mer-ate, 73. 
E-nu'mer-at-ed, 183. 
E-nn'mer-at-ing. 
E-nu-mer-a'tion. 



• there ; Cbatin foot igosin fkcile ; gh a« g in go ; |h m In tb*' 



ENUMERATTVE 



190 



EPIPLOIC 



B-DD'iiier-at'lTe[so Sm.; 
e-nu'mer-a-tiv^ Wr. 
Wb- Gd. 165.1 

E-nnn'd-ate (-akl-^U) 
(171) [no Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; e-nun'shAi, Wb. 
Qd. 155.] 

E-nnii'cl-at-ed (-«A1-)- 

E -nan'd-at-ing (-sh\-). 

E-nun-ci-a'tion ( «A1-). 

tnun'ci at-Ivc(-»Al-a/-) 
[so Sm. i e-nun'»ht- 
a-tivj Wr. ; e-nun'sha- 
«r, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

E-nun'd-a to-ry ( Ml ). 

En-yd'op, r. ( 170) [E n - 
Telope,2(J3.1 

En-Tel ope' (Vr.) {Una- 
vel^p't or oH-Tel-6p')t 
M. [dna-vel-dp't Gd. ; 
on-c«-Mp',Wk.', 9nffv'- 
Idp, Sm. ; dng-velsp'^ 
or in-re-top', Wr. 154, 
155.1 [Enyelop, 
203.1 

0- Tb« Fmch fbrm 
of thia word u a noun. 
emvelope^ ia more In use 
than the Engliih fbrm, en- 
velop. When the lut !■ 
nied it ahouM be pro- 
nounced en-vftop, like the 
rerb. Walker, who firee 
only the Freuch fom, and 
pronounce* it en-ve-lop', 
remarks, however, that " it 
ought to be proDOuneed 
like the Tcrb to emvftop." 

En-Tel'oped (-opO* 1^* 
En-vel'op-in^. 
En-rel'op mcnt. 
En-ren'om, 100. 
En-yen'omed( •umd)^lSO 
En-yen'om-ing. 
BnM-a-ble, 1(H, 109.' 
En'yTed, 90, 18<k 
Eii'yi-«r. 
Bn'yi-ofiB. 

En-yl'ron, 49, N. ; 104. 
Eii-yi'roned( -rum/), 150. 
En-vi'ron-mcnt. 
En-yl'rons, or En'vi- 

ron§ (^-ronz) [so Wr. 

Gd. ; en'vi-ronZf Sm. ; 

on'vi-r6nZi or en-vi'- 

ronz, Wk. 166.] 

tBT" Though Walker 
puts the pronunciation <m'- 
vi-rom first, be smts : "This 
word Is in general use, and 
ought to Be pronounced 
Uke the Englkih rerb to 
eirrtrofi." 

En'yoy, 16, 27. 
En'yy, 16, 93. 



En'yy-tng. 
[Enwrap, 201, 209.— 

See Inwrap.] 
E'o-oene, 171. 
£-o'U-an [JEollan, 

203.] 
E^l'ic[£o lie, 203.1 
E-ol'i-pile (81) [Aoll- 

pile,20a.] 
E'on[jE on, 203.1 
E'pact, 10, 13, 70. 
Ep'areJi {-ark), 52. 
Ep'arch y (^-ark). 
E -pAulc'ment [ E p a n 1 - 

ment,203.] 
Ep'An-let(17l) [Epau- 
lette, 203.] 
E-pen'the-Bi8 (Gr.) [pL 

Epen'the-a^B (-<l«), 

196.] 




E-phem'er-a, n. Hng. A 

pi. 

■gp Bpkemera Is ringo- 
lar in the sense of afevtr 
that eontmvft <mlif one day. 
and plural in the sense of 
tnseets tMat live (wf a ttey. 

E-phem'er-al, 171. 

E-phem'er an. 

E-phem'er-ic, 109. 

E-phcm'er-ia (L.) (233, 
£xc.)[pl. Epn-«-m*r'- 
i-dea (-diz), 19^] 

E-phcm'er-iBt. 

E-phcm'er-on [pi. E- 
phem'er-a, lOH.j 

E-phc'aian (-ztuin). 

Eph-i-al'teB (-»«), n. 
Hng. 

Eph'od (ffod) [ao 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j ^od, 
or c'/od, Wk. 166.] 

Ep'ic, 170. 

Ep'i-carp. 

Ep-i-oe'di-al, 109. 

Ep-i-ce'di-an. 

Ep-i-oe'dl-nm. 

Ep'i-oene, 171. 

Ep-l-ce-ras'tio, 106. 

Ep-i-chi-re'ma (W-) 
(Gr.) [pi. Ep-1-chi-re'- 
ma-ta, 196.T 

Ep-io-te'tian {-than), 

Ep'l-care, 100, 170. 

Ep-i-ca-re'an_fllO) [ao 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; ^- 
ku're^Ht or MH-ku- 
re'an, Wb. Gd. 110, 
165.] 

Ep-i-ea're-an-iam (-iam) 



(136) [ao Sm.Wb. Gd.; 

epi-ktt-re'anrizmy or 

ep-i-ku're-an-itmtWr. 

165.]^ 
Ep'i-cur-ism (-uai), 49, 

N. i 136. 
Ep'i-cy cle, 78, 164. 
Ep-i cyVloid. 
Ep i cy cloid'al fBoCvd.; 

epi-A-eloid'aL Wr. 

155 > 
Ep-i-dcm'ie, 231. 
Ep-i dem'ic-ai. 
Ep'i-dem-y. 
Ep-i-der'mai. 
Ep-i-der'mic, 109. 
Ep-ider'mjc-ai, 106. 
Ep-i-der'mi-dal. 
Ep-i-der'mia (L.) [pi 

£p-i-der'mi-dea(-tf<«> 

l*.J 
Ep'iHdote, 170. 
Ep-i^as'trle, 109. 
Ep-i-ga8'tro<oele. 
Ep-I-ge'al. 
Ep-i-g^lot'tic 
Ep-i-glot'tiB, 170. 
Ep'i gram, 169, 170. 
Ep-i-gram-mat'io, 170. 
Ep-l-gram-mat'io-al. 
Ep-i-gram'ma-tiBt. 
Ep'i-grftph, 127. 
E-pi^y-noflB (jf^*-), 
Ep'i-lep-By, 160. 
Ep-i-lep'tfe, 109. 
£p-l-lep'ti<Ha, 106. 
E-pil'o-glBm( - j{«m),ia6. 
E-pU-o-giat'io. 
£p'ildgue(-fa0), 87,168, 

171. 
Ep-i-nrdon {-nitk'un) 

Tbo Sm. Wb. Gd. ; »• 

%^lsh'i-un, Wk. Wr. 

155.1 
E-plph'a-ny (-pi/*-), 171. 
Ep-i-pho-ne^ma [bo Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; epif 

o-ne'nuiy Sm. 155.1 
E-piph'o-ra (-e-p(/' ) 
Ep-l-phyl'lo&B, or E- 

piph'yl-Io&B [See 

Aaenophy lloua. ] 
Ep-i-pbya'e-al. 
E-piph'^-aiB (-p(^-),l71. 
Ep'i-phyte. 

Wb. Gd. , ep4-JI'M^ 

Wr. 156.1 
Ep-1-phyt'io. 
E-pip4o-oe. 103. 
£-pip'lo-ocle. 
E-pip'lo-io rao Wr. j ep^ 

t-plo'ie, Gd. 166.1 



a, «, i, 5, u, ft long ; &, «> Yi 6, ft, f, ahorti \k a$ in ttt, k tu in ftat, haain 



EPIPLOON 



191 



ERADICATED 



K-pia'co-pa-cy, 160, 171. 
£-pi(('co-pal. 
£ -pis-co-pa'li-an. 
£-pi s-oo-pa'li-an-ism 

(izm), 136. 
X-pi»'co-pate. 
Sp'i-sode, 78, 169. 
Kp i Bo'di-al. 
Ep-i-sod'io. 
Ep^i-sod'ie^. 
Ep-i-spas'tic. 
Ep'i-sperm. 
E-pis'Ue f-pi«'0. 162, 

171. 
E-pia'to-lAiy, 72. 
Ep-18-toKio. 
Ep-i»-tol'io-al. 
E-pis-to -lo-craph'ic 
E-pls-to-log'ra-phy. 
E-pi8'tro-phe, 163. 
Ep'i-Btyle. 
Ep'i-tiph (-M/), [not 

cp'i-t^if, 127, 153.] 
Ep^i-U'phi-an. 
£p-i-taph'ic. 
E-pit'a-sis. 
Ei> i-tha-U'mi-am. 
Ep'i thet, 78, 169. 
Epi thet'ic- 
Epit'<>-me(163) Fpl. E- 

pit'o-mes (-mear).] 
C pit'o-mist. 
E-pit'o-mizc, 202. 
E-pit'o mized, 183. 
E-pit'o-mia-er. 
E-pit'o-miz-ins'. 
Ep'i-trite. 
E-pit'ro-pe, 163. 
Ep-i-zo'an. 
Ep-i-zo-ot'lc 
Ep'och {Of' ok) [so Sm. 

Wb. (rci. ; ep'oky or 

e'pok^ Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Bp'o-cba (-4a). 
Ep'ode [so Sm. Wb. 

Qd. , ta/seL or i'p9d, 

Wk. 155.] 
Ep-od'ic [so Gd.; e-pod'- 

ik, Wr. 155.] 
Ep-o-pee', 122. 
Eprauvette (Fr.) (4- 

proo^vet'). 
Ep-a-lot'io. 
Ep-a-ni'tion. 



E-qaa-bU^-tv {l-kwa-), 
or Eq-ua-oil'^ 
«»•), 171. 



or Eq-aa-bil'i-ty (tt- 



E'qoa-ble (l'ku>a4>l)y or 
Kq'iui-ble (ek'tea-bl) 
(34, 164) l^kwa-bly 
Wk. Wr. Wb. (5d., 
ekfworbl, Sm. 155.] 



E'<]aa-bl7 (e'iwo), or 

Lq'ua-bly (ek'wa-). 
E'qual, 34, 52. 
[Equaled, 203. — See 

Equalled.] 
[Equaling, 203.— 

See Equalfing.J 
E-qual4-t7 X-kwol'')y 

169. 
E-qual-l-za'tion. 
E'qual-ize, 202. 
E'qual-ized, 183. 
E'qual-iz-lng. 
E'Qualled (^e^kwald) 

[Equaled, Wb.Od. 

203. — .See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
E'qual-Iiog [Equal- 
ing, Wb. CJd. 203.] 
E'qual-ly, 93, 170. 
[Equan^ular, 203. 

— 5ee Equiangular.] 
E-qoa-nim'i-ty, l69, 

171. 
E-qua'don, 34, 52. 
E-qua'tor, 171. 
E-qua-to'ri-al [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. , ektoa- 

to'r%-aly Sm. 165.] 
Eq'uer-nr (eit'ircr-y, or 

ekwer^u) (171. 190) 

[so Wr. ; elpwer^, 

Sm. ; e-kwer'y, Wk. 

(rd. 155.] [E query, 

203.] 
E-ques'tri-an. 
E-ques'tri-an-Ism 

i-izm). 
E-qui-an'gu-lar i-ang'-) 

[so Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

ek^tci-ang'othlar, Sm. 

155.] 
E-qui-dis'tant [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ek-wi- 

dis'tantj Sm. 155.1 
E-qui-lat'er-al [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ek-wi- 

lafer^U, Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-li'brate [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. GW. ; ek-wi- 

Wbrat, Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-li'brat-ed. 
E-qui-li'brat-lng. 
E-qul-Ii-bra'tion. 
E-quil'l-brist, 169. 
E^-Ub'ri-um (171) [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

ek-un-Ub'ri-um, Sm. 

155.] 
E-qul-mnl'ti-plo (164) 

[so Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

ek-^oi^mul'ti-plt Sm. 

155.] 



E-qui'nal. 
E'quine, 34, 52. 
E-qul-noc'tial (shal) 

[so Wk. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; ek-wirnok' Shalt 

Sm. 155.] 
E'oui-nox [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. , ek'wi-nokSf 

Sm. 155.] 
E-qulp', 16, M, 52. 
En'ul-page {ek'wl-), 171. 

[not e-kwip'^, 153.] 
E-quip'ment. 
E'qui-poise {-poiz) 

(171) [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; ekffffi-poizt 

Sm. 155.] 
E-qui pol'Ience (169, 

170)[soWk. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. , ekwI-poVlenit 

Sm. 155.1 
E-qui-pol'Ien-cy. 
E-qui pol'lout [so Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; ek-w\- 

poVlent, Sm. 155.] 
E-qui-pon'dcr-anco [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. (Jd. , 

ek-uH-pon'der-ana^ 

Sm. 155.1 
E-qui-pon'der-ant. 
E-quipped' 

165, 176 ; Note 

p. 34. 
£-quip'ping. 
Eq-ui-se'tum (eAr-wl-). 
E-quis'o-nanoe [so wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; ek^%'9o'- 

nanSt Sm. 155.] 
Eq'ui-ta-ble iek'uH-ta- 

W)» 122, 164, 171. 
Eq'ui-ta-bly (ek'wi-). 
Eq'ui-tant (el-'tri-). 
Eq-ui-ta'tion {ek-tai-). 
Eq'ui-tv (ek'wi-ty). 
E-quiv^a-lence, 169. 
E-quiv'a-lcn-cy. 
E-quiv'a-Ient. 
E-quiv'o-cal, 171. 
E-quiv'o-cal-ly. 
E-qulv'o-cate, 73. 
E-quiv'o-cat-cd, 183. 
E-quiv'o-«at-ing. 
E-quiv-o-ca'tion. 
E-quiv'o cat-or. 
E-auiv'o-ea-to-ry. 
Eq'ui-voke (ek'tvV). 
E-qui^voque' (Fr.) (a-Are- 

vdk'). 
E-quiv'o-rotts. 
E'ra, 13, 49, N. ; 72. 
E-rad'i cable, 164. 
E-rad'i-cate, 73, 169. 
E-rad'i-cat-ed, 183. 



tUl; 6 a« in there; ^a«<n foot; 9 m in facile ;gha«g in go ;^a«<»thi& 



KRADICATING 



192 



ESPYING 



E-rad'l-oat-iiig. 
E-rad-i-ca'tioD, 112. 
E-rad'i-cat-Ive (i*l) [io 

Sm. ; e-rad'i-ka-tiv, 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 165.1 
E-raa'a-ble, IM, 183. 
E-rateS 23. 
E-rased' (-ra«<0) 183. 
E-ras'er. 
E-rasMng. 
K-ra'sion (-zhun). 
E-ra'sure (-zhuru 171. 
Ere {ir)f ad. k prep, 

before. {See Air, 

Heir, IfiO,] 
Erect', 15. 
E-rect'a-ble, IM. 
E -reefed. 
E-rect'Ile, 162. 
E-rcct'ing. 
E-rcc'tion. 
Er'e-mite. 
fir-e-mlt'ic. 
fir-e-mifio-al. 
fir'e-thism {-thizm)^ 136. 
Er-e-thls'tic. 
Er'got, 21, N. 
Er'got-ism {^zm). 
fir-fom'e-ter (106) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; B^ri-om't- 

tur, Gd. 155.1 
Er'inlne (15:0 [Er- 

min,203.] 
Er' mined (-mind), 160, 

171, 183. 
£-rode', 24. 
E-rod'ed, 183. 
E-rod'ent. 
E-rod'iag. 
E-rose' (-r««')i 121. 
E-ro'sion i-zhun). 
E-ro'slve, 84. 
E-rot'ic, 109. 
E-rotMc-al, 106. 
fir-o-to-ma'ni-A. 
ftr-o-tom'a-ny. 
[Erpetology. 203. 

— See Herpctology.l 
Err, 21, N. } 171, 176. 
fir'rand (1^0) [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; &r'- 

jrandt Wk. 155.] 

tar Thonffh Walker 
prononncM thla void oK- 
rtntdf he nyu, that it 
"might, perhap*, without 
podantiy, be more proper- 
ly pronounced m If is 
wittton." 

ftr'rant. 
fir'rant-ry. 

fir-ra'ta (L.}, n*pl. [See 
Erratum.] 



erratic, 100. 

fir-rat'io-al, 106. 

fir-ra'tum (L.) [pi. Er- 
ra'ta, 108.] 

Er'rhine (-rln), 162, 171. 

Erred (erd), 21, N.j 171. 

Err'lng. 

fir-ro'ne-olia. 

Br'ror, 16, 60, N. j 88. 

Erse, 21, N. ; 171. 

fir-u-bee'eenoe, 89. 

fir-u-bea'ceQ-cy, 89, 160. 

fir-u-bea'cent, 80. 

E-nic-ta'tion. 

fir'u-dite (89) [ao Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; ir-u-dW, 
Wk. ; ir'U'dlt, or tH- 
tt-dW, Wr. 165.] 

fir-Q-dl'tion {-disk'un). 

E-ru'gi-no&B {-ro(^-) 
[ iB r a ff i n o u 8 , 203. J 

E-rupt'ed. 

E-rup'tlon. 

E-rup'tIre, 84. 

fir-y-alp'e-las, 169, 171. 

Cr-y-ai-pel'a-tottB, 116. 

fir-y-the'ma. 

fir-y-the-mat'ic. 

fir-y-them'a-to&s. 

Eb oa-lade', n. A v, 122. 

Es-ca-lad'ed. 

EB-ca-lad'ing. 

EBcal'op (.skoVup) [ao 
Wk. Gd. ; akoinop, or 
es-koVupt Wr. 165. 
rScallop, Scol- 
lop, 203.] 

■9^ The more common 
Ibrm of ■pelling thia word, 
at the preaeot time, ia 
acaUop. 

Ea-ca-pade', 122. 

EB-cape' (23) [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. i eskHp't 
Wk. Sm. 165.] 

EB-caped' (e«-A:Ap<')>165, 
183 ; Note C, p. 34. 

Ea-cape'ment. 

Ea-cap'ing. 

Es-carp', n. ft v. 

Es-carped' {-karpt')y\fA. 

Ea-oarp'ing. 

Es-carp'ment. 

Each-a-lof {esh-a-loV) 
[so Sm. Gd. ; aha-iot', 
Wk. ; esh^-lot't or 
8ha-lot', Wr. 166.] 
[Shallot, 203.1 

EB'char (-kar), 52, 171, 

Ea-cha-rot'ic (-Ami-), 100. 

EB-cha-tol'o-(rT (-ka-), 

Ea-chgat', n. & v. 



Ea^^eat'a-ble, 164. 

Ea-cheat'age. 

Es-cheat'ed. 

Es-cheafing. 

Ea-chcat'or. 

Ea-chew' (-cfcoo'), 19, 

26. 
EB-chewed' (<hood')f 
•166. 

EB-c^ew'ing (-cktx/-) 
Es'oort, n. 105, 101. 
£B-oort\ r. 10:i, 161. 
Ea-cort'ed. 
EB-oort'ing. 
EB-cri-toir (es-kre- 

tttfor') [so Wb. Gd. ; 

es-kru-t9r*j Wk. 145.] 
Escritoire (Fr.) (e*- 

kretwor') [bo Wr. ; 

es-kre-twar', 8m. IM, 

165.] 

tST Walker, Webatar. 
and Ooodrich gire on!/ 
the Aagiicised form of Cbia 
wotd (eteritoiry, Smart 
and Worceater gire onlv 
the French form {eten- 
Urirty. 

EB^ni-to'ri-aL 
Es-ca-la'pi-an, 160. 
Ea'ea-lent. 
Ea-cu'ri-al, 160. 
Ea-cutch'eon (-kudt'- 

un), 171. 
Ea-cutch'eoned {-kuch'- 

und). 
[EaophagUB, 203. 

— See (EaophagUB.] 
Es-o-t6r'ic, 109. 
Ea-o-tt^rMo-al, 106. 
Ea-o-t^r'l-clsm (-«tn»). 
Es-pal'ier (-yur), 171. 
Ea-p^'oial (-peM'oOt 

231. 
EB-p«'ciaIly {-pesh'al-h 

171. 
Ea-pied', 09, 186. 
£s'pi-o-nage ies'pi-o- 

nd/, or es'pi^-niizh) 

[bo Wr. Gd. ; cs^pl- 

a-ndzhf Sm. 155.] 
EB-pla-nade', 122. 
Es-poa'sal (-zai), 171. 
Ea-poa'sftlB (-x«Uz). 
Ea-ponBc' C-pouz'), 
Es-poused' (-povetfOi 

183. 
Ea-poQB'er (-mmz'-). 
Ea-poaa'ing (-potur'-). 
Esprii de corps (Fr.) 

{e»-prefdyh'k6r*). 
Ea-py', 26. 
Ea-py'mg. 



a, e, 1, <(, &, y, long }&,(,!, 5, tt, y, short ; S m in far, it at in fiwt, kasin 



BSaUIMAU 



193 



EUROPEAN 



l-man (e»*k%-md) 
Es'qui-maiiz 
, or -mdzh 196.] 
ire^ X-kwir'). 
r, n. ICl. 
•', V. 161. 
red' i-sad'), 187. 
r'ing. 

r-iBty or E»-sij'- 
BO Wr. ; es'sA-tstf 
; es-s&'ist, Wk. 
Gd. 155.] 
ice, 170, 17!. 
loed {sensl), 183. 
ic'ing. 
I'tiaU shot). 
i-ti-aia-ty t-sh%-). 

»aish, 104. 

•'liflbed i-Uskt), 

t'UBh-ing. 

/liflh-ment. 

fet'. 

fttte^ (Ft.). 

* Smart gtrM oalf 
^luh <bnn of thu 
ieda^tt^ Worcester 
the French form {f»- 
f). Ooodrlch giTCt 
brmc 

e', 23. 
m', 13. 
m'a-ble, 164. 
med' {-timd')f 

m'tng. 

ietie,203.->5e< 

hetic] 

oa-ble, 104, 171. 

note, n. & 9. 73. 

nit-ed, 183. 

QJit-iiig. 

tut'tion, 112. 

akt-Xye, 84. 

oftt-or, 183. 

al, 78. 

a'tion LBtti- 

ioii,203.J 

ped' i-iopi'). 
M>el [Efltop- 
£8 top el, 203.] 
rera (,^vurz), n. 

le'(Fr.)(«i-#rad') 

Sm. Wr. J es- 

', Wb. Gd. IM, 

ige*. 23, 46. 
iged', 166. 
ige'meDt, 186. 
ig'ing, i-trat^'-). 



Es-tra-pade', 122. 
Es-tray', 23. 
Estreat'. 
Es-treat'ed. 
Es-treat'iug. 
Es-trepe'mcnt. 
Ksfu-a-ry, 72. 
Etaaire (Fr.) (a/a- 

zhtr'). 
Etch (ecA), 15, 44 ; Note 

D. p. 37. 
Etched (ecM), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Etch'er (ech'-\ 77. 
EtchMng {ech'-). 
E-ter'nal, 21, Note. 
E-ter'nal-ly, 170. 
E-ter'ni-ty, 78, tt3, 169. 
E-ter'nize, 202. 
E-ter'nised, 183. 
E-ter'niz-ing. 
E-te'si-an (^-zM-an) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; e-Wzkan^ 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
E'ther, 13, 37, 77. 
E-the're-al, 49, N. ; 169. 
E-the're-al-ize, 202. 
E-the're-al-izcd, 183. 
E-the^re-aMz ing. 
E-ther-1-fI-ca'tlon. 
E-ther'i-form, 169. 
Ether Iza'tion. 
E'ther ize, 202. 
E'ther-ized, 183. 
E'ther iz-ing. 
Eth'ic, 15, 37. 
Eth'ic-al, 108. 
Eth'lcs. 

E-th^'pi-an, 169. 
E-thi-op'lc. 
Eth'moid. 
Eth-moid'al. 
Eth'nic. 
Eth'nic-al, 106. 
Eth nog'ra-pher, 106. 
Eth-no-graph'ic. 
Eth-no-graph'lc-al. 
Eth-nog'ra-phy, 106. 
Eth-no-log'fc (-to/'-). 
Eth-nol'o-glst, 106. 
Eth-nol'o-gy. 
E'Uo-Ute, 73, 122. 
E'U-o-lat-ed, 183. 
E'ti-o-lat-ing. 
E-tt-o-la'tion, 112. 
E-ti-o-log'ks-al (^q/'-). 
E-ti-ol'o-gy, 108. 
Et-i-qnette' {ket'), 122. 
Et-ne'an, 110. 
E-tms'can. 
ttui (Fr.) {et^w%') [so 

Wk. Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 

A-tw%', Wr. 164, 166.] 



W^ WetMter and Uood- 
rfch. bi-tid(>« thia French 
form of the word, gfre alto 
the Anglicized form Et- 
wee. 

Et-y-mo log'lc {-loj'-). 

Et-y-mo-log'io^d(-to/-). 

Et-y-mo-log'ic-al-ly 

JWh 

Et-y-inol'o-gist, 108. 
Et-y-mol'o gy, 108, 170. 
Et'y-mon [Gr. tf L. pi. 

Et'y ma; Eng.pl. El' - 

y-mons {-monz)j 198.] 
Eu'cha rist iu'ka-)^ 171. 
Eu-clia-rist'lc {u-ka-). 
Eu-cha-rist'ic-al {u-bn). 
Eu'chy-my {u'k%-). 
Eu'cra-sy. 169. 
Eu'cre (w'ifcttr), 164, 171. 
Eu-di-om'e-ter, 106. 
Eu-di-o-mct'ric. 
Ku-dl-o-met'rlc-al. 
Eu-dl-om'e-try, 106. 
Ku'lo-giat, 108. 
Eu-lo-gist'ic, 169. 
Eu-lo-gist'ic-al, 108. 
Eu-lo'gi-um, 109. 
Eu'lo gize, 202. 
Eu'Io-gized, 183. 
Eu'Io-giz-ing. 
Eu'lo-gy, 26, 93. 
Eu'no-my. 
Eu'nuch {-nulc). 
Eu'pa-to-ry, 86. 
Eu-pcp'sy [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; u'pepsyt Wk. ; 

u^pepsy, or u-pep'sy, 

Wr. 166.] 
Eu-pcp'tic. 
Eu'phe-mism (^-mizm), 

136. 169. 
Eu'phe-miBt. 
Eu-phe-mist'ic. 
Eu-phc-mist'ic-al. 
Eu-phon'io, 109. 
Eu'phon'ic-al, 106. 
Eu-pho'ni-otts, 169. 
Eu'pho-nism (-nizm). 
Eu'pho-ny, 86, 93. 
Eu'phra-sy, 109. 
Eu'phu-ism (-izm). 
Eu'phu-ist. 
Eu-phu-ist'ic. 
Eu-plas'tic, 109. 
Eu-ri'puBy or Eu'rl-pas 

[so Wr. ; u-ri'pu»t 

Wk. GW.j «'r1-piw, 

Sm. 166.1 
Eu-roc'ly-don. 
Eu'rope, 171. 
Eu-ro-jpe'an (110) [not 

a-ro'pe-aii, 163.] 



as in there i<Sbcuin foot ; qatin facile i ghat gin go; ^ as in thli' 

17 



EURYTHMY 



194 



EXCELLENCY 



Ku^ryth-my [•© Wr. 

WD. Gd. ; u-rith'm^t 

Bm. 155 [Eurith- 

m 7 , Sm. 203.1 
Eu-Bta'chi-«ii (-Jn-)* 
Ku' style. 

Eu-tcr'pe-an, 110, 160. 
£u-tha-na'si-a (-zM-a). 
Eu'than-a-sy (-««) or 

Eu-than'a-sy [wthan- 

d-zy, Sm. ; uthan'ct- 

»y, Wk. ; it-than'a-ayy 

or u'than-d-zyi Wr. ; 

u'tha-n&sy, or u- 

than'a-sy^ Gd. 155.] 
K-vac'u-aiit. 
E-vac'u-ate, 73, 89. 
E-vac'u-at-cd, 183. 
E-vac'u-at-ing. 
E-vac-u-a'tioD, 112. 
E-vac'u-at-Ivc [so Sm. ; 

e-vcUc'u-a-tiv^ Wr. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
£-vao'u-at-or. 
E-vade', 23. 
E-Tad'ed, 168. 
E-vad'ins^. 
Ev-a-nes^senoc, 171. 
Ev-a-nes'ccQt. 
E-van-g^el'Ic. 
E-van-^el'ic-al, or Er- 

an-gel'ic-Al [so Wr. ; 

e-van-Jel'ik-al, Wb. 

Gd. ; ev-an-jel'ik-ai, 

Wk. 8m. 155.1 
E-ran-gf r lo-al ly. 
E-van-fjol'l-cismJ gizm). 
E-van'g^cl ism (-urnt). 
E-van'gel-Ist. 
E-van'gel-lze. 
E-vAn'grel-izcd, 18.3. 
E-van'gcl-Iz-ing. 
E-vap'o-ra-blc, 104. 
E-vap'o-rate, 73. 
E-vap'o-rat-ed. 
'"-vap'o-raMng. 

-vap-o-ra'tion. 

-vap'o-ra-tTve. 

-va'sion {-zhun). 

-va'slve, b4. 

ivc, W. 

-vec'tion. 

;'ven (e'rn), 149. 

I'vened (<?'t;M/), 150. 
E'ven-lng (e'lv*-). 
E'ven>ne8B (e'vn-), 66, 

N. 
E-vcnt', 16. 
E-veut'ful (-/Sol), 
£-ven-tra'tion. 
E-Ycnt'u-al. 
K-vent-u-alM-ty. 
E-vent'u-al-ly. 



Er'er, 15, 77. 

Ev'er-gUide. 

Ev'er-green. 

Ey-er-&Bt'ing. 

Ev'er-llv'ing. 

Ev-er-more'. 

E-yer'aion. 

E-ver'sIve, 21, N. 

Ev'er-y, 132. 233, Ezo. 

Ev'er-y- where. 

Evict'. 

E-vict'ed. 

E-vlct'ing. 

E-vic'tion. 

Ev'i-denoe, 160. 

Ev'i-denced {-denit), 

Ev'i-denc-ing. 

ET'i-dent, 1^. 

E'vll (c'r/), 149. 

E'Tll-do'er (e'ri-AK/-). 

E-vinoe'. 16. 

Evinced' C-vitut'). 

E-vin^'i-ble, 164. 

E-vinc'ing. 

E-vis'ccr-ate, 73. 

E-vis'cer-at-ed. 

E-via'oer-at-ing. 

E-via-oer-a'tion. 

E-voke', 24. 

Evoked' (-vOkt'). 

Ev-o-lat'ic, 109. 

Ev-o-la'tion. 

Ev'o-lute, 170. 

F]v-o-ln'tion. 

Evolve' (volv'), 18. 

E volved' C-wird'), 183. 

K-volv'ing. 

E-vul'sion. 

Ewe (yoo) (171), n. a 

female sheep. [See 

You, 160.] [pi. Ewes. 

— See Use, 160.] 
Ewer iyoor) (171), n. a 

klad of pitcner. [See 

Your, 160.] 
Ew'ry iyoo'ry), 49, N. 
Ex-ac'er-bate_(€;^«-a<'-) 

(137) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; eks-aseHbnt, 

Wb. Gd. 165.1 
Ex-a^'cr-bat-ed (effz-). 
Ex-ay 'er-bat-ing (€gz-\ 
Ex-ay-er-ba'tlon {egz-). 
Ex-act' («^«-), 40, 137. 
Ex-act'ed (egz-). 
Ex-act'er (cgz-) [Ex- 

actor,2():i.] 
Ex-act'ing {egz-). 
Ex-ao'tlon (egz-)* 
Ex-act'or (egz) [Ex- 
actor, 203.] 
Ex-ag'ger-ate i^egz-qj'-), 



Ex-Aff'ger-at-ed (egz^ 

a/^5, 183. 
ExnBg'ger-«t-liig {egz- 

Ex^ag-gor-A'tloii (egz- 

Ex-aiV (eaz), 17, 137. 
£x-41t-a'tion {egz). 
Ex-Alt'ed (egz). 
Ex-am'in-«r.ble (<V£-)> 

164. 
ExHun-in-a'tion (egz-). 
Ex-am1ne {egz)t loii. 
£x-am'Ined {egz-)^ 165. 
£x-am'in-er {egz-)^ 183. 
£x-Am'in-ing {egz). 
Ex-«m'ple (^egz-am'pl) 

(137, 164) [so Wk. Sin. 

Wb. Gd. ; egz-im'ply 

Wr. 155.] 
Ex-an'them (egz-). 
Ex-an-ihl'ma (Gr.) [pi. 

Ex-an'them'<k4a, 

196.] 
Ex -an-them'ft-totts. 
Ex-an-the'sis, 125. 
Ex'arch (^-<wk). 
£x'arch-ate (^r*-)_LM 

Wr. ; eks-ark'lUy Wb. 

Gd. 165.] 
Ex-aa'per-ate {egz). 
Ex-as'per-at-ed {egz-). 
£x-«8'per-at-iiig {egz-). 
Ex-as-per-a'tion {egz-). 
Ex-can-des'ccnoe, 171. 
Ex-oan-des'cent. 
£x-«ar'iiate, a. ft v. 
Ex-car'nat-ed, 183. 
Ex-car'iiat4iig. 
Ex-car-na'tlon. 
Ex-car-ni-fl-ca'tion. 
Exca4he'dra{V,.). 

«r"Th« Latin viU 
allow of cath'e-dm or co- 
tikCdro, but the liMer if 
moat common in Engliah." 
Ooodridk. 

£x'ea-Tate(137) [soSm. 
Wb. Gd. ; eks-k&'vdt, 
Wk.; ek8*ka^at, or 
ek$-kA*vlU. Wr. 165.] 

Ex'ea-vat-ed, 183. 

Ex'ca-vat-ing. 

£x-ca-ra'tlon, 112. 

Ex'ca-vat-or. 

Ex-oeed', 13, 137, 169. 

Ex-oeed'ed. 

-Sx-oeed'ing. 

Ex-oel', 15, 137. 

Ex-oelled', 166, 170. 

Ex'cel-lenoe, 170. 177. 

Ex'oel-lea-cy, 169. 



i, d, i, 5, Q, y, long ; &, «, I, 5, tt, f, ahort , }i at in fkr, k €u in fast, katin 



laCCELLENT 



195 



EXFOLIATIVE 



.Rx'oel-lent. 

£ Escoentrlo, 208.^ 
See £ooentric.] 
:-cept', 16. 
fed. 

I£Ix-«cp'tion. 

Jl!lx-<;ep'tion-a-bIe, IM. 

]Ex-oep'tlon-al. 

ICx-oept^ve, 84. 

Kx-oept'or. 

Islx-oerpt' {bo Sm. Wb. 
G<1. ; eki-serpt'^ or 
ei^'serpt, Wr. 155.] 



'Va (L.), n.pi. 
Ex-ce«V, 121, 137, 171. 
Ex-oes'eTre, 84. 
Ex-c}uLn{^', 23. 
Ex-change-a^bil'i-ty. 
Ex-cbange'a ble, 183. 
i>:x-<^lii.D^er (-ckatU'-). 
Ex-cheq'iier {-cheJpur), 

171. 
S:x-<a8'a-ble (-slz*-), 164. 
Ex-ciBe' (-slz')t n. A r. 
Ex cised' i-ttzd')y 150. 
Ex-case'maii (-*U'-)i 

196. 
Ex-cis'ing (-8U'-). 
Ex-cl'sion (-aidi'un). 
Ex cit-a-bilM-ty, 1«0. 
Ex-cit'a-ble, IM, 183. 
Cx-cit'ant, or Ex'd- 
tant [bo Wr. ; eks-sW- 
ant, Wb. Gd. ; dtt'rt- 
ton<, Sm. 155.J 
Exd ta'tJon. 
Ex cit'a-tlve, 84. 
Ex-cit'a-to-ry, 86. 
Ex cite', 25, 137. 
Ex-cit'ed, 183. 
Exdto'ment, 186. 
Ex-cit'er. 
Ex-cit'infir. 
Ex claims 23. 
Ex-clahned', lfi6. 
Kx-claim'ins'. 
Ex-cla-ma't»>n, 171. 
Ex-cbun'a-tlve. 
Ex-clam'a-to-iy, 86w 
Ex-clude', 26. 
Ex-olud'ed, 183. 
Ex-clad'in^. 
Ex-clu'sion (-tkun), 
Ex-cla'8ion-i0t (-zhun-). 
Ex-<slu'8lve, 84. 
Ex-coe'i-tate (-k€(i'-). 
Ex-cog'i-tat-cd i-kcj'-). 
Ex-cogM-tat-ing i-koj'-). 
Ex-oog-l-ta'tion (koj-). 
Ex-oom-mu'ni-ca-ble, 
164. 



Ex-oom-mn'nl-cate. 

Ex-oom-mu'ni-cat-ed. 

Ex-com-mu'ni-cat-mg. 

Ex-oom-mu-ni-ca'tion. 

Ex-co'ri-ate, 49, N. 

Ex-co'ri-at-ed, 183. 

Ex-co'ri-at-ing. 

Ex-oo-ri-a'tion. 

Ex-cor-ti-ca'tion. 

Ex'cre-ment. 

Ex-cre-mcnVal. 

£x-cre-mcn-tI'tiou8 

{-tish'ua). 
Ex-cres'oence, 171. 
Ex-cree'oent. 
Ex-crete', 13, 137. 
Ex-cret'ed, 183. 
Ex-cret'lng'. 
Ex-cre'tion. 
Ex-cretlve, or Ex'cre- 

tlve [eks-krtt'irj Sm. ; 

eks'kretiv, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. •, elc^'kre-tiVf or 

ekskrit'iv, Wr. 155.1 
Ex-cret'o-ry, or Ex'- 

cre-to-ry [eks-kret'o- 

rift Sm. ; eks'kre-to- 

3S Wk. Wb. Gd. ; 
i'kre-to-rVf or eks- 

krlt'o-ry, Wr. 155] 
Ex-cru'c!-atc i-kroo'shi- 

at) [m Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

eks-krik'shat^ Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Ex-cm'd-at-ed (-itroo'- 

•AI-). 
Ex-cru'ci-at-ing (-Jfcroo'- 

«A1-). 
Ex-cm -d-a'tlon {-kro&- 

BKi). 
Ex-cuFpate, 73, 137. 
Ex-carpat-ed, 183. 
Ex-cnl'pat-ing. 
Ex-cul-pa'tion, 112. 
Ex-cul'pa-to-ry, 86. 
Ex-cttr'rent, 170. 
Ex-cur' Bion. 
Ex-cur' si ve. 
Ex-cuB'a-ble (-itiU:'-), 

183. 
Ex-cuB'a-to-rj (Wz'-). 
Ex-euse. n. 26, 161. 
£x-ense' (-JrOz'), v. 136, 

137, 161. 
Ex-cuBcd' {-kikzd'), 183. 
Ex-cu8'lng[ {-kikz'-), 
Ex'e-cra-ble, 164. 
Ex'e-cra-bly, 93. 
Ex'e-crate, 137, 160. 
Ex'e-crat-ed. 
Ex'e-crat-ing. 
Ex-e-ora'tion. 
Ex'e-cra-to-ry (86) [bo 



Wr. Wb. Gd. ; eks'e- 
crUt-o-ry^ Sm. 155.] 

Ex'e-cuto, IGU. 

Ex'e-cut-cMi, ia3. 

Ex'e-cut er [E xe on- 
to r, 203.] 

Ex'e-cut-ing. 

Ex-e-cu'tion, 112. 

Ex-<?-cu'tion-er. 

Ex-ec'u-tive {egz-)^ 40, 
N. ; W, 137. 

Ex-ec'u-tor {egz-) [E x- 
ecuter. 20;{.j 

Ex-ec-u-to'ri al («^«-)» 

Ex-ec'u-to-ry (egz-). 

Ex-«;'u-trix {^gz-). 

Ex-o-ge'slB (Gr.), 113. 

Ex'e-tjOte. 

Ex-o get'ic, 100. 

Ex^-gct'io-al, 108. 

Ex-cm'plar (egz-), 137. 

Ex'cm-pla-ry (cgz'-), 
107, 137. 

a^ This word, aa pro> 
Doonccd by all the ortnoe- 
pia;s, \m an exception to the 
ireneiml rule by which x at 
the end of an accented ^rl- 
lable ha« the aound of cs. 
It is sounded at gz in ex- 
empkuy, because it has 
that sound in the prlml- 
tire extmpkar. 

Ex-€m-pll-n-oa'tion 

(«y«-), 112, 116. 
Ex-em'pli-fled {egz), 

00 
Ex-em'pll-f y (egz-)^ 04. 
Ex-«m'pl!-f y-ing (egz-), 
Ex-empt' {egz-€nU'\ 

137, 162. 
Ex-emp'tion (egz-tm' ). 
Ex-€-quaUur\L.). 
Ex-c'qui-al. 
Ex'e-qules (Jtirw), n. 

pi. 171. 
Ex'er-dBO (-Hz), 137, 

171. 
Ex'er-dsed (-JUrf), 183. 
Ex-er-dfl'a-ble (-*!«'-), 

164. 
Ex-crgue' {tgz-erg'), 

Ex-€rf {egz-\ 21, N. ; 

137. 
Ex-ert'ed (egz-), 
Ex-ert'ing. (egz). 
Ex-€r'tlon legz-). 
Ex-fo'Iinate. 
Ex-fo'li-at-ed, 183. 
Ex-fo'11-at-ing. 
Ex-fb-li-a'tion. 
Ex-fb'U-a-tlve. 



fall ; 6 <M <» there i 6b M in foot } 9 m <n flidle ;gha« gin go;!]} of in this. 



eXHALABLB 

IM. 
Xx-harant ieff»-), 183. 
£x-ha-U'tlon (,egz-). 
Ex-luOe' {0ff»-), 23i 137, 

130. 
Ex haled' (egz). 183. 
Kx-hal'lng iegz-). 
KxbkuMtr(egZ')t 17, 137, 

139. 
Ex-hknst'ed (egn-), 
Kx-hAustMble ieg»-), 

104, 100. 171. 
Ex-hAu»t'ing iegz-). 
Ex-hAuHtMon {egt- 

hawat'vun)^ 171. 
Ex-hAuBt'Ive {fgz-)t 84. 
Ex-hib'it(fa2-),137,130. 
Ex-hib'it-ed iegz), 
Ex-hib'It^r {egz). 
Ex-hJb'it-lng {egz). 
Ex-hi-bl'Uon {-Hsh'un), 

171,231, Exo. 
Ex-hib'lt-Ire {egz-)t 84. 
Ex-Uib'it-o-ry (egz-), 
Ex-hil'a-rant {egz-). 
Bx-hll'a-rate (egz-)t 130. 
Ex-hil'a-rat-ed (egz-). 
Ex-hil'a-rat-Ing (egz-). 
Ex-hll-a-ra'tion iegz-). 
Exhort' iegz-), 17, 137, 

139. 
Ex-hor-to'ti<m («*«-)• 
Ex-hort'a-tlvo iegz). 
Ex-hort'a-to-ry (egz). 
Ex-hort'er iegz-). 
Ex-hu-ma'aon ieks-). 
Exhume' iegz-), M, 

137 139. 
Ex-humed' iegz-k»md')y 

183. 
Ex-hum'ing (<y«-)- 
[Exlocafe, 203,— 

See ExBiooate.1 
Ex'i-gr<^noef 137, IW. 
Bx'i-gcn-oy, 169. 
Ex'i-ffent. 
Ex-l-gu'I-ty. m. 
Ex-ig'u-ofia. 
Ex'ile («**'lOi »• 81, 

137 
Ex'il'e iett*iDf v. [bo 

8m. Od. ; egzW, 

Wk. ; «^-ar«'» or ett'- 

1/, Wr. 165.1 
Bx-ne' (€y-««')» a. [fo 

Wk. Sm.Wr.i eW'Wi 

Gd. 166.] 

taliilF on th« •!/• of «h« 
may be quertlon«d wheth- 
oty." Walker. 



196 

Ex'Hed, 183. 
Ex'il-lnff. 
ExU'i-tT iegz-). 
Ex-lst' (egz-), 137. 
Ex-lBt'ed iegz). 
Ex-iat'enoe iegz-), 109. 
Ex-iat'ent iegz). 
Ex-lat'ing iegz-). 
Ex'it, 137. 
Ex-mayor (-ma'ur, or 

-m#r'5, 222, N. 
Ex'ode. 
Ex'o-duB. 
£» o/n'ei^ (L.) (€*«- 

Ex'o-gen. 

Ex-og^en-ofta (-q^'-)« 
Ex-on'er-ate (a^e-), 137. 
Ex-on'er-at-ea iegz-), 

183. 
Ex-on'er-at-ing (e|9«-). 
Ex-on-er-a'tion (egz-). 
Ex-on'er-at-lTe (egz-) 

[so 8m. legz-onfur-a- 

Hv, Wr. Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Ex-o-phj^l'lofia, or Ex- 

oph^l-lona. [iSm Ade- 

nophyllouB.T 
Ex'o-ra-ble, 104. 
Ex-or'bi-tanoe iegz-). 
Ex-or'bl-tan-oy iegz-), 

169. 
Ex-or'bl-tant (egz-). 
Ex'or-dse f-airr-af«) 

r20e^ [not eka-or'rix, 

Ex'or-ciaed (-Zizd), 183. 
Ex'or-cis-cr i-sU-). 
Ex'or-ciH-iDg i-^z-). 
Ex'or-dBm l-eizm), 136. 
Ex'or-dat. 
Ex-or'di-al iegz-), 
Ex'OB-mose [ao Sm. 
Gd. i eks-oz^mas', Wr. 

Ex-oB^ae-ofia [ao Wr. 
Wb. Gd. i eks-o$h'*u», 
8m. iSee §26); dfci- 
osk'e^us, Wk. 166.1 

Ex-08-to'aiB, 109, 126. 

Bx-o-tCr'ic, 100. 

Ex-o-ter'io-al, 108. 

Ex-ot'lc. 

Ex-ot'lc-al. 

Ex-ot'i-eism i-Htm). 

Ex-pand', 10, 187. 

Ex-pand'ed. 

Ex-pand'ing. 

Ex-panae'. 10, 137. 

Ex-pan-ai-bil'i-ty. 

Ex-pan'ai-ble, IM. 

£x-pan'Blon. 

Ex-pan'aXye, 84. 



EXPERIMENT AUl 

Ex^e-dl'tioaa (-dui 

E3MM'ti^te(-aftl-«/) 

Wk. 8m. Wr.; eti 

pa' thai, Wb. Gd 
Ex-pa'ti-at-ed (thV). 
Ex-pa'tt^at-ing ( «JkI-) — < 
Ex-pa-ti-a'tioii (^1). — 
Ex-pa'ti4it-or (Ml). 
Ex-pa'd^-to ry i-ekVy^ 
Ex-pa'trl-ate. 
Ex-pa'tri-at-ed, 183. 
Ex-pa'tri-it-lng. 
Ex-pa-tri-a'tion. 
Expect', 15, 137. 
Ex-pect'anoe, 169. 
Ex-pecfan-cy, 169. 
Ex-pect'ant. 
Ex-pect-a'tion. 
Ex-pect'ed, 160. 
Ex-pect'er. 
Ex-peot'iiig. 
Ex-pee'to-rant. 
Ex-pee'to-rate, 73. 
Ex-pec'to-rit-ed. 
Ex-pec'to-rat-ing. 
Ex-peo-to-ra'tion. 
Ex-peo'to-rat-lTe (84)^ 

[bo Sm. ; ekz-ptVUhra — 

Hv, Wr. Wb. Gd^ 

165.] 
Ex-pe'dl-enoe. 
Ex-pe'di-en-«y, 109. 
Exj>e'dl-ent [ao Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; etz-pf- 

di-eni, or ekz-prji- 

ent, Wk. 166.] 
Ex'pe-dlte. 
Ex'pe-dit-ed, 183. 
Ex'pe-dit-iiur. 
Ex-pe-dl'tion i^diA*- 

un), 231, Exc 
Ex-pe-dl'tion-a-rj 

i-dizh'un-), 72. 
Ex-pe-di'Uoaa i-ditk'- 

Ex-pel', 16, 1S7. 
Ex-pel'ia4)le, 104, 176. 
Ex-peUed' i-pdd'), 166. 
Ex-pel'ler, 170. 
Ex-pel'ling. 
Ex-pend', 16, 137. 
Ex-pend'ed. 
Ex-pend'ing. 
Exipend'i-tare, 109. 
Ex-penae', 16, 137. 
Ex-pen'alye, 84. 
Ex-pe'ri-enoe, 109. 
Ex-pe'rl-enoed (-ouO* 
Ex-pe'ri-eii9-iiig, 183. 
Ex-per'1-ment. 169. 
Ex-per-l-ment'aL 
Ex-pCr-l-menfal-iat. 



JSI 




I 



J— 



irijjTKaTy.'^vi*'*'''**'*'^''*^**"'*"*"'^"'***^*"'* 



IBIENTALLT 



197 



EXTENSIBILITY 



-meat'sl-ly. 

-ment-a'ri-an. 

-moit-a'tion. 

-ment-er. 

-ment-iBt. 

, a. A fu (21, 

»<ekB'pait,153.J 

ble, lOi. 

e, 73. 



-tag. 
tion. 

to-ry (M) [bo 

n>. Gd. , elv^- 

/, Sm.] 

L-ble, 164. 

I'tlon, 171. 

k-to-ry, 49, K. 

', 25, 137. 

d, 183. 

ng. 

i', 23, 137. 

I'a-ble, 164. 

ned', 166. 

a'er. 

a'ing. 

na'tloii. 

I'a-to-iy, 86. 

are, 84. 

to-ry. 

Able (164) [not 

k'a-bl, 153.1 

Ate, 73, 137. 

»t-ed, 183. 

ait-ing. 

a&'tjon, 112. 

»M¥e, 84. 

dt-or. 

»t-o-ry [bo 8m. 

eks'p&-£a4o-ry, 

jkl. 155.] 

'it, 171. 

le', 24, 137. 

fed, 183. 

I'er. 

I'ing. 

t' (27, 121) [not 

>ity 15:J.] 

n'tion. 

•'a-to-ry. 

•e', 24, 137. 

ed', 183. 

•'er, 49, N. 

•'Ing'. 

sion {-zkun)tlVL 

Bfre, 84. 

lent (122) [not 

-Dent, 15.3.1 

len'Ual (-<Aa{). 

;',r. 137, 161. 

;, fi. 137, 161. 

/a-ble, 164. 

;<a'tion. 



Ez-pdrt'ed. 
Ex-port'er. 
£x-pdrt'ing. 
Ex-poBe' (^6«0f V- 101* 
Exposi (Ft.) {ekt-po- 

z&% n. 161. 
Ex-pdsed' (,-p9zd'), 183. 
Ex-poB'er (-^«'-). 
£x^)d8'ing {-pSar-). 
Ex-po-Bl'tion i-zigh'- 

ttti). 
Ex-poB'1-tXye {-poz'-). 
Ex-po8'i-tor {-poz'-), 
Ex-poB'i-to-ry {-poz*-). 
£x-poB'tu-late, 73. 
Ex-poB'tu-lat-ed. 
Ex-poB'tu-lat-ing. 
£x-poB-tu-la'tlon. 
Ex-poB'tu-lat-or. 
£x-poB'tu-U-to-ry [bo 

Wr. Wb. (Sd.; ekz- 

pos'tn-UU-o-rtf, 8m. 

166.J 
£x-po8'iire (-pOz'-)j 91, 

112. 
Ex-pound', 28, 137. 
£x-pottnd'ed. 
Ex-pound'er. 
Ex-poand'tng. 
Ex-preB'i-dent (-prez*-), 

232, Note. 
Ex-pre88^ 15, 137. 
Ex-preBs'age.' 
Ex-preBseo' i-preat*). 

Note C, p. 34. 
Ex-preBB'i-ble, 164, 169. 
Ex-prea'Bion {-prtah'- 

un). 
Ex-preBBTve, 84. 
Ex'pro-brate [so 8m. 

Wb. Gd.; ekspro'- 

br&ty Wk.; eks-Dro'- 

6rM, or eks'pro-hrdt, 

Wr. 155.] 
Ex'pro-brat-ed, 183. 
Ex'pro^rat-ing. 
£x-pro-bra'tion. 
Ex-pro'bra-tlve. 
Ex-pro'pri-ate. 
Ex-pro'pri-at-ed, 183. 
Ex-pro'prl-at-ing. 




pug^i 
£x-pug-na'tion. 
Ex-pugned' {-p^nd'), 
Ex-pagn'er (-pftn'-). 
Ex-pagn'ing (-p«n'-)» 
Ex-pul'Bion. 
Ex-puFsTre. 
Ex-punc'tion. 
Ex-pnnge'. 22, 137. 
Ex-pungea% 183. 



Ex-pnns'ing (puny-). 
Ex-porgate [io Sm. 

Wr. j eka-pur'glUt or 

ekt'pw-a&t, Qd. 155.] 
Ex-pur'gat-ed, 183. 
Ex-pur'gaMng. 
Ex-pur-ga'tioQ, 112. 
Ex-pur'ga-tor, or Ex'- 

pnr-gM^r [bo Wr. , 

ek»-pur'ga-tor, 8m. ; 

eks'pur-gHt-or, Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Ex-pur'ga-to-ry, 86. 
Ex'qol-^te {ekt'kuH- 

zU) (137, 162) [noi 

ekB-kwiz'it. 153.] 
Ex-Ban-guin'i-ty 

{-gww-). 
Ex-Ban'gui-no&B 

{-acm&gWi), 
Ex-Ban'gai-olkB (-«at|^- 

gtD%-). 
Ex-Bdnd' i-Hnd% 162. 
Ex-soind'ea (-nmf'-). 
Ex-Bdnd'ing C-timd'-). 
Ex-Bert', 21, N. 
£x-Bert'ed. 
Ex-Bertlle, 162. 
Ex-Blc'cant. 
Ex-Bio'cate [ao Wk. 

Sm. Wr. ; tka-Hk'k&tj 

or eka'sik-k&tt Gd. 

155.] [Ex locate, 

203.J 
Ex-Bie'cat-cd, 183. 
Ex-sic'cat-ing. 
£x-Bie-ea'tion. 
Ex-sic'ca-tlve, 84. 
Ex-Hpu-I'tion (-i»V«n). 
£x-8tip'u-Iate. 
Ex-Buc'ootts (170) [E X- 

accouB, 20:i.] 
Ex-Buo'tion. 
[ExBadation, 203. 

— See Exudation.] 
Ex'tant, 137, 169. 
[Extatic, 203. — .^M 

Ecstatic.] 
Ex-tem-po-ra'ne-ott s, 

169. 
Ex-tem'po-ra-iy, 72. 
Ex-tem'po-re [not eks- 

tem'por, 144, 153.] 
Ex-tem'po-rize, 202. 
Ex-tcm'po-rized, 183. 
Ex-tem'po-riz-cr. 
Ex-tem'po-riz-ing. 
Ex-tendS 16, 137. 
Ex-tend'ed. 
Ex-tend'er. 
£x-tend'l-ble, 164, 169. 
Ex-tend'ing. 
Exten-Bl-bil'i-ty, 169. 



i# im tbare ; Ob at in foot ; 9 at <n faoUe ; gh <w g in-go i^asin tbia. 

17* 



J 



EXTENSIBLE 



198 



FABRICATION 



•ten'8i<ble, IM. 

Ex-ten'Blle, ISH. 

Ex-ten'slon. 

Ex-ten'Blre, 84. 

£x-ten'8or. 

Extent', 15, 137. 

Ex-ten'u-ate, 73, 89. 

Ex-ten'u-At-od, 183. 

Ex-ten'u-it-ingf. 

Ex-ten-u-a'tion. 

Ex-ten'u-atror. 

Ex-te'ri-or, «, N. j 118. 

Ex-te-ri-dr'ity, 109. 

Ex-ter'ml-natc, 21, N. 

Ex-tcWmi-niit-cd, 183. 

Kx-tcr'mi-iiiit -ing^. 

Ex-ter-mi-ua'tioQ 

Ex-ter'mi-uat -or. 

Ex-tcr'ml-na-to-ry (86) 
[BO Wr. Wb. GtLi 
ek8-ter' mi-nHt-o-rfft 
am. 1&5.1 

Ex-tern', 21, N. 

Ex-teHnal. 

Ex-ter-nari-ty, 109. 

Ex-tcr-ra'ue-ods. 

Ex-tcr'Bion. 

Extinct' {-tingbt% 10, 

Ex-tinc'tion. 
Ex-tin'^ulBh i-ting'- 

gwUn)y 1(H. 
Ex-tin'^uiHh-a-blo 

171. 
Ex-tln'guiBhed (^-tina'- 

gwisht)^ Note C, p. 34. 
Ex-tin'guiBh-cr {-ting'- 

gwuih-). 
Ex-tin'^sh-ing (-fin^- 

gtcish-). 
Ex-tiu'guiBh-ment 

I rift 



{-Hn&gwUh). 
Ix-tir^n 



Ex-tir^pH-blo, 164. 
Ex tir'pate, 21, N. 
Ex-tir'iwt-ea, 183. 
Ex-tir'pat-ing. 
Ex-tlr-pa'tion. 
Ex-tir'pat-or, or Ex'- 

tir-pat-or [bo Wr. ; 

eks-lir'pat-ttr, Wk. 

Sni. ; ekx' tirpHt-ort 

Wb. Gd. 155.J 



Extol' 

153. 
Ex-to 



{not eks-tol'. 



Icxl' (WW), 176. 
Ex-tol'ler. 
Ex-tol'Uiig. 
Ex-tor' Blve, 8*. 
Ex-tort', 17, 137. 
Ex-tort'ed. 
£x-tort'ing. 
Ex-tor'tiou. 



Ex-tor'tioii-«-i7, 72. 
Ex-tor'tlon-ate, 73. 
Ex-tor' tion-4?r. 
Ex'tra (72) [tiof eki'tri, 

153.1 
Kx'tract, f». 103, 161. 
Ex-tract', v. 103, 161. 
Ex-traot'ed. 
Ex-tract'ing. 
£x-trac'tion. 
£x-tract^ve, 84. 
£x-tract'or, 88. 
Ex-tra-dl'tion (-ditJk'- 

tin). 
Ex-tra'doa. 
Ex-tra-do'tal, 222. 
£x tra-Ju-dl'dal {-dithf- 

oi), 222. 
Ex-tra'ne-o&s, 106, 160. 
£x-traor'di-na-rl-ly 

{-iror'-). 72. 
Ex-traor'ai-na-ry 

(-*rorM (17, 72, 171) 

[bo WTc. Sm. Wb. 

Grd. i ek»-tror'di'na- 

rp, or eka-tra-or'di- 

na-rjfj Wr. 155.1 
Ex-trav'a-ganoe, 160. 
£x-tray'a-gant. 
£x-tray-a-gan'xa. 
Ex-tray'a-Bate. 
Ex-trav'a-Bat-ed, 183. 
£x-trav 'a-Bat-ing. 
E x-trav -a-aa'tioa. 
Extreme', 13. 
Kx-trem'ist. 
Ex-trgm'i-ty. 
Ex'tri-oa.ble, 164. 
Ex'tri-cate. 
Ex'tri-cat-ed. 
Ex-tri-ca'tion. 
Ex trin'sic, 109. 
Ex-trin'Bic-al, 106. 
Ex-trin'alo-al-ly. 
Ex-trude' (-irood'), 26. 
Ex-trud'ed {-trood'-), 

183. 
Ex-tnid'Ing (-trood'-). 
Ex-tm'sion {4roo'- 

zhun). 
Ex-ta'ber-anoe. 
Ex-tu'ber-ant. 
Ex-u'ber-anoa (€V2-)f 

137. 100. 
Ex-u'ber-ant (egz-). 
[ExuccouB, 203.— 

See ExBaocous.] 
Ex-u-da'tion. 
Ex-ude' (ek9-)f 26. 

wr ThU word If aa cz- 
c«pnon to the general rule, 
(§ 137), by which x la 
■ounded M gu at the end 




of a BTllable. when 
next qrUnble la aecen 
■ad begine with a tow< 

Ex-nd'ed, 183. 
Ex-ud'ing. 
Ex-ul'oer-ate (egM-)t I 
Ex-ul'cer-at-ed (egz- 

183. 
Ex-ul'oer-it-lng iegz-) 
Ex-ul-oer-«'tion {egz-).^^^ 
Exult' (COS), 22, 137. 
Ex-ult'aut iegz-)t 109. 
Ex-ult-a'tioD iegz-). 
Ex-u'vi~CB (L.) (€^« 

W-«), n. pi. 
Eye (I), 25, 171. 
Eye'bAil (I'-), 206. 
Eye'bright (l'6rl*), 
Eye'brow (I'-), 206. 
Eyed (l<l), 150, 183. 
Eye'-glABB, 200. 
Ey'ingfl'-), 183. 
Eye'laah (I'-). 
Eye'Iet (I'-). 
Eye'lid (I'-). 
Ey'er (I'-) (67, 183), ft- 

one who eyea. [Se^ 

Ire, 146.] 
Eye'-Bcr-vant (!'-). 
Eyo'Bight (l'«U), 162* 

206. 
Eye'Borc (I'-). 
Eye'-Btonc (I'-), 24, 156^ 
Eye'-tooth (I'-), 
Eye'-wA-ter (I'-). 
Eyc'-wlt-neBB (l'-). 
Eyre (#r), n. a journey ; 

a court of Juatioes 

itinerant. [See Air* 

Ere, Heir, TOO.] 
Ey'ry(e'rw), or Eyr'T, 

[Aerie, 203.] 



P. 

Fa-ba'oeous {-*kua), 100. 

Fa'bl-an, 78. 

Fa'ble, 23, 104, 230. 

Fa'bled (fh'bld), 183. 

Fa'bler, 77. 

Fa'bling. 

Fab'rio {bo Wr. Wb. 
Gd.i Jbbfrik, or Ji»'- 
hrik, Wk. i /ii'briJt, 
Sm. 155.] 

Fab'ric-«te, 73, 228. 

Fab'ri<>4it-ed, 183. 

Fab'rlo^t-ing. 

Fabric a'tion. 



-37. 



a, e, i, 5, Ui f, long ', &, 6, 1, 6, 0, f , ihort j ii of in fkr, katin fkat, katim 



FABRICATOR 



199 



FANNED 



F'ub'rio-at-or. 
^'ab'a-llBt, 89. 
1* aVu-lofis, 106. 
Fa.-^ade' (Fr.) i/orsud') 

[so Sm. Wr. ;/arsad', 

CM. 155.] 
ra<9e, 23. 
*'a43ed (J^st), Note C,p. 

F^et r/a*'<rf)(171), n. a 
Bmall Burfaoe or lace. 
I See Faucet, 148.1 
F'ac'et-ed (Jos'-). 
^iM^e'ti-iJB (L.) ifarsef- 

shl-t), n. pi. 
F>a-<;e'tio&8 {-ghiu), 169. 
:F*a'cial i'Shal), 169. 
Fwaie (JiK'U), 171. 
B*a-cU'i-tate, 73, 169. 
ira.^l'i-tat-ed, 183. 
K'aK^il'i-tat-iiig. 
¥*a-Gil-i-ta'tion, 112. 
F-a-cU'l-ty, 78, 169. 
Fa^'ing. 
F'ao-aim'i-U. 
V'aet, 10. 
l**ac'tion. 
Kac'tion-ist. 
Kac'tiofis {-9hus)y 169. 
f*ao-»'tious (-/itA'tM). 
Fac'tor, 88. 
yac-to'ri-al. 
Vac'to-ry, 86, 93. 
Fac-to'tum. 
Fac'ul-ty, 170. 
Fade (23), v. to vanish ; 
to decay. [See Fayed, 
160.1 
Fad'ed, 183. 
Tkd'ing. 

[FKcal, 203— 5ee Fe- 
cal. J 
Fences (L.) We'sBz), n. 

/'L [Feces, 2a'J.] 
ccala, 203. — See 
Fecula.] 
[Faery, 203. - See 

Fairy.] 
Fag, 10. 
Fag-end', 206, Exc. 3. 




Fanr'cn-heit (JTlr*en- 



10(171) r§o Gd.;/ct' 
renhU, Wr. 155.] 

Fa-ience' (Fr.) {far 
vans'). 

Fail, 23. 

Failed ( /ttW), 165. 

J'ail'ing. 

Fail'ure, 91. 

FUn, a. glad : — ad. 



gladly, [.^ee Fane, 

Feign, 160.] 
F^nt, a. weak, swoon- 
ing: — V. to grow 

weak ; to swoon. [iS'ee 

Feint, 160.] 
Faint'ed. 
Faint-he&rt'ed (206, 

Exc. 6) [bo Wk. Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; nint'hart- 

edy Wr. 155.] 
Faint'ing. 
Fair {/ir) (14), o. free 

from blemish: — n. a 

meeting for traffic. 

[5ceFare, 160.] 
Falr'y {/tr'y)^ n. & a. 

49, N. [Faery, 203.] 
Fair'y-hind i/Br'-). 
Faith, 23, 37. 
Faith'ful i-/dol), 180. 
Fa'klr Jso Sm. Gd. ; 

fbL-kerf, OTfh'kur, Wr. 

155.] [Faquir, Fa- 

qneer,203.] 



. Qoodrich pronoun- 
ce* thU word fa-keer'^ 
when it b ipelled Faquir. 

Fal-cade', 121. 

Fal'cate. 

Fal'cat-ed. 

Fal-ca'tion. 

F&l'chion i/awl'chun) 
[so Sm. Wb. Gd. i 
fatpl'shunt Wk. ; 

fawVchun, or fawV- 
Bhuut Wr. 155.] 
[not fftl'chun, 153.] 
tFaulchion,2ft3.] 

F»'con i/aw'kn) (149, 
162) [bo Wk. Sm. 
Wr. ; Vatr'Am, or fdl- 
kon, (jd. 155.] 

P^I'con-er {/aw'kn-ur) 
[bo Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 
faw'kn-ury or fal'kon- 
ur, Gd. 155.] 

F&l'conet [bo 8m. Wb. 
Gd. ; fawVkonety 

Wk. ; /(u'koneti or 
fawVko-nety Wr. 155.] 

JiU'con-ry (faw'kn-ry) 
[80 Sm. Wr. ; faw'- 
hi-ryj or faVkon-ry,, 
Gd. 155.] 

Farler'ni-an, 21, N. , 
169. 

Fan, 17, 172. 

Fal la'ciouH {-shus)^ 169. 

Fal'Ia^y, 16l», 170. 

Fallen (fawln). 

Fal-U-bil'i-ty, 169. 



Fai'U-ble, 78, 164, 170. 
Fail'ing. 
Fal-lo'pi-an. 
Fal'low, 10, 101. 
Fal'low-dcer. 
Fal'lowed (-/orf), 187. 
Fal'low-lug. 
J^lsc, 17. 
Faise-hcart'ed, 206, 

Exc. 5. 
FaiBc'hcJbd, 171. 
Fhl-set'to (It.). 
Fal'si-fi-a-ble, 104. 
Fai-Bi-n-ca'tiou, 112, 
Fai'si f led, 99, 186. 
FaFsi-fi-er. 
Fai'Bi-f y, 94. 
Fai'si-ty, 78, 93. 
Fal'tcr, 17, 77. 
Fal'tored, 160. 
Fal'tering. 
Fame, 23. 

Famed {fUmd), 183. 
Fa-mil'iar (-ywr), 61, 

171. 
Fa-mil-iftr'i ty {-y6r>%- 

ty) [bo Wb. Gd. ; 

/a-mtl4-dr'i-tyy Sm. ; 

/a-mil-yiHr'i-tyy Wk. 

Wr. 155.1 
Fa-mil'iar-lze (-yur-). 
Fa-mil'iar-ized (-yur-), 
Fa-miriar-iz-ing 

{yur-). 
Fam'i-ly, 78, 93. 
Fam'Ine, 10, 82, 152. 
Fam'ish, 10. 
Fam'ished {48ht). 
Fam'ish-lug. 
Fu'mo&s, 100, 169. 
Fan, 10. 
Fa-nat'lc, 109. 
Fa-nat'lo-al, 108. 
Fa-nat'i cTsm {-sizm). 
Fan'cled, 99, 186. 
Fun'ci-er. 
Fan'ci-ful {-/Sol). 
Fan'cy, 10, 169. 
Fan-dan'go {-dang'-). 
Fane (23), n. a temple. 

[See Feign. 160.] 
Fan'fare (Fr.) {-/ar)y 

154. 
Fan'fa-ron [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; /an'/a-rOtiy 

Wk. ; /an'/a-roriy or 

/an'fa-rOny Wr. 155.] 
Fan-fa-ron-ade', 122. 
Fang, 10, 54. 
Fanged {/angd)y 165. 
Fan'got (fang'-). 
Fan'ion {-yun). 
Fanned {/and)y 165, 176. 



hU'y ^ cu in there i (Sbtuin foot; 9 aa in facile ; gh a« g <n go j tj) a« m this. 



FANNER 



200 



FAUCET 



Fm'ner. 
Fan'ul&g. 

F€U^4a'9i^ (It.) (-«1-). 
[Fan t a B m . 203. — 5ee 

Pbantaam.j 
Fan-tas'tic, 109. 
Fan-tas'tic-al. 
Fantoccini (It.) {fan-io- 

ehl'ne). 
[Fantom, 303.— 5ce 

Phantom.] 
[Faquecr, Faquir, 

2U3. — ^ee Fakir.] 
Far, 11. 

Farce (/ilr»), 11,39. 
Far'ci-cal, 72, 78. 
Far'cin. 
Far'cy, lfl9. 
Fare l/ir) (14), n. price 

of a pasBa^c : — v. to 

travel; to be treated. 

[See Fair, IflOJ 
Fare-well' (fir-wel')t 

int. [so Sra. Gd. ;/*r- 

trW, or Jtr'ujtl, Wr. ; 

fir' welt or ftr^u>el\ 

/ar'tPcZ, or /drwel', 

Wk. 165.] 

W^ '* When it !■ umkI 
M an Interjection . . . the 
accent Is either on the 
flint or •econd aylUble, •« 
the rhythm of pronuncia- 
tion eeeiiu lo require." 
WaUoer. 

Fare'well (ftr^ipel), n. 
[eo Sm. Wr. ; ffr'weU 
or Jtr-wel' j/ur'wel^ or 
fUrwcl', Wk.i Jtr- 
wel'y Gd. 155.] 

0^ " When it ii need ■• 
a eubftantive, without an 
adjective before it, the ac- 
cent ia grncntUy on the 
llret •yllable." WaltfT.— 
*' It majr be met with in 
poetry acconted a« the 
parent word ffkre-wt'll', 
tnt.y, . . . otherwise the 
proper accent is the one 
aui^ned [fare'well].'* 

Smart. 

Fare' well (ftr'toel), a. 
[so Sm. Wr. ; (tr'weU 
or/ar'tre/, Wk. 155.J 



._ Webflter and Good- 
rich do not give this word 
aa an adjective. Walker 
remarka : " Wh««n it ia 
uaod aa an adjectire, the 
accent ti always on the 
first syllable: as. 'A/air'- 
wrll sermon." " The words 
of Smart, as q noted under 
the noun, apply also to the 
a^jfCtlTe. 



Far-fletched' (fiBeht*), 
a06, Exc. 6. 

Fa-ri'na. 

Fftr-1-na'oeoui C-thut), 
112. 

Flr'i-noae. 

Farm, 11, 135. 

Farm'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Farmed (/arwMi), 105. 

Farm'er. 

Farm'er-7, 233, Exo. 

Farm'ins^. 

Far'o (/9r*o). 

FAr-ra'go. 

FAr'ri-er. 

Fftr'ri-er-y, 171. 

FAr'rdw, 66, 101. 

Far'thcr, aa. to a great- 
er distance : — a. more 
remote. [See Father, 
148.J t^'urther, 
203.] 

i^'*The lattm* {/^tr- 
fAerl is thefenuine Saxon 
word; the former iJar- 
ther] takes precedence in 
modem use." Sutart, 
** Both are ia good use." 
Worcetter. 

Far'ther-most [ F a r - 

thermo8t,203.] 
Far'thest [Furthest, 

Far' thing, 11, 38, 54. 
Far'tHin-gale {-thing' 

g&lJ[M Sm. Gd. i/ar'- 

(fiin-g&L Wr. i far»- 

t^inggily Wk. 155.1 
F(M'ci8 (L.) (-8tz)t n,pi. 
Fas'ci-a i/(uh'i~a). 
Fas'dal {fash'yai) (171) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; /aah'i- 

alj (M. 155.] 
Fas'ci-ate (fash'i-at). 
Fns'cl-at^jd ( /iw*'^a^). 
Fas-d-a'tion (/oaAl). 
Fas'cl-cle, 164. 
Fas'd-cled {IM), 183. 
Fas-clc'u-lar, 108. 
Fits-cic'n-latc, 108. 
Ftts-cic' u-lat-ed. 
Fns-cic'u-ltu (L.) [pi. 

FoB-cic'u-n, 19S.] 
Fas'ci-nate, 160. 
Fas'cl-nat-cd, 183. 
Fns'cl-nat-lng. 
Fa8-<;l-na'tion, 112. 
Fas-cine' (-««n'), 121. 
Fash 'ion {fash'un), 171. 
Fash'ion-a-ble {f<uh'- 

un^a-bl), 161, 160. 
Fash'ioned (/a<A'timf), 

165. 



Fash'ion-er {/ask'un)^ 
Faah'ion-ing {fatk^ 

MR-). 

Fast, 12, 131. 

Faat-day. 

Fast'cn {fU*n), 149, 1„ 

Fast'ened {fiit'nd), ISO. 

Faat'en-ing (/^'»»-). 

Fas-tid'i-o&s (169) [sec 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.. 

ftiM-tid'i-uSf or 

Ud'H-ua, Wk. 155.^ 
FlB-tig'i-ate (-*(/'-). 
Ffts-Ug 'i-at-ed {-*&•>- 
Fast'hig. 
Fat, 10. 
Fa'tal, 23, 72. 
Fa'tal-ism (-ism), 136. 
Fa'tal-ist. 
Fa-tal'i-ty, 169. 
Fate (2.3), n. destinT. 

[See F6te, 160.] 
Fit'od. 
Fa'ther (11, 38), n. a 

male parent. [Set 

Farther, 14<J.] 
Fathered (-Muni), ISO. 
Fa'tEcr-hObS: 
Fa'tEer-ing. 
Fa'tEcr»in-law. 
Fa'tHer-li-ness, 160. 
Fa'tTior-ly, 93. 
FatH'om, 169. 
Fatli'om-.a-ble, 164. 
FatTi'omed (-uumI), 150. 
FaUd'ic^d, 108. 
Fa-tiTer-ofts, 108. 
Fatigue' (-/*7'), 171. 
Fatigued' {-tegd'), 183. 
Fa-tigu'in«f {-tig'-). 
Fa-tiPo-qidst. 
Fa-tis'cenoe, 171. 
Fat'ling. 
[Fatner, 203. — See 

Fattener.l 
Fat'ted, 176. 
Fat'ten (/M'n), 149. 
Fat'tened (yWnrf), 183, 
Fat'ten-er (/a<'»-«r) 

[Fatner, 203.] 
Fat'ti-nesB, 169. 
Fat'ting, 176. 
Fat'ty, 169, 170. 
Fa-tu'l-tot&B. 
Fa-tu'l-ty. 
Fat'n-ofis, 89, 100. 
Fau'baurg {Ft.) (/©'- 

boorg). 
F&u'ces (L.) (-ate), «. 

Fiu'cet (171), n. a spout 
with a spigot for 
drawing liquor ftt>m 





a, e, i, 6, u, y, long ; li, <>, 1, 6, fi, f, short ilkoiin far, kat in fltat, ktuim 



I 



liULT 



201 



FELWORT 



[Ste F^wet, 

156. 
s«, 169. 
3. 
}, n. a mnd 

[SteFawn.] 



(Fr.) ifofpa). 
lie [bo Wr. ; 
at, Gd. 155.] 
8, 170. 
t,88. 
r , Sm. 199, 

imrt inMffti the u 
• derlTativM of 

!>le, 164. 
C-vvnl), 150. 

!, 83, 152. 
lam {-izm). 

I, n. the young 
allow deer : — 
court favor, 
an, 100.] 
foMmd), 150. 
11,77. 

V. 23. 

rf)a87),r.dld 
to Fade, 16a] 

144. 

J7. 

rrd), 165. 

r. wb. Gd. ; 
or /tr'/oolf 

f {-/Sol), 170. 
I'M (-fiat^) 
[F c a r - 
it, 203.] 

203.— 5^ 

1-ty (-«1-). 
(-2f M)> 164. 



7. 

an exploit. 

;l,160.] 
15, 38, 77. 
I, 150, 171. 



FSat'ore, 13, 91. 
Feat'nred (-purd), 183. 
F^aze (13) FFease, 

Fhee8e,203.] 
Feazed, 165, 183. 
Feaz'inff. 

Feb-ri-ft'dent i-shent). 
Fe-brifer-otts, 108. 
Fe-brific, 109. 
Fe-brirn-nl [w Wr.j 

feb-H-APoal, Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Feb'rf-flige, 160. 
Fe'brile, or Feb'rlle 

fl52) [so Wr. Wb. 

Gd.;/l6'r«,Wk.Sm. 

155.] 
Feb'ru-a-ry {-roo-) (72, 

171} [not feb'n^-ry, 

142, 153J 
Fe'cal [Fiecal, 203.] 
[Feces. 203. — ^S^ 

Fiecefl.j 
Fe'dal (-Mhal). 
Fe'cit (L.). 
Foc'u-Ia (108) [Fsca- 

la, 203.] 
Fec'u-lence, 109. 
Fec'u-lcn cy. 
Fpc'u-Ient. 
Fec'und [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; fe'kundj Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Feo'an-date [no 8m. ; 

fdkvm^dlUy Wb. (5d. ; 

ft-kun'cUU, or Jdfun- 

dat, Wr. 155.] 
Fcc-un-da'tion, 112. 
Fe-cund'l-ty, 169. 
Fed. 15. 

Fed'er-al, 233, Exc. 
Fed'er-ai-lBm, 133, 136. 
Fed'or-al-ist. 
Fed'er-al-ize, 202. 
Fed'cr-al-ized, 183. 
Fed'er-al-iz-ing. 
Fed'er-ate, 73. 
Fed-er-a'tion. 
Fcd'er-at-Ive [so 8m. 

fed'er-a-Hv, Wr. Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Fee, 13. 
Fee'ble, 164. 
Fee'bly, 93. 
Feed (188), part, from 

Fee. 
Feed, «. to enpply with 

food ; to take food. 
Feed'er, 77. 
Fecd'lng. 
Fee'ing. 
Feel, 13. 
Feerer. 



Feel'lng. 

Foe'-8lm'ple, 164, 205. 

Feet, ». plural of Foot. 
[See Feat, 160]. 

Fee'-tail', 206. 

Feign (/an) (23, 162}, «. 
to (UBBemble. [Sm 
Fane, 160.1 

Feigned (/&fu<), 162, 
171. 

Feign'ing (/»»'-). 

Feint ifint) (2:J), n. a 
false appearance. [ See 
Faint, im.] 

[Fc lander 8, 203.— 
See Fllanders.] 

[Feldspar, 203.— 
See Felspar.] 

Fe-Uo'i-tate, 73, 169. 

Fe-li^'i-tat-ed, 183. 

Fe-li9'i-tat-ing. 

Fe-ll5-l-ta'tion. 

Fe-Uca-tods, 171. 

Fo-U5'i-ty, 169. 

Fe'line, 152. 

Fell, a. A v. 15, 172. . 

FeU'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Felled (/eW), 165. 

Fell'er, 77. 

Fell'ing. 

Fel'loe, n. the rim of a 
wheel. [See Fellow, 
160.] [Felly, 203.] 

Fel'low (101), n. a com- 
panion. [See Felloe, 
100.] 

Fel'low-crcat'ure, 205. 

Fel'ly, ad. 66, N. 

Fel'ly, n. (06) [Fel- 
loe, 203.] 

tr FkUv ii now the 
more usual ■pelUog of thie 
word. 

Fel'on, 86, 170. 
Fe-lo'nl-otiB, 78, 100. 
Fel'on-y, 93. 
Fel'spar [Feldsp 
203.] 



*r, 



■S^ Smsrt givee only 
the form ffhiMr^ and 
WorceBt45rpreferii It. Web- 
ster Mid Ckmdrich preftr 
ftldnpar. snd give aUo the 
forma re Ida path and 
felapath. 

Fel-spath'lo, 109. 
Felt, n. ft V. 15. 
Felt'ed. 
Felt'ing. 
Fe-luc^, 170. 
Fel'wort {^wurt). 



{» there; db m M foot ; 9 at <n fhdle ; gh m g tn go ; t|) a« in this. 



FEMALE 



202 



FIBBED 



Fe'nule. 

Feme'covert (Ft.) (Jfm- 

ko^vert') [bo Sm. ; 

f&m-ko-vert' t or fim- 

kufffuri, Wr. J /tm- 

kui/urt, Wb. Gd. IW, 

155.] 
Fem^»ole (Ft.) {Jtm- 

96V) [ao Sm. ; /IFr»- 

m', Gd. i fnms6l', 

Wr. 154, 165.] 
Fem'i-nal. 
Fem-1-nal'i-ty, 169. 
Fem'i-ume, 152, 171. 
Fem'o-ral, 72. 
Fe'mur (L.) [pi. ^cui'o- 

ra, 196.] 
Fen, 15. 
Fence, 15, 99. 
Fenced (fenst) (166, 

183) ; Note C, p. 34. 
Fenj'er, 77, 183. 
Fen^'i blc, a. IGi. 
FenQ^i-bles (-biz), n.pl. 
Fen^'ing. 
Fend, 15. 
Fcnd'cd. 
Fcnd'er, 77. 
Fend'ing. 
Fe-nes'tral, 72. 
Fe-nes'tratc, a. 73. 
Fen-CB-tra'tion. 
Fen'nec, 170. 
Fen'nel, CO, 170. 
Fen'uy, 17rt. 
[Feod, 203. — 5c« 

Feud.n 
Feoff(/V), 171. 
FCofTee, or F6off-ee' 

(118 ) [80 Wr. ; fefee, 

Wk. Sm. ; ftf-ee'j 

Wb. Gd. 155.1^ 
FfiolTer, or FfiolTor, 

118. 
F^lfment. 
Fc'rl-al, 72, 78. 
Fe'rine, 152. 
Ferment', v. 103, 161. 
Fer'ment, n. 21, N. ; 

161. 
Fer-ment-a-bil'i-tjr. 
Fer-ment'a-ble, 164, 

169. 
Fer-ment-a'tion. 
Fer-ment'a-tTve. 
Fer-ment'cd. 
Fer-ment'Injf. 
Fern, 21, N. 
Fem'y, 93, 169. 
Fero'ciouB (-«AtM), 169. 
Fe-rog'l-ty, 169, 171. 
Ffir-ra-rese' (-rlz'). 
Fdr're-oGs, 100, 170. 



Fer^ret, tk A v. 66, 170. 

Fer'ret-ed. 

Fer'ret^r. 

F5r'ret-ing. 

Ffir'ri-age, 70, 171. 

Fdr'rled, 99. 

Fer-rlTer-ouB, 108. 

F6r-ro-cy'an-ate. 

FCr-ro-cy-an'ic, 109. 

F6r-ro-cy'an-Ide [Fer- 
rocyanid,203.J 

Ffir-ro-cy-an'o-gcn. 

F6r-ro-pru8'8l-ate 
(-priMft'l), 46, 73. 

FCr-ro-pruB'sic. 

FCr-ru'gi-nat-ed. 

Fer-ru'gi-nofiB, 169. 

Fer'rule (/er'ril) (90, 
171) [bo Wk. Sm.; 
fir'rUf or fer'nUy 
Wr. ; ftr'rily or fir*- 
ral, Gd. 155], n. a 
ringf put round any 
thing to keep it from 
splitting. [See Fer- 
ule, 14871 

Fer'ry, 66, 170. 

Ffir'ry-boat, 209. 

Fer'tfle, 21, N. ; 162. 

Fer-til'l-ty, 169. 

Fer-til-I-za' tlon. 

Fer'til-ize, 202. 

Fcr'til-Ized, 183. 

Fer'til-ia-er. 

Fer'til-iz-lng. 

Fer-u-la'oeouB (-shuB)^ 
80 169. 

Fer'ule * i/lr'Hl, or 
fMr'nO) [bo CW. ; 
/ir'ul, Wr. 155], n. a 
ruler or Bimilar in- 
Btniment used in 
BohoolB to punish 
children bj striking 
the palm or the hand : 
— V. to punish \«ith 
the ferule. [5« Fer- 
rule, 148.] 

Fgr'uled (/ir'ildy or 
fMr'riad), 165, ISJ. 

Ffir'ul-ing ifir'ril-, or 

/«r'H«-). 
Fer'ven-cy, 169. 

Fer'vent, 21, N. 
Fer'vid, 169. 
Fcr'vor, 88. 
FeB'cue, 171. 
Fes'cued (-l:fl<f)i 133 
FeB'cu-lng. 
FeB'els f ■«/«), «. pi. 
Fesse (fes). 
Fes'tal, 15, 72. 
Fes'ter, 15, 77. 



FeB'tered, 160. 
Fea'tcr-ing. 
Fea'ti-val, 72, 169. 
Fes'tlve, 84. 
Fea-tlv'1-ty, 169. 
Fes-toon', J21. 
Festooned' (4oond'). 
Fes'tu-dtne, 152. 
Fes'tu-oofifl [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. y fea4u'bui, 

Wk. Wr. 165.] 
Fe'tal. 
Fetch, 16, 44. 
Fetclied (yte«), 165; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Fetch'ing. 
FHe (Fr.) r/W), n. a 

festival. [See Fate, 

160.1 
Fite-cham-pitre (Fr.) 

(^fU-sham-pdtr*). 
Fe'tich ( fwA), 171. 
Fet'ich-iBm {-Uh-izm), 

or Fefi-dsm (sVsm)^ 

133, 136. 
Fet'id {not fe'tid, 163.] 
Fe-tif er-oHs, 106. 
Fet'lock. 
Fe'tor {-imor), 88. 
Fet'ter, 170. 
Fet'tered, 160. 
Fet'ter-ing. 
Fe'tuB [pi. Fe'tus-cs 

(-fe) [Foetus, 203.1 
Feud (ylld) (26) [Feed, 

203.] 
Feud'al, 72. 
Felid'al-ism (-i>iii), 130. 
Fcu^al'i-ty, 169. 
Feu -dai-T-za' tlon. 
Fcu'dal-ize, 202. 
Fcu'dal-ized, 183. 
Fcu'dal-iz-ing. 
Feu'da-ry, 72. 
Feu'da-to-ry, a. k n. 

[Feudatary, 20:i.] 
Feu. deioie (Fr.) 0>^ 

duh znwa')y 154. 
Feud'ist. 
FeuiUemorte (Fr.) (Joo'- 

a-mort)t 154. 



"It U AngliciicJ 
Into JUe-mot/' Smart. 

FeuUUton (Fr.) (/w'lV 

tdng)j 154. 
Fe'ver, 13, 77. 
Fe'ver-few {-fu). 
Few ifa)y 26. 
Fiacre (Fr.) (/fe-^'Ir). 
Fi'at. 
I-^b, 16. 
Fibbed {fibd), 176. 



a» e, i, 6, u, y, long ;&,€,!, 6, ft, f, short ; i oi in fur, k as in fkst, kasin 



FIBBER 



_'bcr. 
gybing. 

L-^Tire (164) [Fiber, 
"^?1). Gki. 203. — 5«e 
B,^ ^ote E, p. 70.] 
g^ n>ril [not flb'ril. 153.] 
^^ -bril'IoiU [80 Gd. ;/1- 

mTr. 155. 1 

I'brtne (152) Inot flb'- 
rln, 153.] [Fibrin, 
203.] 

I'brln-oiisr BO Gd.yfib^- 
rin^ua^ Wr. 155.] 
B^'broOB, 25, 100, 109. 
^^*lb'a-U (L.) [pL FiVu- 
Ue, 106.] 

le (M't), IM. 
c'ljr. 
X^c'tlle, 152. 
:ft>ne'tion, 16, 46w 
:Knc'tion-al. 
:Kinc'tion-i8t. 
¥1o-«['tioa8 i4i»h'u$), 
:»nc'tor i-tawr), 88. 

:rid, 16. 

Vid'cile, 1(H. 
lind'dled cyW'W). 
JiMd'dler, 183* 
Tld'dUngr. 
n-del'i-tjr (79, 169) [not 

fi-del'1-ty, 153.] 
Tidg'et. 
Fidg'et-ed, 176. 
Fkig'et-i-ness, 169. 
Fldg'et-ing. 



Fldg'et-y, 93. 
Fr-du'< 



'c\aX ishal)y 79. 

Fl-du'd-a-ry (sht-chry) 
[bo Wk. Wr.\n-du'- 
iha^ryy Sm. Wb. Gd. 
155.] [203.] 

Re(/l), <n/.(25)[Fy, 

Fief (/*/), 13. 

Field (>W), 13. 

Fleld'lare (^fild'flr) [so 
Wr Wb. Gd. ; fild'- 
Jtr, ooU. /«'/»r, Sm. 
155.] 

FIdnd {find) \not fSnd, 
127, 153,] 

Flend'ilke, 206, Exc. 5. 

Fierce {Jiri) [bo 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; f%riy 
OT/irt, Wk. 155.] 



" The flnt mode of 
proDoandng this word 
i/«rf] is the nuMrt general: 
uie Mcond \Jh^\, u heard 
[imncbiefly on the atnge.** 

FVe-r% Fa'ci-a»{L,.) (ft'- 
€-r%/a'Bhlr<ui), 



203 

M'er-i-ly, 169. 

FI'er-l-neBB, 171. 

Fl'er-y, 93. 

Fife, 25. 

l-^fed (/I/O, 183. 

Kf er, 77. 

Fifing. 

Fifteen [5ee Eighteen.] 

Fifteenth. 

Fifth, 16, 37. 

Fifti-eth. 

Fifty, 93. 

Fig, 16. 

Fight (/K), 25, 162. 

Fight'er (/!<'-)• 

Fight'ing (/«'-). 

Fig'ment. 

Fig'-trce, 206, Exc. 4. 

Fig-u-ra-bll'i-ty, 169. 

Fig'a-nfc-ble, IM. 

Fi^'u-ral. 

Fia'tHrihU{Tr.), n. mai. 
\%o Gd. J flg'u-rAntf 
Wr. ; Jlg-u-rdng' t Sm. 
155.] 

Fig'u-rarUe (Fr.), n. 
/em. [bo Gd.; flg^- 
rdnt'y Wr. ; /w-tf- 
r0n^, Sm. 155.] 

Flg'u-rate. 

Fig'u-rat-ed, 

Fig-u-ra'tion. 

Fig'u-ra-tlve, 84. 

Fig'ure, 91. 

Fig'ured (^-yurd). 

Fig'ur-ing (-ywr). 

FI^a'ceouB (-«Ai««), 79. 

Fil'a-cer. 

Fil'a-ment. 

Fil-a-ment'oQB. 

Fil'an-ders (-durz)y n. 
pi. [FelanderB, 
203.] 

Fil'a-to-ry. 

Fii'a-ture. 

Fil'bert. 

Filch, 16, 44, N. 2. 

Filched {filcM)y IflS ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Filch'er. 

Filch'ing. 

File (25), n. a thread ; a 
list ; an inntniment 
for abrading: — v. to 
Btring upon a thread ; 
to place upon file ; to 
abrade with a file. [ See 
Phyle, 160.] 

Filed, 183. 

Fil'e-mot [See Feulllft- 
morte.] 

Fil'er. 

Fil'ial {^al)y 16, 51. 



FINANCIBB 

FU-i-a'tion. 

Fil-i-bus'ter. 

ni-l-bu»'tcr-ing. 

Fil-i-buB'ter-iam {-izm\ 

Fl-lic'l-form, 108. 

JMl'i-coid. 

Fil'i-form, loa 

Fil'i-grane. 

Fil'i-gree, 169. 

Ml'i-greed, 188. 

Kl'ing. 

Fil'ings (-<no«), n. pi. 

Fill, 16. 

Filled {fild), 166. 

FiU'er. 

Fil'let, 66, 170. 

Fil'let-ed. 

FU'let-hig. 

Fil'li-bcg [Philibeg, 
203.] ^ ^ ^ 

Fill'ing. 

Fil'Up. 

Fil'liped (-lipt\ 166. 

Fil'li-peen [Philope- 
na,203.] 

Fil'ly, 170. 

l-^hn, 133. 

mm'i-nesB, 169. 

F^lm'y. 

mioBe' [bo Sm. Wr. j 
«'/«», (id. 165.1 

Fil'ter, n. a strainer : — 
V. to strain. [See 
Philter, 160.] 

Fil'tered, 160. 

Fil'ter-ing. • 

FUth, lfl737. 

Filth'i-ly. 

FilthM-nesB, 169. 

F^lth'y, 93. 

Fil'trnte, 73. 

Fil'tnit-ed, 183. 

Fil'trut-ing. 

Fil-tra'tion, 112. 

Fim'ble, IM. 

Fim'bri-ate. 

Flm'bri-at-cd, 183. 

Fim'bri-at-ing. 

Fin (16), n. a membra 
nous organ projecting 
from the body of ftHh- 
es ; — a native of I-^n- 
land. [Finn (in the 
last sense), 203.] 

Rn'a-ble, 154. 

Fi'nal, 25, 72. 

TUime (It.) (/fe-n«'te). 

Fi nal'i-ty, 169. 

Fi'nal-ly, 66, N. 

Finance' (121) [not fl' 
nans. 153.1 

Ff-nan'cial (-thai). 

Fin-an-cier' (-*«r') (122, 



fall } ^iuin there ',<!foasin foot ; 9 « <n fittdle ; gh m g <» go ; t^ a« <n this. 



i 



FINCH 



204 



FLAMING 



109) [fwt fi-nan-ser', 

163.1 
Finch, 16, 44. • 
nnd (25), V, to dlBOOy- 

er. [See Fined, ItfO.J 
Find'er, 77. 
Find'ing. 
Fine, 25. 
Fined (find) (183)j»ar<. 

from Fine. [^'eeFind, 

160.1 
Finc'draw. 
Fine'draw-er. 
Fine'draw-ing. 
Fine'drawn. 
>Mne'nesB, 66, N. 
Fin'er. 
Fin'er-y. 
Fi-nefise' (Fr.) (/<-n«')» 

114, 171. 
Fl-nessed' {-nest'), 
Fl-ness'ing. 
Fin'ger (fing'gur)^ 64, 

Note 2: 138. 
J^n'gered {fing'gurd). 



np'i 
Mi 



Fin'ger-ing {Mff'ff^^-)' 

Fin'ger-ring iJina'- 
aur-), 206, £xo. 1. 

I-ln'i-al, 169. 

nn'i-cal, 72, 169. 

Fin'inff. 

Finnish, 104. 

Fin'ished (-m«). 

Fia'iBh-€r. 

FinMBh-lng-. 

Fi'nit^- 152. 

MnM-tude, 169. 

Finn, n. a native of Fin- 
land. [Fin, 203.1 

Finned ( nnd), 176. 

Fin'nv, 170. 

n-no'chi o [ro Wb.Qd.; 
fin'Sch-Oy Sra. ; fe-^no'- 
«A«-o,Wk.Wr.l64,165] 

Fin'-toed, 206, Exo. 6. 

M-ord'f/fe-ord'). 
i''ir(2I,N.),n. aklndof 

tree. [ 5ec Fur, 160.1 
Fire. 25. 

Mre'-arms {-anrn). 
Fire'brand, 206. 
Flre'-brick. 
Flre'-clay. 
Fired, 183. 
Fire'-en'ffTne, 205. 
Fire'flaire( fiir) [ F i r e - 

flair, 203.1 
Firo'-fly. 
Fire'lock. 
Firc'raan, 196. 
nre'place. 
Hre'-plug. 
Hre'-proof. 



Fire'Bide. 
Fire'wdbd. 
Iflre'works {^wurkt), 

n,pL 
Filling, 49, N. 
Fir'kin, 21 N. ; 169. 
Firm. 21, N. 
Firm'a-ment, 171. 
Firm-a-ment'al. 
Fir'man (21, N.; 160) 

[pi. Fir'nums (-iiMm2), 

196.1 
First, 21, N. 
Fint'-fhiits {-JhwtB), 

n. pi. 171. 
Firat'ling. 
First'^^. 
Firth, 21, N. 
Fir'-tree, 206, Exo. 4. 
If'isc, 181. 
nso'al, 72. 
Fish, 16, 46. 
Fished CJMU), 166} Note 

C, p. 34. 
FiBh'er, 77. 
FlBh'er-man, 196. 
MBh'er-y. 
FUh'gig i-ghig) [Fix- 

gig.20:j.T 
FUh'^hdbk, 206, £xc. 1. 
Fiflh'ing. 

(MBh'ing-linc, 215. 
nBh'-8hop,66,N. ; 206, 

Exc. 1. 
Flsh'y, 93, 169. 
Fis'Bne, 162. 
FiB-BilM-ty, 169. 
FiB'Bion O***'**")- 
FlB-Bip'a-riBm {^rizm), 
FiB-Bip'a-rofiB, 170. 
FiB'Bi-ped. 
FlB-si-roB'tral. 
FlB'sure (JUh'pur). 
Fis'surea (JUh'yurd). 
Mat. 16. 

FtBri-cuffB, n. pi. 
Fis'tinut. 
Fis'tu-la (L.) [pi. Pi«'- 

tu-lae, 196.1 
Fis'tn-lar, 74. 
FiB'tn-la-ry, 72. 
Fifl-tu'li-fonn (108) [bo 

Wr.; fi8*tu-li-/orm, 

Qd. 155.1 
FiB'ta-loftB, 89, 169. 
Bit, 16. 
Fitch, 16, 44. 
Fitch'et. 
Fltch'ew (-O0). 
Fit'Ail (-/550. 
FIt'ted, 176. 
Fit'ter. 
Fit'ting. 



Fire, 25. 

Five'-fold, 206, Exc. 5. 

Fix, 16, 39, N. 

Fix'a-ble, 164. 

Fix-a'tion. 

Fixed iJUut), 165. 

Flx'ed-ncBS, i60. 

Fix'lng. 

Fix'i-ty, 169. 

Flxt'ure, 91. 

Fia'gig ighig) [Fith- 

gfg (in the sense of 

a harpoon), 203.1 
Fia'zle, 164. 
Fiz'zled (jCs'M), 183. 
Flz'zling. 
Flab'bi-ness, 109. 
FUb'bj, 93. 
Fla-berlate, 170. 
Flab-el-la'tion. 
FU-bel'U-form, 106. 
Flac'dd (flafsid). 
Flac-dd'i-ty, 171. 
Flag. 10. 

Flag'eHate iMf'-), 170. 
Flag'el-lat-ed {M'-). 
Flag'el-lat-ing {flqj'-). 
Flag-el-la'tion ijk\f-). 
Fla-gel'li-fonn, 108. 
Flag»eo-let (^<i;'o-X171) 

[not fl^'e-o-let, 145, 

163,] 
Flagged (flagd), 17C. 
Flag-'gi-ness (-^*1)- 
Flag'glnfir(-pfc»»^), 138. 
Flag'gy l-ghy). 
FU-gf'tio&s i-jigh'us), 



171, 231. 
Flag'on, 170. 
Fla'granoe. 
Fla'gran-cy, 169. 
Fla'grant, T2. 
Flail, 23. 
Flaii«, n. a flsh of the 

ray kind. [5m Flare, 

160.] 
Flake, 23. 
Flaked r^a»),183 ; Note 

v >, p. 34. 

Flak'i-nesB. 

Flak'y. 

Fhun'beau (Fr.) Uffim' 
bo) [Ft. pi. Flam'- 
beanx i-bdz)t Eng. pi. 
Flam'beau8(-M2r), 108J 

Flam-boy'ant. 

Flame, )&. 

Flamed (fldmd), 183. 

Fla'men (L.) [L. pi. 
Flam'i-ni8 {-nix) ', 
Eng. pi. Fla'mens 
(^menjB), 196.] 

FUun'ing. 



a, e, i, 0, fi, y, long ; &, S, I, 5, li, f, cftorl ; a of <n far, has in fiwt, ka$i» 



FLAMINGO 



205 



FLOCK 



(54) [pi. FU-min'goes 
i-m4ng*g9z)j 192.] 

nk-min'ic-al, 106. 

Plam-marbil'i-tj, 100. 
I'ma-ble, 164. 

'y, 93- 

sfi [Flange, 203.1 

PUn^ [FUnch,203.J 
Flanic ijlangk), 10, 54. 
WiMMiked iJlangkt)t 166. 
]>*ljuilc'er, n. St v. 
Fljmk'ered, 150. 
Flank' er-ing. 

FUn'nel, 06, 170. 
Flap, 10. 

rUpOack, 206. 
Flapped (Jlapt), 176. 
Flare (jUr) (14), r. to 

irarer; to glitter; to 

spread outward. [See 
naire, IfiO.l 
Flared (fiird), 183. 
Flailing (>Wr'-). 
Flaah, 10, 46. 
Flashed iJUuhS)^ 165. 
Flash'i-lj. 
Flash'i-neai, 169. 
Flash'ing. 
Flash'jTdS, 160. 
Flask, 12, 131. 
Flask'et. 
Flat, 10. 
Fut'flsh, 206. 
Flaf -i-ron (-l-«m). 
Flat'ted, 176. 
Flat'ten (ilat'n), 140. 
Flat'tencd (/Ua'nd),lM, 
Flat'ten-ing (JkU'n-). 
FUt'ter, m. 
Flattered, 150. 
Flafter-ing. 
Flat'ter-y, 171. 
Flatting, 186. 
Flat'n-lenoe. 
Plat'o-len-ej, 169. 

riat'o-lent, 89. 

riaant (fldnt) (11) [not 
flawnt, 153.1 

Plannt'ed. 

FUant'er. 

FUant'ixig. 

FUo'tiat. 

ITa'ror [Flarour, 
Sm. 109,203.] 

Fla'rored {-vwrd) (150) 
[Flaronred, 8m. 
100,203.] 

lla'Tor-ing [Flarour- 
ing,8m. 100, 203. J 

Ha'Tor-otts. 



Flaw, 17. 

Flawed (jfoirtf), 165. 

Flaw'ing. 

Flaw'y, 03. 

Flax, 10, 39, N. 

Flax'en (Jkikisn), 140. 

Flax'seed, 66 N. ; 206. 

Flax'y, 03, 160. 

FUy,23. 

Flayed (;Wd), 187 

Flay'er. 

Flay'ing. 

Flea (13), n. a email in- 
sect of the genna Pu- 
lex. [See Flee, 160.] 

Flea'bane, 206. 

Fleam (1.3) [Plileme, 
203.] 

Flea'wort {-vmrt). 

Heck, 15, 181. 

Flecked (Jekt), 165. 

Flec'tion. 

Flec'tor (-totpr), 88. 

Fled, 15. 

nedge, 15, 45. 

Fledged (JUdd), 165. 

Flcdg'ing, 183. 

Fledge' Ibiig. 

Flee (13), v. to nm, as 
from danger. (See 
Flea, 160.1 

Fleece, 13.30. 

Fleeced (M^h ^^^ ^^ > 

Note C, p. 34. 
Flee^'er. 
Fleec'ing. 
Flee9'y, 03. 
Fle'er (67, N.), n. one 

who flees. 
Fleer (13, 67, N.), v. to 

mock; to gibe: — n. 

a gibe ; a sneer. 
Fleered (/Mrrf), 166. 
Fleer'er. 
Fleer'ing. 
Fleet, 13. 
Fleet'ed. 
Fleet'ing. 
Fle'men. 
Flem'ing, 170. 
Flem'isb. 
Flense (Jlenx), 136. 
Flensed {flenzd). 
Flens'ing (flenz'-). 
Flesh, 15, 46. 
Fleshed (JesM)j 165. 
Flesh'i-ness, 160. 
Flesh'ing. 
Flesh'li-neis, 109. 
Flesh'ly, 93. 
Flesh'-mon'ger [3. 

(-m«n^yur),a06, Exc. 
Flesh'y. 



Fle-tiTer-ofis, 108. 

Fleta. . 

Fleur de lU (Fr.) (Jlur. 

duh-le'). 
Flew iflu) (26) [not floo, 

153J, »oW. from Ily. 

[See Flue, 160.] 
Flex-l-biPi-ty, IW. 
Flex'i-ble, 164. 
FlcxM bly, 93. 
Flcx'Ile, 152. 
Flex'ion (Jlek'ihun)^ 46. 

Note 1. 
Flex'or (-atrr), 88. 
Flcx'uosc. 
Flcx'u oils. 
Flcx'ure, 91. 
Fllck'er. 
Flick'ered, 150. 
Flick'er-ing. 
Fli'er [Flyer, 203.] 
Flight C/nO, 25, 162. 
Flight'rness (jtU*-). 
FUght'y, 93. 
Flim'si ly (-«1-), 136. 
Flim'si-ness (-2l-)> 
Flim'sy (-«y), 136. 
Flinch, 16, 44, Note 2. 
FUnched (Jlincht), 166. 
Flinch'ing. 
Fling, 16, 64. 
Fling'er. 
FUng'ing. 
Flint, 16. 
FlinVi-ness, 169. 
Fllnt'y, 93, 160. 
Flip, 16. 
FUp'-flap. 
Flip'pan-cy, 169. 
Flip'pant, 170. 
Flip'per, 77, 170. 
Flirt, 21, N. 
Flirt-a'tion. 
Flirt'ed. 
Flirt'ing. 
Flit, 16. 
FUtch, 16, 44. 
Flit'ted, 176. 
Flit'ter. 
Flit'tem. 
Flit'ting. 
Fldat, :H. 
Fldat'ed. 
Fldat'age [Flotage, 

203.1 
FlSatOng. 
[ F 1 o at B a m , 203.— 5ee 

Flotsam.] 
Fldat'y. 

Floo-cU-la'tion, 170. 
Floc'cu-lcnoe, 160. 
Floc'cn-lent. 
Flock (18, 181), fi. a col- 



ttili to* in there; db <m in foot j 9 <m in Ikcile ; gh <m g in go ; Ul <m <» ^^ 

18 



\ 



FLOCKED 



206 



FOLD 



lectioii of ■mall ani- 
mals, aa Bheep or 
fowls ; a lock of wool 
or hair. [pi. ]*lock8. 
— See Phlox. 160.] 

Flocked {Jlokt), 105. 

Flock'in^. 

Flock'7, 03. 

Floe, fi. a mafis of float- 
Infi" Ice. [See Flow, 
IfiO.] 

Flog, 18. [ 17fl. 

Floffffed (Jlogd), 165, 

Flog^ng (-ghing), 138. 

Flood (^flud\ 22. 

Flood'ed {fiud'-\ 

Flood-gate (nud'-). 

Flood'ing (}fi«l'-). 

Flook'ln^. 

Floor (^Wr), 24. 

Fldored (>Idrr/), 165. 

Fldor'iog. 

Flo'ra, 72. 

Flo'rai, 49, N. 

nOr'en-tine, or F16r'- 
en-tlne fso Wr. ; ft5r*- 
m-tin, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Flo-rea'oenoe, 171. 

Flo'ret, 49. N. 

F16r-i-<sulrure, 91. 

Fldr'id. 18, 48. 

FlSr'l-form, 108. 

Fl5r'in [not flo'rln,153.1 

Flo'rist, 49, N. 

Floi'cu-lar. 

FloB'cule. 

Flos'ca-lotts. 

Floss. 

FloVage [Floatage, 

awi] 

Flo-ta'tlon. 
Flo-tU'la, 170. 
Flot'sam [Flotson, 

Floatsam, 203.] 
Floanoe, 28, 39. 
Flounced (^Jiourut). 
Flounc'lng. 
Flonn'der, 28, 77. 
Floun'dered (•<lurd),tfiO 
Floor (67), fi. the edible 

part of grain pulvcr- 

I2ed. [See Flower, 

160.] 
Floured {ftourd), 165. 
Flour'ing. 

FlottrMsh {Mr*-\ 22. 
Ftofir'lBhed iftur'iaht). 
Flottr'lsh-er. 
Floflr'lsh-ing. 
Flout, 2& 
Flont'ed. 
Flout'er. 
Flont'ing. 



Flow, 9. to mn or more 
as a fluid. [See Hoe, 
160.] 

Flowed (JiAd), 188. 

Flow'age. 

Flower (28, 67). n. that 
part of a plant by 
which the seed is 

J produced ; a blossom. 
'See Flour, 160.] 
bwer'-de-luce. 

Flowered, 28, 160. 

FloweHi-ness, 171. 

Flower'ing. 

Flowed y. 

Flowing. . 

Flown, 21. 

Flu'ate. 

Fluc'tu-ate, 73, 89. 

Fluo'tu4tt-6d, 183. 

Fluc'tu-at-ing. 

Fluc-tu-a'tion. 112. 

Flud'der [Finder, 
203.] 

Flue, fi. a passage fbr 
smoke, as in a chim- 
ney. [See Flew, 160.] 

Flu'en-cy, 169. 

Flu'ent. 

Fluffy, 170. 

Flu'gel-man(;ff»'flfZ-) ,196 

Flu'ld, 26, 80. 

Flu-id'i-ty, 169. 

Fluke, 26. 

Flum'mer-y, 170. 

Hung. 22. 

Flunk'y- 

Flunk'y-ism (Azm). 
Fln'or-lde [Fluorld, 

203.] 
Flu'or-Tne. 
Flu'or-spar. 
Fllir'rlecf 186. 
Flttr'ry, 21, 22. 
Flftr'ry-lng. 
Flush, 22. 

Flushed iflushi), 166. 
Flush'er. 
Flush'ing. 
Flus'ter. 
Flus'tered, 160. 
Ftus'ter-ing. 
Flute, 26. 
Flut'ed, 183. 
Fliit'er. 
Flut'ing. 
Flut'lst. 
Flut'ter, 170. 
Fluttered, 150. 
Flut'tcr-ing. 
Flut'y. 

FluM-al, 72, 169. 
FluM-al-ist. 



Flu'yi-a-tne. 
Flux, 22, 39. N. 
Fluxed iftu&st), 106. 
Flux'ing. [N. 2. 

Flux'iou(^ta;'»AiMi), 46, 
Flux'ion-al {/luk'skun-] 
Flux'Ion-a-ry i/ltit- 

shun-), 72, 171. 
Flux'lon-ist (JlnJf- 

•hun-). 
Fly, 25. 

Fly'catch-er, 206. 
[Flyer, 203. — 5« 

Fflcr.J 
Fly'ing. 
Fly'ing-fish. 
Fly'-trap. 
Fly'-wheel. 
Foal, 24. 
Foaled C/SM), v. did 

foal. [See Fold, lao.] 
Fdal'ing. 
Foam, 24. 

Foamed i/dmd)^ 165. 
Foam'iug. 
Foam'y. 
Fob, 18. 

Fobbed (/oM), 176. 
Fob'bing. 
Fo'oal, 72. 
Fo'clle, 162. 
Fo'cos (L.) [pL Fo'd, 

198.1 
Fod'der, 170. 
Fod'dered, 160. 
Fod'der-ing. 
F6e (/»), M. 
Fde'man, 196. 
FoBt'i-cide ( fef-). 
FoB'tus (13) [Fetus, 

203.] 
Fog, 18. 

Fopr'gy i-ghtf), 138. 
Fo^ (ifhy) (138, 190) 

[Fogey, Fogic, 

Fdh,Vn<. [so Sm. Gd.; 
/»*, Wk. Wr. 166.] 

Fol'ble, 27, 164. 

FoU, 27. 

Foiled, 166. 

Foll'er, 77. 

Foil'lng. 

Foist, 27. 

Foist'ed. 

Foist'er. 

Foist'ing. 

Fdld, n. an endosiire for 
Bheep;— a flook of 
sheep ; — a plait : — v. 
to lay In fblds; to 
double. [See Foaled, 
160.] 



&, «, f , 6, a, y, long ;&,£,!, 6, fi, f, ahori ifkaiin ftr, ktuin flut, t a« <* 



FOLDAGE 



207 



FORBRUNNER 



Pfild'ase. ' 

Fdld'ed. 

Fdld'er. 

Folding. 

Fo-U-«'oeoaB (-ihtu), 

Fo'Ii-age, 70. 

Fo'U-«tc. 

Fo'li4t-od, 183. 

Fo'U-at-ing. 

Fo-U-a'tioii. 

Fo'U-a-ture. 

Fo'li-er. 

Fo-llTGr-ofli. 

Fo'li-o [bo Wk. 8m. Wb. 
Gd. i /of li-o, or fUl'yOt 
Wr. 156.] [pi. Fo'U- 

Fo'li-o-mort. 

Fo'U^&B. 

F6U (/5t-). IflKf 171. 

rolk'Und (JUk^-), 102. 

Fol'U-cle, IM, 170. 

Fol-lio'u-lAt-ed. 

Fol-lio'u-loiiB. 

Fol'ldw, 18, 101, 170. 

Fol'lowed, 166, 188. 

Fol'Iow-er. 

Fol'low-lng. 

Fol'lf, 66, 170. 

Fo'mal-hAat. 

Fo-ment', 15, 103. 

Fo-ment-a'tion, 112. 

Fo-ment'ed. 

Fo^ment'lng. 

Fond, 18. 

Fon'dle, IM. 

Fon'dled (/on'dW). 

Fon'dler, 183. 

Fon'dllng. 

Fond'lf, W. 

Font, 18. 

Font'al, 72. 

Font'a^nel, 109. 

Food, 19. 

Fool, 19. 

Pooled (/oold), 165. 

Fool'er-y. 

Fool'hard-i-neM, 109. 

Fool'h«rd-y. 

Pool'Ing. 

Fools'oap (/oofe'-). 

Fdbt (20) [pi. Feet, 195.1 

F<»t'bAIl,aOO. 

Fdbt'boy. 

Fdbt'brldge. 

FdW'od. 

Fdbt'fUl, 200. 

FObt'spardB (-ffordi), 

n.pt. 
FOMni&lt. 
Fdbt'hdld. 
F«>Vlng. 
FOM'nuoa, 190. 



FObt'ourk. 

Fdbt'muir. 

F(Jbt'paoe. 

F«)t'pad, 200. 

F(R}t'path. 

F<3bt'print. 

F(Jbt'rope. 

FtJbt'rot. 

F($bt'-sore. 210. 

F«)t'-B6l'dier {-tdl'Jur)^ 

206, Exc. 3. 
TObt'smk (^tawk), 162. 
FObt'Bt&ll. 
Fdbt'Btcp. 
F<Sbt'BtooL 
FcJbt'way. 
Fop, 18. 
Fop'ling. 
Fop'per-y, 170. 
Fop'piBh, 170. 
For, 17, 135. 
F6r'age, 18, 70. 
Fdr'ag^, 106. 
FSr'a-ger. 
Fdr'a-ging. 
Fo-ra'men (L.) [pi. Fo- 

ram'l-na, 198.1 
Fo-ram'l-nat-ed. 
Fo-ram-ln'i-fer [so Gd. j 

/9r-a'min'i-/itr, Wr. 

155.] 
Fo-ram-i-nlfer-ofiB. 
For-aa-much' (-<w-) . 
Fo-ray', or Fdr'ay fso 

Wr.;/o'ra, Wb. Gd. 

165] [Porray,203.J 
For bide', 163, 171. 
Forbear' (-bir), 14. 
For-bear'ance {-birf-), 

169. 

For-bear'ing(-*<r'-)ill5. 

Forbid', 16. 

For-bid'den(-Wd'n),l49. 

For-bid'ding, 176. 

For-bore', 24. 

For-bome'. 

Force, 24. 

Forced OT>r«#), 165, 183 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Fdrce'flil (-ySoO. 180. 
Furoe'meat, 200. 
Fdroe'pamp. 
For^'er, 183. 
FSrc'i-ble, 104. 
Fdrg'i-bly. 
FOro'lng. 
For'd-pat-ed. 
For-d-pa'tion. 
Fdrd, 24. 
Fdrd'a-ble, 104. 
FOrd'ed. 
FOrd'lne. 
Fbre (24), a. anterior : 



— eid, anteriorly. [See 

Four, 160.] 
Fore-bode', 24, 103. 
Fore-bod'ed, 183. 
Fore-bod'er. 
Fore-bdd'lng. 
Fore'brace, 206. 
Fore'caBt. 
Fore' casting. 

Fore'ca8-tlc(-A»i«-/)« 162, 
171. [n. pi. 

Fore-chainB' (-chdnz'), 
Fore-cloBc' (-kloz'). 
Fore-oloBod' (-Jt/ffzrf'). 

Fore-clos'ing (-Ato«'-). 

Fore-clofl'ure {-kldz'-)t 

Fore-date'. [91. 

Fore-dat'ed, 183. 

Forc-diit'ing. 

Fore'dcck. 

Fore'la-ther, or Fore- 

fa'thcrtBO Wr. y^r'- 

/tt-lAur, Sm. ij^r-/a'- 

thur^ Wk. Wb. Gd. 

165.] 

Fore-go'. 24, 103. 

Fore-go'ing. 

Foro-gfineS 18, N. 

Fore'ground. 210. 

Fore'nand-ea. 

Fore'head {/Sr'ed, or 
/arthed) f bo Wr. ; 
fir'hed^ coll. f8r*edy 
Sm. i/pr'edj or /9r*- 
hed, Wb. Gd. 166.] 

FSr'eign (-In), 97, 102. 

F6r'eign-er (in), 102, 
171. 

Fore-knew' (-n«'), 108. 

Fore-kn6w' (-no'), 102. 

Fore-know'er (■no'-). 

Fore-know'ing {-^fu/-). 

Fore-kndwl'eage (-noV- 
tj), 143, 162, r71. 

Fore'lock. 

Fore'man, 190. 

Fore'maBt, 72. 

Fore'moBt. 

Fore'name. 

Fore-named' (-fiAmd) 
[bo Wk. Wr.; yi^K- 
nAmd, Gd. 165.] 

Fore'noon. 

Fo-ren'Bio. 

Foro-or-dain', 223. 

Fore-or-dained', 106. 

Fore-or-dain'lng. 

Fore-or-di-na'tion. 

Fore'part. 

Fore'plane. 

Fore-ran'. 

Fore-nm'. 

Fore-mn'ner, 170. 



IUl;0a«iiitliere;«><M<fifooti9asififtoUeigh<Mgin^;tb«lntliii. 



FORERUNNING 



208 



FOSSILIZING 



Fofe-run'nixig. 
Fore'said (-sw). 
Fore' Bail. 
Fore-saw'. 
Fore-Bee'. 
Fore-Bee'lng. 
Fore-Been'. 
Fore-se'cr. 183. 
Fore-Bhad'ow. 
Fore-flhad'owed, 188. 
Fore-fihad'dw-ine. 
Fore-flhort'en(- snori'n), 

149. [nd). 

Fore-short'ened(-«rtort'- 
Fore-Bhort'en-ing 

{short'n-), 
Fore-Bhow'. 
Fore-showed', 188. 
Fore-show'er. 
Fore-shdw'ing. 
Fore'slde. 

Fore'sl^ht (-iU), 102. 
Forc'skin. 
Fdr'cBt, 170. 
Fore'staff, 193. 
Fore-BtAlI'[ F o r e i t a 1 , 

Sm. 179, 203.] 
Fore-tcll'er. 
Fore-tcU'inff. [162. 

Fore'thongDt (^-ttMict), 
Fore-to'ken (-io'kn). 
Fore-to'kened (-to'knd). 
Fore-told'. 
Fore'top. 
For-er'er. 

19^ Ar and ever uxt 
generallr written aeparate 
Djr English authors, and 
tnej are not giren ai form- 
ing a componnd word in 
the DlcClonarlei of Walker 
and Smart. *' It it the pre- 
raillDR uMge with Ameri- 
can writers?* says Worces- 
ter, ** to form the two parts 
into one word, ybrever." 
Wilson says : " The words 
Ifor and ever] erery where 
ocenr to the common rer- 
slon of the Bible as a 

Bhrase; and, the eye being 
lus accustomed to their 
seoaration, it would prob- 
ably be better to retain this 
form." 

Fore-wlm'. 

Fore-wftmed', IM, 

Fore-wftm'lng. 

Fore-went'. 

For'felt (.;«), 70, 97, 171. 

ForTelt-ure {-/U), 91. 

For'fcx. 

For-gave'. 

Fdrge, n. & v. (24) [not 

fawrj, 163.] 
Forged, 166, 183. 



FSrg'er (/iifi'-\ 24, 77. 
F6rg'er-7 {jiiry'-) [not 

&wj'er-7, 16:1.] 
For-get' i-ffhei'). 
For-get'ful {-ghet'fSbt). 
For-get'*me-not 

{-ghet'), 221. 
For-get'ter (-ghet'-)^V7^. 
Forgoing iprj'-). 
For-glve', 163. 
For-glT'er, 183. 
For-giv'lng. 
For-got'. 

For-got'ten (-aot'n). 
Fo-ns-fa-mll'i-ato [so 

Sm. Wr^ fo-ris-fa- 

mU'yat^ Wb. Gd. 166.] 
Fo-rls-fa-mll'i-at-ed. 
Fo-rlB-fk-mil'i-atlng. 
Fo-ris-fa-mll-l-a'tion. 
Fork, 17. 

Forked (Jorkt), 166. 
Fork'y, 93. 
For-lom', 17. 
Form, 17, 136. 

nor When this word 
has the sense of a loftgneaty 
or of a rla» qftttuIentM, the 
English pronunciation Is 

/OfHt» 

Form'al. 

Form'al-lBm(-isni), 196. 
Form'al-ist. 
For-mal'i-ty, 169. 
For'mal-lze, 202. 
For'mal-izcd, 183. 
For'mal-iz-lng. 
Form'al-ly, 66, N. 
Form-a'tion. 
Form'a-ttve, 84. 
Formed (Jbrmd), 166. 
Form'er (228), n. one 

who forms. 
For'mer, a. anterior. 
For'mlc. 
For'mi-cate, 73. 
For-mi-ca'tion. 
For'mi-da-ble (164) fnot 

for-mid'a-ble, 163.J 
For'ml-da-blv. 
For'ma-la (L.) [L. pi. 

For*mu-l€B'f Eng. pi. 

For'mn-laB, 198.] 
Form'u-la-ry, 72. 
For'ni-eate, a. St v. 
For'ni-cat-ed. 
For'ni-eat-ing. 
For-ni-ea'tion. 
For'ni-oat-or. 
For'ni-oat-rcBS. 
For-ray', or For'ray Fbo 

Wr. ;/or-ra', Sm. Od. 

166.] [Foray, 203.] 



Forsake', 23. 

For-sak'en i-sdfn), 149 

For-sak'er. 

For-sak'taig. 

For-8dt>k'720. 

For-sooth', 19. 

For-Bw6ar^(-«rtr'), 171. 

For-Bw6ar'er. 

For-swore'. 

Fort (24, 160^, n. a small 

fortified plaoe. 
Forte {Ft.) (2i, 160), n. 

that In which one ex- 

oelB. 
For^te (It.) (/or'M),161. 
Forth, ad. forward In 

time or in plaoe. [See 
. Fourth, 160.J 
F6rth'-com-ing(-Jfcwm-), 

206, Exc. 5. 
Forthwith', .?7. 
For'ti-eth. 
For'ti-fi-a-ble, 164. 
For-tl-fl-ca'tion. 
For'ti-fied, 09. 
For'ti-fi-er. 
For'ti-^, 94. 
For'ti8^8i-mo (It.). 
For'ti-tude, 169. 
Fort'night (-»«) (162) 

[bo Wk. Sm. Gd.; 

/ort'nlt, or forVnit, 

Wr. 166.] 
For'tress. 
For-tu'l-tofis, 169. 
For-tu'i-ty, 108. 
Fort'u-nate, 73,89. 
Fort'nne [so Wr. G3.; 

for'tikn, coll. fort'- 

8h*oon(See § 26); for'- 

cAAn, wk. (See} 44, 

N. 1), 166.1 
Fort'nn^tell'er, 206. 
For'ty, 93. 
Fo'rum (L.) [L. pi. /b'- 

ra f Eng. m. fVramfi 

(-rumz\ ite.] 
For'ward. 
For'ward-ed. 
For'ward-er. 
For'ward-ing. 
For'wards {-wardM). 
For-zan'do (It.) {fort- 

tan'do). 
Fosse (/o»). 
FoBse'way, 206. 
Fos'sil, 66, 170. 
Fos-Bil-ifer-ous, 108. 
Fos'sil-iBt. 
Fos-ail-I-za'tion. 
Fos'sll-ize, 20e. 
Fos<«iMzed, 183. 
Fos'sil-iz-inig. 



rorgea, 166, 183. 166. j [roray, :aH.j ros'su-iz-mg. 

a,e,!,d,fi, y, lon^i ft, «, 1, 6, tt, ^ «AoK ; i m in ftr, 4 m <n flwt, t <w M 



POS9ILOGY 



209 



FREEZING 



I'o-gy, 108. 
yfH-U, 49, N. 
tr, 77. 
fr^child. 
ired, liW. 
!r-cr. 

^rling. 
er. 

ered, 150. 
er-iiig. 

It (yStoOf 1^- 
;'i8), a. not clean ; 
clear; shamefal: 
. to soil. [See 
rl, lfl0.j 
d, 28, 166. 

ing. 

ly, W, N. 

aart (foo^-). 

1,28. 

-da'tion. 

i'ed. 

l'er'(228, N.), n. 

who fonndfl. 

der, V. to fill with 

er, and sink; — to 

le to be lame or 

S as the feet of a 

■e. 

dered (-^furd), 

I'er-otts. 

I'er-y [Fonnd- 
303.] 

r Th« Ibnni fomtti- 
nd /oundnf are both 
od uM. VnUker fivei 
fommdry. Smart Mys 
lerp or foundry. 
»«{er and Goodrich 
both, bat prefer 
Icry. 

I'lng. 
iningr. 

I'ry [Fonnd- 

• 28. 

?idn (tfi), 70, 06, 

{fir) (24), a. & n. 
wtwo. [.»eeFore, 



k 



51d, 24, 217. 

i-er-ism (/oo'H- 

im) [so Gd. ; foo*- 

ton, Wr. 155.] 

score. 

teen [See Eight- 

leenth. 

h. 

-ate. 



Fo-ve'o-late fso Wr. j 

_fo've-o-m, Gd, 155.] 

fVvllMa. 

Fowl (28), n. a bird. 

[5te Foul, 160.] 
Fowl'er. 
Fowl'ing. 
Fox, 18. 

Foxed i/okst), 165. 
Fox'glove ( gluv). 
Fox'nke, 2U6, £xc. 5. 
Fox'taU. 
Fra'caa (Fr.) [so Wb. 

Gd. ; fritka\ Sm.; 

fra'kasy or fraka'^ 

Wr. 154, 156.] 
Frac'tion. 
Frac'tion-al, 72. 
Frac'tious {-9hu8\ 160. 
Fraot'are, 01. 
Fract'ttred (-yurd)- 
Fract'ur-lng i-yur), 
Frag^e ifrt^'-), 152. 
Fra-grtl'l-W, 108, 169. 
Frag'ment, 10, 15. 
Frag'ment-a-ry, 72. 
Fraff'ment-ed. 
Fra'grance. 
Fra'gran-cy, 160. 
Fra'grant, 72. 
VthnS, 23. 
Frail'ty. 
Fram'a-ble, 164. 
Frame, 23. 
Framed, 165. 
Fram'er, 183. 
Frame' work {-wurk), 
Fnxa'ins. 
Franc Cfrnngk), n. a 

French silver coin. 

[5e« Frank, 160.] 
Fran'chYse (,-chiz) (171) 

[not fl-an'chlz, 15).] 
Fran-cis'can. 
Fran'oo-lin {/rang'-), 

Fran-gl-bil'i-ty, 160. 

Fran'gi-ble, 1(H. 

Frank (frangk) (54), 
a. ingenuous ; sin- 
cere. [See Franc, 
160.} 

Franked {fi^ngkt). 

Frank'in-oensc 
ifrangk'-), [so Wk. 
Sm. wr. ; frank-in'' 
senSj OT frankfin8en9^ 
Gd. 155.] 

Frank'lng {.frangk^-). 

Frank'Un Ifranak*-), 

Frank'pledge, 206. 

Fran'tic. 

Frap, 10. 



Frapped (J^rapt). 
Frap'ping. 176. 
Fra-ter'nal, 21, N. ; 72. 
JYa-ter'nl-ty, 108, 160. 
Fra-ter-nl-za'tion [so 

8m. ; fnU-er-nt-za' • 

shun, Wr. Gd. 155.1 
Fra-tcr'nize, 21, N. ; 

202 [not fra'tur-niz, 

153.] 
Fra-ter'nized, 183. 
Fra-ter'niz-er. 
Fra-ter'niz4ng. 
Frat-ri-cid'al, 183. 
Frat'ri-cide, 160. 
Frftud, 17. 
Frilud'u-lent, 80. 
Fraught iA'owt), 162. 
Fray (23), n. a chafe in 

doth ; a fight ; a quar- 
rel: — V, tt) rub; to 

frighten. Jpl. of n. 

Frays {friU),^8ee 

Phrase, 160.] 
Frayed iJ^ad), 187. 
Fray'lng. 
Freak, Q. 
Freo'kle, 164. 
Frec'kled {freyid)^ 150. 
Fiec'kllng. 
Free, 13. 
Free'bencb [so Sm. 

Wr. i fre-bench't Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Free'boot-er. 
Free'boot-lng. 
P'ree'bom. 
Freed, 188. 
Free'man, 106. 
Free'dom, 160. 
Free'hdid, 206. 
Free'h6ld-er. 
Free'ing. 
Free'man, 106. 
Free'ma-Bon (-flia-sn), 

140. 
Frec'ma-son-ry (-m«- 

««-). 
Fre'sr, 183, 188. 
Free'stone, 130. 
Frec'thlnk-erf-ttfno*-) 

fso Sm. Wb. Gd.; 

Jirt-thingVw, Wk. 

155.] 
Free'thlnk-ing. 
Free-will', ». (161) fso 

Wk. 8m. Wb. (Jd. ; 

fri'wU, Wr. 155.] 
FYee'will, a. 161. 
Freeze (13, 47), 9. to be 

congealed with cold. 

[See Frieze, 160.] 
Freez'ing, 183. 



) as <» there} db as <» foot; 9 as <» ikcUe ; gb as g in go jt^ as <fi this. 

18* 



FREIGHT 



210 



FRUOALITY 



Freight (J^at), MB. 

Freiferht'ed (/»•«<'-) 

Fitiiijht'er (/riU'-). 

Frel^ht'in{r (frdt^-). 

Frcuch, 15, 44. 

Frcnch'1-f i€d, 186. 

Frencha-f y, *>l. 

French'i-fy-ing. 

French' man, IM. 

Fre-net'ic [Phrenet- 
ic, aoi.] 

Fren'zled, 09. 

Fren'zy, 109. 

Fre'quen-cy, 169. 

Kre'quent, o. ltt% 161. 

Frequent', r. 103, 161. 

Fre-queut'a-tlve. 

Fre-queut'ed. 

Frc-qucut'er. 

Fre-qucnt'iuff. 

Frea'co (It J, n. fpl. 
l>>e8'co8 (-kdz)t 192.] 

Fresh, 15, M\. 

FrcBh'en {/reih'n), 149. 

Freah'ened (Jrem'nd), 
160. 

Fresh'en-ing [^frtsh'n). 

Freah'et, 76. 

FreBh'man, 196. 

Fret, 15. 

Fret'ful {-JSbt), 180. 

Fret'ted, 176. 

Fret'ter. 

Fret'ting. 

Fret'ty, 93. 

Fret' work (-irwr*). 

Fri-a-biri-ty, 10«. 

Fri'a-ble, 104. 

Fri'ar (74), n. a brother 
or member of any re- 
ligions order. [See 
Frier^ 160.] 

Fri'ar-y. 

Frlb'ble, 164. 

Frib'bled (/Hb'ld). 

Frib'bler. 

Frib'bllnfir. 

Frir-an-aeau'^ <Fr.) 
ifrikan^) [Frlc- 
ando,203.j 

Frlc-as-see', 122, 171. 

Fric-aB-Bced', 1S8. 

FVic-aa-Bce'lng. 

Frio'tion. 

FrJc'Uon-al, 72. 

Frl'day (-du). 

Fried (yV-Irf), 186. 

Frir-nd (/rend), '5. 

Frii"?nd'ii-ncB8. 

Frliind'ly, 93, 160. 

Frl'er, n. one who fries. 
ISee Friar, IflO.l 

Fries'lc {friz'-). 



Fri^ie (J^z) (13), n. a 
coarse woollen cloth, 
with a nap on one 
side j — the part of an 
entablature between 
the architrave and the 
cornice. [See Freeze, 
IGO.] 

Frig'ate, 170. 

Fright (/r«)» 162. 

Fright'en (fiU'n), 149, 
1112. 

Fright'ened C/VU'fid), 
150. 

Fright'en-ing (Mfn). 

Fright'ftdTJs^i). 

Frlg'id (AW-). le, 46. 

FrI-gid'i-ty, 160. 

FrUI, 16, 172. 

JMlled (yWW)f !«• 
J^iU'ing. 
Fringe, 10, 46. 
Fringed (/rififrf J, 183. 
Fring'iug (/nf»v'-). 
Fring'y (/r»n/'-). 
JYip'per. 
Frip'per-er. 
Frip'por-y, 170. 
FH-seur' (Fr.) (/re- 

eur'). 
FriBlc, 16. 
Frisked (friskt), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
FriBk'er. 
Friak'et. 
Frisk'ful (JBot). 
FriBk'i-ly. 

FriskM-ness, 169, 186. 
Frisk'ing. 
Frisk'y, 93, 160. 
Frit, 16. 
Frith, 16, 37. 
Frit'ter, 170. 
Frit'tered, 150. 
Frit'ter-lng. 
Fri-vol'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Friv'o-loils. 
Friz'zle, 104. 
Friz'iled (/War'W)» 1®. 
Friz'zlcr. 
Friz'zUng. 
Fro, 24. 
Frock, 18, 181. 
Frock'-coat, 206, 

Exc. 1. 
Frocked i/irokt). 
Frog, 18. 

Frog'hop-per, 206. 
Frol'ic, 18, 170. 
Frol'icked (-*tl), 182. 
Frol'ick-lng. 
Frol'ic-Bome (-turn). 
From, 18. 



Frond. 18. 

Fron-des'oenee, 171. 

Fron'dofis. 

Front (frunt) (22) [m 

8m. Wr. Wb. CM.; 

/H«ia or fronit Wk. 

155.] 

■9- **Mr. Sbofdn 
marka this word In the mc- 
ond manner only [/rmu] : 
but I un much mutakrn 
if custom doos noi almoat 
uniTermlly adopt the flnt 
[Jnmtir Walixr, 

Frontpage ( /HtiU'-) 70. 
Frdnt'al, 72. 
Frdnt'a-ted. 
Front'ed (frunt'-). 
Fr6nt-ier'(l21, WS) [*o 

8m. Wr. (3d. ;/rort'- 

ehir^ or frowylr, 

Wk. 155.] 
Fr6nt-iered' (-«rd'), 165. 
Fronting (/runl'-). 
Frdnt'is-pieoe, 171. 
Fronf let (/rwit*'-). 
Frost (JVtf**, or frtuMt) 

(18, N.) fso Wr. 

Gd. ; fr9tt, Wk. Sm. 

165.] 
Frost'ed. 
Frost'1-ly. 
Frost'i-ness, 109. 
FrosVing. 
Frost' work (■wurk)^ 

206. 
FroBt'wort {-wwrt). 
Frost'y, 93. 
Froth (,fr9th, or 

frawth) (18, N.)_fto 

Wr. (5d. ; fHfth, Wk. 

Sm. 155.1 
Froth'i-ly. 
Froth 'iness, 169. 
Froth'y, 93. 
Frounce, 28. 
Frounced (/V-otcfMl). 
Frounf'ing. 
Fro'ward, 24, 72. 
Frown, 28. 
Frowned (/VymtiuI)- 
Frown'Ing. 
Froze, 24. 

Froz'en C/>««'n), 149. 
Fruc-tes'ocnce, 171. 
Fruo-tircr-ofiB, 108. 
Fruc-ti-fl-ca'tion. 
Fruc'tl-f ied, 99. 
Fruc'tif y, 9*. 
Fruc'ti-fy-ing. 
Fru'gal (fro^')y 19, 72. 
Fru-gal'i-ty (froo-), 

108. 



a, e, S, o, n, y, long ; A, H, !, 6, fi, f , aJwrt ; Has in far, kasin iast, k as in 



FRUGAIJ.Y 



211 



FURNISH 



Pru-girer-otti (/Wh>-), 
FiTi-ffiv'o-rollB (Jroo- 

JU^-), 108. 
FVuit ifrooi)^ 19. 
Froit'age (/Ww*'-), 70. 
l'>uit'er-er {/root'-), 77. 
Kruit'er-y (/roof). 
I-Vuit'tul (/yoo<7»0» 

1», 20. 
FVuifing (/roo*'-)- 
lr*ru-rtioii (/roo-iih'un), 

171. 
F*ru-incn-ta'coou8 {froo- 
w^n-ta' •hus), ICtf, 171. 
Pru'men-ty C/roo'-). 
Kmsh, 22. 
Knis'trate. 
Kru»'trat-ed, 183. 
>^ru»-tra'tion. 
Frus'tmn (L.) [pL 

Frus'ta, 198.1 
Kra-tes'cent {froo-). 
Km'tl-eoBe ifroo^-) [bo 
Gd. ; /roo-H-kOi'y Wr. 
l&6.t 
Kru'tf-ootti (/hx)'-)- 
Kru-tic'a-loie. 
Kry, 25. 
Fry'ing. 
rry'lng-pan, 215. 
Fu'cate. 
ru'cat-ed. 
Fu'coid, 2^ 27. 

Fa'cuB (L.) [pi. ru'd, 

FuiJMle, 1«H. 
Kufi'dled (Jud'ld), 183. 
Fud'dler. 
Fud'dUng. 
Kud;re, 22, 45. 
Fu'.n, 26, 7fi. 
FuVlled(-<!W) [Fu- 
eled, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— Set 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Fu'el-lcr [Fueler, 

Wb. Gd. 2CB.] 
Fu'el-linff [Fueling, 

Wb. Gd. 208.1 
Fn-ga'cioaB, 109. 
yu-giu;'l-tj, 108. 
Fu'gi-tlve, »4, 171. 
Fu'^le-maD, KVi, 196. 
Fugue (fOg) (171 ; Note 

D, p. 37) [not fu), 

153.1 
Fngnlst (/fi^'O 
FtPcnite. 
FQl'cram (L.) [L. pi. 

Ful'cra ', Eng. pi. 



Ful'cnmiB (-krumz)^ 

198 1 
Pul-fil' (JSol.) (179, 180) 

[Fulfill, Wb. Gd. 

— See Note E, p. 70.1 
Ful-fiUed' {fJbl-fiUV). 
Ful-fil'ler {Johl), 170. 
Ful-firilng iM-). 
Ful-fll'meut (f^l) 

[Fulfillment, 

Wb. Gd. 203.J 
Ffil'gen-cy. 
Ffil'gent. 
Ffil-gu-ra'tion. 
Fttl'gu-rite, 152. 
Fu-lJg'i-notiB (-/</')• 
Full C/5»0f 20, 172. 
FuU'-aged (Jool'Ugd), 

206, Exc. 5. 
FuU'-blown CJobV). 
Fulled i/Sbld\ 20, 165. 




me 

FuU'y r/«w''y), 178. 

FQl'mar. 

]<^'mi-iiBte, 73, 169. 

Ftil'mi-nat^ed, 183. 

Ffil'ml-nat-ing. 

F&l-mi-na'tion. 

Flll'ml-nit o-ry [so 

Wk. Sm. ; /tt/'m nrt- 
to-rvj Wr. Wb. Gd. 
155.1 

Ful'neBB (JSol'-) (178) 
[FuIlneBB, Wb. 
Gd. 203.1 

FQI'Bome (/ni'tmm) 
[not fdbl'Bum, 153.1 

Flil'vid. 

Ffil'roQB, 109. 

Fu-ma'do. 

Fu'ma-to-ry [Fumi- 
tory, 203.] 

Fum'ble, 104. 

Fum'bled (JUm'bld)y 
183. 

Fum'bler, 77. 

Fum'bling. 

Fume, 26. 

Fumed (/nnul), 165. 

Fu-mifer-ottB, 108. 

Fu'mi-gate, 73. 

Fu'mi-gat-ed, 183. 

Fu'mi-gat-ing. 

Fu-mi-ga'tion, 112. 

Fum'ing. 

Fu'mi-to-ry [Fuma- 
tory,203.] 

Fum'oQB. 

Fiim'y, 93. 

I>^m,22. 

IXi-namnni-late. 



Fu-nam'bu-Iat-ed. 

Fu-nam'bu-Iat-iDg. 

Fu-nam-bu-la'tion. 

Fu-nam'bu-lat-o-rr Fbo 
Sm. J fu-nam'oft^- 
to-ry, Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 
155.1 

Func'tion (Jkngk'- 

8hun\ 54. 

Func'tion-al, 72. 

J^mc'tion-a-ry, 72. 

Fund. 22. 

li^m-aa-ment'al, 73. 

Fun-da-ment'al-ly. 

Fund'ed. 

Fund'ing. 

Fu'ner- J, 26, 72. 

Fu ne'rc-al, 49, N. ; 109. 

IJin'gi-form, 108. 

Fuu'gold {fung'-). 

Fun-gosM-ty {fung-). 

*\m'goD8 i/Ung'-) ( 160), 
a. like a ftinguR ; 
Bpongy. 

Fun'gua (L.) {fung'-) 
(160) [L. pi. Fun^0\ 
Eng. pi. Fun'gu6-e8 
(-e«), 198], n. one of 
a claBB of cellular, 
flowerlesB plants j — a 
Bpongy excreBoenee. 

Fu'ni-cle, 164. 

Fu-nic'u-lar, 74. 

Fun'nel, 66, 170. 

Fun'ny, 109. 

Fur (21), n. the finer, 
Boft hair on oertmii 
animalB ; — a ooatlii;,' : 
— r. to cover with 
fur, or a coating. r.Stf« 
l-'ir, 148.] [pi. FurK 
{fiirz). — See Furze, 
100.] 

Fur'be-ldw, 109. 

^^l^'be lowed (-/0<f), 188. 

Fur'be-low-ing. 

Fur'bish, 21, 104. 

Fur'biBlied (Mtht). 

Fur'biah-er. 

Fur'biBh-hig. 

Fur'cate. 

Fur'cat-ed. 

Fur-ca'tion. 

t^ir'lUr, 21, 109. 

Fur-fti-ra'ceouB {-shus). 

Fu'rl-ofiB, 49, N. } 78. 

Furl, 21, 135. 

I'^lrled ifurld), 105. 

FurPing. 

Fur'long, 169. 

Fur'lough (Jfl), 102. 

Fur'nace, 109. 

Fur'niBh, 21, 104. 



(all ; £ CM in there \<Sba8in foot \ com in fiMsilc ; gh a« g in go j t^ a« in thi«. 



FURNISHED 



212 



GALANGAL 



Fai'nished (hiOU). 

Fur'niBh-er. 

Fur'nisb-ing. 

Fur'nl-ture [§0 Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; AHni-tBr, 
ooU. y^r'ii*-c**oor, 

8m. (fitee_f 2«);A»^- 
ni^hltr, Wk. 155.] 

Farred (J^rd), 165, 176. 

Fur'rl-er, 169. 

Fur'ri-€r-y. 

Vur'Ting. 

Fttr'row, 22, 101. 

Ffir'rowed, 188. 

Fur'nr, 21, 170. 

Fur'ther, a. & ad. 
[Farther, 203.] 

Fur'ther, v. 

Fttr'tEer-anoe. • 

Fur'tEered (-Iftttrd), 
160r 

Fur'ther-er. 

Fur'tHer-ing. 

Fur'tEer-mope. 

Fur'tEer-most fF a r - 
t her most, 203.] 

Fur'thestrFarthcBt, 
20^ 

Far'tiTTe, M, 169. 

Fa-nin'tde (-rtmflr'fcZ), 
64,164. 

Fu'ry, 40, N. 

Furse i/iirz) (21), n. a 
thorny ahrob of the 
genuB Ulex, ISee 
Furs, pi. of For, 
160.] 

Farx'y. 93, 169. 

FusWtioii. 

Fub'oo&b, 100, 169. 

FuBe (/«»), V. 20, 136. 

Fuse (ntg) fi. [Fase, 
203.1 

Vuaea (/ttzd), 183. 

Fu>Bee' (-«e'), 121, 171. 

FuB-4-bU^i-ty {fUz-) 

FuB'i-ble (J^-) (164, 
169; [flo 8m. Wr. wb. 
Od.; J^'H-bl, Wk. 
166.f 

Fa'sl-form, 106. 

Fu'Bil(-ar/ft (136), a. ca- 
pable of D<»iifir niBcd. 

Fu'bU (zU) Tbo 8m. 
Wb. Gd. ; J^-ze', 
Wk, ifu'zU, or fuze', 
Wr. 156], fi. a Bmall 
muBket. 

Fa-Bil-eer' (-«<^;, 122, 
169. 

FuB'iiig iJ^e'-). 

Ii^'alon l-zhun). 

FttBB, 22, 174. 



FuBBed CAmO, v. did 
IhsB. [see Fast, 160.] 

FaBB'ing. 

FuBB'y,93. 

FaBt, fi. a muBty tmeU ; 
muBtineBB. [See 

FQBsed, 160.1 

FuBt'iaD (-yan), 22, 61. 

FuB'tic, 200. 

FuB-ti-ga'tion. 

FuBt'l-nesB, 169. 

FuBt'v, 93. 

Fa'tXIe, 152. 

Fu'tlle-ly, 66, N. 

Fa-til'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Fut'tockB, n.pl. 

Fat'ure, 91. 

Fu-tu'ri-ty, 89, 169. 

Fuze, ». [F a B e , 209.] 

Fuzz, 22, 176. 

Fnzz7, 93. 

Fy,<n«. [Fie, 203.1 



G. 

Gab^tf-dine' (-din') 
(122) [Gaberdine, 
203.1 

Gab'ble, 164. 

Gab'bled (aab'ld), 183. 

Gab'bler,77. 

Gab'bllng. 

Ga'bi^on, 78, 86. 

Ga-bi-on-nade', 122. 

Ga'ble, 164. 

Ga'blet. 

Gad, 10. 

Gad'ded, 176. 

Gad'der. 

Gad'ding. 

Gad'fly. 206. 

Ga'doid Tbo Wr. Gd. s 
ffod'oia, Sm. 165.1 

Gael Cgdl), n. sing. hpl. 

Gael'Ic (£«/'«:) (171) [io 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j ga^el- 
ik, Sm. 155.] 

Gaff (10) [not gaft, 163.] 

GaTlfer. 

GaTfle, 164. 

Gag, 10. 

Gage (23, 45, 160), n. a 
pledge; — a chal- 
lenge ; — a kind of 
plum ; — an iuBtm- 
ment for .meaBurlng ; 
— the number of met 
which a ship alnkB in 
water j — the position 
of one Bliip as regards 
another. [Gange(ln 



the last three B<m8Ci), 

200.] 
Gage, V. to give as a 

luedge; — to Und by 

a plrage. [See Gauge, 

r. 160J 
Gag^, 166. 
Gag'er (pf^-), n. one 

who ^vea a pledge. 

[See Ganger. 160. J 
Gag'ing (g^'-), part. 

^Ting a pledge. [See 

Gaurfiig, I60!] 
Gagged (jfogd), 176. 
Gag'ger (-f^itr), 138. 
Gag'gle, IW. 
Gag'gled (^ag'ld), 183. 
Gag'gling. 
[Gaiety. 203.— 5« 

Gayety.j 
[Gaily, 203.-.See 

Gayly.] 
Gain, Zi. 

Gained (^and), 165. 
Galn'er. 

Gain'fVil {-fSei), 180. 
Gain-aaid' (yan-«Ai'}, or 

Gain'aaid (jfan'sed) 

TGainaayed, Wb. 

Gd.203.] 
Gain-a&y', or Giin'say 

fao Wr. Gd. ; gdn-eV, 

Wk. i g&n'edy Sm. 

165.] 
Gain-BAj'er, or Gatai'. 

aay-er. 
Gain-aay'liig, or Gain'- 

aay-ing. 
Gair'iah (ffMr'-) [Gar- 

ish,2&] 

■9* Of th« tvo fimaiof 
this wotd. Walker. Smart, 
Welwtar, and Goodrich 
prefler mt first (pntruft). 
WoroMter prefers the hut 
(gariaky. 

Gait (23), n. manner of 
walking. [See Gate, 
160.]^ 

Gait'er. 

Gait'ered (-wyJOt 150. 

Gait'er-ing. 

Ga'la, 72. 

Ga-lac'tic, 109. 

Gal-ac-tom'e-ter, 108. 

Gal-ac-toph'a-gist 

Gkil-ao-toph' a-goftB 

(-to/-). 
Gal-ac-toph'o-rotta 

(4o/»-), 108. 
Ga-lao-to-poi-efio. 

Ga-lan'gar(4^ii^-)> ^' 



a, S» 1, 5, a» y, Umg ;&,€,!, 5, ft, fy tAorf ilkaiin fkr, 4 m In tut, %atw 



GALANTINE 



213 



GANOID 



Gftl'an-tine, 152. 
6»-la'tlan8 {-thanz), n, 

pL 112. 
6al'ax-7, 03, 170. 
Gal'ba-nom. 
Gale, 23. 
Gtl'e-«s [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. j gal'ptu, Wk. ; 

goTuoM, or ga'U<Ut 

Wr. 156.] 
Gft'le-ate, a. 73. 
G«'l&«t-ed. 
G»-lee'to. 
Ga-le'iia, 72. 
Gft-len'ic, 109. 
Ga-IenMc-al, 108. 
Ga'len-ism (tzm), 136. 
Ga'len-iHt. 
Gft-lI'cUn i-lish'un), 
Gtl-i-le'an, 110. 
6al'i-lee (170), n. a 

porch or chap«l. 
Gal'l-ot [so Sm. 6d.; 

gal'putt Wk. ; gal'yot^ 

Wr. 155.1 [Galliot, 

208-] 
^'i-pot (170), n. a 

kind of wliite resin. 

[See Gallipot, 160.] 

Gal'iant (161), a. brave, 
high-spirited. 

Gal-Uat'^ [bo Sm. Wr. ; 
gal-mnt\ Wk. Wb. 
Gd. 155.] (161), a. at- 
tentive to ladies. 

€M Unt' feo Wk. Sm. 
Wr.; gal-UfU', Wb. 
Gd. 1551, n. one who 
is attenave to ladies : 
— V. to wait on or be 
attentive to, as ladies. 

t^^-lant'ed. 

Oal-lant'ing. 

^al'lant-ly (161), ad. 
bravely. 

Oal-lant^ly (161), ad. in 
the manner of a gal- 
lant. 

Oal'lant-rv, 170. 

Qal'late [so Wr. Wb. 
Gd.: gawVOif 8m. 
155.] 

QAlled (ffawld)j 165. 

Gal^e-on, 170. 

Gal'ler-y, 171. 

GiLl'less, 66, N. ; 178. 

Gal'ley (98) [pi. Gal'- 
levs, 190.] 

Gill'fly, 206. 

Gal'Ue [so Wb. Gd. ; 
aawi'il, Sm. Wr. 
156], a. denoting an 



ftdd obtained Arom 
eall-nuts. 

Gal'Iio, «. belonging to 
Gaol, or France. 

Gal'lic-an. 

Gal'li-Gism (Hzm). 

Gal'U-m&a-frf. 

Gal-li-na'oean {-tJuin). 

Gal-li-na'ocous {shtu), 
169, 170, 17L 

Gal'U-nip-per, 170. 

GaPU-nule. 

[Galliot, 203. — S^ 
Galiot.] 

Gal'li-pot (170), n. a 
small glazed pot, used 
bv apothecaries. [See 
CTaUpot, 160.] 

GaU'-nut. 

Gal'lon, 10, 86, 170. 

Gal-loon', 121. 

Gal'lop, 86, 170. 

Gal-lop-iide'. 122. 

Gal'loped {-lupt), 165. 

Gal'lop-er. 

Gal'iop-ing. 

Gal'lo-way. 

Gal'iows l-ku) [pi. Gal- 
lowses (-Itu-ez), 189.] 

19^ Some wntera have 
reg&rded gaUow$ m both 
fingttUr and plural, but 
the beat modem anthori- 
ttea regard it aa singular 
only, with the rccular |>la- 

Ga-loche' (Fr.) (ga 
UiMh't or ga40»h') 
[ga-ldih'f Sm. ; ga- 
«»V, Wk. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. 154, 155.] 

[Gait, 203.— 5e« 

Gaalt.1 

Galvanic, 109, 170. 

Ghd'van-ism (^-izm). 

Gal'van-ist. 

Gal'van-ize, 202. 

GaI'van-ized, 183. 

Gal'van-!z-iDg. 

Gal-va-nog'ra-phy. 

Gal-va-noPo-gist. 

Gal-va-nol'o-gy, 108. 

Gal-va-nom'e-ter. 

Gal-van'o-Bcope. 

Gam-baMo [pi. Gam- 
ba'does (,-ddz)y 192.] 

Gam'bit. 

Gam'ble, 164.* 

Gam'bled (jgam'hld). 

Gam'bler. 

Gam'bling. 

Gam-boge^ (-6oq;')_(l21) 
[so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 



gam^', Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Gam-Do'gi-an. 
Gam'bol, 10, 86. 
Gam'bolled (-bold) 

(165) [Gamboled, 

Wb. Gd. 203. — 5te 

177. and Note £, p. 

70.f 
Gam^bol-ling [G a m - 

boling, Wb. (kl. 

203.] 
Gam'brel [Cambrel, 

Chambrel,203.] 
Game, 23. 
Gamed, 166. 
Game'nil (-/Sol). 
Game'some (-mm). 
Game'ster, 77. 
Gam'ing. 
Gam'mer. 
Gam'mon, 170. 
Gam'moned (-muMc/). 
Gam'mon-lng. 
Gam-o-pet'al-ofiB. 
Gam-o-phvl'lofiB, or 

Ga-mopQ'yl-lofis [See 

Adenophyllous.] 
Gam -o-Bep'al-o&s. 
Gitm'ut, 170. 
Ganch, 10, 44. 
Ganched (gancJU). 
Ganeli'ing. 
Gan'dcr, 10, 77. 
Gang ( 10, 54), n. a band ; 

a crew. [See Gangue, 

160.1 
Gau'gli-ac {gang'-), 54. 
Gan'gli-form {gang'-). 
Gan'gli-o-form {gang'-). 
Gan'gll-on {gang'-), 54. 
Gan'gli-o-na-ry 

{gana'-), 72, 171. 
Gan-gfl-on'ic igana'-), 
Gan'gre-nate (gang'-). 
Gan'gre-nat-ea 

(gang'-). 
Gan'gre-nat-ing 

(gang'-). 
Gau'grene (gang'-), 171. 
Gan'grened (gang'-), 

1^5. 
Gan'gren-ing (gang'-). 
Gan-gre-ncg'oent 

(gang), 171. 
Gau'gre-noOs (gang'-). 
Gaugue (gang), n. the 

matrix of an ore. 

[See Gang, 160.] 
Gang' way, 206. 
Gan'net, 170. 
Ga'noid [so Gd. ; gam'- 

aid, Sm. Wr. 155.] 



fall; 6 m In there; d&aj<i»foot;9a«{nfacile;ghasg<figo;|ba«iiithl& 



OANOIDAL 



214 



GAUGE 



Gftriioid'al. 

Ga-noid'i-oiL 

GftDtlet, n. a milltaiy 
punishment inflicted 
by making the of- 
foider run between 
two rows of men, 
each of whom g^lYCs 
him a stroke with a 
switch or a whip. 
[See Gauntlet, 148.] 

Gan'za. 

Gaol MO/) (158) [Jail, 
208.J 



The form ^aol, 
though heretofora com- 
mon, and Mnctioned by 
Ifood •uthoritiei. Is not 
now m> generally naed aa 
JttiL 

Gaol'er (»«'-) [Jail- 
er, 203.] 

Gap, 10. 

Gape (gUpj orgdp) [so 
Wr.j gdp, Wk. Wb. 
Gd. } gAp, Sm. 155.] 

9Sr *' The expreMiTe 
but irregular pronuncia- 
tion of this wora vith the 
Italian a \ifap] is no longer 
prevalent?* Stnart. "This 
pronnnclation [fiUpl, how- 
eTcr, Is well supported by 
authorities, and it is com- 
mon in the U. 8." Woroe^ 

(Hped {jg'^U or gfkpV), 
Gap'er (gup'-t or giip'-), 
Gap'ln^ (^<^S or 

GWi-gay. 

G&r'an-oine (-<en) [so 
Sm. Wr. ; gdr'an-nn, 
Gd. 165.] 

Garb, 11, 135. 

Grar'bage, 70. 

Gar'baged. 

Gar'ble, 165. 

Gar'bled {gaHbld), 183. 

Gar'bler. 

Gar'bles (gar'blz). n,pL 

Gar'bling. 

Gar'boara. 

Gar'den {gar*dn) (53, 
14«) [so Gd. ; g^arfdn, 
Sm. (5c€ 5 20) , gar'- 
dnt or garfderif Wr. 
165.] 

GarMened {gar^dnd). 

GarMen-er (gar^dn-). 

Gar'den-ing {gar'dn-), 

Gar'flsh, 20(5. 

GaFgan-cf, 98, 100. 



Gar'ga-rism C-ritm). 
Gar'get (-ghet), 1.38. 
Gar'gil ighU), 138. 
Gar'gle, 164. 
Gar'gled (gar^gld), 183. 
Gar'gUng. 
Gar'gol. 

Garfish (ghir'-) [G air- 
is 5,203.1 r 5m Note 

under Gauish.] 
Gar'land, 11, 72. 
Gar'lio, 11, 200. 
Gar'Uck-Y, 182. 
Gar'ment. 
Gar'ner, 11, 77. 
Gar'nered (-ntcrti)) 160. 
Gar'ner-ing. 
Gar'net, 11, 76. 
Gar'nish, 104. 
Gar'nished (-nithi), 
Gar-nish-ec', 122. 
Gar'uish-er. 
Gar'nish-ing. 
Gar'nish-ment. 
Gar'ni-ture, 169. 
Gar'pike. 
Ga'roOs Fso Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; flfttr'iM, Sm. 

155.] 
Gftr'ret, 11, N. 
Gftr'ret^. 
Gftr-ret-eer', 122. 
Giir* retting. 
Gfir'rl-son (-«n), 140. 
Gftr'ri-soned (-Muf), 166. 
Gir-rOte' (Sp.). 
Gar-rot'ed, 183. 
Gar-rot'ing. 

Gllr-ru'li-ty (-roof), 160. 
G&r'ru-lo&s, (-roo-;. 
Gar'ter, 11, 77. 
Gar'tered, 160. 
Gar'ter-ing. 
Ga'rum. 
Gfts (10, 174) [noi giis, 

nor giLi, 153.J 
Gas'con. 

Gas-con-ade', 122. 
Gas-con-ad'ed, 183. 
Gas-oon-ad'ing. 
Gas-con-ad'cr. 
Gas'e-ous igaa'-) (136, 

171, 176) [so Sm. Gd. ; 

gaz*e^u»t or ga'ie^utf 

Wr. 165.] 
Gash, 10, 46. 
Gashed Qyaahi), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Gash'ing. 
Gas'-hdld-er, 206, Ezc 

3. 
Gas-i-fl-ca'tion. 
(}as'i-ned, 186. 



Gaa'1-fbrm, 106. 

Gas'i-f y, 94, 176. 

Gas'i-fyfaig. 

Gas'kei 

Gas'kins {4eku)t n. pi. 

Gas'-me-ter, 206,Exc 3. 

Ga-Bom'e-ter {-zom'-) 

(108) [so Sm. Wr.; 

gaz-om' e-tur tGd. 155.1 
Ga-som'e-try (-aom'-j 

iso Wr. ; gaz-om't" 
ry, Gd. 155.J 
Gasp, 12, 131. 
Gasped {gatpt)^ 166. 
Gasp'ing. 
Gas'sing. 
Gas'sy/OS, 17a 
Gaa'ter-o-pod JGas- 

t r o p o a , 203.J 
Gas-ter-op'o-dofis 

[Gaitropodous, 

Gas'tric, 200. 

Gas-tril'o-quist. 

Gas-tril'o-quy, 171. 

Gas-tri'tis. 

Gas'tro-oele. 

Gas-trol'o-gy, 106. 

Gas'tro-man-cy, 160. 

Gas'tro-nome. 

Gas-tron'o-mer. 

Gas-trp-nomMc, 100. 

Gas-tron'o-mist. 

Gas-tron'o-my. 

Gas'tro-pod [Gae- 
t e r o p o d , 208.1 

Gas-trop'o-dods [G al- 
ter op o do us, 203.] 

Gas-trdr'a-phy. 

Gas-tros'co-py. 

Gas-trofo-my. 

Gate (23), n. a frame for 
<dosing a passage i" 
an avenue. \Stt Giit, 
160.] 

Gate'way, 206. 

Gath'cr, 10, 38, 77. 

Gathered, 160. 

GatH'er-er. 

GatE'er-ing. 

G&ua'i-ly. 

G&ud'i-neaa, 160. 

Giud'v. 

G&uTier-ing. 

Gauge (^) (23, 160), 
n. an instrument 
for measuring ; — the 
number of feet which 
a ship sinks in the 
water ; — the posltioD 
of a ship as re- 

gards another}— the 
readth of a railway- 



a, $, i, 5, u, 5, Umg ; &, 6,1, 5, ti, y, ihori \ Haiin far, ka» in ftst, t a« <a 



f 



GAUGE 

^mge (in the first 
ree sentiet), *i03.] 
ipe ia(^h V. to meaa- 
». [See Gagpe, r. 

ID.J 

'•-ble (g&f), 164, 



r" 



(^*i<0» 183. 
jOg^er (^a;'-)» »• one 
irfio gau(n.^8, or meas- 
■res. [^ee Gagt^r, 
lUO.l 

A n. measuring. [6'ce 

34alt [Gait, Golt, 

203.1 
G&ant (t^ant) [not 

smwnt, 153.J 
CHumt'let (gdnt'-)^ n. a 

Large iron glove. [Sec 

Gantlet, IfX).] 
Oauntaet-ed. 
Gioze, 17, 40. 

Gave, 23. 

GaT'eK 170. 

Gar'el-kind. 

Ga-vot' [80 Sm. ; gav*- 
otj Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Gawk, 17. 

Gawk'r, 03. 

Ga3r.23. 

Gay'e-ty (171) [Gaie- 
ty. 203.) 

Giy'ly [Gaily, 203.] 

Gaxe, 23. 

Gazed, 183. 

Ga-ielle', 121, 171. 

Gix'er. 

(}a-w?tte', 121, 171. 

Ga-act'ted, 171. 

Gai-et toer', 122, 109. 

Giz'ing, 183. 

Gear (aher)j 13, 138. 

CKtiTod (jfhird), 105. 

Gvar'lng {ghir'-). 

Geat (j«). 

Geck'o {ghekfo) [wWr.; 
jek'o^ Gd. 156.] 

Gee, 13, 45. 

Geed, 188. 

Gec'ing. 

Geeae Xghis), n.pl.i 138) 
[See Goose, 105.1 

Cie hen'na (ijrAe-), 138. 

Gc^ne, 152. 

Gel'a-ble, 104, 109. 

Ge-lat'i-nate. 

Ge-latM-nat-ed. 

Ge-lat'1-nat-ing. 

Ge Ut-i-na'tion. 



215 

Gel'a-tlne (46,152)[G e 1- 

atin,20:i.] 
Gel a-tin'i-form ( 106)[bo 

Wr. ; jt-lat'i-ni-form^ 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Ge-lat'i-nlze, 202. 
Ge-lat'i-nized, 183. 
Ge-lat'i-niz-ing. 
Ge-lat'i-noQa. 
OcJd (ghelff). 
Gild'c-d {gfwM). 
Geld'er (gheld'-). 
Geld'ing {aheld'-). 
Gel'ly pell y, 203.] 

09^ Both forms of thif 
word are found in ino«t of 
the DictioDftriet. 8 in art 
and Worcester indicate a 
preference for >//»/, and 
this ibrm is dow the more 
common. 

Gelt {gheU). 

Gem, 15, 45. 

G«-ma'ra {ghe-)y 138. 

Ge-mfir'ic yghe-)- 

Gem'el. 

Gem'i-ni (L.), n.pL 

Gem'i-noQ§. 

Gem'ma-ry, 72, 170. 

Gem'mate. 

Gcni'mat-od. 

Gem ma'tion. 

Gemmed {jemd)^ 176. 

Gem'me-ofis, 160. 

Gem-mifer-ous, 106. 

Gem'ming, 176. 

Gem-mip'a-roQs. 

Gem'malc, 170. 

Gera-mu-Urer-otti. 

Gem'my, 170. 

Gcmslioc ( icmz'tdk) 
[Gem8bok,2o:i.] 

Gen-darme' {zhdn- 
darm') [pi. Gen- 
darme8^ or Gens 
d^armes{zh{iri-d(trm'). 



The plural form, 
aen» tTannes (armed men), 
ts the French cxpreuion, 
tVom which the word gtn- 
ttarme is formed. 

Gen-darm'er-y. 

Gen'der, 15, 45, 77. 

Gen-e-a-loff'ic-al, or Ge- 
nc-a-logMc-al (-Iq)') 
[jen-e-n-loj'ik-alf Wr. 
Wb. Grd. \jtne-a-loj'- 
ik-fU, Wk. 8m. 155J 

Gten-e-al'o-BiBt, or Ge- 
nc-al'o-gi8t. 

(Sen-e-al'o-gy, or Ge-ne- 
al'o-gy ( \OKJ\jen-e-al'- 
o-Jpf Wr. Wb. Gd.; 



GENIUS 

ji-ne-alfo-jift Wk. Sm. 

155.] 
Gkn'c-ra, n. pi. [See 

Genus.] 
Gen'er-al, 106, 233, £.xc. 
Gen-er-al-is' si-mo, 169, 

Gen-er-al'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Gen-er-al-I-za'tlou. 

Gen'er-al-izc, 202. 

Gcn'er-al-ixod, 183. 

Gen'er-al-iz-ing. 

Gcn'er-al ly, 170. 

Gen'er-ant. 

Gen'er-ate, 45, 72. 

Gcn'cr-at-€d, le3. 

(i.'u'er-at-ing. 

Gen-er-a'tion, 45, 112. 

Gen'er-at-lvc [so 8m. ; 
gcn'er-a-t'Wy Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. 153.] 

(3en'er-at-or, 228. 

Gen'er-at-rix. 

Ge nCr'ic, 109. 

CJe-nfr'ic-al, 108. 

Gen-er-os'i-ty, 109. 

Gen'er-oQs, 108, 169. 

Gren'e-sis, 45, 169. 

C}en'et, n. a small-sized 
Spanish horse ; — an 
animal of the weasel 
kind. [See Gcnette, 
148.1 [Genette,203.] 

(3€-netli'li-ac. 

Gen-eth U'ac-al. 

Ge-ncth-U-al'o-gy. 

Ge-net'io. 

Ge-nette' (-nc/'), «• » 
cat skin made into a 
muff or a ttppot ; — a 
small-sized Spanish 
horse ; — an animal of 
the weasel kind. 
[Genet (in the last 

Wo BCUBCS), 2(X).] 

Gc-uc'van. 

Ge-ne'van-ism {-izm). 

Gen-e-vese' {-vtz')^ n. 
sing. &■ pi. 

Gc'nf-al, 72, 78, 156. 

Gc-ni-alM ty, H». 

Ge'nl-al-lv, 66, N. 

Ge-nic'u-fate. 
i Ge-nic'u-lat-ed. 

Ge-nio-tt-la'tion. 
\ Gcn'1-tal. 

Gen'i-ting [Jennet- 
1 ing,203.J 

Gen'i-tiv-al. 

Gen'i-tlre, M, 108. 

Gen'ius (j«n'yi«), or 
Ge'ni-us [so Wr. ; 
jln'gust Gd. j jt'ni-ue^ 



fUl ; 6 otf tn there ■ 6b as in Toot iqasin Cacilc ; gh.a« g in go } th a« in thia 



GENIUS 



216 



GIDDILY 



Wk. 8m. 155] [pL 
GenittseB], n. extnor- 
dinarr mental power. 

Ot^ni-Hi (L.) [pi. Ge'- 
ni4, lOHJ, fi. a tutelar 
ly deity. 

Gen-o-eae' (-*«')» «• 
sing. & pi. 

Gen-feel' 45, 121. 

Oen-teel'If, 66, N. ; 170. 

Gcn'tian Ishan). 

Geu'tU. 

Gen'tile (81,152) [so Sm. 
Wr. Gd. i Jen'ni, or 
jen'tU, Wk. 166.] 

aar Thouch Wmlker 
pr«fvni Jem'tU, he lajrs of 
JaiffU, "Thli pronuncia- 
tion pe«'li/] U mo«t «Erce- 
able to gvneral UMg«." 

Gen' til ism (-izm)y 143. 
Gen ti ll'tinl (iMh'al). 
Gen ti-lI'tio&H (^uiA'tM). 
Gcn-til'i-ty, lOtf. 
Gen'tle, 1(4. 
Gen'tle-folk (/Si) [pi. 
Gen'tlc-folkB i-J^iu).] 



Thoii|;h ffeHti^olk 

la a collective noun, wri- 
tera who make uee of the 
word gencrallj give it the 
plural form. 




The plnnU is often 

miepronouneed Jen'tl- mwt, 

Gen'tle-wom-an ijen'- 

tl-tcobm-). 
Gen-too', 121. 
Gen'try, 16, 93. 
Gen~u-flec'tion [so Sm.; 

je-nu-flek'ffhun, Wr. 

Wb. fed. 155.] 
Gen'u-Tne, 152, 171. 
G«'nu8 (L.) [pi. Gen'- 

er-a, 1«8.] 
Ge-o-cen'tric, 109. 
Ge-o-cen'tric al, 108. 
(Je'ode, 13, 24. 
Gc-o-des'ic, 109. 
(Jo-o-dcB'ic-al, 108. 
Ge-od'e-sy ( 106) [ so Wr. 

Wb. Gd.i je'o-des-y, 

Sm. 165.1 
Ge-o-det'ic, 109. 
Ge-o^et'lc-al, 108. 
Ge-o^f er-oilB, 108. 
Gc'og-nSst. 
Ge-og-ndflt'ic, 109, 
Ge-og-n68t'ic-al, 106. 
Ge-og'no-sy, 106. 



Ge^>-gon'io. 

Ge-o^o-ny, 106. 

Ge-og'ra^pher, 45, 106. 

GeH>-graph'lc, 109. 

Ge-o-graph'io-al, 108. 

Ge-o^ra-phy, 46, 108. 

Ge-oT'o-ger, 46, 77. 

Ge-o-lo'gi-an. 

Ge-o-lo^ic-al (-Iq}'-). 

Ge-ol'o gist, 46, 108. 

Ge-ol'o-gy, 46, 108. 

Ge'o-man-oer. 

Ge'o-man-ev, 169. 

Ge-o-man'tic. 

Ge-om'e-ter, 108. 

Ge-o-met'ric, 109. 

Ge-o-met'rio-al, 106. 

Ge-om-e-trl'cian 
i-trUh'an), 112, 171. 

Ge-om'e-try, 45, 108. 

Ge-o-pon'ic, 109. 

Ge-o-pon'io-al, 106. 

Ge-o-pon'ic8. 

Ge-o-ra'ma [so Wr. ; 
je-o-rd'ma, Gd. 166.] 

Geor'gi-an (}'or'-), 

Geor'gic (joH^), 46, 
171 ; Note D, p. 37. 

Geor'gic-4l {Jorfjik-). 

Geor'g^ics U^^r'jiks), n. 

Ge-os'oo-py, 105. [pi. 

Ge-ra'ni-um, 109. 

Ger'fal-con iJer'/aw-kn) 
(171) [Gyrfalcon, 
Jer falcon, 203.] 

Germ, 21, X. ; 46. 

Ger'man [pi. Ger'mans 
i-fnanz)y 190.] 

(JeWman-der, or Ger- 
man' der [so Wr.; jer'- 
man-der, 8m. ; jer- 
man'dttr,Wk.Wb. Gd. 

Ger-mane', 121. [155.] 

Ger-manMc. 

Ger'man-ism (~iem), 

Germ'i-nal, 72, 78. 

Germ'i-nant. 

Germ'l-nate, 73. 

GcrmM-nat-ed, 183. 

Grerm'i-nat-ing. 

Grerm-1-na'tion. 

Ge-roc'o-my. 

Ger'und, 15, 45. 

Ge-rund'l-al. 

Ge-nindlve, 84. 

Ges-ta'tion. 

(Jes'tlc. 

Ges-tic'u-late, 89. 

Gestic'u-lat-ed, 183. 

Ges-tic'u-lat-lng. 

Ges-tic-u-la'tion, 112. 

Ges-tic'u-lat-or. 

Gtes-tlo'u-lat-o-ry [so 



8m. ; jea4Wu4a4o- 
ry, Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.) 

Gest'ore, 45, 91. 

Gestured (-yurrf), 166. 

Gest'ur-ing (-yur). 

Get (ffhet) (t3b) [noi 
ghlt, 153.] 

Gew'gaw (^'-), 138,171. 

Gey'ser {ffM^aur) (138, 
171) [so Wr. Gd.} 
phi'tur, Sm. 156.] 

Gnaat'li-ncBS, 162, i86. 

Ghast'ly, 12, 93, 162. 

Ghee, 138. [D,p.37. 

GheWkin, 21, N. ; Note 

Ghib'el-Une, 162, 162. 

GhoBt, 24. 



eott. ftc, . . . inrtead of 
Tfnff the rcfular short 
■ounu as heanl In eott, 
/rvtt, Uftt, lost, are pro> 
nounccd with o In Its u>of 
or alphabetical sound i per- 
haps because they were 
once pronounced in two 
■jUablea. in correspond- 
ence with their old spell- 
ing, Ao-ste, fao-sCe, iac" 
Umart. 

GhdBt'likc, 206, Exc 5. 

Ghost'll-nesB, 186. 

GhoBt'ly, 93, 169. 

Ghoul {aool), 19, 171. 

Glal-loU'no Ual-lo-W- 
no) [bo Gd. ; jl-id-k^ 
le'no, Wr. 155.] 

Gi'ant, 25, 72. 

Qiaour (Jour) (Turk- 
ish), 171. 

Gib'bcr-ing (ghib'-), 138. 

Gib'ber-ish (ghib'-)^ 138* 

Gib'bet, 16, 45, 170. 

Glb'bet-ed. 

Gib'bet-ing. 

Gib'bon (gkib'~), 1.18. 

[Gib-boom, 203.— 
See Jib-boom.] 

Gib-boBe' (ghib-), 138. 

Glb-bo8'i-ty (ghib-)y 169. 

Glb'boa8(oA»b'-), 138,171 

Gib'cat ighib'-), 138. 

Gibe (25, 45), n. a sneer: 
— r. to Bneer. [See 
Gybe, 160.] 

Gibed, 166, 183. 

Gib'er. 

GIb'ing. 

Gib'let, a. 

Gib'lets, n. pi, 

Gib'staff (Jib'stif,ot 
ghih'stAf) [so wr.; 
jib'stdA Wb. Gd.i 
ghib'ttif, Sm. 165.] 

Gld'di-ly ighid'-). 



A, e, i, d, ii, y, long ; ft, «, !, 6, fi, f, short ; Hat in far, ka$in fast, i at in 



GIDDINESS 



217 



GLEAN 



Gid'di-nes8 (gkid'-). 
Oid'dj {ghid^-)y 138. 
GIr'ea-gfe ( j2r'«^0ilM- 
Gilt U/hift)t 10, 138. 
Gift'ed. 

Gig iffhig), 1«, 138. 
Gi-gac-te'aD, 110. 
Gi-ean-te«qae' (-/e»Jf ). 
Gi-gran'Uc, 79, 109. 
Gi-gan-tol'o gy, 108. 
t^i^^le (ahYi), l.'»,16*. 
Oig'gled(^*iVW), 183. 



n. 




i:iUd'ed {ghUd'-y 
Oild'er ighiid'ur), 

one who gilds. [.See 

Gmlder, 160.1 
Ciild'ing (ffhiUr-). 
<JiU (^A»7) (i:«, 101), M. 

the orgim of respira- 
tion in flfihes. 
GiU(Ji/)(40, 161),n.the 

fourth part of a pint. 
Giriy-flow-er, 206. 
Gilt (ahilt), part, from 

Gild. [See Guilt, 160.1 
Gbn'bal, 16, 45, 72. 
Gim' crack, 16, 45. 
Gim'let Ufkim'-) (138) 

[not ^hmi^lct, 153.1 
Gim'let-ed {ghim'-). 
GImMet-ing {ahkn'-). 
Gimp iffhimp), 16, 138. 
Gm, 16, 45. 
Gin'ger, 16, 46, 77. 
Gin'^er-br^ad, 206. 
Gingham Ighing'am), 

laS, 162, 171. 
Gin'ging (Jin'jing)t 45. 
Gin'gi-val, 45, 78. 
Ghig'lco(45,M), [Gin- 

Ico, 203.1 
Gin'gle, 45, 104. 
Gto'gled iJing^gld), 183. 
GIn'gler. 
Gln'glhig. 
Gin'glymoid {ghing'-)^ 

5-% 54, 171. 
Gin'gly-mu8 {ghing'-) 

fpl. Gin'gly-mi, 1U8.] 
[Uinko, 203.-5^ 

Gingko.l 
Ginn^ (i«mf), 176. 
Gin'net, 16, 45, 80. 
Gin'ning, 176. 
Gin'sen^, 16, 45. 
Gip, 16, 45. 
Gipped U^i), 
Gip^>hif > 170. 
Gip^y(46j 160) [Gyp- 
sy, 203.] 



war Of the two model 
ef speUlDf thia word. Walk- 
er, Webfter, and Goodrich 
f refer the flret (ytp«v): 
ooArt and Worcester pre- 
fer the laat (jgifptiy- 

Gip'By-iBm(;i7m)[G y p- 



sy ism, 203.1 
GY-rafTe' (121, 171) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. J zh\- 

raf^ Sm. 155.] 
Gi'ran-dole {zhe'ran- 

dal) r io Sm. ; flr'an- 

d9ly Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
GIrU-aole, 16, 45. 
Gird {ghird), 2J , N.; 138. 
Glrd'ed {ghird'). 
Gird'er {ghird'u 171. 
Gird'ing (ghird'-). 
Gh^dleTflrWr'd/), 138,164 
Gir'dled(^fe<r'rf/d). 
Gir'dler (jihir'-). 
Gir'dling (ghir*-). 
[G i r e, 'M.—See Gyre.] 
Girl (ghirl), 21, N. j 138, 

146. 
Oironde (Fr.) (zM- 

rond'). 
Gi-rond'ist (J^-rdnd'ist) 

r 80 Wr. ; Jl-rOnd'istt 

Gd. 165.] 
Girt(oAtrO,21,N.j 1.18. 
Girth (ghirth), 37, 138. 
Gist, 16. 45. 
Gith (ghUh), 16, 1.%. 
Git'tem (ghW), 138. 
Giusto (It.) ijods'to). 
Give (ghiv)y 16, 138, 163. 
Giv'en (oAtVn), 149. 
Giv'er (ghiv'-), 183. 
[Gives, 203.— 5ee 

Gyves.] 
Glv'ing ighiv'-). 
Glz'zard (ghiz'-), 171. 
Gla'bro&s. 
Gla'cial (nM-al) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; gta'- 

ahalj Wb. Gd. 155. 
Gla^'l-er ^Ids'i-ur) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; gla'tir, 

Wb. Gd. 154, 155.] 
Gla'cis (gla'»is, or gkh 

ggs') [bo Wk. Wr.; 

gla'Hs, Wb. (Jd. iola- 

$es'y Sm. 164, 155.J 
Glad, 10. 

Glad'den (alad'n), 140. 
Glad'dcned {glad'nd). 
Glad'den-ing (alad'n-). 
Glad'1-ate, 78. 
Glad'i-atK)r [so Sm.Wr. 

QiX.xgladX-^t'ur.yflL, 

156.] 
Glad-f-a-to'rl-al. 



GladM-a-to-ry [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; glad'i-U-o- 
ry, Sm. 155.] 

Glad'i-ole. 

Glad'some {-sum). 

Glair iglir),n. the white 
of an egg ; — any vis- 
cous, transparent 
matter: — v. to smear 
with gUir. [ See GUre, 
IGO.] 

Glaired {glird), 105. 

dairying ««r'-). 

Glalr'y (glir'g), 171. 

Glance, 12, 131. 

Glanced (gUnst)^ 165, 
183 ; Note C, p. 34. 

Gian9'ing. 

Gland, 10. 

Gland'cred {-urd). 

Gland'ers (arz), n,pL 

Gland-ifer-oQs, 106. 

Gland'i-form, 106. 

Gland'u-lar, 108. 

Gland-u-la'tion. 

Gland'ule, 10, 90. 

Gland-u-lif er oQs, 108. 

Gland-u-los'l-ty, 109. 

Gland'u-loQs. 

Glare Uflir) (14), n. a 
dazzling light : — v. 
to shine wifli a daz- 
zling light. [ See Glair, 
160.] 

Glar'e-otts {gUr'-). 

GlarM-nesB (glir'-) 

Glass. 12, 131, 174. 

Glass'house, 200. 

GlasB'i-ness, 180. 

Glass'works (-tffurA'«), 
n.pL 

Glass'wort (-trart). 

Glass'y, 93, 160. 

GlAu-ces'oent, 171. 

Giau'dnc, 152. 

Giau-co'ma, 17, 72. 

Giau-oo'ma-toQs [so 
Gd. ; glaro-kom'chttM^ 
Wr. 155.] 

Giau-co'sis, 109. 

Giau'cofis, 17, 100, 160. 

[G lay mo re, 203.— 
See Claymore.] 

Glaze, 23. 

Glazed, 105, 183. 

Glaz'er. 

Gla'zicr (-zhur), 47, N. 

Glaz'ing. 

GlOam, 13. 

Gleamed (gUmd), 105. 

Gldam'lng. 

Gleam' y, 93. 

Glean, 13. 



ftll; 6a«<n there; Ob oj tfi foot ; ^ofinftoile; gh a« g <fi go ; |h a« in this. 

10 



GLEANED 



218 



GNOMONICa 



Gleaned iglene[)t 165. 

Glcan'er, 77. 

Glean'ing. 

Glebe, 13. 

Gleb'7, 9.1, 160. 

Glee, 13. 

Gleet. 

Gleet' y. 

Glen, 15. 

Gle'ne [bo Wr. Gd.; 

aUn^ Sm. 155.1 
Gle'noid. 
Glib, 16. 
Glide, 25. 
G id'ed, 183. 
G id'er. 
G id^ng. 
GUm'mcr, 66, 170. 
Glim'mered (-murci), 

150, 171. 
Gllrn'mer-ing. 
Glimpse (gamps) (Id) 

[no Wk. Sin. Wr. ; 



glinuy Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Glis'ga. 
Glis'ten (glWn), 140, 

162. 
Glis'tened (glis'nd), 

165. 
Glis'ten-lng: (glis'ttr). 
Glis'tcr. 

GliB'tcrcd, 150, 105. 
(fUs'ter-ing. 
Glit'ter, 16, 77. 
Glit'tcred, 150, 105. 
Glit'ter-injf. 
Gloam'ing. 
Gloat, 24. 
Gloat'cd. 
(jrloat'ing'. 
Glo'bard. 
Glo'bate. 
Glo'bat-ed. 
Globe, 24. 
Globose'. 

Glo-bos'i-ty, 106, 160. 
Glo'bofls. 
Glob'u-lar, 106. 
Glob'ule, 90. 
Glob'u-lTne (152) 

{Globulin, 203.1 
Glob'u-Io&B. 
Glome, 24. 

Glom'er-ato, a. A v, 73. 
Glom'erat-cd. 
Glom'er-at ing^. 
Glom-er-a'tion. 
Gloom (19) [not dloom, 

141, 153.] 
Gloomed. 165. 
Gloom'i-ly. 186. 
Gloom'l-nesB, 169. 
Gloom'lng. 



Gloom'y. 

Glo'ried, 49. N. ; 99. 
Glo-rl-fl-ca'tion. 
Glo'rified. 
Glo'ri-f y, 49, N. ; 94. 
Glo'ri-fy-ing. 
Glo'ri-o&B. 
Glo'ry, 49, X. ; 93. 
Glo'ry-ing. 
[GloBe,203.— .Sto 

Gloze.J 
GlosB, 18, 174. 
Glos-Ba'ii-al. 
GloBB'a-rUt, 170. 
GloBs'a-ry, 72. 
GloBBed {glost), 106 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Gloss' er. 
GloBs'i-Iy, 186. 
GloBs'i-nesB, 100. 
GlosB'inff. 

GloBs-og'ra-pher, 106. 
GlosB-o-graph'ic-al . 
Gloss-oe'ra phy, 108. 
GloBB-o-lo£^'ic-«l C-^'-)' 
Gloss-ol'o-glst. 
Glo88-ol'o-gy, 106. 
GlosB'y. 
Glot'tal, 72, 170. 
Glot'tis, 66, 170. 
Glot-tol'o-gy, 108. 
Glove {gluvh 22, 163. 
Gloved igluvd), 183. 
Glov'er i^luv'-j. 
Glow, 24. 
Glowed, 165. 
Glow'ing. 

Glow' worm (-taurm). 
Gloze (24) [Glose, 

203.1 
Glozcd, 165, 183. 
Gloz'er. 
Gloz'ing. 
Gla'cic, 26, 39, 62. 
Glu-ci'na. 
Glu'clne, 152. 
Glu-cin'1-um. 
Glu-d'num. 
Gla'oose. 
Glue, 26. 

Glued (^lOd), 165, 183. 
Glu'er. 

Glu'ey, 98, 160. 
Glu'iug, 183. 
Glum, 22. 
Gla-ma'oeoas (shuM), 

160. 
Glume, 26. 
Glum'ofiB, 100. 
Glut, 22. 
Gln'te-al, 160. 
Glu'ten, 26, 76, 140. 
Gln'ti-nate. 



Gln'ti-nat-ed, 183. 

Gln'ti-oat-ing. 

Glu'ti-noas. 

Glut'ted, 176. 

Glut'ting. 

Glut'ton (glta'n), 149. 

Glut'ton-o&B (glut'n). 

Glut'ton-y (alut'n^) 
[bo Sra. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. ; glut'tun-ff, Wk. 
155.] 

Glyc'er-Ine (!5,») 
fGlycerln,aOJ.J 

Gly-co'ni-an. 

Gly-con'ic. 

Gly-cyr'riii-ztae [Gly- 
cyrrhizln,2U3.] 

Glyph (glif), 16, 35. 

Glyph'lc. 

Glyph'o-eriph. 

Gly-phog'ra-pher, 108. 

Glyph-o-graph'ic, 109. 

Gly-phoff^ra-phy, 106. 

Glyp'tic. 

Glyp-to-graph'ic 

Glyp-tog^ra-phy. 

Glyp-to-the'ca. 

Gnarl (naW), H. 162. 

Gnarled (narld) (ICl), 
V. did gnarl. 

Gnarle<l ( 101), a. knotty. 

Gnarl 'ing (narV-). 

Gnarl' y {narl'y)^ a. 
knotty. 

Gnash (nash), 10, 162. 

Gnashed (nasht), 165. 

Guash'ing (naak'-). 

Gnat (TioT), 10, 102. 

Gnaw (fkiir), 17, 163. 

Gnawed {nawd)t 165. 

Gnaw'er (nau/^ 

Gnaw'ing (n/wc'-). 

GndBB (nl«) (10:^, 171), 
n. a primary rock re- 
sembling grranitc in 
its composition, but 
of a Blaty straetore. 
[See Nice, 160.] 

Gneis'soid. 

Gnels'sose. 

Gnome (nOm)^ 24, 162. 

Gnom'ic (m»«'-)i 162. 

Gnom'ic-al {nom'-). 

Gnom-o-log'io {nam-o- 
lof-), 109. 

Gnom-o-log'io^ (turn- 
o-lof), 108. 

Gno-mol'o-gy ino-)i 
106. 

Gno'mon (no'')t 102, 171. 

Gno-mon'ic (no-). 

Gno-mon'ic-al (no-). 

Gno-mon'ics (mo-). 



a, c, i, o, n, y, long ; ft, «, I, O* tt» ft thort ; H om in (kr, k at in fast, katin 



GNOMONIST 

^nc/num-ist {fu/-). 
<C3iio-mon-ol'o-finr (no-). 
^Snos'tic (iio«^0> 162, 

171. 
Onos'ti-dcm (not'ti' 

nam). 
Qnu (nft\ n. * speciei 

of antelope inhabiting 

Sonthem Aftica. {See 

Knew, 160.1 
Go, », 63. 
Qdad,2t. 
Goad'ed. 
Goad'insr. 
Goal, 24. 
Gdat,2t. 
Goat'herd, 206. 
Goat^Buek-er. 
Gol/bet, 170. 
Gol/bing, n. 
Gol/ble, IM. 
Gol/bled {gofld). 
Gob'bler, 183. 

Gob'bUngr. 

Gob'e-lin, a. denoting a 

fine kind of Fraich 

Upeatiy. [See Goblin, 

148.1 
Gob'iet, 18, 70. 
Qob'lin, fi. au evil spir- 
it. [Ste Gobelin, 148.1 
Go'by, 98. 

Go'-cart, 206, Exc 3. 
God, 18. 
God'child, 205. 
God'-d&uffh-ter 

{,-daw'-)^ 66, N. ; 102, 

206, Exc 1. 
God'deaa, 66, 170. 
Ood'f a ther, 206. 
God'hj^a?. 

God'like, 206, Exc. 6. 
Ood'U-neaa, 186. 
God'ly, S3. 

God'moth-er (mu^'-)* 
God'senSI 
God'son i-9un). 
God'ward. 
God' wit. 
Go'er, (24, 67, 77) {See 

(3ore, 148.] 
Gog'gle, 1(H. 
Gog'gled (ffoa'ld). 
Gog'gle-cycd {gog'l- 

itf), 206, Kxe. 5. 
Gog'gles {gog'lz)i n. 

pt. 171. 
Go'ing. 
Goi'tre (-<«r) (27, 164) 

[Goiter, Wb. Gd. 

a03.-~S4se Note £, p. 

70.1 
Goi'&ed i-terd) [Goi- 



219 

tered, Wb. Gd. 

208.] 
Goi'trofis, 27. 
Gold [§o Sm. Wr Wb. 

Gd. ; gdldn or gooldt 

Wk. 155.] 



Thooffa Walktr, In 

deference to the very gen- 
eral UMLge in his time, al- 
lows tne pronunciation 
gooldt he condemns it a« a 
oorruption, and *'an un- 
meaning deriation from 
the feneral rule " for the 
sound of o in wordf of 
this class. 

Gdld'en (aold'n), 

Gold'flncb, 206. 

Gold'fisb. 

Gold'ham-mer. 

Gold'ney, 08. 

Gold'amith, 206. 

Gold'stick. 

Gold'y-locka. 

Golf, 18. 

[Golt,203. — .Ste 
Ckinlt.1 

(yom-phfa-aia. 

Gom-pho'aia, 109. 

Go-mu'tl. 

Gon'do-U, (72, 85) [not 
gim'da-Io, 153.] 

(3on-do-lier', 114, 160. 

GCne (18, N.; 163) [bo 
Wk. Sm. ; ^dn, or 
gavm, Wr. j " pro- 
nounced nearly 
gawn^" Wb. Gd. 
155.1 

Gong^, 18, 54. 

Go-nl-om'o-tor (108) [ao 
Wr. Wb. Gd. j gon-i- 
om'e-tur, Sm. 156.] 

Cto-ni-o-met'ric. 

(ro-ni-o-met'ric-al. 

Go-ni-om'e-try, 108. 

G<$bd, 20. 

G<Jbd'-by', 205. 

G<K>d'li-er, 186. 

Gdbd'U-eat. 

G<3bdai-neBB, 186. 

Gdbd'ly, 20, ft3. 

Gdbda {goodz)y n. pi. 

Gdbd'7, 93, 109. 

(joog'ingfl {jgooj'ingz)^ 
n.pl. 

(joos'an-der [so Wb. 
Gd. ; goos-an'dur, 
Wr. 166.f 

Goose (19; [pi. Geese 
(£his\ 196.] 

Goose'bCr-ry {gooz'- 
btr-y) (190) [so Wk. 



GOTHICIZEb 

Sm. Wr. } gooi'bir- 
ty, Wb. Gd. 165.J 

Gooae'neck, 206. 

Goos'er-y, 233, Exc. 

Go'pher, 24, 35. 

Gor^cock, 206. 

Gor'crow. 

Gor'di-an, 78. 

Gore, (24, 67) [ See (}oer, 
148.] 

(Sored (183), v. did 

fore. [See Gourd, 
00.] 
Gorge, 17, 45. 
Gorged, 183. 
Gor^cofis i-ju9)t 169. 
Gor'gct (./rt), 156. 
Gorg»ing igorj'-)^ 183. 
Gordon. 
Gror-go-ne'ia (-ne'yd)f 

n. pi. 51, 171. 
Ck>r-go'ni-an [ G o r g o - 

ncan, 2a3.j 
GoWhcn, 200. 
Gor'lng. 
Gior'mand [Gour^ 

m and, 203.] 

ai^ Otmrmamd Is the 
French form of this word, 
and Is more generally used 
than oormttfuit the Angli- 
cized form. 

Gor'mand-lBm (-izm). 
Gor'mand-izc, 202. 
Gor'mand-izcd, 183. 
Gor'mand-Tz-er. 
Gor'mand-iz-ing. 
Gorse, 17 j Note D, p. 

37. 
Gor'T, 49, N. 
GosHiawk. 
Gos'linjg^ {jgozf-), 
GoB'peL 18, 76. 
Gos'pelled (165) [Go s - 

pelod, Wb. Gd. 

203. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Gos'pel-ler [Gospel- 

er, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Ctos'pcMing [Gos- 

peling, Wb. CW. 

203.] 
Gos'sa-mer, 170. 
GoB'sa-mer-y. 
Gos'Hlp, 66, 170. 
Gos'sipcd (-M><), 165. 
Gos'sip-ing. 
Got, 18. 
Goth, 18, 37. 
Goth'Ic. 

Goth'i-cism (-tfism), 136. 
Goth'i-cize, 202. 
Goth'i-eized, 183. 



(Ulj do* in there J db « in foot i 9 a« in fitdle } gh m g in go j ^ a« in this. 



XJOTBICIZINO 



220 



GRASPED 



^otfa'i-dz-ing. 
Got'ten igot^), 140. 
Gouge (aowj, or Moj) 

f ■© W r. ; gavy, w"b. 

Gd.i goojf Wk. Sm. 

165.] 
Gouged (aotcjdt or 

gooJd)y isl. 
Goug'ing iffowf; or 

flrocy'-). 
Gourd (odr**) [bo Sm. 

Wb. Gd. ; gord, or 

^oord, Wk. Wr. 155.] 



Though Walker tl- 
lowf goor(t, hie Mjrt: *' The 
flnt [yort/J ii, la mj opin- 
ion, the moet •grceebM to 
Bnglieh analogy .** 

Gdurd'i-nesB, 186. 
Gourd'y, «;{. 

Gour'mand (Fr.) {goor'- 

mdnd) [Go rmaud , 

203. — See Note under 

Oormand.] 
[Gouruet, 203. — See 

Gurnet.] 
Gout (28, 101), 11. an 

inflammation of the 

Joints, particularly 

those of the great 

toe. 
Ocut (Fr.) igoo) (!», 

101), n. taKtc ; relish. 
Gout'i-ness, 28, 18G. 
Gout'y, 28, ai. 
Gov'em (^r'am), 22, 

171. 
Gov'em-a-blc iguv'-), 

1(H. 
Gov'em-ante {gur'itm- 

UrU) [so Sm. (wd. ; 

guv-um-int'y Wr. ; 

go-vur-n&iU't Wk. 

155.] 
Gov'emod {guv'umd). 
Grov'em-css {gtw'-). 
Gov'ern-ing {guv'-). 
Gov'em-meut (£uv'-)t 

171. 
Gov-om-ment'al (guv-). 
Gov'em-or (jfuv'-)j 88, 

171. 
Gov'cm-or-gen'er-al, 

205. 216. 
Gow'an. 
Gown, 28. 

Gowned (^oirml), 166. 
Gown'man, 190. 
Gowns'man {gownz'-)i 

215. 
Grab, 10. 

Grabbed igrdbd), 176. 
Grab'bing. 



Qnoe,23,39. 

Graced {grAst), 165, 

183 i Note C, p. 34. 
Graoe'M {-/ool), 180. 
Gra^'es (-ez), n.i»/. 
Grac'ing. 

Gra'ciofis (-«*«»), 160. 
Grac'kle (grokfJ)^ 164. 
Gra-da'tlon. 
Grad'a-to-ry, 86. 
Grade, 23. 
Grad'ed, 183. 
Grad'i-ent. 
Grad'ing. 
Grad'u-al, 89, 02. 
Grad'u-al-ly, 170. 
Grad'u-ate, 73. 
Grad'u4lt-ed, 183. 
Grad'u-at-ing. 
Grad-u-a'tion, 112. 
Grad'u-at-or, 228. 
0radu9 (L.). 
GrafT, 10, 173. 
Graf fer, 170. 
Graft, 12, 131. 
Graft'ed. 
Graft'er. 
Graft'ing. 
Grail, 23. 
Grain, 23. 
Grained, 183. 
Grain'er. 
Grain'ing. 
Griiin'y, 93, 160. 
Gral la-to'ri-al, 40, N. 
Gral'ltt-to-ry. 
Gral'lio. 
Gram. n. the unity of 

the French system of 

weights. [Gramme, 

2o:i.j 
Gra-min'e-al. 
Gra-min'e-ofts. 
Gram-i-ni-fo'li-otiB. 
G ram-i-niT'o-rofts. 
Gram'mar, 66, 170. 
Gram-ma'ri-an, 49, N. 
Gram-mat'io, 109. 
Gram-mat'ic-al, 108. 
Gram'ma-tist. 
Gramme (Fr.) {gram) 

[Gram, 203.] 
[Grranade, 203.— 

See Grenade.] 
[Granado, 203.— 

See Grenade.] 
Grftn'a-r^ (72, 123, 169) 

{not gran'a-ry, 153.] 
Grand. 10. 
Gran'dam. 
Grand'child, 206. 
Grand'-dftngh-ter 

(-dato-)» ^* Bxo. 1. 



Wk. 



Gran-dee', 121. 
Grand'eur (-yur) 

N.) { so Sm. 

Go. ; gran'jur^ 

155.1 
Grand'fi-lher. 
Gran-dil'oKiuence. 
Gran-dil'o quent. 
Gran-dil'o-<)uofiB. 
Gran'di ose. 
Grand'moth-er 

i-mvih-). 
Grand'^-ent ( -pAr-). 
Grand'sire. 
Grand'son. 
Grange, 23, 46. 
Gra-nirer-ofts, 106. 
Gran'i-form, 108. 
Granite, 152. 
Gra-nit'ic, 109. 
Gra-nit if 1-ca'tlon. 
Gra-nit'i-form, 106. 
GranM-toid. 
Gra-niv'o-rofis, 100. 
Grant, 12, 131. 
Grant'a ble, 164, 169. 
Grant'ed. 
Grant-ee', 118, 121. 
Grant'cr, 160. 
Grantor', or Grant'or 

(118, 160) [Law term, 

correlative of Grewt- 

ee.] 
Gran'u-lar, 72, 80. 
Gran'u-la-ry. 
Gran'u late, 73. 
Gran'u-lat-ed. 
Gran'u-lat-ing. 
Gran-u-la'tion. 
Gran'ulc, 90. 
Gran'u-lite, 152. 
Gran'u-lofis. 
Grape, 23. 
Grap'er-y, 233, Exe. 
Graph'ic, 10, 35, 200. 
Graphical, 106. 
Graph'ic- al-ly. 
Graphite, 70, 152. 
Graph'o lite, 152. 
Graph-om'e-ter, 108. 
Graph-o-met'ric-al. 
Grap'nel (10, 76) 

[Crapnel,203.1 
Grap'ple, 1(H. 
Grap'pled (grap'Ul: 

183. 
Gnip'pling. 
Grap'to-lite, 162. 
Grap'y, 93, 169. 
Grasp, 12, 131. 
Grasp'a-ble, 164. 
Grasped (gnupt), 166-, 

Note C, p. 34. 



a, e, 1, o, u,y,ton^; !,*,!,«, tt,t.«»or« J » « <» far, 4 a« <n flwt, I «« la 



3RASPER 



221 



GRIPER 



er. 

bag. 

12, 131, 174. 

d {grd8t)j 165. 

tiop-per, 171. 

l-aees, 1G9, 186. 

ing. 

f. 

(23), fi. a firame 
its: — r. to rub; 
firet. [5ee Great, 

i, 183. 

rul C/Sol), 180. 

[W-ly (-yfeo. 

r (lci3), n. an in- 

nent for grating. 

Greater, 160.] 

>/-a-la'tion. 

fl-ca'tion. 

Hed, 186. 

fi-er. 

g, 94, 160. 

1, 23, 160. 
tude, 106, 160. 
M-to1iB, 78, 100. 
'1-ty, 160. 
-lant. 

-late, 73, 89. 
-lat-ed. 
-lat-ing. 
-la'tion. 
-la-to-ry [so Wk. 

Wb. Gd. ; grat'- 
-o-ry, Sra. 156.] 
iwacke, 2203.— 
j^raywaoke.] 
/men. 

23. 

1, 166, 183. 
1, 10, 76. 

lied (-eki) n65) 
aTeled, Wb. 
203«— i9eel77,and 
( E, p. 70.1 
l-UngrpraTel- 
, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Hy. 
n (griiv'n)t 149. 

T. 

stdne, 206. 

yard. 

m'e-ter, 106. 

og. 

tate, 73, 160. 

tat-ed. 

tat-ing. 

ta'tion. 

ty, 106, 160. 

,23,03. 

Grey, 203.] 



•* Mom propwly 
snd oommonlr written 
grtif.'* Worceder, 

[Grayhonnd, 203.— 

See Greyhound.] 
Gray'Iing. 
Gray'wack-e [bo Wr. ; 

gra'wak^ Wb. Gd. 

155.] [Granwacke, 

203.] 
Graze, 28, 40. 
Grazed, 166. 
Graz'er, 183. 
Gra'zier {-zhur), 47, N. 
Graz'ing. [161. 

Grease igns)^ n. 130, 
Grease (^r«3r),r. 136, 161. 
Greased (|7r«a;d), 166. 
Gr§a8'i-ly ignz'-). 
Greas'i-ness (griz'-). 



if) [not 



(ariv) n3), n. 

lor the legs ; — 

dly used m the 



Greas'ing {jgriz'A, 
Greas'y {griz'y) 

gres'y, 153.] 
Great (grikt) (23), a. 

Urge ; grand. [ See 

Grate, !«).] 
Great'er, a. more great. 

[See Grater, 160.J 
Greave {griv) (13), n. 

armor 

generally 

plural. [Set Grieve, 

160.] 
Grebe, 13. 
Gre'cian {-than). 
Gre'clsm {-Hzm)^ 136. 
Greed, 13. 
Greed'i-ly, 186. 
Greed'i-ness, 109. 
Greed'y, 03. 
Greek, 13. 
Green. 13. 
Green^flnch, 206. 
Green' house. 
Green'ness, 66, N. 
Green'room. 
Greens {grtn»\ n. pi. 
Green'stone. 130, 206. 
Green'sward. 
Greet. 13. 
Greet'ed. 
G reefer. 
Greeting. 
Gre-ga'n-ouB, 40, N. 
Gre-go'ri^an. 
Gre-nade' n2\) [Gra- 

nade, Granado, 

203.] 
Gren-a-diSH, 122, 160. 
Gre-naf i-form, 106. 
Gren'a-tite, 162. 
Gres-BO'ri-al, 160. 
Greut {ffroot)i 19. 



Grew (jgroo)t 19. 
[Grey, 203.— 5e« 

Gray.] 
Grey'nound {gra'-) 

[(irayhonnd,203.] 

0^ Smart cItm only 
the form gt-eyhotmd, ana 
remark* : " Thii ia not a 
compound of amy, the col- 
or." It if derf vea from the 
Anglo-Saxon grig^kund, in 
which the first part (ffrig) 
doea not appear to have the 
meaning of orcw. No def- 
inition of it If anven In the 
Anfflo-Saxon DicUonariee 
of Boeworth and Lye, and 
the Anglo-Saxon origin of 
gray ia there itated to b« 
grveg, 

Grid'dle, 16«. 
Grid'e-lin. 

Grid'i-ron (-»*'«m), 171. 
Grief, 13, 169, N. 
Griev'anoe, 183. 
Grieve (13, 109, N.), v. 

to wound the feelings 

of;— to mourn. [Set 

Greave, 160.] 
Grieved, 183. 
Griev'er. 
Griev'ing. 
Griev'o&B, 13, 169. 
Griffin, or Griffon, 66, 

170. 
Grig, 16. 
Grin, 16, 172. 
Gril-iade', 121. 
Gril'lage. 

GriUed (^rW/d), 166. 
GriU'ing. 
Grim, 16. 

GrI-maoe'. 121, 171. 
Grimaced' {-nUM'), 
Gri-mac'ing. 
Gri-mal'kin. 
Grime, 25. 
Grimed, 183. 
(jrrim'ing. 
Grim'y, 93. 
Grin, 16. 
Grind. 25. 
Grind'er. 
Grind'ing. 
Grind'stSne (130, 206) 

[so Wk. Wb. Gd. ; 

grind' stdne, coll. 

gr^n'stun, 8m. ; 

grind' tUin^ or grind' 

ttOny Wr. 155.r 
Grinned (gr%nd), 176. 
Grin'ner, 228, N. 
Gripe, 25. 
Griped (jfrfpt), 183. 
Grip'er. 



at im there; 06 at in fbot}^ m in ftdle; gh Mgingo;^atin thii. 

19« 



GRIPING 



222 



G(JAIU> 



Seamen nraally 
pronounce thli wortl 
grtan'eti and hence it if 
•ometimee IncorrecUjr 
•pelted Oruramet. 

Grom'wcH [G r o m i 1 1 , 
20:{.] 

Groom (19^, n. a ser- 
vant ; — a bridef;ri^om. 
[5c«Gnime, U'K).] 

Groomed (groom(i)i 166. 

Groom'ing. 

Grooms'man 
(groomz'), 106, 214. 



Gripping. 

Ortaette (lY.) igrt-gei'.) 

Grls'li uesB (ariz' -)AiVi. 

Gris'ly (jfriz^ly\ a. hor- 
rible ; nrightfXiL [See 
Grizzly, \f*i.] 

Gri'fions {are'zunz), ». 
pi. [bo Wr. Gd. ; grtf- 
zdnzy 8m. 155.] 

Grist, 16. 

Gris'tlc (ara'0, 162,164. 

Griat'ly (Jrit'/y), lOa. 

Grit, 16. 

Grit^Htone, 130, 200. 

Grit'ti-DCBB, 166. 

Grit'ty, 170, 176. 

Griz'zle, 164. 

Griz'zlcd {gHz'U1\ IflB. 

Griz'zly, a. somewhat 
gray. \See Grisly, i 
160.] 

Groau, v. to utter a 
moumfol Bouud, aa 
in pain : — > ». a mourn- 
f\x\ sound ntterod in 
diHtrcBB. [SSee Grown, 
160.] 

Groaned (^rftnd), 105. 

Groaii'in^. 

Groat igrawt), 17, 171, 

Groats {grawts)^ n. pi. 

Groats' worth (grawW- 
wwrth), 171, 206. 

Gro'cer (24, 39), n. a 
trader in goods rc- 

fuired for the table. 
Sec Grosser, 160.] 
Gro'ccr-y, 171. 
Grog. 18. 

Grog^ger-y (-^wr-), 138. 
Grog' ram [Groge- 

ram, Grogran, 

203.1 
Grog'sbop, 200. 
Groin, 27. 

Groined (r^roimf), 165. 
Grom'iilTG r o m w e II, 

203.1 
Grom'met, 170. 



Groove, 19. 

Grooved, 183. 

Groov'or. 

Groov'ing. 

Grope, 24. 

Groped (ar^pt), 165, 183; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Gros'beak [GroBB- 

beak,203.] 
Gross. 24, 174. 
GrdB8'bcak(206)[G r o b- 

beak, 203.1 
GroB'sQ-lar, 72, 170. 
Grot, 18. [171. 

Grotesque' (-tesF), 121, 
Grot'to (66, 170) [pi. 

Grot'tos (-M«), m,) 
Ground, 28. 
Ground'age. 
Ground'ed. 
Gronnd'ing. 
Ground' ling. 
Oround'«nut. 
Ground'ael, n. a plant 

of the genus Senecio. 
Ground'»lI,orGround'- 

Bel, n. the horizontal 

timber of a building 

lying next to the 

ground ; siU. 
Ground'work (-vmrk). 
Group (groop), 19. 
Grouped (groopt), 183. 
Group'ing {groop'-). 
Grouse (arous)t n. Hng, 

A pi. 26, 
Grout, 28. 
Grout'ing. 
Grove, 24. 

Grov'el igrov'l), 149. 
Grov'elled (jfrov^ld) 

[Groveled, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — See 17? j and 

Not« E, p. 70.1 
Grov'el-ler (grofffl) 

[Groveler, Wb. 

Gd. 203.] 
Grov'el ling (yror*/-), 

[Groveling, Wb. 

Gd. 203.] 
Grow, 24. 
Grow'er. 
Grow'ing. 
Growl, &. 

Growled (grotUd)t 165. 
Growl'er, 28, 77. 
Growl'lng. 
Grown, part, from 

Oraw. [See Groan, 

160.] 
Gr«wth, 24. 
Grub, 22. 
Grubbed (gntbd), 176. 



GmbHring. 
€hiidge, 22, 40. 
Grudged (grt^d), 165. 
Grudg'er, 183. 



Grudg'ing. 
-^ I'el 
76. 



Gru'd {groo^efU 19,26. 



Gruir, 22, 173. 
Gruiriy, 178. 
Grum, 22. 
Grum'ble, 104. 
Grum'bled {-bid), 183. 
Grnm'bler. 
Grumbling. 
Grume (^rooai), n. a 

clot, aa of blood. [S«e 

Groom, 100.] 
[ G r u m m e t , 208.— .Sm 

Grommet.] 
Gru'mofia (^roo'-), 19, 

100. 
Grunt, 22. 
Grunt'ed. 
Grunt'er. 
Gnint'injg. 
Gua-cha'ro (j/wa-). 
Gua'ia-oum {gwa'ga- 

kum), .M, 51, 171. 
Guan (jgtDdai). 
Gua'na {gwd'-). 
Gua-na'oo (jftoa-) [pL 

Gua-na'oos, 192.] 
Gua-nif er-o&s {jnoa-). 
Gua'no (^trtt'no). 
Guii'ra(^»r«'-). 
Gu&r-an-tee' (^*r-), n. 

&r.(122) [Guaran- 
ty, ao:M 



U now 
more commonlj need than 



GuAr-an-teed' (188) 
[Guarantied, 
(^aWan.rW), 203.] 

Gu&r-an-tee'ing[G u ar- 
antying IgAr'an- 
iy^ng), 283.] 
uar'an- 



Ga 



-tor, 118. 



mar when this word i* 
ni ea ai the eorrelativr i>f 
gmartmtee (in fte senw ot 
ome to whom mmt if u girr* >. 
It ii properly aceented vu 
the laat ly liable (gmariim- 

tOf*). 

GuftHan-ty, n. & r. 

[Guarantee, 203. 

— See Note under 

Quar€mtee.'\ 
Gu&r'an-^-ing [G n a r - 

anteeinff,a03J 
Guard {gar^ (11,88,58, 

146) [flo Wr. vn». Gd.; 



a, e, i, 0, n, y, long ; 8, C, 1, 5, fi, f-, short t^ktwin fkr, katin fkft, kaain 



GUARDED 



223 



GYMNASIUM 



ff*ard, Qm. (See ^ 26) i 
gyard* Wk. 155.] 

Guard'ed {gard'-). 

<iuard'er {gard'-). 

<jiaard'i-aii (aard'i-nn) 
[80 Wb. Gtl. ; g'aref- 
yon, Sm. (See $ 26); 
ff€ird'i-an, or gard'- 
gan^ Wr. ; gyard'i- 
any or pyar'^'i-on, Wk. 
155.] 

Gol'ra (moU'va) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; gwA'- 
m^ Sm. 155.1 

Gu-ber-na-to'n-al. 

Gad'geon (-jun\ 22, 45. 

Gue'DcrB, or Gue'bres 
(g}u^burz)y n. pi, 

Guelfs igyoelf»)y n. pi. 
[Guelph»,2rj3.J 

Guer'don (gher'dun) 



r21, N.) [no Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gtl.; gh*er'dun, 
Sm. (See § &), 155.] 

Gne-ril'la (ahe-ril'la) 
[•oWr.] [Guerril- 
la (mcer-ril'la)y GU. 
155,203.1 [174. 

Guess (gneM\ 15, 171, 

Guessed (gfteMt)t r. did 
guess. [ See Guest, 
IfiO.] 

Guess'cr (ghet'-). 

Guess'ing (^ghes'-). 

Guess' work (ghea'- 
wurb). 

Guest (ahest) (15, 174; 
Note T), p. 37), n. one 
entertained in the 
house or at the table 
of another. [See 
Guessed, 100.] 

Guhr (gfir)y 21. 

Guid'a-ble (ghliV-)^ IM. 

Uuid'ancc (^Alrf'-), 100. 

Guide (ghld), 25, 52, 53 ; 
Note D, p. 37. 

Gnld'ed (gMd'-). 

Guid'ing (ghhV). 

Guild (ghUd) (171), n. a 
Ihiteniitv, or associ- 
ation. [.See Gild, 100.] 

Guild'er (guild'-), n. a 
Dutch coin. [See Gild- 
er, 1«0.] [Gilder, 
203.] 

Guild'h&II (ghild'-). 

Guile (ghlf) [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; gyU, Wk. ; 
gk'lly Sm. (See % 20), 
52, 53, 156.] 

OuIle'leaB (ghW-), 60, 
N. 



Gniiae-mot (ghW). 
Guil'le-vat (aA«'-). 
Guillotined^ (ghil-lo- 

«rt')(122,171)[8oWr.; 

ghii-yo-tln'j Sra. ; 

ghU'lo-Un, Gd. 155.] 
Guillotined' i-Und'). 
Guil-lo-tin'ing (-iln'-). 
Guilt (o*i7/) (10, 17I),n. 

criminality. [See 

Gilt, 160.] 
Guilt'i-nes«(oA«/'-)il*>0. 
Guilt'y (ghiU'v). 
Guim'bard (ghim'-). 
Guin'ea (ghin'y), 171. 
Guin'iad (gicin'ycui) 

[Gwiniad,20:j.] 
Gui-pure' (ghe-pQr^) [so 

Wr. ; ghe^p^r, Gd.l54, 

155.] 
Guise (ghU), 25, 40. 
Gu'l&und [so Gd. ; gu'- 

Idnd, Wr. 155.] 
Gules (glUz), 
Gulf, 22. 
GuU, 22, 172. 
Gulled (guld), 165. 
Gul'let, 60, 170. 
Gul'Ued. 
Gull'ing:. 
Gul'ly, 03, 170. 
Gul'ly-Ingr. 
Gulp, 22. 

Gulped (gtdpi), 106. 
Gulp'ing. 
Gum, 22. 
Gum-Xr'abic (210) [not 

g-um-a-rab'ik, nor 

^um-a-ra'bik, 153.] 
Gum'boil, 200. 
(ium-e-las'tio, 205, 200. 
Gura-mif er-ofts, 108. 
Gum'mi-nesB, 180. 
Gum'mo&s. 
Gum'my, 93, 170. 
Gump'tlon ^um'shun) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; gump'- 

ahun^ Wb. Gd. 155.J 
Gum-rcs'in (-rc^'tn)[so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; aum'- 

rez-in, Wr. 155.] 
Gum-sen'e-g^al. 
Gum-trag'a-canth. 
Gum'-tree, 200, Exc 4. 
Gun, 22. 

Gun'-bttr-rel, 209. 
[Gunnel, 203. — See 

Gunwale.] 
Gun'nel, n. a small 

spotted flsh. [See 

Gunwale, 100.] 
Gun'ner, 77, 170. 
Gun'ner-y, 171. 



Gun'nlng. 

Gun'ny.lO, 109. 

Gun'pow-der, 200. 

Gun'room. 

Gun' shot. 

Gun'smith. 

Gun'stick. 

Gun' stock. 

Gun'walc (gun'el) (171) 
[Gunn('l,2a3.] 

Gur'gle, 1(H. 

Gur'glcd (gld), 183. 

Gur'jjllnK. 

Gur'nard. 

Gur'nct [Gonrnet, 
20:^.] 

Glir'rHh, 72. 

Gush, 22. 

GuHhed (gusht)^ 105; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Gush'ingf. 

Gus'sot, 00, 170. 

Gust, 22. 

Gust'a-to-ry. 

Gus'to. 

Gust'y, 93, 109. 

Gut. 22. 

Gut'ta per'cha [not gut'- 
ta per'ka, 153.] 

Gut'ta ae-re'na (L.). 

Gut'tat-ed. 

Gut'ted, 170. 

Gut'ter, 170. 

Gut'tered, 105. 

Gut'ter-ing. 

Gut'ti-fer, 77, 78. 

Gut-tirer-olis, 108. 

Gut'ting. 

Gut'tur-al, 21, 22, 72. 

Gut'ty. 

Guy (ghl)y 25, 171. 

Guz'zlc, 101. 

Guz'zled (zld), 183. 

Guz'zler. 

[Gwiniad, 208. — See 
Guiniad ] 

Gy'aU (ght'-). 

Gybe (Jib) (25), r. to 
shift irom one side of 
the vcHMcl to the oth- 
er, as the boom of a 
fore-and-aft sail. [See 
Gibe, 160.1 

Gybed C/l^rf), 183. 

Gyb'ing (iW-\ 

Gym-na'sl-arch (jin^ 
na'zi-ark), 171. 

Gym-na'si-um (Jim-na'- 
zhi-um) [so Wr.; jjim- 
na'zi-um, Gd. ; jim- 
ndz'i^m, coll. Hm- 
ndzh'yumj Sm. 165.] 
[L. pi. Oym-na'ti-a 



fUl} d Of ill there; Ob a« in foot; ^ at in Uidle } gh at g in go :t^ as in this. 



OTMN^T 



224 



HAl-CYON 



(Htft1-a) ; Eng. pi. 

Gym-na'Ri-itins (-d»1- 

umz), 196.1 
Oym'nast (fim'-), tf . 
Qfrn-nas'tlo, 171. 
Gym-nas'ticB, n. pi. 
Gym-nos'o phiat. 
Gym'no-Bpcrm. 
Gym-no-sperin'o&B. 
Gym'note, 46. 
Gym-no'tuB. 
Gv-nan'der (jp-), 46. 
Gf-iian'dii-an. 
Gy-nan'drofiB. 
Gyn'ar-chf ( Wii'or-*y). 
Gyn-e'cian {jln-efshan). 
Gyn-e-coc'ra-cf , IW. 
Gyp'se-o&B. 
Gyp-Bifer-ofiB, 108. 




Gyp'8y-iBin(-tefn)[G I p- 

BriBm,'2a3.] 
Gy'rate, a. ft r. 73. 
Gy'rat-ed, 183. 
Gy'riit-ing. 
Gy-ra'tion, 112. 
Gy'ra to-ry, 49, N. ; ». 
Gyre (25, 46) [GIre, 

t«)3.J 
fOyrfaloon, 203.— 

See Gcrfaloon.1 
Gy'ro-man-cy, 109. 
Gy'ro scope, 49, N. 
Gy'roBC [so Gd.;jl-r««', 

Wr. 166.] 
Gyve (/!»), n. A r. (25, 

46) [Give, 203.] 



__ Th« plnnl. 0y<«f 
(^ir'z) if more eommonly 
UMd than the ilogiiUr. 

Gyve<r(JI«l), 183. 
Gyr'ing. 



H. 

Hil (11/20) [Hah, 203.] 
Ha-ar'ktoB (-kiz). 
Ha'be-a* cor'pivi (L.). 
Hab'er-daah-er, 171. 
Hab'er-daBh-€r-y. 
Hab'er-dlne [bo 8m.; 

hab'urdtn, Gd. ; hab- 

ur-dln', Wk. Wr.l56.] 
Ha-beHge-on [bo Wk. 

Wr. Gd. i hab'ur'junj 

8m. 155.] 
Ha-bil'1-ment, 169. 



Hab'it, 10, 16, 231. 

Hab-it-a-bil'i-ty, 108. 

Hab'it-a-ble, 164. 

Uab'it-an-cy, 109. 

Hab'i-tat, 7H. 

Hab-i-ta'tion. 

Hab'itHxl. 

Hab'it-ing. 

Ha-bit'Q-al, 72, 89. 

Ha-bit'n-al-ly. 

Ha-blt'n-ate. 

Ha-bit'u-atHed, 183. 

Ha-bit'a-at-ing. 

Ha-btt-u-a'tioa. 

Hab'i-tode, 78. 

Hacienda (Sp.) (Ad-/^- 
en'da^t ^71. 

Hack. 10. 

Haok'b^r-ry. 

Hacked (haki), 

Hack'ing. 

Hae'kle (161) [Heck- 
le, Hatohol, 203.] 

Hac'kled (-kid), 183. 

Hac'kler. 

Hac'klinf. 

Hack'ly, 93. 

Haok'ma tack, 171. 

Haok'ney ( 10, 98), ft., a. 
A V. [pi. of fi. Hack- 
nevB (-niz), 190.] 

Hack'neyed {^nid), 171. 

Hack'ney-ing. 

Had, 10. 

Had'dock. 10, 86, 170. 

Ha'dj^a (-diz). 

Ha(U r Ar.) 

Ha^a(Ar.)[HadJee, 

HKO-ce'i-ty, 171. 
H»'mal (he'-), 13, TZ, 
Hiem-a-Btat'lcB (hem-). 
[Hiematite, 203.— 

See Hematite.] 
[HcraatologT, 203. 

— See Hematology.] 
[HiematoBine, 203. 

— See Hematosine.] 
H»-ma-to'BiB (he-) (100) 

[bo Sm. i Jiem-ii-io'HM, 
wr. 155.] [Hemato- 
BiB, 208.] 



'«Word« of thlf 
clMi generally ehanoe th« 
diphthong <r Into e," Smart. 

[Hiemorrhage, 203. 

— See HemorrbageJ 
fHieroorrhoid, 203. 

— See Hemorrhoid.] 
Haft, 12, 131. 
Hiift'ed. 

Haft'ing. 



Hag. 10. 
Hag'gard, 10, T2. 
Hag'ged (-ffhed), 138. 
Hag'gesB (-«*«), or 

Uag'giB (-ghit). 
Hag'glBh i-glUsh). 
Hag'gle^ 164. 
Hag'gled (gld), 183, 
Hag'gler. 



Hag'gllng. 



ar^hy(-*3r). 

Ha'gi-o-grftph. 

Ha-gi-og'ra-pha. n. pL 

Ha-gi-og'ra-phal. 

Ha-gi-og'ra-pher, 108. 

Ha-gi-<^ra-phy. 

Ha-gi^Fo-giBt. 

Ha-gi-ol'o-gy, 108. 

H&^e'but (hqa'lmt) [m 
Wr., Wb. Gd. ; hag'- 
e-ttutt Sm. 155.] 

Hah (11, 29) [Ha, 203.] 

Hii-hk', n. [Haw- 
haw, 203.] 

Haik (23), n. an mider 
garmoit worn by in 
Arab. [See Hake,ieo.] 
rHyke,203.] 

Hail (23), n. froseD 
drops of rain : — r. to 
ponr down froxen 
dropa of rain:— M. 
a term of Balutatioo. 
[See Hale, 160.] 

Hailed (h&id), 105. 

Hairing. 

Hairatdne, 24. 

Hail'y, 23, 93. 

Hair (Air) (14), n. a fila- 
ment, or a oollectioa 
of filaments, growing 
ftt>m the Bkin of an 
animal. [See Hare, 
160.] 

[Hairbell,203.— S<K 
HarebelLl 

Hair'doth (hir'kloih, or 
hir^klawthYlS,^. 

Haired (hira), a. 

Hair'i-ness (MH), 180. 

HaiHy f Jkir'y), 93. 

Hake (23), n. a fish al- 
lied to the ood. [Set 
Haik, 160.1 

Hal'berd [bo Sm. Wb. 
Qd,ihmtfVlmrd,Wt.i 
hawVburdt or haf- 
burd, Wr. 155.] 

Halberdier', 122. 

Hal'e^-on [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. ; hai»8he-un, Wk.; 
haPahi-un, or haPti- 
«», Wr. 165.] 



a, e, i, 6t &t Jf long*, JL, i, I» 5, fi, f, thort iiaain fkr, & of in fkst, A of in 



HALE 



225 



HARANOUER 



Hale (Z\\ a. healthy. 

[See HaU, 160.] 
Hale (hal, or hawl), v. 

[bo Wk.Wr. Gd. j fHU, 

Bm. 156.] 

■9- **Thi« word. In fa- 
miliar langQase, u cor* 
ruptcd, beyond recovety, 
into haul i but ■olemn 
■peaking itill rcqutrci the 
leralar sound, rhyming 
vUhpole; the otlier sound 
voiiId« In thij case, be 
groee and vulgar." H'aiker. 

Haled (hald, or hawld). 

HiUf (hdfi (162) [pi. 
Halves (hdvz), 193.] 

Half-pen-ny {ha'pen- 
ny) [no Wk. Sm. ; ha'- 
pen^ny^ kap'en-nUf or 
hd/'pen-ny^Wr.-y nap'- 
en-nVf or ha'penny^ 
Wb. Gd. 155.] [pi. 
Half-pen-nies, or 
HalTpenoe, 194.] 

Hal'i-bat {hoVi-lna) [so 
Wk. Wb. Gd. i h&l'i- 
htU^ Sm. 155.] 

HUM-mas (180) [bo Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; hol'i- 
fl»a«,Wk. 155.][Hal- 
i m a s 8 , 203.] 

Hai'ing^ftaZ'-,or hawV-) 

Hal-i-og'ra-pher, 108. 

Hal-i-og'ra-phf. 

H&11(17, 172),n. alarge 
room at the entrance 
of a honsc, or for a 
public asBcmbly. [See 
Hani, lAO.l 

Hal-le-ln'jah (lu'ya) 
f51, 171)[90 Wb.Gd.; 
nal-le'Voo'ya^^ixi. ( See 
f 20); hal-le-loo'ya, 
Wr. 155.1 [Allelu- 
jah,AlIcInia,203j 

Hal'liard {hdl'yar^ 
[Halyard, 203.] 



__ Of these two farmt 
Smart gives only hattiardx I 
and tnts Is prefrrred by : 
Webster and Goodrich. 
Woroeeter prefbrs kaljfcand. i 

Hal-loo', int. & v. ' 

Hallooed' (lood'), 188. 
Hal-loo'ing. 
Hal'low. 

Hal'lowed, 165. 188. 
Hal-16w-een' f^so Wr. ; 

kai'lo-in, Gd. 155.] 
Hal'low-mas, 180. 
Hal-la-ci na'tion. 
Hal-lu'ci-iui-to-ry. « 



[Halm, 2m.— See 

Haum.J 
Ha'lo [pi. Ha'loB (-W«), 

192.] 
Ha'lood, 188. 
Hal'o-o^n, 170. 
Ha-logrc-noQs C-iq)'-). 
Haloid. 
Hils'er (AatraVr) 

[Hawser, 203.J 
Hilt, 17. 
H&lt'ed. 
HiUt'er. 
HaitMng. 
Halve (Aar), 162. 
Halved {hitvd). 
HiUvcB (hetvz)i n. pi. 
Halyard [Halliard, 

203.— See Note under 

Halliard.] 
Ham. 10. 
Ham'a-dry-ad [L. pi. 

Sdm-chdry'a-ats 

(-€llz); Engr. pi. Ham'- 

a-dry-ads i-adz), 198.] 
Ha'mate. 
Ha'mat-ed. 
Hames {hdmz)^ n. pi. 
Ham'let, 10, 76. 
Ham'let-ed. 
Ham'mer, 66, 170. 
Ham'mer-a-blc, 104, 169. 
Ham'mered {-murd'j^ldO 
Ham'mer-er. 
Ham'mer-ing. 
Ham'mock, 170. 
Ha'mo&B, 100, 169. 
Ham'i>cr, 10, 77. 
Ham'pcred (-purr/), 160. 
Ham'per-ing. 
Ham'Rter. 
Ham'Btring^, 20A. 
Ham' stringing^. 
Ham'strung. 
Han'a-pcr. 
Han'oea (-«e«), n. pi. 

[Hanche8,203.] 
Hand. 10. 
Hand'bill, 206. 
Hand'b<K>k. 
Hand'br^adth. 
Hand'cart. 
Hand'cuflT. 
Hand'cuflTcd (-ktift). 
Hand'caff-lng. 
Hand'ed. 
Hand'AiI (fSbl) (142) 

[pi. UAna^falB (faolz), 

197.] 
Hand'i-craft, 169. 
Hand'i-eraftB-man, 196. 
Hand'i-ly, 186. 
Hand'1-neBB. 



Hand'i-work (-wurk). 
Hand'ker-ehlef {hang'. 

kur-chi(P, 171. 
Han'dle, 164. 
Han'dle-a-ble, \(A. 
Han'dled {-did), 183. 
Han'dler. 
Han'dlinfir. 
Hand'mald, 206. 
Hand'maid-en(-inAd-n). 
Hand'rail. 
Hand'saw. 
Hand' screw {-ekroo). 
Hand'sel. 
Hand'selled {-eeid) 

[Handseled, Wb. 

Gd. 203.— See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
Hand'sel -lIng_rH an d - 

8 el In g, Wb. Gd. 

203.1 
Hand^Bomc (fiand'tum) 

[80 Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 

Aan'wm, Wk. Wr. 

156], a. ample: — no- 
ble,— beautifal. [See 

HanBom, 148.] 
Hand'spike. 
Hand'writ-ing (-rW-), 

162. 
Hand'y, 10, 93, 169. 
Hang, 10, 54. 
Hang^bird, 266. 
Hang'dog. 
Hang'er, 77. 
Hang'er-on. 
Hang'lng. 
Hang'man, 196. 
Hang'nail. 
Hank {hangk), 10, 54. 
Hank'er. 

Hank'cred (^rr/)i 150. 
Honk'er-ing. 
Han-o-ve'n-an, 169. 
Han'aard. 
Hans, 10. 
Han-Be-at'ic. 
Han'som, n. a low kind 

of travelling vehicle. 

[See Handsome, 148.] 
Hap-haz'ard. 
Hap'lesB. 
Hap'ly, 10, 93. 
Hap'pen (hap'n), 149. 
Hap'pcned( Aap' R ef), 165 . 
Hap'pen-lng. 
Hap'pi-ly. 

Hap'pi-nesB, 100, 186. 
Hap'py, 66, 170. 
Ha-rangue' (■rang*)j\(iS. 
Ha-rangued' {-rangd'), 

165. 
Ha-rangu'er (-nr). 



Iklli dot <n there; Ob m ttt foot } 9 a« «» fadle ; gh a« g in go ; tb m in thla. 



HARANGUING 



226 



HAUGHTILT* 



Ha-raiiga'iiig(-fii^},171. 

lI&r'uB, 10, 171. 

H&r'MBed (-ait). 

U&r'tLMing. 

Har'bin ger, 45, 171. 

Harbor (11, 88) [Har- 
bour, Sm. lUU. 203.1 

Har'boml {-bord) (IfW) 
[Harboured, Sm. 
199, 2a3.] 

Har'bor cr [Har- 
bour c r, Sm. 199,203.1 

Har'boria^ [Har- 
bouring, Sm. 199, 
203.] 

Hard, 11. 

Hard'beam. 

Hard'en (Aarrf'n), 149. 

Hard'ened {Juird'nd)^ 
150. 

Hard'en-cr (hard'n-). 

Hard'en-ln^ {hard'n-). 

Hard'-fougnt (-/oirt), 
206, Kxc. 5. 

Hard'hack. 

Hard'h^ad. 

IIard'1-bdbd, 169. 

Hard'l-ly. 

Hard'i-ness, 186. 

Hard'7, 93, 109. 

Hare [hir)^ n. a small 
quadruped of the g-o- 
nuaL^pus. [^SeeHur, 



160 ■» 






Hare'beU{Wr'-)[H air- 
be 11, 203.] 

Hair'-braincd (hiH- 
hriind)^ 206, Exo. 5. 

Hanyilp. 

Hare'llppcd (-lipt). 

Ha'rem, 49, N. 

Ha-ren'gi-form, 108. 

HUrfi-cot (Ft,) (WWc- 
ko), 

[Harier. TXXi.^See 
Harrier.] 

Hark, 11, 135. 

Harl, 11. 

Hurae-quin (-U»), 171. 

Har^o^. 

Har'lot. 

Har'lot-ry. 

Harm, 11, 1.35. 

Har-mat'tan, 170. 

Harmed (harmd), 166. 

Harm'ful (-^SoOi IW- 

Har-monMc. 

Har-monMc-al. 

Har-monM-ca. 

Har-mon'ic8, n. pi. 

Har-mo'ni-o&B, 78, 100. 

Har-mon'i-phon. 

Har'mon-ist. 



Har'mon-ize, 208. 

Har'mon-ized, 183. 

Har'mon-iz-er. 

Har'mon-iz-ing. 

Har-mo-nom'e-ter, 106. 

Har'mo-ny, 93. 

Har'mdst, 86. 

Har'mo-tdme. 

HaWnesB. 

Har'nessed (-nefl). 

Har'negR-er. 

Har'nesB-ing. 

Harp, U. 

Harped {harpi)^ 165, 

Note C, p. 34. 
Harp'er. 
Harp'ing. 

Harp'iDgB {-ingz\n.pl. 
Haip'lBt. 
Har-po-neer' [H a r - 

pooneer,203.] 
Har-poon', 11, 19, 121. 
Har-pooncd' i-poond'). 
H ar-poon-eer [ H a r - 

poneer,a03.J 
Har-poon'er. 
Har-poon'lug. 
Harp'Bcal. 
Harp'sl-cbord t'kord)^ 

171. 
Har'py, 11, 93, 190. 
HAr'rled, 186. 
H«r'ri-er (77, 78, 171) 

[Harier, 203.] 



The origin al ipell- 
Ing, Aartrr, li diiuaed.*' 
Siaart, 

Hftr'rdw, 101. 
H&r'rowed, 165, 188. 
HAr'row-er. 
Hftr'row-ing. 
Hitr'ry. 
Hftr'ry-lng. 
Harsh, 11, 46, 135. 
Hars'lct (11, 76) [Has- 
let, 203.] 

■^ Of th«t« two forma 
Walker and Smart prefer 
haatt; Goodrich prefrra 
kamtet, Worcealer girea 
both fortni. without uadi- 
caUng any preference. 

Hart (11), n. the male 

of the red deer. [ See 

Heart, 160.1 
Harts'hom, 214. 
Ha-ni B'ploe [ A rn ■ - 

pice, 203.] 
Ha-ruB'pi-cT [ A r a ■ - 

ploy, 203.1 
Har'vest, 11, 7«r. 
Har'vcBt-ed. 
Har'vest-er. 



Har'Teat-ing. 
HaB (Aa2), 10, 174. 
Hash, 10, 46. 
Hashed (fuuhi), 165. 
Hash'lsh [Haseh- 

Inch, Hasheesh, 

203.] 
Has'let [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; ha'slet, Wk. ; 

ha'sletjOThas'let, Wr. 

155J [Harslet, 203. 

— See Note under 

JIarslei.l 
Hasp, 12, 131. 
Hasped (hdgpt). 
Has'socK. 
Hast, 10. 
Has'tate. 
Has'tat-ed. 
Haste, 23. 
Hast'ed. 

Hast'en {hAs'n\ 149,162. 
Hast'ened {hasfnd), 
Hast'en er (AA^'n-). 
Hast'en-ing {has^n). 
Hast'l-ly, 186. 
Hast'i-nesa, 160. 
Hast'ing. 
Hast'y, 93, 169. 
Hast'y-pud'ding 

(-poSd'-), 206. 
Hat, 10. 

Hat'a-ble. 164, 169. 
Hatch, 10, 44. 
Hatched {hacht), 
Hatch'el [so Sm. Wb. 

Gdi hak'l, Wk.; 

hach'el, or hafl, Wr. 

165.] [Hackle, 203.] 
Hatch'clled {-^Id) 

[jEIatchcled, Wb. 

G<1. 203. — See 177, and 

Note E, p. 70.1 
Hatch'el-ler [Hatcli- 

eler, Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Hatch'elllng rH a t c h - 

eling,^^H. Gd- 

203.] 
Hatch'er. 
Hatch'et, 76. 
Hateh'ing. 
Hatch'ment 
Hatch'way. 
Hate, 23. 
Hat'ed, 183. 
Hate'ftd C-fSot), 180. 
Hate'ftil-ly (-/•W-). 
Hat'er, 77. 
Ha'tred. 
Hat'ted, 176. 
Hat'ti-shSr'lf, or Hat'- 

ti-Bch^r'if. 
HAogh'ti-ly (hmff'-^^im. 



a, §, 1, o, fi, y, /on^; ft, d, 1, 5, &, t* 'Aorl ; \k a$ in tbr, k om im fkMt, k a* in 



HAUGHTINESS 



227 



HEBRAISM 



Hftnffli'ti-iieM (Amp'-)* 

Hftngh'tT (Aav'-)» 162, 

17L 
Hlnl, «. to_piill; to 

draw. [SteHall, leo.] 
HiQl'age. 

BkuUsd^Chttwld), 165. 
mnl'ing. 
Hiom [Haolm, 

Halm, Hawm, 

203.1 
Haanch (kUnch) (11) 

Inot hawnch, 151.] 
Hiunehed (kdnrht). 
Haont (kdni) (11) [viol 

hawnt,153.] 
Hinnt/ed. 
Hinnfer. 
HMimt'ing. 
Hiae'tel-Xite. 
Haufboy (Ao'-)> 171* 
Han-teur' {ho-tur*) [so 

8m. : *o-#ar', or ho- 

toor't Wr. ; ko-t%r'^ or 

k4>-<«ttr', (3d. 154, 155.] 
Haut gout (Pr.) (Ao- 

^o</). 
Hire (Aor), 10, 163. 
Ha'ven (Aa'vn), 119. 
HaT'er-Mck. 
HaT'ingr, 183. 
HaT'oe, 10, 80. 
Haw, 17. 
Hawed, 16S. 
Haw-haw' [Ha ha, 

203.1 
Haw'mg. 
Hawk, 17. 

Hawked (havkt), 165. 
Hawk'er. 

Haw'kej, 17, 9B, 160. 
Hawk'ing. 
Hawk'weed, 206. 
Hawse (Aatc2;) [so Sm. 

Wb. Gd. J haws, Wk. 

Wr. 166.] 
[Hawm, 203. — ;S'<» 

Haam.] 
Haws'er [H a 1 s e r , 

203.] 
Uaw'thom, 135. 
Haj, n. grass cot and 

dried for fodder. [See 

Her, 160.] 
Haz'ard, 10, 72. 
Haz'ard-ed. 
Haa'ard-ine. 
Haz'ard-otta. 
Haze, 23. 
Haxed, 160. 193. 
Ha'sei (Aa'sO> 140. 
Has'i-nesB, 180. 



Hia'taig, 183. 
Haz'f , 03. 
He, 13, 20. 
H£ad, 15. 

H<^ad'ache (Oib), 171. 
H^ad'-dress, 60, N. } 

200. Exc 1. 
Hdad'ed. 
Hfiad'er. 
H£ad'(ast, 200. 
n^ad'-flrstS 205. 
Hj^ad'i-ly, 180. 
Head'i-ness, 109. 
H^ad'ing. 
Hted'land. 
H^ad'long. 
Head'maA, 190. 
H^ad'most. 

Heads'man ^hedz''),2H, 
Head'st&U. 
Head'stone, 200. 
Hgad'strong. 

H^ad'y, 15, 93. 

Heal, V. to cure. [See 

Heel, 160.] 
Heal'a-blc, lOt. 
Healds (heldz), n. pi. 
Healed (hild), 105. 
Heal'er. 
Heal'ing. 
Ht^alth, 15, 37. 
UC*alth^ful (JSol), 180. 
Hfalth'l-lf , 180. 
H^alth'l-nesa, 100. 
Hj^alth'y. 
Heap, 13. 
Heaped (hipt), 106 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Heap'er. 
Heap'ing. 

Heap'TTw. 

Hear nS), v, to perceive 
br the ear. [See Here, 
109.1 

Heard (Aerd)rnol herd, 
153] (21, N.), r. did 
hear. [See Herd, lOO.] 

Hfar'er. 

Hear'ing. 

Hcark'cn (hark'n), 149. 

Heark'ened (harVnd), 

HeSrk'en-er (hark'n-). 

Ilci&rk'en-ing (hark'n^). 

Hear'say, 200. 

Hearse (A«r«) (21,N.),n. 
a carriage for conrey- 
Ing the dead. [See 
Herse, 160.] 

Hei&rt {hart) (11), n. the 
muscular organ by 
the alternate contrac- 
tion and dilatation of 



which the blood la 
made to circulate in 
the body of an ani- 
mal. [See Hart, 100.] 

Heiirt'-brok'en (AaW- 
brOk-n), 200, Exc 6. 

Heart'burn. 

Hearth {Mrth) (11) [not 
harth, 15.'}.] 

Hcart'i-ly, m. 

Heart'i-ness, 100. 

Heart'8'-ease(/uir<;r'f«), 
213. 

Heart'-fiick, 20n, Exc. 5. 

Heart'y (hart'y), 93. 

Heat, 13. 

Heat'ed. 

Heat'er. 

Heath, 13, 37. 

Hea'then (he'thn) (149) 
[pi. Hea'thcn (-tkn), 
or Hea'theuB C-thnz).] 

Hea'then-lie (Aelftn-), 
202. 

Hea'then-ized (Ae'^i»-). 

Uea'tHen-tz-ing (Ae'- 

Heath'er (13, 37) [so 
Sm. Wr. ; hi(h'w, 
Qd. 156.] 



"ThiJ [hed'ur} to 
th« onlj pronunclatioii in 
BcoOuid.^' Ooodrich. 

Heath'er-y [so Wr. ; 

heth'ur-y, Gd. 155.] 
Heaih'y, 13, 03. 
Heating. 
Heave (Wr), 13. 
Heaved ihivd), 183. 
H^av'en (Aev'n), 149, 

107. 
Hdav'en-ward (hev'n-). 
Heav'er, 18:}. 
Heaves (hivz), n. pj.- 
Hgav'i-ly, 180. 
H^ava-ness, 100, 171. 
Heav'ing. 

H5av'y Hiev'y), 16, 98. 
Hfav'y-lad'en (Wrf'n), 

205. 
Ueb-dom'a-dal, 72. 
Heb-dom'a-da-ry, 72, 
Heb'e-tate, 73. 
Heb'e-tat-ed, 183. 
Hcb'e-tat-Ing. 
Heb-e-ta'tion, 112. 
Heb'e-tude. 
He'bra-ism (-ism) (133, 

130) [so Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 

heb'rorism, Wk. : he'- 

bra-izm, or AeO'ro- 

izm, Wr. 166.] 



fUljOof in there; 4b<M<i»foot; q aa in fkedei gh a$ gin go i^ at in ib\M, 



HEBRAIST 



228 



HEMIHEORAL 



He'bra-ist [so 8m. Wb. 
Gd. i Mb^rorUt. Wk. ; 
he'broAstt or heb'ra- 
ist, Wr. 166.1 

He-bra-i8t'lo, 100. 

Ue'bni-lze, 202. 

He'bra-ized, 183. 

Ue'bra-iz-ing. 

He'brew (-ftroo), 18, 19. 

Uc-bridM-an. 

Hec'a-tomb (■4oomy or 
torn) Ihek'a-toom, Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; hefa- 
tomj Sm. 165.] 

[Heckle, 203. — 5ee 
Haokle.l 

Hec'tdre (Fr.), 164. 

Hec'Uc, 200. 

Hcc'tic-al, 106. 

ffee'to-{framme (Fr.) 
(164) TH c t o - 
gram, 203.1 

Hectolitre (Fr.) {hek'to- 
le'tr) (164) [kecto- 
liter (hek-iol'i-tur), 
Wb. Gd. 203.] 

HectonUtre ( Fr.) hek'to- 
fna'<r)(164) [Hec to- 
rn e t e r (kek-tom'e- 
tur), Wb. Gd. 203.] 

Heo'tor, 15, 88. 

Hec'torcd, 150, 106. 

Hec'tor-ing. 

Hec-to're-an, 110. 

Heo'tor-iBm_(-<27m), 136. 

Hectostire (Fr.) {hek'to- 
stir), 154. 

Hed'dle, 164. 

Hed-er-a'oeous (shua), 

Hed'er-al, 2.33, Exc. 

Hed-«r-if er-ofi8, 108. 

Hedge (A«;), 15, 45. 

Hedged (A^'<2), 183. 

Hedgc'hog, 206. 

Hedg'er, 183. 

Hedgc'-row, 206, ExoA 

Hedg'ing, 171, 183. 

He-donMo, 100, 200. 

Hed'o-niam (-nisin). 

Heed. 13. 

Heed'ed. 

Hced'M {-/SoOf 180. 

Heed'ing. 

Heel (1.3), n. the hind 
part of the foot : — - v, 
to put a heel to j— to 
iBcline. [See Meal, 

100.] 
Heel'er. 
Heel'ing. 
Heel'tap, 206. 
He-gl'ra, or Heg'i-ra 

(*<;•'-) [so Wk. Wr. j 



h^'ra^ Wb. Gd. } 

hij'i-ra, Sm. 155.] 
Heifer (Jiffur), 15, 171. 
Heigh'-ho (hi'k5), 162. 
Height (hit) (25, 102) 

[flight, Wb. Gd. 

20Q.^See Note E, p. 

70.1 
Heighfen {Mt'n) (140, 

162). 
[Highten, Wb. Gd. 

20:j.] 
Height'ened (hU*nd), 
Height' en-ing (hlt'n-), 
Hei^ofis (hcPntu) [not 

baQ'yiis, nor he'nuB, 

153.] 
Heir (#r) (14, 130), n. 

one who inherits. 

[See Air, Ere, Eyre, 

100.] 
Heir-ap-par'ent (ir-ap- 

pir>ent\ 216. 
Heirless {tr>-)y 171. 
Ueiraoom (<r'-). 
Uel'a-mys. 
Held, 16. 
He'li-ac. 
He-li'ao-al, 108. 
He-U'ac-al-lf. 
Hel'i-cal, 7Z, 78. 
Hcl'idne, 152. 
Hel'1-cite, 152. 
Hel'i-oold. 
Hel-i-oo'ni-an. 
He-li-o-cen'tric. 
He-li-o-cen'trio-al. 
He'li-o-<5hrome {-kr^m). 
He-li-o-chrom'ic 

{-krom'-). 
He-ll-och'ro-my {-oV-) 

[bo Wr. J he'li-o-kro- 

my, Gd. 155.] 
He'Ii-o-grftph. 
He-li-o-grftphMo, 100. 
He-U-og'ra-phy, 108. 
He-U-oPa-ter. 
He-11-ol'a-try. 
He-11-om'e-ter, 108. 
He'li-o-8cope. 
He'11-o-Btat. 
He'li-o-trope. 
Hel-i-sphSr'ic. 
Hel-i-epher'ic-al. 
He'lix [so Wk. Wr. 

Wb. Go. : l^€i'%k9y Sm. 

155.] [pi. Heri-o^B 

(-«!«), 108.] 
Hell. 15, 172. 
Hel'Ie-bore. 
Hel-le'nl-an. 
HeMe'nio, or Hel-len'lo 

(100) [haWnikj Sm. ; 



hel-lefna, Wb. Gd.; 

hel^leniky or he^len'- 

ikf Wr. 156.] 
Heiac-nism (-n<2iii),136. 
Heiae-nlst. 
Hel-le-nlBt'ic, 100. 
Hel'le-nize, 202. 
Heiae-nized, 183. 
Hel'le-niz-iiig-. 
Hcl-leB-pont'lne, 182. 
HcU'ward. 
Helm, 16, 133. 
Helmed (helmd), 
HePmet, 16, 76. 
Hel'met-ed. 
Hel-mln'thio. 
Hel-min-tho-log'io 

i-lqj'-), 
Hel-mtn-tho-log'ic-al 

Hel-min-thol'o-gist. 

Hel-min-thol'o-gy, 1C8. 

Hehn'wlnd. 

Hel'ot [bo Sm. Wr. ; 
he'loty^h. Gd. 166.1 

HeFoMsm (,-4zm). 

Help, 16. 

Helped (helpt), 165. 

Help'er. 

Help'fttl (-/wl), 180 

Help'mate, 206. 

Hclp'meet. 

Hel'ter-skel'ter. 

Ilelre (helv)y 16, 171. 

Helved (hehHi), 165. 

Hcl-vet'io. 

Hel'rlne (162) [Hel- 
V i n , 203.1 

Helr'ing, 183. 

Hem, 15. 

Hcm'a-chate (-kat). 

Hem-as-tat'ic-al. 

Hem'a-tXne (152) 

[He matin, 203.1 

Hem'a-tlte ( 152)[H le m - 
atite,203.] 

Hem-a-tit'io. 

He-mat'o-eele [so Sm. 
Wr. ; hewa-to-Hl^ 
Wb. Gd. 156.1 |H«- 
matooele,203.] 

Hem-a-toFo-gy (108) 
[H semafology, 
203.] 

He-maVo-sTne (152) [so 
Wr. ; hem-a-t^sin^ 
Gkl. 155.]lHemato- 
8in,2(».J 

[Hematosis, 203.— 
See Hematosis.] 

Hem'i-cra-ny. 

Hem'i-cy-de, 1M» 171. 

Hem-i-he'dnd. 



a, e, !, 6, fit fi long ; &> S, T, 5, fi, f, thort i'4ia«in ikr, ka»in ftst, koiin 



HBNINA 



229 



HERI8B0N 



Uem'i-nA. 
Hem'1-op-BT. 



H«m-i-pleg'ic (-pkf' 



(•pM'-). 

rPl3-)[fo 
r. i nem'%' 



ple-fy, Wb. G<L 156.] 

ue-mip'ter-al. 

He-mii>'ter-ottB. 

HemM-sphere, 78, 160. 

Hem-i-Bph£r'ic 109. 

Rem-i-spherMc-al, 106. 

Hem'i»-tich (-tik) [so 
8m. Wb. Gd. ; he- 
mis'Hk. Wk. ; hem'U- 
Hk, or he^misfHk, Wr. 
155.1 

Hem-lB'tlch-al (-tik-) [bo 
Sm. ; he-^mia'tik-ai, 
Wr. Gd. 165.] 

He-mit'ro-p«l. 

Uem'i-trope. 

Ue-mlt'ro-pottB. 

Hem'lock, 15, 18. 

Hemmed (hemd)^ 176. 

Hem'ming. 

Hem'or-rnage (-r^*) 
(ie2, 171) [Haemor- 
rhage, 203.] 

Hem-or-rhaf 'Ic (-r<v''-)- 

Hem-or-rhoid'al 
(-roid'0, 162. 

Hem'or-rhoidB (^roidz), 
n.i><. 162,171. 

Hemp, 15. 

Hemp'en (kempfn), 149. 

Hem'Btltoh. 

Hen, 15. 

Hen'bane, 206. 

Henoe, 15, 39. 

Hence-f 5rth' {so Sm. 
Gd. yhens'/ifrth, Wk. } 
hens'JOrtht or hent- 
y^rth'j Wr. 156.] 

Henoe-for' ward. 

Hen^ec'a-gon. 

Hen-dec-a-Byl-labMo. 

HeQ-deo-a-ayl'la-ble, 
164. 

Hen-di'a-dfB. 

Hen'ner-y, 170. 

[Hep, 203.— 5ee Hip.] 

He-pat'ic, 109. 

Hfr-pat'lo4d, 106. 

Hep'a-tite, 152. 

Hep-a-tl-za'tion. 

Hep'a-tize, 202. 

Hep'a-tized, 183. 

Hep'a-tiz-ing^. 

He-pat'o-oele. 171. 

He-pat-o-f[a8'tric. 

Hep-a-to^ra-ph7, 106. 

Hep^-toro-gy. 

Hep-a-toB'oo-py. 



Hep'ta-chord (-kard). 
Hep'ta-gon, 109. 
Hep'ta-glot. 
Hep-tag'o-nal. 
Hep-ta-eyn'i-a l-Hn'-). 
Hep-ta-gyn'i-an. 
Hep-taf'y-no&B (-<q?'-)* 
Hep-ta-ne'dron [pi. 

Hep-ta-heMra, 198.] 
Hep-ta-hex-a-he'dral. 
Hep-tam'e-redc. 
Hep-tan'dri-a. 
Hep-tan'dri-an, 109. 
Uep-tan'drotiB. 
Hep-tan'fi[u-lar 

(-ton^'-)' 
Hep-ta-pet'al-otlB. 
Hep-ta-phyrio&B, or 

Hep-tapn'yll^fiB. [See 

AdenophylloaB.] 
Hep'tarch \-tark). 
Hep-tarchMc {-tarV-), 
Hep'tarob-y (-*y), 171. 
Hep-ta-Bperm'ouB. 
Hep'tarteucb (liU;). 
Her, 21, N. 
Her'ald, 15, 72. 
Hdr'ald-ed. 
He-ral'dJc [bo Wk. Sm. 

Wr. } Mr-al'dik, Wb. 

Gd. 165.1 
H€r'ald-ry, 93, 171. 
Herb (erft, or fterft) (21, 

N.} 139) [cr6, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. j herbf 

Sm. 156.] 
Herb'age (er&'-, or 

herb^ [80 Wr. Gd. ; 

erb'ij, Wk.} her'b9i, 

Sm. 155.J / 

Herb'aged, 165, 183. 
Herb'aTffcerfc'-), l.'J9. 
Herb'al-lsm {htrb'al- 

izm), 136, 139. 
Herb'al-iBt (Jkerh'-). 
Her-ba'ri-am fft«r-) [L. 

pi. Her-ba'rx-a ; Eng. 

pi. Her-ba'ri-nmB 

I'Umz), 198.] 
Herb'a-ry, 72. 
Herb-eB'oent, 171. 
Herb-lPer-ofiB, 108. 
Herb'iBt. 

Herb-ir'o-ra, n.pl, 
Herb-lv'o-roiiB. 
Herb^et. 
Her-bo*rl-za'tion. 
Her'bo-rlze, 202. 
Her'bo-rized, 183. 
Her'bo-riz-ing. 
Herb'otlB. 
HerVy (erft'y, or herb'- 

y), 139. 



Her-en'le-an, 110. 

Her-cyn'l-an. 

Herd (21, N.), n. annm 
ber of beaBtB feeding 
together:— V. to as 
Bociate, as beaBta, 
[See Heard, 160.1 

Herd'ed. 

Herd'er. 

Herd'ing. 

HerdB'graBS (herdz'-) 
171, 214. 

Herds'man, 196, 214. 

Here (13), ad. in thi& 
place. [See Hear, 
160.] 

Here'a-bout. 

Here'a-boutfl. 

Here-after. 

Here-by'. 

He-red-1-ta-biFi-ty, 108. 

He-red'1-ta-ble, 164. 

H er-e-dit'a-ment. 

09* Thii word ii M>ine- 
timea pronounced he-rert- 
i'ta-metU, u rancdoncd by 
Sheridan and some other 
ortho«pi«to( bnt Wnlker, 
Smart, Worceater, Web- 
•tar, and Goodrich agree 
in pronouncing it her-€- 
ditoHment. Wolker re- 
marks of thif accentuation, 
that it "ii not only moat 
agreeable to the beat urnse, 
and the mostgrateftil to the 
ear, but it aeema to accord 
better with the secondary 
accent of the later Latin 
UaertdUomaUa.'* 

He-red'1-ta-ry, 72, 171. 

Here in'. 

Hereof (hir-of) [so 
Wk. Sm. Gd. ; hlr-of^ 
or hlr-iw't Wr. 155.] 

Here-on'. 

He-re' Bi-arch {-zl-ark)^ 
or H6r'e-8i-arch (2l- 
ark) [he-re' zi-arkt 
Wr. J her'e-zi-arki 
Sm. ; hMr'e-si-arky or 
he-re' zi-ark^ Gd. ; he- 
re'zhi-ark, Wk. 155.] 

HCr-e-si-og'ra-pher. 

Hfr-e-Bi-og'ra-phy, 108. 

Ht^r'e-By, 169. 

Hfr'e-tlc, 109. 

He-ret'ic-al. 

Here-to-fore'. 

Hcre'Qp-on',205, Exc.2. 

Here-with' [not her- 
with', 163.] 

HerTbt, 170. 

H^r'i-ot-a-ble, 164. 

Her'iB-Bon [BO Wb. 



fall ; 6 Of f n there iCbasin foot jqatin fiicile ; gh cu g in go i^ at in tbii. 

20 



HERITABLE 



280 



BICKWAT 



Gd.j ke-rWion, Wr. 

166. J 
H«r'i-ta-ble, 1(M, 171. 
Hfir'i-tage. 160, 171. 
Her-mapn'ro-dite, 162. 
Her-mAph-ro-dit'lc. 
Hcr-mmph-ro-dit'lo-aL 
Her-me-neu'tio, 100. 
Her-me-ncu'tic-«l, 108. 
Ucr-me-neu'tic8. 
Hcr-met'ic, 109. 
Her-met'i(Ma, 106. 
Her-met'ic-al-ly. 
Hcr'mit, 21, N. 
Her'mit-ag^, 109. 
Hcr'mlt-a ry, 72. 
Her-mit'ic-al. 
Her-mo-djic'tyl [bo Wr. 

Wb. Qd. iher' ma-dak- 

til, Sm. 155.] [Her- 

modaotyle, Wr. 

203.] 
Hem [oontraoted from 

Beron.] 
Her'nl-a, 21, N. 
Her-ni-ot'o-mv, 108. 
Hc'ro, 13, 24, 40, N. 
He-ro'ic, 100. 
He-ro'io-al, 108. 
He-ro'io-al-lv. 
Uc-ro-i-oom'ic [bo Wr. 

Wb. Qd., hir-oA- 

kom'iky Sm. 155.] 
H?r'o-Ine (82. 143) Fbo 

Wk. Sm. Wb. Qd.; 

JUrWo-tn, or he'ro-in, 

Wr. 155.] 
Hfir'o-iBm (-izm) (mt 

143)[BoWk. Sm.Wb. 

Gd. ; Mr'o-izmt or 

he'ro-ism, Wr. 156.J 
HCr'on, 170. 
Her'on-ry. 
HOr'on-Bhaw. 
Ho-ro-ol'o-e^Bt, 108. 
He'ro-wor'shlp 

(-•rur'-). 
Her'pcB i-piz). 
Her-pet'lc. 

Her-pet-o-log'lc (loj'-). 
Her-pct-o-log'ic-al 

(-to/-). 

Her-pe-tol'o-gist, 108. 

Her-pe-tol'o-},'y ( ,(>8) 
rErpetoloj,'y,203.] 

Hor'ring, 06, 170. 

HerB(*cr2), 21, N. 

Hor'Bchel (-shel), 21, 
N. ; 171. 

Herse (kers)^ n. a lat- 
tioe or portcallis set 
with Bpfkes ; — a kind 
of candleBtick used 



In ohnrehet. [<9ee 
HearBe, IflO.] 

Her-Belf. 

Uer'sU-lon [bo 8m. 
Wb. Qd. ; her-^U'lon, 
Wr. 166.] 

HcB^-tan-cy (Aes'-), lOB. 

HeB'i-tant (hez'-). 

HcHM-Ute (hez'-). 

HesM-tat-ed (hez'-), 183. 

Hes'i-tat-ing (^ex'-)- 

HcB-i-to'tiou (hez-). 

Ues'i^at-lTe (hez*-). 

Hes'per. 

HeB-pe'ri-an, 40, N. 

Hes'pe-ruB. 

UcB'sian (hesh'an), 171. 

Het-er-o-car'po&B. 

Het-er-o-ceph'a-IoiU. 

Het-er-o-oer'cal. 

Uet-er-o-chro'moiiB 
(-kro'-) [so Wr. ; het- 
er-ok'ro-mugySm, 165.] 

Het'er-o-clit€, 152. 

Het-er-o-clit'lc. 

Het -er-o-clit'io-al. 

Het'er-o-dox, 122, 171. 

Het'er-o-dox-y. 

Het-er-og'a-mollB. 

H ct-er-o-ge'ne-al. 

Het-er-o-ge-ne^-ty, 108. 

Hct-er-o-ge'ne-ottB. 

Ilet-er-o-mor'phobB. 

Hot-er-on'y-moftB. 

Hct-er-o-pathMc. 

Het^r-op'a-thr, 108. 

Het-er-o-phTl'loftB, or 
Het er-opa'yl-lodB 
[See Adenophyllous.] 

Hot'er-o-pod, 171. 

Het-«r-op'o-doiSB. 

Het-er-OB'cian ^-oih'an). 

Het-er-ot'ro-poilB. 

Het-er-ot'ro-pal. 

Hew (A«) (26, 51, N.), v. 
to cut with an axe or 
other edged tool, bo 
as to m^c an even 
Burtkce.lSee Hue,100.] 

Hewed (Add), 166. 

llcw'er (hu'-), 26, 77. 

Hewn (AOn). 

Hcx'a-chord (-kard). 

Hex-a-dac'tyl-o&8. 

Hex'ade. 

Hex'a-gon, 109. 

Hox-a^o-nal. 

Hex 

Hex-i 

Hex 

Hex-a%e'dral. 

Hex-a-he'dron [pi. 
Hex-a-he'dra, 180.] 




Hex^A-he'meroiL 

Hex-am'er-o&a. 

Hcx-am'e-ter, 160. 

Hex-a-met'rio. 

Hex-a-met'rk>-aL 

Hex-an'dri-a. 

Hex-an'drl-an. 

Hex-an'droi&a. 

Hex-an'gu-lar (•ano'-^ 
64, 108. 

Hex-a-pet'al-ofts. 

Hex-a-phrFlo&B, or 
Hex-aph'yl-lo&B [Set 
Adenophylloua.] 

Hex'a-pLa. 

Hex'a-plar, 136. 

Hex'a-pod. 

Hex-ap'ter-ofta. 

Hex'a-Btich (-stik), 

Hex'a-Btyle. 

Hex-oc-ta-he'dron. 

Hey (ha), int. an ez- 
clamation of Joy or 
of exhortation. [See 
Hay, 160.] 

Hey'day (ha'dH). 

Hia'tuB [L. pi. m-a'- 
tfUf £ng. pi. Hi-a- 
tuB-es (-es), 198.] 

Hi-ber'nft-cle, 21, N. ; 
164. 

H!-ber'nal, 79. 

Ui'ber-nate (73) FHy- 
bernate.203.J 

Hi'ber-nat-ed, 183. 

Hi'ber-nat-ing. 

Hi-ber-na'tion, 112. 

Hl-ber'ni-an, 21, N. ; 79. 

Hi-ber'ni-an-l8m (-izm). 

Hi-ber'ni'dam (-Hzm), 

Hic'ooiigh (hifup) (30) 
[BO Wb. Gd. •, hiV- 
hut, or hifkoA Wk. 
Wr. } hiVkof, Sm, 
155.] [Hiccup, 

Hioknp,-203.] 

09* ** Though kieeamgk 
la the mMt general orthoc* 
laphr, hick up It the most 
tttuil pronnnciaUon.'* ~- 
Waltrr. Smart remarke 
that hic'cnp ia ** prefbraMe, 
in fliiniUar use, both In 
spelling and sound." 

Hic'cooghed (kik^upt). 
Hic'cough-ing(A<l;'«|)-). 
[Hiccup, 203. — 5e8 

Hiccough.] 
Hick'o-ry, 86, 171. 
[Hickup, 203.— <8iB8 

Hlooough.1 
Hick'wUL 
Hlck'way. 



a, e, 1, 0, u, y, Umg ; &, 6« I* 6, a, f, short -, \L at in Ur, k at in Ikst, keuin 



HID 



231 



UITTINa 



^i^dS'go (Sp.) (ke-dai'- 
Hid'den {kid'n), 149. 

fljldf/boiind, 306. 
^ I'e-oafi (134) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. G<1. i Wd'<j- 
m», or kid'Je^, Wk. 
155.1 

^-jd'er, 183. 

^Sje, r. to hMten. [See 

Hi^h, 160.] 
Xai'e-rarch (mr*), 169. 
K^'e-r«rch-al (-ror4;-). 
^li-e-rarch'io-u 

i-rark'-). 
Ki'e-nrch-y (-rori:-), 

171. 
Vi-e-rai'ie, 109. 
HJ-e-roc'ra-CT, 169. 
Hi'e-ro-glypn. 
Hi-e-ro-glyph'lc 
Hi -e-ro-^lyph'ic-*l. 
Hi-c-ro-«lyph'io-al-lf. 
Hi-e-ro^ly-phiBt (108) 
[to Wr. ; hl-e-ro-glif- 
ut, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Hi'e-ro-^^ram. 
Hi-e- ro-gram-mat'ic. 
Ui •e-ro-ffram'ma- tist. 
Hi-e-roj^ra-pher, 108. 
Hi-e-ro-grmph 'Ic. 
H]-e-ro-eraphMe4d. 
Hi-e-ro^r»-ph7, 108. 
Hj-e-roPo-gist. 
Hi-e-rol'o-gy, 108. 
Hi'e-ro-man-cf. 
Hi-e-rom-ne'mon. 
Hi'e-ro-phant, or Hi- 
Sr'o-pnaDt [so Gd. ; 
hi*e-ro-fafU^m. ; Al- 
tr^o-fant, Wk.; *l- 
H-'o-fant, or hve^o- 
font, Wr. 155.] 
%-e-ro-phaiit'io. 
ft-e-ro«'oo-pf. 
lllg'ele, 16, 164. 
|llgr'gled ihiff'ld), 183. 
-Hig'rfer. 

High (M) (25, 102), a. 

elerftted ; exalted. 

[See Hie, 160.] 
High'er (hi'ur) (67), a. 

more high. [See Hire, 

148.1 
Hlgh^uid nU'-h 162- 
Hieh'-mina-ed. 
[Eight, n. Wb. Gd. 

m.'^See Height.] 



Hlgh-wir' (fci-KwO 

(162) I>o Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; W'lPa, Gd. 166.] 
Hlgh'wiy-mui (At'-)* 

102, 106. 
Hi-la'ri-o&s, 79, 100. 
Hl-lir'i-ty, or Hl-lir'i- 

ty [hUiHi-ty, Wk. 

Sm. i Al-/ar'<-<y, Wr. 

Gd. 155.] 
Hil'a-ry. 
Hill, 16, 172. 
UUled {hildh 166. 
Hill'ing. 
Uill'ock, 86. 
UiU'-Bide. 
Hill'y, 93. 
Hilt, 10. 
Hilt^ed. 
Hi'lam. 
Him, 16. 

Uim-a-lay'an, 171. 
Uim-selr. 
Hind, 25. 
Hind'bfir-ry. 
HiDd'er, v. 147, 161. 
Hind'er, a. 147, 161. 
Hln'der-ance [ U i n - 

drance,203.] 

0* Both forma of thli 
word are in good ute. but 
th« eontracted fbmi (Atn- 
drance), according to 
Smart, prevails. 

HlnMered (-dicrd)> 150. 

Hln'der-er, 77. 

Hin'der-ing. 

Hind'most. 

Hln-doo' [BO 8m. Wr. ; 

Mn'doo, Wb. Gd. 

155.] rpl. Hin-doo8' 

(-doozn-] 

Hm-doo'iBm {^m). 

Hin-doB-tan'ee [ H i n - 
dooBtanec, 2(i\.] 

Hin'drance [Hinder- 
a n c e , 20:j. — See 
Note under Hinder- 
once.] 

Hinge, 16, 45. 

Hinged ihinjd), 183. 

Hing'ing {hinj'-). 

Hin°ny, 66, 170. 

Hint, 16. 

HintMng. 

Hint'ed. 

Hip(16), fi. A V. [Hep 
(in the senae of the 
fruU of the wUd 
■ftrter), Hyp ^in the 
senBe of to make mei- 
ancholy), 203.] 

Hipped (A^) (165). 



[Hypped (in the 
aenae of dispirited). 
203.] 

Hip'po-camp. 

Hip-po-cen'tAur. 

Uip'po-craB. 

Uip-po-crat'ic. 

Hip'po-drome, 170. 

Hip'po-griff. 

Hip'po-mane. 

H ip-po-pa-thol'o-gy . 

Hip-poph'a-g-o&s. 

Hip-po-pot'a-iniiB [iiot 
hip-po-po-tii'mus, i.» ;] 
[L. pi. Hip p > pot'ii- 
mi; Eng. pi. Hip {>o 
pot'a-muB-eB( -«^) , iut>. ] 

Hip-pu'ric. 

Hire, (25, 67), r. to pro- 
cure temporarily for 
a price : — n. reoom- 
pcnse. [See Higher, 
148.] 

Hired, 165, 183. 

Hire'ling. 

Hir'er. 

Hir'iug. 

Hir-Hute', 121. 

His {hiz)t 16, 174. 

HiH'pid. 

HiBB, 16, 174. 

HisBcd {hi8t), V. did 
hiss. ^See Hiat, 160.] 

HisB'ing. 

Hist, int. commanding 
ailenoe. [See UiBBed, 
160.] 

HiB-tog-e-net'ic (-toj-), 

His-tog'e-ny {-toj'-). 

HiB-tog'ra-phy. 

His-to-logMc (icj'-h 

HiB-to-log'io-al (-i<»'-). 

HiB-tol'o-giBt. 

HiB-tol'o-gy, 108. 

His to'ri-an, 49, N. 

HIh tdr'ic, 109. 

IIi«-t6r'ic-al, 108. 

HUto-ri^te' (Fr.), 154. 

HiB-to-ri-og'ra-phcr. 

HiB-to-ri-og'ra-phy, 108. 

HiB'to-ry, 132. 

HiB-tri-on'ic. 

HiB-tri-on'ic-al. 

His'tri-on-iBm {-izm). 

Hit, 16. 

Hitch, 16, 44. 

Hitched {hicht), 165. 

Hitch'ing. 

Hlth'er, 16, 140. 

HitR'er-to {-too), 

HltR'er-ward. 

HiFter, 176. 

Hit'Ung. 



ftU ; Of <n there ; 05 m in foot ; 9 a« in fkcile ; gh a« g <n go } tt^ a« in thia. 



( 




HiTY-xmr 

(Hity-tlty, 203.— 
See Hoity-toity.] 

Hive, 25. 

Hived, 166, 183. 

Hives (hlvz), fi. pi. 

Uiv'iD^. 

Ho, int. calling: atten- 
tion. [See Hoe, 160. J 
[Hoa (Ao), 203.] 

Hoar, 24. 

Hoard (24), v. to store 
accretly ; to accumu- 
late. [See Horde, 160. 

Hdiu>d'ed. 

Uoard'er. 

Hoard'ing. 

HoaWfroBt, 206. 

Uoar'houud F H o r e - 
hoand,203.j 



..^ The two form* of 
tkif word are both in um. 
Walker give* only hoar- 
hound. and Smart, as well 
at Webatcrand Goodrich, 
prefers it. Worceatex pre- 
fers hortkownd. 

Hdar'i-nesB, 186. 

Hdarse, 24. 

HoaWBtone, 24. 

Hoar'y, 03, 160. 

Hoax. 

Hdaxed {Uksi). 

Hob, 18. 

Hob'ble, 164. 

Hob'bled {Jkdb'ld). 

Hob'bler, 183. 

Hob'bling. 

Hob'by, &, 169. 

Hob-ffob'lin. 

Hob'nail, 206. 

Hob'nailed. 

Hob'nob. 

Hock, n. a white Rhen- 
ish wine; — in quad- 
rupeds, the Joint at 
the lower extremity 
of the tibia: — v. to 
disable in this Joint. 
[H o u g h (in the last 
two senses), 20:i.l 

Hocked {hokt) 

[Houghed, 20:j.] 

llock'ing [Hough- 
ing, 203.] 

Hod, 18. 

Hod'den-grily Chod'n-). 

Hodge'podge [Hotch- 
pot, llotch- 
potoh,2a3.] 

Hod'man, 106. 

Hod'man-dod. 

Hoe (24),n. a tool nsed in 
gardening, and shaped 



282 

like an adxe: — v. to 




Hoed, 166, 183. 
Hoe'ing, 183, Ezo. 
Hog, 18. 

Hogired {hogd)<, 176. 
llotj^'ging {-ghing)^ 138. 
Hoif'gish {-ghiih). 



>g8'heacl Uiogz'-). 
)Pdcn (Aot'dn), 149. 



Hoj 

Hoi 

Hoi'dcned {hoi'dwl). 

Hoi'den-ing {hoi'dn-). 

Hoist, 27. 

HoiMt'ed. 

HoiHt'ing. 

Hoi'ty-toi'ty, a. A int. 

Illity-tity,a03.] 
Hold (24), V. to have or 

grasp in the hand. 

[See Holed, 160.] 
Hold'back, 206. 
Ilold'er. 
Hold'ing. 
Hole (24), n. a cavity : — 

to drive or to go into a 

hole. [.S«eHole, 160. J 
Holed, V. did drive or 

fo into a hole. [See 
[old, 160.] 
[Holibut, 203. — 5ee 

Halibut.! 
Hol'i-day [Holiday, 

203. — See Note under 

Nolyiiay.] 
Ho'li-ly, 186. 
Ho'li-ness, 169. 
Hol'iug. 
Hol'la, n. V. A int. [so 

Sm. Wb. Gd. ; hol-W, 

Wr.j hol-lof, Wk. 
155.J fHolloa, 

Hollo, Hollow, 

Halloo, 203.] 
Hol'liied, 188. 
Hol'la-ing. 
Hol'land-er. 
Hollo', or Hol-16a', 

int. [See Holla,] 
Hol'lo, r. [so Wb. Gd. ; 

hollo', Wt. 155.] [See 

Holla.] 
Hol'loed. 
Hol'lo-hig. 
Hol'low, a. having a 

void space within: — 

n. a cavity: — r. to 

ex ca vate 
Hol'low [so 8m. ; Ao/'- 

/o, orAo/-to', Wr. Gd. 

1551, V. to shout. [See 

Holla.] 



UOMGBOPATBIC 

HoriOwed, 188. 

Hol'ldw-ini;. 

Hol'ly, 170. 

Hol'ly-hock. 

Holin [ so Wr . Wht Gd. ; 

hSlm, Sm. 166.] 
Hol'o-caust. 
Hol-o-he'dral. 
HOl'stcr, 24, 77. 
Hol'stered (^-tturd), ISa 
Ho'ly, a. fVee IVom sin ; 

— sacred. [See Whol- 



Ho 



so Wk. Wr. ; 



ly, 100.] 
.1' •■ 

ho^ly^h; Gd. 155.] 
[Holiday, 203.] 

Ur This word la now 
UBuallv written hohdap^ 
but wnen it is used in th« 
•en»e of a day devoted to 
rrliffiout mrvict*^ it ia prop- 
erly written and pro- 
nounced, as WoroeaCer re- 
marks, Ma'tifdatf. 

Ho'ly-rood. 

^r* " As applied to the 
palace in Edinbargh, it 
Is pronounced hofjf-rood.^ 
Smart. 

Ho'ly-stone. 
Hom'age, 70, 170. 
Hom'agc-a-ble, 104. 
Home. 24, 130. 
Home'li-ncBS, 109, 186. 
Home'ly, 24. 
[Homeopathy, 208. 

— See Homoeopathy.] 
Ho-mer'ic, 109. 
Ho-mur'ic-al. 
Homc'sick, 206. 
Homc'spun, 24. 
Homc'st^ad. 
Home' ward, or Home'- 

wards (-wardz), 
Hom-i-cia'al. 
Hom'i-cide, 106. 
Hom-i-let'ic. 
Hom-i-let'ic-«l. 
Hom-i-let'ica. 
Hom'i-Ust. 
Hom'i-ly, 78, 93. 
Hom'i-ny (169) [Hom- 

ony,203.] 
[HommocK, 203. — 

See Hummock.] 
Ho-mo-ocn'tric [so 8m. 

Wr. ; hom-o-stn'trik, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Ho-mo-oer'cal. 
Ho-moch'ro-motts 

C-mol:'-) [so Sm. ; JbtK 

iRoifro-mtM, or ko- 

mo-kro'muStWr. 166.] 
Ho-moe-o-path'ic (-mm-). 



i, 5, 1, 6, u, y, long j &, 6, 1, 6, &, f, short \ Vi as in Hr, k at in fliat, i of <n 



ROMCBOPATHT 



238 



HOROLOGY 



Ho-moB-op'ft-thv (-me-) 

(106, 171) [not ho'me- 

o-path-f , 153.] 
Ho-mog^a-mofte. 
Ho-mo-ge'ne-al. 
Ho-mo-ge-ne'i-ty, 108. 
Ho-mo-ge'ne-oliB, IGO. 
lIo-moi-op'tQ-ton [so 

Wr. , hom-ci-ap'to- 

ton, Gd. 155.] 
Ho-mol-ou'si-an (-otr'- 

zi^n) riri) [bo Sin.; 

ko-moi-ow'H-anj Gd. ; 

ko~moi-<nc'9hanf Wr. 

156.] 
Ho-mol'o-gate. 
Ho-mol'o-g.it-ed. 
Ho-moro-gHt-ing. 
Ho-mol-o-ga'tioQ. 
Ho-mo-log^ic-al i-loj'-). 
Ho-mol'o-go&8, 170. 
Hom'o-ldgue i-log)t 168. 
Ho-mol'o gy, 108. 
[Homony, 203.~5ee 

Homing.] 
Hom'o-nyme, or Uom'- 

o-nym, 203. 
Hom-o-nym'io, 109. 
Hom-o-nym'lc-al, 108. 
Ho-mon'y-mofts. 
Ilo-mon'y-myt 171. 
Ho-mo-ou'ti-an (-ow'zi- 

an) [bo Sm. ; ho-fno- 

ow'n-an, Gd. ; ho-mo- 

ow'shany Wr. 155J 
Hom'o-phone, 35, 171. 
Ho-moph'o -noils. 
Ho-moph'o-ny, 171. 
Ho-mop't«r-an. 
Ho-mop'ter-oftB. 
Ho-mot'ro-pal. 
Ho-mofro-pofta. 
Hom'o-type. 
Hone, 24. 
Honed, 166, 183. 
Hon'est i,on'-), 139, 171. 
Hon'cBt-y (on'-). 
Hone' wort {-wurt\ 
Hon'ey (*«n'y), 98, li». 
Hon'ey-cOmb {hun'y- 

k6m\ 102. 171. 
Hon'eyed (kun'id). 
Uon'ey-Buo-kle(Aun'y-), 

1<M, 171. 
Hong, 18, 64. 
Hdn^ng. 
Hon'or {on'ur) (138, 

199) [Honour, Sm. 

203.] 

^gr Smftii Iniertt the « 
ia Ml the derirativei of 
ttlt word cze«i>t konora- 



Hon'or-a-ble (on'-)» 164. 

Hon'or-a-bly (on'-). 

Hon'o-ra-ry (^tm*-), 72. 

Hon'ored (on'urd), 138. 

Hon'or-er ion'-\ 77, 88. 

Hon'or-ing Con'-). 

Hdbd,20. 

Hdbd^ed. 

H<Jbd'ing. 

HiKxi'wSik i-wingk)y 64. 

Hdbd'winked (-unngkt). 

Hdbd'wink-ing 
{•wifigk-). 

H(3bf, 20. 

Hdbfed ihooft), 171 ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Hdbk (20) [^ee Book.] 

Iloo'kah, 72. 

HiSbked (hookt), 165.* 

Hdbk'er. 

Habk'y, 93. 

Hoop [hoop, or hoop)[so 
Wr. ; hoopf Wk. Sm. ; 
Aoop, Wb. Gd. 155], n. 
a band of wood or of 
metal used to bind to- 
gether the parts of a 
cask, Ac. i — a ring : 

— V. to bind with 
hoops ; — to encircle. 

Hoop (19), n. a shout: 

— V. to shout. 
[Whoop, 203.] 

Hooped (kooptj or 
hoopt), V. did bind 
with hoops. 

Hooped {hoovt)^ v, did 
shout. [Wnooped, 
203.] 

Hoop'ing {Jkoop'ing^ or 
hoop' ing\ part. Bind- 
ing with hoops. 

Hoop'ing, part, shout- 
ing. rWti o o p i n g , 
203.1 

Hoop'ing^cough (-il-0/), 
18,N.[Whooping- 
oo ugh, 203.1 

Hoo'poo, or Hoo'poe 
{-poo). 

aar Both fbrmi of thia 
word ftreffiven by Worcet- 
ter and Ooodricn, and the 
latter (hoojioe) \» pro- 
nounced by them hof/poi 
but Smart gives only thii 
form, and pronoances it 
ho</poo. 

Hoot. 19. 
Hoot'od. 
Hoofing. 
Hoove (a4X>v). 
Hop, 18. 



Hop'-bind. 
Hope, 24. 
Hoped (hdpt), 183. 
Hope'fhl i-fool). 
Hope'ftil-Iy (-/Sol-). 
Hop'er, 1S&. 
Hop'ing. 

Hopped (AopOt 176b 
Hop'per. 
Hop'plng. 

Hop'ple (IM) [Hob- 
ble, 203.] 
Hop'pled ihop'ld), 183. 
Hop'ples {hop'lz)t n.pl. 



Hop'pling. 
Ho'ral, 49, N. 



Ho'ra-ry (49, N. ; 72) 
[soWlc.Wr.Wb.Gd.i 
Mr'a-rp, Sm. 155.] 

Horde {tUird) (24), n. a 
migratory bodv^ of 
men. [See Hoara,160.] 

Hor'de-Ine(152) [Hor- 
dein,203.] 

Hore'hound [ H o a r - 
hound, 2bQ.— See 
Note under Hoar- 
hound.] 

Ho-ri'zon (8A, 111) [not 
h6r'i-zon, 153.] 

H6r-i-2on'tal, 72, 171. 

Hdr-i-zon'tal-ly. 

Horn. 17. 

Horn'boam. 

Hom'bill, 206. 

Ilorn'blcnde, 171. 

Horn-blcnd'io, 109. 186. 

IIom'-b<%k, 206, Exc.4. 

Horned {homd), 166. 

Ilom'er. 

Hom'ct, 17, 76. 

Hom'ing. 

Hor'ni-to. 

Hom'pipc, 200. 

Hom'pout. 

Horn' stone, 24. 

Hom'work (^wurk), 

Hom'wort (-wurt). 




^so Sm. Gd. ; hdr'o- 

hj, Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Ho-rol'o-ger. 
H6r-o-log"ic(-?oJ'-). 
Hr)r-o-log'ic-al (-lojf-). 
H6r-o-lo-gi -og' ra-phcr . 
H6r-o-lo-gi-o-graph'ic. 
H6r-o-lo-gl-o^ra-phy. 
Ho-rol'o-glst. 
Ho-rol'o-gy (108) iM 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

h8rfo-l9-jy, Sm. 155.] 



fUl; 6 Of in there; db a« in Ibot ; 9 (M <n fadle ; gh m g in go ; (h a« in this. 

20* 



H0R011£TEa 



284 



HUMANITARIAN 



Ho-rom'e-ter, 108. 

Ho-rom'c-try, 109. 

Hdr'o-Bcope. 

Ho-roB'co-p3r, 108. 

Hdr'rent, 170. 

HOr'ri-ble, 164, 170. 

Hdr'ri-bly, W. 

HOr'rid, «J, 170. 

Hdr-iiTlo, 109. 

HOr'ri-f ied, 186. 

Hdr'ri-ly, 94. 

Hdr'ri-fy-Ing. 

Hdr-rip-1-U^oiL 

Hdr'ror, 18, 88. 

Hors de combat (Fr.) 
(hdr duh com-ba'), 154. 

Horse, 17. 

Uorse'back, 206. 

Horse'fObt. 

Horee'-Jook-ev, 98. 

Horse'inan, 196, 206. 

Horse' shoe (shoo), 171. 

Horse'tiil. 

Horse'whip. 

Horse'whipped (-whipt) 

Horse'whip-ping. 

Hor'ta-tlve, 84. 

Hor'ta-to-ry, 86. 

Hor'ti-cul-tor. 

H or-ti-cult ' ur-al( -ywr-). 

Hor'ti-cult-ure, 91, 171. 

H or-ti-<;ult'ur-iBt(-yttr-) 

Hor'tu-lan. 

Hor'tus sic'cfts f L.). 

Ho-san'na i-zan'-)y 170. 

Hose, n. aing. & pi. 
stookJng^s ; — n flexi- 
ble tube for conduct- 
loff water to extin- 
giiish fires. &c. [See 
Hoes, pi. of Hoe, KiO.I 

Ho' Bier (-zkur) (171) [so 
Wk. Wr. Wb. Gil.; 
Ko'zh^ur, Sm. {See 
$ 26), 155.] 

Ho'sler-y {-zhur-), 

Hos'pice (pea), 166. 

Hos'pl-ta-blc (164, 171) 
[not hos-pit'a-bl, 163.1 

Hos'pi-ta-bly. 
Hos'pl-tal, 78, 139, 
Hos-pi-tal'l ty. 
Hos'pi-tallorrHospi- 

taler, Wb. Gd. 2a3. 

•^See 177, and Note 

B, p. 70.] 
Hoe'po^ar. 
Hdst, (24) [See Ghost.] 
H6Bt'age, 139. 
Hdst'esB. 
Hos'tlle, 81, 152. 
Hos'tTIe-Iy, 66, N. 
Ho»>tU'i-ty, 106, 169. 



Hos'tler (ps'lur) (139, 
162)f8oWk.8m.Wr.; 
hot'tur, or oi'lurt Qd. 

Hot, 16. [155.] 

Hot'bed, 206. 

Hotch'pot, or Hotch'- 
potch [Hodfi^e- 
p o d e e , 203.] 

Ho-telC 

Hotel de ville (Fr.) (o- 
tel' duh vel). 

Hotel IHeu (Fr.) (o-tel' 
de-tth'). 

Hot'-house, 206, Exe. 3. 

Hot'press. 

Hot'pressed {-prett). 

Hofpress-ing*. 

Hot'spur. 

Hot' sparred (-apurd). 

Hot'ten-tot (Ao/'n-),171. 

Hou'dah (72) [How- 
dah,203.] 

Hough {huk) (171), n. in 
quadrupeds, the Joint 
at the lower extremi- 
ty of the tibia : — v. to 
hamstring. [Hock, 
203.1 

Houghed (hokt) 



Hocked, 2a3.J 
Jough'ing {hoK'-) 
[Hocking, 203.] 



[Houlet, "203.— flfee 
Howlet.] 

Hound, 28. 

Hour (ourO (139), n. the 
twenty-lourth part of 
a day. [.^ecOur, 160.] 

Hourglass (our'-). 

Hour'i {Kotrr'y) [pi. 
Hour'ies (-«).] 

House, n. 28, 161. 

House (howz)f 17.136,161. 

Housed (hotozd)f l&i, 

House'hold, 206. 

House'leek. 

House'wife (huz'ittf, 
or hous'tplf) [so Wr. j 
huz'K%fy ^Vk. 8m.; 
Jums'wl/yWh. Gd,155.] 
[Huswife, 203.] 



In the Mnve of a 
UtUe cafe for pin*., needle*^ 
Ac., thla worn, according 
to smart, "la colloauially 
pronounced hvasfz\f. 

House' wife-ry(*M«'iry- 
rw, or hous'w\f-ry)[^o 
wr.; Af^'trV'-ryrwk.; 
hom'wuf-ryy Wb. Gd.; 
huz'u}\l'-er-y, Sm.l55.j 
House' Wright (-ri0tl02» 
Hous'lng Qiowz'-). 



Hovo, 24. 
Hor'el, 18, 76, 149. 
Hov'elledj^-eW) I H o v . 

eled, wb. Gd. 203. 

— See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Hoy'el-Ung f H o v e 1 - 

lng,Wb. <M. 20:j.] 
HoT'er (Aui7'tir),22, 171. 
Hov'ered (At<r'ttr(f),150. 
Hov'er-lng {^huv'-). 
How, 28. 

How'dah (72) [Hon- 
da h , 209.] 
How-ev'er. 

How'itx-er (-««-), 171. 
How'ker. 
Howl, 28. 

Howled {howld)y 166. 
H ow'let [ H o a 1 e t, 203] 
Howl'lng. 
How-so-ev'a-. 
Hoy, 27. 

Hub(22)[Hob,a08.] 
Hub'bub, 22. 
Huck'a-baok. 
Huc'kle-backed (huk^- 

l-bakt), 164, 171. 
Huo'kIe-b6r-ry (huk'l-'), 

164, 171. 
Huck'iter, 22, 77. 
Huck'stered (-stuftl), 

150, 165. 
Huck'ster-ing. 
Hud'dle, 161. 
Hud'dled {hud'ld), 183. 
Had'dler. 
Hud'dllng. ' 
Hu-di-bras'tie, 109. 
Hue, 26, 51, N. 
Huff, 22, 173. 
Huffed (Ah^). 
HulTer. 

Huffi-ness, 186b 
Hufi^y, 93. 
Hug, 22. 
Huge, 26, 45. 
Hugged (huffd), 176. 
Hug'ging (gMng), 138. 
Hu'gue-not (-i^he-), 171. 
Hu'gue-not-ism i-ffhe- 
Hulk, 22. [not-4zm). 
Hull, 22, 172. 
Hulled (huld)y 166. 
Hull'ing. 
HuU'y. 
Hul'ver. 
Hum, 22. 
Hu'man, 26, 72. 
Hu-mane', 23, 89. 
Hu'man-lsm {-izm), 136. 
Hu'man-ist. 
Hu-man-i-ta'ri-an, 49,N. 



h a, :, 0,u, y, ton^i 0,6,1,6,% f,thorii Iktuin fiur, a a« in fkat, A <u in 



flUMiLNiTARIANISlC 



235 



HYACINTH 



Ha^man-i-ta'ii-aa-iim 

(-<em), 133, 136. 
Ha-mao'i-ty, 106, 100. 
Hn-man-I-za'tioa. 
Hn'man-ize, 202. 
Hii'man-ized, 183. 
Hu' man-lz-er . 
Hn'mAn-ix-ing'. 
Hum'bird, 206. 
H um^le (Jtem'MfOr tim- 
M) (139, 161, 171) [BO 
Wr.;*t«»'6/,Wb.Gd., 
um'bl^ Wk. Sm. 155.J 
Humble-bee {hum'bf-t 

or utm'bl). 
Hiiinnt>led {kum'bldy or 

trat'&M), 165, 183. 
Hum'bler (hum'- 

Uam'bUng {hum* 

I'biy {hum'-. 



or 



or 



or 



'i 



^um'druin, 22. 
^u'mer-aL 

fiu'inSd, 51, N. 
Xia-mid'i-ty, 106, 160. 
:na-mil'i-Ate, 160. 
:Hu-mll'i at-ed, 183. 
Ha-mll'iat ing. 
Sa-mil-i-a'tioD. 
Ho-mil'i-ty, 108, 100. 
H u'mlne [ H u m i n , 203] 
Hammed (^hutad)^ 170. 
Hnm'mel. 170. 
Hum'melied (-meld) 

(166) [Hammeled, 

Wb. Od. 208.— 5ee 

177, And Note £, p. 

70.] 
Ham'mel-ler TH n m - 

m e 1 e r , Wb. Qd. 

208.1 
Ham'mel-UngrH a m - 

m e 1 i n g , w b. Gd. 

Hnrn'mer, 176. 
Hum'mlng.' 
Hum'min^-bird, 215. 
Ham'moi^ (66, 170) 

[Hom mock, 208.] 
Hum'mock-y, 03. 
Hu'mor (tt'mur, or hu'- 

mur) (51, N. ; 88) [so 

ku'mur (in the sense 
of moisture or fluid of 
the anUnal body), w- 
mur (in other senses), 
8m. ; ku'mur, Wb. 
Od.l55.] [Humour, 
100, 203.] 



M9* Smmrt omita the it 
in the lut qrllable of thii 
word when it mean* moiH- 
nrr, UM aleo In the dcriva- 
tiTet hATinf reference to 
thii Mnee, but he inaerte 
the M lu all other caeet. 

Hu'mored (Wmurd, or 

hu'mord), 150, 171. 
Hu'mor-al f «'-, or hu'-). 
Hu'mor-al-ism {u'mur- 

al-izmy or hu'mur-<U- 

izm), 136. 
Hu'mor-ai-ist («'-, or 

hu'-). 
H u'mor-ing(u'-, or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-ism (u'mur- 

izm, or hu'mur-izm), 

136. 
Hu'mor-i8t(u'-, or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-oD8(t*'-,or hu'-) 
Hu'mor-some (u'mur- 

svm, or hu'mur-9um)t 

171. 
Hump, 22. 
Hump'baok, 206. 
Uump'-backed (^-btikt), 

206, Exc. 5. 
Humped {humpt), 166. 
Hu'mus. 
Hunch, 22, 44. 
Hunch'back, 206. 
Hunch'backed (-bfikt). 
Hun'dred [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; hun'dred, 

or hun'durd, Wk. 

155.] 
Hun'ared-er. 
Han'dredth. 
Hung, 22, 54. 
Hun-ga'ri-an, 40, N. 
Hun'ger {hung'gur), 54, 

138. 
Hun'gered(ftttn^'^rd), 

150. 
Hun'ger-Ing (hung'gur) 
Hun'gri-ly (fcun^'-),186. 
Hun'gry {hung'-). 
Hunks {hungk»),n.8ing. 
Hunt, 22. 
Hunt'od. 
Hunt'er. 
Hunt'ing. 
Hunts'man, 106. 
Hur'dle, 104, 164. 
HurMled ihur'dld), 183. 
Hur'dling. 
Hur'dy-gur'dy, 205. 
Hurl, 21. 
Hurl^bat. 
Hurl'bone. 
Hurled ihurld), 166. 
Hurl'er. 
Hurl'ing. 



Huray-bur'ly. 

Hur-rahMHarrA,203.] 

H&r'ri-cane, 170, 171. 

Hfir'ried, 136. 

HQr'ri-er. 

Htir'ry, 21, 48, 66. 

Hur'ry-ing. 

Hurt, 21. 

Hurt'er. 

Hurt'ful (-/oo/), 180. 

Hur'tle ber ry (hur*tl-). 

Hus'band {huz'-). 

Hus'band-ed {huz'-). 

Hus'band-ing {huz'-). 

Hus'band-man {huz'-). 

Hus'band-ry {huz'-). 

Hush, 22 

Hushed {hu$IU). 

lluflh'iug. 

Husk, 22. 

Husked {hutkt), 

Husk'i-ness, 160, 180. 

Husk'ing. 

HuBk'y, 03. 

Hus-sar'f /u>o«-«ar'X 171) 
[so Wk. Sm. ; hoosh 
zar*, Wr. ; huz-zar*, 
Wb. Qd. 1561, n. orig- 
inally, a Hungarian 
or Polish horse-sol- 
dier. [5f<;Huzza,148.] 

Hus'sy {huz'zy). 

Hust'mgs (-tii4/2), n. pi. 

Hus'tle (hus'l), 162, 104. 

Hus'tled (kwi'ld), 162, 
165. 

Hus'tUng ihus'Hna). 

Hus'wife {huz'z\^y or 
huz'tPif) [so Wr.; 
huz'zif, Wk. Gd.: 
huz'w\f, Sm.. 155.1 
[Ho use wife, 203.1 

Hus'wife-ry {huz'zif- 
rvj or huz'wif-ry) 
Maousewifery, 

Hut, 22. 

Hutch, 22,44. 

Hutched (httdU). 

Hutch'ing. 

Hut'ted, 176. 

Hunting. 

Hut-to'ui-an, 160. 

Huz-zii' {hooz-zd') [so 
8m. Gd. ; fiooz-zd'y 
Wr. ; hooz-zd'y Wk. 
155], int. an exclama- 
tion of Joy. [6'e« Hus- 



sar, 148.1 
ir 



(hoox-zUd'), 



Huz-zaed 

188. 

Huz-zftMng {hdbz-). 
Hy'a-dnth, 171. 



flUl; ^atiniherei 05 a« <fi foot } 9 a« in facile ; gh a« g <ii go ; th a« <fi this. 



> 



BVACINTBINE 

Ilr'mda (-luij), n. pi. 
H!F-«lc«'wnoe, 171. 
HrVlInr;, UU. 
Hy'Llotd. 
Hy^l'o-typo. 
[HTbornato.an.— 

Hy'brlil f»o Sio. i hP- 
Md, or hib'rUi, Wr. 



srt 



».] 



II* brid'l-tj, iiK. 
Uy'brldHiaB ["o Sm. ; 

JkO'rid-oMa, WH. Wr. 

Wb. Grt. IM.) 
Hr'da-tlirwSin., Ai^' 

orAtd'a(irf,Wr. I.W.i 
HjF'dmH[ioHni. Wr.: 

Wd'u-fif, (ill. IM.] 

[pi. Hy.dit'1^1 

t^Ml), IBS.] 
Hr'dii laid. 

feuB. pi. , Ify'dru 

Hy'dmuuituo C-fliV). 
ft?, IfW, 171. 

Hr'dnni, i5, n. 
ily.drtu''ey-raia. 
Hr'drue, % 73, 
Hy-drtu'llr, IW. 

Hf-driii' Ileal. 
HWrSu'Iic-oj. 
Hy^drau'llo. 
lU'dri-td. 
HyMr|.a-date !*o Sm. 

Wr. ; Md'ri-o-dal, 

WD. fid. IM.] 
Hy.drl-od'i<) [ho Hm. 

Wr. ; Wr(-oJ'i*, 

Wb. Qd. 1S5.1 
Hf^l^o-^!ll^'bon. 

Iy.dni-ur'buret. 
ly'droMWle. 
iy-dnmepli'»-[ns. 
HHro eWo'raiPt tJo'.) 

IVHlnnjlilo'riPt-iJO'-). 

if'dro K^llS, «!'l7l. 
Hy'droiirafltc. 
ly'dro giiMKid. 
Iy'dro.KeQ*Hng. 



Hf-arng'^-nom-dn^} 
Uy.drog'n pher, 108. 
Hy-dro^rlph'ie. 
H y.dn>-2rlph'ic4]. 
Hy.droK'n-phy. lOS. 

Ily^dr^os'lo*! l-M'-). 
Uy-dTOfo-eitt. 
Hj-drol'dify, los. 
Hy'dro ni»i>^7, IM. 
Ilv.dra miu'tlfl. 

Il^^rom'e-Wr, IDS. 



h , . ik1.] 



Hl-.irop'lo. 

Ilydrop'la-U. 

Hr.dra-piiai-iiu1 



)ly.dn>.gul'phu-r> 
Hy-dro-gul'pbD-rf 



lly-c'iDBl Ik) Wk. Bm 
Wb. O-J. i_M-e'ro«l, o 
M'e-mat, Wr. lU.] 

Hj'o-to.gTiph, 
i I T.e-to .grlph'ko. 
B y-e-tom'e-ter. 
Ur-B:e'UD (.|«n), Bl 

Itl-ji-ln; (id. IH.l 
)Iy-el-en'k, U». 

Uy^m'S-ter, I0§. 



BTPERBOUFORM 

H y -fro-mct'rlc 

H I «nj-mL'i'rlc.«l. 

Hy-groin'e-try. in, IBft. 

Hy'gTO-eooiH'. 

I1v-ffr<i40op'lc 

llykelHalk.SO.l 

Ify.lco-slu'nu (-S-). 

Hy'lobote. 

llj'lo.lit. 

1 1 y lop's-thlnii(-tU2«t]. 

fmSm.Od.i MIMt'. 



KymeWal. 
Ily.me ne'in, IIO. 

H y-inpD.op't«r.«n. 
Hy-meDOp'ter-oai 
Hymn {kirn} (IK),*. K 
BODg- for ■ rell^ua 
MuVloe. [See Him, 

Hymn'-biRik (kiln'.). 

Hymned*''' (HutJ), or 
Hym'Ded [w Wr. ; 
kimd, Gd. lbs.] 
0^- ■■ 'HiB pvHcLptH 



tlym'Drng [ao Wr. ; 
Alm'nhi^, Wk. i tUm'- 
ning, ntll. kfn'^w, 
Sm. i Um'fii^, W*. 
Od, lU.I 

Hym.Dol'a-t^Bl. 

Itym-DOl'oey, ItM. 

Hy'old, 2S, 37. 

Hyp(l'lHhlp,»n.l 

[ho Wr. Gif 1 Ai/iV 

Hf-pal'laiFP, 163, 17U. 

Hvpw.blt'lo, lOD. 
Hyptr'b«-toa. 
FIy-pr-r'l>o-|jl,!l,N.; 171. 
Hy-per'bo^lo, 11^ 
ny-per-bol'le, li». 
Hy-pfr-bol'lo-«l, 100. 
H y -pcr-bol'lc-«l-lT. 
Uy.per-bon.form, !(». 



,6, a, i, jpflffi l>e,t, fi, B, f, (AoHi ioilnfitf, 1< 



HYPERBOLldM 



23T 



ICHTHYOSAURUS 



Hy-per'bo-UBm (-Uzm). 
Hv-per'bo-Ust, 21, N. 
H^-per'bo-loid. 
Hy-pcr-bo're-«n, 49, N. 
Hjr-per-ear'bu-ret-led 

[UTpercarburet- 

ed.Wb. Gd.203.] 
Hj-per-cat-a-lec'tie. 
Hy-per-crit'lc, 100. 
H^-per-€ritMo-al, 106. 
Hy '{>er-crit'i-ci8m 

(-mm). 
H;-por-du'li-«. 
Hy-per'me-ter, 21. N. ; 

108. 
Hy-per-met'rio-al. 
Hy'per-Htlienc [H y - 

perstcne, 203.J 
Hy-per-Kthen'ic, 100. 
Hjr-per-troph'ic, 109. 
Hy-per-troph'ic-Al, 106. 
Hy-per'tro-phy, 21, N. 
Ily'phen, 25, 35. 
Hyp-noVo-^st, 106. 
Hyp-nol'o^y. 
Hyp-not'ic. 
Hyp'oo-tism {-tizm), 
Hy-pob'o-le [so Sm. 

Wr. ; hl-pot/o-le, 6d. 

156.] 
Hyp'o-dLnst. 
Hyp-o-chon'dreB {-hon'- 

Mrs), n. pi. [bo Wk. 

Wr. Gd. ; hip-o-kcn'- 

driz, Sm. 155.] 
Hyp-o-ohon'dri-a 

(-ion'-), n. pi. 
Hyp-o-€non'd ri-«e 

i-bmf-), 52, 171. 
Hyp-o-enon-dii'ao-al 

i-tan^), 106. 
Hyp-o-chon-dri'srcism 

-J^m^ri'a-tizm), 130, 

171. 
Hyp<M$hoii-dri'ar8lB 

(-ioW-). 

Hyp'o-cist. 

Hyp-o-<5ni-t«r'l-form 
(108)[BoSm.Wr. jAl- 
po-kra-tir'i/ormt Qd. 
155.1 

Hf-poc'ri-iy (IflO, 171) 
[not hi-pok'ri-sy,153.J 

Hyp'o-crtto, 152, 171. 

Hyp-o-crit'lc, 109. 

Hyp-o-crit'Io-al, 106. 

Hyp-o-gae'ofl» (-jV-). 

Hyp-o-eas'tric [so wk. 
8m. Wr. ; hl-po-gaa'- 
trikt Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Hyp-o-eas'tro-oele [so 
Sm. wr. ; hl-po-gaz'- 
tro^ilj Wb. Gd. 155.] 



Hjrp'o-gene. 

Hyp-o-jffe'um [so Wk. 
Sm. wr.; hl-po-je'um, 
Wb. Gd. 155.1 [pi. 
Hyp-o-ge'a, 108.] 

Hyp-o-gloB'eal. 

Hyp'o-^yn (-jin), 46. 

Hv-po^y-noOs {-pcj*-) 
[BO Sm. Wr. ; hl-pqi'- 
t-nust Wb. Gd. 155.J 

Hy-po'pi-am [bo Wr. 
Wb. Gd.j hipH>'pi- 
um, Sm. 155.1 

lly-poB'ta-siB tso Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; hip- 
M'ta-aiSf Sm. 156.] 

Hf-po-BtaVic, 100. 

Uy-po-Btat'ic-al [soWk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; Atp-o- 
Btafik-cU, Sm. 155.1 

Hy-pot'e-nuBe [bo Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; hip- 
ot'e-nikSt Sm. 155.] 
fUypothenuBe, 



1 



203. 

OSr* Walker, Bmui, and 
Webcter give only the 
form hypotemue, and 
Goodrich prefer* thliform; 
but Worceater preftra A|r- 
pothauae. 

Hy-poth'e-cate [bo Wr. 
Wb. Gd.; Mp-otli'e- 
kdt, Sm. 155.] 

Hy-poth'e-cat-ed, 183. 

H y-poth'e-cat-ing. 

H f-poth-e-ca'tlon. 

H jr-poth'e-cat-or. 

Ily-poth'e-nuBe [H y - 
poteanse, 203. — 
See Note under ffy- 
potentue.] 

Uy-poth'o-Bis [bo Wr. 
Wb. Gd.; hip^tk'e- 
9i», or hl-poth'e-»iSt 
Wk. ; hip-oth'e-sU, 
Sm. 155.] 

Hy-po thet'lc [bo Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; Wp-o- 
thet'ik, Sm. 155.] 

Hy-po-thet'io-al. 

" (hipt) (176) 

mr * ^ 

Hy^plBh [HippiBh, 

Hyp-BO-met'rlc. 
Hyp-Bom'e-try. 
Hyrse, 16. n. millet. 

iSee HearBe, and 

Herse, 160.1 
Hy'Bon, 25, 86. 



Hypped 

[Hipped: 203.] 
Hyp'plnfir [Hipping, 



Hys'sop (his*ng}) [bo 
Sm. ; hiz'zuDj or a»*'- 
mpf Wk. ; hi'zupf or 
his'aup, Qd. 155.] 

OSr* Thoiigli Walker 
allowt hi'eup. fie aayi: ''To 
pronounce tne y long be- 
fore double » ii oontrary to 
every rule of orthoepy t 
and. therefore, as the nnt 
mode la undoubtedly the 
beet, the other ought to be 
relinqubhed." 

HyB-te'ri-a. 
Hy8-t«?r'lc, 109. 
Hys-terMc-^al, 106. 
HyH-t«ir'icfl. 
HyB-ter'o-oele. 
Uys-ter-ot'o-my, 108. 



1 

-am'bio, 109. 

-am'buB [L. pi. I-caaV- 

61 ; Eng. pi. I-am'- 

buB-eB {-€z)t 198.] 
'bex, 15, 25. 
'biB, 16, 25. 
-ca'ri-an,49, N.; 169. 
oc, 25, 39. 
cc'bcrg, 206. 
cc'boat. 
ce'cream. 
ced (UO, 183; NoteC, 

p. 3i. 
oe'houBe. 
oe'land-er. 
oe-land'ic, 109. 
ch-neu'mon (iit-nu'-), 

171. 

ch-no-grfiph'ic (iifc-). 
ch-no-grftphMo-al {ik-). 
ch-noe'ra-phy {ik-). 
ch-no-Iog'ic-al lik-no 

ioj'-). 
ch-nol'o-gT^ (ik-)t 106. 

chor (-tetw), 171. 
'ohor-oftB. 
ch'thy-o-col (W-). 
ch-thy-o-odl'la (Or-) 
ch-thy-og'ra-phy (iJfe). 
ch'thy-o-lite (Up-)y 152. 
ch-thy-o-log'ic-al {ik- 

thy-o-Un'it-al), \06. 
ch-thy-ol'o-glBt (ik). 
oh-thy-ol'o-gy (m?0. 
ch'thy-o-man-cy (tifc'-). 
ch-thy-oph'a-giBt (Or-). 
ch-thy-oph'a-gottB 

lik-). 

ch-thy-oph'a-gy (Or-). 
dh-thy-o-Bftu'raB {ik-). 



lUi; 6a«<f» there; 6b a« <n foot ; 9 a« <n fkcile ; gh a« g «n go ;tba« in thia' 



ILLUUINEK 



loh-thT-o'di <lt-), lot. 
I'cl-cle {f1t-i>, IW, ITl. 
T'd DPes, IW, IKS. 
te'lng, in. 

t-con'tHiIana (-tiaxm). 
' -on'aclut. 

Dn-o-cllst'l^ IW. 



oon-ol'o-p, 108. 
<w»i'bc'dran [pi. I- 

io-Wr'lc, m». 

I-de'*, n, 79. 



.de^'i It, II 
-do-Bl'lis'tli 
-de'sl.lie, -ai 



mcd'u r? , M. 

■ien'tiA-lait. 
•aea'tl-tj, 1&, le 

■ ■ 0«r- ■ ■■ ■ 

.„;f 

I-de-o%riph 'lo-iil . 
l-4e-offtt-nhy, IW. 

loo Wr. i id-t-tHitfik- 
ai, Gd. 154.] 

I-da-ol'o-Biet [i-de-oPo- 
at«<, or id-e-at'o-gisl, 
Wr. -. id-e-ofo-giit, 
Gd. ISJ.] 

l-defll'o-er (108) [bo 
Bm. ; i-dt-al'a-h, or 
Id-e-oeo.jy, Wr. : W- 
e-oi'o-JV, Gd. IM.l 

Id»(lJi), n.p;. 

Id-I-Otfrt-ST, 1*0. 

Id-|.a-arat'lc, 109. 
Id-i-o-cnu'lc-al, lOS. 
Id'i-<«7. IM. 1?1- 




Ig-OO'blT. 

Ig-uo-niln'l-olla [aoWr. 
Vb. Od.i ia™-iFriB'- 
vu(, Wk. Sm. IM.I 
Ig'pomln-T, isa. 

Ig'Da-rancc, lOS, 160. 
Ig'no-rml. 



II-lD'mlD-k-ble, 1M 
||.|u'mln4nt. 
Il-lii' minute, 73. 



U-Iu'ailn^t-li'c m) [» 
em.; UJu-min-a^T, 
Wr. WD. Od. IM.J 



i,(,i,a,D,f,lc»Vii.e>Ii 



ILLUMINING 



239 



IMMUNITY 



nin'min-in^, 183. 
ll-ln'min-iiin (-^zm), 
U-la'sion {-zhun), ».de- 

eeption. [SeeElnsion, 

148.1 
n4a'Bion-i8t (-«ft«n}. 
Il-la'slve, 81. 
Il-lu'so-ry, 86. 
Il-lus'tnte. 
IMaB'trit-«d, 183. 
Il-las'tnt-ing. 
Il-lii8-tn'tk>n, 112. 
Il-las'tn-tlve, 8t. 
IMua'trit-or. 
Il-Iu§'tra-to-r7, 86. 
Il-Ias'tri-otks. 
Im'age, 16, 70. 
Im'age-a-ble, 164, 169. 
Im'a-g«r-v [so Wk. 

Sm. ; (rn'oH-ry, Wb. 

Qd. ; im'a-Jer-ff, or 

Im-ag^i-na-ble (-q/'-)t 
164. 

72. 




Im-ag'inea (-<v. 




152. 
nd). 
183. 



m e nt , 
Embank- 



or I 
mAum'. 

[I m b a n k 
203. — See 
meat.] 

[ I m b a r g: o , 203. — Se0 
Embarfi'o.] 

[Imbarlc, 203. — Sm 
Embark.] 

Im-bathc'. 

Im batHed', 165. 

Im-balKMng. 

Im'be-^Uc, or Im-be- 
cilc' (•«') {BO Gd.j 
im-be-$il'. Dm.; im- 
be$>Ut or imrbe-$U'^ 
Wk. Wr. 156.1 

Im-be-cU'i-ty, 109. 

[Imbed, 203. — Soe 
Embed.] 

Imbibe'. 26, 103. 

Imbibed', 183. 

Im-bib'er. 

Im-bib'ing. 

Im-blt'ter [Embit- 
ter ,203.] 

Im-blt'tered, 160. 

Im-blt'ter-er, 77. 

Im-blt'ter-ine. 

Im-bor'der [Ember- 
der,203.] 

Im-bor'dered {-durd). 



Im-bor'der-iiiff. 

Im-bo'Bom {4)do'zum) 
[Embo8om,2a3.J 

Im-bo'Bomed {-boo'- 
zumd)y 165, 171. 

Im-bo'BOm-ing- (-ftJo'- 
zum-). 

[Imbowel,203. — S«e 
Embowel.] 

Im'bri-cate. 

Im'bri-cat-ed. 

Im-bri-ea'Uon. 

Imbroglio (It.) (tif»- 
br^Vyo). 

Im-bromi'. 

Im-browned' 
{-brownd'). 

Tm-browuMng. 

Im-bme' (-6roo'}, 19. 

Im-bmed' l-hrood% 
183. 

Im-bm'ing (-ftroo'-). 

Im-bru'ment {jbroo'-). 

Im-bnite' (4>root')y 19. 

Im-brut'ed {-broot'-). 

Im-brut'ing {-broot'-). 

Im-bae'.26. 

Im-bfled', 183. 

Im-ba'lng. 

Im-i-ta-bn'i-ty, 169. 

Im'i ta-ble, 164. 

Im'i-tate, 169. 

Im'i-tat-ed, 183. 

Im'i-tat-ing. 

Im-i-ta'tion. 

ImM-tat Ire, 84. 

ImM-tat-or, 183. 

Im-mac'a-late, 170. 

Im'ma-nen-CT. 

Im'ma-nent (160), a. in- 
herent. [See Immi- 
nent, 148.J 

Im-ma-te'ri-al, 49, N. 

Im-ma-te'ri-al-ism 
{•izm), 

Im-marte'rl-al-ist. 

Im-ma-te-ri-al'i-ty. 

Im-ma-ture', 170. 

Im-ma-tared'. 

Im-mar-tn'ri-^, 49, N. 

Im-mfiaB'nr-a-ble 
C-mezh'ur-a-bl} (171) 
fso Wb. Gd.; im- 
mezh'u^nhbli Wk. 
Wr. ; im-mezhfoo-ra- 
hi, Sm. 155.] 

Im-me'dl-ate_(73) [ao 
8m. Wr. Wb. (3d.; 
im-me'di-atf or im- 
me'ji-at, Wk. 155.] 

Im-mod'i-ea-ble, 164. 

Im-me-lo'dl-o&B. 

Im-mem'o-ra-ble, 164. 



Im-me-mo'rl-al, 40, N. 

Im-mense', 15, 39. 

Im-men'si-ty, 160, 171. 

Im-men'su-ra-ble 
{-men'thoo^a-bl) \im- 
men'«h^oo-ra-blf Sm. 
{See § 26); im-men'- 
»hu-ra-bl^ Wk.; im- 
men'su-ra-bl, Gd. 
155.] 

Im-merge', 21, N. 

Im-mcrgcd', 183. 

Im-merg'ing {^merj'-). 

Im-mcrse', 21, N. 

Im-mersed' (-merW). 

Im-mere'ing. 

Im-mer'Bion, n. aot of 
immersing or Btatc of 
being immersed. [See 
Emersion, 148.] 

Im-mer'sion-ist. 

Im-mesh', 15, 40. 

Im-meshcMl' {^me$ht'). 

Im-mcsh'ing. 

Im-me-tbo(ric-al, 108. 

I m' mi-grant, 66, 170. 

Im'mi-grate, 73, 78. 

Im'mi-grat-ed, 183. 

Im'mi-grat-ing. 

Im-mi-gra'tion, 112. 

Im'mi-nent (169), a. 
threatening closely* 
[See Immanent, 148.] 

Im-min'gle C-nUnff'gl). 

Im-min'gled {-mtng'- 
gld). 

Im-min'gling {^ming'-), 

Im-miB-^-biri-ty. 

Im-miB'ci-ble, 164, 171. 

Im-mis'sion {-mUh'- 
un). 

Im-mit'i-ga-ble, 164. 

Im-mo-bil'i-ty, 106, 160. 

Im-mod'er-ate, 170. 

I m -mod-er-a'tion. 

Im-mod'est, 170. 

Im-mod'e»-ty. 

Im'mo-late, 73, 170. 

Im'mo-lat-ed, 183. 

Im'mo-lat-ing. 

Im-mo-lu'tion. 

Im-mo-lat'or. 

Im-mdr'al, 66, N. 

Im-mo-ralM-ty, 160. 

Im-mdr'al-ly, 66, N. 

Im-mor'tal, 72. 

Im-mor-tal'i-ty, 171. 

Im-mor-tal-T-za'tloii. 

Im-mor'tal-ize, 202. 

Im-mor'tal-ized, 188. 

Im-mor'tal-iz-liur. 

Im-mov'a-ble, IM, 188. 

Im-mu'ni-ty, 170. 



fiOl; 6<tfii» there; Ob <tf in foot } 9 <tf in facUe } gh <» g in go ; y^ of in this. 




IMMURE 

Im-murc'f 26. 
Im-mured'. 183. 



Im-mur'in^. 
Im-mu'ta-ble, IM. 



Im-mu 



irhig 
-tAbi 



I'l ty, 108. 



i-pair'er ipfr'-). 
i-pair'ing [pir-). 
i-pRl-pa-bil'1-ty, 160. 



Im-mu'ta-blj. 

Impf 16. 

Im-pact', V. 103, 161. 

Im'paet, n. 103, 161. 

Im-pact'ed. 

Im-pact'iag. 

Impair' C-ptr*), 14. 

Impaired' (,-pird'), 166. 

Im 

Im 

Im. . 

Im-pal'pa-blc, 164. 
Im-pal'Hlod {-poi'zid). 
Im-pai'Hy (pol'zy^ 160. 
Im-pal'sy-ing {-pot'- 

Im-pa-na'tlon. 
Im-pan'el [I m p a n - 

ncl , Empanel, 

Empannel,2a'{.] 
Im-pan'elled (-«W) (105) 

rimpanneled, 

Wb. Gd. 203.] [See 

177, and Mote £, p. 

70.] 
Im-pan'el-ling [Im- 

pann cling, Wb. 

Gd. 2m.] 
Im-pftr'a-dise. 
Im-pAr'a-diswl (-rfl«f). 
Im-pftr'a-diH-in^, 183. 
I m-pftr-i-ay 1-lttb' ic. 
Im-pAr'i-ty, lOtt. 
Im pari', 11. 
Im-parl'anoe, 160. 
Im-parlcd', 166. 
Im-parl'ing. 
Im-par-8on-€e', 122. 
Inl-part', 11. 
Im-part'anoe. 
Im-port'od. 
Im-part'er. 
Im-part'ing. 
Im-par'tlal (-«»«/). 
Im-par-tl-ai'i-ty ( «W- 

al'i'ty) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; tm-par-»hcU'i-tyt 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Im-part-i bil'i-ty. 
Im-part'l-ble, IW. 
Im-pasB'a-blc, 104. 
Im-pft8-8l bil'i-ty, 160. 
Im-p&s'Bi-ble, 164. 
Im-pas'sioned (-jmmA'- 

und)y 171. 
Im-pAs'sfve, 84. 
Im-pas-Biv'i-ty, 108. 
Im-paB-ta'tion. 



240 

Im-paste', 23. 
Im-past'cd, 183. 
Im-paBt'ing. 
Im-pa'tience {-aherui). 
Im-pa'tient (^Aen<), 

171. 
Im-pawn', 17. 
Im-pawned', 165. 
Im-pawn'ing. 
Im-peach', 13, 44. 
Im-p«acb'a-ble, 164. 
Im-peached' (-picht*). 
Im-peach'«r. 
Im-peacb'ment. 
Ii^pearl' {-perl'), 21, 

Im-pearled' (-perld'), 
Im-pearl'inf (-perl'-), 
Im-pec-ca-bfl'1-ty, 160. 
Im-pec'ca-ble, 164. 

Im-pec'can-oy. 

Im-pec'cant. 

Im-pe-cu-ni-OB'i-ty. 

Im-pede', 13. 

Im-pC'd'ed. 

Im-ped'i-ble (164) Fso 
Gd. ; im-pt(fi-bl, Wr. 
155.] 

Im-pod'i-ment, 160. 

Im-ped'iD^, 1^. 

Im-ped'i tive, 84. 

Ini-pel', 15. 

Impelled' {-peld'), 166. 

Im-pel'lcnt, 100, 170. 

Im-pel'ler, 176. 

Im-pel'ling. 

Im-pen'. 

Im-pend' (15, 103). v. to 
hang over ; to threat- 
en. [See Impend, 
160.] 

Im-pend'ed. 

Im-pend'enoe. 

Im-pcnd'en-cy. 

Im-pcnd'cnt, 160. 

Im-pend'ing. 

Im-pcn-e-tra-bil'i-ty. 

Im-pen'e-tra-ble, 164, 
171. 

Im-pcn'i-tenoe. 

Im-i)en'i ten-cy, 160 

Im-pen'i-tent. 

Im-pen'nate, 170. 

Im-penned' i-pend'). v, 
did impen. [See Im- 
pend, 160.] 

Im-pen'ning, 176. 

Im-pen'nouB. 

Im-pdr'a-tlve, 84. 

Im-per-cep-ti-bil'i-ty. 

Im-per-cep'ti-ble, 164. 

Im-pcrTect, 21, N. 

Im-per-fec'tion. 



IMPLANTING 

Im-per'fo-ra-ble, 164. 

Im-pcr'fo-rate, 21, N. 

Im-perTo-rat-^. 

Im>per-fo-ra'tion. 

Im-pe'ri-al, 49, N. 

Im-pe'ri-al-iBm (-izm). 

Im-pe'rl-ai-ist. 

Im-pe ri-al'i-ty, 108. 

Im-pe'ri-al-ly. 

Im-p^r'il. 

Im-p?r'il led [Imper- 
iled, Wb. Gd. -^08. 
^See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.1 

Im-per'il-Ung [Im- 
periling, Wb. Gd. 
203.1 

Im-pe^rl-ottB, 49, N. 

Im-pi'r'ish-a-ble, 164. 

Im*per'ma-nence, 21, N. 

Im-per'ma-nen-ey. 

I m-pcr'ma-nent. 

Im-pcr-me-a-bil'i-tT. 

Im-per'me^-ble, lo4. 

Im-peHso-ual, 21, N. 

I m-pcr-ao-nal 'i-ty . 

Im-per' BO- nal -ly . 

Im-per'so-natc. 

Im-per'8o-nat-ed. 

Im-per-BO-na'tion. 

Im-per-aua'si-ble 
i-swa'si-hl), 164, 171. 

Im-per'ti-nenoe, 21, N. 

Im-per'tl-nen-cy. 

Im-per'ti-nent, 160. 

Im-per-tnr-ba-bil'i-ty. 

Im-pcr-tur'ba-ble, 164. 

Im-per-tur-ba'tion. 

Im-per- vi-a-bll'i -ty . 

Im-per'vi-a-ble, 164. 

Im-per' ri-otts. 

Im-pe-tifi^i-no&B (-*(/'-). 

Jm-pe-ti'go (It.), 

Im-pet-u-OB^i-ty, 108. 

Im-pet'a-oAs. 

Im'pe-tus. 

Im-pierce', 13. 

Im-pieroe'a-ble, 183. 

Im-pierced' (-/>*r#f )• 

Im-pier^'ing. 

Im-pi'e-ty, 160. 

Im-pingc^, 16, 45. 

Im-pingcd' {-pif^'). 

Im-pinge'ment. 

Im-ping'ing (-p<»v'-). 

Im'pi-oOB, 78, 109. 

Im-pla-oa-bil'i -ty . 

Im-pla'oa-ble, UA, 

Im-pla'ca-blT, 93. 

Implant', 10, 103. 

Im-plant-a'tion. 

Im-plant'ed. 

Im-plant'lng. 



a, e, i, d,(i, ft long ; &i £,1, 0, ft, jF, $hort -, Hoiin far, a a« <fi ftat, & at in 



IMFLAUtSlBlLITY 



241 



IMPROVISATION 



Im-pUu-Bi-bU'i-ty 

r-«i^), 108, 169. 
Im-pl4u'8i-ble i-zl-bt). 
Im-pleiid'. 
Im-plead'cd. 
Im-plead'er. 
Im-plead'ing. 
Im'ple-menf, 160f 171. 
Im-ple'tion. 
Im'plex. 

Im'pU-cate, 73, 160. 
Im'pli-cat-ed. 
Im'pU-cat-mg. 
Im-pli-ca'tion. 
Im'pli-oat-Iye [bo Sm. 

Wr. ; Ua'pli-koriiv, 

Wb. GNi. 165.] 
Im-pli9'lt. 
Im-plied', 186. 
Im-pli'ed-ly. 
Im-plo-ra'tion. 
Im-plore'. 24, 103. 
Im-plored', 166. 
Im-plor'er. 
Im-pior'ing^. 
Im-plumecr {-pl^md% 
Im-pl]r% 25. 
Im-ply'ing. 
Im-poVi-cy, 169. 
Im-po-lite', 152. 
Im-pol'i-tic, 109. Exc. 
Im-pon-der-a-biri-ty. 
Im-pon'der-a-ble, 164. 
Im-pon'der-oQB. 
Im-pa-ros'i-ty. 
Im-po'ro&s, 49, N. 
Import', V. 24, 49, 161. 

vaT" When thii verb has 
the Knte of to tian\fy. 
Smut pronounc«f it tm- 

Im'pdrt, n. 16, 161. 

•9^ When thifl nonn luw 
the lenTC of figMjieaiinnf 
Bromrt prononnees It im'' 

Im-port'a^ble, 164, 109. 

Im-poHtanoe, 169. 

lm-por't«nt [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; im- 
por'tant, or im-pdr'- 
Umtj Wk. 155.] 

•9^ " The bett neain," 
MLjrt Walker, of the two 
mode* which he gives, " ii 
on tiie side of the flnt pro- 
nunciation [Mi-poKrimi].'* 

Im-^rt-a'tton. 
Im-port'ed. 
Im-port'er. 
Im-port'ing. 



Im-port'a-nate (44, N. 

1) [go 8m. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; im-pot^chu-n(Ui 

yVk. 155.J 
Im-por-tane', 122. 
Im-por-tuned', 183. 
Im-por-tun'er. 
Im-por-tun'ing^. 
Im-por-tu'iii-ty, 169. 
Im-poB'a-blc i-p6z'-)t 

164. 
Im-pose' (•pOz')j 24, 40. 
Im-posed' {-pOzd'). 
Im-poa'er {-pdz'-). 
Im-poB'in^ i-pOz'-). 
Im-po-Brtion {-zish'- 

un). 
Im-poB-Bl-bil'i-ty, 171. 
Im-pos'Bi-ble, 1(4, 170. 
Im'pddt, 16, 24. 
Im-pdBt'hn-mate [so 

8m. Wr. ; im-pos'tu- 

mdt, Wb. GcT; im- 

pos'i^iMfUtt, Wk. 

1560 
Im-po8t'ha-mat-<Ml. 
Im-pdBt'hu-mat-lng. 
Im-pdBt-ha-ma'tion. 
Im-pdst'hume [bo Sm.; 

im-pos'tnmj Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; im-pos'chUm, 

Wk. 166.] 
Im-po8'tor, 88. 
Im-pdst'ure (-ywr) (91) 

[bo Wr. J tm-pos'tUr, 

coll. im-pon'cWooTt 

8m. {See \ 26) ; im- 

pos'ch^r, Wk. 156.] 
Im'po-tencc. 
Im'po-ten-cy, 169. 
Im'po-tent, 106. 
Im-poundS 28. 
Im-pound'ed. 
Im-pound'infi^. 
Im-pov'er-iBD [ E m - 

poveriBh,20:i.l 
Im-pov'er-lBhed {-isht). 
Im-pov'or-lBh-er. 
Im-pov'er-i8h-ing. 
1 m-po v'er-iBh -ment. 
[I m p o w e r , 203. — 

5«elSmpowcr.1 
Im-prac-tf-ca-bill-ty. 
Im-prac'ti-oa-ble, 164. 
Im'pre-cate, 73, 169. 
Im'pre-cat-ed. 
Im'pre-cat-ing. 
Im'pre-cat-o-ry, 86. 
Im-pregn' (-pr«n')> 162. 
Im-preg-na-bil'i-ty. 
Im-preg'na-ble, 164 
Im-prcg'nate. 
Im-preg'nat-ed. 



j Im-preg'QAt'iiig. 
Im-preg-na'tion. 
Im-pregned' {-prlnd')% 

162. 
Im-pregn'ing {-prln'-)^ 

162. 
Im-pro-Bcrip-ti-bil'i-ty. 
Im-pre-Bcrip'tl-ble, 104. 
Im-preBB', v. 103, 161. 
Im'preBB, n. 103, 161. 
Im-presBed' {-presV)^ 

165 i Note C, p. 34. 
Im-presB-i bil'i-ty, 108. 
Im-preBsM-blc, 104. 
Im-preBs'iug. 
Im-pres'sion {-pre»h'- 

un). 
Im-preBBTve, 84. 
Im-prcsB'ment. 
Im-prir-ma'tur (L.). , 
Im-pri'mit {It.). 
Im-prlnt', v, 16, 103, 

161. 
Im'prlnt, n. 108, 161. 
Im-pris'on (-priz'n)^ 

149. 
Im-priB'oned {-priz'- 

n^, 166. 
Im-pris'on-er (priz'- 

n-). 
Im-prlB^on-ing {-priz' 

n). 
Im-priB'on-ment {-priz'- 

n-). 
Im-prob-a-bil'i-ty, 169. 
Im-prob'a-blc, 164. 
Im-prob'i ty. 
Im-prorap'tu [bo Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. J im- 

prom'tu, Wk. 155.] 
Im-prop'er. 
Im-pro'pri-ate. 
Im-pro'pri-at-ed. 
Im-pro'pri-at-lng. 
Im-pro-pri-a'tion. 
Im-pro'prl-at-or [§o 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.j 

im-pro-pri-at'ory Wk. 

155.] 
Im-pro-prl'e-ty, 169. 
Im-prov-a-bil'1-ty 

{-proov-), 
Im-prove' {-proov*-)^ 

19. 
Im-proved' {-proovd'). 
Im-prov'cr {-proov'-). 
Im-prov'ing [-proov'-). 
Im-provc'meat 

{-proov'-). 
Im-prov'l-denoe. 
Im-prov'i-dent. 
Im-prov'ing {-proov'-). 
Im-proT-1-Ba'tion. 



fall; da«<fi there; 6b <tf in foot i 9 cm m faoUe } gh a« g <n go ; t^ a« <n thia. 

21 



1MPROVI8AT1ZE 



242 



INCITED 



Impro-vis'a-tize 

{-viz'-h '^i- 
Im-pro-vii)'a-tized 

C-rtz'-), 18.3. 
Im-pro-via'a tiz-ing 

i-viz'-). 
Im-pro-vlB'a-tor (-rte' ). 
Improvise' ( vW), 202. 
Im-pro-viued' {-vlzd'). 
Im-pro-vi8'er (-i*U'-). 
Im-pro-vis'ing: {-viz'-). 
Im-prov-vi sa to' re (It.) 

[pi. Im-prov-vi-sa-to'- 

ri (-re), 1U8.] 
Im-prov-vi-sa^tri'ce fit.) 

(tm-prov-ve-aa-tre- 

ch&). 



Goodrich remark* 
of the two preceding 
worda, that thej are "usu- 
ally spelled with but one 
V by the Engliah and 
French." 

m-pni'dcnoe (-proo'-). 
m pru'dcnt {-proo'-). 
m'pu-dcnoe, 109. 
m'pu-dont. 

m-pudic'i ty, 109, 171. 
m-pugn'^ (-piin)y 162. 
m-pugnea' (-pft/ki'). 
m-puep'er {-pun'-). 
m puMs-sant, IGU, 170. 
m'pulHC {-puis), 171. 
m-pul'aion, 118. 
m-pol'sive. 
m-pa'ui-ty, 108, 109. 
Ill-pure'. 
m-pu'rl-tY,49, N. [See 

PurifV.l 

ra-pur'ple, 104, 104. 
m-pur'pled {-pur^pld). 
m-pur'pling. 
m-put'a-blc, 104. 
m-pu-t«i'tlon. 
m-put'a-tlve, 84. 
m-pute', 26. 
m-put'ed, ia3. 
m put'ing. 
n, prep. A ad. withJn. 

[See inn, 160.] 
n-a-bilM-ty, 108, 160. 
n-ac-ccs-8i-bil'i-ty. 
n-ac-oes'si-ble, 104. 
n-ac'cu-ra-oy, 160. 
n-ac'cu-rate. 
Q-ac'tion. 
n-ao'tlve, 84. 
n-ac-tlv'i-ty. 
n-ad'e-qua-cy, 171. 
n-ad'e-qnate. 
n-ad-mi9-8l-bll'I-ty. 
n-ad-mis'Mi-blo, 104. 
n-ad-vcr'tcncc, 21, N. 



n-ad-ver'ten-cy. 

n-ad-ver'tent. 

n-al'ien-a-ble (-y«n-), 
101. 

n-am-o-ri&'ta, n. /em, 

n-am-o-ra'to, n. mag. 
[bo Wr. Gd. ; in^am- 

o-ra'to, Sm. 155.] 

n-anc', 23. 

n-an'i-mate, 100. 

n-an'i-nmt-ed. 

n-a-nl'tioD, 112. 

n-an'i ty, 108, 100. 

n-ap pli-ca-bil'i-ty. 

n-ap'plj-ca-ble, 104. 

n-ap-pre'd-a-ble (-prc'- 

shl-a-bl); 104. 

n-«p-pro'pri-«te. 

n-apt'. 

n-aptM-tnde, 106. 

n-ar-tlc'u-late, 7:*, 89. 

Q-ar-ti-fT'cial {-Jlth'al). 

n-at-t«n'tlon. 

n-at-t«u'tlve, 84. 

n-au'di-ble, 104. 

n-&u'gii-ral, 72. 

n-au'g-u-rate. 

n au'gu-riit-ed, 183 

n&u-gu-ra'tion. 

n-Au'g-u-rat-or. 

n-au-8p1'ciou8 {-^ah'- 

«»), 112, 171. 

n'bom, 135. 

n'bred. 

n'ca {ing'ka) [so Sm. ; 

in'ka, Wr. Wb. Gd. 
155.] 
In-cage' (23, 45) [En- 
cage, 203.] 
In-caged', 165. 
In-cag-'ing (-ksj'-), 
In-cai'cu-la-ble, 164. 
In-ca-lea'cence, 30, 171. 
In-ca-le«'oen-cy. 100. 
In-ca-les'cent. 
In-can-des'oenoe, 30. 
In-can-des'ocnt. 
In-can-ta'tion. 
In-can'ta-to-ry, 80. 
In^sa-pa-bil'l-ty, 108. 
In-ca'pa-ble, 164. 
In-ca-pa9'i-tate. 
In-ca-pag'i-tat-ed. 
In-ca-pa9'i-tat-ing. 
In-ca-pa^'i-ty. 
In-carcer-ate, 73. 
In-car'cer-at-ed. 
In-car'cer-at-ing. 
In-oar-ocr-a'tion. "• 

lu-car'nate, a. & v, 73. 
In-car'nat-ed, 183. 
In-ciir'nat-ing. 
In-car-na'tlon. 



In-car'na-tlTe, 84. 

In-case' [ £ Q c a s e, 203.] 

In-caaed' {kd^t'). 

In-cas'lng. 

In-c&u'tiou8 {-shua\\eO. 

In-cend'i-a-riBin(-rtem). 

In-oend'i-a-ry (72, 169) 
[BO Wr. Wb. Gd. ; tn- 
»end'^r-if, Sm. j in- 
cefi'(U-a-ry, or in-»eu'- 
ji-a^ry, Wk. 165.1 

In-oense' noi), r. to in- 
flame with anger j to 
provoke. 

In'oense [ao Wk. 8m. 
Wb. Gdl ; in'wn»^ or 
in-sens', Wr. 1561, v. 
to bum ; — to perfume 
with iucenBc. 

In'oense, n. 101. 

In-cen'slve. 

In-oen'aor, 88. 

In'cen-80-ry, or In-oen'- 
80-ry [bo Wr. ; in*- 
ten-mw-y^ Wk. Sm. ; 
in-cet»'M>-ry, Wb, Gd. 
165.] 

In-een'ti[ye, 84. 

In-oep'tion. 

In-oep'tlve, 84. 

In-cep'tor. 

In-oer'ti-tude, 21, N.IOK. 

In-ees'san-cy. 

In-oes'sant. 

In'cest. 

In-oest'a-o&s. 

Inch, 10, 44. 

[Inchase, 201,203.— 
See Enchase.] 

In-eho'a-tTre {-loo'-) [ao 
Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd,; 
ing'ko-a-tiv, Sm. 165.1 

In'd-dence, 30, 160. 

In'ci-dent, 127. 

In-oi-dent'al. 

In-ci-dent'al-ly. 

In-dn'er-ate. 

In-cin'cr-at-ed. 

In-dn'cr-at-ing. 

In-dn-er-a'tion. 

In-cip'i-enoe. 

In-cip'i-en-oy, 168l 

In-oip'1-ent. 

In-cise' (-alar'-), 2 

In-cised' {-aUd'), 

In-cis'ing l-»\z'-). 

In^'sion (-0{«4'tin}. 

In-ei'sYye, 84. 

In-d'sor. 

In-cit'ant. 

In-oT-ta'tion. 

In-cite', 25. 

In-cit'ed, 183. 



a, $, T, 5, u, y, tang ; A, «, T, 5, fi, j^, $hoH i il (U <n fiu*, 4 <u in fkst, & cm ii» 



INCITEMENT 



243 



INCURABIUTY 



In-eite'ment. 

In-dt'er. 

In-<at'iiig. 

In-df-vil'l-ty. 

In-elasp', 12, 131. 

In-clasped' {-kUapV). 

IiKlaflpMng. 

Iii-«lcni'eii-cy, 160. 

In-clem'cnt. 

In-ciiQ'a-ble, 164. 

In-di-na'tion. 

Iii-«lin'a-to-iy (86) [bo 
8m. Wb. Gd. ; %n- 
knn'a-to-ryy Wk. Wr. 
155.J 

a6r'**The termination 
Qiory ham » tendency to 
ahortcn the jireceding vow- 
el, u U evident in <fe- 
eMmaiory, predatorff^ tteJ" 
Walker. 

In-clinc', 25. 

In-clined', 165, 183. 

In-dm'er. 

In-clin'ing. 

In-close' {-klOz') [Bn- 

close, 201, 203.— 

See Note under En- 
close,] 
In-dosed' {-klOzd')ASa. 
In-cl6n'ing {-kli^z'-). 
In-dos'ure {-kliz'yur) 

[Enclosure, 201, 

203.] 
In-dade', 26. 
In-clad'ed. 
In-clnd'ing. 
In-filn'sion {-zhun). 
In-cln'sTve, 84. 
In K»g'. 
In-cog'ni-to. 
In-cog^ni-za-ble, 164. 
In-oog'ni-zanoe. 
Tn-eo^'nl-zant, 160. 
Tn-co-tie'rence, 40, N. 
Tn-co-he'ren-cy, 
Tn-co-he'rent. 
In-com-bns-ti-bil'i-ty. 
In-com-bas'ti-ble, 104. 
Tn'come i^-kum). 
In-oom-men-su-rn-bil'I- 

tr (-«Aoo-), 26, 46, 

Note 2. 
In-com-men' sn-ra-blc 

(-«Aoo-), 164, 171. 
In-oora-men'sn- rate 

(-«*oo-)46,Note2, 171. 
In-com-mode', 66, 170. 
In-eom-mdd'ed, 183. 
In-oom-mdd'intr. 
In-oom-mo'di-obs [so 

8m. Wr. Wb. Gel. ; 

in-Jfeom-wio'rfi-fK, or 



in-komrmo'ji-utt Wk. 

155.] 
In-oom-mu-ni-ea-bil'i- 

ty. 

In-oom-mu'ni-ca-ble,164 
In-oom'par-a-ble ( 164) 

[not in-kom-pdr'a-ble, 

153.J 
In-oom-pat-i-bil'i-ty. 
In-com-pat'i-ble, 164. 
In-com'pe-tence. 
In-com'pe-ten-cy, 160. 
In-com'pe-tent. 
In-eom-plcte'. 
In-eom-pos'lte {-poz') 

n52) [bo 8m. W^r.j 

%n-kom-poz'itj or in- 

kom'po-zU, Gd. 156.] 
In-com-pre-hen-si-bil'i- 

ty, 116. 
In-com-prc-hen'si-ble, 

164. 
In-oom-presB-i-bil'i-ty. 
In-oom-prc8s'i-ble, 164. 
In-eon-ceiv'a-blc, 164, 

160. 
In-oon-cln'slve. 
In-con'dYte [so Sm.Wb. 

Gd,i in' kon-dU.Wk ; 

in'kon-dltf or in-kon'- 

dU, Wr. 155.1 
In-con-gju'i-ty( -aroo'-). 
In-con'gru-oQs (-kong'- 

groo-), 10, 64, 160. 
In-oon'sc-quenoe. 
In-con'se-qnent. 
In-oon-se-qnen'tial 

(-«AaZ). 

In-con-sld'er-a-ble, 164. 

In-con-sid'er-ate, 73. 

In-con-slBt'en-cy, 160. 

In-con-slst'ent. 

In-con-Bol'a-ble, 164. 

In-con-spic'a-ofis. 

In-oon'stan-cy, 160. 

In-con'stant. 

In-con-test'a-ble, 164. 

In-con'tl-nence. 

In-cou'ti-nent. 

In-con-tro-vert-l-blFi-ty 

In-con-tro-vert'i-ble. 

In-oon-7en'ienoe i-yenn) 
[so Cid. ; in-kon-rSn'- 
yenSt or in-kon-ve'm- 
e»w, Wr. ; in-kon-ve'' 
ni-enSf Wk. Sm. 155.] 

In-eor'po-nite, 73. 

In-cor'po-rat-ed . 

In-cor'po-rat-ingf. 

In-oor-po-ra'tion. 

In-eor-po're-al, 40, N. 

In-cor-po-re'i-ty, 160. 

In-cor-rect', 66, 170. 



In-cor ri-g^-bU'l-ty. 

In-cor'ri-gi-ble, 164." 

In-cor-rupt'. 

In-cor rupt-i bll'i-ty. 

In-cor-rupt'i-ble, 164. 

Inoor-rup'tion. 

In-craa'Bate, 73. 

In-craa'«nt-ed. 

In-crR8'8Ht-ing^. 

In-cras-sa'tion. 

In-cras'sa-tlve. 

In-creaae', v. 103, 161. 

In'crease, or In •crease' 
«, [so Wr. ; in'kriSy 
Wk. 8m. ; inkrls'^ or 
in'kresy Gd. 166.] 

In-creased', 166. 

In-creas'er. 

In-creas'ing. 

In-cred-i-bfi'i-ty. 

In-cred'i-ble, 164. 

In-cre-du'U-ty, 108, 169. 

In-cred'ii-louB (45, N.) 
Fbo Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 
tn-kred'u4us, or in- 
kred'ju-lus, Wk. 155.] 

In'cre-ment (54)[so 8m. 
Wb. Gd. i ing'kre- 
menty Wk. Wr. 165J 

[I n cr o ach , 203.— <9m 
Encroach.] 

In-cniBt' [Encrnst, 
203.] 

In-cruBt-a'tion, 112. 

In-crust'ed. 

In-cru8t'infi^. 

In'cu-bate (54), [so 8m. 
Wb. Gd. ; ing^ku-b&ty 
Wk. Wr. 155.] 

In'cu-b«t-ed. 

In'cu-bat-ing. 

In-cu-ba'tion, 112. 

In'cu bufl (54) [so 8m. 
Wb. Gd. J ing*kuAnts, 
Wk. Wr.l66.] [L.pl. 
in'cubl', En^.pLIii'- 
cu-buH-eB (-el), 108.] 

In-cul'cate, 73. 

In-cul'cat-ed, 183. 

In-cul'cat-ing. 

In-cul-ca'tion. 

In-oul'oat-or. 

In-cul'pate, 73. 

In-cul'pat-ed, 183. 

In curpat-ing. 

In-cul pa'tion. 

In-cul'pa-to-ry. 

In-cum'bcn-cy, 160. 

In-cum'bent. 

[Incumbrance, 208. 
— See Encumbranoe.] 

In-cur', 21. 

In-cur-a-bil'i-ty, 108. 



All ; 6 a< in there ; dbMinfoot; 9 a« m fiuale ; gh (U gin go; til <u<n this. 



INCURABLE 

In-ear'a-ble, 164. 

In-cu'ri-ottB, 40, N. 

In-ourred' {-kwrd'), IdS. 

In-cuHrcnce, 160. 

In-our'riag, 21, 

In-cur'sion. 

iQ-our'sIre, 84. 

In-curv'ate. 

iD-curv'at-ed, 183. 

In-curv'at-ing'. 

In-curv-a'tlon. 

In-dobt'ed (-det'-), 162. 

iD-de'oen-cy, 160. 

In-dc'ocnt. 

In-<le-c]['Bloii (-Hzh^un). 

In-de-clin'a-ble, 104. 

In-de-oo'rofis, or In- 
dec'o-roas (108) [so 
Wk. Wr. Gd. ; in-de- 
ko'rtUj Sm. 165.] 

In-dc-oo'nun. 

In-<leed'. 

In-dc-fiit-i-sra-biri-tT. 

In dc-fat'1-ga-ble, 164. 

In-de-fat'i-ga-bl 7 . 

In-de-fea-Bi-bil'i-tT 

In-de-fea'8i-ble (-z%-bl-). 

In-de-fen-sl-bil'f-ty. 

In-de-fen'si-ble, 104. 

In-de-f Tn'a-ble, 164. 

In-definite, 162, 160. 

In-do-his'oenoe, 30, 171. 

In-dc-his'oent. 

In-dcl i-bU'l-ty, 108. 

In-dcl'i-ble, 164, 160. 

In-dcl'i-oa-cy, 72, 160. 

In-delM-cate, 73. 

In-dem-ni-fY-ca'tion. 

In-dem'ni-f led, 186. 

In-dem'ni-fy. 

In-dem'nl-fy-ing. 

In-dern'oi-t^r, 1&, 160. 

In-<lent', n. A v, 16. 

In-dent-a'tton. 

In-dcnt'ed. 

In-dent'ing. 

In-dent'ure, 01. 

In-de-pend'eaoe, 160. 

In-de-pen'den-cy. 

In-de-pen'dent. 

[Q-de-Bcrib'a-ble, 164. 

[n-de-Btruct-i -bil' i-tr. 

[n-de-Btrnct'i-ble, 164. 

In-de-ter'mi-nate. 

In'dex, n. A v. [pi. of 
n. In'dex-C8 (-»), or 
(in the sense of expo- 
n«nta of quantUie$) 
In'di-o$B (sez).] 

In'dexed {-dekst). 

In-dex'ic-al. 

In'dex-ing. 



244 

Ind'ian (-yon) (45, N. ; 
6n [so Sm. Wr. Wb. 
Ga. ; in'tli-an, •»y»- 
an^ or ind'yanj Wlc. 
165.] 
Ind'la^nib'ber (ind'ya) 
071, 206) [so Sm. Wb. 
Gd. J in^ja^ndf'ber, 
Wr. 165.] 
In'di-cant. 
In'di-cate, 73, 78. 
In'di-cat-ed. 
In'di-cat-ing. 
In-di-ea'tion. 
In-dic'a-ttve [so Wk. 
Wr. Wb. Crd. J in'di- 
cUt-iv^ (in the ^neral 
sense of «ftotnfi^. or 
pointing out), in-aik'- 
a-Hv (as applied to 
note the mode of a 
Tcrb), Sm. 165.] 
In'di-cat-or. 
In'di-ca-to-rj (86) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; Wdi- 
kd-tur^t Sm. 166.] 
InMi-ces i-stz), n. pi. 

[See Index.] 
In-dict' (-d«0 (162), r. 
to accuse. [See In- 
dite, 160.] [Endict, 
201, 203.1 
In-dict'a-We (-dit'-)Aei. 
In-dTct'ed (-<«/'-). 
In-dict'er (■dlt'-)^ n. one 
who accuses. [See 
Inditer, 160.] 
In-dict'ing (-<««'-)• 
In-dic'tion. 

In-dict'ment {-dlt'-) 
(162), n. an accusa- 
tion. [See Indlte- 
ment. 100.] 
In-diTrer-enoe, 160, 
170. 

n-dirfer-ent. 
n'dl-genoe, 30, 46. 
nMi-^ne. 

n-dig'e-nolis (-<l(^'-), 
160, 171. 
n'di-grent. 
n-dl-gest-i-bU'i-ty. 
n-di gest'i-ble, 108. 
n-di-Q[est'ion (^-yun), 
n-dig'nant. 
n-dig-na'tion. 
n-dig'nity, 106, 160. 
n'di-go. 

n-di-gom'e-ter, 106. 
n'di-go-tTne, 152. 
n-dT reef. 

n-dis-eem'i-ble {-diz- 
zem'i-bl), 164, 171. 



INDOCTRINATE 

In-discreet' (160), o. 

imprudent. 
In-dis-eretc' ( 160), a. not 

separated. 
In-dis-crC'tion ( kretk'' 

wi). 
In-dis-crim'l -nate,73,t6l 
In-dls-pen'sa-ble, 164, 

171. 
In-dis-po8e' ( pOz*). 
In-dis-posed' IpOzd'}. 
In-dis-po-sl'tion {-zisk'- 

un). 
In-dls'puta-blo (164) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; tn- 

dis'pu4a-blt or in-dU- 

pu'ta-bU Wk. 155.] 

tar Thofiffh Walker, 
In deference to the author- 
ity of John ion, Aah, and 
otnen, aUowa the pronon- 
ctatlon m-di»-pu'lehbLt he 
Mvt of the other mode 
(m-dtrpH-Ca-W): •• My ex- 
perience and recollection 
gronly fsil inc. if thia la 
not the ifeneral pronunci- 
ation of polite and lettered 
•peakeri." 

In-dis-so-Iu-biri-tv. 

lu-dis'so-lu-blc, iol. 

In-dis tinct'. 

In-dis tin'gui8h-a-ble 
(-ting'gwisk)f 164,171. 

In-dite' (25), r. to com- 
pose, or write. [See 
Indict, 100.] 

In-ditc'ment, n. act of 
one who composes, 
or writes. [See In- 
dictment, 1607] 

In-dit'er, n. one who 
compones or writes. 
[i>'e«Indicter, 100.1 

In^ii vid'u-al j(45, N.) 
[so Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. i 
tn-di-rid'uoL or »»- 
di vurhi-al, W\.15&.\ 

In-di-via'u-al ism 

{-izmh 130. 

In di-vid-u-al'I-ty, 108. 

In-di-Yid-u-al-l-sa'tion. 

In-dl-vid'u-al -126,202. 

In.dl-vid'u-al-iied. 

In-di-vid'u-al iz lug. 

In-dl-viB-i-bil'i ty ( riz) 

In-dI-vU'i-ble( viz^ ),164 

In-d09'i-ble[BO Wk.Sm. 
Wr. ; in-do'si bty or 
In-dos'i-bl, Gd. 165.] 

In-d09'Tle (162) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; in-do'siL 
or in-doa^U, Gd. 166.; 

In-do-dl'i-ty. 

In-doo'trin-ate, 73. 



a,6,i,0, a, f,lpiv} &, «, X, 6, ft, j^, «Aorf ; \L a9 ii^ fkr, k a* in fui, k at in 



INDOCTRINATED 



245 



INFLECT 



In-doe'trin4lt-ed. 
In-doo'trin^lt-iiig. 
In-doc-trin-a'tioii. 
In'do-lenoe. 
In'do-lent, 109. 
In-dom'i-ta-Me, 164. 
In-done' [Endorse, 

201. a03. — 5e« Note 

under Endorse.] 
In-dorsed' {-€U>r»r). 
In-dorse'ment [£ n - 

doriement, 203.] 
In-dors'er, 183. 
In-dors'in^. 
In'dzl, 101. 
In-da'bi-ta-ble, IM. 
In-daoe'. 

In-duoed' {-diut'), 
In-duoe'ment. 
In-duf'ing, 183. 
In-duct'. 
In-dact'od. 
In-duct'ing. 
In-duo'tion. 
In-dactl7e. 
In-duct'or. 
In-duct'rio, 109. 
In-dact'ric-al. 106. 
In-dne' [End a e, 203.1 
In-daedS 105, 183. 
In-da'in£^. 
In-diilff^. 22, 45. 
Ib-dalged' i-du^'), 

183. 
In-dnlg'enoe (-du^'-). 
In-dolg'ent (df<^'-)- 
In-dttli'er (-<f«i(/' }. 
In'dn-rate, 73. 
In'da-rit-ed. 
In'du-rat-ing. 
In-du-ra'tion. 
In-da'iii-ml (-zlU-al)lwi 

Sm. ; in-du'ihal, Wr. 

Gd. 155.J 
In-da'si-um (-zhi-utn) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; in-du'- 

aftl-um, Gd. 155.J 
In-duH'tri-nl. 
In-dus'tri-oAs, 109. 
In'duH-try (105) [not in- 

dtts'try, 153.] 
In-e'bri-ant. 
In-e'bri-ate, 73, 78. 
InVbri-at-ed, 183. 
In-e'bri-at-ing. 
In-e-bri-a'tion. 
In-o-bri'e-ty, 109. 
In-ef fii-ble, 104, 170. 
Ia-ef-faoe'»-ble, 183. 
In-ef-feot'lTe, m. 
In-ef-fect'u-al, 72, 89. 
In-effl-oa'cioas {-shus). 
In-eTfl-ca-cjr, 109. 



In-ef-fl'den-<}y {-Jhh'en- 

sjf), 171. 
In-ef-frcient {-/tsh'ent). 
In-el'e-ganoe, i09. 
In-el'e-gant. 
In-el-i-gi-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-el'i-gi-ble, 108, 101. 
In-ept'. 

In-ept'i-tnde, 108, 169. 
In-e-qual'i-ty {-ktooV'). 
In-eq'ui-ta-blc {;-tk'wi- 

ta4>l)y 104. 171. 
In-ert' 21, N. 
In-er'ti-a (-«M-a) [so 

8m. Wr.; iw-er'aAa, 

Wb. Gd.] 
In-es'ti-ma-ble, 104. 
In-ev'i-ta-ble, 104. 
In-6X-aot'. 
In-ex-<ni8'a-ble (-fcO«'-), 

104. 
In-ex-h&ast'l-ble, 104, 

109. 
In-6x'o-ra-ble, 104, 171. 
In-ex-pe'di-ent. 
In-ex-pe'ri-enoe, 48, N. 
In-ex-pe'ri-enoed 

i-emt). 
In-ex-pert', 21, N. 
In-«x'pi-a-ble. 104, 109. 
In-ex'pll-ca-ble, 104. 
In-ex-press'l-ble, 104. 
In-ex-paff'na-ble, 104. 
In-ex-tin'g^Bh-a-ble 

{■iing'gwish-abl), 104, 

171. 
In-ex'tri-c»-ble, 104, 

109. 
In-fai-ll-bil'I-ty, 108. 
In-fal'li-ble, 104, 170. 
In'tit-motls, 100, 109. 
In'fa-my, 93. 
In'fan-cy, 109. 
In'fant, 10, 72. 
In-fiin'ta (Sp.), n./em. 
In-fan'te (Sp.) (-M), n. 

nuu. 
In-fant'i-clde, 109. 
In'fant-ile, or In'fknt- 

Ile [bo Wr.; in'fant- 

«, Wk. Gd. ; inf/ani- 

II, Sm. 155.] 
In'fimt-ine, or In'fant- 

Ine [so Wr. ; in'fant- 

In, Wk. Gd. ; in'/ant- 

In, Sm. 155.] 
In'fimt-ry, 93, 105. 
In-fkt'a-atc, 73, 89. 
In-fat'u-at-ed, 183. 
In-fkt'u-at-ing. 
In-fat-u-a'tion. 
Infect', 15, 103. 
In-fect'cd. 



In-i!eot'1ng. 

In-fbction. 

In-feo'tiolU (-tkut), 

In-fec'and [bo Wk. Sm 
Wr.; inJ-e'kundyWb, 
Gd. 156.J 

In-fe-cund^l-ty. 

In-fe-U9'i-to&B, 171. 

In-fe-119'i-ty. 

In-fer', 21, N. 

In-fer'a-ble (104) [In- 
ferrible, 2U).] 

06^ Smart says of thia 
word: ** It U iMtterto apvil 
it infarriUe.'' 

In'fer-enee, 170. 

Infer-en'tial (shal). 

In-fe'ri-or, 49, N. 

lu-fe-ri-or'i-ty, 108. 

In-fer'nal, 21, N, 

In-ferred' (ferd^), 170. 

In-fer'ri-bie (104) [In- 
ferable. 203.— ^M 
Note onder Infera- 
ble.] 

In-ferrtnfif, 176. 

Infest', 15, 103. 

In-fest-A'tion. 

In-fest'ed. 

In-fest'er. 

In-fcBt'ing. 

In'fl-del, 70, 78. 

In-fl-del'1-ty, 108, 109. 

In-fll'trate, 73. 

In-fll'trat-ed, 183. 

In-fll'trat ing. 

In-fil-tra'tion. 

In'fl-nlte, 152. 

In-fin-i-tes'i-mal, 110. 

In-ftn'I-tlve, 84. 

In-fin'1-tude, 108. 

In-fin'i-ty, lOS, 109. 

In-firm', 21, N. 

In-flrm'arry, 72. 

In-firm'i-ty, 109. 

Infix', 10, 39, N. 

In-fixed' {-flksf)t 165: 
Note C, p. 34. 

In-fix'tDs*. 

In-flame', 23. 

In-flamed', 183. 

In-flam'er. 

In-flam'ing'. 

In-flam-ma-bll'i-ty. 

In-flam'ma-ble, 104, 170L 

In-flam-ma'tion, 112. 

lu-flam'ma-to-ry, 86. 

In-flate', 23. 

In-flat'ed, 183. 

In-flat'ing^. 

In-fla'tion. 

In-floct', 15. 



fidl; 6 at in there; Cbatin foot ; 9 as in fiudle ; g^h <m g in go ; th a« in thl» 



21* 



INPLICmD 
la-aeeCsd. 

Ia-fl«'tloii->l. 

'B-flrxKil' (ilnllC). 
B-lleji l-tul'l-tj, 108, 
- '1-t.lu, 16*. 



In'Uii^D; ln|{. 



246 



Inforj'cd. 
In-rorm'il. 



i tr- 1 



.n-ror'mil-lr: 



tn-fNo'tlaii. 
[Infrknchlie, 201, 
Wi. — See EdAu- 



In-ftine'cr (-rHnf'-). 
'n-Wn^'lTiit l-MnI--) 
In-flin-dlb'a-Iiir, lOe. 



IQ fti'rlDc. «, N. 
iD-tta'rJ'iit-fil. 183. 



in-nu'. 36, 13". 
Iaf\iicd' I/Hid'), II 
In-f UB i-blt'l Ij (-/• 



In-raa'lng (-/«*'-). 
tu-ni'llon C-iAim). 

lD-ru-K>'rl-a,n.)il. 

In-fti'Hi-rj, IW. 

ln[g»th*r-ing [ao Wk. 
Sm. Wr. jfit^iUA'Kr- 
intf, Wb. tSnl. iwTl 
n-Kvl'a-ble, U, IM, i 

In-lf^D'toBi (Jin'^M), I 
r In-KB'nl-ou* {-jf'- 
i-tu) T«o Wr. ; (n- 
In'yiu, (id. i in^Hf- 
J.WH. Sm. IM.] 
lu-een'lle (l&X) [la SDl. 
Wb. Gd. ; fn'Jrni-tt, 
Wk.i<>wm'",orii.'- 
jen-W, «>. IM.] 

la-geii'u4Di, SD, 100. 
Inulu'il-oaB, 4u, N. 

Illi(lll'Vl-i» C Jl). 

— Sm SoirorKti.l 

in'got, IS, sa. 

In-gHft'tt!, 131) [Ea- 
lo-gntt'ai. 

jn-Briln'ln|-. 

Wb. Gd. ; in-p'a''i 
Wtifa-ffrac orin' 
jirai, Wr. IM.) 
In'KniM. ". f-o Sm. 
Wb. Gd. i ia-grlV, 

Wr. isa.i 

[•o Wli, Sm. Wr. , 
ia-gra'tlM, Wb. Gd. 

Jn.(rrm'tl*t-al [-iM-a(-). 
In-CTH'ti.«t^lnf {-thl- 

la-RTat'l-tnde, loe, IW, 
In-gre'dl-eDt [bo Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Qd.; <b- 



INUIICAI. 
grt'Jml, Wk. IM 



[a-hib'lt«-ble, 1 



■bLbl'tloo (^itA'MH). 

-hlVltoiT, 86. 
-ho»'pi-l*-ble,l«, IM. 
,-hoB pi lil'l-tf. 



B, J, lHort ; 



ilnt'lfl-aT fso Wb, 
Ud. |ln.4Wiul, Sm. : 
tnSm'ii-al, Or <M-^ 
mi'tai, Wk. Wr. ISS.) 

;» ftr, ■ nt in Iklt, k oa ta 



INIMITABLE 



247 



INSNA&E 



In-lm'i-tarble, IM. 
In-lq'ui-to&s (ifufi-). 
iQ-iq'ttl-tj C-Wwi-), 171. 
In-I'tial i-Uk'ai). 
Iii-I'tl-«te (-iiVt-) (171) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr. j t»- 

tth'ate, Wb. Gd. 155.1 
In-I'ti-atred (wA'i). 
In-rti^it-iag {ish'i-). 
In-I-ti-a'tion (ish-i-). 
In-T'tl-a-tlve (ish't-). 
In-I'ti-a-to-iy (-i«*'i-). 
In-lect', 15. 
In- ect'ed. 
In; ect'ing. 
In-jee'tioii. 
[Injoin, 201, 203.— 

See £i^oin.] 
In-Jn-dl'ciobs i-dish'- 

us). 
In-|anc'tion. 
InOore, 91. 
Injured i-jurd), 183. 
In'jur-er. 
Iu'Jur-in|r. 
InJu'ri-otlB, 40, N. 
In'Ja-rjr, 8U, t». 
Injas'tloe (-fu), m, 

ie». 

Ink (ingk), 10, 54. 

Ink'horn (ingk'-), 206. 

Ink'ling (twaJf). 

Ink'stand Ctngk'-), 206. 

Ink'y iingk'y). 

In-Uoe', 23. 

In-Ucod' (-/a««0- 

In-lic'ing. 

InUid',187. 

In'land. 

In-laj', 23. 

In-Uy'er, 187. 

In-liy'ing. 

iQ'Iet. 

[In list, 201, 203.— 

See Enlist.] 
In'mate. 
In'most. 
Inn (16, 175), n. a house 

of entertainment for 

trmrellcrs ; a tavern. 

[See In, leo.l 
In-nate' (66, 170) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; fn'- 

nat, or tn-nUt'^ Grd. 

156.1 
In-nav'i-gra-ble, 164. 
In'ner, ifo. 
In-nerr-a'tion. 
In-nerre', 21, N. 
In-nerred' (-nerpdO» 

183. 
In-nerr'ing. 
Inn'hdld-er. 



Inn'tng*. 
Inn'ktep-er. 
In'no-oenoe, 170. 
In'no-cent. 
In-noo'u-ofts. 
In'no-vate, 106, 170. 
In'no-vat-ed, 183. 
In'no-vat-ing. 
In-no-va'tion. 
In'no-vat-or, 88. 
In-nox'ioQs (-nok'- 

»hus)^ 46, Note 1. 
In-nu-en'do (170, 171) 

[pi. In-na-en'does 

(■</««), 192.1 
In-nu'mer-a-ole, 164. 
In-oc'a-late, 73, 89. 
In-oc'u-lat-ed, 183. 
In-oc'u-lat-ing. 
In-oc-u-la'tion, 112. 
In-oc'u-lat-or. 
In-o'dor-otiB. 
In-or'di-nate, 73, 78. 
In-os'cu-late. 
In-os'cn-lat-ed, 183. 
In-os'ca-lat-lng. 
In-os-cu-la'tion. 
In'quest, 34. 
In-qui'e-tude, 160. 
In-quir'a-blc, 164, 183. 
In-quire' [Enquire, 

201, 203.1 
In-quiredS 165, 183. 
In-quir'er. 
In-quir'ing. 
In-qul-sl'^on (-zish'- 

un), 171,231, Exc. 
In-quis'i-tlve {-kwiz'-). 
In-quisM-tor (kwiz'-). 
In-quis-i-to'ri-al 

(kwiz), 
InVoad. 

In-Bon'a-ble, 164. 
In-sanc', 23. 
In-san'i-ty, 108, H». 
In-sa-ti-a-Wl'i-ty (sa 

8M-), 169. 171. 
In-sa'ti-a-ble (-aa'sM) 

(IM) [so Wk. Sm. 

Wr. ; inna'aliablj 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
In-sa'ti-a-blv {-sa'sM). 
In-sa'ti-ate (-»o'<A1-) [so 

Wk.Sra.Wr. ; inm'- 

«A«, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
In-sat'u-ra-ble, 164. 
In-scrib'a-ble, 164, 160. 
In-scribc', 25. 
In-scribed', 183. 
In-scrib'er. 
In-BcribMng. 
In-scrip'tion. 
In-Bcrip'tlve, 84. 



In-scr6ll' [I n s c r u 1 

Sm. 179, 203.] 
In-scrolled' (-tkrOld'), 

1G5. 



In-scrollMn 
i-sci 
164. 



In-scru' 



UMng. 
table 



(-ikroo'-), 



In'sect, 16, 76. 
In-sectlle, 162. 
In-HCct-iv'o-roOs, 108. 
In-BC-curo'. 
In-se-cu'ri-ty, 49, N, 
lu-ficn'sato, 73. 
In Bcn-si-bllM ty, 108. 
In-Bcn'si-ble, 101. 
In-sen'tient (-«cn'- 

8hent)y 46, 171. 
In-sep a-ra-bil'i-ty, 109. 
In-sep'a-ra-ble, 161. 
Insert', 21, N. 
In-sert'ed. 
In-sert'ing. 
In-ser'tiou. 
In-ses-so'res (-r**,) n. 

pi. 
In-scs-so'ri-al, 49, N. 
In-sbore'. 
[Inshrine, 201, 203. 

— See Enchrine.] 
In-sic-ca'tlon. 
In'sidc. 
In-Mid'i-oQs [so Sm. 

Wr. ^Vb. Gd.j in- 

sid'i-us, or in-iid'Ji- 

us, Wk. 155.] 
In'sight (-*«)» 162. 
In-sig'ni-a (L.), n.pl. 
In-sig-niri-cauce, 169. 
In-Pig-niri-can-cy. 
In-Big-niPi-eaiit. 
In-sig-nifi-ca-tlTe. 
In-sin-cerc'. 
lu-sln-cCT'i-ty. 
In-sin'u-ate, 73. 
lu-sin'u-at-ed. 
In-Kin'u-nt-lng. 
lu-sin-u-a'tion. 
lu-sin'u-a-tfve, 84. 
Insin'u-at-or [so Wk. 

Wr. (5d.; in-Hn'u-a- 

tor, Sm. 155.1 
In sip'id. 170. 
In-si-pidH-ty, 108. 
Insist', 16. 
In-sist'ed. 
In-sist'ing. 
Ip-sl'tion {-Hsh'un) [so 

Wk. Sm. Wb. Gd. ; 

inrizh'un, or in-$Uh'- 

un, Wr. 155.] 
In ei'tu (L.). 
In snare' {antr') (14) 

[En snare, 201.20:).] 



fldl; eat In there; ObMin foot; i^ at in tadXe , gh at gin go ,]\i as in this. 



IN8NARED 



248 



INTENSIPy 



In-antred'C -tnirti')) 183. i 
In-mar'er (snir*-). , 

In-8iiiir'iiig(-»»^'-)« I 
In'so-Ute, r. to dry by i 
the heat of the sun ; | 
to expofike to tho niyB i 
of the sun. [.See Uk- 
■nlate, 148.] 

n'so-lat-ed. 

n'so-lat-ing'. 

n-BO-U'tion. 

n'so-lencc. 

n'so-len-oy, 100. 

n^BO-lent. 

n-8ol-u bll'l-ty, 108. 

n-Bol'u-blc, \M. 

n-8olv'a-ble, IM. 

n-Bolv'on-cy. 

n-Bolv'ent. 

n-Bom'nl-oQB. 

n-Bpeot', 15, 103. 

n-Bp<»ct'ed. 

u-Bpcct'ing'. 

n-Bpcc'tion. 

n-Bpect'Wc, 84. 

n-Bpect'or, 88, 109. 

n-Bpir'a-blc, 104. 

n-8pi-ra'tion. 

n'spl-ra-to-ry, or In- 
BDir'a-to-ry (80) [bo 
Wr. i insplr'a-to-rUf 
or in'«pi-ra-to-ry, Gd. 
165.] 
In-Bpfre', 26. 
In-spired', 183. 
In-spir'er. 
In-BpirMng. 
Insplr'it. 
In-spIrMt-ed. 
ln-Bi)Ir'it-lng. 
In-Bpis'sate, 170. 
In-spls'Bat-ed, 183. 
In-Bpis'Biit-ing. 
In-spiH-Ha'tion. 
In-Bta-bil'i-ty, 108. 
In-8t:i'ble, m. 
In-Btair (17) [I natal, 

203.1 
In-8tall-a'tion, 171. 
In-BtAUcd' i-8t(twld'). 
Tn-8tall'ing. 
In-BtAI'ment (178) [I n - 
Btallment, Wb. 
Gd. 20.3.] 
In'stance. 

In'stanccd (-$tanst). 
In'8tane-ing. 
In'stant. 

In-Btant-a'ne-ofiB, 109. 
In gta'tu qfw (L.) [not 
in Btat'yoo kwo, 153.1 
Instead' (jjfcrf') [not 

in-8tid', 163.] 



In'step. 

In'sti-gate, 73, 78. 
In'Bti-gat-ed, 183. 
In'sti-gat-ing. 
In-Bti-ga'tion, 112. 
In'sti-gat-or, 88. 
In-BtiF(17», IHU) [In- 
still, Wb.Gd. 203.] 
In-stil-la'Uon. 
Instilled' {-atild'), 106. 
In stil'ler, 170. 
In-BtiFllng. 

In-Btil'ment[I n 8 tin- 
men t, Wb. Gd.203.] 
In'atinct (-stingkt) f54, 
101), n. natural im- 
pulse as distiugulBhcd 
from reason or delib- 
eration. 
Instinct' (^-BHngkt'){», 
101), a. moved; ani- 
mated. 

n-stinct'!ve(-»«n^H'-). 
n'Bti-tute, 20, 127. 
n'8ti-tut-ed, 183. 
n'sti-tut-ing. 
n-Bti-tu'tion. 
n-Bti tu'tion-al. 
n-atl-tu'tion-a-ry, 72. 
n'Bti tut^ist, 183. 
n'sti-tut-or, 88. 
n-Btruct', 22. 
n-stnict'ed. 
Instructer, 203.— 
See Instructor.] 
n-Btruct'ing. 
n-stnic'tion. 
n-Btruct1ve, 84. 
n-Btruct'or [I n - 
Btructer,203.] 
n-8truct're88. 
n'Btru-ment (-stroo-). 
n-Btru-ment'al Tnsf roo-) ; 
n-stni-ment-al'l-ty 
(^-stroo-), 108, 109. 
n-Btni-ment-a'tion 
(stroo-). I 

n-Bub-or'di-nate. 
n-Bub-or-di-na'tion. 
u-BuPfer-a-ble, 104. 
n-Buf-fl'den-cy (-fish'- 
en-). 

n-Buf-fT'ciont ( -/f«A'ei»«) 
n'su-lar (72) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; tV- 
nhu4ar, Wk. 155.] 
n-BU-iar'i-ty, 108. 
n'Bu-late uVi^ v. to de- 
tach ; to iBoInte. [5ee 
Insolate, 148.1 
n'8U-lat«d, 183. 
n'BU-lat-lng-. 
n-Hu-la'tion. 



In'sn-lat-or, 88 
In'sult, n. 103, 161. 
In-sult', r. 103, 101. 
In-sult'ed. 
In-sult'cr. 
In-sult'ing. 

In-su-per-a-bil'i-ty, 106. 
In-su'per-a-bie, 164. 
In-Bup-p6rt'a-ble, 104. 
In-Bur'a-ble (-i^oor*-), 

104. 
In-sur'anoe i-tihoor*') 
(4<i, lK-{) [Ensnr- 
ance, 201, 203.1 
In-sure' i^-shoor'} (19, 

40) [Ensure, 201, 
2a3. — 5ee Note under 
Ensure. "[ 

n-sured' {-»hoord'y 

n-sur'er (-^fcoor*-). 

n-sur'ing {~ahoor*-y 

n-Bur'geut. 

n-Bur-mount'a-ble, 164. 

n-Bur-rec'tion, 170. 

n-sur-rco' tion-al . 

n-Bur-rec'tion-a-ry, 72. 

n-sur-rco' tion-ist. 

n-tact'. 

n tagl'io (It.) i-ttU'yo). 

n-tan-gi-bll'i-ty, 106. 

n-tan'gi-blc, 104. 

n'tc-ger. 45, 106. 

n'tc-gral, 72. 

u'te-grant. 

n'te-grate, 73, M». 

n'te-grfit-ed. 

n'te-grat-Ing. 

n-te-gra'tion. 

n-teg'ri-ty, 108, 160. 

n-teg'u-mcnt, 89." 

n-tcg-u-ment'a-ry, 72. 

n'tol lect, 66, 170. 

Q-tel-lec'tion. 

n-tel-lectlve, 84. 

ii-tel-lect'u-al, 72, 170. 

n-toMcct'u-al-ist. 

n-tcl'li-gcnoe, 170. 

n-tel'11-genc-er, 183. 

n-tel'li-gent, 160, 170. 

n-tol-li-gen'tlal (-shtU). 

n tel'U-gi-ble, 108, 164, 
171. 

n-tera'pcr-anoe, 109. 

utcm'pcr-ate, 73. 

n-tend', 16. 

n-tend'an-cy, 160. 

n-tcnd'ant. 

n-tcnd'ed. 

n-tcnd'ing. 

n-tend'ment. 

n-tensc', 15. 

n-tcn'si-f icd, 186. 

n-ten'si-fy, 04. 



a, e, i, 6, ii, y, long ;&,$,!, 0, tt, f, i?iort ; ti <uin fiur, kasin tut, k at in 



INTENSIFYING 



249 



INTERRUPT 



In-ten'slon, n. act of 

maklDS intense. [See 

Int4nitfon, 160.] 
In-ten'faty, KM, leo. 
In-teo'slve, 84. 
In-tent'. a. & n. 15. 
Kn-ten'tlon, n. design; 

parpose. [See Inten- 
sion. 160.] 
Xaa-ten'tion-iil. 
K-n-ten'tloncd (shund). 
lja-«cr', 21, N. 
Xn-ter'ca-lar. 

i-ter'ca-Ia-ry (72) [so 

gm. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

in-ter-kaVa-ry, Wk. 

155.1 

n-ter^ca-late,21, N.; ra. 
In-ter'ca-lat-ed, 183. 
: Q-ter'ca-lat-ing:. 
In-ter-ca-la'tion. 
'Kn-ter-cede', 160. 
Yn-ter-ocd'ed, 183. 
Yn-ter-eed'ent 
^n-ter-ct^'er. 
~Xn-ter-ced'iQg. 
'■n-ter-cept'. 
'Xn-ter-oept'ed. 
^n-ter-cept'er. 
In-ter-oept'ing. 
Tn-ter-49ep'tion. 
^n-ter-oes'aion (-«ecA'- 

«n), 46, 171. 
In ter-«e8'Bion-ai(-«esA'- 

ttii-). 
3n-ter-oefl'8or, 88. 
^n-ter-oea'so-ry, 86. 
In'ter-change, n. 161. 

In-ter-chang'e', v. 161. 

In-ter-chaojfe-arbil'l-f^. 

In-ter-chan^e'a-ble, 1(H. 

Tn-ter-change'a-bly. 

In-ter-changcd', 183. 

In-tcr-eip'i-ent. 

In-ter-clude'. 

In-ter-clud'ed. 

In-ter-eludMng^. 

In-ter-clu'aion {-zhun). 

lo-ter-eo-lum-Di-a'tion. 

In-ter-oos'tal, 72. 

In'ter-conrae {-kOr»). 

In'ter-dlct, n. 161. 

Tn-ter-dlct', v. 161. 

Tn-ter-dict'ed. 

In-ter-dict'ing. 

In-ter-dic'tlon. 

In-ter-dlctTve, 84. 

In-ter-dict'o-iy, 86. 

In'ter-eat, n. s v. 

In'ter-eat-^d. 

iB'ter-esMng [not in- 
ter-eit'ing, 12», 193.] 



In-ter-fii'dal {-thai), 

n-ter-fere', 171. 

n-ter-fered', 183. 

n-ter-ier'enoe. 

n-ter-fer'er. 

n-tcr-fer'lng. 

n'ter-im. 

n-te'ri-or, 49, N. 

a-ter-Ject'. 

n-ter-Ject'ed. 

n-ter-JectMng. 

n-ter-^cc'tlon. 

n -ter-jcc'tion-al. 

n-ter-lace'. 

n-tcr-laced' {-lAsV). 

n-ter-la9'lng, 183. 

n-ter-lard'. 

u-ter-lard'ed. 

n-ter-lard'iag. 

n'ter-leaf [pi. In'ter- 
leavea (-tec^), 183.] 

n-tcr-leavc'. 

n-tcr-leaved', 183. 

n-tcr-leav'ing. 

n-ter-line'. 

n-ter-lin'e-al. 

n-ter-Un'e-ar, 72, 168. 

u-tcr-lin-o-a'tJon. 

n-tcr-lincd', 183. 

n-ter-lin'iii}'. 

n-ter-loc'u-tor [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. : in-ter-hk'- 
u-turt or in-ter-lo-ku'- 
ft»r, Wr. J in-ter-lo- 
ku'tury or in-ter-loV- 
u-tur, Wk. 165.] 
In-ter-loc'u-to-ry, 86. 
In-ter-lope'. 
Interloped' (-lOpt'). 
In-ter-lop'er, 183. 
In-ter-lop'ing. 
In'ter-lude. 
In-ter-lud'ed. 
In-tcr-lu'nar. 
In-ter-lu'na-ry, 72. 
In-ter-miir'riage (-rv)» 

171. 
In-ter-mttr'ried. 
In-ter-mftr'ry. 
In-ter-m&r'rv-ing. 
In-ter-med'me, 164. 
In-ter-med'dled (-med'- 

W). 
In-ter-med'dler. 
In-ter-med'dliiig'. 
In-ter-me'dl-al [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; inter- 
me'di-aly or in-ter-me'- 

ji-al, Wk. 155.] 
In-ter-me'di-a-ry, 72. 
In-ter-me'di-ate, 73. 
In-ter'mi-na-ble, 21, N. ; 
164, 169. 



In-ter-min'gle (-ming'- 

gl), 164. 
In-ter-min'crled (-tning'- 

gld), 183. 
In-ter-min'gllng 

{-ming'-). 
In-ter-mia'aion (j-tnith'- 

un). 
In-tcr-mis'slve, 84. 
In-ter-mit'. 
In-ter-mit'ted, 176. 
In-ter-mit'tcnt. 
In-ter-mit'ting. 
In-ter-mix'. 

Inter-mixed' {^nik$V). 
In-ter-mlx'ing. 
In-tcr-mixt'ure, 91. 
In-tcr'nal, 21, N. 
In-ter'nal-ly, 170. 
In-tcr-nd'tiou-al 

t^cah'un-al) [so Sm. 

Wr. ; in-ter-na'shun- 

al, Wb. Gd. 155.] 
In-ter-ne'clne, 152. 
In-ter-pcl-la'tion. 
In-ter-plead' [Enter- 
plead, 201,203.] 
In-tcr-plead'ed. 
In-ter-plead'er. 
In-ter-plcad'ing. 
In-ter'po-late (21, N. ; 

105) [BoWk.Sm.Wr.; 

in'ter-po-ldt^ or in- 

ter'po-lat, Gd. 156.] 
In-ter'po-lat-ed. 
In-ter'po-liit-ing. 
In-ter-po-la'tion. 
In-ter'po-lttt-or. 
In-ter-pose' (pUz'). 
In-ter-posed' {-pOzd'). 
In-ter-pos'er (-pOa'-), 

183. 
In-ter-pos'lng (p6z'-). 
In-ter-po-sl'non {-zish'- 

un). 
In-tcr'pret, 21, N. 
In-ter'pret-a-ble, 164. 
In-tcr-pre-ta'tion. 
In-tcr'pre-tat-Ive [bo 

Wk. Sm. Wr.; in-ter'- 

pre-ta-tivt Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
In-ter-ra'dl-al, 224. 
Interred' i-terd'), 21, N. 
In-ter-reg'num (L.). 
In-ter'ring, 176. 
In-t^r'ro-gate, 73, 170. 
In-ti?r'ro gat-cd. 
In-ti^r-ro-ffa'tion. 
In-ter-rog'a-tlve. 
In-W^r'ro-ffat-or. 
In-ter-rog'a-to-ry, 86. 
In-ter-nipt'. 



iall; da«ii»there; Cb a$ in foot ', ^ a$ in fuile ; gh eu g in go i ^a$ in XMb. 



*4 

A * 



INTERRUPTED 



250 



INVEIOHER 



In-ter>nipfed. 

In-ter-rupt'er. 

In-ter-rupt'ing. 

iD-ter-rup'tioiLi 

In-ter-sect'. 

In-ter-Bcct'od. 

In-ter-sect'ing. 

In-ter-sec'tion. 

In-ter-Bperse', 21, N. 

In-ter-Bper»ed'(-i5>er«<') 

In-ter-gpersMng-. 

In-ter-sper'sion. 

iD-ter-stcl'Iar, 170. 

In-ter-Btcl'la-ry, 72. 

In'tcr-itlce, or In-tcr'- 
Btlce (stis) (lfi9) [80 
Wk Wr. Gd. , t»-/er'- 
sHs, Sm. 155.] 

Inter sti'tlal (-ttiah'al). 

In-ter-text'urc, 91. 

In-tcr-trop'ic-al, 108. 

In-ter-twlne'. 

Inter-twined', 183. 

In-ter-twin'iug. 

In-ter-twist'. 

In-ter-twist'ed. 

I n-ter-t wiat'ing. 

In'ter-val, 72. 

In-ter-vcno'. 

In-tcr-vened', 183. 

In-ter-Tcn'er. 

In-ter-ven'ing. 

In-tcr-ven'tion. 

In'ter-view (-rfl). 

In-ter-weave'. 

In-ter-weaved', 183. 

In-ter-weav'ing. 

In-tcr-wovc'. 

In-tcr-w6v'en (-irflr'n). 

In-test'a-blc, HH. 

In-test'a-cv, 160. 

In-teat'atc', 73. 

In-tes'tin-al. 

In-tea'tlne, 162. 

In-thrall' (179) (En- 
thral, Sm. — En- 
thral 1,201, 203.] 

In-thraUwI' (thrawld'). 

In-thrail'in}?. 

In-thrAl'raent ( 178)ri n - 
thrallment, wb. 
Gd. 203.] 

In'ti-ma-cy, 109. 

In'ti-matc, a. & r. 73. 

In'ti-mat-ed, 183. 

In'ti-mat-ing. 

In-ti-ma'tlon. 

In-tim'i-datc, 109. 

In-tim'i-dat ed. 

In-ttm'i-dat-ing. 

In-tim-i'da'tion. 

[In tire, 201, 203.— 
See Entire.] 



[Intitle, 201, 203.— 

See EntitleO 
In'to (-too), le, 19. 
In-toPer-a-ble, 164. 
In-tol'er-anoe, 109. 
In-tol'er-«nt. 
In'to-nate. 
In'to-nat-ed. 
In'to-nat-ing. 
In-to-na'tion. 
In-tox'i-cate, 100. 
In-tox'i-oat-ed, 183. 
In-tox'i-cat-ing. 
In-tox-i-ca'tion. 
In-trao-ta-bil'i-iy. 
In-trac'ta-ble, 164, 169. 
In-tra'dOB. 
[I n t r a n c e ', 203.— iSee 

Entrance'.] 
In-tran'si-tlve, Bi. 
In-trench', 15, 44. 
In-trenebad' (trencJU'), 

165 ; Note C, p 34. 
In-trench'lng. 
In-trcnch'ment. 
In-trep'id, 170. 
In-tre-pld^-ty. 
In'tri-ca-cy, 169. 
In'tri-cate, 73, 78. 
Intrigue' {-tr9ff'), 168. 
In-trigued' {-trigd') 
In-trigu'er {-trig'-). 
In-trigu'lng (-<rV-) 
In-trin'sic, 109. 
In-trin'sic-al, 106. 
In-tro-cee'sion (-»€«*'- 

tin).. 
In-tro-duoe'. 
In-tTO-duced' {-dAtt*). 
In-tro-du9'er. 
In-tro-du9'ing. 
In-tro-duc'tion. 
In-tro-<luc'ttve, 84. 
In-tro-duc'to-iy, 86. 
In-tro'it [BO Sm. Wr.; 

tn-*ro«*SWb.Gd. 155.1 
In-tro-mis'sion {-miw- 

un). 
In-tro-mit'. 
In-tro-mit'ted, 176. 
In-tro-mit'ting. 
In-trorse'. 
In-tro-spec'tion. 
In-tro-Bpec'tlve. 
In-tro-8UB-cep'tlon. 
In-tro-ver'sion. 
In-tro-vert', 21, N. 
In-tro-vcrt'ed. 
In-tro-vert'ing. 
In-trude' {-trood'). 
In-tnid'ed {-trood'-). 
In-trud'er {-trood'-). 
In-tmd'ing {-irood'-). 



In-tru'Bion (-^roo'dkvn). 

In-tm'fllve {•4roo'-). 

In-trust', 22. 

In-tru8t'od. 

In-truBt'ing. 

In-tu-I'tion (-ish'un). 

In-tu'1-tlvc, 84, 109. 

In-tu-mcBce' (-in««'),I71. 

In-tu-mesced' {-mest'). 

In-tn-me8'cing, 183. 

In-tu-mes'cence, 171. 

In-tnB-BUB-cep'tion. 

In-twine' [Entwine, 
201,203.] 

In-twincdS 183. 

In-twin'ing. 

In-nm'bratc. 

In-um'brat-cd, 18S. 

In-um'brat-ing. 

In-un'date. 

In-un'dat-ed. 

In-un'dat-ing. 

In-nn-da'tion. 

In-ure', 26. 

In-ured', 165, 183. 

In-ur'ing. 

In-ure'ment. 

In-um', 21. 

In-um«i' (-«nwl'). 

In-um'ing. 

In.u-tll'i-tj, 108, 169. 

In-vadc' f23), v. to en- 
ter with a hoBtile 
annj. [.Se« Inveighed, 
160.1 

In-vad'ed, 183. 

In-vad'er. 

In-Tad'ing. 

In*Tag-i-na'tion (-«»/-)• 

Ia-Tarid(161), a. of no 
Toroe ; weak. 

In'va-lid, or In-ra-lid' 
(-Z«d) (in'va-lid, Wb. 
Gd.; %n-tm-ltd', Wk. 
Sm. Wr. 155] (161), 
n. one who is weak, 
or infirm. 

In-val'i-date, 73, 169. 

In-yal'i-dat-ed, 183. 

In-val'i-dat-ing. 

In-Tal-i-da'tion. 

In-va-lid'i-ty, 108. 

In-val'u-a-bie, 164. 

In-va-ri-a-biri-ty. 

In-va'ri-a-ble,4n,N.;l<H 

In-va'sion (-sAvn). 

In-ra'slve, 84. 

In-vec'tlve. 

In-veigh' (-w'), Iffi. 

In-Yeigbed' (-r«d'), v. 
did Inveigh, or rail. 
[See Invade, 160.] 

In-veigh'er (-va'-). 



a, 6, i, o, tt) ft long i &, e, I, d, tt, f , short i lias in flu-, ka$in tut, i^iuin 



INViaOHINO 



251 



IBREF&AGABLB 



In-reigfa'ing^ {-va'-), 
In-rei^gle C-twVO» IW, 

leo. 

In-Tgi'gled {-vtfgld). 

In-vel'gler. 

In-Tei'fi[liiiff. 

In-venv, 15. 

In-vent'ed. 

[InTeiiter,208.~5M 

Inventor.] 
iB'TentMng. 
In-ven'tion. 
la-ventlve, M. 
In-vent'or (88) [In- 

▼ enter, 203.1 
In'ren-to-iy (86) [not 

In-Ten'to-iy.l 
In-rerse', 21, X. 
In-yer'sion. 
la-yert', 21, N. 
In-Ter'te-brate, 7!& 
In-Ttt'te-brit-ed. 
In-yert'ed. 
In-rert'ing. 
In-rest', 15. 
In-vest'ed. 
In-Te«'ti-ga-ble, 16i. 
In-veB'ti-i^atc, 169. 
In-Tes'ti-giLt-ed, 183. 
tn-Tes'ti-gpat ing'. 
In-ves-ti-ga'tion. 
In-ves'ti-gat-or. 
In-yest'ing'. 
In-Te«t'i-ture. 
In-yest'ment. 
In-vet'er-a-cy, 109. 
In-Tct'er-ate, 73. 
In-vid'i-o&B hm [bo 

Sm. Wr. Wb. 0^.^ 

Hk-frid'i-uSt or in-vid'- 

Ji-utj Wk. 165.J 
In-Tlg'o-rate. 
In-vlg'o-rat-ed. 
In-Tlg'o-rat-lng. 
In-yig-o-ra'tion. 
In-Tln-ci-bll'i-tr, 108. 
In-rin'cf-ble, m. 
In-vl-o-la-bll'l-ty. 
In-yi'o la-ble, IM. 
In-vl'o-late, 73. 
In-yla-i-bii'l-ty (-r««-). 

109. 
iDTi'e'i-ble (-rfa'0» 164. 
In-vi-ta'tion. 
In-vit'a-to-ry, 86. 
Invite', 25. 
In-vit'ed, 183. 
In-vit'er. 
In-vit'ing. 
In-vit'ri-fi-»-ble (164) 

[80 Wr. Wb. Qd. ;in- 

vit-ri/l'a^l, Sm.l55.] 
In-vo-ca'tion. 



In'voioe. 

In'voiced (-voitt). 
In'voi^-ing. 
In-voke'. 34. 
In-voked' {-vOkt'), 
In-vok'ing, 18:{. 
In-vol'u-cel [bo Wb. 
Gd-j tVoo-l«-«€^,Wr. 
155.1 
In-vo-iu'ocl-late. 
In-vo-lu'cral. 
In-vo-lu'crate. 
In-vo-lu'cre (-fair) (164) 
[bo Wb. (xd.j in'vo- 
lu-kur, Wr. 166.] 

n-vo-lu'cred {-kurd), 

n-vo-lu'cret. [171. 

n-vo-lu'cnim. 

n-vol'un-ta-ry, 72. 

n'vo-lute. 

n-vo-lut-ed. 

n-vo-lu'tlon. 

n-volvc', 18. 

n-volved' (^volvd'), 165. 

n-volv'ing, 18:j. 

n-vul-ner-«-bil'i-ty. 

n-vul'ner-a-ble, 164. 

n'ward, tid. & n. 

n'vrardB {-wardz), ad. 
A n. pi. 

n-wrap' (-rap') (162) 



[Enwrap, 2a3.J 
i-wrapped'(-rap<0» 



176 



n-wrap'ping. 
'o-date. 
-od'ie, 109. 

'o-dide[Iodid,203.] 
'o-dlne, 152. 
'o-dize, 202. 
'o-dized, 183. 
'o-diz-ing. 
'o-dottB. 

od'u-ret, 79, 89. 
b-lite, 152. 

on. 

-o'nf-an, 169. 
-on'io, 79, 109. 
-o'ta, 72. 
p-e-CMMVu-an'ha (116, 

171)[Bo8m.Wr.Wb. 

Gd. j ip-e-kak^u-a'fMi 

Wk. 155.] 

n3r Thii word U often 
abridged, in common dit- 
courae, to ip'e-eae. 

f-raB-d-biri-ty, 108, 169. 
I-ras'd-ble, 164, 171. 
Ire Clr), 25, 163. 
Ire'ftil (-/*©/). 
I'ren-aroh {;<Lrk). 
I-ren'io-al. 
I'ri-«n, 160. 



I'ri-dal, 72, 78. 

Ir-i-deB'ccnce, 59, 171. 

Ir-i-dcs't'ent [so Wr. 
Wb.Gd. ; l-ri-de8'8erU» 
8m. 155.] 

I-rid'i-um, 169. 

rrl8(49, N.)[L. pi. /r*- 
i<Us (Miez) ; Eng. pi. 
I'rlB-e8 (HW), 1987) 

I'rl-8at-ed. 

I'ri-Bcope. 

I'rised {-ri8t). 

I'rlah, 49, N. 

T'rish-iBm {-izm), 

Ir'ish-ry. 

Irk'somc (sum), 21, N. 

I'ron (i'urn), 171. 

I'roned (i'umd). 

I'ron-er (i'um-). 

I-ron'io, 109. 

I-ron'io-al, 108. 

I'ron-ing (i'um-). 

I'ron-mon'gfcr ({'urn- 
mung'gur), 206, Exc. 
3. 

I'ron-mon-gery (f'»ni- 
mung-gur^), 171. 

I'ron-y (t'um-fO (161), 
a. macle of iron}— 
reBembling iron. 

I'ron-y (i'run-y) (161), 
n. a BjHicies of ridi- 
cule in which what in 
Baid is contrary to 
what is meant. 

Ir-ra'di-anoe. 

Ir-ra'di-an-cy. 

Ir-ra'dl-ant. 

Ir-ra'di-ate, 169. 

Ir-ra'di-at-ed, 183. 

Tr-ra'di-at-lng. 

Ir-ra-di-a'tion. 

Ir-ra'tion-al (-ranh'un- 
al) [so Sm. Wr. ; 1r- 
rash'o-naJt Wk. ; Ir- 
ra'8hun-<Uy or Ir- 
rofsh'un-al, Gd. 155.1 

Ir-rft-tion-al'l-ty ('rcwi- 
un-). 108. 109, 171. 

Ir-re-ciaim'a-ble, 164. 

Ir-rec-on-cll'a-ble, 164. 

Ir-rec'on-ciled. 

Xr-re-oov'er-a-ble (-kuv'- 
ttr-a-6/), 104, 169. 

Ir-re-deom^a-ble, 164. 

Ir-re-du^M-blc, 164, 169. 

Ir-ref-ra-ga-bil'i-ty. 

Ir-ref ra-ga-ble (164) [bo 
Sm. Wr. , %r-refra~ 
ga-blj or Vr-re-frag'a- 
W, Wk., 1r-re->Vo'- 
gorbU OT Xr-r&'rar 
gorhU Gd. 155.] 



<U1; 6a<<i» there; db a« <» foot j 9 a« in faoUe ; gh m g in go ; tJicMinthia. 



IBREFUTABLE 



252 



ITCHY 



i9" Walker remarki of 
the flrit pronunciation 
which he frivea {ir-re/'tx^ 
ffa-ftf): "If 1 am not much 
mittaken, it haa not only 
the beat utafre on ita aide, 
but the clearaat analogy to 
■upport It." 

Ir-re-fut'a-ble,orIr-ref- 
a-ta blc (IM) [so Wr.; 
%r-re-fni'a-hl, Wk. 
8m. j tr-refu'ta-bly or 
Ir-re-JWa^ly Gd.l55.] 



„ Though Walker, 
in deference to all the au- 
thor! tiea that preceded 
him, adopts the uronunci- 
ation ir-re-/ut*<t-bl, he «ayi 
that analoK/ is in flavor oi 
ir-r^u-tu-bl. 

Ir-reg'u-lRT, 72, 89. 
Ir-n'L'-u lllr'l-ty, 108. 
Ir-rer'a-tlvo, W. 
Ir-rel'e-vant. 
Ir-re-lig'ion (lij'un). 

Ir-rc-lig'lolis(-/(/'t«). 
Ir-rc'me-a-bic, HH. 
Ir-re-me'dl-a-blc, IM. 
Ir-re-mlB'Bl-ble, 104. 
Xr-re-mlB'8Tve. 
Ir-re-mov'a-ble (moov'- 

a-bl), IW. 
Ir-re-mu'nor-a-ble, 164. 
Ir-rep-a-ra-hiri-ty, 109. 
Ir-rep'a-ra-ble (UH, 109) 

[not Ir-re-pSr'a-bl, 

Ir-rop^a-ra-bly. 
Ir-re-peal-a-bll'I-ty. 
Ir-re peal'a-ble, 1(H, 109. 
Ir-rc-plcv'i-a-ble, 104. 
Ir-rc-plo.v'i-8a-ble, IM. 
Tr-rep-re-h'^n'sl-blo, 164. 
Ir-r<*-pn«BH'i bio, 104,169. 
Tr-re-pr6ach'a-ble, 164. 
I r-re-pro V 'a-bleC-jw-oop'- 

a-bl), 164. 
fr-re Bist-i-bil'i-ty 

(-zist-)y 108, 169. 
Ir-re-BiBt'i-ble {-zUt'-), 

164. 
tr-res'o-lu-ble (-rez'-), 

164. 
Ir-rcs'o-luto (-rez'-). 
lr-re»-o-lu'tion (-rear-). 
Ir-re-Bolv-a-bil'i-ty 

(-«o/t'-), lOH, 160. 
Ir-re-Bolv'a-ble (-»©/»'-), 

164. 
Ir-re-spectTve, 84. 
Tr-res'pi-ra-blc, 164. 
I r-rc-»pon-sl-bil'i-ty. 
Ir-re-fipon'Bl-blo, 164. 
Ir-re-triev'a-ble, 164. 



Trrer'er-enee, 160. 
Ir-pev'er-ent. 
Ir-re-vers'l-ble, 164. 
Ir-rev-o-<»-bll'l-ty. 
Ir-rev'o-««-ble. 
Ir'ri-gate, 78, 109. 
Ir'rl-gat-od. 
Tr'ri-gat-lng. 
Tr-ri-^a'tion. 
Tr-rifipu-ofiB, 106. 
Ir-rifl'l-ble (-rte'-), 164. 
1r-rI'Bion (-rizh'tm), 
Ir-ri-ta-bU'i-ty. 
Tr'ri-ta-ble, 164, 160. 
Ir'rltant, 
Tr'ri-tate, 78, 169. 
Ir'ri-tat'ed, 183. 
Ir'ri-tat-ing. 
tr-rl -taction. 
Ir'ii-UMve [00 Sm. 

Wr. i Ir'H-to-rtr, Wb. 

6d. 165.] 
Ir'ri-t»-to-ry (72) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; IKri- 

tnt-o-ry, Sm. 166.] 
Ir-ro-ra'tlon. 
Ir-nipt'ed. 
Ir-rup'tion. 
tr-nip't!ve, 84. 
Is (15), 174. 

T-Ba-gog'ic iaqf'-\ 109. 
T Ba-gog'ic-al (^<y'-),108. 
I'Ba-gon. 

l8-chi-ad'ic (-Jt1-),62,109. 
iB-chi-ag-'ra i-tt-). 
iB-chu-ret'ic (-Att-). 
Is chu'ri-a f-if*'-). 
iB'clm-ry (-««-). 
I'Bin glaBB (zing- (171) 

ri B 1 n g g 1 a B s , Sm. 

iB'lam («'-), 171. 
Is'lam-ism {iz'lam-izm). 
iB-lam-It'ic (i;;-), 109. 
TB'laiid(t'tom/), 102,171. 
iB'land-er ii'land-), 
iBle (U)t 102, 171. 
Tsl'et (tl'et). 
I'so-bare (-bir), 
I-BO-bftr-o-met'rlo. 
I-80-chrmal(-X;»'-) [I b o - 

cbeimal, Wb. Od 

203.J 
T-80-coi'men-al (-H'-) 

[so Gd. ; t-so-kim'e- 

nalt Wr. 155.] 
T-BO-chi'mene (-W-). 
I-BOch'ro-nal (-»oit'-). 
I-Bocb'ro-niBm (^-sok'ro- 

nizm)t 136, 171. 
I-Boch'ro-QotiB (-«oJb'-). 
I-BO-cli'nal [so Wr. j 

l-sok'li-nal, Gd. 165.] 



f-Bod'o-mon. 
I-BO-df-nam'ic, 109. 
I-so-ge-o-ther'mal. 
T-BO-gon'io. 
I-BOg'ra-pby, 106. 
T-so-ny'e-tOBe. 
Is'o-late iiz'o^At) [90 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; igfo- 

Ittt, Wb. Gd. 156.] [not 

i'BO-lit, 163.1 

B'o-lat-€d (iz^-). 

8'o-lat-ing(<2'-). 

8-o-Ia'tlon (w.-). 

-90l'0-g0tkB. 
-BO-mfT'lC 

-8om'er-ism (-<«iii),ia6. 
-BO-met'ric, 109. 
-80-met'ric-al, 106. 
-BO-mor'phlBm ij^zm) 
-BO-mor'pho(&8. 
-8on'o-my, 108. 

Bo-pdr-i-met'ric-al. 
-BO-pe-rim'e-try, 169 
'so-pod. 

Bop'o-doiis. 
'8o-pype. 

BOB'ce-lcB i-ltz)y 171. 

80-Btcm'o-nou8. 

BOtb'cr-al. 

'80-there. 

'so-tberm. 

-80-therm'al, 21, N. 

- Both-€-rom'bro8e. 

-BO-ton'ic. 

B'ra-cl-Ite (ae'rd-) (72) 

fso Sm. ; iz'r<i-fi-it, 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 155.] 
B-ra-€l-it'lc(tc-),72, 10» 
8-ri-el-it'lBh (ir ). 
g'BU-arble i^ish'skoo-a 

6/), 169, 183. 
Is'sae (ish'shoo) (171) 

it« Voo, Sm.( 5<K § 26)) 
sh'shuy Wr. Wb. Gd. 

165.] 
Ig'sued (Uih'shood)^ 183. 
lB'BU-«r {ish'skoo-). 
iB'BU-ing (ish'shoo-). 
iBtb'mi-an {ist'~), 171. 
Isth'muB (t«'-), 41, 171. 
It, 16, 41. 
I-talMan (-van) (51, 79) 

[not i-taryan, 153.] 
I-tal'ic (170) [not i-tal'- 

ic, 15.3.] 
T-talM-cize, 202. 
1-tal'i-cized, 183. 
I-tal'i-ciz-ing. 
Itcb, 16, 44. 
Itched iieht). Note C, 

p. 34. 
Itoh'lng. 
Itch'y. 



ft, e, i, 6, u, y, long -, ft, e, 1, 0, fi, f , short iHatin fkr, ktuin flwt, ka»im 



ITEM 



253 



JAW 



55.1 



te. 

t-ed, 183. 
iring. 

-tiOD. 

t-Ive (84) [80 

; U'er-€htifft Wr. 

Gd. 155.' 

•-an-cy, 

'-ant. 

r-»-ry, 72. 

•-ate. 

'-at-ed. 

r-at-ing. 

, 39, 41. 

r i a , 293. — See 
ia.] 

lam, 20a. — See 
ium.] 

lanrsoWr. lyoo'- 
n, om. 155.1 
[lTyed,203.] 
r, 93. 
60. 
e'd , 203.— 5ee 

»•] 

lan'Ued (-<M), 



J. 



r, 66, 170. 

red {-inird)t 150. 

r-er, 77. 

T'ing, 

nC-roo). 

nar. 

t. 

:h. 

181. 

-dan'dy. 

1 [to Sm. Wr. 

Gd.;ialr^',Wk. 

-lent. 

n-ape, or Jack'an- 

S8, 12, 131. 
lock, 206. 
oots, n. pi. [bo 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; 
loots', Wk. 155.] 
aw. 
t,76. 
t-ed. 

knife (-nl/), 162, 
Exo. 1. 
lane, 206. 
Kcrew (-Bkroo)j 
Exo. 3. 



Jack'Btraw. 
Jac'o-bin. 
Jac-o-bin'ic, 109. 
Jao-o-bin^c-al, 106. 
Jac'o-bin-ism (^izm), 

1.36. 
Jac'o-bite, 152. 
Jac-o-bit'lc-al, 108. 
Jac'o-bit-igm (^izm). 
Ja'oob's-lad'der, 206, 

213. 
Jac'o-net. 

Jac-quard' (-kard'). 
Jac-ta'tion. 
Jao-ti-ta'tion. 
Jac-a-la'tion. 
Jao'u-Ut-or. 
Jao'u-la-to-ry (86) [bo 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; jaJfcV 

Utt-o-ry, Sm. 155.] 
Jade, 23. 
Jad'ed, 183. 
Jad'lng. 
Jad'lBb. 



Jag (10) [Jagg, 203.1 

' Uap^) (181. 
. did Jag, or 



fed 
notch. 



Jag'ged Uag'ffhed) ( 161 , 
166), a. notched, un- 
even. 

Jag'ger (-gur)y 138. 

Jaer'srher-y [Jaggery, 



^"^f 



Jaff'gy (i7Ay)» 138, 170. 

Jag'hire (-ft«r). 

Jag-hlre-dar' (-hSr-). 

Jag-u-ar' 022) [fio* jag'- 
war. nor ja'gwar, 
153.1 

JUi, 72. 

JaU(^3) [Gaol, 203.— 
See Note under Gaol.] 

JaJVerTGaolcr, 203.1 

Jal'ap jfnoljol'up, 153. J 

Jam(lO), n. a conserve 
of fruit ; — a thick bed 
of stone In a lead 
mine : — v. to squeeze 
tight ; to presB. [See 
Jamb, 160.] [Jamb 
(in the second sense 
of the noun), 203.] 

Jamb U(im) (10, 162), 
n. the side piece of a 
door, flreplaoe, &c. ; 
— a thick bed of stone 
in a lead mine. [See 
Jam, 160.] [Jam (in 
the aecona sense), 
203.] 

Jammed {jtund), 176. 

Jam'mlng. 



[Jane, 203. — Set 

Jean.] 
Jan'gle {jang'gl), 64, 

164. 
Jangled {jang'gld), 

Jan'gler {Jang*-). 
Jan'gllng (Jong'-). 
[Janissary, 203. — 

See Janizary.] 
Jan'i-tor, 88, 169. 
Jan-i-za'ri-an. 
Jan'i-za-ry (72, 171) 

[Janissary ,203.] 
Jan'sen-iflm (-izm). 
Jan'sen-ist. 
[J a n t , 203. -^ See 

Jaunt] 
jant'i-ly. 
J&nt'i-ncss. 

Jant'y [Jaunty, 203.1 
Jan'u-a-ry (72) [not 

jen'u-a-ry, 127, 153.] 
Ja-pan'. 
Jap-an-ese' (-iz^), a. A 

n. ting. A pi. 122, 171. 
Ja-panned' (-pand'), 

176. 
Ja-pan'ner. 
Ja-pan'ning. 
Ja-phet'ic, 109. 
Jar, 11, 49, 135. 
Jftr-a-rac'a. 
Jardes {jardz), n. nl. 

[so Wr. Wb. Ga. , 

zhardz, Sm. 155.] 
Jar'gon, 11, 86. 
Jar-go-nellc' (-n«Z')i 114. 
Jarred {jard), 165, 176. 
Jar' ring. 
Ja'sey X-s^)* 160« 
Jas'hawk. 
Jas'mlne (jaz'minf or 

iat'min) (162) [so 

wr. ; jaz'min, Wk. 

Sm. ; jas'minj Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 [Jessa- 
mine, 203. 
Jas'per, 10, 77. 
Jas'per -at-ed. 
Jas'per-y, 93. 
Jas-pid'e-an, 110. 
Jaun'dlce (-tfu), 100, 

171. 
Jaun'dloed C-<{i«0- 
JSnnt(11)[Jant,203.] 
Jaunt'cd. 
J&nnt'ing. 
[Jaunty, 20S.'-See 

Janty.] 
Jav-arnese' (^nls')t «• 
Jftve'lln, 146, 171. 
Jaw, 17, 45. 



a< In there; 6b cm <n foot; 9(w{nfkcile; gh of g <n go ; t]^ <m <n this. 

22 



JAWBONB 



254 



JOLT£E 



Jaw-bone, 20flL 

jRwed U^*^)^ <*• 
Jaw'y. 
Jay, 23. 
Jaa'er-ant. 
Jtel'o&B, 15, 100. 
jeal'o&8-y. 

Jean (23) [bo Wb. Qd. } 
^, Wr. 155.] [J an e , 

Jears U^rz), n. pL 
[Jeers, 2a:).] 

Jeer, 13. 

Jeered ( j<rd), 166. 

Jeer'er. 

Jecr'ing^. 

Jeers (i«r2), i». pL 
[Jears, 203.] 

Je-ho'Fah, 72. 

Je-ho'vist. 

Jejune' l-Joon') [»o 
Wk. Wr. J JejUn', 
Wb. Gd.i jed'joon, 
8m. 155.] 

Jel'Ued, iro, 171. 

Jel'ly (M, 170) [Gol- 
ly. 2a3.— ,<fe€ Note 
ander Cftlly.] 

Jen'net-ing [G e n i - 
ting,203.J 

Jen'ny. 6fl, 1*0. 

Jeofail ( fefal)[BO Sm. 
Gd. ; jefaiy Wr. 155.] 

Jfoi/ard {jep'ard)i 15. 

Jfiop'ard-ed. 

Jeop'ard-ing. 

J^p'ard-izc, 202. 

JSop'ard-izcd, 183. 

Jeop'ard-Iz-inff. 

J6op'ard-y, 171. 

Jer'bo-a. 21, N. 

Jer-e-mradc, 171. 

[Jerfalcon, 203.— 
See Gerfalcon.] 

Jerk, 21, N. 

Jerked (i«r«), UI5 ; 
Note C. p. 34. 

Jer'kln (148), n. a 
Jacket. 

JerkMng( 141,148), part, 
from Jerk. 

Jer'sey (-^y), 21, N. 

Jess, 15, 174. 

Jes'sa-mlnc [Jas- 

mine, 2ai.] 

Jes'se. 

Jessed (ie«0 (1^)* <>• 
having jesses on. 

Jest (15, IGO), n. a joke : 
— r. to joke. 

Jest'ed. 

Jest'er. 

Jest'ing. 



kS: 



Jes'a-tt(i«s'-). 
Jes-a-it'io (ie«-), 100. 
Jea-n-it'io-al (ie«-)f 108. 
Jes'a-tt-ism (jes'u^T- 

<«m), 1.36. 
Jet, 15. 
Jet^^eau (Fr.) («*«-*>') 

~ )1. Jet8-d*eau (zhA- 

, IW).] 

Jet'sam [Jet son, 
Jettison, 203.] 

Jet'tee, n. a projection 
in a buildini; ; — a 
kind of pier. [Jet- 
ty (in the second 
sense), Jutty (in 
both senses), 203.] 

Jet'ty, n. a kind of pier ; 
a mole. [Jet tee, 
203.] 

Jet'ty (17A), a, made of 
jet ; black as jet. 

Jeu d*e*prU (Fr.) (thoo 
des-pri'). 

Wk. Wb. (Jd. ; foo, 
8m.(Seei2Q)i /u, or 
joo, Wr. 155.] 

Jew'el O'-). 

Jew'elled {ju'Od) 

Jeweled, Wb. 
d. 203. — See 177, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

Jew'el-ler (»«'-) [Jew- 
eler. Wb. G<1. 203.] 

[Jewellery, 2a3.— 
See Jewelry.] 

Jew'el-Une (M-) 
[Jeweling, Wb. 
Qd. 203.] 

Jew'eMy (/a'-). 

Jew'el-ry (jV-) [Jew- 
ellery, 203.] 

t&^**JeweUery if lh« 
more regularly ftmned 
word t but Jetcebif {■ per- 
h«M the more common.** 
Worce$ter. — Jewetn l« the 
only form giren by Smart, 
Webeter. and Goodrich. 

Jew'esB (Jh'-), 

Jew'ish Iju'-). 

Jew'ry {ji*'-). 

Jew's-harp (/to'-), 213. 

Jez'e-bel. 

Jib. 16. 

Jibbed (J<M), 176. 

Jib'bing. 

Jib'-boom (206, Exo. 1) 

[Gib-boom, 203.1 
Jirfy, 66, 170. 
Jigr, 16. 
Jig'ger i-gur) (138) 



K 



[Chiere, Cbiff. 

g e r (m the sense ctf a 

Jtind of insect)^ 208. 

~ See Chigre.] 
Jilt, 16. 
Jilt'ed. 
Jilt'ing. 
Jim'my, 170. 
Jln'glo (Jinff*fft) (64, 

164) [Gin gle, 203.1 
Jin'gled ijing'gld), 1». 
Jin'gUng iJingf-). 

Jip'po. 

Job, 18. 

Jobbed (ioM), 176. 

Job'ber. 

Job'bing. 

Jock'ey, 160. 

Jock'eyed (-fcf). 171. 

Jock'ey-ing. 

Jock'ey-ism {^izm). 

Jo-oosc', 121. 

Joc'u-lar, 72, 80. 

Joc-u-lAr'i-ty, 106, lOOi 

Joc'und. 

Jo-cund'i-ty. 

Jog, 18. 

Jogged ijogd), 165, 17ft. 

Jog'ger (-^r), 138. 

Jog'ging (-ghing). 

Jog'gle, 164. 

Jog'gled iJog'Ut), laS- 

Jog'gling. 

Jom. 27. 

Join'der. 

Joined, 166. 

Join'er. 

Join'er-y. 

Join'ing. 

Joint, fw, 

Jolnt'ed. 

.Toint'er. 

Joint'lng. 

Joint'ress rjointar- 
c s s , 203. J 

Joint'are, 01. 

Joint'nred (-ywnf). 

Joinfor-ing (-vMr-). 

Joint'or-esB [Joint- 
ress, 203.1 

Joist, 27. 

Joist^ed. 

Joist'ing. 

Joke, 2f. 

Joked (>0M), 166. 

Jok'er. 

Jdk'ing. 

Jole(24)[Jowl,a»,l 

Jol'U-ty, 108, 160. 

Jol'ly, 66, 170. 

Jdlt, 24. 

J5lt'ed. 

Jdlt'er. 



&,€,i,6,fi, y, tofVi i, 6, 1, 6, Ik, f , fftoff ; & m In ftr, 4 a« In ftst, A «f in 



JOLTING 



255 



JUSTICIABY 



Jdlt'inflr. 

Jon'qaule, or Jon'qoil 

(Umfkwit) [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd.} jun'kwily 

W)L.',junff'kwa, Sm. 

1A5.] 

i9> Walker and Smart 
giTc ooly the French form 
or this word iJontpdUt)\ 
Webiter and Goodrich 
BTC only the Anj^licixed 
nrm {Jomqmr)t Worcester 
Blvei both, but pr«ftr«/o»- 

Jos'tle {joa^l), 162. 

Jos'tlcd {joy id), 1&3. 

JoB'tling \jo9'hng). 

Jot, 18. 

Jot'ted, 176. 

Jot'ting. 

Jounce, 28. 

Joanoed {jowitt), 166. 

Joane'lng. 

JouKnal (/ar'-), 21, 72. 

Jonr'nal-ism (jur'nal- 

izm), 133, 136. 
Jour'nal-ist (ittr'-)« 
Joar'nalije (iwr*-), 

202. 
Jonr'naMzed {jftr'), 
Joar'nal-iz-ing (Jur*-). 
Jour'ney ijur^ny), 08, 

160. 
Joor'neyed (jur*nid). 
Jour'ney-er (/ttr'-). 
Joiir'ncy-ing' (jur*-), 
Jonr'ney-nuin ijur''), 
Joflvt iju»t)y n. & r. 

[tiol Joogt, 153.] 

[J a St, 203.] 

0^ Walker and Smart 
mkr Jovuti Wehvter and 
Ooodrfc h JuM. Worceiter 
prtknjuMt for the noun. 

JoiiBt'ed. 

Jottst'er. 

Jottst'inff. 

Jo'vi -al. 72, 78. 

Jo-Ti-ai'ity, 108, 160. 

Jdwl [so Sm. Wr. : 
jotd, Wb. Gd. 166] 
[Jole, Choule, 
203.] 

Jowl'er iJoui'w) [so 
8m. Wb. Gd. ; jdVuVy 
Wk. ; j9l'ur, or joul'- 
w, Wr. 165.] 

Joy, 27. 




Joy'ing. 



Joy'otts. 

Ju'bi-Uiit. 

Ju-bi-U'te (L.) (163) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; /u-bi4&^te, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Ju-bi-U'tion. 
Ja'bi-lce. 
Ju-daMc, 100. 
Ju-da'ic-al, 108. 
Ju'da-ism Uzm) (72) 

[so Wk. dm. i ju'da- 

tzm, Wr. Wb. Gd. 

155.1 
Ju'da-lst. 
Ju-da-ist'ic. 
Ju-da-I-za'tion. 
JuMa-izc, 72, 202. 
Ju'da-izcd, 183. 
Jtt'da-iz-cr. 
Jn'da-iz-ing. 
Judge {juf)t 22, 46. 
Judged UHid), 166, 183. 
[J u dge m e nt , 203.— 

See Judgment.] 
Judg'er. 
Judg'ing. 
Jud^'ment (186) 

[Judgement, Sm. 

203.] 
Jn'dl-ca-to-ry [so Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; ju'dUa- 

tur^y Wk. 8m. 155.] 
Ju'dl-ca-ture (Mr) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; juTdi- 

cUt-tt^, Wk. Sm. 155.] 

Ju-dl'dal (-di«*'rtO. 
Ju-dT'ci-a-ry {-dUh'i-a- 

ry) [bo Wr. ; ju-dUh'- 

'ar-p (See § 2n), Sm. ; 

Ju-dish'a-ry, Wk. Wb. 

Gd. 155.] 
Jn-dl'dotts (^ish'M). 
JvLK, 22. 
Ju'gat^. 
Jug'gle, 164. 
Jupr'gled ijuff'ld), 183. 
Jug'jyler. 
•I"jr'l?!er-y: 
Jncr'giing. 
Ju'gn-lar, 72, 80, 108. 
Juice (i««), 26, 30. 
Jui'd-nesB, 186. 
Jul'cy, 03. 
Jujube, 26. 
Ju'lcp, 26, 76. 
•TulMan (-fan), 51. 
Ju'luB. 
July'. 
Ju'mart. 
Jum'ble, 164. 
Jum'bled (jum bid). 
Jnm'bler. 
Jum'bUng. 



Jump, 22. 

Jumped (jumpt), 166. 

Jump'er. 

Jump'ing. 

[Juncate, 203.— <SSec 

Junket.] 
Junc'tion {jungle'-). 
Junc'ture {junkt'yur), 

44, N. 1 i 01, 171. 
June, 26. 

Jun'glc {jung'gt), 164. 
Jun'^ly {Jung"-). 
Jun'ior (j^n'yur) [so 

Wb. Gil. yjiin'yur, or 

ju'ni^r, Wr.'yiu'ni- 

ur, Wk. J j^oo'ni-ur 

{See § 26), Sm. 155.] 
Jun-iOr'i ty {-yUr'-), 108 
Ju'ni-per, 77, 78. 
Junk {jungk), 22, 54. 
Juuk'et {jungk'-), n. ft 

V. [Juncate, n. 

203.1 
JunkM;t-ed. 
Junk'ct-ing. 
Ju'no, 26, 127. 
Jun'ta (Sp.), 154. 
Jun'to (Sp.) (154) [pi. 

Jun'tos {-t6z), 102.J 
Ju'pi ter, 77, 78. 
Jup-pon' [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; jup-pon'j or 

jup'pon, Wr. 155.] 
Ju'rat. 

Ju'ra-to-ry, 86. 
Ju-rid'ic-al, 108. 
Ju-rld'Ic-al-ly. 
Ju-ris-oon'sult [bo Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. i ju'rU- 

kon-mU, Sm. 155.] 
Ju-ris-dio'tion. 
Jn-ris-dio'tion-al. 
Ju-rls-dic'tlve. 
Ju-ris-pruMcnoe 

{-proo'-). 
Ju-ris-pru'dent 

{'pro(^-). 
Ju'rlst, 40, H. 
Ju'ror, 88. 
Jn'ry, 40, N. 
Jn'ry>man, 106. 
Ju'ry-mast, 206. 
Just, a. St ad. (22) [fio^ 

Jest, 127, 153.} 
Just, n. A V. [J oust, 

203. — See Note under 

Joust.] 
Just'ed. 
JuBt'lng. 
Juste milieu (Fr.) 

{zhoost mU-yoo'), 154. 
JuB'tloe {-tU), 160. 
JuB-U'd-a-ry {-tish'i<t- 



iUl; ^asintbetei <K> m <n foot ; 9 m <n ftoUeighof gin go ;|]|<M<fitbii. 



JUSTIFIABLE 



256 



KILOGRAM 



ry) r BO Wk. Wr. j ju$- 
tulh^ar-y {See < 26), 
Bm. } Jut-tish'a-rfff 
Wb. Gd. 165.1 

JuBt'i-fi able, IM. 

Just-i-fl-ca'tloa. 

Ju8tMf-i-ca-tIve [so Sm.; 
jUMt-iri-kativ, Wk. 
Wr.Wb. Gd. 156.] 

JuBt'lf-i-ca-to-ry [bo 
Sm. ; jtut^fi-kn-to- 
ry, Wr. Wb. Gd. 165.] 

JuBt'i-fied, IM. 

Ju8t'l-fl-er. 

JuBt'i-f y, 9#. 

JuBtM-fy-ing. 

JuB'tle U^s^l\ W2). 

JuB'tled { jus' Id), 183, 

Jus'tling ( jtM'/tii^). 

Jut, 22. 

Jute, 26. 

Jut'tcd, 176. 

Jut'tiug. 

Jat'ty[Jettee,203.] 

Ju-vc-ncB'cencc. 

Ju-ve-nes'cent. 

Ju've-nllo, 152. 

Ju-ve-nil'i-ty, 108, 169. 

Jux-ta-po-sl'tion 
C-zMi^un), 171, 231. 



K. 

[Kaffre, Kafir, 203. 
— See Caffre.] 

Kale (23), n. a kind of 
cabbage. [See Kayle, 
160.J [Kail, 203.] 

Ka-Ieid'o-Bcopc, 171. 

Ka'lT. 

[Kali f, 203. — ^e Ca- 
liph.] 

KarKO-mYne, 152. 

Knm'a-chi f-AI). 

Kam'sin [Kb am Bin, 
203.] 

[Kan , 203. — See 
Kban.] 

Kan-ffa-roo' (kdng-). 

Kanri-an. 

Kant'lsm (-izm), 136. 

KantMst. 

Ka'oHn [Kaoline, 
203.] 

Ka'ty-did. 

[Kaun , 203. — .S'e« 
Khan.l 

Kayle {k&1\ n. a nlne- 

{>m ; — a kind of game 
n Scotland. [See 
Kale, 160.] 



Keb'lah, 72. 

Keo'kle, IM. 

Kec'kled {keVld), 183. 

Keo'kUng. 

Kcck'By, 160. 

Keok'y. 

Kedgc, 15, 45. 

Kedgod (A*<^Vf), 165. 

Kedg'cr, 1H3. 

Kedg'ing. 

KecL 13. 

Keel'age. 

Keeled (i-f&l), 166. 

Keel'er. 

Kecrhftal [Keel- 

hale, 203.] 

KGclOi&uled, 166. 

Keel'h&uling. 

Kcel'ing. 

Keol'Bon (ktl'mn) [bo 
Sm. Wb. Gd.; kel'- 
8on, Wk. ; kii'son, or 
kil'9on, Wr. 156.] 

Keen. 13. 

Keen'neBs, 66, K. 

Keep. 13. 

Keep'er, 77. 

Keep'ing. 

Keflr(15)[Cag,203.J 

Kelp. 16. 

[Kelt, 203. — 5«« 
Kilt.! 

Ken'nel. 66, 170. 

Ken'nelled (-neld) 

[Kenneled, Wb. 
Gd. 203. — See 177, 
and Note E. p. 70.] 

Ken'nel-ling [ K e n ne 1 - 
ing, Wb. Gd. 2a{.J 

Kcn'tle (IM) [Quin- 
tal, 203.] 

Kent'ledge. 

Kept, 15, 142. 

Ker'chlcf (-cA(^), 21, 
N. J 62, 146. 

Ker'chlcfed (-chift). 

Kerf, 21, N. 

Kcr-i-che'tib f-Ar' ) [so 
Sm. ; kir-i^k-e'tib, Wr. 
155.] 

Ker'mes (-m*«). 

Kern, 21, N. 

Kor'nel.21,N. 

Ker'nelled (-neld) 

[Kerneled, Wb. 
Gd. 203. — See 177, 
and Note E, p. 70.] 

Ker'nel-ly. 

Kj^r'o-sene, 171. 

Ker'Bey (-«y), 21, N. ; 
169. 

Ker'Bey-mere (-^y-) 
[CasBimerc, 20:).] 



Kes'trel [Caatrel, 

aai.] 

Ketch, 15, 44. 
[Ketchup,203. — 5to 

Catohup.j 
Ket'tle, 164. 
Ker'el. 

Kex, 15, 39, N. 
KeyCW) (13, 190). n. an 

inBtrument for rasteu 

Ing and unfastcnin''^ a 

lock; — a guide, Ac. 

[See Quay, ifiO.] 
Key'-board, 209. 
Key'-Btone, 24. 
[Khamsin, 208. — 

See Kamain.] 
Khan (teum, or kdn) [m) 

Wr. ; kawn, Sm. Wb. 

Gd. 165.], n. in Per 

Bia, a governor: in 

Tartary, a prmoe. 
See Can, 160.1 

'Kaii,Kann,203.] 
Knan'ate (kawn-, or 
Kibe, 2^ [tan-}. 

Kibod (HM). 
Kib'y,93, 169. 
Kick, 16, 181. 
Kicked (UibI), 166 ; Note 

C, p. 34. 
KickW. 
Kick'ing. 
Kick'shaw. 
Kid, 16. 
Kid^dle (164) [not klta, 

nor ket'l, m.] 
Kid'ddw, 101. 
Kid'Ung. 
Kid'nap, 10, 16. 
Kid'napped (-napt), 177. 
Kid'nap-per. 
Kid'nap-plng. 
Kid'ney (98, lfl9) [pi. 

Kid'neyB {-niz), 190.1 
Kil'der-kin. 
Km (16, 172), r. to put 

to death. [See Kiln, 

160,1 
Kill'dee. or Kill'dcer. 
Killed (kUdh 1(*5. 
Kill'er. 
Kill'ing. 
Kibi (kU) (162, 171), n. a 

klna or oven for hent- 

tng or drying any 

thing. [^eeKifi, KIO.] 
Kiln'-dried (kiV-), 102. 
Kiln'-dry (Wl'-), 162. 
Klln'-dry-ing (kil'.)^e2, 
Kil'o-gram (Eng.), or 

KU'o-gramme (Fr.), 

208. 



a, «, i, 0, a, y, long , ft« e» I» d, fi, j^, thori \ Ik as in fax, k at in ikst, & a« in 



KILOLITRE 



257 



KNOUT 



KWo4i4re (Pr.) (4e4ry 

rKlloliter,a«.] 
Kil-ori-ter [bo Wb. Gd.; 

Ht'o-ll-rvr, 8m. 155.1 
KU'o-m^tre (!•>.) (-iiic'- 

tr) (154) [Kl IOme- 
ter, aocj.] 
Kil-om'e-tcr [no Wb. 

Gd.: kU'o-na-tur, Sm. 

155.1 
Kilt rKelt,203.] 
KUt'ed. 
Kim'bo. 
Kin, 10. 
Kind (^ 14«) [bo Sm. 

Wr. WD. Gd. ; lylnd, 

Wk. 165.1 
Kind-heiirt'ed, 206, 

Exo.5. 
Kin'dle, IM. 
Kin'dled {kin'dld), 183. 
Kin'dler. 
KindOi-neBi, 186. 
Kin'dUnir. 
Kind'lj. 
Kln'drod, a, A n. ting. 

Apt, 
Klne (tin) (25, 52) [bo 

Wr. Wb. Gd.; iln, 

Sm. (5eef 26), Iryln, 

Wk. 155.] 

i9* Thto word It Um <dd 
plural of cow. Mid b nov 
olaolalc, c3EC«pt in poetry. 

Ki-ne-mAt'ie, 100. 

Ki-ne-mat'lc^, 106. 

Ki-ne-mat'lcs. 

Ki-ne-Bip'a-thist. 

Ki-ne-Bip'a-thy, 106. 

KiHiiet'ics. 

King, 16, 54. 

Kingbird, 206. 

King'onn.. 

Klnf'eap. 

King'dom, 86, 169. 

Klnff'flflh-cr. 

King'like, 206. 

King'U-neBS, 186. 

King'ly, W. 

King'pdBt, 205. 

Kink (Hn^ib), 16,51. 

Kln'k»-Jou(Hn^'i»-ioo) 

Kl'no. 

KlnB'num (Hng'-), 196. 

Kina'wom-an {kinz^- 

«o«m-tfn), 214. 
Ki-osk' (ke) (Toikish). 
Kip, 16. 
Kirteh'wa»-$er (Ger.) 

(k9rth'vH8'»ur) [bo 

wr. ; kir^'waa-sw, 

Gd. 154, 155.] 
Kir'tle,2],N.-, 164. 



Kir'tted (HrfUd), 183. 

KlsB, 16, 174. 

Kissed ikM), 165 *, Note 

C,p.34. 
KisB'er. 
KiBB'inff. 
Kit. 16. 
Kit'cat,62. 
Kitch'en, 149. 
Kite, 25. 
Kit'Ung. 

Kit'ten ikUfn\ 149. 
Klop-e-ma'ni-a. 
Knab (nab), 10, 162. 
Knabbed (na6d),162,165. 
Knab'bing inab'-), 162, 

176. 
Knaok (furir), 10, 162, 182. 
Knack'er (noib'ttr), 162. 
Knag (no^), 10, 162. 
Knagged (nagd), 165. 



Knag^neBfl(iu]9'aAi-). 
Knag'gy (nag'ffhy), 138. 
Knap'sack (nt^-h 102. 



Knap'weed (ni^-h 1^- 
[Knarled(nar2tf),203. 

— See Gnarled.1 
Knare (nav) (23. 162), n. 

a villain;— the card 

next below the queen. 

[See Nave, IflO.] 
Knav'er-y (nar'-), 162. 
Knav'lsh (ndv'-), 102. 
Knaw'el (naw'-)j 162. 
Knuad (nld) (13, 162), v. 

to work or press to- 

S*ther, as oough or 
ay. [See Kneed, ani< 

Need, 160.] 
Knead'ed (n^d'-), 162. 
Knead'er (ntd'-), 162. 
Knead'ing {nfd'-), 162. 
Knee (vuf, 13, 162. 
Kneed (nid), a. having 

knees. [See Knead, 

and Need, 160.J 
Knee'-deep {ni^-), 162, 

206, Exo. 5. 
Kneel (n«0» 102- 
Kneeled {nftd), 162, 165. 
KneeFer (vur-), 162. 
KnceFlng (niV-), 162. 
Knee'pan (nff-), 163. 
Knell (net), 15, 162, 172. 
Knelt (neit), 15, 162. 
Knew (n«), v, did know. 

[See Gnu, and New, 

160.1 
Knick^-knack (nW- 

nak), 162, 206, Exc. 1. 
KnlA) (nl/) (162) [pi. 

Knives (nlvz), 193.J 
Knight (nff) (162), n. 



one admitted to a cer- 
tain military rank by 
appropriate ceremo- 
nies ; — a piece in 
chess. [See Niglit, 
160.] 

Knight'age Inlt*-), 162. 

KnJght'ed (n«'-), 162. 

Knight'-er'rant (nK'-)» 
162,205. 

Knight'-fr'rant-ry 
(n«'-), 162. 

Knight'h<5bd (n«'-),162. 

Knight'U-nesB (nK'-), 
186. 

Knicht'ly (nU'ly) nfl2), 
a. beoomlng a Kn%lit : 

— ad. in a manner 
suitable to a knight. 
[See Nightly, 160.1 

Knit (n»<) (16, 162), v. to 
weave by the hand 
with needles ; — to 
unite. [6'e« Nit, 160.] 

Knit'ta-ble (nW-), 164. 

Knit'ter (n«'-), 176. 

Knit'ting (nW-). 

Knitaie (mY7), 162, 164. 

KniveB {nivz), n. pi. 
162. [See Knife.] 

Knob (nob), 18, 102. 

Knobbed (ikobd), 165. 

Knob'bi-ness (fM>6'-), 
186. 

KnobOiy (nob'-). 

Knock (nok), 18, 162. 

Knocked (nokl), 165. 

Knock'er (nokf-). 

Knoek'ine (nokf-). 

Kndll (not), 102. 

Kndlled (nbld), 165. 

KndllMng (nOV-), 162. 

Knop'pem (nop'-), 162. 

Knot (not) (162), n. a 
part that is compli- 
cated or tied in a cord ; 
— a part in a tree 
where a branch 
BhootH ; — a cluster ; 

— a division of a log- 
line: — r. to compli- 
cate in knots , — to 
unite. [See Not, 160.] 

Knot'bi»r-ry (noi'-), 206. 
Knot'gr&ss (not' ). 
Knot'ted (not'-), 162,176. 
Knot'ti-ness (nof-), 186. 
Knotting (not'-). 
Knot'ty (not'-), 66, 170. 
Knot'weed (not'-). 
Knot'wort (not'wurt), 

171. 
Knout (nowi), 28. 



fldl; ^asinthexe', db o« In fbot ; 9 a« In fkoile ; gh cm g in go ; ^ a« <n thlB. 

22* 



KNOW 



258 



LACUNOSE 



Kndw (n0) (162), v. to 
perceive intolleetual- 
17; — to be informed. 
[See No. 100. j 

Know'a ble (nd'-), IM 

Know'cr {no'ur), 77. 

Kndw'iii<; (^H^'-). 

KDdwl'edgc {noVeJDi 162, 
171) [bo Sni. Wr.VVb. 
Gd. J noVfjt or no'i^', 
Wk. 155.J 



wv Though Walker, In 
def^rrncc to the opinion 
of R few ortbovpiiiU, allows 
no'l^. Me remark! upon 
the greater coniittency of 
the flnt pronunciation 
\noV^ wllh analogy. 

Known (nSn), 162. 

Kuuc'kle {mtk'l), 162, 
1(H. 

Knuc'kled {nuVld), 183. 

Knuc'klingf Inuk'-). 

Knurl (nuW), 21, 162. 

Knurled (nurld)y 166. 

Knurl'y (nurVy), 171. 

Ko-a'la. 

Ko'ba. 

Koh, 24. 

Kdhl'-raTDl. 

Ko'kob. 

Koo'doo, 10. 

Ko'peck. 

Ko'ran, 49, N. 

Ko'rct. 

Kott'mlM ihoo*-) [Ka- 
mi 8 8, 203.1 

Kxkaljkrawt) [kra'al, 
Sm.Wr.Wb. Gd. 155], 
n. a Hott«ntot villa 
or collection of h 



age, 
ui«. 



The pronunciation 
tMiffned to thit word ii 
that given to It by a reri- 
dcnt of Cape Colony who 
recently viatted one of the 
compilers of this volume. 

Kra'ken. 

Krera'lin. 

[Krout, 203. — See 

Crout.l 
Kru'ka (Irroo'-) 
Krul'ler {krool'-), 
Ku'fic. 
[KnmisB, 203.^ See 

KonmisB.] 
Ku'rll. 

Ky'a-nixe, 202. 
Ky'ft-nizcd, 183. 
Ky'a-niz-ing:. 
KvrM-e. 
K^r-I-o-logr'lo (-?o/-). 



K^i^i-o-log^'io-al (lof-). 



?-i 



LX (11, 161), the name 
of the sixth sound in 
the aacendlng diaton- 
ic scale. 

lA CI7, 161 ), ifU, behold. 
f ^ee Law, 160.] 

Lab'ardist, 105. 

Lab'a-rum, 113, 233. 

La'bel, 76. 

La'belied (n&eUf) [La- 
be 1 e d , Wb. Gd. 203. 
— See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

La'bel-linsr TLabel- 



l-linff [L 
,Wb. Gd. 



203.J 



Ing 
Lambent. 
La'bi-al, 72, 78. 
La'bl-ate, 73. 
La-bi-o-dent'al, 228. 
La'bor (88) [Labour, 

Sm., 199, 203.] 
Lab'o-rsrto-ry, 86. 
La'bored ^-burd) (165) 

i Laboured, Sm. 
99,203.1 
La'bor-er [L a b o n r e r, 

Sm. 109, 203.] 
La'bor-ing [Labour- 

iufir.Sm. 199,203.1 
La-bo'rI-ofis, 49, N. ; 

100, 169. 
La'bor-Bomc (-Mcm), 22. 
I^b'ra-ddr-ite, 83. 
La'broBc, or La-brose' 

[la'brda, Wb. (}d. ; 

lorbrOs', or Wbroe, 

Wr. 155.] 
La-bur'num, 160. 
Lab'y-rinth, 03. 
Lab-y-rinth'al, 72. 
Lab-y-rinth'i-an, 100. 
Lab-y-rinth'ic, 109. 
Lab-y-rinth'ic-ol, 108. 
Lab-y-rlnth'l-form, 108. 
Lab-y-rinthlne, 82, 152. 
Lac (181), n. a reBinous 

Bubstanoe. [<S^e€Laok, 

160.1 
Lac'do (lak'sik), 39, 62, 

200. 
Lao'cTue, 82, 152. 
Lace, 163. [34. 

Laced (/d^O* Note C, p. 
La^'cr-a-ble, 104, 160. 
I^'er-ate, 100. 
La^'er-at-ed. 
Lag'er-at-ing. 
La^-cr-a'tion, 112. 
La9'erat-Ive, 84, 100. 



La<er*ta (L.), 21, Note. 

La-oer'tian (^■shan)^ 112. 

La-oer'tlne, 82, 152. 

Lftche,n. sing., or Lach'- 
es (-ee:), n. pi. negli- 
gence. [Law term.] 

Lach'ry-mal (laJ:'-), 52, 
72. 

Lach'ry-ma-ry {Mf-), 
62,72. 

Lach'ry-ma-to-ry 
(toJf -), 86. 

Lach'ry-mose (lak'-)^ 
[BO Wb. (Jd. ; Xak-m- 
m6$f, Wr. 156.] 

La^'lng, 183. 

La-cin'i-ate. 

La-cin'i-at-ed. 

Lack (181), n deficien- 
cy, want: — r. to be 
In want of. [ See Lac, 
160.] 

Laek-ardai'Blo-«l (zik), 
116, 171. 

Lack-a-dai'sy (-«y), 1<9. 

Lacked (toJl-f). Not« C, 
p. 31. 

[Lacker. — 5ee Lac- 
quer, 203.1 

Lack'ey {Ink'y), n. & v. 
(98, 169) (pi. of «, 
Lack'ey 8 (-/e), 190.] 

Lack'eyed (-tr/), 165. 

Lack'ey-ing it-ing). 

Lack'lng. 

Lack'-luB-tre i-tur) 
(101) rSce Lustre.] 

La-con'ic, 109. 

La-conMc-al, T2, 108. 

La-oon'lc-al-ly, 170. 

La-oon'i-clsm (-8izm\ 
1.33, 136. 

Lac'on-tsm (-izm) [so 
Wk. Sm. Wr. ; te'Xron- 
izm, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Lac'quer (-l-ur) [ L a c k - 
er, 203.1 

Lac'quered (-Jtarrf), 155. 

Lac'quer-ing (-jfcur-). 

Lac'ta-rene, 171. 

Lac'ta-ry, n. 72. 

Lac'tate. 

Lao-ta'tion, 112, 109. 

Lac'te-al (72) [so 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; iaJf- 
te-al, or lak'che-aif 
Wk. 165.] 

Lao-tes'cence, 30, 171. 

Lao-tes'oent. 

Lao'tio. 

Lac-tiTer-ofiB, 100, 106. 

Lac-tom'e-tcr, 106. 

Lao-u-nose', 80, 122. 



&, 5, 1, 5, u, y, long -, ft, C, 1, 0, Q, f, ihort ; & a* In ikr, & M in fast, A a« M 



UCUSTKAL 

f*«Ji'tral, 122. 
4Si«'trtne [ao Wr. 
f^ Gd. ila^lnu-trin, 
,8m. 156.] 
J*J.ia 

H'»-«oni, 109. 
J^'(ter,66, no. 
*^e, p. to load. [See 
..UW, 160.1 
J^'ed, 183. 
f^'en Ond'n), 149. 

^'ile-ful lla'dlrfSbl), 

£• dy, «, 190. 
'-•^T-diy (209) [to Wr. 
^, Gd.; lA^p-dA', 
f Jvk. Sm. 155.] 

r (,-c^-), 213. 
/^ dy-lovc f-/<lr). 

l^ng'gur), 2W. 
rt^'dj^sUp'per (-die-), 
'"^fjrm mergeyer, 
^^fXi. — See Lammer- 

-*&, 10,30, 5.^ 
•^ ger^beer {-gur-), 206. 
l^gard, fl6, 72. 

eed nagd\ 165, 176. 
_^ger (-^r), 138. 
^^'gin^ {-ghing)y 141. 

^^^oon' [Lagane, 

^^■^ic, 109. 
^'ic-al, 72, 108. 
^ Sd (23,187), r. did lay. 
X J5ce Lade, IflO.] 
^^-mn (187), jMrt. from 
-^iit. [See Lane, 160.] 




(«r)n4,67),n.the 
^^aouch of a wild beast. 
r" See Layer, 148.J 
Jrd {Urd), 14, 49. 
t''i-ty,95,108,109. 
>-&e, 23. 
^»ace'let,76. 

^^1-U'tion, 66, 170. 

^^ma [not la'ma, 153.] 
d Llama(inthe8enne 
^^f a wool -bearing 

Soadmped of South 
^eTica),203.] 
k-'ma-ism {•izm)^ 1-33, 
'.^ma-liit. [188. 

k'ma-tte, 83. 
-man'flne(I52) [La- 
nantin, Lamen- 
' In, 203.] 




259 

Lamb (tern), 162. 
Lam'ba-tTve, 84. 
Lamb^da-dsm (lam' da- 

Hsnn), 162. 
Lamb-doid'al (torn-) 

n62)[Lamdoidal, 

Lam'bent, 76. 
Lamb'kin {lam'-). 
Lamb's'-wool {lamz'- 

wobl) (213), n. a kind 

of beverage. 
Lame, 23. 
Lamed, 166, 183. 
Lam'el. 170. 
La-mel'la (L.) [pi. La- 

mei'las (-fe), m.] 
Lam'el-lar, 169, 170. 
Lam'el-Iate, 73. 
Lam'el-lat-ed. 
Lam-el-lirer-ofiB, 106. 
La-meFli-form, 108. 
La-ment', r. & n. 121. 
Lam'ent-a-ble, 123. 
Lam'ent-a-bly, 93. 
Lam-ent-a'tion. 
La-ment'ed. 
La-ment'er, 77, 169. 
La-ment'lng. 
Lam'i-^nat (L.) [pi. 

Lam'i-n(e (-ne) 198.] 
Lam-in-a-bil'i-ty, 108, 

169. 
Lam'ln-a-ble, 164, 169. 
Lam'in-ar, 169. 
Lam'in-a-ry, 72. 
Lam'in-at-ed. 
Lam-inVtlon. 
Lam'ing. 
Lam'mas, 180. 
Lam'mer-geir i-gMr), 

or Lwn'mer-gey-er 

{-gh%-ur) [L sm mer- 
ge y e r , 203.] 
Lfunp, 10. 
Lam'pasB, 171. 
Lamp'black. 142. 
Lam^perweel, 206, £xc. 

3. 
Lamp'io. 

Lamplight (AO* 206. 
Lam-poon', n. A v. 121. 
Lam-pooned', 166. 
Lam-poon'er. 
Lara-poon'ing. 
Lam-poon'ry. 
Lam'prey, 98, 169. 
La'na-ry, 233. 
La'nate. 
I^'nat-ed. 
Lance, 12. 
Lanoed {Untt), 183; 

Note C, p. 34. 



r. 



to 
lance 

[See 



LANGUISHER 

Llin'oe-o-lar, 74. 
Lftn'ce-o-late. 
Lftn'oe-o-lat-ed. 
Lanc'er, 131. 
Lftn9'et, 76, 166. 
Lanch (13, 44), 

throw, as a 

from the band. 

Launch, 160.1 
Lanched {Idncht). 
LanchMng. 
Lftn'ci-form, 108. 
L&n'ci-nate, 169. 
Lftn-ci-na'tion. 
Lanc'ing. 
Land, 10. 

Land'am-man, 196. 
Lan'dau [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd.; Ian daw', Wk. 

Wr. 155.1 [Lan- 

d a w (lan'aaWj Wr.), 

203.1 
Lan-d&u-let', 122. 
Land'ed. 
Land'grave. 
Land-grav'i-ate, 123,171. 
Land'gra-vine (-i?ft»). 
Land 'hold -er. 
Land'lng. 
Land'la^dv (206) [bo 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

l&n'la-dy, Wk. 166.] 
Land'Iock, 206. 
Landlocked {-lokt). 
Land'lock-lng. 
Land'lo-per. 
Land'lord. 
Land'lub-ber, 206. 
Land'mark. 
Land 'reeve. 
Land'Bcape, 142. 
Land'elide. 
Land'slip. 
Lands'man (landz'- 

man)f 214. 
Lane, n. a narrow way 

or passage. [See Lain, 

160.] 
Lan'CTage {lang'grQj)^ 

Lan'grel (lang'-). 
Lling-syne', 156. 
Lan'guage {lang'gio(ij)y 

Lan'guid (lang'guHd), 

141. 
Lan'guish (lang'gtpUh)^ 

1(H. 
Lan'guished (lan'- 

gtnsht)y 165 ; Note C. 

p. 34. 
Lan'enlBh-er {JUmg*- 

gunth-er), 77. 



iitMin there; Cb a$ in foot -, qtu in facile -, ghat gin go, ti^ai in th\B. 



LANGUISHING 

Lan'^^h-ing (Ion'- 

gtn8h-4ng). 
Lan'i^Bh-ment (kmgr'- 

gtoith-). 
Lan'guor (ten^fftottr) 

fnot lane'gar, lo3.] 
[LRniard, 203. — 5« 

Lanyard.] 
La'ni-a-ry, or Lan'ia- 

ry i-ya-) [so Wr.j 

la'Hi-a-rpt Gd. : Ian*- 

yUr^i Sm. 166. J 
La'ni-ate, or Lan'l-ate 

(109) [bo Wr.j la'ni- 

Sm. 166.1 
La-nif eroQBf 106. 
La-nig'cr-ofiB (-n^'-)- 
Lank {langk), 10, 64. 
Lank'y {larufk'y)^ 109. 
Lan'ner, 170. 
Lan'ner-et. 

Lans'que-net (-Jbe-), 68. 
Lan'teru [L a n t h o rn , 

203.J 
Laa'tna-nom, or Lan- 

tha'ni-um. 
Larnu'gi-nose, 2, 466. 
Larnu'gi-nofis, 100. 
Lan'yard [Laniard, 

203.] 
La-od-l-oe'an, 72, 110. 
Lap, n. & V. (10) [P^* of 

n. Laps. — iSee Lapse, 

IflO.] 
Lap'dog, 206. 
La-pel', 121. 
Lap'ful (fSbl), 180, 107. 
Lap-i-daM-an, 49, N. 
Lap'i-da-ry, 72, 109. 
Lap-i-des'oenoe, 39, 171. 
Le^i-des'oent. 
Lap-l-diric, 170. 
Lap-i-diflc-ol. 
La-pld-i-f I-ca'tloa, 112. 
La-pida-fied. 
La-pid'if y, 94, 106. 
La-pid'i-fy-lng^. 
La'pis lax'u-h [so Sm. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. i lazh'- 

«-«, Wk. 156.] 
Lapped {IfOfth I<^ * 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lap'per, 77. 
Lap'pet. 
Lap'ping, 170. 

Laps'a-Dle, 169. 
Lwse, n. & v. (10) [See 
Laps, pi. of Lap, 160.] 
Lapsed Oaptt), 
Lap'sid-ed. 
Laps'ing, 18S. 
Lap' stone, 206. 



260 

Lap'mu Un'ffua (L.) 

(ting'gtpe). 
Lap'wlnf. 
-2^*^ (LO [pl« La're$ 

(-rf«), 196.T 
Lar'bdaM. 
Lar'ee-ny, 93, 169. 
Lardi, 136. 
Lard. 49. 

Lar-da'ceoas(-«fttt«),112. 
Lard'ed. 
Lard'er. 
Lard'inff. 
La'rei ^rtz)fn,pL [See 

Lar.J 
Larape. 

Lar'gess (^), 46. 
L&r'l-at, 48, 66. 
Lark. 136. 
Lark'spur, 206. 
Lar'mi-er, 49. 
Lftr'um (169) [so Wk. 

Sm. Gd. f lAr*um, or 

Utfrum, Wr. 166.1 
Lar'va (136) [pi. Lar'- 

TIB (-06), 198.] 
Lar'val. 
Lar'vat-ed. 
Larve, 189. 
Lfr-ryn'ge-al {-je-) [so 

Wr. Gd. ; la-rin{f'gke- 

aif Sm. 166.1 
La-ryn'ge-an (^'e-), 110. 
L&r-yn-gi'tis. 
L&r-yn-got'o-my, 106, 

116, 2S. 
LKr'ynx (JAr'ingte) (16, 

48,52, N.j 64) [so dm. 

Wb. Qd.i Wringka, 

Wk. i lAr^inaks, or 

lA'rinaktj Wr. 166.1 
Las-car, or Las'oar [so 

Wr.; ku^Bor'^ Sm.; 

Uu'karj Wb. Gd. 

166.1 
Las-dV'i-otts, 39, 100. 
Lash, 46. 
Lashed {laskt), 166 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lash'er, 169. 
Lash'ing. 
Lass, 12, 174. 
Las'si-tade, 106, 127, 170. 
Las'so (86) [pi. Laa'sos 

(^6«), 192.1 
Last, 131. 
L&st'ed. 
litsflnff. 

Latch, 44 ; Note D,p. 87. 
Latohed(2acjU),34. 
Latoh'et. 
Latoh'lng, 141. 
Late, 163. 



LAUD 

La-teen', 121. 
La'tent. 

Lat'er-al, 233, Eze. 
Laf er^-Iy, 170. 
Lat'er-an, 72. [171. 

Lat-er-i-fo'li-ofls, 116, 
Lat-er-rtious (^uJb'tw). 
Lath, n. A v. (14) [no! 

Lath, 163] [pl. of n. 

La^s (UcHi).] 
Lithe, 38,1^ 
L4£Eed ilUht), 131, 140. 
Lft|h'er, n.Av.77. 
li^'ered i-wxt), 160, 

1^, 171. 
UUh'er-inff. 
L^'higri40. 
L4th'y, 169. 
La'tian (,-ehan). 
Lantib'u-Iize, 202. 
La-tib'u-lised, 183. 
Lantib'a-Ea-injgp. 
Lafi-oUre. 
Lat-i-oos'tate, 116. 
Lat-i-den'tate. 
Lat>i-fo'U-ate. 
Lat-I-fo'U<ofi8, 171. 
Latin (149) {not Ut'n, 

163.] 
LatTn-lsm (-izm), 133. 
Latln-ist, 170. 
LantUi'i-tas-ter. 
La-tin'i-ty, 106. 
Lat-In-I-za'tlon, 112, U6. 
Latln-lze, 202. 
LatTn-ixed. 
Latln-iz-ing. 
Lat-i-ros'troUs [so Sm. 

Wb. Qd. Wr. ; M-rt- 

roe'tms, Wk. 155.J 
Lat'ish, 183. 
Lat'irtat (L.). 
Lat'itade, 26, 108, 170. 
Lst-i-tud'faiHil, 26, 72. 
Lst-i-tad-hi-«'ii-«n, 49, 

N.i 116. 
Lat-i-t&d-ln-a'ri-aii-lsm 

(-ton), 133, 136. 
Lat-i-tad'in-oUB, 106. 
La'trant. 
LartrT'a, or La'tri-«[lfi- 

tr%'<h Sm. Wb. GkL; 

la'ttUa, Wk. Wr. 

166.] 
Lat'ro-btte, 1A2. 
Lat'ten, 66, 132, 149. 
Lat'ter, 170. 
Lat'tloe, 66, 109. 
Lat'tloed (^^tUt)^ 163 { 

Note C, p. 34. 
Laf ti^imr, 183. 
LAad (17), IS. pratsa 

[See Lord, 146.] 



a, e, !, 0, u, y, Umg $ i, i$> I» 6| lit j^i ehorti & m M ftr, a m in flwt, a as <ii 



LAUPABLB 



261 



LECTIONART 



Iaid'M>le, 1<M, 100. 

laad'a-imm (fmud'a- 
lum, or 2d<ra-iuim; 
f» Wr. } lawd'or- 
mm, Wb. Gd. ; Idd'- 
OHiMh Wk. Sm. 156.1 

lAad-k'Ufm. 

Iiad'a4o-i7, 80- 

liad'ed. 

Uad'er. 

Uod'ine 

Tl 

Lwghod (to/T), 
Note C, p. M 



) (11,35) [iwl 



-), 1«. 
166; 



Laughter (Uif-). 
Langh'ing (fa/-), 141. 
Laagh'ter (tor-). 
LinDoe. 

Uoneh (11. 44), v. to 
euue to slide into the 
witer, as a Tessel : — 
ft. the set of launcli- 
ing a ressel ; — a 
kind of long-boat. 
[See Laneh.] 
Uonebed {leaidU). 
Lionch'ing. 
Unn'der, 11. 156. 
Liim'diefls [not Uwn'- 

dresi, 153.1 
linn'dry, 127. 
lin're-ate, a. It v. 73, 

Itt. 
Utt'pe4t-ed. 
lia're^it-faig. 
lin-re-a'tion. 
Lio'rel {ISr^el^ or law'- 
rti) [so Wr. ; IdHUj 
Wk.; IdrfgL, 8m.; 
tap'rfi, Wb. Crd. 156.] 
Lw'relled {I5r*eld, or 
faip'reW)n77) [Lau- 
reled, Wb. (Jd. 203. 
-S« 177, and Note 
E,p.70.] 
Jln'rw-tlne, 152, 171. 
U'^a r»o Wk. 8m. 
Gd.;7rm, or fifro, 
Wr.l55.] 
}*^^to.ry,86. 

Lwed, 185. 
Uy'en-der, 170. 

Liv'nig, 228, N. 
L«TUifi,fl6, IW. 
I^ iihed (-MU), 
UV»h^,l». 
UT'Uh-ing. 
L»w(i7,&),«. an es- 



tablished role. [See 

La, 160.1 
Law'ftil (-/SiD, 180. 
Law'ftU-Iy (-/w^). 
Law'gir-er (^Aiv-), 206. 
Lawn, 17. 
Law'soit, 26, 206. 
Law'yer, 112. 
Lax, 10, 30, N. 
Lax-a'tion. 
Lax'a-tlTe, 84. 
Lax'i-ty, 108. 
Lay, 23, 60. 
Lay'er (67), n. a stra- 

tom. [See Lair, 148.] 
Lay'er-ing'. 
Lay'lng. 

Lay'man, 196, 206. 
La^zar, 74, 160. 
Laz-«-retS 122. 
Laz-a-ret'to, 170. 
Laz'a-rist, 106. 
[Lazaroni, 203.— 

See Lazzaroni.] 
Laze, 40. 
La'zi-ly, 186. 
La'zi-ness. [uli*] 

Laz'u-ll [See Lapis laz- 
La'zy, IGtf. 
Laz-za-ro'n! [Lazaro- 

n i , 2a3.] 
Lea (13), n. a meadow. 

[See Lee, 160.] 
Leach, v. to wash by 

percolation, as ashes. 

[See Leech, 160.] 

[Letch, 203.] 
Leached {Ucht). 
Leach'ing. 
L^ad (161), n. a metal. 

[5ee Led, 160.] 
Lead (161), v. to guide 

or conduct. 
LCad'ed. 

L^ad'en (Ud'n), 149. 
Lead'er. 
Lead'ing. 
Leaf, n. & v, [pi. of n. 

Leaves {livz\ 193.J 

[See Llcf, IflO.j 
Lealbd {UJt) (165 ; Note 

C, p. 34). [See 

Leaved.] 
LeaTi-ness, 186. 
Leaflnfi^. 
Leaflet, 76. 
Leafy, 93, 169. 
League (lla), 168. 
Leagued (ttgd), 
Leagu'er {lla'-). 
Leaguing {fig''). 
Leak (13), n. a fissure 

or crack that lets a 



fluid in or out: — o. 

to trickle or run in or 

out. [See Leek, 160.] 
Leak'age, 183. 
Leaked (/eA:<), 166 ; Note 

C, p. 34. 
Leak'ing. 
Leak'y, 169. 
Leal [BO Wr. Gd. ; ^o^, 

Sm. 155.1 
L^an, 43, «). 
Leaned, 165. 
Lean'ing. 
Lean'ness, 66, N. 
L^ant, V. did lean; — 

used colloquially for 

Leaned, [See Lent, 

160.] 
Lean'-to (-too), 206, 

Exc. 4. 
Leap, fi. & V. 
Leaped {JMpt, or lipt) 

[so Wr. ; IXptj^ Sm. ; 

Upt, or VBpt, Gd. 156.] 
Leap'er. 
Leap'frog, 2C6. 
Leap' ing. 
Leap'year. 
Learn (lem), 21, N. 
Learned {lernd), part. 

150. 
Leam'ed {lem'ed), a. 

144, 150. 
Leam'er {lem'-). 
Leam'lng {lern'-), 141. 
Learnt (fern/). 
Lease, 136. 
Leased {list). 
Leash, 46. 

Leashed {Usht), 166. 
lA>a8h'ing. 
Least. 

I^%th'er, 16, 38. 
L^atH'em, 135. 
LfatH'er-y, 169. 
Leave, 13. 

Leaved (165), part, hav- 
ing leaves or foliage. 

mar Of leaved and 
7ea/f (/.Smart mvi, "Leat'ed 
Im moit in ute.*' 

L^av'en {lev'n)[»o Wr. 

CW. J lev'in, Wk. Sm. 

156.] 
L<^av'ened {lev'nd). 
L?av'en-ing {lev'nAng). 
LeavMng, 183. 
I^ch'er. 
Lech'er-ottB. 
Lech'er-y. 
Lec'tion, 169. 
Lec'tion-a-ry, 72. 



^ii 01 in there; db 03 In foot; 9 a« in flusile ; gh oe g <n go ; t^ oe in thif. 



Lwl'ur-er (-(nir) gi 
lAXl'V-lag («ur I 
Led, e. did IcuL ( 



Lee'«nd-UT(W ) 7X. 
iLEEcr m. — Bt€ 

Leader] 
I>s-er-d»iiiklii (Iff-) 

g {Btf 



— Sm Leger-liic 1 
L,(«(i:i|. n. the thTe of 

tbat rKim which Ihe 



Lewhod lltcht) lU 

Note C, p. 34. 
Leecb'luj;. 
l.eeli([31. n. ■ plut al 

UnliatlicaDian IStt 

Leak, K^.l 
Lht, 13, M. 
Leered, let. 
Leering. 
Leei<(t<:). n.lAv.Apl. 

Lee'wu^l (R'tninl, or 
M'urrf) (L11) [soWr.j 
U'icurd,Kk.lM.;U'- 



Le-^l'lt7, lOI, S33. 
Le-jtnl I-M'lkm, 112. 
LCt^llie, aoa. 
Lc'gnl-iioil, IBS. 
Le'ttnl-Ii-Inc, IBS. 
Lc-Bnl-ly, (ft, 170. 
LetPate (73) [iwl le'git. 



LeVuon, 70, IH. 
L«E-i-tor', la. 

LeV"'' {l«'j™fl. or 
Legend (ffij'mdlTio 
Wr.Gd.iVf'j*n'(,«^.i 



■, i, i, d. a, ;, long i i, e, I, a, ti, tr • 



'f ^ le-JI« U 

Leg iB-Utor (J*; ) 
LeiTU-Ut ore Icj i>-U< 

Le-i^t I tnnjy ~i !» 
Lc g t i nule a A k 73 
Lc gil i Riat-vd 
Le git I nut lug 183. 
Lei^lmiUon llfl. 
Le git I ma-tlvt. 
Le-git'l-mlit, lOG. 
Legume (20, BO) iHtX 

le'gGm, I03.J 
Le-gu'Dicn (L,) JL. pi. 

Lt-ffU'nU-na ; Ebg. pi. 

mY mm*, 

Le-gD'mlD-oDa, 23S. 
Lel'Bnre(f('j*ur)( 13,17, 

•I, IBB, N.) [m Wr.: 

«'2Mr, *k.i W- 

i*'oor(S«tM),8in.; 

U'sAur. or UtA'awr. 

Od.lS5.] 



LEFTODACTtL 
Ltm'mlDg', M, OO. 

Lem'on, », 170, 
Lem^itade', IM, 133. 
Le'miu, K. lOB. 
Lend, IS. 
Lend'er, 77. 
LeDd'lng. 
LCaeilM, IBS. 
Lenitth, 15, «. 
Lenrtli'en (lo^a'a), 

Liuurth'ened {lengik'- 

LcDgth'Bi-lBg {tengitli'' 

Len^'i-l)-, 03. 
Length 'l-nc»i, ISO. 
Length' wl» (-vb). 

Le'S^c«, lOOi 
Le'nl-en.cy, 1*0. 
LCdI-oiI (78) [|M«1>D'. 

I-ent,16S.l 
LcD'1-nal, (m. 
Leu'l-n, M. 
Len'l-n.Ing, 18«, 
LcD'l^tTeTitl, 108. 

Lena (Tnu), U ; Note C 

Lent, n. ■ fwt of ttatj 
djif* obeerred t^ 
•ome ehnrcbes. [Ste 

Lfuit, ieo.i 

LCDt'cD (Ien<'B).l»JW. 
Len-Ue'D-lar, lOB. 



Zen-n'oo (L.). 

Len'tU, 17L 

L'eu'aif (Pr.) (Idiv'' 

La's Dine, lOf, ISI. 
LMp'vd. 15, 170, 171. 

Lop er, 77, 170. 






W (n Ikr, i Of In fut, t (M fB 



LEPTODACTYLOUS 



263 



LICENSED 



Lep-to-dac'tyl-oas. 
Lesa>i-«n, 78, 100. 
he'tion i-zhun)t 47, 80. 
Lets, 15, 174. 

LCA-BGC' 121. 

Leti'en {les'n) (101,149), 
t>. to make less. [See 
Lesson, 160.1 

Less'ened (Ici^nd), 105. 

Less'en-ing (^les'n). 

Le««'er. 

Les'BOii(;64'n)(iai,l49), 
n. a portion of a book 
renolred to be learned 
ma recited by a papil. 
[See Lessen, 160.] 

Les'sor, 66, 118. 

tST" It i* prononneed 
fa»-«oK trhen contraated 

Ust [so Sm. Wb. Gd. 
Wr. i Ust, or Ust,Wk. 
155.] 

tar" Thouirh Walker al- 
knri 2M (IHW). he con- 
demiu It aa contrary to 
analocy. 

Let, 15. 

;Letch, 203.^ See 
Leach. J 

Le'thal, ?2. 

Le-thar'gic, 75, 200. 

Le-thar'g'ic-al. 

Leth'ar-gy. 

Le'the, 163. 

Le-tbe'an, 110. 

Let'ter, 66, 170. 

Let'tered, 150, 165. 

Let'ter-ingr* 141. 

Let'ter^pa'per, 205. 

Let'ter-press. 

Let'tin^r. [^71. 

Let'tnce (Jet'tU), 90, 156, 

Leu-co'ma. 

Le'rant, or Lev'ant, a. 
r/c'mn/,Wk.Wb.GJ. ; 
lev'ant^ Sm. ; le'vant, 
or levant' y Wr. 155.] 

Le-vant', n. & v., 121. 

Le-rant'cr. 

Le-vantlne, or Ler'ant- 
ine [so Wr. Gd. ; te- 
van'tXn, Sm. 155.] 

Ler'ee, n. a ceremoni- 
ous morning recep- 
tion of visitors ; — an 
embankment on the 
margin of a river. 
[See Leyy, 160.] 

t3f When oacd to dg- 
nify an erening party or 
aaetmbly, it ia often nro- 
noanced, in th* United 
State*. Ie-r€'. 



Ley'el (Note F. p. 70) 
[not lev'l, 155.1 

Lev'eUed (-eW) [Lev- 
eled, Wb. Gd. 203. 
-^See 177, and Note 
E, p. 70.] 

Lev'el-ler [Leveler, 
Wb. Gd. 203 J 

Lev'el-ling [Level- 
ing,Wb. Gd.203.] 

Le'ver [so Wk.Sm.Wr.} 
lev'er, Wb. Gd. 156.] 

Lev'er-age, 70. 

Lev'er-€t. 

Lev'i-a-blc, 186. 

Le-vi'a-thaji. 

Levied, 09, 186. 

Lev'i-gate, 160. 

Lev'i-gat-ed. 

Lev'i-gat-ing, 183. 

Lcv-i-ga'tion, 112. 

Lev'i-rat« [so Wr. j fe- 
vi'rate, Gd. 155.] 

Lev-i-ru'tion. 

Lev-i-ta'tion. 

Le'vite, 83, 163. 

Le-vit'ic-al, 108. 

Le-vitM-cus, 171. 

Lev'i ty, 108. 

Lev'y (93, 169), n. the 
act of raising or col- 
lecting money or 
men ; — the quantity, 
amount, or number 
raised: — v. to raise, 
as taxes. [See Levee, 
160.] 

Lev'y-ing, 186. 

Lewd (/<kl), 26, 128. 

Lew'is {Wis) (26) [so 
Gd. ; too'w,Wr. ; Poof- 
is, Sm. 155.1 

Lex f L.). 52, N. 

Lex'Ic-al, 72, 108. 

JL.ex-i-cog'ra-pher, 108. 

Lex-i-co-graph'ic, 109. 

Lex-i-co-graph'ic-al. 

Lex-i-co^ro-phy, 108, 

Lex-l-coPo-gy, 108. 

Lex'i-con. 

Lex-i-graph'ic. 

Lex-i-graph'ic-al. 

Lex-ig'ra-phy, 93. 

[Ley, 2fX\.— See Lye.] 

Ley'den (l&'dn, or W- 
dn) (149) [la'dn, Sm. ; 
Wdn, Gd. Wr. 155.J 

Li-a-bTl'i-ty, 108. 

Li'a-ble, 164, 169. 

Li'a-ble-ness, 185. 

Liaison (Fr.) (W-fl- 
z6ng'). 

Li'ar (67, 169), n. one 



who Um, or ftlaifles. 

[See Lyre, 148, and 

Lier, 160. J 
Li'as, 72. 

Li-as'sic, 109, 170. 
Li-ba'tion. 
Li'bel, 76. 
Li'bel-lant [ L i b e 1 a n t , 

Wb. Gd. 20;i.] 
Li'beUed (-held) [Li- 

beled, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— See 177, and Note 

E,.p. 70.1 
Li'bel-ler [Libeler, 



Wb. Gd. 2u:). 
U'bel-lint 



'bef-i 



id. 2u:).j 
Inff [Li 
Wb. Gd. 2 



ibel- 

i03.] 



Li'bel-lofis [Libel 
ous, Wb.Grd. 203.1 
Ll'ber (L.). 
Lib'er-al, <W, 233. 
Lib'er-al-ism (-izm),l3A. 
Lib'er-al-ist. 
Ub-er-al'i-ty, 108, 109. 
Lib'er-al-ize, 202. 
Lib'cr-al-iztMi, 106. 
Lib'er-al-iz-ing. 
Lib'er-al-ly, 170. 
Lib'er-al-mind'ed, 206. 
Lib'er-ato. 
Lib'er-at-ed, 183. 
Lib'er-at-ing. 
Lib-er-a'tion, 112. 
Lib'cr-at-or, «8, 160. 
Lib-er-ta'ri-an, 49, N. 
Lib'er-ti-cide, 106. 

•a^ So pronounced by 
all the orthoCplitM, though 
U-fter'ti-eule would do 
ninre analogical, and has 
the authority of Shelley 
(Adonaia, at iv.) to lup^ 
port it Compare infanti- 
citte, parenficvlr. aorori' 
cide, and tyrcmnicide. 

Llb'er-tlne, 82, 152. 

Lib'er-tiu-lsra (izm), 

Llb'cr-ty, o:^, 105. 

Ll-bid'in-olis, 108. 

/.»'6ro (L.), 72. 

Li-bra'ri-an, 40, N. 

Li'bra-ry, 72, 106. 

Ll'brate. 

U'brat-ed. 

Li'brat-ing. 

Li-bra'tion. 

Ll'bra-to-ry, 86. 

Lt-brei'to (It). 

Lice (195), n. pi [See 

Louse.] 
Li'cense [Licence, 

Sm. 203.] 
Li'censed {-senst), 166, 

ia3 J Note C, p. 34. 



fall; £ Milt there i ^ m in foot ', ^a$ in taaHLe ; ghat g in go i^ at in thiB. 



IiICENSEE 



264 



LINEAMENT 



li-oens-ee', 122. 
Ll'oenB-er. 
Li'oens-ing. 
Li-«en'ti-ate (-ffAl-A<) 

(73) f so >Vk. 8m. Wr. ; 

h-sen'shAt, Wb. Gd. 

166.J 
li-cen'tiotti (-«Aim), 

109 
Ll'oheii (Wkm, or lick'- 

en) (52, 149) [bo Wr. 

Gd.) Uch'en (m the 

name of a tetter, or 

rlngworm,/<'iten), Sm. 

156r| 
lAdh-ea-oe'm-phj^Uk-). 
Lick, 16, 181. 
Licked (likt), 166 } Note 

C, p. 34. 
Lick'er, n. one who 

licks. [See Liquor, 

160.1 
Lick'cr-lsh, 171. 
Lick'iug. 
Lick'Bpit-tle, 164. 
Lic'o-rioe (169) [Liq- 
uorice, 203.] 
Lic'tor. 
Lid, 16, 42, 50. 
Lie, 25. 
Lief (13), ad. willing- 

Ir. [See Leaf, 160.] 

rLiove,203.] 
Liege, 13, 45. 
Li'en {Weny or M'cn) [io 

Wr. Gd. J ft'en, Sm. 

155. 1 hwt len, 153.J 
Li-cn-tor'lc, 109. 
Li'en-t«^r-y, 116, 122. 
Li'er (67, 169), n. one 

who lies down, f See 

Lyre, 148, and Liar, 

100.1 
Lieu (W), 26. 
Lleu-ti'n'an-cy {It^ten'-t 

or lev-ten'-). 
Lleu-ton'Hnt (ltt4en'antj 

or lev-ien'ant) [Ict- 

ten'ant, Wk. Sm. ; 

lit-ten'antt or le/-ten'- 

anty Gd. ; lev-ten' ant, 

or l^4en'anti Wr. 

155.] 



_ •* The Irregularity 
In toundinff lieutenant may 
be accounted for by the 

fi^actice, common when 
le word was flrat intro- 
duced fVom the French, of 
confounding the letters v 
and h: the word waa writ- 
ten liertfruini, and sound- 
ed leertenant^ which nat- 
urally shortened into lev- 
tenoftt." Smart. 



[LieTe, 203. -> See 

Lief.] 
Life, n. (103) [pL LtyeB, 

193.] - 
Llfe'blood(-MiMl),200. 
Lifeboat. 

Life'-gir-ing,206^xc 5 
life'guard {-gara). 
LUfe'-in-Rur'anoe 

(shoor'-), 205. 
Liie'Uke, 206, Exc 5. 
Life'-long, 206, Exc. 6. 
Life'time, 200. 
Lift, 10. 
LilVed, 
Lift'er, 77. 
Lift'hig, 141. 
Lig'a-ment, 106, 100. 
LigHi-ment^al, 72, 123. 
IJg-a-ment'otkB. 
Li^'an, 72. 
Li-ga'tion, 112, 16L 
Lig'a-tare, 90. 
Light (M), 162. 
Llght'ed (ht'-). 
Lighten {M'n), 140, 162. 
Ught'encd (nt'nd). 
Light'en-ing (Ut'n-ing), 
Llght'er (fl?-). 
Light'-h(^ad-ed (2K'-), 

206, Exc. 6. 
Light'-house (m'-),206, 

Exc. 3. 
I^lght'-in'fimt-ry ( W), 

Lighting ( W-), 162. 
IJght'ninor (/W'-), 171. 
Lights (lifz), n. pi. 
Light'some (at'sum), 

162, 169. 
Lig-nal'ooB (lig-naf'6Zt 

or lin-al'Oz) [so Gfd. ; 

lia-nal'OZt Sm. ; Hn- 

at'SZt or lig-nal'dz, 

Wr. 165.] 
Lig'ne-oOB, 160. 
Lis ni-n-ca'tion, 11«. 
Lig'ni-form, 109. 
Lig'ni-5, W, 169. 
Lig'ni-fy-ing. 
Lig'nYne (82, 152) [L 1 g - 

nln,2a3.] 
Lig'nite, 83. 162. 
lAg'nutn m'ta (L.) 

(Fl'te). 
Lig'u-la. 
Like, 26. 
Liked (Uki), 183 ; Note 

C, p. 34. 
Llkcai-h<R>d, 186. 
Like'ly, 93, 185. 
Lik'en (rtA-'n), 149. 
Lik'cned (nk'nd). 



Lik'eD-ing (OFn-). 
Like'wise (-foU). 
Lik'ing, 1^ 
Li'lao,72. 

a^ ** This word, wfth- 
oat any reason Amt tt, i* 
often apelled L i 1 a c h} and 
la often oorraptly pflO> 
noonoed laridfc." AmuL 

Lil-i-a'oeoaa (.■Jkaw),ll2. 
Lilled, 186. 

Lil-i-pu'tian (-«Jkait),171. 
LU-U-bul-e'ro [lU-%-indf- 

e-roy Gd. 156.] 
Lii'y, 169, 170, 190. 
Ll-ma'oeoua {-shue). 
Li'ma-ture. 
Limb {Urn) (162), n. one 

of the extremities of 

the body : — r. to dia- 

member. ISee Limn, 
Lim'bate. [160.1 

Limbed {limd)^ 102, 166. 
Lim'ber, 77. 
Limb'ing (/im'-), 162. 
Lim'bo (86) [pi. Lim'- 

boB {-9az), 192.1 
Lim'baB, 160. 
Lime, 163. 
Limed, 166. 
Um'ing 183. 
Lime'ldln i-kO), 162406. 
Lime'Btone. 
Lim'It, 66, 170. 
Lim'it-a-ble, 151, 109. 
LimMt-«-rv, 72. 
Lim-it-a'tfon. 
LimMt-ed. 
Lim'i^ing. 
Limn {Urn) (102), v. to 

draw or paint. [See 

Limb, 160.] 
Lim'ner. 
Lim'ninff. 
Limp, 10. 

Umped {jUmpi)y 165. 
Lim'pct, 76. 
Lim'pid. 

Lim-pid'i-ty, 106, 160. 
Limp'ing. 
LImV, 169, 183. 
Lin'a-ment ( 160) , n. lint; 

a t«nt for a wonnd. 

\Se* Lineament, and 

Liniment, 148.] 
Linch. 16, 44. 
Linch'pin. 
LinMen, 140. 
Line, 25. 
Lin'e-age, 1O0l 
Lin'e-al, 72. 
Lin'e-al-ly, 170. 
Lin'e-a-ment (100), n. a 



^ ■ ■ ■ - — ■■ ■ - ■■ I ■■ ■ , _ - I . 

&, e, i, 5, u, y, long ;&,£,!, 6, fi, ^, ehori \ikaein fiur, a at in Ikst, & cw in 



\ 



UICBAB 



265 



LITRE 



ftetnre. [See Lin*- 
ment, and Liniment, 

Xm'^t 74, 160. 
Lined, 183. 
Ltn'en, 66, 170. 
Lin'er. 
Linff, 16, M. 
Lin'ger (Zf-*^'- 
Lin 
Lin 



I'ger {lUuf'gur^, 64. 

I'gered {Wa^ffurd). 

I'ger-ing (lintj'gur-). 
Lin'go {Ung'go), 86. 
Lin-gaa-denral (JUng- 

avoa-)^ 34. 
Lm'gual {Ung*ffwal)i 72. 
Un'^-form (2<fi^- 

avfi), 169. 
Lm'guiBt (lin'ffwht). 
Un-^ist'ic • (ling- 

ffwUVik), IW. 
Lm-guiHt'lc-al {Jing- 

ffvn»t'ik-<d)^ 108. 
Li-nig'er-ofiB (-nv'-). 
Lin'i-ment (169), n. a 

semi-fluid ointment. 

r^ee Linament, and 

Lineament, 148.J 
lin'infic. 
Link (Jinak, 54), n. A v. 

[pi. of n. LinlcB.—- 

S« Lynx, 160.] 
Linked (lingiet). 
Link'ing. 
Lln-nK'an (13, 72) [tMi< 

lin'c-an, 153] [Lin- 

nean, 203.1 
Un'net^ 66, 170. 
Lin'seed. 
Lln'aey-wdbl'aey (Kn'- 

ey-wouVzy) [so Sro. ; 

Hn'sy woSoVtty, Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Lin'stook [Lint- 

Btock,2(B.] 
Lint, 16. 
Lin'tel, 76. 
Li'on, 25, 86. 
Li'on-ess. 
Li'on-izc, 202, 
Li'on-ized, 183. 
Li'on-iz-ing. 
Lip, 16, 30. 
Lip'o-gram, or Li'po- 

gram \lip'o-^ram,yft. 

wb. Gd. i h'po-gramy 

Sm. 155.] 
Lip-o-gram -mafic, or 

Li-po-gram-mat'io. 
Lip-o-gram'ma-tist, or 

li-po-grnm'ma-tist. 
Li-poth^-ray (151, 171) 

[so Wk. Sm. Gd. ; tl- 

poth'i-mif, Wr. 166.] 



I4n>ed (Upt)n 176. 
LipTpl-tude, 127, 170. 
Liq'iuirble iUkftoa^r), 

164. 
li-qua^on. 
Liq-ue-ta'dent {libdoe- 

/a'9hefU), 112. 
Liq-ue-fiicaion (hm-). 
Liq-ne-fl'a-ble (^ice-), 

164, 160, 171. 
Liq'ue-fied (-toe-). 
Liq'ue-iy (-ire-), 34, 160. 
Liq'ue-fy-lng. 
U-qucs'oen-cy, 151, 171. 
Li-qnes'oent, 31, 30. 52. 
U-queur* (Ft.) ili-fcur') 

[so 8m. ; ll-kQr', Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. 156.] 
Liq'nid {la-fwid), 171. 
Liq'uid-atc (-toid-). 
Liq'nld-at-ed (vHd-), 
Liq'oid-at-ing (-trid-), 
Liq-nid-a'tion (-«7t<^). 
Liq'uid-at-or (-tric^), 

169 
Ll-qnid'i-ty (-Jfrir/d'-), 

108, 160, 232. 
Liq'uid-ize (teid-) 202. 
Liq'uid-ized (-utW-). 
Liq'uid-Iz-lng (-iruf-). 
Lio'uor («Jt'«r) (171), a 

liquid Bubstanoe. [ iSee 

Licker, 160.] 
[Liquorice 203.~ 

See Licorice.] 
Lis'bon ({ie'-),.86, 136. 
Lisp, 16. 
Lisped (U8pt), 
Lisp'er, 77. 
Lisp'ing. 
List, 16. 
List'cd. 
List'el. 

List'en (Wn), 149, 162. 
List'ened {lia'nd), 165. 
List'en-er (lis'n-), 
List'en-lng (lie'n-). 
Listing. 
Lisfless. 
Lit. 16. 

Lit'a-ny, 66, 170. 
[Liter, 203. 5ee Litre.] 
Lit'er-al, a. pertaining 

to, or consisting of, 

letters; according to 

the exact words or 
' their strict meaning. 

[See Littoral, 148.] 
Lit'er-al-ism (Azm), 136. 
Lit'er-al-lst, 171. 
IJt'er-al-ly, 170. 
Lit'er-a-ry, 72, 160. 
Lit'er-ate, n. A a. 73. 



Lit-er-a'H(L,)yn,pl, 
LU-er-a'tim (L.). 
Lit'er-a-ture, 26, 90. 
Lith'arge. 
Lithe, 140. 
LitHe'some (AIA 'n^tn] 

fsoSm. Wr. WB.(5d.i 

lUh'eum, Wk. 155.] 
Lith'i-a, 160. 
Llth^o. 
Llth'i-um, 160. 
Lith'o-dome. 
Ll-thod'o-mi, n. pi, 
LI-thod'o-moliB. 
Lith'o-glyph, 171. 
Lith'o-grtph, 127. 
Llth'o-grftphed (-prart), 

171 ; Notfl C, p. 34. 
Li-thog'ra-pher. 
Llth-o-graph'ic, 109. 
Llth-o-graph'lc-al, 108. 
Lith'o-graph-ing. 
Li-thog'ra phy, 106, 169. 
Lith-oid'al. 
Llth-o-Iog'ic(-Z<?/'-). 
Lith-o-log'ic-al (-to?'-). 
Li -thol'o-gy, 108. 
Lith'o-man-cy. 
Lith-on-trlp'tlo [L i t h - 

ontryptlo, aB.l 
Llth-on-trip'tist [so 

Wr. ; liih'on-trip-tm, 

Sm. 155.1 
Lith-on-trip'tor [bo 

Wr. ; lith'on-trip-tor, 

Sm. Gd. 166.] 
LT-thoph'a-gofis, 17L 
Lith'o-tint. 
Lith'o-tome. 
Ll-thot'o-mist, 151. 
Ll-thot'o-my, 108, 231. 
Lith'o trip-ay, 109. 
Ll-thot'ri-ty, or Lith'o- 

tri-ty [so Wr.j li- 

thot'H4y, Gd.; lUh'- 

o-trJ-ty, Sm. 155.] 
Lith'o-type. 
Lit'i-gant, 72. 
Lit'i-gate, 73, 160. 
Lit'i-gat-ed. 
Lit'i-gat-lng. 
Lit-i-ga'tion, 112. 
Ltt'i-gat-or, 169. 
Li-tig^iolis (ft-<(?'iM), 

145. 
Llt'muB, 160. 
Li-to'tes (-««). 
Li-tram'e-ter, 108. 
Li'tre (Wtur, or le'tur) 

[K'tur, Sm. ; le'tur, 

Wr.Gd.l66.] [Liter, 

S referred by Gd. See 
fotc E, p. 70.] 



fUl i 6a« In ther«; Ob <m in foot ; 9 m in fkdle ; gh « g In go ; ^ m In this. 

23 



J 



LITTER 

Lifter, 170. 

Lit'tored, IfiO. 

Llt'ter-ing. 

Lit'Ue (/t?7), 66, 162. 

Llt'to-ral (230), a. per- 
taining^ to, or grow- 
ing on, tlie shore. [See 
Lfteral, li8.] 

Ll-tnr'gic. 

Ll-tttr'gio-al, 72. 

Lit'ur-gy. 

Live, V. 161, 163. 

Live, a. 161, 163. 

Uved (tlvd) (161), v. did 
live. 

Lived itlvd) (161), a. 
having life. 

Live'Ii-hcrod, 186. 

LIve'li-uc88. [153.] 

Ltve'loug [not liv'long, 

Live'ly, U3. 

Liv'or. 

Liv'er-Ied (-«). 

Liv'cr-wort {-umrt)^S06. 

Liv'er-y, 105. 

Liv'er-y-man, 196. 

Lives {livz) fiei, 193), 
n. pi. [ See Life] 

Lives (rtt'c) (l(U),v.doe8 
live. 

LivMd, 170. 

Liv'ing. 

Livraison (Fr.) (llv-rd- 
zOng'). 

Li' vre (/i('n<r,or te'ttir), 
Tso Wr. Gd.; li'vur, 
Wlc. Sm. 155.]_ 

Lix Iv'I-al, 232, Exc. 

Lix-iv'1-ate, a. &, v. 73. 

Ux-iv'i nt-ed. 

Lix-iv'i-at-ing. 

Lix-iv-i-a'tlon. 

LIx iv'i-um, lfl». 

Liz'ard, 72. 

Lia'ma (171) [Lama, 
203.] 

Lo (24), int. look \ be- 
hold. [ See Low, 160.] 

Loacli, 24, 44. 

Load (24), n. a burden: 
— V. to frclglitj to 
burden. {See Lowed, 
160.] [Lode (in the 
sense of a mineral 
vein)y 203.] 

Ldad'ed. 

Ldad'ing. 

Ldad'Btar [ L o d e 8 1 a r, 
203.] 

Ldad'stone [Lode^ 
Btonc,2ai.l 

Ldaf (24), n. [pi. Ldaves 
(I6vzy 1(56), 193.] 



266 

Ldofer. 

Loam, 24, 163, 156. 

wr^**Y\iiguij loom.** 

Loam'y, 169. 

Loan (24), v. to lend. 

[See Lone, 160.] 
Loaned {lUnd), 165. 
Loan'ing. 
Loath, a. (24. 37) 

{Loth, 20:3.] 
Loathe, v. 140, 163. 
LoatRcd, 165. 
LoatH'ing. 

LoatH'some (lo^'tum). 
Loaves (Idvz) (193), n. 

pi. [See Loaf.] 
Lo'bate, 73. 
Lo'bat-ed. 
Lob'by, 66, 170. 
Lobe, 24, 163. 
Lo-be'Ii^ 72, 78. 
Lob'lol-ly. 
Lob'sooase. 
Lob'ster, 18, 77. 
Lob'ule, 00. 
Lo'cal, 72. 
Lo-ciOe' (Fr.). 
Lo'cal-ism {•izm)^ 133. 
Lo-cal'i-ty, 108, 109. 
Lo-cal-T-za'tion. 
Lo'oal-ize, 202. 
Lo'cal-ized, 183. 
Lo'cal-iz-ing. 
Lo'cate. 

Lo'cat-ed, 228, N. 
Lo'cat-ing, 183. 
Lo-ea'tion. 
Looh (18, 62), n. a lake. 

[See Lock, 160.1 

[Lough, 203.J 
Lo-cha'ber-ftxe (-to'-), 

156, 171. 
Lock (18, 52. 181), n. a 

fastening ror a door, 

Ac. : — V. to fasten 

close. [ See Loch and 

Lough, 160.] 
Lock'age, 70. 
hock&i {lokt)y 165 ; Kote 

C, p. 34. 
Lock'er, 77. 
Look'et, 76. 
Lock'ing. 
Lock'ist. 
Lockjaw, 206. 
Lock'smith. 
Lock'-up, 206, Exc 4. 
Lo'oo-fo'oo, 2^. 
Lo-co-mo'tion. 
I^-co-mo'tlve (84, 86) 

[BoWk.Wr.Wb.Qd.; 



LOITELINESS 

Ic'ko-mo-Hvj Sm. 

155.] 
Loc'u-la-ment. 
Loc'u-lottB. 
Lo'eust. 

Lode [Load, 203.] 
[Lodestar, 203.— See 

Loadstar.] 
[Lodestone, 203.— 

See Loadstone.] 
Lodge, 45, 171. 
Lodged {tojd). 
Lodge'ment ( 185) 

[Lodgment, Wb. 

Gd. 203.J 
Lodg'er, 45. 
Lodg'ing. 
Loft, 18, N. 
Loft'i-ly, 186. 
Loft'i-nesa. 
Loft'y. 
Log, 18, 53. 
Log'arrithm, 1.33, 140. 
Log-a-rith'mic, 100. 
Log-«^rith'mic-al, 106. 
Log'-book, 20(i. Exc. 4. 
Logged (to^rf), 165, 176. 
Log^r-n«'*ad \-gur-). 
Log'ging {-ghing\ 138, 

170, 176. 
Log'ic(to/-), 45, 200, 235. 
Log'ic-al {4oj'-)j 72, 108. 
Log'ic-al-ly (/o/-). 
Lo-gi'oian (^isA'an), 46, 

234 
Lo-gis'tic (-/«'-). 
Lo-gis'tio-al (-jm'-). 
] Lo-gom'a-clii8t{ Jlf>/),52 
I Lo-gom'a-chy (-ifcy), 106. 
! Log-o-met'rio. 
I Log'o-type, 170. 
Log'w<K>d, 206. 
Loin, 27, 156. 
Loi'ter, 77, 104. 
Loi'tercd, 150. 
Loi'tcr-er. 

Loi'ter-lng. [153. 

L611, (18, 172) [nof lol, 
Lol'lard, 72. 
Lolled {lold), 166. 
LolMi-pop, 170. 
Ldll'ing. 
Lom'bard (lum'hnrdt or 

lom'burd) Uum'burd^ 

Sm. ; lom'burd. Wr. 

(M. 155.1 
Lom-bard'ic (lum-, or 

lom~). 
Lo'ment, 103. 
Lon'don-er {Jun'-Y 22. 
Lone (24), a. solitary. 

[i^ee Loan, 160.] 
Lone'li-ness, 186. 



a, g, i, 5, u, y, long ; i&« S, 1, 5, tt, j^, thori \lLat,in far, kM in fast, kasin 



LONELY 



267 



LUCERN 



Lone'ly, 93. [171. 

Lone'some (-ium), 22, 
Long, 18, N. 
hmge {lunj) [Lunge, 

Longped {longd), 165. 
Loni'er (lAl), n. one 

wno longs. 
Lon'ger(/on^'^rX161 ), 

a. more long. 
Lon-ge'val {rJe'-)» 
Lon-gev'i-ty, 108. 
Lon-ge'vo&B, 100. 
Long'-hSad-ed. 



Long'iBl 

Lon°gl-tade, 26. 160. 

Lon-gi-tud'in-al. 

Long'-lived,206, Exo. 5. 

Loo, 19, 50. 

Loof [80 Wk. 8m. Wb. 
Gd. ; »/, Wr. 155], 
n. the after part of a 
ehip's bow. [Com- 
monly written L u f f , 
203.1 

Loof (looA or m ) [too/, 
8m.; lufy Wk.j lif, 
or too/, Wr. 156], r. to 
bring nearer the wind, 
as the head of a ship. 
[Luff, 203.] 

L<K>k (20) [so Sm. Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; looky Wk. 
155.1 \Se€ Note under 
BookA 

Ldbked {Ubk*)^ 166; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Ldbk'er. 

Ldbk'ing. 

Ldbk'ing-gUss (131, 
200, £xc. 4) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; look'- 
in-gl&i, Wk. 155.] 

Ldbk'-out, 206, Exo. 4. 

Loom, 10. 

Loomed, 165. 

Loom'ing. 

Loon, 10, 4.1. 

Loop, 10, 90. 

Looped (loopt). 

Loop'-hole, 206, Exc. 3. 

Loop'ing. 

Loose, a.Av. 

Loosed {loost)y Note C, 
p. 34. 

Loos'en ilooa'n), 167. 

IxMs'ened (too«'nd),166. 

Loose'ness, 185. 

Loose' strife, 66, N.} 216. 

Loos'ing. 

Lop, 18. 

Lopped (/opOi 176. 



Lop'per. 

Lop'ping[. 

Lo-qua'aouB (-kwa'- 
»hus)y 46, 112, 171. 

Lo-quac'i-ty i-hoaa'-), 
169,235. 

Lo'rate, 40, N. 

Lord (17, 135) [noi liw'- 
urd, 153.] 

Lord'ed. 

Lord'lng. 

Lord'll-ness, 186. 

Lord'ly, 93. 

Lore (49, 67), n. learn- 
ing. [5c« Lower, 148.] 

Lorgnette (Fr.) (torn- 

Jet'). 
r'i-cate, 106, 160. 
L6r'i-cat-ed. 
Ldr-i-ca'tion. 
L6r'i-keet, 46, 171. 
Ldr'l-ot. 
Lorn, 17. 

Lo'ry,40, Note; 100. 
Lose (^looz^f 10, 136. 
Los'er {looz'-\ 
Los'lng {looz'). 
Loss, 18, N. ; 174. 
Lost, 18. 
Lot, 18. 

Lote'-tree, 206, Exo. 4. 
[Loth, 203. — See 
Loath.] 



The eommoD or- 
thography la IdoCA, pro- 
nounced with o long, hut 
both the orthogrmph^ and 

8 renunciation originally 
>Uowed the analogy at 
cioth.** ffebtUr, 

Lo'tion. 

Lo'tos (86) [Lotus, 
203.] 

Lot'ter-y, 160, 170. 

Lo'tus(X.otos,203.] 

Loud. ;». 

Lough {lok) (62, 156), n. 
a lake. [See Lock, 
l60.]r^Loch,20:}.] 

LouiB-tTor (Fr.) (too-€- 

Lounge, 28, 45. [dOr'). 

Lounged, 165. 




Lou'sy (-«y), 136, 160. 
Lout, 28. 

Lou'ver {Joo'-)^ 10, 77. 
Lov'arble {luv'-), IM. 
Lov'age {luv'-)j 70, 160. 
Love (luv), 22, 163. 
Love'-ap-ple (/i«»'-),206, 
Exo. 2. 



L07e'lct-ter (luv''), 
Love'-lles-bleed'lng 

{}uv'tlz-)y 221. 
Love'li-ncss {luv'-). 
Loye'lock (luv'-). 
Love'lom {luv'-). 
Love'ly iluv'-)^ 03, 185. 
Lov'er (mi?'-). 
Love'-sick (ftio'-)* 206, 

Exc. 5. 
Loy'ing (luv'-). 
Lo V 'ing-kind'nesB 

(Ittt?'-), 205. 
Low (24), a. not high ot 

elevated. [See Lo, 

160.1 
L6w [90 8m. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; to, or totr, Wk. 

155], V. to bellow, as 

a cow. 
L5w'-bred.20fl, Exc. 5. 
Lowed, V. old low. [See 

Load, 160.] 
Low'er (161), v. to take 

or bring down. [See 

Lore, 148.] 
Lower [lour) (28, 161 ), r. 

to appear dark or 

gloomy. 
Lowered, 150, 161. 
Lowered {Umrd), 150, 

161. 
Low'er-ing, 161. 
Lowcr'ing (/our'-), 161. 
Low'cr-most. 
Lower'y (/our'y), 160. 
Ldw'ing. 
Low'land. 216. 
Ldw'li-ness, 186. 
Low'It. 

Ldw'-s'pir'it-ed, 205. 
Lox-o-orom'ic, 109, 170. 
Loy'al [noi law'yal, 

153.1 
Loy'al -ist. 
Loy'al-ly. 
Loy'al-ty. 
Loz'enge, 156. 
Lub'bcr, 66, 170. 
Ln'bric, 26. 
Lu'brio-al. 
Lu'bri^sant, 72. 
Lu'bri-cate, 78, 160 
Lu'bri-cat-ed. 
Lu'bri-cat-ing. 
Lu-bri-ca'tion, 112. 
Lu-bric'i-ty, 169, 235. 
Luce, 26, 127. 
Lu'oent, 76. 
Lu'oem (26), n. a sort 

of hunting dog; — a 

species of trefoil. [See 

Lusem, 160.] 



flai;6a«<»there; dbMfn foot; 9a<<»fMUe;gh<ugtfngo;tha«<nt^s. 




LUCERNAL 

LQ-eern'al. 

Lu'dd [not loo'fid, 127, 

163.1 
Lu'cirer, 2«, 78. 
Lu-cifer-otts, 106, 160. 
La-dfio, 109. 
Lu'ci-form, 171. 
Luck, 22, 181. 
Luckily, 186. 
Luck'y, ^1, 100. 
Lu'cm-tlve, 72, »4. 
Lu'cre {kur)t IM ; Note 

£, p. 70. 
Lu'cu-bnitc, », 80. 
Lu-cu-bra'tion, 112. 
Lu'cu-lcnt, 80, 156. 
Lu'di-cro&B, 78, 171. 
Luff (22, 173) [Loof, 

2a^J [C, p. 34. 

Luffed (It^/t)* 166 } Note 
Luff'ing. 
Lug, 22. 
Lu^'gaffc, 176. 
ItUgsva {lug f I) J 166. 

Lug't^ng {ghing)t 138. 

Lu-gu'bri-oG8, UW. 

Lukc'warm, 26, 127 

Lull, 22, 172. 

Lull'a-by. 

LuIUm] Ould), 166. 

Lull'iug. 

Lu'nia-chcl {-tet) [so 
Wb. Gd. ; Voo'mor 
kely 8m. {See $ 2f>) ; 
m'ma-cheL Wr. 156.J 

Lu-ma-chorla (-Jte/'-J. 

Lum-bag'in-o&H {-bq;'-), 

Lum-ba^go, 122. 

Lum'bar (70, 100), a. 
pertaining to the 
loin8. [See Lumber, 

l(K).l 

Lum'bcr (70, 160), n. 
any thing uhcIosb 
and cumwjrBome ; — 
sawed or split tim- 
ber: — V. to heap in 
disorder. [See Lum- 
bar, 1C0.1 

Lura'bered (-burd), 160. 

Lum'ber-er, 77. 

Lum'bcr-lng. 

Lum'bric-al. 

Lu'min-a-ry, 26, 72, 160. 

Lu-min-if cr-ous, 108. 

Lu-niln-os'i-ty, 108. 

Lu'min-oQs, 20, 100. 

Lump, 22, 64. 

Lumped {lumpf). 

Lump'ing. 

Lump'ish, 80. 

Lump'suck-er. 



268 

Lnmp'Tj 160. 
Lu^na (L.), 26. 
Ln'na-cy, 160. 
Lu'nar, 74, 127. 
La-iu'ri-Mi, 40, N. 
Lu'nate. 
La'nat-ed. 
La'na-tic, 26, 100. 
Lu-na^ion, 80.^ 
Lunch, 22, 44. 
Lonohed (luneht), 
Lunch'con {htneh'un) 

(171) fso Bm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd. ; hm'thun. 

Wk. 166.] 
Lunch'inff. 
Lnne, 127. 
iM-netW (Ft.), 1M. 
Lung, 22, 54. 
[Lunge, 208. — 5ee 

Longe.] 
Lung' wort (-wurt). 
Lu'i3-form, 108, 160. 
Lu-ni-Bo'lar, 122. 
Lu'nu-lar, 106. 
Lu'nu-late, 106. 
Lu'nn-lat-ed. 
Lu-per'cal [so Sm. Wr. ; 

lu'iter-lMlt Wb. Gd. 

155.] 



Shaketpean aecenti 

the lint lylliible {h/^per- 
col). 

Lu'pTne, 26, 82, 152. 
Lurch, 21, 44. 
Lurched (lurcht), 165; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Lurch'er. 
Lurch'ing. 
Lure, 26, 40. 
Lured, 166. 
Lu'rid, 26, 40, N. 
Lur'ing, 40, Note , 236. 
Lurk, 21. 
I^urkcd (lurkt), 
Lurk'cr, 228. 
Lurk'ing. 
Lurk'ing-pUoe, 206, 

Exc. 4. 
Lus'cious (/fuft'ttt), 171. 
Lu'sem (26), n. the 

lynx. [See Lucem, 

IflO.l 
Lu'sl-ad (-z%-) [so Wb. 

Gd.: tu'9i^ Wr. 

156.] 
Lust, 22. 
Lust'od. 
Lust'ful (JSol), 
Lust'i-ly, 186. 
LustM-nosB. 
LuBt'ing. 



LUXURY 

Las'tral, 230. 

LuB-tra'tion, 112. 

LuB'tre riOO) [Lus- 
ter, Wb. Gd. 203. -^ 
See Note E, p. 70.] 

Lus'tring {so Wk. 8m. 
Wb. Qd.i Uu'tring, 
or iMi'atringy Wr. 
155], n. a luBtroas 
BlUc. [Lutestring, 
203. — See Note onoer 
ZMteBtringA 

LuB'trofiB, 100. 

iMa'tmmit,.) [pLl^u'- 
tra^ 196.] 

Lust'y, 160. 

Lu'nu X<i-iu'ra (I«.). 

Lu'tan-ist. 

Lu-ta'ri-ofiB, 40, N. 

Lu-ta'tion. 

Lute, 26, 163. 

Lut'ed, 183. 

La'te^&s, 160. 

Lute'string, n. the 
string or a late. 



"By mlrapprelien- 
■ion of Its etymology, the 
word biMtring l« also often 
•peUed thut [Imleatring] : 
bat however prvwDting 
thb form to the eye. it has 
lone elnce regained ita true 
character to the ear (buf~ 



Ln'ther-an, 26, 72. 

Lu'ther-an-ism (4crm), 
127, 133. 

Lu'them, 26. 

Lut'lng, 183. 

Lu'tose. 

Lax'ate. 

Lux'at-ed. 

Lux'at-ing. 

Lux-a'tlon, 232, Exc. 

Lux-u'ri-anoe (lugz-), 
40, Note ; 49, N. ; 137. 

Lux-u'ri-an-cy {lugz-). 

Lux-u'ri-ant {lugz-u'r^ 
ant) (40, 49, N.) [(to 
Wr. ; lug-zit'r\-ftHt, 
Wk. 8m. J lukJiU'ri- 
antt Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Lnx-u'ri-«to {higz-)^ 49, 
N. 

Lux-u'ri-at-ed {lugz-). 

Lux-u'ri-at-ing {lugz). 

Lux-u'ri-ofis {lugz-) 
(137, 232, Exc.) [so 
Wr. } lug-zu'ri-u» f 49, 
N.), Wk. 8m. ; /«/»'- 
«'n-t«, Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Lux'u-ry {j99) [so Wb. 
Gd. ; hik'ahu^nf, Wk. 



a.e,i,6,u,y,Zon^j I,e,!,6,tt,^«ftor<} ii a« <n far, a a« in &8t, & m In 



LYCANTHBOPy 



269 



MAGNETO-ELECTRICITY 



Wr. ; hik9*u-ry, coll. 
ktVsh'oo-ry (,866^26) J 
Sm. 155.] 

Ly-can^thro-py (106) [w 
Wk. Sm. WD. Gd. ; tt- 
han'thro-pyt Wr. 155.J 

Ly-ce'um (111, 125) [L. 
pi. L^-ce'a i Eng. pi. 
Ly-<«'um8 (-tiww), 
1061 [no/ li'Be-tim,153.J 

Lyd'i-an, 171. 

Lye (25), n. water Im- 
prc^fDEtcd with alka- 
line salt imbibed 
from Uie aahea of 
wood. [See Lie, 100.] 
[Ley,m] 

Ly'lng, \M. 

Lymph iUn\f)j 16 

Lym-phat'ic, 109. 

Lyneo, 16, 44, Note 2. 

Lynched {Uncht)y 166; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Lynoh'ing. 

Lynx iUnaks) (16, 64), , 
n. a quadruped of the > 
cat kind. [See Link, 
160.1 

Lynx'-eyed (Hngks'ld), 
206, £xc. 5. 

Ly'ra, 49, N. 

Ly'rate. 

Ly'rat-ed. 

Lyre (25, 49) [See Liar, 
and Lier, 146.] 

Ltr'lc. 

Lyr'lc-al, 108. 

LyWi-dsm {-sizm), 133. 

Ly'rist, 49, N. 

Ly-te'rinan, 49, N. 



M. 

Mab, 10, 31, .12. 
Mao-ad-am-I-za'tion. 
Mac-ad'am-ize, 202. 
Mao-ad'am-ized, 183. 
Mac-ad'am-iz-ing. 
Mac-a-ro'nl, 170. 
Mac-a-ron'io. 
Mac-a-roonS 122. 
Ma-caw', 121. 
Mac'oo-boy, 106. 
Mace, 23. 
Ma^-e-do'ni-an. 
Ma^'er-ate, 171,233,IiZC. 
Ma^'er-at-ed, 183. 
Ha9'er-at-ing. 
Ma9-er-a'tion, 112. 
Mach-i-a-vel'ian (mak- 
iro^vtVjfcm) [so Wr. 



Wb. Gd. ; nutk-i-Q' 
vefU-atii Sm. 155.] 

Mach'i-a-vel-ism {maJ^- 
i^a-vel-izm), 133, 136. 

Ma-chio'o-lat-ed. 

Mach-i-co-la'tion 
(mach-t or tnaah-) 
[mach-i-ko-ia'shunj 
Wr. Gd.; tnash-i-kO- 
la'thuui Sm. 155.1 

Mach'in-al (mak'-)y or 
Ma-chin'al(ma-«Ain'-) 
fso Wr. ; mak'in-eU, 
Wk. Wb. Gd.; ma- 
aJii'nal, Sm. 155.1 

Mach'in-ate (mak'-). 

Mach'in-at-ed {mak'-). 

Mach'in-at-ing (fTioJEr-). 

Mach-in-a'tion {mak-). 

Ma-chine' {-shin'), 114. 

Ma-chin'er-y {-shru'-), 

Ma-chln'i8t(-«A^//M. 

Mack'er-el, Note I>, p. 
37. 

Mac'k'in-tosh, 171. 

Mack'Ie {makU)t n. a 
blur in printing. [See 
Macle, 160.1 

Mac'le (maku) [so Sm. 
Wb. Gd. ; ma^kl, Wr. 
155], n. a tessellated 
appearance in crys- 
tals. [ See Macklc, IM.l 

Ma'cro-cosm (-kozm) 
133) [so Wk. Sm. 
r. ; mak'ro-kozm, 
Wb. Gd. 156.] 

Ma-crom'e-ter, 106. 

Ma'cron. 

Mac-ro-phvl'lolis, or 
Ma-cropn'yl-lo&s. — 
[See Adenophylloufi.] 

Ma-crou'ran, or Ma- 
oru'ran {-kroo'-)t 203. 

Ma-crou'rofis, or Ma- 
cru'rotis (-ilTOo'-)»203. 

Mac'u-la (L.) [pi. Mac'- 
tt-te f-te), 198.] 

Mac'u-Iate, v. & a, 

Mac'u-lat-ed. 

Mac'u-lat-ing. 

Mac-u-la'tion. 

Mad. 10, 42. 

Mad'am, 72, 170. 

Ma-dame' (Fr.) [pL 
Mesfiames {md-ddm')i 
198.] 

Mad'cap, 206. 

Mad'dcd. 

Mad'den {mad'n), 149. 

Mad'dened {mad'nd)t 
165, 167. 

Mad'den-lng {mad'n-). 



^^, 



Mad'der, 66, 170. 

Mad'dlng. 176. 

Made, v. did make. [Set 

Maid. 160.] 
Ma-dei'ra {ma-de'ra, or 

ma-da'ra) (49,N.)[»»a- 

de'rOjWr.; ma-der^ra, 

Sm.; ma-da'ra^ Wb. 

Gd. 155.1 
Mad-em-op-selle' {meui- 

mw'd-zel') [bo Sm. 

Gd. ; mad-^r^-wd-zel' y 

Wr. 155.] 
Mad'house, 216. 
Mad'mftn, 196. 
Ma-don'na, 66, 170. 
Mad're-pore, 106, 171. 
Mad'ri-er, or Ma-drier' 

[so Wr. ; mad'ri-er, 

Sm. ; mad-rir', Grd. 

155.] 
Mad'ii-gal, 72. 
Afd-e8-to'8o (It.) {-zo). 
Mag-a-zine' (-««»'), 122. 
Mag'da-len, 105. 
Maff-el-Ian'ic {m(0-) [so 

Wr. Gd. ; mag-elAan'- 

ik, Sm. 155.] 
Mag'got, 170. 
Mag'got-v, 169, 176. 
Ma^gi (-j1), n. pi. 
Ma'gi-an, 78, 171. 
Maggie {maj'-), 200, 236. 
Mag'ic-al {mqj'-), 228. 
Ma-gi'cian {-jtsh'an). 



Ma-gllp' (ghUp'), 121. 
Mag-is-te'n-al 
49, N. 



(»n<V-), 



Mag'is-tra-oy {m^'-). 

Mag'is-trate (miy'-). 

Mag'ma, 72. 

Mag'na Char'ta (L.), 
(ifcar'-), 156. 

Mag-na-nim'i-ty, 160. 

Mag-nan 'i-moUs. 

Mag'nate. 

Mag-ne'si-a (-^ftl-a^ [so 
Wr. ; mag-tte'st-ay 
coll. mag-ne' shi-a, 
Sm. ; mag-nef zka^Gd. 
155.] 

Mag-ne'si-an {-zKi-an). 

Mag'net. 76. 

Mag-net'ic, 109. 

Mag-net'ic-al, 108. 

Mag'net-ism {-izm), 136. 

Mag'net-ize, 202. 

Mag'net-ized, 166. 

Mag'net-iz-er. 

Mag'net-iz-ine^. 

Mag'not-o-e-icc'triCj224 

Mag'net-o-e- leo-trif'i- 
ty [so Sm. Wr. ; mag- 



fiOl; 6a«<fi there; 66 cu in foot ; 9 a« in flusUe ;gha« gin go ;|& at In thla 

23* 




MAGNETOMETER 

ne't<h«-leh-irit'i4^, 

Od. 155.] 
Mag-net-om'e-tcr, 106. 
Ma^uct-o-mo'tor 

tMagneto-mo- 
er,203.] 

Mag-niPic, 109. 

Mai,r-iiirio-al, 106. 

Ma^-niPi-oenoe, 171. 

Mag-iiiri-ocnt, 127. 

Mag^'ni-fied. 

Mag'ui-fi-or, 186. 

Mag'ni-fy, W. 

Mag'ui-fy-lng, 186. 

Mag'-nil'o-qucxioe 
{Incens). 

Ma^-nil'o-quent 
{-Ktcent). 

Mag'ni-tadc, 160. 

Mag-no' U^, 156. 

Mat^'pie. 

Ma<r'ucy (fmz^Vy),Note 
D, p. 37 ; m. 

Maff'yar (mad'yar). 

Ma-na-ba-ra'ta, or M»- 
hab-arra'ta [ma-hab-€t- 
rA'ta, Sm. ; ma-ha- 
hU'rortd, Wr. 155.1 

Ma-hog' a-ny, 171. 

Ma-hom'et-an [ M a - 
horn e d an, M o- 
hammcdan,203.] 

Ma-hom'et-an-iBm 
(-t^m). 

Maid, n. a virgin. [See 
Made, ICO.] 

Maid'en {mad'n), 140. 

Maid'cn-Iu^od {mii(Vn-), 

Maid-ma'ri-an [so Wr. 
Gd. ; mtid-mir'yany 
Wk. ; mitdrm6r'v<my 
Sm. 155.1 

Mail, n. defensive ar- 
mor ; —postal convey- 
ance : — r. to send by 
post. [See Male, 100.] 

MaU'a-ble, IGi, 100. 

Mailed, 166. 

Mail'ing. 

Maim, 23, 32. 

Maimed, 105. 

Maim'ing. 

Main, a. principal,chief: 
— n. the ocean, the 
continent. [.S^eeMane, 
160.] 

Main'miMt, 206, 216. 

Main'prise {-prlz) 
[Mainprise, 203.J 

Main'sail. 

Main-tain' (nutn-tUn') 
[so Wk. Wb. Gd. ; 
manrULn'tOT mOnrUln', 



270 

Wr. ; fiiAn4lln'i Sm. 
155.1 

Main-Uln'»-ble (m«»-), 
109. 

Main-tained' (fii«»-),165. 

Main-tain'er {men-)., n. 
one who maintains or 
Bupporta. \See Main- 
tainor, 160.J 

Main-tain'ing {men-). 

Main-tain'or {men-), n. 
one who maintains a 
suit between others 
by furnishing money. 
[Law term. — See 
Maintalner, 160.1 

Main'ten-anoo (160, 171) 
[soSm.Wr.Wb.Gd.; 
men* tenant, yf It. 155. J 

Maize (23,40), n. Indian 
com. [See Maxe, 160.] 

Ma-ies'tlc, 100. 

Ma-les'tio-al, 228. 

Ma-Jes'tio-al-ly. 

MiO'cB-ty, 105. 

Ma'Jor, 88, 160. 

Ma'jor-do'mo. 

Ma'jor*gen'er-aI, 206. 

Ma-lor'i-ty, 160. 

Ma-jus'cule. 

Make, 23, 52. 

Mak'er. 

Make'-shift,206, Exc. 4. 

Make'-weight {-wHt). 

Mak'ing, 141. 

Mal'a-clilte (-ArK), 52. 

Mal-a-col'o-gy, 108. 

Mal-a-cop-te-ryg'i-ofis 
(-rv'i-tM), 110, 171. 

Mal-a-coB'tra-can. 

Mal-a-cos'tra-coflis. 

[M aladmini stra- 
ti on, 2tti. 5eeMale- 
admini stration .] 

Mal-a-droit', 122. 

Mal'a-dy, 106. 

Mal'a-ga, 72. 

Mal'an-ders (-durz)» 

Mal'a-pert, 21, N. 

MaJr<ip-ro-poa* (Fr.) 

(W). 
Maaar. 

Mn-la'ri-a (40, N.) [so 
Wb. Gd. ; mal-n'rta, 
Wr. ; mal-U're-a, Sm. 
155.1 

Ma-la'ri-otts, 100. 

Ma'late. 

Ma-Iay' (121, 156). n. a 
native or an inhabit- 



ant of Malacca. 
Mei^e, 160.] 
Ma-lay'an. 



[See 



MALIGNANCY 

[Maloonforma- 
tion, 203.— See 
Maleconformation.l 

[Malcontent. — See 
Malecontent.] 

Male, a. of the sex that 
begets young : — n. a 
he-animal. [See Mail, 
160.] 

Mftle, a prefix signlfy- 
ingiU. 



„ Ai a prrflz, nuile 
ii pronoanced mid by 
Smart, Worr«tter, and 
Dioit other orthot>pi$t«. but 
by Walker hmU; and th« 
e, which to lunk in the 
pronunciation, ie often 
omitted in the orthogra- 
phy. Worcester remark*: 
** There are worda in vhich 
male has the lame origin 
and meaninir[UIJ( butuie 
letten arc not so separable 
aa to hare the character of 
a prdlzt M. malefactor.'* 

Mftle-ad-min-i»-tni'tion 

tMaladminia- 
ration,2a3.1 

Mftle>con-form-a'tioii 
[Malcon forma- 
tion, 203.] 

Mftle-oon-tcnt' [Mal- 
con t e n t , 203.1 

Mal-e-dic'tion, 144. 

Mal-e-fkc'tor, or Mml'e- 
fao-tor (88, 116) [mal- 
e^fak^tur, Wk. Wr. 
Wb. Gd.j mal'e-fak- 
tur, Sm. 155.J 

M&Ie-ft'a'sance {mal-fe*' 
zans) [so Wr. Gfd. : 
mal-fa'zan», Sm. 155.J 
[Malfeasance, 

[Male formation, 
203.— See Malforma- 
tion.] 

M&le-prac'tioe (171) 
[Malpractice,203.] 

[M a 1 e t r e a tj 203. — 
See Maltreat.] 

Ma-lev'o-lenoe, 160. 

Ma-lev'o-lent. 

[Malfeasance, 2(n. 
— See Malefeasance. 1 

Mal-form-a'tion[M a 1 e- 
formation, 203.1 

Ma'lic, 200. 

Mal'Ice, 100, 170. 

Ma-U'ciouB {-Usk'us), 
112, 160. 

Ma-lign' (-An'), a. ft v. 
103, 121, 162. 

Ma-Ug'nan-cy, 100. 



i« 8, !, 0» ti, y, long; }L,li, 1, 9, tt, f, tkort ; fktuin far, 4 cm in fkst, ft at lis 



MALIGNANT 



271 



MANIFESTABLE 



Ha-Iifi^'nant, 72. 
Ma-lii^Dod' i-nndf)y 162. 
Ma-lijfn'cr (-/In'-). 
M»-lis,Ti'lnif (4ln'-). 
Ma lit^'ni ty, IGO. 
Ma-lin'ger (ma4ing*- 

fur) (54, 138) [bo dd. 
m. J ma-/«n'Jur, Wr. 
155.] 
Ma-lin'gered {-ling'- 

gurd)i 165. 
Ma-liD'ger-cr {-linff'- 

MA^iu'ger-ingr (-/tn^'- ! 
_fft»r). ! 

M^l'i-Bon (-271), 130, 149. ; 
Markiii {mau>'kin)y 162, 

171. i 

Mill Tbo Wr. Wb. Gd. ; I 

mat, Wk. 8m. 155], n. 

a h€ayy wooden ham- 
mer or Doetle.r M a u 1 , : 

203.] 
Hill [io Sm. Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; mel, Wk. 155], n. 

a public walk. 
Mill, r. to beat with a 

mall. [Maul,a03.— 

See. Mall.] 
Mal'lard, 72. 
Mai le-arbil'i-ty, 160. 
Mal'le-a-ble, 104, 229. 
Mal'le-ate, 170. 
Mal'leat-€d, 183. 
Mal'lc-at-ing. 
Mal-le-a'tion, 112. 
M&lled, 105. 
Mal'le-o-lar. 
Manet, 06, 70, 170. 
Mail'ing. 
Maiaow [pi. Maiadws 

(-tt^), 1«9.] 



_ '^Seldom aaed bat 
In the plunl form.** -~ 
Worcetter. 

MSlm'sey inUtm'zp), 
102. 169. 

[Malpractice, 203. 
— See MalepracUce.] 

Mftlt, 17. 

Malt'ed. 

MalteBc' (-««') (121) 
[bo Wr. i mawl4es't 
Gd. 155.] 

Mal'tha,72. 

Mal-thn'sian (-zhan) 
(112, 127) [nud-thu'- 
than, Wr. ; mal-thu'' 
ti^n, Gd. 166.] 

Milt'ingr. 

Mal-treat' [Male- 
treat, 203.] 



Mal-tr§at'cd. 
Mal-treat'ing. 
Mal-treat'ment. 
Malt'ster, 77. 
Ma'lum in se (L.). 
Slal-va'ceouB {^shxts), 
Mal-ver-sa'tion. 
Mam'e-luke, 20. 
Mam-ma', 171. 
Mam'mal. 72, 170. 
Mam-ma'li-a, n. pi, 
Mam-ma'li-an. 
Mam-mal'o-gist, 45. 
Mam-mal'o-g7, 108. 
Mam'ma-ry, 72. 
Mam'mi-fer, 78. 
Mam-mlPer-ous, 108. 
Mam'mi-form, 106. 
Mam'mil-Ia-ry, 170. 
Mam'mil-lat-ed. 
Mam'mon, 66, 80, 170. 
Mam'mon-ist. 
Mam'moth, 86, 170. 
Maii,n.& r. (10, 43) [pi. 

of n. men, 195.1 
Man'a-cle, 101, 1(H. 
Man'a-cled {-kid), 183. 
Man'a-cling. 
Man'age, 100, 170. 
Man'age-a-ble, 104, 183. 
Man'aged. 
Man'age-ment, 185. 
Maxi'a-gt?r. 
Man'a-eing-. 
Man'a-Kin. 109. 
Man-a-tvx/, 122. 
Manch-i-neel', 122, 171. 
Man-d-pa'tion. 
Man'ci-ple, 104. 
Man-4lX'mn» (L.). 
ilan-darrin' {-rtn'), 122. 
Man'da-ta-ry, 72. 
Man'date. 
Man'da-to-ry, 80. 
Man'dJ-blo, 104, 109. 
Man-dib'u-Ur, 74, 106. 
Man-dib'u-late, 89. 
Man-dib'u-Ut-ed. 
Man-di-bu'li-form, 108. 
Man'drake, 103. 
Man'drel (70), n. an in 
K 

the work in a turner^ 



Btrument for holdin&f 
Man- 



lathe. lSe£ 
drill, 148.] 

Man'drlll, n. a lara^e 
and powerful specks 
of baboon. [5ee Man- 
drel, 148.] 

Mane (23), n. the lone 
hair on the neck or 
certain animals. [See 
Main, 100.] 



Ma-nege' (ma^&zhf) [ bo 
Wr. ; mUn-Azh', Sm. j 
fna-n&zh', or man'^, 
Gd. 155.J 

Mafnea (L.) {-nit), n. 

MSii'fiil (Jwl), 178. 
Man'ful-Iy {-fool-). 
[Maneuver, Wb.Gd. 

2a'}.— 5ee Manoeuvre.] 
[Mancuveror, Wb. 

Gd. 203. — 5€e Ma- 

noBuvrer.] 
[M aneu veringft 

Wb.Gd. 203. — SV(? 

Manoeuvring.] 
Man'ga-by (mrtn^'-),54. 
Man-i'A-nefle' {mnng-gn- 

nez^) (122) [so Sm. 

Wr. ; mang-ga-nla' , 

(Sd. 155.] 
Man-ga-ne'sian {mang- 

ga-ne' zhi-an) [so 

Wr. J mang-ga-nt'- 

»han, (W. 155.] 
Mange, 23, 127. 
Man'gcl-wur'zel 

{mang'gl-vmr'zl), 
Man'ger, 46. 
Man'gl-neBB, 180. 
Man'glc {mang'gl)y 54, 

104. 
Man'glcd {mang'gld). 
Man'glcr (mang'-). 
Man'gling {mang'-). 
Man'go {mang'-). 
MangooBc, 203.— 

See Mongoose, 203.] 
Man'go-stau (mang'-), 

or Man'go-Bieen 

{mang'-). 
Man'grove {mang'-) [bo 

Wr. (jrd. ; man'grCv, 

Sm. 165.1 
Man'gy, 9.3, 150. 
[Man had en, 203.^ 

See Menhaden.] 
Man'lii^d. 
Ma'ni-a.- 

Ma'ni-a a po'tu {L.). 
Ma'ni oc, 108. 
Ma-ni'ac-al, 108. 
Man-i-che'an {-ke'-). 
Man'i-cliee (-ke-) Tbo 

Sm. Gi\. ', man-i-lce', 

Wr. 155.] 
Man-i-chee'lsm C-ke'- 

izm) [bo Sm. Wr.; 

man't-ke-izm, Qd. 

165.] 
Man'i-ohord {-kord). 
Man'i-feBt. 
[Manifestable, 



lUls d <M in there } <M><M<nfoot; 9a«inflMile;gh<Mg<»go;tha«<nthl» 



MANIFESTATION 



272 



MARC 



20i.'~See Manlfesti- 

ble.] 
Man-i-feat-a'tion. 
Man'i-fest-ed. 
Man'i-feBt-i-ble (164) 

[Manifestable, 

mj 

Man'i'fest-ing. 
ManM-feat-ly, 126. 
Man-i-fcBt'o, n. [pi. 

Man-i-lbst'oes (-o«), 

102.1 
Man'i-f51d. 
Man'i-kln, 160, 170. 
Ma'nl-oo. 
Man'1-ple. 164. 
Ma-nip'u-lar, 106. 
Ma-nlp'u-late. 
Ma-nlp'u-lat-ed. 
Ma-nip'u-lat-ing. 
Ma-nlp-u-la'tioiL. ' 
Ma'nifl. 

Man'i-ton (-too). 
Man-kind' (52, 146) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; man- 

Jb'Ind', Sm.(56e§20); 

tnan-k»%nd't Wk. 155.] 

n^When atcd aatl- 
thettcally with retpeet to 
wontankvut, the accent ii 
on the An t •yllabll. 

[Manks, 203.— 5«e 

Manx.] 
Man'Iike, 206, Exo. 5. 
Man'li-nesa, 78, 186. 
Man'ly, 03. 
Man'-mid'wife [bo 

Wr.i man-mid'tc\f, 

Sm. 155.] 
Man'-mll'll-ner. 
Man'na, 60, 72. 
Man'na^drop'ping, 206. 
Man'naed, 165, 188. 
Manned, 165, 176. 
Man'ner (70. 170), n. 

mode, method. [See 

Manor, 160.] 
Man'nercd {-nurd). 
Man'ner-lsm {-izm)f 133. 
Man'ner-lBt. 
Man'ner-U-neBB. 
Man'ner-ly. 
Man'nlnfif. 
Man'nisn, 176. 
Ma-noBtt'vre {-noo'vur) 

n60, 171) [80 Wk. Sm. 

Wr. } nM-nU'vur, Wb. 

Od. 155] TManen- 

V e r , preferred by 

Gd.a03.] 
Ma-n(Bu'yred (-noo'- 

vurd) [Maneu- 
vered, 203.] 



Ma-noea'rrer (-noo'') 
[ManeuTorer, ' 
203.] 

Ma-noDu'vilng (-fioo'-) 
[M a n e u T e r i n g , 

Man^of-w&r', 221. 

Ma-nom'e-ter, 106. 

Man-o-met'rio-al. 

Man'or (66, 70. 170), n. 
a nobleman's estate 
in lands. [See Man- 
ner, 160.] 

Marno'ri-al, 40, N. 

Manse, Note D, p. 37. 

Man'Biop, 112, 2M. 

Man'slaagh-ter(-«{atc-), 
206. 

Man'Bne-tode(nnoe-),160 

Man'tel {man'tl) (140), 
n. the work in ih>nt 
of a chimney over the 
Jambs of a nreplaoe. 

WBT ** This ■pfrllinff If 
now prevalent Insteaaof 
fnaitfle, in order to diatin- 
gttiih Detween this word 
and wtenUle, a garment." 
Goodrich, 

Man'tel^ (man'tl^) 
[so Sm. , man'tel-et, 
Wb.6d.; man-te-let', 
Wk. Wr. 155.] 

Man'ti-ger (-j^r), or 
Man'fi-ger (,-ffttr) 
[man'ti-gurj Wr. wb. 
Gd. ; man'tl-gury Sm.: 
man-Wgur, Wk. 155.1 

Man'tle (-tl), 164. 

IGT' When this word 
means the work in/ront of 
a eMmmeift over tke Jamm 
itf a flrtpUMee, It Is now 
more commonly written 
mtaUeL'^Sat Note under 
MmUL 

Man'tled {Aid), IM, 166. 
Man'tllng, 183. 
Man'taa {man*tu , or 

man'tu-a) [man'tu<, 

Sm., mau'chu-a, Wk.; 

man'ttHi, or man'iu, 

Wr. (3d. 166.] 

Saw-* jr<mleaM...lstha 
original word, and sng^ 
IMS the nsual pronnndi- 
on: the word had no rela- 
tionship to the Italian city, 
and may therelbre proper- 
Ijdiflfer from it in sound." 
SnuBtrt. 

Man'taav-m&k-er (-^i*-), 

205. 
Man'u-al, 72. 80. 
Man-u-duc'tion, 112. 



Man-u-ftfCt'o-ry, 80. 
Han-u-fkct'ure, n. A v. 

80,01. 
Man-n-(hct'nred, 165. 
Man-u-ftict'iir-er(-yur-), 

01, 171, 183. 
Man-u-fact'nr-ing. 
Man-u-mia'sion {-mith*- 

un), 112, 169. 
Man-u-mit' ( 122)[ soWk. 

Wr. Gd. ; man'cMntt, 

Sm. 155.1 
Man-u-mirted, 176. 
Man-u-mit'ting. 
Man-n-mit'tor, 160. 
Ma-nur'a-ble, 49,N.; 160. 
Ma-nare', 103, 121. 
Manured', 166. 
Ma-nur'er, 183. 
M»nnr'ing. 
Man'n>Bcr$it, 80. 
Manx (man^iba), 52, 64. 

[M an ka, 203.1 
Man'y {men'yh 170, 171. 



**Mttnw and oTMy, 
as they were onclnally pro- 
nounced, have Dee n short- 
ened, hy their frrqaent oe- 
eurrenoe in discourse, in- 



Map, 10, 30, 32. 
Ma'ple, 164. 
Mapped {mapi\ 176. 
Map'ping. 
Mar, 11,49, 135. 
M&r'a-bou {-boo), 106 

[bo Qd.; mULr^a-^fOi^ , 

Wr. 155.1 
Mftr'a-boat {-boot) [w 

Qd.; miir-a4H>ot* y Wr. 

155.] 
MOr-a-nd'tha (Heb.) 

(156) [so Sm. Gd. ; 

mXkr-Ornathfay Wk. 

Wr. 155.1 
Mar-as-chi'no {-M~). 
Ma-ras'mua (-ra9'-)»130. 
Ma-rftud', 17, 103. 
Ma-rAud'ed. 
Ma-rAnd'er [so Sm. Wr. 

Wb. Gd.j moTo'dtfr, 

Wk. 155.] 
Ma-r&ad'ing. 
Mar-a-ye'di, 156. 
Mar'ble, 135, 164. 
Mar'bled {-Md), 166. 
Mar'bler, 183. 
Mar'bling. 
Maro( 1 1,«2, 181).n.refa8e 

matter remaining af- 
ter the pressure of 

fhiit. [5ee Mark, an/ 

Marqne, 160.] 



i, fi, i, 5, u, y, lomg ; ft, £, X, 6, 11, f , ehori ; ft of <ii fkr, 4 at <n Ikst, ft « ii» 



MARCASITE 



273 



MARTYR 



tfar'ca-site. 
Mar-ces'ccnt, 122. 
March, 11,44,49, 135. 
Marched {marc/U)t 165; 

Note C, p. U. 
March'er. 
March'es (-*^), 76. 
March 'ing. 
Mar'chion-ess (-«At<n}, 

141, 150. 
Marcb'pane. 
Mar'cid, 80. 
Mar-cid'i-ty, 106, 160. 
Mare (mtr) (14), n. the 

female of the horse. 

[Se^ Mavor, 160.] 
Mare'gchal {mar'sJuU) 

[80 Wk. Wr. Wb.Gd.; 

mdr'e3h-€Ui by con- 
traction mar'shcUy 

Sm.] [Marshal (the 

common ortbogra- 

phT), m,] 
Marga-rate. 
Marg&r'ic. 

Mar'gartne ( 152) [ M a r- 
. garin,2U3.] 
Marge, 11,4.5,49. 
Mar^gin, 11,45. 
Mar'gin al, 72, 106 
Mar'gin-ate. 
Mar'gin-at-ed. 
Mar'grave, 103. 
Mar-grav'i-ate, 123. 
Mar'gra-vine (-t*fn),183. 
M&r'i-gold, 48, 105. 
Marine' iren')^ 121. 
Mir'i-ncr, 105. 
Ma-ri-ol'a-try. 
M&r'iflh [so Sm. Wb. 

Gd. ; mdrfish, Wk. , 

mir'ish, Wr. 155.1 
Mir'l-tal [so Wk.Vr. 

Wb. Gd. ; ma^'tal, 

Sm. 155.1 
K&r'i-tlme [not mAr'ar 

tim, 127, 153.] 
Mar 'jo-ram, Ti, 105. 
Hark (11, 135), n. a trace 

or impression : — v. 

to trace or impress. 

\See Marc, and 

Marque, 100.] 
Marked (tnarki)^ 165; 

Note C. p. 34. 
Mark'er, 228. 
Mar'ket, 11,76. 
Marlcet-a-ble, 106, 109. 
Mar'ket-day', 205. 
Mar'kei-ed. 
Mar'ket-ing. 
Market-man. 
Mar'ket-pUice. 



Mar'ket- wom 'an 
( tcdom'-), 205. 

Mark'ing. 

Marks'man, 214. 

Marl, 11, 1.35. 

Mnrled (jnarld), 165. 

Mar'llne, 82, 152. 

Marl'ing. 

Marl'y, 93, 109. 

Mar'ma-ladc, 105. 

Mar-mo-ra'oeofis 
(-«AtM), 112. 

Mar-mo' re-an,40,N.; 110 

Mar-mo-set' (-2C/' )( l^i) 
[so Wk. Wr. ; mar'- 
mo-zet, 8m. ; mar'mo- 
•ety Gd. 155.1 

Mar'mot, or Mar-mot' 
[so Wr. ; mar'mott 
Wb. Grd. ; mar-mot' y 
Sm. ; mar'moot, Wk. 
155.] 

[Marone, 203. — See 
Marroon.] 

M&r'on-ite. 

Ma-roon'(121),n. a free 
negro UYing on the 
mountains in the 
West Indies. [See 
Marroon, 148.J 

Mar'plot, 205. 

Marque {mark), n. per- 
mission to pass the 
frontier of a country 
in order to make re- 
prisals. [See Marc, 
and Mark, 160.] 

Mar-quee' (-*•«'), 114. 

Mar'quesB (-L-wes) (171) 
[Marquis, 2a:{.J 



"TiU of late, mor- 
ovu WM the luual fbnii, . . . 
out this \m now In a great 
degree dUcontinucd, or 
Dsed onlj with reference 
to the foreign title." SmarU 

Mar'quet-rv {-ket). 
Mar'quis [Marquess, 

203.] 
Mar'quis-atc (-/rtr/z) 

[so Wk. Sm. Wr. ; 

marfl-wis-itj Wb. Gd. 

155.] 
Marred (mard)j 165. 
Mftr'riage (-nfi), 70, 160. 
M&r'riage-a-ble (-ti/-), 

183. 
M&r'rTed, 99. 
Mar'ri-cr, 186. 
If&r-roon' (121), n. a 

very deep red color 

with a brownish cast. 

[See Maroon, 148.] 



„ "It iM generally 
though wrongly tpellei 
mwoon or tnarone." Smart 

M&r'rSw, 48, 101. 

M&r'rdw«bone. 

Mir'row-ftt. 

Mir'row-y, 93. 

Mftr'ry, 48, 93, 104. 

Mttr'ry-ing, 186. 

Mars {marz)y 11, 40. 

Marsh, 11, 44>, 04. 

Mar'shal (2.30), n. a civ- 
il or a military officer 
of high rank. [See 
Martial. 1(30.1 [M ar- 
ose hal, 20.i.] 

Mar'shalled (1G5)[M a r- 
shaled, Wb. Gd. 
203. — See 177, and 
Note E, p. 70.1 

Mar'shal-ler( 177)[H a r- 
shaler, Wb. Gd. 



203.] 
Mar'shal-Un 



8 (177) 
[Marshaling, 
Wb. Gd. 2a3.] 

Mar'shal-sr'n. 

Marsh'-mul'low, 205. 

Marsh'-mftr'i-gold. 

Marsh'v, IGO. 

Mar-su^pi-al, 127. 

Mar-sn'pi-um, 169. 

Mart, 11,41,49. 

Mar-tel'lo, 86, 170. 

Mar't^n (149), n. a large 
kind of weasel : — a 
kind of swallow. 



In the last ■onie, 

the more usual orthogra- 
phy it Martin . 

Mar'tiol (-shnl), a. per- 
taining to war or bat- 
tle. iSee Marshal, 
160.] 

Mar'tan (149), n. a sort 
of swallow that builds 
in the eaves of houses. 
[See Marten, 148.] 
[Marten, 203.— 5ec 
Note under Marten.] 

Mar'tin-et(l22) [so Sm. 
Wb. Grd. ; mar-ti-net\ 
Wr. ; mar-tin-et'y in 
the sense of a riifid 
disciplinarian — mar' - 
tin-ett in the sense of 
a martin, Wk. 155.] 

Mar'tin-gale ( 105) 

[Martingal,203.] 

MaWtln-mas, 72, 180. 

Mart' let, 230. 

Mar'tyr, 95, 109. 



fiUii %€Uinthere; <R>(M<nfooti gasinfacHei gh a« g <n go ; |^ at in this. 




MARTTBOOM 

Mar'tyr-dom (-dwn* 

100. 
Mar'tyred, 150, 165. 
Mar'tyr-Ing, 176. 
Mar-tyr-o lojj'lc (-l<^'-). 
Mar-tyr-o-loff'ic-al 

i-iof). 
Mar-tyr-ol'o-glat. 
Mar-tyr-ol'o-gy. 
MaWvol, Htf. 
Mar-velied [ M a r - 

veled, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— See 177, and Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Mar'veMing [M ar ve 1- 

lngr,Wb.Gd. 203.1 
Mar'vel-lofiB (169, 177) 

[Marvelous, Wb. 

Gd. 203.] 
Mas'cle {nuu'tl) [so 

Sm. Wr. ; mat'lU, or 

mas'l, Gd. 155.1 
Mas'cu-llue, 80, 152. 
Mash, 10, 46. 
Mashed (^masht), 166; 

Note C, p. M, 
Mash'ing^. 
Mash'y, 93, 160. 
Mask, 12, 131. 
Masked {mAskt)^ 166. 
Mask'er, 77. 
Mask'ing. 
Mas'Iin (maz'Un) 

rMaBtlln,MoBliii, 

Ml8lin,2a^] 
Ma'son (ma'sn)^ 140. 
Ma-eon'ic, 109, 12:i. 
Ma'son-ry f-«n-), 106. 
Mas'o-rab [M a s o r a , 

M a 8 B o r a , 203.] 
Mae-o-retMc. 
Mas-o-rct'ic-al. 
Maa'o-rite, 152. 
[Masque, 203. — See 

Mask.] 
Mas-queivade' (-lur-)t 

122. 
Mas-qucr-ad'ed (-kur-). 
Maa-quer-ad'er {-kur-). 
Mas-quer-adMng (kur-). 
Mass, 12, 174. 
Mils' sarcre (-kur-), 171 ; 

Note E, p. 70. 
Mfts'sa-cred (-i*Mrd),171. 
MAe'sa-CTcr (-krur). 
M&s'sa-cring. 
Mass'-book, 206,£xo.4. 
Mas'si-cot. 
Maa'si-ncRB, 186. 
Mas'sTve, i^. 
Mass'-mcet-lng. 
Mass'y, 66, 169. 
Mast, 12, 131. 



274 

M&at'ed. 

Maa'ter (12) [See Mis- 
ter.] 

Maa'tei^bulld'er, 205. 

Maa'ter-lng. 

Maa'tei^Iy. 

Maa'ter-pleoe. 

Maa'ter-ahip. 

Maa'tcr-atroke. 

M48'ter»work'maii 
(-irttrJf -)» 206. 

Maa'ter-y, 03, 109. 

Mast'-hfiad, 206, Exo. 8. 

Maa'tio [Mastioh, 
203.] 

Mas'tt-ca-ble, 164. 

Maa'ti<cate, 73, 160. 

Maa'ti cat-«d, 183. 

Maa'ti-cat-lng. 

Mas-tl-ca'tion, 112, 160. 

Mas'ti-cat-o-ry, 86. 

Mas'tiff, 103. 

IGT' *' The plarml ii re^- 
nlar; Johnion gives nu»- 
ttt^en^ which if out of um." 
Snutrt, 

[Maatlin (nMur'Kn) 

[bo Sm. Wr. ; mea'- 

Hn, Wk.; mAst'lin, 

Wb. <3d. 155).— 5ec 

Maalln, 203.] 
Mas'to-don (105) [so 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; nuut- 

o'don, Sm. 155.] 
Maa'toid. 
3f at, 10, 41. 
Mat'a-co, 156, 170. 
Mat'a-dore [bo Sm. 

Wb. (M. ; mat-a-ddr', 

Wk. Wr. 155.] 
Matcb, 10, 44. 
MatchU-bl&, 164, 169. 
Matched (macht), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Match'er, 77. 
Match'lng. 
Match'lock, 206. 
Mate (23, 161), n. a oom- 

panion: — a aubordl- 

nate officer of a ship :' 

— V. to match. 
Afd'te (Sp.) (ma'M) 

(161) ImUfte, Wr.; 

fM4A', Gd. 155], n. 

Paraguay tea, — being 

the aried leaf of the 

Brazilian holly. 
Ifat'ed, 183. 
Ma-te'ri-al, 40, N. ; 72. 
Ma-te'rl-al-ism (-izm). 
Ma-te'ri-al-ist, 106. 
Ma-te-ri-al-ist'ic. 
Ma-te-ri-al-lst'ic-al. 



MATRONLY 



Ma-te-ri-«l'i-ty, 109. 

Ma-te'ri-alize, 202. 

Ma-te'ri-al -ized, 183. 

Ma-te'ri-al-iz-ing. 

Ma-te'ri ally, 170. 

Ma4e'ri-ii med'i-<ia{l,.). 

Materiel (Fr.) {ma-tA*- 
re-tl). 

Ma-ter'nal, 21, N. ; 72. 

Ma-ter'nal-ly, 170. 

Marter'nl-ty, 109. 

Math-e-mat'ic, 109. 

Mathe-mat'ic-al, 106. 

Math-e-mat 'ic-«l-ly. 

Math-fr-mat'icfl, 109. 

Ma-the'als, 122. 

Matnin, 149, 170. 

Mating, 183. 

Mat'ins (^'n^), n. pi. 

Mat'rasB, n. a chemical 
vessel used in aubli- 
mationa. ( See Mat- 
tress, 148.] 

[Matreaa, 203. — See 
MattresB.] 

Ma'trloe (-iris) (161, 
169), n. toe cavity in» 
which any thing is 
formed; the womb; 
matrix. 

Mat'rice (-rf>)(161, 169), 
fi. a mould, -> pArticu> 
larly for type, or for 
coin ;— in dyeing, the 
five simple colorB, 
black, wnlte, blue, 
red, and yellow. 

Mat'ri-d-dal (lOG) [so 
Sm. Wb. Gd. ; mat- 
risVdaty Wr. 156.] 

Mat'ri-dde, 170, 230. 

Ma-tric'u-late, 89. 

Ma-tric'u-li'it-ed, 183. 

Ma-tric'u-lRt-tng. 

Martrlc-u-la'tlon, 112. 

Mat-ri-mo'ni-al, 72. 

Mat-ri-mo'ni-al -ly . 

Mat'ri-mo-ny, 86, 120. 

Ma'trix (L.). 

Ma'tron'fSO) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; mtU'ronj 
Wb. Gd. 155.] 

Mat'ron-a^e, 70. 

Ma'tron-ar(r2) [so Sm. ; 
mat'ron-al^ or ma'- 
tronrcUi Wr. ; mat'' 
run-€U, or ma-tro'nai^ 
Wk. ; mat'ron<i, 
Wb. Gd. 155.1 

Mat'ron-ize, 202. 

Mafron-ized, 183. 

Mat'ron-iz-ing. 

Ma'tron-ly ( so Wk. Sm. 



&, e, i, 5, u, y, Umffi Ik, €, 1, 9, tt, f, short ; H ae in Uur, k at in fast, & a* Aa 



MATRO&8 



275 



MECHOACAN 



Wr. ; nurf'ron-^f Wb. 
Gd. 155.] 

Ma-tross', 121. 

Mat'ted, 176. 

Mat'ter, 66, 17t). 

Xat'tep-of-fiust, a. 220. 

Xat'ttag. 

Mat'toek, 171. 

Xat'tresa ( 170) [not ma- 
traa', 153], n. a quilted 
bed, stuffed with hair, 
inoflB, huska, wool, or 
other soft material, 
instead of feathers. 

J [See Matrass, 148.] 
[Matre8S,203.] 
at'u-rate. 

Mat'a-rat-ed, 183. 

Mat'u-rat-ing. 

Mat-u-ra'tion, 112. 

Xat'u-ra-tlve (Si) [so 
Wr. Wb. Gd. , mafur 
rA-tiv, Sm. } mach'u- 
ra4iv, Wk. 155.] 

Mature', 26, 127. 

Matured', 165. 

Mature'lj, 185. 

Mat-u-res'cent, 171. 

Ma-tuWing, 183. 

Ma-tu'ri-ty. 49, N. j 109. 

Mat'u-ti-nal [not ma- 
tu'ti-nal, 153.] 

Maud'lia, 17, 171. 



MAa'gre {-gur) (1641 

tM a u ee r , preferred 
yOd. — S«.Note E, 
p. 70.] 
[M auk in, 203.~5ee 

Malklu.l 
MAul(17)[Mall, 203.] 



As a noan, m«m> 
ing a heavM wooden ham- 
mer or beetle, thit word is 
comroonW written meUh 
SB a rerS, in the literal 
sense, to atrike witM a malL 
It follows the spelUne^ of 
the noan; in the denva- 
tlre sense, to beat caui 
bruiae im a coarse mawMtr, 
It Is ofkener spelled matU. 

MAulod, 166. 

Miul'ing. 

Mftul'stick, 206. 

MSund ?12) [so Wk. 
Sm. Wr. ; mdnd, or 
mawndf Gd. 155.] 

M&un'dy-Thurs'day 
(-thurz'-), 

Mlu-so-le'an, 110. 

Mftu-BO-le'um, n. (Ill, 
166) [L. pi. Mtu^80- 
Wa \ £ng. pi. Mau-80- 
le'ums (-tMiix), 106.] 



Ma'vis, 156. 

Maw, 17. 32. 

Mawk'ish. 

Maw'-worm (-wttrm), 
206. Exo. 1. 

Max'il-lar [so Sm.Wb. 
Gid. ; maa-zil'lar, 
Wk. ; max'u-lar, or 
maxM'tar, Wr. 155.] 

Max'il-la-ry, 72. 

Max-U'U-form, 108. 

Max'hn, 10, 80. 

Max't-^mum (L.) [pi. 
Max'i-ma^ 108.] 

May, 23, 32. 

May'be, 206. 

May'day. 

May'flower {-fiour), 

May'hap [so Gd. ; md- 
*ap', Wr. 155.] 

May'hem, {ma'hemy or 
mdm) [so Wr. ; ma'- 
Aem, Wb. Gd. ; mtim., 
Sm. 155J' [Law term. 
— See Maim.] 

May'ing. 

May'or, or Mayor {mir) 
(.a, 67) [md^Wy Wk. 
Wr. Wb. (W. ; OT*r, 
Sm. 155], n. the chief 
magistrate of a city, 
[.^ee Mare, 160.] 

May'or-al-ty. 

May'or-ess. 

May'pole, 206. 

Maz'ard, 72, 170. 

Maa-a-rine' f-rfn'), 122. 

Maxe (23, 40), n. a laby- 
rhith.[ See MaizC) IGO. ] 

Ma-zol'o-gy, 108. 

Maz'y, 100. 

Me, 13, 32. 

Mead, n. a kind of bev- 
erage , — a meadow 
[See Meed, 160.] 

MAad'ow, 101. 

Mead'6w-y, 03. 

Mea'gre i-gur) [M e a - 
ge r , 203 J Note E, p. 



** In Johnson's Dle- 
tlonaiy, It is spelt meager \ 
in the English Dictiona- 
ries which preceded that 
of Johnson, generally mra- 
gre\ and in most of those \ 
pahlished since, meaaer." ' 
iTorcesler. "Meager, how- 
erer justlflahle and de- 
sirable. Is quite disused." 
Anarf. 

M?a'gre-ly (-gur-). 
Mea'gre-ness (-gur-). 
Meal, 13, 50. 



MealM-nesB, 186. 

Meantime, 206. 

Meal'y, 228. 

Moal'y-mouthed, 165, 
206, Exc. 5. 

Mean, a. wanting dig- 
nity or worth : — n. 
mcflium : — r. to in- 
tend ; to signiiy. [See 
Mien, lOO.f 

Me-an'der, 77, 122. 

M&-an'dered(-4iar(0,166. 

Me-an'der-ii^. 

Mean'ing. 

Mean'lng-lesB. 

Moan'ing-ly, 03. 

Mt^an'ness, 66, N. 

Means (jnlnz)f n. ting. 
&pl. 

Milant. 

Mean'tJmc, 206. 

Mo.in'while. 

Mrase (mla, or mlz) 
[mesy Wk. Wr. Wb. 
Gd. , miz, Sm. 155.] 

Mea'sled {me'zld). 

Mea'slea (^me'zlz)^ 171. 

Mea'sly (mc'i///). 

MeaH'ur-a-ble {mezh'ur- 
a-bl), 47, 1(V4. 

M^as'ur-a-bly (mezh'- 
ur-). 

Mi'as'ure (mezh'ur)y 47, 
N. , 01, 156. 

Milns'ured {mezh'urd)^ 
165. 

MC'as'urc-ment {mezh'- 
ur-). 

Mt^as'ur-ing (metrA'wr-), 
01. • 

Meat, n. food, — partic- 
ularly flesh used for 
food. [See Meet, atul 
Mete, 1(K).] 

Mc-chan'ic (tan'-), 109. 

Me-chan'ic-al (-ton'-), 
108. 

Mo-chanMc-al -ly ( -fc<in'-) 

Mcch-a-nl'cian {mek-a- 
nish'an), 112. 

Me-chan'io-o-chcm'io- 
al {'kan'ik-o-kem''), 
224. ^ 

Mc-chanMcs (-ifcan'-). 

Mcoh'an-i8m {mek'an- 
izm), 52, 13.3, 1.36. 

Meeh'an-iflt {tnek'-), 

Mech-an-og'raph-ist 
(mek-). 

Mech an-og'ra-phy 
(mek-), 108. 

Mech'lin (mek'-y, 

Me-oho'a-can {-ko'-y or 



le'ums i'Umz), l«s.j Meal, 13, 60. i ue-ono'a-can {-KO'-y or 

MLi^euin there i<fbaain foot ; 91U Ai fkoile ; gh at g in go ; tSt at <» this. 




MBCONIUM 

-cfco'-i [no Wr. j iii6- 
ko'arKan^ 8m. ; me- 
eho'a-kani or meko'a- 
kan, Gd. 155.] 

Bfe-co'nl-um, liW. 

Med'al (72) [See Med- 
dle, 148.] 

Me-dal'lio, 170. 

Me-daiaion (me-dal'- 
yun)y 51f 170. 

Med'ol-lintrMedalist, 
Wb. Gd. 203. — See 
177, and Note E,p.70.] 

Med'al-lur-gy [ M e d - 
alurgj, Wb. Gd. 
203.] 

Med'dle (104, 104. 170) 
[See Medal, 148.1 

Med'dlod {med'ld), 

Med'dler (70^, n. one 
who meddles. [See 
Medlar. 160.] 

Med'dle-Bome (med'l- 
sutn)t 171. 

tf ed'dUng, 00, 170. 

hfe'di-aCL.),n.pL [See 
Medium.] 

Me-dI-«B'val (13, 72) [so 
8m. Wb. (id. ; med-i- 
e'val.Wr. 155.] [Me- 
dieval, 203.] 

Me'di-al, 78, 171. 

Me'dl-an, 72. 

Me'di-ant, 72. 

Me-di-as'tlne, 82, 152. 

Mc-di-as-ti'num. 

Me'di-atc, a. A v. 73. 

Mc'diat-ed, 183. 

Me'dl-ate-ly, 186. 

Me'dl-at-Ing. 

Me-di-a'tion, 112. 

Me^i-atrl-za'tioQ, 110. 

Mc'di-a-tizc, 202. 

Me'di^-tizcd. 

Me'di-a-tiz-lng. 

Me'di-ator, 120, 109. 

Me-di-arto'ri-al, 49, N. 

Me'di-at-rix [so Sm. 
Wr. ; me-di^'trixy 
Wk. (M. 155.] 

Med'ic-a-ble, 120, 104. 

Mcd'ic-al, 108. 

Med'lo-al-ly, 170. 

Med'io-a-meat, 109. 



wo. Walker. Smsrt. 
Worc«ater, WcMter, and 
Goodrich, acree in pit>- 
nonndng thit word with 
the accent on the flnt ayl- 
lable I trat Walker re- 
markit **Mj indgment 
mneh fidli roe 1? the true 
pronaneiation onght not 
to be with the accent on 



276 

tiM Meond« M Ib pftdiech 



Med'i-oate, 160. 

Med'1-oat-ed. 

Med'i-cat-ing. 

Medi^Mi'tion. 

Mod'1-ca-tlve, 106. 

Med-l-oe'an, 110. 

Me-dif'in-al [so Sm.Wr. 
Wb. Gd. i me-dis'i- 
not, or med-i-H'nalt 
Wk. 156.] 



♦*Ib poetry It will 
■onietimee be neoeMarj to 
accent the penultiinatB." 
Smart. 

Med'i-clne (156) [so 
Wk. Wr. Wb. (Jd.i 
wted't-siftf ooll. med'- 
Hn, Sm. 155.] 

nr ** Vulgarly and lm« 
properly monoonced med'' 

Med'i-00-le'gal, 224. 

[Medieval, 203.— 
See Medieval.] 

Mc'di-o-«rfd, 72. 

Me'dl-o-cre (-X»tr), 126, 
166. 

Me'dl-o-«rlst. 

Me-dl-oc'ri-ty (169) [so 
Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd.; 
me-di-olfri-ty, or me- 
ji^k'ri-ty, Wk. 134, 
165.] 

Med'i-tate, 109. 

McdM-tat^. 

Mod'-l-tat-ing. 

Med-1-ta'tion. 

Med'i-taWve. 

Med-i-ter-ra'ne-«n, 110, 
171. 

Me'dinm (169) [so Sm. 
Wr. Wb. Gd.; meldi- 
ttm, or me'ji-umy Wk. 
134, 155.1 [L. pi. Me'- 
dira ; Eng. pi. Me'di- 
ums (-urn:?), 196.] 

Mcd'lar (70), n. a kind 
of tree and its flrnit. 
[See. Meddler, 160.] 

Med'ley, 96, 169. 

Me-dul'lar, 74, 170. 

Med'ul-la-ry, 72. 

Me-dul'llne (152) [Me- 
dallin.203.] 

Me-du'sa (L.) (26) fpl. 
Me-du'sc (-«e-), 1(16.] 

Meech'ing. 

Meed (1.% 42), n. a re- 
ward. [See Mead, 
160.] 



MELLIFICATION 

Meek, 13, 52. 
Meek'en (fiKJfn), 104. 
Meek'ened {nUk'nd). 
Meek'en-ing {mii^n-). 
Meer'schaum (-fAotmn, 
or -9k<mm,\ 154, 150. 



Thif wofd la pro- 
Donneed by all the ortbo- 
eplate mirtkmim, bnt the 
current. If not oniTeml 
pronunclatlonjLn the Unit- 
ed Statee, ia ' ' 



Meet ( 13), a. fit, proper : 

— r. to encounter. [ See 

Meat, 166.] 
Meet'ing, i». an inter- 
view ; an assembly. 

[See Meting, 160.] 
Meet'ing-house, 200, 

Exo. 4 ; 215. 
Meg'a-oosm (-Jborm), 

136. rn2. 

Meg-a-le'aian {-zhan), 
Meg-a-lo'nyx (r^> [so 

Sm. Wr. ; meg-a-lon'- 

iks, Crd. 155.] 
Meg-a-lo-ft&u'rus. 
Me-ga'ri-an, 49, N. 
Me-grftr'ic, 109. 
Me^a-«5ope. 
Me^-a-the'rl-um, 49, N. 
Me'grim [nolme-grim', 

15l] 
Mei-bo'mi-an, 25, 100. 
[Meiocenc, 203. — 

See Miocene.] 
Mei-o'sis [ml-o'<if, Wr. 

Wb. Gd. i ml'o-«i«, 

Sm. 155.] 
Mel-an-chol'lc {-kol'-). 
Mel'an-diol y (-kol-y). 
Milange (Pr.) (md- 

Idmh') [bo Wr. Wb. 

Gd. ; md'longzh, Sm. 

154.] 
Mel'an-ite, 162. 
[Melasses, 203. — 

See Molasses.] 
Mel-cbis-«-di'cian {-biz- 

e-di»h'an)t 171. 
MiUe {Ft.) {m&-la'\ n. 

a confVised fight. I See 

Malay, 160.] 
Me-llc'ra-to-ry, 86. 
Mel'i lot, 170. 
Mel'io-rate (-yo-) (51) 

[so Sm. Wr. ; me'h-<h- 

ra<, Wk. i mil'yor-At, 

Wb. (W. 155.] 
M^-io-ra'tion (-yo-). 
Mel-lifer-otis, 106. 
MelUric, 100. 
Mel-li-fl^Mi'tion. 



a, fi, i, 6, u, y, lonff i !,<$,!, 5, tt, f, 8h(n^ i Hcuin fkr, k<u in fkst, k tuin 



MELLIFLUENCE 



277 



MEECURIALIZED 



Mel-Ufla-enoe, 160. 
Mel-lif In-ent, 106. 
Mel-liTlu-oas, 100. 
Mel-lig^e-nolis (-^''-)* 
Mel'li^ite, 152. 
Mel-Uph'a-gan, 106. 
Merut. 

Mel'lite, 152, 170. 
Mel'lon (170), n. a yel- 
low powder oomposed 
of carbon and nitro- 
gen. [See Melon, 
IflO.J 

Mel'low(lOl) [no^mel'- 
lur, 153.1 

Mel'lowed, 166, 188. 

Mel'low-ing. 

Mel-o-oo-ton' {-toon') 
(122) [80 Wr. Gd.j 
mel-o-Ko'tonf Sm. 155.] 

Me-lo'de-on, or Mel-o- 
de'on (154, 160) JTso 
Wr.; ine4o'<ie-on, Gd. 
15ft.] 

Me-lo'di-ofis (160) [bo 
Wr. Wb. (3d. ; mdro'- 
M-U9j Sm. : me-lo'di- 
usj or me-io'ji-tu, Wk. 
134, 156.] 

Mel'o-dist. 

MePo-dize, 202. 

Mel'o-dized, 166. 

Mel-o^iz'lng, 183. 

Mel-o-dra'ma [See 
Drama.] 

Mel-o-dra-mat'lc, 100. 

Hel-o-dra-mat'io-al, 
106. 

Hel-o-dram'a-ti8t. 

Mel'o-drame [bo Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; melo-dr&m, 
Sm. 155.] 

MeFo^y, 170. 

Mel'on(170), n. a trail- 
ing plant, and its fhiit 
or several varictieB. 
[5e<;MeUon, 160.] 

Melt. 15, 64. 

Mclt'ed, 228. 

Melt'er, 77. 

Melt'ing. 

Mem'ber, 70, 103. 

Mem'bered {-burd)t 77, 
166. 

Mem-bra-na'ceot&0 
i-shus), 171. 

Mem'brane. 

Mem-bra'ne-otiB, 160. 

Mem-bra^nirer-ofiB,106. 

Mem-bra'ni-rorra, 108. 

Mem-bra-nol'o-gT, 1C8. 

Men^'bra-no&B, 126. 

Me-f^en'to (86, 122) [pi. 



Me-men'tdB (r*dz), 
102.] 
Hem'oir (mem'tpor) 
156) [BO Sm. Wb. 



^ 



d. 



me-moir', or 



mem'tDOTi Wk. Wr. 
156.] 
Mem-o-rchbil'i-a (L.), n. 

l^m-o-ra-bil'i-ty, 108. 
Mem'o-ra-ble, 164. 
Mem'o-ra-bly« 72. 
Mem-o-ran'aom, n. [L. 

pi. Mem^o^cm'aa ; 

£ng. pi. Mem-o-ran'- 

dumB (-dumz)t 106.1^ 
Me-mo'ri-al, 40, JS. ; 

160. 
Me-mo'rl-al-iBt. 
Me-mo'ri-al-ize, 202. 
Me-mo'ri-al-ized. 
Me-mo'ri-al-iz-infi-. 
Me-mo'ri-a tech'ni-ca 

(L.) itekf-). 
Me-mdr'i-teriL.), 
Mem'o-rize. 
Mem'o-rized, 183. 
Mem'o-riz-ing. 
Mem'o-ry, 86, 233. 
Hem'phi-an, 35, 160. 
Men(15,43),n.ii/. [See 

Man.] • 
Men'ace, 70. 
Men'aoed, 166, 183. 
Men'a-cer. 
Men'a-dng. 
Men-iige' Imen-ttzh'). 
Men-&g'er-ie (men-dzh'- 

ttr-«) [so 8m. Wr. Gd.; 

men-azh-^r-e' f Wk. 

155.] [Menagery 

{men-d'jer-y, — bo Wr. ; 

men'a-jer-y^ Wb.(}d.), 

203.J 
Mend, 15. 

Mend'a-ble, 164, 160. 
Men-da'ciouB (shue). 
Men da9'i-ty, 160. 
Mend'ed. 
Mend'er. 
Men'dl-can-cy. 
Men'dl cant, 169. 
Men-dif'i-ty, 108. 

Mend'iner- 
Men-gre^lan {-$han)» 

Men-na'den [M an ha- 
de n, 203.] 
Me'ni-al, 72, 169. 
Me-oin'ge-al (jc), 160. 
Me-nin'geB (;;««), n. pi. 
Me-niB'cal, 72. 
Me-niB'cold, 122. 
Me-niB'cQB. 



Men'l-ver, or Me'nl-ver 
\men'i-vur, Wr. Wb. 
Ud. ; me'm-tTur, Sm. 
155.][MineYer,203.] 

Men'non-ite, 170. 

Men'sa et tho'ro (L.). 

Mcn'Bal, 230. 

Men's^B (-<««), «. pi. 

Men'Btru-ol {-atroo-). 

Men'Btru-ate {-stroo). 

Men'Btru-at-ed {-stroo-). 

3Ieu ' 8tru-dt-ing( -gtroo-) 

Men-Btru-a'tion(-«<roo-) 

Men'Btru-oDs {-stroo). 

Men'stru-um {-Btroo), 
n. (L.) [pi. Men'stru-a 
{-stroo-)^ 198.] 

Mim-BU-ra-bil'i-ty 
{-shoo-). 

Men'su-ra-ble (men'- 
8koo-ra bl){lCyi)[men'- 
8h*oo-ra-bIt Sm. {See 
J 20) ; men'shu-ra-blt 
Wk. Gd. ; mens'yoo- 
ra-bly Wr. 165.] 

Mcn'BU-ral (shoo-). 

Mcn-Bu-ra'tion {-anoo-) 

Mcn'tal, 72, 230. 

Mcn'tally, 170. 

Men'tion. 

Men'tion-a-ble, 164. 

Mcn'tioncd (-«ANnd),166 

Mcn'tiou-ing. 

Men'tor, b*». 

Men to'ri al, 49, N. 

Me-plilt'lc, 109. 

Me-phit'ic-al, 108. 

Me-phi'tis [so Wr. Gd.; 
mifi-ti^yhm. 155] [pi. 
Meph'i-te8 (-«^),lv«.] 

Mepn'i-tism {-tizm). 

Mer'can-tTle(8I, 105) [so 
Wk. Wr. Gd. ; mer'- 
kan-tUj Sm. 155] [not 
mer-kan'til, nor mer- 
kan-tel', 153.] 

Mer-cap'tan. 

Mer'ce-na-ri-ly, 72. 

Mor'ce-na-ry, 169. 

Mer'ccT,21,N. ; 77. 

Mer'chan-dise (-<fl2),202 

Mer'chant, 21, N. ; 72, 
169. 

Mcr'chant-a-ble, 164. 

Mer'chant-man, 206. 

Mcr'cliant-ry. 

Mcr'ci-ful (fool), 186. 

Mer'ci fill ly {-/Sol-). 

Mer'ci-lesB. 

Mer-cu'ri-al, 72, 160. 

Mor-cu'ri-al-ist. 

Mer-cu'rl-al-izc, 202. 

M cr-cu 'rl-al-lzed. 



fall latin there i (fbaain foot i^atin fl&oile ; gh a« g in go ; th a« m this. 

24 



MERCURIALIZING 



278 



BIETAMORPHISM 



Mor-cu'ri-al-ix-lngp. 
Mer-cu'ri-fy, W. 
Mer'cu-ry, 21, N. j 80. 
Mer'cy, 120, 100. 
Mor'oy-seat. 
Mere, 13, 67. 
Mere'ly, 185. 
Mt5r-e-tri'ciou8 (-triih'- 

ush 46, 112. 
Mer-gan'fier [bo Wr. 

Wb. Gd.} mer^gan- 

««r, Sm. 155.] 
Merge, 21, N. 
Merged, 166. 
Merg'er (^mer^f'-). 
MtTgr'ing {merf-), 

M(^rn-o*ri>» 169. 
Me-rid'i-an nW) [so 

Sm. Wr. Wb. Gd. j 

me-rid't-ani or me- 

r«l'i«-an,Wk. 134,155.] 
Me rid'i-on-al feo Wk. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. } me- 

rid'jun-al, Sm. 155.] 
Me-ri^no (-r«'-) (13, 122) 

[pi. Me-ri'uoes {-ri'- 

n«2), 1»2.] 
M£'r-i8-mat^c i-iz-) [bo 

Gd. ; mir-ia-nuU'ik, 

Wr. 155.] 
M.'r'lt, -W, 170. 
M(^r'it-«d. 
MtT'it-lng, 176. 
Mj^r-it-o'ri-oas, 49, N. 
Mgr'i-tot, 105. 
Mer'Un, 169. 
Meraing, 129. 
Mer'lon. 21, N. 
Mer'maid, 169. 
Mer'maD, 196. 
Me'ro-oele. 
Me~rop'i-dan. 
Mcr'ri-ly, 170. 
MiT'ri-ment, 169, 186. 
Mer'ry, 15, 48, 66. 
Mer'ry-An'drew 

i-droo). 
M^r'ry-mak'ing. 
MCr'ry-thought 

(-thawt), 206. 
Mer'sion, 169. 
Me-ru'11-dan (-roo'-), 
Mc-seems' (-aemz'). 
MeB-en-tiT'Ic (mer-). 
Me8'en-Wr-y^»e2'-) [bo 

Wk. Sm. Wr. ; mas'- 

en4ir^, Wb. Gd.l55.] 
Mesh, 15, 46. 
Meshed (m^ht), 165 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Mesh'lng. 
McBh'y, 169. 
Mes'l-al (mez'i<U^ or 



wtexk'i-al) [bo Sm.; 

mear'f-aj, Wr .; me^zheU, 

Gd. 155.1 
[Me8lin(m«»'iin),a03. 

— .StoMastUn.] 
MeB-mer-ee' (met-), 122. 
Mea-mer'ic (mee-), 109. 
MeB-mSr'lc-al {mez-). 
MeB'mer-iBm (mes'fiittr- 

izm), 136, 156. 
Mea'mer-iat fines'-). 
Mcs-mer-I-sa'tion 

(m«z-)j 112. 
Mes'mer-ize (m««'-), 202. 
Mes'mer-izea (mez'-), 
McB'mer-iz-er {mez'-), 
Mes'meMZ'ing (meF-). 
MeBne (mln) ( 102), a. in 

law, intervening. [See 

Mean, Mien, 100.] 
Mes'o-oarp {mes'-, or 

mez'-). 
Mes'o-oo-lon (*"««'-> or 

mez'-) [mero-ko-hknt 

Wb. Gd. ; mez'o-ko- 

lun, Sm. i mes-o-ko'- 

lun^ Wr. 155.] 
Mcs'o-Iabe (mes'-, or 

mez'-)[mea'<hlab, Wr. 

Wb. Gd.i fnee'o-ia^, 

Sm. 155.] 
MeB'o-Bperm (in«f'-, or 

mez'-). 
Mes'o-tho-rax (mes'-, or 

me«'-)J[fne»'o-<Ao-rBkr, 

Wb. Gd.; mez'o41U)- 

mXf Sm. ; mes-o-tho'- 

rax, Wr. 155.] 
Mes'o-type (toes'-, or 

MeBB, 15, 174. 
Mes'sage, 70, 170. 
McsBed (mest), Note C, 

p. 34. 
Mes'Ben-ger. 
Mes-Bl'ad, 122. 
MeB-si'ah, 72. 
Mes-Bi-an'io. 
Mes'sleurs (mes'ffurz) 

[so Sm. ; mesh'sftoorz, 

or meah-shoorz', Wk. ; 

mesh'yurz, Gd. ; 

meah'urz, or me^- 

yurz, Wr. 155.] 
Mess'ing, 228. 
MeBB'mate, 180, 206. 
McB'suage {-swUJ), 66. 
Mea-tee'TM a a t e e^203.] 
MeB-tl'zo (-<c'-) (13,86) 

[pi. Mes-ti'zda {-tef- 

z9a), 192.] 
Met, 15, 41. 
Me-tab'ihsU (Gr.). 



Met-a-bo'Il-«n, 100. 
Met-a-car'pal, 72. 
Met-A^Mr'puB, 169. 
Me4ach'ro-niBm (4atf^ 

ro-nizm), 136. 
Met'a-Giam, 130. 
Me'tage, 70. 
Met-argram'm»-tiBnr 

i-tizm), 1.33, 136. 
Met'al (72) [so Sm.; 

met'l, Wk. Wb. Gd. ; 

met% or met'al, Wr. 

155.] 



Walker nja of the 

K>Dunclattoii meCl, ** The 
propriety la to atrikiim 
u to enooancc ui accu- 
rate ipeaker to reaCore the 
a to iti aonnd at heard in 



Mei-<!aqp'sia (Gr.) [pi. 

Met-a-lep'sU (-siz), 

198.] 
Met'a-lep-sy, 169. 
Met-a-lcp'tic, 109. 
Met-a-lep'tic-al, 108. 
Me-tal'lic, 170. 



' In thii woid. aa veil 

aa in other deriTatlTea of 
metal, »M metaUme, wtetat- 
iuryy, Ac, the { la doub- 
led, contranr to the geaer> 
al rule (\ 1*6), on iooooat 
of the two r« in the ori^nal 
Latin, meloilioii. 

Met-al-llTer-oaB, 106. 
Me-tal'li-form, 108. 
Met'al-line (105, 152) ['ao 

Wk. ^r. Wb. Gd.} 

mefal4in, Sm. 156.1 
Mct'al-UBt. 
Met-al-ll-za'tdon, 112. 
Met'al-lize, 202. 
Mct'al-lized, 165. 
Blet'al-liz-lng, 183. 
Me-tal'Io-chrome 

(-Jtrffm), 
Met-al-Ioch'ro-my 

i-lok'-), 105. 
Met-al-log'ra-phiflt. 
Met-al-log'ra-phy, 108. 
Met'al-loid. 
Mct-al-loid'al, 72. 
Met-al-lur'gio. 
Met-al-lnr'gio-al. 
Met'al-lur-gi8t[ not met- 

aI-luWgl8t, 126, 153.1 
Met'al-lur-gy, 122. 
Met'al-mttn, 196, 206. 
Met«-m(^r'ic. 
Met-a-mor'phlo. 
Met-a-jnor'phism 

i-fizm). 



&, S, 1, 5, u, ft long ; ii« £, 1, 6, tt, f, short ', Ik as in Ur, k as in fkat, kasin 



METAMORPHIBT 



279 



MICKLE 



MeUi-mor'phist. 
Met-a-mor'phose (-/of), 

136. 
Met-a-mor'phoeed 

i'/btt), 166. 
Met4i-mor'phos-er. 
Het4i-mor'phOH-ic. 
Met-a mor'pho»-ing. 
Met-a mor'pbo-sls (105, 

109, 150) [pL Met-a- 

mor'pho-ads i-*iz)f 

198.] 
Met'a-phor, 171. 
Me(-a phdr'lc, 106. 
Met-a-phdr'io-al . 
Met-a-ph6r'le-ai-ly. 
Met'a-ph6r-i8t [so Sm. 

Wr. ; met'a-foT'Uti 

Wb. (M. 155.] 
Met'a-phraBe i-/r^). 
Het'a-phrast. 
Met-a-phrast'io. 
Uet-a-phrast'lo-al. 
Met-a-phys'lo i-Jtz'-). 
Mot-a-phyB'ic-al (jfe'-). 
Met-a-phj s' ic-al-Iy 

(-/«'-), 170. 
Met-a-phy-Bl'dan 

('Zisk*an)j46, 171. 
Met«-phy8'lc-o-the-o- 

log'ic-al (-/iz'ik-o-the- 

o-fcy'-), 2i4. 
Met^phy§'ic8 {-fiz'-), 

109. 
Uet'a-plasm {-plazm), 

13ft. 
Me-taa'ta-siB, 150. 
Met-arstat'ic, 109. 
Uet-a-tar'BRl. 
Met-a-tar'su8, 100. 
He-tath'c-BlB (L.) [pi. 

Me-tath'e-Hes («<«), 

199.1 
Met-athctMc, 100. 
M et-arthct'lc-al, 108. 
Met-a-tho'rax, 122. 
Mete, V. to measure : — 

n. a boundary. [See 

Meat, and Meet, 160.1 
Met'ed, 183. 
Me-temp-Hy-eho'BiB 

(-to'-), 109, 171. 
Mct-emp-to'sis. 
Me'te-or (88, 169) [bo 

8m. Wr. vTb. Gd. j 

me'te-ur, or me'cfte- 

ur, Wk. 156.1 
Me-te-5r'ic, 109. 
Me-te-dr'ic-al, 106. 
He'te-or-ite, 152. 
Me-te-or-off'ra-phy, 108. 
Mc'te-dr-o-lite, or Me- 

te-6r'o-me(152) [me'- 



U-Sr-c-tlt, 'Sm. ; me- 
te-Sr*o4U, Wr. (M. 
156.] 
Me-te-dr-o-loff'io 

(-^•'-). 
Me-te-or-o-loe'io-al 

i4oj:), 108. 
Me-te-or-oPo-glst, 106. 
Me-te-or-ol'o-gy, 106. 
Me-te-*r'o-man-cy. 
Me'te-dr-o-Boope, or 

Me-te-or'o-Bcope 

[fne't€-Sr-o-ak6py Sm. ; 

me-te-or^o-tkUp, Gd. ; 

me-tefo-To-9k6p, Wk. ; 

tne-te~or'o-skOpt or me- 

tefo^ro-akopyWr. 155.] 
Me-teK>r-O0'oo-py, 108. 
Me'ter, n. one who 

metes, or measures. 

ISee Metre, IGO.] 
[Meter, 2Xa. — 8ee 

Metre.1 
Me-thcgOin. 
Mc-thinks', 61. 
Meth'od, 86. 
Me-thod'ic, 109. 
Me-thod'io^, 106. 
Me-thod'ic-aMy. 
Meth'od-ism (-inn). 
Meth'od-ist. 
Meth-od-lBt'ic 
Meth-od-lst'ie-al. 
Meth-od-ist'lc-al-ly. 
Mcth-od-I-za'tion, 112. 
Meth'od-ize, 202. 
Meth'od-ized. 
Meth'od-iz-cr. 
Mcth'od-iz-ing. 
Meth-od-oKo-gy, 106. 
Me-thought' (-lAmt^r'), 

162. 
Mct'ic (156) [so Sm. 

Gd. ; iiM/liJb, Wr. 

155.] 
Met'ing, part, fW>m 

Meie. [See Meeting, 

160.] 
Me-ton'ic, 109. 
Mct-o-nym'ic. 
Met-o-nym'lc-al, 106. 
Met'o-nym-y, or Me- 

ton'y-my (171) [so 

Qd. ; met'o-nim^, 

Sm. ; me-tonH-my^ or 

tnet'o^im^t Wk. Wr. 

155.]. 
Met'o-pe, 163. 
Met-o-po-soopMc-al. 
Met-o-pos'co-pist. 
Met-o-pos'co-py, 108. 
Me'tre (me'tur) ( IM), n. 

measure. [See Meter, 



160.] [Meter,' pre- 
ferred by Gd. — See 

Note E, p. 70.J 
Met'ric-al, 72. 
Met'ric-al-ly, 170. 
Met'ro-ehrome {-kr6m). 
Met'ro-grftph. 
Me-troro-gy. • 

Met'ro-Qome. 
Me-tron'o-my, 106. 
Me-trop'o-Us. 
Met-ro-pol'i-tan [so 

Wk. Wr. Wb. Gd. ; 

me-tro-pol'i-tany Sm. 

155.1 
Mct'tle (met'l), 164. 
Met'tled {met'ld). 
Met'tlc-Bome {jnet'l- 

8um)t 171. 
Mew (ffitt), n. & V. [pi. 

of n. Mews (mA2), 

stables. — See Muse, 

IGO.] 
Mewed {mM). 
Mew'ing {mu'-). 
Mewl, V. to cry, as an 

Infant, [iiee Mule, 

160.] 
Mewled {m^Ul), 
Mewl'er (m<M'-). 
Mewl'lng. 
Mex'i-€an. 
Me-ze're-on, 49, Note; 

109. 
Mcz'za-ninc {-ntn) [so 

Sm. Gd. : mez'za^n, 

Wr. 155.1 
Mez'zo-rihii'vo (It.) 

{tned'zo-). 
Mcz'zo-tlnt {meiVzo-). 
Mez-zo-tln'to {med-zo-) 

[med-zo4in'tOt or met- 

zo-tin'tot Wr. ; mez- 

zo-tint'Oy or ntfd-zo- 

tint'o, Gd. ; met-ao- 

tin'toj Wk. ; met-zo- 

tin'to, Sm. 155.1 
Mi'asm (mt'cum), 1.33, 

l'J6. 
MT-as'ma C-nz'-) (L.) 

(151) [pi. Ml-<u'ma-ta 

l-^*-% 198.] 
Mi-as'mal (-a«'-), 72. 
MT-as-mat'lc {•<tz-). 
Mi-as-matMo-al i-az-). 
MT-as'ma-tist (-€u'-), 
Mi'ca, 25, 72. 
Mi-ca'ceous (-«ArM), 112. 
Mice (26), n. pi. [See 

Mouse.] 
Mich'ael-mas (mik'el-), 

171, 180. 
Mickae (nUk'l), 104. 



Ikll; Cm in there; <K> at <n foot j 9 a« in Ikclle ; gh at g <n go ; t^ a« in this. 




MICROCOSM 

Ml'oro-ooBm {-kozm). 

Mi-cro -ooi'mio^ 

ikoz'-), 
Mi-cro-oous'tio, 2A, 100. 
Mi-cro-^raph'io, lOtf. 
Mi-crotpra-phy, 108,109. 
Mi-croPo-gy, 108. 
Mi-crom'e-ter, 108. 
•Mi-cro-met'rlc, 100. 
Mi-cro-mct'rio-al. 
Ml'cro-phouo. 
M i-cro-phon'ica. 
Mi-croph'o-nofis, 100. 
Mi-croph'thal-my 

(-krof -tOr -krop'-)[mi- 

kroftKal-my^ Wr. ; 

mi-kn^'ihiu-myt Sm. 

155.] 
Ml-oro-phvl'lotts, or 

Mi-croph'yl-lofis [See 

Adenophyllous.] 
Mi'cro-pyle. 
Mi'cro-8cope, 160. 
Mi-cro-8<K>p'ic, 100. 
Mi-cro-8cop'ic-al, 106. 
Mi'cro-8c6p-i8t, 100. 
Mi-cros'co-py, 108. 
Mic-tu-ri'tion {-rUh'- 

tin), 112. 
Mid, Ifl, 42. 
Ml'(la8*8-ear (^-doB-ez- 

Ir), 213. 
Mid'-day, M, N. 
Mid'dlc {mid'l), 1(V4, 170. 
Mid'dle-agped {mid'l- 

ajd). 
Mid'dle-man {mid'l), 

20rt. 
Mid'dlc-most imid'l). 
Middling, 66, 170. 
Midee, 16, 45. 
Mldg'et (mO'-). 
MidHaud, 216. 
Mid'most, 206. 
31id'niL'ht c-nlO* 
Mid'rib. 
Mid'rifT, 189. 
Mid'8hlp. 

Mid '8hip-nian,72,106,206 
Mid'8lUps. 
MidRt, 16, 64. 
3f i<l'f4uin-mer, 210. 
Mid' way. 
Mid' wife, 189. 
Mid'wifery [so Wk. 

8m. Wr. ; mtd'tDtf-ry, 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Mid'vrin-ter, 216. 
Mic'U ( 13),n. external ap- 

ticaranoe and carriage. 
See Mean, Mesne, 
60.] 



280 

Mlfl; 10, 173. 

MiflM (m(/r), 166 ; Note 

C, p. 34. 
MUTing. . 

Might (miOt 102- 
MightM-ly (ml<'-}> 186. 
MightM-ness (mil'-). 
Might'y (m«'-) (109;, a. 

powerful. [See Mity, 

160.] 
Mign-on-ette' {min^yw^ 

J'), 102. 171. 
Mi'grate, 72. 
Mi'grat-cd, 183. 
Mi'grat-ing. 
Mi-gra'tion, 112. 
Mi'gra-to-ry, 86. 
Mil-an-ese' i-€z'), n. 

»ina. A pi. 
Milch, 16, 44, Note 2. 
Mild, 25. 
Mil'dew i-du). 
Mil'dewed (-dil<l). 
Mil'dew-ing i-du-). 
Mile, 26, 1(3. 
Mile'age, 183. 
Mile' stone, 200. 
Mil'foil, lat. 
Mil'la-ry (ya-) (145}. a. 

resembUng a millet- 

seed ; granulated. 

r^e^ MiUary, 148.] 
Mlri-tant. 
Mil'i-ta-ry, 72. 
Mil'i-tate, 160. 
Mil'i tat-ed, 183. 
Mll'iUt-ing. 
MI li'tia (mUi$h'a\ [so 

Wb. Gd. J ml/wWd, 

Wk.imlZt«A'ya,Wr.; 

mVUah'% Sm. (See 

8 26), 155.1 
Milk, 16, 60, 62. 
Milked imilkt), 165; 

Note C, p. 34 ; 64. 
Milk'er, 77. 
Milk'ing. 
MilkM-neBB, 186. 
Milk'maid, 206. 
Milk'man, 196. 
Milk'pall. 
Milk'pftn. 
Milk'Bop. 
Milk'tooth. 
Milk'wftrm. 
Milk'white. 
Milk'wort (-wurt), 
Milk'y, 169. 
Mill, 16, 172. 
MilPdftm, 206. 
Milled, 165. 
Mil-le-na'ri-an, 40, N. ; 

169. 



MILTWORT 

Mil-le-na'ii-an-iam, 
(-ism). 

Mll'le-na-ry(72, 109), n. 
the apaoe of a thou- 
sand years. [See Mil- 
linery, 148.] 

MU-lcn'ni-al, 160. 

Mil-len'nl-al-ist. 

Mil-len'ni-um, 160, 170. 

Mil^e-ped, 189. 

aV Bo •pelled Bnd ptro- 
Bonnced 63- Worcester, 
Wcbtter, and GtxHlrich: 
by Statt, mitl*'-prd<; and 
hv Walker, who gf vei only 
tne plural fbrnt, mirie~ 
pedes (-pldMX or mil-lep'e- 
du i-dizy. 

Mil'le-pore, 170. 

MiU'er, 160. 

Mill'er-tte, 162. 

Mill'er's-thumb {mW- 
erz'lhum), 162, 213. 

Mil lesM-mal, 72, 160. 

Mil' let, 66, 76. 

Mill'hoad, 206. 

Mil'U-a-ry (169), a. per- 
taining to, or denot- 
ing, a mile. [See Mil- 
iary, 148.] 

MilMi-crram (Eng.), or 
MiVU-gramme XVt.'). 

Mil'ii-li-ter [bo Sm. -, 
milrliVi-tur, Gd. 1&5.] 

MU'li-lUre (Fr.) (mtf'- 
leAe-tur). 

Mil'U-me-ter (Eng.), or 
Ani'li-metre (!•>.) 
(mil'le-mA-tur). 

Mll'li-ner, 77, 170. 

Mil'U-ner-y (169, 171), 
n. the work or the 
goods of a milliner. 
TSee Millenary, 148.1 

Mil-li-net% 171. 

Mlll'ing. 

Mill'ion (-yitn), 51, 86. 

Mill'ion-a-ry (-yun-), 
160. 

MillMon-aire {-yttn-Sr) 
(Eng.), or Million- 
naire' (-yunSr') (Fr.). 

MiU'ionth (-yun<A). 

Mill'pdnd. 

Mill'race. 

Mill'rea, or MUl'ree, 
203. 

Miirstone. 24. 

MiU'wheel. 

Mill'wright (-r«), 102. 

Milt, 16. 

Mll-ton'ic, 170. 

Milt'wort i-wurt)y 206. 



a, £, i, 0, u, 9, long ;&,«,!, 6, tt, f , short} liatinULr,ka$ in fast, A a« in 



MILVINE 



281 



MISAPPLYING 



Mil' vine (152) [so Sm.; 
mU'viOy Wr. 165.] 

Mime, 25, 163. 

Ml-met'ic [bo Sm. ; m%- 
met'ik, Wk. Wr. Gd. 
155.] 

Mi-met'lc-al. 

Mim'ic, 200. 

Mim'ic-al. 

Mim'icked (-a-<), 200. 

Mim'ick-ing. 

Mim'ic-ry. 

Mi-mo^'ra-pher, 108. 

Mi-mo^Ba, or Ml-mo'sa 
(-««; [mI-mo'«a, Gd. ; 
ml-mo'ca, Sm. ; mi- 
mo' ia, Wr. 155.] 

MI-na'eioQs (-«Au«), 112. 

MT-na^'i-ty, lOd. 

Mln'a-ret, 76. 

Min'a-to-ry, 86. 

Mince, 16, 39. 

Minoed {minst), 166 ; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Mince'meat, or 
M inced '-meat( m iTt^^O 

Mince'pTe, or Mlnoed'- 

S!e (mintP-). 
ic'iDg. 
Mind, ^. 
Mind'ed. 

MTnd'ful (-/wO, 180. 
Mlnd'fal-ly (->5^), 170. 
Mind'ing. 
Mine, 1(3. 

aV**When thii word 
U uaed a4)cctiv^*ly before 
a word beginning with a 
rowel or A mute, u in tay- 
Ing, * On mine honor.' the 
complete abMsnce of ac- 
centual force, and a ttyle 
qnite colloquial, will per* 
mit the ehortening of the 
•onnd into nun." Stnart, 

Mined, 165. 

Min'er (170), n. one who 

mines. [See Minor, 

160.] 
Hin'er-al, 233, Exo. 
Min'er-al-ist, 106. 
Min-er-al-T-za'tion. 
Min'er-al-ize, 202. 
Min'er-al-ized, 165. 
Min'er-al iz^r, 228, N. 
Min'er-al-iz-ing. 
Min-er-al-og'ic (-o/'-). 
Min-er-al-og'io-al {-oj'-). 
Min-er-al'o-gist, 108. 
Min-er-al'o-gy [not mln- 

ur-ol'o-JY, 127, 153.] 
Min'e-ver [M e n 1 v e r , 

203.] 
Mln'gle {ming'gt), 64. 



Min'gled {fning'gld), 

183. 
Min'gler {ming'-). 
Min'gling {ming'-). 
Min'^ate, v. & a. 73, 169. 
Min'i-at-ed, 183. 
Min'i-atring. 
Min'ia-ture (min'i-Hir), 

or Min'i-a-ture [so 

Gd. Wr.j mifi'i-tilr, 

Wk. 8m. 155.] 
Minaa-tur-iBt {min'i-), 

or Min'i-a-tur-ist. 
Min'i-buB, 170. 
Min'ie-ri'fle ^Jt) (205) 

[bo Wr. ; nUn-e'-ri% 

Gd. 155.] 
Min'i-kin, 66, 169. 
Min'im, 103. 
Min'i-mum (L.) [pL 

Min'irma, 198.] 
MTn'ing, 183. 
Min'iou {-yun\ 51, 86. 
Mln'l8-ter,230. 
MinMB-tered, 150. 
Mln-is-te'ri-al, 49, N.j 

169. 
Min i8-te'rl-al-ly, 93. 
MInMB-ter-lng. 
Min'is-trant. 
Min iB-tra'tion, 112. 
Min'is-trat-Ive. 
Min'lB-tresB. 
Min'iB-try. 
Min'i-um ri69) [bo Sm. 

Wb. Ga.: min'yum, 

Wk. ; min'i-umy or 

min'yumj Wr. 155.J 
Mink (mingk)t 16, 54. 
Min'ne-sing-er, 171. 
Min'now, 101, 170. 
Mi'nor (70, 169), a. 

Bmaller : — n. .one un- 
der age. [See Miner, 

ICO.] 
MT-ndr'i-tj, 169. 
Min'o-t&ur [not mi'no- 

tAur, 153.] 
Minister, 77. 
Min'Btrel, 230. 
Min'Btrel-sy, 169. 
Mint. 16. 
Mint'age, 228. 
Mint'ed. 
Mint'ing. 
Miu'u-end, 89. 
Min'u-et, 89, 156. 
Mi'nus (L.), 169. 
MI-nuB'cole. 
MT-nute', o. (121, 161) 

[BO Wk. 8m. Wb. Gd. ; 

m%-nlU'i or ml-ntU', 

Wr. 155.] 



aV-"If we wish to b« 
Tery muiv/e, we pronounce 
the t in the flnt lyllable 
long." Wuiker. 

Min'nte, n. {min'it) (90, 
160) [BO Wb. Gd.; 
min'iU, or miw'tf ,Wr. j 
m«n'<U, coll. min'U\ 
Wk. Sm. 165.1 

Min'ut-ed (fniV«-) 

Min'ate-guu' {min'U-), 
205. 

Min'ute-ly {min'U-ly), 
101. 

Ml-nate'ly, 161. 

Min'ute-man (-i7-), 196. 

MI-nute'nesB, 186. 

3Iin'ut-ing (-»Y-), 183. 

Ml-nu'ti-oR (L.) (-«AI-e). 

Minx {mingks), IG, 54. 

Min'y, 169, I8:i. 

Mi'o-cene [Meiocene, 
203.] 

Miq'ue-let {-we-). 

Ali-rab'i-le dic'tu (L.). 

Mi'rach {-rak), 49, N. 

Mir'arcle (-^0 (1(H) [not 
m6r'a-kl, 153.] 

Mlr'a-de-mon'ger {-kl- 
mung'gur)t'i05i Exc.3. 

MT-ra<?u-lofi8, 100, 108. 

Afirage' {Ft. ){me-riizh'), 
171. 

Mire, 25, 49. 

Mired, lt>5, 183. 

Ikn-riric, 109. 

Sn-rific-al, 108. 

Mlr'i-nesB, 49, N. ; 186. 

[MIrky (21,N.\203. 
— See Murky.] 

Mlr'ror, 48, (k\ 170. 

Mirth, 21, N. 

Mirth'ftil {-/Sot)j 180. 

Mirth'ful-ly {-/ubl-). 

MIr'y, 49, N. ; 235. 

Mir'za, n. the common 
title of honor in Per- 
sia. [See MurzA, 160.] 

Mis-aa-vcnt'ure, 91. 

Mis-ad-vent'ur-o&s 
(-ffur-us)f 91, 171. 

MiB-al-li'nnce. 

Mifl-al-lied'. 

Mis'an thrope (105) [not 
miB-an'throp, 153.J 

MiB-an-throp'io, 109. 

MlB-an-throp'ie-al, 108. 

MlB-an'thro-pist. 

MiB-an'thro-py, 105, 166. 

MiB-ap-pli-ca'tlon. 

Mis-ap-plicd', 186. 

MiB-ap-ply'. 

MiB-ap-ply'ing, 186. 



fall ; d a« in there -, 6b as in foot i gas in facile ; gh a< g in go j th a< <n this. 

24* 



MISAPPREHEND 



282 



MISPELL 



MlB*ap-prc-hend', 116. 
' Mls-ap-prc-heiid'ed. 
Mls-ap-pre-hend'in^. 
Ml8-ap-pre-hen'8ion. 
Mi8-ap-pro-pri-a'tion. 
Mis-be-carae' {-kHm'). 
Mis-be-oorae' l-kum'). 
Mis-be-oom'ing (turn'-). 
M is-be-baveS fltf. 
MiB-be-haved', 183. 
Mis-be-havMug. 
MiB-be-hav'ior i-ifur)^ 

61, 171. 
Mls-be-lief. 
Mis-be-Ueve' 100. 
Mis-be Ueved', 183. 
Mls-be-liev'er. 
Mis-be-liev'ing. 
Mis-cal'cu-late. 
Mi 8-oal'eu -lat-€d. 
Mis-cal'cu-lat-ing. 
Mis-cal-cu-la'tion. 
Mis-c&U' [Miaeal, 

203.] 
Mis-caUed'. 
Mis-c&U'ing. 
Mi8-car'riagc (-ry), 70. 
Mis-car'ried, UO. 
Mis-cftr'ry, 66, 17a 
Mia-cftr'ry-ing. 
MiB-ca8t\ 131. 
Mis-cast'ing. 
MiB-ccl-la-na'rinon, 40, 

N.j IfiO. 
Mis-celrla'ne-a (L.), «. 

kis'-oeMa'ne-o&B, 160, 

171. 
Ml8-cciaa-niBt, 106. 
MiB'cel-la-uy, 72, 160, 

171. 
Mis-cb&nce'. 
MiB-charge'. 
Mis'chlef (-cMr), 171. 
MiB'chlef-mak'er, 205. 
Mis'chIev-o&8 (iOO, 156, 

171} [not mlB-cher'aB, 

153.] 

o^ '* Some old anthora, 
■nd the rulirar still, accent 
the eecond ly IUkble."&jiarf 

[Mi 8chna,203.^iSM 

MiBhna.l 
MiB-oon Olive'. 160. 
Mis-con-coivea', 165. 
MiB-<»ii-€!eiv'ing. 
Mis-con-cep'tion, 112. 
Ml8-<M>nMuct, n. 161. 
Mis-con-duct', v. 161. 
Mis-oon-Btruc'tion . 
Mis-con'Btme {-»troo) 

(156) [5cc Note under 

Comtrue.'] 



Mii-oon'gtnied 

(-Mtrood). 
Mii-«on' BtrU'lng 

i-atroo-). 
MiB'cre-«it, li4, 100. 
Mis-date'. 
Mis-dat'ed. 
Mis-dat'ing. 
Mia-deed'. 
Mis-de-mean'or, 100. 
MlB-cn-reot', 151. 
MiB-dl-rect'ed. 
Mia-dl-rect'ing. 
Mis-dl-rec'tion, 112. 
MiB-do' i-doo')^ 10. 
MlB-do'er i-doo'-), 77. 
Mis-do'ing (-doof). 

Mis-done' (-dt«n'). 
MiB-em-ploy^ 
MiB-em-ployed', 187. 
MiB-em-ploy'ing. 
MlB-em-ploy'ment. 
MiB-en'try, 03. 
Mi'ser {-zur), 136. 
Mis'er-a-ble (mu'ur-a- 

bl), 164, 160. 
MiB'er-a-bly(miB'-). 
MU-e-re're (L,), 40, N. 
Mi^Ber-ly {-zur-). 
MiB'cr-7 (mis'-), 160, 

233, Exo. 
Mi8-f€a'8anoe {-zatu) 

[bo Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

mit-/a'zans, Sm. 155.] 
Mi8-form', 17. 
MlB-formed'. 
MiB-form'ing. 
MiB-fort'one (00) [See 

Fortune.] 
MiB-gave'. 
Mifl-give' i-ghivf). 
MiB-giv'en (-^Aiv'n), 

140. 
MiB-giv'lng i-ghiv'-). 
Mis-got'ten i-^ot'n), 

140. 
MiB-goy'em {-gw'-), 
MlB-goy'emed {-guv'- 

urw^, 166. 
MiB-gov'em-ing 

MiB-gov'em-ment 

{-guv'-\ 
Mis-guid'anoe, 63, 183. 
MiB-guide'. 
MiB-guid'ed. 
MiB-guid'ing. 
MiB-nap'. 
Mish'maBh. 
Misb'na [Miiohna, 

203.] 
MiB-in-form'. 
MlB-in-form-a'tion, 112. 



Mia-in-fonned', 165. 
Mia-in-form'er. 
Mi B-in-form'ing. 
Mis-in-ter'prot. 
Mis-in-ter-pret-a'tioiL 
Mi8-in-ter'pret-ed. 
MiB-in-terpret-er. 
MiB-ln-ter'pret-iiig. 
Mis-ioin', 27. 
Mis-Join'der, 77. 
Mis-Joined', 165. 
MiB-join'ing. 
Mis-judge', 45. 
MiB:judged', 183. 

Mis-judg'ing (-/lyM- . 

MiB-Judfi^'mcQt {mZZ 
[MisjudgemeDt, 
Sm. 203. — See Not^S 
under AbridgmaU.] 

MlB-laid'. 

Mislay'. 

MiB-lay'ing. 

Mi8'le(ro<?0( 164)r M i i 

zlc,203.] 

Mis-lead'. 

Mis-lead'^. 

Mis-lead'ing. 

MiB'led (mt^'&O (161) 
V. did misle, or raicii:^ 
in very fine drops- 
[Mizzled, 203.] 

MiB-led'(161),v.did mi^ 
lead. 

[M i B 1 et oe ,203.— Sess^ 
Mistletoe.] 

Mis-man 'age. 

Mis-man'aged, 183. 

Mis-man'age-ment. 

Mis-man'a-ger. 

MiB-man'a-ging. 

Mis-mark'. 

Mia-marked' {-tnarkey • 

Mis-mark'ing. 

MlB-match'. 

Mis-matched' {^mMW >• 

Mia-match'ing. 

MlB-m^aB'ure {-mezk'- 

fW*). 

MiB-mfiaB'nred {-mah'- 

urd). 
Mis-mi'aB'ur-ing 

(•^mezh'ur-), 
MiB-name'. 
Mis-named', 183. 
Mis-nam'ing. 
MiB-no'mcr, 122. 
Ml-Bog'a-mist, 151. 
MT-BOg'a-my, 160. 
Ml-BOg'y-nlBt {-80j'')i 

161, 166, 171. 
Ml-BOg'y-ny (-«?/'-),««. 
[Miapell, 203.-Si« 

MlBBpcU.] 



a, §, 1, o, u, y, long \ i, fi, I, d, fi, j^, short ',lLa»in ftr, katin fiwt, ft a« <R 




PEND 

1. 203.— iSSee 

(W'O (167) 
nUs-pUe'elf 



C, p. 34. 
lent, 186. 
ff,183. 

d. 

^: 

d. 
ig- 

d. 
>g 



tin) 



1 (-prizh'un 
}riz'u, 153.] 



J, 183. 

iince'. 

unoed' 

, Note C, 

m^'iiifi^. 
ci-ci-a'tion 
r«1-a'-)(n6) 
lundation.J 
r'tlon. 

•'tioned, 106. 
r'tion-ing. 
tion, ll£ 

1, 183. 

ff. [149. 

I (-reJfn), 

ied(-rel:'nrf). 

i-ing 

I'ber. 

I'bered, 166. 
I'ber-lng. 

•ed (-dttrtf). 
-Ing. 

'ed. 
'ini 



it'(- 
lent'ed 



sent'ing 

sent-A'tion 

e, 128. 
r. (16, 174) 

IIi8B'C8,180.] 

, n. the Ro- 



283 

mtn Catholic masB- 
book. [See MisBile, 
148.1 
MlBsed {mitt), (Note C, 

!». 34), V, did mlBS. 
See Mist, 160.1 
R^Belthniah (miz'- 

zel). 
[MiBseltoe, 203.^ 

See Mistletoe.] 
Mis-Bend'. 66, N. 
MiB-send'ing. 
Mis-sent'. 
Mis-serve'. 21, N. 
Mis-seryea', 166. 
MJB-sery'ing. 
Mis-shape'. 
Mis- shaped' (shltpV), 
Mis-shap'en (-Mhdp'n), 

149. 
Mis'slle (81), n. a weap- 
on to be thrown, [see 

Missal, 148.] 
Miss'ing. 
Mis'sion (mUh'un), 46, 

Note 2; 171. 
Mis'slon-arrr (mish'- 

«n-), 72, 109. 
Mis'sis. 

av Thli ftnn of ipell- 
Ing representi the promm- 
ciation of the common 
title of married women of 
•II clsMea. It it a corrup- 
tion of mutrtu, and la u- 
wayt abbreviated, in wilt- 
faig, to ifra. 

Mis'sTve, 66, 84. 
MiB-BpeU'(66,N.)[MlB- 
pell, 203.] 



Smart, following 

Johneon, ^ves M 1 1 ■ p e 1 . 

Mis-spelled', 166. 
Mis-BpcU'ing. 
Mis-spelt', 166. 
Mis-spend' (64) [MIb- 

pend,203.] 
Mis-spend'ing. 
Mis-spent'. 
Mis-state', 66, N. 
Mis-stat'ed. 
Mis-state'ment, 186. 
Mis-stat'ing. 
Mis-step'. 

Mist (16), n. rain in the 
'form of line and al" 

most imperceptible 

drops. [See Missed, 

160.1 
Mlstak'a-ble, 164, 183. 
Mis-take'. 

Mis-tak'cn (-MAr'n), 149. 
Mis-tak'ing, 183. 



MIBWEITIN6 



Ml»-tAnght'(-teto«0>lQ2- 
Mis-teaoh'. 
Mis-teach'ing. 
MiB'ter. 



Thii Ibrm of ipell- 
Ing represents the prommr 
ciatioH of the common title 
of men of all ranks. It Is 
never used except in con- 
nection with a proper 
name, the word tir taking 
its place in addressing a 

Eerson. It is always ab- 
reviated in writing to Mr. 
"This form of the word 
mas/er,"sayi 8mart,"seems 
to have been adopted, or 
at least promoted, for the 
sake of analogy with r»ii^ 
Cress; fbr mutrur among 
our old writers often had 
the form ma8tre», in order 
to suit with maMer, which 
was Uien used where we 
now find mtsfer." 

Mis-time'. 
Mis-timed', 166. 
Mis-tim'ing, 183. 
Mist'i-ness, 186. 
[Mlstle, 2a3. — 5ee 

Mizzle.] 
Mis'tle-toe (miz'l-to) 

(156, 162) [Misle- 

toe, Mlsseltoe, 

203.1 
Mist'Iike, 206, Exo. 5. 
Mis-tdbk'. 
Mis'tral, 72, 103. 
Mis-trans- late', 116. 
Mls-trans-lat'ed, 228, N. 
Mis-trans-lat'ing. 
Mis-trans-la'tion, 112. 
Mis'tress f 70) [See Note 

nnder JiiisHs,] 
Mis-trust'. 
Mls-trust'ed. 
Mls-tnist'ful i-JSol), 
Mis-trust'ing. 
Mis-tune'. 26, 127. 
Mis-tuned', 166, 188. 
Mls-tun'ing. 
Mist'y, 169. 
Mis-nn-der-Btand'. 
Mls-nn-der-stand'ing. 
Mis-un-der-stdbd' . 
Mis-UB'age(-yoo«'-), 136. 
Mis-use' i-ifooz')i v. 161. 
Mis-use', n. 101. 
Mis-used' {-yoozd'). 
Mis-us'er {-yooz'-). 
Mis-us'ing (-yoo«'-). 
Mis-wed'. 
Mls-wed'ded, 170. 
Mls-wed'ding. 
Mis-write' (-r«'), 162. 
Mis-writ'ing (-r«'-). 



» there; Ob cm ttt foot j 9 a« <n ftoile ; gh m g in go ; |h cu <n thia. 




MIS WRITTEN 

Mis-writ'ten {-rifn). 

MlB-wrote' (-rOf), 24. 

Mis-wrought' {-rawt')t 
1G2. 

Mis-joko'. 

31i8-vokcd' (-yaW). 

Mitch'ell, 171. 

Mito (25), n. a very mi- 
nute animal or partl- 



[ 



cle. r;SVe Might, 100.] 
Mitor,203. — iSe« Mi- 
tre.] 
Mit'i-ga-blc, IM. 
Mit'i-gant, 72. 
Mit'i-gato, 73, IflQ. 
Mit'i-t.'at^, 183. 
Mit'i-gaMng. 
Mit-i-ga'tion, 112. 
Mlt'l-gJit-Ive, W. 
Mlt'l jiiit-or, 109. 
Mi'tnU, 72. 
Mi'tre(-fur)(104)[Mi- 

t e r, preferred bj Wb. 

and Gd. — .See Note 

E, p. 70.] 
Ml'tred {tni'turd), 
Mit'ri-forra, 109. 
Mit'tcn [not mit'n, 149, 

IM.] 
mt'tt-mus (L.), 109. 
3Iltt9, n. pi. 
Mit'y (li''.»), n. having 

mites, [.bee Mighty, 

10<).] 
Mix, 10, 39, N. 
MIx'a-ble, 1«U, 109. 
Mixed {mik-»t) (00, Note 

C, p. W) [Mlxt, 

203.J 

air " Thli being nec««- 
lorily nronouucea, if in 
one •vlliltlv, M if written 
mtxf, is ^u.io tinncccMarl- 
\j made irregular by being 
•o written." Stnurt. 

Mix'ed-ly, or Mixed'Iy 
{mikst'lt/) [so Wr. } 
miks'ed'ly^ Gd. ; 

mikst'lj/j or miks'etl- 
ly, Sm. 155.] [Mixt- 
1 y , 203.] 

Mix'er. 

Mix'lng. 

Mix-ti-lin'e-al. 

Mix-ti-lin'e-ar, 109. 

Mixt'ion {-t/^n), 80. 

MIxt'ure, 01. 

Miz'zcn (miVn), 149. 

Miz'zen-ma8t (miz'n-). 

Miz'zlc (lOi) [Mi lie, 
Mi8tle,203.] 

0^ " The former ipell- 
Ing lmi$le] is Muictlonea by 



284 

e^molocTi the latter {mi»- 
Oe] li more analiwiealt the 
rooet tiiual tpelUnf la, 
howeTer, that which ooo- 
ibnna to the pronundar 
Hon, namdj, ■uask." — 
ANorf. 

Mlz'sled (-zld)t 165. 
Miz'zUng. 
Mii'aly, 170. 
Mnc-mon'lo (ne-), 102. 
Mne-mon'io-al (ne-). 
Mncm-o-nX'oian {nem-o- 

nUh'an\ 46, 162. 
Mnc-mon'ic8 (n«-), 109, 

171. 
Mnem'o-tech-ny (nem'- 

o-<eJb-fiy), 102. 
Mdan (24, 43}, r. to be- 

waU. r5c«Mown,100.] 
Moanea, 106. 
Moan'ing, part. IVom 

Moan, [see Moning, 

160.1 
Mdat (24, 41), «. a ditch 

round a castle, filled 

with water.[.See Mote, 

100.] 
Mob, 18, 31. 
Mobbed, 166, 176. 
Mob'bing. 
Mob'bish. 
Mobile (81) [ao 8m.; 

mo-biV^ >5rk. ; mo'- 

bU, Wb. (3d. ; mo-bH', 

or mob'a, Wr. 166.] 
Mo-bll'i-ty, 169. 
Mob-i-U-za'tion, 112. 
Mobilize, 202. 
Mob'il-ized, 183. 
Mub'il-iz-ing. 
Mob'le (mo6>0 (164) [so 

8m. Wb. (Jd. } nu/blt 

Wk. ; mob'lt or mo'- 

blj Wr. 155.J 
MobMed {mob'ld) [not 

mob'Icd, 166.1 
Mob'Ung. 
MCb-oo'rarcy (169) [so 

Gd. ; nuhhoVra-sy^ 

Wr. 165.] 
Moc'ca-son (-«n) (167; 

[Moooasin, Mog- 

ga8on,203.] 

av- •* Often written 
moccfuint and also oftirn 
written and pronounced 
moggaaoH.** WorceMter, 

Mo'cha (-l»i), 52, 72. 

Mock, 18, 181. 

Mocked (mokt), 165 ; 

Note C, p. 34. 
Mock'cr, 77. 



MODULATE 

Mo6k'er-y, 109. 
Mock'ing. 
Mock'ing-bird, 206; 

Exc. 5. 
Mock'-he-ro'lc 
Mock'-or'ange. 
Mock'-tor'tle, 164. 
Mo'oo (86) [pi. Mo'ods 

(-*««), 192.] 
Mo'dal, 72. 
Mo'dal-iflt, 100. 
Mo-dal'i-ty, 106, 109. 
Mode (163), n. manner. 

[See Mowed. 100.1 
Mod'el, n. & r. (76) [not 

mod'i, 149.] 
Mod'eUed {-eid) (166) 

[Modeled, Wb. and 

Gd. 203.— ^'ee 177 and 

Note E, p. 70.] 
Mod'eller[iIodeler, 

Wb. and Gd. 203.1 
Mod'el-liug [Model- 
ing, Wb. and Gd. 

2037] 
Mo-de'na. 
Mod'er-ate, a. & r. 73, 

108, 233, Exo. 
Mod'er-at-ed. 
Mod'cr-ate-ly, 185. 
Mod'er-at-ing. 
Mod er-a'tiou, 112. 
Mod'er-at-ism {-izm). 
Mod-e-rd'to (It.), 154. 
Mo<l'er-at-or, 88. 
Mod'er-at-rix. 
Mod'ern. 

Mod'em-iam (-i^m), 133 
Mod'ern -ist. 
Mod-em-T-za'tion, 112. 
Mod'em-Izc, 202. 
Mod'ern -izcd, 165. 
Mod'ern-iz-cr. 
Mod'em-iz-Ing. 
Mod'em-ness, 66, N. 
Mod'est, 76, 103. 
Mod'est-y, 93, 109. 
Mod'i-cum. [ 186. 

Mod-i-fi'a-ble, 1<M, W^ 
Mod-i-flr-ca'tlon, 2:i:j. 
Mod'i-fic*l, 99. 
\ Mod'i A-er, 186. 
Mod'i-fy, 94. 
Mod'i-fy-ing, 180. 
Mo-dil'lion (dirttnn). 
Mo-di'o-lar, or >toMi-o- 

lar [mo-di'o-lar^ Wr. i 

mo'di-o-lar, Sm. (xd. 

155.1 
Mod'ish, 156. 
Mod' I St, 183. 
Mod'u-late (89) [ao Sm. 

Wr. Wb. (M. J mod'- 



a, §. i, d, u, y, long ; R, d, f, 6, fi, j^, short ; Has in flur, kasin Ikat, kasin 




MODULATi;.D 

«-/A^, or mod!H^4at, 
Wk. 154, 155.J 

atod'u-lit-ed, 183. 

Mod'u-Ut-lng. 

Mod-a-la'tion, 112. 

Hod'ii-lit-or. 

Hod'nle (90) [«o 8m. 
Wr. Wb. Gd. ; tnofi'- 
«2, or mod'j^t Wk. 
134 155 1 

^od'^U-lus (L.) (89) [pi. 
Mod'u-ttt 196.] 

Mo'duB (L.) [L. pi. Mof- 
dl ; Kug. pi. iio'dvLB- 
es (-ez), 198.] 

Mod^will. 

lI(B'so-Goth'ic(mc'M>-), 
13, 224. 

[Mog^RBon, 203.^ 
See MoocaBon.] 

Mo-gul', 121. 

Mo'hair (Wr). 

Mo-bam'med-an(72,170) 
[M a b o m e t a n , Ma- 
home dan, 203.] 

If o-bam'med- an-lsm 
i-izm)j 133. 130. 

Mo-luim'mea-an-lze,202. 

Mo-ham'med-an-ized. 

Mo-bam'med-an-iz-ing. 

Ho'bAwk [Mo bock, 
203.] 

Ho-ho'n, 191. 

Mohr im9r) (102), ft. a 
■peoieB of antelope in- 
babiting AfHca. [See 
Mobur , 148 J and more, 
160.] 

Mo'bur, n. an Eaat In- 
dian gold coin, wortb 
about #0.07. [See 
Mohr, and More, 148 *, 
and Mower, IflO.j 

Moi'dore (171) [so Wr. 
Wb. Gd. ; mnw'i-ddr, 
8m.; mai-<Ur*f Wk. 
155.] 

MoiVty (moi'-, or 
maw'-) [moi'e4pt Wk. 
Wr. Vb. Gd. ; mow'- 
e-tvt Sm. 155.] 

Moll, 27. 

Moiled, 165. 

Moil'ing. 

3/in'n<jau(Pr.) (-no) J64. 

Moire' 'anrtiqtuf (Fr.) 
{mioor'an-Uk')» 

Moist, 27. 

MoiBt'en {rnoWn), 149, 
162, 167. 

Moiat'ened (moi$'nd), 

Moist'en-big {jnoU'n-^, 

MoiBt'ore, 91. 



285 



Mo'Ur, 74. 

Mo'lar-y, 109. 

Mo-las'BGB {-ld8'ez)nt) 
[mo-Uu'ez, Wb. GW.; 
mo-lds'ez, Wr. ; mo- 
Ids'iz, Wk. ; mo-l&B'' 
eSt Sm. 155.][ M e 1 a b - 

80 8,203.] 



** Commonly called 
mofauK* . . . propeiiy me- 
kmes." Smart, — ** Mt- 
UuKM ... to more accord- 
ant with etymology.** — 
Goodrich. 

[Mold, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— .See Mould J 
[Molder, Wb. Gd. 

203.— See Moulder.] 
[Moldy, Wb.Gd. 2Gi3. 

— See Mouldy.] 
Mole, 24. 
Mo-lec'u-Iar (89) [not 

mol'cu-lar, 144, 153.] 
Mo-lec-u-l&r'i-ty, 169. 
Mol'e-culc [not mol'- 

kul, 144, 16:i.] 
Mole^hUl,206. 
Molest', 103. 
Mol-est-a'tion, 112, 143. 
Mo-lest'ed. 
Mo-leBt'er. 
Mo-lest'lng. 
Mo'lln-ism i-izm), 133. 
Mo'lin-iBt. 
Mdll, 18, 172. 
Mol'iab (72) [Mool- 

lab,203.] 
Mol'lient (mcVyent)i or 

Morii-ent fso Wr.; 

mol'ffent^ Wk. 8m. ; 

moVt-ent, Wb. Gd. 

155.] [180. 

Moru-n-a-ble, 164, 109, 
MoI-11-n-ca'tion, 233. 
MoVU-Hcd, 99. 
Mol'll-fV, M, 170. 
Mol'li-fJ-lng, 180. 
Mbl-ltu'ca (L.), n. pi. 
Mol-lus'can, 72. 
MoMuB'oofiB, 100. 
Mol'luBk, 60, 170. 
Mo'locb l-lok), 52. 
MO-IOBBC' (4o«0i 121. 
Mo-Iob'bub, 170. 
[Molt, Wb. Gd. 203. 

— See Moult.] 
Molt^cn {mdWn), 24, 149, 

107. 
Mol-ybHle'nA, 122. 
Mo-lyb'de-nottB. 
Mol-yb-de'num (171) 

[not mo-liVde-num, 

153.] 



MONEY 

Mo'ment, 24, 70. 
Mo'mentra-ri-ly , 120,18a 
Mo'mcnt-a-ry, r2, 100. 
Mo-ment'ofiB, 100. 
Mo-men'tum (L.) [L. 

pi. Mo-men'ta-, Eng. 

pl. Mo-men'tums 

l-tumz)t rare, 198.] 
Mom'i-er {mum'-)t 22. 
Mo'm6t. 
Mo'muB. 109. 
Mon'a-ohal (-kal), 62, 

72. 
Mon'a-€hism (-iUzm), 

133. 
Mon'&d (103) Tbo 8m. 

Wr. Wb. Gd. ; mon'- 

ad, or mo'nad, Wk. 

155.] 
Mon'a-delpb. 
Mon-a-delph'I-an, 109. 
Mon-a-delph'oilB. 
Mo-nad'io, 109. 
Mo-nad'ic-al, 108. 
Mo-nan'der. 
Mo-nan'dri-an, 160. 
Mo-nan'dro&B, 100. 
Mo-nan'tbobs. 
Mon'arcb (-ark)t 62, 72. 
Mo-narcb'i-al (-nark'-), 

169. 
Mo-narcb'ic {-nark'-). 
Mo-narch'ic-ttl(-fmri*'-). 
Mon'arch-ist (-ark-). 
Mon'arch-izc {-ark-). 
Mon'arcb-lzed (ark-). 
Mon'arcb -iz-ing (-ark-). 
Mon'arch-y (-ark-), 109. 
Mon-RS-te'ri-al, 49, N. 
Mon'as-ter-y (J116, 122) 

[bo Wr. Wb. Gd.; 

mon'aB-try, or mon'- 

ae-tir^, Wk. ; mon'- 

as-tir-y, coll. mon'at- 

try, Sm. 155.] 
Mo-nas'tic, 109. 
Mo-nas'tic-al, 106. 
Mo-naB'tic-ol-ly, 170. 
Mo-nas'ti-ciam (-siznij. 
Mo-naB'ti-oon. 
Mo'n&ul, 150. 
Mon'day (man'f/y), 22. 
M»nde (Fr.) (151) [so 

Sm. Wb. (id. ; mSnd, 

Wr. 155.] 
Mon'e-ta-ry (mun'-" 

g2) [bo Sm. W>' 
d. ; mon'e-tO'ry, a 
mun'e-ta-^, Wr. 
155], a. i)ertaining to 
money. [See Moiiito- 
I ry, 148.] 
I Mon'ey (mun'y) (08, 



fall; •<M<n there; db cu <n fbot ; 9 a« tfn fkdle ; gh (U g in go ; tb m fn thia 




MONEYAGE 

100, 100) [pi. Moneys, 

171, 187.] 
Mon'ej-agfC (mun*-). 
Mon'ey-bro'Ker 

(mun'-), 205. 
Mon'eyeu (mun'id), 171. 
Mon'ej-er (mun^-). 
Mon'ey-mak'eitmttn'-), 

2M. 
Mon'gcr (munff'gur), 

64, 138, 171. 
Mon'gol (fnong'-)t 86. 
Mon-gro'll-an, 100. 
Kou'y^oose imang*-) 

'MangooBC, 



^ 



H o n ^ o o s ' , 203.] 
Mon'gT<n (mun^'-), 22, 
64, 141, 171. 



Mo-nil'i-fonn, 108. 
Mo'ning, n. a fine Und 

of black tea. [See 

Moaning, 160.1 
Mo-nl'tlou (-niU'tm). 
Mon'i-tlve, 84. 
Mona-tor, 109. 
Mon-1-to'ri-al, 40, N. 
Mon'i-to-ry m), a. giv- 

S^ admonition. [See 
onctary, 148.] 
Mon^i-trcBs. 
Monk {mungk)j 22, 64. 
Monk'cr-y {mungk'-), 
Mon'key (muno'l-y), 22, 

64,100. 
Mon'key -Jack'et 

{mung'-\ 205. 
Monk'h($bd {mnnaV-), 
Monk'iflh {mungJe'-). 
Monk'8'h(K)d 

(mungks'-)y 213. 
Mon-o-Wsic, 109. 
Mon-o-car'dl-an. 
Mon-o-car'pofiB, 100. 
Mon-o-oeDh'a-lofiB. 
Mon-o-ohla-myd'e-o&s 

(-*Ia-)j 108, 169. 
Mon'o-chord {-kord). 
Mon-o-chro-mat'io 

{-kro'-). 
Mon'o-cnrome (-Jtr0fn). 
Mon-o-chronMo 

{-kron'A, 62. 
Mon-o-cli'notts. 122. 
Mon-o-co-tylVdon [bo 

Gd. J mon~o-kot-y^- 

doHy 8m. Wr. 165.^ 

See Cotyledon.] 
Mon-o-oo-tyl-e'don-ofiB, 

143. 
Mo-noc'ra<«7, 106. 
Mo-noc'u-lar, 108. 
Mon'o-cnle. 
Mo-noc'a-lofis, 108. 



286 

Mon-o-dac'tyl-otts. 

Mon'o-delph. 

Mon'o-dist. 

Mon'o-don. 

Mon-o-dra-mat'ie, 109. 

Mon'o-drame, 106. 

Mon'o-dy. 

Mo-noB'caan (•fie'ffjkan}, 
13, 46, 160. 

Mo-nce'dolla (-iie'- 

ehua). 

Mo-nog'a-mist. 

Mo-nog'a-mottB. 

Mo-nog'a-my, 93. 

Mon-o-gas'trio, 230. 

Mon'o-gram. 105. 

Mon-o-gram'mlc, 109. 

Mon'o-gram-mal, 72. 

Mon-o-gTam-mat'ic, 
170. 

Mon'o-gram-motts. 

Mon'o-grftph, 127. 

Mo-Dog'ra-pber, 108. 

Mon-o-graph'ie. 

Mon-o-grapb'io-al. 

Mo-nog' ra-phlst. 

Mo-nog'ra-pby, 108. 

Mon'o-gyn (-jin). 

Mon-o-gyn'i-an (-Jin'-). 

Mo-nog'y-uottB {-nq}'-). 

Mon'o-litb. 

Mon'o-Uth-al, 106. 

Mon-o-lithac, 109. 

Mo-noPo-gist, 106. 

Mon'o-16gue (-loa)j 87. 

Mo-nom'a-cby (-Ay), 
108. 

Mon-o-ma'ni-a. 

Mon-o-ma'ni-ao, 108. 

Mon'ome [bo 8m. Gd. ; 
tnofi'o-met Wr. 166.] 

Mo-nom'e-ter, 108. 

Mon-o-mct'ric. 

Mo-no'ml-al, 109. 

Mon-o-mor'pbo&B. 

Mon-o-oa^Bi-an (-ow'zi- 
an) [mon-o-ow'8i<mt 
Gd.j mon-o-cto'ehanf 
Wr. 166. — 5ce Hom- 
ooaaian.] 

Mo-nop'a-thy, 108. 

Mon-o-per' so-nal. 

Mon-o-pet'al-oiiB. 

Mo-nopb'a-nofiB. 

Mo-nopb'tbong^ 
(-nop'-)f or Mon'opb- 
thong (-of-) {mfMwp'- 
thonfft 8m. ; mon'of- 
tkong, Wb. Gd. ; mo- 
noftnong, or mon'of- 
thong, wr. 155.] 
Mon-oph-tbon'gal (^-op- 
thong'-)t 54, 72. 



MONTANIST 

Mon-o-phrriotta, or 
Mo-noph'yl-lofiB. 
[See Adcnopbylloiis.] 

Mon-o-pby'o-4ont. 

Mo-noph'y-Bite, 152. 

Mo-noph- y-Bit 'ic-aL 

Mo-nop'o-<ly, 106. 

Mo-nop'o-lJBt. 

Mo~nop'o-lize, 202. 

Mo-nop'o-IijBGd, 183. 

Mo-nop'o-Iiz-«r, 163. 

Mo-nop'o-llz-in^. 

Mo-nop'o-lj. 

Mon-o-pol'y-ldgne, 87. 

Mo-nop'ter-al, 72. 

Mon'op-tote, t>r Mo- 
nop'tote [bo Wk. ; 
fnon'op-t6t, 8m. Wr. ; 
mo-nop't6t, Wb. Gd. 
155.] 

Mon'o-rbyme (-rim), 
162. 

Mon-o-Bcp'a-Iotts. 

Mon-o-aperrn'ofiB. 

Mon-o-spb£r'ic-al. 

Mon'o-Btich i-stik)^ 141. 

Mon-o-Btropn 'io. 

Mon-o-8y 1 -lab'ic 

Mon-o-8y I -lab'ic-aL 

Mon'o-BTl-la-ble, 164. 

Mon-o-tiial'a-mofis. 

Mon'o-the-iam i-Um), 
133,136. 

Mon'o-the-ist. 

Mon-o-tbe-iBt'ic, 109. 

Mo-notb'e-lite, 152, 10Ol 

Mon'o-tone, 166. 

Mo-not'o-noiis, 100. 

Mo-not'o-ny, 105. 

Mon'o-treme. 

Mon-o-tri'glyph, 122. 

Moneeigneur (Fr.) 
(mdng-sln'gur) [pi. 
Metseigneurs^ (md- 
eln'jfurz), 154.] 

Monneur (Fr.) (moe- 
Hr*, or mo8-yur') 
[moMfr', Gd. i 

miingB-yoor' y or near- 
ly nae'yur', Sm. ; 
m6#'l^r', or mon-$tr*, 
Wr. 166] [pi. Me^. 
tieurs, 198. — See 

MeBsienrB.] 

Mon-Boon', 121. 

Mon'Bter, 77, 230. 

Mon'Btrance, 64. 

Mon-BtroB'i-ty, 169. 

Mon'BtroQs, 100, 160. 
Mon-tan'lc, 109. 
Mon'ta-nism {-nizm\ 

136. 
Mon'ta-nist. 



&f Si 1, 6, u, y, long; ft, S, I, d, ft, f, thort iHatin &x, k€uin fiist, ft cu In 



ONTANISTIC 



287 



MORTGAGED 



ta-nlBt'ie. 
ta-niBt'i<y4a. 
tant, 72. 

de piHi (Tt,) 
ngd'p9 a^d'). 
re (-fd) f 3p.). 
te-fl-as'co, 
tern. 

teth', or Mon'teth 
m-teih', Wb. Gd. j 
I'tethy 8m. ; mon'- 
r,or monr^teth' iWr. 

n (mun1h% 22. 
h'lT fman/V-). 
ttoMi-late, 89. 
-mar'trite, 152. 
fOM^ (ii»«fi^<iror') 
Sm. ; mon'twor, 
. ; mon-twor'f Wr. 

a-ment, 89. 
a-ment'al. 
19«32. 

I (19), n. state of 
id; — the form of 
rb. [S« Moood, 



I 



inff. 

I'i-ly, 186. 

I'i-ness. 

I'y, 160. 

>liah',203. — 5ee 

lUh.] 

1, 19, 32, 43. 

('beam, 200. 

i'calf(-Jfca/). 

ted, 165. 

/-eyed {-Id), 200, 

:. 5. 

i'ish. 

/liffht (410- 

k'shee. 

/shine, 206. 

/shln-y, 109. 

/stone. 

/-struck. 

/wort (-touH). 

/y, 93. 

, 19, «. 

'age, 70. 

'-cock. 

ed. 166. 

'-fowl. 

'-game. 

'-gr&ss. 

'-ben. 

'tag. 

'Ish. 

'land, 200. 



_ (165,188), r. didi 
3. (See Mood, 160.] 



Moor'-stone. 

Moor'y, 109. 

Moose. 

Moose'wdbd. 

Moot, 19. 

Moot'arble, 164, 169. 

Moot'ed. 

Moot'er. 

Moot'ing. 

Mop, 18, 30. 

Mope, 163. 

Moped {mdpt), 188; 
Note C, p. 34. 

Mdp'iiifif, 183. 

Mop'lsn. 

Mopped (mopOt 170. 

Mop'pet, 66, 170. 

Mop'ptag, 176. 

Mop'sey, 98, 160. 

Mo-raine'. 

Mdr'al, 48, 66, 170. 

Al6-r'dAe' (Fr.). 

Mdr'al-ist. 

Mo-ral'i-ty, 106, 169. 

Mdr-al 1-za'tion, 112. 

Mdr'al-ize,202. 

Mdr'al-ized, 166. 

Mdr'al-iz-er. 

Mdr'al-iz-ing. 

M6r'al-Iy,170. 

Mdr'als i-dlz), n. pi, 

Mo-rftssS 121. 

Mo-riUs'y, 93, 109. 

Mo-ra'Tl-an, IW. 

Mo-ra'Tl-an-lsm (-izm), 
136 

Mor'bid, 135. 

Mor-bid'l-ty, 108. 

Mor-blfic, 170. 

Mor-bific^, 228. 

Mor-bil'lotts, 171. 

Mor-bose', 121. 

MoT-ceau' (Fr.) {mor- 
fo') [pi- Mor-ceaux' 
(mor-so').] 

Mor-da'dofis (-«Aiw),46. 

Mor-da9'i-ty, 169. 

Mor'dant, 72. 

More (135), a. greater 
ta degree, quantity, 
or amount. [See 
Mohur, and Mower, 
148 i and Mohr, 160.] 

Mo-reen', 121. 

Mo-rel' (121) [Moril 
(in the sense of a 
kind of muahroom)t 
208.1 

More^and, 72. 

More-o'ver. 

Mo-resque' (■rtsk'), 114. 

Mor-ga-nat'Io, 109. 

Mor'gay. 



Morgue (Fr.) (mora). 
MdrM-bund. 
Mdr'iirMoreI,203.] 
Mo-ril'Ion, 170. 
Mdr'i-neU 48. 
Mo'ri-on, 49, N. 
Mo-ris'co, 86. 
Mor'mon, 86. 
Mor'mon-ite. 
Mom. 17, 135. 
Mom'ing, HI. 
Mom'ing-glo'ry, 205. 
Mo-roc'co, 60, W. 
Mo-rone'. 
Mo-ro»c'. 121. 
Mo-rose'ly, 1H5. 
Mor'pheus [so Wr. ; 

mor'/e-usj Wk. Sm. 

Gd. 155.] 



"The tcrminatfon 
ettf in proper nainet which 
In Greek end in iv(, aa 
Orpheu*, Frometheiu, i« to 
be pronounced ■• one a.vl- 
lable. the eu beina a diph- 
thong. Walker, ilblluwlng 
Labbc, generally separates 
the vowela in pronuncia- 
tion. But the diphthong 
b never reeolved In Greek; 
and very rarely, if ever, in 
Latin poetry of the gold- 
en or silver age. . . . Tlia 
uiage of the Enj^iish poets, 
of modem claMical schol- 
•n, and of the best speak- 
era generallv, also ffavora, 
it ia DoUevea, the pronun- 
ciation which the analogy 
of the original languages 
requires, and which is sup- 

Kirted by the authority of 
e best liatin grammariU 
•ns from Priscian to th% 
present time.** WoretMter 

Mor'phew (-/!»), 26. 
Mor'phi-a. 
Mor'phtne, 82, 152. 
Mor-pho-log'ic (-toj'-). 
Mor-pho-log' ic-al 

{-u>j'-) 

Mor-phol'o-gy (-iv),106 
MSr'ris (170) [Mor 

rice,2a3.] 
Mdr'ris-dancei 
Mdr'row, 60, 101. 
Mor» (L.) {morz). 
Morse, Note D, p. 37. 
Mor'sel, 149. 
Mort, 49. 
Mor'tal, 72. 
Mor-tal'lty, 106, 169. 
Mor'tal-ly, 170. 
Mor'tar, 74, 169. 
Mort'gage (mor'-\ 162. 
Mort'gagcd {morg^d). 



6 cu in there; dbotinfoot; vofinftolle; gho«g<ngo;t]|a«{nthiBi 



MORTGAGEE 



288 



MOW 



Mort-ga-g«e' (mor-^o- 

]^rt-gsge-or' (mor-^^- 
or' {Note D, p. 37) Jbo 
Wr. Od. ; mor^ffa-joTj 
Sm. 155.] [Law term, 
— coirelitive of mori- 
gagei.l [Mortga- 
gor, 208.] 

a^ ** Mortgagor !■ an 
oraognphj that •hould 
have no eonntenane*." 

Mort'ga-ger {mor'ga- 
Jur). 

Mor-tifer-o&B. 
Mor-tl-n-<»'tioxi, 112. 
Mor'ti-f led, 90. 



180. 



Mor'tl fy, 108. 
Mor'tl-fy Ing, 
Mor'tl 8C, 136, 100. 
Mor'tlficd i-tUt), 166. 
Mor'tiH-ing, 183. 
Blon'main. 
Morfu-a-ry, 72, 89. 
Bf o-sa'ic (-za'-). 
Mo-Ba'io-al (-za'-). 
Mos'cha-tcl {-ka-). 
Mo-8elle' i-zeV), 121. 
Mos'lem (moz'-) fl30) 

[so Sm. Gd.i mot'lemt 

Wr. 155.] 
Monqae(mo«ik) [M o b k , 

20:3.1 
Mo8-qui'to {-ke'-) (171) 

[pi. Mos-aurtocB, 

(-itc'M«), 192.] 



•* Thli word hai 

been tpelled In varioui 
ways, but miu^ito and 
mostquito arp moit preva- 
lent." Oootlrich. — ^* iio»- 
ehttto, mwmjwto, and other 
Ibrmt jleld in frequent 
occurrence to the one giv- 
en [momuito], which may 
be contidered a* the eatab- 
llthed one in onr lan- 
guage,** Hmeurt, 

MoBB, 18, N. ; 174. 
MoBB'-dad, 200, Exo. 5. 
MoBB'i-neBB, ISO. 
MoBB'«troop-er. 
MoBs'y, 109. 
Mont (24) [.^ee Ghoat.] 
MoB'tIck [MoBtlc, 
203.] 

9r **A cormption of 
nuwl-eticl:.** fTorccffer. 

MdBtly, 03. 
Mot, 18. 

Mote (24, 163), n. a small 
particle. [See Moat, 

Too.] 



Moth (18, N. ; 156) [pL 
Moths (mothz), 140. ~ 
SeeHote CTp. M.j 

Moth'-eat'cn {tt'n). 

V.oth'er (miUh'ur). 

MotR'er-h«Hr(mirffc'-). 

MotH'er-ing (mtiM^), 

MotH'er-iD-l&w. 

MotE'er-leiB {muW-). 

MotE'er-U-neBB 
{muth'-)j 180. 

Moth'er-ly(mti/*'-). 

MotH'er-of-pearl' 
imuth '«r-or-jMrZ')*221 

Moth^er-of-thyme' 
{muth 'ur-ov-tlm'). 

Moth'^-wort {muU^'w- 
wurt). 

Moth'er-y imiM'-\ 169. 

MoCR'y, 18, N. ; 03. 

Motif Ic, 00, 170. 

Mo'tllc, 81, 152. 

Mo-tilM-ty, 108, 109. 

Mo'tion. 

Mo'tloned {shund), 166. 

Mo'tion-ing. 

Mo'tTve, 84. 

Mo-tiv'1-ty. 

Mot'ley, 100. 

Mot'mot. 

Mo'tor, 88. 109. 

Mo-to'ri-al, 49, N. 

Mo'to-ry, 86. 

Mot'tle(niol'0»164. 

Mot'tled (4(i), 166. 

Mot'to (80,15.3) [pi. Mot- 
toes (-<««), ise.] 

Mourflon (moqf-), 170. 

Mould (24) [M o 1 d ,Wb. 
Gd. 203.— 5ee Note 
E, p. 70.] 

aV " Thit word, b«lbr« 
Dr. Johnson wrote hii 
Dictionary, waa frequently 
written mold, which was 

SBiftctlf agreeable to Its 
axon derivation, and was 
leae Ilabio to mltpronnnci- 
ation than the preaent 
•pelUng." Watker. 

Mduld'a-ble, 164. 
Moold'ed [Molded, 

Wb. Gd. 20.3.] 
Monld'er [M older, 

Wb. Gd. aa.] 

Monld'ered ri06) 

[Moldered, Wb. 

Gd.203.] 
Mduld'er-^ [Mold- 

ering,wb.<3d.203.] 
Mould'i-neBB (186) 

TMaldlnesB, Wb. 

Gd.203.] 



K5iild'taig[Moldl 

Wb.Gd. 203.1 
Mdald'wirp TMo 

warp,Wb. Gd.2 
MduId^r(iC9)[Mol 

Wb. Gd. 20:J.] 
Mdalt(24)[MoIt, 

Gd. 2m. — see 

E, p. 70.] 
Moulded [Molte 

Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Moalt'ing [Molti 

WT). Gd. 203.] 
Mound, 28. 
Mount, 28. 
Mount'a-ble, 101, 1 
Mount'ain (-i»), 96. 
Mount'alD-aflh. 
Mount-aln-eer', 169. 
Monnt'aln-ofts, 145. 
Monnt'e-bank, 144. 
Mount'ed. 
Monnt'ing. 
Mourn, 24, 135. 
Mourned, 165. 
Moum'er. 

Mdum'fhl (-/So/), 180. 
Mdum'ftil-ly i-fiil). 
Moum'big. 
Moum'ing-rlng, 206, 

Exc. 4. 
Mouse, n. (28, 161) [pi- 

Mice, 196.] 
Mouse (moug)t r. 161. 
Moused (mouzd)jy66' 
Mouse'-gar, 200, Exe. 2. 
Mous'er (mcuz'-). 
Mouse'tail, 200. 
Mousc'trap. 
Mous'ing Imouz'-)', 183. 
[Moustache (Fr.) 

(inoos-latAO, 203.' 

See Mustai^e.] 
Mouth, n. (28, 37, 161) 

[pi. Mouths (moiO^)* 

38, 140; "Note CTp. 

34.1 
Mouth, r. 38, 161. 
MoutHcd, 166. 
MoutH'er. 

MouiR'ftil (-/R0> 197. 
Mouth'ing. 
Moul&'pieoe, 206. 
Mov'a-ble (moo^a-bl) 

(164, 160, 171, 183) 

LMoTeable,203.] 
Mov'a-bly (moor'-). 
Move (moov), 19. 
Moved (mooted). 
Move'mcnt(moor'-),l85. 
MoT'er (moop'-), 77. 
MoT'ing (-moor'-), 183. 
Mow imou)t n. 161. 






ote 



a, e, i, d, Q, ftkmgi ft, it 1, 0, tt, f, short ; H a$ in hr, k at in fast, katin 



MOW 



289 



MULTOCA 



mou) (161), r. to 
Qto a mow. 
(161), V. to cut 
a scythe, as 
}. 

I {moud) (101), V. 
DOW, or put into 
w. 

1 (m5d) (161), V. 
now, or cut witi 
the. [See Mode, 

r, ». (67), one 
mowH. [See 
», 148; and Mo- 
160.] 

Qg (mou'ing) 
, jNirf. putting 
a mow. 

ig (161), part. 

Dg with a Boythe. 

(24), part, from 

[^ Moan, 

.231. 

bus'tion i-btut'- 

See Mister.] 
[.9e0 Missis.] 
22,44. 
ic, 109. 
Torm, 106. 
lage, 160. 

lng'in-oas(.2k|f'-)> 

ilU. 

'a-rofis, 108. 

22, 181. 

teorm (-trurm). 

r, 160. 

oele. 

>pa'm-lent, 224. 

/i-ty, J(JH, 160. 

so»9ac'cha-rIne 

), 224. 

is (100), a. per- 

ig to mucus ', 

r. [See Mucus, 

-nate, 106. 
-nat-ed. 
lent, 80. 

I (I60),n. arisdd 
secreted by the 
t>rane lining the 
ies of the body. 
Mucous, 160.] 
. A v. 22, 42. 
)d (176), r. did 
[See Muddied, 

ed (00). V. did 
muddy. [See 
led, 148.] 



Mnd'di-Iy, 186. 

Mnd'di-ness. 

Mnd'ding, 176. 

Mud'dle, 66, 164, 170. 

MudMlcd {mud'ld), 183. 

Mud'dling. 

Mud'dy, 176. 

MudMv-ing, 186. 

Mu-ez^zln, G6, 17a 

Muff, 22, 173. 

Murfin. 

Muffle (mufl), 66, 164. 

Muf fl^ {muftdh 183. 

Muffler. 

Muffling. 

Mufti, fi7, 101. 

Mug, 22, 63. 

Mug'gent {rgheiO) (138) 

[so wb. Gd. -, mug*- 
jerU, Wr. 166.] 
Mug'get i-ghet), 76, 138. 
Mug-glo-to'ni-an (muo' 

4 160. 

Mu-laVto (170) [pi. Mn- 

lat'tdes (,-t6z), 102.] 
Mu-iat'tress. 
Mul'ber-ry, 170. 
Mulch, 22, 44. 
MulchcMl (mulcM), 166; 

Note C, p. 34. 
MulchMng. 
Mulct. 22, 62, 64. 
Mulct'ed. 
Mulct'ing. 
Mulct'u-R-ry, 72, 89. 
Mule (26), n. a mongrel 

animal or plant. [See 

Mewl, 160.] 
Mu let-ecr', IM, 160. 
Mu-li-eb'ri ty, 108. 
Mul'iBh, 183. 
MuU, 22, 172. 
Aful'la, 180. 
Mul-larga-taw'ny, 171. 
Mulled (muld), 1(V5. 
Mul'leln (-Ihi) («?, 170, 

171) [Mullen, 203.] 
Mul'let, 170. 

MuU'ing. 

MuU ion {mulfyvn), 170. 

Mult-an'gru-lar (-fin^'-). 

Mul-ti-ar-tio'u-late. 

Mul-ti-oap'su-lar. 

Mul-ti-«ftr'i-nate, 108. 

Mnl-tl-cus'pi-date. 

Mul-ti-den'tate. 

Mnl-li-fa'rl-oiis, 40, N. ; 
160. 

Mul'ti-fid. 

Mul'ti-flo-roiis, or Mul- 
tiflo<ro&8 [muVtiHo- 
rt«, Sm. ; mul-ti/lo- 



n«, Wb. Grd. ; mul- 
H^o'rMy Wr. 155.] 

Mul'ti-foil. 

Mul'ti-fold. 

Mul'ti-form, 108. 

Mul-ti-form'i-ty, 108. 

Mul-ti-gen'er-ous 



(-J«»' 
Mul-ti-gran'n-late. 

in, 



MuI-t^Mi-gofis [bo Sm. 

Wr. ; mul-txAu'gui, 

Wb. Gd. 165.] 
Mul-ti-lat'er-al. 
Mul-tl-lin'e-al, 160. 
Mul ti-loo'u-lar, 106. 
Mul-til'o-quence. 
Mul-til'o-quent, 160. 
Mul-tifo-quo&s. 
Mul-ti-no'date. 
Mul-ti-no'dotts. 
Mul-ti-no'mi-al, 72, 160. 
Mul-tlp'a-ro&8, 108. 
Mul-tip'ar-tite. 152, 156. 
Mul'ti-ped JMulti- 

pede,203.] 
Mul'ti-ple, 164. 
Mul'ti-plex, 76, 78. 
Mul-ti-pli'a-blo, 1G4. 
Mul-ti-plT-cand' (122) 

[not mul'ti-plMcand, 

153.] 
Mnl'ti-pn-cate, or Mnl- 

tip'li-cate [mttl'ti-pn- 

fcat, 8m. Wb. Gd. ; 

mul-tip'li-k&t, Wk. ; 

mtU-tip'li-k&ftOT mul'- 

ti-pnlat, Wr. 155.1 
Mul-ti-plT-CH'tion, 112. 
Mul'ti-pli-cntrtvo. 
Mul'ti-pU-cat-or[so 8m. 

Wr. ; mvl-ti-pli-l-n'- 

*f*r,Wk.Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Mul-ti-pli^'i-ty, 108, 160. 
Murti-plied, 00, 186. 
Mnl'ti-pll-er. 
MuFU-ply, 04. 
Mul'tl-ply-lng, 186. 
Mul-tlp'o-tent. 
Mul-tl-pres'enoe 

iprez'-). 
Bf ul-ti-ra'di-ate, 160. 
Mu ti-se'ri-al, 40, N. 
Mul-tis'o-nofiB, 166. 
Mu -ti-spi'ral, 40, N. 
Mui-ti-stri'ate. 
Multi-Bul'eate. 
Mul'ti-tude (26, 160)[nof 

muf ti-tood, 127, 153.] 
Mul-ti-tu'din-a-ry, 72. 
Mul-tl-tu'din-obs, 106. 
Mul'ti-valve. 
MuI-tl-Talv'n-lar, 106. 
MtU-to'ca. 



CM i» there; 06 m lii foot ; 9 (U in Ihcile ; gh a« g <n go ; th a« In this. 

85 



MULTOCULAR 



290 



MUSTACHIOED 



Malt-oe'u-lar, 109. 
Mul'ium inpar'vo (L.). 
Mult-un'gu-late (-ung'-) 
Mul'turc, 91. 
Mum (2*2, 32), a. silent. 

[See Mumm, 160.] 
Mum'ble, 1(H. 
Mum'bU>d» 165, 183. 
Mum'blcr. 
Mum'bling-. 
Mamm (175), r. to maek 

one's self. r<9e«Mam, 

160.1 
Mam'ma-chog^ [Mum- 
my c h o ^ , 2a3.] 
Mummed {mumd)i 165. 
Mum'mer, 170. 
Mum'mor-y, 109. 
Mum-mi-fl-ca'tion. 
Mum'ml-f led, 99. 
Mum'mi-form, 108, 186. 
Mum'mi-fv, 94. 
Mum'ml-fy-inp, 186. 
Mum'ming^, 170. 
Mum'my, 66, 170. 
Mump, 22, (U. 
Mumped imumpt)t 165. 
Mump'er. 
Mump'lnsf. 
Mump'isn. 
Mumps, 22. 
Munch, 22, 44. 
Munched (munchi), 165 i 

Note C, p. 3*. 
Munch'ingp. 
Mun^dane, 103. 
Mun-di-fT-ca'tion. 
llun-<liri-ca-tlve, 
Mun-dun'gus (-dung'-), 

5(, 169. 
Mu-ni9'l-pal, 72. 
Mu-nin-i-pal'i-ty, 108. 
Mu-niri-conce, 105. 
Mu-nifi-cent, 171. 
Mu'ni-ment, 169. 
Mu-nl'tlon (-nishfun). 
Mun-jeet', 121. 
Mun'idon (tnun'yun). 
Mu'ral, 49, N. j W. 
Mur'der, 77. 
Mur'dered, 150. 
Mur'der-er, 135. 
MurMer-ess. 
Mur'der-lng. 
MurMer-oAs. 
Mur'dress, 169. 
Mu'ri-ate, 49, N.j 108, 

169. 
Mtt'ri-at^. 
Ma ri-atMc, 109. 
Mu'ri-oate, 108. 
Mu'ri-cat-ed. 
Ma-rl-ea'to-his'pid, 224. 



Mn'ii-form, 106. 
Mu'rine, 49, N. ; 152. 
Murk. 21. 
MurkM-ly, 186. 
Murk'y(109)[Mlrky, 

203.] 
Mur'mur, 92, 169. 
Mur'mured, 150, 165. 
Mur'mar-er, 135. 
Mur'mar-in£^. 
Mur'mur-ous, 100. 
Mftr'raTn (^n), 96, 171. 
Mftr'rhine i-r^n) (171) 

[so 8m. J milr'm, Wr. 

Wb. Gd. 155.] 
Mur'za, n. an hereditary 

nobleman among the 

Tartars. [See Mirza, 

160.] 
Mn-sa'ceoni {-za'thus), 

46, 112. 
Mu-sa-rab'ic (-zor). 
Mus'ca-del, 105. 
Mus'oardine, or Mus'- 

ca-dTnc [so Wr.; mu9'- 

fca-dln, Wk. Gd. ; 

mus'ka-din, Sra. 155.] 
M us 'car-dine, 152. 
Mus-e&r'i-form, 108. 
Mus'cat. 
Mus'ca-tel. 
Musch'el-kalk (mdoMh'-) 

[so Sm.i mush' el-ktUk, 

Wb. Gd.j moosh'el- 

kalkj Wr. 155.1 
Mus'cle (mus't) M62, 

1(H). [See Mussel.] 
Mus'clea {mus'ld). 
Mus'cling (^mus'ling). 
Mua'coioT 
Mus-col'o-gy, 108. 
Mus-cos'1-fy, laS, 169. 
Mus-co-va'do [not mui- 

ko-va'do, 153.] 

oar This word l« from 
the Bpaniih nuM-co-M^cfo 
(unelmyed ragar). in which 
a of the third nYllAblo hM 
properly the Italian iOUDd, 
or that of a in /or s bnttiie 
beet authoritiee gfre to a 
ita lonr aound in the An-> 
gliclzed form Miucovado, 

Mns'co-vTte, 105. 

Mus'co-vy. 

Mus'cn-lar, 89, 106. 

Mu8-ou-12ir'i-ty. 

Mus'cu-Ioiis, 100. 

Muse (mo^), n. one of 
the nine sister god- 
desses who presided 
over the liberal arts : 
— t?. to meditate. [See 
Mews, 160.] 



Mnsed (metzd), 183. 
Muse'ful (mlkz'/ooOy 189^ 
Mus'er (mMz*-). 
Mu-se'um i-ze'-) (111^» 

11.3, 125) [not ma'ie^ 

nm, 153.] 
Mush, 22. 
Mush'room. 
Mu'sic i-zit), 200. 
Mu'aio-al (-«*t ), 72. 
Mu'sio-al-ly i-zik), 170. 
Mu-Bi'clan (^-zish'an). 
Mu'sio-mas'ter (-««:-), 

205*209. 
Mn' Bioo<-ma'ni-a(-z£t-), 

224. 
Mu'sio-Btool (-sik-). 
Mus'ing («««'-), 183. 
Musk, 22. 
Mus'ket (76) [Mus- 

q net, 203.] 
Mus-ket-eer', 122, 160. 
Mus-ket-oon', 122. 
Mus'ket-ry, 93. 
Musk'i-ness, 186. 
Musk'rat, 206. 
Musk'y, 169. 
Mus'lin {muz'-). 
Mu s'lin-de-liine 

(mti«'-)» 171' 
Mus'Iin-et (mtiz'-). 
Mus'mon,or Mus'i-moa 
Mu-so-nia'ni-a(-«o )t169. 
Mas'quash {-kwodh). 
[M u 8 qu e t ,203. — 5«e 

Musket.] 
[Mnsauito, 203.~ 

See Mosquito.] 
Mus'rdl (mil*'-, or 

muz*-) [mujt'rejy Sm. ; 

muz'r9h Wr. Wb. Gd. 

155.] [M us role, 

Wb. Gd. 203.] 
Muss, 22, 174. 
Mus'sel (mi4«'0i "• A 

kind of bivalre mol- 

lusk. [Ma8cle,203.1 
Mus'sul-man (171) [pi. 

Ma8'Bal-mans(Hnaiu) 

196.] 
Mus-Bul-man'io, 170. 
Mus'sul-man-ish. 
Must, 22. 
Mns-taehe' {-tdsk'){Wi) 

J so Sro. G<i. ; mua- 
dsh'y Wk. i mustdnh'j 
OTmu9-t&ah' iWr. 155.1 
[Moustache, 203.1 
Mus-tiich'io (-tdsh'o) 
[pi. MttB-tach'i08(iiitM- 
tUsh'Oz), 192.] 
MuB-tSch'ioed Udsk'Od) 
(188) [so Wb. Gd.; 



a, e, I, 5, u, y, long ;&,£,!, d, 11, j^, short ; 'A as in tke, k as in flut, gas in 



MUSTANG 



291 



NACRE 



muB-td'sht-Od, Wr. 

156.] 
Mas'tanff, 108. 
Mas'tara. 
Hus-tee' [Mestee, 

aw.] 

Mns'te-Gne, 152. 
MuB'ter, 77. 
MuB'tered, 150, 166. 
Mas'ter-lng'. 
MoB'U-ly, 186. 
Mus'ti-neBB. 
MuB'ty, 93. 
Mu-ta-bintT, 106. 
Ma'ta-ble, 16i. 
Mu't«-bly. 
Mu'tage. 
Ma -taction. 
Mu'ta-to-ry, 86. 
Mate, 26. 
Mate'ly, 185. 
Mate'neBS. 
Mo'ti-late, 160. 
Mu'tl-lat-€d, 183. 
Mu'ti-lat-ing. ** 

Mu-ti-la'tloii, 112. 
Ma'ti-lat-or. 
Mu ti-neer', 122, 169. 
Ha'ti-nled, 99, 186. 
Uu'ti-nofiB, 100, 108. 
Ma'tl-ny, 169. 
Mu'tl-ny-lng, 186. 
Hut'ter, 66, 170. 
Mot'tcred, 150, 166. 
Mut'tcr-er. 
Mut'ter-ing. 
Mnt'ton imut'n)j 149. 
Hu'tu-al (mftf't^oo-oO 

(W) r BO Sra. Wr. Gd. j 

mu'ck^-al, Wk. 134, 

155.] 
Mu ta-al'i-ty, 108, 169. 
Mo'tu-al-ly, 170. 
Mu'to-a-ry, 72, 89. 
Mu'tule (mlU'm), 26. 
Muz'zle, 66, 164. 
Maz'zlod {muz'ld), 165. 
Muz'zling. 

My (often mV) [bo Sm. ; 
* ml, or ml, Wk. Wr. 

155.] 

tr *• The word my, 
wh«n uMd witfaont empha- 
ris, takci its rcfular •hort 
tound In EncUnd, and to 
•omc extent in thit eoun- 
tryt M. *I took down mjf 
tuiL* Thli lonnd, hower- 
•r, thonld not t>e given In 
•eiioae or aoleinn dis- 
OOUTM, Bor ahonld the y 
9Ttr be turned Into long 
«. after the Irish flMhion, 
*I took down mee haL"* 
Ooodrieh. 



My-oo-log'lo (4ej/'-), 109. 
My-oo-log'ic-al {4c&'-), 

106. 
My-col'o-gy, 108. 
Myl'o-don. 
Myn-heer' [not min- 

her', 153.] 
My-o-a|^-nam'ic8, 109. 
My-o-dy-nam-i-om'e- 

ter, 108, 116, 171. 
My-o-graph'ic. 
My-o-gmtph 'io-aL 
My-o^ra-phist. 
My-og'ra-phy, 108. 
My-o-log'io (4qj'-). 

My'ope, 180, 
My-op'ic. 
My'op-By, 169. 
My'o-pv, 93. 
My-o'BlB. 109. 
My-o-sit'lo. 
My-o-til'i-ty, 108. 
My-ot'o-my, 108. 
Mfr'l-ad. 
Myr'l-a-gram [Myrl- 

a g r a m m e , 203.1 
Mur'i-€t-gramm^ (Fr.) 

[so Wr. ; mir'i-a- 

gramt Gd. 155.] 
Mf r-i-a-li'ter [mir-i-<d'- 

*-rwr, Gd. 165] [Myr- 

loliter,(mlr-i-o-K'- 

ter), Sm. ; Myrla- 

litre,'203.] 
Myr^i^li'treiyv.) {4e'- 

lur) [ao Wr. ; mlr'i- 

a-le-tur, Gd. 155.] 
Myr-i-am'e-ter(108) [bo 

Gd. } m'irA-a-me'iury 

Sm. 165.1 [Myria- 

metre,203.] 
Myr-i-a-me^tre (Fr.) 

{•ma'tur) [so Wr. ; 

mlWi-o-md-liir, Gd. 

155.] 
MfWi-a-pod. 
MyrM-arch (-arJfc). 
Myr'i^re (Fr.) (-«r). 
Mfr'l-clne (82) [Myr- 

ioin,203.] 
MJr'l-o-Wgne {-log), 87. 
Myr-i-o-phyl'lo&B, or 

Mfr-i-oph'yl-l