(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A manual for the use of the General Court"



^yy^m^'W, 






yw^ 



vvvwvv,\i 



!ww?wwwwy 



vv^uy- 



• UM-- -'5cy 









^Wb>^Ww\S\y, 



SEEGEMT AT AKMS 









^^^j^vy^yvwy^^-: 



--wfe^r 







LEFT. 



Hon. ROBERT R. BISHOP, President. 



RIGHT. 



. Hon. Alpheus Harding. 


II 


Hon. Samuel Snow. 


" Stephen F. Blaney. 


12 


" William Abbott. 


" John L. Otis. 




■ ■ Charles T. Crocker 


" Nathaniel Wales. 


14 


" Elizur Smith. 


" Jonas H. French. 




Emerson Gaylord. 


16 


" Thomas Webb. 


" James W. Stockwell. 




" Starkes Whiton. 


" George G. Crocker. 


18 


" Calvin M. Winch. 


" Alonzo Warren. 


19 


" Charles J. Brooks. 


" Joseph H. Root. 







. Hon. Eugene L. Norton. 


I, 


Hon. Harmon Hall. 


. " Henry C. Rice. 


12 


Anson D. Fessenden. 


■' Asa P. Morse. 


13 


" Marcus P. Knowlton. 


Stephen Osgood. 
" William Taylor. 


t4 


" James W. Dwyer. 
" George B. Richmond. 


IS 


" Eben Hutchinson. 


t6 


" Oliver Ames. 


" Daniel Russell. 


17 


" Ebenezer T. Fogg. 


" Elisha S Converse. 


iH 




" Henry W. Fuller. 




" Andrew C. Stone. 


" James P. Ray. 




" Charles S. Lilley. 



O. F. MITCHELL, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



S. N. GIFFORD, CUrk. 



Cotnmontojaltfj of iHassacfjusettg, 



MANUAL 

FOR THE USE OF THE 

Genera-L Court: 

CONTAINING THE 

EULES AND OEDERS OF THE TWO BEANCHES, 

TOGETHER WITH THE 

CONSTITUTION OF THE CO^niOmVEALTR, AND THAT 
OF TEE UNITED STATES, 

AND A 

List of the ;^.xe( tiiiVi:, Liigis^.^tive, and Judicial 

DErAjiTi/E::Te ov vfiE St^te 'jrovbi^7sr:^jExrr, ^^tate 

Institutions AiJiii' thExi; "Ofpi^eIrs, ^Couj-ty . 

Officers, and c-th^f. Statistical 

Inform at:on. 

Prepared under Chapter 264 of the Acts of the year 1878.' ' 

BY 

S. N. GIFFORD and GEO. A. MARDEN. 



BOSTON: 

RAND, AVERY, & CO., PRINTERS TO THE COMMOI!TWEALTH, 

117 Franklin Street. 

1880. 



NOV 20 1952 

STATE HOUSE. BOSTON 






IND E X. 



Page 

Agricultural Library 413 

Agriculture, Board of . 239 

Assayers of Ores and Metals 242 

Assayer of Liquor 242 

Attorn ey-Geueral, Department of 347 

Attorney-Generals, since 1692 210 

Auditor, Department of . 347 

Auditors, since 1849 210 

Barnstable County Officers 231 

Battle-flags 424 

Berkshire County Officers 231 

Blind, Massachusetts Asylum for 244 

Boston Athenreum 413 

Boston and Albany Railroad, State Directors of . . 242 

Bristol County Officers 232 

Calendar for 1880 426 

Cattle Commissioners 241 

Census of Inhabitants in 1870 and 1875, and Legal Voters 

in 1875 170 

Cities in the Commonwealth 148 

Colleges of the Commonwealth 246 

Commissioners, Boai'ds, Inspectors, etc 241 

Committee Rooms, Assignment of 410 

Committees, Standing, of the Senate .... 395 

Standing, of the House 396 

Joint Standing 399 

Joint Special 406 

Common Pleas, Justices of the Court of, from 1820 to 

1859 221 

Congress, Vote for Members of 271 

Congressional Districts 149 

Constitution of Massachusetts 33 

Amendments to 79 



4 Index. 

Page 

Constitution of the United States 9 

Amendments to 25 

Corporations, Commissioner of 241 

Council, Committees of 346 

Council Districts 160 

Councillors 345 

Counties and Towns of Massachusetts .... 102 

County OfScers . .230 

Court of Common Pleas, Justices of, from 1820 to 1859 . 221 

Court, Superior, of Judicature, from 1692 to 1775 . . 218 

Court, Superior, Justices of, since the Revolution . . 219 

Sui^erior, Justices of, since 1859 222 

Superior, Present Justices of 223 

Court, Supreme Judicial, since the Revolution . . 219 

Present Justices of 223 

Courts, District 225 

Police and Municipal 224 

Of Probate and Insolvency 223 

District Attorneys 228 

District Courts 225 

Dukes County Officers 232 

Education, Board of 240 

Secretaries of, since 1837 * 211 

Essex County Othcers ........ 23aC 

Executi\e Department 345 

Fish, Inspector of 242 

Foreign Letters, Postage on 203 

Franklin County Officers 233 

Gas, &c., Inspectorof 242 

Governors of Massachusetts, since 1620 .... 205 

Hampden County Officers 234 

Hampshire County Officers 234 

Harbor Commissioners 241 

Health, Board of 241 

House of Representatives: 

Alphabetical list of Members of, their districts and 

residences 374 

List of Members of, by Counties .... 359 



Index. 5 

Page 
House of Hepresentatives — Continued. 

Monitors of 392 

Officers of 392 

Reporters of 408 

Speakers and Clerks of, from 1780 to 1879 . . 214-15 
Idiotic and Feeble-Minded Youth, Massachusetts School 

for 244 

Inland Fisheries, Commissioners of 241 

Insurance Commissioner 241 

Judiciary of Massachusetts 218 

Labor Statistics, Bureau of 242 

Land Commissioners 241 

Leather, Inspector of 242 

Legislature, organization of, since 1780 .... 212 

Length of Sessions of, since 1832 .... 216 

Sergeant-at-Arms of, from 1835 to 1879 . . .215 

Lieutenant-Governors of Massachusetts, since 1692 . 207 

Liquor, State Assayer of 242 

Lumber, Surveyor-General of 242 

Lunatic Hospitals, Trustees of 243 

Massachusetts, Constitution of . • 33 

Amendments to 79 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary .... 244 

Massachusetts Historical Society ..... 414 
Massachusetts School for Idiotic and Feeble-Minded 

Youth 244 

Medical Examiners . . « 415 

Middlesex County Officers 235 

Municipal Courts 224 

Monitors of the House 392 

Nantucket County Officers . . . . . . .236 

Norfolk County Officers 236 

Ores and Metals, Assayers of 242 

Perkins Institution and Mass. Asylum for the Blind . 244 

Pilot Commissioners for the Port of Boston . . . 241 

Plymouth County Officers 237 

Police Courts 224 

Population and Voters of Massachusetts .... 170 



6 Index. 

Page 

Postal Regulations (for foreign letters, page 203) . . 200 

Post-Offices in Massachusetts 189 

Prison Commissioners 241 

Railroad Commissioners 241 

Reformatory Prison for "Women 245 

Representative Districts 161 

Rules and Orders of the Senate 287 

Of the House 303 

Joint 335 

Savings Banks, Commissioners of 241 

Secretaries of the Commonwealth since 1780 . . . 209 

Secretary, Department of 346 

Senate, Alphabetical list of Members of . . . . 356 

Arrangement of seats in 355 

Districts 156 

Lists of Members, with districts, residences, etc. . 351 

Officers of 358 

Presidents and Clerks of, from 1780 to 1880 . 212-13 

Reporters of 408 

Senators, United States, from Massachusetts, since 1789 208 
United States, Act regulating the time and manner 

of electing 99 

Sergeants-at-Arms of the Legislature, from 1835 to 1879, 215 

Shire Towns. (See County Officers.) ^ 

Soldiers' Messenger Corps 419 

State Almshouse 245 

State Charities, Board of . • 241 

State House 421 

State Industrial School for Girls . . . . .244 

State Library 412 

State Lunatic Hospitals 243 

State Officers, 1879, Vote for 268 

State Detective Force 418 

State Primary School 246 

State Prison 243 

State Reform SchooLf or Boys 244 

State Workhouse 245 

Suffolk County Officers 237 



Index. 7 

Page 
Towns and Cities, date of incorporation, original name, 

change of boundary, etc 102 

Towns and Post-Offices in Massachusetts . . . 189 

Treasurer, Department of 347 

Treasurers of the Commonwealth, since 1780 . . . 209 
Trial Justices. (See County Officers.) 

United States, Constitution of 9 

Amendments to 25 

Act regulating the time and manner of electing 

Senators in the Congress of 99 

Postal Regulations of 200 

Senators from Mass. in the Congress of, since 1789 . 208 

Valuation of the Commonwealth in 1876 .... 180 

Voters, Legal, in 1875 170 

Vote for President, in Massachusetts, in 1876 . . .251 

Vote for Governor in 1879 258 

Vote for Representatives Forty-sixth Congress . . 271 

Vote for State Officers, 1879 268 

"Worcester County Officers 238 



CONSTITUTION 

OP THE 

UJS-ITED STATES. 



PEEAMBLE. 

ARTICLE I. 

Section 1. Legislative powers ; in -whom vested. Page 11. 

Sect. 2. House of Representatives, how and by whom choBen — 
Qualifications of a Representative — Representatives and direct taxes — 
how apportioned — Census — Vacancies to be filled — Power of choosing 
officers, and of impeachment. 11, 12. 

Sect. 3. , Senators, how and by whom chosen — How classified — State 
executive to make temporary appointments, in case, &c. — Qualifications 
ox a Bcaatoi — Prfcoideuu of tue Senate, ms right i,o vote — President 
pro tem., and other officers of Senate, how chosen — Power to trj^ im- 
peachments — "VMien President is tried. Chief Justice to preside — Sen- 
tence. 12, 13. 

Sect. 4. Times, &c., of holding elections, how prescribed — One ses- 
sion in each year. 13. 

Sect. 5. Each house the judge of membership — Quorum — Adjourn- 
ments — Rules — Power to punish or expel — Journal — Time of adjourn- 
ments limited, unless, &c. 14. 

Sect. 6. Compensation — Privileges — Disqualification in certain 
cases. 14. 

Sect. 7. House to originate all bills for using revenue — Senate may 
amend — Veto — Bill may be passed by two-thirds of each house, not- 
withstanding, &c. — Bill not returned in ten days — Pro^ision8 as to all 
orders, &c., except, &c. 15. 

Sect. 8. Powers of Congress. 15, 16. 

Sect. 9. Provision as to migration or importation of certain persons 
— Habeas Corpus — Bills of Attainder or ear ^ws^/ac/o laws — Taxes, how 
apportioned — No export duty — No commercial preferences — No money 
drawn from treasury, unless, &c. — No title of nobility — Officers not to 
receive presimts, unless, &c. 17. 

Sect. 10. States prohibited from the exercise of certain powers. 18 

9 



10 Constitution of the United States. 

ARTICLE n. 

Section 1. President; his and the Vice-President's term of office — 
Electors of President; number, and how appointed — Who shall not be 
electors — President and Vice-President, how chosen — Quahfication of 
President — On whom his duties devolve in case of his removal, death, 
&c. — President's compensation — His oath. 18-20. 

Sect. 2. President to be commander-in-chief — He may require opin- 
ion of, &c., and may pardon — Treaty-making power — Nomination of 
certain oflicers — When President may fill vacancies. 20. 

Sect. 3. President shall communicate to Congress — He may convene 
Congress and adjourn it, in case, &c.; shall receive ambassadors, execute 
laws, and commission officers. 21. 

Sect. 4. AU civil offices forfeited for certain crimes. 21. 

ARTICLE HI. 

Section 1. Judicial Power — Tenure — Compensation. 21. 

Sect. 2. Judicial power; to what cases it extends — Original juris- 
diction of supreme court — Appellate — Trial by jury, except, &c.— 
Trial, where. 21, 22. 

Sect. 3. Treasondefined — Proof of— Punishment of— AttaLuder. 22. 

ARTICLE IV. ^ 

Section 1. Each State to give credit to the public acts, &c., of every 
other State. 22. 

Sect. 2. Pri\ileges of citizens of each State — Fugitives from justice 
to be deUvered up —Persons held to service having escaped, to be deliv- 
ered up. 23. 

Sect. 3. Admission of new States — Power of Congress over terri- 
tory and other property. 23. 

Sect. 4. Rcpubhcan form of government guaranteed — Each State to 
be protected. 23. 

ARTICLE V. 
Constitution ; how amended — Proviso. 23, 24. 

ARTICLE VI. 
Certain debts, &c., adopted — Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, and 
laws of the United States — Oath to support Constitution, by whom 
taken — No reUgious test. 24. 

ARTICLE Vn. 
What ratification ehaU. establish Constitution. 24. 



Constitution of the United States, 11 

AMENDMENTS. 
I. — ReligioTiB establislunent prohibited — Freedom of speech, of the 

press, and right to petition. 25. 
n. — Right to keep and bear arms. 25. 

m. — No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, &c. 25. 
rv. — Right of search and seizure regulated. 25. 
V. — Provisions concerning prosecution, trial, and punishment — Pri- 
vate property not to be taken for public use, without, &c. 25. 
VI. — Further provision respecting criminal prosecutions. 26. 
Vn. — Right of trial by jury secured. 26. 

Vlil. — Excessive bail, or fines and cruel punishments, prohibited. 26, 
EX. — Rule of construction. 26. 
X. — Same subject. 26. 
XI. — Same subject. 26. 

Xn. — Manner of choosing President and Vice-President. 27. 
Xm. — Prohibition of slavery. 2S. 

XIV. — Citizenship — Basis of representation — Certain persons not to 
hold certain offices — Public debt inviolate — No claims on ac- 
count of slavery to be paid — Power of Congress to enforce the 
article. 28, 29. 
XV. — Right of citizens to vote not to be denied or abridged on account 
of, &c. — Congress to have power to enforce the article. 29. 

WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defence, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves 
and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitu- 
tion FOB THE UlS^ITED STATES OF AmEKICA. 

AETICLE I. 
Section 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall 
be vested in a congress of the United States, which shall 
consist of a senate and house of representatives. 

Sect. 2. The house of representatives shall be composed 
of members chosen every second year, by the people of the 
several states • and the electors in each state shall have the 
qualifications requisite for electors of the most numerous 
branch of the state legislature. 

No person shall be a representative who shall not have at- 



12 Constitution of the United States, 

lained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years a 
citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that state in which he shall be chosen. 

Kepresentatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several states which may be included within this 
Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall 
be determined by adding to the whole number of free per- 
sons, including those bound to service for a term of years, 
and excluding Indians not taxed, three fifths of all other 
persons. The actual enumeration shall be made within 
three years after the first meeting of the congress of the 
United States, and within every subsequent term of ten 
years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. The num- 
ber of representatives shall not exceed one for every thirty 
thousand ; but each state shall have at least one represen- 
tative ; and until such enumeration shall be made, the state 
of New Hampshire shall he entitled to choose three, Mas- 
sachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations 
one, Connecticut five. New York six, NeV Jersey four, 
Pennsylvania eight, Delaware one, Marvland six, Virginia 
ten, Norih Uarolina five. South Carolina five, and Georgia 
three. 

When vacancies happen in the representation from any 
state, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other officers; and shall have the sole power of im- 
peachment. 

Sect. 3. The senate of the United States shall be com- 
posed of two senators from each state, chosen by the legis- 
lature thereof, for six years; and each senator 'shall have 
one vote. 

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence 
of the first election, they shall* be divided, as equally as may 
be, into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year; 



Constitution of the United States, 13 

of tlie second class, at the expiration of the fourth year ; and 
of the third class, at the expiration of the sixth year ; so that 
one third may be chosen every second year; and if vacan- 
cies happen by resignation or otherwise, durirg the recess 
of the legislature of any state, the executive thereof may 
make temporary appointments, until the next meeting of 
the legislature, which shall then fill such vacancies. 

No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of 
the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an 
inhabitant of that state for which he shall be chosen. 

The vice-president of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president x>fo tempore, in the absence of the vice-president, 
or when he shall exercise the office of president of the 
United States. 

The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments ; when sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the president of the United States 
is tried, the chief justice shall preside ; and no person shall 
be convicted without the concurrence of two thirds of the 
members present. 

Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office and disqualification to 
hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit, under 
the United States ; but the party convicted shall neverthe- 
less be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment, 
and punishment according to law. 

Sect. 4. The times, places, and manner of holding elec- 
tions for senators and representatives shall be prescribed 
in each state by the legislature thereof; but the congress 
may, at any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, 
except as to the places of choosing senators. 

The congress shall assemble at least once in every year, 



14 Constitution of the United States, 

and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in Decem- 
ber, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sect. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, 
returns, and qualifications of its own members, and a ma- 
jority of each shall constitute a quorum to do business; 
but a smaller number may adjourn from day to day, and 
may be authorized to compel the attendance of absent 
members, in such manner, and under such penalties, as 
each house may provide. 

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two thirds, expel a member. 

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts 
as may in their judgment require secrecy; and the yeas 
and nays of the members of either house, on any question, 
shall, at the desire of one fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. 

Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the 
two houses shall be sitting. 

Sect. 6. The senators and representatives shall receive 
a compensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, 
and paid out of the treasury of the United States. They 
shall, in all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at 
the session of their respective houses, and in going to and 
returning from the same ; and for any speech or debate in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other place. 

No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been in- 
creased, during such time; and no person holding any 



Constitution of the United States, 15 

office under the United States shall be a member of either 
house during his continuance in ofl&ce. 

Sect. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in 
the house of representatives; but the senate may propose 
or concur with amendments, as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the house of represen- 
tatives and the senate shall, before it become a law, be pre- 
sented to the president of the United States ; if he approve, 
he shall sign it ; but if not, he shall return it, with his ob- 
jections, to that house in which it shall have originated, 
who shall enter the objections at large on their journal, 
and proceed to reconsider it. K, after such reconsideration, 
two thirds of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall 
be sent, together with the objections, to the other house, 
by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, and, if approved 
by two thirds of that house, it shall become a law. But in 
all such cases, the votes of both houses shall be deteimined 
by yeas and nays ; and the names of the persons voting for 
and against the bill shall be entered on the journal of each 
house respectively. If any bill shall not be returned by the 
president within ten days (Sundays excepted) after it shall 
have been presented to him, the same shall be a law, in like 
manner as if he had signed it, unless the congress, by their 
adjounmient, prevent its return, in which case it shall not 
be a law. 

Every order, resolution, or vote, to which the concurrence 
of the senate and house of representatives may be neces- 
sary (except on a question of adjournment), shall be pre- 
sented to the president of the United States; and, before 
the same shall take effect, shall be approved by him, or, 
being disapproved by him, shall be re-passed by two thirds 
of the senate and house of representatives, according to the 
rules and limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

Sect. 8. The congress shall have power: — To lay and 
collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay the debts 



16 Constitution of the United States, 

and provide for the common defence and general welfare 
of the United States ; but all duties, imposts, and excises 
shall be unif onn throughout the United States : — To bor- 
ro-w money on the credit of the United States : — To regu- 
late commerce with foreign nations and among the severa. 
states, and with the Indian tribes : — To establish an uni- 
form rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject 
of banlvruptcies throughout the United States : — To coin 
money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and 
fix the standard of weights and measures: — To provide for 
the punishment of counterfeiting the securities and current 
coin of the United States: — To establish post offices and 
post roads: — To promote the progress of science and use- 
ful arts, by securing, for limited times, to authors and invent- 
ors, the exclusive right to their respective writings and dis- 
coveries : — To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme 
court: — To define and punish piracies and felonies com- 
mitted on the high seas, and offences against the law of na- 
tions : — To declare war, grant letters of marque and repri- 
sal, and make rules concerning captures on land and water: 

— To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years : 

— To provide and maintain a navy: — To make rules for 
the government and regulation of the land and naval forces: 

— To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions : — 
To provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the mili- 
tia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the states, 
respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the au- 
thority of training the militia, according to the discipline 
prescribed by congress : — To exercise exclusive legislation 
in all cases whatsoever over such district, (not exceeding 
ten miles square,) as may by cession of particular states, and 
the acceptance of congress, become the seat of the govern- 
ment of the United States ; and to exercise like authority 
>ver all places purchased by consent of the legislature of the 



Constitution of the United States. 17 

state in whicli the same shall be, for the erection of lorts, 
magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings; 
and to make all laws which shall be necessaiy and proper 
for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the goyernment 
of the United States, or in any department or officer 
thereof. 

Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons 
as any of the states now existing shall think proper to ad- 
mit, shall not be prohibited by the congress prior to the 
year one thousand eight hundred and eight ; but a tax or 
duty may be imposed on such importation, not exceeding 
ten dollars for each person. 

The privileges of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, 
the public safety may require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration, herein before 
directed to be taken. 

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any 
state. 

No preference shall be given, by any regulation of com- 
merce or revenue, to the ports of one state over those of 
another; nor shall vessels bound to or from one state, be 
obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another. 

No money shall be dra^Ti from the treasury but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular state- 
ment and account of the receipts and expenditures of all 
public money shall be published from time to time. 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States ; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under 
them, shall, without the consent of the congress, accept of 
any present, emolument, office, or title, of any kind what- 
ever, fi'o^ any king, prince, or foreign state. 
2 



18 Constitution of the United States, 

Sect. 10. No state sliall enter into any treaty, alliance^ 
or confederation ; grant letters of marque and reprisal ; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts ; pass any bill of 
attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing tlie obligation 
of contracts; or gi-ant any title of nobility. No state shall, 
without the consent of the congress, lay any imposts oi 
duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely 
necessary for executing its inspection laws; and the net 
produce of all duties and imposts, laid by any state on im- 
ports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of 
the United States; and all such laws shall be subject to 
the revision and control of the congress. No state shall, 
without the consent of congress, lay any duty of tonnage, 
keep troops, or ships of war, in time of peace, enter into 
any agreement or compact with another state, or with a 
foreign power, or engagb in war, unless actually invaded, or 
in such imminent danger as will not admit of delay. 

ARTICLE n. 

Section 1. The executive power shall be vested in a 
President of the United States of America. He shall hold 
his office during the term of four years ; and, together with 
the Vice-President, chosen for the same term, be elected as 
follows : — 

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legisla- 
ture thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the 
whole number of senators and representatives to which the 
state may be entitled in the congress: but no senator or 
representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit 
under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote 
by ballot for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall not 
be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; and 
they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the 
number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and 



Constitution of the United States. 19 

certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the senate. 
The president of the senate shall, in the presence of the 
senate and house of representatives, open all the certifi- 
cates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person 
having the greatest number of votes shall be the president, 
if such niunber be a majority of the whole number of elect- 
ors appointed : And if there be more than one who have 
such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the 
house of representatives shall immediately choose by ballot 
one of them for president ; and if no person have a majori- 
ty, then, from the five highest on the list, the said house 
shall, in like manner, choose the president: but in choos- 
ing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the 
representation from each state having one vote ; a quorum 
for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from 
two thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states 
shall be necessaiy to a choice. In every case, after the 
choice of the president, the person having the greatest num- 
ber of votes of the electors shall be the vice-president. 
But if there should remain two or more who have equal 
votes, the senate shall choose from them, by ballot, the 
vice-president. [See Amendments, Article XII.] 

The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes ; 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

No person, except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this con- 
stitution, shall be eligible to the ofiice of president ; neither 
shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not have 
attained the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen 
years a resident within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the president from office, or of 
his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers 
and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the 
vice-president; and the congi*ess may by law provide for 
the case of removal, death, resignation, or inability both of 



20 Constitution of the United States. 

the i)resident and vice-president, declaring wliat officer sliall 
tlien act as president ; and such officer sliall act according- 
ly, until the disability be removed, or a president shall be 
elected. 

The president shall, at stated times, receive for his ser- 
vices a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during the period for which he shall have been 
elected; and he shall not receive, within that period, any 
other emolument from the United States, or any of them. 

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation : — 

"I do solemnly swear, (or affirm,) that I will faithfuUy 
execute the office of president of the United States, and 
will, to the best of my ability, presence, protect, and defend 
the constitution of the United States." 

Sect. 2. The president shall be commander-in-chief of 
the army and navy of the United States, and of the militia 
of the several states when called into the actual service of 
the United States. He may require the opinion, in writing, 
of the principal officer in each of the executive depart- 
ments, upon any subject relating to the duties of their 
respective offices; and he shall have power to grant re- 
prieves and pardons for offences against the United States, 
except in cases of impeachment. 

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and, by 
and with the advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint 
ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of 
the supreme court, and all other officers of the United 
States whose appointments are not herein otherwise pro- 
vided for, and which shall be established by law : but the 
longress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior 
officers as they think proper in the president alone, in the 
courts of law, or in the heads of departments. 

The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies 



Constitution of the United States, 21 

that may happen during the recess of the senate, by 
granting commissions which shall expire at the *nd of 
their next session. 

Sect. 3. He shall, from time to time, give to the con- 
gress information of the state of the Union, and recom- 
mend to their consideration such measures as he shall 
judge necessary and expedient ; he may, on extraordinary 
occasions, convene both houses, or either of them, and in 
case of disagreement between them, with respect to the 
time of adjournment, he may adjourn them to such time 
as he shall think proper; he shall receive ambassadors 
and other public ministers; he shall take care that the 
laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the 
oflScers of the United States. 

Sect. 4. The president, vice-president, and all civil 
officers of the United States, shall be removed from office 
on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, 
or other high crimes and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

Section 1. The judicial power of the United States 
shall be vested in one supreme court, and in such inferior 
courts as the congress may, from time to time, ordain and 
establish. The judges, both of the supreme and inferior 
courts, shall hold their offices during good behavior, and 
shall, at stated times, receive for their services a compen- 
sation which shall not be diminished duilng their contin- 
uance in office. 

Sect. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, 
in law and equity, arising under this constitution, the laws 
of the United States, and treaties made, or which shall be 
made, under their authority ; to all cases affecting ambas- 
sadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to all cases 
of admiralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies 
to which the United States shall be a party ; to controver- 



22 Constitution of the United States. 

sies between two or more states ; between a state and cit- 
izens of another state ; between citizens of different states ; 
between citizens of the same state, claiming lands under 
grants of different states ; and between a state, or the citi- 
zens thereof, and foreign states, citizens, or subjects. 
[See Amendments, Article XI.] 

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public minis- 
ters and consuls, and those in which a state shall be a 
party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. 
In all the other cases before mentioned, the supreme court 
shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, 
with such exceptions, and under such regulations, as the 
congress shall make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, shall be by jurjj^; and such trial shall be held in the 
state where the said crimes shall have been committed; 
but when not committed within any state, the trial shall 
be at such place or places as the congress may by law 
have directed. 

Sect. 3. Treason against the United States shall con- 
sist only in le^'5'ing war against them, or in adliering to 
their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person 
shall be convicted of treason, unless on the testimony of 
two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in 
open court. 

The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason; but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life 
of the person attainted. 

AETICLE lY. 
Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each 
state to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings 
of every other state ; and the congress may, by general 
xaws, prescribe the manner in which such acts, records, and 
proceedings shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 



Constitution of the United States. 23 

Sect. 2. The citizens of each state shall be entitled to 
all privileges and immunities of citizens in the several 
states. 

A person charged in any state with treason, felony, or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in 
another state, shall, on demand of the executive authority 
of the state from which he fled, be delivered up, to be 
removed to the state having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one state, under the 
laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of 
any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such ser- 
vice or labor; but shall be delivered up on claim of the 
party to whom such service or labor may be due. 

Sect. 3. New states may be admitted by the congress 
into this Union; but no new state shall be formed or 
erected within the jurisdiction of any other state, nor any 
state be formed by the junction of two or more states or 
parts of states, without the consent of the legislatures of 
the states concerned, as well as of the congress. 

The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or 
other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing 
in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any 
claims of the United States, or of any particular state. 

Sect. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state 
in this Union a republican form of government: and shall 
protect each of them against invasion : and on application 
of the legislature, or of the executive, (when the legislature 
cannot be convened, ) against domestic violence. 

AETICLE y. 

The congress, whenever two thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this con- 
stitution, or, on the application of the legislatures of two 
thirds of the several states, shall call a convention for 



24 Constitution of the United States, 

proposing amendments, which, in either case, shall be valid 
to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution, 
when ratified by the legislatures of three fourths of the 
several states, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, as 
the one or the other mode of ratification may be proposed 
by the congress ; provided, that no amendment which may 
be made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and 
eight, shall, in any manner, affect the first and fourth 
clauses in the ninth section of the first article ; and that no 
state, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal 
suffrage in the senate. 

AETICLE VI. 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into before 
the adoption of tMs constitution, shall be as valid against 
the United States, under this constitution, as under the 
confederation. 

This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties 
m..:ie, or wixich oLaii l^e luu-de, ixnaei tUe autuurity of tne 
United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and 
the judges in every state shall be bound thereby, any thing 
in the constitution or laws of any state to the contrary not- 
withstanding. 

The senators *and representatives before mentioned, and 
members of the several state legislatures, and all executive 
and judicial ofllcers, both of the United States and of the 
several states, shall be bound, by oath or aflirmation, to 
support this constitution; but no religious test shall ever be 
required as a qualification to any office or pubUc trust under 
the United States. 

ARTICLE VII. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine states shall 
be sufficient for the establishment of this constitution, 
between the states so ratifying the same. 



Constitution of the United States* 25 



ARTICLES, 

Jn addition tOy and amendment ofy the Constitution of the 
United States, proposed hy Congress, and ratijied by the 
Legislatures of the several States, pursuant to the Fifth 
Article of the original Constitution, 

I. Congress shall make no law respecting an establish- 
ment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the government for a redress of grievances. 

n. A well-regulated militia being necessary to the se- 
curity of a free state, the right of the people to keep and 
bear arms shall not be infringed. 

III. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 
any house without the consent of the owner, nor in time of 
war but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

IV. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrants shall 
issue, but upon probable cause, supported by oath or afllr- 
mation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, 
and the persons or things to be seized. 

V. No person shall be held to answer for a capital or 
otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or 
indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the 
land or naval forces, or in the militia when in actual ser- 
vice in time of war or public danger; nor shall any per- 
son be subject for the same offence to be twice put in jeop- 



26 Constitution of the United States, 

ardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled, in any crimi- 
nal case, to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of 
life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor 
shall private property be taken for public use without just 
compensation. 

VI. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy 
the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury 
of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been 
committed, which district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause 
of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses 
against him ; to have compulsory process for obtaining wit- 
nesses in his favor; and to have the assistance of counsel 
for his defence. 

VII. In suits at common law, where the value in con- 
troversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by 
jury shall be preserved ; and no fact tried by a jury shall be 
otherwise re-examined, in any court of the United States, 
than according to the rules of the common law. 

Vin. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor ex- 
cessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments 
inflicted. 

IX. The enimieration, in the constitution, of certain 
rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others 
retained by the people. 

X. The powers not delegated to the United States by 
the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are 
reserved to the states respectively, or to the people. 

XI. The judicial power of the United States shall not 
be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, com- 
menced or prosecuted against one of the United States by 
citizens of another state, or by citizens or subjects of any 
foreign state. 



Constitution of the United States. 27 

Xn. The electors shall meet in their respective states, 
and vote by ballot for president and vice-president, one 
of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots 
the person voted for as president, and, in distinct ballots, 
the person voted for as vice-president; and they shal' 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as president, 
and of all persons voted for as vice-president, and of the 
number of votes for each; which lists they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the sen- 
ate ; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of 
the senate and house of representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates, and the votes shall then be counted ; the person 
having the greatest number of votes for president shall be 
the president, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed : and if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest num- 
bers, not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as 
president, the house of representatives shall choose im- 
mediately, by ballot, the president; but in choosing the 
president, the votes shall be taken by states, the represen- 
tation from each state having one vote ; a quorum for this 
purpose shall consist of a member or members from two 
thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall 
be necessary to a choice ; and if the house of representa- 
tives shall not choose a president, whenever the right of 
choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of 
March next following, then the vice-president shall act as 
president, as in the case of the death or other constitutional 
disability of the president. 

The person having the greatest number of votes as vice- 
president shall be the vice-president, if such number be a 
majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and 
if no person have a majority, then from the two highest 
numbers on the list, the senate shall choose the vice-pres- 



28 Constitution of the United States. 

ident; a quorum for tlie purpose shall coiisist of two tWids 
of the whole number of senators, and a majority of the 
whole number shall be necessary to a choice. 

But no person, constitutionally ineligible to the ofl&ce of 
president, shall be eligible to that of vice-president of the 
United States. 

XIII. Sect. 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servi- 
tude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party 
•shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United 
States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Sect. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this 
article by appropriate legislation. 

XIV. Sect. 1. All persons bom or naturalized in the 
United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are 
citizens of the United States, and of the state wherein they 
reside. JS'o state shall make or enforce ,any law which 
shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the 
United States, nor shall any state deprive any person of 
life, liberty, or property without due process of law, nor 
deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protec- 
tion of the laws. 

Sect. 2. Kepresentatives shall be apportioned among 
the several states according to their respective numbers, 
counting the whole number of persons in each state, ex- 
cluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at 
any election for the choice of electors for president and 
vice-president of the United States, representatives in 
congress, the executive and judicial officers of a state, or 
the legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhab- 
itants of such state, being twenty-one years of age, and 
citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, ex- 
cept for participation in rebellion, or other crimes, the 
basis of representation shall be reduced in the proportion 
«yhich the number of such male citizens shall bear to the 



Constitution of the United States, 29 

whole number of such, citizens, twenty-one years of age, 
in such state. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be a senator or representative 
in congress, or elector of president or vice-president, or 
hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, 
or under any state, who having previously taken an oath as 
a member of congress, or as an officer of the United States, 
or as a member of any state legislature, or as an executive 
or judicial officer of any state, to support the constitution 
of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or 
rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof. But congress may, by a two-thirds vote 
of each house, remove such disability. 

Sect. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United 
States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for the 
payment of pensions and bounties for sen-ices in suppress- 
ing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But 
neither the United States, nor any state, shall assiune or pay 
any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or 
rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the 
loss or emancipation of any slave ; but all such debts, obli- 
gations, and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Sect. 5. The congress shall have power to enforce, by 
appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article. 

XV. Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United States 
lo vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States, 
or by any state, on account of race, color, or previous con- 
dition of servitude. 

Sect. 2. The congress shall have power to enforce this 
article by appropriate legislation. 



[Note. —The Articles of Confederation between the thirteen United 
States of America were agreed upon by delegates from the states, in 
Congress assembled, on the 15th of November, 1777, and were finally 
ratified by all the states, March 1st, 1781. On the 21st of February, 1787, 
the Congress of the Confederation recomjnended that a Convention of 



30 Constitution of the United States. 

Delegates, to be appointed by the states, be held for the purpose of revis 
ing the Articles of Confederation. In accordance with this recommenda- 
tion, delegates from the several states met together at Philadelphia, Mon- 
day, May 14th, 1787, and organized by choosing George Wat hington as 
their President. On the 17th of September, the Convention fir-aUy agreed 
to a proposed form of Constitution, "which was transmitted to the Cctj- 
gress of the Confederation. By that body copies were transmitted to 
the several states, and the Constitution was ratified by Conventiona 
therein in the following order : — 

Delaware ..••..•• December 7, 1787, 

Pennsylvania "12, 1787, 

New Jersey "18, 1781 

Georgia January 2, 1788 

Connecticut " 9, 1788, 

Massachusetts February 6, 1788. 

Maryland April 28, 1788, 

South Carolina May 23, 1788. 

New Hampshire June 21, 1788, 

Virginia " 26, 1788, 

New York July 26,1788, 

Eleven states having ratified the Constitution, Congress proceeded to 
make all proper preparations for carrying it into eflect. The first Wednes- 
day of January, 1789, was appointed as the time for choosing electors, 
the first Wednesday in February as the day on which they should vote 
for President and Vice-President, and the first Wednesday of March as 
the day on which the new Congress should assemble together. The 
members of the two houses of the new Congress met at New York at 
the time appointed, March 4th, 1789. A quorum of the House of Repre- 
sentatives ^id not appear until the first of April, when a Speaker and a 
Clerk were chosen. A quorum of the Senate did not appear until April 
6th, when a President ^ro tempore was chosen, for the purpose of count- 
ing the votes for President and Vice-President. On the same day, in 
presence of both houses, the returns of votes from the several states 
were opened and counted. George Washington was declared elected 
President, and John Adams Vice-President. The Senate then elected a 
President pro tempore, and a Secretary, and both houses, being organ- 
ized, proceeded to transact public business. On the 21st of April the 
Vice-President assumed his seat as President of the Senate, and on 
Thursday, April 30th, George Washington was inaugurated President. 
The Constitution was ratified soon afterwards by the two remaining 
states ; by North Carolina, November 21st, 1789, and by Rhode Island, 
\Iay 29th, 1790. 



Constitution of the United States. 31 



On the 2yth of September, 1789, Congress proposed twelve articles of 
amendment to the Constitution, ten of which (numbered in the preceding 
pages from one to ten) were finally ratified December 15th, 1791. The 
eleventh article of amendment was proposed by Congress March 5th, 
1794, and was declared by the President, in his message of January 8, 
1798, to have been adapted by the requisite number of states. The 
twelfth amendment was proposed by Congress December 12th, 1803, and 
was adopted during the year 1804. The thirteenth amendment was 
adopted by the Senate of the United States April 8th, 1864, by a vote of 
38 yeas to 6 nays ; and by the House on the 31st of January, 1865, by a 
vote of 119 yeas to 56 nays. On the 18th of December, 1865, the Secretary 
of State made proclamation that it had been ratified by the requisite num- 
ber of states. 

The fourteenth amendment was adopted by the Senate of the United 
States June 8th, 1866, by a vote of 33 yeas to 11 nays ; and by the House 
on the 13th of June, 1866, by a vote of 138 yeas to 36 nays. On the 21st 
of July, 1868, the Senate and House passed this concurrent resolution : — 

" Whereas, The legislatures of the states of Connecticut, Tennessee, 
New Jersey, Oregon, "Vermont, West Virginia, Kansas, Missouri, In- 
diana, Ohio, lUiaois, Minnesota, New York, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
Nebraska, Maine, Iowa, Arkansas, Florida, North CaroUna, Alabama, 
South Carolina, and Louisiana, being three fourths and more of the sev- 
eral states of the Union, have ratified the fourteenth article of amendment 
to the Constitution of the United States, duly proposed by two thirds of 
each house of the thirty-ninth Congress ; therefore 

'* Resolved by the Senate, (the House of Representatives concurring,) 
That said fourteenth article is hereby declared to be a part of the Con- 
stitution of the United States, and it shall be duly promulgated aa such 
by the Secretary of State." 

Afterwards a proclamation was issued by the Secretary of State, in 
which it was declared that the amendment had been ratified, and- had 
become a part of the Constitution. 

Theffteenth amendment was adopted by Congress "on or about the 
27th day of February, in the year 1869." On the 30th of March, 1870, the 
Secretary of State proclauned its ratification •' by the legislatures of the 
states of North CaroUna, West Virginia, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, 
Maine, Louisiana, Michigan, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, Arkansas, 
Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, New York, New Hampshire, 
Nevada, Vermont, Virginia, Alabama, Missouri, Mississippi, Ohio, 
Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Rhode Island, Nebraska, and Texas, in all 
twenty-nine states," three fourths of the whole number. And the Secre- 
tary farther proclaimed that it appeared from official documents on file 
bi hie depaitment, that "the legislature of New York has since passed 



32 Constitution of the United States, 

resolutions claiming to withdraw said ratification; " and that "the legiB* 
latnre of Georgia has by resolution ratified the said propose d amend- 
ment." The Secretary then certified that " the amendment aforesaid ha« 
become valid, to all intents and purposes, as a part of the Constitution of 
ihe United States." 



CONSTITUTION 

OB 

rOEM OF GOVEENMENT 

FOB THB 

CommonlBealtlf of iHassacJusjclls. 



PREAMBLE. 

Objects of GTovemment— Right of people to alter it— Body politle; 
how formed — ^Its nature — Duty of the people. Page 39. 

PART I.— DECLARATION OF RIGHTS. 

Article 1. Equality and natural rights of all men. 40. 

Akt. 2. Eight and duty of public religious worship — Protection of 
the Buhject In his own mode of worship, unless, &c. 40. 

Art. 3. Provisions in relation to pubhc worship, election of public 
teachers, parochial taxes, &c., abolished by Art. XI. of the amend- 
ments. 40. 

Akt. 4. Right of self-government secured — Exercise of all powers 
not delegated, &c. 41. 

Art. 5. Accountability of all officers, &c. 41. 

Art. 6. Services rendered to the public being the only title to peculiar 
privileges, hereditary offices are absurd and unnatural. 41. 

Art. 7. Objects of government; right of people alone to institute and 
ciiange it. 41. 

Art. 8. Right of people to cause their public officers to retire to pri- 
vatelife. 41,42. 

Art. 9. All, having the qualifications prescribed, equally eligible to 
office and equal right to elect. 43. 

Art. 10. Right to be protected and duty to contribute correlative — 
Taxation, founded on consent — Private property not to be taken for 
public uses, without, &c. 43. 

3 33 



34 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Akt. 11. Remedies by recouTBe to law, to be free, complete, and 
prompt. 43. 

Akt. 12. Rights of persons held to answer for crimes — Right to trial 
by jury in criminal cases, except, &c. 43, 44. 

Abt. 13. Crimes to be proved in the \'icinity. 44. 

Art. 14. Right of search and seizure regulated. 44. 

Abt. 15 Right to trial by jury, sacred, except, &c. 45. 

Abt. 16 Liberty of the press not to be restrained. 45. 

Abt. 17 Right to keep and bear arms — Standing armies dangerotu 
— Militarj power subordinate to ci%al power. 45. 

Abt. 18. Adherence to fundamental principles of piety, &c., neces- 
sary — Moral obligations of lawgivers and magistrates. 45. 

Abt. 19. Right of people to assemble, to instruct representatives, and 
petition legislature. 45. 

Abt. 20. Power to suspend laws or their execution — When and by 
whom exercised. 45. 

Abt. 21. Freedom of debate in the legislature. 46. 

Abt. 22. Fre(juent sessions, and objects thereof. 48. 

Abt. 23. Taxation founded on consent. 46. 

Abt. 24. I^x post facto laws -prohibited. 46. 

Abt. 25. Legislature not to convict of treason or felony. 46. 

Abt. 26. Excessive bail or fines, and cruel punishments, prohibited. 4tL 

Abt. 27. No soldier to be quartered In any house, unless, &c. 48, 

Abt. 28, Citizens exempt from law -martial, unless, &c. 47. 

Akt. 29. Judges of supreme judicial court — Tenure of their ofl3.ceg 
—Salaries. 47. 

Abt. 30. Separation of executive, judicial, and legislative depart* 
ments. 47. 

PAKT n. — THE FRAME OF GOVERNMENT. 

CHAPTER I. — The Legislative Poweb. 
Section I. — The General Court. 

Abtictj!! 1. Legislative department shall consist of, &c. — Shall 
assemble every year — Style of. [See amendments, Art. X.] 48. 

Abt. 2. Governor's veto — Bill may be passed by two-thirds of each 
house, notwithstanding. [See amendments, Art. I.] 48, 49. 

Art. 3. General Court may constitute judicatories, courts of record, 
&c. — Courts, &c., may administer oaths. 49. 

Abt. 4. General Court may enact laws, &c., not repugnant to the 
Constitution; may provide for the election or appointment of officers; 
prescribe their duties ; impose taxes ; duties and excises, to be disposed 
of for defence, protection, &c. — Valuation of estates, once in ten yeara, 
at least, while, &c. 50, 51. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 35 

Section U.-^The Senate 

Article 1. Senate. [See amendments, Arts. XTTT., XVI., XXII.] 
51, 52 [87, 89, 94]. 

Art. 2. Senate the first branch — Word "inhabitant" defined— 
Selectmen to preside — Return of votes — Inhabitants of imincorporated 
plantations, who pay State taxes, may vote — Plantation meetings — 
Assessors to notify, &c. 52, 53 [79, 80, 83, 88, 89]. 

Abt. 3. Governor and five of the council to examine and coimt votea 
and issue summonses. 54 [83]. 

Art. 4. Senate to be final judge of elections, &c., of its own membeia 
—Vacancies how fiUed. [See amendments, Art. X., XTV., XXIV.] 64 
[83,88,95]. 

Art. 5. Qualifications of a senator. [See amendments, Art. xiii., 
XXn.] 55 [87]. 

Art. 6. Senate not to adjourn for more than two days at a time. 55. 

Art. 7. ShaU choose its own officers, and determine its rules. 55. 

Art. 8. Shall try all impeachments — Oath in such case— Limitation 
of sentence. 55. 

Art. 9. Quonun. 55. 

Section TU. — House of Eepresentativea. 

ARTiciiE 1. Annual representation of the people. 56. 

Art. 2. House. [See amendments, Art. XII., XTTT., XXT.] TowM 
liable to fine, &c. — Mileage. 56 [85, 87, 92]. 

Art. 3. Elections by ballot — Freehold qualifications. [See amend- 
ments. Art. Xin., XIV., XXI.] 57 [87, 88, 92]. 

Art. 4. Qualifications of a voter. [See amendments. Art. HI., XX.] 
67 [80, 92]. 

Art. 5. Representatives, when chosen. [See amendments, Art. X., 
XV.] 57 [83, 89]. 

Art. 6. Ilouse alone can impeach — Senate to try. 57. 

Art. 7. Ilouse to originate all money bills — Senate may amend. 67. 

Art. 8. Not to adjourn for more than two days at a time. 57. 

Art. 9. Quorum. [See amendments. Art. XXI.] 58 [92]. 

Art. 10. House to judge of returns, &c., of its own members; t? 
choose its officers and establish its rules, &c. — May pimish forcertaiii 
offences — Members free from arr.est, &c. 58. 

Art. 11. Senate's power in like cases — Governor and council may 
punish — General limitations — Trial may be bj cormnittee, or other- 
Wise. 68. 

CHAPTER n.— The Executive Power. 
Section I. — The Governor. 

Article 1. Governor— His title. 59. 

Art. 2. To be chosen annually — Qualificationa. [See amendmenta, 
Art.Vn.] 69 [81]. 



36 Constitution of Massachusetts, 



Aet 8. How chosen, &c. [See amendments, Art. n., X., XEV., 
XV.] 69 [79, 83, 88, 89.] 

Art. 4. Tower of governor, and of governor and council. 60. 

Art. 6. Power as to proroguing the general court. [See amend- 
ments, Art. X.J 60 [83] . 

Abt. }. Governor and council may adjourn general court, in cases of 
disagreement, but not exceeding ninety days. 61. 

Art. 7. Governor to be commander-in-chief — Limitation. 61. 

Art. 8. Governor and council may pardon offences, except, &c., but 
not before conviction. 62. 

Art. 9. All judicial officers, &c., how nominated and appointed. [See 
amendments. Art. XIV., XVTL., XIX.] 62 [88, 90, 91]. 

Art. 10. Militia officers, how elected. [See amendments. Art. V., 81.] 
How commissioned — Manner of convening the electors — Major-gen- 
erals, how appointed and commissioned — Vacancies, how fiUed, in case, 
&c. — Officers, duly commissioned, how removed. [See amendments, 
Art. rV., 80.] Adjutants, &c., how appointed — Present division of mili- 
tia to stand until altered by law. 63. 

Art. 11. Money, how drawn from the treasury, except, &c., and for 
what purpose. 64. 

Art. 12. All public boards, &c., to make quarterly returns. 64. 

Art. 13. Salary of governor — Salaries of justices of supreme judicial 
court — Salaries to be enlarged if insufficient, as the legislature shall 
judge proper. 65. 

Section U. — The Lieutenant- Governor. 

Article 1. Lieutenant-governor; his title and qualifications— How 
chosen. 65. 

Art. 2. Governor to be president of council, but to have no vote — 
Lieutenant-governor a member of, except, &c. — To preside in governor's 
absence. 66. 

Art. 3. Lieutenant-governor to be acting governor, in case, &c. 68. 

Section JIl.— The Council. 

Article 1. Council. [See amendments. Art. XVI.] 66 [89]. 

Art. 2. Number; from whom and how chosen — If senators become 
councillors, their seats to be vacated. [See amendments, X., Xlll., 
XVI.] 67 [83, 87, 89]. 

Art. 3. Rank of councillors. 67. 

Art. 4. No district to have more than two. [Obsolete.] 67. 

Art. 5. Register of coimcil — May be called for by the legislature. 67. 

Art. 6. Council to exercise the power of governor, in case, &c. 67. 

Art. 7. Elections may be adjourned, imtil, &c. — Order thereof. [See 
•mendments, Art. XVI., XXV.] 68 [89, 95]. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 37 

Section rv. — /Secretory, Treasurer, cfec. 

Aetkxe 1. Secretary, &c., by ■whom and how chosen. [See amende 
ments, Art. IV., XVII.] Treasurer ineligible for more than five succea- 
Bive years. 68 [80,90]. 

Akt. 2. Seeretary to keep records, to att«nd the governor and conn< 
cil,&c. 68. 

CHAPTER m. — JUDICIABT POfTEBS. 

Akticle 1. Tenure of all conunissioned oflScers to be expressed in 
their commissions — Judicial officers, except, &c., to hold office during 
good behavior — But may be removed on address. 69. 

Akt. 2. Legislature, and governor and cotmcil, have right to require 
opinions of supreme judicial court, &c. 69. 

Aet. 3. Justices of the peace; tenure of their office to be seven 
years. 69. 

Abt. 4. Provision for holding probate courts. 69. 

Abt. 5. Causes of marriage, divorce, &c., to be determined by gov- 
emor and coimcil until legislature make other provision. 70. 

CHAPTER IV. — Delegates to Congress. [Obsolete.] 
CHAPTER V. — The University at Cambridge, and ENcotTBAGB- 
MENT OP Literature, &c. 
Section I. — The University. 
Article 1. Harvard College — Powers, privileges, &c., of the pres- 
ident and fellows confirmed. 70. 
Art. 2. All gifts, grants, &c., confirmed. 71. 

Art. 3. Who shall be overseers — Power of alteration reserved to the 
legislature. 71, 72. 

Section H. — The Encouragement of Literature, dtc. 
Duty of legislators and magistrates. 72. 

CHAPTER VI. — Oaths and Subscriptions, &c. 

Article 1. Oaths, &c. [See amendments, Art. VT., VH.] How 
administered. 73 [81]. 

Art. 2. Plurality of offices prohibited to governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, judge of supreme judicial court, &c., except, &c. — Incompatible 
offices. [See amendments, Art. VHI.] Bribery, &c., to operate aa dis- 
qualifications. 75. 

Art. 3. Value of money ascertained — Property qualifications may 
be increased. 76. 

Art. 4. Proxisions respecting conamissions. 77. 

Art. 5. Pro\isions respecting writs. 77. 

Abt. 6. Continuance of former laws, except, &c. 77. 

Abt. 7. Habeas Coi-pus secured, and not suspended, except, &c. 77 

Aet. 8. The enacting style. 77. 



38 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. 9. Officers of former governments continued, until, &c. [Olv 
Bolete.] 77. 
Art. 10. Provision for revising constitution. [Obsolete.] 78. 
Art. 11. Provision for preserving and publishing IMS constitution. 79. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Article 1. Bill, &c., not approved Avithin five days not to become a 
law, if legislature adjourn in the mean time. 79. 

Art. 2. General court empowered to charter cities — Provisos. 79. 

Art. 3. Qualification of voters for governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators, and representatives. [See amendments, Art. XX.] 80 [92]. 

Art. 4. Notaries public, how appointed and removed — Vacancies in 
the offices of secretary and treasurer, how filled, in case, &c. [See 
amendments. Art. XVII.] Commissary-general may be appointed, in 
case, &c. — MiUtia officers maybe removed as the legislature may pre- 
scribe. 80 [90].^ 

Art. 5. "Who may vote for captains and subalterns. 81. 

Art. 6. Oath to be taken by aU officers, or affirmation in case, &c. 81. 

Art. 7. Ko other oath, except, &c., required. 81. 

Art. 8. Incompatibihty of offices. 81. 

Art. 9. Amendments to constitution, how made. 82. 

Art. 10. Commencement of poUtical year; and termination — Meet- 
ings for choice of governor, lieutenant-governor, &c., when to be held — 
May be adjourned. [See amendments, Art. XV.] 83 [89]. 

Art. 11. Third article of Declaration of Eights annulled— Rehgioua 
freedom established. 84. 

Art. 12. Representation in the legislature. [See amendments, Art. 
XXI.] 85 [92]. ^^ 

Art. 13. Same subject. [See amendments, Art. XVT., XXI., XXU.] 
Possession of freehold not required. 87 [89, 92, 94] . 

Art. 14. In elections of civil officers by the people, the person having 
the highest number of votes to be elected. 88. 

Art. 15. Meetings for choice of governor, &c., to be held on the 
Tuesday next after the first Monday in November — In case of failure 
to elect representatives, a second meeting may be held on fourth Mon- 
day. 89. 

Art. 16. Councillors — Provisions for electing; districting the State; 
qualifications, &c. ; filling vacancies — Organization of the government 
■without delay, how provided for. 89. 

\rt. 17. Secretary, treasurer, auditor, and attorney -general — Pro- 
visions concerning mode of electing, quaUfications, vacancies, &c. 90. 

Art. 18. School moneys not to be appropriated to schools other than 
those conducted according to law, and not to be appropriated to religious 
sects for the maintenance exclusively of their own schools. 91. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 39 

Aet. 19. Legislature to prescribe by law for election of sheriffs, 
registers of probate, commissioners of insolvency, clerks of cc arts, and 
district attorneys by the people. 91. 

Abt. 20. Reading constitution in English, aid writing, necessary 
qualifications of voters. 92. 

AUT. 21. House of Representatives — Census to be taken every tenth 
year, beginning in 1865 — Special enumeration of legal voters — Appor. 
tionment of rej)resentatives — Districts, how formed — Qualifications of 
representatives — Quorum, &c. 92. 

Art. 22. Senate — Census — Division into senatorial districts — Qual- 
ifications — Quorum, &c. 94. 

Art. 23. Residence of two years required of naturalized citizens, to 
entitle to suflrage or make eligible to oflice. [See amendments, Art. 
XXVI.] 95 [95]. 

Art. 24. Vacancies in the senate, how filled. 95. 

Art. 25. Vacancies in the council, how filled. 96. 

Art. 26. Article 23 of the amendments annulled. 96. 



PREAMBLE. 

The end of the institution, maintenance, and administrar 
tion of government, is to secure tlie existence of tlie body 
politic; to protect it; and to furnisli tlie individuals who 
compose it with the power of enjoying in safety and tran- 
quillity their natural rights, and the blessings of life: and 
whenever these great objects are not obtained, th6 people 
have a right to alter the government, and to take measures 
necessary for their safely, prosperity, and happiness. 

The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of 
individuals; it is a social compact, by which the whole 
people covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with 
the whole people, that all shall be governed by certain laws 
for the common good. It is the duty of the people, there- 
fore, in framing a constitution of government, to provide 
for an equitable mode of making laws, as well as for an im- 
partial interpretation, and a faithful execution of them; 
that every man may, at all times, find his security in them. 

We, therefore, the people of IMassachusetts, acknowledg- 
ing with grateful hearts the goodness of the great Legislator 
of the universe, in affording us, in the course of his provi- 



40 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

dence, an opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without 
fraud, violence, or surprise, of entering into an original, 
explicit, and solemn compact with each other; and of form- 
ing a new constitution of civil government for ourselves 
and posterity; and devoutly imploring his direction in so 
interesting a design, do agree upon, ordain, and establish, 
the following Declaration of BightSy and Frame of Govemr 
mentj as the Constitution of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 



PART THE FIRST. 

A Declaration of the Bights of the Inhabitants of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Article I. All men are bom free and equal, and have 
certain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among 
which may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending 
their lives and liberties; that of acquiring, possessing, and 
protecting property; in fine, that of seeking and obtaining 
their safety and happiness. 

Art. II. It is the right as well as the duty of all men 
in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the 
Supeeme Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the 
universe. Aid no subject shall be hurt, molested, or re- 
strained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping 
God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dic- 
tates of his own conscience ; or for his religious profession 
5r sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public 
peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship. 

Aet. m. As the happiness of a people, and the good 
order and preservation of civil government, essentially 
depend upon piety, religion, and morality; and as these 
cannot be generally diffused through a community but by 
the institution of the public worship of God, and of public 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 41 

instructions in piety, religion, and morality: therefoie, to 
promote tlieir happiness, and to secure tlie good order and 
preservation of their government, the people of this Com- 
monwealth have a right to invest their legislature with 
power to authorize and require, and the legislature shall 
from time to tiine authorize and require, the several towns^ 
parishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious 
societies, to make suitable provision, at their own expense, 
for the institution of the public worship of God, and for 
the support and maintenance of public Protestant teachers 
of piety, religion, and morality, in all cases where such pro- 
vision shall not be made voluntarily. [See Amendments, 
Article XI.] 

And the people of this Commonwealth have also a right 
to, and do, invest their legislature with authority to enjoin 
upon all the subjects an attendance upon the instructions of 
the public teachers aforesaid, at stated times and seasons, if 
there be any on whose instructions they can conscientiously 
and conveniently attend. [See Amendments, Article XI.] 

Provided notwithstanding, that the several towns, par- 
ishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious 
societies, shall at all times have the exclusive right of 
electing their public teachers, and of contracting with them 
for their support and maintenance. [See Amendments^ 
Article XI.] 

And all moneys paid by the subject to the support of pub- 
lic worship, and of the public teachers aforesaid, shall, if 
lie require it, be unifonnly applied to the support of the 
public teacher or teachers of his own religious sect or de- 
nomination, provided there be any on whose instiiictioi-s he 
attends ; othervkise it may be paid towards the support of 
the teacher or teachers of the parish or precinct in which 
the said moneys are raised. [See Amendments, Ariicle XL] 

And every denomination of Christians, demeaning them- 
selves peaceably, and as good subjects of the Common- 
wealth, shall be equally under the protection of the law; 
and no subordination of any one sect or denomination to 



42 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

another sliall ever be established by law. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XT.] 

Act. IV. The people of this Commonwealth have the 
sole and exclusive right of governing themselves, as a free, 
sovereign, and independent State; and do, and forever 
hereafter shall, exercise and enjoy eveiy power, jurisdic- 
tion, and right, which is not, or may not hereafter, be bj 
them expressly delegated to the United States of America, 
in Congress assembled. 

Art. V. All power residing originally in the people, 
and being derived from them, the several magistrates and 
officers of government, vested with authority, whether 
legislative, executive, or judicial, are their substitutes and 
agents, and are at all times accountable to them. 

Aet. VI. No man, nor corporation, or association of 
men, have any other title to obtain advantages, or partic- 
ular and exclusive privileges, distinct from those of the 
community, than what arises from the consideration of 
services rendered to the public ; and this title being in nature 
neither hereditar^^, nor transmissible to children, or de- 
scendants, or relations by blood, the idea of a man born a 
magistrate, lawgiver, or judge, is absurd and unnatural. 

Art. VII. Government is instituted for the common 
good, for the jjrotection, safety, prosperity, and happiness 
of the people ; and not for the profit, honor, or private in- 
terest of any one man, family, or class of men: Therefore 
the people alone have an incontestable, unalienable, and 
indefeasible right to institute government ; and to reform, 
alter, or totally change the same, when their protection, 
safety, prosperity, and happiness require it. 

Art. VIII. In order to prevent those who are vested 
with authority from becoming oppressors, the people have 
a right, at such periods and in such manner as they shall 
establish by their frame of government, to cause their pub- 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 43 

lie officers to return to private life; and to fill up vacant 
places by certain and regular elections and appointments. 

AnT. IX. All elections ought to be free; and all the 
inhabitants of this Commonwealth, having such qualifica- 
tions as they shall establish by their frame of government, 
have an equal right to elect officers, and to be elected, for 
public employments. 

APvT. X. Each individual of the society has a right to 
be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and 
property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, con- 
sequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this 
protection; to give his personal service, or an equivalent, 
when necessary : but no part of the property of any indi- 
vidual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to 
public uses, without his own consent, or that of the repre- 
sentative body of the people. In fine, the people of this 
Commonwealth are not controllable by any other laws than 
those to which their constitutional representative body have 
given their consent. And whenever the public exigencies 
re(iuire that the property of any individual should be appro- 
priated to public uses, he shall receive a reasonable compen- 
sation therefor. 

Art. XI. Every subject of the Commonwealth ought 
to find a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, 
for all injuries or wrongs which he may receive in his per- 
son, property, or character. He ought to obtain right and 
justice freely, and without being obliged to purchase it; 
completely, and without any denial ; promptly, and without 
delay; confonnably to the laws. 

Art. XII. No subject shall be held to answer for any 
crimes or offence, until the same is fully and plainly, sub- 
stantially and formally, described to him; or be com- 
pelled to accuse, or furnish evidence against himself. And 



41 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

every subject shall have a rignt to produce all proofs that 
may be favorable to him; to meet the witnesses against 
him face to face, and to be fully heard in his defence by 
himself, or his counsel, at his election. And no subject 
shall be arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his 
property, immunities, or privileges, put out of the pro- 
tection of the law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, 
or estate, but by the judgment of his peers, or the law of 
the land. 

And the legislature shall not make any law that shall 
subject any person to a capital or infamous punishment, 
excepting for the government of the army and navy, with- 
out trial by jury. 

Art. XIII. In criminal prosecutions, the verification 
of facts in the vicinity where they happen is one of the 
greatest securities of the life, liberty, and property of the 
citizen. 

Art. XIV. Every subject has a right to be secure from 
all unreasonable searches and seizures of his person, his 
houses, his papers, and all his possessions. All warrants, 
therefore, are contrary to this right, if the cause or founda- 
tion of them be not previously supported by oath or affir- 
mation; and if the order in the warrant to a civil officer, 
to make search in suspected places, or to arrest one oi 
more suspected persons, or to seize their property, be not 
accompanied with a special designation of the persons oi 
objects of search, arrest, or seizure ; and no warrant ought 
to be issued but in cases, and with the formalities, pie- 
scribed by the laws. 

Art. XY. In all controversies concerning property, and 
in all suits between two or more persons, except in cases in 
which it has heretofore been otherways used and practised^ 
the parties have a right to trial by jury ; and this method 
of procedure shall be held sacred, unless, in causes arising 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 4ij 

on the high seas, and such as relate to mariuers' wages, 
the legislature shall hereafter find it necessary to alter it. 

Abt. XVI. The liberty of the press is essential to the 
security of freedom in a state: it ought not, therefore, to be 
restrained in this Commonwealth. 

Akt. XYII. The people have a right to keep and to 
oear arms for the common defence. And as, in time of 
peace, aiTnies are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be 
maintained without the consent of the legislature ; and the 
military power shall always be held in an exact subordina- 
tion to the civil authority, and be governed by it. 

Akt. XYIII. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental 
principles of the constitution, and a constant adherence to 
those of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, industrj-, 
and frugality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the 
advantages of liberty, and to maintain a free government. 
The people ought, consequently, to have a particular atten- 
tion to all those principles, in the choice of their officers 
and representatives: and they have a right to require of 
their lawgivers and magistrates an exact and constant 
obsei-vance of them, in the formation and execution of the 
laws necessaiy for the good administration of the Common- 
wealth. 

A-BT. XIX. The people have a right, in an orderly and 
peaceable manner, to assemble to consult upon the com- 
mon good; give instructions to their representatives, and 
to request of the legislative body, by the way of addresses, 
petitions, or remonstrances, redress of the wrongs done 
them, and of the grievances they suffer. 

Aet. XX. The power of suspending the laws, or the 
execution of the laws, ought never to be exercised but by 
the legislature, or by authority derived from it, to be exer 



46 Constitution of Massachu^au^, 

cised ill si.ch particular cases only as the legislature sball 
expressly provide for. 

Akt. XXI. Tlie freedom of deliberation, speech, and 
debate, in either house of the legislature, is so essential to 
the rights of the people, that it cannot be the foundation ol 
any accusation or prosecution, action or complaint, in any 
o'iher court or place whatsoever. 

Aet. XXII. "The legislature ought frequently to assemble 
for the redress of grievances, for correcting, strengthening, 
and confinning the laws, and for making new laws, as the 
common good may require. 

Aet. XXIII. No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duties, 
ought to be established, fixed, laid, or levied, under any 
pretext whatsoever, without the consent of the people, or 
their representatives in the legislature. 

Art. XXIV. Laws made to punish for actions done 
before the existence of such laws, and which have not been 
declared crimes by preceding laws, are unjust, oppressive, 
and inconsistent with the fundamental principles of a free 
government. 

Arf. XXY. No subject ought, in any case, or in any 
time, to be declared guihy of treason or felony by the 
legislature. 

Aet. XXYI. No magistrate or court of law shall de- 
mand excessive bail or sureties, impose excessive fines, or 
inflict cruel or unusual punishments. 

Aet. XXYII. In time of peace, no soldier ought to be 
quartered in any house without the consent of the owner; 
and in time of war, such quarters ought not to be made 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 47 

but by the civil magistrate, in a manner ordained by the 
legislature. 

Akt. XXVIII. No person can in any case be subjected 
to law-martial, or to any penalties or pains by virtue of 
that law, except those employed in the army or navy, and 
except the militia in actual service, but by authority of the 
legislature. 

Akt. XXIX. It is essential to the preservation of the 
rights of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and 
character, that there be an impartial interpretation of the 
laws, and administration of justice. It is the right of every 
citizen to be tried by judges as free, impartial, and inde- 
pendent as the lot of humanity will admit. It is, there- 
fore, not only the best policy, but for the security of the 
rights of the people, and of every citizen, that the judges 
of the supreme judicial court should hold their offices as 
long as they behave themselves well, and that they should 
have honorable salaries ascertained and established by 
standing laws. 

Art. XXX. In the government of this Commonwealth, 
the legislative department shall never exercise the executive 
and judicial powers, or either of them; the executive shall 
never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either 
of them; the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and 
executive powers, or either of them: to the end ij may be i 
government of laws, and not of men. 



48 Constitution of Massachusetts, 



PART THE SECOND. 

The Frame of Govei-nment. 

The people, inhabiting the territory formerly called the 
Province of Massachusetts Bay, do hereby solemnly and 
mutually agree with each other, to form themselves into a 
free, sovereign, and independent body politic (xr state, by 
the name of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

CHAPTER I. 

THE LEGISLATIVE POWER. 



TJie General Court. 

Article I. The department of legislation shall be 
formed by two branches, a Senate and House of Kepre- 
sentatives, each of which shall have a negative on the 
other. 

The legislative body shall assemble every year, on the 
last Wednesday in May, and at such other times as they 
shall judge necessary ; and shall dissolve and be dissolved, 
on the day next preceding the said last "Wednesday in May; 
and shall be styled, The General Court of Massachu- 
setts. [See Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. 11. No bill or resolve of the senate or house of 
representatives shall become a law, and have force as such, 
until it shall have been laid before the governor for his re- 
visal; and if he, upon such revision, approve thereof, he 
shall signify his approbation by signing the same. But if 
he have any objection to the passing of such bill or resolve, 
he shall return the same, together with his objections 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 49 

thereto, in writing, to tlie senate or house of representa- 
tives, in whichsoever the same shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections sent down by the governor, at 
large, on their records, and proceed to r-econsider the said 
bill or resolve: but if, after such reconsideration, two 
thirds of the said senate or house of representatives shall, 
notwithstanding the said objections, agree to pass the same, 
it shall, together with the objections, be sent to the other 
branch of the legislature, where it shall also be reconyid- 
eri^d, and if approved by two-thirds of the membv.vs i resent, 
shill have the force of a law: but in all such cases, the 
votes of both houses shall be deteimined by yeas and nays ; 
and the names of the persons voting for, or against, the said 
bill or resolve, shall be entered upon the public records of 
Jie Commonwealth. 

And in order to prevent unnecessary delays, if any bill 
or resolve shall not be returned by the governor within five 
days after it shall have been presented, the same shall have 
the force of a law. [See Amendments, Article L] 



Akt. III. The general court shall forever have full 
power and authority to erect and constitute judicatories 
and courts of record, or other courts, to be held in the name 
of the Commonwealth, for the hearing, trying, and deter- 
mining of all maimer of crimes, offences, pleas, processes, 
plaints, actions, matters, causes, and things, whatsoever, 
arising or happening within the Commonwealth, or be- 
t\\cen or concerning persons inhabiting, or residing, or 
brought within the same ; whether the same be criminal oi 
civil, or whether the said crimes be capital or not capital, 
am' whether the said pleas be real, personal, or mixed; and 
for the awarding and making out of execution thereupon: 
to which courts and judicatories are hereby given and 
granted full power and authority, from time to time, to 
administer oaths or affirmations, for the better discover5 
4 



50 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

of truth ia any matter in controversy, or depending before 
them. 

AnT. IV. And further, full power and authoiity are 
hereby given and granted to the said general court, from 
time to time, to make, ordain, and establish, all mannei 
of Mholesome and reasonable orders, laws, statutes, and 
ordinances, directions and instructions, either with penal- 
ties or without; so as the same be not repugnai^t or con- 
trary to this constitution, as they shall judge to be for the 
good and welfare of this Commonwealth, and for the gov- 
ernment and ordering thereof, and of the subjects of the 
same, and for the necessary support and defence of the 
government thereof; and to name and settle annually, or 
provide by fixed laws for the naming and settling, all civil 
officers within the said Commonwealth, the election and 
constitution of whom are not hereafter in this form of gov- 
ernment otherwise provided for; and to set forth the sev- 
eral duties, powers, and limits of the several civil and mili- 
tary officers of this Commonwealth, and the forms of such 
oaths or affirmations as shall be respectively administered 
unto them for the execution of their several offices and 
places, so as the same be not repugnant or contrary to this 
constitution ; and to impose and levy proportional and rea- 
sonable assessments, rates, and taxes, upon all the inhab- 
itants of, and persons resident, and estates lying, within 
the said Commonwealth ; and also to impose and levy rea- 
sonable duties and excises upon any produce, goods, wares, 
merchandise, and commodities whatsoever, brought into, 
produced, manufactured, or being within the same; to be 
issued and disposed of by warrant, under the hand of the 
governor of this Commonwealth for the time being, witb 
the advice and consent of the council, for the public service, 
in the necessary defence and support of the government of 
the said Commonwealth, and the protection and preserva- 
tion of the subjects thereof, according to such acts as are 
or shall be in force within the same. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 51 

And Y^liile the public charges of government, or any 
part thereof, shall be assessed on polls and estates, in the 
manner that has hitherto been practised, in order that such 
assessments may be made with equality, there shall be a 
valuation of estates within the Commonwealth, taken anew, 
once in every ten years at least, and as much oftener as the 
general court shall order. 



CHAPTER L 

SECTION U. 

Senate. 

Abticle I. There shall be annually elected, by the 

freeholders and other inhabitants of this Commonwealth, 
qualified as in this constitution is provided, forty persons 
to be councillors and senators, for the year ensuing their 
election; to be chosen by the inhabitants of the districts 
into which the Commonwealth may from time to time be 
divided by the general court for that purpose; and the 
general court, in assigning the numbers to be elected by 
the respective districts, shall govern themselves by the 
proportion of the public taxes paid by the said districts, 
and timely ntake known to the inhabitants of the Com- 
monwealth the limits of each district, and the number of 
councillors and senators to be chosen therein: provided, 
that the number of such districts shall never be less than 
thirteen; and that no district be so largij as to entitle the 
same to choose more than six senators. [See Amend- 
ments, Articles XIII. and XYI.] 

And the several counties in this Commonwealth shall, 
until the general court shall determine it necessary to alter 
the said districts, be districts for the choice of councillors 
and senators (except that the counties of Dukes County 
and Nantucket shall form one district for that purpose) 



52 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 



and shall elect the following number for councillors and 



senators; viz.: — | 


See 


Amend 


ments, Article XIII. j 




Suffolk . 




six. 


York .... 


two. 


Essex . 




six. 


Dukes County and i 
Nantucket . \ ' 




Middlesex . 




five. 


. one 


Harapshire . 




four. 


Worcester . 


. five. 


I'lymouth . 




three. 


Cumberland 


one. 


Barnstable . 




one. 


Lincoln . . . ^ 


one. 


Bristol. . . . 




three. 


Berkshire . 


two. 



Art. II. The senate shall be the first branch of the 
legislature ; and the senators shall be chosen in the follow- 
ing manner, viz.: There shall be a meeting on the first 
Monday in April, annually, forever, of the inhabitants of 
each town in the several counties of this Commonwealth, 
to be called by the selectmen, and warned in due course 
of law, at least seven days before the first Monday in 
April, for the purpose of electing persons to be senators 
and councillors; and at such meetings every male inhab- 
itant of twenty-one years of age and upwards, having a 
freehold estate within the Commonwealth, of the annual 
income of three pounds, or any estate of the value of 
sixty pounds, shall have a right to give in his vote for the 
senators for the district of which he is an inhabitant. And 
to remo' e all doubts concerning the meaning of the word 
" inhabitant," in this constitution, every person shall be 
considered as an inhabitant, for the purpose of electing and 
b(.>ing elected into any ofiice, or place within this State, 
in that town, district, or plantation where he dwelleth, or 
hath his home. [See Amendments, Articles II., III., X., 
XIY., XV.] 

The selectmen of the several towns shall preside at such 
meetings impartially, and shall receive the votes of all the 
inhabitants of such towns present and qualified to vote for 
senators, and shall sort and count them in open town meet- 
ing, and in presence of the town clerk, who shall make a 
fair record, in presence of the selectmen, and in open town 



Constitution of Massachusetts. b!^ 

meeting, of the name of every persoi. voted for, and ol 
the numbei of votes against his name; and a fair copy of 
this record shall be attested by the selectmen and the town 
clerk, and shall be sealed up, directed to the secretary of 
the Commonwealth for the time being, with a superscrip- 
tion expressing the purport of the contents thereof, and 
delivered by the town clerk of such towns to the sheriff of 
the county in which such town lies, thirty days at least 
before the last Wednesday in May, annually ; or it shall be 
delivered into the secretary's office seventeen days at least 
before the said last Wednesday in May; and the sheriff of 
each county shall deliver all such certificates, by him re- 
ceived, into the secretary's office, seventeen daj-s before the 
said last Wednesday in May. [See Amendments, Articles 
II. and X.] 

And the inhabitants of plantations unincoi-porated, quali- 
fied as this constitution provides, who are or shall be em- 
powered and required to assess taxes upon themselves 
towards the support of government, shall have the same 
privilege of voting for councillors and senators, in the plan- 
tations where they reside, as town inhabitants have in their 
respective towns ; and the plantation meeting for that pur- 
pose shall be held, annually, on the same first Monday in 
April, at such place in the plantations, respectively, as the 
assessors thereof shall direct; which assessors shall have 
like authority for notif\ing the electors, collecting and re- 
turning the votes, as the selectmen and town clerks have 
ia their several town's, by this constitution. And all other 
persons living in places unincorporated, (qualified as afore- 
said.) who shall be assessed to the support of goveriment, 
by the assessors of an adjacent town, shall have the privi- 
lege of giving, in their votes for councillors and senators, in 
the town where they shall be assessed, and be notified of 
the place of meeting, by the selectmen of the town where 
they shall be assessed, for that purpose, accordingly. [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 



54 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Aet. III. And that there may be a due convention o^ 
senators on. the last Wednesday in May, annually, the gov« 
enior, with five of the council for the time being, shall, 
as soon as may be, examine the returned copies of such 
records; and fourteen days before the said day, he shall 
issue his summons to such persons as shall appear to be 
chosen by a majority of voters, to attend on that day, and 
take their seats accordingly: provided, nevertheless, that for 
the first year the said returned copies shall be examiii^ 
by the president and five of the council of the former con- 
stitution of government; and the said president shall, in 
like manner, issue his summons to the persons so elected, 
that they may take their seats as aforesaid. [See Amend- 
ments, Article X.] 

Art. IY. The senate shall be the final judge of the 
elections, returns, and qualifications of their ovm mem- 
bers, as pointed out in the constitution, and shall, on the 
said last Wednesday in May, annually, determine and de- 
clare who are elected by each district, to be senators, by a 
majority of votes : and in case there shall not appear to be 
the full number of senators returned, elected by a majority 
of votes, for any district, the deficiency shall be supplied 
in the following manner, viz. : The members of the house 
of representatives, and such senators as shall be declared 
elected, shall take the names of such persons as shall be 
found to have the highest number of votes in such district, 
and not elected, amounting to twice the number of senators 
wanting, if there be so many voted for, and out of these 
shall elect by ballot a number of senators sufiicient to fill 
up the vacancies in such district; and in this manner all 
such vacancies shall be filled up in every district of the 
Commonwealth; and in like manner all vacancies in the 
senate, arising by death, removal out of the State, or other- 
wise, shall be supplied as soon as may be after such vacan. 
cies shall happen. [See Amendments, Article X.] 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 55 

Art. Y. Provided, nevertheless, that i o person sliall 
be capable of being elected as a senator, who Is not seized 
in liis own right of a freehold, witliin this Con jiionwealth, 
of the value of three hundred pounds at least, or possessed 
of personal estate to the value of six hundred pounds at 
least, or of both to the amount of the same sum, and who 
lias not been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth for the 
space of five years immediately preceding his election, and, 
at the time of his election, he shall be an inhabitant in the 
district for which he sliall be chosen. [See amendments, 
Article XIII.] 

Art. VI. The senate shall have power to adjourn them- 
selves, provided such adjournments do not exceed two days 
at a time. 

Aet. YII. The senate shall choose its o\ni president, 
appoint its own officers, and determine its own rules of 
proceeding. 

Art. VIII. The senate shall be a court, with full au- 
thority, to hear and determine all impeachments made by 
the house of representatives, against any officer or officers 
of the Commonwealth, for misconduct and maladministra- 
tion in their offices; but, previous to the trial of every im- 
peachment, the members of the senate shall, resiDCctively, 
be sworn, truly and impartially to try and determine the 
charge in question, according to evidence. Their judg- 
Qient, however, shall not extend further than to remove 
from office, and disqualification to hold or enjoy any place 
of honor, trust, or profit, under this Commonwealth: bat 
the party so convicted shall be, nevertheless, liable to in- 
dictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to the 
laws )f the land. 

Art. IX. Not less than sixteen members of the senate 
shall constitute a quorum for doing business. 



66 Constitution of 3Iassachusett», 



CHAPTER I. 

SECTION III. 

House of Representatives. 

Abticle I. There shall be in the legislature of this 
Commonwealth, a representation of the people, annually 
elected, and founded vipon the principle of equality. 

Art. II. And in order to provide for a representation of 
the citizens of this Commonwealth, founded upon the prin- 
ciple of equality, every corporate town containing one hun- 
dred and fifty ratable polls, may elect one representative; 
every corporate town containing three hundred and seventy- 
five ratable polls, may elect two representatives; every cor- 
porate town containing six hundred ratable polls, may elect 
three representatives ; and proceeding in that manner, mak- 
ing two hundred and twenty-five ratable polls the mean 
increasing number for every additional representative. 
[See Amendments, Articles XII. and XIII.] 

Provided, nevertheless, that each town now incorporated, 
not having one hundred and fifty ratable polls, may elect 
one representative; but no place shall hereafter be incor- 
porated with the privilege of electing a representative, 
unless there are within the same one hundred and fifty 
ratable polls. 

And the house of representatives shall have power, from 
time to time, to impose fines upon such towns as shall neg- 
lect to choose and return members to the same, agreeably to 
this constitution. 

The expenses of travelling to the general assembly, and 
returning home, once in every session, and no more, shall 
be paid by the government, out of the public treasury, to 
every member who shall attend as seasonably as he can, in 
the judgment of the house, and does not depart without 
leave. 



Constitution of Massacliusetts. 57 

Art. III. Every member of the house of representatives 
shall be chosen by written votes; and, for one year at least, 
next preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant 
of, and have been seized in his own right, of a freehold of 
the value of one l.imdred pounds, within the town he shall 
be chosen to represent, or any ratable estate to the value of 
cwo hundred pounds; and he shall cease to represent the 
said town immediately on his ceasing to be qualified as afore- 
said. [See Amendments, Articles XIII. and XIY.] 

Art. IV. Every male person, being twenty-one years of 
age, and resident in any particular town in this Common- 
wealth for the space of one year next preceding, having a 
freehold estate, within the same town, of the annual income 
of three pounds, or any estate of the value of sixty pounds, 
shall have a right to vote in the choice of a representative 
or representatives for the said town. [See Amendments, 
Article III.] 

Art. V. The members of the house of representatives 
shall be chosen annually in the month of May, ten days, at 
least, before the last Wednesday of that month. [See 
Amendments, Articles X. and XV.] 

Art. VI. The house of representatives shall be the 
grand inquast of this Commonwealth; and all impeach- 
ments mafia by them shall be heard and tried by the 
senate. 

Art. VII. All money bills shall originate in the house 
of representatives; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

Art. Vm. The house of representatives shall have 
power to adjourn themselves ; provided such adjournment 
ihall not exceed two days at a time. 



68 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. IX. Not less than sixty members of the house of 
representatives shall constitute a quorum for doing busi- 



Art. X. The house of representatives shall be the 
judge of the returns, elections, and qualifications of its 
own members, as pointed out in the constitution; shall 
choose their own speaker, appoint their own officers, and 
settle the rules and orders of proceeding in their own 
house. They shall have authority to punish by imprison- 
ment every person, not a member, who shall be guilty of 
disrespect to the house, by any disorderly or contemptuous 
behavior in its presence ; or who, in the town where the 
general court is sitting, and during the time of its sitting, 
shall threaten harm to the body or estate of any of its mem- 
bers, for any thing said or done in the house ; or who shall 
assault any of them therefor; or who shall assault, or arrest, 
any witness, or other person, ordered to attend the house, 
in his way in going or returning ; or who shall rescue any 
person arrested by the order of the house. 

And no member of the house of representatives shall l»e 
arrested, or held to bail on mean process, during his going 
unto, returning from, or his attending, the general assembly. 

Aet. XI. The senate shall have the same powers in the 
like cases ; and the governor and council shall have the same 
authority to punish in like cases; provided that no imprison- 
ment, on the warrant or order of the governor, council, 
senate, or house of representatives, for either of the above 
described offences, be for a term exceeding thirty days. 

And the senate and house of representatives may try and 
determine all cases where their rights and privileges are con- 
cerned, and which, by the constitution, they have authority 
to try and determine, by committees of their own members, 
or in such way as they may, respectively, think best. 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 59 



CHAPTER n. 

EXECUTIVE POWEB. 

BECTION II. 

t 

Governor. 

Abticle I. There shall be a supreme executive magis- 
trate, who shall be ityled — The Governor of the Com- 
monwealth OF Massachusetts; — and whose title shall 
be — His Excellency. 

Art. II. The governor shall be chosen annually ; and 
no person shall be eligible to this oflBce, unless, at the time 
of his election, he shall have been an inhabitant of this Com- 
monwealth for seven years next preceding ; and unless he 
shall, at the same time, be seized, in his own right, of a free- 
hold, within the Commonwealth, of the value of one thou- 
sand pounds ; and unless he shall declare himself to be of 
the Christian religion. [See Amendments, Article YII.] 

Art. III. Those persons who shall be qualified to vote 
for senators and representatives, within the several towns 
of this Commonwealth, shall, at a meeting to be called for 
that purpose, on the first Monday of April, annually, give 
in their votes for a governor, to the selectmen, who shall 
preside at such meetings ; and the town clerk, in the pres- 
ence and with the assistance of the selectmen, shall, in 
open town meeting, sort and count the votes, and fonn a 
list of the persons voted for, with the number of votes for 
each person against his name ; and shall make a fair record 
of the same in the town books, and a public declaration 
thereof in the said meeting; and shall, in the presence of 
the inhabitants, seal up copies of the said list, attested by 
him and the selectmen, and transmit the same to the sheriff 
of the county, thirty days at least before the last Wednes. 



60 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

day in May ; and the sheriff shall transmit the same to the 
secretary's office seventeen days at least before the said last 
Wednesday in May; or the selectmen may cause returns of 
the same to be made to the office of the secretary of the 
Commonwealth, seventeen days, at least, before the said 
day ; and the secretary shall lay the same before the senat« 
and the house of representatives, on the last Wednesday in 
May, to be by them examined ; and in case of an electio:i 
by a majority of all the votes returned, the choice shall be 
by them declaj-ed and published; but if no person shall 
have a majority of votes, the house of representatives shall, 
by ballot, elect two out of four persons, who had the high- 
est number of votes, if so many shall have been voted for; 
but if otherwise, out of the number voted for; and make 
return to the senate of the two persons so elected; on 
which the senate shall proceed, by ballot, to elect one, 
who shall be declared governor. [See Amendments, Ar- 
ticles II., X., XIV., XY.] 

Akt. IV. The governor shall have authority, from time 
to time, at his discretion, to assemble and call together the 
councillors of this Commonwealth for the time being ; and 
the governor, with the said councillors, or five of them at 
least, shall, and may, from time to time, hold and keep a 
comicil, for the ordering and directing the affairs of the 
Commonwealth, agreeably to the constitution and the laws 
of the land. 

Abt, Y. The governor, with advice of council, shall 
Lave full power and authority, during the session of the 
general court, to adjourn or prorogue the same to any time 
the two houses shall desire; and to dissolve the same on 
the day next preceding the last Wednesday in May; and, 
in the recess of the said court, to prorogue the same from 
time to time, not exceeding ninety days in any one recess ; 
and to call it together sooner than the time to which it may 
be adjourned or prorogued, if the welfare of the Common- 
wealth shall require the same; and in case of any infectious 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 61 

disorder prevailing in the place where the said court is next 
at any time to convene, or any other cause happening, 
whereby danger may arise to the health or lives of the mem- 
bers from their attendance, he may direct the session to be 
held at some other, the most convenient place within the 
State. [See Amendments, Article X.] 

And the governor shall dissolve the said general couit on 
the day next preceding the last Wednesday i n May. [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. YI. In cases of disagreement between the two 
houses, with regard to the necessity, expediency, or time of 
adjournment, or prorogation, the governor, with advice of 
the council, shall have a right to adjourn or prorogue the 
general court, not exceeding ninety days, as he shall deter- 
mine the public good shall require. 

Art. VII. The governor of this Commonwealth, for 
the time being, shall be the commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy, and of all the military forces of the state, by sea 
and land ; and shall have full power, by himself, or by any 
commander, or other officer or officers, from time to time, 
to train, instruct, exercise, and govern the militia and 
navy; and, for the special defence and safety of the Com- 
monwealth, to assemble in martial array, and put in war- 
like posture, the inhabitants thereof, and to lead and con- 
duct them, and with them to encounter, repel, resist, 
expel, and pursue, by force of arms, as well by sea as by 
land, within or without the limits of this Commonwealth, 
and also to kill, slay, and destroy, if necessary, and con- 
quer, by all fitting ways, enterprises, and means what- 
soever, all and every such person and persons as shall, at 
any time hereafter, in a hostile manner, attempt or enter- 
prise the destruction, invasion, detriment, or annoyance 
of this Commonwealth; and to use and exercise over the 
army and navy, and over the militia in actual service, the 
law-martial in time of war or invasion, and also in time 



62 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

of rebellion, declared by the legislature to exist, as occasion 
shall necessarily require; and to take and surprise, by all 
ways and means whatsoever, all and every s uch person or 
persons, with their ships, arms, ammunition, and other 
goods, as shall, in a hostile manner, invade or attempt the 
invading, conquering, or annoying this Commonwealth; 
and that the governor be intrusted with all these and other 
powers, incident to the offices of captain-general and com- 
mander-in-chief, and admiral, to be exercised agreeably to 
the rules and regulations of the constitution, and the laws 
of the land, and not otherwise. 

Provided, that the said governor shall not, at any time 
hereafter, by virtue of any power by this constitution 
granted, or hereafter to be gi-anted to him by the legisla- 
ture, transport any of the inhabitants of this Common- 
wealth, or oblige them to march out of the limits of the 
same, without their free and voluntary consent, or the con- 
sent of the general court; except so far as maybe neces- 
sary to march or transport them by land or water, for the 
defence of such part of the state to which they cannot 
otherwise conveniently have access. 

Aet. YIII. The power of pardoning offences, except 
such as persons may be convicted of before the senate, by 
an impeachment of the house, shall be in the governor, by 
and with the advice of council ; but no charter of pardon, 
granted by the governor, with advice of the council, before 
conviction, shall avail the party pleading the same, notwith- 
stmding any general or particular expressions contained 
therein, descriptive of the offence or offences intended to 
be pardoned. 

Abt. IX. All judicial officers, the attorney-general, the 
solicitor-general, all sheriffs, coroners, and registrars of 
probate, shall be nominated and appointed by the gov- 
ernor, by and with the advice and consent of the council; 
an<l every such nomination shall be made by the governor 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 63 

aud made at least seven days prior to sucli appointmeut. 
[See Amendments, Articles XIY., XVH., XIX.] 

Akt. X. The captains and subalterns of tlie militia slial] 
be elected by the written votes of the train-band and alarm- 
list of their respective companies, of twenty-one years ol 
age and upwards; the field ofiicers of regiments sha'l e 
elected by the written votes of the captains and subalierns 
of their respective regiments ; the brigadiers shall be elected 
in like manner, by the field officers of their respective bri- 
gades ; and such officers, so elected, shall be commissioned 
by the governor, who shall determine their rank. [Sec 
Amendments, Article Y.] 

The legislature shall, by standing laws, direct the time 
and manner of convening the electors, and of collecting 
votes, and of certifying to the governor the officers elected. 

The major-generals shall be appointed by the senate and 
house of representatives, each having a negative upon the 
other; and be commissioned by the governor. 

And if the electors of brigadiers, field officers, captains, 
or subalterns, shall neglect or refuse to make such elections, 
after being duly notified, according to the laws for the time 
being, then the governor, with advice of council, shall ap- 
point suitable persons to fill such offices. 

And no officer, duly commissioned to command in the 
militia, shall be removed from his office but by the address 
of both houses to the governor, or by fair trial in court mar- 
tial, pursuant to the laws of the Commonwealth for the time 
being. [See Amendments, Article lY.] 

The commanding officers of regiments shall appoint their 
adjutants and quarter-masters; the brigadiers their brigade- 
majors ; and the major-generals their aids ; and the governor 
shall appoint the adjutant-general. 

The governor, with advice of council, shall appoint all 
officers of the continental army, whom by the confedera- 
tion of the United States it is provided that this Com- 



64 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

monwoaltli appoint, — as also all officers of forts and garri- 
sons. 

The divisions of the militia into brigades, regiments and 
companies, made in pursuance of the militia laws now in 
force, shall be considered as the proper divisions of the 
mihtia of this Commonwealth until the same shall be al- 
tered in pursuance of some future law. 

Akt. XI. No moneys shall be issued out of the treasury 
of this Commonwealth and disposed of (except such sums 
as may be appropriated for the redemption of bills of credit 
or treasurer' s notes, or for the payment of interest arising 
thereon) but by warrant under the hand of the governor 
for the time being, with the advice and consent of the 
council, for the necessary defence and support of the Com- 
monwealth, and for the protection and preservation of the 
inhabitants thereof, agreeably to the acts and resolves of the 
general court. 

Akt. XII. All public boards, the commissary-general, 
all superintending officers of public magazines and stores, 
belongiDg to this Commonwealth, and all commanding offi- 
cers of forts and garrisons within the same, shall, once in 
every three months, officially and without requisition, and 
at other times when required by the governor, deliver to 
him an account of all goods, stores, provisions, ammuni- 
tion, cannon with their appendages, and small arms with 
their accoutrements, and of all other public property what- 
ever under their care, respectively; distinguishing the 
quantity, number, quality, and kind of each, as particularly 
as may be; together vrith the condition of such forts and gar 
risons ; and the said commanding officer shall exhibit to the 
governor, when required by him, true and exact plans of 
such forts, and of the land and sea, or harbor or harbors, 
adjacent. 

And the said boards, and all public officers, shall coramu- 
Bicate to the governor, as soon as may be after receiving 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 65 

the same, all letters, despatches, and intelligences of a pub- 
lic natm-e, which shall be directed to them respectively. 

Art. XIII. As the public good requires that the gov- 
ernor should not be under the undue influence of any of 
the members of the general court, by a dependence on 
them for his support — that he should, in all cases, act 
with freedom for the benefit of the public — that he should 
not have his attention necessarily diverted from that object 
to his private concerns — and that he should maintain the 
dignity of the Commonwealth in the character of its chief 
magistrate — it is necessaiy that he should have an honor- 
able stated salary, of a fixed and peimanent value, amply 
sufficient for those purposes, and established by standing 
laws: and it shall be among the first acts of the general 
court, after the commencement of this constitution, to es- 
tablish such-salary by law accordingly. 

Permanent and honorable salaries shall also be estab- 
lished by law for the justices of the supreme judicial court. 

And if it shall be found that any of the salaries afore- 
said, so established, are insufiicient, they shall, from time 
to time, be enlarged, as the general court shall judge proper. 



CHAPTER IL 



Lieutenant-Governor. 

Abticle I. There shall be annually elected a lieutenant- 
governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, whose 
title shall be — His Honor; and who shall be qualified, in 
point of religion, property, and residence in the Common- 
wealth, in the same manner with the governor; and the 
day and manner of his election, and the qualifications oi 
5 



66 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

the electors, shall be the same as are required in the elec- 
tion of a governor. The return of the votes for this officer, 
and the declaration of his election, shall be in the same 
manner; and if no one person shall be found to have a 
majority of all the votes returned, the vacancy shall be 
filled by the senate and house of representatives, in the 
same manner as the governor is to be elected, in case no 
one person shall have a majority of the votes of the people 
to be governor. [See Amendments, Articles III., VI., X., 
XV.] 

Abt. II. The governor, and in his absence the lieu- 
tenant-governor, shall be president of the council, but shall 
have no vote in council ; and the lieutenant-governor shall 
always be a member of the coimcil, except when the chair 
of the governor shall be vacant. 

Aet. III. Whenever the chair of the governor shall be 
vacant, by reason of his death, or absence from the Com- 
monwealth, or otherwise, the lieutenant-governor, for the 
time being, shall, during such vacancy, perform all the 
duties incumbent upon the governor, and shall have and 
exercise all the powers and authorities, which, by this con- 
stitution, the governor is vested with, when personally 
present. 

CHAPTER n. 

SECTION m. 

Council, and the Manner of settling Elections ly the 

Legislature. 

Abticle I. There shall be a council for advising the 
governor in the executive part of the government, to con- 
sist of nine persons besides the lieutenant-governor, whom 
the governor, for the time being, shall have full power and 
authority, from time to time, at his discretion, to assemble 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 67 

and call together ; and the governor, with the said counci'j- 
lors, or five of them at least, shall and may, from time to 
time, hold and keep a council, for the ordering and direct- 
ing the affairs of the Commonwealth, according to the laws 
of the land. [See Amendments, Article XVI.] 

Art. II. Nine councillors shall be annually chosen 
from among the persons returned for councillors and sen- 
ators, on the last Wednesday in May, by the joint ballot 
of the senators and representatives assembled in one 
room ; and in case there shall not be found, upon the first 
choice, the whole number of nine persons who will accept 
a seat in the council, the deficiency shall be made up by 
the electors aforesaid from among the people at large ; and 
the number of senators left shall constitute the senate for 
the year. The seats of the persons thus elected from the 
senate, and accepting the trust, shall be vacated in the 
senate. [See Amendments, Articles X., XHI., XVI.] 

Akt. III. The councillors, in the civil arrangements 
of the Commonwealth, shall have rank next after the lieu- 
tenant-governor. 

Aet. IV. Not more than two councillors shall be chosen 
out of any one district of this Commonwealth. 

• Akt. V. The resolutions and advice of the council 
shall be recorded in a register, and signed by the members 
present ; and this record may be called for, at any time, 
by either house of the legislature; and any member of the 
cc>uncil may insert his opinion, contrary to the resolution oi 
the majority. 

Aet. VI. Whenever the office of the governor and 
lieutenant-governor shall be vacant, by reason of death, 
absence, or otherwise, then tlie council, or the major par* 



68 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

of tliein, shall, during such vacancy, have full power and 
authority to do and execute all and every such acts, mat- 
teis, and things, as the governor or the lieutenant-gov- 
ernor might or could, by virtue of this constitution, do or 
execute, if they, or either of them, were personally present. 

Aet. VII. And whereas the elections appointed to be 
made by this constitution, on the last Wednesday in May, 
annually, by the two houses of the legislature, may not be 
completed on that day, the said elections may be adjourned 
from day to day, until the same shall be completed. And 
the order of elections shall be as follows: The vacancies 
in the senate, if any, shall first be filled up ; the governor 
and lieutenant-governor shall then be elected, provided 
there should be no choice of them by the people; and 
afterwards the two houses shall proceed to the election 
of the council. 



CHAPTER n. 

SECTION IV. 

Secretary Treasurer^ Commissary^ &c. 

Article I. The secretary, treasurer, and receiver-gen- 
eral, and the commissary-general, notaries public, and 
naval officers, shall be chosen annually, by joint ballot of 
the senators and representatives, in one room. And that 
the citizens of this Commonwealth may be assured, from 
time to time, that the moneys remaining in the public 
treasury, upon the settlement and liquidation of the public 
accounts, are their property, no man shall be eligible as 
treasurer and receiver-general more than five years suc- 
cessively. [See Amendments, Articles IV., XVII.] 

Aet. II. The records of the Commonwealth shall be kept 
in the oflfice of the secretary, who may appoint his deputies, 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 69 

for whose conduct he shall be accountable ; and he shall 
attend the governor and council, the senate and house of 
representatives, in person, or by his deputies, as they shall 
resi)ectively require. 



CHAPTER III. 

jud'iciary power. 

A RTICLE I. The tenure that all commission oflScers shall 
by law have in their offices shall be expressed in their re- 
spective commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, 
commissioned, and sworn, shall hold their offices during good 
behavior, excepting such concerning whom there is different 
provision made in this constitution: provided, nevertheless, 
the governor, with consent of the council, may remove them 
upon the address of both houses of the legislature. 

Art. II. Each branch of the legislature, as well as the 
governor and council, shall have authority to require the 
opinions of the justices of the supreme judicial court, upon 
important questions of law, and upon solemn occasions. 

Art. III. In order that the people may not suffer from 
the long continuance in place of any justice of the peace 
who shall fail of discharging the important duties of his 
office with ability or fidelity, all commissions of justices of 
the peace shall expire and become void in the tenn of seven 
years from their respective dates; and, upon the expiration 
of any commission, the same may, if necessarj-, be renewed, 
01 another person appointed, as shall most conduce to the 
well-being of the Commonwealth. 

AijT. lY. The judges of probate of wills, and for grant- 
ing letters of administration, shall hold their courts at such 
place or places, on fixed days, as the convenience of the 



70 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

people shall require ; and the legislature shall, from time to 
time, hereafter appoint such times and places; until which 
appointments, the said courts shall be holden at the times 
and places which the respective judges shall direct. 

Abt. Y. All causes of marriage, divorce, and alimony, 
and all appeals from the judges of probate, shall be heard 
and determined by the governor and council, until the legis- 
lature shall, by law, make other provision. 



CHAPTER lY. 

DELEGATES TO CONGRESS. 

The delegates of this Commonwealth to the congress of 
the United States shall, some time in the month of June, 
annually, be elected by the joint ballot of the senate and 
house of representatives, assembled together in one room; 
to serve in congress for one year, to commence on the first 
Monday in November then next ensuing. They shall have 
commissions under the hand of the governor, and the great 
seal of the Commonwealth; but maybe recalled at any time 
within the year, and others chosen and commissioned, in 
the same manner, in their stead. [Annulled by the adop- 
tion of the Constitution of the United States.] 



CHAPTER V. 

THE UNIVEBSITY AT CAMBRIDGE, AND ENCOURAGEMENT 
OF LITERATURE, ETC. 

SECTION I. 

The University. 
Article I. Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so 
early as the year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, 
laid the foundation of Harvard College, in which umver* 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 71 

sity many persons of great eminence have, by the blessing 
of God, been initiated in those arts and sciences which 
qualified them for public employments, both in church and 
state ; and whereas the encouragement of arts and sciences; 
and all good literature, tends to the honor of God, the ad- 
vantage of the Christian religion, and the great benefit of 
this and the other United States of America, — it is de- 
clared, that the President and Fellows of Hahvaed 
College, in their corporate capacity, and their successors 
in that capacity, their ofiicers and servants, shall have, 
hold, use, exercise, and enjoy, all the powers, authorities, 
rights, liberties, privileges, immunities, and franchises, 
which they now have, or are entitled to have, hold, use, 
exercise, and enjoy; and the same are hereby ratified and 
confirmed unto them, the said president and fellows of 
Harvard College, and to their successors, and to their offi- 
cers and servants, respectively, forever . 

Akt. II. And whereas there have been, at sundry times, 
by divers persons, gifts, grants, devises of houses, lands, 
tenements, goods, chattels, legacies, and conveyances, here- 
tofore made, either to Harvard College, in Cambridge, in 
New England, or to the president and fellows of Harvard 
College, or to the said college by some other description, 
under several charters successively; it is declared, that all 
the said gifts, grants, devises, legacies, and conveyances 
are hereby forever confirmed unto the president and fellows 
of Harvard College, and to their successors, in the capacity 
aforesaid, according to the true intent and meaning of the 
donor or donors, grantor or grantors, devisor or devisors. 

Akt. III. And whereas by an act of the general court 
of the Colony of Massachusetts Bay, passed in the year 
one thousand six hundred and forty-two, the governor and 
deputy-governor for the time being, and all the magis- 
trates of that jurisdiction, were, with the president, and a 
mmiber of the clergy in the said act described constituted 



72 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Ihe overseers of Harvard College ; and it being necessary, 
in this new constitution of government, to ascertain who 
shall be deemed successors to the said governor, deputy- 
governor, and magistrates; it is declared, that the gov- 
ernor, lieutenant-governor, council, and senate of this Com- 
monwealth, are, and shall be deemed, their successors; 
who, with the president of Harvard College for the time 
being, together with the ministers of the congregational 
churclie;3 in the towns of Cambridge, Watertown, Charles- 
town, Boston, Eoxbury, and Dorchester, mentioned in the 
said act, shall be, and hereby are, vested with all the pow- 
ers and authority belonging, or in any way appertaining, to 
the overseers of Harvard College; provided, that nothing 
herein shall be construed to prevent the legislature of this 
Commonwealth from making such alterations, in the gov- 
ernment of the said university, as shall be conducive to its 
advantage, and the interest of the republic of letters, in as 
full a manner as might have been done by the legislature of 
tlie late Province of the Massachusetts Bay, 



CHAPTEK V. 

SECTION n. 

The Encouragement of Literature, &c. 

Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused gen- 
erally among the body of the people, being necessary for 
the preservation of their rights and liberties ; and as these 
depend on spreading the opportunities and advantages of 
education in the various parts of the country-, and among 
the different orders of the people, it shall be the duty of 
legislatures and magistrates, in all future periods of this 
Commonwealth, to cherish the interests of literature and 
the sciences, and all seminaries of them; especially the 
university at Cambridge, public schools, and grammar 
schools in the towns; to encourage private societies, and 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 73 

public institutions, rewards and immunities for the promo- 
tion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, man- 
ufactures, and a natural history of the country; to coun- 
tenance and inculcate the principles of humanity and 
general benevolence, public and private charity, industry 
and frugality, honesty and punctuality in their dealings; 
sincerity, good humor, and all social affections and gen- 
erous sentiments among the people. [See Amendments, 
Article XVIII.] 



CHAPTER VI. 

OATHS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS ; mCOMPATIBrLITY OF AND EX- 
CLUSION FEOM offices; pecuniary qualifications; 
commissions; writs; confirmation of laws; ha- 
beas CORPUS ; THE ENACTING STYLE ; CONTINUANCE OF 
officers; PROVISION FOB A FUTURE EEVISAL OF THE 
CONSTITUTION, &C. 

Article I. Any person chosen governor, Ueutenant- 
governor, councillor, senator, or representative, and ac- 
cepting the trust, shall, before he proceed to execute the 
duties of his place or office, make and subscribe the follow- 
ing declaration, viz. : 

"I, A. B., do declare, that I believe the Christian reli- 
gion, and have a firm persuasion of its truth; and that I 
am seized and possessed, in my own right, of the property 
required by the constitution, as one qualification for the 
oflSce or place to which I am elected." [See Amendments, 
Article VIL] 

And the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors 
shall make and subscribe the said declaration in the pres- 
ence of the two houses of assembly; and the senators and 
representatives first elected under this constitution, before 
the president and five of the council of the former consti- 
tution, and forever afterwards before the governor and 
council for the time being. 



74 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

And every person chosen to either of the places or of- 
fices aforesaid, as also any person appointed or commis- 
sioned to any judicial, executive, military, or other office 
under the government, shall, before he enters on the dis- 
charge of the business of his place or office, take and sub- 
scribe the following declaration, and oaths or affirmations, 
■?iz. : 

"I, A. B., do truly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, 
testify, and declare, that the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts is, and of right ought to be, a free, sovereign, and 
independent State; and I do swear that I will bear true 
faith and allegiance to the said Commonwealth, and that I 
will defend the same against traitorous conspiracies and 
all hostile attempts whatsoever; and that I do renounce 
and abjure all allegiance, subjection, and obedience to the 
king, queen, or government of Great Britain, (as the case 
may be,) and eveiy other foreign power whatsoever; and 
that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate, 
hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, superiority, pre- 
eminence, authority, dispensing or other power, in any 
matter, civil, ecclesiastical, or spiritual, within this Com- 
monwealth; except the authority and power which is or 
may be vested by their constituents in the congress of the 
United States; and I do further testify and declare, that 
no man, or body of men, hath, or can have, any right to 
absolve or discharge me from the obligation of this oath, 
declaration, or affirmation; and that I do make this ac- 
knowledgment, profession, testimony, declaration, denial, 
renunciation, and abjuration, heartily and truly, according 
to the common meaning and acceptation of the foregoing 
words, without any equivocation, mental evasion, or secret 
reservation whatsoever. So help me, God." 

'*I, A. B., do solemnly swear and affirm, that I will 
faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the 
duties incumbent on me as , according to 

the best of my abilities and understanding, agreeably to the 



Constitution of Massachusetts, lb 

rules and regulations of the constitution, and the laws of 
the Commonwealth. So help me, God." [See Amend- 
ments, Article VL] 

Provided, always, that when any person, chosen or ap- 
pointed as aforesaid, shall be of the denomination of the 
people called Quakers, and shall decline taking the said 
oaths, he shall make his affirmation in the foregoing form, 
and subscribe the same, omitting the words, " I do swear, '^^ 
" and abjure,^' " oath or,'' " and abjuration,'' in the fii-st 
oath; and in the second oath, the words, ^^ swear and;" 
and in each of them the words, ^' So help me, God;" 
subjoining, instead thereof, " This I do under the pains 
and penalties of perjury.'^ [See Amendments, Article 
VL] 

And the said oaths or affirmations shall be taken and 
subscribed by the governor, lieutenant-governor, and coun- 
cillors, before the president of the senate, in the presence 
of the two houses of assembly; and by the senators and 
representatives first elected under this constitution, before 
the president and five of the council of the former con- 
stitution ; and forever afterwards before the governor 
and council for the time being; and by the residue of 
the officers aforesaid, before such persons, and in such 
manner, as from time to time shall be prescribed by the 
legislature. 

Art. II. No governor, lieutenant-governor, or judge 
of the supreme judicial court shall hold any other office 
or place under the authority of this Commonwealth, ex- 
cept such as by this constitution they are admitted to hold, 
saving that the judges of the said court may hold the offices 
of justices of the peace through the state ; nor shall they 
hold any other place or office, or receive any pension or 
salary, from any other state, or government, or power, 
whatever. 

No person shall be capable of holding or exercising at 
the same time, within this State, more than one of the fol. 



76 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

lowing offices, viz. : judge of probate, sheriff, register of 
probate, or register of deeds; and never more tbau any 
two offices, which are to be held by appointment of the 
governor, or the governor and council, or the senate, or 
the house of representatives, or by the election of the 
people of the state at large, or of the people of any county, 
military offices and the offices of justices of the peace 
excepted, shall be held by one person. 

No person holding the office of judge of the supreme 
judicial court, secretary, attorney-general, solicitor-gen- 
eral, treasurer, or receiver-general, judge of probate, com- 
missary-general, president, professor or instructor of Har- 
vard College, sheriff, clerk of the house of representatives, 
register of probate, register of deeds, clerk of the supreme 
judicial court, clerk of the inferior court of common 
pleas, or officer of the customs, — including, in this de- 
scription, naval officers, — shall at the same time have a 
seat in the senate or house of representatives; but their 
being chosen or appointed to, and accepting the same, 
shall operate as a resignation of their seat in the senate or 
house of representatives; and the place so vacated shall 
be filled up. [See Amendments, Article VIII.] 

And the same rule shall take place in case any judge of 
the said supreme judicial court, or judge of probate, shall 
accept a seat in council ; or any councillor shall accept of 
either of those offices or places. 

And no person shall ever be admitted to hold a seat in 
the legislature, or any office of trust or importance under 
the government of this Commonwealth, who shall, in the 
due course of law, have been convicted of bribery or cor- 
ruption in obtaining an election or appointment. 

Art. ni. In all cases where sums of money are men- 
tioned in this constitution, the value thereof shall be com- 
puted in silver, at six shillings and eightpence per ounce ; 
and it shall be in the power of the legislature, from time to 
time, to increase such qualifications, as to property, of the 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 77 

persons to be elected to offices, as the circumstances of the 
Commonwealth shall require. 

Aet. IY. All commissions shall be in the name of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, signed by the governor, 
and attested by the secretary or his deputy, and have the 
great seal of the Commonwealth affixed thereto. 

Abt. Y. All writs, issuing out of the clerk's office in 
any of the courts of law, shall be in the name of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts ; they shall be under the seal 
of the court from whence they issue ; they shall bear test 
of the first justice of the court to which they shall be re- 
turnable, who is not a party, and be signed by the clerk of 
such court. 

Aet. YI. All the laws which have heretofore been 
adopted, used, and approved in the Province, Colony, or 
State of Massachusetts Bay, and usually practised on in 
the courts of law, shall still remain and be in full force, 
until altered or repealed by the legislature ; such parts only 
excepted as are repugnant to the rights and liberties con- 
tained in this constitution. 

Aet. YII. The privilege and benefit of the writ of 
habeas corpus shall be enjoyed in this Commonwealth in 
the most free, easy, cheap, expeditious, and ample mann<}r; 
and shall not be suspended by the legislature, except upon 
the most urgent and pressing occasions, and for a limited 
time, not exceeding twelve months. 

Aet. YIII. The enacting style, in making and passing 
all acts, statutes, and laws, shall be, "Be it enacted by tht, 
Senate and House of Bepresentatives, in General Court 
assembled, and by the authority of the same." 

Aet. IX. To the end there may be no failure of justice, 
or danger arise to the Conmionwealth, from a change of 



78 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

the form of government, all officers, civil and military, 
holding commissions under the government and people of 
Massachusetts Bay, in New England, and all other officers 
of the said government and people, at the time this cc nsti- 
tution shall take effect, shall have, hold, use, exercise, and 
enjoy all the powers and authority to them granted or com- 
mitted, until other persons shall be appointed in their stead ; 
and all courts of law shall proceed in the execution of the 
business of their respective departments ; and all the execu- 
tive and legislative officers, bodies, and powers shall con- 
tinue in full force, in the enjoyment and exercise of all 
their trusts, employments, and authority, until the general 
court and the supreme and executive officers under this 
constitution are designated, and invested with their respec- 
tive trusts, powers, and authority. 

Aet. X. In order the more effectually to adhere to the 
principles of the constitution, and to correct those viola- 
tions which by any means may be made therein, as well as 
to form such alterations as from experience shall be found 
necessary, the general court which shall be in the year of 
our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five 
shall issue precepts to the selectmen of the several towns, 
and to the assessors of the unincorporated plantations, 
directing them to convene the qualified voters of their 
respective towns and plantations, for the purpose of col- 
lecting their sentiments on the necessity or expediency of 
revising the constitution, in order to amendments. 

And if it shall appear, by the returns made, that tW3 
thirds of the qualified voters throughout the State, who 
shall assemble and vote in consequence of the said pre- 
cepts, are in favor of such revision or amendment, the 
general court shall issue precepts, or direct them to be 
issued from the secretary's office, to the several towns, 
to elect delegates to meet in convention for the purpose 
aforesaid. 

The said delegates to be chosen in the same manner and 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 79 

projjortion as their representatives in the second branch of 
the legislature are by this constitution to be chosen. 

Art. XI. This form of government shall be enroll d on 
parchment, and deposited in the secretary's office, and be a 
part of the laws of the land; and printed copies thereof 
shall be prefixed to the book containing the laws of tL.s 
Commonwealth, in all future editions of the said laws. 



ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT. 

Article I. If any bill or resolve shall be objected to, 
and not approved by the governor, and if the general court 
shall adjourn within five days after the same shall have 
been laid before the governor for his approbation, and 
thereby prevent his returning it, with his objections, as 
provided by the constitution, such bill or resolve shall not 
become a law, nor have force as such. 

Art, II. The general court shall have full power and 
authority to erect and constitute municipal or city govern- 
ments, in any corporate town or towns in this Com m on- 
wealth, and to grant to the inhabitants thereof such powers, 
privileges, and immunities not repugnant to the constitu- 
tion, as the general court shall deem necessary or expe- 
dient for the regulation and government thereof; and to 
prescribe the manner of calling and holding public meet- 
ings of the inhabitants in wards or otherwise, for the elec- 
tion of officers under the constitution, and the manner of 
returning the votes given at such meetings : provided, that 
no such government shall be erected or constituted in any 
town not containing twelve thousand inhabitants; nor 
unless it be with the consent, and on the application, of a 
majority of the inhabitants of such town, present and vot- 
ing thereon, pursuant to a vote at a meeting duly warned 



80 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

and holden for that purpose: and provided, alsc^ hat all by- 
laws, made by such municipal or city government, shall be 
subject, at all times, to be annulled by the general court. 

Akt. III. Every male citizen of twenty-one years of age 
and upwards (excepting paupers and persons under guar- 
dianship), who shall have resided within the Commonwealth 
one year, and within the town or district in which he may 
claim a right to vote six calendar months, next preceding 
any election of governor, lieutenant-governor, senators, or 
representatives, and who shall have paid, by himself or his 
parent, master, or guardian, any state or county tax, which 
shall, within two years next preceding such election, have 
been assessed upon him, in any town or district of this 
Commonwealth ; and also every citizen who shall be by law 
exempted from taxation, and who shall be in all other 
respects qualified as above mentioned, shall have a right to 
vote in such election of governor, lieutenant-governor, sena- 
tors, and representatives ; and no other person shall be enti- 
tled to vote in such elections. 

Art. 1Y. Notaries public shall be appointed by the 
governor in the same manner as judicial officials are ap- 
pointed, and shall hold their offices during seven years, 
unless sooner removed by the governor, with the consent 
of the council, upon the address of both houses of the 
legislature. 

In case the office of secretary or treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth shall become vacant from any cause, during the 
recess of the general court, the governor, with the advice 
and consent of the council, shall nominate and appoint, un- 
der such regulations as may be prescribed by law, a compe- 
tent and suitable person to such vacant office, who shall 
hold the same until a successor shall be appointed by the 
general court. [See Amendments, Article XVII.] 

Whenever the exigencies of the Commonwealth shall 
require the appointment of a commissary-general, he shall 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 81 

be nominated, appointed, and commissioned in such man- 
ner as the legislature may, by law, prescribe. 

All officers commissioned to command in the militia may 
be removed from office in such manner as the legislature 
may, by law, prescribe. 

Aki:. Y. In the elections of captains and subalterns of 
the militia, all the members of their respective companies, 
as well those under as those above the age of twenty-one 
years, shall have a right to vote. 

Aet. YI. Instead of the oath of allegiance prescribed 
by the constitution, the following oath shall be taken and 
subscribed by every person chosen or appointed to any 
office, civil or military, under the government of this Com- 
monwealth, before he shall enter on the duties of his office, 
to wit : — 

" I, A. B., do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith 
and allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
and will support the constitution thereof. So help me, 
God." 

Provided, That when any person shall be of the denom- 
ination called Quakers, and shall decline taking said oath, 
he shall make his affirmation in the foregoing form, omit- 
ting the word "swear," and inserting, instead thereof, the 
word ''affirm," and omitting the words *'So help me, 
God," and subjoining, instead thereof, the words " This I 
do under the pains and penalties of perjury." 

AuT. YII. No oath, declaration, or subscription, ex- 
cepting the oath prescribed in the preceding article, and 
the oath of office, shall be required of the governor, lieu- 
tenant-governor, councillors, senators, or representatives, 
to qualify them to perform the duties of their respective 
offices. 

Art. YIII. No judge of any court of this Common- 
wealth (except the court of sessions), and no person hold- 
6 



82 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

iug any office under the authority of the United States 
(postmasters excepted), shall, at the same time, hold the 
office of governor, lieutenant-governor, or councillor, or 
have a seat in the senate or house of representatives of 
this Commonwealth; and no judge of any court in this 
Commonwealth (except the court of sessions), nor the 
attorney-general, solicitor-general, county-attorney, clerk 
of any court, sheriff, treasurer, and receiver-general, regis- 
ter of probate, nor register of deeds, shall continue to 
hold his said office after being elected a member of the 
Congress of the United States, and accepting that trust; 
but the acceptance of such trust, by any of the officers 
aforesaid, shall be deemed and taken to be a resignation ©f 
his said office; and judges of the courts of common pleas 
shall hold no other office under the government of this 
Commonwealth, the office of justice of the peace and militia 
offices excepted. 

Abt. IX. If, in any time hereafter, any specific and par- 
ticular amendment or amendments to the constitution be 
proposed in the general court, and agreed to by a majority 
of the senators and two thirds of the members of the house 
of representatives present and voting thereon, such pro- 
posed amendment or amendments shall be entered on the 
journals of the two houses, with the yeas and nays taken 
thereon, and referred to the general court then next to be 
chosen, and shall be published ; and if in the general court 
next chosen, as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or 
amendments shall be agreed to by a majority of the sena- 
tors and tw^o thirds of the members of the house of repre- 
sentatives present and voting thereon, then it shall be the 
duty of the general court to submit such proposed amend- 
ment or amendments to the people; and if they shall be 
approved and ratified by a majority of the qualified voters, 
voting thereon, at meetings legally warned and holden for 
that purpose, they shall become part of the constitution oi 
the Commonwealth, 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 83 

Abt. X. The political year shall begin on the first 
Wednesday of January, instead of the last "Wednesday of 
May; and the general court shall assemble every year on 
the said first Wednesday of January, and shall proceed, at 
that session, to make all the elections, and to do all the 
other acts, which are by the constitution required to ba 
made and done at the session which has heretofore com- 
menced on the last Wednesday of May. And the general 
court shall be dissolved on the day next preceding the first 
Wednesday of January, without any proclamation or other 
act of the governor. But nothing herein contained shall 
prevent the general court from assembling at such other 
times as they shall judge necessary, or when called to- 
gether by the governor. The governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, and councillors shall also hold their respective 
offices for one year next following the first Wednesday of 
January, and until others are chosen and qualified in their 
stead. 

The meeting for the choice of governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, senators, and representatives, shall be held on the 
second Monday of November in every year; but meetings 
may be adjourned, if necessary, for the choice of repre- 
sentatives, to the next day, and again to the next succeed- 
ing day, but no further. But in case a second meeting 
shall be necessary for the choice of representatives, such 
meetings shall be held on the fourth Monday of the same 
month of November. [See Amendments, Article XY.] 

All the other provisions of the constitution, respecting 
the elections and proceedings of the members of the 
general court, or of any other officers or persons what- 
ever, that have reference to the last Wednesday of May 
as the commencement of the political year, shall be so far 
altered as to have like reference to the first Wednesday of 
January. 

This article shall go into operation on the first day of 
October, next following the day when the same shall be 
duly ratified and adopted as '»n amendment of the ( onstitu* 



84 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

tion; and the governor, lieutenant-governor, councillors, 
senators, representatives, and all other state officers, who 
are annually chosen, and who shall be chosen for the cur- 
ren> year, when the same shall go into operation, shall 
hold their respective offices until the first Wednesday of 
January then next following, and until others are chosen 
and qualified in their stead, and no longer; and the first 
election of the governor, lieutenant-governor, sonators, 
and representatives, to be had in virtue of this article, shall 
be had conformably thereunto, in the month of November 
following the day on which the same shall be in force and 
go into operation, pursuant to the foregoing provision. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution, inconsist- 
ent with the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly 
annulled. 

Abt. XI. Instead of the third article of the bill of 
rights, the following modification and amendment thereof 
is substituted : — 

As the public worship of God, and instructions in piety, 
religion, and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity 
of a people, and the security of a republican government ; 
therefore, the several religious societies of this Common- 
wealth, whether corporate or unincorporate, at any meeting 
legally warned and holden for that purpose, shall ever have 
the right to elect their pastors or religious teachers, to con- 
tract with them for their support, to raise money for erect- 
ing and repairing houses for public worship, for the main- 
tenance of religious instruction, and for the payment of 
necessary expenses : and all persons belonging to any reli- 
gious society shall be taken and held to be members, until 
they shall file with the clerk of said society a written notice 
declaring the dissolution of their membership, and thence- 
forth shall not be liable for any grant or contract which may 
be thereafter made or entered into by such socioty: and all 
religious sects and denominations, demeaning themselves 
peaceably, and as good citizens of the Commonwealth, shall 



Constitution of 3fassachusetts. 85 

be equally under the protection of the law ; and no subor- 
dination of any one sect or denomination to another shall 
ever be established by law. 



Aet. XII. In order to provide for a representation of 
the citizens of this Commonwealth, founded upon the 
principles of equality, a census of the ratable polls in each 
city, town, and district of the Commonwealth, on the first 
day of May, shall be taken and returned into the secre- 
tary's office, in such manner as the legislature shall pro- 
vide, within the month of May, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, and in every 
tenth year thereafter, in the month of May, in manner 
aforesaid: and each town or city having* three hundred 
ratable polls at the last preceding decennial census of polls 
may elect one representative, and for every four hundred 
and fifty ratable polls, in addition to the first three hun- 
dred, one representative more. [See Amendments, Article 

xin.] 

Ajiy town having less than three hundred ratable polls 
shall be represented thus: The whole number of ratable 
polls at the last preceding decennial census of polls shall 
be multiplied by ten, and the product divided by three 
hundred; and such town may elect one representative as 
many years within ten years as three hundred is con- 
tained in the product aforesaid. [See Amendments, Article 
XIII.] 

Any city or town having ratable polls enough to elect 
one or more representatives, with any number of polls be- 
yond the necessary number, may be represented, as to that 
surplus numlier, by multiplying such surplus number by 
ten, and dividing the product by four hundred and fifty; 
and such city or town may elect one additional representa- 
tive as many years within the ten years as four hundred 
and fifty is contained in the product aforesaid. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XIII.] 



86 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Any two or more of the several towns and districts may, 
by consent of a majority of the legal voters present at a 
legal meeting in each of said towns and districts, respect- 
ively, called for that purpose, and held previous to the 
first day of July, in the year in which the decennial census 
of polls shall be taken, form themselves into a represen- 
tative district, to continue until the next decennial census 
of polls, for the election of a representative or representa- 
ti7es ; and such districts shall have all the rights, in regard 
to representation, which would belong to a town containing 
the same number of ratable polls. [See Amendments, Ar- 
ticle XIII.] 

The governor and council shall ascertain and determine, 
within the months of July and August, in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, accord- 
ing to the foregoing principles, the number of representa- 
tives which each city, town, and representative district is 
entitled to elect, and the number of years, within the period 
of ten years then next ensuing, that each city, town, and rep- 
resentative district may elect an additional representative ; 
and where any town has not a sufficient number of polls to 
elect a representative each year, then, how many years with- 
in the ten years such town may elect a representative : and 
the same shall be done once in ten years thereafter, by the 
governor and council, and the number of ratable polls in 
each decennial census of polls shall determine the number 
of representatives which each city, town, and representative 
district may elect as aforesaid; and when the number of 
representatives to be elected by each city, town, or represen- 
tative district is ascertained and determined as aforesaid; 
the governor shall cause the same to be published forthwith 
for the information of the people, and that number shall 
reiwain fixed and unalterable for the period of ten years. 
[See Amendments, Article XIII. J 

All the provisions of the existing constitution inconsist 
ent with the provisions herein contained are hereby wholly 
innulled. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 87 

Abt. XIII. A census of tlie inhabitants of each city and 
town on the first day of May shall be taken and returned 
into the secretary's office, on or before the last day of June, 
of the year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and of 
every tenth year thereafter ; which census shall determine 
the apportionment of senators and representatives for the 
term of ten years. 

The several senatorial districts now existing shall be per- 
manent. The senate shall consist of forty members; and 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and forty, and 
every tenth year thereafter, the governor and council shal 
assign the number of senators to be chosen in each district 
according to the number of inhabitants in the same. But 
in all cases, at least one senator shall be assigned to each 
district. 

The members of the house of representatives shall be 
apportioned in the following manner: Every town or city 
containing twelve hundred inhabitants may elect one rep- 
resentative; and two thousand four hundred inhabitants 
shall be the mean increasing number which shall entitle it 
to an additional representative. 

Every town containing less than twelve hundred inhab- 
itants shall be entitled to elect a representative as many 
times within ten years as the number one hundred and 
sixty is contained in the number of the inhabitants of said 
town. Such towns may also elect one representative for 
the year in which the valuation of estates within the Com- 
monwealth shall be settled. 

Any two or more of the several towns may, by consent 
of a majority of the legal voters present at a 'egal meeting 
in each of said towns, respectively, called for that purpose, 
and held before the first day of August, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and forty, and every tenth year 
thereafter, form themselves into a representative district, to 
continue for the term of ten years ; and such district shall 
have all the rights, in regard to representation, which woi^ld 
belong to a town containing the same number of inhabitants. 



8S Constitution of Massachusetts. 

The number of inhabitants which shall entitle a town to 
elect one representative, and the mean increasing number 
which shall entitle a town or city to elect more than one, 
and also the number by which the population of towns 
not entitled to a representative every year is to be divided, 
shall be increased, respectively, by one tenth of the num- 
bers above mentioned whenever the population of the 
Commonwealth shall have increased to seven hundred and 
seventy thousand, and for every additional increase of 
seventy thousand inhabitants, the same addition of one 
tenth shall be made, respectively, to the said numbers 
above mentioned. 

In the year of each decennial census, the governor and 
council shall, before the first day of September, apportion 
the number of representatives which each city, town, and 
representative district is entitled to elect, and ascertain how 
many years, within ten years, any town may elect a repre- 
sentative, which is not entitled to elect one every year; and 
the governor shall cause the same to be published forthwith. 

Nine councillors shall be annually chosen from among 
the people at large, on the first Wednesday of January, or 
as soon thereafter as may be, by the joint ballot of the sena- 
tors and representatives, assembled in one room, who shall, 
as soon as may be, in a like manner, fill up any vacancies 
that may happen in the council, by death, resignation, or 
otherwise. No person shall be elected a councillor who has 
not been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth for the term 
of five years immediately preceding his election; and not 
more than one councillor shall be chosen from any one sena- 
torial district in the Commonwealth. [See Amendments, 
Article XVI.] 

No possession of a freehold, or of any other estate, shall 
be required as a qualification for holding a seat in either 
branch of the general court, or in the executive council. 

Aet. XIV. In all elections of civil oflBcers by the people 
of this Commonwealth, whose election is provided for by the 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 89 

constitution, the person having the highest number of votea 
shall be deemed and declared to be elected. 

Abt. XY. The meeting for the choice of governor, 
lieutenant-governor, senators, and representatives, shall be 
held on the Tuesday next after the first Monday in 
November, annually; but in case of a failure to elect 
representatives on that day, a second meeting shall be 
holden for that purpose, on the fouith Monday of the 
same month of November. 

Akt. XYI. Eight councillors shall be annually choseo 
by the inhabitants of this Commonwealth, qualified to vote 
for governor. The election of councillors shall be deter- 
mined by the same rule that is required in the election of 
governor. The legislature, at its first session after this 
amendment shall have been adopted, and at its fii-st session 
after the next State census shall have been taken, and at its 
first session after each decennial State census thereafter- 
■wards, shall, divide the Commonwealth into eight districts 
of contiguous territory, each containing a number of in- 
habitants as nearly equal as practicable, without dividing 
any town, or ward of a city, and each entitled to elect one 
councillor: promded, however, that if, at any time, the 
constitution shall provide for the division of the Common- 
wealth into forty senatorial districts, then the legislature 
shall so arrange the councillor districts, that each district 
shall consist of five contiguous senatorial districts, as they 
shall be, from time to time, established by the legislature. 
No person shall be eligible to the oflice of councillor who 
has not been an inhabitant of the Commonwealth for the 
term of five years immediately preceding his election. The 
day and manner of the election, the retui-n of the votes, 
and the declaration of the said elections, shall be the same 
as are required in the election of governor. Whenever there 
shall be a failure to elect the full number of councillors, 
the vacancies shall be filled in the same manner as required 
for filling vacancies in the senate ; and vacancies occasioned 



90 Constitution of JIassachusetts, 

by death, removal from the State, or otherwise, shall be 
filled in like manner as soon as may be after such vacancies 
shall have happened. And that there may be no delay in 
the organization of the government on the first Wednesday 
of Januaiy, the governor, with at least five councillors for 
the time being, shall, as soon as maybe, examine the le- 
turned copies of the records for the election of govern >i, 
lieutenant-governor, and councillors; and ten days befoi-c 
the said first Wednesday in January, he shall issue his 
summons to such persons as appear to be chosen, to attend 
on that day to be qualified accordingly ; and the seci etary 
shall lay the returns before the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives on the said first Wednesday in January, to be 
by them examined ; and in case of the election of either 
of said officers, the choice shall be by them declared and 
published ; but in case there shall be no election of either 
of said officers, the legislature shall proceed to fill such 
vacancies in the manner provided in the constitution for 
the choice of such officers. 

AiiT. XVII. The secretary, treasurer and receiver- 
general, auditor, and attorney-general, shall be chosen 
annually, on the day in November prescribed for the choice 
of governor; and each person then chosen as such, duly 
qualified in other respects, shall hold his office for the 
term of one year from the third Wednesday in January 
next thereafter, and until another is chosen and qualified 
in his stead. The qualification of the voters, the manner of 
the election, the return of the votes, and the declaration 
of the election, shall be such as are required in the election 
of governor. In case of a failure to elect either of said 
officers on the day in November aforesaid, or in case of 
the decease, in the mean time, of the person elected as 
such, such officer shall be chosen on or before the third 
Wedn(isday in January next thereafter, from the two per- 
sons who had the highest number of votes for said offices 
on the day in November aforesaid, by joint ballot of th« 



Constitution of JlassacJmsetts. 91 

senators and representatives, in one room; and in case tlie 
aflSce of secretary, or treasurer and receiver-general, or 
auditor, or attorney-general, shall become vacant, from any 
cause, during an annual or special session of the general 
court, such vacancy shall in like manner be filled by choice 
from the people at large; but if such vacancy shall occur at 
any other time, it shall be supplied by the governor by ap- 
pointment, with the advice and consent of the council. 
The person so chosen or appointed, duly qualified in other 
respects, shall hold his oflQice until his successor is chosen 
and duly qualified in his stead. In case any person chosen 
or appointed to either of the oflQces aforesaid shall neglect, 
for the space of ten days after he could otherwise enter upon 
his duties, to qualify himself in all respects to enter upon 
the discharge of such duties, the office to which he has 
been elected or appointed shall be deemed vacant. No 
person shall be eligible to either of said offices unless he 
shall have been an inhabitant of this Commonwealth five 
years next preceding his election or appointment. 

Aet. XYin. All moneys raised by taxation in the towns 
and cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys 
which may be appropriated by the State for the support of 
common schools, shall be applied to, and expended in, no 
other schools than those which are conducted according to 
law, under the order and superintendence of the authorities 
of the town or city in which the money is to be expended ; 
and such moneys shall never be appropriated to any 
religious sect for the maintenance, exclusively, of its own 
schools. 

Art. XIX. The legislature shall prescribe, by general 
law, for the election of sheriffs, registers of probate, com- 
missioners of insolvency, and clerks of the courts, by the 
people of the several counties, and that district-attorneys 
shall be chosen by the people of the several districts, for 
such term of office as the legislature shall prescribe. 



92 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Abt. XX. No person shall have the right to vote, oi 
be eligible to office under the constitution of this Common- 
wealth, who shall not be able to read the constitution in the 
English language, and write his name: provided, however y 
that the provisions of this amendment shall not apply to 
any person prevented by a physical disability from com- 
plying with its requisitions, nor to any person who now 
has the right to vote, nor to any person who shall be sixty 
years of age or upwards at the time this amendment shall 
take effect. 

Art. XXI. A census of the legal voters of each city 
and town, on the first day of May, shall be taken and re- 
turned into the office of the secretary of the Common- 
wealth, on or before the last day of June, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven; and a census of 
the inhabitants of each city and town, in the year one thou- 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of every tenth year 
thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special eniuneration 
shall be made of the legal voters, and in each city said 
enumeration shall specify the nimiber of such legal voters 
aforesaid residing in each ward of such city. The enu- 
meration aforesaid shall determine the apportionment of 
representatives for the periods between the taking of the 
census. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hun- 
dred and forty members, which shall be apportioned 
by the legislature, at its first session after the return 
of each enumeration as aforesaid, to the several counties 
of the Commonwealth, equally as near as may be, ac- 
cording to their relative number of legal voters, as as- 
certained by the next preceding special enumeration; and 
the town of Cohasset, in the county of Norfolk, shall, 
for this purpose, as well in the formation of districts, 
as hereinafter provided, be considered a part of the 
county of Plymouth; and it shall be the duty of the 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 93 

secretary of tlie Commonwealth, to certify, as soon as may 
be after it is determined by the legislature, the number of 
representatives to which each county shall be entitled, to 
the board authorized to divide each county into representa- 
tive districts. The mayor and aldermen of the city of 
Boston, the county commissioners of other counties than 
Suffolk, — or in lieu of the mayor and aldermen of the city 
of Boston, or of the county commissioners in each county 
other than Suffolk, such board of special commissioners 
in each county to be elected by the people of the county, 
or of the towns therein, as may for that purpose be pro- 
vided by law, shall, on the first Tuesday of August next 
after each assignment of representatives to each county, 
assemble at a shire town of their respective counties, and 
proceed, as soon as may be, to divide the same into repre- 
sentative districts of contiguous territory, so as to appor- 
tion the representation assigned to each county equally, as 
nearly as may be, according to the relative number of legal 
voters in the several districts of each county; and such 
districts shall be so formed that no town or ward of a city 
shall be divided therefor, nor shall any district be made 
which shall be entitled to elect more than three representa- 
tives. Every representative, for one year at least next pre- 
ceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of the 
district for which he is chosen, and shall cease to represent 
such district when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the 
Commonwealth. The districts in each county shall b*; 
numbered by the board creating the same, and a descrip- 
tion of each, with the numbers thereof, and the number 
of legal voters therein, shall be returned by the board, to 
the secretary of the Commonwealth, the county treasurer 
of each county, and to the clerk of every town in each dis- 
trict, to be filed and kept in their respective offices. The 
manner of calling and conducting the meetings for the 
choice of representatives, and of ascertaining their elec- 
tion, shall be prescribed by law. Not less than one hun- 
dred members of the house of representative^ shall con- 



94 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

stitute a quoriun for doing business ; but a less number may 
organize temporarily, adjourn from day to day, and compel 
the attendance of absent members. 

KxiT. XXII. A census of tlie legal voters of each city 
and tOAvn, on the first day of May, shall be taken and re- 
turned into the oflBice of the secretary of the Common- 
weallli, on or before the last day of June, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven; and a census of 
the inhabitants of each city and town, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of every tenth 
year thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special enu- 
meration shall be made of the legal voters, and in each 
city said enumeration shall specify the number of such 
legal voters aforesaid, residing in each ward of such city. 
The enumeration aforesaid shall determine the apportion- 
ment of senators for the periods between the taldng of the 
census. The senate shall consist of forty members. The 
general court shall, at its first session after each next pre- 
ceding special enumeration, divide the Commonwealth into 
forty districts of adjacent territory, each district to con- 
tain, as nearly as may be, an equal number of legal voters, 
according to the enumeration aforesaid : promded, however, 
that no town or ward of a city sliall be divided therefor; 
and such districts shall be fonned, as nearly as may be, 
without uniting two counties, or parts of two or more 
counties, into one district. Each district shall elect one 
senator, who shall have been an inhabitant of this Com- 
monwealth five years at least immediately preceding his 
election, and at the time of his election shall be an inhab- 
itant of the district for which he is chosen; and he shall 
ceas- to represent such senatorial district when he shall 
cease to be an inhabitant of the Commonwealth. Xot less 
than sixteen senators shall constitute a quorum for doing 
business; but a less number may organize temporarily, 
adjourn from day to day, and compel the attendance oi 
absent members. 



Constitution of Ilassachusetts, 95 

Art. XXIII. No person of foreign birth shall be enti- 
tled to vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall have 
resided within the jurisdiction of the United States for two 
years subsequent to his naturalization, and shall be other- 
wise qualified, according to the constitution and laws of this 
Commonwealth: provided, that this amendment shall not 
affect the rights which any person of foreign birth possessed 
at the time of the adoption thereof: and provided, further, 
that it shall not affect the rights of any child of a citizen of 
the United States, born during the temporary absence of the 
parent therefrom. [See Amendments, Article XXYL] 

AuT XXIY. Any vacancy in the senate shall be filled by 
election by the people of the unrepresented district, upon 
the order of a majority of senators elected. 

Art. XXY. In case of a vacancy in the council, from a 
failure of election, or other cause, the senate and house of 
representatives shall, by concurrent vote, choose some eli- 
gible person from the people of the district wherein such 
vacancy occurs, to fill that ofiice. If such vacancy shall 
happen when the legislature is not in session, the governor, 
with the advice and consent of the council, may fill the same 
by appointment of some eligible person. 

Art. XXVI. The twenty-third article of the articles of 
amendment of the constitution of this Commonwealth, which 
is as follows, to wit: "No person of foreign birth shall ha 
entitled to vote, or shall be eligible to office, unless he sli;;!l 
have resided within the jurisdiction of the United States for 
two years subsequent to his naturalization, and shall Ite 
otherwise qualified, according to the constitution and laws 
of this Commonwealth : prouitZeri, that this amendment shall 
not affect the rights which any person of foreigh birth pos- 
sessed at the time of the adoption thereof: and provided, 
further, that it shall not affect the rights of any child of a 



96 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

citizen of the United States, born during the temporary 
absence of the parent therefrom," is hereby wholly an- 
nulled. 

Akt. XXVII. So much of article two of chapter six of 
the constitution of this Commonwealth as relates to persons 
holding the office of president, professor or instructor of 
Harvard College, is hereby annulled. 

[Note. — Soon after the Declaration of Independence, steps were taken 
in Massachusetts towards framing a Constitution, or Form of Govern- 
ment. The Council and House of Representatives, or the General Court 
of 1777-8, in accordance with a recommendation of the General Court, of 
the previous year, met together as a Convention, and adopted a form 
of Constitution '« for the State of Massachusetts Bay," which was sub- 
mitted to the people, and by them rejected. This attempt to form a Con- 
stitution having proved unsuccessful, the General Court, on the 20th of 
February, 1779, passed a Resolve calling upon the qualified voters to give 
in their votes upon the questions — Wliether they chose to have anew 
Constitution or Form of Government made, and, Whether they will em- 
power their representatives to vote for calling a State Convention for that 
purpose. A large majority of the inhabitants having voted in the affirma- 
tive to both these questions, the General Court, on the 17th of June, 1779, 
passed a Resolve calling upon the inhabitants to meet and choose delegates 
to a Constitutional Convention, to be held at Cambridge, on the 1st of 
September, 1779. The Convention met at time and place appointed, and 
organized by choosing James Bowdoin, President, and Samuel Barrett, 
Secretary. On the 11th of November the Convention adjourned, to meet 
at the Representatives' Chamber, in Boston, January 5th, 1780. On the 
2d of March, of the same year, a form of Constitution having been agreed 
upon, a Resolve was passed by which the same was submitted to the 
people, and the Convention adjourned to meet at the Brattle Street 
Church, in Boston, June the 7th. At that time and place, the .Conven- 
tion again met, and appointed a Committee to examine the returns of 
votes from the several towns. On the 14th of June the Committee 
reported, and on the 15th, the Convention resolved, " That the people of 
the State of Massachusetts Bay have accepted the Constitution as it 
8tands, in the printed form submitted to their revision." A Resolve 
providing for carrying the new Constitution into effect was passed; and 
the Convention then, on the 16th of June, 1780, was finally dissolved. In 
accordance with the Resolves referred to, elections immediately took 
place in the several towns ; and the first General Court of the Common- 
wealth OF Massachusetts met at the State House, in Boston, on 
Wednesday, October 25th, 178Q. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 97 



The Constitution contained a provision providing for taking, in 1795, 
the sense of the people as to the expediency or necessity of revising the 
original instrument. But no such revision was deemed necessary at that 
time. On the 16th of June, 1820, an Act was passed by the General 
Court, calling upon the people to meet in their several towns, and give in 
their votes upon the question, " Is it expedient that Delegates should be 
chosen to meet in Convention for the purpose of revising or altering the 
Constitution of Government of this Commonwealth? " A large majority 
of the people of the State having voted in favor of revision, the Governor 
issued a proclamation announcing the fact, and calling upon the people 
to vote, in accordance with the provisions of the aforesaid Act, for dele- 
gates to the proposed Convention. The delegates met at the State House, 
in Boston, November 15, 1820, and organized by choosing John Adams, 
President, and Benjamin Pollard, Secretarj'. Mr. Adams, however, de- 
clined the appointment, and Isaac Parker was chosen in his stead. On 
the 9th of January, 1821, the Convention agreed to fourteen Articles of 
Amendment, and after passing a Resolve providing for submitting the 
same to the people, and appointing a committee to meet to count the 
votes upon the subject, was dissolved. The people voted on Monday, 
April 19, 1821, and the Committee of the Convention met at the State 
House to count the votes, on "Wednesday, May 24th. They made their 
return to the General Court; and at the request of the latter the Governor 
issued his proclamation on the 5th of June, 1821, announcing that nine of 
the fourteen Articles of Amendments had been adopted. These articles 
are numbered in the preceding pages from one to nine, inclusive. 

The tenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the political years 1829-30, and 1830-31, and was 
approved and ratified by the people May 11th, 1831. 

The eleventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the political years 1832 and 1833, and was approved 
and ratified by the people November 11th, 1833. 

The twelfth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions ^f the years 1835 and 1836, and was approved and 
ratified by the people November 14th, 1836. 

The thirteenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1839 and 1840, and was approved 
and ratified by the people April 6th, 1840. 

The General Court of the year 1851 passed an Act calling a third Con- 
vention to revise the Constitution. The Act was submitted to the people, 
and a majority voted against the proposed Convention. In 1852, on the 
7th of May, another Act was passed calling upon the people to vote upon 
the question of calling a Constitutional Convention. A majority of the 
people having voted in favor of the proposed Convention, election for 
delegates thereto took place in March, 1853. The Convention met in the 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 



State House, in Boston, on tlie 4th day of May, 1853, and organized by 
choosing Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., President, and 'William S. Robinson 
and James T. Robinson, Secretaries. On the 1st of August, this Con- 
vention agreed to a form of Constitution, and on the same day was dis- 
solved, after having provided for submiting the same to the people, and 
appointed a committee to meet to count the votes, and to make a return 
thereof to the General Court. The Committee met at the time and 
place agreed upon, and found that the proposed Constitution had been 
rejected. 

The fourteenth, fifteenth^ sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nine- 
teenth Articles of Amendment were adopted by the General Court dur- 
ing the sessions of 1854 and 1855, and were approved and ratified by the 
people May 23, 1855. 

The twentieth, twenty-first, and twenty-second Articles of Amendment 
were adopted by the General Court of 1856 and 1857, and were approved 
and ratified by the people May 1st, 1857. 

The twenty-third Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court of 1858 and 1859, and was approved and ratified by the people 
May 9th, 1859. 

The twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth Articles of Amendment were 
adopted by the General Court of 1859 and 1860, and were approved and 
ratified by the people May 17th, 1860. 

The twenty-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court of 1862 and 1863, and was approved and ratified April 6th, 1863. 

The ttcenty-seventh Article was adopted by the legislatures of the 
political years 1876 and 1877, and was approved and ratified by the 
people on the 6th day of November, 1877.] 



Elections for Senators in Congress, 99 



CHAPTEB CCXLV. 

An Act to regulate the Times and Manner of holding 
Elections for Senators in Congress. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Bepresentatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 
That the legislature of each state which shall be chosen 
next preceding the expiration of the time for which any 
senator was elected to represent said State in Congress 
shall, on the second Tuesday after the meeting and organ- 
ization thereof, proceed to elect a senator in Congress, in 
the place of such senator so going out of office, in the fol- 
lowing manner: Each house shall openly, by a viva voce 
vote of each member present, name one person for senator 
in Congress from said state, and the name of the person so 
voted for, who shall have a majority of the whole number 
of votes cast in each house, shall be entered on the journal 
of each house by the clerk or secretary thereof ; but if either 
house shall fail to give such majority to any person on said 
day, that fact siiall be entered on the journal. At twelve 
o'clock, meridian, on the day following that on which pro- 
ceedings are required to take place, as aforesaid, the mem- 
bers of the two houses shall convene in joint assembly, and 
the journal of each house shall then be read, and if the 
same person shall have received a majority of all the votes 
in each house,. such person shall be declared duly elected 
seiiator to represent said state in the Congress of the United 
States; but if the same person shall not have received a 
majority of the votes in each house, or if either house shall 
bave failed to take proceedings as required by this act, the 
joint assembly shall then proceed to choose, by a viva mre 
vote of each member present, a person for the piirjose 
aforesaid, and the person having a majority of all the \ ou-s 



100 Elections for Senators in Conqress. 

of the said joint assembly, a majority of all the members 
elected to both houses being present and voting, shall be 
declared duly elected ; and in case no person shall receive 
such majority on the first day, the joint assembly shall 
meet at twelve o'clock, meridian, of each succeeding day 
during the session of the legislature, and take at least one 
vote, until a senator shall be elected. 

Sect. 2. And he it further enacted, That whenever, on 
the meeting of the legislature of any State, a vacancy shall 
exist in the representation of such State in the senate of 
the United States, said legislature shall proceed, on the 
second Tuesday after the commencement and organization 
of its session, to elect a person to fill such vacancy, in the 
manner hereinbefore provided for the election of a senator 
for a full term ; and if a vacancy shall happen during the 
session of the legislature, then on the second Tuesday after 
the legislature shall have been organized, and shall have 
notice of such vacancy. 

Sect. 3. And he it further enacted, That it shall be the 
duty of the governor of the State from which any senator 
shall have been chosen as aforesaid, to certify his election, 
under the seal of the State, to the president of the senate of 
the United States, which certificate shall be countersigned 
by the secretary of state of the State. Approved July 25, 
1866. 



STATISTICS. 



HISTORICAL, STATE, COUNTY, DISTRICT, POST-OFFICE, 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 



102 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts, 



rO r^ 


03 






QJ C 


c 






fe ^- 


.2 






Ph - 


]-+3 






CD W 


'^ 






^5 


-i 














o 


c3 






CO H 








OO H 


CO 








.2 






o ^ 


c! 






tr ^-^ 


^ 






S ^ 






\6 


(/} 


^ 






^i 


a 




1H 


5 




ef 


O O 








•4H 


rt 




1-5 


O t>i 


a 






^ '^ 




^ 


C^ <-^ 






« 
o 


03 C3 


c3 




g 


?i 


«— 1 




M 


c5 




>^ 


^1 


1 

0) 






a^ 




f-p 


8 


o „-, 




ci 


*l 


"S 


fe 


H 


rrt 


OT 


rH 


hq 




S 

.-;:! 


3 


<< 


o P>» 


Cli 


C^ 


H 


« ^ 


s 


pi 




<» -§ 


o 


_?Q 












e 


m 
2 


H g 




:2 




ho -^ 


CO 


fcJD 






1—1 






o o 


.s 


o 




II 


1 


+3 




<1^ -, 




c3 




H5 


_o 


9. 












,jd 


i 






rH 








o 


o 

Ceo 






2 










it 






© 

n 


j 


« 




f-l © 






S 


2 


& 


2 


Eg 


1" 

©,a 






© 

S 




1 




€g 


-5 






^ § 


1 


1^ 

o 

1 


1 

4^" 






/3 


CO 



© 


If 


1 


1 


J 


^ ill 


-(J <3J 


+3 

C! 


^ 


© 




O 


-M OJ 













% 


o 
& 




CrO 




P3 


11 

^ 


4^ 
© 


1 


o 


^■| 


'o 


S 
^ 




1 


i 


11 


ll 




.9 


©" 

a 


1^ 


© 




fl 


= -c 


Ct cl 


'0 
2 


c3 


C^'^ 


la 




1 


Is 


If 


+3 


.§ 


.2 


(3 




►5 


1^ 

M 


r- © 
1— 1 


^ 

H 


^ 
5 


■§3 




o 


1 


1 


I— 


g 


1 


i 


~i 






I"* 




rH 


T-^ 


rH 


rH 


CO 


cT 


rn" 


C^ 


Cf 


^-^ 


rjT 


fi 1 




rH 


rH 


•<-<> 






rH 


-4^ 




© 


© 


© 


© 


• 


u 




,Q 


CI 


c 


PI 




ft 


M 


M 




13 

1-5 


;3 




^ 


i 


; 


* 






• 


; 


' 


o • 
















H 



















© 


. 


• 


. 


. 


• 


. 


-0 

03 


1 

OS 


u 


g 




g 


4J 


rC 


1 




1 


.2 




13 

1 


.2 




C3 


u 


A 


© 


c3 


^ 


d 




p 


w 


Q 


« 


P^ 


£ 


w 



Date of Incoi'poratiorij Etc. 



103 



goo 

!^ « 9 

oj ce « 



P. PI =3 ^ 

«3 2 £ ^: 



gee 



M 03 

^ s s 






'^S 






^p^ Jh C3 



2 e 



CO ^ -N 



xn 



hI 



Oj'-l 

P-I a 

6 - 

® ^ 
CO 



I 

a> o §^ 
S c3 « 



c3 ^(M 



<x> § 



Is 



^^•r -?, 









^S^"! 



c3 o a 






O oj 



Co 

c3 ? 






0.2 
£.22 

Pi ^• 



2 u 



O .5 



^ ^ 






4J 

Ph 



bS 












a o 




rt a. 




•^ S 




«M a 




o a 








>> '" 




c3 « 




-=1 "5 




t'i 




«C •;? 




«« 




5 *^' 








i^ 




"i 1 




f^ a 












ll 




"S >, 




5« 




«M « 




O ". 




u 




o <v 




a > 








53 






a 


^1 


s. 


*^ o 


01 


^1 

O 3 


1 


■s f=^'^ 


N 


§ 


&i 


£ 


O *J 




o a 


^ 




a 


§ b 


1 




'in 


-3 o 


5 


o - 




s § 


'^ 


^ ^ 


's 


Sf5 


i 


•S-S 


> 


^ 2 


£ 


^-g 


1 


<M bl 




o ^ 


ti 


-u y 


t~ 


O S 




<5 -a 


2 


e * 




C3 o 


a 


&| 


1 


* tf 


1 


t- 


3 



104 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 






- <D 



P.O. 






TO •'-' 



o ® 



|3 



c3 O 






r- '^ 

I— .•— ' D 

c3 fC 



;^p 



< b I 

S SnrO 

C Ol- 

^^ rf\ t-^■r-^ 



JjOO ^ 






- 2 tH* '-• 





T. 

a 

c3 


1 


'tS 


"cS 




< 


Q 


^2 




o 




"o 


■tj 


C'^ 


^ 


-d 


cS ® 


-«^ 


® 


.^-ra 


o 


^ 


a^ 


fl 


S 


§ o 


bX) 


S 


r- -M 


.a 


cS 


^-^ 


'>. 


M 


^ <0 




o 


« X 




CO 


o S 


'o 


TJ 




43 


d 


^•1 


1 


-3 


^ o 


c« 


4i 


-^ 


S 


^ 


- CO 

5^ S o 


O 


a 




3 




o: ^ D 


o . 






t^^cc 


Sol 


c« 


r^% 


0(M 


& • . 


CS-*, 




a1^ 




1^ 


2^^ 


-sS 


^ 


N 


<1 




1-1 rl IM 

o qj rj 

O P^ i-s 



5S 



bo 



a 'S s 
<1 <1 w 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



105 



Boundary line between 
6, 1790. Parts of Sheffield 
[)0, and Feb. 10,1824; and 
! 17, 1817. Boundary line 
j9. See Mt. Washington. 


•sj 




-H 








■&I8 


3| 




^2 


15 
•=■3 


1 

i 

a 

1 








ashington, north-easte 
3pelands, so called), 1 
illiams Grant. Seeiew 


ft 
11 




is 

II 


ffield. 
.Feb. 
22, 17' 
, June 
ab. 18( 


w 








2 


1 






i 


^0 


rom lands lying west of She 
Egreniont and Alford estab 
annexed to Egreniont, Feb. 
part of Mount Wasliington 
between it and Sheflield est 


rom Bernardstone's (Barna: 
Bullock's Grant (unincorpo 
burg annexed to Florida, M 


2 

.a 

tn 

o 


i 

6 




1 



>> 


1 

a 

bXJ 

.s 

s 

1 


rom the south-westerly part 
part of Great Barrington \ 
Glass Works Grant, and par 


f§1 

Is" 
s 

a 


© 
a 

1 

© 

© 
© 

© 


art of Tyringhatn. Part of 
Monterey, May 24, 1851. P 
Apr. 24, 1875. 


h 


^ 




52; 


>^ 


521 


fe 


W 




Ph 




^ 




^ 
















8 


o 




CO 


£S 





0" 


Ef 


^" 




i 


t-. 






t- 


t- 






!>• 


t- 




r-t 


T-i 




l-< 




lH 


iH 


T-i 








a 






0) 




0) 


r-T 
© 




f^ 






,Q 


a 




a 


a 


a 


^ 


,6 




a 


J^ 


s 




s 


3 




a 





© 




f^ 


^ 




H^ 


•-J 


^ 


1-5 





Pq 




<1 


• 


• 




1 


• 


• 


■a 




• 




• 


• 


• 




.p-i 


• 


• 


tf 




• 




• 


1 
1 


s 
s 




PQ 




,t4 


® 

a 


1 

1^ 


2 


M 









14 



106 Counties and Toicns of Massachusetts. 




<0 m 



lis 

•s«| 

fl 7-1 W 

'ei <!) IS 



eg 2 
^^2 



H 



^< 

CO <» 

T-l <D 

oD n, • 



M C O 
0) * O) 

III 

, o .g 

2 ^^ 



y^ '-' tL -^ 

«M - C« CO 

-1^ 00 „ . o 



(-1 cAh pig 



p< ^ CC g ^H 



fcX) 

H 



CO o 
t— 1— I 

00 00 



(S <^ 



<1 1-5 






f^ ^ 






I— ( 

»-5 



^ ■ 


• 


1 




+3 


<j 


s 


^ 







^ 


t2i 



•a 

o 

o 



O "43 
^ O 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 107 



^i 111 1". §- ^>. 



<. > ^"^ . "wi ,M ^^^i;3 

^ r; .c lo C bJD >;^ J) 



-G5rrt"S"-d^ c«;3 -jgoju ^-- 

SCCC 3J02 ^O r§fl ^-^ 

I i.f. ||il 1 ^1 II II 

S!,i4 '^•StJrtS_j"a) oJh^ Or^ ^'^^ 

r-J|irCtHr^^>i®® ^ 3^0 ^^^ 



S 



fl "^^ ...-is SJ^ 



f ^^a nil I |ii ill ^1 ": 



02 M 






~ 














^ 


^ 


^ 


b- 


O 


S*^ 


S^ 


Sf 


O 


?? 


M 


§ 


^ 


t— 


t- 


L-- 


t- 


t- 




b- 




t- 


t- 


tH 








iH 


iH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


1-1 






















rir 


(M 


!M 


o 


05 


S" 


if 


sC 


(£ 


1-4 


►-5 


t-4 




5^ 




1 


I 

1-5 


0. 
1-5 




< 



1 I 1 2 ? ^ t 



-^ ^S b 



b 5fl r^ « -S 



o 






108 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 







+3 ^ 1 


■1-3 * 


s 






(DO 


s^ 






O (D r-l 












in 
5| 


ID 

4> e 




>, 


.^^ 




u 


land ai 
Stockbi 
ee Rich 


II 


l'^ 




2 


■^ c3 


r^ C« 




M 


Is 


O g 




i 

o 


O o 


ii 






to 


ot" 


fl OJ 


m 




o 

i 


bridge. 
2, 1793. 
, Feb. 1 


O <A 

S o 






"A 


f'i^ 


- ^ 






C^'CJ 






O 




^5 
IS 








k1 






West p 
Stock 
West 
hridgi. 








O 






^ 


^ 


_^ 






■^ 


»o" 


T-T 




c 


b- 


CO 


b- 




o 


t- 


l- 


t- 




tw '+3 


T-\ 




1-1 




O c3 




^ 






« O 


CO 


IM 


(N" 




•^ 8 


r^ 




>» 




c 


S 


H^ 


9 
1-5 






1 ■ 


. 


. 








o 


. 




< 


o 


■♦J 






3 




;-( 




a 

o 


1 


a 






^ 


% 


^ 



■^ 




a a . 


<D 


c3 o s 


PQ 


c = i 


o 


3 

1 




D 
g 




ID 

! 


<D 


<*-r 


^ 


«■='- 


o 




■s 


1 


SbS, 






55 9 


a 


t>i - 


r^CM C3 


<D 


f-00 




> 


CSl-H 


C W r-l 


rt 


■^ ^ 






•mSS 


c6 


S^ =3 


oS 


©^ 






IS 

5S 




2cPR 




1^ 


^ 


^ 


P^ 








s 


sh" 


^^ 






t- 


tH 


T-H 




CO 


cT 


00 


rQ 


4^ 


i 


® 


o 


fR 


O 


< 


• 


rd 


• 


• 


3 


• 


4^ 


o 






§ 


>. 




,2 


03 


o 


4^ 


s 


<1 


<^ 


pq 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



109 









^ 13 
o 



o O^ 












■Mo • ^ "^ 
j> 00 C3 ^ C5 



^1 






■2 o 



<D 



<» '^ 



«^ „ - ^ 

2 03 o o 2 

2-^gI^^ 



a^.^^S 5 .3 ^ 



02 



O ;5 

fg03 
CO 

^ 30 

^ 03 

O -J 



^ > 

IK O 



-^^ ® OJ OS 

03 -.r; ^ 
-r i^-g 03 _^ 

S 0<1 03| 

^^ • ^ s 

-^2 ri 

^ 1^ '-I :!4r^ 

(X) -^^ 

II §1.3 

'^'^^ s 



l]T5' 



r— IK O ^ Cj Ft, 






g o <^ . • 

03 CS r^i* 

^ o5 3^1: 

cs ^ c 0; 



C- 33 =3 
H 



03 



„ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




^ 




i 


1-1 


00 


i 


00 










tH 


tH 




tH 




T^ 


tH 




















CO 





CO 




<M 


CO 




CO 




CO 




IM 


CM 


c^ 




(M 


0) 

c 





1-5 


1 




03 


>» 

S 
^ 


< 



110 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 





hnett, or 

Bedford, 

accepted 

Part of 






between 
w tucket, 
ver, was 


1 

+3 




ft 
o 




o 


fcX) 

S . 




- Ob-' 5 
a) += •rti ' 




t 
1 




^ 
^ 
+= 








1 


1? 


>i 




^^^ 


"^ 




+3 




is 

«*^ rH 


% 
a 




i 

T-l 


1 
1 


Si-rS-d 


1 


'I 


1^ 


J§ 


m|^1 


(D 




2 


^ 


fl 


1 


^1 


c3 ^ 


o 




^ 


?2- 

C <D C3 


H 


o 


o 

Co 

i| 

1^ 


^ 
® 


^"! 


1 
'A 

1 




<1 

d 

'TIS 


d 
o 

1 
•s 


rii( t» C« O 


o 

B 


o 


II 

rC 


11 


o 




o 


S25 

o ^ © 
1^^ 


a; 


2 


M 


^3 

so 


M 




W 




"A 


Ph 






p; 








^ 


^ 






^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




t-^ 












i-T 




(^^ 


s 


d 


00 




T-H 








CO 


O 


rH 


o 


t- 




t- 








t- 


CO 




<H « 


rH 




iH 


■r-{ 






iH 


rH 


rH 


rH 


O g 


„ 






^ 






^ 




^ 


^ 


fl o 


^ 




s 


T-l 






(N 


TdT 


^ 


g 


,Q 






U 






U 




^ 


rQ 


rt 


g 


• 


i-s 






ft 
<1 


1-5 


r® 
fe 




» 
^ 






















o 








kT 
















1 




. 


g. 






. 




. 


. 




03 












1=1 
>> 


^ 


M 


+3 


5 


w 
^ 




o 








1 


a 
^ 
S 


2 




.^ 




o 


55 






c3 


■aJ 


o 




!zi 




^ 


Ri 






Ph 


P^ 


m 


c» 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



Ill 



ce 4) 



r. ^ 






O 0) O § 






C cS 5 b2i 



^ 30 CO 

i fl © 
O '^ o 

-; « 



o fcX)^t4_ ;:: o ^ ^ c3 



<D 00 



^ I 

CO Fi 




112 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 




o ^ 

S S 03 






1151 

►1 ^ c c 

-5 2^^ C3 



g ^ o ^ 






ce- 



>5 t» 



CA.. j;, 



oQ -e 'i- .22 



c o r" g 



Ph C 






© ® © 
OS© 

S o2 

53 '^ 
cs^ <« 

CM 'do 

bC'd o fl 

^^' S S 

^^t o 












COM «j Ec2l5<'~^ 



> (dCS 



n 

o_: ® 
•So 



S a^-.s 






©Q ® c: o rn e8 

2 .S oT =e g ^ o 



CO »o 
CO t^ 

CO C£) 



^ 


. 


o 




H 




o 


, 


< 


b 


m 


s 




rQ 


(ri 








u 


a 




<^ 



o 'd 

I - 

fl o 



^ 'o 



Date of Incorporation, Etc. 113 






£ fl 



r.'^ Si^ a § ^ o 



>s 






k and Traga 
26,1871; Ac 
pr. 28, 1873, 




S^^ 


^ 


'^s>; 





l.,^-3 


M 

«*-! 


^Sca 


+3 




. -' 



5^3.!:* '^ ««' 






tJD V 


.1 




^-5 


^ 




aji-5 


T* 




^-1 " 


n'^ 








i! 


M S 


?^ 


Cs 






pS 


c; 




03 




J/J 


t>1 




4) 









^ 





n 


^ 


P^ 


-g 


^ 



— 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




^ 













c<r 


lO" 


Ttl t- 


fc: 


00 


§0 





s 


^ 


S 


2 ^ 


CO 




r-( 


i-( 


1-i 


T-l 


iH 


iH 


r-l tH 


rH 


CO 


?f 


g^"^ 


00" 


r-T 


r 


« tT 


I*" 


i 


^ 


>^ 


u 


H5 




fci ^^ 


> 




e3 


C3 




;3 Ph 





S 


-§" 


g 


^ 




< <1 


J?; 



d 


, 


, 


, 


. 


. . 


* 


^ 


S 


'd 


r^ 


^_, 


<D 







^ 


!=l 


2 
1 


"-H 


_ 











e3 

1 




,C3 

> 

1 


2 S 
^5 





15 



114 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts, 





782. 
een 
een 


















h 




n.B^ 














n^rH 

d ^ 

^0 




^ 




co" © "S 










53 






^ 


i 












i 
4 




0^ 

8^ 






& 

•a 
a 

§ 

i 

"A 
"S 

to 

a 

c3 

,q 

o 


ft ^^-^ 
c«fqcM ® 

d^ .0 

^^^^§ 






d 


1 

-d 

i 


1 

1 
1 
1 

«d 

GO 




cepq 
d 

^ 


'd 


'd 

<o 

d 

d 

eg 


!^ 








rd 


02 

1 
1 


a" 

02 


1 


d 

d 

a 




d| 
^.d 


d 

i 

g 

m 


rH 

II 






i 

^ 
'^ 
g 


C3 




1 


a 

p 





d 

hH 


H 




CC 


^^ 


^ 


Ph 


^ 


m 




Pm 


.2 


t— 


1 


i 


0^ 




g 


i 


1 




1 


1 

1 1 


rH 




rH 

of 


tH 


rH 
00" 


^' 


rH 


rH 

0" 






« 8 


t>» 


>. 


>i 


;4 


d 


g 


U 


^ 




d 


a 


1 


ce 


c« 


Ph 


s 


c3 






M 


^ 


^ 


<1 


Q 


^^ 


^ 


^ 




i 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


■ • 


• 




-g 


Q 


• 


^1 


'd 


• 


• 




• 


• 









d 


1 
1 


c3 
1 


5r! 


d 


d 



d 

as 

rd 


1 




d 




b»3 




1:3 


a> 


QJ 




c3 


0) 




O) 




^S^ 


^ 


^ 


s 


^ 


s 


!zi 


!2i 




(Z5 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



115 



i 

2 
1 






















il 












ll 








THh3 


^ 








'^^'"^ 




^ 2 


s o • 










1 


-2 












dl 












V. 












S^ 


5|i 










IZl 


i 








^ .1 




2 










i 


CO 

<]3 
O 


o 

■s 












d 
fl 

CS 

i 


III 

^.2 


'§ 






Ah 
eg 


"d 


Ah 






ss 


2 i i| 




43 

1 

1 

Ph 


III 




^ 




>, 


S 

-s 


i 

•s 

Is 

r 


i 

1 

1 


1 
§ 

c3 


•s 

■1 

4) 


1 
m 

u 
o 


ill 


i 

o 

1 


1 

in 

m 
1 

l5 


<D 

a 

a? 

u 

o 

a 
o 


O 

1 

C3 

CO 

1 


2 

1 

o 

C3 


OJ 


Ah 


M 


O 


Ah 


W. 


H 


^ 


W 


a3 


Ah 






^ 


^ 




















lO" 


lO^ 


cT 


cT 


cT 


cT 


icT 


icT 


cq" 


o" 


CO 


(^ 


d 




iH 














lO 


IC 


2 




l-H 


tH 


iH 


T-l 


tH 


1— 1 


CO 
1—1 


tH 


00 
tH 


s 


T— 1 


00 
1—1 




























«> 


oo" 


fc 


■^ 


^"^ 


t-^ 


t-^ 


oo" 


i-T 


oo" 


o 


rjT 


oo" 




iH 


c^ 






tH 


iH 


<N 


r-l 


tH 


tH 


tH 


1 


>5 






1-5 


1 


1 


^ 
^ 


1 


o 




H3 




03 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


>> 


. 


1 


t>> 


u 
o 


^ 


• 


^ 


M 


1 


if 

o 

o 


% 


1 


1 
1 


S 

« 


1 


O 


a 
« 




:3 
S 


1 


3 

1 


^ 
^ 




o 


-d 

s 

^ 



116 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 







^ 


^^ 


s 






-Sg'l 


o 








<1 




5~ 






1^1 


1 






S 


< 


:2 






§ 


xO 






1 


1 






III 




If 






^ 


o 


c^ 






% s • 


ai 


^ s 


h 




0) 


S 








cC © '-' 


XJl 




1 

1 

a 
a 

o 

aT 

i 






pq 

o 
o 


'! 

o 

1 

<33 

1 

O 

o 

03 
1 






55 -^S 

111 

. o a 

OJ -d 


,i4 

a 

o 

o . 

11 

si' 

P-l-O 


^^ 

1 ^ 

cCco 
oo 

4i'g 


1 


1 

a 
W 


IS'-' 


li 


§ 

® 

aj 






1— I 






pR 


:: 


S 


^ 


o 


c» 


w 














_^ 










^"^ 


c<r 


05 


»o" 


1 




i>r 


c-T 


00 


c 


o 


t- 


o 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■^ •■§ 








^ 




^ 


1- 


oo 


2 S 


i-T 


o 


•*" 


r-T 




o" 


co" 


•* 


t-^ 


rt & 


(M 




iH 


(n 




CO 


rH 


(M 


1-1 


ft ?. 


03 






<D 




<D 


O 






1— 1 y 




1 


ft 


4 


, 


^5 




^ 
^ 


< 





• 


d 


• 


43 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


^ 




o 




a 












CO 


;d 


4^ 




o 

a 
1 






t.. 


2 






15 

,13 


^ 


c3 


!3 


d 
1 




ca 


be 
.9 




■5 


<o 


^ 


r=5 


O 


'o 


o 


Ol 






<1 


m 


w 


o 


tS] 


U 


o 


ft 


w 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 117 

s2 . I ^J «^ 



PI 9 



'5 o" ^ C 






So 'S -^- -« ^ sl"^ -^ 

Du+a _3-<»»d 4j ^ ^cU(r)«4-iC~ 

%'^ % % ^ I -^ I ^i . 1^1 i:i 

!5i S ? S 1 1 ^ 2 ll f 1?^ i^^.- 

la^ ^ I 5 ^ 2 a 5 21 I III -ll^ 

§Og I ^ I ^ ^ 2 I ^a. 'g ^io ^-^^^ 



lo <o 2 <o '^ ^ :i 4)® 0) 



cd&? ■Sd®^'5 cd® 



118 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 





2 








fl 


^•3 




r^ 








C3 


© C3 


J 
o 


a 




Q^ 




© 

11 

"Sg 

^1 


ll 

2S§ 




53 
2I 




1 




II 

^1 


B 


o 






'^ 




g^ 


•S.3rf 


1 


11 


s 




1- 


s;2 




= 

■si 

13 


1 






^1- 


© 


© 
© 


C3 


^1 




■S 


^i 


Xil 


02 




hj .% 




fH " 






P 


© c3 


^Mr-l 5R 


® 


1^ 


d 
^ 


2 
'© 


eg 





000 ® 




3 


i 


1 


«2^ 

1" 






I25 


P^ 


^ 


P^ 


P4 


;z5 




otT 


^ 


rjn" 


c<:r 


r-T 


T-T 


s 


CO 


CO 


rH 


CO 


00 


t- 


.2 


t- 


t; 


t- 


ir 


$3 


t:; 


•s 1 


^ 




iH 


tH 


r-K 






T-T 


8 


S^ 




« 


^^ 


•^ s 


(» 


<D 


i 


© 


^ 


M 
cu 


■^ 


1-5 


^^ 


"A 


pR 


^ 


<1 
















O 














H 

















• 


>> 


tS 


• 


• 


• 




g 


i 


-id 


^_ 


>^ 


^ 
g 


S 
jO 


-2 


1— ( 


1 


'© 


1 


5 


'0 


13 


q 


C3 


© 




' 


^ 


g 


3 


^ 


^ 


^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



119 









->^ 










kT 










ft 




t-T 


-t^ a 






SJ 










>j 


CO 






j3 




. 


Si3 




1 


i 


a 




i 


g 

8 




3 


2 

*© 
«d 

PI 
■3 




1 

g 
1 

1 
li 

r-l 


©d 


S3" 

a 

c3 

O 
4^ 


lo- 
se 

1! 




I 
1 


If 






1 


CO. 

5:o 


c8 
O 


! 

o 






CO 


d 




T-t 






03 


TS 


fl 


a 


'3^ 




S 




1^ 


b 


5 


35 

i 

«2 


1 
1 


^1" 

II 

IS 

Si 


o 
1 


i 


! 

1 




0) 

be 

ft 

■§ 


•2 
o 

©■ 

M 


1 

© 


©,o 

CC © 

a^ 

o| 
ft:: 


. a 

- o 

ii 

§3 


is 






CO 


s 




00 


^" 


00 

5:; 


s"^ 


^ 


S3" 


if 


8 


S^ 




SS'" 


^ 




^ 


!::; 




s 


r-t 


tH 


tH 


T-i 


i:^ 


t- 


tH 


1—1 






s 




3 


d 




^"^ 


^ 


^" 


»o" 


TiT 


t-T 


oo~ 




^ 




^"^ 


ft 
<1 






8 




<1 


t-5 


U 
^ 


>> 

9 

1-5 




1 




<1 


1 






• 




• 


■ 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


6: 


• 


• 






• 






















o 






r,' 






1 




2 

a 


1 




1 


1 


1 
i 




© 
>> 

M 


3 


1 
5 


i 
1 


© 

1 

1^ 




J 



120 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 



^•1 



ft . 



I25 



illll 

rh- ^ ?^ ^ -S 

K « ^ t;^ .< 

N ft^.S 
"5 CO t^-^ 

. dl « OS 

a-^ftt^ 

^ S S ® 
§^ § ft 



^02 



^ si 









'2 ^ 

eg ^ 

§§1 



5-^ 

CSrr^ 



ft^ 

ftO 







'^ S 



^ 

5 

s 


cd 

1 


fd 
1 


o 


ft 


o 


02 


M 


H 



^ ^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



121 



11 
I! 


ley annexed to 
eb. 17, 1814. 




to Chesterfiekl, 
liesterfiekl and 
erfield, Goshen, 
amshurg. 




id North Hamp- 
nd as a Town, 
stlianipton and 
1 Feb. 21, 1802. 
npton, Mar. 13, 
een Eastliamp- 
See Southamp- 


02. 

rt taking the i 
e of FrankUn 


Moo 




5zi 


1 


iiJ|il 

,„ l-H ^ O — ' "^ 




Is" 

C 0) 


1 
1 


6 




LE COUNTY. 
i? divided into two 
was erected into 
3 incorporated as t 


If 

rr- ''^ 


i 


1 

1 


fl^^ Soil's 

M 


Ph 5£5 




^ 


^ 






i-( ^-2^ 


cT 


T-T 


c<r 


cT 


S" 


W *2« 


»b 


(C: 


o 


t- 


t- 


t- 


t- 


t- 


t- 


CO -p s"^ 


l-H 


rH 


tH 




tH 


sfii 


co" 


^^ 


r-T 


if 




<: i--=.= 




© 


© 


<o 


© 


,6 


c 


fl 





a 


H Ilts 


J^ 




3 


3 


3 




^ 


►^ 


^ 


^ 


»-3 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


ss:: 












C? s 












=^oS 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


.= §.2 












ill 


2 




2 
'© 


d 


1 




a 






a 

a 


1 


^5=u 


% 


^ 


s 


c8 


-^5 


<i 


pq 


U 


o 


P^ 



16 



122 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 







^ OJ 

^'■S 



O 



O « J3 
p. OJ 

w --'^ . 

CO b 















'Ot-I 

Coo 

IP 

^ =? « 

o- 






(S d s 



B I 

IK ^ 

5'd 

«^ 



C O) 



o 5 0"^ 
«2 






eS c« 5 

IP 

o "« 

SSI 

oojSS 
% u <o 

"" s s 



CO 






< ^ 



03 © 

1-5 hs 



Ti 


d 


>> 




03 


^ 


«a 




3 


a 


o 




H 


O 


C3 



03 J^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 123 

^4 :- a 3 f gl gl 



U 



^ 



gl ^1 i - 5 ^ 11^ li =« |i 



^^ oil ^ 5 I I 111 ^^ IIS lit 

II i^o ^-11^ III I- iis^ i§i 

"£ s =« ^ -- s s M .s «H p. S ? > 3 ■£ .."'^ t.^^ 

Is «?o^ I ^ ^ S PI S^ IsS: §<^? 





^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




^ 


CO 




irT 


lo" 




CO 


co" 




CO 




CO 


iO 


r*i 


CO 


O'i 


lO 


lO 


o 


t~ 


t- 


t- 




t- 


t- 




t- 


t- 


t- 


t~ 


t~ 


r-1 


1—1 


tH 


tH 


1-1 








1-1 


iH 






















(M 


00 


lO 


CO 


oo" 


C<J 


lO 


lO 


cT 


^"^ 


iH 


'"' 


iH 


r-( 


(M 


T-l 




CI 


iM 


5i 


4^ 


1-5 


53* 
% 






fl 

^ 


i 


4.; 


< 






124 Counties and Toivns of Massachusetts. 



w 

S 
a 
'A 
o 

a 

a 

s 

"3 

'3) 

u 

O 


o 

.s 

o 

o 

a> 
>< 

<D 

q 

1. 

is 


^ 8 


i 

a 


1 


1 

1 







11 

Ph a 








i 

,a 






'^ 








+= 






«• « 


f^ 






c3 






a ^ 


M 






^ 






ii 


>|-H 






'd 






E t- 


■q 






a 






Is 








c8 






■« 


a 






^ 






<; > 


c3 






O 






il 


a"^ 






S 






II 


c3 

bX) 




1 


^ 
^ 


.2 


' 




a 




o 

5- 


n3 


1- 






v^ 


t 




'Sim* 


s 




- a; CO 


pf 






6 




rO 1^1-1 


o 


• rH 


cS 


SH2 






C ^'^•^ 


+s 


^ 


c8 


o"^„ 


<D 




Oi flCO 


a 


W. 


o 


o 
o 
a 
o 


1 


rts of Towns 
burnham an 
liburg, Mar. 


3 

1 
■s . 


o 


1 
O 


^1 

a; a 

fi 


■^ 


cj^ o 


««.s 




C3 


CSr^ 


e4-l 


.■iJ 


&^.t^ 


Ph^ 


o 


Ph 


f^fl 


o 


fe. 


a^^ 


4 


5 


a 


a§ 


1 


S 


2o5 


2^ 




a 


cp; 


Pm 


02 


fM 


w 


PlH 


^ 


P^ 








^ 


^ 






OS 


tJ^ 


t^ 


'■£ 


r-T 


(£ 


^ 




CO 


rtH 


t- 


(M 








t- 


t- 


CO 


t- 




r-l 


1-1 


r-l 


r-l 


r-l 


r-l 


r-l 
















CO 


^^ 


lO 


to 


•># 


CO 


CO 






rH 


r-l 


(M 


rH 


1-3 


1 


^ 
^ 


^ 
^ 


i 


U 
^ 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


. 


. 


. 


1 


1 

.9 






s 


1 


4^ 

o 

a 


O 


72 


t^ 


0? 


(>> 


O) 


"c 


< 


of 


<^ 


<j 


<j 


P^ 


P5 



Date of Incorporation, Etc. 125 






1 


M^ 


ts2 




r> 


OO 


r^CO O 




■73 








">* 


:;3 c3 


® c >> 








i 


o 




f^ 


•n^-[ 


y 


1 




ill 

O X^ 


02 




-^^ 




rH 


w 




^ S, '^ 


^ 


(0 


o "^ 






i 


S.H 


•sis 


'o 
o 


t3 
1— 1 


Z^ 


gopq 




fa 


«2 


Ph 









s . 


cc 


r* 












5^ 




" 




GJX 


(-1 


~ 


X 


rC'-^ 




^- 












g^ 




^ 


■* 


S 5 


§ 

T- 


?' 


^ 
^ 


«!-? 


a) 






|i 


HT 


3 





O-j'^^flSS =g©S 
0^ l5 •" b* t^r^ :; -^ rr ^ 



^ fR |i( En GO ■ <1 1-5 






126 Counties and Toivns of Massachusetts. 




03 :;2^ 






k: a; « 



;» ^r7^ 






^ (^ 



13 













^ 


;:::■* 




o 


rt=o 


ai 


k1 




J3 


o 




li 


r^ 


5 :« 


g 


0) 


^S 


ar« 




C-T 


S-2 


c 


P-^i 


ce-i: 


CS 


c3 > 


c s 


,. - 


ttS O 




o 


Ol^ 


K 



03 " S 
§^^ 

® s © 

-2 = 3 

>>-.-- s 

Is:- 1 






^t§ 



-^1 

Or-5 

oo 

o £ Si 
c !^ S 
C2g 









o ^ =* ^ 
xn Pi 



g2| 

CS 50cO 

C o c5 S 



^ s 



"5^ -S 

Til Pm 







O 
3 




f. 




J^ 


43 


c5 






d 


?? 


s 


K 


CD 


H 


o 


?3 


c3 


-- 




rt 


p 










tH 




o 


p 


Q 


W 


P^ 


O 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



127 






1^ S 






oi "D C i; .2 



5 "2 ►:; 












■" t^ o 






11 






9 ^ 



5 a 

u o 



'"'so 






• CO ^ 

(^ a» r— 

CO - t; 
03 C O 

Jo 

a; d 

III 






> b 



CO . :« 



. U ^1 



r'^'Ci 



- ?= Xi -^ t- 

CS O 2^ ^^-^ 

&^ c cs nS 
I— I ,^ t: t- >5 

o . 5 s "^ 3 



o 

^- 

O -I 

'SB 

P-l O 



dir- 



ects 

(^2 . 






02 



S >^ 3 s 
o 2 2 o 



^ 



O cv cc 

^ ii «^* 
^ <1 Q 



c^ 


J^ 


1 


1 



o 

O ^i 



H^ h^ h:; 





,£1 


• 


bO 




S 




o 


ri 


1=^ 


'■:i 


rO 






C3 


c3 


g 


^ 



128 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 




=« o ?: 2 



:£e2 



2 c3 ^ 






C TO ~ 
■■^ ^ r^ ' 



C! S ® 



2 '^ 


fl 


2 &i 


ai 


S<1 


-^ 




CS 




% 


Si'd 


«+-! 








s 



Ph m 



Ph H 



== A fl i 

4j C! qj Cs 

■^^^ >.d . 

Ph^ CSCO ?; 
W ,1-, rr-! 1— I ^ 

C 03 - .^-'^ 

1^ GO • !j oi 
.Si t;; o ^ M 

«y (^ t- "Sco 

Or" CD rH 

p2 o ^ .2 

>>=« af^ 



O eg 



03 

^ S -• S 



^ rg C *J t- 

cs ° :: oj >, 

C ^- 03 -g ^ 

^ -50 






^ C 11 -^ ^ 



§ .2 



g ;? 



-s 

c ^ 



wg 



P5p^ 

-I 



0=1=3 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 129 



11 




1 


S 














4^ 

1 






?> 


e 


O) 




a 


03 r^ 

^ fcX) 

d d 

CM 33 

1; 

«^ 

C4-1 




's 










Is 

«„• 

^^ 

11 

!i 
11 

See 

i| 

&^ 

§^ 

M 


1 

o 

i 

1 
t 


2 

^^ 
as § 

II 
11 

It 

1- 


1^ 

d 
d 

li 

it 

n 
P 


<1 

u 

%^ 
« p 

M > 

d^S 

042 


1 



% 
m 

d 


1 

1 

d 


1 

d 




J 

y 

cj 

t. 

rdio" 

il 


1 

d 


m 

d 
a 
t>5 


1^ 


II 
II 

IS 


Hi 

Sod 





+3 


4 

ll 
If 


1 
1 


d 
1 




>^ 
a; 
d 







Hi 


M 


m 




^ 


m 


^1^ 


1— 1 


02 


w 




H 


co" 


- 


^ 


n 




c<r 


r^ 


jo" 


CO" 


a^ 


riT 




<>t" 












1^ 


■iH 


























b- 














iH 


T-l 






1-1 


iH 


T-l 


rH 










CO 


gf 


^"^ 


lO 




CO 


^ 


^ 


0" 


•* 


?^ 




^ 


^ 

a 
^ 


^ 
g 


^ 
^ 


i 

t-5 








i 

Q 


1 


ft 


d 




d 

d 

H3 


S 


s 


d 
o 


i>^ 




Si 

1 


i 


1 


• 


>> 

d 
'd 


d 




'd 

d 


S. 
a 




^ 
^ 

© 






tg 


d 






ri4 




d 


05 


0^ 


^ 


,d 







Q 


d 








PM 


Ph 


02 


m 




m 


^ 


02 


02 


02 


H 




H 



17 



130 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 





District, 
of Dun- 
on ndary 
June 10, 


g 


1^ 


1 

5^ 




annexed 
Arling- 
mhridge. 










.s 

MOO 

CCiH 

^3 - 


03 


6 

i 




i 


III 






1 


IS 

g'O) 




1 




o 








5^; 






'^ 




i 

,C3 


f§^l 


V 


i 


8. 

c 


c a ? =« 

ollt 


o 
o 


% 

m 




o 

1 


00^ 


o 

O 

o 


8 

XJl 


•a 
o 


r- . g :S OJ 


1^^ 

xn 






c8 

1 

1 

m 






+3 

o 

.s 






nils 

«2 


>> 


is 

i 

1— 1 


1 




-2 


1 








^ 






^ 


^ 


^ 






C5 


(M 


t-T 


^ 


o 


o 


^ 




cq 


c 


00 




CO 


00 


00 




iH 


.2 


t- 


CO 


b- 


o 


t- 


t- 






t- 


o "S 


r-l 


T-l 


rH 


iH 


r-l 


r-( 


rH 


iH 


tH 




















■2 o 


C-l 


lO 


Tt< 


b- 


O 


O 


t- 


CC 


rH 


ej & 


(M 


(M 






r-t 


Tl 


C^ 


(M 




l-i 




i 


c3 
1-5 


P- 

® 

Oi 


^ 
^ 


1 


1 


i 
^ 






-g) 


• 


• 


• 


• 


1 


1 


• 


• 


fi 


S 


• 


• 


fl 
^ 
5 

M 

s 


• 


S 


• 


• 


H 


o 

1 


2 


1 




1 


1 


•2 
1 


1 

■en 


o 





^ 


Is 


c3 


c3 


CO 


O) 


<o 




p 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


>§ 


^ 


^ 


^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



131 





1 1 


c3 




f 








?£" 




s S 


J 




U '^— 






^co 






1^ 


1 




eei-i 


t^ 




Uc<r 


P^ 




4^rH 






sc 






<» >. 


g 




^1 


t 


bb 


'« 


s 


.s 




"S 


% 

^ 

^ 


1^ 


(1 


i 




m 


c 


r-'3 




S 

p 


!•§ 




1 


15 


> 


«4-l 


.»-'73 




o 


o <o 


a 


1 


C3 E 




a 


^i 


CO 


2 


i.- 


1 


fq 


p^ 


6 






^ 


o" 


o~ 


(m" 


CO 




■* 


t- 




o 


r-l 


iH 




JS 


o 


oT 


C^ 


CO 


rH 


i 


i. 
< 




. 


, 


. 


§ 


o 


• 


■& 

s 


m 

<0 


g 


3 


1 


o 


g 


g 


^ 



rn 


fn 


O 


o 


iH 


iH 






t^ 


h- 


(M 


(N 


® 


O 


fl 


a 


d 


d 


h5 


1-3 



a^ K i 4> 

.C ce 3 oo 

^ te=S ^ 

-.r r- ® 
C K a 
C" .-^ 



CO (C-Sii o 

5 c ^ ^ * -2 



. d N 53 o g 

o 



'S ^ 5 D 



"3 >. 



fa 5=4- ° 



U^r- tr. ^ 



t'^*^ 


^S^ 


III 


tl 


C © O 


lo> 


Boi 
way, 
iidon 


'J 


.■r o 


p 


im 


ifla 


5^- =3 


C3 




P 


B -J 




c^;= tc 


o 


S'^;2 


^ 




Jg* 


-IJ 


5faM 

0) ^ s3 


c 

c 


o 


;^iS 


^ 


P^3 ^ 


h 


- hH*^ 


;h 


c - a: 


t-l 


edbar 
Bellii 
line b 


1 


jh" 


Qs- 


3 


o^g^ 


1 




rom 1 
line 
Feb. 
Mar. 


o 


fa 


g 






cT 


o" 


t- 


o 




tH 






t- 


CO 


<M 


r-( 


t> 


>» 


o 


c3 


!z; 


^ 


. 


. 


a 


• 


c3 


« 


'^ 


1 


.2 


fl 


3 


'S 


03 


M 


M 


PQ 



132 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 



O 03, 






mi 

f3 03 r^ 

3 ^^ 



cC S o 
^^ o 



O .CO 






tn ^ — 
cS c3 c3 






rO S 



•< .2 






^ 



■t; ® =^ CD 



=^ s s 

S s s 



03 t«l-5 
03'^ a; 

Cl< 13 fl 



si 

03 
03 03 
= 02 

^ . 



"-Is 

T^ 03 +^ 
3^ 03 

-t^ 2 03 






■K 



is 



25^ 



c« v: 



S ^33 

= 5,0 



r^ 03 fl 



n^ a ® 




P^ <1 02 



C« O 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



133 



rC 




t- 




tJL 

1 


X 

a; 










fl 




C3 


E 


S 


^ 










S 




j; 


o 






© 








UJH 


'bJc 


'^ 


^ 




c 




-s 


§ 


{/J 




-^^ 


T-l 



&• '♦H 1— ( -M 






-e S: 



ce :s 

Ce S X CSJS; 









o 2 ^'^ 

V: i^ r' V) 









c3'-i 

ceo 

^ . . 

^§ 

cc -*^ r:; 



a 



^1 



^^ 

■« ^ 

5 <D 

II 

0.2 



o >» 

w w 



C 05 






^ ^ 



c t- 

k 

03 S 
^c3 

•^ a 



^ (U 

2 1 



^' 














^ 






^ 




oo 


CO 


of 




T-^ 


co" 


(M" 




o" 


I- 




E5 


g 


^ 




8 


t- 


fe 


iH 


r-( 


tH 


r-l 


1-1 


iH 


r-( 




1-t 




















s 


c-i 




^^ 


.CO 


^"^ 


t- 


lO 


?f 


1-5 


1 


1 


ft 
< 




o 




> 

1 





134 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 






£ o 

<V 1-1 

c a, 

^_ 

(D CO 

o ^ 



(V 






-M D X 3J 

s-( ^ S ;h 



•-3 



^ « 
o ^ 
c P 



0!« 



00 ^"^ _ OCC 



CO ^1 J § 2 ^ 

&g b-^ =^ 

rd _. 5 S a; 'S 
X 3^ => TO o 



-•^ -: d o 

O^ =« « 

(I) ^^ y( 

Sh CJ/2 3 

P^ o ^ 2 <» 

<U O OJ c>!s 

02 -^^^^ 

- ^^ ►=? 



CO 



"^ r-l O 






c cs 



5^ 



^^ bs ^ - S 
eS ci cs i~5 +j c3 



;: ^ ^ -^ ,0 

-■^ o . =« ® 
.^-^^^ 

o -js +^ r* 

S C O ? 03 




'd 



-a 

-3 
'd 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc, 



135 



oo 






;^ 



eS C ? 

o o S 

s ® ^ 

cs 5 S 

!=• -g 



o 

-a 

o 



o _r 









5 ^ bX) 



^1 



£||-g 



Ooc ^^p-:^ 

TS S ^ ^ S 
n ^" *3 a^ 5^ 



•^ o ^ 

K' S ^ CD 

-1^ •'-' c« ® . . 

C^ R o ^ 

5,^2 O C3 C3 



s 



^ 



g* 



SCO 
O . 

05 5 

o o 



°^ 



M o 

a? 

eg d 









^!^ 



" &j 'o -3 
rq -• fci:^ 

lig 

d c^ ? 

list 

rl "^ S 



^ 





i 




&c 




s 








"m • 




pq 1 








"^1 








-p,o 




s-1 




a^ 








y^ 5^ 








03 "* 




-^Tli 




ifl 


>o 


w 




'^" 


o 


. g 


T— 1 


c « 




.—1 -^ 


(M 


tX-ii 




C3 5J 


^ 


q; O 


'^ 


^2:; 


t3 


«3 „ 


•-5 


§^ 






pi 


£ § 


i 

1— ( 


dS 
II 


>; 


dOQ 
C3 


pj 


d . 


^ 


u 


o 


II 


o 


■s^ 




M 


c<r 


O 


i^ 


g 


o" 


>^ 


i-H 


v^ 


<U 


Ph 


d 

d 




•-5 




d 




o 




-u 




fcfl 




d 








3 




<1 



136 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 




S^ 






cck 






• '^ ii s 

4^ ^ TO g 

';:; J^ o 5~ 

5m csaq 



:2 od"':S 



12; 









^ .^ 

fl 9 i^ 

ti^ bJD 

§2^ 



a '•-TO 






>5 - 

1^ 



a > 



r- 9 

CO 






t-^. 



.--^ 

O cS 

Oca 

. tn 
■^ u 

oj ^ a 
s s ^ 



03 S 



rr*. ^^ 

b<j -Si o 






oi -is 



M 



^ 






^ 


^ 




10 


^■^ 


8 


CO 


C^ 


^" 




00 


t- 






CO 


tH 






1-H 


1—1 


iH 














CO 


ocT 


03 


t- 


■* 


(M 




C^T 






tH 


(N 





, 


© 


d) 


® 


, 


a 


C3 


a 


fl 


d 


,0 


s 
^ 


t-5 


1-5 


H^ 







^ 




• 


bC 


• 


(>> 








M 


fl 


;3 


P^ 










X 


■g 


p 


3 


§ 


l5 


« 


H 


w 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 137 









--i:-s<g5&^s«i as s§ ^,1 o g oj 






c^-^ CO ^r^;::;^ >^ -^ r^^ ^fl So W 3 Cs 



^ 




^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 






^ 


^ 


g 


i 


1 


1 


g 


i 


i 


1 


1 


i 


tH 




r-l 


r-l 


tH 


tH 


iH 


tH 


i-H 


rH 






















rjT 


rjT 


M 


cT 


to 


CO 


tH 


(M 


O 


1 




rH 




(M 


tH 


tH 


iH 




CI 




>> 
1-3 






1 




1 


^ 
g 






H3 



fi 




d 


® 




J 


• 


H 


'>^ 


s 


bJD 




fcX) 


0) 




p 


r3 


1=1 


'^. 


as 



2 Tx) ^ fcjo 0) .i^ -3 ^ fd 



18 



-d 



138 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 






§3^=^ 



(M 



<X) 



• ®^ =« 9 

^ O S -1^ 









^ 






a| 



o <o 

s^ 

^^ 
(4-1 CD 
O ® 

CO f» 

^^ 
T +=> 

t^ o . 

5 fl 8 

O M e 

02 >»:-^ 

g © 5, 
p o TO 



'^m' 






b«5 
CC CO 
C ^ 

H 

.2 J 
ft r 



g'5 

TO '2 



" 2^ 
1^^ 



P-iCO 

esoo 



. S3 



C3 o 




^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



139 






C3 g ^ . 



CC S3 


"k>o 


II 


gs 






s ^, 


C ^ 


ee ® 


R<1 


mai 


M ~ 


^ 


c a 


"© . 


• rH Q 


as 

eg ^ 


^1 


fl O 


^H O 


flH 


O^ 



ceoo 
-Coo 



c © s: 



o a ^ 

O O!-^ 

•-C >^ a 

ce <u <u 

-M q tu 

i^ C ^ 



3 


S 




1 


&£ 


cS 




« 


a 


S 


• 


fee 


,o 




a 


n3 
•r' 


<1 


?c 


§ 


P^ 


rS 


r^ 


(O 










05 


f3 


a 


c3 


O 


O 


eg 


^ 


^ 



'^3 


0) 






CI 
c3 


S 
^ 






2 


<£) 








P^ 






^ 


3 






© 


"^ a 






^ 








r4 


■§2 






&H 


r^ 






C3 


© +3 






% 


at» 






CSrO 






^ 


^'^ 






C3 


03 






a 


do 






a 


O^f-t 




C8 


p^ 


^a 




J 




s ^ 




Ij 


i 
a 

is 


% 




O 

o 


2 


ii 


1 


-3 


©■^ 


a: S 




-s 


II 

M 


1^ 


1 

05 


1 

1 


ilH 


CO 


W 


^ 




^ 




ocT 








g 


^ 


^ 


^ 




1—1 


rl 


r-( 










s 


cT 




^^ 


03 


(^ 


;4 


^ 


03 


C3 


c3 


^ 


^ 


^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


-1 


• 


• 








^ 


c3 


f< 


2 


g 


'oj 


r 


a 


J 
O 


^ 


« 


P 



140 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 



"C ^ o 

f* CO J3 _j 
^W to X 

5 o aj 

-'•^ ^ +j o 






rH O 






S<1 












c^l*"^ cub- 

,3; ^ a o 






C O r- -»^ 



tz^ <« 'd 



cs'd 



SS.SP' 



C3 !h 

"^ So 2 
o . ^x 

CC kr! CO CO 



■*^ S-i 

Ti o 



o 



fr^ ^ ^ ^ 

1 cS s ^ « 
. +^ c3 ce ^H 

) rC CO r- o 

O * 2^ 



Oj ^ v.PQ « -tJ CO 

„^ a r— C «U 2 i-i 



gS5-^-a^;a§S>> 



J-;; 



Or- 

H c8 



opq 






t^i^t^.^^mt 






00 ^ S'sJco^rH-r^ 

iH+Sr^l^rHp'COU 




Date of Incorporation^ Etc. 



141 




142 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts, 













t 








o 


a5 fi O 


pj 




■So 






1^ 

1^ 


W 


s|^ 





«^s 


'd 


c8 






M . 


1 




t 


lis 

0»c 


id 

as 








^10 


s 
•s 

8. 

s 




1 


t 
1 




1 







It 


1 

1 




3 




1 

i 


i 


t^ 




<v be 

.2t3 


"2 


« ^- 3 




-^^ 







2 


© ct::! 


^rd 


'E 
O 


0^0:5 




a; 

1 


S c sh' Ch 

"2 a; G 33 




1 
1 


CO 
CS 





All 


.2 fl 




PM 


^ 


M 




(2 


'^ 






^ 








__ 






■ 


otT 


cT 


00" 




■^ 


o" 


T-T 


«r 


c 










10 







•* 


o 






t- 




b- 




00 


t- 


*" ^ 










iH 


r-1 


rH 


iH 


o g 


^^ 


rH*^ 


S^ 




cf 


^"^ 


00 




§ 


ii 


> 




>■ 


;; 


^ 






1-5 


C6 












% 




^ 


g 


"A 




^ 


1^ 


^ 




g 

^ 


















g 


















a 


. 


• 


. 




• 


. 


, 


. 


'A 






2 












m 




fl 


d) 




fl 






OS 


s 





-2 


1 




3 

7h 


1 


c3 


4 


5 




T^ 




c« 


G 





=3 










M 




^ 


•"1 


c3 







M 


M 


w 







;; 


fi 


Q 



Date of Incorporation, Etc. 143 



© <D 

5 02 



l^fe i-i. C-- "S^ . -S;? § S^. 

?5^ 1^ II ^.H ^i § Mil C- 

Hc«< cS -r5''*-'x'* ^[V^ ^ .S°cS ^ esse 



Id! |o 1: is2 2ii i i|^ ^ 111 

ccSls -g^ t:© <^ :^ S ^o^ '-' i^-H- 2 flS 



SJ^ 



1-1 Tjtiioio S5 C-10 t-co 

CO OOOCO 1^ COrH CCiO 

t- t-t-t- on b-t» t-O 

rH ^^,H ^ THrH i-li-H 

(m" CO" S^" ^ 2^ ^^ cT 2 S 

© . s © . © 






be M 



£■ III I ll |l 

Q f^OO W WW WhI 



1 44 Counties and Towns of Massachusetts. 







7~! 


1 

a 

S 
o 




1 


1 

o 




i 

1 


c8 
-a 
1^ 


«1 

1 

si 




s 

§ 

a 




o 


^1 
BE- 


® 
m 

o 


IJ. 




i 

o 

g 


11 

Is 

O 

11 


G 


i 
1 


S 

S 


o 

i 




S 
^ 
g 
cT 


II 






2^ 


11 

C3 


1 


cc 


o 


CO 


fcJO 

II 

is 
§1 


«2 




"S 


Mj 


a 
1 


o 


*c3 


1 




1^ 

O QJ 


d 
o 


g 




li 


H 

o 


g 
"5b 


1 

1 


li 


^1 

o =* 


<D O 

.1" 


1 


"B 

i 

a 
a 


IS 




1 




^ 
5 




1^ 


3° 

1— 1 


o 


1=1 
I— ( 




S-^^ 
^ 


o 






















P5 
o 


fi 


^"^ 


^" 


ic 


o" 


g"^ 


CO~ 


lO 


8 




o 


t^ 


t- 


t- 


o 


t— 


CO 


b- 


t- 


t— 


^ 


=3 fj* 






r-T 


T-H 


r-l 
r-l 


T-l 
T-H 


CO 


^" 


-* 












^ 
% 


^ 
a 
< 


1-5 



t-5 


i 


1-5 




" 


• 


• 


• 


• 


' 


•> 


• 


• 


• 




O 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


® 


• 


• 




H 




















r 


IZi 

5 


2 

1 


1 

.s 

a 
o 


<D 


o 


O 


b 

S 
jO 






rd 






<D 


a; 


J3 


a; 






OJ 


o 


o 






^ 


h^ 


H^l 


^ 


k 


k 


^ 


;zi 


^ 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc, 145 






? 5 'Sol ^p^":- « S^ ^2 .sgo 



OS o 



o t^ 
C3 



§ '^-l «^"is ^ ^S ^^ «^ .1 S^ 

5 s 3il^ =1^1 i <s| == §1^1 III 



^ 










^ 




t- 




ci 


s 


^ 


€ 


^^ 


» 


^ 


§ 


00 


t- 


00 


t- 


t- 




t- 


t- 


T-l 


T-l 


iH 


tH 


iH 


rH 


i-H 


T-i 


00" 




l" 


c<r 


P 


o" 


o 


^^ 


t^ 


(N 




rH 


(N 


S 


(M 


iH 


^ 


03 

d 


'- 


rQ 


P. 


^ 


^ 


i 


rO 


<v 


d 




0) 


o 




© 


f=H 


^ 




fe 


<1 


O 


o 


^ 


^ 



cd 

2 * * * a § * fl d 

(Yi d "^ -S So 

'^i'g g ■SI:! « 



19 



146 Counties and Toivns of Massachusetts, 





ii 


1 


0'< 


Dud- 

Stur- 
Stur- 
1871. 


1 


II 


tton, 
orth- 


2 

1 

o 


IE 


1 = 

11 

o "^ 




^3 


1 


11 


-21 


51 








1 


c 

C3 

J. 

1 

© 

o 
o 
'5 


ill 


© C^ 

© tf 5. 
tn © 

m 


1 

1 


^1 


i 


Ms 

si 
1- 


III" 

o:s§ 

III 


1 

o 
o 

.S 
*3 


© CJ 






o 

o 


S-l -LJ 

ei w 

?! 


lis 


£ 


1 




be'"' a^'2 






Itl 


o 


o 
© 


S © 

©^;=i 


5 S3 s 




M 


Pm 


P^ 


Ul 


m 


^ 


^ 






^ 


^ 






^ 








CO 




t- 


o 


CO 




oT 


lo" 


s 


rH 




<M 




»o 


GO 


CO 


iH 


o 


t- 




t- 


00 


t- 


t- 


t- 


t- 


V. - 


tH 


iH 


tH 




tH 




1-1 


tH 


O c3 


?f 




CO 


»o 


CO 


^^ 


^" 


T-T 


•^ 8 


,rj 


^5 


>» 


,o 


^ 


u 


© 


© 


s 


v 


© 


s 


a> 


Ph 


a 


;i 


s 


1— 1 


P^ 


Q 


l-» 


^ 


< 


^ 


1-5 


1-5 


03 






















,r3 












izi 


• 


>> 


o 


t. 


• 


• 


§) 


. 


-< 




s 


'P 








1 


fd 


-S 


o 


'u 


;j 


be 


■73 




1 




s 


:3 


© 

© 


© 


•a 


1 




1 


1— « 


o 


o 


a 


■•2 


^ 




cc 


m 


CO 


M 


^ 


02 


m 



Date of Incorporation^ Etc, 



147 



s 



o 

w 

CIS 



mi 

C U 03 
Co 



^ ^ oc 



O Jh 

1-^ 



^ o 

ii I 

o| I 

ce w eg 

?^ s it 
;: o o 

* ft 



pi 

W CO 

* C^ 
til I 

^-5 



=» 2 



^^ 

^c 
c5 

D CO 
O O 

KM 
§1 



O X 



o a) 
^02 



-tJ r-l 
03 . 

c - 

c8 C 



S'Sc 

O) c« o 

c-d'S 
c=> 



;, o 



|c P 



So 
o 



c o 



So 

2 = ?^ 



txco 

CC 5 4-3 S 
-k^ 3 t^ s 

!3 "* c« --- ^ 



(C 8 



&hS 



Ph ? s C 



Sh Cl-o 'd 

*2 .S C - r- , 



f^ 3J 6 ^ r 



C02 
o 



bicES 






c £; 



CT 


»o 




^- 


c^; 




oo" T-T 


o" 


^ i 


O 


CO 


<n 


■* 


CO 


^ 2 




t- 




t>- 


^ 


I- 


CO 


^ 


^ s 


o" 


s*^ 


^"^ 




o~ 


S g 


" S 


^^ 


© 




c 

1-3 


c 

c 

'-5 


c 

1-5 


^ 
s 


> c 


II 




C -M 
Hj o 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 



c3 © 



c 

O "^i 

»-i o 

o ca 

CO tn 

© © 



^ 


h 




r 


-2 


1 -• 

c ^ 


M £ 


s 


^ S 


4i ^ 


+3 


o o 


CC ~ 


a3 


C ^ 


© S 


© 




^fe 


^ 


^^ 



148 



Cities of the Commonwealth. 



CITIES IN THE COMMONWEALTH, 



WITH THE DATE OF THEIR ORGANIZATION. 



N A M E. 



Incokporated. 



Boston 
Salem . 
Lowell 
Cambridge . 
New Bedford 
"Worcester . 
Lynn . 
Newburyport 
Springfield 
Lawrence . 
Fall River . 
Chelsea 
Taunton 
Haverhill . 
Somerville . 
Fitchbnrg^ . 
Holyoke 
Gloucester . 
Newton 



Feb. 

March 

April 

March 

March 



22, 1822. 
23, 1836. 

1, 1836. 
17, 1846. 

9, 1847. 



Feb. 29. 1848. 



April 

May 

April 

March 

April 

March 

May 

May 

April 

March 

April 

April 

June 



9, 1849. 
24, 1851. 
12, 1852. 
21, 1853. 

12, 1854. 

13, 1857. 
11, 1864. 
10, 1869. 

14, 1871. 
8, 1872. 

17, 1873. 

28, 1873. 

2, 1873. 



Congressional Districts. 



149 



CONGEESSIONAL DISTEICTS. 



[EstabUshed by Chapter 300, Acts of 1872, and Chapter 113, Acts of 
1876.] 



DISTRICT No. 1. 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Barnstable Co. 




Bristol Co. 




Barnstable . 


4,302 


Acushnet . 




1,059 


Brewster . 


, 


1,219 


Dartmouth 




3,434 


Chatham 


. 


2,274 


Fairhaven . 




2,768 


Dennis 


, 


3,369 


Fall Puver . 




45,340 


Eastham 


, 


639 


Freetown . 




1,396 


Falmouth 


. 


2,211 


New Bedford 




25,895 


Harwich 


. 


3,355 


Somerset . 




1,940 


Mashpee 


. 


278 


Swansea . 




1,308 


Orleans 


. 


1,373 


Westport . 




2,912 


Provincetown 




4,357 






Sandwich . 


. 


3,417 


Plymouth Co. 




Truro . 




1,098 


Carver 


1,127 


Wellfleet . 


. 


1,988 


Duxbury . 




2,245 


Yarmouth . 




2,264 


Halifax 




568 






Kingston . 




1,569 






Lakeville . 




1,061 


Dukes Co. 
Chilmark . 
Edgartown . 
Gay Head . 
Gosnold 
Tisbury 




508 

1,707 

216 

115 

1,525 


Marion 
Marshfield . 
Mattapoisett 
Middlfborough 
Pembroke . 
Plymouth . 
Plympton . 




862 
1,817 
1,361 
5,023 
1,399 
6,370 

755 






Rochester . 




. 1,001 






Wareham . 




2,874 


Xaniucket Co. 
Nantucket . 








3,201 


Total . 


153,500 



150 



Congressional Districts, 

DISTRICT No. 2. 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


BrUtol Co. 




Norfolk Co. — Con. 




Attleborough 




9,224 


Sharon 


1,330 


Berkley 




781 


Stougbton . 


4,842 


Dighton 




1,755 


Walpole . 


2,290 


Easton . 




3,898 


Weymouth 


9,819 


Mansfield . 




2,656 


Wrentham 


2,395 


Norton 




1,595 






Raynham . 




1,687 


Plymouth Co. 




Rehoboth . 




1,827 


Abington . 


3,241 


Seekonk 




1,167 


Bridgewater 


3,969 


Taunton 




20,445 


Brockton . 
East Bridgewater 


10,578 
2,808 


Norfolk Co 






Hanover . 


1,801 


Braintree . 




4,156 


Hanson 


1,265 


Canton 




4,192 


Hingham . 


4,654 


Cohasset . 




2,197 


Hull . . . . 


316 


Foxborough 




3,168 


Rockland . 


4,203 


Holbrook . 




1,726 


Scituate . 


2,463 


Hyde Park . 




6,316 


South Abington 


2,456 


Milton . 




2,738 


South Scituate . 


1,818 


Norfolk . 
Quincy 




920 
• 9,155 


"West Bridgewater . 


1,758 








Randolph . 


4,064 


Total 


145,673 



DISTRICT No. 3.* 



Suffolk Co. 




Suffolk Co. — Con. 




Boston, Ward 13 


21,682 


Boston, Ward 19 . 


18,703 


Ward 14 


18,698 


Ward 20 . 


13,349 


Ward 15 


13,767 


Ward 21 . 


11,545 


Ward 16 


14,646 


Ward 24 . 


13,462 


Ward 17 


13,736 








Ward 18 


13,055 


Total . . . 


152,643 



DISTRICT No. 4.* 



Suffolk Co. 

Boston, Ward 1 . 

Ward 2 . 




Suffolk Co. — Con. 
Boston, Ward 6 
Ward 7 



*SeeNoTE, p. 155. 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. 4— Concluded. 



151 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Siiffolk Co. — Con. 

Boston, Ward 8 

Ward 9 

Ward 10 

AVard 11 


12,097 
12,578 
10,430 
13,857 
14,842 


Suffolk Co. -Con. 
Chelsea . . . 
Revere 
Winthrop . 

Total . . . 


20,737 

1,603 

627 


Ward 12 


146,217 



DISTRICT No. 5. 



Essex Co. 




Jfiddlesex Co.— Con. 




Lynn .... 


32,600 


Somerville . 


21,868 


Nahant 


766 


Stoneham . 


4,984 


Saugus 


2,578 


Wakefield . . . 


5,349 


Swampscott 


2,128 


Waltham . 


9.967 






Winchester 


3,099 


Middlesex Co. 




Woburn . 


9,568 


Arlington . 


3,906 






Belmont 






1,937 






Burlington 






650 


Suffolk Co.* 




Everett 






3,651 


Boston, Ward 3 


11,165 


Lexington 






2,505 


Ward 4 


11,153 


Maiden 






10,843 


Ward 5 


11,238 


"Nrpflfnrd 






6,267 










Melrose 


3,990 


Total 


160,212 



DISTRICT No. 



Essex Co. 




Essex Co. — Con. 




Amesbury . 


3,816 


Merrimac . 


2,171 


Beverly 




7,271 


Middleton . 


1,092 


Boxford 




834 


Newbury . 


1,426 


Bradford 




2,347 


Newburyport . 


13,323 


Danvers 




6,024 


North Andover 


2,981 


Essex . 




1,713 


Peabody . 


8,066 


Georgetown 




2,214 


Rockport . 


4,480 


Gloucester . 




16,754 


Rowley 


1,162 


Groveland . 




2,084 


Salem 


25,958 


Hamilton . 




797 


Sahsbury . 


4,078 


Haverhill . 




14,628 


Topsfield . 


1,221 


Ipswich 




3,674 


Wen ham . 


911 


Lj-nnfield . 




769 


West Newbury . 


2,021 






1,560 
7,677 






Marblehead . 




Total . . . 


141,052 



* See Note, p. 155. 



152 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. 7. 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


TowTsrs. 


Population, 
1875. 


i:ssex Co. 




Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Andover 


5,097 


Marlborough . 


8,424 


Lawrence . 


34,916 


Maynard . 




1,965 


Methuen 


4,205 


North Reading 
Pepperell . 
Reading . 




979 
1,927 
3,186 


Middlesex Co. 




Shirley . 




1,352 


Acton .... 


1,708 


Stow . 




1,022 


Ashby . 




. 


962 


Sudbury . 


.• 


1,177 


Ayer . 




. 


1,872 


Tewksbury 




1,977 


Bedford 




. 


900 


Townsend . 




2,196 


Billerica 




. 


1,881 


Tyngsborough 




665 


Boxborough 




. 


318 


VVestford . 




1,933 


Carlisle 




. 


548 


Wilmington 




879 


Chelmsford 




. 


2,372 






Concord 




. 


2,676 






Dracut . 






1,116 


Worcester Co. 




Dunstable 






452 


Berlin 


987 


Groton . 




. 


1,908 


Bolton 


987 


Hudson 




, 


3,493 


Harvard . 


1,304 . 


Lincoln 




. 


834 


Lancaster . 


1,957 














LoweU 




• 


49,688 


Total . 


138,813 



DISTRICT No. 



Middlesex Co 
Ashland 
Cambridge . 
Framingham 
Holliston 
Hopkinton 
Natick . 
Newton 
Sherborn 
Watertown 
Wayland 
Weston 



ITorfolk Co. 
Brookline . 
Dedham 
Dover . 



2,211 

47,838 

5,167 

3,399 

4,503 

7,419 

16,105 

999 

5,099 

1,766 

1,282 



6,675 

5,756 

650 



Norfolk Co. 
Franklin . 
Medfield . 
Medway 
Needham . 
Norwood . 



Suffolk Co.* 

Boston, Ward 22 

Ward 23 

Ward 25 

Worcester Co. 
Milford . 
Southborough . 



■Con. 



Total 



See Note, p. 155. 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. 9. 



153 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Worcester Co. 




Worcester Co. — Con. 




Auburn 


1,233 


Paxton 


600 


Barre . 




2,460 


Princeton . 


1,063 


Blackstone . 




4,640 


Rutland . 


1,030 


Boylston 




895 


Shrewsbury 


1,524 


Brookfield . 




2,660 


Southbridge 


5,740 


Charlton 




1,852 


Spencer . 


5,451 


Douglas 




2,202 


Sturbridge 


2,213 


Dudley 




2,653 


Sutton 


3,051 


Grafton 




» 4,442 


Upton 


2,125 


Hardwick . 




1,992 


Uxbridge . 


3,029 


Holden 




2,180 


Warren 


3,260 


Hubbardston 




1,440 


Webster . 


5,064 


Leicester 




2,770 


Westborough . 


5,141 


Mendon 




1,176 


West Boylston . 


2,902 


Millbury . 




4,529 


West Brookfield 


1,903 


New Braintree 




606 


Worcester . 


49,317 


Northborough 




1,398 






Northbridge 




4,030 


Norfolk Co. 




North Brookfielc 




3,749 


Bellingham 


1,247 


Oftlrhnm 




873 






Oxford 




2,938- 


Total . . . 


145,378 



DISTRICT No. 10. 



Franklin Co. 




Franklin Co. — Con. 




Ashfield . 


1,190 


Shutesbury 


558 


Bernardston 




991 


Sunderland 




860 


Buckland . 




1,921 


Warwick . 




744 


Charlemont 




1,029 


Wendell . 


. 


503 


Colrain 




1,699 


Whately . 




958 


Conway 




1,452 






Deerfield . 




3,414 


Hampden Co. 




Erving 




794 


Holyoke . 


16,260 


Gill . 




673 






Greenfield . 




3,540 


Hampshire Co. 




Haw ley 




588 


Amherst . 


3,937 


Heath . 




545 


Belchertown 




2,315 


Leverett 




831 


Chesterfield 




746 


Leyden 




524 


Curaraington 




916 


Monroe 




190 


Easthampton 




3,972 


Montague . 




3,380 


Enfield 




1,065 


New Salem . 




923 


Goshen 




349 


Northfield . 




1,641 


Granby 




812 


Orange 




2,497 


Greenwich 




606 


Rowe . 




661 


Had ley 




2,125 


Shelbume . 


1,590 


Hatfield . 


1,600 



20 



154 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. IQ— Concluded. 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Hampshire Co. — Con 




Worcester Co. — Con. 




Huntington . 


1,095 


Clinton 


6,781 


Middletield . 




603 


Dana . 




760 


Northampton 


. 


11,108 


Fitchburg . 




12,289 


Pelham 


. 


633 


Gardner . 




3,730 


Plainfield . 




481 


Leominster 




5,201 


Prescott 


, 


493 


Lunenburg 




1,153 


South Hadley 


. 


3,370 


Petersham 




1,203 


Southampton 


. 


1,050 


Phillipston 




666 


Ware . 


. 


4,142 


RoyalstQn . 




1,260 


Westhampton 


. 


556 


Sterling 




1,569 


Williamsburg 


. 


2,029 


Templeton 




2,764 


Worthington 


, 


818 


Westminster 




1,712 






Winchendon 




3,762 


Worcester Co. 
Ashburnham 








2,141 


Total . . . 


143,902 


Athol .... 


4,134 







DISTRICT No. 11. 



Berkshire Co. 




Berkshire Co. — Con. 




Adams 


15,760 


Richmond . 


1,141 


Alford. 


389 


Sandisfield 


1,172 


Becket 


1,329 


Savoy 


730 


Cheshire . 


1,693 


Sheffield . . . 


2,233 


Clarksburg . 


670 


Stockbridge 


2,089 


Dalton .... 


1,759 


Tyringham 


517 


Egremont . . . 


890 


Washington 


603 


Florida 


572 


West Stockbridge . 


1,981 


Great Barrington 


4,385 


Williamstown . 


3,683 


Hancock 


730 


Windsor . 


624 


Hinsdale 


1,571 






Lanesborough . 


1,357 






Lee ... . 


3,900 


Hampden Co. 




Lenox .... 


1,845 


Agawam . 


2,248 


Monterey . 


703 


Blandford . 




964 


Mt, Washington 


182 


Brim field . 




1,201 


New Ashford . 


160 


Chester 




1,396 


New Marlborough 


2,037 


Chicopee . 




10,335 


North Adams i . 




Granville . 




1,240 


Otis . . . , 


855 


Hampden ^ 






Peru 


443 


Holland . 




334 


Pittsfield . 


12,267 


Longmeadow 




1,467 



1 Incorporated from a part of Adams, April 16, 1878. 

2 Incorporated from a part of Wilbraham, March 28, 1878. 



Congressional Districts. 

DISTRICT No. \1— Concluded. 



155 



Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Towns. 


Population, 
1875. 


Hampden Co.— 
Ludlow 
Monson 
Montgomery 
Palmer 
Russell 


-Con. 


1,222 
3,733 

304 
4,572 

643 

1,114 

31,053 


Hampden Co. — Con. 

Tolland . . . 

Wales 

Westfield . . . 

West Springfield 

Wilbraham 

Total . , 


452 
1,020 
8,431 
3,739 
2,576 


Springfield . 


146,314 



Note. — Tlie population of the several wards in the City of Boston is 
from a computation on the basis of the census of 1875, made by the City 
of Boston after a re-division of the city into its present wards. The 
figures, therefore, give the population for 1875 of the territory covered 
by each ward as it now exists. 



156 Senate Districts. 



SENATE DISTEICTS. 

As Established by Chapter 190 of the Acts of 1876. 



[Average ratio for the State, 8,776+.] 



SUFFOLK COVlifTY— Eight Senators. 

[Ratio for one Senator, 9,220+.] 

J'lVs^-Dis^Hc^ — Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop, and Wards Nos. 1 and 2, 

Boston. Legal voters, 10,310. 
Second District. — Wards ISTos. 3, 4, and 5, Boston. Legal voters, 7,924. 
Third District. — Wards Nos. 6, 7, and 8, Boston. Legal voters, 8,567. 
fourth District. — Wards Nos. 9, 10, 11, and 12, Boston. Legal voters, 

11,757. 
M/th District. —Wards Nos. 13, 14, and 15, Boston. Legal voters, 8,629. 
Sixth District. — Wdrds Nos. 16, 17, and 18, Boston. Legal voters, 9,035. 
Seventh District. — Wards Nos. 19, 20, and 21, Boston. Legal voters, 

9,012. 
Eighth District. — Wards Nos. 22, 23, 24, and 25, Boston. Legal voters, 

8,527. 

ESSEX COJJl^TY — Six Senators. 

[Ratio for one Senator, 9,726.] 

First District. — Lynn, Nahant, Saugus, and Swampscott. Legal voters," 

9,067. 
Second District. — Lynnfield, Marblehead, Peabody, and Salem. Legal 

voters, 9,103. 
Third District. — Beverly, Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Manchester, 

Rockport, and Wenham. Legal voters, 7,594. 
Fourth District. — Avaesbwry, Ipswich, Merrimac, Newbury, Newbury-. 

port, Row^ley, Salisbury, and West Newbury. Legal voters, 7,489. 
Fifth District. — Boxford, Bradford, Danvers, Georgetown, Groveland, 

Haverhill, Middleton, and Topsfield. Legal voters, 7,401. 
Sixth District. — Ando-ver, Lawrence, Methuen, and North Andover. 

Legal voters, 7,976. 



1 



Senate Districts. 157 



MIDDLESEX COJmTY — Seven Senators. 
[Ratio for one Senator, 8,434+.] 

I'irst IHstHct. — Everett, Maiden, Medford, and Somerville. Legal 
voters, 9,103. 

Second IXstrict. — Arlington, Belmont, Lexington, Newton, Waltham, 
and Watertown. Legal voters, 7,993. 

Third District. —Cambridge. Legal voters, 9,213. 

Fourth District. — Ashland, Framingham, Holliston, Hopkinton, Marl- 
borough, Natick, Sherborn, Wayland, and "Weston. Legal voters, 
7,772. 

Fifth District. — Acton, Ashby, Ayer, Boxborougb, Carlisle, Chelms- 
ford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Groton, Hudson, Lincoln, Littleton, 
Maynard, Pepperell, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury;- Townsend, Tyngs- 
borough, and "Westford. Legal voters, 7,384. 

Sixth District. — Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Melrose, North Reading, 
Reading, Stoneham, Tewksbury, Wakefield, Wilmington, Winchester, 
and Woburn. Legal voters, 8,537. 

Seventh District. — Lowell. Legal voters, 9,061. 

WORCESTER COJJl^iTY — Five Senators. 
[Ratio for one Senator, 8,978+.] 

First District. — Worcester. Legal voters, 10,853. 

Second District. — Blackstone, Boylston, Douglas, Grafton, Mendon, 
Milford, Northborough, Northbridge, Shrewsbury, Southborough, 
Upton, Uxbridge, and Westborough. Legal voters, 8,647. 

Third District. — Auburn, Brookfield, Charlton, Dudley, Leicester, 
Millbury, Oxford, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Sutton, Warren, 
Webster, and West Brookfield. Legal voters, 8,349. 

Fourth District. — Athol, Barre, Dana, Gardner, Hardwick, Holden, 
Hubbardston, New Braintree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Paxton, 
Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Rutland, Templeton, and Win- 
chendon. Legal voters, 7,968. 

Fifth District. — Ashburnham, Berlin, Bolton, Clinton, Fitchburg, Har- 
vard, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Princeton, Sterling, West 
Boylston, and Westminster. Legal voters, 9,074. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY— One Senator. 
Hampshire District. — Amherst, Belchertown, Chesterfield, Cumming- 
ton, Easthampton, Enfield, Goshen, Granby, Greenwich, Hadley, Hat- 
field, Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, Pelham, Plainfield, Pres- 
cott, South Hadley, Southampton, Ware, Westhampton, Williamsburg, 
and Worthington. Legal voters, 9,253. 



158 Senate Districts. 



HAMPDEN COUNTY— Tico Senators. 

[Ratio for one Senator, 9,456+.] 

Mrst District. — Brimfield, Hampden, Holland, Monson, Palmer, Spring. 

field, Wales, and Wilbraham. Legal voters, 9,483. 
Second District. — Agawam, Blandford, Chester, Chicopee, Granville, 
Holyoke, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, 
Tolland, Westfield, and West Springfield. "Legal voters, 9,429. 

FRANKLLN" COUNTY— One Senator, 
franklin District. — Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, 
Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, 
Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Montague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, 
Rowe, Shelburne, Shutesbury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell, and 
Whately. Legal voters, 8,516. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY— Tico Senators. 
[Ratio for one Senator, 7,067+.] 

27brth Berkshire District. — Adams, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, 
Florida, Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, New Ashford, North 
Adams, Peru, Pittsfield, Savoy, Williamstown, and Windsor. Legal 
voters, 8,330. 

South Berkshire District. — Alford, Becket, Egremont, Great Barrington, 
Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount Washington, New Marlborough, Otis, 
Richmond, Sandisfield, Shefiield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washing- 
ton, and West Stockbridge. Legal voters, 5,805. 

NORFOLK COUNTY— Tmjo Senators. 
[Ratio for one Senator, 9,357+.] 
First District. — Braintree, Canton, Holbrook, Milton, Qulncy, Ran- 
dolph, Stoughton, and Weymouth. Legal voters, 9,355. 
Second District. — Bellingham, Brookline, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, 
Franklin, Hyde Park, Medfield, Medway, Needham, Norfolk, Nor- 
■wood, Sharon, Walpole, and Wrentham. Legal voters, 9,360. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY— Two Senators. 
[Ratio for one Senator, 8,968.] 
First District. — Carver, Duxbury, Halifax, Hanson, Kingston, Lakeville, 
Marion, Marshfield, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, Pembroke, Plym- 
outh, Plympton, Rochester, Scituate, South Scituate, and Wareham. 
Legal voters, 8,950. 
Second District. — Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, Cohasset, East 
Bridgewater, Hingham, Hull, Hanover, Rockland, South Abington, 
and West Bridgewater. Legal voters, 8,986. 



Senate Districts. 159 



BRISTOL COUNTY — Three Senators. 

[Ratio for one Senator, 8,958-f .] 

First District. — Attleborough, Easton, Mansfield, Norton, Raynham, 

Seekonk, and Taunton. Legal voters, 8,909. 
Second District. — Berkley, Dighton, Fall River, Rehobolh, Somerset, 

and Swansea. Legal voters, 8,945. 
Third District. — Acuslmet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Freetown, New 
Bedford, and Westport. Legal voters, 9,022. 

BARNSTABLE, DUKES, AND NANTUCKET COUNTIES.— C>nc 
Senator. 

Cape District. — Bamsiahle, Brewster, Chatham, Chilraark, Dennis, 
Eastham, Edgartown, Falmouth, Gay Head, Gosnold, Harwich, 
Mashpee, Nantucket, Orleans, Provincetown, Sandwich, Tisbury, 
Truro, Wellfleet, and Yarmouth. Legal voters, 10,444. 



160 Council Districts. 



COUNCIL DISTRICTS. 

As Established by Chapter 222 or the Acts of 1876. 



[Each District consists of five Senatorial Districts.] 



I. — The Cape, First and Second Plymouth, and the Second and 
Third Bristol Districts. 

IL — The First Bristol, First and Second Norfolk, Eighth Suffolk, 
and the Second Worcester Districts. 

ni. — The First and Second Suffolk, and the First, Second, and Third 
Middlesex Districts. 

IV. — The Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Suffolk Districts. 

V. — The First, Second, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Essex Districts. 

VI. — The Sixth Essex, and the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh 
Middlesex Districts. 

Vn. — The First, Third, Fourth, and Fifth Worcester, and the First 
Franklin Districts. 

Vni. — The Hampshire, First and Second Hampden, and the North and 
South Berkshire Districts. 



Representative Districts. 



161 



EEPEESENTATIYE DISTRICTS. 



Established under Chapter 15, Acts of 1876. 



[Average ratio for the State, 1,462 + voters.] 



SUFFOLK COUNTY — i^i/fy Representatives. 



District. 

1. — Boston, Ist Ward. Legal voters, 

n. — Boston, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 

in. — Boston, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 

rV". — Boston, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 

V. — Boston, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

VI. — Boston, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 

Vn. — Boston, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

Vm. — Boston, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 

IX. — Boston, 9th Ward. Legal voters, 

X. — Boston, 10th Ward. Legal voters, 

XI. — Boston, 11th Ward. Legal voters, 

Xn. — Boston, 12th Ward. Legal voters, 

Xm. — Boston, 13th Ward. Legal voters, 

XTV. — Boston, 14th Ward. Legal voters, 

XV. — Boston, 15th Ward. Legal voters, 

XVI. — Boston, 16th Ward. Legal voters, 

XVn. — Boston, 17th Ward. Legal voters, 

XVIII. — Boston, 18th Ward. Legal voters, 

XIX. — Boston, 19th Ward. Legal voters, 

XX. — Boston, 20th Ward. Legal voters, 

XXI. —Boston, 2l6t Ward. Legal voters, 

XXIL — Boston, 22d Ward. Legal voters, 

XXIIL — Boston, 23d Ward. Legal voters, 

XXIV. — Boston, 24th Ward. Legal voters, 

XXV. — Boston, 25th Ward. Legal voters, 

XXVI. — Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop. 

representatives. 

21 



2,719. 
2,645. 
2,652. 
2,612. 
2,660. 
2,860. 
2,799. 
2,908. 
2,910. 
2,950. 
2,936. 
2,961. 
2,888. 
3,126. 
2,615. 
2,958. 
3,077. 
3,000. 
3,221. 
2,913. 
2,878. 
1,601. 



1,415. 
Legal 



Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
One representative. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
One representative. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
One representative, 
voters, 4,946. Three 



162 Representative Districts. 

ESSEX COXnSTY — Thirty-three Representatives. 
District 

I. — Rockport and Gloucester, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 1,596. One 

representative. 
II. — Gloucester, Ist Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 
and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,611. Two representatives. 
HI. — Gloucester, 8th Ward, Essex, Manchester, and Hamilton. 

Legal voters, 1,388. One representative, 
rv. — Wenham and Danvers. Legal voters, 1,441. One represents- 

tive. 
V. — Beverly. Legal voters, 1,748. One representative. 
VI. — Salem, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,821. 

Two representatives. 
Vn. — Salem, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,477. 
Two representatives. 
Vin. — Marblehead and Swampscott. Legal voters, 2,440. Two rep- 
resentatives. 
IX. — Lynn, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 1,560. One representative. 
X. — Lynn, Ist Ward, 2d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 7th Ward, and 
Nahant. Legal voters, 4,633. Three representatives. 
XI. — Lynn, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 1,689. One representative. 
Xn. — Peabody. Legal voters, 1,720. One representative. 
XTIT. — Saugus, Lynnfield, Middleton, and Topsfield. Legal voters, 

1,446. One representative. 
XTV. — An dover and North Andover. Legal voters, 1,446. One repre- 
sentative. 
XV. — Boxford, Rowley, and Ipswich. Legal voters, 1,519. One rep- 
resentative. 
XVI. — Newbury, Newhuryport, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th 
Ward, 5th Ward, and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 3,229. Two 
representatives. 
XVn. — Georgetown, Groveland, and Bradford. Legal voters, 1,668. 

One representative. 
XVm. — West Newbury, SaUsbury, Amesbury, and Merrimac. Legal 
voters, 2,962. Two representatives. 
XIX. —Haverhill, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 
6th Ward, and Methuen. Legal voters, 4,633. Three repre- 
sentatives. 
XX. — Lawrence, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 
2,780. Two representatives. 
XXL — Lawrence, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 
2,823. Two representatives. 



Representative Districts. 163 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Forty Representatives. 
District 

I. — Cambridge, 1st Ward, and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,704. Two 

representatives. 
n. — Cambridge, 2d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 4,789. Three 
representatives. 
m. — Cambridge, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 1,720. One representa- 
tive. 
rV. — Somerville, Ist Ward. Legal voters, 1,538. One representa- 
tive. 
V. — Somerville, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 1,396. One representa- 
tive. 
"VT. — Somerville, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 1,531. One 
representative. 
Vn. — Medford. Legal voters, 1,512. One representative. 
Vni. — Maiden and Everett. Legal voters, 3,126. Two representa- 
tives. 
EX. —Melrose. Legal voters, 1,035. One representative. 
X. — Stoneham. Legal voters, 1,281. One representative. 
XI. — Wakefield. Legal voters, 1,218. One representative. 
Xn. — Reading, North Reading, and Wilmington. Legal voters, 1,319. 

One representative. 
XIII. — Woburn. Legal voters, 1,958. One representative. 
XTV. — Arlington and Winchester. Legal voters, 1,425. One repre- 
sentative. 
XV. — Watertown and Belmont. Legal voters, 1,457. One represent- 
ative. 
XVI. —Newton, Ist Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 
6th Ward, and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 3,278. Two repre- 
sentatives. 
XVII. — Waltham. Legal voters, 1,897. One representative. 
XVin. — Lexington, Burlington, Bedford, and Billerica. Legal voters, 
1,359. One representative. 
XIX. — Tewksbury, Chelmsford, Tyngsborough, and Dracut. Legal 
voters, 1,258. One representative. 
XX. — Lowell, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 1,617. One representative. 
XXI. — Lowell, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 1,528. One representative. 
XXII. — Lowell, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 1,484. One representative. 

XXIII. — Lowell, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 1,554. One representative. 

XXIV. — Lowell, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 1,377. One representative. 
XXV. — Lowell, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 1,501. One representative. 

XXVI. — Concord, Acton, Carlisle, and Lincoln. Legal voters, 1,407. 
One representative. 



164 Representative Districts. 

District 
XXVn. — "Weston, Wayland, Sudbury, and Maynard. Legal voters, 
1,396. One representative. 
XXVIII. — Natick. Legal voters, 1,716. One representative. 

XXIX. — HoUiston and Sherborn. Legal voters, 1,105. One repre- 
sentative. 
XXX. — Hopkinton and Ashland. Legal voters, 1,470. One repre- 
sentative. 
XXXI. — Framingham. Legal voters, 1,054. One representative. 
XXXII. — Marlborough. Legal voters, 1,645. One representative. 

XXXIII. — Hudson, Stow, Boxborough, and Littleton. Legal voters, 

1,256. One representative. 

XXXIV. — Westford, Groton, Dunstable, and Pepperell. Legal voters, 

1,518. One representative. 
XXXV. — Ayer, Shirley, Townsend, and Ashby. Legal voters, 1,614. 
One representative. 

WORCESTER COUNTY— Thirty-one Representatives. 
District 

I. — Blackstone and Uxbridge. Legal voters, 1,399. One repre- 
sentative, 
n. — Mendon, Milford, and Upton. Legal voters, 2,870. Two 

representatives. 
III. — Xorthbridge and Grafton. Legal voters, 1,513. One repre- 
sentative. 
rV. — Westborough and Southborough. Legal voters, 1,545. One 

representative. 
V. — Clinton, Berlin, Bolton, Sterling, Lancaster, Harvard, and 
Lunenburg. Legal voters, 3,098. Two representatives. 
VI. — Fitchburg. Legal voters, 2,815. Two representatives. 
VII. — Winchendon, Ashburnham, Gardner, Westminster, and Prince- 
ton. Legal voters, 3,030, Two representatives. 
Vin. — Athol and Royalston. Legal voters, 1,405. One representa- 
tive. 
IX. — Petersham, Phillipston, Templeton, and Hubbardston. Legal 
voters, 1,547. One representative. 
X. — Dana, Hardwick, Barre, Oakham, and New Braintree. Legal 

voters, 1,584. One representative. 
XI. — Rutland, Holden, Paxton, and Leicester. Legal voters, 1,437. 
One representative. 
Xn. — West Brookfield, Warren, Brookfield, North Brookfield, and 
Sturbridge. Legal voters, 2,932. Two representatives. 
Xni. — Spencer, Charlton, Southbi-idge, and Oxford. Legal voters, 
2,908. Two representatives. 



Representative Districts, 165 



District 
XrV. — Douglas, "Webster, and Dudley. Legal voters, 1,679. One 

representative. 
XV. — Auburn, Millbury, and Sutton. Legal voters, 1,485. One 
representative. 
XVI. — Shrewsbury, Xorthborough, Boylston, and "West Boylston. 

Legal voters, 1,400. One representative. 
X'VII, — Leominster. Legal voters, 1,391. One representative. 
XVLQ. — "Worcester, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 1,342. One representa- 
tive. 
XLX. — "Worcester, 2d "Ward. Legal voters, 1,315. One representa- 
tive. 
XX. — "Worcester, 3d "Ward. Legal voters, 1,359. One representa- 
tive. 
XXI. — "Worcester, 4th "Ward. Legal voters, 1,368. One representa- 
tive. 
XXII. — "Worcester, 5th "Ward. Legal voters, 1,374. One representa- 
tive. 
XXm. — "Worcester, 6th "W"ard. Legal voters, 1,396. One representa- 
tive. 
XXIV. — "Worcester, 7th "Ward. Legal voters, 1,346. One representa- 
tive. 
XXV. — Worcester, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 1,353. One representa- 
tive. 

HAMPSHIRE COXmTY — Six Representatives. 
District 

I. — Easthampton, Northampton, and Southampton. Legal voters, 

3,125. Two representatives. 
n. — Hadley, Hatfield, Westhampton, and Williamsburg. Legal 
voters, 1,312. One representative. 
III. — Chesterfield, Cummington, Goshen, Huntington, Middlefield, 
Plainfield, and Worthington. Legal voters, 1,326. One 
representative. 
rV. — Amherst, Pelham, Prescott, and South Hadley. Legal voters, 

1,706. One representative. 
V. — Belchertown, Enfield, Granby, Greenwich, and Ware. Legal 
voters, 1,784. One representative. 

HAMPDEN COUNTY — Thirteen Representatives. 

District 

I. — Monson, Brimfield, Holland, and Wales. Legal voters, 1,349. 
One representative. 



166 Representative Districts, 



DiSTKICT 

n. — Hampden, Palmer, Wilbraham, and Ludlow. Legal voters, 
1,630. One representative. 
TTT . — Chicopee. Legal voters, 1,686. One representative. 
IV. — Springfield, 1st Ward and 2d Ward. Legal voters, 2,589. Two 

representatives. 
V. — Springfield, 3d Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 1,481. One 
representative. 
YI. — Springfield, 4th Ward, 7th Ward, and Longmeadow. Legal 

voters, 1,455. One representative. 
Vn. — Springfield, 5th Ward and 8th Ward. Legal voters, 1,568. 

One representative. 
Vni. — Holyoke, Ist Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward, and 5th 
Ward. Legal voters, 1,592. One representative. 
IX. —Holyoke, 6th Ward, 7th Ward, and West Springfield. Legal 
voters, 1,463. One representative. 
X. — Westfield, Agawam, and Montgomery. Legal voters, 2,620. 

Two representatives. 
XI. — Southwick, Granville, Tolland, Blandford, Chester, and Rus- 
sell. Legal voters, 1,479. One representative. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY— /Six Representatives. 

District 

I. — Erving, Warwick, Orange, and New Salem. Legal voters, 

1,416. One representative, 
n. — Montague, Sunderland, Leverett, Shutesbury, and Wendell. 

Legal voters, 1,467. One representative, 
in. — Greenfield, Gill, and Shelbume. Legal voters, 1,417. One 

representative. 
IV. — Deerfield, Conway, and Whately. Legal voters, 1,382. One 
representative, 
v. — Northfield, Bernardston, Leyden, Colrain, and Heath. Legal 
voters, 1,368. One representative. 
VI. — Ashfield, Buckland, Charlemont, Hawley, Rowe, and Monroe. 
Legal voters, 1,466. One representative. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Ten Representatives. 
District 

I. — Hancock, Lanesborough, New Ashford, WiUiamstown, and 

Clarksburg. Legal voters, 1,346. One representative. 
n. — Adams and North Adams. Legal voters, 2,820. Two repre- 
sentatives. 
m. — Pittsfield and Dal ton. Legal voters, 2,863. Two representa- 
tives. 



Representative Districts. 167 

District 

rV. — Florida, Savoy, Cheshire, "Windsor, "Washington, Peru, and 

Hinsdale. Legal voters, 1,423. One representative. 
"V. — Beeket, Lee, Otis, and Tyringham. Legal voters, 1,446. One 

representative. 
"VI. — Richmond, Lenox, Stockbridge, and "West Stockbridge. Legal 
voters, 1,477. One representative. 
Vn. — Alford, Egremont, Great Barrington, and Monterey. Legal 

voters, 1,457. One representative. 
"Vm. — Mount Washington, New Marlborough, Sandisfield, and Shef- 
field. Legal voters, 1,303. One representative. 

NORFOLK COUNTY — Thirteen Representatives. 
District 

L — Dedham and Norwood. Legal voters, 1,514. One representa- 
tive. 
n. — Brookline. Legal voters, 1,247. One representative, 
m. — Hyde Park. Legal voters, 1,237. One representative. 
rV. — Milton and Canton. Legal voters, 1,312. One representative. 
"V". — Quincy and Weymouth. Legal voters, 4,400. Three repre- 
sentatives. 
VI. — Braintree and Holbrook. Legal voters, 1,433. One repre- 
sentative. 
VTI. — Randolph, Stoughton, Sharon, and Walpole. Legal voters, 
3,046. Two representatives. 
"Vni. — Franklin, Foxborough, Wrentham, Bellingham, and Medway. 
Legal voters, 2,972. Two representatives. 
EX. — Needham, Dover, Medfield, and Norfolk. Legal voters, 1,554. 
One representative. 

BRISTOL GQiXmTY — Eighteen Representatives. 
District 

I. — Attleborough, Norton, and Mansfield. Legal voters, 2,894. 

Two representatives. 
n. — Easton and Raynham. Legal voters, 1,301. One representa- 
tive. 
HE. — Taunton and Berkley. Legal voters, 4,628. Three represent- 
atives. 
IV. — Acushnet, Fairhaven, and Freetown. Legal voters, 1,396. 

One representative. 
V. — New Bedford, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 
3,000. Two representatives. 



168 Representative Districts. 



District 

VI. — New Bedford, 4th "Ward, 5th Ward, and 6th Ward. Legal 
voters, 3,004. Two representatives. 
Vn. — Westport and Dartmouth. Legal voters, 1,622. One repre- 
sentative. 
Vin. — Fall River, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, and 4th Ward. Legal 
voters, 4,670. Three representatives. 
IX. — Fall River, 5th Ward, 6th Ward, and Somerset. Legal voters, 

2,788. Two representatives. 
X. — Seekonk, Swansea, Rehoboth, and Dighton. Legal voters, 
1,573. One representative. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY— rMJe?»e Representatives. 

District 

1. — Hingham and Hull. Legal voters, 1,147. One representative. 
n. — Cohasset, Scituate, and South Scituate. Legal voters, 1,610. 

One representative. 
TTT. — Marshfield, Pembroke, Hanson, and Halifax. Legal voters, 

1,443. One representative. 
rv. — Duxbury, Kingston, Plympton, and Carver. Legal voters, 
1,565. One representative. 
V. — Plymouth. Legal voters, 1,656. One representative, 
VI. — Wareham, Rochester, Marion, and Mattapoisett. Legal voters, 

1,502. One representative, 
vn. — Middleborough and Lakeville. Legal voters, 1,671. One rep- 
resentative. 
VTTT. — Bridgewater and East Bridgewater. Legal voters, 1,516. One 
representative. 
iX. — Rockland and Hanover. Legal voters, 1,509. One representa- 
tive. 
X. — Brockton and West Bridgewater. Legal voters, 2,804. Two 

representatives. 
XI. — Abington and South Abington. Legal voters, 1,513. One 
representative. 

BARNSTABLE COUNTY — /Six Representatives. 

District 

I. — Sandwich and Falmouth. Legal voters, 1,519. One represent- 
ative. 
n. — Barnstable and Mashpee. Legal voters, 1,268. One repre- 
sentative. 
in. — Yarmouth and Dennis. Legal voters, 1,502. One representa- 
tive. 



Bepresentative Districts. 169 

District 

rv. — Harwich and Chatham. Legal voters, 1,468. One representa- 
tive. 
V. — Brewster, Orleans, Eastham, and Wellfleet. Legal voters, 

1,457. One representative. 
VI. — Truro and Provincetown. Legal voters, 1,223. One repre- 
sentative. 

DUKES COJmTY — One Representative. 
District 

I. — Chilmark, Edgartown, Gay Head, Gosnold, and Tisbnry. 
Legal voters, 1,117. One representative. 

NAiJTUCKET COUNTY— One Representative. 
District 

I. — Nantucket. Legal voters, 890. One representative. 
22 



170 



Population and Voters, 



A LIST 



Of the Counties, Towns, and Cities in the Commonwealth, 
with the Census of Inhabitants in 1870 and 1875, and 
of Legal Voters in 1875. 





POPUIiATION. 




COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 






Voters in 






1875. 




1870. 


1875. 


Barnstable. 








Barnstable 


4,793 


4,302 


1,204 


Brewster 


1,259 


1,219 


307 


Chatham 


2,411 


2,274 


603 


Dennis 


3,269 


3,369 


921 


Eastham 


668 


639 


172 


Fahnouth 


2,237 


2,211 


632 


Harwich 


3,080 


. 3,355 


865 


Mashpee * 


348 


278 


64 


Orleans 


1,323 


1,373 


400 


Provincetown 


3,865 


4,357 


948 


Sandwich 


3,694 


3,417 


887 


Truro 


1,269 


1,098 


275 


Wellfleet 


2,135 


1,988 


578 


Yarmouth 


2,423 


2,264 


581 


Totals 


32,774 


32,144 


8,437 


Berkshire. 








Adams 


12,090 


15,760 


2,820 


Alford 










430 


389 


106 


Becket 










1,346 


1,329 


280 


Cheshire . 










1,758 


1,693 


401 


Clarksburg 










686 


670 


159 


Dalton 










1,252 


1,759 


342 


Egremont . 










931 


890 


233 


Florida 










1,322 


572 


122 


Great Harrington 










4,320 


4,385 


944 


Hancock . 










882 


730 


178 


Hinsdale . 










1,695 


1,571 


317 


Lanesborough . 










1,393 


1,357 


265 


Lee . . . 










3,866 


3,900 


821 


Lenox 










1,965 


1,845 


409 


Monterey . 
Mount Washington 










653 


703 


174 










256 


182 


46 


New Ashford . 










208 


160 


42 


New Marlborough 










1,855 


2,037 


464 



* Incorporated May 28, 1870. 



Population and Voters, 



171 



COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 1875 



Voters in 
1875. 



Berkshire — Con. 

Otis 

Peru 

Pittsfield 

Richmond 

Sandisfield . . . . 

Savoy 

Sheffield 

Stockbridge . . . , 
Tyringham . . . . 
Washington . . . , 
West Stockbridge . 
Williamstown . . . , 
Windsor 



Totals 



Acusbnet . 
Attleborough 
Berkley 
Dartmouth 
Dighton 
Easton 
Fairhaven . 
Fall River . 
Freetown . 
Mansfield . 
New Bedford 
Norton 
Raynham . 
Rehoboth . 
Seekonk 
Somerset . 
Swansea . 
Taunton . 
Westport . 



Bristol. 



Totals 



Chilmark . 
Edgartown 
Gay Head * 
Gosnold 
Tisbury 

Totals . 



Dukes. 



455 

11,112 

1,091 

1,482 

861 
2,535 
2,003 

557 

694 
1,924 
3,559 



64,826 



1,132 



744 
367 

817 



766 
372 
432 
320 
821 
713 
895 
021 
776 
294 
629 
724 



102,886 



476 
1,516 

160 

99 

1,536 



855 

443 

12,267 

1,141 

1,172 

730 

2,233 

2,089 

517 

603 

1,981 

3,683 

624 



68,270 



1,059 
9,224 
781 
3,434 
1,755 
3,898 
2,768 

45,340 
1,396 
2,656 

25,895 
1,595 
1,687 
1,827 
1,167 
1,940 
1,308 

20,445 
2,912 



131,087 



1,707 
216 
115 

1,525 



212 
97 
2,521 
193 
306 
199 
487 
456 
133 
122 
419 
702 
165 



14,135 



1,884 
227 
814 
416 
873 
760 

7,024 
348 
622 

6,004 
388 
428 
524 
313 
434 
320 

4,401 



158 

466 

58 

31 

404 



J,787 



4,071 



1,117 



Incorporated April 30, 1870. 



172 



Population and Voters. 



COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 1875 



Essex. 



Amesbury . 
Aiidover . 
Beverly 
Boxford 
Bradford . 
Danvers 
Essex 

Georgetown 
Gloucester 
Groveland . 
Hamilton . 
Haverhill . 
Ipswich 
Lawrence . 
Lynn . 
Lynnfield . 
Manchester 
Marblehead 
Merrimac* 
Methuen . 
Middleton . 
Nahant 
Newbury . 
Newburyport . 
North Andover 
Peabodyt • 
Rockport . 
Rowley 
Salem 
Salisbury . 
Saugus 
Swampscott 
Topsfield . 
Wenham . 
West Newbury 



Totals 



Ashfield . 
Bemardston 
Buckland . 
Charlemont 
Colrain 
Conway 
Deerfield . 
Erving 



Franklin. 



5,581 
4,873 
6,507 
847 
2,014 
5,600 
1,614 
2,088 

15,389 

1,766 

790 

12,092 
3,720 

28,921 

28,2.33 

818 

1,665 

7,703 

2,959 

1,010 

475 

1,430 

12,595 
2,549 
7,343 
3,904 
1,157 

24,117 
3,776 
2,247 
1,846 
1,213 
985 
2,006 



200,843 



1,180 
961 
1,946 
1,005 
1,742 
1,460 
3,6Si2 
579 



3,816 
5,097 
7,271 
834 
2,347 
6,024 
1,713 
2,214 

16,754 

2,084 

797 

14,628 
3,674 

34,916 

32,600 
769 
1,560 
7,677 
2,171 
4,205 
1,092 
766 
1,426 

13,323 
2,981 
8,066 
4,490 
1,162 

25,955 
4,078 
2,578 
2,128 
1,221 
911 
2,021 



223,349 



1,190 
991 
1,921 
1,029 
1,699 
1,452 
3,414 
794 



* Incorporated April 11, 1876. 



t Formerly South Danvers. 



Population and Voters. 



173 





POPCXATION. 




COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 






Voters in 














1875. 




1870. 


1875. 




Franklin — Con. 








Gill 


653 


673 


189 


Greenfield 


3,589 


3,540 


835 


Hawley 


672 


588 


164 


Heath 


613 


545 


142 


Leverett 


877 


831 


249. 


Leyden 


518 


524 


114 


Monroe 


201 


190 


49 


Montague 


2,224 


3,380 


707 


New Salem 


987 


923 


258 


Northfield 


1,720 


1.641 


430 


Orange . 


2,091 


2,497 


722 


Rowe 


581 


661 


175 


Shelburne 


1,582 


1,590 


393 


Shutesbury 


614 


558 


157 


Sunderland 


832 


860 


201 


Warwick 


769 


744 


218 


Wendell 


539 


503 


153 


Whately 


1,068 


958- 


241 


Totals 


32,635 


33,696 


8,516 


Hampden. 








Agawam 


2,001 


2,248 


432 


Blandford 


1,020 


964 


259 


Brimfield ^ . 


1,288 


1,201 


298 


Chester 


1,253 


1,396 


355 


Chicopee 


9,607 


10,335 


1,686 


Granville 


1,293 


1,240 


295 


Holland 


344 


334 


83 


Holyoke 


10,733 


16,260 


2,225 


Longmeadow 


1,342 


. 1,467 


335 


Ludlow 


1,136 


1,222 


254 


Monson 


3,204 


3,733 


714 


Montgomery 


318 


304 


82 


Palmer 


3,631 


4,572 


761 


Russell 


635 


643 


146 


Southwick 


1,100 


1,114 


306 


Springfield 


26,703 


31,053 


6,758 


Tolland 


509 


452 


118 


Wales 


831 


1,020 


254 


Westfield 


6,519 


8,431 


2,106 


West Springfield 


2,606 


3,739 


830 


Wilbraham 


2,330 


2,576 


615 


Totals 


78,409 


94,304 


18,912 



* Incorporated from town of Wilbraham, Mar. 28, 1878 



174 



Population and Voters. 





Population. 




COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 




Voters in 






1875. 




1870. 


1875. 




Hampshire. 








Amherst 


4,035 


3,937 


847 


Belchertown 












2,428 


2,315 


553 


Chesterfield 












811 


746 


208 


Curaminston 












1,037 


916 


247 


Easthampton . 












3,620 


3,972 


634 


Enfield . 












1,023 


1,065 


273 


Goshen 












368 


349 


96 


Gran by 












863 


812 


199 


Greenwich 












665 


606 


80 


Hadley . 












2,301 


2,125 


428 


Hatfield . 












1,594 


1,600 


294 


Huntington 












1,156 


1,095 


261 


Middlefield 












728 


603 


129 


Northampton . 












10,160 


11,108 


2,231 


Pelham 












673 


633 


146 


Plainfield . 












521 


481 


156 


Prescott . 












541 


493 


144 


South Hadley 












2,840 


3,370 


569 


Southampton 












1,159 


1,050 


260 


Ware . 












4,257 


4,142 


679 


Weetliampton 












587 


556 


124 


Williamsburg 












2,159 


2,029 


466 


Worthington 












860 


818 


229 


Totals 


44,388 


44,821 


9,253 


Middlesex. 








Acton 


1,593 


1,708 


447 


Arlington 


3,261 


3,906 


794 


Ashby 


994 


962 


255 


Ashland 


2,186 


2,211 


522 


Ayer* 


_ 


1,872 


464 


Bedford 


849 


900 


224 


Belmont 


1,513 


1,937 


337 


Billerica 


1,833 


1,881 


419 


Boxborough 


338 


318 


87 


Brighton f 


4,967 


- 


- 


Burlington 


626 


650 


149 


Cambridge 


39,634 


47,838 


9,213 


darlisle 


569 


548 


163 


Charlestown J 


28,323 


- 


- 


Chelmsford 


2,374 


2,372 


528 


Concord 


2,412 


2,676 


624 


Dracut 


2,078 


1,116 


294 


Dunstable 


471 


452 


131 



* Incorporated Feb. 14, 1871. t Annexed to Boston, May 21, 1873. 

X Annexed to Boston, May 14, 1873. 



Population and Voters. 



175 



COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 1875 



Middlesex— Con. 

Everett 

Framingham . . . . 

Groton 

Holliston 

Hopkinton . . . . 

Hudson 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Lowell 

Maiden 

Marlborough . . . . 

Maynard * 

Medford 

Melrose 

Natick 

Newton 

North Reading . . . . 

Pepperell 

Reading 

Sherboi-n 

Shirley 

Somerville 

Stoneham 

Stow 

Sudbury 

Tewksbury . . . . 

Townsend 

Tyngsborough . . . . 

Wakefield 

Waltham 

Watertown . . . . 

Way land 

Westford 

Weston 

Wilmington . . . . 
Winchester . . . . 
Woburn 

Totals 

Nantucket. 
Nantucket 

Norfolk. 
Bellingham . . . , 



2,220 

4,968 

3,584 

3,073 

4,419 

3,389 

2,277 

791 

983 

40,928 

7,367 

8,474 

5,717 

3,414 

6,404 

12,825 

942 
1,842 
2,664 
1,062 
1,451 
14,685 
4,513 
1,813 
2,091 
1,944 
1,962 

629 
4,135 
9,065 
4,326 
1,240 
1,803 
1,261 

866 
2,645 
8,560 



274,353 
4,123 
1,282 



3,651 
5,167 
1.908 
3,399 
4,503 
3,493 
2.505 

834 

950 

49,688 

10,843 

8,424 

1,965 

6,627 

3,990 

7,419 

16,105 

979 
1,927 
3,186 

999 
1,352 
21,868 
4,984 
1,022 
1,177 
1,997 
2,196 

665, 
5,349 
9,967 
5,099 
1,766 
1,933 
1,282 



9,568 



284,112 
3,201 
1,247 



* Incorporated April 19, 1871. 



176 



Population and Voters. 



COUKTIES, CITIES, AlsD TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



1875. 



Norfolk — Con. 



Braintree . 
Brookline . 
Canton 
Cohaeset . 
Dedham . 
Dover 
Foxborough 
Franklin . 
Holbrook* 
Hyde Park 
Medfield . 
Medway . 
Milton 
Needham . 
Norfolk . 
Norwood t 
Quincy 
Randolph . 
Sharon 
Stoughton . 
Walpole . 
"West Roxhury J 
Weymouth 
Wrentham 



Totals .... 

Plymouth. 
Abington . . . - 
Bridgewater 
Brockton § 

Carver . . . . 
Duxbury .... 
East Bridgewater . 
Halifax . . . . 
Hanover .... 
Hanson .... 
Hingham .... 

Hull 

Kingston . . . . 
Lakeville .... 
Marion .... 
Marshfield. 
Mattapoisett 



,948 
,650 
,879 
,130 
,342 
645 
,057 
,562 

,136 
,142 
,721 
,683 
,607 
,081 

,442 
,642 
,508 
,914 
,137 
,683 
,010 
,292 



89,493 



007 
092 
341 
017 
619 
628 
219 
422 
261 



,659 
,361 



4,156 
6,675 
4,192 
2,197 
5,756 

650 
3,168 
2,983 
1,726 
6,316 
1,163 
4,242 
2,738 
4,548 

920 
1,749 
9,155 
4,064 
1,330 
4,842 
2,290 

9,819 
2,395 



88,321 



3,241 
3,969 
10,578 
1,127 
2,245 
2,808 

568 
1,801 
1,265 
4,654 

316 
1,569 
1,061 

862 
1,817 
1,361 



* Incorporated Feb. 29, 1872, from town of Randolph. 

t Incorporated Feb. 23, 1872. X Annexed to Boston, May 29, 1873. 

§ Name changed from N'orth Bridgewater, March 28, 1874. 



Population and Voters. 



177 





Population. 




COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 






Voters in 














1875. 




1870. 


1876. 




Plymouth— Con. 








MiddlelDorough 


4,687 


5,023 


1,376 


Pembroke 


1,447 


1,399 


407 


Plj^mouth 


6,238 


6,370 


1,656 


Plympton 


804 


755 


209 


Rochester 


1,024 


1,001 


286 


Rocklami* 


- 


4,203 


1,004 


Scituate 


2,350 


2,463 


611 


South Scituate 


1,661 


1,818 


502 


South Abington f 


- 


2,456 


681 


Wareham 


3,008 


2,874 


595 


West Bridgewater 


1,803 


1,758 


370 


Totals 


65,365 


69,362 


17,439 


SUTFOLK. 








Boston 


250,526 


341,919 


68,815 


Chelsea 


18,547 


20,737 


4,480 


Revere t 


1,197 


1,603 


308 


Winthrop 


532 


627 


158 


Totals 


270,802 


364,886 


73,761 


WOKCESTEE. 








Ashbumham 


2,172 


2,141 


513 


Athol 












3,517 


4,134 


1,073 


Auburn 














1,178 


1,233 


219 


Barre . 














2,572 


2,460 


639 


Berlin 














1,016 


987 


259 


Blackstone 














5,421 


4,640 


799 


Bolton 














1,014 


987 


245 


Boylston 














800 


895 


201 


Brookfield 














2,527 


2,660 


645 


Charlton 














1,878 


1,852 


470 


Clinton 














5,429 


6,781 


1,151 


Dana . 














758 


760 


223 


Douglas 














2,182 


2,202 


430 


Dudley 














2,388 


2,653 


356 


Fitchburg 














11,260 


12,289 


2,815 


Gardner 














3,333 


3,730 


881 


Grafton 














4,594 


4,442 


850 


Hardwick 














2,219 


1,992 


336 


Harvard 
Holden 














1,341 

2,062 


1,304 
2,180 


302 
467 


Hubbardston 


1,654 


1,440 


398 



* Incorporated March 9, 1874. f Incorporated March 4, 1875. 

X Name changed from North Chelsea, March 24, 1871. 

23 



178 



Population and Voters. 



COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS. 



Population. 



1870. 



1875. 



Voters in 
1876. 



Worcester - 
Lancaster . 
Leicester . 
Leominster 
Lunenburg 
Men don 
Milford . 
Millbury . 
New Braintree . 
Northborough . 
Nortbbridge 
North Brookfield . 
Oakham 
Oxford 
Paxton 
Petersham 
Phillipston 
Princeton . 
Royalston . 
Rutland 
Shrewsbury 
Southborough . 
Southbridge 
Spencer 
Sterling 
Sturbridge 
Sutton 
Templeton 
Upton 
Uxbridge . 
Warren 
Webster . 
Westborough . 
West Boj'lston . 
West Brookfield 
Westminster 
Winchendon . 
Worcester . 



Con. 



1,845 
2,768 
3,894 
1,121 
1,175 
9,890 
4,397 

640 
1,504 
3,774 
3,343 

860 
2,669 

646 
1,335 



1,279 
1,354 
1,024 
1,610 
2,135 
5,208 
3,952 
1,670 
2,101 

2',802 
1,989 
3,058 
2,625 
4,763 
3,601 
2,862 
1,842 
1,770 



Totals 



41,105 



192,716 



1,957 
2,770 
5,201 
1,153 
1,176 
9,818 
4,529 

606 
1,398 
4,030 
3,749 

873 
2,938 

600 
1,203 

666 
1,063 
1,260 
1,030 
1,524 
1,986 
5,740 
5,451 
1,569 
2,213 
3,051 
2^764 
2,125 
3,029 
3,260 
5,064 
5,141 
2,905 
1,903 
1.712 
3,762 
49,317 



210,295 



545 
1,391 
299 
259 
2,128 
755 
164 
317 
663 
770 
222 
686 
159 
326 
177 
279 



372 
417 
876 
876 
446 
467 
511 



600 
651 



1,128 
510 



10,854 



44,892 



Population and Voters. 



179 



REC 



APITULATION. 



u"^ m Population. 

Ill 
^ o 



COUNTIES. 



1870. 



1875. 



Voters in 
1875. 



Barnstable 
Berkshire 
Bristol . 
Dukes . 
Essex 
Franklin 
Hampden 
Hampshire 
Middlesex 
Nantucket 
Norfolk . 
Plymouth 
Suffolk . 
"Worcester 
Totals 



14 
32 
19 

5 
35 
26 
22 
23 
54 

1 
24 
27 

4 

58 

344 



32,774 
64,826 

102,886 
3,787 

200,843 
32,635 
78,409 
44,388 

274,353 
4,123 
89,493 
65,365 

270,802 

192,718 



32,144 
68,270 

131,087 
4,071 

223,349 
33,696 
94,304 
44,821 

284,112 
3,201 
88,321 
69,362 

364,886 

210,295 



8,437 
14,135 
26,876 

1,117 
48,630 

8,516 
18,912 

9,253 
59,043 
890 
19,212 
17,439 
73,761 
44,892 



1,457,402 



1,651,919 



351,113 



180 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



VALIJATION or THE COMMONWEALTH. 



ESTABLISHIID BY CHAPTER 189 OP THE ACTS OF 1876.* 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 









Tax of $1,000, 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Barnstable .... 


1,100 


$2,863,099 00 


$1 56 


Brewster . 






. 


279 


748,160 00 


41 


Chatham . 








542 


881,632 00 


50 


Dennis 








792 


1,646,437 00 


92 


Eastham . 






. 


177 


212,633 00 


13 


Fahnouth . 






, 


672 


2,561,805 00 


1 37 


Harwich . 








858 


1,103,508 00 


65 


Mashpee . 






. 


73 


97,502 00 


06 


Orleans . 






. 


378 


520,679 00 


30 


Provincetown 








1,101 


1,943,982 00 


1 10 


Sandwich . 






. 


756 


1,442,201 00 


81 


Truro 








319 


294,363 00 


18 


Wellfleet . 








516 


960,940 00 


54 


Yarmouth 








522 


1,558,494 00 


84 


Total 


8,085 


$16,835,435 00 


$9 37 






B 


ERKS 


HIRE CC 


►UNTY. 





Adams 


2,937 


$6,685,060 00 


$3 69 


Alford . 






111 


292,863 00 


16 


Becket 






363 


472,518 00 


28 


Cheshire . 






436 


1,117,018 00 


61 


Clarksburg 






152 


261,850 00 


15 


Dalton 






324 


1,371,426 00 


73 


Egremont . 






254 


613,063 00 


34 


Florida . 






242 


191,874 00 


12 


Great Barrington 






1,113 


3,541,601 00 


1 91 


Hancock . 






165 


459,607 00 


25 


Hinsdale . 






468 


858,134 00 


48 


Lanesborough . 






423 


781,820 00 


44 


Lee 


899 


2,027,731 00 


1 12 



* This schedule constitutes the basis of apportionment for State and 
County taxes until the year 1885, unless hereafter changed by law. 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



181 



BERKSHIRE COV^TY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000, 


TOWNS. 


PoUs. 


Property. 


incliul. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Lenox 


475 


$1,477,811 00 


$0 80 


Monterey . 






197 


280,736 00 


16 


Mount Washington 






77 


78,989 00 


05 


New Ashford . 






48 


94,201 00 


05 


New Marlborough 






470 


847,278 00 


48 


North Adams* . 






_ 


_ 


_ 


Otis . 






212 


279,926 00 


16 


Peru . 






128 


151,765 00 


09 


Pittstield . 






2,841 


9,402,059 00 


5 06 


Richmond 






304 


593,554 00 


33 


Sandisfield 






306 


432,851 00 


25 


Savoy 
Sheffield . 






187 


213,764 00 


13 






540 


1,215,178 00 


67 


Stockbridge 






520 


2,993,700 00 


1 57 


Tyringham 






137 


265,444 00 


15 


Washington 






161 


248,026 00 


14 


West Stockbridge 






513 


881,894 00 


50 


Willlamstown . 






7^1 


1,894,373 00 


1 04 


Windsor . 






162 


224,014 00 


13 


Total . . 




• 


15,906 


$40,250,128 00 


$22 04 



Incorporated from Adams, April 16, 1878. 
. BRISTOL COTJNTY. 



Acushnet 


268 


$623,980 00 


$0 34 


Attleborough 








2,366 


4,627,974 00 


2 59 


Berkley . 








207 


316,967 00 


18 


Dartmouth 








750 


1,909,515 00 


1 05 


Diehton . 








433 


846,659 00 


47 


Eastham . 








993 


3,063,753 00 


1 66 


Fairhaven 








714 


1,608,404 00 


89 


Fall River 








11,118 


50,382,058 00 


26 71 


Freetown . 








316 


770,047 00 


42 


Mansfield . 








671 


1,187,158 00 


67 


New Bedford 








5,930 


27,528,048 00 


14 58 


Norton 








432 


875,357 00 


49 


Raynham . 








426 


1,290,699 00 


70 


Rehoboth . 








450 


820,551 00 


46 


Seekonk . 








262 


641,638 00 


35 


Somerset . 








478 


1,083,109 00 


60 


Swansea . 








307 


702,963 00 


39 


Taunton . 








5,352 


17,773,864 00 


9 57 


Westport . 








702 


1,483,918 00 


82 


Total . 






32,175 


$117,536,662 00 


$62 94 



182 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



DUKES COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000, 
includ. I'oUs 
at one-tenth 
of mm each. 


Chilmark 

Edgartown .... 
Gay Head . . . . 

Gosnold 

Tisbury 


166 

511 

32 

36 

419 


$297,423 00 

1,816,506 00 

11,834 00 

187,925 00 

710,558 00 


$0 17 
97 
01 
10 
40 


Total 


1,164 


$3,021,246 00 


$1 65 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Amesbury . . . . 


988 


$1,802,007 00 


$1 02 


Andover . 








1,105 


4,009,874 00 


2 15 


Beverly . 








2,202 


8,931,663 00 


4 76 


Boxford . 








241 


617,568 00 


34 


Bradford . 








567 


1,423,243 00 


78 


Danvers , 








1,398 


3,928,544 00 


2 14 


Essex 








464 


982,931 00 


55 


Georgetown 








651 


1,047,714 00 


60 


Gloucester 








3,390 


9.166,267 00 


5 00 


Groveland 








540 


874,444 00 


50 


Hamilton . 








200 


543,936 00 


30 


Haverhill . 








4,226 


10,984,538 00 


6 00 


Ipswich . 








880 


2,211,187 00 


1 21 


Lawrence . 








7,728 


23,329,454 00 


12 63 


Lynn 








8,419 


27,713,391 00 


14 92 


Lynnfield . 








200 


841,885 00 


45 


Manchester 








471 


1,830,385 00 


98 


Marblehead 








2,130 


4,247,711 00 


2 37 


Merriraac . 








705 


968,845 00 


56 


Methuen . 








1,038 


2,429,809 00 


1 34 


Middleton 








237 


475,582 00 


27 


Nahant . 








169 


8.119,833 00 


4 14 


Newbury . 








312 


1,062,203 00 


57 


Newburyport 








3,208 


7,975,814 00 


4 37 


North Andovei 








796 


2,278,826 00 


1 24 


Peabody , 








2,168 


6,763,364 00 


3 65 


Rockport . 








1,097 


2,184,509 00 


1 22 


Rowley . 








309 


562,950 00 


32 


Salem 








6,271 


27,674,630 00 


14 69 


Sahsbury . 








1,200 


2,189,333 00 


1 23 


Saugus 








632 


1,888,960 00 


1 02 


Swampscott 








612 


2,695,681 00 


1 43 


Topsfield . 








307 


783,413 00 


43 


Wenham . 








232 


609,392 00 


33 


West Newbury 






532 


1,122,416 00 


62 


Total . 








55,625 


$174,272,302 00 


$94 13 



Valuation of the Commonivealth. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



183 









Tax of $1,000, 


TOWKS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Ashfield 


342 


$544,556 00 


$0 31 


Bernardston 








243 


426,528 00 


24 


Buckland . 








461 


593,489 00 


35 


Charlemont 








260 


356,808 00 


21 


Colrain . 








397 


695,501 00 


39 


Conway . 








378 


836,555 00 


46 


Deerfield . 








808 


1,710,340 00 


95 


Erving 








249 


346.218 00 


20 


Gill . . 








193 


502,043 00 


27 


Greenfield 








929 


3,300,622 00 


1 77 


Hawley . 








159 


157,354 00 


10 


Heath 








149 


191,401 00 


11 


Leverett . 








224 


333,626 00 


19 


Leyden 








111 


228,748 00 


13 


Monroe 








44 


43,214 00 


03 


Montague . 








803 


2,100,063 00 


1 15 


New Salem 








262 


325,395 00 


19 


Northfield 








433 


757,180 00 


43 


Orange 








860 


1,584,615 00 


89 


Rowe 








147 


174,826 00 


10 


Shelbnrne 








380 


973,093 00 


53 


Shutesbury 








144 


166,806 00 


10 


Sunderland 








217 


482,846 00 


27 


Warwick . 








224 


298,435 00 


17 


Wendell . 








133 


171,910 00 


10 


Whately . 








283 


820,401 00 


44 


Total . 








8,833 


$18,122,573 00 


$10 08 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 



Agawam 


595 


$1,277,089 00 


$0 71 


Blandford 








253 


407,798 00 


23 


Brimfield . 








302 


593,247 00 


33 


Chester 








374 


533,469 00 


31 


Chicopee . 








2,522 


5,861,5.59 00 


3 23 


Granville . 








322. 


404,157 00 


24 


Hampden* 








_ 


_ 


_ 


Holland . 








80 


122,299 00 


07 


Holyoke . 








3,559 


10,631,605 00 


5 76 


Longmeadow 








402 


1,417,694 00 


76 


Ludlow . 








307 


548,863 00 


31 


Monson . 








755 


1,441,257 00 


81 


Montgomery 








84 


141,298 00 


08 


Palmer 








1,006 


1,854,962 00 


1 04 


Russell . 








163 


430,520 00 


23 


Southwick 








300 


635,669 00 


35 



* Incorporated from Wilbraham, Mar. 28, 1878. 



184 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



HAMPDEN COUNTY— Concluded. 



TOWNS. 



PoUs. 



Property. 



Tax of $1,000, 
includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 



Springfield 
Tolland - 
Wales 
Westfield . 
West Springfield 
Wilbraham 



Total 



8,160 
128 
276 

2,439 
970 
591 



$41,742,118 00 

236,400 00 

429,799 00 

7,337,548 00 

3,081,937 00 

964,845 00 



23,588 



$80,094,133 00 



$22 03 

13 

25 

3 97 

1 66 

55 



$43 05 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 



Amherst 


937 


$2,588,314 00 


$141 


Belchertown 








573 


1,069,399 00 


60 


Chesterfield 








207 


320,022 00 


18 


Cummington 








261 


428,422 00 


24 


Easthampton 








793 


2,623,493 00 


1 41 


Enfield . 








304 


772,795 00 


42 


Goshen 








95 


124,888 00 


07 


Granby 








219 


518,965 00 


29 


Greenwich 








186 


307,347 00 


17 


Hadley . 
Hatfield . 








582 


1,473,127 00 


81 








409 


1,323,563 00 


71 


Huntington 
Middlefield 








250 


519,007 00 


29 








158 


386,722 00 


21 


Northampton 








2,423 


7,857,455 00 


4 23 


Pelhara . 








157 


160,807 00 


10 


Piainfield . 








158 


216,125 00 


13 


Prescott . 








132 


195,335 00 


11 


South Hadley 








713 


1,921,344 00 


1 05 


Southampton 








274 


497,224 00 


28 


Ware 








950 


1,926,153 00 


1 07 


Westhampton 








116 


294,347 00 


16 


Williamsburg 
Worthington 








565 
220 


1,378,175 00 
342,834 00 


76 

20 


Total . 






• 


10,682 


$27,245,863 00 


$14 90 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Acton 
Arlington 
Ashby 
Ashland 
Ayer . 




$1,325,424 00 

6,377,689 00 

545,364 00 

1,468,016 00 

1,092,883 00 



$0 72 

3 34 

30 

81 

61 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 

MIDDLESEX COXmTY — Co7icluded. 



185 









Tax of $1,000. 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Bedford 


253 


$760,901 00 


$0 41 


Belmont . 








535 


4,305,961 00 


2 24 


Billerica . 








490 


1,771,662 00 


95 


Boxborough 








86 


271,701 00 


15 


Burlington 








195 


530,794 00 


29 


Cambridge 








11,983 


66,081,126 00 


34 77 


Carlisle . 








164 


381,350 00 


21 


Chelmsford 








642 


1,504,912 00 


83 


Concord . 








713 


3,157,531 00 


1 68 


Dracut 








335 


1,045,853 00 


56 


Dunstable 








138 


340,832 00 


19 


Everett 








927 


4,380,269 00 


2 32 


Framingham 








1,448 


4,845,885 00 


2 61 


Groton 








467 


2,306,032 00 


1 22 


HoUiston . 








9.32 


1,863,695 00 


1 04 


Hopkinton 








1,056 


2,319,537 00 


1 28 


Hudson 








953 


1,687,492 00 


95 


Lexington 








731 


3,067,692 00 


1 63 


I^ineoln 








235 


881,382 00 


47 


Littleton . 








245 


775,066 00 


42 


Lowell 








11,336 


39^00,500 00 


21 10 


Maiden . 








2,570 


9,731,455 00 


5 20 


Marlborough 








2,082 


3,285,860 00 


1 88 


Maynard . 








518 


1,336,342 00 


73 


Medford . 








1,785 


9,736,661 00 


5 13 


Melrose . 








1,039 


4,473,067 00 


2 38 


Natick 








1,864 


3,708,110 00 


2 07 


Newton . 








3,917 


30,867,560 00 


16 08 


North Reading 








265 


449,198 00 


25 


Pepperell . 








551 


1,457,142 00 


80 


Reading . 








882 


2,377,630 00 


1 30 


Sherborn . 








281 


927,158 00 


50 


Shirley . 








318 


975,348 00 


53 


Somerville 








5,341 


29,334,350 00 


15 44 


Stoneham . 








1,350 


3,129,181 00 


1 72 


Stow . 








274 


714,050 00 


39 


Sudbury . 








337 


1,043,080 00 


56 


Tewksbury 








286 


929,408 00 


50 


Town send 








613 


776,758 00 


46 


Tyngsborough 








161 


309,502 00 


17 


Wakefield 








1,484 


4.706,056 00 


2 54 


Waltham , 








2,552 


10;257,698 00 


5 47 


Watertown 








1,285 


8,170,369 00 


4 28 


Way laud . 
Westford . 








452 
517 


1,131,363 00 
1,115,088 00 


62 
62 


Weston 








345 


1,737,649 00 


92 


Wilmington 








255 


542,091 00 


30 


Winchester 


. 






849 


4,781,527 00 


2 51 


Woburn . 


• 






2,924 


8,767,630 00 


4 75 


Total . . 


• 






71,928 


$299,160,880 00 


$159 20 



24 



186 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



NANTUCKET COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000, 
includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Nantucket .... 


837 


$2,446,936 00 


$1 33 


Total 


837 


$2,446,936 00 


$1 33 


NORFOLK COUNTY. 



Bellingham 
Braintree . 
Brookline 
Canton 
Cohasset . 
Dedham . 
Dover 
Foxborough 
Franklin . 
Holbrook . 
Hyde Park 
Medfield . 
Medway . 
Milton 
Needham . 
Norfolk . 
Norwood . 
Quincy 
Randolph . 
Sharon 
Stoughton 
Walpole . 
"Weymouth 
Wrentham 



Total 



$531,926 00 
2,733,625 00 
30,769,194 00 
3,242,254 00 
2,411,466 00 
6,250,090 00 

444,801 00 
1,761,058 00 
1,486,788 00 
1,598,675 00 
6,545,203 00 
1,043,036 00 
1,825,077 00 
8,275,712 00 
4,576,394 00 

5.39,881 00 
1,759,652 00 
7,203,329 00 
2,471,764 00 

966,313 00 
2,487,872 00 
1,533,404 00 
6,119,045 00 
1,160,069 00 



$97,736,628 00 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 



Abington 


1,018 


$1,657,879 00 


$0 94 


Bridgewater . 






989 


2,620,298 00 


1 43 


Brockton . 






2,894 


5,590,721 00 


3 13 


Carver 






265 


597,290 00 


33 


Duxbury . 






680 


1,340,-538 00 


75 


East Bridgewater 






787 


1,367,826 00 


77 


Halifax . . 






169 


291,943 00 


17 


Hanover . 






469 


985,625 00 


55 


Hanson 


363 


572,791 00 


33 



Yaluation of the Commomuealth , 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Concluded. 



187 









Tax of $1,0(10, 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Hinghara 


1,234 


$3,590,222 00 


$1 95 


Hull . 






78 


617,251 00 


32 


Kingston . 






452 


1,748,679 00 


93 


Lakeville • 






305 


572,735 00 


32 


Marion 






232 


489,064 00 


27 


Marsh field 






502 


978,188 00 


55 


Mattapoisett . 






343 


1,266,062 00 


68 


Middleborough 






1,38S 


2,556,523 00 


1 44 


Pembroke 






398 


714,449 00 


40 


Plymouth 






1,633 


4,565,865 00 


2 48 


Plympton 






197 


310,817 00 


18 


Rochester 






289 


493,931 00 


28 


Rockland . . 






1,152 


2,030,697 00 


1 15 


Scituate . 






654 


1,461,254 00 


81 


South Abington 






686 


1,393,904 00 


78 


South Scituate 






475 


1,129,694 00 


62 


Wareham 






761 


1,124,248 00 


65 


West Bridgewater 






461 


923,115 00 


52 


Total . 






18,874 


$40,991,609 00 


$22 73 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston 

Chelsea 

Revere 

Winthrop 


84,684 

5,374 

404 

167 


$795,638,935 00 

18,270,619 00 

1,971,955 00 

1,074,126 00 


$412 74 

9 82 

1 04 

56 


Total 


90,629 


$816,955,635 00 


$424 16 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Ashburnham . . . . 


650 


$1,112,682 00 


$0 63 


Athol 








1,179 


2,855,548 00 


1 57 


Auburn . 






. 


284 


590,426 00 


33 


Barre 






. 


698 


1,956,812 00 


1 06 


Berlin 






. 


283 


489,691 00 


28 


Blackstone 






. 


1,049 


2,143,923 00 


1 19 


Bolton 








283 


556,372 00 


31 


Boylston . 






. 


214 


581,669 00 


32 


Brookfield 






. 


745 


1,411,318 00 


79 


Charlton . 






. 


501 


1,003,629 00 


56 


Clinton . 






. 


1,591 


4,548,192 00 


2 47 


Dana 


206 


290,184 00 


17 



188 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



WORCESTER COJT^TY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000, 


TOWNS. 


Polls. 


Property. 


iiicliul. Polls 
at one-tenth 
of mill each. 


Douglas . . 


607 


$922,375 00 


$0 53 


Dudley . 






619 


1,039,645 00 


59 


Fitcliburg . 






3,733 


13,217,220 00 


7 09 


Gardner . 






1,135 


2,103,023 00 


1 18 


Grafton . 






1,000 


1,9.50,459 00 


1 09 


Hardwick 






501 


1,093,452 00 


61 


Harvard . 






348 


1,131,722 00 


61 


Holden . 






520 


982,204 00 


55 


Hubbardston . 






420 


883,049 00 


49 


Lancaster . 






423 


2,412,592 00 


1 27 


Leicester . 






713 


2,194,297 00 


1 19 


Leominster 






1,473 


3,941,878 00 


2 15 


Lunenburg 






307 


785,049 00 


43 


Mendon . 






316 


659,572 00 


37 


Milford . . 






2,700 


5,107,290 00 


2 86 


Millbury . 






1,0.50 


2,680.798 00 


1 47 


New Braintree 






154 


501,115 00 


27 


Northborough . 






385 


1,321,1.53 00 


71 


Nortbbridge . 






900 


2,282,544 00 


1 25 


North Brookfield 






1,048 


1,848,489 00 


1 04 


Oakham . 






230 


347,879 00 


20 


Oxford . 






800 


1,529,756 00 


86 


Paxton . 






174 


321,911 00 


18 


Petersham 






290 


713,469 00 


39 


Phillipston 






189 


317,555 00 


18 


Princeton . 






314 


932,909 00 


51 


Royalston 






345 


760,525 00 


42 


Rutland . 






2.54 


460,895 00 


26 


Shrewsbury . 






426 


1,157,279 00 


63 


Southborough . 






545 


1,401,967 00 


77 


Southbridge 






1,235 


3,210,879 00 


1 75 


Spencer . 






1,262 


2,786,234 00 


1 54 


Sterling . 






439 


1,166,371 00 


64 


Sturbridge 






575 


1,140,047 00 


64 


Sutton 






688 


1,469,105 00 


82 


Templeton 






765 


1,314,781 00 


74 


Upton 






503 


859,936 00 


49 


TJxbridge . 






686 


1,872,254 00 


1 02 


"Warren . 






796 


1,557,419 00 


87 


Webster . 






1,359 


2,486,999 00 


1 40 


Westborougli . 






1,049 


2,448,983 00 


1 35 


West Boylston 






665 


1,161,436 00 


66 


West Brookfield 






442 


848,347 00 


48 


Westminster . 






443 


874,917 00 


49 


Winchendon . 






1,041 


2,245,237 00 


1 24 


Worcester 






13,341 


53,488,687 00 


28 51 


Total . . 




• 


54,881 


$151,474,149 00 


$82 47 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



189 



TOWNS IN MASSACHUSETTS, 

AVITH THE 

POST-OFFICES THEREIN. 



TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


Abington 


( Abington. 
. ] North Abington. 
( West Abington. 


Athol . 


(Athol. 
Athol Centre. 
' South AthoL 


Acton 
Acushnet 


("Acton. 
South Acton. 

• ] West Acton. 

.Ellsworth. 

( Acushnet. 

• \ Long Plain. 


Attleborough . < 


'Attleborough. 

AttleboroughFalls 

N. Attleborough. 

S. Attleborough. 

Hebronville. 
. Dodgeville. 


Adams . 


. Adams. 


Auburn . 


Auburn. 


Agawavi 

Alford . 
Amesbury * 


( Agawam. 
• \ Feeding Hills. 

. Alford. 

. Amesbury. 


Ayer 
Barnstable . • 


Ayer. 

Barnstable. 
West Barnstable. 
Centreville. 
Marston's Mills, 
Hyannis. 


Amherst 


i Amherst. 
. \ North Amherst. 
( South Amherst. 




Hyannis Port. 
Cotuit. 
.Osterville. 


Andover 


( Andover. 
• \ Ballard Vale. 


Barre . 


Barre. 

Barre Plains. 
. Smithville. 


Arlhigton 
Ashburnham 


( Arlington. 
■ 1 Arlington Heights. 

( Ashburnham. 
. j Ashburnh'mDep't. 


Becket . 


' Becket. 
West Becket. 
, Becket Centre. 




( Burrageville. 


Bedford 


Bedford. 


Ashby . 


. Ashby. 


Belchertoicn . 


Belchertown. 


Ashfield . 
Ashland 


Ashfield. 
• South Ashfield. 

. Ashland. 


Bellingham . 


Bellingham. 
N. Bellingham. 
Caryville. 




* See M 


errimac. 





190 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNS. 

Belmont 
Berkley . 
Berlin . 
Bernardston 

Beverly . 
Billerica 

Black-stone 

Blandford 
Bolton . 



Boston 



Boxborough 
Boxford 

Boylston 
Bradford 

Braintree 



POST-OFFICES. 

( Belmont. 
\ Waverly. 

, Berkley. 

\ Berlin. 

I West Berlin. 

Bernardston. 

( Beverly. 
, ] Beverly Farms. 
( North Beverly. 

fBillerica. 
J Korth Billerica. 
' 1 East Billerica. 
[South Billerica. 

( Blackstone. 
, \ East Blackstone. 
( Millville. 

( Blandford. 
• \ North Blandford. 

. Bolton. 

f Boston. 

South Boston. 

East Boston. 

Station A. 

Roxbury. 

West Roxbury. 
■ Jamaica Plain. 

Roslindale. 

Brighton. 

AUston. 

Dorchester. 

Mattapan. 

Charlestown. 

West Acton P. O. 

Boxford. 
West Boxford. 

Boylston. 
Boylston Centre. 

Bradford. 



Braintree. 
South Braintree. 
East Braintree. 



Brewster 

Bridgewater 
Brim field 
Brockton 

Brookfield 

Brookline 
Buckland 
Burlington 

Cambridge 

Canton . 
Carlisle . 

Carver . 
Charlemo7it 

Charlton 
Chatham 



POST-OFFICES. 

Brewster. 
East Brewster. 
AVest Brewster. 
South Brewster. 

Bridgewater. 
Scotland. 

Brimfield. 
East Brimfield. 
West Brimfield. 

Brockton. 
Campello. 

Brookfield. 
East Brookfield. 
West Brookfield. 

Brookline. 

Buckland. 

, Burlington. 

r Cambridge.* 
J Cambridgeport.* 
; N. Cambridge.* 
I, East Cambridge.* 

( Canton. 
■ \ Ponkapoag. 

. Carhsle. 

Carver. 
North Carver. 
South Carver. 

Charlemont. 
East Charlemont. 
Zoar. 

Charlton. 
Charlton City. 
Charlton Depot. 

Chatham. 
Chatham Port. 
North Chatham. 
South Chatham. 
West Chatham. 



* Sub-office to Boston. Postage, 2 cents from Boston. 



Post-0 ffices in Massachusetts. 



191 



TOWNS. 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea . 
Chesh ire 

Chester . 

Chesterfield 
Chicopee 

Chilmark 

Clarksburg 
Clinton . 

Cohasset 
Colrain . 

Concord 
Conway . 



Cummington . ■{ 



POST-OmCES. 

Chelmsford. 
I^. Chelmsford. 
West Chelmsford. 
So. Chelmsford. 

, Chelsea Station.* 

, Cheshire. 

r Chester. 
I Chester Centre. 
'1 North Chester. 
l_ Hampden. 

( Chesterfield. 
• I West Chesterfield. 

Chicopee. 
Chicopee Falls. 
Willimanset. 

Chilmark. 
Gay Head. 

Clarksburg. 

(N. Adams P.O.) 

Clinton. 

Cohasset. 

Xantasket. 

Beechwood. 

r Colrain. 
I Adams%'ille. 
.\ Elm Grove. 
I Griswoldville. 
[Shattucksville. 

f Concord. 
! Westvale. 
) Warnerville. 
I, Prison Station. 

. Conway. 

C Cummington. 

! Cummington W. 



Village. 



Dalton 
Dana 



{ Swift River. 
Dalton. 



Dana. 
North Dana. 



Danvers 

Dartmouth 

Dedham 
Deerfield 

Dennis . 

Dighton 

Douglas 

Dover 
Dracut . 

Dudley . 

Dunstable 

Duxbury 

East Bridge- 
water . 

Eastham 
Easthampton, 

Easton . 



POST-OFFICES. 

r Danvers. 
I Danvers Centre. 
. <^ Danvers Poi-t. 
I Tapleyville. 
L Asylum Station. 

f Dartmouth, 

! North Dartmouth. 

■ 1 South Dartmouth, 
t Apponegansett. 

( Dedham. 
. \ West Dedham. 
( Islington. 

( Deerfield. 
. \ South Deerfield. 
( West Deerfield. 

["Dennis. 
Dennis Port. 
. < East Dennis. 
I South Dennis. 
tWest Dennis. 

< Dighton. 

■ / North Dighton. 

( Douglas. 

■ \ East Douglas. 



. Dover. 

• Dracut. 

\ Dudley. 

* \ West Dudley. 

• Dunstable, 
f Duxbury. 
I West Duxbury. 

* I South Duxbury. 
(.Island Creek. 

Elmwood. 

E. Bridgewater. 

Mount Tom. 

Eastham. 
North Eastham. 



Easthampton. 
Easton. 
North Easton. 
South Easton. 



* Postage, 2 cents from Boston and its stations. 



192 



Post-Offices in 3fassachiisetts, 



TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 




Edffartown. 




'Magnolia. 


Edgartown . 


Vineyard Grove. 




Bay View. 
Gloucester. 




Egremont. 


Gloucester . i 


East Gloucester. 


Egremont 


North Egremont. 




West Gloucester. 




South Egremont. 




Lanesville. 
Annisquam. 


Enfield . 


Enfield. 










Goshen . 


Goshen. 


Erving . 


Erving. 




Gosnold. 


Essex 


Essex. 


Gosnold 


(Wood's Holl 
1 P.O.) 
'Grafton. 


Everett . 


Everett. 




Fairhaven . 


Fairhaven. 


Grafton . . < 


New Eng. Village. 
Saundersville. 


Fall River . 


Fall River. 
Steep Brook. 


Granby . 


.Farnumsville. 

Granby. 




'Falmouth. 
East Falmouth. 
North Falmouth. 


Chranville 


Granville Corner. 
; East Granville. 
West Granville. 




West Falmouth. 






Falmouth 


Wood's Holl. 


Great Bar- 


Great Barrington. 




Quissett. 
Hatchville. 


rington 


[ Huusatonic. 

. Van Dusenville. 




. Waquoit. 






Fitchburg 


Fitchburg. 
West Fitchburg. 


Greenfield . 


( Greenfield. 
Factory Village. 


Florida . 


Florida. 
Hoosac Tunnel. 


Greenwich . 


Greenwich. 
\ Greenw'ch Village. 




Foxborough. 


Groton . 


Groton. 
West Groton. 


Foxborough . 


East Foxborough. 








West Foxborough. 




Groveland. 






Groveland 


South Groveland. 




Framingham. 






Framingham 


S. Framingham. 
. Saxonville. 


Hadley . 


Hadley. 
North Hadley. 


Franklin 


Franklin. 
South Franklin. 


Halifax . 
Hampden 


Halifax. 
Hampden. 


Freetown 


Freetown. 
East Freetown. 


Hamilton 


Hamilton. 
Asbury Grove. 


Gardner 


Gardner. 
South Gardner. 


Hancock 


Hancock. 
Hanover. 






Hanover . 


South Hanover. 


Georgetown . 


Georgetown. 




West Hanover. 


mil 


, Gill. 

' Riverside. 


Hanson . 


Hanson. 
South Hanson. 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



193 



Mardwick 
Halyard 

JIanoich 

Hatfield . 

Haverhill 

Hawley . 
Heath . 

Hingham 

Hinsdale 
Holden . 

Holbrook 
Holland . 

Holliston 
Holyoke . 
Hopkinton 

Hubbardston 

Hudson . 
Hull 



POST-OrFICES. 

Hard wick. 

Gilbortville. 

Furnace. 

( Harvard. 
\ Still River. 

fHarwich. 
j Harwich Port. 
1 East Harwich. 
I North Harwich. 
I South. Harwich. 
I. West Harwich. 

I Hatfield. 

I North Hatfield. 

Haverhill. 
East Haverhill. 
Ayer's Village. 

Hawley. 
West Hawley. 

Heath. 

Hinghara. 
Hingham Centre. 
South Hingham. 

Hinsdale. 

Holden. 
JeffersonviUe. 

Holbrook. 
Brookville. 

Holland. 

Holliston. 
East Holliston. 
Braggville. 

\ Holyoke. 
/ Ireland. 

( Hopkinton. 
I Woodville. 
( Hayden Row. 

Hubbardston. 
E. Hubbardston. 
Williamsville. 

Hudson. 

Hull. 

25 



TOWNS. 

Huntington . 

Hyde Park . 
Ipswich . 
Kingston 
Lakeville 
Lancaster 

Lanesborough 

Lawrence 

Lee . 
Leicester 

Lenox 

Leominster . 

Leverett . 

Lexington 
Leyden . 
Lincoln . 
Littleton 
Longmeadoio, 

Lowell . 

Ludlow . 
Lunenburg 



POST-OFFICES. 

Huntington. 
Xorwich. 

Hyde Park. 
Readville. 

Ipswich. 

Kingston. 
Island Creek. 

Lakeville. 

Lancaster. 
South Lancaster. 

Lanesborough. 
Berkshire. 

]^awrence. 

( Lee. 

I East Lee. 

( South Lee. 

( Leicester. 

< Cherry Valley. 

( Rochdale. 

Lenox. 

Lenox Furnace. 

New Lenox. 

I Leominster. 
( N. Leominster. 

( Leverett. 

} North Leverett. 

( Lexington. 

I East Lexington. 

Leyden. 

( Lincoln. 

/ South Lincoln. 

Littleton. 

( Longmeadow. 
I E. Longmeadow. 

\ Lowell. 

\ Middlesex Village. 

{ Ludlow. 

) Ludlow Centre. 



Lunenburg. 



194 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


Lynn 
Lynnfield 


Lynn. 

( Lynnfield. 

\ Lynnfield Centre. 


Middlefield . 
Middleton . 


( Middlefield. 
\ Bancroft. 

Middleton. 


Maiden . 


( Maiden. 

\ Maplewood. 

( Linden. 


3Iilford . 


( Milford. 

j South Milford. 

( Hopedale. 


Manchester 
Mansfield 


Manchester. 

Mansfield. 
West Mansfield. 


Millbury 


\ Millbury. 

\ West Millbury. 

Milton. 


Marblehead 


. Marblehead. 


3Iilton . 


East Milton. 
Blue Hill. 


Marion . 


Marion. 


Monroe . 


Monroe. 


Marlborough 
Marslifield 


. Marlborough. 

f Centre Marshfield. 

Marshfield. 
{ North Marshfield. 

East Marshfield. 
, Brant Rock. 


Monson . 
Montague 


Monson, 

["Montague. 
J Montague City. 
1 Turner's Falls. 
[Miller's Falls. 


Mashpee 
Mattapoisett 


. Mashpee. 
. Mattapoisett. 


Monterey 


Monterey. 


Maynard 


. Maynard. 


Montgomery 


Montgomery. 


Medfield 
Medford 


. Medfield. 

fMedford. 
j West Medford. 
•] College HilL 
LGlenwood. 

r Medway. 
J East Medway. 
•] West Medway. 
[Rockville. 


ML Wash'gfn 

Nahant . 
Nantucket 


\ Mt. Washington. 
\ South Egremont. 

Nahant. 

Nantucket. 


Medway . 


Natick . 


{ Natick. 

\ South Natick. 


Melrose . 
Mendon . 
Merrimac 


( Melrose. 

• \ Melrose Highlands. 

. Mendon. 

\ Merrimac. 

• / Merrimac Port. 


Needham 


Needham. 
Wellesley. 
{ Grantville. 
Highlandville. 
.Charles Riv. Vil. 


Methuen 


. Methuen. 

'Middleborough. 
E. Middleborough. 
A N. Middleborough. 
S. Middleborough. 
.Rock. 


New Ashford 


New Ashford. 


Middleboro' 


New Bedford 
N. Braintree 


New Bedford. 
New Braintree. 



i 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



195 



N. Marlboro^ 



Ifew Salem 



Nexohury 



POST-OFFICES. 

fNew Marlborough. 
I Hartsville. 
{ Mill River. 
I Southfield. 
t Clayton. 

Cooleyville. 
New fcjalem. 
N. New Salem. 
[Millington. 

f Newbury. 

\ Bvfield. 

L South Byfield. 



Neioburyport, Newburyport. 



f Newton. 

I Newtonville. 

Auburndale. 
I West Newton. 
.-^ Newton Centre. 
I Newton L. Falls. 

Newton U. Falls. 
I Chestnut Hill. 
L Newton Highlands. 

\ Norfolk. 
• / Franklin City. 

\ North Adams. 
■ \ Blackinton. 

( North Andover. 
' \ N. Andover Depot. 

North Brookfield. 

North Reading. 

[■Northampton. 

Florence. 
! Leeds. 
I Loudville. 
I West Farms, 
t. Smith's Ferry. 

Northborough. 

Northbridge. 
Northb'dge Centre. 
Whitinsville. 

Northfield. 
Northtield Farms. 
West Northfield. 

Norton. 
East Norton. 
Barrowsville. 

Norwood. 



Nexoton . 

Norfolk . 
N. Adams 

N. Andover , 

2f. Brookfield, 
N. Reading . 

Northampton, 

Northboro' . 
NorthbyHdge . 

Northfield . 

Norton . 
Norwood 



TOWNS. 

Oakham 
Orange . 

Orleans . 

Otis 
Oxford , 

Palmer . 

Paxton . 
Peabody 
Pelham . 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

Peru 

Petersham, 

Phillipston 

Pittsfield 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 
Plympton 



POST-OFFICES. 

Oakham. 

Cold Bi-'k Springs. 

Orange. 
North Orange. 

Orleans. 
East Orleans. 
South Orleans. 

\ Otis. 

■ \ West Otis. 

\ Oxford. 

• \ North Oxford. 

(Palmer. 
Bond's Village. 
Thorndike. 
Three Rivers. 

. Paxton. 

I Peabody. 
South Peabody. 
West Dan vers. 

Pelham. 

C Pembroke, 
j North Pembroke. 

■ I East Pembroke. 
[Bryantville. 

( Pepperell. 

■ \ East Pepperell. 

, Peru. 

Petersham. 
, Phillipston. 

( Pittsfield. 

• I West Pittsfield. 

, Plainfield. 

r Plymouth. 
J South Plymouth. 
' ] Chiltonville. 
t North Plymouth. 



1 Plympton. 
Silver Lake. 
North Plympton. 



196 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES, 


TOWNS. 


POST-OFFICES. 


Prescott . 


\ Prescott. 
• \ North Prescott. 


Salem . 


Salem. 




'Princeton. 


Salisbury 


Salisbury. 
East Salisbury. 




East Princeton. 






Princeton 


. ^ Mt. Wachusett. 




'Sandisfield. 
New Boston. 
Montville. 




1 Princeton Depot. 
L Brook Station. 


Sandisfield . - 






. South Sandisfield 


Provincetown 


, Provincetown. 




'Sandwich. 




'Atlantic. 




East Sandwich. 




Wollaston. 




North Sandwich. 


Quincy . 


A Quincy. 




South Sandwich. 




Quincy Point. 
^ West Quincy. 


Sandwich 


West Sandwich. 
Monument. 
Monument Beach. 


Randolph 


. Randolpli. 




Pocasset. 
Cohasset Narrows 


Raynham 


( Raynham. 
• ( North Raynham. 




.Spring Hill. 


Reading 


. Reading. 


Saugus . 


Saugus. 
East Saugus. 
Clifton Dale. 


Rehoboth 


( Rehoboth. 
■ \ North Rehoboth. 










Savoy . 


Savoy. 


Revere . 


. Revere.* 




^Scituate. 


Richmond 


k Richmond. 
' / Richm'nd Furnace. 


Scituate. 


Scituate Centre. 
North Scituate. 
. Greenbush. 


Rochester 


( Rochester. 
• \ North Rochester. 


Seekonk . 


Seekonk. 
South Seekonk.- 


Rockland 


. Rockland. 






Rockport 


( Rockport. 
* / Pigeon Cove. 


Sharon . 


Sharon. 
East Sharon. 


Rowe 


. Rowe. 


Sheffield 


Sheffield. 






Ashley Falls. 


Rowley . 


. Rowley. 




■ Bardwell's Ferry. 

Shelburne. 

Shelburne Falls. 
.East Shelburne. 


Royalston 


( Royalston. 
• \ South Royalston. 


Shelburne 


Russell . 


. Russell. 


Sherborn 


Sherborn. 


RiUland 


( Rutland. 
. \ West Rutland. 
( North Rutland. 


Shirley 


Shirley. 
Shirley Village. 




* Sub-offict 


; to Boston. 





Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



197 



TOWNS. 

/Shrewsbury . 
Shutesbury . 
Somerset . . 

Somerville 

So. Abington . 
So. Hadley . 

So. Scituate . 
Southampton, 
Southboro' 

Southbridge 
Southwick 
Spencer . 

Springfield 

Sterling 

Stockbridge . 
Stone ham . . 
Stovghton 

Stow. . . . 



posT-orncES. 
Shrewsbury, 

, Shutesbury. 

■ Somerset. 

C Somerville.* 
J East Somerville.* 
'I Xoith Somerville.* 
(. West Somerville.* 

j South Abington. 
' / So. Abington St'n. 

( South Hadley. 
■) So. Hadley Falls. 

West Scituate. 
South Scituate. 
Ridge Hill. 

Southampton. 

( Southborough. 
< Cordaville. 



( Fayville. 

( Southbridge. 
\ Globe Village. 

Southwick. 

(Spencer. 

\ North Spencer. 

f Springfield. 
{ Indian Orchard. 
I, Bright wood. 

(■Sterling. 

J Sterling Junction. 
1 West Sterling. 
I. Pratt's Junction. 

f Stockbridge. 
^ Glen Dale. 
[ Curtisville. 

Stoneham. 

( Stoughton. 

\ East Stoughton. 

( North Stoughton. 

j Stow. 

/ Rock Bottom. 



TOWNS. 

Sturbridge 

Sudbury . 
Sunderland 

Sutton . . 

Swampscott 
Swansea . 

Taunton . 

Templeton 

Tewksbui^ 

Tisbury 

Tolland . 
Topsfield . 

Townsend . 

Truro . . 

Tyngsboro* 
Tyringham 

Upton . . 



POST-OFFICES. 

i Sturbridge. 
' ( Fiskdale. 

f Sudbury. 

! South S'udbury. 

■ ] North Sudbury. 
tNobscot. 

. Sunderland. 

f Sutton. 
! West Sutton. 
'I Manchaug. 
t Wilkinsonville. 

( Swampscott. 

■ \ Beach Bluff. 

I Swansea. 

/ North Swansea. 

Taunton. 
East Taunton. 
Myricksville. 

f Templeton. 
I East Templeton. 
I Baldwinsville. 
I Otter Rivep. 

Tewksbury. 

( Vineyard Haven, 
] West Tisbury. 
( North Tisbury. 

Tolland. 

Topsfield. 

i Townsend. 

j Townsend Harbor. 

( West Townsend. 

Truro. 

North Truro. 
South Truro. 

Tj-ngsborough. 

Tyringham. 

Upton. 
"West Upton. 



* Sub-office to Boston. 



198 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



TOWNS. 

Vxbriclge . . 

Wakefield . . 
Wales . . . 

Walpole . . 

Waltham . . 

Ware . . . 

Wareham . . 

Warren . . . 

Warwick . . 
Washington . 

Watertoicn . 

Wayland 

Webster 

Wellfleet 

Wendell 

Wenham 
W. Boylston 



West Bridge- 
water . . . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Uxbridge. 
North Uxbridge. 

Greenwood. 
• Wakefield 

"Wales. 

Walpole. 
East Walpole. 
South Walpole. 

Waltham. 

Ware. 



Wareham. 
West Wareham. 
South Wareham. 

Warren. 
West Warren. 

Warwick. 

Washington. 

Watertown. 
Mount Auburn.* 

Wayland. 
Cochituate. 

Webster. 

Wellfleet. 
South Wellfleet. 

Wendell. 
Wendell Depot. 
Locke's Village. 

Wenham. 

West Boylston. 
Oakdale. 

Cochesett. 

W. Bridgewater. 

Mattfield. 



W. Brookfield, West Brookfield. 



TOWNS. 

W. Newbury . 

West Spring- 
field . . . 

West Stock- 
bridge . . 

Westborough . 
Westfield . . 

Westford . . 

Westhampton, 
Westminster . 
Weston . . . 

Westport 



Weymouth . -i 

Whately . . 
Wilbraham . 
Williamsb'rg, 

Williamst'wn, 

Wilmington . 



POST-OFFICES. 

West Newbury. 

West Springfield. 

Ashleyville. 

Mittineague. 

State Line. 

West Stockbridge. 

Rock Dale Mills. 

Westborough. 

Westfield. 

Westford. 
Forge Village. 
Graniteville. 

Nashoba. 

Westhampton. 

Westminster. 
Westmins'r Depot. 
So. Westminster. 

, Weston. 

r Westport. 

I Westport Point. 

<( South Westport. 

Central Village. 

[North Westport. 

f Weymouth. 

' East Weymouth. 

North Weymouth. 
[ South Weymouth. 

Whately. 
East Whately. 

Wilbraham. 
No. Wilbraham. 

Williamsburg. 
Haydenville. 

Williamstown. 
S. Williamstown. 
Sweet's Corner. 

Wilmington. 
N. Wilmington. 



* Sub-oflice to Boston. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



199 



TOWNS. 

Winchendon 
Winchester 

Windsor . 

Winthrop . 

Woburn 

Worcester . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Winchendon. 

Winchester. 

Windsor. 
East Windsor. 

Winthrop.* 

Woburn. 
Montvale. 
North Woburn. 

Worcester. 



POST-OFFICES. 



{Worthington. 
W. Wortbington. 
Ringville. 
So. W( " 



Wrentha7n 



Yarmouth . 



"orthington. 

rWrentham. 
J W. Wrenthara. 
•] Plainville. 
[Sheldonville. 

r Yarmouth, 
j Yarmouth Port. 
' j South Yarmouth. 
1 West Yarmouth. 



* Sub-office to Boston. 



200 U. /S. Postal Beg Illations . 



ABRIDGMENT OF U. S. POSTAL REGULATIONS. 



POSTAGE. 



TO ANY PART OF THE U. S. AND THE TEBRITORIES; AND TO THE 
DOMINION OF CANADA. 



Three cenU for each half ounce, or fraction thereof, on letters, sealed 
packages, mail-matter, wholly or partly in writing, except local or drop- 
letters. 

Two centa per half ounce, or fraction thereof, on drop-letters where 
free delivery by carriers is established : where such free delivery is not 
established the rate is one cent. 

One cent for two ounces, or fraction thereof, on almanacs, books 
(printed), calendars, catalogues, corrected proofs, hand-bills, magazines, 
newspapers, pamphlets, posters, proof-sheets, and circulars. 

One cent for each ounce, or fraction thereof, on blank books, blank 
cards, book manuscript, card-boards, and other flexible material, en- 
gravings, envelopes, letter envelopes, merchandise, photographic views 
printed blanks, printed cards, sample cards, samples of ores, metals, 
minerals, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, and scions. 

Postage to Great Britain and other foreign countries, see 
*' Postage on Foreign Letters." 

REGISTRATION OF DOMESTIC LETTERS. 

The Post-Office Department or its revenue is not by law liable for the 
loss of any registered mail-matter. 

Letters, or other mail-matter on which postage is fully prepaid, can 
be registered for transmission between post-offices in the United States 
or Territories. 

The fee for registering at any post-office in the United States or Ter- 



J 



U. S. Postal Regulations. 201 

Titories, atid addressed to any other office in the United States or Terri- 
lories, is fixed at ten cents, in addition to the regular postage. 

When a " domestic " letter or third class matter is presented for regis- 
tration, the postmaster must require the name and post-office address of 
the sender to be indorsed on the face of the envelope, which must bear 
stacops of sufficient value to prepay both postage and registry fee. 

MONEY-ORDERS. 
Postal conventions for the exchange of money-orders have been con- 
cluded with the following foreign countries: viz., Switzerland, Great 
Britain and Ireland, Germany and Italy; also with the Dominion of 
Canada. 

The exchange of money-orders between the United States and each of 
the countries mentioned is effected through the agency of " International 
Exchange Offices," of which Xew York is the office on the part of the 
United States. Hence, tin international money-order cannot be drawn 
by a postmaster in either country directly upop a postmaster in the other, 
but must be drawn upon the international exchange office. 

The postmaster at any foreign money-order office in the United States 
— the same being designated by the Postmaster-General — will furnish a 
blank form of application, on which the sender must enter all the particu- 
lars of the amount (in United States money), names, address, etc., and 
must state the/«/^ name and exact residence of the person to whom the 
order is to be made payable. The postmaster will then issue an interna- 
. tional order on the postmaster at New York, giving all the particulars 
furnished in the application, and transmit the same, together with the 
coupon. 
The fees or charges on domestic orders are as follows : — 

On orders not exceeding $1.5 10 cents. 

" " over $15 and not exceeding $30 . . . 15 cents. 

'• •' $30 ' $40 . . . 20 cents. 

" '• " $40 " " " $50 . . . 25 cents. 

When a larger sum than fifty dollars is required, additional orders to 
make it up must be obtained. 

Money-Order Offices in Massachusetes : 

Abington. Ashland. Boston. 

Adams. Athol Depot. Brighton Station. 

Araesbury. Ayer. Cambridge Station. 

Amherst. Barnstable. Cambridgeport St'n. 

Andover. Barre. Charlestown Station^ 

Arlington. Berlin. Chelsea Station 

26 



202 



U. S. Postal Regulations. 



Boston — Continued. 

East Boston Station. 

East Cambridge St'n. 

Jamaica Plain. 

Roxbury Station. 

Somerville Station. 

South Boston Stat'n. 

Stat'n A, South End. 
Brewster. 
Bridgewater. 
Brimfield. 
Brockton. 
Brookline. 
Canton. 
Chatham. 
Chicopee. 
Chicopee Falls. 
Clinton. 
College Hill. 
Concord. 
Conway. 
Cummington. 
Dedhara. 
Dennis. 

East Bridgewater. 
East Douglas. 
Easthampton. 
Edgartown. 
Fall River. 
Fitchburg. 
Foxborough. 
Franklin. 
Gardner. 
Gloucester. 
Great Barrington. 
Greenfield. 
Harwich. 
Haverhill. 
Hinsdale. 
Holliston. 
Holyoke. 
Hopkinton. 
Hudson. 



Huntington. 

Hyannis. 

Lawrence. 

Lee. 

Leeds. 

Leominster. 

Lowell. 

Lynn. 

Maiden. 

Mansfield. 

Marblehead. 

Marlborough. 

Medway. 

Melrose. 

Middleborough. 

Milford. 

Millbnry. 

Miller's Falls. 

Milton. 

Monson. 

Montague. 

Nantucket. 

Natick. 

Needham. 

New Bedford. 

Newburyport. 

Newton. 

Newton Centre. 

North Adams. 

Northampton. 

North Andover Depot. 

North Brookfield. 

Northfield. 

Orange. 

Orleans. 

Oxford. 

Palmer. 

Pittsfield. 

Plymouth. 

Provincetown. 

Quincy. 

Salem. 



Sandwich. 

Saxonville. 

Shelburne Falls. 

Southborough. 

Southbridge. 

South Deerfield. 

South Dennis. 

South Framingham. 

South Gardner. 

South Had ley. 

South Hadley Falls. 

South Natick. 

South Yarmouth. 

Spencer. 

Springfield. 

Stoneham. 

Stoughton. 

Taunton. 

Templeton. 

Turner's Falls. 

Uxbridge. 

Vineyard Haven. 

Wakefield. 

Wales. 

Waltham. 

Ware. 

Warren. 

WatertowD. 

Webster. 

Wellesley. 

Wellfleet. 

Westborough. 

Westfieid. 

West Medway. 

Wilbraham. 

Williamsburg. 

Williamstown. 

Winchendon. 

Winchester. 

Wobum. 

Worcester. 

Yarmouth Port. 



Foreign Letters. 203 



POSTAGE OiN FOREIGN LETTERS. 



Foreign Letters should indicate on the outside the route by which 
they are to he sent, as the difference by various routes is great. The 
rate given is for \ ounce or under. A star (*) against the rate denotes 
that prepayment is optional, except for registered letters; where there 
is no star, the postage must be prepaid. 

;8®= For rates by special routes, and on particular dates, inquire at the 
Post-Office. 



Cents. 
Australia, New Zeaxakd, and New South Wales, via South- 
ampton 15 

Via Brindisi 19 

New Zealand, New South "Wales, Victoria, and Queensland, 

via San Francisco 12 

Australia, except Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria, 

via San Francisco 5 

Aspinwall 5 

Bahamas 3 

Belgium, via England, or direct steamer 5* 

Beumuda 5* 

Brazil 10* 

Buenos Ayres and Argentine Confederation, via England . 10 
Canada, including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward 

Island, and British Columbia 3 

Ceylon 10* 

China 10* 

Shanghai, and places in China not named below .... 5 
Hong Kong, Canton, Amoy, Swatow, Foo Chow, Kiung Chow, 

NiNGPO, and Hankow 10* 

Cuba 5* 

Denmark 5* 

Egypt 5* 



204 Foreign Letters. 



Cents, 

France, including Algeria, via England, or via direct steamer . 5* 

Gibraltar 5* 

German Empire and Austria 5* 

Great Britain and Ireland . 5* 

Greece . 5* 

Guiana, British, French, and Dutch 10* 

Holland 5* 

Honduras 13 

India, British, also French Colonies 10* 

Via San Francisco 10* 

Italy 5* 

Manilla, Philippine Islands 10* 

Mauritius, via England 10 

Mexico 10 

Nassau, Bahamas 3 

Newfoundland 5 

Norway 5* 

Panama 5 

Peru 10 

Ecuador and Chili 17 

Portugal, via Southampton or Liverpool 5* 

Russia 5* 

Sandwich Islands 6 

Singapore, via San Francisco . . 10* 

Spain 6* 

Sweden 5* 

Switzerland 5* 

Turkey, European or Asiatic 6* 

Venezuela, via St. Thomas 13 

West Indies (except the Bahamas), direct mail .... 5* 

British Mail, via St. Thomas 13 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



205 



GOVEENORS AND LIEUT.-GOVEENOES IN MASS. 

[Revised and Corrected by David Pulsifer, Esq.] 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY BY THE PEOPLE. 
Governors of Plymouth Colony. 



1620 
1621 
1633 
1634 
1635 
1636 
1637 

1680 
1681 



Nov. 11, John Carver. 
April, "William Bradford. 
Jan. 1, Edward Winslow. 
Mar. 27, Thomas Prence. 



Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



1638 June 5, Thomas Prence. 

1639 June 3, William Bradford. 

1644 June 5, Edward "Winslow. 

1645 June 4, William Bradford. 
1657 June 3, Thomas Prence. 
1673 June 3, Josiah Winslow. 
1680 Dec. 18, Thomas Hinckley.* 



3, William Bradford. 

1, Edward Winslow. 

7, William Bradford. 

Deputy-Governors of Plymouth Colony. 

Thomas Hinckley. f I 1682 William Bradford 

James Cudworth. I 1689 William Bradford 



to 1686 
to 1692 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY UNDER THE FIRST CHARTER. 
Governors of Massachusetts. 



1629 Apr. 30, John Endicott.J 

1630 Oct. 20, John Winthrop.J 

1634 May 14, Thomas Dudley. 

1635 May 6, John Haynes. 

1636 May 25, Henry Vane. 

1637 May 17, John Winthrop. 
1610 May 13, Thomas Dudley. 

1641 June 2, Richard Bellingham. 

1642 May 18, John Winthrop. 
1644 May 29, John Endicott. 



1646 May 6, John Winthrop. 

1649 May 2, John Endicott. 

1650 May 22, Thomas Dudley. 

1651 May 7, John Endicott. 

1654 May 3, Richard Bellingham. 

1655 May 23, John Endicott. 
1665 May 3, Richard Bellingham. 

1672 Dec. 12, John Leverett(act'g). 

1673 May 7, John Leverett. 

1679 May 28, Simon Bradstreet, to 
1686. 

1692. 



1645 May 14, Thomas Dudley. 

* Mr. Hinckley was Governor till the union of the colonies 
except durins; the administration of Andros. 

t Previously there was no Deputy-Governor, a Governor pro tern, being 
appointed by the Governor to serve in his absence. 

X By the Royal Charter, which passed the seals March 4, 1628-9, Mat- 
thew Cradock was appointed the first Governor, and Thomas Goffe, 
Deputy-Governor, both of whom had held the same offices before the 
Charter was granted. On the 13th of the following May the same per- 
sons were re-chosen under the Charter; but they never came to New 
England. On the 20th of October, 1629, John Winthrop was chosen 
Governor, and John Humphry, Deputj'-Governor. On the 30th of April, 
1629, John Endicott was chosen, in London, to be Governor of the Plan- 
tation in New England, and held the office until the arrival of the Gov- 
ernor (Winthrop) in 1630. 



206 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



Deputt-Governors or Massachusetts. 



1629 Thomas Dudley* 

1634 Roger Ludlow 

1635 Richard Bellingham 

1636 John Wintbrop . 

1637 Thomas Dudley . 

1640 Richard Bellingham 

1641 John Endicott 
1644 John Wintbrop . 
1646 Thomas Dudley . 
1650 John Endicott 



to 1634 I 1651 Thomas Dudley . 
, ]635 1653 Richard Bellingham 

1636 1654 John Endicott 
, 1637 I 1655 Richard Bellingham 

1640 i 1665 Francis Wilioughby 



1641 
1644 
1646 
1650 
1651 



1571 John Leverett 

1673 Sam'l Symonds, to Oct, 

1678 Oct., Simon Bradstreet, 

1679 Thomas Danforth 



to 1653 
1C54 
1655 
1665 
1671 
1673 
1678 
1679 



Note. — Maj' 25, 1686, Joseph Dudley assumed the oflCice of Presi- 
dent under a commission of King James II., and. with a council, bad 
jurisdiction over the king's dominion of New England. This office be 
held till Dec. 20, the same year, when Sir Edmund Andros appeared 
as Governor of New England, appointed by James 11. April 20, 1689, 
Governor Andros was deposed by a revolution of the ijeople. 



AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE FIRST CHARTER. 

Simon Bradstreet was Governor from May 24, ]689, to May 14, 3692; and 

Thomas Danforth was Deputy-Governor during the same time. 



APPOINTED BY THE KING UNDER SECOND CHARTER. 
Governors of Massachusetts. 

1730 June 30, William Toiler. 
1730 Aug. 8, Jonathan Belcher. 



1692 May 14, Sir William Phipps. 
1694 Nov. 17, William Stoughton.-\ 

1699 May 26, Richard Coote, Earl 

of Bellamont. 

1700 July, William Storighton. 

1701 July 7, The Council. 

1702 June 11, Joseph Dudley. 
1714-15 Feb., The Council. 
1714-15 March, Joseph Dudley, 

1715 Nov. 9, William. Tailer-X 

1716 Oct. 4, Samuel Shute. 
1722 Dec. 27, William Dumnier. 

1728 July 13, William Burnet. 

1729 Sept. 7, William Dnmm^er. 



1741 Aug. 17, William Shirley. 
1749 Sept. 11, Spencer Phipa. 
1753 Aug. 7, William Shirley. 

1756 Sept. 25, Spencer Phips. 

1757 April 4, The Council. 
1757 Aug. 3, Thomas Pownal. 
1760 June 3, Thomas Hutchinson. 
1760 Aug. 1, Sir Francis Bernard, 

Bart. 
1769 Aug. 1, Thomas Hutchinson. 
1771 March, Thomas Hutchinson. 
1774 May 13, Thomas Gage. 



* Thomas Goflfe never came to New England. John Humphry was 
elected, but did not serve. 

t Those whose names are printed in italics were Acting Governors. 

X In November, 1715, Elizeus Buryess was proclaimed Governor, he 
having had the appointment in March, 1714; but he never came over to 
perform his duties, and resigned the office in 1716. 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



207 



Lieut. -Governors in Massachusetts. 



1692 Wra. Stoughton to July, 1701 
1702 Thomas Povey . . 1706 
1705-6 Jan., vacancy to Oct., 1711 
1711 William Tailer. 
1716 William Dummer. 



1730 William Tailer. 
1733 Spencer Phips, 
1758 Thomas Hutchinson. 
1771 Andrew Oliver. 
1774 Thomas Oliver. 



UNTIL THE CONSTITUTION. 
1774 Oct., a Provincial Congress. | 1775 July, The Council. 



UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Governors of Massachusetts. 



1780 
1785 
1787 
1794 
1797 
1800 
1807 
1809 
1810 
1812 
1816 
1823 
1825 
1834 
1836 
1840 



John Hancock 

James Bowdoin . 

John Hancock, Oct. 8, 

Samuel Adams 

Increase Sumner, June 

Caleb Strong 

Jas. Sullivan, Dec. 10, 

Christopher Gore 

Elbridge Gerry . 

Caleb Strong 

John Brooks 

Wm. Eustis, Feb. 6 . 

Levi Lincoln 

John Davis, March 1 

Edward Everett . 

Marcus Morton 



to 1785 i ^841 John Davis . 
1787 j 1843 Marcus Morton . 
1793 [ 1844 George N. Briggs 
1797 ; 1851 George S. Bout well 

7, 1799 j 1853 John H, Clifford . 

1807 I 1854 Emery Washburn 

1808 i 1855 Henry J. Gardner 



1810 
1S12 
1816 
1823 
1825 
1834 
1835 
1840 
1841 



1858 Nathaniel P. Banks 
1861 John A. Andrew . 
1866 Alexander H. Bullock 
1869 William Claflin . 
1872 William B. Washburn 

1875 William Gaston . 

1876 Alexander H. Rice 

1879 Thomas Talbot . 

1880 John Davis Long 



Lieut. -Governors of Massachusetts. 

1809 David Cobb . 

1810 William Gray 
1812 William Phillips . 

1823 Levi Lincoln, Feb. 

1824 Marcus Morton, Julj- 
1826 Thomas L. Winthrop 
1833 Samuel T. Arm.Hro7ig 



1780 Thos. Gushing, to Feb. 28, 1788 

1788 Benjamin Lincoln . 1789 

1789 Samuel Adams t ■ • 1794 
1794 Moses Gill, May 20 . 1800 

1801 Sam'l Phillips, Feb. 10, 1802 

1802 Edward H. Bobbins . 1806 
1807 Levi Lincoln X . . 1809 

* Resigned May 1, 1874. Chosen U. S. Senator, April 17, 1874. 

t The Lieutenant-Governors whose names are in italics were 
Governors also during vacancies in the office of Governor. 

X General William Heath was elected in 1806, and declined to 
the office. 



1843 
1844 
1851 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1858 
1861 
1866 
1869 
1872 
1874 
1876 
1879 
1880 



to 1810 
1812 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1833 



Acting 
accept 



208 



United States Senators^. 



1836 George Hull . 


.to 1843 


1861 John Z.Goodrich, Mar. 


29, 1861 


1843 Henry H. Childs . 


. 1844 


1861 John Nesmith, Sept. 


1862 


1844 John Reed . 


. 1851 


1863 Joel Hayden 


1866 


1851 Henry \Y. Cushman 


. 1853 


1866 William Claflin . 


186» 


1853 Elinha Huntington 


. 1854 


1869 Joseph Tucker' , 


187a. 


1854 William C. Plunkett 


. 1855 


1873 Thomas Talbot* . 


1875 


1855 Simon Brown 


. 1856 


1S75 Horatio G. Knight 


1879 


1856 Henry W. Benchley 


. 1858 


1879 John D. Long 


1880 


1858 Eliphalet Trask . 


. 1861 


1880 Byron Weston . 





UNITED STATES SENATORS FROM MASSACHUSETTS, 



From 1789 to 1S79. 



Caleh Strong . . . 1789-96 

Theodore Sedgwick . 1796-99 
Samuel Dexter . . 1799-1800 

Dwight Foster . . 1800-03 

John Quincy Adams . 1803-08 

James Lloyd . . . 1808-13 

Christopher Gore . . 1813-16 

Eli Porter Ashmun . 1816-18 

Prentiss Mellen . . 1818-20 

Elijah Hunt Mills . . 1820-27 

Daniel Webster . . 1827-41 

Rufus Choate . . . 1841-45 

Daniel Webster . . 1845-50 
Robert Charles Winthrop, 1850-51 

Robert Rantoul, Jr. . 1851-51 

Charles Sumner t . . 1851-74 

William B. Washburn . 1874-75 

Henry Laurens Dawes % 1875- 



Tristram Dalton . . 1789-91 

George Cabot . . 1791-96 

Benjamin Goodhue . 1796-1800 

Jonathan Mason . . 1800-03; 

Timothy Pickering . 1803-11 

Joseph Bradley Varnum, 1811-17 

Harrison Gray Otis . 1817-22 

James Lloyd . . . 1822-26 

Nathaniel Silsbee . . 1826-35 

John Davis . . . 1835-41 

Isaac Chapman Bates . 1841-45 

John Davis . . . 1845-53, 

Edward Everett . . 1853-54 

Julius Rockwell . . 1854-55 

Henry Wilson . . 1855-73 

George S. Boutwell . 1873-7r 

George Frisbie Hoar J . 1877- 



NoTE.— Mr. Wilson was elected Vice-President in 1872; George S.. 
Boutwell chosen to fill vacancy. 

* Acting Governor from May 1, 1874. 

t Charles Sumner died March I'l, 1^74; William B. Washburn chosen 
to fill vacancy, April 17, 1874. 

X Mr. Dawes' term will expire Haiich 4, 1881; Mr. Hoar's terra, Marchi 
4, 1883. 



Secretaries. — Treasurers. 



209 



SECEETAEIES. 



List of Persons loJio have held the office of Secretary 
OF THE Commonwealth, 



From 1780 to 1880. 



John Avery . 


1780-1806 


John G. Palfrey . 


1844-48 


Jonathan L. Austin 


1806-08 


William B. Calhoun 


1848-51 


William Tudor . 


1808-10 


Amasa Walker 


1851-53 


Benjamin Homans 


1810-12 


Ephraim M. Wright 


1853-56 


Alden Bradford . 


1812-24 


Francis DeWitt . 


1856-58 


Edward D. Bangs . 


1824-36 


Oliver Warner 


1858-76 


John P. Bigelow . 


1836-43 


Henry B. Peirce . 


1876- 


John A. BoUes 


1843-44 








TEEASUEERS. 





List of Persons who have held the office of Treasurer 
AND Receiver-General, 

From 1780 to 1880. 



Henry Gardner 


1780-83 


David Wilder 


1837-42 


Thomas Ivers 


1783-87 


Thomas Russell . 


1842-43 


Alexander Hodgdon 


1787-92 


John Mills 


1843-44 


Thomas Davis 


1792-97 


Thomas Russell 


1844-45 


Peleg Coffin . 


* 1797-1801 


Joseph Barrett 


1845-49 


Jonathan Jackson . 


1802-06 


Ebenezer Bradbury 


1849-51 


Tompson J. Skinner 


1806-08 


Charles B, Hall . 


1851-53 


Josiah Dwight 


1808-10 


Jacob H. Loud 


1853-55 


Thomas Harris 


1810-11 


Thomas J. Marsh . 


1855-56 


Jonathan L. Austin 


1811-12 


Moses Tenney, Jr. 


1856-61 


John T. Apthorp . 


1812-17 


Henry K. Oliver . 


1861-66 


Daniel Sargent 


1817-22 


Jacob H. Loud 


1866-71 


Nahum Mitchell . 


1822-27 


Charles Adams, Jr. 


1871-76 


Joseph Sewall 


1827-32 


Charles Endicott . 


1876- 


Hezekiah Barnard 


1832-37 






* Secretary Avery hac 


I a warrant to take care of the Treae 


ury on the 


resignation of Coffin, in 


1802. 




■ 27 









210 



Attorney -Generals. — Auditors. 



ATTORNEY-GENEEALS. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Attorney- 
General. 



IIN-DER THE PROVINCE CHARTER. 



Anthony Checkley 
Paul Dudley . 
Thomas Newton 
John Overing 
John Read 
William Brattle 
William Brattle 



1692-1702 
1702-18 
1718-21 
1728-32 
1733-35 
1736 
1738 



John Overing 
Jeremiah Gridley . 
John Overing 
James Otis 
Edmund Trowbridge 
Jeremiah Gridley . 
Jonathan Sewall . 



UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Robert Treat Paine . 1780-90 John Henry Clifford . 
James Sullivan . . 1790-1807 Stephen Henry Phillips, 
Barnabas Bidwell . . 1807-10 Dwight Foster 
Perez Morton . . 1810-32 Chester I. Reed j • 

James T. Austin . . 1832-43 Charles Allen 
John Henry Clifford . * 1849-53 Charles R. Train . 
Rufus Choate . . 1853-54 George Marston 

* The office of Attorney-General was abolished in 1843, and 
lished in 1849. 

t Resigned during the session of the Legislature of 1867. The 
was filled by the election of Charles Allen. 



1739-41 

1742 

1743-48 

1748 

1749-67 

1767 

1767-69 

1854-58 
1858-61 
1861-64 
1864-67 
1867-72 
1872-79 
1879- 
re-estab- 

vacancy 



AUDITOES. 



List of Persons who have held the office of Auditor of 
Accounts. 

[Established by Act of 1849.] 



David Wilder, Jr. . 


1849-54 


Julius L. Clarke . 


1865-66 


Joseph Mitchell . 


1854-55 


Henry S. Briggs . 


1866-70 


Stephen N. Gifford 


1855-56 


Charles Endicott . 


1870-76 


Chandler R. Ransom 


1856-58 


Julius L. Clarke 2 . 


1876-79 


Charles White 


1858-61 


Charles R. Ladd 2 . 


1879- 


Levi Reed i . 


1861-65 








1 Resigned I 


)ec. 20, 1865. 





* Mr. Clarke resigned, and Mr. Ladd was appointed in his place May 5, 1879, 



Secretaries of Board of Education. 211 



SECEETAEIES OE THE STATE BOAED OE EDECATION. 



List of Persons tcho have held the office of Secretary of 
THE State Board of Education. 

[See Act of 1837.] 



Horace Mann. . . 1837-48 I George S. Boutwell . 1855-61 

Barnas Sears . . . 1848-55 I Joseph White . . 1861-77 

John "W. Dickinson . . . 1877-. 



212 



Organization of the Legislature. 



OEGANIZATION OF THE LEGISLATUEE, 



From 1780 to 1880. 



The first General Court, under the Constitution of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, assembled at Boston, on "Wednesday, Oct. 25, 1780, 
and was finally prorogued ^having held three sessions) May 19, 1781. 
From this time until 1832, the political year commenced on the last 
Wednesday in May; and the General Court held two, and frequently 
three, sessions during each year. In 1832, hy an amendment of the Con- 
stitution, the commencement of the political year was changed to the 
first Wednesday in January. 





SENATE. 






PRESIDENTS. 




Thos. Cushing, resigjied 


1 1780-81 


Samuel Phillips 


1799-1800 


Jeremiah Powell 




Samuel Phillips 


1800-01 


Jeremiah Powell 


1781-82 


David Cobb . 


1801-02 


Samuel Adams 


1782-83 


David Cobb . 


1802-03 


Samuel Adams 


1783-84 


David Cobb . 


1803-04 


Samuel Adams 


1784-85 


David Cobb . 


1804-05 


Samuel Adams, resigned 


1 1785-86 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1805-06 


Samuel Phillips, Jr. 




John Bacon 


1806-07 


Samuel Phillips, Jr. 


1786-87 


Samuel Dana . 


1807-08 


Samuel Adams 


1787-88 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1808-09 


Samuel Phillips, Jr. 


1788-89 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1809-10 


Samuel Phillips, Jr. 


1789-90 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1810-11 


Samuel Phillips 


1790-91 


Samuel Dana . 


1811-12 


Samuel Phillips 


1791-92 


Samuel Dana . 


1812-13 


Samuel Phillips 


1792-93 


John Phillips . 


1813-14 


Samuel Phillips 


1793-94 


John Phillips . 


1814-15 


Samuel Phillips 


. 1794-95 


John Phillips . 


1815-16 


Samuel Phillips 


1795-96 


John Phillips . 


1816-17 


Samuel Phillips 


1796-97 


John Phillips . 


. 1817-18 


Samuel Phillips 


. 1797-98 


John Phillips . 


. 1818-19 


Samuel Phillips 


. 1798-99 


John Phillips . 


. 1819-20 



Organization of the Legislature. 



213 



John Phillips . 


1820-21 


Marshall P. Wilder 


1850 


John Phillips . 


1821-22 


Henry Wilson 


1851 


John Phillips . 


1822-23 


Henry Wilson 


1852 


Nathaniel Silsbee . 


1823-24 


Charles H. Warren 


18.53 


Nathaniel Silsbee . 


1824-25 


Charles Edward Co 


ok . 1854 


Nathaniel Silsbee . 


1825-26 


Henry W. Benchle 


y . 1855 


John Mills . 


1826-27 


Elihu C. Baker 


1856 


John Mills . 


1827-28 


Charles W. Upham 


1857 


Sherman Leland . 


1828-29 


Charles W. Upham 


1858 


Samuel Lathrop 


1829-30 


Charles A. Phelps 


1859 


Samuel Lathrop 


1830-31 


Charles A. Phelps 


1860 


Leverett Saltonstall 


1831 


William Claflin 


1861 


William Thorndike 


1832 


John H. Clifford 


1862 


Benj. T. Pickman . 


1833 


Jonathan E. Field 


1863 


Benj. T. Pickman . 


1834 


Jonathan E. Field 


1864 


Benj. T. Pickman, dec'sed 


1 1835 


Jonathan E. Field 


1865 


George Bliss . 




Joseph A. Pond 


• 1866 


Horace Mann . 


1836 


Joseph A. Pond 


1867 


Horace Mann . 


1837 


George 0. Brastow 


1868 


Myron Lawrence . 


1838 


Robert C. Pitman, 


resigned,) ^ggg 


Myron Lawrence . 


1839 


George 0. Brastow 




Daniel P. King 


1840 


Horace H. Coolidg 


e . 1870 


Daniel P. King . 


1841 


Horace H. Coolidg 


s . 1871 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


1842 


Horace H. Coolidg 


e . 1872 


Phineas W. Leland, resign 


''^' 1843 


Geo. B. Loring 


1873 


Frederick Robint^on 




Geo. B. Loring 


1874 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


1844 


Geo. B. Loring 


. . 1875 


Levi Lincoln . 


1845 


Geo. B. Loring 


1876 


William B. Calhoun . 


1846 


John B. D. Cogswc 


11 . 1877 


William B. Calhoun . 


1847 


John B. D. Cogswt 


11 . 1878 


Zeno Scudder 


1848 


John B. D. Cogswt 


41 . 1879 


Joseph Bell . 


1849 
CLE 


RKS. 




William Baker, Jr. 


1780-84 


Samuel F. Lyman 


1822 


Samuel Cooper 


1785-95 


Paul AVillard . 


182.3-29 


Edward McLane . 


1796-99 


Charles Calhoun 


1830^2 


Edward Payne Hayman 


1800 


Lewis Josselyn 


1843 


George Elliot Vaughn . 


1801-02 


Charles Calhoun 


1844-50 


Wendell Davis 


1803-05 


Chauncey L. Knap 


p . 1851 


John D. Duipbar . 


1806-07 


Francis H. Underw 


ood. 1852 


Nathaniel Coffin . 


1808-10 


Charles Calhoun 


18^3-54 


Marcus Morton 


1811-12 


Peter L. Cox . 


1855-57 


Ramuel F. McCleary 


1813-21 


Stephen N. Gifforc 


I . 1858- 



214 Organization of the Legislature. 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

KERS. 

Timothy Bigelow . . 1818-19 

Timothy Bij^elow . . 1819-20 

Elijah H. Mills, resigned, 1820-21 

Josiah Quincy . . 1821 

Josiah Quincy, resigned, 1821-22 

Luther Lawrence . . 1822 

Levi Lincoln . . . 1822-23 

William C. Jarvis . . 1823-24 

William C. Jarvis . . 1824-25 

Timothy Fuller . . 1825-2& 

William C. Jarvis . . 1826-27 

William C. Jarvis . . 1827-28 

William B. Calhoun . 1828-29 

William B. Calhoun . 1829-30 

William B. Calhoun . 1830 

William B. Calhoun . 1831 

William B. Calhoun . 1832 

William B. Calhoun . 1833 

William B. Calhoun . 1834 

Julius Rockwell . . 1835 

Julius Rockwell . . 1836 

Julius Rockwell . . 1837 

Robert C. Winthrop . 1838 

Robert C. Winthrop . 1839 

Robert C. Winthrop . 1840 

George Ashraun . . 1841 

Thomas Kinnicut . . 1842 

Daniel P. King . . 1843 
Thomas Kinnicut, resigned, 1844 

Samuel H. Waliey, Jr. . 1844 

Samuel H. Waliey, Jr. . 1845 

Samuel H. Waliey, Jr. . 1846 

Ebenezer Bradbury . 1847 

Francis B. Crowninshield 1848 

Francis B. Crowninshield 1849 

Ensign H. Kellogg . 1850 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr. 1851 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr. 1852 

George Bliss . . . 1853 

Otis P. Lord . . . 1854 

Daniel C.Eddy . . 1855 





SPEA 


Caleb Davis . 


1780-81 


Caleb Davis, resigned 


1781-82 


Nathaniel Gorham 


1782 


Nathaniel Gorham 


1782-83 


Tristram Dalton . 


1783-84 


Tristram Dalton . 


1784-85 


Nathaniel Gorham 


1785-86 


Artemas Ward 


1786-87 


James Warren 


1787-88 


Theodore Sedgwick 


1788-89 


David Cobb . 


1789-90 


David Cobb . 


1790-91 


David Cobb . 


1791-92 


David Cobb . 


1792-93 


Edward H. Bobbins 


1793-94 


Edward H. Robbins 


1794-95 


Edward H. Robbins 


1795-96 


Edward H. Robbins 


1796-97 


Edward H. Robbins 


1797-98 


Edward H. Robbins 


1798-99 


Edward H. Robbins 


1799-1800 


Edward H. Robbins 


1800-01 


Edward H. Robbins 


1801-02 


John Cotfin Jones . 


1802-03 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1803-04 


Harrison Gray Otis 


1804-05 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1805-06 


Perez Morton . 


1806-07 


Perez Morton . 


1807-08 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1808-09 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1809-10 


Perez Morton, resigned 


1810-11 


Joseph Story . 


1811 


Joseph Story, resigned 


1811-12 


Eleazer W. Ripley 


1812 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1812-13 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1813-14 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1814-15 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1815-16 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1816-17 


Timothy Bigelow . 


1817-18 



Organization of the Legislature. 215 



Charles A. Phelps . 
Charles A. Phelps . 
Julius Rockwell 
Charles Hale . 
John A. Goodwin . 
John A. Goodwin . 
Alexander H. Bullock 
Alexander H. Bullock 
Alexander II. Bullock 
Alexander H. Bullock 
James M. Stone 
James M. iStone 



Andrew Henshaw . 
George Richards ilinot 
Henry Warren . 
Nicholas Tillinghast . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner 
Nicholas Tillinghast . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner 
Benjamin Pollard 
Pelham W. Warren . 
Luther S. Gushing . 



1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 



CLE 
1780-81 
1782-91 
1792-1802 
1803-05 
1806-07 
1808-09 
1810-11 
1812-21 
1822-31 
1832-43 



Harvey Jewell 


. 1868 


Harvey Jewell 


. 1869 


Harvey Jewell 


. 1870 


Harvey Jewell 


. 1871 


John E. Sanford . 


. 1872 


John E. Sanford . 


. 1873 


John E. Sanford . 


. 1874 


John E. Sanford . 


. 1875 


John D. Long . 


. 1876 


John D. Long . 


. 1877 


John D. Long . 


. 1878 


Levi C. Wade . 


. 1879 


RKS. 

Charles W. Storey . 


. 1844-50 


Lewis Josselyn . 


. 1851-52 


William Schouler . 


. 1853 


William Stowe . 


. 1854 


Henry A. Marsh 


. 1855 


W. E. P. Haskell . 


. 1856 


William Stowe . 


. 1857-61 


William S. Robinson 


. 1862-73 


Charles H. Taylor . 


. 1873-74 


George A. Harden . 


. 1874- 



SERGE A NT S-AT -ARMS. 
. 1835-59 I Oreb F. Mitchell 
. 1859-75 I 



1875- 



Benjarain Stevens 
John Morissey . 

The office of Sergeant-at-Arms was established hy law in 1835. Pre- 
vious to that time, Jacob Kuhn was Messenger to the General Court from 
1786. 



216 Levgth of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 



TABLE 



Showing the Length of the Sessions of the Legislature, and 
the Number of Representatives in each Year since 1832. 



Yea: 



Time of 
Meeting. 



Prorogued. 



Length of 

Session. 



No. of 
Repa. 



1832 


January 4. 


March 24. 


80 days. 


528 


1833 . 








2. 


28. 


86 " 


574 


1834 . 








1. 


April 2. 


92 " 


570 


1835* . 








7- 


8. 


92 " 


615 


1836 . 








6. 


16. 


102 " 


619 


1837 . 








4. 


20. 


107 " 


635 


1838 . 








3. 


25. 


113 " 


480 


1839 . 








2. 


10. 


99 " 


521 


1840 . 








1. 


March 24. 


84 " 


521 


1841 . 








6. 


18. 


72 » 


397 


1842 * . 








5. 


3. 


58 " 


336 


1843 . 








4. 


24. 


80 " 


352 


1844 . 








3. 


16. 


74 " 


321 



* There was an extra session of sixty-two days in 1835, to revise the 
Statutes ; one of nine days in 1842, to divide the Commonwealth into Con- 
gressional Districts ; one of three days in 1848, to choose electors of 
President and Vice-President; one of eighteen days in 1857, to establish 
districts for the Choice of Councillors, Representatives, and Senators; 
one of one hundred and thirteen days in 1859, to revise the General Stat- 
utes ; one of fourteen days in 1860, to consider the subject of the disease 
among the cattle of the Commonwealth ; one of ten days in 1861, to con- 
sider the duty of the Commonwealth in relation to public affairs, conse- 
quent on the Rebellion ; one of eight days in 1863, to provide for raising 
the quota under the call of the President of the United States, of the 17th 
of October, 1863, for 300,000 men ; and one of thirty days in 1872, to con- 
sider what legislation is necessary by reason of the great fire in Boston, 
November 9 and 10. 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 217 



Year. 


Time of 
Meeting. 


Prorogued. 


Length of 

Session. 


No. of 
Reps. 


1845 


January ] . 


March 26. 


85 days. 


271 


1846 










7. 


April 16. 


100 •• 


264 


1847 










6. 


16. 


111 '« 


255 


1848* 










5. 


May 10. 


127 " 


272 


1849 










3. 


2. 


120 " 


263 


1850 










2. 


3. 


122 «' 


297 


1851 










1. 


24. 


146 " 


396 


1852 










8. 


22. 


137 " 


402 


1853 










5. 


25. 


142 '« 


288 


1854 










4. 


April 29. 


116 " 


310 


1855 










3. 


May 21. 


138 " 


380 


1856 










1. 


June 6. 


158 " 


329 


1857* 










7. 


May 30. 


144 " 


357 


1858 










6. 


March 27. 


81 " 


240 


1859* 










5. 


April 6. 


92 " 


240 


1860* 










4. 


4. 


92 «« 


240 


1861* 










2. 


11. 


100 *« 


240 


1862 










1. 


30. 


120 " 


240 


1863* 










7. 


29. 


113 " 


240 


1864 










6. 


May 14. 


130 " 


240 


1865 










4. 


17. 


137 " 


240 


1866 










3. 


30. 


147 " 


240 


1867 










2. 


June 1. 


150 " 


240 


1868 










1. 


12. 


164 " 


240 


1869 










6. 


24. 


170 " 


240 


1870 . 










5. 


23. 


170 " 


240 


1871 . 










4. 


May 31. 


148 " 


240 


1872* . 










3. 


7. 


126 •' 


240 


1873 . 










1. 


June 12. 


163 " 


240 


1874 . 










7. 


30. 


175 " 


240 


1875 . 










6. 


May 19. 


134 " 


240 


1876 . 










5. 


April 28. 


115 " 


240 


1877 . 










3. 


May 17. 


135 " 


240 


1878 . 










2. 


17. 


136 " 


240 


1879 . 










1. 


April 30. 


120 " 


240 



28 



>ee note on preceding page. 



218 



Judiciary, 



JUDICIAEY. 



Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay, from 1692 to 1776.* 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1692. 


William Stoughton . 


1701. 


Resigned. 


1701. 


1702. 


Isaac Addington 


1703. 


Resigned. 


1715 


1708. 


Wait Winthrop . 


1717. 






1718. 


Samuel Sewall . 


1728. 


Resigned. 


1730. 


1729. 


Benjamin Lynde 


1745. 




1745. 


1745. 


Paul Dudley- 


1751. 




1751. 


1752. 


Stephen Sewall . 


1760. 




1760. 


1761. 


Thomas Hutchinson . 


1769. 


Appointed Governor. 


1780 


1769. 


Benjamin Lynde 


1771. 


Resigned. 


1781. 


1772. 


Peter Oliver 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1791 




JU 


S T I C E S. 




1692. 


Thomas Danforth 


1699. 




1699. 


1692. 


Wait Winthrop . 


1701. 


Resigned. 


1717 


1692. 


John Richards . 


1694. 




1694. 


1693. 


Samuel Sewall - 


1718. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1730. 


1695. 


Elisha Cooke. . 


. 1702. 


Removed. 


1715 


1700. 


John Walley . . 


1712. 




1712 


1701. 


John Saffin . 


1702. 


Removed. 


1710. 


1702. 


John Hathorne . 


1712. 


Resigned. 


1717. 


1702. 


John Leverett . 


1708. 


Resigned. 


1724. 


1708. 


Jonathan Corwin 


1715. 


Resigned. 


1718. 


1712. 


Benjamin Lynde 


. 1729. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1745. 


1712. 


Nathaniel Thomas . 


1718. 


Resigned. 


1718. 


1715. 


Addington Davenport 


1736. 




1736. 



* The judges died in office, except where otherwise stated. 



Judiciary. 



219 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE 


BENCH. 


DIED. 


1718. 


Paul Dudley 


1745. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1751. 


1718. 


Edmund Quincy 


1737. 




1737. 


1729. 


John Gushing . 


1733. 


Removed. 


1737. 


1733. 


Jonathan Remington 


. 1745. 




1745. 


1736. 


Richard Saltonstall . 


. 1756. 




1756. 


1737. 


Thomas Greaves 


1738. 


Resigned. 


1747. 


1739. 


Stephen Sewall . 


1752. 


Appointed Ghief Justice. 


1760. 


1745. 


Nathaniel Hubbard . 


1746. 


Resigned. 


1748. 


1745. 


Benjamin Lynde 


1769. 


Appointed Ghief Justice. 


1781. 


1747. 


John Gushing . 


1771. 


Resigned. 


1775. 


1752. 


Ghambers Russell 


1766. 




1766. 


1756. 


Peter Oliver 


1772. 


Appointed Ghief Justice. 


1791. 


1767. 


Edmund Trowbridge 


1775. 


Resigned. 


1793. 


1771. 


Foster Hutchinson . 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1799. 


1772. 


Nathaniel Ropes 


1774. 




1774. 


1772. 


William Gushing 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1810. 


1774. 


William Browne 


1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1802. 



Justices of the Superior Court of Judicature and the Supreme 
Judicial Court of Massachusetts since the Revolution. 



GHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 

1775. John Adams 

William Gushing 
Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent 
Francis Dana 
Theophilus Parsons . 
Samuel Sewall . 
Isaac Parker 
Lemuel Shaw 
George Tyler Bigelow 
Reuben Atwater Ghapman 1873 
Horace Gray 



1777 
1790, 
1791, 
1806. 
1814. 
1814. 
1830. 



1873. 



THE 


BENCH. 


DIED. 


1776. 


Resigned.* 


1826. 


1789. 


Resigned.! 


1810. 


1791. 




1791. 


1806. 


Resigned. 


1811. 


1813. 




1813. 


1814. 




1814. 


1830. 




1830. 


1860. 


Resigned. 


1861. 


1868. 


Resigned. 





1873. 



* Mr. Adams never took his seat on the bench. 

t Chief Justice Gushing resigned on being appointed one of the Jus- 
tices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 



220 



Judiciary, 



1775. 
1775. 
1775. 
1775. 
1776. 
1776. 
1777. 
1782. 
1785. 
1790. 
1790. 
1792. 
1797. 
1800. 
1801. 
1801. 
1802. 
1806. 
1813. 
1814. 
1814. 
1815. 
1824. 
1825. 
1837. 
1842. 
1848. 
1848. 
1848. 
1850. 
1852. 
1853. 
1853. 
1859. 
1860. 
1864. 



JUSTICES. 




STED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


William Cushing 


1777. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1810. 


ISTathaniel Peaslee Sargent 


1790. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1791. 


William Reed . 


, 1776. 


Superseded. 


1780. 


Robert Treat Paine . 


, 1776. 


Superseded. 


1814. 


Jedediab Foster 


, 1779. 




1779. 


James Sullivan . 


, 1782. 


Resigned. 


1808. 


David Sewall . 


. 1789. 


Resigned.* 


1825. 


Increase Sumner 


, 1797. 


Elected Governor. 


1799. 


Francis Dana 


1791. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1811. 


Robert Treat Paine . 


, 1804. 


Resigned. 


1814. 


Natban Cusbing 


, 1800. 


Resigned. 


1812. 


Thomas Dawes . 


. 1802. 


Resigned. 


1825. 


Tbeopbilus Bradbury- 


. 1803. 


Removed. 


1803. 


Samuel Sewall . 


, 1814. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1814. 


Simeon Strong . 


, 1805. 




1805. 


George Tbacber 


, 1824. 


Resigned. 


1824. 


Theodore Sedgwick . 


. 1813. 




1813. 


Isaac Parlier 


. 1814. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1830. 


Charles Jackson 


, 1823. 


Resigned. 


1855. 


Daniel Dewey . 


. 1815. 




1815. 


Samuel Putnam . 


, 1842. 


Resigned. 


1853. 


Samuel Sumner Wilde 


, 1850. 


Resigned. 


1855. 


Levi Lincoln 


, 1825. 


Elected Governor. 


1868. 


Marcus Morton . 


. 1840. 


Elected Governor. 


1864. 


Charles Augustus Dewey 


. 1866. 




1866. 


Samuel Hubbard 


. 1847. 




1847. 


Charles Edward Forbes , 


. 1848. 


Resigned. 




Thereon Metcalf 


. 1865. 


Resigned. 


1875. 


Richard Fletcher 


. 1853. 


Resigned. 


1869. 


George Tyler Bigelow 


. 1860. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 




Caleb Cushing . 


. 1853. 


Resigned.! 




Ben.i. Franklin Thomas 


. 1859. 


Resigned. 




Pliny Merrick . 


. 1864. 


Resigned. 


1867. 


Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar 1869. 


Resigned.! 




Reuben Atwater Chapman 1868. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1873. 


Horace Gray, Jr. 


. 1873. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 





* Mr. Justice Sewall resigned on being appointed Judge of the United 
States District Court for the District of Maine. 

t M^r. Justice Cushing and Mr. Justice Hoar resigned on being ap- 
pointed to the office of Attorney-General of the United States. 



Judiciary. 



221 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1865. James Denison Colt . . 1866. Resigned. 

1866. Dwight Foster . 
1866. John Wells 

1868. James Denison Colt. 

1869. Seth Ames. 
1869. Marcus Morton. 
1873. William C. Endicott. 
1873. Charles Devens, Jr. . 
1875. Otis P. Lord. 
1877. Augustus L. Soule. 



. 1869. Resigned. 
. 1875. 



1877. Resigned. 



1875. 



Jtcsticen of the Court of Common Pleas, from its Establishment 
1820 until its Abolition in 1859. 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1820. Artemas Ward . . . 1839. Resigned. 

1839. John Mason Williams . 1844. Resigned. 

1844. Daniel Wella . . . 1854. 

1854. Edward Mellen . . . 1859. 



DIED. 

1847. 
1868. 
1854. 
1875. 





JU 


STICES. 






1820. 


Solomon Strong 


1842. 


Resigned. 




1850. 


1820. 


John Mason Williams 


1839. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1868. 


1820. 


Samuel Howe . . ■ . 


. 1828. 






1828. 


1828. 


David Cummins 


. 1844. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1839. 


Charles Henry Warren 


. 1844. 


Resigned. 




1874. 


1842. 


Charles Allen . 


. 1«44. 


Resigned. 




1869. 


1843. 


Pliny Merrick . 


, 1848. 


Resigned. 




1867. 


1844. 


Joshua Holyoke Ward 


, 1848. 






1848. 


1844. 


Emory Washburn 


, 1847. 


Resigned. 




1877. 


1844. 


Luther Stearns Cushing . 


. 1848. 


Resigned. 




1856. 


1845. 


Harrison Gray Otis Colby 


• 1847. 


Resigned. 




1853. 


1847. 


Charles Edward Forbes . 


1848. 


Appointed to Sup. 


C't. 




1847. 


Edward Mellen . 


1854. 


Appointed Chief Justice. 


1875. 


1848. 


George Tyler Bigelow 


. 1850. 


Appointed to Sup. 


C't. 




1848. 


Jonathan Coggswell Per- 












kins 


1859. 






1877. 


1848. 


Horatio Byington 


1856. 






1856. 


* Mr. Justice Devens resigned on \ 


}eing appointed to 


the office of 



Attorney- General of the United States. 



222 



Judiciary. 



APPOINTED. 

1848. Thomas Hopkinson 
Ebenezer Rockwoo( 
Pliny Merrick . 
Henry Walker Bishop 
George ISTixon Briggs 
George Partridge Sanger . 1859. 
Henry Morris . . . 1859. 
David Aiken . . . 1859. 



1849. 
1850. 
1851. 
1853. 
1854. 
1855. 
1856. 



■T THE 


BENCH. 








DIED. 


. 1849. 


Resigned. 








1856. 


r 1855. 


Resigned. 










. 1853. 


App'ted to 


Sup. 


Jud. 


C't. 


1867. 


. 1859. 










1871. 


. 1859. 










1861. 



Justices of the Superior Court since its Establishment in 1859. 



APPOINTED, 

1859. Charles Allen . 

1867. Seth Ames . 

1869. Lincoln Flagg Brigham. 



1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1867. 
1867. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1875. 
1875. 



CHIEF JUSTICES. 

LEFT THE BENCH. B 

. 1867. Resigned. 

. 1869. Appointed to Sup. Jud. C't. 



JUSTICES. 



Julius Rockwell. 

Otis Phillips Lord . . 1875. 

Marcus Morton, Jr. . . 1869. 

Seth Ames .... 1867. 

Ezra Wilkinson. 

Henry Vose . . . 1869. 

Thomas Russell 

John Phelps Putnam. 

Lincoln Flagg Brigham . 1869. 

Chester Isham Reed - . 1871. 

Charles Devens, Jr. . . 1873. 

Henry Austin Scudder , 1872. 

Francis Henshaw Dewey. 

Robert Carter Pitman. 

John W. Bacon. 

William Allen. 

P. Emory Aldrich. 

Waldo Colburn. 

William S. Gardner. 



Appointed to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Appointed to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Appointed Chief Justice. 



1867. Resigned. 



Appointed Chief Justice. 
Resigned. 1873. 

Appointed to Sup. Jud. C't. 
Resigned. 



Judiciary, 



223 



Present Organization of the Courts. 



[All judges in the Commonwealth are appointed by the Governor, 
with the advice and consent of the Council, and hold oflBce during good 
behavior.] 



Supreme Judicial Court. 
Horace Gray, of Boston, Chief Justice 
James D. Colt, of Pittsfield, Justice . 

Seth Ames, of Brookline, 
Marcus Morton, of Andover, 
William C. Endicott, of Salem, 
Otis P. Lord, of Salem, 
Augustus L. Soule, of Springfield, 



Salary, $6,500 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 



Superior Court. 
Lincoln F. Brigham, of Salem, Chief Justice 
Julius Rockwell, of Lenox, Justice . 

Ezra Wilkinson, of Dedham, " 

John P. Putnam, of Boston, " 

Francis H. Dewey, of Worcester, " 
Robert C. Pitman, of Xewton, " 

John W. Bacon, of Natick, " 

William Allen, of Northampton, " 
P. Emory Aldrich, of Worcester, " 
Waldo Colburn, of Dedham, " 

William S. Gardner, of Newton, " 



Salary, $4, 



4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 
4,500 



Probate Courts and Courts of Insolvency. 

There is a Probate Court and a Court of Insolvency in each 
county, distinct in their jurisdiction, powers, proceedings, and practice, 
but having the same judge and register. These courts are held by 
the judge of probate and insolvency, appointed for the county ; but the 
judges of the several counties may, in case of necessity or convenience, 
interchange services, and perform each other's duties. 

The names of the judges, registers, assistant registers and commis- 
sioners of insolvency may be found among the list of County Officers. 



224 Judiciary. 



Police Courts and Municipal Courts. 
Boston. — (Municipal Court.) J. "Wilder May, Chief Justice,' 
Joseph M. Churchill and William E. Parraenter, Associate Justices; 
salary, $3,000 each. Special Justice, "William J. Forsaith. Clerks, 
"William T. Connolly, civil side; salary, $2,250. John C. Leighton, 
criminal side; salary, $2,250. Roxbury Distviict .— Justice , Peter S. 
"Wheelock; salary, $2,000. Special Justices, Solomon A. Bolster, Henry 
"W. Fuller. Clerk, Alfred Williams; salary, $1,200. Assistant Clerk, 
Giles H. Rich, salary, $600. Dorchester District. — Justice, Joseph 
R. Churchill; salary, $1,200. Special Justices, George M. Reed, George 
A. Fisher. West Roxbury District. — </w.s-^ice, James M. F. Howard; 
salary, $1,200. Special Justices, George R. Fowler, Henry R. Brigham. 
Brighton District. — Justice, Henry Baldwin ; salary, $1,200. Special 
Justices, Frederick W. Galbraith, James H.Rice. South Boston Dis- 
trict. — t/'MS'^ice, Robert I. Burbank; salary, $1,800. Special Justices, 
Joseph D. Fallon, Patrick A. Collins. Clerk, Joseph H. Allen ; salary, 
$1,200. East Boston DisumcT . — Justice , Benjamin Pond; salary, 
$1,200. Special Justices, Roscoe H. Thompson, William Whitton 
Dwyer. Clerk, Willard S. Allen; salary, $800. Charlestown Dis- 
trict. — Justice, George W. Warren; salary, $1,500. Special Justices, 
Henry -W. Bragg, Joseph H. Cotton. Clerk, Daniel Williams; salary, 
$1,200. 

Cambridge. — Justice, John S. Ladd ; salarj', $1,800. Special Justices, 
Woodward Emery, H. W. Muzzey. Clerk, Thomas Mclntire, Jr.; 
salary, $1,000. 

Chelsea. — Justice, Haralett Bates; salary, $1,600. Special Justices, 
Eraetus Rugg, Eben Hutchinson. 

Chicopee. — Justice, 'E.dyvxn O. Carter; salary, $1,000. Special Jus- 
tices, Simon G. Southworth, Luther White. 

YwcwK\3-RG.. — Justice, Thornton K. Ware; salary, $1,000. Special 
Justices, David H. Merriam, Charles S. Hayden. Clerk, Edward P. Lor- 
ing; salary, $500. 

Gloucester. — Justice, James Davis ; salary, $1,400. Special Justice, 
Elbridge G. Friend. Clerk, Sumner D. York; salary, $600. 

Haverhill. — Justice, Henry Carter ; salary, $1 ,400. Special Justices, 
Henry N. Merrill, Ira A. Ahbott. Clerk, Edward B. Gwrge; salary, 
$600, 



Judiciary. 225 



IToLYOKE. — Jwtfice, W. B. C. PoarHons ; salary, $1,500. Sficcial Jus- 
tices, Porter Underwood, Kdward W. Cbapiii. 

I.AWUKNCK. — ,/«.v</(v, Xatliaii W. Mainion ; salary, $1,800. Special 
Justireff, CliarloB U. Holl, Wilbur F. Gilt;. Clerk, Henry F. IIopkhiB; 
salary, $1,000. 

Lkk. — Justice, Mo8C8 II. Pease; salary, $600. Special Justices, 
James Hiillard, Franklin W. (Jibbs. 

Lowell. — Justice, Natban Crosby; salary, $1,800. Spa ial Justices, 
Jobri Davis, Frederick T. (.Jreenbalge. r//rA-, Samuel P. Hadk-y ; salary, 
$1,000. 

Lynn. — JuKtire, llollln K. llaimon; salary, $1,400. Sjit <i(t/ Justices, 
John W. lU-rry, Ira 15. Keitb. C/fH-, Henry ('. Oliver ; salary, $800. 

Newiuihyi'OUT. — ,/(/A*</cr, William E. Currier; salary, $700. Special 
Justices, Henry W. Cbapnum, John N. Pike. Vlerk, E. F. Hartlctt; 
salary, $600. 

Newton. — Justice, William W. (larrutb; salary, $800. Special , [us- 
<iVes, Henry H. Matber, Kdward H. Mason. Clerk, Edward W. Cate ; 
salary, $400. 

SoMEiiviLLE. — Justice, Isaac Story ; salary, $1,200. Special Justices, 
Alpheus II. Brown, Charles G.Pope. Clet^k, Lebbcus Htctson ; salary, 
$600. 

SpuiNfJFiELi) (jurisdietion, Springlield, West Springlield, Wilbrabani, 
Agawam, and Lonj^meadow). — ./ws/wr, Gideon Wells; salary, $1,800. 
Special Justices, Alfred M. Copeland, Bamuel B. Spooner. Clerk, 
Charles C. Spellman ; salary, $1,000. 

WiLLiAMSTowN. — Justice, John R. Bulkley; salary, $300. Special 
Justices, Andrew M. Bmith, Henry L. Sabin. 

District Courts. 
Central BEUKSiiinE (court held at Pitlsfield ; .jurisdiction in Han- 
cock, Lanesborough, Peru, Windsor, Hinsdale, Dalton, Pittsfield, and 
Richmond) . — Justice, Joseph Tucker ; salary, $1 ,200. Special Justices, 
Lorenzo H. Gamwell, William T. Filley. Clerk, Walter B. Hmith; 
salary, $000. 

NoKTiiEUN BEnKsiiiiiE (court held at Adams, and North .\dams; 
jurisdiction in Adams, Clarksburg, North Adams, Havoy, Florida, and 

29 



226 Judiciary. 

Cheshire).— Justice, Jarvis Rockwell; salary, $1,000. SpecialJustices, 
S. Proctor Thayer, Nelson H. Blxby. Cley^k, William Bowers ; salaiy, 
$500. 

SouTHEKN Berkshire (court held at Great Barrington ; jurisdiction 
in Sheffield, Great Barrington, Egremont, Alford, Mount Washington, 
Monterey, and Xew Marlborough). — Ji<.siice, James Bradford; salary, 
$800. Special Justices, James H. Rowley, Rensselaer K. Couch. 
Clerk, Thomas Siggins; salary, $400. 

First Plymouth (court held at Brockton; jurisdiction in Brockton, 
Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, and West Bridgewater). — Justice, 
Jonas R. Perkins; salary, $1,000. Special Justices, Hosea Eangman, 
Charles W. Sumner. Clerk, David L. Cowell; salary, $400. 

Second Pltmouth (court held at Abington and Hingham; jurisdic- 
tion in Abington, Rockland, Hingham, Hull, Hanover, Hanson, South 
Abington, Scituate, and South Scituate) . — Justice, Jesse E. Keith ; salary, 
$1,100. Special Justices, Zen^kS, S^n^vas, James S. Lewis. Clerk, Otis 
W. Soule; salary, $500. 

Third Plymouth (court held at Plymouth ; jurisdiction in Plymouth, 
Kingston, Plyrapton, Pembroke, Duxbury, and Marshfield). — Jus- 
tice, Chas. G. Davis; salary, $700. Special Justices, Frank T. Vinal, 
Wm. S. Danforth. Clerk, Benj. A. Hathaway; salary, $300. 

Fourth Plymouth (court held at Middleborough and Wareham; 
jurisdiction in Middleborough, Wareham, Lakeville, Marion, Mattapoi- 
sett, and Rochester).— Jwsiice, Francis M. Vaughan; salary, $800. 
Special Justice, Lemuel LeB. Holmes. Clerk, William L. Chipman; 
salary, $400, 

First Northern Middlesex (court held at Ayer; jurisdiction in 
Ayer, Groton, Pepperell, Townsend, Aishby, Shirley, Westford, Little- 
ton, and Boxborough). — Jzis<2Cf, Levi Wallace; salary, $800. Special 
Justices, Warren H. Atwood, John Spaulding. Clerk, George W. San- 
derson ; salary, $400. 

First Southern Middlesex (court held at South Framingham; 
jurisdiction in Ashland, Framingham, Holhston, Hopkinton, Natick, 
Sherborn, Sudbury, and Wayland). — t/?/si'ic^, Constantine C. Esty; 
salary, $1,200. Special Justices, Lucius H. Wakefield, Edw^in C.Mori^e. 
Clerk, Ira B. Forbes; salary, $600. 

First Eastern Middlesex (court held at Maiden and Wakefield; 
jurisdiction in Wilmington, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wake- 



Judiciary 227 

field, Melrose, Maiden, Everett, and Medford). — Justice, John W. Pet- 
tengill; salary $1,200. Special Justices, Thomas S. Harlow, Solon 
Bancroft. C/erA;, William N. Tyler; salary, $800. 

Central Middlesex (court held at Concord; jurisdiction in Acton, 
Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lincoln, Maynard, Stow, and Lexington). — 
Justice, John S. Keyes ; salary, $600. Special Justices, Augustus E. 
Scott, Charles Thompson. 

First Essex (court held at Salem ; .iurisdiction in Salem, Beverly, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Middleton, Topstield, and Wenham). — Justice, 
Joseph B. F. Osgood; salary, $1,600. Special Justices, l>a.me\ E. Saf- 
ford, Nathaniel J. Holden. Clerk, Samuel P. Andrews; salary, $1,000. 

First Bristol (court held at Taunton; jurisdiction in Taunton, 
Rehoboth, Berklej', Dighton, Seekonk, Attleborough, Norton, Mansfield, 
Easton, and 'R^ynha.m).— Justice, Wm. H. Fox ; salary, $1,400. Sjiecial 
Justices, Erastus M. Reed, William E. Fuller. Clerk, Arthur M. Alger; 
salary, $800. 

Second Bristol (court held at Fall River; jurisdiction in Fall River, 
Freetown, Somerset, and Swansea) . — Justice, Josiah C. Blaisdell ; salary, 
$2,500. Spjecial Justice s,lsl\\\.o\i Reed, Benj. K. Lovatt. C/frl, Augus- 
tus B. Leonard; salary, $1,800. 

Third Bristol (court held at New Bedford; jurisdiction in New 
Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, Dartmouth, and Westport) . — t/wsiice, 
Alanson Borden; salary, $1,400. Special Justices, Francis W. Tappan, 
Frank A. Milliken. Clerk, Charles H. Sanford; salary, $800. 

First Southern Worcester (court held at Southbridge and Web- 
ster; jurisdiction in Sturbridge, Southbridge, Charlton, Dudley, Oxford, 
and Webster) . — Justice, Clark Jillson ; salary, $1,000. Special Justices, 
Frederick W. Botham, William H. Davis. 

Second Southern Worcester (court held at Blackstone and Ux- 
bridge; jurisdiction in Blackstone, Uxbridge, Douglas, and North- 
bridge) . — Justice, Arthur A. Putnam ; salary, $1,000. Sptecial Justices, 
Zadok A. Taft, Francis N. Thayer. 

Third Southern Worcester (court held at Milford; jurisdiction in 
Milford, Mendon, and Upton). — Justice, Charles A. Dewey; salary, 
$1,400. Special Justices, James R. Davis, Charles E. Whitney. 



228 Judiciary. 

First Eastern Worcester (court held atWestborough and Grafton; 
jurisdiction in Northborough, Southborough, Weetborough and Grafton). 
Justice, Dexter Newton; salary, $700. Special Justices, Benj. B. 
Nourse, Luther K. Leland. 

Second Eastern Worcester (court held at Clinton; jurisdiction in 
Clinton, Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster, and ^t^rMng). — Justice, 
Chas. G. Stevens; salary, $800. Special Justice, Christoi^her C. ^tone. 
Clerk, Frank E. Howard; salary, $400. 

Central Worcester (court held at Worcester; jurisdiction in 
Worcester, Mi llbury, Sutton, Auburn, Leicester, Paxton, W. Boylston, 
Boylston, Holden, and Shrewsbury). — t/?^9^^■ce, Hartley Williams ; salary, 
$2,500. Special Jxistices,^3im-Qe\'[JX\ey, George M.Woodward. Clerk, 
Theodore S. Johnson; salary, $2,000. Assistant Clerk, Amos C. Allen; 
salary, $800. 

East Norfolk (court held at Quincy; jurisdiction in Randolph, 
Braintree, Cohasset, Weymouth, Quincy, Holbrook, and Milton).— 
Justice, Everett C. Bumpus; salary, $1,200. Special Justices, James A. 
Tower, E. Granville Pratt. Clerk, J. White Belcher; salary, $600. 

Eastern Hampden (court held at Palmer; jurisdiction in Palmer, 
Brirafield, Monson, Holland, and Wales). — Jtistice, George Robinson, 
salary, $800. Special Justices, Ira G. Potter, Henry F. Brown. 

District Attorneys. 

[Elected by the several Districts for the term of three j'ears, ending 
January, 1881.] 

Northern District. — Middlesex County, John W. Hammond, 
of Cambridge; salary, $1,600. 

Eastern District. — Essex County, Edgar J. Sherman, of Law- 
rence; salary, 1,600. 

Southern District. — Bristol, Barnstable, Dukes, and Nantucket 
Counties, Hosea M. Knowlton, of New Bedford; salary, $1,600. 

South-Eastern District. — Norfolk and Plymouth Counties, Asa 
French of Braintree; salary, $1,600. 

Middle District. — Worcester County, Hamilton B. Staples, of 
Worcester ; salary, $1,600. 



Judiciary, 229 

Western District. — Hampden and Berkshire Counties, Nehemiab 
A. Leonard, of Springfield; salary, $1,600. 

North- Western District. — Hampshire and Franklin Counties, 
Daniel W. Bond, of Northampton; salary, $1,200. 

SurroLK County. — Oliver Stevens, of Boston ; salary, $4,500. 
Timothy J. Dacey, First Assistant Attorney ; salary, $2,400. Melvin O 
Adams, Second Assistant; salary, $2,000. Clei^k, Robert W. Xason; 
salary, $1,000. 



230 County Officers, 



COUNTY OFFICEES. 



Sheriffs, Registers of Deeds, and County Treasurers are elected by the 
people of the several counties for terms of three years. The cur- 
rent triennial term of Sheriffs expires on the first Wednesday of 
Januarys 1881, and that of the Registers of Deeds and County 
Treasurers in January, 1880. 

Registers of Probate and Insolvency and Clerks of Courts are elected 
for terms of five years. The current term of the former expires on 
the first Wednesday in January, 1884; that of the latter in 1881. 

Commissioners of Insolvency are elected by the people, three in number 
for each county, except Worcester County, which has four. Each 
Commissioner holds his office for three years from the first Wednes- 
day in January following his election. The current term expires on 
the first Wednesday in January, 1881. 

Registers of Deeds and Clerks of Courts are paid by fees. Sheriffs and 
County Treasurers are, by sections 37 and 70 of chapter 17 of the 
General Statutes, paid by fixed salaries. 

County Commissioners are elected one annually, and severally for terms 
of three years; and two Special Commissioners are elected every 
third year, the current terra ending in December, 1880. 

By section 29 of chapter 17 of the General Statutes, the County Commis- 
sioners and Special Commissioners of the several counties are paid 
from the treasuries of their respective counties a gross sum in full for 
their services and travel, the same to be apportioned to each, accord- 
ing to the number of days' service and actual amount of travel per- 
formed by each respectively. (See chap. 295, Acts 1879.) 

By the provisions of section 33 of chapter 120 of the General Statutes, 
the Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, is re- 
quired to designate and commission a certain number of Justices 
of the Peace as Trial Justices in the several counties to try crim- 
inal cases. No Justice of the Peace not thus designated and com- 
missioned has any powder or authority in criminal cases, except to 
receive complaints and issue warrants, for which no fees are to be 
allowed. 
By the provisions of chapter 187 of the Acts of 1860, each Trial Justice 
holds office for the term of three years from the time of his designa- 
tion, unless such designation is sooner revoked, or unless his com- 
mission of Justice of the Peace shall sooner expire. 



County Officers. 231 



BARNSTABLE COUNT Y — Incorporated 1685. 

Shire Toivn, Barnstable. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate ajul Insolvency — Jof^e-ph M. Day, Barnstable . $1,000 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Chas. Thacher, 2d,Yarm'th, 1,000 

Sheriff— Thomas Harris, Barnstable 500 

Clerk of Coiirts — Smith K. Hopkins, Barnstable. 

County Treasurer — Chav\^s H. Nye, Barnstable (Hyannis) . . 500 

Register of Deeds — As-a E. Lovell, Barnstable. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,100) — 

Jonathan Higgins, Orleans . . Term expires December, 1880 
Joshua C. Robinson, Falmouth . " " " 1881 

James S. Howes, Dennis . . " •• " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

John "W. Davis, Provincetown . Term expires December, 1880 
Joshua M. Hawes, Yarmouth . " " " 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Samuel Snow, Barnstable; Joshua M. 
Howes, Yarmouth; Henry Shortle, Provincetown. 

Trial Justices — James B. Crocker, Yarmouth ; Marshall S. Underwood, 
Dennis; Eben S. Whittcmore, Sandwich; Theodore F. Bassett, Hy- 
annis; Smith K. Hopkins, Barnstable; George T. Wyer, Wellfleet; 
Shubael B. Kelley, Harwich Port. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Incorporated 1761. 

Shire Toicn, Pittsfield. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Jas. T. Robinson, No. Adams. $1,200 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — A. J. Waterman, Pittsfield, 1,200 

^Aw;/f— Graham A. Root, Pittsfield 1,000 

Cltrk of C'owr^.s — Henry W. Taft, Pittsfield. 

Cotmiz/ rjYasi^rfr — George H. Tucker, Pittsfield .... 1,200 
Regixters of Deeds — North District. E. E. Merchant, Adams; 
Middle District, Theodore L. Allen, Pittsfield; South Dis- 
trict, Isaac Seeley, Great Barrington. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $1,600) — 

Henry J. Bliss, Adams . . . Term expires December, 1880 
Lyman Payne, Hinsdale ..." " '• 1881 

John B. Hull, Stockbridge . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

James M. Waterman, Williamstown, Term expires December, 1880 
H. M. Pierson, Pittsfield. . . " " " 1880 

Commissioners of Disolvency-Francia A. Rockwell, Pittsfield; 
F. T. Whiting, Great Barrington; S. Proctor Thayer, North 
Adams. 



232 • County Officers. 



Berkshire County — Concluded. 
Trial Justice-^ — William C. Spaulding, West Stockbridge; Henry J. 
Dunham, Stockbridge. 

BRISTOL COUXTY — Incorporated 1685. 

Shire Toions, Taunton and New Bedford. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Edm'd H. Bennett, Taunton, $1,800 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Wm. E. Fuller, Taunton . 1,800 

Sheriff— Andrew R. Wright, Fall River 1,500 

Clerk of Courts — Simeon Borden, Fall River. 

County Treasurei — George F. Pratt, Taunton .... 1,500 

Registers of Deeds — North District, Joseph E. Wilbar, Taunton; 
South District, Charles C. Sayer, New Bedford. 

County Commissioners (compensation $2,000) — 

Franklin Gray, Fall River . . Term expires December, 1880 

Henry A. Thayer, Taunton . . " " '« 1881 

Killey E. Terry, New Bedford . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

George N. Crandall, Attleborough . Term expires December, 188 
Daniel J. Lewis, Fairhaven . . " " " 185 

Commissioners of Insolvency — George E. Williams, Taunton; Charles 
T. Bonney, New Bedford; George A. Adams, Attleborough. 

Trial Justice — AWi&rl A. Rotch, Easton. 

DUKES COUNTY — Incorporated 1683. 

Shire Town, Edgartown. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — J. T. Pease, Edgartown . . $500 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — 'Q. Vincent, Edgartown . 600 

/S^fri/f— Francis C. Smith, Edgartown .* 300 

Clerk of Courts — Samuel Keniston, Edgartown. 

County Treasurei — John S. Smitn, Edgartown .... 300 

^f^is^fr 0/ Z>eftZs — John S. Smith, Edgartown .... 200 

County Commissioners (com.pensation, $400) — 

Jonathan H. Munroe, Edgartown . Term expires December, 1880 
Moses C. Vincent, Chilmark . . " " " 1881 

Lorenzo Smith, Tisbury . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

Abraham Rodman, Gay Head . Terra expires December, 1880 
Vernal Clifford, Gosnold . . •' ♦' ♦• 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Charles B. Allen, Tisbury ; Archibald 
Mellen, Edgartown; Thomas Jeffries, Gay Head. 

Trial Justice — Jeremiah Pease, Edgartown. 



County Officers. 233 



ESSEX COUI^TY — Incorporated 1634. 

Shire Towns, Salem, Lawrence, and Ne-wburtport. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — George F. Choate, Salem . $2,500 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Jeremiah T. Mahoney, Salem, 2,000 

Assistant Register — Ezra D. Hines, Danvers 1,500 

Sheriff — Horatio Gr. Herrick, Lawrence 1,800 

Clerk of Courts — Alfred A. Abbott, Peabody. 

Assistant Clerk — George R. Lord, Salem 2,100 

County Treasurer — E. KendallJenkins, Andover . . . 1,800 

Registers of i>^^f7.s — Southern District, Charles S. Osgood, Salem; 

Northern District, John R. Poor, Lawrence. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $3,200) — 

Joseph O. Proctor, Gloucester . Term expires December, 1880 
John W. Raymond, Beverly . . •« " •• 1881 

..." •• «« 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

Aaron Sawyer, Amesbury . . Term expires December, 1880 

Daniel W. Bartlett, Essex . . «« «• «« 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — William L. Thompson, Lawrence; 

Dean Peabody, Lynn; Nathaniel J. Holden, Salem. 

TrialJustices — J. Scott Todd, Rowley; Nath'l F. S. York, Rockport; 

William M. Rogers, Methuen; Orlando B. Tenney, Georgetown; 

George H. Poor, Andover; George W. Cate, Amesbury; Amos 

Merrill, Peabody; Orlando S. Baley, Salisbury; William Nutting, 

Jr., Marblehead; Wesley K. Bell, Ipswich; Joseph T. Wilson, 

Nahant. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY— Incorporated 1811. 

Shire Town, Greenfield. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — C. C. Conant, Greenfield . $1,400 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — F. M. Thompson, G'nfield, . 1,400 

Sheriff— George A. Kimball, Greenfield 800 

Clerk of Courts — Edward E. Lyman, Greenfield. 

County Treasurer — C. M. Moody, Greenfield 600 

Register of Deeds — Edwin Stratton, Greenfield. 
County Commissioners (compensation, $1,100) — 

Carlos Batchelder, Conway . . Term expires December, 1880 
Lyman G. Barton, Greenfield . " •• •« 1881 

Edward F. Mayo .... •• «« •« 1882 

30 



234 County Officers. 



Frankxin County— Concluded. 

Special Commissioners — 

David L. Smith, Colraia . . . Term expires December, 1880 
Beriah W. Fay, New Salem . . •' " " 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency— RoBweW A. Buck, Colrain; Hiram 
Woodward, Orange; John Sprague, Conway. 

TriaUustices — Gorham D. Williams, Greenfield; Hiram Woodward, 
Orange; Samuel D. Bardwell, Shelburne Falls ; Joseph H. Root and 
George L. Barton, Montague; Albert Montague, Sunderland; John 
A. Winslow, Charlemont; Henry W.Billings, Conway; Silas Blake, 
Ashfield. 

HAMPDElSr COUNT Y — Incorporated 1812. 

Shire Town, Springfield. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — VTm. S. Shurtleff, Spring- 
field $1,800 

Register of Probate and Insolvency— Samuel B. Spooner, Spring- 
field 1,600 

Sheriff— ^iram Q. Sanderson, Springfield 1,250 

Clerk of Courts — Rohert O. Morris, Springfield. 

Assistant Ci!crA; — Charles C. Spellman. 

CoMni!y rreasjfrer — M. Wells Bridge, Springfield . . . . 1,200 

Register of Deeds — James E. Russell, Springfield. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,600) — 

Edwin Chase, Holyoke . . . Term expires December, 1880 
Lewis F. Root, Westfield . . " " " 1881 

Leonard Clark, Springfield . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

Ira G. Potter, Wilbraham . . Term expires December, 1880 
Samuel A. Bartholomew, Blandford " " •' 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Y. D. Lincoln, Brimfield; William B. 
Rogers, Springfield; J. R. Dunbar, Westfield. 

THal Justices —Henry B. Lewis, Homer B. Stevens, and Henry Fuller, 
Westfield; James M. Goodwin, West Granville; Rufus Smith, 
Chester. 

HAMPSHIRE COinSTTY — Incorporated 1662. 

Shire Town, Northampton. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — William G. Bassett, East- 

hampton $1,400 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — J^M^e Lyman, Northamp- 
ton 1.400 



County Officers. 235 

Hampshire County — Concluded. 

Salary. 

/SAeriif— Henry A. Longley, Northampton $800 

Clerk of Courts — W. P. Strickland, Northampton. 

County Treasurer — Lewis Warner, Northampton . . . . 600 

Register of Deeds — Henry P. Billings, Northampton. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,200) — 

Elnathan Graves, Williamsburg . Term expires December, 1880 
Flavel Gay lord, Amherst ..." •' " 1881 

Elisha A. Edwards, Southampton . " " •• 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

S. L. Parsons, Northampton . . Term expires December, 1880 
C. E. Blood, Ware ....•' " «« 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Benjamin Aldrich, South Hadley; Timo- 
thy G.Spaulding, Northampton; Franklin D. Richards, Ware. 

Trial Justices — Yran^Wrx D. Richards, Ware; Edward A. Thomas, 
Amherst; Garry Munson, Huntington; Charles Richards, Enfield; 
Franklin Dickinson, Belchertown; Nathan Morse, South Hadley; 
A. Perry Peck, and Haynes H. Chilson, Northampton; Francis H. 
Dawes, Cummington; Lafayette Clapp, Easthampton. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY —Licorporated 1643. 

Shire Towns, Cambridge (East) and Lowell. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Geo. M. Brooks, Concord . $2,500 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Joseph H. Tyler, Win- 
chester 2,600 

Assistant Register — Samuel H. Folsom, Winchester . . . 1,500 

Sheriff— Eben W. Fiske, Waltham 2,000 

Clerk of Courts — Theodore C. Hurd, Cambridge 

^ssistowi O/erA — John J. Sawyer, Somerville .... 2,100 

Second Assistant Clerk — John L. Ambrose, Somerville 

County Treasurer -Axo.os'&ioney'E.vexQit ." . . . . 1,800 

Registers of Deeds — North District, Joseph P. Thompson, Lowell; 

South District, Charles B. Stevens, Cambridge. 
Cmmty Commissioners* (compensation, $3,600) — 

Harrison Harwood, Natick . . Term expires December, 1880 
J. Henry Reed, Westford . . . •• '« «« 1881 

Daniel G. Walton, Wakefield . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners, — 

Edward Everett Thompson, Woburn, Term expires December, 1880 
Samuel Staples, Concord . . . *' " " 1881 

* The jurisdiction of the County Commissioners of Middlesex extends 
over Revere and Winthrop, in the County of Suffolk. 



236 County Officers. 



Middlesex County — Concluded. 

Commissioners of Insolvency —John Spaulding, Ayer; John Haskell 
Butler, Somerville; Frederick T. Greenhalge, Lowell. 

Trial Justices — B. Berkley Johnson, Walthara; Leonard Huntress 
(Special), Tewksbury; James T. Joslin, Hudson; George 8. Little- 
field, Winchester; Parker L. Converse, Woburn; Ira O. Carter, 
Arlington; Jesse F. Wheeler, Watertown; Nahum Witherbee, 
Marlborough ; Henry Fuller, Westford. 

NANTUCKET COUNTY — Incorporated 1695. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Th&A^exwC.DefnQz . . $500 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Samuel Swain ... 600 

Sheriff— Josiah F. Barrett 300 

Clerk of Coitrts — George W. Jenks. 
County Treasurer — Samuel Swain. 
Register of />eeds — Andrew M. Myrick. 
Assistant Register — George W. Jenks. 
Trial Justices — David Folger, Allen Coffin. 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Charlea W. Uussey, Andrew M. Myrick, 
Albert A. Gardner. 

Note. — The selectmen of the town of Nantucket have the powers and 
perform the duties of County Commissioners. The Treasurer of the 
town is also County Treasurer. 

NORFOLK COUNTY — Incorporated 1793. 

iShire Town, Dedham. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — George White, Needham . $2,000 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Jonathan Cobb, Dedham . 1,500 

Assistant Register — John D.CohhfBedham 1,100 

^/^eW/f— RufusC. Wood,Dedham 1,200 

Clerk of Cbi^Ws — Erastus Worthington, Dedham. 

^ssiston^ CVerA;- Edgar H. Kingsbury, Dedham .... 1,500 

County Treasurer — Chauncey C. Churchill, Dedham . . . 1,200 

Register of Deeds — John H. Burdakin, Dedham. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,900) — 

James Humphrey, Weymouth . . Term expires December, 1880 
George W. Wiggin, Franklin . . " '• " 1881 

Jabez Talbot, Jr., Stoughton . . " " «« 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

J. Q. A. Field, Quincy . . . Term expires December, 1880 
George P. Morey, Walpole . . '• " «• 1880 



County Officers. 237 

Norfolk County — Concluded. 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Georga W. Wiggin, Franklin; Emery 

Grover, Needham ; James E. Tirrell, Quincy. 
Ti-ial Justices — Emery Grover and Thomas E. Barry, Needham ; 

Charles H. Drew, Brookline; Charles H. Deans, West Medway; 

Samuel Warner, Wrentham; Frederick D. Ely, Dedham; George 

W. Wiggin, Franklin; Oscar A. Harden, Stoughton; Thomas E. 

Grover, Canton; Henry B. Terry, Hyde Park. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 

Shire Town, Plymouth. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — V^^m. H. Wood, Middleboro', $1,500 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — B. E. Damon, Plymouth . 1,500 

6'A<'n;/— A. K. Harmon, Plymouth 900 

Clerk of Cotir ts — WUlhim II. Whitman, Plymouth. 

County Treasurer — John Moriasey, Plymouth .... 1,000 

Register of i)ee(?.s — William S. Danforth, Plymouth. 

County Commissioners (compensation, $1,900) — 

Charles H. Paine, Halifax . . Term expires December, 1880 

Joseph T. Wood, Middh-borough . " " " 1881 

Jedediah Dwelley, Hanover . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

Chas. W. 8. (Seymour, Hingham . Term expires December, 1880 
Frederic Howard, Brockton . . '• " " 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — J ontis R. Perkins, Brockton; Hosea 
Kingman, Bridgewater; Jesse E. Keith, Abington. 

SUFFOLK COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 

Salary. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — John W. McKim, Boston . $4,000 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — ^\\]s^hQ:Qorge,Tio(iton . 3,000 

(7/erA: — James L. Crombie 1,200 

Assistant Register — John 11. VaXnQ 1,500 

/S/im;/- John M.Clark, Boston 2,500 

Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court — John Noble. 

Assistant Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court — Henry A. Clapp, 

Boston 

Clerk of Superior Court {Civil Session) -Joscjyh A. Willard, 

Boston 

Assistant — Edwin A. Wadleigh. 

Clerk of Superior Court {Criminal Session) —John P. Manning, Boston. 



238 County Officers. 



Suffolk County — Concluded. 

City and Courdy rreosj^rfr— Charles H. Dennie. 
Register of Deeds — Thomas F. Temple, Boston. 
THal Justice — 'E.A^m C. Gilman, Winthrop. 

Commissioners of Insolvency — 'Edyvard J. Jones, James F. Farley, and 
Edward J. Jenkins, all of Boston. 

Note. — In the city of Boston the Board of Aldermen have all the 
powers and duties of County Commissioners, except in relation to trials 
by jurj' and recovery of damages in such trials, in cases of laying out 
and discontinuing highways, and appeals from assessors for abatement 
of taxes. The Treasurer of the city of Boston is likewise County Treas- 
urer. 

COUNTY OF WORCESTER — Incorporated 1731. 

Shire Towns, Worcester and Fitchburg. 

Salary. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — AAxn Thayer, Worcester . $2,500 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Chas. E. Stevens, Worcester, 2,000 

Assistant Register — Frederick W. Southwick, Worcester . . 1,500 

iS'Aer-i/— Augustus B. R. Sprague, Worcester .... 2,000 

Clerk of Courts — John A. Dana, Worcester. 

^.s.sis^a72< C'/crA — William T. Harlow, Worcester .... 2,100 

Second Assistant Clerk — Elliott H. Peabody, Worcester. 

Register of Deeds — B.arsrej B. Wilder, Worcester. 

County Treasurer — Edward A. Brown, Worcester . . . 1,800 

County Commissioners (compensation, $3,400) — 

William O. Brown, Fitchburg . . Term expires December, 1880 
Henry G. Taft, Uxbridge . . . " " " 1881 

Henry E. Rice, Barre . . . " " " 1882 

Special Commissioners — 

Bethuel Ellis, Winchendon . . Term expires December, 1880 
James R. Davis, Milford . . . " " " 1880 

Commissioners of Insolvency — Charles Field, Athol; David H. Mer- 
riam, Fitchburg; Frank P. Goulding, Worcester. 

Trial Justices — Edwin Woods, Barre ; J. F. Hitchcock, Warren ; Luther 
Hill, Spencer; E. Wyman Stone, Stillman Cady, Templeton; Chas. 
H. Merriam, Leominster; Samuel M. Osgood, Athol; Bethuel Ellis, 
Giles H. Whitney, Winchendon ; Thomas E. Glazier, Gardner; Geo. 
S. Duell, Brookfield; Charles E. Jenks, North Brookfield; S. Joseph 
Bradley, Ashburnham. 



Board of Agriculture. 



239 



BOAED or AGRICTILTUEE. 



[Established "by Act of April 21, 1852. See also chap. 220 of Acts of 
1863, and chap. 263 of Acts of 1866.] 



Members ex Officiis. 
Hie Excellency John D. Long. 
His Honor Byron TTeston. 

Hon. Henry B. Peirce, Secretary of the Commonwealth. 
Charles L. Flint, President Mass. Agricultural College. 
Charles A. Goessmann, State Agricultural Chemist. 

Appointed by the Governor and Council. 

Marshall P. Wilder, of Boston Tenn expires, 1880 

James S. Grinnell, of Greenfield . . . . " «• 1881 

James R. Nichols, of Haverhill .....•* " 1882 



Chosen by the County Societies. 
Massachusetts, E. Frank Bowditch, of Framingham, 
Essex, Benjamin P. Ware, of Marblehead . 
Middlesex, John B. Moore, of Concord 

•' North, John A. Goodwin, of Lowell 
" South, Thomas J. Damon, of Wayland 
Worcester, O. B. Had wen, of Worcester . 

•' West, William A. Warner, of Hardwick 
" North, John F. Brown, of Lunenburg 
" North-west, Enoch T. Lewis, of Athol 
" South, Nathaniel Upham, of Sturbridge 
" South-east, Velorous Taft, of Upton 
Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden, J. H. Demond 

of Northampton 

Hampshire, Henry C. Comins, of North Hadley 
Highland, Abiel K. Abbott, of Chester 
Hampden, William R. Sessions, of Hampden . 
•* East, Horace P. Wakefield, of Palmer 



, Terr 


Q expires 1880 


«t 


'« 1881 


«« 


•• 1882 


«« 


«' 1880 


<t 


" 1881 


«« 


«' 1881 


:, " 


•* 1881 


«« 


" 1881 


It 


" 1880 


i « 


" 1880 


i( 


•' 1882 


•« 


«« 1882 


<« 


«' 1880 


«« 


1881 


«« 


" 1882 


«« 


•' 1882 



240 Board of Agriculture, — Education. 



Union, Franklin C. Knox, of Blandford . 
Franklin, Arthur A. Smith, of Colrain 
Deerfield Valley, Otis J. Davenport, of Colrain 
Berkshire, Henry M, Pierson, of Pittsfield 
Hoosac Valley, A. W. Preston, of North Adams 
Housatonic, Merritt I. Wheeler, of Great Barrington 
Norfolk, Henry 8. Russell, of Milton . 
Hingham, Edmund Hersey, of Hingham . 
Bristol, Avery P. Slade, of Somerset . 
Plymouth, John Lane, of East Bridgewater 
Marshfield, George M. Baker, of Marshfield 
Barnstable, S. B. Phinney, of Barnstable . 
Nantucket, Alex. Macy, Jr., of Nantucket . 
Martha's Vineyard, Hebron Vincent, of Edgar 

town 

Charles L. Flint 



Term expires 



1880 
1881 
1882 
1882 
1882 
1880 
1882 
1881 
1881 
1882 
1880 
1882 

1881 



Secretary. 



BOAED or EDUCATION. 



[Established by Act of April 20, 1837.] 



The Board consists of the Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, ex 
officiis, and eight members, one to be appointed annually by the Gov- 
ernor and Council. 



Abby W. May, Boston Term expiree 1880 

Horatio G. Knight, Easthampton . . . . " ♦• 1881 

Christopher C. Hussey, Billerica " " 1882 

Charles B. Rice, Danvers " •« 1883 

Elijah B. Stoddard, Worcester " " 1884 

Alonzo A. Miner, Boston " ** 1885 

Gardner G. Hubbard, Cambridge ....'• " 1886 

WilUam Rice, Springfield " •' 1887 

John W. Dickinson, Secretary. Office in the Library. 

C. B. Tillinghast, Clerk and Treasurer. 

George A. Walton and Eli A. Hubbard, Agents. 

Walter Smith, Director of Art-Education. 



Commissioners^ Etc, 241 

COMMISSIONEES, ETC. 



On Cattle — Levi Stockbridge, Amherst; Elisha F. Thayer, West 
Newton; Horace W. Jordan, Brighton. 

Op Cobporations — Daniel A. Grleason. Office, State House. 

Harbor and Land — Francis A. Nye, Falmouth, 1880; TTillard P. 
PhmipB, Salem, 1881; Albert Mason, Brookline, 1882. (Chap. 263, Acts 
of 1879.) 

On Inland Fisheries — Edward A. Brackett, "Winchester, 1884; 
Asa French, Braintree, 1881; Theodore Lyman, Brookline, 1881. 

On Insurance — Julius L. Clarke, Newton. Deputy, William S. 
Smith. Office, No. 33 Pemberton Square. 

On Pilots eor the Port or Boston — Jacob G. Pierce, Milton; 
Nathaniel Spooner, Boston. (Chap. 176, Acts of 1862.) 

Op Prisons- Mary Gr. Ware, Lancaster, 1880; William Roberts, 
Waltham, 1881; Ellen C. Johnson, Boston, 1882; Charles O. Chapin, 
Springfield, 1883; Thomas Parsons, Brookline, 1884. (Chap. 294, Acts of 
1879.) 

On Railroads — Thomas Russell, Boston, Chairman ^l^^l; Edward 
W. Kinsley, Boston, 1881; Albert D. Briggs, Springfield, 1880. Clerk, 
William A. Crafts. Supervisor of Railroad Accounts, Joseph H. Good- 
speed. Office, No. 7 Pemberton Square. 

On Savings Banks — Jeremiah Gatchell, Blackstone, 1881 ; Cadwal- 
lader Curry, Brookline, 1882. Office, State House. 

Board op Health, Lunacy, and Charity — Albert Wood, Wor- 
cester, 1880; Nathan Allen, Lowell, 1880; John C. Hoadley, Lawrence, 
1881; Edward Hitchcock, Amherst, 1881; Robert T. Davis, Fall River, 
1882; Ezra Parmenter, Cambridge, 1882; Charles F. Donnelly, Boston, 
1883; Henry I. Bowditch, Boston, 1883; Moses Kimball, Boston, 1884. 
(Chap. 291, Acts of 1879.) Secretary, Charles F. Folsom, Boston. 
Inspector of Charities, Frank B. Sanborn, Concord. Superintenderit 
of In-Door Poor, S. C. Wrightington, Fall River. Superintendent of 
Out-Door Poor, Henry B. Wheelwright, Taunton. Expert in Lunacy, 
Henry C. Prentiss. 

31 



242 Commissioners, Etc, 

BuKEAU or Labob Statistics — Chief, Carroll D. "Wright, Reading. 
Deputy, Charles F. Pidgin. Office, 33 Pemberton Square. 

Inspector or Leather — George R. Hodgdon, Boston. 

Inspector op Q-as and Gas-Metebs — Charles W. Hinman, Boston. 

Inspector-Generax of Fish — William Cogswell, Salem. 

Survbtor-General of Lumber — George W. Cram, Cambridge. 

State Directors of Boston and Albany Railroad (elected by the 
Legislature) —J. H. Chadwick, Boston, 1880; Jarvis N. Dunham, Pitts- 
field, 1880; Charles L. Wood, New Bedford, 1880; Francis B. Hayes, 
Boston, 1881; David N. Skillings, Winchester, 1881. 

State Assayers of Ores and Metals — S. Dana Hayes, Boston; 
Augustus A. Hayes, Boston; Stephen P. Sharpies, Cambridge; Horace 
L. Bowker, Boston. 

State Assater of Liquors — James F. Babcock, Boston. 



State Institutions, 243 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



LIIN-ATIC HOSPITALS. 

The government of each is vested in a Board of Five Trustees, one to 
be appointed annually by the Governor and Council, and the place of the 
senior member, as arranged in the following order, to be vacated each 
year : — 

Worcester. 

Rufus D. "Woods, Enfield, 1880; Thomas H. Gage, Worcester, 1881; 
John D. Washburn, Worcester, 1882; James B. Thayer, Cambridge, 
1883; Robert W. Hooper, Boston, 1884. 

SupeHntendent — John G. Park, M.D. 

[The Temporary Asylum for Chronic Insane, Hosea M. Quimby, M.D. 
Superintendent, is also under charge of above Trustees.] 

Taunton. 

Samuel L.Crocker, Taunton, 1880; George Howland, Jr., New Bed- 
ford, 1881; William C. Lovering, Taunton, 1882; Simeon Borden, Fall 
River, 1883; Le Baron Russell, Boston, 1884. 

Superintendent — 3. P. Brown, M.D. 

Northampton. 

Adams C. Deane, Greenfield, 1880; Henry W. Taft, Pittsfield, 1881 ; 
Edmund H. Sawyer, Easthampton, 1882; William M. Gaylord, North- 
ampton, 1883; Silas M. Smith, Northampton, 1884. 

Superintendent — Pliny Earle, M.D. 

Banvers. 

Charles P. Preston, Danvers, 1880; Daniel S. Richardson, Lowell, 1881; 
James Sturgis, Boston, 1882; Gardner A. Churchill, Boston, 1883; Sam- 
uul W. Hopkinson, Bradford, 1884. 

Superintendent — C. S. May, M. D. 



STATE PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 

Trustees — SamuelR. Hey wood, Worcester, 1880; Adelaide A. Calkins, 
Springfield, 1880; George W. Johnson, Brookfield, 1881; Milo Hildreth, 
Northborough, 1881; M. J. Flatley, Boston, 1882; Anne B. Richardson, 
Lowell, 1883; Lyman Belknap, Westborough, 1884. 

[This Board of Trustees was established by sect. 8, chap. 291, Acts of 
1879, and they have charge of the government of the State Reform School 
at Westborough, the Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster, and the 
State Primary School at Monson.] 



244 State Institutions, 



STATE REFORM SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

At Westborough. 

Superintendent — li. H. Sheldon. Treasurer — Samuel M. Griggs. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 
At Lancaster. 
Superintendent — N. Porter Brown. Treasurer — Frank B. Fay, 
Chelsea. 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

At Monson. 

Superintendent — Gardiner Tufts. Physician — William Holbrook, 
M.D. 



MASSACHUSETTS EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY. 

At Boston. 

[By Resolves 1872, chap. 28.] 

Two Trustees appointed by the Governor. 

Trustees — Willard P. Phillips, Salem; Isaac N. Stoddard, Plymouth. 



MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR IDIOTIC AND FEEBLE- 
MINDED YOUTH. 
At South Boston. 
Chapter 150 of the Acts of 1850 was repealed by chap. 126 of the Acts 
of 1878 ; and the Board now, by said Act, consists of six Trustees, ap- 
pointed by the Governor for the term of three years : 

John S. Damrell, Boston; William W. Swan, Boston, 1880. John F. 
Moors, Greenfield; Stephen Salisbury, Jr., Worcester, 1881. Lewis Al- 
len, Peabody; Charles D. Homans, Boston, 1882. 



PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS ASYLUM 
FOR THE BLIND. 

At South Boston. 
Trustees — Andrew P. Peabody, Cambridge ; John S. Dwight, Boston ; 
J. Theodore Heard, Boston ; James H. Means, Boston, 1880. 



State Institutions. 245 



STATE PRISON". 
At Concord. 

Trar(?en — Samuel E. Chamberlain, appointed December, 1871. Dep- 
uty Warden — Joseph "SY. Owens. C^er^— William Pelrce. Physician — 
Henry A. Barrett, M.D. C^ajo^am — Julius H. Waterbury. 

Agent for Discharged Cbnvtcfe — Daniel Russell. 



REFORMATORY PRISON FOR WOMEN". 

At Sherborn. 

Superintendent — Mrs. Eudora C. Atkinson, Boston. Physician — Miss 
Lucy M. Hall, Sherborn. Chaplain — Qnsao. P. Harold, Somervllle. 
Treasurer and Steward — Hiram A. Stevens. 



STATE ALMSHOUSE. 
At Tewksbury. 

Trustees —'EmilY F. Pope, M.D., Boston, 1880; Francis H. NTourse, 
Winchester, 1881; Ellen S. S. Hammond, Boston, 1881; William R. 
Spaulding, Lawrence, 1882; George P. Elliot, Billerica, 1882. 

SupeHntendent — Thomas J. Marsh. Resident Physician — 'WiWiBxa 
H. Lathrop. First Assista7it Physician — Charles Foster. Second As- 
sistant Physician . 



By chap. 45 of the Acts of 1872, the State Almshouses at Bridgewater 
and Monson were discontinued, and the buildings to be used for a State 
Workhouse, and a State Primary School. 



STATE WORKHOUSE. 
At Bridgewater. 

Trustees — Catharine P. Lothrop, Taunton, 1880 : Georgianna A. Bout- 
well, Groton, 1881; Seabury W. Bowen, Fall River, 1881; J, White 
Belcher, Randolph, 1882; Joshua E. Crane, Bridgewater, 1882. 

Superintendent — N ahum Leonard, Jr. Physician — Ed\rard Sawyer. 



246 Colleges. 



COLLEGES O MASSACHUSETTS, 

WITH THEIR PRESIDENTS AND TRUSTEES. 



HARVARD COLLEGE. 

CORPORATION. 

Charles Wm. Eliot, LL.D., President. 
Fellows. 
Francis Parkman. Jobn Quincy AdamB. 

Martin Brimmer. Alexander Agassiz. 

Rev. Joseph H. Thayer, D.D. 

Edward W. Hooper, Treasurer. 

board of OVERSEERS. 

Hon. E. R. Hoar, LL.D., President of the Board. 

Ex Officio Mem bers. 

Charles W. Eliot, President of the University. 

Edward W. Hooper, Treasurer of the University. 

Elective Members. 

[Term of office expires June, 1880.] 
Hon. E. R. Hoar. George O. Shattuck. 

Theodore Lyman. Hon. John Lowell. 

Samuel A. Green, M.D. 

[Term of office expires June, 1881.] 
Hon. Charles F. Adams. Morrill Wyman, M.D. 

Darwin E. Ware. Rev. Edward E. Hale, D.D. 

William G. Russell. 

[Term of office expires June, 1882.] 
Rev. Phillips Brooks, D.D. Leverett Saltonstall. 

Hon. William C. Endicott. Moorfield Storey. 

Henry W. Paine, LL.D. 

[Term of office expires June, 1883.] 
Hon. Stephen Salisbury, LL.D. William Amory. 

James Elliot Cabot Rev. Francis G. Peabody. 

O. W. Hohnes. 

[Term of office expires June, 1884.] 
Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D. Charles R. Codman. 

Le Baron Russell Richard M. Hodges. 

Robert D. Smith. 

[Term of office expires June, 1885.] 
Henry W. Bellows, D.D. Rev. James F. Clarke, D.D. 

Amos A. Lawrence. John Fiske. 

Edwin P. Seaver. 



Colleges. 



247 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Charles L. Flint, President. 

Trustees. 

Henrj' L. Whiting. 



William Kiiowlton. 
Henry F. Hills. 
Richard Goodman. 
James S. GrinnelL 



Marshall P. Wilder. 
Charles G. Davis 
Henry Colt. 
John Cummin gs. 
Phineas Stedman. 
Daniel Needham. 

Trustees ex Officiis. 
His Excelleney John D. Long. 
Charles L. Flint, President of the College and Secretary of the Board 

of Agriculture. 
John W. Dickinson, Secretary of the Board of Education. 



WILLIAMS COLLEGE. 

CORPORATION. 

Paul A. Chadbourne, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Trustees. 



Hon. Paul A. Chadbourne. 
Rev. Mark Hopkins, D.D., LL.D. 
Hon. Henry L. Sabin. 
Hon. Joseph White, LL.D. 
Hon. Eraslus C. Benedict. LL.D. 
Rev. Robert R. Booth, D.D. 
Rev. Samuel Irepseus Prime, D.D. 
Hon. Francis H. Dewey, LL.D. 
Hon. James D. Colt, LL.D. 
Rev. Ephraim Flint, D.D. 

Hon. Joseph White, Treasurer and Secretary. 



Rev. Stephen H. Tyng, Jr., D.D. 
Derrick Lane Boardman. 
James White. 
Arthur B. Graves. 
Hon. Horatio G. Knight. 
Charles A. Davison. 
Edward Clark. 
Derrick L. Boardman. 
Amos L. Hopkins. 



AMHERST COLLEGE. 

corporation. 

Rev. Julius H. Seelye, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Trustees. 



Henry Edwards. 

Hon. Alexander H. Bullock, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry Morris, LL.D. 

Rev. Edward S. Dwight, D.D. 

Nathan Allen, M.D., LL.D. 

Hon. Edward B. Gillett. 

Rev. Richard S. Storrs, D.D., LL.D. 

Rev. R. D. Hitchcock, D.D., LL.D. 



D.D. 



Rev. Edmund K. Alden 

Hon. John E. Sanford. 

Rufus B. Kellogg. 

Rev. William S. Karr, D.D. 

Henry D. Hyde. 

Rev. James D. Wilson, D.D 

George Howland. 

Prof. F. A. Walker, Ph. D. 



Rev. Edward S. Dwight, D.D., Sec'y. Wm. A. Dickinson, Treas. 



248 



Colleges. 



TUFTS COLLEGE. 
Rev. Elmer H. Capen, D.D., President. 

Trustees. 
Israel Washburn, Jr., LL.D., President. 



Richard Frothingham, LL.D. 

Rev. Alonzo A. Miner, D.D.,LL.D. 

James O. Curtis, Esq. 

Rev. Thomas B. Thayer, D.D. 

Nathaniel Adams, Esq. 

Rev. Lucius R. Paige, D.D. 

Hon. Timothy T. Sawyer. 

Henry B. Metcalf, Esq. 

Rev. Henry W. Rugg. 

Hon. Charles Robinson, Jr., Vice-President 
Hon. Newton Talbot, Secretary. 
William H. Finney, Esq., Treasurer. 



Norman C. Munson, Esq. 
Rev. Elmer H. Capen, D.D. 
Charles G. Pope, A.M. 
Zebulon L. White, A.M. 
Charles S. Fobes, A.M. 
Hon. Hosea M. Knowlton. 
Thomas H. Armstrong, Esq. 
Hon. Charles H. Rogers. 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY. 
[20 Beacon Street.] 

CORPORATION. 

Hon. William Claflin, LL.D., President. 

Hon. Jacob Sleeper, Vice-President. 

Bradford K. Peirce, S.T.D., Secretary. 

Richard W. Husted, Esq., Treasurer. 

William F. Warren, LL.D., S.T.D., Member ex officio. 



Hon. Henry O. Houghton, A.M. 
Major Joseph H. Chadwick. 
Daniel Steele, S.T.D. 
Bradford K. Peirce, S.T.D. 
Francis A. Perry, Esq. 
William G. Lincoln, Esq. 
Pliny Nickerson, Esq. 
Abner I. Benyon, Esq, 
Hon. Jacob Sleeper. 
Rt. Rev. Gilbert Haven. 
Joseph B. Thomas, Esq. 
John W. Lindsay, S.T.D. 
John H. Twombly, S.T.D. 
Hon. Liverus Hull. 



Leonard Whitney, Esq. 

Edwin H. Johnson, Esq. 

William R. Clark, S.T.D. 

John Kendrick, Esq. 

Hon. William Claflin, LL.D. 

Hon. Alden Speare. 

Hon. Willis Phelps. 

Rt. Rev. Randolph S. Foster, 

S.T.D., LL.D. 
Hon. Edward H. Dunn. 
Mrs. Mary B. Claflin. 
Mrs. Augustus Hemenway. 
Wm. O. Grover, Esq. 



Colleges, 



249 



DEPARTMENTS. 

Rev. William F. Warren, D.D., LL.D., President. 
School of All Sciences, 20 Beacon St., J. W. Lindsay, S.T.D., Dean. 
School of Theology, 36 Bromfield St., J. E. Latimer, S.T.D., Dean. 
School of Law, 36 Bromfield St., E. H. Bennett, LL.D., Dean. 
School of Medicine, East Concord St., I. T. Talbot, M.D., Dean. 
College of Liberal Arts, 18 Beacon St., J. W. Lindsay, S.T.D., Dean. 
College of Music, Music Hall, E. Tourjee, Mus. D., Dean. 
College of Agriculture, Amherst, Mass., Hon. C. L. Flint, Dean. 



WELLE8LEY COLLEaE. 

CORPORATION. 

Rev. Noah Porter, D.D., LL.D., President. 

Rev. Howard Crosby, D.D., LL.D., Vice-President. 



Trustees. 



Rev. Wm. F. Warren, D.D.,LL.D. 

Rev. P. A. Chadbourne, D.D.,LL.D. 

Rev. Austin Phelps, D.D. 

Rev. Alvah Hovey, D.D. 

Rev. George Z. Gray, D.D. 

Rev. Nathaniel G.Clark, D.D.,LL.D. 

Bp. Randolph S. Foster, D.D. , LL.D. 

Rev. John Hall, D.D. 

Rev. Jos. Cummings, D.D., LL.D. 

Rev. Bradford K. Peirce, D.D. 

Rev. William H. Willcox. 

Mr. Dwight L. Moody. 



Mr. Abner Kingman. 
Mr. Elisha S. Converse. 
Hon. William Claflin. LL.D. 
Mrs. William Claflin. 
Mr. M. H. Simpson. 
Hon. Rufus S. Frost. 
Mr. A. W.. Stetson. 
Mrs. Arthur Wilkinson. 
Mrs. H. B. Goodwin. 
Mrs. Caroline A. Wood. 
Mr. Henry F. Durant. 
Mrs. Henry F. Durant. 



Mrs. Henry F. Durant, Secretary. 



SMITH COLLEGE. 
Rev. L. Clark Seblye, D.D., President. 

Trustees. 



Rev. L. Clark Seelye, D.D. 
Rev. William S. Tyler, D.D., LL.D. 
Rev. Julius H. Seelye, LL.D. 
Hon. William B. Washburne, LL.D. 
Rev. Edwards A. Park, D.D. 
Hon. Joseph White, LL.D. 
Hon. Birdseye G. Northrop, LL.D. 
32 



Hon. Edward B. Gillett. 

Hon. George W. Hubbard. 

Rev. A. P. Peabody, D.D., LL.D. 

A. Lyman Williston, Esq. 

Rev. Robert M. Woods. 

Rev. William R. Huntington, D.D. 

Rodney Wallace, Esq. 



250 Colleges. 

BOSTON COLLEGE. 
Rev. Robert Fulton, President and Treasurer. 
Trustees. 
Rev. Robert Fulton. Rev. William H. Duncan. 

Rev. Robert W. Brady. Rev. John Bapst. 

Rev. Edward H. Welch. Rev. Peter P. Fitzpatrick. 

Rev. Alphonzo Chartier, Secretary/. 



COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS. 
Rev. Edwakd D. Boone, President and Treasurer. 
Trustees. 
Rev. Edward D. Boone. Rev. John J. Murphy. 

Rev. Peter J. Blenkinsop. Rev. Michael J. Byrnes. 

Rev. Robert W. Brady. Rev. John J. Ryan. 

Rev. Albert Peters, Secretary. 



Vote for President in 1876. 



251 



VOTE rOE PEESIDENT IN 1876. 





Congressional District M>. 1. 






Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Barnstable Co. 






Bristol — Con. 






Barnstable . 


359 


196 


Dartmouth . 


288 


26 


Bre-wster 


140 


19 


Fairbaven . 


370 


118 


Chatham . 


161 


51 


Fall River . 


2,533 


1,672 


Dennis . 


346 


35 


Freetown . 


152 


40 


Eastham 


74 


22 


New Bedford . 


2,649 


1,488 


Falmouth . 


350 


66 


Somerset . 


262 


68 


Harwich 


239 


51 


.Swansea 


164 


47 


Mashpee . . 


37 


1 


Westport . 


290 


20 


Orleans 


172 


24 








Provincetown 


548 


85 








Sandwich . 


343 


148 


Plymouth Co. 






Truro . 


148 


8 


Carver 


87 


117 


Wellfleet . 


280 


31 


Duxbury . 


251 


197 


Yarmouth . 


296 


48 


Halifax . . 


89 


43 








Kingston . 


230 


118 


Dukes Co. 






Lakeville . 


123 


41 


Chilmark . 


36 


38 


Marion 


106 


43 


Edgartown . 


174 


65 


Marsbtield . 


217 


97 


Gay Head . 


17 


_ 


Mattapoisett 


232 


17 


Gosnold 


15 


_ 


Middleborough . 


581 


351 


Tisbury 


157 


56 


Pembroke . 


106 


92 








Plymouth . 


820 


363 


Nantucket Co. 






Plympton . 


78 


84 


Nantucket . 


379 


103 


Rochester . 


142 


23 








Wareham . 


269 


187 


Bristol Co. 












Acushnet . ' . 


135 


25 


Totals 


14,445 


6,314 



Scattering, 46. 



Congressional District No. 2. 



Bristol Co. 
Attleborough 
Berkley 
Dighton 
Easton . 
Mansfield 
Norton 
Raynham 
Rehoboth 



134 
255 
357 
258 
190 
218 
234 



427 
13 
65 
223 
140 
87 
58 
77 



Bristol — Con. 
Seekonk 
Taunton 

Norfolk Co. 
Braintree . 
Canton 
Cohasset 
Foxborough 



119 
2,054 



344 
218 
385 



252 Vote for President in 1876, 

Congressional District Ko. 2 — Concluded. 



To-wms. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


TUden. 


Norfolk— Con. 






Pltm'th— Core. 






Holbrook . 


233 


106 


Bridgewater 


360 


288 


Hvde Park 




635 


344 


Brockton . 


1,373 


613 


Milton . 




310 


■188 


E. Bridgewater , 


341 


261 


Norfolk 




80 


55 


Hanover 


214 


95 


Quincy 




867 


852 


Hanson 


112 


69 


Randolph 




323 


527 


Hingham . 


591 


268 


Sharon 




153 


115 


Hull . . . 


32 


24 


Stoughton 




528 


457 


Rockland . 


483 


279 


Walpole 




227 


165 


Scituate 


299 


209 


Weymouth 




1,079 


715 


S. Abington 


333 


185 


Wrentham 




258 


111 


South Scituate . 


258 


124 








W. Bridgewater, 


181 


103 


Plymottth Co. 
Abington . 












402 


227 


TotalB . 


15,749 


9,714 



Scattering, 25. 



Congressional District 27^o. 3. 



Suffolk Co. 




1 


Suffolk— Con. 






Boston, Ward 13, 


228 


1,529 


Boston, Ward 19, 


608 


1,133 


Ward 14, 


1,064 


985 


Ward 20, 


885 


1,043 


Ward 15, 


770 


836 


Ward 21, 


1,311 


574 


Ward 16, 


634 


890 


Ward 24, 


1,356 


900 


Ward 17, 
Ward 18, 


1,128 
1,399 


802 
617 








Totals . 


9,383 


9,309 



Scattering, 48. 





Congressional 


District No. 4. 






Suffolk Co. 






Suffolk— Con. 






Boston, Ward 1, 


1,064 


863 


Boston, Ward 11, 


1,208 


734 


Ward 2, 


553 


1,227 


Ward 12, 


490 


1,221 


Ward 6, 


334 


1,637 


Chelsea, . 


2,184 


1,216 


Ward 7, 


328 


1.311 


Revere 


143 


146 


Ward 8, 


568 


987 


Winthrop . 


74 


56 


Ward 9, 
Ward 10, 


1,141 
886 


611 
606 








Totals 


8,973 


10,614 



Beattering, 12. 



Vote for President in 1876, 

Congressional District 2^o. 5. 



253 



Towns 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Essex C 


)o. 




Mid'sex— Con. 






'Lyon. . 


2,773 


2,265 


Somerville . 


1,801 


1,262 


Nahant 


57 


59 


Stoneham . 


617 


358 


Saugus 


282 


212 


Wakefield . 


560 


345 


Swampscott 


253 


126 


Waltham . 


949 


741 








Winchester 


323 


213 


Middle SE 


sCo. 




Woburn 


807 


832 


Arliugton 


386 


343 








Belmont 


168 


179 








Burlington 


50 


59 


StrPFOLK Co. 






Everett 


393 


239 


Boston, Ward 3 . 


898 


973 


Lexington 


284 


177 


Ward 4 . 


895 


813 


Maklcn 


1,004 


586 


Ward 5 . 


766 


1,051 


Medford 












Melrose 


472 


291 


Totals 


14,569 


11,566 



Scattering, 44. 



Congressional District 27b. 6. 



Essex Co. 






Essex— Cbn. 






Amesbury . 


268 


180 


Merrimac . 


297 


163 


Beverly 


904 


341 


Middleton . 


111 


60 


Bosford 


119 


42 


Newbury . 


222 


45 


Bradford . 


230 


196 


Newburyport . 


1,269 


938 


Danvers 


701 


335 


North Andover . 


259 


252 


Essex . 


284 


93 


Peabody 


698 


437 


Georgetown 


316 


235 


Rockport . 


537 


277 


Gloucester . 


1,620 


1,095 


Rowley 


165 


117 


Groveland . 


247 


181 


Salem . 


2,485 


1,572 


Hamilton . 


91 


67 


Salisbury . 


470 


201 


Haverhill . 


1,517 


1,007 


Topsfield . 


183 


71 


Ipswich 


451 


234 


Wenham . 


122 


66 


Lynnfiold . 


92 


37 


West Newbury . 


267 


94 














Marblehead 


678 


833 


Totals . . 


14,827 


9,260 



Scattering, 84, 



Congressional District 2To. 7. 



Essex Co. 
Andover 
Lawrence . 
Methuen 



555 

2,499 

443 



214 

2,461 

301 



Middlesex Co. 
Acton . 
Ashby 
Ayer . 



200 
161 
178 



254 



Vote for President in 1876, 



Congressional District 27b. 7 — Concluded. 



Towns. Hayes. Tilden. Towns Hayes. Tilden 



Con 



Mro'SEX 
Bedford 
Billurica 
Boxborough 
Carlisle 
Chelmsford 
Concord 
Dracut 
Dunstable . 
Groton 
Hudson 
Lincoln 
Littleton 
Lowell 
Marlborough 
Maynard 
North Reading 
Pepperell . 



134 

269 

33 



348 
139 
42 
300 
356 
104 
150 
4,003 
604 
153 
149 
247 



62 

63 

41 

35 

171 

154 

81 

69 

70 

215 

26 

38 

1,089 

523 

146 

61 

139 



Mid'sex — Con. 
Reading 
Shirley 
Stow . 
Sudbury 
Tewksbury 
Townsend . 
Tyngsborough 
Westford . 
WUnaington 

WorcbsterCo 

Berlin . 
Bolton 
Harvard 
Lancaster . 

Totals . 



483 
160 
120 
150 

170 



226 
121 



181 
159 
138 

287 



14,080 



Scattering, 126. 



Congressional District 27d. 8. 



Middlesex Co. 






Norf'lk — Con. 






Ashland 


256 


146 


Franklin 


292 


184 


Cambridge . 


3,654 


3,531 


Mcdfield . 


157 


77 


Fraraingham 


654 


544 


Medway . 


433 


289 


Holliston . 


370 


286 


Necdham . 


456 


214 


Hopkinton . 


335 


400 


Norwood . 


240 


169 


Natick 


729 


762 








Newton 


1,771 


832 


Suffolk Co. 






Sherbom . 


134 


65 


Boston, Ward 22, 


408 


728 


Watertown 


512 


382 


Ward 23, 


1,039 


991 


Wayland . 


243 


147 


Ward 25, 


481 


628 


Weston 


184 


60 


Worcester Co. 






Norfolk. Co. 






Milford . . 


859 


715 


Brooliline . 


658 
518 


465 
504 


Southborough . 


200 


82 










Dover . 


53 


38 


Totals . 


14,636 


12,239 



Scattering, 94, 



Congressional District 27b. 9. 



Worcester Co. 
Auburn 
Barre . 



54 

201 



Wo'STER — Con. 
Blackstone . 
Boylston . 



267 
138 



Vote for President in 1876. 255 

Congressional District No. 9 — Concluded. 



Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


"Wo'STER— Con. 






"Wo'sTER— Con. 






Brookfield . 


333 


283 


Rutland 


114 


65 


Charlton . 


244 


116 


Shrewsbury 


228 


90 


Douglas 


167 


219 


Southbridge 


400 


345 


Dudley- 


142 


178 


Spencer 


518 


209 


Grafton 


372 


196 


Sturbridge . 


198 


185 


Hardwick . 


180 


95 


Sutton . 


230 


193 


Holden 


272 


91 


Upton . 


2G6 


125 


Hubbardston 


197 


96 


Uxbridge . 


275 


218 


Leicester . 


296 


128 


Warren 


307 


216 


Mendon 


129 


74 


Webster . 


363 


314 


Millbury . 


398 


240 


Westborough . 


532 


271 


New Braintree . 


78 


53 


West Boylston . 


304 


88 


Northborough . 


199 


77 


W. Brookfield . 


190 


163 


Northbridge 


345 


244 


Worcester . 


4,795 


4,189 


N. Brookfield . 


387 


280 








Oakham 


121 


47 


Norfolk Co. 






Oxford 


315 


237 


Bellingham . 


122 


87 


Paxton 


100 


44 








Princeton . 


160 


40 


Totals . 


14,100 


10,155 


Scattering, 31. 


Congr 


essional 


District J7b. 10. 






Franklin Co. 






Fr'klin— Con. 






Ashfield . . 


173 


53 


Shutesbury 


71 


30 


Bemardston 


140 


62 


Sunderland 


140 


43 


Buckland . 


161 


155 


Warwick . 


102 


78 


Charlemont 


151 


' 36 


Wendell . 


46 


61 


Colrain 


240 


78 


Whately . 


93 


115 


Conway 


178 


64 








Deerfield . 


304 


214 


Hampden Co. 






Erving 


80 


74 


Holyoke 


750 


935 


Gill . . . 


106 


48 








Greenfield . 


369 


317 


Hampshire Co. 






Hawley 


96 


11 


Amherst 


501 


203 


Heath . 


83 


19 


Belchertown 


350 


129 


Leverett 


116 


62 


Chesterfield 


115 


42 


Leyden 


65 


37 


Cummington 


162 


35 


Monroe 


24 


12 


Easthampton 


392 


212 


Montague . 


267 


233 


Enfield . . 


170 


61 


New Salem . 


150 


43 


Goshen 


68 


5 


Northfield . 


176 


177 


Granby 


129 


23 


Orange 


368 


183 


Greenwich . 


98 


54 


Rowe . 


113 


4 


Hadley 


242 


67 


Shelbume . 


260 


48 


Hatfield . . 


153 


66 



256 Vote for President in 1876, 

Congressional District No. 10 — Concluded. 



Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


H'SHiRE — Con. 






Wo'sTEB — Con. 






Huntington 


125 


90 


Athol . . . 


559 


294 


Middlelield . 


78 


23 


Clinton 


576 


482 


Northampton 


972 


695 


Dana . 


106 


49 


Pelham 


68 


49 


Fitchburg . 


1,462 


944 


Plainfield . 


104 


11 


Gardner 


460 


313 


Prescott 


51 


35 


Leominster 


833 


268 


South Hadley . 


315 


195 


Lunenburg . 


175 


53 


Southampton . 


176 


37 


Petersham . 


151 


93 


Ware . 


314 


241 


Phillipston . 


118 


22 


VVeethampton . 


77 


15 


Royalston . 


220 


55 


Tv'illiamshurg . 


224 


173 


Sterling 


246 


81 


Worthington 


136 


46 


Templeton . 


345 


172 








Westminster 


286 


61 








Winchendon 


465 


196 


Worcester Uo. 
Ashbumham 












250 


106 


Totals . 


16,094 


8,888 



Scattering, 



Congressional District 27b. 11. 



Berkshire Co. 






B'SHiRE— Con. 






Adams 


1,172 


668 


Sheffield . 


217 


179 


Alford. . . 


32 


57 


Stockbridge 


249 


197 


Becket 


109 


106 


Tyringham 
Washington 


64 


69 


Cheshire . 


138 


211 


56 


50 


Clarksburg . 


87 


17 


W. Stockbridge . 


167 


170 


Dalton 


139 


188 


WilUamstown . 


315 


222 


Egremont . 


104 


121 


Windsor . 


77 


64 


Florida 


70 


19 








Gt. Ban-mgton . 


492 


353 








Hancock 


86 


51 


Hampden Co. 






Hmsdale . 


169 


139 


Agawam . 


152 


164 


Lanesborough . 


125 


116 


Blandford . 


115 


97 


Lee . . . 


407 


352 


Brimfield . 


156 


93 


Lenox . 


144 


212 


Chester 


158 


157 


Monterey . 
Mt. Washington . 


77 


74 


Chicopee . 


675 


668 


19 


17 


Granville . 


138 


121 


New Ashford . 


17 


23 


Holland . . 


55 


28 


New Marlboro' . 


167 


196 


Longmeadow 


164 


103 


Otis . 


54 


100 


Ludlow 


154 


45 


Peru . 


62 


20 


Monson 


346 


188 


Pittsfield . 


953 


1,236 


Montgomery 


40 


26 


Richmond . 


72 


92 


Palmer 


370 


302 


Sandisfield . ' . 


99 


111 


Russell 


58 


53 


Savoy . 


76 


58 


Southwick . 


116 


148 



Vote for President in 187 6 » 

Congressional District Ko.ll — Concluded. 



257 



Towns. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Towns. 


Hayes. 


TUden. 


Hampden — Con. 
Springfield . 
Tolland 
Wales . 
Westfield . 


2,949 
35 
117 
826 


2,098 

48 

54 

906 


Hampden— Con. 
W. Springfield . 
Wilbraham 

Totals . 


325 
254 


227 
144 


13,228 


11,148 



Scattering, 48. 

Summary by Congressional Districts of Presidential Vote. 



Districts. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


Districts. 


Hayes. 


Tilden. 


District 1 . . 

2 . 

3 . . 

4 . 

5 . 

6 . . 

7 . 


14,445 
15,749 
9,383 
8,973 
14,569 
14,827 
14,080 


6,314 
9,714 
9,309 
10,614 
11,566 
9,260 
9,581 


District 8 . 
9 . 

10 . 

11 . 

Totals . 


14,636 
14,100 
16,094 
13,22S 


12,239 

10,155 

8,888 

11,148 


150,084 


108,788 



All others, 594. 

Summary by Counties of Votes cast for Electors at Large. 



COTTNTIES. 


Talbot. 


Salisbury. 


Gaston. 


Avery. 


Suffolk 


22,837 


22,832 


25,101 


25,100 


Essex 








21,686 


21,689 


14,895 


14,890 


Middlesex 








27,301 


27,304 


19,561 


19,562 


Worcester 








22,051 


22,054 


14,319 


13,834 


Hampshire 








5,018 


5,020 


2,507 


2,507 


Hampden 








7,963 


7,963 


6,605 


6,605 


Franklin . 








4,072 


4,072 


2,257 


2,257 


Berkshire 








6,015 


6,015 


5,478 


5,478 


Norfolk . 








8,963 


8,956 


6,685 


6,682 


Plymouth 








8,310 


8,310 


4,518 


4,518 


Bristol . 








11,576 


11,578 


5,814 


5,814 


Barnstable 








3,493 


3,493 


785 


785 


Dukes . 








399 


399 


149 


149 


Nantucket 








379 


379 


103 


103 


Totals 








150,063 


150,064 


108,777 


108,284 



All others, 779. 
33 



258 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



POB GOVEENOE. 

{By Counties.) 
BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 



Governor. 



TOWNS. 












Long. 


Butler. 


Adams. 


Eddy. 


Barnstable 


870 


160 


S5 


1 


Brewster 


108 


46 


4 


- 


Chatham 


133 


86 


15 


12 


Dennis 


178 


95 


4 


- 


Eastham 


72 


20 


8 


- 


Falmouth 


286 


42 


13 


- 


Harwich 


126 


182 


1 


6 


Mashpee 


42 


8 


- 


- 


Orleans 


150 


37 


6 


_ 


Provincetown 


369 


204 


22 


13 


Sandwich 


316 


139 


34 


3 


Truro 


76 


11 


- 


- 


Wellfleet 


183 


136 


10 


- 


Yarmouth 


219 


48 


9 


- 


Totals 


2,628 


1,204 


161 


35 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams 


325 


219 


13 


2 


Alford 


28 


42 


9 


- 


Becket 


92 


53 


21 


1 


Cheshire 


97 


124 


16 


- 


Clarksburg 


68 


40 


- 


- 


Dalton 


138 


132 


25 


1 


Egremont 


106 


53 


33 


2 


Florida 


49 


4 


2 


- 


Great Barrington 


384 


306 


30 


1 


Hancock 


78 


32 


4 


- 


Hinsdale 


133 


106 


13 


- 


Lanesborough 


121 


29 


43 


- 


Lee 


351 


239 


66 


1 


Lenox 


110 


98 


55 


— 


Monterey 


71 


44 


15 


- 


Mount Washington .... 


27 


1 


4 


- 


New Ashford 


16 


6 


20 


— 


New Marlborough .... 


171 


137 


29 


■ 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 259 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY- Concluded. 















Gove 


KNOR. 




TOWNS. 












Long. 


Butler. 


Adams. 


Eddy. 


North Adams 


705 


395 


9 


_ 


Otis 








61 


60 


27 


- 


Peru 










62 


1 


19 


- 


Pittsfield 










785 


853 


111 


9 


Richmond 










45 


24 


19 


- 


Sandisfleld 










59 


58 


27 


- 


Savoy . 
Sheffield 










67 


39 


10 


- 










147 


88 


28 


- 


Stockbridere 










215 


96 


36 


- 


Tyringham 
"Washington 










62 


31 


18 


- 










38 


26 


6 


- 


West Stockbridge 








115 


60 


33 


2 


Williamstown 








270 


188 


14 


- 


Windsor 








76 


39 


14 


- 


Totals 


5,072 


3,623 


769 


19 


All others, Williamstown, 2. 








BRISTOL COUNTY 








Acushnet 


110 


38 


2 


1 


Attleborough 


573 


241 


26 


32 


Berkley 


107 


42 


- 


1 


Dartmouth 


292 


53 


3 


21 


Dighton 


186 


51 


1 


- 


Easton 


283 


216 


17 


2 


Fairhaven 


261 


108 


12 


17 


Fall River 


1,622 


2,875 


41 


5 


Freetown 


121 


14 


16 


2 


Mansfield 


233 


94 


13 


19 


New Bedford 


2,071 


1,454 


94 


90 


Norton 


157 


63 


13 


- 


Raynham 

Rehoboth 


147 


78 


8 


- 


156 


41 


10 


1 


Seekonk 


97 


9 


16 


- 


Somerset 


206 


87 


T 


2 


Swansea 


144 


38 


8 


- 


Taunton 


1,642 


1,376 


22 


46 


Westport 


237 


44 


- 


25 


Totals 










8,645 


6,922 


309 


264 



AU others, Somerset,!; Taunton, 1; Westport, 5. 



260 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



DUKES COUNTY. 








- 




Governor. 


TOWNS. 


Long. 


Sutlel-. 


Adams. 


Eddy. 


Chilmark 

Edgartown 

Gay Head 

Gosnold 

Tisbury 


53 

308 

5 

17 
184 


41 
65 
19 

108 


8 
33 

10 


6 
5 


Totals 


567 


233 


51 


11 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Amesbury 

Andover 

Beverly . 

Boxford 

Bradford 

Danvers 

Essex 

Georgetown . 

Gloucester . 

Groveland , 

Hamilton 

Haverhill 

Ipswich , 

Lawrence 

Lynn 

Lynnfield 

Manchester . 

Marblehead . 

Merrimac 

Methuen 

Middleton . 

Nahant . 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

North Andover 

Peabody 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Salem . 

Salisbury 

Saugus . 

Swampscott . 

Topsfield 

Wenham 

West Newbury 

Totals . 



236 


164 


16 


450 


202 


29 


636 


713 


22 


83 


24 


14 


182 


182 


26 


470 


568 


19 


135 


179 


19 


233 


191 


42 


1,016 


1,299 


91 


158 


196 


34 


73 


60 


19 


1,311 


1,252 


145 


319 


294 


39 


1,738 


2,549 


117 


2,292 


3,266 


242 


65 


21 


6 


93 


157 


29 


399 


886 


157 


222 


163 


22 


351 


155 


59 


96 


68 


- 


50 


50 


23 


128 


69 


13 


876 


1,105 


92 


190 


196 


42 


548 


674 


6 


275 


461 


35 


134 


102 


18 


1,784 


1,672 


182 


332 


259 


14 


231 


180 


30 


209 


163 


12 


106 


71 


10 


104 


93 


8 


186 


176 


11 


15,711 


17,860 


1,643 



All others, Gloucester, 1; Lawrence, 2; Lynn, 1; Marblehead, 1; 
Methuen, 1; Peabody, 1; Salem, 2. 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



261 



FRAXKLIN COUNTY. 















GOVEKNOE. 


TOT\Tn^S. 












Long. 


Adams. 


Butler. 


Eddy. 


Ashfield 


140 


36 


14 


1 


Bernardston 












107. 


44 


13 




Buckland 












106 


175 


12 


2 


Charlemont 












162 


28 


5 




Colrain . 












172 


90 


13 


_ 


Conway 












132 


75 


12 


_ 


Deertield 












200 


240 


24 


1 


Erving . 












51 


97 


3 




Gill 












83 


32 


9 


_ 


Greenfield 












332 


354 


57 


1 


Hawley . 












68 


29 


2 




Healh . 












64 


11 


11 


_ 


Leverett 












82 


55 


12 


_ 


Leyden . 












45 


38 


5 


1 


Monroe . 












16 


1 


2 


_ 


Montague 












192 


230 


16 


1 


New Salem 












103 


44 


7 


_ 


Northfield 












121 


125 


41 


_ 


Orange . 












347 


188 


1 


_ 


Rowe 












72 


8 


1 


_ 


Shelburne 












225 


94 


1 


_ 


Shutesbury 












47 


45 


9 


_ 


Sunderland 












126 


34 


3 


1 


Warwick 












92 


30 


32 




Wendell 












40 


30 


9 


_ 


Whately 










. 


66 


141 


15 


- 


Totals 










• 


3,191 


2,274 


329 


8 



All others, Greenfield, 1. 

HAMPDEN COUNTY. 



Agawam 


126 


119 


18 


_ 


Blandford 












93 


43 


40 


. 


Brimfield 












121 


41 


21 


_ 


Chester . 












122 


84 


36 


_ 


Chicopee 












441 


587 


45 


2 


Granville 












124 


94 


8 


_ 


Hampden 












82 


63 


3 


_ 


Holland. 












37 


14 


5 


_ 


Holyoke 












661 


1,043 


29 


4 


Longmeadow 










125 


30 


10 


1 


Ludlow .... 






117 


55 


3 


- 



262 



Vote for State Officers — 1879, 



HAMPDEN COUNTY — Concluded. 





Governor. 


TOWNS. 












Long. 


Butler. 


Adams. 


Eddy. 


Monson 


245 


231 


7 


15 


Montgomery 


37 


22 


7 


- 


Palmer 


319 


253 


21 


- 


Russell 


44 


57 


7 


- 


Southwick 


121 


86 


27 


- 


Springfield 

Tolland 


2,391 
32 


2,204 
37 


182 
8 


25 


Wales 


101 


48 


12 


- 


Westfield 


594 


757 


142 


2 


West Springfield 


218 


205 


10 


- 


Wilbraham 


157 


41 


10 


1 


Totals 


6,308 


6,114 


651 


50 



All others, Chicopee, 2; Holyoke, 1; Springfield, 5; Westfield, 
West Springfield, 1. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 



Amherst 
Belchertown . 
Chesterfield . 
Cummington 
Easthampton 
Enfield . 
Goshen . 
Granby . 
Greenwich . 
Hadley . 
Hatfield . 
Huntington . 
Middlefield . 
Northampton 
Pelham . 
Plainfield 
Prescott 
South Hadley 
Southampton 
Ware 

Westhampton 
Williamsburg 
Worthington 

Totals . 



396 


221 


23 


227 


177 


3 


94 


51 


3 


111 


93 


5 


317 


186 


14 


115 


82 


6 


52 


11 




100 


31 


1 


73 


38 


15 


151 


128 




96 


144 


11 


116 


75 


13 


64 


13 


_ 


628 


702 


53 


58 


49 




81 


24 


1 


39 


33 


1 


224 


136 


20 


129 


47 


3 


254 


272 


22 


69 


18 


5 


149 


210 


2 


129 


26 


6 


3,672 


2,767 


207 



19 



All others, Huntington, 1. 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



263 



TOWNS. 



Governor. 



Long. Butler. Adams. Eddy- 



Acton , 
Arlington 
Ashby . 
Ashland 
Ayer 
Bedford 
Belmont 
Billerica 
Boxborough . 
Burlington . 
Cambridge . 
Carlisle . 
Chelmsford . 
Concord 
Dracut . 
Dunstable 
Everett . 
Framingham 
Grroton . 
HoUiston 
Hopkinton . 
Hudson . 
Lexington 
Lincoln . 
Littleton 
Lowell . 
Maiden . 
Marlborough 
Maynard 
Medford 
Melrose . 
Natick . 
Newton . 
North Reading 
Pepperell 
Reading 
Sherborn 
Shirley . 
Somerville . 
Stoneham 
Stow . 
Sudbury . 
Tewksbury . 
Townsend . 
Tyngsborough 
Wakefield . 
Waltham 
W"atertown . 



179 


135 


30 


363 


268 


30 


127 


27 


19 


194 


105 


10 


166 


176 


20 


91 


75 


2 


158 


118 


19 


229 


76 


_ 


24 


23 


13 


49 


50 


16 


210 


2,834 


250 


72 


31 


5 


198 


151 


21 


335 


117 


18 


136 


65 


33 


44 


13 


39 


336 


212 


23 


553 


391 


52 


195 


93 




284 


254 


39 


349 


399 


29 


233 


UO 


34 


252 


1^4 


22 


99 


12 




120 


48 


9 


,332 


4,397 


128 


,042 


908 


42 


450 


774 


22 


108 


144 


13 


666 


418 


40 


445 


204 


22 


561 


902 


28 


,687 


781 


74 


89 


32 


7 


156 


123 


20 


359 


195 


18 


95 


42 


7 


131 


35 


7 


,504 


1,165 


55 


447 


485 


25 


130 


42 


11 


136 


44 


28 


163 


65 


1 


226 


91 


39 


66 


18 


12 


440 


337 


30 


808 


763 




419 


323 


28 



264 Vote for State Officers — 1879. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Concluded. 







GOVEKNOR. 




Towisre. 










Long. 


Butler. 


Adams. Eddy. 


Wayland 


145 


170 


1 


6 


Westford 


176 


123 


32 


- 


Weston 


164 


21 


3 


- 


Wilmington 


100 


78 


5 


- 


Winchester 


293 


184 


25 


- 


Woburn 


750 


946 


52 


5 


Totals 


23,084 


19,957 


1,554 


371 



All others, Cambridge, 7; Medford, 2; Melrose, 1; Newton, 3; Sher- 
born, 5 ; Waltham, 5 ; Watertown, 2. 

NANTUCKET COLTSTTY. 



Nantucket 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 



Bellingham 

Braintree 

Brookline 

Canton . 

Cohasset 

Dedhara 

Dover . 

Foxborough 

Franklin 

Holbrook 

Hyde Park 

Medfield 

Medway 

Milton . 

Needham 

Norfolk . 

Norwood 

Quincy . 

Randolph 

Sharon . 

Stoughton 

Walpole 

Weymouth 

Wrentham 

Totals 



111 


50 


10 


361 


344 


31 


647 


296 


42 


280 


281 


27 


187 


78 


17 


486 


444 


72 


73 


24 


1 


314 


38 


41 


294 


135 


12 


221 


177 


14 


527 


354 


29 


149 


41 


20 


341 


262 


27 


304 


161 


20 


393 


223 


11 


77 


41 


2 


203 


211 


10 


770 


568 


174 


276 


540 


30 


130 


85 


12 


455 


503 


39 


183 


130 


42 


837 


786 


35 


150 


50 


16 


7,769 


5,822 


734 



All others, Brookline, 1; 
Quincy, 2, 



Holbrook, 2; Hyde Park, 2; Needham, 7; 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 

PLYMOUTH COUXTY. 



265 



TOA\T^S. 



Govi:rnor. 



Long. Butler. Adams. Eddy, 



Abington 

Bridgewater . 

Brockton 

Carver . 

Dusbury 

East Bridgewater . 

Halifax . 

Hanover 

Hanson . 

Hingham 

Hull 

Kingston 

Lakeville 

Marion . 

Marshfield . 

Mattapoisett . 

Middleborough 

Pembroke 

Plymouth 

Plympton 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Scituate 

South Abington . 

South Scituate 

Wareham 

West Bridgewater 



389 


381 


18 


319 


132 


116 


094 


944 


68 


83 


79 


15 


144 


92 


36 


309 


129 


58 


74 


33 


3 


192 


119 


16 


104 


99 


4 


627 


99 


6 


22 


26 


1 


196 


96 


30 


102 


50 


4 


55 


70 


13 


184 


80 


7 


222 


25 


3 


532 


216 


121 


134 


91 


12 


715 


350 


40 


54 


64 


26 


94 


30 


_ 


391 


463 


14 


220 


119 


15 


290 


337 


22 


195 


87 


25 


148 


145 


15 


132 


103 


17 



Totals 



7,021 



4,459 



705 



All others, Abington, 1; Brockton, 1; Hingham, 1. 
SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston 

Chelsea 

Revere 

Winthrop 


18,268 

1,778 

126 

90 


23,508 

1,199 

139 

37 


1,533 

106 

16 

10 


104 

26 

1 


Totals 


20,262 


24,883 


1,665 


131 



All others, Boston, 24. 



266 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



TOWNS. 



Governor. 



Long. Butler. Adams. Eddy. 



Ashburnham 
Athol . 
Auburn . 
Barre 
Berlin . 
Blackstone . 
Bolton . 
Boylston 
Brookfield . 
Charlton 
Clinton . 
Dana 
Douglas 
Dudley . 
Fitchburg 
Gardner 
Grafton . 
Hardwick 
Harvard 
Holden . 
Hubbardston 
Lancaster 
Leicester 
Leominster . 
Lunenburg . 
Mendon . 
Milford . 
Millbury 
New Braintree 
Northborougb 
Northbridge . 
North Brookfield 
Oakham 
Oxford . 
Paxton . 
Petersham . 
Phillipston . 
Princeton 
Royalston 
Rutland 
Shrewsbury . 
Soutbborough 
Southbridge . 
Spencer . 
Sterling . 
Sturbridge . 
Sutton . 
Templeton . 



181 


80 


23 


431 


428 


4 


78 


41 


5 


278 


103 


20 


93 


45 


_ 


247 


309 


37 


94 


59 


6 


107 


16 


6 


270 


231 


17 


235 


69 


14 


492 


527 


23 


64 


78 


7 


172 


146 


20 


116 


177 


14 


,125 


820 


95 


425 


438 


65 


327 


143 


13 


171 


73 


8 


140 


42 


30 


176 


111 


7 


162 


86 


11 


229 


72 


5 


253 


97 


21 


695 


248 


25 


126 


59 


9 


107 


60 


10 


719 


719 


33 


359 


220 


35 


69 


34 


3 


186 


63 


15 


292 


184 


5 


394 


313 


8 


93 


23 


1 


196 


138 


17 


97 


27 


7 


135 


26 


14 


98 


23 


6 


99 


11 


10 


150 


66 


3 


81 


50 


5 


203 


85 


13 


153 


90 


3 


388 


248 


37 


488 


272 


7 


168 


48 


8 


178 


58 


37 


176 


175 


42 


303 


118 


19 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



267 



WORCESTER COIIN"TY — Concluded. 



TOWNS. 



Governor. 



Long. Butler. Adams. Eddy, 



Upton . 
Uxbridge 
Warren . 
Webster 
Westborough 
West Boylston 
West Brookfield 
Westminster 
Winchendon . 
Worcester . 

Totals . 



193 
271 
258 
362 
446 
202 
186 
234 
421 
4.167 



202 
127 
184 
377 
213 

86 
157 

35 
174 
,871 



23 

27 

19 

5 

1 

13 

35 

212 



18,559 



12,975 



1,184 



All others, Ashburnbam, 1; Fitchburg, 1; Grafton, 1; Hubbardston, 
1; Sutton, 1; Worcester, 2. 

Summat'y by Counties of Votes cast for Governor. 













Governor. 


COUNTIES. 










All 
others. 




Long. 


Butler. 


Adams. 


Eddy. 


Barnstable .... 


2,628 


1,204 


161 


35 




Berkshire 










5,072 


3,623 


769 


19 


2 


Bristol . 










8,645 


6,922 


309 


264 


7 


Dukes . 










567 


233 


51 


11 


_ 


Essex 










15,711 


17,860 


1,643 


254 


9 


Franklin . 










3,191 


2,274 


329 


8 


1 


Hampden 










6,308 


6,114 


651 


50 


15 


Hampshire , 










3,672 


2.767 


207 


19 


1 


Middlesex 










23,084 


19,957 


1,554 


371 


25 


Nantucket ' 


' 








262 


56 


27 


_ 


_ 


Norfolk . • 










7,769 


5,822 


734 


153 


14 


Plymouth 










7,021 


4,459 


705 


91 


a 


Suffolk . 










20,262 


24,883 


1,665 


131 


24 


Worcester 










18,559 


12,975 


1,184 


239 


7 


Totals 










122,751 


109,149 


9,989 


1,645 


108 



268 Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



For Lieutenant-Governor. 

Byron "Weston of Dalton 126,252 

Albert C. Woodworth of Chicopee 104,904 

William R. Plunketfof Pittsfield 10,210 

Timothy K. Earle of Worcester 1,616 

All others 166 

For Secretary of State. 

HenryB. Peirceof Abington 129,024 

Michael T. Donohoe of Somerville 111,438 

Charles Almy of New Bedford 1,597 

Michael T. Donohoe of Boston 401 

M. T. Donohoe of Boston 25 

All others 59 

For Treasurer and Receiver-General. 

Charles Endicott of Canton 127,019 

David N. Skillings of Winchester 115,510 

G-eorge Dutton of Springfield 715 

All others 57 

For Auditor of the Commonwealtti. 

Charles R. Ladd of Springfield 126,749 

Davis J. King of Boston 104,578 

Charles R. Field of Greenfield 7,722 

William R. Field of Greenfield . 2,285 

Jonathan H. Orne of Marblehead 1,513 

Davis F. King of Boston 426 

AU others 174 

For Attorney-General. 

George Marston of New Bedford 127,112 

William D. North end of Salem ....... 103,455 

Richard Olney of Boston 10,005 

Samuel M. Fairfield of Maiden 1,509 

Horace Binney Sargent of Salem 957 

All others 346 



Vote for State Officers — 1879. 269 

For Executive Councillors. 
District No. 1. 

John S. Brayton of Fall River 16,770 

Weston Howland of Fairhaven 7,310 

Charles Gr. Davis of Plymouth 2,230 

Noah C. Perkins of Middlehorough 1,104 

Joseph M. Day of Barnstable 480 

Nehemiah P. Baker of Faknouth 211 

All others 76 

District No. 2. 

William O. Taylor of Boston 17,793 

William A. Hodges of Dedham 13,902 

Timothy A. Smith of Westborough ...... 287 

All others 76 

District No. 3. 

George P. Carter of Cambridge 16,866 

Frank S. Nickerson of Chelsea 11,716 

Daniel H. Thurston of Cambridge 958 

Harvey Davis of Cambridge 925 

Alfred A. Wright of Boston 104 

All others 49 

District No. 4, 

John P. Spaulding of Boston 14,289 

Michael J. Flatley of Boston 13,551 

Richard Garvey of Boston 635 

All others 71 

District No. 5. 

John M. Raymond of Salem 14,096 

William Cogswell of Bradford 13,437 

Charles A. Ropes of Salem 1,498 

All others ■ 169 

District No. 6. 

George Heywood of Concord 16,160 

John C. Sanborn of Lawrence . . . . . . . . 14,957 

Elbridge Dearborn of Lowell 308 

Waltor Raynor of Reading 285 

All others 113 



270 Vote for State Officers — 1879. 



District No. 7. 

Rodney Wallace of Fitchburg 18,741 

William Keith of Greenfield 13,847 

All others 5 

District No. 8. 

Oscar Edwards of Northampton 15,689 

Richmond Kingman of Cummington 10,370 

Richard Kingman of Cummington 2,829 

All others 92 



Representatives, Forty-Sixth Congress. 271 



FOE EEPEESENTATIYES, TOETY-SIXTH CONGEESS. 



(BY DISTRICTS.) 



Congressional District 27b. 1. 





^ 


u 


^ 




TOWNS. 




1 


^-1 


1 




2 PQ 

o 


a 
S 


^" 


5 


Acushnet 


111 


29 


_ 


_ 


Barnstable 


386 


135 


1 


- 


Brewster 


103 


76 


- 


- 


Carver . 


69 


118 


- 


- 


Chatham 


162 


64 


5 


- 


Chihnark 


45 


24 


- 


- 


Dartmouth 


261 


59 


24 


- 


Dennis 


208 


109 


- 


- 


Duxhury 


188 


125 


1 


- 


Eastham 


55 


29 


7 


— 


Edgartown 


147 


41 


12 


- 


Fairhaven 


279 


92 


12 


- 


Fall River 


2,398 


2,509 


— 


- 


Falmouth 


328 


64 


10 


- 


Freetown 


123 


31 


1 


- 


Gay Head 




.- 


- 


17 


Gosnold 


14 


- 


— 


— 


HaUfax 


71 


39 


1 


- 


Harwich 


127 


172 


5 


- 


Kingston 


212 


118 


- 


- 


Lake\ille 


102 


58 


- 


- 


Marion 


98 


59 


- 


- 


Marshfield 


201 


86 


- 


- 


Mashpee 


32 


7 


- 


- 


Mattapoisett 


221 


24 


1 


- 


Middleborough 


566 


316 


— 


- 


Nantucket 


356 


79 


_ 


— 


New Bedford 


2,284 


1,243 


68 


7 


Orleans 


139 


59 


1 


— 


Pembroke 


132 


, 85 


- 


3 


PljTnouth 


734 


344 


- 


3 


PljTnpton 


53 


99 


- 


- 


Provincetown 


348 


238 


- 


- 


Rochester 


101 


41 


~ 


- 


Sandwich 


386 


171 


8 


- 


Somerset 


279 


110 


. 


— 


Swansea 


138 


46 


- 


— 


Tisbury 


214 


22 


14 


- 


Truro 


94 


12 


2 


" 



272 Representatives^ Forty-Sixth Congress. 



Congressional District 27b. 1 — Concluded. 





I'S 


1 


1 . 


2 


TOWNS. 




O 


^;^ 


1 














2 M 


?4 


g M 


:3 




o 


1^ 


^ 


<^ 


Wareham 


170 


191 






Wellfleet 


154 


160 


11 


_ 


Westport 


259 


51 


35 


- 


Yarmouth 


227 


48 


- 


- 


Totals 


12,575 


7,383 


219 


30 



Congressional District No. 2. 



TOWNS. 


^> i 


M 


1 


n 


00 

1 










.a cs 






c3 'S 


1 ^ 


^ i 


1^ 


=3 




w « 


< 


^ 


< 


Abington .... 


388 


333 


36 


1 


_ 


Attleborough 






758 


81 


208 


- 


- 


Berkley . 






123 


- 


1 


- 


17 


Braintree 






888 


204 


192 


13 


1 


Bridgewater . 






350 


97 


157 


- 


- 


Brockton 






1,161 


762 


119 


23 


— 


Canton . 






357 


287 


37 


2 


— 


Cohasset 






191 


- 


90 


10 


1 


Dighton . 






195 


- 


58 


- 


- 


Easton . 






287 


4 


258 


3 


— 


East Bridgewater 






322 


104 


88 


2 


- 


Foxborough . 






339 


18 


65 


10 


- 


Hanover . 






199 


94 


28 


2 


— 


Hanson . 






100 


98 


11 


_ 


_ 


Hingbam 






628 


- 


109 


10 


82 


Holbrook 






230 


120 


51 


2 


1 


Hyde Park . 






565 


221 


112 


16 


3 


Hull . . 






34 


20 


1 


— 


— 


Mansfield 






289 


104 


23 


1 


- 


Milton . 






353 


- 


152 


— 


— 


Norfolk . 






76 


— 


11 


_ 


37 


Norton . 






215 


21 


68 


_ 


. 


Quincy . 






949 


244 


408 


1 


4 


Randolph 






308 


152 


376 


3 




Raynham 






202 


2 


100 


- 


- 


Rehoboth 


• 


173 


~ 


56 


1 


"" 



Representatives, Forty -Sixth Congress, 273 



Congressional District 27b. 2 — 


Concluded. 






tg i 


M 


fl 






TOWNS. 


^1 


1 


Si 




1 
















HM 


fi 


<1 


^ 


<1 


Rockland .... 


394 


430 


23 


1 




Scituate . 




211 


_ 


129 


6 


_ 


Seekonk . 




108 


_ 


45 


_ 


_ 


Sharon . 




138 


86 


24 


_ 


_ 


South Abinsrton . 




315 


271 


41 


6 


_ 


South Scituate 




218 


_ 


114 


4 


- 


Stoughton 




464 


448 


60 


27 


- 


Taunton . 




2,049 


380 


831 


193 


1 


Walpole . 




224 


42 


134 


4 




West Bridge water 




158 


109 


26 


- 


_ 


Weymouth . 




896 


739 


7] 


46 


- 


Wrentham 




224 


1 


61 


4 


- 


Totals 


• 


14,579 


5,472 


4,374 


391 


147 



Congressional District iVb. 3. 



TOWN. 


1 

P 


P 




£ 
o 
< 


Boston, Wards 13,14,15,16,17,18, 
19, 20, 21, and 24 . . . . 


10,919 


10,478 


66 


148 



Congressional District 27b. 4. 







if ji 


. 


1 


<s 


TOWNS. 


ii 






^ a 

J3 -^ 


1 




!^ 


« 


s 


<1 


Boston, Wards 1,2,6,7,8,9, 












10, 11, and 12 . 


9,608 


6,085 


68 


20 


17 


Chelsea 


1,740 


1,403 


5 


6 


3 


Revere 


222 


94 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Winthrop .... 


77 


72 


- 


- 


- 


Totals .... 


11,647 


7,654 


73 


26 


20 



35 



274 Representatives .f Forty- Sixth Congress, 



Congressional District 27b, 6. 



TOWNS. 


si 


i 




i 




^ 


% 


Boston, Wards 3, 4, and 5 . 


2,998 


2,271 




8 


Arlington . . . 






414 


254 


- 


2 


Belmont 












177 


136 


— 


1 


Burlington 












64 


57 


- 


- 


Everett . 












396 


207 


_ 


1 


Lexington 












297 


118 


- 


- 


Lynn 












2,629 


2,985 


- 


12 


Maiden . 












1,064 


695 


- 


13 


Medford 












841 


348 


_ 


5 


Melrose . 












477 


244 


_ 


3 


Kahant . 












70 


62 


_ 


- 


Saugiis . 












306 


172 


- 


- 


8omerville 












1,968 


623 


265 


13 


Stoncbam 












540 


470 


_ 


1 


Swampscott 
Wakelield 












240 


103 


- 














657 


308 


_ 


1 


Waltham 












1,041 


584 


- 


10 


Winchester 












340 


119 


- 


_ 


Woburn 












889 


897 


- 


1 


Totals . . . . . 


15,308 


10,653 


265 


71 


Congressional IHstrict 2> 


^0. 6. 










i>^ 


-; 








rT =3 


^ •« 


£ 


TOWNS. 


^ i 


s% 


it 


1 




|3 


1^ 


P 


i 


Amesbury 


241 


189 


24 


_ 


Beverly 


614 


644 


47 


1 


Boxford 


115 


9 


38 


_ 


Bradford 


183 


121 


96 


_ 


Danvers 


483 


497 


60 


1 


Essex 


162 


158 


24 




Georgetown 


• 245 


132 


102 


« 


Gloucester 


859 


1,391 


220 


1 


Groveland 


158 


130 


99 




Hamilton 


75 


55 


27 


_ 


ELaverhiU 


1,033 


998 


621 


12 



Representatives Forty-Sixth Congress, 275 



Congressional District 2fb. 6 — Concluded. 



TOWNS. 



^1 



P 

pq 



Ipswich 

Lynnfield 

Manchester . 

Marblehead . 

Merrimac 

Middleton 

Newbury 

Newburyport 

North Andover 

Peabody 

Rockport 

Rowley . 

Salem . 

Salisbury 

Topsfield 

Wenham 

West Newbury 

Totals . 



342 
71 

402 

214 

94 

151 

956 

187 

543 

260 

123 

1,995 

344 

129 

84 

187 



10,339 



234 
25 
162 
851 
176 



1,140 

177 

525 

503 

S4 

1,255 

244 

86 

73 

213 



51 

15 

32 

216 

IS 

5 

9 

141 

131 

104 

40 

20 

535 

31 

18 

21 

13 



10,226 



2,658 



Congressional District 2^o. 7. 





^ 


^ 












^ 


^ 


.d 


^. 


«d 


2 


TOWNS. 


11 




11 


II 

< 


1^ 


5 

o 


Acton 


201 


81 


48 








Andover . 






586 


184 


13 


- 


- 


- 


Ashby . 






151 


52 


4 


- 


- 


- 


Ayer 






154 


103 


44 


33 


_ 


_ 


Bedford . 






117 


72 


3 


_ 


- 


_ 


Berlin 






119 


67 


_ 


- 


« 


_ 


Billerica . 






328 


48 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Bollon 






123 


64 


2 


_ 


- 


- 


Box bo rough 






26 


14 


6 


3 


- 


. 


CarUtile . 






67 


37 




- 


- 


- 


Chelmsford 






253 


111 


62 


- 


- 


_ 


Concord . 






334 


110 


17 


1 


_ 


1 


Dracut . 






182 


47 


46 


. ~ 


~ 





276 Representatives^ Forty -Sixth Congress, 



Congressional District 27b. 7— Concluded. 



TOWNS. 


1 

5 S 


1 


It 


1^ 


w. 


o 


Dunstable 
Groton 
Harvard . 
Hudson . 
T, an caster 
Lawrence 
Lincoln . 
Littleton . 
Lowell 
Marlborough 
Maynard . 
Methuen . 
North Reading 
Pepperell . 
Reading . 
Shirley . 
Stow 

Sudbury . 
Tewksbury 
Townsend 
Tyngeborough 
Westford . 
Wihnmgton 




47 
226 
149 
326 
219 

2,220 
109 
128 

3,985 
568 
118 
458 
104 
233 
422 
153 
143 
144 
169 
244 
83 
187 
93 


30 

35 

88 

81 

67 

2,247 

7 

50 

2,231 

862 

125 

179 

35 

172 

44 

43 

31 

70 

87 

89 

31 

89 

37 


1 

27 
239 

176 

4 

2 

1,456 

11 

1 

10 

1 

179 

1 

3 

1 

30 
49 


18 
8 

9 
23 

48 


390 


2 
11 
2 

1 

1 


Totals 




13,169 


7,700 


2,441 


143 


390 


18 



Congressional District 27b. 8. 










S) 








. 


- 13 


S 


m 




s 


•c *c 


^ 


»H 


TOWNS. 




o -^ 


f^ 


1 




S^ 


2q 


1 «2 


J- 






« 


m 


< 


Ashland 


220 


100 


3 


_ 


Boston, Wards 22, 23, and 25 




2,056 


2,392 


9 


6 


Brookline .... 




771 


307 


1 


4 


Cambridge .... 




3,534 


3,081 


10 


15 


Dedham .... 




522 


548 


4 


2 


Dover 




72 


31 


_ 


— 


Fraraingham . . . 




688 


469 


21 


~ 



Representatives^ Forty -Sixth Congress. 

Congressional District No. 8 — Concluded. 



277 







o — 








o 


to 


1 


0) 


TOWNS. 




11 


fl 


o 




o 


tt 


OQ 


< 


Frauklin 


316 


144 


4 


_ 


Holliston 


312 


314 


56 


- 


Hopkinton 


368 


418 


7 


1 


Mediield 


181 


49 




3 


Medway 


364 


298 


18 


— 


Milford 


7:3 


693 


33 


- 


Isatick 


631 


930 


26 


1 


Needham 


404 


258 


3 


— 


Newton 


1,846 


750 


8 


3 


Norwood 


224 


209 


- 


- 


Sbcrborn 


105 


71 


8 


- 


Soulhborough 


184 


99 


5 


- 


Watertown 


496 


366 


7 


— 


Waylaud 


153 


200 


- 


- 


Weston 


201 


31 


- 


- 


Totals 


14,300 


11,758 


223 


35 


Congressional District 1/ 


0.9. 








. 


ti 


J> 




TOWNS. 


o 







2 
o 




g " 


^" 


a -^ 


5 


Auburn 


95 


49 


5 


_ 


Barre . 










290 


123 


- 


— 


Bcllinsham . 










119 


60 


- 


1 


BLickstone . 










290 


326 


— 


1 


Boylritou 










131 


25 


- 


1 


Brookfield . 










326 


221 


2 


- 


Chariton 










230 


84 


2 





Douylas 










169 


124 


17 


- 


Dudley . 










131 


163 


- 


- 


Grafton. 










365 


145 


- 


— 


Hardwick . 










186 


83 


- 


- 


Bolden . 










183 


135 


- 


— 


Hubbardston 










163 


92 


- 


_ 


Leicester 










288 


91 


_ 


_ 


Mendon . 










114 


50 


5 


■" 



278 Representatives^ Forty -Sixth Congress. 



Congressional District No. 9— Concluded. 





u 


u 


J. 




TOWNS. 






^1 


i 


Millbury 


390 


237 


_ 


. 


New Braintree 










74 


26 


— 


_ 


Northborough 










197 


104 


- 


. 


Northbridge . 










322 


164 


7 


. 


North Brookfield 










442 


282 


_ 


— 


Oakham 










108 


42 


_ 


. 


Oxford . 












249 


191 


42 


. 


Paxton . 












90 


41 


_ 


_ 


Princeton 












141 


7 


_ 


_ 


Rutland 






• 






98 


60 


- 


_ 


Shrewsbury 












184 


85 


6 


- 


Southbridge 












410 


253 


- 


- 


Spencer . 












522 


248 


3 


— 


Sturbridge 












222 


86 


— 


. 


Sutton . 












223 


196 


10 


. 


Upton . 












213 


185 


4 


- 


Uxbridge 












315 


148 


_ 


- 


Warren . 












305 


165 


4 


. 


Webster 












390 


316 


8 


_ 


Westborough 










452 


261 


23 


. 


West Doylston 










225 


116 


12 


_ 


West Brookfield 










200 


169 


6 


- 


Worcester . 










4,443 


3,807 


109 


3 


Totals 


13,295 


8,960 


265 


6 







Congressional District 27b. 10. 






TOWNS. 


u 


2 

ll 


Wilb.RWhit- 
ney, Ash- 
bumham. 


Wm. F.Whit- 
ney, Ash- 
burnham. 


S 
< 


Amherst 


384 


60 


203 






Ashficld . 








96 


76 


51 


_ 


_ 


Aehbumham 








173 


20 


89 


- 


8 


Athol . 








409 


30 


396 


— 


_ 


Belchertown 








98 


44 


67 


. 


. 


Bemardston 








111 


56 


30 


— 


. 


Buckland 








115 


33 


166 


~ 


~ 



Representatives^ Forty-Sixth Congress. 279 





Congressional 


District N'o. 10.- 


-Continued. 






(« 


'6 


^e . 


4x. . 




TOWNS. 


u 


li 


ilb.F.Wl: 
ney, A( 
burnham 


'm.F.WL 
ney, As 
burnham 


;=! 




^ 


O 


^ 


^ 


< 


Charlemont . . . . 


141 


6 


45 


_ 


, 


Chesterfield 








100 


13 


48 


— 


- 


Clinton . 








521 


216 


305 


- 


. 


Colrain . 








187 


39 


70 


- 


- 


Conway . 








139 


30 


93 


- 


- 


Cummington 








110 


6 


80 


- 


- 


Dana 








69 


8 


69 


_ 


• 


Deerfield 








132 


202 


178 


- 


- 


Easthampton 








376 


59 


154 


- 


- 


Enfield . 








167 


28 


10 


_ 


_ 


Erving . 








56 


6 


93 


- 


- 


Fitchburg 








1,182 


382 


567 


- 


6 


Gardner . 








354 


237 


117 


_ 


_ 


Gill . 








80 


21 


44 


- 


- 


Goshen . 








63 


_ 


13 


_ 


_ 


Granby . 
Greenfield 








106 


34 


10 


_ 


_ 








251 


198 


235 


- 


8 


Greenwich 








72 


48 


6 


_ 


. 


Hadley . 








546 


12 


90 


_ 


_ 


Hatfield . 








79 


86 


76 


_ 


. 


Hawley . 








64 


8 


35 


- 


. 


Heath . 








74 


11 


9 


_ 


. 


Holyoke . 








602 


194 


772 


_ 


1 


Huntington 








103 


11 


71 


_ 


1 


Leominster 








773 


96 


210 


_ 


- 


Leverett . 








80 


14 


62 


_ 


_ 


Leydcn . 








53 


16 


24 


_ 


_ 


Lunenburg 








122 


17 


69 


- 


- 


Middleficld 








62 


17 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Monroe . 








15 




17 


_ 


_ 


Montague 








182 


102 


112 


93 


2 


N"ew Salem 








173 


4 


50 


- 


- 


Northampton 
Northfield 








716 


136 


574 


- 


1 








118 


75 


129 


_ 


_ 


Orange . 








392 


38 


177 


- 


- 


Pelham . 








60 


2 


41 


- 


. 


Petersham 








152 


23 


36 


_ 


_ 


Phillipston 
Plainfidd 








99 


8 


20 


_ 


_ 








87 


11 


6 


_ 


_ 


Prescott . 








36 


2 


42 


_ 


_ 


Rowe 








78 


30 


6 


_ 


1 


Royalston 








188 


21 


47 


_ 


.. 


Shelbume 








237 


20 


68 


_ 


_ 


Shutesbury 








33 


20 


52 


_ 


7 


South Hadley 






232 


77 


113 


_ 




Southampton 








153 


6 


25 


- 


- 



280 Representatives^ Forty-Sixth Congress, 



Congressional District No. 10. — Concluded. 



TOWITS. 


11 


'6 


ilb.F.Whit- 
ney, Ash- 
burnham. 


^4 






^ 


C5 


\^ 


^ 


% 


Sterling 


196 


16 


68 






Sunderland . 






128 


8 


42 


_ 


- 


Templeton 






296 


39 


105 


- 


_ 


Ware 






304 


272 


3 


_ 


_ 


Warwick 






96 


36 


34 


_ 


_ 


Wendell . 






35 


7 


45 


_ 


1 


Westhampton 






74 


6 


1 


- 


_ 


Westminster . 






215 


54 


_ 


_ 


1 


Whately . 






36 


49 


127 


- 


- 


Williamsburg 






168 


9 


203 


- 


_ 


VVinctiendon . 






409 


202 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Worthington . 






103 


3 


56 


- 


- 


Totals .... 


13,051 


3,609 


6,746 


93 


31 


Congressional Di 


stHct m 


?. 11. 






TOWNS. 


|1 


13 


2 


i 


Adams ....... 


269 


39 


258 


2 


Alford 


25 


19 


39 




Agawam ...... 


112 


22 


129 


_ 


Becket 


89 


30 


65 


_ 


Blandford 


99 


25 


37 


. 


Brimfield 


115 


14 


63 


1 


Cheshire 


113 


17 


139 


_ 


Chester 


125 


21 


110 


_ 


Chicopee 


674 


16 


492 


3 


Clarksburg 


44 


- 


33 


- 


Dalton 


136 


38 


125 


1 


Egremont 


108 


45 


37 


_ 


Florida 


44 


6 


12 


» 


Granville 


131 


10 


99 


_ 


Great Barrington 


411 


57 


286 


. 


Hampden 


68 


9 


59 


— 


Hancock 


82 


11 


29 


_ 


Hinsdale . . . . . 


136 


25 


100 


1 



Representatives <i Forty-Sixth Congress. 281 



Congressional IHstrici 27b. 11 — 


Concluded. 




TOWNS. 


if 


a a 



A 

o a 


o 


Holland 


41 


5 


19 


_ 


Lanesborough 


129 


40 


23 


- 


Lee 


33T 


69 


210 


8 


Lenox 


107 


97 


68 


_ 


Lon^meadow 


153 




58 


2 


Ludlow 


_ 


_ 


_ 


189 


Monson 


270 


15 


204 


9 


Monterey 


78 


13 


45 


1 


Montgomery 


34 


10 


15 


— 


Mount Washington .... 


25 


_ 


6 


— 


New Ashford 


17 


22 


1 


— 


New Marlborough .... 


135 


38 


122 


- 


North Adams 


609 


26 


426 


>— 


Otia 


46 


17 


70 


— 


Palmer 


323 


19 


250 


6 


Peru 


56 


16 


5 


_ 


Pittsfield 


770 


428 


555 


15 


Richmond 


56 


22 


21 


— 


Ruseell 


45 


13 


36 


- 


Sandisfield 


60 


20 


66 


— 


Savoy 


63 


45 


24 


- 


Sheffield 


167 


29 


127 


- 


Southwick 


91 


57 


90 


_ 


Springfield 


2,606 


244 


1,882 


23 


Stockbridge 


225 


57 


105 


- 


Tolland 


22 


16 


26 


i. 


Tvringham 


63 


7 


54 


. 


Wales 


92 


_ 


73 


— 


Washington 


33 


6 


40 


- 


Westfield 


578 


178 


786 


— 


West Springfield 


253 


17 


183 


1 


West Stockbridge .... 


125 


45 


87 


9 


Wilbraham 


173 


7 


38 


— 


Williamstown 


284 


60 


148 


. 


Windsor 


80 


28 


19 


- 


Totals 


10,927 


2,069 


7,994 


270 



282 BepresentcUives, Forty-Sixth Congress, 



EECAPITrLATIOI( OP CONGEESSIONAL YOTE. 

District No. 1. 

WilUam W. Crapo of New Bedford 12,575 

Matthias Ellis of Carver 7,383 

Rodney French of New Bedford 219 

Presbery L. Smith 9 

Benjamin Clough 8 

AU others 13 

District No. 2. 

Benjamin "W. Harris of East Bridgewater 14,579 

Edgar E. Dean of Brockton 5,472 

Edward Avery of Brain tree 4,374 

Thomas J. Lathrop of Taunton 391 

Edgar E. Dean of Taunton 82 

Edgar E. Dean of Boston 37 

Edward E. Dean 17 

All others U 

District No. 3. 

Walbridge A. Field of Boston 10,919 

Benjamin Dean of Boston 10,478 

Eugene H. Clapp of Boston 66 

AU others 48 

District No. 4. 

Leopold Morse of Boston 11,647 

Martin Brimmer of Boston • . . 7,654 

"William Washburn of Boston 73 

WendeU Phillips 26 

All others 20 

District No. 6. 
Selwyn Z. Bowman of Somerville ...••.. 15,308 

Nathan Clark of Lynn 10,653 

Nathan J. Clark of Lynn 265 

AU others 71 



Representatives^ Forty-Sixth Congress. 283 

District No. fl. 

George B. Loring of Salem 10,339 

E. Moody Boynton of West Newbury 10,226 

James H. Carleton of Haverhill 2,658 

All others 52 

District No. 7. 

"William A. Russell of Lawrence 13,169 

John K. Tarbox of Lawrence 7,700 

Samuel M. Stevens of LoweU 2,441 

Samuel M. Stephens of Lowell 390 

James C. Abbott of Lowell ........ 143 

All others 18 

District No. 8. 

"William Claflin of Newton 14,300 

Isaac Bradford of Cambridge 11,758 

George W. Stacy of Milford 223 

All others 35 

District No. 9. 

"William "W. Rice of Worcester 13,295 

Eli Thayer of Worcester 8,960 

Timothy A. Smith of Westborough 265 

All others 8 

District No. 10. 

Amasa Norcross of Fitchburg 13,051 

James 8. Grinnell of Greenfield 3,609 

Wilbur F. "Whitney of Ashburnham 6,746 

Wilham F. "Whitney of Ashburnham 93 

All others 31 

District No. 11. 

George D. Robinson of Chicopee 10,927 

Jarvis N. Dunham of Pittsfield 2,069 

Edward H. Lathrop of Springfield 7,994 

A. C. Woodworth 126 

Justin L. Worthy 72 

Lewis B. Norton 52 

John Blackmer of Springfield 11 

All others 9 



RULES AND ORDERS. 



THE SENATE. 



EULES AND ORDEES OE THE SENATE. 



Of the Duties and Powers of the President. 

RilLE 1. To call the members to order, and cause the journal of the 
preceding day to he read. 

Rule 2. To preserve order and decorum — To speak to points of 
order in preference to other members — To decide all questions of order, 
subject to appeal — To rise in putting a question, etc., but may read 
sitting. 

RtTLE 3. To declare all votes ; if doubted, a return to be ordered. 

Rule 4. The President may vote on all questions. 

Rule 5. President to order the Yeas and Nays, if one-fifth of the 
members present require them. 

Rule 6, Concerning motions when a question is under debate, and 
the precedence thereof. 

Rule 7. Motions undebatable. 

Rule 8. President to name who may speak, when two or more mem- 
bers rise at once. 

Rule 9. President may name member to take his plaee — Limitation 
thereof. 

Rule 10. In absence of President, the senior member present to 
call the Senate to order — The election of a President pro tern, to be the 
first business. 

Of the Rights, Duties, and Decorum of Members. 

Rule 11. Members, when speaking, to address the President. 

Rule 12. Limitation as to speaking. 

Rule 13. Members not to interrupt another, except, etc. 

Rule 14. Members not to speak to a question after it is put to vote. 

Rule 15. Concerning the presentation of petitions, etc. 

Rule 16. All motions to be reduced to writing, if the President bo 
direct. 

Rule 17. Concerning the reconsideration of votes. 

Rule 18. Bills, etc., to remain in Clerk's possession until the right of 
reconsideration has expired. 



288 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 



RuiiE 19. Division of a question to be made if desired — Motion to 
strike out and insert. 

Rule 20. Unfinished business to have the preference. 

Rule 21. Members not to vote on questions where their private 
rights are concerned, distinct from the public interest. 

Rule 22. Members not to absent themselves without leave, unless, 
etc. 

Rule 23. Concerning the Yeas and Nays. 

Of Committees. 

Rule 24. Requiring statements to be made to committees relative 
to proposed alterations of laws. 

Rule 25. List of standing committees. 

Rule 26. Committees to be appointed by the President, unless, etc. 
— First named to be chairman — Substitute to hold same rank as the 
original member — In elections, the person having the highest number of 
votes to be chairman. 

Rule 27. Order of question when motion is made to commit. 

Rule 28. Reports of committees not proposing final action, and of 
Committees of Conference, to be made the order of the day for the sttc- 
ceeding day. 

Rule 29. No committee to occupy the Senate Chamber without 
leave. 

Of Bills and Resolves. 

Rule 30. Concerning reports on petitions, notice of the presentation 
of which has not been pubUshed. 

Rule 31. Restrictions on the introduction of. 

Rule 32. Bills and resolves, how to be written — Not to be introduced 
by a member without leave — When introduced on leave, to be com- 
mitted before second reading. 

Rule 33. Bills, etc., from the House, to be committed, unless reported 
by a joint committee. 

Rule 34. Bills, etc., not to be engrossed without three readings — 
Bills in the second and third readings to be made the order of the day 
for the succeeding day — Matters passed over, how disposed of. 

Rule 35. Bills and resolves involving expenditure of money, to be 
referred to the Committee on the Treasury. 

Rule 36. Bills, etc., in their third reading, to be committed for 
examination. 

Rule 37. Engrossed bills, etc., to be committed for examination — 
Bills reported as rightly and truly engrossed, not to be again read, 
unless, etc. 



Rules and Orders of the Senate. 289 

RtTLE 38. No engrossed bill to be amended. 

Rule 39. No rejected measure to be revived — This rule to apply to 
House as well as Senate measures. 

Elections by Ballot. 
Rule 40. Elections by ballot — Time to be assigned therefor. 

Senate Library. 
Rule 41. Books to be in care of the Clerk — Clerk to keep account of 
all books delivered. 

Reporters. 
Rule 42. Reporters— Seats for, to be numbered and assigned by lot. 

General Rules. 

Rule 43. Seats not to be occupied by persons other than members. 

Rule 44. Regulations respecting admission of persons to Senate 
Chamber and rooms adjoining. 

Rule 45. Cushing's Manual and Cushing's Law and Practice to 
govern when not inconsistent with Rules and Orders. 

Rule 46. Concerning the alteration, rescinding, etc., of rules. 



KULES AND ORDEES. 

[The dat«s under each rule indicate the years of their adoption, 
and amendments thereto. 

The date 1817 denotes the time that the several rules, against which 
it is placed, were first preserved, as, previous to that year, they are 
not to be found, although, from the Senate Journal, it appears that 
they were printed. 

Rule 32 was adopted in 1825. If any others were adopted between 
1821 and '26, no record can be found. 

Numbers enclosed in braekets following rule number, indicate corre- 
sponding Rules of the House.] 

Of the Duties and Powers of the President. 
Rule 1. [1.] The President shall take the chair every 
day at the hour to -which the Senate stands adjourned, 
37 



290 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

shall call the members to order, and, on the appearance of 
a quorum, shall proceed to business. 
[1831.] 

EuLE 2. [2, 5.] He shall preserve order and decorum, 
may speak to points of order in preference to other mem- 
bers, and shall decide all questions of order subject to an 
appeal. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the 
Senate, but may read sitting. 

[1817; between 1821 and '26; 1831.] 



Rule 3. [3, 64.] He shall declare all votes; but, if any 
member rises to doubt a vote, the President shall order a 
return of the number voting in the affirmative, and in the 
negative, without further debate. 
[1831.J 

Rule 4. [4.] The President may vote on all questions. 
[1826.] 

Rule 5. [66 ] When any member moves that a ques- 
tion be taken by yeas and nays, the President shall take the 
sense of the Senate in that manner, provided one-fifth of 
the members present shall so direct. 
[1817; 1852.] 

Rule 6. [78.] When a question is under debate, the 
President shall receive no motion but to adjourn, to proceed 
to the consideration of the special assignment, to lay on the 
table, to postpone to a day certain, to commit, to amend, to 
refer to the next General Court, or to postpone indefinitely, 
which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they stand. 

[Between 1821 and '26; 1881; 1844; 1870.] 



Rules and Orders of the Senate. 291 

Rule 7. [67, 77.] The motions to adjourn, to lay on 
the table, to take from the table, and for the yeas and nays, 
shall be decided without debate. 
[1817; 1859; 1870; 1874.] 

Rule 8. [72.] When two or more members rise at 
once, the President shall designate which of these shall be 
entitled to the floor. 
[1831.] 

Rule 9. [7.] The President shall have the right to 
appoint a member to perform the duties of the chair, but 
such appointment shall not extend beyond three days. 
[1831; 1862; 1865.] 

Rule 10. [8.] In case of a vacancy in the oflfice of 
President, or in case the President, or the member substi- 
tuted by him in accordance with Rule 9, is absent at the 
hour designated in Rule 1, the senior member present shall 
call the Senate to order, and shall preside until a President 
or a President pro tempore is elected by ballot, which shall 
be the first business of the Senate. 
[1831.] 



Of the BightSf Duties^ and Decorum of Members. 
Rule 11. [71.] Every member, when he speaks, shall 
stand in his place, and address the President. 
[1817; 1831; 1871.] 

Rule 12. [74.] No member shall speak more than 
once on one question, to the prevention of any other who 
has not spoken and is desirous to speak, nor more than 
twice without obtaining leave of the Senate. 
[1817.] 



292 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

KuLE 13. [73.] No member speaking shall be inter- 
rupted by another, but by rising to call to order. 
[1817; 1831.] 

Rule 14. After a question is put to vote, no member 
shall speak to it. 
[1817.] 

Rule 15. [35.] Every member presenting a petition, 
memorial, or remonstrance, shall indorse his name thereon, 
and, in the filing thereof, state briefly the nature and 
object of the instrument; and the reading of the same shall 
be dispensed with, unless specially ordered by the Senate. 
[1831.] 

Rule 16. [75.] Any motion shall be reduced to writ- 
ing, if the President so direct. 
[1817; 1844; 1871.] 

Rule 17. [68, 69.] When a vote has passed, except 
on motions specified in Rule 7, it shall be in order for any 
member to move a reconsideration thereof on the same or 
the succeeding day; and such motion, if made on the same 
day, shall be placed first in the Orders of the Day for the 
day succeeding that on which it is made; but, if first 
moved on such succeeding day, it shall be forthwith con- 
sidered; and, when a motion for reconsideration is decided, 
that vote shall not be reconsidered : provided, however, that 
a motion to reconsider a vote, upon any collateral matter, 
shall not remove the main subject under consideration 
from before the Senate, but shall be considered at the time 
when it is made. 

[1817; between 1821 and '26; 1858.] 



Rules and Orders of the Senate. 293 

Rule 18. [15.] Bills, resolves, and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, enacted bills, orders of 
inquiry, and orders of notice), shall remain in the possession 
of the Clerk until the right of reconsideration has expired : 
provided^ that the operation of this rule shall be suspended 
during the last week of the session. 
[1855; 1856; 1875.] 

Rule 19. [89.] A question containing two or more prop- 
ositions, capable of division, shall be divided whenever 
desired by any member. A motion to strike out and insert 
shall be deemed indivisible. But a motion to strike out, 
being lost, shall neither preclude amendment nor a motion 
to strike out and insert. 
[1817; 1841.] 

Rule 20. [58.] The unfinished business in which the 
Senate was engaged at the time of the last adjournment 
shall have the preference in the Orders of the Day next after 
motions to reconsider. 
[1830; 1870.] 

Rule 21. [61.] No member shall be permitted to vote 
or serve on any committee on a question where his private 
right is immediately concerned, distinct from the public 
interest. 

[1855.] 

Rule 22. No member shall absent himself from the 
Senate without leave, unless there is a quorum without 
his presence. 
[1817.] 

Rule 23. [62, QQ.'\ Whenever a question is taken by 
yeas and nays, the Clerk shall call the names of all the 

38 



294 Bules and Orders of the Senate. 

members, except the President, in alphabetical order, and 
every member present shall answer to his name, unless 
excused before the vote is taken ; and no member shall be 
permitted to vote after the decision is announced from the 
chair. 

[1837; 1844.] 



Of Committees. 

Rule 24. [38.] It shall be the duty of every member 
of the Senate, who moves that any standing committee be 
instructed to inquire into the expediency of amending an 
existing law, to point out to such committee, in writing, the 
amendment which he deems expedient, and to furnish a 
written statement of the facts and authorities in favor 
thereof to such committee, if by them required. 
[1858.] 

Rule 25. [21.] The following standing committees shall 
be appointed at the commencement of the first session, 
to wit: — 

A Committee on the Judiciary; 

A Committee on Bills in the Third Reading; 
And each of these committees shall consist of five members. 

A Committee on Matters of Probate and Chancery; 

A Committee on the Treasury; 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills ; 
. A Committee on Leave of Absence; 
And each of these committees shall consist of the members. 
[1831; 1836; 1840; 1844; 1847; 1863; 1864; 1870; 
1876.] 

Rule 26. [22, 23.] All committees shall be appointed 
by the President, unless otherwise specially directed by the 
Senate, and the person first named shall be chairman. In 



Bules and Orders of the Senate. 295 

all elections of committees by ballot, the person having 
the highest number of votes shall act as chairman. 
[1817; between 1821 and '26; 1831.] 



RiTLE 27. [86.] Wlien a motion is made to commit any- 
subject, and different committees are proposed, the ques- 
tion shall be taken in the following order: A Standing 
Committee of the Senate — a Select Committee of the 
Senate — a Joint Standing Committee — a Joint Select 
Committee. 
[1844.] 

Rule 28. [55.] Reports of committees, except such as 
do not propose final action, and reports of Committees of 
Conference, shall, unless otherwise specially ordered, be 
placed in the Orders of the Day next succeeding that on 
which they are presented to the Senate. 
[1845; 1853.] 

Rule 29. [98.] ^o committee shall be allowed to 
occupy the Senate Chamber without leave of the Senate. 
[1836; 1863.] 

Rule 80. [30.] No bill or resolve affecting the rights of 
individuals, or private or municipal corporations, or the 
Commonwealth, shall be reported to the Senate by any 
committee, unless it is made to appear, to the satisfaction 
of the committee, that notice had been given in the manner 
provided by law; or unless such notice as the committee 
shall direct has been given, and proper proof of the same 
placed before the committee; or unless, in the judgment 
of the committee, no notice to the parties or the public is 
necessary. 

[1870.] 



296 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

Rule 31. [46.] Xo bill affecting directly the legal rights 
of individuals or corporations, otherwise than as it affects 
generally the interests of the whole people of the Common- 
wealth, or the cities or towns to which it specifically applies, 
shall be proposed or introduced, by amendment or otherwise, 
except by report of a committee, upon petition duly pre- 
sented and referred. 
[1875.] 



Of Bills and Besolves. 
Rule 32. [40, 45-1 All bills and resolves shall be writ- 
ten in a fair, legible hand, without interlineations, on not 
less than one sheet of paper, with suitable margins and 
spaces between the several sections or resolves. No bill 
or resolve shall be introduced by a member without special 
leave ; and all bills and resolves, when so introduced, shall 
be committed before they are passed to a second read- 
ing. Bills amending existing laws shall not provide for 
striking words from, or inserting words in such laws, unless 
such course is the best calculated to show clearly the subject 
and nature of the amendment. No repealed law, and no 
part of any repealed law, shall be re-enacted by reference 
merely. 

[1844; 1857.] 

Rule 33. [43.] All bills and resolves from the House 

of Representatives, after they are read a first time, shall be 

committed to a committee of the Senate, except when said 

bills or resolves have been reported by a joint committee. 

[1825.] 

Rule 34. [49, 56, 57.] No bill or resolve, or substitute 
therefor, shall pass to be engrossed without three readings 
on three several days. Bills and resolves in the first reading 



Rules and Orders of the Senate. 297 

shall be read by their titles, unless otherwise ordered ; and 
bills and resolves in the second and third readings shall be 
made the order of the day for the day next succeeding that 
on which leave has been given to read them a second or 
third time, and the President shall order them accord- 
ingly. Matters in the Orders of the Day not giving rise 
to any motion or debate shall be first disposed of in their 
order; then the remaining matters shall be considered in 
like order, and disposed of; and such as are by vote then 
passed over shall go to the foot of the list, and shall not be 
considered till the next day. 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878.] 

KuLE 35. [42.] All bills and resolves involving the 
expenditure of public money shall, after the first reading, 
be referred in course to the Committee on the Treasury, 
whose duty it shall be to report on their relation to the 
finances of the Commonwealth. 
[1871.] 

Rule 36. [27.] All bills and resolves in the third read- 
ing shall be committed to the Committee on Bills in the 
Third Reading, whose duty it shall be to ascertain their 
relations to the Constitution and any existing laws upon 
the same subject-matter, and to see that all such bills and 
resolves are correct in form. 
[1817; 1836.] 

Rule 37. [28, 50, 52.] All engrossed bills and resolves 
shall be committed to the Standing Committee on En- 
grossed Bills, whose duty it shall be carefully to com- 
pare the same with the bill as passed to be engrossed; and, 
if found by them to be rightly and truly engrossed, they 
shall so indorse on the envelope thereof; and the final 
question shall be taken thereon without any further 
38 



298 Rules and Orders of the Senate. 

reading, unless, on motion of any member, a majority 
of the Senate shall be in favor of reading the same as 
engrossed. 

[1817; 1831.] 



EuLE 38. [51.] No engrossed bill or resolve shall be 
amended. 

[1837.] 

Rule 39. [47.] When any measure has been finally 
rejected, it shall not be revived, except by reconsideration, 
and no measure substantially the same shall be introduced 
during the session. 

[1817 — dispensed with in 1831, and revived in 1838 — 
amended in 1841; 1844; 1877.] 



Elections by Ballot. 
Rule 40. [94.] In all elections by ballot, a time shall 
be assigned for such election, at least one day previous 
thereto. 

[1831.] 

Senate Library. 
Rule 41. The books belonging to the Senate Chamber 
shall be in the care of the Clerk, who shall keep an accu- 
rate list thereof; and no book shall be taken from the 
Senate Chamber by any person without giving notice 
thereof to the Clerk, who shall enter, in a book to be kept 
by him, the name of the book, and the name of the person 
taking the same. 
[1837.] 



Bules and Orders of the Senate. 299 

Beporters. 
Rule 42. Seats for reporters shall be numbered, and 
assigned by lot, under tbe direction of tlie Clerk of the 
Senate. 

[1847.] 

General Bules. 
Rule 43. [97.] No person not a member of the Senate 
shall be allowed to sit at the Senate table while the Senate 
is in session. 
[1853.] 

Rule 44. No person other than members of the legisla- 
tive and executive departments of the State Government, 
and past members of the Senate, shall be allowed to be 
present in the Clerk's room, or the room intervening 
between that and the Senate Chamber, while the Senate 
is in session, or during the fifteen minutes immediately 
preceding any session. 
[1870; 1875.] 

Rule 45. The Rules of Parliamentary Practice com- 
prised in Gushing' s Manual, and the Principles of Parlia- 
mentary Law set forth in Cushing's larger work, shall govern 
the Senate in all cases to which they are applicable, and in 
which they are not inconsistent with the Standing Rules 
and Orders of the Senate, or the Joint Rules of the two 
branches of the legislature. 
[1847; 1858.] 

Rule 46. [100.] Any Rule or Order, except the thirty- 
sixth, may be altered, suspended, or rescinded, two-thirds of 
the members present consenting thereto. 
[1817; 1841; 1848.] 



RULES AND ORDERS 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 



RULES AND OEDERS 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 



[This schedule of Rules and Orders was adopted Jan. 27, 1874. Sub- 
sequent amendments are noted under each Rule which has been amended.] 



The Speakek. 

1. The Speaker shall take the chair at the hour to 
which the House stands adjourned, call the members 
to order, and, on the appearance of a quorum, proceed to 
business. 

2. He shall preserve decorum and order; may speak 
to points of order in preference to other members; and 
shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal to 
the House. 

[With regard to appeals, see Rules 81 and 92.] 

3. He shall declare all votes, subject to verification as 
hereinafter provided. 

[See Rules 63 to 67.] 

4. In all cases he may vote. 

5. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the 
House, but may read sitting. 



304 Rules and Orders of the 

6. He shall each day examine the journal of the 
House. 

7. He may name a member to perform the duties of 
the chair for a period not exceeding two days at one time. 

8. In case of a vacancy in the office of Speaker, or 
in case the Speaker or the member named by him in accord- 
ance with the preceding rule, is absent at the hour to which 
the House stands adjourned, the senior monitor present 
shall call the House to order, and shall preside until a 
Speaker 2)ro temx>ore or a Speaker is elected by ballot, which 
shall be the first business in order. 

MoisriTORS. 

9. Two monitors shall be appointed by the Speaker for 
each division of the House, whose duty it shall be to see to 
the due observance of the Rules and Orders, and, on request 
of the Speaker, to return the number of votes and members 
in their respective divisions. 

10. If a member transgress any of the Rules and 
Orders after being notified thereof by a monitor, it shall 
be the duty of such monitor to report the case to the 
House. 

[For duty of monitor in case of the absence of the Speaker, see Rule 
8.] [See Rule 20.] 

Clerk. 

11. The Clerk shall keep the journal of the House. 
He shall enter therein a record of each day's proceedings, 
and submit it to the Speaker before the hour fixed for the 
next sitting. 

12. Every question of order shall be noted in the jour- 
nal, and, with the decision, shall be entered at large in an 



House of Representatives. 305 

appendix, which shall also contain the Rules and Orders of 
the House, and of the two branches. 

13. The Clerk shall prepare and cause to be printed 
each day a calendar of matters in order for consideration, 
followed by a brief minute of the preliminary proceedings 
of the previous day; a list of matters lying on the table; 
and such other memoranda as the House or the Speaker 
may direct. 

14. Any objection to the calendar shall be made and 
disposed of before the House votes to proceed to the con- 
sideration of the Orders of the Day. 

16. The Clerk shall retain bills and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, enacted bills, orders of 
inquiry, and orders of notice), until the right of reconsid- 
eration has expired: provided, that the operation of this 
rule shall be suspended during the last week of the ses- 
sion. 

Membees. 

16. No member shall stand up, to the inconvenience of 
others, while a member is speaking ; or pass unnecessarily 
between the Speaker of the House and the member speaking; 
or stand in the passages, or in the area in front of the 
chair, 

17. No member shall be absent more than two days 
without leave of the House. 

18. No member shall absent himself from the House 
without leave, unless there be a quorum without his 
presence. 

19. Papers in possession of a member obtaining leave of 
absence, or at the end of the session, shall be left by him 
with the Clerk. 



306 Rules arid Orders of the 

20. If a member is guilty of a breach of any of the 
Rules and Orders, he may be required by the House, on 
motion, to make satisfaction therefor; and, until he has 
done so, he shall not be allowed to vote or speak, except by 
way of excuse. 

[See Rule 10.] 

Committees. 

21. At the beginning of the political year, eleven stand- 
ing committees, to consist of seven members each, shall be 
appointed, as follows: — 

A Committee on the Judiciary ; 

A Committee on Matters of Probate and Chancery; 

A Committee on Finance; 

A Committee on Elections ; 

A Committee on Bills in the Third Reading ; 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills ; 

A Committee on County Estimates ; 

A Committee on the Pay-Roll ; 

A Committee on Leave of Absence; 

A Committee on Public Buildings ; 

A Committee on Rules and Orders. 

22. Unless other provision is made in any case, all 
committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, and the 
member first named shall be chairman. 

23. In case of the election of a committee by ballot, 
the member having the highest number of votes shall be 
chairman. 

24. No member shall be required to be on more than 
two committees at the same time, nor chairman of more 
than one. 

25. No member shall serve on any committee in any 



House of Representatives. 307 

question where his private right is immediately concerned, 
distinct from the public interest. 

26. The Committee on Finance shall report, in appro- 
priation bills, only such items of expenditure as are author- 
ized by law, or such as the committee has been directed by 
the House to insert. 

27. The Committee on Bills in the Third Reading shall 
examine and correct the bills which are referred to it, for 
the purpose of avoiding repetitions and unconstitutional 
provisions, insuring accuracy in the text and references, and 
consistency with the language of existing statutes : provided, 
that any change in the sense or legal effect, or any material 
change in construction, shall be reported to the House as an 
amendment. [Amended Jan. 15, 1880.] 

28. The Committee on Engrossed Bills shall carefully 
examine and compare engrossed bills, and report them 
rightly and truly engrossed, when found to be so, without 
delay. 

29. When the object of an application, whether by peti- 
tion, order, or bill introduced on leave, can be secured 
without a special act under existing laws, or without detri- 
ment to the public interests, by a general law, the committee 
to which the matter is referred shall report such general 
law, or leave to withdraw, inexpedient to legislate, or ought 
not to pass, as the case may be. [Amended Jan. 15, 1880.] 

30. No bill specially affecting the rights of individuals 
or private or municipal corporations shall be reported by a 
committee, unless notice has been given to all parties in- 
terested, by public advertisement or otherwise, without 
expense to the Commonwealth; or unless satisfactory 
evidence is produced that the parties interested have 



308 Rules and Orders of the 

either received notice in writing, or have in writing 
waived notice. Objections to tlie violation of this rule may 
be taken at any stage prior to the third reading of the bill. 

31. On or before the first Wednesday in March, com- 
mittees shall make final report upon matters referred to 
them prior to that day, unless further time is granted, for 
cause. 

Committee of the Whole. 

32. "When the House determines to go into a commit- 
tee of the whole, the chairman shall be appointed by the 
Speaker. 

33. The Rules of the House shall be observed in a com- 
mittee of the whole, so far as they may be applicable, except 
the rules limiting debate. A motion to rise, rep(?rt progress, 
and ask leave to sit again, shall be always first in order, and 
be decided without debate. 

Eegulak Coukse of Peoceedings. 

Petitions, etc., and Beports of Committees. 

34. Petitions, memorials, remonstrances, and papers of 
a like nature, and reports of committees, shall be presented 
before the House proceeds to the consideration of the Orders 
of the Day, and the Speaker shall call on the several divis- 
ions for such papers. 

36. The member presenting a petition, memorial, or 
remonstrance, shall indorse his name thereon, with a 
brief statement of the nature and object of the paper; 
and the reading thereof shall be dispensed with, unless 
specially ordered. 

Papers from the Senate. 
36. Papers from the Senate shall be laid before the 



House of Representatives. 309 

House by the Speaker, and received for action conforma- 
bly to such of these Kiiles and Orders as are applicable 
thereto, before the House proceeds to the consideration of 
the Orders of the Day. 

Papers addressed to the House, not Petitions. 

37. Papers addressed to the House, or the General 
Court, other than petitions, memorials, and remonstrances, 
or those received from the Senate, may be presented by 
the Speaker, or by a member in his place, and shall be 
read, unless it is specially ordered that the reading be dis- 
pensed with. 

Orders of Inquiry. 

38. All motions contemplating legislation, when not 
founded upon petition, or upon bill proposed to be intro- 
duced on leave, shall be made in the form of an order of 
inquiry, which shall indicate the nature of the legislation 
proposed; and if reference is made to any particular law, 
for amendment or otherwise, the order shall specify the 
chapter and section, as well as the subject to which it 
relates. 

Postponement to the Next Bay on Bequest of a Member. 

39. The consideration of any order proposed for adop- 
tion, or of any request for leave to introduce a bill, shall be 
postponed without question to the day after that on which 
the order is proposed or request made, if any member asks 
such postponement. 

Bills and Besolves. [See Kule 93.] 

40. Bills shall be fairly written in a legible hand, with- 
out material erasure or interlineation, on not less than one 
sheet of paper, with suitable margins and spaces between 
the several sections; dates and numbers being written in 
words at length. Bills amending existing laws shall not 



310 Hules and Orders of the 

provide for striking words from, or inserting words in, such 
laws, unless such course is best calculated to show clearly 
the subject and nature of the amendment. No repealed 
law, and no part of any repealed law, shall be re-enacted 
by reference merely. 

41. If opposition is made to a bill before it is ordered to 
a second reading, the question shall be, *' Shall this bill be 
rejected? ''"' If no opposition is made, or if the question to 
reject is negatived, the bill shall go to its second reading 
without a question. 

42. Bills involving an expenditure of public money, 
shall, after their first reading, be referred to the Committee 
on Finance, for report on their relation to the finances of 
the Commonwealth. 

43. Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, shall 
be referred to a committee of the House, unless they were 
reported to the Senate by a joint committee. 

44. Amendments, proposed by the Senate, and sent 
back to the House for concurrence, shall be referred to the 
committee which reported the measure proposed to be 
amended, unless such committee is composed of members 
of both branches. In which case such amendments shall be 
placed in the Orders of the Day for the next day. [Amended 
April 9, 1878.] 

45. No bill shall be proposed or introduced unless re- 
ceived from the Senate, reported by a committee, or moved 
as an amendment to the report of a committee: provided, 
that the House may grant special leave to a member to 
introduce a bill; but when leave is asked for the introduc- 
tion of a bill, it shall be read for information before the 
question is put on gi'anting leave ; and if leave is granted, 
it shall be committed, before it is ordered to a second 
reading. 



House of Representatives. 311 

46. No bill affecting directly tHe legal rights of indi- 
viduals or corporations, otherwise than as it affects gene- 
rally the interests of the whole people of the Commonwealth 
or of the cities or towns to which it specifically applies, shall 
be proposed or introduced, by amendment or otherwise, 
except by report of a committee, upon petition duly pre- 
sented' and referred. Objection to the violation of this rule 
may be taken at any stage prior to the third reading of the 
bill. 

47. When a bill, order, petition, memorial, or remon- 
strance has been finally rejected, no measure substan- 
tially the same shall be introduced by any committee or 
member during the same session. [Amended April 26, 
1877.] 

48. Bills in their third reading shall be referred to the 
Committee on Bills in the Third Keading for examination, 
correction, and report. 

[See Rule 27.] 

49. No bill shall pass to be engrossed without having 
been read on three several days. 

50. Engrossed bills shall be referred to the Commit- 
tee on Engrossed Bills for examination, comparison, and 
report. 

[See Rule 28.] 

61. No engrossed bill shall be amended. 

52. Engrossed bills, reported by the Committee on 
Engrossed Bills to be rightly and truly engrossed, shall be 
put upon their passage to be enacted ; and engrossed resolves, 
when so reported, shall be put upon their passage without 
further reading, unless specially ordered. 



312 Rules and Orders of the 

63. No engrossed bill shall be sent to the Senate with- 
out notice thereof being given by the Speaker. 



Orders of the Bay. 

54. Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, when 
not referred to a committee of the House, and bills report- 
ed to the House by committees, to which no objection 
is made, or when the question of rejection is negatived, 
shall be placed in the orders for second reading on the next 
day. 

bb. Reports of committees not by bill or resolve shall 
be placed in the orders of the next day after that on which 
they are received from the Senate, or made to the House, as 
the case may be : 'provided, that the report of a committee 
asking to be discharged from the further consideration of a 
subject, and recommending that it be referred to another 
committee, shall be immediately considered. 

bQ. Bills ordered to a third reading shall be placed in 
the orders of the next day for such reading. 

57. After entering upon the consideration of the Orders 
of the Day, the House shall proceed with them in regular 
course, as follows: Matters not giving rise to a motion or 
debate shall first be disposed of in the order in which they 
stand in the calendar; after which the matters that were 
passed over shall be considered in like order and disposed 
of. 

58. When the House does not finish the consideration 
of the Orders of the Day, those which had not been acted 
upon shall be the orders for the next and each succeeding 
day until disposed of, and shall be entered in the calendar. 



House of Representatives, 313 

without change in their order, to precede matters added 
under Rules fifty-four, fifty-five, and fifty-six. The unfin- 
ished business in wliicli tlie House was engaged at the time 
of adjournment shall have the preference in the orders of 
the next day, after motions to reconsider. 

Special Rides Affecting the Course of Proceedings. 

[For postponement of Order, etc., to the next day, on request of a mem- 
ber, see Rule 39.] 

69. No matter which has been duly placed in the Orders 
of the Day sliall be discharged therefrom, or considered out 
of the regular course. 

60. If, under the operation of the previous question, or 
otherwise, an amendment is made at the second or third 
reading of a bill substantially changing the greater part of 
such bill, the question shall not be put forthwith on order- 
ing the bill to a third reading or to be engrossed (as the 
case may be), but the bill, as amended, shall be placed in 
the orders of the next day after that on which the amend- 
ment is made, and sliall then be open to further amendment 
before such question is put. In like manner, when, under 
the operation of the previous question or otherwise, an 
amendment is made in any proposition of sucli a nature as 
to change its character, as from a bill to an order, or the 
like, the proposition as amended shall be placed in the 
orders of the next day after that on which the amendment 
was made. 

Voting. 

61. No member shall vote in any question where his 
private right is immediately concerned, distinct from the 
public interest. 

62. Every member not prevented by interest, who is 

40 



314 Rules and Orders of the 

present in the House when a question is put, shall give his 
vote, unless the House, for special reasons, excuse him. 
Members desiring to be so excused shall make application 
to that effect before the division of the House or the taking 
of the yeas and nays is begun. Such application may be 
accompanied by a brief statement of reasons by the member 
making it, but shall be decided without debate. [Amended 
Jan. 8, 1877.] 

63. When a question is put, the sense of the House 
shall be taken by the voices of the members, and the 
Speaker shall first announce the vote as it appears to him 
by the sound. 

64. If the Speaker is unable to decide by the sound of 
the voices, or if his announcement made thereupon is 
doubted by a member rising in his place for that purpose, 
the Speaker shall order a return by divisions of the number 
voting in the affirmative and in the negative, without further 
debate upon the question. 

[For duty of monitors in case of a division, see Rule 9.] 

65. When a return by divisions is ordered, the mem- 
bers for or against the question, when called on by the 
Speaker, shall rise in their places, and stand until they are 
counted. 

QQ. The sense of the House shall be taken by yeas 
and nays whenever required by thirty of the members 
present. When the yeas and nays are taken, the roll of 
the House shall be called in alphabetical order, and no 
member shall be allowed to vote who was not on the 
floor when his name was called or before the vote is de- 
clared. If, before such time, a member states to the House 
that he has paired wath another member, and how each 
would vote upon the pending question, the fact shall be 



House of Representatives. 315 

entered on the journal immediately after the record of the 
yeas and nays, and such member shall be excused from 
voting. [Amended Jan. 4, 1878; also April 2, 1878; also 
April 1, 1879.] 

67. The call for the yeas and nays shall be decided 
without debate. If the yeas and nays have been ordered 
before the question is put, the proceedings under Rules 
sixty-three, sixty-four, and sixty-five shall be omitted; if 
not, they may be called for in lieu of a return by divis- 
ions when the Speaker's announcement is doubted by a 
member rising in his place, and, if then ordered, the pro- 
ceedings under Rules sixty-four and sixty-five shall be 
omitted. 

Eeconsideration. 

68. When a vote has passed (except as provided in the 
next rule), it shall be in order for any member to move 
the reconsideration thereof on the same or the succeeding 
day, and such motion, if made on the same day, shall (ex- 
cept in the last week of the session) be placed first in the 
orders of the next day after that on which it is made; 
but, if first moved on such succeeding day, it shall be 
forthwith considered: provided, however, that a motion to 
reconsider a vote upon any incidental or subsidiary ques- 
tion shall not remove the main subject under consideration 
from before the House, but shall be considered at the time 
when it is made. 

69. When a motion for reconsideration is decided, that 
decision shall not be reconsidered, and no question shall be 
twice reconsidered; nor shall any vote be reconsidered upon 
either of the following motions : — 

to adjourn, 

to lay on the table, 

to take from the table ; or, 

for the previous question. 



316 Rules and Orders of the 

70. Debate on motions to reconsider shall be limited to 
thirty minutes, and no member shall occupy more than five 
minutes. 

[For rule requiring the Cleric to retain papers, except, etc., until the 
right of reconsideration has expired, see Rule 15.] 

EuLEs OF Debate. 

71. Every member, when about to speak, shall rise, and 
respectfully address the Speaker; shall confine himself to 
the question under debate, and avoid personality ; and shall 
sit down when he has finished. ' No member shall speak out 
of his place without leave of the Speaker. 

72. When two or more members rise at the same time, 
the Speaker shall name the member entitled to the floor, 
preferring one who rises in his place to one who does not. 

73. No member shall interrupt another while speaking, 
except by rising to call to order. 

74. No member shall speak more than once to the pre- 
vention of those who have not spoken and desire to speak 
on the same question, nor more than twice on the same 
question without leave of the House. 

Motions. 

75. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker so directs. 

76. A motion need not be seconded, and may be with- 
drawn by the mover if no objection is made. 

77. A motion to adjourn shall be always first in order, 
and shall be decided without debate ; and on the motions to 
lay on the table, to take from the table, to commit or 
recommit, not exceeding ten minutes shall be allowed for 
debate; and no member shall speak more than three min- 
utes. [Amended Feb. 19, 1878; and Jan. 26, 1880.] 



House of Representatives. 317 

[For application to be excused from voting, to "be decided without 

debate, see Rule 62.] 
[For call for yeas and nays, to be decided without debate, see Rule 

67.] 
[For questions of order, arising after the previous question is moved, 

to be decided without debate, except on appeal, see Rule 81.] 

78. When a question is before the House, until it is 
disposed of, the Speaker sliall receive no motion that does 
not relate to the same, except the motion to adjourn, or 
some other motion that has precedence either by express 
rule of the House, or because it is privileged in its na- 
ture ; and he shall receive no motion relating to the same, 
except, — r 

to lay on the table, See Rule 77, above. 

for the previous question. See Rules 79-84, below. 

to close the debate at a specified 

time. See Rules 83, 84, below. 

to postpone to a time certain, See Rule 85, below. 

to commit (or recommit), See Rule 86, below. 

to amend. See Rules 87-90, below. 

to refer to the next General 
Court, 

or to postpone indefinitely. See Rule 91, below, 

which several motions shall have precedence in the order in 
which they are arranged in this rule. 

Previous Question. 

79. The previous question shall be put in the following 
form: *' Shall the main question be now putf^^ — and all 
debate upon the main question shall be suspended until the 
previous question is decided. 

80. On the previous question, not exceeding ten min- 
utes shall be allowed for debate, and that only to give 
reasons why the main question should not be put; and no 
member shall speak more than three minutes. 

41 



318 Rules and Orders of the 

81. All questions of order arising after a motion is 
made for the previous question shall be decided without 
debate, excepting on appeal ; and on such appeal no mem- 
ber shall speak more than once without leave of the 
House. 

[See Rule 92.] 

82. The adoption of the previous question shall put an 
end to all debate, except as provided in Rule eighty-four, 
and bring the House to a direct vote upon pending amend- 
ments, if any, in their regular order, and then upon the 
main question. 

Motion to Close Debate at a Specified Time. 

83. Debate may be closed at any time, not less than 
thirty minutes from the adoption of a motion to that effect. 
On this motion, not exceeding ten minutes shall be allowed 
for debate, and no member shall speak more than three 
minutes. In case the time is extended by unanimous con- 
sent, the same rule shall apply at the end of the extended 
time as at the time originally fixed. [Amended Jan. 8, 
1877 ; and Jan. 15, 1880.] 

[See the next rule.] 

When Debate is closed, Ten Minutes allowed, etc. 

84. When debate is closed by ordering the previous 
question, or by a vote to close debate at a specified time, 
the member in charge of the measure under consideration 
shall be allowed to speak ten minutes, and may grant to 
any other member any portion of his time. When the 
measure under consideration has been referred to the Com- 
mittee on Finance, under House Rule forty-two, the member 
originally reporting it shall be considered in charge, except 
where the report of the Committee on Finance is substan- 
tially different from that referred to them, in which case 
the member originally reporting the measure and the mem- 
ber of the Finance Committee reporting thereon shall each 



House of Representatives. 319 

be allowed to speak five minutes, the latter to have the 
close. [Amended March 28, 1877.] 

Motion to Postpone to a Time Certain. 

85. When a motion is made to postpone to a time cer- 
tain, and different times are proposed, the question shall 
first be taken on the most remote time; and the time 
shall be determined before the question is put on post- 
ponement, which may then be rejected if the House see 
fit. 

Motion to Commit. 

86. When a motion is made to commit, and different 
committees are proposed, the question shall be taken in the 
following order : — 

a standing committee of the House, 
a select committee of the House, 
a joint standing committee, 
a joint select committee; 

and a subject may be recommitted to the same committee 
or to another committee at the pleasure of the House. 

Motions to Amend. 

87. A motion to amend an amendment may be re- 
ceived; but no amendment in the third degree shall be 
allowed. 

88. No motion or proposition of a subject different 
from that under consideration shall be admitted under color 
of amendment. 

89. A question containing two or more propositions 
capable of division shall be divided whenever desired by any 
member. When a motion to strike out and insert is thus 
divided, the failure of the motion to strike out shall not 



320 Rules and Orders of the 

preclude amendment; or, if the motion to strike out pre- 
vails, the matter proposed to be inserted shall be open to 
amendment before the question is taken on inserting it. 

90. In filling blanks, the largest sum and longest time 
shall be put first. 

Equivalent for Motion to Postpone Indefinitely. 

91. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a 
bill shall be equivalent to a motion to postpone indefi- 
nitely. 

Appeal. 

92. No appeal from the decision of the Speaker shall be 
entertained, unless it is seconded; and no other business 
shall be in order until the question on the appeal has been 
disposed of. 

[See Rule 81.] 

Eesolves. 

93. Such of these Rules and Orders as are applicable to 
bills, whether of the House or of the Senate, shall apply 
likewise to such resolves as require the concurrence of the 
Senate and approval by the Governor, in order to become 
laws and have force as such. Except in Rule fifty-two, the 
word "bill" shall be equivalent to the word "resolve" in 
the same place. 

Elections by Ballot. 

94. A time shall be assigned for elections by ballot, at 
least one day previous thereto. 

Secret Session. 

95. All proceedings in secret session, and matters relat- 
ing thereto, shall be kept secret until the House removes 
the injunction of secrecy. 



House of Representatives. 321 

Seats. 

96. (1.) The desk on the right of the Speaker shall be 
assigned to the use of the Clerk and such persons as he may 
employ to assist him, and that on the left to the use of the 
Chairmen of the Committees on Bills in the Third Reading 
and on Engrossed Bills. 

(2.) The senior member of the House, and the oldest 
member of the House who is not the senior member, shall 
be allowed to select their seats, from those not otherwise 
assigned, before the drawing of seats by the members. 
[Amended Jan. 7, 1878.] 

(3.) The seat numbered 11, in the first division, shall 
be assigned to the use of the Chairman of the Committee 
on the Judiciary, and that numbered 4, in the sixth divis- 
ion, to the use of the Chairman of the Committee on 
Finance. [Amended Jan. 7, 1878.] 

(4.) The following seats shall be assigned to the use of 
the monitors: — 

Those numbered 30 and 34, in the first division; 

100 and 104, in the second division; 
96 and 99, in the third division; 
92 and 95 in the fourth division; 
87 and 91, in the fifth division; and 
15 and 19, in the sixth division. 

(5.) The first business in order, after the appointment 
of standing committees and monitors is announced by the 
Speaker, shall be the drawing of the other seats upon the 
floor of the House. 

(6.) The Clerk shall call the roll of the members in 
alphabetical order, omitting the names of the Speaker, the 
senior member, the oldest member, the chairmen of com- 
mittees hereinbefore mentioned, and the monitors; and 
the drawing shall be had in presence of the House, under 
the supervision of a committee of three selected from the 
members mentioned in this paragraph. 

(7. ) The seat assigned to any member, or drawn by him, 

41 



322 Rules and Orders of the 

shall be his seat for the year, unless an exchange is made 
and notice thereof given to the Sergeant-at-Arms within 
ten days from the day of the drawing. 

PRrvrLEGE OP THE FlOOR. 

97. (1.) Every member shall have the privilege of intro- 
ducing upon the floor of the House, to occupy (for that day) 
any seat then vacant not belonging to a member, or belong- 
ing to a member who is absent, not more than one person 
at the same time, such person not having any private inter- 
est in any measure before the legislature distinct from the 
public interest: provided, that in any case, when by the 
exercise of this privilege on the part of some of the mem- 
bers the vacant seats have been filled, and the Speaker so 
announces, the further exercise of the privilege shall be 
suspended for that day, or until one or more of the seats 
thus filled are vacated. 

(2.) The Speaker may also invite visitors, not inhabit- 
ants of this Commonwealth, without limit of number, to 
seats (not numbered) upon the floor of the House. 

(3.) Contestants for seats in the House whose papers 
are in the hands of the Committee on Elections, may be 
admitted, while their cases are pending, to seats to be 
assigned by the Speaker. 

(4.) Senators, and the principal oflBcers* in the Execu- 
tive and Judicial departments of the Civil Government of 
the Commonwealth, the Chaplains of both Houses, and 
the Clerk of the Senate, shall be admitted to the" floor 
whenever they may have occasion to visit the House, and 
may occupy any of the seats not numbered which they may 
find vacant, or any seats which may be assigned by the 
Speaker for their use for the time being. 

Representatives' Chamber. 

98. Use of the Representatives' Chamber shall not be 

* See list in the Blue Book. 



House of Representatives. 323 

granted, except by a vote of four-fifths of the members 
present. 

Parliamentary Practice. 

99. The rules of parliamentary practice shall govern 
the House in all cases to which they are applicable, and in 
which they are not inconsistent with these Rules and Or- 
ders, or the Joint Rules and Orders of the two branches. 

Suspension, Amendment, and Repeal. 

100. Nothing in these Rules and Orders shall be dis- 
pensed with, altered, or repealed, unless two-thirds of the 
members present consent thereto ; but this rule, and Rules 
thirty-nine, forty-eight, and ninety-eight, shall not be sus- 
pended, unless by unanimous consent of the members 
present. 



Blanks for orders, bills, reports, petitions, and indorsement of peti- 
tions, may be had on application to the Clerk, or at the document-room ; 
and members are respectfully requested to use the same in the prepara- 
tion of papers. 



INDEX 



RULES AND ORDERS 



fgouse of J^epresentattbes. 



INDEX TO THE RULES AND ORDEES 



HOUSE or EEPEESENTATIYES, 



[The figures refer to the numbers of the Rules.] 

Adjourn, motion to, 77, 78 
Admission to the floor, 97 
AMENDMENT : 

to be reported by Committee on Bills in 3d Reading, 27 

of existing law, in order of inquiry, 38 

from Senate, sent back for concurrence, 44 

bill may be moved as, 45 

private bill not to be moved as, 46 

engrossed bill not to be amended, 51 

making substantial change, 60 

motions to amend, 78, 87 to 90 

when previous question is ordered, 82 

amendment to amendment, etc., 87 

not to be admitted of a different subject, 88 

when question is divided, 89 

in filling blanks, largest sum, etc., 90 

striking out enacting clause, 91 

of Rules and Orders, 100 
Appeals from the decision of the Speaker, 2, 81, 92 

Ballot, elections by, 23, 94 



328 Index to Rules and Orders of the 

BILLS : 

1. Preliminary. 

how to be written, 40 

motions contemplating legislation, etc., to be in form of order 

of inquiry, 38, 39 
how to be introduced, 45; introduced on leave, ibid. 
restriction on introduction by leave, 46 

('* applications ") after the first "Wednes- 
day in February ; see Joint Rule 20. 
again, when once rejected, 47 

2. As reported by Committees. 

appropriation bills to contain certain items only, 26 
restriction or regulation of reports, 29, 30, 47 
reports to be made before the first Wednesday in March, 31 
when to be presented to the House, 34 

3. Be/ore the second reading. 

if opposed, question on rejection; otherwise, 2d reading, 41 
involving expenditures, referred to Committee on Finance, 42 
from the Senate, 36, 54 

referred to committee, etc., 43 
case of Senate amendments to House bill, 44 

4. Before the third reading. 

referred to committee, 48 
duties of committee, 27 
placed in Orders of the Day, 56 

5. After the third reading. 

not to be engrossed unless read on three several days, 49 

6. After engrossment. 

refeiTed to committee, 50 

duties of committee, 28 

not to be amended, 51 

passage to be enacted, 52 

notice to be given ; sent to the Senate, 53 

7. Provisions applicable at several stages. 

arrangement of matters in Orders of the Day, 13, 58 
consideration of matters in Orders of the Day, 57 
matters not to be discharged from Orders of the Day, 59 
amendment changing nature of a bill, 60 
Clerk to retain bills and other papers, except, etc., 15 
bills and papers in possession of members, 19 
effect of motion to strike out enacting clause, 91 
provisions respecting bills also applicable to resolves, 93 



House of Representatives, 329 



Calendar, 13, 14, 58 
Clerk, 11, 12, 13, 15, 19, 47 
Commit, motion to, 78, 86 
COMMITTEES : 

eleven standing committees to te appointed, 21 

to be appointed by Speaker, unless, etc., 22 

case of election by ballot, 23 

no member required to be on more than two, etc., 24 

no member to serve where his private right, etc., 25 

duty of Committee on Finance, 26 

on Bills in Third Reading, 27 
on Engrossed Bills, 28 

to report adversely in certain cases, 29 

notice to be given in certain cases, 30 

to make report on or before first Wednesday in March, 31 

DEBATE, RULES OF, 71 to 91 

Speaker may speak to points of order, etc., 2 

matters to be disposed of without debate, 57, 62, 67, 81 

motions to be decided without debate, 77 

debate on motions to reconsider, 70 

motion to close debate, 78, 83, 84 
See Previous Question. 
Doubt; when a vote is doubted, 64, 65, 67 

Elections by ballot, 23, 94 

Engrossed Bills, Committee on, 28, 50; see Bills. 

Excuse from voting, time for application for, 62 

Finance, Committee on, 26, 42 

Journal of the House, 4, 11, 12 

MEMBERS : 

not to stand up, etc., 16 
not to be absent, etc., 17, 18 
to leave papers with the Clerk, 19 
number of, upon each standing committee, 21 
first named to be chairman of committee, etc., 22 
having highest number to be chairman, etc., 23 
no member required to be on more than two committees, etc., 24 
no member to serve on committee where his private right, etc., 25 
member presenting petition, etc., to indorse his name, etc., 35 
42 



330 Index to Rules and Orders of the 

MEMBERS — Contimied. 

no member to vote where his private right, etc., 61 

every member to vote except, etc., 62 

member about to speali, to rise and address the Speaker, etc., 71 

no member to interrupt another, etc., 73 

no member to speak more than once, etc., 74 

seats of members, 96 

privilege of the floor, 97 
See Votiyig. 
Monitors, 8, 9, 10, 64 
Motions, 75 to 91 

Order; see Questions of Order; Rules and Orders. 
ORDERS, generally, 29, 39 

once rejected, not to be renewed, 47 

of inquiry, 15, 38 

of notice, 15 

of the Day, 13, 14, 54 to 60 



Pairs, recording of, 66 
Petitions, 29, 34, 35 

once rejected, 47 
Postpone, to a time certain, motion for, 78, 85. See also 

indefinitely, motion for, 78, 91 
Previous question, 78 to 82, 84 
Privilege of the floor, 97 

Questions of order, 2, 12, 73, 81 

Reading of papers, 5, 35, 37 

Recommit, motion for, 78, 86 

Reconsideration, 68, 69, 70 

Reports of committees (see Sills), 34, 54, 55 

Representatives' Chamber, 98 

Resolves, 93; see Bills. 

Rules and Orders, 2, 9, 10, 20, 100 

Seats, 96 

Secret Session, 95 

Senate, papers from, 36, 43, 44, 45, 47, 54, 55 
engrossed bills sent to, 53 



House of Representatives. 331 



SPEAKER, 1 to 6 

may name a member to perform the duties of the chair, 7 

absence of, 8 

to appoint monitors, 9 

may direct as regards matters in calendar, 13 

to appoint committees, 22 

chairman of committee of the whole, 32 
to call on several divisions for "petitions, etc., 34 
to lay before the House papers from the Senate, 36 
may present papers not petitions, etc., 37 
to give notice of engrossed bill sent to Senate, 53 
to name member entitled to floor, 72 
may direct motion to be reduced to writing, 75 
may invite visitors to seats on the floor, 97 
See Rules of Debate; Voting. 

Strike out and insert, motion for, 89 
enacting clause, 91 

Suspension of Rules, 100. 

Table, papers on, 13 

lay on, motion to, 77, 78 

take from, motion to, 77 
Third Reading, Bills in. Committee on, 27, 48; see Bills. 

Undebatable matters and motions; see Debate. 
Unfinished business, 58 

Voting, 3, 4, 61 to 67 

Yeas and nays, 66, 67 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 



TWO BRANCHES 



JOINT EULES AND OEDEES OE THE TWO BEANCHES. 



Rule 1. List of joint standing committees — JS^o member of either 
House to act as counsel before any committee. 

Rule 2. Joint committees; how they may report — How their re- 
ports shall be written. 

Rule 3. Reports of joint committees may be recommitted by either 
House, except, etc. — All reports, after recommitment, to be made to the 
House which ordered the same. 

Rule 4. Reports of joint committees on subjects referred to them 
from standing committees of either branch, to be made in the House 
where such reference is made. 

Rule 5. Clerk to indorse amendments made in reports of joint com- 
mittees over signature of chairman or member of committee. 

Rule 6. Report, leave to withdraw, to be made on petitions for legis- 
lation,, which can be secured under general laws. 

Rule T. Papers on their passage to be under the signature of the 
Clerks, except, etc. — Messages. 

Rule 8. Engrossed bills and bills ordered to be engrossed. 

Rule 9. Notice of bills, etc., rejected, to be sent to the other branch. 

Rule 10. Bills that have passed to be enacted. 

Rule 11. Rule 10, concerning bills, to be applied also to rasolves. 

Rule 12. Resolves proposing amendments to the Constitution. 

Rule 13. President of the Senate to preside in Conventions — Conven- 
tions to be held in the Representatives' Chamber — Clerk of the Senate 
to be Clerk of Conventions. 

Rule 14. An agreement to go into a Convention not to be altered or 
annulled, unless, etc. 

Rule 15. Restriction as to business of Conventions. 

Rule 16. Elections by joint ballot; time to be assigned therefor. 

Rule 17. Convention for election of Senator under Act of Congress; 
rule governing, etc. 

Rule 18. Committees of Conference; how composed, and their re- 
ports. 

Rule 19. Joint committee to make final report on or before first 
Wednesday in March. 



336 Joint Rules and Orders. 



Rule 20. Concerning petitions, memorials, etc., presented after the 
first Wednesday of February. 

Rule 21. Concerning reports on petitions, notice of the presentation 
of which has not been given. 

Rule 22. Bills and resolves affecting rights of individuals or corpora- 
tions not to be introduced, except, etc. 

Rule 23. Concerning the printing and binding of documents. 



Rule 1. The following joint standing committees shall 
be appointed at the commencement of the Jaunary session, 
viz. : — 

A Committee on Agriculture; 

A Committee on Banks and Banking; 

A Committee on Claims; 

A Committee on Education ; 

A Committee on Expenditures; 

A Committee on Federal Relations; 

A Committee on the Fisheries; 

A Committee on Ilarbors and Public Lands; 

A Committee on Insurance; 

A Committee on the Library; 

A Committee on Manufactures; 

A Committee on Mercantile Affairs; 

A Committee on Military Affairs; 

A Committee on Parishes and Religious Societies ; 

A Committee on Printing; 

A Committee on Prisons; 

A Committee on Public Charitable Institutions; 

A Committee on Railroads; 

A Committee on Roads and Bridges; 

A Committee on the State House; 

A Committee on Street Railways; 

A Committee on Taxation; 

A Committee on Towns; 

A Committee on Public Health, 



Joint Rules and Orders. 337 

And each of said committees shall consist of two on the 
part of the Senate, and five on the part of the House, ex- 
cept the Committee on Banks and Banking, the Committee 
on Claims, the Committee on Harbors and Public Lands, 
the Committee on Mercantile Affairs, the Committee on 
Military Affairs, the Committee on Prisons, the Committee 
on Public Charitable Institutions, the Committee on Rail- 
roads, the Committee on Street Railways, the Committee 
on Taxation, and the Committee on Public Health, which 
shall each consist of three members on the part of the 
Senate, and eight members on the part of the House ; and 
except the Committee on Expenditures, which shall consist 
of the Committee on the Treasury of the Senate, and the 
Committee on Finance of the House. No member of either 
House shall act as counsel for any party before any com- 
mittee of the legislature. [Amended Jan. 7, 1870; Jan. 5, 
1877; Jan. 8, 1878; Jan. 3 and March 7, 1879 ; and Jan. 9, 
1880.] 

Rule 2. The joint committees of the two Houses may 
report by bill, resolve, or otherwise, to either House, at their 
discretion; and all bills and resolves reported by them shall 
be fairly written in a legible hand, without material erasure 
or interlineation, on not less than one sheet of paper, with 
suitable margins, and spaces between the several sections; 
dates and numbers being written in words at length. 

Rule 3. Reports of joint committees may be recom- 
mitted to the same committees at the pleasure of the House 
first acting thereon, without asking the concurrence of the 
other branch; and bills or resolves which have been pre- 
viously acted on in one branch may be recommitted in the 
other without a concurrent vote, except when recommitted 
with instructions: provided, that, after such recommitment, 
report shall, in all cases, be made to the branch which shall 
have ordered such recommitment. 

43 



338 Joint Rules and Orders. 

Rule 4. Whenever a report is made from any commit- 
tee to either House, and the subject-matter thereof is sub- 
sequently referred therein to a joint committee, such com- 
mittee shall report its action to the branch in which the 
original report was made. 

Rule 5. If any part of the report of a committee over 
the signature of the chairman or members of the commit- 
tee is amended in eitlier branch, the Clerk of that branch 
shall indorse upon the report such amendment. [This rule 
was adopted Jan. 10, 1874.] 

Rule 6. Whenever, upon any application for an act of 
incorporation, or other special legislation, the purpose for 
which such legislation is sought can be secured under ex- 
isting laws, or, without detriment to the public interests, by 
a general law, the committee to which tlie matter is referred 
shall in all cases report such general law, or " leave to with- 
draw," or " inexpedient to legislate." [Amended Jan. 14, 
1880.] 

Rule 7. All papers, while on their passage between the 
two Houses, may be under the signature of the respective 
Clerks, except bills and resolves in their last stage. Mes- 
sages may be sent by such persons as each House may 
direct. 

Rule 8. After bills shall have passed both Houses to be 
engrossed, they shall be in the charge of the Clerks of the 
two Houses, who shall deliver the same to the Secretary of 
the Commonwealth, to be engrossed in the manner pre- 
scribed by law ; and when engrossed, the said Clerks shall 
forthwith deliver the same to the Committee of the House 
of Representatives on Engrossed Bills; and when the same 
shall liave passed to be enacted in that House, they shall in 
like manner be delivered to the Committee of the Senate on 
Engrossed Bills. 



Joint Bules and Orders. 339 

Rule 9. If any petition, memorial, bill, resolve, or order, 
presented or originating in one braneb, sball be adversely 
acted upon in tbe other, notice thereof sball be given, under 
the signature of the Clerk, to the branch in which the same 
originated. [Amended Jan. 8, 1878: and Jan. 14, 1880.] 

EuLE 10. The Clerk of the House in which a bill origi- 
nated shall make an indorsement thereon, certifying in 
which House the same originated, which indorsement shall 
be entered on the journals by the Clerks respectively. 

After said bills shall have passed both Houses to be 
enacted, the Clerk of the Senate shall lay them before the 
Governor for his approbation, and shall enter upon the 
journal of the Senate the day on which the same were laid 
before the Governor. 

Rule 11. All resolves and other papers which are to be 
presented to the Governor for his approbation, shall be laid 
before him in the same manner as is prescribed in the case 
of bills. 

Rule 12. All resolves proposing amendments of the 
Constitution shall have three several readings in each 
House, and the final question upon adopting the same shall 
be taken by yeas and nays. 

Rule 18. The President of the Senate shall preside in 
Conventions of the two branches; and such Conventions 
shall be liolden in the Representatives' Chamber; the Clerk 
of the Senate shall be Clerk of the Convention, and a rec- 
ord of the proceedings of the Convention shall be entered 
at large on the journals of both branches. 

Rule 14. When an agreement has been made by the 
two branches to go into Convention, such agreement shall 
not be altered or annulled, except by concurrent vote. 



340 Joint Mules and Orders. 

Rule 15. No business shall be entered on, in Conven- 
tion, other than that which may be agreed on before the 
Convention is formed. 

Rule 16. In all e'lections by joint ballot, a time shall be 
assigned therefor at least one day previous to such election. 

Rule 17. The joint assembly required to be held by the 
Act of Congress approved July 25, 1866, entitled, "An Act 
to regulate the times and manner of holding elections for 
Senators in Congress," shall be deemed a Convention of 
the two branches, and the proceedings therein shall be in 
accordance with the provisions of said Act. The President 
of the Convention shall receive no motion on any day until 
one vote for Senator has been taken. After one vote for 
Senator has been taken, no motion shall be in order except 
a motion to adjourn, for a recess, or to proceed to vote for 
Senator; and these motions shall have precedence in the 
order of their arrangement, and shall be decided without 
debate. If a motion is made for a recess, and different 
times are proposed, the question shall first be taken on the 
most remote time; and the time shall be determined, but 
without debate, before the question is put upon taking the 
recess. On either of the questions permitted by this rule, 
the sense of the Convention shall be taken by yeas and nays, 
whenever required by one-fifth of the members present. 
When the yeas and nays are taken, the roll of the Conven- 
tion shall be called in alphabetical order, and no member 
shall be allowed to vote who was not on the floor when his 
name was called, or before the roll-call was finished. The 
call for the yeas and nays shall be decided without debate. 

Rule 18. Committees of Conference shall consist of 
three members on the part of each House, representing its 
vote; and their report, if agreed to by a majority of each 
committee, shall be made to the branch asking the confer- 
ence, and may be either accepted or rejected ; but no other 
action shall be had, except through a new Committee of 
Conference. 



Joint Rules and Orders. 341 

Rule 19. Joint committees shall make final report 
upon all matters previously referred to them, on or before 
the first Wednesday in March, unless further time is 
granted for cause. [Amended Jan. 3, 1879.] 

Rule 20. Petitions, memorials, applications, and all 
other subjects of legislation which shall be proposed or 
introduced after the first Wednesday of February, shall be 
referred to the next General Court. This rule shall not 
be rescinded, amended, or suspended, except by a concur- 
rent vote of four-fifths of the members of each House pres- 
ent and voting thereon, [Amended Jan. 5, 1877; and Jan. 
8, 1878; also Jan. 3, 1879.] 

Rule 21. No bill or resolve specially affecting the rights 
of individuals, or private or municipal corporations, shall be 
reported by a committee, unless notice has been given to all 
parties interested, by public advertisement or otherwise, 
without expense to the Commonwealth; or unless satisfac- 
tory evidence is produced that the parties interested have 
either received notice in writing, or have in writing waived 
notice. 

Rule 22. No bill or resolve affecting directly the legal 
rights of individuals or corporations, otherwise than as it 
affects generally the interests of the whole people of the 
Commonwealth, or of the cities or towns to which it spe- 
cifically applies, shall be proposed or introduced, by amend- 
ment or otherwise, except by report of a committee, upon 
petition duly presented and referred. Objection to the vio- 
lation of this or the last preceding rule may be taken at any 
stage prior to the third reading of the bill or resolve. 

Rule 23. The Committee on Printing may make regu- 
lations for the distribution of all documents printed or 
assigned for the use of the legislature not otherwise dis- 
posed of, such regulations to be reported to and subject to 
the order of the two branches. 



342 Joint Rules and Orders. 

Under the general order to print a report, bill, or other 
document, the number printed shall be eight hundred. 

Leave to report in print shall not be construed to author- 
ize the printing of extended reports of evidence. 

No printing, except as aforesaid, and no binding or 
engraving, shall be ordered, except upon the report of the 
Joint Committee on Printing, accepted by the legislature. 

Bills, reports, and other documents, printed under the 
general order of either House, shall be distributed as fol- 
lows, to wit: Two copies to each member of the Senate and 
House of Representatives (to be placed on his file under the 
direction of the Sei-geant-at-Arms, if desired by the mem- 
ber) ; three copies to each Clerk in either branch, and three 
copies to each reporter in regular attendance, to whom a 
seat has been assigned in either branch; twenty copies to 
the Executive; twenty copies to the Secretary's Office; six 
copies to the State Library; and when the document is the 
report of a committee, ten copies shall be assigned to the 
committee making the report. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall 
preserve as many as may be necessaiy for the permanent 
files to be placed in the lobbies, and distribute the remain- 
der under such regulations as may be prescribed by said 
joint committee. [Amended Jan. 7, 1876; also Jan. 3, 
1879.] 



LIST OF THE 



mnim mi ^t^i^Mlu fleprtmenfe 



OF THE GOVEENMENT 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS, 



AND OrnCERS IMMEDIATELY CONNECTED THEREWITH, 
WITH PLACES OF RESIDENCE. 



1880. 



EXECUTIYE DEPAETMENT. 



His Excellency JOHX D. LONG of Hingham, 

GOVERNOR. 
423 Beacon Street, Boston. 

His Honor BYRON WESTON of Dalton, 

LIEUT. -GOVERNOR. 
Tremont House, Boston. 



Council. 

District I. — John S. Bhayton of Fall River. 
At home. 

II. — William O. Taylor of Boston. 

The Bi'unswick. 

III. — George P. Carter of Cambridge. 

At home. 

ly. — John P. Spaulding of Boston. 
United States Hotel. 

Y. — John M. Raymond of Salem. 

At home. 

VI. — George Heywood of Concord. 

At home. 

YII. — Rodney Wallace of Fitchburg. 

At home. 

VIII. — Oscar Edwards of Northampton. 



Private Secretary of the Governor. 
AVilliam M. Olin. 

29 St. James Street, Boston. 



346 Executive Department. 



Committees of the Council. 

On Pardons.— m^ Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. 
Carter, Mr. Heywood, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Eaymoud. 

On Finance. — His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. 
Brayton, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Edwards, Mr. Spaulding. 

On Railroads and the Hoosac Tunnel. — His Honor the Lieu- 
tenant-Governor, Mr. Brayton, Mr. Spaulding, Mr Edwards, 
Mr. Heywood. 

On Harbors and Public Lands.— Mr Brayton, Mr. Taylor, 
Mr. Carter, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Raymond. 

On Charitable Institutions. — His Honor the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, Mr. Brayton, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Spaulding, Mr. Edwards. 

On Prisons. — His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. 
Carter, Mr. Heywood, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Raymond. 

On MlUtarij Affairs. — His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, 
Mr. Carter, Mr. Taylor, Mr. Spaulding, Mr. Edwards. 

On Warrants. — Mx. Taylor, Mr. Wallace, Mr. Raymond. 

On Accounts. — Mr. Carter, Mr. Brayton, Mr. Heywood. 



Edward F. Hamlin . . Executive Messenqer, 
Charles F. A. Francis . Assistant Executive Messenger. 



Secretarg of tfje (JTommonbJealtfr. 
Heistby B. Peirce ... of Abington. 

Abington. 

Henry J. Coolidge, 1st Clerk .... Boston. 

Isaac H. Edgett, 2d Clerk Beverly. 

George Spear, Jr., 3d Clerk .... Somerville. 



Executive Department. 



347 



^Treasurer anO i^ecptbers^ettfral anti Cai Commtgsionfr. 
Charles Endicott of Canton. 

At home. 



Daniel H. Rogers, 1st Clerk . 


Brookline. 


John Q. Adams, 1st Assistant Cleric 


Auburndale. 


Joshua Phippen, Cashier .... 


Salem. 


G. Arthur Adams, Extra Clerk 


North Brookfield 


David Wilder, Extra Clerk 


Jamaica Plain. 


Deputy Tax Commissioner 


. 


Daniel A. Gleason 


. Medford 


Andrew J. Morton, Clerk 


Boston. 


Edward D. Endicott, 2d Clerk 


Canton. 



^utJitor. 
Charles R. Ladd of Springfield. 



William D. Hawley, 1st Clerk . 
Edward S. Davis, Id Clerk 
Benjamin C. Piper, Extra Clerk 
John P. Reynolds, Extra Clerk 



Maiden. 
Lynn. 
Boston. 
Salem. 



^ttarncgs6cneraL 

George Marston of New Bedford. 

Frederic H. Gillett, Assistant Attorney-General, Springfield. 



348 Executive Department. 



(Kobernar's Staff. 

Major-General A. Hun Beeby of Boston, 
Adjutant-General. 

Colonel Isaac F. Kingsbury of Newton, Ass' t Adjutant-Gen. 
Colonel Edward H. Haskell of Gloucester, Ass' t Adjutant-Gen. 
Colonel Edmund H. He wins of Boston, Ass't Inspector-Gen. 
Colonel Morris Scliaff of Pittsfield, AssH Inspector-Gen. 
Brig.-Gen. W. W. Blackmar of Boston, Judge-Advocate-Gen. 
Colonel S. P. Train of Br ^okline, Ass't Quartermaster- Gen. 
Brig.-Gen. William J. Dale of North Andover, Surgeon-Gen. 

Aides-de-Camp. 

Colonel T. W. Higginson Cambridge. 

Colonel William O. Fiske Lowell. 

Colonel William F. Draper .... Milford. 

Colonel Edward T. Bouve Hingliam. 

Colcnel WilliarQ M. Olin of Boston, Military occretarT/. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT. 



Senate, by Districts. 



351 



H 





i 












>. 


Lj 






in 








d 




lb 


s 






'2 






4^ 


2 




X 


m 




6 








0) 


M 







2 













,2 



6 

02 


^ 
s 
s 




1 



ft 




"g 


1 




faC 


3 




+3 


a 


-IJ 


6 


1 






c 


1 


-Si 

10 




a 


a 

1 


1 




• 




• 






«' 






• 


6 




















o 








































g 




















'S 


c8 


















« 


S 




fl 












2 


v 


t» 

















a 


M 






B 


2 


s 


= 


- 


- 


bJO 









W 












J» 


!25 


i 

w 

d 


1 


1 

g 


1 

6 





a 

a 
V 


U 

0) 


1 


1 
1 




<» 









Q 


a 


ce 


^ 






^ 


$ 





^ 


'3 








W 


H 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




CP 




















H 




























































CQ 


^ 


















fi 


"o 
















V! ' 




§tt 


- 


- 


^ 


^ 


3 


tr 


^ 


S 




J3 
CO 


n 




-a 






,a 


^ 






4^ 


5C 










a 
eg 




1 



852 



Senate, by Districts. 







a 


























o 














































































o 






















g 




w 






















^ 




,^ 
















^ 






i 




OQ 
















1 






■H 


« 


o 


© 














w 


(D 




« 


Si 




a 














t>» 


a 




o 




o 














o 


o 






pG 


^ 


pC3 














a 


^ 































<1 




< 














C 


< 








• 


^ 


• 


• 


• 




• 


^ 


• 


' 


• 


S 

a 

a 
1 


1 


1 


o 


o 

1 


o 


d 

a; 


1 


§0 

a 


fcX) 

o 


1 


2 


iff 




ai 






0) 


rt 




O 


oS 




o 


a> 


o 




Ph 


O 


^ 


o 


k:; 


^ 


;2i 


O 


s 


H 


^ 


H^ 




: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


; 


: 


d 


: 


: 




>» 










2 

03 






^ 










0) 


o 


^ 


Tl 




§■ 


. 




03 


. 


t>> 






f3 


O) 


Q 


o 


> 


rC 






w 


,_( 


tS 


!25 








1 


d 
1% 


o 
O 

02 


73 


® 

o 


<1 


05 
03 


1 


3 

02 




CO 


§ 
^ 






2 


5 


'o 
P^ 


Ah 


3 


1 


2 






• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


X 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


C4 












S 














&! 


k 




































13 














« 


'O 


"• 


,J3 


"• 


"• 




r:i 




^ 






:2 


1 


o 

1 


c 

g 


1 




5 


^ 

s 


o 
o 








•5 

>< 


a 

<o 

>• 



Senate^ by Districts. 353 





. 










, 










































































O 










o 




















1 


5 






1 

c3 


- 


©• 

o 


O 










© 


02 


^ 


M 


© 


-^2 


W 




w 


w 


-^3 


© 






i 




1 

^ 


>5 

.2 
*2 


s 

o 


o 

a 


■1-3 

"3 


"• 


>> 

o 

'3 


© 


o 


1 






<l 


p 


H 


c 


< 


H 


P 




G? 


Pk 


H 


<1 






• 




• 


• 




• 


• 


c 


• 


03 




• 


• 


• 
















o 




~ 








© 


u 








tt 


'd 


* 


a 


0) 


cS 




c 




-S 


1 


?^ 


d 




J- 




1 


g 

c3 


S 
^ 


<^ 


. 


3 
O 

CO 


.S 


© 


1 


1 


o 
m 


o 


s 
s 


'V, 


o 

S 
o 


1 


o 


O 


J 




6 
m 


• 


• 


* 


• 


* 


e! 


* 


* 




* 


* 




: 


; 












o 


















d 

1 


o 


1 

03 
0) 

1-3 


W 


4) 

g 

o 

1 

rd 

o 


o 

1 
1 


o 

o 

a 


o 

o 

1-5 


-1^ 

a, 
t-5 


© 
>> 

^* 

a 

•-5 


5 

a 

.2 


1 

[© 

"S 

1 


1 

© 
1-3 




1 


• 


• 


• 


• 


s 


• 


2 


• 


CO 


• 




• 


^ 


o 














fl 






o 




>> 


^ 


-d 




^ 




w 


-d 

j3 


a 


S 


M 
^ 


^ 


!zi 


'S 


s 


E 


o 

1 




1 


§ 


£ 
S 


O 

1 


K 


1 




d 

^ 


£ 
S 


8 
© 

02 


2 



45 



354 



Senate^ by Districts. 























cS 








« 


"Hi 








» 


^ 








o 


^ 


, 






w 


1 


o 






1 




+3 


^ 


2 


:: ce 




< 






g 




• 




• 


'd 


S 


-?, 


§ 


(3 


o o 
'd 2 

« 1 


w 




-2 




s S 






d 


Is 


<» c3 




S 


H 


p^ 


^ W 




• 


. 


• 


n3 

s 




1 






1 1 


!zi 


1 


a 
1 


t 


. a 

& 1 




^ 


> 


o 


o a 






r^ 


,jq 


? c« 




GQ 


o 


H 


O M 


H 


rd 


• 


• 


• • 


5 


-e 








i 


o 








5 


g 


3 








s 


CO 


■* 


■* 




r^ 


pp 


'd 






a 
o 
o 


2 




1 - 




<» 




aj 


rd 03 




!» 


s 


CC 


H V 



Senate, Arrangement of. 



355 



AEEANGEMENT Of THE SENATE. 



Hon. EOBEET R. BISHOP, President. 



LEFT. 

1. Alpheus Harding. 

2. Stephen F. Blaney. 

3. John L. Otis. 

4. Nathaniel Wales. 

5. Jonas H. French. 

6. Samuel N. Aldrich. 

7. James W. Stockwell. 

8. George G. Crocker. 

9. Alonzo Warren. 

10. Joseph H. Boot. 

11. Samuel Snow. 

12. William Abbott. 

13. Charles T. Crocker. 

14. Elizur Smith. 

15. Emerson Gaylord. 

16. Thomas Webb. 

17. Starkes Whiton. 

18. Calvin M. Winch. 

19. Charles J. Brooks. 



RIGHT. 

1. Eugene L. Norton, 

2. Henry C. Rice. 

3. Asa P. Morse. 

4. Stephen Osgood. 

5. William Taylor. 

6. Eben Hutchinson. 

7. Daniel Russell. 

8. Elisha S. Converse. 

9. Henry W. Fuller. 

10. James P. Ray. 

11. Harmon Hall. 

12. Anson D. Fessenden. 

13. Marcus P. Knowlton. 

14. James W. Dwyer. 

15. George B. Richmond. 

16. Oliver Ames. 

17. Ebenezer T. Fogg. 

18. Warren Currier. 

19. Andrew C. Stone. 

20. Charles S. Lilley. 



356 



Senate, Alphabetically. 



SENATE, ALPHABETICALLY. 



Hon. ROBERT R. BISHOP (Second Middlesex), 

PRESIDENT. 



Abbott, William . 
Aldrich, Suuuel N". 
Ames, Oliver . 
Blaney, Stephen F. 
Brooks, Charles J. 
Converse, Elisha S. 
Crocker, Charles T. 
Crocker, George G. 
Currier, Warren . 
Dwyer, James W. 
Fessenden, Anson D. 
Fogg, Ebenezer T. 
French, Jonas H. . 
Fuller, Henry W. . 
Gaylord, Emerson . 
Hall, Harmon 
Harding, Alpheus . 
Hutchinson, Eben 
Knowlton, Marcus P. 
Lilley, Charles S. . 



Second Worcester District. 

Fourth Middlesex 

First Bristol 

Second Essex 

Eighth Suffolk 

First Middlesex 

Fifth Worcester 

Fourth Suffolk 

Fourth Essex 

North Berkshire 

Fifth Middlesex 

First Plymouth 

Third Essex 

Seventh S^iffolk 

Second Hampden 

First Essex 

Fourth Worcester 

First Suffolk 

First Hampden 

Seventh Middlesex 



Senate^ Alphabetically. 357 

Morse, Asa P Third Middlesex District. 

Vacancy Second Suffolk 

Osgood, Stephen .... Fifth Essex 

Otis, John L Hampshire 

Ray, James P Second Norfolk 

Rice, Henry C First Worcester 

Richmond, George B. . . . Third Bristol 

Root, Joseph H. .... Franklin 

Russell, Daniel Sixth Middlesex 

Smith, Elizur South Berkshire 

Snow, Samuel Cape 

Stockwell, James W. . . . Third Worcester 

Stone, Andrew C Sixth Essex 

Taylor, William .... Tliird Suffolk 

WalcS, Nuthaiiiel .... First Norfolk 

Warren, Alonzo .... Fifth Suffolk 

Webb, Thomas Second Bristol 

Whiton, Starkes .... Second Plymouth 

Winch, Calvin M Sixth Suffolk 



358 



Officers of the Senate. 



. OFEICEES OF THE SENATE. 



STEPHEK N. GIFFORD, Duxbury . 


Clerk. 


E. HERBERT CLAPP, Boston . 


Assistant Clerk. 


O. F. MITCHELL, Bridgewater. 


Sergeant-at-Arms. 


Rev. EDMUND DOWSE, Sherborn . 


Chaplain. 


S. W. EDGELL 


Doorkeeper. 


JOSEPH STDWELL . . . . 


Assistant Doorkeeper 


J. E. ARMSTRONG . . . . 


Messenger. 


C. N. MARSH 


Messenger. 


E. W. LAW 


Messenger. 


J. W. FINAN 


Page. 


GEORGE DeWITT HOYT . . 


Page. 



House of Representatives. 



359 



HOUSE or EEPEESENTATIYES, 

BY COUNTIES. 





COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 




No. 

of 

Dist. 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence , 


1 


Boston, TVard 


1, 


George T. Sampson . 
Edwin R. Webster . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


2 


Boston, " 


2, 


\ William A. Foss . 
\ James J. Doherty , 


Boston. 
Boston. 


3 


Boston, " 


3, 


Jeremiah J. Crowley, 
George M. Starbird . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


4 


Boston, " 


4, 


Augustus W. Stover, 


Boston. 


5 


Boston, " 


5, 


( John H. Dee . 

J John H. Sherburne . 


Boston. 
Boston, 


6 


Boston, " 


6, 


\ James L. Quigley . 
/ Patrick F. Mahoney, 


Boston. 
Boston. 


7 


Boston, " 


7, 


1 Richard Roach . 
/ Peter Cannon . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


8 


Boston, " 


8, 


( Charles W. Smith . 
) Patrick F. McGaragle 


Boston. 
Boston. 


9 


Boston, '* 


9, 


John F. Andrew 
James M. Bugbee 


Boston. 
Boston. 


10 


Boston, " 


10, 


I A. J. C. Sowdon 
1 Increase E. Noyes . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


11 


Boston, " 


11, 


( Hamilton A. Hill . 
1 John G. Webster . 


Boston. 
Boston. 



360 



House of Representatives^ 



No. 










of 
Dist 


District. 




Xame of Representative. 


Residence. 


12 


Boston, Ward 12, 


John D. Mnlchinock, 
Jereuiiali H. Mullane 


Boston. 
Boston. 


13 


Boston, " 


13, 


( JainesA.McGeough, 
\ James T. Mahony . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


14 


Boston, " 


14, 


Charles J. Noyes 
George H. Bond 


Boston. 
Boston. 


15 


Boston, " 


15, 


( George W. Ball 
\ Frank A. Clapp 


Boston. 
Boston. 


16 


Boston, " 


16, 


\ Joseph H. O'Neil . 
/ Isaac Rosnosky 


Boston. 
Boston. 


17 


Boston, '• 


17, 


I J. Q. A. Brackett . 
\ Zenas E. Smith 


Boston. 
Boston. 


18 


Boston, " 


18, 


( Lewis Coleman 

i Charles H. Allen . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


19 


Boston, " 


19, 


J John Joyce 

{ James H. Nugent . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


20 


Boston, " 


20, 


( Horace T. Rockwell, 
\ Vacancy* . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


21 


Boston, " 


21, 


Arthur W. Tufts 
William Blanchard . 


Boston. 
Boston. 


22 


Boston, " 


22, 


Wm, H. Carberry . 


Boston. 


23 


Boston, " 


23, 


1 R. M. Morse, Jr. 

1 Abraham 0. Bigelow, 


Boston. 
Boston. 


24 


Boston, " 


24, 


( Martin L. Bradford . 
1 George L. Burt 


Boston. 
Boston. 


25 


Boston, " 


25, 


Geo. B. Livermore . 


Boston, 


»l 


Chelsea 
Revere 
Winthrop . 


* 


( Elbridge C. Donnell, 
< Charles H. Person . 
( Thomas B. Jones 


Chelsea. 
Chelsea. 
Chelsea. 



* No election. Precept issued for new election to be held Tuesday, 
Feb. 10, 1880. 







By Counties. 


361 


COUNTY OF ESSEX. 




No. 
of 


District. 


Name of Eepresentative. 


Residence. 


Dist 








i| 


Eockport . 
Gloucester,Wd. 7, 


j William H. Sargent, 


Gloucester. 


A 


Gloucester, Wds. 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 . 


) Stephen Rich . 
( Robert Tarr 


Gloucester. 
Gloucester. 


3 


Gloucester, Wd.8, 


1 




Essex . 
Mau Chester 
Hamiltou . 


\ William A. Brown . 

J 


Hamilton. 


*l 


Wenliam . 
Dauvers 


1 Henry Hobbs . 


Wenham. 


5 


Beverly 


John I. Baker . 


Beverly. 


6 


Salem, Wards 1, 
2,5 . . . 


( George D. Glover . 
1 Daniel B. Lord . 


Salem. 
Salem. 


A 


Salem, Wards 3, 
4, 6 . 


I Nath. A. Horton 
1 Rufus B. Gifford 


Salem. 
Salem. 


«l 


Marbleliead 
Swampscott 


1 William B. Brown . 
/ Thomas Main . 


Marblehead. 
Marblehead. 


9 


Lynn, Ward 3 . 


Ebenezer Beckford . 


Lynn. 


»! 


Lynn, Wards 1, 

2, 4, 5, 7 . 
Kabant 


|C.A.Wentworth,2d, 

< Bryan Harding 

( Henry Cabot Lodge . 


Lynn. 
Lynn. 
Nali^nt. 


11 


Lynn, Ward 6 . 


Samuel B. Valpey . 


Lynn. 


12 


Peabody . 


Edward Trask . 


Peabody. 


13 


Saugns 
Lvnn field . 
Middleton- . 
Topsfield . 


[■ J. Allston Newhall . 


Saugus. 


14 { 


Andover 

North Andover . 


1 John Cornell . 


Andover. 



46 



362 



House of Representatives, 



District. 



Kame of Representative. 



Eesidence. 



Boxford 
Rowley 
Ipswich 

Newbury . 
Newburvport 
Wds.l,"'2,3, 4,5,6 

Georgetown 
Groveland . 
Bradford . 

West Newbury 
Salisbury . 
Amesbury . 
Merrimac . 

Haverhill, Wds 

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 
Methuen 

Lawrence, Wds 
1,2,3 

Lawrence, Wds 
4, 5, 6 



i William H. Tozer 



Eben F. Stone 
Amos Cofltia 



/ Andrew J. Huntress 



Elias P. Collins- 
William Smeath 



(Levi Taylor 
Edwin Gage 
Daniel T. Morrison 

( Henry P. Danforth 
I Joseph J. Nichols 

I Edward P. Poor 
Daniel F. Dolan 



IjDswich. 



Newburyport. 
Newbury port. 



Groveland. 



Salisbury. 
Amesbury. 



Haverhill. 
Haverhill. 
Methuen. 

Lawrence. 
Lawrence. 

Lawrence. 
Lawrence. 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Cambridge,Wds. 
1,5 . . . 

Cambridge, Wds. 
2, 4 . 

Cambridge,Wd.3, 
Somerville,Wd.l, 
Somerville,Wd.2; 



( George W. Park 

I Thos. W. Higginson, 

!A. Carter Webber . 
James H. Sparrow . 
Henry J. Wells 

John McSorley . 

John Haskell Butler, 

Robert L. Spear 



Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 

Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 

Cambridge. 

So mer villa. 

Somerville. 



By Counties. 



363 



No. 

of 

Dist. 



Name of Representative. 



10 

11 

13 

-! 

17 

18- 

f 
19] 

i 
20 
21 



Som'rv'le,Wds.3,4: 

Medford 

Maiden 
Everett 

Melrose 

Stoneham . 

Wakefield . 

Reading 
North Reading 
Wiliuington 

Woburn . . 

Arlington . 
Winchester 

Watertown 
Belmont 

Newton, Wds. 1 
2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 

Waltliam . 

Lexington . 
Burlington . 
Bedford 
Billerica 

Tewksbury 
Chelmsford 
Tyiigsborough 
Dracut 

Lowell, Ward 1 

Lowell, " 2 



Person Davis . 

Daniel W. Lawrence, 

( James P. Magee 

I George S. Marshall . 

Joseph D. Wilde 

John F. Berry . 

Lucius Beebe . 

[• George L. Flint 

Edward D. Hay den . 
j William G. Peck . 

I Wm. H. Ingraham . 

I George D. Eldridge . 
I Chas. Robinson, jr. . 

Nathan Warren 
Augustus E. Scott . 

\ John W. Peabody . 

i 

John O'Donnell 
L. R. J. Varnum 



Somerville. 

Medford. 

Maiden. 
Everett. 

Melrose. 

Stoneham. 

Wakefield. 

N. Reading. 

Woburn. 
Arlington. 

Watertown. 



Newton. 
Newton. 

Waltham. 



Lexington. 



Dracut. 



Lowell. 
Lowell. 



364 



House of Representatives^ 



No. 








of 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


Dist. 








22 


Lowell, Wards. 


Simon Kelley . 


Lowell. 


23 


Lowell, " 4 . 


James W. Bennett . 


Lowell. 


24 


Lowell, " 5 . 


Robert Goulding 


Lowell. 


25 


Lowell, " 6 . 


John J. Pickman 


Lowell. 


r 


Concord 


1 

• Sidney A. Bull . 




26 j 

i 


Acton . 
Carlisle 
Lincoln 


Carlisle. 


r 


Weston 


1 




27] 

I 


Wayland . 

Sudbury 

Maynard 


Charles F. Gerry 


Sudbury. 


28 


Natick . 


Francis Bigelow 


Natick. 


.{ 


Holliston . 
Slierborn . 


j George B. Fiske 


Holliston. 


aoj 


Hopkinton . 
Ashland 


j Silas F. Thayer 


Ashland. 


31 


Framingliam 


George B. Brown . 


Framingham. 


32 


Marlborough 
Hudson 


Jas. W. McDonald . 

1 


Marlborough. 


33 

I 


Stow . 

Boxborough 

Littleton 


\ John W. Adams 


Littleton. 




Westford . 






34 


Groton 
Dunstable . 
Pepperell . 


!■ Dexter Butterfield . 

J 


Dunstable. 


f 


Ayer . 






35] 
I 


Shirley 
Town send . 
Ashby . 


\ Norman C. Munson . 


Shirley. 



By Counties. 



365 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



Name of Representative. 



Blackstone . 
Uxbridge . 

Men don 
Milford 
Upton . 

North bridge 
Grafton 

Westhorough 
Soutbborough 



Clinton 

Berlin . 

Bolton . 

Sterling 

Lancaster 

Harvard 

Lunenburg 

Fitchbnrg . 

Winchendon 
Ashbnrnham 
Gardner 
Westminster 
Princeton . 

Atbol . 
Royalston . 

Petersham . 
Phillipston . 
Templeton . 
Hubbardstou 



Dana . 
Hard wick . 
Barre . 
Oakham 
New Biaintree 



Chas. E. Seagrave 



I Lsaac N. Crosby 
I Benj. A. Jourdan 

j Henry F. Wing 

\ Leander W. I^wton, 



! Daniel B. Ingalls 
I Lewis L. Carter 



Joseph A. Tufts 
Eli Culley . 



! George W. Eddy 
j Edwin J. Cushing 



Russell S. Horton 



\ James A. Carruth 



Thomas P. Root 



L'xbridge. 

Milford. 
Upton. 

Grafton. 

Southboro' 



Clinton. 
Berlin, 



Fitchburg. 
Fitchbnrg. 



Ashbnrnham. 
Gardner. 



Athol. 



Phillipston. 



Barre. 



366 



House of Representatives^ 



No. 






of District. 


Xame of Representative. 


Residence. 


Dist.| 






IH 


Rutland 


1 




Holden 
Pax ton 
Leicester . 


\ Lewis Bigelow . 
J 


Paxton. 


12 


W. Brookfiekl . 


1 




Warren 
Brookfield . 
N. Brooktield . 
Sturbridge . 


! George W. Johnson . 
■ George N. Bacon 


Brookfield. 
Sturbridge. 


13^ 

i 


Spencer 
Charlton 
Soutlibridge 
Oxford 


1 Jo'nn W. Bigelow . 
j John M Cochran 


Spencer. 
Southbridge. 


"1 


Douglas 
Webster 
Dudley 


i William W. Brown . 


Douglas. 


■»! 


An burn 
Millbury . 
Sutton . 


> George W. Rice 


Sutton. 


f 

16^ 


Shrewsbury 
Northborough . 
Boylston 
West Boylston . 


1- Henry H. Brigham . 


Boylston. 


i 


J 




17 


Leominster 


Dwight B. Look 


Leominster. 


18 


Worcester,Wd.l, 


Thomas J. Hastings, 


Worcester. 


19 


Worcester, " 2, 


M. V. B. Jefferson . 


Worcester. 


20 


Worcester, " 3, 


Eugene M. Moriarty, 


Worcester. 


21 


Worcester, " 4, 


Francis Plunkett 


Worcester. 


22 


Worcester, " 5, 


John R. Thayer 


Worcester. 


23 


Worcester, " 6, 


Joseph H. Walker . 


Worcester. 


24 


Worcester, " 7, 


Calvin L. Hartshorn . 


Worcester. 


25 


Worcester, " 8, 


J. Marcus Rice . 


Worcester. 







By Counties. 


367 


COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 


Ko. 

of 

Dist 


District. 


Kame of Eepresentative. 


Residence. 


■1 


Easthampton 
Northampton . 
Southampton . 

Hadley 


) William E. Topliff . 
J John F. Warner 


Easthampton. 
Northampton. 


2 


Hatfield 

Westhampton . 
Williamsburg . 


Lewis H. Warner . 
J 


Williamsburg. 


3- 


Chesterfield 

Cum mi i^icn 

Goshen 

Huntino;ton 

Middlefield 

Plainfield . 

Worthington 


1 

\ Edward Pease . 


Huntington 


4 


Amherst 


1 




Pelham 
Prescott 
South Hadley . 


\ Chas. 0. Parmenter, 

J- 


Pelham. 


5 
I 


Belchertown 
Eufield 
Granby 
Greenwich . 
Ware . 


1- Stephen P. Bailey . 

1 

J 


Greenwich. 


COUNTY OF HAI^IPDEN. 


1 


Monson 
Brimfleld . 
Holland . 
Wales . 


John C. Burley 
J 


Wales. 


2 


Palmer 
Wilbraham 
Hampden . 
Ludlow 


Joseph F. Holbrook, 

J 


Palmer. 



368 



House of Representatives^ 



No. 

of 

Dist. 



District. 



Name of Eepresentative. 



Residence. 



f 

11 i 



Chicopee 

Springfield, Wd . 

1, 2 . 

Springfield,Wds. 

3, 6 . 

Springfield,Wds. 

4, 7 . 
Longmeadow 

Springfield,Wds. 

5, 8 . 

Hoi yoke, Wds. 1, 

2, 3, 4, 5 . 

Holyoke,Wds.6,7, 
W. Springfield . 

Westfield . 

Agawaiii 

Montgomery 

Sonthwick . 
Granville . 
Tolland 
Blandford . 
Chester 
Russell 



Dwiglit L. Shaw 

Hinsdale Smith 
Jona. E. Shi^jman 

Edwin D. Metcalf 



Henry M. Phillips 

C. C. Merritt . 
Michael J. Teahan 
John Delaney . 



Merritt Yan Densen, 
J. Henry Churchill . 



S. A. Bartholomew 



Chicopee. 

Springfield. 
Springfield. 

Springfield. 



Springfield. 

Springfield. 

Holyoke. 

Holyoke. 



Westfield. 
Agawam. 



Blandford. 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 



J 



Erving 
Warwick , 
Orange 
New Salem 




Warwick. 



By Counties. 



369 



District. 



Name of Eepreseutative. Residence. 



Montague 

Sunderland 

Leverett 

Sliutesbury 

Wendell 

Greenfield 
Gill . 
Slielbnrne 

Deerfield 

CouAvav 

Whateiy 

Kortlifield 
Bernardston 
Leyden 
Colrain 
Heath . 

Ash field 
Buckland , 
Charleniont 
Hawley 
Rowe . 
Monroe 



\ George A. Berry 



Samuel D. Bardwell, 



Chester K. Waite 



1 
I 
\ Hugh Maxwell 



> Clinton H. Dodge 



Shutesbury. 



Shelburne. 



Whately. 



Heath. 



Hawley. 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



Hancock 

Lanesl)()rougli 
' New Ashford 
I "William stown 

Clarksburg 

Adams 

N. Adams . 

Pittsfield . 
Dalton 



\ Keyes Danforth 

I 
J 

( Horace M. Holmes . 
I S. Proctor Thayer . 

( Sam'lW.Bowerman, 
) Edward D. G. Jones, 



Williamst'n. 



Adams. 
N. Adams. 

Pittsfield. 
Pittsfield. 



47 



370 



. House of Representatives^ 



Name of Representative. 



Florida 

Savoy . 

Clieshire 

Windsor 

Washington 

Peru . 

Hinsdale 

Becket 
Lee 

Otis . 
Tyringham . 

Richmond . 
Lenox . 
Stockbridge 
W. Stockhridge 

Alford . 
Egremont . 
Gt. Barrington 
Monterey . 

Mt. Washington 
New Marlboro' 
Sandisfield . 
Sheffield . 



\ William 0. Warren . 



\ William Tinker 



\ James Shead 



Walter B. Peck 



I" Lorrin P. Keyes 



Windsor. 



Otis. 



W. Stockb'ge. 



Egremont. 



N. Marlboro'. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Dedham 
Norwood 

Brookline 

Hyde Park 

Milton 
Canton 

Quincy 
Weymouth 



William J. Wallace . 

Edward I. Thomas . 
Hobart M. Cable 

Horace E. Ware 



( Edwin B. Pratt 
-J N. D. Canterbury 
( Louis A. Cook . 



Norwood. 

Brookline. 
Hyde Park. 

Milton. 

Quincy. 

Weymouth. 

Weymouth. 



By Counties. 



371 



Ko. 

of 

Dist. 


District.' 


Name of Representative. 


Kesidence. 


7 
8 

r 

i 


Braintree . 
Holbrook . 

Randolph . 
Stoughton . 
Sharon 
Walpole . 

Franklin 
Foxborough 
Wrentham . 
Bellingham 
Medway 

Needham . 
Dover . 
Medtield . 
Norfolk 


1 Francis Gardner 

, Jonathan Wales 

' Newell S. Atw^ood . 

1 

! Benj. F. Boyden, 2d, 

j Wm. R. Tompkins . 

J 

\ Lyman K. Putney . 


Holbrook. 

Randolph. 
Stoughton. 

Foxborough. 
Wrentham. 

Needham. 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



■i 


Attleborough 
Norton 
Mansfield . 


) Edwin J. Horton . 
j Seth C. Shepard 


Attleboro'. 
Mansfield. 


2 


Easton 
Raynham . 


Hiram Williams 


Easton. 


3 


Taunton 
Berkley 


( John D. Reed . 
< James M. Evans 
( John H. Galligan 


Taunton. 
Taunton. 
Taunton. 


•1 


Acushnet . 
Fairhaven . 
Freetown . 


> Joseph Burt, Jr. 


Acushnet. 


5 


New Bedford, 
Wards 1, 2, 3 . 


( James M. Lawton . 
1 Eben C. Milliken . 


N. Bedford. 
N. Bedford. 


«i 


New Bedford, 
Wards 4, 5, 6 . 


) William Sanders 
{ Thos. B. Hathaway. 


N. Bedford. 
N. Bedford. 



372 



House of Representatives^ 



No. 

of 

Dist. 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


f 

10 1 


"Westport . 
Dartmouth . 

Fall River, Wds. 
1, 2, 3, 4 . 

Fall River, Wds. 

5, 6 . 
Somerset . 

Seekouk 
Swansea 
Rehoboth . 
Dighton 


Henry A. Slocum . 

( Marcus Leonard 

I Patrick M.McGlynn, 

( James Langford 

) James F. Davenport, 
j Pardon Macomber . 

• Andrew N. Medbery, 

J 


Dartmouth. 

Fall River. 
Fall River. 
Fall River. 

Fall River. 
Fall River. 

Seekonk. 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



I 

6 

el 



Hingham 
Hull . 

Cohasset 
Scituate 
South Scituate 

Marsh field . 
Pembroke . 
Hanson 
Halifax 

Duxbury . 
Kingston 
Plympton . 
Carver 

Plymouth . 

Wareham . 
Rochester . 
Marion 
Mattapoisett 

Middleborough 
Lakeville . 

Bridgewater 
E. Bridgewater 



Arthur Lincoln 
Philander Bates 

James T. Drew 

Walter H. Faunce . 
Charles H. Howland, 
\ JoseiDh R. Taber 



James L. Jenuey 
Joshua Dean . 



Hingham. 
Cohasset. 

Halifax. 

Kingston. 
Plymouth. 
Mattapoisett. 

Middleboro'. 
E. Bridge w'r. 



By Cou7ities. 



373 



No. 

of 

Dist. 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


9J 
10 
11 


Rockland . 
Hanover 

Brockton . 
W. Bridgewater, 

Abington . 
S. Abington 


j Howard A. Wheeler, 

) Alfred C. Munroe . 
\ Albert Keith . 

1 Marcus M. Loud 


Rockland. 

Brockton. 
Brockton. 

Abington. 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 



Sandwich 
Falmouth 

Barnstable 
Mashpee 

Yarmouth 
Dennis 

Harwich 
Chatham 

Brewster 
Orleans 
Eastliam 
Wellfleet 

Truro . 
Provincetown 



James E. Gifford 



Clark Lincoln . 



Charles F. Swift 



Erastus Nickerson . 



Jesse H. Freeman 



Joseph P. Johnson 



Falmouth. 
Barnstable. 
Yarmouth. 
Chatham. 

Wellfleet. 

Provinceto'n. 



DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark 
Edgartown 
Gay Head 
Gosnold 
Tisbury 




Chilmark. 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



Nantucket 



Henry Padtlack 



Nantucket. 



374 



House of Representatives^ 



w 

Ah 
-t1 



CO 

I 

P^ 

CD 

CO 

o 



Pi w 

H 






® -ji 


^ 


S 


g 


^ 


n 


5g 


^ 


i? ^ 




















• 








d 


• 














o 




































, 












o 




1 

1 


<a 


4i 


0) 

2 


© 


CD 


W 
6 

m 

rd* 

i 


1 

o 

w 






^ 


O 


q 


U 


W 






o 


o 


o 


03 




d 




W 


^ 




w 


^ 


t^ 


_ 








d 
o 


O) 




,d 




d 






tJC 




o 


S 


o 


d 


d 


rC 




d 


^ 


(U 


<D 


o 


o 


bfi 


^ 


o 




^ 


-*-= 


s 


50 

o 


d 
R 




§ 


2 




k! 


tt 


PQ 


CO 


cc 


W 


O 




^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


2 


















^' 


S 


^ 


M 


riii 




^ 


t 


S 


'S 


§tt 


<g 


o 


ft 


iS 




ft 


s 


c» 


d 


^ 


^ 


^ 


W 




CO 


CO 


O 


t- 


c-i 


lO 


»o 




CO 














p4 


'o 

1-5 


6 


d 
o 

1-5 


'^3 


125 

o 

® 




d 

t 

02 




a 




2 


o 

o 


d 
o 
o 
c3 


o 


n^ 




«5 


0) 


d 




'S 


*f^ 




<1 


<l 


<1 


< 


M 


« 


« 



AlpJiabetically. 



375 







• 










• 






• 






• 


a 






























o 




































li 










s 










1 


© 


O 






o 

K 

-2 










o 
pq 






. 




02 


© 

<1 


o 

02 

e3 






CC 










o 




fl 






O 




!? 






02 










K 




o 


• 




w 


© 




<D 




'd 


<D 


4> 


<t) 


® 




© 


% 


m 


<D 


^ 


g 


^ 


B 




i' 






a 


g 


fl 


C 


M 








>^^ 


pq 


o 




fl 


O 


O 


o 


c 


2 


o 


•* 


o 


o 


;3 


o 


W 




l:^ 


w 


K 


w 


W 


c? 


w 


rl 


K 


M 


a 


^ 


1§ 


. 




'g 




. 


^" 


• 


f3 


a 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


>-, 




o 












rrt 






u 










C3 




!» 


. 




"-H 


VI 


n 


fl 


v> 


O) 


rt 


fl 


fl 






'5 




= 


1 


<» 

^ 


o 
s 


o 


2 

03 




o 

fl 


^ 
X 


2 

w 


2 ■ 

m 


s 


s 


S 


o 


^ 


p: 


^ 


/3 
CO 


O 


^ 


02 


OS 

Ph 


o 


O 


• 


• 


pj 


^ 


• 


X 


X 


• 


M 


• 


X 


^ 


^ 


• 


• 


03 


.9 


P. 

i 


'J 
o 

S 


02 




'5 


.s 

1 




1 


0) 


1 

p 
o 


xn 


44 
1 


1 


H 


e 


Ph 


S 


^ 


g 


f^ 


^ 


13 
02 


g 


^ 


^ 


02 


;3 


JO 


CO 


^ 


(M 


c; 


^ 


CO 


<M 


o 


CO 


00 


(>f 


^ 


^'- 


rH 






^ 






'"' 






T-l 








r-t 


CI 




. 


. 


. 




. 


. 




. 


. 


. 


. 


, 


. 




. 





© 

i 

02 


© 


© 






< 




o 


m 


^ 




1 


o 
© 


ri 
1 


© 




© 


w 


B 

c3 




fe 

rt 


c3 

^5 




a 
-^ 


© 


^ 


© 


1 

o 


IS 

Ph 


o 


5 


Ho 


o 
© 




< 
i 


[=H 


1-0 


^q 




1? 

'd 


i 


© 


© 


^ 


1:^ 


'© 


O 

"© 


'© 


o 
© 


o 


'd' 


CS 


Jf, 


a 


0^ 


s 


© 


© 


© 


bJC 


fcC 


tc 


be 


CS 


N 


PQ 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 


p5 


p; 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 



376 



House of Representatives^ 



o « 


00 


00 


o 


o 


M 


lO 


TtH 


CO 


»o 


o 


»o 


C5 


to 


. rt 


o 


(M 


CO 


C5 


t- 


t- 


t- 


(M 


t- 








O <u 




tH 




tH 
















C<J 




•A ^ 


































• 


^T 


• 










• 




• 


• 




a 






4-3 


fl 










g 










o 






2 


o 










-is 








1 








1 

o 
Q 
4-r 












€ 

? 




w 


"d" 


M 


o 




C3 




2: 














CO 

02 










Ah 


02 

S-i 


o 










02 




t 


Q 


a 


® 


o 


0) 


c3 


© 


03 


© 


® 


s 


® 


1 


03 




^-5 


a 


'3 


1 


02 


a 


a 


2 


a 


5 


d 




a 






o 


p) 




o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


*d 


o 




4-2 


w 


"* 


tc 




K 


w 


H 


w 


§ 


w 


D 


w 




♦ 


^ 


• 




• 


a 


• 








• 


• 


• 


S 


• 


CJD 


• 


• 


• 


c« 


• 


1 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


g 
-a 

1 


2 

CO 


1 

O 


d 
c 

33 


1 


1 


Tjd 


d 
o 

3 


2 

2 
3 
^ 

rt 
^ 


1 


d 
o 

55 


1^ 


CO 

73 


d 

00 




s 


o 


O 


O 


& 


1 


c3 


o 


W 


c3 


^ 


o 




.5h 






• 


^ 

m 


X 

^ 


• 


• 




■ 


S 


d 

03 


• 


1 

.2 


^ 


o 


3 




1 

o 


!3 






o 




3 


a 

K 


44 
1 


fi 


® 

M 


o 


3 


cc 


&■ 


1 


00 


w 

w 


^^ 


c« 


^ 


ci 




co~ 


CO 


t-T 


■^ 


ciT 


T-T 


CO 


00 


tjT 


cT 


«r 


r-T 










r-l 


cq 




CO 










c^ 






• 


'^ 


• 


• 




• 






• 






• 






^ 


<M 


























I 

5 

a 


1 


< 

a 


h4 




&■ 

o 
O 


< 


1 


a 

.2 


CO 


< 

d 


d 

d 

rd 

o 

t-5 


h4 

1 








1 


1 


fl" 


d" 


d" 


d" 


S 


c2 


>i 


o 




J? 


>» 


1 


.W) 


o 


o 


o 


o 


f. 


-- 


03 


?'' 




o 


o 


^ 


Ul 


'S 


M 


u 


M 


M 




d 


d 






M 


W 


M 


PQ 


w 


M 


w 


M 


M 


PQ 


W 


M 


M 



Alphabetically, 



377 



2 ^ 



t^ r-t 



• • * 






• • 


rn' 


d 


• 


• 


• 


. 


. 


. 


, 


3 


o 




, 


. 






a 




o 


o 












o 




PQ 


6 


_, 






. 


+3 


1 


• 


-(j 


1 


' % 


• 


<D 


B 


w 


4^ 


m 


OJ 


M 


% 






• 02 

o 

• .2 


4^ 

02 


0) 


S 


4^ 

02 
'3 


1 

02 


. 02 
+3 

• 1 


1 



M < 



k) M M '^ ^ ;h 

, ^ . . . ^ ^ 

i: 9 ^- 1 s ^ g i f ^ 1 1 i I J 

::^ 5 g i § S I I I 2 g I c 1 1 

SS5c3c6c3eec3c3^4Soooo 

48 



378 



House of Representatives^ 





?2 


05 
t- 




1 


g 


s 


8 


^ 




1 


r-l 


CO 


^ 




• 






fl 




o 












a 


• 










CO 
















tn 






* 






c3 




o 












C3 


• 


a 








^ 




M 












A 










u 
















U 




i 


-f^ 










S 












>■ 


^ 


5 


o 

a 






2 

^ 




CO 












4J 






^ 

^ 

^ 


<D 


--© 


o 

o 


<D 


1 


® 


0) 


© 


o 


O 


a 

O 
O 


"cS 




J3 


1 


J 


% 


a 

o 




a 

o 


a 

o 


a 

o 


g 

o 


a 

o 




w 


w 


^ 


w 


iO 


w 


w 


K 


W 


w 


3 


tD 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


fl 


• 


• 




• 


• 


















? 






•S 






1 


a 


a; 
> 

% 


-H 
^ 


1 


^ 

g 
o 






o 

a 
.2 




,2 

2 


1 


o 


o 




^ 


< 


^ 


M 


s 




3 


^ 


S 


o 

02 


W 


M 


^ 






• 


0) 




M 

OJ 


^ 




<D 




X 


;:3 




a 


4i 


4i) 
1 






1 




40 
S 
g 


iD 




1 


^ 


§ 

H 


O 


t 




s 
;25 




o 


o 


o 


do 


5^ 








itt 


w 


n 


H 


^ 


S 

OJ 


^ 


^ 


H 


M 


M 


g 


s 


r3 
«2 


w 




»o 


3 


(M 


CO 


CO 


t- 


g 


1-1 


Ci 


o" 


oo 


»o~ 


cT 




: 


; 


: 


1-^' 


: 


: 


* 


: 


P=I 


* 


• 




* 










-^ 




1-^ 


flH 




S 

? 










w 


• 


• 


y, 


J^ 


• 


c 






• 


• 




• 


g 


<i 


i=i 




?^ 




^ 


0) 


t>> 


1-5 

1 

> 


fl 


c« 




fl 


< 


'a 

o 


o 


1 


o 


s 

fc^ 

^ 




1 




o 


P3 

1 

c3 




1 




o 


o 


2 


u 


^ 


;3 


05 


Cj 


cS 


C3 


0) 


(V 


'aj 




U 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


ft 


P 


Q 


Q 


Q 


fl 


Q 



Alphabetically. 



379 



«o 


CD 


t>. 


oo 


o 


O 


o 


(M 


?J^ 


-ti 


(M 


cq 


CO 


CO 


T-l 








CO 


'^ 




CO 


<M 


tH 


o 


o 
















C, 


(M 
















'"' 


fl 


• 








© 




• 








d 

o 






• 


B 

m 
O 
W 










s 

o 




. 








O 




pa 

© 


d 

o 


W 


o 








rf) 
















ji 


^ 


© 














. 








;h 




05 


% 


fcr 


OQ 








4i 












© 




u 




'd 
•n 


O' 








CO 












i 




1 




a 








>, 


i« 












^ 




© 


>> 


® 


© 


o 










© 


© 






^ 

1 


o 


o 


Hi 


g 
n 


d 
o 


d 


M 


a 

o 


a 

o 


d 
o 


a 


d 


^ 


i 


d 


CO 


IC 


w 


w 


G" 


^ 


M 


w 


w 


w 


w 


o 


w 


C 


• 




• 


• 


• 


a 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




be 




• 


* 


• 


<D 


* 


■ 


c3 

rd 


* 


* 


d 


* 


d 


,^ 


d 


* 


■(J 




d 
o 




c« 

1 

"© 


<2 


d 


1 


2 

d 


3 


c8 
© 

'© 


o 
.2 


1 


^ 


d 

1 


© 


K 


o 
pq 


3 


u 


w 


^ 


© 


S 


s 




K 


O 


Jzi 


M 


^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


S-i 


X 


• 


• 




t^ 




s^' 


• 


© 


(1 








'+^ 


?^ 


© 




'^ 




© 




© 




^ 








1 


d 
o 

d 




03 
© 


1 


d 




J 




© 


1 




S 


d 
iy2 


s 


d 


s 


^ 


^ 


tt 


s 


d 

02 


g 


P 


S 


M 


pq 


to 


<M 


(M 


^ 


CO 


t- 


O 


CO 


•* 


?. 


?, 


rH 


(M 


<M 


»o 






p:^ 


1 


H 


^* 


P 


^ 


© 


© 


w 


d 
© 


P 


<i 


K 


2 

.S 


'o 


2 
'3 

d 
o 


"© 

d 
d 
o 


© 

1-2 

© 


© 

fcX) 

o 
© 
C 


© 

1 


1-5 

d 

c3 


la 

d 


C3 

d" 

© 


© 

o 
© 

O 
©" 


Xfl 

d 


So 

o 
© 
O 

d 


^ 


a 


P 


Q 


p 


P 


P 


W 


w 


w 


fM 


^ 


pR 


^ 


f=< 


PSH 


p^ 



380 



House of Representatives^ 



■s ^ 


c; 


s 


o 


S 


CO 


»c 


O 


00 


t- 


o 


CO 


^ 


T-i 


. 03 


CO 


o 


'* 


CO 




lO 


00 




o 


t- 


tc 


CO 


o <o 




1-1 


rH 


iH 


















tH 


'A <» 
































• 








d 


















• 


§ 








1 




















•M 








o 
















% 


. 










M 
















® 




pq 








•> 
















CO 




^ 








'3 
















s> 




(U 








-t-9 
















5 

bo 




o 








o 
















•S 


. 


w 








M 












. . 
















"d 
















p 




>> 








o 


















® 


o 


® 


® 


© 


^s 


<D 


® 


<o 


03 


2 


« 


<o 




s 


fl 


a 


a 


a 


2 


d 


g 


a 


a 




a 






o 


"^ 


o 


o 


o 


c« 


o 


o 


o 


o 


5 


o 


Q 




w 


& 


w 


w 


w 


g 


w 


w 


K 


w 


w 


w 


n 




• 










• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 




i 






o 


o 




i 
1 


a 

1 


a 




d' 

1 


u 

1 


^ 
^ 
s 
2 

1 


1 




• 


• 


• 


• 


X 


o 


• 


• 


X 


• 


^ 


fc! 


~ 


1 


y, 
S 




.2 


1 




1 

1 


X 


X 




X 

50 


1 
i 


1 

o 


1 


S 


W 


fi 


« 


^ 


s 


M 


H 


w 


§ 


^ 


^ 


^ 




tH 


i-T 


CO 


o" 


S5" 


T-T 


t-T 


«r 


^" 


s 


^^ 


s" 


»o 






• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






* 


pq 
























h4 


hj 


i 
1 


c4 


s 




w 

1 
1 


2 




p4 

OS 

a 

1-5 


d 

1 


o 


4^ 

O 

.a 


d 
h 

be 

_d 


d 

o 

d" 
1 


05 
CS 

a 

o 
,d 
H 

a 

2 








_tjD 


d 


hT 


U 


^ 


<» 


'O 




Vj 




1^ 










^d 




o 


O 


> 




'S 




■-iS 


,d 




^^ 


% 


Is 


1 


5d 


5d 


O 


o 


^ 


s 


?^ 


% 




o 


o 


C3 


C3 


O 


5 





o 


O 


w 


K 


w 


w 



Alphabetically. 



381 



8 


00 


^ 


13 


1 


n 




rH 


i 


g 


^ 


§ 


^ 


^ 


?o 




• 




• 




• 


' 












c 










§ 








% 


% 






















1 








O 

H 


o 












S 
S 










_y 






CC 


m 












^ 










s 




(S 




i 


1 












.S 
'o 










p 




i-s 




ts 


■d 












"d 










Q 


® 






n^i 


HI 


® 


<D 


fl 
fl 


® 


© 


^ 


© 


© 


© 




2 


a 


cc 


a 






a 


a 


a 




3 


a 


a 




o 


o 


a 


fl 


o 


o 




o 


o 


n 


o 


o 


o 




<1 


K 


?^ 


w 


D 


t:^ 


w 


w 


^ 


w 


K 


t- 


W 


w 


M 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


Tc 




1 




a 


1 


a 


03 


1 

1 


g 
5 


'o 


o 

g 


'5 

© 
> 

o 


s 


d 
© 


© 

IB 

o 


3 
O 




^ 


5 


PQ 


^ 


fi 


^ 


<! 


c3 
03 


< 


s 


O 


6 


^ 


^ 


^ 








1 


« 


a 




o 

03 


>< 


0] 


5 

o 

g 

>5 


X 
^ 


© 

a? 

o 


© 

OJ 

© 

'd 




g 




^ 


^ 




W 


W 


w 


W 


^ 


s 


W 


^ 


g 


^ 


^ 




CO 


iH 


^ 


•<# 


cf 


of 


rH 


t- 


CO 


»o 


t- 


»o 


o 


c: 


b- 




1-1 




'-' 
















7-t 




rH 


rH 






I 




< 

o 

a 




1 

o 




a 




1 


w 

1 
6 


t-5 

1 

•d 
< 


© 

'S 


a 
.s 


i 


•-5 






1 


w 


1 

o 




a 


a 

2 
(-) 

o 


1 

o 


2 

o 


o 


© 


oT 

1) 


1 


1 


© 




W 


W 


w 


H 


w 


w 


W 


w 


W 


w 


K 


M 


HH 


^ 





382 



House of Representatives^ 



"S *^ 


cq 


1 


C£ 


C3 


■ >* 


'^ 


JO 


lO 


tH 


t- 


(M 


rH 


JO 


. rt 




CO 


lO 


c^ 






lH 


00 


JO 




O 


Oi 


o aJ 






1-1 




1-1 


tH 


tH 




T-( 




^ 


tH 








. 


. 




. 


. 




, 


, 












a" 




























o 




























■u 




























§ 


rt 


. 




• 


• 




• 


• 










fl 


W 


B 


^ 












^ 














CO 


<u 












a; 














O 
























S 


02 


•w 


o 






+= 






O 










(K 






w 






0) 






w 










0) 

3 


o 


13 






• 






• 


00 












o 


^ 


1 




• 


o 




• 


3q 










ft 


7h 


& 


1 


<o 


a? 




® 


® 




<» 


2 


© 


© 




1 


.s 




s 


a 


^ 


g 


a 


.-s 


a 




a 


a 




'5 


'S 


o 






o 


o 


g 


o 


o 


o 


o 




§^ 


c 


tD 


w 


w 


g 


w 


w 


ID 


w 


w 


w 


w 




• 


fl 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


s" 




• 


fd 


• 


. 




^ 














O 






^ 




c 

1 


2 


2 
.2 


'3 


(S 

J 


i=i 


d 
o 


1 


OJ 


1 


> 


'2 

<2 


o 


Fh 
^ 

s 


M 


§ 


o 


^ 


'S 


o 


m 


o 


? 


^ 


;:5 


'U! 


^ 






u 


M 


•^ 


^ 


a 


o 




o 


OJ 


c3 


a> 


^ 


'^ 




M 


flH 


flH 


o 


p 


W 


M 


^ 


^ 


pq 


S 


^z; 


^ 


« 


1 


1 

t/3 




^ 


1 


^ 


o 


1 


03 


'o 


M 


o 


'o 


s 


o 




,i4 


1 




1 




^ 
'C 


•g 


-Jo 




-2 

CO 


1 


ft 


^ 


pq 


4 


3 

CO 


^^ 


5 


s 


s 


4 




S 






cf 


CO 


CO 


o 


c^ 


cT 


o 


c-f 


00 


00 


t-^ 


»o 


oo" 




1H 






C-l 








(M 












W 
S 




P4* 




m 


'5* 


• 


• 


PI 




a 




s 

C3 

a 
o 


1 




o 

o 


m 

O 


cS 
(0 


o 
H 
en 


M 
ce 

-2 


o 

1-5 


% 

< 


O 

a 


o 


1. 




V 

c3 




,c 


,r) 





rt 


2 


t»> 


• r-l 


i-H 


^ 


fl 


1? 


I? 


o 




o 

1-S 


o 


^ 


^ 


o 

^5 


4 


t^ 




M 


^ 


^ 


Hi 


S 



Alphabetically. 



383 



CO 


^^ 


t- 


M 


o 


s 


^ 


(M 


iH 


(M 


00 


in 


»o 


t— 


^ 


h- 


C<1 


co 




«M 


00 


t- 


t- 




»o 


rt< 




rti 








& 






(M 








cq 






<M 




. 


. 


. 


. 




. 


. 






. 


. 






. 




a 
o 

K 

o 
1 

02 


1 


* 


B 

CO 

§ 




* 








pq 

2 


+3 

S-l 






o 
1 


. i 


i 




13 


o 


<D 


o 


o 


0) 


CO 


CO 

1 


<15 


® 


a 


® 


^ 


2 




a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


H 


CO 


a 




O 


a 


r^ 








o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


O 


o 


00 


!^ 


W 


53 


w 


w 


H 


w 


w 


CI 


o 


M 


a 


CO 


w 


• 


® 


• 


• 


p 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


'^ 


• 


• 


"fci; 








OJ 






u 








Oj 








1 


1 

DO 

1 


o 
o 


4J 

i 


a 

1 


CO 


1 


"3 




o 

02 

o 


o 


1 


> 




2 

o 

c3 


w 


« 


tt 


^ 


h^ 


<1 


£ 


g 


M 


W 


g 


W 


w 


g 


5 


t2 
2 




• 






rfl 


• 






• 


• 


X 


d 


X 


a 


^ 


^ 


* 


o 


• 


o 

a 


^ 


QJ 


Ji^ 


M 


• 


<D 




o 


CI 


!§ 


)^ 




cc 


? 


^ 


i 


CO 




^ 

g 


'3 


K 


(S 


=3 


w 


^ 




s 


M 


g 


m 


C3 
CO 


H 


g 


£ 


^ 


?H 


IM 




S 


t- 


o 




05 


00 


CO 


o 


00 


00 


lO 


g? 


. 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


1 


• 


H 


ri4 




CO 






,c3 


e8 


8 




+3 


fq 






^ 

s 


a 




1 


1 


f. 
s 


5 


h 




c 


bX3 




P 




H 


C3 


^in 


rh 


X 




1 




o 




° 


7i 


j3 


g 
o 

o 


t-5 


t-5 

>^ 

C 

o 

-a 




o 


^ 

M 


2 
a 








Q 








c3 


c3 


cS 


03 


e3 


c3 


03 


u 


H^ 


h^ 


^ 


)-] 


^ 


Hi 


Hi 


S 


:^ 


1^ 


g 


^ 


1^ 


^ 


;^ 



384 



House of Representatives ,f 



'S « 


J2 


^ 


^ 


Ci 


o 


<M 


t- 


<7i 


CO 


o 


o 


tH 


^1 










t- 


'# 










iH 




'A ^ 






r. 




T-l 












C<1 




"* 


1 
J 


• 


fl 






• 


• 


• 










f3 


• 




. 


OS 






b 


. 


. 










*5 


, 


g 




n 






>< 

i 
> 
<1 


% 


Ij 










C8 




i 

S 
1 


% 

o 


o 

CO 

i 






O 

w 
1 

OS 


03 

1 

«2 










1 


1 


fl 


c^ 


2 


<X) 


® 


S 


'd 


■d 


<D 


(S 


<s 


<n 


O) 


5 




o 


P4 


a 


a 


o 


-2 


.-S 


a 


a 


a 


G 


s 


?^ 






o 


o 


o 


|34 


1=) 


id 


o 


o 


o 


O 


'C 


ro 




iri 


^ 


w 


w 


OS 


U 


P 


w 


w 


w 


w 


P^ 


b- 




• 


• 


• 


• 




• 




'd 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


J 


O 

1 


1 


u 

t 


1 
a 

O 


% 


2 


2 




1 


s 

o 


s 

1 


P 

o 

1 


J 


*3 


^ 


M 


-c? 


g 
J 


% 


g 

'd 


t 


7) 


+3 

o 


1 

CO 


M 


,« 


M 














a 


1 












.2 
ft 


^ 
^ 






1 








^ 


1 


SB 
5 






CO 


CO 


00 


CO 


o 


t- 


>^ 


>o 


o 


9. 


Ci 


co" 


(M 
























c<» 








< 


^ 


, 


t^ 


0) 


: 


: 


: 


% 


o 


: 


Q 


5?5 


.2 


1-5 

'tJC 

1 


ri4 


7h 


'd 


CO 

O 

if 


Is 


d 


d 

-d 


tuC 


4 


5 

i:3 

3 




o 


O 


O 




^ 




S 






£ 


^ 




o 


o 


o 




© 


<v 


ct> 




O 


O 


n 


o 






^ 


^ 


;^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


r=R 


1*^ 


g 


% 


^ 


^. 


^ 



Alphabetically, 



385 



M 


^ 


t- 


^ 


g 


o 


^ 


o 


t- 


t- 


■* 


C5 


)n 


b« 


o 




CI 


00 


CO 






lo 


c? 


00 




TtH 




o 




1-1 


''^ . 




'"' 


^ 


CI 


c» 


















• 


' 








• 


a 


• 


• 




• 


• 


















s 


5 














CD 






1 








1 


^ 


-tJ 








1 




02 

1^' 




I 












5 
rn 


+^ 






2 






02 

M 




w 


^ 












c/; 






^ 




T5 




'5S 


13 
O 


m 






02 

1^ 


^ 




02 




(/J 

o 


s 




e3 






M 








CD 


iJ 


o 


« 




tr 


o 




a 






<a 


<x> 


<c 


r 


^ 






o 




w 


<j) 


o 


;=< 




e 


i 


o 


^ 


M 
•^ 


^ 




6 


s 


a 
o 


o 


c^ 


£ 


w 


w 


w 


B 


CO 


s§ 


^ 


w 


^ 


M 


w 


W 


w 


• 


• 


• 


^ 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 








5i; 
























* 




* 


2 

o 




a 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1 


§ 


a 


* 


a 


>^ 


«! 


,Q 


?i 


C3 


a 


d 


fl 


■—4 


a 




S-i 


-u 


o 




tJD 




-a 


o 


o 


O 


V 


o 


,^ 


a 




93 


.ii 




^ 


t^ 


X 


M 


175 


^ 


OD 






^ 


^ 


C 


,^ 


c« 




rt 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


c 


O 




CS 


<o 




w 


m 


02 


m 


h3 


U 


w 


M 


M 


^ 


M 


14 


U 


Ph 


Q 


• 


y, 


' 


Ul 


• 


© 


• 


• 


• 


M 


• 


^ 


(^ 


2 


>^ 


^ 




• 


t 

^ 


• 


^ 
^ 


^ 


M 


^ 


^ 
® 


^ 


o 
13 






CO 










M 

^ 




















ig 


-% 


^ 


a 
5- 


iS 


^ 


iS 


-5 


o 




'C 


a 


IS 


13 
CO 


% 


50 


^ 


H 






S 
M 


02 


g 


02 


^ 


^ 


M 


s 


CI 


^ 


CO 


rjl 


o 


■* 


Tji 


o 


C5 


o 


o 


^ 


^ 


^ 


Oi 




tH 














CI 












w 
-i 

i 


g 

o 


1 


3 




02 


CO 

1 


OJ 


w 

CO 




'E, 


a 

M 


o 


d 

1 

u 


1 


§ 
^ 

s 

^ 


i 


Is 

121 


1 


o 


1 


>> 
o 


M 

CO 




a 
a 




Q 


1 


O 

1 


a 


1 



49 



386 



House of Representatives^ 



"A 03 



i s 



o o 

W W 

J -I 

cc CO 

<D © 

'3 '3 



a H 
o o 



^ W ^ 




•I 3 ^ 
W H <^ 



(^ c? 



9 3 



a 


a a 


o 


o o 


w 


K W 



.2 S 



M h:i 



Ph f^ (1h 







^ 
1 




fl 


OQ 

a 


1-5 

i 


i 


S 


^ 

§ 






H 


^ 




•- 


a> 








u 

8 


B 


^ 


'5 


p^ 


Ph 


^ 


PM 


P4 


c 



o 



(3 s f3 



Alphabetically. 



387 



^ 


^ 


CO 


t- 


CO 


t~ 


^ 


?^ 


s 


^ 


h;^ 




^ 


CO 


n 




(M 




















(M 




tH 






• 




• 


o 




• 










d 






'00 




• 




® 


zn 

O 


• 


pq 













• 




7h 
c3 




. 




3 


J- 


. 


-(-T 










w 


-2 














^ 


02 


_,^ 


03 










43 




"C 


i 


1 


2 

S 
o 


<1 


00 


03 

> 
o 




03 

i 


03 

2 


03 

i 


a 



a 


1 


S 

1 

a 


2 



1 

1 


tq 


(O 
t- 


w 


^ 


(N 


3 




w 


W 


B 


w 


t- 


I:^ 


W 


CO 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






• 


• 


• 




?r 


• 


• 
















13 










r3 






1 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


^ 

'd 


ft 
2 


§ 


4 


03 


»4 


'd 


• 
















03 


M 


-f 


03 


C3 






C3 


a 


o 


C 




fl 


G 


M 


03 


fcJD 


tj 


a 





CC 


a 


O 


o 


-1-5 


o 


03 


o 


O 


W 


fl 


T! 





*- 


tn 




'i 




^ 


t/: 


!-i 






5: 


Q 


X 


rO 









w 




o 


<1> 


O 


ci 


o 


o 


a> 




03 




^ 


^ 


^ 


Q 


O 


M 


Izi 


P 


P3 


w 


M 


;2< 





1-3 


p 





1^ 


w 


: 


^ 


1^ 


^ 


^1 

1 


M 


^ 


■ 


: 


03 


5p 


a 

r2 


1 


: 


^ 


>< 


sg 


13 


^ 


o 


i 


^ 


93 


03 


'd 
'd 


2 


a 


CO 


^ 


^ 


s 


5 


g 


3 


^ 


3 

02 


m 




to 


^ 


^ 


w 


03 

pq 


^ 

m 


3 
zn 


cq 


t- 


o 


g 


o 


CO 


TH 


«o 


r-( 


30 


r-l 


CO 


CO 


iH 


V5 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


. 


T^ 


1 


o 


p^* 


„ 


H 

03 


a 

03 


w 




w 

w 

^ 


^ 


. 


d 


w 

id 


d 


^ 


,a 


o 


^ 


^ 


o 






C3 


^ 


an 




^ 






O 
IS 


B 
o 

H 

o 


M 

i 




1 


^^ 






1 


P 


a 
4 


1 

03 


oT 
a 

1 


« 


rt 


S 


^ 


« 


« 


C8 


$ 


^ 


C3 


OS 


g 




m 


02 



388 



House of Representatives^ 



"S « 


t 


g 


g 


^ 


^ 


•?^ 


S 


CO 


^ 


^ 


rH 


^ 


53 


























r-l 




)^i CQ 






























. 






. 


. 


. 


, 


. 




CI 




. 


, 






















02 




fl 




^ 


' 






* 




* 


• 


1 




3 




09 

1 


• 


1 


O 


a 




• 


1 




4A 


E 








1 


i 


W 




+= 




M 
M 


02 


^3 




w 






€ 




I 


S 




^ 


if 


o 




a 




03 




s 


1 


p 


:» 


hr 




® 


cc 


fl 


t« 


o 




l-O 




m 


M 


fi 


1 


o 


i 




'3 


& 


a 


a 

o 


<s> 

i 


1 


PI 

03 

3 


1 

■a 




t:3 


cc 


M 




P 


^ 


CO 


w 


M 


tH 


w 


t- 


t» 






• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


t, 


• 


• 


1 




3 


^ 


• 


2 
'3 


• 


• 


§= 


f2 


• 


>1 


• 


5 


s 


% 


o 

a 


rO 


a 


fr 


d 


a 




U 


ri 




d 





K 


*C 


03 

a 


o 

02 





o 


a 


,r; 


03 


3 

CO 


^ 

^ 


2 


i 




&) 




O 


a 


o 


O 


cS 


o 


O 


03 


Q 


cS 




c» 


tt 


<i 


M 


CQ 


M 


M 


o 


02 


p: 


IZi 


w 


t>H 




fl 


• 


• 


• 


fl 


• 


• 


M 


M 


• 




• 


03 




0) 














a> 


05 








r^ 


■« 




_ 


* 


44 




M 


^ 


0^ 


05 


ri4 


• 


44 


.=§ 
























03 




d 






-S 




o 


a 


o 


o 


'C 


T) 


O 





s 


c8 




EC 


CO 




5a 
ci 


s 


^ 
§ 


CO 


5tt 

eg 


1 




■* 


t- 


oo" 


00 


Tti 


t- 


o" 


<N 


»o 


CO 


O 


rjT 


CO 


! 




























1 

(25 




w 
a" 




o 


r2 




d 
< 

1 


1-5 

2 


4 

o 


o 


03 

03" 


CO 
1 


1 




J 


o 


a 


a 


a 


a 


o 




Oj 


i^ 





^ 




02 


O! 


Oi 


crj 


M 


02 


02 


02 


Oi 


02 


02 


02 


02 



Alphabetically. 



389 



rHJOOi-HrtHOCOOC-liMTHr-lfMO 

05r-iOOCOC5CO i-ICqi-lOSCOlO 





States Hotel 
States Hotel 

States Hotel 
States Hotel 

te Street . 



s s 

o o 
W M 



O W 



< ^ o ^ 



o j^ 



P^ 



w ^ 



© © 5 

aj CO «R 

CC CO 2 

H H 02 



C<J 



a ^ 



: f^ 



o -^ 



H H 






^ < 



3^0 



House of Representatives^ 



■s « 


CO 


Ci 


(M 


g 


CO 


C5 


<M 


CS 


C5 


tH 


i-t 


"* 


CO 


■ c3 












rH 


O 


Ttl 


CO 


00 


■* 


^ 


o <u 




iH 




iH 


C<J 




C^l 


iH 


l-( 


r-l 








"A 02 
































• 




• 


• 








• 


• 




• 








• 




o 


• 








. 


• 




O 




s 




..^ 




-is 










1 


1 




CO 




•2 




-2 




o 


. 








03 


03 

4-9 






S 




o 




p3 










O 


o 




w 




a> 




W 




oT 










W 


w 




03" 




s 




«3 




02 










03 


CO 




O 






■U 




rt 










03 


03 




c8 








-M 














■1-2 


+i 




f— 1 












S 


. 








(S3 










fl 


2 


(D 


<D 




03 


o 


03 


03 


1 


r^ 


03 


_P 


03 






-g 


a 




P 


a 


a 


•3 




.■§ 


a 


O 


a 




o 


'S 


o 


*S 


o 


o 


o 


o 


j5 


r- 


o 


^ 


o 




w 


u 


w 


5" 


w 


w 


R 


M 


P 


p 


K 


tH 


w 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


CI 


^ 


• 




• 


aj 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 




. 


, 


° 


s 








o 




2 

en 






'o 


^1 

03 

+-5 

CO 


1 


a 


g 


a 

c3 


a 


o 

CO 




1 




1 




1 


Ti 


O 


1 


S 


"^ 




li 


S 


,:2 

a 




3- 


^ 


^ 


$ 


1 


^ 


o 


S 


g 


% 


^ 


^ 


e3 




• 




M 


• 


• 


^. 


• 


• 


03 
S-i 


03 


t^ 


<D 


M 


1 








C3 


,i4 

2 


03 






1 
i 


'S 


'^ 


'oo 


03 

'5 


s 


S 


§ 


fi 


1 


^ 


1 


1 


K 


C3 


S 


03 


s 




^" 


o" 


T-T 


TjT 


t-" 


co" 


^ 


■* 


tH 


c-T 


t-^ 


TlT 


<N 




1-1 


1-1 


(N 






CI 










iH 








• 


• 


1-5 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 






























J2i 


1 




i 

1 




1 
§ 


w 

1-5 


1-5 

a 


O 








1 


s 

< 




i 




a 


3 




03 






03 

a 


03 




03 


1 




Is 
!> 


1 


■« 


li 


li 


IS 


c3 


d 


ce 


c3 


eS 


03 




^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 



Alphabetically. 



391 



ca 


CO 


CO 


o 


tH 


iH 


00 


Oi 


CO 


»o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


"* 


t- 










r-t 


(M 


rH 




M 


• 


• 






• 








^ 


„«^ 






' 






H 




(H 












^ 




O 












->i 


-1^ 


a 












9. 


OJ 


(D 














CD 


S) 












m 


M 


1 












fl 


a 


^ 












.S 


o 


a 














+3 








. 






1 


1 


® 


<D 


<D 


0) 


0) 


® 


« 


a 


S 


a 


d 


a 


a 


O 


oo 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


CO 


w 


w 


w 


W 


w 


w 


. 


. 


gc 


. 


r:j 


. 


; 


: 


a 


c 


TS 
•C 




d 


05 


d 


d 
o 


o 


o 


,o 


^ 


2 


O 


o 


+^ 


-M 






M 


4J 


a 


M 


a: . 




d 


o 




IB 


c3 


o 


O 


cS 




o 


£) 


CS 




m 


W 


O 


>A 


P^ 


^ 


H 


O 


j« 


jW 


1^ 


: 


o 


X 

a; 


^ 


t-t 








3? 




o 




'o 


"o 


r^ 


g 


"w 


^^ 


2 
O 


St! 


^ 


1^ 


>5 


•o 


.22 


CO 


Si 


^ 


CO 


s 


s 


pq 


^ 


i-T 


tH 


<M" 


o 


cT 


cT 


cf 


co' 




• 


• 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


<i 


<i 


• 


• 


• 


f4 

d 


6 

d 
o 

i 




1 

o 




pd 

o 


d 

w 
a 


d 

w 






'3 


d 

0) 


'a; 


r2 


.5 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


P 


? 


g 



OFFICEES or THE HOUSE OE EEPEESENTATIYES. 



GEORGE A. MARDEN, Lowell . . Clerk. 

EDWARD A. Mclaughlin, Boston . Assistant Clerk. 

OREB F. MITCHELL, Bridgewater . Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Rev. DANIEL W. WALDRON, Boston . Chaplain. 

THOMAS J. TUCKER, Jr. . . . Doorkeeper. 

JOHN E. KILLIAN Ass't Doorkeeper. 

E. M. ALEXANDER Postmaster. 

THOMAS PLUNKETT .... Messenger. 

CHARLES W. PHILBRICK . . . Messenger. 

WILLIAM H. GRAVES .... Messenger. 

EZRA T. POPE Messenger. 

GEORGE C. CLAPP Messenger. 

LEWIS A. MOODY Messenger. 

WILLIAM G. MACDONALD . . . Messenger. 

JAMES McCORMACK .... Messenger, 

WILLIAM H. WHITING .... Messenger. 

FRANK W. LANE Messenger. 

WILLIAM H. HARGRAVES . . . Page. 

FRED A. ROWE Page. 



FmsT Division . 
Second Division . 
Third Division . 
Fourth Division, 
Fifth Division . 
Sixth Division . 



MONITOES. 

Messrs. HILL of Boston, and 

McGEOUGH of Boston. 
Messrs. SHIPMAN of Springfield, and 

PICKMAN of LoAvell. 
Messrs. DANFORTH of Lawrence, and 

SHERBURNE of Boston. 
Messrs. LEONARD of Fall River, and 

SCOTT of Lexington. 
Messrs. TRASK of Peabody, and 

NEWHALL of Saugus. 
Messrs. WALKER of Worcester, and 

KELLEY of Lowell. 



COMMITTEES. 



50 



STANDING COMMITTEES OE THE SENATE. 



On the Judiciary. 

Messrs. Knowlton of Hampden. 

Rice of Worcester. 

Aldrich of Middlesex. 

Crocker of Suffolk. 

Fuller of Suffolk. 

On Probate and Chancery. 

Messrs. Rice of Worcester. 

Hutchinson of Suffolk. 

Lilley of Middlesex. 

On the Treasury. 

Messrs. Blaney of Essex. 

of Suffolk. 

Morse of Middlesex. 



On Bills in the Third Reading. 



Messrs, Stone 
Aldrich 
Fuller 
Brooks 
Lilley 



of Essex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Suffolk, 
of Suffolk, 
of Middlesex. 



On Engrossed Bills. 

Messrs. Root of Franklin. 

Stockwell of Worcester. 

Abbott .of Norfolk. 

On Leave of Absence. 

Messrs. Taylor of Suffolk. 

Ray of Norfolk. 

Dwyer of Berkshire. 



396 Standing Committees of the House, 
STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE. 



On the Judiciary. 

Messrs. Morse of Boston. 

Bowerman of Pittsfield. 

"Ware of Milton. 

McGeough of Boston. 

Lincoln of Hingham. 

Pickman of Lowell. 

Andrew of Boston. 

On Probate and Chancery. 

Messrs. Roljinson of Neioton. 

Galligan of Taunton. 

Butler of Somerville. 

"Wells of Cambridge. 

Plunkett of Worcester. 

Danforth of Williamstown. 

"Wales of Randolph. 

On Finance. 

Messrs. Stone of Newhuryport. 

Hill of Boston. 

Johnson ..... 0/ Brookfield. 

Allen of Boston. 

Merritt of Springfield. 

Davenport of Fall River. 

Tufts of Boston. 

On Elections. 

Messrs. Cochran of Southbridge. 

Van Deusen of Westfield. 

Spear of Somei^ille. 

Parnienter of Pelham. 

Loud of Abington. 

Nickerson of Chatham. 

Gale of Warwick. 



Standing Committees of the House. 397 

Ox Bills in the Thirb Reading. 

Messrs. Lodge of Nahant. 

Thayer of Ashland. 

Doherty of Boston. 

Brown of Douglas. 

Keyes of Neic Marlborough. 

Sliepard of Mansfield. 

Maxwell of Heath. 

On Engrossed Bills. 

Messrs. Cable of Hyde Park. 

Bailey of ^Greenwich. 

Bigelow of Paxton. 

Cannon of Boston. 

Collins of Salisbury. 

Gardner of Holbrook. 

Tealian of HolyoJce. 



On County Estemates. 

Messrs. I.E. Noyes . . . . .of Boston. 

Atwood of Stoughton. 

Bull of Carlisle. 

Carter of Berlin. 

Dodge of Hawley. 

Flanders of Chilmark. 

Slocum of Dartmouth. 



On Pay-Roll. 

Messrs. Cornell of Andover. 

Newton of Southborough. 

Warren of Windsor. 

"Williams of Easton. 

Smeath of Amesbury. 

P. F. Mahoney . . . .of Boston. 
Sargent . . ... . .of Gloucester. 



398 Standing Committees of the House. 

Ox Leave of Absence. 

Messrs. Went worth of Lynn. 

Bigelow of Spencer. 

Wheeler of Rockland. 

Lincoln of Barnstable. 

Brown of Hamilton. 

Medbery of Seekonk. 

Dolan of Lawrence. 

On Public Buildings. 

Messrs. Lawton of Neio Bedford, 

Bates of Cohasset. 

Langford of Fall River. 

Stover of Boston. 

Ingalls of Clinton. 

Horton of Atliol. 

Waite of Whately. 

On Rules and Orders. 

Messrs. Baker of Beverly. 

Brackett of Boston. 

Sowdon of Boston. 

Hastings of Worcester. 

Stone of Neiohuryport. 

Merritt of Springfield. 

Johnson of Brookfield. 

Park ...... of Cambridge. 



Joint Standing Committees. 399 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



On Agriculture. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs, Stock well of Worcester, aud 
Russell of Middlesex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Hartshorn of Worcester, 
E. R. Webster of Boston, 
Jenney of Middleborough, 
Butterfleld of Dunstable, and 
Churchill of Agawam. 

On Banks and Banking. 

Of the *Senaie.— Messrs. Harding of Worcester, 

Gaylord of Hampshire, and 
Hall of Essex. 

Of the House. — MessTS. Thomas of Brookline, 
Sampson of Boston, 
Pratt of Quincy, 
Hayden of Woburn, 
Wing of Grafton, 
Beebe of Wakefield, 
Eddy of Ashburnham, and 
Hobbs of Wenham. 

On Claims. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Fuller of Suffolk, 

Currier of Essex, and 
Root of Franklin. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Shelburne of Boston, 
Sparrow of Cambridge, 
Rice of Sutton, 
Gage of Haverhill, 
Roach of Boston, 
Fiske of Holliston, 
Bardwell of Shelburne, and 
Putney of Needham. 



400 Joint Standing Committees, 

On EDUCATioisr. 

Of the 5ena«e.— Messrs. Harding of Worcester, and 
Morse of Middlesex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Peck of Arlington, 
Marshall of Everett, 
Higginson of Cambridge, 
Boyden of Foxborough, and 
Moriarty of Worcester. 

On Expenditures. 

Of the S'enaie.— Messrs. Blaney of Essex, 

of Suffolk, and 

Morse of Middlesex. 

Of the flbiise. — Messrs. Stone of Newburyport, 
Hill of Boston, 
Johnson of Brookfield, 
Allen of Boston, 
Merritt of Springfield, 
Davenport of Fall River, and 
Tufts of Boston. 

On Federal Relations. 

Of the ^enafe.— Messrs. Hutchinson of Suffolk, and 
Stone of Essex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Park of Cambridge, 
Jones of Pittsfield, 
Burt of Acushnet, 
Tozer of Ipswich, and 
Holbrook of Palmer. 

On the Fisheries. 

Of the 5enafe.— Messrs. Taylor of Suffolk, and 

Snow of the Cape District. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Johnson of Brookfield, 
Main of Marblehead, 
Freeman of Wellfieet, 
Evans of Taunton, and 
Topliff of Easthampton. 



Joint Standing Committees, 401 

On Harbors a>t) Public Lands. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. of Suffolk, 

Winch of Suffolk, and 
Snow of the Cape District. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Brackett of Boston, 

Paddack of Nantucket, 
Brown of Framingham, 
Foss of Boston, 
Tarr of Gloucester, 
Taber of Mattapoisett, 
Starbird of Boston, and 
Coffin of Newburyport. 

On Insurance. 
Of the iSena^e. — Messrs. Russell of Middlesex, and 

Brooks of Suffolk. 
Of the House. — Messrs. Gerrj- of Sudbury, 

Eldridge of Newton, 

Livermore of Boston, 

Warren of Waltham, and 

Faunce of Kingston. 

On the Library. 

Of the S'enaie. — Messrs. Osgood of Essex, and 
Otis of Hampshire. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Sowdon of Boston, 
Horton of Salem, 
Lincoln of Hingham, 
Webber of Cambridge, and 
Bowerraan of Pittsfield. 

On Manufactures. 
Of the 5'enafe.— Messrs. Ray of Norfolk, and 

Converse of Middlesex. 
Of the House. —Messrs. J. G. Webster of Boston, 

Z. E Smith of Boston, 

Wallace of Norwood, 

Tinker of Otis, and 

Burley of Wales. 

51 



402 Joint Standing Committees. 

On Mercantile Affairs. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Stockwell of Worcester, 
Smith of Berkshire, and 
Whiton of Plymouth. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Bigelow of Boston, 

Metcalf of Springfield, 
C. W. Smith of Boston, 
Keith of Brockton, 
Adams of Littleton, 
Warner of Northampton, 
Trask of Peabody, and 
Flint of North Reading. 

On Military Affairs. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Otis of Hampshire, 

Fuller of Suffolk, and 
Wales of Norfolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Phillips of Springfield, 
Monroe of Brockton, 
Rich of Gloucester, 
Nugent of Boston, 
Rockwell of Boston, 
Dolan of Lawrence, 
Gushing of Gardner, and 
Drew of Halifax. 

On Parishes and Religious Societies. 

Of the Senate.— Messrs. Smith of Berkshire, and 
Converse of Middlesex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Magee of Maiden, 

J. G. Webster of Boston, 
Tompkins of Wrentham, 
Joyce of Boston, and 
Gifford of Falmouth. 

On Printing. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Abbott of Worcester, and 
Fogg of Plymouth. 



Joint Standing Committees, 403 

Of the iZbwse. — Messrs. Rockwell of Boston, 

Huntress of Groveland, 
Bail of Boston, 
Bacon of Stnrbridge, and 
Danfortli of Lawrence. 

Os Prisons. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Morse of Middlesex, 

Taylor of Suffolk, and 
Ray of Norfolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Swift of Yarmouth, 
Bond of Boston, 
Glover of Salem, 
Sanders of New Bedford, 
Varnum of Lowell, 
Leonard of Fall River, 
J. T. Mahony of Boston, and 
Valpey of Lynn. 

On Public Charitable Institutions. 

Of the /Senafe. — Messrs. Osgood of Essex, 

Warren of Suffolk, and 
Richmond of Bristol. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Tompkins of Wrentliam, 
Blanchard of Boston, 
Macomber of Fall River, 
Shipman of Springfield, 
Taylor of Haverhill, 
Milliken of New Bedford, 
Burt of Boston, and 
McSorley of Cambridge. 

On Public Health, 

Of the Senate.— MessTS. Warren of Suffolk, 
Stone of Essex, and 
Currier of Essex. 



404 Joint Standing Committees. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Horton of Salem, 
Holmes of Adams, 
Webber of Cambridge, 
Lawrence of Medford, 
Bosnosky of Boston, 
Culley of Fitchburg, 
Horton of Attleborougb, and 
Kelley of Lowell. 

On Railroads. 

Of the Senate. —Messrs. Crocker of Suffolk, 
Ames of Bristol, and 
Crocker of Worcester. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Brown of Marblehead, 
Sherburne of Boston, 
Rice of Worcester, 
Bigelow of Natick, 
Bennett of Lowell, 
Ingraham of Watertown, 
Hathaway of New Bedford, and 
Canterbury of Weymouth. 

On Roads and Bridges. 

Of the Se7iate. — Messrs. Wales of Norfolk, and 
Fogg of Plymouth. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Ferson of Chelsea, 
Wilde of Melrose, 
Huntress of Groveland, 
Morrison of Methuen, and 
Delaney of Holyoke. 

On the State House. 

Of the Senate. —Messrs. Currier of Essex, and 
Wales of Norfolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Peck of Egremont, 
Jones of Chelsea, 
Gifford of Salem, 
Warner of Williamsburg, and 
Jourdan of Upton. 



Joint Standing Committees. 405 

On Street Rallways. 

Of the Senate.— Messrs. Winch of Suffolk, 

Russell of Middlesex, and 

AVhiton of Plymouth. 
0/ the House. — Messrs. Coleman of Boston, 

Berry of Stoneham, 

O'Neil of Boston, 

Smith of Springfield, 

Carberry of Boston, 

Goulding of Lowell, 

Clapp of Boston, and 

Davis of Somerville. 

On Taxation. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Aldrich of Middlesex, 
Crocker of Suffolk, and 
Smith of Berkshire. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Hastings of Worcester, 
Sowdon of Boston, 
Crosby of Milford, 
Dee of Boston, 
Quigley of Boston, 
Poor of Lawrence, 
Shaw of Chicopee, and 
Pease of Huntington. 

On Towns. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Hutchinson of Suffolk, and 
Harding of Worcester. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Johnson of Provincetown, 
Magee of Maiden, 
Peabody of Dracut, 
Seagrave of Uxbridge, and 
Mulchinock of Boston. 



406 Joint Special Committees. 



JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 



On Constitutional Amendments. 

Of the iS'enafe. — Messrs. Hall of Essex, 

Converse of Middlesex, and 
Blaney of Essex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Higginson of Cambridge, 
Scott of Lexington, 
Thayer of Worcester, 
Robinson of Newton, 
Cochran of Southbridge, 
Bartholomew of Blandford, 
McDonald of Marlborough, and 
Galligan of Taunton. 

On Hoosac Tunnel and Tkot and Greenfield Railroad. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs, French of Essex, 

Fessenden of Middlesex, and 
Gaylord of Hampden. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Donnell of Chelsea, 
Baker of Beverly, 
Bradford of Boston, 
Tufts of Fitchburg, 
Jefferson of Worcester, 
Thayer of North Adams, 
Beckford of Lynn, and 
^ McGaragle of Boston. 

On Labor. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Fessenden of Middlesex, 
Dwyer of Berkshire, and 
Webb of Bristol. 



ooiTit opecial Committees, 407 

Of the House. — Messrs. Howland of Plymouth, 
McGl.vnn of Fall River, 
Reed of Taunton, 
Nichols of Lawrence, 
Dean of East Bridgewater, 
Crowley of Boston, 
O'Donnell of Lowell, and 
Harding of Lynn. 

On the Liquor Law. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Fogg of Plymouth, 

Brooks of Suffolk, and 
Richmond of Bristol. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Brigham of Boylston, 
\ Bugbee of Boston, 

Look of Leominster, 

Cook of Weymouth, 

Shead of West Stockbridge, 

Root of Barre, 

McDonald of Marlborough, and 

Berry of Shutesbury. 

On Public Service. 

Of the /Senate. —Messrs. French of Essex, 

Knowlton of Hampden, and 
! Otis of Hampshire. 

\ Of the House. — Messrs. Walker of Worcester, 
I Munson of Shirley, 

I Lodge of Nahant, 

Hill of Boston, 

Lord of Salem, 

Mullane of Boston, 
/ Loud of AbJngton, and 

Carruth of Phillipston. 



EEPOETEES. 



IN THE SENATE. 



GEORGE C. BURPEE 
FRED W. WEBBER 
WILLIAM B. SMART 

A. M. BRIDGMAN 

FRANK L GRAY. 
W. B. WRIGHT . 
WILLIAM H. POPE 



Boston Post. 

Boston Journal. 

Boston Transcript. 
( Springfield Republican. 
\ Boston Herald. 

Boston Advertiser. 

Boston Globe. 

Boston Traveller. 



IN THE HOUSE. 



WILLIAM B. SMART . 

SAMUEL J. MENARD 
OSCAR HOSMER . 
R. L. BRIDGMAN . 
CHARLES F. TOWLE . 
WILLIAM T. GILBERT 
E. M. HAZEWELL . 
A. M. BRIDGMAN . 



\ Boston Post. 
Boston Transcript. 
Boston Journal. 
Boston Herald. 
Boston Advertiser. 
Boston Traveller. 
Boston Globe. 
Worcester Spy. 
Springfield Republican. 



COMMITTEE EOOMS. 



Agriculture, in Agricultural Room, "West "Wing. 

Banks and Banking, in No. 12, West Wing. 

Claims, in No. 7, West Wing. 

Constitutional Amendments, in No. 4, East "Wing. 

County Estimates, in No. 6, East "SVing. 

Education, in No. 12, West Wing. 

Elections, in No. 16, West Wing. 

Expenditures, in Sergeant-at-Arms' Office. 

Federal Relations. 

Fisheries, in No. 3, East Wing. 

Finance, in Sergeant-at-Arms' Office. 

Harbors and Puljlic Lands, in No. 4, East Wing. 

Hoosac Tunnel and Troy and Greenfield Railroad, in 

Green Room. 
Insurance, in No. 3, East Wing. 
Judiciary of the Senate, in No. 2, East Wing. 
Judiciary of the House, in No. 8, West Wing. 
Labor, in Blue Room. 
Leave of Ab^icnce, in No. 11, Rear. 
Library, in Library. 
Liquor Law. 

Manufactures, in No. 18, West Wing. 
Mercantile Aftairs, in No. 5, East Wing. 
Military Affairs, in No. 13, West Wing. 
Pay Roll, in No. 11, Rear. 

Parishes and Religious Societies, in No. 7, East Wing. 
Printing, in No. 11, Rear. 
Prisons, in No. 5, East Wing. 

Probate and Chancery (Senate), No. 13, West Wing. 
Probate and Chancery (House), No. 9, West Wing. 
Public Charitable Institutions, in No. 15, West Wing. 
Public Buildings. 

PubHc Health, in No. 14, West Wing. 
Public Service, in Green Room. 
Railroads, in No. 10, AVest Wing. 
Roads and Bridges, in No. 6, East Wing. 
State House, in Sergeant-at-Arms' Office. 
Street Railways, in No. 16, West Wing. 
Taxation, in No. 14, West Wing. 
Towns, in Blue Room. 
Treasury. 

52 



410 Assignment of Committee Rooms. 



ASSIGNMENT OF COMMITTEE EOOMS. 



EAST AVING. 

RIGHT, ON ENTERING FROM J5EACON STREET. 

President of the Senate and Clerk of the Senate. 
{Rear of the Seriate Chamber.) 

No.l. Clerk of the House. 

2. Committee on the Judiciary. {Senate.) 

3. Committee on the Fisheries. 

3. Committee on Insurance. 

4. Committee on Constitutional Amendments. 

4. Committee on Harbors and Public Lands. 

5. Committee on Mercantile Affairs, 

6. Committee on Prisons. 

6. Committee on County Estimates. 

6. Committee on Roads and Bridges. 

7. Committee on Claims. 

7. Committee on Parishes and Religious Societies. 
Committee on the Library, 
(/n the Library.) 

Committee on Finance; and 
Committee on the State House. 
{In Sei'geant-at- Arms' Office.) 

Committee on Labor; and 
Committee on Towns. 
(/n " Blue Room.") 



Assignment of Committee Rooms. 411 



WEST WING. 

LEFT, ON EXTERES-G FROM BEACON STREET. 

Speaker's Room between House and Council Chamber. 
No. 8. Committee on the Judiciary. (House.) 

9. Committee on Probate and Chancery. (House.) 

10. Committee on Railroads. 

11. Committee on Leave of Absence. 
11. Committee on the Pay Roll. 

11. Committee on Printing. 

12. Committee on Banks and Banking. 

12. Committee on Education. 

13. Committee on Military Affairs. 

13. Committee on Probate and Chancery. (Senate.) 

14. Committee on Public Health. 

14. Committee on Taxation. 

15. Committee on Public Charitable Institutions. 

16. Committee on Elections, 

16. Committee on Street Railways. 
18. Committee on Manufactures. 

Committee on Hoosac Tunnel & Troy and Greenfield 

Railroad; and 
Committee on Public Service. 

(In the " Green Room.") 

Committee on Agriculture. 

(In AffricuUural Room, icest basement.) 

(Committees not named have no rooms specially assigned.) 



412 Notice to Members of the General Court. 



NOTICE TO MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL COURT. 



STATE LIBRARY. 

The first section of the fiftli chapter of the General Stat- 
utes provides that there shall l)e a State Library kept in the 
State House, for the use of the Governor, Lieuteiiant-Gc^v- 
ernor, the Council, the Senate, the House of Representa- 
tives, and such other officers of the Government and other 
persons as may from time to time be permitted to use the 
same. 

The Library is in the second story of the enlargement. 

REGULATIONS. 

The Library is open during the session of the Legislature, 
each, day, without intermission, from 9 a.m. to 5 p m., ex- 
cept on Saturday p.m., when it is closed at 1 o'clock for 
sweeping, dusting, etc. 

All persons may use the library for consultation or refer- 
ence. 

Members of the Legislature may enter any alcove, and 
consult or peruse any book at their pleasure. 

Members may take any of the miscellaneous books to 
their lodgings, and retain them for a reasonable time. 

Tlie Statutes, Law Reports, State Papers, Journals, Dic- 
tionaries, Encyclopredias, etc., etc., may be taken to any 
part of the State House, but are not to be removed from it, 
except in special cases. 

Any member wishing to have access to any or all parts of 



Notice to Members of the General Court. 413 

the Library, can be furnished with a key, which will open 
every alcove, on application to one of the Assistants, the key 
to be returned before leaving the Library-room. 

Members taking books from the shelves are requested to be 
particularly careful to return them to their proper places, or 
to leave them on the tables, to be rei)Iaced by the attendants. 

No book is to be taken by a member from the Library-room 
without its being charged to hiiu. 

Books used at a hearing before a committee are to be 
charged to some member of the comniittee or of the Legis- 
lature, and not to counsel or parties in tlie case pending. 

Any member having special occasion to use the Library in 
the evening, or at any hour after it is closed, can have access 
to it through one of the watchmen in charge of the building. 

OFFICERS. 

George O. Shattuck, J. M. Manning, and Edwin P. Whipple, 
of Boston, Trustees; John "W. Dickinson, Librarian ex-officio ; 
C. B. Tillingliast, ^ss/sfanf Librarian; Miss C. B. Jackson, 
Miss E. M. Sawyer, Clerks. 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY. 

A valuable Agricultural Library, connected with the office 
of the Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, is also open at 
all hours of tlie day for the use of the members of tlie Legis- 
lature. It is in the basement of the State House, in the rear. 



BOSTON ATHENJEUM. 

By the Act of the General Court incorporating the Pro- 
prietors of the Boston Athenaeum, it is provided that the 
Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, the members of the Coun- 



414 Notice to Members of the Oeneral Court. 

cil, of the Senate, and of the House of Representatives, for 
the time being, shall have free access to the Library of the 
said corporation, and may visit and consult the same at all 
times, under the same regulations as may be provided by the 
by-laws of said corporation for the proprietors thereof. 

The Boston Athenseum is situated in Beacon Street, near 
the State House; and members who may wish to avail them- 
selves of their privilege can receive a note of introduction to 
the Librarian by applying to the Sergeant-at-Arms. 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 
Section 6 of the Act of 1794, incorporating the Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, provides that " either branch of the 
Legislature shall and may have free access to the library and 
museum of said society." 



MEDICAL EXAMINEES. 

[Appointed under chapter 200 of the Acts of 1877.] 



Suffolk County. 



Frank W. Draper .... 


Boston. 


Francis A. Harris .... 


Boston. 


Essex County. 




Geo. B. Stevens 


Gloucester. 


YoRiCK G. Hurd 


Ipsioich. 


George W. Snow .... 


Neiohuryport 


William Cogswell .... 


Bradford. 


William D. Lamb .... 


Laivrence. 


Richmond B. Root .... 


Georcjetoion. 


Joseph G. Pinkham .... 


Lj/nn. 


Charles A. Carleton 


Scdem. 


Charles Haddock .... 


Beverly. 


George S. Osborne .... 


Peahody. 


Middlesex County. 




Alfred F. Holt 


Cambridge. 


John L. Sullivan .... 


Maiden. 


Samuel W. Abbott .... 


Wakefield. 


Frederick Winsor .... 


Winchester. 


Henry A. Barrett .... 


Concord. 


Alfred Hosmer 


Watertown. 


Nathan S. Chamberlain . 


Marlborough. 


Benjamin H. Hartwell . 


Ayer. 


John C. Irish 


Lowell. 


Ezra A. Hobbs 


Framingham. 



416 



Medical Examiners. 



Worcester County 



James P, Lynde . 
William M. Parker 
Samuel C. Hart well 
David W. Hodgkins 
Charles W. Whitcomb 
J. Marcus Rice . 
George M. Morse 
Henry A. Jewett 
RowsE R. Clarke 
Ernest P. Miller 
Ira Russell . 



Hampshire County 



Joseph W. Winslow . 
Christopher Seymour 
Dyer B. N. Fish . 
David W. Miner . 



Athol. 

Milford. 

Southhridge. 

Brookfield. 

Barre. 

Worcester. 

Clinton. 

Nortliborough. 

Nortlibridge. 

Fitchhurg. 

Winchendon. 



Easthampton. 
Northampton. 
Amherst. 
Ware. 



Hampden County. 

William Holbrook Palmer. 

Theodore F. Breck Springfield. 

Lyman M. Tuttle Holyoke. 

James H. Waterman Westfield. 

Franklin County. 

Francis J. Canedy Shelhurne Falls. 

Erastus C. Coy Montague. 



Berkshire County. 



Henry L. Sabin . 
James F. A. Adams 
Samuel Camp 
Charles C. Holcomb 



Williamstown. 

Pittsfield. 

Gt. Barrington. 

Lee. 



Medical Examiners. 



417 



Norfolk County. 



Charles Sturtevant . 
James Morison 
Charles C. Tower 
Alexa>t)er R. Holmes 
Robert Amory 
Albert D. Kingsbury 
Joseph G. S. Hitchcock 
Charles A. Bemis 
GusTAVus P. Pratt 



Hijde Park. 

Quinaj. 

Weymouth. 

Canton. 

BrooJiline. 

Needham. 

Foxhorough. 

Medioay. 

Cohasset. 



Plymouth County. 

A. Elliot Paine Brockton. 

JuBAL C. Gleason Rockland. 

James B. Brewster Plymouth. 

Ebenezer W. Drake Middlthoroxigh. 

Bristol County. 

John R. Bronson Attleborough. 

Silas D. Presbrey Taunton. 

Jerome Dwelly Fall River. 

Henry Johnson New Bedford. 



Barnstable County. 

George N. Munsell Hanoich. 

John M. Crocker Provincetoion. 

John M. Smith Barnstable. 

Dukes County. 

John Pierce Edgartown. 

Edwin Mayberry Edgartown. 

William Leach Tishury. 

Nantucket County. 

John B. King Nantucket. 

53 



418 Roster of the District Police Force. 



EOSTER OF THE DISTRICT POLICE FORCE. 



^'AMES. 


Residence. 


District. 


Rufus R. Wade, Chief, 


Cambridge . 


Northern. 


John T. White . 


Arlington . 


Northern. 


James P. Wade . 


Chelsea 


Suffolk County. 


George C. Pratt . 


North Abiugton . 


South-eastern. 


Joseph M. D3'son 


Worcester . 


Middle. 


William M. Hill . 


Salem . 


Eastern. 


George F. Seaver 


Taunton 


Southern. 


Henry A. Dexter 


Fall River . 


Southern. 


Benson Munyan . 


Williamsburg 


North-western. 



Soldiers^ Messenger Corps, 419 



SOLDIEES' MESSENGEE COEPS. 

For the Delivery of Messages, Letters, Small Packages, etc., in 
this City and vicinity. 



D. O. BALCOM, Superintendent, 34 Pemberton Square. 



Stations. 

1. Pemberton Square. 

2. Corner of Water and Washington Streets. 

3. Scollay Square. 

4. Union Park and Concord Square.* 

5. Merchants' Row, Corner of State Street. 

6. Milk, corner Washington Street. 

7. Corner of Summer and Washington Streets. 

8. Boston and Albany Depot. 

9. Boston and Providence Depot. 

10. Old State House, corner of Washington and State Streets. 

11. Corner of Winter and Tremont Streets. 

12. Front of Merchants' Bank, 28 State Street. 

13. Front of Boylston Market, Washington Street. 

14. Corner of Charles and Chestnut Streets. 

15. Athenreum, 12 and 14 Beacon Street. 

16. Corner of Arlington and Beacon Streets. 

17. Congress Street, corner of Post-office Square. 

18. Liberty Square. 

19. Opposite Horticultural Building, 100 Tremont Street. 

20. Corner of Devonshire and Milk Streets. 

21. Lowell and Eastern Depots. 

22. State House. 

23. Front of Mercliants' Exchange, State Street. 

24. Front of the Parker House on School Street. 

* Meseenger No. 4 has cards, with printed tariff for his station. 



420 Soldiers' Messenger- Corps. 



Tariff.* 

To any point in Boston, north of Dover Street, and 

east of Berkeley Street 15 cents. 

To any point in Boston, north of Dover Street, and 
east of Berkeley Street, with return letter or 
parcel 25 cents. 

To any point in Boston, south of Dover Street (old 

city limits), and west of Berkeley Street . . 20 cents. 

To any point in Boston, south of Dover Street (old 
city limits), and west of Berkeley Street, with 
return letter or parcel 30 cents. 

To East or South Boston, Charlestown, Cambridge, 
Hij^hlands, or any point out of Boston proper, 
per hour . * 25 cents. 

Circulars delivered according to agreement with the Superin- 
tendent. 
Extra messengers, to be paid by the day or week, may be 

had at the Superintendent's office, at any time. 

Complaints, from any cause whatever, made to the Superin- 
tendent, at his office, 34 Pemberton Square, will secure prompt 

attention. 

* Messenger No. 4 has cards, with printed tariff for his station. 



The State House. 421 



THE STATE HOUSE. 



The present State House was erected -in 1795-7, upon land 
purchased of the lieirs of John Hancock, hy the town of Bos- 
ton, for the sum of .'554,000, and conveyed by said town to the 
Commonwealth, May 2, 1795. The Commissioners on the 
part of the town to convey the " Governor's Pasture," as it 
was styled, to the Commonwealth, were William Tudor, 
Charles Jarvis, John Coffin Jones, William Eustis, William 
Little, Thomas Dawes, Joseph Russell, Harrison Gray Otis, 
and Perez Morton. The agents for erecting the State House 
were named in the deed as follows: Thomas Dawes, Edward 
Hutchinson Kobldns, and Charles Bullinch. 

The corner-stone was laid July 4, 1795, by Governor Samuel 
Adams, assisted by Paul Revere, Master of the Grand Lodge 
of Masons. The stone was drawn to the spot by fifteen 
white horses, representing the number of States of the Union 
at that time. Tlie biiilding is 173 feet front ; the height, in- 
cluding dome, is 110 feet, and the foundation is about that 
height above the waters of the Bay. The dome is 53 feet in 
diameter, and 35 feet high. 

Extensive improvements, including a/* new part," extend- 
ing backward upon Mount Vernon Street, were made, chiefly 
under the direction of a commission, in the years, 1853, 1854, 
1855, and 185G. 

Under a Resolve of 18G6, a commission was appointed to 
inquire and report concerning the whole subject of remodel- 
ling or rebuilding the State House. Tliey reported three 
propositions, without deciding in favor of either. The first 



422 Tlie State House. 

was a plan of remodelling, at an expense of 8375,430 ; the 
second, a plan of remodelling, at an expense of $759,872 ; 
and the third, a plan for a new building, at an expense of 
$2,042,571. The report of the commission was referred to the 
Committee on the State House of the session of 1867, who 
recommended a plan of alterations, at the estimated expense 
of $150,000 ; and by Resolve No. 84 of that year, the work 
was ordered to be executed under the supervision of a com- 
mission consisting of the President of the Senate and the 
Speaker of the House of Represeutatives, who were author- 
ized by the same Resolve to expend $150,000, and by a sub- 
sequent Resolve, $20,000 in addition. The President of the 
Senate died on the 2gth of October, and thereafter tlie work 
was continued by the surviving commissioner. 

The work was commenced on the second day of July, and 
was so nearly completed, so far as the conveniences for the 
legislative department Avere concerned, that both branches 
of the General Court met on the first day of January, and 
continued their sessions substantially without interruption. 
The improvements consist of an almost entire reconstruction 
of the interior of the building, except the " new part" before 
referred to as having been added from 1853 to 18oG, whereby 
waste spaces are economized, the access to the several parts 
of tlie building simplified and made much more convenient, 
additional height and commodiousness given to a large part 
of the rooms, and a net gain of more than thirty rooms 
secured without extending the exterior walls of the building. 
Including the extension of the old, as well as the construc- 
tion of the additional rooms, the contents of these apart- 
ments have been increased from about one hundred and 
three thousand to about two hundred and sixty-five thou- 
sand cubic feet, —a net gain of one hundred and sixty-two 
thousand cubic feet. 

The exterior improvements consist princii:)ally in the re- 
moval of a large number of supernumerary chimneys, and 
other excrescences, Avhich had marred and concealed the 
original well-approved architectural proportions of the State 
House. Two new galleries were added to the Representa- 
tives' Hall ; and its finish, as also that of the Senate Cham- 



The State House. 423 

ber, were much improved, while their general outline was 
retained. The Council Chamber, with the exception of the 
ceiling, wliic-h was frescoed, remains with its ancient finish 
unchanged. The Governor's room was enlarged laterally, 
and additional height was also added by absorbing into it 
the old "green room," which was directly above. A new 
"green room," a spacious hall, elegantly finished and well 
lighted and ventilated, fifty-six by thirty-seven feet, has 
been constructed. The ceiling of the Doric Hall was raised 
two feet, and finished in panels ; and its floor, and also those 
of the corridors on either side of it, were laid with marble 
tile. Imi:)rovennients were made in the basement storj'^, which 
entirely changed its character and ittilized its waste places. 
Beside the space occupied by the heating and A'entilating 
apparatus and two large fire-proof rooms, there are now in 
this story, in the old part, twelve good rooms. Openings are 
made in both wings between the main building and the addi- 
tion, by which spacious corridors were secured, leading 
directly from the Mt. Vernon Street entrance, which by 
branch corridors are connected with each other, and give 
easj^ access to every jmrt of the basement. The floors of the 
corridors in this story are also laid with marble tile. The 
whole is heated by steam, generated in three boilers located 
in an underground room outside of the walls, between the 
west wing and Hancock Avenue. Warm, fresh hydrated air, 
for ventilation, is supplied to every room by a fan propelled 
by a steam-engine; and the same engine runs an exhaust-fan 
for removing the foul air from the halls and some of the 
principal rcjoms. A steam-pump forces water to the upper 
part of the building through large i^ipes, to which there is 
attached in.the several stories more than a thousand feet of 
rubber hose, by which every room may be reached in case 
oLfire. In addition to this precaution against fire, there is 
a steam-pipe leading to the dome, by means of which a fire 
there may be alnujst instantly extinguished. 

These improvements were executed from the plans of the 
architects, Washburn & Son, and under their direct and con- 
stant supervision. Cost, including furniture, about .•&'2o0,000. 

The legislature of 18G8 made j)rovision for reseating the 



424 The State House. 

Senate Chamber and the Hall of the House, which improve- 
ments were made under the sai)ervision of legislative com- 
mittees, ill season for the accommodation of the legislature 
of 1869, at a cost of about $6,600. 

The Battle-Flags. 

The colors of the several regiments and batteries of Massar 
chusetts which had served the country during the War of the 
Rebellion, were returned to the State House on the 22d of De- 
cember, 1«65. A full account of the interesting ceremonies of 
the occasion may be found in the Adjutant-General's Report 
for the year 1865. The colors were grouped around the pillars 
in the Doric Hall, where they remained until, by authority of 
Resolve No. 38 of 1866, they w^ere placed in the niches on the 
north side of the hall, and in the sides of the recess occupied 
by the Washington Statue, according to a plan of A. R. Esty, 
Esq., architect, in whose charge the matter was jilaced by the 
Governor and Council. The flags are 269 in number, —194 
being of infantry regiments, and 75 of cavalry and artillery. 
The cavalry flags are placed in the north-west angle niche of 
the hall ; the infantry flags in the Washington Statue recess, 
and the artillery and battery flags in the north-eastern niche. 
In the statue recess, the national colors are located in regular 
numerical order upon the lowest shelf on either side of the 
statue, commencing No. 1 next to cavalr^^ flags, with the State 
and other colors in the background. The flags are enclosed 
within mammoth panes of glass, and the openings are prop- 
erly guarded by fencing. 

The Statue of "Washington, 

By Chantret, was placed in the State House in 1828, by the 
Washington Monument Association, at a cost of $15,000. 

In the pavement of the area, near the statue, are/oc similes 
of certain Memorial Stones of the ancestors of Washington, 
from the parish church at Brington, near Althorp, Northamp- 
tonshire, England. They were i^resented by the Right Hon. 
Earl Spencer to the Hon. Charles Sumner, and by him to the 
Commonwealth, February 22, 1861. 



The State House. 425 

The Statue of Webster, 

By Powers, was erected upon the grounds in front of the 
State House, in 1859, by the AYebster Memorial Committee, at 
a cost of §10,000. 

The Statue of Mann, 

By Miss Stebbins, was erected in 1865. 

The Statue of Ex-Governor Andrew, 

By Thomas Ball, was placed in the Doric Hall in February, 
1872. 

Lincoln and Sumner, 

Busts of President Lincoln and Senator Sumner have recent- 
ly been placed in niches in tlie Doric Hall. 

"Wilson and Boutwell. 

Busts of Vice-President Wilson and Mr. Secretary Boutwell 
were recently placed in the Library ; but that of Vice-Presi- 
dent Wilson was, in 1878, removed to Doric Hall. 



426 



Cdlendar. 



\m 


g 
^ 


1 


1 


1 


8 


1 


1 


\m 




1 






g 


1 


1 


]k\ 


'4 


'5 


*6 


'7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


JULY 


4 


'5 


'h 


'7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 

10 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16117 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 




18 


19 


20 21 


22i23|24 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 




25 


26 


27 28 


29 


30 31 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 30 


31 


FEB. 


'i 


'2 


'3 


4 


'5 


'e 


•i 


/UG. 


*i 


'2 


*3 


4 


*5 '6 


'7 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 


14 


8 


9 


10 


11 12'13 


14 




15 


If) 


17 


18 


1920:21 




15 


16 


17 


18 '19 20 211 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 27|28 




'>2 


23 


24 


25 26,27 


28 




29 








. 


1 




29 


30 


31 










MAI|. 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5! 6 


SliP. 








1 


2 


3 


4 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 13 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9110 


11 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 19,20 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23,24 


25 




28 


29 


30 


31 


.. 






26 


27 


28 


29 


30|.. 




jlPR. 


4 


'5 


6 


'7 


1 

8 


2 3 
9'10 


m. 


'3 


'4 


*5 


'e 


'7 


1 

8 


2 
9 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


1617 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14!l5 


16 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22123 24 




17 


18 


19 


20:21:22 


23 




25 


26 


27 


28:29;30|.. 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28,29 


30 


MjlY 


'2 


*3 


*4 


'5 


*6 


'7 


1 

8 


Hpv. 


31 


'i 


'2 


*3 


'4 


'5 


'6 







10 


11 


12 


13 14 


15 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




10 


17 


I81I9202I 


22 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18119 


20 




23 


24 


25 


26 27i28;29 




21 


22 


93 


24 


25;26 


27 




80 


31 






.. .. 




28 


29 


30 




.. .. 




JU!(. 






1 


2 3 


4 5 


DKi;. 








i 


2 3 


4 


6 


7 


8 


910111112 




5 


6 


7 


8 


910 


11 




18 


14 


15 


16 17il8:i0 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 17 


18 




20 


21 


22123 24:25:26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


2324 


25 




27 28 


29 30 . . 


:: :: 




26 


27 


28 29 


3031 





I 




■fv 



■ m^^m 



m^y^^^.:.:y 



i^vww^CC^'^'^i 






V^wv^, 



,^^^«^Wul 



^'wwv'Vi 






'^mZ^^^w,, 



vwv^ vvv 






W^^WWw 



^w^bu:^!, 



•t^WW^^IS^ 






v^ vW 



^®.,,v»i^; 






'O^Vi^O.-^W^ 






:c^:"^»i^ 



Kv.,.v,„- "'^'wsfififcft-yw 



;§e:^..'^«-'^^yw 



m^ 



>;^oo^^^vw€|,;;^i^y;