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Full text of "A manual for the use of the General Court"

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Hon. LEVI H. GREENWOOD, President. 



ON PRESIOENT-S RIGHT. 

Hon. Erson B. Barlow. 
Luke S. Stowe. 
William R. Burke. 
Thomas M. Vinson. 
Samuel Boss. 
Walter B. McLane. 
William H. Wheeler. 
Daniel E. Denny. 
Arthur L. Nason. 
James P. Timilty. 
Denuis E. Halley. 
John H. Hunt. 
John H. Schoonmaker. 
Arthur S. Adams. 
Charles H. Brown. 
James A. Hatton. 
Harry N. Steams. 
Joseph P. Lomasney. 
Edric Eklridge. 
Frank P. Bennett, Jr. 



HENEY D. OOOLIDQB, Clerk. 




ON PRESIDENT'S LEFT. 

Hon. Charles V. Blanchard. 

" George L. Barnes. 

" Claude L. Allen. 

" Charles H. Pearson. 

" Calvin Coolidge. 

" Edward J. Grainger. 

" Ezra W. Clark. 

" Frederic M. Hersey. 

" Francis J. Horgan. 

" George H. Newhall. 

" James F. Powers. 

" Francis X. Quigley. 

Vacant. 

" Geo. Holden Tinkhan 

" Thomas M. Joyce. 

" George A. Schofield. 

" Charles F. McCarthy. 

" John H. Mack. 

" Charles S. Chace. 

" Henry C. Mulligan. 



THOMAS F. PEDEICK, Sergeant-at-Amn. 



©I|f Ql0mm0nmraltIy nf iHasaarljuartta 



MANUAL 

j FOB THE USE OF THE 

'general court 



CONTAINING THE 

RULES OF THE TWO BRANCHES, 

TOGETHEB WITH THE 

CONSTITUTION OF THE COMMONWEALTH AND THAT OF THE 

UNITED STATES. AND A LIST OF THE EXECUTIVE. 

LEGISLATIVE AND JUDICIAL DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT. STATE 

INSTITUTIONS AND THEIR 

OFFICERS, 

AND OTHER STATISTICAL INFORMATION. 

Prepared under Section 10 of Chapter 9 of the Revised Laws, 
»- - Bi 

HENRY D. OOOr-IliGfe, CLEaK ofthr Sbwate 

AND 

JAMES W. KIMBALL, Cljrk 07 the House. 



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BOSTON: 

Wright & Pottbk Printing Company, State Pbintbbs, 

18 Post Office Squabh. 

1912. 

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flMEiMiirOflMSSACHBSEnS 





MAY 3 1961 




STATE HOUSE. BOSIQIl 

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CONTENTS. 



Page 

Agricultural (Massachusetts) College, .... 340 

Agricultural Library 676 

Agriculture, State Board of, 303 

Amherst College 337 

Armory Commissioners, 305 

Arms of the Commonwealth, 674 

Art Commission, 305 

Attorney -General, Department of 423 

Attorneys-General since 1686 263 

Auditor of the Commonwealth, Department of, . . . 423 

Auditors since 1849, 265 

Ballot Law Commission, 305 

Bank Commissioner, 305 

Bar Examiners, State Board of, 305 

Barnstable, State Normal School at, 314 

Blind, Massachusetts Commission for the, .... 305 

Boards and Commissions, 303-314 

Boston, Directors of the Port of, 306 

Boston, Licensing Board for the City of, . . . . 306 

Boston, Pilots for the Port of, 306 

Boston, State Normal Art School at, 318 

Boston Athenaeum, 676 

Boston College, 340 

Boston Finance Commission, 306 

Boston Juvenile Court, 283 

Boston Police Commissioner 306 

Boston State Hospital, 324 

Boston Transit Commission 306 



iv Contents. 

Page 

Boston University, 341 

Boys, Industrial School for, 319 

Brldgewater, Slate Normal School at, 318 

Brigham (Peter Bent) Hospital, 327 

Calendar for 1912, 677 

Cattle Bureau, 306 

Census of Inhabitants in 1905 and 1910, Legal Voters in 

1905 and Registered Voters in 1911, .... 246 

Charity, State Board of 306 

Cities, Statistics of, 93 

Cities and Towns Alphabetically, with the Congressional, 
Councillor, Senatorial and Representative Districts 

of each, 219 

Cities in the Commonwealth, with the Dates of their Incor- 
poration and their Population, 194 

Civil Service Commission, 307 

Clark College, 345 

Clark University, 344 

College of the Holy Cross 338 

Colleges in Massachusetts, 335 

Commissions, 303-314 

Committees : 

Joint Standing, . 480 

Standing, of the House, 478 

Standing, of the Senate, 477 

Conciliation and Arbitration, State Board of, . . . 307 
Congress : 

Act regulating the Time and Manner of electing Sen- 
ators to, 89 

Vote for Members of, 383 

Congressional Districts, 195 

Constitution of Massachusetts, 25 

Amendments to, 68 

Constitution of the United States, 3 

Amendments to, 17 

Consumptives, Massachusetts Commission on Hospitals 

for 320 

Corporations, Commissioner of, ..... . 307 



Contents. v 

Page 

Council, Committees of the, 422 

Councillor Districts, 202 

Councillors, 421 

Counties, Cities and Towns of Massachusetts, Statistics of, 93 

County Accounts, Controller of, 307 

County Officers, 292 

Court of Common Pleas, Justices of, from 1820 to 1859, . 277 
Court, Superior, for the County of Suffolk, from 1855 to 

1859, 278 

Court, Superior, of Judicature, from 1692 to 1775, . . 274 
Courts : 

Boston Juvenile, 283 

District, 285 

Land, 283 

Municipal, 290 

Of Probate and Insolvency, 283 

Police 284 

Courts, Superior and Supreme Judicial : 

Justices of, since the Revolution, 275 

Justices of, since 1859, 279 

Present Justices of, 280-282 

Dairy Bureau, . . 304 

Danvers State Hospital, 322 

Dentistry, Board of Registration in, 307 

Deputy Governors of Massachusetts since 1629, . . . 257 

District Attorneys, 291 

District Courts, 285 

District Police, Massachusetts, 315 

Education, Board of, 307 

Secretaries of, since 1837, 265 

Embalming, Board of Registration in, . . . . 308 

Everett (Mount) Reservation Commission, ... . 311 

Executive Department, 421 

Executive Secretary, 421 

Fall River, Board of Police for the City of, ... 308 

Fall River, The Bradford Durfee Textile School of, . . 308 

Feeble-minded, School for, 323 

Fire Insurance Rates, Board of Appeal for, . . . 308 



vi Contents. 



Page 

Firemen's Relief Fund, Commissioners of the, . . . 308 

Fisheries and Game, Commissioners on, .... 308 

Fitchburg, State Normal School at 318 

Foreign Letters, Postage on, 369 

Foxborough State Hospital, 324 

Framingham, State Normal School at, .... 318 

Free Public Library Commissioners, 308 

Gardner State Colony, 323 

Gas and Electric Light Commissioners, .... 308 

Governor, 1912 421 

Messenger to, • . . 422 

Secretary to, 421 

Governor's Staff, 424 

Governors since 1620, 256 

Greylock Reservation Commission, 309 

Harbor and Land Commissioners 309 

Harvard College, 335 

Health, State Board of, 309 

Highway Commission, 309 

Holy Cross, College of, 338 

Holyoke (Mount) College, 337 

Homestead Commission, 310 

Hospital Cottages for Children, 323 

House of Representatives : 

Alphabetical List of Meml^ers, their Districts and Res- 
idences, 453 

List of Members, by Counties, 437 

List of Members, with Committees of which each per- 
son is a Member, 496 

Monitors of, 473 

Officers of, 472 

Reporters of, • 506 

Rules of, 539 

Notes of Rulings on the, 620 

Speakers and Clerks of, since 1780, . . . 269-271 

Industrial School for Boys, 319 

Insane Hospitals, Trustees of, 321-324 

Insanity, State Board of, 310 



Contents. vii 



Page 
Institutions under Supervision of Board of Prison Com- 
missioners : 

Massachusetts Reformatory, 325 

Prison Camp and Hospital, 325 

Reformatory for Women, 325 

State Prison, 325 

Institutions under Supervision of State Board of Charity : 

Consumptives, Trustees of Hospitals for, . . . 320 

Industrial School for Boys, 319 

Lyman School for Boys, 319 

Massachusetts Training Schools, 319 

Massachusetts Hospital School, 320 

Rutland State Sanatorium, 320 

State Farm, 319 

State Industrial School for Girls 319 

State Infirmary, 319 

Institutions under Supervision of State Board of Insanity : 

Boston State Hospital 324 

Danvers State Hospital, 322 

Foxborough State Hospital, 324 

Gardner State Colony, 323 

Hospital Cottages for Children, 323 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded, . . 323 

Medfield State Asylum, 322 

Monson State Hospital, 322 

Northampton State Hospital, 322 

Taunton State Hospital, '• 321 

Westborough State Hospital, 322 

Worcester State Hospital, 321 

Wrentham State School, 323 

Insurance Commissioner, 310 

Insurance Guaranty Fund, Trustees of the, . . . 309 

Jackson College, 345 

Joint Rules of the Two Branches, 575 

Notes of Rulings on the, 648 

Judiciary of Massachusetts, 274 

Lakeville State Sanatorium, 320 

Land Court 283 



viii Contents. 

Page 
Legislation in the United States, Commissioners for the 

Promotion of Uniformity in, 313 

Legislature : 

Length of Sessions of, since 1832, 272 

Organization of, since 1780, 266 

Sergeants-at-Arms of, since 1835, 271 

Lieutenant-Governor of Massachusetts, 1912, . . . 421 
Lieutenant-Governors of the Province of Massachusetts 

Bay, 259 

Lieutenant-Governors since 1780, 259 

Loan Agencies, Supervisor of, 310 

Lowell, State Normal School at, 318 

Lowell Textile School, 310 

Lumber, Surveyor-General of, 310 

Lyman School for Boys, 319 

Lynn Harbor, Commission for Investigation of, . . 310 

Massachusetts, Constitution of, 25 

Amendments to, 68 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 340 

Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, . . 326 

Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, 336 

Massachusetts District Police, 315 

Massachusetts Employees Insurance Association, Board 

of Directors of, 310 

Massachusetts General Hospital, 326 

Massachusetts Historical Society, 676 

Massachusetts Homceopathic Hospital, .... 327 

Massachusetts Hospital School, 320 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, .... 339 

Massachusetts Reformatory, 325 

Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded, . . . 323 

Massachusetts Training Schools, 319 

Medfield State Asylum, 322 

Medical Examiners, 328 

Medicine, Board of Registration in, 311 

Metropolitan Park Commission, 311 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, .... 311 

Militia, Massachusetts Volunteer 425 



Contents. ix 

Page 

Monson State Hospital, 322 

Mount Everett Reservation Commission, . . . . 311 

Mount Holyoke College, 337 

Municipal Courts 290 

Nautical Training School, Commissioners of the, . . 311 

New Bedford Textile School, 311 

Normal Schools, State, 318 

Northampton State Hospital, 322 

North Adams, State Normal School at, ... . 318 

North Reading State Sanatorium, 320 

Nurses, Board of Registration of, 311 

Perkins Institution and Massachusetts School for the Blind, 326 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 327 

Pharmacy, Board of Registration in, 311 

Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of 336 

Plumbers, State Examiners of, 312 

Police Courts, 284 

Population and Voters of Massachusetts, .... 246. 

Postal Regulations (for foreign postage, see page 369) , . 365 

Post-offices in Massachusetts 346 

President of the United States, vote for, in 1908, . . 371 

Prison Camp and Hospital, 325 

Prison Commissioners, Board of, 312 

Prisons. (See Massachusetts Reformatory, Prison Camp 

and Hospital, Reformatory for Women and State 

Prison.) 

Probate and Insolvency, Courts of, 283 

Probation, Commission on, . . . . . . . 312 

Province Laws, 312 

Publication, State Board of, 312 

Public Library Commissioners, Free • 308 

Public Records, Commissioner of, 312 

Radcliffe College, 343 

Railroad Commissioners, Board of 312 

Reformatory, Massachusetts, 325 

Reformatory for "Women, 325 

Reporters 506 

Representative Districts, 209 



X Contents. 

Page 

Representatives in Congress (1910), by Districts, . . 383 
Rules : 

Joint, 575 

Of the House, 539 

Of the Senate, 511 

Rulings, Notes of, of the Presiding Offlcers : 

On the Constitution, 597 

On the House Rules, 620 

On the Joint Rules, 648 

On the Senate Rules, 604 

On Sundry Questions, 663 

Rutland State Sanatorium, 320 

Salem, State Normal School at, 318 

School for the Feeble-minded, 323 

Seal of the Commonwealth, 673 

Secretaries of the Commonwealth since 1780, . . . 262 

Secretary of the Commonwealth, Department of, . . 423 
Senate : 

Alphabetical List of Members, 434 

Arrangement of Seats in, 433 

List of Members, by Districts, with Residences, etc., . 429 
List of Members, with Committees of which each per- 
son is a Member , 493 

Offlcers of, 436 

Presidents and Clerks of, since 1780, . . . 266-268 

Reporters of, 506 

Rules of, 511 

Notes of Rulings on the, 604 

Senatorial Districts, 205 

Senators, United States : 

Act regulating the Time and Manner of electing, . . 89 

From Massachusetts, since 1789, 261 

Sergeant-at-Arms and Appointees, . . . • . . 474 

Sergeants-at-Arms of the General Court since 1835, . . 271 
Shire Towns. (See County Officers.) 

Simmons College, 344 

Smith College, 343 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, 327 

Solicitors-General, 263 



Contents. xi 

Page 

state Aid and Pensions, Commissioner of, . . . . 312 

State Dairy Bureau, 304 

State Farm, 319 

State Forester, 313 

State House, 669 

State Industrial School for Girls, 319 

State Infirmary, 319 

State Institutions, 319-325 

State Library 313,075 

State Normal Schools, 318 

State Officers, Vote for, in 1911, 415 

State Prison, 326 

Statistics, Bureau of, 313 

Sundry Rulings, 663 

Superior Court. (See Courts, Superior and Supreme Judicial.) 
Supreme Judicial Court. (See Courts, Superior and Su- 
preme Judicial.) 

Taunton State Hospital 321 

Tax Commissioner, 313 

Technology, Massachusetts Institute of, . . . . 339 

Towns, Statistics of, 93 

Towns and Cities Alphabetically, with the Congressional, 
Councillor, Senatorial and Representative Districts 

in which each is located 219 

Treasurer and Receiver-General, Department of, . . 423 

Treasurers of the Commonwealth since 1780, . . . 262 
Trial Justices. (See County Officers.) 

Tufts College, 338 

Uniformity of Legislation in the United States, Commis- 
sioners for the Promotion of, 313 

United States : 

Act regulating the Time and Manner of electing Sena- 
tors in the Congress of, 89 

Constitution of, 3 

Amendments to, 17 

Postal Regulations of, 365 

Senators from Massachusetts in the Congress of, since 

1789 261 

Universities. (See Colleges in Massachusetts.) 



xii Contents. 

Page 

Valuation of the Commonwealth in 1910, .... 235 

Various Institutions, 326, 327 

Veterinary Medicine, Board of Registration in, . . . 313 

Vote for Councillors in 1911, 416 

Vote for Governor in 1911, 397 

Vote for President in Massachusetts in 1908, . . . 371 

Vote for Representatives, Sixty-second Congress, . . 383 

Vote for State Officers, 1911, 415 

Voters, Legal, in 1905, 246 

Voters, Registered, in 1911, 246 

Voting Machine Examiners, 313 

Wachusett Mountain State Reservation Commission, . 313 

Weights and Measures, Commissioner of, . . . . 314 

Wellesley College 342 

Westborough State Hospital, 322 

Westfield, State Normal School at 318 

Westfield State Sanatorium, 320 

Williams College, 336 

Women, Reformatory for, 325 

Worcester, State Normal School at, 318 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 341 

Worcester State Hospital, 321 

Wrecks and Shipwrecked Goods, 314 

Wrentham State School, 323 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

United States of America 

AND 

CONSTITUTION 

OR 

FORM OF GOVERNMENT 

FOR THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 
OF AMERICA. 



PREAMBLE. 

Objects of the Constitution. 

Article I. 

Section 1. Legislative powers, in whom vested. Page 5. 

Sect. 2. House of representatives, how and by whom chosen — 
Qualifications of a representative — Representatives and direct 
taxes, how apportioned — Census — Vacancies to be filled — Power 
of choosing officers, and of impeachment. 5, 6. 

Sect. 3. Senators, how and by whom chosen — How classified — 
State executive to make temporary appointments, in case, «&c.— 
Qualifications of a Senator— President of the Senate, his right to 
vote — President ;)ro tern, and other officers of Senate, how chosen — 
Power to try impeachments — AVheu President is tried, Chief Justice 
to preside — Sentence. 6,7. 

Sect. 4. Times, &c., of holding elections, how prescribed — One 
session in each year. 7. 

Sect. 5. Membership — Quorum — Adjournments — Rules — 
Power to punish or expel — Journal — Time of adjournment limited, 
unless, «&c. 7, 8. 

Sect. 6. Compensation— Privileges — Disqualification in certain 
cases. 8. 

Sect. 7. House to originate all revenue bills — Veto — Bill may 
be passed by two-thirds of each house, notwithstanding, &c. — Bill 
not returned in ten days — Provision as to all orders, &c., except, 
&c. 8, 9. 

Sect. 8, Powers of Congress. 9, 10. 

Sect. 9. Provision as to migration or importation of certain per- 
Bons,— Habeas corims — B\\\s of attainder, &c. — Taxes, how appor- 
tioned— No export duty— No commercial preferences — No money 
drawn from treasury, unless, &c. — No titular nobility — Officers not 
to receive presents, unless, &c. 10, 11. 

Sect. 10. States prohibited from the exercise of certain powers. 
11. 



Constitution of the United States, 



Article n. 

Section 1. President and Vice-President, their term of office — 
Electors of President and Vice-President, number, and how ap. 
pointed — Electors to vote on same day — Qualifications of President 
— On whom his duties devolve in case of his removal, death, &c.— 
President's compensation — His oath. 11-13. 

Sect. 2. President to be commander-in-chief — He may require 
opinion of, &c., and may pardon — Treaty-making power — Nomina- 
tion of certain officers — When President may fill vacancies. 13. 

Sect. 3. President shall communicate to Congress — He may con- 
vene and adjourn Congress, in case, &c.; shall receive ambassadors, 
execute laws, and commission officers. 14. 

Sect. 4. All civil offices forfeited for certain crimes. 14. 

Article III. 

Section 1. Judicial power— Tenure — Compensation. 14. 

Sect. 2. Judicial power, to what cases it extends — Original juris- 
diction of supreme court — Appellate — Trial by jury, except, &c.— 
Trial, where. 14, 15. 

Sect. 3. Treasondefined — Proof of — Punishment of. 15. 

Article IV. 

Section 1. Credit to be given to public acts, &c., of every State. 
15. 

Sect. 2. Privileges of citizens of each State — Fugitives from jus- 
tice to be dehvered up — Persons held to service, having escaped, to 
be delivered up. 15. 

Sect. 3. Admission of new States — Power of Congress over ter- 
ritory and other property. 15, 16. 

Sect. 4. Republican form of government guaranteed — Each 
State to be protected. 16. 

Article V. 

Constitution, how amended — Proviso. 16. 

Article VI. 
Certain debts, «&c., adopted — Supremacy of Constitution, treaties, 
and laws of the United States — Oath to support Constitution, by 
whomtaken— No religious test. 16, 17. 

Article VII. 
What ratification shall establish Constitution. 17. 



Constitution of the United States 



Amendments. 
I. — Religious establislnuent prohibited— Freedom of speech, ol 

the press, and right to petition. 17. 
II. — Right to keep and bear arms. 17. 

HI. — No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, &c. 17. 
IV. — Right of search and seizure regulated. 17, 18. 
v. — Provisions concerning prosecutions, trials, and punishments 
— Private property not to be taken for public use, witiiout, 
&c. 18. 
VI. —Further provisions respecting criminal prosecutions. 18. 
VII. — Right of trial by jury secured. 18, 
VIII. — Bail, fines, and punishments. 18. 
IX. — Rule of construction. 18. 
X. — Same subject. 18. 
XI. — Same subject. 19. 
XII. — Manner of choosing President and Vice-President. 19, 20. 
XIII. — Slavery abolished. 20. 

XIV. — Citizenship defined — Apportionment of representatives — 
Persons engaged in rebellion excluded from oflice — Debts 
of United States, and of States contracted during the rebel- 
lion. 20, 21. 
XV. — Right of citizenship not to be abridged. 21. 

"We the people of the United States, in order to form a more 
perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquillity, 
provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, 
and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, 
do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States 
of America. 

Article I. 

Section 1. All legislative powers herein granted shall be 
vested in a congress of the United States, which shall consist 
of a senate and house of representatives. 

Sect. 2. The house of representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the several 
states, and the electors in each state shall have the qualifica- 
tions requisite for electors of the most numerous branch of the 
state legislature. 

No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years 



6 Constitution of the United States. 

a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that state in whicli he shall be chosen. 

Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among 
the several states which may be included within this Union, 
according to their respective numbers, which shall be deter- 
mined by adding to the whole number of free persons, includ- 
ing those bound to service for a term of years, and excluding 
Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. The actual 
enumeration shall be made withm three years after the first 
meeting of the congress of the United States, and within every 
subsequent term of ten years, in such maim.er as they shall by 
law direct. The number of representatives shall not exceed 
one for every thirty thousand, but each state shall have at least 
one representative ; and until such enumeration shall be made, 
the state of New Hampshire shall be entitled to choose three, 
Massachusetts eight, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations 
one, Connecticut five. New York six. New Jersey four, Penn- 
sylvania eight, Delaware one, Maryland six, Virginia ten. North 
Carolina five. South Carolma five, and Georgia three. 

When vacancies happen m the representation from any state, 
the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of election to 
fill such vacancies. 

The house of representatives shall choose their speaker and 
other ofiicers; and shall have the sole power of impeachment. 

Sect. 3. The senate of the United States shall be composed 
of two senators from each state, chosen by the legislature 
thereof, for six years ; and each senator shall have one vote. 

Immediately after they shall be assembled in consequence of 
the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may be 
into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first class 
shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year, of the 
second class at the expiration of the fourth year, and of the 
third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third 
may be chosen every second year ; and if vacancies happen by 
resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of 
any state, the executive thereof may make temporaiy appoint- 
ments until the next meeting of the legislature, which shall 
then fill such vacancies. 



Constitution of the United States, 7 

No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained to 
the age of thu-ty years, and been nine years a citizen of the 
United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhabit- 
ant of that state for which he shall be chosen. 

The vice-president of the United States shall be president of 
the senate, but shall have no vote, imless they be equally 
divided. 

The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a presi- 
dent pro tempore, in the absence of the vice-president, or when 
he shall exercise the office of president of the United States. 

The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeachments. 
When sittmg for that purpose, they shall be on oath or affirma- 
tion. When the president of the United States is tried, the 
chief justice shall preside: and no person shall be convicted 
without the concurrence of two-thirds of the members present. 

Judgment m cases of impeachment shall not extend further 
than to removal from office, and disqualification to hold and 
enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States : 
but the party convicted shall nevertheless be liable and subject 
to indictment, trial, judgment and punishment, according to 
law. 

Sect. 4. The times, places and manner of holdmg elections 
for senators and reiiresentatives, shall be prescribed in each 
state by the legislature thereof ; but the congress may at any 
time by law make or alter such regulations, except as to the 
places of choosing senators. 

The congress shall assemble at least once in eveiy year, and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, imless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 

Sect. 5. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, 
returns and qualifications of its own members, and a majority 
of each shall constitute a quormn to do business ; but a smaller 
number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, 
and under such penalties as each house may provide. 

Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, xumish 
its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence 
of two-thirds, expel a member. 



8 Constitution of the United States. 

Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and from 
time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in 
then- judgment require secrecy; and the yeas and nays of the 
members of either house on siny question shall, at the desire of 
one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. 

Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, without 
the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days, nor 
to any other place than that in which the two houses shall be 
sitting. 

Sect. 6. The senators and representatives shall receive a 
compensation for their services, to be ascertamed by law, and 
paid out of the treasury of the United States. They shall in all 
cases, except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privi- 
leged from arrest dm-mg their attendance at the session of their 
respective houses, and in going to and returning from the same ; 
and for any speech or debate in either house, they shall not be 
questioned in any other place. 

No senator or representative shall, during the time for which 
he was elected, be appointed to any civil office under the 
authority of the United States, which shall have been created, 
or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased during 
such time ; and no person holding any office under the United 
States, shall be a member of either house during his continu- 
ance in office. 

Sect. 7. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of representatives ; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments as on other bills. 

Every bill which shall have passed the house of representa- 
tives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be pre- 
sented to the president of the United States ; if he approve he 
shall sign it, but if not he shall return it, with his objections, 
to that house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter 
the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to recon- 
sider it. If after such reconsideration two-thirds of that house 
shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together with the 
objections, to the other house, by which it shall likewise be 
reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it 



Constitution of the United States. 9 

shall become a law. But in all such cases the votes of both 
houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of 
the persons voting for and agamst the bill shall be entered on 
the journal of each house respectively. If any bill shall not be 
returned by the president within ten days (Sxmdays excepted) 
after it shall have been presented to him, the same shall be a 
law, in like manner as if he had signed it, unless the congress 
by their adjournment prevent its return, in which case it shall 
not be a law. 

Every order, resolution, or vote to which the concurrence of 
the senate and house of representatives may be necessary (except 
on a question of adjournment) shall be presented to the presi- 
dent of the United States ; and before the same shall take effect, 
shall be approved by him, or being disapproved by him, shall 
be repassed by two-thirds of the senate and house of representa- 
tives, according to the rules and limitations prescribed in the 
case of a bill. 

Sect. 8. The congress shall have power — to lay and collect 
taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide 
for the common defence and general welfare of the United States ; 
but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout 
the United States ; — to borrow money on the credit of the United 
States ; — to regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several states, and with the Indian tribes ; — to establish an 
tmiform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject 
of bankruptcies throughout the United States ; — to coin money, 
regulate the value thereof, and of foreign coin, and fix the 
standard of weights and measures ; — to provide for the punish- 
ment of counterfeiting the securities and current coin of the 
United States; — to establish post offices and post roads; — to 
promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing 
for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right 
to their respective writings and discoveries; — to constitute tri- 
bunals inferior to the supreme court; — to define and punish 
piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offences 
against the law of nations ; — to declare war, grant letters of 
marque and reprisal, and make rules concerning captures on 
land and water ; — to raise and support armies, but no appro- 



10 Constitution of the United States. 

priation of money to that use shall he for a longer term than 
two years ; — to provide and maintain a navy ; — to make rules 
for the government and regulation of the land and naval forces ; 

— to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws 
of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; — to 
provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia, 
and for governing such part of them as may be employed in the 
service of the United States, reserving to the states respectively, 
the appointment of the officers, and the authority of training 
the militia according to the discipline prescribed by congress ; 

— to exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever, over 
such district (not exceeding ten miles square) as may, by cession 
of particular states, and the acceptance of congress, become the 
seat of the government of the United States, and to exercise 
like authority over all places purchased by the consent of the 
legislature of the state in which the same shall be, for the erec- 
tion of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock yards, and other needful 
buildings ; — and to make all laws which shall be necessary and 
proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the government of 
the United States, or in any department or officer thereof. 

Sect. 9. The migration or importation of such persons, as 
any of the states now existing shall think proper to admit, shall 
not be prohibited by the congress prior to the year one thousand 
eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed on 
such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be sus- 
pended, imless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

No capitation, or other direct tax, shall be laid, unless in pro- 
portion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed to 
be taken. 

No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from any state. 

No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce 
or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another; nor 
shall vessels bound to, or from, one state, be obliged to enter, 
clear or pay duties in another. 



Constitution of the United States. 11 

No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in conse- 
quence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular statement 
and accoimt of the receipts and expenditures of all public money 
shall be published from time to time. 

No title of nobility shall be granted by the United States; 
and no person holding any office of profit or trust under them 
shall, without the consent of the congress, accept of any present, 
emolument, office or title, of any kind whatever, from any king, 
prince, or foreign state. 

Sect. 10. No state shall enter into any treaty, alliance, or 
confederation ; grant letters of marque and reprisal ; coin money ; 
emit bills of credit ; make any thing but gold and silver coin a 
tender in payment of debts ; pass any bill of attainder, ex post 
facto law, or law impairmg the obligation of contracts, or grant 
any title of nobility. No state shall, without the consent of the 
congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except 
what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection 
laws: and the net produce of all duties and imposts, laid by 
any state on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the 
treasury of the United States ; and all such laws shall be sub- 
ject to the revision and control of the congress. No state shall, 
without the consent of congress, lay any duty of tonnage, keep 
troops, or ships of war in time of peace, enter into any agree- 
ment or compact with another state, or with a foreign power, 
or engage in war, unless actually invaded, or in such imminent 
danger as will not admit of delay. 

ArticIiJ: II. 

Section 1. The executive power shall be vested in a Presi- 
dent of the United States of America. He shall hold his office 
during the term of four years, and, together with the vice-presi- 
dent, chosen for the same term, be elected, as follows: — 

Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the legislature 
thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole 
number of senators and representatives to which the state may 
be entitled in the congress ; but no senator or representative, or 
person holding an office of trust or profit under the United 
States, shall be appointed an elector. 



12 Constitution of the United States, 

[The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote 
by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an 
inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall 
make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of 
votes for each; which list they shall sign and certify, and 
transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United 
States, directed to the president of the senate. The president 
of the senate shall, in the presence of the senate and house of 
representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall 
then be coimted. The person having the greatest numb'er of 
votes shall be the president, if such number be a majority of 
the whole number of electors appointed ; and if there be more 
than one who have such majority, and have an equal number 
of votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately 
choose by ballot one of them for president; and if no person 
have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said 
house shall in like manner choose the president. But in choos- 
ing the president, the votes shall be taken by states, the repre- 
sentation from each state having one vote ; a quorum for this 
purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds 
of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary 
to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the president, 
the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors 
shall be the vice-president. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from them 
by ballot the vice-president.] 

The congress may determine the time of choosing the electors, 
and the day on which they shall give their votes ; which day 
shall be the same throughout the United States. 

No person except a natural bom citizen, or a citizen of the 
United States, at the time of the adoption of this constitution, 
shall be eligible to the oftice of president; neither shall any 
person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained to 
the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resident 
within the United States. 

In case of the removal of the president from office, or of 
his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and 
duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the vice- 
president, and the congress may by law provide for the case of 



Constitution of the United States, 13 

removal, death, resignation, or inability, both of the president 
and vice-president, declaring what officer shall then act as presi- 
dent, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the disability 
be removed, or a president shall be elected. 

The president shall, at stated times, receive for his services, 
a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished 
during the period for which he shall have been elected, and he 
shall not receive within that period any other emolument from 
the United States, or any of them. 

Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take 
the following oath or affirmation : — 

" I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute 
the office of president of the United States, and will to the best 
of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the constitution of 
the United States." 

Sect. 2. The president shall be commander-in-chief of the 
army and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several states, when called into the actual service of the United 
States ; he may require the opmion, in writing, of the principal 
officer in each of the executive departments, upon any subject 
relating to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall 
have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against 
the United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent of 
the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the senators 
present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and with the 
advice and consent of the senate, shall appoint ambassadors, 
other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme court, 
and all other officers of the United States, whose appointments 
are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be estab- 
lished by law : but the congress may by law vest the appoint- 
ment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the 
president alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of depart- 
ments. 

The president shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by grant- 
ing commissions which shall expire at the end of their next 



14 Constitution of the United States. 

Sect. 3. He shall from time to time give to the congress 
information of the state of the Union, and recommend to their 
consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and 
expedient ; he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both 
houses, or either of them, and in case of disagreement between 
them, with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn 
them to such time as he shall think proper; he shall receive 
ambassadors and other public ministers ; he shall take care that 
the laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the 
officers of the United States. 

Sect. 4. The president, vice-president, and all civil officers of 
the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and 
misdemeanors. 

Article III. 

Section 1. The judicial power of the United States shall 
be vested in one supreme court, and in such mferior courts as 
the congress may from time to tune ordain and establish. The 
judges, both of the supreme and mferior courts, shall hold their 
offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive 
for their services, a compensation, which shall not be diminished 
during their continuance in office. 

Sect. 2. The judicial power shall extend to all cases, in law 
and equity, arising under this constitution, the laws of the 
United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, 
imder their authority; — to all cases affecting ambassadors, 
other public ministers, and consuls; — to all cases of admiralty 
and maritime jurisdiction; — to controversies to which the 
United States shall be a party ; — to controversies between two 
or more states ; — between a state and citizens of another state ; 
—between citizens of different states ; — between citizens of the 
same state claiming lands under grants of different states, and 
between a state, or the citizens thereof, and foreign states, 
citizens or subjects. 

In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers and 
consuls, and those in which a state shall be a paity, the supreme 
court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the other cases 



Constitution of the United States, 15 

before mentioned, tlie supreme court shall have appellate juris- 
diction, both as to law and fact, with such exceptions, and 
under such regulations as the congress shall make. 

The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall 
be by jury ; and such trial shall be held in the state where the 
said crimes shall have been committed; but when not com- 
mitted within any state, the trial shall be at such place or 
places as the congress may by law have du-ected. 

Sect. 3. Treason against the United States, shall consist 
only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their 
enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be 
convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses 
to the same overt act, or on confession in open court. 

The congi'ess shall have power to declare the punishment of 
treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of 
blood, or forfeiture excei^t during the life of the person attainted. 

Article IV. 
Section 1. Full faith and credit shall be given in each state 
to the public acts, records, and judicial proceedings of every 
other state. And the congress may by general laws prescribe 
the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall 
be proved, and the effect thereof. 

Sect. 2. The citizens of each state shall be entitled to all 
privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states. 

A person charged in any state with treason, felony, or other 
crime, who shall flee from justice, and be found in another 
state, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the state 
from which he fled, be delivered uj) to be removed to the state 
having jurisdiction of the crime. 

No person held to service or labor in one state, under the laAvs 
thereof, escaping into another, shall, in consequence of any law 
or regulation therein, be discharged from such service or labor, 
but shall be delivered up on claim of the party to whom such 
service or labor may be due. 

Sect. 3. New states may be admitted by the congress into 
this Union ; but no new state shall be formed or erected within 



16 Constitution of the United States, 

the jurisdiction of any other state ; nor any state be formed by 
the junction of two or more states, or parts of states, without the 
consent of tlie legislatm-es of the states concerned as well as of 
the congress. 

The congress shall have power to dispose of and make all 
needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other 
property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this 
constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any claims of 
the United States, or of any particular state. 

Sect. 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state in 
this Union a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion, and on application of the legis- 
lature, or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be con- 
vened) against domestic violence. 

Article V. 
The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall deem 
it necessary, shall propose amendments to this constitution, or, 
on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the several 
states, shall call a convention for proposing amendments, which, 
in either case, shall be valid to all intents and purposes, as part 
of this constitution, when ratified by the legislatures of three- 
fourths of the several states, or by conventions in three-fourths 
thereof, as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by congress ; provided that no amendment which may be 
made prior to the year one thousand eight hundred and eight 
shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in the 
ninth section of the first article ; and that no state, without its 
consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage in the senate. 

Article VI. 

All debts contracted and engagements entered into, before the 
adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the United 
States under this constitution, as imder the confederation. 

This constitution, and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof ; and all treaties made, or 
which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, 
shall be the supreme law of the land ; and the judges in every 



Constitution of the United States. 17 

state shall be bound thereby, any thing in the constitution or 
laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding. 

The senators and representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several state legislatures, and all executive and 
judicial officers, both of the United States and of the several 
states, shall be bound by oath or affirmation, to support this 
constitution ; but no religious test shall ever be required as a 
qualification to any office or public trust under the United 
States. 

Article VII. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine states, shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution between 
the states so ratifying the same. 



ARTICLES 

IN ADDITION TO, AND AMENDMENT OF, 

The Cojistitution of the United States of America, proposed by 
congress, and ratified by the legislatures of the several states, 
pursuant to the fifth article of the original constitution. 

Article I. Congress shall make no law respecting an estab- 
lishment of religion, or i^rohibiting the free exercise thereof ; or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right 
of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the govern- 
ment for a redress of grievances. 

Art. II. A well regulated militia, being necessary to the 
security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear 
arms shall not be infringed. 

Art. III. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered 
in any house, without the consent of the owner, nor in time of 
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

Art. IV. The right of the people to be secure in their per- 
sons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated, and no warrants shall issue, 



18 Constitution of the United States, 

but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and 
particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons 
or things to be seized. 

Art. V. No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or 
otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indict- 
ment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval 
forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war 
or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same 
offence to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb ; nor shall be 
compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, 
nor be deprived of life, liberty or property, without due process 
of law ; nor shall private property be taken for public use, with- 
out just compensation. 

Art. YI. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall 
enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial 
jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been 
committed, which district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of 
the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against 
him ; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his 
favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defence. 

Art. VII. In suits at common law, where the value in con- 
troversy shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury 
shall be preserved, and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise 
re-examined in any court of the United States, than according 
to the rules of the common law. 

Art. VIII. Excessive bail shall not be required, nor exces- 
sive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

Art. IX. The enmneration in the constitution, of certain 
rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others 
retained by the people. 

Art. X. The powers not delegated to the United States by 
the constitution, nor prohibited by it to the states, are, reserved 
to the states respectively, or to the people. 



Constitution of the United States. 19 

Art. XI. The judicial power of the United States shall not 
be construed to extend to any suit in law or equity, commenced 
or prosecuted against one of the United States by citizens of 
another state, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign state. 

Art. XII. The electors shall meet in their respective states, 
and vote by ballot for president and vice-president, one of whom, 
at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with them- 
selves ; they shall name in their ballots tlie person voted for as 
president, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as vice- 
president, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted 
for as president, and of all persons voted for as vice-president, 
and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign 
and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the senate ; — 
the president of the senate shall, in presence of the senate and 
house of representatives, open all the certificates and the votes 
shall then be comited ; — the person having the greatest number 
of votes for president, shall be the president, if such number be 
a majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and if 
no person have such majority, then from the persons having 
the highest nmnbers not exceeding three on the list of those 
voted for as president, the house of representatives shall choose 
Immediately, by ballot, the president. But in choosing the 
president, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation 
from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose 
shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the 
states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a 
choice. And if the house of representatives shall not choose a 
president whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon 
them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the 
vice-president shall act as president, as in the case of the death 
or other constitutional disability of the president. 

The person having the greatest number of votes as vice-pres- 
ident, shall be the vice-president, if such number be a majority 
of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no person 
have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the 
list, the senate shall choose the vice-president ; a quorum for 
the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 



20 Constitution of the United States. 

senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary 
to a choice. 

But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of pres- 
ident shall be eligible to that of vice-president of the United 
States. 

Art. XIII. Sect. 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servi- 
tude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall 
have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, 
or any place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Sect. 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

Art. XIV. Sect. 1. All persons bom or naturalized in the 
United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens 
of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. No 
state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the 
privileges or immmiities of citizens of the United States ; nor 
shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, 
without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its 
jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. 

Sect. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the 
several states accordmg to their respective numbers, counting 
the whole number of persons in each state, excluding Indians 
not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the 
choice of electors for president and vice-president of the United 
States, representatives in congress, the executive and judicial 
officers of a state, or the members of the legislature thereof, 
is denied to any of the niifle inhabitants of such state, being 
twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or 
in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion or 
other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced 
in the propoi'tion which the number of such male citizens shall 
bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of 
age in such state. 

Sect. 3. No person shall be a senator, or representative in 
congress, or elector of president and vice-president, or hold any 
office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any 
state, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of 



Constitution of the United States, 21 

congress, or as an oflBcer of the United States, or as a member 
of any state legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of 
any state, to support the constitution of the United States, shall 
have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or 
given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But congress may, 
by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. 

Sect. 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, 
authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of 
pensions and bomities for services in suppressing insurrection or 
rebellion, shall not be questioned. 

But neither the United States, nor any state, shall assimie or 
pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or 
rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss 
or emancipation of any slave ; but all such debts, obligations 
and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Sect. 5. The congress shall have power to enforce, by appro- 
priate legislation, the provisions of this article. 

Art. XV. Sect. 1. The right of citizens of the United States 
to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States, or 
by any state, on account of race, color, or previous condition of 
servitude. 

Sect. 2. The congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

[Note. The constitution was adopted September 17, 1787, by the 
unanimous consent of the states present in the convention appointed 
in pursuance of the resolution of the congress of the confederation 
of February 21, 1787, and was ratified by the conventions of the sev- 
eral states, as follows, viz.: By convention ot Belaicare, December 
7,1787; Pen)isi/lra7}ia, Decemher 12, 1787; New Jersey, December 18, 
1787; Georgia, January 2, 1788; Coivnecticut, January 9,1788; Massa- 
chusetts, February 6, 1788; Maryland, April 28, 1788; South Carolina, 
May 23, 1788; New Hampshire, June 21, 1788; Virginia, June 26, 1788; 
New YorTc, July 26, 1788; North Carolina, November 21, 1789; Rhode 
Island, May 29, 1790. 

The first ten of the amendments were proposed at the first session 
of the first congress of the United States, September 25, 1789, and 
were finally ratified by the constitutional number of states on De- 
cember 15, 1791. The eleventh amendment was proposed at the first 
session of the third congress, March 5, 1794, and was declared in a 



22 Constitution of the United States, 



message from the President of the United States to both houses of 
congress, dated January 8, 1798, to have been adopted by the consti- 
tutional number of states. The twelfth amendment was proposed at 
the first session of the eighth congress, December 12, 1803, and was 
adopted by the constitutional number of states in 1804, according to 
a public notice thereof by the secretary of state, dated September 25 
of the same year. 

The thirteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the thirty-eighth congress on February 1, 1865, and 
was declared, in a proclamation of the secretary of state, dated 
December 18, 1865, to have been ratified by the legislatiu'es of three- 
fourths of the states. 

The fourteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the thirty-ninth congress, on June 16, 1866. 

On July 20, 1868, the secretary of state of the United States issued 
his certificate, setting out that it appeared by ofiicial documents on 
file in the department of state that said amendment had been ratified 
by the legislatures of the states of Connecticut, Kew Hampshire, 
Tennessee, Xew Jersey, Orerjov, Vermont, Xew York, Ohio, Illinois, 
West Virginia, Kansas, Maine, Nevada, Missouri, Indiana, Minne- 
sota, Rhode Island, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan, MassachU' 
setts, Nebraska and Iowa, and by newly esfciblished bodies avowing 
themselves to be and acting as the legislatures of the states of Arkan- 
sas, Florida, North Carolina, Louisiana, South Carolina, and Ala- 
bama ; that the legislatures of Ohio and New Jersey had since passed 
resolutions withdrawing the consent of those states to said amend- 
ment; that the whole number of states in the United States was 
thirty-seven, that the twenty-three states first above named and the 
six states next above named together, constituted three-fourths of 
the whole number of states, and certifying that if the resolutions of 
Ohio and New Jersey, ratifying said amendment were still in force, 
notwithstanding their subsequent resolutions, then said amendment 
had been ratified and so become valid as part of the constitution. 

On July 21, 1868, congress passed a resolution reciting that the 
amendment had been ratified by Connecticut, Tennessee, Neio Jersey^ 
Oregon, Vermont, West llrginia, Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, Ohio, 
Illinois, Minnesota, New York, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Rhode 
Island, Michigan, Nevada, Nero Hampshire, Massachusetts, Ne- 
braska, Maine, Iowa, Arkansas, Florida, North Carolina, Alabama, 
South Carolina and Louisiana, being three-fourths of the several 
states of the Union, and declaring said fourteenth article to be a part 
of the constitution of the United States, and making it the duty of 
the secretary of state to duly promulgate it as such. 

On July 28, 1868, the secretary of state issued his certificate, recit- 



Constitution of the United States. 23 

ing the above resolution, and stating that official notice had been 
received at the department of state that action had been taken by the 
legislatures of the states in relation to said amendment, as follows : 
"It was ratified in A.D. 1866, by ConnecticzU, June 30; JS^eio Hamp- 
shire, July 7; Tennessee, July 19; Oregon, September 19; Vermont, 
November 9. In A.D. 1867, by New Yorh, January 10; Illinois, Jan- 
uary 15; West Virginia, January 16; Kansas, January 18; Maine, 
January 19; Nevada, January 22; Missotiri, January 26; Indiana, 
January 29; Minnesota, February 1; Rhode Island, February 7; 
Wisconsin, February 13; Pennsylvania, February 13; Michigan, 
February 15; Massachusetts, March 20; Nebraska, June 15. In A.D. 
1868, by Iowa, April 3; Arkansas, April 6; Florida, June 9; Louisi- 
ana, July 9; and Alabama, July 13. 

" It was first ratified and the ratification subsequently withdrawn 
hy New Jersey, ratified September 11, 1866, withdrawn April, 1868; 
Ohio, ratified January 11, 1867, and withdrawn January, 1868. 

" It was first rejected and then ratified by Georgia, rejected No- 
vember 13, 1866, ratified July 21, 1868; North Carolina, rejected 
December 4, 1866, ratified July 4, 1868; South Carolina, rejected De- 
cember 20, 1866, and ratified July 9, 1868. 

" It was rejected by Texas, November 1, 1866; FiV^'zm'a, January 9, 
1867; Kentucky, January 10, 1867; Delaioare, February 7, 1867; and 
Maryland, March 23, 1867." 

And on said July 28, 1868, and in execution of the act proposing 
the amendment and of the concurrent resolution of congress above 
mentioned and in pursuance thereof, the secretary of state directed 
that said amendment to the constitution be published in the news- 
papers authorized to promxxlgate the laws of the United States, and 
certified that it had been adopted in the manner above specified by 
the states named in said resolution, and that it " has become valid 
to all intents and purposes as a part of the constitution of the United 
States." 

Subsequently it was ratified by Virginia, October 8, 1869, by 
Georgia, again, February 2, 1870, and by Texas, February 18, 1870. 

The fifteenth amendment was proposed to the legislatures of the 
several states by the fortieth congi-ess on February 27, 1869, and was 
declared, in a proclamation of the secretary of state, dated March 30, 
1870, to have been ratified by the constitutional number of states and 
to have " become valid to all intents and purposes as part of the con. 
stitxition of the United States."] 



CONSTITUTION OR FORM OF GOYERNMENT 

FOR THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



Preamble. 

Objects of government — Body politic, how formed — Its nature. 
Page 32. 

Part I. 

Article 1. Equality and natural rights of all men. 33. 

Art. 2. Right and duty of public religious worship — Protection 
therein. 33. 

Art. 3. Legislature empowered to compel provision for public 
worship; and to enjoin attendance thereon — Exclusive right of 
electing religious teachers secured — Option as to whom parochial 
taxes may be paid, unless, &c. — All denominations equally protected 

— Subordination of one sect to another prohibited. 33, 34. 
Art. 4. Right of self-government secured. 34. 

Art. 5. Accountability of all officers, &c. 34. 

Art. 6. Services rendered to the public being the only title to 
peculiar privileges, hereditary offices are absurd and unnatural. 35. 

Art. 7. Objects of government; right of people to institute and 
change it. 35. 

Art. 8. Right of people to secure rotation in office. 35. 

Art. 9. All, having the qualifications prescribed, equally eligible 
to office. 35. 

Art. 10. Right of protection and duty of contribution correlative 

— Taxation founded on consent— Private property not to be taken 
for public uses without, «S;c. 35, 36. 

Art. 11. Remedies, by recourse to the law, to be free, complete 
and prompt. 36. 

Art. 12. Prosecutions regulated — Right to trial by jury in crimL- 
nal cases, except, &c. 36. 

Art. 13. Crimes to be proved in the vicinity. 36. 

Art. 14. Right of search and seizure regulated. 36, 37. 

Art. 15. Right to trial by jury sacred, except, &c. 37. 

25 



26 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Art. 16. Liberty of the press. 37. 

Art. 17. Right to keep and bear arms — Standing armies danger- 
ous—Military power subordinate to civil. 37. 

Art. 18. Moral qualifications for office — Moral obligations of 
lawgivers and magistrates. 37. 

Art. 19. Right of people to instruct representatives and petition 

legislature. 37, 38. 

Art. 20. Power to suspend the laws, or their execution. 38. 

Art. 21. Freedom of debate, &c., and reason thereof. 38. 

Art. 22. Frequent sessions, and objects thereof. 38. 

Art. 23. Taxation founded on consent. 38. 

Art. 24. JE'cT ^os^/ac^o laws prohibited. 38. 

Art. 25. Legislature not to convict of treason, &c. 38. 

Art. 26. Excessive bail or fines, and cruel punishments, prohib- 
ited. 38. 

Art. 27. No soldier to be quartered in any house, unless, «S:c. 38,39. 

Art. 28. Citizens exempt from law-martial, unless, &c. 39. 

Art. 29. Judges of supreme judicial court — Tenure of their office 

— Salaries. 39. 

Art. 30. Separation of executive, judicial and legislative depart- 
ments. 39. 

Part n. — Frame of Government. 

Title of body politic. 40. 

Chapter I. 
Section 1, 

Article 1. Legislative department. 40. 

Art. 2. Governor's veto — Bill may be passed by two-thirds of 
each house, notwithstanding. 40, 41. 

Art. 3. General court may constitute judicatories, courts of 
record, &c. — Courts, &c., may administer oaths. 41. 

Art. 4. General court may enact laws, &c., not repugnant to the 
constitution; may provide for the election or appointment of offi- 
cers; prescribe their duties; impose taxes, duties and excises, to be 
disposed of for defence, protection, «S:c. — Valuation of estates, once 
in ten years, at least, while, &c. 41, 42. 

Section 2. 

Article l. Senate, number of, and by whom elected — Counties 
to be districts, until, &c. 42, 43. 

Art. 2. Manner and time of choosing senators and councillors — 
Word " inhabitant," defined — Selectmen to preside at to\Am meetings 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 27 

— Return of votes — Inhabitants of unincorporated plantations, who 
pay state taxes, may vote — Plantation meetings — Assessors to 
notify, «&c. 43^5. 

Art. 3. Governor and council to examine and count votes, and 
issue summonses. 45. 

ART. 4. Senate to be final judge of elections, &c., of its own mem- 
bers—Vacancies, how filled. 45, 46. 

Art. 5. Qualifications of a senator. 46. 

ART. 6. Senate not to adjourn more than two days. 46. 

Art. 7. Shall choose its oflicers and establish its rules. 46. 

Art. 8. Shall try all impeachments — Oath — Limitation of sen- 
tence. 46. 

Art. 9. Quorum. 46. 

Section 3. 

Article 1. Representation of the people. 47. 

Art. 2. Representatives, by whom chosen — Proviso as to towns 
having less than 150 ratable polls — Towns liable to fine in case, &c. 

— Expenses of travelling to and from the general court, how paid. 
47. 

Art. 3. Qualifications of a representative. 47, 48. 

Art. 4. Qualifications of a voter. 48. 

Art. 5. Representatives, when chosen. 48. 

Art. 6. House alone can impeach. 48. 

Art. 7. House to originate all money bills. 48. 

Art. 8. Not to adjourn more than two days. 48. 

Art. 9. Quorum. 48.. 

Art. 10. To judge of returns, &c., of its own members; to choose 
its officers and establish its rules, &c. — May punish for ceitain 
offences — Privileges of members. 48, 49. 

Art. 11. Senate — Governor and council may punish — General 
limitation — Trial may be by committee, or otherwise. 49. 

Chapter II. 
Section 1. 

Article 1. Governor— His title. 49. 

Art. 2. To be chosen annually — Quahfications. 50. 

Art. 3. To be chosen by the people, by a majority of votes — 
How chosen, when no person has a majority. 50. 

Art. 4. Power of governor, and of governor and council. 51. 

Art. 5. Same subject. 51. 

ART. 6. Governor and council may adjourn general court in 
cases, &c., but not exceeding ninety days. 51. 



28 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. 7. Governor to be commander-in-chief — Limitation. 51, 52. 
Art. 8. Governor and council may pardon offences, except, &c. 

— But not before conviction, 52. 

Art. 9. All judicial officers, &c., how nominated and appointed. 
53. 

Art. 10. Militia officers, how elected — How commissioned — 
Election of officers — Major-generals, how appointed and commis- 
sioned-Vacancies, how filled, in case, &c. —Officers, duly commis- 
sioned, how removed — Adjutants, &c., how appointed — Organization 
of militia. 53, 54. 

Art. 11. Money, how drawn from the treasury, except, &c. 54. 

Art. 12. All public boards, &c., to make quarterly returns. 54. 

Art. 13. Salary of governor— Salaries of justices of supreme 
judicial court — Salaries to be enlarged, if insufficient. 54, 55. 

Section 2. 

Article l. Lieutenant-governor, his title and qualifications — 
How chosen. 55. 

Art. 2. Presidentof council — Lieutenant-governor a member of, 
except, &c. 55, 56. 

Art. 3. Lieutenant-governor to be acting governor, in case, &c. 
56. 

Section 3. 

Article l. Council. 56. 

Art. 2. Number; from whom, and how chosen — If senators be- 
come councillors, their seats to be vacated. 56. 

Art. 3. Rank of councillors. 57. 

Art. 4. No district to have more than two. 57. 

Art. 5. Register of council. 57. 

Art. 6. Council to exercise the power of governor in case, &c. 
57. 

Art. 7. Elections may be adjourned until, &c. — Order thereof. 
57. 

Section 4. 

Article 1. Secretary, &c., by whom and how chosen — Treas- 
urer ineligible for more than five successive years. 58. 

Art. 2. Secretary to keep records, to attend the governor and 
council, &c. 58. 

Chapter III. 

Article 1. Tenure of all commissioned officers to be expressed 
—Judicial officers to hold office during good behavior, except, &c. 

— But may be removed on address. 58. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 29 

Art. 2. Justices of supreme judicial court to give opinions, when 
required. 58. 

Art. 3. Justices of the peace; tenure of their office. 59. 

Art. 4. Provisions for holding probate courts. 59. 

Art. 6. Provisions for determining causes of marriage, divorce, 
Ac. 59. 

Chapter IV. 

Delegates to congress. 59. 

Chapter V. 
Section 1. 
Article l. Harvard College — Powers, privileges, &c., of the 
president and fellows confirmed. 60. 
Art. 2. All gifts, grants, &c., confirmed. 60. 
Art. 3. Who shall be overseers — Power of alteration reserved to 
the legislature. 61. 

Section 2. 

Duty of legislatures and magistrates in all future periods. 61, 62. 

Chapter VI. 

Article 1. Oaths of allegiance and office, &c. 62-64. 

Art. 2. Plurality of offices prohibited to governor, &c., except, 
&c. — Incompatible offices —Bribery, &c., disqualify. 64, 65. 

Art. 3. Value of money ascertained — Property qualifications 
may be increased. 65. 

Art. 4. Provisions respecting commission. 65. 

Art. 5. Provisions respecting writs. 65. 

Art. 6. Continuation of former laws, except, &c. 65, 

Art. 7. Benefit of habeas corpus secured, except, &c. 66. 

ART. 8. The enacting style. 66. 

Art. 9. Officers of former government continued until, &c. 66. 

Art. 10. Provision for revising constitution. 66, 67. 

Art. 11. Provision for preserving and publishing this constitu- 
tion. 67. 

Amendments. 

Article 1. Bill, &c., not approved within five days, not to be- 
come a law, if legislature adjourn in the meantime. 68. 

Art. 2. General court empowered to charter cities — Proviso. 
68. 

Art. 3. Qualifications of voters for governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, senators and representatives. 68, 69. 



30 Constitution of Massachusetts. 



Art. 4. Notaries public, how appointed and removed — Vacancies 
in tlie office of secretary and treasurer, how filled, in case, &c.— 
Commissary-general may be appointed, in case, &c.— Militia offi- 
cers, how removed. 69. 

Art. 5. Who may vote for captains and subalterns. 69. 

Art. 6. Oath to be taken by all officers; or affirmation in case, 
&c. 69, 70. 

Art. 7. Tests abolished. 70. 

Art. 8. Incompatibility of offices. 70. 

Art. 9. Amendments to constitution, how made. 70, 71. 

Art. 10. Commencement of political year; and termination — 
Meetings for choice of governor, lieutenant-governor, &c., Avhen to 
be held — May be adjourned — Articles, when to go into operation — 
Inconsistent provisions annulled. 71, 72. 

Art. 11. Religious freedom established. 72, 73. 

Art. 12. Census of ratable polls — Representatives, how appor- 
tioned. 73, 74. 

Art. 13. Census of inhabitants — Senatorial districts — Appor- 
tionment of representatives and councillors — Freehold as a qualifi- 
cation for a seat in general court or council not required. 74-76. 

Art. 14. Election by people to be by plurality. 76. 

Art. 15. Time of annual election of governor and legislature. 76. 

Art. 16. Eight councillors, how chosen — State to be districted — 
Eligibility defined — Day and manner of election — Vacancies, how 
filled — Organization of government. 76, 77. 

Art. 17. Election of secretary, treasurer, auditor and attorney- 
general by the people — Vacancies, how filled- To qualify within 
ten days — Qualifications. 77,78. 

Art. 18. School money not to be applied for sectarian schools. 
78. 

Art. 19. Legislature to prescribe for election of sheriffs, registers 
of probate, &c., by the people. 78, 79. 

ART. 20. Reading constitution in Enghsh and writing, necessary 
qualification s of voters — Proviso. 79. 

Art. 21. Census of voters and inhabitants — House of representa- 
tives to consist of 240 members — Legislature to apportion, &c.— 
Qualifications of representatives, and number for quorum. 79, 80. 

Art. 22. Census of voters and inhabitants — Senate to consist of 
40 members — Senatorial districts — Proviso —Qualifications of sen- 
ators, and nimiber for quorum. 80, 81. 

Art. 23. Residence of two years required of naturalized citizens 
to entitle to suffrage, or make eligible to office. Repealed. 81. 

Art. 24. Vacancies in the senate. 82. 



Constitution of Massachusetts.' 31 



Art. 25. Vacancies in tlie council. 82. 

Art. 26. Twenty-third article repealed. 82. 

Art. 27. Oflicers of Harvard College may be elected members of 
the general court. 82. 

Art. 28, Persons having served in the U. S. army or navy, &c., 
not to be disqualified from voting, &c. Amended. 82. 

Art. 29. General court empowered to provide more than one 
place of meeting in towns for the election of oflicers, and to prescribe 
manner of calling, &c., such meetings. 82, 83. 

Art. 30. No person to be disqualified from voting because of u 
change of residence, until after six months, &c. 83. 

Art. 31. Article twenty-eight amended. 83. 

Art. 32. So much of article three annulled as makes the payment 
of a poll tax a prerequisite for voting. 83. 

Art. 33. A majority of each Ijranch of the general court to con- 
stitute a quorum, &c. 83, 84. 

Art. 34. Property qualification of governors annulled. 84. 

Art. 35. Clause in relation of payment of travelling expenses of 
mem])ers of the house annulled. 84. 

Art. 36. So much of article nineteen as is contained in the words 
*' Commissioners of Insolvency " annulled. 84. 

Art. 37. Governor, with the consent of the council, may remove 
justices of the peace and notaries public. 84. 

Art. 38. Voting machines or other mechanical devices for voting 
may be used at all elections, under regulations. 84. 

Art. 39. Article ten of part one amended so as to permit legis- 
lature to authorize the taking in fee by the commonwealth, or by a 
county, city or town, of more land and property than are needed for 
the laying out, widening or relocating of highways or streets. 84. 



32 Constitution of Massachusetts, 



PREAMBLE. 

The end of the mstitution, mamteiiance, and admmistration 
of government, is to secure the existence of the body politic, to 
protect it, and to furnish the individuals who compose it with 
the power of enjoying m safety and tranquillity their natural 
rights, and the blessings of life: and whenever these great 
objects are not obtained the people have a right to alter the 
government, and to take measures necessary for their safety, 
prosperity, and happiness. 

The body politic is formed by a voluntary association of indi- 
viduals: it is a social compact, by which the whole people 
covenants with each citizen, and each citizen with the whole 
people, that all shall be governed by certam laws for the common 
good. It is the duty of the people, therefore, in frammg a con- 
stitution of government, to provide for an equitable mode of 
making laws, as well as for an impartial interpretation and a 
faithful execution of them ; that every man may, at all times, 
find his secm-ity in them. 

We, therefore, the people of Massachusetts, acknowledging, 
with grateful hearts, the goodness of the great Legislator of the 
universe, in affording us, in the com'se of His providence, an 
opportunity, deliberately and peaceably, without fraud, vio- 
lence, or surprise, of entering into an original, explicit, and 
solemn compact with each other ; and of forming a new con- 
stitution of civil government, for ourselves and posterity; and 
devoutly imploring His direction in so interesting a design, do 
agree upon, ordain, and establish, the following Declaration of 
Eights, and Frame of Government, as the Constitution of 
THE Commonwealth of IVIassachtjsetts. 



Constitution of Maasacliusetts, 33 



PART THE FIRST. 

A Declaration of the Rights of the Inhabitants of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 

Article I. All men are bom free and equal, and have cer- 
tain natural, essential, and unalienable rights; among which 
may be reckoned the right of enjoying and defending their lives 
and liberties ; that of acquiring, possessing, and protecting proi>- 
erty; in fine, tliat of seeking and obtaining their safety and 
happiness. 

Art. II. It is the right as well as the duty of all men in 
society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the Supreme 
Being, the great Creator and Preserver of the imiverse. And 
no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, 
liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the manner and sea- 
son most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience ; or 
for his religious profession of sentiments ; provided he doth not 
disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious 
worship. 

Art. III. [As the happmess of a jieople, and the good order 
and i)reservation of civil government, essentially depend upon 
piety, religion, and morality ; and as these cannot be generally 
diffused through a community but by the institution of the 
public worship of God, and of public instructions in piety, 
religion, and morality: Therefore, to promote their happiness, 
and to secure the good order and preservation of their govern- 
ment, the people of this commonwealth have a right to invest 
their legislature with power to authorize and require, and the 
legislatm'e shall, from tune to time, authorize and require, the 
several towns, parishes, precincts, and other bodies politic, or 
religious societies, to make suitable provision, at their own 
expense, for the institution of the public worship of God, and 



34 Constitutio7i of Massachusetts, 

for the support and mamtenance of public Protestant teachers 
of piety, religion, and morality, in all cases where such provision 
shall not he made voluntarily. [See Amendment, Article XI.] 

And the people of this commonwealth have also a right to, 
and do, invest their legislature with authority to enjoin upon 
all the subjects an attendance upon the instructions of the pub- 
lic teachers aforesaid, at stated times and seasons, if there be 
any on whose instructions they can conscientiously and con- 
veniently attend. 

Provided, notwithstanding, that the several towns, parishes, 
precincts, and other bodies politic, or religious societies, shall, 
at all times, have the exclusive right of electing their public 
teachers, and of contracting with them for their support and 
maintenance. 

And all moneys paid by the subject to the support of public 
worship, and of the public teachers aforesaid, shall, if he require 
it, be uniformly applied to the support of the public teacher 
or teachers of his own religious sect or denomination, provided 
there be any on whose instructions he attends ; otherwise it may 
be paid towards the support of the teacher or teachers of the 
parish or precinct in which the said moneys are raised. 

And every denomination of Christians, demeaning themselves 
peaceably, and as good subjects of the comnaon wealth, shall be 
equally mider the protection of the law : and no subordmation 
of any one sect or denomination to another shall ever be estab- 
lished by law.] 

Art. IV. The people of this commonwealth have the sole 
and exclusive right of governing themselves, as a free, sovereign, 
and independent state ; and do, and forever hereafter shall, 
exercise and enjoy every power, jurisdiction, and right, which 
is not, or may not hereafter be, by them expressly delegated to 
the United States of America, in Congress assembled. 

Art. V. All power residing originally in the people, and 
being derived from them, the several magistrates and officers 
of government, vested with authority, whether legislative, 
executive, or judicial, are their substitutes and agents, and are 
at all times accountable to them. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 35 

Art. VI. Ko man, nor corporation, or association of men, 
have any other title to obtain advantages, or particular and 
exclusive privileges, distinct from those of the commimity, than 
what arises from the consideration of services rendered to the 
public ; and this title bemg in nature neither hereditary, nor 
transmissible to children, or descendants, or relations by blood, 
the idea of a man bom a magistrate, lawgiver, or judge, is 
absurd and unnatural. 

Art. YII. Government is instituted for the common good ; 
for the protection, safety, prosperity, and happiness of the 
people ; and not for the profit, honor, or private interest of any 
one man, family, or class of men : Therefore the people alone 
have an incontestable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to 
institute government ; and to reform, alter, or totally change 
the same, when their protection, safety, prosperity, and happi- 
ness require it. 

Art. YIII. In order to prevent those who are vested with 
authority from becoming oppressors, the people have a right, 
at such periods and in such maimer as they shall establish by 
their frame of government, to cause their public ofiicers to 
return to private life ; and to fill up vacant places by certain 
and regular elections and appointments. 

Art. IX. All elections ought to be free; and all the in- 
habitants of this commonwealth, having such qualifications as 
they shall establish by their frame of government, have an 
equal right to elect officers, and to be elected, for public 
emplojTnents. 

Art. X. Each individual of the society has a right to be 
protected by it in the enjojinent of his life, liberty, and proj)- 
erty, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, 
to contribute his share to the expense of this protection ; to give 
his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary: but no 
part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken 
from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, 
or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the 



36 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

people of this commonwealtli are not controllable by any other 
laws than those to which their constitutional representative 
body have given their consent. And whenever the j)ublic 
exigencies require that the property of any individual should 
be appropriated to public uses, he shall receive a reasonable 
compensation therefor. [See Amendments, Article XXXIX.] 

Art. XI. Every subject of the commonwealth ought to find 
a certain remedy, by having recourse to the laws, for all injuries 
or wrongs which he may receive in his person, property, or 
character. He ought to obtain right and justice freely, and 
without being obliged to purchase it ; completely, and without 
any denial; promptly, and without delay; conformably to the 
laws. 

Art. XII. Xo subject shall be held to answer for anj^ crimes 
or offence, until the same is fully and plainly, substantially and 
formally, described to him ; or be compelled to accuse, or furnish 
evidence against himself. And every subject shall have a right 
to produce all proofs that may be favorable to him ; to meet the 
witnesses against him face to face, and to be fully heard in his 
defence by himself, or his comisel, at his election. And no sub- 
ject shall be arrested, imprisoned, despoiled, or deprived of his 
property, immunities, or privileges, put out of the protection of 
the law, exiled, or deprived of his life, liberty, or estate, but by 
the judgment of his peers, or the law of the land. 

And the legislature shall not make any law that shall subject 
any person to a capital or infamous pmiishment, excepting for 
the government of the army and navy, without trial by jury. 

Art. XIII. In criminal prosecutions, the verification of 
facts in the vicinity where they happen, is one of the greatest 
securities of the life, liberty, and property of the citizen. 

Art. XIV. Every subject has a right to be secure from all 
\inreasonable searches, and seizures, of his person, his houses, his 
papers, and all his possessions. All warrants, therefore, are 
conti-arj^ to this right, if the cause or fomidation of them be not 
jireviously supported by oath or affirmation, and if the order in 
the warrant to a civil officer, to make search in suspected places, 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 37 

or to arrest one or more suspected persons, or to seize their 
property, be not accomjianied with a special designation of the 
persons or objects of search, arrest, or seizure: and no warrant 
ought to be issued but in cases, and with the formalities pre- 
scribed by the laws. 

Art. XV. In all controversies concerning propertj^ and in 
all suits between two or more persons, except in cases in which 
it has heretofore been otherways used and practised, the parties 
have a right to a trial by jury ; and this method of procedure 
shall be held sacred, unless, in causes arising on the high seas, 
and such as relate to mariners' wages, the legislature shall here- 
after find it necessary to alter it. 

Art. XVI. The liberty of the press is essential to the 
security of freedom in a state: it ought not, therefore, to be 
restrained in this commonwealth. 

Art. XVII. The people have a right to keep and to bear 
arms for the common defence. And as, in time of peace, armies 
are dangerous to liberty, they ought not to be maintained with- 
out the consent of the legislature ; and the military power shall 
always be held in an exact subordination to the civil authority, 
and be governed by it. 

Art. XVIII. A frequent recurrence to the fundamental 
principles of the constitution, and a constant adherence to those 
of piety, justice, moderation, temperance, industry, and fru- 
gality, are absolutely necessary to preserve the advantages of 
liberty, and to maintain a free government. The people ought, 
consequently, to have a particular attention to all those prin- 
ciples, in the choice of their ofiicers and representatives: and 
they have a right to require of their lawgivers and magistrates 
an exact and constant observance of them, in the formation and 
execution of the laws necessary for the good administration of 
the commonwealth. 

Art. XIX. The people have a right, in an orderly and 
peaceable manner, to assemble to consult upon the common 
good ; give instructions to their representatives, and to request 



38 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

of the legislative body, by the way of addresses, petitions, or 
remonstrances, redress of the wrongs done them, and of the 
grievances they suffer. 

Art. XX. The power of suspending the laws, or the execu- 
tion of the laws, ought never to be exercised but by the legis- 
lature, or by authority derived from it, to be exercised in such 
particular cases only as the legislature shall expressly provide 
for. 

Art. XXI. The freedom of deliberation, speech, and debate, 
in either house of the legislature, is so essential to the rights of 
the people, that it caimot be the foundation of any accusation 
or prosecution, action or complaint, in any other court or place 
whatsoever. 

Art. XXII. The legislature ought frequently to assemble 
for the redress of grievances, for correcting, strengthening, and 
confirming the laws, and for making new laws, as the common 
good may require. 

Art. XXIII. No subsidy, charge, tax, impost, or duties 
ought to be established, fixed, laid, or levied, under any pretext 
whatsoever, without the consent of the people or their repre- 
sentatives in the legislature. 

Art. XXIV. Laws made to punish for actions done before 
the existence of such laws, and which have not been declared 
crimes by preceding laws, are imjust, oppressive, and incon- 
sistent with the fundamental principles of a free government. 

Art. XXV. No subject ought, in any case, or in any time, 
to be declared guilty of treason or felony by the legislature. 

Art. XXVI. No magistrate or court of law shall demand 
excessive bail or sureties, impose excessive fines, or inflict cruel 
or unusual punishments. 

Art. XXVII. In time of peace, no soldier ought to be quar- 
tered m any house without the consent of the owner; and in 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 39 

time of war, such quarters ought not to be made but by the 
civil magistrate, in a manner ordained by the legislature. 

Art. XXVIII. No person can in any case be subject to law- 
martial, or to any penalties or pains, by virtue of that law, 
except those employed in the army or navy, and except the 
militia in actual service, but by authority of the legislature. 

Art. XXIX. It is essential to the preservation of the rights 
of every individual, his life, liberty, property, and character, that 
there be an unpartial interpretation of the laws, and adminis-. 
tration of justice. It is the right of every citizen to be tried by 
judges as free, impartial, and independent as the lot of humanity 
will admit. It is, therefore, not only the best policy, but for 
the secm-ity of the rights of the people, and of every citizen, 
that the judges of the supreme judicial court should hold their 
offices as long as they behave themselves well ; and that they 
should have honorable salaries ascertained and established by 
standing laws. 

Art. XXX. In the government of this commonwealth, the 
legislative department shall never exercise the executive and 
judicial powers, or either of them: the executive shall never 
exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them : 
the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive 
powers, or either of them : to the end it may be a government 
of laws and not of men. 



40 Constitution of Massachusetts, 



PART THE SECOND. 

The Frame of Government. 
The people, inhabiting the territory formerly called the 
Proviace of Massachusetts Baj^ do hereby solemnly and mutu- 
ally agree with each other, to form themselves into a free, 
sovereign, and independent body politic, or state, by the name 
of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Chapter I. 

the legislative power. 

Section I. 

The Geyiei-al Court. 

Article I. The department of legislation shall be formed 

by two branches, a Senate and House of Representatives ; each 

of which shall have a negative on the other. 

The legislative body shall assemble every year [on the last 
Wednesday in May, and at such other times as they shall judge 
necessary; and shall dissolve and be dissolved on the day 
next preceding the said last Wednesday in May;] and shall 
be styled. The General Court of Massachusetts. [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. II. No bill or resolve of the senate or house of repre- 
sentatives shall become a law, and have force as such until it 
shall have been laid before the governor for his revisal; and 
if he, upon such revision, approve thereof, he shall signify his 
approbation by signing the same. But if he have any objection 
to the passing of such bill or resolve, he shall return the same, 
together with his objections thereto, in writing, to the senate 
or house of representatives, in whichsoever the same shall have 
originated; who shall enter the objections sent down by the 
governor, at large, on their records, and proceed to reconsider 
the said bill or resolve. But if after such reconsideration, two- 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 41 

thirds of the said senate or house of representatives, shall, 
notwithstanding the said objections, agree to pass the same, it 
shall, together with the objections, be sent to the other branch 
of the legislature, where it shall also be reconsidered, and if 
approved by two-thirds of the members present, shall have the 
force of a law : but in all such cases, the votes of both houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays; and the names of the 
persons voting for, or against, the said bill or resolve, .shall be 
entered upon the public records of the commonwealth. 

And in order to prevent unnecessaiy delays, if any bill or re- 
solve shall not be returned by the governor within five days 
after it shall have been presented, the same shall have the 
force of a law. [See Amendments, Article I.] 

Art. III. The general court shall forever have full power 
and authority to erect and constitute judicatories and courts of 
record, or other courts, to be held in the name of the common- 
wealth, for the hearing, tryuig, and determinmg of all manner 
of crimes, offences, pleas, processes, jilaints, actions, matters, 
causes, and things, whatsoever, arising or hai^pening within the 
commonwealth, or between or concerning jDcrsons inhabiting, 
or residing, or brought within the same : whether the same be 
criminal or civil, or whether the said crimes be capital or not 
capital, and whether the said pleas be real, personal, or mixed ; 
and for the awarding and making out of execution thereupon. 
To which courts and judicatories are hereby given and gi-anted 
full power and authority, from time to time, to administer oaths 
or affirmations, for the better discovery of truth in any matter 
in controversy or depending before them. 

Art. TV. And further, full power and authority are hereby 
given and granted to the said general court, from time to time 
to make, ordain, and establish, all manner of wholesome and 
reasonable orders, laws, statutes, and ordinances, directions and 
instructions, either with i^enalties or without ; so as the same 
be not repugnant or contrary to this constitution, as they shall 
judge to be for the good and welfare of this commonwealth, 
and for the government and ordering thereof, and of the sub- 
jects of the same, and for the necessary support and defence of 



42 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

the government thereof ; and to name and settle annually, or 
provide by fixed laws for the naming and settling, all civil 
officers within the said commonwealth, the election and consti- 
tution of whom are not hereafter in this form of government 
otherwise provided for; and to set forth the several duties, 
powers, and limits, of the several civil and military officers of 
this commonwealth, and the forms of such oaths or affirmations 
as shall he respectively administered imto them for the execu- 
tion of their several offices and places, so as the same he not 
repugnant or contrary to this constitution ; and to impose and 
levy proportional and reasonable assessments, rates, and taxes, 
upon all the inhabitants of, and persons resident, and estates 
lying, within the said commonwealth ; and also to impose and 
levy reasonable duties and excises upon any produce, goods, 
wares, merchandise, and commodities, whatsoever, brought 
into, produced, manufactured, or being within the same ; to be 
issued and disposed of by warrant, under the hand of the gov- 
ernor of this commonwealth for the time being, with the advice 
and consent of the council, for the public service, in the neces- 
sary" defence and support of the government of the said com- 
monwealth, and the protection and preservation of the subjects 
thereof, according to such acts as are or shall be in force within 
the same. 

And while the public charges of government, or any part 
thereof, shall be assessed on polls and estates, in the manner 
that has hitherto been practised, in order that such assessments 
may be made with equality, there shall be a valuation of estates 
within the commonwealth, taken anew once in every- ten years 
at least, and as much oftener as the general com't shall order. 
[See Amendments, Article II.] 



Chapter I. 
Section II. 

Senate. 
Article I. [There shall be annually elected, by the free- 
holders and other inhabitants of this commonwealth, qualified 
as in this constitution is provided, forty persons to be council- 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 43 

lors and senators for the year ensuing their election; to be 
chosen by the inhabitants of tlie districts into which the com- 
monwealth may, from time to time, be divided by the general 
court for that purpose : and the general court, m assigning the 
numbers to be elected by the respective districts, shall govern 
themselves by the proportion of the public taxes paid by the 
said districts; and timely make known to the inhabitants of 
the commonwealth the limits of each district, and the number 
of comicillors and senators to be chosen therein ; provided, that 
the number of such districts shall never be less than thirteen ; 
and that no district be so large as to entitle the same to choose 
more than six senators. [See Amendments, Articles XIII., 
XVI., XXII.] 

And the several counties in this commonwealth shall, until 
the general court shall determine it necessary to alter the said 
districts, be districts for the choice of councillors and senators, 
(except that the counties of Dukes County and Nantucket shall 
form one district for that purpose) and shall elect the following 
number for coimcil lors and senators, viz. : — Suffolk, six ; Essex, 
six ; Middlesex, five ; Hampshire, four ; Plymouth, three ; Barn- 
stable, one; Bristol, three; York, two; Dukes County and 
Nantucket, one; Worcester, five; Cumberland, one; Lincoln, 
one; Berkshire, two.] 

Art. II. The senate shall be the first branch of the legisla- 
ture ; and the senators shall be chosen in the following manner, 
viz. : there shall be a meeting on the [fii-st Monday in April,] 
annually, forever, of the inhabitants of each tovm in the sev- 
eral counties of this commonwealth ; to be called by the select- 
men, and warned in due course of law, at least seven days 
before the [first Monday in April,] for the purpose of electuig 
persons to be senators and councillors; [and at such meetings 
every male inhabitant of twenty-one years of age and upwards, 
having a freehold estate within the commonwealth, of the 
annual income of three pounds, or any estate of the value of 
sixty pounds, shall have a right to give in his vote for the sen- 
ators for the district of which he is an inhabitant.] And to 
remove all doubts concerning the meaning of the word "in- 
habitant" in this constitution, every person shall be consid- 



44 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

ered as an inhabitant, for the purpose of electing and being 
elected into any olfice, or place within this state, in that town, 
district, or j)lantation where he dwelleth, or hath his home. 
[See Amendments, Articles II., III., X., XV., XX., XXII., 
XXIII., XXVI., XXVIII., XXX., XXXI., XXXII.] 

The selectmen of the several towns shall preside at such 
meetmgs impartially ; and shall receive the votes of all the in- 
habitants of such towns present and qualified to vote for sena- 
tors, and shall sort and count them in open town meeting, and 
in presence of the town clerk, who shall make a fair record, in 
presence of the selectmen, and in open town meeting, of the 
name of every person voted for, and of the number of votes 
against his name : and a fair copy of this record shall be attested 
by the selectmen and the town clerk, and shall be sealed up, 
directed to the secretary of the commonwealth for the time 
being, with a superscription, expressing the purport of the con- 
tents thereof, and delivered by the to^oi clerk of such towns, 
to the sheriff of the county in which such town lies, thirty days 
at least before [the last Wednesday m May] annually; or it 
shall be delivered into the secretary's office seventeen days at 
least before the said [last Wednesday in May:] and the sheriff 
of each county shall deliver all such certificates by him re- 
ceived, into the secretary's office, seventeen days before the 
said [last Wednesday in May.] [See Amendments, Articles 
II., X.] 

And tlie inhabitants of plantations unincorporated, qualified 
as this constitution provides, who are or shall be empowered 
and required to assess taxes upon themselves toward the sup- 
port of government, shall have the same privilege of voting for 
coimcillors and senators in the plantations where they reside, 
as town inhabitants have in their respective towns; and the 
plantation meetings for that purpose shall be held annually [on 
the same first Monday in April], at such place in the planta- 
tions, respectively, as the assessors thereof shall direct ; which 
assessors shall have like authority for notifying the electors, 
collecting and returning the votes, as the selectmen and town 
clerks have in their several towns, by this constitution. And 
all other persons living in places unincorporated (qualified as 
aforesaid) who shall be assessed to the support of government 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 45 

by the assessors of an adjacent town, shall have the privilege 
of giving in their votes for coiincilloi-s and senators in the town 
where they shall be assessed, and be notified of the place of 
meeting by the selectmen of the town where they shall be 
assessed, for that purpose, accordingly. [See Amendments, 
Article XV.] 

Art. III. And that there may be a due convention of senators 
on the [last Wednesday m May] annually, the governor with 
five of the council, for the time being, shall, as soon as may be, 
examine the returned copies of such records ; and fourteen days 
before the said day he shall issue his summons to such persons 
as shall appear to be chosen by [a majority of] voters, to attend 
on that day, and take their seats accordingly : provided, never- 
theless, that for the first year the said returned copies shall be 
examined by the president and five of the council of the former 
constitution of government; and the said president shall, m 
like manner, issue his summons to the persons so elected, that 
they may take their seats as aforesaid. [See Amendments, 
Articles X., XIV.] 

Art. IV. The senate shall be the final judge of the elec- 
tions, returns and qualifications of their own members, as 
pointed out in the constitution; and shall, [on the said last 
Wednesday in May] annuallj-, determine and declare who are 
elected by each district to be senators [by a majority of votes; 
and in case there shall not appear to be the full number of sen- 
ators returned elected by a majoi-ity of votes for any district, 
the deficiency shall be supplied in the following manner, viz. : 
The members of the house of representatives, and such senators 
as shall be declared elected, shall take the names of such per- 
sons as shall be found to have the highest nimiber of votes in 
such district, and not elected, amounting to twice the nmnber 
of senators wanting, if there be so many voted for ; and out of 
these shall elect by ballot a number of senators suflicient to fill 
up the vacancies in such district ; and in this mamier all such 
vacancies shall be filled up in every district of the common- 
wealth ; and in like manner all vacancies in the senate, arising 
by death, removal out of the state, or otherwise, shall be sup- 



46 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

plied as soon as may be, after such vacancies shall happen. 
[See Amendments, Articles X., XIV., XXIV.] 

Art. V. Provided, nevertheless, that no person shall be 
capable of being elected as a senator, [who is not seised in his 
own right of a freehold, within this commonwealth, of the 
value of three hundred pounds at least, or possessed of personal 
estate to the value of six hundred pounds at least, or of both to 
the amount of the same sum, and] who has not been an inhabit- 
ant of this commonwealth for the space of five years immedi- 
ately preceding his election, and, at the time of his election, he 
shall be an inhabitant in the district for wliich he shall be 
chosen. [See Amendments, Articles XIII., XXII.] 

Art. VI. The senate shall have power to adjourn them- 
selves, provided such adjournments do not exceed two days at 
a time. 

Art. VII. The senate shall choose its own president, appoint 
its own officers, and determine its own rules of proceedings. 

Art. VIII. The senate shall be a court with full authority 
to hear and determine all impeachments made by the house of 
representatives, against any officer or officers of the common- 
wealth, for misconduct and mal-administration in their offices. 
But previous to the trial of every impeachment the members 
of the senate shall respectively be sworn, truly and impartially 
to try and determine the charge in question, according to evi- 
dence. Their judgment, however, shall not extend further 
than to removal from office and disqualification to hold or en- 
joy any place of honor, trust, or profit, imder this common- 
wealth ; but the party so convicted shall be, nevertheless, liable 
to indictment, trial, judgment, and punishment, according to 
the laws of the land. 

Art. IX. [Not less than sixteen members of the senate 
shall constitute a quorum for doing business.] [See Amend- 
ments, Articles XXII . , XXXIII . ] 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 47 

Chapter I. 
Section III. 
House of Itepresentatives. 
Article I. There shall be, in the legislature of this com- 
monwealth, a representation of the people, annually elected, 
and founded upon the principle of equality. 

Art. II. [And in order to provide for a representation of 
the citizens of this commonwealtii, founded upon the principle 
of equality, every corporate town containing one hundred and 
fifty ratable polls may elect one representative ; every corporate 
town containing three hundred and seventy-five ratable polls 
may elect two representatives ; every corporate town containing 
six hundred ratable polls may elect three representatives ; and 
proceeding in that manner, making two hundi'ed and twenty- 
five ratable polls the mean increasing number for every addi- 
tional representative. [See Amendments, Articles XII., XIII., 
XXI.] 

Provided, nevertheless, that each town now incorporated, not 
having one hundred and fifty ratable polls, may elect one repre- 
sentative ; but no place shall hereafter be incorporated with the 
privilege of electmg a representative, unless there are within 
the same one hundred and fifty ratable polls.] 

And the house of representatives shall have power from time 
to time to impose fines upon such towns as shall neglect to choose 
and return members to the same, agreeably to this constitution. 

[The expenses of travelling to the general assembly, and 
returning home, once in every session, and no more, shall be 
paid by the government, out of the public treasiu-y, to every 
member who shall attend as seasonably as he can, in the judg- 
ment of the house, and does not depart without leave.] [See 
Amendments, Article XXXV.] 

Art. III. Every member of the house of representatives 
shall be chosen by written votes ; [and, for one year at least 
next preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of, 
and have been seised in his own right of a freehold of the value 



48 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

of one hundred pounds within the town he shall he chosen to 
represent, or any ratable estate to tlie value of two hundred 
pounds; and he shall cease to represent the said town imme- 
diately on his ceasing to be qualified as aforesaid.] [See 
Amendments, Articles XIII., XXI.] 

Art. IV. [Every male person, being twenty-one years of 
age, and resident in any particular to^vn in this commonwealth 
for the space of one year next preceding, having a freehold 
estate within the said town of the amiual mcome of three 
pounds, or any estate of the value of sLstj^ poimds, shall have a 
right to vote in the choice of a representative or rei^resentatives 
for the said town.] [See Amendments, Articles III., XX., 
XXIII., XXVI., XXVIII., XXX., XXXI., XXXII.] 

Art. V. [The members of the house of representatives shall 
be chosen annually in the month of May, ten days at least before 
the last Wednesday of that month.] [See Amendments, Arti- 
cles X., XV.] 

Art. VI. The house of representatives shall be the grand 
inquest of this commonwealth ; and all impeachments made by 
them shall be heard and tried by the senate. 

Art. VII. All money bills shall originate in the house of 
representatives; but the senate may propose or concur with 
amendments, as on other bills. 

Art. VIII. The house of representatives shall have power 
to adjourn themselves; provided such adjournment shall not 
exceed two days at a time. 

Art. IX. [Not less than sixty members of the house of rep- 
resentatives shall constitute a quorum for doing business.] [See 
Amendments, Articles XXI., XXXIII.] 

Art. X. The house of representatives shall be the judge of 
the returns, elections, and qualifications of its own members, as 
pointed out in the constitution ; shall choose their own speaker ; 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 49 

appoint their own officers, and settle the rules and orders of pro- 
ceeding in their own house. They shall have authority to pun- 
ish by unprisonment every person, not a member, who shall be 
guilty of disrespect to the house, by any disorderly or contemp- 
tuous behavior m its presence ; or who, in the town where the 
general court is sitting, and during the time of its sitting, shall 
threaten harm to the body or estate of any of its members, for 
any thmg said or done in the house ; or who shall assault any 
of them therefor ; or who shall assault, or arrest, any witness, 
or other person, ordered to attend the house, in his way in going 
or returnmg ; or who shall rescue any person arrested by the 
order of the house. 

And no member of the house of representatives shall be 
arrested, or held to bail on mesne process, during his going 
imto, returning from, or his attending the general assembly. 

Art. XI. The senate shall have the same powers in the 
like cases ; and the governor and coimcil shall have the same 
authority to punish in like cases ; provided, that no imprison- 
ment on the warrant or order of the governor, council, senate, 
or house of representatives, for either of the above described 
offences, be for a term exceedmg thu'ty days. 

And the senate and house of representatives may try and 
determine all cases where their rights and privileges are con- 
cerned, and which, by the constitution, they have authority to 
try and determine, by committees of their own members, or in 
such other way as they may respectively think best. 



Chapter II. 

EXECUTIVE POWER. 

Section I. 
Governor. 
Article I. There shall be a supreme executive magistrate, 
who shall be styled — The Governor of the Common- 
wealth OF Massachusetts ; and whose title shall be — His 
Excellency. 



50 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. II. The governor shall be chosen annually; and no 
person shall be eligible to this office, xinless, at the time of his 
election, he shall have been an mhabitant of this commonwealth 
for seven years next preceding ; [and miless he shall at the same 
time be seised, m his ovni right, of a freehold, within the com- 
monwealth, of the value of one thousand pounds ;] [and unless 
he shall declare himself to be of the Christian religion.] [See 
Amendments, Articles VII., XXXIY.] 

Art. III. Those persons who shall be qualified to vote for 
senators and representatives within the several towns of this 
commonwealth shall, at a meetmg to be called for that purpose, 
on the [first Monday of April] annually, give in their votes for 
a governor, to the selectmen, who shall preside at such meet- 
ings ; and the town clerk, in the presence and with the assist- 
ance of the selectmen, shall, in open town meeting, sort and 
count the votes, and form a list of the persons voted for, with 
the nimiber of votes for each person against his name ; and shall 
make a fair record of the same m the to\^Ti books, and a pub- 
lic declaration thereof in the said meeting; and shall, in the 
presence of the inhabitants, seal up copies of the said list, 
attested by him and the selectmen, and transmit the same to 
the sheriff of the county, thirty days at least before the [last 
Wednesday in May] ; and the sheriff shall transmit the same 
to the secretary's office, seventeen days at least before the said 
[last "Wednesday m May] ; or the selectmen may cause returns 
of the same to be made to the office of the secretary of the com- 
monwealth, seventeen days at least before the said day; and 
the secretary shall lay the same before the senate and the house 
of representatives on the [last Wednesday in May], to be by 
them examhaed ; and [in case of an election by a majority of all 
the votes returned], the choice shall be by them declared and 
published ; [but if no person shall have a majority of votes, the 
house of representatives shall, by ballot, elect two out of four 
persons who had the highest number of votes, if so many shall 
have been voted for ; but, if otherwise, out of the number voted 
for ; and make return to the senate of the two persons so elected ; 
on which the senate shall proceed, by ballot, to elect one, who 
shall be declared governor.] [See Amendments, Articles II., 
X., XIV., XV.] 



Constitution of Massachusetts, 51 

Art. IV. The governor shall have authority, from time to 
time, at his discretiou, to assemhle aud call together the coim- 
cillors of this commonwealth for the time bemg ; and the gov- 
ernor with the said comicillors, or live of them at least, shall, 
and may, from time to time, hold and keep a comicil, for the 
ordering and directing the affairs of the commonwealth, agree- 
ably to the constitution and the laws of the land. 

Art. V. The governor, with advice of council, shall have 
full power and authority, durmg the session of the general 
court, to adjourn or prorogue the same to any time the two 
houses shall desire ; [and to dissolve the same on the day next 
preceding the last Wechiesday in May ; and, in the recess of the 
said court, to prorogue the same from time to time, not exceed- 
ing ninety days in any one recess ;] and to call it together sooner 
than the time to which it maybe adjourned or prorogued, if the 
welfare of the commonwealth shall require the same ; and in 
case of any infectious distemper prevailing in the place where 
the said court is next at any time to convene, or any other 
cause happening, whereby danger may arise to the health or 
lives of the meuibers from their attendance, he may direct the 
session to be held at some other, the most convenient place 
within the state. [See Amendments, Article X.] 

[And the governor shall dissolve the said general court on 
the day next preceding the last Wednesday in May.] [See 
Amendments, Article X.] 

Art. VI. In cases of disagreement between the two houses, 
with regard to the necessity, expediency, or time of adjourn- 
ment or prorogation, the governor, with advice of the council, 
shall have a right to adjourn or prorogue the general com-t, not 
exceeding ninety days, as he shall determine the public good 
shall require. 

Art. VII. The governor of this commonwealth, for the 
time being, shall be the commander-in-chief of the army and 
navy, and of all militaiy forces of the state, by sea and land ; 
and shall have full power, by himself, or by any commander, 
or other officer or officers, from time to time, to train, instruct, 
exercise, and govern the militia and navy ; and, for the special 



52 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

defence and safety of the commonwealth, to assemble in martial 
array, and put in Trarlike posture, the inhabitants thereof, and 
to lead and conduct them, and with them to encounter, repel, 
resist, expel, and pursue, by force of arms, as well by sea as by 
land, within or without the limits of this commonwealth, and 
also to kill, slay, and destroy, if necessary, and conquer, by all 
fitting ways, enterprises, and means whatsoever, all and every 
such person and persons as shall, at any time hereafter, in a 
hostile manner, attempt or enterprise the destruction, invasion, 
detriment, or annoyance of this commonwealth ; and to use and 
exercise, over the army and navy, and over the militia in actual 
service, the law-martial, in time of war or invasion, and also in 
time of rebellion, declared by the legislature to exist, as occa- 
sion shall necessarily require ; and to take and surprise, by all 
ways and means whatsoever, all and every such person or per- 
sons, with their ships, arms, ammimition, and other goods, as 
shall, in a hostile manner, invade, or attempt the invading, 
conquering, or annoying this commonwealth ; and that the gov- 
ernor be intrusted with all these and other powers, incident 
to the offices of captain-general and commander-in-chief, and 
admiral, to be exercised agreeably to the rules and regulations 
of the constitution, and the laws of the land, and not otherwise. 
Provided, that the said governor shall not, at any time here- 
after, by virtue of any power by this constitution granted, or 
hereafter to be granted to hini by the legislature, transport any 
of the inhabitants of this commonwealth, or oblige them to 
march out of the limits of the same, without their free and 
voluntary consent, or the consent of the general court ; except 
so far as may be necessary to march or transport them by land 
or water, for the defence of such part of the state to which they 
caimot otherwise conveniently have access. 

Art. VIII. The power of pardoning offences, except such 
as persons may be convicted of before the senate by an impeach- 
ment of the house, shall be in the governor, by and with the 
advice of comicil; but no charter of pardon, granted by the 
governor, with advice of the council before conviction, shall 
avail the party pleading the same, notwithstanding any general 
or particular expressions contained therein, descriptive of the 
offence or offences intended to be pardoned. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 53 

Art. IX. All judicial officers, [the attorney-general,] the 
solicitor-general, [all sheriffs,] coroners, [and registers of pro- 
bate,] shall be nominated and appointed by the governor, by 
and with the advice and consent of the council ; and everj^ such 
nomination shall be made by the governor, and made at least 
seven days prior to such appointment. [See Amendments, 
Articles IV., XVII., XIX.] 

Art. X. The captains and subalterns of the militia shall be 
elected by the written votes of the train-band and alarm list of 
their respective companies, [of twenty-one years of age and 
upwards ;] the field officers of regiments shall be elected by the 
written votes of the captains and subalterns of their respective 
regiments ; the brigadiers shall be elected, in like manner, by 
the field officers of their respective brigades ; and such officers, 
so elected, shall be commissioned by the governor, who shall 
determine their rank. [See Amendments, Article V.] 

The legislature shall, by standmg laws, direct the time and 
manner of convening the electors, and of collecting votes, and 
of certifying to the governor, the officers elected. 

The major-generals shall be appointed by the senate and house 
of representatives, each having a negative upon the other ; and 
be commissioned by the governor. [See Amendments, Article 
IV.] 

And if the electors of brigadiers, field officers, captains or 
subalterns, shall neglect or refuse to make such elections, after 
being duly notified, according to the laws for the time being, 
then the governor, with advice of coimcil, shall appoint suitable 
persons to fill such offices. 

[And no officer, duly commissioned to command in the militia, 
shall be removed from his office, but by the address of both 
houses to the governor, or by fair trial in court-martial, pursuant 
to the laws of the commonwealth for the time being.] [See 
Amendments, Article IV.] 

The commanding officers of regiments shall appoint their 
adjutants and quartermasters; the brigadiers their brigade- 
majors; and the major-generals their aids; and the governor 
shall appoint the adjutant-general. 

The governor, with advice of council, shall appoint all officers 
of the continental army, whom by the confederation of the 



54 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

United States it is provided that this commonTrealth shall 
appoint, as also all oflBcers of forts and garrisons. 

The divisions of the militia into hrigades, regiments, and com- 
panies, made in pursuance of the militia laws now in force, shall 
he considered as the proper divisions of the militia of this com- 
monwealth, until the same shall be altered in pursuance of 
some future law. 

Art. XI. No moneys shall be issued out of the treasuiy of 
this commonwealth, and disposed of (except such sums as may- 
be appropriated for the redemption of bills of credit or treas- 
urer's notes, or for the papnent of interest arising thereon) but 
by warrant imder the hand of the governor for the time being, 
with the advice and consent of the council, for the necessary 
defence and support of the commonwealth ; and for the pro- 
tection and preservation of the inhabitants thereof, agreeably 
to the acts and resolves of the general court. 

Art. XII. All public boards, the commissary-general, all 
superintending officers of public magazines and stores, belonging 
to this commonwealth, and all commanding officers of forts and 
garrisons within the same, shall once in every three months, 
officially, and without requisition, and at other times, when 
required by the governor, deliver to him an account of all goods, 
stores, provisions, ammunition, camion with their appendages, 
and small arms with their accoutrements, and of all other public 
property whatever under their care respectively ; distingiiishing 
the quantitj^ number, quality and kind of each, as particularly 
as may be ; together with the condition of such forts and gar- 
risons; and the said commandmg officer shall exhibit to the 
governor, when required by him, true and exact plans of such 
forts, and of the land and sea or harbor or harbors, adjacent. 

And the said boards, and all public officers, shall communicate 
to the governor, as soon as may be after receiving the same, all 
letters, despatches, and intelligencies of a public nature, which 
shall be directed to them respectively. 

Art. XIII. As the public good requires that the governor 
should not be imder the undue influence of any of the members 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 55 

of the general court by a dependence on them for his support, 
that he should m all cases act with freedom for the benefit of 
the public, that he should not have his attention necessarily- 
diverted from that object to his private concerns, and that he 
should maintain the dignity of the commonwealth in the char- 
acter of its chief magistrate, it is necessary that he should have 
an honorable stated salarj', of a fixed and permanent value, 
amply sufficient for those purposes, and established by standing 
laws : and it shall be among the first acts of the general court, 
after the commencement of this constitution, to establish such 
salary by law accordingly. 

Pemianent and honorable salaries shall also be established by- 
law for the justices of the supreme judicial court. 

And if it shall be foimd that any of the salaries aforesaid, so 
.established, are insufficient, they shall, from time to time, be 
enlarged, as the general court shall judge proper. 



Chapter II. 
Section II. 
Lieutenant- Governor. 
Article I. There shall be annually elected a lieutenant- 
governor of the commonwealth of Massachusetts, whose title 
shall be — His Honor; and who shall be qualified, in point of 
[religion,] [property,] and residence m the commonwealth, in 
the same manner with the governor ; and the day and manner of 
his election, and the qualifications of the electors, shall be the 
same as are required in the election of a governor. The return 
of the votes for this officer, and the declaration of his election, 
shall be in the same manner; [and if no one person shall be 
found to have a majoritj' of all the votes returned, the vacancy 
shall be filled by the senate and house of representatives, in the 
same manner as the governor is to be elected, in case no one 
person shall have a majoi-ity of the votes of the people to be 
governor.] [See Amendments, Articles VII., XIV., XXXIV.] 

Art. II. The governor, and in his absence the lieutenant- 
governor, shall be president of the council, but shall have no 



56 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

vote in council ; and the lieutenant-governor shall always be a 
member of the council, except when the chair of the governor 
shall be vacant. 

Art, III. Whenever the chair of the governor shall be 
vacant, by reason of his death, or absence from the common- 
wealth, or otherwise, the lieutenant-governor, for the time 
being, shall, during such vacancy, perform all the duties incum- 
bent upon the governor, and shall have and exercise all the 
powers and authorities, which by this constitution the governor 
is vested with, when personally present. 



Chapter II. 
Section III. 

Council, and the Manner of settling Elections by the Legislature. 

Article I. There shall be a comicil for advising the gov- 
ernor m the executive part of the government, to consist of 
[nine] persons besides the lieutenant-governor, whom the gov- 
ernor, for the time being, shall have full power and authority, 
from time to time, at his discretion, to assemble and call 
together ; and the governor, with the said councillors, or five of 
them at least, shall and may, from time to time, hold and keep 
a council, for the ordering and directuig the affairs of the com- 
monwealth, accordmg to the laws of the land. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XVI.] 

Art. II. [Nine coimcillors shall be annually chosen from 
among the persons returned for councillors and senators, on the 
last Wednesday in May, by the joint ballot of the senators and 
representatives assembled in one room ; and in case there shall 
not be found upon the first choice, the whole number of nine 
persons who will accept a seat in the coimcil, the deficiency 
shall be made up by the electors aforesaid from among the 
people at large ; and the number of senators left shall constitute 
the senate for the year. The seats of the persons thus elected 
from the senate, and accepting the trust, shall be vacated in the 
senate.] [See Amendments, Articles X., XIII., XVI.] 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 57 

Art. III. The councillors, in the civil arrangements of 
the commonwealth, shall have rank next after the lieutenant- 
governor. 

Art. IV. [Not more than two councillors shall be chosen 
out of any one district of this commonwealth.] [See Amend- 
ments, Article XVI.] 

Art. V. The resolutions and advice of the council shall be 
recorded in a register, and signed by the members present ; and 
this record may be called for at any time by either house of 
the legislature ; and any member of the council may insert his 
opinion, contrary to the resolution of the majority. 

Art. VI, Whenever the office of the governor and lieutenant- 
governor shall be vacant, by reason of death, absence, or other- 
wise, then the council, or the major part of them, shall, during 
such vacancy, have full power and authority to do, and execute, 
all and every such acts, matters, and things, as the governor or 
the lieutenant-governor might or could, by virtue of this consti- 
tution, do or execute, if they, or either of them, were personally 
present. 

Art. VII. [And whereas the elections appointed to be made, 
by this constitution, on the last Wednesday in May annually, 
by the two houses of the legislature, may not be completed on 
that day, the said elections may be adjourned from day to day 
until the same shall be completed. And the order of elections 
shall be as follows : the vacancies in the senate, if any, shall 
first be filled up; the governor and lieutenant-governor shall 
then be elected, provided there should be no choice of them by 
the people ; and afterwards the two houses shall proceed to the 
election of the council.] [See Amendments, Articles XVI., 
XXV.] 



58 Constituti07i of Massachusetts. 



Chapter II. 
Section IV. 
Secretary, Treasurer, Commissary, etc. 
Article I. [The secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, 
and the commissary-general, notaries public, and] naval officers, 
shall be chosen annually, by joint ballot of the senators and 
representatives in one room. And, that the citizens of this com- 
monwealth maybe assured, from time to time, that the moneys 
remaining in the public treasury, upon the settlement and 
liquidation of the public accounts, are their property, no man 
shall be eligible as treasurer and receiver-general more than five 
years successively. [See Amendments, Articles IV., XVII.] 

Art. II. The records of the commonwealth shall be kept in 
the office of the secretary, who may appoint his deputies, for 
whose conduct he shall be accountable ; and he shall attend the 
governor and council, the senate and house of representatives, 
in person, or by his deputies, as they shall respectively require. 



Chapter III. 

JUDICIARY POWER. 

Article I. The tenure, that all commissioned officers shall 
by law have in their offices, shall be expressed in their respective 
commissions. All judicial officers, duly appointed, commis- 
sioned, and sworn, shall hold their offices during good behavior, 
excepting such concerning whom there is different provision 
made in this constitution : provided, nevertheless, the governor, 
with the consent of the comicil, may remove them upon the 
address of both houses of the legislature. 

Art. II. Each branch of the legislature, as well as the 
governor and council, shall have authority to require the 
opinions of the justices of the supreme judicial court, upon 
important questions of law, and upon solemn occasions. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 59 

Art. III. In order that the people may not suffer from the 
long continuance in place of any justice of the peace who shall 
fail of discharging the important duties of his office with ability 
or fidelity, all commissions of justices of the peace shall expire 
and become void, in the term of seven years from their re- 
spective dates; and, upon the expiration of any commission, 
the same may, if necessary, be renewed, or another person 
appointed, as shall most conduce to the well-being of the 
commonwealth. [See Amendments, Article XXXVII.] 

Art. IV. The judges of probate of wills, and for granting 
letters of admmistration, shall hold their courts at such place 
or places, on fixed days, as the convenience of the people shall 
require ; and the legislature shall, from time to time, hereafter, 
appomt such times and places ; until which appointments, the 
said courts shall be holden at the times and places which the 
respective judges shall direct. 

Art. V. All causes of marriage, divorce, and alimony, and 
all appeals from the judges of probate, shall be heard and deter- 
mined by the governor and council, until the legislature shall, 
by law, make other provision. 



Chapter IV. 

DELEGATES TO CONGRESS. 

[The delegates of this commonwealth to the congress of the 
United States, shall, some time in the month of June, annually, 
be elected by the joint ballot of the senate and house of repre- 
sentatives, assembled together in one room ; to serve in congress 
for one year, to commence on the first Monday ui November 
then next ensumg. They shall have commissions under the 
hand of the governor, and the great seal of the commonwealth ; 
but may be recalled at any time within the year, and others 
chosen and commissioned, in the same manner, in their stead.] 



60 Constitution of Massachusetts, 



Chapter V. 

THE UNIVERSITY AT CAMBRIDGE, AXD ENCOURAGEMENT OF 
LITERATURE, ETC. 

Section I. 
The University. 
Article I. Whereas our wise and pious ancestors, so early 
as tlie year one thousand six hundred and thirty-six, laid the 
foundation of Harvard College, in which university many jjer- 
sons of great eminence have, by the blessmg of God, been 
initiated in those arts and sciences which qualified them for 
public emplopnents, both in church and state ; and whereas the 
encouragement of arts and sciences, and all good literature, 
tends to the honor of God, the advantage of the Christian 
religion, and the great benefit of this and the other United States 
of America, — it is declared, that the President and Fellows 
OF Harvard College, in their corporate capacity, and their 
successors in that capacity, their officers and servants, shall 
have, hold, use, exercise, and enjoy, all the powers, authorities, 
rights, liberties, privileges, immunities, and franchises, which 
they now have, or are entitled to have, hold, use, exercise, and 
enjoy; and the same are hereby ratified and confirmed unto 
them, the said president and fellows of Harvard College, and 
to their successors, and to their officers and servants, respec- 
tively, forever. 

Art. II. And whereas there have been at sundry times, by 
divers persons, gifts, grants, devises of houses, lands, tenements, 
goods, chattels, legacies, and conveyances, heretofore made, 
either to Harvard College in Cambridge, ia New England, or 
to the i^resident and fellows of Harvard College, or to the said 
college hy some other description, under several charters, suc- 
cessively; it is declared, that all the said gifts, grants, devises, 
legacies, and conveyances, are hereby forever confirmed imto 
the president and fellows of Harvard College, and to their 
successors in the capacity aforesaid, according to the true intent 
and meaning of the donor or donors, grantor or grantors, devisor 
or devisors. 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 61 

Art. III. And whereas, by an act of the general court of the 
colony of Massachusetts Bay, passed in the year one tliousand 
six hundred and forty-two, the governor and deputy-governor, 
for the time being, and all the magistrates of that jurisdic- 
tion, were, with the president, and a number of the clergj^ in 
the said act described, constituted the overseers of Harvard 
College; and it being necessary, in this new constitution of 
government to ascertain who shall be deemed successors to the 
said governor, deputy-governor, and magistrates; it is declared, 
that the governor, lieutenant-governor, council, and senate of 
this commonwealth, are, and shall be deemed, their successors, 
who, with the president of Harvard College, for the time being, 
together with the ministers of the congregational churches in 
the towns of Cambridge, Watertown, Charlestown, Boston, Kox- 
burj^, and Dorchester, mentioned in the said act, shall be, and 
hereby are, vested with all the powers and authority belonging, 
or in any way appertainmg to the overseers of Harvard College ; 
provided, that nothing herein shall be construed to previent the 
legislature of this commonwealth from making such alterations 
in the government of the said university, as shall be conducive 
to its advantage, and the interest of the republic of letters, in 
as full a manner as might have been done by the legislature of 
the late Province of the Massachusetts Bay. 



Chapter V. 
Section II. 
TJie Encouragement of Literature, etc. 
"Wisdom and knowledge, as well as virtue, diffused generally 
among the body of the people, being necessary for the preserva- 
tion of their rights and liberties ; and as these depend on spread- 
ing the opportunities and advantages of education in the various 
parts of the country, and among the different orders of the 
people, it shall be the duty of legislatures and magistrates, in 
all future periods of this commonwealtli, to cherish the inter- 
ests of literature and the sciences, and all seminaries of them ; 
especially the university at Cambridge, public schools and 



62 Constitution of Massachusetts, 

grammar schools in the towns ; to encourage private societies 
and public institutions, rewards and immunities, for the pro- 
motion of agriculture, arts, sciences, commerce, trades, manu- 
factures, and a natural history of the country ; to countenance 
and inculcate the principles of humanity and general benevo- 
lence, public and private charity, industry and frugality, honesty 
and punctuality in their dealings ; sincerity, good humor, and 
all social affections, and generous sentiments, among the peoi^le. 
[See Amendments, Article XVIII.] 



Chapter VI. 

OATHS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS ; INCOMPATIBILITY OF AND EXCLU- 
SION FROM offices; pecuniary qualifications; COMMIS- 
SIONS ; WRITS ; CONFIRMATION OF LAWS ; HABEAS CORPUS ; 
THE ENACTING STYLE ; CONTINUANCE OF OFFICERS ; PRO- 
VISION FOR A FUTURE REVISAL OF THE CONSTITUTION, ETC. 

Article I. [Any person chosen governor, lieutenant-gov- 
ernor, councillor, senator, or representative, and accepting the 
trust, shall, before he proceed to execute the duties of his place 
or office, make and subscribe tlie following declaration, viz. : 

*' I, A. B., do declare, that I believe the Christian religion, 
and have a firm persuasion of its truth ; and that I am seised and 
possessed, in my own right, of the property required by the con- 
stitution, as one qualification for the office or place to which I 
am elected." [See Amendments, Article VII.] 

And the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, shall 
make and subscribe the said declaration, in the presence of the 
two houses of assembly ; and the senators and representatives, 
first elected vmder this constitution, before the president and 
five of the council of the former constitution ; and forever after- 
wards before the governor and comicil for the time being.] 

And every person chosen to either of the places or offices 
aforesaid, as also any person appointed or commissioned to any 
judicial, executive, military, or other office under the govern- 
ment, shall, before he enters on the discliarge of the business of 
his place or office, take and subscribe the following declaration, 
and oaths or affirmations, viz. : 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 63 

["I, A. B., dotruly and sincerely acknowledge, profess, testify, 
and declare, that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is, and 
of right ought to be, a free, sovereign, and independent state; 
and I do swear, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the 
said commonwealth, and that I will defend the same against 
traitorous conspiracies and all hostile attempts whatsoever ; and 
that I do renounce and abjure all allegiance, subjection, and 
obedience to the king, queen, or government of Great Britain 
(as the case may be) , and every other foreign power whatsoever ; 
and that no foreign prince, person, prelate, state, or potentate, 
hath, or ought to have, any jurisdiction, superiority, pre-emi- 
nence, authority, dispensing or other power, in any matter, civil, 
ecclesiastical, or spiritual, within this commonwealth, except 
the authoritj'- and power which is or may be vested by their 
constituents in the congress of the United States: and I do 
further testify and declare, that no man or body of men hath 
or can have any right to absolve or discharge me from the obli- 
gation of this oath, declaration, or affirmation; and that I do 
make this acknowledgment, profession, testimony, declaration, 
denial, renunciation, and abjuration, heartily and truly, accord- 
ing to the common meaning and acceptation of the foregoing 
words, without any equivocation, mental evasion, or secret res- 
ervation whatsoever. So help me, God."] [See Amendments, 
Article VI.] 

" I, A. B., do solemnly swear and affirm, that I will faithfully 
and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent 
on me as , according to the best of my abilities and under- 

standing, agreeably to the rules and regulations of the constitu- 
tion and the laws of the commonwealth. So help me, God." 

Provided, always, that when any person chosen or appointed 
as aforesaid, shall be of the denomination of the people called 
Quakers, and shall decline taking the said oath[s], he shall 
make his affirmation in the foregoing form, and subscribe the 
same, omitting the words, ['^ Ido swear," ^^ and abjure " '^ oath 
or," "and abjuration," in the first oath, and in the second 
oath, the words] " swear and," and [in each of them] the words 
" <So help me, God;" subjoining instead thereof, " This I do 
under the pains and penalties of perjury." [See Amendments. 
Article VI.] 



64 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

And the said oaths or affinnations shall he taken and sub- 
scribed by the governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, 
before the president of the senate, in the presence of the two 
houses of assembly; and by the senators and representatives 
first elected under this constitution, before the president and 
five of the council of the former constitution ; and forever after- 
wards before the governor and council for the time being ; and 
by the residue of the oflicers aforesaid, before such persons and 
in such manner as from time to time shall be prescribed by the 
legislature. 

Art. II. No governor, lieutenant-governor, or judge of the 
supreme judicial court, shall hold any other office or place, 
under the authority of this commonwealth, except such as by 
this constitution they are admitted to hold, saving that the 
judges of the said court may hold the offices of justices of the 
peace through the state ; nor shall they hold any other place or 
office, or receive any pension or salary from any other state or 
government or power whatever. [See Amendments, Article 
VIII.] 

No person shall be capable of holding or exercising at the 
same time, within this state, more than one of the following 
offices, viz.: judge of probate — sheriif — register of probate — 
or register of deeds ; and never more than any two offices, which 
are to be held by appointment of the governor, or the governor 
and council, or the senate, or the house of representatives, or 
by the election of the people of the state at large, or of the 
people of any comity, military offices, and the offices of justices 
of the peace excepted, shall be held by one person. 

No person holding the office of judge of the supreme judicial 
court — secretary — attorney-general — solicitor-general — treas- 
urer or receiver-general — judge of probate — commissary-general 
— [president, professor, or instructor of Harvard College] — 
sheriff — clerk of the house of representatives — register of pro- 
bate — register of deeds — clerk of the supreme judicial court — 
clerk of the inferior court of common pleas — or officer of the 
customs, including in this description naval officers — shall at 
the same time have a seat in the senate or house of representa- 
tives ; but their being chosen or appointed to, and accepting the 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 65 

same, shall operate as a resignation of their seat in the senate 
or house of representatives ; and the place so vacated shall be 
filled up. [See Amendments, Articles VIII., XXVII.] 

And the same rule shall take place in case any judge of the 
said supreme judicial court, or judge of probate, shall accept a 
seat in council ; or any councillor shall accept of either of those 
ottices or places. 

And no person shall ever be admitted to hold a seat in the 
legislature, or any office of trust or importance under the govern- 
ment of this commonwealth, who shall, in the due course of 
law, have been convicted of bribery or corruption in obtaining 
an election or appointment. 

Art. III. In all cases where sums of money are mentioned 
in this constitution, the value thereof shall be computed in 
silver, at six shillmgs and eight pence per oimce ; and it shall 
be in the power of the legislature, from time to time, to mcrease 
such qualifications, as to property, of the persons to be elected 
to offices, as the circumstances of the commonwealth shall 
require. [See Amendments, Articles XIII., XXXIV.] 

Art. IV. All commissions shall be in the name of the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, signed by the governor and attested 
by the secretary or his deputy, and have the great seal of the 
commonwealth affixed thereto. 

Art. V. All writs, issuing out of the clerk's office in any of 
the courts of law, shall be in the name of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts ; they shall be rmder the seal of the court from 
whence they issue ; they shall bear test of the first justice of 
the court to which they shall be returnable, who is not a party, 
and be signed by the clerk of such court. 

Art. VI. All the laws which have heretofore been adopted, 
used, and approved in the Province, Colony, or State of Massa- 
chusetts Bay, and usually practised on in the courts of law, shall 
still remain and be in full force, imtil altered or repealed by 
the legislature ; such parts only excepted as are repugnant to 
the rights and liberties contained in this constitution. 



66 Constitution of Massachusetts. 

Art. VII. The privilege and benefit of the writ of habeas 
corpus shall he enjoyed in this commonwealth, in the most free, 
easy, cheap, expeditious, and ample manner; and shall not be 
suspended by the legislature, except upon the most urgent and 
pressmg occasions and for a limited time, not exceedmg twelve 
months. 

Art. VIII. The enacting style, in making and passing all 
acts, statutes and laws, shall be — " Be it enacted by the Senate 
and House of Representatives in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the same." 

Art. IX. To the end there may be no failure of justice, or 
danger arise to the commonwealth from a change of the form of 
government, all officers, civil and military, holding commissions 
under the government and people of Massachusetts Bay in New 
England, and all other officers of the said government and 
people, at the time this constitution shall take effect, shall 
have, hold, use, exercise, and enjoy, all the powers and authority 
to them granted or committed, imtil other persons shall be 
appointed in their stead ; and all courts of law shall proceed in 
the execution of the business of their respective departments ; 
and all the executive and legislative officers, bodies, and powers 
shall continue in full force, in the enjojnnent and exercise of all 
their trusts, employments, and authority ; until the general court, 
and the supreme and executive officers under this constitution, 
are designated and invested with their respective trusts, powers 
and authority. 

Art. X, [In order the more effectually to adhere to the prin- 
ciples of the constitution, and to correct those violations which 
by any means may be made therein, as well as to form such 
alterations as from experience shall be found necessary, the 
general court which shall be in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand seven himdred and ninety-five, shall issue precepts to the 
selectmen of the several towns, and to the assessors of the tmin- 
corporated plantations, directing them to convene the qualified 
voters of their respective towns and plantations, for the purpose 
of collecting their sentiments on the necessity or expediency 



Constitution of Massachusetts. 67 

of revising the constitution, in order to amendments. [See 
Amendments, Article IX.] 

And if it shall appear, by the returns made, that two-thirds 
of the qualified voters throughout the state, who shall assemble 
and vote m consequence of the said precepts, are in favor of such 
revision or amendment, the general court shall issue precepts, 
or direct them to be issued from the secretary's office, to the 
several towns to elect delegates to meet in convention for the 
purpose aforesaid. 

The said delegates to be chosen in the same manner and pro- 
portion as their representatives in the second branch of the 
legislature are by this constitution to be chosen.] 

Art. XI. This form of government shall be enrolled on 
parchment, and deposited in the secretary's ofKce, and be a part 
of the laws of the land ; and pruited copies thereof shall be pre- 
fixed to the book containing the laws of this commonwealth, in 
all future editions of the said laws. 



68 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 



ARTICLES OF AMENDMENT. 

Article I. If any bill or resolve shall be objected to, and not 
approved by the governor; and if the general court shall adjourn 
within five days after the same shall have been laid before the 
governor for his approbation, and thereby prevent his returning 
it with his objections, as provided by the constitution, such bill or 
resolve shall not become a law, nor have force as such. 

Art. II. The general court shall have full power and authority 
to erect and constitute municipal or city governments, in any 
corporate to^vn or towns in this commonwealth, and to grant to 
the inhabitants thereof such powers, privileges, and immunities, 
not repugnant to the constitution, as the general court shall deem 
necessary or expedient for the regulation and government thereof, 
and to prescribe the manner of calling and holding public meetings 
of the inhabitants, in wards or otherwise, for the election of 
officers under the constitution, and the manner of returning the 
votes given at such meetings. Provided, that no such govern- 
ment shall be erected or constituted in any town not containing 
twelve thousand inhabitants, nor unless it be Avith the consent, 
and on the application of a majority of the inhabitants of such 
town, present and voting thereon, pursuant to a vote at a meeting 
duly warned and holden for that purpose. And provided, also, 
that all by-laws, made by such municipal or city government, 
shall be subject, at all times, to be annulled by the general court. 

Art. III. Every male citizen of twenty-one years of age and 
upwards, excepting paupers and persons under guardianship, who 
shall have resided within the commonwealth one year, and within 
the town or district in which he may claim a right to vote, 
six calendar months next preceding any election of governor, 
lieutenant-governor, senators, or representatives, [and who shall 
have paid by himself, or his parent, master, or guardian, any 
state or county tax, which shall, within two years next preceding 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments, 69 

such election, have been assessed upon him, in any town or dis- 
trict of this commonwealth; and also every citizen who shall be, 
by law, exempted from taxation, and who shall be in all other 
respects, qualified as above mentioned,] shall have a right to vote 
in such election of governor, lieutenant-governor, senators and 
representatives; and no other person shall be entitled to vote in 
such elections. [See Amendments, Articles XX., XXIII., XXVI., 
XXVIIL, XXX., XXXL, XXXII ] 

Art. IV. Notaries public shall be appointed by the governor 
in the same manner as judicial officers are appointed, and shall 
hold their offices during seven years, unless sooner removed by the 
governor, with the consent of the council, upon the address of ])Oth 
houses of the legislature. [See Amendments, Article XXXVII.] 

[In case the office of secretary or treasurer of the common- 
wealth shall become vacant from any cause, during the recess of 
the general court, the governor, with the advice and consent of 
the council, shall nominate and appoint, under such regulations 
as may be prescribed by law, a competent and suitable person to 
such vacant office, who shall hold the same until a successor shall 
be appointed by the general court.] [See Amendments, Article 
XVII.] 

Whenever the exigencies of the commonwealth shall require 
the appointment of a commissary-general, he shall be nominated, 
appointed, and commissioned, in such manner as the legislature 
may, by law, prescribe. 

All officers commissioned to command in the militia may be 
removed from office in such manner as the legislature may, by law, 
prescribe. 

Art. V. In the elections of captains and subalterns of the 
militia, all the members of their respective companies, as well 
those under as those above the age of twenty-one years, shall 
have a right to vote. 

Art. VI Instead of the oath of allegiance prescribed by the 
constitution, the following oath shall be taken and subscribed by 
every person chosen or appointed to any office, civil or military, 



70 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

under the government of this commonwealth, before he shall enter 
on the duties of his office, to wit: — 

♦'I, A. B., do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith and 
allegiance to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and will sup- 
port the constitution thereof. So help me, God." 

Provided, That when any person shall be of the denomination 
called Quakers, and shall decline taking said oath, he shall make 
his affirmation in the foregoing form, omitting the word " swear" 
and inserting, instead thereof, the word "affirm" and omitting 
the words " So help me, God, " and subjoining, instead thereof, 
the words, " This 1 do under the pains and penalties of perjury." 

Art. VII. No oath, declaration, or subscription, excepting 
the oath prescribed in the preceding article, and the oath of office, 
shall be required of the governor, lieutenant-governor, council- 
lors, senators, or representatives, to qualify them to perform the 
duties of their respective offices. 

Art. YIII. No judge of any court of this commonwealth, (ex- 
cept the court of sessions,) and no person holding any office under 
the authority of the United States, (postmasters excepted,) shall, 
at the same time, hold the office of governor, lieutenant-governor, 
or councillor, or have a seat in the senate or house of representa- 
tives of this commonwealth; and no judge of any court in this 
commonwealth, (except the court of sessions,) nor the attorney- 
general, solicitor-general, county attorney, clerk of any court, 
sheriff, treasurer, and receiver-general, register of probate, nor 
register of deeds, shall continue to hold his said office after being 
elected a member of the Congress of the United States, and ac- 
cepting that trust; but the acceptance of such trust, by any of the 
officers aforesaid, shall be deemed and taken to be a resignation 
of his said office; and judges of the courts of common pleas shall 
hold no other office under the government of this commonwealth, 
the office of justice of the peace and militia offices excepted. 

Art. IX. If, at any time hereafter, any specific and particular 
amendment or amendments to the constitution be proposed in the 
general court, and agreed to by a majority of the senators and 



Constitution of 3fassachusetts — Amendments. 7 1 

two-thirds of the members of the house of representatives present 
and voting thereon, such proposed amendment or amendments 
shall be entered on the journals of the two houses, with the yeas 
and nays taken thereon, and referred to the general court then 
next to be chosen, and shall be published : and if, in the general 
court next chosen as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or 
amendments shall be agreed to by a majority of the senators and 
two-thirds of the members of the house of representatives present 
and voting thereon, then it shall be the duty of the general court 
to submit such proposed amendment or amendments to the peO' 
pie ; and if they shall be approved and ratified by a majority of 
the qualified voters, voting thereon at meetings legally warned 
and holden for that purpose, they shall become part of the consti- 
tution of this commonwealth. 

Art. X. The political year shall l)egin on the first Wednesday 
of January, instead of the last Wednesday of May ; and the gen- 
eral court shall assemble every year on the said first Wednesday 
of January, and shall proceed, at that session, to make all the 
elections, and do all the other acts, which are by the constitution 
required to Ijc made and done at the session which has heretofore 
commenced on the last Wednesday of May. And the general 
court shall be dissolved on the day next preceding the first 
Wednesday of January, without any proclamation or other act 
of the governor. But nothing herein contained shall prevent the 
general court from assembling at such other times as they shall 
judge necessary, or when called together by the governor. The 
governor, lieutenant-governor, and councillors, shall also hold 
their respective offices for one year next following the first Wednes- 
day of January, and until others are chosen and qualified in their 
stead. 

[The meeting for the choice of governor, lieutenant-governor, 
senators, and representatives, shall be held on the second Monday 
of November in every year; but meetings may be adjourned, if 
necessary, for the choice of representatives, to the next day, and 
again to the next succeeding day, but no further. But in case a 
second meeting shall be necessary for the choice of representa- 
tives, such meetings shall l)e held on the fourth Monday of the 
month of November.] [See Amendments, Article XV.] 



72 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

All the other provisions of the constitution, respecting the elec- 
tions and proceedings of the members of the general court, or 
of any other officers or persons whatever, that have reference to 
the last Wednesday of May, as the commencement of the political 
year, shall be so far altered, as to have like reference to the first 
"Wednesday of January. 

This article shall go into operation on the first day of October, 
next following the da}" when the same shall be duly ratified and 
adopted as an amendment of the constitution ; and the governor, 
lieutenant-governor, councillors, senators, representatives, and all 
other state officers, who are annually chosen, and who shall be 
chosen for the current year, when the same shall go into opera- 
tion, shall hold their respective offices until the first Wednesday 
of January then next following, and until others are chosen and 
qualified in their stead, and no longer; and the first election of 
the governor, lieutenant-governor, senators, and representatives, 
to be had in virtue of this article, shall be had conformably there- 
unto, in the month of November following the day on which the 
same shall be in force, and go into operation, pursuant to the fore- 
going provision. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution, inconsistent with 
the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly annulled. 

Art. XI. Instead of the third article of the bill of rights, the 
following modification and amendment thereof is substituted: — 

"As the public worship of God and instructions in pietj^, relig- 
ion, and morality, promote the happiness and prosperity of a 
people, and the security of a republican government; therefore, 
the several religious societies of this commonwealth, whether 
corporate or un in corporate, at any meeting legally warned and 
holden for that purpose, shall ever have the right to elect their 
pastors or religious teachers, to contract with them for their sup- 
port, to raise money for erecting and repairing houses for public 
worship, for the maintenance of religious instruction, and for 
the payment of necessary expenses ; and all persons belonging to 
any religious society shall be taken and held to be members until 
they shall file with the clerk of such society a written notice, de- 
claring the dissolution of their membership, and thenceforth shall 
not be liable for any grant or contract which may be thereafter 



Constitution of Massacluiselts — Amendments. 73 

made, or entered into by such society ; and all religious sects and 
denominations, demeaning themselves peaceably, and as good 
citizens of the commonwealth, shall be equally under the protec- 
tion of the law ; and no subordination of any one sect or denomi- 
nation to another shall ever be established by law." 

Art. XII. [In order to provide for a representation of the cit- 
izens of this commonwealth, founded upon the principles of equal- 
ity, a census of the ratable polls, in each city, town, or district of 
the commonwealth, on the first day of May, shall be taken and 
returned into the secretary's office, in such manner as the legis- 
lature shall provide, within the month of May, in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven, and in 
every tenth year thereafter, in the month of May, in the manner 
aforesaid ; and each town or city having three hundred ratable 
polls at the last preceding decennial census of polls, may elect 
one representative, and for every four hundred and fifty rat- 
able polls in addition to the first three hundred, one representa- 
tive more. 

Any town having less than three hundred ratable polls shall be 
represented thus : The whole number of ratable polls, at the last 
preceding decennial census of polls, shall be multiplied by ten, 
and the product divided by three hundred ; and such town may 
elect one representative as many years within ten years, as three 
hundred is contained in the product aforesaid. 

Any city or town having ratable polls enough to elect one or 
more representatives, with any number of polls beyond the neces- 
sary number, may be represented, as to that surplus number, by 
multiplying such surplus number by ten and dividing the product 
by four hundred and fifty; and such city or town may elect one 
additional representative as many years, within the ten years, as 
four hundred and fifty is contained in the product aforesaid. 

Any two or more of the several towns and districts may, by 
consent of a majority of the legal voters present at a legal meet- 
ing, in each of said towns and districts, respectively, called for 
that purpose, and held previous to the first day of July, in the 
year in which the decennial census of polls shall be taken, form 
themselves into a representative district to continue until the next 
decennial census of polls, for the election of a representative, or 



74 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amenrhnents. 

representatives ; and such district shall have all the rights, in re- 
gard to representation, which would belong to a town containing 
the same number of ratable polls. 

The goA'ernor and council shall ascertain and determine, within 
the months of July and August, in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand eight hundred and thirty-seven, according to the foregoing 
principles, the number of representatives which each city, town, 
and representative district is entitled to elect, and the number of 
years, within the period of ten years then next ensuing, that each 
city, town, and representative district may elect an additional 
representative ; and where any town has not a sufficient number 
of polls to elect a representative each year, then, how many years 
within the ten years, such town may elect a representative ; and 
the same shall be done once in ten years, thereafter, by the gov- 
ernor and council, and the number of ratable polls in each decen- 
nial census of polls, shall determine the number of representatives 
which each city, town, and representative district may elect as 
aforesaid ; and when the number of representatives to be elected 
by each city, town, or representative district is ascertained and 
determined as aforesaid, the governor shall cause the same to be 
published forthwith for the information of the people, and that 
number shall remain fixed and unalterable for the period of ten 
years. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution inconsistent with 
the provisions herein contained, are hereby wholly annulled.] 
[See Amendments, Articles XIII., XXI.] 

Art. XIII. [A census of the inhabitants of each city and 
town, on the first day of May, shall be taken, and returned into 
the secretary's office, on or before the last day of June, of the year 
one thousand eight hundred and forty, and of every tenth year 
thereafter; which census shall determine the apportionment of 
senators and representatives for the term of ten years. [See 
Amendments, Articles XXI., XXII.] 

The several senatorial districts now existing shall be permanent. 
The senate shall consist of forty members ; and in the year one 
thouf^and eight hundred and forty, and every tenth year there- 
after, the governor and council shall assign the number of sena- 
tors to be chosen in each district, according to the number of 



ConstiLiitioii of Massackasetis — Aniendinents. 75 

inhabitants in the same. But, in all cases, at least one sena- 
toi* shall be assigned to each district. [See Amendments, Article 
XXII] 

The members of the house of representatives shall be appor- 
tioned in the following manner : Every town or city containing 
twelve hundred inhabitants may elect one representative ; and 
two thousand four hundred inhabitants shall be the mean increas- 
ing number, which shall entitle it to an additional representative. 
[See Amendments, Article XXI.] 

Every town containing less than twelve hundred inhabitants 
shall be entitled to elect a representative as many times within ten 
years as the number one hundred and sixty is contained in the 
number of the inhabitants of said town. Such towns may also 
elect one representative for the year in which the valuation of es- 
tates within the commonwealth shall be settled. 

Any two or more of the several towns may, by consent of a 
majority of the legal voters present at a legal meeting, in each 
of said towns, respectively, called for that purpose, and held be- 
fore the first day of August, in the year one thousand eight hun- 
dred and forty, and every tenth year thereafter, form themselves 
into a representative district, to continue for the term of ten 
years ; and such district shall have all the rights, in regard to 
representation, which would belong to a town containing the same 
number of inhabitants. 

The number of inhabitants which shall entitle a town to elect 
one representative, and the mean increasing number which shall 
entitle a town or city to elect more than one, and also the number 
by which the population of towns not entitled to a representative 
every year is to be divided, shall be increased, respectively, by 
one-tenth of the numbers above mentioned, whenever the popula- 
tion of the commonwealth shall have increased to seven hundred 
and seventy thousand, and for every additional increase of seventy 
thousand inhabitants, the same addition of one-tenth shall be 
made, respectively, to the said numbers above mentioned. 

In the year of each decennial census, the governor and council 
shall, before the first day of September, apportion the number of 
representatives which each city, town, and representative district 
is entitled to elect, and ascertain how many years, within ten 
years, any town may elect a representative, which is not entitled 



76 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

to elect one every A'ear; and the governor shall cause the same 
to be published forthwith. 

Nine councillors shall be annually chosen fi'om among the 
people at large, on the first Wednesday of January, or as soon 
thereafter as may be, by the joint ballot of the senators and rep- 
resentatives, assembled in one room, who shall, as soon as may 
be, in like manner, fill up any vacancies that may happen in the 
council, by death, resignation, or otherwise. No person shall be 
elected a councillor, who has not been an inhabitant of this com- 
monwealth for the term of five years immediately preceding his 
election ; and not more than one councillor shall be chosen from 
any one senatorial district in the commonwealth.] [See Amend- 
ments, Article XYL] 

No possession of a freehold, or of any other estate, shall be 
required as a qualification for holding a seat in either branch of 
the general court, or in the executive council. 

Art. XIV. In all elections of civil officers b}' the people of 
this commonwealth, whose election is provided for by the consti- 
tution, the person having the highest number of votes shall be 
deemed and declared to be elected. 

Art. XV. The meeting for the choice of governor, lieutenant- 
governor, senators, and representatives, shall be held on the 
Tuesday next after the first Monday in November, annually ; but 
in case of a failure to elect representatives on that day, a second 
meeting shall be holden, for that purpose, on the fourth Monday 
of the same month of November. 

Art. XVI. Eight councillors shall be annually chosen by the 
inhabitants of this commonwealth, qualified to vote for governor. 
The election of councillors shall be determined by the same rule 
that is required in the election of governor. The legislature, at 
its first session after this amendment shall have been adopted, 
and at its first session after the next state census shall have been 
taken, and at its first session after each decennial state census 
thereafterwards, shall divide the commonwealth into eight districts 
of contiguous territory, each containing a number of inhabitants 
as nearly equal as practicable, without dividing any town or ward 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 77 

of a cit}', and each entitled to elect one councillor : provided, how- 
ever, that if, at any time, the constitution shall provide for the 
division of the commonwealth into forty senatorial districts, then 
the legislature shall so arrange the councillor districts, that each 
district shall consist of five contiguous senatorial districts, as they 
shall Ixj, from time to time, established by the legislature. No 
person shall be eligible to the office of councillor who has not 
been an inhabitant of the commonwealth for the term of five 
years immediately preceding his election. The day and manner 
of the election, the return of the votes, and tlie declaration of the 
said elections, shall be the same as are required in the election of 
governor. [Whenever there shall be a failure to elect the full 
number of councillors, the vacancies shall be filled in the same 
manner as is required for filling vacancies in the senate; and 
vacancies occasioned by death, removal from the state, or other- 
wise, shall be filled in like manner, as soon as may be, after such 
vacancies shall have happened.] And that there may be no delay 
in the organization of the government on the first Wednesday of 
January, the governor, with at least five councillors for the time 
being, shall, as soon as may be, examine the returned copies of 
the records for the election of governor, lieutenant-governor, and 
councillors ; and ten days before the said first Wednesday in Jan- 
uary he shall issue his summons to such persons as appear to be 
chosen, to attend on that day to be qualified accordingly ; and 
the secretary shall lay the returns before the senate and house of 
representatives on the said first Wednesday in January, to be 
by them examined ; and in case of the election of either of said 
officers, the choice shall be by them declared and published ; but 
in case there shall be no election of either of said officers, the 
legislature shall proceed to fill such vacancies in the manner pro- 
vided in the constitution for the choice of such officers. [See 
Amendments, Article XXV ] 

Art. XVII. The secretary, treasurer and receiver-general, 
auditor, and attorney-general, shall be chosen annually, on the 
day in November prescribed for the choice of governor; and each 
person then chosen as such, duly qualified in other respects, shall 
hold his office for the term of one year from the third Wednesday 
in January next thereafter, and until another is chosen and quali- 



78 Constitution of Massachusetts — Ainendments. 

fied in his stead. The qtialification of the voters, the manner of 
the election, the return of the votes, and the declaration of the 
election, shall be such as are required in the election of governor. 
In case of a failure to elect either of said officers on the day in 
November aforesaid, or in case of the decease, in the mean time, 
of the person elected as such, such officer shall be chosen on or 
before the third Wednesday in January next thereafter, from the 
two persons who had the highest number of votes for said offices 
on the day in November aforesaid, by joint ballot of the senators 
and representatives, in one room ; and in case the office of secre- 
tary, or treasurer and receiver-general, or auditor, or attorney- 
general, shall become vacant, from any cause, during an annual 
or special session of the general court, such vacancy shall in like 
manner be filled by choice from the people at large ; but if such 
vacancy shall occur at any other time, it shall be supplied by the 
governor by appointment, with the advice and consent of the 
council. The person so chosen or appointed, duly qualified in 
other respects, shall hold his office until his successor is chosen 
and duly qualified in his stead. In case any person chosen or 
appointed to either of the offices aforesaid, shall neglect, for the 
space of ten days after he could otherwise enter upon his duties, 
to qualify himself in all respects to enter upon the discharge of 
such duties, the office to which he has been elected or appointed 
shall be deemed vacant. No person shall be eligible to either 
of said offices unless he shall have been an inhabitant of this com- 
monwealth five years next preceding his election or appointment. 

Art. XVIII. All moneys raised by taxation in the towns and 
cities for the support of public schools, and all moneys which 
may be appropriated by the state for the support of common 
schools, shall be applied to, and expended in, no other schools 
than those which are conducted according to law, under the order 
and superintendence of the authorities of the town or city in 
which the money is to be expended ; and such money shall never 
be appropriated to any religious sect for the maintenance, exclu- 
sively, of its own school. 

Art. XIX. The legislature shall prescribe, by general law, 
for the election of sheriffs, registers of probate, [commissioners 



Constitution of Massachnsetts — Amendments. 7*J 

of insolvency,] and clerks of the courts, by the people of the sev- 
eral counties, and that district-attorneys shall be chosen by the 
people of the several districts, for such terra of office as the legis- 
lature shall prescribe. [See Amendments, Article XXXVI.] 

AuT. XX. No person shall have the right to vote, or be eligible 
to office under the constitution of this commonwealth, who shall 
not be able to read the constitution in the English language, and 
write his name : provided, hoioever, that the provisions of this 
amendment shall not apply to any person prevented by a physi- 
cal disability from complying with its requisitions, nor to any 
person who now has the right to vote, nor to any persons who 
shall be sixty j-ears of age or upwards at the time this amend- 
ment shall take effect.. [See Amendments, Articles III., XXIII., 
XXVI.] 

Art. XXI. A census of the legal voters of each city and town, 
on the first day of May, shall be taken and returned into the 
office of the secretary of the commonwealth, on or before the 
last day of June, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
fifty-seven ; and a census of the Inhabitants of each city and town, 
in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of 
every tenth year thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special 
enumeration shall be made of the legal voters ; and in each city, 
said enumeration shall specify the number of such legal voters 
aforesaid, residing in each ward of such city. The enumeration 
aforesaid shall determine the apportionment of representatives 
for the periods between the taking of the census. 

The house of representatives shall consist of two hundred and 
forty members, which shall be apportioned by the legislature, 
at its first session after the return of each enumeration as afore- 
said, to the several counties of the commonwealth, equally, as 
nearly as may be, according to their relative numbers of legal 
voters, as ascertained by the next preceding special enumeration; 
and the town of Cohasset, in the county of Norfolk, shall, for 
this purpose, as well as in the formation of districts, as herein- 
after provided, be considered a part of the county of Plymouth ; 
and it shall be the duty of the secretary of the conmionwealth, 
to certify, as soon as may l)e after it is determined by the legis- 



80 Constilution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

lature, the number of representatives to which each county shall 
be entitled, to the board authorized to divide each count)^ into 
representative districts. The mayor and aldermen of the city of 
Boston, the county commissioners of other counties than Suffolk, 
— or in lieu of the mayor and aldermen of the city of Boston, 
or of the county commissioners in each county other than Suffolk, 
such board of special commissioners in each county, to be elected 
by the people of the county, or of the towns therein, as may for 
that purpose be provided by law, — shall, on the first Tuesday 
of August next after each assignment of representatives to each 
county, assemble at a shire town of their respective counties, and 
proceed, as soon as may be, to divide the same into representative 
districts of contiguous territory, so as to apportion the representa- 
tion assigned to each county equally, as nearly as may be, accord- 
ing to the relative numljer of legal voters in the several districts 
of each county ; and such districts shall be so formed that no 
town or ward of a city shall be divided therefor, nor shall any 
district be made which shall be entitled to elect more than three 
representatives. Every representative, for one year at least next 
preceding his election, shall have been an inhabitant of the district 
for which he is chosen and shall cease to represent such district 
when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the commonwealth. 
The districts in each county shall be numbered by the board cre- 
ating the same, and a description of each, with the numbers there- 
of and the number of legal voters therein, shall be returned by the 
board, to the secretary of the commonwealth, the county treasurer 
of each county, and to the clerk of every town in each district, 
to be filed and kept in their respective offices. The manner of 
calling and conducting the meetings for the choice of representa- 
tives, and of ascertaining their election, shall be prescribed by 
law. [Not less than one hundred members of the house of repre- 
sentatives shall constitute a quorum for doing business ; but a 
less number may organize temporarily, adjourn from day to day, 
and compel the attendance of absent members.] [See Amend- 
ments, Article XXXIII.] 

Art. XXII. A census of the legal voters of each city and town, 
on the first day of May, shall be taken and returned into the office 
of the secretary of the commonwealth, on or before the last day 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 8 1 

of June, in the rear one thousand eight hundred lifty-seven; and 
a census of the inhabitants of each city and town, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, and of every tenth year 
thereafter. In the census aforesaid, a special enumeration shall 
be made of the legal voters, and in each city said enumeration 
shall specify the number of such legal voters aforesaid, residing 
in each ward of such cit}^. The enumeration aforesaid shall deter- 
mine the apportionment of senators for the periods between the 
taliing of the census. The senate shall consist of forty members. 
The general court shall, at its first session after each next preced- 
ing special enumeration, divide the commonwealth into forty dis- 
tricts of adjacent territory, each district to contain, as nearly as 
may be, an equal number of legal voters, according to the enum- 
eration aforesaid : provided, hoicever, that no town or ward of a 
city shall be divided therefor ; and such districts shall be formed, 
as nearly as may be, without uniting two counties, or parts of two 
or more counties, into one district. Each district shall elect one 
senator, who shall have been an inhal)itant of this commonwealth 
five years at least immediately preceding his election, and at 
the time of his election shall be an inhabitant of the district for 
which he is chosen ; and he shall cease to represent such senato- 
rial district when he shall cease to be an inhabitant of the com- 
monwealth. [Not less than sixteen senators shall constitute a 
quorum for doing business ; but a less number may organize 
temporarily, adjourn from day to day, and compel the attend- 
ance of absent members.] [See Amendments, Articles XXIV., 
XXXIII.] 

Art. XXIII. [No person of foreign birth shall be entitled to 
vote, or shall be eligible to ofiice, unless he shall have resided 
within the jurisdiction of the United States for two years subse- 
quent to his naturalization, and shall be otherwise qualified, ac- 
cording to the constitution and laws of this commonwealth: 
provided, that this amendment shall not afiect the rights which 
any person of foreign birth possessed at the time of the adoption 
thereof; &n^, provided, further, that it shall not affect the rights 
of any child of a citizen of the United States, born during the 
temporary absence of the parent therefrom.] [See Amendment8> 
Article XXVI.] 



82 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

Art. XXIV. Any vacancy in the senate shall be filled by 
election by the people of the unrepresented district, upon the order 
of a majority of the senators elected. 

Art. XXY. In case of a vacancy in the council, from a fail- 
ure of election, or other cause, the senate and house of represent- 
atives shall, by concurrent vote, choose some eligible person from 
the people of the district wherein such vacancy occurs, to fill that 
office. If such vacancy shall happen when the legislature is not 
in session, the governor, with the advice and consent of the coun- 
cil, may fill the same by appointment of some eligible person. 

Art. XXVI. The twenty-third article of the articles of amend- 
ment of the constitution of this commonwealth, Avhich is as fol- 
lows, to wit : " No person of foreign birth shall be entitled to vote, 
or shall be eligible to office, unless he shall have resided within 
the jurisdiction of the United States for two years subsequent to 
his natui'alization, and shall be otherwise qualified, according to 
the constitution and laws of this commonwealth : provided, that 
this amendment shall not affect the rights which any person of 
foreign birth possessed at the time of the adoption thereof ; and 
provided, further, that it shall not affect the rights of any child of 
a citizen of the United States, born during the temporary absence 
of the parent therefrom, "• is hereby wholly annulled. 

Art. XXVII. So much of article two of chapter six of the 
constitution of this commonwealth as relates to persons holding 
the office of president, professor, or instructor of Harvard College, 
is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXVIII. No person having served in the army or navy 
of the United States in time of war, and having been honorably 
discharged from such service, if otherwise qualified to vote, shall 
be disqualified therefor on account of [being a pauper;] or [, if a 
pauper,] because of the non-payment of a poll tax. [See Amend- 
ments, Article XXXI.] 

Art. XXIX. The General Court shall have full power and 
authority to provide for the inhabitants of the towns in this Com- 
monwealth more than one place of public meeting within the 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 83 

limits of each town for the election of officers under the constitu- 
tion, and to prescribe the manner of calling, holding, and con- 
ducting such meetings. 

All the provisions of the existing constitution inconsistent with 
the provisions herein contained are hereby annulled. 

Art. XXX. No person, otherwise qualified to vote in elections 
for governor, lieutenant-governor, senators, and representatives, 
shall, by reason of a change of residence within the Common- 
wealth, be disqualified from voting for said officers in the city or 
town from which he has removed his residence, until the expira- 
tion of six calendar months from the time of such removal. 

Art XXXI. Article twenty-eight of the Amendments of the 
Constitution is hereby amended by striking out in the fourth line 
thereof the words " being a pauper," and inserting in place thereof 
the words : — receiving or having received aid from any city or 
town, — and also by striking out in said fourth line the words " if 
a pauper," so that the article as amended shall read as follows ; 
ARTICLE XXVIII. No person having served in the army or 
navy of the United States in time of war, and having been 
honorably discharged from such service, if otherwise qualified to 
vote, shall be disqualified therefor on account of receiving or 
having received aid from any city or town, or because of the non- 
payment of a poll tax. 

Art. XXXII. So much of article three of the Amendments of 
the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is contained in the fol- 
lowing words : *' and who shall have paid, by himself, or his par- 
ent, master, or guardian, any state or county tax, which shall, 
within two years next preceding such election, have been assessed 
upon him, in any town or district of this Commonwealth; and 
also every citizen who shall be, by law, exempted from taxation, 
and who shall be, in all other respects, qualified as above men- 
tioned," is hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXIII. A majority of the members of each branch of 
the General Court shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of 
business, but a less number may adjourn fi-om day to day, and 
compel the attendance of absent members. All the provisions of 



84 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 

the existing Constitution inconsistent with the provisions herein 
contained are hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXIV. So much of article two of section one of chap- 
ter two of part second of the Constitution of the Commonwealth 
as is contained in the following words: "and unless he shall at 
the same time, be seised in his own right, of a freehold within the 
Commonwealth of the value of one thousand pounds," is hereby 
annulled. 

Art. XXXV, So much of article two of section three of chap- 
ter one of the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is contained 
in the following words : " The expenses of travelling to the gen- 
eral assembly, and returning home, once in every session, and no 
more, shall be paid by the government, out of the public treasury, 
to every member who snail attend as seasonably as he can, in the 
judgment of the house, and does not depart without leave," is 
hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXVI. So much of article nineteen of the articles of 
Amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth as is con- 
tained in the following words : " commissioners of insolvency," is 
hereby annulled. 

Art. XXXVII. The governor, with the consent of the council, 
may remove justices of the peace and notaries public. 

Art. XXXVIII. Voting machines or other mechanical devices 
for voting may be used at all elections under such regulations as 
may be prescribed by law : provided, however^ that the right of 
secret voting shall be preserved. 

Art. XXXIX. Article ten of part one of the Constitution is 
hereby amended by adding to it the following words : — The legis- 
lature may by special acts for the purpose of laying out, widening 
or relocating highways or streets, authorize the taking in fee by 
the Commonwealth, or by a county, city or town, of more land 
and property than are needed for the actual construction of such 
highway or street : provided, however, that the land and property 
authorized to be taken are specified in the act and are no more in 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 85 

extent than would be sufficient for suitable building lots on both 
sides of such highway or street; and after so much of the land or 
property has been appropriated for such highway or street as is 
needed therefor, may authorize the sale of the remainder for value 
with or without suitable restrictions. 

[Note. — Soon after the Declaration of Independence, steps were 
taken in Massachusetts towards framing a Constitution or Form of 
Government. The Council and House of Representatives, or the Gen- 
eral Court of 1777-78, in accordance with a recommendation of the Gen- 
eral Court, of the previous year, met together as a Convention, and 
adopted a form of Constitution "for the State of Massachusetts Bay," 
which was submitted to the people, and by them rejected. This at- 
tempt to form a Constitution having proved unsuccessful, the General 
Court on the 20th of February, 1779, passed a Resolve calling upon the 
qualified voters to give in their votes upon the questions — Whether 
they chose to have a new Constitution or Form of Government made, 
and, Whether they will empower their representatives to vote for calling 
a State Convention for that purpose. A large majority of the inhabitants 
having voted in the affirmative to both these questions, the General 
Court, on the 17th of June, 1779, passed a Resolve calling upon the in- 
habitants to meet and choose delegates to a Constitutional Convention, 
to be held at Cambridge, on the 1st of September, 1779. The Convention 
met at time and place appointed, and organized by choosing James 
Bowdoin, President, and Samuel Barrett, Secretary. On the 11th of 
November the Convention adjourned, to meet at the Representatives' 
Chamber, in Boston, January 5th, 1780. On the 2d of March, of the 
same year, a form of Constitution having been agreed upon, a Resolve 
was passed by which the same was submitted to the people, and the 
Convention adjourned to meet at the Brattle Street Church, in Boston, 
June the 7th. At that time and place, the Convention again met, and 
appointed a Committee to examine the returns of votes from the several 
towns. On the 14th of June the Committee reported, and on the loth 
the Convention resolved, "That the people of the State of Massachusetts 
Bay have accepted the Constitution as it stands, in the printed form 
submitted to their revision." A Resolve providing for carrying the new 
Constitution into effect was i)assed; and the Convention then, on the 
16th of June, 1780, was finally dissolved. In accordance with the Re- 
solves referred to, elections immediately took place in the several towns; 
and the first General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
met at the State House, in Boston, on Wednesday, October 25th, 1780. 

The Constitution contained a provision providing for taking, in 1795, 
the sense of the people as to the expediency or necessity of revising the 



86 Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 



original instrument. But no such revision was deemed necessary at 
that time. On the 16th of June, 1820, an Act was passed by the General 
Court, calling upon the people to meet in their several towns, and give 
in their votes upon the question, "Is it expedient that delegates should 
be chosen to meet in Convention for the purpose of revising or altering 
the Constitution of Government of this Commonwealth?" A large 
majority of the people of the State having voted in favor of revision, the 
Grovernor issued a proclamation announcing the fact, and calling upon 
the people to vote, in accordance with the provisions of the aforesaid 
Act, for delegates to the proposed Convention. The delegates met at 
the State House, in Boston, November 15, 1820, and organized by choos- 
ing John Adams, President, and Benjamin Pollard, Secretary. Mr. 
Adams, however, declined the appointment, and Isaac Parker was 
chosen in his stead. On the 9th of January-, 1821, the Convention agreed 
to fourteen Articles of Amendment, and after passing a Resolve pro- 
viding for submitting the same to the people, and appointing a com- 
mittee to meet to count the votes upon the subject, was dissolved. The 
people voted on Monday, April 9th, 1821, and the Committee of the 
Convention met at the State House to count the votes, on Wednesday, 
May 24th. They made their return to the General Court ; and at the 
request of the latter the Governor issued his proclamation on the 5th of 
June, 1821, announcing that nine of the fourteen Articles of Amendment 
had been adopted. These articles are numbered in the preceding cages 
from one to nine inclusive. 

The tenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the political years 1829-30, and 1830-31, and was 
approved and ratified by the people May 11th, 1831. 

The eleventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the years 1832 and 1833, and was approved and 
ratified by the people November 11th, 1833. 

The twelfth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General Court 
during the sessions of the years 1835 and 1836, and was approved and 
ratified by the people November 14th, 1836. 

The thirteenth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1839 and 1840, and was approved 
and ratified by the people April 6th, 1840. 

The General Court of the year 1851 passed an Act caUing a third Con- 
vention to revise the Constitution. The Act was submitted to the people, 
and a majority voted against the proposed Convention. In 1852, on the 



Constitution of Massachusetts — Amendments. 87 



7th of May, another Act was passed calling upon the people to vote upon 
the question of calling a Constitutional Convention, A majority of the 
people having voted in favor of the proposed Convention, election for 
delegates thereto took place in March, 1853. The Convention met in 
the State House, in Boston, on the 4th day of May, 1853, and organized 
by choosing Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., President, and William S. Robin- 
eon and James T. Robinson, Secretaries. On the 1st of August, this 
Convention agreed to a form of Constitution, and on the same day was 
dissolved, after having provided for submitting the same to the people, 
and appointed a committee to meet to count the votes, and to make a 
return thereof to the General Court. The Committee met at the time 
and place agreed upon, and found that the proposed Constitution had 
been rejected. 

The fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and nine- 
teenth Articles of Amendment were adopted by the General Court dur- 
ing the sessions of the years 1854 and 1855, and were approved and 
ratified by the people May 23d, 1855. 

The twentieth, twenty-first and twenty-second Articles of Amendment 
were adopted by the General Court during the sessions of the years 
1856 and 1857, and were approved and ratified by the people May 1st, 
1857. 

The twenty-third Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1858 and 1859, and was approved 
and ratified by the people May 9th, 1859. 

The twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth Articles of Amendment were adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1859 and 1860, and 
were approved and ratified by the people May 17th, 1860. 

The twenty-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1862 and 1863, and was approved 
and ratified April 6th, 1863. 

The twenty-seventh Article was adopted by the General Court during 
the sessions of the years 1876 and 1877, and was approved and ratified by 
the people on the 6th day of November, 1877. 

The twenty-eighth Article was adopted by the General Court during 
the sessions of the years 1880 and 1881, and was approved and ratified by 
the people on the 8th day of November, 1881. 



88 Constitution of Massachusetts — Aynendments. 



The twenty-ninth Article was adopted by the General Court during the 
sessions of the years 1884 and 1885, and was approved and ratified by the 
people on the 3d day of November, 1885. 

The thirtieth and thirty-first Articles of Amendment were adopted by 
the General Court during the sessions of the years 1889 and 1890, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 4th day of November, 



The thirty-second and thirty-third Articles of Amendment were adopted 
by the General Court during the sessions of the years 1890 and 1891, and 
were approved and ratified by the people on the 3d day of November, 



The thirty-fourth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1891 and 1892, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 8th day of November, 1892. 

The thirty-fifth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1892 and 1893, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1893. 

The thirty-sixth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1893 and 1894, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 6th day of November, 1894. 

The thirty-seventh Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court diiring the sessions of the years 1906 and 1907, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 5th day of November, 1907. 

The thirty-eighth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1909 and 1910, and was approved 
aad ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1911. 

The thirty-ninth Article of Amendment was adopted by the General 
Court during the sessions of the years 1910 and 1911, and was approved 
and ratified by the people on the 7th day of November, 1911.] 



Elections for Senators in Congress, 80 



ELECTIONS FOR SENATORS IN CONGRESS. 



{Sections 14 to 19, Revised Statutes of the United States.] 

Sect. 14. The legislature of each State which is chosen next 
preceding the expiration of the time for which any Senator was 
elected to represent such State in Congress shall, on the second 
Tuesday after the meeting and organization thereof, proceed to 
elect a Senator in Congress. 



Sect. 15. Such election shall be conducted in the following 
manner: Each house shall openly, by a viva voce vote of each 
member present, name one person for Senator in Congress from 
such State, and the name of the person so voted for, who receives 
a majority of the whole number of votes cast in each house, shall 
be entered on the journal of that house by the clerk or secretary 
thereof ; or if either house fails to give such majority to any person 
on that day, the fact shall be entered on the journal. At twelve 
o'clock meridian of the day following that on which proceedings 
are required to take place as aforesaid, the members of the two 
houses shall convene in joint assembly, and the journal of each 
house shall then be read, and if the same person has received a 
majority of all the votes in each house, he shall be declared duly 
elected Senator. But if the same person has not received a majority 
of the votes in each house, or if either house has failed to take 
proceedings as required by this section, the joint assembly shall 
then proceed to choose, by a viva voce vote of each member present, 
a person for Senator, and the person who receives a majority of 
all the votes of the joint assembly, a majority of all the members 
elected to both houses being present and voting, shall be de- 
clared duly elected. If no person receives such majority on the 



90 Elections for Senators in Congress. 

first day, the joint assembly shall meet at twelve o'clock meridian 
of each succeeding day during the session of the legislature, and 
shall take at least one vote, until a Senator Is elected. 

Sect. 16. Whenever on the meeting of the legislature of any 
State a vacancy exists in the representation of such State in the 
Senate, the legislature shall proceed, on the second Tuesday after 
meeting and oi-ganization, to elect a person to fill such vacancy, in 
the manner prescribed in the preceding section for the election of 
a Senator for a full term. 

Sect. 17. Whenever during the session of the legislature of 
any State a vacancy occurs in the representation of such State 
in the Senate, similar proceedings to fill such vacancy shall be had 
on the second Tuesday after the legislature has organized and has 
notice of such vacancy. 

Sect. 18. It shall be the duty of the executive of the State 
from which any Senator has been chosen, to certify his election, 
under the seal of the State, to the President of the Senate of the 
United States. 

Sect. 19. The certificate mentioned in the preceding section 
shall be countersigned by the secretary of state of the State. 



STATISTICS. 



HiSTOBicAL, State, County, District, 
Post-office, Etc. 



[93] 



COUNTIES, CITIES, AND TOWNS OF 
MASSACHUSETTS. 



The tables that follow under this heading were prepared 

by Henry E. Woods, Esq., Commissioner 

of Public Becords. 



"Towns . . . became in effect municipal or quasi corporations, 
without any formal act of incorporation." (122 Mass. p. 349.) 

August 23, 1775. "Every incorporated district 'shall henceforth 
be, and shall be holden, taken, and intended to be, a town to all 
intents and purposes whatsoever.' " (Prov. Laws, Vol. V., p. 420.) 

March 23, 1786. " The inhabitants of every town within this gov- 
ernment are hereby declaired to be a body politic and corporate." 
(Acts 1785, chap. 75.) 

Nov. 4, 1835. "All places now incorporated as districts, except 
the district of Marshpee, in the county of Barnstable, shall have all 
the powers and privileges, and be subject to all the duties to which 
towns are entitled by the provisions of this chapter." (R. S. chap. 
1.% sec.9.) 

The asterisk (*) following a date signifies that it is Old Style. 

Many of the doings of the court are given in dijierent volumes of 
the early records under different dates, usually, however, in the 
same year. The earliest date is given in these tables. The dates 
that appear in the columns headed " First mentioned in the records 
of the State," etc., are those under which the several names as there 
given first appear in the records of the Colonies, Province, or State, 
although settlements under the same or different names might have 
been earlier made. 

Names of cities are printed in small capitals; of extinct cities, 
towns, and districts, in italics. 



94 Date of Establishment^ Incorporation, Etc. 



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table and 
Barnsta- 
arnstable 
-dditional 
between 
. 29,* 1672 
ed. Jan. 
of Mash- 
table and 


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ommon land. June 17,* 1641 
Yarmouth established. Mar. 
ble and Sandwich to be estab 
and Yarmouth agreed upon 
lands granted to Barnstable, 
Barnstable and Sandwich 
bounds between Barnstable 
22, 1795 bounds between Ban: 

1>ee established. Mar. 28, 189' 
►lashpee established. 






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Counties^ Cities^ and Towns oj Massachusetts. 95 



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Counties, Cities, and Towns of Massachusetts. 101 

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Counties^ Cities, and Toivns of Massachusetts. 103 



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Counties^ Cities^ and Toivns of Massachusetts. 105 



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799 part of Dighton 
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part established as 
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Counties^ Cities^ and Towns of Massachusetts. 107 

« -TT <i^ :=^ ^ < -is :ff c, ?? c « «So tsS 

o3':i^b> O-S • ^ Or tL a is cot<-2 'S^_.*j~a_ 

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192 Date of JEstabUshment, Incorporation., Etc. 





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Counties, Cities^ and Toions of Massachusetts. 193 



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III 



194 



Cities in the Commonwealth. 



CITIES IN THE COMMONWEALTH, 

WITH THE DATES OF THEIR INCORPORATION AND THEIR POPULATION. 







Popu- 


Popu- 


Popu- 




Incorpo- 
rated. 


lation, 


lation, 


lation, 


NAME. 


1900. 


1905. 


1910. 




(U. S. Cen- 


(State Cen- 


(U. S. Cen- 






sus.) 


sus.) 


sus.) 


Boston,* . 


Feb. 23, 1822 


560,892 


595,380 


670,585 


Salem, 


Mar. 23, 1836 


35,956 


37,627 


43,697 


Lowell, t . 


Apr. 1, 1836 


94,969 


94,889 


106,294 


Cambridge,* . 


Mar. 17, 1846 


91,886 


97,434 


104.839 


New Bedford, . 


Mar. 9, 1847 


62,442 


74,362 


96,652 


Worcester, 


Feb. 29, 1848 


118,421 


128,135 


145,986 


Lynn, 


Apr. 10, 1850 


68,513 


77,042 


89,336 


Newburyport, . 


May 24, 1851 


14,478 


14,675 


14,949 


Springfield, 


Apr. 12, 1852 


62,059 


73,540 


88,926 


Lawrence, 


Mar. 21, 1853 


62,559 


70,050 


85,892 


Fall River, 


Apr. 12, 1854 


104,863 


105,762 


119,295 


Chelsea, . 


Mar. 13, 1857 


34,072 


37,289 


32,452 


Taunton,. 


May 11, 1864 


31,036 


30,967 


34,259 


Haverhill, 


Mar. 10, 1869 


37,175 


37,830 


44.115 


Somerville,t 


Apr. 14, 1871 


61,643 


69.272 


77,236 


Fitchburg, 


Mar. 8, 1872 


31,531 


33,021 


37.826 


Holyoke.§ 


Apr. 7, 1873 


45.712 


49,934 


57.730 


Gloucester, 


Apr. 28, 1873 


26,121 


26,011 


24.398 


Newton, . 


June 2, 1873 


33,587 


36,827 


39,806 


Maiden, . 


Mar. 31. 1881 


33.664 


38,037 


44,404 


Brockton, 


Apr. 9, 1881 


40.063 


47,794 


56,878 


Northampton,! 


June 23, 1883 


18.643 


19.957 


19.431 


Waltham, 


June 2, 1884 


23.481 


26,282 


27.834 


Quincy, . 


May 17, 1888 


23,899 


28.076 


32,642 


Woburn, . 


May 18, 1888 


14,254 


14,402 


15,308 


Pittsfield, 


June 5, 1889 


21,766 


25,001 


32.121 


Chicopee, 


Apr. 18, 1890 


19,167 


20,191 


25,401 


Marlborough, . 


May 23, 1890 


13,609 


14,073 


14,579 


Medford, . 


May 31, 1892 


18,244 


19.686 


23,150 


Everett, . 


June 11, 1892 


24.336 


29.111 


33,484 


Beverly, . 


Mar. 23, 1894 


13.884 


15.223 


18,650 


North Adams, . 


Mar. 22, 1895 


24,200 


22,150 


22,019 


Melrose, . 


Mar. 18, 1899 


12,962 


14,295 


15.715 



* Change in boundary line between Cambridge and Boston in 1910. 
Hyde Park (with 15,507 population) annexed to Boston in 1911. 
t Part of Tewksbury annexed to Lowell in 1906. 

X Change in boundary line between Somerville and Arlington in 1910. 
§ Part of Northampton annexed to Holyoke in 1909. 



Congressional Districts, 



195 



CONGEESSIONAL DISTKICTS. 



[As established by Chapter 511 of the Acts of 1901. See alec Revised 


Laws, Chapter 11, Section 422.] 


DISTRICT No. 1. 


™, Population 
Cities and Towns. 1900. 


Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1!»00. 


Berkxhire County. 




Berkshire Co.- Con. 




Adams 


11,134 


Washington, . 


377 


Alford, . 




272 


AVest Stockbridge, 


1,158 


Becket, . 




994 i 


Williamstown, 


5,013 


Cheshire, 




1,221 


Windsor, 


507 


Clarksburg, . 




943 






Dalton, . 




3,014 


Frrmklin County. 




Egreraont, 




758 


Ashfield, 


955 


Florida, . 




390 


Beruardston, 






792 


Great Barriiigton, 




5,854 


Buckland, 






1,446 


Hancock, 




451 1 Charlemont, 






1,094 


Hinedale, 




1,485 1 Colrain, . 






! 1,749 


Laneeborough, 




780 Conway, 






1,458 


Lee, . . 




3,596 I Deerfield, 






1,969 


Lenox, . 




2,942 Gill, 






1,015 


Monterey, 




455 : Greenfield, 






7,927 


Mount Waehingto 


i» 


122 Hawley, 






429 


New Aehford, 




! 107 Heath, . 






411 


New Marlborough 




1 1,282 Ley den, . 






379 


North Adams, 




24,200 ' Monroe,. 






305 


Otis, 




476 Rowe, . 






549 


Peru, 




253 i Shelburne, 






1,508 


PlTTSFIELD, . 




21,766 1 Whately, 






769 


Richmond, . 




679 






Sandisfield, . 




661 


Hampden County. 




Savoy, . 




506 


Agawam, . . . | 2,536 


Sheffield, 




1,804 


Blandford, ... 836 


Stockbridge, . 




2,081 


Chester,. . . 1,450 


Tyringham, . 


386 

1 


GranviUe, . . . 1,050 



196 



Congressional Districts. 



DISTRICT No 


. 1— Concluded. 






Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1900. 


Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1900. 


Hampden Co. — Con. 




Hampshire Co. — Con. 




HOLYOKE, . 


45,712 


Goshen, .... 


316 


Montgomery, 


'273 


Hatfield, 




1,500 


RuBeell, .... 


793 


Huntington, . 




1,475 


Southwick, . 


1,040 


Middlefield, . 




410 


Tolland 


275 


Plainfield, . 




404 


Westfield, 


12,310 


Southampton, 




1,012 


West Springfield, . 


7,105 


Westhampton, 
Williamsburg, 




469 
1,926 


Hampshire County. 
Chestertield, . 


611 


Worthington, 




675 






Cummington, 


748 


Total, . . . 


201,378 



DISTRICT No. 2. 



Franklin County. 




Hampshire Co. — Con. 




Erving, .... 


973 


Easthampton, 


5,603 


Leverett, 




744 


Enfield, . 




1,036 


Montague, 




6,150 


Grauby, . 




761 


New Salem, 




807 


Greenwich, . 




491 


Northfield, 




1,966 


Hadley, . . 




1,789 


Orange, . 




5,520 


Northampton, 




18,643 


Shuteeburj-, 




382 


Pelham. . 




462 


Sunderland, 




771 


Prescott, 




i 380 


Warwick, 




619 


South Hadley, 




1 4,526 


Wendell, 




492 


Ware, . . 




8,263 


FFampden County. 








Brimfield, . . . | 941 


Worcester County. 




Chicopee, . . . i 39,167 


Athol 


7,061 


East Longmeadow, . 1,187 


Barre, . 




2,059 


Hampden, . . . i 782 


Brookfield, . 




3,062 


Holland, . . . j 169 


Dana, . 




790 


Longmeadow, . . 1 811 


Hardwick, 




3,203 


Ludlow,. 


1 3,536 


New Braintree, 




500 


Monson, . 


3,402 


North Isrookfield, 




4,587 


Palmer 


7,801 


Oakham, 




588 


Springfield, 


62,059 


Petersham, . 




853 


Wales, .... 


773 


Phillip ston, . 




441 


Wilbraham, . 


1,595 


Royalston, 
Warren, 




958 
4,417 


Hampfthii^e County. 


5,028 


West Brookfield, 




1,448 


Amherst, 






Belchertown, 


2,292 


Total, . 


199,888 



Congressional Disti'icts, 



197 



DISTRICT No. 3. 



Cities and Towns. 



Worcester County. 
Auburn, 
Charltou, 
Douglas, 
Dudley, . 
Graftou, 
Holden, . 
Leicester, 
Millbury, 
Northbridge, , 
Oxford, . 
Paxton, . 
Rutland, 



Population 
1900. 



1,621 
1,860 
2,113 
3,553 

2^464 
3,416 ' 
4,460 
7,036 
2,677 
459 
1.334 



Cities and Towns. 



Worcester Co. — Con, 
Shrewsbury, 
Southbridge, 
Spencer, 
Sturbridge, 
Sutton, . 
Uxbridge, 
"Webster, 
Weetborough, 
West Boylston, 
"Worcester, 

Total, . 



Population 
1900. 



,626 
025 
,627 
058 
328 
599 
,804 
,400 
,314 
.421 



199,064 



DISTRICT No. 4. 



Middlesex County. 




Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Acton 


2,120 


Weston 


1,834 


Aehby, . 






876 






Ashland, 






1,525 


Worcei^ter County. 




Ayer, 






2,446 


Ashburnham, 


1,882 


Bedford, 






1,208 


Berlin, . 




1,003 


Boxborough, 






316 


Bolton, . 




770 


Concord, 






5,652 


Boylston, 




1,364 


Framingham, 






11,302 


Clinton, . 




13,667 


Groton, . 






2,052 


FiTCHBUBG, . 




31,531 


Hudson, 






5,454 


Gardner, 




10,813 


Lexington, 






3,831 


Harvard, 
Hubbardston, 




1,139 


Lincoln, . 






1,127 




1,227 


Littleton, 






1,179 


Lancaster, 




2,478 


Marlboroug 


H, 




13,609 


Leominster, . 




12,392 


Maynard, 






3,142 


Lunenburg, . 




1,332 


Natick, . 






9,488 


Northborough, 




2,164 


Pepperell, 
Shirley, . 






3,701 
1,680 


Princeton, 
Southborough, 




975 
1,921 


Stow, . 






1,002 


Sterling, 




1,420 


Sudbury, 






1,150 


Templeton, . 




3,489 


Townsend, 






1,804 


Westminster, 




1,327 


"Waltham, 
Way land. 






23,481 
2,303 


Winchendon, 




5,001 










Westford, 






2,624 


Total, . 


200,801 



198 



Congressional Districts, 



DISTRICT No. 5. 



Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1900. 


Cities and Towns. ^^900^° 


Essex County. 




Middlesex Co. -Con. 


Andover, 


6,813 


Chelmeford, . 


1 3,984 


Lawrence, . 


62,559 


Dracut, . 




3,253 


Lynnfield, 


888 


Dunstable, . 


. 


427 


Methueu, 


7,512 


Lowell,* 


, 


94,969 


Nortli Andover, . 


4,243 


North Reading, 

Reading, 

Tewksbury,* 


• 


1,035 
4,969 
3,683 


Middlesex Co u n ty. 




Tyngsborough, 




773 


Billerica, . . . 
Burlington, . 


2,775 
593 


Wilmington, . 




1,596 






Carlisle,. 


480 


Total, . 


200,552 



DISTRICT No. 6. 



Essex County. 




Essex Co.— Con. 




Amesbury, . 


9,473 


Middleton, . 


839 


Beverly, 






13,884 


Xewburv, 




1,601 


Boxford. 






704 


Xewbcryport, 




14,478 


Danvers, 






8,542 
1,663 ' 


Peabody, 




11,523 


Essex, . 






Rockport, 




4,592 


Georgetown, 






1,900 


Rowley,. 




1,391 


Gloucester, 






i 26,121 


Salem, . 




35,956 


Groveland, 






2,376 


Salisbury, 




1,558 


Hamilton, 






1,614 


Swampscott, , 




4,548 


Haverhill, 






37,175 


Topsfieid, 




1,030 


Ipswich, 






4,6.J8 


Wenham , 




847 


Afanchester, 
Marblebead, 






2,522 

7,582 


West Newbury, 




1,558 










Merrimac, 






2,131 


Total, . . . 


200,266 



DISTRICT No. 7. 



Essex County. 


1 


Middlesex Co. — Con. 




Ltnn 


68,513 


Stoneham, 


6,197 


Nahant, .... 


1,152 


Wakefield, . 


9,290 


Saugus, .... 


5,084 

1 


Suffolk County. 




Middlesex County. 




Chelsea, 


34,072 


Everett, 


24,336 


Revere, .... 


10,395 


Malden, 


33,664 






Melrose, 


12,962 


Total, 


205,665 



* Part of Tewksbury (with 1,491 population) annexed to Lowell, 
April 30, 1906. 



Congressional Districts. 



199 



DISTRICT No. 8. 



Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1900. 


CITIES AND TOW.N-S. ^^^^l^^if 


Middlesex County. 
Arlingtou, . 
Belmont, 
Cambridge, . 


8,603 

3,929 

91,886 

18,244 

61,643 


Middlesex Co. — Con. 
Winchester, . 
WOBURN, 

Total, . . . 


7,248 
14,254 


Medford, . 
80mehville, 


205,807 



DISTRICT No. 9. 



Suffolk County. 




Snfolk Co. — Con. 




Boston, Ward 1, . 


22,832 


Boston, Ward 8, 


28,817 


Ward 2, . 


22,924 


^V^ard 9, 


24,583 


Ward 3, . 


14,564 


Ward 12, pre- 




Ward 4, . 


13,248 


cincts 6 and 7, 


8,524 


Ward 5, . . 


12,840 


Winthrop, . 


6,058 


Ward 6, . 


30,546 








Ward 7, . . 


14,782 


Total, . . . 


199,718 



DISTRICT No. 10. 



Norfolk County. 




Suffolk Co. — Con. 




Milton, .... 


6,578 


Boston, Ward 15, 


19,700 


QUINCT, 


23,899 


Ward 16, 


20,017 






Ward 17, 


25,038 






Ward 20, 


32,556 


Snfolk County. 




Ward 24, 


27,126 


Boston, Ward 13, 


22,835 






Ward 14, 


21,453 


Total, . . . 


199,202 



DISTRICT No. 11. 



Suffolk County. 




Suffolk Co. — Con. 




Boston, Ward 10, 


22,142 


Boston, Ward 21, 


23,868 


Ward 11, 


19,275 


Ward 22, 


25,610 


Ward 12, pre- 


1 


Ward 23, 


23,637 


cincts 1,2, 3, 




Ward 25, 


19,279 


4 and 5, 


15,117 
! 22,401 






Ward 18, 




Ward 19, 


27,178 


Total, . 


198,507 



200 



Congressional Districts, 



DISTRICT No. 12. 



Cities and Towns. 



Bristol County. 
North Attleborough, 

Middlesex County. 
HoUiston, 
Hopkiuton, 
Newton, 
Sherborn, 
Watertown, 



Norfolk County. 
Avon, 
Hellingham, 
Braintree, 
Brookline, 
Canton, . 
Dedham, 
Dover, 
Foxborough, 
Franklin, 
Holbrook, 
Hyde Park, J 
Medfield, 



ropulation 
1900. 



7,253 



2,598 
2,623 
33,587 
1,483 
9.706 



1,741 

],682 
5,981 

19,935 
4,584 
7,457 
656 
3,266 
5,017 
2,229 

13,244 
2,926 



Cities and Towns. 



■Con. 



I^orfolk Co 
Medway, 
Millis, . 
Needham, 
Norfolk, 
Norwood, 
Plainville,* 
Randolph, 
Sharon, . 
Stoughton, 
Walpole, 
Wellesley, 
Weetwood, , 
Weymonth, 
Wrentham,* 

Worcefiter County. 
Blacketoue, 
Hopedale, 
MendoD, 
Milford, 
Upton, . 

Total, 



DISTRICT No. 13. 



Bristol County. 


1 


Dukes Co. — Con. 




Acuehnet, 


1,221 


Cottage City,t 


1,100 


Berkley, 




949 


Edgartown, . 


1,209 


Dartmouth, . 




3,669 


Gay Head, . . . 


173 


Dighton, 




1 1,802 


Gosnold, 


164 


Fairhaven, 




3,567 


Tisbury, 


1,149 


Fall River, 




j 104,863 


West Tisbury, . 


442 


Freetown, 




1,394 






New Bedford, 




62,442 


Nantucket County. 




Rehoboth, 




1,840 


Nantucket, . 


3,006 


Seekonk, 




1,673 






Somerset, 




2,241 


Plymoiith County. 




Swansea, 




1,645 


Marion, .... 


902 


West port, 




2,890 


Mattapoisett, 
Rochester, . 


1,061 
986 


Dukes County 












Chilmark, 




324 


Total, . 


200,712 



* Plainville was incorporated from a part of Wrenthara, April 4, 1905. 
t Name changed from Cottage City to Oak Bluffs by act of the General 
Court, January 25, 1907. 

I Hyde Park annexed to Poston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



Congressional Districts. 



201 



DISTRICT No. 14. 



Cities and Towns. 


Population 
190O. 


Cities and Towns. 


Population 
1900. 


Barnfitable County. 




Plymouth County, 




Barnstable, . 


4,364 


Abington, , 


4,489 


Bourue, . 






1,657 


Bridgewater, 




5,806 


Breweter, 






829 


Brockton, . 




40,063 


Chatham, 






1,749 


Carver, . 




1,104 


Dennis, . 






2,333 


Duxbury, 




2,075 


Eastham, 






502 


East Bridgewater, 




3,025 


Falmouth, 






3,500 


Halifax, . 




522 


Harwich, 






2,334 


Hanover, 




2,152 


Mashpee, 






303 


Hanson, . 




1,455 


Orleans, . 






1,123 


Hingham, 




5,059 


Provineetown 






4,247 


Hull, . . 




1,703 


Sandwich, 






1,448 


Kingston, 




1,955 


Truro, . 






767 


Lakeville, . 




958 


Wellfleet. 






988 


Marshfield, . 




1,810 


Yarmouth, 






1,682 


Middleborough, 




6,885 






Norwell, 




1,560 


Bristol County. 




Pembroke, 




1,240 


Attleborough, 


11,335 


Plymouth, 




9,592 


Eastou, . 






4,837 


Plympton, 




488 


Mansfield, 






4,006 


Rockland, 




5,327 


Norton, . 






1,826 


Scituate, 




2,470 


Raynham, 






l,5iO 


Wareham, 




3,432 


Taunton, 






31,036 


West Bridgewater 


, 


1,711 






Whitman, . 




6,155 


Norfolk County. 










CohasBet, 


2,759 


Total, . . . 


196,201 



202 Councillor Districts. 



COUNCILLOR DISTRICTS. 



[As established by Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1906.] 



I. — The Cape, the First and Second Plymouth and the Second and 

Third Bristol Senatorial Districts. Legal voters, 77,340. 

Cape District. — Barnstable, Bourne, Brewster, Chatham, Dennis, 
Eastham, Falmouth, Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans, Provincetown, 
Sandwich, Truro, WeUfleet and Yarmouth, iri the countij of Barn, 
stable; Chihuark, Cottage City,*Edgartown, Gay Head, Gosnold, 
Tisbury and ^Vest Tisbury, in the county of Dukes County; and 
Nantucliet. 

Plymouth Districts. — Abiugton, Bridgewater, Brockton, Carver, 
Duxbury, East Bridgewater, Halifax, Hanover, Hanson, Hing- 
ham, HuU, Kingston, Lakeville, Marion, Marshfield, Mattapoi- 
sett, Middleborough, Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Plympton, 
Rochester, Rockland, Scituate, Wareham, West Bridgewater and 
Whitman; and Cohasset, in the county of Xorfolk. 

Bristol Districts. — Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Fall River, 
Freetown, New Bedford, Somerset, Swansea and Westport. 

II. — The First Bristol, the First and Second Xorfolk and the Eighth 

and Ninth Suffolk Senatorial Districts. Legal voters, 86,018. 
Bristol District. — AtiXoborough, Berkley, Dighton, Easton, Mans- 
field, North Attleborough, Norton, Raynham, Rehoboth, Seekonk 
and Taunton. 

Norfolk Districts. — Avon, Bellingham, Braintree, Bi'ookline, Can 
ton, Dedham, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Holbrook, Hyde 
Park,t Medfield, Medway, Millis, Milton, Needham, Norfolk, 
Norwood, Plainville, Quincy, Randolph, Sharon, Stoughton, 
Walpole, Wellesley, Westwood, Weymouth and Wrentham. 

Suffolk Districts. — Wards Nos. 20, 21, 23 and 24 of Boston. 

* Name of town changed to Oak Bluffs by act of the General 
Court, January 2.5, 1907. 
t Hyde Park annexed to Boston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



Councillor Districts. 203 

III. — The Second, Third, Fourth, Sixth and Seventh Suffolk Sena- 
torial Districts. Legal voters, 5)1,826. 

Suffolk Districts. — ^Y?^Yds. Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 
18, 19 and 22 of Boston ; and also Wards Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 of Cam- 
bridge, in the county of ^fiddlesex. 

IV. —The First and Fifth Suffolk and the Second, Third and Fourth 
Middlesex Senatorial Districts. Legal voters, 84,934. 

Suffolk Districts. — Wards Nos. 1, 10, 11 and 25 of Boston, and Chelsea, 
Revere and Winthrop. 

Middlesex Districts. — Wards Nos. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of Cambridge, 
and Everett, Maiden, Melrose and Somerville. 

v.— The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Essex Senatorial 
Districts. Legal voters, 83,104. 

Essex Districts. — Ameshnry, Andovcr, Beverly, Boxford, Danvers, 
Essex, Georgetown, Gloucester, Groveland, Hamilton, Haverhill, 
Ipswich, Lawrence, Wards Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 of Lynn, Man- 
chester, Marblehead, Men-imac, Methuen, Middleton, Nahant, 
Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, Peabody, Rockport, 
Rowley, Salem, Salisbury, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham and 
West Newbury. 

VI. — The First, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and Eighth Middlesex Sena- 
torial Districts. Legal voters, 86,215. 

Middlesex Districts. — Acton, Arhngton, Ashby, Ashland, Ayer, 
Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Boxborough, Burlington, Carlisle, 
Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Framinghain, Groton, 
Holliston, Hopkinton, Hudson, Lexington, Lincoln, Littleton, 
Lowell, Marlborough, Maynard, Medford, Natick, Newton, North 
Reading, Pepperell, Reading, Sherborn, Shii-ley, Stoueham, 
Stow, Sudbury, Tewksbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough, Wake- 
field, Wahham, Watertown, Wayland, Westford, Weston, Wil- 
mington, Winchester and Woburn; and also Ward No. 6 of Lynn, 
and Lynnfleld and Saugus, in the county of Essex. 

VII.— The First, Second, Third and Fourth Worcester and the 
Worcester and Hampden Senatorial Districts. Legal voters, 
81,266. 

Worcester D/s^r/cfs. — Ashbui-nham, Athol, Auburn, Berlin, Black- 
stone, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Douglas, Fitchburg, Gardner, 



204 Councillor Districts. 



Grafton, Harvard, Holden, Hopedale, Lancaster, Leominster, 
Lunenburg, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Northborough, North- 
bridge, Oxford, Royalston, Stirewsbury, Southborougli, Sterling, 
Sutton, Upton, Uxbridge, Webster, Westborough, West Bovlston, 
Westminster, Winchendon and ATorcester. 

Worcester and Hampden District. — Barre, Brookiield, Charlton, 
Dana, Dudley, Hardwick, Hubbardston, Leicester, New Brain- 
tree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Paxton, Petersham, PhilUpston, 
Princeton, Rutland, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Temple- 
ton, Warren and West Brookfield, in the county of Worcester; 
and Brimfield, Hampden, Holland, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, 
Wales and Wilbraham, in the county of Hampden. 

VIII. — The Berkshire, the Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden, 
the FrankUn and Hampshire and the First and Second Hamp- 
den Senatorial Districts. Legal votei-s, 83,471. 

Berkshire District. — Adams, Cheshire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Florida, 
Hancock, Hinsdale, Lanesborough, New Ashford, North Adams, 
Peru, Pittsfield, Savoy, WilliamstowTi and Windsor. 

Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden District. — Alford, Becket, 
Egremont, Great Barrington, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, Mount 
Washington, New Marlborough, Otis, Richmond, Sandisfield, 
Sheffield, Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washington and West 
Stockbridge, in the county of Berkshire ; Chesterfield, Cumming- 
ton, Easthampton, Goshen, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, 
Northampton, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, Wil- 
liamsburg and Worthington, in the county of Hampshire ; and 
Agawam, Blandford, Chester, East Longmeadow, Granville, 
Longmeadow, Montgomery, Russell, Southwick and Tolland, 
in the county of Hampden. 

Franklin and Hampshire District. — Ashfield, Bernardston, Buck- 
land, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, GiU, 
Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Mon- 
tague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutes- 
bury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell and Whately, in the 
county of Franklin ; and Amherst, Belchertown, Enfield, Granby, 
Greenwich, Hadley, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley and Ware, 
in the county of Hampshire. 

Hampden Districts. — Chico^ee, Holyoke, Springfield, Westfield and 
West Springfield. 



Senatorial Districts. 205 



SENATOEIAL DISTRICTS. 



[As established by Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1906.] 



[Average ratio for the State, 16,854+.] 



Berkshire District. — Adams, Chesliire, Clarksburg, Dalton, Florida, 
Hancock, Hinsdale, Lancsborough, New Ashford, North Adams, 
Peru, Pittsfield, Savoy, Williamstown and Windsor. Legal 
voters, 16,471. 

Berkshire, Hampshire and Hampden District. — Alford, Becket, Egrc- 
mont, Great Barrington, Lee, Lenox, Montere.v, Mount Washing- 
ton, New Marlborough, Otis, Richmond, Sandisfield, Sheffield, 
Stockbridge, Tyringham, Washington and West Stockbridge, in 
the county of Berkshire ; Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, 
Goshen, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlcfield, Northampton, Plain- 
field, Southampton, AVesthampton, Williaiusburg and AVorth- 
ington, in the county of Hampshire; and Agawam, Blandford, 
Chester, East Longmcadow, Granville, Longmeadovr, INIoutgom- 
ery, Russell, Southwick and Tolland, in the county of Hamjyden. 
Legal voters, 16,093. 

First Bristol Z)?sfr«'c^. — Attleborough, Berkley, Dighton, Easton, 
Mansfield, North Attleborough, Norton, Raynham, Rehoboth, 
Seekonk and Taunton. Legal voters, 16,431. 

Second Bristol District. — Fall River, Somerset and Swansea, Legal 
'voters, 18,791. 

Third Bristol District. — Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven, Free- 
town, New Bedford and Westport. Legal voters, 16,146. 

Cape District. — Barnstable, Bourne, Bi-ewster, Chatham, Dennis, 
Eastham, Falmouth, Harwich, Mashpee, Orleans, Provincetown, 
Sandwich, Truro, Wellfleet and Yarmouth, in the county of 
Barnstable ; Chilmark, Cottage City,* Edgartown, Gay Head, 
Gosnold, Tisbury and West Tisbury, in the county oj Dukes 
County; and Nantucket. Legal voters, 9,191. 

* Name of town changed to Oak Bluffs by act of the General 
Court, January 25, 1907. 



206 Senatorial Districts. 



First Essex District.— Wards Nos. 1, 2, 3, i, 5 and 7 of Lynn, and 
Nahant and Swampscott. Legal voters, 16,476. 

Second Essex District. — Beverly, Danvers, Marblehead and Salem. 
Legal voters, 16,373. 

Tliird Essex District. — Essex, Gloucester, Hamilton, Ipswich, Man- 
Chester, Newbury, Newburyport, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, 
Topsfield, Wenham and West Newbury, Legal voters, 15,874. 

Fourth Essex District. — Amesbury, Boxford, Georgetown, Grove- 
land, Haverhill, Merrimac, Middleton and Peabody. Legal 
voters, 16,620. 

Fifth Essex District. — Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover. Legal voters, 17,761. 

FranMin and Hampshire District. — Ashfield, Bernardston, Buck- 
land, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Erving, Gill, 
Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, Leyden, Monroe, Mon- 
tague, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutes- 
bury, Sunderland, Warwick, Wendell and Whately, in the 
count II of Franklin ; and Amherst, Belcherto^vn, Enfield, Granby, 
Greenwich, Hadley, Pelham, Prescott, South Hadley and Ware, 
in the county of Hampshire. Legal voters, 16,045. 

First Hampden Z>/sirtci. — Springfield. Legal voters, 17,376. 

Second Hampden District. — Chico^Ge., Holyoke, Westfield and West 
Springfield. Legal voters, 17,486. 

First Middlesex District. — Ashland, Framingham, HoUiston, Hop- 
kinton, Natick, Ne^^-ton, Sherborn, Watertown and Weston. 
Legal voters, 18,460. 

Second Middlesex District. — Wards Nos. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 of Cam- 
bridge. Legal voters, 15,309. 

Third Middlesex District. — Somerville. Legal voters, 15,906. 

Fourth Middlesex District. -Y^yerett, Maiden and Melrose. Legal 
voters, 18,660. 

Fifth Middlesex District. — Belmont, Concord, Hudson, Lexington, 
Lincoln, Marlborough, Maynard, Stow, Sudbury, Waltham and 
Wayland. Legal voters, 16,213. 

Sixth 3riddlesex District. — Arlington, Medford, Stoneham, Wake- 
field, Winchester and Woburn. Legal voters, 16,226. 



Senatorial Districts 207 



Seventh Middlesex District. — Acton, Aycr, Bedford, Billcrica, Box- 
borough, Burlington, Carlisle, Littleton, Wai'ds Nos. 5 and 9 of 
Lowell, North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, Westford and 
Wilmington, in the county of Middlesex; and also Ward No. 6 of 
Lynn, and Lynnfield and Saugus, in the countij of Essex. Legal 
voters, 16,011. 

Eighth Middlesex Z)/.s^r/c/.—Ashby, Chelmsford, Dracut, Dunstable, 
Groton, Wards Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8 of Lowell, Pepperell, 
Shirley, Townsend and Tyngsborough. Legal voters, 19,305. 

First Norfolk Z)/s^r/c<. — Braintree, Canton, Hollirook, Hyde Park,* 
Milton, Quincy, Randolph and Weymouth. Legal voters, 18,835. 

Second Xorfolk District. — Avon, Bellingham, Brookline, Dedham, 
Dover, Foxborough, FrankUn, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Necd- 
hani, Norfolk, Norwood, Plainville, Sharon, Stoughton, Walpole, 
Wellesley, Westwood and Wrentham. Legal voters, 18,737. 

First Phpnouth District. — Ahmgion, Carver, Duxbury, East Bridge- 
water, Halifax, Hanover, Hanson, Hingham, Hull, Kingston, 
Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke, Tlymouth, Plympton, Rockland, 
Scituate and Whitman; and also Cohasset, in the county of Nor- 
folk. Legal voters, 15,620. 

Second Plymouth District. — Bridgewater, Brockton, Lakeville, 
Marion, Mattapoisett, Middlel)orough, Rochester, Wareham and 
West Bridgewater. Legal voters, 17,502. 

First Suffolk District. — Chelsea, Revere, Winthrop and Ward No. 1 

of Boston. Legal voters, 18,371. 
Second Suffolk District. — ^Vnrda Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 of Boston; and 

also Wards Nos. 1, 2 and 3 of Cambridge, in the county of Middle- 
sex. Legal voters, 20,178. 
Third Suffolk District. — Wards Nos. 6, 7 and 8 of Boston ; and also 

Ward No. 4 of Cambridge, in the county of Middlesex. Legal 

voters, 15,714. 
Fourth Stiffolk District. — Wards Nos. 9, 12 and 17 of Boston. Legal 

voters, 17,189. 
Fifth Suffolk District. — yv Sir diB Nos. 10, 11 and 25 of Boston. Legal 

voters, 16,688. 
Sixth Suffolk District. — ^SLvdB Nos. 13, 14, 15 and 16 of Boston. 

Legal voters, 19,993. 

* Hyde Park annexed to Boston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



208 Senatorial Districts. 



Seventh Suffolk District. — Wards Nos. 18, 19 and 22 of Boston. Legal 
voters, 18,752. 

Eighth Suffolk District. — Wards Nos. 20 and 21 of Boston. Legal 
voters, 17,869. 

Ninth Suffolk District. — Wards Nos. 23 and 24 of Boston. Legal 
voters, 14,146. 

First Worcester Disti-ict. — WardsSos. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of Worces- 
ter. Legal voters, 19,220. 

Second Worcester District. — Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Har- 
vard, Holden, Lancaster, Sterling, West Boylston and Wards 
Nos. 1, 2 and 3 of Worcester. Legal voters, 13,955. 

Third Worcester District. — Ashburnham, Athol, Fitchburg, Gard- 
ner, Leominster, Lunenburg, Royalston, Westminster and Win- 
chendon. Legal voters, 16,854. 

Fourth Worcester District. — Auburn, Blackstone, Douglas, Grafton, 
Ilopedale, Meudon, Milford, Millbury, Northborough, North- 
bridge, Oxford, Sbrewsbuay, Southborough, Sutton, Upton, 
Uxbridge, Webster and Westborough. Legal voters, 15,588. 

Worcester and Ham])den District. — Barre, Brookfield, Charlton, 
Dana, Dudley, Hardwick, Hubbardston, Leicester, New Brain- 
tree, North Brookfield, Oakham, Paxton, Petersham, Phillipston, 
Princeton, Rutland, Southbridge, Spencer, Sturbridge, Temple- 
ton, Warren and West Brookfield, in the county oj Worcester ; 
and Brimfield, Hampden, Holland, Ludlow, Monson, Palmer, 
Wales and Wilbraham, in the county oj Hampden. Legal voters, 
15,649. 



Representative Districts* 209 



REPRESENTATIVE DISTRICTS. 



[As established by Chapter 497 of the Acts of 1906.] 



[Average ratio for the State, 2,809 -f-.] 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY. 

Three Representatives. 
District 

1. — Barnstable, Bourne, Fahiiouth, Mashpee and Sandwich. 

Legal voters, 2,9()5. One representative. 

2. — Chatham, Dennis, Harwich and Yannouth. Legal voters, 

2,149. One representative. 

3. — Brewster, Eastham, Orleans, Provincetown, Truro and Well- 

fleet, Legal voters, 2,089. One representative. 

BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 

Eight Representatives. 
District 

1. — Clarksburg, Florida, North Adams, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 

oth Ward, and Savoy. Legal voters, 2,.567. One repre- 
sentative. 

2. — North Adarns, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. 

Legal voters, 2,515. One representative. 

3. — Adams, Cheshire, Hinsdale, New Ashford, Peru and Wind- 

sor, Legal voters, 3,013. One representative. 

4. — Dalton, Hancock, Lanesborough, Pittsfield, 1st Ward, and 

Williamstown. Legal voters, 3,185. One representative. 

5. — Pittsfield, 2d Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,G3G. One rci)reseutative. 

6. — Pittsfield, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,561. One rexjresentative. 



210 Representative Districts. 



District 

7. — Becket, Lee, Lenox, Monterey, New Marlborough, Otis, Rich- 

mond, Sandisfield, Tyringham and Washington. Legal 
voters, 2,995. One representative. 

8. — Alford, Egremont, Great Barrington,Mount'Washington, Shef- 

field, Stockbridge and West Stockbridge. Legal voters, 
3,152. One representative. 

BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Eighteen Repkesentatives. 
District 
1. — Attleborough, North Attleborough, Norton and Seekonk. 
Legal voters, 5,871. Two representatives. 

2. — Easton, Mansfield and Raynham. Legal voters, 2,782. One 

representative. 

3. — Taunton, 5th W^ard, 7th Ward and 8th W^ard. Legal voters, 

2,691. One representative. 

4. — Taunton, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,405. One representative. 

5. — Berkley, Dighton, Rehoboth and Taunton, 1st Ward and Gth 

Ward. Legal voters, 2,G82. One representative. 

6. — Acushnet, Dartmouth, Fairhaven and Freetown. Legal 

voters, 2,502. One I'epresentative. 

7. — New Bedford, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal 

voters, 6,580. Two representatives. 

8. — New Bedford, 4th Ward, 5th W^ard and 6th Ward. Legal 

voters, 6,359. Two representatives. 

9. — Fall River, 1st Ward and 2d Ward, and Westport. Legal 

voters, 5,610. Two representatives. 

10. — Fall River, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

5,543. Two representatives. 

1 1. — Fall River, 6th Ward, 7th Ward, 8th Ward and 9th Ward, and 

Somerset and Swansea. Legal voters, 8,343. Three repre- 
sentatives. 

DUKES COUNTY. 

One Representative. 
District 
1. — Chilmark, Cottage City,* Edgarto^\Ti, Gay Head, Gosnold, 
Tisbury and West Tisbury. Legal voters, 1,150. One 
representative. 

* Name of town changed to Oak Bluffs by act of the General 
Court, January 25, 1907. 



Represeiitative Districts, 211 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

Thirtv-two Representatives. 
District 
1. — Amesbury and Merrimac. Legal voters, 2,745. One repre- 
sentative. 
2.— Haverhill, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 
2,367. One representative. 

3. — Haverhill, 4th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 3,002. 

One representative. 

4. — Haverhill, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,536. One representative. 

5. — Lawrence, 1st Ward and 2d Ward, and Methueu. Legal 

voters, 5,85.5. Two representatives. 

6. — Lawrence, 3d Ward and 4th Waz'd. Legal voters, 4,140. One 

representative. 
7.— Lawrence, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,577. One representa- 
tive. 

8. — Lawrence, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,608. One representative. 

9. — Andover. Legal voters, 1,523. One representative. 

10. — Boxford, Groveland, Haverhill, 7th Ward, and North Au- 

dover. Legal voters, 3,138. One representative. 

11. — Peabodj. Legal voters, 3,0J7. One representative. 

12. — Lynn, 3d Ward, and Swampscott. Legal voters, 5,765. Two 

representatives. 

13. — Lynn, 1st Ward, 5th Ward and 7th Ward, and Lynnfleld- 

Legal voters, 5,486. Two representatives. 

14 —Lynn, 2d Ward and 4th Ward, and Nahant. Legal voters, 
5,460. Two representatives. 

15. — Lynn, 6th Ward, and Saugus. Legal voters, 6,C59. Two rep- 
resentatives. 

16. — Marblehead. Legal voters, 2,193. One representative. 

17. — Salem, 1st Ward and 2d Ward. Legal voters, 2,737. One 

represenfcitive. 

18. — Salem, 3d Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,983. One 

representative. 

19. — Salem, 4th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,024. One 

representative. 
20.— Beverly and Danvers. Legal voters, 5,836. Two representa- 
tives. 

21. — Gloucester, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 8th Ward, and Man- 

chester. Legal voters, 2,768. One representative. 

22. — Gloucester, 3d Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,401. One representative. 



212 Representative Districts, 



District 

23. — Gloucester, 1st Ward and 2d Ward, and Rockpoit. Legal 

voters, 2,833. One representative. 

24. — Essex, Hamilton, Ipswich, Middleton, Rowley, Topsfleld and 

Wenham. Legal voters, 3,013. One representative. 

25. — Newburj-port, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward and 4tli Ward. 

Legal voters, 2,475. One representative. 
26 —Georgetown, Newbury, Newburyport, 5th Ward and 6tb 
Ward, Salisbury and West Newbury. Legal voters, 3,177. 
One representative. 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 

Four Representatives. 
District 

1. — Ashfield, Buckland, Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, Hawley, 

Heath, Monroe, Rowe, Shelburae and Whately. Legal 
voters, 2,692. One representative. 

2. — Greenfield. Legal voters, 2,383. One representative. 

3. — Bernardston, Deerlleld, Gill, Leverett, Leyden, Montague 

and Sunderland. Legal voters, 2,778. One representative. 
4.— Erving, New Salem, Northfield, Orange, Shutesbury, War 
wick and WendeU. Legal voters, 2,761. One representa- 
tive. 

HAMPDEN COL^TY. 

Fourteen Representatives. 
District 

1. — Brimfield, Holland, Monson, Palmer and Wales. Legal 

voters, 2,723. One representative. 

2. — Agawam, Blandford, Chester, East Longmeadow, Granville, 

Hampden, Longmeadow, Ludlow, Montgomery, Russell, 
Southwick, Tolland, West Springfield and Wilbraham. 
Legal voters, 5,383. Two representatives. 

3 . — Springfield, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 2,998. One representa- 

tive. 

4. — Springfield, 2d.Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 3,591. One 

representative. 

5 _ Springfield, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 
5,.549. Two representatives. 

6._Snringfield, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 2,596. One representa- 
tive. 



Representative Districts, 213 

District 

7. — Springfield, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 2,r>42. One representa- 

tive. 

8. — Chicopee. Legal voters, 3,438. One representative. 

9. — Holyoke, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 4tli Ward. Legal voters, 

3,5'J7. One representative. 

10. — Holyoke, 3d Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 2,856. One 

representative. 

11. — Holyoke, 5th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 2,552. One 

representative. 

12. — Westfield, Legal voters, 3,169. One representative. 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 

Four Representatives. 
District 

1. — Northampton. Legal voters, 3,781. One representative. 

2. — Chesterfield, Cummingtou, Easthampton, Goshen, Hunting- 

ton, Middlefield, Plainfield, Southampton, Westhampton, 
WilUamsburg and Worthington. Legal voters, 3,297. One 
representative. 

3. — Amherst, Hadley, Hatfield and South Hadley. Legal voters, 

3,106. One representative. 

4. — Belchertown, Enfield, Granby, Greenwich, Pelham, Prescott 

and Ware. Legal voters, 2,687. One representative. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

Forty-eight Representatives. 
District 
1. — Cambridge, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 

4,455. Two representatives. 
2 —Cambridge, 4th Ward, 5th Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. 
Legal voters, 9,S04. Three representatives. 

3. — Cambridge, 8th Ward, 9th Ward, 10th Ward and 11th Ward. 

Legal voters, 8,254. Three representatives. 

4. — Newton. Legal voters, 7,821. Three representatives. 

5. — Waltham. Legal voters, 5,822. Two representatives. 

6. — Natick. Legal voters, 2,621. One representative. 

7. — Framingham. Legal voters, 2,827. One representative. 

8. — Ashland, Holliston, Hopkinton and Sherljoru. Legal voters, 

2,097. One representative. 
0. — Marlborough. Legal voters, 3,421. One representative. 



214 Representative Districts. 

District 

10. — Boxborough, Hudson, Maynard and Stow. Legal voters, 

2,756. One representative. 

11. — Acton, Ayer, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Littleton and Westford. 

Legal voters, 3,015. One representative. 

12. — Asliby, Dunstable, Groton, Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend and 

Tyngsborougli. Legal voters, 2,738. One representative. 
13.— Bedford, Concord, Lincoln, Sudbury, Wayland and Weston. 
Legal voters, 3,084. One representative. 

14. — Dracut and Lowell, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 3,068. One rep- 

resentative. 

15. — Lowell, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 2,277. One representative. 

16. — Lowell, 4th Ward and 5th AVard. Legal voters, 3,819. One 

representative. 

17. — Lowell, 3d Ward, 6th AVard and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

6,385. Two representatives. 

18. — Lowell, 8th Ward. Legal votei's, 2,041. One representative. 

19. — Billerica, Lowell, 9th Ward, and Tewksbury. Legal voters, 

3,107. One representative. 

20. — Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Wilmington and Wo- 

burn. Legal voters, 5,628. Two representatives. 

2 1. — Wakefield. Legal voters, 2,473. One representative. 

22. — Melrose. Legal voters, 3,458. One representative. 

23. — Maiden. Legal voters, 8,512. Three representatives. 

24. — Everett. Legal voters, 6,690. Two representatives. 

25. — Somerville, 1st Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. 

Legal voters, 8,604, Three representatives. 

26. — Somerville, 2d Ward, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 

7,302. Three representatives. 

27. — Medford, 3d Ward and 6th Ward, and Winchester. Legal 

voters, 3,300, One representative. 

28. — Medford, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 4th Ward, 5th Ward and 7th 

Ward. Legal voters, 3,266. One representative. 

29. — Arlington and Lexington. Legal voters, 3,132. One repre- 

sentative. 

30. — Belmont and Watertown. Legal voters, 3,551. One repre- 

sentative. 

3 1. — Stoneham. Legal voters, 1,672. One representative. 

NANTUCKET COUNTY. 

One Representative. 
District 

1.— Nantucket. Legal voters, 838. One representative. 



Representative Districts, 215 



NORFOLK COUNTY. 

Thirteen Representatives. 
District 

1. — Dedham and Needham. Legal voters, 2,777. One repre- 

sentative. 

2. — Brookline. Legal voters, 5,120, Two representatives. 

3. — Hyde Park.* Legal voters, 3,3C2. One repi-esentative. 

4. —Canton and Milton. Legal voters, 2,702. One representative. 

5. — Quincy, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 3d Ward. Legal voters, 

3,196. One representative. 

6. — Quincy, 4tli Ward, .5th Ward and 6th Ward. Legal voters, 

2,813. One representative. 

7. — Wej'mouth. Legiil voters, 3,249. One representative. 

8. —Avon, Braintree and Holbrook. Legal voters, 2,883. One 

representative. 
9 —Randolph, Sharon and Stoughton. Legal voters, 3,086. One 

representative. 
10. —Norwood, Walpole and Westw'ood. Legal voters, 2,614. One 

representative. 

11. — Dover, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Norfolk and Wellesley. 

Legal voters, 2,814. One representative. 

12. — Bellingham, Foxborough, Franklin, Plainville and Wren- 

tham. Legal voters, 2,956. One representative. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 

Twelve Representatives. 
District 
1. — Plymouth. Legal voters, 2,501. One representative. 
2.— Duxbury, Marshfield, Norwell, Pembroke and Scituate. Le- 
gal voters, 2,644. One representative. 
3.— Cohasset, Hingham and Hull. Legal voters, 2,367. One rep- 
resentative. 
4.— Hanover, Hanson and Rockland. Legal voters, 2,867. One 
representative. 

5. — Abington and Whitman. Legal voters, 3,280. One repre- 

sentative. 

6. — Carver, Lakeville, Marion, Malta poisett, Rochester and Ware- 

ham. Legal voters, 2,273. One representative. 

7. — Halifax, Kingston, Middleborough and Plympton. Legal 

voters, 2,667. One representative. 

* Hyde Park annexed to Boston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



216 



Representative Districts. 



District 

8. — Bridge water, East Bridgewater and West Bridgewater. 

Legal voters, 2,533. One representative. 

9. — Brockton, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 3,276. One 

representative. 

10. — Brockton, 1st Ward, 2d Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 

5,1S1. Two representatives. 

1 1. — Brockton, 6th Ward and 7th Ward. Legal voters, 3,623. One 

representative. 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 

FiFTr-FODR Representatives. 
District 

1. — Boston, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 5,808. Two representatives. 

2. — Boston, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 5,082. Two representatives. 
3 — Boston, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 3,915. Two representatives. 

4. — Boston, 4th Ward and 5th Ward. Legal voters, 6,726. Three 

representatives. 

5. — Chelsea, 1st Ward and 2d Ward Legal voters, 3,132. One 

representative. 



6. — Boston, 6th Ward. Legal voters, 3,994. 

7. — Boston, 7th Ward. Legal voters, 3,726. 

8. — Boston, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 5,745. 

9. — Boston, 9th Ward. Legal voters, 5,392. 

10. — Boston, lOih Ward. Legal voters, 6,722. 

1 1. — Boston, 11th Ward. Legal voters, 4,654. 

12. — Boston, 12th Ward. Legal voters, 6,038. 

13. — Boston, 13th Ward. Legal voters, 4,380. 

14. — Boston, 14th Ward. Legal voters, 5,384. 

15. — Boston, 15th Ward. Legal voters, 4,744. 

16. — Boston, 16th Ward. Legal voters, 5,4^. 

17. — Boston, 17th Ward. Legal voters, 5,759. 

18. — Boston, 18th Ward. Legal voters, .5,284. 

19. — Boston, 19th Ward. Legal voters, 6,660. 

20. — Boston, 20th Ward. 

tives. 

2 1. — Boston, 21st Ward. 

22. — Boston, 22d Ward. 

23. — Boston, 23d Ward. 

24. — Boston, 24th Ward 

tives. 

25. — Boston, 25th Ward. Legal voters, 5,312. Two representatives. 



Two representatives. 
One representative. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
T wo representatives . 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Two representatives. 
Legal voters, 10,866. Three representa- 

Legal voters, 7,003. Two representatives. 

Legal voters, 6,808. Two representatives. 

Legal voters, 6,227. Two x-epresentatives. 

Legal voters, 7,919. Three representa- 



Mepresentative Districts. 217 

District 

26. — Chelsea, 3d Ward and 4th Ward. Legal voters, 3,104. One 

representative. 
27. — Chelsea, Tjth Ward, Revere and Winthrop. Legal voters, 

0,327. Two representatives. 

WORCESTER COUNTY. 

twentt-eight representatives. 
District 

1. — Athol, Dana, Petersham, Phillipston and Royalston. Legal 

voters, 2,678. One representative. 

2. — Ashburnham, Gardner, Templeton and Winchendon. Legal 

voters, 5,175. Two representatives. 

3. — Barre, Holden, Hubbardston, Oakham, Princeton, Rutland, 

Sterling and Westminster. Legal voters, 2,828. One rep- 
resentative. 

4. — Brookfield, Hardwick, New Braintree, North Brookfield, 

Warren and West Brookfield. Legal voters, 2,8G7. One 
representative. 

5. — Charlton, Southbridge and Sturbridge. Legal voters, 2,919. 

One representative. 

6. — Auburn, Leicester, Paxton and Spencer. Legal voters, 2,901. 

One representative. 
7. — Dudley, Oxford and Webster. Legal voters, 2,872. One rep- 
resentative. 

8. — Blackstone, Douglas, Grafton, Millbury, Shrewsbury, Sutton 

and Uxbridge. Legal voters, 5,599. Two representatives. 

9. — Hopedale, Mendon, Milford, Northbridge and Upton. Legal 

voters, 5,420. Two representatives. 

10. — Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, Northborough, Southbor- 

ough. West Boylston and Westborough. Legal voters, 
5,516. Two representatives. 

11. — Fitchburg, 6th Ward, Harvard, Lancaster, Leominster and 

Lunenburg. Legal voters, 5,631. Two representatives. 

12. — Fitchburg, 1st Ward, 2d Ward, 3d Ward, 4th Ward and 5th 

Ward. Legal voters, 5,135. Two representatives. 

13. — Worcester, 1st Ward. Legal voters, 2,917. One representative. 

14. — Worcester, 2d Ward. Legal voters, 2,8,55. One representative. 

15. — Worcester, 3d Ward. Legal voters, 2,947. One representative. 

16. — Worcester, 4th Ward. Legal voters, 2,709. One representa- 

tive. 

17. — Worcester, 5th Ward. Legal voters, 2,878. One representa 

tive. 



218 Representative Districts, 



District 

18. — Worcester, Ctli Ward. Legal voters, 2,580. One representa- 

tive. 

19. — Worcester, Ttli Ward. Legal voters, 2,697. One representa- 

tive. 

20. — Worcester, 8th Ward. Legal voters, 2,861. One representa- 

tive. 

21. — Worcester, Gtli Ward. Legal voters, 2,882. One representa- 

tive. 

22. — Worcester, lOtli Ward. Legal voters, 2,613. One representa- 

tive. 



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Valuatio7i of the Commonivealtli. 235 



YALUATION OF THE COMMONWEALTH. 



[Established by Chapter 357 of the Acts of 1910.* See Revised Laws, 
Chapter 12, Sections 100 and 101.) 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY- 









Tax of $1,000. 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One- tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Barnstable 


1,066 


$6,221,967 


$1 52 


Bourne, . 










666 


4,395,415 


1 06 


Brew8t«r, 










210 


671,144 


17 


Chatham. 










533 


1,286,607 


35 


Dennis, . 










555 


1,347.057 


36 


Eastham, 










143 


450,951 


12 


Falmouth, 










933 


9,563.560 


2 27 


Harwich. 










584 


1,420,245 


38 


Mashpee, 










85 


216,282 


06 


Orleans. . 










309 


688.122 


19 


Provincetown, 










1,422 


2.082,066 


62 


Sandwich, 
Truro, . 










357 
196 


1.057.182 
382,488 


28 
11 


Wellfleet. 










325 


1.238.537 


31 


Yarmouth, 










456 


2,410.192 


59 


Totals, 










7,740 


$33,431,815 


$8 39 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



Adams 


2,686 


$7,165,492 


$1 90 


Alford, . 










86 


190,145 


05 


Becket, . 










293 


527.430 


15 


Cheshire, 










458 


830.342 


23 


Clarksburg, 










278 


266,381 


09 


Dalton, 










876 


4,610,160 


1 14 


Egremont, 










216 


485,464 


13 


Florida 


108 


192,832 


05 



• This schedule constitutes the basis of apportionment for State and 
county taxes until the year 1913, when a new apportionment will be 
made. 



236 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000. 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Great Barrington, . 


1,843 


$6,270,783 


$1 61 


Hancock, 




141 


316,242 


09 


Hinsdale, 




329 


596,959 


17 


Lanesborough, 




256 


529,352 


15 


Lee. . . . 




1,274 


2,192,875 


63 


Lenox, . 




936 


6.335,406 


1 53 


Monterey, 




119 


320,602 


08 


Mount Washington, 




25 


92,144 


02 


New Ashford, 




33 


50,251 


01 


New Marlborough, 




298 


719,494 


19 


North Adams, 




5,140 


16,546.648 


4 27 


Otis, 




148 


278,101 


08 


Peru, 






80 


140.187 


04 


PiTTSFIELD, 






8,546 


24,474.469 


6 42 


Richmond, 






140 


387,293 


10 


Sandisfield, 






178 


341.085 


10 


Savoy, . 






148 


189,621 


06 


Sheffield, 






474 


1,114,546 


30 


Stockbridge, 






513 


4,502,608 


1 07 


Tyringham, 






98 


268,462 


07 


Washington, 






82 


278,834 


07 


West Stockbridge, . 




356 


446,220 


14 


Williamstown, 




993 


3,580,541 


91 


Windsor. 




139 


279,326 


08 


Totals, 






27.290 


$84,520,295 


$21 93 



BRISTOL COUNTY. 



Acushnet, .... 


316 


$805,519 


$0 21 


Attleborough, 






4,717 


15,186,731 


3 92 


Berkley, 






258 


419,691 


12 


Dartmouth, 








996 


4,249,897 


1 07 


Dighton, 








541 


1,143,556 


31 


Easton, . 








1,446 


5,988,598 


1 51 


Fairhaven, 








1,238 


3,509,891 


92 


Fall River, 








31,080 


95,129,690 


24 73 


Freetown, 








394 


986.314 


26 


Mansfield, 








1,375 


4,092,054 


1 07 


New Bedford, 






23,956 


87,503,240 


22 28 


North Attleborough, 






2,740 


7,004.337 


1 87 


Norton, . 






626 


1,250,499 


35 


Raynham, 






424 


854.541 


24 


Rehoboth, .... 


497 


871,950 


25 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



237 



BRISTOL COUNTY — Concluded. 



Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000, 
includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Seekonk 

Somerset, .... 
Swansea, .... 

Taunton 

Westport 


580 
728 
548 
9,521 
826 


$1,283,490 
1,460,754 
1,824,445 

25,326,745 
1,879,255 


$0 35 

40 

47 

6 71 

51 


Totals, .... 


82,807 


$260,771,197 


$67 55 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark 


119 


$317,406 


$0 08 


Edgartown, .... 


359 


1.230,121 


32 


Gay Head 


46 


30,864 


01 


Gosnold, .... 


45 


581,341 


14 


Oak Bluffs 


295 


1,827,603 


44 


Tisbury 


349 


1,602,750 


40 


West Tisbury, 


145 


608,682 


15 


Totals, .... 


1,358 


$6,198,767 


$154 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



Amesbury 


2,714 


$6,352,115 


$1 71 


Andover, 








1,930 


8,258,227 


2 07 


Beverly, 








6,106 


36,806,035 


8 88 


Boxford, 








182 


1,439,079 


35 


Danvers, 








2,538 


6,528,501 


1 74 


Essex, . 








475 


1,212,445 


32 


Georgetown, 








535 


1,028,318 


29 


Gloucester, 








7.608 


23,264,233 


6 05 


Groveland, 








616 


1,175.229 


33 


Hamilton, 








475 


4.419,559 


1 05 


Haverhill, 








12,907 


32,577,268 


8 69 


Ipswich, 








1,182 


5,150,855 


1 29 


Lawrence, 








21,201 


64,241.036 


16 72 


Lynn, . 








27,207 


74,081,912 


19 56 


Lynnfield, 








240 


800,196 


21 


Manchester, 








801 


16,947.227 


3 93 


Marblehead, 








2,130 


8,165,136 


2 07 


Merrimac, 








564 


1,297,240 


35 


Methuen, 








2,773 


6,675,090 


1 79 



238 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



ESSEX COVNTY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000, 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Middleton 


259 


$832,913 


$0 22 


Nahant, 








347 


8,076.496 


1 87 


Newbury, 








392 


1,308,349 


34 


Newburyport, 








4,351 


13,228,615 


3 44 


North Andover, 








1,374 


5,211,428 


1 32 


Peabody, 








4,377 


11,110,151 


2 96 


Rockport, 










1,200 


3,348,450 


88 


Rowley, . 










359 


769,376 


21 


Salem, . 










11,260 


36,023,941 


9 31 


Salisbury, 










460 


890,717 


25 


Saugus, . 










1,964 


5,832,570 


1 52 


Swampscott, 










1,504 


11,274,093 


2 71 


Topsfield, 










273 


1,429,710 


35 


Wenham, 










293 


2,787,026 


66 


West Newbury, 








442 


1,130,571 


30 


Totals, 










120,039 


$403,674,107 


$103 74 



FRANKLIN COUNTY. 



Aehfield, .... 


274 


$651,872 


$0 18 


Bernardston, 










211 


476,784 


13 


Buckland, 










443 


721,143 


21 


Cbarlemont, 










298 


528,663 


15 


Colrain, . 










465 


744,031 


22 


Conway, 










333 


727,813 


20 


Deerfield, 










631 


1,885.442 


49 


Erving, . 










343 


1,051,321 


27 


Gill, 










220 


475,157 


13 


Greenfield, 










3,189 


10,483,859 


2 70 


Hawley, 










109 


167,218 


05 


Heath, . 










111 


172,608 


05 


Leverett, 










194 


319,792 


09 


Leyden, . 










96 


174,327 


05 


Monroe, . 










95 


172,007 


05 


Montague, 










1,826 


4,410.049 


1 18 


New Salem, 










185 


374,674 


10 


Northfield, 










412 


1,415,903 


36 


Orange, . 










1,719 


4,085,123 


1 10 


Rowe, 










175 


195,406 


06 


Shelburne, 










423 


1,310,114 


34 


Shutesbury, 










76 


258,947 


07 


Sunderland, 










315 


506,690 


15 


Warwick, 










120 


437,072 


11 



Valuation of the Commonwealth. 



239 



FRANKLIN COV^TY — Concluded. 



Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000, 
includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


WendeU 

Whately 


145 

268 


$261,472 
484.024 


$0 07 

14 


Totals 


12,676 


$32,491,511 


$8 65 



HAMPDEN COUNTY. 



Agawam, .... 


894 


$2,011.4.54 


$0 55 


Blandford, . 






172 


543.592 


14 


Brimfield, 






233 


560,079 


15 


Chester, . 






372 


741.616 


21 


Chicopeb, 






6,436 


13.925,483 


3 81 


East Longmeadow, 






414 


711.908 


20 


Granville, 






216 


480,338 


13 


Hampden, 






163 


377,961 


10 


Holland, 






43 


98,541 


03 


HOLTOKB, 






13.617 


50.506.650 


12 84 


Longmeadow, 






270 


1,502.854 


37 


Ludlow, . 






1,109 


3.991,012 


1 02 


Monson, . 






1.100 


1.962,990 


56 


Montgomery, . 






72 


169,074 


05 


Palmer, . 






2,285 


4.389,877 


1 23 


Russell. . 






237 


743,263 


19 


Southwick, . 






293 


694,768 


19 


Springfield, . 






23,809 


116,218,874 


28 79 


Tolland, . 






51 


198.819 


05 


Wales. . 






123 


291.935 


08 


West Springfield, 






2,250 


7.305.002 


1 88 


Westfield, 






3.826 


9.849.516 


2 62 


Wilbraham, . 






552 


1,215,648 


33 


Totals. . 






58,537 


$218,491,254 


$55 52 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY. 



Amherst, .... 


1,397 


$3,951,140 


$1 04 


Belchertown, . 








506 


939.207 


27 


Chesterfield, . 








162 


319.022 


09 


Cummington, 








180 


338,921 


09 


Easthampton, 








2,077 


5.975,370 


1 57 


Enfield, . 








254 


730.859 


19 


Goshen, . 








71 


252,904 


08 



240 



Valuation of the Commomoealth. 



HAMPSHIRE COUNTY - Concluded. 









Tax of 11,000, 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Granby 


203 


$517,006 


$0 14 


Greenwich, 








126 


255,252 


07 


Hadlev, . 








590 


1,377,976 


37 


Hatfield, 








539 


1,388,973 


37 


Huntington, . 








419 


638,778 


19 


Middlefield. . 








77 


188,908 


05 


Northampton, 








4,537 


15,006,637 


3 86 


Pelham, . 








123 


288,902 


08 


Plainfield. . 








110 


178,317 


05 


Prescott, 








105 


187,046 


05 


South Hadley, 








1,209 


3,227,944 


85 


Southampton, 








237 


501,659 


14 


Ware, . 








2,358 


5,281,108 


1 44 


Westhampton, 








97 


246,043 


07 


Williamsburg, 








570 


1,030,390 


29 


Worthington, . 








161 


355.341 


10 


Totals. 








16,168 


S43. 177.703 


$11 43 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 



Acton, 


630 


$2,167,930 


$0 56 


Arlington, 










2,787 


12,040,688 


3 02 


Ashby, . 










278 


773,888 


20 


Ashland, 










468 


1,210,363 


32 


Ayer, 










805 


2,116,075 


56 


Bedford, 










299 


1,449,334 


36 


Belmont, 










1,372 


6,854,544 


1 69 


Billerica, 










822 


2,855,846 


73 


Boxborough, 










95 


268,562 


07 


Burlington, 










191 


628,898 


16 


Cambridge, 










25,898 


114,094,902 


28 52 


Carlisle, . 










171 


524,114 


14 


Chelmsford, 










1,306 


4,615,068 


1 18 


Concord, 










1,614 


7,810,410 


1 94 


Dracut, . 










870 


2,329,492 


62 


Dunstable, 










114 


383.556 


10 


Everett, 










8,768 


27,342,393 


7 09 


Framingham, 










3,406 


12,041,289 


3 08 


Groton, . 










609 


4,283,327 


1 03 


Holliston, 










779 


1,727,538 


47 


Hopkinton, 










765 


1,616,003 


44 


Hudson, . 










2,056 


4,406,495 


1 21 


Lexington, 










1,444 


8.640,266 


2 11 


Lincoln, . 










355 


3.520.205 


84 



Valuation of the Commomvealth. 



241 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Concluded. 



TowNa. 



Polls. 



Property. 



Tax of $1,000, 
includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 



Littleton, 

Lowell, 

Malden, 

Marlborough 

Maynard, 

Medford, 

Melrose, 

Natick, . 

Newton, 

North Reading 

Pepperell, 

Reading, 

Sherborn, 

Shirley, . 

Somerville, 

Stoneham, 

Stow, 

Sudbury, 

Tewksbuxy, 

Townsend, 

Tyngsborough 

Wakefield, 

Waltham, 

Watertown, 

Way land, 

Westford, 

Weston, . 

Wilmington, 

Winchester, 

WOBURN, 



Totals, 



388 

25,895 

11,610 

4,626 

2,232 

6,235 

4,438 

3,127 

10,474 

271 

869 

1,688 

299 

391 

21,067 

2,218 

296 

330 

508 

554 

216 

2,997 

7,303 

3,662 

650 



512 

2,182 
4,234 



$1,115,794 

85,175,700 

45,004,522 

10,898,089 

3,884,701 

24,264,078 

17,063,560 

8,225,368 

80,837,081 

731.082 

2,316,594 

5,742,532 

1,552,583 

1,164,290 

65,411.419 

5,182.026 

956,940 

1,303,166 

1,341.886 

1.332.153 

593,866 

9,671,533 

28,563.213 

15,479,139 

2,542.454 

2,344,168 

8.748.609 

1.465,908 

13,826.399 

11,638,886 



176,453 



$682,078,925 



$0 29 

21 95 

11 39 

2 94 

1 11 

6 14 
4 32 

2 18 
19 42 

19 
61 
1 47 
38 
30 
16 97 

1 40 
25 
33 
36 
36 
16 

2 50 

7 22 

3 88 
64 
60 

2 05 
38 

3 36 
3 07 



$172 66 



NANTUCKET COUNTY. 


Nantucket, .... 


817 


$3,473,416 


$0 87 


NORFOLK COUNTY. 


Avon, 

Bellingham, .... 
Braintree, .... 


577 

412 

1,993 


$979,471 

895,813 

6,477,294 


$0 28 

24 

1 67 



242 Valuation of the Commomvealth, 



NORFOLK COUNTY — Concluded, 









Tax of $1,000, 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Brookline 


7,218 


$118,513,924 


$27 66 


Canton, . 










1,264 


4,603,931 


1 17 


Cohasset, 










735 


8,425,307 


1 99 


Dedham, 










2,286 


14,247,994 


3 47 


Dover, . 










219 


5,738,416 


1 33 


Foxborough, 










913 


2,294,432 


61 


Franklin, 










1.385 


3,922,637 


1 03 


Holbrook, 










773 


1,615.692 


44 


Hyde Park,* 










4,088 


15,041.961 


3 83 


Medfield, 










512 


1,900,642 


48 


Medway, 










775 


1,453.664 


41 


Millis, . 










330 


1,107,323 


28 


Milton, . 










1.996 


30,027,548 


7 02 


Needham, 










1,360 


6,143,578 


1 53 


Norfolk, 










305 


855,701 


22 


Norwood, 










2,287 


14,510,576 


3 53 


Plainville, 










405 


794,020 


22 


QUINCT, . 










9,415 


30,606,390 


7 90 


Randolph, 










1,089 


2,303,882 


63 


Sharon, . 










636 


2,824.364 


71 


Stoughton, 










1,943 


3,532,469 


1 00 


Walpole, 










1,327 


4,556,099 


1 17 


Wellesley, 










1,366 


15.322,124 


3 62 


Westwood, 










338 


2.741,179 


66 


Weymouth, 










3,377 


8,323,916 


2 23 


Wrentham, 










454 


1,233,618 


33 


Totals, 










49,778 


S310,993,965 


$75 66 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY. 



Abington, .... 


1,634 


$2,991,324 


$0 84 


Bridgewater, , 








1,340 


3,469,277 


92 


Bbockton, 








16,234 


43,911,145 


11 60 


Carver, . 








286 


1,530.950 


38 


Duxbury, 








606 


2,308,400 


58 


East Bridgewater, 








964 


2,303,788 


62 


Halifax, . 








147 


542,205 


14 


Hanover, 








647 


1,619,814 


43 


Hanson, 








430 


1,129,912 


30 


Hingham, 








1,160 


6,930,664 


1 69 


Hull, . 








365 


5,605,743 


1 31 


Kingston, 








659 


1,834,323 


48 


Lakeville, .... 


269 


720,555 


19 



* Hyde Park annexed to Boston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



Valuation of the Commomvealth. 



243 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000, 


Towns. 


Polls. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Marion 


353 


$4,777,715 


$1 12 


Marshfield, . 








490 


2,002,795 


50 


Mattapoisett, . 








278 


1,936,080 


47 


Middleborough, 








2,151 


5,053,958 


1 36 


Norwell, 








496 


1,090.735 


30 


Pembroke, 








310 


997,428 


26 


Plymouth, 








3,260 


11,596.979 


2 96 


Plympton, 








162 


378,223 


10 


Rochester, 








261 


667,863 


18 


Rockland, 








2,000 


4.234.547 


1 16 


Scituate, 








717 


4.635,042 


1 13 


VVareham, 








1,306 


4,997,052 


1 27 


West Bridgewater, 








607 


1,315.410 


36 


Whitman, 








2,214 


4.938,660 


1 34 


Totals, . 








39,246 


$123,520,587 


$31 99 



SUFFOLK COUNTY. 



Boston,* .... 
Chelsea, .... 
Revere, .... 
Winthrop 


189,539 
8,182 
4,993 
2,846 


$1,420,981,033 
25.493,242 
15.660.186 
12,219,155 


$341 89 
6 61 
4 06 
3 06 


Totals 


205,560 


$1,474,353,616 


$355 62 



WORCESTER COUNTY. 



Ashburnham, 


505 


$1,043,470 


$0 29 


Athol, . 






2,271 


4,795,239 


1 32 


Auburn, . 








617 


1,242,674 


34 


Barre, . 








856 


1.908.838 


52 


Berlin, . 








245 


562.307 


15 


Blackstone, 








1,360 


2,271,572 


65 


Bolton, . 








207 


500,181 


13 


Boylston, 








193 


485,022 


13 


Brookfield, 








610 


1.328,678 


36 


Charlton, 








567 


1,307,664 


35 


Clinton, . 








3,403 


8,841,229 


2 35 


Dana, . 








190 


403,751 


11 


Douglas, 








652 


1,347,893 


37 



Hyde Park annexed to Boston (Ward 26) in 1911. 



244 



Valuation of the CommoniDealth, 



WORCESTER COUNTY — Concluded. 









Tax of $1,000. 


Towns. 


PoUs. 


Property. 


includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of MiU Each. 


Dudley 


892 


$1,820,724 


$0 50 


FlTCHBURQ, , 








9,675 


30,815,118 


7 97 


Gardner, 








3,944 


7,999,254 


2 21 


Grafton, 








1,272 


2,954,956 


80 


Hardwick, 








879 


2,013,791 


55 


Harvard, 








309 


1,353,506 


34 


Holden, . 








548 


1.791,207 


46 


Hopedale, 








725 


6,671,281 


1 59 


Hubbardston, 








338 


702,235 


19 


Lancaster, 








621 


4,778,268 


1 15 


Leicester, 








926 


2,596,652 


68 


Leominster, . 








4,932 


12,836,174 


3 41 


Lunenburg, . 








349 


1,131,246 


29 


Mendon, 








263 


757,307 


20 


Milford. . 








3,694 


8,830,094 


2 38 


Millbury, 








1,256 


2,451,189 


68 


New Braintree, 








147 


408.637 


11 


North Brookfield, 








733 


1,707,572 


46 


Northborough, 








523 


1,395,575 


37 


Northbridge, . 








2,658 


5,573,724 


1 53 


Oakham, 








163 


382,937 


10 


Oxford, . 








862 


2,072,912 


56 


Paxton, 








92 


334,528 


09 


Petersham, 








210 


949,548 


24 


Phillipston, . 








112 


290,313 


08 


Princeton, 








279 


1,300,734 


32 


Royalston, 








207 


646,519 


17 


Rutland, 








314 


719,110 


19 


Shrewsbury, . 








550 


1,800.536 


46 


Southborough, 








535 


3,016,516 


74 


Southbridge, . 








3,576 


6.392,075 


1 81 


Spencer, 








1,969 


4,014,410 


1 11 


Sterling, 








412 


1,151,538 


30 


Sturbridge, . 








548 


1,069,508 


30 


Sutton, . 








702 


1,307,877 


37 


Templeton, . 








1,112 


1,752,055 


51 


Upton, . 








554 


1,154.040 


32 


Uxbridge, 








1.172 


3,069,637 


81 


Warren, . 








1,173 


2.063.147 


59 


Webster, 








2,823 


10,206,433 


2 60 


West Boylston, 








313 


786,860 


21 


West Brookfield, 








400 


964,995 


26 . 


Westborough, . 








1,196 


3,363,258 


88 


Westminster, . 








390 


847,667 


23 


Winchendon, . 








1,747 


4,158.306 


1 12 


Worcester, , 








39,091 


146,201,068 


37 14 


Totals. . 








106.862 


$324,643,555 


$84 45 



Valuation of the Commonicealtli. 



245 



RECAPITULATION. 



Counties. 


Polls. 


Property. 


Tax of $1,000, 
includ'g Polls 
at One-tenth 
of Mill Each. 


Barnstable, .... 


7,740 


$33,431,815 


$8 39 


Berkahire, 










27.290 


84.520.295 


21 93 


Bristol, . 










82,807 


260,771,197 


67 55 


Dukes, . 










1,358 


6,198,767 


1 54 


Essex, . 










120,039 


403.674.107 


103 74 


Franklin, 










12,676 


32,491.511 


8 65 


Hampden, 










58,537 


218,491.254 


55 52 


Hampshire, 










16.168 


43.177.703 


11 43 


Middlesex, 










176,453 


682,078,925 


172 66 


Nantucket, 










817 


3,473,416 


87 


Norfolk, 










49.778 


310.993,965 


75 66 


Plymouth, 










39.246 


123.520,587 


31 99 


Suffolk, . 










205,560 


1,474,353,616 


355 62 


Worcester, 










106,862 


324,643,555 


84 45 


Totals, 


905,331 


$4,001,820,713 


$1,000 00 



246 



Population and Voteri^ 



A LIST 



OF THE Counties, Cities and Towns in the Commonwealth, 
WITH the Census of Inhabitants in 1905 and 1910, and 
of Legal Voters in 1905, revised and corrected by the 
Bureau of Statistics. 

Also, a List of Registered Voters in 1911, prepared by the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth. 





POPUiATION. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


Barnstable. 










Barnstable, .... 


4,336 


4,676 


1,185 


1,217 


Bourne, 






1,786 


2,474 


491 


615 


Brewster, . 




. 


739 


631 


222 


232 


Chatham, 






1,634 


1,564 


531 


470 


Dennis, 




. 


1,998 


1,919 


582 


562 


Eastham, . 




. 


519 


518 


157 


139 


Falmouth, . 




. 


3,241 


3,144 


820 


721 


Harwich, . 




. 


2,291 


2,115 


598 


544 


Mashpee, 






317 


270 


95 


78 


Orleans, 




. 


1,052 


1,077 


317 


270 


Provincetown, 






4,362 


4,369 


913 


705 


Sandwich, . 




. 


1,4:33 


1,688 


374 


368 


Truro, . 






743 


655 


165 


128 


Welllleet, . 




. 


958 


1,022 


315 


294 


Yarmouth, . 






1,422 


],420 


438 


398 


Totals, .... 


26,831 


27,542 


7,203 


6,741 


Berkshire. 










Adams 


12,486 


13,026 


2,115 


1,880 


A 1 ford. 






275 


275 • 


76 


66 


Becket, 






890 


959 


229 


200 


Cheshire, 






1,281 


1,508 


334 


297 


Clarksburg, 






1,200 


1,207 


218 


182 


Dalton, 






3,122 


3,568 


765 


829 


Egremont, . 
Florida, 






721 


605 


221 


160 






424 


395 


92 


72 


Great Barrington 


, 




6,152 


5,926 


1,508 


1,275 


Hancock, 




. 


434 


465 


117 


99 


Hinsdale, . 




' 


1,452 


1,116 


312 


244 



Population and Voters, 



U1 





Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




190.> 


1910 


1903 


1911 


Berkshire— Co?i. 










Lanesborough, . 


845 


947 


259 


220 


Lee, . 




3,972 


4,106 


955 


988 


Lenox, 




3,058 


3,060 


701 


750 


Monterey, • 




444 


388 


103 


98 


Mount Washington, 




87 


110 


22 


21 


New Ash ford, 




100 


92 


37 


24 


New Marlborough, 




1,209 


1,124 


351 


265 


NORTH ADAM8, . 




22,150 


22,019 


4,625 


3,761 


Otis, . 




534 


494 


156 


119 


Peru, . 




268 


237 


68 


69 


PITTSFIELD, 




25,001 


32,121 


6,127 


6,765 


Richmond, . 




601 


650 


145 


117 


Sandisfield, . 




657 


566 


188 


123 


Savoy, . 




549 


503 


147 


117 


Sheffield, . 




1,782 


1,817 


486 


387 


Stockbridge, 




2,022 


1,933 


538 


496 


Tyringham, 




314 


382 


93 


83 


Washington, 




339 


277 


74 


60 


West Stockbridge, 




1,023 


1,271 


301 


286 


William stown, ' . 




4,425 


3,708 


1,108 


783 


Windsor, 




513 


404 


147 


97 


Totals 


98,330 


105,259 


22,618 


20,933 


Bristol. 










Acushnet, . . , . 


1,284 


1,692 


319 


213 


Attleborough, 






12,702 


16,215 


2,880 


2,858 


Berkley, 






931 


999 


216 


203 


Dartmouth, . 






3,793 


4,378 


875 


662 . 


Dighton, 






2,070 


2,235 


443 


350 


Easton, 






4,909 


5,139 


1,242 


1,219 


Fairhaven, . 






4,235 


5,122 


951 


833 


Fall River, 






105,762 


119,295 


17,825 


16,125 


Freetown, . 






1,470 


1,471 


357 


285 


Mansfield, . 






4,245 


5,183 


1,153 


1,043 


New Bedford, 






74,362 


96,652 


12,939 


12,631 


North Attleborou 


gh. 




7,878 


9,562 


2,0.52 


1,950 


Norton, 






2,079 


2,544 


511 


462 


Raynham, . 
Rehoboth, . 






1,662 • 


1,725 


387 


296 






1,991 


2,001 


438 


318 


Seekonk, 






1,917 


2,397 


428 


.327 


Somerset, . 






2,294 


2,798 


513 


424 


Swansea, 






1,839 


1,978 


453 


395 


Taunton, . 






30,967 


34,259 


6,681 


6,227 


Westport, . 






2,867 


2,928 


705 


502 


Totals, . 




• • 


269,257 


318,573 


51,368 


47,323 



248 



Population and Voters. 







Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


Dukes County. 










Chilmark, .... 


322 


282 


100 


101 


Edgartown, 


. 


1,175 


1,191 


324 


295 


Gay Head, . 




178 


162 


47 


33 


Gosnold, 


, 


IfJl 


152 


49 


53 


Oak Bluffs,* 




1,138 


1,084 


210 


247 


Tisbury, 


. 


1,120 


1,196 


293 


273 


West Tisbury, 


. 


457 


437 


127 


103 


Totals, . 


4,.^51 


4,504 


1,150 


1,105 


Essex 












Amesbury, • 




8,840 


9,894 


2,211 


1,885 


Andover, 




6,632 


7,.301 


1,523 


1,447 


Beverly, . 




15,223 


18,650 


3,782 


4,003 


Boxford, 




665 


718 


180 


163 


Danvers, 




9,063 


9,407 


2,054 


1,980 


Essex, . 




1,790 


1,621 


488 


412 


Georgetown, 




1,840 


1,9.58 


544 


501 


Gloucester, 




26,011 


24,398 


6,328 


5,049 


Groveland, . 




2,401 


2,253 


642 


528 


Hamilton, . 




1,646 


1,749 


333 


369 


Haverhill, 




37,830 


44,115 


9,163 


8,213 


Ipswich, 




5,205 


5,777 


1,005 


975 


Lawrence, 




70,050 


85,892 


13,346 


11,681 


Lynn, . 




77,042 ^ 


89,336 


19,.520 


17,203 


Lynnlield, . 




797 


911 


235 


248 


Manchester, 




2,618 


2,673 


620 


604 


Marblehead, 




7,209 


7,338 


2,193 


2,246 


Merrlmac, . 




1,884 


2,202 


534 


489 


^lethuen, 




8,676 


11,448 


1,834 


1,846 


Middleton, . 




1,068 


1,129 


249 


244 


Nahant, 




922 


1,184 


258 


349 


Newburv, 




1,480 


1,482 


434 


382 


Newburyport, 




14,675 


14,949 


3,756 


3,436 


North Andover, 




4,614 


5,.529 


1,058 


1,057 


Peabody, 




13,098 


15,721 


3,097 


2,928 


Rockport, . 




4,447 


4,211 


1,054 


899 


Rowley, 




1,388 


1,368 


402 


312 


Salem, 




■37,627 


43,697 


8,344 


8,081 


Salisbury, . 




1,622 


1,6.58 


479 


455 


Saugus, ' 




6,2.53 


8,047 


1,441 


1,569 


Swampscott, 




5,141 


6,204 


1,316 


1,330 


Topstield, . 




1,095 


1,174 


282 


252 


Wenham, 




924 


1,010 


254 


255 


West Newbury, 




1,405 


1,473 


439 


378 


Totals 


381,181 


436,477 


89,398 


81,769 


* Name of Cottage City changed to 


ik Bluffs h 


y act of tl 


le General 


Court, January 25, 


1907. 











Population and Voters. 



249 





Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U. S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


FRANKLIN. 










Ashfield, . . . . 


m^ 


959 


271 


223 


Jiernnvdstou, 






769 


741 


205 


176 


lUickland, . 






1,.500 


1,.573 


407 


410 


Cliurleniont, 






1,002 


1,001 


261 


221 


Colraiu, 






1,780 


1,741 


400 


318 


Conway, 






1,340 


1,230 


329 


274 


Deerfield, . 






2,11-2 


2,209 


.509 


440 


Erving, 






1,094 


1,148 


274 


247 


Gill, . 






1,023 


942 


248 


145 


Greenfield, . 






9,156 


10,427 


2,38:^ 


2,473 


Hawlev, 






448 


424 


125 


90 


Heath," . 






3.56 


346 


112 


93 


Leverett, 






703 


728 


190 


153 


Leyden, 






408 


363 


97 


85 


Monroe, 






269 


246 


64 


37 


Montaunie, . 






7,015 


6,866 


1,380 


1,2.54 


New Salem, . 






672 


639 


193 


154 


Northfield, . 






2,017 


1,642 


411 


372 


Orange, 






5,.578 


5,282 


1,-530 


1,320 


Rowe, • 






533 


456 


114 


89 


Shelburne, . 






1,515 


1,498 


396 


371 


Shutesbury, 






374 


267 


98 


47 


Sunderland, 






910 


1,047 


149 


142 


Warwick, . 






527 


477 


130 


81 


Wendell, . 






480 


502 


125 


113 


Whately, . 




. 


822 


846 


213 


182 


Totals 


43,362 


43,600 


10,614 


9,510 


Hampden. 










Agawam, . . . . 


2,795 


3,501 


658 


626 


Bland ford, . 




746 


717 


195 


151 


Brim field, . 




894 


866 


220 


165 


Chester, 




1,.S66 


1,377 


345 


282 


CllICOPEE, . 




20,191 


25,401 


3,438 


3,301 


East Longmeadow, 




1,327 


1,5.53 


261 


248 


Granville, . 




865 


781 


246 


190 


Hampden, . 




561 


645 


148 


150 


Holland, 




151 


145 


51 


36 


HOLYOKE,* . 

Longmeadow, 
Ludlow, 




49,934 


57,730 


9,005 


7,984 




964 


1,084 


213 


265 




3,881 


4,948 


.508 


431 


Monson, 




4,344 


4,758 


929 


837 


Montgomery, 




259 


217 


69 


59 


Palmer, 




7,7.55 


8,610 


1,316 


1,281 


Russell. 




1,0.53 


965 


184 


168 


Southwick. . 




1,048 


1,020 


265 


244 



* Part of Northampton annexed to Holyoke in 1909. 



250 



Population and Voters, 











Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U. S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


Hampden— Co/i. 










Springfield, . 


73,540 


88,926 


17,376 


14,849 


Tolland, 




274 


180 


70 


41 


Wales, . 




645 


345 


207 


95 


West Springfield, 
Westfield, . 




8,101 


9,224 


1,874 


1,611 




13,611 


16,044 


3,169 


2,741 


Wilbraliam, 




1,708 


. 2,332 


347 


269 


Totals, . . . . 


196,013 


231,369 


41,094 


36,024 


Hampshire. 










Amherst, . . . . 


5,313 


5,112 


1,434 


1,126 


Belchertown, 






2,088 


2,054 


476 


438 


Chesterfield, 






563 


536 


180 


154 


Cunimington, 






740 


637 


219 


164 


Easthanipton, 






6,808 


8,524 


1,343 


1,372 


Enfield, 






973 


874 


274 


198 


Goshen, 






277 


279 


72 


67 


Granbv, 






747 


761 


164 


155 


Greenwich, . 






475 


452 


134 


108 


Ha die V, 
Hatfield, 






1,895 


1,999 


402 


338 






1,779 


1,986 


362 


318 


Huntington, 






1,451 


1,473 


327 


341 


Middlefield, . 






399 


3.54 


74 


74 


Northampton,* 






19,957 


19,431 


3,781 


3,399 


Pelham, 






460 


467 


120 


100 


Plainfield, . 






382 


406 


112 


105 


Prescott, 






322 


320 


103 


87 


South Hadley, 






5,054 


4,894 


908 


812 


Southampton, 






927 


870 


222 


176 


Ware, . 






8,594 


8,774 


1,416 


1,.S36 


Westhampton, 






466 


423 


115 


97 


AVilliamsburg, 






1,943 


2,132 


458 


430 


Worthington, 






614 


569 


175 


144 


Totals, . . . . 


62,227 


63,327 


12,871 


11,539 


Middlesex. 










Acton, 


2,089 


2,136 


531 


504 


Arlington,! 






. 


9,668 


11,187 


2,104 


2,078 


Ashbj% 






_ 


865 


885 


250 


225 


Ashland, 






. 


1,597 


1,682 


401 


415 


Aver, . 






. 


2,386 


2,797 


608 


589 


Bedford, 






. 


1,208 


1,231 


280 


271 


Belmont, 








4,360 


5,542 


966 


960 


Billerica, 






• 


2,843 


2,789 


684 


654 



* Part of Northampton annexed to Holyoke, Hampden County, in 1909. 
t Change in boundary line between Somerville and Arlington in 1910. 



Population and Voters. 



251 









Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


Middlesex— Con. 










Boxborough, 


324 


317 


75 


80 


Burlin.i^ton, . 






.588 


.591 


153 


144 


Cambridge,* 






97,434 


104,839 


22,013 


16,117t 


Carlisle, 






5-23 


551 


139 


130 


Chelmsford, 






4,2.54 


5,010 


971 


922 


Concord, 






5,421 


6,421 


1,095 


1,065 


Dracut, 






3,.537 


3,461 


749 


703 


Dunstal)le, . 






412 


408 


113 


85 


Everett, . 






29,111 


33,484 


6,690 


5,318 


Framingham, 






11,548 


12,948 


2,827 


2,928 


Grotoii, 






2,2.53 


2,155 


515 


462 


Hollistou, . 






2,G63 


2,711 


662 


680 


Hopkiuton, . 






2,.585 


2,452 


739 


638 


Hudson, 






6,217 


6,743 


1,527 


1,.339 


Lexington, . 






4,530 


4,918 


1,028 


1,012 


Lincoln, 






1,122 


1,175 


24^3 


2.58 


Littleton, . 






1,219 


1,229 


287 


259 


Lowell,! . 






94,889 


106,294 


18,652 


15,.507 


Maldex, 






38,037 


44,404 


8,512 


7,500 


Marlborough, 






14,073 


14,579 


3,421 


3,386 


Mayuard, 






5,811 


6,390 


932 


927 


Medford, . 






19,686 


23,150 


4,746 


4,460 


Melrose, . 






14,295 


15,715 


3,458 


3,347 


Natick, . 






9,609 


9,866 


2,621 


2,478 


Newton, 






36,827 


39,806 


7,821 


6,902 


North Reading, 






903 


1,059 


251 


251 


Pepperell, . 
Reading, 






3,268 


2,953 


791 


649 






5,682 


5,818 


1,435 


1,3.59 


Sherboi-n, 






1,379 


1,428 


295 


229 


Shirley, 






1,692 


2,139 


346 


306 


SOMERVILLE,§ 






69,272 


77.2.36 


15,906 


13,251 


Stonehani, . 






6,332 


7,090 


1,672 


1,6.59 


Stow, . 






1,027 


1,115 


222 


211 


Sudbury, 






1,159 


1,120 


338 


243 


Tewksbury,! 






4,415 


3,750 


612 


3.58 


Townsend, . 






1,772 


1,761 


528 


413 


Tyngsborough, 
Wakefield, " 






768 


829 


195 


172 






10,268 


11,404 


2,473 


2,427 


Waltham, . 






26,282 


27,834 


5,822 


5,655 


Watertown, . 






11,258 


12,875 


2,.585 


2,487 


Wavland, . 






2,220 


2,206 


619 


544 


Westford, . 






2,413 


2,851 


479 


461 


Weston 


2,091 


2,106 


509 


422 



* Change in boundary line between Boston and Cambridge in 1910. 

t Figures returned for State election, Nov. 7, 1911. 

i Part of Tewksbury annexed to Lowell in 1900. 

§ Change in boundary line between Somerville and Arlington in 1910. 



252 



Population and Voters. 





Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1 190.> 


1911 


Middlesex— Co7i. 










Wilmiugtou, 


1,670 


1,858 


378 


370 


Winchester, 


8,242 


9,309 


1,820 


1,636 


WOBURN, .... 


14,402 


15,308 


3,411 


3,415 


Totals, .... 


608,499 


669,915 


136,500 


118,861 


Nantucket. 










Nantucket 


2,930 


2,962 


a38 


774 


Norfolk. 










Avon, 


1,901 


2,013 


504 


463 


Bellingham, 


1,686 


1,696 


345 


256 


Braintree, .... 


6,879 


8,066 


1,693 


1,622 


Brookline 


23,436 


27,792 


5,120 


4,946 


Canton, .... 


4,702 


4,797 


1,098 


992 


Cohasset, .... 


2,727 


2,585 


682 


658 


Dedhani, .... 


7,774 


9,284 


1,834 


1,803 


Dover, 


636 


798 


150 


169 


Foxborough, 


3,364 


3,863 


792 


751 


Franklin, .... 


5,244 


5,641 


1,099 


1,023 


Holbrook, .... 


2,509 


2,816 


686 


632 


Hvde Park, * . . . 


14,510 


15,507 


3,362 


3,045* 


Medfleld, .... 


3,314 


3,466 


437 


375 


Medway 


2,650 


2,696 


721 


659 


Millis, 


1,252 


1,399 


254 


240 


Milton, .... 


7,0.54 


7,924 


1,604 


1,623 


Needham 


4,284 


5,026 


943 


998 


Norfolk, .... 


1,089 


960 


320 


222 


Norwood, .... 


6,731 


8,014 


1,474 


1,495 


Plainville.t .... 


1,300 


1,385 


344 


323 


QUINCY, .... 


28,076 


32,642 


6,009 


6,279 


Randolph, .... 


4,034 


4,301 


1,134 


941 


Sharon, .... 


2,08,5 


2,310 


499 


506 


Stoughton 


5,959 


6,316 


1,453 


1,400 


Walpole, .... 


4,003 


4,892 


895 


933 


Wellesley, .... 


6,189 


5,413 


932 


1,043 


Westwood, .... 


1,136 


1,266 


245 


233 


Weymouth 


11,585 


12,895 


3,249 


2,835 


Wrentham,t 


1,428 


1,743 


376 


361 


Totals 


167,537 


187,506 


38,254 


36,826 


Plymouth. 










Abington, .... 


5,081 


5,455 


1,422 


1,324 


Bridgewater, 


6,754 


7,688 


1,192 


1,012 


Brockton, 


47,794 


56,878 


12,080 


11,209 


Carver, .... 


1,410 


1,663 


299 


217 



* Hyde Park annexed to Boston in 1911. Figures returned for State 
election, Nov. 7, 1911. Figures returned for city election, Jan. 9, 1912, 
were 3,053. 

t Plainville was incorporated from a part of Wrentham, April 4, 1905. 



Population and Voters. 



253 





Population. 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U. S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


Plymouth— Co ?i. 










Duxbury, .... 
East Bridgewater, 


2,028 


1,688 


527 


419 


3,169 


3,363 


862 


736 


Halifax 


4!)4 


550 


135 


92 


Hanover, .... 


2,176 


2,326 


644 


460 


Hanson, .... 


1,490 


1,854 


398 


357 


Hingham 

Hull, 


4,819 


4,965 


1,197 


1,147 


2,060 


2,103 


488 


344 


Kingston, .... 


2,205 


2,445 


510 


463 


LakeviUe, .... 


912 


1,141 


247 


204 


Marion, .... 


1,029 


1,460 


282 


292 


Marshlleld, .... 


1,763 


1,738 


499 


431 


Malta poi sett. 


1,180 


1,233 


301 


283 


Middleljorougli, . 


6,888 


8,214 


1,867 


1,644 


Norwell 


1,534 


1,410 


473 


408 


Pembroke, .... 


1,261 


1,336 


389 


309 


Plymouth, .... 


11,119 


12,141 


2,.501 


2,192 


Plympton 


514 


561 


155 


135 


Rochester, .... 


1,181 


1,090 


265 


189 


Rockland 


6,287 


6,928 


1,825 


1,820 


Scituate 


2,597 


2,482 


756 


704 


Warehani, .... 


3,660 


4,102 


879 


877 


West Bridgewater, 


2,006 


2,231 


479 


462 


Whitman 


6,521 


7,292 


1,858 


1,700 


Totals, .... 


127,932 


144,337 


32,530 


29,430 


Suffolk. 










Boston,* .... 


595,380 


670,585 


139,633 


108,299t 


Chelsea 


37,289 


32,452 


7,842 


5,052 


Revere 


12,659 


18,219 


2,854 


3,442 


Winthrop, .... 


7,034 


10,132 


1,867 


2,412 


Totals 


652,362 


731,388 


152,196 


119,205 


WORCESTER. 










Ashburnham, 


1,851 


2,107 


444 


390 


Athol, 


7,197 


8,536 


1,898 


1,855 


Auburn, 




2,006 


2,420 


387 


481 


Barre, . 




2,558 


2,957 


516 


423 


Berlin, . 




906 


904 


239 


223 


Blackstone, 




5,786 


5,648 


1,235 


984 


Bolton, 




762 


764 


195 


161 


Boylston, 




649 


714 


165 


164 


Brookfield, 




2,388 


2,204 


560 


477 


Charlton, 




2,089 


2,032 


508 


397 


Clinton, 




13,105 


13,075 


2,740 


2,508 


Dana, 


763 


736 


197 


184 



* Change in boundary line between Boston and Cambridge in 1910. 
Hyde Park annexed in 1911. 

t Registration for city election, Jan. 9, 1912. The registered voters in 
Hyde Park (Ward 26) for the same election numbered 3,053 additional. 



254 



Population and Voters, 





Population. | 


Legal 
Voters 


Regis- 


COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND TOWNS. 


State 
Census 


U.S. 
Census 


tered 
Voters 




1905 


1910 


1905 


1911 


WORCESTER— Co??. 










Douglas, .... 


2,120 


2,152 


487 


419 


Dudley, 






3,818 


4,267 


573 


.523 


FITCHBURG, 






33,021 


37,826 


6,355 


6,011 


Gardner, 






12,012 


14,699 


2,.564 


2,422 


Grafton, 






5,052 


5,705 


1,040 


832 


Hardwick, . 






3,261 


3,.524 


499 


451 


Harvard, 






1,077 


1,034 


271 


240 


Holden, 






2,640 


2,147 


532 


435 


Hopedale, . 






2,048 


2,188 


592 


539 


Hubbardston, 






1,205 


1,073 


.334 


251 


Lancaster, . 






2,406 


2,464 


456 


369 


Leicester, . 






3,414 


3,237 


790 


658 


Leominster, 






14,297 


17,580 


3,345 


3,037 


Lunenl)urg, 






1,293 


1,393 


339 


295 


Meudon, 






922 


880 


253 


210 


Mil ford. 






12,105 


13,0.55 


2,699 


2,470 


Millbury, . 






4,631 


4,740 


982 


879 


New Braintree, 






477 


464 


117 


97 


North Brookfleld, 






2,617 


3,075 


600 


611 


Northborougb, 






1,947 


1,713 


439 


381 


Northbridge, 






7,400 


8,807 


1,348 


1,146 


Oakham, 






519 


552 


150 


133 


Oxford, 






2,927 


3,361 


687 


588 


Faxton, 






444 


416 


106 


79 


Petersham, . 






8.55 


757 


2.32 


173 


Phillipston, . 






442 


426 


124 


98 


Princeton, . 






907 


818 


241 


171 


Kovalston, . 






903 


792 


227 


172 


Rutland, 






1,713 


1,743 


339 


230 


Shrewsbury, 






1,866 


1,946 


539 


415 


Southborough, 






1,931 


1,745 


365 


373 


Southbridge, 






11,000 


12,592 


1,956 


2,042 


Spencer, 






7,121 


6,740 


1,678 


1,501 


Sterling, 






1,315 


1,359 


.344 


300 


Sturbridge, . 






1,974 


1,957 


455 


367 


Sutton, 






3,173 


3,078 


527 


433 


Templeton, . 






3,783 


3,756 


857 


686 


Upton, . 






2,024 


2,071 


528 


468 


Uxbridge, . 






3,881 


4,671 


789 


788 


Warren, 






4,300 


4,188 


722 


662 


Webster, . 






10,018 


11,.509 


1,612 


1,717 


West Boylston, 






1,571 


1,270 


294 


231 


West Brookfleld, 






1,384 


1,327 


369 


320 


Westborough, 






5,378 


5,446 


1,079 


978 


Westminster, 






1,348 


1,353 


372 


310 


Winchendon, 






5,933 


5,678 


1,310 


1,127 


Worcester, 






128,135 


145,986 


27,939 


25,860 


Totals, . 






362,668 


399,657 


77,540 


70,745 



Population and Voters. 



2bb 



RECAPITULATION. 





Number 

of 

Cities 

and 

Towns 


Population. 


Legal 
Voters 

1905 


Regis- 


COUNTIES. 


State 
Census 
1905 


u. s. 

Census 
1910 


tered 
Voters 

1911 


Barnstable, . 


15 


26,831 


27,542 


7,203 


6,741 


Berkshire, . 


32 


98,330 


105,259 


22,618 


20,933 


Bristol, . 


20 


269,257 


318,573 


51,368 


47,323 


Dukes County, 


7 


4,551 


4,504 


1,150 


1,105 


Essex, . 


34 


381,181 


436,477 


89,398 


81,769 


Franklin, 


26 


43,362 


43,CO0 


10,614 


9,510 


Hampden, 


23 


196,013 


231,369 


41,094 


36,024 


Hampshire, . 


23 


62,227 


63,327 


12,871 


11,539 


Middlesex, . 


54 


608,499 


669,915 


136,500 


118,861 


Nantucket, . 


1 


2,930 


2,962 


838 


774 


Norfolk,* 


29* 


167,537 


187,506 


38,2.54 


36,826 


Plymouth, . 


27 


127,932 


144,337 


32,.530 


29,430 


Suffolk,* 


4 


652,362 


731,388 


152,196 


119,205 


Worcester, . 


59 


362,668 


399,657 


77,540 


70,745 


Totals, . 


354* 


3,003,680 


3,366,416 


674,174 


590,785 



* Town of Hyde Park annexed to Boston in 1911, thus making 28 in 
Norfolk, and a total of 353. 



256 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors, 



GOVERNORS AND LIEUT.-GOVERNORS. 



CHOSEN ANOTJALLT BY THE PEOPLE. 



GOVERNOKS OF 

1620 Nov. 11, John Carver. 

1621 April, William Bradford. 

1633 Jan. 1, Edward Winslow. 

1634 Mar. 27, Thomas Prence. 

1635 Mar. 3, William Bradford. 

1636 Mar. 1, Edward Winelow. 

1637 Mar. 7, William Bradford. 



Pltmouth Colony. 

1638 June 5, Thomas Prence. 

1639 June 3, William Bradford. 

1644 June 5, Edward Winslow. 

1645 June 4, William Bradford. 
1657 June 3, Thomas Prence. 
1673 June 3, Josiah Winslow. 
16S0 Dec. 18, Thomas Hinckley. 



Deputy-Governors of Plymouth Colony. 

1680 Thomas Hinckley.f I 1682 William Bradford, to 1686 

1681 James Cudworth. 1689 William Bradford, to 1692 



CHOSEN ANNUALLY LT^DER THE FIRST CHARTER. 



Governors of Massachusetts Bay Colony. 

1646 May 6, John Wiuthrop. 

1649 May 2, John Endicott. 

1650 May 22, Thomas Dudley. 

1651 May 7, John Endicott. 

1654 May 3, Richard Bellingham. 

1655 May 23, John Endicott. 
1663 May 3, Richard Bellingham. 

1672 Dec. 12, John Leverett (act'g). 

1673 May 7, John Leverett. 
1679 May 28, Simon Bradstreet, to 

May 20, 1686. 



1629 Mar. 4, Matthew Cradock.J 
1629 Apr. 30, John Endicott. X 
1629 Oct. 20, John Winthrop.t 

1634 May 14, Thomas Dudley. 

1635 May 6, John Haynes. 

1636 May 25, Henry Vane. 

1637 May 17, John Winthrop. 

1640 May 13, Thomas Dudley. 

1641 June 2, Richard Bellingham. 

1642 May 18, John Winthrop. 

1644 May 29, John Endicott. 

1645 May 14, Thomas Dudley. 



* Mr. Hinckley was Governor till the union of the colonies in 1692, 
except during the administration of Andros. 

t Previously there was no Deputy-Governor, a Governor pro tern. 
being appointed by the Governor to serve in his absence. 

% A patent of King James I., dated Nov. 3, 1620, created the Council 
for New England and granted it the territory in North America from 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors. 



257 



UBPUTY-ItOVEKNOKB or Mi 

1629 Thomas Goffe,* to Oct. 20, 1629 


1650 Johu Endicott, . 


to 1651 


1629 Thomas Dudley, . 


1634 


1651 Thomas Dudley, . 


1653 


1634 Roger Ludlow, . 


1635 


1653 Richard Bellingham, 


1654 


1635 Richard Bellingham, 


1636 


1654 John Endicott, . 


1655 


1636 John Winthrop, . 


1637 


1655 Richard Bellingham, 


1665 


1637 Thomas Dudley, . 


1640 


1665 Francis Willoughby, 


1671 


I6i0 Richard Bellingham, 


1641 


1671 John Leverett, 


1673 


1641 John Endicott, . 


1644 


1673 Sam'lSymonds,toOct. 


1678 


1644 John AVinthrop, . 


1646 


1678 Oct., Simon Bradstreet 


1679 


1646 Thomas Dudley, . 


. 1650 


1679 Thomas Danforth, 


1686 



40° to 48° N. latitude and from sea to sea, to be known thereafter as New 
England in America. By instrument of March 19, 1628, the Council for 
New England granted to Sir Henry Rosewell and others the territory 
afterwards confirmed by royal Charter to the " Governor and Company 
of the Mattachusetts Bay in Newe England." This Charter, which 
passed the seals March 4, 1629, designated Matthew Cradock as the 
first Governor of the Company and Thomas Goffe as the first Deputy- 
Governor. Both had held similar offices from the grantees under the 
instrument of March 19, 1628. On May 13, 1629, the same persons were 
rechosen by the Company ; but they never came to New England. On 
Oct. 20, 1629, John Winthrop was chosen Governor of the Company and 
John Humfrey Deputy-Governor. Humfrey having declined the ser- 
vice, Thomas Dudley was chosen in his stead. 

John Endicott had been sent over in 1628, with a small band, as the 
agent of the grantees under the instrument of March 19, 1628. "NVhile 
Cradock was Governor of the Company, a commission, dated April 30, 
1629, was sent out to Endicott at Salem appointing him " Governor of 
London's Plantation in the Mattachusetts Bay in New England." In 
the exercise of this commission he was subordinate to the " Governor 
and Company " in London, by whom he was deputed, and who, from 
time to time, sent him elaborate instructions for his conduct. Cradock 
and Endicott were thus chief governor and local governor, respectively, 
from April 30, 1629, or, rather, from the time when Endicott's commis- 
sion reached Salem, a few weeks later, until Oct. 20, 1629 ; and "Winthrop 
and Endicott were chief and local governors, respectively, from that 
date until the arrival of Winthrop at Salem with the Charter, June 
12, 1630, when Endicott's powers merged in the general authority of 
Winthrop. 

* Thomas Goffe, the first Deputy-Governor, never came to New 
England. John Humfrey was elected, but did not serve. 



258 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors, 



THE INTER-CHARTER PERIOD. 

On May 25, 1686, Joseph Dudley became President of New England 
under a commission of King James II., and had jurisdiction over the 
royal domiuioDS in New England. This office he held till December 20, 
the same year, when Edmund Andros became Governor of New Eng- 
land, appointed by King James 11. On April 18, 1689, Governor Andros 
was deposed by a revolution of the people. 



AFTER THE DISSOLUTION OF THE FIRST CHARTER. 

Bimon Bradstreet was Governor from May 24, 1689, to May 14, 1692; 
and Thomas Danforth was Deputy-Governor during the same time. 



APPOINTED BY THE KING UNDER SECOND CHARTER. 
Governors op the Province of Massachusetts Bat. 



1692 May U, 
1694 Nov. 17, 

1699 May 26, 

1700 July, 

1701 July 7, 

1702 June 11, 
1714-15 Feb., 
1714-15 Mar., 

1715 Nov. 9, 

1716 Oct. 4, 
1722 Dec. 27, 

1728 July 13, 

1729 Sept. 7, 



William Phips. 
William Stoughton. 
Richard Coote. 
Williatn Stoughton. 
The Council. 
Joseph Dudley. 
The Council. 
Joseph Dudley. 
William Tuiler.] 
Samuel Shute. 
Williat7i Dummer. 
WiUiam Burnet. 
William Dummer. 



1730 June 30, 
1730 Aug. 8, 
1741 Aug. 17, 
1749 Sept 11, 
1753 Aug. 7, 

1756 Sept. 25, 

1757 April 4, 
1757 Aug. 3, 
1760 June 3, 
1760 Aug. 1, 
1769 Aug. 1, 
1771 March, 
1774 May 13, 



William Taller. 
Jonathan Belcher. 
William Shirley. 
Spencer Phips. 
William Shirley. 
Spencer Phips. 
The Council. 
Thomas Pownal. 
Thomas Hutchinson, 
Francis Bernard. 
Thomas Hutchinson. 
Thomas Hutchinson. 
Thomas Gage. 



* Those whose names are printed in italics were Acting Governors. 

t In November, 1715, Elizeus Burgess was proclaimed Governor, he 
having had the appointment in March, 1714, but he never came over to 
perform his duties, and resigned the office in 1716. 



Governors and Lieut, -Governors. 



259 



Lieutenant-Governors of the Province of Massachusetts Bay. 



1692 Wra. Stoughtou, to July, 1701 
1702 Thomas Povey, . . 1706 
1705-6 Jan., vacancy to Oct., 1711 
1711 William Tailer. 
1716 William Dummer. 



1730 William Tailer. 
1733 Spencer Pliips. 
1758 Thomas Hutchinson. 
1771 Andrew Oliver. 
1774 Thomas Oliver. 



UNTIL THE CONSTITUTION". 
1774 Oct., a Provincial Congress. | 1775 July, The Council. 



UNDER THE CONSTITUTION. 
Governors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

1858 Nathaniel P. Banks, . to 1861 

1851 John A. Andrew, . 1866 

1866 Alexander H. Bullock, 1869 

18G9 William Claflin, . . 1872 

1872 William B. Washburn,* 1874 

1875 William Gaston, . . 1876 

1876 Alexander H. Pace, . 1879 
1879 Thomas Talbot, . . 1880 
1830 John Davis Long, . 1883 

1883 Benjamin F. Butler, . 1884 

1884 George D. Robinson, . 1887 
1887 Oliver Ames, . . 1890 

1890 John Q. A. Brackett, . 1891 

1891 William E. Russell, . 1894 
1894 Frederic T.Greenhalge,t 1896 
1897 Roger Wolcott, . . 1900 
1900 W. Murray Crane, . 1903 
1903 John L. Bates, . . 1905 

1905 William L. Douglas, . 1906 

1906 Curtis Guild, Jr., . . 1909 
1909 Eben S. Draper, . . 1911 
1911 Eugene N, FosD, . 



1780 John Hancock, . 


to 1785 


1785 James Bowdoin, . 


1787 


1787 John Hancock, Oct 8, 


1793 


1794 Samuel Adams, . 


1797 


1797 Increase Sumner, June 


7, 1799 


1800 Caleb Strong, 


1807 


1807 Jas. Sullivan, Dec. 10, 


1808 


1809 Christopher Gore, 


1810 


1810 Elbridge Gerry, . 


1812 


1812 Caleb Strong, 


1816 


1816 John Brooks, 


1823 


1823 Wm. Eustis, Feb. 6, 


1825 


1825 Levi Lincoln, 


1834 


1834 John Davis, March 1, 


1835 


1836 Edward Everett, . 


1840 


1840 Marcus Morton, . 


1841 


1841 John Davis, . 


1843 


1843 Marcus Morton, . 


1844 


1844 George N. Briggs, 


1851 


1851 George S. Boutwell, 


1853 


1853 John H. Clifford, . 


1854 


1854 Emory Washburn, 


1855 


1855 Henry J. Gardner, 


1858 



♦ Resigned May 1, 1874. Chosen U. S. Senator April 17, 1874. 
t Mr. Greenhalge died March 5, 1899. 



260 



Governors and Lieut. -Governors, 



LIBUTENANT-GOVERNORS 


OF THB 


CoMM;oirwEAi,TH OF Massachit. 




SETTS. 




1780 Thos.Cushing,io'Feb.: 


28,*1788 


1858 Eliphalet Trask, . 


to 1861 


1788 Benjamin Lincoln, 


, 1789 


1861 John Z. Goodrich, Mar 


29,1861 


1789 Samuel Ada?ns, . 


, 1794 


1862 John ISTesmith, Sept., 


. 1862 


1794 Moses GUI, May 20,t 


1800 


1863 Joel Ilayden, 


. 1866 


1801 Sam'l Phillips, Feb. 10 


1802 


1866 William Claflin, . 


1869 


1802 Edward H. Robbins, 


1806 


1869 Joseph Tucker, . 


. 1873 


ISO! Levi Lincoln, t . 


1809 


1873 Thomas Talbot,^ . 


. 1875 


1809 David Cobb, . 


. 1810 


1875 Horatio G. Knight, 


, 1879 


1810 William Gray, . 


1812 


1879 John D. Long, 


. 1880 


1812 WiUiam Phillips, . 


1823 


1880 Byron Weston, . 


. 1883 


1823 Levi Lincoln, Feb., 


1824 


1883 Oliver Ames, 


. 1837 


1824 Marcus 3forton, July, 


1825 


1887 John Q. A. Brackett, 


1890 


1826 Thomas L. Winthrop, 


, 1833 


1890 William H. Haile, 


. 1893 


1833 Samuel T. Armstrong 


1836 


1893 Roger Wolcott,\\ . 


. 1897 


1836 George Hull, 


1843 


1897 W. Murray Crane, 


. 1900 


1843Henry H. Childs, . 


1844 


1900 John L. Bates, . 


, 1903 


1844 John Reed, , 


1851 


1903 Curtis Guild, Jr., . 


. 1906 


1851 Henry W. Cushman, 


1853 


1906 EbenS. Draper, . 


. 1909 


1853 Elisha Huntington, 


1854 


1909 Louis A.Frothingham 


1912 


1854 William C. Plunkett, 


1855 


1912 Robert Luce, 




1855 Simon Brown, 


1856 






1856 Henry W. Benchley, 


1858 







* The Lieutenant-Governors whose names are in italics were Acting 
Governors also during vacancies in the office of Governor. 

t Mr. Gill died on the 20th of May, 1800, and the Commonwealth, for 
the only time under the Constitution, was without a Governor and 
Lieutenant-Governor. The Council, Hon. Thomas Dawes, President, 
officiated till the 30th of the month, when Caleb Strong was inaugu- 
rated Governor. 

X General William Heath was elected in 1800, and declined to accept 
the office. 

§ Acting Governor from May 1, 1874. 

Ij Acting Governor from March 5, 1899. 



United States Senators. 



261 



UNITED STATES SENATORS 



FROM MASSACHUSETTS, 



Tristram Dalton, . 
George Cabot, 
Benjamin Goodhue, 
Jonathan Maeou, . 
John Quiucy Adims, . 
James Lloyd, Jr., . 
Christopher Gore, , 
Eli Porter Ashmun, 
Prentiss Mellen, . 
Elijah Hunt Mills, 
Daniel Webster, . . 
Rufus Choate, 
Daniel Webster, , . 
Robert Charles Winthrop, 
Robert Rantoul, Jr., . 
Charles Sumner, t . . 
William B. Washburn, . 
Henry Laurens Dawes, 
Henry Cabot Lodge,§ . 



From 1789. 

1789-91 

1791-96 
179Q-1S00 

1800-03 

1803-08 

180S-13 

1813-16 

1816-18 

1818-20 

1820-27 

1827-41 

1841-45 

1845-50 

, 1850-51 

18>1 

1851-74 

1874-75 

1875-93 

1893- 



Caleb Strong, . 


1789-98 


Theodore Sedgwick, . 


1796-99 


Samuel Dexter, 


1799-1800 


Dwight Foster, 


1800-03 


Timothy Pickering, 


1803-11 


Joseph Bradley Varnurc 


1, 1811-17 


Harrison Gray Otis, 


1817-22 


James Lloyd, . 


1822-26 


Nathaniel Silsbee, . 


1826-35 


John Davis, , 


1835-41 


Isaac Chapman Bates, 


1841-45 


John Davis, . 


1845-53 


Edward Everett, . 


1853-54 


Julius RockweU, . 


1854-55 


Henry Wilson,* . 


1855-73 


George S.Boutwell, 


1873-77 


George Frisbie Hoar,t 


1877-1904 


Winthrop Hurray Cran 


e,§ 1904- 



* Mr. Wilson was eleoted Vice-President in 1872; George S. Boutwell 
chosen to fill vacancy. 

t Charles Sumner died March 11, 1874; William B. Washburn chosen 
to fill vacancy April 17, 1874. 

% Mr. Hoar died Sept.. SO, 1904, and Mr. Crane was appointed by 
Governor Bates Oct. 12, 1904. 

§ Mr. Lodge's term will expire March 4, 1917, and Mr. Crane's, March 
i, 1913. 



262 



Secretaries. — Treasurers. 



SECRETARIES. 



List of Persons ivJio 


have held the Office of Secretary of the 


Commonwealth, since 1780. 




John Avery, . 


. 1780-1806 


William B. Calhoun, 


1848-51 


Jonathan L. Austin, 


1806-08 


Amasa Walker, . 


1851-53 


William Tudor, . 


1808-10 


Ephraim M. Wright, 


1853-56 


Benjamin Homans, 


1810-12 


Francis DeWitt, . 


1856-58 


Alden Bradford, . 


1812-24 


Oliver Warner, 


1858-76 


Edward D, Bangs, 


1824-36 


Henry B. Peirce, . 


1876-91 


John P. Bigelow, . 


1836-43 


William M.Olin,*. 


1891-1911 


John A. Bolles, . 


1843-44 


Albert P. Langtry,* 


1911- 


John Gt. Palfrey, . 


1844-48 








TREAS 


CJRERS. 




List of Persons tcho 


hare held 


the Office of Treasurer and 


Reci 


:iver-Gene 


RAL, since 1780. 




Henry Gardner, . 


. 1780-83 


Joseph Barrett, . 


1845-49 


Thomas Ivers, 


1783-87 


Ebenezer Bradbury, 


1849-51 


Alexander Hodgdon, 


1787-92 


Charles B.Hall, . 


1851-53 


Thomas Davis, 


1792-97 


Jacob 11. Loud, . 


1853-55 


Peleg Coffin, . 


tl797-1801 


Thomas J. Marsh, 


1855-56 


Jonathan Jackson, 


1802-06 


Moses Tenney, Jr., 


1856-61 


Thompson J. Skinner, 


1806-08 


Henry K. Oliver, . 


1861-66 


Josiah Dwight, . 


1808-10 


Jacob H. Loud, 


1866-71 


Thomas Harris, 


1810-11 


Charles Adams, Jr., 


1871-76 


Jonathan L. Austin, 


1811-12 


Charles Endicott, , 


1876-81 


John T. Apthorp, . 


1812-17 


Daniel A. Gleason, 


1881-86 


Daniel Sargent, 


1817-22 


Alanson W. Beard, 


1886-89 


Nahuro Mitchell, . 


1822-27 


George A. Marden, 


1889-94 


Joseph Sewall, 


1827-32 


Henry M. Phillips,! 


1894-95 


Hezekiah Barnard, 


1832-37 


Edward P. Shaw.J 


1895-1900 


David Wilder, 


1837-42 


Edward S. Bradford, 


1900-05 


Thomas Russell, . 


1842-43 


Arthur B. Chapin,§ 


1905-09 


John Mills, . 


1843-44 


Elmer A. Stevens, § 


1909- 


Thomas Russell, . 


1844-45 







* Secretary Olin died April 15, 1911, and Mr. Langtry was elected to 
fill the vacancy April 26, 1911 

t Secretary Avery had a warrant to take care of the treasury on the 
resignation of Coffin, May 25, 1802. 

X Mr. Phillips resigned April 12, 1895, and Mr. Shaw was elected to 
fill the vacancy April 25, 1895. 

§ Mr. Chapin resigned April 1, 1909, and Mr. Stevens was elected to 
fill the vacancy April 7, 1909. 



Attorneys- General. — Solicitors-General. 263 



ATTORNEYS-GENERAL- SOLICITORS- 
GENERAL. 



[This table was prepared by Mr. A. C. Goodell, Jr., and contributed 
by him to the Massachusetts Historical Society's proceedings for June, 
1895.] 

TABLE OF ATTORNEYS-GENERAL BEFORE THE CON- 
STITUTION. 

CHOSEN. APPOINTED. 

Under the Presidency of Joseph Dudley : 

Benjamin BuUivant Date uncertain, but before 

July 1, 1686; sworn in 
July 26. 
Under Sir Edmund Andros : 

Giles Masters, "To frame indictments, 

arraign and prosecute 
felons." April 30, 1687. 
He died " Kings Attor- 
ney," Feb. 29, 1688. 

James Graham, ...... Date uncertain, but as early 

as Aug. 25, 1687, he was 
" settled in Boston and 
made attornej'-general." 

James Graham, Reappointed (2d commia- 

sion) June 20, 1688. 
During the inter-charter period : 

Anthony Checkley, . June 14, 1689. 
Under the Province Charter ; 

Anthony Checkley Oct. 28, 1692. 

Paul Dudley July 6, 1702. 

Paul Dudley, . . . June 8, 1716. 

Paul Dudley, . . . June 19, 1717. 

Paul Dudley,* . . June 25, 1718, 

John Valentine, . . Nov. 22, 1718. 

John Valentine, . . June 24, 1719. 

Thomas Newton, f . . June 19, 1720. 

( Vacancy ; John Read chosen, but negatived by Governor Shute.) 

John Overing, . . June 29, 1722. 

John Read, . . . June 20, 1723. 

( Vacancy ; John Read cbosen, but not consented to.) 

* Resigned Nov. 22, 1718. j Died May 28, 1721. 



264 Attorneys- General. — Solicitors- General 



John Read, 
Jobn Read, 
John Read, 
Joseph Hiller, 



CHOSEN. 

. June 28, 1725. 

. June 21, 1726. 

. June 28, 1727 

. June 19, 1728. 



(Addington Davenport, Jr., chosen June 12, but declined.) 

John Overing, June 26, 1729. 

Edmund Trowbridge, June 29, 1749. 

Edmund Trowbridge, May 14, 1762. 

(Made Justice of the Superior Court of Judicature, March 25, 1767.) 

Jeremiah Gridley,* March 25, 1767. 

Jonathan Sewall Nov. 18, 1767. 

( Vacancy from September, 1774, to June 12, 1777.) 
Robert Treat Paine, . June 12, 1777, . . . Accepted Aug. 26. 
Robert Treat Paine, . June 19, 1778 (sworn). 
Robert Treat Paine, . Feb. 5, 1779. 
Robert Treat Paine, . Jan. 4, 1780. 



Jonathan Sewall, 



Special Attorney-Genekal, etc. 



March 25, 1767. 



SOLICITORS GENERAL, ETC. 

Jonathan Sewall, June 24, 1767 

( Vacxmcy from Nov. 18, 1767, to March 14, 1771.) 
Samuel Quincy.f March 14, 1771. 



TABLE OF ATTORNEYS-GENERAL SINCE THE 


CONSTI- 




TUTION. 




Robert Treat Paine, . 


1780-90 


Charles Allen, 


1867-72 


James Sullivan, 


1790-1807 


Charles R. Train, . 


1872-79 


Barnabas Bidwell, 


1807-10 


George Marston, . 


1879-83 


Perez Morton, 


1810-32 


Edgar J. Sherman, || 


1883-87 


James T. Austin, . 


1832-4.3 


Andrew J. Waterman, 


1887-91 


John Henry Clifford, . 


J1849-53 


Albert E. Pillsbury, 


1891-94 


Rufus Choate, 


1853 54 


Hosea M. Knowlton, 


1894-1902 


John Henry Clifford, . 


1854-58 


Herbert Parker, . 


1902-06 


Stephen Henry Phillips, 


1858-61 


Dana Malone, 


1906-11 


Dwight Foster, 


1861-64 


James M. Swift, . 


1911- 


Chester I. Reed,§ . 


1864-67 







* Died Sept. 10, 1767, and was buried on the 12th. 

t A refugee, 1774-75. 

t The office of Attorney-General was abolished in 1843 and re-estab- 
lished in 1849. 

§ Resigned during the session of the Legislature of 1867. The vacancy 
was filled by the election of Charles Allen. 

II Resigned Oct, 1, 1887. The vacancy was filled by the appointment 
of Andrew J. Waterman. 



Auditors. — Secretaries Board of Education. 265 



AUDITORS. 



List of Persons who have held the Office of Auditor of 
Accounts, 



[Established by Act of 1849.] 



David Wilder, Jr., . 


1849-54 


Joseph Mitchell, 


1854-55 


Stephen N. Gifford, . 


1855-56 


Chandler R. Ransom, 


1856-58 


Charles White, . 


1858-61 


Levi Reed,* . . 


1861-65 


Julius L Clarke, . 


1865-66 


Henry S. Briggs, 


1866-70 



Charles Endicott, 

Julius L. Clarke, t . 

Charles R. Ladd.f . 
William D. T. Trefry, 

John W. Kimball, . 

Henry E. Turner.J . 
John E. White, t 



. 1870-76 

. 1876-79 

. 1879-91 

. 1891-92 
1892-1901 

. 1901-11 

. 1911- 



SECRETARIES OP THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION. 



Lint of Persons who have held the Office of Secretary of the 
State Board op Education. 





fSee Act of 1837.] 




Horace Mann, . 


. 1837-48 John W. Dickinson, 


1877-94 


Barnas Sears, . 


. 1848-55 


Frank A.Hill,§ . 


. 1894-1903 


George S. Boutwell, 


. 1855-61 


George H.Martin,|| 


1904-09 


Joseph White, . 


. 1861-77 







* Resigned Dec. 20, 1865. 

t Mr. Clarke resigned, and Mr. Ladd was appointed in his place May 
5, 1879. 

I Mr. Turner died June 29, 1911, and Mr. White was elected to fill the 
vacancy July 6, 1911. 

§ Mr. Hill died Sept. 12, 1903. Mr Caleb B. Tillinghast was appointed 
acting secretary May 19, 1903, and served until March 1, 1904, when Mr. 
Martin, who was elected Feb 4, 1904, entered upon his duties. 

II The office of secretary of the State Board of Education was abol- 
ished by chapter 457 of the Acts of 1909. 



266 Organization of the Legislature, 



ORGANIZATION OF THE LEGISLATURE, 

Since 1780. 



The first General Court, under the Constitution of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, assembled at Boston on Wednesday, Oct. 25, 1780, 
and was finallj' prorogued (having held three sessions) May 19,1781. 
From this time until 1832 the political year commenced on the last 
Wednesdaj^ in May, and the General Court held two, and frequently 
three, sessions during each year. In 1832, by an amendment of the 
Constitution, the commencement of the political year was changed to 
the first Wednesday In January. 





SENATE. 






PRE SIDENTS, 




Thomas Gushing, rfs'Ti'fZ 


'*j 1780-81 


Samuel Phillips, 


. 1795-96 


Jeremiah Powell, . 


Samuel Phillips, 


. 1796-97 


Jeremiah Powell, rfs'jiV? 
Samuel Adams, 


* { 1781-82 


Samuel Phillips, 
Samuel Phillips, 


. 1797-98 
. 1798-99 


Samuel Adams, 


1782-83 


Samuel Phillips, 


. 1799-1800 


Samuel Adams, 


1783 -S4 


Samuel Phillips, 


. 1800-01 


Samuel Adams, 


1784-85 


Samuel Phillips, re& 


'"'^'/j 1801-02 


Samuel Adams, resigned, 


1 1785-86 


David Cobb, . 


Samuel Phillips, Jr.,, 




David Cobb, . 


. 1802-03 


Samuel Phillips, Jr., 


1786-87 


David Cobb, . 


. 1803-04 


Samuel Adams, 


1787-83 


David Cobb, . 


. 1804-05 


Samuel Phillips, Jr., 


1788-89 


Harrison Gray Otis 


. 1805-06 


Samuel Phillips, Jr., 


1789-90 


John Bacon, . 


. 1806-07 


Samuel Phillips, . 


1790-91 


Samuel Dana, . 


. 1807-08 


Samuel Phillips, . 


1791-92 


Harrison Gray Otis 


. 1808-09 


Samuel Phillips, . 


1792-93 


Harrison Gray Otis 


. 1809-10 


Samuel Phillips, 


1793-94 


Harrison Gray Otis 


. 1810-11 


Samuel Phillips, . 


1794-95 


Samuel Dana, . 


. 1811-12 



* Resigned to serve in Governor's Council. 
t Resigned to serve as Lieutenant-Governor. 



Organization of the Legislature, 



207 



Samuel Dana, 


. 1812-13 


Johu Phillips, 


. 1813-14 


John Phillips, 


. 1814-15 


John Phillips, 


. 1815-16 


John Phillips, 


. 1816-17 


John Phillips, 


. 1817-18 


John Phillips, 


. 1818-19 


John Phillips, 


. 1819-20 


Johu Phillips, 


. 1820-21 


John I'hillips, 


. 1821-22 


John Phillips, 


. 1822-23 


Nathaniel Silsbee, 


. 1823-24 


Nathaniel Silsbee, 


. 1824-25 


Nathaniel Silsbee, 


. 1825-26 


John Mills, . 


. 1826-27 


John Mills, . 


. 1827-28 


Sherman Leland, 


. 1828-29 


Samuel Lathrop, 


. 1829-30 


Samuel Lathrop, re 


'^■^"'^^' j 1830-31 


James Fowler, 




Leverett Saltonstal] 


1, . . 1831 


William Thoindikc 


J, . . 1832 


Benjamin T. Pickna 


an, . . 1833 


Benjamin T, Pickn: 


an, . . 1834 


Benjamin T. Pickn 


^^r^,died, jj33^ 


George Bliss, . 


Horace Mann, 


. . . 1836 


Horace Mann, 


. 1837 


Myron Lawrence, 


. 1838 


Myron Lawrence, 


. 1839 


Daniel P. King, 


. 1840 


Daniel P. King, 


. 1841 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


. 1842 


PhineasW. Leland 


resignecJ,^ j 1343 


Frederick Robinso 


Josiah Quincy, Jr. 


,' . . 1844 


Levi Lincoln, , 


. 1845 


William B. Calhou 


n, . . 1846 


William B. Calhou 


n, . . 1847 


Zeno Scudder, 


. 1848 


Joseph Bell, . 


. 1849 



Marshall P. Wilder, 
Henry Wilson, 
Henry Wilson, 
Charles H. Warren, 
Charles Edward Cook, 
H^ry W. Benchley, 
Elihu C. Baker, . 
Charles W. Upham, 
Charles W. Upham, 
Charles A. Phelps, 
Charles A. Phelpe, 
William Claflin, . 
John H. Clifford, . 
Jonathan E. Field, 
Jonathan E. Field, 
Jonathan E. Field, 
Joseph A. Pond, . 
Joseph A. Pond, . 
George O. Brastow, 
Robert C. Pitman, resigned, 
George O. Brastow, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
Horace H. Coolidge, 
George B. Loring, . 
George B. Loring, . 
George B. Loring, . 
George B. Loring, . 
John B. D. Cogswell, 
John B. D. Cogswell, 
John B. D. Cogswell, 
Robert R. Bishop, . 
Robert R. Bishop, . 
Robert R. Bishop, . 
George Glover Crocker 
George A. Bruce, . 
Albert E. Pillsbury, 
Albert E. Pillsbury, 
Halsey J. Boardman, 
Halsey J. Boardman, 
Harris C. Hart well. 



1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 



1870 
1871 

1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 



* Appointed Justice of Superior Court. 



268 Organization of the Legislature. 



Henry H. Sprague, 


1890 


George R. Jones, . 


. 1903 


Henry H. Sprague, 


1891 


George R. Jonee, . 


. 1904 


Alfred S. Pinkerton, . 


1892 


William F. Dana, . 


. 1905 


Alfred S. Pinkerton, . 


1893 


William F. Dana, . 


. 1906 


William M Butler, 


1894 


William D. Chappie, . 


. 1907 


William M. Butler, 


1895 


William D. Chappie, 


. 1908 


George P. Lawrence, . 


1896 


Allen T.Treadway, 


. 1909 


George P. Lawrence, . 


1897 


Allen T. Treadway, 


. 1910 


George E. Smith, . 


1898 


Allen T. Treadway, 


. 1911 


George E. Smith, . 


1899 


Levi H. Greenwood, 


. 1912 


George E Smith, . 


1900 






Rufus A.Soule, . 


. 1901 






Rufus A. Soule, . 


. 1902 
CLE] 


RK s . 




William Baker, Jr , . ] 


780-84 


Charles Calhoun, . 


1830-42 


Samuel Cooper, . . J 


L785-95 


Lewis Josselyn, . 


1843 


Edward McLane, . . 1 


L796-99 


Charles Calhoun, . 


1844-50 


Edward Payne Hayman, ] 


L800 


Chauncy L. Knapp, 


1851 


George Elliot Vaughan, 1 


L801-02 


Francis H. Underwood 


1852 


Wendell Davis, . . ] 


L803-05 


Charles Calhoun, . 


1853-54 


John D. Dunbar, . . ] 


L806-07 


Peter L. Cox, . 


1855-57 


Nathaniel Coffin, . . ] 


1808-10 


Stephen N. Gifford,* 


1858-86 


Marcus Morton, 


1811-12 


E. Herbert Clapp, . 


1S86-88 


Samuel F McCleary, . ] 


813-21 


Henry D, Coolidge, 


1889- 


Samuel F. Lyman, 


1822 






PaulWillard, . . . " 


1823-29 







* Died April 18, 1886. 



Organization of the Legislature, 



260 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Caleb DavlB, . 
Caleb Davis, resigned 
Nathaniel Gorham 
Nathaniel Gorham 
Tristram Dalton 
Samuel AUyne Otis 
Nathaniel Gorham 
Artemas Ward, 
James Warren, 
Theodore Sedgwick, 
David Cobb, . 
David Cobb, . 
David Cobb, . 
David Cobb, . 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward H, Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward U. Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
Edward H. Robbins, 
John Coffin Jones, 
Harrison Gray Otis, 
Harrison Gray Otis, 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Perez Morton, , 
Peiez Morton, 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Perez Morton, resigned. 
Joseph Story, 
Joseph Story, resigned: 
Eleazer W. Ripley, 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 
Timothy Bigelow, . 



SPB A 

1780-81 
1781-82 
. 1782 
1782-83 
1783-84 
1784-85 
1783-86 
1786-87 
1787-88 
1788-89 
1759-90 
1790-91 
1791-92 
1792-93 
1793-94 
1794-95 
1795-96 
1796 97 
1797-98 
1798-99 
1799-1800 
1800-01 
1801-02 
1802-03 
1803-04 
1804-05 
1805-06 
1806-07 
1807-08 
1808-09 
1809-10 
1810-11 
. 1811 
1811-12 
. 1812 
1812-13 
1813-14 
1814-15 
1815-16 
1816-17 



Timothy Bigelow, . . 1817-18 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1818-19 

Timothy Bigelow, . . 1819-20 

Elijah H. Mills, resigned, 1820-21 

Josiah Quincy, . . . 1821 

Josiah Quincy, resigned, 1821-22 

Luther Lawrence, , . . 1822 

Levi Lincoln, . . . 1822-23 

William C. Jarvis, . . 1823-24 

William C, Jarvis, . . 1824-25 

Timothy Fuller, . . 1825-26 

William C. Jarvis, . . 1826-27 

William C. Jarvis,. . 1827-28 

William B. Calhoun, . 1828-29 

William B. Calhoun, . 1829-30 

William B. Calhoun, . . 1830 

William B. Calhoun, . . 1831 

William B. Calhoun, . . 1832 

William B. Calhoun, . . 1833 

William B Calhoun, . . 1834 

Julius Rockwell, . . . 1835 

Julius Rockwell, , . . 1836 

Julius Rockwell, . . . 1837 

Robert C. Winthrop, . . 1838 

Roberto. Winthrop, . . 1839 

Roberto. Winthrop, . . 1840 

George Ashmun, . . , 1841 

Thomas Kinnicut, . . . 1842 

Daniel P. King, . . . 1843 
Thomas Kinnicut, resigned, 1844 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., , 1844 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., . 1845 

Samuel H. Walley, Jr., , 1846 

Ebenezer Bradbury, . . 1847 

Francis B. Crowninshield, , 1848 

Francis B. Crowninshield, . 1849 

Ensign H. Kellogg, . . 1850 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., . 1851 

Nathaniel P. Banks, Jr., . 1852 

George Biles, . , . , 1853 



270 Organization of the Legislature. 



Otis P. Lord, . 


. 




. 1854 


John Q. A Brackett, . 


. 1885 


Daniel C.Eddy, . 




1855 


John Q. A. Brackett, . 


. 1886 


Charles A. Phelps, 




. 1856 


Charles J. Noyes, . 


. 1887 


Charles A.Phelps, 




. 1857 


Charles J. Xoyes, . 


. 1888 


Julius Rockwell, . 




. 1858 


William E.Barrett, 


1889 


Charles Hale, . 




. 1859 


William E. Barrett, 


1890 


John A. Goodwin, 




1860 


William E.Barrett, 


1891 


John A. Goodwin, 




. 1861 


William E. Barrett, 


1892 


Alexander H. Bullock, 




1862 


William E. Barrett, 


1893 


Alexander H. Bullock, 




1863 


George v. L. Meyer, 


1894 


Alexander H. Bullock, 




1864 


George v. L. Meyer, 


1895 


Alexander H. Bullock, 




1865 


George v. L. Meyer, 


1896 


James M . Stone, . 




1866 


John L. Bates, 


1897 


James M. Stone, 






1867 


ffohn L. Bates, 


1898 


Harvey Jewell, 






1868 


John L. Bates, 


1899 


Harvey Jewell, 






1869 


James J. Myers, . 


1900 


Harvey Jewell, 






1870 


James J Myers, . 


1901 


Harvey Jewell, 






1871 


James J. Myers, . 


1902 


John E Sauford, 






1872 


James J. Myers, . 


1903 


John E, Sanford, 






1873 


Louis A. Frothingham, 


1904 


JohnE. Sanford, 






1874 


Louis A. Frothingham, 


1905 


John E. Sanford, 






1875 


John N. Cole, 


1906 


John D. Long, 






1876 


John N". Cole, 


1907 


John D. Long, 






1877 


John N. Cole, 


1908 


.John D. Long, 






1878 


Joseph Walker, 


1909 


Levi C. Wade, 






1879 


Joseph Walker, 


1910 


Charles J. Noyes, 






1880 


Joseph Walker, . 


1911 


Charles J Noyes, 






1881 


Grafton D. Cushing, . 


1912 


Charles J, Noyes, 






1882 






George A. Marden 






1883 






George A. Marden 






1884 







Organization of the Legislature. 



271 



Andrew Henehaw, 
George Richards Minot, 
Henry Warren, 
NicholaB Tillinghaet, . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner, 
Nicholas Tillinghast, . 
Chas. Pinckney Sumner, 
Benjamin Pollard, . 
Pelham W. Warren, 
Luther S. Gushing, 
Charles W. Storey, 
Lewis Josselyn, 
William Schouler, . 



CLERKS. 




1780-81 


William Stowe, 


. 1854 


1782-91 


Henry A. Marsh, . 


. 1855 


1792-1802 


William E. P. Haskell, . 


. 1856 


1803-05 


William Stowe, . . ] 


857-61 


1806-07 


William 8 Robinson, . 1 


862-72 


1808-09 


Charles H. Taylor, 


. 1873 


1810-11 


George A. Marden, . ] 


874-82 


1812-21 


Edward A McLaughlin, ] 


1883-95 


1822 31 


George T. Sleeper, 


. 1896 


1832-43 


James W.Kimball, . 1897- 


1844-50 






1851-52 






. 1853 







8ERGEANTS-AT-ARMS.* 

Benjamin Stevens, . 1835-59 Charles G, Davis,t . 1901-03 

John Morrissey, . . 1859-74 i David T. Remington, . 1904-09 

Oreb F. Mitchell, . . 1875-85 1 Thomas F, Pedrick, . 1910- 

John G. B. Adams, t . 1886 1900 | 



* The office of Sergeant-at-Arms was established by law in 1835. Pre- 
viously to that time Jacob Kuhn was Messenger to the General Court 
from 1786. William Oaker preceded him from the first session under 
the Constitution in 1780-81, he having also served in a similar position 
for many years previously thereto. 

t Mr. Adams died Oct. 19, 1900. Mr. Davis was appointed Acting 
Sergeant-at-Arme Oct. 24, 1900. 



272 Length of Legislative Sessions^ Etc. 



Table showing- the Length of the Sessions of the 
Legislature and the Number of Representatives 
in Each Year since 1832. 



Y E A K . 


Time of 
Meeting. 


Prorogued. 


Length of 
Session. 


No. 

of 

Reps. 


1S32 


January 4. 


March 24. 


80 days. 


528 


1833, 


2 


28. 


86 " 


574 


1834 


1. 


April 2. 


92 " 


570 


1835,* 


7. 


8. 


92 " 


615 


1836 


6. 


16. 


102 " 


619 


1837 


4. 


20. 


107 " 


0S5 


1838, 


3. 


25. 


113 " 


480 


1839 


2. 


10. 


99 " 


521 


1840, 


1. 


March 24. 


84 '« 


521 


184i; 


6. 


18. 


72 " 


397 


1842,* 


5. 


3. 


58 " 


336 


1843 


4. 


24. 


80 " 


352 


1844, 


3. 


16. 


74 " 


321 


1845, 


1. 


26. 


85 " 


271 


1846, 


7. 


April 16. 


100 " 


264 


1847, 


6. 


16. 


111 " 


2.55 


1848,* 


5. 


May 10. 


127 " 


272 


1849 


3. 


2. 


120 " 


263 


1850, 


2. 


3. 


122 " 


297 


1851, 


1. 


24. 


146 •' 


396 


1852 


7. 


22. 


137 " 


402 


1853 


5. 


25. 


142 " 


288 


1854 


4. 


April 29. 


116 " 


310 


1855, 


3. 


May 21. 


138 «' 


380 


1856, 


1. 


June 6. 


158 " 


329 


1857,* 


7. 


May 30. 


144 " 


357 


1858 


6. 


March 27. 


81 " 


240 


1859,* 


5. 


April 6. 


92 " 


240 


I860,* 


4. 


4. 


92 " 


240 


1861,* 


2. 


11. 


100 " 


240 


1862, 


1. 


30. 


120 «' 


240 



* There was an extra session of sixty-two days in 183.5, to revise the statutes ; one of 
nine days in 1842, to divide the Commonwealth into Congressional Districts ; one of 
three days in 1848, to choose electors of President-and Vice-President; one of eighteen 
days in 1857, to establish districts for the choice of Councillors, Representatives and 
Senators ; one of one hundred and thirteen days in 1859, to revise the general statutes ; 
one of fourteen days in 1860, to consider the subject of the disease among the cattle of 
the Commonwealth; one of ten days in 1861, to consider the duty of the Common- 
wealth in relation to public affairs, consequent on the Rebellion; one of eight days in 
1863, to provide for raising the quota under the call of the President of the United 
States of the 17th of October, 1863, for 300,000 men ; one of thirty days in 1872, to con- 
sider what legislation was necessary by reason of the great fire in Boston, November 9 
and 10 ; one of ten days in 1881 and one of seven days iu 1901, to act upon the report of 
a joint special committee to revise the statutes. 



Length of Legislative Sessions, Etc. 273 



V1.AT? Time of 
Ykar. Meeting. 


Prorogued. 


Length of 
Session. 


No. 

of 

Reps. 


1863,* 


January 7. 


April 29. 


113 days. 


240 


1864, 








. 


6. 


May 14. 


130 " 


240 


1865, . 








. 


4. 


17. 


137 " 


240 


1866, 










3. 


30. 


147 " 


240 


1867, 










2. 


June 1. 


1.50 " 


240 


18(58, 










1. 


12. 


164 " 


240 


18(59, 










6. 


24, 


170 « 


240 


1870, 










5. 


23. 


170 " 


240 


1871, . 










4. 


May 31. 


148 " 


240 


1872,* 










3. 


7. 


126 " 


240 


]873, . 










1. 


June 12. 


lfJ3 " 


240 


1874, . 










7. 


30. 


175 " 


240 


1875, . 










6. 


May 19. 


134 " 


240 


1876, . 










5. 


April 28. 


115 " 


240 


1877, . 










3. 


May 17. 


135 " 


240 


1878, . 










2. 


17. 


136 " 


240 


1879, 










1. 


April 30. 


120 " 


240 


1880, 










7. 


24. 


109 " 


240 


1881,* . 










5. 


May 13. 


129 " 


240 


1882, . 










4. 


27. 


144 " 


240 


1883, 










3. 


July 27. 


208 " 


240 


1884, 










2. 


June 4. 


155 " 


2^0 


1885, , 










7. 


19. 


164 " 


240 


188(5, 










6. 


30. 


176 " 


240 


1887, 










5. 


16. 


163 " 


240 


1888, . 










4. 


May 29. 


147 " 


240 


1889, 










2. 


June 7. 


157 " 


240 


1890, 










1. 


July 2. 


183 " 


240 


1891, 










7. 


June 11. 


156 " 


240 


1892, 










6. 


17. 


163 " 


240 


1893, 










4. 


9. 


157 " 


240 


1894, 










3. 


July 2. 


181 " 


240 


1895, 










2. 


June 5. 


155 " 


240 


1896, 










1. 


10. 


162 '« 


240 


1897, 










6. 


12. 


158 " 


240 


1898, 










5. 


23. 


170 " 


240 


1899, 










4. 


3. 


151 " 


240 


liJOO, 










3. 


July 17. 


196 " 


240 


1901,* 










2. 


June 19. 


169 " 


240 


1902, 










1. 


28. 


179 " 


240 


1S03. 










7. 


26. 


171 " 


240 


1904, 










6. 


9. 


156 " 


240 


1905, 










4. 


May 26. 


143 " 


240 


1906, 










3. 


June 29. 


178 " 


240 


l'.>07, 










2_ 


28. 


178 '« 


240 


1908, 










i! 


13. 


165 " 


240 


ir;09. 










6. 


19. 


165 " 


210 


1910, 










5. 


15. 


162 " 


240 


1911, 










4. 


July 28. 


206 " 


240 



* See note on preceding page. 



274 



Judiciary. 



JUDICIARY. 



Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature of the Province of 
Massachtcsetts Bay, from 1692 to 1775.* 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPO] 


NTED. 


LEFT THK BENCH. 








DIED. 


1692, 


WiUiam Stoughton, 


. 1701. 


Resigned. 








1701. 


1701. 


Wait Winthrop, . 


. 1701. 


Resigned. 








1717. 


1702. 


Isaac AddingtoD, 


. . 1703. 


Resigned. 








1715. 


1708. 


Wait Winthrop, . 


. 1717. 










1717. 


1718. 


Samuel Sewall, . 


. 1728. 


Resigned. 








1730. 


1729. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


. 1745. 










1745. 


1745. 


Paul Dudley, 


. 1751. 










1751. 


1752. 


Stephen Sewall, . 


. 1760. 










1760. 


1761. 


Thomas Hutchinson, 


. 1769. 


Acting Governor. 




1780. 


1769. 


Benjamin Lynde, 


, 1771. 


Resigned. 








1781. 


1772. 


Peter Oliver, 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1791. 






JUSTICES. 










1692. 


Thomas Danforth, 


. 1699. 










1699. 


1692. 


Wait Winthrop, . 


. 1701. 


Resigned. 








1717. 


1692. 


John Richards, . 


. 1694. 










1694. 


1692. 


Samuel Sewall, . 


. 


(Appointed 


C 


J. 


1718.) 


1730. 


1695. 


Elisha Cooke, . 


. 1702. 


Removed. 








1715. 


1700. 


John Walley, . 


. 1712. 










1712. 


1701. 


John Saffin, 


. 1702. 


Removed. 








1710. 


1702. 


John Hathorne, . 


. 1712. 


Resigned. 








1717. 


1702. 


John Leverett, . 


. 1708. 


Resigned. 








1724. 


1708. 


Jonathan Curwin, 


. 1715. 


Resigned. 








1718. 


1712. 


Benjamin Lynde, 




(Appointed 


c. 


J. 


1729.) 


1745. 


1712. 


Nathaniel Thomas, 


. 1718. 


Resigned. 








1718. 


1715. 


Addington Davenport 


, . 1736. 










1736. 


1718. 


Paul Dudley, 


. 


(Appointed 


c. 


J. 


1745.) 


1751. 


1718. 


Edmund Quincy, 


. 1737. 










1737. 


1728. 


John Cushing, . 


. 1733. 


Removed. 








1737. 


1733. 


Jonathan Remington, 


. 1745. 










1745. 


1736. 


Richard Saltonstall, 


. 1756. 










1756. 


1737. 


Thomas Greaves, 


. 1738. 


Resigned. 








1747. 


1739. 


Stephen Sewall, . 




(Appointed 


c 


J. 


1752.) 


1760. 



* The judges died in office, except where otherwise stated. 



Judiciary. 



276 



1745. 
1745. 
1747. 
1752. 
1756. 
1767. 
1771. 
1772. 
1772. 
1774. 



TED. LEFT THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


Nathaniel Hubbard, . 


. 1746. 


Resigned. 


1748 


Benjamin Lynde, 


. 


(Appointed C. J., 1769.) 


1781 


John Ciiehjng, . 


. 1771. 


Resigned. 


1778 


Chambers Russell, . 


. 1766. 




1766. 


Peter Oliver, 




(Appointed C. J., 1772.) 


1791. 


Edmund Trowbridge, 


. 1775. 


Resigned. 


1793 


Foster Hutchinson, . 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1799 


Nathaniel Ropes, 


. 1774. 




1774 


William Gushing, . 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1810 


William Browne, 


. 1775. 


Removed at Revolution. 


1802 



Justices of the Superior Court of Judicature and the Supreme JzcdU 
cial Court of Massachusetts since the Revolution. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 


DIED. 


1775. 


John Adams, 


1776. 


Resigned.* 


1826. 


1777. 


William Gushing, 


1789. 


Resigned.! 


1810. 


1790. 


Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent 


1791. 




1791. 


1791. 


Francis Dana, . 


1806. 


Resigned. 


1811. 


1806. 


Theophilus Parsons, 


1813. 




1813. 


1814. 


Samuel Sewall, . 


1814. 




1814. 


1814. 


Isaac Parker, 


1830. 




1830. 


1830. 


Lemuel Shaw, . 


1860. 


Resigned. 


1861. 


1860. 


George Tyler Bigelow, 


1868. 


Resigned. 


1878. 


1868. 


Reuben Atwater Chapman 


, 1873. 




1873. 


1873. 


Horace Grray,J . 


1882. 




1902. 


1882. 


Marcus Morton, . 


1890. 


Resigned. 


1891. 


1890. 


Walbridge Abner Field, 


1899. 




1899. 


1899. 


Oliver Wendell Holme8,§ 


1902. 






1902. 


Marcus Perrin Knowlton 


1911. 


Resigned. 




1911. 


Arthur Prentice Rugg 









* Mr. Adams never took his seat on the bench. 

t Chief Justice Cushiiig resigned on being appointed one of the Jus- 
tices of the Supreme Goxirt of the United States. 

I Chief Justice Gray vacated his oflBce by accepting an appointment 
as one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 

§ Chief Justice Holmes vacated his oiUce by accepting an appointment 
as one of the Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. 



276 



Judiciary. 



JUSTICES. 



APPOINTEB. LKFT 


THE BENCH. 




DIED. 


1775. 


William Gushing, 




(Appointed G. J., 


, 1777.) 


1810. 


1775. 


Nathaniel Peaslee Sargent 




(Appointed G. J., 


, 1790.) 


1791. 


1775. 


William Reed, . 


. 1776. 


Superseded. 




1780. 


1776. 


Jedediah Foster, 


, 1779. 






1779. 


1776. 


James Sullivan, . 


, 1782. 


Resigned. 




1808. 


1777. 


David Sewall, 


. 1789. 


Resigned.* 




1825. 


1782. 


Increase Sumner, 


. 1797. 


Elected Governor 




1799. 


1785. 


Francis Dana, 




(Appointed G. J,, 


1791.) 


1811. 


1790. 


Robert Treat Paiue, . 


. 1804. 


Resigned. 




1814. 


1790. 


Nathan Gushing, 


. 1800. 


Resigned. 




1812. 


1792. 


Thomas Dawes, . 


. 1802. 


Resigned. 




1825. 


1797. 


Theophilus Bradbury, 


, 1803. 


Removed, t 




1803. 


1800. 


Samuel Sewall, . 




(Appointed C. J., 


1814.) 


1814. 


1801. 


Simeon Strong, . 


. 1805. 






1805. 


1801. 


George Thacher, 


. 1824. 


Resigned. 




1824. 


1802. 


Theodore Sedgwick, . 


. 1813. 






1813. 


1806. 


Isaac Parker, 




(Appointed G. J., 


1814.) 


1830. 


1813. 


Gharles Jackson, 


. 1823. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1814. 


Daniel Dewey, . 


. 1815. 






1815. 


1814. 


Samuel Putnam, 


, 1842. 


Resigned. 




1853. 


1815. 


Samuel Sumner Wilde, 


, 1850. 


Resigned. 




1855. 


1824. 


Levi Lincoln, 


. 1825. 


Elected Governor 




1868. 


1825. 


Marcus Morton, . 


, 1840. 


Elected Governor 




1864. 


1837. 


Gharles Augustus Dewey, 


, 1866. 






1866. 


1842. 


Samuel Hubbard, 


, 1847. 






1847. 


1848. 


Charles Edward Forbes, , 


. 1848. 


Resigned. 




1881. 


1848. 


Theron Metcalf, . 


. 1865. 


Resigned. 




1875. 


1848. 


Richard Fletcher, 


, 1853. 


Resigned. 




1869. 


1850. 


George Tyler Bigelow, , 




(Appointed G. J., 


1860.) 


1878. 


1852. 


Caleb Gushing, . 


. 1853. 


Resigned.f 




1879. 


1853. 


Benj. Franklin Thomas, . 


, 1859. 


Resigned, 




1878. 


1853. 


Pliay Merrick, . 


1854. 


Resigned. 




1807. 


1859. 


Ebenezer Kockwood Iloar, 


, 1869. 


Resigned. t 




1895. 


1860. 


Reuben Atwater Chapman 




(Appointed G. J., 


, 1868.) 


1873. 



* Mr. Justice Sewall resigned on being appointed Judge of the United 
States District Court for the District of Maine. 

t Mr. Justice Bradbury was removed on account of physical disa- 
bility. 

X Mr. Justice Gushing and Mr. Justice Hoar resigoed on being ap- 
pointed to the office of Attorney-General of the United States. 



Judiciary, 



277 



APPOINTED. LEFT 


THE BENCH. 






DIED. 


1864. 


Horace Gray, Jr., 




(Appointed C, 


.J. 


, 1873.) 


1902. 


1865. 


Jamee Denison Colt, . 


. 1866. 


Resigned. 






1881. 


1866. 


Dwight Foster, . 


. 1869. 


Resigned. 






1884. 


1866. 


John Wells, . . . 


. 1875. 








1875. 


1868. 


James Denieon Colt, . 


. 1881. 








1881. 


1869. 


Seth Ames, . 


. 1881. 


Resigned. 






1881. 


1869. 


Marcus Morton, . 




(Appointed C, 


• J. 


, 1882.) 


1891. 


1873. 


Wm. Crowninshield Endicott 


, 1882. 


Resigned. 






1900. 


1873. 


Charles Devens, Jr., . 


. 1877. 


Resigned.* 






1891. 


1875. 


Otis Phillips Lord, . 


, 1882. 


Resigned. 






1884. 


1877. 


Augustus Lord Soule, 


, 1881. 


Resigned. 






1887. 


1881. 


Walbridge Abuer Field, . 




(Appointed C. 


J, 


, .1890.) 


1899. 


1881. 


Charles Devens,* 


, 1891. 








1891. 


1881. 


William Allen, . 


, 1891. 








1891. 


1882. 


Charles Allen, . 


1898. 


Resigned. 








1882. 


Waldo Colburn, . 


, 1885. 








1885. 


1882, 


Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr 


., 


(Appointed C. 


J., 


, 1899.) 




1885. 


William Sewall Gardner, . 


, 1887. 


Resigned. 






1888. 


1887. 


Marcus Perrin Knowlton, , 




(Appointed C. 


J., 


, 1902.) 




1890. 


James Madison Morton. 












1891. 


John Lathrop, . 


1906. 


Resigned. 






1910. 


1891. 


James Madison Barker, . 


1905. 








1905. 


1898. 


John Wilkes Hammond. 












1899. 


William Caleb Loring. 












1902. 


Henry King Braley. 












1905. 


Henry Newton Sheldon. 












1906. 


Arthur Prentice Rugg, 




(Appointed C. 


J., 


1911.) 




1911. 


Charles Ambrose DeCourcy. 











Justices of the Court of Common Pleas, from its Establishment in 
1820 untilits Abolition in 1859. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 



APPOINTED. LEFT THK BENCH. 

1820. Artemas Ward, . . . 1839. Resigned. 

1839. John Mason Williams, . 1844. Resigned. 

1844. Daniel Wells, . . . 18-54. 

1854. Edward Mellen,. . .1859, 



DIHD. 

1847. 
1868. 
1854. 
1875. 



* Mr. Justice Devens resigned on being appointed to the office of 
Attorney-General of the United States, and was reappointed to the 
Supreme Bench in 1881. 



278 



Judiciary. 



JUSTICES. 



LEFT THE BENCH. 



. 1842. 

. 1828. 
. 1844. 
. 1844. 
. 1844. 
. 1848. 
. 1848. 
. 1847. 
. 1848. 



APPOINTED. 

1820. Solomon Strong, 

1820. John Mason Williams, 

1820. Samuel HoTve, . 

1828. David Cummins, 

1839. Charles Henry Warren, 

1842. Charles Allen, . 

1843. Pliny Merrick, . 

1844. Joshua Holyoke Ward, 
1844. Emory Washburn, . 

1844. Luther Stearns Gushing, 

1845. Harrison Gray Otis Colby, 1847. 
1847. Charles Edward Forbes, . 1848. 

1847. Edward Mellen, . 

1848. George Tyler Bigelow, . 1850. 
1848. Jonathan Cogswell Perkins,1859. 
1848. Horatio Byington, . . 1856. 

1848. Thomas Hopkinson, . . 1849. 

1849. EbenezerRockwoodHoar, 1S55. 

1850. Pliny Merrick, . . . 1853. 

1851. Henry Walker Bishop, . 1859. 

1853. George Nixon Briggs, . 1859. 

1854. George Partridge Sanger, . 1859. 

1855. Henry Morris, . . . 1859. 

1856. David Aiken, . . . 1859. 



Resigned. 

(Appointed C, J., 1839.) 

Resigned. 
Resigned. 
Resigned. 
Resigned. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup, Jud. C't. 

(Appointed C. J., 1854.) 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



Resigned. 
Resigijed. 
App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



DIEB. 

1850. 
1868. 
1828. 
1855. 
1874. 
1869. 
1867. 
1848. 
1877. 
1856. 
1853. 
1881. 
1875. 
1878. 
1877. 
1856. 
1856. 
1895. 
1867. 
1871. 
1861. 
1890. 
1888. 
1895. 



Justices of the Superior Cozirt for the County of Sufolk, from its 
Establishment in 1855 xnitil its Abolition in 1859. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. DIKD. 

1855. Albert Hobart Nelson, . 1857. 1858. 

1858. Charles Allen,* . . . 1859. 1869. 

* In 1859 Charles Allen became the first Chief Justice of the Superior 
Court of the Commonwealth. 



Judiciary, 



279 



JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1855. Josiah Gardner Abbott, . 1858. 

1855. Charles Phelps Huntington, 1859. 

1855. Stephen Gordon Nash, . 1859. 

1858. Marcus Morton,* . . 1859. 



1894. 
1891. 



Justices of the Superior Court since its Establishment in 1859. 
CHIEF JUSTICES. 

APPOINTED. LEFT THK BENCH. DIED. 

1859. Charles Allen, . . . 1867. Resigned. 1869. 

1867. Seth Ames 1869. App'd toSup. Jud.C't. 1881. 

1869. Lincoln Flagg Brigham, . 1890. Resigned. 1895. 

1890. Albert Mason, . . . 1905. 1905. 
1905. John Adams Aiken. 

JUSTICES. 



1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1859. 
1867. 
1867. 
1869. 



1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1875. 
1875. 
1881. 



Julius Rockwell, . 
Otis Phillips Lord, 
Marcus Morton, . 
Seth Ames, . 
Ezra Wilkinson, . 
Henry Vose, . 
Thomas Russell, . 
John Phelps Putnam, . 
Lincoln Flagg Brigham, 
Chester Isham Reed, . 
Charles Devens, Jr., . 
Henry Austin Scudder, 
Francis Henshaw Dewey, 
Robert Carter Pitman, 
John William Bacon, . 
William Allen, 
Peleg Emory Aldrich, 
Waldo Colburn, . 
William Sewall Gardner, 
Hamilton Barclay Staples, 



1886. Resigned. 1888 

1875. App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1884 

1869. App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1891 

(Appointed C. J., 1867.) 1881 

1882. 1882 



1867. 
1882. 

1871. 
1873. 
1872. 
1881. 
1891. 
1888. 
1881. 
1895. 
1882. 
1885. 
1891. 



Resigned. 1887 
1882 

(Appointed C. J., 1869.) 1895, 

Resigned. 1873 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1891, 

Resigned. 1895 

Resigned. 1887 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1891 

1895 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1885 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 1888 

1891 



* In 1859 Marcus Morton became one of the Associate Justices of the 
Superior Court of the Commonwealth. 



280 



Judiciary. 



APPOIK 

1381. 

1882. 
1882. 
1S82. 
1885. 
1886. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1888. 
1888. 
1890. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1891. 
1892. 
1892. 
1S93. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1896. 
1898. 
1898. 
1898. 
1900. 
1900. 
1900. 
1902. 
1902. 
1902. 
1902. 
1902. 
1903. 
1903. 
1905. 
1905. 
1906. 
1906. 
1907. 
1907. 



TED. LEFT THE BEK( 

Marcus Perrin Knowlton, . 1887. 

Caleb Blodgett, . . . 1900. 
Albert Mason, 

James Madison Barker, . 1891. 
Charles Perkins Thompson, 1894. 

John TVilkes Hammond, . 1898. 

Justin Dewey, . . . 1900. 

Edgar Jay Sherman, . .1911. 

John Lathrop, . . . 1891. 

James Robert Dunbar, . 1898. 

Robert Roberts Bishop, . 1909. 

Daniel Webster Bond, . 1911. 

Henry King Braley, . . 1902. 

John Hopkins, . . . 1902. 

Elisha Burr Maynard, . 1906. 
Franklin Goodridge Fesseuden. 



John William Corcoran, . 1893. 

James Bailey Richardson, . 1911. 

Charles Sumner Lilley, . 1900. 

Henry Newton Sheldon, . 1905. 

Francis Almon Gaskill, . 1909 

John Henry Hardy. 

Henry Ward well, . . 1898. 

William Burnham Stevens. 

Charles Upham Bell. 

John Adams Aiken, . 

Frederick Lawton. 

Edward Peter Pierce. 

Jabez Fox. 

Charles Ambrose DeCourcy.lOll 

Robert Orr Harris, . .1911. 

Lemuel LeBaron Holmes, . 1907. 

William Cushing Wait. 

William Schofield, 

Lloyd Everett White. 

Loranus Eaton Hitchcock. 

John Crawford Crosby. 

John Joseph Flaherty, . 1906. 

William Franklin Dana. 

John Freeman Brown. 

Henry Amasa King. 

George Augustus Sanderson. 



App'dto Sup. Jud.C't. 
Resigned. 

(Appointed C. J., 1890.) 
App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 

App'd to Sup. Jud.C't. 

Resigned. 

App'dto Sup. Jud.C't. 

Resigned. 



App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



Resigned. 

Resigned. 

App'd to Sup. Jud. C't. 



Resigned. 

(Appointed C J., 1905.) 



App'd to Sup Jud.C't. 
Resigned. 



1901. 
1905. 
1905. 
1894- 

1900. 

1910. 

1909. 
1911. 

1902. 
1906. 

1904. 
1911. 



1911. Resigned. 



1907. 



1906. 



Judiciary, 281 



APPOINTED. LEFT THE BENCH. 

1907. Robert Fulton Raymond. 

1909. Marcus Morton. 

1909. Charles Francis Jenney. 

1911. Joseph Francis Quinn. 

1911. John Dwyer McLaughlin. 

1911. John Bernard Ratigan. 

1911. Hugo Adelard Dubuque. 

1911. Patrick Michael Keating. 

1911. Walter Perley Uall. 

1911 Frederic Hathaway Chase. 

1911. Richard William Irwin. 

1911. Nathan Dexter Pratt. 



282 Judiciary. 



PRESENT ORGANIZATION OF THE COURTS. 

[Corrected to Jan. 25, 1912.1 



(AH Judges in the Commonwealth are appointed by the Governor 
with the advice and consent of the Council, and hold office during good 
behavior.! 

SUPREME JUDICIAL COURT. 

[Revised Laws, Chapter 156.] 

Arthur Prentice Rugg of Worcester, Chief Justice. 

Justices. 
James Madison Morton of Fall ' Henry King Braley of Boston. 

River. Henry Newton Sheldon of Boston. 

John Wilkes Hammond of Cam- i Charles Ambrose DeCourcy of 

bridge. Lawrence. 

William Caleb Loring of Boston. ' 

Clarence H. Cooper of Boston, 1914, Clerk for the Commonwealth. 
John F. Cronin of Boston, 1917, Clerk for the County of Suffolk. 
Henry W. Swift of Boston, Reporter of Decisions. 
Robert Herter, Messenger. 



SUPERIOR COURT. 

[Revised Laws, Chapter 157.] 

John Adams Aiken of Greenfield, Chief Justice. 



Justices. 



Franklin Goodridge Fessenden of 

Greenfield. 
John Henry Hardy of Arlington. 
William Burnham Stevens of 

Stoneham. 
Charles Upham Bell of Andover. 
Frederick Lawton of Lowell. 
Edward Peter Pierce of Fitchburg. 
Jabez Fox of Cambridge. 



William Cushing Wait of Med- 
ford. 

Lloyd Everett White of Taunton. 

Loranus Eaton Hitchcock of 
Springfield. 

John Crawford Crosby of Pitts- 
field. 

William Franklin Dana of Newton. 

John Freeman Brown of Milton. 



Judiciary. 



283 



Henry Amasa King of Springfield. 

George Augustus Sanderson of 
Ayer. 

Robert Fulton Raymond of New 
Bedford. 

Marcus Morton of Newton. 

Charles Francis Jenney of Boston 
(Hyde Park). 

Joseph Francis Quinn of Salem. 

John Dwyer McLaughlin of Bos- 
ton. 



John Bernard Ratigan of Worces- 
ter. 

Hugo Adelard Dubuque of Fall 
River. 

Patrick Michael Keating of Boston. 

Walter Perley Hall of Fitchburg. 

Frederic Hathaway Chase of Bos- 
ton. 

Richard William Irwin of North- 
ampton. 

Nathan Dexter Pratt of Lowell. 



Charles F. Dolan, Messenger. 



PROBATE COURTS AND COURTS OF INSOLVENCY. 
[Revised Laws, Chapters 162-164.] 

There is a Probate Court and a Court of Insolvency in each 
county, distinct in their jurisdiction, powers, proceedings and practice, 
but having the same judge and register. These courts are held by the 
judge of probate and insolvency appointed for the county; but the 
judges of the several counties may, in cases of necessity or convenience, 
interchange services, and perform each other's duties. 

The names of the judges, registers and assistant registers may be 
found among the list of County OflScera. 



LAND COURT. 
[Revised Laws, Chapter 128.1 
Judge, Charles Thornton Davis of Milton. Associate Judge, Louis M. 
Clark of Boston. Recorder, Clarence C. Smith of Newton, 1913. Room 
408, Court House. 



BOSTON JUVENILE COURT. 

[Acts of 1906, Chapter 489.) 
Justice, Harvey Humplirey Baker. Special Justices, Frank Leveroni, 
Philip Rubenstein. Clerk, Charles W. M. Williams, 1911. Room 127, 
Court House. 



284 Judiciary. 



POLICE, DISTRICT AND MUNICIPAL COURTS. 

[Revised Laws, Chapter 160.] 

Police Courts. 

Brockton (jurisdiction in Brockton, Bridgewater, East Bridgewater 
and West Bridgewater). — Justice, Warren A. Reed. Special Justices, 
Charles Carroll King, Walter I. Lane. Clerk, Harry W. Flagg, 1914. 

Chelsea (jurisdiction in Chelsea and Revere), — Justice, Albert D. 
Bosson. Special Justices, Samuel R. Cutler, George M. Stearns. Clerk, 
Joseph M. Curley, 1912. 

Chicopeb. — Justice, Luther White. Special Justices, James H. 
Loomis, John P. Kirby. Clerk, Cornelius J. Driscoll, 1916. 

FiTCHBURG (jurisdiction in Fitchburg, Ashburnham and Lunenburg). 
— Justice, Thomas F. Gallagher. Special Justices, Charles H. Blood, 
Clark A. Batchelder. Clerk, Peter F. Ward, 1912. 

HoLTOKB. — Justice, Edward W. Chapin. Special Justices, John 
Hildreth, Robert A. Allyn. Clerk, Thomas J. Tierney, 1916. 

Lawrence. — Justice, Jeremiah J. Mahonej'. Special Justices, Wil- 
bur E. Rowell, Frederic N. Chandler. Clsrk, Daniel W. Mahoney, 1916. 

Lee. — Justice, Bart Bossidy. Special Justices, Henry C. Phelps, 
Edward S. Rogers. Clerk, John T. Wilson, 1915. 

Lowell (jurisdiction in Lowell, Tewksbury, Billerica, Dracut, 

Chelmsford, Dunstable and Tj'ngsborough). — Justice, . 

Special Justices, John J. Pickman, Frederic A. Fisher. Clerk, James F. 
Savage, 1915. Assistant Clerk, Edward W. Trull. 

Marlborough. — Justice, James W. McDonald. Special Justices, 
Edgar Weeks, Raoul Beaudreau. Clerk, James F. J. Otterson, 1916. 

Newburyport (jurisdiction in Newburyport, Newbury and Row- 
ley). — Justice, Thomas C. Simpson. Special Justices, Horace I. Bart- 
lett, Nathaniel N. Jones. Clerk, Edward H. Rowell, 1915. 

Newton. — Justice, John C. Kennedy. Special Justices, William F. 
Bacon, Frank M. Copeland. Clerk, Francis W. Sprague, 2d, 1913. 

SoMERViLLE. — Justice, L. Roger Wentworth. Special Justices, John 
Haskell Butler, Michael F. Farrell. Clerk, Herbert A. Chapin, 1912. 

Springfield (jurisdiction in Springfield, Agawam, Longmeadow, 
East Longmeadow, Hampden and West Springfield). — Justice, Henry 
W. Bosworth. Special Justices, Alfred M. Copeland, Edwin F. Lyford. 
Clerk, George Leonard, 1914. 

Williamstown. — Justice, Sanborn G. Tenney. Special Justices, 
William Cook Hart, Byron J. Rees. Clerk, Michael L. Monahan, 1916. 



Judiciary. 285 



District Courts. 
East Boston (court held at East Beaton; jurisdiction in Winthrop 
and the district and territory included in Wards 1 and 2 of the city 
of Boston as such wards existed March 1, 1886). — Justice, Frank E. 
Dimick. Special Justices, Joseph H. Barnes, Jr., Charles J. Brown. 
Clerk, Thomas H. Dalton, 1913. 

First Barnstable (court held at Barnstable and Bourne; jurisdiction 
in Barnstable, Bourne, Yarmouth, Sandwich, Falmouth and Mashpee). 
— Justice, Frederick C. Swift. Special Justices, Charles C. Paine, 
Edward S. Ellis. 

Second Barnstable (court held at Harwich and Provincetown; juris- 
diction in Provincetown, Truro, Wellfleet, Eastham, Orleans, Brewster, 
Chatham, Harwich and Dennis). — Justice, Raymond A. Hopkins. 
Special Justices, Walter Welsh, Charles Bassett. 

Central Berkshire (court held at Pittsfield; jurisdiction in Pitts- 
field, Hancock, Lanesborough, Peru, Hinsdale, Dalton, Washington 
and Richmond). — Jjistice, Charles E.Burke. Special Justices, Hiram 

B. Wellington, Charles L. Hibbard. Clerk, Walter B. Smith, 1912. 

Northern Berkshire (court held at North Adams; jurisdiction in 
North Adams, Clarksburg and Florida). — Justice, Carlton T. Phelps. 
Special Justices, Charles J. Parkhurst, John E. Magenis. Clerk, John 
Martin, 1914. 

Southern Berkshire (court held at Great Barrington; jurisdiction 
in Sheffield, Great Barrington, Egremont, Alford, Mount Washington, 
Monterey and New Marlborough). — Justice, Walter B. Sanford. (Spe- 
cial Justices, Frank H. Wright, Herbert C. Joyner. Clerk, Dennis 

C. Killeen, 1916. 

Fourth Berkshire (court held at Adams; jurisdiction in Adams, 
Cheshire, Savoy and Windsor). — Justice, Nelson H. Bixby. Special 
Justices, Henry L. Harrington, William S. Morton. Clerk, Franklin 
H. B. Munson, 1915. 

First Bristol (court held at Taunton; jurisdiction in Taunton, Re- 
hoboth, Berkley, Dighton, Seekonk, Easton and Raynham). — Justice, 
William H. Fox. Special Justices, Frederick E. Austin, William S. 
Woods. Clerk, George F. Williams, 1913. 

Second Bristol (court held at Fall River; jurisdiction in Fall River, 
Freetown, Somerset and Swansea). — Justice, John J. McDonough. 
Special Justices, Benjamin Cook, Jr., Henry F. Nickerson. Clerk, 
Augustus B. Leonard, 1914. 



286 Judiciary. 



Third Bristol (court held at New Bedford; jurisdiction in N6w 
Bedford, Fairhaven, Acushnet, Dartmouth and Westport). — Justice, 
Frank A. Milliken. Special Justices, Albert E. Clarke, Eliot D. Stet- 
son. Clerk, Frank Vera, Jr., 1912. 

(The second and third district courts of Bristol have concurrent juris- 
diction in Westport and Freetown.} 

Fourth Bristol (court held at Attleborough; jurisdiction in Attle- 
borough. North Attleborough, Mansfield and Norton). — Justice, Fred- 
erick B. Byram. Special Justices, Charles C. Hagerty, Philip E. Brady. 
Clerk, Edwin F. Thayer, 1913. 

Dukes County (court held at Oak Bluffs, Edgartown and Tisbury; 
jurisdiction in Edgartown, Oak Bluffs, Tisbury, West Tisbury, Chil- 
mark. Gay Head and Gosnold). — Justice, Edmund G. Eldridge. <Spe- 
cial Justices, Beriah T. Hillman, Everett Allen Davis. 

First Essex (court held at Salem; jurisdiction in Salem, Beverly, 
Danvers, Hamilton, Middleton, Topsfield and Wenham). — Justice, 
George B. Sears. Special Justices, Edward C. Battis, Dennis W. Quill. 
Clerk, Frank V. Wright, 1912. 

Second Essex (court held at Amesbury; jurisdiction in Amesbury 
and Merrimac). — Justice, Anthony W. Reddy. Special Justices, M. 
Perry Sargent, William Smeath. Clerk, Fred A. Brown, 1916. 

Third Essex (court held at Ipswich; jurisdiction in Ipswich). — 
Justice, Charles A. Sayward. Special Justices, George H. W. Hayes, 
Charles Augustus Norwood. 

Northern Essex (court held at Haverhill; jurisdiction in Haver- 
hill, Groveland, Georgetown and Boxford). — Justice, John J. Ryan, 
Special Justices, John J. Winn, Otis J. Carleton^ Clerk, Horace M. 
Sargent, 1916. 

Eastern Essex (court held at Gloucester; jurisdiction in Gloucester, 
Rockport and Essex). — Justice, Sumner D. York. Special Justices, 
Lincoln S. Simonds, William W. French. Clerk, Carleton H. Parsons, 
1915. 

Southern Essex (court held at Lynn; jurisdiction in Lynn, Swamp- 
scott, Saugus, Marblehead and Nahant). — Jtzsh'ce, Henry T. Lummus. 
Special Justices, James H. Sisk, Elisha M. Stevens, Edward B. O'Brien. 
Clerk, J. Joseph Doherty, 1916. 

Franklin (court held at Greenfield, Turner's Falls and Shelburne 
Falls; jurisdiction in Ashfield, Bernardston, Buckland, Charlemont, 
Colrain, Conway, Deerfield, Gill, Greenfield, Hawley, Heath, Leverett, 



Judiciary. 287 

Leyden, Monroe, Montague, Northfield, Rowe, Shelburne, Shutesbury, 
Sunderland and Whately). — Justice, Henry J. Field. Special Jus- 
tices, Samuel D. Conant, James J. Leary. Clerk, William S. Allen, 1916. 

Eastern Franklin (court held at Orange; jurisdiction in Orange, 
Erving, Warwick, Wendell and New Salem). — Justice, Elisha S. Hall. 
Special Justices, Willard Putnam, Hartley R. Walker. Clerk, Israel 
Newton, 1914. 

Eastern Hampden (court held at Palmer; jurisdiction in Palmer, 
Brimfield, Monson, Holland, Wales and Wilbraham). — Justice, Thomas 
W. Kenefick. Special Justices, David F. Dillon, . Clerk, Ar- 
thur E. Fitch, 1916. 

Western Hampden (court held at Westfield and Chester; jurisdiction 
in Westfield, Chester, Granville, Southwick, Russell, Blandford, Tol- 
land and Montgomery). — Justice, Willis S. Kellogg, Special Justices, 
Robert C. Parker. Lewis C. Parker. Clerk, George W. Searle, 1915. 

Hampshire (court held at Northampton, Amherst, Cummington, Bel- 
chertown, Huntington and Easthampton; jurisdiction in Amherst, Bel- 
chertown, Chesterfield, Cummington, Easthampton, Goshen, Granby, 
Hadley, Hatfield, Huntington, Middlefield, Northampton, Pelham, 
Plainfield, South Hadley, Southampton, Westhampton, Williamsburg 
and Worthington). — Justice, William P. Strickland. Special Justices, 
John W. Mason, Winslow H. Edwards. Clerk, John A. Crosier, 1914. 

Eastern Hampshire (court held at Ware; jurisdiction in Ware, 
Enfield, Greenwich and Prescott). — Justice, Henry C. Davis. Special 
Justices, George D. Storrs, Hubert M. Coney. Clerk, J. Gardner Lin- 
coln, 1913. 

Leominster. — Justice, Franklin Freeman. Special Justices, Ralph 
W. Robbins, John H. Coburn. Cl^k, J. Ward Healey, 1915. 

Central Middlesex (court held at Concord; jurisdiction in Acton, 
Bedford, Carlisle, Concord, Lincoln, Maynard, Stow and Lexington). — 
Justice, Prescott Keyes. Special Justices, Elihu G. Loomis, Howard A. 
Wilson. Clerk, Edward F. Loughlin, 1915. 

First Northern Middlesex (court held at Ayer; jurisdiction in 
Ayer, Groton, Pepperell, Townsend, Ashby, Shirley, Westford, Little- 
ton and Boxborough). — Justice, Warren H. Atwood. Special Justices, 
Charles F. Worcester, John M. Maloney. Clerk, George W. Sanderson, 
1914. 

First Eastern Middlesex (court held at Maiden; jurisdiction in 
Wakefield, Melrose, Maiden, Everett and Medford). — Justice, Charles 
M. Bruce. Special Justices, E. Leroy Sweetser, Thomas P. Riley. 
Clerk, Wilfred B. Tyler, 1914. 



288 Judiciary, 

Second Eastern Middlesex (court held at Waltham; jurisdic- 
tion in Watertown, Weston and Waltham). — Justice, Enos T. Luce. 
Special Justices, Samuel P. Abbott, Edward Irving Smith. Clerk, 
Dudley Roberts, 1915. 

Third Eastern Middlesex (court held at Cambridge; jurisdic- 
tion in Cambridge, Arlington and Belmont). — Justice, Charles Almy. 
Special Justices, Arthur P. Stone, Robert Walcott. Clerk, William A. 
Forbes, 1915. 

Fourth Eastern Middlesex (court held at Woburn; jurisdiction 
in Woburn, Winchester, Burlington, Wilmington, Stoneham, Reading 
and North Reading). — Justice, Edward F. Johnson. Special Justices, 
George S. Littlefield, John G. Maguu-e. Clerk, Arthur E. Gage, 1913. 

First Southern Middlesex (court held at Framingham; jurisdic- 
tion in Ashland, Framingham, HoUiston, Sherborn, Sudbury and Way- 
land). — Justice, Willis A. Kingsbury. Special Justices, Walter Adams, 
George T. Higley. Clerk, Joseph H. Ladd, 1915. 

Northern Norfolk (court held at Dedham; jurisdiction in Dedham, 
Hyde Park, Dover, Norwood, Westwood, Medfield, Needham and 
Wellesley). — Justice, Emery Grover. Special Justices, Fred J. Hutch- 
inson, Harrison A. Plympton. Clerk, Clifford B. Sanborn, 1912. 

East Norfolk (court held at Quincy; jurisdiction in Randolph, 
Braintree, Cohasset, Weymouth, Quincy, Holbrook and Milton). — 
Justice, Albert E. Avery. Special Justices, E. Granville Pratt, Louis 
A. Cook. Clerk, Lawrence W. Lyons, 1915. 

Southern Norfolk (court held at Stoughton and Canton; juris- 
diction in Stoughton, Canton, Avon and Sharon). — Justice, Oscar A. 
Harden. Special Justices, Henry F. Buswell, Gerald A. Healy. Clerk, 
Michael F. Ward, 1912. 

Western Norfolk (court held at Franklin and Walpole; jurisdic- 
tion in Bellingham, Foxborough, Franklin, Medway, Millis, Norfolk, 
Walpole, Wrentham and Plainville). — Justice, Orestes T. Doe. Special 
Justices, Henry E. Ruggles, Elbridge J. Whitaker. Clerk, Harry L. 
Howard, 1913. 

Second Plymouth (court held at Abington and Hingham; juris- 
diction in Abington, Whitman, Rockland, Hingham, Hull, Hanover, 
Scituate, Norwell and Hanson). — Justice, George W. Kelley. Special 
Justices, Charles H. Edson, Edward B. Pratt. Clerk, Herbert L. Pratt, 
1915. 



Judiciary. 289 

Third Plymouth (court held at Plymouth; Jurisdiction in Plymouth, 
Kingston, Plympton, Pembroke, Duxbury and Marshfield). — Jtistice, 
Harry B. Davis. Special Justices, Charles S. Davis, Morton Colling- 
wood. Clerk, Benjamin A. Hathaway, 1914. 

Fourth Plymouth (court held at Middleborough and Wareham; 
jurisdiction in Middleborough, Wareham, Lakeville, Marion, Mattapoi- 
sett and Rochester). — Justice, Nathan Washburn. Special Justices, 
Dennis D. Sullivan, Bert J. Allan. Clerk, Charles E. Ryder, 1912. 

Winchendon. — Justice, Frank B. Spalter. Special Justices, George 
M. Whitney, Arthur F. Evans. Clerk, Elliot S. Tucker, 1916. 

Central Worcester (court held at Worcester; jurisdiction in Worces- 
ter, Millbury, Sutton, Auburn, Leicester, Paxton, West Boy Iston, Holden, 
Shrewsbury and Rutland). — Justice, Samuel Utiey. Special Justices, 
George R. Stobbs, Winfred H. Whiting, J. Otis Sibley. Clerk, Edward 
T. Raymond, 1911. 

First Northern Worcester (court held at Athol and Gardner; 
jurisdiction in Athol, Petersham, Phillipston, Royalston, Templeton, 
Gardner, Hubbardston and Dana). — Justice, Frederick J. Dunn. 
Special Justices, Edgar V. Wilson, George R. Warfield. Clerk, Charles 
B. Boyce, 1914. 

First Eastern Worcester (court held at Westborough and Graf- 
ton; jurisdiction in Southborough, Westborough, Grafton and North- 
borough). — Justice, William E. Fowler. Special Justices, John W. 
Slattery, John B. Scott. Clerk, Willard J. Humes, 1915. 

Second Eastern Worcester (court held at Clinton; jurisdiction 
in Clinton, Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Harvard, Lancaster and Sterling). 
— Justice, Jonathan Smith. Special Justices, Charles Mayberry, Allan 
G. Buttrick. Clerk, Orra L. Stone, 1914. 

First Southern Worcester (court held at Southbridge and Web- 
ster; jurisdiction in Sturbridge, Southbridge, Charlton, Dudley, Oxford 
and Webster). — Justice, Henry J. Clark. Special Justices, Victor W. 
Lamoreux, John M. Cochran. Clerk, Frederick H. Berger, 1913. 

Second Southern Worcester (court held at Blackstone and Ux- 
bridge; jurisdiction in Blackstone, Uxbridge, Douglas and North- 
bridge). — Justice, Francis N. Thayer. Special Justices, William J. 
Taft, John F. Meaney. Clerk, Welford A. Beane, 1916. 

Third Southern Worcester (court held at Milford; jurisdiction 
in Milford, Mendon, Upton and Hopedale). — Justice, Clifford A. Cook. 
Special Justices, Chester F. Williams, John C. Lynch. Clerk, William 
G. Pond, 1915. 



290 Judiciary. 

Westekn Worcester (court held at East Brookfield; jurisdiction 
in Spencer, Brookfield, North Brookfield, West Brookfield and War- 
ren). — Justice, Henry E. Cottle. Special Justices, L. Emerson Barnes. 
Jere R. Kane. Clerk, Arthur F. Butterworth, 1912. 

Municipal Courts. 
Boston. — Chief Justice, Wilfred Bolster. Associate Justices, Frederick 
D. Ely, John H. Burke, George L. Wentworth, James P. Parmenter, 
William Sullivan, Michael J. Murray, John Duff. Special Justices, John 
A. Bennett, Michael J. Creed. Clerks, William F. Donovan, civil busi- 
ness, 1914; Oscar F. Timlin, 1st assistant; Warren C. Travis, 2d as- 
sistant; Clesson S. Curtice, 3d assistant; George B. Stebbins, 4th 
assistant; Volney D. Caldwell, 5th assistant; Pioom 314, Court House. 
Frederic C. Ingalls, criminal business, 1916; Edward J. Lord, 1st assist- 
ant; Sidney P. Brown, 2d assistant; John F. Barry, 3d assistant; Har- 
vey B. Hudson, 4th assistant; Henry R. Blackmer, 5th assistant; 
Albert R. Brown, 6th assistant; Room 111, Court House. 

Brighton District. — Justice, Charles A. Barnard. Special Jus- 
tices, Robert W. Frost, Harry C. Fabyan. Clerk, Henry P. Kennedy, 
1914. 

Charlestown District. — Justice, Henry W. Bragg. Special Jus- 
tices, William H. Preble, Charles S. Sullivan. Clerk, Mark E. Smith, 
1912. 

Dorchester District. — Justice, Joseph R. Churchill. Special Jus- 
tices, Michael H. Sullivan, William F. Merritt. Clerk, Frank J. Tuttle. 
1912. 

RoxBURT District. — Justice, A. Nathan Williams. Special Jus- 
tices, Joseph N. Palmer, Abraham K. Cohen. Clerk, Maurice J. O'Con- 
nell, 1913. 

South Boston District. — Justice, Joseph D. Fallon. Special Jus- 
tices, Josiah S. Dean, Edward L. Logan. Clerk, Adrian B. Smith, 1912. 

West Roxburt District. — Justice, John Perrins, Jr. Special Jus- 
tices, Henry Austin, J. Albert Brackett. Clerk, Edward W. Brewer, 1912. 

Brookline. — Justice, Charles F. Perkins. Special Justices, Philip 
8. Parker, Henry Ware. Clerk, Daniel A. Rollins, 1915. 



Judiciary, 291 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 

(Elected by the several Districts for the term of three years, ending 
January, 1914.) 
Northern District (Middlesex County). — John J. Higgins, Somer- 
ville. First Assistant, Charles J. Wier, Lowell. Second Assistant, Nelson 
P. Brown, Everett. 

Eastern District (Essex County). — Henry C. Attwill, Lynn. 
Assistant, John J. Burke, Gloucester. 

Southern District (Barnstable, Bristol, Dukes and Nantucket 
Counties). — Joseph T. Kenney, New Bedford. Assistant, Frank B. 
Fox, Taunton. 

Southeastern District (Norfolk and Plymouth Counties). — 
Albert F. Barker, Brockton. Assistant, Frederick G. Katzmann, Hyde 
Park. 

Middle District (Worcester County). — James A. Stiles, Gardner. 
Assistant, Edward T. Esty, Worcester. 

Western District (Hampden and Berkshire Counties). — Christo- 
pher T. Callahan, Holyoke. 

Northwestern District (Hampshire and Franklin Counties). — 
George P. O'Donnell, Northampton. 

Suffolk District. — Joseph C. Pelletier, Boston. Assistants, Thomas 
D. Lavelle, Boston; Abraham C. Webber, Boston; Daniel V. Mclsaac, 
Boston. Deputy Assistants, Henry P. Fielding, Ralph H. Hallett. 
Room 218, Court House. 



292 County Officers. 



COUNTY OFFICERS. 



County Treasurers are elected by the people of the several counties for 
terms of three years, Registers of Deeds and Sheriffs for terms of 
five years. The current term of County Treasurers expires on the 
first Wednesday of January, 1913; that of Sheriffs expires in Janu- 
ary, 1916; and that of Registers of Deeds expires in January, 1917. 

Registers of Probate and Insolvency and Clerks of Courts are elected 
for terms of five years. The current term of the former expires on 
the first Wednesday in January, 1914; that of the latter in 1917. 

County Commissioners are elected, one annually for each county, except 
Suffolk and Nantucket, severally for terms of three years; and, 
except in the counties of Suffolk and Nantucket, two Associate 
Commissioners are elected every third year, the current term of 
Associate Commissioners ending in January, 1914. 

By the provisions of section 52 of chapter 165 of the Revised Laws, the 
Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, is required 
to appoint in each county a certain number of Masters in Chan- 
cery, who shall hold office for the term of five years, unless sooner 
removed by the Governor and Council. Under the provisions of 
chapter 187, Acts of 1906, Masters in Chancery have Jurisdiction and 
the right to act in any and every county. 

By the provisions of section 6 of chapter 161 of the Revised Laws, the 
Governor, with the advice and consent of the Council, is required, 
from time to time, to designate and commission a suitable number 
of Justices of the Peace as Trial Justices in the several counties, 
By the provisions of section 7 of chapter 161 of the Revised Laws, 
each Trial Justice holds office for the term of three years from the 
time of his designation, unless, during that period, he ceases to hold 
a commission as Justice of the Peace, or unless such designation 
and commission as Trial Justice are revoked. 



County Officers. 293 



BARNSTABLE COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 
Shire Town, Barnstable. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Freeman H. Lothrop, Barnstable. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Clarendon A. Freeman, Chatham. 

Assistant Register — Mary G. Hinckley, Barnstable. 

Sheriff — Henry M. Percival, Orleans. 

Clerk of Courts — Alfred Crocker, Barnstable. 

County Treasurer — Edward L. Chase (Hyannis), Barnstable. 

Register of Deeds — John A. Holway, Sandwich. 

County Commissioners — 

Thomas H. Soule, Barnstable, . . Term expires January, 1913 
Lafayette K. Chase, Yarmouth, . . " '* " 1914 

William H. Tubman, Wellfleet, . . " " " 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Elisha H. Bearse (Harwichport), Har- 
wich, Term expires January, 1914 

Jonathan Eldridge, Chatham, . . " " " 1914 

Masters in Chancery — 

J. Arthur Baker, Bourne; . . . Term expires February, 1912 
Lewis G. Parke. West Falmouth, . " " June, 1912 

C.Sumner Morrill, Wellfleet, . . " " October, 1916 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY - Incorporated 1761. 
Shire Town, Pittsfield. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Edward T. Slocum, Pittsfield. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur M. Robinson, North Adams. 

Assistant Register — Alice M. Hoyt, Pittsfield. 

Sheriff — John Nicholson, Pittsfield. 

Clerk of Courts — Frank H. Cande, Pittsfield. 

County Treasurer — Henry A. Brewster, Pittsfield. 

Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, Arthur W. Safford, Adams. 

Middle District, Henry M. Pitt, Pittsfield. 

Southern District, Malcolm Douglas, Great Barrington. 

County Commissioners — 

Henry D, Sisson, New Marlborough, . Term expires January, 1913 
George B. Adams, Adams, . . " " " 1914 

Arthur W. Plumb, Pittsfield, . . " " " 1915 



294 



County Officers. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY — Concluded. 



Associate Commissioners — 

John H. C. Church, Great Barrington, 
Edward W. Gleason, Clarksburg, 

Master in Chancery — 

Michael Flynn, 2d, Stockbridge, 



Term expires January, 



1914 
1914 



Term expires February, 1913 



BRISTOL COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 
Shire Towns, Taunton and New Bedford. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur M. Alger, Taunton. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Richard P. Coughlin, Taunton. 
Assistant Register — Florence A. Pratt, Taunton. 
Sheriff — Edwin H. Evans, Taunton. 
Clerk of Courts — Simeon Borden, Fall River. 
Assistant Clerk — Edwin L. Barney, Jr., New Bedford. 
County Treasurer — George F. Pratt, Taunton. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, Enos D. Williams, Taunton. 

Assistant Register for Northern District, Maude E. Dupee, Taunton. 

Southern District, Albert B. Collins, New Bedford. 

Assistant Register for Southern District, Marietta Hammond, New 
Bedford. 

Fall River District, Charles E. Mills, Fall River. 

Assistant Register for Fall River District, Mary L. Rankin, Fall 
River. 
County Commissioners — 

John I. Bryant, Fairhaven, 

Frank M. Chace, Fall River, 

Richard E. Warner, Taunton, 
Associate Commissioners — 

John W. Orr, Attleborough, 

Arthur M. Reed, Westport, 
Masters in Chancery — 

David Silverstein, Fall River, 

Louis Swig, Taunton, 

Edwin F. Thayer, Attleborough 

John T. Swift, Fall River, . 



Term expires January, 1913 
1914 
1915 

Term expires January, 1914 
1914 

Term expires January, 1913 
" March, 1913 
" October, 1915 
" April, 1916 



County Officers. 295 

DUKES COUNTY — Incorporated 1695. 
Shire Town, Edgartown. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Charles G. M. Dunham, Edgartown. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Beriah T. Hillman, Edgartown. 

Sheriff — Walter H. Renear. Tisbury. 

Clerk of Courts — William C. Nevin, Edgartown. 

County Treasurer — Jonathan H. Munroe, Edgartown. 

Register of Deeds — Littleton C. Wimpenney, Edgartown. 

County Commissioners — 

William D. Harding, Oak Bluffs, . Term expires January, 1913 
Gilbert L. Smith, Tisbury, . . " " " 1914 

George L. Donaldson, West Tisbury, " " " 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Richard G. Shute, Edgartown, . . Term expires January, 1914 
Linus S. Jeffers, Gay Head, . . •< «. «• 1914 

ESSEX COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 
Shire Towns, Salem, Lawrence and Nbwburtport. 
Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 

Rollin E. Harmon, Lynn. 

Harry R. Dow, North Andover. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur Bogue, Salem. 
Assistant Register — Ezra D. Hines, Danvers. 
Second Assistant Register — Clarence W. Brown, Danvers. 
Sheriff — Samuel A. Johnson, Salem. 
Clerk of Courts — Edward B. George, Haverhill. 
First Assistant Clerk — Ezra L. Woodbury, Salem. 
Second Assistant Clerk — James P. Hale, Salem. 
County Treasurer — David I. Robinson, Gloucester. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, Moses Marshall, Lawrence. 

Assistant Register for No. District, Jennie M. Marston, Lawrence. 

Southern District, Willard J. Hale, Newburyport. 

Assistant Register for Southern District, Robert W. Osgood, Salem. 
County Commissioners — 

James C. Poor, North Andover, . Term expires January, 1913 

John M. Grosvenor, Jr., Swampscott, " " " 1914 

Moody Kimball, Newburyport, . " " " 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Clarence E. Kimbal), Wenham, . Term expires January, 1914 

John W. Lovett, Beverly, ..." .... 1914 



296 



County Officers, 



ESSEX COUNTY — Concluded. 

Masters in Chancery — 

E. Howard Perley, Salem, . . Term expires 

Carleton H. Parsons, Gloucester, . " 
John T. Long, Lynn, . , . . " 
HoUis L. Cameron, Beverly, . . " 
John H. Sheedy, Salem, ..." 
Frederick W. Ryan, Lynn, . . " 

Arthur G. Wadleigh, Lynn, . . '* 
John H. Donovan, Peabody, . . " 

Trial Justices — William M. Rogers, Methuen; 



July, 1912 

December, 1912 

" September, 1913 

" February, 1915 

June, 1915 

June, 1915 

" July, 1916 

September, 1916 

Colver J. Stone, An- 



dover; Joseph T. Wilson, Nahant; 
Newton P. Frye, North Andover; 
Benjamin G. Hall, Peabody. 



William E. Ludden, Saugus; 
Moses S. Case, Marblehead; 



FRANKLIN COUNTY — Incorporated 1811. 
Shire Town, Greenfield. 

Judge of Probate and Insokencp — Francis M. Thompson, Greenfield. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Francis N. Thompson, Greenfield. 

Assistant Register — Ellen K. O'Keefe, Greenfield. 

Sheriff — Edson J. Pratt, Erving. 

Clerk of Courts — Clifton L. Field, Greenfield. 

County Treasurer — Eugene A. Newcomb, Greenfield. 

Register of Deeds — John D. Bouker, Greenfield. 

County Commissioners — 

Osgood L. Leach. Northfield, . . Term expires January, 1913 
Eugene B. Blake, Greenfield, . . " '* " 1914 

Allen C. Burnham, Montague, . . " " " 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Harry W. Fay, New Salem, , . Term expires January, 1914 
Frederick H. Smith, Ashfield, . . " " " 1914 



HAMPDEN COUNTY — Incorporated 1812. 
Shire Town, Springfield. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Charles L. Long, Springfield. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Frank G. Hodskins, Longmeadow. 
Assistant Register — Estella M. Lapham, Springfield. 
Sheriff — Embury P. Clark, Springfield. 
Clerk of Courts — Robert O. Morris, Springfield. 
Assistant ^Clerk — Charles M. Calhoun, Springfield. 



County Officers. 297 



HAMPDEN COV^TY — Concluded. 

County Treasurer — Fred A. Bearse, Springfield. 

Register of Deeds — James R. Wells, Springfield. 

Assistant Register — Lydia M. Tanner, Springfield. 

County Commissioners — 

Charles C. Spellman, Springfield, . Term expires January, 1913 
George W. Bray, Chicopee, . . " " " 1914 

William H. Ensign, Westfield, . . " " " 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Harrison Loomis, West Springfield, . Term expires January, 1914 
John H. Sickman, Holyoke, . . " " " 1914 

Master in Chancery — 

Henry Lasker, Springfield, . . Term expires July, 1915 

Trial Justice — George A. Birnie, Ludlow. 

HAMPSHIRE COUNTY — Incorporated 1662. 
Shire Town, Northampton. 

Judge of Probate and Insolvency — William G. Bassett, Northampton. 

Special Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Henry P. Field, Northampton. 

Register of Probate and Insolvency — Hubbard M. Abbott, Northampton. 

Assistant Register — Alice C. Rice, Northampton. 

Sheriff — Maurice Fitzgerald, Northampton. 

Clerk of Courts — Haynes H. Chilson, Northampton. 

County Treasurer — Edwin H. Banister, Northanipton. 

Register of Deeds — Charles S. Chase, Northampton. 

County Commissioners — 

Frank A. Brooks, Williamsburg, . Term expires January, 1913 
Eugene E. Davis, Northampton, . " '* ** 1914 

Frank M. Sibley, Ware. . . . " " *' 1915 

Associate Commissioners — 

Homer O. Strong, Southampton, . Term expires January, 1914 
Eugene H. Lyman, South Hadley, . " " " 1914 

Masters in Chancery — 

Walter L. Stevens, Northampton, . Term expires April, 1912 
N. Seelye Hitchcock, Easthampton, " *' January, 1915 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 
Shire Towns, Cambridge (East) and Lowell. 
Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 
Charles J. Mclntire, Cambridge. 
George F. Lawton, Cambridge. 



298 



County Officers. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY — Concluded. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — William E. Rogers, Wakefield. 
Assistant Register — Frederick M. Esty, Framingham. 
Second Assistant Register — Charles N. Harris, Winchester. 
Third Assistant Register — Nellie H. Philbrick, Cambridge. 
Sheriff — John R. Falrbairn, Cambridge. 
Clerk of Courts — William C. Dillingham, Maiden. 
First Assistant Clerk — Ralph N. Smith, Arlington. 
Second Assistant Clerk — Roger H. Hurd, Winchester. 
Third Assistant Clerk — Frederick L. Putnam, Melrose. 
County Treasurer — Joseph O. Hayden, Somerville. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Northern District, William C. Purcell, Lowell. 

Southern District, Edwin O. Childs, Newton. 

Assistant Register for Southern District, Thomas Leighton, Cam- 
bridge. 
County Commissioners • — 

Chester B. Williams, Wayland, . 

Charles H. Richardson, Lowell, 

Levi S. Gould, Melrose, 
Associate Commissioners — 

Edward E. Thompson, Woburn, 

Francis A. Patch, Littleton, 
Masters in Chancery — 

Gilbert A. A. Pevey, Cambridge, 

William V. Thompson, Cambridge, 

Stanley A. Dearborn, Wakefield, 

James Stuart Murphy, Lowell, . 

Lloyd Makepeace, Maiden, 

Samuel W. Forrest, Melrose, 

Elias B. Bishop, Newton, . 

George S. Harvey, Maiden, 

George M. Weed, Newton, . 

Edwin P. Fitzgerald, Somerville, 

Haven G. Hill, Lowell, 
Trial Justices — George L. Hemenway 



Term expires January, 



Term expires January, 



1913 
1914 
1915 

1914 
1914 



1912 
1912 
1912 
1913 
1913 



Term expires April, 
" " August, 

" •* August, 

" " February, 

" '* June, 

September, 1913 
" " September, 1914 

" " January, 1915 

June, 1915 

" " December, 1915 

" " January, 1916 

Hopkinton; James T. Joslin, 



Hudson; Henry C. Mulligan, Natick; John J. Hartnett, Hudson 



• The jurisdiction of the County Commissioners of Middlesex extends 
over Revere and Winthrop, in the county of Sufifolk. 



County Officers. 299 

NANTUCKET COUNTY — Incorporated 1695. 
Shire Town, Nantucket. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Henry Riddell. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Robert Mack. 
Sheriff — Josiah F. Barrett. 
Clerk of Courts — Josiah F. Murphey. 
County Treasurer — G. Howard Winslow. 
Register of Deeds — Lauriston Bunker. 
Trial Jwtice — Reginald T. FitzRandolph. 

Note. — The Selectmen of the town of Nantucket have the powers 
and perform the duties of County Commissioners. The Treasurer of the 
town is also County Treasurer. 

NORFOLK COUNTY - Incorporated 1793. 
Shire Town, Dedham. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — James H. Flint, Weymouth. 
Reqister of Probate and Insolvency — John D. Cobb, Dedham. 
Assistant Register — Jossph R. McCoole, Dedham. 
Sheriff— Samuel H. Capen, Dedham. 
Clerk of Courts — Louis A. Cook, Weymouth. 
Assistant Clerk — Robert B. Worthington, Dedham. 
County Treasurer — Henry D. Humphrey, Dedham. 
Register of Deeds — John H. Burdakin, Dedham. 
Assistant Register — Edward L. Burdakin, Dedham. 
County Commissioners — 

Evan F. Richardson, Millis, 

Silas A. Stone, Sharon, 

John F. Merrill, Quincy, 
Associate Commissioners — 

Fred L. Fisher, Norwood, . 

Henry A. Whitney, Belhngham, 
Masters in Chancery — 

Henry B. Terry, Hyde Park, . 

Henry Hyde Smith, Hyde Park, 

Edward W. Baker, Brookline, . 

George G. Darling, Dedham, . 

Frank A. Tirrell, Quincy, . 



. Term 


expires January, 


1913 
1914 
1915 


. Term 


expires January, 


1914 
1914 


. Term 


expires July, 


1912 


" 


" November 


,1913 


. 


*' April, 


1915 


" 


" September, 1915 


, 


February, 


1917 



300 County Officers. 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY — Incorporated 1685. 
iS^iVe Town, Plymouth. 
Judge of Probate and Insolvency — Loyed E. Chamberlain, Brockton. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Sumner A. Chapman, Hanson. 
Sheriff — Henry S. Porter, Plymouth. 
Cl&rk of Courts — Edward E. Hobart, Plymouth. 
Assistant CZerA; — Edgar W. Swift, Plymouth. 
County Treasurer — Horace T. Fogg. Norwell. 
Register of Deeds — John B. Washburn, Plymouth. 
County Commissioners — 

Lyman P. Thomas, Middleborough, . Term expires January, 1913 

Walter H. Faunce, Kingston, 

Jere B. Howard, Brockton, 
Associate Commissioners — 

Ezekiel R. Studley, Rockland, 

Albert T. Sprague, Marshfield, 
Masters in Chancery — 

Frank M. Reynolds, Hull, 

William T. Way, Plympton, 



1914 
1915 

Term expires January, 1914 
1914 

Term expires November, 1914 
" April, 1916 



SUFFOLK COUNTY — Incorporated 1643. 

Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 

Robert Grant, Boston. 

Elijah George, Boston. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — Arthur W. Dolan, Boston. 
First Assistant Register — John R. Nichols, Boston. 
Second Assistant Register — Clara L. Power, Boston. 
Sheriff — John Quinn, Jr., Boston. 

Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court — John F. Cronin, Boston. 
Assistant Clerk of Supreme Judicial Court — John H. Flynn, Boston. 
Clerk of Superior Court {Civil Session) — Francis A. Campbell, Boston. 
Clerk of Superior Court (Criminal Session) — John P. Manning, Boston. 
County Treasurer — Charles H. Slattery, Boston.* 
County Auditor — J. Alfred Mitchell, Boston. t 
Register of Deeds — William T. A. Fitzgerald, Boston. 
Assistant Register — Stephen A. Jennings, Boston. 

• Treasurer of the city of Boston. t Auditor of the city of Boston. 



County Officers. 



301 



SUFFOLK COUNTY — Concluded. 
Masters in Chancery — 

Henry S. Dewey, Boston, . 
James F. Farley, Boston, . 
Charles E. Grinnell, Boston, 
David A. Lourie, Chelsea. . 
Thomas D. Lavelle, Boston, 
Butler R. Wilson, Boston. . 
John H. Sherburne, Jr., Boston 
Ernest W. Woodside, Boston, 
James Ballantyne, Boston, 
Joseph Michelman, Boston, 
Albert R. MacKusick, Boston, 

Note, — In the city of Boston the City Council has most of the 
powers and duties usually exercised by County Commissioners. 



. 


Term expires January, 1913 






January, 1913 






" July, 1913 






" October, 1913 






' " January, 1914 






" April. 1914 


1 




" December. 1914 






January, 1915 






December, 1915 






" April, 1916 






September, 1916 



WORCESTER COUNTY — Incorporated 1731. 
Shire Towns, Worcester and Fitchburg. 
Judges of Probate and Insolvency — 

William T. Forbes, Worcester. 

Frederick H. Chamberlain, Worcester. 
Register of Probate and Insolvency — John W. Mawbey, Worcester. 
Assistant Register — Henry H. Atwood, Fitchburg. 
Sheriff — Benjamin D. Dwinnell, Fitchburg. 
Clerk of Courts — Theodore S. Johnson, Worcester. 
Assistant Clerk — Henry W. Aiken, Millbury. 
County Treasurer — Edward A. Brown, Worcester. 
Registers of Deeds — 

Worcester District, Daniel Kent, Worcester. 

Assistant Register for Worcester District, Lottie E. Hubbard, Worces- 
ter. 

Northern District, David H. Merriam, Fitchburg. 
County Commissicners — 

Arthur C. Moore, Southbridge, . 

George W. Cook, Barre, 

Warren Goodale, Fitchburg, 
Associate Commissioners — 

George F. Morse, Leominster, . 

Thomas C. Sheldon, Fitchburg, 



Term expires January, 1913 
1914 
1915 

Term expires January, 1914 
1914 



302 



County Officers, 



WORCESTER COUNTY 

Masters in Chancery — 

Charles T. Tatman, Worcester, . 
Edward D. R. Morrell, Worcester, 
Charles R. Johnson, Worcester, . 
Louis O. Rieutord, Southbridge, 
Aubrey Z. Goodfellow, Fitchburg, 
Fred W. Cronin, Worcester, 
Charles S. Webster, Worcester, . 

Trial Justices — Matthew Walker, Barre 
Harry C. Bascom, Leominster, 



Concluded. 



Term expires April, 
June 



1913 
" '* June, 1913 

" September. 1913 
" " November, 1913 

" " January, 1915 

'* *' December, 1915 

" May, 1916 

Dennis Healy, Hardwick; 



Board oj Agriculture. 



303 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



Members ex Officio. 
Hi3 Excellency Eugene N. Foss, Governor. 
His Honor Robert Luce, Lieutenant-Governor. 
Hon. Albert P. Langtry, Secretary of the Commonwealth. 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, LL.D., President Massachusetts Agricultural 

College. 
J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary of the Board. 
Frederick F. Walker, Chief of the Cattle Bureau. 
F. William Rane, B.Agr., M.S., State Forester. 

Members appointed by the Governor and Council. 
Charles M. Gardner of Westfield, .... Term expires 1913 
Frank P. Newkirk of Easthampton, . ..." " 1914 

HeMy M. Howard of West Newton, . . . . " " 1915 



Members chosen by the Incorporated Societies. 
Ameabury and Salisbury, A. Willis Bartlett of Salis- 
bury, Term expires 1915 

Barnstable County, John Bursley of West Barnstable, ** " 1913 
Blackstone Valley, Jacob A. Williams of North- 
bridge " " 1915 

Deerfield Valley, Ernest W. Payne of Heath, . . " " 1914 

Eastern Hampden, O. E. Bradway of Monson, . " " 1915 

Essex, Frederick A. Russell of Methuen, . . . ** " 1914 

Franklin County, C. P. Aldrich of Greenfield, . " *' 1913 

Hampshire, Howard A. Parsons of Amherst, . . " " 1913 
Hampshire, Franklin and Hampden, Rufus M. 

Smith of Hadley, " " 1915 

Highland, John T. Bryan of Middlefield (P. O. 

Chester, R. F. D.), " " 1914 

Hillside, Harry A. Ford of Windsor, ..." " 1914 

Hingham, Urban S. Bates of Hinsham, ..." " 1915 

Hoosac Valley, Abner Towne of Williamstown, . " " 191i^ 

Housatonic, R. Henry Race of North Egremont, . " " 1915 

Marshfield, Walter H. Faunce of Kingston, . . " " 1915 



304 



Board of Agriculture. 



Martha's Vineyard, J. F. Adams of West Tisbury, . Term expires 1913 
Massachusetts Horticultural, Wilfrid Wheeler of Con- 
cord, " " 1915 

Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture, 

N. I. Bowditch of Framingham, ..." " 1915 

Middlesex North, Geo. W. Trull of Tewksbury, . " " 1914 

Middlesex South, John J. Erwin of Wayland, . . " '* 1914 

Nantucket, Herbert G. Worth of Nantucket, . " " 1915 

Oxford, W. A. Lovett of Oxford " " 1913 

Plymouth County, Augustus Pratt of North Middle- 

• borough " " 1914 

Spencer, Walter C. Bemis of Spencer, ..." " 1913 

Union, Sylvester H. Peebles of Blandford, . . " " 1913 

Weymouth, Theron L. Tirrell of South Weymouth, " " 1915 

Worcester, B. W. Potter of Worcester, ..." " 1914 

Worcester East, George F. Morse of Lancaster, . " " 1915 

Worcester North-west, Albert Ellsworth of Athol, . " " 1913 

Worcester South, Wm. E. Patrick of Warren, . . " " 1913 

Worcester County West, John L. Smith of Barre, . " " 1914 

Presidetit, His Excellency Eugene N. Foss, Ex Officio. 

First Vice-President, John Bursley, West Barnstable. 

Second Vice-President, Wilfrid Wheeler, Concord. 

Secretary, J. Lewis Ellsworth, Worcester. Room 136, State House. 



Specialists, 
Chemist, Dr. J. B. Lindsey, Amherst. 
Entomologist, Prof. C. H. Fernald, Amherst. 
Botanist, Dr. George E. Stone, Amherst. 
Pomologist, Prof. F. C. Sears, Amherst. 
Veterinarian, Prof. James B. Paige, Amherst. 
Engineer, William Wheeler, Concord. 
State Ornithologist, E. H. Forbush, Westborough. 
State Nursery Inspector, Dr. H. T. Fernald, Amherst. 
State Inspector of Apiaries, Burton N. Gates, Ph.D., Amherst. 

First Clerk. 
Howard N. Legate, Boston. Room 136, State House. 



Dairt Bureau. 

Howard A. Parsons, Amherst, 1912; George W. Trull, Tewksbury, 1913; 
Charles M. Gardner, Westfield, 1914. 

Executive Officer, J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary, State Board of Agri- 
culture. General Agent, P. M. Harwood, Barre. Room 136, State House. 



Boards and Commissions. 305 



OTHER BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS. 

[Corrected to Jan. 31, 1912.] 



Armory Commissioners. 
Adjutant General Gardner W. Pearson (Chairman), Lowell; Quarter- 
master General William B. Emery, Newton; E. Leroy Sweetser, Everett. 

Art Commission. 

Waldo Lincoln {Chairman), Worcester, 1915; Henry S. Hunnewell, 

Wellesley, 1915; William A. Burnham, Boston, 1915; Charles D. Magin- 

nis, Boston, 1915; Walter Oilman Page (Secretary), Boston (310 Fenway 

Studios, Back Bay), 1915. 

Ballot Law Commission. 
Francis W. Estey (Secretary), Boston, 1912; Henry V. Cunningham 
(Chairman), Boston (635 Tremont Building), 1913; Malachi L. Jennings, 
Boston, 1914. 

Bank Commissioner. 
Augustus L. Thorndike, Brewster, 1915. Deputy, James O. Otis, 
Maiden. Chief of Trust Company Division, Charles W. Levi. Exam- 
iners, HenryW. Langley, William O. Lovell, Charles C. Handy, Oreb 
M. Tucker, Chester C. Freeman. Room 124, State House. 

Bar Examiners, Board of. 
Hollis R. Bailey (Chairman), Cambridge; Frederick L. Greene (Sec- 
retary), Greenfield; George S. Taft, Uxbridge; Henry W. Bragg, Boston; 
L. Elmer Wood, Fall River. 

Blind, Massachusetts Commission for the. 
James P. Munroe (Chairman), Lexington, 1912; Edward E. Allen, 
South Boston, 1913; Annette P. Rogers, Boston, 1914; Lucinda W. 
Prince, West Newton, 1915; Walter Bradlee Snow (Secretary), Water- 
town, 1916. Central Office, 15 Ashburton Place, Room 308. General 
Superintendent, Lucy Wright. 



306 Boards and Commissions. 



Boston, Finance Commission for the City op. 
Francis N. Balch, Boston, 1912; Charles P. Curtis, Boston, 1913; John 
A. Sullivan (Chairman), Boston, 1914; Geoffrey B. Lehy, Boston, 1915; 
John F. Moors, Boston, 1916. Secretary, John C. L. Dowling. Room 
413, Trenaont Building. 

Boston, Licensing Board for the City op. 
Ezra H. Baker {Chairman), Boston, 1912; Samuel H. Hudson, Boston, 
1914; Fred A. Emery, Boston, 1916. (Secreiary, Louis Epple, Boston. 29 
Pemberton Square. 

Boston, Commissioners of Pilots for the Port op, 
John C. Ross (C^nm?? an), Plymouth, 1913. Frank L. Oakes, Newton, 
1914. Secretary, Edmund S. Manson. Room 716, Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Boston, Police Commissioner for the City of. 
Stephen O'Meara, Boston, 1916. Secretary, Leo A. Rogers, Boston. 
29 Pemberton Square. 

Boston, Directors of the Port of. 
Francis T. Bowles, Boston, 1912; Joseph A. Conry, Boston, 1913; Hugh 
Bancroft (C/iam«an), Boston, 1914; George E. Smith (of the Board of 
Harbor and Land Commissioners) , Swampscott. On the Part of the City 
of Boston, Williain F. Fitzgerald, 1914. 

Boston Transit Commission. 
George G. Crocker (Chairman), Boston, 1914; Horace G. Allen, Boston, 
1914. On the Part of the City of Boston. — George F. Swain, Josiah 
Quincy, James B. Noyes, 1914. Secretary, B. Leighton Beal. 15 Beacon 
Street, eighth floor. 

Cattle Bureau. 
Chief, Fred Freeland Walker, Burlington, 1912. Agents, William T. 
White, Newtonville; Harrie W. Peirce, Medford. Room 138, State 
House. 

Charity, State Board of. 
Abraham C. Ratshesky, Boston, 1912; Thomas Downey, Boston, 1912; 
Leontine Lincoln {Chairman), Fall River, 1913; Charles H. Adams, Mel- 
rose, 1913; Ada Eliot Sheffield, Cambridge, 1914; Frances G. Curtis, 



Boards and Commissions. 307 

Boston, 1915; David F. Tilley, Boston, 1915; Charles R. Johnson, 
Worcester, 1916; Jeffrey R. Brackett, Boston, 1916. Secretary, Robert 
W. Kelso, Room 37, State House. 

Superintendent of State Adult Poor, Joshua F. Lewis, M.D., Room 
30, State House. 

Superintendent of State Minor Wards, James E. Fee, Room 43, State 
House. 

Civil Service Commission. 

Elmer L. Curtiss, Hingham, 1912; Frank Foxcroft, Cambridge, 1913; 
Thomas F. Boyle {Chairmnn), Boston, 1914. Chief Examiner, Henry 
Sherwin. Secretary, Warren P. Dudley, Room 151, State House. Reg- 
istrar of Labor, John C. Gilbert, Room 16, State House. 

Conciliation and Arbitration, State Board of. 
Willard Howland (Chairman), Chelsea, 1912; Richard P. Barry, Lynn, 
1913; Charles G. Wood, New Bedford, 1914. Secretary, Bernard F. Sup- 
ple, Boston. Room 12S, State House. 

Corporations, Commissioneb op. 
William D. T. Trefry, Marblehead, 1914. Room 235, State House. 

County Accounts, Controller op. 
Frank L. Dean, Worcester, 1913. Deputy Controllers, William H. 
Wing, Maiden; Lrving Taylor, Somervillo; James C. Emerson, Somer- 
ville. 8 Beacon Street, Room 23. 

Dentistry, Board of Registration in. 
John F. Dowsley (ChairmMn), Boston (175 Tremont Street), 1912; 
George E. Mitchell (Secretary), Haverhill, 1912; William W. Marvel, 
Fall River, 1913; George A. Maxfield, Holyoke, 1913; Thomas J. Barrett, 
Worcester, 1914. 

Education, Board of. 
Clinton Q. Richmond, North Adams, 1912; Sarah L. Arnold, Newton, 
1912; Simeon B. Chase, Fall River, 1912; Frederick P. Fish (Chairman), 
Brookline, 1913; Frederick W. Hamilton, Somerville, 1913; Ella Lyman 
Cabot, Boston, 1913; Thomas B. Fitzpatrick, Brookline, 1914; Paul H. 
Hanus, Cambridge. 1914; Levi L. Conant, Worcester, 1914. Commis- 
sioner of Education, David Snedden. Deputy Commissioners, Charles 
A. Prosser, William Orr. Agents, James W. MacDonald, Julius E. War- 
ren, Charles R. Allen, Rufus W. Stimson, Michael W. Murray (Special), 
Edward C. Baldwin. 15 Ashburton Place, Room 500. 



308 Boards and Commissions. 



Embalming, Board of Registration in. 
John A. Weinbeck, Lowell, 1912; Frederick L. Briggs (Secretary), Bos- 
ton (20 Howard Street), 1913; Thomas H. Reilly (Chairman), Westbor- 
ough, 1914. 

Fall River, Board of Police for the City of. 
James M. Morton, Jr. (Chairjnan) , Fall River, 1912; Frederick W. 
Lawson, Fall River, 1913; Timothy F. Lawlor, 1914. Clerk, John R. 
Rostron, 37 Granite Street, Fall River. 

Fall River, The Bradford Durfeb Textile School of. 
James E. Cunneen, Fall River, 1912; George E. Prest, Fall River, 
1914. 

Fire Insurance Rates, Board of Appeal for. 
Frank H. Hardison (Insurance Commissioner) (Chairman); Alfred E. 
Green, Duxbury, 1915; Roger Sherman Hoar, Concord, 1915. 

Firemen's Relief Fund, Commissioners of the. 
George F. Harwood (Chairman), Lynn, 1912; Fred W. Jenness, Lowell, 

1913; , 1914. Appointed by the State Firemen's Association, 

— Walter B. Randlett, Newton, 1912; Edward S. Hosmer, Lowell, 
1913. Secretary, D. Arthur Burt, 294 Washington Street, Room 650. 

Fisheries and Game, Commissioners on. 
George H. Garfield, Brockton, 1913; George W. Field (Chairman), 
Sharon, 1914; George H. Graham, Springfield, 1916. Chrk, W. Raymond 
Collins, Boston. Room 158, State House. 

Free Public Library Commissioners. 
Elizabeth P. Sohier, Beverly, 1912; Frank H. Howes, Newton, 1913; 
Anna M. Bancroft, Hopedale, 1914; Hiller C. Wellman, Springfield, 
1914; Charles F. D. Belden (Chairman), State Library, Boston, 1915. 

Gas and Electric Light Commissioners. 

Alonzo R. Weed, Newton, 1912; Forrest E. Barker (Chairman), Worces- 
ter, 1913; Morris Schaff, Cambridge, 1914. Clerk, Robert G. Tobey, 
Boston. 15 Ashburton Place, Room 603. 

Gas Inspectors, Charles D. Jenkins, Cambridge, 1914; Lawrence S. 
James, Boston, 191*; Leslie R. Moore, Newton, 1914. 32 Hawley Street. 

Smoke Inspector, William H. Gerrish, Maiden. Deputy, Warren A. 
Edson, Boston. 15 Ashburton Place, Room 603. 



Boards and Commissions. 309 



General Insurance Guaranty Fund, Tru8tee8 op the. 

Preston Pond, Winchester, 1912; Charles W. Hubbard, Weston, 1913; 
Warren A. Reed {President), Brockton, 1914; Hamilton Mayo, Leomin- 
ster, 1915; Charles C. Hitchcock, Ware, 1916; Charles K. Fox, Haverhill, 
1917; George Wigglesworth, Milton, 1918. 

Clerk, Harry W. Kimball. State Actuary, William J. Montgomery, 
161 Devonshire Street, Room 1011. 

Greylock Reservation Commission. 

William H. Sperry {Clerk), North Adams, 1912; Francis W. Rockwell 

{Chairman), Pittsfield, 1914; Arthur B. Daniels {Secretary) , Ada.Tas, 1915. 

Harbor and Land Commissioners, Board of. 
Samuel M. Mansfield, Boston, 1912; George E. Smith {Chairman), 
Swampscott, 1913; Charles C. Paine, Barnstable, 1914. Clerk, Frederick 
N. Wales, Newtonville. Room 131, State House. 

Health, State Board of. 

Clement F. Coogan, Pittsfield, 1912; Joseph A. Plouff, Ware, 1913; 
Henry P. Walcott {Chairman), Cambridge, 1914; Julian A. Mead, Water- 
town, 1915; Hiram F. Mills, Lowell, 1916; Robert W. Lovett, Boston, 
1917; C. Eugene McGillicuddy, Worcester, 1918. Secretary, Mark W. 
Richardson, Boston, Room 145, State House. Assistant to the Secretary, 
William C. Hanson. Engineer, X. Henry Goodnough, Room 141, State 
House. 

State Inspectors of Health. — District No. 1, Adam S. MacKnight, Fall 
River, 1912. No. 2, Elliott Washburn, Taunton, 1912. No. 3, Wallace 
C. Keith, Brockton, 1912. No. 4, Harry Linenthal, Boston, 1912. No. 
5, Frank L. Morse, Somerville, 1914. No. 6, William W. Walcott, Natick, 
1912. No. 7, J. William Voss, Beverly, 1912. No. 8, William Hall Coon, 
Haverhill, 1912. No. 9, Charles E. Simpson, Lowell, 1912. No. 10, Lewis 
Fish, Fitchburg, 1912. No. 11, Melvin G. Overlock, Worcester, 1912. 
No. 12, James V. W. Boyd, Springfield, 1914. No. 13, John S. Hitch- 
cock, Northampton, 1915. No. 14, Lyman A. Jones, North Adams, 1912. 

Highway Commission. 

, 1912; William D. Sohier, Beverly, 1913; Frank D. Kemp, 

Springfield, 1914. Chief Engineer, Arthur W. Dean, Winchester. Secre- 
tary, Frank I. Bieler, Boston. 15 Ashburton Place, Room 400. 



310 Boards and Commissions. 



Homestead Commission. 
Charles F. Gettemy (Director of the Bureau of Statistics) {Chairman) ; 
Augustus L. Thorndike (Bank Commissioner); Kenyon L. Butterfield 
(President of the Massachusetts Agricultural College) ; Clement F.Coogan 
(of the State Board of Health); Warren Dunham Foster, Boston, 1912; 
Eva W. White, Boston, 1913; Henry Sterling {Secretary), Boston, 1914. 

Insanity, State Board of. 

Henry P. Field, Northampton, 1911; Herbert B, Howard {Chairman) , 

Boston, 1912; Edward W. Taylor, Boston. 1913; William F. Whitte- 

more, Boston, 1914; Michael J. O'Meara, Worcester, 1915. Secretary and 

Executive Oficer, Charles E. Thompson, M.D. Room 36, State House. 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Frank H. Hardison, Wellesley Hills, 1913. Deputy, Lemuel G. 
Hodgkins. Actuary, Emma W. Cushman. Examiner, Harry L. Pea- 
body. Chief Clerk, Arthur E. Linnell. Room 246, State House. 

Loan Agencies, Supervisor of. 
E. Gerry Brown, Brockton, 1914. 

Lowell Textile School. 
Frederick A. Flathers, Lowell, 1912; Franklin W. Hobbs, Brookline, 
1914. 

Lumber, Surveyor-General of. 
Charles H. Crane, Revere, 1913. 88 Broad Street, Room 514. 

Lynn Harbor, Commission for Investigation of. 
William E. Dorman {Chairman), Lynn; Thomas W. Gardner, Lynn; 
Lewis H. Bartlett {Secretary), Lynn. 

Massachusetts Employees Insurance Association, Board op 
Directors of the. 

Patrick F. Sullivan, Lowell; Walter C. Fish, Lynn; James W. Spence, 
Rockland; Henry Howard, Brookline; Frederick C. McDuffie, Law- 
rence; George W. Wheelv.Tight, Boston; William B. Plunkett, Adams; 
Fred H. Daniels, Worcester; George F. Willett, Norwood; Edgar J. 
Rich, Winchester; William O. Day, Springfield; James S. Murphy, 
Brookline; Walter H. Langshaw, New Bedford; Charles S. Dennison, 
Boston; Louis K. Liggett, Boston, 



Boards and Commissions. 311 



Medicine, Board op Registration in. 
Walter P. Bowers, Clinton, 1912; Samuel H. Calderwood (Chairman), 
Boston, 1913; Augustus L. Chase, Randolph, 1914; Edwin B. Harvey (Sec- 
retanj), Westborough, 1915; Charles H. Cook, Natick, 1916; Matthew 
T. Mayes. Springfield, 1917; Nathaniel R. Perkins, Boston, 1918, Room 
159, State House. 

Metropolitan Park Commission. 
Ellerton P. Whitney, Milton, 1911; William B. de la.s Casas {Chair- 
man), Maiden, 1912; Edwin U. Curtis, Boston, 1913; David N. Skillings, 
Winchester, 1914; Everett C. Benton, Belmont, 1915. Secretary, George 
Lyman Rogers, Boston. 14 Beacon Street, Room 507. 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 
Henry H. Sprague (Chairman), Boston, 1912; James A. Bailey, Jr.» 
Arlington, 1913; Henry P. Walcott, Cambridge, 1914. Secretary, William 
N. Davenport, Marlborough. 1 Ashburton Place. 

Mount Everett Reservation Commission. 
A. Chalkley Collins, Great Barrington, 1912; Herbert C. Joyner 
Chairman), Great Barrington, 1914; Henry M. White (Secretary), Lee, 
1916. 

Nautical Training School, Commissioners of the. 
John F. Merry (Chair yuan), Someivillo, 1912; John Read, Cambridge, 
1913; William E. McKay, Milton, 1914. Secretary. William H. Dimick', 
Boston. Room 110, State House. 

New Bedford Textile School. 
William E. Hatch, New Bedford, 1912; Abbott P. Smith, New Bed- 
ford, 1914. 

NtJRSES, Board of Registration of. 
Charles A. Drew, Worcester, 1911; Mary E. Shields, Boston, 1912; 
Lucia L. Jaquith, Worcester, 1913; Mary M. Riddle (Chairman), New- 
ton, 1914; Edwin B. Harvey (of the Board of Registration in Medicine) 
(Secretary), Westborough. Room 159, State House. 

Pharmacy, Board of Registration in. 

Irving P. Gammon, Boston, 1912; Peter J. McCormick (Secretary), 

Cambridge, 1913; William S. Flint (President), Worcester, 1914; Albert 

J. Brunelle, Fall River, 1915; Charles F. Ripley, Taunton, 1916. Room 

22, State House. 



312 Boards and Commissions, 



Plumbers, State Examiners op. 
Edward C. Kelly (Clerk), Boston (195 Centre Street, Roxbury), 1912; 
Charles R. Felton, Brockton, 1913; James C. Coffey (Chairman), Worces- 
ter, 1914. 

Prison Commissioners, Board op. 
Frederick G. Pettigrove (Chairman), Boston, 1911; Arthur H. Well- 
man, Maiden, 1912; Mary Boyle O'Reilly, Boston, 1913; Henry Park- 
man, Boston, 1914; Margaret P. Russell, Boston, 1915. Secretary, 
J. Warren Bailey, Somerville. Room 24, State House. 

Probation, Commission on. 
Robert O. Harris (Chairman), William Sullivan, John D. McLaughlin, 
Warren A. Reed, Joseph Lee. Secretary and Deputy Commissioner, 
Edwin Mulready. Room 174, Court House, Boston. 

Province Laws. 
Melville M. Bigelow, Cambridge. Room 115, State House. 

Publication, State Board op. 
Edward S. Sears (Secretary), Winthrop, 1912; James W. Kimball 
(Chairman), Swampscott, 1913; Charles F. Gettemy, Boston, 1914. 

Public Records, Commissioner of. 
■ Henry E. Woods, Boston, 1913. Clerk, Edward S. Sears, Winthrop. 
Room 104, State House. 

Railroad Commissioners, Board op. 

Clinton White, Melrose, 1911; Frederick J. Macleod (Chairman), Cam- 
bridge, 1912. George W. Bishop, Newtonville, 1913. Clerk, Charles E. 
Mann, Maiden. Consulting Engineer, George F. Swain, Boston. Assist- 
ant Clerk, Allan Brooks, Harvard. 20 Beacon Street, second floor. 

Inspectors. — Daniel M. Wheeler, Springfield, 1912; Lewellyn H. Mc- 
Lain, Melrose, 1912; Winfield L. Larry, Boston, 1913; John Q. Henni- 
gan. East Milton, 1913; Henry W. Seward, Brockton, 1913; John H. 
Parant, Worcester, 1914; John W. Ogden, Maiden, 1914. 

State Aid and Pensions, Commissioner op. 
Francis A. Bicknell, North Weymouth, 1913. Deputy, Richard R. 
Flynn, Somerville, 1913. Room 123, State House. 



Boards and Commissions. 313 



State Forester. 
F. William Rane, Newton (Waban). Assistants, Harold O. Cook, 
Leon H. Worthley, Russell S. Langdell, Maxwell C. Hutchins, Harry 
F. Gould, F. F. Moon, Charles O. Bailey. 6 Beacon Street, Room 1009- 

State Library, Trustees op the. 
Levi H. Greenwood, President of the Senate; Grafton D. Gushing, 
Speaker of the House of Representatives; Winfield S. Slocum, Newton, 
1912; Robert L, O'Brien, Brookline, 1913; Josiah H. Benton {Chairman), 
Boston, 1914. Librarian, Charles F. D. Belden, Cambridge. 

Statistics, Bureau of. 
Director, Charles F. Gettemy, Boston, 1912. Chief Clerk, William G. 
Grundy, Boston. Room 256, State Hoiise. 

Tax Commissioner. 
William D. T. Trefry, Marblehead, 1914. Deputy, Charles A. Andrews, 
Newton (Waban). Assistants, Albert B. Fales, Som^erville; George S. 
Hatch, Medford; Albert E. Taylor, Boston. First Clerk, Edward D. 
Endicott, Canton. Room 235, State House. 

Uniformity op Legislation in the United States, Commissioners 
FOR THE Promotion of. 
Samuel Ross {Chairman), New Bedford, 1914; Hollis R. Bailey, Cam- 
bridge, 1914; Samuel Wiiliston, Cambridge, 1914, 

Veterinary Medicine, Board op Registration in. 
George P. Penniman, Worcester, 1912; Elmer Warren Babson {Secre- 
tary), Gloucester, 1913; Langdon Frothingham {Chairman). Boston, 
1914; Thomas E. Maloney, Fall River, 1915; Lester H. Howard, Boston, 
1916. 

Voting Machine Examiners, Board of. 
Charles F. Richardson {Chairman), Weston, 1913; Horace B. Gale 
{Clerk), Natick, 1913; Page G. Poole, Everett, 1913. 

Wachusett Mountain State Reservation Commission. 
Theodore L. Haxlovj {Secretary), Gardner, 1913; Harold Parker {Chair- 
man), Lancaster, 1915; John T. Burnett, Southborough, 1917. Superin- 
tendent, Everett W. Needham, Princeton. 



314 Boards and Commissions. 



Weights and Measures, Commissioner of. 
Daniel C. Palmer, Maiden, 1913. Inspectors, Amasa S. K. Clark, 
Lorenzo D. F. Marston, J. William Williams, Philias J. Tetrault, John J. 
Cumming3, Walter W. Gleason. Room 101, State House. 

Wrecks and Shipwrecked Goods, Commissioners op. 
James W. Bradley, Rockport; William B. Floyd, Winthrop; A. Brooks 
Anderson, Scituate; Wendell L. Hinckley, Yarmouth; Thomas H. G. 
Douglass, Gloucester; William McKay, Newburyport; E. Parker Welch, 
Scituate; James B. Steele, Eastham; William H. Sawyer, Gloucester; 
John Killen, Nantucket; Fernando F. Bearse, Chatham; Michael F. 
Gallagher, Pall River. 



Massachusetts District Police. 



315 



MASSACHUSETTS DISTRICT POLICE. 



JOPHANUS H. WHITNEY, Chief. 
Room 20, State House. 



George C. Neal, Deputy Chief, Detective and Fire Inspec- 
tion Dept. Room 1. 
Joseph A. Moore, Deputy Chief, Inspection Dept. Room 2. 
Joseph H. McNeill, Chief Boiler Inspector, Room 3. 
Charles F. Rice, Chief Fire Inspector. Room IB. 



Detective and Fire Inspection Department. 
Detectives. 



Name. 


Assigned. 


Office. 


Barrett, Michael J., 
Bligh, Thomas E., 

Bradford, Ernest S., . 
Dexter, Thomas A., . 

Flynn, Frederick F., . 

Grady, James J., . 
Hardiman, Frank P., . 
Hodges, Alfred B., 
Keating, Arthur E., 
McKay, James, 

Molt, Robert E., . 
Proctor, William H., . 

Scott, John H., . 

Smith, Silas P., . 
Wells, Arthur G., . 


Tramp officer, . 
Hampden and Berkshire 

Counties. 
Barnstable County, . 
Dukes and Nantucket 

Counties. 
Essex and Middlesex 

Counties. 
District No. 6, . 
Unassigned, general work, 
Bristol County, 
Suffolk County, 
Franklin and Hampshire 

Counties. 
Worcester County, 
Steamer "Lexington" and 

general duty. 
Norfolk and Plymouth 

Counties. 
Middlesex County, . 
Essex County, . 


Boston. 
Pittsfield. 

Hyannis. 
Edgartown. 

Lawrence. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Taunton. 

Boston. 

Northampton. 

Worcester. 
Boston. 

Braintree. 

Cambridge. 
Lynn. 



316 



Massachusetts District Police. 



Detective and Fire Inspection Department — CoTicHwici. 
Fire Inspectors. 



Name. 


Assigned. 


Office. 


Anderson, James, . 
Collamore, Henry H., . 
Crittenden, George F., . 
Daly, Joseph v., . 
Eustace, Thomas F., . 
Sherlock, Edward J., . 
Thompson, Thomas A., 


District No. 1, . 
District No. 3, . 
District No. 4, . 
Special duty, 
District No. 2, . 
Unassigned, general work, 
District No. 5. . 


Springfield. 

Fall River. 

Northampton. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 



Inspection Department. 
Building Inspectors. 



Adams, Charles, . 


District No. 9, . 


Worcester. 


Ball, Horace F., . 


District No. 4, . 


Boston. 


Beyer, Richard S., 


District No. 2, . 


Salem. 


Burfitt, Charles E., 


District No. 3, . . 


Boston. 


Cheney, Ansel J., . 


District No. 1, . 


Salem. 


Cleveland, Ernest E., . 


District No. 11, 


Springfield. 


Dyer, David H., . 


District No. 7, . 


Fall River. 


McKeever, William J., . 


1 District No. 5, . 


Boston. 


Merriam, Frederick W., . 


Special duty. 


Boston. 


Penniman, Walter A., . 


District No. 10, 


Worcester. 


Plunkett, John H., 


District No. 6, . 


Boston. 


Pope, Lemuel, 


District No. 12, 


North Adams. 


Saunders, Frank W., . 


District No. 8, . 


Fall River. 


Factory and Workshop Inspectors. 


Atherton, Arlon S., 


District No. 4, . . 


Boston. 


Atkinson, Harry, . 


District No. 8, . 


Boston. 


Cairns, William H., 


District No. 12, . 


Fall River. 


Carey, Jeremiah J., 


District No. 2, . 


Lowell. 


Casey, John F., . 


District No. 15, 


North Adams. 


Clerke, Charles S., 


District No. 6, . 


Boston. 


Cobb, Joseph F., . 


District No. 9, . 


Boston. 


Dam. Charles A., . 


District No. 13, 


Worcester. 


Dexter, John R., . 


District No. 11, 


Fall River. 


Goff, Andrew M., . 


District No. 10, 


Boston. 


Griffin, John E., . 


District No. 7, . 


Boston. 


Howes, James R., 


District No. 14, . 


Springfield. 


Lewis, Elmer, 


District No. 3, . 


Boston. 


McDonald, Angus H., . 


District No. 1, . 


Salem. 


Roach, Arthur F., 


Special duty. 


Springfield. 


Ryan, Everett E., 


District No. 5, . 


Boston. 


Halley, Mary E., . 


Special duty. 


Lowell. 


Nason, Mary A., . 


Special duty, . 


Boston. 



Massachusetts District Police. 



317 



Inspection Department — Concluded. 
Boiler Inspectors. 



Name. 


Assigned. 


Office. 


Baxter, Sturgis C, 
Bushek, Henry, . 
DeShazo, James B., 
Evans, James W., . 
Ferguson, Charles, 
Forbush, Franklin L., . 
Harlow, Willis A., 
Hinckley, Frank C, . 
Kearney, John B., 
Lovering, Arthur F., . 
Luck, George A., . 
Mackintosh, George D., 
McGrath, John, . 
Moran, Edward, . 
Morton, Harrv E., 
Ramsay, William W., . 
Sanborn, Freeman H., . 
Simm, Wilbert E., 
Sullivan, Herbert A., . 


District No. 10, 
District No. 1, 
District No. 13, 
District No. 8, 
District No. 2, 
District No. 17, 
District No. 6, 
Special duty. 
Special duty. 
District No. 16, 
District No. 4, 
District No. 7, 
District No. 9, 
District No. 3, 
District No. 5, 
District No. 14, 
District No. 15, 
District No. 12, 
District No. 11, 






Boston. 

Salem. 

Worcester. 

Boston. 

Salem. 

North Adams. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Northampton. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Boston. 

Lowell. 

Boston. 

Worcester. 

Springfield. 

Fall River, 

Fall River. 



1st Clerk, Frederick W. Macer. Sd Clerk, Frank K. Hahn. Room 2. 

Stenographer to Chief, Etta M. Kennedy. Room 2. 

Detective and Fire Inspection Department. — Clerk, Francis W. 
Fogarty. Stenographers, John I. Adams, Mary E. Buxton, John W. 
Gilmartin. 

Inspection Department. — Clerks, Jacob W. Powell, Boston; Lewis 
P. Fall, Boston; Belle C. Davis, Boston; Margaret A. Diviney, Bos- 
ton; Veronica A. Lynch, Boston; Mary M. Kane, Worcester; Mary W. 
Moore, Springfield; Etta F. Reynolds, Salem; Nellie M. Quinn, Fall 
River. 

Storehouse. — Keeper, Terrence McSweeney. 

Branch Offices. — Salem, 12 Kinsman Block; Lowell, 71 Central 
Block; Worcester, 476 Main Street; Fall River, Hudner Building; 
Springfield, 21 Besse Place; North Adams, Kimbell Block. 

Board op Boiler Rules. 
Joseph H. McNeill (Chairman), Melrose (chief inspector, boiler in- 
spection department); Bartholomew Scannell, Lowell (representing 
boiler-manufacturing interests), 1912; Robert J. Dunkle, Boston (rei>- 
resenting boiler-insurance interests), 1912; John A. Stevens, Lowell 
(representing boiler-using interests), 1913; William M. Beck, Everett 
representing operating engineers), 1913. Room 247A, State House. 



318 State Normal Schools. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOLS. 



(The general management of the several normal schools is vested by 
statute in the Board of Education, and all money appropriated for their 
maintenance is expended under its direction.] 



At Framingham (for women only) — Opened at Lexington, July, 1839 ; 
transferred to West Newton, September, 1844; removed to Framingham, 
1853. Principal — Henry Whittemore. 

At Westfield — Opened at Barre, September, 1839; suspended, 1841; 
reopened at Westfield, September, 1844. Principal — Clarence A. 
Brodeur. 

At Bridgewater — Opened September, 1840. Principal — Arthur C. 
Boyden. 

At Salem — Opened September, 1854. Principal — J. Asbury Pitman. 

At Worcester — Opened September, 1874. Principal — Francis R. 
Lane. 

At Fitchburg — Opened September, 1895. Principal — John G. 
Thompson. 

At North Adams — Opened February, 1897. Principal — Frank F. 
Murdock. 

At Barnstable (Hyannis) — Opened September, 1897. Principal — 
William A. Baldwin. 

At Lowell — Opened October, 1897. Principal — Cyrus A. Durgin. 

State Normal Art School. 
At Boston — Opened November, 1873. Principal — George H. Bart- 
lett. 



State Institutions. 319 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL 

SUPERVISION OP THE STATE 

BOARD OF CHARITY. 



MASSACHUSETTS TRAINING SCHOOLS. 



James J. Slieehan, Peabody, 1912. 
David F. Slade, Fall River, 1912. 
Mary Josephine Bleakie, Brook- 
line, 1913. 
Matthew Luce, Cohasset, 1913. 
John F. Scully, Arlington, 1914. 



Elizabeth G. Evans, Boston, 1914. 
Charles M. Davenport, Boston, 

1915. 
Charles Dreyfus, Boston, 1915. 
James W. McDonald, Marlborough, 

1916. 



Lyman School for Boys. 
(At Westbororigh.) 
Superintendent — Elmer L. Coffeen. 

State Industrial School for Girls. 
(At Lancaster.) 
Superintendent — Amy F. Everall. 

Probation Department, 198 Dartmouth Street, Boston. 

Industrial School for Boys. 
(At Shirley.) 
Superintendent — George P. Campbell. 



STATE INFIRMARY AND STATE FARM. 

Trustees — Helen R. Smith, Newton, 1912; John B. Tivnan (Chairman), 
Salem, 1913; Payson W. Lyman, Fall River, 1913; Leonard Huntress, 
Lowell, 1913; Galen L. Stone, Brookline, 1914; Henrietta Gushing, Bos- 
ton, 1914; John W. Coughlin, Fall River, 1914. 

State Infirmary. 

(At Tewkshury.) 

Superintendent and Resident Physician — John H. Nichols, M.D. 

State Farm. 

(At Bridgewater.) 

Superintendent — HoUis M. Blackstone. 



320 State Institutions. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL. 
At Canton. 
[For the care and education of crippled and deformed children.) 
Trustees — Leonard W. Ross (Secretary), Boston (Mattapan), 1911; 
Walter C. Baylies, Taunton, 1912; William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline, 
1913; Edward H. Bradford {Chairman), Boston, 1914; Alfred S. Pinker- 
ton, Worcester, 1915. 
Superintendent — John E. Fish, M.D. 



TRUSTEES OF HOSPITALS FOR CONSUMPTIVES. 

Arthur T. Cabot (Chairman), Boston, 1912; William D. McFee, 
Haverhill, 1912; Albert C. Getchell, Worcester, 1913: Arthur Drinkwater, 
Cambridge, 1914; Sylvia B. Knowlton, Newton, 1915; George A. Dunn, 
Gardner, 1916; Daniel L, Prendergast, Brookline, 1916. 

Secretary — John B. Hawes, 2d, M.D., 3 Joy Street, third floor. 

Rutland State Sanatorium. 
Superintendent — IP. Challis Bartlett, M.D. 

North Reading State Sanatorium. 
Superintendent — Carl C. McCorison, M.D. 

Lakeville State Sanatorium. 
Superintendent — Sumner Coolidge, M.D. 

Westfield State Sanatorium. 
Superintendent — B.emy D. Chadwick, M.D. 



State Institutions. 



321 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL 

SUPERVISION OP THE STATE 

BOARD OF INSANITY. 



INSANE HOSPITALS. 

The government of each is vested in a board of seven Trustees, five 
of whom shall be men and two of whom shall be women, one to be ap- 
pointed annually by the Governor and Council, and the place of the 
senior member, as arranged in the following order, to be vacated each 
year: — 

Worcester State Hospital. 



Georgie A. Bacon, Worcester, 1912 
Samuel B. Woodward (Chairman) 

Worcester, 1913. 
George F. Blake, Worcester, 1914. 
Lyman A. Ely, Worcester, 1915. 
T. Hovey Gage, Jr., Worcester, 
1916. 
Superintendent — Hosea M. Quinby, M.D. 

(The Worcester State Asylum, Ernest V. Scribner, M.D. 
tendent, is also under charge of above Trustees.] 



Thomas Russell (Secretary), Bos- 
ton. 1917. 

Carrie B. Harrington, Worcester, 
1918. 



Superin- 



Taunton State Hospital. 
Susan E. Learoyd, Wakefield, 1912. 
Loyed E. Chamberlain, Brockton, 

1913. 
Henry R. Stedman (Chairman), 

Brookline, 1914. 
Edward Lovering, Taunton, 1915. 
Superintendent — Arthur V. Goas, M.D 



Simeon Borden, Fall River, 1916. 

James P. Francis, New Bedford, 
1917. 

Elizabeth C. M. Gifford (Secre- 
tary), Eaat Boston, 1918. 



322 



State Institutions. 



NOHTHAMPTON StATB HOSPITAL. 

Caroline A. Yale, Northampton, Charles S. Shattuck, Hatfield, 1916. 

1912. i Joseph W. Stevens, Greenfield, 

Luke Corcoran, Springfield. 1913. 1917. 

John McQuaid, Pittsfield, 1914. Emily N. Newton, Holyoke, 1918. 
Henry L. Williams {Secretary), 

Northampton, 1915. j 
Superintendent — John A, Houston, M.D. 

Danvers State Hospital. 



Annie M. Kilham, Beverly, 1912. 
Samuel Cole, Beverly, 1913. 
Horace H. Atherton, Saugus, 1914. 
Mary Ward Nichols, Salem, 1915. 



S. Herbert Wilkins (Chairman), 

Salem, 1916. 
Seward W. Jones, Newton, 1917. 
Ernest B. Dane, Brookline, 1918. 



Superintendent — Henry W. Mitchell, M.D. 



Westborough State Hospital. 
Goddard, Worcester, 1 John L. Coffin {Chairman), North- 
I borough, 1914. 

George B. Dewson, Cohasset, 1917. 
Sarah B. Williams, Taunton, 1918. 
William Avery Gary, Cambridge, 
1918. 



Harry W. 

1912. 
Eliza C. Durfee (Secretary), Fall 

River, 1913. 
John M. Merriam, Framingham, 

1913. 



Superintendent — George S. Adams, M.D. 



Medfield State Astlum. 



James M. Codman, Jr., Brookline, 

1912. 
Fred Bates Lund, Boston, 1913. 
Nellie Barker Palmer (Secretary), 

South Framingham, 1914. 



Ira G. Hersey (Chairman), Hing- 

ham, 1915. 
Fred H. Williams, Brookline, 1916. 
Francis M. Carroll, Boston, 1917. 
Sarah J. Rand, Newton, 1918. 



Superintendent — Edward French, M.D. 



MONSON STATE HOSPITAL. 

At Palmer. 

Trustees — Mary P. Townsley, Springfield, 1912; Edward P. Bagg, 

Holyoke, 1912; Henry P. Jaques, Lenox, 1913; Mabel W. Stedman, 

Boston, 1914; John Bapst Blake (Secretary), Boston, 1914; William N. 

BuUard (Chairman), Boston, 1917; Michael I. Shea, Chicopee Falls, 1918. 

Superintendent — Everett Flood, M.D. 



State Institutions. 323 



GARDNER STATE COLONY. 
At Gakdner. 
Trustees — John G. Blake, Boston, 1911; Wilbur F. Whitney, South 
Ashburnham, 1912; George N. Harwood, Barre, 1913; Amie H. Goes 
{Secretary), Worcester, 1914; Alice M. Spring, Fitchburg, 1914; William 
H. Baker, Lynn, 1917; Edmund A. Whitman (Chairman), Cambridge, 
1918. 
Superintendent — Charles E. Thompson, M.D. 



MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL FOR THE FEEBLE-MINDED. 

At Waltham. 

Trtisiees — Thomas W. Davis, Belmont, 1912; Felix Gatineau, South- 
bridge, 1912; Luann L. Brackett, Newton, 1914; Edmund M. Wheel- 
wright, Boston, 1915; William W. Swan (President), Brookline, 1916; 
Francis J. Barnes, Cambridge, 1917. Secretary, Charles E. Ware, 
Fitchburg. 

Superintendent —Walter E. Fernald, M.D. 



WRENTHAM STATE SCHOOL. 
At Wrentham. 
Trustees — Mary Stevf art Scott, Worcester, 1912; Susanna W. Berry, 
Lynn, 1913; Harry T. Hayward, Franklin. 1913; Ellerton James (Sec- 
retary), Nahant, 1914; Patrick J. Lynch, Beverly, 1916; George W. Gay, 
Newton, 1917; Albert L. Harwood (Chairman), Newton, 1918. 
Superintendent — George L. Wallace, M.D. 



.-HOSPITAL COTTAGES FOR CHILDREN. 

At Baldwinvillb. 

Trustees — Herbert S. Morley (Presi(ienO, Templeton, 1912; Arthur 
H. Lowe, Fitchburg, 1913; Lizzie R. Doherty, Boston, 1914; Jenness 
K. Dexter, Springfield,-;1915; George B. Dewson, Cohasset, 1916. Clerk, 
Robert N. Wallis, Fitchburg. 

Superintendent — Hartstein W. Page, M.D. 



324 State Institutions. 

FOXBOROUGH STATE HOSPITAL. 
At Foxborough. 
Trustees — Frank L. Locke, Maiden, 1911; Robert A. Woods {Chair- 
man), Boston. 1912; Edwin Mulready, Rockland, 1912; William H. 
Prescott {Secretary), Boston, 1912; W. Rodman Peabody, Cambridge, 
1913; Philip R. Allen, Walpole, 1914; Timothy J. Foley, Worcester, 1917. 
Superintendent — Irwin H. Neff, M.D. 



BOSTON STATE HOSPITAL. 
At Boston. 
Katherine G. Devine, Boston, 1912; Lehman Pickert, Brookline, 1913; 
Henrietta S. Lowell, Brookline, 1914; Henry Lefavour (Secretary), Bos- 
ton, 1915; Walter Channing (Chairman), Brookline, 1916; Michael J. 
Jordan, Boston, 1917; Melvin S. Nash, Hanover, 1918. 
Superintendent — Henry P. Frost. M.D. 



State Institutions. 325 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE GENERAL 

SUPERVISION OP THE BOARD OP 

PRISON COMMISSIONERS. 



(This board has the government of the institutions named below, and 
appoints the warden and superintendent in each place.) 



STATE PRISON. 
At Boston (Charlestown District). 
Warden — Benjamin F. Bridges, Deerfield. Deputy Warden — Nathan 
D. Allen. Clerk — Edward A. Darling. Physician and Surgeon — Joseph 
I. McLaughlin, M.D. Chaplain — Rev. Herbert W. Stebbins. 

Agent for Discharged Convicts — George E. Cornwall. Room 24, State 
House. 



MASSACHUSETTS REFORMATORY. 
At Concord (Concord Junction P. O.). 
Superintendent — Alvah S. Baker, Concord. Deputy Superintend- 
ent— Vercy W. Allen. Physician — G\xy G. Fernald, M.D. Clerk — 
Charles W. Wales. Chaplain — Rev. Robert Walker. 



REFORMATORY FOR WOMEN. 
At Sherborn (South Framinoham P. O.). 
Superintendent — Mrs. Jessie D. Hodder, Sherborn. Deputy Superin- 
tendent — Mrs. Lizzie O. Averill. Physician — Frances W. Potter, M.D. 
Chaplain — Emily L. Herndon. 

Agent for Discharged Female Prisoners — Elizabeth A. Quirk. Room 9, 
State House. 



PRISON CAMP AND HOSPITAL. 
At Rutland (West Rutland P. O.). 
Superintendent — George C. Erskine. Physician — William E. Cham- 
berlain, M.D. 



326 Various Institutions. 



VARIOUS INSTITUTIONS. 



MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL. 
At Boston. 
(By chapter 46 of the Acts of 1864, four Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.] 

Trustees — Jyavid P. Kimball, Boston, 1912; Charles P. Greenough, 
Boston, 1912; Henry S. Hunnewell, Wellesley. 1912; Henry S. Howe, 
Brookline, 1912. 
Administrator — Frederic A. Washburn, M.D. 



PERKINS INSTITUTION AND MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL 
FOR THE BLIND. 
At South Boston. 
[By chapter 96 of the Acts of 1864, four Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.] 

Trustees — Paul Revere Frothingham, Boston, 1912; William L. Rich- 
ardson, Boston, 1912; Annette P. Rogers, Boston, 1912; Norwood P. 
HaUowell, Medford, 1912. 
Director — Edward E. Allen. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE EYE AND EAR 
INFIRMARY. 
At Boston. 
[By chapter 28 of the Resolves of 1872, two Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.] 
Trustees — William D. Sohier, Beverly; John Lawrence, Groton. 
Superintendent — Farr ax Cobb, M.D. 



Various Institutions. 327 



SOLDIERS' HOME IN MASSACHUSETTS. 
At Chelsea. 
[By chapter 282 of the Acts of 1889, three Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.] 

Trwsiees — Alexander McGregor, Maiden, 1912; Edward P. Starbird, 
Boston, 1913; Daniel E. Denny, Worcester, 1914. 
Commandant — Richard R. Foster. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOMCEOPATHIC HOSPITAL. 
At Boston. 
[By chapter 358 of the Acts of 1890, five Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.) 

Trustees — N. Emmons Paine, Newton, 1911; Henry F. Harris, 
Worcester, 1911; Elwyn G. Preston, Woburn, 1912; Erastus T. Colburn, 
Newton, 1913; Frederic W. Bliss, Boston, 1913. 
Superintendent — William O. Mann, M.D. 



PETER BENT BRIGHAM HOSPITAL. 
At Boston. 
[By chapter 370 of the Acts of 1909, two Trustees appointed by the 
Governor.] 

Trustees — John P. Reynolds, Jr., Boston, 1912; Irvin McDowell 
Garfield, Boston, 1915. 
Superintendent — Herbert B. Howard, M.D. 



328 



Medica I Exa m in ers . 



MEDICAL EXAMINERS. 

[See chapter 24, Revised Laws.) 
[Corrected to Jan. 1, 1912.] 



Barnstable County. 

No. 1. — Harwich, Dennis, Yarmouth, Brew- 
ster, Chatham, Orleans and East- 
ham, 

No. 2. — Barnstable, Bourne, Sandwich, 
Mashpee and Falmouth, 

No. 3. — Provincetown, Truro and Wellfleet, . < 
Associate. — No. 2, Ernest F. Curry, Bourne, 

Berkshire County. 

No. 1. — North Adams, Williamstown, 

Clarksburg, Adams, Florida, Sa- 
voy, New Ashford and Cheshire, 
No. 2. — Pittsfield, Lanesborough, Windsor, 1 

Dal ton, Hinsdale, Peru and Han- ■ 

cock, 

No. 3. — Richmond, Lenox, Washington, 

Becket, Lee, Stockbridge, Tyring- 

ham and Otis, .... 
No. 4. — West Stockbridge, Alford, Great 

Barrington, Monterey, Sandisfield, 

New Marlborough, Sheffield, Egre- 

mont and Mount Washington, 

Associates. — No. 1, Harry B. Holmes, Adams, 1916. No. 2, John J. 
Flynn, Pittsfield, 1912. No. 3, John J. Hassett, Lee, 1916. No. 4, Clifford 
S. Chapin, Great Barrington, 1918. 



Harrie D. Handy, 

Harwich, 1917. 

Charles W. Milliken, 

Barnstable, 1915. 
Clarence P. Curley, 

Provincetown, 1912. 



Orland J. Brown, 

North Adams, 1917. 

Henry Colt, 

Pittsfield, 1915. 

Dorvil M. Wilcox, 

Lee, 1916. 



.John B. Beebe, 

Great Barrington, 1918. 



Medical Examiners. 329 



Bristol Countt. 

No. 1. — Attleborough, North Attleborough, "1 p, , „ 

Seekonk, Norton, Mansfield and \ » ^^i u l\,>,^ 

Rehoboth J Attleborough, 1918. 

No. 2. — Taunton, Raynhara, Easton, Berk- \ Silas D. Presbrey, 

ley and Dighton / Taunton, 1912. 

No. 3. — Fall River, Somerset, Swansea, 1 Thomas F. Gunning, 

Freetown and Westport, . . J Fall River, 1912. 

No. 4. — New Bedford, Dartmouth, Fair- \ Garry de N. Hough, 

haven and Acushnet, . , . / New Bedford, 1912. 

Associates. — No. 1, Joseph B. Gerould, North Attleborough, 1912. 
No. 2, Charles A. Atwood, Taunton, 1912. No. 3," John H. Gifford, Fall 
River, 1913. No. 4, John T. Bullard, New Bedford, 1912. 



Dukes County. 

XT 1 t-.j X J /-. 1 r>i tt « r Thomas J. Walker, 

No. 1. — Edgartown and Oak Bluffs,* . . < _, , ,„,„ 

1 Edgartown, 1913. 

No. 2. - Tisbury,West Tisbury and Gosnold, \ ^^^^^^ ^'S^J^^' ,o,o 

1 Tisbury, 1918. 

No. 3. — Chilmark and Gay Head, . . Vacancy. 

.Associates. — No. 1, Edward P. Worth, Edgartown, 1914. No. 2, 
Frank H. Parker, Gosnold, 1918. 



Essex County. 

M 1 /-.I 4. J T> 1 i. / Sumner F. Quimby, 

No. 1. — Gloucester and Rockport, . .< _,, ^ ,«,, 

1^ Gloucester, 1915. 

No. 2. — Ipswich, Rowley, Hamilton and T George G. Bailey, 

Essex, / Ipswich, 1918. 

No. 3. — Newburyport, Newbury, West New- 1 Randolph C. Hurd, 

bury, Amesbury and Salisbury, . J Newburyport, 1913. 

No. 4. — Haverhill and Merrimac, . .< '.. , .' ,..„ 

[ Haverhill, 1912. 

No. 5. — Lawrence, Methuen, Andover and 1 George W. Dow, 

North Andover J Lawrence, 1915. 

No. 6. — Georgetown, Boxford, Topsfield and 1 Richmond B. Root, 

Groveland J Georgetown, 1912. 

• Name of Cottage City changed to Oak Bluffs by act of the General 
Court, January 25, 1907. 



330 Medical Examiners. 



Essex Countt — Concluded. 

George A. Stickney, 



No. 7. — Beverly, Wenham and Manchester, . , _, , ,„ij 

' Beverly, 1914. 

No. 8. — Peabody, Danvers, Middleton and \ Horace K. Foster, 

Lynnfield / Peabody, 1916. 

No. 9. — Lynn, Saugus, Nahant and Swamp- 1 Joseph G. Pinkham, 

scott J Lynn, 1912. 

»T ^« „ , ,,,,,, , r Frank S. Atwood, 

No. 10. — Salem and Marblehead, . . .< „. .... 

Associates. — No. 1, Parker Burnham, Gloucester. 1918. No. 2, 
Stephen A. Pedrick, Rowley, 1912. No. 3, Daniel D. Murphy, Ames- 
bury, 1913. No. 4, Francis W. Anthony, Haverhill, 1912. No. 5, Victor 
A. Reed, Lawrence, 1915. No. 7, Harry E. Sears, Beverly, 1914. No. 
8, S. Chase Tucker, Peabody, 1912. No. 9, Herbert W. Newhall, Lynn, 
1912. No. 10, James E. Simpson, Salem, 1916. 

Franklin Cotjntt. 

Northern District. — Orange, Warwick, New 1 Stanton J. Ten Broeck, 
Salem and Wendell, . . . J Orange, 1913. 

Eastern District. — Bernardston, E r v i n g , ] 

Gill, Greenfield, Leverett, Mon- I George P. Twitchell, 
tague, Northfield, Shutesbury and | Greenfield, 1916. 

Sunderland J 

Western District. — Ashfield, Buckland, ] 

Charlemont, Colrain, Conway, I _, • t /-. j 
T^ c ij T^ 1 TT ^u T ! Francis J. Canedy, 
Deerfield, Hawley, Heath, Ley- > „, „ ,_,- 

,, ' _•" -,, ' ^ I Shelburne, 1912. 

den, Monroe, Rowe, Shelburne 

and Whately, .... 

Associates. — Northern, Francis E. Johnson, Erving, 1913. Eastern, 
Norman P. Wood, Northfield, 1916. Western, George R. Fessenden, 
Ashfield, 1912. 

Hampden County. 

No. 1. — Brimfield, Holland, Palmer, Monson 1 Jacob P. Schneider, 

and Wales J Palmer, 1917. 

No. 2. — Springfield, Agawam, East Long- ] 

meadow, Longmeadow, West I Simon J. Russell, 
Springfield, Wilbraham and [ Springfield, 1918. 

Hampden J 

,, „ , , f William J. Teahan, 

No.3.-Holyoke, | Holyoke, 1918. 



Medical Examiners. 



331 



Hampden County — Concluded. 



No. 4. — Blandford, Chester, Granville, 
Montgomery, Russell, Southwick, 
Tolland and Westfield, . 

No. 5. — Cliicopee and Ludlow, 



George H. Janes, 

Westfield, 1913. 

I John H. C. Gallagher, 
\ Cliicopee, 1918. 

Associates. — No. 1, Charles W. Jackson, Monson, 1917. No. 2, Theo- 
dore S. Bacon, Springfield, 1914. No. 3, Frank A. Woods, Holyoke, 1912. 
No. 4, Edward S. Smith, Westfield, 1913. No, 5, Louis E. Mannix, 
Chicopee, 1918. 

Hampshire County. 



No. 1. — Northampton, Chesterfield, Cum- 
mington, Goshen, Hatfield, Plain- 
field and Williamsburg, 

No. 2. — Easthampton, Huntington, Middle- 
field, Southampton, Westhampton 
and Worthington, .... 

No. 3. — Amherst, Granby, Hadley, Pelham 
and South Hadley, 

No. 4. — Belchertown, Enfield, Greenw 
Prescott and Ware, 

Associates. — No. 1, William P. Stutson, Cummington, 1912. No. 2, 
William R. Lyman, Worthington, 1913. No. 3, Henry E. Doonan, 
South Hadley, 1918. No. 4, Willard B. Segur, Enfield, 1917. 



Qwich, 1 



Christopher Seymour, 
Northampton, 1912. 

Clarence I. Sparks, 

Easthampton, 1916. 

Herbert G. Rockwell, 

Amherst, 1914. 

Worthington W. Miner, 

Ware, 1915. 



Middlesex County. 
No. 1. - Cambridge, Belmont and Arlington. | ^'"'^"^cfmbrTdge, 1912. 
No. 2. — Maiden, Somerville, Everett and 1 Thomas M. Durell, 

Medford, J Somerville, 1914. 

No. 3. — Melrose, Stoneham, Wakefield, Wil- ] t> -nw -n i 

• X T, J- J TVT xu L Roscoe D. Perley, 
mmgton, Readmg and North f „ , ,.,_ 

_ ,. Melrose, 1918. 

Readmg, J 

No. 4. — Woburn, Winchester, Lexington and \ William H. Keleher, 

Burlington J Woburn, 1918. 

No. 5. — Lowell, Dracut, Tewksbury, Bille- ] _ v M * 

rica, Chelmsford and Tyngsbor- \ ' _' „ ,„,- 

Lowell, 1915. 
ough, J 

No. 6. — Concord, Carlisle, Bedford, Lincoln, 1 Henry J. Walcott, 

Littleton, Acton and Boxborough, J Concord, 1917. 



332 Medical Examiners. 



Middlesex County — Concluded. 

No. 7. — Newton, Waltham, Watertown and \ George L. West, 

Weston, / Newton, 1912. 

No. 8. — Framingham, Vv'ayland, Natick, 1 _ • ,r -n i 

cu u XT 11- i Ti 1 • ^ l Lewis M. Palmer, 

Sherborn, Holliston, Hopkmton f c. -n • u -.t^to 
- . ,,' ^ So. Frammgham, 1916. 

and Ashland, . . . .J 

No. 9. — Marlborough, Hudson, Maynard, 1 Eugene G. Hoitt, 

Stow and Sudbury, . . . J Marlborough, 1912. 

No. 10. — Aj'er, Groton, Westford, Dun- 1 _, , o -d n i 

1 LI T, 11 C.1-- 1 m I Frank S. Bulkeley, 

stable, Pepperell, Shirley, Town- > A 1Q1' 

send and Ashby, .... J 

Associates. — No. 2, Herbert S. Johnson, Maiden, 1914. No. 3, Paul 
H. Provandie, Melrose, 1915. No. 5, Robert E. Bell, Lowell, 1915. No. 
6, Henry H. Braley, Concord, 1917. No. 7, Richard Hinchey, Waltham, 
1912. No. 8, George A. Bancroft, Natick, 1913. No. 9, John E. McGrath, 
Hudson, 1913. No. 10, Herbert B. Priest, Groton, 1915. 



Nantucket County. 

John S. Grouard, 



One District i -vt * i * imr 

Nantucket, 1916. 



Norfolk County. 

No. 1. — Dedham, Needham, Wellesley, 1 Andrew H. Hodgdon, 

Westwood, Norwood and Dover, . J Dedham, 1912. 

ivT o TT J T, 1 J nc-ix / Charles Sturtevant, 

No. 2. - Hyde Park and Milton, • • • | Hyde Park, 1912. 

,.T o ^ • 1 T, t 1 1 r Frederick E. Jones, 

No. 3. - Quincy and Randolph, . . . | Quincy. 1913. 

No. 4. — Weymouth,Braintreeand Holbrook, < ' *, .... 

No. 5. — Avon, Stoughton, Canton, Walpole 1 William O. Faxon, 

and Sharon, J Stoughton, 1915. 

No. 6. — Franklin, Foxborough, Plainville 1 Francis A. Bragg, 

and Wrentham, . . . , / Foxborough, 1918. 

No. 7. — Medway, Medfield, Millis, Norfolk \ Norman P. Quint, 

and Bellingham / Medway, 1915. 

XT o T> 1 1- / Harry M. Cutta, 

No. 8. — Brooklme, < r> i i- mio 

1 Brooklme, 1912. 



Medical Examiners. 333 



Norfolk Cotjntt — Concluded. 

XT n >-. V. i. r Oliver H. Howe, 

No. 9. — Cohasset { r> i. \ imc 

L Cohasset, 1915. 

Associates. — No. 1, John W. Pratt, Dedham, 1913. No. 2, Edward H. 
Baxter, Hyde Park, 1916. No. 5, Edward H. Ewing, Stoughton, 1912. 
No. 6, Ambrose J. Gallison, Franklin, 1918. No. 7, Ernest L. Hill, 
Millis, 1917. No. 8, Everett M. Bowker, Brookline, 1912. 



A. Elliot Paine, 

Brockton, 1912. 



Plymouth County. 

No. 1. — Brockton, West Bridgewater, East 

Bridgewater, Bridgewater and 

Whitman, 

No. 2. — Abington, Rockland, Hanover, 1 Oilman Osgood, 

Hanson, Norwell and Pembroke, . J Rockland, 1914. 

No. 3. — Plymouth, Halifax, Kingston, 1 Edgar D. Hill, 

Plympton and Duxbury, . . J Plymouth, 1912. 

No. 4. — Middleborough, Wareham, Matta- 1 ^, , t-. nr 

• .X r-, -r> I X T 1 1 Charles E. Morse, 

poisett. Carver, Rochester, Lake- f „, , ,«,- 

, ,, . Wareham, 1917. 

ville and Marion, . . . .J 

No. 5. — Hingham, Hull, Scituate and 1 John A. Peterson, 

Marshfield J Hingham, 1917. 

Associates. — No. 1, Fred J. Ripley, Brockton, 1912. No. 2, Frank G. 
Wheatley, Abington, 1914. No. 3, Nathaniel K. Noyes, Duxbury, 1912. 
No. 4, A. Vincent Smith, Middleborough, 1914. No. 5, Charles W. Bart- 
lett, Marshfield, 1912. 

Suffolk County. 

f George B. Magrath, 

Boston, Chelsea, Revere and Winthrop, • { rr,- ^i. x ' 

' Timothy Leary, 

Boston, 1917. 

Associate. — William H. Watters, Boston, 1917. 



Worcester County. 

No. 1. — Athol, Dana, Petersham, Phillips- \ James F. Cuddy, 

ton and Royalston, . . . / Athol, 1918. 

No. 2. — Gardner, Templeton and Winchen- 1 Edward A. Sawyer, 

don J Gardner, 1917. 



334 



Medical Examiners. 



Worcester County — Concluded. 



No. 3. — Fitchburg, Ashburnham, Leomin- 
ster, Lunenburg, Princeton and 
V/estminster, .... 

No. 4. — Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Clinton, 
Harvard, Lancaster, Northbor- 
ough and Sterling, 

No. 5. — Grafton, Southborough and West- 
borough, 

No. 6. — Hopedale, Men don, Milford and 
Upton, 

No. 7. — Blackstone, Douglas, Northbridge 
and Uxbridge, .... 

No. 8. — Charlton, Dudley, Oxford, South- 
bridge, Sturbridge and Webster, . 

No. 9. — Brookneld, North Brookfield, Spen- 
cer, Warren and West Brookfield, . 

No. 10. — Barre, Dana, Hubbardston, Hard- 
wick, New Braintree, Oakham and 
Rutland, 

No. 11. — Worcester, Auburn, Holden, Leices- 
ter, Millbury, Paxton, Shrews- 
bury, Sutton and West Boylston, . 



Frederick H.Thompson, 
Fitchburg, 1915. 

George L. Tobey, 

Clinton, 1913. 

Charles S. Knight, 

Westborough, 1916. 
William J. Clarke, 

Milford, 1912. 
William L. Johnson, 

Uxbridge, 1912. 
Gary C Bradford, 

Southbridge, 1914. 
Ephraim W. Norwood, 
Spencer, 1918. 

William E . C ham berlain , 
Rutland, 1912. 

Frederick H. Baker, 

Worcester, 1916. 



Associates. — No. 1, Alphonso V. Bowker, Athol, 1916. No. 2, Albert 
F. Lowell, Gardner, 1917. No. 3, Appleton H. Pierce, Leominster, 1917. 
No. 4, James J. Goodwin, Clinton, 1913. No. 5, John Lowell Bacon, Jr., 
Southborough, 1916. No. 6, George F. Curley, Milford, 1912. No. 7, 
W. Edward Balmer, Northbridge (\N'hitinsvilIe), 1913. No. 8, J. R. 
Woodward, Oxford, 1912. No. 9, C. A. Deland, Warren, 1912. No. 10, 
Walter S. Bates, Barre, 1918. No. 11, Ernest L. Hunt, Worcester, 1915. 



Colleges. 335 



COLLEGES IN MASSACHUSETTS. 

With their Presidents and Trustees. 



HARVARD COLLEGE. 

(Cambridge.) 
[Founded 1636.) 

corporation. 
Abbott Lawrence Lowell, President. 

Fellows. 
Henry P. Walcott. Thomas N. Perkins. 

Henry L. Higginson. Charles F. Adams, 2d, Treasurer. 

Arthur T. Cabot. 

George Peabody Gardner, Jr., Secretary to the Corporation. 

BOARD of overseers. 

Members ex Officio. 
Abbott Lawrence Lowell, President of the University. 
Charles F. Adams, 2d, Treasurer of the University. 

Elective Members. 

[Term of oflBce expires June, 1912.] 
George B. Shattuck. Frederick P. Fish. Amory A. Lawrence. 

James T. Mitchell. Augustus E. Willson. 

[Term of office expires June, 1913.] 
William Lawrence. George D. Markham. William A. Gaston. 

William Endicott, Jr. Robert S. Peabody. 

[Term of office expires June, 1914.) 
John D. Long, President. William Rand, Jr. John Collins Warren. 

Robert Grant. Moses Williams. 

[Term of office expires June, 1915.] 
Howard Elliott. John Pierpont Morgan. Francis J. Swayze. 

William L. Richardson. George Wigglesworth. 

[Term of office expires June, 1916.) 
Charles W. Eliot. Francis L. Higginson. Abbot L. Mills. 

Theodore Roosevelt. George A. Gordon. 



336 Colleges. 



HARVARD COISLEGE - Concluded. 
[Term of office expires June, 1917.) 
George von Lengerke Meyer. Henry Cabot Lodge. Jerome D. Greene. 
William C. Boyden. Lawrence E. Sexton. 

Winthrop H. Wade, Secretary of the Board of Overseers. 



WILLLi^MS COLLEGE. 
(Williamstown. ) 
[Chartered 1793.] 

CORPORATION. 

Harry A. Garfield, President. 

Trustees. 
William W. Adams. Clark Williams. 

Francis L. Stetson. Harry P. Dewey. 

Hamilton W. Mabie. Henry Lefavour. 

Daniel Merriman. Bliss Perry. 

Eugene Delano. Howard J. Rogers. 

James R. Dunbar, Charles S. Holt. 

Bentley W. Warren. Solomon B. Griffin. 

Willard E. Hoyt, Secretary and Treasurer. 



MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

(Boston.) 

[Founded 1823. Incorporated 1852.) 

C. Herbert Packard, President. 

LiNviLLE H. Smith, Frank Piper, Vice-Presidents. 

Lyman W. Griffin, Secretary. 

John G. Godding, Treasurer. 

Henry A. Est ab rook, Auditor. 

Trustees. 
Irving P. Gammon. Alfred A. Burnham. 

William H. Glover. Ernst O. Engstrom. 

Frederick W. Archer. George E. Grover. 

Thomas J. O'Brien. William R. Acheson. 

Fred A. Hubbard. 

Thomas J. O'Brien, Deayi. 



Colleges. 337 



AMHERST COLLEGE. 

(Amherst.) 
(Incorporated Feb. 21, 1825.] 

CORPORATION. 

George A. Plimpton, President. 

Trustees. 
George Harris. John W. Simpson. 

G. Henry Whitcomb. Cornelius H. Patton. 

William Hayes Ward. Wilford L, Robbins. 

Williston Walker. Frank W. Stearns. 

Charles M. Pratt. Arthur C. Rounds. 

Charles H. Allen. Arthur L. Gillett. 

Henry H. Kelsey. Talcott Williams. 

Arthur C. James. Robert A. Wooda. 

Harry W. Kidder. Treasurer. 



MT. HOLYOKE COLLEGE. 

(South Hadley.) 

[Founded 1837.] 

Mary Emma Woollbt, President of the Faculty. 

Trustees. 
Edward W. Chapin, President. 
A. Lyman Williston. Arthur B. Chapin. 

John L. R. Trask. John C. Schwab. 

G. Henry Whitcomb. Alfred R. Kimball. 

Mrs. A. Lyman Williston. William H. Button. 

Henry A. Stimson. Charles A. Hull. 

W. Murray Crane. Charles Bulkley Hubbell. 

Elbridge Torrey. Fred'k H. Jackson. 

Sarah P. Eastman. Henry B. Day. 

Robert L. Williston. Mary G. Peterson. 

Joseph A. Skinner. 

Mrs. William Barry, 1 

Mary C. Tuttle Bourdon, j^ Chosen by the Alumnce. 

Elizabeth Mayher Smith, J 

Mary E. WooUey, Ex Officio. 

Joseph A. Skinner, Secretary. 

A. Lyman Williston, Treasurer. 

Robert L. Williston, Assistant Treasurer. 



338 



Colleges. 



COLLEGE OF THE HOLY CROSS. 

(Worcester.) 

[Founded 1843. Incorporated March 24, 1865.] 

Joseph M. Dinand, President. 
James A. Mtjllen, Vice-President. 

Board of Trustees. 
Joseph M. Dinand, President. 
John J. Flemming, Vice-President. 
John F. L«hy, Treasurer. 
James A. Mullen, Secretary. 
Thomas F. McLoughlin. Albert R. Peters. Fernand Rousseau. 



TUFTS COLLEGE. 

(Medford.) 
(Incorporated March 20, 1850.] 
F. W. Hamilton, President. 

Trustees. 
Hosea W. Parker, President. 



Hosea W. Parker. 
Walter E. Parker. 
J. Coleman Adams. 
Byron Groce. 
William W. Spaulding. 
Charles E. Morrison. 
Sumner Robinson. 
John W. Hammond. 
Frederick W. Hamilton. 
Albert Metcalf. 
J. Frank Wellington. 
Arthur E. Mason. 
Robert R. Andrews. 
J. Arthur Jacobs. 
Thos. Cunningham. 
Austin B. Fletcher, Vice-President. 



Rosewell B. Lawrence. 
Edward H. Clement. 
Arthur W. Peirce. 
Edwin Ginn. 
Charles Neal Barney. 
Austin B. Fletcher. 
Frank O. Melcher. 
Hiram A. Tuttle. 
Lloyd E. White. 
Fred Gowing. 
John A. Cousens. 
Ira Rich Kent. 
Wm. D. T. Trefry. 
Wm. W. McCIench. 

Arthur E. Mason, Treasurer. 



Edmund W. Kellogg, Secretary and Assistant Treasurer. 



Colleges. 



339 



MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. 

(Boston.) 

[Incorporated April 10, 1861.) 

MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION. 

Richard C. Maclaurin, President. 
James P. Munroe, Secretary. 
William B. Thurbek, Treasurer. 



Life Members. 



William Endicott. 
Howard A. Carson. 
Francis H. Williams. 
James P. Tolman. 
Howard Stockton. 
Hiram F. Mills. 
Percival Lowell. 
Charles C. Jackson. 
Samuel M. Felton. 
Desmond Fitz Gerald. 
Charles W. Hubbard. 
Thomas L. Livermore. 
A. Lawrence Rotch. 
George Wigglesworth. 
John R. Freeman. 
William H. Lincoln. 
J. B. Sewall. 
A. Lawrence Lowell. 



James P. Munroe. 
William L. Putnam. 
Eben S. Draper. 
Robert S. Peabody. 
Elihu Thomson. 
Elliot C. Lee. 
James P. Stearns. 
Lucius Tuttle. 
Frederick P. Fish. 
Francis L. Higginson. 
Charles A. Stone. 
W. Murray Crane. 
Francis R. Hart. 
T. Coleman duPont. 
Arthur F. Estabrook. 
John M. Longyear. 
Ernest W. Bowditch. 



Term Members. 

[Term expires March, 1912.] 
George E. Hale. George W. Kittredge. Frank G. Stantial. 

[Term expires March, 1913.1 
Arthur T. Bradlee. Everett Morss. James W. Rollins. 

[Term expires March, 1914.) 
Charles R. Richards. Theodore W. Robinson. Walter B. Snow. 

[Term expires March, 1915.) 
Edward Cunningham. Frank W, Rollins. Edwin S. Webster. 

[Term expires March, 1916.] 
Henry Howard. Henry A. Morss. Arthur Winslow. 

On the Part of the Commonwealth. 
His Excellency Eugene N. Foss, Governor. 

Hon. Arthur P. Rugg, Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court. 
Dr. David Snedden, Commissioner of Education. 



340 Colleges. 



BOSTON COLLEGE. 
(Boston.) 
[Incorporated April 1, 1863.] 
Trustees. 
Thomas I. Gasson, President. 
William P. Brett, Secretary. 
Joseph A. Gorman, Treasurer. 
William J. Conway, Thos. P. O'Donneli. 

Francis P. Powers. George A. Keelan. 

Timothy Fealy. Thoa. F. White. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

(Amherst.) 

[Incorporated April 29, 1863.] 

Kbnyon L. Butterfield, President. 

Trustees. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1913.] 

William H. Bowker. George H. Ellis. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1914.] 
Elmer D. Howe. Charles E. Ward. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1915.] 
Nathaniel I. Bowditch. William Wheeler. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1916.] 
Arthur G. Pollard. Charles A. Gleason. 

[Term of office expires Jan, 1, 1917.] 
Frank Gerrett. Harold L. Frost. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1918.] 
Charles H. Preston. Frank A. Hosmer. 

[Term of office expires Jan. 1, 1919.] 
Davis R. Dewey. Marquis F. Dickinson. 

Trustees ex Officio. 
Kenyon L. Butterfield, President of the College. 
J. Lewis Ellsworth, Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture. 

Officers. 
President — His Excellency Eugene N. Foss. 
Vice-President — Charles A. Gleason, Springfield. 
Secretary — J. Lewis Ellsworth, Worcester. 
Treasurer — Fred C. Kenney, Amherst. 
Auditor — Charles A. Gleason, Springfield. 



Colleges. 341 



WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE. 

(Worcester.) 
(Incorporated May 10, 1865.) 

CORPORATION. 

Charles G. Washburn, President. 

Charles Baker, Secretary. 

Homer Gage, Treasurer. 
G. Henry Whitcomb, T. Edward Wilder. 

Austin S. Garver. Fred H. Daniels. 

Allyn King Foster. Charles G. Stratton. 

Elmer P. Howe. Shepherd Knapp. 

James Logan. 

Milton P. Higgins, 
On the Part of the State Board of Education. 

Mayor of the City of Worcester, Ex Officio. 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY. 

(Boston.) 
[Incorporated May 26, 1869.] 

Lemuel H. Murlin, President. 
Office, 688 Boylston Street. 

Alonzo R. Weed, Acting Dean, School of Law. 
Laure-ss J. BiRNEY, Dean of School of Theology. 
.John P. Sutherland, Dean of School of Medicine. 
WiLLTAM M. Warren, Dean of College of Liberal Arts. 

corporation. 

John L. Bates, President. 

Willard T. Perrin, Secretary. 

Silas Peirce, Treasurer. 

Lemuel H. ]\Iurlin, Member ex Officio. 
Josiah H. Benton. Austin B. Fletcher, 

Alice Stone Blackwell. Charles T. Gallagher. 

Dillon Bronson. H. Clifford Gallagher. 

E. T. Burrowes. Walter G. Garritt. 

Geo. S. Butters. W. F. Gilman. 

Isabel P. Cushman. H. C. Graton. 

G. A. Dunn. John W. Hamilton. 



342 Colleges. 



BOSTON UNIVERSITY — Concluded. 

W. I. Haven. R. R. Robinson. 

Charles Leeds. Arthur P. Rugg. 

Joel M. Leonard. Edward Ray Speare. 

Horace A. Moses. Daniel Steele. 

Elizabeth C. Northup. W. I. Ward. 

Silas Peirce. A. R. Weed. 

William W. Potter. Daniel G. Wing. 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE. 

(Wellesley.) 
[Incorporated March 17, 1870.] 

Ellen F. Pendleton, President. 

CORPORATION. 

Board of Trustees. 

Alexander McKenzie, President Emeritus. 

Samuel B. Capen, President of the Board. 

William Lawrence, Vice-President. 

Mrs. Henry F. Durant, Secretary. 

Alpheus H. Hardy, Treasurer. 
William F. Warren. Cornelia Warren. 

Lilian Horsford Farlow. Herbert J. Wells. 

Edwin Hale Abbot. George Edwin Horr. 

Louise McCoy North. George H. Davenport. 

Adaline Emerson Thompson. William Edwards Huntington. 

Sarah E. Whitin. Helen Josephine Sanborn. 

Andrew Fiske. Anna R. Brown Lindsay. 

William H. Lincoln. William Blodget. 

Rowland G. Hazard. William V. Kellen. 

Caroline Hazard. Helen Barrett Montgomery. 

Joseph L. Colby. 

Ellen F. Pendleton, ex officio. 



Colleges. 



343 



SMITH COLLEGE. 

(Northampton.) 

[Incorporated March 3, 1871.] 

Marion Lb Rot Burton, President. 



John M. Greene. 
A. Lyman Williston. 
Charles N. Clark. 
John B. Clark. 
Arthur L. Gillett. 
Charles H. Allen. 
Samuel W. McCall. 



Board of Trustees. 

H. Clifford Gallagher. 
Thomas W. Lamont. 
Charles A. Roberts. 
Ruth B. Baldwin. 
Lucia C. Noyes. 
Ada Louise Comatock. 



Charles N. Clark, Treasurer. 



RADCLIFFE COLLEGE. 

(Cambridge.) 
[Incorporated Aug. 16, 1882.) 



Associates. 
Le Baron Russell Briggs, President. 
Mary Coes, Dean. 
Ezra Henry Baker, Treasurer. 
William Elwood Byerly, Chairman of the Academic Board. 



Mary Lowell Barton. 
Elizabeth Briggs. 
Ella Lyman Cabot. 
Frederick Pickering Cabot. 
Lilian Horsford Farlow. 
Frederick Perry Fish. 
William Watson Goodwin. 
John Chipman Gray. 
Caroline Louise Humphrey. 
Virginia Newhall Johnson. 
Alice Mary Longfellow. 



Mabel Harris Lyon. 
Ellen Francis Mason. 
Fanny Peabody Mason. 
John Farwell Moors. 
Frances Parkman. 
Fred Norris Robinson. 
James Hardy Ropes. 
Joseph Bangs Warner. 
Anna Florena Wellington. 
Sarah Yerxa. 



344 Colleges. 



CLARK UNIVERSITY. 

(Worcester.) 

[Incorporated March 31, 1887.] 

G. Stanley Hall, President. 

CORPORATION. 

Board of Trustees. 

A. George Bullock, President. 

Francis H. Dewey, Vice-President. 

Francis H. Dewey, Treasurer. 

G. Stanley Hall, Secretary (not a member). 
Orlando W. Norcross. Lucius Tuttle. 

Arthur F. Estabrook. Austin S. Garver. 

Herbert Parker. Arthur P. Rugg. 



SIMMONS COLLEGE. 

(Boston.) 

(Incorporated May 24, 1899.] 

Hknry Lefavour, President. 

CORPORATION. 

Henry Lefavour, President. 

John W. Bartol, Clerk. 
Frances B. Ames. Frances R. Morse. 

Edward D. Brandegee. Marion McG. Noyes. 

George H. Ellis. William T. Sedgwick. 

Mary M. Kehew. Joseph B. Warner. 

Horatio A. Lamb. Robert Treat Paine, 2d. 

Guy Lowell. Mary E. Williams. 



Colleges. 345 



CLARK COLLEGE. 

(Worcester.) 

[Founded 1902.] 

Edmund C. Sanford, President. 

Board of Trustees. 

A. George Bullock, President. 

Francis H. Dewey, Vice-President. 

Francis H. Dewey, Treasurer. 

G. Stanley Hall, Secretary (not a member). 
Orlando W. Norcrosa. Lucius Tuttle. 

Arthur F. Estabrook. Austin S. Garver. 

Herbert Parker. Arthur P. Rugg. 



JACKSON COLLEGE. 

(Medford.) 
[Chartered 1910.] 

Frederick William Hamilton, President. 
Caroline Stodder Davies, Dean. 

Trustees. 

Hosea Washington Parker, President. 

John Coleman Adams. Rosewell Bigelow Lawrence. 

Byron Groce. Edward Henry Clement. 

Walter Edward Parker. Arthur Winslow Peirce. 

William Waldemar Spaulding. Edwin Ginn. 

Charles Ewell Morrison. Charles Neal Barney. 

Sumner Robinson. Austin Barclay Fletcher. 

Albert Metcalf . Hiram Austin Tuttle. 

John Wilkes Hammond. Frank Otis Melcher. 

Frederick William Hamilton. Lloyd Everett White. 

J. Frank Wellington. Fred Gowing. 

Arthur Ellery Mason. John A. Cousens. 

Robert Robbins Andrews. Ira Rich Kent. 

Thomas Cunningham. Wm. D. T. Trefry. 

James Arthur Jacobs. Wm. W. McClench. 



346 



Post-Offices in Massacliv setts. 



POST-OFFICES IN MASSACHUSETTS, 

WITH THE 

CITIES, TOWNS AND COUNTIES IN WHICH THEY ARE 
SITUATED. 

[Corrected to Jan. 1, 1912.] 



[The spelling of the names of post-offices is that established 
by the Post-Office Department.] 



POST-OFFICES. 

Abington, 

Accord, . 

Acoaxet, 

Acton, . 

Acushnet, 

Adams, . 

Adamsdale, 

Adams villa, 

Agawam, 

Alandar, 

Allerton, 

AUston, 

Amesbury, 

Amherst, 

Andover, 

Annisquam, 

Arlington, 

Arlington Heights, 

Asbury Grove, 

Ashburnham, 

Ashby, . 

Ash field, 

Ashland, 

Ashley Falls, 

Assinippi, 

Assonet, 

Athol, . 



CrriES AND TOWNS. 

Abington, 

Hingham, 

Westport, 

Acton, 

Acushnet, 

Adams, 

North Attleborough 

Colrain, 

Agawam, 

Mount Washington 

Hull, . 

Boston, 

Amesbury, 

Amherst. 

Andover, 

Gloucester, , 

Arlington, 

ArUngton, 

Hamilton, 

Ashburnham, 

Ashby, 

Ashfield, 

Ashland, 

Sheffield, 

Hanover, 

Freetown, 

Athol, . 



Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Bristol. 

Franklin. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Briatol. 

Worcester. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



347 



POST-OFFICES. 

Athol Center, 

Atlantic, 

Attitash, 

Attleboro, 

Attleboro Falls, 

Auburn, 

Auburndale, 

Avon, 

Ayer, 

Ayers Village, 



Back Bay, 
Baldwinsville, 
Ballard Vale, . 
Bancroft, 
Bardwells Ferry, 
Barnstable, 
Barre, . 
Barre Plains, . 
Barrowsville, . 
Beachbluff, . 
Becket, . 
Becket Center, 
Bedford, 
Beechwood, . 
Belchertown, . 
Bellingham, . 
Belmont, 
Berkshire, 
Berlin, , 
Bernardston, . 
Beverly, 
Beverly Farms, 
Billerica, 
Bisbees, 
Blackinton, 
Blackstone, 
Blandford, 
Bolton, . 
Bondsville, 
Boston, . 
Boulevard, 
Bourne, 
Boumedale, . 
Boxford, 
Boylston Center, 
Bradford, 
Bradstreet, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Athol, . 

Quincy, 

Amesbury, , 

Attleborough 

North Attleborough 

Auburn, 

Newton, 

Avon, . 

Ayer, . 

Haverhill, 

Boston, 

Templeton, 

Andover, 

Middlefield, 

Shelburne, - 

Barnstable, 

Barre, . 

Barre, . 

Norton, 

Swampscott, 

Becket, 

Becket, 

Bedford, 

Cohasset, 

Belchertown 

Bellingham, 

Belmont, 

Lanesborough 

Berlin, 

Bernardston 

Beverly, 

Beverly, 

Billerica, 

Chesterfield, 

Williamstown 

Blackstone 

Blandford, 

Bolton, 

Palmer, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Bourne, 

Bourne, 

Boxford, 

Boylston, 

Haverhill, 

Hatfield, 



COUNTIES. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk, 

Essex, 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk, 

Middlesex, 

Essex. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Hampshire, 

Franklin. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester, 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Essex. 

Berkshire. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Hampshire. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Hampshire. 

Berlcshire. 

Worcester. 

Hampden. 

Worcester. 

Hampden. 

Suffolk. 

Suffolk. 

Barnstable, 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Essex, 

Hampshire, 



348 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST-OFFICES. 

Braggville, 

Braintree, 

Brant Rock, . 

Brewster, 

Bridgewater, . 

Brier, 

Brighton, 

Byghtwood, . 

Brimfield, 

Brockton, 

Brookfield, 

Brookline, 

Brooks Station, 

Brookville, 

Bryantville, . 

Buckland, 

Barrage, 

Buzzards Bay, 

Byfield, 

Cambridge, 
Cambridgeport, 
Campello, 
Camp Merrill, 
Canton, . 
Canton Corner, 
Canton Junction, 
Carlisle, . 
Carver, . 
Caryville, 
Cataumet, 
Center Marshfield, 
Centerville, 
Central Village, 
Cbarlemont, . 
Charles River, 
Charlestown, . 
Charlton, 
Charlton City, 
Charlton Depot, 
Chartley, 
Chatham, 
Chatham Port, 
Chelmsford, . 
Chelsea, 
Cherry Valley, 
Cheshire, 
Chester, 



CITIES AND TOWNS, 

Holliston, 

Braintree, 

Marshfield, 

Brewster, 

Bridgewater, 

Savoy, 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

Brimfield, 

Brockton, 

Brookfield, 

Brookline, 

Princeton, 

Ho) brook, 

Pembroke, 

Buckland, 

Hanson, 

Bourne, 

Newbury, 

Cambridge, 

Cambridge, 

Brockton, 

Pittsfield, 

Canton, 

Canton, 

Canton, 

Carlisle, 

Car\^er, 

Bellingham, 

Bourne, 

Marshfield, 

Barnstable, 

Westport, 

Charlemont, 

Needham, 

Boston, 

Charlton, 

Charlton, 

Charlton, 

Norton, 

Chatham, 

Chatham, 

Chelmsford, 

Chelsea, 

Leicester, 

Cheshire, 

Chester, 



Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Berkshire. 

SuflFolk. 

Hampden. 

Hampden. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Plymouth. 

Franklin. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Berkshire. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Bristol. 

Franklin. 

Norfolk. 

Suflfolk. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Suflfolk. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Hampden. 



Post- Offices in Massachicsettt 



349 



POST-OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIEa 


Chesterfield, . 


. Chesterfield, . 


. Hampshire 


Chestnut Hill, 


. Newton, 


. Middlesex. 


Chicopee, 


. Chicopee, 


. Hampden. 


Chicopee Falls, 


. Chicopee, 


. Hampden. 


Chilmark, 


. Chilmark, . 


. Dukes. 


City Mills, 


. Norfolk, 


. Norfolk. 


Clifford, 


. New Bedford, 


. Bristol. 


Clifton, . 


. Marblehead, . 


. Essex. 


Cliftondale, . 


. Saugus, 


. Essex. 


Chnton, . 


. Clinton, 


. Worcester. 


Cochesett, 


. West Bridgewater, 


. Plymouth. 


Cochituate, . 


. Wayland, 


. Middlesex. 


Cohasset, 


. Cohasset, 


. Norfolk. 


Coldbrook Springs, 


. Oakham, 


. Worcester. 


Coldspring, 


. Westford, 


. Middlesex. 


Cole rain, 


. Colrain, 


. Franklin. 


Collinsville, . 


. Dracut, 


. Middlesex. 


Concord, 


. Concord, 


. Middlesex. 


Concord Junction, 


. Concord, 


. Middlesex. 


Conway, 


. Conway, 


, Franklin. 


Cooley^'ille, . 


. New Salem, . 


. Franklin. 


Cordaville, 


. Southborough, 


. Worcester. 


Cotuit, . 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Craig\'ille, 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Creekville, 


. Chilmark, . 


. Dukea. 


Crow Point, . 


. Hingham, 


. Plymouth. 


Cummaquid, . 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Cummington, . 


. Cummington, 


. Hampshire. 


Cushing, 


. Salisbury, 


. Essex. 


Cushman, 


. Amherst, 


. Hampshire. 


Cuttyhunk, . 


. Gosnold, 


. Dukes. 


Cyrus, . 


. Heath, 


. Franklin. 


Dalton, . 


, Dalton, 


. Berkshire. 


Dana, . 


. Dana, . 


. Worcester. 


Danvers, 


. Danvers, 


. Essex. 


Dartmouth, . 


. Dartmouth, . 


. Bristol. 


Davis, , 


. Rowe, . 


. Franklin. 


Dedham, 


. Dedham, 


. Norfolk. 


Deerfield, 


. Deerfield. 


, Frankhn. 


Dell, . 


. Heath, 


. Franklin. 


Dennis, . 


. Dennis, 


. Barnstable. 


Dennis Port, . 


. Dennis, 


Barnstable. 


Dighton, 


. Dighton, 


. Bristol. 


Dodge, . 


. Charlton, 


. Worcester. 


Dodgeville, 


. Attleborough, 


. Bristol. 


Dorchester, 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Dorchester Center, , 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 



350 



Post- Offices in 3fassachusetts, 



POST-OFFICES. 

Douglass, 
Dover, . 
Dracut, . 
Drury, . 
Dudley, 
Dunstable, 
Duxbury, 
Dwight, 

East Billerica, 
East Boston, . 
East Boxford, 
East Brewster, 
East Bridgewater, 
East Brimfield, 
East Brookfield, 
East Cambridge, 
East Cancer, . 
East Dedham, 
East Deerfield, 
East Dennis, . 
East Douglass, 
East Falmouth, 
East Foxboro, 
East Freetown, 
East ham, 
Easthampton, 
East Harwich, 
East Haverhill, 
East HoUiston, 
East Lee. 

East Long Meadow, 
East Lynn, 
East Mansfield, 
East Mattapoisett, 
East Milton, . 
East Northfield, 
East Norton. . 
Easton, . 
Eastondale, 
East Orleans, . 
East Otis. 
East Pembroke, 
East Pepperell, 
East Princeton, 
East River, 
East Sandwich, 
East Saugus, . 



CrriES AND TOWNS. 

Douglas, 

Dover, 

Dracut, 

Florida, 

Dudley, 

Dunstable, 

Duxbury, 

Belchertown, 

Billerica, 

Boston, 

Boxford, 

Brewster, 

East Bridgewater, 

Brimfield, 

Brookfield, . 

Cambridge, . 

Car^'^er, 

Dedham, 

Deerfield, 

Dennis, 

Douglas, 

Falmouth, 

Foxborough, 

Freetown, 

Eastham, 

Easthampton, 

Harwich, 

Haverhill, 

HoUiston, 

Lee, 

East Longmeadow 

Lynn, . 

Mansfield, 

Mattapoisett, 

Milton, 

Northfield, . 

Norton, 

Easton, 

Easton, 

Orleans. 

Otis, . 

Pembroke, . 

Pepperell, 

Princeton, 

Hyde Park, . 

Sandwich, 

Saugus, 



COUNTIES. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Hampshire. 

Middlesex. 

Suffolk. 

Essex. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Hampden. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Franklin. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Norfolk. 

Bristol. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Hampden. 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Franklin. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Barnstable. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 



Post 


-Offices in Ifassachusetts. 351 


POST-OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


C0UIITIE8. 


East Taunton, 


. Taunton, 


Bristol. 


East Templeton, 


. Templeton. . 


Worcester. 


East Walpole, 


. Walpole, 


Norfolk. 


East Warehara, 


. Wareham, 


Plymouth. 


East Weymouth, 


. Weymouth, . 


Norfolk. 


East Whately, 


. Whately, 


Franklin. 


East Windsor, 


. Windsor, 


Berkshire. 


Edgartown, . 


. Edgartown, . 


Dukes. 


Egypt, . 


. Scituate, 


Plymouth. 


Ellis, . 


. Dedham, 


Norfolk. 


Elmgrove, 


, Colrain, 


Franklin. 


Elmwood, 


. East Bridgewater, 


Plymouth. 


Enfield, . 


. Enfield, 


Hampshire. 


Erving, . 


. Erving, 


Franklin. 


Essex, . 


. Essex, . 


Essex. 


Essex Street, . 


. Boston, 


Suffolk. 


Everett, 


. Everett, 


Middlesex. 


Fairhaven, 


. Fairhaven, . 


Bristol. 


Fall River, . 


. Fall River, . 


Bristol. 


Falmouth, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable. 


Falmouth Heights, 


. Falmouth, 


Barnstable. 


Farley, . 


. ErA'ing, 


Franklin. 


Famams, 


. Cheshire, 


Berkshire, 


Farnumsville, 


. Grafton, 


. Worcester. 


Fay^'ille, 


. Southborough, 


Worcester. 


Feeding Hills, 


, Agawam, 


Hampden. 


Fisherville, . 


. Grafton, 


Worcester. 


Fiskdale, 


. Sturbridge, . 


Worcester. 


Fitchburg, 


. Fitchburg, 


Worcester. 


Flint, . 


. Fall River. . 


Bristol. 


Florence, 


. Northampton, 


Hampshire. 


Forestdale, 


. Sandwich, 


. Barnstable. 


Forge Village, 


. Westford, . 


Middlesex. 


Fort Andrews, 


. Hull, . 


Plj'mouth. 


Fort Warren,* 


. 


Suffolk. 


Foxboro, 


. Foxborough, 


Norfolk. 


Framingham, . 


. Framingham, 


Middlesex. 


Franklin, 


. Frankfin, 


Norfolk. 


Franklin Park, 


. Revere, 


Suffolk. 


Furnace, 


. Hardwick, 


. Worcester. 


Gardner, 


. Gardner, 


Worcester. 


Gay Head, . 


. Gay Head, . 


Dukes. 


Georgetown, . 


. Georgetown, 


. Essex. 


Gilbertville, . 


. Hardwick, 


Worcester. 


Gleasondale, . 


. Stow, . 


Middlesex. 



* On George's Island, a military reservation in Boston lower harbor. 



352 



Post- Offices in Massadiusetts . 



POST-OFFICES. 

Glendale, 
Globe Village; 
Gloucester, 
Goshen, 
Grafton, 
Granby, 
Graniteville, . 
Granville, 
Granville Center, 
Great Barrington, 
Greenbush, 
Greendale. 
Greenfield. 
Green Harbor, 
Green Hill, . 
Greenwich, 
Greenwich Village, 
Greenwood, 
Griswoldville, . 
Groton, . 
Grove Hall, 
Grov eland, 

Hadley, 

Halifax, 

Hamilton, 

Hampden, 

Hancock, 

Hanover, 

Hanover Center, 

Hanover Street, 

Hanson, 

Harding, 

Hardwick, 

Hartsville, 

Harvard, 

Harwich, 

Harwicli Port, 

Hatchville, 

Hatfield, 

Hathorne, 

Haverhill, 

Hawley, 

Ilayden Row, 

Haydenville, 

Heath, . 

Hebronville, 

Highland, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Stockbridge, . 

Southbridge, 

Gloucester, 

Goshen, 

Grafton, 

Granby, 

Westford, 

Granville, 

Granville, 

Great Barrington, 

Scituate, 

AVorcester, 

Greenfield, 

Marshfield, 

Hull. . 

Greenwich, 

Greenwich, 

Wakefield, 

Colrain, 

Groton, 

Boston, 

Groveland, 

Hadley, 

Halifax, 

Hamilton, 

Hampden, 

Hancock, 

Hanover, 

Hanover, 

Boston, 

Hanson, 

Medfield, 

Hardwick, 

New Marlborough, 

Harvard, 

Harwich, 

Harwich, 

Falmouth, 

Hatfield, 

Danvers, 

Haverhill, 

Hawley, 

Hopkinton, 

Williamsburg, 

Heath, 

Attleborough, 

Springfield, . 



Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Worcester. 

Hampshire. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth, 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Middlesex. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Suffolk. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Essex. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk. 

Plymouth. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Essex. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Hampshire. 

Franklin. 

Bristol. 

Hampden. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



353 



POST-OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


Hillsboro, 


. Leverett, 


. Franklin. 


Hingham, 


. Hingham, 


. Plymouth. 


Hingham Center, 


. Hingham, 


. Plymouth. 


Hinsdale, 


. Hinsdale, 


. Berkshire. 


Holbrook, 


. Holbrook, . 


. Norfolk. 


Holden, 


. Holden, 


. Worcester. 


Holliston, 


. Holliston, 


. Middlesex. 


Holyoke, 


. Holyoke, 


. Hampden. 


Hoosac Tunnel, 


. Florida, 


. Berkshire. 


Hopedale, 


. Hopedale, 


. Worcester. 


Hopkinton, 


. Hopkinton, . 


. Middlesex. 


Housatonic, . 


. Great Barrington, 


. Berkshire. 


Hubbardston, 


. Hubbardston, 


. Worcester. 


Hudson, 


. Hudson, 


. Middlesex. 


Hull. . 


. Hull, . 


. Plymouth. 


Huntington, . 


. Huntington, . 


. Hampshire 


Hyannia, 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable 


Hyannis Port, 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Hyde Park, . 


. Hyde Park, . 


. Norfolk. 


Indian Orchard, 


. Springfield, . 


. Hampden. 


Interlaken, . 


. Stockbridge, . 


. Berkshire. 


Ipswich, 


. Ipswich, 


. Essex. 


Island Creek, . 


. Duxbury, 


. Plymouth. 


Islington, 


. Westwood, . 


. Norfolk. 


Jamaica Plain, 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Jefferson, 


. Holden, 


. Worcester. 


Kenberma, 


. Hull, . 


. Plymouth. 


Kendal Green, 


. Weston, 


. Middlesex. 


Kingston, 


. Kingston, 


. Plymouth. 


Lake Pleasant, 


. Montague, 


. Franklin. 


LakeviUe, 


. LakeviUe, 


. Plymouth. 


Lancaster, 


. Lancaster, 


. Worcester. 


lianesboro. 


. Lanesborough, 


. Berkshire. 


Tianesville, 


. Gloucester, . 


. Essex. 


Laurel Park, . 


. Northampton, 


. Hampshire 


Lawrence, 


. Lawrence, 


. Essex. 


Lee, 


. Lee. . 


. Berkshire. 


Leeds, . 


. Northampton, 


. Hampshire 


Leicester, 


. Leicester, 


. Worcester. 


Lenox, . 


. Lenox, 


. Berkshire. 


Lenox Dale, . 


. Lenox, 


. Berkshire. 


Leominster, , 


. Leominster, . 


. Worcester. 


Leverett, 


. Leverett, 


. Franklin. 


Lexington, 


. Lexington, . 


. Middlesex. 



354 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts, 



P03T-OFFICE3. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


Leyden, 


. Leyden, 


. Franklin. 


Lincoln, . 


. Lincoln, 


. Middlesex. 


Line. . 


. Colrain, 


. Franklin. 


Linwood, 


. Northbridge, 


. Worcester. 


Lithia, . 


. Goshen, 


. Hampshire. 


Littleton, 


. Littleton, 


. Middlesex. 


Littleton Common, 


. Littleton, 


. Middlesex. 


Littleville. . 


. Chester, 


. Hampden. 


Locka Village, 


. Wendell. 


. Franklin. 


Lowell, . 


. Lowel), 


. Middlesex. 


Lower Falls, . 


. Newton, 


. Middlesex. 


Ludlow, 


. Ludlow, 


. Hampden. 


Ludlow Center, 


. Ludlow, 


. Hampden. 


Lunenburg, 


. Lunenburg, . 


. Worcester. 


Lynn, 


. Lynn, . 


. Essex. 


Lynnfield, 


. Lynnfield, 


. Essex. 


Lynnfield Center, 


. Lynnfield. . 


. Essex. 


Lyonsville, 


. Colrain, 


. Franklin. 


Magnolia, 


. Gloucester, . 


. Essex. 


Maiden, 


. Maiden, 


. Middlesex. 


Manchaug, 


. Sutton, 


, Worcester. 


Manchester, . 


. Manchester, . 


. Essex, 


Manomet, 


. Plymouth, . 


. Plymouth. 


Mansfield, 


. Mansfield, 


. Bristol. 


Marblehead, . 


. Marblehead, . 


. Essex. 


Marblehead Neck. 


. Marblehead. . 


. Essex. 


Marion, . 


. Marion, 


. Plymouth. 


Marlboro, 


. Marlborough, 


. Middlesex. 


Marshfield, . 


. Marshfield. . 


. Plymouth. 


Marshfield Hills, 


. Marshfield, . 


. Plymouth. 


Marstons MUls, 


. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Mashpee, 


. Mashpee. 


. Barnstable. 


Mattapan, 


. Boston. 


. Suffolk. 


Mattapoisett, . 


. Mattapoisett, 


. Plymouth. 


Maynard, 


. Maynard, 


. Middlesex. 


Meadowbrook, 


. Norton, 


. Bristol. 


Medfield. 


. Medfield. 


. Norfolk. 


Medford, 


. Medford. 


. Middlesex. 


Medway, 


. Medway. 


. Norfolk. 


Megansett, 


. Falmouth, 


. Barnstable. 


Melrose, 


. Melrose. 


. Middlesex. 


Melrose Highlands, 


. Melrose. 


. Middlesex. 


Mendon, 


. Mendon. 


. Worcester. 


Menemsha, 


. Chilmark, 


. Dukes. 


Merrick, 


. West Springfield, . 


. Hampden. 


Merrimac, 


. Merrimac, 


. Essex. 


Merrimacport, 


. Merrimac, 


. Essex. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



355 



POST-OFFICES. 


CrriES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


Metcalf, 


. Holliston, . 


. Middlesex. 


Methuen, 


. Methuen, 


. Essex. 


Middleboro, . 


. Middleborough, 


. Plymouth. 


Middlefield. . 


. Middle6eld, . 


. Hampshire. 


Middleton, 


. Middleton. . 


. Essex. 


Milford, 


. Milford, 


. Worcester. 


MiUbrook. 


. Duxbury, 


. Plymouth. 


Millbury, 


. Millbury, 


. Worcester. 


Millers Falls, . 


. Montague, 


. Franklin. 


Millington, 


. New Salem, . 


. Franklin. 


Millis, . 


. Millis. . 


. Norfolk. 


Mill River, . 


. New Marlborough, 


. Berkshire. 


Millville, 


. Blackatone, . 


. Worcester. 


Milton, . 


. Milton, 


. Norfolk. 


Minot, . 


. Scituate, 


. Plymouth. 


Mittineague, . 


. West Springfield, 


. Hampden. 


Monroe Bridge, 


. Monroe, 


. Franklin. 


Monson, 


. Monson, 


. Hampden. 


Montague, 


. Montague, . 


. Franklin. 


Montague City, 


. Montague, 


. Franklin. 


Montello, 


. Brockton, 


. Plymouth. 


Monterey, 


. Monterey, 


. Berkshire. 


Montgomery, . 


. Montgomery, 


. Hampden. 


Montville, 


, Sandisfield, . 


. Berkshire. 


Montwait, 


. Framingham, 


. Middlesex. 


Monument Beach, 


. Bourne, 


. Barnstable. 


Moores Comer, 


. Leverett, 


. Franklin. 


Mount Auburn, 


. Watertown, . 


. Middlesex. 


Mount Blue, . 


. Scituate, 


. Plymouth. 


Mount Hermon, 


. Northfield, . 


. Franklin. 


Mount Tom, . 


. Easthampton, 


. Hampshire. 


Mount Washington, 


. Moimt Washington 


. Berkshire. 


Myricks, 


. Berkley, 


. Bristol. 


Nahant, 


. Nahant, 


. Essex. 


Nantasket Beach, 


. Hull, . 


. Plymouth. 


Nantucket, 


. Nantucket, . 


. Nantucket. 


Nashoba, 


. Westford, . 


. Middlesex. 


Natick. . 


. Natick, 


. Middlesex. 


Needham, 


. Needham, 


. Norfolk. 


Needham Heights, 


. Needham, 


. Norfolk. 


New Bedford. 


. New Bedford, 


. Bristol. 


New Boston, . 


. Sandisfield, . 


. Berkshire. 


New Braintree, 


. New Braintree, 


. Worcester. 


Newburyport, 


. Newburyport, 


. Essex. 


New Lenox, . 


. Lenox, 


. Berkshire. 


New Marlboro, 


. New Marlborough, 


. Berkshire. 


New Salem, . 


. New Salem, . 


. Franklin. 



356 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST-OFFICES. 

Newton, 
Newton Center, 
Newton Highlands 
Newton Upper Falls 
Newtonville, . 
Nobscot, 
Nonquitt, 
Norfolk, 

North Abington, 
North Acton, . 
North Adams, 
North Amherst, 
Northampton, 
North Andover, 
North Ashburnham 
North Attleboro, 
North Bellingham, 
North Billerica, 
Northboro, 
North Brewster, 
Northbridge, . 
Northbridge Cente; 
North Brookfield, 
North Cambridge, 
North Carver, 
North Chatham, 
North Chelmsford, 
North Chester, 
North Cohasset, 
North Dana, . 
North Dartmouth, 
North Dighton, 
North Duxbury, 
North Eastham, 
North Easton, 
North Egremont, 
North Falmouth, 
Northfield, 
Northfield Farms, 
North Grafton, 
North Hadley, 
North Hanover, 
North Hanson, 
North Harwich, 
North Hatfield, 
North Heath. 
North Leominster, 
North Leverett, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Newton, 

Newton, 

Newton, 

Newton, 

Newton, 

Framingham, 

Dartmouth, . 

Norfolk, 

Abington, 

Acton, . 

North Adams, 

Amherst, 

Northampton, 

North Andover, 

Ashburnham, 

North Attleborough, 

Bellingham, . 

Billerica, 

Northborough, 

Brewster, 

Northbridge, 

Northbridge, 

North Brookfield, 

Cambridge, 

Carver, 

Chatham, 

Chelmsford, 

Chester, 

Cohasset, 

Dana, . 

Dartmouth, 

Dighton, 

Duxbury, 

Eastham, 

Easton, 

Egremont, 

Falmouth, 

Northfield, 

Northfield, 

Grafton, 

Hadley, 

Hanover, 

Hanson, 

Harwich, 

Hatfield, 

Heath, 

Leominster, 

Leverett, 



COUNTIES. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Plymouth. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Barnstable. 

FrankUn, 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts. 



357 



POST-OFFICES. 




CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


North Marehfield, 


. Marshfield, . 


. Plymouth. 


North Middleboro, 


. Middleborough, 


. Plymouth. 


North New Salem, 


. New Salem, . 


. Franklin. 


North Orange. 


. Orange, 


. Franklin. 


North Oxford, 


. Oxford, 


. Worcester. 


North Pembroke, 


. Pembroke, . 


. Plymouth. 


North Plymouth, 


. Plymouth, . 


. Plymouth. 


North Postal, . 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


North Prescott, 


. Prescott, 


. Hampshire. 


North Raynham, 


. Raynham, 


. Bristol. 


North Reading, 


. North Reading, 


. Middlesex. 


North Scituate, 


. Scituate, 


. Plymouth. 


North Stoughton, 


. Stoughton, . 


. Norfolk. 


North Sudbury, 


. Sudbury, 


. Middlesex. 


North Swansea, 


. Swansea, 


. Bristol. 


North Tbbury, 


. West Tisbury, 


. Dukes. 


North Truro, . 


. Truro, . 


. Barnstable. 


North Uxbridge, 


. Uxbridge, 


. Worcester. 


North Westport, 


. Westport, 


. Bristol. 


North Weymouth, 


. Weymouth, . 


. Norfolk. 


North Wilbraham, 


. Wilbraham, . 


. Hampden. 


North Wilmington, 


. Wilmington, 


. Middlesex. 


Norton, . 


. Norton, 


. Bristol. 


Norwell, 




. Norwell, 


. Plymouth. 


Norwood, 




. Norwood, 


. Norfolk. 


Oak Bluffs, 




. Oak Bluffs, . 


. Dukes. 


Oakdale, 




. West Boylston, 


. Worcester. 


Oakham, 




. Oakham, 


. Worcester. 


Onset. . 




. Wareham, . 


. Plymouth. 


Orange, . 




. Orange, 


. Franklin. 


Orleans, 




. Orleans, 


. Barnstable. 


Osterville, 




. Barnstable, . 


. Barnstable. 


Otis, 




. Otis, , 


. Berkshire. 


Otter River, 




. Templeton, . 


. Worcester. 


Oxford, . 




. Oxford, 


. Worcester. 


Palmer. . 




. Palmer, 


. Hampden. 


Pasque Island 




. Gosnold, 


. Dukes. 


Paxton, 




. Paxton, 


. Worcester. 


Peabody, 




. Peabody, 


. Essex. 


Pelham, 




. Pelham, 


. Hampshire 


Pembroke, 




. Pembroke, . 


. Plymouth. 


Penikese, 




, Gosnold, 


. Dukes. 


Pepperell, 




. Pepperell, . 


. Middlesex. 


Peru, 




. Peru, . 


. Berkshire. 


Petersham, 




. Petersham, . 


. Worcester. 


Phillipston, 




. Phillipston, . 


. Worcester. 



358 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



POST-OFFICES. 


CrriES AND TOWNS. COUNTIES. 


Pigeon Cove, . 


. Rockport, . 


. Essex. 


Pittsfield, 


. Pittsfield, . 


. Berkshire. 


Plainfield, 


. Plainfield, 


. Hampshire. 


Plainville, 


. Plainville, . 


. Norfolk. 


Pleasant Lake, 


. Harwich, 


. Barnstable. 


Plymouth, 


. Plymouth, 


. Plymouth. 


Pl3Tiipton, 


. Plympton, 


. Plymouth. 


Pocasset, 


. Bourne, 


. Barnstable. 


Ponkapog, 


. Canton, 


. Norfolk. 


Potteraville, . 


. Somerset, 


. Bristol. 


Pratts Junction, 


. Sterling, 


. Worcester. 


Prescott, 


. Prescott. 


. Hampshire 


Prides Crossing, 


. Beveriy, 


. Essex. 


Princeton, 


. Princeton, 


. Worcester. 


Princeton Depot, 


. Princeton, 


. Worcester. 


Province town. 


. Province town 


. Barnstable. 


Quinapoxet, . 


. Holden, 


. Worcester. 


Quincy, 


. Quincy, 


. Norfolk. 


Quinsigamond, 


. Worcester, 


. Worcester. 


Quissett, 


. Falmouth, 


. Barnstable. 


Randolph, 


. Randolph, 


. Norfolk. 


Raynham Center, 


. Raynham, 


. Bristol. 


Reading, 


. Reading, 


. Middlesex 


Readville, 


. Hyde Park, 


. Norfolk. 


Rehoboth, 


. Rehoboth. 


. Bristol. 


Revere, 


. Revere, 


. Suffolk. 


Rexhame, 


. Marshfield, 


. Plymouth. 


Richmond, 


. Richmond, 


. Berkshire. 


Richmond Furnace, 


. Richmond, 


. Berkshire. 


Ringville, 


. Worthington, 


. Hampshire 


Rivermoor, . 


. Scituate, 


, Plymouth. 


Rochdale, 


. Leicester, 


. Worcester, 


Rochester, 


. Rochester, 


. Plymouth. 


Rock, . 


. Middleboroug 


h, . . Plymouth. 


Rockland, 


. Rockland, 


. Plymouth. 


Rockport, 


. Rockport, 


. Essex. 


Rock^nlle, . 


. Millis, . 


. Norfolk. 


Roslindale, . 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Rowe, . 


. Rowe, . 


. Franklin. 


Rowley, 


. Rowley, 


. Essex. 


Roxbury, 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Roxbury Crossing, 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Royalston, 


. Royalston, 


. Worcester. 


RuaseU, 


. RusseU, 


. Hampden. 


Rutland, 


. Rutland, 


. Worcester. 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



359 



P08T-0FFICES. 

Sagamore, 
Sagamore Beach 
Salem, . 
Salisbury, 
Sandhills, 
Sandwich, 
Santuit, 
SaugU3 Center, 
Saundersville, 
Savoy, . 
Savoy Center, 
Saxonville, 
Scituate, 
Scituate Center, 
Scotland, 
Sea View, 
Seekonk, 
Segreganset, . 
Sharon, . 
Shattuckville, 
Shawmut, 
Sheffield, 
Shelbume Falls, 
Sheldonville, ■. 
Sherborn, 
Shirley, . 
Shirley Center, 
Shrewsbury, . 
Shutesbury, . 
Siaaconset, 
Silver Lake, . 
Smiths, . 
Smiths Ferry, 
Somerset, 
Somerville, 
South Acton, . 
South Amherst, 
Southampton, 
South Ashburnham, 
South Ashfield, 
South Athol, . 
South Attleboro, 
South Barre, . 
South Berlin, . 
Southboro, 
South Boston, 
South Braintree, 
South Brewater, 



CITIES AND TOWNS, 

Bourne, 

Bourne, 

Salem, 

Salisbury, 

Scituate, 

Sandwich, 

Barnstable, 

Saugus, 

Grafton, 

Savoy, 

Savoy, 

Framingham, 

Scituate, 

Scituate, 

Bridgewater, 

Marshfield, 

Seekonk, 

Dighton, 

Sharon, 

Colrain, 

New Bedford 

Sheffield, 

Shelbume, 

Wrentham, 

Sherborn, 

Shirley, 

Shirley, 

Shrewsbury, , 

Shutesbury, , 

Nantucket, 

Kingston, 

Enfield, 

Northampton 

Somerset, 

Somerville, 

Acton, . 

Amherst, 

Southampton 

Ashburnham 

Ashfield, 

Athol, . 

Attleborough, 

Barre, . 

Berlin, . 

Southborough 

Boston, 

Braintree, 

Brewster, 



COUNTIES. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Essex, 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Pljonouth. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Franklin. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Franklin. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Nantucket. 

Plymouth. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Bristol. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Bristol. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Suffolk. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 



360 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST-OFFICES. 

Southbridge, . 
South Byfield, 
South Carver, 
South Chatham, 
South Chelmsford, 
South Dartmouth, 
South Deerfield, 
South Dennis, 
South Duxbury, 
South Eaaton, 
South Egremont, 
South End, . 
South Essex, . 
Southfield, 
South Framingham, 
South Gardner, 
South Groveland, 
South Hadley, 
South Hadley Falla, 
South Hamilton, 
South Hanover, 
South Hanson, 
South Harwich, 
South Hingham, 
South Hyannis, 
South Lancaster, 
South Lee, 
South Lincoln, 
South Middleboro, 
South Middleton, 
South Miiford, 
South Natick, 
South Orleans, 
South Postal, . 
South Royalston, 
South Sandisfield, 
South Sandwich, 
South Sudbury, 
South Swansea, 
South Truro, . 
Southville, 
South Walpole, 
South Wareham, 
South Wellfleet, 
South Westport, 
South Weymouth, 
Southwick, 
South Williamstown 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Southbridge, 

Newbury, 

Cancer, 

Chatham, 

Chelmflford, . 

Dartmouth, . 

Deerfield, 

Dennis, 

Duxbury, 

Easton, 

Egremont, 

Boston, 

Essex, . 

New Marlborough, 

Framingham, 

Gardner, 

Groveland, . 

South Hadley, 

South Hadley, 

Hamilton, 

Hanover, 

Hanson, 

Harwich, 

Hingham, 

Barnstable, 

Lancaster, 

Lee, 

Lincoln, 

Middleborough, 

Middleton, 

Hopedale, 

Natick, 

Orleans, 

Boston, 

Royalston. 

Sandisfield, 

Sandwich, 

Sudbury, 

Swansea, 

Truro. . 

Southborough, 

Walpole, 

Wareham, 

Wellfleet, 

Westport, 

Weymouth, 

Southwick, 

Williamstown, 



COUNTIES. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Franklin. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Bristol. 

Berkshire. 

Suffolk. 

Essex. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Hampshire. 

Essex. 

Plymouth. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Plymouth. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex . 

Barnstable. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Bristol. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Bristol. 

Norfolk. 

Hampden. 

Berkshire. 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



361 



POST-OFFICES. 


CITIES AND TOWNS. 


COUNTIES. 


South Worthington, 


. Worthington, 


. Hampshire. 


South Yarmouth, 


. Yarmouth, . 


. Barnstable. 


Spencer, 


. Spencer, 


. Worcester. 


Springfield, 


. Springfield, . 


. Hampden. 


Squantum, 


. Quincy, 


. Norfolk. 


Standish, 


. Marshfield, . 


. Plymouth. 


State Farm, . 


. Bridge water. 


. Plymouth. 


State Line, 


. West Stockbridge, 


. Berkshire. 


Sterling, 


. Steding, 


. Worcester. 


Sterling Junction, 


. SterUng, 


. Worcester. 


Still River, . 


. Harvard, 


. Worcester. 


Stockbridge, . 


. Stockbridge, . 


. Berkshire. 


Stoneham, 


. Stoneham, . 


. Middlesex. 


Stonybrook, . 


. Weston, 


. Middlesex. 


Stoughton, 


. Stoughton, . 


. Norfolk. 


Stow, . 


. Stow, , 


. Middlesex. 


Sturbridge, 


. Sturbridge, . 


. Worcester. 


Sudbury, 


. Sudbury, 


. Middlesex. 


Sunderland. . 


. Sunderland. . 


. Franklin. 


Swampscott, . 


. Swampscott, 


. Essex. 


Swansea, 


. Swansea, 


. Bristol. 


Swift River, . 


. Cummington, 


. Hampshire 


Tarpaulin Cove, 


. Gosnold, 


. Dukes. 


Taunton, 


. Taunton, 


. Bristol. 


Teaticket, 


, Falmouth, . 


. Barnstable. 


Templeton, . 


. Templeton, . 


. Worcester. 


Tewksbury, . 


. Tewksbury, . 


. Middlesex. 


Thorndike, . 


. Palmer, 


. Hampden. 


Three Rivers, 


. Palmer, 


. Hampden. 


Tolland, 


. Tolland, 


. Hampden. 


Topsfield, 


. Topsfield, 


. Essex. 


Touisset, 


. Swansea, 


. Bristol. 


Townsend, 


. Townsend, . 


. Middlesex. 


Townsend Harbor, 


. Townsend, . 


. Middlesex. 


Truro, . 


. Truro, . 


. Barnstable 


Tufts College, 


. Medford, 


. Middlesex. 


TuUy, . 


. Orange, 


. Franklin. 


Turners Falls, 


. Montague, . 


. Franklin. 


Tyngsboro, 


. Tyngsborough, 


. Middlesex. 


Tyringham, . 


. Tyringham, . 


. Berkshire. 


Unionville, 


. Franklin, 


. Norfolk. 


Uphams Comer, 


. Boston, 


. Suffolk. 


Upton, . 


. Upton, 


. Worcester. 


Uxbridge, 


. Uxbridge, . 


. Worcester. 


Vineyard Haven, 


. Tisbury, 


. Dukes. 



362 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



POST-OFFICES. 

Waban, 
Wadsworth, 
Wakefield, 
Walefe, . 
Walpole, 
Waltham, 
Wamesit, 
Waquoit, 
Ward HiU, 
Ware, . j 
Wareham, ^ 
Warren, 
Warwick, ' 
Washington, 
Watertown, 
Waterville, 
Watson, 
Waverley, 
Wayland, 
Webster, 
WeUesIey, 
Wellesley Farms, 
WeUesley Hills, 
WeUfleet, 
Wendell, 
Wenham, 
West Acton, . 
West Auburn, 
West Barnstable, 
West Becket, . 
West Berlin, . 
Westboro, 
West Borford, 
West Boj'lston, 
West Brewster, 
West Bridgewater, 
West Brookfield, 
West Chatham, 
West Chelmsford, 
West Chesterfield, 
West Chop, . 
West Cummington, 
Westdale, 
West Dennis, . 
West Dudley, 
West Duxbury, 
West Falmouth, 
Weatfield, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Newton, 

Franklin. 

Wakefield, 

Wales, 

Walpole, 

Waltham, 

Tewksbury, 

Falmouth, 

Haverhill, 

Ware, . 

Wareham, 

Warren, 

Warwick, 

Washington, 

Watertown, 

Winchendon, 

Ash field, 

Belmont, 

Wayland, 

Webster, 

Wellesley, 

WeUesley, 

W^ellesley, 

WeUfleet, 

WendeU, 

Wenham, 

Acton, 

Auburn, 

Barnstable, 

Becket, 

Berlin, 

Westboro ugh 

Boxford, 

West Boylston, 

Brewster, 

West Bridgewater, 

West Brookfield, 

Chatham, 

Chelmsford, . 

Chesterfield, . 

Tisbury, 

Cummington, 

West Bridgewater, 

Dennis, 

Dudley, 

Duxbury, 

Falmouth, 

Westfield, . 



COUNTIES. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Norfolk. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Barnstable. 

Essex. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

FrankUn. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Hampshire. 

Dukes. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampden. 



Post- Offices in Massachusetts. 



363 



P03TH5FFICE3. 

Weatford. 
Weat Groton. 
Westhampton, 
West Hanover, 
West Harwich, 
West Hatfield, 
Weat Hawley, 
Weat Leyden, 
West Lynn, . 
West Mansfield, 
West Medford, 
West Medway, 
West Millbury, 
Westminster,. . 
West Newbury, 
Weat Newton, 
West Northfield. 
Weston, 
Weat Otis, 
West Peabody, 
Westport, 
Westport Point, 
West Roxbury, 
West Rutland, 
West Somerville, 
West Springfield, 
West Sterling, 
West Stockbridge, 
West Stoughton, 
West Tisbury. 
West Townsend, 
West Upton, . 
West Wareham, 
West Warren. 
Westwood, 
West Worthington, 
West Wrentham, 
West Yarmouth, 
Wejrmouth, 
What«ly, 
Wheelwright, . 
White Horse Beach 
White Valley, 
Whitinsville, . 
Whitman, 
Wianno, 
Wilbraham, . 
Wilkinsonville, 



CITIES AND TOWNS, 

Westford, 

Groton, 

Westhampton, 

Hanover, 

Harwich, 

Hatfield, 

Hawley, 

Leyden, 

Lynn, . 

Mansfield, 

Medford, 

Medway, 

Millbury, 

Westminster, 

West Newbury, 

Newton, 

Northfield, . 

Weston, 

Otis, . 

Peabody, 

Westport, 

Westport, 

Boston, 

Rutland, 

Somerville, . 

West Springfield, 

Sterling, 

West Stockbridge, 

Stoughton, , 

West Tisbury, 

Townsend, . 

Upton, 

Wareham, 

Warren, 

Westwood, . 

Worthington, 

Wrentham, . 

Yarmouth, . 

Weymouth, . 

Whately, 

Hardwick, 

Plymouth, . 

Barre, . 

Northbridge, 

Whitman, 

Barnstable, . 

Wilbraham, . 

Sutton, 



COUNTIES. 

Middlesex. 

Middlesex. 

Hampshire. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampshire. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Middlesex. 

Norfolk. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Essex. 

Middlesex. 

Franklin. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Essex. 

Bristol. 

Bristol. 

Suffolk. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Hampden. 

Worcester. 

Berkshire. 

Norfolk. 

Dukes. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Norfolk. 

Hampshire. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Norfolk. 

Franklin. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Plymouth. 

Barnstable. 

Hampden. 

Worcester. 



364 



Post-Offices in Massachusetts, 



POST-OFFICES. 

Williamsburg, 

Williamstown, 

Williamsville, 

Willimansett, . 

Wilmington, . 

Winchendon, . 

Winchendon Springs 

Winchester, . 

Windsor, 

Winter Hill, . 

Winthrop, 

Woburn, 

WoUaston, 

Woods Hole, . 

Woodville, 

Worcester, 

Woronoco, 

Worthington, , 

Wrentham, 

Yarmouth, 
Yarmouth Port, 



CITIES AND TOWNS. 

Williamsburg, 

Williamstown, 

Hubbardston, 

Chicopee, 

Wilmington, 

Winchendon, 

Winchendon, 

Winchester, 

Windsor, 

Somerviile, 

Winthrop, 

Wobum, 

Quincy, 

Falmouth, 

Hopkinton, 

Worcester, 

Russell, 

Worthington, 

Wrentham, 

Yarmouth, 
Yarmouth, 



COUNTIES. 

Hampshire. 

Berkshire. 

Worcester. 

Hampden. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Worcester. 

Middlesex. 

Berkshire. 

Middlesex. 

Suffolk. 

Middlesex, 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 

Middlesex. 

Worcester. 

Hampden. 

Hampshire. 

Norfolk. 

Barnstable. 
Barnstable. 



Zoar, 



Charlemont, 



Franklin. 



United States Postal Regulations. 365 



ABRIDGMENT OP UNITED STATES 
POSTAL REGULATIONS. 



POSTAGE 

TO ANY PART OF THE UNITED STATES, THE TERRITORIES, AND THE POS- 
SESSIONS OF THE UNITED STATES; ALSO TO CANADA, MEXICO, CUBA, 
THE REPUBLIC OF PANAMA AND THE UNITED STATES POSTAL AGENCY 
AT SHANGHAI, CHINA. 



Two cents for each ounce, or fraction thereof, on letters, sealed packages, 
mail matter, wholly or partly in writing. 

Two cents per ounce, or fraction thereof, on drop-letters where free deliv- 
ery by carriers is established; where such free delivery is not established, 
the rate is one cent. 

One cent for two ounces, or fraction thereof, on almanacs, books (printed), 
calendars, catalogues, engravings, pamphlets, photographs, posters, 
printed cards, proof sheets, corrected proof sheets and manuscript accom- 
panying the same, circulars, seeds, bulbs, roots, scions and plants. 

One cent for every four ounces on newspapers and magazines of the 
second class. 

One cent for each ounce, or fraction thereof, on blank books, blank cards, 
card-boards, and other flexible material, envelopes, merchandise, sample 
cards, samples of ores. 

For Postage to Great Britain and Other Foreign Countries, 
SEE "Rates of Foreign Postage." 



REGISTRATION OF MAIL MATTER. 

The Registry System is intended to give to registered mail the greatest 
security within the province of the Post-oflBce Department, and this 
special security is obtained by a distinctive cover for the matter, its 
retention in special custody, and a system of records and receipts showing 
a complete chain of receipts from the time it leaves the hands of the 
sender until it is delivered to the addressee. 



366 United States Postal Regulations. 

Any class of mail matter may be registered at any post-oflBce in the 
United States. 

TThe fee on registered matter, domestic or foreign, is ten cents for each 
letter or parcel, to be affixed in stamps, in addition to the postage. Full 
prepayment of postage and fee is required. 

'Every letter presented for registration must be fully and legally ad- 
dressed and securely sealed by the sender, and all letters and other arti- 
cles must also have the name and address of the sender endorsed thereon 
in writing or print before they can be registered. 

Registered mail may be delivered to the addressee, to a person au- 
thorized by the addressee in writing to receive it, or to any responsible 
person to whom the addressee's ordinary mail is customarily delivered. 
All persons calling for registered matter should be prepared to furnish 
reasonable proof of their identity, as it is impossible otherwise, at large 
post-offices, to guard against fraud. 

Safety is considered before celerity in the transmission of registered 
mail, and as delays are sometimes necessary to secure proper receipts at 
points of transfer, due allowance should be made by those mailing such 
matter and those to whom it is addressed, as registered mails cannot be 
handled with the same despatch as ordinary mail matter. 

The sender of any registered article may obtain assurance of its receipt 
at the office of delivery by endorsing it with the words, " Return receipt 
requested." 

Letters and packages containing money or articles of value should be 
registered, and never deposited for transmission by ordinary mail. 

The Post-office Department is liable to an amount not exceeding $50 
for the loss in the mails of any piece of domestic first-class registered 
mail matter, and not exceeding $25 for the loss of domestic third and 
fourth class registered mail matter. 

Indemnity will be paid for the value of any registered article, except 
Parcel-Post mail and except in case of "force majeure" (beyond con- 
trol), not to exceed 50 francs in any one case (or its equivalent in 
United States money), where the registered article is addressed to a 
country embraced in the Universal Postal Union, and is lost in the 
international mails. 

MONEY ORDERS. 

The fees or charges on domestic orders are as follows: — 

Payable in the United States (which includes Hawaii and Porto 
Rico) and its possessions, comprising the Canal Zone (Isthmus of 
Panama), Guam, the Philippines and Tutuila, Samoa ; also for orders 
payable in Bermuda, British Guiana, British Honduras, Canada, 
Cuba, Mexico, Newfoundland, the United States Postal Agency at 



United States Postal Regulations. 367 



Shanghai (China), the Bahama Islands, and certain other islands in 
the West Indies mentioned in Register of Money Order Post Oflfices: — 



For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 



from $0.01 
from $2.51 
from $5.01 
from $10.01 
from $20.01 
from $30.01 
from $40.01 
from $50.01 
from $60.01 
from $75.01 



to $2.50. 
to $5, . 
to $10, 
to $20, 
to $30, 
to $40, 
to $50, 
to $60, 
to $75, 
to $100, 



3 cents. 

5 cents. 

8 cents. 
10 cents. 
12 cents. 
15 cents. 
18 cents. 



25 cents. 
30 cents. 



A single money order may include any amount from one cent to one 
hundred dollars inclusive, but must not contain a fractional part of a 
cent. 

The postmaster of any foreign money-order office in the United States 
— the same being designated by the Postmaster- General — will furnish 
a blank form of application, on which the sender must enter all the par- 
ticulars of the amount (in United States money), names, address, etc., 
and must state the full name and exact residence of the person to whom 
the order is to be made payable. The postmaster will then issue an 
international order, to be sent by the remitter to the payee, in the case 
of "direct" orders. 

INTERNATIONAL RATES. 

The fees for orders payable in Chili, Fiance, Algeria and Tunis, 
Greece, Netherlands, Norway and Sweden, are as follows: — 



For orders from $0.01 to $10, 


. 10 cents. 


For orders from $10.01 to $20, 


. 20 cents. 


For orders from $20.01 to $30, 


. 30 cents. 


For orders from $30.01 to $40, 


. 40 cents. 


For orders from $40.01 to $50, 


. 50 cents. 


For orders from $50.01 to $60, 


, 60 cents. 


For orders from $60.01 to $70, 


. 70 cents. 


For orders from $70.01 to $80, 


. 80 cents. 


For orders from $80.01 to $90, 


. 90 cents. 


For orders from $90.01 to $100, 


. 1 dollar. 



The fees for orders payable in any foreign country not enumerated 
above, and upon which this office is authorized to draw money orders, 
are as follows; — 



368 United States Postal Regulations. 



For orders 

For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 
For orders 



from 

from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 
from 



$0.01 
$2.51 
S5.01 
S7 51 
$10.01 
$15.01 
$20.01 
$30.01 
$40.01 
$50.01 
$60.01 
$70.01 
$80.01 
$90.01 



to $2.50, 
to $5.00, 
to $7.50, 
to $10, 
to $15, 
to $20, 
to $30, 
to $40, 
to $50, 
to $60, 
to $70, 
to $80, 
to $90, 
to $100, 



. 10 cents. 

. 15 cents, 

. 20 cents. 

. 25 cents. 

. 30 cents. 

. 35 cents. 

. 40 cents. 

. 45 cents. 

. 50 cents. 

. 60 cents. 

. 70 cents. 

. 80 cents. 

. 90 cents. 

. 1 dollar. 



There is no limitation to the number of international orders that may 
be issued in one day to a remitter in favor of the same payee. 

The maximum amount for which a single international money order 
may be drawn is one hundred dollars ($100) to any foreign country. 



SPECIAL DELIVERY. 

Every article of mailable matter bearing a special-delivery stamp in 
addition to the lawful postage, or bearing stamps to the value of ten 
cents in addition to the lawful postage and plainly marked ''special de- 
livery," will be entitled to an immediate delivery by messenger at any 
post-office in the United States. The price of the special-delivery stamps 
is ten cents each. They are sold by postmasters in any required amount 
and to any person who may apply for them ; but they can be used only 
for the purpose of securing the immediate delivery of mail matter 
addressed to and received in the mails at any post-office. Under no 
circumstances are they to be used in the payment of postages of any 
description, or of the registry fee. The special-delivery stamp must be 
in addition to the lawful postage. 

Registered letters will be entitled to immediate delivery, the same 
as ordinary letters, when bearing a special-delivery stamp in addition 
to the full postage, or when bearing stamps to the value of ten cents in 
addition to the full postage and plainly marked ''special delivery,'' and 
registry fee required by the law and the regulations. 

Special-delivery letters will be delivered by messengers within the 
carrier limits of a free-delivery office between the hours of 7 a.m. and 
11 P.M.; and within a radius of one mile from the post-office at all other 
offices between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m. 



Foreign Postage, 369 



RATES OF FOREIGN POSTAGE. 



UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION. 

The rates of postage applicable to all foreign countries, other than 
England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Germany, Newfoundland, Canada, 
Cuba, Mexico and Panama, are as follows: — 

For letters, 5 cents for the first ounce, and 3 cents for each additional 
ounce or fraction of an ounce; prepayment optional. 

For postal cards, single, 2 cents each; double, 4 cents each. 

For commercial papers, 5 cents for the first 10 ounces or less, and 1 cent 
for each additional 2 ounces or fraction of 2 ounces. Limit of size and 
weight the same as for prints. The packages must not be closed against 
inspection. 

For samples of merchandise, 2 cents for the first 4 ounces or less, and 
1 cent for each additional 2 ounces or fraction of 2 ounces. Limit of 
weight, 12 ounces; limit of size, 12 by 8 by 4 inches. The packages must 
not be closed against inspection. 

For prints of every kind, 1 cent for each 2 ounces or fraction of 2 ounces. 
Limit of weight, 4 pounds 6 ounces; limit of size, 18 inches in any direc- 
tion, except that when rolled the package may measure 30 inches in 
length by 4 inches in diameter. The packages must not be closed against 
inspection. 

The postage on letters for Newfoimdland. England, Ireland, Scotland 
and Wales is 2 cents per ounce, and on letters for Germany by steamers 
sailing for Germany direct the postage is 2 cents per ounce. Letters for 
Germany bearing postage at the rate of 2 cents per ounce will be held for 
steamers sailing direct for Germany; letters for Germany bearing post- 
age at the rate of 5 cents per ounce will be forwarded by fast mail. 

The rate of postage for all mail matter, other than letters, to England, 
Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Newfoundland and Germany is the same aa 
stated above. 

To Canada, comprising Provinces of Ontario and Quebec, British Co- 
lumbia, Manitoba, New Brunsunck, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, 
the postage for letters, merchandise and printed matter is the same as 
in the United States. All matter for Canada must be fully prepaid, 
except letters, which must be prepaid at least 2 cents. 



370 Foreign Postage, 



To Mexico the postage for letters and printed matter is the same as in 

the United States. 

All mail matter may be registered to the above places upon prepay- 
ment of 10 cents for each address, besides the postage. 

Unmailable Articles. — All articles prohibited from domestic mails 
are also excluded from foreign mails. 

Postal cards and letters addressed "Around the World" are unmail- 
able; as also are letters or packets containing gold or silver substances, 
pieces of money, jewelry or precious articles, except that gold or silver 
coin may be sent by mail to and from Canada. 

Liquids, — ardent, vinous, spirituous or malt, — poisons, explosive and 
inflammable articles, and envelopes and postal cards upon which obscene 
language is written or printed. 

No letter or circular concerning lotteries, so-called gift concerts, or 
other similar enterprises, offering prizes, or concerning schemes devised 
and intended to deceive and defraud the public, for the purpose of ob- 
taining money under false pretences, shall be carried in the mail. Any 
person who shall knowingly deposit or send anything to be conveyed by 
mail in violation of this section shall be punishable by a fine of not more 
than five hundred dollars nor less than one hundred dollars, with costs 
of prosecution. 



Vote for President in 1908. 



371 



VOTE FOR PRESIDENT IN 1908. 
(BY COUNTIES.) 



Note. — The vote given is that for the candidate for Elpxtor 
AT Large on each ticket for whom the most ballots were cast. It 
is in accordance with the report of a committee of the Council on the 
returns of votes given in the several cities and towns. A summary 
at the end of the tables gives the aggregate vote for all the candidates 
for electors at large, in accordance with the said report. 

COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 



Cities and Towns. 


i 
1 


6 

.a 


8§ 

.1! 
.11 


i 

1 


§ 

a 


J 


, 




M 


r 


CD 

t 


|£ 


11 


A 

;§ 




H 


CQ 


n 


fi 


w 


b 


•< 


Barnstable, 


657 


219 


44 


7 


5 


1 




Bourne, . 




296 


58 


12 


2 


14 


1 


- 


Brewster, . 




99 


17 


5 


- 


5 


_ 


_ 


Chatham, , 




160 


37 


9 


1 


t 


_ 


_ 


Dennis, 




279 


39 


6 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


Eastham, . 




68 


10 


5 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


Falmouth, 




461 


75 


10 


4 


/ 


2 


_ 


Harwich, . 




232 


63 


10 


7 


7 


1 


_ 


Mashpee, . 




44 


5 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Orleans, . 




116 


20 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Provincetown, 




279 


77 


10 


1 


4 


1 


_ 


Sandwich, 




176 


82 


5 


20 


7 


1 


_ 


Truro, 




84 


12 


2 


1 






_ 


Wellfleet, . 




135 


20 


3 


- 


4 


_ 


_ 


Yarmouth, 




226 


43 


6 


2 


1 


- 


- 


Totals, 




3,312 


777 


133 


46 


66 


7 


- 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



Adams, 
Alford, 
Becket, 
Cheshire, 



836 


441 


62 


107 


7 


10 


13 


34 


1 


1 


3 




101 


40 


4 


6 


6 


_ 


115 


106 


2 




1 


- 



372 



Vote for President in 1908. 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE— Co?JcZM<ie(f. 



Cities and Towns. 


1 


1 


Jt 

P 


4 

1 
1 


1 

a 




i 








OD 


1^ 


5.S 
5s 


1 




S 


U 




9 


A 


:aSi 


s 




H 


63 


5"^ 


fi 


« 





< 


Clarksburg, 


115 


32 


2 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


Dalton, 


324 


250 


13 


14 


17 


2 


_ 


Egreniont, 


100 


54 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Florida, . 


48 


6 


2 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


Great Barrington, . 


621 


464 


30 


21 


9 


2 


_ 


Hancock, . 


61 


17 




- 




- 


- 


Hinsdale, . 


101 


98 


2 


2 


4 


- 


_ 


Lanesborougli, 


81 


39 


4 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Lee, . . . . 


413 


349 


26 


3 


8 


1 


_ 


Lenox, 


255 


213 


19 


10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Monterev, . 


60 


15 


1 


1 


1 


- 


- 


Mount VVashington, 


12 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


New Ashford, . 


11 


9 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


New Marlborough, . 


146 


70 


7 


3 


10 


2 


- 


North Adams, 


1,615 


1,141 


84 


58 


17 


7 


- 


Otis 


74 


21 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


Peru, 


22 


28 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


PITTSFIEI.D, . 


2,744 


1,807 


139 


79 


23 


24 


- 


Richmond, 


61 


23 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


_ 


Sandisfield, 


67 


34 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Savo}% 
Sheffield, . 


57 


21 


1 


_ 


1 


- 


_ 


184 


104 


2 


2 


4 


- 


- 


Stockbridge, . 


190 


132 


3 


10 


4 


2 


- 


Tyringhani, 


48 


29 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Washington, . 


32 


13 


2 


1 


_ 


- 


- 


West Stockbridge, . 


120 


87 


1 


1 


2 


- 


- 


Williamstown, . 


448 


210 


8 


3 


11 


- 


- 


Windsor, . 


62 


15 


3 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Totals, 


9,137 


5,903 


424 


325 


141 


51 


- 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



Acushnet, . 
Attleborough, 
Berkley, • 
Dartmouth, 
Dightou, . 
Easton, 
Fairhaven, 
Fall River, 



118 

1,613 

116 

261 

187 
435 

408 



12 

348 
.9 
45 
33 
234 
117 



6,207 4,985 



1 
55 
3 
11 
2 

35 
19 
547 148 



18 



3 
112 

2 
15 

3 
12 
13 



Vote for President in 1908. 



373 



COUNTY OF BRISTOT^— ConcZwfferf. 



Cities and Towns. 


3 


.J 




i 

1 

i 


a 

A 


j 
11 


t 




08 






s. 


A 


Sec 


j3 




H 


PQ 


h 


Q 


O 





< 


Freetown, 


148 


20 


3 




2 


1 




Mansfield, 


500 


130 


55 


6 


23 


2 


_ 


New Bedford, 


5,065 


2,749 


477 


234 


103 


54 


_ 


North Attleborough, 


989 


281 


69 


17 


24 


4 


_ 


Norton, 


214 


26 


15 


_ 


6 


_ 


_ 


Raynham, 
Rehoboth, 


173 


18 


8 


2 


7 


_ 


_ 


138 


9 


6 


3 


6 


_ 


_ 


Seekonk, . 


139 


26 


8 


- 


6 


- 


_ 


Somerset, . 


241 


62 


1 


4 


8 


_ 


_ 


Swansea, . 


204 


34 


6 


6 


IS 


_ 


_ 


Taunton, 


3,322 


1,525 


203 


66 


34 


13 


_ 


Westport, . 


205 


56 


6 


- 


7 


1 


- 


Totals, 


20,683 


10,719 


1,560 


572 


493 


117 


- 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark, . 


46 


21 


2 




5 






Edgartown, 




154 


25 


1 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


Gay Head, 




33 


1 








_ 


_ 


Gosnold, . 




25 


3 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Oak Bluffs, 




114 


27 


5 


_ 


6 


_ 


_ 


Tisbury, . 
West Tisbury, 




154 


35 


3 


10 


3 


3 


_ 




63 


21 




- 


4 




- 


Totals, 




589 


133 


12 


11 


19 


3 


- 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



Amesbury, 
Andover, . 
Beverlv, 
Box ford, . 
Danvers, . 
Essex, 
Georgetown, 
Glouoesteu, 





959 


402 


54 


85 


8 


2 




797 


274 


45 


18 


14 


2 




2,103 


510 


120 


77 


63 


_ 




95 


16 


- 


3 


3 


- 




975 


439 


65 


68 


14 


1 




200 


93 


17 


7 


3 


_ 




253 


121 


10 


20 


6 


_ 




2,478 


1,061 


165 


69 


31 


6 



374 



Vote for President in 1908. 



COUNTY OF ESSEX— Conc??/rfe<i. 



Cities and Towns. 


1 


1 


1} 

11 


1 
i 


a 
o 

S 


J 

II 


i 

1 




H 


u 

» 


5^ 


a- 




5» 


< 


Groveland, 


232 


122 


8 


24 


3 


1 




Hamilton, 




204 


40 


18 


2 


5 


1 


_ 


Haverhill, 




3,354 


1,692 


221 


676 


118 


10 


_ 


Ipswich, . 




473 


182 


32 


1 


14 


1 


- 


Lawrence, 




4,403 


4,057 


454 


298 


68 


19 


_ 


Lynx, 




6,736 


4,147 


721 


422 


178 


33 


_ 


Lynn field, 




137 


24 


4 


4 


3 


1 


_ 


M'anchester, 




345 


131 


20 


2 


8 


_ 


_ 


Marblehead, 




942 


558 


60 


47 


20 


4 


_ 


Merrimac, 




245 


90 


7 


25 


12 


1 


_ 


Methuen, . 




974 


189 


93 


59 


28 


10 


_ 


Middletou, 




106 


34 


10 




1 


1 


_ 


Nahant, . 




137 


82 


2 


1 


4 


_ 


_ 


Newburv, . 




239 


34 


6 


7 


1 


_ 


_ 


Newburtport, 


1,495 


676 


145 


109 


9 


5 


_ 


North Andover, 


547 


157 


43 


8 


8 


3 


- 


Peabody, . 


1,230 


951 


91 


29 


15 


8 


_ 


Rockport, . 


. 


464 


182 


54 


51 


22 


9 


- 


Rowley, . 


. 


197 


71 


2 


5 


1 


- 


- 


Salem, 


, 


3,786 


1,898 


285 


158 


43 


29 


_ 


Salisbury, 


. 


181 


78 


17 


10 


8 


1 


_ 


Saugus, ' . 


. 


808 


194 


81 


54 


29 


4 


_ 


Swampscott, 


. 


753 


177 


59 


17 


11 




_ 


Topsfield, . 


. 


141 


30 


6 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Wenham, . 


. 


172 


22 


2 


1 


3 


1 


- 


West Newbury, 


190 


67 


8 


19 


11 


- 


- 


Totals, 


• 


36,351 


18,801 


2,925 


2,376 


767 


153 


- 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 



Ashfield, . 
Bernardston, 
Buckland, 
Charlemont, 
Colrain, . 
Conway, . 
Deerfie'ld, . 
Erving, 
GiU, . 
Greenfield, 





148 


29 






2 






99 


2€ 


1 


5 


2 


1 




187 


96 


7 


2 


1 


_ 




165 


29 




1 


1 


_ 




189 


31 


1 


1 


5 


_ 




161 


68 


6 


1 


4 


1 




215 


70 


14 


3 


1 






132 


46 


4 


6 


3 


1 




88 


19 


4 


2 


3 


_ 




1,040 


426 


124 


99 


18 


3 



Vote for President in 1908. 



375 



COUNTY OF YYiK^KLYS— Concluded. 





i 


.2 


li 


^ 


i 


i 




Cities and Towns. 


1 


1 
o 

.a 




1 
1 




S.2 


. 




,& 


f 


If 


1 


1^ 


^•1 


1 




H 


P3 


n 


Q 


O 





< 


Hawley, . 


53 


2 


_ 




1 


_ 


_ 


Heath, 




51 


10 


— 


— 


1 


— 


_ 


Leverett, . 




64 


10 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


Ley den, . 




49 


8 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Monroe, . 




32 


6 


_ 


— 


— 


_ 


_ 


Montague, 




461 


362 


59 


70 


8 


2 


- 


New Salem, 




71 


13 


1 


4 


5 


- 


_ 


Northfield, 




177 


60 


4 


1 


7 


_ 


_ 


Orange, 




834 


169 


59 


40 


23 


- 


_ 


Rowe, 




61 


10 


_ 


- 


2 


_ 


_ 


Shelbume, 




248 


47 


5 


- 


6 


- 


- 


Shutesburv, 




30 


4 




- 


- 


- 


- 


Sunderland, 




96 


21 


1 


— 


2 


_ 


— 


Warwick, . 




37 


18 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


Wendell, . 




53 


22 


4 


4 


1 


_ 


_ 


Whately, . 




83 


35 


2 


1 


1 


- 


- 


Totals, 




4,824 


1,637 


298 


240 


100 


9 


- 



COUNTY 


OF HAMPDEN. 








Agawam, . 


245 


162 


59 


4 


2 


1 


_ 


Blandford, 


64 


26 


1 


_ 


1 


— 


— 


Brimfield, 


91 


30 


9 


2 




- 


- 


Chester, . 


103 


40 


14 


16 


4 


- 


- 


Chicopee, 


1,112 


1,046 


157 


109 


12 


2 


- 


East Longmeadow, . 


118 


35 


10 


3 


4 


- 


- 


Granville, 


84 


32 


6 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


Hampden, 


53 


34 


4 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


Holland, . 


26 


3 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


HOLYOKE, 


2,912 


2,977 


300 


248 


28 


27 


_ 


Longmeadow, . 


117 


49 


11 


1 






_ 


Ludlow, . 


204 


85 


19 


2 


3 


_ 


_ 


Monson, . 


422 


199 


28 


11 


8 


- 


- 


Montgomery, . 


30 


16 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Palmer, 


547 


312 


82 


8 


8 


1 


— 


Russell, . 


65 


34 


10 


2 


- 


1 


- 


Southwick, 


116 


40 


6 




3 


- 


- 


Spkingfield, . 


6,347 


3,460 


1,003 


465 


87 


11 


_ 


Tolland, . 


21 


10 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Wales, 


48 


25 


2 


2 


1 


- 


- 



376 



Vote for President in 1908. 



COUNTY OF B.AMVTf'E.^ — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


1 

p. 


•I 

i 


li 
It 


1 


1 


1 


£ 




/ 




! 




ii 






H 


Cfl 


w 


a 


« 





-11 


West Springfield, . 


516 


301 


303 


21 


5 






Westfield, . 


1,131 


944 


121 


79 


17 


1 


- 


Wilbraham, . 


113 


50 


8 




4 


- 


- 


Totals, 


14,485 


9,910 


2,154 


973 


187 


44 


- 





COUNTY 


OF HAMPSHIRE. 








Amherst, . 


599 


155 


18 


3 


13 


4 




BelcbertowTi, 




170 


71 


4 


1 


2 




- 


Chesterfield, 




93 


26 


1 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


Cummington, 




89 


23 


1 


1 


4 


- 


- 


Easthampton, 




637 


202 


55 


24 


16 


5 


- 


Enfield, . 




124 


17 


5 


1 


4 


- 


- 


Goshen, . 




40 


3 


_ 


_ 


4 


- 


_ 


Granby, . 




79 


27 


'3 


- 


3 


- 


- 


Greenwich, 




62 


11 


2 


- 




- 


_ 


Ha die V, . 




190 


45 


5 


2 


3 


_ 


_ 


Hatfield, . 




125 


104 


4 


1 




- 


- 


Huntington, 




133 


87 


15 


14 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Middleiield, 




28 


13 


3 


- 


- 




- 


Northampton 


, 


1,456 


998 


182 


99 


21 


8 


_ 


Pelham, . 




44 


11 


1 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


Plainfield, 




69 




1 


_ 


3 


- 


_ 


Prescott, . 




49 


9 


4 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


South Hadley, 




493 


178 


21 


17 


8 


1 


_ 


Southampton, 




90 


24 


4 


3 


10 


- 


- 


Ware, 




497 


405 


72 


63 


3 


1 


- 


Westhampton, 




40 


10 


1 


- 


10 


- 


- 


Williamsburg, 




179 


116 


38 


3 


10 


2 


- 


Worthington, 




76 


10 


6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals, 




5,362 


2,612 


446 


232 


121 


22 





COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



Acton, 
Arlington, 



274 


77 


9 


3 







1,100 


419 


38 


6 


15 


3 



Vote for President in 1908. 



377 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX — Co»«nMC(f. 



Cities and Towns, 




6 


II 


is 
1 


5 

-■-i 


it 


OQ 




f 


i 


1 




ii 


s 




H 


P3 


m^ 


Q 


V 





■< 


Ashbv, . 


122 


41 


3 


3 


3 


1 




Ashland, . 




209 


107 


9 


7 


1 


2 


- 


Ayer, 




303 


171 


29 


1 


1 


- 


- 


Bedford, . 




152 


45 


6 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


Belmont, . 




493 


172 


10 


7 


4 


_ 


_ 


Billerica, . 




364 


161 


10 


10 


4 


_ 


_ 


Boxborough, 




34 


20 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Burlington, 




84 


35 


7 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


Cambridge, 




6,595 


5,562 


343 


1S3 


103 


6 


_ 


Carlisle, . 




62 


25 


2 


1 


4 


1 


_ 


Chelmsford, 




463 


210 


7 


10 


11 


_ 


_ 


Concoi'd, . 




609 


250 


25 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


Dracut, 




261 


210 


10 


7 


1 


_ 


_ 


Dunstable, 




47 


18 


2 






_ 


_ 


Everett, 




2,756 


953 


215 


103 


62 


39 


_ 


Framingham, 




1,432 


809 


67 


16 


17 


7 


_ 


Groton, 




252 


72 


11 


8 


7 


_ 


_ 


Holliston, . 




316 


173 


16 


6 


2 


_ 


_ 


Hopkinton, 




284 


261 


13 


5 


6 


1 


_ 


Hudson, . 




661 


419 


92 


15 


6 


_ 


_ 


Lexington, 




626 


161 


14 


5 


4 


- 


- 


Lincoln, . 




127 


50 


1 


2 


3 


_ 


_ 


Littleton, . 




150 


46 


7 


5 


3 


_ 


_ 


Lowell, . 




6,426 


6,031 


218 


197 


103 


18 


_ 


Malden, . 




3,818 


1,703 


272 


183 


90 


26 


_ 


Marlborough 


' 


1,490 


1,020 


291 


28 


19 


7 


_ 


Maynard, . 




505 


245 


33 


14 


7 




_ 


Medford, 




2,329 


831 


137 


50 


40 


5 


_ 


Melrose, 




2,057 


544 


110 


28 


23 


3 


_ 


Natick, . 




1,051 


948 


133 


45 


4 


1 


_ 


Newtox, , 




4,053 


1,470 


114 


81 


37 


2 


1 


North Reading, 




137 


28 


5 


1 


1 


- 




Pepperell, 
Reading, . 




320 


137 


16 


13 


4 


_ 


_ 




924 


175 


28 


8 


12 


1 


_ 


Sherborn, . 




118 


38 


4 




5 




_ 


Shirley, . 




150 


40 


10 


3 


4 


1 


_ 


SOMERVILLE, 




7,264 


2,760 


381 


201 


140 


13 


_ 


Stoneham, 




804 


313 


80 


8 


21 


4 


_ 


Stow, 




117 


38 


1 


1 


4 


1 


_ 


Sudbury, . 




148 


42 


4 


1 


1 


- 


- 


Tewksbury, 




213 


47 


1 


5 


6 


1 


- 


Town send. 




246 


47 


14 


_ 


10 




_ 


Tyngsborough, 


86 


17 


3 


1 


3 


_ 


- 


Wakefield, 


1,231 


639 


124 


48 


12 


5 


- 



378 



Vote for President in 1908. 



COUNTY OF MIT>T>1.^SI1X— Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


3 


.2 


g| 
.2 


1 


IS 


i^ 


S 




^« 


go 


2 


s^ 




1 




^ 


^ 


t 


,4 


3l 


a 




H 


M 


H 


fl 


« 


3 


< 


WALTHAM, 


3,122 


1,317 


181 


50 


12 


5 




AVatertown, 


1,153 


825 


66 


34 


12 


- 


- 


AVayland, . 


282 


137 


29 


3 




3 


- 


Westford, . 


261 


91 


14 


7 


6 


1 


- 


Weston, . 


2S3 


44 


6 


1 


1 


- 


- 


Wilmin.t;ton, . 


187 


37 


9 


5 


4 


- 


- 


Winchester, 


922 


294 


38 


6 


1 


- 


- 


WOBURN, . 


1,199 


1,037 


103 


15 


11 


14 


- 


Totals, 


58,672 


31,362 


3,371 


1,441 


869 


171 


1 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



Nantucket, 



359 



136 


6 


- 


6 


- 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Avon, 

Bellingham, 
Braintree, 
Brookline, 
Canton, 
Coliasset, . 
Dedham, . 
Dover, 
Foxborough, 
Franklin, . 
Holbrook, 
Hyde Park, 
Medfield, . 
Med way, . 
Minis, 
Milton, 
Needham, . 
Norfolk, . 
Norwood, . 
Plainville, 
QUINCY, . 

Randolph, 





179 


116 


31 


20 


2 


_ 




113 


59 


15 


1 


1 


- 




839 


253 


65 


66 


t 


2 




3,010 


878 


48 


17 


20 


3 




408 


293 


34 


2 


2 


- 




319 


102 


31 


2 


- 


- 




875 


452 


44 


33 


11 


- 






17 


4 


- 


2 


1 




344 


101 


24 


2 


11 


_ 




607 


233 


24 


13 


9 


- 




332 


119 


20 


65 


5 


_ 




1,499 


660 


99 


90 


36 


4 




205 


62 


11 


2 


3 


- 




290 


120 


8 


2 


11 


1 




139 


44 


16 


2 


- 


1 




841 


284 


32 


12 


10 


2 




504 


118 


38 


31 


6 


1 




85 


38 


9 


2 


2 


- 




658 


394 


82 


33 


7 


2 




221 


18 


8 


2 


1 


- 




2,996 


1,411 


244 


110 


23 


5 




361 


317 


43 


31 


4 


~ 



Vote for President in 1908. 



379 



COUNTY OF ^OUFOJ^K— Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


! 


.2 


It 


i 

1 

m 


1 
IS 

it 


J 


2 

1 




g 


PQ 


"tS"" 


& 


s 


s» 


< 


Sharon, 


280 


84 


9 


6 


4 


1 




Stougbton, 




642 


415 


76 


50 


6 


_ 


_ 


Walpole, . 
Wellesley, 
Westwood, 




402 


170 


53 


85 


14 


_ 


_ 




524 


175 


15 


18 


6 


- 


_ 




114 


26 


5 


9 


2 


3 


_ 


Weymoutli, 




1,274 


701 


96 


80 


17 


1 


- 


Wrcntham, 




187 


22 


12 


2 


3 


- 


- 


Totals, 


• 


18,225 


7,682 


1,196 


733 


225 


27 


6 



COUNTY 


OF PLYMOUTH. 








Abington, . 


614 


304 


72 


71 


16 


4 


_ 


Bridgewater, . 


496 


186 


36 


13 


8 


2 


- 


Brockton, 


5,042 


2,525 


508 


761 


63 


9 


- 


Carver, 


62 


29 


4 


1 


2 


- 


- 


Duxburv, . 


166 


45 


6 


5 


3 


_ 


_ 


East Bridgewater, . 


301 


109 


34 


39 


5 


1 


_ 


Halifax, . 


64 


8 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Hanover, . 


243 


48 


15 


8 


1 


- 


- 


Hanson, . 


114 


21 


11 


16 


5 


4 


_ 


Hingham, . 

Hulf, . . . . 


514 


169 


21 


12 


16 


- 


_ 


142 


54 


6 


3 


6 


- 


- 


Kingston, . 


239 


58 


14 


2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Lakeville, 


81 


18 


5 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


Marion, . 


132 


35 


3 


2 


1 


_ 


_ 


Marshfield, 


193 


19 


4 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


Mattapoisett, . 


159 


24 


3 


1 


2 


- 


- 


Middleborough, 


780 


212 


59 


12 


21 


1 


- 


Norwell, . 


164 


40 


10 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


Pembroke, 


147 


34 


5 


4 


1 


1 


_ 


Plymouth, 


1,152 


362 


195 


34 


14 


5 


_ 


Ply mp ton. 


63 


9 


3 


3 


3 


1 


_ 


Rochester, 


92 


11 




2 






_ 


Rockland, 


739 


339 


78 


84 


7 


2 


_ 


Scituate, . 


220 


104 


11 




7 


_ 


_ 


Warebam, 

West Bridgewater, . 


281 


140 


23 


20 


6 


_ 


_ 


224 


60 


21 


11 


2 


- 


_ 


Whitman, . 


812 


332 


93 


82 


18 


- 


1 


Totals, 


13,236 


5,295 


1,244 


1,187 


212 


30 


1 



380 



Vote for President in 1908. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Cities and Towns. 


i 


1 
f 


si 
§1 

.2 ^ 


i 

•1 

IS 


1 

c"2 


J 

si 


< 


Boston, . 
Chelsea, . 
Revere, 
Winthrop, 


41,249 
2,496 
1,3-24 
1,268 


41,456 
1,417 

664 
236 


2,661 
179 

187 
63 


1,363 

108 
72 
16 


434 
29 
20 
15 


268 
8 
4 
2 


- 


Totals, 


46,337 


43,773 


3,090 


1,559 


498 


282 


- 





COUNTY 


OF WORCESTER. 








Ashburnham, . 


226 


60 


2 


3 


8 






Athol, 




904 


271 


108 


44 




1 


- 


Auburn, . 




206 


105 


IS 


_ 


6 


- 


_ 


Barre, 




229 


54 


10 


- 


5 


- 


- 


Berlin, . 




138 


20 


2 


1 


4 


_ 


_ 


Black stone, 




319 


532 


14 


4 


11 


- 


- 


Bolton, . 




82 


9 


8 


1 


7 


_ 


- 


Boylston, . 




87 


10 


5 


- 


2 


- 


- 


Brookfield, 




203 


93 


33 


- 


2 


- 


_ 


Charlton, . 




217 


42 


17 


1 


8 


_ 


_ 


Clinton, . 




1,062 


862 


72 


117 


10 


3 


_ 


Dana, 




82 


29 


7 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


Douglas, . 




251 


119 


4 


5 


2 


- 


- 


Dudley, . 




245 


156 


29 


6 


3 


1 


- 


FITCHBURG, 




2,595 


1,343 


203 


290 


45 


5 


- 


Gardner, . 




1,314 


444 


90 


22 


37 


' 6 


- 


Grafton, . 




506 


139 


48 


5 


10 


2 


- 


Hardwick, 




199 


89 


31 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


Harvard, . 




111 


52 


_ 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


Holden, . 




269 


39 


16 


4 


7 


- 


- 


Hopedale, 
Hubbardston, 




400 


50 


6 


8 


3 


2 


- 




146 


30 


- 




5 


- 


- 


Lancaster, 




211 


30 


5 


2 


1 


1 


_ 


Leicester, . 




306 


235 


17 


2 


7 


- 


- 


Leominster, 




1,685 


538 


129 


114 


18 


2 


- 


Lunenburg, 




159 


28 


6 


3 


2 


- 


- 


Mendon, . 




123 


36 


3 


3 


4 


- 


- 


Milford, . 




844 


968 


56 


34 


10 


14 


- 


Millljury, . 




45S 


214 


28 


2 


2 


- 


- 


New Braintree, 


47 


18 


3 


- 


3 


_ 


_ 


North Brookfield, . 


279 


151 


21 


3 


5 


1 


- 


Northborough, . 


229 


67 


22 


5 


1 


1 


" 



Vote for President in 1908. 



381 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER— Co«cZ«cZerf. 





• 


,d 


. 


^ 


d 


u 






o3 




® 3 




§ 


g 




Cities and Towns. 


3 

t 




II 


« 


'2> 


J 

if 


2 




^ 


^ 


«'2 


fii 


« 




o 




g 






Q 




3«2 


< 


Northbridge, . 


668 


309 


25 


8 


18 


1 




Oakham, . 




61 


16 


1 




2 




_ 


Oxford, . 




305 


89 


55 


7 


5 


- 


_ 


Paxton, 




53 


9 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


Petersham, 




92 


34 


1 


- 




_ 


- 


Phillipston, 




56 


5 


1 


- 


2 


_ 


_ 


Princeton, 




123 


6 


3 


_ 


4 


_ 


_ 


Royalston, 




98 


14 


3 


_ 


3 


_ 


_ 


Rutland, . 




113 


43 


1 


2 


4 


_ 


1 


Shrewsburj-, 




240 


54 


7 


4 


3 


_ 




Southborough, 




220 


92 


10 






_ 


_ 


Southbridge, 




848 


559 


111 


7 


8 


_ 


_ 


Spencer, . 




576 


418 


76 


1 


12 


- 


_ 


Sterling, . 




190 


38 


3 


1 


3 


_ 


_ 


Sturb ridge. 




178 


98 


15 


_ 


5 


_ 


_ 


Sutton, 




220 


107 


11 


2 


6 


_ 


_ 


Templeton, 




416 


112 


26 


4 


11 


- 


- 


Upton, 




272 


108 


15 


4 


6 


- 


- 


Uxbridge, 




400 


197 


13 


2 


20 


- 


- 


Warren, . 




336 


160 


35 


23 


3 


_ 


_ 


Webster, . 




811 


398 


133 


34 


9 


4 


_ 


West Bovlston, 


129 


30 


2 


2 


4 


2 


_ 


West Brookfield, 


133 


74 


11 


8 


2 


_ 


_ 


Westborough, . 


505 


217 


30 


18 


12 


_ 


_ 


Westminster, . 


205 


23 


3 


9 


7 


_ 


_ 


Winchendon, . 


629 


274 


43 


10 


13 


_ 


_ 


Worcester, . 


12,325 


6,486 


730 


254 


268 


49 


- 


Totals, 




34,394 


16,803 


2,378 


1,084 


670 


95 


1 



382 



Vote Jor President in 1908. 



•Bjaq^^o ny 



I I r-l I CC- 






•a3ld9o;a 

uBnuajj 



•J smnoqx 



t- rH t- CO eg Si ; 



l(M 1^ C^ CO ^ 



t-i-Ht-eocoo5-*irJT 









•jaqsTj 



•H8AVO0 



iC035t^Ot^^05:DlO5*00O 

I Ci r-l o o 00 .n » oi —I c; t- 

1-* l-r-li-lr-133 (N(M-*«3 



>OGC<M W <M.-IOil 
■I— li-4i-IOO (M C^ ■>* ; 






ii 


•9%mj^ !joita 


46 
325 
572 

n 

2,376 
240 
973 
232 

1,441 

733 
1,187 
1,559 

1,084 

10,779 


•^9uoqBH[ 




s 


III 


•0 P^qoiH 


133 

424 

1,560 

12 

2,f)25 

298 
2,154 

446 
3,371 
6 
1,196 
1,244 
3,090 
2,378 






133 

424 

1,560 

12 

2,925 

298 
2,154 

446 
3,371 
6 
1,196 
1,244 
3,088 
2,378 


s" 






•JLQ'i'XOO 



t-coc;co— <t^o<M'M;D(Miccoco 

t-O-HCOOCOi-i^^CPIOCC-. t~o 






OS'S 



'H !}8nSny 



•89^'Ba 



(Mt-irisicicoo-Miocsci-^a^cn 
rHco-jcx-*'MC::c:cint-Hco'MOO 
co_i-j_-^ic; co_x_-*_co__;o_co <>* fU cc co 



"55 



•»fiftC^(MCiiOCOt^- 



i52^^ 



-^P o 



p;??p;; 



&::;", ^ ;^ ;^ i,. ^ ^ 



Representatives, Sixty-second Congress. 383 



REPRESENTATIVES - SIXTY-SECOND CONGRESS. 

(by districts.) 

Election, November 8, 1910. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 1. 





o2 


^ti 


g-^fl. 




Cities and Towns. 


eh 






S 




Louis B 

Wests 
Sociali 


eorge 
rence 
Adami 
lican. 


dwar 
Lewis 
liam 
Demoi 


^ 
t 




O 


W 


< 


Adams 


142 


634 


569 


_ 


Agawam, 








35 


231 


167 


- 


Alford, . 








- 


14 


29 


- 


Ashfield, . 








_ 


83 


14 


- 


Becket, 








3 


78 


35 


- 


Bernardston, 








5 


66 


14 


- 


Blandford, . 










63 


16 


- 


Buckland, . 








3 


107 


99 


- 


Charlemont, 








_ 


118 


21 


• - 


Cheshire, . 








2 


112 


85 


- 


Chester, 








16 


73 


46 


- 


Chesterfield, 








4 


61 


19 


- 


Clarksburg, . 








- 


87 


26 


- 


Cob-ain, 








- 


103 


20 


- 


Conway, 








3 


104 


43 


- 


Cummington, 








5 


93 


21 


- 


Dalton, 








54 


268 


254 


- 


Deerneld, . 








14 


179 


81 


- 


Egremont, . 








- 


56 


22 


- 


Florida, 








- 


31 


5 


- 


Gill, . 








2 


65 


18 


- 


Goshen, 








- 


38 


2 


- 


Granville, . 








- 


40 


29 


- 


Great Barrington, 








30 


438 


489 


- 


Greenfield, . 








155 


817 


610 


— 


Hancock, 










69 


15 


- 


Hatfield, 








6 


109 


148 


- 


Hawley, 










24 


- 


- 


Heath, . 








- 


41 


9 


- 


Hinsdale, . 








3 


83 


72 


~ 



384 Eepresentatives, Sixty-second Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 



Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


02 




d Morgan 
of W 11 - 
stown, 
cratic. 






•§|§ 


George 
rence 
Adami 
lican. 


Edwar 
Lewie 
liam 
DemO' 


i 


HOLTOKE 


354 


2,107 


3,314 


. 


Huntington, 






14 


140 


73 


- 


Lanesborough, . 






- 


75 


44 


- 


Lee, . . . 






16 


303 


350 


— 


Lenox, . 






15 


161 


214 


- 


Leyden, 






1 


38 


7 


- 


Middlefield, . 








25 


5 


- 


Monroe, 






_ 


13 


5 


- 


Monterey, 






_ 


42 


9 


- 


Montgomery, 






1 


20 


8 


- 


Mount Washington, 






- 


14 


2 


- 


New Ashford, 






_ 


15 


4 


- 


New Marlborough, 






2 


62 


33 


- 


North Adams, . 






76 


1,357 


1,420 


- 


Otis, . 






1 


51 


10 


- 


Peru, . 






3 


19 


21 


- 


PlTTSFIELD, . 






244 


2,291 


2,215 


- 


Plainfield, . 






_ 


75 


5 


- 


Richmond, . 






- 


42 


20 


- 


Rowe, . 






_ 


31 


12 


- 


Russell, 






5 


55 


31 


- 


Sandisfield, . 






1 


35 


24 


- 


Savoy, . 






1 


53 


21 


- 


Sheffield, . 






7 


129 


99 


- 


Shelburne, . 






3 


168 


88 


- 


Southampton, 






3 


104 


21 


- 


Southwick, . 






4 


87 


32 


— 


Stockbridge, 






14 


188 


145 


- 


Tolland. 






— 


8 


6 


— 


Tyringham, . 






- 


34 


23 


- 


Washington, 






- 


26 


10 


- 


West Springfield, . 






109 


448 


383 


1 


West Stockbridge, 






2 


79 


98 


- 


Westfield, . 






102 


964 


943 


- 


Westhampton, 






- 


47 


8 


1 


Whately, 






3 


57 


35 


- 


Williamsburg, 






5 


173 


175 


- 


Williamstown, 






7 


200 


337 


- 


Windsor, 






- 


32 


9 


- 


WorthingtOD, 






- 


66 


7 


- 


Totals, . 




• 


1.476 


14,109 


13,244 


2 



Representatives^ Sixty- second Congress. 385 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 2. 





|i' 


0.9-2 


d o-a 






S«3 


^ E 3 






Cities and Towns. 




,.•0.0. 


i a m 
echnie 
ingfi( 
ocratic 


2 
2 




.2 


^^'^ ^ 


-M^a 


:S 




08^ O 


-Si^-s s 


« « a « 


o 




>OM 


giJta g 


-SwQ 






< 


fe 


^ 


< 


Amherst, 


8 


496 


287 


J 


Athol, . 








81 


705 


487 


_ 


Barre, . 








10 


207 


66 


_ 


Belchertown, 








6 


192 


87 


_ 


Brimfield, . 








1 


56 


28 


_ 


Brookfield, . 








1 


196 


143 


_ 


Chicopee, . 








89 


773 


1,440 


_ 


Dana, . 








3 


76 


29 


_ 


East Longmeadoi^ 


', 






2 


97 


42 


_ 


Easthampton, 








50 


545 


541 


_ 


Enfield, 










118 


26 


_ 


Erving, 










12 


84 


68 


_ 


Granby, 










1 


75 


36 


_ 


Greenwich, 










_ 


42 


13 


_ 


Hadley, 










2 


143 


92 


_ 


Hampden, 










2 


51 


47 


_ 


Hardwick, 










3 


142 


132 


_ 


Holland, 










1 


15 


6 


_ 


Leverett, 










5 


44 


17 


_ 


Longmeadow 


, 








1 


100 


78 


_ 


Ludlow, 










9 


146 


167 


_ 


Monson, 










19 


327 


268 


_ 


Montague, 










55 


381 


491 


_ 


New Braintree, 










46 


17 


_ 


New Salem, 








1 


49 


9 


_ 


North Brookfield. 








5 


236 


204 


_ 


Northampton, 








91 


1,263 


1,486 


_ 


Northfield, . 








2 


114 


61 


_ 


Oakham, 












56 


17 


_ 


Orange, 










95 


524 


291 


_ 


Palmer, 










19 


407 


494 


_ 


Pelham, 












30 


14 


_ 


Petersham, 










1 


81 


38 


_ 


Phillipston, 












51 


6 


_ 


Prescott, 










_ 


37 


9 


~ 


Royalston, 










_ 


78 


22 




Shutesbury, 








1 


19 


2 


_ 


South Hadley, 








26 


404 


253 


I 


Springfield, 








476 


4,838 


6,206 


_ 


Sunderland, 








1 


86 


24 


~ 


Wales, . 








3 


34 


19 




Ware, . . 








61 


374 


630 


- 



386 Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress, 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 2 — Concluded. 





|2 


m 


do;d 




Cities and Towns. 




.« o 


lam 
echnie 
ingfi 
ocratic 


e 




t-ol 


reder 
lett 
field, 
can. 


ill 
McK 
Spr 
Dem 


2 




< 


^ 


^ 


< 


Warren 


22 


237 


206 




Warwick 


2 


19 


14 


_ 


Wendell 


3 


36 


26 


_ 


West Brookfield, .... 


6 


12i 


79 


_ 


Wilbraham 


1 


88 


56 


- 


Totals, 


1,177 


14,242 


13,774 


1 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 





"Sg 


-^SS 




Cities and Towns. 


1 


M 

"-^ o « 
111 


i 




o 


< 


Auburn, 


159 


142 




Charlton, 


74 


165 


- 


Douglas, 


175 


188 


- 


Dudley 


250 


156 


- 


Grafton, 


231 


314 


_ 


Holden 


57 


201 


_ 


Leicester 


282 


229 


_ 


Millbury 


377 


285 


_ 


Northbridge, 


393 


511 


- 


Oxford, 


209 


232 


- 


Paxton, 


17 


34 


_ 


Rutland 


42 


77 


- 


Shrewsbury 


72 


201 


- 


Southbridge, 


1,045 


547 


- 


Spencer, 


604 


451 


- 


Sturbridge, 


99 


133 


- 


Sutton, 


343 


142 


- 



Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress. 387 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 3 — Concluded. 





1 








o a 


^ o d 






ip^ 


III 




Cities and Towns. 


^|. 




1 




<iei 


gfl« 




$t 


III 


% 




^ 


O 


< 


Uxbridge 


298 


272 




Webster, 


765 


593 


_ 


West Boylston, 


37 


127 


_ 


Westborough, 


335 


477 


_ 


Worcester, 


9,579 


9.067 


- 


Totals 


15.243 


14.544 


- 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 4. 





^xT 


t5 


^h 






^^ 


*3 


2« 




Cities and Towns. 


ill 


«5 




2 




1- 






1 


< 


Acton, 


127 


1 


222 




Ashburnham, 








118 


3 


155 


_ 


AsLby, 








49 


1 


97 


_ 


Ashland. . 








122 


3 


180 


_ 


Ayer, . 








246 


6 


192 


_ 


Bedford, 








62 


2 


118 


_ 


Berlin, . 








26 




142 


_ 


Bolton, 








24 


3 


107 


_ 


Boxborough, 








16 




39 


_ 


Boylston, 








12 


1 


108 


_ 


Clinton, 








1,235 


99 


877 


_ 


Concord, 








426 


4 


413 


_ 


FiTCHBURG, . 








2,173 


287 


2,119 


_ 


Framing ham. 








1,168 


17 


1,007 


_ 


Gardner, 








696 


31 


1,159 


_ 


Groton, 








128 


11 


190 


_ 


Harvard, 








42 


1 


95 


- 



388 Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 4 - Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


It 


II 




i 
< 


Hubbardston, 

Hudson, 

Lancaster, . 

Leominster, . 

Lexington, . 

Lincoln, 

Littleton, 

Lunenburg, . 

Marlborotjgh, 

Maynard, 

Natick, 

Northborough, 

Pepperell, 

Princeton, . 

Shirley, 

Southborough, 

Sterling, 

Stow, . 

Sudbury, 

Tempieton, . 

Townsend, . 

Waltham, , 

Wayland, . 

Westford, 

Westminster, 

Weston, 

Winchendon, 








33 

652 

50 

1,240 

310 

89 

76 

46 

1,958 

453 
1,234 

121 

202 
14 
80 

154 
53 
64 
68 

197 

76 

2,079 

219 

144 
40 
73 

440 


2 
17 
2 

67 
6 
1 
6 
5 
24 
17 
41 
2 
12 

1 

2 

1 

8 
2 
45 
17 
15 
4 
3 
7 


101 
430 
212 

1,C86 
475 
94 
100 
123 
952 
316 
773 
188 
229 
79 
110 
163 
Ul 
103 
117 
292 
191 

2,260 
205 
194 
162 
216 
435 


- 


Totals, . 








18,835 


767 


16,965 


- 



Representatives, Sixty-second Congress. 389 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 5. 





en O, 


©Q 




Cities and Towns. 


< . 


K« . 


S 




3H^:3 


mes 
micl 
Lowel 
cratic. 


t 




fQ 


^ 


< 


Andover, 


732 


408 




Billerica 


316 


156 


1 


Burlington, 


82 


13 




Carlisle 


71 


27 


_ 


Chelmsford, 


410 


208 


1 


Dracut, 


239 


199 




Dunstable, 


35 


18 


1 


Lawrence, 


3,256 


5,124 




Lowell 


5,858 


5,980 


- 


Lynnfield, 


137 


37 


_ 


Methuen 


902 


328 


1 


North Andover 


426 


264 




North Reading 


131 


29 


- 


Reading, 


726 


249 


- 


Tewksbury 


151 


63 


_ 


Tyngsborough 


81 


18 


- 


Wilmington, 


207 


42 


- 


Totals 


13,760 


13,163 


4 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 6. 





1= 


11 






Cities and Towns. 


p=;>.2 


III 


Z9a 
.-0 2 


a 




►? 


< 


^ 


< 


Amesbury, 


136 


801 


470 


_ 


BEVERI.T 


226 


1,838 


735 


- 


Boxford 


7 


68 


16 


_ 


Danvers 


117 


794 


497 


- 


Essex 


14 


175 


85 


- 



390 Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress, 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 6 - Concluded. 













Cities and Towns. 


^2 


73 a 




1 




S OCB 


!?§« 


•"0 3 


s 




►^ 


< 


^ 


< 


Georgetown, .... 


89 


185 


97 


1 


Gloucester, 








120 


1,961 


1,367 




Groveland, . 








45 


172 


141 


_ 


Hamilton, . 








4 


233 


55 


_ 


Haverhill, 








936 


2,451 


2,002 


_ 


Ipswich, 








16 


447 


199 


_ 


Manchester, 








8 


242 


201 


_ 


Marblehead, 








94 


750 


720 


_ 


Merrimac, . 








34 


219 


110 


_ 


Middleton, . 








6 


94 


26 


- 


Newbury, 








14 


192 


33 


- 


Newburyport, 








188 


1,133 


791 


_ 


Peabody, . 








84 


1,045 


1,154 


_ 


Rockport, . 








44 


323 


232 


_ 


Rowley, 








8 


139 


80 


- 


Salem, 








370 


2,901 


2,612 


- 


Salisbury, . 








20 


132 


77 


_ 


Swampscott, 








61 


610 


208 


- 


Topsfield, . 








3 


100 


37 


_ 


Wenham, 








5 


124 


32 


_ 


West Newbury, 








18 


143 


61 


- 


Totals, . 








2,667 


17,272 


12,038 


1 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 7. 



Cities and Towns. 


is 

m 

03 O o 


.LathropMeaker 
of Revere, Direct] 
People's Candi- 
date. 


1^ 


1 

o 




^ 


^ 


w 


< 


Chelsea 


1,572 


89 


2,072 


_ 


Everett, 


1,355 


130 


2.121 


~ 



liepresentatives, Sixty-second Congress. 391 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 7 - Concluded. 















si 


^M 


%^ 




Cities and Towns. 




l«3 

2§« 




2 




03 O O 


.Latt 
of Re 
Peop 
date. 




a 




^ 


^ 


H 


<i 


Lynn, 


5,738 


721 


4.676 


_ 


Malden, 




2,112 


208 


2,929 


- 


Melrose, 




714 


237 


1,396 


- 


Nahant, 




101 


3 


154 


- 


Revere, 




967 


174 


1,043 


- 


Saugus, 




332 


102 


658 


- 


Stoneham, 




521 


35 


674 


- 


Wakefield, 




925 


140 


901 


- 


Totals, 




14,337 


1.837 


16,624 


- 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 8. 





o50Q 








31. 

" « fl 




Cities and Towns. 


oO® • 


^|3 


03 




l^.^-n 


1^^ 

2-< <D 


j3 










£i.o o 


Sort 






fe 


CG 


< 


Arlington 


610 


873 


_ 


Belmont, 


250 


420 


- 


Cambridge, 


6,683 


5,031 


- 


Medford 


1,172 


1,869 


- 


SOMERVILLE, 


3,482 


5,625 


1 


Winchester 


289 


892 


- 


Woburn 


1,356 


1,144 


- 


Totals 


13,842 


15.854 


1 



392 Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 9. 



CrnES AND Towns. 


John A. Keliher 
of Boston, 
Democratic 
Independent 
Nom. Paper. 


III 


|4 


1 


Boston: Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 

8, 9, 12 (Prec. 6 and 7). . 
Winthrop 


8,787 
1,250 


11,416 
236 


1,736 
345 


1 


Totals, 


10,037 


11,652 2,081 


1 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 10. 





hu 


3|g 








o o 




Cities and Towns. 


« ° s 


121 


1 

o 




A 


*-> 


< 


Boston: Wards 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 24, . 


17,893 


12,245 


7 


Milton 


417 


819 


- 


QOINCT 


2,035 


2,719 


5 


Totals 


20,345 


15,783 


12 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 11. 









^ 


m • 










^Oo 


Sfl . 










^.-tf 


|o.2 






Cities and Towns. 




am Du 
tton, Ji 
ston, 
blican. 


•-» O O 


1 








:5 o o 3 


"^oP 










^ 


< 


3 


Boston 


Wards 10, 11, 12 (Prec. 1 


.2,3,4,5). 








18. 19, 


21, 22, 23, 25, . 




13.033 


18.933 


2 



Representatives^ Sixty -second Congress. 393 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 12. 





Ǥ 


o; 






P|.2 


%^ 






S-S 






Cities and Towns. 


•3 a 








ro^ 




o 




Q 


^ 


< 


Avon, 


186 


123 




Bellingham 


63 


97 


_ 


Blackstone 


569 


196 


_ 


Braintree 


449 


673 


_ 


Brookline 


1,539 


2,353 


_ 


Canton, 


419 


372 


_ 


Dedham 


667 


746 


_ 


Dover 


29 


68 


_ 


Foxborough, 


190 


328 


_ 


Franklin, . . . . 


330 


379 


_ 


Holbrook 


162 


226 


_ 


HoUiston 


190 


253 


_ 


Hopedale 


63 


412 


_ 


Hopkinton, 


259 


239 


_ 


Hyde Park 


1,014 


1,174 


_ 


Medfield 


70 


199 


_ 


Medway 


167 


223 


_ 


Mendon 


46 


91 


_ 


Milford, 


1,159 


771 


- 


Millis 


72 


99 


- 


Needham 


208 


439 


_ 


Newton, 


1,887 


3,570 


_ 


Norfolk 


65 


75 


_ 


North Attleborough, 


566 


673 


- 


Norwood 


548 


561 


_ 


Plainville, 


48 


214 


_ 


Randolpli 


407 


246 


1 


Sharon, 


133 


261 


1 


Sherborn 


32 


91 




Stoughton, 


496 


563 


- 


Upton 


108 


243 


- 


Walpole 


286 


323 


- 


Watertown, 


915 


939 


_ 


Wellesley 


234 


418 


_ 


Westwood, 


41 


104 


_ 


Weymouth, 


1.041 


1,116 


_ 


Wrentham 


40 


179 


- 


Totals 


14,698 


19,037 


2 



394 Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress, 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 13. 







.2 u 






o o • 


U o • 






» > Pi 


f; > o 






qS| 


ls| 


• 


CrriBS AND Towns. 






1 




Sort 


ioQ 


a 




^ 


•-S 


<J 


Acushnet, 


79 


18 




Berkley, 








104 


9 


_ 


Chilmark, . 








36 


11 


_ 


Dartmouth, . 








162 


58 


_ 


Dighton, 








185 


28 


_ 


Edgartown, . 








120 


49 


_ 


Fairhaven, . 








331 


136 


_ 


Fall River, 








6,673 


5,452 


- 


Freetown, 








124 


19 


_ 


Gay Head, . 








25 


2 


_ 


Gosnold, 








15 


4 


_ 


Marion, 








126 


36 


_ 


Mattapoisett, 








172 


32 


_ 


Nantucket, . 








196 


96 


_ 


New Bedford, 








4,672 


3,587 


9 


Oak Bluffs, . 








83 


31 




Rehoboth, . 








115 


19 


_ 


Rochester, . 








79 


21 


_ 


Seekonk, 








61 


33 


_ 


Somerset, 








198 


70 


_ 


Swansea, 








186 


36 


_ 


Tisbury, 








106 


47 


- 


Westport. . 








174 


32 


1 


West Tisbury, 




. * 




57 


5 


1 


Totals, . 


• 


• • • 




14,079 


9,831 


11 



Representatives^ Sixty-second Congress. 395 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. 14. 





M 








Cities and Towns. 


m. 


IL 


o m a 8 
hache 
armou 
emocrat 


i 




■ti_'? «fl 


g 2-2 


j^ 




obei 
OfE 
wat 
lica 


fllSla 


t 




■S<!« 


-^H^^Q 


S 




|« 


^ 


H 


< 


Abington 


433 


65 


481 




Attleborough, 








1,049 


95 


816 


_ 


Barnstable, . 








382 


3 


540 


_ 


Bourne, 








238 


4 


184 


_ 


Brewster, 








55 




86 


_ 


Bridgewater, 








452 


16 


288 


_ 


Brockton, . 








3,337 


775 


4,120 


1 


Carver, 








56 


1 


47 


_ 


Chatham, . 








128 


_ 


145 


_ 


Cohasset, 








222 


3 


226 


_ 


Dennis, 








106 


_ 


249 


_ 


Duxbury, 








156 


3 


114 


_ 


East Bridgewater 








407 


24 


103 


- 


Eastham, 








43 


_ 


48 


_ 


Easton, 








360 


21 


376 


_ 


Falmouth, . 








317 


5 


221 


_ 


Halifax. 








43 




13 


_ 


Hanover, 








182 


6 


82 


_ 


Hanson, 








153 


12 


48 


_ 


Harwich, . 








141 


7 


146 


_ 


Hingham, . 








404 


8 


350 


1 


Hull, . 








76 


2 


141 


_ 


Kingston, . 








218 


5 


98 


_ 


Lakeville, 








38 




34 


_ 


Mansfield, . 








322 


2 


294 


_ 


Marshfield, . 








120 




79 


_ 


Mashpee, 








35 


_ 


11 


_ 


Middleborough, 








468 


13 


491 


_ 


Norton, 








143 




72 


_ 


Norwell, 








199 


_ 


98 


_ 


Orleans, 








85 


1 


98 


_ 


Pembroke, . 








90 


3 


46 


_ 


Plymouth, . 








755 


79 


747 


_ 


Plympton, . 








51 


2 


39 


- 


Provincetown, 








128 


2 


278 


_ 


Ray n ham, . 








118 


4 


50 


_ 


Rockland, . 








554 


81 


665 


_ 


Sandwich, . 








103 


13 


147 


1 


Scituate, 








173 


4 


182 




Taunton, . 








2,073 


110 


2,249 


1 



396 Representatives^ Sitxy-second Congress. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT No. U — Concluded. 



Cities and Towns. 


Robert O, Harris 
of East Bridge- 
water, Repub- 
lican. 




Thomas C. 
Thacher of 
Yarmouth, 
Democratic. 


o 
< 


Truro, 

Wareham, 

Wellfleet 

West Bridgewater, 

Whitman 

Yarmouth 


43 

222 
78 
176 
688 
133 


1 

17 

1 

9 

82 


46 
279 
82 
85 
511 
181 


- 


Totals 


15,753 


1,480 


15,686 


4 



Vote Jor State Officers — 1911. 397 



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398 Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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Vote for State Officers — 1911. 399 



I I I I I I I I I I I 



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400 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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to 


Chilmark 

Edgartown, .... 

Gay Head 

Gosnold, 

Oak Bluffs, .... 

Tiabury 

West Tisbury, .... 





Vote fo7' State Officers — 1911. 401 



I I I I I I I -44 I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I t I I 






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i-H »-i lO CO us 1-1 »-> 






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402 



Vote for State Officers — 1911, 



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1 1 1 1 1 


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2 
00 


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1 


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Cities and Towns. 


Saugus 

Swampscott 

Topsfield, 

Wenham, 

West Newbury, 


H 



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Vote for Slate Officers — 1911 . 403 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



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404 Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



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Vote for State Officers — 1911. 405 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I t I I 



cc fO c<X y-i ■^ to T-< |i-ic«5 \ to leOM I |Tj<e<5»OtOOiN 



c^co I I (M I 1 »o I T-i»-i I I »o I I I •^ I 00 I eoco 



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406 Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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Vote for State Officers — 1911, 



407 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



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408 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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Cities and Towns. 


1 

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Vote for State Officers — 1911. 409 



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1C5 
896 
496 
65 
564 
204 

2,502 
251 
270 
473 
323 
504 
98 

1,089 
184 


s 
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Millis, 
Milton, 
Needham, . 
Norfolk, . 
Norwood, . 
Plainville, . 

QuiNCY, 

Randolph, 
Sharon, 
Stoughton, 
Walpole, . 
Wellesley, . 
Westwood, 
Weymouth, 
Wrentham, 


H 



I I I I I I I I I I I 



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410 



Vote for State Officers — 1911, 



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Vote for State Officers — 1911. 411 



to 1 1 1 


CO 






T^^-^^ 


1 


28,751 
1,681 
1,057 
1,188 


?3 


f- 


i 


00 


00 


40,957 

1,696 

989 

438 


5 


IS- 


s 


Boston, 

Chelsea, 

Revere, 

Wintbrop 


1 



I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



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412 Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



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6 










Harvard, , 
Holden, . 
Hopedale, . 
Hubbardston, 
Lancaster, . 
Leicester, . 
Leominster, 
Lunenburg, 
Mendon, . 
Milford, . 
Millbury, . 
New Braintree, 
North Brookfiel 
Northborough, 
Northbridgo, 
Oakham, . 
Oxford, . 
Paxton, 
Petersham, 
Phillipston, 
Princeton, 
Royalston, 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



413 



1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 


IM 


00<N.-iiOi-l 1 00 ■* O T-i t- 05 OJ M .-1 OO OS «0 CO 


S 


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S 


87 
153 
170 
533 
414 
129 
121 
146 
280 
244 
344 
229 
480 
115 
105 
446 
142 
432 
8.238 




1 »O^OCOC<) 1 1-I^CO 1 oo-<*< 1 1 1 —"oo^ 


^ 


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2 


00 




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Rutland, . 

Shrewsbury, 

Southborough, 

Southbridge, 

Spencer, , 

Sterling, . 

Sturbridge, 

Sutton, 

Templeton, 

Upton, 

Uxbridge, . 

Warren, . 

Webster, . 

West Boylston, 

West Brookfield 

Westborough, 

Westminster, 

Winchendon, 

WoRCESTEK, 


1 



4U 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



•sjaq^o nv 


1 1 ^ 1 T}< 1 1 I CO 1 C«5,-lO(M 


S 


•uoniqiq 
-ojj *inq-i9ABH 

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s 


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'uo^sog JO ufBq 
-gun^:^oj^ -y smo^; 


2,889 

7,126 

17,431 

491 

27,760 

3,676 
12,144 

4,634 
46,534 
349 
15,521 
10,228 
32,677 
25,335 


CO 


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JO ssoj -jsT euaSng 


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in 


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i 


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1,119 
5,710 

12,283 
138 

22,240 
1,798 
9,618 
2,832 

35,700 

161 

9,476 

7,488 

43,980 

20,435 


1 
s 


-OS 'inVSABH 
JO XajBQ -J sauiTJf 


47 

792 

752 

6 

2,725 

391 

1,240 

224 

1,770 

5 

815 

1,246 

2,159 

1,183 


CO* 


o 
O 














Barnstable, 
Berkshire, . 
Bristol, 

Dukes County, 
Essex, 
Franklin, . 
Plampden, 
Hampshire, 
Middlesex, 
Nantucket, 
Norfolk, . 
Plymouth, 
SufTolk, . 
Worcester, . 


1 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



415 



For Lieutenant Governor. 

Robert Luce of Somcrville (Republican), 

David I. Walsh of Fitchburg (Democratic Progressive 

Democratic), 

Walter S. Hutchins of Greenfield (Socialist), 
William G. Merrill of Maiden (Prohibition), 
Patrick Mulligan of Boston (Socialist Labor), 
All others, 



204,469 votes. 



200,318 

15,059 

5,534 

3,123 



For Secretary. 

Albert P. Langtry of Springfield (Republican), 
Frank J. Donahue of Boston (Democratic Progressi\ 

Democratic), 

Rose Fenner of Worcester (Socialist), 

Alfred H. Evans of Northampton (Prohibition), 

David Craig of Milford (Socialist Labor), 

All others 



206,968 votes. 

178,530 " 

11,733 •• 

8.770 •• 

6.771 •• 
2 •• 



For Treasurer and Receiver GeneraL 

Elmer A. Stevens of Somerville (Republican), . . 209,690 votes. 
Augustus L. Thorndike of Brewster (Democratic Pro- 
gressive. Democratic), 172,977 

Joseph M. ColdweU of Milford (Socialist), . . . 14,642 

Charles E. Peakes of Weston (Prohibition), . . . 5,747 

Jeremiah P. McNally of Salem (Socialist Labor), . . 5,482 

All others, 3 



For Auditor. 

John E. White of Tisbury (Republican), . 
Charles B. Strecker of Brookline (Democratic Progres- 
sive. Democratic), 

Sylvester J. McBride of Watertown (Socialist), 
William W. Nash of Westborough (Prohibition), 
Karl Lindstrand of Lynn (Socialist Labor), 
All others, 



,729 votes. 



173,839 

12,795 

6,566 

5.976 

3 



416 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



For Attorney- General. 

James M. Swift of Fall River (Republican), . . . 210.520 votes. 
George W. Anderson of Boston (Democratic Progressive. 

Democratic), 175,953 " 

George E. Roewer, Jr., of Boston (Socialist), . . . 12,557 " 

Henrj' C. Hess of Boston (Socialist Labor), . . . 5,193 " 

All others 7 " 



For Executive Councillors. 

First District. 

Eben S. S. Keith of Bourne (Republican), . . . 26,199 votes. 

Alfred E. Green of Duxbury (Democratic), . , . 17,257 

Edward Smith of New Bedio d (Socialist), . . . 2,831 " 

All others 1 vote. 



Second District. 

J. Stearns Gushing of Norwood (Republican), . 

Henry J. Dixon of Boston (Democratic), 

All others 



32,778 votes. 
23,493 *' 
2 •• 



Third District. 

John Quinn, Jr., of Boston (Democratic), 
Henry A. Savage of Boston (Republican), 
All others 



32,836 votes. 
9,962 •• 
1 vote. 



Fourth District. 

Alexander McGregor of Maiden (Republican), 
Edward B. James of Cambridge (Democratic), 
All others, 



29,148 votes. 
19,531 " 
2 •• 



Fifth District. 

Edward G. Frothingham of Haverhill (Republican), 

Edward J. Carney of Salem (Democratic), 

James H. Walker of Amesbury (Democratic Progressive) 

John H. Blackstock of Amesbury (Socialist), . 

All others, 



. 26.398 


votes. 


. 14.601 


•• 


, 5,309 


" 


. 2,822 


" 


1 


vote. 



Vote for State Officers — 1911. 



417 



Sixth District. 

Herbert E. Fletcher of VVestford (Republican), . . 32,598 votes. 
Leander V. Colahan of Stoneham (Democratic Progres- 
sive. Democratic), 23,050 *' 

All others 3 " 

Seventh District. 

Winfield S. Schuster of Douglas (Republican), . . 27,776 votes. 
Arthur E. Seagrave of Uxbridge (Democratic), . . 21,790 " 
All others, 4 " 

Eighth District. 

August H. Goetting of Springfield (Republican), . . 26,479 votes. 
William H. Gross of Lee (Democratic Progressive. Dem- 
ocratic), 18,705 " 

Edward A. Buckland of Holyoke (Socialist), . . . 3,701 " 



LIST OF THE 



Eiecutiye aoJ i^iMm Depaftnieiits 

OF THE 

GOVERNMENT 

OF 



AND OFFICERS IMMEDIATELY CONNECTED THEREWITH, 
WITH PLACES OF RESIDENCE. 

1912. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, 



His P:xcellency EUGENE N. FOSS (D.) of Boston, 

GOVERNOR. 

His Honor ROBERT LUCE (/?.) of Somerville, 

LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR. 



Council. 
District ThE LiECTEXANT-GOVERNOR. 

I. — Ebex S. S. Keith (R.) of Bourne. 
n. — J. Stearns Gushing {R.) of Norwood. 
^ J John Quinn, Jr.* (i>.), of Boston. 



{ 



Edward D Collins f (Z>.) of Boston. 
IV. — Alexander McGregor (/?.) of Maiden. 
V. — Edward G. Frothingham (/?.) of Haverhill. 
VI. — Herbert E. Fletcher (R.) of Westford. 
VII. — WiNFiELD S. Schuster (R.) of Douglas. 
VIII. — August II. Goetting {R.) of Springfield. 



Secretary to the Governor. 
Dudley M. Holman of Taunton. 



Executive Secretary. 
Edward F. Hamlin of Newton. 



• Mr. Quinn resigned January 17, 1912. 

t Mr. Collins, having been elected by the two branches of the Gen- 
eral Court, was qualified January 24, 1912. 



422 Executive Department. 

Committees of the Council. 
On Pardons, Charitable Institutions and Prisons. — His Honor the 
Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. Goetting, Mr. Fletclier, Mr. Keitli, Mr. 
Collins. 

On Finance, Accounts and JFarrants. — HiB Honor the Lieutenant- 
Governor, Mr. Gushing, Mr. Schuster, Mr. McGregor, Mr. Collins. 

On Harbors and Public Lands and Railroads.— Mr. Fletcher, 
Chairman, Mr. Gushing, Mr. Schuster, Mr. Frothingham, Mr. Keith. 

On Military and Nai^al Affairs. — Mr. Goetting, Chairman, Mr. 
Cushing, Mr. Schuster, Mr. McGregor, Mr. Frothingham. 

071 State House.— Mr. McGregor, Chairman, Mr. Goetting, Mr. 
Fletcher, Mr. Keith, Mr. Frothingham. 

On Nomiiiations.-HiB Honor the Lieutenant-Governor, Mr. Goet- 
ting, Mr. Collins. 

Messenger to the Governor and Council. 
William L. Reed, Boston. 



Executive Department. 423 

Secretary of the Commonwealtli. 

Albert P. Langtry (R.) of Springfield. 

Isaac H. Edgett, Deputy, Beverly. 

Herbert H. Boynton, Deputy North Abington. 

J&meB J. Tracy, Chief 0/ Archives Divition, . .Everett. 



Treasurer and Receiver-General. 

Elmer A. Stevens (R.) of Somerville. 

Henry 8. Bridge, First Clerk Wincheflter. 

James C. Bond, Receiving Teller, Boston. 

Eben Sumner, Paying Teller Nev?ton. 

Wendell P. Marden, Cashier Newton. 



Auditor of the Commonwealth. 
John E. White {R.) of Tiebxiry. 
William D. Hawley, Deputy Auditor, .... Maiden. 

James Pope, First Clerk Melrose. 

Carl A. Raymond, Second Clerk Melrose. 



Attorney-General. 
James M. Swift (R.) of Fall River. 

Frederic B. Greenhalge, Assistant Lowell. 

Andrew Marshall, Assistant, Boston. 

Henry M. Hatchings, Assistant, ..... Dedham. 
Walter A. Powers, Assistant Brookline. 



424 Executive Department. 

Governor's Staff. 

Adjutant General, Chief of Staff. 
Brig. Gen. Gardner W. Pearson, Lowell. 

Aids-de-Camp. 

Maj. Curtis D. Noyea, Boston. 

Maj. Arthur Blake, Boston. 

Maj. Thomas L. Walsh, Clinton. 

Maj. Robert E. Green, Brookline. 

Detailed from the Line. 
Maj. William H. Perry of Salem, Eighth Infantry. 
Capt. Stuart W. Wise of Brookline, Ordnance Department. 
First Lieut. Herbert P. Ward of Springfield, Battalion Adjutant, Second 

Infantry. 
First Lieut. Nicholas J. Smith of Worcester, Battery B, First Battalion 

Field Artillery. 
First Lieut. Henry D. Crowley of Boston, Battalion Adjutant, Ninth 

Infantry. 
Second Lieut. Joseph W, Bartlett of Newton, Company D, First Corps 

Cadets. 



Executive Departmeyit. 425 

Massachusetts Volunteer Militia. 

First Brigade. 

Brig. Gen. Frederick E. Pierce Greenfield. 



Second Brigade. 
Brig. Gen. William A. Pew, Jr Salem. 



Corps of Cadets — Unattached. 
Firat Corps Cadets, Lieut. Col. Franklin L. Joy, . . Boston. 
Second Corps Cadets, Lieut. Col. Charles F. Ropes, . . Salem. 



Naval Brigade. 
Chief of Brigade, Lieut. Comd. Daniel M. Goodridge, . Boston. 



Hospital Corps. 
Capt. Robert E. Bell Lowell. 



Signal Corps. 
Capt. Harry G. Chase Somerville. 



LEGISLATIVE DEPAETMENT. 



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432 



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Arrangement of the Senate. 



433 



ARRANGEMENT OF THE SENATE. 





Hon. LEVI H. GREI 


]NW( 




Right. 




1. 


Hon. Erson B. Barlow. 


1. 


2. 


Hon. Luke S. Stowe. 


2. 


3. 


Hon. William R. Burke. 


3. 


4. 


Hon. Thomas M. Vinson. 


4. 


5. 


Hon. Samuel Ross. 


5. 


6. 


Hon. Walter E. McLane. 


6. 


7. 


Hon. William H. Wheeler. 


7. 


8. 


Hon. Daniel E. Denny. 


8. 


9. 


Hon. Arthur L. Nason. 


9. 


10. 


Hon. James P. Timilty. 


10. 


11. 


Hon. Dennis E. Halley. 


11. 


12. 


Hon. John H. Hunt. 


12. 


13. 


Hon. John H. Schoon- 


13. 




maker. 


14. 


14. 


Hon. Arthur S. Adams. 




15. 


Hon. Charles H. Brown. 


15. 


16. 


Hon. James A. Hatton. 


16. 


17. 


Hon. Harry N. Stearns. 


17. 


18. 


Hon. Joseph P. Lomasney. 


18. 


19. 


Hon. Edric Eldridge. 


19. 


20. 


Hon. Frank P. Bennett, Jr. 


20. 



Left. 
Hon. CharlesV. Blanchard. 
Hon. George L. Barnes. 
Hon. Claude L. Allen. 
Hon. Charles H. Pearson. 
Hon. Calvin Coolidge. 
Hon. Edward J. Grainger. 
Hon. Ezra W. Clark. 
Hon. Frederic M. Hersey. 
Hon. Francis J. Horgan. 
Hon. George H. Newhall. 
Hon. James F. Powers. 
Hon. Francis X. Quigley. 
(Vacant.) 
Hon. George Holden 

Tinkham. 
Hon. Thomas M. Joyce. 
Hon. George A. Schofield. 
Hon. Charles F. McCarthy. 
Hon. John H. Mack. 
Hon. Charles S. Chace. 
Hon. Henry C. Mulligan. 



434 



Senate^ Alpliahetically . 



SENATE, ALPHABETICALLY. 



Hon. LEVI H. GREENWOOD (Third Worcester) , 
President. 



Adams, Arthur S., . 
Allen, Claude L,, . 
Barlow, Erson B., . 
Barnes, George L., . 
Bennett, Frank P., Jr. 
Blanchard, Charles V., 
Brown, Charles H., 
Burke, William R., 
Chace, Charles S., 
Clark, Ezra W., 

Coolidge, Calvin, 

Denny, Daniel E., 
Eldridge, Edric, 
Grainger, Edward J. 
Greenwood, Levi H., 
Halley, Dennis E., 
Hatton, James A., 
Hersey, Frederick M. 
Horgan, Francis J., 



. Second Essex District. 

. Fourth Middlesex . " 

. Eighth Middlesex " 

. First Norfolk " 

. Seventh Middlesex " 

. Third Middlesex " 

. Sixth Middlesex " 

. Fourth Worcester " 

. First Bristol " 

. Second Plymouth '• 

Berkshire, Hampshire } ,, 
and Hampden \ 

. Second Worcester " 

. Cape 

. First Suffolk 

. Third Worcester " 

. Fifth Essex " 

. Second Suffolk " 

. First Plymouth " 

. Mnth Suffolk " 



Senate, Alphabetically. 



435 



Hunt, John H., 
Joyce, Thomas M., 
Lomasney, Joseph P., 
Mack, John H., 
McCarthy, Charles F., 
McLane, Walter E., 
Mulligan, Henry C, 
Nason, Arthur L., . 
Newhall, George H., 
Pearson, Charles H., 
Powers, James F., . 
Quigley, Francis X., 
Ross, Samuel, . 
Schofield, George A., 

Schoonmaker, John II. 

Stearns, Harry N., . 
Stowe, Luke S., 
Timilty, James P., 
Tinkham, George Holden 
Vinson, Thomas M., 

Wheeler, William H. 



. First Worcester District. 

. Fourth Suffolk " 
. Third Suffolk 

. Berkshire " 

. Fifth Middlesex ** 

. Second Bristol '* 

. First Middlesex " 

. Fourth Essex " 

. First Essex " 

. Second Norfolk " 

. Sixth Suffolk " 

. Second Hampden " 
. Third Bristol 

. Third Essex " 

J Franklin and } „ 

* I Hampshire \ 

. Second Middlesex " 

. First Hampden " 

. Seventh Suffolk " 
. Fifth Suffolk 

. Eighth Suffolk "" 

j Worcester and } ,, 

* ( Hampden \ 



436 Officers of the Senate. 



OFFICERS OF THE SENATE. 



HENRY D. COOLIDGE, Concord, . Clerk. 

WILLIAM H. SANGER, Boston, . Assistant Clerk. 

THOMAS F. PEDRICK, Lynn, . . Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Rev. EDWARD A. HORTON, Boston, Chaplain. 



House of Representatives, By Counties. 437 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

(BY COUNTIES.) 



[In this list the politics of the several membere are designated as 
follows : /?., Republican ; Z)., Democrat ; S , Socialist ; / C , Independent 
Citizen ; D. P , Democratic Progressive , R. P , Republican Progressive ; 
/., Independent.] 



COUNTY OF BARNSTABLE. 



^5 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



!<; 



Barnstable, 

Bourne, 

Falmouth, 

Mashpee, 

Sandwich, 

Chatham, 
Dennis, 
Harwich, 
Yarmouth, 

Brewster, 

Eastham, 

Orleans, 

Provincetown 

Truro, . 

Wellfleet, 



1 
I 
> Charles L Gifford, ft. 

I 
J 



Benjamin D. Gifford, ft., . 



j- Jerome S. Smith, ft. 
I 



Barnstable. 



Chatham. 



Provincetown. 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE. 



Clarksburg, . 
Florida, 
North Adams 

Wards 3, 4,5, 
Savoy, . 

North Adams, 
Wards 1, 2, 6,7, 



> Almiron J. McCulloch, R 



William A. O'Hearn, D 



Savoy. 



North Adams. 



438 



House of Representatives^ 



COUNTY OF BERKSHIRE - Conc/u(Zcd. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Adams, 

Cheshire, 

Hinsdale, 

New Ashford 

Peru, 

"Windsor, 

Dalton, . 
Hancock, 
Laneeborough, . 
Pittsfield, Wardl, 
"William stown, . 

Pittsfield, Wards 

2, 6, 7, . . 

Pittsfield, "Wards 

3, 4, 5, 

Becket, . 
Lee, 

Lenox, . 
Monterey, . 
New Marlboro', . 
Otis, 

Richmond, . 
Bandisfleld, . 
Tyringham, . 
Washington, 

Alford, . 
Egremont, . 
Great Harrington, 
Mt. Washington, . 
Sheffield, 
Stockbridge, 
West Stockbridge, 



> Morton Henrj' Burdick, D. 



I 

)• Arthur H. Bicknell, R. 

J . 

j Edward M. Hall, D., . 
[ James Kittle, R., 

j- Albert B. Clark, R., . 



J- Alexander Sedgwick, 2>., . 



Adams. 

Dalton. 

Pittsfield. 
Pittsfield". 

Lee. 



Stockbridge. 



COUNTY OF BRISTOL. 



Attleborough, 
N. Attleborough, . 
Norton, 
Seekonk, 



I Joseph Wm. Martin, Jr., ^. 
j Edward A. Sweeney, R., . 



North Attle- 
borough. 
Attleborough. 



By Counties, 



439 



COUNTY OF BBlWHOlj — Concluded. 



District. 



Name of RepreBentative. 



Reaidenco. 



EastoD, . 
Mansfield, . 
Raynham, . 

Taunton,Wards5 
7,8, . 

Taunton, Wards 2, 
3, 4, . 

Berkley, 
Dighton, 
Rehoboth, . 
Taunton, Wards 
1, 6, . 

Acushnet, . 
Dartmouth, . 
Falrhaven, . 
Freetown, . 

New Bedford 
Wards 1, 2, 3, 

New Bedford 
Wards 4, 5, 6, 

Fall River, Wards 

1,2, . 
Westport, . 

Fall River, Wards 
3, 4, 5, 

Fall River, Wards 

6, 7, 8, 9, . 
Somerset, 
Swansea, 



> Clarence A. Barnes, R., 

j William A. Bellamy, R., 
j Clifford L. King, Z>., . 

I J. Howard O'Keefe, R., D., 



^George A. Braley, R., 

) GerrettGeils, Jr.,^., 
\ Laurence 8. Ferry, R., 

) Andrew P. Doyle, R., 

\ Edward R. Hathaway, R. 



I William Booth, i?., . 

I William H. GIfford, 3d, Z>., 

) Edward F. Harrington, D., 
\ Joseph A. Parks, Z>., 

1 Francis X. Le Boeuf, R., . 
i-Frank Mulveny, R., . 
I Isaac E, Willetts, R., 



Mansfield. 

Taunton. 
Taunton. 

Taunton. 

Freetown. 

New Bedford. 
(I 

New Bedford. 



Fall River. 
Westport. 



Fall River. 
Fall River. 



COUNTY OF DUKES COUNTY. 



Chilmark, 
Edgartown, 
Gay Head, 
Gosnold, 
Oak Bluffs, 
Tisbury, 
West Tisbury, 




Tisbury. 



440 



House of MepresentcUives, 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



4 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


•1 


Amesbury, . 
Merrimac, . 


j Samuel I. Collins, R., 


Amesbury. 


^1 


Haverhill, Wards 
1, 2, 3, 


i A. Franklin Priest, /?., . 


Haverhill. 


3 


Haverhill, Wards 
4, 6, . . . 


j Henry O. Wells, i?., . 


Haverhill. 


4 


Haverhill, Ward 5, 


Charles H. Morrill, *S'., . 


Haverhill. 


•{ 


Lawrence, Wards 
1,2, . . . 
Methuen, 


) John C. Sanborn, D. P., D., 
} Frederick W. Scblupp, D. 
) P.,D, . . . . 


Lawrence. 


•! 


Lawrence, Wards 
3,4, . . . 


j Daniel Fitzpatrick, D., . 


Lawrence. 


7 


Lawrence,Ward 5, 


Charles H. Morgan, R., . 


Lawrence. 


8 


Lawrence, Ward 6, 


William J. Graham, D., . 


Lawrence, 


9 


Andover, 


Harry Millett Fames, R., . 


Andover. 


..{ 


Boxford, 
Groveland, . 
Haverhill, Ward 7, 
North Andover, . 


] 

)> George P. Webster, R. P., 


Boxford, 


11 


Peabody, . 


Charles R. O'Connell, D., . 


Peabody. 


-! 


Lynn, Ward 3, . 
Swampscott, 


). John H. Cogswell, i?.. 

\ Martiu L. Quinn, Z>. P.,R , 


Lynn. 
Swampscott. 


,3| 


Lynn,Ward8l,5,7, 
Lynnfield, . 


( Francis M. nill, R., . 
i Michael S. Keenan, R., 


Lynn. 


14 j 


Lynn, Wards 2, 4, 
Nahant, 


I Frank W. Atkins, R., 
\ Fred W. Ford, /?., . 


Lynn. 


>5j 


Lynn, Ward 6, . 
Saugus, 


I Michael H. Cotter. D., . 
) John R. Wallace, D., 


Lynn. 


16 


Marblehead,. 


John G. Stevens, D. P., D , 


Marblehead. 


17 


Balem, Wards 1,2, 


James D. Burns, D., . 


Salem. 


18 


Salem .Wards 3, 5, 


Chauncey Pepin, R., . 


Salem. 


19 


Salem, Wards 4, 6, 


Michael Kelly, D. P., B., . 


Salem. 


.oj 


Beverly, 
Danvers, 


1 Herman A. MacDonald.^., 
j John L. Saltonstall, R., . 


Beverly. 



By Counties. 



441 



COUNTY OF ESSEX— (^onc^udcd. 



d ^ 

^5 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


22 j 

23 i 

24.^ 

-1 

26. 
i 


Gloucester, Wards 

4,5,8, 
Manchester, . 

Gloucester, Wards 
3, 6, 7, 

Gloucester.Wards 

1, 2, . 
Rockport, . 

Essex, . 

Hamilton, 

Ipswich, 

Middleton, . 

Rowley, 

Topsfield, . 

Wenham, 

Ne wburyport, 
Wardsl, 2, 3,4, 

Georgetown, 
Newbury, . 
Newbu ry port, 

Wards 5, 6, 
Salisbury, . 
West Newbury, . 


Ih. Bert Knowles, «., 

j Charles D. Smith, D., 

I Henry n. Parsons, ff, 

1 

J-C. Augustus Norwood, R., 

James E. Fowle, /? , . 
1^ A. Willis Bartlett,/?., 


Gloucester. 
Gloucester. 
Gloucester, 

Hamilton. 

Newbury port. 
Salisbury. 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN. 





• 


Ashfield, . 
Buckland, . 
Charlemont, . 
Colrain, 


1 




1- 




Conway, 

Hawley, 

Heath, . . 

Monroe, 

Rowe, . . . 

Shelburne, , 

Whately, ; . 


Henry D. Wright, /. C, 

' D. P.yD , 

1 

J 


Rowe 


2 


Greenfield, . 


Harold H. Flower, 72., . 


Greenfield. 



442 



House of Representatives^ 



COUNTY OF FRANKLIN — Concluded. 



•s« 








o^ 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


^■h 








r 


Bernardston, 
Deerfield, . 








Gill, . 








1 


Leverett, 

Leyden, 

Montague, 




)^John W. HaigiB,^., . 


Montague. 


I 


Sunderland, 










Erving, . 
New Salem, 
Northfleld, 




1 
1 




4^ 


Orange, 

Shutesbury, 

Warwick, 




> Norman P. Wood, ^., 
1 


Northfield. 




Wendell, . 


J 





COUNTY OF HAMPDEN. 



r 


Brirafield, . 


1 




1 


Holland, 




1 


Mouson, 
Palmer, 
Wales, . 


Henry W. Holbrook, 7?., . 


Palmer. 


r 


Agawam, 

Blandford, . 

Chester, 

East Longmeadow, 

Granville, . 

Hampden, . 


1 

1 

1 




2< 


Longmeadow, 


! James F. Barry, D., . 

f William F. Emerson, R., . 


Aeawara, 


Ludlow, 


Longmeadow. 




Montgomery, 


1 






Russell. . . 


1 






Southwick, . 


1 






Tolland, 


1 






West Springfield, 


1 






Wilbrahara, . 


J 




3 


Springfield, Wd. 1, 


John J. Carmody, Z>., 


Springfield. 


M 


Springfield, Wards 
2, 3, . . . 


j John Mitchell, D., . , . 


Springfield. 


6 


Springfield, Wards 


( Gurdon W. Gordon, R., . 


Springfield. 


4, 5, 6, . . 


\ Paul I. Lombard, R., 





By Counties, 



443 



COUNTY OF HAMPDEN— C7onc/MC?<!<f. 



^1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


6 


Springfield,Wd. 7, 


Charles T. Holt, i2., . 


Springfield. 


7 


Springfield.Wd.S, 


Ernest A. Witt, i?., . 


Springfield. 


8 


Chicopee, . 


DanielJ. Buckley, Z>., . 


Chicopee. 


"1 


Holyoke, Wards 
1. 2, 4, . . 


1 George R. Burns, D., R., . 


Holyoke. 


:oj 


Holyoke, Wards 
3, 6, . . . 


j Thomas Davies, 2>., . 


Holyoke. 


"I 


Holyoke, Wards 
5, 7, . . . 


George Francis Reardon, ft., 


Holyoke. 


12 


Westfield, . 


Harry B. Putnam, B., 


Westfield. 



COUNTY OF HAMPSHIRE. 



1 


Northampton, 


Henry W. Warner, D., . 


Northampton. 


r 


Chesterfield, 


1 




1 


Cummington, 






1 


Easlhampton, 






1 


Goshen, 






1 


Huntington, . 


1 




2^ 


Middlefield, . 
Plaintield, . 
Southampton, 
Westhampton, 
Williamsburg, . 


J> Leonard F. Hardy, ft., 
1 


Huntington. 




Worthington, 


J 






Amherst, 


1 




Hadley, 
Hatfield, 


^ John E. Lyman, ft., . 


South Hadley. 


South Hadley, . 


J 






Belchertown, 

Entield, 

Granby, 

Greenwich, . 

Pelham, 

Prescott, 


1 




*i 


•Edgar E. Sargent, Z),, 


Belchertown. 








I 


Ware, . 







444 



House of Representatives y 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Cambridge, Wds. 

1, 2, 3, . . 

Cambridge, Wds. 

4, 5, 6, 7, . 



Cambridge, "Wds. 
8, 9, 10, 11, 



Newton, 



Waltham, . 

Natick, . 

Framingham, 

Ashland, 
Holliston, 
Hopkinton, . 
Sherborn, 

Marlborough, 

Boxborough, 
Hudson, 
Maynard, 
Stow, . 

Acton, . 

Ayer, . 

Carlisle, 

Chelmsford, 

Littleton, 

Westford, 

Ashby, . 

Dunstable, 

Groton, 

Pepperell, 

Shirley, . 

Townsend, 

Tyngsborough, 



) John E. Quinn, D., . 
I Joseph J. Keed, Z)., . 

C James W. Bean, R., . 

< Henry J. Winelow, R., 
i Charles J. Wood, R., 

{John P. Brennan, D., 
Russell D. Crane, R., 
C. Burnside Seagrave,^., 

f Henry E Both f eld, 72., 

< George H. Ellis, R., . 
i Thomas W. White, R., 

\ George P. Drury, R., 
\ Nathan A. Tults, R., . 

William J. Naphen, R., 

Enos H. Bigelow, R., . 



J- Charles A. Crowley, R., 



James M. Hurley, Z>., 



> George W. W. Edson, D. 



I 

J^Edward Fieher, D., . 



^OtisL. Wright,^., 



Cambridge. 
Cambridge. 

14 

Cambridge. 
<< 
It 

Newton. 
If 
<i 

Waltham. 

Natick. 
Framingham. 

Holliston. 

Marlborough. 

Stow. 

Westford. 
Tyngsboro'. 



By Counties. 



445 



COUNTY OF MIDDLBQEX— Contitiued. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Bedford, 

Concord, 

Lincoln, 

Sudbury, 

Wayland, 

Weston, 



Dracut, . 
Lowell, Ward 1, 

Lowell, Ward 2, . 

Lowell, Wd8.4,5, 

Lowell, Wards 3, 
6, 7, . 

Lowell, Ward 8, . 

Blllerica, 
Lowell, Ward 9, . 
Tewksbury, . 

Burlington, . 
North Reading, . 
Reading, 
Wilmington, 
Woburn, 

Wakefield, . 

Melrose, 



Maiden, 



24 Everett, 



oe J Somerville, Wards 
^n\ 1, 3, 4. 5. . . 



o« j Somerville, Wards 
^^ ) 2, 6, 7, . . 



i-Waldo L. Stone, ^., . 



{ Otis W. Butler, n., . 

John E. Kearns, D , . 

Eugene F. Toomey, D. 

) TTenry Achin, Jr., E., 
\ Victor F. Jewett, /?., . 

Joseph Craig, 7?., 
Thomas 8. Cuff, Z>., . 



! Henry L. Andrews, /?., 
{Joseph il. Parker, Jr., Z> 

Charles A. Dean, Z>., . 

George W. Libbey, ^., 

fAlvin E. Blips, ^., . 
^ Charles M. Blodgett, R., 
i Truman R. Hawley, R., 

< James F. Cavanagh, R., 
I Fred P. Greenwood, R., 

( William W. Kennard, R , 
^ Ray R. Rideont, fi , . 
[Charles L. Underhill, R., 

rZebedeeE. Cliff, /?., . 
<, Leon M Conwell, R., 
L Charles W. Eldridge, R., 



Sudbury. 

Lowell. 

Lowell. 
Lowell. 
Lowell. 

Lowell. 

Lowell. 

Woburn. 

Wakefield. 

Melrose. 

Maiden. 

Everett. 

Somerville. 
it 

Somerville. 



446 



House of Representatives, 



COUNTY 0¥ :KIDDL.B8EX— Concluded. 



4 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence, 


-1 

30 

31 


Medford,Wd8.3,6, 
"Winchester, . 

Medford,"Ward8 1, 
2, 4, 5, 7, . 

Arlington, . 
Lexington, . 

Belmont, 
"Wate.rtown, . 

Stoneham, . 


j Wilton B. Fay, R., . 

i Benjamin F. Haines, R., . 

I John G. Brackett, R., 

1 James H. L. Coon, R., 
Arthur N. Newhall, R., . 


Medford. 

Medford. 

Arlington. 

"WatertowD. 
Stoneham. 



COUNTY OF NANTUCKET. 



1 Nantucket, . 



Benjamin Sharp, D., R., 



Nantucket. 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Dedham, 
Needham, 

Brookline, . 

Hyde Park, . 

Canton, 
Milton, . 

Quincy, "Wards 1, 
2, 3, . 

Quincy, "Wards 4, 
5, 6, . . 

"Weymouth, . 



Frederic J. Grady, D. P., D., ' Dedham. 

John A. Curtin, R., . . Brookline. 
John H. Sherburne, R., . " 

David W. Murray,/). P., A, Hyde Park. 

i 
Roger Wolcott, R., . . \ Milton. 

1 
Walter E. Piper, R., . . Quincy. 



"William J. Leslie, R., 
John F. Dwyer, D. P., D., 



Quincy. 
"Weymouth. 



By Counties, 



447 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK- Conc/?fc?cd. 



-1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


•! 
•{ 
■•{ 

4 

I 

r 

[ 


Avon, . 
BraJntree, 
Holbrook, . 

Randolph, . 
Sharon, 
Stoughton, . 

Norwood, 
Walpole, . 
Weetwood, . 

Dover, . 

Medfleld, . . 
Medway, 

Milll8, . 

Norfolk, 
Wellesley, . 

Bellingham, . 
Foxborough, 
Franklin, 
Piainville, . 
Wrentham, . 


I Henry M. Storm, R., . 
I John V. Beal, /?., 

jwillle W.Baker,/?.,. . 

1 

J> J. Herbert Baker, R., 

! 

J 

1 

|. Herbert E. Thompson, R , 


Braintree. 
Randolph. 
Westwood. 

Medfleld. 
Piainville. 



COUNTY OF PLYMOUTH. 



Plymouth, 

Duxbury, 

Marshfleld, 

Norwell, 

Pembroke, 

Scituate, 

Cohasset, 
Hingham, 
Hull, . 

Hanover, 
Hanson, 
Rockland, 



Frederick D. Bartlett, /., . 



iwilliam D.Turner, R 
>Ira G. Hereey, /?., 



George E. Bowker, R., 



Plymouth. 



Norwell. 



Hingham. 



Hanson. 



448 



House of Representatives^ 



COUNTY OF FlaY}£.OVTB.— Concluded. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Abington, 
Whitman, 

Carver, . 

Lakeville, 

Marion, 

Mattapoisett 

Rochester, 

Wareham, 

Halifax, 
Kingston, 
j Middleborough, . 
Plympton, . 

Bridgewater, 
East Bridgewater, 
W. Bridgewater, . 

Brockton, Wards 
3, 4, . 

Brockton, Wards 
1,2,5, 

Brockton, Wards 
6, 7, . 



Clarence W.Harding, D. P., 
D 



Lester W. Jenney, /?., 



^•Alexander Holmes, i?., 

J 

>Edward T. Morse, i?., 
J 



Stewart H. McLeod, R., 



Charl.'S B. Packard, R. 
Timoihy J. Meade, D., 



Freeman Hall, R. 



Whitman. 

Mattapoisett. 

Kingston. 

E. Brid'water. 

Brockton. 
Brockton. 

Brockton. 



COUNTY OF SUFFOLK. 



Boston, Ward 1, . 
Boston, Ward 2, . 
Boston, Ward 3, . 

Boston, Wards 4, 5, 



( Edward C. R. Bagley, R., . 
\ Benjamin F. Sullivan, 75., . 

( Michael J. Brophy, Z)., 
} Joseph H. Pendergast, Z> , 

( James J. Brennan, />., 
I William J. Murray, Z>., . 

rjames H. Brennan, D., 
I Patrick B. Carr, D., . 
I. James I. Green, Z)., . 



Boston. 



By Counties. 



449 



COUNTY OF STJFFOhK— Continued. 



DiBtrict. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



Chelsea.Wds 1,2, 
Boston, Ward 6, . 
Boston, Ward 7, . 
Boston, Ward 8, . 

Boston, Ward 9, . 

Boston, Ward 10, 

Boston, Ward 11, 

Boston, Ward 12, 

Boston, Ward 13, 

Boston, Ward 14, 

Boston, Ward 15, 

Boston, Ward 16, 

Boston, Ward 17, 

Boston, Ward 18, 

Boston, Ward 19, 

Boston, Ward 20, 



Louis R. Kiernan, D. P., D 

I Vincent Brogna, D., . 
I Francis 1). O'Donnell, Z> 

John L. Donovan, D., 

I AdolphusM. Burroughs,/) 
' Martin M. Lomasney, D., 

I Isaac Gordon, D., 
' Joseph Leonard, £>., . 

Channing H. Cox, R., 
William'^S. Kinney, R., 

Courtenay Crocker, R., 
Grafton D. Cushing, R., 

George T. Daly, Z>., . 
James J. Murphy, £>., 

Leo F, McCullough, D., 
William J. 8ullivan, D., 

William P. Hickey, D., 
John J. Murphy, D., . 

John J. Creed, D., 
Michael J. Keidy, Z)., 

John F. McCarthy, Z>., 
John D McGivern, Z>., 

•John D. Connors, D,, 
William P. O'Brien, D., 

Daniel Francis Cronin, Z>. 
Edward E. McGrath, D., 

Jamps Mc[nerney, 2)., 
William H. Sullivan, £>., 

James Frank Eagan, D., 
Louis A Foley, /)., . 
James A. McElaney, Jr., D 



Chelsea. 
Boston. 



450 



House of Representatives^ 



COUNTY OF B\JFF01.K— Concluded. 



•SS 

^1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


21 

22 
23 

24 

25 
26 


Boston, Ward 21, 
Boston, Ward 22, 
Boston, AVard 23, 

Boston, Ward 24, 

Boston, Ward 25, 

Chelsea, Wds. 3, 4, 

Chelsea, Ward 5, 
Revere, . 
Wtnthrop, . 


\ John Ballantyne, R , . 
I Walter R. Meins, R., . 

{ James F. Griflin, D., . 
'( James P. Maguire, D , 

\ Francis M. Cummings, D., 
\ William M..McMorio\v,Z>., 

( Sandford Bates, R., . 
{ Charlts 1.. Can, 72., . 
(James A. Hart, ft., . 

{ Thomas F. J. Callahan, D., 
I Martin Uays, R., 

Melvin B. Breath, X>., 

1 Hugh M. McKay, /?.,. 

j Alfred Tewkebury, D., R., 


Boston. 

<i 

•• 

(< 

Chelsea. 

Revere. 
Wiuihrop. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER. 



Athol, . 
Dana, . 
Petersham, . 
Phillipstou, . 
Royalston, . 

Ashburnham, 
Gardner, 
Templeton, . 
Winchendon, 

Barre, . 

Ilolden, 

Hubbardston, 

Oakham, 

Princeton, . 

Rutland, 

Sterling, 

Westminster, 



Ernest Warren Tyler, /?., , 



1 

\ 

I 
J 

! Wendell P. Clark, ft., 
r Judsoul. Wood, ft., . 
J 



)■ Harry C. Beaman, ft. 

I 



Athol. 



Winchendon. 
Gardner. 



Princeton. 



By Counties. 



451 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER— Con«7iuecf. 



District. 



Name of Representative. 



Residence. 



4^ 



Brookfield, . 
Hardwick, . 
New Braintree, 
North Brookfield 
Warren, 
West Brookfield, 

Charlton, 
Southbridge, 
Sturbridge, . 



Auburn, 
Leicester, 
Paxton, . 
Spencer, 

Dudley, 
Oxford, 
Webster, 

Blackstone, . 

Douglas, 

Grafton, 

Mlllbury, . 

Shrewsbury, 

Sutton, . 

Uxbrldge, 

Ilopedale, 
Mendon, 
Milford, 
Northbridge, 
Upton, . 

Berlin, . 

Bolton, 

Boylston, 

Clinton, 

Northborough, 

Southborough, 

West Boylston, 

Westborough, 

Fitchburg.Ward 
Harvard, 
\\{ Lancaster, . 
Leominster, . 
Lunenburg, . 



10< 



I. 



Thomas Webb, /^., . New Braintree 



)■ Louis O. 



Rieutord, Z>. 



Edward J. McDermott, D , 



George J. Brunell, R , 



William A. L. Bazeley, R 
John F. Meauey, Z>., . 



Matthew J. Carbary, D. P.. 

D , ... 

Edwin F. Liliey, R., . 



William S. Duncan, R., 
James D. Tyler, R , . 



Charles H.Howe, i?., 
Frank H. i'ope, Z>., . 



Southbridge. 



Leicester. 



Webster. 



Ux bridge. 
Blacksiune. 



Milford. 



Clinton. 
Berlin. 



Leominster. 



452 House of Representatives^ By Counties. 



COUNTY OF WORCESTER— Conc^urfccf. 



•si 

^1 


District. 


Name of Representative. 


Residence. 


12 


Fitchburg, Wards 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 


\ John B. Fellows, R., . 
\ Daniel W. Teehan, D., 


Fitchburg. 


13 


Worcester, Wd. 1, 


Clarence W. Hobbs, Jr., R., 


Worcester. 


14 


Worcester, Wd. 2, 


Frederick W. Hurlburt, R., 






15 


Worcester, Wd. 3, 


John C. Mahoney, Z>., 






16 


Worcester, Wd. 4, 


John T. Flanagan, Z>., 






17 


Worcester, Wd. 5, 


Michael A. Henebery, D., . 






18 


Worcester, Wd. 6, 


Charles A. Orstrom. D., . 






19 


Worcester, Wd. 7, 


Albert H. Bilvester, R., . 






20 


Worcester,Wd. 8, 


Norman B. Parsons, R., . 




♦ 


21 


Worcester,Wd.9, 


Oscar E. Arkwell, R., 




• 


22 


Worce8ter,Wd. 10, 


Robert M. Washburn, R., . 


" 



House of Representatives^ Alpliahetically. 453 



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454 



House of Representatives^ 



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472 Officers of the House. 



OFFICERS OF 
THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



JAMES W. KIMBALL, Swampscott, Clerk. 
FEANK E. BRIDGMAN, Boston, . Assistant Clerk. 
THOMAS F. PEDRICK, Lynn, . . Sergeant-at-Arms. 
Rev. DANIEL W. WALDRON, Boston, Chaplain. 



Monitors of the House, 



473 



MONITORS OF THE HOUSE, 



First Division 



Second Division 



Third Division 



Fourth Division 



Ision, { 

•{ 

ion, < 

■{ 



Messrs. Wells 

Davies . 

Messrs. Lillet 

Mc Morrow 

Messrs. Hill . 

Mahoney 

Messrs. Witt . 

DWYER . 



of Haverhill, 
of Holyoke. 

of Milford. 
of Boston. 

of Lynn. 

of Worcester. 

of Springfield, 
of Weymouth. 



474 Sergeant- at- Arm s^ Etc. 

SERGEANT-AT-AEMS AND APPOINTEES. 



Thomas F. Pedrick, Lynn. 

Sergeant-at-Aryns. 

APPOINTEES. 

First Clerk. — Adelbert M. Mossman. 

CTerA:. — Frank S. Finney. 

Messengers. — C\i2,v\es W. Philbrick, George M. Fillebrown. 

Document CTerA;. — Frank W. Cole. 

Assistant in Document Room. — Benjamin H. McKinley. 

Chief Engineer. — Ytedi H. Kimball. 

Cashier and Stenographer. — Ellen Mudge Burrill. 

ASSIGNED TO THE SENATE. 

Doorkeeper. — Luke K. Davis. 

Assistant Doorkeeper. — Charles H. Johnson. 

Messengers. — Benjamin H. Jellison, Francis A. Ireland, 
Edward C. Cook, Lawrence G. Mitchell, Enoch Pratt, Wil- 
lard S. Cooke, Frank A. Dow, Charles Oscar Holt. 

Pa^^es. — George H. Norton, Arthur R. Driscoll, Lee A. 
Kingsbury, Francis R. Whelton. 

ASSIGNED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATITES. 

Doorkeeper. — James Beatty. 

Assistant Doorkeeper. — Francis Steele. 

Postmaster. — Morris C. Jackson. 

Messengers. — 3 o\m B. Fisher, Edwin C. Gould, Mark C. 
London, Sidney Holmes, Charles J. Tarbell, Thomas P. Frost, 
James P. Clare, John O. Bush, Nathaniel D. Curry, Jacob B. 
Henry, Richard B. Brown, David Fuller, Ernest Saunders, 
Horace S. Tower, Edmund J. Gill. 

Pa^es. _ Austin T. Davis, Thomas H. Turtle, William J. 
Roimds, Lester W. Kimball, Francis W. Manning, Laurence 
J. Finn, Elbert W. Marso, Charles M. Stiller. 



COMMITTEES. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE SENATE. 



ON THE JUDICIARY. 

Messrs. Mulligan of Middlesex. 

Stearns of Middlesex. 

ScHOONMAKER . . of Franklin and Hampshire. 

Allen of Middlesex. 

Hunt of Worcester. 

ON WAYS AND MEANS. 

Messrs. Bennett of Middlesex, 

Ross of Bristol. 

Barnes of Norfolk. 

Eldridge of the Cape. 

Powers of Suffolk. 

ON BILLS IN THE THIRD READING. 

Messrs. Barlow of Middlesex. 

McLane of Bristol. 

Joyce of Suffolk. 

ON ENGROSSED BILLS. 

Messrs. Hersey of Plymouth. 

HoRGAN of Suffolk. 

Burke of Worcester. 

ON RULES. 

The President. 

Messrs. Blanchard of Middlesex. 

Barnes of Norfolk. 

Stearns of Middlesex. 

Lomasney of Suffolk. 



478 Standing Committees of the House, 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE. 



ON RULES. 

The Speaker. 

Messrs. Holmes of Kingston. 

BOTHFELD of Ncwton. 

Cox of Boston. 

Crane of Cambridge. 

Bliss of Maiden. 

Tufts of Waltham. 

Hawley* of Maiden. 

Putnam of Westfield. 

Pope of Leominster. 

Meaney of Blackstone. 

ON WAYS AND MEANS. 

Messrs. Washburn of Worcester. 

Crocker of Boston. 

CoN^^ELL of Somer\dlle. 

Fay of Medford. 

White of Newton. 

Putnam* of Westfield. 

Saltonstall of Beverly. 

Hersey of Hingham. 

Pope of Leominster. 

GiFFORD of Westport. 

Lomasney of Boston. 

* Clerk, 



Standing Committees of the House. 479 



ON THE JUDICIARY. 

Messrs. Cox of Boston. 

HoBBS* of Worcester. 

Brackett of Arlington. 

Barnes of Mansfield. 

Beal of Randolph. 

Clark of Lee. 

Drury of Waltham. 

Meant of Blackstone. 

Fisher of Westford. 

Sanborn of Lawrence. 

Burroughs of Boston. 

ON ELECTIONS. 

Messrs. Hobbs of Worcester. 

Witt of Springfield. 

Eames of Andover. 

MuLVENY* of Fall River. 

Morse of E. Bridgewater. 

Murray of Boston. 

Griffin of Boston. 

ON BILLS IN THE THIRD READING. 

Messrs. Brackett of Arlington. 

Drury of Waltham. 

Fisher of Westford. 

ON ENGROSSED BILLS. 

Messrs. Meins of Boston. 

Bates of Boston. 

McCuLLOUGH of Boston. 

ON PAY-ROLL. 

Messrs. QuiNN of Swampscott. 

Kittle of Pittsfield. 

Brennan, J. J of Boston. 

* Clerk. 



480 



Joint Standing Committees. 



JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 





ON AGmCULTUKE. 


Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Cooledge ol 


Berkshire, Hampshire 
and Hampden. 




Wheeler of Worcester and Hampden. 




BUBKT!) . 


. of Worcester. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Eames . 


. of Andover. 




Stone . 


. of Sudbury. 




Bartlett 


. of Salisbury. 




Lyman . 


. of South Hadley. 




Webb . 


. of New Braintree. 




Tyler* . 


. of Berhn. 




Sargent 


. of Belchertown. 




Carbary 


. of MHford. 




ON BANKS AND Bi 


INK TNG. 


Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Tinkham 


. of Sujffolk. 




Stowe 


. of Hampden. 




Joyce 


. of Suffolk. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Cavanagh 


. of Everett. 




RiDEOUT 


. of Somerville. 




FOWLE . 


. of Newburyport. 




MacDonald 


. of Beverly. 




Fellows* 


. of Fitchburg. 




Brennan, J. 


H. . of Boston. 




Orstrom 


. of Worcester. 




Carmody 


. of Springfield. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



481 





ON CITIES. 




Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Newhall 


. of Essex. 




Denny . . 


. of Worcester. 




CooLiDGE of Berkshire, Hampshire 






and Hampden. 




Lomasney . 


of Suffolk. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Bliss 


of Maiden. 




Doyle . 


of New Bedford. 




Lombard 


of Springfield. 




Bellamy 


of Taunton. 




Hart . . 


of Boston. 




Kennard 


of Somerville. 




Graham 


of Lawrence. 




Meade , 


of Brockton. 




Teehan . 


of Fitchburg. 




Burns* . 


of Holyoke. 




Warner 


of Northampton. 


ON CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 


Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Allen 


of Middlesex. 




Adams . 


of Essex. 




Halley . 


of Essex. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Wolcott 


of Milton. 




Flower . 


of Greenfield. 




Howe 


of Leominster. 




Kinney* 


of Boston. 




Meins . 


of Boston. 




Meade . 


of Brockton. 




Murray 


of Boston. 




Grady . . 


of Dedham. 




ON COUNTIES. 




Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Barlow . 


of Middlesex. 




Chace . . 


of Bristol. 




Joyce 


of Sufifolk. 



Clerk. 



482 



Joint Standing Committees. 



Of the House. — Messrs. Fay . 

WiLLETTS 

Thompson 

Crowley 

Braley . 

King 

Kelly 

Maguire* 



of Medford. 
of Fall River, 
of Plainville. 
of Holliston. 
of Freetown, 
of Taunton, 
of Salem, 
of Boston. 



Of the Senate. 



Of the House. 



ON DRATNAGE. 

Messrs. Nason . 

TiMILTY . 

Hatton 
Messrs. Bowker 
Newhall 
Hall 
Parsons 
Reardon* 

McCuLLOUGH . 

Murphy, John J. 
Sullivan, W. H. 



of Essex. 
of Suffolk, 
of Suffolk. 
of Hanson, 
of Stoneham. 
of Brockton, 
of Worcester, 
of Holyoke. 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Boston. 



ON EDUCATION 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Clark 
Nason 
Hunt 

Of the House. — Messrs. Haines 



Greenwood 
Morse* . 

Baker 
Wood 

McElaney . 
Morrill 
cummings . 



of Plymouth, 
of Essex, 
of Worcester, 
of Medford. 
of Everett, 
of East Bridge- 
water, 
of Medfield. 
of Gardner, 
of Boston, 
of Haverhill, 
of Boston. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



483 



ON ELECTION LAWS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Stearns . 
Pearson 



Of the House. — Messrs, 



Hatton . 
Holmes . 
White 
holbrook 
Howe 

CURTIN* 

Murray 

McMORROW 
McGlVERN 



of Middlesex, 
of Norfolk, 
of Suffolk, 
of Kingston, 
of Newton, 
of Palmer, 
of Leominster, 
of Brookline. 
of Hyde Park, 
of Boston, 
of Boston. 



ON FEDEKAL RELATIONS. 



Of the Se?iate. — Messrs. Mulligan 
Brown . 
Grainger 

Of the House. — Messrs. Haigis . 
Silvester 
Cogswell 
Webster 
Le Bceuf 
Green* . 
Hickey . 
Eagan 



of Middlesex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Suffolk, 
of Montague, 
of Worcester, 
of Lynn, 
of Boxford. 
of Fall River, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Boston. 



ON FISHERIES AND GAME. 
Of the Senate. — Messrs. Schoonmaker . of Franklin and 



Of the House. 



McLane 

SCHOFIELD 

Messrs. Sharp 

holbrook 

Norwood 

Smith 



Hampshire, 
of Bristol, 
of Essex, 
of Nantucket, 
of Palmer, 
of Hamilton, 
of Provincetown. 



Clerk. 



484 



Joint Standing Committees. 



Of the House. — Messrs. Seagrave* . . of Cambridge. 

Bartlett . . of Plymouth. 

Griffin ... of Boston. 

Mitchell . . of Springfield. 



ON HAKBORS AND PUBLIC LANDS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Nason . 
Hersey . 
Grainger 

Of the House. — Messrs. Cogswell 
Tewksbury 
Parsons 
Leslie . 
Brunell 
Burns 
Stevens* 

KlERNAN 



of Essex. 

of Plymouth. 

of Suffolk. 

of Lynn. 

of Winthrop. 

of Gloucester. 

of Quincy. 

of Webster. 

of Salem. 

of Marblehead. 

of Chelsea. 



Of the House. — Messrs. 



ON INSURANCE. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Stowe 

Mulligan 
McCarthy 
Halley . 
Wells . 
hurlburt 
Sweeney 
Naphen . 

GiFFORD . 
ACHIN 

Foley* . 
Leonard 
Packard 
Harding 
Cotter . 



of Hampden, 
of Middlesex, 
of Middlesex. 
of Essex, 
of Haverhill, 
of Worcester, 
of Attleborough. 
of Natick. 
of Barnstable, 
of Lowell, 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Brockton, 
of Whitman, 
of Lynn. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



485 



Of the Senate. 



Of the House. 



ON LABOR. 

Messrs. Ross 

Vinson . 

QUIGLEY . 

Messrs. Caer, C. L. 
Ellis 
Silvester 
Look 
Craig 
Parks* . 
Sargent 



of Bristol, 
of Suffolk, 
of Hampden, 
of Boston, 
of Newton, 
of Worcester, 
of Tisbury. 
of Lowell, 
of Fall River, 
of Belchertown, 



Murphy, James J. of Boston. 



ON LEGAL AFFAIRS. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Coolidge of Berkshire, Hampshire 

and Hampden. 



TlNKHA-M 


of Suffolk. 


Mack 


of Berkshire. 


Schofield . 


of Essex. 


Of the House. — Messrs. Tufts 


of Waltham. 


Haines . 


of Medford. 


Hill* . . 


of Lynn. 


Perry 


of New Bedford. 


McLeod . 


of Brockton. 


Geils 


of New Bedford. 


O'Keefe 


of Taunton. 


Mahoney . 


of Worcester. 


Callahan . 


of Boston. 


Brogna . 


of Boston. 


Quinn . . 


of Cambridge. 


ON THE LIQUOR Li 


VW. 


Of the Senate. — Messrs. McLane 


of Bristol. 


Clark . 


of Plymouth. 


Hunt 


of Worcester. 



Clerk. 



486 



Joint Standing Committees. 



Of the House. 


— Messrs. Wood 


. of Cambridge. 




Doyle* . 


. • . of New Bedford 




Hawley . 


. of Maiden. 




Ford 


. of Lynn. 




Wood 


. of Gardner. 




Wright . 


. of Rowe. 




O'DONNELL 


. of Boston. 




Reed 


. of Cambridge. 



ON MERCANTILE AFFAIRS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Pearson 
Eld RIDGE 
Ross 

TiMILTY 

Of the House. — Messrs. Hawley 
CooN 
Lilley 
Bagley 
Bates* 
Piper 
Butler 
Harrington 
Carr,P.B. 
Breath . 

RiEUTORD 



of Norfolk, 
of the Cape, 
of Bristol, 
of Suffolk, 
of Maiden, 
of Watertown. 
of Milford. 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Quincy. 
of Lowell, 
of Fall River, 
of Boston, 
of Chelsea, 
of Southbridge. 



ON METROPOLITAN AFFAIRS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Brown . 

Stearns . 

Allen 

Hatton . 
Of the House. — Messrs. Bothfeld 

Carr, C. L. 

Sherburne 



of Middlesex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Suffolk, 
of Newton, 
of Boston, 
of Brookline. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



487 



Of the House. — Messrs. Blodgett . 
McKay . 
Ballantyne 

LiBBEY . 

Lomasney . 
Parker* 
Brophy . 
Brennan 



of Maiden, 
of Revere, 
of Boston, 
of Melrose, 
of Boston, 
of Woburn. 
of Boston, 
of Cambridge. 



ON MHilTARY AFFAIRS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Denny . 
Newhall 
McCarthy 

Of the House. — Messrs. Witt 

Kittle . 

Leslie . 

Holt 

Andrews 

Edson* . 

McGrath 

Buckley 



of Worcester, 
of Essex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Springfield, 
of Pittsfield. 
of Quincy. 
of Springfield, 
of Woburn. 
of Stow, 
of Boston, 
of Chicopee. 



ON PRISONS. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Brown ... of Middlesex. 

McCarthy . . of Middlesex. 

Powers ... of Suffolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Holt ... of Springfield. 

Eldridge . . of Somerville. 

Stone ... of Sudbury. 

QuiNN ... of Swampscott. 

McCuLLOCH . of Savoy. 

Flanagan* . . of Worcester. 

Kearns ... of Lowell. 

Sullivan, B. F. . of Boston. 



Clerk. 



488 



Joint Standing Committees. 



ON PUBLIC CHAHITABLE INSTITUTIONS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Wheeler 



Of the House. 



Clark 

QUIGLEY 

Messrs. Cliff 
Wood 
Atkins 

BOWKER 

Arkwell 
Sullivan, W. J. 

SCHLAPP* 
TOOMET . 



of Worcester and 

Hampden, 
of Plymouth, 
of Hampden, 
of Somerville. 
of Cambridge, 
of Lynn, 
of Hanson, 
of Worcester, 
of Boston, 
of Lawrence, 
of Lowell. 



ON PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Chace ... of Bristol. 

TiNKHAM . . of Suffolk. 

Grainger , . of Suffolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Flower ... of Greenfield. 

GiFFORD ... of Chatham. 

Sharp ... of Nantucket. 

BiGELOW . . of Framingham. 

Wood* ... of Northfield. 

Cuff ... of Lowell. 

Sedgwick . . of Stockbridge. 

Hall ... of Pittsfield. 



ON PUBLIC LIGHTING. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Adams . 
Blanchard 
Hersey . 

TiMILTY . 

Of the House. — Messrs. Underhill 
Clark 
Booth 
Priest* . 
Hays 



of Essex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Plymouth, 
of Suffolk, 
of Somerville. 
of Winchendon. 
of FaU River, 
of Haverhill, 
of Boston. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees, 



489 



Of the House. 


— Messrs. Martin . 


of N. Attleborough. 




Tyler . . 


of Athol. 




Bartle'it 


of Plymouth. 




McInerney . 


of Boston. 




Connors 


of Boston. 




McCarthy . 


of Boston. 




ON PUBLIC SERVICE. 


Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Vinson . 


of Suffolk. 




Denny . . 


of Worcester. 




Burke . 


of Worcester. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Coon 


of Watertown. 




Collins . 


of Amesbury. 




Rideout 


. of Somerville. 




Greenwood 


of Everett. 




HURLBURT . 


of Worcester. 




DWYER . . 


. of Weymouth. 




Hurley* 


of Marlborough. 




Cronin . 


. of Boston. 




ON RAHiROADS. 




Of the Senate. 


— Messrs. Schoonmaker 


of Franklin anc 
Hampshire. 




Pearson 


. of Norfolk. 




Newhall . 


. of Essex. 




Powers . 


. of Suffolk. 


Of the House. 


— Messrs. Ellis 


. of Newton. 




Haigis . 


. of Montague. 




WOLCOTT 


. of Milton. 




Bean . . 


. of Cambridge. 




Cavanagh . 


. of Everett. 




Bazeley . . 


. of Uxbridge. 




Beaman . 


. of Princeton. 




Davies . 


. of Holyoke. 




Barry , 


. of Agawam. 




Dean 


. of Wakefield. 




O'Hearn* . 


. of North Adams. 



Clerk. 



490 



Joint Standing Co7nmittees. 



ON KOADS AND BEZDGES. 



Of the Senate. 



Of the House. 



Messrs. Eld ridge 
Bennett 

HOEGAN . 

Messrs. Willetts 
Collins* 
Morgan . 
Keenan . 
Turner . 
Dwter . 
Burns 
Sedgwick 



of the Cape. 
of Middlesex, 
of Suffolk, 
of Fall River, 
of Amesbury. 
of Lawrence, 
of Lynn, 
of Norwell. 
of Weymouth, 
of Salem, 
of Stockbridge. 



ON STATE HOUSE AND LTBRARIES. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. 



Of the House. — Messrs, 



Stowe 
Mack 

HORGAN . 

Eld ridge 
Tewksbury 

GiFFORD . 

Baker 

Newhall* 

Donovan 

O'Brien 

Fitzpatrick 



of Hampden, 
of Berkshire, 
of Suffolk, 
of Somerville. 
of Winthrop. 
of Chatham, 
of Westwood. 
of Stoneham. 
of Boston, 
of Boston, 
of Lawrence. 



ON STREET RAILWAYS. 



Of the Senate. — Messrs. Blanchard 
Bennett 
Vinson . 
Mack 

Of the House. — Messrs. Hardy . 
Underhill 
Hathaway 
Knowles* 

WiNSLOW 



of Middlesex, 
of Middlesex, 
of Suffolk, 
of Berkshire, 
of Huntington, 
of Somerville. 
of New Bedford, 
of Gloucester, 
of Cambridge. 



Clerk. 



Joint Standing Committees. 



491 



Of the House. — Messrs. Gordon . 
Duncan . 
Parks 
Reidy 
Henebery 
Daly 



of Springfield, 
of Clinton, 
of Fall River, 
of Boston, 
of Worcester, 
of Boston. 



ON TAXATION. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Barnes ... of Norfolk. 

Barlow ... of Middlesex. 

QuiGLEY ... of Hampden, 

Lomasney . . of Suffolk. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Crane ... of Cambridge. 

Mulveny . . of Fall River. 

Look ... of Tisbury. 

Jewett* . . of Lowell. 

CuRTiN ... of Brookline. 

Kinney ... of Boston. 

Jenney ... of Mattapoisett. 

Murray ... of Hyde Park. 

Smith ... of Gloucester. 

Gordon ... of Boston. 

Creed ... of Boston. 



ON TOW^NS. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Adams ... of Essex. 

Wheeler of Worcester and Hampden. 



Schofield . 
Of the House. — Messrs. Storm 

Baker . 
Wright . 
Emerson 

BiCKNELL* , 

Wallace 

McDermott 

Burdick 



of Essex. 
of Braintree. 
of Westwood. 
of Tyngsborough. 
of Longmeadow. 
of Dalton. 
of Lynn, 
of Leicester, 
of Adams. 



Clerk. 



492 



Joint Standing Committees. 



ON WATER SUPPLY. 

Of the Senate. — Messrs. Hersey ... of Plymouth. 

Chace ... of Bristol. 

Halle Y ... of Essex. 

Of the House. — Messrs. Lombard . . of Springfield. 

Norwood . . of Hamilton. 

MacDonald . of Beveriy. 

Crane ... of Cambridge. 

Pepin ... of Salem. 

O'Connell* . of Peabody. 

Brennan, J. J. . of Boston. 

Pendergast . of Boston. 



Clerk. 



List of Members with Committees. 493 



List of Members of the Senate, with Committees 
of which Each Person is a Member. 



NAME. 

Adams, Arthur S. 



Allen, Claude L., . 

Barlow, Erson B., 

Barnes, George L., 
Bennett, Frank P., Jr. 

Blan chard, Charles V., 
Brown, Charles H., . 

Burke, William R., . 
Chace, Charles S., 
Clark, Ezra W., . . 

Coolidge, Calvin, . 



COMMITTEES. 

Constitutional Amendments, 

Public Lighting {chairman) , 
Towns {chairman) . 

Constitutional Amendments 

{chairman). Judiciary, Metro- 
politan Affairs. 

Counties {chairman) , Taxation, 
Bills in the Third Reading 
{chairman) . 

Rules, Taxation {chairman), "Ways 
and Means. 

Roads and Bridges, Street Rail- 
ways, Ways and Means {chair- 
man). 

Public Lighting, Rules, Street 
Railways {chairman) . 

Federal Relations, Metropolitan 
Affairs {chairman) , Prisons 
{chairman) . 

Agriculture, Engrossed Bills, Pub- 
lic Service. 

Counties, Public Health {chair- 
man) , Water Supply. 

Education {chairman) , Liquor 
Law, Public Charitable Insti- 
tutions. 

Agriculture {chairman), Cities, 
Legal Affairs {chairman). 



494 List of Members loith Committees. 



NAME. 

Denny, Daniel E., 
Eldridge, Edric, . 



Grainger, Edward J. 

Greenwood, Levi H. 
Halley, Dennis E., 

Hatton, James A., 

Hersey, Frederic M. 



Horgan, Francis J., 

Hunt, John H., 
Joyce, Thomas M., 

Lomasney, Joseph P., 
Mack, John H., . 

McCarthy, Charles F, 

McLane, Walter E., 

Mulligan, Henry C, 
Nason, Arthur L., 

Newhall, George H. 



COMMITTEES. 

. Cities, Military Affairs (chair- 
vian), Public Service. 

. Mercantile Affairs, Roads and 
Bridges (chairman). Ways and 
Means. 
Federal Relations, Harbors and 
Public Lauds, Public Health. 

. [President] t Rules (chairman). 
Constitutional Amendments, 

Insurance, Water Supply. 

. Drainage, Election Laws, Metro- 
politan Affairs. 

. Engrossed Bills (chairman), Har- 
bors and Public Lands, Public 
Lighting, Water Supply (chair- 
man). 

. Engrossed Bills, Roads and 
Bridges, State House and Li- 
braries. 

. Education, Judiciary, Liquor Law. 
Banks and Banking, Bills in the 
Third Reading, Counties, 

. Cities, Rules, Taxation. 

. Legal Affairs, State House and 
Libraries, Street Railways. 

. Insurance, Military Affairs, 
Prisons. 

. Bills in the Third Reading, 
Fisheries and Game, Liquor 
Law (chairman). 

. Federal Relations (chairman). In- 
surance, Judiciary (chairman). 

. Drainage (chairman). Education, 
Harbors and Public Lands 
(chairman) . 

. Cities (chairman). Military Af- 
fairs, Railroads. 



lAst of Members loith Committees. 495 



NAME. 

Pearson, Charles H., . 
Powers, James F., 
Quigley, Francis X., . 

Ross, Samuel 

Schofield, George A., 
Schoonmaker, John H., . 
Stearns, Harry N., 

Stowe, Luke S 

Timilty, James P., 
Tinkham, George Holden, 
Vinson, Thomas M., . 
Wheeler, William H,. 



COMMITTEES. 

Election Laws, Mercantile Af- 
fairs {chairman), Railroads. 

Prisons, Railroads, Ways and 
Means. 

Labor, Public Charitable Insti- 
tutions, Taxation. 

Labor {chairman), Mercantile Af- 
fairs, Ways and Means. 

Fisheries and Game, Legal Af- 
fairs, Towns. 

Fisheries and Game {chairman). 
Judiciary, Railroads {chairman). 

Election Laws {chairman). Ju- 
diciary, Metropolitan Affairs, 
Rules. 

Banks and Banking, Insurance 
{chairman), State House and 
Libraries {chairman) . 

Drainage, Mercantile Affairs, 
Public Lighting. 

Banks and Banking {chairman). 
Legal Affairs, Public Health. 

Labor, Public Service {chairman). 
Street Railways. 

Agriculture, Public Charitable In- 
stitutions {chairman). Towns. 



496 List of Members with Committees. 



List of Members of the House of Representa- 
tives, with Committees of which Each 
Person is a Member, 



NAME. 

Achin, Henry, Jr., 
Andrews, Henry L., 
Arkwell, Oscar E., 
Atkins, Frank W., 



COMMITTEES. 

Insurance. 

Military Affairs. 

Public Charitable Institutions. 

Public Charitable Institutions. 



Bagley, Edward C. R., 
Baker, J. Herbert, 
Baker, Willie W., 
Ballantyne, John, 
Barnes, Clarence A., . 
Barry, James F., . 
Bartlett, A. Willis, . 
Bartlett, Frederick D., 

Bates, Sanford, 

Bazeley, William A. L. 
Beal, John V., . . 
Beaman, Harry C, 
Bean, James W., . 
Bellamy, William A., 
Bicknell, Arthur H., . 
Bigelow, Enos H., 
Bliss, Alvin E., 



Mercantile Affairs. 

Education. 

State House and Libraries, Towns. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Judiciary. 

Railroads. 

Agriculture. 

Fisheries and Game, Public Light- 
ing. 

Engrossed Bills, Mercantile Af- 
fairs {clerk). 

Railroads. 

Judiciary. 

Railroads. 

Railroads. 

Cities. 

Towns {clerk). 

Public Health. 

Rules, Cities {chairman). 



List oj Members with Committees. 497 



NAME. 

Blodgett, Charles M., 
Booth, William, . 
Bothfeld, Henry E., 

Bowker, George E., 

Brackett, John G., 

Braley, George A., 
Breath, Melvin B., 
Brennan, James H., 
Brennan, James J., 
Brennan, John P., 
Brogna, Vincent, . 
Brophy, Michael J., 
Brunell, George J., 
Buckley, Daniel J., 
Burdick, Morton H., 
Burns, George R., 
Burns, James D., 



Burroughs, Adolphus M. 
Butler, Otis W., . . 



COMMITTEES. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Public Lighting. 

Rules, Metropolitan Affairs {chair- 
man). 

Drainage {chairman) , Public Char- 
itable Institutions. 

Judiciary, Bills in the Third 
Reading {chairman). 

Counties. 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Banks. 

Pay-Roll, Water Supply. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Legal Affairs. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Harbors and Public Lands. 

Military Affairs. 

Towns. 

Cities {clerk). 

Harbors and Public Lands, Roads 
and Bridges. 

Judiciary. 

Mercantile Affairs. 



Callahan, Thomas F. J 
Carbary, Matthew J., 
Carmody, John J., 
Carr, Charles L., . 

Carr, Patrick B., . 
Cavanagh, James F. 

Clark, Albert B., . 
Clark, Wendell P., 
Cliff, Zebedee E., 



Legal Affairs. 

Agriculture. 

Banks and Banking. 

Labor {chairman) , Metropolitan 

Affairs. 
Mercantile Affairs. 
Banks and Banking {chairman), 

Railroads. 
Judiciary. 
Public Lighting. 
Public Charitable Institutions 

{chairman). 



498 List of Members with Committees. 



NAME. 

Cogswell, John H., 

Collins, Samuel I., 

Connors, John D., 
Conwell, Leon M., 
Coon, James H. L., 

Cotter, Michael H., 
Cox, Channing H., 
Craig, Joseph, 
Crane, Russell D., 

Creed, John J., 
Crocker, Courtenay, 
Cronin, Daniel F., 
Crowley, Charles A., 
Cuff, Thomas S., . 
Cummings, Francis M 
Curtin, John A., . 
Cushing, Grafton D., 



COMMITTEES. 

Federal Relations, Harbors and 

Public Lands {chairman). 
Public Service, Roads and Bridges 

(clerk) . 
Public Lighting. 
Ways and Means. 
Mercantile Affairs, Public Service 

(chairman). 
Insurance. 

Rules, Judiciary (chairman). 
Labor. 
Rules, Taxation (chairman) , Water 

Supply. 
Taxation. 
Ways and Means. 
Public Service. 
Counties. 
Public Health. 
Education. 

Election Laws (clerk), Taxation. 
[Speaker.] 



Daly, George T., . 
Davies, Thomas, . 
Dean, Charles A., 
Donovan, John L., 
Doyle, Andrew P., 
Drury, George P., 

Duncan, William S. 
Dwyer, John F., . 



Street Railways. 

Railroads. 

Railroads. 

State House and Libraries. 

Cities, Liquor Law (clerk). 

Judiciary, Bills in the Third 

Reading. 
Street Railways. 
Public Service, Roads and Bridges. 



Eagan, James F., 
Eames, Harry M., 
Edson, George W. W. 



E 

Federal Relations. 

Elections, Agriculture (chairman). 

Military Affairs (clerk). 



List of Members with Committees. 499 



NAME. 

Eldridge, Charles W. 

Ellis, George H., . 
Emerson, William F. 



COMMITTEES. 

Prisons, State House and Li- 
braries {chairman). 
Labor, Railroads {chairman). 
Towns. 



Fay, Wilton B., . 

Fellows, John B., . 
Fisher, Edward, . 

Fitzpatrick, Daniel, 
Flanagan, John T., 
Flower, Harold H., 

Foley, Louis A., . 
Ford, Fred W., . 
Fowle, James E., . 



Ways and Means, Counties {chair- 
man) . 

Banks and Banking {clerk). 

Judiciary, Bills in the Third 
Reading. 

State House and Libraries. 

Prisons {clerk). 

Constitutional Amendments, Pub- 
lic Health {chairman). 

Insurance {clerk). 

Liquor Law. 

Banks and Banking. 



Geils, Gerrett, Jr., 
Gifford, Benjamin D. 

Gifford, Charles L., 
Gifford, WUliam H., 
Gordon, Gurdon W., 
Gordon, Isaac, 
Grady, Frederic J., 
Graham, William J., 
Green, James I., . 
Greenwood, Fred P., 
Griffin, James F., 



Legal Affairs. 

Public Health, State House and 

Libraries. 
Insurance. 
Ways and Means. 
Street Railways. 
Taxation. 

Constitutional Amendments. 
Cities. 

Federal Relations {clerk). 
Education, Public Service. 
Elections, Fisheries and Game. 



500 List of Members ivith Committees, 



NAME. 

Haigis, John W., . 

Haines, Benjamin F., 

Hall, Edward M., 
Hall, Freeman, 
Harding, Clarence W., 
Hardy, Leonard F., . 
Harrington, Edward F., 
Hart, James A., . 
Hathaway, Edward R., 
Hawley, Truman R., . 

Hays, Martin, 
Henebery, Michael A., 
Hersey, Ira G., 
Hickey, William P., . 
Hill, Francis M., . . 
Hobbs, Clarence W., Jr. 

Holbrook, Henry W., 

Holmes, Alexander, . 
Holt, Charles T., . . 

Howe, Charles H., 

Hurlburt, Frederick W., 
Hurley, James M., 



COMMITTEES. 

Federal Relations (chairman) » 
Railroads. 

Education (chairman), Legal Af- 
fairs. 

Public Health. 

Drainage. 

Insurance. 

Street Railways (chairman). 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Cities. 

Street Railways. 

Rules (clerk) , Liquor Law, Mercan- 
tile Affairs (chairman). 

Public Lighting. 

Street Railways. 

Waj^s and Means. 

Federal Relations. 

Legal Affairs (clerk). 

Judiciary (clerk), Elections (chair- 
man). 

Election Laws, Fisheries and 
Game. 

Rules, Election Laws (chairman). 

Military Affairs, Prisons (chair- 
man) . 

Constitutional Amendments, Elec- 
tion Laws. 

Insurance, Public Service. 

Public Se^^^ce (clerk). 



Jenney, Lester W. 
Jewett, Victor F., 



Taxation. 
Taxation (clerk). 



List of Members ivith Committees. 501 



NAME. 

Kearns, John E., . 
Keenan, Michael S., 
Kelly, Michael, . 
Kennard, William W. 
Kiernan, Louis R., 
King, Clifford L., 
Kinney, William S., 

Kittle, James, . 
Knowles, H. Bert, 



COMMITTEES. 

Prisons. 

Roads and Bridges. 

Counties. 

Cities. 

Harbors and Public Lands. 

Counties. 

Constitutional Amendments 

(clerk), Taxation. 
Pay-Roll, Military Affairs. 
Street Railways (clerk). 



Le Boeuf, Francis X., 
Leonard, Joseph, . 
Leslie, William J., 

Libbey, George W., 
Lilley, Edwin F., . 
Lomasney, Martin M 

Lombard, Paul I., 
Look, William J., . 
Lyman, John E., . 



Federal Relations. 

Insurance. 

Harbors and Public Lands, Mil- 
itary Affairs. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Ways and Means, Metropolitan 
Affairs. 

Cities, Water Supply (chairman). 

Labor, Taxation. 

Agriculture. 



MacDonald, Herman A., 

Maguire, James P., . 
Mahoney, John C, 
Martin, Joseph W., Jr., 
McCarthy, John F., . 
McCulloch, Almiron J., 
McCullough, Leo F., 
McDermott, Edward J., 
McElaney, James A., Jr. 



M 

Banks and Banking, Water Sup- 
ply. 
Counties (clerk). 
Legal Affairs. 
Public Lighting. 
Public Lighting. 
Prisons. 

Engrossed Bills, Drainage. 
Towns. 
Education. 



502 List of Members luith Committees. 



NAME. 

McGivern, John D., 
McGrath, Edward E 
Mclnemey, James H 
McKay, Hugh M., 
McLeod, Stewart B., 
McMorrow, William 
Meade, Timothy J., 

Meaney, John F., 
Meins, Walter R., 

Mitchell, John, 
Morgan, Charles H., 
Morrill, Charles H., 
Morse, Edward T., 
Mulveny, Frank, . 
Murphy, James J., 
Murphy, John J., . 
Murray, David W., 
Murray, William J., 



COMMITTEES. 

. Election Laws. 
Military Affairs. 

. Public Lighting. 

. Metropolitan Affairs. 

. Legal Affairs. 
M., Election Laws. 

. Cities, Constitutional Amend- 
ments. 

. Rules, Judiciary. 

. Engrossed Bills {chairman). Con- 
stitutional Amendments. 

. Fisheries and Game. 

. Roads and Bridges. 

. Education. 

. Elections, Education (clerk). 

. Elections (clerk), Taxation. 

. Labor. 

. Drainage. 

. Election Laws, Taxation. 

. Elections, Constitutional Amend- 
ments. 





N 


Naphen, William J., . 


. Insurance. 


NewhaU, Arthur N., . 


. Drainage, State House and Li 




braries (clerk). 


Norwood, C. Augustus, 


Fisheries and Game, Water Sup- 




ply. 
O 


O'Brien, William P., . 


. State House and Libraries, 


O'Connell, Charles R., 


Water Supply (clerk). 


O'Donnell, Francis D., 


. Liquor Law. 


O'Hearn, William A., 


Railroads (clerk). 


O'Keefe, J. Howard, . 


Legal Affairs. 


Orstrom, Charles A., . 


Banks and Banking. 



List of Members ivith Committees. 



503 



NAME. 

Packard, Charles B., 
Parker, Joseph H., Jr 
Parks, Joseph A., , 
Parsons, Henry H., 
Parsons, Norman B., 
Pendergast, Joseph H 
Pepin, Chauncey, . 
Perry, Laurence S., 
Piper, Walter E., . 
Pope, Frank H., . 
Priest, A. Franklin, 
Putnam, Harry B., 



COMMITTEES. 

Insurance. 

Metropolitan Affairs (clerk). 

Labor (clerk), Street Railways. 

Harbors and Public Lands. 

Drainage. 

Water Supply. 

Water Supply. 

Legal Affairs. 

Mercantile Affairs. 

Rules, Ways and Means. 

Public Lighting (clerk). 

Rules, Ways and Means (clerk) . 



Quinn, John E., 
Quinn, Martin L. 



Legal Affairs. 

Pay -Roll (chairman), Prisons. 



Reardon, George F. 
Reed, Joseph J., . 
Reidy, Michael J., 
Rideout, Ray R., . 

Rieutord, Louis O., 



Drainage (clerk). 
Liquor Law. 
Street Railways. 

Banks and Banking, Public Serv- 
ice. 
Mercantile Affairs. 



Saltonstall, John L., . 
Sanborn, John C, 
Sargent, Edgar E., 
Schlapp, Frederick W., 

Seagrave, C. Burnside, 
Sedgwick, Alexander, 
Sharp, Benjamin, 



Ways and Means. 

Judiciary. 

Agriculture, Labor. 

Public Charitable Institutions 

(clerk) . 
Fisheries and Game (clerk). 
Public Health, Roads and Bridges. 
Fisheries and Game (chairman), 

Public Health. 



504 List of Members loith Committees. 



NAME. 

Sherburne, John H., Jr, 
Silvester, Albert H. 
Smith, Charles D., 
Smith, Jerome S., 
Stevens, John G., . 
Stone, Waldo L., . 
Storm, Henry M., 
Sullivan, Benjamin F., 
Sullivan, William H., 
Sullivan, William J., . 
Sweeney, Edward A., 



COMMITTEES. 

Metropolitan Affairs. 

Federal Relations, Labor. 

Taxation. 

Fisheries and Game. 

Harbors and Public Lands (clerk). 

Agriculture, Prisons. 

Towns {chairman). 

Prisons. 

Drainage. 

Public Charitable Institutions. 

Insurance. 



Teehan, Daniel W., . 
Tewksbury, Alfred, . 

Thompson, Herbert D 
Toomey, Eugene F., 
Tufts, Nathan A., 
Turner, William D., 
Tyler, E. Warren, 
Tyler, James D., . 



Cities. 

Harbors and Public Lands, State 

House and Libraries. 
Counties. 

Public Charitable Institutions. 
Rules, Legal Affairs (chairman). 
Roads and Bridges. 
Public Lighting. 
Agriculture (clerk). 



Underhill, Charles L. 



Public Lighting (chairman). Street 
Railways. 



Wallace, John R., 
Warner, Henry W., 
Washburn, Robert M 
Webb, J. Thomas, 
Webster, George P., 
Wells, Henry G., . 
White, Thomas W., 



TV 

Towns. 

Cities. 

Ways and Means (chairman). 

Agriculture. 

Federal Relations. 

Insurance (chairman). 

Ways and Means, Election Laws. 



List of Members ivith Committees. 505 



NAME. 

Willetts, Isaac E., 

Winslow, Henry J., 
Witt, Ernest A., . 

Wolcott, Roger, . 

Wood, Charles J., 

Wood, Judson I., . 
Wood, Norman P., 
Wright, Henry D., 
Wright, Otis L., . 



COMMITTEES. 

Counties, Roads and Bridges 
(chairman) . 

Street Railways. 

Elections, Military Afifairs (chair- 
man). 

Constitutional Amendments 
(chairman), Railroads. 

Liquor Law (chairman), Public 
Charitable Institutions. 

Education, Liquor Law. 

Public Health (clerk). 

Liquor Law. 

Towns. 



506 



Reporters. 



LEGISLATIVE REPORTERS. 



IN THE SENATE AND HOUSE 
CHARLES F. W. ARCHER, . 
FRANK L. AREY. 



HENRY C. BERLIN, . 
HENRY WARD BIRD, 

ROBERT T. BRADY, . 

ARTHUR M. BRIDGMAN, 

RAYMOND L. BRIDGMAN, 
GEORGE R. CONROY, 

CHARLES H. COPELAND, 



FRANK J. DONAHUE, . 
FREDERICK T. FULLER, . 
JAMES T. HARRIS, . 
MICHAEL E. HENNE8SY, 

GROVER C. HOYT, . 



< State House News Service. 
' I Lynn Daily Item. 

. Christian Science Monitor. 

. Robinson News Service. 

I Boston Advertiser. 
. \ Boston Record. 
{ The Associated Press, 

( Fall River Herald. 
. \ New Bedford Mercury. 
( Worcester Gazette. 

I Worcester Telegram. 
' ( Springfield Republican. 

I Springfield Republican, 
' \ Worcester Telegram. 

. Boston Herald. 



' State House News Service. 

Brockton Times. 

Fall Rir.er Globe. 

Haverhill Gazette. 

Lawrence Eagle-Tribune. 

Lawrence Sun- American. 
.Lowell Courier- Citizen. 

Practical Politics. 

Boston Common. 

State House News Service. 

Boston Globe. 

Boston Financial News. 
State House News Service. 
New Bedford Standard. 



Reporters, 



507 



HOWARD W. KENDALL, . 
DONALD C. MACDONALD, 
ELIAS A. McQUAID, . 
WILLIAM A. MURPHY, 
FRANK A. NICHOLS, 

MALCOLM E. NICHOLS, 

ROBERT L. NORTON, 



E. WE^TWORTH PRE8C0TT, 



JAMES S. ROBINSON, 
CHARLES D. ROONET, 
ROBERT STEIN, . 
WILLIAM U. SWAN, . 
JAMES C. WHITE, . 
JAMES O. WINSLOW, 
JOHN L. WRIGHT, . 



. Sprinofleld Union. 

. Practical Politics. 

. Boston American. 

. Boston Globe. 

. Boston Transcript. 

{ Boston Post. 
' } American Press Association. 

. Boston Post. 

( Boston yews Bureau . 
I Lynn JVews. 
* I Beverly Times. 
{ Gloucester Times. 

. Robinson News Service. 

. Boston Traveler. 

. Boston American. 

. The Associated Press. 

. Boston Journal. 

. Boston Traveler. 

. Christian Science Monitor. 



KULES OF THE SENATE. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 



[The dates under each rule indicate when the rule and its amend- 
ments were adopted. The rules as they are here printed were finally 
adopted by the Senate on Jan. 29, 1912. 

The date 1817 denotes the time when the several rules against which 
it is placed were first preserved. Previously to that year these rules 
are not to be found, altliough from the Senate Journal it appears that 
they were printed. 

Numbers enclosed in parentheses following each I'ule indicate the 
corresponding House rule.] 

The President. 

1. The President shall take the chair at the hour to 
which the Senate stands adjourned, shall call the mem- 
bers to order, and, on the appearance of a quorum, shall 
proceed to business. (1.) [1831 ; 1888.] 

2. The President shall preserve order and decorum, 
may speak to points of order in preference to other 
members, and shall decide all questions of order subject 
to an appeal to the Senate. He shall rise to put a 
question, or to address the Senate, but may read sitting. 
(2, 5.) [1817; between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1888.] 

3. The President may vote on all questions. (4.) 
[1826.] 

4. The President may appoint a member to perform 
the duties of the chair for a period not exceeding three 
days at any one time. (7.) 

[1831; 1862; 1865; 1888.] 

5. In case of a vacancy in the office of President, or 
in case the President, or the member appointed by him 
to perform the duties of the chair, is absent at the hour 
to which the Senate stands adjourned, the eldest senior 

511 



512 Bules of the Senate, 

member present sliall call the Senate to order, and shall 
preside imtil a President, or a President pro tempore, 
is elected by ballot, and such election shall be the first 
business in order. (8.) [1831; 1885; 1888.] 



Clerk. 

6. The Clerk shall keep a journal of the proceedings 
of the Senate, and shall cause the same to be printed 
daily. He shall, in the journal, make note of all ques- 
tions of order, and enter at length the decisions thereon. 
He shall insert in an appendix to the journal the rules 
of the Senate and the joint rules of the two branches. 
(11, 12.) [1882; 1888.] 

7. The Clerk shall prepare and cause to be printed 
each day a calendar of matters in order for considera- 
tion; a list of matters lying on the table; and such 
other memoranda as he may deem necessary, and as the 
Senate or the President may direct. (13.) 

[1882; 1888.] 

8. The Clerk shall retain bills and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, bills and resolves in- 
troduced on leave, orders of inquiry, orders of notice, 
reports of committees asking to be discharged from the 
further consideration of a subject, and enacted bills), 
until the right of reconsideration has expired. (15, 57.) 

[1855; 1856; 1875; 1882; 1885; 1888; 1891.] 

9. AVhen a bill or resolve coming from the other 
branch does not appear in print in the form in which it 
was passed in that branch, the Clerk shall either indi- 
cate the amendments on the Orders of the Day, or shall 
have the bill or resolve reprinted, at his discretion. 

[1882.] 



Rules of the Senate. 513 

Members of the Senate. 

10, No member shall be permitted to act on a com- 
mittee or to vote upon a question in which his private 
right, distinct from the public interest, is immediately 
concerned. (24,63.) [1855; 1888; 1889.] 

11. No member shall absent himself from the Senate 
without leave, unless there is a quorum without his pres- 
ence. (17.) [1817.] 



Comsuttees. 

12, The following standing committees shall be ap- 
pointed at the beginning of the political year, to wit : — 

A committee on the Judiciary ; 
A committee on Ways and Means ; 
Each to consist of five members. 

A committee on Bills in the Third Reading ; 
A committee on Engrossed Bills ; 
Each to consist of three members. 

A committee on Bules ; 
To consist of the President and four members. (20.) 

[1831; 1836; 1840; 1844; 1847; 1863; 1864; 
1870; 1876; 1882; 1885; 1886; 1888; 1891; 
1896; 1897.] 

13. Committees shall be appointed by the President, 
unless the Senate shall otherwise specially order, and 
the member first named upon a committee shall be its 
chairman. In case of the election of a committee by 
ballot, the member having the highest number of votes 
shall act as chairman. (21, 22.) 

[1817; between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1888.] 

13a. All motions or orders authorizing committees 
of the Senate to travel or to employ stenographers and 



514 Mules of the Senate, 

all propositions involving special investigations by com- 
mittees of the Senate shall be referred without debate 
to the committee on Rules, Avho, within fourteen days 
after such reference, shall report thereon, recommend- 
ing what action should be taken. (104.) [1904.] 

14. Xo committee shall be allowed to occupy the 
Senate Chamber without a vote of the Senate. (100.) 

[1836; 1863: 1888.] 

15. Xo legislation affecting the rights of individuals 
or the rights of a private or municipal corporation, 
otherwise than as it affects generally the people of the 
whole Commonwealth or the peojDle of the city or town 
to which it specifically applies, shall be proposed or 
introduced except by a petition, nor shall 2in.j bill or 
resolve embodying such legislation be reported by a 
committee, except upon a petition duly referred, nor 
shall such a bill or resolve be reported by a committee, 
whether on an original reference or on a recommittal 
with instructions to hear the parties, until it is made to 
appear to the satisfaction of the committee that proper 
notice of the proposed legislation has been given by 
public advertisement or otherwise to all parties inter- 
ested, without expense to the Commonwealth, or until 
evidence satisfactory to the committee is produced that 
all parties interested have in writing waived notice. A 
committee reportmg leave to withdraw or reference to 
the next General Court for want of proper notice or of 
a waiver thereof shall set forth this fact in its report, 
and no bill or resolve shall be in order as a substitute 
for, or amendment of, such report. Objection to the 
violation of this rule may be taken at any stage prior 
to that of the third reading. (31.) 

[1870; 1871; 1885; 1890.] 



Rules of the Senate, 515 

16. When the ol)ject of an application, whether by- 
petition, or bill or resolve introduced on leave, can be 
secured under existing laws, or, without detriment to the 
public interests, by a general law, the committee to 
whom the matter is referred shall report leave to with- 
draw, ought not to pass, or a general law, as the case 
maybe. (30.) [1882; 1885; 1888; 1891; 1893.] 



Form of Bills and Resolves. 
17. Bills and resolves shall be presented in a legible 
form without material erasures or interlineations, on not 
less than one sheet of paper, with suitable margins and 
spaces between the several sections or resolves, and 
dates and numbers shall be written in words at length. 
Bills amending existing laws shall not jjrovide for 
striking words from, or inserting words in, such laws, 
unless such course is the best calculated to show clearly 
the subject and nature of the amendment. No repealed 
law and no law which has expired by limitation, and no 
part of any such law, shall be re-enacted by reference 
merely. (42.) 

[1844; 1857; 1880; 1882; 1885; 1888; 1889.] 



Introduction of Business. 

18. Every member presenting a petition, memorial, 
or remonstrance, shall endorse his name thereon, and a 
brief statement of the nature and object of the instru- 
ment ; and the reading of the instrument shall be dis- 
pensed with, unless specially ordered. (37.) 

[1831; 1888.] 

19. All motions contemplating legislation shall be 
founded upon petition or upon bill or resolve proposed 



516 Rules of the Senate. 

to be introduced on leave. Committees to whom mes- 
sages from the Governor, rej^orts of State officers, 
boards, commissions, and others authorized to report to 
the Legislature shall be referred, may rejDort by bill or 
otherwise such legislation as may be germane to the 
subject-matter referred to them. (40.) 
[1858; 1888; 1891; 1893.] 

20. All bills and resolves for introduction on leave, 
resolutions, and petitions for legislation accompanied by 
bills or resolves embodying the subject-matter prayed 
for, and all orders of inquiry, which are intended for 
presentation or introduction to the Senate, and all reports 
of State officers, shall first be deposited with the Clerk, 
and, prior to their presentation or introduction, shall be 
submitted by him to the committee on Rules for inspec- 
tion. The committee shall examine the same for the 
purpose of ascertaining (1) whether the legislation pro- 
jDOsed is plainly and specifically stated or already pro- 
vided for; (2) whether such bills, resolves, resolutions, 
petitions and orders are in proper form ; and (3) that 
compliance has been had with the rules of the Senate 
and the joint rules of the t^vo branches. Every such 
matter shall be returned by the committee on Rules to 
the Clerk not later than the third legislative day suc- 
ceeding the day of its deposit with him, unless consent 
in writing to the longer detention thereof is filed with 
the Clerk by the member presenting the matter, and 
it shall be by the Clerk submitted to the President and 
by him laid before the Senate not later than on the 
next legislative daj^ after it is so returned. Bills, re- 
solves and resolutions which have been laid before the 
Senate and introduced shall be read, and shall be, by 
the President, with the consent of the Senate, referred 
to the appropriate committees. Prior to such reference, 



utiles of the Seriate, 517 

the President may, in his discretion, order bills and 
resolves, intended for introduction on leave or tiled to 
accomj^any petitions, and resolutions, intended for in- 
troduction, to be printed ; and when he so orders they 
shall, after they are introduced, be printed under the 
direction of the Clerk. They shall retain, during all 
subsequent stages, their original numbers and shall also 
bear such new numbers as may be necessary. Every 
petition which is not accompanied by a bill or resolve 
shall be deposited with the Clerk and be retained in his 
custody until a bill or resolve embodjung the legislation 
23rayed for shall be filed with him, Avhen he shall j^re- 
sent the same to the committee on Rules, to be disposed 
of as provided above. The Senate may at any time by 
order make any other disposition of petitions and re- 
monstrances in the hands of the Clerk. Petitions and 
remonstrances relating to matters already sent to com- 
mittees shall be by the President referred to the appro- 
priate committees. (28.) [1891; 1893; 1894.] 

21, The committee on Rules shall make no change 
in the substance or form of any matter referred to them 
in accordance with the preceding rule, without the con- 
sent of the member depositing the same, but upon the 
presentation or introduction of any such matter to the 
Senate it shall be the duty of some member of the com- 
mittee on Rules, acting under the conmaittee's instruc- 
tion, to suggest any failure to comply with the rules, 
and to offer such amendment or projDose such other 
action as is determined proper or necessary by the com- 
mittee within the scope of its duties, as above set forth. 
If, upon such motion, before a petition is referred to a 
committee, the petitioner is given leave to withdraw 
because the petition is not in proper form, such action 
shall not be deemed to be a final rejection under Rule 54, 



518 Rules of the Senate. 

and shall not prejudice the right of a member to present 
a petition for the same object conformably to the rules 
of the Senate and the joint rules of the tvvo branches. 
[1893.— Partly embodied in Rule 20 of 1891.] 

22. Any petition remaining in the hands of the Clerk 
subsequently to five o'clock in the afternoon of the second 
Saturday of the session, for the reason that no bill or 
resolve embodying the legislation prayed for has been 
presented, shall be forthwith submitted by him to the 
President, and by him, at the legislative session next suc- 
ceeding, be referred to the next General Court. (29.) 

[1893; 1894; 1898; 1905; 1910.] 

23. No bill or resolve shall be proposed or intro- 
duced unless received from the House of Representatives, 
reported by a committee, or moved as an amendment to 
the report of a committee, except that special leave may 
be granted to a member to introduce a bill or resolve, 
and such bill or resolve shall thereupon be referred 
to the proper committee for consideration and report. 
(47.) [1881; 1882; 1888.] 

24. The consideration of any order proposed for 
adoption, or of any request for leave to introduce a bill 
or resolve, or of any motion to suspend Senate Rule 
15, or joint rule 8, 9 or 12, shall be postponed without 
question to the day after that on which the order is pro- 
posed or request made, if any member asks such post- 
ponement. (41.) [1885; 1891.] 

25. A petition for the incorporation of a town or 
city, or for the division of an existing town or city, or 
for the incorporation of a railroad, street railway, ele- 



Rules of the Senate. 519 

vated railroad or canal company, or for tlie amendment, 
alteration or extension of the charter or corporate powers 
or privileges of any such company, either specially in- 
corporated or organized mider general laws, or for 
authority to take water for a water supply, or relative 
to building structures over navigable or tide waters, 
sliall be referred to the next General Court, and not to 
a committee, unless the petitioner has given the notice 
required by chapter 3 of the Revised Laws or by other 
provisions of law. A petition for the incorporation of 
a college or university or other educational institution, 
with power to grant degrees, or for amendment of the 
charter of an existing educational institution so that tlie 
said institution, not having such power, shall thereafter 
have power to grant degrees, shall also be referred to 
the next General Court, and not to a committee, unless 
the petitioner has given the notice required by chapter 3 
of the Revised Laws. But if, no objection being raised, 
any such petition is referred to a committee, without 
such required notice, the committee shall forthwith re- 
port reference to the next General Court, setting forth 
as the reason for such report failure to give the re- 
quired notice, unless evidence satisfactory to the com- 
mittee is produced that all parties interested have in 
writing Avaived notice. In case a bill or resolve is 
reported by a committee upon such a petition, after 
proof of such waiver of notice, this fact shall be set 
forth in the report of the committee. When a report of 
reference to the next General Court is made by a com- 
mittee on account of failure to give the required notice, 
no bill or resolve shall be sul^stituted for such report, 
nor shall such report be recommitted or referred to 
another committee ; but reference of the petition to the 
next General Court for want of proper notice under this 



520 Rules of the Senate, 

rule shall not affect action upon any other measure 
involving the same subject-matter. (32.) 

[1890; 1891; 1898; 1903.] (See Rule 15.) 



Course of PROCEEDmas. 

26. Bills and resolves from the House, after they are 
read a first time, shall be referred to a committee of the 
Senate, unless they have been reported by a joint com- 
mittee or substituted for the report of a joint committee. 
Bills and resolves reported in the Senate, and bills and 
resolves from the House reported by joint committees or 
substituted for the reports of joint committees, shall, after 
they have been read once, be placed in the Orders of the 
Day for the next day for a second reading without a ques- 
tion, except as otherwise provided by Rule 27. Resolu- 
tions received from the House, or introduced or reported 
in the Senate, shall be read and, pending the question 
on their adoption, shall be placed in the Orders oi the 
Day for the next day. (45, 56.) 

[1825; 1885; 1888; 1890; 1891; 1897.] 

27. Bills and resolves involving the expenditure of 
public money, or a grant of public property", unless the 
subject-matter has been acted upon by the joint com- 
mittee on Ways and Means, shall, after the first reading, 
be referred m course to the Senate committee on Ways 
and Means, whose duty it shall be to report on their 
relation to the finances of the Commonwealth or of any 
county thereof. (44.) 

[1871; 1882; 1887; 1888; 1889; 1896.] 

28. No bill or resolve shall pass to be engrossed 
without three reachngs on three several daj's. (51.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885.] 



Mules of the Senate. 521 

29, Bills and resolves, in their several readings, and 
resolutions, shall be read by their titles, unless objection 
is made. (48.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885; 1890.] 

30, If a committee to whom a bill or resolve is re- 
ferred report that the same ought not to pass, the ques- 
tion shall be ' ' Shall this bill (or resolve) be rejected ? " 
and if such committee report recommending that the 
same be referred to the next General Court, the question 
shall be " Shall this bill (or resolve) be referred to the 
next Genera] Court?" If the rejection or the recom- 
mendation of reference to the next General Court is 
negatived, the bill or resolve, if it has been read but 
once, shall go to its second reading without a question ; 
and if it has been read more than once it shall be placed 
in the Orders of the Day for the next day, pending the 
question on ordering to a third reading, or engrossment, 
as the case may be. (43.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885; 1897.] 

31, If an amendment is made at the second or third 
reading of a bill or resolve, substantially changing the 
greater part thereof, the question shall not be put forth- 
with on ordering the bill or resolve to a third reading 
or to be engrossed, as the case may be, but the bill or 
resolve, as amended, shall be placed in the Orders of the 
next day after that on which the amendment is made, and 
shall then be open to further amendment before such 
question is put. In like manner, when an amendment is 
made in any proposition of such a nature as to change its 
character, as from a Ijill to an order, or the like, the 
proposition as amended shall be jjlaced in the Orders of 



522 Bules of the Senate. 

the next day after that on which the amendment was 
made. (62.) [1882; 1888.] 

32. Bills or resolves ordered to a third reading shall 
be placed in the Orders for the next day for such reading. 
(58.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1881; 1882; 
1885.] 

33. Bills and resolves when ordered to a third read- 
ing shall be referred to the committee on Bills in the 
Third Reading, whose duty it shall be to examine and 
correct them, for the jjurpose of avoiding repetitions and 
unconstitutional provisions, and of insuring accuracy in 
the text and references, and consistency with the lan- 
guage of existing statutes ; but any change in the sense 
or legal effect, or any material change in construction, 
shall be reported to the Senate as an amendment. Reso- 
lutions received from the House or introduced or re- 
ported in the Senate shall, after they are read and before 
they are adopted, be referred, in like manner, to the 
committee on Bills in the Third Reading. When a bill, 
resolve or resolution has been so referred, no further 
action shall be taken until report thereon has been made 
by the committee. (26, 50.) 

[1817; 1836; 1882; 1888; 1890; 1891.] 

34. Engrossed bills and resolves shall be referred 
to the committee on Engrossed Bills, whose duty it shall 
be carefully to compare the same with the bills or re- 
solves as passed to be engrossed ; and, if found by them 
to be rightly and truly engrossed, they shall so endorse 
on the envelope thereof ; and the question of enactment 
or final passage shall be taken thereon without further 
reading, unless specially ordered. (27, 52, 54.) 

[1817; 1831; 1882; 1888.] 



Mules of the Senate, 523 



Orders op the Day. 

35. The unfinished business in which the Senate was 
engaged at the time of the last adjournment shall have 
the preference in the Orders of the Day next after mo- 
tions to reconsider. (60.) [1830; 1870.] 

36. Reports of committees not by bill or resolve 
shall be placed in the Orders of the next day after that 
on which they are made to the Senate or received from 
the House, as the case may be ; except that the report 
of a committee askino^ to be discharo;ed from the further 
consideration of a subject, and recommending that it be 
referred to another committee, shall be immediately con- 
sidered. Amendments to a measure, which have been 
made by the House and sent back to the Senate for con- 
currence, shall be f)laced in the Orders of the next day 
after that on which they are received. (46, 57.) 

[1845; 1853; 1888; 1891.] 

37. After entering upon the consideration of the 
Orders of the Day, the Senate shall proceed wdth them 
in regular course, as follows : Matters not giving rise 
to a motion or debate shall first be disposed of in the 
order in w^hieh they stand in the calendar ; then the mat- 
ters that were passed over shall be considered and dis- 
posed of in like order. (59.) 

[1817; 1836; 1841; 1859; 1878; 1882; 1885.] 

38. Ko matter which has been duly placed in the 
Orders of the Day shall be discharged therefrom or con- 
sidered out of its regular course. (61.) [1885.] 



524 Hides of the Senaie, 

Rules of Debate. 

39. Every member, when he sjDeaks, shall stand in 
his place and address the President. (73.) 

[1817; 1831; 1871.] 

40. When two or more members rise to sj)eak at the 
same time, the President shall designate the member who 
is entitled to the floor. (74.) [1831 ; 1888.] 

41. No member shall speak more than once to the 
prevention of any other member who has not spoken 
and desires to speak on the same question. (76.) 

[1817; 1886.] 

42. No member shall interrupt another while speak- 
ing, except by rising to call to order. (75.) 

[1817; 1831.] 

43. After a question is put to vote no member shall 
to it. [1817.] 



Motions. 

44. Any motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
President so directs. A motion need not be seconded 
and may be withdrawn by the mover if no objection is 
made. (77,78.) [1817; 1844; 1871; 1888.] 

45. A question containing two or more propositions, 
capable of division, shall be divided whenever desired 
by any member. When a motion to strike out and in- 
sert is thus divided, the failure of the motion to strike 
out shall not preclude amendment ; or, if the motion to 
strike out prevails, the matter proposed to be inserted 
shall be open to amendment before the question is taken 
on inserting it. (91.) [1817 ; 1841 ; 1888.] 



Eules of the Senate. 525 

46. When a question is under debate the President 
shall receive no motion that does not relate to the 
same, except a motion to adjourn or some otlier motion 
which has precedence b}" express rule of the Senate, 
or because it is privileged in its nature ; and he shall 
receive no motion relating to the same except : — 

(1) To lay on the table ; 

(2) To close debate at a specified time; 

(3) To postpone to a day certain ; 

(4) To commit (or recommit) ; 

(5) To amend; 

(6) To refer to the next General Court ; or 

(7) To postpone indefinitely. 

These motions shall have precedence in the order in 
which they stand. (80.) 

[Between 1821 and 1826; 1831; 1844; 1870; 
1882; 1885; 1888.] 

47. Debate may be closed at any time not less than 
one hour from the adoption of a motion to that effect. 
On this motion not more than ten minutes shall be 
allowed for debate, and no member shall speak more 
than three minutes. (85.) [1882.] 

48. When motions are made to refer a subject to 
different committees, the committees proposed shall be 
considered in the following order : — 

(1) A standing committee of the Senate ; 

(2) A special committee of the Senate; 

(3) A joint standing committee of the two branches ; 

(4) A joint special committee of the two branches. 
(88.) [1884; 1888.] 

49. Ko engrossed bill or resolve shall be amended. 
(53.) [1837.] 



526 Rules of the Senate, 

50. No motion or proposition of a subject different 
from that under consideration shall be admitted under 
the color of an amendment. (90.) [1882.] 

61. In filling blanks the largest sum and longest 
time shall be put first. (87, 92.) [1882.] 

52. The motion to adjourn, and the call for yeas and 
nays, shall be decided without debate. On the motions 
to lay on the table and take from the table, to commit or 
recommit (except with instructions) , not exceeding ten 
minutes shall be allowed for debate, and no member 
shall speak more than three minutes. (69, 79.) 
[1817; 1859; 1870; 1874; 1882; 1885.] 



Reconsideration. 
53. No motion to reconsider a vote shall be enter- 
tained unless it is made on the same day on which the 
vote has passed, or on the next day thereafter on which 
a quorum is present and before the Orders of the Day 
for that day have been taken up. If reconsideration is 
moved on the same day, the motion shall be placed first 
in the Orders of the Day for the succeeding day ; but, 
if it is moved on the succeeding day, the motion shall be 
considered forthwith : j^rovided, hoivever, that this rule 
shall not prevent the reconsideration of a vote on a 
subsidiary, incidental or dependent question at any time 
when the main question to which it relates is under con- 
sideration ; and iwovided, further, that a motion to re- 
consider a vote on any incidental, subsidiary or dependent 
question shall not remove the main subject under con- 
sideration from before the Senate, but shall be considered 
at the time when it is made. There shall be no recon- 
sideration of the vote on the question on adjourning, for 
the yeas and nays, on laying on the table or on taking 



Bides of the Senate. 527 

from the table ; and when a motion for reconsideration 
has been decided, that decision shall not be reconsidered. 
(70, 71.) 

[1817; betAveen 1821 and 1826; 1858; 1885; 
1888; 1891; 1902.] 



Rejected Measures. 
54, When any measure has been finally rejected, no 
measure substantially the same shall be introduced by 
any committee or member during the session. (49.) 

[1817; dispensed with in 1831, and revived in 
1838 ; amended in 1841 ; 1844 ; 1877 ; 1882.] 



Voting. 
55. The President shall declare all votes ; but if a 
member doubts a vote, the President shall order a re- 
turn of the number voting in the afiirmative, and in the 
negative, without further debate. (3, 66.) 
[1831; 1888.] 

58. AVhen a member moves that a question be taken 
by yeas and nays, the President shall take the sense 
of the Senate in that manner, provided one-fifth of the 
members present so direct. If, before the question is 
taken, a member states to the Senate that he has j^aired 
with another member and how each would vote on tlie 
pending question, the fact shall be entered on the journal 
immediately after the record of the yeas and nays, and 
such member shall be excused from voting. (68.) 
[1817; 1852; 1888.] 

57. Whenever a question is taken by yeas and 
nays, the Clerk shall call the names of all the members, 
except the President, in alphabetical order, and every 



528 Rules of the Senate. 

member present shall answer to his name, unless excused 
before the vote is taken ; and no member shall be per- 
mitted to vote after the decision is announced from the 
chair. (64,68.) [1837; 1844.] 



Elections by Ballot. 
58. In all elections by ballot a time shall be assigned 
for such election, at least one day previous thereto, ex- 
cept in case of an election of President or President p?*o 
tempore, under the provisions of Rule 5. (96.) 
[1831; 1891.] 



Reporters' Gallery. 
59. Subject to the approval and direction of the 
committee on Rules during the session and of the Presi- 
dent after prorogation, the use of the reporters' gallery 
of the Senate Chamber shall be under the control of 
the organization of legislative reporters known as the 
Massachusetts State House Press Association. (100.) 
[1847; 1911.] 



The Senate Chamber and Adjoining Rooms. 

60. No person not a member shall be allowed to sit 
at the Senate table while the Senate is in session. (99.) 

[1853; 1888.] 

61. No person, except members of the legislative 
and executive departments of the State government, 
persons in the exercise of an official duty directly con- 
nected with the business of the Senate, and legislative 
reporters, shall, unless invited by the President, be 
admitted to the floor of the Senate Chamber, or to the 
reception room or that part of the Senate corridor which 
is between the reception room and the Senate Cham- 



Rules of the Senate. 529 

ber, during the sessions of the Senate, or during the half 
hour preceding or succeeding said sessions, nor to the 
Senate reading room or cloak room on any day when 
a session of the Senate is held, except upon written 
invitation bearing the name of the person it is desired 
to invite and the name of the Senator extending the 
invitation, which invitation shall be surrendered when 
the said person enters the apartment. No legislative 
counsel or agent shall be admitted to the floor of the 
Senate Chamber, nor, on any day when a session of the 
Senate is held, to the reading room, the cloak room, 
the reception room or the Senate corridor which is be- 
tween the reception room and the Senate Chamber. No 
person, except members of the legislative and execu- 
tive departments of the State government, persons in 
the exercise of an official duty directly connected with 
the business of the Senate and legislative reporters, 
shall be permitted to loiter in the reading room, the 
cloak room, the reception room or the Senate corri- 
dor at any time. Smoking shall not be permitted in 
the reception room. (99.) 

[1870; 1875; 1886; 1891; 1895; 1896; 1897; 
1898; 1907; 1909.] 



Parliamentary Practice. 
62. The rules of parliamentary practice comprised in 
the revised edition of Crocker's Principles of Procedure 
in Deliberative Bodies, and the principles of parliamen- 
tary law set forth in Cushing's Law and Practice of Leg- 
islative Assemblies, shall govern the Senate in all cases 
to which they are applicable, and in which they are not 
inconsistent with the rules of the Senate, or the joint 
rules of the two branches. (101.) 
[1847; 1858; 1882; 1895.] 



530 Rales of the Senate, 



Alterations, Suspension or Repeal of Rules. 

63. This rule and rales 24, 31, 33, 34 and 53 shall 
not be suspended if objection is made ; rule 22 shall not 
be rescinded, amended or susj^ended, except by a vote of 
four-fifths of the members present and voting thereon ; 
and no other rule shall be altered, suspended or re- 
pealed, except by vote of two-thirds of the members 
present and voting thereon. (103.) 

[1817; 1841; 1848; 1882; 1888; 1891; 1893: 
1899.] 



INDEX TO SENATE RULES. 



Adjourn, motions to, 46, 52. 

AMENDMENTS: 

made by House and sent back, to be placed in Orders of the Day, 36. 
if made at the second or third reading, substantially changing the 
greater part of a bill or resolve, when question shall be taken, 31. 
when questions sliall be divided, 45. 
engrossed bill or resolve not to be amended, 49. 
not to be admitted of a different subject, 50. 
in filling blanks, largest sum, etc., 51. 

Ballot, elections by, 13, 58. 

BILLS AND RESOLVES: 

Clerk to retain, until right of reconsideration has expired, 8. 

from the House, to be reprinted in certain cases, 9. 

embodying certain legislation not to be reported unless based upon 
petition, etc., 15. 

how to be written, etc., 17. 

for introduction on leave, to be deposited with Clerk and submitted 
by him to committee on Rules, 20. 

to accompany petitions and to be printed v/hen ordered by Presi- 
dent, etc., 20. 

how to be introduced; when introduced on leave to be thereupon 
committed, 23. 

from the House, to be committed, unless reported by, or substi- 
tuted for report of, a joint committee; certain, to be placed 
in the Orders of the Day for next day without question, except, 
etc., 26. 

involving expenditure of money, or a grant of public property, 
to be referred to the committee on Ways and Means, unless, 
etc., 27. 

not to be engrossed unless read on three several days, 28. 

to be read by their titles only, unless, etc., 29. 

531 



532 Index to the Rules of the Senate. 

BILLS AND RESOLVES — Concluded. 

if adversely reported on by committee, question on rejection, other- 
wise, etc., 30. 

if committee recommends reference to next General Court, 30. 

ordered to a third reading, placed in Orders of the next day, 32. 

amendment changing nature of, the bill or resolve to be placed in 
the Orders of the next day, 3L 

in third reading, to be committed for examination, 33. 

engrossed, to be committed for examination; if reported as rightly 
and truly engrossed, not to be again read unless, etc., 34. 

engrossed, not to be amended, 49. 

no rejected measures to be revived, 54. 

CLERK: 

to keep a journal and cause the same to be printed daily, 6. 

to note in the journal questions of order, etc., 6. 

to prepare and cause to be printed, each day, a calendar, etc., 7. 

to retain bills and other papers until the right of reconsideration 

has expired; exceptions, 8. 
to have bills or resolves from the House reprinted in certain cases, 9. 

COMMITTEES: 

no member to serve on, where his private right is immediately con- 
cerned, 10. 

standing, to be appointed, 12. 

to be appointed by President unless, etc.; in case of election by 
ballot, 13. 

orders authorizing, to travel or to employ stenographers to be referred 
to committee on Rules, 13a. 

no committee to occupy the Senate Chamber without a vote of 
the Senate, 14. 

not to report bills and resolves in certain cases, unless notice has 
been given to parties interested, etc., 15. 

to report adversely in certain cases, 16. 

to report reference to next General Court in certain cases, 25. 

duty of the committee on Rules, 20, 21. 

on Ways and Means, 27. 

on Bills in the Third Reading, 33 . 

on Engrossed Bills, 34. 

DEBATE, RULES OF: 

matters not giving rise to motion or debate to be first disposed 
of, 37. 



Index to the Males of the Senate. 533 

DEBATE, RULES OF — Concluded. 

member to stand in his place when speaking, and to address the 
President, 39. 

President to designate who may speak when two or more mem- 
bers rise at same time, 40. 

limitation as to speaking, 41. 

member not to interrupt another, except, etc., 42. 

member not to speak to a question after it is put to vote, 43. 

when a question is under debate, the President shall receive no 
motion except, etc., 46. 

motion to close debate at any time, not less than one hour, in order, 47. 

motions to be decided without debate, 52. 

Engrossed Bills, committee on, 34. 

Investigations, orders involving special, by committees to be referred 
to the committee on Rules, 13a. 

Legislative counsel and agents not to be admitted to Senate Chamber, 
etc., 61. 

MEMBERS: 

no member to act on any committee or to vote upon a question 

where his private right is immediately concerned, distinct from 

the public interest, 10. 
not to absent themselves without leave, unless, etc., 11. 
number of, on each standing committee, 12. 
member first named to be chairman of cornmittee; having highest 

number of votes to be chairman, 13. 
member presenting petition, etc., to endorse his name, etc., 18. 
manner in which, shall make motions contemplating legislation, 19. 
when speaking, to rise and address the President, 39. 
limitation as to speaking, 41. 
member not to interrupt another, except, 42. 
not to speak to a question after it is put to vote, 43. 
may announce pairs before yeas and nays are called, 56. 
Motions, 44 to 52. 

ORDERS: 

of inquiry and notice, 8. 

to be deposited with Clerk and submitted by him to committee on 

Rules, 20. 
consideration of, may be postponed if any member so requests, 24. 



534 Index to the Rules of the Senate, 

ORDERS OF THE DAY: 

unfinished business to have the preference in, next after motions 

to reconsider, 35. 
reports of committees, except those asking discharge, etc., to be 

placed in, next succeeding their presentation, 36. 
consideration of matters in, 37. 
matters not to be discharged from, 38. 

Parhamentarj' practice, rules of, to govern the Senate, 62. 

PETITIONS: 

certain legislation not to be proposed, introduced or reported unless 
founded on petition, 15. 

how committees shall report upon certain, 15, 16. 

how m^embers shall endorse, 18. 

to be deposited with Clerk and submitted by him to committee 
on Rules, 20. 

to be retained by Clerk until bills or resolves are filed, 20. 

to be referred to next General Court, if no bill or resolve is filed, 22. 

certain, not advertised according to law, to be referred to next Gen- 
eral Court, 25. 

POSTPONE: 

to a day certain, motion to, 46. 
indefinitely, motion to, 46. 

PRESIDENT: 

to call the members to order, 1. 

to preserve order and decorum; may speak to points of order in 
preference to other members; to decide all questions of order, 
subject to appeal; to rise to put a question, etc., but may read 
sitting, 2. 

may vote on all questions, 3. 

may appoint a member to perform his duties; limitation thereof, 4. 

in absence of, the eldest senior member present shall call the Sen- 
ate to order, and preside until, etc., 5. 

to appoint committees, 13. 

may order bills and resolves accompanying petitions, and bills, 
resolves or resolutions intended for introduction to be printed, 20. 

to designate who may speak when two or more members rise at 
the same time, 40. 

to declare all votes; if doubted, a return to be ordered, 55. 

to order the yeas and nays, if one-fifth of the members present 
request them, 56. 



Index to the Bides of the Senate. 535 

PRESIDENT — Concluded. 

use of reporters' gallery to be subject to approval and direction 
of, after prorogation, 59. 
Public property, bills or resolves involving grant of, to be referred to 
the committee on Ways and Means, unless, 27. 

Questions of order, 2, 6, 42. 

Reading of papers, 2, 18, 29. 

Reconsideration, 53. 

Rejected measures, 54. 

Reporters' gallery, use of, under control of Massachusetts State House 

Press Association, subject to approval, etc., 59. 
Reports of committees, 36. 

RESOLUTIONS: 

to be deposited with Clerk and submitted by him to committee 

on Rules, 20. 
to be placed in Orders of the Day, 26. 
to be read by titles, 29. 

to be referred to committee on Bills in the Third Reading before 
adoption, 33. 
Resolves. See Bills and Resolves. 

RULES: 

committee on, to inspect matters contemplating legislation, etc., 

20,21. 
motions to suspend certain, may be postponed, 24. 
alteration, suspension, or repeal of, 63. 

Senate Chamber and adjoining rooms, 60, 61. 
Stenographers, employment of, by committees, 13a. 

TABLE: 

list of papers on, to be printed in calendar daily, 7. 

lay on, motion to, 52. 

take from, motion to, 52. 
Third Reading, committee on Bills in the, 33. 
Travel, orders authorizing committees to, 13a. 

Unfinished business, 35. 

Ways and Means, committee on, 27. 

Yeas and nays, 56, 57. 



RULES 



HOUSE OP EEPEBSBISTTATIVES. 



RULES 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



[This schedule of Rules was adopted Jan. 27, 1874. Subsequent 
amendments are noted under each Rule which has been amended.] 



Speaker. 

1. The Speaker shall take the chair at the hour to 
which the House stands adjourned, call the members 
to order, and, on the appearance of a quorum, proceed 
to business. (Senate Rule 1.) 

2. He shall preserve decorum and order ; may sjDeak 
to points of order in preference to other members ; and 
shall decide all questions of order, subject to an appeal 
to the House. (2.) 

[With regard to appeals, see Rules 83 and 94.] 

3. He shall declare all votes, subject to verification 
as hereinafter provided. (53.) 

[See Rules 65 to 69.] 

4. In all cases he may vote. (3.) 

5. He shall rise to put a question, or to address the 
House, but may read sitting. (2.) 

539 



540 Rules of the 

6. He shall each day examine the journal of the 
House. 

7. He may appoint a member to perform the duties 
of the chair for a period not exceeding three days at 
one time. (4.) 

[Amended Jan. 14, 1892.] 

8. In case of a vacancy in the office of Speaker, or 
in case the Speaker or the member named by him in ac- 
cordance with the preceding rule is absent at the hour 
to which the House stands adjourned, the senior mem- 
ber present shall call the House to order, and shall pre- 
side until a Speaker pro tempore or a Speaker is elected 
by ballot, which shall be the first business in order. 
(5.) 

Monitors. 

9. Two monitors shall be appointed by the Speaker 
for each division of the House, whose duty it shall be to 
see to the due observance of the rules and, on request of 
the Speaker, to return the number of votes and members 
in their respective divisions. 

10. If a member transgress any of the rules after 
being notified thereof by a monitor, it shall be the duty 
of such monitor to report the case to the House. 

[See Kule 19.] 

Clerk. 

11. The Clerk shall keep the journal of the House. 
He shall enter therein a record of each day's proceed- 
ings, and submit it to the Speaker before the hour fixed 
for the next sitting, and shall cause the same to be 
printed daily. (6.) 

[Amended Jan. 16, 1888.] 

12. Every question of order with the decision thereon 
shall be entered at large in the journal, and shall be 



House of Representatives. 541 

noted in an appendix, wliich shall also contain the rules 
of the House, and of the two branches. (6.) 
[Amended Feb. 2, 1891.J 

13. The Clerk shall prepare and cause to be printed 
each day a calendar of matters in order for considera- 
tion ; a list of matters lying on the table ; and such 
other memoranda as the House or the Speaker may 
direct. (7.) 

[Amended Jan. 16, 1888.] 

14. Any objection to the calendar shall be made and 
disposed of before the House votes to proceed to the 
consideration of the Orders of the Day. 

15. The Clerk shall retain bills and other papers, in 
reference to which any member has a right to move a 
reconsideration (except petitions, enacted bills, orders 
of inquiry and orders of notice) , until the right of recon- 
sideration has expired : 2^^^ovided, that the operation of 
this rule shall be suspended during the last week of the 
session. (8.) 

Members. 

16. No member shall stand up, to the inconvenience 
of others, while a member is speaking; or pass unnec- 
essarily between the Speaker of the House and the 
member speaking ; or stand in the passages, or in the 
area in front of the chair ; or stand at the Clerk's desk 
while a roll-call is in progress. 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891.] 

17. No member shall be absent more than two days, 
without leave of the House. Xo member shall absent 
himself from the House without leave, unless there be a 
quorum without his presence. When it appears to the 
presiding officer that the presence of a quorum is en- 



542 Rules of the 

dangered he shall order the doors to be closed until the 
House takes action thereon. (11-) 
[Amended Feb. 2, 1891.] 

18. Papers in possession of a member obtaining 
leave of absence, or at the end of the session, shall be 
left by him with the Clerk. 

19. If a member is guilty of a breach of any of the 
rules, he may be required by the House, on motion, to 
make satisfaction therefor; and, imtil he has done so, 
he shall not be allowed to vote or speak, except by way 
of excuse. 

[See Eule 10.] 

Committees. 

20. At the beginning of the political year, standing 
committees shall be appointed as follows : — (12.) 

A committee on Kules ; 
(to consist of the Speaker, who shall be chairman of the 
committee, and ten other members) . 

A committee on Ways and Means ; 

A committee on the Judiciary ; 
(to consist of eleven members each) . 

A committee on Elections ; 
(to consist of seven members) . 

A committee on Bills in the Tliird Reading ; 

A committee on Engrossed Bills ; 

A committee on Pay-Roil ; 
(to consist of three members each) . 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891; Jan. 2, 1896; Jan. 11, 1897; Jan. 10, 1898; 
Jan. 7, 1901.] 

21. Unless other i)rovision is made in any case all 
committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, and the 
member first named shall be chairman. (13.) 



House of Representatives, 543 

22. In case of the election of a committee by ballot, 
the member havin^^ the hiHiest number of votes shall be 
chairman. (13.) 

23. No member shall be required to be on more than 
two committees at the same time, or chairman of more 
than one. 

24. No member shall serve on any committee in 
any question where his private right is immediately 
concerned, distinct from the public interest. (10.) 

25. The committee on Ways and Means shall report, 
in aiDj^ropriation bills, only such items of expenditure as 
are authorized by law, or such as the committee has 
been directed by the House to insert, and shall state in 
its report the total amount of appropriations in the ac- 
companying bill ; and also at the end of each item in 
said bill the amount, if any, appropriated the previous 
year for the same purpose. 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891; Jan. 2, 1896.] 

26. The committee on Bills in the Third Reading 
shall examine and correct the bills which are referred 
to it, for the purpose of avoiding repetitions and uncon- 
stitutional provisions, insuring accuracy in the text and 
references, and consistency with the language of exist- 
ing statutes : 2)rovided, that any change in the sense or 
legal effect, or any material change in construction, shall 
be reported to the House as an amendment. (33.) 

[Amended Jan. 15, 1880.] 

27. The committee on Engrossed Bills shall care- 
fully examine and compare engrossed bills, and report 
them rightly and truly engrossed, when found to be so, 
without delay. (34.) 



544 Hules of the 

28. All resolutions, bills and resolves for introduc- 
tion on leave, intended for i^resentation by any member 
of the House, and all reports of State officers, shall first 
be deposited with the Clerk, and jtrior to their presenta- 
tion shall be submitted by him to the Speaker for his 
examination; and not later than the fourth legislative 
day succeeding the day of their deposit with the Clerk, 
the Speaker shall, before the Orders of the Day are con- 
sidered, present the same to the House, when they, in 
the case of resolutions, bills and resolves, shall be read, 
and shall by the Speaker with the consent of the House 
be referred to the appropriate committee ; and all such 
resolutions, bills and resolves shall be printed under the 
direction of the Clerk. They shall retain their original 
provided numbers, when reprinted, together with new 
numbers thereafter, during all subsequent stages. All 
petitions asking for legislation shall, if accompanied by 
a bill or resolve embodying the subject-matter prayed 
for, be referred with such bill or resolve as provided 
above. The same disposition shall be made of petitions 
and remonstrances referring to matters previously sent 
to a committee. Petitions not so accompanied shall be 
retained in the custody of the Clerk until a bill or resolve 
embodying the legislation prayed for shall be filed with 
him, when he shall present the same to the Si^eaker, to 
be disposed of as provided above. The House may at 
any time by order make any other disposition of petitions 
and remonstrances in the hands of the Clerk. (20.) 

[Adopted Jan. 13, 1893; amended Jan. 11, 1894; March 30, 1894; 
March 14, 1899.] 

29. Any petition remaining in the hands of the Clerk 
subsequent to five o'clock in the afternoon on the second 
Saturday of the session, for the reason that no bill or 
resolve embodying the legislation prayed for has been 
presented, shall be forthwith submitted by him to the 



House of Representatives. 545 

Speaker, and by him, at the legislative session next suc- 
ceeding, be referred to the next General Court. This 
rule shall not be rescinded or revoked or suspended 
except by a vote of four-lifths of the members present 
and voting thereon . (22.) 

[Adopted Jan. 13, 1893; amended Jan. 11, 1894; Jan. 10, 1898; Feb. 
21,190.1; Feb. 1,1910.] 

30, When the object of an application can be secured 
without a special act under existing laws, or, without 
detriment to the public interests, by a general law, the 
committee to which the matter is referred shall report 
such general law, or leave to withdraw, or ought not to 
pass, as the case may be. (16.) 

[Amended Jan. 15, 1880; Jan. 13, 1893.] 

31, No legislation affecting the rights of individuals 
or the rights of a private or municipal corj^oration, other- 
wise than as it affects generally the peoj)le of the whole 
Commonwealth or the people of the city or town to 
which it specifically applies, shall be proposed or intro- 
duced except upon .a petition; nor- shall any bill or 
resolve embodying such legislation be reported by a 
committee except upon a petition duly referred ; nor 
shall such a bill or resolve be reported by a committee, 
whether on an original reference or on a recommittal 
with instructions to hear the parties, until it is made to 
ai^pear to the satisfaction of the committee that projDcr 
notice of the proposed legislation has been given, by 
public advertisement or otherwise, to all jDarties inter- 
ested, without expense to the Commonwealth, or until 
evidence satisfactory to the committee is produced that 
all parties interested have in writing waived notice. A 
committee reporting leave to withdraw or reference to 
the next General Court, for want of proper notice or of 
a waiver thereof, shall set forth this fact in its rei)ort. 



546 Rules of the 

and no bill or resolve shall be in order as a substitute 
for or amendment of such rejDort. Objection to the vio- 
lation of this rule may be taken at any stage prior to that 
of the third reading. (15.) 

[Adopted Feb. 11, 1890; amended Jan. 13, 1893.] 

32. A petition for the incorporation of a tovi^n or 
city, or for the division of an existing town or city, or 
for the incorporation of a railroad, street railway, ele- 
vated railroad or canal company, or for the amendment, 
alteration, or extension of the charter or corporate 
powers or privileges of any such company, either sjDe- 
cially incorporated or organized under general laws, or 
for authority to take water for a water suj^ply, or rela- 
tive to building structures over navigable or tide waters, 
shall be referred to the next General Court, and not to 
a committee, unless the petitioner has given the notice 
required by chapter 3 of the Revised Laws or by other 
provisions of law ; a petition for the incorporation of a 
college or universitj^ or other educational institution, 
with power to grant degrees, or for an amendment of 
the charter of an existing educational institution so that 
the said institution not having such power shall there- 
after have power to grant degrees, shall also be referred 
to the next General Court, and not to a committee, un- 
less the petitioner has given the notice required by 
chapter 3 of the Revised Laws ; but if, no objection 
being raised, any such petition is referred to a commit- 
tee without such required notice, the committee shall 
forthwith report reference to the next General Court, 
setting forth as the reason for such report failure to give 
the required notice, unless evidence satisfactory to the 
committee is produced that all parties interested have in 
writing waived notice. In case a bill or resolve is re- 
ported by a committee ui^on such a petition, after proof 



House of Representatives, 547 

of such waiver of notice, this fact shall be set forth in 
the report of the committee. When a report of refer- 
ence to the next General Court is made by a committee, 
on account of failure to give the required notice, no bill 
or resolve shall be substituted for such report, nor shall 
such report be recommitted or referred to another com- 
mittee ; but reference of the petition to the next General 
Court for want of proper notice under this rule shall not 
affect action upon any other measure involving the same 
subject-matter. (25.) 

[Adopted Feb. 11, 1890; amended Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 18, 1838; Feb. 
6, 1902.] 

33. On or before the second Wednesday in March, 
committees shall make final report upon matters re- 
ferred to them prior to that day. . 

[Amended Feb. 15, 1883; Feb. 2, 1891; Jan. 25, 1894.] 

Committee of the Whole. 

34. When the House determines to go into a com- 
mittee of tlie whole, the chairman shall be appointed by 
the Speaker. 

35. The rules of the House shall be observed in a 
committee of the whole, so far as they may be appli- 
cable, except the rules limiting debate. A motion to 
rise, report progress, and ask leave to sit again, shall be 
always first in order and be decided without debate. 

Regular Course of Proceedings. 
Petitions, etc., and Reports of Committees. 

36. Petitions, memorials, remonstrances and papers 
of a like nature, and reports of committees, shall be pre- 
sented before the House proceeds to the consideration of 
the Orders of the Day, and the Speaker shall call for 
such papers. 



548 Rules of the 

37. The member presenting a petition, memorial, or 
remonstrance, shall indorse his name thereon, with a 
brief statement of the nature and object of the paper ; 
and the reading thereof shall be dispensed with, unless 
specially ordered. (18.) 

Papers from the Senate, 

38. Papers from the Senate shall be laid before the 
House by the Speaker, and received for action conform- 
ably to such of these rules as are applicable thereto, 
before the House proceeds to the consideration of the 
Orders of the Day. 

Papers adch^cssed to the House, not Petitions. 

39. Papers addressed to the House, or the General 
Court, other than petitions, memorials and remon- 
strances, or those received from the Senate, may be 
presented by the Speaker, or by a member in his place, 
and shall be read, unless it is specially ordered that the 
reading be dispensed with. 

^lotions contemjjlating Legislation, etc. 

40. All motions contemplating legislation shall be 
founded upon petition or upon bill or resolve proposed 
to be introduced on leave. 

The committee on Ways and Means may originate 
and report appro^Jriation bills based upon existing law. 
ISIessages from the Governor shall, unless otherwise 
ordered, be referred to the aj^propriate committee, which 
may report by bill or otherwise thereon. A similar dis- 
position shall, unless otherwise ordered, be made of 
reports by State officers and recess committees author- 
ized to report to the Legislature, and similar action may 
be had thereon. (19.) 

[Amended Jan. 13, 1893; Jan. 2, 1896.] 



House of Representatives. 549 



Postponement to the Next Day on Bequest of a Member. 

41. The consideration of an order proposed for 
adoption, except as provided in joint rule twentj-eight 
or House rule one hundred and four, or of any request 
for leave to introduce a bill, or any motion to suspend 
Joint rules eight or thirteen, or House rules thirty -one, 
forty-five or forty-six, shall be postponed without ques- 
tion to the day after that on which the order is proposed 
or request or motion made, if any member asks such post- 
ponement. (24.) 

[Amended June 13, 1890; Jan. 13, 1893; March 14, 1899.] 

Bills and Besolves. [See Rule 95.] 

42 . Bills shall be printed or written in a legible hand, 
without material erasure or interlineation, on not less 
than one sheet of paper, with suitable margins and spaces 
between the several sections, dates and numbers beino: 
written in words at length. Bills amending existing 
laws shall not provide for striking words from, or insert- 
ing words in, such laws, unless such course is best cal- 
culated to show clearly the subject and nature of the 
amendment. Xo repealed law, and no j)art of any 
repealed law, shall be re-enacted by reference merely. 
(17.) 

[Amended Jan. 15, 1880; Feb. 2, 1891.] 

43. If a committee to whom a bill is referred report 
that the same ought not to pass, the question shall be, 
" Shall this bill be rejected? " If the question on rejec- 
tion is negatived, the bill, if it has been read but once, 
shall go to a second reading without question; other- 
wise it shall be placed in the Orders for the next day, 
pending the question on ordering to a third reading, or 
engrossment, as tlie case may be. (30.) 

[Amended Jan. 10, 1883.] 



550 Rules of the 

44. Bills involving an expenditure of public money, 
or grant of public i^ropertj, unless the subject-matter 
has been acted upon by the joint committee on Ways 
and Means, shall, after their first reading, be referred 
to the committee on Waj^s and Means, for report on their 
relation to the finances of the Commonwealth. Xew 
provisions shall not be added to such bills by the com- 
mittee on "Ways and oMeans, unless directly connected 
with the financial features thereof. Bills involving an 
expenditure of count^^ money shall, after their first read- 
ing, be referred to the committee on Counties on the 
part of the House, for report on their relation to the 
finances of the county affected, unless the subject-matter 
thereof has been previously acted upon by the joint 
committee on Counties ; and no new provisions shall be 
added to such bills by the committee on Counties on the 
part of the House unless directly connected with the finan- 
cial features thereof. (27.) 

[Amended Jan. 24, 18S7; Feb. 11, 1890; Jan. 25, 1895; Jan. 29, 1895; 
Jan. 2, 1896; Jan. 27, 1S96; Jan. 10, 1898.] 

45. Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, 
shall be referred to a committee of the House, unless they 
were reported to the Senate by a joint committee. (26.) 

46. Amendments proposed by the Senate and sent 
back to the House for concurrence shall be referred to 
the committee which reported the measure proposed to 
be amended, unless such committee is composed of mem- 
bers of both branches ; in which, case such amendments 
shall be placed in the Orders of the Day for the next 
day. (36.) 

[Amended April 9, 1878.] 

47. jSTo bill shall be proposed or introduced unless 
received from the Senate, reported by a committee, or 
moved as an amendment to the report of a committee : 



House of Representatives, 5t51 

provided, that the House may grant special leave to a 
member to introduce a bill ; but, when leave is asked for 
the introduction of a bill, it shall be read for information 
before the question is put on granting leave ; and, if 
leave is granted, it shall be committed before it is ordered 
to a second reading. (23.) 



48. Bills, resolves and other papers that have been, 
or, under the rules or usage of the House, are to be 
printed, shall be read by their titles only, unless the full 
reading is requested. (29.) 

[Adopted Jan. 10, 1883.] 

49. AVhen a bill, order, petition, memorial or remon- 
strance has been finally rejected by the House, no meas- 
ure substantially the same shall be introduced by any 
committee or member during the same session. (54.) 

[Amended April 2G, 1877; Feb. 11, 1890.] 

50. Bills in their third reading shall be referred to 
the committee on Bills in tlie Third Reading for exam- 
ination, correction and report. Eesolutious received 
from and adopted by the Senate, or reported in the 
House, shall, after they are read and before they are 
adopted, be referred in like manner to the committee on 
Bills in the Third Reading. When a bill or resolution 
has been so referred, such bill or resolution shall not be 
acted upon until report thereon has been made by the 
committee. (33.) 

[Amended Jan. 10, 1898.] 
[See Rule 26.] 

51. No bill shall pass to be engrossed without hav- 
ing been read on three several days. (28.) 

52. Engrossed bills shall be referred to the com- 
mittee on Engrossed Bills for examination, comparison 
and report. (34.) 

[See Rule 27.] 



552 Uules of the 

53, No engrossed bill shall be amended except by 
striking; out the enacting clause. (34.) (49.) 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1801.] 

54, Engrossed bills, reported by the committee on 
Engrossed Bills to be rightly and truly engrossed, shall 
be put ujDon their passage to be enacted ; and engrossed 
resolves, when so reported, shall be put upon their pas- 
sage without further reading, unless specially ordered. 
(34.) 

55, Xo engrossed bill shall be sent to the Senate 
without notice thereof being given by the Speaker. 

Orders of the Day. 

56, Bills from the Senate, after their first reading, 
when not referred to a committee of the House, bills 
favorably re^Dorted to the House by committees, and bills 
the question of the rejection of which is negatived, shall 
be placed in the Orders for the next day, and, if they have 
been read but once, shall go to a second reading with- 
out question. Resolutions received from and adopted 
by the Senate, or reported in the House by committees, 
shall, after they are read, be jDlaced in the Orders of the 
Day for the next day. (26.) 

[Amended Jan. 10, 1883; Feb. 5, 1886; Jan. 10, 1898.] 

57, Reports of committees not by bill or resolve 
shall be placed in the Orders of the next day after that 
on which they are received from the Senate, or made 
to the House, as the case may be : provided, that the 
report of a committee asking to be discharged from the 
further consideration of a subject, and recommending 
that it be referred to another committee, shall be imme- 
diately considered and shall not be subject to the provi- 
sions of rule fifteen. (36.) 

[Amended Jan. 15, 1880; Feb. 2, 1891.] 



Jlouse of Representatives, 553 

58, Bills ordered to a third reading shall be placed 
in the Orders of the next day for such reading. (32.) 
(33.) 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891 ; Jan. 10, 1898.] 

59, After entering upon the consideration of the 
Orders of the Day, the House shall proceed witli them 
in regular course as follows : Matters not giving rise 
to a motion or debate shall first be disposed of in the 
order in which they stand in the calendar; after which 
the matters that were passed over shall be considered in 
like order and disposed of. (37.) 

60, When the House does not finish the considera- 
tion of the Orders of the Day, those which had not been 
acted upon shall be the Orders of the next and each 
succeeding day until disposed of, and shall be entered 
in the calendar, without change in their order, to pre- 
cede matters added under rules fifty-six, fiftj^-seven and 
fifty-eight. The unfinished business in which the House 
was engaged at the time of adjournment shall have the 
preference in the Orders of the next day, after motions 
to reconsider. (35.) 

[Amended Jan. 13, 1893.] 

Special Rules affecting the Course of Proceedings, 

[For postponement of order, etc., to the next day, on request of a 
member, see Rule 41.] 

61, No matter which has been duly placed in the 
Orders of the Day shall be discharged therefrom, or 
considered out of the regular course. This rule shall 
not be rescinded or revoked or suspended except by a 
vote of four-fifths of the members present and voting 
thereon. (38.) 

[Amended Jan. 10, 1895.] 

62, If, under the operation of the previous question, 
or otherwise, an amendment is made at the second or 



554 Rules of the 

third reading of a bill substantially changing the greater 
part of such bill, the question shall not be put fortliwith 
on ordering the bill to a third reading or to be engrossed 
(as the case may be), but the bill, as amended, shall be 
placed in the Orders of the next day after that on which 
the amendment is made, and shall then be open to fur- 
ther amendment before such question is put. In like 
manner, when, under the operation of the previous ques- 
tion or otherwise, an amendment is made in any propo- 
sition of such a nature as to change its character, as 
from a bill to an order, or the like, the proposition as 
amended shall be placed in the Orders of the next day 
after that on which the amendment was made. (31.) 

Voting. 

63. No member shall vote upon any question where 
his private right is immediately concerned, distinct from 
the public interest. (10.) 

64. Members desiring to be excused from voting 
shall make application to that effect before the division 
of the House or the taking of the yeas and nays is begun. 
Such application may be accompanied by a brief state- 
ment of reasons by the member making it, but shall be 
decided without debate, and shall not be subject to the 
provisions of rule sixty-eight. (57.) 

[Amended Jan. 8, 1877; Feb. 5, 1886; Jan, 13, 1893.] 

65. When a question is put, the sense of the House 
shall be taken by tlie voices of the members, and the 
Speaker shall first announce the vote as it appears to 
him by the sound. (55.) 

66. If the Speaker is unable to decide by the sound 
of the voices, or if his announcement made thereupon is 
doubted by a member rising in his place for that pur- 
pose, the Speaker shall order a return by divisions of 



House of Representatives. 555 

the number voting in the affirmative and in tlie negative, 
without further debate upon the question. (55.) 
[For duty of monitors in case of a division, see Rule 9.] 

67. When a return by divisions is ordered, the mem- 
bers for or against the question, when called on by the 
Speaker, shall rise in their places, and stand until they 
are counted. If upon the taking of such a vote the pres- 
ence of a quorum is doubted, a count of the House shall 
be had, and if a quorum is present the vote shall stand. 

[Amended Feb. 11, 1889.] 

68. The sense of the House shall be taken by yeas 
and nays whenever required by thirty of the members 
present. When the j^eas and nays are taken, the roll of 
the House shall be called in alphabetical order, and no 
member shall be allowed to vote who was not on the 
floor before the vote is declared. If, before the ques- 
tion is taken, a member states to the House that he has 
paired with another member who is absent with a com- 
mittee by authority of the House, and how each would 
vote upon the pending question, the fact shall be entered 
on the journal immediately after the record of the yeas 
and nays, and such member shall be excused from 
voting, but shall be included with the members voting 
for the purposes of a quorum. (56.) (57.) 

[Amended Jan. 4, 1878; April 2, 1878; April 1, 1879; Feb. 2, 1891; 
Jan. 10, 1895; Jan. 21, 1909; Jan. 18, 1910.] 

69. The call for the yeas and nays shall be decided 
without debate. If the yeas and nays have been ordered 
before the question is put, the proceedings under rules 
sixty -five, sixty-six and sixty-seven shall be omitted ; if 
not, they may be called for in lieu of a return liy divi- 
sions when the Speaker's announcement is doubted by a 
member rising in his place, and, if then ordered, the 



556 Rules of the 

proceedings under rules sixty-six and sixty-seven shall 
be omitted. (52.) 
[Amended Jan. 13, 1893.] 

Reconsideration. 

70. No motion to reconsider a vote shall be enter- 
tained unless it is made on the same day on which the 
vote was passed, or before the Orders of the Day have 
been taken up on the next day thereafter on which a 
quorum is present. If reconsideration is moved on the 
same daj^ the motion shall (excej^t during the last week 
of the session) be placed first in the Orders of the Day 
for the succeeding day ; but, if it is moved on the suc- 
ceeding day, the motion shall be considered forthwith : 
provided, however, that this rule shall not prevent the 
reconsideration of a vote on a subsidiary, incidental or 
dependent question at any time when the main question 
to which it relates is under consideration ; and ji^ovided, 
further, that a motion to reconsider a vote on any sub- 
sidiary, incidental or deiDendent question shall not re- 
move the main subject under consideration from before 
the House, but shall be considered at the time when it 
is made. (53.) 

[Amended June 13, 1890; Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 7, 1902.] 

71. When a motion for reconsideration is decided, 
that decision shall not be reconsidered, and no question 
shall be twice reconsidered ; nor shall any vote be re- 
considered upon either of the following motions : — 

to adjourn, 

to lay on the table, 

to take from the table ; or, 

for the previous question. (53.) 

72. Debate on motions to reconsider shall be limited 
to thirty minutes, and no member shall occupy more 
than five minutes ; but on a motion to reconsider a vote 



House of Representatives, hbl 

upon any subsidiary or incidental question, debate shall 
be limited to ten minutes, and no member shall occupy 
more than three minutes. 

[Amended Feb. 5, 1886; June 13, 1890.] 

[For rule requiring the Clerk to retain papers, except, etc., until 
the right of reconsideration has expired, see Rule 15.] 

Rules of Debate. 

73. Ever}^ member, when about to speak, shall rise 
and respectfully address the Speaker ; shall confine him- 
self to the question under debate, and avoid person- 
alities ; and shall sit down when he has finished. No 
member shall speak out of his place without leave of 
the Speaker. (39.) 

74. When two or more members rise at the same 
time the Speaker shall name the member entitled to the 
floor, preferring one who rises in his place to one who 
does not. (40.) 

75. No member shall interrupt another while speak- 
ing, except by rising to call to order. (-^2.) 

76. Xo member shall speak more than once to the 
prevention of those who Iiave not spoken and desire to 
speak on the same question. (41.) 

Motions, 

77. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker so directs. (44.) 

78. A motion need not be seconded, and may be 
withdrawn by the mover if no objection is made. (44.) 

Limit of Debate, 

79. A motion to adjourn shall be always first in 
order, and shall be decided without debate ; and on the 



558 Rules of the 

motions to lay on the table, to take from the table, for 
the previous question, to close debate at a specified time, 
to postpone to a time certain, to commit or recommit, 
not exceeding ten minutes shall be allowed for debate, 
and no member shall speak more than three minutes. 
(62.) 

[Amended Feb. 19, 1878; Jan. 26, 1880; Feb. 2, 1891; March 14, 
1899.] 

[For application to be excused from voting, to be decided without 
debate, see Rule 64.] 

[For call for yeas and nays, to be decided without debate, see 
Rule 69.] 

[For questions of order, arising after the previous question is 
moved, to be decided without debate, except on appeal, see Rule 83.J 

80. When a question is before the House, imtil it is 
disposed of, the Speaker shall receive no motion that 
does not relate to the same, except the motion to ad- 
journ, or some other motion that has precedence either 
by express rule of the House, or because it is privileged 
in its nature ; and he shall receive no motion relating to 
the same, except, — 

to lay on the table. See Rule 79. 

for the j^revious question. See Rules 79, 81-86. 

to close the debate at a specified time. See Rules 79, 85, 86. 

to postpone to a time certain. See Rules 79 and 87. 

to commit (or recommit) , See Rules 79 and 88. 

to amend, See Rules 89-92. 

to refer to the next General Court, 
which several motions shall have precedence in the 
order in which they are arranged in this rule. (46.) 

[Amended Jan. 14, 1892.] 

Previous Question. 

81. The previous question shall be put in the fol- 
lowing form: " Shall the main question be noiu puf^ " 
— and all debate upon the main question shall be sus- 
pended until the previous question is decided. 



House of Representatives, 559 

82, On the i^revious question debate shall be 
allowed only to give reasons why the main question 
should not be put. 

[Amended March 14, 1899.] 

83, All questions of order arising after a motion is 
made for the previous question shall be decided with- 
out debate, excepting on appeal ; and on such appeal, no 
member shall speak more than once without leave of 
the House. 

[See Rule 94.] 

84, The adoption of the previous question shall put 
an end to all debate excejDt as provided in rule eighty- 
six, and bring the House to a direct vote upon pending 
amendments, if any, in their regular order, and then 
upon the main question. 

[Amended Jan. 14, 1892; Jan. 13, 1893.] 

Motion to close Debate at a Specified Time. 

85, Debate may be closed at any time not less than 
thirty minutes from the adoption of a motion to that 
effect. In case the time is extended by unanimous con- 
sent, the same rule shall apply at the end of the extended 
time as at the time originally fixed. (47.) 

[Amended Jan. 8, 1877; Jan. 15, 1880; March 14, 1899.] 
[See the next rule.] 

When Debate is closed. Ten Minutes allowed, etc. 
88, When debate is closed by ordering the pre- 
vious question, or by a vote to close debate at a specified 
time, the member in charge of the measure under con- 
sideration shall be allowed to speak ten minutes, and 
may grant to any other member any portion of his 
time. When the measure under consideration has been 
referred to the committee on Ways and Means, under 



560 Bides of the 

House rule forty-four, the member originally reporting 
it shall be considered in charge, except where the report 
of the committee on \Yays and Means is substantially 
different from that referred to them, in which case the 
member originally reporting the measure, and the mem- 
ber of the committee on Ways and Means reporting 
thereon, shall each be allowed to speak five minutes, the 
latter to have the close. Wlien the member entitled to 
speak under this rule is absent, the member standing 
first in order upon the committee reporting the measure, 
who is present and joined in the report, shall have the 
right to occupy such time. 

[Amended March 28, 1877; Feb. 11, 1890; Jan. 13, 1893; Jan. 2, 
1896.] 

Motion to Postpone to a Time Certain. 

87. When a motion is made to postpone to a time 
certain, and different times are proposed, the question 
shall first be taken on the most remote time ; and the 
time shall be determined before the question is put on 
postponement, which may then be rejected if the House 
see fiit. (51.) 

Motion to Commit. 

88. When a motion is made to commit, and different 
committees are proposed, the question shall be taken in 
the following order : — 

a standing committee of the House, 

a select committee of the House, 

a joint standing committee, 

a joint select committee ; 
and a subject may be recommitted to the same commit- 
tee or to another committee at the pleasure of the 
House. (48.) 



House of Representatives. 561 



Motions to Amend. 

89. A motion to amend an amendment may be re- 
ceived ; but no amendment in the tliird degree shall be 
allowed. 

90. No motion or ^proposition on a subject different 
from that under consideration shall be admitted under 
color of amendment. (50.) 

91. A question containing two or more propositions 
capable of division shall be divided whenever desired by 
any member. When a motion to strike out and insert 
is thus divided, the failure of the motion to strike out 
shall not preclude amendment ; or, if the motion to strike 
out prevails, the matter proposed to be inserted shall 
be open to amendment before the question is taken on 
inserting it. (-15.) 

92. In filling blanks, the largest sum and longest 
time shall be put first. (51.) 

Enacting Clause. 

93. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a 
bill shall only be received when the bill is before the 
House for enactment. 

[Amended June 13, 1890.] 

Appeal. 

94. No ajDpeal from the decision of the Speaker shall 
be entertained unless it is seconded ; and no other busi- 
ness shall be in order until the question on the appeal 
has been disposed of. 

[See Rule 83.] 

Resolves. 

95. Such of these rules as are applicable to bills, 
whether of the House or of the Senate, shall apply like- 



562 Rules of the 

wise to such resolves as require the concurrence of the 
Senate and approval by the Governor, in order to be- 
come laws and have force as such ; except in rule fifty- 
four the word '* bill " shall be equivalent to the word 
" resolve "" in the same place. 
[Amended Jan. 13, 1893.] 

Elections by Ballot. 

96. A time shall be assigned for elections by ballot, 
at least one day previous thereto, exce^jt in the cases 
provided for in rule eight. (58.) 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891.] 

Secret Session. 

97. All jDroceedings in secret session, and matters 
relating thereto, shall be kept secret until the House 
removes the injunction of secrecy. 

Seats. 

98. (1.) The desk on the right of the Speaker 
shall be assigned to the use of the Clerk and such i^er- 
sons as he may employ to assist him, and that on the 
left to the use of the chairmen of the committees on 
Bills in the Third Reading and on Engrossed Bills. 

(2.) The senior member of the House, and the oldest 
member of the House who is not the senior member, shall 
be allowed to select their seats from those not otherwise 
assigned, before the drawing of seats by the members. 

[Amended Jan. 7, 1878.] 

(3.) The seat numbered 30, in the first division, 
shall be assigned to the use of the chairman of the com- 
mittee on the Judiciary ; that numbered 6, in the third 
division, to the use of the member first named by the 
Speaker on the committee on Rules ; and that numbered 
13, in the fourth division, to the use of the chairman of 
the committee on Ways and Means. 

[Amended Jan. 7, 1878; Jan. 6, 1882; Jan. 7, 1895; Jan. 2, 1896; Jan. 
11, 1897; Jan. 10, 1898; Jan. 4, 1907.] 



House of Hepresenlatives, 563 

(4.) The following seats shall be assigned to the 
use of the monitors : — 

Those numbered 8(5 and 78, in the first division ; 

77 and 72, in the second division; 
71 and 6G, in the third division; 
65 and 57, in the fourth division. 
[Amended Jan. 6, 1882; Jan. 7, 1895.J 

(5.) The first business in order, after the appoint- 
ment of standing committees and monitors is announced 
by the Speaker, shall be the drawing of the other seats 
upon the floor of the House. 

(6.) The Clerk shall call the roll of the members in 
alphabetical order, omitting the names of the Speaker, 
the senior member, the oldest member, the chairmen of 
committees hereinbefore mentioned, and the monitors ; 
and the drawing shall be had in presence of the House, 
under the supervision of a committee of three selected 
from the members mentioned in this paragraph. 

(7.) The seat assigned to any member, or drawn by 
him, shall be his seat for the year, unless an exchange 
is made and notice thereof gis'en to the Sergeant-at- 
Arms within five days from the day of the drawing. 

Privilege of the Floor. 

99. The following persons shall be entitled to ad- 
mission to the floor of the House, during the session 
thereof, to occupy seats not numbered : — 

(1.) The Governor and Lieutenant-Governor, mem- 
bers of the Executive Council, Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth, Treasurer and Receiver-General, Auditor, 
Attorney-General, Librarian and Assistant Librarian. 

(2.) The members of the Senate. 

(3.) Persons in the exercise of an ofiicial duty 
directly connected with the business of the House. 

(4.) The legislative reporters assigned to seats in 
the reporters' gallery. (59.) 



564 Mules of the 

(5.) Contestants for seats in the House, whose papers 
are in the hands of the committee on Elections, may be 
admitted, while their cases are pending, to seats to be 
assigned by the Speaker. 

Ko other jjerson shall be admitted to the floor during 
the session except upon the permission of the Speaker. 
(60.) (61.) 
[Adopted Jan. 10, 1890; amended Jan. 25, 1894; March 14, 1899.] 

Rp:pkesentatives' Chamber and Adjoining Rooms. 

100. Use of the Representatives' Chamber shall not 
be granted except by a vote of four-fifths of the mem- 
bers present and voting thereon. 

!No person shall be admitted to the members' corri- 
dor and adjoining rooms, except persons entitled to the 
privilege of the floor of the House, unless upon written 
invitation, bearing the name of the person it is desired 
to invite and the name of the member extending the in- 
vitation, which invitation shall be surrendered upon the 
person entering the corridor. No legislative agent or 
counsel shall be admitted to said corridor and adjoining 
rooms. 

No smoking shall be allowed in the writing room of 
the House or in the ladies' parlor. 

No person shall be admitted to the north gallery of 
the House except upon a card of a member; and no 
person shall be so admitted except ladies, or gentlemen 
accompanied by ladies. 

Subject to the approval and direction of the commit- 
tee on Rules during the session and of the Speaker 
after prorogation, the use of the reporters' gallery of 
the House Chamber shall be under the control of the 
organization of legislative reporters known as the Mas- 
sachusetts State House Press Association. (59.) 

[Amended Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 5, 1895; Feb. 6, 1900; Jan. 26, 1911.] 



House of Representatives, 565 



Parliamentary Practice. 

101. The rules of parliamentary practice shall gov- 
ern the House in all cases to which they are applicable, 
and in which they are not inconsistent with these rules 
or tlie joint rules of the two branches. (62.) 

Debate on Motions for the Suspension of Rules. 

102. Debate upon a motion for the suspension of any 
of the joint rules or House rules shall be limited to fif- 
teen minutes, and no member shall occupy more than 
three minutes. 

[Amended Feb. 11, 1889; June 13, 1890; Feb. 2, 1891.] 

Suspension, Amendment and Repeal. 

103. Xothing in these rules shall be dispensed with, 
altered or repealed, unless two-thirds of the members 
present consent thereto ; but this rule, and rules forty- 
one, forty-nine, fifty, sixty-two, seventy, ninety-nine and 
one hundred, shall not be suspended, unless by unani- 
mous consent of the members j^resent. (63.) 

[Amended Jan. 10, 1890; June 13, 1890; Feb, 2, 1891; Jan. 13, 1893.] 

104. All motions to suspend the ninth or twelfth joint 
rule, or House rule thirty-two, all questions on concurring 
with the Senate in the suspension of eitlier of said joint 
rules, all motions or orders authorizing committees of 
the House to travel or to employ stenograj)hers, and all 
propositions involving special investigations by com- 
mittees of the House, shall be referred without debate 
to the committee on Rules, who, within fourteen days 
after such reference, shall report thereon, recommend- 
ing what action should be taken. On all questions on 
the suspension of the ninth joint rule, or House rule 
thirty-two, the committee shall report adversely, unless 



566 Eules of the House. 

evidence satisfactory to the committee is produced that 
the petitioners have previously given notice, by public 
advertisement or otherwise, equivalent to that required 
by chapter 3 of the Revised Laws. (13a.) 

[Adopted Jan. 10, 189S; amended March 14, 1899; Jan. 22, 1904; Feb. 
21, 1905.] 

Quorum. 

105. One himdred and twenty-one members shall 
constitute a quorum for the organization of the House 
and the transaction of business. 

[Adopted Feb. 8, 1892.] 



INDEX TO THE RULES OP THE HOUSE 
OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



[Tlie figures refer to the numbers of the Rules.] 
Adjourn, motion to, 79, SO. 
Admission to the floor, 99. 

AMENDMENT : 

to be reported by committee on Bills in the Third Reading, 26. 
from Senate, sent back for concurrence, 46. 
bill may be moved as, 47. 
private bill not to be moved as, 31. 
engrossed bill not to be amended, 53. 
making substantial change, 62. 
motions to amend, 80, 89 to 02. 
when previous question is ordered, 84. 
amendment to amendment, etc., 89. 
not to be admitted of a different subject, 90. 
when question is divided, 91. 
in filling blanks, largest sum, etc., 92. 
striking out enacting clause, 93. 
of rules, 103. 
Appeals from the decision of the Speaker, 2, 83, 94. 

Ballot, elections by, 22, 96. 

BILLS: 

1. Preliminary. 

to be deposited with Clerk and examined by Speaker, 28. 

accompanying petitions to be j)rinted, 28. 

how to be written, 42. 

motions contemplating legislation, etc., to be founded upon 

petition or upon bill or resolve (on leave), 40. 
how to be introduced, 47. 
post]3onement of consideration of reqiiest to introduce on 

leave, at request of member, 41. 
to be read by their titles only, unless, etc., 48. 

567 



568 Index to the Rules of the 

BILLS — Continued. 

1. Preliminanj — Concluded. 

for special legislation, not to be reported if ol)ject is attain- 
able by general or existing laws, 30. 
specially affecting rights of individuals or corporations, not 
to be reported except on petition, etc., 31. 

" applications " after the second Saturday of the session. 

See Joint Rides 12 and 14. 
again -when once rejected. 49. 

2. As reported by committees. 

appropriation bills to contain certain items only, 25, 40. 
restriction or regulation of reports, 30, 32, 49. 
reports to be made before the second Wednesday in March, 33. 
when to be presented to the House, 36. 

3. Before the second reading. 

if opposed, question on rejection; otherwise, second read- 
ing, 43. 

involving expenditures of public money, referred to commit- 
tee on Ways and Means, 44. 

involving expenditures of county money, referred to com- 
mittee on Counties on the part of the House, 44. 

from the Senate, 38, 56. 

referred to committee, etc., 45. 

case of Senate amendments to House bill, 46. 

4. Before the third reading. 

referred to committee, 50. 
duties of committee, 26. 
placed in Orders of the Day, 58. 

5. After the third reading. 

not to be engrossed unless read on three several days, 51, 

6. After engrossment. 

referred to committee, 52. 

duties of committee, 27. 

not to be amended, 53. 

passage to be enacted, 54. 

notice to be given ; sent to the Senate, 55. 

7. Provisions applicabie at several stages. 

arrangement of matters in Orders of the Day, 13, 60. 
consideration of matters in Orders of the Day, .59. 



House of Representatives. 569 

BTL'LS— Concluded. 
7. Provisions applicable at several stages — Concluded. 

matters not to be discharged from Orders of the Day, 61. 
amendment changing nature of a bill, 62. 
Clerk to retain bills and other papers, except, etc., 15. 
bills and papers in possession of members, IS. 
motion to strike out enacting clause, when received, 93. 
provisions respecting bills also applicable to resolves, 95. 

Calendar, 13, 14, 60. 

Clerk. 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 28, 98. 

Commit, motion to, 79, 80, 88. 

COMMITTEES: 

standing, to be appointed, 20. 

to be appointed by Speaker, unless, etc., 21. 

case of election by ballot, 22. 

no member required to be on more than two, etc., 23. 

no member to serve where his private right, etc., 24. 

duty of committee on Ways and Means, 25, 40, 44. 

on Counties, 44. 

on Bills in the Third Reading, 26. 

on Engrossed Bills, 27. 
to report adversely in certain cases, 30, 32. 
notice to be given in certain cases, 32. 

to make report on or before second Wednesday in March, 33. 
propositions for, to travel referred to committee on Rules, 104. 

DEBATE, RULES OF, 73 to 93. 

Speaker may speak to points of order, etc., 2. 

matters to be disposed of without debate, 59, 64, 69, 83. 

motions to be decided without debate, 79. 

debate on motions to reconsider, 72. 

debate on motions to lay on table, for the previous question, to 
commit or recommit, 79. 

debate on motions to postpone to a time certain, 79. 

motion to close debate, 79, 80, 85, 86. 

debate on motions for suspension of rules, 102. See Previous 
Question. 
Doubt: when a vote is doubted, 66, 67, 69. 

Elections by ballot, 22, 96. 

Enacting clause, when motion to strike out, received, 53, 93. 
Engrossed Bills, committee on, 27, 52. See Bills. 
Excuse from voting, time for application for, 64. 



570 Index to the Rules of the 



Investigations, propositions involving special, by committees to be 
referred to tlie committee on Rules, 104. 

Journal of the House, 6, 11, 12. 

MEMBERS: 

not to stand up, etc., 16. 

not to stand at Clerk's desk during roll-call, 16. 

not to be absent, etc., 17. 

to leave papers with the Clerk, 18, 28. 

number of, upon each standing committee, 20. 

first named to be chairman of committee, etc., 21. 

having highest number to be chairman, etc., 22. 

no member required to be on more than two committees, etc., 23. 

no member to serve on committee where his private right, etc., 24. 

member presenting petition, etc., to indorse his name, etc., 37. 

no member to vote where his private right, etc., 63. 

desiring to be excused from voting, etc., 64. 

member about to speak, to rise and address the Speaker, etc., 73. 

no member to interrupt another, etc., 75. 

no member to speak more than once, etc., 76. 

seats of, 98. 

privilege of the floor, 99. See Voting. 
Messages from the Governor to be referred, etc., 40. 
Monitors, 9, 10, 66. 
Motions, 77 to 93. 

Notice to parties, 31, 32. 

Order. See Questions of Order. 

ORDERS : 

postponement of consideration of, at request of member, 41. 

once rejected, not to be renewed, 49. 

of inquiry, 15. 

of notice, 15. 

of the Day, 13, 14, 56 to 62. 

Pairs, recording of, 68. 

PETITIONS, 15, 28, 29, 32, 36, 37. 

once rejected, 49. 
Postpone to a time certain, motion for, 79, 80, 87. 
Postponement of consideration of orders, etc., at request of mem- 
ber, 41. 
Previous question, 79 to 84, 86. 
Privilege of the floor, 99. 



House of Representatives, 571 



Questions of order, 2, 12, 75, 83. 
Quorum, 1, 67, 68, 105. 

Reading of papers, 5, 37, 39, 48. 

Recommit, motion to, 79, 80, 88. 

Reconsideration, 15, 70, 71, 72. 

Reporters' gallery, control of, 100. 

Report of State officers, to be referred, etc., 28, 40. 

Reports of committees, 33, 36, 56, 67. See Bills. 

Representatives' Chamber and adjoining rooms, 100. 

Resolutions, 28, 50, 56. 

Resolves, 95. See Bills. 

Rules, 9, 10, 19, 103, 104. 



Secret session, 97. 

SENATE : 

papers from, 38, 45, 46, 47, 50, 56, 57. 
engrossed bills sent to, 55. 

SPEAKER, 1 to 6. 

may appoint a member to perform the duties of the chair, 7. 

absence of, 8. 

to appoint monitors, 9. 

may direct as regards matters in calendar, 13. 

to appoint committees, 21. 

chairman of committee of the whole, 34. 

to examine bills, etc., 28. 

to call for petitions, etc., 36. 

to lay before the House papers from the Senate, 38. 

may present papers not petitions, etc., 39. 

to give notice of engrossed bill sent to Senate, 55. 

to name member entitled to floor, 74. 

may direct motion to be reduced to writing, 77. 

may invite visitors to seats on the floor, 99. See Rules of Debate ; 
Voting. 
Stenographers, employment of, by committees, 104. 
Strike out and insert, motion to, 91. 
enacting clause, 53, 93. 

SUSPENSION OF RULES, 41, 103. 
limit of debate on motions for, 102. 

motions to suspend certain rules to be referred to the committee 
on Rules, 104. 



572 Index to Rules of House of Representatives. 

TABLE: 

papers on, 13. 

lay on, motions tx>, 79, 80. 

take from, motions to, 79. 
Third Reading, Bills in the, committee on, 26, 50, 58. See Bills. 
Travel, orders authorizing committees to, referred to committee on 
Rules, 104. 

Undebatable matters and motions. See Debate. 
Unfinished business, 60. 

Voting, 3, 4, 63 to 69. 

Ways and Means, committee on, 20, 25, 40, 44, 86. 

Yeas and nays, 68, 69. 



JOINT RULES OF THE TWO BRANCHES. 



JOINT RULES OP THE SENATE AND 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 



Committees, 

1. Joint standing committees shall be appointed at 
the beginning of the political year as follows : — 

A committee on Agriculture ; 

A committee on Banks and Banking ; 

A committee on Constitutional Amendments ; 

A committee on Counties ; 

A committee on Drainage ; 

A committee on Education ; 

A committee on Election Laws ; 

A committee on Federal Relations ; 

A committee on Fisheries and Game; 

A committee on Harbors and Public Lands ; 

A committee on Labor ; 

A committee on the Liquor Law ; 

A committee on Military Affairs ; 

A committee on Prisons ; 

A committee on Public Charitable Institutions ; 

A committee on Public Health ; 

A committee on Public Service ; 

A committee on Roads and Bridges ; 

A committee on State House and Libraries ; 

A committee on Towns ; 

A committee on Water Supply ; 

Each to consist of three members on the part of the 
Senate, and eight on the part of the House ; 

575 



576 Joint Rules, 

A committee on Cities ; 

A committee on Insurance ; 

A committee on Legal Affairs ; 

A committee on Mercantile Affairs ; 

A committee on Metropolitan Affairs ; 

A committee on Public Lighting ; 

A committee on Railroads ; 

A committee on Street Eaihvays ; 

A committee on Taxation ; 

Each to consist of four members on the part of the 
Senate, and eleven on the part of the House. 

Matters referred by either the Senate or the House to 
its committee on the Judiciary, on Ways and Means, or 
on Rules shall be considered by the resjDective commit- 
tees of the two branches, acting as joint committees, 
when, in the judgment of the chairmen of the respective 
committees of the two branches, the interests of legisla- 
tion or the expedition of business will be better served 
by such joint consideration. Matters may also be re- 
ferred respectively to the committees on the Judiciary, 
on Ways and Means, and on Rules, of the two branches, 
as joint committees. 

The committees on Rules, together with the presiding 
officers of the two branches, acting as a joint committee, 
may consider and suggest such measures as shall, in 
their judgment, tend to facilitate the business of the ses- 
sion. [Amended Jan. 6, 1882; Jan. 5, 1883; Jan. 7, 
1884 ; Jan. 8, 1885 ; Jan. 26, 1885 ; Jan. 8, 1886 ; Jan. 
12, 1887; Jan. 9, 1888; Jan. 28, 1889; Jan. 8, 1890; 
Feb. 2, 1891; Jan. 11, 1892; Feb. 10, 1892; Feb. 7, 
1893; Jan. 8, 1894; Jan. 7, 1895; Jan. 7, 1896; Jan. 
11, 1897; Jan. 10, 1898; Jan. 9, 1899; Jan. 22 and 
Jan. 29, 1901; Jan. 6, 1902; Jan. 9, 1903; Jan. 8, 
1904; Jan. 6, 1905; Jan. 4, 1907; Jan. 5, 1910; and 
Jan. 4, 1911.] 



Joint Rules. 577 

2. No member of either branch shall act as counsel 
for any party before any committee of the Legislature. 

3. No committee of the Senate or the House shall 
travel unless authorized by a vote of two-thirds of the 
members of its branch present and voting. No joint 
committee shall travel unless authorized by a concur- 
rent vote of tvvo-thirds of the members of each branch 
l^resent and voting. No committee shall travel except 
at the expense of the Commonwealth. In any case 
when a committee is authorized to travel, the Sergeant- 
at-Arms shall provide transportation only for members 
of the committee and the otficer accompanpng tliem, and 
the reasonable travelling exj^enses of such members and 
officers only shall be charged to or paid by the Com- 
monwealth. Neither the Sergeant-at-Arms nor the offi- 
cer detailed by him shall permit any person to accompany 
such committee while in the discharge of its olficial duties 
unless invited by vote of the committee. 

All bills for the travelling expenses of committees 
shall, in such form and detail as may be prescribed by 
the Auditor of the Commonwealth, be submitted by the 
Sergeant-at-Arms to the committee by whom they have 
been incurred ; and such bills, before they are presented 
to the Auditor of the Commonwealth, shall first be ap- 
jDroved by a majority of the committee incurring them. 
The Sergeant-at-Arms shall procure from the Auditor 
and shall, on the first Monday in each month, transmit 
to the General Court in print a statement of all such bills 
which have been presented to the Auditor during the 
preceding month. [Adopted Feb. 7, 1890. Amended 
Feb. 2, 1891, and Jan. 20, 1904.] 

4. Joint committees may report by bill, resolve, or 
otherwise, to either branch, at their discretion, having 



578 Joint Rules, 

reference to an equal distribution of business between 
the two branches, except that money bills shall be re- 
ported to the House ; and except that when a report is 
made from any committee to either branch, and the sub- 
ject-matter thereof is subsequently referred therein to a 
joint committee, such committee shall report its action 
to the branch in which the original report was made. 
[See also next rule.] 

5. Reports of joint committees may be recommitted 
to the same committees at the pleasure of the branch 
first acting- thereon, and bills or resolves may be recom- 
mitted in either branch, but no such recommittal shall 
be made after the fourth Wednesday in March. A 
concurrent vote shall, however, be necessary for the 
recommitment of such reports, bills, or resolves, with 
instructions. After recommitment, report shall, in all 
cases, be made to the branch originating the recommit- 
ment. [Amended Feb. 2, 1891.] 

6. Bills and resolves reported by joint committees 
shall be printed or fairly written in a legible hand, with- 
out material erasure or interlineation, and on not less 
than one sheet of jDaper, with suitable margins, and with 
spaces between the several sections. Dates and num- 
bers shall be printed or written in words at length. 
[Amended Jan. 28, 1889.] 

7. Whenever, upon any application for an act of in- 
corporation or other legislation, the purpose for which 
such legislation is sought can be secured without detri- 
ment to the public interests by a general law or under 
existing laws, the committee to which the matter is 
referred shall report such general law, or " leave to 
withdraw," or *♦ ought not to pass." [Amended Feb. 2, 
1891, and Feb. 7, 1893.] 



Joint Rules, 579 



Notice to Parties Interested. 

8. Xo legislation affecting the rights of individuals 
or the rights of a private or municipal corporation, 
otherwise than as it affects generally the people of the 
whole Commonwealth or the people of the city or town 
to which it specifically applies, shall be proposed or in- 
troduced except by a petition, nor shall any bill or resolve 
embodying such legislation be reported by a committee 
except upon a petition duly referred, nor shall such a 
bill or resolve be reported by a committee, whether on 
an original reference or on a recommittal with instruc- 
tions to hear the parties, until it -is made to appear to 
the satisfaction of the committee that proper notice of 
the proposed legislation has been given by public ad- 
vertisement or otherwise to all parties interested, with- 
out expense to the Commonwealth, or until evidence 
satisfactory to the committee is produced that all parties 
interested have in writing waived notice. A committee 
reporting leave to withdraw or reference to the next 
General Court for want of proper notice or of a waiver 
thereof shall set forth this fact in its report, and no bill 
or resolve shall be in order as a substitute for, or amend- 
ment of, such report. Objection to the violation of this 
rule may be taken at any stage prior to that of the third 
reading. [Adopted Feb. 7, 1890.] 

9. A petition for the incorporation of a town or city, 
or for the division of an existing town or city, or for the 
incorporation of a railroad, street railway, elevated rail- 
road or canal company, or for the amendment, altera- 
tion or extension of the charter or corporate powers or 
privileges of any such company, either specially incor- 
porated or organized under general laws, or for author- 
ity to take water for a water supply, or relative to 



580 Joint Rules. 

building structures over navigable or tide waters, shall 
be referred to the next General Court, and not to a com- 
mittee, unless the petitioner has given the notice required 
by chapter 3 of the Kevised Laws, or by other provisions 
of law. A petition for the incorporation of a college or 
university or other educational institution, with power 
to grant degrees, or for an amendment of the charter of 
an existing educational institution so that the said in- 
stitution, not having such power, shall thereafter have 
power to grant degrees, shall also be referred to the 
next General Court, and not to a committee, unless the 
petitioner has given the notice required by chapter 3 of 
the Revised Laws. But if, no objection being raised, 
any such petition is referred to a committee without such 
required notice, the committee shall forthwith report ref- 
erence to the next General Court, setting forth as the 
reason for such report failure to give the required notice, 
unless evidence satisfactory to the committee is produced 
that all parties interested have in writing waived notice. 
In case a bill or resolve is rej^orted by a committee upon 
such a petition, after proof of such waiver of notice, this 
fact shall be set forth in the report of the committee. 
When a report of reference to the next General Court is 
made by a "committee on account of failure to give the 
required notice, no bill or resolve shall be substituted 
for such report, nor shall such report be recommitted 
or referred to another committee ; but reference of the 
petition to the next General Court for want of proper 
notice under this rule shall not affect action upon 
any other measure involving the same subject-matter. 
[Adopted Feb. 7, 1890. Amended Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 
3, 1BD8; and Jan. 16, 1903.] 



Joint Rules, 581 



Limit of Time allowed for Beports of Committees. 

10. Joint committees shall make final report upon 
all matters previously referred to them, on or before the 
second Wednesday in March ; but, except as jyrovided 
in Rule Xo. 29, the time within which they are required 
to report upon such matters may be extended, by con- 
current vote, until a day not later than the second 
Wednesday in April. When the time within which 
such joint committees are required to report has ex- 
pired, all matters upon which no report has then been 
made shall, within three legislative days thereafter, be 
reported by the chairman of the committee on the part 
of the branch in which they were respectively intro- 
duced, with a recommendation of reference to the next 
General Court under this rule. This rule shall not be 
rescmded, amended or suspended, except by a concur- 
rent vote of four-fifths of the members of each branch 
present and voting thereon. [Amended Feb. 2, 1891 ; 
Jan. 25, 1894; Jan. 16, 1903; and Jan. 20, 1904.] 

Committees of Conference. 

11. Committees of conference shall consist of three 
members on the part of each branch, representing its 
vote ; and their report, if agreed to by a majority of 
each committee, shall be made to the branch asking the 
conference, and may be either accepted or rejected, but 
no other action shall be had, except through a new com- 
mittee of conference. 

Limit of Tiyne allowed for Neiu Business. 

12. Resolutions, and petitions, memorials, bills and 
resolves introduced on leave, and all otlier subjects of 
legislation, except reports required to be made to the 
Legislature, deposited with the Clerk of either branch 



582 Joint Rules. 

subsequently to five o'clock in the afternoon on the sec- 
ond Saturday of the session, shall, when presented, be 
referred to the next General Court ; but this rule shall 
not ajiply to petitions in aid of, and remonstrances 
against, legislation already introduced and pending; 
nor shall it apply to a petition offered in place of a 
former one having in view the same object, upon which, 
before reference to a committee, leave to Avithdraw was 
given because the same was not in proper form, pro- 
vided that such subsequent petition is dejDOsited with the 
Clerk of either branch within one week from the day on 
which leave to withdraAV was given ; nor shall it apply 
to a bill or resolve introduced on leave or to a resolution 
presented subsequently to five o'clock in the afternoon 
on the second Saturday of the session, wiien such bill, 
resolve or resolution is based upon the report of a joint 
committee which has been made in compliance with in- 
structions to report facts or to investigate, provided the 
said bill, resolve or resolution is introduced within one 
week after the committee's report is submitted. This 
rule shall not be rescinded, amended or suspended, ex- 
cept by a concurrent vote of four-fifths of the members 
of each branch present and voting thereon : 2^^ovicled, 
however, that, except by unanimous consent, it shall not 
be suspended with reference to a j^etition for legislation 
when such petition is not accompanied by a bill or a re- 
solve embodying the legislation requested. [Amended 
Feb. 7, 1890; Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 7, 1893; Jan. 10, 
1898; Jan. 9, 1899; Feb. 15, 1901; May 4, 1904; and 
Jan. 31, 1910.] 

Requests for Legislation to he deposited with the Clerks. 
13. Petitions and memorials, accompanied by bills 
or resolves embodying the subject-matter praj^ed for, 
bills and resolves for introduction on leave, and all 
other sul)jects of legislation, and all resolutions and 



Joint Rules. 5fiS 

orders of inquiry, intended for presentation to the Gen- 
eral Court by any member, shall be deposited with the 
Clerk of the branch to which such member belongs, and 
shall be laid before such branch not later than at the 
session of the fourth legislative day succeeding the day 
on which the same have been so deposited. [Adopted 
Feb. 7, 1890. Amended Feb. 2, 1891; Feb. 7, 1893; 
and Jan. 25, 1894.] 

14. The joint committee on Rules shall have author- 
ity to prescribe the manner and form of keeping the 
dockets of legislative counsel and agents which are re- 
quired by law. [Adopted Feb. 2, 1891.] 

Duties of the Clerks. 

15. If any part of the report of a committee over the 
signature of the chairman or members of the committee 
is amended in either branch, the Clerk of that branch 
shall endorse upon the report such amendment. 

16. All papers, while on their passage between the 
two branches, may be under the signature of tlie respec- 
tive Clerks, except bills and resolves in their last stage. 
Messages may be sent by such persons as each branch 
may direct. 

17. After bills have passed both branches to be en- 
grossed, they shall be in the charge of the Clerks of the 
two branches, who shall deliver the same to the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth, to be engrossed in the manner 
prescribed by law ; and when engrossed the said Clerks 
shall forthwith deliver the same to the committee of the 
House of Representatives on Engrossed Bills ; and when 
the same have passed to be enacted in that House, they 
shall, in like manner, be delivered to the committee of 
the Senate on Engrossed 1 Jills. 



584 Joint Rules, 

18. If any petition, memorial, bill, resolve or order, 
presented or originating in one branch, is adversely acted 
upon in the other, notice thereof shall be given, under 
the signature of the Clerk, to the branch in which the 
same originated. 

19. The Clerk of the branch in which a bill origi- 
nated shall make an endorsement thereon, certifying in 
which branch the same originated, which endorsement 
shall be entered on the journals by the Clerks respec- 
tively. [Amended Jan. 28, 1889.] 

Printing and Distribution of Documents. 

20. The joint committee on Rules may make regula- 
tions for the distribution of all documents printed or 
assigned for the use of the Legislature not otlierwise 
disposed of, and such regulations shall be reported to 
and be subject to the order of the two branches. 

Under the general order to print a report, bill or other 
document, the number printed shall be nine hundred. 

Leave to report in print shall not be construed to au- 
thorize the printing of extended reports of evidence. 

Bills, reports and other documents, printed under the 
general order of either branch, shall be distributed as 
follows, to wit: tvvo copies to each member of the 
Senate and House of Representatives ' (to be placed on 
his file under the direction of the Sergeant-at-Arms, if 
desired by the member) ; three copies to each Clerk in 
either branch, and three copies to each reporter in reg- 
ular attendance, to whom a seat has been assigned in 
either branch ; twenty copies to the Executive ; twenty 
copies to the Secretary's office ; six copies to the State 
Library ; one copy to each Public Library in the Com- 
monwealth, which shall make due application therefor 
to the Sergeant-at-Arms, and shall make proper provi- 



Joint Mules. 585 

sion for the transmission and preservation thereof ; and, 
when the document is the report of a committee, ten 
copies shall be assigned to tlie committee making the 
report. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall preserve as many 
as may be necessary for the permanent files to be 
placed in the lobbies, and distribute the remainder 
under such regulations as may be prescribed by said 
joint committee. [Amended Jan. 8, 1886 ; Jan. 28, 
1889; and Jan. 27, 1911.] 

21. Bills, resolves and other papers requiring the 
approval of the Governor shall be laid before him for 
his approbation by the Clerk of the Senate, Avho shall 
enter upon the journal of the Senate the day on which 
the same were so laid before the Governor. [Amended 
Jan. 28, 1889.] 

Constitutional Amendments. 

22. All resolves proposing amendments to the Con- 
stitution shall have three several readings in each 
branch, and the question upon agreeing to an amend- 
ment to the Constitution shall be taken by yeas and 
nays. [Amended Jan. 28, 1889.] 

Joint Conventions. 

23. The President of the Senate shall preside in 
Conventions of the two branches, and such Conventions 
shall be holden in the Representatives' Chamber; the 
Clerk of the Senate shall be Clerk of the Convention, 
and a record of the ^proceedings of the Convention shall 
be entered at large on the journals of both branches. 

24. When an agreement has been made by the two 
branches to go into Convention, such agreement shall 
not be altered or annulled, except by concurrent vote. 



586 Joint Eules. 

25. No business shall be entered on, in Convention, 
other than that which may be agreed on before the 
Convention is formed. 

Joi?ii Elections. 
28. In all elections by joint ballot a time shall be 
assigned therefor at least one day previous to such 
election. 

Elections of United States Senators. 
27. The joint assembly required to be held by the 
statutes of the United States, relating to the elections 
for Senators in Congress, shall be deemed a Conven- 
tion of the two branches, and the proceedings therein 
shall be in accordance with the provisions of said stat- 
utes. The President of the Convention shall receive 
no motion on any day until one vote for Senator has 
been taken. After one vote for Senator has been taken, 
no motion shall be in order except a motion to adjourn, 
for a recess, or to proceed to vote for Senator; and 
these motions shall have j)recedence in the order of 
their arrangement, and shall be decided without de- 
bate. If a motion is made for a recess, and different 
times are proposed, the question shall first be taken 
on the most remote time ; and the time shall be deter- 
mined, but without debate, before the question is put 
upon taking the recess. On either of the questions 
permitted by this rule, the sense of the Convention shall 
be taken by yeas and nays whenever required by one- 
fifth of the members present. When the yeas and nays 
are taken, the roll of the Convention shall be called in 
alphabetical order ; and no member shall be allowed 
to vote who was not on the floor when his name was 
called or before the roll-call was finished. The call for 
the yeas and nays shall be decided without debate. 



Joint Rules, 587 

28. All motions or orders authorizing joint commit- 
tees to travel or to employ stenographers and all 
propositions involving special investigations by joint 
committees shall be referred without debate to the joint 
committee on Rules, who, within fourteen days after 
such reference, shall report thereon, recommending 
what action should be taken. [Adopted Jan. 10, 1898. 
Amended Jan. 20, 1904.] 

29. All motions or orders extending the time within 
which joint committees are required to report shall be 
referred without debate to the joint committee on Rules, 
who shall report recommending what action should be 
taken thereon. No such extension beyond the second 
Wednesday in April shall be granted, against the rec- 
ommendation of the joint committee on Rules, except 
by a four-fifths vote of the members of each branch 
present and voting thereon. This rule shall not be re- 
scinded, amended or suspended, except by a concur- 
rent vote of four-fifths of the members of each branch 
present and voting thereon. [Adopted Jan. 16, 1903. 
Amended Feb. 6, 1912.] 

30. A member of either branch who directly or in- 
directly solicits for himself or others any position or 
office within the gift or control of a railroad corpora- 
tion, street railway company, gas or electric light com- 
pany, telegraph or telephone company, aqueduct or 
water company, or other public service corporation, 
shall be subject to suspension therefor, or to such other 
penalty as the branch of which he is a member may see 
fit to impose. [Adopted May 22, 1902.] 

31. Subject to the approval and direction of the joint 
committee on Rules during the session and of the Presi- 
dent of tlie Senate and the Speaker of the House after 



588 Joint Rules. 

prorogation, the use of the rooms and facilities assigned 
to reporters in the State House shall be under the con- 
trol of the organization of legislative reporters known 
as the Massachusetts State House Press Association. 
(100.) [Adopted Jan. 27, 1911.] 

32. Any joint rule except the tenth, twelfth and 
twenty-ninth may be altered, suspended or rescinded by 
a concurrent vote of two-thirds of the members of each 
branch present and voting thereon. [Amended Feb. 7, 
1893. Adopted in revised form Jan. 9, 1899. Amended 
Jan. 16, 1903.] 



INDEX TO THE JOINT RULES OP THE 
TWO BRANCHES. 



AMENDMENTS: 

rule as to new business, how amended, 12. 
of Constitution, how passed, 22. 
rules, how amended, 30. 

BILLS: 

report of, etc., may be made to either branch except, etc., 4. 

money, to be reported to the House, 4. 

recommitment without instructions may be made in either branch, 5. 

recommitment not to be made after fourth Wednesday in March, 5. 

recommitment with instructions to require concurrent vote, 5. 

how to be v.ritten, 6. 

for special legislation, not to be reported if object is attainable by 
general or existing laws, 7. 

specially affecting rights of individuals or corporations, not to be 
reported except on petition, etc., 8. 

on leave, deposited with Clerks subsequently to five o'clock p.m. 
on second Saturday of the session, to be referred to next Gen- 
eral Court, 12. 

shall not be referred under rule to next General Court when intro- 
duced on leave subsequently to five o'clock on second Satur- 
day of the session, if based on report of a joint committee made 
on an order to investigate, etc., 12. 

on leave, to be deposited with Clerks, 13. 

how printed, etc., 20. 

after passage to be engrossed, to be in charge of Clerks, etc., 17. 

notice of adverse action to be given to branch originating, 18. 

enacted, to be presented to Governor by Senate Clerk, 21. 

CLERKS: 

petitions, etc., intended for presentation, to be deposited with, 13. 
shall endorse amendments of reports of committees, 15. 
papers on passage between the two branches to be under signa- 
ture of, 16. 

589 



590 Index to the Joint Rules. 



CLERKS — Concluded. 

shall have charge of bills, etc., after passage to be engrossed, etc., 17. 

shall endorse where bill originated, 19. 

Senate Clerk shall lay enacted bills before Gk)vernor, 21. 

Senate Clerk shall be Clerk of joint Convention, 23. 

COMMITTEES: 

standing, to be appointed, 1. 

number of members of standing, 1. 

members of Legislature not to act as counsel before, 2. 

not to travel outside of the State except, etc., 3. 

travelling expenses of, 3. 

reports of. may be made to either branch, except, etc., 4. 

reports of money bills to be made to House, 4. 

report of committee referred to a committee to be reported to branch 
in which original report was made, 4. 
• reports of, without instructions may be recommitted by branch 
first acting thereon, 5. 

reix)rta of, with instructions require concurrent vote for recom- 
mitment, 5. 

report after recommitment must be made to branch originating 
recommitment, 5. 

reports not to be recommitted after fourth Wednesday in March, 5. 

special legislation to be reported against, if purixjse can be secured 
by general or existing law, 7. 

bills specially affecting individuals or corporations not to be re- 
ported without notice, etc., 8. 

to report reference to next General Court on petitions not adver- 
tised according to law, etc., 9. 

limit of time for reports, etc., 10. 

of conference, three in each branch, 11. 

of conference, report how made, 11. 

if report is amended in either branch, to be endorsed by Clerk, 15. 

joint committee on Rules to regulate distribution of documents, 20. 

orders authorizing, to travel and to employ stenographers and 
propositions involving special investigations to be referred to 
the joint committee on Rules, 28. 

motions and orders extending the time within which, may report, 
to be referred to joint committee on Rules, 29. 

CONSTITUTION; AMENDMENTS OF : 

how passed, 22. 

vote on agreeing to, to be taken by yeas and nays, 2-2. 



Index to the Joint Rules, 591 



CONVENTION OF BOTH BRANCHES: 

President of Senate shall preside, 23. 

shall be held in Representatives' Chamber, 23. 

Clerk of Senate to be Clerk and record to be made in journals of 

both branches, 23. 
agreement to go into Convention shall not be altered except by 

concurrent vote, 24. 
no business to be transacted except that before agreed upon, 25. 
for election of United States Senators, 27. 
Counsel, no member shall act as, before committees, 2. 

Debate, not in order in election of United States Senators, 27. 
Documents, distribution and number, 20. 

ELECTIONS: 

time to be assigned one day previous, 26. 

United States Senators, how elected, 27. 
Engrossed bills, under charge of Clerks, etc., 17. 
Evidence, printing of extended reports, 20. 

General law to be preferred to special legislation, 7. 

Investigations, propositions involving special, to be referred to the 
joint committee on Rules, 28. 

Legislation affecting rights of individuals or corporations must be intro- 
duced by petition, 8. 

LIMIT OF TIME: 
for reports, 10. 
for introduction of new business, 12. 

MEMBERS: 

not to act as counsel before committees, 2. 

not to solicit employment for themselves or others, 30. 

MEMORIALS CONTEMPLATING LEGISLATION: 

deposited with Clerks subsequently to five o'clock p.m. on second 
Saturday of the session to be referred to next General Court, 12. 
to be deposited with Clerks, 13. 

Messages between the two branches, how sent, 16. 

Motions, what allowed in case of election of United States Senators, 27. 



592 Index to the Joint Rules. 



NOTICE: 

of adverse action to be given to branch originating bill, etc., 18. 

of legislation specially affecting the rights of individuals and cor- 
porations to be given, 8. 
New business, limit of time allowed for, 12. 

Orders of inquiry to be deposited with Clerks, 13. 

PAPERS: 

to be under Clerks' signatures on passage between the two 

branches, 16. 
other than bills, requiring the signature of the Governor, to be laid 

before him like bills, 21. 

PETITIONS: 

not advertised as required by law to be referred to next General 

Court, etc., 9. 
deposited with Clerks subsequently to five o'clock p.m. on second 
Saturday of the session to be referred to next General Court, 12. 
to be deposited with Clerks, 13. 

notice of adverse action to be given to branch originating, 18. 
Printing, how ordered, provided, etc., 20. 

Recommitment of reports, bills and resolves, 5. 

Reporters, use of rooms and facilities assigned to, to be under control 

of the Massachusetts State House Press Association, subject, 

however, etc., 31. 
Reports required to be made to Legislature not limited in time, 12. 
See also Committees. 

RESOLUTIONS: 

certain, deposited with Clerks subsequently to five o'clock p.m. 
on second Satiirday of the session to be referred to next Gen- 
eral Court, 12. 

shall not be referred, under rule, to next General Court when intro- 
duced subsequently to five o'clock p.m. on second Saturday 
of the session, if based on report of a joint committee made 
on an order to investigate, etc., 12. 

RESOLVES: 

on leave, deposited with Clerks subsequently to five o'clock p.m. 
on second Saturday of the session to be referred to next Gen- 
eral Court, 12. 



Index to the Joint Rules, 593 



RESOLVES — Concluded. 

shall not be referred, under rule, to next General Court when intro- 
duced subsequently to five o'clock p.m. on second Saturday 
of the session, if based on report of a joint committee made 
on an order to investigate, etc., 12. 

on leave to be deposited with Clerks, 13. 

requiring the approval of the Governor to be laid before him by 
the Clerk of tlie Senate, 21. 

for constitutional amendments, to have three readings and yeas 
and nays, 22. 

See also Bills. 

RULES: 

joint, how suspended, 10, 12, 29, 31. 

joint committee on, to have authority to prescribe the manner 

and form of keeping the dockets of legislative counsel and 

agents, 14. 

SPECIAL LEGLSLATION: 

not to be granted if object is attainable under general or existing 

laws, 7. 
affecting individuals and corporations must be introduced by 

petition, 8. 
affecting individuals and corporations not to be reported except 
on petition, etc., 8. 
Standing committees, appointment and number, 1. 

Stenographers, motions or orders authorizing committees to employ, 
to be referred to joint committee on Rules, 28. 

Travel and travelling expenses of committees, 3, 28. 

United States Senators, how elected, 27. 



NOTES OF RULINGS 

OP THK 

PRESIDING OFFICERS 

From the Year 1833. 



Prepared by Hon. George G. Crocker. 



Memoranda. — S. stands for Senate Journal, H. for House Journal. 
Citations from Journals which have never been printed refer to the 
duplicate manuscript copy in the State Library. 



NOTES OF KULINGS 



PRESIDING OFFICERS ON THE CONSTITUTION 
OF MASSACHUSETl^. 



Power of Presiding Officers to decide Constitu- 
tional Questions. — In a decision on a money bill, in 
which it was held that it was within the pro\ance of the 
chair to decide the constitutional question involved, the 
following statement was made: "It is of course not in- 
tended to assume to the chair any right of decision as to 
the constitutionality of matters of legislation in relation 
to their substance; but where the question relates to form 
and manner of proceeding in legislation, or, in other 
words, is one of order, it is the duty of the chair to rule 
upon the same, although it may depend upon the provisions 
of the Constitution for its solution." Cases of a propo- 
sition to adjourn for more than two days, of proceedings 
without a quorum, of a faulty enacting form, and of neg- 
lecting to take the yeas and nays on a vetoed bill, are 
cited. Pitman, S. 1869, p. 341. See also Jewell, H. 1868, 
p. 386; Stone, H. 1866, p. 436; Butler, S. 1894, pp. 555, 
648; Butler, S. 1895, p. 378; Darling (acting Presi- 
dent), S. 1895, p. 578; Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 509, 1399; 
Tread WAY, S. 1911, p. 506. 

It is not within the province of the chair to rule out a 
bill on the point of order that the bill is not properly before 
the House for the reason that it was not returned by the 
Governor with his objections thereto in writing within the 
time fixed by the Constitution. Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1399. 

597 



598 Notes of Rulings 

A point of order having been raised that a proposed amend- 
ment was not in order for the reason that it was micon- 
stitutional, it was held that it was not within the province 
of the chair to decide as to the constitutionaHty of the 
amendment. Bates, H. 1897, p. 979. See also Walker, 
H. 1910, p. 1480; Blanchard (acting President), S. 1911, 
p. 1497. 

For further rulings regarding the power of the presiding 
officer to decide constitutional questions, see Meyer, H. 
1896, p. 254; Myers, H. 1901, p. 1352. See also notes 
on "Courtesy between the Branches," under the heading 
"Sundry Rulings." 

Chap. I., Sect. I., Art. II. — **No hill or resolve.'^ See 
Long, H. 1878, p. 58; Noyes, H. 1880, p. 123. 

''Laid before the Governor for his revisaU* If either 
branch desires for any reason to revise an enacted bill, 
joint action of the two branches must be had, and the 
motion should be one providing that a message be sent by 
the two branches requesting the Governor to return the bill 
to the Senate. Jewell, H. 1869, p. 645. Notwithstanding 
this ruling, it is customary for the Senate, when it desires 
to revise an enacted bill, to request the return of the bill, 
without asking the concurrent action of the House. 

" Who shall enter the objections . . . and proceed to re- 
consider the same." In a case in which a resolve and the 
objections thereto were laid on the table, it was held that 
it was then out of order to introduce a new resolve of a 
similar nature. Goodwin, H. 1890, p. 613. 

"But if, after such reconsideration, two-thirds of the said 
Senate or House of Representatives shall, notwithstanding the 
said objections, agree to pass the same, it shall, together with 
the objections, be sent to the other branch of the Legislature, 
where it shall also be reconsidered, and if approved by two- 
thirds of the memhers present, shall have the force of a law." 



On the Constitution, 699 

Under this provision it has been held that in the branch 
first taking action a vote of two-thirds of the members pres- 
ent is sufficient to pass a bill. Clifford, S. 1862, p. 625; 
Bullock, H. 1862, p. 586. See also Walker v. State, 12 
S. C. 200; Frillsen v. Mahan, 21 La. Ann. 79. Contra, 
see Co. of Cass v. Johnston, 95 U. S. 360. 

In 1862, in a case in which, the President not voting, 33 
votes were cast, of which 22 were in favor of the passage 
of the bill, it was held that the record of the yeas and 
nays was the only evidence of the number or the names of 
the members present, and that the necessary two-thirds 
had been obtained. Clifford, S. 1862, p. 625. Later de- 
cisions do not support this position. Sanford, H. 1874, 
p. 564; PiLLSBURY, S. 1885, p. 584; Hartwell, S. 1889, 
p. 589; Barrett, H. 1889, p. 226. See also House Rule 
67. See Brown v. Nash, 1 Wyoming Terr. 85. 

It is permissible to reconsider a vote refusing to pass 
a bill over the Executive veto, notwithstanding the first 
vote is described in the Constitution as a reconsideration 
of the bill. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 583; Frothingham, 
H. 1905, p. 1098. But see Sank v. Phila., 4 Brewster, 133. 
Wilson's Digest, 2058. 

Chap. I., Sect. I., Art. IV. — ** All manner of whole- 
some and reasonable orders.'* See Long, H. 1878, p. 60. 

" To set forth the several duties, powers and limits of the 
several civil and military officers." For certain resolves de- 
fining the powers of the Legislature, especially the power 
to prescribe duties to the Governor and other executive 
officers, see Phelps, H. 1857, p. 557. 

Chap. I., Sect. II., Art. VI. — "Provided such adjourn- 
ments do not exceed two days at a time" Sunday is not to 
be counted, but Fast Day must be counted. Jewell, H. 
1868, p. 311; Stone, H. 1867, p. 270. 



600 Notes of Rulings 

Chap. I., Sect. III., Art. VI. — For a case of an ar- 
raignment of a State official at the bar of the House, see 
Hale, H. 1859, p. 149. 

Chap. L, Sect. III., Art. VII. — "All money hills shall 
originate in the House of Representatives'* The exclusive 
constitutional privilege of the House of Representatives 
to originate money bills is limited to bills that transfer 
money or property from the people to the State, and does 
not include bills that appropriate money from the treasury 
of the Commonwealth to particular uses of the govern- 
ment or bestow it upon individuals or corporations. The 
Senate can originate a bill or resolve appropriating money 
from the treasury of the Commonwealth, or directly or in- 
directly involving expenditures of money from the treas- 
ury, or imposing a burden or charge thereon. Opinion 
OF Justices, S. 1878, appendix; 126 Mass. Reports, 596; 
Cogswell, S. 1878, p. 279; Pitman, S. 1869, p. 340. See, 
contra, Long, H. 1878, pp. 197, 563; Jewell, H. 1869, 
p. 630; Jewell, H. 1868, p. 385. See Loring, S. 1873, 
p. 409, for opinion that money bills should be allowed to 
originate in either branch. 

It is the duty of the presiding officer of the Senate to 
observe with punctilious care the constitutional preroga- 
tives of the House of Representatives. Without waiting 
for a point of order to be raised, he should cause a money 
bill which originates in the Senate to be laid aside or re- 
committed. In such case the action on the bill previously 
taken by the Senate is to be considered as not having been 
taken. Butler, S. 1894, p. 555; Butler, S. 1895, p. 378. 
See also Soule, S. 1901, p. 753. 

It was formerly held that bills designating certain prop- 
erty as subject to or exempted from taxation, as well as bills 
imposing a tax in terms, were "money bills." Bishop, S. 
1881, p. 419; PiNKERTON, S. 1893, p. 811. See also San- 



On the Constitution. 601 

FORD, H. 1873, p. 283; Stone, H. 1866, p. 436. Later, an 
important bill exempting certain kinds of personal prop- 
erty from taxation was held not to be a "money bill." In 
rendering his decision, President Butler called attention 
to the fact that conditions which led to the adoption of 
this constitutional provision no longer exist, that the 
members of the Senate, like the members of the House, 
are now elected directly by the people, that the property 
qualifications of senators have been abolished, that repre- 
sentation in both branches alike is based on the number 
of legal voters, and that there remains no reason or excuse 
for construing into the Constitution a prohibition which 
does not clearly appear, that the bill was not in itself a 
proposition to impose a tax, and that in determining the 
point of order it was unnecessary to conjecture what 
results might accrue from its passage. Butler, S. 1895, 
p. 737. 

It has been held that a bill exempting from taxation 
certain property in a particular town is not a "money 
bill." PiLLSBURY (acting President), S. 1884, p. 259. 

A bill abolishing certain existing exemptions from tax- 
ation and thereby subjecting to taxation property pre- 
viously exempted, was held not to be a money bill. 
Treadway, S. 1911, p. 506. 

A bill, known as the bar and bottle bill, was held not 
to be a " money bill." Walker, H. 1910, p. 941. 

The words "money bill" do not cover bills merely cre- 
ating a debt, but only bills relating to the taking of money 
or property from the people for the payment of a debt, or 
for some other public purpose. Dana, S. 1906, p. 1033. 

A bill is considered as originating in that branch in 
which it is first acted upon. Brackett, H. 1885, p. 759. 

For a case in which the Senate instructed a committee to 
report a bill to the House, see Pillsbury, S. 1886, p. 702. 



602 Notes of Hidings 

Chap. I., Sect. III., Art. VIII. — "Provided such ad- 
journments shall not exceed two days at a time." Sunday is 
not to be counted, but Fast Day must be counted. Jew- 
ell, H. 1868, p. 311; Stone, H. 1867, p. 270. See also 
Meyer, H. 1895, p. 1313. 

Chap. I., Sect. III., Art. X. — "And settle the rules 
and orders of proceedings in their own House." See Long, 
H. 1878, p. 60. 

Chap. VI., Art. II. — "But their being chosen or 
appointed to, and accepting the same, shall operate as a res- 
ignation of their seat in the Senate or House of Representa- 
tives." It is not within the province of the chair to decide 
whether a member has forfeited his membership by accept- 
ing an office incompatible with his seat in the Legislature. 
Hale, H. 1859, p. 48. 

Articles of Amendment, VIII. — See note to Consti- 
tution, Chap. VI., Art. II. 

Articles of Amendment, IX. — An amendment of the 
Constitution may be amended on the second year of its 
consideration, but such action will necessitate its reference 
to the next Legislature. Bishop, S. 1880, p. 321; Noyes, 
H. 1880, p. 57; Dewey (acting Speaker), H. 1890, p. 369. 

It has also been held that an amendment to the Consti- 
tution cannot be amended on the second year of its con- 
sideration. Phelps, H. 1857, p. 906; Phelps, S. 1859, 
p. 323. 

A vote agreeing to an article of amendment of the Con- 
stitution can be reconsidered. Marden, H. 1883, pp. 377, 
422-427. 

As to the method of procedure in acting on an amend- 
ment on the second year, and in providing for its submis- 



On the Constitution. 603 

sion to the people, see Noyes, H. 1881, p. 466. See also 
Meyer, H. 1896, pp. 255, 269. 

Articles of Amendment, XXXIII. — See note to 
House Rule 68. 

It is immaterial that a quorum does not vote if a quorum 
is present. Pillsbury, S. 1885, p. 584; Hartwell, S. 
1889, p. 589. See note to House Rule 67, and note to 
Senate Rules under " Voting." Contra, see Clifford, 
S. 1862, p. 625. 

As to what constitutes a quorum of the Senate, see 
opinion of the Attorney-General, House Doc, No. 38 
(1892). 

In ascertaining the presence of a quorum, senators who 
are in the chamber but do not answer to their names when 
the roll is called are to be counted. . Soule, S. 1901, 
p. 1014. 



604 Notes of Rulings 



NOTES OF RULINGS 



SENATE RULES. 



THE PRESIDENT. 

The President has no power, either by general parHa- 
mentary law or by special authority vested in him by the 
Senate, to cause any document to be printed or distributed, 
or to prevent any document from being printed or distrib- 
uted; and, upon the simple request of a member of the 
Senate, he has no authority to issue an order to the Ser- 
geant-at-Arms to remove from the desks and files of the 
senators a report, portions of which are claimed to be un- 
parliamentary. Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 489, 575. 

CLERK. 

Rule 8. The suspension of this rule by itself does not 
take a bill out of the possession of the Clerk, nor does it 
preclude reconsideration moved in accordance with Senate 
Rule 53. Jones, S. 1904, p. 802. 

This rule does not apply to a bill which is referred to 
the committee on Ways and Means under the Senate rule 
relating to bills involving the expenditure of public money. 
Smith, S. 1900, p. 885. 

See notes to House Rule 70. 

" Except petitions, hills and resolves introduced on leave, 
orders of inquiry," etc. As to the reason for these excep- 



On the Senate Rules. 605 

tions and their effect, see Lorinq, S. 1873, pp. 295, 299. 
It would seem that the right to reconsider the enactment 
of a bill, the reference of a petition or bill, or the adoption 
of an order, should expire when the bill, petition or order 
passes out of the hands of the Clerk. 

MEMBERS OF THE SENATE. 

Rule 10. In the case of a bill relative to the common 
use of tracks by two or more street railway companies it 
was held that it was not a matter in which the private right 
of a senator who was president of a street railway company 
could be said to be immediately concerned as distinct from 
the public interest. Chapple, S. 1907, p. 730. See notes 
to House Rule 63. 

COMMITTEES. 

Rule 12. For sundry rulings as to committees, see notes 
on the Joint Rules, under the head of " Committees." 

"A committee on Ways and Means" {formerly, "on the 
Treasury"). See notes to House Rules 20, 25. 

Rule 15. A bill relating to the appointment of certain 
officers of the city of Boston was held not to be a special 
bill. Jones, S. 1904, p. 210. 

A bill relating to the taxation of telegraph companies 
was held not to come within the provisions of this section, 
although it appeared that there might be but one such com- 
pany in existence. Hartwell, S. 1889, p. 732. See also 
notes to House Rule 31 and Joint Rule 8. 

Rule 16. A special act, as distinguished from a general 
law, is one which directly affects individuals as such differ- 
ently from the class to which they belong or from the people 
at large. Pillsbury, S. 1885, pp. 558, 589. It is not within 
the province of the chair to rule that the object of an ap- 
plication can be secured under existing laws, or without 



606 N'otes of Rulings 

detriment to the public interests by a general law. This 
question must be determined by the committee (Pillsbury, 
S. 1885, p. 588; Harwood, acting President, S. 1899, pp. 
249, 761), unless it appears on the face of the papers that 
the object can be secured under existing laws. Pillsbury, 
S. 1886, p. 700. For a case in which it was held not to be 
allowable to substitute a general law for a special act, see 
Pillsbury, S. 1885, p. 589. 
See notes to House Rules 30 and 31, and to Joint Rule 7. 

FORM OF BILLS AND RESOLVES. 
Rule 17. Objection that this rule is violated cannot be 
sustained in the case of a House bill. Pillsbury, S. 1885, 
p. 582. 

INTRODUCTION OF BUSINESS. 

Rule 19. Under this rule a bill based on a resolution 
was laid aside, for the reason that a resolution differs from 
a bill or resolve in that it is simply an expression of opinion 
by the General Court, has but one reading and is not laid 
before the Governor for his approval. Chapple, S. 1907, 
p. 900. 

Rule 23. See note to House Rule 47. 

** Unless received from the House of Representatives.'* A 
bill coming from the House must be entertained even 
though it is not germane to the petition upon which it is 
based. Pinkerton, S. 1893, p. 470. 

See notes on "Courtesy between the Branches," under 
the heading "Sundry Rulings," at the end of the notes on 
the Joint Rules. 

Rule 24. For cases in which an order has been held to 
be unparliamentary in form, see Sprague, S. 1890, p. 189; 
Pillsbury, S. 1886, p. 140. 



On the Senate Rules. 607 

COURSE OP PROCEEDINGS. 
Rule 27. The question being on ordering to a third 
reading a bill involving the expenditure of public money, 
the point of order was raised that the bill had not been re- 
ferred to the committee on Ways and Means. The point 
of order was held to be well taken and the bill was referred. 
Smith, S. 1898, p. 759. See also notes on House Rule 44. 

Rule 28. The subsequent rejection of a bill substituted 
for a report of a committee recommending "no legislation" 
does not revive the question upon the adoption of the 
recommendation of the report. The requirement that 
every bill shall be read three times does not render the 
substitution liable to be nullified by the rejection of the 
bill at a subsequent stage. Bishop, S. 1881, p. 212. 

Rule 31. For a case in which a bill was held to have 
been substantially changed, see Smith, S. 1900, p. 487. 

Rule 33. Notwithstanding this rule, a motion to in- 
struct the committee to report on a bill forthwith is in 
order. For sundry other rulings in a case in which, such 
instructions having been given and not having been com- 
plied with, some of the members of the committee were 
held to be in contempt, see Jones, S. 1903, pp. 769, 771, 
778. 

ORDERS OP THE DAY. 

See note to House Rule 61. 

RULES OP DEBATE. 
See notes upon this division of the House Rules. 

Rule 39. A member by yielding the floor to another 
member cannot thus transfer to the latter the right to the 



608 Notes of Rulings 

jfloor. Such right can only be secured through compliance 
with the rule. Chapple, S. 1908, p. 696. 

In a case in which, pursuant to a standing order, the 
Senate adjourned while a member was speaking, it was 
held that such member was not in consequence thereof 
entitled to the floor when the subject was again taken up. 
Chapple, S. 1908, p. 1139. 

MOTIONS. 

See notes upon this division of the House Rules. 

A motion in its nature trivial and absurd will not be 
entertained. Sprague, S. 1890, p. 189; Pillsbury, S. 
1886, p. 140. 

The Senate having passed a general order that the read- 
ing of the Journal should be dispensed with unless other- 
wise ordered, it was held that a senator could not require 
the reading of the Journal without a vote to that effect, 
and that a motion that the Journal be read was not a ques- 
tion of privilege. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 290. 

Appeals. When Cushing was by rule the sole authority 
governing the Senate, it was held, in accordance with 
Cushing's Law and Practice of Legislative Assemblies 
(Sect. 1467), that a question on an appeal could be laid on 
the table; and if such action was taken, the matter, what- 
ever it was, which gave rise to the appeal, proceeded as if 
no appeal had been taken. Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 288, 289. 
In the House it has been held that a motion to lay an ap- 
peal on the table is not in order. See IMarden, H. 1883, 
p. 582. See also notes to House Rule 94. 

It is to be noted that the Senate was required to fol- 
low Cushing's statement of Parliamentary Law, while the 
House, by its Rule 101, was simply required to conform to 
the rules of parliamentary practice. 

In Crocker's Principles of Procedure it is held_that 



On the Senate Rules. 609 

an appeal cannot be laid upon the table separately from 
the proceedings out of which the point of order arose. 
Crocker's Principles of Procedure, Sect. 94. 

Rule 45. For an instance in which it was held that the 
adoption of an amendment inserting certain words pre- 
cluded, except through reconsideration, striking out such 
words in part at the same stage of the bill, see Smith, S. 
1900, p. 530. 

See notes to House Rule 91. 

Rule 46. " To adjourn." It was held that when, upon 
a motion to adjourn, the yeas and nays had begun before 
the time fixed for adjournment and had ended after that 
time, and the Senate had voted in the negative upon the 
motion, the refusal to adjourn had the effect of suspending 
the operation of the order relative to adjournment, and 
was equivalent to otherwise ordering. Morse (acting 
President), S. 1896, p. 912. 

A motion to adjourn having been lost, a second motion 
to adjourn was held not to be in order when the only 
intervening business had been the rejection of a motion 
to postpone further consideration of the pending bill. 
Dana, S. 1906, p. 496. 

See notes to House Rule 79. 

" Or some other mofion which has precedence.'' Where 
the Senate assigned one matter for 2.30 p.m., and one 
matter for 3 p.m., it was held to be the duty of the presid- 
ing officer to call up the second assignment at 3 p.m., even 
though the consideration of the first assignment was not 
finished. Pitman, S. 1889, p. 316. See notes to House 
Rule 80. 

" To lay on the table." Pending the consideration of one 
of the Orders of the Day, a motion to lay the Orders of the 
Day on the table is admissible. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 287. 



610 Notes of Rulings 

A motion to postpone laying the orders on the table is 

inadmissible. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 287. 

When Gushing was the sole authority governing the Sen- 
ate, it was held that, if a motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table, or is postponed to a specified time, the pending 
bill does not go with it. See Pinkerton, S. 1893, p. 627. 
Contra, see Crocker's Principles of Procedure, Sect. 62, 
and appendix note thereto. See also Senate Rule 62. 

" To close debate at a specified time." See note to House 
Rule 80. 

A motion that the debate be closed in one hour is ad- 
missible, although, under a general order, the Senate would 
adjourn before the ex^Diration of the hour. Crocker, S. 
1883, p. 286. 

After the time for closing debate has arrived, the taking 
of the question cannot be postponed by a motion to ad- 
journ or to commit, or that the Journal be read, and these 
motions cannot then be entertained. Crocker, S. 1883, 
pp. 288, 289. 

If a motion to close debate in one hour is reconsid- 
ered, the question does not recur upon the original mo- 
tion, because that motion, owing to the lapse of time, is 
out of order. The debate will proceed without limitation 
unless a new motion to close it is made. Pillsbury, S. 
1885, p. 589. 

"To commit {or recommit)." A motion to recommit, 
with instructions to report a bill broader in its scope than 
the measures upon which the bill is based, is out of order. 
Pinkerton, S. 1892, p. 266. 

*To amend." A substitute which, by Rule 28, must 
have three several readings on three successive days, can be 
amended in the second degree. Coolidge, S. 1870, p. 416. 

It is not out of order to substitute an entire bill for 
another entire bill. Brastow, S. 1868, p. 48. See also 
Senate Rule 28. 



On the Senate Rules. 611 

The substitution of a question on the rejection of an 
order for a question on the passage of the order is not a 
parliamentary substitution, because one is simply the neg- 
ative of the other. Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 575, 578. 

If an amendment has been once rejected, the same or 
substantially the same amendment cannot again be moved 
at the same stage of the bill, but the rejection of the amend- 
ment may be reconsidered. Howland (acting President), 
S. 1886, p. 611; Bradford (acting President), S. 1895, 
p. 715. So also an amendment embodying a rejected 
amendment cannot be entertained at the same stage. Pink- 
ERTON, S. 1893, p. 471. As to whether an amendment is 
similar to one previously acted upon, see Soule, S. 1901, 
p. 989. An amendment which has been rejected at one 
stage of a bill can be offered again at a subsequent stage. 
Ch.\pple, S. 1907, pp. 1004, 1095; Jones, S. 1903, p. 941. 

See notes to House Rule 90. 

Rule 47. A motion to close debate in one hour is in 
order although a standing order requires adjournment be- 
fore the expiration of the hour, and, if the Senate adjourns 
before the time allowed for debate has elapsed, the bill 
when again considered is open for debate for such portion 
of the hour as had not elapsed at the time of adjourn- 
ment. Chapple, S. 1908, p. 735. 

Rule 50. According to Cushing's Manual, Sect. 102, 
amendments proposing subjects different from those under 
consideration would be in order if they were not excluded 
by special rule. Contra, see Crocker's Principles of Pro- 
cedure, Sect. 44. See also Brastow, S. 1868, p. 51. 

If a committee reports only in part, amendments must 
be germane to that portion of the subject which is reported 
on. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 86. 

Amendments are admissible if they are germane to 



612 Notes oj Eulings 

any portion of the subject-matter which is the basis of a 
committee's report. Sprague, S. 1891, p. 715. See also 
SouLE, S. 1901, p. 1049. 

An amendment may be inadmissible on the ground that 
it introduces a subject different from that under consid- 
eration, although it would operate as a limitation on the 
terms of the bill. Butler, S. 1894, pp. 644, 656-658. 

Inasmuch as a bill coming from the House must be 
entertained, even though it is not germane to the peti- 
tion upon which it is based, it seems that in such cases 
amendments which are germane to the bill are admis- 
sible, although they may not be germane to the petition. 
PiNKERTON, S. 1893, p. 493. 

See also notes to Senate Rule 23. 

An amendment which, if adopted, would render the bill 
inoperative, may nevertheless be germane. Pinkerton, 
S. 1893, p. 556. 

Amendments changing a special act into a general law 
are admissible because, under Senate Rule 16, the com- 
mittee could have reported a general law. Pinkerton, 
S. 1892, p. 707. 

But a general law reported on a petition for general 
legislation cannot be so amended as to change it into a 
special act. Pinkerton, S. 1893, p. 493. See also Law- 
rence, S. 1897, p. 427; Smith, S. 1900, p. 873. 

Upon the question whether a proposed amendment 
would change a bill from a general to a special law, see 
SouLE, S. 1901, p. 543. 

For sundry cases in which a point of order has been 
raised that a proposed amendment is not germane to the 
subject mider consideration, see the indexes to the Senate 
Journals under "Order, Questions of." A list of the cases 
which arose prior to 1902 may be found in the Manual of 
the General Court for that year. 

After an amendment has been adopted, the objection 
that the bill in its amended form is broader than the scope 



On the Seriate Mules. 613 

of the petition on which it is based cannot be entertained. 
Butler, S. 1895, p. 473. 

It is too late to raise the objection that an amendment 
is not germane if the amendment has been considered and 
voted on at a previous stage of the bill. Lawrence, S. 
1897, p. 848. 

See also notes to House Rule 90. 

Rule 51. Prior to the adoption of this rule it was held 
that the smallest sum and the longest time must be put 
first. Cogswell, S. 1879, p. 376. 

See note to House Rule 91. 

Rule 52. "Not exceeding ten minutes shall he allowed 
for debate." Time consumed in taking the question on a 
motion to adjourn is not to be deducted from the ten min- 
utes allowed for the debate. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 288. 
See notes to Senate Rule 46 and House Rules 79, 80. 

RECONSIDERATION. 

Rule 53. This rule was reconstructed and certain new 
provisions were added in 1902. 

The right to move a reconsideration is not limited to 
those who voted with the majority on the motion which 
is to be reconsidered. Dana, S. 1906, p. 500. 

President Loring (S. 1873, p. 299) went so far as to say 
that there is no reconsideration of votes to commit j)eti- 
tions, etc.; but it would seem that a better position to 
take would be that there can be no reconsideration after 
such petition, etc., has actually been handed over by the 
Clerk to the committee. See Smith, S. 1900, p. 885. 

The same would be true, mutatis mutandis, with reference 
to enacted bills. In the case of the latter, a method some- 
times adopted is to request the Governor to return the bill, 
and then reconsider its enactment. See Senate Rule 8 and 



614 Notes oj Rulings 

notes thereto. See also note to Constitution, Chap. 1., 
Sect. I., Art. II. 

As to the effect of a reconsideration of a vote to close 
debate at a specified time, see Pillsburt, S. 1885, p. 589. 

Previous to the change made in 1902, in a case where a 
bill had been amended and rejected, and when reconsid- 
eration of the rejection had been moved within the time 
allowed, and the motion to reconsider postponed until 
another day and then carried, it was held that a motion to 
reconsider the adoption of the amendment was not then in 
order. Soule, S. 1901, p. 969. 

Previous also to the change made in 1902, when the rule 
provided for a reconsideration only on "the same day or 
before the Orders of the Day are taken up on the succeed- 
ing day," it was held that if on the day following that on 
which the vote was passed a quorum was not present, 
such day should not be counted as "the succeeding day." 
Soule, S. 1901, p. 955. 

** A subsidiary y incidental or dependent question.*' A 
motion to amend by substituting an entirely new bill is 
covered by these words. Chapple, S. 1908, p. 697. 

"No reconsideration oj the vote on the question of adjourn- 
ing.'* Reconsideration of motions to adjourn, to lay on or 
take from the table and for the yeas and nays was held to 
be cut off by the rule as it stood in 1883. Crocker, S. 
1883, p. 287. 

" When a motion for reconsideration has been decided, that 
decision shall not be reconsidered." See Dana, S. 1906, p. 500. 

See notes to House Rules 70 and 71. 

REJECTED MEASURES. 

Rule 54. See notes to House Rule 49. 

This rule is an expression of a principle of parliamentary 
law. For a discussion of its origin and effect, see Bishop, 
S. 1880, p. 243. 



On the Senate Rules. 615 

General parliamentary practice not only forbids the in- 
troduction of a proposition which is substantially the same 
as a proposition previously rejected, but also forbids the 
introduction of a proposition substantially the same as one 
already pending, or substantially the same as one previously 
adopted or passed. In legislative procedure a bill is not 
passed within the meaning of the foregoing general parlia- 
mentary rule imtil it has passed to be enacted. Sprague, 
S. 1891, p. 713. 

"Finally rejected.** These words must be construed to 
refer either to a rejection by both Houses, or to such action 
of the Senate as amounts to a final rejection of the measure 
independently of any action of the House. Pillsbury, S. 
1885, p. 584. See also Barrett, H. 1889, p. 864. 

" When an order is rejected, or a petition excluded, or 
leave is refused to bring in a bill, or a bill or resolve is re- 
fused any one of its stages of advancement, it is 'finally 
rejected.' " Cogswell, S. 1877, pp. 301, 306. Indefinite 
postponement is a final rejection. Pinkerton, S. 1892, 
p. 808. 

"The phrase *when any measure has been finally re- 
jected ' must be construed to apply solely to such measures 
as the Senate has power finally to reject, and cannot of 
course apply to amendments which may be offered at any 
stage of a bill, even if rejected at a previous stage; nor has 
it ever been denied that an amendment rejected by the 
Senate may be adopted by the House and sent up for con- 
currence. A substitute is an amendment differing only in 
this, that it is capable of amendment in the second degree, 
and by rules of the Senate, but not of the House, requires 
three several readings. To propose a substitute is therefore 
only to propose an amendment, and it does not become a 
'measure' until it is adopted. The rule, being made by the 
Senate, and applicable to the Senate alone, must mean that 
no senator shall introduce a second time a 'measure,* that 



616 Notes of Rulings 

k, a bill or resolve, and some kinds of orders, which has 
been once and finally rejected by the Senate. Any other 
interpretation would put it in the power of a single sena- 
tor to defeat any bill, which might be pending in either 
branch or in the committee, and to which he was opposed, 
by offering it as a substitute for any other bill which he 
had reason to believe the Senate was desirous of passing, 
and so compelling the Senate to choose between two bills, 
both of which it might be desirous of passing." Cool- 
IDGE, S. 1870, p. 415. This ruling was made before the 
adoption of Senate Rule 50. See also Smith, S. 1898, 
p. 730; SouLE, S. 1902, p. 755. See, contra, Pitaian, S. 
1869, p. 517. 

In conformity with the foregoing it was held that a bill 
passed in the branch in which it began might be sent from 
that branch to the other, and so introduced, although a 
similar bill was there pending, or had been passed or re- 
jected. Cogswell, S. 1877, pp. 301, 306. See also Bishop, 
S. 1882, p. 307; Lawrence, S. 1896, p. 1036; Smith, S. 
1898, p. 981. 

A House bill, practically identical with a previous bill 
which had been received from the House and rejected by 
the Senate, was admitted, in recognition of the practice of 
the Senate that courtesy to the co-ordinate branch usually 
requires the consideration of a bill so received. Soule, 
S. 1901, p. 931. 

So also in a case when a report "inexpedient to legis- 
late" had been adopted by the Senate, it was held that the 
Senate was still bound to entertain a House bill on the 
same subject, if the report had not been concurred in by 
the House. Pillsbury, S. 1885, p. 585. 

When the above decisions of Presidents Coolidge and 
Cogswell were given, the words " by any committee or 
member" were not embodied in the rule, and the rule ended 



On the Senate Rules. 617 

as follows: "and this rule shall apply as well to measures 
originating in the House as to those originating in the 
Senate." These words were left out in 1877. 

The fact that a bill has been finally rejected in one branch 
does not prevent its introduction in the other. Hartwell, 
S. 1889, p. 822. 

If, however, a bill or measure has been once rejected by 
both branches, general parliamentary law as well as this 
rule would prevent any measure substantially the same 
from being again introduced into either branch at the same 
session; and the fact that one branch had passed such 
measure and forwarded it to the other would not justify 
its introduction in the latter branch. Thus, where a re- 
port of "leave to withdraw" had been accepted by both 
branches, it was held that a bill which embodied a measure 
substantially the same as that contemplated in the petition 
must be laid aside, even though the bill came from the 
other branch. Chapple, S. 1907, p. 426; Bishop, S. 1880, 
p. 243. See also Pillsbury, S. 1885, p. 583. 

It seems that, notwithstanding this rule, an amendment 
of the Constitution can be introduced, although it is sub- 
stantially the same as an amendment which came from 
the previous Legislature and which has been rejected. 
Phelps, S. 1859, p. 325. 

''No measure substantially the same." A resolve pro- 
viding only for biennial elections is not substantially the 
same as a resolve providing for biennial elections and 
biennial sessions of the Legislature. Bruce, S. 1884, 
p. 581. See also Smith, S. 1898, p. 893; Pillsbury, S. 
1886, p. 635. 

For cases in which measures were ruled out under this 
provision, see Hartwell, S. 1889, p. 804; Butler. S. 
1894, p. 730; Chapple, S. 1908, p. 945. 

For cases in which measures were held not to be sub- 



618 Notes oj Rulings 

stantially the same, see Treadwat, S. 1911, p. 1542; 
Chapple, S. 1908, p. 883; Butler, S. 1894, p. 804; 
Jones, S. 1904, p. 875. 

"Shall he introduced." The rejection of a measure does 
not prevent the consideration of a measure substantially 
the same, if it was introduced previously to such rejection. 
BoARDMAN, S. 1888, p. 485; Pinkerton, S. 1893, p. 897. 
But the fact that an order was presented and laid upon the 
table prior to the indefinite postponement of another order 
practically identical was held not to be an introduction 
within the meaning of this section. Pinkerton, S. 1892, 
p. 808. 

A point of order having been raised that a Senate bill 
was substantially the same as a bill previously rejected by 
the Senate, the President refused to lay the bill aside on 
the ground that the Senate, having first rejected the later 
bill and then having reconsidered its rejection, had indi- 
cated its willingness to act upon it. Dana, S. 1906, p. 882. 

VOTING. 

Rule 55. A vote of less than a quorum is not conclusive 
proof that a quorum is not present, and is valid, provided 
a quorum is in fact present. Sprague, S. 1890, p. 905; 
Hartt\^ell, S. 1889, p. 589; Pillsbury, S. 1885, p. 584; 
Sanford, H. 1874, p. 564; Chapple, S. 1908, p. 470. 
See also Crocker's Principles of Procedure, Sect. 114, and 
appendix note thereto. 

When the presiding officer by count ascertained that a 
quorum was not present at the time of the taking of a 
vote, the vote was declared void. Lawrence, S. 1896, 
pp. 633, 745. 

As to what constitutes a quorum of the Senate, see 
rulings on Amendment XXXIII. of the Constitution and 
opinion of the Attorney-General, House Doc. No. 38 (1892). 

A motion that the Orders of the Day be laid on the 



On the Senate Rules. 619 

table having been entertained by the presiding officer but 
not stated by him, it was held that it was not then too late 
to verify a vote taken just previously, as the member that 
requested the verification had risen for the purpose of 
making the request in due season. Galloupe (acting 
President), S. 1896, p. 823. 

Rule 56. For a case in which it was held that a request 
for the yeas and nays was made too late, see Smith, S. 
1900, p. 660. 

Rule 57. "Unless excused before the vote is taken.** 
After a viva voce vote has been taken, a request to be 
excused from voting cannot be entertained. Pillsbury, 
S. 1885, p. 583. 

*'And no member shall be permitted to vote after the deci- 
sion is anncninced from the chair." If other business has 
intervened, a vote cannot be cast even if this rule is sus- 
pended. Hartwell, S. 1889, p. 650. 

PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE. 
Rule 62. See notes to House Rule 101. 



620 Notes of Rulings 



]S^OTE8 OF KULINGS 



HOUSE RULES. 



SPEAKER. 

Rule 8. This rule applies only to a vacancy in the 
office of Speaker occurring after the permanent organiza- 
tion of the House. Eames (chairman), H. 1911, p. 4. 

CLERK. 
Rule 15. " Except petitions, enacted bills, orders of in- 
quiry and orders of notice." See notes to Senate Rules 8 
and 53, and to House Rule 70. 

MEMBERS. 

If objection is made, it is not the privilege of any indi- 
vidual member to have an amendment which is printed in 
the calendar read by the Clerk. Meyer, H. 1895, p. 1211. 

If the report of a committee that Mr. A., a sitting mem- 
ber, is not entitled to a seat, has been accepted, it is out of 
order for Mr. A. to take part in the proceedings, although 
a motion to reconsider the acceptance of the report is 
pending. Phelps, H. 1856, p. 493. 

Rule 17. " No member shall absent himself from the 
House without leave." The phrase "the House" refers to 
the Representatives' Chamber alone. Sanford, H. 1874, 
p. 313. 

The presence of a quorum is not necessary to excuse a 
member from attending. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 774. 



On the House Rules. 621 



COMMITTEES. 

Rule 20. For sundry rulings as to reports of com- 
mittees, see notes on the Joint Rules, under the head of 
" Committees." 

*'A committee on Ways and Means.** Notwithstanding 
a previous investigation and report by the committee on 
Claims, or other committee, it seems that this committee 
has power to examine every matter before it as a new 
question, and decide for or against it, on its merits. 
Jewell, H. 1870, p. 454. But see House Rule 44. 

Rule 24. A point of order that a bill was improperly 
before the House for the reason that two of the members 
of the committee reporting it were ineligible under this rule 
was held not to be well taken. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1431. 

Rule 25. For the ruling which is embodied in this sec- 
tion, see Long, H. 1878, p. 347. See House Rule 40. 

Rule 30. A bill is special orgeneral as it applies to one 
or all of the individuals of a given class. Bates, H. 1897, 
p. 182. See also notes to Senate Rule 16. 

After a bill has been ordered to a third reading it is too 
late to raise the point of order that the bill is in violation 
of this rule. Barrett, H. 1892, p. 698. See also Meyer, 
H. 1894, p. 350. 

"Can he secured . . . under existing laws." It is the 
province of the committee, not of the Speaker, to deter- 
mine whether the object of an application can be secured 
under existing laws. Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 350, 485; Bar- 
rett, H. 1892, p. 1160; Myers, H. 190f, p. 1048. 

Pending the point of order that the object desired by a 
bill could be secured by existing law, a motion to recom- 
mit was entertained. Noyes, H. 1887, p. 808. 

" Or without detriment to the 'public interests by a general 



622 Notes of Rulings 

law.''* Prior to the adoption of this rule a committee could 
not change a special to a general bill. Sanford, H. 1874, 
p. 502. Nor could the Legislature change a private or 
special bill by amendment into a general law. Sanford, 
H. 1874, pp. 217, 513; Long, H. 1878, pp. 117, 361. See 
also NoYES, H. 1888, p. 600. 

Rule 31. See notes to House Rule 40 and Joint Rule 8. 

* Wo legislation affecting the rights of individuals," etc. A 
bill to prohibit the imposition of fines, or deductions of 
wages of employees engaged in weaving, was held not to 
affect the rights of individuals otherwise than as it affected 
the interests of the whole people. Notes, H. 1888, p. 476. 

On a petition for general legislation it is not permissible 
to report a special bill. Frothingham, H. 1905, p. 272. 

For a case in which an amendment restricting the scope 
of a bill to some of the cases covered by it was held not 
to affect the rights of individuals otherwise than as they 
were affected by the original bill, see Harden, H. 1883, 
pp. 484, 522, 523. 

Under this rule in the form which it had before 1890, it 
was held that an order to consider the expediency of legis- 
lation limiting the maximum fares on trunk or main lines 
of steam railroads did not affect the "legal " rights of such 
corporations otherwise than as it affected generally the in- 
terests of the whole people of the Commonwealth. Bar- 
rett, H. 1889, p. 230. 

A bill requiring railroad corporations, when issuing new 
stock, to sell the same at auction, was held not to come 
within the scope of this rule. Barrett, H. 1891, p. 638. 

A bill providing for supervision by the State of the issue 
of securities by water companies was held not to be within 
the scope of this rule. Barrett, H. 1893, p. 986. 

A bill contemplating legislation affecting certain trust 
companies differently from other trust companies of- the 



On the House Rules. 623 

same class was held to be within the scope of the rule. 
Barrett, H. 1891, p. 866. 

" Shall be proposed or introduced except upon a petition." 
On a petition asking the extension of the provisions of a 
certain act, a bill cannot be reported extending the pro- 
visions of a different act. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 392. 

For instances in which bills have been ruled out because 
not based upon petition, see Barrett, H. 1889, pp. 26, 230, 
390. 

Rule 32. See notes to House Rule 40 and Joint Rule 9. 

REGULAR COURSE OP PROCEEDINGS. 

It is the custom of the House to have the chaplain offi- 
ciate only once during each calendar day. Myers, H. 
1903, p. 1065. 

Rule 36. Immediately after the Speaker calls for peti- 
tions, etc., and before any are presented, a motion to pro- 
ceed at once to the consideration of the Orders of the Day 
is not out of order. Myers, H. 1903, p. 965. 

Rule 37. After a petition has been presented in accord- 
ance with the rules, and the question on its reference has 
been stated, it is then too late to call for a vote on its re- 
ception. Hale, H. 1859, p. 64. 

Rule 38. Papers from the Senate may be laid before 
the House by the Speaker after the Orders of the Day 
have been laid upon the table, Myers, H. 1903, p. 1064. 

Rule 40. " Motions contemplating legislation.'* This 
rule does not prevent the introduction of orders of inquiry 
or investigation, but does take away the power of com- 
mittees making investigations under such orders to report 
bills. The rule does not prevent suggestions of legisla- 
tion. Bates, H. 1898, p. 456. 



624 Notes of Rulings 

" Founded upon 'petition." The loss of a petition, 
which the records show to have been duly presented, does 
not bar procedure thereunder. Walker, H. 1909, p. 847. 

" The committee on Ways and Means may originate and 
report appropriation bills based upon existing law." This 
rule does not give the committee authority to insert in 
an appropriation bill a section providing for the discon- 
tinuance of a work which an existing statute (St. 1899, 
c. 477) orders to be continued, thus in effect repealing 
the statute. Myers, H. 1903, p. 328. 

Rule 41. This rule is not applicable to motions for 
adjournment. Rice (actmg Speaker), H. 1859, p. 224. 

Quaere, whether an order can be postponed without 
question after the discussion of it has begun. See Kinni- 
CUTT, H. 1844, p. 524; Barrett, H. 1889, p. 700. In a 
case in which the consideration of an order had by vote 
been postponed to a later day, and the order had then 
been considered and an amendment had been moved, it 
was held that the order could not then be postponed upon 
request under this rule, even though the adoption of the 
amendment would substantially change the order. Bar- 
rett, H. 1889, p. 753. 

In order to make a request for postponement a member 
must obtain the floor in the regular way. Barrett, H. 
1889, p. 699. 

''An order." In 1890 the word "order" in this rule was 
held not to include resolutions against a reimposition of a 
duty on hides. Barrett, H. 1890, pp. 538, 553. There- 
upon the words "or resolution" were inserted in the rule, 
and in 1899 these words were stricken out again. 

Rule 43. When the question, "Shall this bill be re- 
jected?" is pending, a motion to amend the bill is not in 
order (Phelps, H. 1856, p. 323), but it is in order to move 
the previous question. Phelps, H. 1856, p. 332. 



On the House Mules. 625 

Rule 44. A bill which would operate to deprive the 
Commonwealth of money to which it would otherwise be 
entitled comes under the provisions of this rule. Walker, 
H. 1909, p. 1020. For a case in which a bill relating to li- 
cense fees was held not to be within the scope of this rule, 
see Walker, H. 1910, p. 940. A bill will be referred by 
the Speaker under this rule to the committee, even if the 
fact that it involves the expenditure of public money is not 
discovered by him or brought to his attention by point of 
order or otherwise until the question on its engrossment is 
pending. Cole, H. 1907, p. 914; Myers, H. 1900, pp. 
640, 1303; Bates, H. 1899, p. 516; Whipple (acting 
Speaker), H. 1S99, p. 728; Brackett, H. 1885, pp. 709, 
732; Barrett, H. 1889, p. 795; Barrett, H. 1892, pp. 
330, 824, 1168; Bates, H. 1898, p. 742. See also Bates, 
H. 1899, pp. 619, 635; Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 756, 977. 

A bill providing for an expenditure by the Board of Rail- 
road Commissioners was referred under the rule, although 
provision is made by law for repayment to the State of all 
sums expended by or for said Board. Myers, H. 1902, 
pp. 936, 943. 

A resolve providing for an extension of time within 
which suit should be brought under an act previously 
passed upon by the committee on Ways and Means was 
held not to come within the scope of this rule. Myers, 
H. 1902, pp. 572, 971. 

"New provisions shall not be added to such bills by the 
committee on Ways and Means, unless,'* etc. See Meyer, 
H. 1894, pp. 1197, 1219. 

Rule 47. As to whether it is proper under this rule to 
move to take from the files of last year a bill (which was 
then referred to the next General Court), and move its 
reference to a committee, without getting special leave 
to introduce it, see Long, H. 1877, p. 466, and Osgood, 
appellant, p. 469. 



626 Notes of Ru 



" Unless received from the Senate," See note to Senate 
Rule 23. 

"Moved as an amendment to the report of a committee.*' 
After a bill has been substituted for the report of a com- 
mittee, it is too late to raise the point of order that the 
bill is broader in its scope than the subject-matter referred 
to the committee. Notes. H. 1888, p. 463. 

Rule 49. See notes to Senate Rule 54. See also " Cour- 
tesy between the Branches," under "Sundry Rulings," at 
the end of the notes on the Joint Rules. 

"Finally rejected hy the House." The words "by the 
House" were added in 1890, following a ruling by Speaker 
Barrett, H. 1889, p. 864. For a statement of the gen- 
eral parliamentary practice which differs from the position 
taken by Speaker Barrett, see notes to Senate Rule 54. 

A bill passed to be engrossed by the House but rejected 
by the Senate is not by this rule barred from being again 
introduced in the House. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1151. 

Under this rule it was held that a bill from the Senate 
must be laid aside when the course of proceedings had 
been as follows: The petition with accompanying bill was 
originally presented in the Senate and there referred to a 
joint committee, in which reference the House concurred. 
The committee reported to the House, recommending ref- 
erence to the next General Court; a motion to substitute 
the bill in question was rejected, and then the report was 
adopted by the House. In the Senate the bill was substi- 
tuted for the report, and this bill, on its passage to a third 
reading in the House, was laid aside as coming within the 
scope of the rule. Barrett, H. 1893, p. 856. See also 
Meyer, H. 1896, p. 1142. Subsequently, in the same ses- 
sion, in a case in which the House had previously adopted 
a report recommending that the petitioner have leave to 
withdraw, it was held that a bill substituted in the Senate 



On the House Rules, 627 

for the report should be entertahied. The distinction 
made was that in this case the bill itself had not been 
previously offered in and rejected by the House. Bar- 
rett, H. 1893, pp. 961, 967. 

The rejection of a bill providing for permanent clerical 
assistance does not exclude the subsequent introduction 
of a resolve providing for temporary clerical assistance. 
Adams (acting Speaker), H. 1900, p. 325. 

It is not in order under this rule to move as an amend- 
ment a bill which has once been finally rejected. Harden, 
H. 1883, p. 819. 

After a bill "making appropriations for expenses of 
various charitable and reformatory institutions" was re- 
jected, it was held that one of the sections of that bill 
could be introduced without violating this rule. Mar- 
den, H. 1883, p. 569. See also Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1226. 

On an order relative to memorializing Congress for an 
amendment to the Constitution of the United States so as 
to provide for election of United States Senators by direct 
popular vote, a joint committee reported to the House no 
legislation necessary. Resolutions offered as a substitute 
for the report were rejected by the House, and the report 
was accepted and sent to the Senate for concurrence. 
The Senate substituted the resolutions which had been 
rejected by the House, and sent them to the House. The 
Speaker ruled that under this rule they must be laid aside. 
Barrett, H. 1891, p. 419. 

Previous to the foregoing ruling it had been held that a 
bill may be received from the Senate and considered by 
the House, although a similar bill is there pending, or has 
been passed or rejected. Once in the House, and there 
referred to a committee of the House, a subsequent report 
of it back from that committee is a part of its career, and 
not such an introduction of it as to bring it within this 
rule as "introduced by a committee." Long, H. 1877, 



628 Notes of Rulings 

p. 424; Goodwin, H. 1860, p. 550. Contra, see Sanford, 
H. 1875, p. 323; Osgood (acting Speaker), H. 1877, p. 416. 

A bill changed in but a single essential provision is not 
substantially the same. Notes, H. 1881, p. 402. See also 
Meyer, H. 1896, p. 1179; Notes, H. 1881, p. 447; 
Jewell, H. 1868, p. 204. 

A bill was excluded under this rule embracing a meas- 
ure substantially the same as that covered by a previous 
reference on which a report of inexpedient to legislate had 
been accepted. Frothingham, H. 1904, p. 990; Sanford, 
H. 1874, p. 349; Bishop, S. 1880, p. 243; IMarden, H. 
1884, p. 555. Contra, see Rideout (acting Speaker), H. 
1893, pp. 1103, 1112. 

So also a report of leave to withdraw having been ac- 
cepted by both branches, it was held that a bill, moved as 
an amendment to a subsequent report of the same com- 
mittee to the same effect on a petition asking for sub- 
stantially the same legislation as that on which the first 
report was based, must be laid aside. Cole, H. 1907, 
p. 540. 

For a case in which a memorial was introduced and re- 
ferred to a committee, although it related to the same sub- 
ject as that embraced in a petition upon which a report of 
leave to withdraw had been accepted, see Phelps, H. 1856, 
p. 683. 

After a bill reported on a petition has been rejected, the 
petition cannot be further considered. Sanford, H. 1874, 
p. 511. See also Sanford, H. 1873, p. 198; Kimball 
(acting Speaker), H. 1871, p. 400. 

The acceptance of a report "no legislation necessary on 
the Governor's message" was held not to cut off action 
on a substitute for a bill previously reported by the same 
committee, although such bill and substitute covered mat- 
ter embraced in the Governor's message. Notes, H. 1888, 
p. 584. 



On the House Rules, 629 

It seems that reference to the next Legislature is not a 
final rejection. See Goodwin, H. 1860, p. 550. 

In the case of a bill which had been read a third time, it 
was held that it was too late to raise the point of order 
that it was improperly before the House because it was 
substantially the same as a bill which had been previously 
finally rejected. Bates, H. 1897, p. 1197. 

** Introduced by any committee or memher." As to the 
effect of these words, see Long, H. 1877, p. 427. 

Rule 50. It is within the province of the committee on 
Bills in the Third Reading to report that a bill ought not 
to pass. Barrett, H. 1890, pp. 862, 864. 

Rule 53. Notice of an amendment of an engrossed bill 
or resolve adopted by one branch should be communicated 
to the other by a message. See Wallet, H. 1846, pp. 314, 
440, 578, 606. The formality of a message is now dis- 
pensed with. 

Rule 59. Matters in the calendar must be acted upon 
separately. A single request that several matters be passed 
for debate is not in order. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 604. 

A motion that several matters in the calendar be laid 
upon the table is not in order. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 604. 

Rule 60. " The unfinished business," etc. See Kinni- 
cutt, H. 1844, p. 524. 

Rule 61. If a matter is discharged from the Orders of 
the Day, the vote cannot be reconsidered on the succeed- 
ing day. Bliss, H. 1853, p. 362. 

Rule 62. "// . . . an amendment is made.'' ^ The word 
"made" is the equivalent of "adopted." Barrett, H. 
1889, p. 696. 



630 Notes oj Rulings 

" SvbstantiaUy changing the greater part of such bill." 
For a case in which a bill was held to have been sub- 
stantially changed, see Paton (acting Speaker), H. 1899, 
p. 855. For cases in which a bill was held not to have 
been substantially changed, see Meyer, H. 1895, p. 1275; 
Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1312. 

*'And shall then be open to further amendment before such 
question is put." By general parliamentary law it is not in 
order to amend a substitute at the same stage in which it is 
adopted. Phelps, H. 1857, p. 984. 

VOTING. 

It is the duty of every member to vote unless excused 
from so doing, or debarred by private interests. Bar- 
rett, H. 1892, p. 1207. See note to House Rule 64. 

A member has no right to change his vote after the re- 
sult is declared, even though the declaration is erroneous, 
and the right is claimed prior to a corrected statement. 
Phelps, H. 1856, p. 496. 

A vote may be declared null and void after it has been 
recorded. Eddy, H. 1855, p. 1570. 

Pending a roll-call it is not in order to move that the 
doors be closed, because such a motion, if adopted, might 
prevent a member who happened to be outside from voting. 
It is, however, in order to close the doors in case of a call 
of the House, because it is the very object of the proceed- 
ing to ascertain who is present. Hale, H. 1859, p. 335. 

Rule 62. For a case in which a substitute bill was held 
not to change substantially the greater part of the original 
bill, see Myers, H. 1903, p. 955. 

Rule 63. In the case of a creditor or stockholder of 
the Eastern Railroad, it was held that he could vote on the 
bill "for the relief of the Eastern Railroad Company and 



On the House Rules, 631 

the securing of its debts and liabilities," inasmuch as such 
creditor's or stockholder's interest was not "distinct from 
the public interest, but was inseparably mixed with it." 
Long, H. 1876, p. 181, and cases there cited. See also 
WiNTHROP, H. 1838, pp. 202, 212. 

A director of a bank which has petitioned for an increase 
of capital was held not to be excluded by interest from 
voting on a motion to instruct the committee on Banks 
and Banking to report leave to withdraw on all petitions 
by banks for an increase of capital. Buss, H. 1853, 
p. 605. See also Winthrop, H. 1838, pp. 77, 78, 79; 
WiNTHROP, H. 1840, p. 207. 

In the case of a bill "to equalize the bounties of our 
soldiers," which provided for paying certain sums of 
money to a particular class of persons described in the 
bill, it was held that a member w^ho, under the provisions 
of the bill, would be entitled to $200, had such an interest 
as would deprive him of the right to vote. Stone, H. 
1866, p. 364. See also cases there cited. 

The proper time to raise a point of order questioning 
the right of a member to vote on account of interest is 
after the roll has been called and the member's vote re- 
corded. Barrett, H. 1892, p. 1125. 

For other cases relating to this rule, see Banks, H. 1852, 
p. 225; AsmiuN, H. 1841, p. 387. 

Rule 64. Any member may require the observance by 
other members of the duty of voting while the vote is 
proceeding, and before it is declared; but it is too late 
to call for the enforcement of the rule after the vote has 
been completed and declared. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 564. 

"Members desiring to be excused from voting shall make 
application," etc. For a case which arose prior to the 
adoption of this provision, see Bliss, H. 1853, p. 367. 

This rule applies only to main questions, and not to 



632 Notes oj Rulings 

subsidiary, incidental or privileged questions. Brackett, 
H. 1885, p. 766. 

"And shall not he subject to the provisions of rule &ixty- 
eight." This means that the yeas and nays cannot be taken 
on the question of excusing a member from voting. Bar- 
REHT, H. 1890, p. 607. 

Rule 66. The privilege of a member to doubt a vote 
has been held not to be lost, although another member, de- 
sii-ing to offer an amendment, first secures recognition by 
the chair. Underhill (acting speaker), H. 1911, p. 1996. 

Rule 67. "And if a quorum is present the vote shall 
stand." This is an expression of a general principle enun- 
ciated by Speaker Sanford, H. 1874, p. 564. 13arrett, 
H. 1889, p. 226. See also notes of rulings on the Consti- 
tution, Articles of Amendment, XXXIIL, and on the Sen- 
ate Rules under "Voting." 

Where the Journal showed that less than a quorum 
voted, and that the point of order was immediately raised 
that a quorum was not present and the House adjourned 
without determining whether a quorum was in fact present, 
it was held that the vote was void. Meyer, H. 1895, p. 370. 

Rule 68. The call for the yeas and nays on the ques- 
tion of the disposition of a matter on the calendar must 
be made before the consideration of the next matter on 
the calendar has been taken up. Myers, H. 1902, p. 359. 

Under a rule which enabled one-fifth of the members 
present and voting to order the yeas and nays, it was held 
that a vote for the yeas and nays could not be reconsid- 
ered except by a four-fifths vote. Eddy, H. 1855, p. 15. 
Contra, Phelps, H. 1856, p. 1120; Gushing, § 1271. 

When a question is before the House, and the yeas and 
nays have been ordered, a motion to reverse the roll-call 
is not in order. Bliss, H. 1853, p. 299. 



On the House Mules. 633 

It seems that a request for the yeas and nays cannot be 
laid on the table. See Ashmun, H. 1841, p. 385. 

Pending the taking of the yeas and nays a point of order 
will not be entertained. Myers, H. 1902, p. 1232. 

After a request for the yeas and nays has been refused, 
a second request on the same question cannot be enter- 
tained. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1314; White (acting 
Speaker), H. 1910, p. 646. 

'*No member shall be allowed to vote who was not on the 
floor before the vote is declared.'' For a case arising when 
the rule provided that no member shall be allowed to vote 
who was not upon the floor when his name was called, 
or before the roll-call was finished, see Eddy, H. 1855, 
pp. 1573, 1658. 

*' // . . .a memher states . . . that he has faired . . . 
such members shall be excused from voting." It has been 
held not to be in order to pair on a motion to adjourn. 
Barnes (acting Speaker), H. 1889, p. 709. 

" But shall be included with the members voting for the 
purposes of a quorum." Prior to the addition of these 
words to the rule it was held that if the roll-call showed 
less than a quorum present and voting, the pairs announced 
could not be comited to make up a quorum. Barrett, H. 
1890, pp. 774, 799. 

Rule 69. If a request for the yeas and nays, made before 
the question is put, fails, a second request for the purpose 
of verifying the vote cannot be entertained. Myers, H. 
1900, p. 1314. 

RECONSIDERATION. 

Rule 70. This rule was reconstructed and certain new 
provisions were added in 1902. 

As to reconsideration of a vote on a motion requiring 
more or less than a majority vote for its adoption, see 
notes to Rule 68. 

Reconsideration can be had of a vote rejecting the re- 



634 Notes oj Rulings 

port of a committee which declared that the seat of a 
member was vacant. Hale, H. 1859, p. 133. 

As to reconsideration of votes to commit petitions, etc., 
and of the enactment of laws, see notes to Senate Rules 8 
and 53. 

The vote requiring the yeas and nays to be taken can be 
reconsidered. Notes, H. 1881, p. 490. 

A motion to suspend this rule may be entertained after 
the time allowed for a motion to reconsider has elapsed. 
Notes, H. 1887, p. 331. 

When a vote has been passed to close debate at a speci- 
fied time, and that time has arrived, it is too late to move 
a reconsideration in order to extend the debate. Notes, 
H. 1880, p. 220. 

A motion to reconsider a vote whereby a rule has been 
suspended cannot be entertained after business consequent 
upon the suspension has intervened. Meter, H. 1894, 
p. 466. 

As to whether the adoption of an order can be recon- 
sidered after its execution has begun, see Hale, H. 1859, 
p. 270. 

It has been held that a motion to reconsider a vote on 
an undebatable question cannot be debated. Rockwell, 
H. 1858, p. 331. 

A motion to rescind a standing or special order of the 
House may be entertained after the time for reconsidera- 
tion of the order has expired. Meter, H. 1895, p. 982; 
Meter, H. 1894, p. 823. 

*' On the next day thereafter on which a quorum is present." 
Before the requirement of the presence of a quorum was 
inserted in this rule, it was held that a session held merely 
for the purpose of complying with the provisions of the 
Constitution, and not for the purpose of transacting busi- 
ness, was not to be considered as "the succeeding day." 
Barrett, H. 1890, p. 1277. 



Oi the House Rules. 636 

When each of two or more daily sessions is declared to 
be a legislative day, each session is a day within the mean- 
ing of this rule. Barrett, H. 1893, p. 1036. 

" Last week of the session.'* These words may be con- 
strued as meaning the week prior to the date of final ad- 
journment voted by the House. Barrett, H. 1889, p. 965. 
See also the sub-heading " Last Week of the Session," 
under " Sundry Rulings." 

" Before the Orders of the Day have been taken up," For 
a case in which a motion to reconsider was entertained 
after the Orders of the Day were taken up, see Olmstead 
(acting Speaker), H. 1892, pp. 380, 381. But see also St. 
John (acting Speaker), H. 1892, p. 1202. 

" First in the Orders of the Day for the succeeding day.'* 
Under a rule having a similar requirement, it was held to 
be necessary, notwithstanding the rule, to take up forth- 
with a motion to reconsider a vote that when the House 
adjourn it be to a day or hour different from that fixed by 
the rules. Goodwin, H. 1860, p. 415. 

" Shall be considered forthwith." This does not prevent 
a postponement of action on the motion to reconsider 
by vote to that effect. Hale (acting Speaker), H. 1874, 
p. 23. 

A bill having been laid aside on the ground that it was 
beyond the scope of the petition on which it was based, a 
motion was made to recommit the bill under a suspension 
of the 5th Joint Rule. This motion having been rejected, 
and a motion to reconsider its rejection being before the 
House, it was held that the consideration of such motion 
could by vote be postponed to a time certain. Walker, 
H. 1909, pp. 844, 851. 

Where a bill had passed to be engrossed, and a motion 
to reconsider had been made, it was held that laying the 
motion to reconsider on the table would not carry the bill 
to the table, but would leave the Clerk at liberty to send 



636 Notes of Rulings 

it to the Senate. Jewell, H. 1870, p. 478. Contra, see 
notes to Senate Rule 46. 

" Provided, further." For the origin of this proviso, see 
KiNNicuTT, H. 1844, p. 524. 

In the case of a motion to reconsider a vote whereby 
the House refused to discharge a matter from the Orders 
of the Day under a suspension of the rules, it was held that 
such motion should be considered at the time when made. 
ToBiN (acting Speaker), H. 1886, p. 524. 

Rule 71. "No question shall be twice reconsidered.*' 
Where a bill had been rejected, and reconsideration was 
carried, and the bill was then amended in an essential fea- 
ture, it was held that a reconsideration of a second rejection 
would be in order, because the question on the second re- 
jection was not the same as that on the first. Stone, H. 
1867, p. 218; Hey^^ood (acting President), S. 1865, p. 533. 

The same question cannot twice be reconsidered. The 
fact that the question has been decided once in the affirma- 
tive and once in the negative makes no difference. Bliss, 
H. 1853, p. 721. 

It has been held that this rule can be suspended so as to 
allow a second reconsideration. Phelps, H. 1856, p. 481. 

It is competent for the House to reconsider a vote refus- 
ing to pass a bill over the Executive veto, notwithstanding 
the first vote is described in the Constitution as a "recon- 
sideration of the bill." Sanford, H. 1874, p. 583; Froth- 
INGHAM, H. 1905, p. 1098. See notes on the Constitution, 
Chap. L, Sect. I., Art. II. 

RULES OF DEBATE. 

Remarks should be addressed to the presiding officer, 
not to the House in general. Bullock, H. 1865, p. 155. 

When a member yields the floor to another, he loses the 
right to it altogether. Brackett, H. 1885, p. 741. 

No person not a member of the legislative body has any 



On the House Rules. 637 

right to take part in the debates. For a case in which 
application of this rule was made to the chaplain's prayer, 
see Sanford, H. 1872. p. 291. 

The uniform custom in the House has been to allude to 
a member by his residence. The pronouncing of the name 
of one member by another in debate is liable to lead to 
the excitement of personal feeling, and to a disturbance of 
that harmony and courtesy among the members which are 
essential to the highest style of order in a deliberative 
assembly. Bullock, H. 1865, p. 155. 

Allusion should not be made to the opinions or wishes of 
the Executive for the purpose of influencing the decision of 
any question. This point is not one merely of formality 
or propriety, but one of principle, affecting the independ- 
ence of the several branches of the government. The 
ofpcial acts and orders of the Executive, and his opinions 
oflScially communicated to the Legislature, are properly 
subjects of discussion, and may well be referred to for the 
purpose of influencing the action of the legislative body; 
but it is irregular and unparliamentary in debate for a 
member, with a view to securing the passage or defeat of 
a measure, to refer to the supposed opinion or wish of the 
Executive not officially promulgated. Bullock, H. 1865, 
p. 155; MoRisoN (acting Speaker), 11. 1889, p. 800. 

After a point of order has been raised, the subject can 
be postponed to give the chair time for consideration. 
Notes, H. 1882, p. 446. 

A point of order will not lie for the reason that a bill 
does not conform to the subject-matter as stated in the 
title. Barrett, H. 1892, p. 1160. 

An order having been adopted that the Speaker should 
declare an adjournment on the completion of the business 
on which the House was engaged at 5 o'clock, it was 
held that a motion to take a recess until 7.30, made after 
5 o'clock, was not in order, for the reason that the order 
had not been suspended. Brackett, H. 1885, pp. 771, 775. 



638 Notes of Rulings 

Rule 74. See Barrett, H. 1893, p. 908. 

Rule 76. The House has refused to sustain a ruling 
that the intent of this rule is to give the preference in 
speaking only to such members who have not spoken as 
rise at the same time with a member who may desire to 
speak a second time. Hale, H. 1859, p. 288. See also 
Barrett, H. 1893, p. 908. 

MOTIONS. 

In general terms, it is a principle of parliamentary law 
that no question can be moved a second time upon which 
the judgment of the House has already been expressed. 
See Wade, H. 1879, p. 540; Hale, H. 1859, p. 277; 
Phelps, H. 1856, p. 530. Thus a report of leave to with- 
draw having been made and an amendment substituting 
a bill having been rejected and the report having then been 
laid upon the table, the same motion to amend is not in 
order when the report is again taken from the table. 
Frothingham, H. 1904, p. 767. 

If a motion to lay on the table is lost, another motion 
to lay on the table is not in order until some substantial 
business has been transacted. The rejection of a motion 
to adjourn is not substantial business. Bliss, H. 1853, 
p. 281. See also Crocker, S. 1883, p. 286. 

A motion for the previous question was held to be out of 
order where the only business inter\'ening between it and 
a prior motion for the previous question was the offering 
of two amendments and the rejection of a motion to post- 
pone. Myers, H. 1903, p. 349. 

A motion to suspend the rule limiting the time allowed 
to each speaker is in order pending a debate, although 
before the debate began a similar motion had been made 
and defeated. Hale, H. 1859, p. 603. 

A motion that the further reading of a paper be dis- 



On the House Rules. 639 

pensed with is not barred by the fact that at a previous 
point in the reading a similar motion has been rejected. 
HiGGiNS (acting Speaker), H. 1894, p. 128. 

No two resolutions nor any two bills contradictory to 
each other can be passed at the same session. See Wade, 
H. 1879, p. 540. 

If, however, an amendment is made at one reading of a 
bill, inserting certain words, the same words, or any part 
of them, may be stricken out by amendment at a subse- 
quent reading without reconsideration of the first amend- 
ment. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 246. So also the rejection 
of an amendment at one reading of a bill does not bar the 
same amendment from being entertained at a subsequent 
reading. Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1187. For further modifica- 
tions and explanations of this principle, see notes to Senate 
Rule 54 and House Rule 49. 

A resolution disapproving of the course of a member is 
not admissible, unless such course has been in violation of 
the rules and privileges of the House. Sanford, H. 1872, 
p. 292. 

Rule 78. "A motion . . . may he withdrawn by the 
mover if no objection is made." When a motion to recon- 
sider was made, and under the rule went over to the suc- 
ceeding day, it was held that it was no longer before the 
House and could not be withdrawn until reached on such 
succeeding day, unless the rule was suspended so that it 
could be at once considered. Phelps, H. 1857, p. 533. 

Rule 79. "A motion to adjourn shall be always first in 
order.'* A motion to adjourn is not in order pending the 
verification of a vote. If the previous question is ordered, 
a motion to adjourn is not in order until the main question 
is decided. Bliss, H. 1853, pp. 274, 365. See also Lor- 
ING, S. 1874, pp. 551, 554; Crocker, S. 1883, p. 289. 



640 Notes of Rulings 

A motion to adjourn to a specified time is not entitled to 
precedence. Bliss, H. 1853, p. 302. 

If a motion to adjourn has been negatived, it cannot be 
renewed until substantial business has intervened. Bliss, 
H. 1853, p. 303; Bachelder (acting Speaker), H. 1898, 
p. 780. See notes to Senate Rule 46. 

The ordering of the yeas and nays on the pending ques- 
tion, and the interposition of a request to be excused from 
voting and ordering the yeas and nays on this question, is 
not substantial business. Brackett, H. 1885, p. 356. 

If there is no other motion before the House, a motion 
to adjourn may be amended by specifying a particular day, 
and it has been held that it is not even then debatable. 
Crowninshield, H. 1849, p. 314. 

Rule 80. See notes to House Rules 68 and 79. 

" Or some other motion that has precedence." If a special 
assignment is not called up on the day assigned for its con- 
sideration, it has been held that it falls through and loses 
its privilege, but this ruling was overruled by the House. 
Bliss, H. 1853. p. 347. See note to Senate Rule 46. 

"For the previous question." A motion for the previous 
question was held to be out of order where the only busi- 
ness intervening between it and a prior motion for the 
previous question was the offering of two amendments 
and the rejection of a motion to postpone. Myers, H. 
1903, p. 349. 

" To close the debate at a specified tim^." The adoption 
of a motion to take the vote at a specified time does not 
bar a motion for the previous question or a motion to 
extend the time. Sanford, H. 1873, p. 262. When, 
however, the time fixed for taking the vote has arrived, it 
is too late to move a reconsideration in order to extend 
the time. Noyes, H. 1880, p. 220. 

A motion to reconsider a vote fixing the time for clos- 



On the House Rules. 641 

ing debate, although made before the time specified, is 
cut off if the time specified arrives before the vote on re- 
consideration is taken. Walker, H. 1910, p. 1266. 

It has been held that a motion to close the debate must 
be put to the question before the time specified in the 
motion, even if it is necessary to interrupt a speaker for 
the purpose of so doing. Upham, S. 1858, p. 448. 

A motion to close debate at a specified time was held 
not to have been rendered inoperative by the fact that 
after the time had passed, but before the votes on various 
pending amendments and on the main question had been 
taken, the House considered and acted upon a special as- 
signment and then adjourned. Myers, H. 1903, p. 955. 

The motion to close the debate at a specified time cannot 
be applied to a motion to refer a matter to the next General 
Court. Brackett, H. 1885, p. 599. 

" To commit {or recommit)." See note to Senate Rule 46. 

" To amend." See notes to House Rule 90 and Senate 
Rules 46 and 50. 

" To refer to the next General Court." It has been held 
that a motion to refer to the next General Court can be ap- 
plied to a motion to reconsider. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 1277. 

Rule 81. If the House adjourns pending a motion for 
the previous question, the consideration of said motion is 
not removed from before the House on the following day. 
Barrett, H. 1890, p. 604. 

Rule 84. After the adoption of the motion for the 
previous question, and after it was shown, on putting the 
main question to vote, that a quorum was not present, 
the point of order that upon securing the attendance of a 
quorum further debate should be allowed was held to be 
not well taken, as not being seasonably raised. Cole, H. 
1907, p. 794. 



642 Notes of Rulings 

If a motion for the previous question is carried while 
a motion to reconsider the adoption of an amendment is 
pending, the motion to reconsider is not thereby made the 
main question. Eldridge (acting Speaker), H. 1860, p. 288. 

''And then upon the main question." The announcement 
of a vote for the preacher of the election sermon having 
shown that no person had a majority, a motion was made 
that the person having the highest number of votes be 
declared elected, and the previous question was then 
moved and carried, and it was held that the main question 
was the motion that a plurality should elect. Bradbury, 
H. 1848, p. 273. 

Rule 85. Unless the vote on a motion to close debate 
at a specified time can be taken at least thirty minutes 
before the time specified, the motion is improperly before 
the House. Bates, H. 1899, p. 505; Walker, H. 1911, 
p. 1952. 

Rule 86. When a bill has been substituted for the re- 
port of a committee, the member who made the motion to 
substitute is not in charge of the measure within the mean- 
ing of this rule, unless such member was in charge of the 
original measure. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 863; Barrett, H. 
1893, p. 1073. 

If the committee on Bills in the Third Reading reports 
adversely on a bill which has been substituted for the re- 
port of a committee, the chairman of the committee on 
Bills in the Third Reading is not in charge of the bill 
within the meaning of this rule. Barrett, H. 1890, p. 863. 

Reference to the committee on Rules for the purpose of 
modifying a bill so as to make it conform to the provisions 
of the order upon which it was based, was held not to take 
the bill out of the charge of the member of the committee 
by ;whom it was originally reported. Powers (acting 
Speaker), H. 1892, p. 914. 



On the House Rules. 643 

Where a bill reported by a committee had been amended 
in the House by the substitution of another bill, it was held 
that the member in charge of the bill originally reported 
was entitled to the ten minutes allowed by the rule. Bates, 
H. 1897, p. 836. 

A bill reported to the House by the committee on Edu- 
cation having been amended in the Senate by the sub- 
stitution of another bill, and the latter on reaching the 
House having been referred under the rule to the Finance 
committee, which reported that the substituted bill ought 
to pass, it was held that the member of the committee on 
Education who had charge of the original bill was still in 
charge. Dewey (acting Speaker), H. 1891, p. 1037. 

The member in charge of a measure is entitled to the 
time allowance given by this rule whenever the measure is 
before the House. Myers, H. 1902, p. 1283. 

" When the member entitled to speak under this rule is ab- 
sent," etc. Prior to the addition of this clause it was held 
that in the absence of the member in charge no other mem- 
ber of the committee could be considered as in charge, and 
entitled to speak. Brackett, H. 1885, p. 677. 

Rule 89. When an amendment has been adopted in- 
serting certain words in a bill, the same words when taken 
in connection with other words, thus constituting a differ- 
ent proposition, may be struck out by subsequent amend- 
ment at the same stage. Bates, H. 1899, p. 909. 

See notes to Senate Rule 46, under "to amend." 

Rule 90. Before the rules allowed committees to report 
a general law upon a petition for special legislation, it was 
held that a private or special act could not be changed by 
amendment to a general law. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 217; 
Long, H. 1878, pp. 117, 361. 

Amendments extending the provisions of a private or 



644 Notes of Rulings 

special bill so as to make it general are admissible if the 
committee might have reported such a general bill on the 
order referred to it. Frothingham, H. 1904, p. 628; 
Harden, H. 1883, p. 630; Mellen (acting Speaker), H. 
1893, p. 660; Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1146; Myers, H. 1903, 
p. 1383. See Senate Rule 16, House Rule 30, Joint 
Rule 7. 

To change a special act into a general act by amendment 
is to so amend as to make the provisions of the act appli- 
cable to all individuals of the same class. Bates, H. 1897, 
p. 183. 

Resolutions general in their scope may be moved as a 
substitute for resolutions special in character. Barrett, 
H. 1891, p. 60; Barrett, H. 1890, p. 866. See House Rule 
30 and notes thereto, and House Rule 95. 

If the subject-matter referred to a committee is general 
in its character, it is not in order to propose amendments 
changing the bill reported thereon from a general law to a 
special act. Bates, H. 1898, p. 674; Bates, H. 1897, pp. 
875, 968; Meyer, H. 1895, pp. 826, 1071, 1132; Noyes, H. 
1887, pp. 700,785; Wadlin (acting Speaker), H. 1887, p. 448. 
See also Bates, H. 1899, p. 332; Marden, H. 1884, p. 450; 
Noyes, H. 1888, p. 600. ^ See also notes to Senate Rule 50. 

An amendment is not in order if it extends beyond the 
scope of the subject-matter on which the report of a com- 
mittee is based. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1146; Barrett, H. 
1893, p. 1046; Bennett (acting Speaker), H. 1893, p. 471; 
Noyes, H. 1887, pp. 422, 532, 654, 668; Marden, H. 1883, 
pp. 232, 558. See notes to Senate Rule 50. See also ruling 
by Speaker Barrett, cited in notes on Joint Rules under 
" Committees. " 

A bill contemplating legislation is not admissible as an 
amendment to a report of a committee, leave to withdraw, 
on a petition which simply asks for a public hearing and not 
for legislation. Tucker (acting Speaker), H. 1892, p. 460. 



On the House Rules. 645 

In a case where a bill permissive in its character was the 
subject-matter referred, it was held that an amendment, 
which, if adopted, would make the bill mandatory, was not 
in order. McDonough (acting Speaker), H. 1888, p. 535. 

An amendment which provides for a modification of an 
existing law is not germane to a bill which provides for a 
repeal of the law. Marden, H. 1883, p. 512; Barrett, 
H. 1892, p. 786; Meter, H. 1804, p. 1085. 

A bill providing for the abolition of an official board 
was held not to be germane to a petition asking for the 
continuance of the board. Meyer, H. 1894, p. 825. 

An amendment striking out a portion of a bill is not 
germane if it broadens the bill beyond the scope of the 
petition. Myers, H. 1900, p. 918. 

A substitute removing existing legal restrictions is not 
germane to a petition and bill imposing more rigid restric- 
tions. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1007; Weeks (acting Speaker), 
H. 1908, p. 749. 

A bill regulating the giving of entertainments on the 
Lord's Day was held to be within the scope of and ger- 
mane to a petition asking for the prohibition of such en- 
tertainments. Myers, H. 1900, p. 738. 

A bill authorizing the sale of soda water was held to be 
germane to a petition for legislation to authorize the sale 
of "soda" on the Lord's Day, on the ground that "soda" 
was the colloquial phrase for soda water, and was the term 
most often used. Myers, H. 1902, pp. 917, 920. 

The House has a right in granting legislation to impose 
such provisos, conditions or limitations as to it may seem 
fit. Barrett, H. 1892, pp. 536, 839, 840. 

When the question is upon concurring with the other 
branch in the adoption of an amendment, such amendment 
only is the subject under consideration. Cole, H. 1906, 
p. 982. 

For sundry cases in which a point of order has been 



646 Notes of Rulings 

raised that a proposed amendment is not germane to the 
subject under consideration, see the appendixes to the 
House Journals under the title of "Questions of Order," 
or "Order, Points of." See also H. 1908, p. 838. A list 
of the cases which arose prior to 1902 may be found in the 
Manual of the General Court for that year. 

It is too late to raise objection that a substitute bill is 
not germane to a petition after the substitute has been 
adopted. Meyer, H. 1895, p. 406. 

So also it is too late to raise objection that an amend- 
ment is not germane to a bill after the amendment has 
been adopted (Myers, H. 1903, p. 1032; Myers, H. 1902, 
p. 1276; NoYES, H. 1888, p. 463), or after the considera- 
tion of the amendment has occupied the attention of the 
House a portion of two sessions. Sanford, H. 1874, 
p. 367. See also Dewey (acting Speaker), H. 1877, 
p. 463; NoYES, H. 1881, p. 480. 

See notes to Senate Rule 50 and to Joint Rules under 
the head of "Committees." 

Rule 91. This rule does not save the right to amend 
when a simple motion to strike out {i.e., a motion not 
embracing a proposition to insert) has been made and 
rejected. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 499. 

"A question containing two or more propositions capable 
of division." The question, "Shall this bill pass to be en- 
grossed?" is not divisible. Thus, in passing to be en- 
grossed a bill fixing certain salaries, the bill cannot be 
divided so as to allow the salary of each official to be voted 
on separately. Wardwell (acting Speaker), H. 1881, 
p. 490. 

''Strike out and insert." See Noyes, H. 1880, p. 60. 

Rule 92. Where there is no blank, and amendments 
are offered, changing the sum or time, the matter is to be 
treated as if the sum or time were left blank in the origmal 



On the House Rules, 647 

motion, and the sum or time therein stated is to take its 
place among the amendments in accordance with the pro- 
visions of this rule. Wade, H. 1879, p. 144. 
See note to Senate Rule 51. 

APPEAL. 

Rule 94. An appeal from the ruling of the chair must 
be taken at once. The right to appeal is cut off by the 
intervention of other business. Phelps, H. 1857, p. 907. 
See also Crocker, S. 1883, p. 289. 

Upon the question raised by an appeal, a motion for the 
previous question is in order. Miers, H. 1903, pp. 945, 
1064. 

For a case where the chair refused to entertain an appeal 
because the question had previously been decided by a 
ruling of the chair, which was confirmed by a vote of the 
House, see Bliss, H. 1853, p. 366. See also Crocker, S. 
1883, pp. 289, 290. 

The decision upon an appeal can be reconsidered. Bliss, 
H. 1853, pp. 730, 736. 

A motion to lay an appeal on the table is not in order. 
Harden, H. 1883, p. 582. See notes to Senate Rules 
under heading "Motions." 

ELECTIONS BY BALLOT. 

Rule 96. The election of a State director of the Troy 
and Greenfield Railroad Company was held to be within 
this rule. Goodwin, H. 1860, p. 665. 

PARLIAMENTARY PRACTICE. 

Rule 101. It is not competent for the House on motion 
to suspend the principles of general parliamentary law. 
The House could not suspend the rule that the rejection of 
a motion to strike out precludes amendment, any more 
than it could suspend the rule requiring a majority of votes 
to pass a motion. Sanford, H. 1874, p. 499. 



648 Notes of Rulings 



JSTOTES OF EULIXGS 



JOINT RULES. 



COMMITTEES. 

A report adopted at a duly notified meeting of a com- 
mittee, a quorum being present, was held to be a valid re- 
port of the committee, although an unsigned memorandum 
was written on the report to the effect that certain mem- 
bers, constituting a majority of the committee, dissented. 
BoARDMAif, S. 1888, p. 378. 

It is not within the province of the chair upon a point 
of order to inquire into the internal workings of a com- 
mittee with a view to determining whether a bill has been 
properly considered by such committee. Barrett, H. 
1891, p. 1127; Jones, S. 1903, p. 457. 

When a report is received, the committee's duties as to 
the matter reported on are ended, and they can make no 
further report upon it unless the subject is recommitted 
to them by vote of the assembly. Crocker, S. 1883, 
pp. 489, 576; Barrett, H. 1891, p. 789; Harden, H. 
1883, pp. 529, 669. 

The reception of a report discharges the committee, 
even though the report is subsequently ruled out as beyond 
the scope of the reference. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1463. 

A report of a committee made without authority cannot 
be considered. Barrett, H. 1892, p. 877. 

Every report should conclude with some substantive 



On the Joint Rules. 649 

proposition for the consideration of the assembly, such as, 
that a bill, resolve, order or resolution ought or ought not 
to pass, that it is inexpedient to legislate, that the peti- 
tioners have leave to withdraw, etc., etc. 

If a report recommends the passage of a bill or resolve, 
action is had upon the bill or resolve alone, and it takes its 
several readings, or is otherwise disposed of, as to the 
assembly seems fit. In such cases nothing is done about 
"accepting the report." The statement of facts and argu- 
ments embodied in the report in support of the recom- 
mendation of the committee is not accepted or adopted, 
. . . and the assembly, by passing the bill or resolve, does 
not endorse that statement of fact or argument any more 
than, when it passes a vote, it endorses every speech made 
in support of the motion. 

What is true of a report recommending the passage of 
a bill or resolve is equally true of a report recommending 
the passage of a resolution or order, reference to another 
committee or to the next General Court, or any other 
action. The substantive proposition of the report is the 
motion, as it were, of the committee, and that proposition 
alone is before the assembly for its action. The prelimi- 
nary statement of facts and of opinions contained in re- 
ports in the usual forms is not before the assembly for its 
action, and therefore cannot be amended. If, however, 
the proposition of a report is that its statement of facts 
and of opinions should be endorsed and adopted by the 
assembly itself, then and then only such statement would 
properly be before the assembly, and might be amended 
or otherwise acted upon. Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 489, 576; 
Barreit, H. 1890, p. 1254. 

Whatever the proposition of the report is, the question 
should be so framed as to embody that proposition in 
distinct terms. The ordinary form of putting the ques- 
tion, namely, "Shall this report be accepted?" is inac- 



650 Notes of Rulings 

curate, ambiguous, misleading, and ought to be abolished. 
Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 489, 576. 

If a committee report in part only, its report should 
expressly state that it is "in part," and should clearly 
define what portion of the subject-matter committed to 
it is covered by the report. The use of the words "in 
part" is, however, not essential. If the committee intended 
to report in part only, and the phraseology of its report 
is consistent with such intent, its report will be treated 
as a report in part. Crocker, S. 1883, p. 87; Barrett, 
H. 1889, p. 843. See also Sprague, S. 1891, p. 713. 

When a committee reports only in part, a motion to 
substitute a bill which is germane to another part of the 
subject-matter referred to the committee is not in order. 
Walker, H. 1909, p. 1245. 

A committee to which the report of a commission has 
been referred may report a bill on the subject covered by 
the report of the commission, although such report omits 
to recommend legislation. Notes, H. 1888, p. 670. But 
see Hartwell, S. 1889, p. 733. See also Sprague, S. 1891, 
p. 514. 

A committee to which a report of a commission has 
been referred should make separate reports on the various 
subjects on which legislation is specially suggested, and a 
final report, — "no further legislation necessary." In a 
case, however, where a committee reported a bill on one 
only of several subjects, deeming that legislation on the 
other subjects was inexpedient, and plainly indicated that 
its report was intended to be a report in full, it was held that 
any amendment within the scope of the matter referred to 
the committee was admissible, though such amendment 
might not be germane to the subject-matter covered by the 
reported bill. Otherwise the committee would possess the 
power to bury by its own action, and without the power 
of revision, the issues referred to it. Barrett, H. 1889, 
p. 842. 



On the Joint Rules, 651 

For a discussion as to the creation of joint committees, 
and their relation to the two branches, see Hale, H. 1859, 
p. 269. 

A joint order having been adopted instructing joint com- 
mittees to report reference to the next General Court on 
all matters remaining in their hands after a fixed date, a 
bill reported subsequently to such date was held to be im- 
properly before the House. Noyes, H. 1888, p. 832; Bar- 
rett, H. 1889, p. 897; Barrett, H. 1893, p. 706. 

As to whether the same subject may be referred to two 
committees, see Sanford, H. 1872, p. 419. It seems that 
such action would conflict with the principle of parliamen- 
tary law, that no bill or measure shall be twice passed 
upon in the same session. See Butler, S. 1894, p. 730. 
A recommendation of His Excellency the Governor having 
been referred to a joint committee, and a bill covering the 
same subject-matter having been referred to another joint 
committee, the Speaker, on a pouit of order raised when 
the latter committee reported, held that it was not within 
the province of the chair to question the propriety of the 
consideration by a committee of a subject referred to it. 
Frothingham, H. 1904, p. 349. 

Committees must confine their report to the subject re- 
ferred to them. For sundry cases in which the point of 
order has been raised that this principle has been violated, 
see the indexes to the Senate Journals under "Order, 
Questions of," and the appendixes to the House Journals 
under the title "Questions of Order," and "Order, Points 
of." A list of the cases which arose prior to 1902 may be 
found in the Manual of the General Court for that year. 
See also H. 1908, p. 1359. 

If the report of a committee is ruled out as beyond the 
scope of the reference, the subject-matter of the refer- 
ence is still before the House for its action. Walker, H. 
1909, p. 844; Myers, H. 1900, p. 1463; Underhill (act- 
ing Speaker), H. 1911, p. 1816. 



652 Notes of Rulings 

If a bill reported by one committee is referred to another 
committee, the latter committee is not limited to the scope 
of the bill referred to it, but may report any measure within 
the scope of the propositions upon which the original bill was 
based. Butler, S. 1894, p. 920; Lawrence, S. 1897, p. 763. 

When the rules require that legislation shall be based 
upon petition, the petition determines the scope of legisla- 
tion. A bill filed with the petition does not enlarge the scope 
of the petition unless the petition contains phraseology 
which makes the bill a part of it. Butler, S. 1894, p. 940-; 
Jones, S. 1903, p. 491. Neither does a bill curtail the 
scope of the petition which it accompanies. Bates, H. 
1899, pp. 1036, 1061. 

A bill prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors was 
held not to be germane to a petition asking that the sale of 
malt and spirituous liquors be prohibited, for the reason 
that, as appears from 2 Gray, 502, there are intoxicating 
liquors other than malt and spirituous liquors. Barrett, 
H. 1892, p. 730. 

In determining the scope of an application for legisla- 
tion, it should be construed liberally; but the chair is, at 
the same time, held to secure an observance of the rules 
made for obtaining well-considered legislation, and to the 
end that all citizens of the Commonwealth shall have full 
notice of matters brought before the Legislature affecting 
their interests. Sprague, S. 1890, pp. 405, 886; Tread- 
way, S. 1911, p. 1536; Pillsbury, S. 1886, p. 703; Board- 
man, S. 1888, p. 352; Noyes, H. 1888, p. 700. 

For a case in which the scope of an order was construed 
liberally, see Barrett, H. 1890, p. 1259. 

A committee can report a larger sum than that named in 
the resolve referred to it, Pillsbury, S. 1886, p. 700. 

A motion to recommit, with instructions to report a bill 
broader in its scope than the measures upon which the bill 
is based, is out of order. Pinkerton, S. 1892, p. 266. 



On the Joint Rules, 653 

As the greater includes the less, it is a general rule that 
a bill will not be ruled out because it does not cover all the 
objects embraced in the order. Pillsbury, S. 1886, p. 395; 
PiNKERTON, S. 1892, p. 428. See also Soule, S. 1901, 
p. 1049; Cole, H. 1908, p. 1005. 

But on a petition for general legislation it is not per- 
missible to report a special bill. Walker, H. 1910, p. 
1255; Walker, H. 1909, p. 844; Frothingham, H. 1905, 
p. 272; Frothingham, H. 1904, p. 806; Marden, H. 1884, 
p. 450; PiNKERTON, S. 1893, p. 505; Jones, S. 1903, p. 
491. See also Cole, H. 1908, p. 1005. 

It has further been held that a bill providing for a modi- 
fication of an existing law cannot be reported on a petition 
which asks for a repeal of the law. Notes, H. 1887, 
pp. 523, 552. 

As to what legislation can be based on the reference to a 
committee of a report of a commission or board of trustees, 
see Jewell, H. 1870, p. 478; Notes, H. 1888, p. 670. 

When a bill for a rearrangement of the congressional 
districts was reported by a committee, under an order that 
directed that the districts as rearranged should conform 
to the districts as then established as closely as the Imes 
of the existing wards and precincts of the city of Boston 
would conveniently admit, it was held that the chair could 
not attempt to decide whether the lines of the proposed 
new districts conformed as closely to the lines of existing 
wards and precincts as convenience permitted, but that 
the committee was free to use its own judgment upon the 
question. Lawrence, S. 1896, p. 983; Meyer, H. 1896, 
p. 1211. 

A message from the Governor transmitting a commimi- 
cation from a State commission calling the attention of the 
Legislature to a threatened abuse by a certain corpora- 
tion, and suggesting that some appropriate action be taken, 
was held to be sufficiently broad in scope to permit a remedy 



654 Notes of Rulings 

of the threatened evil either by a general or by a special bill, 
or by both. Myers, H. 1901, p. 1048. 

If any part of a bill covers a matter not referred to the 
committee, or if a special bill is reported on a petition for 
general legislation, the whole bill must be withdrawn or 
excluded. It cannot be amended before it is received. 
Sanford, H. 1872, pp. 422, 429; Sanford, H. 1875, p. 365; 
PiLLSBURY, S. 1886, p. 702. But such a bill may be recom- 
mitted. Walker, H. 1909, p. 844; Smith, S. 1899, p. 879; 
Sprague, S. 1890, p. 886; Frothingham, H. 1905, p. 272; 
Myers, H. 1900, p. 706; Brackett, H. 1885, p. 559; 
Brackett, H. 1886, p. 713; Barrett, H. 1889, pp. 717, 
853; Barrett, H. 1892, p. 724; Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1218. 

If, however, a bill or an amendment, which is not ger- 
mane to the subject-matter referred, comes to one branch 
from the other, such bill or amendment must be entertained 
out of courtesy to the branch from which it is received. 
Dana, S. 1906, p. 982; Smith, S. 1899, p. 887; Pinkerton, 
S. 1893, p. 470; Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 466, 877; Marden, 
H. 1884, p. 451. But see Marden, H. 1883, p. 478. For 
other cases upon "Courtesy between the Branches," see 
under "Sundry Rulings," at the end of the notes on the 
Joint Rules. 

Objection that a bill covers matter not referred to the 
committee cannot be raised after action on the bill, by 
amendment, or by passing it to a third reading, or even 
after continued deliberation in regard to it. Dana, S. 

1906, p. 480; Smith, S. 1900, p. 660; Lawrence, S. 1896, 
p. 941; Butler, S. 1895, p. 473; Pinkerton, S. 1893, 
pp. 387, 423; Pinkerton, S. 1892, p. 476; Cole, H. 

1907, p. 976; Newton of Everett (acting Speaker), H. 
1902, p. 479; Bates, H. 1898, p. 940; Attwill (acting 
Speaker), H. 1898, p. 840; Meyer, H. 1894, p. 1248; 
Barrett, H. 1891, p. 807; Barrett, H. 1890, pp. 340, 
1020; Brackett, H. 1886, p. 503; Dewey (acting 



On the Joint Rules. 655 

Speaker), H. 1877, p. 464; Sanford, H. 1874, p. 368; 
Jewell, H. 1870, p. 477. See also Notes, H. 1881, 
p. 480; Wade, H. 1879, p. 540. 

For a case in which, the question being on passing a 
resolve to be engrossed, it was held to be too late to 
raise the point of order that under the provisions of a 
statute (St. 1907, c. 520, § 3) the petition should have 
been referred to the next General Court, see Curtiss 
(acting Speaker), H. 1909, p. 1121. 

Where a committee has referred to it several petitions on 
the same subject, or various papers involving either directly 
or remotely the same subject, whether simply or connected 
with other things, and the committee has once considered 
and reported upon any one subject involved in them, it has 
entirely exhausted its authority over that subject. 

After such report has been once made, the subject passes 
beyond the control of the committee and becomes the 
property of the House. 

Any papers left in the hands of the committee which 
may indirectly involve the same subject must be treated 
as if that question was not in them. It seems not to be 
within the power of a committee to withhold mention of 
any particular petition, report or other paper, and thus 
retain possession of a subject once reported upon as a 
basis for a new action and a new report. 

General considerations support strongly this view. It is 
a maxim of jurisprudence that it is for the public advan- 
tage that strifes should come to an end. It is equally for 
the public interest that contentions in what our fathers 
called the Great and General Court should be settled once 
for all. Many persons have a deep interest in the matters 
heard before committees. They appear in person or by 
counsel; and when the subject is, by report of the com- 
mittee, brought before the Legislature, they appear to in- 
fluence the action of members, as they have the right to do. 



656 Notes oj Bulings 

When the matter is once disposed of, they depart, and 
suppose they may do so hi safety. They have a right to 
believe their interests no longer require their presence. 
But if a committee may revive questions once reported 
upon and settled, there will never be rest. Jewell, H. 
1870, p. 480. See also Notes, H. 1888, p. 584; Sprague, 
S. 1891, p. 516; Barrett, H. 1891, p. 790. 

A resolve, not an order, should be the form used to pro- 
vide for printing a document not for the use of the Legis- 
lature, and involving the expenditure of public money. 
Long, H. 1878, p. 58; Notes, H. 1880, p. 123. 

Further, as to cases in which orders would be suitable, 
see Long, H. 1878, p. 58. 

A motion that several bills comprised in one report 
should be placed separately in the Orders of the Day is not 
in order before the report has been received and the bills 
read the first time. Sanford, H. 1872, p. 404. 

Rule 3. A delegation to represent the State, composed 
not only of members of the Legislature but also of State 
officers, is not a joint committee within the meaning of this 
rule. Bates, H. 1898, p. 1068. 

Rule 5. Under this rule a motion to recommit, made 
at a date later than that fixed in the rule, is out of order. 
Barrett, H. 1891, pp. 866, 983. 

This rule does not apply to a motion to recommit to 
a House committee. Gushing (acting Speaker), H. 1911, 
p. 902. 

Rule 7. "Or other legislation." Prior to 1891 this 
phrase was "other special legislation" and special legisla- 
tion was held to be that which directly affects individuals 
as such differently from the class to which they belong or 
from the people at large. Pillsbury, S. 1885, pp. 588, 589. 



On the Joint Rules. 657 

It is the province of the committee, and not of the 
Speaker, to determine whether the purpose for which the 
legislation is sought can be secured without detriment to 
the public interest by a general law. Myers, H. 1901, 
p. 1048. See also Walker, H. 1910, p. 660. 

See notes to Senate Rule 16 and to House Rule 30. 

NOTICE TO PARTIES INTERESTED. 

Rule 8. See note to Senate Rule 15 and House Rule 31. 
For a case in which it was unsuccessfully claimed that 
a bill, though general in its terms, was in fact special in 
its operation, and that therefore notice to parties interested 
should have been given, see Walker, H. 1910, p. 1211. 

A bill may be laid aside on the ground that it is in viola- 
tion of this rule after it has passed through one branch. 
Bishop, S. 1882, p. 307. 

A bill which is offered as a substitute for a report of a 
committee must be germane to the subject referred to the 
committee. Jewell, H. 1871, p. 342. 

It is sufficient if the petition bears the certificate of the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth that the required publica- 
tion has been made. It is not necessary to state in detail 
in the publication all the provisions of the legislation de- 
sired. Barrett, H. 1892, p. 995. 

It is not within the province of the Speaker, but within 
the province of the committee, to determine whether a 
petition has been properly advertised. Barrett, H. 1892, 
p. 1160; Walker, H. 1910, p. 1471. 

"No legislation." Prior to 1890 the phraseology was 
"no hill or resolve," and under that phraseology it was 
held that an order that a committee investigate the man- 
agement and condition of a certain society and report 
what legislation is necessary was within the operation of 
the rule, because any bill or resolve embodying the con- 
clusions of such investigation would be within the scope 



658 Notes of Rulings 

of the rule. Bruce, S. 1884, p. 580. Contra, Pillsbiirt, 
S. 1885, p. 580. 

A bill to incorporate the Boston Railroad Holding Com- 
pany was held not to be such legislation as that described 
in this rule. Treadway, S. 1909, p. 1034. See also 
Walker, H. 1911, p. 1800. 

"Except by a petition." Prior to 1890 the words " by 
amendment or otherwise" were also used. For an in- 
stance in which under that form of the rule an amendment 
was held to be barred by the rule, see Bishop, S. 1880, 
p. 333. For an instance in which an amendment propos- 
ing a new treatment of a subject already in the bill, and not 
the introduction of a new subject into the bill, was held 
not to be barred by the rule, see Bishop, S. 1881, p. 384. 

For an instance in which it was held that a communica- 
tion from the Governor transmitting a subject-matter for 
legislation is, for the purposes of legislation, to be con- 
sidered in the light of a message from him^ and is entitled 
to the same consideration that such a message would have, 
and that a bill reported upon said communication is not in 
violation of this rule, see Myers, H. 1901, p. 1048. 

Prior to 1890 the following words were used, "Except 
by a report of a committee on petition duly presented and 
referred," and under this form of the rule various rulings 
were made. For cases in which a bill was ruled out, 
see Long, H. 1878, pp. 116, 120; Cogswell, S. 1878, 
p. 178; NoYES, H. 1888, p. 479. For a case in which it 
was held that the words "duly presented" did not require 
compliance with the provisions of chapter 2 of the Public 
Statutes in regard to notice; that those provisions were 
mandatory only to the petitioner, and that the Legislature 
might, if it saw fit, hear the petitioner, notwithstanding 
his failure to comply with the law, see Marden, H. 1883 
p. 533. See also Noyes, H. 1882, p. 90. 

*' Objection, to the violation of this rule may be taken at 



On the Joint Rules. 659 

any stage prior to thai of the third reading." For a case 
which arose prior to the insertion of these words, see 
Dewey (acting Speaker), H. 1877, p. 463. 

Rule 9. This rule does not apply to a message from 
the Governor or to recommendations contained in a report 
of a commission. Treadway, S. 1909, p. 1034; Cole, 
H. 1907, p. 976; Wajjcer, H. 1911, p. 1800. 

For instances in which bills mider this rule were referred 
to the next General Court, see Chapple, S. 1907, pp. 898, 
978; Cole, H. 1907, p. 1064. 

As to the form and evidence of publication, see notes to 
Joint Rule 8, 

For a case in which a bill was held not to be special, 
but to be general and therefore not subject to the provi- 
sions of this section, see Walker, H. 1910, p. 1212. 

The provisions of the Revised Laws, chapter 3, which 
are referred to in this rule, are mandatory only to the 
petitioner, and the General Court may hear the petitioner 
notwithstanding his failure to comply with the law. 
Myers, H. 1902, p. 268. 

Under this rule it was held that a petition to establish 
the boundary line in tide waters between two towns, in- 
volving the taking of land from one town and the annexing 
of it to the other, is, in effect, a petition to divide an exist- 
ing town; and, since no publication of notice, as required 
by law, had been made and the rule had not been suspended, 
a bill reported upon such a petition was improperly before 
the House. Meyer, H. 1896, p. 947. 

This rule having been concurrently suspended with refer- 
ence to a petition before its reference to a committee, and 
the committee having reported "leave to withdraw," it was 
held that the rule was no longer operative on the subject- 
matter of the petition, and that a bill could be substituted 
for the report of the conmiittee. Dana, S. 1906, p. 748. 



660 Notes oj Bulv. 



A bill reported to the House in violation of this rule, 
and there passed to be engrossed and sent to the Senate 
for concurrence, was in the Senate, in compliance with 
this rule, referred to the next General Court Dana, S. 
1906, p. 712. See "Sundry Rulings." 

For the case of a bill which was held not to come within 
the provisions of this rule, see Bates, H. 1899, pp. 1036, 
1061. 

LIMIT OP TIME ALLOWED FOR REPORTS OP 

COMMITTEES. 

Rule 10. If after the date fixed for final report a com- 
mittee reports a bill, such bill must be laid aside. Bar- 
rett, H. 1893, p. 706. So also a report of leave to with- 
draw will be laid aside. Meyer, H. 1895, p. 920. 

After a bill has been substituted for a report recom- 
mending reference to the next General Court, it is then 
too late to raise the point of order that the report was 
not made within the three-day limit fixed by this rule. 
Underhill (acting Speaker), H. 1911, p. 1791. 

General orders extending the time for reports of joint 
committees apply to these committees no less when sit- 
ting joindy than when sitting separately. Myers, H. 
1901, p. 1047. 

COMMITTEES OP CONPERENCE. 

Rule 11. It seems that any difference between the two 
branches can be submitted to a committee of conference. 
PiLLSBURY. S. 1886, p. 702. 

That which has been agreed to by both branches cannot 
be disturbed by a committee of conference. It is compe- 
tent for a committee of conference to report such change 
in the sections or portions not agreed to as is germane to 
those sections. Bishop, S. 1882, p. 391; Myers, H. 1900, 
p. 1403. 



On the Joint Rules, 661 

The reception of a report of a committee of conference 
discharges the committee, even though the report is sub- 
sequently ruled out as beyond the scope of the reference. 
Myers, H. 1900, p. 1463. 

LIMIT OF TIME ALLOWED FOR NEW BUSINESS. 

Rule 12. This rule does not exclude matters of privi- 
lege. They may be considered whenever they arise. 
PiLi^BURY, S. 1885, p. 583; Barrett, H. 1890, p. 1259. 

"AU other subjects of legislation." See LonG; H. 1878, 
p. 572; Brackett, H. 1885, p. 354. 

An order which is merely incidental to a subject of legis- 
lation before the House is not within the scope of this 
rule. Harden, H. 1883, p. 311. 

"Deposited with the Clerk of either branch." In 1891 
these words were substituted for the words ''proposed or 
introduced," previously used. Under the rule as it stood 
prior to 1891, it was twice ruled that matter referred by 
one General Court to the next, when called up in the Gen- 
eral Court to which it is so referred, must be considered 
as the introduction of new business within the intent of 
this rule. In both cases the bill in question related to 
the compensation of members of the Legislature, and in 
both cases, on appeal, the decision of the chair was re- 
versed. Crocker, S. 1883, pp. 521, 578; Long, H. 1877, 
pp. 466-473. 

" Shall, when presented, be referred to the next General 
Court." Under this rule, before the words "when pre- 
sented" were inserted, in a case where a bill had passed to 
a third reading, it was held that it was then too late to 
secure its reference to the next General Court under the 
rule. Dewey (acting Speaker), H. 1877, p. 463. See also 
Wade, H. 1879, p. 540. 

For a case arising under a somewhat similar rule, see 
Jewell, H. 1868, p. 591. 



662 Notes of Rulings on the Joint Rules, 

After the House had debated an order several times and 
had once adopted it, it was held too late to raise the point 
that the order came within the scope of this rule. Brack- 
ETT, H. 1885, p. 354. 

" This rule shail not he , , , suspended except by a con- 
current vote." Pending the question on concurring in the 
suspension of this rule to admit a petition, it has been held 
not to be in order to move to lay the petition upon the 
table. Notes, H. 1888, p. 260. 

PRINTING AND DISTKIBUTION OF DOCUMENTS. 

Rule 20. See notes on the Joint Rules under "Com- 
mittees." For a ruling on this rule as it stood before 
1886, see Long, H. 1878, p. 116. 

The House can by its vote alone order documents printed 
for the use of the House. Meyer, H. 1894, p. 397. 



Sundry Ridings. 663 



SUNDRY RULINGS. 



QUESTIONS OF PRIVILEGE. 

A resolution declaring vacant certain contested seats is 
a resolution of high privilege, and need not be supported 
by a petition. Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 1192, 1198. 

COURTESY BETWEEN THE BRANCHES. 
Where one branch has passed upon a matter and for- 
warded it to the other, the latter is, as a rule, bound to 
receive and act upon it. For instances in which this prin- 
ciple was followed and for the exceptions to it, see Cole, 
H. 1907, pp. 1236, 1240; Cole, H. 1906, p. 1177; Jones, 
S. 1903, p. 753; Myers, H. 1903, p. 1435; Myers, H. 
1902, pp. 1244, 1287; Soule, S. 1901, p. 931; Smith, S. 
1900, p. 531; Bates, H. 1899, p. 1096; Lawrence, S. 
1896, p. 1036; Pinkerton, S. 1893, p. 470; Sprague, S. 
1890, pp. 317, 794; Meyer, H. 1894, pp. 466, 877; Bar- 
rett, H. 1892, p. 1161; Barrett, H. 1891, p. 790; Mar- 
den, H. 1883, pp. 523-528, also p. 478; Bishop, S. 1882, 
p. 307; IMarden, H. 1884, p. 451; Pillsbury, S. 1885, pp. 
582, 583; Morrison (acting Speaker), H. 1882, p. 443; 
Brown (acting Speaker), H. 1882, p. 515; Bishop, S, 1881 
(extra session), p. 19; Bishop, S. 1881, p. 384; Bishop, S. 
1880, p. 243; Cogswell, S. 1878, p. 178; Cogswell, S. 
1877, pp. 301, 306; Long, H. 1877, p. 426; Sanford, H. 
1874, p. 392; Sanford, H. 1872, p. 125; Bullock, H. 
1865, appendix, p. 492; Phelps, S. 1859, p. 325. See 
also Manchester (acting Speaker), H. 1897, p. 1188. 



664 Sundry Rulings, 

A bill was referred in the Senate to the next General 
Court because reported in violation of the ninth joint 
rule, although it had been passed to be engrossed in the 
House and sent up for concurrence. Dana, S. 1906, p. 712. 

See notes to Senate Rule 54 and House Rule 49. 

CONCURRENCE IN AMENDMENTS. 

Where a bill passed in the House was sent to the Senate 
and there passed with an amendment, and was" then re- 
turned to the House for concurrence in the amendment, 
it was held that the House might agree or disagree with 
the amendment, or it might agree after amending the 
amendment, or it might refer the question of agreeing to 
the amendment to a committee, or might lay the subject 
on the table, or defer action to some day certain, because 
all such motions are supposed to be not unfriendly in their 
nature, at least not decisive or destructive. On the other 
hand, a motion to postpone indefinitely the whole subject, 
or any motion which carries with it an original purpose of 
destruction to the bill, is not in order, because the two 
branches have already agreed to the bill as a whole, and 
such a motion would be irregular in itself, and in its par- 
liamentary effects uncourteous towards the other branch 
of the Legislature. Bullock, H. 1865, appendix, p. 493. 

Where a bill which had been agreed to by both branches 
was sent by the House to the Senate for concurrence in 
certain amendments, and the Senate, in addition to acting 
on the amendments, amended other parts of the bill de 
novo, it was held that such amendments were not properly 
before the House. Meter, H. 1895, p. 906; Myers, H. 
1900, p. 1403. 

One branch, in considering an amendment to its bill 
made by the other branch, may amend such amendment, 
but its amendment must be germane to the amendment 
submitted for concurrence. Smith, S. 1900, p. 878; Far- 



Sundry Rulings. 665 

LET (acting Speaker), H. 1894, p. 1403; Cole, H. 1906, 
p. 982. 

For a discussion as to proceedings in case of a disagree- 
ment between the two branches in relation to amendments, 
see Hale, H. 1859, p. 116. 

LAST WEEK OF THE SESSION. 

During the last week of the session, the House having 
voted to remain in session until the completion of the 
matter under consideration and the vote thereon having 
been taken, it was held that a motion to reconsider was in 
order before adjournment. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1444. 

A standing order fixing the last week of the session is 
in force from the time it takes effect until the close of 
the session. Myers, H. 1900, p. 1444. 



The State House, 

Seal of the Commonwealth, 

State Library, etc. 



THE STATE HOUSE. 



The so-called "Bulfinch Front" of the State House was erected in 
1795-7, upon land purchased of the heirs of John Hancock, by the 
town of Boston, for the sum of £4,000, and conveyed by said town to 
the Commonwealth, May 2, 1795. The Commissioners on the part of 
the town to convey the " Governor's Pasture," as it was styled, to the 
Commonwealth, were William Tudor, Charles Jarvis, John Coffin 
Jones, Williiim Eustis, William Little, Thomas Dawes, Joseph Russell, 
Harrison Gray Otis and Perez Morton, The agents for erecting the 
State House were named in the deed as follows : Thomas Dawes, 
Edward Hutchinson Robbins and Charles Bulfinch. 

The corner-stone was laid July 4, 1795, by Governor Samuel Adams, 
assisted by Paul Revere, Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons. The 
stone was drawn to the spot by fifteen white horses, representing the 
number of States of the Union at that time. The original building is 
172 feet front; the height, from base course to pinnacle, is 155 feet; and 
the foundation is about 106 feet above the waters of the bay. The dome 
is 53 feet in diameter and 35 feet high. The original cost of the building 
was estimated at $133,333.33. 

Extensive improvements, including a "new part" extending backward 
upon Mount Vernon Street, were made, chiefly under the direction of a 
commission, in the years 1853, 1854, 1855 and 1856. 

Under a resolve of 1866 a commission was appointed to inquire and 
report concerning the whole subject of remodelling or rebuilding the 
State House. They reported three propositions, without deciding in 
favor of either. The first was a plan of remodelling at an expense of 
$375,430; the second, a plan of remodelling at an expense of $759,872; 
and the third, a plan for a new building at an expense of $2,042,574. 
The report of the commission was referred to the committee on the State 
House of the session of 1867, who recommended a plan of alterations at 
the estimated expense of $150,000; and by Resolve No. 84 of that year 
the work was ordered to be executed under the supervision of a com- 
mission consisting of the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the 
House of Representatives, who were authorized by the same resolve to 
expend $150,000, and, by a subsequent resolve, $20,000 in addition. The 
President of the Senate died on the 29th of October, and thereafter the 



670 The State House. 

work was continued by the surviving commissioner. The improvements 
consisted of an almost entire reconstruction of the interior of the build- 
ing, except the " new part," before referred to as having been added 
from 1853 to 1856. They were executed from the plans of the architects, 
Washburn & Son, and cost, including furniture, about $250,000. 

The Legislature of 1868 made provision for reseating the Senate Cham- 
ber and the Hall of the House, which improvements were made under 
the supervision of legislative committees, in season for the accommoda- 
tion of the Legislature of 1869, at a cost of about $6,600, 

By Resolve chapter 68 of the year 1881, the sum of $45,000 was author- 
ized to be expended for improving the basement of the State House, in 
accordance with plans submitted by the joint standing committee on the 
State House. The work was begun soon after the regular session of 
1881, and was carried on under the supervision of the commissioners on 
the State House, consisting of Oreb F. Mitchell, 8ergeant-at-Arms, Hon. 
Daniel A. Gleason, Treasurer and Receiver-General, and Hon. Henry B. 
Peirce, Secretary of State, assisted by John W. Leighton and Asa H. 
Caton, both of Boston, and appointed, under the resolve referred to, by 
the Governor and Council. Under the plans the floor of the basement 
was brought down to a common level, and numerous additional office 
rooms and needed accommodations were obtained. 

Under authority of chapter 70 of the Resolves of 1885, passenger ele- 
vators were erected in the east and west wings of the State House. 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 349 of the Acts of the 
year 1888, the Governor and Council, " for the purpose of providing 
suitable and adequate accommodations for the legislative and executive 
departments of the State government and for the several bureaus, boards 
and officers of the Commonwealth, whose offices are, or may be, located 
in the city of Boston, and for any other necessary and convenient uses 
of the Commonwealth," on November 7 of the same year, took posses- 
sion in the name of the Commonwealth of the parcel of land lying next 
north of the State House, and bounded by Derne, Temple, Mount Vernon 
and Hancock streets, and also of a parcel of land lying to the east of Tem- 
ple Street, between Mount Vernon and Derne streets, both lots with the 
buildings and improvements thereon, full power being given them to 
settle, by agreement or arbitration, the amount of compensation to be 
paid any person by reason of the taking of his property. They were 
also authorized to discontinue the whole of Temple Street between 
Mount Vernon and Derne streets, and to negotiate with the city of Bos- 
ton concerning the construction of new streets or ways. 

By chapter 404 of the Acts of 1892, for the purpose of securing an open 
space around the State House, the commissioners were authorized to 
take, by purchase or otherwise, the land bounded north by Derne Street, 



The State Rouse. 671 

east by Bowdoin Street, south by Beacon Hill Place and west by the 
State House, and by chapter 129, Acts of 1893, they were authorized to 
sell the buildings thereon. Subsequently, the commissioners were author- 
ized to take Beacon Hill Place (chapter 450, Acts of 1893) and also the 
land bounded east by Bowdoin Street, south by Beacon Street, west by 
Mount Vernon Street and north by the land then owned by the Com- 
monwealth; and provision was made for the removal of buildings on said 
land and for the improvement thereof (chapter 532, Acts of 1894; chap- 
ter 223, Acts of 1897; chapter 382, Acts of 1900; and chapter 525, Acts of 
1901). In 1901 authority was given to the Governor, with the advice and 
consent of the Council, to take in fee simple, in behalf of the Common- 
wealth, a parcel of land, with the buildings thereon, on the southerly 
side of Mount Vernon Street, immediately west of Hancock Avenue 
(chapter 525, Acts of 1901). 

By chapter 92 of the Resolves of 1888 the Governor and Council were 
allowed a sum not exceeding $5,000 to enable them to devise and report 
to the next General Court a general plan for the better accommodation 
of the State government. 

A plan was accordingly submitted to the General Court of 1889, and 
$2,500 were appropriated for the further perfecting of said plan. A bill 
to provide for the enlargement of the State House was subsequently 
reported in the Legislature and became a law (chapter 394 of the Acts 
of 1889). Under this act the Governor was authorized to appoint three 
persons, to be known as the State House Construction Commissioners, 
and Messrs. John D. Long, Wm. Endicott, Jr., and Benjamin D. Whit- 
comb were appointed the commissioners. Mr. "Whitcomb died in 1894, 
and Mr. Charles Everett Clark was appointed to fill the vacancy. The 
latter died in 1899. In 1894 Mr. Long resigned, and Mr. George W. 
Johnson was appointed a member of the commission. The architects 
selected were Messrs. Brigham & Spofford of Boston. Subsequently 
to March, 1892, Mr. Charles E. Brigham was the sole architect of the 
extension. 

On the twenty-first day of December, 1889, the corner-stone of the new 
building was laid by His Excellency Governor Ames with appropriate 
ceremonies. The removal of the various departments and commissions 
to the new building was begun in the latter part of 1894. The House of 
Representatives of 1895 convened in the old Representatives' Cham- 
ber on the second day of January, and on the following day met for 
the first time in the hall set apart for it in the State House extension. 
It has occupied this hail ever since. Pending changes in the State House 
building, the Senate sat in a room numbered 239, 240 and 241, in the 
extension. Its first meeting in this room was on February 18, 1895. 
On April 8 it resumed its sittings in the old Senate Chamber. 



672 Tlie State House. 

By chapter 124 of the Resolves of 1896 the State House Construction 
Commiasion was directed to provide temporary accommodations for the 
Senate of 1897 and its officers. A temporary floor was accordingly con- 
structed across the apartment, then unfinished, that has since come to 
be known as Memorial Hall, on a level with the present gallery; and 
the room thus made was finished and furnished as a Senate Chamber, 
with accommodations for spectators. On January 6, 1897, the Senate 
met in this chamber, which it continued to occupy throughout the session 
of that year, and it also, for the first time, made use of the reading-room 
and the other rooms and oflices intended for its permanent occupancy. 
. By chapter 531 of the Acts of 1896, His Honor Roger Wolcott, Acting 
Governor, Hon. George P. Lawrence, President of the Senate, and Hon. 
George v. L. Meyer, Speaker of the House, were made a committee to 
decide upon a plan for preserving, restoring and rendering practically 
fire-proof the so-called Bulfinch State House. The committee was 
directed to employ an architect, who was to superintend the execution 
of the work in accordance with such drawings and specifications as 
should be approved by said committee. It was provided that the State 
House Construction Commission should have charge of the work. Mr. 
Arthur G. Everett was the architect selected by the committee, and with 
him was associated Mr. Robert D. Andrews. Mr. Charles A. Cummings 
was made consulting architect. 

By chapter 470 of the Acts of 1897, His Excellency Roger Wolcott, 
Hon. George P. Lawrence, President of the Senate, and Hon. John L. 
Bates, Speaker of the House, were made a committee to decide upon 
plans for furnishing the so-called Bulfinch State House, with authority 
to employ an architect to make drawings, specifications and designs 
therefor, and also to superintend the execution of the work. Mr. Everett 
was selected for the purpose. 

On the convening of the General Court of 1898, the Senate occupied 
for the first time the chamber in the Bulfinch building that had formerly 
been the hall of the House of Representatives. The original Senate 
Chamber was assigned to the Senate by the Governor and Council as 
one of its apartments. The Senate has continued to occupy its new 
chamber ever since. 

In accordance with the provisions of various acts of the General Court, 
the Treasurer and Receiver-General has, from time to time, with the 
approval of the Governor and Council, issued scrip or certificates of 
indebtedness for the purpose of meeting the expenses incurred in con- 
nection with the taking of land, — including land damages, — the con- 
structing and furnishing of the State House extension, the finishing of 
the Memorial Hall therein, the restoring and furnishing of the Bulfinch 
front, etc.; and bonds to the amount of $7,120,000 have been issued. 



Seal of the Commomvealth. 673 



SEAL OP THE COMMONWEALTH. 




COUNCIL RECORDS, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13th, 1' 



Ordered, That Nathan Cushing, Eeqr., be a committee to prepare a 
Seal for the Commonwealth of Maesachusetts, who reported a Device 
for a Seal for said Commonwealth as follows, viz. : Sapphire, an Indian, 
dressed in his Shirt, Moggosins, belted proper, in his right hand a Bow, 
Topaz, in his left an Arrow, its point towards the Base; of the second, 
on the Dexter side of the Indian's head, a Star, Pearl, for one of the 
United States of America. 

CREST. On a Wreath a Dexter Arm clothed and ruffled proper, grasp- 
ing a Broad Sword, the Pummel and Hilt, Topaz, with this Motto : Ense 
petit placidam Sub Libertate Quietem. And around the Seal : Sigilluin 
Reipublicce Massachusettensis. 

Advised that the said Report be Accepted as the Arms of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 



674 Arms and Seal of the Commonwealth. 



[Chapter 2 of the Revised Laws.] 

Of the Arms and the Great Seal of the Commonwealth, 

Section 1. The arms of the commonwealth shall consist of a shield 
having a blue field or surface with an Indian thereon, dressed in a shirt 
and moccasins, holding in his right hand a bow, and in his left hand an 
arrow, point downward, all of g6ld; and, in the upper corner of the 
field, above his right arm, a silver star with five points. The crest shall 
be a wreath of blue and gold, whereon, in gold, shall be a right arm, 
bent at the elbow, clothed and ruffled, with the hand grasping a broad- 
sword. The motto shall be " Ense petit placidam sub libertate quietem." 

Section 2. The coat-of-arms as drawn and emblazoned under the 
direction of the secretary of the commonwealth in the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-eight and deposited in his office shall be the official 
representation of the coat-of-arms of the commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts, and all designs of said coat-of-arms for official use shall conform 
strictly to said representation. 

Section 3. The great seal of the commonwealth shall be circular in 
form, bearing upon its face a representation of the arms of the com- 
monwealth encircled with the inscription, "Sigillum Reipublicae Massa- 
chuseltensis." The colors of the arms shall not be an essential part of 
said seal, but an impression from a seal engraved according to said de- 
sign, on any commission, paper or document shall be valid without the 
use of such colors or the representation thereof by the customary her- 
aldic lines or marks. 

Section 4. The seal of the commonwealth in use in the office of the 
secretary of the commonwealth when this act takes effect shall be the 
authorized seal so long as its use may be continued. 



Notice to Members of the General Court. 675 



STATE LIBRARY OP MASSACHUSETTS. 



It is hoped that the members of the Legislature will make constant 
use of the State Library and the Legislative Reference Rooms. The 
Librarian and assistants will be at the service of those in search of in* 
formation, and may be freely consulted. 

The twenty-third section of chapter 10 of the Revised Laws provides 
that the State Library shall be for the use of — 

1. The Governor, the Lieutenant-Governor, the Council, the General 
Court. 

2. Such other officers of Government and other persons as may be 
permitted to use it. 

REGULATIONS. 

1. The Library is open every day in the year, except Sundays and 
Legal Holidays, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Saturdays, when it is 
closed at 12 m. 

2. Visitors are requested to use the books at the tables, — Hot in the 
alcoves, — and to avoid conversation. 

3. The Statutes, Law Reports, and some other reference books may 
be taken to any room in the State House for temporary use, but are not 
to be removed from the building. 

4. Any book taken from the Library-room must be receipted for by 
the person taking it, who will be held responsible for its safe return. 

Trustees. — J 0^1 An H. Benton, Chai7-7nan, Boston; Allen T. 
Treadwat, Ex officio, Stockbridge; Joseph Walker, Ex officio, 
Brookiine; Winpield 8. Slocum, Newton ; Stephen O'Meara, Bos- 
ton. 

Ziftrarian. — Charles F. D. Belden. 

Assistants. — M\rs Ellen M. Sawyer, Principal; Miss Maria C. 
Smith, Miss Jennie W. Foster, Miss Susy A. Dickinson, Mrs. 
Annie G. Hopkins, Miss Sara E. Noyes, Miss E. Louise Jones, 
J. F. MuNROB, L. A. Phillips, W. R. Griffin, Abraham Trusty. 



676 Notice to 3Iembers of the General Court. 



AGRICULTURAL LIBRARY. 



A valuable Agricultural Library, connected with the oflSce of the 
Secretary of the Board of Agriculture, is also open, during the usual 
business hours, for the use of the members of the General Court. 



BOSTON ATHEN^UM. 



By the Act of the General Court incorporating the Proprietors of 
the Boston Athenaeum, it is provided that the Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, the members of the Council, of the Senate, and of the House 
of Representatives, for the time being, shall have free access to the 
Library of the said corporation, and may visit and consult the same at 
all times, under the same regulations as may be provided by the by-laws 
of said corporation for the proprietors thereof. 

The Boston Athenaeum is situated in Beacon Street, near the State 
House ; and members who may wish to avail themselves of their privilege 
can receive a note of introduction to the Librarian by applying to the 
Sergeant-at-Arms. 



MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Section 6 of the Act of Feb. 19, 1794, incorporating the Massachusetta 
Historical Society, provides that " either branch of the Legislature shall 
and may have free access to the library and museum of said society." 



CALENDAR 1912. 


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21 


22 


23 


24 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 








25 


2b 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


MARCH. 


SEPTEMBER. 


. . 


. . 


. . 


. . 


. . 


I 


2 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


b 


7 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


^S 


lb 




15 


lb 


•7 


18 


19 


20 


21 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




22 


23 


24 


25 


2b 


27 


28 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




29 


30 


, 


. 


;: 


• • 


• • 


APRIL. 


OCTOBER. 


. . 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


b 




. . 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


13 




b 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


12 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




13 


14 


»5 


lb 


17 


18 


19 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


2b 


27 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


2b 


28 


29 


30 


. . 










27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






MAY. 


NOVEMBER. 






. . 


I 


2 


3 


4 






. . 




, . 


I 


2 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


II 




3 


4 


5 


b 


7 


8 


9 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


15 


lb 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


2b 


27 


28 


29 


30 


JUNE. 


DECEMBER. 






. . 




. . 


. . 


1 


I 


2 


3 


4 


5 


b 


7 


2 


3 


4 


5 


b 


7 


8 




8 


9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


9 


10 


II 


12 


13 


14 


'5 




•5 


lb 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


lb 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




22 


23 


24 


25 


2b 


27 


28 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




29 


30 


31 




. . 




. . 


30 































mmm 


^J ^^ . ■ 


IM 








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