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Full text of "Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey"

Compliments of 

RICHARD S. KUHL, 

N. J. Senate, 1895. 



Date Due 



carl 



23-236 T'j 



J328 Copy 3 

M29U rl. J. Manual of the Legisla- 
ture of New Jersey 

1893 



: J328 Copy 3 
! M29li N- J. Manual of the Legis- 
lature of Mew Jersey 



1695 



TITLE 



DATE DUE 



BORROWER'S NAME 



New Jersey State Library 

Department of Education 

Trenton, New Jersey 08625 



(Si 



1 




-x/-*-^ 



//^-i^ur 



GOVERNOR. 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



MANUAL 



Legislature of New Jersey. 



ONE HUNDRED AND NINETEENTH SESSION. • 



1895. ^55^ 




BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

Copyright, 1895, by T. F. Fitzgerald, 



TRENTON, N. J.: 

T. F. FITZGERALD, LEGISLATIVE REPORTER, 
Compiler and Publisher. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in 1895, by 

THOMAS F. FITZGERALD, 

In the oflSce of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



4®=^The newspaper press are welcome to use such parts of the 
work as they may desire, on giving credit therefor to the Manual. 

THE J. L. MURPHY PUB. CO., PRINTERS, TRENTON, N. J. 



WBW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
TESNTON. NEW JERSEY 



<^M 



->! 



-dalendai' foif 1895.- 



%■ 






,^_ 


, ^^ 


1 ' -a «o '~-j' -^ 


. - ^ ■'«• i s 


1895 


1 


1^ ^ ^-"^ '^ "S li 
:^^ tsr t^ C^ eg 


1895 S .0 J i| ^ -rf ^ 

1 1 . 1 1 ■ 


JAN... 






1 


21 3 4| 5 


JULY.. 




1' 2{ 3' 4 5 6 




6 


7' 8' 9^10'llll2 




7 


8 9'l011 12 13 




13 1415 16 17 18119 




14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 




20|2i;22 23 24;25 


26 




21 


22,23 24:25,26 27 


FEB... 


27 


28l2930i31 


... 

i 


"2 


AUG... 


28 


29 30 31 


1 : 






12 3 




3 


4 


5 6 7 


8 


9 




4 


5 6 


7 


8 910 




10 


11121314 


15 


16 




11 


12 13114 


1511617 




17 


18 19 20 21 


22 


23 




18 


19 20;2ll22!23 24| 




24 


25 26 


27 28 








25 


26 '27 


28:29 30 311 


MAR... 






' 


1 


? 














3 


4 5 


6 7 


8 


9 


SEPT.. 


1 


2} 3 


4 5 


6i 7 




10 


1112 


13!l4 


15 


16 




8 


9I1O 


111213141 




17118 19 


20 21 22 23 




15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 




24|25|26 


27 28,2930 




22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 


APE... 


31 














OCT.... 


29 


30 












1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




71 8' 9 


1011 


12 


13 




6 


7 8 


9'10'11'12 




1411516 


17 18 19 


20 




13 


1415 


16 17 18 19 




21 


22 23 


24,25 


26 


27 




20 


2122 


23:24 25 26 


MAY... 


28 


^9 30 








1 


NOV.. 


27 


28 29 


30:31 


"1 
8 


... 
2 
9 






1 


^ 


3 
10 


4' 
11 




5 


6 


7 


8! 9 




3 


4| 5 


6 7 




12 


13 


14 


15'16 


17 


18 




10 


III12 


13!l4'l5!l6 




19 20 21 


22 23 


24 


25 




17 


18 19 


20 21 22 23 




26 27,28 


29 30 31 






24 


25,26 


27 28 29 30 


JT7NE. 












1 
8 


DEC... 




1 










2 


3 


4 


5 6 


7 


1 


2 3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 1011 


12 13 14 


15 




8 


9 10 


111213 


14 




16:17 18 


19 20 21 


22 




15 


16 17 


18 19 20;21 


'23j24,25 


26 27 28:291 




22 


2324, 


25 26 27 28 


30|...|... 


...L..I...I...! 




29 


301311 


...1. ..'...'... 



PERPETUAL CALENDAR 


FOR ASCERTAINING THE DAY OF THE WEEK FOR ANV YEAR 


BETWEEN 1700 AND 2499. 


Table of Dominical 
Letters. 


Month. 


Dominical Letter. 


YEAR of the 


CENTUR'S. 


Jan. Oct. 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


CENTURY. 




Feb. Mar. Nov. 
Jan. Apr. July 


D 
G 


E 
A 


F 
B 


G 

C 


A 
D 


15 
E 


c 

F 


'c) 


o'o 


N. B.—A star 





"P, 


^ 





.May 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


<m the left 


1^' 


"" 


^' 


S 


June 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


c 


D 


denotes leap 


!s 




2 


g 


Feb. Aug. 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


year. 


c 


E 


5^ 

G 


A 


Sept. Dec. 


F 


G 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


o\*2s\*56 


*84 


1 


8 


15 


20 


29 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


1 29 


57 


85 


B 


D 


F 


G 


2 


9 


16 


23 


30 M 


s 


s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


2 30 


58 


86 


A 


C 


E 


F 


3 


10 


17 


24 


31; Tu 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


3 31 


59 


87 


G 


B 


D 


E 


4 


11 


18 


25 




W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


F 


TH 
















5 


12 


19 


26 




Th 


W 


Tu 


^i 


s 


S 


F 


*4 *32;*60 


*88 


E 


G 


B 


C 


6 


13 


20 


27 




F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


5; 33 


61 


89 


D 


F 


A 


B 


7 


14 


21 


28 




s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


6 34 

7 35 

*8*36 

9, 37 


62 
63 

*64 
65 


90 
91 

*92 
93 


C 
B 

G 
F 


E 
D 

B 

A 


D 

C 


A 
G 

E 
D 


























EXPI.AXATION. 


10 38 

11 39 


66 
67 


94 
95 


E 
D 


G 
F 


B 
A 


C 
B 


Under the Century, and in the line with 
the Year of the Century, is the Dominical 


*12 *40 


*68 


*96 


B 


D 


F 


G 


Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 


13 " 
14 


41 
42 


69 
70 


97, 
98 


A 
G 


c 

B 


E 
D 


F 
E 


the month find the column coniaining 


15 


43 


71 


99 


F 


A 


C 


D 


this letter ; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 


*16 
17 


*44 
45 


*72 
73 




D 

c 


F 
E 
D 


A 
G 
F 


B 


the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 


18 


tl 


74 




B 


G 


January and February are in the lines 


19 


47 


75 




A 


C 


E 


F 


where these months are printed in Italics. 


*20 *48'*76 




F 


A 


C 


D 




21 


49 


77 




E 


G 


B 


C 


EXAMPLES. 


22 


50 


78 




D 


F 


A 


B 




23 


51 


79 




C 


E 


G 


A 


For December 31st, 1875 : for 1875, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 


*24 
25 


*52 
53 


*80 
81 




A 

G 


c 

B 


E 
D 


F 
E 


Friday; and for January 1st, 1876, the 


26 


54 


82 




F 


A 


C 


D 


letter is A ; under A, and in a line with 


27 


55 


83 




E 


G 


B 


C 


1, is Saturday. 



PERPETUAL CALENDAR 

FOR ASCERTAINIXG THE DAY OF THE WKKK FOR ANY YKAK 
BETWEEN 1700 AND 2199. 



Table of Dominical 
Letters. 



Month. 



YEAR of the! 

CENTURY. 

N. B.—A star 
on the lejt\ 
denotes leap 
year. 



c'*28'*56 



1 29 

2 30 

3 31 

*4*32 

5| 33 

6 34 

7 35 



*8*36 
9 
10 



*64 
371 65 
38l 66 
39 1 67 



13 
It 
15 

17 
18 
19 

*20 
21 
22 
23 

*24 
25 
26 
27 



*7. 



*76 



87 



o 'o 

9M 



EIG A 
DF G 
C,EIF 
B;D,E 



G B 

fa! 

E G- 
D F, 

bIJ 

A C 
G B 
F,A B 



GiA 
FIG 

c d' 

B'C 

AlB 



T\ 



Jan. Oct. 

Feb. Mar. Nov- 

Jan. Apr. July 

May 

June 

Feb. Aug. 

Sept. Dec. 



1 8 
21 9 
3 10 
4j 11 
5 12 
13 
14 



Dominical Letter. 



29 S 

30 M 
31|Tu 

W 
Th 
F 
S 



B 





D 


E 


F 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


A 


B 


G 


D 


K; 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


F 


G 


A 


B 


V. 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


G 


A 


B 


C 


D 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


T,-! 


i 


S 


F 


Th 


W 1 


S 


S 


F 


Ti:: 


Ti: 


M 


s 


s 


F 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


s 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 



EXPILANATIOX. 

Under the Century, and in the line with 
the Year of the Century, is the Dominical 
Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 
the month find the column containing 
this letter; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 
the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 
January and Febniarj' are in the lines 
where these months are printed in Italics. 

EXAMPLES. 

For December 31st, 1875 : for 1875, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 
Friday; and for January 1st, 1876, the 
letter is A ; under A, and in a line with 
1, is Saturday. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 



In 1606, King James of England granted a new patent 
for Virginia (ignoring that of Sir Walter Raleigh, dated 
in 1584), in which was included the territory now known 
as the New England States and New York, New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania and Maryland. The possession of Eastern 
New Jersey was claimed by the Dutch, the Swedes claim- 
ing the right to the Western portion. The former built 
Fort Nassau, on the Delaware, near Gloucester; Fort 
Orange, on the Hudson, near Albany ; and the Hirsse of 
Good Hope, on the Connecticut; the latter found the set- 
tlements along the Delaware river, after the Dutch built 
Nassau, the tort not being of sufficient strength to main- 
tain their shadowy claims. Disputes as to the rightful 
possession of territory continued for years, until the early 
spring of 1 664, when Charles II. sold to his brother James, 
Duke of York, "all that tract of land adjacent to New 
England, and lying and being to the westward of Long 
Island ; bounded on the east part by the main sea and 
part by the Hudson river, and hath upon the west Dela- 
ware bay or river, and extendeth southward to the main 
ocean as far as Cape May, at the mouth of Delaware bay, 
and to the northward as far as the northernmost branch 
of said bay or river of Delaware, which is forty-one de- 
grees and forty minutes of latitude, and worketh over 
thence in a straight line to Hudson river, which said tract 
of land is hereafter to be called by the name or names of 
Nova C^sarea or New Jersey." James soon sold this 
to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret. 

The name was given in honor of Carteret, on account 
of his gallant defense of the Island of Jersey, at the time 
he was Governor of the island. 

This grant regarded the Dutch and Swedes as intruders, 
and Berkeley and Carteret not only became rulers, but 
acquired the right to transfer the privilege to others. 
Measures were speedily devised for peopling and govern- 
ing the country. The proprietors published a constitu- 
tion, dated February 10th, 1664, by which the government 
of the province was to be exercised by a Governor and 
Council and General Assembly. The Governor was to 
receive his appointment from the proprietors ; the Coun- 
cil was to be selected by the Governor, who might make 
choice of six Councilors, at least (or twelve, at most), or 
any even number between six and twelve. 

On the same day that the instrument of government 
was signed, Philip Carteret, a brother of one of the pro- 
^ (7) 



8 BISTOR r OF NEW JERSEY. 

prietors, received a commisson as Governor of New Jersey. 
He landed at Elizabeth in August, 1665. 

The precise date of the first settlements in New Jersey 
is not known, though it is believed that the Danes or Nor- 
wegians, who crossed the Atlantic with the Dutch colo- 
nists, began a settlement at Bergen about the year 1624. 
About ten years previous, an attempt was made to form a 
settlement at Jersey City. In 1623, the Dutch West India 
Company sent out a ship under the command of Capt. 
Cornelius Jacobse Mey , who entered the Delaware bay and 
gave his name to its northern cape, and, sailing up the river 
to Gloucester, built Fort Nassau, which may be considered 
the first permanent settlement of the State. 

Upon the arrival of Governor Carteret, he entered at 
once upon a vigorous discharge of his duties. A large 
number of settlers flocked thither, and at an early period 
the executive authority of the province was established by 
the appointment of a Council, composed of Captain Nich- 
olas Varlett, Daniel Pierce, Robert Bond, Samuel Edsall, 
Robert Vacquellen and William Pardon. James Bollen 
was appointed Secretary of the province. 

The first Legislative Assembly in the history of New 
Jersey met at Elizabethtown, on the 26th of May, 1668. 
The session lasted four days, and was characterized by har- 
mony and strict attention to the business for which the 
Burgesses and Representatives were summoned by Gov- 
ernor Carteret. It may be noted that this Assembly passed 
laws by which twelve distinct offenses were made punish- 
able with death. The Assembly adjourned sine die, and 
seven years elapsed before another convened. The cap- 
ture of New York by the Dutch, July 30th, 1673, was fol- 
lowed by the subjection of the surrounding country, 
including the province of New Jersey. The whole of the 
territory, however, swung back to the possession of the 
English crown, by the treaty of peace with Holland, on 
the 9th of February, 1674. 

The second General Assembly began its session on the 
5th of November, 1675. Eight members of Council, in- 
cluding the Governor, were present, and fourteen Repre- 
sentatives appeared from the towns. Laws were enacted 
looking to the proper military defense of the province, 
for the institution of regular courts, and for the assessment 
of taxes. A code of capital laws was also adopted, similar 
in its provisions to that passed in 1668. 

On the 18th of March, 1673, Lord Berkeley, one of the 
original proprietors of New Jersey, disposed of his right 
and interest in the province to John Fenwick and Edward 



HISTOR Y OF NEW JERSEY. 9 

Byllinge, members of the Society of Quakers, or Friends, 
wiio paid the sum of £1,000 for the same. John Fenwick 
received the conveyance in trust for Edward Byllinge, and 
a dispute as to the terms having arisen, William Penn was 
called in as arbitrator. He gave one-tenth of the province 
and a considerable sum of money to Fenwick, and the 
remainder of the territory was adjudged to be the prop- 
erty of Byllinge. A permanent settlement was made at 
Salem, in June, 1675. 

Owing to the continued disputations and dissensions, a 
division of the territory of the province was agreed upon. 
By this "Indenture Quintipartite," dated July 1st, 1676, 
the line of division was made to extend across the prov- 
ince, from Little Egg Harbor to a point in the Delaware 
river in forty-one degrees of north latitude. These divi- 
sions were known respectively as East and West Jersey, 
until the charters of both were surrendered, and the two 
portions included together under a royal government. 

By the retrocession of New Jersey to Great Britain, by 
the treaty of 1674, the question arose whether the title 
returned to the proprietors or to the King. To avoid all 
difficulty, the King recognized the claim of Carteret, and 
made a new grant to the Duke of York, who also executed 
a fresh conveyance to Carteret, covering, however, only a 
part of the original territory of New Jersey. But, before 
making this conveyance, the Duke included the province 
in a commission given to Sir Edmund Andros, Governor 
of New York, who refused to recognize the authority, as 
Governor, of Philip Carteret, arrested all magistrates who 
would not submit to his own jurisdiction, and finally, on 
April 30th, 1680, carried Carteret himself prisoner to New 
York. The Duke was finally prevailed upon to acknowl- 
edge the claims of the proprietors, and in 1681 the gov- 
ernment of Andros came to an end. 
^ West Jersey, in February, 1682, was purchased by Wil- 
liam Penn and eleven other Quakers, and settlements 
were made at Burlington, " ye falls of ye Delaware " or 
Trenton, and a flourishing whaling station established at 
Cape May, not to mention Salem, already a growing town. 
The first Governor under the new proprietors was Robert 
Barclay, a Scotchman, and one of the twelve purchasers, 
under whom the country became an asylum for the op- 
pressed members of his creed, and for a time enjoyed 
great prosperity. But the number of proprietors, the 
frequent sub-divisions and transfers of shares, and various 
other difficulties in the way of good government, soon in- 
volved the province in trouble, and in 1702 the proprie- 
tors surrendered the rights of government to the Crown. 



10 LlfST OF GOVERNORS, 

Queen Anne appointed Lord Cornbury Governor of New 
York and New Jersey, but each continued to have a sep- 
arate Assembly. In 1738, New Jersey petitioned for a dis- 
tinct administration, and Lewis Morris was appointed 
Governor. The population was then about 40,000. The 
last Royal Governor was William Franklin, the illegiti- 
mate son of Benjamin Franklin. A State Constitution 
was adopted July 2d, 1776, and some of the most import- 
ant battles of the Revolution took place upon its soil. 
Among these were the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Red 
Bank and Monmouth. 

The first Legislature met at Princeton, in August, 1776, 
and chose William Livingston, Governor. The Federal 
Constitution was adopted by a unanimous vote, Decem- 
ber 18th, 1787. The State Capital was established at 
Trenton, in 1790. 

New Jersey, out of 98,806 men liable to do military duty, 
furnished 88,305 during the civil war, being 10,057 in ex- 
cess of the number called for by the general government, 
and within 10,501 of her entire militia at that time. Of 
this number 79,348 served with State organizations, and 
the remainder in regiments of other States. The naval 
and marine enlistments from New Jersey numbered 4,853. 
The entire expense to the State for organizing, equipping, 
subsisting, supplying and transporting her troops, was 
$2,894,384.99. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF GOVERNORS OF NEW JERSEY. 

GOVERNORS OF EAST JERSEY. 

Philip Carteret, 1665 to 1681 

Robert Barclay, 1682 to 1683 

Thomas Rudyard, Deputy Governor, 1683 

Gawen Laurie, 1683 

Lord Niel Campbell, 1685 

Andrew Hamilton, 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse, 1698 to 1699 

GOVERNORS OF WEST JERSEY. 

Samuel Jenings, Deputy, 1681 

Thomas Oliver, Governor, 1684 to 1685 

John Skein, Deputy, ... 1685 to 1687 

William Welsh, Deputy, 1686 

Daniel Coxe, Governor, 16S7 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse, Deputy, 1697 to 1699 

Andrew Hamilton, Gov., 1099 till surrender to the Crown, . . 1702 



LIST OF GOVERNORS. 11 

EAST AND WEST JERSEY UNITED. 

Edward, Lord Cornbury, Governor, 1703 to 1708 

John, Lord Lovelace — (died in office), 1708 

Richard Ingoldsby, Lieutenant-Governor, 1709 to 1710 

General Robert Hunter, 1710 to 1719 

Lewis Morris (President of Council), 1719 to 1720 

William Burnet, 1720 to 1727 

John Montgomerie, . . 1728 to 1731 

Lewis Morris (President of Council), 1731 to 1732 

William Crosby, 1732 to 1736 

John Anderson (President of Council), 1736 

John Hamilton (President of Council), 1736 to 1738 

(The foregoing were also Governors of New York at the same time.) 



SEPARATE FROM NEW YORK. 

Lewis Morris, 1738 to 1746 

John Hamilton (President of Council), 17-lG to 1747 

John Reading (President of Council), 1747 

Jonathan Belcher, 1747 to 1757 

Thomas Pownall, Lieutenant-Governor, 1757 

John Reading (President of Council), 1757 to 1758 

Francis Bernard, = 1758 lo 1760 

Thomas Boone, 1760 to 1761 

Josiah Hardy, 1761 to 1763 

William Franklin, 1763 to 1776 

FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION. 

William Livingston (Federalist), 1776 to 1790 

William Paterson (Federalist), 1790 to 1792 

Richard Howell (Federalist), 1792 to 1801 

Joseph Bloo.nfield (Democrat), 1801 to 1802 

John Lambert, Pres't ot Council and Act'g Gov. (Dem), . . . 1802 to 1803 

Joseph Bloomfield (Democrat), 1803 to 1812 

Aaron Ogden (Federalist) 1813 to 1813 

Williams. Pennington (Democrat), 1813 to 1815 

Mahlon Dickerson (Democrat), 1815 to 1817 

Isaac H. Williamson (Federalist), 1817 to 1829 

Garret D. Wall (Democrat), 1829 decl'd. 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat), 1?29 to 1832 

Samuel L. Southard (Whig), 1832 to 1833 

Elias P. Seeley (Whig), 1833 to 1833 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat), 1833 to 1836 

Philemon Dickerson (Democrat), 1836 to 1837 

William Pennington (Whig), 1837 to 1843 

Daniel Haines (Democrat), 1843 to 1844 

Charles C. Stratton (Whis), 1845 to 1848 

Daniel Haines (Democrat), 1848 to 1851 

George F. Fort (Democrat), 1851 to 1854 

Rodman M. Price (Democrat), 1854 to 1857 

William A. Newell (Republican), 1857 to 1860 

Charles S. Olden (Republican), 1860 to 1863 

Joel Parker (Democrat), 1863 to 1866 

Marcus L. Ward (Republican), 1866 to 1869 

Theodore F. Randolph (Democrat), 1869 to 1872 

Joel Parker (Democrat), 1872 to 1875 

Joseph D. Bedle (Democrat), 1875 to 1878 

George B. McClellan (Democrat), 1878 to 1881 

George C. Ludlow (Democrat), 1881 to 1884 

Leon Abbett (Democrat). 1884 to 1887 

Robert S.Green (Democrat), 1887 to 1890 

Leon Abbett (Democrat), 1890 to 1893 

George T, Werts (Democrat), 1893 to 



12 LIST OF UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



The following is a list of the United States Senators for New 
Jersey from 1789 to date: 

Jonathan Elmer, March 4th, 1789, to March 3d, 1791. 

William Paterson, March 4lh, 1789, to November 23d, 1790. 

Philemon Dickinson, November 23d, 1790, to March 3d, 1793. 

John Kutherford, March 4th, 1791, to December 5th, 1798. 

Frederick Frelinghuvsen. March 4th, 1793, to November 12th, 1796, 

Richard Stockton, November 12th, 1796, to March 3d, 1799. 

Franklin Davenport, December 5th, 1798, to February 14th, 1799. 

James Schureman, February 14th, 1799, to February 26th, 1801. 

Jonathan Dayton, March 4th, 1799, to March 3d, 1805. 

Aaron Ogden, February 26th, 1801. to March 3d, 1803. . 

John Condit, September 1st, 1803, to March 3d, 1809. 

Aaron Kitchell, March 4th, 1805, to March 21st, 1809. 

John Lambert, March 4lh, 1809, to March 3d. 1815. 

John Condit, March 21st, 1809, to March 3d, 1817. 

James Jefferson Wilson, March 4th, 1815, to January 26th, 1821. 

Mahlon Dickerson. March 4th, 1817, to March 3d, 1829. 

Samuel L. Southard, January 26th, 1821, to November 12th, 1823. 

Joseph Mcllvaine, November 12ih, 1823, to November 10th 1826. 

Ephraim Batemaii, November 10th. 1826, to January 30th. 1829. 

Theodore Frelinghuvsen, March 4th, 1829. to March 3d, 1836. 

Mahlon Dickerson, January 3Cth, 1829, to March 3d, 183b. 

Samuel L. Southard, March 4th, 1S33, to June 26th, 1842 

Garret D. Wall, March 4th, 1835, to March 3d. 1841. 

Jacob W. Miller, March 4th, 1841, to March 3d. 1853. 

William L Davton, July 2d. 1842, to March 3d, l»oi. 

Jacob W. Miller, Januarv 4th, 1841, to March 3d. 1853. 

Robert F. Stockton, March 4th, 1851, to February 11th, 1853. 

William Wright, March 4th, 1853, to March 3d, 1859. 

John R. Thomson (died), February lllh, 1853, to December, 1862. 

Richard S. Field (vacancy), December 12th, 1862, to January 13th, 

1863. 
John C. Ten Evck, from March 17th, 1859. to March 3d. 1865. 
James W. Wall (vacancv). January 14th, 1863, to March 3d, 1863. 
William Wright, March 4th, 1863, to November, 1866. 
F. T. Frelinghuvsen, November, 1866. to March 3d, 1869. 
John P. Stocktoii, March 4th, 1865, to March 27th, 1866. 
Alexander G Cattell, March 27th. 1866, to March 3d. 1871. 
John P. Stockton, March 4th, 1869. to March 3d, 1875. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen, March 4th, 1871. to March 3d, 1877. 
T. F. Randolph, March 4th, 1875, to March 3d, 1881. 

John R. McPherson, March 4th, 1877, to . 

William J. Sevvell, March 4th, 1881. to March 3d. 1887. 
Rufus Blodgett, March 4th, 1887, to March 3d, 1893. 
James Smith, Jr., March 4th, 1893, to . 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary 
for one people to dissolve the political bands which have con- 
nected tliem with another, and to assume, among the powers 
of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the lav»'s 
of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect 
to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare 
the causes which impel them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident : that all men are 
created equal ; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain unalienable rights ; tliat among these are life, liberty 
and the pursuits of happiness. That, to secure these rights, 
governments are instituted among men, deriving their just 
powers from the consent of the governed ; that whenever any 
form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is 
the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a 
new government, laying its foundations on such principles, 
and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem 
most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, 
indeed, will dictate that governments long established should 
not be changed for light and transient causes ; and accordingly, 
all experience hath shown that mankind are more disposed to 
suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invari- 
ably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under 
absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw 
off such government, and to provide new guards for their 
future security. Such has been tlie patient sufierance of these 
colonies, and such is now the necessity which constrains them 
to alter their former systems of government. The history of 
the present \ung of Great Britain is a history of repeated 
injuries and/usurpations, all having, in direct object, the estab- 
lishment of an absolute tyranny over these vStates. To prove 
this, let facts be submitted to a candid world : 

He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good. 

(13) 



14 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of immediate 
and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operations 
till his assent should be obtained ; and when so suspended, he 
has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish 
the right of representation in the Legislature— a right ines- 
timable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, 
uncomfortable and distant from the repository of their public 
records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance 
with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for 
opposing, with manly firnmess, his invasions on the rights of 
the people. 

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to 
cause others to be elected ; whereby the legislative powers, 
incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large 
for their exercise ; the State remaining, in the meantime, 
exposed to all the dangers of invasions from without, and con- 
vulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States ; for that purpose, obstructing the laws for the natural- 
ization of foreigners ; refusing to pass others to encourage 
their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new 
appropriations of lands. ^ 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing 
his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the 
tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their 



He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our Legislatures. 

He has afiected to render the military independent of, and 
superior to, the civil poAver. 

He has combined, with othei-s, to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by our laws ; 
giving' his assent to their acts of pretended legislation : 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us ; 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishment, for 
any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of 
these States ; 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world ; 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent ; 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 15 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefit of trial by 
jury ; 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses ; 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neigh- 
boring province, establishing therein an arbitrary government, 
and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render it at once an 
example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute 
rule into these colonies ; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable 
laws, and altering, fundamentally, the forms of our govern- 
ments ; 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring them- 
selves invested with power to legislate for us in all cases 
whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of 
his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned our 
towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

wHe is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign 
mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and 
perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on 
the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become 
the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall 
themselves by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrection among us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is an 
undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned for 
redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated petitions 
have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince 
whose character is thus marked by every act which may 
define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been wanting in our attentions to our British 
brethren. We have warned them, from time to time, of 
attempts by their Legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circum- 
stances of our emigration and settlement here. We have 
appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we 
have conjured them, by the ties of our common kindred, to 
disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt 
our connections and correspondence. They, too, have been 
deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, 



15 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our 
separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, 
enemies in war, in peace, friends. 

We, therefore, the representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress assembled, appealing to the 
Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of our inten- 
tions, do, in the name and by the authority of the good people 
of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these 
United Colonies are, and of right ought to be. Free and 
Independent States; that they are also absolved from ail 
allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connec- 
tion between them and the State of Great Britain, is, and 
ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that, as Free and Inde- 
pendent States, they have full power to levy war, conclude 
peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other 
acts and things which Independent States may of right do. 
And, for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance 
on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually j)ledge 
to each other, our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 

.JOHN HANCOCK. 



GEORGIA. 

Button Gwinnett. 
Lyman Hall. 
Geo. Walton. 

SOI'TH CAROLINA. 

Edward Rutledge. 
Thos. Hayward, Jr. 
Thomas Lynch, Jr. 
Arthur Middleton. 



Fras. Hopkinson. 
John Hart. 
Abra. Clark. 

MASSACHUSETTS BAY, 

Saml. Adams. 
John Adams 
Robt. Treat Paine. 
Elbridge Gerry. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Wm. Hooper. 
Joseph Hewes. 
John Penn. 



VIRiilNIA. 

George Wythe. 

Richard Henry Lee. 

Thos. Jefferson. 

Benjan. Harrison. 

Thos. Nelson, Jr. _ 

Francis Lightfoot Lee. xijoj ^Stone 

Carter Braxton. Charles Carroll 



MARYLAND. 

Samuel Chase. 
Wm. Paca. 



DELAWARE. 

Csesar Rodney. 
Geo. Read. 



of Carrollton. 



Geo. Clymer. 
Jas. Smith. 
Geo. Taylor. 
James Wilson. 
Geo. Ross. 

NEW YORK. 

Wm. Floyd. 
Phil. Livingston. 
Fran's Lewis. 
Lewis Morris. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Josiah Bartlett. 
Wm. Whipple. 
Matthew Thornton. 

RHODE ISLAND AND 
PROVIDENCE, AC 

Step. Hopkins. 
William Ellery. 

CONNECTICUT. 

PiOger Sherman. 
Saml. Huntington. 
Wm. Williams. 
Oliver Wolcott. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Robt. Morris. 
NEW JERSEY. Benjamia Rush. 
Richd. Stocktcn. Benja. Franklin. 

Jno. Witherspoon. John Morton. 

Thomas McKean 
Ordered: IN CONGRESS, January 18, 1777. 

That an authenticated copy of the Declaration of Independencj. 
with the names of the Members of Congress subscribing the stme. be 
sent, to each of the United States, and that they be desired to have 
the same put on record. 

By order of Congress. JOHN HANCOCK, 

Attest, Cd.AS. Thomson, A true copy. President 

Seey. John Hancock, 

I^endt. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.* 



We, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect imion, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quility, provide for the common defense, promote the general 
welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and 
our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution of the 
United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

LEGISLATIVE POWERS. 
Section I. 

All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a 
Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

1. The house of representatives shall be composed of mem- 
bers chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States ; and the electors in each State sliall have the qualifica- 
tions requisits for electors of the most numeroas branch of the 
State legislature. 

members' QUALIFICATIONS. 

2. No person shall be a representative Avho shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five yeai*s, and been seven years 
a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

RULE OF APPORTIONING REPRESENTATIVES AND 
DIRECT TAXES. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several States which may be included within this 

*This Constitution went into operation on the first Wednesday Id 
March, 1789. 

. 2 (17) 



18 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall 1)6 
determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, 
including those l)ound to service for a term of years, and 
excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. 
The actual enumeration shall be made within three years after 
the first meeting of the congress of the United States, and 
within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as 
they shall by law direct. The number of representatives shall 
not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall 
have at least one representative; and until such enumeration 
shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall he entitled 
to choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, one; Connecticut, five; New York, 
six; New Jersey, four; Pennsylvania, eight ; Delaware, one ; 
Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; South 
Carolina, five ; and Georgia, three. 

FILLING OF VACANCIES. 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any 
State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of elec- 
tion to fill such vacancies. 

OFFICERS — IMPEACHMENT. 

5. The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other officers, and shall have the sole power of impeach- 
ment. 

SENATE — HOW COMPOSED. 

Section TIL 

1. The senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two senators from each State, chosen by the legislature thereof, 
for six years, and each senator shall have one vote. 

ROTATION OV SENATORS. 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may 
be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year ; of 
the second class, at the expiration of the fourth year; and of 
the third class, at the expiration of the sixth year, so that 
one-third may be chosen every second year. And if vacancies 
happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the 
legislature of any State, the executive thereof may make tem- 
porary appointments until the next meeting of the legislature, 
which shall then fill such vacancies. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE XJ, S. 19 

THEIR QUALIFICATIONS. 

3. No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the 
United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhab- 
itant of that State for which he shall be chosen. 



PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE. 

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

5. The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or 
when he shall exercise the office of President of the United 
States. 

THE senate's powers. 

6. The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the President of the United States is 
tried, the chief justice shall preside. And no person shall be 
convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present. 

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office, and disqualification to 
hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the 
United States ; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be 
liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punish- 
ment according to law. 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS — HOW ELECTED. 

Section IV. 

1. The times, places and manner of holding elections for 
senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each State, 
by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at any time, 
by law, make or alter such regulations, except as to the places 
of choosing senators. 

WHEN CONGRESS SHALL MEET. 

2. Congress shall assemble at least once in every year ; and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 



20 GOnSTlTXJTtON OP TRP V. S. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF EACH HOUSE. 

Section V. 

1. Each house shall be the judge of the electiops, returns 
and qualifications of its own members ; and a majority of 
each sliall constitute a quorum to do business ; but a smaller 
number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner 
and under such penalties as each house may provide. 

4 

RULES, «&:C. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

JOURNALS. 

3. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as 
may, in their judgment, require secrecy ; and the yeas and 
nays of the members of each house, on any question, shall, 
at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

4. Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three 
days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses 
shall be sitting. 

COMPENSATION, PRIVILEGES AND INCAPACITIES. 

Section VL 

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the treasury of the United States. They shall, in all 
cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privi- 
leged from arrest during their attendance at the session of 
their respective houses, and in going to and returning from 
the same ; and for any speech or debate in either house, they 
shall not be questioned in any other place. 

APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE. 

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil ofiice under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been increased, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 21 

during such time ; and no person holding any office under the 
United States, shall be a member of either house during his 
continuance in office. 

REVENUE BILLS. 

Section VIL 

1. All bill for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of representatives ; but the senate may propose or concur with 
amendments, as on other bills. 

PASSING BILLS, &C. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the house of repre- 
sentatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be 
presented to the President of the United States ; if he approve, 
he shall sign it ; but if not, he shall return it, with his objec- 
tions, to that house in which it shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and pro- 
ceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsideration, two-thirds 
of that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, 
together with the objections, to the other house, by which it 
shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds 
of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such cases 
the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and 
nays, and the names of the persons voting for and against the 
bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten 
days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the congress, by their adjournment, prevent 
its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 

ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

3. Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concurrence 
of the senate and house of representatives may be necessary 
(except on the question of adjournment), shall be presented 
to the President of the United States, and before the same 
shall take effect, shall be approved by him, or, being disap- 
proved by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the senate 
and house of representatives, according to the rules and 
limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

POWERS OF CONGRISS. 

Section VIII. 

The congress shall have power: 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to 
pay the debts and provide for the common defense, and gen- 



22 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. 8. 

eral welfare of the United States ; but all duties, imposts and 
excises shall ))e uniform throughout the United States. 

2. To borrow money on the credit of United States ; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several States, and with the Indian tribes ; 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uni- 
form laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the 
United States ; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign 
coins, and fix the standard of weights and measures ; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the 
securities and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish post offices and post roads ; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by 
securing, for limited times, to authors and inventoi-s, the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries ; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court ; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed 
on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations ; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, 
and make rules concerning captures on land and water ; 

12. To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years ; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy ; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the 
laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be employed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the States, 
respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority 
of training the militia according to the discipline prescribed 
by congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatsoever, 
over such district (not exceeding ten miles square), as may, 
by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of congress, 
become the seat of government of the United States ; and to 
exercise like authority over all places purchased by the con- 
sent of the legislature of the State in which the same shall 
be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards 
and other needful buildings ; and — 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, 
for carrying into execution the foregoing powers and all other 
powers vested by this constitution in the government of the 
United States, or in any department or officer thereof. 



CONSTITUTION OP THE U, S. 23 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section IX. 

1. The migration or importation of such persons as any of 
the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not 
be prohibited by the congress, prior to the year one thousand 
eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed 
on such importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless, when in cases of rebellion or invasion, the 
public safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder, or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed 
to be taken. 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
any State. No preference shall be given, by any regulation 
of commerce or revenue, to the ports of one State over those 
of another ; nor shall vessels bound to or from one State, be 
obliged to enter, clear or pay duties in another. 

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular 
statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all 
public money shall be published from time to time. 

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United 
States ; and no person holding any office of profit or trust 
under them, shall, without the consent of the congress, accept 
of any present, emolument, office or title of any kind what- 
ever, from any king, prince or foreign State. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF INDIVIDUAL STATES. 

Section X. 

1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance or confed- 
eration ; grant letters of marque and reprisal ; coin money ; 
emit bills of credit ; make anything but gold and silver coin a 
tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post 
facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts; or 
grant any title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the congress, lay 
any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may 
be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws ; and 
the net produce of all duties and imposts laid by any State 
on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of 
the United States ; and all such laws shall be subject to the 
revision and control of the congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of congress, lay any 



24 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, 
enter into any agreement or compact with anotl)er State, or 
with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, 
or in such imminent danger as will not admit delay. 

AKTICLE II. 

THE EXECUTIVE POWEB. 
Section I. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of the 
United States of America. He shall hold his office during 
the terra of four years, and, together with the Vice-President, 
chosen for the same term, be elected as follows : 

HOW ELECTED. 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legisla- 
ture thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to the 
whole number of senators and representatives to which the 
State may be entitled in congress ; but no senator or repre- 
sentative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under 
the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGES. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and 
vote by ballot, for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And 
they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the 
number of votes for each ; which list they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the government of 
the United States, directed to the president of the senate. 
The president of the senate shall, in the presence of the 
senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates, 
and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the 
greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and 
if there be more than one who have such majority, and have 
an equal number of votes, then the house of representatives 
shall immediately choose by ballot, one of them for President; 
and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest 
on the list, the said house shall in like mannner choose the 
President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall _ be 
taken by States, the representation from each State having 
one vote ; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member 
or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of 
the States shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 25 

the choice of the President, the person having the greatest 
number of votes of the electors, shall be the Vice-President. 
But if there should remain two or more ■who have equai 
votes, the senate sliall choose from them, by ballot, the Vice- 
President. [See Xllth amendment.'] 

4. The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes, 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

WHO MAY BE ELECTED PEESIDENT. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this constitu- 
tion, shall be eligible to the office of President ; neither shall 
any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resi- 
dent within the United States. [See Xllth amendment.'} 

ON THE DEATH, REMOVAL, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT, 

THE POWERS AND DUTIES DEVOLVE UPON 

THE VICE-PRESIDENT. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of 
his death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and 
duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice- 
President ; and the congress may, by law, provide for the case 
of removal, death, resignation or inability, both of the Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, declaring what officer shall then act 
as President, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the 
disability be removed, or a President shall be elected. 

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his ser- 
vices a compensation which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during the period for which he shall have been 
elected ; and he shall not receive, within that period, any 
other emolument from the United States or any of them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation : 

THE OATH. 

" I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully exe- 
cute the office of President of the United States, and will, to 
the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the con- 
stitution of the United States." 



26 CONSTITUTION OF THE V. S. 

POWERS, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section IT. 

1. The President shall be commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several 
States, -svhen called into the actual service of the United States ; 
he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer 
in each of the executive departments, upon any subject relat- 
ing to the duties of their respective offices, and he sliall have 
power to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the 
United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

TREATIES, AMBASSADORS, &C. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and 
with the advice and consent of the senate shall appoint, ambas- 
sadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme 
court, and all other officers of the United States whose appoint- 
ments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall 
be established by law. But the congress may, by law, vest the 
appointment of such inferior officers as they think proper in 
the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of 
department. 

APPOINTING POWER. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by granting 
commissions, which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section III 
He shall, from time to time, give to the congress information 
of the state of the Union, and recommend to their consider- 
ation such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient ; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both h(>uses, or 
either of them; and in case of disagreement between them 
with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them 
to such time as he shall think proper; he shall receive ambas- 
sadors and other public ministers; he shall take care that the 
laws be faithfully executed, and shall commission all the 
officers of the United States. 

IMPEACHMENT, &C. 
Section IV. 
The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the 
United States shall be removed from office on impeachment 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 27 

for, and conviction otj treason, bribery or other high crimes 
and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER. 
Section I. 

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested in 
oijc supreme court, and in such infericr courts as the congress 
may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, 
both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices 
during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for 
their service a compensation, which shall not be diminished 
during their continuance in office. 

EXTENT OF THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

{See Amendments, Art. XL) 
Section II. 

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the United 
States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, or other public 
ministers and consuls ; to all cases of admiralty and maritime 
jurisdiction; to controversies to which the United States shall 
be a party; to controversies between two or more States; 
between a State and citizens of another State ; between citizens 
of different States ; between citizens of the same State, claim- 
ing lands under grants of different States, and between a State, 
or the citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens or subjects. 

ORIGINAL AND APPELLATE JURISDICTION OF THE 
SUPREME COURT. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers 
and consuls, and those in which a State shall be party, the 
supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the 
other cases before mentioned, the supreme court shall have 
appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such excep- 
tions and under such regulations as the congress shall make. 

TRIALS FOR CRIMES. 

3. The trials of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, 
shall be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the State 
where the said crime shall have been committed ; but when 
not committed within any State, the trial shall be at such 
place or places as the congress may by law have directed. 



28 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

TREASON — WHAT AND HOW PUNISHED. 
Section III. 

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in 
levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person sliall lie convicted 
of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same 
overt act, or on confession in open court. 

2. The congress shall have power to declare the punishment 
of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption 
of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person 
attainted. 

ARTICLE lY. 

ACTS, RECORDS, &C., OF EACH STATE. 
Section I. 

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each State, to the 
public acts, records and judicial i)roceedings of every other 
State. And the congress may, by general laws, prescribe the 
manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be 
proved, and the efl'ect thereof. 

PRIVILEGES OF CITIZENS. 

Section 11. 

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
leges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 

FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in another 
State, shall, on demand of the executive authority of the State 
from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the 
State having jurisdiction of the crime. 

SERVANTS, &C., TO BE SURRENDERED ON CLAIM. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under 
the laws thereof, escaping into .another, shall, in consequence 
of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from such 
service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on claim of the 
party to whom such service or labor may be due. 

HOW NEW STATES ARE ADMITTED. 

Section III. 
1. New States may be admitted by the congress into this 
Union : but no new State shall be formed or erected within 



CONSTITUTION OF THE V. S. 29 

the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be formed 
by the junction of two or more States or parts of States, with- 
out the consent of the legislatures of the States concerned, as 
well as of the congress. 

THE DISPOSITION OF TERRITORIES. 

2. The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory or 
other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing 
in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any 
claims of the United States, or of any particular State. 

GUARANTY AND PROTECTION OF THE STATES BY THE UNION. 

Section IV. 

The United Stcttes shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion ; and, on application of the legis- 
lature or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be con- 
vened), against domestic violence. 

AETICLE V. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION— HOW MADE. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this constitu- 
tion ; or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds 
of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing 
amendments, which in either case shall be valid, to all intents 
and purposes, as part of this constitution, when ratified by the 
legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or by con- 
ventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode 
of ratification may be proposed by the congress ; provided, that 
no amendment which may be made prior to the year eighteen 
hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and 
fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article, and that 
no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal 
suffrage in the senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

FORMER DEBTS VALID. 

Section I. 

All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, before 
the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the 
United States under this constitution as under the confederation. 



30 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND. 

Section IL 
This constitution, and the laws of the United States which 
shall he made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or 
which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, 
shall he the supreme law of the land ; and the judges in every 
State shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or 
laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL OATH NO RELIGIOUS TEST. 
Section III. 
The senators and representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State legi&latures, and all executive 
and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the sev- 
eral' States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support 
this constitution ; but no religious test shall ever be required 
as a qualification to anv office of public trust under the United 
States. 

AETICLE VII. 

WHEN THE CONSTITUTION TO TAKE EFFECT. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution between the 
States so ratifying the same. 

Done in the convention, by the unanimous consent of the 
States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, 
and of the independence of the United States of America the 
twelfth. 

In witness >vhereof, we have hereunto subscribed our names. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President, 

And Deputy from Virginia. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. DELAWARE. 

John Langdon, George Reed, 

Nicholas Gilman. Gunning Bedford, Jun., 

John Dickinson, 
MASSACHUSETTS. Richard Bassett, 
Nathaniel Gorman, J^^^b Broom. 

BuFus King. 

MARYLAND. 

CONNECTICUT. Dan'l of St. Thos. Jenifer, 

William Samuel Johnson, James McHenry, 
Roger Sherman. Daniel Carroll. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 31 

NEW YOEK. VIKGINIA. 

Alexander Hamilton. John Blair, 

James Madison, Jun. 
NEW JERSEY. 
William Livingston, NORTH CAROLINA. 

David Brearle, William Blunt, 

William Paterson, Rich'd Dobbs Spaight, 

Jonathan Dayton. Hugh Williamson. 

PENNSYLVANIA. SOUTH CAROLINA. 

Benjamin Franklin, John Rutledge, 

Thomas Mifflin, Chas. Coatesworth Pinck* 

Robert Morris, ney, 

George Clymer, Charles Pinckney, 

Thomas Fitzsimons, Pierce Butler. 

Jared Ingersoll, 

James Wilson, GEORGIA. 

Gouv. Morris. William Few, 

Abraham Baldwin. 
Attest : 

William Jackson, 

Secretary. 



AMENDMENTS 



TO the constitution of the united states, ratified 

ACCORDING TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE FIFTH ARTICLE 
OF THE FOREGOING CONSTITUTION. 



The following articles proposed by congress, in addition to 
and amendments of the constitution of the United States, hav- 
ing been ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the 
States, are become a part of the constitution. 

First Congress, First Session, March 5th, 1789. 
ARTICLE I. 

RIGHT OF CONSCIENCE, FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, &C. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of 
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging 



82 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

the frceJom of speech, or of the press ; or the right of the 
{)eople peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government 
lor a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. 

OF THE MILITIA. 

A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of 
a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear anus 
shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

OF QUARTERING SOLDIERS. 

No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any liouse 
without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in 
a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OF UNREASONABLE SEARCHES AND SEIZURES. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, 
shall not be violated; and no warrant shall issue l)ut upon 
probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particu- 
larly describing the place to be searched, and the persons oi 
things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. 

OF CRIMES AND INDICTMENTS. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise 
infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a 
grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, 
or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or 
public danger, nor shall any person be subject, for the same 
ofibnse, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall 
be compelled in any criminal case to be witness against him- 
self; nor to be deprived of life, liberty or property, without 
due process of law, nor shall private property be taken for 
public use without just compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. 

OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 33 

State and district wherein the crime shall have been com- 
mitted, which district shall have been previously ascertained 
by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the 
accusation ; to be confronted wdth the witnesses against him ; 
to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, 
and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense. 



AETICLE VII. 

OF TRIAL BY JURY IN CIVIL CASES. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, llie right of trial by jury shall 
be preserved ; and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise 
re-examined in any court of the United States, than accord- 
ing to the rules of the common law. 

AETICLE VIII. 

OF BAILS, FINES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

AETICLE IX. 

RESERVED RIGHTS. 

The enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, shall 
not be construed to deny or disparage others, retained by the 
people. 

AETICLE X. 

POWERS NOT DELEGATED RESERVED. 

The powers not delegated to the JJnited States by the con- 
stitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the 
States respectively, or to the people. 



Third Congress, Second Session, December ^d, 178S. 
AETICLE XI. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER— SEE ART. 3, SEC. 2. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit, in law or equity, commenced or 
prosecuted against one of the United States, by citizens of 
another State, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign State. 

3 



34 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S, 

Eighth Congress, First Session, October 17th, 1803. 
AKTICLE XII. 

HOW THE PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT ARE ELECTED. 

The electors sliall meet in their respective States,* and vote 
by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at 
least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with them- 
selves; they siiall name, in their ballots, the person voted for 
as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as 
Vice-President ; and they shall make distinct lists of all 
persons voted for as I^resident, and of all pereons voted for as 
Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each ; which 
list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed,! to the 
seat of the government of the United States, directed to the 
president of the senate ; the president of the senate shall, in 
the j)resence of the senate and house of representatives, open 
all tiie certificates,^ and the votes shall then be counted ; the 
pei-son having the greatest number of votes for President shall 
be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed. And if no person have such 
majority, then from the pei-sons having the highest numbers, 
not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as President, 
the house of representatives shall choose immediately, by 
ballot, the President; but in choosing the President, the votes 
shall be taken by States, the representation from each State 
having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a 
member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a 
majority of all the States shall be necessaiy to a choice ; and 
if the house of representatives shall not choose a President, 
whenever the right of a choice shall devolve upon them, 
before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice- 
President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or 
other constitutional disability of the President. The person 
having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall 
be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the 
whole number of electors apjiointed ; and if no pei-son have a 
majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
senate shall choose the Vice-President ; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 
senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be neces- 
sary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to 

*0n the first Wednesday in December, by act of Congress, 1st 
March, 1792. 

tBefore the 1st Wednesday in January, by act of Congress, 1st 
March. 1792. 

lOn the 2d Wednesday in February, by the same act. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 35 

the office of President, shall be eligible to that of Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



AETICLE XIII. 

SLAVERY ABOLISHED — 13tH AMENDMENT, PASSED 1865. 

Section I. 

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been 
duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Section II. 

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

CITIZENS AND THEIR RIGHTS — 14tH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United 
States, and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall 
make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or 
immunities of citizens of the United States. Nor shall any 
State deprive any person of life, liberty or property without 
due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdic- 
tion the equal protection of the laws. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective number, counting the 
whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not 
taxed; but whenever the right to vote at any election for 
electors of President and Vice-President, or for United States 
representatives in congress, executive and judicial officers, or 
the members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of 
the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of 
age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, 
except for participation in rebellion or other crime, the basis 
of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion 
which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the 
whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in 
such State. 



36 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

DISABILITY OF PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE REBELLION. 

Section III. 

J^o person shall be a senator or representative in congress, 
elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any ofBce, 
civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, 
who, having previously taken an oath as a member of congress, 
or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any 
State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any 
State to support the constitution of the United States, shall 
have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or 
given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof; but congress may, 
by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. 

VALIDITY OF PL'BLIC DEBT NOT TO BE QUESTIONED. 

Section IV. 

The validity of the public debt of the United v*5tates author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for the payment of 
pensions and bounties for service in suppressing insurrec-tion 
or rebellion, shall not be questioned, but neitber the United 
States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation 
incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United 
States, or claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave, but 
all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and 
void. 

Section V. 

Tbe congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate 
legislation, the provisions of this article. 

AETICLE XV. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE NOT TO BE IMPAIRED. 

Section I. 

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State, 
on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude. 

Section II. 

The congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
aitpropriate legislation. 

[The fifteenth amendment passed at the Fortieth Congress.] 



STATE CONSTITUTION 



A CoNSTiTrTiON agreed upon by the delegates of the people of 
New Jersey, in convention begun at Trenton on the fourteenth 
day of May, and continued to the twenty-ninth day of June, 
in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
four, ratified by the people at an election held on the thirteenth 
day of August, A. I). I844, and amended at a special election 
held on the seventh day of September, A. D. 1875. 

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to 
Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He 
hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him for a 
blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit the same 
unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish 
this Constitution : 

AKTICLE I. 

KIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. 

1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have 
certain natural and unalienable rights, among Avhich are those 
of enjoying and defending life and liberty ; acquiring, pos- 
sessing and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining 
safety and happiness. 

2. All political power is inherent in the people. Govern- 
ment is instituted for the protection, security and benefit of 
the people, and they have the right at all times to alter or 
reform the same, whenever the public good may require it. 

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privilege 
of worshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to the 
dictates of his own conscience; nor, under any pretense what- 
ever, to be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary 
to his faith and judgment ; nor shall any person be obliged to 
pay tithes, taxes or other rates for building or repairing any 
church or churches, place or places of woi*ship, or for the 
maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he 
believes to be right, or has deliberately and voluntarily engaged 
to perform. 

4. There shall be no establishment of one religious sect in 
preference to another ; no religious test shall be required as a 
qualification for any office or public trust; and no person 

(37) 



38 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right merely on 
account of his religious principles. 

5. Every person may freely speak, write and publish his 
sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of 
that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the 
liberty of speech or of the press. In all prosecutions or 
indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence to 
the jury; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter 
charged as libelous is true, and was published with good 
motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted ; 
and the jury shall have the right to determine the law and 
the fact. 

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
liouses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and 
seizures, shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue but 
upon prol)able cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and 
particuhirly descril)ing the place to be searched and the papers 
and things to be seized. 

7. The right of a trial by jurv" shall remain inviolate; but 
the legislature may authorize the trial of civil suits, when 
the matter in dispute does not exceed fifty dollars, by a jury 
of six men. 

8. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury ; to be 
informed of the nature and cause of the accusation ; to be 
confronted with the Avitnesses against him ; to have com- 
pulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to 
have the assistance of counsel in his defense. 

9. No pereon shall be held to answer for a criminal oflTense, 
unless on the presentment or indictment of a grand jury, 
except in cases of impeachment, or in cases cognizable by 
justices of the peace, or arising in the army or navy ; or in 
the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public 
danger. 

10. No person shall, after acquittal, be tried for the same 
oflense. All persons shall, before conviction, be bailable by 
sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses, Avhen the proof 
is evident or presumption great. 

11. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless in case of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

12. The military shall be in strict subordination to the civil 
power. 

] 3. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any 
house without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, 
except in a manner prescril)ed by law. 

14. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 39 

war against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them aid 
and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason, unless 
on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on 
confession in open court. 

15. Excessive Ijail shall not be required, excessive fines 
shall not be imj^osed, and cruel and unusual punishments 
shall not be inflicted. 

16. Private property shall not be taken for public use with- 
out just compensation ; but land may be taken for public 
highways as heretofore, until the legislature shall direct com- 
pensation to be made. 

17. No person shall be imprisoned for debt in any action, 
or on any judgment founded upon contract, unless in cases of 
fraud ; nor shall any person be imprisoned for a militia fine 
in time of peace. 

18. The people have the right freely to assemble together, 
to consult for the common good, to make known their opinions 
to their representatives, and to petition for redress of griev- 
ances. 

19. No county, city, borough, town, township or village 
shall hereafter give any money or property, or loan its money 
or credit, to or in aid of any individual association or corpora- 
tion, or become security for or be directly or indirectly the 
owner of any stock or bonds of any association or corporation. 

20. No donation of land or appropriation of money shall 
be made by the State or any municij^al corporation to or for 
the use of any society, association or corporation whatever. 

21. This enumeration of rights and privileges shall not be 
construed to impair or deny others retained by the people. 

AKTICLE II. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

1. Every male citizen of the United' States, of the age of 
twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this State 
one year, and of the county in which he claims his vote five 
months, next before the election, shall be entitled to vote for 
all officers that now are, or hereafter may be, elective by the 
people; provided, that no person in the military, naval or 
marine service of the United States shall be considered a resi- 
dent in this State, by being stationed in any garrison, barrack, 
or military or naval place or station within this State ; and no 
pauper, idiot, insane person, or person convicted of a crime 
which now excludes him from being a witness unless pardoned 
or restored by law to the right of suffrage, shall enjoy the 
right of an elector ; and provided further, that in time of war 
no elector in the actual military service of the State, or of the 



40 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

United States, in the army or navy thereof, shall be deprived 
of his vote by reason of his absence from sucli election dis- 
trict; and the legislature shall have power to provide the 
manner in which, and the time and place at which, sudi 
absent electors may vote, and for the return and canvass of 
their votes in the election districts in which they respectively 
reside. 

2. The legislature may pass laws to deprive persons of the 
right of sufirage who shall be convicted of bribery. 



ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. The powers of the government shall be divided into 
three distinct departments — the legislative, executive and 
judicial ; and no persrm or persons belonging to, or consti- 
tuting one of those departments, shall exercise any of the 
powers pro|)crly belonging to either of the others, except as 
herein expressly provided, 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

Section I. 

1. The legislative power shall be vested in a senate and 
general assembly. 

2. No person shall be a member of the senate who shall 
not have attained the age of thirty years, and have been a 
citizen and inhabitant of the Stale for four years, and of the 
county for which he shall be chosen one year, next before his 
electicm; and no i)erson shall be a member of the general 
assembly who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one 
years, and have been a citizen and inhabitant of the State for 
two years, and of the county for which he shall be chosen 
one year next before his election; provided, that no person 
shall be eligible as a member of either house of the legisla- 
ture, "who shall not be entitled to the right of suffrage. 

3. Members of the senate and general assembly shall be 
elected yearly and every year, on the first Tuesday after tlie 
first Monday in November; and the two houses shall meet 
separately on the second Tuesday in January next after the 
said day of election, at which time of meeting the legislative 
year shall commence ; but the time of holding such election 
may be altered by the legislature. 



STATE CONSTITUTION, 41 

Section II. 

1. The senate shall be composed of one senator from each 
county in the State, elected by the legal voters of the counties, 
respectively, for three years. 

2. As soon as the senate shall meet after the first election to 
be held in pursuance of this constitution, they shall be divided 
as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the 
senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of 
the first year; of the second class at the expiration of the 
second year ; and of the third class at the expiration of the 
third year, so that one class may be elected every year ; and 
if vacancies happen, by resignation or otherwise, the persons 
elected to supply such vacancies shall be elected for the unex- 
pired terms only. 

Section III. 

1. The general assembly shall be composed of members 
annually elected by the legal voters of the counties, respect- 
ively, who shall be apportioned among the said counties as 
nearly as may be according to the number of their inhabitants. 
The present apportionment shall continue until the next census 
of the United States shall have been taken, and an apportion- 
ment of members of the general assembly shall be made by 
the legislature at its first session after the next and every 
subsequent enumeration or census, and when made shall 
remain unaltered until another enumeration shall have been 
taken ; provided, that each county shall at all times be entitled 
to one member; and the whole number of members shall 
never exceed sixty. 

Section IV. 

1. Each house shall direct writs of election for supplying 
vacancies, occasioned by death, resignation, or otherwise ; but 
if vacancies occur during the recess of the legislature, the 
writs may be issued by the governor, under such regulations 
as may be prescribed by law. 

2. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each 
shall constitute a quoi'um to do business ; but a smaller num- 
ber may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to 
compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, 
and under such penalties, as each house may provide. 

3. Each house shall choose its own officers, determine the 
rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly 
behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, may expel 
a member. 

4. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 



42 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

from time to time publish the same ; and tlie yeas and nays 
of the members of either house on any question shall, at the 
desire of one-fifth of those i)resent, l)e entered on the journal. 

5. Neither house, during the session of the legislature, 
shall, without the ccjusent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two 
houses shall be sitting. 

6. All bills and j(jint resolutions shall be read three times 
in each house, before the linal passage thereof; and no bill or 
joint resolution shall pass unless there be a majority of all the 
members of each body personally present and agreeing thereto; 
and the yeas and nays of the membei"s voting on such final 
passage shall be entered on the journal. 

7. Members of the senate and general assembly shall receive 
annually the sum of five hundred dollars during the time for 
which they shall have heen elected and while they shall hold 
their office, and no other allowance or emolument, directly or 
indirectly, for any purpose whatever. The president of the 
senate and the speaker of the house of assembly shall, in virtue 
of their offices, receive an additional compensation, equal to 
one-third of their allowance as members. 

8. Members of the senate and general assembly shall, in all 
cases except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privi- 
leged from arrest during their attendance at the sitting of their 
respective houses, and in going to and returning from the 
same; and for any speech or debate, in either house, they 
shall not be questioned in any other place. 

Section V. 

1. No member of the senate or general assembly shall, 
during the time for which he was elected, be nominated or 
appointed by the governor, or by the legislature in joint meet- 
ing, to any civil office under the authority of this State which 
shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall 
have been increased, during such time. 

2. If any memlier of the senate or general assembly shall 
be elected to represent this State in the senate or house of 
representatives of the United States, and shall accept thereof, 
or shall accept of any office or appointment under the govern- 
ment of the United States, his seat in the legislature of this 
State shall thereby be vacated. 

3. No justice of the supreme court, nor judge of any other 
court, sheriff, justice of the peace nor any pei-son or persons 
possessed of any office of profit under the government of this 
State, shall be entitled to a seat either in the senate or in the 
general assembly ; but, on being elected and taking his seat, 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 43 

his office shall be considered vacant ; and no person holding 
any office of profit under the government of the United States 
shall be entitled to a seat in either house. 

Section VI. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of assembly ; but the senate may propose or concur with 
amendments, as on other bills. 

2. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but for 
appropriations made by law. 

3. The credit of the State shall not be directly or indirectly 
loaned in any case. 

4. The legislature shall not, in any manner, create any debt 
or debts, liability or liabilities, of the State which shall, singly 
or in the aggregate with any previous debts or liabilities, at 
any time exceed one hundred thousand dollars, except for 
purposes of war, or to repel invasion, or to suppress insurrec- 
tion, unless the same shall be authorized by a law for some 
single object or work, to be distinctly specified therein ; which 
law shall provide the ways and means, exclusive of loans, to 
pay the interest of such debt or liability as it falls due, and 
also to pay and discharge the principal of such debt or liability 
within thirty-five years from the time of the contracting 
thereof, and shall be irrepealable until such debt or liability, 
and the interest thereon, are fully paid and discharged ; and 
no such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general election, 
have been submitted to the people, and have received the 
sanction of a majority of all the votes cast for and against it 
at such election ; and all money to be raised by the authority 
of such law shall be applied only to the specific object stated 
therein, and to the payment of the debt thereby created. 
This section shall not be construed to refer to any money that 
has been, or may be, deposited with this State by the govern- 
ment of the United States. 

Section VII. 

1. No divorce shall be granted by the legislature. 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by this State, and no ticket 
in any lottery not authorized by a law of this State shall be 
bought or sold within the State. 

3. The legislature shall not pass any bill of attainder, ex post 
facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts, or 
depriving a party of any remedy for enforcing a contract 
which existed when the contract was made. 

4. To avoid improper influences which may result from 
intermixing in one and the same act such things as have no 



44 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

proper relation to each otlier, every law shall embrace but 
one oljtject, and that shall be expressed in the title. No law 
shall be revived or amended by reference to its title only ; but 
the act revived, or the section or sections amended, shall be 
inserted at length. No general law shall embrace any pro- 
vision of a private, special or local character. No act shall 
be passed which shall provide that any existing law, or any 
part thereof, shall be made or deemed a j)art of the act, or 
which shall enact that any existing law, or any part thereof, 
shall be applicable, except by inserting it in such act. 

5. The laws of this State shall begin in the following style: 
"Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the 
State of New Jersey." 

6. The fund for the support of free schools, and all money, 
stock and other property which may hereafter be approjjriated 
for that purpose, or received into the treasury uncler the pro- 
vision of any law heretofore passed to augment the said fund, 
shall be securely invested and remain a perpetual fund ; and 
the income thereof, except so much as it may be judged 
expedient to apply to an increase of the capital, shall be 
annually appropriated to the support of public free schools, 
for the ecjual benefit of all the people of the State; and it 
shall not be competent for the legislature to borrow, appropri- 
ate or use the said fund, or any part thereof, for any other 
purpose, under any pretense whatever. The legislature shall 
provide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and 
efficient system of free public schools for the instruction of all 
the children in this State between the ages of five and eighteen 
years. » 

7. No private or special law shall be passed authorizing the 
sale of any lands belonging in whole or in part to a minor or 
minoi"s, or other pei-sons who may at the time be under any 
legal disability to act for themselves. 

8. Individuals or private corporations shall not be author- 
ized to take private property for public use, without just 
compensation first made to the owners. 

9. No private, special or local bill shall be passed unless 
public notice of the intention to apply therefor, and of the 
general object thereof, shall have been previously given. The 
legislature, at the next session after the adoption hereof, and 
from time to time thereafter, shall prescribe the time and 
mode of giving such notice, the evidence thereof, and how 
such evidence shall be preserved. 

10. The legislature may vest in the circuit courts, or courts 
of common pleas within the several counties of this State, 
chancery powers, so far as relates to the foreclosure of mort- 
gages and sale of mortgaged premises. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 45 

11. The legislature shall not pass private, local or special 
laws in any of tlie following enumerated cases ; that is to say : 

Laying out, opening, altering and working roads or highways. 

Vacating any road, town plot, street, alley or public grounds. 

Regulating the internal affairs of towns and counties ; 
appointing local offices or commissions to regulate muni- 
cipal affairs. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or empaneling grand or 
petit jurors. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing the percentage or allow- 
ance of public officers during the term for which said officers 
were elected or appointed. 

Changing the law of descent. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual any 
exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise whatever. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual the 
right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or criminal cases. 

Providing for the management and support of free public 
schools. 

The legislature shall pass general laws providing for the 
cases enumerated in this paragraph, and for all other cases 
which, in its judgment, may be provided for by general laws. 
The legislature shall pass no special act conferring corporate 
powers, but they shall pass general laws under which corpora- 
tions may be organized and corporate powers of every nature 
obtained, subject, nevertheless, to repeal or alteration at the 
will of the legislature. 

12. Property shall be assessed for taxes under general laws, 
and by uniform rules, according to its true value. 

Section VIIL 

1. Members of the legislature shall, before they enter on 
the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe the 
following oath or affirmation : 

" I do solemnly swear [or affirm, as the case may be,] that 
I will support the constitution of the United States and the 
constitution of the State of New Jersey, and that I will faith- 
fully discharge the duties of senator [or member of the general 
assembly, as the case may be,] according to the best of mv 
ability." 

And members-elect of the senate or general assembly are 
hereby empowered to administer to each other the said oath 
or affirmation. 

2. Every officer of the legislature shall, before he enters 
upon his duties, take and subscribe the following oath or 



46 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

affirmation : " I do solemnly promise and swear [or affirm] 
that 1 will faithfully, impartially and justly perform all the 

duties of the oflice of , to the best of my ability and 

understanding; tliat I will carefully preserve all records, 
papers, writings or property intrusted to me for safe-keeping 
by virtue of my office, and make such disposition of the same 
as may be required by law." 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a governor. 

2. The governor shall be elected by the legal voters of this 
State. The person having the highest number of votes shall 
be the governor ; but if two or more shall be equal and highest 
in votes, one of them shall be chosen governor by the vote of 
a majority of the members of both houses in joint meeting. 
Contested elections for the office of governor shall be deter- 
mined in such manner as the legislature shall direct by law. 
When a governor is to be elected by the people, such election 
shall be held at the time when and at the places where the 
people shall respectively vote for members of the legislature. 

3. The governor shall hold his office for three years, to 
commence on the third Tuesday of January next ensuing the 
election for governor by the people, and to end on the Monday 
preceding the third Tuesday of January, three years there- 
after ; and he shall be incapable of holding that office for 
three years next after his term of service shall have expired; 
and no appointment or nomination to office shall be made by 
the governor during the last week of his said term. 

4. The governer shall be not less than thirty years of age, 
and shall have been for twenty years, at least, a citizen of 
the United States, and a resident of this State seven years 
next before his election, unless he shall have been absent 
during that time on the public business of the United States 
or of this State. 

5. The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his services 
a compensation which shall be neither increased nor dimin- 
ished during the period for which he shall have been elected. 

6. He shall be the commander-in-chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State ; he shall have power to convene 
the legislature, or the senate alone, whenever in his opinion 
pu]->lic necessity requires it ; he shall communicate by message 
to the legislature at the opening of each session, and at such 
other times as he may deem necessary, the condition of the 
State, and recommend such measures as he may deem expe- 
dient ; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 47 

and grant, under the great seal of the State, commissions to 
all such officers as shall be required to 1)e commissioned. 

7. Every bill which shall have passed both houses shall be 
presented to the governor ; if he approve he shall sign it, but 
if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to the house in 
which it shall have originated, wlio shall enter the objections 
at large on their journal, and jaroceed to reconsider it; if, 
after such reconsideration, a majority of the whole number of 
that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together 
with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall 
likewise be reconsidered, and if approved of by a majority of 
the whole number of that house, it shall become a law ; but 
in neither house shall the vote be taken on the same day on 
which the bill shall be returned to it ; and in all such cases, 
the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, 
and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor, within five 
days (Sunday excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the legislature by their adjournment prevent 
its return, in which case it shall not be a law. If any bill 
presented to the governor contain several items of appropria- 
tions of money, he may object to one or more of such items 
while approving of the other portions of the bill. In such 
case he shall append to the bill, at the time of signing it, a 
statement of the items to which he objects, and the appropria- 
tion so objected to shall not take effect. If the legislature be 
in session he shall transmit to the house in which the bill 
originated, a copy of such statement, and the items objected to 
shall be separately reconsidered. If, on reconsideration, one 
or more of such items be approved by a majority of tlie 
members elected to each house, the same shall be a part of 
the law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor. All 
the provisions of this section in relation to bills not approved 
by the governor shall apply to cases in which he shall with- 
hold his approval from any item or items contained in a bill 
appropriating money. 

8. No member of congress, or person holding an office under 
the United States, or this State, shall exercise the office of 
governor; and in case the governor, or person administering 
the government shall accept any office under the United 
States or this State, his office of governor shall thereupon be 
vacant. Nor shall he be elected by the legislature to any 
office under the government of this State or of the United 
States, during the term for which he shall have been elected 
governor. 



48 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

9. The governor, or person administering the government, 
shall have power to suspend the collection of fines and for- 
feitures, and to grant reprieves, to extend until the expiration 
of a time not exceeding ninety days after conviction ; but this 
power shall not extend to cases of inipeacliment. 

10. The governor, or ])erson administering the government, 
the chancellor, and the six judges of tl»e court of errors and 
appeals, or a major part of them, of whom the governor, or 
person administering the government, shall he one, may remit 
tines and forfeitures, and grant pardons, after conviction, in 
all cases except impeachment, 

11. The governor and all other civil officers under this 
State shall be liable to impeachment for misdemeanor in 
office during their continuance in office, and for two yeare 
thereafter. 

12. In case of the death, resignation or removal from office 
of the governor, the powers, duties and emoluments of the office 
shall devolve upon the president of tlie senate, and in case of 
his death, resignation or removal, then upon the speaker of 
the house of assembly, for tiie time being, until another gov- 
ernor shall be elected and qualified ; but in such case another 
governor shall be chosen at the next election for membei*s of 
the legislature, unless such death, resignation or removal shall 
occur within thirty days immediately preceding such next 
election, in which case a governor shall be chosen at the 
second succeeding election for members of the legislature. 
When a vacancy happens, during the recess of the legislature, 
in any office which is to be filled by the governor and senate, 
or by the legislature in joint meeting, the governor shall fill 
such vacancy and the commission shall expire at the end of 
the next session of the legislature, unless a successor shall be 
sooner appointed; when a vacancy happens in the office of 
clerk or surrogate of any county, the governor shall fill such 
vacancy, and the commission shall expire when a successor is 
elected and qualified. 

13. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his absence 
from the State or inability to discharge the duties of his office, 
the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall devolve 
upon the president of the senate; and in case of his death, 
resignation or removal, then upon the speaker of the house 
of assembly for the time being, until the governor, absent or 
impeached, shall return or be acquitted, or until the disquali- 
fication or inability shall cease, or until a new governor be 
elected and qualified. 

14. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor from any 
other cause than those herein enumerated, or in case of the 
death of the governor-elect before he is qualified into office, 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 49 

the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall devolve 
upon the president of the senate or speaker of the house of 
assembly, as above provided for, until a new governor be 
elected and qualified. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Section I. 

1. The judicial power shall be vested in a court of errors 
and appeals in the last resort in all causes as heretofore; a 
court for the trial of impeachments ; a court of chancery ; a 
prerogative court ; a supreme court ; circuit courts, and such 
inferior courts as now exist, and as may be hereafter ordained 
and established by law ; which inferior courts the legislature 
may alter or abolish, as the public good shall require. 

Section II. 

1. The court of errors and appeals shall consist of the 
chancellor, the justices of the supreme court, and six judges, 
or a major part of them ; which judges are to be appointed 
for six years. 

2. Immediately after the court shall first assemble, the six 
judges shall arrange themselves in such manner that the seat 
of one of them shall be vacated every year, in order that 
thereafter one judge may be annually appointed. 

3. Such of the six judges as shall attend the court shall 
receive, respectively, a per diem compensation, to be provided 
by law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

5. When an appeal from an order or decree shall be heard, 
the chancellor shall inform the court, in writing, of the reasons 
for his order or decree ; but he shall not sit as a member, or 
have a voice in the hearing or final sentence. 

6. When a writ of error shall be brought, no justice who 
has given a judicial opinion in the cause in favor of or against 
any error complained of, shall sit as a member, or have a voice 
on the hearing, or for its affirmance or reversal ; but the reasons 
for such opinion shall be assigned to the court in writing. 

Section III. 

1. The house of assembly shall have the sole power of 
impeaching, by a vote of a majority of all the members ; and 
all impeachments shall be tried by the senate ; the members, 
when sitting for that purpose, to be on oath or affirmation 
"truly and impartially to try and determine the charge in 

4 



50 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

question according to evidence ;" and no person shall be con- 
victed without the concurrence of two-thirds of all the members 
of the senate. 

2. Any judicial officer impeached shall be suspended from 
exercising liis office until his acquittal. 

3. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend 
farther tlian to removal from ottice, and to disqualification to 
liold and enjoy any office of honor, profit or trust under this 
State ; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be liable to 
indictment, trial and punishment according to law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

Section IV. 

1. The court of chancery shall consist of a chancellor. 

2. The chancellor shall be the ordinary or surrogate general, 
and judge of the prerogative court, 

?>. All persons aggrieved by any order, sentence or decree 
of the orphans' court, may appeal from the same, or from 
any part thereof to the prerogative court; but such order, 
sentence or decree shall not be removed into the supreme 
court, or circuit court if the subject-matter thereof be within 
the jurisdiction of the orphans' court. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the register of the pre- 
rogative court, and shall perform the duties required of him 
by law in that respect. 

Section V. 

1. The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice and 
four associate justices. The number of associate justices may 
be increased or decreased by law, but shall never be less than 
two. 

2. The circuit courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more of the justices of the supreme court, or 
a judge appointed for that purpose, and shall, in all cases 
within the county except in those of a criminal nature, have 
common law jurisdiction, concurrent with the supreme court; 
and any final judgment of a circuit court may be docketed in 
the supreme court, and shall operate as a judgment obtained 
in the supreme court from the time of such docketing. 

3. Final judgments in any circuit court may be brought by 
writ of error into the supreme court, or directly into the court 
of errors and appeals. 

Section VI. 

1. There shall be no more than five judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas in each of the counties in this State, 
after the terms of the judges of said court now in office shall 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 51 

terminate. One judge for each county shall be appointed 
every year, and no more, except to fill vacancies, which shall 
be for the unexj)ired terra only. 

2. The commissions for the first appointments of judges of 
said court shall bear date and take effect on the first day of 
April next; and all subsequent commissions forjudges of said 
court shall bear date and take effect on the first day of April 
in every successive year, except commissions to fill vacancies, 
which shall bear date and take effect when issued. 

Section YIL 

1. There may be elected under this constitution two, and 
not more than five, justices of the peace in each of the town- 
ships of the several counties of this State, and in each of the 
wards, in cities that may vote in wards. When a township or 
ward contains two thousand inhabitants or less, it may have 
two justices; when it contains more than two thousand inhab- 
itants, and not more than four thousand, it may have four 
justices ; and when it contains more than four thousand inhab- 
itants, it may have five justices ; provided, that whenever any 
township not voting in wards contains more than seven thou- 
sand inhabitants, such township may have an additional justice 
for each additional three thousand inhabitants above four 
thousand. 

2. The population of the townships in the several counties 
of the State and of the several wards shall be ascertained by 
the last preceding census of the United States, until the legis- 
lature shall provide, by law, some other mode of ascertaining it. 



AKTICLE VII. 

APPOINTING POWER AND TENURE OF OFFICE. 

Section I. 

MILITIA OFFICERS. 

1. The legislature shall provide by law for enrolling, organ- 
izing and arming the militia. 

2. Captains, subalterns and non-commissioned officers shall 
be elected by the members of their respective companies. 

3. Field officers of regiments, independent battalions and 
squadrons shall be elected by the commissioned officers of their 
respective regiments, battalions or squadrons. 

4. Brigadier -generals shall be elected by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

5. Major-generals, the adjutant-general and quartermaster- 



52 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

general shall be nominated by the governor, and appointed 
by him, with the advice and consent of the senate. 

G. The legislature shall provide, by law, the time and 
manner of electing militia officers, and of certifying their 
elections to the governor, who shall grant their commissions, 
and determine their rank, when not determined by law ; and 
no commissioned officer shall be removed from office but by 
the sentence of a court-martial, pursuant to law. 

7. In case the electors of subalterns, captains or field officers 
shall refuse or neglect to make such elections, the governor 
shall have power to appoint such officers, and to fill all vacancies 
caused by such refusal or neglect. 

8. Brigade inspectors shall be chosen by the field officers of 
their respective brigades. 

9. The governor shall appoint all militia officers whose 
appointment is not otherwise provided for in this constitution. 

10. Major-generals, brigadier-generals and commanding 
officers of regiments, independent battalions and squadrons 
shall appoint the stafl' officers of their divisions, brigades, 
regiments, independent battalions and squadrons, respectively. 

■ Section II. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

1. Justices of the supreme court, chancellor, judges of the 
court of errors and ap})eals and judges of the inferior court 
of common pleas shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the senate. 

The justices of the supreme court and chancellor shall hold 
their offices for the term of seven years ; shall, at stated times, 
receive for their services a compensation which shall not be 
diminished during the term of their appointments ; and they 
shall hold no other office under the government of this State 
or of the United States. 

2. Judges of the courts of common pleas shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

They shall hold their offices for five years ; but when 
appointed to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only. 

3. The state treasurer and comptroller shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

They shall hold their offices for three years, and until their 
successors shall be qualified into office. 

4. The attorney-general, prosecutoi-s of the pleas, clerk of 
the supreme court, clerk of the court of chancery, secretary 
of state and the keeper of the state prison shall be nominated 



STATE CONSTITUTION, 53 

by the governor, and appointed by him, with the advice and 
consent of the senate. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

5. The law reporter shall be appointed by the justices of 
the supreme court, or a majority of them ; and the chancery 
reporter shall be appointed by the chancellor. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

G. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected by the 
people of their respective counties, at the annual elections for 
members of the general assembly. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the people of 
their respective counties, at the elections for members of the 
general assembly, and they shall hold their offices for three 
years, after which three years must elapse before they can be 
again capable of serving. Sheriffs shall annually renew their 
bonds. 

8. Justices of the peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties of 
the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in wards, 
in such manner and under such regulations as may be hereafter 
provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their com- 
missions shall bear date and take effect on the first day of May 
next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years ; but when elected 
to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired term only; 
provided, that the commission of any justice of the peace shall 
become vacant upon his ceasing to reside in the township in 
which he was elected. 

The first election for justices of the peace shall take place 
at the . next annual town-meetings of the townships in the 
several counties of the State, and of the wards in cities that 
may vote in wards. 

9. All other officers, whose appointments are not otherwise 
provided for by law, shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the senate ; 
and shall hold their offices for the time prescribed by law. 

10. All civil officers elected or appointed pursuant to the 
provisions of this constitution, shall be commissioned by the 
governor. 

11. The term of office of all officers elected or appointed, 
pursuant to the provisions of this constitution, except when 
herein otherwise directed, shall commence on the day of the 
date of their respective commissions ; but no commission for 
any office shall bear date prior to the expiration of the term 
of the incumbent of said office. 



54 STATE CONSTITUTION. 



AETICLE VIII. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

1. The secretary of state shall be ex officio an auditor of the 
accounts of the treasurer, and a.s such, it shall be his duty to 
assist the legislature in tlie annual examination and settlement 
of said accounts, until otherwise provided by law, 

2. The seal of the State shall be kept by the governor, 
or person administering the government, and used by him 
oflicially, and shall be called the great seal of the State of 
New Jersey. 

3. All grants and commissions shall be in the name and by 
the authority of the State of New Jersey, sealed with the 
great seal, signed by the governor, or pereon administering 

the government, and countersigned by the secretary of state, 

and it shall run thus: "The State of New Jersey, to , 

greeting." All writs shall be in the name of the State; and 
all indictments shall conclude in the following manner, viz., 
" against the peace of this State, the government and dignity 
of the same." 

4. This constitution shall take eflfect and go into operation 
on tbe second day of September, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four. 

AETICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any specific amendment or amendments to the constitution 
may be jiroposed in the senate or general assembly, and if the 
same shall be agreed to by a majority of the membei-s elected 
to each of the two houses, such proposed amendment or 
amendments shall be entered on their journals, with the yeas 
and nays taken thereon, and referred to the legislature then 
next to' be chosen, and shall l)e published for three months 
previous to making such choice, in at least one newspaper of 
each county, if any be published therein ; and if in the legis- 
lature next chosen as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or 
amendments, or any of them, shall be agreed to by a majority 
of all the membei-s elected to each house, then it shall be the 
duty of the legislature to submit Buch proposed amendment 
or amendments, or such of them as may have been agreed to 
as aforesaid by the two legislatures, to the people, in such 
manner and at such time, at least four months after the 
adjournment of the legislature, as the legislature shall pre- 
scribe ; and if the people at a special election to be held for 
that purpose only, shall approve and ratify such amendment 
or amendments, or any of them, by a majority of the electors 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 55 

qualified to vote for members of the legislature voting thereon, 
such amendment or amendments so approved and ratified shall 
become part of tlie constitution; provided, that if more than 
one amendment be submitted, they shall be submitted in such 
manner and form that the people may vote for or against each 
amendment separately and distinctly ; but no amendment or 
amendments shall be submitted to tlie people by the legislature 
oftener than once in five years. 

ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDULE, 

That no inconvenience may arise from the change in the 
constitution of this State, and 'in order to carry the same into 
complete operation, it is hereby declared and ordained, that— 

1. The common law and statute laws now in force, not 
repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until they 
expire by their own limitation, or be altered or repealed by 
the legislature; and all writs, actions, causes of action, prose- 
cutions, contracts, claims and rights of individuals and of 
bodies corporate, and of the State, and all charters of incor- 
poration, shall continue, and all indictments which shall have 
been found, or which may hereafter be found, for anv crime 
or offense committed before the adoption of this constitution 
may be proceeded upon as if no change had taken place. The 
several courts of law and equity, except as herein otherwise 
provided, shall continue with the like powers and jurisdiction 
as if this constitution had not been adopted. 

2. All oflScers now filling any office or appointment shall 
continue in the exercise of the duties thereof, accordino- to 
their respective commissions or appointments, unless by this 
constitution it is otherwise directed. 

3. The present governor, chancellor and ordinary or surro- 
gate-general and treasurer shall continue in office until suc- 
cessors elected or appointed under this constitution shall be 
sworn or aflSrmed into office. 

4. In case of the death, resignation or disability of the pres- 
ent governor the person who may be vice-president of .council 
at tli^ time of the adoption of this constitution shall continue 
in ofhce and administer the government until a governor shall 
Jiave been elected and sworn or affirmed into office under this 
constitution. 

5. The present governor, or in case of his death or inabilitv 
to act, the vice-president of council, together with the present 
members of the legislative council and secretary of state, shall 
constitute a board of state canvassers, in the manner now pro- 
vided by law, for the purpose of ascertaining and declaring 



56 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

the result of tlie next ensuing election for governor, members 
of tlie house of representatives, and electors of i^resident and 
vice-president. 

6. The returns of the votes for governor, at the said next 
ensuing election, shall be transmitted to the secretary of state, 
the votes counted, and the election declared in the manner 
now provided by law in the case of the election of electors of 
president and vice-president. 

7. The election of clerks and surrogates, in those counties 
where the term of ofKce of the present incumbent shall expire 
previous to the general election of eighteen liundred and forty- 
five, shall be held at the general election next ensuing the 
adoption of this constitution; the result of which election 
shall be ascertained in the manner now provided by law for 
the election of sheriffs. 

8. The elections for the year eighteen hundred and forty- 
four shall take place as now provided by law. 

9. It shall be the duty of the governor to fill all vacancies 
in office happening between the adoption of this constitution 
and the first session of the senate, and not otherwise provided 
for, and the commissions shall expire at the end of the first 
session of the senate, or when successor shall be elected or 
appointed and qualified. 

10. The restriction of the pay of members of the legislature, 
after forty days from the commencement of the session, shall 
not be applied to the firet legislature convened under this 
constitution. 

11. Clerks of counties shall be clerks of the inferior courts 
of common pleas and quarter sessions of the several counties, 
and perform the duties, and be subject to the regulations now 
required of them by law until otherwise ordained by the 
legislature. 

12. The legislature shall pass all laws necessary to carry 
into effect the provisions of this constitution. 



State of New Jersey : 

I, Henry C. Kelsey, Secretary of State of the State of 
New Jersey, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy 
of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey as amended, as 
the same is taken from and compared with the original Con- 
stitution and amendments thereto, now remaining on file in 
my office. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand 
[l. s.] and affixed my official seal, this ninth day of October, 
A. D. eighteen hundred and seventy-five. 

HENRY C. KELSEY. 



SENATE. 

KULES ADOPTED THIS TEAK. 

President. 

1. The President shall take the Chair at the time appointed, 
and a quorum being present the journal of the preceding day 
shall be read, to the end that any mistake therein may be 
corrected. 

2. He shall not engage in any debate without leave of the 
Senate, except so far as shall be necessary for regulating the 
form of proceeding. (Rule 6.) 

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 

4. He shall, on all occasions, preserve the strictest order 
and decorum. (Rules 8, 43, 53.) 

5. When two or more Senators shall rise at the same time, 
he shall name the one entitled to the floor. 

6. He shall have the right to name a Senator to perform 
the duties of the Chair, but such substitution shall not extend 
beyond one day. 

7. He shall decide every question of order without debate, 
sulyect to an appeal to the Senate ; and he may call for the 
sense of the Senate upon any question of order. 

8. He shall cause all persons to be arrested or removed 
from the Senate chamber who shall interrupt the proceed- 
ings of the Senate, or conduct themselves improperly in the 
lobby or gallery. (Rule 53.) 

Quorum. 

9. A majority of the members of the Senate shall constitute 
a quorum ; and whenever a less number than a quorum shall 
convene at a regular meeting, and shall adjourn, the names 
of those present shall be entered on the journal. 

10. Whenever a less number than a quorum shall convene 
at any regular meeting, they are hereby authorized to send 
the Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or persons by them 
authorized, for anv or all absent Senators. 



Order of Business. 

3hair, the o: 

'.57) 



11. After the President has taken the chair, the order of 
business shall be as follows : 



68 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

I. Prayer. 

II. Calling the Koll. 

III. Reading the Journal. 

IV. Presentation and reference of petitions and memo- 

rials. 
V. Reports of Committees. 

1. Standing Committees (according to Rule 13.) 

2. Select Committees. 
VI. Unfinished business. 

VII. Introduction of bills. 
VIII. Senate bills on second reading. 
IX. Senate bills on third reading. 

X. Assembly bills on second reading. 
XI. Assembly bills on third reading. 

Committees. 

12, All Committees shall be appointed by the President, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. (Rule 34.) 

13. The following Standing Committees, consisting of three 
membei's each, shall be appointed at the commencement of 
each session, until otherwise ordered, with leave to report by 
Ijill or otherwise: 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on the Revision of the Laws 

A Committee on Finance. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Railroads, Canals and Turnpikes. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance Companies. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on the Militia. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Agriculture. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Claims and Pensions. 

A Committee on Untinislied Business. 

A Committee on Labor and Industries. 

A Committee on Borougns anrt Borougii Commissions. 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills, whose duty it shall be 
to examine all bills and joint resolutions before they shall 
be put upon their third reading, and who shall report the 
Fame to the Senate, and the Secretary shall enter upon 
the journal that the same have been correctly engrossed. 

Special Committees shall consist of three member?, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 59 

The several Joint Committees shall consist of three members 
each, and shall be also appointed to act conjointly with corre- 
sponding committees to be appointed by the House of Assembly. 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on the Lunatic Asylums. 

A Committee on the Library. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Public Printing. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Kelations. 

A Committee on the Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Eeform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes. 

Bills and Joint Resolutions. 

14. When a memorial or bill is referred to a committee, 
praymg or providing for an act of incorporation, or for any 
other act, notice of the application for which is required by 
law to be previously advertised, the committee shall not have 
leave to report such bill unless satisfactorv evidence has been 
presented to the committee tliat the application for such act 
has had a bona fide advertisement according to law; and all 
committees reporting such bills referred to them shall certify 
to the Senate that such proof has been presented and is deemed 
satisfactory. 

15. The titles of all bills, and such parts thereof only as 
shall be affected by proposed amendments, shall be entered 
on the journal. 

16. When leave is asked to bring in a bill, its title shall 
l3e read for the information of the Senate, and if objected to 
It shall be laid over for one dav ; and all public bills and 
joint resolutions shall, after the first reading, be printed for 
the use of the Senate ; but no other paper or document shall 
be printed without special order, except private bills, as pro- 
vided by Kule 17. '■ ^ f 

yj. No private bill shall be read a second time, unless 
printed copies thereof, procured by the applicants, shall be in 
the possession of the Senate. 

18. All bills and special reports of committees shall be 
numbered by the Secretary as they are severally introduced, 
and a list made of tlie same, and such bills a^ud reports shall 
be called up by the President for consideration in the order 
m which they are reported and stand upon the calendar, unless 



6U RULES OF THE SENATE. 

otherwise ordered ; and the Secretary shall read from the said 
list or calendar, and not from the files of bills or reports. 

19. No bill shall be committed or amended until it shall 
have been ordered to a second reading, after which it may be 
referred to a committee. 

20. All bills may be made the order for a particular day, 
and public bills, when called for, shall have the preference of 
private bills ; and when two or more bills shall be called for 
by Senators, they shall be taken up according to their seniority, 
reckoning from the date of their introduction. (Kule 56.) 

21. The consent of a majority of the Senators present shall 
be sufficient to engross or re-engross any bill or joint resolu- 
tion ; but no bill or joint resolution shall pass unless there 
shall be a majority of all the Senators personally present and 
agreeing thereto ; and the yeas and nays of Senators voting 
on. the final passage of any bill or joint resolution shall be 
entered on the journal ; and the like entry on any other ques- 
tion shall be made at the desire of any Senator. 

' 22. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three read- 
ings previous to its being passed ; and the President shall give 
notice at each reading whether it be the first, second or third, 
which readings shall be on three different days, 

23. The final question upon the second reading of every bill 
or joint resolution originating in the Senate shall be whether 
it shall be engrossed and read a third time ; and no amend- 
ment shall be received at the third reading unless by unani- 
mous consent of the Senators present, but it shall be in order, 
before the final passage of any such bill or joint resolution, to 
move its recommitment ; and should such recommitment take 
place, and any amendment be reported by the committee, the 
said bill or resolution shall be again read a second time and 
considered, and the aforesaid question again put. 

24. All bills ordered to be engrossed shall be executed in a 
fair, round hand. 

25. When a bill or joint resolution shall have been lost, 
and reconsidered and lost again, the same shall not again be 
reconsidered but by the unanimous consent of the Senate. 

26. Bills and joint resolutions, when passed by the Senate, 
shall be signed by the President. 

27. When a Senate bill or joint resolution shall have been 
passed, the same shall be signed, taken to the House of 
Assembly, and its concurrence therein requested, without a 
motion for that purpose. 

28. When a bill or resolution passed by the Senate shall be 
carried to the House of Assembly, all papers and documents 
relating thereto on the files of the Senate, shall be carried by 
the Secretary, with such bill or resolution, to the House of 
Assembly. 



RULES OF THE SENATE, 61 



Motions and their Precedence. 

29. When a motion shall be made, it shall be reduced to 
writing by the President or any Senator, and delivered to the 
Secretary at his table, and read before the same shall be 
debatable. 

30. All motions entered on the journal of the Senate, shall 
be entered in the names of the Senators who make them. 

31. If the question in debate contains several points, any 
Senator may have the same divided ; but a motion to strike 
out and insert, or to commit with instructions, shall not be 
divided. (Kule 49.) 

32. The rejection of a motion to strike out and insert one 
proposition shall not prevent a motion to strike out and insert 
a different proposition, nor pi'event a subsequent motion 
simply to strike out ; nor shall the rejection of a motion 
simply to strike out, prevent a subsequent motion to strike 
out and insert. 

33. On filling blanks the question shall be first taken on 
the largest sum, the greatest number, and the most distant 
day. 

34. When motions are made for reference of the same sub- 
ject to a Select Committee and to a Standing Committee, the 
question of reference to a Standing Committee shall be put 
first. 

35. When a question is before the Senate, no motion shall 
be received but — 

1. To adjourn. (Kules 36, 37.) 

2. To proceed to the consideration of Executive business. 

3. To lay on the table. (Kules 37, 39.) 

4. To postpone indefinitely. (Rule 39.) 

5. To postpone to a certain day. (Eule 39.) 

6. To commit. (Rule 39.) 

7. To amend. (Rules 38, 39.) 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they stand arranged. (Rule 39.) 

36. The motion to adjourn, or to fix a day to which the 
Senate shall adjourn, shall always be in order except when 
a vote is being taken, or while a Senator is addressing the 
Senate. 

37. Tlie motion to adjourn, to proceed to the consideration 
of Executive business, and to lay on the table, shall be decided 
without debate. 

38. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill 
shall have precedence of a motion to amend, and if carried 
shall be equivalent to its rejection. 



62 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

39. When a motion shall have been once made and carried 
in the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any 
Senator who voted on the prevailing side, to move a recon- 
sideration thereof on the same or next succeeding day of 
actual session ; but no motion for tlie reconsideration of any 
vote shall be in order after a bill, resolution, message, report, 
amendment or motion upon which the vote was taken, 
announcing their decision, shall have gone from the posses- 
sion of the Senate, and they shall not pass from the possession 
of the Senate until the expiration of the time in which a 
reconsideration is permitted ; and every motion for reconsid- 
eration shall be decided by a majority of votes, except a 
motion to reconsider the vote on the final passage of a bill or 
joint resolution, which shall require the same majority as is 
necessary for their final passage. 

Members. 

40. The seats within the bar shall be reserved exclusively 
for the Senators, the officers of the Senate, and the reporters 
of the press, who may have seats assigned them. 

41. No Senator shall speak in any debate without rising, 
nor more than three times on any subject of debate, unless he 
shall first obtain leave of the Senate, 

42. Every Senator, in speaking, shall address the President, 
confine himseK to the question under debate, and avoid 
personality. 

43. Any Senator may change his vote before the decision 
of the question shall have been announced by.the Chair. 

44. No Senator shall have his vote recorded on any ques- 
tion, when the yeas and nays are called, unless he shall be 
present to answer to his name. 

Messages. 

45. All messages shall be sent to the House of Assembly 
by the Secretary, under the direction of the President, as a 
standing order, without a vote thereon. 

46. Messages may be delivered at any stage of business 
except when a vote is being taken. 

47. When a message shall be sent from the Governor or 
House of Assemby to the Senate, it shall be announced at the 
door by the Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Senate Bills in the House. 

48. When an amendment made in the Senate to a bill from 
the House of Assembly shall be disagreed to by that House, 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 63 

and not adhered to by the Senate, the bill shall be considered 
as standing on a third reading. 

49. An amendment of the House of Assembly to a Senate 
bill shall not be divisible. 

50. In case of disagreement between the Senate and House 
of Assembly, the Senate may either recede, insist and ask a 
conference or adhere, and motions for such purposes shall take 
precedence in that order. 

51. When a Senate bill shall be returned, amended by the 
House of Assembly, the sections of the bill so amended, 
together with the amendments, shall be read by the Secretary 
for a first reading, and be entitled to a second reading, without 
special motion, at which reading the proposed amendments 
shall be open to the action of the Senate. (Rule 50.) And 
if, at its third reading, upon the question being put by the 
President, *' Will the Senate concur in the House amendment 
to Senate bill No. — ?" a majority of the whole Senate should, 
by a vote of yeas and nays, to concur, the question shall then 
be upon ordering the bill to be re-engrossed. If so ordered, 
the bill shall be re-engrossed, the amendments embodied 
therein, and the re-engrossed bill examined and reported by 
the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and read in oj^en Senate, 
to the end that it may be known to be correctly engrossed, and 
shall be then signed and certified as other bills. 

Disorder. 

52. In case of any disturbance in the gallery or lobby, the 
President shall have power to order the same to be cleared. 

53. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall aid in the enforcement of 
order, under the direction of the President. 

54. No Senator, in speaking, shall mention a Senator then 
present by his name. 

Special Orders. 

55. When the hour shall have arrived for the consideration 
of a special order, the same shall be taken up, and the Senate 
shall proceed to consider it, unless it shall be postponed by the 
Senate. 

56. The unfinished business in which the Senate shall have 
been engaged at the last preceding adjournment shall have the 
preference in the special orders of the day. (Kule 20.) 

57. No concurrent resolution shall pass unless by the con- 
sent of a majority of the Senators elected. 

Secret Session. 

58. On a motion made and seconded to shut the doors of 
the Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in 



64 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

the opinion of a Senator, require secrecy, the President shall 
direct the chamber to be cleared, and during the discussion 
of such motion the doors shall remain shut. 

Rules. 

59. No standing rule or order of the Senate shall be sus- 
pended unless by the consent of two-tliirds of the Senators 
elected, nor rescinded or amended but by the same number, 
and one day's notice shall be given of the motion for rescission 
or amendment. 

Executive Session. 

60. When nominations shall l)e made by the Governor to 
the Senate, they shall, unless otherwise ordered by the Senate, 
be referred to appropriate committees; and the final question 
on every nomination shall be, "Will the Senate advise and 
consent to this nomination?" which question shall not be put 
on the same day on which the nomination is received, nor on 
the day on which it may be reported In' a committee, unless 
by the unanimous consent of the Senate. 

61. When acting on Executive business, the Senate shall 
be cleared of all persons except the Senators and Secretary. 

62. All information or remarks concerning the character or 
qualifications of any person nominated by the Governor to 
office shall be kept a secret. 

68. The Legislative and Executive proceedings of the Senate 
shall be kept in separate and distinct books. 

64. All nominations approved by the Senate, or otherwise 
definitely acted on, shall be transmitted by the Secretary to 
the Governor, with the determination of the Senate thereon, 
from day to day, as such proceedings may occur ; but no fur- 
ther extract from the Executive journal shall be furnished, 
published or otherwise communicated, except by special order 
of the Senate. 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

RULES ADOPTED THIS YEAR. 



Of the Meeting- of the House. 

1. Any member or members less than a quorum may meet 
and adjourn the House from day to day, when necessary. 

2. Every member shall attend in his place precisely at the 
hour to which the House was last adjourned ; and in case of 
neglect, he shall be subject to a reprimand from the Cbair, 
unless excused by the House ; nor shall any member absent 
himself from the House for more than the space of a quarter 
of an hour without leave previously obtained. 

3. In case a less number of members than a quorum shall 
be present after the arrival of the hour to which the House 
stood adjourned, they are hereby authorized to send their 
Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or persons by them 
authorized, with a warrant duly executed, for any and all 
absent members, as the majority of such as are present may 
agree, and at the expense of such absent members, respect- 
ively, unless such excuse for non-attendance shall be rendered 
as the House, when a quorum is convened, shall judge suffi- 
cient. Inmiediately after the appointment of the Standing 
Committees, the members shall arrange among themselves 
their several seats appropriated to their counties ; and in case 
of disagreement, the same shall be decided by lot. 

Of the Duties of the Speaker. 

4. He shall take the chair at the hour to which the House 
shall have adjourned, and immediately call the membei's to 
order ; and on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause the 
journal of the preceding day to be read, which may then be 
corrected by the House. 

5. He shall preserve order and decorum, and in debate shall 
prevent personal reflections, and confine members to the ques- 
tion under discussion ; but he shall not engage in any debate, 
nor propose his opinion on any question, without first calling 
on some member to occupy the chair. When two or more 
members rise at the same time, he shall name the one entitled 
to the floor. 

6. He shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal 
to the House, when demanded by any four members, on which 

5 (65) 



66 MULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

appeal no member shall speak more than onoe, unless by leave 
ol' tlie House. 

7. All questions before the House shall be stated by the 
Speaker, and distinctly put in tlie following form, to wit: "As 
many as are in favor of (the question) will say aye ; " and after 
the affirmative is expressed, " Those of a contrary opinion, no." 
If the Speaker doubts, or a division be called ibr, the House 
shall divide; those in the affirmative of the question shall first 
rise from their seats, and afterwards those in the negative ; and 
in case of an equal division, the Speaker shall decide. 

8. All Committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially directed by the House. 

9. All acts, addresses and joint resolutions shall be signed 
by the Speaker; and all writs, warrants and subpoenas issued 
by the order of the House shall be under his hand and seal, 
and attested by tiie Clerk. If the Speaker be absent, a less 
number of members than a quorum may appoint a Speaker 
2V0 tempore, who may sign any warrants, or perform any act 
requisite to bring in absent meml)ei-s. 

10. He shall have a general direction of the hall, and he 
may name a member to perform the duties of the Chair ; but 
such substitution shall not extend beyond a second adjourn- 
ment. 

Of the Order of Business. 

11. After the reading of the journal, the business of the first 
meeting of each day shall be conducted in the following man- 
ner, to wit : 

I. Letters, petitions and memorials, remonstrances and 
accompanying documents may be presented and disposed of, 

II. Eeports of Committees may be read, 

in. Original resolutions may be offered and considered; 
items of unfinished business referred ; motions to reconsider 
and to appoint additional members of Committees made; and 
leave of absence, leave to withdraw documents, and leave to 
introduce bills asked. 

Leave for Bills and to Introduce Bills. 

IV, Bills and joint resolutions on a third reading may be 
taken up. 

V. The House shall then proceed in the order of the day, 
preference being always given to the unfinished business of 
the previous sitting; alter which bills and joint resolutions on 
a second reading shall be taken in their order ; and the House, 
in its afternoon session, will proceed to business as though 
there had been no adjournment of its morning session, except- 
ing that original resolutions, and leave to introduce bills of 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY, 67 

Committees, be the first business in the afternoon session ; and 
shall, on demand of the majority, proceed with the order of 
the day. 

] 2. The Clerk shall make a list of all public bills and joint 
resolutions. He shall keep a separate calendar of private 
bills. No bills for granting, continuing, altering, amending, 
or renewing a charter for any corporation, other than a munici- 
pal corporation, shall be i)laced on the calendar of public bills. 
All bills, public and private, shall be numbered according to 
the time of their introduction into the House. They shall be 
taken up and considered in the order of time in which they 
were reported, or ordered to a third reading, as appears by the 
calendar; and the calendar shall be proceeded in until all the 
bills tbereon are called up before the commencement of the 
calendar anew. 

13. All messages shall be sent from this House to the 
Senate by the Clerk. 

Of Decorum and Debate. 

14. When a member is about to speak in debate, or com- 
municate any matter to the House, he shall rise from his seat 
and respectfully address himself to the Speaker, confining him- 
self to the question under debate, and avoiding personality. 

15. If any member in debate transgress the rules of the 
House, the Speaker shall, or any member may, call liira to 
order, in which case the member so called to order shall im- 
mediately sit down, unless permitted to explain. The House 
shall, if appealed to, decide on the case, but without debate; 
if there be no appeal, the decision of the Chair shall be sub- 
mitted to. If the decision be in favor of the member called 
to order, he shall be at liberty to proceed ; if otherwise, he 
shall not be permitted to proceed without leave of the House, 
and if the case require it, he shall be liable to censure of the 
House. 

16. If a member be called to order for words spoken in 
debate, the person calling him to order shall repeat the words 
excepted to, and they shall be taken down in writing at the 
Clerk's table; and no member shall be held to answer, or be 
subject to the censure of the House, for words spoken in debate, 
if any other member has spoken, or other business has inter- 
vened after the words spoken, and before exception to them 
shall have been taken. 

17. No member shall speak more than twice, or longer 
than five minutes each time, without leave of the House. 

18. While the Speaker is putting any question, or address- 
ing the House, none shall walk out of or across the hall ; nor 



68 RVLES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

in such case, or when a member is speaking, shall anyone 
entertain private discourse; nor shall anyone, while a 
member is speaking, pass between him and the Chair. 

19. No member shall vote on any question in the event 
of which he is particularly interested, nor in any case 
where he was not within the bar of the House when the 
question was put. 

20. Every member who shall be in the House when the 
question is put shall give his vote, unless the House for 
special reasons shall excuse him. AH motions to excuse a 
member from voting shall be made before the House di- 
vides, or before the call of the yeas and nays is commenced; 
any member requesting to be excused from voting may 
make a brief verbal statement of the reasons for such re- 
quest, and the question shall then be taken without fur- 
ther debate. 

21. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to 
the House shall be presented by the Speaker, or by a mem- 
ber in his place ; a brief statement of the contents thereof 
shall be made by the introducer, and, if called upon, he 
shall declare that it does not, in his opinion, contain any 
indecent or reproachful language, or any expressions of 
disrespect to the House, or any committee of the game. 

22. It shall be the duty of the Sergeant-at-Arms, at all 
times, not to allow any person to smoke in the Assembly 
chamber. 

On Motions. 

23. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker or any member desire it. 

24. When a motion is made and seconded, it shall be 
stated by the Speaker, or being in writing, it shall be 
handed to the Chair and read aloud by the Clerk, when 
it shall be deemed to be in the possession of the House 
and open to debate; but it may be withdrawn at any 
time before a decision or amendment. 

25. When a question is under debate no motion shall 
be received but — 

1. To adjourn. 

2. A call of the House. 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. For the previous question. 

5. To postpone indefinitely. 

6. To postpone to a day certain. 

7. To go into a Committee of the Whole on the pend- 

ing subject immediately. 

8. To commit to a Committee of the Whok 

9. To commit to a Standing Committee. 

10. To commit to a Select Committee. 

11. To amend. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 09 

AVhich several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they are stated, and no motion to postpone to a day 
certain, to commit, or to postpone indefinitely, being decided, 
shall be again allowed on the same day, and at the same stage 
of the bill or proposition. 

26. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill or 
joint resolution shall have precedence of a motion to amend, 
and if carried shall be considered equivalent to its rejection. 

27. A motion to adjourn shall be always in order, except 
when the House is voting, or while a member is addressing 
the House, or immediately after the question to adjourn has 
been negatived ; that, and the motion to lay on the table, shall 
be decided without debate. 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, 
which shall be divided if it comprehends questions so distinct 
that one being taken away from the rest may stand entire for 
the decision of the House ; a motion to strike out and insert 
shall be deemed indivisible ; but a motion to strike out being 
lost, shall preclude neither amendment nor a motion to strike 
out and insert. 

29. When any motion shall be made and seconded, the same 
shall, at the request of any two members, be entered on the 
Journal of the House. * 

30. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member 
who voted with the prevailing party to move for the reconsid- 
eration thereof, on the same day or on the next day of actual 
session of the House thereafter ; all motions may be reconsid- 
ered, by a majority of the members present ; but bills, to be 
reconsidered, must have the same majority that would be 
necessary to pass them ; and such vote, on motion to recon- 
sider, shall be by taking the yeas and nays. 

31. When a blank is to be filled, the question shall first be 
taken on the largest sum, or greatest number, and remotest 
day. 

32. The yeas and nays shall be entered on the Journal of 
the House, when moved for and seconded by five members, 
and in taking the yeas and nays the names of the members, 
including the Speaker, shall be called alphabetically. 

33. The previous question shall be put in this form : 
"Shall the main question be now put?" It shall only be 
admitted when demanded by a majority of the members 
present, and its effect shall be, if decided affirmatively, to put 
an end to all debate, and bring the House to a direct vote 
upon amendments reported by a committee, if any, then upon 
pending amendments, and then upon the main question ; if 
decided in the negative, to leave the main question and 



70 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

amendmentsifany,under(lebate for the residue of the sitting, un- 
less sooner disposed of by taking tlie question, or in some other 
manner. All incidental questions oforder arising after a mction 
is made for the previous question, and pending such motion, shall 
be decided, whether on appeal or otherwise, without debate. 

34. After the Clerk has commenced calling the yeas and 
nays on any question, no motion shall be received until a 
decision shall have been announced by the Chair. 

Of Coramittees. 

85. The following Standing Committees shall be appointed 
at the commencement of the session, until otherwise ordered : 

A Committee of Ways and Means. 

A Committee on Bill Revision. 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Agriculture and Agricultural College. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills. 

A Conmiittee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Boroughs and Borough CommisBlons. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Claims and Revolutionary Pensions. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Incidental Expenses. 

A Committee on Stationery. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Revision of Laws. 

A Committee on Fisheries. 

A Committee on Railroads and Canals. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Subjects. 

A Committee on Labor and Industries. 

A Committee on Towns and Townships. 

Which several committees shall consist of five members 
each. 

Joint Committees. 

The following Joint Committees, of five members each, 
shall also be appointed to act conjointly with corresponding 
committees to be appointed by the Senate: 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on Public Printing. 

A Committee on the Library. 

A Committee on the Lunatic Asylums. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Relations. 



RVLES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 71 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Honie. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes. 

36. The several Standing Committees of the House shall 
have leave to report by bill or otherwise. 

37. No committee shall sit during the sitting of the House, 
without special leave. 

38. All committees appointed at the first sitting shall 
continue to act during every subsequent sitting of the same 
Legislature, or until they have reported on the business com- 
mitted to them, or have been discharged. 

Of the Committee of the Whole House. 

39. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the 
Speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman to preside in 
committee shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

40. The rules of proceeding in the House shall be observed^ 
as far as practicable, in Committee of the Whole, except that 
any member may speak oftener than twice on the same subject, 
but shall not speak a second time until every member choosing 
to speak shall have spoken ; nor shall a motion for the previous 
question be made therein. 

41. All amendments made in Committee of the Whole shall 
be noted by the Clerk, but need not be read by the Speaker 
on his resuming the chair, unless required by the House. 

On Bills and Joint Resolutions. 

42. All bills and joint resolutions shall be introduced b^ 
motion for leave, or on the report of a committee, and the 
member offering the same shall indorse his name on them, 
that the committee may confer with him should they so desire. 

43. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three sepa- 
rate readings in the House previous to its passage, but no bill 
or joint resolution shall be read twice on the same day, without 
special order of the House. 

44. All bills and joint resolutions shall, after their first 
reading, be printed for the use of the members, and referred 
to their appropriate committees. 

45. All bills and joint resolutions may be made the order 
of a particular day, on which day they shall be taken up in 
preference to others on the calendar ; and the calendar of pri- 
vate bills shall not be taken up until the calendar of public 
bills shall have been gone through with. 



72 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

46. All bills and joint resolutions, previous to their final 
passage ))y the House, all petitions, motions and reports, may 
be committed at tlie pleasure of the House. And the recom- 
mitment of any l)ill or resolution, when the same has been 
ordered to a third reading, shall have the effect of placing tl»e 
same upon the second reading. 

47. All bills and joint resolutions ordered to be engrossed 
shall be executed in a fair, round hand, and no amendment 
by way of rider shall be received to any bill or joint resolution 
on its third reading. 

48. On a motion to strike out any item in the incidental 
bill, the question to be submitted to the House shall be, " Shall 
the item be retained in the bill?" and a majority of all the 
members of the House shall Ije necessary to adopt the same. 

49. After the introduction of any private bill, the applicants 
for said bill shall, at their own expense, furnish the usual 
number of copies for the use of the members, unless the print- 
ing thereof be dispensed with by a special order of the Ilouse. 

50. On the question of the final pa&sage of all bills and 
joint resolutions, the yeas and nays shall be entered on the 
journal of the House. 

51. Whenever a bill or resolution that has passed the House 
shall be carried to the Senate, all papers and documents relat- 
ing thereto, on the files of the House, shall be carried with 
such bill or resolution to the Senate. 

Of Rules. 

52. No standing rule or order of the House shall be rescinded 
or changed without one day's notice being given of the motion 
therefor ; nor shall any rule be suspended except by a vote of 
the majority of the whole number of members of the House. 

53. When an Assembly bill is returned amended by the 
Senate, the report thereof by the Secretary of the Senate shall 
be taken as the first reading, and the same be entitled to a 
second reading, without a motion for that purpose; after its 
second reading, the question shall be, "Shall the Senate amend- 
ments to Assembly bill No. — have a third reading?" If 
ordered to a third reading, the amendments shall be read, but 
these readings shall be on different days; the question shall 
then be, "Will the House of Assembly concur in the Senate 
amendments to Assembly bill No. — ?" upon which question 
the votes shall be by yeas and nays. If concurred in by a 
majority of the whole House, the bill shall be re-engrossed, 
the amendments embodied therein, and the re-engrossed bill 
examined and reported upon by the Committee on Engrossed 
Bills, and read in open Assembly, to the end that it may be 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 73 

known to be correctly engrossed, and then signed and certified 
as other bills. 

54. Cushing's Manual shall in all cases, when not in conflict 
with the rules adopted by the House, be considered and held 
as standard authority. 

55. No person shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
during its sessions except State officers and members and 
officers of the Senate, unless by written permission of the 
Speaker. 

56. No committee of this House shall report a bill adversely 
without notifying the introducer of the bill ; nor shall such 
adverse report be acted upon unless the introducer of the bill 
is in his seat. 

57. After the calling of the roll has been commenced upon 
any question, n.o member shall be permitted to explain his vote. 

58. Every bill amended in the House, after its report by 
the committee to which it was referred upon introduction, shall, 
when ordered to be engrossed and have a third reading, be 
delivered to the Committee on Bill Kevision, whose duty it 
shall be to examine the same, and if it be found that such 
amendment agrees with the context the bill shall then be 
engrossed. If in the opinion of the committee such amend- 
ment is, as to form, improper, they shall report to the House 
with such recommendation as they think fit. Such report 
shall be made within two days from the receipt of the bill. 

59. That hereafter any motion or resolution which will 
result in relieving; a standing committee of a bill referred 
to it, shall not be entertained unless one day's notice shall 
be given the House of the introduction of such motion 
or resolution. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 

OF THE 

SENATE AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



1. In every case of an amendment of a bill agreed to in 
one House and dissented from in the other, if either House 
shall request a conference and appoint a committee for that 
purpose, and the other House shall also appoint a committee 
to confer, such committee shall, at a convenient hour to be 
agreed on bv their respective chairmen, meet in conference, 
and state to each other, verbally or in writing, as either shall 
choose, the reasons of their respective Houses for and against 
the amendment, and confer freely thereon. 

2. After each House shall have adhered to their disagree- 
ment, a bill or resolution shall be lost. 

3. When a bill or resolution which shall have passed in 
one House is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be sent 
to the House in vrhicli the same shall have passed. 

4. Each House in which any bill or resolution shall have 
passed shall transmit therewith to the other House all papers 
and documents relating to the same, 

5. When a message shall be sent from either House to the 
other, it shall be announced at the door of the House by the 
doorkeeper, and shall be respectfully communicated to the 
Chair by the person by whom it is sent. 

6. After a bill shall have passed both Houses, it shall be 
delivered by the Clerk of the Assembly, or the Secretary of 
the Senate, as the bill may have originated in one House or 
the other, to a Joint Committee on Passed Bills, of two from 
each House, appointed as a Standing Committee for that pur- 
pose, and shall be presented by said committee to the Governor 
for his approbation, it being first indorsed on the back of the 
bill, certifying in which House the same originated, which 
indorsement shall be signed by the Secretary or Clerk, as the 
case may be, of the House in which the same did originate, 
and shall be entered on the journal of each House. The said 
committee shall report on the day of presentation to the 
Governor, which time shall also be carefully entered on the 
ioumal of each House. 

(74) 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

PBOM 1774 TO THE PBESENT TIME. 



Continental Congress. 

1774-5, James Kinsey; 1774-6, John Cooper, Stephen 
Crane, John De Hart, John Hart, Francis Hopkinson, Wil- 
liam Livingston, Richard Smith, Eichard Stockton; 1776-7, 
Jonathan D. Sergeant; 1776-8, Abraham Clark, Jonathan 
Ehner; 1776-9, John Witherspoon ; 1777-8, Elias Boudinot; 
1777-9, Nathaniel Scudder; 1778-9, Frederick Frelinghuy- 
sen, Elias Dayton; 1778, John jSTeilson; 1778-80, John Fell; 
1779, Thomas Henderson; 1779-81, William Ch. Houston; 
1780-1, William Burnett, William Paterson; 1780-3, Abra- 
ham Clark; 1780-2, John Witherspoon; 1781-3, William 
Paterson; 1782-3, Frederick Frelinghuysen ; 1781-4, Silas 
Condict, Jonathan Elmer; 1783-5, John Beatty, »Samuel 
Dick ; 1783-4, John Stevens, Sr. ; 1784-5, Charles Stewart, 
William Ch. Houston ; 1784-7, Lambert Cadwalader ; 1785-6, 
John Cleaves Symmes, Josiah Hornblower; 1786-7, James 
Schureman ; 1786-8, Abraham Clark ; 1787, William Pater- 
son ; 1787-8, Jonathan Elmer ; 1787-9, Jonathan Dayton. 



Prom 1789 to Date. 

I. 1789-91. Elias Boudinot, Burlington ; Lambert Cad- 
walader, Hunterdon ; James Schureman, Middlesex ; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem. 

II. 1791-3. Elias Boudinot, Burlington ; Abraham Clark, 
Essex ; Jonathan Dayton, Essex ; Aaron Kitchell, Morris ; 
James Schureman, Middlesex. 

III. 1793-5. John Beatty, Hunterdon ; Elias Boudinot, 
Burlington ; Lambert Cadwalader, Hunterdon ; Jonathan 
Dayton, Essex; Abraham Clark, Essex (died 1794); Aaron 
Kitchell, Morris (to fill vacancy). 

IV. 1795-7. Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex ; Thomas 
Henderson, Monmouth ; Aaron Kitchell, Essex ; Isaac Smith, 
Hunterdon ; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

V. 1797-9. Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex ; James 
H. Imlay, Monmouth ; James Schureman, Middlesex ; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem ; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

(75j 



76 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

VI. 1799-1801. John Condit, Essex; Franklin Daven- 
port, Gloucester ; Samuel H. Imlay, Monmouth ; Aaron Kit- 
chell, Morris ; James Linn, Somerset. 

YII. 1801-3. John Condit, Essex ; Ebenezer Elmer, 
Cumberland ; William Helms, Sussex ; James Mott, Burling- 
ton ; Henry Southard, Somerset. 

VIII. 1803-5. Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlington; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Adam Boyd, Bergen. 

IX. 1805-7. Ebenezer Elmer, Chnnberland ; William 
Helms, Sussex; John Lambert, Hunterdon; James Sloan, 
Gloucester ; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Ezra Darby, Essex. 

X. 1807-9. William Helms, Sussex; John Lambert, 
Hunterdon ; Thomas Kewbold, Burlington ; James Sloan, 
Gloucester ; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Ezra Darby, Essex 
(until 1808) ; Adam Bovd, Bergen (from 1808-9). 

_ XI. 1809-11. James Cox, Monmouth (until 1810) ; Wil- 
liam Helms, Sussex ; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland ; Thomas 
Newbold, Burlington; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam 
Boyd, Bergen. 

XII. 1811-13. Adam Boyd, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; George C. Maxwell, 
Hunterdon; James Morgan, Middlesex; Thomas Xewbold, 
Burlington. 

XIII. 1813-15. Lewis Condict, Morris; William Cox, 
Burlington ; Richard Stockton, Somerset ; Thomas Ward, 
Essex ; James Schureman, Middlesex ; Jacob Huftv, Cumber- 
land (untn 1814); Thomas Binns, Essex (1814-15)'. 

XIV. 1815-17. Ezra Baker, Middlesex ; Ephraim Bate- 
man, Cumberland ; Benjamin Bennett, Monmouth ; Lewis 
Condict, Morris ; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Thomas Ward, 
Essex. 

XV. 1817-19. Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Benja- 
min Bennett, Monmouth ; Joseph Bloomfield, Bnrlington ; 
Charles Kinsey, Essex ; John Linn, Sussex ; Henry South- 
ard, Sussex. 

XVI. 1819-21. Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland ; Joseph 
Bloomfield, Burlington ; John Linn, Sussex ; Barnard Smiib, 
Middlesex ; Henry Southard, Somei-set ; John Condit, Essex 
(until 1820) ; Thomas Bums, Essex (1820-1). 

X\T:I. 1S21-3. George Cassady, Bergen ; Lewis Condict, 
Morris ; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth ; James Matlack, Glou- 
cester ; Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland ; Samuel Swan, Som- 
erset. 

X\TII. 1823-5. George Cassady, Bergen ; Daniel Garri- 
son, Salem ; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth ; James Matlack, 
Gloucester ; Lewis Condict, Morris j Samuel Swan, Somerset, 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN, 77 

XIX. 1825-7. Greorge Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; Daniel Garrison, Salem; G. E. Holcombe, Mon- 
mouth ; Samuel Swan, Somerset ; Ebenezer Tucker, Burling- 
ton. 

XX. 1827-9. Lewis Condict, Essex ; Isaac Pierson, Es- 
sex ; Samuel Swan, Somerset ; Ebenezer Tucker, Burling- 
ton; George E. Holcombe, Monmouth (until 1828); Hedge 
Thompson, Salem (until 1828) ; James Fitz Eandolph, Mid- 
dlesex (1828-9) ; Thomas Sinnickson, Salem (1828-9). 

XXI. 1829-31. Eichard M. Cooper, Gloucester; Lewis 
Condict, Morris ; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May ; Isaac Pier- 
son, Essex ; James Fitz Randolph, Middlesex ; Samuel Swan, 
Somerset. 

XXIL 1831-3. Lewis Condict, Morris; Richard M. 
Cooper, Gloucester ; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May ; James 
Fitz Randolph, Middlesex; Isaac Southard, Somerset; Silas 
Condit, Essex. 

XXIII. 1833-5. Philemon Dickerson (B.), Essex ; Sam- 
uel Fowler (D.), Sussex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; 
James Parker (D.), Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), 
Somerset; William N. Shinn (D.), Burlington. 

XXIV. 1835-7. Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic (re- 
signed and elected Governor); Samuel Fowler (D.), Sussex; 
Thomas Lee (D,), Cumberland; James Parker (D.), Middle- 
sex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), Somerset; William N. 
Shinn (D.), Burlington; William Chetwood (D.), Essex (va- 
cancy 1836-7). 

XXV. 1837-9. John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen ; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell ( W.j, Warren ; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones York (W.), Salem. 

XXVI. 1839-41. William B. Cooper (D.), Gloucester; 
Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic; Joseph F. Randolph 
(W.), McMimouth; Daniel B. Ryall (D.), Monmouth; Joseph 
Kille (D.), Salem; Peter D. Vroom (D.), Somerset. 

XXVII. 1841-3. John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen ; Wil- 
liam Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), 
AVarren; Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. 
Stratton (W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones Yorke (W.), Salem. 

XXVIII. 1843-5. Lucius Q. C. Elmer (D.), Cumberland ; 
George Sykes (D.), Burlington; Littleton Kirkpatrick (D.), 
Middlesex ; Isaac G. Farlee (D.), Hunterdon ; William Wright 
(W.), Essex. 

XXIX. 1845-7. James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland ; 
Samuel G. Wright (W.) (died 1845), Monmouth; George 
Sykes (D.) (vacancy), Burlington; John Runk (W.), Hunter- 
don; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex; William Wright (W.), 
Essex. 



78 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

XXX. 1847-9. James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland; 
William A. Newell (W.), Monmouth ; Jolin Van Dyke ( VV j, 
Middlesex ; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex ; Dudley S. Greg- 
ory (W.), Hudson. 

XXXI. 1849-51. Andrew K. Hay (W.), Camden ; Wil- 
liam A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van Dyke (W.), 
Middlesex; Isaac Wildrick (D.J, Warren; James G. King 
(W.), Hudson. 

XXXII. 1851-3. Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberland ; 
Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer; George H. Brown (W.), Som- 
erset; Isaac Wildrick (D.j, Warren; Rodman M. Price (D.J, 
Essex. 

XXXIII. 1853-5. Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberland ; 
Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer ; Samuel Lilly (D.), Hunterdon ; 
George Vail (D.), Morris; A. C. M. Pennington (W.), Essex. 

XXXIV. 1855-7. Isaiah D. Clawson (R.), Cumberland; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; James Bishop (N. A.), 
Middlesex ; George Vail (D.J, Morris ; A. C. M. Pennington 
(R.), Essex. 

XXXV. 1857-9. Isaiah D. Clawson (R.\ Cumberland ; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; Garnet B. Adrain (D.), 
Middlesex; John Huyler (D.j, Bergen; Jacob R. Worten- 
dvke CD.), Hudson. 

' XXXVI. 1859-61. John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington ; Garnet B. Adrain (D.), 
Middlesex ; Jetur R. Riggs (D.j, Passaic ; William Penning- 
ton (R.) (Speaker), Essex. 

XXXVII. 1861-3. John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington; William G. Steele 
(D.), Somerset; George T. Cobb (D.), Morris; Nehemiah 
Perry (D.), Essex. 

XXXVIII. 1863-5. John F. Starr f R.), Camden ; G eorge 
Middleton (D.), Monmouth; William G. Steele (D.), Somer- 
set ; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex ; Nehemiah Perry (D.), 

XXXIX. 1865-7. John F. Starr (R.), Camden ; William 
A. Newell (R.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), War- 
ren ; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex ; Ed. R. V. Wright (D.), 
Hudson. 

XL. 1867-9. William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 
Haight (D.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), Warren; 
John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex. 

XLI. 1869-71. William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 
Haight (D.\ Monmouth; John T. Bird (D.\ Hunterdon; 
John Hill (R.\ Morris; Orestes Cleveland (D.), Hudson. 

iXLII. 1871-3. John W. Hazleton (R.), Gloucester; 
Sam'l C. Forker (D.), Burlington ; John T. Bird (D.), Hunter- 
don ; John Hill (R.), Morris ; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex, 



Kt:W JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 79 

XLIII. 1873-5. John W. Hazleton fR.), Gloucester; Samuel A. Dob- 
bins (R.), Burlington; Amos Clark, Jr. (R.), Union ; Robert Hamilton {T>.\ 
Sussex; William Walter Phelps (R.), Bergen; Marcus L. Ward (R.), 
Essex; Isaac W. Scudder (R.\ Hudson. 

XLIV. 1875-7. Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem; Samuel A. Dob- 
bins (R ), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex ; Robert Hamilton (D,), 
Sussex; Augustus W. Cutler (D.), Morris; Frederick H. Teese (D.), 
Essex; Augustus A. Hardenbergh t D.), Hudson. 

XLV. 1877-9 Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem; J. Howard Pugh 
(R.), Burlington; Miles Ross iD.), Middlesex; Alvah A. Clark (D.), 
Somerset; Augustus W. Cutler (D.), Morris; Thomas B. Peddie (R ), 
Essex; Augustus A. Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVI. 1879-81. George M. Robeson R ), Camden; Hezekiah B. 
Smith (D.), Burlington ; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex ; Alvah A. Clark (D.), 
Somerset; Charles H. Voorhis (R.), Bergen; John L. Blake (R.), Essex; 
Lewis A. Brigham (R.), Hudson. 

XLVn. 1881-3. George M. Robeson (R.), Camden ; John Hart Brewer 
(R.), Mercer: Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex; Henry S. Harris (D.), War- 
ren; John Hill (R.', Morris; Phineas Jones (R.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVni. 1883-5. Thomas M. Ferrell (D.), Gloucester-, John Hart 
Brewer (R.), Mercer; John Kean, Jr. 'R.), Union; Benjamin F. Howey 
(R.), Warren; William Walter Phelps (R.), Bergen; William H. F. Fiedler 
(T> ), Essex ; William McAdoo (D), Hudson. 

XLIX. 1885-7. George Hires (R.), Salem; James Buchanan (R.), 
Mercer; Robert S. Green (D.), Union; James N. Pidcock (D.), Hunter- 
don; William Walter Phelps (R.), Bergen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; 
William McAdoo (D.), Hudson. 

L. 1887-9. George Hires (R.), Salem; James Buchanan (R.), Mercer; 
John Kean, Jr. (R.), Union; James N. Pidcock (D.), Hunterdon; William 
Walter Phelps (R.), Bergen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex ; William Mc- 
Adoo (D.), Hudson. 

LI. 1889-91. Christopher A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James Buchanan 
(R.), Mercer; Jacob A. Geissenhainer (D.), Monmouth ; Samuel Fowler 
(D.). Sussex; Charles D. Beckwith (R.), Passaic; Herman Lehlbach (R.), 
Essex; William McAdoo (D.), Hudson. 

LII. 1891-93. C. A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James Buchanan (R.), 
Mercer; J. A. Geissenhainer \X>.), Monmouth; Samuel Fowler (D.), Sus- 
sex; C. A. Cadmus (D.), Passaic ; T. D. English (D.), Essex; *E. F. Mc- 
Donald (D.>, Hudson. 

LIII. 1893-95. Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester ; John J. Gard- 
ner (R.), Atlantic; J. A. Geissenhainer * D.), Monmouth ; Johnston Cornish 
(D.), Warren; C. A. Cadmus (D.), Passaic; T. D. English (D.), Essex; 
George B. Fielder (D.), Hudson ; John T. Dunn (D.), Union. 

LIV. Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester ; John J Gardner (R.), 
Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.), 
Morris; James T. Stewart (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; 
Thomas McEwan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union. 



* Mr. McDonald died November 5th, 1892, and he was succeeded by 
George B. Fielder. 



THE JUDICIARY, 

(From 1704 to date.) 



CHANCELLORS. 
(Term, seven years- -Salary. SIO.OOO.) 

1845, Oliver S. Halsted ; 1852, Benjamin Williamson ; 1860, 
Henry W. Green; 1866, Abraham 6. Zabriskie; 1873, Theo- 
dore Runyon; 1887, Alexander T. McGill (term expires May 
Ibt, 1901). 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
(Term of office, seven years— Salary, $10,000.) 

1704, Roger Mompesson ; 1709, Thomas Gordon; 1710, 
David Jamiscm ; 1728, AVilliam Trent; 1724, Robert Lettis 
Hooper ; 1728, Thomas Farmer ; 1738, Robert Hunter Morris ; 
1758, William Ay nsley ; 1764, Charles Read; 1764, Frederick 
Smyth; 1776, Richard Stockton (declined i; 1776, John De- 
Hart (declined) ; 1777, Robert Morris ; 1779, David Brearley ; 
1789, James Kinsev ; 1803, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 1824, 
Charles Ewing ; 1832, Joseph C. Hornblower; 1846, Henry 
W. Green ; 18o3,l*eter D. Yroom (declined) ; 1853, Alexander 
Wurts (declined); 1861, Edward W. Whelpley; 1864, Mercer 
Beasley (term expires March 8th, 1899). 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME 

COURT. 

(Term of office, seven years— Salary, $9,000 each.) 

1704, William Pinhorne; 1705, William Sandford; 1705, 
Andrew Bowne; 1706, Daniel Coxe ; 1708, Thomas Revel; 
1708, Daniel Leeds ; 1710, Peter Sonmans ; 1710, Hugh Huddy; 
1711, Lewis Morris; 1711, Thomas Farmer; 1721, Peter 
Bard ; 1734, Daniel Coxe ; 1735, John Hamilton ; 1739, Jo- 
seph Bonnel ; 1739, John Allen ; 1748, Samuel Nevil ; 1749, 
Charles Read; 1754, Richard Salter; 1764, John Berrien; 
1772, David Ogden ; 1774, Richard Stockton; 1776, Samuel 
Tucker ; 1776, Francis Hopkinson (declined) ; 1777, Isaac 
Smith; 1777, John Cleves Svmmes; 1788, John Chetwood; 
1797, Andrew Kirkpatrick ; 'l798, Elisha Boudinot ; 1804, 
William S. Pennington ; 1804, William Rossell ; 1813, Mah- 
lon Dickerson ; 181o, Samuel L. Southard ; 1820, Gabriel H. 
Ford; 1826, George K. Drake; 1834, Thomas C. Rverson; 
1838, John Moore White; 1838, AVilliam L. Dayton; 1838, 

(80) 



THE JUDICIARY. 81 

James S. Nevius ; 1841, Daniel Elmer ; 1841, Ira C. White- 
head ; 1845, Thomas P. Carpenter ; 1845, Joseph F. Kandolph ; 
1845, James S. Nevius; 1848, Elias B. D. Ogden ; 1852, Lucius 
Q. C. Elmer; 1852, Stacy G. Potts ;^ 1852, Daniel Haines; 
1855, Peter Vredenburgh ; 1855, Martin Ryerson; 1855, Elias 
B. D. Ogden; 1858, Edward Wo Whelpley; 1859, Daniel 
Haines; 1859, William S. Clawson; 1859, John Vandyke*, 
1861, George H. Brown; 1861, L. Q. C. Elmer; 1862, Peter 
Vredenburgh ; 1862, L. Q. C. Elmer ; 1862, Elias B. D. Ogden ; 
1865, Joseph D. Bedle; 1866, Vancleve Dalrimple; 1866, 
Georges. Woodhull; 1866, 73, '80 and '89, David A. Depue; 
1869, 76, '83 and '90, Bennet Van Syckel ; 1869, 76, '83 and 
'90, Edward W. Scudder; 1875, '82 and '89, Manning M. 
Knapp ; 1875, '82 and '89, Jonathan Dixon ; 1875, '82 ard 
'89, Alfred Reed; 1880 and '87, Joel Parker; 1880 and '87, 
William J. Magie ; 1888, Charles G. Garrison ; 1892, George 
T. Werts ; 1893, Job H. Lippincott ; 1893, Leon Abbett. 

ATTORNEY-GENERALS. 

(Term, five years— Salary, S,7000, 

1704, Alexander Griffith; 1714, Thomas Gordon; 1719, 

Jeremiah Bass; 1723, James Alexander; 1728, Lawrence 
Smith; 1733, Joseph Warrel; 1754, Cortland Skinner; 1776, 
William Paterson; 1783, Joseph Bloomfield; 1792, Aaron D. 
Woodruff; 1811, Andrew S. Hunter; 1817, Theodore Freling- 
huysen ; 1829, Samuel L. Southard ; 1833, John Moore White ; 
1838, Richard S. Field; 1841, George P.. Molleson; 1844, 
Richard P. Thompson; 1845, Abraham Browning; 1850, 
Lucius Q. C. Elmer ; 1852, Richard P. Thompson ; 1857, Wil- 
liam L. Dayton ; 1861, F. T. Frelinghuysen ; 1867, George M. 
Robeson; 1870, Robert Gilchrist; 1875, Joel Parker; 1875, 
Jacob Vanatta ; 1877, John P. Stockton (term expires April 
5th, 1897). 

CLERKS IN CHANCERY. 
(Term, five years— Fees.) 

1831, Stacy G. Potts; 1840, Samuel R. Gummere; 1851, 
Daniel B. Bodine; 1856, William M. Babbitt; 1861, Barker 
Gummere ; 1871, Henry S. Little ; 1881, George S. Duryee ; 
1886, Allan L. McDermott (term expires March 28th, 1896). 

CLERKS OF SUPREME COURT. 

(Term, five years— Fees.) 

1776, Jonathan D. Sergeant (declined) ; 1776, Bowes Reed; 
1781, William C. Houston; 1788, Richard Howell; 1793, 
Jonathan Rhea; 1807, William Hyer ; 1812, Garret D. Wall; 
1817, Zachariah Rossell ; 1842, Eli Morris; 1842, James Wil- 
son; 1852, William M. Force; 1857, Charles P. Smith; 1872, 
Benjamin F. Lee (term expires November 2d, 1897). 



STATE OFFICERS. 

(From 177G to date.) 



SECRETARIES OF STATE. 

(Term, five years— Salary, SG.OOO.) 

1776, Charles Pettit, resio^ned October 7th, 1778 ; 1778, Bowes 
Reed; 1794, Samuel W. Stockton; 1795, John Beatty ; 1805, 
James Linn ; 1820. Daniel Coleman ; 1830, James L). West- 
cott ; 1840, Charles G. McChesnev ; 1851, Thomas S. Allison ; 
1861, Whitfield S. Johnson; 1866, Horace N. Congar; 1871, 
Henry C. Kelsey (term expires April 6th, 1897), 



STATE TREASURERS. 

(Term, three years— Salary, SG,000.) 

1776, Richard Smith (resigned February 15th, 1777) ; 1777, 
John Stevens, Jr.; 1783, John Schureman (declined) ; 1783, 
James Mott; 1799, James Salter ; 1803, Peter Gordon; 1821, 
Charles Parker; 1832, William Grant ; 1833, Charles Parker; 
1836, Jacob Kline; 1837, Isaac Southard; 1843, Thomas Ar- 
rowsmith ; 1845, Stacy A. Paxson ; 1848, Samuel Mairs ; 1851 , 
Rescarrick M. Smith ; 1865, David Naar ; 1866, Howard Ivins; 
1868, William P. McMichael ; 1871, JosephusSooy, Jr.; 1875, 
Gershom Mott ; 1876, Georee M. Wright ; 1885, Jonathan H. 
Blackwell; 1885, John J. Toffey ; 1891, George R. Grav ; 
1894, George B. Swain (term expires April 2d, 1897). 



STATE COMPTROLLERS. 

(Term, three years— Salary, SO.OOO.) 

1865, William K. McDonald; 1871, Albert L. Runyon; 
1877, Robert F. Stockton; 1880, Edward J. Anderson; 

1891, William C. Heppenheimer; 1894, William S Hancock 
(term expires April 2d, 1897). 

(82) 



STATE OFFICERS. 83 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS. 

(Salary, 81,200.) 
1776, William Bott; 1793, Anthony Walton White ; 1808, 
7ohn Morgan; 1804, Ebenezer Elmer; 1804, Peter Hunt; 
3810, James J. Wilson; 1812, John Beatty ; 1814, James J. 
Wilson; 1814, Charles Gordon; 1816, Zachariah Kossell; 
1842, Thomas Cadwallader; 1858, Kobert F. Stockton, Jr.; 
1867, William S. Stryker. 



QUARTERMASTER-GENERALS. 

(Salary, 81,200.) 

1776, John Mehelm ; 1778, Matthias Williamson ; 1813, 
Jonathan Rhea; 1821, James J. Wilson; 1824, Garret D. 
Wall; 1830, Samuel R. Hamilton; 1855, Lewis Perrine 
(died 1889) ; 1890, Richard A. Donnelly. 



STATE PRISON KEEPERS. 

(Term since 1876, five years— Salary, $3,500.) 

Crooks; Henry Bellerjeau ; Francis Labaw; 



1829, Ephraim Eyno; 1830, Thomas M. Perrine; 1836, Jo- 
seph A. Yard ; 1839, John Voorhees; 1841, Jacob B. Gaddis; 
1843, Joseph A. Yard ; 1845, Jacob B. Gaddis; 1851, William 
B. Vanderveer; 1857, Robert P. Stoll; 1862, T. V. D. Hoag- 
land; 1863, Joseph B. Walker; 1866, Peter P. Robinson; 
1868, Joseph B.Walker; 1869, David D. Hennion: 1871, 
Robert H. Howell; 1873, Charles Wilson; 1876, Gershom 
Mott ; 1881, P. H. Laverty ; 1886, John H. Patterson (term 
expires Aoril 22d, 1896). 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



Below is a record of the length of each session, the date of meeting 
and adjournment of, and the number of laws enacted by the various 
Legislatures since the adoption of the new Constitution in 1844 : 

[Special Sessions. — An extra session convened on April 30th, and 
adjourned on May 10th, 1861, called in obedience to Governor Olden's 
proclamation, to raise troops for the war. Laws enacted, 18; Joint 
Resolutions, 2. A special session of the Senate was convened in 1877, 
for the purpose of acting on the Governor's nominations of District 
Court Judges ; it met on March 28lh, and adjourned ou March 30th. 
A special session of the Senate was convened in 1884, to act on the 
Governor's nominations for members of the State Board of Assessors; 
it met on April 23d, and lasted two hours.] 













Laws 


Joint 


Year, 


Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted. 


Resolutions. 


1845— January 14, 


AprU 


4, 


12 Weeks. 





... 


1846— 


13, 


" 


18, 


14 " 


144 


.» 


1847- 


12, 


March 


5, 


8 " 


109 


13 


1848- 


11, 


" 


9, 


9 " 


136 


14 


1849- 


9, 


" 


2, 


8 " 


136 


12 


1850- 


8, 


" 


8, 


9 " 


123 


9 


1851— 


14, 


" 


19, 


10 " 


171 


3 


1852- 


" 13, 


" 


30, 


11 " 


213 


9 


1853— 


12, 


" 


11. 


9 " 


198 


12 


1854— 


10, 


" 


1", 


10 " 


223 


13 


1855— 


9, 


April 


6, 


13 " 


258 


5 


1856- 


8, 


March 


14, 


10 " 


180 


11 


1857- 


" 13, 


" 


21, 


10 " 


223 


2 


1858- 


" 12, 


" 


18, 


10 " 


215 


8 


1859— 


11, 


" 


23, 


11 " 


231 


1 


1860— 


10, 


" 


22, 


11 " 


270 


6 


1861— 


8, 


" 


15 


10 " 


181 


2 


1862- 


14, 


" 


28, 


11 " 


194 


5 


1863- 


" 13, 


" 


25. 


11 " 


279 


3 


1864— 


12, 


April 


14, 


14 " 


446 


7 


1865— 


10, 


" 


6, 


13 " 


514 


5 


1866- 


9, 


" 


6, 


13 " 


487 


6 


1867- 


" 18, 


" 


12, 


12 " 


480 


12 


1868— 


14, 


«« 


17, 


14 " 


566 


11 


1869— 


" 12, 


tt 


2, 


12 " 


577 


& 



(84) 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURE, 



85 













Laws 


Joint 


Year. 


Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted. 


Resolutiona 


1870— Januar>' 11, 


March 


IV, 


10 Weeks. 


532 


6 


1871— 


10, 


April 


6, 


13 " 


625 


9 . 


1872- 


9, 


- <i 


4, 


13 " 


603 


10 


1873- 


14, 


" 


4, 


12 " 


723 


1 


1874- 


13, 


March 


27, 


11 " 


534 


1 


1875- 


12, 


April 


9, 


13 " 


439 





1876- 


11, 


" 


21, 


15 " 


213 


6 


1877- 


9, 


March 


9, 


9 "■ 


156 


6 


1878- 


8, 


April 


5, 


13 " 


267 


7 


1879- 


" 14, 


March 


14, 


9 " 


209 


3 


1880— 


" 13, 


" 


12, 


9 " 


224 


4 


1881- 


11, 


II 


25, 


11 " 


230 


10 


1882— 


10, 


" 


31, 


12 " 


190 


7 


1883— 


9, 


" 


23. 


11 " 


208 


6 


1884— 


8, 


April 


18, 


15 " 


225 


9 


1885— 


13, 


" 


4, 


12 " 


250 


4 


1886- * 


12, 


June 


2 


15 '* 


279 


3 


1887-t 


11, 


April 


7, 


13 " 


182 


3 


1888— 


10, 


March 


30, 


12 " 


337 


11 


1889— 


8, 


April 


20, 


15 " 


297 


8 


1890— 


14, 


May 


23, 


19 " 


311 


3 


1891- 


13, 


March 20, 


10 " 


285 


6 


1892— 


12, 


tt 


11, 


9 " 


296 


1 


1893— 


" 10, 


« 


11, 


9 " 


292 


2 


1894-t 


9, 


Oct. 


2, 


20 " 


354 


7 



*Aiter a session of 14 weeks the House tOok a recess on April letli 
cill June 1st. The Senate continued in session, as a Court of Impeach- 
ment, till April 22d, when a recess was taken till June 1st. Up to the 
time of taking the recess the Senate and House were in session to- 
gether 14 weeks, and the Senate by itself one week. Both Houses 
re-assembled on June 1st, and an adjournment sine die took place at 
5 o'clock P. M., on Wednesday, June 2d. The Laverty impeachment 
trial was opened before the Senate, sitting as a court, on March 11th, 
and ended on Wednesday, April 21st, at 9 o'clock p. m., when a ver- 
dict of guilty on two counts, by a two-thirds majority, was returned. 
The trial lasted 19 days. See Senate Journal, session of 1886, pages 
905 to 959. 

fThe Senate did not oraranize till February 1st, 

X On May 26th a recess was taken until October 2d, when the Legis- 
lature re-assembled, and witnout transacting any business adjourned 
^ine die at 3:30 in the afternoon. 



STATE SENATORS. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM 1845 to 1893. 



Atlantic County. 



45—47. 
48—50, 
51—53, 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60—62, 

63—65, 



45—47, 
48—49. 
50—51, 
52—53, 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60 — 62, 
63—65, 
66-68, 



45—46, 
47—49. 
50—52, 
53-58. 
59—6', 
62, 
63—64, 
65-67, 



Joel Adams. 
Lewis M. Walker. 
Joseph E. Potts. 
David B. Somers. 
Enoch Cordery. 
Thomas E. Morris. 
Samuel Stille. 



66—68, David S. Blackman. 
69 — 71, Jesse Adams. 
72 — 74, William Moore. 
75 — 77, Hosea F. Madden. 
78—92, John J. Gardner. 
Sa 



93—95, 



jamuel D. Hoffman. 



Bergen County. 



Richard R. Paulison 
Isaac I. Haring. 
John Van Brunt. 
Abraham Hopper. 
Daniel D. Depew. 
Thomas H. Herring. 
Ralph S. Demarest. 
Daniel Holsman. 
John Y. Dater. 



69 — 71, James J. BrinVerhoff. 
72 — 74, Cornelius Lydecker. 
75—77, George Dayton. 
78 — 80, Cornelius S. Cooper. 
8i — 83, Isaac Wortendyke. 
84—85, Ezra Miller. 
86— 89, John W. Bogert. 
90 — 95, Henry D. Winton. 



Burlington County. 



James S. Hulme. 
Thomas H. Richards. 
Joseph Satterthwaite. 
Joseph W. Allen. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Joseph W. Pharo. 
William Garwood. 
Geo. M. Wright. 



68—70, 
71-73, 
74—76, 
77-79. 
80—82, 

83-85, 
86—91, 

92—94, 



Job H. Gaskell. 
Henry J. Irick. 
Barton F. Thorn. 
Caleb G. Ridgway. 
Wm. Budd Deacon. 
Hezekiah B. Smith. 
William H. Carter. 
Mitchell B. Perkins. 



Camden County. 



45, Richard W. Howell. 
46 — 48, Joseph C. Stafford. 
49 — 51, John Gill. 
52—54, Thomas W. Mulford. 
55 — 60, John K. Roberts. 
61 -63, VVilliam P. Tatem. 
64 — 66, James M. Scovel. 



67—72, Edward Bettle. 
73 — 81, William J. Sewell. 
82—84, Albert Merritt. 
85—87, Richard N. Herring. 
88-90, George Pfeiffer. 
91 — 93, Maurice A. Rogers. 



Cape 3Iay County. 



45 — 46, Reuben Willets. 
47 — 49, James L. Smith. 
50 — 52, Enoch Edmunds. 
53 — 55, Joshua Swain, Jr. 
56—58, Jesse H. Diverty. 
59 — 61, Downs Edmunds. 
62 — 64, Jonathan F. Leaming. 
65 — 67, Wilmon W. Ware. 

(86) 



68 — 70, Leaming M. Rice. 
71 — 73, Thomas Beesley. 
74 — 76, Richards. Leaming. 
77 — 79, Jonathan F. Leaming. 
80—85, Waters B. Miller. 
86 — 88, Joseph H. Hanes. 
89 — 91, Walter S. Leaming. 
92 — 94, Lemuel E, Miller, 



STATE SENATORS. 



87 



Cumberland County. 



45—46, 
47—50, 
51—53, 
54—56, 
57—59. 
60 — 62, 
63—68, 
69—71, 



Enoch H. More. 
Stephen A. Garrison. 
Reuben Fithian. 
Lewis Howell. 
John L. Sharp. 
Nat. Stratton. 
Providence Ludlam. 
James H. Nixon. 



72 — 74, C. Henry Shepherd. 
75 — 77, J. Howard Willets. 
78—80, George S. Whiticar. 
81—86, Isaac T. Nichols. 
87—89, PhiHp P. Baker. 
90 — 92, Seaman R. Fowler, 
93—95, Edward C.. Stokes. 



Essex County. 



45, Joseph S. Dodd. 67 

46 — 48, Stephen R. Grover. 70 

49 — 51, Asa Whitehead. 76 

52 — 54, Stephen Congar. 79 — 81, 

55 — 57, George R. Chetwood. 82 — 84, 

58—60, Charles L. C. GifTord. 85—87, 

61 — 63, James M. Quinby. 88 — 90, 

64 — 66, John G. Trusdell. 91 — 93, 



69, James L. Hays 

75, 
78, 



John W. Taylor. 
William H. Kirk. 
William H. Francis. 
William Stainsby. 
Fredericks. Fish. 
A F. R. Martin. 
Michael T. Barrett. 



Gloucester County. 



45-48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61 — 63, 
64—66, 
67-69, 



John C. Smallwood. 
Charles Reeves. 
John Burk. 
Joseph Franklin. 
Jeptha Abbott. 
John Pierson. 
'oseph L. Reeves, 
"oodward Warrick. 



^ 



70 — 75, Samuel Hopkins. 
76—78, Thomas P. Mathers. 
79 — 81, John F. Bodine. 
82—83, Thomas M. Ferrell. 
84 — 87, Stacy L. Pancoast. 
88—90, Joseph B. Roe. 
91 — 93, George H. Barker. 



Hudson County. 



45—47, 
48—49, 
50, 
51—53. 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60 — 61, 
62 — 65, 
66—68, 
69—71, 



Richard Cutwater. 
John Tennele. 
John Cassedy. 
Abraham O. Zabriskie. 
Moses B. Bramhall. 
C. V. Clickener. 
Samuel Wescott. 
Theodore F. Randolph. 
Charles H. Winfield. 
Noah D. Taylor. 



72—74, John R. McPherson. 
75 — 77, Leon Abbett. 
78—80, Rudolph F. Rabe. 
81—83, Elijah T. Paxton. 
84—86, William BrinkerhoflF. 
87—89, William D Edwards. 
90 — 91, *Edward F McDonald. 

92, Robert S. Hudspeth. 
93 — 95, William D. Daly. 



Hunte>rdon County. 



45 — 46, Alexander Wurts. 

47 — 49, Isaac G. Farlee. 

50 — 52, John Manners. 

53 — 55, Alexander V. Bonnel 

56—58, John C. Rafferty. 

59 — 61, Edmund Perry. 

62 — 64, John Blane. 

65 — 67, Alexander Wurts. 

68 — 70, Joseph G. Bowne. 



71 — 73, David H. Banghart. 
74-76, Fred. A. Potts. 
77 — 79, James N. Pidcock. 
80—82, Eli Bosenbury. 
83 — 85, John Carpenter, Jr. 
86-88, George H. Large. 
89 — 91, Moses K. Everitt. 
92—94, William H. Martin. 



* Mr. McDonald was unseated the last day of the session of 1890, and 
William S. Stuhr was given his seat. The first week of the session of 1891 
Mr. Stuhr was unseated and Mr. McDonald resumed his seat. 



88 STA TE SENA TORS. 



Mercer County. 

45 — 50, Charles S. Olden. 72 — 74, Charles Hewitt. 

51 — 56, William C. Alexander. 75 — 77, Jonathan H. Blackwell. 

57 — 59. Robert C. Hutchinson. 78—80, Crowell Marsh. 

60 — 62, Jonathan Cook. 81 — 83, John Taylor. 

63—65, Edward W. Scudder. 84—86, George O. Vanderbilt. 

66—68, Aug. G. Richey. 87—92, John D. Rue. 

69 — 71, John Woolverton. 93 — 95, SVilliam H. Skirm. 



Middlesex County. 

45 — 46, David Crowell. 71 — 76, Levi D. Jarrard. 

47 — 49, Adam Lee. 77 — 79, George C Ludlow. 

50—52, Edward Y. Rogers. 80 — 82, Isaac L. Martin. 

53 — 55, Ralph C. Stults 83 — 85, Abraham V. Schenck. 

56—58, Henry V. Speer. 86—88, Daniel C. Chase. 

59 — 61, Abra. Everitt. 89 — 94, Robert Adrain. 
62 — 70, Amos Robbins. 

Monmouth County. 

45, Thomas E. Combs. 64—71. Henry S. Little. 
46 — 48, George F. Fort. 72, Wm. H. Conover, Jr. 

49—51, John A. Morford. 79—81, George C. Beekman. 

52 — 54, William D Davis. 82 — 84, John S. Applegaie. 

55 — 57. Robert S. Laird. 85 — 87, Thomas G. Chattle. 

58— 6o,)vv.^ H xj^r.A^\^\^r.r. 88— 90, Hcory M . Nc vlus. 

;3_78; I ^^ "^- H. Hendrickson. ^^^^'^ Thon^as S. R. Brown. 
61—63, Anthony Reckless. 93, Hemry S. Terhune. 

Morris County. 

45—47, John B. Johnes. 71, Columbus Beach. 

48 — 50, Ephraim Marsh. 72 — 74, Augustus W. Cutler, 

51—53, John A Bleecker. 75—77, John Hill. 

54 — 56, Alexander Robertson. 78 — 80, Augustus C. Canfield. 

57—59, Andrew B. Cobb. 81 — 86, James C. Youngblood. 

60 — 62, Daniel Budd. 87 — 92, George T. Werts. 

63 — 65, Lyman A. Chandler. 93 — 95, Elias C. Drake. 
66 — 70, George T. Cobb. 

Ocean Covinty. 

51—53, Samuel Birdsall. 75-^77, John S. Schultze. 

54 — 56, James Cowperthwaite. 78—80, Ephraim P. Emson. 

57—62, William F. Brown. 81—83, Abram C. B. Havens. 

63—68, George D. Horner. 84—92, George T. Cranmer. 

69—71, John Torrey, Jr. 93 — 95, George G. Smith. 
72—74, John G. W. Havens. 



45—46, Cornelius G. Garrison. 71—73, Henry A. Williams. 

47—49, Martin J. Ryerson. 74—76, John Hopper. 

50—52, Silas D. Canfield. 77—82, Garret A. Hoi 

53—55, Thomas D. Hoxsey. 83-88, John W. Griggs 

56-58, Jetur R. Riggs. 89—91, John Mallon. 

59 — 67, Benjamin Buckley. 92 — ^\, John Hinchliffe. 



STATE SEi^ATOKS. 



69 



Salem County. 



45, 
46-48, 
49— 5I; 
52— 54> 
55—57: 
58—60, 
61 — 63, 
64—66, 
67-69, 



45, 

46—48, 
49— 5I) 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 



William J. Shinn. 
Benjamin Acton, Jr. 
John Summerill, Jr. 
Allen Wallace. 
Charles P. Smith. 
Joseph K. Riley. 
Emmor Reeve. 
Richard M. Acton. 
Samuel Plummer. 



70 — 72, John C. Belden. 
73—75, Isaac Newkirk. 
76—78, Charles S. Plummer. 
79 — 81, Quinton Keasbey. 
82 — 84, George Hires. 
85—87, Wyatt W. Miller. 
88—90, William Newell. 
91 — 93, James Butcher. 



Somerset County. 



George H. Brown. 
William H. Leupp. 
John W. Craig. 
Moses Craig. 
Samuel K. Martin. 
James Campbell. 
Rynier H. Veghte. 
Joshua Doughty. 



67 — 69, John H. Anderson. 
70 — 72, Calvin Corle. 
73 — 75, Elisha B. Wood. 
76—78, Charles B. Moore. 
79—81, John G. Schenck. 
82 — 84, Eugene S. Doughty. 
85 — 90, Lewis A. Thompson. 
91 — 93, William J. Keys. 



Sussex County. 



45 — 46, Benjamin Hamilton. 
47 — 49, Nathan Smith. 
50—52, Joseph Greer. 
53 — 55, Isaac Bonnell. 
56—58, Zachariah H. Price. 
59 — 61, Edward C. Moore. 
62 — 64, Peter Smith. 
65—67, Joseph S. Martin. 



68—73, Richard E. Edsall. 
74 — 76, Samuel T. Smith. 
77—79, Francis M. Ward. 
80 — 82, Thomas Lawrence. 
83 — 85, Lewis Cochran. 
86-88, J. Anson McBride. 
89—91, Peter D. Smith. 
92 — 94, John McMickle. 



Union County. 



58—60, John R. Ayres. 
61 — 63, Joseph T. Crowell, 
64 — 65, James Jenkins. 
66, Philip H. Grier. 
67 — 69, Amos Clark, Jr. 
70—72, James T. Wiley. 



73 — 75, J. Henry Stone. 
76—78, William J. Magie. 
79 — 84, Benjamin A. Vail. 
85 — 87, Robert L. Livingston. 
88-90, James L. Miller. 
91 — 93, Frederick C. Marsh. 



"Warren County. 



45, 

46—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61-63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 



Charles J. Ihrie. 
Jeremy Mackey. 
George W. Taylor. 
Charles Sitgreaves. 
William Rea. 
Philip Mowry. 
James K. Swayze. 
Henry R. Kennedy. 
Abraham Wildrick. 



70—72, Edward H. Bird. 
73 — 75, Joseph B. Cornish. 
76 — 78, Will am Silverthom, 
79 — 81, Peter Cramer. 
82—84, George H. Beatty. 
85 — 87, James E. Moon. 
88—90, Martin Wyckoff. 
91 — 93, Johnston Cornish. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM 1845 TO 1893 







Atlantic County. 


45, 


46, 


Joseph IngersoU. 
Mark Lake. 


70. 


71, 


Benjamin H. Overheiser. 


47- 


-49, 


72, 


73, 


Samuel H. Cavileer. 


50, 




Robert B. Risley. 


74. 


75. 


Lemuel Conover. 






John H. Boyle. 


76, 


77. 


Leonard H. Ashley. 






Thomas D. Winner. 




73. 


Israel Smith. 






Daniel Townsend. 


79, 


80, 


James Jeffries. 






Nicholas F. Smith. 




81, 


George Elvins. 


56, 


57, 


David Frambes. 




82. 


Joseph H Shinn. 




58, 


John B. Madden. 




83, 


John L. Brj'ant. 
Edward North. 




59, 


Thomas E. Morris. 


84, 


85. 


60- 


-62, 


Charles E P. Mayhew. 


86, 


87. 


James S. Beckwith. 




63, 


John Godfrey. 




88, 


James B. Nixon. 




64, 


Simon Hanthom. 


89. 


90, 


Shepherd S. Hudson. 




65. 


Simon Lake. 




9^> 


Smith E. Johnson. 


66, 


67, 


P. M. Wolfseiffer. 




92, 


Samuel D Hoffman. 


68, 


69, 


Jacob Keim. 




93, 


Charles A Baake. 






Bergen County. 




45, 


William G. Hopper. 


69, 


70. 


Eben Winton. 




45, 


Jacob C. Terhune. 


70, 


71, 


Henry A. Hopper. 


46, 


47, 


John G. Banta. 


71. 


72, 


Jacob G. Van Riper. 


46, 


47, 


Jacob J. Brinkerhoff. 


72, 


73, 


George J. Hopper. 


48. 


49, 


John Ackerman, Jr. 




73. 


John J. Anderson. 


48, 


49, 


Henr>- H Voorhis, Jr. 


74, 


75, 


Henrj' C. Herring. 


50—52, 


John Huyler. 


74, 


75, 


John W. Bogert. 


50, 


51, 


John H. Hopper. 


76. 


77, 


John H. Winant. 




52, 


John Zabriskie. 
Jacob I Demarest. 


76, 


77, 


Barney N Ferdon. 


53, 


54» 




78, 


M Corsen Gillham. 


53, 


54, 


Abraham Van Horn. 


78, 


79, 


Southey S. Parramore. 


55, 


56 


Ralph S. Demarest 


79, 


8^, 


John A. Demarest. 


55, 


56, 


Thomas W. Demarest. 




80, 


Oliver D Smith. 


57, 


58, 


Daniel Holsman. 


Si- 


-83, 


86, John Van Bussum. 


57, 


58, 


Aaron H. W'estervelt. 


Si. 


82, 


Elias H. Sisson. 




59, 


Andrew C. Cadmus. 


81, 


84. 


Peter R. Wortendyke, 


59, 


60, 


Enoch Brinkerhoff. 




84, 


*Jacob W. Doremus. 




60, 


John A. Hopper. 




85, 


Peter Ackerman. 


61, 


62, 


Abram Carlock. 


85, 


86, 


Eben Winton. 


61, 


62, 


John R. Post. 


87- 


-88, 


Anderson Bloomer. 


63, 


64, 


Thoma'^ Dunn English. 




87. 


Peter Ackerman. 


63, 


64, 


John y. Dater. 


88—89, 


Charles F. Harrington. 


65, 


66, 


Isaac Demarest. 


89—90, 


Abram De Ronde. 


65, 


66, 


Abraham J. Haring. 


90—91, 


George Zimmermann. 


67, 


68, 


Cornelius Christie. 




01. 


John H Huyler. 




67, 


A. Van Emburg. 


92—93, 


Samuel G. H. Wright. 


68, 


69. 


, Henry G. Herring. 


92-93, 


John J. Dupuy. 



* John W. Doremus was first elected, but died before Legislature con- 
vened. 

(90) 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 



01 



Burlington County. 



45, 

45, 

45, 47, 

45, 

45, 

46, 

46, 

46, 

46, 

46, 

47—49, 

47—49, 

47, 48, 

47, 

48—50, 

49—51, 

49—51, 

50—52, 

50, 51, 

51—53, 

52—54, 

52—54, 

52, 

53, 54, 

53, 54, 

54, 

54—56, 

55, 

55, 

55, 57. 

55, 56, 
56, 
56, 

56, 57, 

57, 58, 
57—59, 
57—59. 

58, 

58, 59, 

59, 60, 
59—61, 

60, 61, 
60—62, 
60 — 62, 

61, 
62 — 64, 
62, 63, 
63-65, 
63-65, 

64, 



Joseph Satterthwait. 
Isaiah Adams. 
48, John W. C. Evans. 
Edward Taylor. 
William Biddle. 
Clayton Lippincott. 
William Malsbury, 
Garrit S. Cannon. 
Stephen Willets. 
Wm. G Lippincott. 
John S. Irick. 
Benjamin Kemble. 
Joseph W. Allen. 
William Biddle. 
Edward French. 
Samuel Stockton. 
William R. Braddock. 
William Brown. 
William S. Embley. 
Allen Jones. 
John W. Fennimore. 
Charles Haines. 
Benajah Antrim. 
Mahlon Hutchinson. 
Jacob L. Githens. 
Job H Gaskill. 
William Parry. 
Josephus Sooy, Jr. 
Benjamin Gibbs. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Elisha Gaunt. 
Richard Jones. 
William M. Collom. 
Jervis H. Bartlett. 
Samuel Keys. 
Charles Mickle. 
Ezra Evans 
Samuel C. Middleton. 
Charles S. Kemble. 
John Larzalere 
Samuel A. Dobbins. 
George B. Wills. 
Robert B. Stokes. 
William Sooy. 
Joseph L Lamb. 
Wm. P. McMichael. 
John M. Higbee. 
Israel W. Heulings. 
Henry J. Irick. 
Jarett Stokes. 



65, 

65, 66, 

66, 67, 
66, 67, 
66, 67, 
67 — 69, 
68—71, 

68, 
68, 

69—71, 
69, 

70, 71, 
70, 

71—73. 
72, 

72—74. 

72—74, 

73. 74, 
74, 
75, 
75, 
75, 

75—77. 
76. 

76-78. 

76-78, 

77—79. 

78, 79, 

79, 80, 
79. 

80—82, 

80—82, 

8r, 

80, 81, 
82, 

83—86, 
83. 84, 
83. 
84—86, 
85, 86, 
87, 88, 
87. 88, 



90, 91, 

90. 91. 

91. 92, 
92-93, 

93, 



Samuel Stockton. 
Charles C. Lathrop. 
George W. Thompson. 
Samuel Coate. 
Andrew J. Fort. 
Wallace Lippincott. 
John J. Maxwell. 
Charles E. Hendrickson. 
Charles Collins. 
Thomas C. Alcott. 
Theophilus I. Price. 
Abraham Perkins. 
Levi French. 
Edward T. Thompson. 
Robert Aaronson. 
E. Budd Marter. 
George B. Borton. 
Townsend Cox. 
Joseph P. Adams. 
Levi French. 
Charles J. Gordon. 
Henry Moffett. 
Samuel Taylor. 
Daniel L. Piatt. 
John Cavileer. 
Edward F. Mathews. 
George Sykes. 
Wm. Budd Deacon. 
John W. Haines. 
Wm. R. Lippincott. 
William H Carter. 
Henry C. Herr. 
John Cavileer. 
Abraham Marter. 
Thomas M. Locke. 
Theodore Budd. 
87, Stacy H. Scott. 
Horace Cronk. 
Thomas J. Alcott. 
Allen H. Gangewer. 
90, Robert C. Hutchinson. 
89, William H. Doron. 
Albert Hansell. 
George C. Davis. 
Mitchell B. Perkms. 
Lewis L. Sharp. 
A. H. White. 
Howard E. Packer. 
Micajah E. Matlack. 



Camden County. 



45, Joseph Kay, Jr. 

45, John Redfield. 

46, Joel G. Clark. 

46, Gerrard Wood. 

47, Edward Turner. 

47, Joseph B. Tatem. 

48, John C. Shreeve. 

48, John E. Marshall. 

49, Jacob Troth. 



49, Joseph Wolohon. 
50, 51, Charles D. Hineline. 
50, 51, Thomas W. Hurff, 

52, 53, J- O. Johnson. 
52, J. Kay. 

52, Jonathan Day. 

53, Samuel Lytie. 

53, 54. John K. Roberts. 

54, 55, Samuel S. Cake. 



&s 



ASSEMBLYMEn. 



55, James L. Hines. 
54 — 56, Keiley Barret. 

56, Evan C. Smith. 
56, 57, John P. Harker. 
57 — 59, *Samuel Scull. 

57, T, B. Atkinson. 

57, Joseph M. Atkinson. 

58, Edmund Hoffman. 
58, 59, Samuel M. Thorne. 

59, Zebedee Nicholson. 

60, 61, John R. Graham 

60, Joseph Stafford, Jr. 

60, George Brewer. 

61, 62, Joel P. Kirkbride. 

61, James L. Hines. 

62, Daniel A. Hall. 

62, 63, Edwin J. Osier. 

63, James M. Scovel. 

63, 64, Chalkley Albertson. 

64, Samuel Tatem. 

64, 65, Paul C. Brinck. 

65, 66, Isaac W. Nicholson. 

65, John F. Bodine. 

66, 67, George W. N. Custis. 
66, 67, Thomas H. Coles. 

67, Edward Z. Collings. 

68, John Hood. 
68, James Wills. 

68, Chalkley Albertson. 
69, 70, Henry S. Bonsall. 
69, 70, William C. Shinn. 

69, Thomas H. Coles. 

70, Samuel Warthman. 

71, Charles Wilson. 

71, Isaac W. Nicholson, 

72, Fred. Bourquin. 
71, 72, Stevenson Leslie. 



45: 

46, 

47, 

48, 49> 

50, 5I) 

52, 

53> 

54. 55, 

56-58, 

59, 60, 

61, 

62—64, 

65-67, 



45, 

45, 46, 

45, 46, 

46, 

47, 



Cape 

John Stites. 
Samuel Townsend. 
Richard S. Ludlam. 
Nathaniel Holmes, Jr. 
Mackey Williams 
Joshua Swaim. 
Waters B. Miller. 
Jesse H. Diverty, 
Downs Edmunds, Jr. 
Abram Reeves. 
Jonathan F. Leaming. 
Wilmon W, Ware. 
69, 70, Thos. Beesley. 



72 — 74, George B. Carse. 

73, Isaac Foreman. 
73, 74, William H.Cole. 

74, Chalkley Albertson. 
75 — 77, Alden C. Scovel. 

75, 76, 79, 80, R. N. Herring. 

75, Henry B. Wilson. 

76, 77, Oliver Lund. 

77, Samuel T. Murphy. 

78, Isaiah Woolston. 

78, 79, Alonzo D. Nichols, 
78, Andrew J. Rider. 

79, 80, Edward Burrough. 

80, 81, Henry L. Bonsall. 

81, 82, Chris. J. Mines, Jr. 
81, 82, John H. McMurray. 

82, Robert F. S. Heath. 

83, George W. Bortcn. 

83, John Bamford. 

83, 84, 93, Clayton Stafford. 

84, 87, Edward A. Armstrong. 

84, John W. Branning. 

85, Benjamin M. Braker. 

85, 86, Henry M. Jewett. 

86, George Pfeiffer. 

87, Philip Young. 

87, Henry Turley. 

88, 89, Adam Clark Smith. 
88, 89, 90, John Harris. 

88, 89, George H Higgins. 
90, Franiclin C. Woolman. 

90, 91, 92, Abram W. Nash. 

91, 92, Joseph M. Engard. 

91, 92, also 73, 74, William H.Cole 
93, Clayton Stafford. 

93, George W, Henry. 
93, William J. Thompson. 

May County. 

68, Samuel R. Magonagle. 
71 — 73, Richard S. Leaming. 

74, Alexander Young. 

75, Richard D. Edmunds. 
76 — 78, William T. Stevens. 

79, Daniel Schellinger. 

80, 83—85, Jesse D. Ludlam. 

81, 82, Furman L. Richardson. 
86, 87, Alvin P. Hildreth. 

88, Walter S. Leaming, 

89, 90, 91, Eugene C. Cole. 

92, 93, Edmund L. Ross. 



Cumberland County. 



Josiah Shaw. 
George Heisler. 
Lewis Howell 
Stephen A. Garrison. 
Leonard Lawrence , 



47, Jeremiah Parvin. 

47, 48, Uriah D. Woodruff'. 

48, 49, Reuben Fithian. 

48, 49, Richard Lore. 

49, 50, John T. Nixon. 



»In 1857 Mr. Scull v"\s unseated by T. B. Atkinson. 



ASSEMBLYMEN 



93 



so, 51, 

50, 51, 

51, 52, 

52, 
53, 
53. 
54, 
54, 
55, 56, 
55. 56, 
57, 
57, 

58, 59, 

59, 

60, 

60, 

61, 62, 

61, 62, 

63, 64, 

63, 64, 

65-67, 

65—68, 

68, 

69, 

69—71, 

70, 71, 



Benj. Ay res. 
Joel Moore. 
Samuel Mayhew. 
David Campbell. 
Enos S. Gandy. 
Lewis Woodruff. 
Daniel Harris. 
Morton Mills 
James M. Wtlls. 
John F. Keen. 
Uriah Mayhew. 
Elias Doughty. 
Elwell Nichols. 
Robert Moore. 
Aaron S. Westcott. 
Ebenezer Hall. 
John Carter. 
William Bacon. 
J. Edmund Sheppard 

B. Rush Bateman. 
Edw. W. Maylin. 
Robert Moore. 
James H. Nixon. 
Thomas D. Westcott. 

C. Henry Shepherd. 
Wm. A. House. 
Charles C. Grosscup. 



77, 78 

79, 
79, 
81, 



90, 



73, George S. Whiticar. 

73, J. Howard Willets. 

75, Lewis H. Dowdney. 

74, George B. Langley. 

77, George W. Payne. 

76, Isaiah W. Richman. 
Isaac T. Nichols. 

78, James Loughron. 
80, Robert P. Ewing. 

80, Arthur T. Parsons. 
82, Charles Ladow. 

81, John H. Avis. 

82, Philip P. Baker. 

83, Isaac M. Smalley, 

84, John B. Campbell. 

85, Jeremiah H. Lupton. 

86, Wilson Banks. 

87, Franklin Lawrence. 

87, Thomas H. Hawkins. 

88, Mulford Ludlam. 

88, Isaac M. Smalley. 

89, Thomas W. Trenchard. 

90, Reuben Cheesman. 
93, John N. Glaspell. 

91, James L. Van Syckel. 

92, Edward C Stokes. 

93, Wilber H. Baxter. 



Essex County. 



Isaac Van Wagenen. 
William M. Scudder. 
John Runyon. 
Hugh F. Randolph. 
Jabez Pierson. 
Keen Pruden. 
Alvah Sherman. 
George W. McLane. 
Parker Teed. 
A. S. Hubbeel. 
Jabez G. Goble. 
Francis B. Chetwood. 
Abraham Van Riper. 
Elston Marsh. 
Hugh H. Bowne. 
Charles Harrison. 
Joel W. Condit. 
Obadiah Meeker. 
William F. Day. 
Stephen Personnett. 
Hugh H. Bowne. 
Lewis C. (jrover. 
Jonathan Valentine. 
David Wade. 
Isaac H. Pierson. 
Beach Vanderpool. 
John C. Beardsley. 
William M. Whitehead. 
Cornelius Boice. 
Thomas McKirgan. 
John M. Clark. 
William M. Sandford. 
Silas Merchant. 



52, John Munn. 

52, James S. Bell. 

52, 53, John B. Clark. 

53, Stephen Day, Jr. 
53, Grant J. Wheeler. 
53, Edward T. Hillyer. 
53, Charles T. Day. 

53, Charles O. Bolles. 

53, 54, Abiathar Harrison. • 
53, 54, Daniel Price. 

53, 54, William Dennis. 

54, David S. Craig. 
54, Daniel H. Noe. 

54, James N. Joraleman. 

54, David Ripley. 

54, 55, Hugh Holmes. 

54, 55, Daniel D. Benjamin. 

55, Charles O. Bolles. 

55, Daniel F. Tompkins. 

55, 56, Nehemiah Perry. 

55, 56, James A. Pennington. 
55, 56, Apollos M. Elmer. 
55, 56, Joseph T. Hopping. 

55, 56, Samuel R. Winans. 

56, Warren S. Baldwin. 
56, James E. Bathgate. 

56, George H. Doremus. 

56, 57, William K. McDonald. 

57, Johi^ C Denman. 
57, Moses P. Smith. 
57, John L. Blake, Jr. 
57, William B " " ■ 



57, 



Baldwin. 
Charles L. C. Gifford. 



94 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



Elihu Day. 
Chaxles C. Stewart, 
John C. Thornton. 
Simeon Harrison. 
James McCracken. 
Joseph Booth. 
Ira IVl Harrison. 
Thomas Kirkpatrick. 
Adolphus W. Waidron. 
James F. Bond. 
Amzi Condit. 
Cashier De Witt, Jr. 
David Ayres. 
Isaac P. Trimble. 
David A. Hayes. 
James McCracken. 
J. W. Hale. 
Frederick H. Teese. 
James Wheeler. 
George A. Halsey. 

iames M. Lang. 
)avid Oakes. 
John Flintoft. 
James E. Smith. 
Walter Tompkins. 
Corra Drake. 
John D. Freeman. 
John P. Jackson. 
Thomas McGrath, 
Amzi Dodd. 
JohnC Litlell. 
Adolph Schalk. 
James Smith. 
Rufus F. Harrison. 
Charles A. Lightpipe. 
Thomas B Peddie. 
John C. Seiffert. 
Bernard Kearney. 
Jeremiah DeCamp. 
Ira M. Harrison. 
J. B. S. Robinson. 
John H Landell. 
James D. Cleaver. 
David Anderson. 
William Bodwell. 
Albert P. Condit. 
Isaac P. Trimble. 
William H. Murphy. 
Edward L. Price. 
John F. Anderson. 
David Ayers. 
James L. Hays. 
Israel D. Condit. 
Daniel Ayers. 
William R. Sayre. 
Samuel Atwater. 
Edward Hedden. 
M. H. C. Vail. 
Josiah Speer. 
James Peck. 
John Kennedy. 
Timothy W. Lord. 



68, 


69. 




68, 


69. 


70, 


69. 


70, 


69, 


70, 


69. 


71, 


70. 


71, 


7^, 


71, 


70, 


71, 




70. 




70, 




70, 




71, 


71, 


72, 


7h 


72, 


71, 


72, 




71, 


72. 


73, 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, 




72, 




7=, 




72, 




73, 




73, 


73, 


74, 


73. 


74, 


73, 


74. 




74, 


74, 


75, 


74. 


75, 


74, 


75, 




74. 


73- 


-75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 


75, 


76, 


76, 


77, 


76, 


77, 


76. 


77, 


76, 


77, 




76, 




76, 




76, 


76, 


80, 




77, 


77, 


80, 


77, 


78. 


77, 


78. 


77, 


78, 


78. 


79. 


78. 


79, 


78, 


79, 


78, 


79, 




78. 




78, 


79—81, 


79, 


80, 


79, 


80, 




79, 



Francis Macken. 
Josiah L. Baldwin. 
James L. Gumey. 
John Hunkele. 
William W. Hawkins. 
James G Irwin. 
Joseph F. Sanxay. 
Farrand Kitchell. 
Henry W. Wilson. 
Chauncey G. Williams. 
William R. Sayre. 
Matthew Murphy. 
Albert P. Condit. 
Edmund L. Joy. 
Theodore Horn. 
Rochus Heinisch, Jr. 
William A. Ripley. 
Samuel Wilde. 
Joseph G. Hill. 
Theodore Macknett. 
David Anderson. 
Daniel Murphy. 
Moses H. Williams. 
L. M. Armstrong. 
John W. Campbell. 
Elias O. Doremus. 
Phineas Jones. 
Aaron G. Baldwin. 
Moses E. Halsey. 
Thomas S. Henry. 
Julius C. Fitzgerald. 
William H. Kirk. 
James T. Vanness. 
Samuel Morrow, Jr. 
Andrew Teed. 
Hugh Kinnard. 
Patrick Doyle. 
William CarroUon. 
David Dodd. 
Albert D. Traphagen. 
Francis K. Howell. 
S. V. C. Van Rensselaer. 
Elkanah Drake. 
Charles H. Harrison. 
Marcus S. Richards. 
Philip W. Cross. 
James M. Patterson. 
Joseph H. Wightman. 
Gottfried Krueger. 
Charles Gomer. 
James Malone. 
Edward D. Pierson. 
Edward W. Crane. 
George S. Durjee. 

82, William H. F. Fiedler 
Schuyler B. Jackson. 
Alexander Phillips. 
Charles Holzwarth. 
Harrison Van Duyne. 
Peter J. Gray. 

83, 89, John Gill. 
Charles A. Felch. 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 



95 





80, 


80 


. 81, 


80 


, 81, 


79 


-81, 




81, 




81, 




81, 


81 


. 82, 


80 


, 81, 


82 


83. 


82 


, 83, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




83. 




83, 




83, 




83, 


83 


84. 


83-87, 


84 


85. 


84 


85, 


84 


85, 


84 


85. 


84 


85, 




84, 




84, 




84, 


85 


86, 


8^ 


86, 


85 


86, 




85, 


86 


87, 




86, 


86 


87, 




86, 




86, 


86 


87, 


87 


88, 


87 


88, 



♦William H. Brown. 
Elias A Wilkinson. 
Thomas W. Langstroth. 
83, Thomas O'Connor. 
Joseph L. Munn. 
William Wright. 
fCharles G. Bruemmer. 
Michael McMahan. 
William R. Williams. 
John H Parsons. 
David Young. 
Robert McGowan. 
Roderick Robertson. 
Ulysses B Brewster. 
Edward R. Pennington. 
Adam Turkes. 
Edwin B. Smith. 
Lucius B. Hutchinson. 
James N. Arbuckle. 
John H. Murphy. 
William Hill. 
93. John L. Armitage. 
93, William Harrigan. 
George B. Harrison. 
David A. Bell. 
Edward Q. Keasbey. 
William E. O'Connor. 
Charles Holzwarth. 
Herman Lehlbach, 
Rush Burgess. 
Frederick S. Fish. 
Henry M. Doremus. 
R. Wayne Parker. 
Augustus F. R. Martin. 
Franklin Murphy. 
Charles F. Underbill. 
Henry A. Potter. 
Elias M. Condit. 
Edwin Lister. 
Jacob Schreihofer. 
93, John H. Peal. 
James Peck. 
Charles E. Hill 



87. 

87, 
87-89, 
87, 88, 

87. 



89, 90, 

89, 90, 

89, 

89, 90, 
89, 

90, 91, 
90, 91, 
90 — 92, 

90, 91, 
90, 91, 
90, 92, 



90, 91, 
9^, 92, 

91. 92, 

91, 92, 
91, 
92, 
92, 
92, 
92, 

92, 93, 
93, 
93. 
93, 
93, 
93, 
93, 
93 
93, 
93, 
93, 



Michael T. Barrett. 
Elvin W. Crane. 
Frank M. McDermitt. 
James Marlatt. 
William Harrigan. 
Thomas McGowan. 
Adrian Riker. 
DeForrest P. Lozier. 
Augustus Dusenberry. 
Joseph Schmelz. 
James A. Christie. 
John Gill. 
Richard A. Price. 
92, Leonard Kalisch. 
Moses Bigelow. 
Reuben Trier. 
George W. Wiedenmayer, 
George Rabenstein. 
Thomas H. Pollock. 
Thomas Smith. 
Charles Trefz. 
John J. Bertram. 
Edward H. Snyder. 
Edward W. Jackson. 
John Nieder. 
John R. Hardin. 
George W. Ketcham. 
Edward M. Taylor. 
Thomas F. Cavanagh. 
James A. Dempsey. 
Benedict Ulrich. 
William L Glorieux. 
Augustus C. Studer. 
William Harrigan. 
John L. Armitage. 
Joseph P. Clarke. 
Joseph M. Byrne. 
Thomas A. Murphey. 
Dennis F. Olvaney. 
William J. Kearns. 
John H. Peal. 
J. Broadhead Woolsey. 
Timothy Barrett. 



Gloucester County. 



53, Jeptha Abbott. 

53, John V. Parch. 

54, John Franklin. 
54, Benjamin Beckett. 

55, 56, Jacob G. Tomlin 
55, 56, James B. Albertson. 

57, John H. Brad-way. 

57, Benjamin Smith. 
58, 59, John F. Thomas. 
58, 59, George C. Hewitt, 



*In 1880, W. H. Brown was unseated by William R. Williams. 
fMr, Bruemmer was elected for 1882, but died before Legislature con- 
vened. 



45, 


46, 


Samuel W. Cooper. 


45, 


46, 


Benjamin Harding. 


47, 


48, 


John B. Miller. 


47, 


48, 


■ ohn B. Hilliard. 


49, 


50, 


John Duell. 




49, 


John Burk. 




50, 


Thomas Gaskell. 


51, 


52, 


Benjamin C. Tatem. 




51, 


Edmund Weatherby 




52, 


Thomas Mills. 



96 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 



60, 61, 

60, 

60, 61, 

62, 63, 
62, 

63, 64, 

64, 65, 

65, 66, 

66, 67, 

67. 

68, 

68, 
69—71, 
69, 70, 
71, 72, 

72, 



John Starr, 
♦Joseph Harker. 
*Joseph Duffield. 
Allen Moore. 
Thomas G. Batten. 
E. C. Heritage, 
Nathan S. Abbott. 
William D. Wilson. 
William W. Clark. 
Jacob J. Hendrickson. 
Charles T. Molony. 
William B. Rosenbaum. 
Nimrod Wooler>-. 
Leonard F. Harding. 
John S. kulon. 
John R. Middleton. 



74, Obadiah E'dridge. 

74, D. W. C. Hemmingway. 

76, Thomas B. Lodge. 

75, Simeon Warrington. 

77, Samuel Moore. 
-79, Caleb C. Pancoast. 

79, Lawrence Lock. 
81, George Craft. 

81, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

82, Abijah S. Hewitt. 
-85, Job S. Haines. 

87, Joseph B. Roe. 
-90, James West. 

92, James J. Davidson. 

93, Solomon H. Stanger. 



Hudson County. 



45, 46, Hartman Van Wagenen. 

47, Benjamin F. Welsh. 

48, Oliver S. Strong. 

49, James J. Van Boskerck. 

50, Edward T. Carpenter. 
S^j 52, John Van Vorst. 

52, Edmund T. Parker. 

52, Joseph W. Hanco.v. 

53, John Dunn Littell. 
53, James S. Davenport. 

53, Jacob M. Vreeland. 

54, Clement M. Hancox. 

54, Augustus F. Hardenbergh. 
54, 55, Jacob M. Merseles. 

55, Dudley S. Gregory, Jr. 

55. John M. Board. 

56, John D. Ward. 

56, James T. Hatfield. 

56, 57, George V. De Mott. 

57, Robert Gilchrist, Jr. 

57, 58, Robert C. Bacot. 

58, William Voorhees. 
58—60, Garret M. Van Horn. 

59, William H. Hemenover. 
50, Samuel A. French. 

60, W. H. Peckham. 

60, N. C. Slaight. 

61, Franklin B. Carpenter. 

61, Theodore F. Randolph. 

61, 62, Michael J. Vreeland. 

62, Edward D. Reiley. 

62, 63, George McLaughlin 
62, 63, Josiah Conley. 

62, 63, John B. Perry. 
62 — 64, Joshua Benson. 

63, 64, James Lynch. 

63, 64, Garret D. Van Reipen. 
64, John B. Drayton. 

64, 65, John Van Vorst. 

64, 65, Abraham W. Duryee. 





65, 




65, 




65, 


65, 


, 66, 


66—68. 


66, 


■ 67, 


66, 


. 67, 




66, 




66, 


67, 


. 68, 


67. 


68, 


67, 


68, 




68, 


68, 


69, 


69. 


70, 


69, 


70, 




69, 


69. 


71, 


70, 


71, 




70, 




70, 




71, 




71. 




71, 




71, 


72, 


73. 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, ' 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, . 


72, 


73, 




72, , 




72, 




73, 


73, 


74, 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75, 


74- 


-76, 




74, 



Delos E. Culver. 

William E. Broking. 

Hiram Van Buskirk. 

69, 70, Leon Abbett. 

Noah D. Taylor. 

Obadiah D. Falkenburg. 

De Witt C. Morris. 

John Ramsay. 

Charles F. Ruh. 

Hosea F. Clark. 

A. O Evans. 

John Dw^'er. 

John Van Vorst. 

Henr>- C. Smith. 

Sidney B. Bevans. 
James B. Doremus. 

Elbridge V. S. Besson. 
Michael Coogan. 

Herman D. Busch. 
Abel L Smith. 
William Brinkerhoff. 
James F. Fielder. 
John Anness. 
George Warrin. 
Josiah Homblower. 
George H. Farrier. 
Dennis Reardon. 
George S. Plympton. 
Henrj' Gaede. 
Jasper Wandel. 
Anthony J. Rj'der. 
James Stevens. 
John A. O'NeiU. 
John Lee. 

Richard C. Washburn. 
Alexander T.McGill. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Alexander ^McDonnell. 
John D. Carscallen. 
Henrj' Coombs. 



*Mr. Harker died during the session of i860, and Mr. Duffield was 
elected to fill the vacancy. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



97 



74, 
74—77, 

75, 76. 
75, 
75, 
76, 
76. 
76, 

76, 78, 

76, 77, 

77, 78, 
77, 78, 

77, 78, 
77, 
77, 
77, 
78, 
78, 

78, 79, 

78. 79, 
79. 
79, 
79, 

79, 80, 

79, 80, 

80, 81, 
80, 81, 
80, 81, 

80, 81. 
80; 
81, 

81, 82, 
80, 82, 

82, 83, 
82—84, 
82—84, 

82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
83. 
83. 

83—85, 

83. 

- 84, 



84, 



James K. Selleck. 

Rudolph F. Rabe. 

John J. Toffey. 

Thomas Carey. 

Edward F. McDonald. 

William A. Lewis 

Henry Brautigam. 

Thomas C. Brown, 

Alex. Jacobus. 

Thomas J Hannon. 

Marmaduke Tilden. 

Alexander W. Harris. 

James Stevens 

Martin M. Drohan. 

Lewis A Brigham. 

Elijah T. Paxton. 

Dudley S. Steele. 

Edward P. C. Lewis. 

81, T. J. McDonald. 

Henry Dusenberry. 

John Owen Rouse. 

Frank C. Frey. 

Gustavus A. Lilliendahl. 

John A. Tangeman. 

Joseph Meeks. 

Samuel W. Stilsing 

Noah D. Taylor. 

Allan L. Mc Oermott. 

90 — 92, J. Herbert Potts. 

James Curran. 

Patrick Sheeran. 

Frederick Payne. 

James J. Casey. 

David W. Lawrence. 

Thomas V. Cator. 

James C. Clarke 

Dennis McLaughlin. 

William McAdoo. 

Robert McCague, Jr. 

George H. Farrier. 

David M. Durrell. 

John O'Rourke. 

Peter F. Wanser. 

John M. Shannon 

Edwin O. Chapman. 

Martin Steljes, 

Augustus A Rich. 

Frank O. Cole. 

Joseph T. Kelly. 

Cornelius S. See. 

87, 88, Samuel D. Dickinson 

Michael J. O'Donnell. 

Thomas H. Kelly. 

Isaac Romaine. 



85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 

85, 86, 
86, 

86, 87, 



86, 87, 

86, 87, 

86, 

86, 87, 

86, 87, 

o ^7, 
87—90, 
87—89, 

87, 88, 



«9, 92, 
89. 

89, 90, 
89, 

90, 91, 
90, 91, 

90, 

90, 

90, 

90, 91, 

90, 91, 
91, 

91, 92, 
91, 
91, 
91, 
92, 
92, 
92, 

92, 93, 
92, 93, 
92, 93, 
92, 93, 
92, 93, 

93. 
93, 
93, 
93, 
93, 
93, 



John W. Heck. 
James J. Clark. 
John Wade. 
Fred. Frambach, Jr. 
John C. Besson. 
R. B. Seymour. 
Philip Tumulty. 
D. A. Peloubet. 
A. B. I>ayton. 
John Pearson. 
89, R. S. Hudspeth. 
T.J. McDonald. 
Thomas F. Noonan, 
Edward Lennon. 
Edward T. McLaughlin. 
William C.'Heppenheimer, 
John P. Feeney. 
William H. Letts. 
Jos'.-ph Gallagher. 
James F. Norton. 
Richard Brown. 
Charles W. Fuller. 
Edward P. Farrell. 
*E. Frank Short. 
Patrick H. O'Neill. 
Peter T. Donnelly. 
Laurence Pagan. 
Judson C. Francois. 
Michael Mullone. 
Henry Byrne. 
James Murphy. 
James S. Erwin. 
John F. Kelly. 
Andrew J. Boyle. 
Thomas B. Usher. 
Simeon H. Smith. 
James Moylan. 
Henry Puster. 
John F. Madden. 
William D. Daly. 
Thomas Magner, 
James Tumilty. 
George A. Heaney. 
Timothy J. Carroll. 
Martin Law/ess. 
Michael J. Coyle. 
Cornelius J. Tahen. 
John Zeller. 
Ebenezer Berry. 
Max Salinger. 
Henry H Holmes. 
Hugh A. Kelly. 
Adam J. Dittmar. 
S. V. W. Stout. 



* Mr. Short was elected to a second term of office, but he died before 
the Legislature met. Mr. Francois was chosen for the vacancy. 



98 



ISSEMBLYMEN. 



Hunterdon County. 



48, 49, Jonathan Pickel. 
45, John Svvackhamtner. 
45, Amos Moore. 

45, John H. Case. 

46, Henry Stevenson. 

47, Isaac R. Srope. 
47, Joseph Fritts. 
47, Frederick Apgar. 

49, John Lambert. 
49, Andrew Banghart. 
49, David Van Fleet. 



{ohn Marlow. 
,uthe 



er Opdycke. 

51, William Tinsman. 

52, John R. Young. 

53, Peter H. Aller. 

53, Andrew Vansickle. 
52, Hiram Bennett. 

54, John Lambert. 

54, Samuel H. Britton. 

55, Lewis Young. 

55, Peter E. Voorhees. 
55, Jacob S. C Pittenger. 
55, Edward Hunt. 
57, William Sergeant. 
57, John M Voorhis. 
57» Joseph W. Willever. 
57, John P. Rittenhouse. 
59, John H. Horn. 
59, William Snyder. 
59, Cornelius B. Sheets. 
59, Frederick Apgar. 
61, Charles Denson. 
61, Ambrose Barcroft. 
61, D. D, Schomp. 



62, 64, 

63, 64. 

64, 65, 

65, 67, 

65, 66, 

66, 67, 

67, 68, 

68, 6y, 
68—70, 

69, 70, 

70, 71, 

71, 72. 
71, 72, 
73. 74, 
73. 74. 
75, 76, 
75, 76, 
77. 78, 
77. 78, 
79, 80, 
79. 80, 
81, 82, 
81, 82, 
83. 84. 
83. 84, 
85-87, 
85-87, 
88—90, 
88—90, 
91, 92, 
91—93. 

93, 



Thomas Banghart, Jr. 
Jacob H. Huffman. 
S. R. Huselton. 
Joseph W. Wood. 
David H. Banghart. 
David B Boss. 
William J. Iliff. 
James J. Willever. 
Richard H. Wilson. 
Baltes Pickel. 
John Williamson. 
Theodore Probasco. 
John P. Lare. 
John Kugler. 
Peter Voorhees. 
Augustus E. Sanderson. 
W. L. Hoppock 
John Carpenter, Jr. 
James Bird. 
William W. Swayze. 
Henry Britton. 
John Hackett. 
Charles W. Godown. 
James N. Ramsey. 
George H. Mathews. 
Jacob Hipp. 
John V. Robbins. 
W. Howard Lake. 
John C Arnwine. 
Chester Wolverton. 
William H. Martin. 
Laurence H. Trimmer. 
William B. Niece. 
Benjamin E. Tine. 
J. L. Chamberlin. 



Mercer County. 



45, Israel J. Woodward. 
45, Richard J. Bond. 
45, *John Lo^vTey. 
47, Isaac Pullen. 
47, John M. Vancleve. 

47, William White, 

49, James M. Redmond. 
-50, Josiah Buzby. 

48, Samuel C. Cornell. 

49, John R. Dill. 

50, John F. Hageman. 

51, John H. Phillips. 
51, Eli Rogers. 

51, Westley P. Danser. 

52, William Napton. 
52, John C. Ward. 

52, Jeremiah Vandyke. 

53, Abner B. Tomlinson. 
53, Elijah L. Hendrickson. 
53, Randal C. Robbins. 



54, 
54. 
54, 

55, 

55, 

55. 

56, 57, 

56, 57, 
56, 

57, 58, 

58, 59, 
58, 

59, 60, 

60, 61, 
60, 
6r, 

61, 62, 

62, 63, 
62. 



James H. Hill. 
Franklin S. Mills. 
Runey R. Forman, 
James Vandeventer. 
William Jay. 
Garret Schenck. 
Geo. R. Cook. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
Samuel Wooley. 
Jacob Van Dyke. 
Augustus L. Martin. 
Jonathan S. Fish. 
Robert Aitken. 
Ed. T. R. Applegate. 
Joseph Abbott. 
Harper Crozer. 
Wm. S. Yard. 
Morgan F. Mount. 
Geo W. Johnston. 
John G. Stevens. 



* Died in office. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



99 



63, Peter Crozer. 78 

63, 64, James G. West. 78 

64, James F. Bruere. 

64, 65, John A. Weart. 80 

65, 66, Alex. P. Green. 80 

65, 65, Samuel Fisher. 

66, 67, Thomas Crozer. 82 

67, 71, Joseph H. Bruere. 82 

67, Chas. W. Mount. 83 

68, 69, Absalom P. Lanning. 84 

68, Thomas J. Corson. 84 

68, Thomas C. Pearce. 

69, John P. Nelson. 86, 
691 70* James C. Norris. 

70, 71, Wm H. Barton. 

70, Charles O Hudnut. 

71, Liscomb T. Robbins. 

72, 73, Alfred W. Smith. 

72, Richard R. Rogers. 
72, John H. Silvers. 

73. 74> John N. Lindsay. 

73, 74, Andrew J Smith. 

74, 75, Geo. O. Vanderbilt. 89, 
75, Samuel M. Youmans. 90, 

75, Robert S. Woodruff, Jr. 

76, Enoch H. Drake. 

76, John Hart Brewer. 91, 

76, Robert L. Hutchinson. 92, 
77, 78, Horatio N. Burroughs. 92, 

77, William S. Yard. 
77, J. Vance Powers. 



79, 82, Eckford Moore. 



83 



John D. Rue. 
Wm. Roberts. 
Charles S. Robinson. 
Richard A. Donnelly. 
John V. D. Beekman. 
Nelson M. Lewis. 

83, William J. Convery. 

84, Joseph H. Applegate. 

85, A. Judson Rue. 
85, John Caminade. 

85, Benjamin F. Chambers. 
87, Symmes B. Hutchinson. 

86, James C. Taylor, Jr. 

86, William Ossenberg. 

87, Frederick Walter. 

87, George D. Scudder. 

88, Charles H. Olden. 
88, Josiah Jones. 

88, Lyman Leavitt. 

89, Uriel T. Scudder. 

89, Thomas S. Chambers. 

90, John Schroth. 

91, Jacob R. Wyckoff. 

90, Howell C. Stull. 

91, James H. Mulheron. 

92, Patrick T. Burns. 

93, James W. Lanning. 
93, Barton B. Hutchinson. 
93, Charles G. Roebling. 



Middlesex County. 



Simeon W. Phillips. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Daniel C. Dunn. 
Charles Abraham. 
Garret G. Voorhees, 
Theodore F. King. 
John A. Davison. 
Richard McDowell. 
Melancton F. Carman. 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Aaron Gulick. 
William A. Gulick. 
James Bishop. 
Henry Vandyke. 
Charles Abraham. 
Israel R. Coriell. 
David Dunn. 
Peter F. Dye. 
J. B. Johnson. 
Robert M. Crowell. 
James Applegate. 
Josephus Shann. 
Martin A. Howell. 
Abraham Everett. 
Samuel E. Stelle. 
William Hutchinson. 
John T. Jenkins. 
Amos Robbins. 
Henry Stults. 
John D. Buckelew. 



58—60, 

58, 59, 

59. 

60, 

60, 

61, 62, 

62, 63, 
62, 

63, 64, 

63, 64, 

64. 65, 
65-67. 

65. 
66, 67, 
66, 67, 

68, 
68, 69, 
68, 69, 
70, 71,- 

70, 
71—73, 

71, 
72, 73. 

72. 

73, 

74, 

74, 
74, 75, 

75, 

75, 



Ellis B. Freeman. 
Garret I. Snedeker. 
Andrew McDowell, 
Thomas Booraem, 
Elias Dey. 
Elias Ross. 
James T. Crowell. 
Orlando Perrine. 
Miles Ross. 
David B. Wyckoff. 
Abraham C. Coriell. 
69, 70, Levi D. Jarrard 
James G. Goble. 
Nathan H. Tyrell. 
John W. Perrine. 
George E. Strong. 
Alfred W. Jones. 
William M. Cox. 
Albert L. Runyon. 
George E. Brown. 
Isaac L Fischer. 
Edward F. Roberts, 
Joseph C. Letson. 
Johnston Holcombe. 
H. F. Worthington. 
John Von Deursen. 
John F. Ten Broeck. 
Joseph C. Magee, Jr. 
James H. Van Cleef. 
Josephus Shann. 



100 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



Isaiah Rolfe. 
Charles A. Campbell, 
Daniel Z. Martin. 
John Waldron. 
Isaac L Martin. 
Patrick Convery. 
Vincent W. Mount. 
Robert G. Miller. 
John M. Board 
8i, Stephen M. Martin. 

82, James H Van Cleel. 

83, Manning Freeman. 



82, John Adair. 

83, James H Go 

84, William R. J 



Goodwin, 
emee. 



85, Edward S. Savage. 

85, Robert Carson. 

86, John Martin. 

87, John F. Ten Broeck. 
" R. R. Vandenbergh. 



87. 



John Mulvey. 
Ephrain] Cutter. 
Daniel M. Kane. 
Charles B. Herbert. 
Luther H Tappen. 
William C. Jacques. 
Charles H Manahan. 
John W. Beekman. 
John H. Daly. 
Hezekiah Wame 



Monmouth County, 



45, 
-47, 
46, 
-47, 
45, 
47, 
47, 
47, 
48. 
48, 
48. 
48. 
48. 
50, 
50, 
50, 
49, 
49. 
50, 
50, 
52, 
52, 
51, 
52, 
-53, 
53, 
53, 
54, 
54, 
54, 
-56. 
55. 
55, 
55, 
57, 
57. 
57, 
-59, 
59, 
59, 
-60, 
61, 
61. 



George F. Fort. 
Hartshorne Tantum 
Andrew Simpson. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
*James H. Hartshorne. 
William Vandoren. 
John Borden. 
Andrew Simpson. 
William W. Bennett. 
Joel Parker. 
Ferdinand Woodward. 
*Samuel Bennett. 
Joel W. Ayres. 
Alfred Walling. 
George W. Sutphin. 
James D. Hall. 
James Hooper. 
John B. Williams. 
William G. Hooper. 
Charles Butcher. 
William H Conover. 
Garret S. Smock. 
Bernard Connolly. 
Charles Butcher. 
Samuel W. Jones. 
Charles Allen. 
Daniel P. Van Doren. 
Robert Allen. 
Forman Hendrickson. 
John L. Corlies 
Henry E. Lafetra. 
John Vandoren. 
Thomas B. Stout. 
William H. Johnson. 
Jacob Herbert. 
John R. Barricklo. 
Samuel Beers. 
John V. Conover. 
George Middleton. 
Richard B. Walling. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
W^illiam H. Mount. , 
James Patterson. 



60, 
61, 62 
61, 62, 

62 
63. 65 
63, 64 
63. 64 
65, 66 
65, 66 

66; 
67, 68, 
67, 68, 
67, 68, 

fi '^' 
09, 70, 

69. 70. 
70—72, 

71. 
71, 72, 

72, 
73—75. 
73, 74, 
73. 74, 
75, 76. 

75, 76, 

76, 77, 

77, 78, 
77, 
78, 

78, 79. 

79, 80, 

79. 80, 

80, 81, 
81, 

81 82. 



83, 84, 

83, 84, 

84, 85, 
8=?, 

85, 86, 

86, 87, 



, J. J. McNinney. 
, William V. Ward. 
, Charles Haight. 
, George C. Murray, 

.Michael Taylor. 
, Osbom Curtis 
, David H. Wyckoft. 
, Daniel A. Holmes. 
, George Schenck. 
, William C. Browne. 
, Charles Allen. 
, Francis Corlies. 
, Thomas S R. Brown. 
, William H Conover. 
, Daniel H. Van Mater. 
, Andrew Brown. 
, Austin H. Patterson. 
, William S. Horner. 
, John T. Haight. 
, William B. Hendrickson. 
, George W. Patterson. 
, John B. Giffcrd. 
, John S. Sproul. 
, Charles D. Hendrickson. 

William V. Conover. 

James L. Rue. 

William H. Bennett. 

James H. Leonard. 

George J. Ely. 

Arthur Wilson. 

87, Sherman B. Oviatt. 

92, 93, John D Honce, 

87, 88, Grover H. Luf burrow 

Holmes W. Murphy, 

David A. Bell. 

Peter Forman, Jr. 

Benjamin Griggs. 

Alfred B. Stoney. 

Thomas G. Chattle. 

Charies H. Boud. 

William H Grant. 

Frank E. Hever. 

W. S. Throckmorton. 



* Died in office. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



101 



90, 



86, William Pintard. 
89, Edward B. Potts. 
89, Archibald A. Higgins. 
89, William F. Patterson. 
91, Aaron E. Johnston. 



90, 91, William D, Campbell. 
90, 91, Charles H. Ivins. 
92, 93, John D. Honce. 
92, 93, Reuben G. Strahan. 
92, 93, William Taber Parker. 



Morris County. 





45, 


45, 


46. 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


46, 


47, 




47, 




47, 




47, 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49, 


48, 


49, 




50, 




50, 




50, 




50, 




51, 




51, 




51, 


SI, 


52, 


52, 


53, 


52, 


53, 


52, 


53, 




53, 


54, 


55, 


54, 


55, 


54, 


55, 




54, 


55, 


56. 




56, 


56, 


57, 


56, 


57, 


57, 


58, 


57, 


58, 


58, 


59, 


58, 


59, 




59, 


59, 


6o, 




60. 


60—62, 


60—62. 




61, 


61, 


62, 


62, 


63, 




63, 


63- 


-65, 



Timothy Kitchel. 
Matthias Kitchel. 
Henry Seward. 
George H. Thompson. 
Calvin Howell. 
Richard Lewis. 
Charles McFarland. 
Samuel Hilts. 
Andrew I. Smith. 
David T. Cooper. 
Samuel Van Ness. 
Edward W. Whelpley. 
John L. Kanouse. 
Andrew Cobb. 
Freeman Wood. 
George H. Thompson. 
Horace Chamberlain. 
Jonathan P. Bartley. 
Josiah Meeker. 
Cornelius B. Doremus. 
C. S. Dickerson. 
John D. Jackson. 
Robert Albright. 
Johi L Kanouse. 
William P. Conkling. 
William Logan 
Aaron Pitney. 
Andrew B. Cobb. 
Edward Howell. 
William M. Muchmore. 
William A. Carr. 
Daniel Budd. 
Benjamin M. Felch. 
Richard Speer. 
Lyman A. Chandler. 
John Naughright. 
A. H. Stansborough. 
James H Ball 
Eugene Ayres. 
Nelson H. D ake. 
Nathan Horton. 
William W. Beach. 
John Hill 
Jacob Vanatta. 
William J Wood. 
Jesse Hoffman. 



68- 
69, 
69. 
71, 
71, 
71- 
73. 
73, 
74- 
75, 
75, 



64, Henry C. Sanders. 

65, John Bates. 

65, Alfred M. Treadwell. 

66, John Hill. 

67, James C. Yawger. 
67, Elias M. White. 

67, Lewis Estler. 

68, Daniel Coghlan. 
68, George Gage. 

-70, Jesse M. Sharp. 

70, Theodore W. Phoenix. 

70, Columbus Beach. 

72, Nathaniel Niles. 

72, W. B. Lefevre. 
-73, August C. Canfield. 

74, W. H. Howell. 

74, Jacob Z. Budd. 
-76, Elias M. Skellinger. 

76, James C. Youngblood. 

76, Edmund D. Halsey. 

77, Abm C. Van Duyne. 

77, *Cummins O Cooper. 

78, Cornelius P. Garrabrant. 
78, Francis J. Doremus. 

78, Joshua S. Salmon. 
80, Charles F. Axtell. 
80, James H. Bruen. 
80, Holloway W. Hunt. 
82, William C. Johnson. 
82, 91, 92, John F. Post. 

82, Oscar Lindsley. 
-85, George W. Jenkins. 

84, James H. Neighbour. 
84, Amzi F. Weaver. 
86, John Seward Wills. 

86, Elias C. Drake. 

87, John Norwood. 

83, Samuel S Lyon. 

88, John R. Pitney. 

89, Carnot B. Meeker. 

90, John Norris. 

90, William S. Naughright. 

91, James Preston Albright. 

92, Ford D. Smith. 

93, Thomas J. O'Brien. 
93, Sylvester Utter. 



51 — 53, Joel Haywood. 

54, A. O S. Havens. 
55, 56, Wm. F. Brown. 
57 — 59, Edwin Salter. 



Ocean County. 



60, Thomas W. Ivins. 

61, Chas. H. Applegate. 

62, Ephraim Emson. 

63, Edwin Salter. 



*In 1878 C. O. Cooper was unseated by Joshua S. Salmon. 



102 



ASSEMBLYMBVI. 



64, 65, Jacob P.irdsall. 

6^'. 67, Job Edwards. 

68, 69, Geo. W. Cowperthwaite. 

•JO, 71, Albert M. Bradshaw. 

72, Richard B. Parker. 

73, Jolin S. Shultz. 

74, Kdward M. Lonan. 

75, 87, 88, 89, Jonathan S. Goble. 
76, Ephraim P. Emson. 



77, Isaac A. Van Htse. 
78—80, Rufus Blodgett. 

81, \Vm. H. Bennett. 

82, Clifford Homer. 

83, George T. Cranmer. 

84, Augustus W. Irons. 
85, 86, George G. Smith 
90, 91, 92, Adolph Ernst. 

93, John T. Burton. 



Passaic County. 



45, 46, George W. Colfax. 
45, 46, Chileon F. De Camp. 

47, Abm. Prall. 

47, 48, Henry M Van Ness. 

48, John M. Demarest. 

49, 50, C. S. Van Wagoner. 

49, Oscar Decker. 

50, 51, Thomas D Hoxsey. 

51, 52, Benjamin Geroe. 
52, J. S Fayerweather. 

J. V. R. Van Blarcom. 
Cornelius Van Winkle. 
Philip Rafferty. 
Charles H. May. 
54, John L. Laroe. 
Wm. C. Stratton. 
Wm. M. Morrell. 
John Schoonmaker. 
Benj. Buckley. 
Peter H. Whitenor. 
John J. Brown. 
James B. Beam. 
Patrick Maginnis. 
Richard Van Houten. 
Samuel Pope. 
Joel M. Johnson. 
Isaac Stagg. 
Isaac P. Cooley. 
Socrates Tuttle. 
John N. Terhune. 
Chandler D. Norton. 
Samuel Pope. 
Joseph N. Taylor. 
Chas. F. Johnson. 
Aaron Kinter. 
Garret Van Wagoner. 
Isaac D. Blauvelt. 
David Henr>'. 
Joseph R. Baldwin. 
E. A. Stansbury. 
Albert A. Van Voorhees. 
Hugh Reid. 

72, Chas. Hemmingway. 
Henry Hobbs. 
Chas, P. Gurnee. 





53, 




53. 


53, 


54. 




54, 


51. 


52, 




55. 




55. 


55, 


56, 


56- 


-58, 




S6, 




57, 




57. 




58. 


58, 


59. 


59- 


-61, 




59, 




60, 


60, 


61, 


6i, 


62. 


62—66, 


62—66, 




63, 


63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 


64, 


65, 


65, 


66, 


65, 


66, 


67, 


68, 


67, 


68, 




67, 


68, 


69, 


69. 


70. 


69. 


71, 




70, 




70, 



87, 88, 
87. 
87. 

87, 88, 



89. 93: 



79, John O'Brien. 
75, Robert M. Torbet, 
Henry McDanolds. 
George Barnes. 
Garret A. Hobart. 
David Henry. 
John P. Zeluff. 
John W. Griggs. 
John Sanderson. 
Joseph L. Cunningham, 
John Kennell. 
John H. Robinson. 
George W. Conkling. 
Robert B. Morehead. 
Thomas B. Vreeland. 
Jacob Latus. 
Joseph A Greaves. 
Patrick H. Shields. 
William F. Gaston. 
92, 93, Thomas Flynn, 
Clark W. Mills. 
William Prall. 
Cornelius A. Cadmus. 
John Scheele. 
DeWitt C. Bolton. 
George H. Low. 
William B. Gourley. 
George Law. 
John Donohue. 
Robert A. Carroll. 
89, James Keys, 
James H. Rogers. 
Eugene Emley. 
John I. Holt. 
Charles T Woodward. 
William W. Welch. 
John King. 
John F. Kerr. 
Thomas McCran. 
Robert Williams. 
Richard Carroll. 
Frank Gledhill. 
Thomas Flynn. 
John F Smith. 
James Parker. 



45, David Wiley. 
45, Isaiah ConkljTi. 

45, Robert Hewitt. 

46, Ephraim Carel. 



Salein County. 

46, Charles Bilderback. 

46, George Remster. 

47. Joseph M. Springer. 
47, James Vanmeter. 



ASSEMBLYMEN, 



103 



Joseph Foster. 
Benjamin F. McCoUister. 
Joseph R. Chew. 
James H. 'Irenchard. 
Isaac Lippincott. 
John Fowler. 
Charles B Newell. 
David Sithens. 
Benjamin Remster. 
Smith Bilderback. 
Charles Benner. 
Harman Richman. 
Jacob Hitchner. 
John C. Lummis. 
Nathaniel G Swing. 
John Blackwood. 
Isaiah D. Clawson. 
Richard Grier. 
Joshua Thompson. 
John Harris. 
Joseph Kille. 
Samuel Plummer. 
William Beckett. 
Thomas B. Jones. 
Alfred Simpkins. 
Joshua Lippincott. 
Samuel Habermayer. 
Owen L. Jones. 
William P. Somers. 
Samuel D. Miller. 
Joseph W. Cooper. 



Joseph Waddington. 
William N. Hancock. 
William Callahan. 
Aux. M. P. y. H. Dickeson. 
Samuel Garrison. 
John S. Newell. 
Henry M. Wright. 
Andrew S. Reeves. 
Charles F. H. Gray. 
David Evans. 
John W. Dickinson. 
John Hitchner. 
Daniel P. Darrell. 
Smith Hewitt. 
William Iszard. 
William B Carpenter. 
Charles P. Swing. 
Richard Coles. 
Quinton Keasbey. 
Johns Elwell. 
William C. Kates. 
Henry Barber. 
John D. Garwood. 
Henrj' Combs. 
Joseph D. Whitaker. 
William Newell. 
Millard F. Riley. 
John C. Ward. 
James Strimple. 
William Diver. 



Somerset County. 



Peter Voorhees 
Samuel Reynolds. 
Peter Kline. 
James B. Elmendorf. 
Peter T. Beekmao. 
Jonathan Cory. 
Samuel K Martin. 
F. V. D. Voorhees. 
John M. Wyckoff. 
53, John DeMott. 
Samuel S. Doty. 
Frederick D. Brokaw. 
Eugene S. Doughty. 
Michael R. Nevius. 
John H. Anderson. 
John S. Hoagland. 
Alvah Lewis. 
Cornelius M. Schomp. 
Cornelius N. Allen. 
Nehemiah V. Steele. 
Elisha B. Wood. 
70, Jas W. Arrowsmith. 
John G. Schenck. 
John M. Mann. 

Sussex 

Absalom Dunning. 
Jesse Bell. 
Timothy H. Cook. 



64, 
65, 
66, 

68- 



83, 



65, Daniel Corey. 

66, Rynier A. Staats. 

67, Ralph Davenport. 

67, Peter A. Voorhees. 
69, John J. Bergtn. 

68, Abraham T. HuflF. 
71, John R Staats. 
71, James Doty. 

73, David D. Smalley. 

74, John G. Schenck. 

75, William P. Sutphin. 
•77, Joseph H. Vooihees. 
77, 91, 92, James J. Bergen. 
80, John Ringelmann. 

80, J. Newton Voorhees. 
82, William A. Schomp. 

81, John L Oakey. 

84, Cornelius S Hoffman. 

86, John Vetterlein. 

87, George E. Pace. 

88, Oscar Conkling. 
90, Jacob Klotz. 

93, George H. Cramer. 



46, John Hunt. 



County. 

46, 47, Peter Young. 

46 — 48, Thomas D. Armstrong. 

47 — 49, Peter Hoyt. 

48—50, Jacob Hombeck, Jr. 



104 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



49. 

50, 51 

50, 51, 

51, 

52, 

52. 55i 
52—54, 

53, 54, 
53, 54, 

55, 
55—57, 
56-58, 
56-58, 

58, 

59, 60, 

60, 61, 
60, 61, 

61, 



58, 
58, 
59, 

59, 60, 

60, 61, 
61, 

62, 63, 
62, 

63, 64, 

64, 65, 
65, 
66, 
66, 
67, 
67. 

68, 69, 
68, 69, 
70, 7', 

70. 

71. 

72, 
72—74, 
72—74, 

73 
74, 75 



Martin Ryerson. 
Guy Price. 
Wiilicm Simurson. 
Daniel D. Decker. 
George W. Coliver. 
Aaron K. Stinson. 
Timothy E. Shay. 
Benjamin Hamilton. 
Luther Hill. 

iames L. Decker. 
>anicl D. Gould. 
William Smith. 
John W. Opdyke. 
Sanford McKeeby. 
Martin Cole. 
Charles Mackerly. 
Daniel D. Decker. 
William Price. 



62 — 64, 
62, 
63, 64 
65, 
65-67, 
66, 67, 
68—70, 
68—70, 
71, 72, 
71. 
75, 76 
77, 78, 
79—81, 
82—84 
85, 86, 
88, 89 
91, 9^ 



, William H. Bell. 

Thomas N. McCarter. 
, Robert Hamilton. 
, Samuel Fowler. 

William M. Iliflf. 
73 1 74, Francis M. Ward. 

Hiram C. Clark. 

Samuel H. Hunt. 
, Lebbeus Martin. 

Peter Smith. 
, William Owen. 

George Greer. 
, Lewis J. Martin. 
, William E. Ross._ 

87, Horatio N. Kinney. 
, 90, Andrew J. I:!ale. 
, 93, Jacob Swartwout. 



Union County. 



Benjamin M. Price. 
Cooper Parse. 
William Stiles. 
Elston Marsh. 
David Mulford. 
Israel O. Maxwell. 
Samuel L. Moore. 
John J High. 
Noah Woodruff. 
Philip Dougherty. 
Joseph T. Crowell. 
John R. Crane. 
Thomas J. Lee. 
A. M. W. Ball. 
Enos W. Runyon. 
John H. Whelan. 
DeWitt C. Hough. 
75, Ferdinand Blancke. 
Albert A. Drake. 
Joseph W. Yates. 
Andrew Dutcher 
William McKinley. 
John H. Luf berr}'. 
Jabez B. Cooley. 
H. Gill. 



5, William 



74, 75, EFiaS B. Pope. 
76 — 78, John Egan. 
76, 77, Moses F. Cary. 
76, 77, Benjamin A. VaH. 
78—80, George M Stiles. 

78, Joseph B. Coward. 
79, 80, Philip H. Vernon. 
79—82, John T. Dunn. 
81, 82, George T. Parrott. 
81—83, Frank L. Sheldon. 
83, 84, Edward J Byrnes. 
83, 84, Asa T. WoodruflF. 

84, DeWitt C Hough. 
85, 86, Peter L. Hughes. 

85, 86, 87, William H Corbin. 

85, Jacob Kirkner. 

86, 87, William Chamberlain. 

87, 88, John J. Matthews. 

88, 89, 90, Foster M. Voorhees. 

88, 89, 90, John Ulrich. 

89, 90, Frederick C. Marsh. 
91, 92, John Carroll. 

91, 92, 93, George Kyte. 
91, 92, 93, 'I'homas F. Lane. 
93, Timothy xM. Kelly. 



Warren County. 



45, 46, 
45, 
45, 
46—48, 
46—48, 
47—49, 
49—51, 
49—51. 
50, 51, 
52—54. 
52—54, 
52, 
54—56, 
55—57, 
55—57; 



Robert C. Caskey. 
Abram Wildrick, 
Stephen Warne. 
Jonathan Shotwell. 
Amos H. Drake. 
Samuel Mayberrj'. 
Andrew Ribble. 
Benjamin Fritts. 
53, John Loller. 
John Sherrer. 
David V. C. Crate, 
John Cline. 
George H. Beatty. 
Archibald Osborn. 
John White. 



57—59, 
58, 59, 

58, 
59—61, 
60 — 62, 

60, 
61, 63, 
62 — 64, 
63-65, 
64—66, 
65, 66, 
66—68, 
67-68, 
67—69, 
69—71, 



Isaac Leida. 
William Feit. 
Abm. S. Van Horn. 
Robert Rusling. 
John C. Bennett. 
Philip Shoemaker. 
David Smith. 
Wm. W. Strader. 
Elijah Allen. 
Charles G. Hoagland. 
Si as Young. 
Andrew J. Fulmer. 
John N. Givens. 
Nelson Vliet. 
Absdom B. Pursell. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



103 



69—71, 
70—72, 
72-74, 

73—75, 

76. 
76-78, 

77—79, 
79-81, 
80-82, 



Caleb H. Valentine. 
William Silverthon. 
Valentine Mutchler. 
Joseph Aiiderson. 
JohnRI WyckofF. 
William Carpenter. 
Elias J. Mackey. 
Silas W. De Witt. 
Coursen H. Albertson. 
William Fritts. 



82, Robert Bond. 
83 — 85, Stephen C. Larison. 
83—85, Isaac Wildrick. 

86, Thomas L. Titus. 
86. 87, William M. Baird. 
87—89, Samuel B. Mutchler. 
88 — 91, Eliphalet Hoover. 
90—92, Daniel W. Hagerty. 
92, 93, L. Milton Wilson. 

q^, Richard H. Sheppard. 



106 



SPECIAL ELECTION. 



SPECIAL ELECTION— 1890. 



A special election was held Tuesday, September 30th, 1890, on proposed 
amendments to the State Constitution, one of which abrogated the clause 
which prohibits special legislation for towns and counties, and the other of 
which provided for the appointment of Comiaci. Pleas Judges by the Senate 
and General Assembly in joint meeting. Both amendments were rejected, 
the votes by counties being as fol'ows : 





Special 
Legislation. 


Judges' 
Amendment. 




Counties. 


i 


.1 

rt 





1 
< 


Atlantic 


81 
60 
92 

876 

105 
50 

553 
29 

447 


638 

1482 

2591 

2765 

306 

1309 

11861 

1080 

10187 


272 
501 
533 

1044 
178 
363 

5935 
377 

1924 
549 
730 

1114 


447 
1030 
2150 
2601 

233 

996 
6472 

732 
8709 
1901 
1943 


• 719 




1538 


Burlington 


2684 




3644 

411 

1359 

12432 


Cape May 

Cumberland 




Gloucester 


1110 
10664 




Hunterdon 


39 


241.^ 


2456 


Mercer .. 


207, 2465 
59! 3174 
85; 3144 

154! 2186 
31 1 566 

185 3538 
11 1121 
40 1327 
23 1134 

106 3667 

105, 2104 


5>fi7a 


Middlesex 


91201 ?19^ 




216 30131 3-236 


Morris 


486 1855' 2342 


Ocean 


152 443 696 


Passaic 


316' 3407 3723 




1411 991 1132 




348 1019 1367 


Sussex 


178' 978 1158 




1160 2602 3765 


Warren , 


239 1970 2210 




3328 






Totals 


59050 


16756 45611 62453 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OF COUNCIL AND 

SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE 

OF ASSEMBLY, 

FROM 1776 TO 1844, 

WHEN THE NEW CONSTITUTION WAS FORMED. 
• 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



17761 
1777 

1778 
1779 
1780 
1781 
1782— John Cox, Burlington. 

]ll\ } Philemon Dickinson 

1785 
1786 
1787 
1788 
1789 
1790 
1791 
1792 
1793 
1794 



John Stevens, Hunterdon. 



Hunterdon. 



Robert Lettis Hooper, 

Hunterdon. 



ElishSl Lawrence, 

Monmouth. 



Thomas Henderson. 

Monmouth. 
1795— Elisha Lawrence, 
■tfjac) Monmouth, 

^igy y James Linn, Somerset. 

1798) 

1799 VGeo. Anderson, Burlington. 

1800 J 
1801 1 
1802 

1803 I J°^^ Lambert, Hunterdon. 

1804 J 

1805— Thomas Little, Monmouth. 
1806— Geo. Anderson, Burlington. 
1807— Ebenezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1808— Ebenezer Seeley, 

Cumberland. 
X809— Thomas Ward, Essex. 



1810^ 
1811 



Charles Clark, Essex. 



1812— James Schureman, 

Middlesex. 
1813— Charles Clark, Essex, 

1815 } William Kennedy, Sussex. 

18161 

1817 

1818 1 

1819 }■ Jesse Upson, Morris. 
1820 
1821 
1822 
18231 
1824 
1825 
1826 



Peter J, Stryker, Somerset. 



Ephraim Bateman, 

Cumberland. 
1827— Silas Cook, Morris. 
1828-Charles Newbold. 

Burlington. 

Jg^Q I Edward Condict, Morris. 

]lll \ Elias P. Seeley, 
^^•^^J Cumberland. 

1833— Mahlon Dickerson, Morris. 
1834— Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 
1835— Charles Sitgreaves. Warren. 
1836— Jeptha B. Munn, Morris. 

,000 \ Andrew Parsons, Passaic. 

1840 [ Jo^^P^ Porter, Gloucester. 
1842- John Cassedy, Bergen. 
1843— William Chetwood, Essex. 
1844— Jehu Patterson, Monmouth 



(107) 



108 



SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE. 



SPEAKERS. 



1776) 

1777 VJohn Hart, Hunterdon. 

1778) 

Second session 1878— Caleb Camp, 

Essex. 
1779— Caleb Camp, Essex. 
1780— Josiah Hornblower, Essex. 
1781— John Mehelm, Hunterdon. 

i^M^Ephraim Harris, 

^^^i Cumberland. 

1784— Daniel Hendrickson, 

Monmouth. 

1 7CA 1 Benjamin Van Cleve. 
^^^^J Hunterdon. 

1787— Ephraim Harris. 

Cumberland. 
1788— Benjamin Van Cleve. 

Hunterdon. 
1789— John Beatty. Middlesex. 
1790— Jonathan Dayton, Essex. 
1791— Ebeuezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1792) 

1793 ysilas Condict, Morris. 

1794 j 

1795— Ebenezer Elmer. 

Cumberland. 
1796— James H. Imlay, 

Monmouth. 
1797— Silas Condict, Morris. 
1798) 

1799 V William Coxe, Burlington. 
1800) 

1801— Silas Dickerson. Sussex. 
1802— William Coxe, Burlington. 
1803— Peter Gordon, Huuterdon. 
18041 

1806 f J^°^6S ^<^^' Monmouth. 

1807 J 

1^ [ Lewis Condict, Morris. 



J|}J} William Kennedy .-Snisex 

1812— William Pearson, 

Burlington, 
1813— Ephraim Bateman, 

Cumberland. 

I^IJ* I Samuel Pennington, Essex. 

1816— Charles Clark, Essex. 
1817— Ebenezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
18181 
1819 

1820 \ David Thompson, Jr., 

1821 Morris. 

1822 J 

1823— Lucius Q C.Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1824— David Johnston, 

Hunterdon. 

18% [ George K. Drake, Morris. 

}^27i William B. Ewing. 

1829) 

1830 'Alexander Wurts. 
1831 ) Hunterdon. 

1832— John P. Jackson, Essex. 
11833) 

1834 y Daniel B.Ryall. 

1835 j Monmouth. 
18o6— Thomas G. Haight, 

Monmouth. 

1838 } ^^^ Condict, Morris. 
1839— William Stites, Essex. 
1841 } *^°^^ Emley, Burlington, 
l&J2~Samuel B. Halsey, Morris. 



Cumberland. 



J?^H Joseph Taylor, 



Cumberland. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



109 



SENATE OFFICERS. 



PRESIDENTS. 
1845"! 

}|^7 f JohnC.Smallwood.Glou'str 

1848J 

1850 i Ephraim Marsh, Morris. 

1851--Silas D. Canfield, Passaic. 

1852~John Manners, Hunterdon. 

18531 

1855 f ^'- ^- Alexander, Mercer. 

1856 1 

1858 } Henry V. Speer, Middlesex. 
1859— Thomas R. Herring, Bergen. 
1860— C. L. C. Gifford, Essex. 
1861— Edmund Perry, Hunterdon. 
1862— Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 
1863— Anthony Reckle.-s, Mon'th. 
1864— Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 
1865— Edward W. Scudder, Mercer 
1866— James M. Scovel, Camden. 
1867— Benjamin Buckley, Passaic. 

1869 1 Henry S. Little, Monmouth. 
1870— Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 
1872 } ^<^ward Bettle, Camden. 
1873) 

1874 yJohn W. Taylor, Essex. 

1875 j 

1876— W. J. Sewell, Camden. 
1877— Leon Abbett, Hudson. 
1878— G. C. Ludlow, Middlesex. 

1880 } ^- •^- Sewell, Camden. 
18811 



1882/ 



G. A. Hobart, Passaic, 



1883— J. J. Gardner, Atlantic. 
1884— B. A. Vail, Union. 
1885— A. V. Schenck, Middlesex. 
1886 — John W. Griggs, Passaic. 
1 887— Frederick S. Fish, Essex. 
1888— Geo. H. Large, Hunterdon. 
1889— George T. Werts. Morris. 
1890— H. M. Nevius. Monmouth, 
1891) 

1892 V Robert Adrain, Middlesex. 

1893 J 

1891— Maurice A. Rogers, 
Camden. 



SECRETARIES 
-Daniel Dodd.Jr, 



Philip J. Gray, Camden. 

-John Rogers, Burlington. 
}^^3 1 Samuel A. Allen, Salem. 
1854— A. R. Throckmorton, 
18.5t) Hudson, 

|S?^ [ A. R, Throckmorton, 
^^^^ Monmouth 

Jo?Z I A. B., Chamberlain, 
^'^^> Hunterdon. 

1860 1 "^^^^ ^- Rafferty, Hunterdon 
1861— Joseph J. Sleeper, 
lof?,-,-^ Burlington, 

is^^ [ Morris R. Hamilton, 
i8fiji Camden. 

1865 f "^^^^ H. Meeker, Essex. 

Jggy } EnoQh R Borden, Mercer, 

1869 } J'^seph B. Cornish, Warren. 

1870— John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon 

1871' 

1872 

1873 

1874 _ 

^^Z^ !■ N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 



■ John P. Babcock, Middlesex 



1876 

1877 ) 

1878 I ^" ■^- Jsmison, Somerset. 

1879— N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon 
1880) 

1881 >Geo. Wurts, Passaic. 

1882 j 
1883^ 

1884 !-W, A. Stiles, Sussex. 
1885) 

^^^^1 Richard B. Reading, 



Hunterdon. 



1887 

1888 j 

1889— John Carpenter, Jr., 

Hunterdon. 
1890— Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1891) John Carpenter, Jr., 
1892/ Hunterdon. 

1893— Samuel C. Thompson, 

Warren. 
1894— Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 



no 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



HOUSE OFFICERS. 



SPEAKERS. 

1846 — Isaac Van Wagenen, P^ssex. 
1846 — Lewis Howell, Cumberland. 

1848 } J^^'" ^^- ^- ^^^^^' Burlington. 
1849— Edw. W. Whelpley, Morris. 
1850 — John T. Ni.von, Cumberland. 
1861— John H. Phillips, Mercer. 
1862 — John Huyler, Bergen. 
1863) John W. Fennimore, 
1854/ Burlington. 

1855— William Parry, Burlington. 
1856 — Thos. W. Demarest, Bergen. 
1857 — Andrew Dutcher, Mercer. 
1858 — Daniel Holsman, Bergen. 
1859 — Edwin Salter, Ocean. 
I860 — Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 
1861— F. H. Teese, Esse.x. 
1862— Charles Haight, Monmouth. 
18(53- James T. Cr well, Middlesex. 
1864— Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic. 
1865— Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 
1866— John Hill, Morris. 
1867— G. W. N. Curtis, Camden. 
18G8— Aug. O. Evans, Hudson. 
}^^^ I Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1871— Albert P. Condit, Es.sex. 
1872- Nathaniel Niles, Morris. 
1873— Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex. 
1874— Garret A. Hobart, Passaic. 
1875— George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer. 
1876— John D. Carscallen, Hudson. 
1877— Rudolph F. Rabe, Hudson. 
1878- John Egan, Union. 
1879— Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex. 
1880— Sherman B. Oviatt, Monm. 
1881— Harrison Van Duyne, Es.sex. 
1882— John T. Dunn, Union. 
1883— Thomas O'Connor, Essex. 
1884- A. B. Stoney, Monmouth. 
I^g^l E. A. Armstrong, Camden. 
Ife87— William ^^ Baird, Warren. 
1888— Sam'l D. Dickinson, Hudson. 
1889- Robert S. Hudspeth, Hudson. 
1890 — W. C. HQppenheimer,Hudson. 
jgg.^| James J. Bergen, Somerset, 
1693— Thomas Flynn, Passaic, 
^ooa f John I Holt,* Passaic. 
^^^^ \ Joseph Cross,* Union. 1 

* Speaker Holt resigned on May 26th, when Mr. Cross was elected 
in his place. 



CLERKS. 

1815— Alexander D. Cattell, Salem. 
1846— Adam C. Davis, Hunterdon. 
18471 

1849 f Alex. M. Cumming, Mercer. 

1850 J 

1852 f ^^^'^ ^^^''' ^^•=*- 

J^^J I David W. Dellicker, Somerset 

185.5— Peter D. Vroom, Hudson. 

}g^ I William Darmon, Gloucester. 

1858— Daniel Blauvelt, Essex. 
1859— John P. Harker, Camden. 
1860— D. Blauvelt, Jr., Essex. 

1862 } J^*^°^ ^^^'^' Warren. 
1864 f ^^^' ^^^'^y* Monmouth. 
1866 I ^^^''8^ B- Cooper, Cumberl'd. 
1867 — Ed. Jardine, Bergen. 
1868) 

1869 VA. M. Johnston, Mercer. 

1870 j 

1871 — A. ^L Cumming, Mercer. 

1872) 

187a >Sinnickson Chew, Camden. 

1874) 

1875 — Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 

1877 } J°^" ^- ^°'^^''' Es^«^- 

1878 — Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 

1879) 

1880 >C. O. Cooper, Morris. 

1881 ) 

1853 f -^'■^^"'' ^^'ilson, Monmouth. 
1884— Henr^' D. Winton, Bergen. 
}^^g { Samuel Toombs, Essex. 

1887 — Joseph Atkinson, Essex. 
18;8 — James P. Logan, Burlington. 

1890 } J°^" J- ^^^"^«^'^' Union. 
1892 [ ^^°^' ^" ^^°°°^"' J"" ' Hudson. 
, 1893— Leonard Kalisch, Essex. 
1894— J. Herbert Potts, Hudson. 



CLASSIFICATION OF COUNTIES, 
CITIES AND BOROUGHS. 



COUNTIES. 

(See Act of February 7th, 1883 ) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 150,000. 
Hudson, 275,126; Essex, 256,098. 

Second Class — Having a population between 50,000 and 
150,000. Passaic, 105,046 ; Camden, 87,687 ; Mercer, 79,978 ; 
Union, 72,467; Monmouth, 69,128; Middlesex, 61,754; 
^Burlington, 58,528 ; Morris, 54,101. 

Third Class — Having a population between 20,000 and 
50,000. Bergen, 47,226; Cumberland, 45,438; Warren, 
36,553; Hunterdon, 35,355; Atlantic, 28,836; Gloucester, 
28,649; Somerset, 28,311 ; Salem, 25,151; Sussex, 22,250. 

Fourth CVass— *Ocean, 15,974; Cape May, 11,268. 

CITIES. 

(See Act of March 4th, 1882.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 100,000. 
Newark, 181,830 ; Jersey City, 163,003. 

Second Class — Having a population between 12,000 and 
100,000. Paterson, 78,347; Camden, 58,313; Trenton, 
57,458; Hoboken, 43,648; Elizabeth, 37,764; Bayonne, 
19,033; Orange, 18,844; New Brunswick, 18,603; Passaic 
City, 13,028. 

Third Class— All cities not embraced in the first and 
second classes, except cities lying on the Atlantic Ocean 
and having seaside or summer resorts. Bridgeton, 11,424 
Plainfield, 11,267 ; Town of Union, 10,643 ; Millville, 10,002 
Perth Amboy, 9,512; Phillipsburg, 8,644; Harrison, 8,338 
Morristown, 8,156 ; Burlington, 7,264 ; Rahway, 7,105 
Gloucester City, 6,564; Salem, 5,516; Bordentown, 4,232 
Lambertville, 4,142; also Dover, Boonton, Woodbury, Ham- 
monton, Hackettstown, Belvidere, Beverly, Egg Harbor, 
Guttenberg. 

Fourth Class— A\\ those cities lying on the Atlantic ocean 
and being seaside and sifmmer resorts. 



* Since this United States census was taken the township of Little 
Egg Harbor, ia Burlington county, and having a population of 1,771, 
was annexed to Ocean county. The census figures, however, have 
not been changed in this compilation. 

(Ill) 



112 CLASSIFICA TION. 

BOROUGHS. 

(See Act of March 28d. 1883, and Supreme Court decision. State, Bor- 
ough of Ilightstown, pros., vs. James Glenn, 18 Vr., pkge 105.) 

First (7/«ss— Having a population exceeding 3,000. 
^'^cond CVoss— Having a population between 1,500 and 
0,000. 

Third Class— AW boroughs and incorporated villages not 
contained in the first and second classes. 

The following is a list of the most important boroughs 
and VI lages of New Jersey: Allentown, Anglesea, Asbury 
Park, Atlantic llighlands, Avalon, Bayhead, Beach Haven, 
Belmar, Belleville, Beverly, Bound Brook, Brigantine, Cape 
May Point Carlstadt, Chesilhurst, Clavton, Clinton, CoUings- 
wood, Deckertown, Dunellen, East Millstone, Egg Harbor 
Elmer Enghshtown, Freehold. Fleraington, Frenchtown! 
Cxarfield, Hackensack, Haddonfield, Ilightstown, Holly Beach 
Irvington, Island Heights, Jamesburg, Kevport, Lavallette' 
Linden, Linwood, Long Beach, Long Branch, Madison! 
Manasquan, Matawan, Merchantville, Milltown, Mount Ar- 
lington Neptune City, Newton, North Plainfield, Ocean City 
Ocean Grove, Pemberton Pennington, Pennsgrove, Plea.'^ant- 
ville, Point Pleasant Beach, Princeton, Earitan, Red Bank, 
Kooky Hill Kidgefield, Riverton, Rockaway, Rutherford, 
feea Bright, Sea Isle City, Somers Point, Somerville, South 
Amboy South Atlantic City, South Bound Brook, South 
Cape May, Springfield, Swedesboro, Tenaflv, Vineland, 
Washington (^^ arren county), Washington' (Middlesex 
county), Wenonah, West Cape May, Wilbur, Woodstown. 
Incorporated Village— ^owih Orange. 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1844. 



List of Delegates elected to the Convention to form a gov- 
ernment for the people of the State of New Jersey, which met 
at Trenton, on May 14th, 1844, and continued to June 29th of 
the same year. The constitution was agreed to in convention 
by a vote of 55 to 1 (Mr. Condit), Mr. Stokes being excused 
from voting. It was ratified by the people on August 13th, 
1844, by a vote of 20,276 for, and 3,526 against, 69 ballots be- 
ing rejected. The figures indicate the ages of the respective 
members. The compiler of this work is indebted to Hon. G. 
D. W. Vroom, of Trenton, for the important data given. 

Atlantic County. — Jonathan Pitney, 46, physician. 

Bergen County. — John Cassedy, 47, gentleman ; Alexan- 
der Westervelt, 60, gentleman, 

Burlington County. — William R. Allen, 42, farmer ; Jon- 
athan J. Spencer, 51, physician; Charles Stokes, 52, farmer; 
John C. Ten Eyck, 30, lawyer; Moses Wills, 51, merchant. 

Camden County. — Abraham Browning, 35, lawyer; John 
W. Mickle, 50, mariner. 

Cape May County. — Joshua Swain, 66, farmer. 

Cumberland County.— Joshua Brick, 62, farmer ; Daniel 
Elmer, 59, lawyer; William B. Ewing, 68, physician. 

Essex County. — Silas Condit, 66, gentleman; Oliver S. 
llalsted, 51, lawyer; Joseph C. Hornblower, 67, lawyer; 
David Naar, 43, farmer; William Stites, 52, merchant; Elias 
Van Arsdale, 73, lawyer; Isaac H. Williamson, 71, lawyer. 

Gloucester County. — John R. Sickler, 43, physician; 
Charles C. Stratton, 48, farmer. 

Hudson County. — Robert Gilchrist, 52, county clerk. 

Hunterdon County. — Peter I. Clark, 53, lawyer ; David 
Neighbour, 46, merchant ; Jonathan Pickle, 45, farmer ; Alex- 
ander Wurts, 48, lawyer. 

Mercer County. — Richard S. Field, 39, lawyer; Henry 
W. Green, 39, lawyer; John R. Thomson, 43, gentleman. 

Middlesex County. — Moses Jaques, 73, farmer; James 
Parker, 68, farmer ; Joseph F. Randolph, 40, lawyer ; James 
C. Zabriskie, 40, tailor. 

Monmouth County.— Bernard Connolly, 40, printer ; Geo. 
F. Fort, 35, physician; Thomas G. Haight, 49, farmer; Dan- 
iel Holmes, 50, iarmer; Robert Laird, 32, physician. 

8 (113) 



114 CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, 

Morris Couxty.— Frnnds Child, 51, farmer ; Mahlon Dick- 
erson, 73, lawyer; Ephraiin Marsh, 48, farmer; William N. 
Wood, 38, lawyer. 

Passaic County.— Elias B. D. Ogden, 44, lawyer ; Andrew 
Parsons, 53, mercliant. 

SAI.EM County. — Alexander G. Cattell, 28, merchant ; John 
H. Lambert, 45, merchant ; Richard P. Thompson, 39, attor- 
ney-general. 

80MERSET County.— George H. Brown, 34, lawyer ; Fer- 
dinand S. Schenck, 54, ])hysician ; Peter D. Vroom, 52, lawyer. 

8ussEX County.— J olm Bell, 58, merchant; Josej^h E. Kd- 
sall, 54, manufacturer; Martin Ryerson, 29, lawyer. 

Warren County. — Samuel Hibbler, 44, painter; P. B. 
Kennedy, 42, lawyer; R. S. Kennedy, 41, farmer. 

Presidents of the Convention— \s2i?iC H. Williamson, Essex 
(resigned June 28th, 1844) ; Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

Vice President — Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

Secretary — William Paterson, 27, lawyer, Middlesex. 

Assistant Secretary — Th. S. 8aundei-s, 35, physician, Glou- 
cester. 

Recapitulation. — Lawyers, 20; farmers, 14; physicians, 
7; merchants, 7; other professions, 10; ex-Governoi-s, 3; ex- 
Members of Congress, 7. Four between 70 and 80 years of 
age; six between 60 and 70; seventeen between 50 and 60; 
twenty between 40 and 50 ; nine between 30 and 40 ; two un- 
der 30. 

The only survivors on January 1st, 1894, w-ere Robert 
Laird, and William Paterson, who was Secretary, and John 
B. Faussett, of Trenton, who was page of the Convention. 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 

OF 1873. 



On April 4th, 1873, the Legislature passed a concurrent 
resolution empowering the Governor to appoint, by and with 
the advice of the Senate, a commission of two persons from 
each Congressional District, to suggest and propose amendments 
to the State Constitution for submission to and consideration by 
the next two Legislatures, and afterwards to be submitted to a 
vote of the people. 

On April 24th, of the same year. Governor Parker nominated 
the following gentlemen, who were duly confirmed by the 
Senate : 

First District — Benjamin F. Carter, Woodbury ; Samuel H. 
Grey, Camden. Second District — Mercer Beas^Iey, Trenton ; 
John C. Ten Eyck, Mount Holly. Third District— Kobert S. 
Green, Elizabeth ; John F. Babcock, Kew Brunswick. Fourth 
District — Martin Eyerson and Jacob L. Swayze, both of New- 
ton. Fifth District — Augustus W. Cutler, Morristown ; Benja- 
min Buckley, Paterson. Sixth District — Theodore Runyon 
and John W. Taylor, both of Newark. Seventh District — 
Abraham O. Zabriskie and Robert Gilchrist, both of Jersey 
City. 

Shortly afterwards Chief Justice Mercer Beasley declined to 
serve, and Philemon Dickinson, of Trenton, was appointed in 
his stead. Martin Ryerson resigned and Joseph Thompson, 
of Somerset, was appointed to fill the vacancy. Chancellor 
Theodore Runyon also declined and George J. Ferry, of 
Orange, was appointed in his stead. Ex-Chancellor Zabriskie 
was unanimously elected president of the Commission, and 
upon his decease, which occurred in a short time afterwards, 
Dudley S. Gregory, of Jersey City, was appointed to fill the 
vacancy in the Seventh District. John C. Ten Eyck was 
elected president, vice Zabriskie, deceased. The secretaries 
were Joseph L. Naar and Edward J. Anderson, both of Tren- 
ton. Subsequently Robert Gilchrist resigned and William 
Brinkerhofi', of Jersey City, was appointed in his place. John 
W. Taylor also resigned and Algernon S. Hubbell, of Newark, 
was appointed in his place. 

The first session of the Commission was held on May 8th, 
1873, and the last on December 23d, of the same year. The 
amendments submitted were partially adopted by the two 
succeeding Legislatures, and were ratified by a vote of the 
people at a special election held on September 7th, 1875. 

(115) 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 



This edifice, a massive structure, erected at sundry 
times and various periods, is located on West State street, 
at the corner of Delaware street, running thence westerly 
along State street to the grounds of the late ex-Chancellor 
Green, and southerly to the Water Power. The location 
is a good one, and although the style of the building is 
not modern, yet it answers the purposes for which it was 
intended, even if it does not present a very imposing 
appearance. 

The seat of Government was fixed at Trenton by an 
act of the Legislature, approved November 25th, 1790. 
James Cooper, Thomas Lowery, James Ewing, Maskell 
Ewing, George Anderson, James Mott and Moore Fur- 
man were appointed commissioners to select, purchase or 
accept so much land as was needed, and to erect thereon 
suitable buildings for the use of the Legislature. They 
purchased the present site, containing about three and 
three-quarters acres — a frontage on Second street (now 
West State street) of 247 feet and 6 inches, and a depth 
from the front to low water line of the Delaware river of 
666 feet — at a cost of £250 5s. The old State House was a 
plain, bare-looking, rough-cast building, and was erected 
at a cost of £3,992 3s. ^d. By an act of March 4th, 1795, 
a building was erected to serve as an office for the Secre- 
tary of State, and for the preservation of the public 
records, at a cost of £620 19s. lOd. Numerous improve- 
ments and repairs were made, and on March 3d, 1806, an 
act was passed appointing commissioners to make certain 
repairs to the State House, to provide and hang a suitable 
bell, &c. This was done, and the bell was used for inform- 
ing the members of both houses, as well as the courts, 
of the hour of meeting. The bell was eventually dis- 
carded, and an American flag substituted, which waves 
from the building unto this day, when the Legislature 
is in session, and upon holidays and State occasions. In 
1848, the State House was altered by the removal of the 
(116) 



THE STATE CAPITOL 117 

rough-casting, and changing the front to the style of the 
Mercer County Court House, placing neat porticoes over 
the front and rear entrances, and erecting two additional 
buildings adjoining the main one, as offices for the Clerks 
of the Chancery and Supreme Courts. The rotunda was 
also erected, and the grounds fenced, graded, laid out 
and shade trees planted, all at a cost of $27,000. The 
commissioners under whose directions the work was 
completed, were Samuel K. Gummere, Samuel R. Hamil- 
ton and Stacy A. Paxson. In 1863, '64 and '65, appro- 
priations were made and expended in building additions 
for the State Library, Executive Chambers, &c. In 1871, 
Charles S. Olden, Thomas J. Stryker and Lewis Perrine 
were appointed commissioners to cause a suitable addi- 
tion to be built — more commodious apartments for the 
Senate and Assembly, &c. The sum of $50,000 was appro- 
priated, and the buildings for the Legislature were ready 
for occupancy in time for the meeting of the Legislature 
of 1872. In 1872, $120,000 was appropriated for complet- 
ing the building, $3,000 for fitting up the Executive 
Chamber, $4,000 for fitting up the Chancery and Supreme 
Court rooms, and $2,000 for fitting up the offices on the 
first floor of the east wing. In 1873, the sum of $43,000 
was appropriated for the improvement of the front of 
the building, completing unfinished repairs and improve- 
ments, and for fitting up the Library, &c. On March 
18th, 1875, the sum of $15,000 was appropriated for the 
purpose of putting a new three-story front to the build- 
ing, and to fit up offices on the second floor for the Clerks 
of the Court of Chancery and Supreme Court, and for 
providing a suitable museum for geological specimens, 
and the battle- flags of New Jersey volunteer regiments, 
carried during the war of the Rebellion. 

On March 21st, 1885, the front portion was destroyed 
by fire, and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for re- 
building, and, in 1886, an additional appropriation of 
$225,000 was granted. 

The new building was finished in 1889. It is of rect- 
angular shape and of the Renaissance style of architec- 
ture, with a frontage of one hundred and sixty feet on 
State street, a depth of sixty-seven feet, and three and a 
half stories high, with a rotunda thirty-nine feet across, 
which connects the new section of the Capitol with the 
original part. The rotunda is surmounted by a dome 
one hundred and forty-five feet high. 



1 1 8 THE ST A TE CA PITOL, 

The building has about sixty feet more frontage than 
the former one, and approaches about ten feet nearer 
the street. 

The walls are constructed of solid, fire-proof, brick 
masonry, faced with a light-colored stone from Indiana, 
known as Salem Oolitic, with foundations and trimmings 
of New Jersey freestone, from the Prallsville quarries, in 
Hunterdon county. The portico, door-head and trim- 
mings about the door are of the same material. The 
portico, with balcony, is supported by massive pillars of 
polished granite and surmounted by the coat of arms of 
the State. 

The apartments used for oflSces are very spacious, fitted 
throughout in the most approved modern style, and each 
department is supplied with one or more of the finest 
fire-proof vaults. The first and second stories are set 
aside for offices, and the entire third story is used for the 
State Library. 

The old State Library apartments have been improved 
and extended, and are now used as offices for the Attor- 
ney-General, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
and Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. A new 
story was added, which is used for the Geological Museum 
and State offices. 

In 1891, a new Assembly Chamber was erected. The 
old one was too small and poorly ventilated, and besides, 
there was a lack of suitable committee rooms. The 
Legislature of 1891 passed a Joint Resolution, which 
was approved on March 20th, authorizing the Governor 
" to provide a suitable chamber and committee rooms for 
the use of the General Assembly of this State," &c., and 
also, " to make such additions and alterations aa will 
afi'ord the necessary accommodations for the Supreme 
Court and Court of Errors and Appeals, or for other State 
offices, and sufficient money is hereby appropriated for 
that purpose, to be paid by the Treasurer of this State on 
the warrant of the Comntroller, after approval by the 
Governor." 

The new chamber was built by James W. Lanning, of 
Trenton, from plans prepared by James Moylan, of Jer- 
sey City, and under the superintendency of Bernard J. 
Ford, of Newark. It covers the site of the former cham- 
ber, and extends beyond it to Delaware street on the 
east and to the water power on the south. It has a front- 
age on Delaware street of 120 feet and a depth of 75 feet. 
The exterior finish and design of the building are similar 
to the adjoining portion of the Capitol. The foundation 



THE STA TE LIBRAR Y. 119 

is of brown stone, from the Stockton quarries, and the 
trimmings of light Indiana stone. The interior is fin- 
ished in Trenton tile, quartered oak and Italian statuary 
marble. It is a fire-proof building throughout, and is speci- 
ally ventilated. The committee rooms are ample and 
convenient, and the interior design, arrangement and 
finish make it a model legislative chamber. It cost the 
State $140,500. The cost of the steam heating and venti- 
lating systems was about $25,000. 

The other new addition to the Capitol provides a con- 
sultation room for the Judges of the Supreme Court and 
the Court of Errors and Appeals and a private room for 
the Governor, a room for the Museum of the Geological 
Survey, and other offices, and cost $34,500. 

An electric light apparatus was also placed in the 
Capitol, which cost $23,000. Every department in the 
building is now lighted by electricity. 

A new Otis elevator has been placed in the front part 
of the building, which gives easy access to all the upper 
floors. 



THE STATE LIBRARY. 



This {valuable collection of books is located on the 
third floor of the State Capitol. The old saying, " Great 
oaks from little acorns grow," most appropriately applies 
to this institution. 

The first library of the State was a case ordered to be 
procured by Maskell Ewing, Clerk of the House of 
Assembly, for the keeping and preservation of such 
books as belonged to the Legislature. It was ordered 
by a resolution passed March 18th, 1796. This was the 
nucleus of the present extensive library. On February 
18th, 1804, William Coxe, of Burlington; Ezra Darby, 
of Essex, and John A. Scudder, of Monmouth, were 
appointed a Committee on Rules, and to make a cata- 
logue; they reported that there were 168 volumes 
belonging to the State, and presented a code of seven 
rules, which was adopted. On February 10th, 1813, an 
act (the first one) was passed, entitled "An act concern- 
ing the State Library." Up to 1822 it appears that the 
Clerk of the House had charge of the books, as Librar- 
ian, and, on J^ovember 16th, 1822, an act was passed for 



120 THE STATE ARSENAL. 

the appointment of a State Librarian, annually, by joint 
meeting. In 1846, on April 10th, an act was passed 
making the term of oflSce three years. The Law Library 
at that time belonged to the members of the Law Library 
Association. Tiie only persons allowed the use of the 
Library were members of the Association, the Chan- 
cellor, and the judges of the several courts. Stacy G. 
Potts was Treasurer and Librarian of the Association. 
The Law Library was kept in the Supreme Court room 
until 1837, when the Legislature authorized the State 
Librarian to fit up a room adjoining the Library for the 
care and reception of the books and papers belonging to 
the State Library. Thus the two Libraries were consoli- 
dated. On March 13th, 1872, $5,000 per year for three 
years was appropriated for the Library by the Legisla- 
ture, and by the act of March 15th, 1876, the sum of 
$2,500 was appropriated for finishing and refurnishing 
the Library room. In 1890, the Library was removed to 
the third story of the new part of the Capitol. 



THE STATE ARSENAL. 



The building now used as the State Arsenal was for- 
merly the old State Prison. It is situate on Second 
street, in the Sixth "Ward of the city of Trenton, and 
has on its front the following inscription : 

Labor, Silence, Penitence. 

The Penitentiary House, 

Erected by Legislative Authority. 

Richard Howell, Governor. 

In the XXII. YEAR of American Independence, 

mdccxcvii. 

That those who are Feared for their Crimes, 

May learn to fear the laws and be Useful. 

Hic Labor, Hoc Opus. 

In the messages of Governors P. D. Yroom and S. L. 
Southard, recommending the erection of the new prison, it 




% 

V' Scale of Miles. 



li., .Vi.Y. * Oj., Enji-'f, Chicago 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM. 121 

was proposed that the old one be converted into an Arsenal 
for the safe keeping of the arms and military property of the 
fe ae, which, previous to that time, had been kept in the old 
fetate Bank, corner of Warren and Bank streets, with accoutre- 
men s and camp and garrison equipage at the State House. 
Aftei the removal of the State convicts from the old prison 
permission was given to the county of Mercer to occupy it as 
a jail until_ their jail, then in course of completion, was finished, 
and wiien it was again vacated it was converted into an arsenah 
Among the stores, &c., at the Arsenal are one bronze gun, 
French, of the date of 1758; two bronze guns, English, four' 
poundei^, and two iron six-pounders. There is also one gun 
captured at the battle of Trenton, December 26th, 1776 and 
two guns captured at Yorktown, October 19th, 1781. There 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM, 

NEAR TRENTON. 



This institution is located in Ewing township, in Mercer 
fri>^i' -"^"^ """"A ^^^^ "'^^^^ northwest of the city of Trenton, on 
the Belvidere Delaware Kailroad, and near the Delaware riler 
A very fine view is had from the Asylum. The building is 
built of reddish sand-stone (from the Ewing quarries on the 
premises), laid in rubble and broken range work, and pointed, 
with hammer-dressed stone for base. The roof is covered with 
slate, except the dome, which is covered with tin. 

In 1844 after many futile attempts to cause' action to be 
taken for the building of a State Asylum for the Insane, com- 
missioners were appointed to select a site, and an appropri- 
ation of 63o,000 was made to pay for the land and commence 
the erection of a building. The commissioners selected the 
present site. During the year 1845, commissioners were ap- 
pointed to contract for and superintend the erection of the 
Asylum, which was done by William Phillips and Joseph 
VVhittaker, of Trenton— the builders of the State House It 
was opened for the reception of patients May 15th, 1848 
JNumerous additions were made to the building from time to 
time and under the direction of the present Superintendent, 
UY.d. VV. Ward, a fine green-house has been added, and he 
has introduced many new plans and devices for the comfort 
and amusement of the patients. Handsome pictures have 
\)een hung up in the wards and dormitories of the patients; 



122 NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

flowers and hot-liouse plants are a source of much pleasure to 
the unfortunates, who regard them with rare appreciation ; 
and during the fell and winter months there liave been regu- 
lar weekly entertainments, consisting of tableaux, conceits, 
dancing, the performance of minor theatricals, and stereop- 
ticon exhibitions. The effect of these, besides breaking up 
the monotony of long evenings, seems to call the minds of the 
patients from their troubles, and not unfrequently tends towards 
the restoration of their mental health. 

An addition was made to the building in 1889. 



STATE LUNATIC ASYLUM. 

MOBRIS PLAINS. 



Owing to the crowded condition of the Trenton Asylum, 
connnissioners were appointed to select a site and build an ad- 
ditional asylum in the northerly portion of the State. They 
purchased 430 acres, at a cost of $82,672.11, in Hanover town- 
ship, Morris county, and plans were drawn by Samuel Sloan, 
architect, of Philadelphia. The building was erected and 
occupied by August 17th, 1876. It is 1,243 feet in length, and 
is 542 feet deep from the front of the main center to the rear 
of the extreme wing, and will accommodate 800 patients. The 
total cost was $2,250,000. 



STATE NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 



These schools are located in the city of Trenton, on a piece 
of ground belonging to the State, at the junction of Clinton 
avenue and Perry street. There are two buildings — one called 
the Normal and the other the Model Hall. 

As early as the year 1839, the Trustees of the School Fund, 
in their annual report, advised the erection of schools for the 
education of teachers. The appeal was unheeded. Normal 
schools, so far as this country was concerned, might then have 
been considered an untried experiment. There was but one 
in the United States, and that had just gone into operation in 
Massachusetts. 

For upwards of fifteen yeai-s, New Jersey continued to forego 
the means for the education of teachers ; but the Legislature 
of 1855, with an enlightened liberality, passed a law for the 
establishment of a State Normal School. The object was de- 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 123 

clared to be, the training and education of teachers in such 
branches of ^ knowledge, and such methods of instruction, as 
should qualify them to become teachers of our common scliools. 

The location of the school and its general management were 
committed to a board of ten trustees, two from each Congres- 
sional District in the State, to be appointed by the Governor, 
by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. 

The lot was purchased of William P. Sherman, Esq., at a 
cost of $3,000. The architect was Chauncey Graham. The 
corner-stone was laid by Governor Price, October 9th, 1855. 
The school was opened in a temporary building, October 1st, 
1855, under the direction of the chosen Principal, Prof. 
William F. Phelps, there being fifteen candidates for entrance 
examination— five gentlemen and ten ladies. The school con- 
tinued under the management of Prof. Phelps till March 15th, 
1865, when Prof. John S. Hart, Principal of the Model 
School, took charge of the two schools. The latter resigning 
February 7th, 1871, Lewis M. Johnson, of Newark, was 
elected Principal, and was succeeded by Washington Has- 
brouck, July 1st, 1876. James M. Green succeeded Mr. Has- 
brouck in 1889. The property of these schools is valued at 
$250,000. In 1890 and '91, an addition was made to the 
buildings at a cost of $48,000. 

An auxiliary to the Normal School is the Farnum Pre- 
paratory School, at Beverly, Burlington county, founded 
by Paul Farnum, in 1856, who gave $70,000 in money and 
property for its support. 



STATE REFORM SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



This institution is situate at Jamesburg, Middlesex county, 
and was authorized by an act of the Legislature, passed April 
6th, 1865. Juvenile criminals between the ages of eight and 
sixteen years are here cared for, and every influence tending 
to their reformation is brought to bear upon them. Numerous 
additions have been made to the original building, to which is 
attached a farm of 490 acres. The first pupils were received 
July 6th, 1867. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 



This institution is located on the line of the Trenton Branch 
of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, in Ewing town- 
ship, near the Trenton Lunatic Asylum, and is located on a 



124 THE STATE PRISON. 

farm of about 79 acres of land. A substantial building was 
erected, at a cost of $23,334, and other improvements made, 
which bring the value of the place, with furniture, &c., up to 
$^37,740. Previous to the erection of the new building, the 
scliool was at " Pine Grove," in the Sixth Ward of the city 
of Trenton. Tins place liad been leased so as to afford room 
for persons sentenced under the act of April 4th, 1871. 



THE STATE PRISON. 



The New Jersey State Prison, situated on the block enclosed 
by Federal, Tliird, Cass and Second streets, in the city of 
Trenton, is one of the finest institutions of its kind in tlie 
country. Its erection was authorized by an act of the Legis- 
lature passed Februarv 13th, 1832, and it was completed in 
the year 1836, having'l50 cells, at a cost of $179,657.11. It 
was built of red sand-stone, from the Ewing quarries, and the 
style of its architecture is Egyptian, having four Egyptian 
cohnnns in front of the main entrance, on Third street. It 
consists of a main building, used as a residence for the Keeper 
and as reception rooms and offices. From time to time the 
prison has been enlarged, and although there is not sufficient 
room to afford separate confinement for each prisoner, as re- 
quired by law, the provisions of the act are carried out as far 
as possible. The rules and regulations now in force have 
brought the internal affairs of the institution, as to cleanliness, 
discipline, victualing, &c., to a much higher standard than 
was ever before reached, and a visit thereto will convince the 
visitor that the management is as perfect as can be. 

On March 4th, 1847, $5,000 was appropriated to build an 
additional wing to the original building. On March 25th, 
1852, $15,000 was granted for the erection of a new wing for 
hospital purposes. On March 22d, 1860, the sum of $17,000 
was voted for the purpose of building an additional wing for 
cells, and on February 16th, 1861, a further sum of $2,243.01 
was appropriated to complete the same. On April 16th, 1868, 
$6,000 was appropriated for the building of an additional wing 
to provide room for female convicts. An act passed April 2d, 
1869, provided for the appointment of commissioners to extend 
the grounds of the prison to the wall of the State Arsenal, to 
build an additional wing and work shops, and made an appro- 
priation of $50,000 for that purpose, and in the same month 
$9,734 was appropriated for the purpose of completing the 
wing of the female department. On April 4th, 1871, the sum 



SOLDIERS' HOME AT NEWARK. 125 

of $75,000 was appropriated for the purpose of completing the 
new or east wing, and on April 4th, 1872, a further sum of 
$28,700 was appropriated for the completion of the same. 
March 3d, 1874, $12,000 was voted for the construction of gas 
works for the supply of illuminating gas for the prison. On 
March 8th, 1877, the sum of §100,000 was appropriated for 
the enlargement of the prison and the purchase of a burial 
ground for deceased convicts. The north wing was remodeled 
out of this last appropriation, and a burial ground purchased. 
Previous to the year 1798 there was no State Prison, and 
prisoners were confined in the county jails. On March 1st, 
1797, Jonathan Doane was appointed by an act of the Legis- 
lature as an agent to purchase a lot of land from Peter Hunt, 
situate at Lamberton, containing six and a half acres, and to 
erect suitable buildings thereon. This was done at an expense 
of £9,852 Os. 3d., and what is now the State Arsenal, at Second 
and Cass streets, is the result. Solitary confinement was not 
practiced previous to 1836, in which year the old orison was 
vacated and the present one occupied. 



SOLDIERS' HOME. 



This institution is located in Kearny township, Hudson 
county, to which place it was removed from Newark in 1888. 
It was organized under a joint resolution of the Legislature 
approved April 12th, 1862. The Home in Newark was opened 
July 4th, 1866. The Legislatures of 1886 and 1887 appro- 
priated §175,000 for the erection of a new Home, under the 
direction of Commissioners appointed by the Legislature. 
The present site, consisting of 17 j acres, was selected, and six 
new and commodious buildings were erected thereon. The 
Home has a frontage of 600 feet on the Passaic river, and 
contains over three hundred inmates. 



NEW JERSEY SCHOOL FOR DEAF-MUTES. 



The New .Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes occupies the build- 
ing and grounds formerly belonging to the Soldiers' Children's 
Home, at the corner of Hamilton and Chestnut avenues, 
Chambersburg, about a mile and a quarter from the State 
Capitol. By an act of the Legislature, approved March 31st, 
1882, this property was set apart for its present use, and a 
Board of Trustees, consisting of the Governor, the State 
Comptroller, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
and eight other gentlemen, was appointed. 



126 HOME FOR FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 

Under the provisions of this act and of another act, ap- 
proved March 5th, 1883, the Board have made such re- 
pairs, alterations and additions to the buildings as were 
necessary for adapting them to the purposes of the new 
institution, have furnished them suitably and placed the 
grounds in thorough order. 

The school opened in the fall of 1883, and shortly after- 
wards contained about 90 pupils, though it is expected that 
the attendance will ultimately reach 150, which is about 
the number of such pupils whom the State has hitherto 
been supporting in schools outside her own limits, and 
which is the limit of the capacity of the present accom- 
modations. Pupils are received between the ages of five 
and twenty-one, and the length of the term allowed is 
five years. 

The object of the institution is to give to the afflicted 
children, who are here received, a knowledge of the En- 
glish language in its written, and, in the case of some pu- 
pils, in its spoken form — a knowledge which, but for such 
institutions, they would never acquire, and to instruct 
them in the rudiments of an English education. They 
are also trained to acquire such a degree of general intel- 
ligence and of manual dexterity that they may become 
self-supporting men and women. Their training also en- 
ables moral forces to be brought to bear upon them with 
the effect of raising them from a condition of moral irre- 
sponsibility to the level of respectable citizens. 



THE STATE INSTITUTION FOR FEEBLE- 
MINDED T^T'OMEN, VINELAND 



This institution was established under an act of March 
27th, 1888, with Rev. S. O. Garrison as superintendent. 
On November 15th, of the same year, he was succeeded 
by Mary J. Dunlap, M.D. It is one of the most admir- 
ably situated public buildings in the State. Lying nearly 
opposite the Home for Feeble-Minded Children, and 
facing Landis avenue, Vineland's main street of several 
miles in length, it enjoys facilities of the city yet sur- 
rounded by acres of fruit, vineyards and orchards. The 
main building is well arranged, and a large annex was 
erected in the winter of 1891-'92. It is a home for females 



SCHOOL POR FEEBLE-MtNDPD CHILDREN. 127 

of twelve years of age and upwards. It is a fact that this 
branch of State work is one of New Jersey's greatest 
monuments. Though late in being recognized, it will 
grow more and more in interest as its existence is better 
known and a knowledge and inspection of its work made 
and rightly understood. 



NEW JERSEY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 

FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN, 

VINELAND. 



This institution is an outgrowth of a private one which 
Rev. S. Olin Garrison established in Millville, Cumber- 
land county, on September 1st, 1887. It was opened at 
Vineland on March Ist, 1888 with an enrollment of ten 
inmates. Adjacent properties were soon acquired and 
a handsome building, costing about $18,000, was erected 
in 1890-'91. There are eight cottages located on a farm 
of one hundred acres. The wards of New Jersey are 
now sent there. 

The plan and scope of training and education by the 
School, requires eight teachers in English, Kindergarten 
and Manual Trades departments, thereby indicating the 
special and comprehensive fields of instruction. There 
is also a custodial department for the idiotic, and a hos- 
pital department for epileptics. 

The property is worth between $50,000 and $60,000, 
with only a debt of $8,000. Besides very good property 
acquisitions at low cost, at least $30,000 have been donated 
to the school since its organization, to aid in the current 
expenses, in improvements and new buildings. 

One hundred and forty children over the age of five years, 
residents chiefly of New Jersey, of which a few are private 
patients, enjoyed the facilities of the school in 1891. 



12S 



NEW ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 



NEW ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 



The new Electoral College has a total of 444 votes, divided among the 
forty-four States as follows : 



Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 9 

Colorado 4 

Connecticnt 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Idaho 3 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Maine fi 

Marj'land 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota 9 

Misissippi 9 

Missouri 17 



Total., 



Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey... 10 

New York 36 

North Carolina 11 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 4 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Vermont 4 

Virginia 12 

Washington 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 

Wyoming 3 

444 



At the election for President and Vice-President of the United States, 
held in November, 1888, the following was the result, by States, for the 
tickets of the two great parties — Republican and Democratic : 

Votes for Harrison and Morton (Rep.) — CaHfomia,8 ; Colorado, 3; 
Illinois, 22 ; Indiana, 15 ; Iowa, 13 ; Kansas, 9 ; Maine, 6 ; Massachusetts, 
14 ; Michigan, 13 ; Minnesota, 7 ; Nebraska, 5 ; Nevada, 3 ; New Hamp- 
shire, 4 ; New York, 36 ; Ohio, 23 ; Oregon, 3 ; Pennsylvania, 30 ; Rhode 
Island, 4 ; Vermont, 4 ; Wisconsin, 11. Total, 233. 

Votes for Cleveland and Thurman (Dem.)— Alabama, 10; Arkan- 
sas, 7 ; Connecticut, 6 ; Delaware, 3 ; Florida, 4 ; Georgia, 12 ; Kentucky, 
13 ; Louisiana, 8 ; Maryland, 8 ; Mississippi, 9 ; Missouri, 16 ; New Jersey, 
9; North Carohna, 11 ; South Carolina, 9; Tennessee, 12; Texas, 13; 
Virginia, 12 ; West Virginia, 6. Total, 168. 

Since then the following new States have been admitted; Montana, 
Washington, South Dakota, North Dakota, Wyoming and Idaho. 



NEW JERSEY ELECTORAL VOTE. 129 

ELECTORAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY, 
For President and Vice-President, from March 4tli, 1789. 



1789 — George Washington, of Virginia 6 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 1 

John Jay, of New York 6 

1793 — George Washington, of Virginia 7 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

1797 — John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1801 — John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

C. C. Pinckney, of South CaroUna 7 

1805 — Thomas J<='fferson, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1809 — James Madison, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1813— DeWitt Chnton, of New York 8 

Jarard Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania 8 

1817 — James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1821 — James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1825 — Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina 8 

1829— John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts 8 

Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania 8 

1833 — Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

Martin Van Buren, of New York 8 

1837— William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

Francis Granger, of New York 8 

1841— William H. Harrison, of Ohio... 8 

John Tyler, of Virginia , 8 

1845 — Henry Clay, of Kentucky 7 

Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey 7 

1849 — Zachary Taylor, of Louisiana 7 

Millard Fillmore, of New York 7 

1853 — Franklin Pierce, of New Hamsphire 7 

William R. King, of Alabama 7 

1857 — ^James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania 7 

John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky 7 

1861 — Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois 4 

Hannibal Haml'n, of Maine 4 

Stephen A. Douglass, of Illinois 3 

Herchel V. Johnson, of Georgia... 3 

1865— George B. McClellan, of New Jersey 7 

George H. Pendleton, of Ohio 7 

1869— Horatio Sevmour, of New York 7 

Francis P. Blair, of Missouri 7 

1873— Ulysses S. Grant, of Illinois 7 

Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts 7 

1877— Samuel J. T=lden, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1881 — Winfield Scott Hancock, of Pennsylvania 9 

William H. English, of Indiana 9 

1885— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1889 — Grover Cleveland, of New York.. 9 

Allan G. Thurman, of Ohio 9 

1893— Grover Cleveland, of New York 10 

Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois 10 



130 



PRESIDENTS. 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Year of 
Qualificat'n. 


Name. 


Where From. 


Term of Office. 


1789 


George Washington 


Virginia 

Massachusetts .. 
Virginia ... .. 


8 years. 
4 years. 
8 years. 
8 years. 
8 years. 
4 years. 
8 years. 
4 years. 
1 month 


1797 


1801 


Thomas Jefferson 


1809 






1817 






1824 


John Qumcy Adams 


Massachusetts .. 

Tennessee 

New York 

Ohio 


1820 


1837 


Martin Van Buren 

Wm. Henry Harrison*.. 

John Tyler 

James Knox Polk 


1841 


1841 


Virginia 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

New York 

NewHampshire 
Pennsylvania ... 


3 yrs., 11 mos. 

4 years. 

1 yr.,4 mos., 5 d. 

2yrs.,10mo.,26d. 

4 years. 

4 years. 

4yrs.,l mo., 10 d. 

3yrs.,10mo.,20d. 

8 years. 

4 years. 

6 mrs., 15 days. 

3 yrs., 5 mo., 15 d. 

4 years. 
4 years. 


1845 


1849 


Zachary Taylorf 


1850 




18.13 


Franklin Pierce 


1857 ... 


James Buchanan 


1861 


Abraham Lincoln^ 

Andrew Johnson 


18fi5 


Tennessee 

Illinois 


1869 . 


Ulysses S Grant 


1877 


Rutherford B. Hayes.... 

James A. Garfield** 

Chester A. Arthur 

Grover Cleveland 

Benjamin Harrison 


Ohio 


1881 

1881 

1885 

1889 


Ohio 

New York 

New York 

Indiana 



1893 ' Grover Cleveland. 



New York. 



* I>ied in office April 4, 1841, when Vice-President Tyler succeeded him. 
f Died in office July 9, 1850, when Vice-President Fillmore succeeded him. 
X Assassinated April 14, 1865, when Vice-President Johnson succeeded him. 
** Assassinated July 2, 1881 ; died September 19, 1881, when Vice-Presi- 
dent Arthur succeeded him. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



131 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Year of Qualification. 


Name. 


Where From. 


1789 


John Adams 




1797 




Virginia. 
New York 


1801 


Aaron Burr 


1804 


G 'orge Clinton . 


New York 


1813 






1817 


Daniel D. Tompkins 


New York 


1824 




1833 




New York 


1837 


Richard M. Johnson 


Kentucky. 
Virginia. 
New Jersey. 
Pennsylvania. 
New York 


1841 




1842 . . 


Samuel L. Southard^ 


1845 

1849 


George M. Dallas 

Millard Fillmore 


1851 


William R. King? 

David R. Atchinson? 




1853 


Missouri 


1855 


Jesse D. Brightg 




1857 


John C Breckenridge..... 


Kentucky. 
Maine 


1861 


Hannibal Hamlin 


1865 






1865 


Lafayette C Foster? . ............. 


Connecticut. 


1869 






1873 


Henry Wilson! 




1875 


ThomasW Ferry? 


Michigan. 
New York. 


1877 


William A. Wheeler 


1881 


Chester A. Arthur , 


New York. 


1883 


George F Edmunds 


Vermont 


1S85 






1886 




Ohio. 


1889 


Levi P. jNIorton 


New York 


1893 


Adlai E Stevenson .. 


Illinois 









§ Ex-ojfficio as President j>ro tern, of Senate. 
IJ Died in office November 22, 1875. 
ff Died in office November 25, 1885. 



132 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



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2 ~: S ?i 1- -2 oc X o>,Tq 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



135 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTR 
1880 and 1884. 





1884. 


1880. 


STATES. 

(38) 


Blaine, 
Rep. 


Cleve- 
land, 
Dem. 


Butler, 
Gr'b'k. 


St. John 
Pro. 


Garfield, 
Rep. 


Han- 
cock, 
Dem. 


Alabama 


59,444 

50,895 

100,816 

36,277 

65,898 

12,788 

28,039 

47,964 

337,449 

238.480 

197,089 

153,158 

118,674 

46,347 

72,209 

85,699 

146,724 

192,669 

111,923 

42,774 

*202,261 


92.973 

72,927 

88,307 

27,627 

67,182 

17,054 

31,769 

94,567 

312,320 

244,992 

*177,288 

89,466 

152,757 

62.546 

52.140 

96,932 

122,352 

*191,225 

70,144 

78,547 

235.972 

*54,354 

7,000 

39,166 

127,784 

563,048 

142,905 

868,280 

24,593 

393,510 

12,391 

69,764 

133,258 

223,208 

17,'^31 

14c ,497 

67,317 

146.4''4 


762 

1,844 

1,975 

1,957 

tl,685 

6 


610 


56,221 

42,436 

80,348 

27,450 

67,071 

14,133 

23,654 

54,086 

318,037 

232,164 

183,927 

121,549 

106,306 

§38,637 

74,039 

78,515 

165,205 

185,341 

93,903 

34,854 

153,567 

54,979 

8,732 

44,852 

120,555 

555,444 

115,874 

875,048 

20,619 

444,704 

18,195 

58,071 

107,677 

57,893 

45,567 

84,020 

46,243 

144,000 


91,185 
60 775 




California 

Colorado 


2,640 

759 

t2,492 

55 

74 

184 

11,824 

3,018 

1,472 

4,495 

8,106 


80,426 
24 647 


Connecticut 

Delaware 


64,415 

15 275 


Florida 


27,964 


Georgia 


125 
10,753 
8,176 


102,470 




277,321 




225,522 
105,845 
59 801 






16,110 
1,655 


Kentucky 


149 068 


Louisiana 


65,067 
*65,171 
93 706 




3,953 

531 

24.382 

tt763 

8,587 


2.160 
2,794 
9,923 
18,403 
4,691 




Massachusetts.. 


111,960 
131,597 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 


53.315 
75 750 




2,153 
2,858 


208,609 

28,523 

9,613 


Nebraska 


76 877 




IINevada 


8,381 

43,166 

123,433 

562,001 

125,068 

400,082 

26,8-^2 

474.268 

19,030 

21,733 

124,078 

88,353 

39,514 

139,356 

*63,096 

161,147 




N. Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 
Ohio 


552 
3,494 
16,955 

5,170 

723 

16.942 

422 


1,573 

6,155 

24,999 

448 

11,269 

488 

15,366 

928 


40.794 
122,565 
534,511 
124,208 
840,821 
; 19,948 
407,428 

10,779 
112,312 
123,191 
156 428 


Oregon 


Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina 


UTennessee 

Texas 


957 

3,321 

785 

""tfsib 

4,597 


1,131 
8,511 
1,752 
143 
939 
7.649 


Vermont 


18,316 
al28,586 


West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 


57,391 
114,649 


Total 


4,844.002 


4,914,947 
70.915 


134,599 


151,531 


4,454,416' 4.444.952 


Plurality 


9.464 





1884— Scattering and imperfect, 7,876; Lockwood, 5; total vote, 

10,053,770. 
1880— Greenback, 308,578; Prohibition. 10,305; American, 707; 

scattering, 989 ; total vote, 9,219,947. 

* Fusion, t Including 160 misspelled. J Including 232 misspelled. 
f One county missing in 1884. || One county estimated in 1884 'i Vote 
for the two Republican tickets (Regular, 27,676; "Beattie, 10,340) 
combined, ft Straight Greenback, o Regular (96,9 12) and Readjuster 
(31,674) votes combined. 



136 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



■] 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 1888. 



States. 


Harrison. 


Cleveland. 


Fisk. 


Labor. 




67,197 

58,752 

124,809 

50,766 

74,584 

12.978 

26,660 

40,453 

370,470 

263,361 

211,598 

182,914 

156.134 

30,184 

73,734 

99,986 

183,456 

236,370 

136,359 

30,096 

236,325 

108,425 

7.238 

45,728 

144,:?44 

650,338 

134,709 

415,792 

33,293 

526,091 

21,969 

13,740 

138,815 

83,280 

45,192 

150,438 

78,491 

176,553 


117,31(1 

85,962 

117,729 

37,542 

74,92(j 

16.414 

39,661 

100.472 

348,258 

261,013 

179.877 

102,738 

183,800 

89,941 

50,482 

106,168 

151.990 

218,404 

99.664 

85,476 

261,957 

80.552 

5,326 

43,358 

151.493 

6?5,966 

148.336 

399,969 

26,524 

446,200 

17,530 

65,825 

159,079 

234,883 

16,788 

151,977 

79,330 

155,232 


683 

614 

5.761 

2,100 

4,234 

400 

403 

1,802 

21.386 

9,881 

3,550 

6,779 

6,226 

130 

2.690 

4,766 

8,636 

20,942 

15,000 

218 

4,954 

9,424 

46 

7,585 

7,904 

30.3-27 

6.787 

4,618 

1.677 

20.743 

1,261 


10,643 






1,591 

1,205 

240 


Colorado 

Conn6Cticut . 






Florida 


* 




136 


Illinois 

Indiani 


7,410 
2,694 
9 105 




Kausas 


37 787 




6-22 


Louisiana 




Maine 


1,345 




Massachusetts 




Michi°^au . ... 


4,542 




Mississippi .'... 






15,853 


Nebraska 


Nevada 




New Hampshire 

New Jersey 


42 


New York 


5,050 


North Carolina 


Ohio 


' 3,452 
363 


Oregon 




3,865 
18 


Rhode Island 


South Carolina 






5,669 
4.749 
1,450 
1,678 


43 


Texas 




Vermont 


^ 






West Virginia 





Wisconsin 


14,277 


8,522 




Total 


5,430,607 


5,538.045 


257,248 


114,623 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 18DS, 



STATES. 


1 
> 

u 






1 

5 




O ^ (11 


Alabama 


138.138 

87,834 

118,174 


9,197 

46,974 

118,027 

38,620 

77,032 

18,077 

22 

48,305 

8,599 

399,288 

255,615 

219,795 

157,241 

135,441 

26,134 

62,878 

92,736 

202 927 

222 708 

122,823 

1,406 

226,918 

18,851 

87 227 

2,811 

45,658 

156,101 

609,459 

100,565 

17,519 

405 187 

35,002 

516,011 

20,975 

13,384 

34,888 

99,851 

77,475 

37 992 

113 256 

36 460 

80,293 

170,846 

8,454 


85,181 
11,831 
25 311 
53,584 
809 


241 
113 

8,096 

1,687 

4,026 

564 

570 

988 

288 

25 870 

13,050 

6,402 

4,553 

6,442 


128.941 

40,860 

147 




Arkansas 




California 






38.620 




82,395 

18,581 

30,143 

129,386 

2 

426,281 

262,740 

196.367 


5,363 

504 

30 121 

81,081 


Delaware 




Florida 


4 843 
42,939 
10,520 
22,207 
22,208 
20,595 
163,111 
23,500 
27,903 

2,381 
796 

3,348 
19,796 
29 313 
10.256 
41213 

7,334 
83,134 

7,264 
293 
985 
16,436 
44.7.32 
17 700 
14,852 
26,965 

8,714 
228 

2,410 
26,544 
23,780 
99,688 
42 
12 274 
19 054 

4,166 

9 909 

7,722 




Georgia 


** 


Idaho 


8,597 


Illinois 


26,993 
7,125 


Indiana 




Iowa 


23,428 
157,241 






Kentucky 


175,461 

87,622 

48,044 

113,866 

176,858 

202,296 

100,920 

40,237 

268,398 

17,581 

24,943 

714 

42,081 

171,066 

654,908 

133,098 


40,020 
61,488 






Maine 


3 062 

5,877 

7,539 

20 857 

14,182 

910 

4,331 

549 

4,902 

89 

1,297 

8,134 

38,191 

2,636 

899 

26,012 

2 281 

25123 

1,654 


14,834 




21,130 




26 069 


Michigan ... . 




20,412 
21,903 






Mississippi 


38,831 
41,480 






Montana 


1,270 
62,284 
2,097 
3,577 


Nebraska ., . 




Nevada 




N. Hampshire 






14,965 
45,449 
32,533 






N. Carolina.... 




N. Dakota 


17,519 
1,072 
20,759 
63,747 
2,639 


Ohio 


404,115 
14 243 

452,264 
24,336 
54,698 
9,081 

136,594 

239 148 
16,325 

163,977 
29,844 
84,467 

177,335 








Pennsylvania.. 
Rhode Island. 




S. Carolina 


41,314 


S Dakota 




25,807 


Tennessee 

Texas 


4,776 
2,165 
1,424 
2,736 
2,553 
2,145 
13,132 
530 


36,743 
161,673 




21,667 




60,721 


Washington ... 
West Virginia, 


6,616 


4,174 
6,489 




Wyoming 


8,454 




* 




Totals 


5 554,561 


5,185,028 


1 055,871 


270,876 


918,145 


548,612 



Cleveland's plurality,'369,533. 

Wing, Socialist-Labor, received in Connecticut, 333 votes ; in Masschu- 
setts, 676 ; in New Jersey, 1,337; i"^ New York, 17,958; in Pennsylvania, 
898. Total, 21,202. 

* In Louisiana the Republican and People's parties voted each for four of 
the other's eight candidates for electors. Thus some of the Louisiana 
Toters are counted twice in the above table, and while all the Presidential 
candidates received a total of 12,098,668 votes in the whole country, there 
were only 12,070,766 actual voters. 

(137) 



138 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1892. 



For Cleveland, Dem. 



Alabama ... . 


11 




8 


California 


8 


Connecticut 


6 




3 


Florida 


4 




13 




24 


Indiana 


15 




13 


Louisiana 


8 




8 


Michigan 


5 


Mississippi 


9 




17 


New Jersey ,. . 


10 


New York 


36 


North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 


11 

1 

1 


South Carolina 


9 




12 


Texas 


15 


Virginia 


12 


West Virginia 

Wisconsin 


6 

12 



For Harrison, Rhp. 

California 1 

Iowa 13 

Maine 6 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 9 

Minnesota 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

New Hampshire '.... 4 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio 22 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania.. 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Dakota 4 

Vermont 4 

Washington 4 

Wyoming 3 

115 
For Weaver, Pop. 

Colorado .. , 4 

Idaho 3 

Kansas 10 

Nevada 3 

North Dakota „ 1 

Oregon 1 



22 



Cleveland over Harrison, 132. 

Cleveland over Harrison and Weaver, 110. 



CITY AND TO WN DEBTS. 139 



DEBTS OF CITIES AND TOWNS. 



The annexed table, compiled from the census of 1890, shows the tota, 
indebtedness, available resources and annual interest charge of various cities 
and towns in New Jersey : 



Total Debt. 



Available Annual 
Resources. Interest. 



Atlantic City $34 450 $1,987 

Bayonne 1,624,031 $88,204 76,615 

Bordentown 18,000 900 

Bridgeton 85.500 13.713 4 673 

Burlington 81,800 2,000 4,585 

Camden 1,331,850 176,101 88,806 

EHzabeth 3,673,196 319,807 257,124 

Gloucester City 82,000 3,780 

Hackensack 33,000 1,980 

Hackettstown 18,000 900 

Hoboken 1,225,815 33,241 67,742 

Jersey City 18,195,545 1,776,524 878,037 

Keyporf, 6,500 390 

Lambertville 5,000 1.536 249 

Millville 29,395 1,553 

Montcla-.r 315,000 16,000 

Morristown 3,000 1,200 210 

Newark 11,571,000 3,094,920 241,452 

Newton 14,500 805 

Orange 741,500 215 021 39,932 

Passaic 270 496 349 052 10 380 

Paterson 1,558,538 2.368,971 87,843 

Perth Amboy 117,200 19.093 5,061 

Phillipsburg 103,500 9,970 4 570 

Rahway 1,145,250 45 810 

Salem 76.500 3 980 

Trenton 1,447,984 706,904 66,743 



UNITED STATES CENSUS 1890. 



507 
2,337 

1,464 

1,776 
717 
741 



The following table gives in detail the population of the State for 1890 
and 1880, by cities, towns and townships: 

Atlantic County. 1890. 1880. 

Atlantic City 13,(»55 5,477 

Buena Vista township 1,299 885 

Egg Harbor city 1,439 1,232 

Egg Harl)or township, including Linwood borough and 

Absecom town 4,255 4,075 

Linwood borough 536 

Absecom town 501 

Galloway township 2,'208 

Hamilton township 1,512 

Hammonton township, coextensive with Hammonton 

town 3,833 

Mullica township 697 

Weymouth township 538 

— 28,836 18,704 

Bergen County. 

Boiling Springs township 1,438 

Englewood township 4,785 4,076 

Franklin township 2,307 2,206 

Harrington township 2,769 2,570 

Hohokus township 2,373 2,920 

Lodi township 5,131 4,071 

Midland township 1,829 1,591 

New Barbadoes township, coextensive with Hackensack 

town 6,004 4,248 

Orville township 1,690 

Palisade township 2,590 2,302 

Ridgefield township 5,477 3,952 

Ridgewood township 1,841 1,478 

Rutherford borough ; 2,293 2,299 

Saddle River township 2,197 1,355 

Union township 1,560 865 

Washington township 2,942 2,853 

47,226 36,786 

* Burlington County. 

Bass River township 853 1,006 

Beverly city..... 1,957 1,759 

Beverly township 1,451 1,369 

Bordentown township, including Bordentown city 5,090 5,334 

Bordentown city 4.232 4,258 

Burlington township, including Burlington city 8,222 7,237 

Burlington city 7,264 6,090 

Chester township 3,768 2,855 

Chesterfield township 1,253 l,52=i 

Cinnaminson township 3,966 2,184 

Delran township 2,267 1,760 

(140) 



U. S. CENSUS. 141 

1890. 1880. 

Easthampton township 654 560 

Evesham township. 1,501 1,602 

Florence township 1,922 1,528 

Little Egg Harbor township 1,771 1,881 

Lumberton township 1,799 1,689 

Mansfield township 1,671 1,648 

Medford township ; 1,864 1,980 

Mount Laurel township 1,699 1,739 

New Hanover township 1,962 2,373 

Northampton township 5,376 4,630 

Pemberton township, including Pemberton borough 2,689 2,885 

Pemberton borough 834 799 

Randolph township 302 428 

Shamona township 958 1,097 

Southampton township 1,849 2,269 

Springfield township 1,670 1,886 

Washington township 310 389 

Westhampton township 688 715 

Willingboro' township 739 743 

Woodland township 327 325 

58,528 55,402 
♦Little Egg Harbor township, in this county, was annexed to Ocean 
county by the Legislature of 1891, thus reducing the population of Burling- 
ton county to 56,757. 

Camden County. 

Camden city 58,313 41,059 

First ward , 7,650 

Second ward 9,536 

Third ward 4,533 

Fourth ward 5,299 

Fifth ward 7,325 

Sixth ward 6,956 

Seventh ward 6,149 

Eighth ward 5,996 

Ninth ward 4,869 

Centre township 1,834 1,538 

Delaware township 1,457 1,481 

Gloucester city 6,564 6,347 

First ward 2,845 

Second ward 3,719 

Gloucester township 3,091 2,527 

Haddon township, including Haddonfield and Collings- 

wood boroughs 3,929 2,551 

Collingswood borough 539 

Haddonfield borough 2,502 1,480 

Merchantville borough 1,225 439 

Stockton township 6.445 3,093 

Waterford township 2,421 2,149 

Winslow township 2,408 2,158 



87,687 62,942 

Cape May County. 

Anglesea borough 161 

Cape May city 2,130 1,699 

Cape May Point borough 167 

Dennis township 1,707 1,812 



142 U. S. CENSUS. 

1890. 1880. 

Holly Beach City borough 217 

Ixjwer township .*.'..'.'...* 1 150 i 077 

Middle township !!!!!!!!.!.*.*.'.',."....!..'.*.!! 2'riC8 2*575 

Ocean City borough " '452 ' 

Sea Isle City borough .'.'.".'..".!!.!! 76C 

Upper township ......................." 1 181 \ ily 

West Cape ISIay borough !*.!.!.!!!!!! '757 '' 



ll;^C8 9,765 



* Cumberland County. 

Eridgeton city 1] 424 

First ward .....'.'..'," "3,158 

Second ward 3 023 

Third ward 2 865 

Fourth ward .*..' 2 378 



8,722 



Commercial townshi 



P 2,344 2, 



Deerfield township 2,614 1.643 

Downe township 1 jy3 j gg^ 

Fairfield township 1^88 3 215 

Greenwich township 1^173 j 045 

rlopewell township ] ^43 1 764 

I^ndis township .'..■."■.■■■.■..■■■.■.■.■.■.■.■ 3,'8.55 3,'486 

Lawrence township 2 729 

Maurice River township .' " 2*279 "2*374 

Millville city ■.■.■.■.■.'.'.".'.".*. lo'fii)2 7!660 

first ward „ 3^352 

Second ward 1 7O5 

Third ward '.'.'.'.'. s'osy 

Fourth ward 1 888 

Stow Creek township "".".".".'. ,' 972 1,107 

Vineland borough 3 822 2 519 

45,438 37,687 

*A portion of Maurice River township, in this county, was set off into 
Dennis township, in Cape May, in 1891. 



3,004 



Essex County. 

Belleville township 3 487 

Bloomfield township '.....■.■.'""!.'!.'.".'.".■.■.'.".' 7>08 5:748 

Caldwell township 3 638 3 ^57 

Llinton township 3 g84 2 74*? 

East Orange township .'."".'.V.'.V.V.'.'".'.".'.".'.'".' 13^282 8!349 

Pranklm township 2,007 1617 

Livingston township 1^197 1*4^^ 

Milburn township 2 437 1 743 

Montclair township ."!!".'..'.".'.'!!!!!."*."."!!'.!!;" 8!656 5*147 

Newark city. Igi 330 ise.'sos 

I- irst ward 7^595 

Second ward 7 151 

Third ward 6404 

Fourth Ward '."!.'.'!..'.'.'.'.'". 5,'946 

Fifth ward ...."' 5*403 

Sixth ward .....".'.'.*!."."!!." 25^830 

Seventh Ward 9 288 

Eighth ward ;; .7.;.'.'.'."".!".!!.'Z!!;.' 19^575 

Ninth ward 7 934 

Tenth ward„ !..!!.!".!!! 13^897 



V. S. CENSUS. 143 

Newark city— 1890. 1880. 

Eleventh ward.,... 11,784 

Twelfth ward 19,616 

Thirteenth ward 27,600 

Fourteenth ward 5,700 

Fifteenth ward 8,957 

Orange city 18,844 13,207 

First ward 4,931 

Second ward 5,481 

Third ward 8,432 

South Orange township, including South Orange bor- 
ough 4,970 3,911 

South Orange borough 3,io6 2,178 

West Orange township 4,358 3,385 



256.098 



Hudson County. 



Gloucester County. 

Clayton township, including Clayton borough 2,299 1,981 

Clayton borough 1,807 ^,433 

Deptford township 2,064 1,520 

East Greenwich township 1,259 

Franklin township 2,021 2,480 

Glassboro' township 2,642 2,088 

Greenwich township 1,900 2,598 

Harrison township , 1,545 2,841 

Logan township 1,523 1,765 

Mantua township , 1,791 1,718 

Monroe township 1,945 1,858 

South Harrison township 971 

Washington township 1,155 1,366 

West Deptford township 1,588 1,399 

Woodbury city , 3,911 2,298 

First ward 1,014 

Second ward 1,654 

Third ward 1,243 

Woolwich township, coextensive with Swedesboro' 

town 2,035 1,974 



28,649 25,886 



Bayonne city 19,033 9,372 

First ward 2,085 

Second ward 3,868 

Third ward .V73 

Fourth ward 4,402 

Fifth ward, 5,505 

Guttenburg town 1,947 1,206 

Harrison city 8,338 6,898 

First ward 2,143 

Second ward 1,203 

Third ward 1,947 

Fourth ward 3,045 

Hoboken city 43,648 30,999 

First ward 10,063 

Second ward 5,765 

Third ward 14,859 

Fourth ward 12,96X 



144 U. S. CENSUS. 

1890. 1880. 

Jersey City 103,003 120,722 

First Aldermanic district 17,837 

Second Aldermanic district 30^216 

Third Aldcrmanic district 24,312 

P'ourth Aldcrmanic district 30,776 

Fifth Aldcrmanic district 20,294 

Sixth Aldcrmanic district 33^568 

Kearney township .*,..., 7,064 777 

North Bergen township 5'715 4 268 

Union town 10^643 5'840 

Union township 2,127 1,310 

Weehawken township 1 943 \ iq2 

West Hoboken township 11^665 5|44l 



Hunterdon County. 

Alexandria township 

Bethlehem township 

Clinton township, including Clinton town 

Clinton town 

Delaware township 

East Amwcll township 

Franklin township 

Frenchtown borough 

High Bridge township 

Holland township 

Kingwood township 

Lambertville city 

First ward 1,274 

Second ward 1,163 

Third ward 1,705 

Lebanon township 

Raritan township 

Readington township 

Tewksbury township 

Union township 

West Amwell township 



75,126 


187,944 


1,250 


1,324 


2,308 


2,830 


2,888 


2,975 


1.975 


842 


3,037 


3,092 


1,375 


1,696 


1,287 


1,338 


1,023 


1,039 


1,935 


2,209 


1,704 


1,886 


1,424 


1,694 


4,142 


4,183 


2,337 


2,699 


3,798 


4,188 


2,813 


3,103 


2,034 


2,108 


1,134 


1,167 


866 


1,039 



35,355 38,570 

Mercer County. 

Chambersburg borough 5,437 

East Windsor township, including Hightstown borough.. 2,756 2*271 

Hightstown borough 1,875 i!355 

Ewing township 3,129 2,412 

Hamilton township 4,163 3^370 

Hopewell township 4,338 4^462 

Lawrence township 1,448 3,174 

Princeton township, including Princeton borough _ 4,231 4,348 

Princeton borough 3,422 3^209 

Trenton city 57,458 29,910 

First ward 5,076 

Second Ward 3,063 

Third ward 7,331 

Fourth ward 5,032 

Fifth ward 5,585 

Sixth ward 2,791 

Seventh ward 9,383 

Eighth ward 3,802 

Ninth ward 6,128 

Tenth ward 3,949 

Eleventh ward „ 5,318 



V. S. CENSUS. 145 

1890. 1880. 

Washington township 1,126 1,281 

West Windsor township 1,329 l.SQU 

79,978 58,0G1 

Middlesex County. 

Cranbury township 1,422 1,599 

East Brunswick township 4,438 3,272 

Madison township 1,520 1,662 

Monroe township 3,040 3,017 

New Brunswick city 18,003 17,106 

First ward 2,573 

Second ward .S,556 

Third ward 1,731 

Fourth ward 912 

Fifth ward 5.122 

Sixth ward 4,709 

North Brunswick township 1,238 1,251 

Perth Amboy township, coextensive with Perth Amboy 

city 9,512 4,808 

Perth Amboy city by wards: 

First ward 2,533 

Second ward 3,321 

Third ward 3,658 

Piscataway township, inchiding Dunellen borough 3,286 3,242 

Dunellen borough i,o6o 817 

Raritan township 3,788 3,789 

Sayreville township 3,509 1,930 

South Amboy township, coextensive with South Amboy 

borough 4,330 3,643 

South Brunswick township 2,403 2,803 

Woodbridge township 4,665 4,099 

61.754 52,286 

Monmouth County. 

Atlantic township 1,505 1,743 

Eatontown township 2,953 2,642 

Freehold township, including Freehold town 5 097 4 302 

Freehold town 2,932 2,432 

Holmdel Township 1 479 1.575 

Howell township 3,018 3,374 

Minalapan township. 2,002 2.175 

Marlboro' township 1,913 2,193 

Matawan township 3,183 2,699 

Middletown township, including Atlantic Highlands town 6 595 5,059 

Atlantic Highlands town 945 

Millstone township 1,782 2,080 

Neptune township, including Ocean Grove town and 

Asbury Park borough 8,333 4,187 

Ocean Grove town 2,754 620 

Ocean township, including Long Brapch town 10,209 6,027 

Long Branch town 7,231 3,833 

Raritan township, including Keyport town 4,779 3,891 

Keyport town 3,411 

Shrewsbury township, including Red Bank town 8 367 6,526 

Red Bank town 4, 145 2,684 

Upper Freehold township 2,861 3,236 

Wail township, including Manasquan town 5,052 3.829 

Manasquan town 1,506 

69,128 55 538 

10 



140 V. S. CENSUS. 

Morris County. i890. 1880. 

Boonton township, including paitof lioonton city 3,307 2,082 

Boonton city (part of) 2,981 

Chatham township 4,081 4 276 

Chester township... 1,625 2,337 

Hanover township, including part of Boonton city 4 481 4.138 

Jefferson township 1,011 1,792 

Mendham township 1,266 1,.526 

Morris township, including Morristown city 10.155 6,837 

Morristown city 8,156 5,418 

Mount Olive township 1,848 1.982 

Mountville township 1,333 1^270 

Passaic township 1,821 1,896 

Pequannock township 2,862 2,239 

Randolph township 7,972 7,700 

Rockaway township 6,033 7,366 

Roxbury township 2,739 2,139 

Washington township 2,367 2,681 

54,101 50,861 

* Ocean County. 

Berkley township 786 683 

Brick township 4,065 2.990 

Dover township 2,8S0 2,439 

Eagleswood township 791 592 

Jackson township 1,717 1,803 

Lacey township 711 814 

Manchester township 1,057 1,057 

Ocean township 482 484 

Plumsted township 1,327 1,561 

Stafford township 1,095 1,003 

Union township 1,063 1,024 

15,974 14,455 
*The population of Ocean county was increased to 17,745. by reason of 
the annexation of Little Egg Harbor township, Burlington, in 1891. 

Passaic County. 

Acquackanonck township 2.562 1,781 

Little Falls township 1,890 l,40t 

Manchester township 2,576 1,513 

Passaic city 13,028 6,532 

First ward 5.075 

Second ward 2,844 

Third ward 1,677 

Fourth ward 3,432 

Patcrson city 78,347 51.031 

First ward 8,324 

Second ward 10 395 

Third ward 15,180 

Fourth ward 8,890 

Fifth ward 10,835 

Sixth ward 4,024 

Seventh ward 5,956 

Eighth ward 14 743 

Pompton township 2,153 2,251 

Wayne township 2,004 1,757 

West Milford township 2,486 2,591 

105,046 08,860 



U. S. CENSUS, 147 

Salem County. i890. 188O. 

Elsinborough township 524 570 

Lower AUoways Creek township 1,308 1,373 

Lower Penns Neck township 1,289 1,834 

Maunington township 1,870 2,230 

Oldmans township 1,432 

Pilesgrove township, induding Woodstown borough 3,312 3,497 

Woodstown borough 556 490 

Pittsgrove township 2,756 1,778 

Quinton township 1307 1,390 

Salem city 5,516 5,056 

East ward 2 891 

West ward 2,625 

Upper Alloways Creek township 1,675 1,917 

Upper Penns Neck township 2,239 3,361 

Upper Pittsgrove township 1,923 2,073 

25,151 24,579 

Somerset County. 

Bedminster township 

Bernards township 

Branchburg township 

Bridgewater township, including Somerville, Bound 
Brook and Raritan boroughs 

Somerville borough 

Bound Brook borough 

Raritan borough 

Franklin township, including Bloomington borough 

Bloomington borough 

Hillsboro township 

Montgomery township 

North Plainfield township 

Warren township 

28,311 27,162 

Sussex County. 

Andover township 1,126 1,150 

Byram township 1 380 1 406 

Frankford township 1,459 1,682 

Greene township 636 727 

Hampton township 866 895 

Hardyston township 2 542 2,645 

Lafayette township 742 781 

Montague township 797 1,022 

Newton township, coextensive with Newton town 3 003 2,513 

Sandyston township 1,084 1,195 

Sparta township 1,724 2,274 

Stillwater township 1 296 1,502 

Vernon township 1,756 1,811 

Wallpack township 436 575 

Wantage township 3,412 3,361 

22,259 23,539 



. 1,749 


1,812 


. 2,558 


2,622 


. 1,152 


1,316 


9,323 


7,997 


• 3,861 
1,462 

2,556 


3,105 

934 

2,046 


. 3,754 


3,818 


801 


671 


. 2,825 


3,248 


, 1,655 


1,928 


. 4,250 


3 217 


. 1,045 


1,204 



148 U. K CENSUS. 

Union County. i890. 1880. 

Clark township 307 3.')3 

Cranford township 1,717 1.184 

Elizabeth city 37,764 28,229 

First ward 8,874 

Second ward 7,610 

Third ward 5,8.36 

Fourth ward 2 213 

Fifth ward 5 990 

Sixth ward 2,697 

Seventh Ward 2.004 

Eighth ward 2,640 

Fanwood township 1,305 1,167 

Linden township 2,057 1,889 

New Providence township 839 781 

Plainfield city 11,207 8,125 

First ward 2,221 

Second ward 2,897 

Third ward 2,203 

Fourth ward 3,946 

Rahway city 7,105 6 455 

First ward 1,362 

Second ward 1,687 

Third ward 2,746 

Fourth ward 1,310 

Springfield township, coextensive with Springfield town.. 959 844 

Summit township 3,502 1,910 

Union township 2,846 2,418 

Westfield township 2,739 2,216 

72,467 55,571 

Warren County. 

Allamuchy township 759 648 

Belvidere town 1,763 1,773 

Blairstown township 1,662 1,458 

Franklin township 1,283 1,529 

Frelinghuysen township 879 1,042 

Greenwich township 825 2,554 

Hackettstown town 2,417 2,502 

Hardwick township 503 583 

Harmony township 1,152 1,350 

Hope township 1,332 1,569 

Independence township 904 1,018 

Knowlton township 1,411 1,476 

Lapatcong township 1,738 1,591 

Mansfield township 1,362 1,709 

Oxford township 4,002 4,594 

Pahaquarry township 291 418 

Phillipsburg city 8,644 7,181 

First ward 2,033 

Second ward 2,207 

Third ward 2,799 

Fourth ward 1,605 

Pohatcong township 1,483 

Washington township, including Wastiington borough... 4,138 3,594 

Washington borough 2,834 2,142 

36,553 36,589 



U. S, CENSUK 



149 



SUMMARY BY COUNTIES. 



COUNTIES. 


POPULATION. 


INCREASE. 


1890. 


1880. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


Atlantic, 


28,836 
47,226 
68,528 
87,687 
11,268 
45,438 

256,098 
28.649 

275,126 
35,355 
79,978 
61,754 
69,128 
54,101 
15,974 

105,046 
25,151 
28,311 
22,259 
72,467 
86,553 


18,704 
36,786 
55,402 
62,942 
9,765 
37,687 

189,929 
25,886 

187,944 
38,570 
58,061 
52,286 
55,538 
50,861 
14,455 
68,860 
24,579 
27,162 
23,539 
55,571 
30,589 


10,132 
10,440 

3,126 
24,745 

1,503 

7,751 
66,169 

2,763 
87,182 
a3,215 
21,917 

9,468 
13,590 

3,240 

1,519 

36,186 

572 

1,149 

al,280 

16,896 

a36 


54.17 


Bergen, 


28.38 


*Burlington, 


5.64 
39.31 


Cape May, 


15.39 


Cumberland, 

Essex, 


20.57 
31.84 




10.67 


Hudson, 


46 39 
a8.34 


Mercer, 


37.75 


Middlesex, 

Monmouth, 

Morris, 


18.11 

24.47 

637 


*Ocean, 


10.51 




52.55 


Salem, 


2.33 


Somerset, 


4.23 


Sussex, 

Union, 

Warren, 


a5.44 
30.40 
aO.lO 


The State, 


1.444,933 


1.131,116 


313,817 


27.74 



* Owing to the annexation of Little Egg Harbor township to Ocean 
county, in 1891, the population of Burlington was decreased to 56,757, and 
that of Ocean increased to 17,745. 

a Decrease. 



150 V. >S'. CENSUS. 



SUMMA.RY BY CITIES, &c. 

Of the cities, towns, and boroughs having a population of 4,000 or more, 
the largest numerical increases are found in the cities of Newark and Jersey 
City, which places show increases of 45,322 or 33.20 percent , and 42,281 
or 35.02 per cent , respectively. The largest percentages of increase are 
found in Atlantic City, Eayonne, Perth Amboy, Passaic, and Trenton 
cities, Atlantic City showing an increase of 138 3G per cent., while Trenton 
shows an increase of 92.10 per cent. In two places only are slight decreases 
shown. 

The following table shows the results of the present census as compared 
with 1880 for twenty-nine cities and towns and one borough having a pop- 
ulation of 4,000 or more, in the order of their rank : 

PoiTLATiON. Increase. 

1890, 1880. No. Percent. 

Newark city, 181,830 136,508 45,322 33.20 

Jersey City, 163,003 120,722 42,281 35.02 

Paterson city, 78,347 51,031 27,316 53.53 

Camden city, 58,313 41,659 16,654 39.98 

Trenton city, 57,458 29,910 27,543 92.10 

Hoboken city, 43,648 30,999 12,649 40.80 

Elizabeth city, 37,764 28,229 9,535 33.78 

Bayonne city, 19,033 9,372 9,G61 103.08 

Orange city, 18,844 13,207 5,637 42.68 

New Brunswick city, 18,603 17,166 1,437 8.37 

Atlantic City. 13,055 5,477 7,578 138.36 

Passaic city 13,028 6,.532 6,496 99.45 

Bridgeton city, 11,424 8,722 2,702 30.98 

Plainfield city, .• . . . 11,267 8,125 3,142 38.67 

Union town, 10,643 5,849 4,794 81.96 

Millvillecity 10,002 7,660 2,342 30.57 

Perth Amboy city, 9,512 4,808 4,704 97.84 

Phillipsburg city, 8,644 7,181 1,463 20.37 

Harrison city, 8,338 0,898 1,440 20.88 

Morristown city, 8,156 5,418 2,738 50.54 

Burlington city, 7,264 6,090 1,174 19.28 

Long Branch town, 7,231 3,833 3,398 88.65 

Rahwaycity, 7,105 6,455 650 10.07 

Gloucester city, 6,564 5,347 1,217 22.76 

Hackensack town, 6,004 4,248 1,756 41.34 

Salem city, 5.516 5,056 460 9.10 

South Amboy borough, 4,330 3,648 682 18.70 

Bordentown city, 4,232 4,258 a26 a0.61 

-Red Bank town, 4,145 2,684 1,461 54.43 

Lambertville city, 4,142 4,183 ail aO.98 

a Decrease. 



U. >S. CENSUS. 



151 



POPULATION OP THE UNITED STATES. 



Population. Increase from 

1880 to 1890. 

States and Territories. 1890. 1880. Percent- 
Number, age. 

The United States, 62,622,250 50,155,783 12,466,647 24.86 

North Atlantic Division, . . . 17,401,545 14,507,407 2,894,138 19.95 

Maine, 661,086 648,936 12,150 1.87 

New Hampshire, 376,.530 346,991 29,539 8.51 

Vermont, 332,422 332,286 136 0.04 

Massachusetts, 2,238,943 1,783,085 455,858 25.57 

Rhode Island, 34.^,506 276,531 68,975 24 94 

Connecticut, 746,258 622,700 12-3,558 19.84 

New York, 5.997,853 5,082,871 914,982 18.00 

New Jersey, 1,444,933 1,131,116 313,817 27.74 

Pennsylvania, 5,258,014 4,282,891 975,123 22.77 

South Atlantic Division, . , . 8,857,920 7,597,197 1,260,723 16.59 

Delaware 168,493 146,608 21,885 14.93 

Maryland, 1,042,390 934,943 107,447 11.49 

District of Columbia, . . . 230,392 177,624 52,768 29.71 

Virginia, 1,655,980 1,512,565 143,415 9.48 

West Virginia, 762,794 618,457 144,337 23.34 

North Carolina 1,617,947 1,399,750 218,197 16.59 

South Carolina, 1,151,149 995,577 155,572 15.63 

Georgia, 1,8.37,H53 1,542,180 295,173 19.14 

Florida, 391,422 269,493 121,929 45 24 

Northern Central Division, . 22,362,279 17,364,111 4,998,168 28.78 

Ohio, 3,672,316 3,198,062 474,254 14.83 

Indiana, 2,192,404 1,978,301 214,103 10 82 

Illinois, 3,826,351' 3,077,871 748,480 24.32 

Michigan, 2,093,889 1,636,937 456,952 27.92 

Misconsin, 1,686,880 1,315,497 371,883 28.23 

Minnesota, 1,301,826 780,773 521,053 66.74 

Iowa 1,911,896 1,624,615 287,281 17.68 

Missouri, 2,679,184 2,168,380 510,804 23.56 

North Dakota, 182,719 36,909 145,810 395.05 

South Dakota, 328,808 98,268 230,540 234.60 

Nebraska, 1,058,910 452,402 606,-508 134.06 

Kansas, 1,427,096 996,095 431,000 43.27 

Southern Central Division, . . 10,972,893 8,919,371 2,053,522 23.02 

Kentucky, 1,858,635 1,648,690 209,945 12.73 

Tennessee, 1,767,518 1,-542,359 225,159 14.60 

Alabama, 1,513,017 1,262,505 250,512 19.84 

Mississippi, 1,289,600 1,131,597 158,003 13.96 

Louisiana, 1,118,587 939,946 178,641 19 01 

Texas, 2,235,523 1,591,749 643,774 40.44 

Indian Territory (3), .... 

Oklahoma, <:61,834 .... 61,834 . . . 

Arkansas, 1,128,179 802,525 325,654 40.58 



^The number of white persons in the Indian Territory is not included in 
this table, as the census of Indians and other persons on Indian reserva- 
tions, which was made a subject of special investigation by law, has not 
yet been completed. 

c Including 5,3.38 persons in Greer county (in Indian Territory), claimed 
by Texas. 



152 



U. S. CENSUS. 



Population. Increase froM 

1880 to 1890. 

States and Territories. 1890. 1880. Number. Percent- 

age. 

Western Division, 3,027,013 1,767,697 1,259,916 71.27 

Montana, 132,159 39,159 93,000 237.49 

Wyoming, 60,705 20,789 39,916 192.01 

Colorado, 412,198 194,327 217,871 112.12 

New Mexico, 153,593 119,565 34,028 28.46 

Arizona, 59,620 40,440 19,180 47.43 

Utah, 207,905 143,903 63,942 44.42 

Nevada, 45,761 62,266 al6,505 a26 51 

Idaho, 84,385 32,610 51,775 158.77 

Alaska (d) 

Washington. 349,390 75,116 274,274 365.13 

Oregon 313,767 174,768 138,999 79 63 

California, 1,208,130 864,694 343,436 39.72 

The population of the United States in 1870 was 38,558,374. 

a Decrease. 

(/The number of white persons in Alaska is not included in this table, as 
the census of Alaska, which was made a subject of special investigation by 
law, has not yet been completed. 



Cities of the United States having a Population 
of 50,000 and Over. 



*New York, N. Y., . . . . 1 

Chicago, 111., 1 

Philadelphia, Pa., . . , . 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y., 

St. Louis, Mo., 

Boston, Mass., 

Baltimore, Md , 

San Francisco, Cal., . . . 

Cincinnati, C, 

Cleveland. O., 

Buffalo, N. Y., 

New Orleans, La., .... 

Pittsburg, Pa., 

Detroit, Mich , 

Milwaukee, Wis , 

Newark, N. J., 

Minneapolis, Minn., .... 
Jersey Citj', N. J., . . . . 

Louisville, Ky., 

Omaha, Neb., 

Rochester, N. Y., 

St. Paul, Minn., 

Providence, R. I., . , . . 
Indianapolis, Ind., .... 

Denver, Col., 

Allegheny, Pa., 

Albany, N. Y., 

Columbus, O., ...... 



,513,501 
,098,576 
,014,894 
804,377 
460,357 
446,507 
435,151 
297,990 
296,309 
261,546 
254,457 
241,995 
238,473 
205,669 
204,105 
181,830 
164,738 
163,003 
161,005 
139,526 
138,327 
133,156 
132,043 
107,445 
106,670 
104,967 
94,640 
90,398 



Syracuse, N. Y., 87,877 

New Haven, Conn , 85,981 

Worcester, Mass., 84,536 

Scranton, Pa., 83,450 

Toledo, O., 82,652 

Richmond, Va., 80,838 

Paterson, N. J , 78,347 

Lowell, Mass., 77,605 

Nashville, Tenn., 76,309 

Fall River, Mass., 74,351 

Cambridge, Mass., 69,837 

Atlanta, Ga , 65,514 

Memphis, Tenn., 64,586 

Grand Rapids. Mich., .... 64,147 

Wilmington, Del., 61,437 

Troy, X. Y., 60,605 

Reading, Pa., 58,926 

Dayton, O., 58,868 

Camden, N. J , 58,313 

Trenton, N. J., 57,458 

Lynn, Mass., 55,684 

Lincoln, Neb., 55,491 

Charleston, S. C, 54,592 

Hartford, Conn., 53,182 

Evansville, Ind., 50,674 

Los Angeles, Cal., 50,394 

Des Moines, la., 50,067 



* A census taken by the police authorities, and completed October 14th, 
1890, makes the population 1,710,715, an increase of 197,214. 



STATE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES. 



DEMOORATIO. 

At Large— B. F. Lee, Trenton ; John Hone, Red Bank; 
Gottfried Krueger, Newark ; Allan L. McDermott, Jersey- 
City; Thomag H. Hoagland, Rockaway. 

First District— HsLTry B. Paul, Camden. 

Second District— John H. Scudder, Trenton. 

Third District— J osBT^h W. Ballentine, Somerville. 

Fourth District— n. S. Rudd, Glen Ridge. 

Fifth District— Ahra.m De Ronde, Englewood. 

Sixth District— J Simea Smith, Jr., Newark. 

Seventh District— Beter Hauck, Harrison. 

Eighth District— A. B. Carlton, Elizabeth. 

Chairman, Allan L. McDermott ; Treasurer, B. F. Lee ; 
Secretary, Willard C. Fisk. 

Member of the National Democratic Committee— Wiles Ross, 
New Brunswick. 

REPUBLICAN. 

Garret A. Hobart, Paterson ; William Bettle, Camden; 
William II. fekirm, Mercer; John H. Conger, New 

Brunswick ; (Vacancy) ; Matthias Wooley, Lon^^ 

Branch; George W. Jenkins, Morristown; A. M. Brad 
shaw. Lake wood; Arthur B. Pearce, Paterson; George 
Hires, Salem; Edward J. Anderson, Somerville; Theo. 
H. Andress, Sparta; Edward M. AVood, Elizabeth; Rich- 
ard B. Reading, Raven Rock ; Edward W. Wooley, Jersey 
City ; Franklin Murphy, Newark ; John Y. Foster, New- 
ark; John J. Toffey, Jersey City; Robert C. Hutchinson, 
Bordentown; H. A. Potter, East Orange; David Baird, 
Camden ; John J. Gardner, Atlantic City ; C. E, Breck- 
enridge. May wood; W. S. Leaming, Cape May; H. B. 
Tuller, Vineland; William Stainsby, Newark; H. C. 
Loudenslager, Woodbury ; R. B. Seymour, Jersey City ; 
Dewitt C. Blair, Belvidere ; Charles N. Robinson, Camden. 

Chairman, Franklin Murphy; Vice- Chairman, E. J. 
Anderson ; Treasurer, John J. Toffey ; Secretary, John Y. 
Foster. 

Member of the National Republican Committee— Gdnret A. 
Hobart, Paterson. 

(153) 



154 POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS. 

OFFICERS OF THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY 
OF NEW JERSEY. 

President, Robert Adrain, New Brunswick ; Treasurer, 
James W. Lanning, Trenton; Secretary, W. S. McKean, 
Asbury Park; Chairman of P^xecutive Committee, W. R. 
Wilson, Elizabeth; Campaign Committee — W. R. Wilson, 
W. S. McKean, William A. Cotter, John Hinchliffe, Dr. 
JohnNevin; Finance Committee— Howard Carrow, Cam- 
den; Cyril R.Forbes, Paterson; Timothy Furlong, Tren- 
ton; Dr. A. K. Baldwin, Newark; J. W. Ballentine, 
Somerville ; James F. Minturn, Hoboken ; W. W. Cutler, 
Morristown ; Frank H. Halliday, Rah way. 



STATE REPUBLICAN LEAGUE 
OF NEW JERSEY. 

(Headquarters, Mount Holly.) 

President, Joseph H. Gaskill, Mount Holly; Secretary, 
Joshua Matlack, Jr., Mount Holly ; Treasurer, Edmund 
C. Hill, Trenton; State Organizer, J. Ulrich, Plainfield; 
Vice Presidents — 1st District, Maurice A. Rogers, Cam- 
den; 2d District, Frank A. Magowan, Trenton; 3d Dis- 
trict, Lewis A. Thomson, Somerville ; 4th District, Geo. 
M. Shipman, Belvidere; 5th District, Eugene Emley, 
Paterson ; 6th District, Joseph S. Vinson, Newark ; 7th 
District, Richard Brown, Jersey City; 8th District, Elias 
M. Condit, West Orange. Executive Committee — At- 
lantic, R. H. IngersoU; Bergen, Charles Parigot; Bur- 
lington, L. R. Hibbard; Camden, T. P. Varney; Cape 
May, J. M. E. Hildreth; Camberland, T. W. Trenchard; 
Essex, E. W. Sanderson; Gloucester, Joseph B. Roe; 
Hudson, J. B. Landrine; Hunterdon, W. F. Hayhurst; 
Middlesex, William Howell; Mercer, Thomas S. Cham- 
bers; Monmouth, W. T. Hoffman; Morris, Mahlon Pit- 
ney; Ocean, C. S. Patterson; Passaic, William I. Lewis; 
Salem, J. F. Sinnickson ; Somerset, H. M. Spencer ; Sus- 
sex, W. M. Smith ; Union, J. F. McDonald ; Warren, A. 
Blair Kelsey. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, on Tuesday, 
September 14th, 1892.) 

The Democratic party of New Jersey, in convention 
assembled, declare : 

That they re-aflBrm the National Democratic Platform 
adopted at Chicago, and enthusiastically endorse the 
nomination of Grover Cleveland and Adlai E. Stevenson 
for President and Vice-President of the United States. 

That they endorse the administration of Governor 
Leon Abbett. 

As an answer to the slanders of those who have per- 
sistently misrepresented the existing management of 
State affairs, we call the attention of the people to the 
following facts: 

That the only permanent State officers to which any 
salary or compensation is allowed, created by the Demo- 
cratic party during the past three years, are as follows : 
A Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, a Chief of 
State Police, a State Board of Taxation, a State Board 
for the Arbitration of Differences between Employers 
and Employes, a Board of Commissioners of Electric 
Subways, a Commissioner of Mines, a resident physician 
at the State Prison, and a Superintendent of the School 
Census. ^ 

The acts creating the office of the Commissioner of 
Banking and Insurance, and Commissioners of Electric 
Subways, provide that the expenses of these depart- 
ments shall be paid, respectively, by the insurance and 
telegraph companies doing business in this State. The 
total of all salaries to be paid by the State to permanent 
officers created by Democratic Legislatures during the 
present administration is less than $15,000. 

The pledge made in our State Platform of 1889, that 
there should not be any general State tax imposed upon 
the people, has been faithfully kept, and we renew the 
promise then made that there shall not be any general 
State tax imposed while the affairs of the State are 
intrusted to the Democratic party. On January 1, 1889, 
the floating debt of the State amounted to $400,000. 

(155) 



156 PARTY FLA T FORMS. 

Every dollar of this has been paid, and over a quarter of 
a million dollars expended for the improvement of pub- 
lic buildings and the purchase of a camp ground at Sea 
Girt. That these expenses have been met without the 
imposition of a single dollar of direct State tax upon 
the property of private owners, and without an increase 
in the rate imposed upon the property of corporations, 
supports the claim that the State Government of New 
Jersey is the most economical in the Union. 

That in pursuance of its pledge made in its platform of 
1889, to legislate in the interest of labor, the Democratic 
party has, during the present administration, through its 
legislative representatives, enacted the following meas- 
ures, all of which received the approval of a Democratic 
Governor, to wit : — Acts which secure, beyond the reach 
of fraud, the payment of wages to mechanics and others 
engaged in the erection of buildings; an act providing 
for sixty free scholarships in the State Agricultural Col- 
lege; acts to authorize the establishment of free public 
libraries and reading rooms in cities aud towns; an act 
giving a lien for wages due and labor performed and 
materials furnished in finishing silk and goods of which 
silk is a component part; an act for the improvement of 
the State Agricultural Experiment Station ; an act mak- 
ing Saturday a half holiday; an act extending the pro- 
visions of the mechanics' lien law to money due for labor 
or materials furnished in the erection of public buildings; 
an act prohibiting corporations from forcing their em- 
ploy 63 to contribute to relief funds; an act creating a 
State Board of Arbitration for the amicable adjustment 
of grievances and disputes that may arise between em- 
ployers and employes ; acts providing for absolute secrecy 
in the exercise of the elective franchise ; an act providing 
for a commissioner of mines to inspect all mines in this 
State and to secure proper safe-guards for the protection 
of the lives of men employed therein ; an act making 
wages due workmen and laborers a first lien upon the 
assets of insolvent corporations ; an act providing for the 
incorporation of trades unions and labor organizations, 
and other acts. 

In dealing with the municipal government of the State, 
the Democratic party has adopted the plan of vesting in 
the Mayors of large cities the power of appointment of 
municipal boards and officers, and we submit to the 
people of the State that this plan of municipal govern- 
ment is entitled to a thorough test in lights other than 
those afforded by mere political partisanship. Under 



PARTY PLATFORMS, 157 

this system there is a concentration of personal and 
political responsibility in a single office, the occupant of 
which is choden by the votes of the entire city. The 
plan is in no wise antagonistic to local self-government, 
but, on the contrary, affords an incentive to citizens to 
participate in municipal elections. Under it the grievous 
evil of sectional strife for municipal patronage can be 
avoided and economy enforced. While the plan is 
necessarily imperfect, it is subject to amendment and 
should be given a fair trial and receive impartial judg- 
ment before a return is made to a system under which 
responsibility is distributed and elusive. We denounce 
all frauds perpetrated upon the elective franchise, and 
we call the attention of the people to the fact that prose- 
cution and punishment of those crimes have been the 
work of a Democratic court and prosecutor and Dem- 
ocratic jurors. We ask from fair-minded citizens a com- 
parison of this fact with the action of a Republicaa 
Senate, which voted to seat, as Senator from Hudson, a 
man whom every one knew was not entitled to the office. 
The action of that Senate was protected by constitutional 
privilege; but it was none the less a crime. 

The necessity for a diversion of the proceeds from the 
sale of riparian lands from the school fund to funds 
necessary to pay the expense of rebuilding the State 
House and other extraordinary expenses having ceased, 
we favor a repeal of the act allowing such diversion. 



REPUBLICAN. 

(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, September 13th, 1892.) 

The Republicans of New Jersey, through their repre- 
sentatives assembled in convention, re-affirm their ad- 
herence and undying devotion to the great principles of 
the Republican party, to which the nation owes loDg 
years of unexampled prosperity in the past, and through 
which we look for its future greatness and honor. 

We approve and endorse the declaration of principles 
as set forth in the platform adopted by the Republican 
National Convention at Minneapolis, June 9th, 1892. 

We reaffirm oar belief in the doctrine of a tariff for 
the protection of American industry, supplemented by 
reciprocity, inaugurated by the present administration 
under the McKinley tariff act, and we are opposed to the 
pernicious doctrine of free trade, whether presented in 
its own true name or disguised as tariff reform. 



158 PARTY FLA TFORMS. 

We repudiate the Democratic doctrine as enunciated 
in the platform of that party, that " the Federal Govern- 
ment has no constitutional power to impose and collect 
tariff duties except for the purpose of revenue only," and 
as evidences of wise Republican legislation on this sub- 
ject, we call attention to the general prosperity of the 
country, the decreased prices of manufactured goods, the 
increased value of agricultural products, and the increased 
earnings of wage workers, as shown by statistics collected 
and published by Democratic oflBcials, while, at the same 
time, our commerce, instead of diminishing, as was pre- 
dicted, has been greater than ever before. 

We re-affirm our endorsement of the wise and able 
administration of President Harrison, whose broad states- 
manship in the treatment of every public question, whose 
apt and patriotic utterances on all occasions, and whose 
unerring accuracy of judgment and action in every 
emergency have earned for him the title of the man who 
never makes a mistake. The glorious past is an earnest 
of a still more glorious future, and we want no change in 
national affairs. 

We denounce as utterly vicious and contrary to public 
policy, the passage by the last Democratic Legislature, 
under the direction of a Democratic Executive, with the 
cooperation of members of the Democratic State Execu- 
tive Committee, of a bill to legalize an unconstitutional 
and pernicious combination of corporations engaged in 
the production and carrying of coal, as the result of which 
the prices of this necessary commodity have been in- 
creased, and the burdens of consumers have been vastly 
augmented. We remind the people that this legislation 
affects not only men of wealth and the great industries 
of the State, but increases the cost of living to that more 
numerous class who are compelled to meet the increased 
burden out of the proceeds of their daily toil. 

Resolved, That labor and capital should be allies, not 
enemies. We favor arbitration and profit sharing as 
remedies for idleness, want and suffering, and tending to 
secure peace, plenty and prosperity to our people. We 
favor reduction in the hours of labor. We favor tene- 
ment house and factory inspection in the interest of 
health and morals. 

We favor the passage of an act restoring the proceeds 
of the sale of riparian lands to the School Fund of the 
State. 

We are opposed to an administration of the State 
Government for personal uses; to the subserviency of 



PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS. 159 

the Legislature and the courts to Executive dictation; 
to the abolition by the Legislature, under executive 
orders, of local home government ; to the multiplication 
of public offices and the increase of salaries, for the 
furtherance of personal and political ends; to the ap- 
pointment of public officers for a stated consideration to 
be paid to the party campaign fund ; to the indiscrimi- 
nate and wholesale pardon of convicts in the State Prison ; 
to the unheard-of extravagance of the present State 
administration in the expenditure of public money ; to 
clothing the Governor with dictatorial powers by acts of 
a Legislature obsequiously subject to executive control ; 
to the creation of unnecessary boards and commissions 
for partisan purposes, investing them with arbitrary 
powers and placing them beyond the control of the peo- 
ple by making their term of office subject to the will of 
the Governor; to evasions and misconstructions of the 
constitution by the chief executive to secure political and 
personal support; to the countenance and support by 
State officers and party leaders of race-track gambling, 
with all its attendant evils; to the destruction of the 
right of suffrage by false registry, ballot-box stuffing and 
fraudulent count of votes; and to the general maladmin- 
istration of public affairs which, in these and other mat- 
ters during the current administration, have brought 
shame and disgrace upon the State. 

We pledge ourselves to the thorough reform of these 
evils, and we appeal to all patriotic voters in the State to 
aid us in the re-establishment of a government of which 
Jerseymen need not be ashamed. 

Resolved, That we are in favor of the principle of home 
rule by all peoples everywhere; and especially do we 
favor the extension of this principle to the local govern- 
ments in New Jersey. 

Resolved, That we indorse the principles set forth in the 
communication from the colored voters of New Jersey, 
in convention assembled, in Trenton, on September 12th, 
1892, and that Charles N. Robinson, of Camden, be added 
to the Republican State Committee, as desired by said 
convention. 

PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS— 1892. 

Democratic. 

For President, Grover Cleveland, of New York ; for 
Vice-President, Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois. 

Presidential Electors— At Large, Millard F. Ross, Mid- 
dlesex; Philip P. Baker, Cumberland. 1st District, 



160 PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS. 

Charles H. Mana ; 2d District, Thomas J. Prickett ; 3d 
District, James Deshler ; 4th District, Theodore Simon- 
son ; 5th District, James G. Morgan ; Gth District, Ed- 
ward Ba'bach, Jr.; 7th District, Edwin A.Stevens; 8th 
District, Martin R. Cook. 

Ilepublican. 

For President, Benjamin Harrison, of Indiana; for 
Vice-President, Whitelaw Reid, of New York. 

Presidential Electors — At Large, John I. Blair, Warren ; 
Alexander G. Cattell, Camden. 1st District, George Hires, 
Salem; 2d District, Ferdinand W. Roebling; 3d District, 
Adolph Mack ; 4th District, Luther Kountze ; 5th Dis- 
trict, J. Hull Browning; 6th District, Frederick Kuhn; 
7th District, George F. Perkins; 8th District, John W. 
Murray. 

Proliil)ition. 

For President, John Bidwell, of California ; for Vice- 
President, James B. Cranfil, of Texas. 

Presidential Electors — George Lamonte, "William TL 
Nicholson, Thomas B. Welch, Jacob D. Joslin, Daniel M. 
Forman, John F. Schenk, Mahlon B. Reed, George H. 
Strobell, Stephen B. Ransom, Uzal M. Osborne. 

People's Party. 

For President, James B. Weaver, of Iowa ; for Vice- 
President, James G. Field, of California. 

Presi'lential Electors — Joseph R. Buchanan, John Will- 
cox, William M. DeCamp, P. Henry Jacobs, John W. 
Hayes, Richard H. Carter, Christopher Maguire, Otto G. 
Horster, John Hossack, Thomas S. Burgess. 

Socialist Labor Party. 

For President, Simon Wing, of Massachusetts ; Vice- 
President, Charles H. Matchett, of New York. 

Presidential Electors— Bartlet C. Harris, Otto Hirscb, 
Friedrich Landgrof, Anton Stehulka, William Meissner, 
James Meyer, Otto Krause, Aug. Kaeding, C. Scheer, 
Joseph Bieck. 



For Governor. 



Dtmocratic— George T. Werts, of Morris. 
Republican— Zohn Kean, Jr., of Union. 
Proliibition — Thomas J. Kennedy, of Hudson. 
People's — Benjamin Bird, of Hunterdon. 
Socialist- Labor — Joseph B. Keim, of Union. 



N. J. PRESiDENTiAL VOTE. 161 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE OF NETV JERSEY 
FROM 1840 TO DATE. 

1840— Harrison, Whig, 33,351 ; Van Buren, Dem, 31,034. Harrison's 
majority, 2,327. 

1844— Clay, Whig, 38,318 ; Polk, Dem., 37,495. Clay's majority, 823. 

1818— Taylor, Whig, 40,015 ; Cass, Dem , 36,901 ; Van Buren, 819. 
Taylor's plurality, 3,114. 

1852— Pierce. Dem., 44,305 ; Scott, Whig, 38,556 ; Hale, Free Soil, 350. 
Pierce's plurality, 5,749. 

1856— Buchanan, Dem., 46,943; Fremont, Rep., 28,338; Fillmore, 
Amer., 24,115. Buchanan's plurality, 18,605. 

1860— Dem. Fusion ticket, 62,869*; Lincoln, Rep., 58,346. Fusion 
majority, 4,523. (Three Douglas electors, Cook. Parker and Runyon, 
were chosen, the highest vote being 62,869 for Cook, and four Lincoln 
electors were chosen. Hornblower, Hay, Elmer and Ivins. the highest 
vote being 58,346 for Hornblower. The highest vote cast for a Breck- 
enridge elector ( Wurts) was 56,237. ) 

1864— McClellan, Dem., 68,024; Lincoln, Rep., 60.723. McClellan's 
majority, 7,301. 

1868— Seymour, Dem., 83,001; Grant, Rep., 80,131. Seymour's 
majority, 2,870. 

1»72— Grant, Rep , 91,656 ; Greeley, Dem., 76,456. Grant's majority, 
15,200. 

1876— Tilden, Dem., 115,962 ; Hayes, Rep., 103,517. Tilden's major- 
ity, 12,445. 

1880— Hancock, Dem, 122,565; Garfield, Rep., 120,555. Hancock's 
majority, 2,010. 

1884— Cleveland, Dem., 127,784; Blaine, Rep., 123,433. Cleveland's 
majority, 4,351. 

1888— Cleveland, Dem., 151,493 ; Harrison, Rep., 144,344 ; Fisk, Pro., 
7,904. Cleveland's plurality, 7,149. 

1892— Cleveland, Dem., 171,066; Harrison, Rep., 156,101; Bidwell, 
Pro., 8,134 ; Wing, Social.-Lab., 1,337 ; Weaver, People's, 985. Cleve- 
land's plurality, 14,965. 



162 N. J. GUnERNATOniAL VOTE. 

NEW JERSEY'S VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 
FROM 1844 TO DATE. 

wlifg^lSy^iS^'^^^ Thomson,Dem,36,591; Parkhurst,76. 
c^-^^il~^^^i°^^' ^^°^- ^^'"^65; Wright, Whi- 32,166; William Right 
185^°'Fo?t''^r)P^ ^\^o=4f "."'^°,^' .i«^- Democratic plura?i?y, 2.5S9: 
ity. 5 669 ' '^^' ^''°^' ^^^'^' ^*'°^*- Cemocralic majorl 

ma&^t782.^''^' ^^'^^^= Haywood, Whig, 31,530. Democratic 
mal^iu^'?^"' ^^P' ^°'^°^= Alexander, Dem.. 48,216. Republican 
mSuJiY^eSi. ""'P- ''"'''= '''^^■^^*' ^^°^' 51'^^4- Republican 
ity,^14;^9^7^'^^'' ^^'^•' ^^'^^^ = ^^^''^' ^^P- ^^'"^^0. Democratic major- 
mijSir^t.fsg ^^P" ^^'^^' ^''^y^^' ^^°'' 6^'736. Republican 
majo?U^4"5i7!P^' ^^"^ ' ^^'^^^= ^'^^'' ^^P- "^^'^2. Democratic 
ity,i!979^^'^^''' ^^°'" ^^'^^ = ^^'^^^^' ^^P' '^'383- I^emocratic major- 
ityfel^"^^^' ^^^°'- ^^'^ = ^^^^y- ^«P-' 8*'O50- Democratic major- 

barS^Vnfi'S^ rJ^^^^""' A^^^'^" = ^^^^^^l' ^^P • 85.091 ; Hoxsey. Green- 
12,746. ' ^'°^^^°^' Ta^ and Pro., 1,439. Democratic plurality, 

biff7^'5'^^Ro;S^°'-4> ^21,666; Potts, Rep., 121,015; Hoxsey, GxeQU- 
isi? ' AK>;.?.^?f°°^' fn^'f o' 1^^- Democratic plurality, 651. 

Parsn;;; Prn "i Dem 103,806 ; Dixon, Rep , 97,047 ; Urner, Nat., 2,960 : 
iee« ;^-^^°-'^d^^- Democratic plurality, 6,809. 

19S~nZ^^P.^'^-S^^^V^^'': ^«^ey, Rep., 101,919; Fiske, Pro., 
VoQc^ Democratic plurality, 8.020. i- . . . , 

fi iT~Tw^i^' P-^'^V ^^\^^^ ' ^™b^- I^ep., 123,992; La Monte. Pro., 

1 onr. Democratic plurality, 14,253. ^ > > . . 

„ if^^-^J^'f^ts, Dem 167.257 ; Kean, Jr., Rep., 159,362 ; Kennedy, Pro., 

pluralityf7^25 ' ' ^'^^^' ^'^^' ^^^ple's, 891. Democratic 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



163 



POLITICAL COMPLEXION OF NEW JER- 
SEY'S LEGISLATURES FROM 
1840 TO DATE. 



181C— Council, 13 Whigs ; 5 Dems. 

1841— Council, 9 Whigs ; 9 Dems. 

1812-Couucil, 10 Whigs ; 8 Dems. 

1813— Council, 6 Whigs ; 12 Dems. 

1844— Council, 13 Whigs ; 6 Dems. 

1815— Senate, 12 Whigs ; 7 Dems 
Native American. 

1816— Senate, 12 Whigs ; 7 Dems. 

1847— Senate, 12 Whigs : 7 Dems. 

1848— Senate, 12 Whigs ; 7 Dems. 

1849— Senate, 10 Whigs; 9 Dems. 

1850— Senate, 9 Whigs ; 11 Dems. 

1851— Senate, 10 Whigs ; 10 Dems. 

1852— Senate, 13 Dems. ; 7 Whigs. 

1853— Senate, 13 Dems 

1854— Senate, 13 Dems 

1855— Senate, 10 Dems 
Dems 

1856 



House, 41 Whigs ; 12 Dems. 
House, 35 Whigs ; 23 Dems. 
House, 32 Whigs ; 26 Dems. 
House, 23 Whigs ; 35 Dems. 
House, 40 Whigs : 18 Dems. 
Hou.se, 30 Whigs; 27 Dems; I 



House, 40 Whigs ; 18 Dems. 
House, 38 Whigs; 20 Dems. 
House, 39 Whigs ; 19 Dems. 
House, 33 Whigs ; 25 Dems. 
House, 25 Whigs; 35 Dems. 
House, 28 Whigs ; 30 Dems. 
House, 45 Dems : 15 Whigs. 
7 Whigs. House, 39 Dems. ; 21 Whigs. 
7 Whigs. House, 40 Dems ; 20 Whigs. 
9 Whigs; 1 Native American. House, 29 
25 Whigs ; 6 Native American. 
Senate, 11 Dems ; 5 Whigs; 4 Native American. House, 30 



House, 38 



Dems. ; 14 Whigs; 1 Ind. Dem. ; 15 Native American 

1867— Senate, 11 Dems.; 6 Whigs; 3 Know Nothings, 
Dems. ; Combined opposition, 22. 

1868 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1859— Senate, Democratic. House, Opposition. 

1860— Senate, Democratic. House. 30 Dem ; 28 Rep. ; 2 American 

1861— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic 

1862— Senate, Democrats and Republicans, tie; Independent, 1 
House, Democratic. Democratic majority on joint ballot, 3. 

1863— Both Houses Democratic. 

1864— Both Houses Democratic. 

1865— Senate, Democratic. Hou.se, a tie. 

1866— Both Houses Republican. 

1867— Both Houses Republican. 

1868— Both Houses Democratic. 

1869— Both Houses Democratic. 

1870— Both Houses Democratic, 

1871— Both Houses Republican. 

1872— Both Houses Republican. 

1873— Both Houses Republican. 

1874— Senate, 14 Republicans, 7 Democrats. House, 32 Republi- 
cans, 28 Democrats. 

1875— Senate, 13 Republicans, 
19 Republicans. 

1876— Both Houses Republican. 

1877— Senate, 11 Democrats, 10 Republicans, 

1878— Both Houses Democratic. 

1879— Both Houses Republican. 

1880— Both Houses Republican. 

1881— Both Houses Republican. 

1882— Senate, Republican. Hou.se. Democratic. 

1883— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 35 Democrats, 
25 Republicans. 

1884— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1885— Both Houses Republican. 

1886— Both Houses Republican. 



Democrats. House, 41 Democrats. 



House, a tie. 



164 NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 

1887— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 32 Democrats, 
26 Republicans, 2 Labor Democrats. 

1888— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 37 Republicans, 
23 Democrats. 

1889— Senate, 11 Democrats, 10 Republicans. House, 32 Democrats, 
28 Repulilicans. 

1890— Senate, 11 Republicans, 10 Democrats. House, 37 Democrats, 
23 Republicans. 

1891— Senate, 14 Democrats, 7 Republicans, House, 40 Democrats, 

20 Republicans. 

1892— Senate, 16 Democrats, 5 Republicans. House, 42 Democrats, 
18 Republicans. 
1893— Senate, 16 Democrats, 5 Republicans. House, 39 Democrats, 

21 Republicans. 

1891— Senate, 11 Republicans, 10 Democrats. House, 39 Republi- 
cans, 20 Democrats, 1 Ind. Dem. 

1895— Senate, 16 Republicans, 5 Democrats, House, 54 Republicans, 
6 Democrats. 



MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

1894-1895. 



Atlantic County. 
Senate— Samuel D. HoflFman, R. 
House— '94, Frederick Schuchardt, D. '95, Wesley C. Smith, E. 

Bergen County. 
Senate— Henry D. Winton, D. 

House —'94, Walter Dewsnap, D. '95, Frederick L.Voorhees, R. 

David D. Zabriskie, R. David D. Zabriskie, R. 

Burlington County. 
Senate— '94, Mitchell B. Perkins, D. '95, William C. Parry, R. 
House— '94, August C. Stecher, R. '95, George Wildes, R. 

Micajah E. Matlack, R. Micajah E. Matlack, R. 

Camden County. 
Senate— Maurice A. Rogers, R. 
House— '94, Clayton Stafford, R. '95, Louis T. Derousse, R. 

William Watson, R. Clayton Stafford, R. 

William J. Thompson, D. George W. Barnard, R. 

Cape May County. 
Senate— '94, Lemuel E. Miller, D. '95, Edmund L. Ross, R. 

House— '94, Edmund L. Ross, R. '95, Furman L. Ludlam, R 

Cumberland County. 
Senate— Edward C. Stokes, R. 
House— '91, Thomas F. Austin, R. '95, Thomas F. Austin, R. 

John N. Glaspell, R. Bloomfield H, Minch, R. 

Essex County. 
Senate— George W. Ketcham, R. 
Hou.^e— '94, William Harrigan, D. '95, George P. Olcott, R 

Charles B. Duncan, R. Charles B. Storrs, R. 

Joseph P. Clarke, D. Charles B. Duncan, R. 

Joseph M. Byrne, D. John C. Eisele, R. 

Thomas A. Murphey, R. Amos W. Harrison R. 

Dennis F. Olvaney, D. Alfred F. Skinner, R. 

Thomas P. Edwards, R. James A. Christie, R. 

John C. Eisele, R. George L. Smith, R. 

J. Brodhead Woolsey, R. David E. Benedict, R. 

Charles B. Storrs, R. Charles A. Schober, R. 

George P. Olcott, R. Fred. W. Mock, R. 



(165) 



166 MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

Gloucester County. 
Senate— Daniel J. Packer, R. 
Hous^e— '94, Solomon H. Stauger, R. '95, Solomon II. Stanger, R. 

Hudson County. 
Senate— William D Daly, D. 

House— '94, Ebenezer Berry. -R. '95, William N. Parslow, D 

Max Salinger, R. James Usher, D 

Thomas Egan, B. Pierce J. Fleming, D. 

Hugh A. Kelly, D. Henrj- C. Gruber, R 

George W. Harding, R. Richard M. Smart, D. 

Timothy J, Carroll, D David M. Cagney, D. 

John Kerr, R. James F. Blacksbaw, R. 

Thomas McEwan, Jr., R. Henry M, Nutzhorn, R. 

Michael J. Coyle, D. Frederick Schober, R. 

Charles Erlenkotter, Lid. D. Robert McAudrew, R. 

James Usher, D. William E. Drake, /.'. 

Hunterdon County. 
Senate— '94, William H. Martin, D. '95, Richard S. Kuhl, D. 

House— '94, Charles N. Reading, R. Charks N. Reading, R. 

William C. Alpaugh, D. William C Alpaugh, D. 

Mercer County. 
Senate— William H. Skirm, R. 
House— "91, William L. Wilbur, R. '95, William L Wilbur, /.'. 

John Ginder, R. John Ginder, R. 

William T. Exton, R. William T. Exton, R. 

Middlesex County. 
Senate— '94, Robert Adrain, D. '95, Charles B Herbert, R. 

House— '94, John W. Beekman, D. '95, Edward W. Hicks, R. 

William F. Harkins, D. George H. Tice, R. 

Andrew H. Slover, R. Andrew H Slover, R. 

Monmouth County. 

Senate— James A. Bradley, R. 

House— '94, David D. Denise, R. David D. Denise, R. 

Charles L. Walters, R. George B. Snyder, R 

Richard Borden, D. Charles A. Francis, R 

Morris County. 
Senate— Elias C. Drake, D. 

House— "94, Charles A. Baker, R. '95, Charles A. Baker, R. 

William C. Bates, R. William C. Bates, R. 



MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 167 

Ocean County. 
Senate— George G. Smith, E. 
House— '94, John T. Burton, E. '95, Abraham Lower, R. 

Passaic County. 

Senate— '94, John HinchlitTe, B. '95, Robert Williams, E. 

House— '94, John I. Holt, E. '95, Samuel Frederick, E. 

John McKelvey, B. James Robertson, E. 

Thomas Flyun, B. Samuel Bullock, E. 

William I. Lewis, E. John King, E. 

Salem County. 
Senate— John C. Ward, E. 
House— '94, William Diver, B. '95, Charles W. Powers, E. 

Somerset County. 
Senate— Lewis A. Thompson, E, 
House— '94, Frank W. Somers, E. '95, Frank W. Somers, E. 

Sussex County. 
Senate— '94, John McMickle, B. '95, Jacob Gould, E. 

House- '91, William P. Coursen, E. '95, William P. Coursen, E. 

Union County. 
Senate— Foster M. Voorhees, E. 
House —'94, John N. Burger, E. '95, John N. Burger, E. 

Joseph Cross, E. Joseph Cross, E. 

Charles N. Codding, E. Charles N. Codding, E 

"Warren County. * . 

Senate— Christopher F. Staates, B. 

House— '94, L. Milton Wilson, B. '95, Samuel V. Davis, E. 

Samuel V. Davis, E. George W. Smith, E. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 



PREROGATIVES AND DUTIES OF THE 
GOVERNOR. 

The Governor is Commander-in-Chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; is President {ex-qj^cio) of the 
Board of Trustees of Princeton and Rutgers Colleges, and 
also of Burlington College, and of the Board of Managers 
of the Geological Survey. He is Chairman of the State 
Board of Canvassers, and has power to fill any vacancy for 
New Jersey that may occur in the United States Senate, 
during a recess of the "Legislature. 

He is a member of the following Boards : Trustees of 
School Fund; Riparian Commissioners; Court of Pardons; 
Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund ; Premium 
Committee of the New Jersey State Agricultural Society; 
Commissioners of the State Library; and composing, with 
the State Comptroller, a Board to choose newspajiers in which 
to publish the laws of the State. 

With the advice and consent of the Senate, he has the 
power of appointing the following officei-s: Chancellor, Chief 
Justice; Judges of the Supreme Court and Circuit Courts; 
Inferior Courts and Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals ; Attorney-( Tcneral, Secretary of State, Clerk of the 
Court of Chancery, Clerk of the Supreme Court, Keeper of 
the Slate Prison, a Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, 
a Superintendent of Public Instruction, Prosecutors of the 
Pleas, Visitors to the State Board of Agriculture, State Board 
of Assessors, State Board of Education, Chief of Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, Major-General, Quartermaster-General, Ad- 
jutant-General, Inspector of Factories and Workshops, Super- 
visor of the State Prison, six Inspectors of the State Prison, 
Commissioners of Pilotage, the Board of Managers of the 
State Hospitals, the Trustees of the Jamesburg Reform School 
and the State Industrial School for Girls, Judges of the 
District Courts, Riparian Commissioners, Commissioners of 
Fisheries, Managers for the Home for Feeble-Minded Women, 
Port Wardens and Harbor Masters. 

Without the consent of the Senate : Foreign Commission- 
ers of Deeds ; New Jersey State Pharmaceutical Association, 
and State Board of Health, Sta*e Board of Medical Exam- 

(168) 



THE EXECUTIVE. 169 

iners, State Board of Dentistry, Inspectors of Steamboats, 
Private Secretary, Notaries Public, Moral Instructors of 
the State Prison, Kailroad Policemen, and fill all vacancies 
that occur in any office during a recess of the Legislature, 
which ofiices are to be filled by the Governor and Senate, 
or Legislature in Joint Meeting ; also, vacancies happening 
in the offices of Clerk or Surrogate in any county ; issues 
warrants for the admission of blind and feeble-minded 
children into institutions ; grants requisitions and rendi- 
tions, and has power to ofler rewards for apprehending 
and securing persons charged with certain crimes; signs 
or vetoes all bills and joint resolutions passed by the Legis- 
lature ; has power to convene the Legislature, or Senate alone, 
if, in his opinion, public necessity requires it ; grants, under 
the Great Seal of the State, commissions to all such officers 
as require to be commissioned ; has right to borrow money 
for the State ; sign all leases or grants issued by the Riparian 
Commissioners ; he has power to reprieve in cases of capital 
punishment, and to suspend fines at any time not exceeding 
ninety days after conviction, and in case of pardon or com- 
mutation of sentence, the Governor's vote in the affirmative 
is necessary. 

Besides all these duties, the Governor finds it necessary 
to read and answer a large mass of correspondence, which 
comes to the department daily. All bills and joint reso- 
lutions passed by the Legislature are compared, and then 
indexed in the Executive Department, before presentation 
to the Governor. 

He receives a salary of $10,000 a year, and is not allowed 
any fees or perquisites whatever. 

His term of office is three years. 



OFFICES FILLED BY THE LEGISLATURE 
IN JOINT MEETING. 

State Treasurer, State Comptroller, Commissioners of 
Deeds and State Director of Eailroads and Canals. 



170 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1894. 



CONSTITUTIONAL. COMMISSION OF 1894 

In pursuance of a Joint Resolution of the Legislature, 
approved on May 17th, 1894, " for the appointment of Com- 
missioners to report amendments of the system of juris- 
prudence of this State, and provide for the election of certain 
officers by the people," Governor Werts sent tlie following 
nominations to the Senate, all of which were confirmed: 

At Large — John P. Stockton, Trenton ; Allan L Mc- 
Dermott, Jersey City ; Samuel H. Grey, Camden ; and William 
Walter Phelps, Englewood. 

First District — George Hire?, Salem; Howard Carrow, 
Camden. Second District— William M. Lanning, Trenton ; 
Edward D. Stokes, Mount Holly, Third District — Henry 
Mitchell, Asbury Park ; George C. Ludlow, New Brunswick. 
Fourth District— John Franklin Fort, East Orange ; Carman 
F. Rand(dph, Morristown. Fifth District— Garret A. Hobart, 
Paterson ; John D. Probst, Englewood. Sixth District — 
Edward Balbach, Jr , and Frederick Frelinghuysen, Newark. 
Seventh District — Edwin A. Stevens, Hobaken ; Joseph D. 
Bedle, Jersey City. Eighth I)istrict— John Kean, Jr., Eliza- 
beth ; John McC. Morrow, Newark. 

Messrs. Hobart and Balbach declined to serve on the Com- 
mission, and their places were filled by the appointment of 
Eugene Em'ey, of Paterson, and E. Cortlandt Drake, of 
Newark. 

On Tuesday, June 5th, the Commission met in the Senate 
Chamber, at Trenton, and organized by the election of 
Samuel H. Grey as President ; George C. Ludlow, Vice 
President, and Joseph L. Naar, of Trenton, Secretary. The 
last session of the Commission was held on September 2oth. 

The following amendments were adopted and submitted to 
the Governor, who in turn submitted them to the Legislature : 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

Insert, in lieu of Paragraph 10, a new paragraph, as fol- 
lows : 

10. The Governor, or person administering the govern- 
ment, the Chancellor and the Attorney-General, or two of 
them, of whom the Governor or person administering the 
government shall be one, may remit fines and forfeitures, 
and grant pardons, after conviction, in all cases except im- 
peachment. 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1894. 171 
ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Insert, in lieu of Section II , a new section^ as follows : 

Section II 

1. The Court of Errors and Appeals shall consist of a 
Chief Justice and four Associate Justices, or any four of 
them. 

2. In case any Justice of said court shall be disqualified to 
sit in any cause, or shall be unable, for the time being, to 
discharge the duties of his oflSce, whereby the whole number 
of Justices capable of sitting shall be reduced below four, the 
Governor shall designate a Justice of the Supreme Court to 
discharge such duties until the disqualification or inability 
shall cease. 

3. The Secretary of State shall be Clerk of this court. 

4. When a writ of error shall be brought, any judicial 
opinion in the cause, in favor of or against any error com- 
plained of, shall be assigned to the court in writing. When 
an appeal shall be taken from an order or decree of the Court 
of Chancery, the Chancellor or Vice Chancellor making such 
decree or order shall inform the court in writing of the 
reasons for his order or decree. 

5. Writs of error to remove final judgments in the Circuit 
Courts and the Inferior Courts of Common Pleas, and upon 
all indictments, shall be returned directly to the Court of 
Errors and Appeals. 

6. The granting of a rule to show cause why a verdict 
should not be set aside shall not be conditioned upon, nor 
deemed a waiver of, the bills of exception. Upon a writ of 
error, the plaintiff therein may assign errors upon the law of 
the whole case, notwithstanding any defects or omissions in 
the bills of exception, and the court shall hear and determine 
the same. 

7. All causes heard by the Court of Errors and Appeals 
shall be decided within sixty days after the close of the argu- 
ment, unless the court shall extend the time for such decision 
for a further period, not exceeding sixty days. If such 
decision be not made within said sixty days, or such extended 
period, either party may put the case on the list for re-argu- 
ment at the next succeeding term, and such case shall have 
a preference on the list until re-argued. 



172 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1894. 

Section IV. 

Amend Paragraph 1 by adding thereto the following 
words : 

There shall be two or more Vice Chancellors, each of 
whom may, under the direction of the Chancellor, separately 
exercise the jurisdiction of the court. Until otherwise pro- 
vided by law, there shall be four Vice Chancellors. The 
Vice Chancellors shall be appointed by the Chancellor. The 
Chancellor shall make the rules governing the practice of the 
court, where the same is not regulated by statute. 

Section V. 

Insert, in lieu of Section V., a new section, as follows: 

1. The Supreme Court shall consist of nine Justices, 
which number may be increased by law. Such court shall be 
arranged, by the Justices thereof, into three or more divisions. 
Each division shall have the jurisdiction of the court. Not 
less than two nor more than four Justices shall hold a divi- 
sion. The sessions of such divisions shall be held at such 
times and places as shall be determined by statute, or in the 
absence of such statute, by said court, but the sessions of only 
one division shall be held in Trenton. The rules governing 
the practice in said court shall be made by a majority of all 
the Justices of said court. The Justices of the Supreme 
Court at the time these amendments shall go into effect shall 
continue as Justices of the Supreme Court until the expiration 
of their terms, respectively. 

2. The Circuit Courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more Justices of the Supreme Court, and 
shall in all cases within the county, except in those of a 
criminal nature, have common-law jurisdiction concurrent 
with the Supreme Court, and any final judgment of a Circuit 
Court may be docketed in the Supreme Court, and shall 
operate as a judgment obtained in the Supreme Court from 
the time of such docketing. 

3. Ko Justice shall sit in the Supreme Court, or any divi- 
sion thereof, in review of any cause tried or heard before 
him. , 

Section VIL 

Insert, in lieu of Section VII., a new section, as follows : 
1. Every Justice of the Court of Errors and Appeals, the 
Chancellor, Justice of the Supreme Court and Vice Chan- 
cellor shall be, at the time of his appointment, not less than 
thirty years of age, learned in the law, and shall have been 
a citizen and resident of this State for at least ten years 
before such appointment. 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1894. 173 

AKTICLE Vir. 

Section IT. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

Amend Paragraph 1 to read : 

1. Justices of the Court of Errors and Appeals, Justices of 
the Supreme Court, the Chancellor, and Judges of the Inferior 
Courts of Common Pleas shall be nominated by the Governor, 
and appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the 
Senate. The Justices of the Court of Errors and Appeals, 
except those first appointed, the Justices of the Supreme 
Court, the Chancellor and Vice Chancellor shall hold their 
offices for the term of seven years, and shall, at stated times, 
receive for their services a compensation which shall not be 
diminished during the term of their appointment, and they 
shall hold no other office under the government of this State 
or the United States. The Justices of the Court of Errors 
and Appeals first appointed shall be appointed one for three 
years, two for five years, and two for seven years. 

Judges of the Inferior Courts of Common Pleas shall hold 
their offices for the term of five years. 

Amend the section, by striking out the following figure 
and words : 

2. Judges of the Court of Common Pleas shall be ap- 
pointed by the Senate and General Assembly, in joint meet- 
ing. 

They shall hold their offices for five years ; but when ap- 
pointed to fill vacancies they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only. 

Amend by striking out Paragraph 7, which reads as follows : 

7. Justices of the Peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties of 
the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in wards, 
in such manner and under such regulations as may be here- 
after provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their com- 
missions shall bear date and take effect on the first day of 
May next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
elected to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only; provided, that the commission of any Juttice of 
the Peace shall become vacant upon his ceasing to reside in 
the township in which he was elected. 

The first election for Justices of the Peace shall take place 
at the next annual town meetings of the townships in the 



174 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, I8O4. 

several counties of llie State, and the wards in cities, that 
may vote in wards. 

Change Paragraphs 8, 9 and 10, to 7, 8 and 9. 



ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDULE. 

Insert, as Paragraph 13, a new paragraph, as follows: 
13. The Legislature shall pass all laws necessary to pro- 
vide for the trial, hearing, and determination of all civil and 
criminal causes pending in any court of this State at the time 
of the adoption of any amendments to this Constitution, and 
to carry into effect the provisions of the Constitution as 
amended. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 



The following is a list of the titles of newspapers published 
in the State of New Jersey ; town and county where pub- 
lished ; time of publication ; political or special character, 
and names of editors and publishers. 

[* Denotes that the paper was designated to publish the 
laws of New Jersey, 1894.] 



ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

Der Pilot (German).— Egg Harbor City. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. H. Mass & Co., publishers. 
H. Mass, editor. 

Der Beobachter (German). — Egg Harbor City. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Wilhelm Mueller, publisher. 

Der Zeitgeist (Spirit of the Times) (German).— Egg 
Harbor City. Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. 
George F. Breder. 

Atlantic Star Gazette. — Egg Harbor City. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Henry Regensburg, publisher and editor. 

Atlantic Journal. — Atlantic City. Issued on Sunday. 
Independent Democratic. Haslett & MuUer, editors 
and proprietors. 

South Jersey Republican. — Hammonton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Orville E. Hoyt, editor and 
publisher. 

Atlantic City Review.— Atlantic City. Daily, every 
morning, except Sunday, and Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. J. G. Shreve, proprietor. 

*Atlantic Times-Democrat. — Atlantic City. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Daily Union Printing Co 
J. F. Hall, editor and manager. 

*Mays Landing Record. — Mays Landing. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. E. C. Shaner, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

(175) 



176 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Daily Union. — Atlantic City. Every afternoon, except 
Sunday, at the office of the Atlantic Times-Democrat. 
Independent. Daily Union Printing Co. J. F. Hall, 
editor and manager. 

Sunday Gazette. — Atlantic City. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican. William McLaughlin, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Weekly Press. — Pleasantville. AVeekly, on Saturday. 
J. E. Risley, editor and publisher. 

Freie Presse. — Atlantic City. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Carl Voelker, publisher. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

*Bergen County Democrat.— Hackensack. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Henry D. Winton, editor and 
publisher. 

*The Hackensack Republican.— Hackensack. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. Hugh M. Herrick, editor 
and publisher. 

The Bergen Index.— Hackensack, Semi-weekly, on 
Tuesday and Friday. Independent. S. E. Clapp. 

Carlstadt Freie Presse (German). Carlstadt. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Independent. 

The Englewood Times. Englewood. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. Stockton & Sterling, proprietors 
and publishers. 

The Englewood Press. — Englewood. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. Joseph H. Tillotson, editor and 
proprietor. 

Bergen County Herald — Rutherford. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. C. L. Parker, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Rutherford News. — Rutherford. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Rutherford News Publishing Co., editors 
and proprietors. 

Record. — Tenafly. Weekly, on Thursday. Record Pub- 
lishing Co., publishers. 

The News.— Ridgewood. Weekly, on Friday. Baxter & 
Babcock, publishers. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 177 

The Park Eidge Local. — Park Kidge. Published 
weekly, on Wednesday. James B. H. Storms and John 
C. Storms, editors and proprietors. 

Era. — Ridgefield Park. Thursday. J. L. Race, pro- 
prietor. 

Rutherford American.— Rutherford. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. John E. Tyler, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 

*New Jersey Mirror. — Mount Holly. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. Charles H. Folwell, editor and 
proprietor. 

*The Mount Holly Herald.— Mount Holly. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. William B. Wills, editor. 

*News. — Mount Holly. Weekly, on Tuesday. Republican. 
H. L. Walters, George W. Hand and Joseph C. King- 
don, publishers. J. C. Kingdon, editor. 

*The Mount Holly Dispatch.— Mount Holly. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Democratic. Elton J. Buckley, editor. 

*BuRLiNGTON GAZETTE. — Burlington. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Daily, in the afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. James O. Glasgow, editor and proprietor. 

The New Jersey Enterprise.— Burlington. Daily, in 
the afternoon, and Weekly, on Friday. Enterprise Pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. Republican. David V. Holmes, 
editor. 

Evening Reporter. — Burlington. Daily, in the after- 
noon. D. W. P. Murphy, proprietor and publisher. 

Bordentown Register. — Bordentown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. James D. Flynn, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Beverly Banner. — Beverly. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent. L. W. Perkins, editor and proprietor. 

Moorestown Chronicle, — Moorestown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. W. J. Lovell, editor and 
proprietor. 

New Jersey Sand Burr. — Riverside. Weekly. Inde- 
pendent. Hiram D. Torrie & Bro., editors and pro- 
prietors. 



178 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

The Republican.— Moorestown. Weekly. Republican. 
Charles Laessle, editor and proprietor. 

The New Era.— "Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Riverton and Palmyra. Walter L. Bowen, publisher. 
J. D. Janney, M.D., editor. 

The Weekly News. — Palmyra. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. C. F. Sleeper, editor and proprietor. 



CAMDEN COUNTY. 

*West Jersey Prf,<s. — Camden. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew, editor and proprietor. 

*The Camden Democrat. — Camden. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. C. S. Magrath, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

*The Camden Daily Post. — Camden. Afternoon. Re- 
publican. The Post Printing and Publishing Co., 
editors and publishers. 

Saturday Evening Express.— Camden. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. News Publishing Co. T. C. 
Hamilton, editor. 

*The Courier.— Camden. Daily, in the afiemoon, and 
Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. Courier Publishing 
Association, proprietors. 

*The Daily Telegram.— Camden. Daily. Republican 
Camden Daily Telegram Co., proprietors. F. F. Patter- 
son, Jr., President. 

^Camden Review.— Camden. Daily. Democratic. Re- 
view Co., publishers. Harry B. Paul, President. 

New Jersey Temperance Gazette. — Camden. Weekly, 
on Saturday. A. C. Graw, manager. Rev. J. B. Graw, 
editor. 

Atlantic Coast Guide.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
T. F. Rose, editor and proprietor. 

Camden County Journal (German). — Camden. Weekly, 
on Friday. Louis Hoeller, editor and publisher. 

Citizen. — Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Citizen Pub- 
lishing Co. E. M. Benton, editor. Joseph Hall, 
manager. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 179 

True Republican.— Camden. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
S. W. Wheeler, editor. W. S. Scliermerhorn, manager. 

Echo.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Religious. A. A. 
Holt, editor and proprietor. 

Churchman.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Religious. 
Frederick Alexander, editor and publisher. 

* Advertiser. — Gloucester City. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. William D. Jenkins, editor and publisher. 

Herald and Times. — Atco. Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent. M. J. Skinner, editor and publisher. 

The Tribune. — Haddonfield. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. W. G. Taylor, editor and publisher. 

Advocate-News. — Cramer Hill. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Walter Sawn, editor and publisher. 

The Review.— Merchantville. Weekly. Independent. 
W. J. Lovell, publisher. W. H. Lewis, editor. 

Blackwood Herald. — Blackwood. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. William G. Taylor, Jr., editor and publisher. 



OAPE MAY COUNTY. 

*Cape May Wave,— Cape May City. Weekly, on Satur- 
day, during the whole year, and Daily during July and 
August. Democratic. Henry W. Hand, editor, tfames 
H. Edmunds, proprietor. 

*Star of the Cape. — Cape May City. Weekly, on Friday, 
during tbe whole year, and Daily during July and 
August. Republican. T. R. Brooks & Son, editors and 
proprietors. 

*Cape May County Gazette. — Cape May Court House. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. Alfred Cooper, 
editor. 

Sentinel.— Ocean City. Weekly, on Thursday. Repub- 
lican. R. Curtis Robinson, editor and proprietor. 

*Cape May County Times. — Sea Isle City. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. T. E. Ludlum, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



180 NEW JERSEY J^EWSPAPERS. 



OUMBBRLAND COUNTY. 

*BfiiDGETON Chroxicle.— Bridgeton. Weekly. Demo- 
cratic. Samuel A. Laning, editor and proprietor. 

*Bridgeton Pioneer.— Bridgeton. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. George W. Mc- 
Covvan, editor and publisher. 

New Jersey Patriot. — Bridgeton. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. John Cheeseman & Son, editors and pub- 
lishers. 

*Bridgeton Evening News. — Bridgeton. Daily. Even- 
ing News Company, publishers J. W. Richardson, 
editor and manager. 

MiLLViLLE Enterprise. — WeekW, on Friday. Republi- 
can. Stevens tS: Williamson, editors and proprietors. 

Dollar Weekly News. — Bridgeton. Independent. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Evening News Company, pub- 
lishers. 

Weekly Independent. — Vineland. Weekly, on Friday. 
Populist. John Wilcox and J. J. Streeter, editors and 
publishers. 

The Evening Journal. — Vineland. Afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. B. Franklin Ladd, editor. 

*Millville Republican. — Millville. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican. John W. Newlin, editor and publisher. 

Millville Transcript. — Millville. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. B. J. Eltrelh, editor and proprietor. 

The Vineland News. — Vineland. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Edward and Lewis Miller, editors and 
proprietors. 

The Daily Republican. — Vineland. Afternoon. Cloyd 
& Smith, editors and publishers. 

The Outlook.— Vineland. Weekly. Prohibition. Henry 
W. Wilbur, editor. 

Every Saturday. — Vineland. Weekly. Republican. 
Arthur Russell, editor and publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 181 



ESSEX COUNTY. 

*Newark Daily Advertiser. — Newark. Afternoon. 
Republican. Daily Advertiser Publishing Co. Fred- 
erick Evans, managing editor. Lorenzo Abbey, busi- 
ness manager, 

*Newark Evening News. — Newark. Afternoon. Even- 
ing News Publishing Company. Wallace M. Scudder, 
business manager. Henry A. Steele, managing editor. 

Newark Journal. — Newark. Afternoon. Democratic. 
John J. Leidy, editor and manager. 

*New Jersey Freie Zeitung (German). — Newark. Daily, 
also Sunday edition. Republican. Mrs. B. Prieth, pro- 
prietress. Frederick Kuhn, editor. Benedict Prieth, 
business manager. 

*New Jersey Deutsche Zeitung (German).— Newark. 
Daily, including Sunday. Democratic. New Jersey 
Deutsche Zeitung Co., proprietors. Lewis Dannenberg 
and E. Kraeuther, managers. 

Sunday Call. — Newark. Weekly, on Sunday. Inde- 
pendent. William A. Ure, James W. Schoch, G. W. 
Thorne, W. T. Hunt, Louis Hannoch and H. C. Mc- 
Dougall, publishers. W. T. Hunt, editor. 

Sentinel of Freedom. — Newark. Weekly, on Tuesday. 
Republican. Published at the Daily Advertiser office. 

The Sunday Standard. — Newark. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Independent. The Times-Standard Publishing Co. 
Thos. C. Barr, manager. Herman E. L. Beyer, man- 
aging editor. 

Der Erzahler (German). — Newark. Sunday edition of 
New Jersey Freie Zeitung. Weekly, on Sunday. Re- 
publican. Published at the New Jersey Freie Zeitung 
office. 

Newark Tribune (German). — Weekly, on Sunday. 
Democratic. Published at the New Jersey Deutsche 
Zeitung office, 

Newark Pioneer (German). — Newark. Evening, with 
morning edition on Sunday. Independent. F. E. Adler 
& Co., publishers. 

Town Talk.— Newark. Weekly, on Saturday Illus- 
trated. Social. Geo. H. Ethridge, publisher and pro- 
prietor. 



182 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Item and Enterprise. — Newark. Weekly. Independent. 
M. H. C. Vail, editor and publisher. 

Life. — Newark. Saturdays. L. D. Maltbie & Co., editors 
and publishers. 

Newarker Sonntagsblatt (German). —Newark. Weekly. 
John Schroth, editor and publisher. 

New Jersey Trade Review. — Newark. Semi-monthly. 
Commercial. Paul V. Flynn, editor and publisher. 

Railroad Employee.— Newark. Monthly. B. E. Cam- 
pin, editor and publisher. 

The Orange Chronicle. — Orange. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Frank W. Baldwin, editor and 
proprietor. 

*The Orange Journal.— Orange. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Edgar Williams, editor and proprietor. 

*Orange Volksbote (German).— Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. August Temme, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Orange Herald.— Orange. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Thomas F. Lane, editor and proprietor 

Orange Sonntagsblatt (German). — Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. August Koehler, editor and proprietor. 

*East Orange Gazette. — East Orange. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Charles Starr, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

*South Orange Bulletin. — South Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. Edgar Williams, editor and 
publisher. 

The Bloomfjeld Record.— Bloomfield. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. S. M. Hulin, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The Bloomfield Citizen. — Bloomfield. Weekly, on 
Friday. 

*Montclair Times. — Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. 
A. C. Studer, editor and publisher. 

The Herald.— Montclair. Weekly, on Thursday. Mont- 
clair Publishing Company. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 183 

Review.— Semi-monthly. Social. Charles D. Bailey, 
editor and publisher. 

Item. — Short Hills. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Gibbs & Wright, editors and publishers. 



GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

*The Constitution and Farmers' and Mechanics' 
Advertiser — Woodbury. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. A. S. Barber, Jr., editor and publisher. 

Liberal Press.— Woodbury. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Charles N. Bell, editor and publisher. 

*Gloucester County Democrat, — Woodbury. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. J. D. Carpenter, editor and 
publisher. 

Weekly Item. — Newfield. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. A. C. Dalton, editor and publisher. 

Enterprise. — Glassboro. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. A. M. Seabrook, editor and publisher. 

Swedesboro News.— Swedesboro. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. George W. Pither, editor and publisher. 



HUDSON COUNTY. 

*The Evening Journal. — Jersey City. Afternoon. Re- 
publican. Z. K. Pangborn, Joseph A. Dear and F. W. 
Pangborn, editors and proprietors. 

* Jersey City Herald and Gazette. — Jersey City. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Democratic. Jersey City Herald 
Publishing Co., proprietors. Robert Langdon McDer- 
mott, editor. 

*The Jersey City News. — Jersey City. Afternoon. 
Democratic. James Luby, editor. The City Publishing 
Company, publishers. 

''^The Jersey City Democrat.— Jersey City. Weekly. 
Democratic. 

*The Chronicle. — Jersey City. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. The Chronicle Publishing Co , publishers. 



184 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Hudson County Dispatch. — Town of Union. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. Eder B. Cole, editor and 
proprietor. 

^Evening News.— Hoboken, Afternoon. Democratic. G. 

A. Seide, William Wall and John Ilenchy, publishers 
and proprietors. 

The Kearny Republican. — Arlington and Kearny. 
AVeekly, on Saturday. Kearny Publishing Company. 
J. A. Stowe, editor. 

Hudson County Journal (German).— Hoboken. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. William Kauflfman, editor 
and publisher. 

The Bayonne Times.— Bayonne City. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. E. Gardner & Son, editors 
and proprietors. 

Bayonne Herald and Greenville Register. — Bayonne 
City. Weekly, on Saturday. Democratic. H. C. Page, 
editor and publisher. 

The Reporter.— West Hoboken. Friday. Democratic. 

B. G. Reynolds, editor and publisher. 

North Hudson Leader. — West Hoboken. Friday. C. 
H. Wood, editor and publisher. 

The Bayonne Budget. — Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. James T. R. Proctor, editor and publisher. 

New Jersey Staats Zeitung and Hudson County 
Wecker (German).— Jersey City. Daily. Democratic. 
New Jersey Staats Zeitung Company, publishers. Alex- 
ander Schlesinger, editor. 

Kearny Record. — Harrison. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Philip A. McAviney, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Union Hiller Sonntags Journal (German). — Union 
Hill. Sunday. Independent. John Weber, editor and 
publisher. 

*The Observer.— Hoboken. Daily, and Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. Hoboken Printing and Publishing 
Company, proprietors. John McAuley, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 185 

Kearny Observer. — Arlington. Weekly, on Saturday. 
D. J. Frederick, editor and publisher. 

Town Gossip. — Hoboken. Wednesday. Society. John 
A. Schwartz and George Gerdts, editors and proprietors. 



HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

^Hunterdon County Democrat.— Flemino ton. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Democratic. Robert J. Kilgore, editor 
and publisher. 

*Democrat-Advertiser.— Flemington. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. John N. and H. M. Voorhees, editors and 
proprietors. 

*HuNTERDON REPUBLICAN. — Flemingtou. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. William G. Callis, editor. 

The Beacon. — Lambertville. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. Phineas K. Hazen, editor and publisher. 

*The Lambertville Record. — Lambertville. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Republican. Clark Pierson, editor and 
publisher. 

The Clinton Democrat.— Clinton Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. John Carpenter, Jr., editor and publisher. 

Hunterdon Independent. — Frenchtown. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. John R. Hardon, editor and 
publisher. 

The Star.— Frenchtown. Weekly, on Wednesday. In- 
dependent. William H. Sipes, editor and publisher. 

Home Visitor. — Flemington. Weekly. Prohibition. 
John F. Schenk, editor. 

MiLFORD Leader. — Milford. Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent, Henry C. Boss, proprietor. 

The Avalanche,— Glen Gardner. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. E. W. Rush, editor and publisher. 

The Monitor. — High Bridge. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. High Bridge Publishing Co. 

The Hunterdon Gazette.— High Bridge. Weekly. 
Republican. W. G. Tomer, editor. 



186 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 



MERCER COUNTY. 

*State Gazette. — Trenton. Daily and Weekly. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Eepublican. The John L. Murphy Pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. Thomas Holmes, editor. 

*True American.— Trenton. Daily and Weekly. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Joseph L. Naar, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Daily Emporium. — Trenton. Daily. Democratic. 
J. K. Miles, publisher. 

The Trenton Times.— Trenton. Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic. The Times Asso- 
ciation, publishers. Charles W. Smith, editor. 

The New Jersey Staats Journal (German). — Trenton. 
Semi-weekly. Democratic. Ernest C. Stahl, editor and 
proprietor. 

*SuNDAY Advertiser. — Trenton. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Independent. Advertiser Publishing Co., editors and 
proprietors. 

Mercer County News.— Trenton. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Independent. E. G. Moody, editor and publisher. 

Town Talk.— Trenton. Weekly. C. M. Barcalow, editor 
and proprietor. 

Hightstown Gazette. — Hightstown. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Thomas B. Appleget, publisher. 
Fred. B. Appleget, editor. 

Hightstown Independent. — Hightstown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. Independent Publishing Co., 
publishers. 

Princeton Press. — Princeton. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Eepublican. C. S. Eobinson & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers. 

The Princetonian.— Princeton. Tri- Weekly, on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday. Devoted to the interests of 
Princeton University. Edited by students. 

The Hopewell Herald. — Hopewell. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. C. E. Yoorhees, editor and publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 187 

American Potters' Journal.— Trenton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. In the interest of organized labor. John I). 
McCormick, editor and publisher. 

Pennington Seminary Review. — Pennington. Bi- 
monthly. Published by the Literary Societies of Pen- 
nington Seminary. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

*The New Brunswick Fredonian. — New Brunswick. 
Afternoon and Weekly. Weekly, on Friday. Repub- 
lican. Fredonian Publishing Co. James P. Logan, 
editor. 

*The New Brunswick Times.— New Brunswick. After- 
noon and Weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic. 
The Times Publishing Co., publishers. J. D. Chandlee, 
editor. 

*The Home News — New Brunswick. Afternoon and 
Weekly. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. Hugh 
Boyd, editor. 

The Journal (German). — New Brunswick. Saturday. 
Democratic. B. Strassburger, editor and publisher. 

Middlesex Mail. — New Brunswick. Independent. 
Weekly, on Sunday, W. H. Fiske, Jr., editor and pro- 
prietor. 

^Middlesex County Democrat.— Perth Amboy. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. St. George Kempson, editor 
and proprietor. 

Middlesex County Herald.— Perth Amboy. Every 
evening except Sunday. Independent. Perth Amboy 
Printing House, editors and publishers. 

The Republican.— Perth Amboy. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. James L. and William H. Tooker, editors 
and publishers. 

The Independent Hour. — Woodbridge. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Peter K. Edgar, editor and 
publisher. 

The Sun. — Woodbridge. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. 

The Inquirer. — Metuchen. Weekly. Independent. J. 
F. Kempson, editor and publisher. 



188 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

The Recorder. — Metuchen, Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. Recorder Printing and Publishing Co. J. 
Bromley Adams, editor. 

The Record, — Jamcaburg. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent. E S. Hammell, editor and proprietor. 

The Press.— Cranbury. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. 
George W. Burroughs, editor and proprietor. 

The Advance. — Jamesburg. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Printed and published at the New Jersey State Reform 
School. 

The Chronicle. — Perth Amboy. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Wilbur La Roe, editor and publisher. 

Weekly Register. — Woodbridge. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. H. B. RoUinson, editor and publisher. 

The Citizen.— South Amboy. Independent. Weekly, on 
Saturday. M. X. Roll, editor and publisher. 



MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

*The Monmouth Inquirer. — Freehold. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Maxey Applegate, editor and 
publisher. 

Monmouth Democrat.— Freehold. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. James S. and Joseph A. Yard, 
editors and proprietors. 

*New Jersey Standard.— Red Bank. Semi-weekly, on 
Tuesday and Thursday. Democratic. Daniel H. Apple- 
gate and John Hone, proprietors. 

Red Bank Register. — Red Bank. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. John H. Cook, editor. 

*Keyport Enterprise. — Keyport. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Fred. F. Armstrong, editor and proprietor. 

Keyport Weekly. — Keyport. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. E. D. Petteys, editor and proprietor. 

Long Branch News. — Long Branch. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Eben Heisley, editor. 

The Long Branch Record. — Long Branch. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Independent. F. M. Taylor, Jr., editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 189 

*LoNG Branch Times —Long Branch. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day, Republican. Jacob Stulls, editor and publisher. 

The Transcript. — Freehold. Weekly, on Friday Demo- 
cratic. Alexander L. and John B. Moreau, editors and 
proprietors 

The Matawan Journal.— Matawan. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Eepublican. Benjamin F. S. Brown, editor and 
proprietor. 

*The Journal,.— Asbury Park. Daily, during July and 
August. Weekly, on Saturday. Kepublican. J. K. 
Wallace, editor and publisher. 

The Shore Press.— Asbury Park. Daily, and Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. Penfield Publishing Co., 
proprietors. Eobertus D. Love, editor. 

The Daily Spray. — Asbury Park, Afternoon, June, July 
and August. Devereux & Burt, publishers. 

Evening News. — Asbury Park, every evening except Sun- 
day. J. H. Youmans, editor and publisher. 

Ocean Grove Record.— Ocean Grove. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Religious. Rev. A. Wallace, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The Advertiser. — Eatontown. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. Garrett S. WyckofF, editor and publisher. 

The Coast Star Democrat. — Manasquan. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. W. E. Hoskins, editor. 

The Coast Echo.— Belmar, Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Conrad Pinches, editor and proprietor. 

Seabright Sentinel. — Seabright. Republican. Weekly, 
July and August, on Friday. Jacob Stults, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Journal. — Atlantic Highlands. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. A. C. Hart, editor and proprietor. 

Seaside Gazette.— Spring Lake Beach. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Republican. Seaside Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers. E. S. V. Stults, manager. 

Monmouth Press. — Atlantic Highlands. Republican. 
Weekly, on Saturday. William J. Leonard, editor. 



190 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

The Times.— Ocean Grove. Weekly, on Saturday. W. 
H. Beagle, editor and publisher. 

New Jersey Trumpet.— Asbury Park. Weekly. Re- 
publican. Interest of colored citizens. William Mur- 
rell, editor and proprietor. 



MORRIS COUNTY. 

*The Jerseyman. — Morristown. Weekly, on Friday. Re- 
publican. Alanson A. Vance, editor. Vance & Stiles, 
publishers. 

"True Democratic Banner. — Morristown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Vogt Brothers, editors and 
proprietors. 

The Morris County Chronicle.— Morristown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. J. Frank Lindsley, editor and 
proprietor. 

*The Iron Era.— Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Repub- 
lican. Dover Printing Company, editors and publishers. 

*DovER Index.— Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. 
Frank F. Hummell, editor. 

*The Bulletin.— Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Samuel L. Garrison, editor and publisher. 

The Eagle. — Madison. Weekly, on Friday. Indepen- 
dent. Eagle Printing Company Wm. P. Tuttle, editor 
and manager. 

The Record. — Rockaway. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. W. Burd, Jr., editor and publisher. 

The Express. — Morristown. Democratic. Saturday. 
Abraham L. Adams, editor and proprietor. 



OCEAN COUNTY. 

New Jersey Courier. — Toms River. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. W. H. Fischer and Charles T. Pat- 
tercon, editors and proprietors. 

*Ocean County Democrat. — Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles S. Haslett, editor and 
publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 191 

*TiMES AND JouENAL. — Lakewood. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Kepublican. A. M. Bradshaw, editor and publisher. 

The Beacon. — Point Pleasant. Weekly, on Saturday. J. 
T, Havens and D. C. Leaw, editors and proprietors. 

The Island Heights Herald.— Island Heights. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Independent. J. B. Graw, editor and 
publisher. 

New Jersey Coast Guard. — Bay Head. Weekly, on 
Saturday. W. J. Lovell, editor and publisher. 

The Tuckerton Beacon. — Tuckerton. Weekly." Benj. 
H. Crosby, editor and publisher. 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

*Paterson Guardian. — Afternoon and AVeekly. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Carleton M. Herrick, editor 
and publisher. 

*The Paterson Press — Paterson. Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. The Press Print- 
ing and Publishing Co., publishers and proprietors. 
George Wurts, editor. 

^The Morning Call.— Paterson. Daily, except Sunday. 
Republican. The Call Printing and Publishing Com- 
pany, proprietors and publishers. William H. Moses, 
editor. Joseph E. Crowell, city editor. 

Paterson Yolks-Freund (German). — Paterson. Daily, 
afternoon. Democratic. Carl August Boeger, editor 
and publisher. 

De Telegraf (Holland).— Paterson. Semi-weekly. Re- 
publican. Tanis & Schrauder, publishers. 

Paterson Labor Standard. — Paterson. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Labor. J. P. McDonnell, editor and proprietor. 

Paterson Censor.— Paterson. Monday. Printed record 
of the counties of Bergen and Passaic. A. E. & B. 
Vanderhoven, editors and proprietors. 

The Item. — Passaic. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Alfred Speer, editor and proprietor. 

*Passaic City Herald. — Passaic. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent Democratic. O. & A. E. Vanderhoven, 
editors and proprietors. 



192 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Passaic Daily Herald.— Passaic. Afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. Vanderhoven & Engeman, proprietors. O. 
Vanderhoven, editor. 

Passaic Daily News. — Passaic. Afternoon. Republican. 

D, W. Mahoney, editor. News Publishing Co., pro- 
prietors and publishers. 

Passaic County Journal (German). — Paterson. Daily, 
morning. Otto Stutzbach, editor and publisher. 

Evening News.- Paterson. Daily, afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. News Printing and Publishing Co., proprietors. 

E. B. Haines, editor. 



SALEM COUNTY. 

^National Standard. — Salem. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew & Brother, proprietors. 
Benjamin Patterson, editor and manager. 

*Salem Sunbeam. — Salem. "Weekly, on Saturday. Demo- 
cratic. Robert Gwynne, editor and proprietor. Robt. 
Gwynne, Jr., assistant editor. 

*The South Jerseyman. — Salem. Weekly, on Tuesday. 
Republican. William H. Harris, proprietor. 

The Woodstown Monitor-Register. — Wocdstown. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Independent. Benjamin Pat- 
terson, proprietor. 

Pennsgrove Record. — Pennsgrove. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. W. A. Summerill, proprietor. 

Elmer Times. — Elmer. Weekly, on Saturday. S. P. 
Foster, editor and publisher. 



SOMERSET COUNTY. 

*The Somerset Messenger. — Somerville. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Democratic. John H. Mattison, editor 
and publisher. 

*The UNIO^^ST-GAZETTE. — Somerville. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. The Unionist-Gazette Association, 
publishers. Charles H. Bateman, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 193 

*The Somerset Democrat.— Somerville. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic, D. N. Messier, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Bound Brook Chronicle.— Bound Brook. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. W. B. R. Mason, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

Bound Brook Democrat. — Bound Brook. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles J. Wilson, manager. 

Der Somerset Bote (German). — Bound Brook. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Democratic. Walter Neitz, editor and 
publisher. 



SUSSEX COUNTY. 

*The Sussex Register. — Newton. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Richard F. Goodman, editor and publisher. 

*The New Jersey Herald. — Newton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Jacob L. Bunnell, editor and 
proprietor. Henry C. Bunnell, assistant editor. 

Sussex County Independent. — Deckertown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. Stanton & Wilson, editors. 

New Jersey News. — Newton. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. D. H. Rittenhouse, editor and proprietor. 

The Wantage Recorder. — Deckertown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Stickney & Yatman, editors 
and proprietors. 

The Milk Reporter.— Deckertown. Monthly. John J. 
Stanton, manager. 



UNION COUNTY. 

^Elizabeth Daily Journal. — Elizabeth. Afternoon, also 
Weekly. Republican. Charles C. McBride, editor. 
Augustus S. Crane, business manager. 

^Central New Jersey Herald. — Elizabeth. Issued 
every afternoon, also Weekly, on Saturday. Demo- 
cratic. F. S. Lockwood, editor and proprietor. 

■^The Leader. — Elizabeth. Daily. Independent. J.Mad- 
ison Drake, editor and publisher. 



194 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Freie Pf-ESSE (German). Elizabeth. Weekly, on Satur- 
day, Democratic. Charles H. Schmidt, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

*Union County Kecord. — Elizabeth. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Isaac N. Lewis, editor and pub- 
lisher, 

*The Union Democrat. — Eahway. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Lewis S. Hyer, editor and proprietor. 

*The Advocate. — Eahway. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. H. B. Eollinson, editor and publisher. 

Central Xew Jersey Times.— Plainfield. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Eepublican, Times Publishing Company. 

■'^The Constitutionalist. — Plainfield. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. A. L. Force, publisher. 

*The Plainfield Courier News. — Plainfield. Afternoon. 
Eepublican. F. W. Eunyon, editor and proprietor. 

The Eoyal Craftsman. — Plainfield. Monthly. Devoted 
to Masonry. John Ulrich, proprietor. 

*The Summit Eecord. — Summit, Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Thomas F. Lane, editor and proprietor. 

The Summit Herald.— Summit. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Eepublican. D M. Smythe, publisher. Xewton Wood- 
ruff, managing editor. 

Union County Standard. — Westfield. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Alfred E. Pearsell, editor and proprietor. 

*New Jersey Law Journal.— Plainfield. Monthly. 
New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Co., proprietors. 
Edward Q. Keasbey and C, L. Borgmeyer, editors. 

The Daily Press.— Plainfield. Published at the office 
of the Constitutionalist. Democratic A. L. Force, 
proprietor. 

The Westfield Leader. — Westfield, Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. The Westfield Printing Company. W. H. 
Morse, editor. J. H. Cash, manager. 

The Cranford Chronicle. — Weekly, on Wednesday. 
John Alfred Potter, editor and publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 195 



WARREN COUNTY. 

■^Belvidere Apollo. — Belvidere. Weekly, on Friday. 
Kepublican. Josiah Ketcham, editor and publisher. 

The Warren Journal. — Belvidere. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. John M. Simerson, editor and publisher. 

*Hac'Kettstown Gazette. — Hackettstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Charles B-ittenhouse, editor and 
publisher. 

Warren Eepublican. — Hackettstown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Curtis Bros., editors and proprietors. 

Warren Democrat. — Phillipsburg. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Charles F. Fitch, proprietor. 

*The Washington Star. — Washington. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles L. Stryker, editor 
and proprietor. 

The BLAIRSTO^YN Press. — Blairstown. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent. De Witt C. Carter, editor and 
publi-sher. 

The Warren Tidings. — Washington. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. J. B. R. Smith, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The Post. — Phillipsburg. Evenings, except Sunday. 
Lynch & Sterner, proprietors and publishers. 

There are 279 daily, weekly and other papers altogether 
in the State, of which 82 are Democratic, 83 Eepublican, 55 
Independent, 37 Neutral, 4 Religious, 3 Social, 2 Prohibition, 
2 Labor, and one each as follows : Temperance, Populist, 
Commercial, Railroad Employes, Collegiate, Masonic, Law, 
Seminary, Reform School for Boys, Milk and in interest of 
colored people. Twenty-two are published in the German 
and one in the Holland language. 

The summary by counties is as follows: Atlantic, 13 
Bergen, 13 ; Burlington, 14 ; Camden, 20 ; Cape May, 5 
Cumberland, 14; Essex, 29; Gloucester, 6; Hudson, 20 
Hunterdon, 13 ; Mercer, 15 ; Middlesex, 18 ; Monmouth, 25 
Morris, 9; Ocean, 7; Passaic, 13; Salem, 6 ; Somerset, 6 
Sussex, 6 ; Union, 18 ; Warren, 9. Total, 281. 



CITIES, TOWNS AND BOROUGHS 

With Population and the Names of the 
Mayors and their Politics. 



Anglesea, 161, Cape May ; Edwin H. Hewitt, D. 
AsburyPark, 5,500 * Monmouth ; Frank L. Ten Broeck, K. 
Atlantic City, 13,055, Atlantic; Franklin P. Stoy, R. 
Atlantic Highlands, 945, Monmouth ; Jacob T. Stout. 
Avalon, Cape May ; Thomas H. Bray. 
Bayhead, Ocean ; John M. Chadwick, D. 
Bayonne, 19,033, Hudson ; W. C. Farr, D. 
Beach Haven, Ocean ; William L. Butler, E,. 
Belmar, Monmouth ; Charles H. Thompson, R. 
Belvidere, 1,768, Warren ; Theodore P. Hopler, D. 
Beverly, Burlington ; J. D. Fish, R. 
Boonton, 4,200,* Morris; YAVis G. Myers. 
Bordentown, 4,232, Burlington ; J. O. Hudson, D. 
Bound Brook, 1,462, Somerset; J. Howard Perry, J). 
Bradley Beach, Monmouth ; Benjamin Bennett. 
Bridge'ton, 11,424, Cumberland ; £, Milford Applegate, R. 
Brigantine, Atlantic; A. B. Smith, R. 
Burlington, 7,264, Burlington ; J. Parrish Woolman, D. 
Camden, 58,313, Camden ; J. L. Wescott, R. 
Cape May Citv, 2,136, Cape May; James M. E. Hil- 
dreth, R. 
Cape May Point, 167, Cape May ; John W. Bailey. 
Carlstadt, Bergen ; John Oehler, R. 
Clayton, 1,807, Gloucester; H. R. Sparks, R. 
Clinton, 1,975, Hunterdon ; F. A. Esty. 
Collingswood, 539, Camden ; R. T. Collings, R. 
Deckertown, Sussex ; Theodore W. Margerum, R. 
Dover. 3,200, Morris ; George H. McCracken, D. 
Egg Harbor, 1,439, Atlantic; Fred. Schuchardt, D. 
Elizabeth, 37,764, Union ; J. C. Rankin, R. 
Elmer, Salem ; George M. Bacon, D. 
Englishtown, Monmouth ; J. H. Laird, D 
Freehold, 2,932, Monmouth ; J. S. Yard, D. 
Frenchtown, 1,023, Hunterdon; James E. Sherman. 

Garfield, Bergen ; Bogart. 

Gloucester City, 6,564, Camden ; John Beaston, D. 

* Estimated. 
(196) 



CITIES, TOWNS AND BOROUGHS. 197 

Hackettstown, 2,672, Warren ; G. W. Smith, E. 

Haddonfield, 2,502, Camden; Edward Austin, R. 

Harrison City, 8,328, Hudson. 

Hightstown, 1,875, Mercer; W. Irving Norton, R. 

Hoboken, 43,648 Hudson ; Lawrence Fagan, D. 

Holly Beach, 217, Cape May ; Frank Smith, R. 

Irvington, Essex; James M. Moreland. 

Island Heights, 250, Ocean ; Howard D. Vansant, R. 

Jersey City, 163,003, Hudson ; Peter F. Wanser, R. 

Keyport, Monmouth, 3,411 ; John G. Schanck. 

Lambertville, 4,142, Hunterdon; Torbett Coryell, D. 

Lavallette, Ocean ; Charles G. Errickson, R, 

Linwood, 536, Atlantic ; George W. Haggerty, D. 

Long Beach, Ocean ; Thomas Callahan. 

Long Branch, 7,231, Monmouth ; Rufus Blodgett, D. 

Madison, Morris ; James P. Albright, D. 

Manasquan, 1,506, Monmouth ; C. M. Hults, R. 

Merchantville, 1,225, Camden; Charles Spangles, R. 

Millville, 10,002, Cumberland ; Thos. S. Whitaker, D. 

Morristown, 8,156, Morris; Edward A. Quayle, D. 

Mount Arlington, Morris ; Howard P. Frothingham, R. 

Neptune City, George W. Brown. 

Newark, 181 830, Essex ; Julius A. Lebknecher, R, 

New Brunswick, 18,603, Middlesex ; J. H. Van Cleef, D. 

North Plainfield, Somerset ; Henry E. Needham, R. 

North Spring Lake, Monmouth ; Oliver H. Brown. 

Ocean City, 452, Cape May ; Harry G. Steel man. 

Ocean Grove, Monmouth ; Rev. E. H. Stokes. 

Orange, 18,844, Essex ; John Gill, R. 

Passaic City, 13,028, Passaic ; John J. Slater, R. 

Paterson, 78,347, Passaic ; Christian Braun. t>. 

Pemberton, 834, Burlington ; Davis C. Wells, R. 

Pennsgrove, Salem ; James S. Torton, R. 

Perth Amboy, 9,512, Middlesex ; E. W. Barnes, R. 

Phillipsburg, 8,644, Warren ; Samuel V. Davis, R. 

Plainfield, 11,267, Union ; A. Gilbert, R. 

Pleasantville, Atlantic; Joseph C. Farr, R. 

Point Pleasant, Ocean ; Lawrence D. Vannote, D. 

Princeton, 3,422, Mercer ; James L. Briner, R. 

Eahway, 7,105, Union ; J. J. Daly, R. 

Red Bank, 4,145, Monmouth ; Charles D. Warner. 

Ridgefield, Bergen ; W. B. Pugh. 

Riverton, Burlington ; Edward H. Ogden, R. 

Rockaway, Morris ; Morford B. Strait. 

Rutherford, 2,293, Bergen ; William McKenzie. 

Salem, 5,516, Salem ; J. W. Acton, D. 

Seabright, Monmouth. 

*9 



i98 CITIES, TOWNS AND BOROUGttS. 

Sea Isle City, 766, Cape May ; T. E. Liidlam, D. 
Somerville, 3,861, Somerset ; J. J. Bergen, D. 
Somers Point, 250, Atlantic; William Keatc*, D. 
South Amboy, 4,330, Middlesex ; D. C. Chase, D. • 
South Atlantic City, Atlantic; P. J. Gilligan, D. 
South Cape May, Cape May ; James Ritchie, Jr. 

South Orange, 3,106, Essex'; . 

Spring Lake, Monmouth ; E, V. Patterson. 

Stockton, Camden ; ( Jeorge W. Miles, R. 

Tenafly, Bergen ; Henry B. Palmer. 

Trenton, 57,458, Mercer; Joseph B. Shaw, D. 

Union, Town of, 10,643, Hudson ; Moritz Klump. 

Vineland, 3,822, Cumberland ; Charles P. Lord, R. 

Washington, 2,834, Warren ; Nathan Dilts, R. 

West Cape May, 757, Cape May ; George H. Reeves, R. 

West Hoboken, Hudson ; Charles J. Chandless. 

Wilbur, Mercer ; Henry Barlow, R, 

Woodbury, 3,911, Gloucester; Daniel F. Hendrickson, R. 

Woodstown, 556, Salem ; C. H. Richman, R. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY. 



George T. Werts. 

Governor Werts was born at Hackeltstown, Warren county, 
N. J., March 24th, 1846, He lived there until his parents 
moved to Bordentown, in 1849. His father was Peter Werts, 
who died about nine years ago, and his mother was sister of 
the late Attorney-General Jacob Vanatta. The Governor 
attended the Bordentown High School and the State Model 
School at Trenton, and at the age of seventeen went to 
Morristown to study law with Mr. Vanatta. He was admitted 
to the bar at the November Term, 1867, and began the practice 
of law in Morristown. He was Recorder of that town from 
May, 1883, to May, 1885, and was Mayor from 1886 until his 
resignation in February, 1892. He was Senator from Morris 
county from 1886, and until he resigned in February, 1892, 
to accept the office of Justice of the Supreme Court, to which 
he was appointed by Governor Abbett, and his nomination 
was at once confirmed by a unanimous vote of the Senate. 
He took the place of the late Justice Knapp, of the Hudson 
county circuit. 

During the legislative session of 1889, Governor Werts 
served as President of the Senate, when he discharged the 
duties of that office with marked ability and impartiality. 
While a member of the Senate, he drafted the Liquor and 
the Ballot Reform laws. He always took a prominent part 
in legislation, and during several sessions he was the leader 
of his party on the floor of the Senate. 

He was elected Governor in 1892 by a plurality of 7,625 
votes over John Kean, Jr. He occupied his seat on the 
bench during the whole of the campaign, and personally 
took no part in it beyond writing his letter of acceptance of 
the nomination, which had been unanimously tendered to 
him by the Democratic State Convention. 

Werts, Dem , 167,257 ; Kean, Jr., Rep., 159,632; Kennedy, 
Pro., 7,750; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 1,338; Bird, People's, 894; 
Werts' plurality, 7,625. 

(199) 



200 BIOGRAPHIES. 

UNITED STATES SENATORS. 

John Rhoderic McPherson. 

Senator McPherson was born at York, Livingston county, 
New York, on the nintli of May, 1833. He received a com- 
mon-school and academic education. Leaving the academy 
when eighteen years old, he engaged in farming and stock- 
raising, ill which, by dint of hard work, he was moderately 
successful, until he became a resident of Jersey City, in 1858. 
Here he entered largely into the live-stock trade, and very 
soon became one of the most prominent dealers. He invented, 
perfected and put into practice new and hitherto unknown 
devices and principles in the treatment of animal matter. 
He designed and put in operation in this country the great 
abattoir system in use in France, and improved it in many 
material ways. Senator McPherson was a member of the 
Board of Aldermen of Jersey City from 1864 to 1870, and 
for more than three years of that time he was President of 
the Board. He established in that city the People's Gas 
Ligiit Company, and was elected its President. He was also 
President of several savings banks. In 1871 he was elected 
to the New Jersey Senate by an unu.sually large majority, 
and served for three years with great credit to his county and 
State. In 1876 he was a Presidential elector, when the State 
went for Tilden by a very large majority. In 1877 he was 
elected a United States Senator to succeed Hon. F. T. Freling- 
huysen. He was re-elected in 1883 and again in 1889. He 
is the only New Jersey Senator who has ever served a third 
term. In 1884 he was a delegate to the National Democratic 
Convention, at Chicago, and supported Thomas F. Bayard 
for the Presidency, but when Cleveland was nominated he 
gave him his hearty support. He was also a delegate to the 
National Democratic Conventions held at St. Louis, in 1888, 
and at Chicago, in 1892, when he supported Cleveland for 
the nomination each time. His term as United States Senator 
expires on March 3d, this year, and he will be succeeded by 
a Republican. 



James Smith, Jr. 

Senator Smith was born in 1851, at Newark, N. J., and 
was educated at private schools in his native city up to the 
time he went to college at Wilmington, Del. After graduat- 
ing he located in New York in the dry goods business, his 



BIOGRAPHIES. 201 

father having been in this line for many years in the same 
city. He did not like the business, however, and soon 
returned to Newark, where he engaged in the manufacturing 
of patent and enameled leather He is now the sole owner 
of one of the largest concerns in that line of business in the 
country, and the product of his factories is shipped to all 
parts of this country and Europe. The business is conducted 
under the firm name of J. H. Halsey & Smith. It has 
earned the reputation of manufacturing the finest carriage 
leathers in the world. Mr. Smith's first political office was 
that of Councilman of the city of Newark, having been 
elected in 1883, Avhen the Council was a tie. While the 
ward he ran in was Republican, he was elected by more 
majority than the Republican candidate received votes. He 
at once became a leader, and in the following fall he was 
unanimously nominated for Mayor, notwithstanding that he 
wrote a letter to the convention that he would not accept. 
He stood by that letter, and declined the nomination, where- 
upon the convention was reconvened and Mayor Haynes Avas 
named. 

Mr. Smith was President of the Board of Public Works 
of the city of Newark from the time of its creation and until 
a short period after he was elected United States Senator, 
when he resigned. Previous to his connection wi'h that 
Board he had declined several offices which had been 
tendered to him by his party. He was nominated for United 
States Senator, to succeed Mr. Blodgett, in 1893, by a unani- 
mous vote of the caucus, and he received every Democratic 
vote in each house on Tuesday, January 24th, when the 
election was held, the Republicans voting for General William 
J. Sewell. The vote stood— Senate: Smith, 16; Sewell, 5 ; 
House : Smith, 39 ; Sewell, 21. 

Senator Smith's rise in politics has been rapid and remark- 
able. In a period of ten years he was advanced from the 
office of Alderman to that of United States Senator. He has 
always been a zealous and an active Democrat, and during 
recent years he has been recognized as a prominent leader of 
his party. His term as United States Senator will expire on 
March 3d, 1899. 



202 BIOGRAPHIES. 



NEW JERSEY'S CONGRESSMEN. 
First District. 

Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem 
Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 198,193.) 

Henry C. Loudenslager. 

(Rep., Woodbury.) 

Mr. Loudenslager was born in Mauricetown, Cumberland 
county, N. J., May 22d, 1852. His parents moved to Pauls- 
boro, Gloucester county, in March, 1856, where he has con- 
tinuously resided ever since. His education was obtained in 
the common schools. After leaving the farm of his father, 
he entered the produce commission bui-ine^s in Philadelphia, 
and continued in it for ten years, from 1872 to 1882. During 
this time his father was the County Clerk of Gloucester, and 
except when engaged in the market during produce season, 
the son was employed in the office. He was elected to the 
office in 1882, and was re-elected in 1887. At both of his 
elections he ran far ahead of his ticket, his plurality the last 
time being 946. Mr. Loudenslager is well known all over 
the State from his secret society connections. He is at present 
the Great Keeper of Wampum, Improved O R. M., of this 
State. He is a member of Florence Lodge, No. 87, F. and 
A. M., and is a 32-degree Mason. In 1894 he was re-elected 
to Congress by the increased pluralitv of 12,380. 

1892— Loudenslager, Rep., 25,099*; Porch, Dem., 22,511; 
Seagraves, Pro., 1,940. Loudenslager' s pluralitv, 2,588. 

1894— Loudenslager, Rep., 24,462 ; Ferrell, Dem., 12,082 ; 
Gilbert, Pro., 1,731; Willcox, People's, 1,641; Kreck, Soc- 
Lab., 194. Loudenslager' 8 plurality, 12,380. 



Second District. 

Atlantic, Mercer, Burlington and Ocean Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 183,316.) 

John J. Gardxee. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Mr. Gardner was born October 17th, 1845, in Atlantic 
county, N. J., and since 1856 has resided in Atlantic City, 
except during his term of service in the army during the late 



BIOGRAPHIES. 203 

war. He is in the real estate and insurance business. He 
was elected Mayor of Atlantic City in 1868, '69, 70, 73 and 
74 — having declined the nomination in 1872 and 1875. In 
the latter year he was elected a member of the Common 
Council, and one of the Coroners of the county. He was 
elected Senator in 1877, and was re-elected in 1880, '83, '86 
and '89. He beat the record with regard to the length of 
service of any State Senator in the history of the State, 
having served five consecutive terms, or fifteen years alto- 
gether. In the session of 1883 he was President of the 
Senate, when he discharged the duties of the position with 
much ability and impartiality. He always took a prominent 
part in legislation, and during many years was the leader of 
his party in the Senate. He is noted for his readiness in 
debate, repartee and quick and forcible expression of ideas. 
He was a Delegate at-Large to the National Kepublican Con- 
vention at Chicago in 1884. He was re-elected to Congress 
in 1894 bv the increased plurality of 9,741. 

1892-Gardner, Rep., 22,716; Wetherill, Dem., 20,592; 
French, Pro., 1,348; Duroe, People's, 169. Gardner's 
plurality, 2,124. 

1894— Gardner, Eep , 22,641; Haines, Dem., 12,900; 
Joslin, Pro., 1,278 ; Ellis, People's, 630. Gardner's plurality, 
9,741. 



Third District. 

Somerset, Middlesex and Monmoutli Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 159,913.) 

Benjamin F. Howell. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Howell was born in Cumberland county, N. J., Janu- 
ary 27th, 1844, and is President of the People's National 
Bank of New Brunswick, He was Surrogate of Middlesex 
county for ten years, from November, 1882, until November, 
1892. He served with the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers 
throughout the late war. He came to South Amboy, where 
he entered business and continued his residence there until 
1882, Avhen he was elected Surrogate and removed to New 
Brunswick. He served three years as a member of a Town- 
ship Committee, and two terms as Chosen Freeholder, during 
the last year of Avhich he was Director of the Board. He is 
a director of the New Brunswick Savings Bank and holds 
many other positions of trust. He was elected to Congress by 



204 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a plurality of 3,976 over Jacob A. Geissenhainer, Democrat, 
who two vears before carried the district bv 3,327. 

1892 - Geissenhainer, Dera., 20,40" ; Hofiman, Rep., 17,080 ; 
Marshall, Pro., 992. Geissenhainer's plurality, 3,327. 

1894— Howell, Rep., 18,403; Geissenhainer, Dem., 14,427 ; 
Lanning, Pro., 791 ; Merritt, People' .s, 412 ; Weigel, Soc- 
Lab., 265. Howell's plurality, 3,976. 



Fourth District. 

Sassex, Warren, Hunterdon and Morris Counties. 

(Population, Censu.s of 1890, 148,?''>S.) 
Mahlon Pitney. 
(Rep., Morristown.) 

Mr. Pitney was born at Morristown, N. J., February 5th, 
1858, and is a lawyer by i)rofession. He is a son of Vice 
Chancellor Pitney. He obtained his early education in the 
schools of his native town and entered Princeton College in 
1875, and was graduated in 1879. Upon graduation he at 
once commenced the study of law in the office of his father, 
who was then practicing in Morristown. He was admitted 
to the bar as attorney in June, 1882, and became a counselor- 
at-law in 1885. He opened an office in L>over, Morris county, 
in 1882, and remained there until 1889, when he returned to 
Morristown, and has since resided and practiced law in that 
place. His law practice is quite general in its character. At 
the recent election Morris county gave him 1,803 majority, 
which is entirely without precedent in any general election, 
and has been exceeded only once in a county election. His 
own township of Morris gave him a majority of 441, which 
is the highest ever received in that township by any candi- 
date in a contested election. He also has the honor to have 
carried the Democratic counties of Sussex and Warren, the 
latter county being the home of his opponent, Hon. Johnston 
Cornish. 

1892— District different from that of 1894. 

1894— Pitney, Rep., 16,116 ; Cornish, Dem., 14,709; Ramsey, 
Pro., 1,586 ; Barrick, People's, 507. Pitney's jjlurality, 1,407. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 205 

Fifth District. 

Passaic and Bergen Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,272.) 

James Fleming Stewart. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Stewart was born at Paterson, N. J., June 15tli, 1851, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He attended both school and 
college, and occupied his summer vacations in various depart- 
ments of labor to acquire the means to defray the expenses 
of his education. In the law class of the University of the 
City of New York, in 1870, which comprised many men 
who have since attained eminence in their profession, he 
took the $250 prize for the best examination— a fact of which 
he is particularly proud. He has been three times appoint* d 
Recorder of the city of Paterson, a position which he held 
when he was elected to Congress, but he was legislated out of 
office in 1892 by the Democratic Legislature, and was restored 
in the spring of 1894, owing to Republican ascendancy in the 
Legislature. 

1892 -District different from that of 1894. 

1894— Stewart, Rep., 16,441; Demarest, Dem., 10 469; 
Parsons, Pro., 540; Ball, Soc.-Lab., 2,511. Stewart's plu- 
rality, 5,972. 



Sixth District. 

The City of Newark and the Township of East Orange, 

Kssex County, 

(Population, Census of 1890, 195,112.) 

Richard Wayne Parker. 

(Rep , Newark.) 

Mr. Parker was born at Morristown, N. J., August 6th, 
1848, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1867, studied law in the Columbia Law 
School, New York, and was admitted to the bar in 1870. He 
then became the law partner of his father, Cortlandt Parker, 
and the partnership still exists. He was a member of Assem- 
bly from Essex county in 1885 and 1886, when he took a 
prominent part in legislation. In 1892 he was defeated for 
Congress by Thomas Dunn English. 

1892— District different from that of 1894. 

1894— Parker, Rep., 23,219; English, Dem., 14,746; Gray, 
Pro., 503 ; Buchanan, People's, 798 ; Walker, Soc.-Lab., 836. 
Parker's plurality, 8,473. 



206 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Seventh District. 

All of Hudson County excepting the City of Bayonne. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 256,093.) 

Thomas McEwan, Jk. 
(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. McEwan, was born at Paterson, N. J , February 26th, 
1854 ; is a lawyer by profession, and was formerly a civil 
engineer. He was Assessor of the Fourth District, Jersey 
City, for two years, 1886-87. He was United States Com- 
missioner and Chief Supervisor of Elections for tlie District 
of New Jersey from August, 1892, to October, 1893. He w^as 
a delegate from Hudson county to the Republican National 
Convention of 1892, having for his colleague Hon. Gilbert 
Collins. He has been Secretary ^nd one of the Governors 
of the Union League Club of Hudson county from the time 
of its foundation. He has also been Secretary of the Hudson 
County Republican General Committee for about fifteen years, 
up to January, 1893. He has been a delegate to and Secre- 
tary of every Republican Convention of Jersey City and 
Hudson county for about fifteen years, to January, 1892, and 
also a delegate to all the State Conventions of the Republican 
party in that period. In 1893 he was elected as a member 
of Assembly in a Democratic district in Hudson county, by 
a plurality of 815 over Dr. Stout, who was the representative 
the year before. In the legislative session of 1894, Mr. 
McEwan was chosen the Republican leader of the House, he 
being the first new member who has been so honored on either 
side in many years. 

1892— District diflferent from that of 1894. 

1894— McEwan, Rep., 23,5C0 ; Stevens, Dem., 23,207; 
Burger, Pro., 299 ; Herrschaft, People's and Soc.-Lab., 1,193. 
McEwan's plurality, 293. 



Eighth District. 

The County of Union, the City of Bayonne, Hudson County, 

and all the County of Essex excepting the City 

of Newark and Township of East Orange. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,486.) 

Charles Newell Fowler. 
(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Fowler was born at Lena, Illinois, November 2d, 1852, 
and is in the banking business. His earlier years were 
passed on his father's farm, w^here he remained until his 



BIOGRAPHIES. 207 

eighteenth year, when he became a student at Beloit College, 
Wisconsin. Two years later he entered Yale College, from 
which he was graduated in 1876. He read law in the office 
of Williams & Thompson, in Chicago, and attended the 
Chicago Law School, and was graduated in 1878. He has 
been more or less engaged in active politics since he came to 
Elizabeth, ten years ago, and for some time he has been 
Chairman of the City Republican Central Committee. 

1892— District different from that of 1894. 

1894— Fowler, Rep., 19,041; Dunn, Dem., 12,805; Ken- 
nedy, Pro., 518; Pope, People's, 167; Bell, Soc -Lab., 648. 
Fowler's plurality, 6,236. 



r 



POPULATION AND VOTE CAST IN EACH DISTRICT FOE, 
CONGRESS IN 1892 AND 1894. 

TOTAL VOTE. 

District. Population. 1892. 1894. 

First 198,193 49,550 40,110 

Second 183,316 44,825 37,449 

Third 159,913 38,409 34,298 

Fourth 148,268 35,988 32,918 

Fifth 152,272 34,055 29,961 

Sixth 195,112 45,817 40,102 

Seventh 266,093 51,752 48,199 

Eighth. 152,486 34,556 33,179 

Total 1,441,933 334,952 296,216 

In this computation the lines of the districts in 1892 were made to 
conform with those of the districts of 1894. 



STATE SENATORS. 
Atlantic County. 

(Population, 28,836.) 

Samuel D. Hoffman. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Senator Hoffman was born in Auburn, Salem county, Feb- 
ruary 27th, 1850, and is an attorney and counselor-at-law. 
He was educated in the public schools of his native county, 
under John S. Locke, a noble educator and valiant soldier, 
and later on graduated from the New Jersey State Normal 
School. He is a strong champion of public schools, having 
taught in Salem and Atlantic counties, serving several years 
as County Examiner under Superintendents Eev. George B. 



208 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Wiglit and S. R. Morse He was Clerk of the Board of Free- 
holders for three years, and has been several times Chairman 
of the Republican County Convention. In November, 1884, 
he was elected Alderman of Atlantic City, and served as 
Chairman of the Finance Committee. In 1885 he was 
elected City Superintendent of Public Schools and retired 
from that position to take the mayorality nomination in 
November, lb86, when he defeated Aikin, Democrat, by a 
decisive majority. He was re-elected in 1888 and 1890, and 
so satisfactory was his conduct of the office that after receiv- 
ing the Republican nomination he was indorsed by the Demo- 
crats. Senator Hoffman, besides discharging his professional 
and official duties, finds time and pleasure in doing consider- 
able newspaper work, and is the President of the Atlantic 
City Journalist Club. 

In 1892 he was a member of the House of Assembly. In 
1893 his late opponent, Mr. Riddle, contested the Senator's 
right to his seat, and, afier an investigation by the Senate, 
Mr. Hoffman was declared entitled to it by a vote of 17 to 3, 
those in the negative being Messrs. Daly, Barker and Miller. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on Revis- 
ion of Laws, Elections, Treasurer's Accounts and Industrial 
School for Girls, and as a member of the Committees on 
Banks and Insurance and State Prison. 

1889— Gardner, Rep., 2,625 ; French, Dem., 2,401 ; Wilbur, 
Pro, 230; Gardner's pluralitv, 224. 

1892— Hoffman, Rep., 3,183; Riddle, Dem., 3,128; Turner, 
Pro., 252 ; scattering, 17. Hoffman's plurality, 55. 



Bergen County. 

(Population, 47,226.) 

Henry D. Winton. 

(Dem., Hackensack.) 

Senator Winton was born in New York City, and is on the 
threshold of his forty-seventh year. He is editor and pro- 
prietor of the Bergen County Democrat and is the son of ex- 
Assemblyman Eben Winton. 

In 1871, having bought out his father's interest in the 
paper, he became the editor and owner of the Democrat, which 
now stands in the first rank of Democratic newspapers in 
New Jersey, as it has for many years. 

The Senator was a Delegate to the National Democratic 
Convention at Cincinnati in 1880, and cast his vote fgr 



mOGRAPHIES. ^09 

Hancock. He was appointed by Governor Abbett, during 
his first term of office, as one of the managers of the State 
Insane Asylum at Morris Plains. He was Clerk of the 
House of Assembly in 1884, and he received the caucus 
nomination of the Democratic Senators for five years for 
Secretary of the Senate. He was President of the New 
Jersey Editorial Association in 1887, and is a member of the 
New York Press Club. He was elected to the Senate in 
1892 by a plurality of 573, over Peter Ackerman, an ex- 
Assemblyman, being the largest given for a Senator in the 
county since 1880. Latt year he served on the Committees 
on Finance, Elections and Treasurer's Accounts. 

1889— Winton, Dem., 4,007 ; Moore, Kep., 3,537 ; Church, 
Pro., 125 Winton's plurality, 470. 

1892— Winton, Dem, 5,700; Ackerman, Kep., 5,127; 
Conklin, Pro., 123. Winton's plurality, 573. 



Burlington County. 

(Population, 58,528.) 

William C. Parry. 

(Rep., Hainesport.) 

Senator Parry was born at Warminster, Bucks county. Pa., 
May 17th, 1849, and is a physician by profession. He is a 
graduate of the Jefferson Medical College of the Class of 
1872. He taught school one year previous to his studying 
medicine. This is the first time he has ever held a public 
office. He has always been interested in movements to assist 
the farmers in securing better business methods so as to 
improve their condition, and to aid in the proper develop- 
ment of the agricultural interests of the State under existing 
conditions of competition. 

1891— Perkins, Dem., 5,894; Hays, Kep., 5,367; Coles, 
Pro , 515. Perkins' pluralitv, 527. 

1894— Parry, Rep., 7,147 ;'Prickett, Dem., 4 317 ; Wright, 
Pro., 474. Parry's plurality, 2,830. 



210 BTOORAPHIES. 

Camden County. 

(Population, 87,687.) 

Maurice Alexander Rogers. 

(Rep., Camden.) 

Senator Rogers was born in Philadelphia, Pa., July 3d, 
1858. His parents removed to Camden, June 4th, 1868, 
since Avhich time he has resided in that city. He is the 
junior member of the firm of T. A. Rogers & Son, planters 
of oysters and commission merchants. In the spring of 1882 
he was elected to the Board of Education in the city of 
Camden, was re-elected in 1884, and was President of the 
Board in 1886. He was elected to the City Council in the 
spring of 1883, and was re-elected in 1886 and 1889. He 
was President of Council in 1887. He served as chairman 
of all the important committees of the Board of Education, 
and of those on Finance, Water and Lighting in the City 
Council. The Senator was elected Vice President, from the 
First Congressional District, of the Convention of Republican 
League of Clubs, which Avas held at Trenton on October 15th, 
1891. He was re-elected to the Senate in 1893 after one of 
the hardest-fought campaigns in the history of New Jersey. 
Last year he served as President of the Senate, when he dis- 
charged the duties of the office with much dignity, ability 
and impartiality. 

1890— Rogers, Rep., 7,940; Brewer, Dem., 5,919 ; Harned, 
Ind. Rep., 581 ; Bowdin, Pro , 598. Rogers' plurality, 2,021. 

1893— Rogers, Rep., 11,073; Dickinson, Dem., 9,416; 
Nicholson, Pro., 490; Cooper, Cit. League, 663. Rogers' 
plurality, 1,657, 



Cape May County. 

(Population, 11,268.) 

Edmund Lee Ross. 

(Rep., Cape May Court House.) 

Senator Ross was born at Cape May Court House, March 
10th, 1852, and is engaged in the mercantile business. He 
attended the public schools and afterwards took a course at 
the Mayville Academy. He served for eight years as a 
member of the Election Board, and has been County Col- 
lector for the past seven years. He served three terms as a 
member of the House of Assembly— in 1892, '93, '94. Last 
year he served as Chairman of the Committee on Engrossed 



BIOGRAPHIES. 211 

Bills and as a member of the Committees on Corporations and 
Railroads and Canals. 

1891— Miller, Dem , 1,327 ; Cole, Rep., 1,088 ; Smith, Pro., 
120. Miller's plurality, 239. 

1894— Ross, Rep., 1,557; Ewing, Dem., 1,087; Phillips, 
Pro., 115; Townsend, People's, 54. Ross' plurality, 470. 



Cumberland County. 

(Population, 45,438.) 

Edward Casper Stokes.) 

(Rep., Millville.) 

Senator Stokes was born in Philadelphia, Pa., December 
22d, 1860, and is a bookkeeper. He was educated in the 
public schools of Millville and at Brown University, Provi- 
dence, R. I. He was elected City Superintendent of Public 
Schools in Millville in 1889, a position he still holds. He 
served as a member of Assembly from the Second District of 
Cumberland county in 1891 and 1892. He was elected 
Senator by a plurality of 830 over Isaac C. Smalley. Mr 
Stokes is the youngest member of the present Senate. Last 
year he acted as leader of his party on the floor of the Senate, 
and he served as Chairman of the Committees on Railroads 
and Canals, Education and Printing and as a member of the 
Committees on Judiciary, Riparian Rights, Soldiers' Home 
and School for Deaf-Mutes. 

1889— FoAvler, Rep., 4,647; Baker, Dem., 4,215; Gilbert, 
Pro., 608. Fowler's plurality, 432. 

1892— Stokes, Rep., 5,533; Smalley, Dem., 4,703; Moore, 
Pro., 711 ; scattering, 4. Stokes' plurality, 830. 



Essex County. 

(Population, 256,093.) 

George W. Ketcham. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Senator Ketcham is descended from an old Jersey family 
that settled in Pennington early in the eighteenth century. 
He was born in Newark, March 28th, 1839, and has always 
made that city his home. His early training was at the 
Newark Wesleyan Institute, and later at the Flushing Insti- 
tute, Long Island. In 1857 he entered the Junior Class of 



212 BlOGTtAPUlES. 

Princeton College, and was graduated in 1859 with one of 
the honors, United States Senator George Gray being one of 
his classmates. 

Since leaving Princeton the Senator has been engaged in 
the manufacture of tin wares and sheet-metal goods, employ- 
ing many hundreds of persons. The firm of E. Ketcham & 
Co., with which he was connected from 1859 to 1885, was 
merged into a new corporation, one of whose factories is in 
Newark. The Senator is a Director as well as Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Central Stamping Company. During the 
years 1884-5 he represented the Eleventh ward in the Newark 
Board of Education. In 1886 he was elected to the Common 
Council, and for four years he was an active member of that 
body. Besides being chairman of important committees and 
a member of the Committee on Finance, he took a leading 
interest in municipal questions, notably those of a new water- 
supply and rapid transit. lie is also a Director of the 
American Insurance Company of Newark, the largest com- 
pany of its kind in the State of New Jersey. He was a 
member of the House of Assembly from Essex county in 
1891-2. The Senator was the author of the Saturday half- 
holiday law which was passed in 1891. Last year he served as 
Chairman of the Committees on Banks and Insurance, Miscel- 
laneous Business, Public Grounds and Buildings and Sinking 
Fund, and as a member of the Committees on Municipal 
Corporations, Militia and Printing. 

1890— Barrett, Dem., 23,341 ; Howell, Kep., 21,380; Stro- 
bell. Pro., 1,024. Barrett's pluralitv, 1,961. 

1893— Ketcham, Eep., 28,542 ; ' Barrett, Dem., 25,746 ; 
Jones, Pro., 663; Scheer, Soc, 585. Ketcham's plurality, 
2,796. 



Gloucester County. 

(Population, 28,649.) 

Daniel J. Packer. 

(Rep , Woodbury.) 

Senator Packer was born in the house where he now 
lives in Woodbury, N. J., February 26th, 1829. He was 
formerly a blacksmith. He was a member of the Township 
Committee of Deptford from 1857 to 1862 ; of the Gloucester 
County Board of Freeholders from 1862 to 1868, and was 
Sherifl' of that county from 1884 to 1887, and from 1890 to 
1893, having served two full terms in that office. He was 
elected a member of the City Council of Woodbury at the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 213 

first charter election, in 1872, and served three years. He 
has never been defeated for any office for which he was a 
candidate. He worked in front of the anvil for forty years, 
and stopped only when he was first elected Sheriff. Last 
year he served as Chairman of the Committees on Agricul- 
ture and Agricultural College and Commerce and Navigation, 
and as a member of the Committees on Corporations, Claims 
and Pensions, Public Grounds and Buildings and Keform 
School for Boys. 

1890— Barker, Dem , 3,080; Koe, Kep., 2,940; Downer, 
Pro., 324. Barker's plurality, 140. 

1893— Packer, Rep., 3,735; Barker, Dem,, 3,145; Morgan, 
Sr., Pro., 243. Packer's plurality, 590. 



Hudson County. 

(Population, 275,126 ) 

WiiiLiAM D. Daly. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Senator Daly was born in Jersey City in 1851, and has 
resided in Hudson county all his life. He was educated in 
Public School No. 1, Jersey City, and at the age of fourteen 
left school and entered the iron foundry of LFzal Cory, at 
the foot of Greene street, Jersey City, as an apprentice at 
iron moulding, and at the age of seventeen he was a journey- 
man iron moulder. He continued at his trade until the age of 
nineteen, working in the meantime in the Erie foundry and 
at Blackmore's foundry, on Railroad avenue. Mr. Daly, 
while engaged at his trade, was always ambitious to becorne 
a lawyer, and at the time of the great strike on the Erie rail- 
road, in 1870, was working in the Erie foundry and went 
out with the other moulders. Being then out of employ- 
ment, he entered the law ofiice of S. B. Ransom and ex- Judge 
Blair, in Jersey City, as a student of law. In May, 1871, 
and in June, 1874, he was admitted to the bar respectively as 
attorney and counselor. Since that time he has practiced law 
in all the courts of this State. He has probably been engaged 
in and has tried as many capital cases on the part of the 
defense as any lawyer in the State. Among the noted crimi- 
nal cases in which he has been engaged was that of George 
Disque, for the killing of his wife. He also defended young 
Schlemmer, who, in a fit of jealous passion, in August, 1887, 
shot his wife and was sentenced to be executed. Mr. Daly 
carried this case to the highest courts, obtained a new trial 
and saved his client's life. 



214 BIOGRAPHIES. 

The Senator was the defender of Morris O'Brien for the 
killing of his brother; Murphy, for the Henderson street 
bridge murder ; Harney, for the killing of Ford; the Good- 
win brothers, for tlie alleged killing of their father; Murphy, 
for the killing of Denning, and Cinmift" for the alleged kill- 
ing of his wife by setting her on fire with a lamp. He was 
also counsel for the arrested freight handlers in the great 
Erie strike in 1878, none of whom were convicted, and also 
for the Cigar Makers' Union in their strike in Jersey City 
seven years ago, and upon their trial they were acquitted. 

The Senator served as Assistant United States District 
Attorney for three years, having been appointed under the 
first Cleveland administration. He was an alternate dele- 
gate to the St. Louis Democratic National Convention in 1888. 
He has been counsel for the Hudson County Liquor Dealers' 
Association for several years, and he represented the Eighth 
District of Hudson county in the House of Assembly in 1891, 
when he was the leader of his jjarty on the floor. He served 
as District Court Judge of Hoboken from 1891 and until he 
was sworn in as State Senator. 

He was elected Senator after an exciting campaign by a 
plurality of 5,645, over J. Herbert Potts, a Republican of 
great strength and popularity. 

Last year lie served on the Committees on Revision of 
Laws, Municipal Corporations and Passed Bills. 

1891— Hudspeth, Dem , 21,424 ; Carr, Eep., 14,169 ; Ran- 
som, Pro., 27(5 ; Gilliar, Lab., 429. Hudspeth's plurality, 
7,255. 

1892— Dalv, Dem., 30,109; Potts, Rep, 24,464; Burger, 
Pro., 251 ; Gilliar, Soc.-Lab., 407 : McBride, People's, 118 ; 
scattering, 11. Daly's plurality, 5,645. 



Hunterdon County. 

(Population, 35,3'5.) 

Richard S. KtHL. 
(Dem., Flemington.) 

Senator Kuhl was born in Hunterdon county, N. J., August 
25th, 1841, and is a lawyer by profession. He served as 
President Judge of the Hunterdon Common Pleas Court from 
1887 to 1891. 

1891— Martin, Dem., 4,026 ; Shields, Rep , 3,045 ; Ritten- 
house. Pro., 564. Martin's pluralitv, 981. 

1894— Kuhl, Dem., 3,950 ; Shields, Rep., 3,826 ; Shuman, 
Pro., 437 ; Foster, People's, 153. Kuhl's plurality, 124. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 215 

Mercer County. 

(Population, 79,978.) 

William H. Skirm. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Senator Skirm was born in Trenton, N. J., January 17th, 
1841, and is in the wholesale grocery business, being a 
member of the firm of D. P. Forst & Co. At an early age he 
entered the wholesale grocery house of Forst & Taylor as 
a bookkeeper, and subsequently became a member of the 
firm. 

For fifteen years the Senator has served as Treasurer of 
the Pennington Seminary. His wise management of the 
financial affairs of that institution, his personal contributions 
to its fund, and the great assistance he has rendered it in 
many other ways, have been largely instrumental in placing 
the Seminary on a solid foundation, and increasing the value 
of its property to at least $150,000. 

In the military service the Senator has made quite a record. 
He joined Company A, an independent military organization, 
on November 30th, 1860, which was then under the command 
of Captain William R. Murphy. This organization after- 
wards became merged in the National Guard of the State 
as a part of the Seventh Eegiment, and the Senator served as 
Lieutenant and Captain of the company for several years. 
He declined the rank of Major of the Regiment when 
tendered to him, but accepted the Colonelcy, Avlien he was 
elected on June 9th, 1890, to fill the vacancy caused by the 
resignation of Colonel John C. Patterson. 

The Senator has always been an ardent Republican and 
twice he has been elected as a Delegate to National Repub- 
lican Conventions. He is now a member of the State 
Republican Committee, a position he has held for several 
years, and he has frequently been at the head of the County 
Republican Committee, and is at present its chairman. He 
has represented the Fifth ward of Trenton in the Common 
Council for several terms, and was President of that body for 
some years. 

The Senator is known as a most excellent business man, 
and he has clone much to further the growth and prosperity 
of his native city. For a number of years he has been a 
Director of the Trenton Banking Company. 

He ran away ahead of his ticket at the election in 1892, 
and received the largest majority ever given a Senator in 
Mercer county. 



216 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Municipal Corporation, Militia, State Library and School 
for Deaf-Mutes, and as a member of the Committees on Banks 
and Insurance, Miscellaneous Business and Public Grounds 
and Buildings. 

1889— Rue, Rep., 8,244; Bamford, Dem., 8,139; Cadv, 
Pro., 386. Rue's plurality, 105. 

1892— Skirm, Rep., 10,312; Apgar, Dem., 8,852; Ely, Pro., 
380. Skirm's plurality, 1,460. 



Middlesex County. 

(Population, 61,754.) 

Charles B. Herbert. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Senator Herbert was born at Herbertsvilie, Middlesex 
county, N. J., June 4th, 1857, and is a counselor-at-law. He 
was a member of the House of Assembly from New Bruns- 
wick in 1888 and 1889. 

1891— Adrain, Dem , 5,991 ; Goodwin, Rep., 4,561 ; Kellv, 
Pro, 318. Adrain's pluralitv, 1,430. 

1891— Herbert, Rep., 7,252; Van Cleef, Dem., 6,011; 
Hults, Pro., 215 ; Tice, People's, 326 ; Pyatt, Soc.-Lab , 172. 
Herbert's plurality, 1,241. 



Mod mouth County. 

(Population, 69,128.) 

James A. Bradley. 

(Rep., Asbury Park.) 

Senator Bradley was bom at Rossville, Staten Island, N. Y., 
February 14th, 1830, and is a brush manufacturer. He 
received his early education in the Madison Street Public 
School, Xew York City, and at twelve years of age he was a 
boy of all work on the farm of "William Davies, Bloomfield, 
N. J. At the age of twenty-one he was foreman in the brush 
factory of Francis P. Furnald, Pearl street. New York. He 
went into business on his own account in 1857. He has 
been in business in the same building, at 251 Pearl street, 
thirty-five years. Mr. Bradley being in poor health in 1871, 
and desiring to get the benetit of the outdoor exercise that 
would result from surveying, laying out streets, &c., purchased 



BIOGRAPHIES. 217 

county. This tract consisted of pine woods, briars and sand 
dunes. The tract was laid out with broad streets and many- 
open spaces, and through the publicity given to the place by 
newspaper writers, it has become what is now known as 
Asbury Park, perhaps the best known and most popular sea- 
side summer resort in the United States. The Senator has 
been a member of the Kepublican party since its foundation, 
excepting for two or three years, about 1884, when he worked 
with the Prohibitionists, but he returned to the Kepublican 
party soon after that period. For nineteen years the Senator 
has been a Commissioner of the borough of Asbury Park. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Riparian Eights, Boroughs and Borough Commissions and 
Federal Eelations, and as a member of the Committees on 
Education, Engrossed Bills, Labor and Industries, State 
Library and Industrial School for Girls. 

1892— Terhune, Dem., 8,977 ; Heisley, Eep., 7,686 ; Emery, 
Pro., 519. Terhune's plurality, 1,291. 

1893— Bradley, Eep., Pro. and Cit. Leag., 8,171 ; Terhune, 
Dem. and Jack. Dem., 7,904. Bradley's majority, 267. 



Morris County. 

(Population, 54,101.) 
Elias C. Dkake. 

(Dem., Chester.) 

Senator Drake was born in Chester, Morris county, N. J., 
December 15th, 1852, and is a general merchant. He was 
elected Township Clerk in 1876, 77 and '78, and resigned 
that office in 1879, when he went to Kansas, but returned 
home the same year. He was elected a member of the Town- 
ship Committee in 1880, and was made Treasurer of that 
body. In 1882, '83 and '84 he was elected Assessor of Chester 
township. He represented the then Third District of Morris 
county in the House of Assembly in 1885 and '86. He was 
Engrossing Clerk of the House in 1889 and '90. At the 
election in 1892 he carried his own township (Chester) by 
the largest majority ever given any candidate for public 
office. Last year he served on the Committees on Game and 
Fisheries and Federal Eelations. 

1889— Werts, Dem., 5,046; Condit, Rep., 4,854; Brad- 
brook, Pro., 439. Werts' plurality, 192. 

1892— Drake, Dem., 5,954; Condit, Eep., 5,679; Kitchel, 
Pro., 649. Drake's plurality, 275. 

10 



218 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Ocean County. 

(Population, 15,974.) 

George Greeley Smith. 
(Rep., Lakewood.) 

Senatxjr Smith Avas born in Clinton, "Worcester county, 
Mass., January 5th, 1854. He came to Lakewood when 
thirteen years' of age, and subsequently attended Peddie 
Institute at Hightstown, for two years. He is related, through 
his mother's family, to the late Horace Greeley, from whom 
he gets his middle name. After leaving Peddie Institute, he 
attended the Eastman Business College, at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., from which he was graduated in 1870. The next two 
years he spent learning the practical part of the dry goods 
business at his old home in Clinton, Mass. In 1872 he 
engaged in the dry goods business in Lakewood. His enter- 
prise and business tact made him successful from the first, 
and he is now at the head of the largest dry goods establish- 
ment in Ocean county, and one of the largest in that section 
of the State. The business block rebuilt by him a few years 
ago contains three of the leading stores in the town, besides 
his own and the Park View House. This is only one of the 
several evidences of Mr. Smith's public spirit and enterprise 
in one of the most attractive villages in the State. 

Mr. Smith was elected to the House of Assembly in 1884 
and 1885 by the largest majority ever received for that oflSce 
in Ocean county. During his first year in the Assembly he 
was Chrirman of the Committee on Deaf and Dumb Asylum, 
and a member of the Committees on Fisheries and Commerce 
and Navigation. In 1886 he was Chairman of the Com- 
mittees on Kiparian Rights and Education, and a member of 
the Committees on Industrial Schools and Fisheries. He is 
at present a member of the Board of Trustees, and Chairman 
of the Property Committee of Peddie Institute, Vice Presi- 
dent of the Lakewood Trust Company, and President of the 
Lakewood Republican Club. He was elected to the Senate 
by a much larger majority than was ever given to any candi- 
date for that office, over one of the most popular opponents 
ever nominated by the Democratic party. Last year he 
served as Chairman of the Committees on Finance, Claims 
and Pensions, Passed Bills and Reform School for Boys, and 
as a member of the Committees on Game and Fisheries, 
Boroughs and Borough Commissions and State Hospitals. 

1889— Cranmer, Rep., 1,838 ; Emson, Dem., 1,566 ; Wood, 
Pro , 85. Cranmer's pluralitv, 272. 

1892— Smith, Rep., 2,543; Irons, Dem., 1,616; Wood, 
Pro., 157 ; scattering, 12. Smith's plurality, 927. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 219 

Passaic County 

(Population, 105,046.) 

Robert Williams. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Senator Williams was born in Paterson, N. J., March 16th, 
1860, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1881 and from Columbia College Law 
School in 1884. In the latter year he was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney and in 1887 as a counselor. He was a 
member of the House of Assembly in 1890 and 1891, and in 
the latter year received the minority nomination for Speaker. 

1891— Hinchliffe, Dem., 9,160; Emlev, Eep., 9,048; Hill, 
Pro., 320. Hinchlifte's plurality, 112. 

1894— Williams, Pvep., 10,973; Van Hovenburg, Dem., 
6,861 ; Reed, Pro., 409; Wilson, Soc.-Lab., 2,285. Williams' 
plurality, 4,112. 



Salem County. 

(Population, 25,151 ) 
John C. Ward. 

(Rep., Centreton ) 

Senator Ward was born in Camden, N. J., September 9th, 
1853, and is a farmer. He was Sergeant of Company E, Cen- 
tennial Guard, of Philadelphia, in 1876, at the Centennial 
Exhibition. He served as a member of the House of Assem- 
bly, in 1889 and 1890, from Salem county. Last year he 
served as Chairman of the Committees on Game and Fish- 
eries, Engrossed Bills and Soldiers' Home, and as a member 
of the Committees on Railroads and Canals, Unfinished 
Business, State Hospitals and Federal Relations. 

1890— Butcher, Dem., 3,213 ; Starr, Rep., 2,874 ; Wadding- 
ton, Pro , 133. Butcher's plurality, 339. 

1893— Ward, Rep.. 3,105; GVynne, Jr., Dem., 3,014; 
Lecroy, Pro., 226. Ward's plurality, 91. 



220 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Somerset County. 

(Population, 28,311.) 

Lewis A. Thompson. 

(Rep , Somerville.) 

Senator Thompson was born at Basking Ridge, Somerset 
county, N, J., July 19th, 1845. lie taught school for five 
years, and then engaged in the millinery and fancy goods 
business, which he continues at Somerville. He was elected 
Sheriff" of Somerset county in 1880 for a term of three years, 
and he was President of the Board of Commissioners of 
Somerville two years, 1883 and 1884. He was elected Sena- 
tor in 1884 over Lane, Dera., by a plurality of 89 ; re-elected 
in 1887 over Bergen, Dem , by a plurality of 450, and again 
in 1893 by a largely increased plurality of 893, over Beek- 
man, Dem. During his former service in the Senate he was 
a member of the most important committees and always took 
an active part in legislation. Last year he was Chairman of 
the Committees on Corporations, Unfinished Business and 
State Prison, and a member of the Committees on Finance, 
Agriculture and Agricultural College, Treasurer's Accounts 
and Commerce and Navigation. 

1890-Keys, Dem., 2,906; Reed, Rep., 2,512; Williamson, 
Pro , 155. keys' pluralitv, 394. 

1893— Thompson, Rep.', 3,317; Beekman, Dem., 2,424; 
Thompson's plurality, 893. 



Sussex County. 

(Population, 22,259.) 

Jacob Gould. 

(Rep , Deckertown.) 

Senator Gould was born in the township of Wantage, Sussex 
county, N. J., October 12th, 1838, and is in the mercantile 
business. He is the only son of the late Daniel D. Gould, 
who, in his day, was a very prominent farmer of Wantage 
township, and served as a member of the Assembly from 1855 
to 1857. The Senator attended the schools of the township, 
and finished his education in the academy of the late William 
Rankin, who was an educator of considerable prominence. 
Mr. Gould began his business career as a clerk, in Decker- 
town. He went to Newton in 1860 and was engaged in the 
freighting business until 1871, when he removed to Newark, 



BIOGRAPHIES. ^21 

where he remained in business for two years. He returned 
to Deckertown in 1873 and formed a partnership in the 
mercantile business with the late John Loorais, remaining 
with him until the big fire in Deckertown, in November, 1884. 
In 1885 he built a handsome brick block, in which he is now 
engaged as a merchant. The Senator has been a member of 
the Common Council of Deckertown from the time of its 
organization, and has served on the Street Committee for four 
years. Last year he was elected President of the Council. 

1891— McMickle, Dem , 2,073; Eyerson, Rep., 1,613; 
Bowman, Pro., 125. McMickle's plurality, 460. 

1894— Gould, Rep., 2,593; Bale, Dem., 2,412; Conklin, 
Pro., 166. Gould's plurality, 181. 



Union County. 

(Population, 72,467.) 

Foster M. Voorhees. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Senator Voorhees was born at Clinton, Hunterdon county. 
New Jersey, November 5th, 1856, and is an attorney and 
counselor-at-law, practicing in Elizabeth. He was graduated 
from Rutgers College in 1876, and studied law with Hon. 
William J. Magie, now a Justice of the Suj)reme Court, at 
Elizabeth. He was a School Commissioner of Elizabeth for 
four years, and was a member of the House of Assembly 
during the years 1888, 1889 and 1890. Last year he was 
nominated by Governor Werts to the office of Circuit Court 
Judge, but declined the honor. In the session of 1894, he 
served as Chairman of the Committees on Judiciary, Labor 
and Industries and State Hospitals, and as a member of the 
Committees on Revision of Laws, Elections, Passed Bills and 
Sinking Fund. 

1890— Marsh, Dem., 7 299 ; Rankin, Rep., 5,601 ; Bigelow, 
Pro., 163. Marsh's plurality, 1,698. 

1893— Voorhees, Rep., 7,616; Martine, Dc^m., 6,472; 
Bigelow, Pro., 218; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 353. Voorhees' plu- 
rality, 1,144. 

Warren County. 

(Population, 36,553.) 

Christopher F. Staates. 

(Dem., Washington.) 

Senator Staates was born at Finesville, Warren county, 

N. J., October 12th, 1845. Prior to his nomination for State 

Senator he was the proprietor of the St. Cloud Hotel, Wash- 

no 



222 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ington, when be leased it to Walter De Camp. Tlie Senator 
enlisted on September 3d, 1862, in Company E, Thirty-tirst 
Kegiment, N. J. Volunteers, and was mustered out of service 
June 24tb, 1863. He re-enlisted in Company E, Tliirty- 
eightb Regiment, N. J. A^olunteers, September 23d, 1861, 
for one year, or during the war, and was mustered out of 
service June 30th, 1865. He served with the Army of the 
Potomac and the Army of the James under Burnside, Hooker 
and Grant until the close of the war. The Senator was Col- 
lector of Franklin township, Warren county, three years and 
has been Treasurer of the Firemen's Relief Association, 
AVashington Fire Company and Temjile Chapter, No. 12, F. 
and A. M. He is a member of the following associations: 
I. O. O F., F. and A. M., I. O. of R. M., K. of P. and G. A. R. 
Last year he served on the Committees on Corporations and 
Commerce and Navigation. 

1890— Cornish, Dem., 4,331 ; Reese, Rep , 2,551 ; Davis, 
Pro, 339. Cornish's plurality, 1,780. 

1893— Staates, Dem , 3,754 ; Lommasson, Rep., Cit. League, 
3,224; Davis, Pro., 251. Staates' plurality, 530. 



Sumraary, 

Senate- Republicans, 16 Democrats, 5=21 
House — Republicans, 54 Democrats, 6=60 

70 11 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 59. 



When Regular Senatorial Elections Occur. 

In 1895 — Cumberland, Atlantic, Ocean and Mercer, now 
represented by Republicans ; Bergen, Hudson and Morris, 
now represented by Democrats — 7. 

In 1896— Essex, Monmouth, Union, Somerset, Gloucester, 
Salem and Camden, now represented by Republicans, and 
Warren, now represented by a Democrat — 8. 

In 1897 — Cape May, Burlington, Middlesex, Passaic and 
Sussex, now represented by Republicans, and Hunterdon, 
now represented bv a Democrat — 6. 

The Senators who will be elected in 1896 and 1897, wiU 
each have a vote for a United States Senator to succeed James 
Smith, Jr. 



mOGRAPHlES. 223 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

Atlantic County. 

Wesley Charles Smith. 
(Rep , Absecon.) 

Captain Smith was born in Atlantic county, N. J., August 
'ith, 1849, and is a lumber merchant. He was formerly a sea 
captain. In 1891 and 1892 he served as Tax Assessor for the 
town of Absecon. 

1894— Smith, Kep., 2,939; Schuchardt, Dem', 1,819; Adams, 

Smith's plurality, 1,120. 



Bergen County. 

David D. Zabriskie. 

(Rep., Ridgewood.) 

Mr. Zabriskie was born at Paramus, Bergen county, N. J., 
November 27th, 1856, and is a lawyer by profession. He was 
prepared for college at Erasmus Hall Academy, Flatbush, 
Long Island, and entered Rutgers College in 1875, from which 
he was graduated in 1879. He entered Columbia College 
Law School in 1879 and graduated in 1881. In 1882 he was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey as an attorney, and in 
1889 as a counselor. He has represented Eidgewood town- 
ship in the Bergen County Republican Executive Committee 
for six years. Last year he was a member of the Assembly, 
where he served as Chairman of the Committee on Miscel- 
laneous Business, and as a member of the Committees on 
Revision of Laws, Ways and Means and Passed Bills. He 
was re-elected by a plurality of 930. 

Frederick L. Yoorhees. 

(Rep , Englewood ) 

Mr. Voorhees was born at Stephensburg, Morris county, 
N. J., June 6th, 1841, and is in the real estate and insurance 
business. He devoted his early life, from 1860 to 1872, 
principally to teaching district schools in Morris, Warren 
and Hunterdon counties. He was next engaged as a salesman 
on a wholesale Yankee notion wagon, which he continued for 
three years, traveling through different parts of New Jersey 
and Rockland county, N. Y. In 1875 he settled in Engle- 



224 BIOGRAPHIES. 

wood, where he now resides. He served two years on a 
Township Committee and was, also, a Justice of tlie Peace. 
He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 948. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Zabriskie, R., 5,035. Zimmerman, D., 4,105. 
Voorhees, R, 5,053. Dewsnap, D , 4,097. 

Armauer, Soc.-Lab., 156; Metzler, Soc.-Lab , 155; Hopler, 
47 ; Wanmaker, 44. ■ 



Burlington County. 

Mica J AH E. Matlack. 

(Rep., Mount Holly.) 

Mr. Matlack was born in Mercer county, N. J., December 
16th, 1862. He studied law in the offices of John C. Ten 
Eyck and Howard C. Levis, and in 1890 was admitted to the 
bar. In 1892 he was nominated for member of Assembly on 
the Republican ticket, and was elected over John J. Kelley, 
Dem., of Bordentown, bv 770 pluralitv. He was renominated 
in 1893, and again elected by a plura'lity of 1,402. In 1894 
he carried the county by a plurality of 2,869. He served 
eight years as a member of the National Guard of the State, 
retiring as an officer. He organized a campaign club, known 
as " The Plumed Knights," during the campaign of James 
G. Blaine for the Presidency, and it gained the reputation of 
being the best-equipped and finest-drilled organization of the 
kind in the State, being called out frequently, after the cam- 
paign closed, to give exhibitions in fancy drill movements. 
In 1890 he organized the Mount Holly Light Guard, which 
also proved a successful campaign organization year after 
year, being even superior in fancy drill and marching move- 
ments to the Plumed Knights. In 1894 he was appointed, 
by Colonel Skirm, Battalion Adjutant of the Seventh Regi- 
ment, N. G. N. J., with the rank of First Lieutenant. He 
has an extensive law practice. Last year he was Chairman 
of the Committee on Boroughs and Borough Commissions, 
and a member of the Committees on Judiciary, Militia and 
Reform School for Boys. 

George Wildes. 

(Rep., New Egypt.) 

Mr. Wildes was born at Arneytown, New Hanover town- 
ship, Burlington county, N. j', July 21st, 1837, and is a 
farmer. Before his election to the Assembly he never held 



BIOGRAPHIES. 225 

any office except that of School Trustee, and he never con- 
tested for any. He carried the county by a plurality of 2,869. 



THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Matlack, E., 7,137. Conrow, D., 4,268. 
Wildes, K, 7,137. Mcllhenny, D., 4,198. 
Aaronson, Pro., 484; Eidgway, Pro., 489. 



Oaraden County. 

Louis Theodoee Derousse. 

(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Derousse was born in Philadelpha, Pa., May 29t]i, 
1844, and is an accountant. He was formerly in the flour, 
feed and grain business, but was forced to retire from it 
owing to ill health. He was a member of the Board of 
Freeholders for one term — in 1881 — and declined a renomi- 
nation. He was City Comptroller of Camden for three 
years— 1888 to 1891. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 7,227. 

Clayton Stafford. 

(Rep , Ellisburg.) 

Mr. Stafford was born near Haddonfield, Camden county, 
N. J., October 3d, 1855, and is a farmer. He has been Town- 
ship Clerk for a number of years, and served in the House of 
Assembly in 1883, '84, '93 and '94. He was elected a member of 
the Board of Freeholders of Camden county in April, 1892, 
for a three-year term, in the First Assembly District. Last 
year he served as Chairman of the Committee on Corporations, 
and as a member of the Committees on Municij^al Corpora- 
tions and Public Printing. He carried the county in 1894 
by a plurality of 7,255. 

George William Barnard. 

(Rep , Gloucester City.) 

Mr. Barnard was bom in Gloucester City, X. J., March 
7th, 1852, and is a clerk by occupation. He was Eecorder 
and Clerk of Common Council, Gloucester City, having been 
elected in 1878 and 1879, each time for a one-year term. He 
was elected a member of Common Council of Gloucester City 



226 BIOGRAPHIES. 

in 1883 for a three-year term, and re-elected in 1886. lie 
served as President of Council in 1883 and 1884. He carried 
the county for the Assembly by a plurality of 7,104. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Derousse, K, 11,166. Davis, D., 3,750. 

Stafford, R, 11,194. Ridgway, D., 3,838. 

Barnard, R., 11,043. Wentz, D., 3,939. 
Haven, Pro. and Cit , 1,217; Watson, Tnd. and Cit., 1,224; 
French, Pro., 577 ; Lippincott, l*ro., 578 ; Tucker, Ind. and 
Cit., 615; Lorang, Soc.-Lab., 124; Asliner, Soc.-Lab., 138; 
Kohn, Soc-Lak, 131; Lolier, Pop., 117; Hart, Pop., 119; 
Horner, Pop ,113. 



Cape May County. 

FURMAX L. LUDLAM. 

(Rep., South Dennis.) 

Captain Ludlam was born at South Dennis, Cape May 
county, N. J., November 23d, 1832, and is a farmer. He was 
formerly a sea captain. 

1894-Ludlam. Rep, 1,611 ; Young. Dem , 1.022; Smith, 
Pro., 126 ; Van Gilder, People's, 58. Ludlara's plurality, 589. 



Cumberland County. 

Thomas F. Austin. 

(Rep , Millville ) 

Mr. Austin was born in Philadelphia, Pa , July 15th, 1864, 
and is a glass worker by trade. He was Assessor of the 
Fourth ward in Millville in 1887, was a national census 
enumerator for the Second ward of the same city in 1890, and 
was appointed, on February 1st, 1891, by Revenue Collector 
Moffett, a Deputy Collector for the Second division of the 
district, from which office Mr. Austin retired on November 
30th, 1893. He taught public night school in 1890 and 1891. 
He was a member of the Assembly last year, where he served 
as Chairman of the Committee on Labor and Industries, and 
as a member of the Committees on Game and Fisheries, Mis- 
cellaneous Business and Treasurer's Accounts. He was re- 
elected by a plurality of 2,606. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 227 

Bloomfield Holmes Minch. 

(Rep., Bridgeton.) 

Mr. Mincli was born in Bridgeton, N. J., October 10th, 
1864, and is a merchant and contractor. Before his election 
to the Assembly he never held any State or county office, but 
nevertheless he has been actively engaged in political work 
since he became a voter. He was graduated at the South 
Jersey Institute in 1883 and took a business course in Bryant 
& Stratton's College the same year, and in 1884 he entered 
the same business in which he is now engaged. He was 
elected by a plurality of 2,554. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Austin, E., 4,588. Campbell, D., 1,970. 
Minch, R., 4,536. Vanmeter, D., 1,982. 
Vanaman, Pro., 638 ; Cambrow, Pro., 609 ; Barraclougli, 
People's, 1,002 ; Zimmerman, People's, 1,032. 



Essex County. 

George P. Olcott. 

(Rep., East Orange) 

Colonel Olcott was born in New York City, June 16th, 1850. 
His perents removed, to Montclair in 1860, and he has been 
a continuous resident of Orange and East Orange since 1864. 
His education was acquired in the public and private schools 
of that vicinity and at the Blairstown Academy, in Warren 
county. After a brief term of practical railroading, and 
when he was only eighteen years of age, he was a member of 
the engineering corps which constructed the Passaic river 
dykes on the Newark meadows. On the completion of this 
work he became first an assistant and afterAvard a partner of 
W. H. V. Reimer, civil engineer, Avith whom he remained 
until 1875. He then embarked in the special field of drain- 
age and sanitary engineering on his own account, in which 
he has been very successful, and in which he has earned a 
wide reputation, having put in a number of large sanitary 
plants in different parts of the country, and acquired a large 
clientage as an expert in this field. He has been Superin- 
tendent of the Orange Water Company since the completion 
of the East Orange water system, in 1882. He has always 
been active in local aflfairs, and a hard worker at all times in 



228 BIOGRAPHIES. 

behalf of persons or measures in which he took an interest. 
He is an exempt fireman, but still an active member of Ash- 
land Hook and Ladder Company, and has been for four years 
a member of the East Orange Board of Education, rendering 
especially valuable service as Chairman of the Committee 
on Buildings and Grounds. In politics he has always been 
an active Republica]i, and for twenty years every election has 
seen him working faithfully for the success of the nominees 
of his party, though never accepting or seeking political 
office for liimself until his friends insisted on his election as 
a member of the Assembly in 1893. The Colonel is an 
Assistant Quartermaster-General. He joined the National 
Oiuard in 1868 as a private and has served ever since. In 
1894 lie was commissioned Assistant Quartermaster-General 
with the rank of Colonel. Last year he served as Chairman 
of the Committee on Incidental Expenses and a member of 
the Committees on Towns and Townships, School for Deaf- 
Mutes and Public Grounds and Buildings. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly by a i)lurality of 10,323. 

Amos W. Harrison. 

(Rep., Livingston.) 

Mr. Harrison was born in Livingston, Essex county, N. J., 
April 2d, 1846, and is in the farming and general store busi- 
ness. By profession he is an auctioneer, which, in connection 
with his business, he has followed for tlie last twenty years. 
Besides, he sells farming implements and machinery, and 
does considerable business in insurance and real estate. He 
served as Collector of Taxes in his township for six years, 
from 1869 to 1876, and is now Postmaster, an office he has 
held for nineteen consecutive years. He is a Director of the 
Second National Bank of Orange, and is a member of 
Livingston Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, of the Golden 
Star Fraternity and of the Eepublican Indian League. He 
was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 11,570. 

Charles Bigelow Storrs. 

(Rep., Orange.) 

Mr. Stori-s was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, August 23d, 1859, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He never held any public 
position in this country before his election to the Assembly, in 
1893, but for several years he served the Japanese Govern- 
ment, holding the pcsition of Professor of Anglo-American 
Law in the Imperial Lniversity of Tokio, Japan.^ Last year 
he was Chairman of the Committee on Elections, and a 



BIOGRAPHIES. 229 

member of the Committees on Judiciary and Municipal Cor- 
porations. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 10,388. 

Alfeed Ford Skinner. 
(Rep., Nutley. 
Mr. Skinner was born in Newark, N. J., September 24th, 
1862, and is a lawyer by profession. He is a son of Dr. D. 
M. Skinner, of Belleville, Essex county, N. J. From, his 
infancy he resided in Belleville until February, 1894, when 
he moved to Nutley, Franklin township. He was graduated 
from Rutgers College in 1883, studied law at Columbia Col- 
lege, was admitted as an attorney in November, 1886, and as 
a counselor in 1891. In 1892 he was Chairman of the Belle- 
ville Township Committee, and has been counsel for Franklin 
township since 1890. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 11,604. 

Charles B. Duncan. 
(Rep., Newark.) 
Mr. Duncan was born at Franklin, Essex county, N. J., 
November 17th, 1854, and is engaged in the business of 
stationer, news dealer, real estate and insurance. He removed 
to Newark in 1859, and has been a resident of the "Iron 
Bound District" ever since. He was engaged as a clerk in 
the grocery business with ex-Assemblyman James Marlatt 
from 1870 to 1880, when he purchased the Tenth Ward Book 
and News Store. His father was a native of Scotland, and at 
one time a large and successful woolen manufacturer at 
Franklin, N. J. His mother was a daughter of Prof. Elijah 
Garfield, of Middletown, Conn. Mr. Duncan received his 
education in the Newark public schools. Since 1884 he has 
been interested in building and loan associations, being Secre- 
tary of two and a member of the State Building and Loan 
League. He was a member of the Assembly last year, when 
he served as Chairman of the Committee on Stationery, and 
as a member of the Committees on Labor and Industries, 
Riparian Rights and Treasurer's Accounts. He was re-elected 
by a plurality of 11,677. 

James A. Christie. 
(Rep., Newark ) 
Mr. Christie was born in Newark, N. J., October 8th, 1850, 
and is a member of the firm of Headley & Christie, general 
contractors. He served as Alderman of the city of Newark 
for four years, and was a member of the Assembly in 1888. 
His plurality for the Assembly in 1894 was 11,641. 



230 BIOGRAPHIES. 

George L. Smith. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Smith was born at Akron, Ohio, September 6th, 1844, 
and is a manufacturer of saddlery hardware. He was formerly 
an apothecary. His parents, who were of old New Jersey 
stock, returned to their native State when Mr. Smith was 
four years old. After living in Newark for six years, they 
moved to Warren county, N. J., where they engaged in 
farming. At the age of eighteen, Mr. Smith was apprenticed 
at the drug business, which he followed both as clerk and 
proprietor until 1876, when he commenced the manufacturing 
of saddlery hardware specialties in Newark, and at which he 
has met with marked success. He has always been identified 
with the Republican party. He has been a member of the 
old Republican Club since it organization, also belongs to the 
Northern Republican Club, the North End Social Club, the 
Essex County Republican Committee and is Chairman of the 
First AVard Republican Executive Committee. He was a 
candidate for the Assembly in 1888 in a strong Democratic 
district, and was defeated by Leonard Kalisch, by a small 
majority. His plurality for the Assembly last fall was 11,588. 

David E. Benedict. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Benedict was born in Newark, N. J., March 15th, 1839, 
and is engaged in the business of fire insurance and general 
supplies for fire protection. By trade he is a silver plater. 
He was Superintendent of Stephen G. Sturges & Sons' 
saddlery hardware factory for several years. He was Chief 
Engineer of the Newark Fire Department from 1876 to 1884. 
He began fire service in that department in 1855, as a runner, 
and in 1860 was elected a member of Neptune Hose Ck)m- 
pany, No. 1. He was elected by the Common Council as 
First Assistant Engineer January 1st, 1871, and served as 
such until January 1st, 1875. He was a member of No. 2 
Steamer Company from January 1st, 1875, until January 3d, 
1876, when he was elected Chief Engineer. He wa-s removed 
from office in 1884 by the Democratic party, which then 
came into power. While in the department he held the 
position of Foreman, was a member of the Board of Represen- 
tatives and Board of Trustees of the Widows' and Orphans' 
Fund. Several times he risked his life to save others, and 
he has been injured in the service. He is still a member of 
the National Board of Chief Engineers of the United States. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 231 

His education was received in private and public schools in 
Newark. He was born where the Republican Club House 
now stands, in Park Place, Newark. He has been an ardent 
Republican since the organization of the party. When he 
retired from fire duty in 1884, he received many presents 
from the fire department, including a handsome badge Avith 
his name in diamonds. He was elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 11,032. 

John C. Eisele. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Eisele was born in Newark, N. J., August 1st, 1860, 
and is the New Jersey Manager of the Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society of the U. S. A. He was formerly a silver 
plater. He has been in the life insurance business nine 
years, and has achieved great success in that line, having 
worked his way from the position of a canvasser to the office 
of General Manager for the State of New Jersey of the com- 
pany with which he is connected. He is very largely 
interested in real estate, and his operations in that business 
during the past nine years have been extensive. Mr. Eisele 
is indentified with building and loan interests of the city of 
Newark, being President of the Norfork Building and Loan 
Association, and Treasurer of the Lincoln Building and 
Loan Association, and a director in several other associations 
of that kind. His success in life is entirely due to his own 
energy and business ability, and he is a self-made man in 
every sense of the term. He was a member of the Assembly 
last year, when he made a brilliant record as a legislator. 
He made a successful fight for a renomination against great 
odds, and his popularity was attested at the election in 
November, when he headed the poll in Essex county and 
received 681 votes more than the next highest candidate. 
His total vote was 32,404, being a plurality of 12,358 over 
Comes, the highest candidate ont he Democratic ticket. Last 
year he served as Chairman of the Committee on Treasurer's 
Accounts and as a member of the Committees on Banks and 
Insurance and Unfinished Business. 

Charles A. Schober. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Schober was born in Baden, Germany, January 20th, 
1863, and is a liquor dealer. He worked as a cutler for 
fifteen years. This is the first time he has held public office. 
He came to this country with his parents in 1864. He 



232 BIOGRAPHIES. 

attended a Cierman private school for four years, then entered 
a public school and after graduation, having a desire to 
become a good mechanic, he became an apprentice in R. 
Heinisch & Sons' shear works. He learned the trade 
thoroughly and worked at it for fifteen years. He is Past 
Chancellor of (iranite Lodge, No. 21, K of P., and also 
belongs to the I. ( ). O. F., A. O. U. W., and Fraternal Legion. 
He was one of the organizers of the U. S. Grant Republican 
Club of Newark, which is one of the most prominent poli- 
tical bodies in Newark. He was elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 9,410. 

Frederick William Mock, Jr. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Mock was born in Newark, N. J., July 23d, 1870, and 
is a bank clerk. He is the youngest member of the Assem- 
bly. He was graduated from the public schools of Newark. 
Eight years ago he accepted a position in the Chemical 
National Bank of New York City and is now a correspond- 
ing clerk in that institution. He has secured a furlough 
while the Legislature is in session. Although a very young 
man in politics, yet he has been an active political worker and 
already has done good service for the Republican party. He 
was the prime mover and was Chairman when the First 
Presidential Voters' Club was organized in Newark in 1892. 
He also rendered great assistance in organizing district clubs 
in his own ward and acted as Secretary of the Executive 
Committee of the ward for two years. He is an active, 
energetic young man, with bright prospects of a successful 
career. He was elected by a plurality of 11,509. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Olcott, R., 30,369. Wilcox, D., 19,705. 

Harrison, R., 31,616. Dusenberrv, D., 20,032. 

Storrs, R., 30,434. Comes, ' D., 20,046. 

Skinner, R., 31,650. Oelkers, D., 19,403. 

Duncan, R., 31,723. Smith, D , 19,864. 

Christie, R., 31,678. Mullin, D., 19,413. 

Smith, R., 31,634. Bomeisler, D., 19,470. 

Benedict, R., 31,078. Hassenger, D., 19,868. 

Eisele, R., 32,404. Jone.s D., 19,670. 

Schober, R., 29,456. Holzner, D., 19,451. 

Mock, Jr., R., 31,555. Williams, D., 19,568. 
People's, Comes, 423; Davis. 788; Condit, 802; Yuill,794: 

Pierson, 771; Rice, 799; McHugh, 804; Wallace, 791; 
Wentz, 756; Has.singer, 438 ; Trenchman, 775. Pro., Sloan, 



mOGRAPHIES. 23S 

747 ; Mav, 727 ; Berry, 724 ; Tyack, 750 ; Gould, 728 ; Stro- 
bell, 738; Teas, 723; Berryman, 733 ; Darm, 732; Haviland, 
745; Holmes, 745. Soc.-Lab., Duggan, 966; Frachenpuhl, 
964; Leske, 966; Ost, 957; Derchert, 965; Woerner, 966; 
Mellick, 966 ; Wemesthofi; 963 ; Scliriler, 962. Scattering, 25. 



Gloucester County. 

Solomon H. Stangek. 
(Rep., Glassboro.) 

Mr. Stanger was born in Glassboro, N. J., March 27tli, 
1836, on a farm. His boyhood days were spent with these 
surroundings, and he received his education at the old school- 
house of Glassboro, after which he became initiated into the 
industry of agriculture, which he pursued until 1881. In 
that year, seeing a good opening for a general store in Glass- 
boro, he quit farming and engaged in a business which has 
proved to be, at the present time, the largest and most success- 
ful of its kind in the county. In 1885 he was elected to the 
Board of Freeholders, and he has served in that body ever 
since, having been re-elected for each succeeding term. 
During the early part of his membership he was appointed 
to serve on several committees, the most important being the 
Almshouse Committee, of which he was elected Treasurer, 
and filled this office for three consecutive years. Afterward, 
the majority of the Board became Democratic and a new 
committee was appointed, but he was retained as a member 
for one year. Then, in 1892, when the Board again became 
Republican, he was re-appointed on this committee and re- 
elected as Treasurer, and at the present time is serving the 
county in that position. His term as a member of the Board 
will expire in 1895, making a period of ten years in succes- 
sion of faithful service in this important office. He has 
always been very closely identified with the interests of the 
Eepublican party, and is an active member of the Republican 
Club of Glassboro. This is his third year in the Assembly. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committee on Com- 
merce and Navigation, and as a member of the Committees 
on Agriculture and Agricultural College, Boroughs and 
Borough Commissions and Towns and Townships. 

1894— Stanger, Rep., 3,717; Swackhamer, Dem., 2,080; 
Gardner, Pro., 237 ; Chew, People's, 166. Stangei-'s plurality, 
1,637. 



234 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Hudson County. 

William N. Parslow. 

(Dem„ Hoboken.) 

Mr. Parslow was born June 9th, 1852, in the city of New 
York. His parents removed to Hoboken the same year, 
where he has since resided. In 1855 his father started in 
the business of an undertaker, and at his death in 1871 he 
succeeded him and he lias continued the business up to the 
present time. Mr. Parslow attended Public School No. 1 in 
Hoboken. He held the office of Coroner of Hudson county 
in the years 1873, '74, 75, '79, '80, '81, '91, '92 and '93, and 
was a member of the Board of Freeholders in 1881 and 1882. 
He Avas President of the New Jersey Funeral Directors' 
Association in 1891, '92, and acted as Sherifi" of Hudson 
county upon the death of Sheriff McPhillips in December 
1892, and until the appointment of Sheriff Stanton. He 
filled the office for ten days by virtue of his being the senior 
Coroner of the county. At the election last November he 
received the largest vote cast in Hudson county for member 
of Assembly, 25,657, being a plurality of 481 over the 
highest defeated candidate. 

Hexry C. G ruber. 
(Rep , Jersey City.) 

Mr. Gruber was born in Jersey City, November 24th, 1860, 
and is a cigarmaker. He was educated in the public schools. 
For several years he has taken an active part in reform 
movements, and has been prominently connected with indus- 
trial organizations, representing them in the national and 
State conventions. During the ballot reform campaign he 
worked with zeal for the passage of the new ballot law, 
which has given to the people of the State honest elections. 
In November, 1891, he accepted the independent nomina- 
tion for Assembly in the Fifth District on the Labor ticket. 
He challenged his Democratic and Republican opponents to 
debate the issues of the campaign, particularly on the ques- 
tions afiecting labor, but they refused to appear against him. 
He waged a cart-tail campaign and made a hustling light 
but was, however, defeated. At the recent election, he polled 
the highest number of votes on the Republican Assembly 
ticket. He is opposed to dual office-holding, and conse- 
quently has resigned the position of re-assessor, to which he 
was appointed by the Board of Street and Water Commis- 
sioners of Jersey City, on July 1st, 1894. His total vote in 
the county was 25,312. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 235 

James Usher. 

(Dem., Weehawken.) 

Mr. Usher was born May 2d, 1859, in West Hoboken, 
N. J., and is the eldest son of the late James Usher, a highly 
respectable gentleman long resident in that town. Mr. 
Usher's home from the day of his birth has been in the 
district he now represents. Educated in the public schools 
of his native place, he early began to study for the legal 
profession, but did not finish his studies, owing to his 
appointment as trustee of an estate in Xew York City. In 
addition to managing this trust, he conducts a real estate 
business in connection with loans, having offices at No. 9 
Murray street. New York. Mr. Usher was elected to the 
Assembly in 1893 by a plurality of 850. His opponents 
were Mr. G. "VV. Christie, the regular Republican nominee, 
whose name appeared also on an Independent ticket; Mr. 
Mann, the Socialistic-Labor candidate, and Mr. Fred, Lampe, 
the candidate of the Independent Citizens' convention. In 
the opinion of experienced observers Mr. Usher's election 
by such a large majority was one of the remarkable incidents 
in a campaign in which so many of the candidates of his 
party were defeated. Mr. Usher never held public office be- 
fore his election to the Assembly. He has always been a con- 
sistent Democrat and is known to be scrupulously attentive 
to his political duties, holding that every one should be 
conscientious in this regard as a duty to the country and to 
the people. In the Legislature of 1894 Mr. Usher served 
on the Committees on Judiciary and Towns and Townships, 
At the close of his term he was renominated without opposi- 
tion, and in the election which followed (and in which for 
the first time Assemblymen were voted for ihroughout their 
respective counties) he was re-elected, and notwithstanding 
the heavy Eepublican gains elsewhere in the State, he 
carried his district by a largely increased majority over the 
precediog year and also had a handsome majority in the 
county, his total vote being 25,347. 

Henry M. Nutzhorn. 

(Rep., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Nutzhorn was born in Hoboken, N, J., June 1st, 1868, 
and is a counsel or-at-law. After attending the public schools 
he entered the Hoboken Academy, where he completed his 
studies in German. He completed his education at the 
Northwestern L'niversity, Water town, Wis., and at the Con- 
cordia College, Fort Wayne, Ind. Upon his return to 



2S6 BiOGRAPiitES, 

Hoboken he received a commercial training in Packard*s 
Business College, in New York. Next he was graduated 
from the law school of the University of New York. lie 
then entered Russ & Ileppenheimer's law offices, and later 
Abel I. Smith & Mabon's law offices in Hoboken, where he 
studied law until he was admitted to the bar in 1891. He 
was admitted as a counselor in 1894. Mr. Nutzhorn formed 
a partnership with Horace L. Allen and they opened 
offices in the Hoboken Bank for Savings building. The 
partnership was recently dissolved. His popularity in 
Democratic Hoboken was evidenced by the large vote he 
received there. His total vote in the county was 25,275. 

James F. Blackshaw. 
(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Blackshaw was born in Cheshire, England, July 15th, 
1841. Soon after the death of his father, and in early boy- 
hood, he came to this country with his mother, and settled 
in New York City. He was educated in the public schools. 
He served five years at the plumbing business, and worked 
several years as a journeyman. With the exercise of strict 
economy he saved enough to start in business for himself. 
In 1855 he took up his residence in Jersey City, where he 
has since resided and conducted a profitable business for the 
past twenty-four years. On August 21st, 1862, he enlisted in 
Company (I, TAventy-first New Jersey Volunteers, and served 
nine months. He was taken prisoner at the battle of Salem 
Heights, and paroled after spending some time in Belle Isle 
prison. He is a conspicuous member of G. Van Houten 
Post, No. 3, Department of New Jersey, G. A. R. He is a 
Avarm friend and staunch supporter of organized labor. He 
received a total vote in the countv for the Assemblv of 25,240. 



Frederick Schober. 

(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Schober was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 7th,' 
1847, and is a wholesale butcher. He came to this country 
when about seven years of age, and settled in Jersey City, 
where he has resided ever since. He was educated in the 
public schools. In 1883 and 1884 he was a member of the 
Board of Freeholders. His total vote in the county for the 
Assembly was 25,215. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 237 



Pierce J. Fleming. • 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Fleming was born in Jersey City, December 2d, 1863, 
and is an index clerk in the Hudson County Court House. 
He was formerly a clerk for Wells, Fargo & Co.'s Express. 
He was elected Alderman from the Second District, Jersey 
City, in 1893, but resigned when he became a candidate for 
the Assembly. His total vote in the county was 25,802. 

Robert McAndrew. 
(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. McAndrew was born at Pecanic, near Bridgeport, 
Conn., October 14th, 1844, of Scottish parents. He removed 
with them to Glen Spey, Sullivan county, N. Y., in 1854, 
and was brought up on a farm. He received a common- 
school education. He enlisted in Company B, Fifty-sixth 
Kegiment, New York State Volunteers, when a little over 
sixteen years of age, and served through the entire war, from 
July 29th, 1861, to October 17th, 1865. Returning liome, he 
became Superintendent of the large farm of the late George 
R. McKenzie, President of the Singer Manufacturing Co , 
which position he held until his removal to Jersey City, in 
1882, when he became agent for his large estate in Jersey 
City. He received a total of 25,190 votes for the Assembly, 
being a plurality of 28 over his competitor, Mr. Wolbert. 

Richard Murray Smart. 
(Dem., Bayonne.) 

Mr. Smart was born in Banffshire, Scotland, June 3d, 1844, 
and is a draftsman, designer and engraver. He has resided 
in Hudson county, N. J., since the spring of 1847, first in 
Hoboken and next in Jersey City and Bayonne. He is an 
exempt fireman, and was for three consecutive years Vice 
President of the Independence Fire Association. In April, 
1893, he was elected from the First ward of Bayonne as a 
Trustee of the School Board for a term of three years. He 
has frequently declined nominations for Council and other 
offices. His total vote in the county for the Assembly was 
25,292. 

William Edward Drake. 
(Rep., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Drake was born in Penn Yan, N. Y., January 19th, 
1855, and is Principal of the Drake Business College, 23 and 
25 Newark avenue, Jersey City. His total vote in the county 
for the Assembly was 25,184. 



238 BIOGRAPHIES. 

* David H. Cagney. 

{Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Cagney was born February 22d, 1858, in New York 
City. He attended the St. James Parochial School for two 
years, when his parents removed to Jersey City, where he 
attended the public schools until he was fifteen years of age. 
After leaving school, he learned the printing business, in 
Avhich he continued until he became a journeyman, after 
wliich he became associated with his brothers in the railroad 
and steamship ticket brokerage business, having offices in all 
the principal cities, the principal ones being located at No. 
301 Broadway, New York City, and No. 2u0 Clark street, 
Chicago, 111. The firm name is "Cagney Brothers.'' At 
present he is President of the Guarantee Ticket Brokers' 
Association, which organization has the confidence of the 
railroad managers, and the respect of the traveling public 
throughout the United States. The system of nominating 
candidates for the Assembly from Hudson county was changed 
for the first time at the late election. The Democrats of the 
various Aldermanic Districts met and indorsed various gen- 
tlemen from their districts, and who, on receiving such 
indorsement, were voted for directly by the people, at the 
primaries held in each district. There were four aspirants 
for the honor in Mr. Cagney's district, who received the 
votes of their friends as "follows, 57, 84, 123 and 624, the 
latter number being cast for him, showing that he was, 
as he was called throughout the campaign, the "Popular 
Candidate." Mr. Cagney is a member of various social and 
charitable organizations, and was formerly President of the 
" C. Y. M. L. A.," and an active member of Democratic 
societies. He has never held an elective office and is no 
politician, but simply a business man. The vote cast for him 
in the county was 25,283. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 



Parslow, 


D., 


, 25,657. 


Jacob, 


D, 


, 25,176. 


Usher, 


D., 


, 25,347. 


Wolbert, 


D.; 


, 25,162. 


G ruber. 


K.; 


, 25,312. 


MuUin, 


D.; 


, 25,156. 


Fleming, 


D.: 


, 25,302. 


Dobke, 


E., 


, 25,146. 


Smart, 


D.i 


, 25,292. 


Kerr, 


E., 


, 25,100. 


Cagney, 


D.. 


, 25,283. 


Erlenkotter, D., 


25,089. 


Nutzhorn, 


E.; 


, 25,275. 


Sweeney, 


D., 


, 25,071. 


BlackshaWj 


, E., 


, 25,240. 


Egan, 


D., 


, 25,037. 


Schober, 


E., 


. 25,215. 


Fuller, 


R, 


24,933. 


McAndrew 


,E, 


, 25,190. 


Gerdts, 


R, 


24,851. 


Drake, 


E., 


25,184. 


Leonard, 


R, 


24,700. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 239 

Soc-Lab., Oakes, 1,098; Dickson, 1,282; Schuster, 1,067; 
Mann, 1,059; Aignew, 1,051; Ewald, 1,061; Fincke, 1,063; 
Meyers, 1,062 ; Eschenback, 1,055 ; Guarnerico, 1,051 ; Kop- 
pelson, 1,023. Pro., Brown, 333 ; Merschutt, 336 ; Gallagher, 
337; Black, 332; Dorr, 335; Seage, 334; Hooper, 335; 
Vroom, 335 ; Tily, 327 ; Hester, 324 ; Lamb, 325. People's, 
Cowgille, 219; Kelly, 220; Schopper, 234; Kuhn, 272; 
Lester, 230; McNulty, 280; Winter, 224; Duffy, 303; Hcs- 
sack, 224. 



Hunterdon County. 

Charles Nelson Beading. 

(Rep., French town.) 

Mr. Beading was born at Frenchtown, N. J., January 7th, 
1854, and is a merchant. He is a direct lineal descendant of 
Hon. John Beading, who was President of Council and by 
virtue of his office Governor of the State of New Jersey 
in 1757 and 1758. Mr. Beading was elected a member of 
Council of the Borough of Frenchtown in April, 1884, to 
which office he was re-elected in April, 1885, and he served 
both terms. He was elected Mayor of Frenchtown in April, 
1886, and re-elected in April, 1887, and served two terms. 
He was elected a member of the Board of Freeholders of 
Hunterdon county, in April, 1891, and served two years. 
Last year he was a member of the Assembly, when he served 
as Chairman of the Committee on Biparian Bights and as a 
member of the Committees on Bill Bevision and Bailroad 
and Canals. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 345 over Chanaberlin, Dem., although his Democratic 
colleague, Mr. Alpaugh, had a plurality of 376 over Simpson, 
Bep. 

William C. Alpaugh. 

(Dem., Milford.) 

Mr. Alpaugh was born in Alexandria township, Hunterdon 
county, N. J., August 5th, 1830, and is a farmer. In 1849 
he became a clerk in a store, served three years as such and 
then went to farming. The first public office he held was 
Clerk of the township of Alexandria, to which he was 
elected in 1851, and he served for three years. He served as 
a member of the Board of Freeholders of Hunterdon county 
from 1859 to 1861. He has filled small offices in the town- 
ship of Holland, where he now resides. He has always voted 
the Democratic ticket. He was re-elected to the Assembly 



240 BIOGRAPHIES. 

by a plurality of 376 over Simpson, Eep. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Agriculture and Agricultural 
College and School for Deaf-Mutes. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Reading, 11., 4,055. Simpson, R, 3,775. 
Alpaugh, D., 4,151. Chamberlin, D., 3,710. 
Pro., Warne, 449 ; Fritz, 447. People's, Holcomb, 140 ; 
Anderson, 128. 



Mercer County. 
William Lane Wilbur. 

(Rep., Hightstown.) 

Dr. Wilbur was born in Hightstown, N. J., August 22d, 
1864, and has always resided there. He is a son of Dr. Lloyd 
Wilbur, of that town, who was County Superintendent of 
Schools for some years, and who is the present Supervisor of 
the School Census. Dr. Wilbur was graduated from Peddle 
Institute in 1881 and from Princeton College in 1885, receiv- 
ing the degree of Master of Arts from Princeton three years 
later. He was graduated from the Medical Department of 
the University of Pennsylvania in 1888. Dr. Wilbur has 
been all his life an enthusiastic Republican and worker in 
the ranks of the party. He is at present Township Physician 
of East Windsor, and Medical Director of tlie Board of Health 
of the borough of Hightstown. Last year he served as 
Chairman of the Committee on Education, and as a member 
of the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and also of the Joint 
Committee on State Prison. He was elected in 1893 and 
1894 by the largest majorities ever given an Assemblyman 
in Mercer county. 

John Ginder. 
(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Ginder was born in Trenton, N. J., November 7th, 
1855, and is a potter by trade. He served as Assistant Ser- 
geant-at-Arms of the House of Assembly in 1885 and 1886, 
and was elected a member of the Board of Chosen Free- 
holders of Mercer county in 1888 for a term of two years, 
and served on some of the most important committees. He 
was elected Street Commissioner of the city of Trenton in 
May, 1894. Last year he was a member of the Assembly, when 
he served as Chairman of the Committee on State Prison, 
and as a member of the Committees on Labor and Industries, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 241 

Unfinished Business and Keform School for Boys He 
carried the county last November by a plurality of 4,203, his 
total vote being 10,214. 

William T, Exton. 

(Rep,, Trenton.) 

Mr. Exton was born at Trenton, N. J., August 19th, 1855, 
and is a baker and cake and biscuit dealer. He was formerly 
a cracker salesman. He is entirely a self-made man. When 
a boy he was employed in Exton's cracker bakery, in Trenton, 
where he worked until 1888, when he engaged in business 
for himself at his home. No. 693 South Broad street. His 
business increased so much that he found it necessary to 
remove several times, until he settled down at his present 
stand, No. 325 South Broad street, where he conducts one of 
the largest wholesale and retail stores of the kind in the city 
of Trenton. He is in no sense a politician, but his business 
experience and general knowledge of affairs — State, county 
and municipal — aids him very much in the discharge of the 
duties of the offi(;e of Assemblyman. Last year he was a 
member of the Assembly, when he served as Chairman of 
the Comm°ittee on Public Grounds and Buildings and as a 
member of the Committees on Elections, Miscellaneous Busi- 
ness and Treasurer's Accounts. Last November he carried 
the county by a plurality of 4,342, his total vote being 10,353. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Wilbur, K., 10,385. Grover, D., 5,887. 
Ginder, K , 10,214. Drake, D., 5,854. 
Exton, K, 10,353. Howell, D, 6,011. 
Pro., PuUen, 380 ; Brown, 414 ; Muirheid, 388. People's, 
Carter, 373 ; Apple, 390 ; Fagan, 371. 



Middlesex County. 

George Henry Tice. 

(Rep., Perth Amboy.) 

Mr. Tice was born at Perth Amboy, N. J., November 14th, 
1845, and is a shipper for the Staten Island Terra Cotta and 
Lumber Company. He was formerly a blacksmith by occupa- 
tion. He has lived in Perth Amboy all his lifetime. He 
was a member of the Board of Education of the city of Perth 
Amboy from April, 1878, to April, 1880, and again from 

11 



242 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1883, to April 1885. He was a member of the Board of Free- 
holders from May, 1880, to May, 1881. On February 15th, 
1890, lie was appointed Postmaster by President Harrison, 
which office he held until May 9th, 1894, when he resigned. 
He started the free delivery system in Perth Amboy on 
December 1st, 1892. He carried the county for Assembly 
last November by a plurality of 1,274, his total vote being 
7,277. 

Edward Waldron Hicks. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Hicks was born in New Brunswick, N. J., November 
19th, 1868, and is an attorney and counselor-at-law, being a 
member of the firm of Florance & Hicks. He has always 
re^ided in New Brunswick. He was admitted as an attorney 
at the February Term, 1890, and as a counselor at the Novem- 
ber Term, 1893. Last November he carried the county for 
the Assembly by a plurality of 1,367, his total vote being 
7,370. 

Andrew H. Slover. 

(Rep., South Amboy.) 

Mr. Slover was born at Sayreville, Middlesex county, N. J., 
October 13th, 1851, and is a merchant. Last year he was a 
member of the Assembly, when he served as Chairman of 
the Committee on Unfinished Business, and as a member of 
the Committees on Education and Ways and Means. He 
carried the county for Assembly last November by a plurality 
of 1,374, his total vote being 7,377. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Tice, R , 7,277. Homman, D., 6,003. 

Hicks, R., 7,370. Harkins, D., 5,876. 

Sh.ver, R., 7,377. Cozzens, D., 5,940. 
Pro., Dunham, 221 ; Barclay, 221 ; De Frest, 223. People's, 
Stelle, 2tj3 ; Van Alen, 255 ; Delaney, 274. Soc.-Lab., Sanks, 
170 ; Larem, 166 ; Toft, 159. 



Monmouth County. 
David Demarest Denise. 

(Rep., Freehold ) 

Mr. Denise was born in Freehold, Monmouth county, N. J., 
September 23d, 1840. His ancestors came from Utrecht, 
Holland, in 1638, and settled in Monmouth county, and the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 243 

old family mansion, wliich was erected more than a hundred 
years before the Kevolution, is still in the possession of the 
family Mr. Denise's education was begun in the common 
schools and completed at the Freehold Institute. He has made 
agriculture and horticuliure the study of his life. He has 
been one of the leading spirits in every organization for the 
advancement of agriculture. He is Treasurer of the State 
Board of Agriculture, one of the Board of Visitors to the 
Agricultural College, one of the Managers of the Experiment 
Station, connected with the State Horticultural Society, and 
a member of the Grange. He owns a farm on which the 
battle of Monmouth was fought, and it is regarded as one of 
the model farms of the State. Last year he served as Chair- 
man of the Committee on Agriculture and as a member of 
the Committee on Game and Fisheries. He has displayed 
much ability as a party leader, and has the admiration of 
his Democratic opponents. 

Charles Asa Francis. 

(Rep. , North Long Branch ) 

Mr. Francis was born at Keyport, N. J., October 28th, 
1855, and is a merchant. He received his education in the 
old Turkey School and at Freehold. He was formerly a 
clerk for the New Jersey Central Railroad Company at Sandy 
Hook. In 1881 he formed a copartnership under the firm 
name of Hoyt & Francis, in the grocery business, at North 
Long Branch, which is one of the most prosperous in Mon- 
mouth county. He was elected a Commissioner of that town 
in 1884, and was re-elected in 1885, '86 and '87. In 1893 he 
was placed on both tickets for Commissioner at-Large, and 
received the total vote cast at the municipal election. He 
was made Chairman of the Finance Committee and a member 
of the Sanitary, Ordinance and Printing Committees by Mayor 
Blodgett. He has been a member of the Board of Education 
since 1886, and in 1889 he was elected its Secretary. He 
served as Postmaster of North Long Branch under Presi- 
dents Arthur and Harrison. He is a fireman and an active 
church worker, and belongs to the following lodges : Long 
Branch Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Standard Chapter, K. A. M. ; 
Corson Commandery, Knights Templar; Sea View Lodge, 
I. O. O. F. ; Hollywood Council, Jr. O. U. A. M. ; Long 
Branch Council, Royal Arcanum, and Progressive Council, 
Loyal Additional Benefit Association, a branch of the Royal 
Arcanum. He carried the county for the Assembly by a 
plurality of 799, over Borden, the highest man on the Demo- 
cratic ticket, his total vote being 7,355. 



244 BIOGRAPHIES. 

George B. Snyder. 

(Rep., Fair Haven ) 

Mr. Snyder Avas born in Fair Haven, Monmouth county, 
September 2d, 1842, and has been a resident of that place 
during his lifetime. He has been engaged in tlie oyster 
business since his boyhood, having begun with a small capital, 
and is now one of the largest planters and growers on the 
Shrewsbury river. He is the senior partner of the firm of 
Snyder & Allen, w^ell known in the trade. For the last 
twenty years he has been active as a public servant, and has 
never yet been defeated as a candidate for office. He has 
held several township offices, and besides has been Trustee of 
the Public School Board for the past twenty years. Under 
the new law he was elected President of the Board of Shrews- 
bury township. For the last six years he has served as a 
member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders, which office he 
now holds. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
1,064, his total vote being 7,620. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Denise, R., 7,445. Walker, D., 6,281. 
Francis, R , 7,355. McCabe, D., 6,096. 
Snyder, R., 7,620. Borden, D., 6,566. 
Pro., Woodruff, 376 ; Edwards, 398 ; Woodfield, 379. 



Morris County. 

Charles A. Baker. 

(Rep., Ledgewood.) 

Mr. Baker was born in Morris county, N. J., May 2d, 1852, 
and is a farmer, besides being engaged in the bottling busi- 
ness. He was fifteen years in the service of the Delaware, 
Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company. He was 
Assessor of Roxbury township, Morris county, for four years 
and was Collector in 1890. He was a member of the Assembly 
last year, when he served as Chairman of the Committee on 
Federal Relations and as a member of the Committees on 
Banks and Insurance, Incidental Expenses and Public Print- 
ing. He was re-elected by a plurality of 1,774, his total vote 
being 6,061. 



hlOORAPttlES. 245 

William C. Bates. 
(Rep., Parsippany.) 

Mr. Bates was born in Hanover township, Morris county, 
about forty-five years ago, and is a farmer. He is a son of 
John Bates, who was a Kepublican Assemblyman from Morris 
county in 1864 and 1865. He has held several township 
offices. Last year he was a member of the Assembly, when 
he served as Chairman of the Committee on State Hospitals 
and as a member of the Committees on Engrossed Bills, 
Miscellaneous Business and Industrial School for Girls. He 
was re-elected by a plurality of 1,729. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Baker, R., 6,061. Davis, D., 4,287. 
Bates, R., 6,016. Brant, D., 4,266. 
Pro., Smith, 536 ; Freeman, 535. People's, Krahmer, 305 ; 
Roseveer, 304. 



Ocean County. 

Abraham Lower. 

(Rep., Point Pleasant.) 

Mr. Lower was born in York, Pa., October 27th, 1839, and 
is a carpenter and builder. He was educated in the public 
schools of Philadelphia, and also learned the trade of car- 
penter in that city. In 1853 he removed to Ohio, but 
returned to the Quaker City again four years after, where he 
lived till the outbreak of the Rebellion. In April, 1861, he 
enlisted in the Nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. His 
three months of service expiring, he re-enlisted in August of 
the same year in the Seventy-second Pennsylvania Volun- 
teers, and served there till his discharge, on August 5th, 1863. 
From the date of his discharge he served as a Special Officer 
of the War Department until near the close of the Civil War. 
In 1868 he moved into New Jersey and took up his resi- 
dence at Camden. For the past seventeen years Point 
Pleasant has been his home. Mr. Lower has filled many 
official positions. He has been Coroner of Ocean county, is 
a Commissioner of Deeds, has served in the Point Pleasant 
Borough Council and is its present Clerk, is a member of the 
local Board of Health and Clerk of that body, is a member 
of the Board of Education, and was the first Police Magis- 
trate of the borough. From the time of his majority he lias 
taken an active part in political aftkirs, and at one time was 

ni 



246 BtOGRAPHtES. 

a figure of no small amount in Camden municipal politics. 
Since his residence in Ocean county he has been seen at 
nearly or quite every Kepublican convention as a representa- 
tive of his district. Mr. Lower is a member of the Masonic 
order is a Past Councilor in the Pythian Knighthood, is at 
present State Councilor of the United American Mechanics 
of New Jersey, is Commander of Elwood Arnold Post, G. A. 
R., at Point Pleasant, and occupies positions in several other 
secret societies and organizations. His plurality in the 
county for Assemblyman was 686, and his total vote 1,838. 

Lower, Rep., 1,838; Harrison, Dem., 1,152; Lippincott, 
Pre, 185. 



Passaic County. 

James Robertson. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Robertson was born at Perth, Scotland, October 29th, 
1865, and is a lawyer by profession. He came to New York 
State when he was only eight years of age, and had to work 
in the lumber woods of northern New York and Canada to 
earn money to obtain an education. He was graduated from 
McGill University, Montreal, in 1889, with the degree of 
B A. taking first honors in mental and moral philosophy. 
He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 3,480 over 
ex-Speaker Thomas Flynn, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket, and his total vote was, 10,804. 

Samuel Bullock. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Bullock was born at Macclesfield, Cheshire, England, 
May 6th, 1863, and is a silk twister by occupation. He came 
to Paterson fifteen years ago and has resided there ever since. 
Has been a silk worker in various branches for twenty years. 
He is a graduate of Professor Oakley's Shorthand and Type- 
writing School. He is an active member of the Silk Loom 
Fixers' and Twisters' Protective and Benevolent Associa ion 
of America, formerly Local Assembly 7098, K. of L , and 
several fraternal societies. He organized the Passaic Falls 
Wheelman, now one of the strongest cycling clubs in New 
Jersey. He is a strong trades-unionist and is well known as 
a fearless and aggressive writer on the Tariff", Unionism and 
Arbitration questions, usually using the nom de plume of 
"Bufiy Lane," "Totowegian" or "Anti-Free Trader.'' In 
1893 he ran for the Assembly in the old Second District of 



BIOGRAPHIES. m 

Passaic county, and was defeated by John McKelvey, Demo- 
crat, by a plurality of 322. Last November Mr. Bullock 
carried Passaic county by a plurality of 3,193, and his total 
vote was 10,517. 

Samuel Fkederick. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Frederick was born at Suffern, Kockland county, N. Y., 
March 26th, 1856, and is a carpenter and builder. He was 
formerly a farmer. The only public office he held before his 
election to the Assembly was that of a Township Committee- 
man of Hohokus, Bergen county, for a three-year term 
during which he served as Treasurer of that body. He 
received the nomination for Freeholder in the Third ward of 
Paterson in the spring of 1894, in anticipation of a change being 
made in the law governing the election of Freeholders. Mr. 
Frederick was educated in the public schools, followed the 
life of a farmer until he was twenty-five years of age, then 
learned the trade of a carpenter and in September, 1886, 
removed to Paterson, and in the spring following bought his 
employer's residence and business interest. He was nomi- 
nated for the Assembly by a nearly unanimous vote and was 
elected by a plurality of 3,743, his total vote being 11,067. 

John King. 

(Rep., Passaic.) 

Mr. King was born in Dublin, Ireland, February 10th, 
1850, and is a hotel-keeper. He -was formerly in the grocery 
business, and at one time a gold miner. In April, 1876, he 
assisted the late John J. Breslin in rescuing six political 
prisoners from West Australia, who were sentenced by the 
British Government for treason-felony to imprisonment for 
1 fe. Mr. King was a member of the Assembly from the old 
Fourth District of Passaic county in 1890 and 1891. Last 
November he received the highest vote on the Republican 
Assembly ticket, 11,198, and a plurality of 3,874 over ex- 
Speaker Flynn, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Robertson, R, 10,804. Flynn, D., 7,324. 

Bullock, R., 10,517. McKelvey, D., 6,397. 

Frederick, R., 11,067. Marley, D., 6,821. 

King, R., 11,198. Spear, D., 5,938. 
Pro., Howell, 424 ; Datreman, 453 ; Mirsdon, 429 ; Forfar, 

414. Soc.-Lab., Lees, 2,312 ; White, 2,330 ; Kennedy, 2,585: 
G laser, 2,182. 



248 JSrOGRAPttlES. 

Salem County. 

Charles W. Powers. 

(Rep., Pennsville.) 

Mr. Powers was born in Lower Penn's Neck township, 
Salem county, N. J., May 9th, 1847, and is a farmer, having 
followed that business for the last eighteen years. For seven 
years he was in the mercantile business in Philadelphia. 
He was Township Assessor for two terms, and was a member 
of the Township Committee for three years, and until March 
15th, 1894. In 1890 he was a national census enumerator. 

1894— Powers, Eep., 3,209; Diver, Dem., 2,859; Graf, 
Pro., 197. 



Somerset County. 

Frank Williamson Somees. 

(Rep., Bound Brook.) 

Mr. Somers was born in South Bound Brook, Somerset 
county, N. J., January 22d, 1863, and is a hardware clerk. 
He is a son of the late Daniel J. Somers, at one time a 
prominent business man of Bound Brook, He received his 
education in the public schools, and has always been an ardent 
Republican. He never held public office before his election 
to the Assembly in 1893, not having been a candidate for any 
place before. He has displayed much ability as a party 
leader, and has the admiration of his political opponents. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committee on Towns 
and Townships, and as a member of the Committees on Bill 
Revision and Militia. 

1894— Somers, Eep., 3,291; Lane, Dem., 2.409; Scribner, 
Pro., 189. 



Sussex County. 

William P. Coursen. 

(Rep., Fredon.) 

Mr. Coursen was born at Fredon, Sussex county, N. J., in 
June, 1832, and is a farmer. He is the first Assemblyman 
who has been elected on the Republican ticket from Sussex 
county. He was a member of the Assembly last year, when 
he served as Chairman of the Committee on Soldiers' Home, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 249 

and as a member of the Committees on Agriculture and Agri- 
cultural College, Riparian Rights and Sinking Fund. 

1894— Coursen, Rep., 2,581; Bell, Dem., 2,431; Leach, 
Pro., 160. 



Union County. 

Charles Nelson Codding. 

(Rep., Westfleld.) 

Mr. Codding was born at Collingsville, Conn., December 
21st, 1861, and is a counselor- at-l aw. He was prepared for 
college at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass., and at Wills- 
ton Seminary, East Hampton, Mass. He was graduated at 
Yale University in the Class of '86, and immediately entered 
Columbia Law School, New York, from which institution he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1888. He has 
been practicing ever since, having an office in New York, 
and being also a member of the firm of Green, Codding & 
Van Winkle, of Westfield, N. J. Last year he Avas a mem- 
ber of the Assembly, when he served as Chairman of the 
Committee on State Library, and as a member of the Com- 
mittees on Corporations and Revision of Laws. His plurality 
in Union county last November was 1,539, and his total vote 
8,397. 

Joseph Cross. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Cross was born near Morristown, N. J., December 29th, 
1843. His father was a large and successful farmer. He was 
prepared for college at the Pearl Cottage Seminary, a school 
located at Elizabeth, N. J., under the care of the late Rev. 
Dr. Pierson. He entered the Sophomore Class in the College 
of New Jersey in the fall of 1862, and was graduated from 
that institution in the Class of 1865. Immediately thereafter 
he began the study of law in the office of William J. Magie, 
Esq., at Elizabeth. As additional preparation for the prac- 
tice of his profession, he took a course of lectures at Columbia 
College Law School, and was admitted to practice as an 
attomey-at-law at the June, 1868, Term of the Supreme 
Court of this State, and as a counselor in 1871. Soon after 
receiving his license he was taken into partnership by Mr. 
Magie under the firm name of Magie & Cross. This firm, 
after an existence of over eleven years, was dissolved in 188() 
by the appointment of its senior member to be one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Court. Mr. Cross has, since that 
time, been a member of two other law firms, the latter of 



250 BIOGRAPHIES. 

which, under the name of Cross & Noe, has been in existence 
since January, 1884. Since the spring of 1858 he has, with 
the exception of the years spent at college, been a resident of 
Elizabeth, and although always known as a staunch Repub- 
lican and ardent supporter of his party, had, up to the elec- 
tion in 1893, steadfastly refused to permit his name to be 
used as a candidate for an elective oflSce. He was appointed 
Judge of the District Court of the city of Elizabeth in 
January, 1888, but was legislated out of office, in common 
with the other Republican District Court Judges of the State, 
in April, 1891. When Speaker Holt resigned the chair, on 
May 26th, 1894, Judge Cross was chosen as his successor for 
the remainder of the session. During his brief term as 
presiding officer Speaker Cross exhibited marked ability as a 
parliamentarian and as a prompt dispatcher of business. 
During the session he served as Chairman of the Committee 
on Passed Bills, and as a member of the Committees on Banks 
and Insurance, Judiciary and Sinking Fund. Last Novem- 
ber he was the highest man on the Assembly ticket in Union 
county, his plurality being 2,093, and total vote 8,951. 



John N. Burger. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Burger was born at Baden, Germany, May 12th, 1835, 
and is a dealer in leather, findings and saddlery hardware at 
1172 and 1174 Elizabeth avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Last year 
he was a member of the Assembly, when he served as Chair- 
man of the Committee on School for Deaf-Mutes, and as a 
member of the Committees on Education, Federal Relations 
and Industrial School for Girls. He was re-elected last 
November by a plurality of 1,986, his total vote being 8,844. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Codding, R., 8,397. Cook, D., 6,344. 
Cross, R., 8,951. Green, D., 6,578. 
Burger, R., 8,844. Clauss, D., 6,858. 
Pro., Blake, 283; Wood, 275; Van Cise, 281. Soc.-Lab., 
Keim, 466 ; Miller, 456 ; Scott, 433. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 251 

"Warren County. 

Samuel V. Davis. 

(Rep., Phillipsburg.) 

Mayor Davis was born at Westfield, Union county, N. J., 
February 14th, 1839, and is engaged in the coal business. 
He was formerly engaged in the hotel business. He was 
elected Mayor of Phillipsburg in the spring of 1892 by 506 
majority, and re-elected in 1893 by 213 majority. Before his 
election as Mayor he never held any public office. Last year 
he was a member of the Assembly, when he served as Chair- 
man of the Committee on Reform School for Boys, and as a 
member of the Committees on Stationery, State Hospitals 
and Soldiers' Home. He was re-elected last November by a 
plurality of 750, his total vote being 4,273. 

George W. Smith. 

(Rep., Hackettstown ) 

Mayor Smith was born at Hanover Neck, Morris county, 
N. J., June 4th, 1856, and is in the furniture and undertaking 
business. He was formerly a contractor and builder. He 
was elected a member of the Common Council of Hacketts- 
town in April, 1886, and re-elected the four succeeding years. 
He was elected Mayor of the same town in April, 1891, '92, 
'93 and '94. At the election last November his plurality for 
member of Assembly was 261, and total vote 3,784. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Davis, R., 4,273. McCabe, D., 2,576. 
Smith, R., 3,784. Gulick, D., 3,523. 
Pro., Alleger, 973 ; Prall, 538. 



Summary. 

House — Republicans, 54 Democrats, 6=60 
Senate — Republicans, 16 Democrats, 5=21 

70 11 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot^ 59, 



252 BIOGRAPHIES, 

THE JUDICIARY. 

United States District Court. 

Edwakd T. Green, Trenton. 

Edward T. Green, Judge of the District Court of the 
United States for the District of New Jersey, and the Asso- 
ciate of Hon. George Shiras, Jr., Circuit Justice, and the 
Hon. Marcus W Acheson, Circuit Judge, in the Circuit 
Court, was born in Trenton, N. J., in 1837. He is a son of 
the late George S. Green and nephew of the late Chancellor 
Green. He was graduated at Princeton College in 1854, was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney in November 1858, and 
as a counselor in November, 1861. He was attorney for 
several years for the old Camden and Amboy Railroad Com- 
pany. For twenty years he was general counsel for the 
Pennsylvania Eailroad Company, a position he held at the 
time of his appointment as Judge. At one time he was 
City Solicitor for Trenton. He was sworn into office on 
Tuesday, October 29tli, 1889, and succeeded the late Judge 
John T. Nixon. His salary is $5,000 a year. 



Court of Chancery. 

Alexander T. McGill, Chancellor, Jersey City. 

(Term, seven years. Salary, 810,C00 per annum.) 

Chancellor McGill, LL.D., was born in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
about fifty years ago. He came to New Jersey in 1854, when 
his father accepted a professorship in the Theological Semi- 
nary of the College of New Jersey. The Chancellor gradu- 
ated from that college in 1864, which has since conferred on 
him the honorary degree of LL.D., and from Columbia Law 
School, New York, in 1866. He continued the study of the 
law with the late Supreme Court Justice Edward W. Scudder, 
at Trenton, and was admitted to the bar as an attorney in 
1867, and as a cauuselor in 1870. He was counsel fur the 
city of Bayonne for two years, in 1874 and 1875, when he 
also represented the then First District of Hudson county in 
the House of Assembly. He served on leading committees 
and took a very active part in legislation. He was at one 
time a law partner of ex-Attorney General Gilchrist. He 
served one term as Prosecutor of the Pleas of Hudson county, 
succeeding A. Q. Garreton, who was appointed Law Judge, 
and when the latter resigned that oflice Mr. McGill again 



BIOGRAPHIB^, 253 

succeeded him as Judge, an office he held when he was 
appointed Chancellor by Governor Green, on March 29th, 
1887. He was unanimously confirmed by the Senate the 
31st of the same month. He was re-appointed by Governor 
Werts in 1894, and unanimously confirmed by the Senate. 
His term expires on May 1st, 1901. 



Vice Chancellors. 

(Term, seven years. Salary, 19,000 a year.) 

Abraham V. Van Fleet, Newark. 

Vice Chancellor Van Fleet was born in Hillsboro, Somer- 
set county, January 6th, 1831. He was admitted to the bar 
in November Term, 1852, and made counselor in 1858. He 
commenced the practice of his profession in Flemington, 
where he soon built up a large and lucrative business. He 
was appointed Vice Chancellor by Chancellor Runyon, and 
commissioned by Governor Bedle, in 1875, for a term of 
seven years. He was re-appointed in 1882, for another term, 
but tendered his resignation to Chancellor McGill in 1887, 
which was accepted, and he was re-appointed for another full 
term. In 1894 he was again appointed for an additional 
term by Chancellor McGill. He is considered one of the 
finest Chancery lawyers in the State. In politics he is a 
Eepublican. His term expires in 1901. 

John T. Bird, Trenton. 

Vice Chancellor Bird was born in Bethlehem township, 
Hunterdon county, August 16th, 1829. He attended the 
public schools of his neighborhood, and spent three years at 
a classical academy at Hackettstown. He studied law with 
the late Hon. A. G. Richey, then residing at Asbury, N. J., 
and was admitted to the bar in November Term, 1855. For 
three years he practiced at Bloomsbury, this State. In 1863 
he was appointed Prosecutor of the Pleas for Hunterdon 
county by Governor Parker. He then removed to Clinton 
and remained there till 1865, when he changed his residence 
to Flemington. He served one term of five years as Prose- 
cutor of the Pleas. In 1868 he was elected by the Democratic 
party to Congress, and in 1870 he was re-elected. In 1882 he 
Avas appointed Vice Chancellor, to succeed Hon. Amzi Dodd, 
who had resigned, and in 1889 he was re-appointed for 
another term of seven years. His term expires in 1896, 



254 BIOGRAPHIES. 



Henry C. Pitney, Morristown. 

Vice Chancellor Pitney, LL.D., was born at Mendham, 
Morris county, N. J., January 17th, 1827. He was gradu- 
ated from Princeton College, in the Class of 48, which has 
since conferred on him the honorary degree of LL.D. He 
was admitted to the bar as an attorney in July, 1851, and 
as a counselor in November, 1854. He is regarded as one of 
the ablest constitutional lawyers in New Jersey. He was 
appointed Vice Chancellor for a term of seven years, in the 
spring of 1889. In politics he is a Republican. His term 
expires in 1896. 

Robert Stockton Green, Elizabeth. 

Vice Chancellor Green, LL.D., was bom at Princeton, N. J., 
March 25th, 1831. He is the son of James S. Green, a lawyer 
and a sturdy Jersey man, whose father. Rev. Dr. Ashbel 
Green, was President of Princeton College. The Vice Chan- 
cellor's great-grandfather. Rev. Jacob Green, of Hanover, 
Morris county, N. J., was chairman of the committee which 
prepared the first Constitution for the State of New Jersey at 
the Provincial Congress held at Burlington in 1776. 

The Vice Chancellor Avas graduated from Nassau Hall in 
1850, and since then it has conferred on him the honorary 
degree of LL.D. He was admitted to the bar in 1853, and 
became a counselor in 1856. He removed to Elizabeth in 
1856, and at once became interested in tlie movement then 
on foot for the creation of Union county. He was largely 
instrumental in the passage of the act of 1857, which desig- 
nated Elizabeth as the county seat. During 1857 he was 
appointed Prosecutor of the Borough Courts by Governor 
Newell, and the following year became City Attorney of 
Elizabeth. In 1868 he was elected to the City Council from 
a strong Republican ward, and so great was his popularity 
that he continued to hold the office by successive re-elections 
until 1873, when he retired. He was elected Surrogate of 
Union county in 1862, and appointed Presiding Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas and County Courts in 1868. During 
the succeeding year he was appointed by Governor Randolph 
to the Commercial Convention at Louisville as a representa- 
tive of New Jersey. In 1873 he was appointed by Governor 
Parker, and confirmed by the Senate, as one of the Commis- 
sioners to suggest amendments to the Constitution of the 
State. In 1884 he was elected to Congress from the Third 
District of New Jersey by a majority of 1,848, over Joliu 
Keau, Jr. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 255 

The Vice Chancellor was one of the delegates to the Balii- 
more Convention of I860, which nominated Stephen A. 
Douglas for the Presidency; was a delegate to the National 
Convention of 1880, which nominated General Hancock, and 
also to the St. Louis Convention, in 1888, which nominated 
Grover Cleveland, In January, 1874, he became a member 
of the bar of New York, as a partner in the firm of Brown, 
Hall & Vanderpoel, which afterwards became changed to 
Vanderpoel, Green & Cumming. He has been very success- 
ful in his profession, and is ranked as one of the ablest 
constitutional lawyers in the State. 

In 1886 he was elected Governor, after a very exciting 
canvass, by a plurality of 8,020, over the late ex-Congressman 
Benjamin F. Howey, Rep , of Warren county. 

He was appointed Vice Chancellor in 1890 for a term of 
seven years. His term Avill expire in the spring of 1897. 

In 1894 he was appointed by Governor Werts a Judge of 
the Court of Errors and Appeals, to fill a vacancy caused by 
the death of William AValter Phelps. 



JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

(Term of office, seven years. The salary of the Chief Justice is 
$10,000 a year, and that of each Associate Justice $9,000.) 

Chief Justice. 

Mekcer Beasley, Trenton. 

Chief Justice Beasley, LL.D., was born in Mercer county, 
N. J., in 1815. His father was Rev. Frederick Beasley, for 
many years President of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and at one time rector of St. Michael's Church, in Trenton. 
His mother was Maria Williamson, daughter of Mathias 
Williamson, who was a brother of ex-Governor Isaac AVilliam- 
son. He entered the Junior Class of Princeton College when 
a lad, and after remaining a year came to Trenton to study 
with his father, at the same time reading law under the 
tutelage of Samuel L. Southard, and later in the oflBce of ex- 
Chancellor Isaac H. Williamson, at Elizabeth. He was 
admitted to practice at the September Term of the Supreme 
Court, in 1833, and became a counselor in February, 1842. 
As a young man at the bar, he was noted as a special pleader. 
He was particularly accomplished in the preparation of 
pleadings and famous for his accuracy and discernment. 
Upon his elevation to the bench, the advocates lost from 
anaong their number one of the very brightest in the whole 



256 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State, and the Judiciary gained a member whose name is 
now known in all the courts of the land ; who is excelled in 
knowledge of the law by few, if any, of the eminent jurists 
of America, and whose decisions are quoted constantly before 
foreign, as well as home tribunals. Mr. Beasley, in his 
younger days, served as City Solicitor of Trenton, when that 
office paid only |15 a year. In 1851 he was the Whig can- 
didate for Mayor of Trenton, when he was defeated by 
William Napton, Dem., by a vote of 783 to 491. He was a 
member of tlie Trenton Common Council, and ferved as 
President of that body in 1850. Of those who were admitted 
to the bar at the same time the Chief Justice was, but few 
are still in the land of the living. Barker Gummere, ex- 
Secretary of the Navy Robeson, Judge Depue and a best of 
others, well known to the bench and bar, are younger mem- 
bers of the profession. In 1864 he was appointed by Gover- 
nor Parker Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He was 
re-appointed by Governor Randolph in 1871, by Governor 
McClellan in 1878, and by Governor Abbett in 1885 and 1892. 
In politics he is a Democrat. His term expires March 8th, 
1899. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Monmouth and Mid- 
dlesex. Total population, 130,882. 



Associate Justices. 

(Eight altogether. Salary 89,000 a year.) 

Da\id Ayres Depue, Newark. 

Justice Depue, LL.D., was born at Mount Bethel, North- 
ampton county. Pa , October 27th, 1826. He is of Huguenot 
descent, and his ancestors were among the earliest sett'ers of 
Pahaquarry, Warren county, N. J. The family moved in 
1840 to Belvidere, Warren county. The Justice entered 
Princeton College in 1843, and he was graduated three years 
later. He studied law under John M. Sherrard, and' was 
admitted to the bar in 1849. In the same year he began 
practice in Belvidere. In 1866 he was appointed by Gov- 
ernor Ward a Justice of the Supreme Court, to succeed 
Justice Haines, and was assigned to the Essex and Union 
circuit, when he removed to Newark, where he has since 
resided. Union county was detached from this dist-ict when 
two additional Judicial districts were created by the act of 
April 6th, 1875. He was re-appointed by Governor Parker 
in 1873. In 1880 he was re-appointed by Governor Mc- 
Clellan for another term of seven years, and again in 1887 



mOGRAPHtES. 25? 

by Governor Green, and in 1894 by Governor Werts. He 
received Ibe honorary degree of LL.D. from Rutgers College 
in 1874, and also from Princeton College, his alma mater, in 
1880. In politics he is a Republican. His present term 
expires in 1901. 
His circuit comprises Essex county. Population, 256,098. 

Bennet Van Syckel, Trenton. 

Justice Van Syckel was born April 17th, 1830, in Beth- 
lehem, Hunterdon county, N. J. He was prepared for college 
at Easton, Pa., entered Princeton College in 1843, and was 
graduated in 1846, in the same class with David A. Depue, 
now one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court. 
Immediately after graduating he entered the law office of 
Alexander Wurts, of Flemington, in which he remained 
until he was admitted to the bar, in 1851. He at once began 
the practice of his profession at Flemington. In 1869 he 
was appointed to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, 
and was re-appointed in 1876, again in 1883, and again in 
1890. He is a Democrat in politics. His present term 
expires February 15th, 1897. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Union and Ocean. 
Total population, 88,441. 

Jonathan Dixon, Jersey City. 

Justice Dixon was born in the city of Liverpool, England, 
July 6th, 1839. He remained there until his eighth year, 
having attended the public schools for two or three years. 
His family then removed to Marypont, Cumberland county, 
in the same country, where his education was continued. 
His father came to the United States in 1848, and his faniMy 
followed him two years later, and settled in New Brunswick, 
N. J. Jonathan became an inmate of the home of Cornelius 
L. Hardenbergh, a lawyer, who suffered from blindness, and 
to him the lad acted as attendant and amanuensis for nearly 
five years, or until September, 1855. In that year he entered 
Rutgers College, and graduated from that institution in 1859. 
He then entered the law office of his former tutor, War- 
ren Hardenbergh, and studied there for twelve months. 
Upon Mr. Hardenbergh removing to New York, Mr. Dixon 
entered the office of George R. Dutton, and subsequently 
that of Robert Adrain, both of these gentlemen being mem- 
bers of the bar of New Brunswick. While studying law, 
he taught school as a means of livelihood. He was admitted 
as an attorney in November, 1862, and three years later as a 
counselor. After being admitted as an attorney, he moved 



25g ntOGRAPHTES. 

to Jersey City and entered the law office of E. B. "Wakeman, 
in a clerical capacity, and in the spring of 1864 he formed a 
copartnership with his employer, which lasted one year. 
For five years he practiced by himself, and then formed a 
copartnership with Gilbert Collins, In April, 1875, he was 
appointed as Justice of the Supreme Court by Governor 
Bedle, in 1882 he was re-appointed by Governor Ludlow, and 
in 1889 by Governor Green. He is a Republican in politics, 
and was the candidate of his party for Governor in 1883, 
when he was defeated by the late Leon Abbett. His present 
term expires in 1896. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Passaic and Bergen. 
Total population, 152,272. 

Alfred Reed, Trenton. 

Justice Reed was born December 23d, 1839, in Ewing 
township, Mercer county. He attended the Lawrenceville 
High School in 1856, and the Model School, at Trenton, in 
1857-58, and entered Rutgere College, at New Brunswick, in 
1859. In the fall of 1860 he was matriculated at the State 
and Normal Law School, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and in the 
summer of 1862 admitted to the practice of the law in New 
York. He returned to Trenton and renewed his study of 
law, and was admitted to the bar of New Jersey at the June 
Term, 1864. In the spring of 1865 he was elected to the 
Common Council of Trenton, of which body he was made 
President. He was elected Mayor of Trenton in 1867, serv- 
ing for one year, and in the spring of 1869 he was appointed 
Law Judge of Mercer county, a position he held for a full 
term of five years. On April 8th, 1875, he was appointed by 
Governor Bedle a Justice of the Supreme Court ; in 1882 he 
was re appointed by Governor I^udlow, and in 1889 by Gov- 
ernor Green. In politics he is a Democrat. His present 
term expires in 1896. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Cape May, Cumber- 
land, Salem and Atlantic. Total population, 110,693. 

William J. Magie, Elizabeth. 

Justice Magie was bnrn at Elizabeth, Union county, N. J., 
December 9tli, 1832. His father, David Magie, was for nearly 
forty-five years pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of 
Elizabeth* and was also a native of the same town. He 
entered Princeton College in 1852, and graduated in 1855. 
He studied law with the late Francis B. Chetwood, of Eliza- 
beth, Avas admitted as an attorney in 1856, and as a coun- 
selor in 1859. For six years he was associated in prae- 



MOGRAPiilES. ^d 

tice with Mr. Cbetwood, and after practicing alone for some 
time he formed another copartnership with Mr. Joseph Cross. 
From 1866 to 1871 he was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Union 
county. He has been connected with the banks of Elizabeth, 
and has acted as counsel to several corporations. He was 
elected to the State Senate from Union county in 1875, for a 
term of three years, and in 1880 he was appointed a Justice 
of the Supreme Court by Governor McClellan. He was re- 
appointed by Governor Green in 1887, and by Governor 
Werts in 1894. His term expires in 1901. In politics he is 
a Kepublican. 

His circuit consists of Morris, Sussex and Somerset coun- 
ties. Total population, 104,671. 

Charles Grant Garrison, Camden. 

Justice Garrison was born in Swedesboro, Gloucester 
county, N. J., August 3d, 1849. He is a son of Rev. Joseph 
Fithian Garrison, D.D., a well-known divine of the Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, who is now a professor in a Philadel- 
phia college. The Judge was educated at Edgehill School, 
Princeton, at the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, and in 
the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated as 
a physician in 1872. He practiced that profession until 1876, 
at Swedesboro, and then entered the law office of Samuel H. 
Grey, of Camdeu, where he remained until he was admitted 
to the bar, in 1878. He was made Judge-Advocate General 
of New Jersey in 1884, and in 1882 he was made Chancellor 
of the Southern Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
of New Jersey. He was appointed to the Supreme Court 
bench in January, 1888, in the place of the late ex-Governor 
Joel Parker, for a full term of seven years. He is the 
youngest member of the court. In politics he is a Democrat. 
His term expires in 1895. 

His circuit consists of the counties of Burlington, Camden 
and Gloucester. Total population, 174,864. 

Job H. Lippincott, Jersey City. 

Justice Lippincott was born near Mount Holly, N. J., 
November 12th, 1842. He was reared on his father's farm 
at Vincentown, N. J , and received a common-school educa- 
tion. When eighteen years of age he attended a private 
academy at Vincentown, conducted by John G. Herbert, for 
one year. Afterward he attended the Mount Holly Institute, 
under the tuition of the Rev. Samuel Aaron, for about a 
year. He entered, as a law student, the law office of Ewan 
Merritt, Esq., at Mount Holly, January 1st, 1863. During 



260 ^lOGRAPtiTES. 

his period of service as a law student he attended the Dane 
Law School of Harvard University, at Cambridge, Mass , 
and in July, 1865, he graduated therefrom with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and at the February Term, 1867, of the 
Supreme Court, he was admitted to the bar of this State. 

In May, 1867, he located in Hudson county, and opened a 
law office at the court-house, in what was then the city of 
Hudson. He was a member and President of the Board of 
Education of the city of Hudson from 1868 to 1871, whfn 
the three cities of Bergen, Jersey City and the city of Hudson 
were consolidateil into one city. In 1874 he was elected 
counsel of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of the county of 
Hudson, which office he held, by annual election, for thirteen 
successive years. In 1886 he was appointed by President 
Cleveland L'nited States Attorney for the District of New 
Jersey, which office he held one year, and then resigned to 
accept the position of Law Judge of the county of Hudson, 
to which he was appointed by Governor Green, to fill the 
unexpired term of Chancellor McGill, who held that office 
at the time of his appointment as Chancellor. 

In 1888 he was re-appointed as Law Judge by Governor 
Green for a full term of five years. In January, 1893, he 
resigned this position, and was appointed by Governor Werts 
one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court for the 
full term of seven years, to succeed Justice Werts, who had 
resigned to become Governor. In politics he is a Democrat. 

His circuit consists of Hudson county. Population, 275,126. 

Vacancy. 

There is one vacancy on the bench of the Supreme Court, 
caused by the death of Leon Abbett, which occurred Decem- 
ber 4th, 1894. 



Circuit Court Judges. 

(Term of office, seven years. Salary, 57,500.) 

Richard T. Millee, Camden. 

Judge Miller was born in Cape May City, N J., December 
16th, 1845. He studied law with the late Thomas P. Car- 
penter, who was a Justice of the Supreme Court. He was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney in 1867 and as a counselor 
in 1870. He was City Solicitor of Cape May during 1869 
and 1870 ; District Court Judge of the city of Camden from 
March 3d, 1877, until July llth, 1888. He was appointed 
Prosecutor of the Pleas of Cape May county, April 19th, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 261 

1889, and resigned that office on March 30th, 1892. He was 
appointed President Judge of the Court of Common Pleas of 
Camden county April 1st, 1892, and resigned on March 11th, 
1893. Governor VVerts appointed Judge Miller a Circuit 
Court Judge of New Jersey March 11th, 1893, for a term of 
seven years. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Francis Child, Morristown. 

Judge Child is a native of New Jersey and about fifty-one 
years of age. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney in 
June, 1865, and as a counselor in February, 1877. He filled 
the office of President Judge of the Court of Common Pleas 
of Morris county from April 1st, 1878, and until he was 
appointed Circuit Court Judge on March 11th, 1893. 



Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

(Term of oflBce, six years. Compensation, 88 for each day's attend- 
ance, and SI for every ten miles going and returning.) 

Hendrick H. Brown, Browntown. 

Judge Brown was born at BroAvntown, Middlesex county, 
upon the 23d day of June, 1833, where he now resides and 
where he has, since boyhood, followed the occupation of farm- 
ing. His ancestors were John and Susannah Brown, and in 
the family Bible, under date of January 24th, 1737, appears 
a sketch of their nine sons and three daughters. One of this 
large family was Peter Brown, a great-great-grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch. The grandfather of Judge Brow^ 
was Whitehead Brown, who had one son, Abram W. Brown, 
who, like his ancestors, was a large plantation owner. Abram 
Brown was an active Democrat and held the office of Free- 
holder and Sheriff, and in 1843-44 represented his party in 
the New Jersey Senate. 

Judge Brown was educated at Matawan Institute. He 
early entered into the political arena— after the death of his 
father, in 1854 — and became a pronounced Democrat. After 
serving as Freeholder, he was for ten years Law Judge of 
Middlesex county. In 1884 Governor Abbett appointed him 
one of the Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeal and he 
was re-appointed in 1890. His term expires in 1896. 

Abraham Carpenter Smith, Bloomsbury. 

Judge Smith was born in Greenwich township, Warren 
county, December 11th, 1832, At an early age he was placed 
under the care of John S. Labar, Principal of the Stewarts- 



262 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ville Classical School, where he fitted himself to enter 
Lafayette College. He continued in college uotil the 
middle of his Junior year, when he entered the oflBce of the 
late Doctor J. P. B. Sloan. In 1851 he graduated from the 
medical department of the University of Pennsylvania before 
attaining his majority. In 1856 the Trustees of Lafayette 
College conferred on him the honorary degree of A.M. 
Whilst a student at college he received an appointment as a 
cadet at West Point on the recommendation of the Hon. 
Eichard Brodhead, the then Senator from Pennsylvania. 
Being the only son, his father and mother Interposed and he 
declined the appointment. After receiving the degree of 
M.D. he spent one year as one of the resident physicians in 
the Long Island Hospital, in Brooklyn, N. Y. In 1853 he 
located at Durham, Bucks county, Pa., and in 1854 was 
elected as a member of the Board of Control, and acted as its 
President for six years. In 1862 he moved to Mauch Chunk, 
and in 1866 until 1869 was U. S. Pension Examining Surgeon. 
In 1872 his father died, and having left him executor of his 
estate he removed to New Jersey. In the organization of the 
Bloomsbury National Bank in 1875 he was one of its prime 
movers, and was elected its teller and bookkeeper, which 
position he held until 1880, when, on account of close con- 
finement and impairment of health, he resigned. In 1889 
he was appointed by Governor Eobert S. Green Lay Judge of 
the Court of Errors and Appeals. He is a member of the 
Hunterdon County Medical Society, the Medical Society of 
New Jersey, the American Medical Association and the 
Medico-Legal Society. His term expires in 1895. 

John W. Bogert, Hohokus. 

Judge Bogert was born at Hohokus, Bergen county, Sep- 
tember 3d, 1839. His ancestors settled in that locality some 
time before the Revolution. He has held several township 
offices and was Collector of Bergen county for fourteen years. 
He was a member of the House of Assembly from the Second 
District of Bergen county in the sessions of 1874-75, and he 
served as State Senator for four years. He is an executor 
and administrator for several large estates. He was appointed 
by Governor Abbett Judge of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals in 1891, and his term will expire in 1897. 

Gottfried Krueger, Newark. 

Judge Krueger was born in Baden, Germany, November 
4th, 1837, and came to this country February 13th, 1852, 
when he settled in Newark, where he has resided ever since. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 263 

He is extensively engaged in the brewing business. He 
served as an apprentice with Adams & Laible, Newark, and 
when that firm dissolved Mr. Laible built a new brewery for 
himself, and made Mr. Krueger foreman, a position he tilled 
until 1865. He then formed a copartnership with Gottlieb 
Hill, and they purchased the old brewery in which Mr. 
Krueger had served his time, and also adjoining property. 
The business rapidly increased, and several additions were, 
from time to time, made to their brewery. In 1875 Mr. Hill, 
owing to ill health, was forced to retire from business, and 
Mr. Krueger became the sole proprietor. The brewery is 
now one of the most extensive in the State. The Judge 
served as a member of the Assembly in 1877 and 1880. In 
1872 he served as a member of the Essex County Beard of 
Freeholders. In 1880 he was chosen a Presidential Elector, 
and he, together with the other Electors from New Jersey, 
cast their votes for Hancock and English, the Presidential 
nominees of the Democratic party. He was appointed Judge 
of the Court of Errors and Appeals in 1891 by Governor 
Abbett, to succeed the late Judge John McGregor. His 
term will expire in 1897. 

Clifford Stanley Sims, Mount Holly. 

Judge Sims is a native of Pennsylvania, having been born 
in 1839 at Emeline Furnace, near Harribburg, He began to 
study law in 1856, and was admitted to practice in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1860. He was admitted in Tennessee in 1866 and 
in Arkansas in 1868. He served in the United States Navy 
from 1862 to 1864, when he was appointed Lieutenant- Colonel 
of the Fourth Arkansas Infantry, U. S. Volunteers. He was 
taken prisoner that year, and was on parole until the close 
of the war. He was a member of the Constitutional Con- 
vention of Arkansas in 1867-68, and of the Legislature of 
that State in 1868 69, and was appointed commissioner to 
prepare a digest of the statutes of Arkansas in 1868. He was 
appointed Consul for the District of Canada in 1869, and 
retained that position until 1878, when he resigned to enter 
the service of the Pennsylvania Kailroad Company, in which 
he remained until 1887. He has been a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Jersey since 
1861, and its President since 1883. 

He published at Albany, in 1862, a valuable work, entitled 
"The Origin and Signification of Scottish Surnames," also 
"The Institution of the Society of the Cincinnati of the 
State of New Jersey " Judge Sims is a member of several 
boards of directors of leased lines of the Pennsylvania Kail- 



264 BIOGRAPHIES. 

road Company. He was appointed a Judge of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals by Governor Werts in 1894, to suc- 
ceed the late Judge Clement. His term expires in 1900. He 
is a Democrat in politics. 

Robert Stockton Green, Elizabeth. 

Vice Chancellor Green was appointed a Judge of the 

Court of Errors and Appeals, in 1894, by Governor Werts, 

to succeed the late William Walter Phelps. For a biograph- 
ical sketch of Judge Green, see page 254. 



U. S. OFFICERS FOR NEW JERSEY. 

District Attorney. 

John Woodhull Beekman, Perth Amboy. 

Mr. Beekman was b^rn in Montgomery township, Somerset 
county, N. J., February 28th, 1844, and is a lawyer by pro- 
fession. While reading law he taught school for four years. 
He was City Attorney for Perth Amboy for seventeen years, 
and was a School Commissioner for two years, during one of 
which he was President of the Board. He served three 
terms in the House of Assembly from the First District of 
Middlesex county, and in 1894 he was the leader of the 
Democratic minority. He was appointed District Attorney 
for New Jersey by President Cleveland, in 1894, to succeed 
Henry Simmons White, whose term had expired. No fixed 
salary is attached to this office. The compensation consists 
of fees. 



Clerk U. S. Circuit Court. 

S. Duncan Oliphant, Trenton. 

General Oliphant was born at Franklin Forge, on the 
Youghiogheny river, Fayette county, Pa., in 1824. He was 
graduated from Jefferson College, Washington county. Pa., in 
September, 1844; from Harvard Law School, Cambridge, 
Mass., in July, 1847, and was admitted to practice in Fayette 
county, Pa., Septemi)er of the same year. In the fall of 1849 
he entered into partnership witli the Hon. Thomas Williams, 
of the Pittsburgh bar, and practiced law there until the 
spring of 1852, and then, on account of the health of his 
family, returned to A^incentown, and resumed and continued 
in the practice of law there until April, 1861. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 205 

On the 19th of April, 1861, he recruited a volunteer com- 
pany of one hundred men, entered the military service of the 
United States with the rank of Captain, and was, from time 
to time, promoted to the rank of Major, Lieutenant-Colonel 
and Colonel, and near the close of the war to the rank of 
Brigadier- General by brevet, "for faithful and meritorious 
services,'' and assigned to the command of the Second 
Brigade of the garrison of Washington, and was honorably 
discharged and mustered out of service in September, 1866. 

In the spring of 1867 he moved from Fayette county. Pa., 
to Princeton, and was admitted to practice law at the bar of 
New Jersey. In September, 1870, he was appointed Clerk of 
the Circuit Court of the United States for the District of 
New Jersey, by the late Hon. William McKennan, which 
position he continues to hold. In the spring of 1874 he 
removed from Princeton to Trenton, where he now resides. 
No fixed salary, but instead fees. 



Clerk U. S. District Court. 

George T. Cranmer, Trenton. 

Mr. Cranmer was born at Barnegat, N. J., December 6th, 
1848. He was formerly engaged in the banking and broker- 
age, real estate and insurance business. He has been an 
active member of the State National Guard for a number of 
years, and, since 1875, Quartermaster of the Seventh Regi- 
ment. In 1878 he was the Republican candidate for member 
of Assembly, but was defeated by Hon, Rufus Blodgett, since 
a United States Senator. In September, 1879, without his 
solicitation, he was appointed, by President Hayes, Collector 
of Customs for the District of Little Egg Harbor, N. J., 
which office he resigned July 1st, 1880. In 1882 he was 
again nominated for member of Assembly, and elected over 
William J. Harrison by a majority of 477. In 1883 he was 
unanimously nominated for Senator, and elected over ex- 
Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a plurality of 36. In 1886 he 
was renominated for Senator, and elected over Judge Richard 
H. Conover by a plurality of 743. In 1889 he was again 
unanimously renominated for Senator, and elected over ex- 
Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a plurality of 272. He always 
took an active part in the proceedings of the Senate, and for 
many years was Chairman of the Senate Republican Caucus, 
and also of the Joint Republican Caucus. In 1889 he was 
unanimously nominated by the Republican Caucus for Presi 
dent of the Senate. He was an Alternate Delegate-at-Large 

12 



266 BIOGRAPHIES. 

to the National Republican Convention at Chicago in 1888, 
and also to the Minneapolis Convention in 1892. In October, 
1891, at a convention of the State League of Republican 
Clubs, he was elected an Alternate Delegate- at -Large to the 
National Convention of Republican Clubs. He was appointed 
to his present office by Judge Green, in January, 1893, to 
succeed Linsly Rowe, who had resigned. No fixed salary, 
but instead, fees. 



U. S. Marshal. 

George Pfeiffer, Camden. 

Colonel Pfeiffer was born in Camden, N. J., March 16th, 
1856, and for a number of years was a member of the firm of 
(jeorge Pfeiffer & Son, dealers in lumber, brick, coal, &c., of 
Camden. He was elected to the Camden City Council in 
March, 1883, and served as a member of the House of Assem- 
bly in the session of 1886 from a Republican district. He 
was elected Senator from Camden county in 1887 by a plurality 
of 477 over Richard N. Herring, Republican. In 1888 he 
was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention at St. 
Louis. As soon as he was inaugurated. Governor "Werts 
appointed Mr. Pfeiffer as a member of his personal staff. 
The Colonel is also one of the Fish and Game Commissioners 
for New Jersey. He was appointed United States Marshal 
in 1893, to succeed W. Budd Deacon. No fixed salary, but 
instead, fees. 



STATE OFFICERS. 

Secretary of State. 

Henry Cooper Kelsey, Trenton. 

Mr. Kelsey was born at Sparta, Sussex county, in the year 
1837. He was educated and brought up in that town. At 
one time he was editor of the New Jersey Herald, was Postmaster 
at Newton, and Judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 
Sussex county for four years. He was appointed Secretary 
of State by Governor Randolph, to fill a vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Mr. H. N. Cougar, and took possession of 
the office July 1st, 1870. His term expired in 1871, and Mr. 
Kelsey was re-appointed by Governor Randolph, and con- 
firmed by a Republican Senate for a full term, which expired 
in 1876. Again Mr. Kelsey was re-appointed, by Governor 
Bedle, and confirmed by a Republican Senate, for another full 



BIOGRAPHIES. 267 

term, which expired April 6th, 1881. Governor Ludlow 
noEQlDated him for another term of five year, and, the Senate 
refusing to confirm the nomination, the Governor appointed 
Mr. Kelsey to fill the vacancy for one year. In 1882 Gover- 
nor Ludlow again nominated him for another term of five 
years, and he was confirmed by a Republican Senate. In 
1887 he was again renominated, by Governor Green, for 
another full term, and was unanimously confirmed by a 
Republican Senate, and again in 1892, by Governor Abbett, 
when he was confirmed by a unanimous vote of the Senate. 

His salary is $6,000 per year, and his present term expires 
April 1st, 1897. 

By virtue of his office, Mr. Kelsey is Clerk of the Board 
of State Canvassers, Clerk of the Court of Errors and Appeals, 
Clerk of the Court of Impeachment, Clerk of the Court of 
Pardons, Clerk of the Prerogative Court, a Trustee of the 
State School Fund, Commissioner of the State Library and 
of the Scientific School. In 1885 the Legislature appointed 
him a member of tlie State House Rebuilding Commission. 
Mr. Kelsey is also a member of other boards, and the duties 
of his office in other respects are multifarious. 



Assistant Secretary of State. 

Alexander H. Rickey, Trenton. 

Mr. Rickey was born in Trenton in 1847. He received a 
public school education and graduated from Eastman's Busi- 
ness College, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He studied law with 
Hon. Alfred Reed, now an Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court. He has held several municipal offices, and was a 
member of the Common Council of the city of Trenton from 
1871 to 1875. He has been an attache of the office of the 
Secretary of State since 1866, and for many years chief clerk 
in the department. He was commissioned Assistant Secre- 
tary of State January 1st, 1890, and recommissioned April 
1st, 1892. His powers and duties, defined by statute, are: 
He "shall, during the absence or inability, through sickness 
or other cause, of the Secretary of State, have the same 
powers and perform all the duties which are now imposed by 
law upon the Secretary of State." 



268 BIOGRAPHIES, 

State Treasurer. 

George B. Swain, Newark. 

Mr. Swain was born in Warren county, N. J., March Gth, 
1835. When Mr. Swain was quite young the family 
moved to Morris county (near Dover), where he lived 
till after his father's death. In 1852 he came to Newark, 
where he has since resided. In 1853 he secured a position 
as clerk Avith Mr. Geo. A. Van Wagenen, a lumber dealer, 
and succeeded to the business, with Mr. J. M. Randall as a 
partner, in 1865. He has continued in the business and 
occupied the same premises to the present time. The present 
firm of Swain & Jones was formed in 1875. Mr. Swain has 
voted for every Republican candidate for President from 
Lincoln down to Harrison. In 1871 he was elected a member 
of the Newark Board of Education, and by successive re-elec- 
tions served as a member of that Ijody for twelve years, and 
during the last three years as its President. In 1881 he was 
appointed by Governor Ludlow a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the State Reform School for Boys at Jamesburg, 
and served one term. At the Newark city election, in April, 
1893, he was elected a Trustee of the Newark City Home for 
two years. He is interested in many local associations and 
institutions, including the German National Bank of Newark, 
of which he is a Director and Vice President. He was 
elected by a joint meeting of the Legislature of 1894 as 
State Treasurer, to succeed George R. Gray. His term of 
office is three years, and it will expire April 2d, 1897. Salary, 
16,000 a year. 



State Comptroller. 
William S. Hancock, Trenton. 

Mr. Hancock was born in Trenton, N. J., October 19th, 
1854. He received his education at the State Model School 
and Trenton Business College. In 1871 he entered the live 
stock and provision business with ex-Senator John Taylor, of 
Trenton, and remained with him nine years. This was his 
first experience in the business world. Mr. Hancock was one 
of the organizers of the Crescent Pottery Company, of Tren- 
ton, which was formed in July, 1881. This company was 
absorbed by the Trenton Potteries Company in May, 1892, 



MOGRAPMrES. 269 

when Mr. Hancock was made Vice President of the new 
organization, which position he still holds. He was elected 
a member of the Trenton Common Council from the Second 
ward in 1888, and served his entire term of three years as 
Chairman of the Finance Committee. It was during this 
period that Chambersburg and Millham were consolidated 
with Trenton, when a re-appraisement of all the city property 
was necessitated, and also a sewer system was established, a 
public park purchased and a paid fire department created. 
The management of the finances of the city in those years 
required rare skill and experience in order to be successful, 
and Mr. Hancock acquitted himself with much credit in the 
performance of the duties assigned to him. He was elected 
State Comptroller by a Joint Meeting of the Legislature, in 
1894, for a term of three years. His salary is $6,000 a year, 
and his term of office will expire on April 2d, 1897. 



Attorney-General. 

John P. Stockton, Trenton. 

John Potter Stockton was born at Princeton, August 2d, 
1826, and is a son of the late Commodore Stockton, U. S. N. 
He graduated from Princeton College in the Class of 1843, 
and studied law with the late Judge R. S. Field. He was 
admitted to practice as an attorney at the April Term, 1847, 
of the Supreme Court, and was called to the bar as counselor 
in 1850, and practiced law in New Jersey until 1857, when 
he was appointed U. S. Minister to Rome by President 
Buchanan. He held that position until 1861, when he 
returned to his native land, and recommenced the practice of 
law in Trenton. He was elected to the Senate of the 
United States for six years, for the term commencing March 
4th, 1865, to succeed Hon. J. C. Ten Eyck, but was unseated 
after serving one year. He was, however, re-elected to the 
United States Senate for the term commencing March 4th, 
1869, and served the full term, when he returned to Trenton 
and resumed the practice of law. 

Senator Stockton was appointed, with Judges Ryerson and 
Randolph, as Commissioner to revise and simplify the pro- 
ceedings and practice in the courts of law, and made a report 
to the Legislature, which was adopted. 

He has been a delegate to several National Democratic 
Conventions, including that of 1884, in Chicago, which 
nominated President Cleveland. 

*12 



270 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He was appointed Attorney-(jeneral of the State for a term 
of five years, on April 8th, 1877, and in 1882, 1887 and 1892 
he was re-appointed. His salary is $7,000 per year, and an 
annual allowance of $1,500 for clerical assistants. His 
present term expires April 5th, 1897. 



Oommander of the National Guard. 

Major-General Joseph W. Plume, Newark. 

General Plume was born in Troy, N. Y., on the 23d of 
August, 1839. His grandfather was William Turk, M.D , of 
the United States Navy, a descendant of Antonie Janssen 
Salers, a wealthy Hollander, who settled in Gravesend (now 
a part of Brooklyn, L. I.), in 1631. 

On his father's side. General Plume is a lineal descendant 
of Samuel Plum, one of the colony from Bradford, Connecti- 
cut, which settled Newark in 1666. 

General Plume has been a resident of Newark since 1843. 
In early life he entered the banking business, which calling 
he has followed during the greater part of his career. He is 
now the cashier of the Manufacturers' National Bank of 
Newark, having held that office since the establishment of 
the institution, in 1871. 

In 1857 he entered the ranks of Company C of the "City 
Battalion" of Newark, and remained a private therein for 
four years. On the 29th of May, 1861, he was commissioned 
First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the Second New Jersey 
Volunteers, holding that position until February 15th, 1862, 
when he was appointed Aide-de-Camp on the stafl' of Briga- 
dier-General William H. French, the commander of the 
Third Brigade of Sumner's Division. On the 1st of June, 
1862, he was appointed Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of 
this brigade, and on the 8th of September next succeeding 
he was appointed Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of the 
Third Division of the Second Corps. He resigned the latter 
appointment on the 19th of December, 1862, with a view to 
accepting the position of Assistant Adjutant-General, the 
resignation being accepted on the 20th of January, 1863. 
When, on January 31st, 1863, a commission as Captain and 
Assistant Adjutant-General was offered to him, he declined 
the same and retired from the service, as he deemed himself 
entitled to the rank, at least, of Major. While connected 
with the Army of the Potomac, he participated in the battles 
of First Bull Run, Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, 
Gaines' Mills, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White Oaks 



ntOGRAPHIES. S71 

Bridge, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Kun, Antietam and 
Fredericksburg. 

On the 4th of November, 1863, he was appointed Major 
and Brigade Inspector of the National Guard of the State of 
New Jersey. In the organization of the^ Thirty-sevenlh 
Kegiment, New Jersey Volunteers, he was elected its Colonel, 
but declined the compliment, on account of the regiment 
being enlisted for only one hundred days' service. On the 
6th of July, 18<55, he was commissioned Colonel of the 
Second Regiment, New Jersey Rifle Corps, and on April 26th, 
1869, he was elected Colonel of the Second Regiment, N. G. 
N. J. On the 8th of May, 1869, he was commissioned Briga- 
dier-General of the First Brigade, N. G. N. J. and on the 
tenth anniversary of the date of his commission he was also 
commissioned Brevet Major-General, by General (then Gov- 
ernor) George B McClellan. On the 4th of April, 1885, he 
was commissioned Major-General of the National Guard of 
the State of New Jersey, to succeed the late General 
Gershom Mott. 



Adjutant- General 

William S. Stryker, Trenton. 

General Stryker was born at Trenton, N. J., June 6th, 1838. 
He was educated at the College of New Jersey, graduating 
there in the year 1858. He commenced the study of laAv, 
and had nearly completed the course when the war broke 
out. As stated in ''New Jersey and the Rebellion," he 
entered the military service of the country, in response to 
the first call for troops. He then assisted in organizing the 
Fourteenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1863, was ordered to Hilton Head, South Carolina, and 
made Major and Aide-de-Camp to Major-General Gillmore, 
then in command of the Tenth Army Corps. He partici- 
pated in the capture of Morris Island and the bloody night 
attack on Fort Wagner. Subsequently, he was transferred to 
the North, on account of illness, and placed in charge of the 
Pay Department, U. S. Army, at Parole Camp, Columbus, 
Ohio. He was brevelted Lieutenant-Colonel for meritorious 
service during the war, and resigning in June, 1866, was soon 
after placed on the staff of the Executive of New Jersey. 
On April 12, 1867, he was made Brigadier-General and Adju- 
tant-General of New Jersey, which position he holds at the 
present time. He was brevetted Major-General, for long and 
meritorious service, February 9th, 1874. He has compiled, 
oflScially, and published a ''Roster of Jerseymen in the 



272 mOGRAPtilES. 

Revolutionary War," a " Roster of New Jersey Volunteers 
in the Civil War," and several works on historical subjects 
relating to New Jersey. He was made a counselor-at-law of 
the .State of Ohio in the year 1866, was at one time President 
of the Trenton Banking Company, is a member of a large 
number of State and county historical societies, a Fellow of 
the American Geographical Society, and a member of the 
Society of the Cincinnati. He is now President of the 
Trenton Saving Fund Society. His salary is f 1,200 per year. 



Quartermaster-General. 
Richard Grant Augustus Donnelly, Trenton. 

General Donnelly was born at Richmond, Staten Island, 
in the year 1841, of an Irish father and an American mother 
of Scotch descent. He was educated in the district school of 
Richmond, and at a select boarding school near Belleville, 
Essex county, N. J. In 1854 he removed to Hoboken, N. J., 
and entered the law office of Hon. J. Dunn Littell, remaining 
there until the decease of his instructor, which occurred in 
1857. He then entered into mercantile pursuits as a clerk. 
He began his military career in February, 1860, as a private in 
Company B. First Regiment, Hudson Brigade. At the break- 
ing out of the War of the Rebellion he enlisted as a private 
in Company I, First New Jersey Volunteers, attached to 
Kearny's Brigade, Army of the Potomac, and was advanced 
to the grades of Corporal and Sergeant respectively, passing 
a creditable examination for proinotion just previous to the 
battle of Gaines' Mills. At this engagement he was twice 
wounded, slightly in the left arm during the early part, and 
severely during the latter part of the fight. Left on the 
field of battle, he was taken prisoner and confined in Libby 
Prison until exchanged. He was discharged from the United 
States service at McKim's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, Md., 
by reason of physical disability caused by gun-shot wounds 
received in battle. He returned home, and, after a period of 
four months, was capable of resuming his position in New 
York City as a salesman. 

In the year 1867 he removed to Trenton, and embarked in 
the hosiery and furnishing goods business, which he still 
carries on. General Donnelly re-entered the military ser- 
vice of New Jersey, March 18th, 1879, as paymaster of the 
Seventh Regiment, National Guard. He was promoted 
Major, January 20th, 1881 ; Lieutenant-Colonel, May 31st, 
1882, and Colonel, September 7th, 1882. He was appointed 



BIOGRAPHIES. 273 

Quartermaster-General by Governor Green, January 13th, 
1890, which appointment was sent to the Senate by Gov- 
ernor Abbett, and unanimously confirmed by that body March 
6th, 1890. 

General Donnelly was selected by Governor Ludlow as the 
Major of the provisional battalion which distinguished itself 
at Yorktown, at the centennial celebration in 1881, and was 
proffered by Governor Green the command of the veteran 
camp at Gettysburg, during the ceremonies of the unveiling of 
the monuments, in 1888, to the New Jersey heroes of the 
battle of Gettysburg, which he was obliged to decline in con- 
sequences of other engagements. He was Chairman of the 
Board of Commissioners to select grounds and erect buildings 
for the new Soldiers' Home at Kearny, which was completed 
a few years ago. He was appointed a Trustee of the New 
Jersey State Reform School at Jamesburg, by Governor 
Abbett, in 1885. He was re-appointed by the joint meeting 
of the Legislature, in 1888. He is one of the Managers of 
the Home for Disabled Soldiers, having been appointed by 
Governor Green, on the recommendation of the Chief Justice, 
to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Hon. Rynear H. 
Veghte. In addition to the management of a large mercan- 
tile business, General Donnelly is interested in several stock 
companies and land associations as a director, notwithstand- 
ing which, he gives time to many beneficial and social 
societies to which he is attached, and indulges in a fair 
amount of healthful outdoor recreation, which receives his 
encouragement. Taking the statement of the press tliough- 
out, the appointment of General Donnelly as Quartermaster- 
General gave much satisfaction, especially to the National 
Guard and the Grand Army of the Republic, of which latter 
organization he is also an active member, being a Past Com- 
mander of Aaron Wilkes Post, No. 23. In 1892 he was 
chosen Commander of the G. A. R., Department of New 
Jersey. 

The office of Quartermaster-General carries with it the 
responsible positions of Commissary-General, Paymaster- 
General and Chief of Ordnance. Salary, $1,200. 

General Donnelly is a Democrat in politics. He was twice 
elected to the House of Assembly, and has served two terms 
as Mayor of the city of Trenton. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court. 

Benjamin F. Lee, Trenton. 

Mr. Lee was born in Port Elizabeth, Cumberland county, 
N. J., in 1828. His father, Hon. Thomas Lee, was a promi- 



274 BIOGRAPHIES, 

nent public man, having served several terms in Congress and 
the State Legislature, and been a successful merchant in Port 
Elizabeth, where he died in 1856. The Hon. Thomas Lee 
was a brother of Colonel Francis Lee, of the Regular Army, 
and a graduate of West Point, who distinguished himself in 
the Mexican War, and the father of Dr. Thomas Lee, a 
surgeon in the Regular Army, who died in 1838 from disease 
contracted in tlie Florida War. This branch of the Lee 
family are descendants of the Lees and Alexanders (Scotch 
and Irish) who emigrated to this country prior to the Revo- 
lution. 

The subject of this sketch finished a thorough English 
education under the tutorship of John Gummere, at Bur- 
lington, in 1845, and immediately entered his father's store, 
at Port Elizabeth, as partner. In time he succeeded the firm 
of Thomas and Benjamin F. Lee, and finally, in 1860, retired 
from the business altogether. In 1863 he was elected 
Treasurer of the Cape May and Millville Railroad Company, 
and in 1866 Treasurer of the West Jersey Marl and Trans- 
portation Company, which position he resigned upon enter- 
ing on the duties of CJerk of the Supreme Court. He was 
for several years a Director of the State Agricultural Society 
of New Jersey. Like his father, he was always an earnest 
and active supporter of the Democratic doctrine, and took 
an active part in politics In 1856 he was a Presidential 
Elector, and had served a term on the State Central Com- 
mittee. In 1858 his friends of the First District presented 
his name in convention for nomination for Congress, and he 
received thirty-nine of the forty-one votes necessary to a 
choice. He was afterwards nominated for the Legislature 
from this district, which was largely Republican, and after an 
exciting contest, was defeated by only three votes. In 1870 
Mr. Lee was nominated for Congress in the First District. 
The district usually gave 3,700 Republican majority, and 
that year about 1,500 colored voters were added, making nearly 
6,000 to overcome, but he was defeated by only 1,800 votes. 
This was the first inroad made upon the large Republican 
majority in the district. In the Gubernatorial Convention 
that nominated Hon. Joel Parker, in 1871, Mr. Lee received 
118 votes as a candidate for Governor— the entire strength of 
his district. In 1872 he was appointed, by Governor Parker, 
Clerk of the Supreme Court, which appointment was unani- 
mously confirmed by the Senate. In 1877 he was re-appointed 
by Governor Bedle, and his appointment had the singular 
and unusual compliment of a confirmation by the Senate 
without the customary reference to a committee ; and again 
in 1882, he was similarly honored by Governor Ludlow and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 275 

the Senate, thus giving him a third term. And again in 
1887, he was re appointed by Governor Green and unani- 
mously confirmed by the Senate, and in 1892 by Governor 
Abbett, and the Senate paid him a similar compliment He 
is at present Treasurer of the Democratic State Committee. 
His present term expires November 2d, 1897. 



Clerk in Chancery. 
AiiLAN Langdon McDermott, Jersey City. 

Mr. McDermott was born in South Boston, Mass., on the 
30th of March, 1854. His father was Hugh Farrer McDer- 
mott, who, to use the language of the memorial resolutions 
adopted by the New York Press Club, on his decease, in 1890, 
" in the wide scope of his literary labors, as journalist, 
dramatist, author and poet, made a conspicuous place and 
earned enduring fame for himself." His mother's maiden 
name was Annie J. Langdon, and she was of one of the oldest 
families in New England. In 1870 the subject of this sketch 
determined to follow journalism, and, as a preliminary step, 
learned to set type and run a press. A few verses published 
in a Boston paper, and reprinted in the Nevj York Telegram, 
in 1870, show that Mr. McDermott had a very narrow escape 
from a literary tomb. In 1876 he gntered the law school of 
the University of the City of New York, and was graduated 
the following year, delivering an essay on " The Sanction of 
the Law," at the commencement exercises, held at the 
Academy of Music, in June, 1877. The same year he was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey, becoming a counselor in 
1880. While he was a student in the office of the late Leon 
Abbett, there Avas formed a friendship between preceptor and 
pupil which had grown with the years, and had on more than 
one occasion evidenced a steadfastness which is rarely found 
in the harsh lines of political association. In 1878 Mr. 
McDermott was defeated as a candidate for Assembly from 
the Fourth District of Hudson county, but was elected in 
1879 and 1880, and in 1881 was the Democratic candidate for 
Speaker of that body. From 1878 to 1883 he was Corpora- 
tion Attorney of Jersey City, resigning that position when 
appointed Judge of the Second District Court, by Governor 
Ludlow. In 1884 Governor Abbett appointed Mr. McDer- 
mott a member of the State Board of Assessors. In that 
position he formulated the rules which have ever since been 
followed in the taxation of railroad property and corporate 
franchises in New Jersey. In 1886 Governor Abbett nomi- 



276 BIOGRAPHIES. 

nated him to his present position. In communicating the 
fact to the Legislature, the late ex-United States Senator 
Cattell, also a member of the State Board, wrote : " Tlie Hon. 
Allan L. McDermott, one of the original members of the 
Board, was, during the last session of the Legislature, 
appointed and confirmed as Clerk in the Court of Chancery, 
and, on the 1st of April, resigned as a member of this Board, 
to enter upon his new position. Much of the success of the 
early work of this Board is due to the intelligent and faithful 
service of Mr. McDermott, largely supplemented by his legal 
knowledge, which was invaluable. The Board parted with 
him most regretfully, and we are free to say that in our judg- 
ment it will be difficult to find one who will in all respects 
fill his place." In* 1884, '85 and '86 Mr. McDermott was 
President of the Board of Finance and Taxation of Jersey 
City. Upon his retirement from that position, the Argus 
said: "The withdrawal of Allan L. McDermott from the 
management of our municipal finances is a public calamity. 
His clear head, his honesty of purpose and untiring energy 
have rendered him of inestimable value to our city. He has 
introduced and enforced rigid principles of economy in our 
local expenditures, and has, with the aid of his colleagues, 
established an admirable financial system, which has placed 
our credit above cavil or suspicion." He was renominated for 
Clerk in Chancery, in 1891, by Governor Abbett. In 1892 
Mr. McDermott was, because of dissatisfaction with the exist- 
ing local government, defeated in a canvass for the Mayoralty 
of Jersey City. In 1894 he was nominated by Governor 
Werts as a member of the Commission appointed to revise 
the State Constitution. He has been Chairman of the State 
Democratic Committee since 1886, and has drawn every plat- 
form, with one exception, adopted by a State Democratic 
Convention during that time. His term of office expires 
March 29th, 1896. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Addison B. Poland, Jersey City. 

Dr. Poland was originally a New England man. He was 
born at Winchendon, Worcester county, Massachusetts 
March 26th, 1851. His boyhood was divided between the 
farm and the "district school" where his studies began. 
After leaving the village High School of his native place he 
was prepared for college at the AVilbraham^ Academy, and 
was admitted to Wesleyan University, at Middletown, Con- 
necticut, at the early age of 17. After leaving college h« 



BIOGRAPHIES. 277 

was made Principal of the Ashburnham, Massachusetts, High 
School. From the above place he was called to the principal- 
ship of the Salisbury, Massachusetts, High School. He re- 
signed the latter position to take up the study of the law with 
the Hon. George F. Verry, Mayor of Worcestor, Massachusetts, 
but the following year a tempting offer caused him to return 
to teaching and take the principalship of the Day Street 
Grammar School of Fitchburg, Massachusetts. From this 
position he was soon promoted to the principalship of the 
High School at Ilion, New York, whence he was appointed 
to the principalship of the Jersey City High School. After 
holding this position for nearly three years with the same 
marked ability and success, he was appointed to the Superin- 
tendency of the Jersey City public schools in 1887. 

In the latter po-ition he showed a force and tact which, 
combined with his large educational experience and study, 
enabled him to carry forward the work of that city in a 
manner that won the highest compliments of the Board of 
Education and the people. The degree of M.A. was con- 
ferred upon him by Wesley an University in 1876, and that 
of Ph.D. by the tloiversity of the City of New York, in 
1890. He is at present an associate editor of the " Educational 
Eeview," the leading school publication of America. He 
has always taken a great interest in the educational work of 
the Bute. He is an active member of the New Jersey 
Council of Education, and was unanimously elected Presi- 
dent of the State Teachers' Association for the year 1892. 
He enjoys the confidence of educational men throughout the 
country, and his appointment to and acceptance of his 
present office were asked for by nearly every prominent 
educational man in the State, he himself not seeking the 
position. His term will expire on March 1st, 1895. 



State Prison Keeper. 

John H. Patterson, Trenton. 

Mr. Patterson was bom in the to^vnship of Middletown, 
Monmouth county, N. J., March 12th, 1834, on the farm that 
had been owned and occupied by his ancestors almost from 
the first settlement of the country. His gran'l father was 
surveyor and one of the commissioners that located the Dela- 
ware and Karitan canal, was a member of the Assembly and 
Council (now Senate), and was one of the Judges of the Mon- 
mouth County Court for thirty-two years. His father, James 
Patterson^ was an active business man. He was Director of 



278 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Monmouth county for 
seventeen years, was a member of the Assembly and Council, 
and President of the Council during the administration of 
Governor Pennington. Four of the Prison Keeper's brothers 
were graduates of college, one from Princeton, one from 
Madison U-niversity, of New York, and two from Columbia. 
The old people, in former years, did not consider in necessary 
for their children to have a collegiate education, except to 
enter a profession, as they termed it, and they believed a 
common-scliool education was all that was necessary for a 
farrner. Consequently, John H. was sent to a district' school 
until he was thirteen years of age, when he went to work on 
the farm. In the summer he learned all kinds of farm work, 
and attended school in the winter. Before he was twenty 
years of age he caught the gold fever, then raging in Cali- 
fornia, and, much against the wishes of his people, he deter- 
mined to migrate, and left Xew York in April, 1853, on the 
old ship " Illinois," commanded by Capt. Herndon, for San 
Francisco, and arrived there about May 1st. He started at 
once for Northern Californa, and, arriving in Shasta, engaged 
in mining and shipping goods from that place to the different 
mining camps He returned home in the winter of 1856, at 
the earnest solicitation of his father, who was growing old, 
and located on the homestead of his ancestors on the north 
bank of the Shrewsbury river, Monmouth county, where he 
has since been engaged in farming, oystering, and the lime 
and vessel business. His grandfather and father were both 
Jeftersonian Democrats. The fir&t vote Mr. Patterson cast 
was for John Bigler, the second time he ran for Governor of 
California, when he was defeated by Neilly Johnson, the 
Know-Nothing candidate; and for Josepli McKibben, who 
was elected to Congress, and who at one time was one of the 
proprietors of the Girard House, Philadelphia. Mr. Patter- 
son was a member of the State Convention of California that 
selected delegates to the Baltimore Convention which nomi- 
nated James Buchanan for the Presidency. He was always 
active in politics in his own county, andwas nominated for 
Sheriff' in 1868, was elected for one year, and re-elected for 
two years. In 1872 he was nominated for Congress over 
Kobert S. Green, late Governor, and Hon. Miles Ross, who 
were candidates before the Conveniion. This was during 
the celebrated Greeley campaign, and owing to dissension 
in the party, caused by the nomination of Mr. Greeley, there 
was then only one Democrat elected to Congress in the State. 
Mr. Patterson was badly defeated, and he has often Avished 
that either of his competitors had carried off" the honors. 
When the Democrats gained the ascendancy in the Forty- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 279 

fourth Congress, Mr. Fitzhugh, of Texas, was elected Door- 
keeper of the House of Representatives. He was very soon 
removed, and Mr. Patterson was appointed to the position. 
He was a candidate for re-election, but, in the distribution of 
the patronage this office was conceded to the South, and 
Colonel Polk, nephew of ex-President Polk, and a conspicuous 
Confederate Army officer, was chosen in his stead, but was 
removed two months afterwards for irregularities in office. 
Mr. Patterson returned to his farm and business, Avhich 
engrossed his attention until he received the appointment of 
Keeper of the New Jersey State Prison from Governor 
Abbett, which was unanimously confirmed by the Senate. 
He was re-appointed in 1891. 

His salary is |3 500 per year, and his term expires April 
22d, 1896. 



State Prison Supervisor. 

Edward J. Anderson, Somerville. 

Major Anderson, who was born at Flemington, Hunterdon 
county, N. J., December 15th, 1830, is of pre-Revolutionary 
stock. His great-grandfather, on his father's side, was a 
native of the Colonies, and held an office in the British ser- 
vice prior to the Revolution, but joined the patriot cause on 
the breaking out of hostilities, and fought through the war 
on the side of liberty. On his mother's side the Major's 
earliest ancestor in this country was Samuel Fleming, who, 
in 1756, founded and gave his name to Flemington, the 
county seat of Hunterdon county, and whose daughter, 
Esther, married Colonel Thomas Lowrey, who commanded a 
regiment of the New Jersey contingent troops during the 
Revolutionary War, subsequently held many important public 
trusts in this State, and in 1790 was designated by the Legis- 
lature as a member of the Commission which selected the 
site upon which the present State Capitol stands. His son, 
William Lowrey, was also an officer of the New Jersey 
troops during the Revolutionary War, and his daughter was 
the grandmother of the subject of this present sketch. 

After receiving a common-school education, the Major 
engaged in mercantile pursuits in Philadelphia, Pa., until 
the breaking out of the Civil War, when he returned to New 
Jersey and was appointed principal assistant in the Adjutant- 
General's Department of the State, which position he held 
until the close of the war, when he resigned and engaged in 
business in New York City, retaining, however, his residence 
in New Jersey. In 1871 he was appointed first assistant in 



280 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the office of the State Comptroller, which he held until 1880. 
In that year he was elected Comptroller, by the Legislature, 
and held the office until 1891, when he was succeeded by 
General Heppenheimer, Democrat. He was appointed Fish 
Commissioner in 1878, and held that office until 1883. The 
Major is an active and ardent Republican. For thirteen 
years he was a member of the Mercer County Eepublican 
Committee, and has been fifteen years a member of the 
Republican State Committee, and is now Vice Chairman of 
the latter body. He was nominated by Governor Werts for 
Prison Supervisor in 1894, to succeed James M. Seymour, a 
Democrat. His term of office is three years. 



State Librarian. 

Morris R. Hamilton, Trenton. 

Colonel Hamilton was born at Oxford Furnace, Sussex 
county, N. J., May 24th, 1820, and is the son of the late 
General Samuel R. Hamilton, of Trenton, who was Quarter- 
master-General of the State for twenty-five years, being the 
immediate predecessor of General Lewis Perrine in that 
office. He was of Scotch descent. Colonel Hamilton being a 
great-grandson of John Hamilton, Provincial Governor of 
New Jersey from 1736 to 1747, and of Andrew Robeson, 
Surveyor-General of the Province at the same time, both 
being Scotch immigrants The State Librarian was educated 
at the old Trenton Academy, Lawrenceville High School, 
and Princeton College, from which he graduated in 1839. 
He studied law with his father, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1842. He practiced in Camden two years, and in Phila- 
delphia two years, in addition to being employed in the 
Philadelphia Post Office, from 1844 to 1849, when he resigned 
to take editorial charge of the Trenton True American, 
which he conducted until 1853, when it was sold to Judge 
Naar. Since that time he has been professionally connected 
with the press of New Jersey, New York, Missouri and 
Pennsylvania, having occupied editorial positions upon the 
New York National Democrat, the StLssex Herald, the Camden 
Democrat, Newark Journal, Sussex Record, Kansas City News, 
Elizabeth Herald and Philadelphia Record, during a period of 
thirty-five years. He obtained the title of Colonel by serving 
upon Governor Fort's staff", from 1851 to 1854. He was 
elected State Librarian, by the Commissioners, February 27th, 
1884, for a term of five vears, and was re-elected in 1889 and 
1894. His salary is $2,000 a year. 



MOGRAPHIES. 281 



State Board of Assessors. 
Bird W. Spencer, Passaic. 

General Spencer was born in New Jersey, in 1845. He 
entered the service of the New York, Lake Erie and Western 
Railroad Company January 1st, 1860, where he remained for 
twenty-five years. During that period he served as clerk, 
division superintendent, paymaster, cashier, assistant treasurer 
and treasurer. In 1863 he enlisted in the Seventh Regiment, 
N. Y., and has served continuously in the militia from that 
year until the present time. On May 4th, 1876, he was 
appointed Colonel and Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Governor 
Bedle, June 4th, 1878, Major and Deputy Quartermaster, and 
on May 23d, 1881, Brigadier-General and Inspector-General 
of Rifle Practice. 

He is now a member of the firm of Campbell, Morrell & 
Co., merchants, Passaic, and is also President of the People's 
Bank and Trust Company. He has been Mayor of the city 
of Passaic three terms, or six years altogether, from 1879 to 
1885. He was a member of Common Council for five years, 
prior to his election as Mayor, and he has held the former 
ofBce since 1885. He was appointed a member of the State 
Board of Assessors by Governor Green, in May, 1889, for a 
term of four years, and was re-appointed by Governor Werts 
in 1893. He served as President of that body in 1893. His 
term will expire in May, 1897. 

Ferdinand H. Wismer, President, Newark. 

Mr. Wismer was born in Berlin, Germany, July 27th, 1833. 
He was educated in the common schools, and is a tailor by 
trade. He came to the United States in 1851, and to Newark 
in 1852, where he has since resided. In 1856 he cast his first 
vote for James Buchanan. In 1857 he engaged in the Avhole- 
sale manufacture of clothing. He was twice elected a mem- 
ber of the Aqueduct Board of Newark, and was a Director 
of the German National Bank from 1876 until 1890, when 
he withdrew. He has been President since its organization 
(1881) of the Newark German Building and Loan Associa- 
tion. He was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Assessors by Governor Green in 1887, and again by Governor 
Abbett in 1891 He was President of that body in 1894-95. 
His term expires in 1895. 



S8^ BiOGRAPHtSS. 



Olivp:r Kp:lly, Metuchen. 

Mr. Kelly was born near Metnchen, Middlesex county, 
N. J., in 1847. His father, the late Christian Kelly, was a 
prominent citizen of New Jersey. Mr. Kelly's mother still 
lives and resides with him at his home in Metuchen. He 
received a good common-school education and afterwards 
entered the real estate business, which he conducted success- 
fully for twenty years, both in New Jersey and New York. 
He was appointed Collector of the Port of Perth Amboy by 
President Cleveland and held the office throughout his first 
administration. Mr. Kelly has always been an active and 
influential Democrat, and his skill in politics has a State 
reputation. He was appointed a member of the State Board 
of Assessors by Governor Abbett in April, 1891, for a term of 
four years. His term expires in 1895. 

Anthony R. Kuser, Trenton. 

Colonel Kuser was born in Newark, N. J., May 12th, 18r>2, 
but has resided a greater part of his lifetime on the old 
homestead of his parents, near Trenton He is extensively 
engaged in manufacturing pursuits, and is well and favorably 
known in business and soci-^l circles throughout the State 
and also in New York. He was appointed by Governor 
Abbett soon after his inauguration in 1890, as a member of 
his personal staff, and in 18y2 the Colonel was appointed as a 
member of the State Board of Assessors and was unanimously 
confirmed by the Senate. Governor Werts appointed the 
Colonel a member of his personal staff soon after the inaugur- 
ation in J 893. His term will expire in 1896. 

Colonel John T. Van Cleef, Secretary, Trenton. 

Colonel Van Cleef was born at Coxsackie, New York, July 
9th, 1849, but the family removed their residence to Jersey 
City when he was less than one year of age. His father. 
Rev. Paul D. Van Cleef, has been pastor of the Wayne Street 
Reformed Church, Jersey City, for over forty-two years, and 
is also a Trustee of Rutgers College. The Colonel's early 
education was derived at Dr. Hasbrouck's Institute, in Jersey 
City, and when twenty years of age he was graduated from 
Rutgers. In 1873 he was admitted to the bar, and later on 
he became a member of the firm of Fleming, Van Cleef & 
Van Horn, who had an extensive practice, making a specialty 
of corporation laws. In 1874-75 he represented the Sixth 
District of Jersey City in the Board of Aldermen. He was 



mOGRAPtilES. 28S 

appointed on Governor Green's personal stafi" in 1888, and 
was re-appointed by Governor Abbett and Governor Werts. 
To Colonel Van Cleef belongs the credit of having formu- 
lated the blanks upon which tlie railroads make their tax 
returns. They are not only thoroughly legal, but are con- 
venient and easily understood. He has also compiled, with 
the assistance of Mr. J. Brognard Betts, the most thorough 
railroad map of the State ever issued. The Colonel has 
been Secretary of the State Board of Assessors ever since it 
came into existence in 1884. This position was extended to 
him at the personal solicitation of Governor Abbett, who had 
known him for ten years as the Secretary of the Board of 
Finance in Jersey City. Since his departure from Jersey 
City he resided in Somerville for some years, where he has 
been conspicuous as a party leader, and until 1893, when he 
removed to Trenton. 



Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. 

George S. Duryee, Newark. 

Mr. Duryee was born in the city of Newark, in 1850, and 
is a son of the late Peter S. Duryee, of that city. After a 
three years' business engagement in his native city, Mr. 
Duryee entered Kutgers College, New Brunswick, at which 
institution he was graduated in 1872. He then entered the 
law office of McCarter & Keen, of Newark, and was admitted 
to the bar as an attorney in 1875, and as a counselor in 1878. 
He began the practice of his profession in Newark, where he 
has continued it ever since. In 1878 and 1879 he served as a 
member of the House of Assembly from the then Fourth 
District of Essex county, and in the latter year he was the 
Democratic nominee for Speaker. In 1881 he was nominated 
by Governor Ludlow for the office of Clerk in Chancery for 
a term of five years, and was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate. In 1886 he was elected a member of the Newark 
Common Council, from the Fourth ward, for a term of two 
years, and in 1888 he was appointed by President Cleveland 
U. S. District Attorney for New Jersey, and resigned that 
office in 1890. In 1891 he was appointed by Governor 
Abbett to the office of Commissioner of Banking and Insur- 
ance, to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Colonel 
G. B. M. Harvey, and in 1892 he was appointed for a full 
term, and was unanimously confirmed by the Senate. His 
term will expire on February 9th, 1895. 



284 niOGRApniEf^. 

Private Secretary to the Governor. 
John Stevenson McMaster. 

Mr. McMaster was born at Pocomoke City, Worcester 
county, Maryland, on December 29tli, 1859. He is the son 
of the Late Dr. John T. B. McMaster, who was a Union 
Democrat during the war. Dr. McMaster served one term in 
the Maryland Senate, besides holding various Federal 
appointments, and was the first President of the railroad to 
Pocomoke City, which has since been extended to Cape 
Charles, Virginia. He was actively engaged in the practice 
of his profession in Pocomoke City for forty years prior to 
his death in 1889. Kev. Samuel McMaster, the great-grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch, was from Scotland, and 
was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Lewes, Del., in 
1774. For thirty-fire years, and until his death, in 1811, the 
reverend gentleman was pastor of several churches on the 
Eastern shore of Maryland and Virginia. On his mother's 
side Mr. McMaster is distantly related to Vice President 
Adlai E. Stevenson, which branch of the Stevenson family 
emigrated to America from Ireland in the latter part of the 
seventeenth century. His maternal grandfather, John S. 
Stevenson, was a prominent merchant, farmer and stump 
speaker, and during the late war was a staunch Confederate. 

Private Secretary McMaster was educated at the Pocomoke 
City High School, attended Delaware College, at Newark, for 
one year, and for two years afterward taught school at his 
native home. He then attended Lafayette College, at Easton, 
Pa , where he graduated in 1883 as Latin Salutatorian, with 
the degree of A B. After graduating he located at Morris- 
town, N. J., and for the next five years taught mathematics 
and the natural sciences in the Morris Academy at that 
place — a boys' preparatory school. While in Morristown he 
studied law with Vice Chancellor Pitney and later at the 
University of Virginia, and was admitted \o the bar in 1888 
as an attorney-at-law and in three years as a counselor at-law. 
For a short while he practiced law with Mahlon Pitney, at 
Dover, N. J., before going to Jersey City, in the fall of 1889. 
Among his first cases in Jersey City he was one of the coun- 
sel for Mayor Cleveland, in the celebrated contested election 
case of Perkins vs. Cleveland. On April 1st, 1892, he became 
a member of the law firm of Dickinson, Thompson & Mc- 
Master, of No. 1 Exchange Place, Jersey City. Mr. McMaster 
seived as Private Secretary to President Werts, of the Senate, 
in 1889, and in a similar capacity to Speaker Heppenheimer, 
of the House, in 1890, and to President Adrain, of the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 285 

Senate, in 1891 and 1892. Governor Werts, as soon as he 
took the oath of office, appointed Mr. McMaster his Private 
Secretary. 



Chief of the Bureau of Statistics of Labor 

and Industries. 

Charles H. Simmerman, Trenton. 

Mr. Simmerman was born in the year 1836 on a farm near 
Pitman Grove, Gloucester county, N. J. His father died 
when Mr. Simmerman was only six years of age, leaving his 
mother with five children to care for. Before the subject 
of this sketch was eight years old he was put to work on a 
farm in Salem county, and from that early age until he was 
twelve he earned his living by the labor of his hands. When 
he was fourteen years of age he went to work as a tending- 
boy in the glassworks at Glassboro, where he afterward 
became an apprentice at glassblowing and worked at the trade 
for twenty-five years. His opportunities for education were 
limited to a quarter's schooling in the winter season while he 
lived on the farm, and about two months in the summer in 
the public school at Glassboro while he remained a tending- 
boy ; but he does not remember the time when he could not 
read and write, for his mother taught him these rudiments, 
so that when he was separated from her at eight years of age 
he was able to carry on a correspondence with her. 

In 1867 he was elected a member of the Board of School 
Trustees of Salem. In 1875 he was elected a member of the 
Board of City Assessors in Camden by 256 majority. He was 
the Democratic candidate for Congress in the First District 
of New Jersey in 1876, when he received 800 more votes 
than Mr. Tilden, who ran for President of the United States. 
In 1878 he was instrumental in having the Bureau of Statis- 
tics of Labor and Industries instituted ; three years afterward 
he became Secretary of the Bureau, and in 1893 he was 
appointed Chief by Governor Werts. He was a member of 
the first union ever instituted in his trade, and when he was 
an apprentice and only twenty years of age, and from that 
time until the present, he has taken an active interest in labor 
matters. 



286 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Custodian of the Capitol. 

John H. Bonnell. 

Mr. Bonnell was born in Newton, Sussex county, N. J., 
January 5th, 1849, which was his home until 1873, when he 
removed to Newark, N. J. In 1887 he was elected Superin- 
tendent of the Court House at Newark, N. J., by the Repub- 
lican Board of Freeholders, which office he held for three 
years. He was appointed Supervisor of the Census of Essex 
county for 1890, and at the close of the census work he was 
appointed by Charles Foster, Secretary of the Treasury, to a 
position in the customs service, which position he held until 
Grover Cleveland was elected President ; he then sent in his 
resignation, which was accepted in due time. He has always 
been very closely identified with the interests of the Repub- 
lican party, and is an active member of the Republican 
Indian League of New Jersey, and is serving his fifth term 
as Treasurer of that organization. He was appointed Custo- 
dian of the Capitol in 1894, and his salary is $2,000 a year. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



1895. 

A Justice of the Supreme Court, in the place of Charles G. 
Garrison, February 1st. 

A Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, in the place 
of George S. Duryee, February 9th. 

Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, in the 
places of Abraham C. Smith, March 13th, and Robert S. 
Green, ad interim. 

A member of the Board of Managers of the State Hospi- 
tals, in the place of Henry S. Little, ad interim. 

A Superintendent of Public Instruction, in the place of 
Addison B. Poland, March 1st. 

An Inspector of Factories and Workshops, in the place of 
Laurence T. Fell, who holds over. 

Deputy Inspectors of Factories and Workshops — John 
D'Arcy, Patrick Callan, May 31st ; James Keys, June 8th; 
Joseph S. Weinthal, William J. McCloud, June 20th ; Wil- 
liam W. Johnson, July 5th. 

State Board of Assessors — Ferdinand H. Wismer, Oliver 
Kelly, April 6th. 

Law Judges — Essex, Andrew Kirkpatrick ; Mercer, Robert 
S. Woodruff; Middlesex, J. Kearny Rice ; Monmouth, J. 
Clarence Conover ; Somerset, John D. Bartine ; aU April 
1st, except Bartine, April 4th. 

Lay Judges— Camden, John Gaunt, adinterim; Gloucester, 
Bowman S. Cox, ad interim; Salem, William Newell, ad 
interim. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas — Bergen, Abraham D. Campbell, 
March 18th ; Burlington, Eckard P. Budd, April 4th ; Salem, 
Jonathan W. Acton, April 21st ; Camden, Wilson H. Jenkins, 
adinterim; Gloucester, Belmont Perry, adinterim; Middle- 
sex, Robert Adrain, by appointment of the court. 

Trustees of the Industrial School for Girls— Lewis Parker, 
E. Rezeau Cook, April 20th. 

Harbor Master for Hudson County — Peter H. Daly, Feb- 
ruary 27th 

Port Warden for Camden — William C. Scudder, May 23d. 

(287) 



288 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College— First 
District, Henry Frederick, (vacancy) ; Second District, Joshua 
Forsyth, Ralph Ege; Third District, James Neilson, David 
D. Denise; Fourth District, Benjamin F. Tine, William H. 
Green ; Fifih District, Samuel R. Demarest, Abram W. 
Duryee ; Sixth District, Jesse B. Rogers, Charles L. Jones ; 
Seventli District, James Stevens, James McCarthy ; Eighth 
District, George W. Doty, "William R. Ward ; all March lltb. 

WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE. 

State Board of Health— Cyrus F. Brackett, May 3d. 

State Board of Pharmacy — Albert S. Elwell, July 7th ; 
Albert P. Brown, who holds over. 

State Board of Medical Examiners — William L. Newell, 
Armin Ubelacker, William Perry Watson, May 25th. 

State Board of Dentistry— G. Carleton Brown. 

Inspectors of Steamboats— Thomas Budell, John MacCor- 
mack, Charles N. Chamberlain, June 1st. 

Joint Meeting of the Legislature. 

A Joint Meeting of the Legislature may be held every year 
to elect Commissioners of Deeds for the various counties and 
a State Director of Railroads and Canals. 

One will be held in 1897 to elect successors to State 
Treasurer George B. Swain and State Comptroller William S. 
Hancock, each for a term of three years. 

1896. 

Clerk in Chancery — Allan L. McDermott, March 30th. 

Justices of the Supreme Court— Alfred Reed and Jonathan 
Dixon, April 8th. 

Keeper of the State Prison— John H. Patterson, April 22d. 

District Court Judges — Jersey City, Henry Puster and 
John A. McGrath ; Elizabeth, Patrick H. Gilhooly; Trenton, 
Chauncy H. Beasley ; Camden, Howard Carrow ; Paterson, 
John Francis Kerr ; Newark, John G. Trusdell and Thomas 
S. Henry; all April 1st. 

State Board of Assessors— Anthony R. Kuser, March 10th. 

State Board of Education— James Deshler, William R. 
Barricklo, Nicholas M. Butler and James L. Hays, Ap'il 1st. 

Judge of Court of Errors— Hendrick H. Brown, April 18th. 

Law Judges — Hunterdon, Octavius P. Chamberlain ; Sussex, 
Lewis J. Martin, April 1st. 

Lav Judges— Atlantic, Richard J. Byrnes ; Warren, Hiram 
D. White. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS, 289 

Prosecutors of the Pleas — Hunterdon, Harlem G. Chamber- 
lain, April 6th; Passaic, William B. Gourley, April 1st; 
Warren, William A. Stryker, April 1st. 

State Board of Taxation— Theodore P. Hopler, Albert H. 
Slape, Charles C. Black ; all April 1st. 

Harbor Master for Hudson county — James H. Moore, 
April nth. 

Board of Managers of the Home for the Care and Training 
of Feeble-minded Women— Annie E. Gile and Mrs. Caroline 
B. Alexander, March 31st. 

Council of State Charities and Correction — Henry Fred- 
ericks and Aaron K. Baldwin, March 31st ; Frank P. Mc- 
Dermott, April 18th. 

WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE. 

State Board of Health — Franklin Gauntt, May 1st. 
State Board of Medical Examiners — Anthony H. Worth- 
ington, E. L. B. Godfrey and B. F. Lane, May 25th, 
State Board of Dentistry — George Emory Adams. 

1897. 

Attorney-General — John P. Stockton, April 5th. 

Secretary of State — Henry C. Kelsey, April 1st. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court — Benjamin F. Lee, Novem- 
ber 2d. 

Justice of the Supreme Court— Bennet Van Syckel, Feb- 
ruary 15th. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals — Gottfried 
Krueger, March 7th ; John W. Bogert, April 30th. 

Supervisor of the State Prison — Edward J. Anderson, 
June 11th. 

State Board of Assessors — Bird W. Spencer, May 4th. 

Law Judges — Camden, George A. Vroom ; Gloucester, 
Kobert S. Clymer ; Passaic, John Hopper ; all April 1st. 

Lay Judges — Atlantic, Wilson Senseman; Bergen, Peter 
Bogert, Jr. ; Burlington, James O. Glasgow ; Cape May, Jesse 
D, Ludlam ; Cumberland, Eli B. Hendee ; Essex, Michael J. 
Ledwith ; Hudson, John Kenny ; Mercer, Josiah W. Wright ; 
Middlesex, Matthew O'Gorman ; Monmouth, Charles Morris ; 
Morris, William E. Wilson; Ocean, Ephraim P. Emson; 
Passaic, Alfred Van Hovenberg ; Salem, William A. Wood ; 
Somerset, Charles M. Jamison ; Union, Lewis S. Hyer. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas — Monmouth, Charles H. Ivins, 
January 18th ; Ocean, Thomas W. Middleton, March 16th. 

13 



290 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

State Board of Arbitration— Joseph P. McDonnell, Lewis 
D. Roberson, Patrick F. Doyle; all April 19th. 

Commissioners of Pilotage— Henry W. Miller, John R. 
Dewar, Henry C. Gulick, Daniel C. Chase, Elias A. Newell, 
Mark Townsend ; all May 25th. 

Trustees of State Industrial School for Girls — George C. 
Maddock, Aaron Carter, Edward H. Stokes, Patrick J. Fitz- 
gibbon ; all May 25th. 

Commissioner of Public Roads — Edward Burrough, May 
25th. 

Council of State Charities and Correction— Martin V. B. 
Searing, April 18th. 

WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE. 

State Board of Health— Albert R. Leeds, May 1st. 
State Board of Pharmacy— William C. Alpers, July 19th. 
State Board of Medical Examiners — Aaron K. Baldwin, 
George F. Wilbur, Edwin De Baun ; all May 2oth. 

1898. 

State Board of Education — James B. Woodward, Feb- 
ruary 21st. 

Chief of Bureau of Labor and Statistics— Charles H. Sim- 
merman, April 3d. 

District Court Judge— Hoboken, Elijah T. Paxton. 

Law Judges — Atlantic, Joseph Thompson ; Bergen, James 
M. Van Valen ; Hudson, Robert S. Hudspeth ; Morris, Wil- 
lard W. Cutler; Union, Thomas F. McCormick; Warren, 
William H. Morrow ; all April 1st. 

Lay Judges — Burlington, William R. Lippincott; Camden, 
Thomas McDowell ; Cape May, Joseph E. Hughes ; Cumber- 
land, Mulford Ludlam ; Gloucester, Edmund Jones; Hunter- 
don, John Kugler; Mercer, William S. Yard; Middlesex, 
Manning Freeman; Monmouth, Archibald A. Higgins; 
Morris, Charles Hardin ; Ocean, James E. Otis ; Passaic, 
James Inglis, Jr. ; Salem, William Plummer ; Sussex, Job J. 
Decker. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas — Atlantic, Samuel E. Perry, 
March 7th; Cape May, Jonas S. Miller, March 11th ; Hud- 
son, Charles H. Winfield, April 3d ; Mercer, Bayard Stockton, 
February 7th ; Morris, Joshua S. Salmon, April 1st ; Sussex, 
Theodore Simonson, March 29th ; Union, Frederick C. Marsh, 
March 11th. 

Port Warden for Hudson County — James P. Laverty, Feb- 
ruary 7th, 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 291 

Board of Managers of the New Jersey Home for the Care 
and Training of Feeble-minded Women— Philip P. Baker 
and Mrs. Emily H. Williamson, March 28th. 

Council of State Charities and Correction — Benjamin Edge, 
April 19th. 

WITHOUT THE CONSENT OF THE SENATE. 

State Board of Health — Cornelius Shepherd, May 5th. 
State Board of Pharmacy— Geo. W. C. Phillips, June 6th. 
State Board of Dentistry — Frederick C. Barlow. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT. 



President— Grover Cleveland, of New York. Salary, 
$50,000. 

Vice President— A dial E. Stevenson, of Illinois. Salary, 
$10,000. 

president's cabinet. 

Secretary of State— Walter Q. Gresham, of Illinois. 

Secretary of the Treasury— John G. Carlisle, of Kentucky. 

Secretary of War — Daniel S. Lamont, of New York. 

Secretary of the Navy — Hillary A. Herbert, of Alabama, 

Secretary of the Interior— Hoke Smith, of Georgia. 

Postmaster-General — Wilson S. Bissel, of New York. 

Attorney-General — Richard Olney, of Massachusetts. 

Secretary of Agriculture — Julius Sterling Morton, of 
Minnesota. 

The salary of each Cabinet officer is $8,000. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court — Melville W. Fuller, 
of Illinois. Salary, $10,5U0. 

Associate Justices— Stephen J. Field, of California ; John 
M. Harlan, of Kentucky ; Horace Gray, of Massachusetts ; 
David J. Brewer, of Kansas ; Henry B. Brown, of Michigan ; 
George Shiras, Jr., of Pennsylvania ; Howell E. Jackson, of 
Tennessee ; Edward Douglass White, of Louisiana. 

(292) 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 



The United States District Court was organized at New 
Brunswick, on Tuesday, December 22d, 1789. 



DISTRICT JUDGES. 



David Brearley 1789 

Robert Morris 1790 

William S. Pennington 1817 

William Rossell 1826 

Mahlon Dickerson 1840 



Philemon Dickerson 1841 

Richard S. Field 1863 

John T. Nixon 1870 

Edward T. Green 1889 



CLERKS. 



Jonathan Dayton 1789 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 1790 

Robert Boggs 1791 

William Pennington 1817 

Joseph C. Potts 1840 

Edward N. Dickerson 1844 

Philemon Dickerson, Jr 1863 



Andrew Dutcher 1862 

Ralph H. Shreve 1863 

E. Mercer Shreve 1868 

Robert C. Belville 1871 

William S. Belville 1875 

LinslyRowe 1882 

George T. Cranmer 1893 



MARSHALS. 



Thomas Lowrey 1789 

John Heard 1802 

Oliver Barnett 1802 

Oliver W. Ogden 1808 

Robert S. Kennedy 1849 

George H. Nelden 1853 

Benijah Deacon 1866 



W. Budd Deacon 1868 

Samuel Plummer 1869 

Robert L. Hutchinson 1877 

W. Budd Deacon 1882 

A. E. Gordon 1886 

W. Budd Deacon 1889 

George Pfeiffer 1893 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 



Richard Stockton 1789 

Abraham Ogden 1792 

Lucius H. Stockton 1798 

George C. Maxwell 1802 

Joseph Mcllvaine 1804 

Lucius Q. C. Elmer 1824 

Garret D. Wall 1828 

James S. Green 1837 



William Halstead 1849 

Garritt S. Cannon 1853 

Anthony Q. Keasbey 1861 

Job H. Lippincott 1886 

Samuel F. Bigelow 1887 

George S. Duryee 1888 

Henry S. White 1890 

John W. Beekman 1894 



U. S. OFFICIALS, 1895. 

Circuit Judge ^^''^'^%'%- A±T^' 

District Judge ^"^^^{^r ^Ti ^l^^^V, 

District Attorney John W Beekman. 

Marshal George Pfemer. 

Clerk of District Court George T. Cranmer. 

Deputy Clerk of District Court Frank R. Brandt. 

Clerk of Circuit Court S^ Duncan Oliphant. 

Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court Henry D. Oliphant. 

Postmaster at Trenton Frank H. Lalor. 

Internal Revenue Collector— First District James Butcher. 

'« <« " Second District James F. Connelly. 

^13 (293) 



STATE OFFICIALS. 



Governor — George T. Werts ; term expires 1896. 
Private Secretary to the Governor— John S. McMaster. 
Secre.tary of State — Henry C. Kelsey, 1897. 
Assistant Secretary of State — Alexander H. Rickey, 1897. 
Treasurer — George B. S^s•ain, 1897. 
Comptroller — William S. Hancock, 1897. 
Attorney-General — John P. Stockton, 1897. 
Adjutant-General — William S. Stryker. 
Assistant Adjutant-General— Henry P. Perrine. 
Quartermaster-General— Richard A. Donnelly. 
Inspector-General — William C. Heppenheimer. 
Judge Advocate-General — Edward P. Meany. 
Major-General — Joseph W. Plume. 
Chancellor— Alexander T. McGill, 1901. 

f Abraham V. Van Fleet, 1901. 

Vice Chancellors- \ ^^^^ ^- ^^^^' ^^^^• 
\ ice i^nancellors ^ jj^^^.^ ^ pjtnev, 1896. 

[Roberts. Green, 1897. 

Vice Ordinary and Vice Surrogate-General — Abraham V. 
Van Fleet, 1901. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court — Mercer Beasley, 1899. 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court— Bennet Van 
Syckel, 1897 ; David A. Depue, 1901 ; Alfred Reed, 1896 ; 
Jonathan Dixon, 1896 ; William J. Magie, 1901 ; Charles G. 
Garrison, 1895; Job H. Lippincott, 1900; (vacancy.) 

Court of Errors and Appeals— The Chancellor, the Justices 
of the Supreme Court, and Lav Judges Hendrick H. Brown 
1896; John W. Bogert, 1897; Gottfried Krueger, 1897 
Abraham C. Smith, 1895; Clifford Stanley Sims, 1900 
Robert S. Green, ad interim. Clerk, Secretary of State. 

Court of Pardons— Governor, Chancellor and Lay Judges 
of the Court of Errors and Appeals. Clerk, Secretary of 
State. 

Circuit Court Judges— Francis Child and Richard T. 
Miller, 1900 ; (^vacancy.) 

District Court Judges — Camden, Howard Carrow ; Eliza- 
beth, Patrick H. Gilhooly; Hoboken, Elijah T. Paxton ; 
Jersey City, John A. McGrath and Henry Puster ; Newark, 
Thomas S'. Henry and John G. Trusdell; Paterson, John 

(294) 



STATE OFFICTALS. m 

F. Kerr ; Trenton, Chaimcy H. Beasley. Terms, five years 
each ; all expire in 1896, except that of E. T. Paxton, in 1898. 

Clerk of Supreme Court — Benjamin F. Lee, 1897. 

Deputy Clerk of Supreme Court — Alfred Lawshe, 1897. 

Clerk in Chancery— Allan L. McDermott, 1896. 

Chancery Keporter — S, Meredith Dickinson, 1895. 

Law Keporter— Garret D. W. Vroom, 1898. 

State Librarian — Morris R. Hamilton, 1899. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction — Addison B. 
Poland, 1895. 

Keeper of the State Prison— John H. Patterson, 1896. 

Supervisor of the State Prison— Edward J. Anderson, 1897. 

Commissioner of Public Eoads — Edward Burrough, Mer- 
chantville, 1897. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance — George S. Dur- 
yee, 1895 ; Deputy, Thomas K. Johnston. 

Supervisor of the School Census — Lloyd Wilbur. 

State Geologist— John C. Smock. 

Chief of Bureau of Labor Statistics — Charles H. Simmer- 
man, 1898. Secretary, James T. Morgan. 

Custodian of the State House and Public Grounds — John 
H. Bonnell. 

Assistant Custodian — John T. Burton. 

State Board of Education— Bond V. Thomas, Millville, 
1899; George A. Frey, Camden, 1899; James B. Woodward, 
Bordentown, 1898; Silas R. Morse, Atlantic City, 1899; 
James Deshler, New Brunswick, 1896; T. Frank Appleby,. 
Asbury Park, 1899 ; Steven C. Larrison, Hackettstown, 1899 ; 
Steven Peirson, Morristown, 1899 ; Nicholas M. Butler, 
Paterson, 1896; Joseph P. Cooper, Rutherford, 1899; Wil- 
liam R. Barricklo, Jersey City, 1896 ; Evan Steadman, 
Hoboken, 1899; James M. Seymour, Newark, 1899; James 
L. Hays, Newark, 1896 ; Benjamin A. Campbell, Elizabeth, 
1899; James Owens, Montclair, 1899. President, James L. 
Hays ; Vice President, Nicholas Murray Butler ; Secretary, 
Addison B. Poland. 

Principal State Normal and Model Schools — James M. 
Green, Ph.D. 

Principal New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes — Weston 
Jenkins, A.M. Steward, Thomas F. Hearnon. 

Trustees of the School Fund— Governor, Secretary of State, 
President of the Senate, Speaker of the Assembly, Attorney- 
General, State Comptroller and State Treasurer. 

Board of Managers of State Hospitals — George Richards, 
President, Dover; Charles E. Green, Trenton; Romeo F. 
Chabert, Hoboken ; James M. Buckley, Morristown ; Patrick 
Farrelly, Morristown ; George B. Jenkinson, Newark ; Lewis 



296 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Parker, Trenton ; all in 1899. Henry S. Little, Matawart, 
ad interim. Charles H. Green, Secretary, Morristown. 

Morris Plains State Hospital — Medical Director, Britton 
J). P>ans, M.D. ; Treasurer, Guido C. Hinchman; Steward, 
Moses K. Everitt. 

Trenton State Hospital— Medical Directx)r, John W. Ward, 
M.D. ; Treasurer, Harvey H. Johnson ; Steward, William 
H. Earley. 

Commissioners of State Library— Governor, Chancellor, 
Chief Justice, Secretary of State, Treasurer and Comptroller. 

Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund — Governor, 
Secretary of State, Treasurer, Attorney-General and Comp- 
troller. 

Kiparian Commissioners — The Governor ; Willard C. Fisk, 
Jersey City, 1899; Miles Ross, New Brunswick, 1899; John 
I. Holt, Paterson, 1899 ; William Cloke, Trenton, 1899. 

Commissioners of Pilotage— Henry W. Miller, Morristown, 
1897 ; John R. Dewar, Jersey City, 1897 ; Henry C. Gulick, 
Barnegat, 1897 ; MarkTownsend, Pleasantville, 1897 ; Daniel 

C. Chase, South Amboy, 1897 ; Elias A. Newell, Haleyville, 
1897. Secretary, R. C. Bacot, Jersey City. 

State Board of Health— Laban 'Dennis, 1901, Newark; 
Franklin Gauntt, 1896, Burlington ; Edward J. O'Reilly, 1900, 
Elizabeth ; Cyrus F. Brackett, President, 1895, Princeton ; 
Albert R. Leeds, 1897, Hoboken ; John A. Githens, 1899 ; 
Asbury Park ; Cornelius Shepherd, 1898, Trenton. The Sec- 
retary of State, the Attorney-General, and the State Geolo- 
' gist are members ex officio. 

Secretary of State Board of Health— Henry Mitchell, 
Asbury Park. 

State Board of Assessors — Ferdinand H. Wismer, President, 
Newark, 1895 ; Bird W. Spencer, Passaic, 1897 ; Oliver Kelly, 
Metuchen, 1895; Anthony R. Kuser, Trenton, 1896. Sec- 
retary, John T. Van Cleef, Trenton. 

State Board of Taxation— Charles C. Black, Jersey City ; 
Albert H. Slape, Salem; Theodore P. Hopler, Belvidere ; 
Henry J. West, Camden Secretary, Thomas B. Usher. All 
tlieir terms expire in 1896, except Henry J. West, 1899. 

State Board of Agriculture — President, vacancy; Vice 
President, E. B. Voorhees, New Brunswick ; Treasurer, D. 

D. Denise, Freehold; Secretary, Franklin Dye, Trenton. 
State Director of the Weather Service— Edward W. Mc- 

Gann, New Brunswick. 

Inspectors of Steamboats— Thomas Bodell, Camden ; Charles 
N. Chamberlain, Lake Hopatcong ; John MacCormack, Bay- 
onne, 1895. 

State Dairy Commissioner— George W. McGuire, Trenton. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 297 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops - Laurence T. Fell, 
Orange, holding over. Deputies— John D'Arcy, James Keys, 
Patrick Callan, Joseph S. Weinthal, William J. McCloud, 
William W. Johnson, all in 1895. 

Inspectors of Stale Prison Markham E. Staples, Jersey 
City; William H. Brown, Newark; William H. Carter, 
Bordentown; Edward H. Holcombe, Lambertville ; Samuel 
F. Stanger, Clayton; Wells Lawrence, Mendham; all in 
1899. 

Trustees of State Industrial School for Girls— George C. 
Haddock, 1897, Trenton ; Edward H. Stokes, 1897, Trenton ; 
Aaron Carter, 1897, Newark ; Lewis Parker. 1895, Trenton ; 
E. Eezeau Cook, 1895, Trenton ; Patrick J. Fitzgibbon, 1897, 
Trenton. 

Trustee of Keform School for Boys— James M. Parsons, 
New Brunswick; Nathaniel S. Kue, Cream Kidge; Moses 
Bigelow, Newark ; Horace L. Dunham, Dover ; Edwin H. 
Bidwell, Yineland ; Frank S. Gaskill, New Egypt; all in 
1899. Superintendent, Ira Otterson. 

Council of State Charities and Correction— Governor Werts, 
President; Martin V. B. Searing, Morris, 1897; Frank P. 
McDermott, Freehold, 1896; Benjamin Edge, Jersey City, 
1898 ; Henry Fredericks, Camden, 1896 ; Aaron K. Baldwin, 
Newark, 1896; Robert A. Haley, Paterson, 1899. 

State Board of Medical Examiners — Armin Ubelacker, 
Morristown ; William P. Watson, Jersey Citv, and William 
L. Newell, Millville, 1895. Anthony H. Worthington, Tren- 
ton ; E. L. B. Godfrey, Camden, and F. B. Lane, East Orange, 
1896. Aaron K. Baldwin, Newark ; George F. Wilbur, As- 
bury Park, and Edwin De Baun, Passaic, 1897. 

State Board of Dentistry— George Emory Adams, 1896 ; 
Frederick C. Barlow, Jersey City, 1898 ; G. Carlton Brown, 
Elizabeth, 1895 ; Charles A. Meeker, Newark, 1899. 

State Board of Pharmacy — William C. Alpers, Bayonne, 
1897; Albert P. Brown, Camden, holding over; Albert S. 
Elwell, Bridgeton, 1895 ; George W. C. Phillips, Jersey City, 
1898; Edward M. Wallington, Vineland, 1897. 

State Board of Arbitration— Lewis D. Roberson, French- 
town ; Patrick F. Doyle, Jersey City ; Joseph P. McDonnell, 
Paterson; all in 1897. Secretary, John W. Eomaine, 
Paterson. 

New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers — Managers : Col- 
onel Edward H. Wright, Newark ; Amzi Dodd, Newark ; 
Marcus L. Ward, Newark ; James E. Fleming, Newark ; 
General E. Burd Grubb, Edgewater Park ; General Richard 
A. Donnelly, Trenton. Ofl&cers— Superintendent, Major 
Peter F. Rogers ; Surgeon, Dr. Archibald Mercer ; Adjutant, 



298 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Bishop W. Mains ; Chaplain, (vacancy) ; Matron, Mrs. 
Peter F. Rogers. 

State Director of Joint Companies— William Clark, New- 
ark, (yearly). 

Fish and Game Commissioners — George Pfeiffer, Camden ; 
Parker W. Page, Summit; H. P. Frothingham, Mount 
Arlington ; W. Campbell Clark, Newark ; all in 1899. 

Fish Wardens — Atlantic, Henry Schneider, Edward John- 
son, Lewis Barrett ; Bergen, Abraham Terhune, George 
Ricardo ; Burlington, Levi French, Thomas AVells; Cam- 
den, William Guthridge, James Hunt; Cape May, Gus 
Hilton; Cumberland, John F. L. Green, Harry Dare; 
Essex, John R. Riley ; Gloucester, Benjamin F. Deusten, 
Charles B. Piatt; Hudson, (vacancy); Hunterdon, George 
W. Naylor, Henry Suydam ; Mercer, Henry Fahrenbach. Jr., 
Clinton Smith ; Middlesex, (vacancy) ; Monmouth, William 
B. Kinney ; Morris, Thomas Meskell, John Mooney ; Ocean, 
George E. Burton, John E. Loveland ; Passaic, Charles A. 
Schriner, Stephen H. Palmer; Salem, William Lawrence, 
H. W. D. White ; Somerset, C. L. Honeyman, A. W. Post ; 
Sussex, Jacob B. Hendershot, William H. Ingram ; Union, 
David Riley; Warren, Edward Hill, George W. Dewitt. 

State Board of Visitors to the Agricultural College — First 
District, Henry Fredericks, 1895, Camden ; Daniel W. Horner, 
Cramers Hill. Second District. Joshua Forsyth, 1895, 
Pemberton; Ralph Ege, 1895, Hopewell. Third District, 
James Neilson, 1895, New Brunswick ; David D. Denise, 
1895, Freehold. Fourth District, Benjamin F. Tine, 1895, 
Stanton ; William H. Green. 1895, Morristown. Fifth Dis- 
trict, Samuel R. Demarest, Vice President, 1895, Hacken- 
sack ; Abram W. Duryee, President, 1895, New Durham. 
Sixth District, Jesse B. Rogers, 1895, Newark ; Charles L. 
Jones, 1895, Newark. Seventh District, James Stevens, 1895, 
Jersey Citv ; James McCarthy, 1895, Jersev City. Eighth 
District, George W. Dotv, 189'5, Union ; William R. Ward, 
1895, Newark 

New Jersey State Agricultural Experiment Station — Board 
of Managers : First District, Henry Fredericks, Camden ; 
Daniel VV. Horner, Cramers Hill. Second District, Joshua 
Forsvth, Pemberton; Ralph Ege, Hopewell. Third District, 
David D. Denise, Freehold ; James Neilson, New Bruns- 
wick. Fourth District, William H, Green, Succasunna; 
Benjamin F. Tine, Stanton. Fifth District, Abraham W. 
Duryee, President, New Durham ; Samuel R. Demarest, Jr., 
Hackensack. Sixth District, Jesse B. Rogers, Newark; 
Charles L. Jones, Newark. Seventh District, James Stevens, 
Jersey City ; James McCarthy, Jersey City. Eighth District, 



STATE OFFICIALS. 299 

William K. Ward, Secretary, Newark ; George W. Doty, 
Union. Station staff — Prof. Edward B. Voorhees, Director ; 
Louis A. Voorhees, Chemist; John P. Street, Chemist; 
Irving S. Upson, Chief Clerk and Treasurer. 

Board of Managers of the State Institution for Feeble- 
Minded Women — Benjamin F. Lee, President, Trenton, 1900 ; 
Philip P. Baker, Treasurer, Vineland, 1898 ; Mrs. Emily H. 
Williamson, Elizabeth, 1898; Mrs. Annie E. Gile, Orange, 
1896; Mrs. Caroline B. Alexander, Hoboken, 1896; Barton 
F. Thorn, Burlington, 1900 ; Martin P. Grey, Salem, 190O. 

New Jersey Training School for Feeble-Minded Children, 
Vineland — Directors : Governor Werts ex officio ; John M. 
Moore, Clayton, 1895; Daniel Thackara, Woodbury, 1896; 
William H. Nicholson, Vice President, Haddonfield, 1895 ; 
T. W. Synnott, Wenonah, 1896 ; B. D. Maxham, Vineland, 
1896 ; Benjamin C. Keeve, Camden, 1897 ; William Graham 
Tyler, Treasurer, Philadelphia, Pa., 1897 ; Charles Keighley, 
Vineland, 1897; Edward C. Stokes, Millville, 1898 ; Howard 
Carrow, Camden, 1898 ; P. P. Baker, President, Vineland, 
1898; Thomas J. Smith, Bridgeton, 1895; Kev. H. H. 
Beadle, Bridgeton, 1896 ; S. Olin Garrison, Secretary. Bel- 
mont Perry, Woodbury ; Howard Carrow, Camden, and W. 
W. Benthall, Vineland, Solicitors. Board of Lady Visitors — 
Kebecca H. Thompson, Salem, 1895 ; Miss Julia Frame, 
Bridgeton, 1895; Isabel Craven, Salem, 1895; Sarah P. 
Johnson, Bridgeton, 1895 ; Martha Keighley, Vineland, 
1896 ; Mrs. Fanny A. Sheppard, Greenwich, 1896 . Susan N. 
Warrington, Moorestown, 1896 ; Miss A. E. Moore, Clayton, 
1896 ; Miss Caroline Hunt, Woodstown, 1897 ; Mrs. Josiah 
Bacon, Oaklyn, 1897; Kachel E. Allinson, Yardville, 1897; 
Helen McKeen Dayton, Camden, 1897 ; Mrs. Chas. M. Allen, 
Beverly, 1897. 

Geological Survey — Board of Managers : Governor Werts. 
First District, vacancy ; Clement H. Sinnickson, Salem. 
Second District, Emmor Koberts, Moorestown ; H. S. Little, 
Trenton. Third District, M. D. Valentine, Woodbridge; 
William H. Hendrickson, Middletown. Fourth District, 
Augustus W. Cutler, Morristown ; Geo. W. Kichards, Dover. 
Fifth District, William Frank Hall, George W. Wheeler. 
Sixth District, Thos. T. Kinney, Newark; Frederick W. 
Stevens, Newark. Seventh District, Samuel B. Dod, Hobo- 
ken ; Lebbeus B. Ward, Jersey City. Eighth District, Henry 
Aitken, Elizabeth ; Wendel P. Garrison. 

County Superintendents of Public Instruction — Atlantic, 
John E. Wilson, Atlantic City ; Bergen, John Terhune, Hack- 
ensack; Burlington, Edgar Haas, Bordentown; Camden, 
Charles S. Albertson, Magnolia ; Cape May, Vincent O. Miller, 



300 STATE OFFICIALS. 

South Dennis ; Cumberland, Charles G. Hampton, Bridgetou ; 
Essex, Elmer C. Sherman, South Orange ; Gloucester, Wil- 
liam H. Eldridge, Williamstown; Hudson, Rev. George C. 
Houghton, Hoboken ; Hunterdon, E. M. Heath, Locktown ; 
Mercer, John S. Van Dike, Hopewell ; Middlesex, H. Brews- 
ter Willis, New Brunswick ; Monmouth, John Enright, Free- 
hold ; Morris, Martin Luther Cox, Dover ; Ocean, Capt. E. 
M. Lonan, Toms River ; Passaic, James D. Donnell, Paterson ; 
Salem, Robert Gwynne, Jr., Salem ; Somerset, John L. Ander- 
son, Somerville; Sussex, Luther Hill, Andover ; Union, B. 
Holmes, Elizabeth ; Warren, Robert S. Price, Hackettstown. 

City Superintendents of Public Instruction — Atlantic City, 
William A. Loudenslager ; Bayonne, Charles M. Davis ; 
Bridgeton, John S. Turner ; Camden, Martin V. Bergen ; 
Egg Harbor City, John Schuester ; Elizabeth, Warren R. 
Dix ; Gloucester City, J. C. Stinson ; Hoboken, David E. Rue ; 
Jersey City, Henry Snyder; Millville, E. C. Stokes; Morris- 
town, W. L. R. Haven ; Newark, William N. Barringer; New 
Brunswick, George G. Ryan ; Orange, V. W. Cutts ; Passaic, 
H. H. Hutton; Paterson, J. A. Reinhart; Perth Amboy, 
Adrian Lyon ; Phillipsburg, H. Budd Howell ; Plainfield, H. 
M. Maxson; Rahway, H. B. Rollinson ; Salem, Morris H. 
Stratton ; Trenton, Leslie C. Pierson. 

United States Senators — John R. McPherson, 1895 ; James 
Smith, Jr., 1899. 

Representatives in Fifty-fourth Congress— First District, 
Henry C. Loudenslager ; Second District, John J. Gardner ; 
Third' District, Benjamin F. Howell ; Fourth District, Mablon 
Pitney ; Fifth District, James F. Stewart ; Sixth District, 
Richard Wayne Parker ; Seventh District, Thomas McEwan, 
Jr. ; Eighth District, Charles N. Fowler. 



TERMS OF OFFICE AND SALARIES OF 

STATE OFFICERS, AND MEMBERS 

AND OFFICERS OF THE 

LEGISLATURE. 

Governor, three vears, |10,000. Private Secretary, three 
years, $2,000. 

Secretary of State, five years, |6,000. Assistant, five vears, 
$3,000. 

State Treasurer, three years, $6,000. 

State Comptroller, three years, $6,000. 

Attorney-General, five years, $7,000. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 301 

Adjutant-General, $1,200. 

Quartermaster-General, $1,200. 

Chancellor, seven years, $10,000. 

Vice Chancellors, seven years, 89,000. 

Clerk in Chancery, five years, fees. 

Chief Justice Supreme Court, seven years, .$10,000. 

Justices of the Supreme Court, seven years, $9,000. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court, five years, fees. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, six years, per 
diem, $8, and mileage. 

Circuit Court Judges, seven years, $7,500. 

District Court Judges, five years, $2,500 and $3,000. 

Chancery Reporter, $500. Law Reporter, $500. 

State Librarian, five years, $2,000. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, three years, 
$3,000. 

Superintendent of the School Census, two years, $1,500. 

Keeper of the State Prison, five years, $3,500. 

Inspectors of the State Prison, five years, $500. 

Supervisor of the State Prison, three years, $3,000. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, three years, 
$4,000. 

Custodian of the State House, at pleasure of the Governor, 
State Treasurer and State Comptroller, $2,000. 

Riparian Commissioners, five years, $1,500. 

State Board of Assessors, four years, $2,500. 

State Board of Taxation, five years, $2,000. 

Chief of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, five years, $2,500. 
Secretary, $1,200. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops, $2,500. Assistants, 
$1,000. 

State Board of Arbitration, five years, $10 a day for actual 
service. 

State Dairy Commissioner, $2,000. 

State Commissioner of Public Roads, three years, $5 a day 
and expenses for actual service. 

Commissioners of Pilotage, three years, fees. 

State Board of Education, five years, no salary. 

State Board of Health, seven years, no salary. Secretary, 
$2,500. 

Board of Managers of State Hospitals, five years, no salary. 

Fish and Game Commissioners, five years, no salary. 

Trustees State Reform School for Boys, three years, no 
salary. 

Trustees State Industrial School for Girls, three years, no 
salary. 



302 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Council of State Charities and Correction, six years, no 
salary. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College, three 
years, no salary. 

State Board of Medical Examiners, three years, no salary. 

State Board of Pharmacy, three years, no salary. 

State Board of Dentistry, five years, no salary. 

State Senators, three years, and Members of the Assembly, 
one year,. salary $500. 

Senate officers— President, $666.66; President's Private 
Secretary, $600; Secretary, $1,500; Assistant Secretary, 
$1,200; Engrossing Clerk, $1,200; Assistant Engrossing 
Clerk, $600; Journal Clerk, $1,000; Assistant Journal Clerk, 
$500; Sergeant-at- Arms, $700; Assistant Sergeants-at-Arms, 
$500 ; Calendar Clerks, each $500 ; Bill Clerks, $500 ; Door 
and Gallery Keepers, each $350; Pages, each $200; Clerk 
to Committee on Engrossed Bills, $500. 

House of Assemblv officers— Speaker, $666.66; Speaker's 
Private Secretary, $600; Clerk, $1,500; Assistant Clerk, 
$1,200; Engrossing Clerk, $1,300; Assistant Engrossing 
Clerk, $600 ; Journal Clerk. $1,000 ; Assistant Journal Clerk, 
$500; Sergeant-at-Arms, $700 ; Assistant Sergeants-at-Arm.s, 
$500 ; Gallerv and Doorkeepers, each $350 ; Pages, each 
$200; Document Clerk, $400; Clerk to Committee on En- 
grossed Bills, $500 ; Bill Clerk, $500. 



MILITARY. 



Roster of OfiBcers of the National Guard. 

Commander-in-Chief — Governor George T. Werts. 

-S'^a/— Adjutant-General, Brevet Major-General William 
S. Stryker ; Quartermaster General, Brigadier-General Rich- 
ard A. Donnelly ; Surgeon-General, Brigadier-General John 
D. McGill ; Inspector-General, Brigadier-General William 
C. Heppenheimer ; Inspector-General of Rifle Practice, 
Brigadier-General Bird W. Spencer ; Judge Advocate-Gen- 
enal Brigadier-General Edward P. Meany; Aides-de-Camp, 
Colonel Robert Adrain, Colonel Michael T. Barrett, Colonel 
Anthony R. Kuser, Colonel George Pfeiffer, Jr., Colonel 
Leon Abbett, Jr., Colonel Joseph D. Bedle, Jr., Colonel Asa 
W. Dickinson, Colonel John T. Van Cleef, Colonel J. S. 
Henry Clark, Colonel Charles A. Sterling. 

Department Stof — Assistant Adjutant-General, Colonel 
Henry P. Perrine; Deputy Adjutant-General, Lieutenant- 
Colonel James S. Kiger; Deputy Quartermaster-Generals, 
Colonel Cyrus F. Loutrel, Colonel William H, Earley, Colonel 
George G. Felton, Colonel George P. Olcott, Captain Samuel 
S. Armstrong; Military Storekeeper, Captain Charles F. 
Snowden ; Assistant Inspector-Generals of Rifle Practice, 
Colonel John C. Owens, Colonel William F. Decker ; Medi- 
cal Inspector, Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund L. B. Godfrey. 

i)msiori— Major-General Joseph W. Plume, commanding. 

^Sto/— Assistant Adjutant-General, Colonel Marvin Dodd ; 
Inspector Colonel Alexander C. Oliphant ; Surgeon, Colonel 
George W. Terriberry; Quartermaster, Lieutenant-Colonel 
William Strange ; Paymaster, Lieutenant-Colonel William S. 
Eighter; Judge Advocate, Lieutenant-Colonel John A. 
Miller; Chief of Artillery, Colonel A. Judson Clark; Aides- 
de-Camp, Major James W. Howard, Major Charles A. Gifford; 
Major Harry P. Fairchild. 

First Brigade — Brigadier-General P. Farmer Wanser, com- 
manding. 

Staff — Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel John 
A. Parker ; Inspector, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Boltwood ; 
Surgeon, Lieutenant-Colonel CharlesF. W. Myers ; Quarter- 



(303) 



304 MILITARY. 

master, Major Thomas F. Bedle; Paymaster, Major Enos 
Runyon ; Judge Advocate, Major Eobert I. Hopper ; Engi- 
neer, Major Lewis H. Broome ; Aides-de-Camp, Captain 
Allen B. Wallace, Captain S. Wood McClave. 

Second Brigade — Brevet Major-General William J. Sewell, 
commanding. 

^Sta/f— Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Thomas S. Chambers; Inspector, Brevet Colonel Daniel B. 
Murphy ; Surgeon, Lieutenant-Colonel Franklin Gauntt ; 
Quartermaster, Major AVilliam M. Palmer; Paymaster, 
Major Kenneth J. Duncan ; Judge Advocate, Major E. 
Ambler Armstrong; Engineer, Major Hamilton Markley ; 
Aide-de-Camp, Captain William H. Skirm, Jr. 

First Regiment Infantnj, Headquarters, Newark— Colonel, 
Edward A. Campbell ; Adjutant, Captain James L. Marsh. 

Second Regiment Infantri/, Headquarters, Paterson— Colonel, 
Samuel V. S. Muzzy ; Adjutant, Captain John T. Hilton. 

Third Regiment Infanfrij, Headquarters, Elizabeth— Colonel, 
Benjamin A. Lee ; Adjutant, First Lieutenant Louis J. Mc- 
Vicker. 

Fourth Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Jersey City— Col- 
onel, Hugh H. Abernethy ; Adjutant, Captain Benjamin M. 
Gerardin. 

Sixth Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Camden— Colonel, 
William H. Cooper; Adjutant, Captain Christopher S. 
Magrath. 

Seventh Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Trenton— Colonel, 
William H. Skirm; Adjutant, Captain Charles H. W. Van 
Sciver. 

Galling Gun Company B, Camden— Captain, John R. Jones. 

First Troop, Newark — Captain, James E. Fleming. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



County Officers, with the Date op the Expiration 

OF THEIR Term of Office, Time of 

Holding Courts, &c. 



Atlantic County. 

County Seat — Mays Landing. Population, about 1,000. 

Sheriff— Smith E. Johnson, 1896. 

Coroners — Kobert H. IngersoU, 1895 ; George Seuft, 1897 ; 
Charles B. Creasey, 1896. 

County Clerk — Lewis Evans, 1895. 

Surrogate— John S. Kisley, 1897. 

County Collector— Allen B. Endicott, Atlantic City. 

President Judge— Alfred Keed, 1896. 

Law Judge— Joseph Thompson, 1898. 

Lay Judges — Wilson Senseman, 1897 ; Kichard J. Byrnes, 
1896. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Samuel E. Perry, 1898. 

County Board of Eegistry — Henry S. Scull, John T. French, 
Dems. ; James D. Southwick, Joseph E. P. Abbott, Reps. 

Terms of Court — April, September and December — second 
Tuesday. 

Bergen County. 

County Seat — Hackensack. Population, about 6,004. 

Sheriff- Albert Bogert, 1895. 

Coroners — Alexander Cass, 1895; John J. May, 1895 
Jacob H. Ullman, 1896. 

County Clerk— Samuel Taylor, 1895. 
Surrogate — Tennis A. Haring, 1898. 
County Collector — Isaac A. Hopper, Fair Lawn. 
President Judge — Jonathan Dixon, 1896. 
Law Judge— James M. Van Valen, 1898. 

(305) 



S06 CO UNTY iDIRECTOR Y. 

Lay Judges — Peter Bogert, Jr., 1897 ; George W. Wheeler, 
1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— A. D. Campbell, 1895. 

County Board of Registry — John O. Grode, William Ely, 
Dems. ; Elisha H. Pratt, A. E. Holdrum, Reps. 

Terms of Court — April, first Tuesday ; September, second 
Tuesday ; and December, second Tuesday. 



Burlington County. 

County Seat — Mount Holly. 

Sheriff— William A. Townsend, 1896. 

Coroners — Albert V. Horner, Walter E. Borden, 1896 ; 
Louis R. Hibbard, 1895. 

County Clerk— William W. Worrell, 1898. 

Surrogate — Charles B. Ballinger, 1896. 

Auditor— Samuel A. Atkinson. 

County Collector— Joseph Powell, Mount Holly. 

President Judge — Charles G. Garrison, 1895. 

Law Judge — Joseph H. Gaskill, 1899. 

Lay Judges — James O. Glasgow, 1897; William R. Lip- 
pincott, 1898. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas -Eckard P. Budd, 1895. 

County Board of Registry— Jesse French, James L. Young, 
Dems. ; Nathan Haines, John R. Howell, Reps. 

Terms of Court — April and December, third Tuesday ; 
September, fourth Tuesday. 



Camden County. 
County Seat— Camden. Population, 58,313. 

Sheriff— George Barrett, 1896. 

Coroners— Jacob S. Justice, Seaver C. Ross, 1896 ; William 
J. Hopper, 1895. 

County Clerk— Robert L. Barber, 1896. 

Register of Deeds— Jacob Sickler, 1895. 

Surrogate — George S. West, 1897. 

County Collector— Mahlon F. Ivins, Camden. 

President Judge — Charles G. Garrison, 1895. 

Law Judge— George A. Vroom, 1897. 

Lay Judges— Thomas McDowell, 1898; John Gaunt, ad 
interim. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Wilson H. Jenkins, ad interim. 



COUNTY DiRECTORt. S07 

Port Warden— William C. Scudder, 1895. 

County Board of Kegistry— John Hood, Christopher H. 
McGrath, Dems. ; Alfred W. Clement, Christopher J. Mines, 
Jr., Keps. 

Terms of Court - Second Tuesday in January, first Tuesday 
in May and second Tuesday in October. 



Oape May County. 

County Seat — Cape May Court House. Population, 1,610. 

Sheriff- Kobert E. Hand, 1895. 

Coroners — E. Curtis Kobinson, Francis K. Duke, Julius 
Way, 1896. 

County Clerk— Edward L. Eice, 1901. 

Surrogate— William Hildreth, 1897. 

County Collector — Edmund L. Eoss, Cape May Court 
House. 

President Judge— Alfred Eeed, 1896. 

Lay Judges — Jesse D. Ludlam, 1897 ; Joseph E. Hughes, 
1898 ; Stephen H. Bennett, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Jonas S. Miller, 1898. 

County Board of Eegistry— Michael Kearns, Ephraim 
Erricson, Dems. ; George Eldridge, John W. Eeeves, Eeps. 

Terms of Court — Fourth Tuesday in April and September, 
third Tuesday in December. 

Cumberland County. 

County Seat — Bridgeton. Population, 11,423. 

Sheriff— Allen E. Shinn, 1896. 

Coroners — John S. Halsey, 1897; Gabriel Bobbins, 1895; 
Ellsmere Stiles, 1896. 

County Clerk— William B. Trenchard, 1899. 

Surrogate— Samuel P. Fithian, 1898. 

County Collector — William O. Garrison, Bridgeton. 

President Judge— Alfred Eeed, 1896. 

Law Judge— James E. Hoagland, 1899. 

Lay Judges— Mulford Ludlam. 1898 ; Eli B. Hendee, 1897. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — William A. Logue, 1899. 

County Board of Eegistry — John Ogden, Cuno Becker, 
Dems. ; Eli E. Eogers, Harry O. Newcomb, Eeps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 



308 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Essex County. 
County Seat— Newark. Population, 181,830. 

Sheriff— Herman Lehlbach, 1896. 

Coroners — James H. Cummins, Gustave J. Wolber, Francis 
A. Gile, 1896. 

County Clerk— James T. Wrightson, 1897. 

Surrogate— Edward W. Jackson, 1899. 

County Collector— Henry L. Keepers, Newark. 

Register of Deeds— William Riker, Jr., 1898. 

President Judge— David A. Depue, 1901. 

Law Judge— Andrew Kirkpatrick, 1895. 

Lay Judges— Michael J. Ledwith, 1897; Herman Schalk, 
1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Elvin W. Crane, 1899. 

Assistant Prosecutor— Louis Hood. 

County Board of Registry — Leonard Kalisch, Edwin A. 
Raynor, Dems. ; William R. Williams, Edward W. Jackson, 
Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September, and second Tuesday in December. 

Gloucester County. 

County Seat — Woodbury. Population, 3,911. 

Sheriff— Franklin D. Springer, 1896. 

Coroners -Thomas E. Parker, 1897; Samuel H. Ledden, 
1895 ; John B. Carey, 1896. 

County Clerk— Frank B. Ridgway, 1897. 

Surrogate -Millard F. Du Bois, 1899. 

County Collector— William J. Adamson, Woodbury. 

President Judge — Charles G. Garrison, 1895. 

Law Judge— Robert S. Clymer, 1897. 

Lay Judges — Edmund Jones, 1898; Bowman S. Cox, ad 
interim. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Belmont Perry, ad interim. 

County Board of Registry— Thomas W.' Hurff, C. Fletcher 
Meyers, Dems. ; George E. Pierson, William J. Adamson, 
Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 309 

Hudson County. 
County Seat — Jersey City. Population, 163,003. 

Sheriff- John J. Toffey, 1896. 

Coroners — Anthony J. Volk, 1896 ; Diedrich Oldenberg, 
1897 ; James A. Exton, 1897. 

County Clerk— John G. Fisher, 1900. 

Surrogate -James H. O'Neil, 1896. 

County Collector — Hugh Dugan, Jersey City. 

Register of Deeds— George B. Fielder, 1900. 

President Judge— Job H. Lippincott, 1900. 

Law Judge— Kobert S. Hudspeth, 1898. 

Lay Judges— John Kenney, 1897 ; Albert Hoffman, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Charles H. Winfield, 1898. 

Assistant Prosecutor — Joseph M. Noonan. 

Port Warden— James P. Laverty, 1898. 

Harbor Masters— James H. Moore, 1896; Peter H. Daly, 
1895. 

County Board of Registry — Charles C. Black, James F. 
Minturn, Dems. ; Joseph J Guisto, Michael Schultz, Jr., 
Eeps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Hunterdon County. 

County Seat — Flemington. Population, 1,909. 

Sheriff— William J. Poulson, 1896. 

Coroners — Moses D. Knight, Peter D. Rockafellar, 1896 ; 
Thomas S. Callan, 1897. 

County Clerk— H. Eugene Park, 1898. 

Surrogate— Obadiah H. Sproul, 1899. 

County Collector — Andrew R. Dilts, Flemington. 

President Judge — (vacancy). 

Law Judge — Octavius P. Chamberlain, 1896. 

Lay Judges— John Kugler, 1898 ; W. H. Baker, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Harlem G. Chamberlain, 1896. 

County Board of Registry — William H. Parker, Oliver 
I. Blackwell, Dems. ; Walter F. Hayhurst, John H. Nunn, 



Terms of Court — Second Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 



310 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Mercer County. 

County Seat — Trenton. Population, 57,458. 

Sheriff— Augustus T. Ege, 1896. 

Coroners— Richard C. Towers, John R. D. Bower, John E. 
Lloyd, 1896. 

County Clerk — Barker Gummere, Jr., 1898. 

Surrogate - John W. Cornell, 1899. 

County Collector — Samuel Walker, Jr., Trenton. 

President Judge— (vacancy). 

Law Judge -Robert S.Woodruff, 1895. 

Lay Judges— Josiah W. Wright, 1897 ; William S. Yard, 
1898. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Bayard Stockton, 1898. 

County Board of Registry — William Rodgers, Howell C. 
Stull, Dems. ; Joseph II. ]Mount, George R. Whittaker, Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in January, second Tues- 
day in May and second Tuesday in October. 

Middlesex County. 
County Seat — New Brunswick. Population, 18,603. 

Sheriff— Richard Serviss, 1896. 

Coroners — H. Martvn Brace, 1897; William J. McDede, 
George Kohlhepp, 1896. 

County Clerk— John H. Conger, 1899. 

Surrogate — Leonard Furman, 1897. 

County Collector — David Servis, New Brunswick. 

President Judge — Mercer Beasley, 1899. 

Law Judge — J. Kearny Rice, 1895. 

Lay Judges— Matthew O'Gorman, 1897 ; Manning Freeman, 
1898. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Robert Adrain, by appointment 
of Court. 

County Board of Registry — Hendrick H. Brown, Oliver 
Kelly, Dems. ; Woodbridge Strong, Bernard Roddy, Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 311 

Monmouth County. 

County Seat — Freehold. Population, 2,932. 

Sheriff— Matthias Woolley, 1896. 

Coroners — Benjamin L. Herbert, Joseph L. Cliver, John 
S. Sickles, 1896. 

County Clerk — Theodore Aumack, 1898. 

Surrogate— David S. Crater, 1898. 

County Collector — Asher T. Applegate, Freehold. 

President Judge— Mercer Beasley, 1899. 

Law Judge — J. Clarence Conover, 1895, 

Lay Judges — Charles Morris, 1897 ; Archibald A. Higgins, 
1898. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Charles H. Ivins, 1897. 

County Board of Kegistry— John P. Walker, William E 
Joline, Dems. ; John C. Patterson, D. A. Statesir, Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day of Jan- 
uary, first Tuesday in May and October. 

Morris County. 

County Seat — Morristown. Population, about 8,156. 

Sheriff— Edmund A. Backer, 1896. 

Coroners— James Douglas, George C. Coates, Henry Col- 
lins, 1896. 

County Clerk— Elias B. Mott, 1898. 

Surrogate— George Pierson, 1898. 

County Collector— George McCracken, Dover. 

President Judge— William J. Magie, 1901. 

Law Judge— Willard W. Cutler, 1898. 

Lay Judges — William R. Wilson, 1897 ; Charles Hardin, 
1898. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Joshua S. Salmon, 1898. 

County Board of Registry — John D. Guerin, Thomas 
Hoagland, Dems. ; William O. Freeman, John B. Vreeland, 
Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in January, first Tuesday 
in May and second Tuesday in October. 



312 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Ocean County. 

County Seat— Toms River. Population, about 1,300. 

Sheriff— Frank M. Chambers, 1896. 

Coroners — Stephen F. Irons, Harry C. Shoemaker, R. 
Augustus Crane, 1896. 

County Clerk— Abram C. B. Havens, 1898. 

Surrogate— Charles H. AVardell, 1897. 

County Collector — George L. Sliinn, New Egypt. 

President Judge— Bennet Van Syckel, 1897. 

Lay Judge— Ephraim P. Emson, 1897; James E. Otis, 
1898 ; Charles B. Mathis, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Thomas W. Middleton, 1897. 

County Board of Registry — Ephraim P. Emson, Thomas 
W. Middleton, Dems. ; George W. Copperthwaite, Jonathan 
Goble, Reps. 

Terms of Court— Second Tuesday in April, first Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Passaic County. 

County Seat— Paterson. Population, 78,347. 

Sheriff — James Johnstone, 1896. 

Coroners -Sylvester F. Wilev, 1895; John D. S. Good 
ridge, William N. Carroll, 1896' 

County Clerk— Albert D. Winfield, 1896. 

Surrogate— Charles M. King, 1895. 

County Collector — P. Henry Shields, Paterson. 

President Judge— Jonathan Dixon, 1896. 

Law Judge — John Hopper, 1897. 

Lay Judges— James Inglis, Jr., 1898 ; Alfred Van Hoven- 
berg, 1897. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— William B. Gourley, 1896. 

County Board of Registry — Abel Horton, Henry Milnes, 
Dems. ; John H. Cook, Alfred G. Booth, Reps 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day of 
January, fourth Tuesday in April and September. 

Salem County. 

County Seat — Salem. Population, 5,516. 

Sheriff— Oliver H. Wriggins, 1896. 

Coroners— Wilbert Christy, Lewis Hoelzel, James D. 
Torton, 1896. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 313 

County Clerk— S. Luther Richmond, 1899. 

Surrogate— George R. Morrison, 1897. 

County Collector — Eichman Coles, Woodstown. 

President Judge -Alfred Eeed, 1896. 

Lay Judges— William A. Wood, 1897 ; William Plum- 
mer, 1898 ; William Newell, ad interim. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Jonathan W. Acton, 1895. 

County Board of Registry— John P. Flynn, Millard F. 
Riley, Dems. ; Edward R. Davis, Henry Combs, Reps. 

Terms of Court — Third Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

Somerset County. 

County Seat — Somerville. Population, 3,861. 

Sheriff— George A. Dilts, 1895. 

Coroners — John F. Brady, 1895 ; Frederick C. Jones, 1896 ; 
Henry C. Adair, 1895. 

County Clerk — Matthew H. Vanderveer, 1895. 

Surrogate— Abraham T. Huff, 1898. 

County Collector— E. B. Allen, Plainfield. 

President Judge— William J. Magie, 1901. 

Law Judge— John D, Bartine, 1895. 

Lay Judges— Charles M. Jemison, 1897; Henry G. Wag- 
oner, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — James J. Meehan, 1899. 

County Board of Registry— John Yetterlein, John H. Mat- 
tison, Dems. ; C. H. Bateman, George W. Cooper, Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in April, fourth Tuesday 
in September and fourth Tuesday in December. 



Sussex County. 
County Seat — Newton. Population, 3,003. 

Sheriff— Peter S. Gunderman, 1896. 

Coroners— Joseph L. Hetzel, Charles R. Nelden, Theophilus 
H. Andress, 1896. 

County Clerk— Ora C. Simpson, 1897. 

Surrogate — Samuel Johnson, 1898. 

County Collector — Theodore Morford, Newton. 

President Judge — William J. Magie, 1901. 

Law Judge — Lewis J. Martin, 1896. 

Lay Judges— Job J. Decker, 1898; J. Anson McBride, 
1899. 

14 



314 COUNTY DIRECTORY, 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Theodore Simonson, 1898. 

County Board of Registry — William E. Ross, Peter B. 
Swarts, Dems. ; Obadiah P. Armstrong, William H. Palmer, 
Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 



Union County. 

County Seat— Elizabeth. Population, 37,764. 

Sheriff-George Kyte, 1896. 

Coroners — Henry C. Pierson, 1897 ; Charles B. Holmes, 
1896 ; George H. Horning, 1895. 

County Clerk— William Howard, 1899. 

Surrogate — George T. Parrot, 1897. 

County Collector— E. M. Wood, Elizabeth. 

President Judge— Bennet Van Syckel, 1897. 

Law Judge— Thomas F. McCormick, 1898. 

Lay Judges— Lewis S. Hyer, 1897; John W. Crane, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — Frederick C. Marsh, 1898. 

County Board of Registry— Dayid Schleiner. Elmore B. 
Moffett, Dems. ; Edward C. Woodruff, William Chamberlain, 
Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

"Warren County. 

County Seat — Belyidere. Population, 1,768. 

Sheriff— Benjamin Swarts, 1896. 

Coroners — Joseph D. Vann, 1897 ; Edward W. Sharps, 
Peter H. Hagerty, 1896. 

County Clerk— John A. Wildrick, 1895. 

Surrogate— George L. Shi 1 linger, 1899. 

County Collector — Louis Merrill, Vienna. 

President Judge — (vacancy ). 

Law Judge— William H. Morrow, 1898. 

Lay Judges— W^illiam H. Dawes, 1899 ; Hiram D. White, 
1896. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— William A. Stryker, 1896. 

County Board of Registry — Stephen Larrison, Robert M. 
Petty, Dems. ; A. Blair Kelsey, William R. Laire, Reps. 

Terms of Court — Fourth Tuesday in April, fourth Tuesday 
in September, and the first Tuesday after the fourth Tuesday 
in December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 315 



TIME OP HOLDING COURTS. 

The Court of Chancery meets on the first Tuesday in 
February, the third Tuesday in May and the third Tuesday 
in October. 

The Supreme Court meets on the third Tuesday in Feb- 
ruary, the first Tuesday in June and the first Tuesday in 
November. 

The Court of Errors and Appeals meets on the first Tues- 
day in March, the third Tuesday in June and the third 
Tuesday in November. 

The Court of Pardons meets on the same days as the 
Court of Errors and Appeals. 

The Prerogative Court meets on the same days as the 
Court of Chancery. 

The U. S. Circuit Court meets on the fourth Tuesday in 
March and the fourth Tuesday in September. 

The CJ. S. District Court meets on the third Tuesday in 
January, April, June and September. 

The Circuits of New Jersey are divided as follows : 

1st District — Cape May, Cumberland, Salem and Atlantic. 
Justice Reed. 

2d District— Gloucester, Camden and Burlington. Justice 
Garrison. 

3d District — Mercer, Hunterdon and Warren. Vacancy. 

4th District — Middlesex and Monmouth. Chief Justice 
Beasley. 

5th District — Somerset, Morris and Sussex. Justice Magie. 

6th District — Bergen and Passaic. Justice Dixon. 

7th District— Essex. Justice Depue. 

8th District — Hudson. Justice Lippincott. 

9th District — Union and Ocean. Justice Van Syckel. 

For the time of holding county courts, see County Directory. 



REPORTS OF STATE DEPART- 
MENTS AND INSTITUTIONS. 



STATE TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The annual report of State Treasurer Swain, for the fiscal 
year ending October 31st, 1894, makes the following exhibit : 

STATE FUND. 

Receipts. 

From railroad corporations $1,096,582 97 

Miscellaneous corporations 670,849 8S 

Collateral Inheritance tax 204,695 15 

Ofllicial fees 101,271 15 

State Prison receipts 49,282 15 

Judicial fees 21,006 39 

Loans to Sinking Fund account 20,000 00 

Dividends 18,870 00 

Sundry sources 10,515 37 

$2,193,073 01 
Disbursemeiits. 

Court expenses $171,826 51 

Militia 130,882 74 

State Hospitals ." 129,291 45 

County Lunatic Asylums 111,957 74 

Legislature 108,791 24 

Public debt 92,000 OO 

Jersey City Armorv 88,847 98 

Blind and Feeble-ininded 87,705 41 

Advertising .^ 78,538 54 

State Prison salaries 78,081 27 

State Prison maintenance 77,491 38 

Salaries „. 74,291 35 

Public roads 71,731 24 

State House expenses 71,180 29 

Reform School 67,769 21 

Printing 63,081 08 

Loans to Sinking Fund 59,122 00 

Clerical service 37,071 85 

Home for Disabled Soldiers 29,895 57 

Industrial School 27,806 58 

Arbitration claims of Robert S. Johnston ^.. 14,582 74 

Collateral Inheritance tax „. 14,417 51 

Corporation tax expenses 14,275 60 

State Capitol „ 13,435 79 

Fish and Game 13,398 95 

Geological Survev... 13,091 01 

State Board of Arbitration 12,824 30 

Trenton Battle Monument 12,500 00 

Dairy protection 12,452 84 

Agricultural Experiment Station 11,980 34 

Revision of Statutes 11,433 33 

Stationery and postage 11.317 62 

Labor inspection 11,017 45 

Agriculture , 10,250 38 

Sundry disbursements 104,913 93 

$1,930,255 22 
(316) 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 317 

Receipts over disbursements $262,817 79 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1893 724,038 12 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1894 986,855 91 

State Fund securities 1,027,487 11 

SCHOOL FUND. 

Total amount of School Fund securities $3,508,725 80 

State school tax 2,026,110 00 

Total amount of receipts — 

Income $189,617 77 

Securities paid ofiU 149,457 78 

Sundry receipts 982 01 

330,057 56 

Annual appropriation to the several school districts of 

the State 100,000 00 

Amount of other disbursements 267,059 78 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1893 255,210 12 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1894 218,207 90 



STATE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

For the Assessment and Taxation of Kailroad and 
Other Corporate Property. 

Ferdinand H. Wismer, President ; Bird W. Spencer, Vice 
President ; Oliver Kelly, Anthony R. Kuser. John T. Van 
Cleef,_ Secretary ; Irvine E, Maguire, Assistant Secretary. 

This department of the State Government was created 
under an act of the Legislature entitled **An act for the taxa- 
tion of railroad and canal property," approved April 10th, 

The work of the Board was increased during the same 
year by the passage of another act, entitled "An act to pro- 
vide for the imposition of State taxes upon certain corpora- 
tions, and for the collection thereof." 

The report of the Board for the year 1894 shows that 118 
railroad and canal companies within the State are subject to 
taxation. These companies represent about 2,250 miles of 
railroads and 173 miles of canals. 

The aggregate asses*sed valuation (subject to review) is 
$222,059,373, against $218,406,065 last year, an increase of 
$3,653,308. 

The tax for State uses is $1,110,296.86, against $1,092,030.32 
last year, thus increasing the revenues of the State $18,266.54. 

The tax for local purposes is $408,334.39, against $391,- 
446.68, an increase of $16,887.71. 

The total tax is $1,518,631.25, against $1,483,477 la.st year, 
an increase of $35,154.25. 

The summary of the assessment follows : 
*14 



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STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



m 



MISCELLANEOUS CORPORATIONS. 

The following table shows the comparison with previous 
years of the number of corporations assessed and the amount 
of tax levied : 





6-6 




^^ 








81 




«+H C§ 


Years. 


^ «. 








^.2 




a "^ 








^ 


1884 


619 


1885 


797 

917 

1,132 

1,457 

1,698 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890 


2,103 

2,377 
3,149 

3,889 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


4,287 



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$195,273 51 


235,769 40 


244,035 81 


287,702 13 


360,197 59 


438,893 42 


574,048 16 


629,659 62 


788,486 86 


973,417 19 


1,085,172 45 



3 on3 



s ^ s 



178 
120 
215 
325 
241 
405 
274 
772 
740 
398 






140,495 89 

8,266 41 

43,666 32 

72,495 46 

78,695 83 

135,154 74 
55,611 46 

158,827 24 

184,930 33 



THE NEW JERSEY STATE NORMAL 
AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

These schools are the property of the State, and are located 
at the junction of Perry street and Clinton avenue, Trenton. 
There are two buildings, the one for the schools located on the 
west side of Clinton avenue, the other, containing the board- 
ing halls and dormitories, situated on the east side of the 
avenue. These schools were established in 1855 by an act of 
the Legislature. The purpose of the Normal School was 
defined to be, "the training and education of its pupils in 
such branches of knowledge, and such methods of teaching 
and governing, as will qualify them for teachers of our 
common schools." The Model School was designed to be a 
place where "the pupils of the Normal School shall have 



320 STATE DEPARTMENTS, 

opportunity to observe and practice the modes of instruction 
and discipline inculcated in the Normal School, and in which 
pupils may be prepared for the Normal School." 

The following figures show the original cost and present 
valuation of the Normal School property : 

Original cost of Normal and Model School buildings, with 

lot ?72,0C0 

Estimated value of furniture, books, &c 8,000 

Value of boarding halls 65,000 

Value of boarding hall furniture 10,000 

§155,000 

The above original values have appreciated till the tables 
should now read as follows : 

Former Normal and Model buildings $60,000 

Former school furniture, apparatus, &c 8,000 

Lot 115,000 

Appropriation of 1890 for new building 40,000 

Appropriation of 1891 for alterations, furniture, &c 8,000 

Principal's residence and boarding halls, including addi- 
tion of 1892 99,000 

Boarding hall furniture 15,000 

Appropriation of 1893 for new building 12,000 

Appropriation of 1894 lO.COO 

Additional furniture and apparatus 13,000 

Total $380,000 



The enrollments in 1855 were as follows : Normal School, 
43 ; Model School, 125. For the year ending June 30th, 
1894, these enrollments had increased to 525 in the Normal 
and 586 in the Model. During its history the Normal School 
has graduated 1,643 students, and these, together with the 
number who were able to take but part of the course, have, 
as teachers, exercised a large influence over the educational 
system of the State. A goodly number of these graduates 
are now occupying positions as Principals and Superintendents 
in the cities and towns of the State. The Model has exer- 
cised a large influence as a pattern for other schools in the 
commonwealth. The courses of study in both the Normal 
and Model departments are kept in harmony with the leading 
educational thought of the day. Both schools receive pupils 
from all parts of the State. ' The law provides that each 
member of the Legislature shall be entitled to at least six 
reprasentatives in the Normal School. The State appro- 
priates §28,000 annually for the support of the schools, and 
the earnings of the Model School for tuition during the year 
closing June 30th, 1894, were $26,309.63. This school is 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 321 

self-supporting. The boarding halls are self-supporting. 
The cost per pupil for board is §150 per year. 

The Principals of the schools have been as follows: 
William F Phelps, A.M., October 1st, 1855, to March 15th, 
1865; John S. Hart, LL.D., March 15th, 1865, to February 
7th, 1871 ; Lewis M. Johnson, A.M., February 7th, 1871, to 
July 1st, 1876; Washington Hasbrouck, Ph.D., July 1st, 
1876, to February 10th, 1889 ; James M. Green, Ph.D., Feb- 
ruary 10th, 1889, to the present. 

The Faculty is composed of the most efficient and best- 
experienced teachers that can be secured. The present corps 
is as follows : 

Normal School — James M. Green, Ph.D., Principal, 
Instructor in Philosophy of Education; Austin C. Apgar, 
Vice Principal. Instructor in Botany and Zoology ; William 
N. Mumper, Ph D., Instructor in Physics and Chemistry; 
Amelia Cooper Hewitt, Assistant Instructor in Chemistry; 
Mrs. Phebe E. Dinsmore, Preceptress, Girls' Hall ; Edith 5l. 
Luther, B.A., Instructor in English ; Dickerson H. Farley, 
Instructor in Penmanship and Book-keeping ; Elias F. Carr, 
Ph.D., Instructor in Higher Mathematics and History of 
Education; Mary C. Field, Instructor in Drawing; M. Vir- 
ginia Fogle, Training Teacher and Instructor in Theory and 
Practice of Teaching; Lillie A. William.s, Instructor in 
General History and Psychology ; Caroline McGuire, Instruc- 
tor in Beading ; Kate D. Stout, Instructor in American His- 
tory and Arithmetic; Susan A. Eeilly, Instructor in Geo- 
graphy ; Laura C. Johnson, Instructor in Vocal Music ; 
Alfred S. Brace, Instructor in Piano and Vocal Solo Music ; 
H. B. Boice, M.D., Instructor in Physiology and Director in 
the Gymnasium, Preceptor in Boys' Hall ; Charles A. Burt, 
B.S., Instructor in Manual Training ; Frank H. Scobey, In- 
structor in Algebra and Number Methods ; Bertha E. Blake- 
ley, B.L., Librarian. 

Model School — Oliver C. Mordorf, M.A., Supervisor in 
High and Grammar Departments, Instructor in Latin and 
Mathematics ; Sarah Y. Ely, Supervisor in High and Gram- 
mar Departments, Instructor in Mathematics ; Kena T. Mer- 
win, Supervisor in Primary Department, Instructor in D 
Grade ; Melina A. Bosworth, Instructor in History and Rhe- 
toric ; Elizabeth B. Johnson, Instructor in English Grammar; 
John C. Leach, B.A., Instructor in Latin and Greek ; Alice 
L. Brewster, B.A., Instructor in Literature and History; 
Margaret B. Parker, Instructor in Drawing ; M. Lilian New- 
man, Instructor in Geography; Josephine Carll, Instructor 
in Geography and Arithmetic ; Julia B. Dennis, Instructor in 
German and Arithmetic'; Mercy A. Pearson, Instructor in 



822 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

A Primary; Mary B. Eastburn, Instructor in B Primary; 
May Bobbins, Instructor in C Primary ; Frederick J. Ger- 
main, Instructor in French. A number of the Normal 
instructors teach their branches in the Model. 

The Farnum Preparatory School, at Beverly, is an auxiliary 
of the Normal School. It was founded in 1856 by Paul 
Farnum, who presented a building and an endowment of 
§20,000, on condition that the State would appropriate $1,200 
annually and receive the school under the control of the 
State Board of Education. 

The pupils of the High School department intending to 
enter the Normal School have their tuition free. Others are 
charged a small fee. The enrollment for the past year was 
150. 

The corps of teachers is as follows : James B. Dilks, A.M., 
Supervisor, Instructor in Mathematics, Natural Science and 
Greek; Caroline B. Barlow, Instructor in Literature, History 
and Latin ; Mary Keane, Instructor in Elocution, Grammar 
and Physical Culture ; Mary W. Hutchinson, Instructor in 
Geography and Supervisor of Primary Classes; Susie M. 
Clark, Instructor in Drawing. 



NEW^ JERSEY STATE SCHOOL FOR 
DEAF-MUTES. 

This institution, which is located at Trenton, is under the 
control of the State Board of Education. It was established 
by an act of the Legislature, approved ]\Iarch 31st, 1882. 
The following are the conditions of admission : The candidate 
must be a resident of the State, not less than eight nor more 
than twenty-one years of age, deaf, and of sufficient physical 
health and intellectual capacity to profit by the instruction 
afforded. The person making application for the admission 
of a child as a pupil is required to fill out a blank form, 
furnished for the purpose, giving necessary information in 
regard to the case. The application must be accompanied by 
a certificate from a County Judge or County Clerk of the 
county, or the Chosen Freeholder or Township Clerk, or the 
Mayor of the city, Avhere the applicant resides, also a certifi- 
cate from two freeholders of the county. Blank forms of 
application and any desired information in regard to the 
school, may be obtained by writing to Weston Jenkins, A.M., 
Principal, Trenton, N. J. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 323 

On November 20tb, 1894, there were 124 pupils enrolled. 
A new building, which cost $15,000, has just been erected, 
and is used for the purpose of industrial education. 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The State Board of Health has general supervision over 
all matters affecting the public health. The law provides 
that the Board shall investigate the cause of disease, especially 
of epidemics, and the sources of mortality. The Board also 
inquires into the effects of localities, employments, conditions 
and circumstances upon the public health. 

Prof. C. F. Brackett, M.D , LL.D., is President of the 
Board, and Henry Mitchell, M.D , is Secretary. The Secre- 
tary of State, the Altorney-GeQeral and the State Geologist 
are members ex officio. The other members are — Franklin 
Gauntt. M.D., Burlington ; Prof. A. Pv. Leeds, Ph.D., Hobo- 
ken ; John A. Githens, Esq., Asbury Park ; Edward K. 
O'Keilly, M.D., Elizabeth ; Laban Dennis, M.D., Newark ; 
Cornelius Shepherd, M.D., Trenton. 

The Board executes the laws relating to contagious diseases 
of animals, adulteration of foods, the sale of petroleum and 
the sanitary inspeclion of all State and county institutions for 
the criminal and dependent classes. 

As a bureau of vital statistics it causes a record to be made 
of all marriages, births and deaths in the State, and tabulates 
these for the information they give as to conditions of popu- 
lation and the causes of disease. The Board is constantly 
c:)nsulted by cities and townships as to health ordinances, the 
removal of nuisances and plans for sanitary improvement. 



824 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

Bureau of Vital Statistics. 

Statement for the Year Ending June 30th, 1894. 

Counties. Marriages. Births. Deaths. 

Atlantic 302 697 585 

Bergen 339 1,158 911 

Burlington 413 975 894 

Camden 4,508 1,944 2,117 

Cape May 77 237 187 

Cumberland 363 1,021 741 

Essex 2,080 7,150 6,105 

Gloucester 234 602 466 

Hudson 2,526 8,370 7,419 

Hunterdon 300 561 430 

Mercer 731 1,018 1,494 

Middlesex 444 1,141 1,092 

Monmouth 598 1,116 1,102 

Morris ^ 303 836 814 

Ocean 139 332 290 

Passaic 1,119 3,019 2,380 

Salem 164 341 331 

Somerset 184 442 408 

Sussex 157 206 272 

Union 530 1,765 1,436 

Warren 734 731 530 

*16,245 33,662 30,004 
•3.881 of these were the marriages of non-residents, mostly from 
Pennsylvania. 

Cities. Marriages. Births. Deaths. 

Atlantic City 177 363 315 

Bayonne 126 719 469 

Bordentown 37 84 76 

Bridgeton 130 337 205 

Burlington 81 141 185 

Camden 4,328 1,357 1,463 

Elizabeth 285 1,071 801 

Gloucester City 42 118 146 

Hackensack 69 131 100 

Harrison 22 192 212 

Hoboken 641 1,952 1,192 

Jersey City 1,367 4,120 4,320 

Long Branch 79 112 88 

Millville 77 285 151 

Morristown 53 219 172 

Newark 1,592 5,336 4,760 

New Brunswick 165 227 338 

Orange 164 529 431 

Passaic 161 509 337 

Paterson 883 2,1S2 1,836 

Perth Amboy 130 297 223 

Phillipsburg 411 232 123 

Plainfield 98 277 228 

Rahway 69 92 137 

Salem 48 93 118 

Town of Union 168 319 236 

Trenton 600 775 1,067 

~12,003 22,069 19,724 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 325 



STATE HOSPITALS. 

TRENTON. 

Officers— Medical Director, John W. Ward, M.D. ; Assist- 
ant Physician, John Kirby, M.D. ; Second Assistant, John C. 
Felty ; Third Assistant, William J. Jones, M.D. ; Fourth 
Assistant, (vacancy) ; Warden, William H. Earley ; Treasurer, 
Harvey H. Johnson. 

Men. Women. 

Patients in Hospital October 31st, 1893 442 463 

Beceived since, to November 1st, 1894 115 107 

557 570 

Discharged— Recovered 40 39 

Improved 12 10 

Unimproved 5 5 

"VfTitof habeas corpus 2 

Died 45 39 

104 93 

Remaining, October 31st, 1894 458 472 

Whole number of cases received and treated from 
opening of institution, May 15th, 1848, to No- 
vember 1st, 1894 4,139 4,081 

Total 8,220 

Balance on hand November 1st. 1893 $17,385 59 

Warden's orders outstanding November 1st, 1893 2,093 45 

$19,479 04 
Received from the State Treasurer for mainten9,nce of 

county patients $41,601 28 

Received for maintenance of insane convicts 7,037 15 

$48,638 43 

Received from various counties $134,280 79 

Received from private patients $26,680 86 

Sale of fat and tallow 2,396 02 

Cows and calves 47 50 

Incidentals 910 87 

$31,316 66 

Total receipts $233,714 86 

Disbursements— Warden's orders $209,948 96 

Outstanding 735 11 

$210,684 07 

Balance on hand October 31st, 1894 $23,030 79 

Unpaid— Mercer county 23,211 74 

Morris Plains Hospital loan 10,000 00 

$56,242 53 



826 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



MORRIS PLAINS. 

Officers — Medical Director, Britton T>. Evans, M.D. ; 
Assistant Plivsician, Eliot Oorton, M.D. ; Second Assistant, 
Thomas P. Prout, M.D.; Third Assistant, Peter S. Mallon, 
M.D. ; Fourth Assistant, M. S. Perry, M.D. ; Warden, Moses 
K. Everitt; Treasurer, Guido C. Hinchman. 

Men. Women, 

Patients in Hospital October 31&t, 1893 509 500 

Received during the year 115 124 

624 624 

Discharged— Restored 29 30 

Improved 12 16 

Unimproved 2 11 

Died 60 37 

Elopement 1 

Remaining October 31st, 1894 520 530 

Balance on hand November 1st. 1893 813,539 76 

Received from State Treasurer for county patients 44,312 42 

Convict patients 16.221 35 

Various counties 162,782 01 

Private patients.. 49,127 49 

Pale of hides, tallow, &c 6,7fO 60 

First National Bank, Morristown, interest.. 51 62 

$292,795 25 

Disbursement— Orders of the Warden 5262,013 .30 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1894 30,781 93 



HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS, 
KEARNY. 

Number of inmates October 81st, 1893 471 

Admitted during the year 423 

894 

Discharged 322 

Summarily discharged 16 

Dishonorablv discharged 2 

Died 34 

374 

Remaining 520 

Receipts S70,576 62 

Expenditures 70,530 57 

Balance 516 05 

Average cost of rations per day, 19.1617 cents. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 827 

STATE REFORM SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 

JAMESBURG. 

The State Keform School is located on a farm of four 
hundred and ninety acres, two miles from Lower Jamesburg 
station, on the Pennsylvania Eailroad. The buildings are in 
the center of the farm, on an elevation of one hundred and 
twenty feet above tidewater. There are seven family build- 
ings, one of which is a double one, accommodating two fami- 
lies. Each family consists of about fifty boys, presided over 
by a male officer and a female teacher. During the last 
year there has been completed and occupied a new family 
building, which in itself is a complete home. The officers 
in charge of it, and the boys, have their cooking done and 
their dining-room arrangements in the building. Besides 
this, as in the other buildings, there are play-room, lavatories, 
school-room and dormitories. These buildings surround the 
main building, which is in the center, is on a beautiful 
campus, having a fine view of the surrounding country. 
Usually visitors coming for the first time to the institution, 
inquire " where are your walls ? " 

There were remaining in the school October 31st, 1893, 
373 boys ; received by commitment during the year, 114 ; 
paroled boys returned, 50 ; making a total of 537 boys cared 
for in the institution during the year, 

There were disposed of 165, leaving 372 boys remaining 
October 31st, 1894, 59 of whom are colored. Two thousand 
six hundred and tliirty-six boys have been committed to 
the school since it was established. During the last year, 
one or more boys were received from every county in the 
State, except Atlantic, Gloucester, Ocean and Salem, 



328 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 
TRENTON. 

This institution is located in Ewing towmship, near the 
Trenton State Hospital, on a farm of about 79 acres. 

Inmates received from December 27th, 1871, to October 31st, 

1894 423 

Indentured and discharged 391 

Number returned 76 

315 

Remaining on October 31st, 1894 108 

Remaining October 31st, 1893 99 

Received during the year 32 

Returned 4 

Under care during the year 115 

Discharged from school, 4 ; died, 2; indentured, 21. 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1893 «2,119 21 

Received from State Treasurer on account of new building, 9,455 75 

Received for maintenance 18,350 83 

Sales of farm produce « 397 94 

Disbursements ''26io81 80 

Balance on hand 84,241 87 



STATE PRISON. 

Number of convicts in prison at beginning of fiscal year, 1893... 968 

Highest number at any time during the year 1,027 

Average number 1,004 

This is an increase of 69 over the next preceding year, and is the 
highest average in the history of the State. 
Number in prison November 1st, 1894 1,026 

Cash receipts— Earnings during the year $49,282 15 

Expenditures— For maintenance $77,491 38 

Repairs 5,645 54 

Salaries 69,097 07 

Discharged convicts 1,390 00 

Salaries of Keeper, Supervisor and 

Inspectors 8,984 20 

8162,608 19 

Total expenditures over receipts $113,326 04 



NEW JERSEY STATE ELECTION RETURNS. 

OFFICIAL, 1894. 



Atlantic County. 

Cox. — 



»a Oa ad -o «2 ^a So So 

ao) -gaj --S mS OOf .t^i^ SS Moj 

C3fl gp^ gpH 3^ flfl grt -cPh 2Ph 

Absecon 67 60 5 1 49 80 4 1 

Atlantic City— 

1st Ward 133 317 12 1 133 316 14 1 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 59 175 13 1 68 166 13 1 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 100 198 1 1 101 194 1 1 

3d Ward, 1st Dist 109 197 7 6 106 197 7 6 

3d Ward, 2d Dist 113 217 15 120 212 13 

4th Ward, 1st Dist 140 177 11 4 137 181 11 3 

4th Ward, 2d Dist 141 150 25 4 147 143 25 4 



795 1431 84 17 812 1409 84 16 



Brigantine 4 18 2 1 5 17 2 1 

Buena Vista 79 138 4 20 84 134 4 19 

Egg Harbor Township 78 155 20 3 77 158 20 2 

Egg Harbor City 103 187 1 10 171 117 1 9 

Galloway— 1st Dist 88 154 5 1 82 159 5 1 

2d Dist 81 35 2 90 27 2 

Hamilton 83 206 12 6 83 206 11 6 

Hammonton 104 246 58 34 98 250 57 36 

Liuwood 35 65 2 34 66 2 

Mullica 44 95 17 4 60 81 15 4 

Pleasantville 83 175 23 6 73 189 20 6 

Somers Point 40 9 1 1 40 10 1 1 

South Atlantic Borough 11 8 9 10 

Weymouth 51 28 10 2 52 26 10 2 



1746 3010 246 106 1819 2939 238 104 
Majority in county 1264 



(329) 



3S0 ELECTION RETURN.^. 

Bergen County. 



.01 fea) mu ^-5 >(D go »-ai Sa; 

;fl S« ^p, -3(2 SQ £a ^« §tf 



ci di 


d 




S« 




gs 


t« 


P4 


M 


55 


4 


41 


155 


5 


3 



New Barbadoes— 1st Dist 131 55 4 41 130 133 52 54 

2d Dist 156 155 5 3 155 152 161 153 

3d Dist 94 163 10 3 93 93 165 164 

4th Dist 123 178 8 1 118 118 181 182 



504 551 27 48 496 496 559 553 



Ridgefield— 1st Dist 183 210 4 8 176 181 211 218 

2d Dist 94 105 2 7 89 104 92 111 

3d Dist 81 126 7 1 79 81 130 126 

4th Dist 83 117 1 1 85 83 114 117 



441 558 14 17 429 449 547 572 

Borough Eidgefield. 26 62 1 26 25 63 62 

p:nglewood— Eastern 148 214 4 3 143 135 216 224 

Western 217 210 7 2 211 216 211 221 

Borough Tenaflv 87 124 6 2 87 87 123 124 

Bergen Fields 56 38 1 56 56 38 37 

Schraalenburgh 43 39 43 43 39 39 

Cresskill 27 36 2 27 27 35 37 

Palisades 63 24 2 3 62 63 24 24 

Harrington— 1st Dist 137 154 5 3 136 135 153 153 

2d Dist 82 63 2 6 81 82 63 64 

Borough Eastwood 51 12 3 51 50 13 12 

Westwood 74 61 1 73 74 62 61 

Woodcliff. 34 39 2 3 34 34 39 39 

ParkBidge 79 46 2 81 78 46 44 

Mont Vale 33 19 1 33 33 19 19 

Washington 75 107 4 2 76 75 107 107 

Orvil....: 137 240 7 1 176 137 232 205 

Hohokus 135 227 11 1 149 139 223 214 

Franklin 120 144 4 127 121 138 142 

Borough Midland Park 56 91 3 4 56 57 91 92 

Glen Rock 40 35 1 5 40 40 35 35 

Bidgewood 117 257 4 119 110 261 254 

Midland 62 73 2 1 62 61 71 73 

Borough Delford 52 59 1 52 54 57 59 

Biverside 23- 49 1 1 23 22 50 49 

Maywood 22 24 1 21 22 24 24 

Saddle Biver 144 267 1 10 144 144 266 263 

Lodi 79 125 1 3 81 84 122 121 

Borough Hasbrouck Heights.. 38 91 2 40 34 94 91 

Little Ferry 53 28 2 3 52 54 28 27 

Carlstadt 150 121 6 149 171 104 117 

Bergen 168 210 1 177 203 178 195 

Borough East Butherford 136 190 4 5 134 142 188 187 

Eutherford-lst Dist. 110 192 6 3 107 108 195 195 

2d Dist. 93 216 1 4 93 95 215 215 

Union 147 107 1 4 150 149 106 103 



4059 5103 132 146 4097 4105 5035 5053 
Majority in county 1044 

Social-Labor vote for the Assembly— Armann, 156; Metzler, 155. Hop- 
per, 47 ; Wanmaker, 44. 



ELECTION HETURNS. 
Burling-ton County. 

—Con.— — Skx.— Ass'y.- 



|a Ig. la ^-a la la |a la 

aai ^OJ "Soi «ai r^O) ^-loi "Oid r^ (V 

•|p JSK .Hp ^rt gfi gp gp^ |p^ 

Bass River 81 48 91 30 95 80 31 51 

Beverly City 94 235 93 235 91 96 230 235 

Beverly Township 100 199 101 197 96 102 195 199 

Bordentown— 1st Dist 131 280 133 279 130 126 280 285 

2d Dist 165 214 164 217 155 159 222 221 

3d Dist 96 70 96 70 89 82 69 83 

392 564 393 566 374 367 571 589 

Burlington— 1st Dist 158 188 157 190 155 153 191 192 

2d Dist 225 339 226 339 225 227 337 340 

3d Dist 190 304 189 305 188 191 305 304 

4th Dist 159 331 159 334 157 162 330 331 

732 1162 731 1168 725 733 1163 1167 

Chester— East Dist 77 236 77 238 77 87 233 226 

West Dist 135 264 134 266 135 150 261 251 

Chesterfield 51 195 47 201 38 51 206 194 

Cinnaminson— 1st Dist 109 98 106 98 107 111 97 92 

2d Dist 94 138 98 135 127 61 119 121 

Delran 277 201 280 198 250 258 190 216 

Eastampton 59 70 58 73 58 59 74 71 

Evesham! 121 184 112 189 111 119 189 184 

Florence 151 264 150 266 146 143 268 271 

Lumberton 79 249 60 276 73 80 258 252 

Mansfield 171 183 168 188 154 160 203 187 

Medford 158 272 159 266 156 159 272 273 

Mount Laurel 90 174 89 176 88 93 176 170 

New Hanover 161 234 158 239 149 163 248 227 

Northampton-lst Dist 136 263 131 270 122 128 262 279 

2d Dist 87 182 87 184 79 84 186 191 

3d Dist 125 318 132 314 114 114 322 338 

348 763 350 768 315 326 770 808 

Palmyra 125 281 124 279 122 115 272 275 

Pemberton— East Dist 120 213 120 213 118 125 215 210 

West Dist 74 90 67 98 65 76 98 88 

Shamong 97 116 93 120 92 95 121 118 

Southampton— East Dist 87 113 86 115 80 82 119 118 

West Dist 109 113 91 131 87 91 134 129 

Springfield... 125 136 125 134 115 127 141 135 

Washington 20 70 20 71 19 19 71 72 

Westampton 28 103 27 104 26 29 105 102 

Willingborough 74 60 72 63 72 74 62 60 

Woodland 37 46 37 46 37 37 45 46 

4376 7074 4317 7147 4198 4268 7137 7137 

Majority in county 2698 2830 

For Congress— Joslin, Pro., 482 ; Ellis, People's, 103. For Senate- 
Wright, Pro., 474. For Assembly— Aaronson, Pro., 484; Ridgway, Pro., 



332 ELECTION HETURNS. 

Camden County. 

—Cox.— Ass'y.- 



-•1 . ^ . .. I -6 i 

-SS flic. tTS ^a ^s so, go. Si 

uoi ^o Toi tc® coi oa»£a' -a* 

feft S=^ Sfi S^ .^c; fc« sS |S 

Camden Citv — 

1st Ward, 1st Dist 29 158 27 25 26 151 151 150 

1st Ward, 2d Dist 31 128 29 30 29 126 126 127 

1st Ward, 3d Dist 55 202 52 52 53 200 196 194 

1st Ward, 4tli Dist 44 183 44 44 44 181 180 180 

1st Ward, 5th Dist 57 181 58 59 58 180 179 178 

1st Ward, 6th Dist 65 133 61 60 61 130 130 130 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 18 121 16 14 13 114 117 113 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 28 141 23 24 26 136 136 133 

2d Ward, 3d Dist 84 180 76 78 81 167 170 167 

2d Ward, 4th Dist 76 108 71 75 75 104 107 106 

2d Ward, 5th Dist 48 158 44 44 44 151 151 150 

2d Ward, 6th Dist 64 251 57 58 61 242 244 241 

2d Ward, 7th Dist 69 282 62 63 66 275 278 273 

8d Ward, 1st Dist 80 176 75 75 75 172 173 173 

3d Ward, 2d Dist 79 199 76 75 74 194 196 195 

3d Ward, 3d Dist 71 216 60 61 63 217 218 216 

4th Ward, 1st Dist 95 290 91 89 93 290 289 289 

4th Ward, 2d Dist 60 174 57 56 61 167 168 162 

4th Ward, 3d Dist. 67 170 60 63 63 167 170 171 

5th Ward, 1st Dist 40 194 40 40 40 194 194 194 

5th Ward, 2d Dist 68 174 63 61 61 170 169 168 

5th Ward, 3d Dist 48 173 44 44 44 170 170 171 

5th Ward, 4th Dist 72 200 68 69 68 196 197 190 

5th Ward, 5th Dist 56 191 51 50 49 189 190 189 

5th AVard, 6th Dist 48 115 48 48 50 112 112 110 

6th Ward, 1st Dist 63 139 55 59 60 136 138 135 

6th Ward, 2d Dist 41 139 34 39 38 134 136 133 

6th Ward, 3d Dist 28 89 22 23 23 85 85 84 

6th Ward, 4th Dist 39 90 34 34 34 80 76 80 

6th Ward, 5th Dist 16 134 13 15 15 132 132 132 

6th Ward, 6th Dist 26 119 25 25 25 119 119 119 

6th Ward, 7th Dist 82 194 74 78 77 189 190 188 

6th Ward, 8th Dist 60 129 52 50 52 128 128 124 

7th Ward, 1st Dist 39 158 39 39 39 158 158 158 

7th Ward, 2d Dist 36 185 34 33 36 184 184 180 

7th Ward, 3d Dist 83 208 73 75 74 205 208 205 

7th Ward, 4th Dist 23 330 21 22 23 329 330 330 

7th Ward, 5th Dist 28 106 27 27 27 106 106 106 

8th Ward, 1st Dist 75 188 51 58 60 181 182 173 

8th Ward, 2d Dist 47 157 40 40 40 158 155 148 

8th Ward, 3d Dist 25 87 19 16 16 84 84 41 

8th Ward, 4th Dist 53 141 45 44 42 137 136 133 

8th Ward, 5th Dist 26 114 21 21 21 114 114 112 

8th Ward, 6th Dist 10 182 7 7 8 181 182 180 

9th W^ard, 1st Dist 46 193 41 41 45 188 189 187 

9th Ward, 2d Dist 64 227 54 53 55 223 221 222 

9th Ward, 3d Dist 67 140 64 64 64 140 140 136 

9th Ward, 4th Dist 57 120 54 54 57 118 119 119 

2486 8067 2252 2274 2309 7904 7923 7795 



ELECTION RETURNS. 

—Cox.— ■ 





1^ 


11 


1 


44 
7 
20 
33 


90 
123 

22 
141 


89 
123 

22 
147 


87 
123 

23 
141 


267 
208 
221 


214 
124 
114 


215 
124 
113 


212 
130 
111 


696 


452 


452 


453 



'sS «ia «rS ^a 

t-i v ^o TO) W)a> 

§3fi grt Sft Sfl 

ptj H^ P p^ 

Centre— 1st Dist 48 88 44 43 

2d Dist 7 123 7 7 

Chesilhurst 19 22 19 20 

Delaware 34 143 33 31 

Gloucester City— 

1st Ward 272 217 272 269 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 223 127 213 210 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 224 124 222 221 

719 468 707 700 

Gloucester Townsliip-lst Dist. 123 188 74 75 116 170 170 162 

2d Dist. 40 124 36 35 42 128 120 123 

Haddon— 1st Dist 80 443 77 69 75 440 438 442 

2d Dist 33 145 33 33 35 145 143 143 

MerchantvUle 42 176 38 37 40 175 175 176 

Pensauken— 1st Dist 38 233 34 37 37 233 233 233 

2d Dist 27 147 25 24 25 148 147 147 

Stockton-lst Ward 123 145 20 114 114 136 141 135 

2d Ward 132 203 121 118 122 198 199 198 

3d Ward 76 359 65 57 61 344 354 347 

331 707 206 289 297 678 694 680 

Waterford 109 195 106 104 103 191 193 190 

Winslow 59 127 59 60 60 126 125 125 

4195 11396 3750 3838 3939 11166 11194 11043 

Majority in county 7201 

For Congress— Gilbert, Pro., 552 ; Wilcox, People's, 139 ; Kreck, Social- 
Labor, 124. For Assembly— Haven, Nat. Pro. and Ind. Citz., 1217 ; French, 
Nat. Pro., 577 ; Lippincott, Nat. Pro., 578 ; Watson, Tnd. Citz., 1224 ; Tucker, 
Ind. Citz., 615 ; Lorang, Social-Labor, 124 ; Rohner, Social-Labor, 138 ; Kohn, 
Social-Labor, 131 ; Lotier, Populist, 117 ; Hart, Populist, 119 ; Horner, 
Populist, 113. 



834 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Cape May County. 



SS "SS* ^u .SO) x a, 



53? 



^a grt £&; -gfi SK :=s sp Is 

Anglesea 21 30 1 15 38 16 37 

Avalon 8 26 7 27 8 26 

CapeMayCity 205 229 29 239 197 25 208 226 

Cape May Point 7 18 7 17 7 18 

Dennis— 1st Preo 117 108 2 122 109 2 118 112 

2cl Prec 80 107 14 85 108 14 69 123 

Holly Beach 24 37 22 38 22 39 

Lower 121 152 7 127 145 6 122 150 

Middle-lst Dist.. 126 204 14 117 225 12 127 212 

2d Dist 119 130 6 116 134 4 118 131 

Ocean City 36 111 21 35 112 21 34 112 

Sea Isle City 5? 71 2 53 71 2 51 72 

Upper 65 247 15 68 247 15 71 245 

West Cape Mav 51 94 15 70 78 14 50 94 

South Cape May 1 14 4 11 1 14 

1034 1578 126 1087 1557 115 1022 1611 

Majority in county 544 470 589 

For Congress— Wilcox, People's, 72: K reck, Social-Labor, 6. For Sen- 
ate— Townsend, People's, 54. For Assembly— Smith, Pro., 126 ; Van Gilder, 
People's, 58. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 335 

Cumberland County. 

Con-. Ass'v. 



P 



- ^ a 



.e. .. IS ag fi i& p fo |d 

^., , ifi srt i§AH sp |fi §« .Sp^ ip^ a,s^ 

Bridgeton- P^h^O^O^^^O 

1st Ward, 1st Free 105 158 22 106 107 154 151 25 22 

1st Ward, 2d Free 107 208 26 108 111 209 192 33 26 

2d Ward, 1st Free 50 145 7 56 57 146 142 10 8 

2d Ward, 2d Free 35 159 15 39 39 162 160 14 15 

3d Ward, 1st Free 94 213 28 89 95 213 205 38 28 

3d Ward, 2d Free 68 150 24 66 66 143 136 41 27 

4th Ward, 1st Free 80 198 28 78 79 188 178 33 32 

4th Ward, 2d Free 52 123 14 52 55 124 117 17 15 

591 1354 164 594 609 1339 1281 211 173 

Commercial— 1st Dist 28 196 18 29 24 198 198 18 18 

2d Dist 21 92 5 23 7 89 90 .... 5 

Deerfield— 1st Dist 132 61 8 137 137 55 60 8 8 

2d Dist 41 104 7 42 41 105 107 7 7 

Downe-lst Dist 50 66 11 47 56 60 65 11 11 

2d Dist 26 91 25 26 26 91 92 25 24 

Fairfield 54 119 31 54 55 119 115 31 30 

Greenwich 41 144 11 41 41 143 140 11 12 

Hopewell 114 162 26 123 117 161 154 27 26 

Landis-lst Dist 19 33 10 19 19 33 33 11 11 

2d Dist. 26 90 23 27 26 90 90 22 22 

3d Dist 46 72 26 44 44 74 74 27 27 

4th Dist 24 64 10 25 25 64 63 9 9 

115 259 69 115 114 261 260 69 69 

Lawrence 65 110 47 66 67 109 107 48 48 

Maurice River— 1st Dist.. 17 83 6 16 16 84 82 6 5 

2d Dist.. 92 124 3 95 94 124 124 3 3 

Millville- 

1st Ward, 1st Dist 65 195 9 62 61 197 193 8 10 

1st Ward, 2d Dist 54 171 12 50 50 172 172 12 12 

2d Ward 58 291 26 56 49 283 296 25 29 

3d Ward, 1st Dist 88 165 11 86 86 163 164 12 13 

3d Ward, 2d Dist 74 114 6 73 72 114 114 6 6 

4th Ward 80 308 20 74 78 301 304 20 20 

419 1244 84 401 396 1230 1243 83 90 

Stoe Creelr 41 88 15 44 42 86 84 15 15 

Vineland— 1st Dist 55 136 35 57 56 142 142 31 31 

2d Dist 74 186 32 72 72 192 192 34 34 

1976 4619 597 1982 1970 4588 4536 638 609 

Majority in county.... 2643 

For Congress— Wilcox, People's, 1077; Krecl?:, Social-Labor, 37; For 

Assembly— Banaclough, Feople's, 1002 ; Zimmerman, People's, 1032. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



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341 



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343 



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349 






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I CO re X K /- X t? 1^ '/. X tB 



jr? <'<.««'f,<«'^,< 



i-lCICO-rU3i:Ot^aCC-. 1-II- — i-lrHrHi-lrHi-l 

o: to X ■/; X X 7G X cc X X x x x x ai M .2 



352 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'iJaqiOAV «"-' ^ =^ " < 



"5 ?':i£3£:~"'"«o»~aoo-. ccvoc". ''J 









|»SSIg"--2?:sK2ggi§ 

i, "-I "-I f-i « C^ --I 1-1 i-l .-I r-( ^ 1-1 



3 


Is 


§ 


1 


li 


i 


lO 


1 » 


^ 


P 


i« 


s 


«»• 


1 1, 


<M 


i 


'1 


s 


i 


g 


§ 


w 


s 




i 


1 


§ 


i 




i 



o I 

GQ 

'a 
W 



•SgSs;1lili^S'-^g || |gi||5g||gsg^|| II IS 



JBlUg 

'ijBuosj.iaH 



'jtaSina: 



' t> I S5 OS 'T 



e-J ec c-iic cc « •^ 5C •^ rt CI • 



I? IK 



"davr O5£JS!S«>u5iM»-H00ifflaST». i^ ^. t^ a a:. =■ 



'sa9Aa;s SJ^^iegMc^;:;;^;^ 



lecciNC^MM ?i 



^^ft_ ^gii§i«S2gggS 









j5 "CUSUSUSl-IUsSSuSloSSiS 



jL X p Z, i, 0/ 



ir: -r- j: -^ r. r. -£ -j^ ■£ T. X zc T. 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



353 






'ujoqz^n^ 






M rH r^ -H CICJ ■ 



•dan g^SSStgf^^Sgli?^ 

' i)jbuo9t: ^ ^"^ ^ ^ -^ -" ^ ^ ^' ^' ^ ^ 



».. WW"- - _-.«>ooeoooeo05 cc 



cr. floco t^iOOeo «s a>oc CO CD CO O cc o 
?- e-1 CI ec M « eo M eo C-1 CO f 1 c-1 iM M c^ 



S 8 



■jf '35tqoa 



•daa: 






1 e^ ec iM M 



O «1 OO -^ OOIM •* «C — « CO w^ XCO © 

00 C'l c-1 so CI eo CO CO eo CI e<5 e-1 CI e^i ec c^ 

•^ t~cCiraco;D--ci'*cO'<J'iOCiOt-© 

S eoocSaoci^to-eccctoooeo© 



'aj8X 



Irt^rH^l-HdCI'Tl 



'©t^C105©0>0©MU5© 



: ? ':? I- P SS S £ 



T OS t~. t- 05 'S" 1-1 e<i 05 eo oo © 05 '* 

■dan tJldOSlOlftCOOOCOCiJ-CJlCCO 
. j-^,-^ 0»OCl©t^«0!0!<l'J't-»©05 

•de^i g2SsSSgE:?§|2SSS 
'.laqiuo ^ ^"" ^ " ^ '^ ^ ^' ^' ^ ^ " 

T _ r^ Tf © CO uo "5 -^ «o 00 l> o -< CO 

•daVT t^«'©U3irairiQ0TO3"T'^l>-t^ 

'.UBqSilotia cc,c,-----^-c,c^- 



ci c5 « CI M ec eo eo CI eo ct ci CI CO c» 
d 

©oor^cct^c^'^'*'''S5meoC3©22 
, cc©^^Oi'^^«C'^^ccQOCoooeo© 

So cicieccicococoeccieociciciccci 
I CJ 

ijq t^t^siftt^deoawcoLCCjcjcc© 
e^ eo©;H--ooci'T«o — cocDcoooM© 



11! 



CI CI eo CI ec CO CO CO C5 eo CI CI CI eo CI \ ^ 

S MOoSSStT CC — COOOMOOCOOS jO 

§ CI S M CI 5b ec CO CO CI CO CI CI CJ CO rt e^ 



05 © 00 CO lo lo 00 C5 '^ c<i cj lO 55 05 o -:< 
S •»r©©.-i©i-(cocc^coi>cit^'«>;© 
00 dcieOdcococococieociOCieoCJ 



i-'©«>cie<9©©rfcot^cic 



'aann^ ' 



cioo5;«0'i<2:io--co^r-;io( 



'Tnan; i_|.«<cio5u3eoeo©^t'»^oo ic 



_ ©co-«<ci«"«Deoiocooocj;T'i;^ug 

/^ eo^©^HCO^HCOiO-^cit^dcDCi05 

^ C1NMCICOCOCOeOC1COClC5C»COrH 
C^ 

;O'ViO'ra0Tf<eo©int>io>-i^i^co 



t->r:^eoU5eoO5Ni/5've0©U5 

'ja^ojiueija '^ 



§2© ^ tt5"5-4<OD-J'eo©U5r-iOrl|£i£eO 

O d ^rHrlrt-^.-ll-ICJ'Hi-lrH^^'-" 






r-JcieO'VC«Dt-OD! 



! CC X X X '/: K 



^ i!o lO lO lO K ICiO IC U3 lO >o "5 >o 



dddcidddooduo 



,l;c5coTrS«5t^cooi^'-i'-''-i»-i'-< 

g p fi g g g p 5 p 5 p 'm p r c 
'^ "^ S S S S 2 2' 2 2 2 2' 2 2 2 

CC«oSeO«OCcSS«C5C«0«C5C«0'» 



s fe 



354 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



(D 

.9 
o 

o ^ 

o ' 

W 



•tuaa 

'A\OISJ'Bd: 

•raari 

•raaa : 

•xiiaa ! 
'^aa99MS ' 

•raaa ; 
'jjaqio^ < 

•uiaa 

•uiaa 
'qooBj" 

•mecE 

•qBi-'oos 
pne -ooj 
'UBqosjjeH 



•OJJ 

'jaSjne: 



M OO t^ 



9,'-l7'.-Z £ S«;a:a= 



O eoS5 — ( 



O 05 c: Oi c» 



O O C5 O 03 

CO .-I CO xi :c 
C5 « rt rt rj 






— eo M U3 

e^ 1-c M M 



!2S£ «> OOCUJ! 



—I MCJ lO 



<-l -^ T cc 



o eq b»oc X 

eo ^ CO lO «D 

03 eo M rt H 



•daa: fe:§2S 



'saoAajs " 



C5 00 C5 Ci 
O M M rH 



sJ :; cS c3 



llll 



05 — CI -r © US 5 
00 -. ?l (N c1 CI S 



00 •* r^ i/D cc ;o t- oo 
^ iooo^oaou3-H 
la i-iNMeOi-iNOS 



u5 c<5 t^ r^ -r CO o !-» 

iM U5oo-roac<c" 
us .-I f J M ec rt M 



(cici^ci^ ;- 



r; « 1.': . 



S2SSS? S£ -£'r=t-r:'« ^ 



I w ;c c-i t^ ;c 00 

! OCT OOO U5 — 

1 C-l *» SO ^ M eo 



11 



ic CO eo us 33 00 •«■ 

us 00 T O 00 U3C» 

>-i M M CO 1-c ci eo 



CJ »c t^ •^ us 



-; US eo 00 t^ 03 
>ao^ ©oo-r -H 
I c) N ec FH e<l CO 



M Mr^-reoususeo 
M lox-rooousc^ 

us "-1 r< CJ eo -^ s-1 eo 



5C 00 00 W t-~ I 



US 1-1 S-1 rt us 



00 C5 00 lift U5eO!Ct^--MI 

03'>iTj> It^ uss;'«'5503r~i 

F^IlrH I us «C<IHM.-I(M{ 



111 



y o o o o o « 

O) O QJ 4> O 4) O! 

ti -I Si t< t< 1< tn 



^cS S S :; S =3 c3 



t^ -^NCIrtC)^ — 



«0 05 t^ ^ 5V f 1 O 
« OCieot-^us 



C". C3 00 o r^ eo 33 






i-C -^ -- © 00 Ci 



d o aj ffl Qj ® 
r^ r5 M ? 5 S 



eo ec eo eo CO CO eo 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



355 



dan: ! 
's^piao 



•r,§ S 



•dan: S;?g< 



•day; : 
'pjBuoaT: 



> © lo us I ta c: o >o 
>eooO CO ooeoo 



0CU50CM "«< SS52 
OCOOlO ■«' ws'so 
CI rH 1-1 lO 1-1 M i-H 



t^ OS^00t-|«0'*O' 



rr 1-1 l« i-c CO U5 O © 
OO lOOOJOOiO — l^ 



5gS§? 



lO ■^ CO t-os ©c 
to •V COMlOOOt 



© N USiO OS 50 ' 
c-1 ■v |> to r- 05 1 



J/5 c^ooifi'^'^cs"* |M ioi/scici«e«o 



isss 



■«j< <c N e<i t» • 



to I © 






•dan S^^i: 



•daa: I 

'a^reaa 



•daa Sj^j:? 
'.laqotios '^ ' 

'.weipuYSK ^ ' 

•da^ S;?^:? 
' jaqnjo '^ ' 



sl-IISs^s 



g|i| lisil 






I> 10©CJC1C10©«3 



IC 05 Tl o © 



© C5 OC lO© jp 



«0 •<T©©CClOOCO 
113 r-l rt 1-1 rl CI d 



to <Mm_li«'QOU5'^ 

1^ iooc500ic©r~ 

Iffl THt-l i-lr-tdCl 



I^ U5©05«)''5©^ 



^ toTO toooM eg 



-■= ?? 



CI t^ ( 



35© ej 



Id I 115 © to 05 



1-1 I lO i-lWrH 

00 © ■^ 



TT © So oc lo © t 



£; ©ciis© 1*5. » 

lO i-(r-l rH I lO 1-1 



CI CI 

©ooc^ 



-nr>T?Ta- C1"|u3 ^^ rH|uSr-INrH|lCr-.rH i-li-lCI 

U5-H"e<5 



'.V\'BqS5[0Bia 



•dan 
'jaiin^ 



C5CI C5 © e^ 



i-( iH lO >-< 5^ 1-1 I "3 



'jeqsil *^ - -' ' 



© c5^i^<N|a>'-<e'' 



IS 



1-1 U5 -J ■T' t^ © © 
1C©©CC JOJ-^ 



■* M U? M CI »»• N 

lO •v to eo to 00 CO 
to eo us to "S" US eo 

eo cotot^^^**^ 
to TT ©eo toooeo 



M eous'0©'«'us iCi I© 
t^ TTtOMtOCOCC CJ © 



CO octe©oi--e<i leis lus 
S ©cinrooeous eo eo 



•tnaa 
'janosinaiia 



us© to© 



^ © 00 -^ 00 -- CI 
to © CJ 1— ' © »'? CI 
rt d CI CO r-i d e<s 



r-i CO us aoc» c 



lie 



I 'C'p'C' 

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O) S o 

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?:^^ 



a a) G) 0) 3^ Hi a> 

■-I t^ -^ U f-l U U 

Ah P^ P^ A^ (^ Cm Ph 

7j ^ "C ->J *^ *J -^ 

1-1 CI CO ir US © J> 

$$>$$$$ 
CO CO CO CO CO eo CO 



O « O O U i 

<u o) o) aj O) 1^ 

tH b (4 ^ ^ ^ 

p^ Ph PL| P-i CM pL| 



^^^^^^ 



856 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•nr-i/T » «o -H eo 
UI3(I 00 eo t> r^ 



M U2 00 0< 



00C<5 OS ' 



•raafE ES?gSlg?JS|S 






lO C-) rH CO CI HC<) f 



J5 S?5ti = 



i^-^tj. QCMcoJ^ «c Clio r^oscoi^oo 






en c-1 M 

IS S Sg 

I C5 CI M 

00 o; ooS 

C-. "5 eo lO 

OO 05 t>.t>. 



O "T O 5C CI lO 
00 05 T CI O -H 

rt « M rt „ CI 



t" CI V L5 O TJ" 

l^OSCOCI O'- 
rt M CI « -^ CI 






■ M O -i rt us I •.Jt 



a 

O J- 

I i 

s ^ 

o I 






* *^cT 



'qooBf 
caaci 



s?j;2 ^ 



! Meo U5 I C5 



put? s.aidoa J -^ «> 



lO CI rt I ec ci M CI . 



OS CI 

00 -r 



eo ic 



. C4 rt i-c CI 



t? i" ^ !» — "= 



i 



•0.1 J ^'"'^gj 


M M 


1 t- TM-CI 


M \ 

1 « -H 


eo 


N 

1 " 


TCO 


:ci 




M 

o 


M 


j^sjua 




1 














1- 



Jf aBA\aOI\[ -leor-.^ |^rt„ |eoNr-,rtC^ |ooc^ 
'SneAr>JS ^■^ -Hlus'Hcqlcoeoc^ciSISS 



'^S^C^OSCl |C5 Igeo 



cceseoci < 



CO tn so 00 



I 



I i 

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■5 fc- V, t, ^ J; C 
O S3 ci ci c3 03 a 

jT « .-1 d d e<s e<3 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



357 



•dan ^gg£;2 
'Sipjao"""^ 


JD 


IS 


i 


S2^§ 


i 


Si 


^S 


|2 


l2|2^i 


•day: SSSoS;^ 
'ujoqz;njsl '^"^■^ 


2 


^i> 


1 


IS2| 


g 


8 


S| 


\B 


IliSSI 


•den Sgg?; 


U5 


^2 


i 


gll^ 


i2 


1 


gs 


1- 


i2iS^S 


•daa: ^gfeS 

'jr'sjiqoa^''"^' 


1 


Si 


i 


■«J<05lO-- 


g 


1 


-1 


2 


i2iaS2 


■^^» Sill 


gg 


?22 


i 


^sii 


S 


1 


;^o 


2 


eooto^c^-* 


'jjex"**^^ 


^ 


"^ 


c^ 


IM 1-1 i-( c^l 


*~ 




^ 






s 


K2 


i 


isiS 


i 


o 

CI 


s| 


2 


ssisss 


•d8H ^|S;S 

'jsqoqos'""'"'^ 


2 


^2 


i 


III! 


g 


1 


s§ 


1 


8ssS=S 




1 


^00 


1 


im 


t^ 


i 


So 


2 


SsSS3s 


•d9a J^Sgfe^'^ 


2 


SI 


i 


TfoOON 




i 


S| 


2 


§25==2 


'.uBqsjioBia: '^ «■ « ^ 


1 


U3O0 
I>i-( 


1 


i32;^ 


^ 


o 

CI 


Sl 




§35=23 


'aaiin^ '^ " '^ -* 


2 


ss 


N 


i^2i 


i 


S2 


S| 


2 


SsiiSs 


•m9a £5^gf2 


i 


Is 


fe 


^gii 


2 


i 


^^^ 


i 


sslllS 




g 


l2 


1 


osMe<ih- 

S?5^T2 


i 


1 


^'^ 


1 


eSiSIS 






«« 



fiflpfl 



II 


7 


1 


a 




o 


t^ 


s 

p 






to «} 






CO tc a: 03 03 03 



t;^ 


1 




■c 


03"0"SE 


-c 




?^ 


-^l 






''i 




^ 










^ 


or 


^ 




2 




Kp 


► 


^ ' K 


^ 


c 






1' 








1 


p 


rn 


'C'O'O'^S 


P 






eo 



358 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



LUOU. TT. ec 00 »^ o •"J- OS -H 

AauaaAvs ocKMr-i-H^rtcceo 






a 

S3 

o 
D 

PI 
o 
m 






joq^i -oog 
'1193 



•s.aidoad: 



c N .-1 -- — rJ 



•OJ J CJ-^-r«>9"-H(N 

Xpanuax 






© 1 t- 

ce in 

2 Is 



2 I *~ 



I '^ -^ u u u '^ ^ !^ e o 

P - x: - 



X' 



pq 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



859 



•day: S 






"Cla^J ^ r^ eo 05 i-i C-liO O 



ciaa; o j> «) 05 1^ <M ic o 
' p junoaT: '^ <^ =^ ci <m ^ im 

•daa 
'•jf 'asiqoa 

■daa 
'jjax 

•daa 
'a5li8JG[ 



daa 2f2§5gS?^S 






Cia'JJ ^t~C005l^'MUiO 

'A\ajpnvoj\[ *= ^1 «> iM t^i ^ e-1 

•day; ISSSiS^Sg 
'jaqnjo'^^'^ cci^^ 

aay; ^ i^ «> os r- c^i >ra o 
'M-BqsJio^ia: '^'^'^ CI M rt (M 

•rT^'XT «0'-t>rtair-IC5 0U3 
U'Sy. t^r^Oooco— '50.-I 
' Tairn T CIC-I ec N C-1 >- CI 



•TTTan- 0'i"M<»0>©5Coo 



•maa SmSi 



I 'ja^}05[uai.ia ' 



M tc cc cc 



-C ■? 'C -p "p -3 T3 ' 



:^^P^^^^ 






^8 






> 



>^ a •' 

to 0) '"' y 

o m" 
QO! a-- 
" ao 
• ' ■ ' o « 

eo J-; ky( - < 
tS >«" 

be -"^ 

.- ^ >> 

a"Sse 

cqS .- - 
2-2 = 

1 s ^ •- 

•^ fr-CI 

d -'H _ 

HCO U 
t£ CO «o « 

"2 9S & 



360 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Gloucester County. 



Cox. 







^ 




<» 


.5 


b 






tn 




is 


h 


u 


II 


J 

P 


is 


u 


IS 


Si 




Ph 


1^ 


C 


P- 


W 


QQ 


CO 


o 


o 


Clayton 


118 


311 


17 


1 




115 


313 


16 


1 


Deptford 


80 


184 


11 


7 


1 


79 


187 


11 


7 


East Greenwich 


86 


158 


14 


5 


1 


85 


l.SS 


13 


5 


Elk 


86 


101 


7 


1 




86 


105 


7 


1 


Franklin 


183 


166 


2S 


22 


1 


186 


162 


27 


22 


Glassboro-lst Dlst.... 


97 


187 


23 


1 




71 


217 


19 


1 


2d Dist.... 


106 


125 


11 


3 




91 


141 


11 


3 


Greenwich 


189 


274 


14 


9 


2 


194 


269 


16 


8 


Harrison 


106 


247 


12 


6 




107 


248 


10 


6 


Logan 


142 


111 


11 


7 


3 


141 


112 


11 


7 


Mantua 


208 


227 


10 


4 


1 


205 


227 


10 


4 


Monroe 


165 


276 


12 


28 




145 


287 


13 


32 


South Harrison 


.... 33 


109 


13 


7 




32 


112 


12 


7 


Washington 


109 


l.SO 


4 


3 




110 


128 


5 


3 


West Deptford 


80 


191 




1 




77 


194 


7 


1 


Wenonah 


16 


63 


12 


1 




15 


65 


10 


1 


Woodbury— 




















1st Ward 


43 


131 


8 


3 




43 


131 


8 


3 


2d Ward 


89 


224 


9 


5 




90 


226 


10 


3 


3d Ward 


101 


151 


11 


6 


1 


98 


155 


11 


5 




233 


506 


28 


14 


1 


231 


512 


29 


11 


Woolwich 


114 


280 


10 


46 




110 


280 


10 


46 




2151 


3649 


242 


166 


10 


2080 


3717 


237 


166 



Majority in countj'. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 361 
Hunterdon County. 

—Con.— —Sen.— Ass'y. 

"^ r^ y~ r^ 

.2c3 S-a ^'C 2ft gS ga -^a g.ft 

g(D ^oi j-O) ajoi 5'!' Si) ii<i' B"^ 

gfl 5m 9fi !« |fl ftfl grt gp^ 

OP-(McCO*'1Ph'^ 

Alexandria 197 69 199 62 147 199 114 64 

Bethlehem— East Dist 127 109 122 113 124 125 105 111 

WestDist 168 66 160 70 166 165 68 69 

Clinton, Town of 86 115 87 115 74 87 126 118 

Clinton Township 209 168 223 152 207 213 162 168 

Delaware-North Dist 221 113 218 115 204 217 127 119 

Pouth Dist 185 138 154 165 132 155 183 165 

EastAmwell 163 157 165 162 152 162 175 164 

Franklin 165 112 142 132 130 157 141 113 

Frenchiown 144 126 126 136 77 134 190 135 

High Bridge 158 282 160 264 150 157 269 304 

Holland 199 212 211 187 181 198 226 214 

Kingwood 186 130 181 130 142 183 157 130 

Lambertvllle— 

1st Ward.. 214 92 107 196 132 202 174 99 

2d Ward 141 151 124 164 116 142 175 152 

3d Ward 187 253 197 239 157 191 283 252 

512 496 428 599 405 535 632 503 

Lebanon-East Dist 89 77 94 68 101 100 65 66 

WestDist 163 135 134 166 142 135 158 170 

Raritan-East Dist 216 221 189 247 204 213 229 224 

WestDist 229 251 197 299 234 238 252 248 

Readington-North Dist. 172 195 161 197 166 172 197 197 

South Dist 103 129 94 132 108 110 135 136 

Tewksbury-East Dist 146 86 152 79 141 146 93 89 

WestDist 112 95 113 92 94 111 94 119 

Union 145 77 148 73 145 149 78 75 

West Amwell 91 73 92 71 84 90 79 74 

4216 3632 3950 3826 3710 4151 4055 3775 

Majority in county 584 124 

For Congress— Ramsey, Pro., 459 ; Barrick, People's, 160. For Senate- 
Sherman, Pro., 437 ; Foster, People's, 153. For Assembly— Pro., Warne, 
449 ; Tritts, 447 ; People's, Holcombe, 140 ; Anderson, 128. 

16 



362 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Mercer County. 

^- A '^ • ^ -^ ' -■ — -<* ^ . s-" . - . 

*c '-s< *^c *'" S'S "a i'C —a 

= c "Co ><xi -^0/ feo £o "30- Ca> 

|;; Ss cp gp |p =^ =^ -^ 

East Windsor— North Dist 81 210 90 74 79 219 203 204 

South JMst 102 204 105 95 99 215 200 202 

Ewing 125 295 126 129 131 286 288 291 

Hamilton— North Dist 50 231 55 50 50 221 226 227 

8outli Dist 73 178 74 75 73 177 176 174 

West Dist 61 230 60 62 64 230 224 234 

184 639 186 187 187 628 626 635 

Hopewell-CentralDist 131 228 141 158 140 214 217 227 

East Dist 196 214 204 213 212 218 199 208 

West Dist 57 157 57 66 58 151 153 156 

384 599 402 437 410 583 569 591 

Lawrence 76 199 80 75 79 200 197 201 

Princeton— 1st Dist 133 2f9 128 130 126 303 290 290 

2d Dist 172 342 172 162 170 344 337 335 

Trenton— 

1st Ward, 1st Dist 104 257 103 104 116 254 249 251 

1st Ward, 2d Dist 64 203 64 66 67 204 197 204 

1st Ward, 3d Dist 133 246 135 133 141 239 235 247 

301 706 302 303 324 697 681 702 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 127 233 128 124 131 233 228 229 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 120 310 121 122 130 302 298 307 

247 543 249 246 261 535 526 536 

3d Ward, 1st Dist 106 205 107 107 114 203 200 205 

3d Ward, 2d Dist 80 240 85 81 92 236 228 233 

3d Ward, 3d Dist 128 118 132 129 134 117 111 118 

3d Ward, 4tli Dist 99 99 100 99 102 97 98 92 

3d Ward, 5th Dist 158 160 153 155 156 160 158 159 

571 822 577 571 598 818 795 807 

4th Ward, 1st Dist 152 193 149 149 164 193 192 186 

4th Ward, 2d Dist 174 156 169 175 188 155 153 148 

4th Ward, 3d Dist 137 129 136 137 136 128 128 128 

463 478 454 461 488 476 473 462 

5th Ward, 1st Dist 100 189 103 103 101 188 185 187 

5th Ward, 2d Dist 100 284 97 98 103 283 277 283 

5th Ward, 3d Dist 112 141 111 111 111 142 137 142 

5th Ward, 4th Dist 122 183 123 124 124 185 182 186 

434 797 434 436 439 798 781 798 

6th Ward, 1st Dist 116 193 115 116 122 191 191 192 

6th Ward, 2d Dist 141 123 143 140 150 121 116 119 

257 316 258 256 272 312 307 311 



ELECTION RETURNS, 
Mercer County— Continued. 

— Con.— 



Trenton— ^ 

7th Ward, 1st Dist 212 

7th Ward, 2d Dist 141 

7th Ward, 3d Dist. 181 

7th Ward, 4th Dist 148 

7th Ward, 5th Dist 119 





S?^ 


oTfl 


"3 3 






5 ^ 


^.A 


Sa 


la 


OH 


r« 


^s 


u 


O 


o 


fl 


w 


!^ 


o 


W 


221 


214 


212 


213 


217 


217 


217 


170 


140 


140 


140 


170 


171 


169 


251 


179 


180 


185 


249 


247 


249 


320 


150 


154 


160 


318 


309 


316 


170 


119 


119 


123 


169 


167 


169 



1132 802 805 821 1123 1111 1120 



8th Ward, 1st Dist 135 227 134 135 138 226 223 224 

8th Ward, 2d Dist 96 160 95 96 96 160 160 160 



231 387 229 231 234 386 283 284 

9th Ward, 1st Dist 82 246 83 83 86 243 243 241 

9th Ward, 2d Dist 101 231 102 102 110 232 222 226 

9th Ward, 3d Disr 146 

9th Ward. 4th Dist 



. 146 
. 50 


207 
139 


147 
50 


148 
51 


147 
54 


206 
136 


204 
134 


206 
141 


379 


823 


382 


384 


397 


817 


803 


814 


. 104 
123 


414 
255 


103 
123 


100 
124 


112 
125 


413 
254 


405 
248 


411 
254 



10th Ward, 1st Dist 

10th Ward, 2d Dist 123 

227 669 226 224 237 667 653 665 

11th Ward, 1st Dist. 133 257 134 134 141 256 248 251 

nth Ward, 2d Dist 114 228 114 114 116 227 222 225 

nth Ward, 3d Dist 136 185 136 136 137 184 184 184 

383 670 384 384 394 667 654 660 

4297 4301 4465 7296 7167 7259 

Washington Ill 151 119 111 111 138 148 150 

West Windsor 152 196 182 153 154 173 189 195 

5814 10467 5887 5854 6011 10385 10214 10353 

Majority in county 4653 

For Congress- Joslin, Pro., 396; Ellis, People's, 386. For Assembl}'- 
Pro., Pullen,380; Brown, 414; Muirheid, 388 ; People's, Carter, 373 ; Apple, 
390; Fagan, 371. 



864 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Middlesex County. 

—Con.— —Sen.— Ass'y.— 









ii 


P 




¥ 


eS 


Is 


11 


si 




11 








o 


w 


> 


w 


w 


w 


6 


h 


w 


CO 


Cranbury 






. 88 


257 


99 


243 


100 


99 


99 


242 


243 


242 


E. Brunswick- 


-1st Dist. 


. 225 


191 


231 


185 


237 


232 


228 


178 


183 


189 




2d 


Dist. 


. 178 


142 


166 


153 


179 


171 


187 


129 


140 


143 




3d 


iJist. 


. 131 


127 


134 


125 


133 


129 


131 


125 


127 


126 



534 460 531 463 549 532 546 432 450 458 

Madison 159 199 128 229 165 142 165 191 191 213 

Monroe-lst Dist 65 160 69 156 69 72 69 153 156 156 

2d Dist 141 192 146 186 147 140 147 185 186 191 

206 352 215 312 216 212 216 338 342 347 
New Brunswick— 

1st Ward, 1st Dist 165 128 164 127 165 165 167 125 130 125 

1st Ward, 2d Dist 120 186 120 177 121 113 121 183 195 187 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 257 335 261 329 263 261 266 329 337 328 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 123 248 130 230 126 117 123 241 249 242 

3d Ward 254 163 255 157 259 244 258 157 169 156 

4th Ward 87 149 103 125 91 86 90 141 149 140 

5th Ward, 1st Dist 229 397 255 371 245 240 247 376 388 383 

5th Ward, 2d Dist 227 416 248 390 236 229 234 416 427 414 

6th Ward, 1st Dist 345 255 371 227 353 369 351 237 246 241 

6th Ward, 2d Dist 277 227 295 214 287 289 282 224 221 224 

2084 2504 2202 2347 2146 2113 2139 2429 2511 2440 

North Brunswick 91 225 91 226 97 97 95 219 221 221 

Perth Amboy— 

1st Ward 105 226 107 221 121 107 107 212 223 223 

2d Ward 112 190 115 189 115 114 109 190 186 188 

3d Ward 136 236 139 232 139 138 138 233 232 231 

4th Ward 66 154 70 149 66 71 70 160 150 149 

5th Ward 127 114 129 111 130 133 131 113 107 109 

6th Ward 132 137 132 137 137 113 132 156 136 135 

678 1057 692 1039 708 676 687 1064 1034 1035 

Piscatawav— 1st Dist 93 206 95 203 93 95 92 201 204 206 

2d Dist 135 220 138 216 137 138 137 216 217 218 

228 426 233 419 230 233 229 417 421 424 

Raritan-lst Dist 224 315 240 298 2-34 223 233 300 314 301 

2d Dist 135 166 136 166 136 134 134 167 166 167 

359 481 376 464 370 357 367 467 480 468 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



365 



Middlesex County— Continued. 



— Cox.- 



-Sex.- 



1^ 




OS 
> 




11 


II 

w 


a d 




w 


P 


Sayreville 168 


243 


166 


245 


170 


166 


162 


240 


243 


248 


South Amboy— 1st Dist. 238 
2d Dist. 341 


236 
289 


254 
369 


221 

265 


248 
358 


247 
356 


241 
343 


216 
262 


215 
261 


231 
294 


579 


525 


623 


486 


606 


603 


584 


478 


476 


525 


S. Brunswick— 1st Dist. 124 
2d Dist.. 85 


194 
120 


133 
91 


184 
113 


129 

87 


127 

85 


133 
90 


189 
117 


191 
118 


190 
118 


209 


314 


224 


297 


216 


212 


223 


308 


309 


308 


Woodbridge— 1st Dist... 167 
2d Dist... 119 
3d Dist... 153 


229 
162 
56 


164 
115 

152 


231 
164 
57 


163 
115 
152 


164 
117 
153 


163 
113 
152 


230 
167 
57 


230 
163 
56 


228 
163 
57 


439 


447 


431 


452 


430 


434 


428 


454 


449 


448 



5822 7490 6011 7252 6003 5876 5940 7277 7370 7377 
Majority in county.. 1668 1241 

For Congress— Lanning, Pro., 205 ; Weigel, Soc.-Labor, 182 ; Merritt, People's 
286. For Senat^Hults, Pro., 215 ; Tice, People's, 326 ; Pyatt, Soc.-Labor, 172. 
For Assembly— Pro., Dunham, 221 ; Barclay, 221 ; De Forest, 223 ; People's 
Stelle, 263; Van Aken, 255; Delancy, 274; Soc.-Labor, Sands, 170: Larsen' 
166 ; Toft, 159. 

*16 



366 ELECTION RETURNS, 

Monmouth County. 

—Con.— . 



|i !£■ :SS oS "gi -St IS* vo 

•|p o?i «C oS o" ^^ *rt ^-J^ 

O W's:g p; a £ (» 

Atlantic 144 149 140 118 145 172 150 147 

Eatontown— 1st Dist 65 156 70 68 77 148 151 159 

2d Dist 117 133 121 124 125 126 126 133 

Freehold-lst Dist 242 165 239 212 244 188 156 167 

2d Dist 236 153 228 220 233 170 153 153 

3d Dist 268 232 260 220 265 284 218 228 

746 550 727 652 742 642 527 548 

Holmdel 142 91 146 147 150 84 86 87 

Howell-East Dist 210 144 209 215 210 142 139 155 

West Dist 121 123 123 120 118 127 117 120 

Manalapan 188 287 188 180 189 291 285 290 

Marlboro 227 179 235 217 239 178 172 167 

Matawan— 1st Dist 140 150 139 85 140 150 151 199 

2d Dist 151 146 156 130 156 143 143 157 

Middletown— 1st Dist 118 148 114 98 116 150 147 160 

2d Dist 235 280 233 224 236 281 280 286 

3d Dist 134 156 114 110 125 164 181 168 

4th Dist 74 61 74 73 84 60 66 52 

561 645 535 505 561 «655 674 666 

Millstone 181 180 183 177 184 179 178 177 

Neptune— 1st Dist 207 424 207 236 207 411 401 410 

2d Dist 204 376 203 235 202 364 348 365 

3d Dist 87 190 82 105 82 191 172 189 

4th Dist 169 266 168 190 168 266 248 265 

667 1256 660 766 659 1232 1169 1229 

Ocean— 1st Dist 128 123 127 115 127 121 129 127 

2d Dist 109 97 199 113 113 92 97 94 

3d Dist 210 242 201 201 214 241 253 243 

4th Dist 124 236 126 133 131 217 233 226 

5th Dist 204 217 206 190 212 207 225 213 

6th Dist 162 189 162 159 167 182 192 185 

937 1104 931 911 964 1060 1129 1088 

Raritan— 1st Dist 216 239 225 209 240 219 216 224 

2d Dist 199 276 206 180 216 268 265 279 



ELECTION RETURNS. 367 

Monmouth County— Continued. 

—Con.— Ass'Y. 



*ai :;ai ;::a; 0*1 ^4* "S*" C** ^1^ 

•5P cp^ ,c;q ^« gp grt grt >>« 

Shrewsbury— W. Red B'k Dist, 60 109 60 48 69 103 102 123 

EastDist 166 154 156 165 180 137 138 194 

Middle Dist 119 260 111 117 156 233 243 268 

South Dist 114 185 106 115 150 156 168 200 

West Dist Ill 252 109 103 135 241 247 253 

570 960 542 548 690 870 898 1038 

Upper Freehold— 1st Dist 120 156 133 135 136 143 140 140 

2d Dist 120 193 118 115 119 200 194 193 

Wall— 1st Dist 199 179 212 222 224 155 174 161 

2d Dist 160 109 161 152 162 110 118 109 

Manasqua* Borough. .. 120 152 121 120 120 151 153 154 

479 440 494 494 506 416 445 424 

6301 7557 6281 6096 6566 7445 7355 7620 

Majority in county 1256 

For Congress— Lanning, Pro., 377 ; Merritt, People's, 76 ; Weigel, Soc- 
Lab., 49. For Assembly— Pro., Woodruff, 376; Edwards, 398; Wood- 
field, 379. 



368 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Morris County. 



-fi 5« |!^ SP gfi -^S S« sS ££ 

Boonton— East Dist 114 215 14 115 105 212 226 15 14 

WestDist 116 258 4 116 114 255 256 7 7 

Chatham— East Dist 112 208 6 110 112 207 209 8 6 

North Dist 177 194 7 183 191 191 181 8 8 

South Dist 147 222 5 15'J 159 217 213 5 4 

436 624 18 413 462 615 603 21 18 

Chester 248 105 15 213 241 115 106 16 16 

Hanover— North Dist 53 177 7 42 52 176 192 6 5 

South Dist 209 256 5 200 209 255 269 5 5 

Jefferson 97 166 11 93 92 171 169 11 II 

Mendham 148 165 27 150 148 159 157 31 31 

Montville 71 152 7 43 42 177 178 8 8 

Morris— East Dist 219 376 18 229 232 371 368 18 18 

North Dist 270 381 30 288 288 364 362 30 30 

South Dist 183 228 1 194 195 217 218 2 2 

West Dist 192 320 26 198 201 316 314 26 27 

864 1305 75 909 916 1268 1262 76 77 

Mount Olive 156 132 30 161 156 131 122 32 31 

Passaic 170 150 3 171 174 148 149 3 2 

Pequannock— Isl Dist 41 188 8 42 43 188 187 8 8 

2(1 Dist 109 263 13 114 111 2-59 258 13 13 

Randolph— Central Dist.. 121 217 46 120 120 216 214 45 49 

North Dist... 147 352 70 146 143 355 351 70 71 

South Dist... 166 147 24 166 169 145 145 24 25 

West Dist 61 96 30 58 54 99 95 30 30 

495 812 170 490 486 815 805 169 175 

Rockaway— North Dist... 108 173 8 113 113 166 166 9 9 

South Dist... 83 113 6 82 81 115 113 6 7 

WestDist.... 94 162 25 94 94 163 163 26 25 

CentralDist. 113 181 18 112 110 181 179 19 19 

398 629 57 401 398 625 621 60 60 

Koxbury— P.Morris Dist. 103 90 15 116 100 90 86 12 12 

Succasunna Dist. 179 149 10 173 147 181 149 11 11 

Bor. Mt. A 18 50 1 18 18 50 50 1 1 

300 289 26 307 265 321 285 24 24 

Washington— NorthDist. 84 84 10 87 88 81 81 12 11 

South Dist. 158 100 15 160 164 90 90 19 19 

4267 6070 515 4287 4266 6061 6016 536 535 

Majority in county... 1803 

For Congress— Barrlck, People's, 294. For Assembly— People's, Krah- 
mer, 305 ; Koseveer, 304. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 369 

Ocean County. 

Cox. Ass'y. 



la flft do ^^^ -ga 5J"a .So 

5P gp^ g&H Sc^ ^fl S« 3^ 

W O t? W W h^ Hi 

Beach Haven 16 39 2 16 37 3 

Berkeley 41 56 12 42 55 13 

Bay Head 13 21 3 22 12 3 

Brick— East Dist 61 117 8 105 65 9 

Middle Dist 20 111 3 42 83 3 

Island Heights 11 32 4 2 11 28 5 

Dover 113 314 7 4 127 292 10 

Eagleswood 20 82 6 1 21 79 7 

Jackson 134 88 6 3 151 72 6 

Lacey 25 100 5 5 27 92 7 

Lavallette 1 10 2 9 

Lakewood 125 244 14 6 170 195 17 

Little Egg Harbor 45 172 46 3 43 158 60 

Manchester 102 97 5 3 111 89 5 

Ocean 28 53 5 30 51 5 

Point Pleasant Beach 40 85 2 65 56 2 

Plurasted 83 197 6 1 84 197 7 

Stafford 45 121 10 4 42 117 13 

Union 41 151 10 3 41 151 10 



964 2090 154 35 1152 1838 185 
Majority in county.... 1126 686 



370 



ELECTION RETURNS. 
Passaic County. 



—Con. — —Sex. 





P 


u 


5fi 




= 2 


ll 


ll 


|| 


1^ 


ll 




ll 




Q 


TJl 


K* 


^^ 


S 


^'^ 


S 


ff 




w 


Acquackauonk 


. 171 


Ti% 


181 


265 


149 


163 


235 


163 


272 


245 


266 


240 


Little Falls 


. 155 


246 


157 


244 


154 


152 


218 


157 


234 


200 


237 


232 


Manchester— 1st Dist 


. 83 


258 


113 


239 


87 


86 


88 


87 


250 


248 


252 


251 


2d Dist 


. 49 


144 


62 


134 


51 


46 


63 


51 


142 


134 


145 


142 


Passaic City— 


























1st Ward, 1st Dist.. 


. 171 


248 


191 


228 


191 


153 


172 


139 


257 


223 


238 


278 


1st Ward, 2d Dist.. 


. 94 


82 


96 


80 


93 


83 


90 


50 


80 


78 


78 


121 


2d Ward, 1st Dist. 


. 70 


250 


67 


252 


61 


62 


78 


79 


250 


235 


245 


209 


2d Ward, 2d Dist.. 


. 46 


180 


47 


179 


52 


38 


44 


45 


186 


176 


177 


163 


3d Ward 


. 67 


304 


66 


304 


62 


63 


72 


99 


298 


289 


298 


268 


4th Ward, 1st Dist. 


. 168 


201 


176 


192 


173 


146 


162 


98 


196 


183 


196 


243 


4tli Ward, 2d Di.st.. 


. 88 


229 


90 


229 


81 


72 


86 


63 


231 


224 


228 


2.'?2 


Paterson 


704 


1494 


733 


1464 


713 


617 


704 


573 


1498 


1408 


1460 


1514 


1st Ward, 1st Dist.. 


. 108 


348 


117 


343 


120 


107 


109 


105 


348 


337 


344 


336 


l.st Ward, 2d Dist.. 


. 145 


405 


167 


393 


165 


143 


149 


146 


401 


392 


405 


391 


1st Ward, 3d Dist.. 


. 53 


337 


53 


335 


55 


52 


54 


52 


334 


336 


337 


330 




lol 


1090 


337 


1071 


"340 


302 


312 


303 


1083 


1065 


1086 


1057 


2d Ward, 1st Di.st.. 


97 


296 


110 


284 


108 


108 


101 


94 


282 


287 


288 


287 


2d Ward, 2d Dist.. 


74 


253 


81 


252 


88 


74 


72 


67 


251 


246 


250 


253 


2d Ward, 3d Dist.. 


145 


298 


145 


296 


176 


173 


129 


129 


286 


277 


286 


287 


2d Ward, 4th Dist.. 


204 


417 


208 


412 


217 


217 


187 


191 


405 


408 


415 


405 




520 


1264 


544 


1244 


589 


572 


489 


481 


1224 


1218 


1239 


1232 


3d Ward, 1st Dist.. 


117 


229 


122 


222 


139 


117 


117 


113 


219 


216 


227 


224 


3d Ward, 2d Dist.. 


122 


312 


140 


297 


147 


127 


131 


120 


306 


287 


314 


308 


3d Ward, 3d Dist.. 


175 


494 


177 


485 


251 


171 


186 


167 


472 


414 


484 


464 


3d Ward, 4th Dist.. 


111 


236 


106 


294 


147 


107 


110 


104 


279 


271 


283 


278 


3d Ward, 5th Dist.. 


172 


312 


181 


313 


206 


169 


168 


160 


310 


309 


330 


312 


3d Ward, 6th Dist.. 


102 


130 


135 


121 


121 


108 


113 


100 


123 


122 


126 


122 




799 


1763 


861 


1732 


1011 


799 


825 


764 


1709 


1619 


1764 


1708 


4th Ward, 1st Dist.. 


. 63 


194 


72 


190 


75 


66 


60 


54 


195 


181 


193 


188 


4th Ward, 2d Dist.. 


112 


272 


124 


260 


159 


116 


129 


110 


233 


243 


264 


260 


4th Ward, 3d Dist.. 


98 


384 


110 


371 


144 


107 


126 


96 


346 


346 


372 


376 


4th Ward, 4th Dist.. 


98 


282 


113 


262 


136 


102 


135 


99 


242 


245 


269 


268 


4th Ward, 5th Dist.. 


62 


314 


74 


302 


75 


65 


71 


63 


295 


300 


313 


305 


4th Ward, 6th Dist.. 


40 


199 


47 


193 


69 


41 


45 


36 


186 


182 


190 


200 




473 


i^ 


540 


1578 


658 


497 


566 


4.58 


1497 


1497 


1601 


1597 


5th Ward, 1st Dist.. 


167 


234 


193 


208 


222 


174 


192 


157 


196 


183 


217 


218 


5th Ward, 2d Dist.. 


137 


239 


162 


234 


202 


154 


158 


142 


230 


217 


230 


237 


5th Ward, 3d Di.st.. 


194 


123 


196 


116 


212 


194 


198 


175 


118 


108 


118 


133 


5th Ward, 4th Dist.. 


217 


279 


238 


256 


250 


211 


214 


177 


275 


269 


270 


282 



733 762 651 819 777 835 



ELECTION RETURNS. 371 

Passaic County— Continued. 



-Con. — -Sen. 



S . r P. 



Paterson— Con. P 



"^' ^* "^ ■'! ii ii II II II 11 li |i 

'aiersuii— vyuu. h c/^ f' "^ ^^^ '^ '^^_ ,„„ ,„. ,„„ ice i7i 

Sl;^:S;a'SS::;l^ JS j§ S II jS ^ 3 3 ^ 1' 1" 

332 327 368 295 401 342 374 336 277 280 286 301 

521 290 536 277 583 604 527 483 280 269 277 310 
8thWard,lstDi8t...21!4 146 236 148 ^2 ^2 g7 218 148 US 143 158 

1276 944 1298 924 1340 1279 1283 1124 J50 _880 _904 W45 
i^ 8198 5273 7935 5808 5028 5138 4600 7739 7605 7992 8120 

~-S'g|£r:: JS 1?, ?I IS II ,| J | jS ;1 i i 
^irMao^a:.:;::r.::;_^ _§ ^1 jS ^ T* J Jl JJ JSJ? J§ 

6410 11338 6861 10973 7324 6397 6821 5938 10804 10517 11067 11198 
Majority in county.. 4928 4112 

^ro?:kST!i^\riSiSf^??o-^w|?i24|°i5|r^^^ 

429 ; Forfar, 414 ; Soc.-Lab., Lees, 2312 ; White, 2330 ; Kennedy, 2585 ; Glaser, 2182. 



372 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Salem County. 



—Cox. 



"Si -§& |p Ig 

■^C %^ IS 5^ 

t^lpway 240 155 ^ 7 '' 4 

Elsinboro 67 49 3 9 

Lower Alloways Creek ii8 193 10 6 

Lower Penns Neck 190 170 7 5 

Manninj^ton 142 28'> 9 4 

Oldmaus 151 195 n 7 

Pilesgrove 138 243 6 4 

Borough of Elmer 141 115 ig 4 

Pittsgrove 203 144 9 28 

Borough of Pennsgrove 208 171 23 8 

Quinton 86 229 10 3 

Salem— 

East Ward, 1st Dist 100 151 10 11 

East Ward, 2d Dist 214 305 19 23 

West Ward, 1st Dist 144 144 13 ■>! 

Westward, 2d Dist 171 146 10 25 



IS 



|i S^S- vr2 
^- §« t^ 



240 153 

79 49 

119 196 

195 168 

142 283 

160 181 

134 251 



150 
209 



110 
140 



235 153 
85 231 



629 746 52 80 5 675 771 



Upper Penns Neck 127 67 4 

Borough of Woodstown 104 227 24 

Upper Pittsgrove 182 239 21 



Majority in county. 



2726 3220 214 
494 



16 2859 3209 
350 



1 108 156 7 

1 225 313 18 

3 158 150 10 

••• 184 152 9 



44 



••• 140 57 3 
- 109 232 21 
1 187 234 26 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



373 



Somerset County. 



—Cox. 



-Ass'v, 



w 5> 



" . a t^ ' 



C5 W 

Bedminster 220 128 

Bernards— 1st Dist 179 120 

2d Dist 104 57 

Branchburg. 100 153 

Bridgewater— 1st Dist 204 317 

2d Dist 120 312 

3d Dist 121 104 

4th Dist 150 326 

5th Dist 112 199 

6th Dist 51 48 



s g 

12 
12 



fcC 



^^ ^' 



2S 
5« 
Hi 
223 
182 
106 
104 

219 
134 
129 
157 
120 
52 



124 
118 
55 

148 

307 
312 
96 
321 
195 



Majority in county. 



2304 3356 211 
1052 



50 34 2409 3291 







758 


1306 


81 


27 


13 


811 


1279 


71 


Fi'anklin 1st Dist 




77 


130 
172 
127 


4 
19 
4 


4 

2 
2 


1 
1 


82 
97 
104 


126 
183 
125 


4 


2d Dist 

3d Dist 




... 100 
... 102 


13 
4 






279 


429 


0- 


8 


4 


283 


434 


21 


Hillsboro— 1st Dist 

2d Dist 

Montgomery 

North Plalnfield— 1st Dist 

2d Dist 

Warren 


... 130 
... 94 
.... 107 
... 124 
.... 102 
... 107 


169 

207 
202 
283 

218 
84 


5 
7 
9 
17 
12 
3 


2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
3 


1 
1 

4 
3 


152 
106 
115 
127 
97 
103 


148 
195 
196 
280 
225 
89 


3 
6 
8 
17 
11 
3 



374 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Sussex County. 



-Con 



Aiidover 120 92 

Deckertown 74 156 

Byram 104 155 

Frankford 182 169 

Green 85 74 

Hampton 103 87 

Hardyston 238 272 

Lafayette 85 111 

Montague 89 87 

Newton— 1st Dist 119 233 

2d Dist 238 210 



Sandyston 175' 

Sparta 208 

Stillwater 167 

Vernon 117 

Wallpack 94 

Wantage -East Dist 197 

West Dist 96 



S o 

1^ 

20 
22 
13 
15 



413 

84 
256 
119 
185 

24 
114 
100 



.a 

120 
88 
74 

174 



6 110 
12 232 



o Oi 
C« 

95 
172 
156 
178 

75 

81 
279 
109 

87 



6 a 

u _rai 

0^ •;« 

W 

20 132 

9 100 

23 70 

15 181 

3 84 

6 107 

12 234 



87 



85 
159 
160 
162 

74 

86 
278 
112 

85 



12 115 233 15 111 2i?9 

13 201 223 22 205 232 



25 316 456 37 316 471 



163 
206 
175 
121 
99 



257 
116 
182 
23 



2 162 
11 205 



190 120 

86 109 



159 
121 



197 
95 



97 
256 
134 
182 

25 
114 
101 



2491 2528 
Majoritj^ in county... 37 

For Congress -Barrick, People's, 1. 



2593 
181 



2431 2581 
150 



ELECTION RETURNS, 375 



Union County. 

—Con.— Ass'Y. 

i% %% M% i% i% If i% II 

Sq |rt oq op |fl -gp^ op^ grt 
PPhOOOOOM 

Clark 40 40 40 38 38 41 43 43 

Cranford 117 253 134 140 141 243 245 244 

Elizabeth— 

1st Ward, 1st Dist 409 112 414 414 427 103 109 104 

1st Ward, 2d Dist 117 56 115 116 121 58 60 56 

526 168 529 530 548 161 169 160 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 232 84 233 234 239 78 78 84 

2d Ward, 2d Dist 142 158 145 144 172 141 156 149 

374 242 378 378 411 219 234 233 

3d Ward, 1st Dist 290 110 293 293 300 109 104 104 

3d Ward, 2d Dist 179 257 176 176 200 237 257 254 

469 367 469 469 500 316 361 358 

4th Ward, 1st Dist 139 176 137 137 164 152 178 176 

4th Ward, 2d Dist 121 208 126 124 144 185 206 202 

260 384 263 261 308 337 384 378 

5th Ward, 1st Dist 101 233 96 97 152 204 235 223 

5th Ward, 2d Dist 71 137 74 75 97 119 133 134 

172 370 170 172 249 323 368 357 

6th Ward, 1st Dist 165 139 175 174 183 128 133 128 

6th Ward, 2d Dist 108 151 104 104 115 150 156 157 

273 290 279 278 298 278 289 285 

7th Ward, 1st Dist 138 135 148 145 181 115 126 117 

7th Ward, 2d Dist 108 125 108 111 145 106 121 112 

216 260 256 256 326 221 247 229 

8th Ward, 1st Dist 220 416 240 235 245 398 405 408 

8th Ward, 2d Dist 234 200 238 238 267 181 196 191 

454 616 478 473 512 579 601 599 

9th Ward," 1st Dist 148 222 151 155 176 193 214 221 

9thWard, 2d Dist 148 157 162 159 182 149 156 159 

296 379 313 314 358 342 370 380 

10th Ward 132 311 140 142 147 302 316 309 

nth Ward, 1st Tist 88 268 94 93 104 257 268 268 

nth Ward, 2d Dist 56 187 59 60 61 182 187 183 

144 455 153 153 165 439 455 451 

12th Ward, 1st Dist 56 190 58 59 63 188 192 187 

12th Ward, 2d Dist 124 116 128 128 133 111 115 109 

180 306 186 187 196 299 307 296 

3526 4148 3614 3613 4018 3846 4101 4035 



376 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Union County— Continued. 

—Cox.— Ass'y. 

u . . . -t 

il it IS il ll 11 IS II 

■c , HfeQOooopq 

ESn ,f^ ^i-^ 103 104 101 199 206 205 

it ^J? ••••: 140 328 137 143 136 329 ^^^ ^ou 

New Providence 41 97 53 53 S I? ^6 2 

riainfield— 

IS Ward' 5? S f^ ^l^o 120 133 132 278 306 301 

1st ward, 2d Di&t 37 83 43 52 43 70 80 80 

122 419 163 185 "l75 "348 Ise ~38l 

2d Ward, 1st Dist 73 ZH2 1'>Z 135 127 ^94 n? qqo 

2d Ward,2dDist 21 li 21 20 ll I ^ ^ 

94 410 144 155 148 350 ~366 ~366 
3d Ward 80 365 100 117 110 325 352 352 

4th Ward, 1st Dist 133 367 I66 217 irq 97« ^lo itd 

4th Ward, 2d Dist ^Sm m m fi ^3 I24 

_230 ^ 273 386 275 I46 "565 ~568 

Rahway- ^^ ^"^ ^^ 843 "7O8 1469 1669 1667 

If Wo^H 1^5 198 174 170 181 167 194 192 

^^^^^^^ ^ _192 125 123 139 165 188 188 

682 1013 676 701 732 950 1016 1010 

Springfield... 44 120 49 49 49 119 l-'o 120 

feummit^lstDist 135 184 144 143 149 177 lio 174 

2a I>ist 198 200 201 202 204 196 199 192 

Union-lstDist 88 156 99 96 96 155 153 1.50 

^^^l 98 61 102 102 102 58 58 58 

3d Dist 44 125 49 52 50 122 125 122 

230 342 2.50 250 ~248 ~335 I36 IsO 

Westfield-ist Dist ns 233 lie 143 122 217 235 2^0 

I2d Dist U9 198 147 156 160 190 190 190 

Total vote in countj- 6016 9165 6344 6578 6858 8397 8951 8844 

Majority in couatj' 3149 

A^'^'^Tp^^F^^'J^^'^^^^y' Pro., 271; Pope, People's, 53; BeU, Soc.-Lab., 
f«h ^L^^^^'^^'u^^'i-.^^''^^' '^^'^ ^'ood, 275; Van Cise 281; Soc- 
Lab., Keim, 466 ; Miller, 456 ; Scot t, 433. , , ^. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 377 

"Warren County. 



•^a 


^a 


oQ"a 


a" a 






^^ 




6P 


mP 


F^ 


^ 


o 


fl 


£ 


53 


66 


90 


106 


151 


170 


'217 


174 


99 


171 


188 


168 


70 


142 


132 


81 


67 


96 


112 


121 



boo «'o 



If g?a |d 

§fl -S^ gp; gp -gfl §f^ g^ ;5a. gOH 



Allamuchy 58 103 3 53 66 90 106 4 3 

Belvidere 188 200 88 151 170 217 174 102 106 

Blairstown 152 189 29 99 171 188 168 34 31 

Franklin 135 109 22 

Frelinghuysen 87 117 9 

Greenwich 67 91 7 33 87 109 83 19 8 

Hackettstown— 1st Dist.. 110 124 30 65 107 120 154 33 32 

2d Dist.. 134 146 18 96 123 140 179 21 19 

Hardwick.... 60 23 4 45 60 28 22 4 2 

Harmony 99 86 11 58 99 116 84 11 14 

Hope 104 161 19 62 114 179 155 27 22 

Independence 81 134 8 50 120 117 127 10 8 

Knowlton 147 149 19 133 180 141 124 22 33 

Lopatcong 154 190 4 136 156 210 181 3 2 

Mansfield 174 124 24 109 188 112 134 70 22 

Oxford— 1st Dist 174 115 33 116 179 124 99 47 60 

2d Dist 197 225 14 224 159 209 176 44 14 

Pahaquarry 64 8 1 58 32 42 15 1 1 

Phillipsburg— 1st Ward.. 168 257 2 110 157 313 256 2 2 

2d Ward.. 225 237 3 188 197 274 238 6 5 

3d Ward.. 220 347 19 145 193 409 362 15 9 

4tli Ward.. 152 184 4 157 105 195 182 4 4 



765 1025 28 600 652 1191 1038 27 20 

Pohatcong 118 185 12 85 118 209 179 11 14 

Wash'ton Bor.— E. Dist. 235 150 36 83 154 193 143 173 47 

W.Dist. 270 122 28 106 195 180 142 153 33 

Township 162 110 8 77 155 114 99 82 11 



3735 3886 455 2576 3523 4273 3784 973 
Maj ority in county. . . 151 

For Congress— Barrick, People's, 52. 



Total Number of Election Precincts by Counties. 

Atlantic, 22 ; Bergen, 44 ; Burlington, 38 ; Camden, 67 ; Cape May, 15 ; 
Cumberland, 33 ; Essex, 128 ; Gloucester, 20 ; Hudson, 131 ; Hunterdon, 26 ; 
Mercer, 49 ; Middlesex, 36 ; Monmouth, 40 ; Morris, 32 ; Ocean, 19 ; Pas- 
saic, 47 ; Salem, 18 ; Somerset, 19 ; Sussex, 18 ; Union, 48 ; Warren, 26. 
Total, 876. 



378 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Vote for President— 1892. 



Pluralities. 



Counties. 



Atlantic 3001 

Bergen 5864 

Burlington 6727 

Camden 10007 

Cape May 1310 

Cumberland 4725 

Essex 30176 

Gloucester 3528 

Hudson 32236 

Hunterdon 5120 

Mercer 9347 

Middlesex 7942 

Monmouth 9014 

^OTTis 5836 

Ocean 156i 

Passaic 10992 

Salem 3237 

Somerset .'.".'.""".'".' 3403 

^"ssex 3218 

Vll"0" 8597 

Warren 5201 



■s ^ 



P5 S 

3329 247 

5020 125 

6881 507 



11001 
1479 



3749 
23307 
3448 
9795 



2610 

11528 

3152 



190 



5516 720 
29045 781 



224 
272 
623 
435 



6142 248 
7676 556 
5729 674 



168 
405 
290 



3307 218 

2346 195 

7826 302 

3182 453 



Average vote 171042 156068 8131 133 

Plurality 14974 



CS 


jj^ 




— 


1 


1 


1 


1 


16 


35 




3?8 


31 


13 


844 




15 


82 




154 


31 


45 




994 


3 


4 




169 


27 


69 




791 


203 


118 


1131 




6 


12 




??A 


485 


109 


8929 




20 


80 


1672 




12 


81 




448 


46 


52 


1800 




10 


23 


1338 




6 


130 


107 




3 


14 




1049 


199 


23 




536 


8 


13 


85 




1 


4 


96 




8 


21 


872 




180 


27 


771 




27 


64 


2019 















337 


969 


19664 
14974 


4690 



Number of names on poll-books.. 
Ballots rejected 



340733 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



379 



Vote for Governor— 1892. 



Pluralities, 



182 



733 
207 



Atlantic 3022 3310 242 

Bergen 5791 5098 124 

Burlington 6688 7053 485 

Camden 9890 11153 451 

Cape May 1357 1437 

Cumberland 4667 5605 

Essex 28962 30148 

Gloucester 3497 3804 

Hudson 30883 24526 268 

Hunterdon 4971 3587 631 

Mercer 9196 9970 393 

Middlesex 7838 6247 235 

Monmouth 8966 7744 523 

Morris 5782 5735 670 

Ocean 1570 2608 162 

Passaic 10856 11629 332 

Salem 3191 3159 271 

Somerset 3376 3321 218 

Sussex 3143 2421 189 

Union 8466 7851 301 

Warren 5145 3226 447 



as 

OJOQ 
W 
16 
31 
17 
31 
3 

25 

204 

6 

463 

20 

11 



7 
187 
26 



W 
35 



37 
4 

63 
103 

12 
116 



22 
118 
14 
20 
13 
5 
20 
25 
61 



6357 
1384 

'1591 

1222 

47 



32 
55 

722 
615 
1919 



365 
1263 



307 



1038 
773 



167257 159632 7750 1338 
Plurality 7625 



14637 7012 
7625 



Vote for Congress— 1894. 



First District. 



Pluralities. 



Counties. 



Camden 4195 

Cape May 1034 

Cumberland 1976 

Gloucester 2151 

Salem 2726 



1^ 

11396 
1578 
4619 
3649 
3220 






S P 

o 

552 139 

126 72 

597 1077 

242 166 

214 187 



« o 

124 
6 
37 
11 
16 



Plurality, 



12082 24462 1731 1641 
12380 



194 



a> 

7201 
544 
2643 
1498 
494 



12380 



880 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



SKCOXD DlSTRTfT. 



Pluralities. 



CorxTiKs. £ ^ h ■ - "^ 

S o ^ w 

:^tlantic 1746 3010 246 106 

Burlington 4376 7074 482 103 

^^ercer 5814 10467 396 386 

964 2090 154 35 



Ocean. 



Plurality 



12900 22641 127J 
9741 



a a 

1264 



4653 
1126 



Third JJistrict. 



Pluralities. 



Counties. 

Middlesex 

Monmouth 


Il 

5822 

6301 


Somerset 




Plurality 


14427 



it 12 'It 1§ a d. 

c2? Scu Zx o-iB S ?• 

►-3 S ^ fi « 

7490 203 286 182 1668 

7557 377 76 49 1256 

3356 211 50 34 1052 

18403 791 412 265 3976 



Fourth District. 



Pluralities. 



Couxties. ■= a 

o 

Hunterdon 4216 

Morris 4267 

Sussex 2491 

Warren 3735 

14709 



nS. 



Ph 

3632 

6070 

2528 

3886 455 



16116 1586 
1407 









a a, 
Q 1^ 

459 160 594 

515 294 

157 1 



1803 
37 
151 



1991 
1407 



Fifth District. 



Pluralities. 



Counties. | g 

Bergen 4059 

6410 



i^ So 

OQ Ph 

5103 132 

11338 403 



10469 16441 540 
5972 



= a a 

« fi P3 

146 1044 

2365 4928 



2511 



5972 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



381 



Sixth District. 



Counties. 



Essex (part of). 
Plurality 











Pluralities. 










.D 














i & 


w 


^ 


o 


PQ 


« « 


14748 


23219 


503 


798 


836 


8473 



Seventh District. 



Hudson (part of) 23207 

Plurality 









P 


lura 


lilies. 








C 






la 


II 


12 

3 ^ 




a 

0) 


s^ 


CO 


s 


M 


fl 


tf 


. 23207 


23500 


299 .. 


.... 1193 


zi: 


293 



Eighth District. 



Counties. s g 

(part of ) 5008 

Hudson (part of ) 1781 

Union 6016 



Plurality. 



to" J2 

ft '. 



7947 2C 

1929 39 8 66 

9165 271 53 456 



Qp-t "Sec 
106 126 



19041 518 
6236 



167 648 



2939 
148 
3149 



6236 



Total vote for Congress 115345 

Republican plurality for Congress.,.. 





rn 


XJ 


W.Q 




0) 

ft 


a 


sa 


2 


oS 


g 




Ph 


Ph 


QQ 


Pk^ 


7246 


4155 


4451 


1193 



382 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Vote by Counties for Congress. 



Atlantic 1746 3010 

Bergen 4059 5103 

Burlington 4376 7074 

Camden 4195 11396 

Cape May 1034 1578 

Cumberland 1976 4619 

Essex 19754 31166 

Gloucester 2151 3649 

Hudson 24988 25429 

Hunterdon 4216 3632 

Mercer 5814 10467 

Middlesex 5822 7490 

Monmouth 6301 7557 

Morris 4267 6070 

Ocean 964 2000 

Passaic 6410 11338 

Salem 2726 3220 

Somerset 2304 3356 

Sussex 2491 2528 

Union 6016 9165 

Warren 3735 3886 



72 
1077 
904 



246 106 

132 

482 
552 
126 
597 
711 
242 
338 
459 
396 
203 
377 
515 
154 
408 
214 
211 
157 
271 
455 



c3h3 



103 

139 124 



286 182 



76 


49 


294 




35 






2365 


187 


16 


50 


34 


1 




53 


456 


52 





6 

37 

962 

11 

66 1193 



Plurality. 



1264 
1044 
2698 
7201 

544 
2643 
11412 
1498 

441 



584 



Plurality. 



115340 



163823 7246 4155 4454 1193 

48478 



4653 
1668 
1256 
1803 
112<! 
4928 

494 

1052 

37 

3149 

151 



584 49062 

48478 



Average Vote by Counties for Members of the 
General Assembly. 

^ ^- .: Plurality. 



Atlantic 1819 

Bergen 4101 

Burlington 4233 

Camden 3842 

Cape May... 1022 

Cumberland 1976 

Essex 19620 

Gloucester 2080 

Hudson 25231 

Hunterdon 3930 

Mercer 5917 

Middlesex 5940 

Monmouth 6314 

Morris 4276 

Ocean 1152 

Passaic 6620 

Salem 2859 

Somerset 2409 

Sussex 2431 

Union 6593 

Warren 3050 



s* 


o 


rt 


fk 


2939 


238 


5044 




7137 


487 


11134 


578 


1611 


126 


4.562 


624 


31237 


736 


3717 


237 


25097 


344 


3915 


448 


10317 


394 


7341 


222 


7473 


384 


6038 


536 


1838 


185 


10896 


430 


3209 


197 


3291 


189 


2581 


160 


8731 


280 


4028 


755 



104 



116 
58 
1017 
787 
166 
252 
128 
378 
264 



156 

"in 



So 



452 



134 
15 



1120 
943 

2904 
7292 
589 
2.586 
11617 
1637 



4400 
1401 
1159 
1762 
686 
4276 
350 
882 
150 
2138 
978 



115415 162136 7550 2675 5309 919 149 46870 

Plurality 46721 46721 

Total number of names on poll-books 302150 

Ballots rejected 2162 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



STATE BOARD OP AGRICULTURE. 

President, vacancy ; Vice President, E. B. Voorhees, New 
Brunswick; Treasurer, D. D. Denise, Freehold; Secretary, 
Franklin Dye, Trenton ; Executive Committee, William K. 
Lippincott, Fellowship ; H. F. Bodine, Locktown ; Theodore 
F. D. Baker, Bridgeton ; also the President, Vice President, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

A part of the work of the Board, as stated in the law, is 
"to collect and disseminate reliable and useful information, 
and to encourage a higher standard in the agriculture and 
horticulture of the State; to investigate such subjects relating 
to the improvement of land and agriculture, in its various 
branches in this State, as the Executive Committee may think 
proper ; to cause to be made, experimental and practical, tests 
of specific remedies or cures of diseases of domestic animals 
and poultry, and of plants, vegetables and fruits, and of insects 
injurious thereto; and to employ suitable persons to lecture 
before the State Board of Agriculture at its annual or other 
meetings, and in the counties of the State as far as the sum 
herein appropriated will allow." 

The act provides, also, for the organization of County Boards 
of Agriculture in the several counties. These are auxiliary to 
the State Board, and are a means of disseminating agricul- 
tural information among the farmers thus organized. All 
farmers of the State can become members of the County Boards 
if they desire to, and through them have representation in the 
State Board. The State Board is now extending its lecture 
work in the County Boards and in Farmers' Institutes. 

There are eighteen County Boards now organized, also a 
State Horticultural Society aud a State Poultry Association. 
The meetings of these societies are proving their value as a 
means of practical information on all questions connected with 
the improvement of the farm, stock, dairy, fruit and market- 
garden interests of the State, as is shown by increased member- 
ship and attendance. 

All these societies, except the Poultry Association, receive 
financial aid from the State Board appropriation, amounting 
to from $1,000 to $1,800 annually. 

The market value of lands now devoted to farming pur- 
poses varies in ditferent parts of the State, running from $30 
to $60, $80 and $100 per acre, being cheaper in New Jersey, 
considering all the advantages, than any other State in the 
Union, The number of farms in the State is 34,307, having 
an average size of 85 acres. (Census of 1880.) 

During the past year most farm crops in the State were 



§84 STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

below the usual average yield. Late wet spring followed by 
protracted drought contributed to this result. 

The average yield per acre of farm crops in New Jersey for 
1893, as taken from the U. S. Department of Agriculture Re- 
port, is : Corn, 26.4 bushels — the lowest by 10 bushels for years, 
owing to adverse weather ; wheat, 14.5 bushels ; rye, 13.4 bush- 
els; oats, 23.9 bushels; buckwheat, 13.4 bushels; white pota- 
toes, 73 bushels ; sweets, 97 bushels ; pears and grapes gave 
good crops ; apples were much below an average yield ; 
peaches, an excessive yield, which reduced both quality and 
price. There has been a reduction in the acreage of cereals 
in the State during the last decade amounting to 172,018 acres, 
or 22.24 per cent. Other crops, as dairy products, fruit, pota- 
toes and market-garden crops, are being substituted. The pro- 
duct of the dairy especially is increasing rapidly each year. 

Number and value of farm animals in the State in 1893 : 
Horses, 83,321 ; value, ^7,105,037. Mules, 8,296 ; value, $843,- 
644. Milch cows, 190,734 ; value, $6,713,837. Oxen and other 
cattle, 52,641 ; value, $1,532,272. In 1892— Sheep, 102,077 ; 
value, $413,922. Swine, 190,547 ; value, $1,758,746. A total 
valuation of $18,367,458. 

The canning business is large, in which New Jersey leads 
every other State but one. 

In commercial floriculture, according to the last United 
States census. New Jersey makes the largest showing of any 
State in the Union in proportion to its size. Of florists' estab- 
lishments we have 366 ; owned and managed by women, 8. 
Total square feet of glass, 3,703,554. 

Total value of establishments $3,666,518 46 

Total value of tools and implements 155,107 14 

In these are propagated — 

Roses 1,808,014 

Hardy plants 4,006,602 

All other plants 12,912,114 

Total 22,726,730 

Plants sold— value $897,908 58 

Cat flowers sold— value 1,288,478 56 

Total value $2,186,387 14 

Of seed farms the State has thirtv-four, comprising an acre- 
age of 6,272. 
Total value of farms, implements and buildings $2,333,066 68 

Farms devoted to the nursery business number 145, with a 
total acreage of 5,465. 

Total value of nurseries $1,712,464 75 

Total capital invested 1,970,593 90 



PUBLIC ROADS. 885 

Concerning the immense fruit, dairy and poultry products 
of the State there are no statistics, as there is no State law 
enabling the State Board of Agriculture to collect this valua- 
ble information. 

The demand made for the Annual Keports of the Board is 
increasing from year to year as their value and its work be- 
come better known. About five thousand copies are distribu- 
ted each year in New Jersey, and it is called for in almost 
every other State in the Union, in Canada, England, France, 
Germany, New Zealand and Japan. 



THE PUBLIC ROADS. 

Edwaed Burrough, Commissioner, Merchantville. 

Commissioner Burrough in his report says : 

The first practical operations for improved stone roadways 
in New Jersey began in Essex county more than twenty 
years ago, under a special law, and that county, though only 
12 miles square, has built more than 200 miles of fine Telford 
and Macadam roads, many of them boulevards. 

Inspired by the example of Essex county and the many 
advantages thereby secured to it, and impatient at the delay 
in obtaining direct State aid for the construction of improved 
roadways, the adjoining county of Union procured the pas- 
sage of a general law allowing counties to issue bonds for 
road purposes, which is familiarly known as the Union 
County law, under the provisions of which the county bor- 
rowed $455,000 at 4 per cent, on 5.20 bonds, and covered the 
county with a complete system of Telford and Macadam 
roads, and with the interest of this sum added to the annual 
tax levy the rate of taxation is lower than before the build- 
ing of the roads. 

Under the old road system, or rather lack of system, the 
ofiice of overseer of the roads became a sinecure, and the 
money voted for the repairing of the roads was wasted in far 
too many instances. There are about 202 townships outside 
the counties of Hudson, Essex, Bergen, Passaic and Union, 
and estimating the expenditures for the repairs of roads as 
reported to the Governor, about $450,000 is annually raised 
and expended for repairing and maintaining these country 
roads. This sum of $450,000 is practically thrown away on 
roads that have existed for nearly a century, and which are 
still in much the same condition they were half a century 
ago, notwithstanding the vast amount of money that has been 

17 



386 PUBLIC ROADS. 

spent upon them. In 1874 the State Board of Agriculture 
began the consideration of the best methods for improving 
the public roads of the State, and this agitation has led to 
the passage of the act granting State aid to the building of 
permanently-improved roads. This latest enactment, which 
is a new departure in the United States and is original in 
New Jersey, is the law of 1891, made operative in 1892, by 
which the State, under certain prescribed conditions, aids the 
county and the property-holders along the line of road to be 
improved. Hence, this law is commonly known as the 
"State-aid" law. Under its provisions more than 100 miles 
of stone roads have already been constructed, and more 
applications are in for the current year than the total appro- 
priation can meet. Although the fear was expressed, and 
honestly entertained, that stone roads would be more expen- 
sive than profitable to the taxpayers, especially farmers, the 
fear has not been realized where most of such roads have 
been built No one living along such roads is willing to go 
back to the old system. 

The salient features of the State-aid law are that the 
abutting property-owners along the improved road pay 10 
per cent, of the cost, the State 33^, and the county the 
balance of the cost and maintains the road. Under the 
new law, the State paid on the 27th of December, 1892, 
$20,661.85, being the first money paid by the State of New 
Jersey for improved roadways. Jt is also the first money ever 
paid in the United States under a law granting State aid for the 
construction of public roads, and it was paid to Middlesex, county. 

Since that time there has been an increasing desire for 
roads to be improved under this act, and a much larger sum 
will be required annuallv to meet the demands. 

In the year 1893 the' State paid $71,237.22 and in 1894 
$74,696.03. The conservative manner in which this law has 
been enforced has tended greatly to develop its usefulness. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE 

GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 



After congratulating the State on its financial condition, 
the Governor says : 

There is no floating debt, and practically the State is 
entirely out of debt. There are outstanding, at the date of 
this message, bonds of the State issued for " war purposes " 
amounting in the aggregate to the sum of $735,400. Por- 
tions of these bonds fall due annually, on the first day of 
January in each year until January 1st, 1902, when the last 
of them mature. Against these there is in the Sinking Fund 
$441,663.48 of available assets. The State also owns 1,887 
shares of the stock of the Joint Companies, worth in the 
market at this time about $450,000, making a total of $891,- 
663.08 of assets against a bonded indebtedness of $735,400. 
These war bonds could, therefore, be extinguished to-day, if 
due. They are, however, being discharged as rapidly as it is 
legally possible to do so. 

The estimate of the Comptroller, of receipts and disburse- 
ments for the current fiscal year, is as follows : 

Estimated receipts (exclusive of balance of $986,855.91) 

for fiscal year ending October 3lst, 1895 $2,042,870 00 

Estimated disbursements during fiscal year ending Octo- 
ber 31st, 1895 2,017,605 86 

Balance $25,264 14 

Appropriations heretofore made, and balances due on such 
appropriations, amounting in the aggregate to $171,306.74, 
are outstanding and unpaid. Some of these unpaid appro- 
priations are liable to be called for during the current year, 
others are not. But, assuming the above estimates of the 
Comptroller to be correct, it is evident that those appropria- 
tions, and any additional ones that your Honorable Bodies 
may make, cannot be defrayed from current receipts. They 
will have to be paid from the balance on hand, to that extent 
depleting it. This fact should be borne in mind in all 
legislation involving an appropriation of public funds. 

(387) 



388 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 



PRLSON ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The cell capacity of the State Prison is seven hundred. 
The number of convicts, at the date of the Keeper's report 
(October 31st, 189i), was 1,026, an increase of fifty-eight over 
the preceding year. The law requires that "each convict 
shall be confined in one of tlie cells of the prison, separate and 
alone." This provision of the law cannot be complied with. 
The Keeper is obliged to violate it and to confine two or more 
prisoners in cells intended and fit for but one. This is pre- 
judicial to the good order and discipline of the prison, and 
highly detrimental to the health and morality of the convicts. 
The report of the physician discloses an increased rate of 
mortality and sickness in the prison during the past year, 
which he ascribes to its overcrowded condition and the lack 
of proper hospital facilities 

I regard the enlargement of the prison as the most impera- 
tive demand upon your Honorable Bodies. A law was en- 
acted in 1890 (Chapter 154) appropriating $100,000 for the 
erection of an additional wing to the prison and providing 
proper hospital accommodations. By reason of its peculiar 
provisions, that law is inoperative. I therefore recommend 
the passage of a new act appropriating a sufiicient sum for the 
extension and enlargement of the prison, including a proper 
hospital and such other improvements and changes in and 
about the institution (suggested and recommended in the re- 
ports of the Supervisor, the Keeper and the Inspectors) as may 
be deemed necessary or proper. 

The act, in my judgment, should provide for the appoint- 
ment of commissioners, under whose supervision and direc- 
tion the work shall be done, with large discretionary powers 
as to the changes or additions to be made and the mode and 
manner of making or doing them. 

It is claimed there is not suflBcient room within the present 
prison limits for the necessary enlargement or extension of 
the prison. If that be so, it seems to me advisable, on grounds 
of convenience and economy, that recourse should be had to 
the State Arsenal grounds, immediately adjoining those of 
the prison. It would be an economical measure to incor- 
porate the arsenal grounds within the prison limits and to 
locate the arsenal on the State camp ground at Sea Girt and 
thus save the large annual expense of transporting the ma- 
terial from the present arsenal to and from the camp ground. 
It is objected, however, that the sea air and moisture would 
prove injurious and perhaps destructive to the arms, ammu- 
nition, equipments and material on storage. If that objection 
be well founded, the arsenal grounds can probably, with 



GOVERNOR'S 31 ESS AGE. 389 

feconomy of space and perhaps changing the location of certain 
buildings, be utilized for both prison and arsenal uses. Should 
there prove to be insufl5cient land for both purposes, the 
arsenal could be located on other lands of the State, suffi- 
ciently remote from the seacoast. 

I am decidedly in favor of a State Reformatory or interme- 
diate prison for youthful and first offenders, and, abstractly 
stated, I would prefer the erection of a reformatory to the 
enlargement of the present prison. But the necessity of the 
case demands immediate relief, and that can be afforded 
much more cheaply and expeditiously by the enlargement of 
the prison. 

I beg leave, however, to direct the attention of your Honor- 
able Bodies to the suggestions of my first annual message 
concerning the erection of a reformatory, and also to the re- 
port of a commission to select a site and provide for the 
erection of a reformatory, transmitted by the Executive, by 
special message, to the Legislature of 1894. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

The State Hospitals are located at Morris Plains, in the 
county of Morris, and at Trenton, the State capital. For- 
merly they were designated " insane asylums," but that 
designation was changed to '' State Hospitals " by legislative 
enactment in the year 1893. The Legislature of 1894 en- 
acted that the general management and control of the State 
Hospitals should be vested in one Board of Managers, non- 
partisan in its composition. The Board is now constituted 
conformably to the last-mentioned act. The conduct and 
management of the hospitals, under the direction of the 
present Board of Managers, is, in my opinion, beyond criti- 
cism Both institutions are in first-class condition and have 
high reputations for efficiency and success in the treatment 
of patients. 

The Trenton Hospital, while the oldest of the two, is 
creditable to the State. That at Morris Plains is probably 
the finest institution of its kind in this or any other country. 
Both are, however, overcrowded, particularly that of Morris 
Plains. That hospital was erected with a view to the ac- 
commodation of eight hundred patients. But that limit has 
been exceeded, and at the date of the Managers' report 
(October 31st, 1894) the number of patients was 1,050, and 
the average number during the year 1,032. The yearly in- 
crease of patients is about fifty. 

It is manifest that some plan must soon be adopted for the 
relief of both institutions. It is suggested that the erection 

*17 



§90 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE!. 

of a separate building or buildings for '' incurables " is feasible 
and probably the best solution of the problem. 

The water-supply at the Morris Plains Hospital needs 
attention. The necessity therefor is fully detailed in the 
report of the Managers. 

For all matters connected with the conduct and manage- 
ment of these institutions I beg leave, most respectfully, to 
refer your Honorable Bodies to the report of the Managers 
and accompanying reports of officials. As to the changes to 
be made for the relief of the institutions, the report states 
that the plans of the Managers are not yet in form to be em- 
bodied or outlined in a report, but that they will be sub- 
mitted to the proper legislative committee as soon as prac- 
ticable. 

THE NATIONAL GUARD, STATE CAMP GROUND AND 
ARMORIES. 

The National Guard consists of 313 officers and 3,487 en- 
listed men. This force is organized into fifty-six companies 
of infantry, one Gatling gun company and one troop of 
cavalry. 

The National Guard is in every way honorable to itself 
and the State. It has developed a marked improvement in 
discipline and soldierly qualities during the past year. The 
Second Brigade, under the command of Brevet Major-General 
William J. Sewell, was encamped at Sea Girt from July 16th 
to July 2l8t. The period of time covered by the encamp- 
ment was coincident with the closing events of the serious 
outbreaks which, in the months of June and July last, dis- 
turbed the peace and good order of several of the Western 
States. For several days anterior to the encampment, well- 
grounded apprehensions existed that the violence and- 
disorder prevailing in the West might spread to the East and 
this State. Preparations were accordingly made for the 
speedy concentration of the National Guard, thoroughly 
armed and equipped, at any threatened point. Happily, the 
necessity for such action did not arise. I, however, fully 
concur in the opinion of the Adjutant-General, expressed in 
his annual report, that had occasion occurred for its services, 
the National Guard would have afi^orded ample defense to 
the persons and property of the citizens of the State. There 
can be no doubt that, at the time referred to, the confidence 
reposed in the National Guard, and the fact that a brigade 
thereof was encamped ready to move promptly upon any 
threatened point, afforded a sense of security to the entire 
State. It is at such times and in such emergencies (always 



GOViJkNORS MESSAGE SM 

liable to arise) that the value, and in truth, the indispens- 
ability of the National Guard, are felt and recognized. 

In marksmanship, under the direction of Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Bird W. Spencer, Inspector-General of Rifle Practice, 
the National Guard has attained great proficiency. The 
record of each regiment in this branch of service for the past 
year is superior to that of any preceding year. 

PUBLIC WATER-SUPPLY. 

I deem it of great public importance that measures should 
be speedily taken by the State for its control of the sources 
of potable water within its borders. This is a matter of con- 
cern to the entire State, but more immediately interests the 
populous communities in its northeastern section. In my 
last annual message, I submitted an extract from the report of 
the State Geologist, showing the sources now available for 
supplying northern New Jersey towns and cities with water, 
the supplying capacities of such available sources and the 
present and prospective population to be supplied thereby. 
The data thus presented are most instructive and emphasize 
the conclusion expressed by the State Geologist, that wise 
and judicious development of these water-sheds is necessary 
for the benefit of all the people, rather than their segrega- 
tion to the uses of a few powerful communities. I respect- 
fully invite your attention to the extracts alluded to. They 
convey a most impressive warning and invite prompt and 
determined action. These sources of water-supply are now 
sought to be acquired, and in many instances have been ac- 
quired by private individuals or corporations, that they may 
be held for speculative purposes and sold to individual 
municipalities to the exclusion of others. If such a policy is 
to prevail, it is evident that the time is not distant when the 
bulk of the population in northern New Jersey will, for this 
absolute necessity of life, be at the mercy of those owning or 
controlling its supply. This should not be. The time is at 
hand when the State should exercise its prerogative and 
secure for the common benefit what was intended for the use 
of all. Of course, all rights of individuals or corporations 
should be respected and fair compensation awarded for all 
property taken for public purposes. But, subject to that pro- 
vision, the State should not hesitate to assert its authority to 
the fullest extent. 

In addition to the data above referred to, I am advised that 
the State Geological Department has in press, and expects to 
have ready for distribution at the present session of your 
Honorable Bodies, a volume containing a full description of 



S§2 GOVERNOR'S MESSAOK 

the several water-sheds of the State, their general characters 
of geological formation, nature of soil and forest conditions 
and their capacity of delivery of water available for town and 
city supply. The volume also contains full discussions of the 
important questions of rainfall, evaporation from the surface 
of the ground, surface-flow, ground-water, &c. 

I recommend legislation on this subject upon the lines of 
Senate Bill No. 42, introduced in the last Legislature. If the 
objections made to that bill were well founded they can be 
remedied, or if not, otiier measures can be proposed. It can- 
not be impossible to devise legislation to meet the exigencies 
of the case. 

PARKS AND RESERVATIONS.— THE PALISADES. 

The setting aside of tracts of land for public parks, as 
places for public recreation, ref^t and enjoyment, has come to 
be regarded as a necessity rather than a mere convenience. 
They conduce to the public health, promote the general 
happiness and encourage good citizenship. As public in- 
vestments they are remunerative and profitable. Experience 
has proved that the increased valuations in the vicinity of a 
well-regulated public park, will soon more than pay the cost 
of the original investment. This subject has already re- 
ceived considerable attention in this State. The last Legis- 
lature passed several acts recognizing the value of public 
parks, and providing for their original creation or extension 
where already existing. Among the acts passed was one 
authorizing the appointment, by a Justice of the Supreme 
Court, in counties of over 200,000 inhabitants, of five pers »ns 
to be County Park Commissioners, to " consider the advisa- 
bility of laying out ample open spaces for the use of the 
public in such county, * ^ ^ ^ and make a 
report in writing of a comprehensive plan for laying out, 
acquiring and maintaining such open spaces." Lender the 
last-mentioned act, a commission has been appointed in the 
cjunty of Essex, which has already given much thought and 
intelligent consideration to this subject, and which will so3n 
submit its suggestions, recommendations and conclusions in a 
detailed report. 

The Highlands in the northern part of this State abound 
in romantic scenery, and are remarkably adapted to the pur- 
poses of public parks or reservations. They are not remote 
or uneasy of access from large centers of population, and I 
cannot better express my views on this subject than to cite 
from the report of the State Geologist for 1892 (page 25) 
the following extract: 

" The more specific purpose of this reference to the subject 



GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 393 

is, however, to call attention to the large and available tracts 
in the Highlands which are so well fitted to become natural 
parks for the use of the masses of our people who need the 
resort to the country, and yet cannot aiford to have coun- 
try homes. Nearly all of the more attractive places and all 
of the larger lakes in the Highlands are less than thirty miles 
from Newark and Paterson and the adjacent towns, and a 
radius of forty miles from the cities of that part of the State 
would sweep within its range all of them and the greater part 
of the Highlands. One of sixty miles would take in nearly 
the whole of the northern part of the State. It is the com- 
parative nearness of so large a territory filled with wildwocd 
scenery and still in forest, and with so many lakes and lake- 
lets within easy reach by railway, which is the attractive 
feature of this country, and more remarkable as we note the 
deforesting march of improvement over districts more suited 
to the demands of cropping, or where the capacious maws of 
furnaces and mines, or the market for lumber have consumed 
the woods. It is not a region scarred by fires, as are some of 
the more remote and more pine-covered mountains of north- 
eastern Pennsylvania or of the southern part of our own 
State. And it is naturally suited to the production of luxu- 
riant tree-growth, except on the reeky mountain crests, and 
ridges, where the soil is necessarily scanty and not of a depth 
to make a heavy growth of wood. The preservation of the 
more beautiful and attractive parts of this region for use as 
large natural parks by our cities, and as gathering territory 
for their supply of wholesome water, is a subject deserving of 
public attention before it be too late to secure them " 

Closely related to this subject is the preservation of the 
Palisades on the Hudson river. The Palisades are located 
mostly in the State of New Jersey. They extend northerly 
to the State line and then continue for three or four miles in 
the State of New York. As a feature of natural scenery they 
are altogether unique. They present the appearance of a 
perpendicular wall of trap rock from 350 to 500 feet high, 
against which the waters of the Hudson seem to beat. There 
is, however, between the base of the Palisades and the waters 
of the river, a strip of land, varying in width from a few feet 
to 150 to 200 feet. This strip of land is at the present time 
little used. All along the base of the Palisades is a mass of 
rock and debris, fallen from above during centuries past. 
The surface of the Palisades is a plain or plateau, extending 
ten or twelve miles along the river and back from it for one- 
half or three-quarters of a mile, when the descent to the low- 
lands on the west begins. The land of this plateau or plain 
is very valuable— averaging not less than |2,500 per acre. 



394 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE, 

Some of it is occupied by handsome and costly residences. 
Other portions remain in a state of nature. The strip of 
land at the base is not nearly so valuable, although the 
acquisition of the entire strip would cost a large aggregate 
sum. 

The preservation of the Palisades in unbroken uniformity 
and grandeur is very much to be desired. This desire may 
partake of the sentimental, but if so, is kindred to that feeling 
which prompted the preservation of Niagara, the Adiron- 
dacks, Yellowstone Park, Mount Vernon, Washington's 
Headquarters at Morristown, and other places of natural or 
historical interest. It is true, the beauties of the Palisades 
are enjoyed in equal or greater degree by the citizens of New 
York, and that they are equally interested with us in their 
preservation. So far as the Palisades are located in New 
York, that State may be intrusted with their preservation. 
So far as they are located in New Jersey, it should be a mat- 
ter of State pride to protect and save them. I know of no 
way in Avliich the State of New York could intervene to aid 
in their preservation in this State, nor do I think its aid 
should be invoked. New Jersey is not reduced to that ex- 
tremity. It would exhibit a mean and selfish spirit on our 
part to refuse to preserve what is admittedly an object of na- 
tional interest, simply because it was located in a par icular 
section of the State, or so situated that the citizens of neigh- 
boring States could enjoy its beauties in common with our 
own citizens. One test of a nation's refinement and civiliza- 
tion, is its appreciation of the beautiful and the grand in art 
and nature. 

This natural wonder, the Palisades, is now threatened with 
irreparable injury, which is equivalent to entire destruction. 
To entirely level the immense pile of rock would require 
generations, but the destruction of its continuity and uni- 
formity of appearance can be accomplished in a very brief 
period. That, as stated, is equivalent to destruction. At 
various points, quarries have been opened and stone-crushers 
erected, and the work of extracting stone for street-paving, 
Macadam filling and other purposes begun upon a large 
scale. At some points the work is at prasent confined to the 
debris at the base, at others inroads have been made upon 
the Palisades proper. The removal of the debris probably 
does no harm. 

Being the property of private owners, restrained by no 
" sentimental feelings," they have the undoubted legal right 
to build up or destroy at pleasure, keeping within the rule 
"so use your own as not to injure another," The enforce- 
ment of that principle might be invoked by one private 



GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 395 

party against another, but would offer no adequate remedy 
for the threatened public injury. It is evident that the de- 
struction of the Palisades can only be preserved by the in- 
tervention of the State. I do not think it would be wise, 
even were it legal, to attempt to restrain any individual by 
legislation from using his own property in any legal way he 
sees fit. The only mode in which the desired object can be 
accomplished is the exercise of the right of eminent domain, 
taking the property for public uses and purposes and making 
just compensation to the owners. As to the manner in 
which the right of eminent domain shall be exercised, 
different plans have been proposed. 

The idea of converting the Palisades into a public park is 
out of the question, as also is the proposition to condemn the 
long strip of land at the base. Aside from the immense cost 
involved there is no occasion for such sweeping proceedings. 

The construction of a public road along the strip at the 
base has been suggested. But it is impossible to see how 
that would prevent the owners of adjoining Palisade lands 
from breaking up and removing the soil or rock. It would 
rather seem to afford additional facilities f r so doing. This 
is, in effect, the proposition to condemn the strip of land in 
question, with the additional cost of constructing and main- 
taining the road. 

Propositions to condemn the right to quarry, and to con- 
demn bodily from the foot of the slope up to where the top 
of the slope adjoins the perpendicular ledge, have been made. 
Both of these plans would be ineffectual, and might prove 
very costly. 

It seems to me that the most feasible plan lies through an 
amendment of the riparian laws, coupled with a judicious 
exercise of the State's power of purchase, or if need be, of 
the right of eminent domain. 

The State owns (where not disposed of) the riparian lands 
under the Hudson river, between high and low-water marks, 
adjoining the narrow strip of land referred to. The Palisades 
are accessible and valuable for quarry purposes only by reason 
of their proximity to the navigable river, which affords a 
ready means of transportation. Those engaged in the work 
of quarrying the Palisades have erected their crushers and 
appliances for work, and their piers or docks, along the 
river's edge, or over its waters, so that the stone can be loaded 
directly into boats and floats. Without a grant from the 
State no person has a right to occupy or use its riparian lands 
for any purpose. Along the Palisades, the State has, in some 
instances, parted with its riparian rights, but mostly at points 
where no present injury is threatened. For over two an4 a, 



896 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

half miles of these grants the rentals are largely in arrear, 
and the leases therefor should be canceled. The State 
would then own most of the riparian lands adjoining the 
Palisades. 

Under the present law the owner of the shore adjoining 
the riparian land has the right to apply to the Riparian 
Commission, and have made to him a lease or grant of the 
lands under water upon the terms established by the commis- 
sion. Without the riparian right, quarrying at the Palisades 
could not be profitably conducted, if it could be carried on at 
all. A riparian grant is necessary to permit the construction 
of a dock or pier wherefrom to ship the stone to market. 
An investigation made within a few days discloses the fact 
that, with a single exception, none of the persons engaged in 
quarrying the Palisades own the shore adjoining the riparian 
lands ; consequently they are not entitled to grants from the 
State, and their occupation of the riparian lands by any struc- 
ture or for any purpose is a trespass. The one exception 
alluded to is that of a firm who have constructed a large stone 
crusher and a dock in reality upon the State's riparian lands. 
They did this under a mistake as to their rights in the prem- 
ises. They leased from the upland owners the quarry right 
with an option of purchase, and supposed their occupation of 
the riparian land was authorized by their lease. But the 
upland owner had never acquired the riparian right. On 
ascertaining that fact, the lessees exercised their option, pur- 
chased the upland and then applied for a grant of the adjoin- 
ing riparian land, whereon their crusher and dock are erected. 
That application is still pending before the Piparian Com- 
missioners. Two or three other parties engaged in quarrying 
have intimated their intention to make similar application if 
they procure the adjoining upland. 

As the law is it would be an arbitrary proceeding for the 
Piparian Board to refuse to execute the grant on the pending 
application, if the party demands it. The parties purchased 
in good faith, relying upon the law that a grant would be 
executed upon proper request. However much the State 
may desire to withhold the grant, it cannot afford to do so, 
in violation of its exprcis or implied pledge. 

So far forlh, therefore, as the parlies referred to or any 
others have secured vested rights, or what the State should 
recognize as equivalent thereto, they should be dealt with on 
the basis of purchase or by condemnation proceedings. 

The riparian laws should be amended forbidding any lease 
or grant of riparian lands adjoining the Pa'isades, except 
upon such conditions and limitations as will insure their 
preservation. Parties will then be forewarned and have 



GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE, 397 

knowledge that no riparian rights can be secured that will in 
any wise involve or permit the injury or destruction of the 
Palisades. The simple enactment of such a law will go far 
towards the future preservation of the Palisades. 

As to those points where the riparian rights are in the 
hands of private owners and liable to be used now or here- 
after in aid of destructive operations against the Palisades, 
the only plan I can suggest, if purchase at reasonable price be 
impossible, is to proceed as in ordinary cases of taking private 
lands for public purposes. To take and hold, for the benefit 
of the public, any and so much land as may be necessary as 
points or spaces, parks or inclosures, whence may be viewed 
and enjoyed an unequaled natural curiosity like the Palisades, 
is, it seems to me, a justifiable exercise of the right of emi- 
nent domain. 

The points where actual damage to the Palisades proper is 
being committed are not numerous. The injury so far in- 
flicted is small compared to what is threatened and will hap- 
pen unless prevented. The State Geological Department has 
made an examination of the Palisades and ascertained the 
location of the rock-blasting. A map of the Palisade range 
on a large scale has been prepared, showing the part still in- 
tact and the parts affected by the quarry work. 

If your Honorable Bodies are disposed to legislate upon 
this subject, I recommend the enactment of a law providing 
for the appointment of a commission of three persons, to serve 
without compensation, empowered to negotiate and agree, for 
the purchase by the State, of any land or lands, whenever, in 
their opinion, it shall be necessary to purchase the same, in 
order to preserve to the public any feature or object of natural 
scenery, or to secure such lands for any public use or purpose, 
and with the concurrence of the Governor (and other State 
oflficials if thought best) to consummate such purchase ; or, if 
unable to agree with the owners for such purchase, and such 
lands are desired for any public use or purpose, then, with 
the approval of said State officials, to institute proceedings 
for taking such land by condemnation. 

Provision should also be made that the commissioners 
may, with the approval of the same officials, sell or exchange 
any lands by them purchased or acquired, if it be found 
more advantageous to sell or exchange the same, imposing 
such restrictions and limitations upon the land sold or ex- 
changed as they may deem fit and proper. 

Such a law, while general and ai)plying to the entire State, 
would, as applied to the present situation in the Palisades, 
operate about as follows : 

To stop the impending destruction, some one or more 



398 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

tracts of land to be used as public parks or reservations 
would have to be acquired by purchase or condemnation. 
The quantity of land would not be great or the price there- 
for beyond the ability of the State to pay from current re- 
ceipts or funds on hand. If, for any reason, it should subse- 
quently be deemed advisable to sell or exchange any of the 
land so acquired, the sale or exchange could be effected upon 
such terms and conditions as the State might see fit to im- 
pose. It is not probable that the sale or exchange of any 
Palisades land Avould involve much, if any, loss. Nor is it 
likely that any grantee would object to the imposition of re- 
strictions intended to preserve the condition of affairs on 
which the value of the property depends. 

The process of purchase or condemnation might have to 
be several times repeated, but in every instance the operation 
and effect of the law would be as above stated. Persons 
would not be apt to engage in destructive operations or even 
threaten so to do for specu'ative purposes, when they realized 
that the only effect thereof would be the taking of the lands 
by the State at a fair valuation. 

In course of time the State might, through the operation 
of such a law as is above detailed, possess several small de- 
tached parks or reservations upon the Palisades. By sa'e 
or exchange, as provided for, the detached and separated 
parks could be brought together and one or more parks of 
considerable area formed. If at any time deemed advisable, 
the State could doubtless, by sale, reimburse itself all outlays 
and expenditures. 

RIPARIAN MATTERS. 

The Riparian Commission, after careful and thorough con- 
sideration of the subject, is of the opinion that a new policy 
should be adopted by the State in disposing of its riparian 
lands. 

They say : " They believe that it would be wise for the State 
to refuse to make any more grants of these lands in fee, and 
to dispose of them henceforth only by lease. 

" If such a policy had been started in the beginning, and 
continued until the present time, the State income from this 
source would now be very large. 

"The present value of all the riparian lands that have 
been sold in fee is $7,503,146. If these lands had been 
leased instead of sold they would now turn into the treasury, 
under the present rates, rentals to the amount of $525,522.22 
per annum. 

"The present value of the riparian lands of the State, re- 
maining unsold, aggregating 400 miles of water-front, is $25,- 



GOVERNORS MESSAGE. 399 

344,000. If these lands were rented at the present rates they 
would return in the way of rentals, $1,479,509.78 per annum. 

"The proposition of the commissioners is, that the riparian 
lands of the State, after a fixed date, say the first of next 
July, be rented under a lease of twenty-one years, with 
renewal at the expiration of that time under a revaluation. 

"There is no doubt, in the judgment of the commissioners, 
that such a policy would immensely increase the revenue from 
this source, rising, in time, to imperial magnitude, under the 
development of this State's material resources, to which they 
are manifestly destined. 

"The commissioners recommend that the Legislature enact 
a law making this the settled policy of the State." 

I approve the recommenHation of the commission, and trust 
your Honorable Bodies will comply therewith. 

THE OYSTER INDUSTRY. 

For several years past controversies have existed between 
persons engaged in the oyster industry in Delaware bay, and 
others claimiug certain riparian rights or privileges. At 
times these controversies have led to breaches of the peace, 
and during the winter of 1893-94 culminated in a violent 
outbreak. This occasioned the passage of a joint resolution 
by the last Legislature, "providing for the appointment of 
three commissioners to examine into the difficulties existing 
among the oystermen of Maurice river cove and Delaware 
bay." 

In pursuance of said joint resolution a commission was duly 
appointed and reported within ten days. Their report, with 
their conclusions and recommendations, was transmitted to 
the Legislature still in session, but was unacted upon by that 
body. The report is also appended to the report of the Ei- 
parian Commissioners for the year ending October 31st last. 
The report is a most exhaustive, thorough and intelligent 
treatment of the subject. I shall not enter into its details, 
but content myself with merely stating its conclusion and 
recommendations, earnestly requesting your Honorable Bodies 
to examine the report and give it the consideration its import- 
ance warrants and demands. 

The conclusions are as follows: 

" 1. That unless some radical change is made in the law.-, 
the industry will be extinguished. 

"2. That State control of the oyster lands, under proper 
regulations as to their use, is desirable. 

"3. That the dredging for natural oysters in the bay 
should be prohibited, either in whole or in part, for a period 
of years. 



400 GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE. 

"4. That a'rough-cuir law should be enacted ; that is, a 
law requiring the dredger to separate the oysters from the 
shells of the bed, and thus prevent the carrying away of the 
beds themselves." 

The following are the recommendations : 

"This commission strongly recommend that the oyster 
lands in Maurice River cove and Delaware bay be placed 
under State control, as necessary to their preservation. Con- 
necticut, Delaware, Maryland and Virginia, all States having 
large oyster interests, have adopted this policy, to the benefit 
and satisfaction of their citizens. 

' A law should be enacted providing for the leasing by the 
State to private persons of lands to be used for the cultiva- 
tion of oysters south of the 'southwest line,' and for which a 
small annual rent per acre should be charged. In thus tak- 
ing control of lands for the cultivation of oysters, the State 
should respect the rights of the pers ns who now occupy 
staked-up grounds, and they should have the first right to 
leases for the same, and to have the title to all oysters now 
placed thereon. All vessels engaged in the business should 
pay a tonnage tax to the State and receive licenses. Proper 
regulations for the use of the bay, and for the protection of 
the natural oysters, should be made, and should include the 
power to prohibit dredging on the natural oyster grounds for 
a time; the introduction of a 'rough-cull' rule; provision 
for replenishing the oyster beds with shells, at State expense. 
Adequate means should be provided by guard _ boats to 
enforce the law an 1 protect the bay. Severe penalties should 
be provided for violations of the law, and in case of offiending 
vessels the license should be revoked. A reasonable rental 
and license fee should be charged, sufficien': only to provide 
funds to properly protect the industry and enforce the law. 

" In case the oyster lands are placed under State control, 
the commission advise that the State acquire title, by con- 
demnation or otherwise, to the lands covered by these 
riparian grants, to the end that all the oyster territory may 
be held by the State and the use thereof regulated for the 
benefit of all its citizens." 

The commission state they are convinced that a large 
majority of all parties interested concur in their conclusions 
and recommendations. 

Concerning the report of the "Oyster Commission," the 
Riparian Commissioners in their annual report say : " This 
report is a clear and exhaustive treatment of the subject, and 
the Riparian Commissioners indorse the recommendations in 
that report that the Legislature enact a law placing these 
oyster beds under State control, and providing for a system 



GOVERNOR'S Message. 4o1 

of tonnage tax and licenses out of which to meet the expense 
of policing and protecting these lands from unlawful en- 
croachments. This would settle a vexed question on an 
equitable and satisfactory basis, and save a great interest 
from threatened destruction." 

I fully agree with both commissions, and recommend the 
enactment of legislation in accordance with their conclusions 
iind recommendations. 

Sallot reform and reform in primary elections. 

As to changes in the Ballot Reform law, if any be con- 
templated, I beg to suggest that "mere change is not reform." 
The great objects to be attained in any system of voting are 
freedom of the individual voter from coercion, intimidation 
or undue influence from employers or others, and the ina- 
bility of the briber or corruptionist to know whether his 
contract of bribery or corruption has been fulfilled. Any 
system of voting that effectually secures these ends with the 
least annoyance and inconvenience to the voter is the best 
system. Some " reformers " seem to be of the opinion that 
the suffrage is purified in proportion as the procuring of a 
ballot or the act of voting is made difficult and annoying. 
Such views should not prevail. 

Judged by the standards above mentioned, the ballot law 
of this State is better than any other within my knowledge. 
Experience in elections occurring under its provisions has 
demonstrated its efficiency as well as simplicity. Eather 
than sanction any extensive innovations by way of " blanket 
ballots" or intermingling of all candidates upon one ticket, 
I would much prefer the voting machine known as the 
Meyers machine, or some similar device, if any there be. I 
mention the Meyers machine merely because, having been 
brought to my attention through the public press, I have seen 
and inspected it, and because it is already in use in several 
of the towns and cities of New York. I am indisposed in an 
oflBcial communication to seem to indorse or recommend any 
particular voting contrivance, but in case changes of the 
character deprecated should be proposed in the existing law, 
I invoke your examination of such appliances as may be pos- 
sible. "Voting by machinery," I am sure, is much more 
simple, easy, efficient and expeditious than several of the 
methods now in use. It might possibly require a constitu- 
tional amendment to permit the use of mechanical instru- 
ments in this State, but I think not. The recent amendments 
adopted in the State of New York provided for their use as a 
measure of precaution, although the machines had been 
quite extensively used in that State theretofore. 



MBIVIBERS 

OF THE 

One Hufidfed and Nineteenth Legislatuie 

OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY, 
With Post Office Address and Expiration of Term of Senators. 



SENATE. 



County. Name. P. 0. Address. 

Atlantic Samuel D. Hoffman, R.. 1896* Atlantic City. 

Bergen. Henry D. Winton, D., 1896* Hackensack. 

Burlington William C. Parry, R . 1893 Hainesport, 

Camden Maurice A. Rogers, R., 1897.. Camden. 

Cape May ., Edmund L. Ross, R., 1898 Cape May C. H. 

Cumberland.. ..Edward C. Stokes, R., 1896* Millville. 

Essex George W. Ketcham, R , 1897 Newark. 

Gloucester Daniel J. Packer, R., 1897 Woodbury. 

Hudson William D. Daly, D , 1896* Hoboken. 

Hunterdon Richard S Kuhl. D., 1898... Flemington. 

Mercer William H. Skirm, R, 1896* Trenton. 

Middlesex Charles B. Herbert, R., 1898 New Brunswick, 

Monmouth James A. Bradley, R., 1897 Asbury Park. 

Morris Elias C Drake, D., 1896* Chehter, 

Ocean George G. Smith, R , 1896* Lakewood. 

Passaic Robert Williams, R . 1898 Paterson. 

Salem John C. Ward, R., 1897 Centreton. 

Somerset Lewis A. Thompson. R., 1897 ^..Somerville. 

Sussex Jacob Gould, R , 1893 Deckertown. 

Union Foster M. Vooehees, R.. 1897 Elizabeth. 

Warren Christopher F. Staates, D., 1897. ..Washington. 

♦Successor to be elected in 1895. 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

County. Name. P. O. Address. 

Atlantic Wesley C. Smith, R Absecon. 

Bergen David D. Zabriskie. Rf Ridgewood. 

Frederick L. Voorhees, R Englewood. 

Burlington George Wildes, R New Egypt. 

MiCAJAH E Matlack, R.f Mount Holly. 

Camden Louis T. Derousse, R Camden. 

Clayton Stafford, R t Ellisburg. 

George William Barnard, R Gloucester City 

Cape May Fubman L. Ludlam, R, South Dennis. 

Cumberland Thomas F. Austin, R.f Millville. 

Bloomfield H. Minch, R Bridgeton. 

(402) 



MEMBERS OF TH^ LEGISLATURE, 40S 

County. Name. P. O. Address. 

Essex George P. Olcott, R.f East Orange. 

Amos W. Harrison, R Livingston. 

Charles B. Storrs, R.f Orange. 

Alfred F. Skinner, R Nutley. 

Charles B. Duncan, R.f Newark. 

James A. Christie, R Newark. 

George L. Smith, R Newark. 

David E. Benedict, R Newark. 

John C. Eisele, R.f Newark. 

Charles A. Schober, R Newark. 

Frederick William Mock, Jr., R.. Newark. 

Gloucester Solomon H. Stanger, Rf Glassboro. 

Hudson William N. Parslow, D Hoboken. 

Henry C. Gruber, R Jersey City. 

Henry M. Nutzhorn, R Hoboken. 

James Usher, D.t Weehawken. 

James F, Blackshaw, R Jersey City. 

Frederick Schober, R Jersey City. 

Pierce J. Fleming, D Jersey City. 

Robert McAndrew, R Jersey City. 

Richard M Smart, D Bayonne. 

William E. Drake, R Jersey City. 

David H. Cagney, D Jersey City. 

Hunterdon Charlel N. Reading, R.f Frenchtown. 

William C. Alpaugh, D f Milford. 

Mercer William L. Wilbur, R f Higtitstown. 

John Ginder, R.f Trenton. 

William T. Exton, R.f Trenton. 

Middlesex George H. Tice, R Perth Amboy. 

Edward W. Hicks, R New Brunswick. 

Andrew H. Slover, R.f South Amboy. 

Monmouth David D. Denise, R.f Freehold. 

C. Asa Francis, R N. Long Branch. 

George B. Snyder, R Fairhaven. 

Morris Charles A. Baker. Rf Led^ewood. 

William C Bates, R.f Parsippany. 

Ocean Abraham Lower, R Point Pleasant. 

Passaic James Robertson, R Paterson. 

Samuel -Bullock, R Paterson. 

Samuel Frederick, R Paterson. 

John King, R Passaic 

Salem Charles W. Powers, R Pennsville. 

Somerset Frank W. Somers, Rf Bound Brook. 

Sussex William P. Couksen, R f Fredon. 

Union Charles N. Codding, R.f Westfield. 

Joseph Cross, R.f Elizabeth. 

John N. Burger, R.+ Elizabeth. 

Warren Samuel V. Davis, Rf Phillipsburg. 

George W. Smith, R Hackettstown. 

t Re-elected. 

Senate— Republicans, 16 Democrats, 5—21 
House —Republicans, 54 Democrats, 6—60 

70 11 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 59. 



404 ^TAfE SENATE CONTHOVERS^, 



THE STATE SENATE CONTROVERSY, 
1894. 

The controversy over the organization of the State Senate 
of 1894 wa3 begun on the first day of the session, Tuesday, 
January 9th. The Democratic Senators contended that the 
Senate was a continuous body, and that the hold-over Senators 
should first organize and admit the newly-elected Senators 
to their seats before a permanent organization could be 
effected. 

As a result, the Republican Senators refused to join with 
the Democrats unless assured that the Senators-elect should 
participate in the proceedings of the Senate. This being re- 
fused, the Republicans withdrew and organized by electing 
Maurice A Rogers President The Democrats, not having a 
majority of the whole number of Senators, elected Robert 
Adrain President pro tempore. Both bodies claimed to be the 
Senate of New Jersey and met as a Senate, the Republican 
Senate being recognized by the House of Assembly as the 
true Senate, 

In order to determine which of the claimants, if either of 
them, was the true President of the Senate, a petition was 
filed by the Attorney-General, on the relation of George T. 
Werts, Governor, for leave to file an information in the 
nature of a quo icarranto, against Robert Adrain and Maurice 
A. Rogers, to inquire by what warrant they and each of them 
claimed the said office. This was on February 21st. The 
prayer of the petition was granted by the full-bench of 
the'Supreme Court. The taking of depositions was begun be- 
fore Supeme Court Commissioner S. M. Dickinson, on the 
rule granted by the court, on February 24th, and was finished 
on February 28th, and the cause came up for a hearing at the 
February Term, 1894, on March 5th, and the arguments were 
closed on March 14th. With the exception of Justice Magie, 
whose term had expired, there was a full bench present, con- 
sisting of Chief Justice Beasley and Justices Depue, Van 
Syckel, Dixon, Reed, Garrison, Lippincott and Abbett. For 
the relator appeared Attorney-General Stockton, Robert Y. 
Lindabury and Frederic W. Stevens. For Maurice A. Rogers, 
Thomas N. McCarter, John W. Griggs, Cortlandt Parker, R. 
Wayne Parker, Samuel H. Grey, Joseph Coult, Gilbert Col- 
lins' and William M. Lanning. For Robert Adrain, Allan 
L. McDermott. 

The decision of a majority of the court was rendered by 
Chief Justice Beasley on March 21st, the conclusions being as 
follows : 

" The result of the inquiry before us is, that we have con- 



ADDENDA. 405 

eluded that the Senate of New Jersey is not a continuous 
body, but that it expires annually, in the same sense that the 
Assembly does. 

''Therefore, our conclusion is, that Mr. Adrain has no title 
to the office that he ostensibly holds, and that the appropriate 
judgment must be entered against him. 

" With respect to the title of the opposite c'aimant, Mr. 
Eogers, we hold that his title must be regarded as constitu- 
tional and valid. Our resolution in this regard is founded 
entirely on the ground that, touching the act of re-organizing 
its own body, the majority of Senators are the absolute mas- 
ters of the occasion. Such action is taken by a body co- 
ordinate with ourselves, and whose proceedings, when not 
violative of the Constitution of the State, we have no capacity 
to supervise or control. In our opinion, when a majority of 
Senators organized the Senate and elected Mr. Rogers its 
President, such action was and is conclusive upon this court 
as well as upon all departments of the government." 

The following head-notes are taken from the opinion of the 
court filed in the Supreme Court Clerk's office: 

*' 1. Whether the Senate of the State be a continuous body 
or one to be organized into life annually, is a purely consti- 
tutional question, and therefore as such is to be decided by 
the courts. 

" 2. In such case where there are two bodies, each claiming 
to be the true Senate, an information in the nature of a quo 
warranto is the appropriate process whereby to test such re- 
spective claims. 

" 3. Where a majority of the entire body of Senators 
proceed to organize themselves into a Senate, their methods 
and proceedings are not subject to judicial supervision." 

Justice Abbett filed a dissenting opinion. 



ADDENDA. 



Supreme Court Justice Abbett died on December 4th, and 
Vice Chancellor Van Fleet died on December 26th, 1894. 
The vacancies in the offices had not been filled when the 
Manual went to press. 

The Newark Times, which had suspended publication as a 
morning paper, resumed as an afternoon paper. 

The Newark Journal has suspended publication entirely. 

Changes in the management of the Newark Daily Advertiser 
have been made as follows : Frederick Evans, Jr., is editor ; 
John J. Leidy, managing editor, and Lorenzo H. Abbey, 
business manager. 

The Trenton Town Talk has suspended publication. 



ORGANIZATION 



One Hundrted and WinetBBnth Legi^IatuPe. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

President — Edward C. Stokes, Cumberland. 

President's Private Secretary— Joseph C. Kingdon, Burling- 
ton. 

Secretary — Henry B. Eollinson, Union. 

Assistant Secre ary -Edward M. F.elder, Monmouth. 

Journal Clerk — William H. Long, Somerset. 

Assistant Journal Clerk — Andrew S. Church, Middlesex. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — James L. Smith, Cumberland. 

Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms — Reuben R, Carter, Mercer. 

Engrossing Clerk — John G. Shreve, Atlantic. 

Assistant Engrossing Clerk — Charles J. Patterson, Ocean. 

Bill Clerk — Charles V. Hance, Ocean. 

Assistant Bill Clerk — John Wagner, Ocean. 

Calendar Clerks — Richard T. Starr, Salem ; James E. Stan- 
ton, Sussex. 

Doorkeepers — L. E Rose, Benjamin F. Davis, Edward R. 
Davis, Robert Herrman, David Vannote, Cortlandt Castle, 
James Steele, Gandy Robinson. 

Keeper of Cloak-Room — William Rodman. 

Clerk Committee on Engrossed Bills — Charles Pearson, 
Essex. 



ASSEMBLY OFFICERS. 

Speaker — Joseph Cross, Union. 

Speaker's Private Secretary — Charles C. McBride, Union. 

Clerk— James Parker, Passaic. 

Assistant Clerk — William F. Cyphers, Essex. 

Journal Clerk — John L. Swayze, Sussex. 

Assistant Journal Clerk — Joshua Matlack, Jr., Burlington. 

Engrossing Clerk — Edgar Williams, Essex. 

First Assistant Engrossing Clerk — W. Irving Norton, 
Mercer. 

Second Assistant Engrossing Clerk — R. Starr Keeler, Cam- 
den. 

Document Clerk — James P. Logan, Middlesex. 

Sergeant-at-Arms — Lysander E. W^atson, Monmouth 

First Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms —Daniel H. Hunt,'Essex. 

Second Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms — Edward Hance, Morris. 

Bill Clerk— Thomas M. Belknap, Union. 

First Assistant Bill Clerk — C. E. Bellows, Cumberland. 

(406) 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 407 

Second Assistant Bill Clerk — G. Frank Sutherland, Hudson. 

Postmaster — John Kerr, Hudson. 

Doorkeepers— George Hess, John H. Hughes, Albert Ottin- 
ger, Henry C. Garretson, Frank Barkley, John Roland, J. 
Clark Oliver, William H. Depue, Daniel Walters, Philip 
Beyer, Abel J. Berry, George Stanton, Jacob Euddinger, 
John Cherry, Joseph Kallner, George J. Force, Anthony 
Bratsch, William B. Tompkins, Clarence H. Leland, John 
Dykes, George Botyble, John Hunter, John Lloyd, Isaac 
Jacobs, David Miller. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Senate. 

Judiciary — Voorhees, Rogers, Daly. 

Revision of the Laws —Hoffman, Williams, Herbert. 

Appropriations — Rogers, Ro&s, Gould. 

Finance — Smith, Thompson, Winton. 

Corporations — Thompson, Packer, Staates. 

Municipal Corporations — Skirm, Ketcham, Daly. 

Railroads and Canals— Herbert, Ward, Kuhl. 

Banks and Insurance — Ketcham, Williams, Ross. 

Education — Hoffman, Bradley, Ketcham. 

Militia— Skirm, Williams, Drake. 

Game and Fisheries -Ward, Smith, Gould. 

Riparian Rights— Bradley, Ross, Winton. 

Agriculture and Agricultural College — Packer, Tliompson, 
Parry. 

Miscellaneous Business— Ketcham, Skirm, Parry. 

Elections — Williams, Voorhees, Winton. 

Claims and Pensions— Smith, Packer, Drake. 

Unfinished Business — Thompson, Ward, Staates. 

Engrossed Bills — Ward. Ross, Drake. 

Labor and Industries— Rogers, Bradley, Kuhl. 

Boroughs and Borough Commissions — Bradley, Smith, 
Parry. 

Assembly. 

Agriculture and Agricultural College— Denise, Coursen, 
Stanger, Harrison, Alpaugh. 

Banks and Insurance— Eisele, Davis, Ginder, McAndrew, 
Minch. 

Bill Revision— Coursen, Frederick, Nutzhorn, Robertson, 
Cagney. 

Boroughs and Borough Commissions— Exton, G. W. Smith, 
Storrs, Lower, Alpaugh. 



408 LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 

Claims and Kevolutionary Pensions— W. C. Smith, C. A. 
Schober, Powers, McAndrew, Snyder. 

Corporations -Stafford, Duncan, Snyder, Baker, Cagney. 

Education — Wilbur, Tice, Drake, Barnard, G. L. Smith. 

Elections — Stanger, C. A. Schober, Voorhees, Davie, 
Fleming. 

Engrossed Bills— Matlack, Lower, Harrison, Christie, 
Smart. 

Game and Fisheries— Baker, Francis, G. L. Smith, King, 
Powers. 

Incidental Expenses— Drake, Tice, G. W. Smith, Derousse, 
Burger. 

Judiciary — Storrs, Eobertson, Skinner, Exton, Usher, 

Labor and Industries — Austin, Benedict, Bullock, Gruber, 
Smart. 

Militia— Bates, Matlack, Mock, Blackshaw, Ludlam. 

Miscellaneous Business - Burger, Zabriskie, Wildes, Bene- 
dict, Bullock. 

Municipal Corporations —Codding, Stafford, Eisele, F. 
Schober, King. 

Railroads and Canals— Olcott, Derousse, Denise, Wilbur, 
Fleming. 

Revision of the Laws — Zabriskie, Austin, Nutzhorn, Hicks, 
Parslow. 

Riparian Rights — Reading, Blackshaw, Slover, Christie, 
Barnard. 

Stationery — Duncan, Hicks, Minch, F. Schober, Francis. 

Towns and Townships— Somers, Frederick, Reading, Voor- 
hees, Wildes. 

L^nfinished Business— Ginder, Ludlam, ^Mock, Gruber, 
Parolow. 

Ways and Means— Slover, Bates, Somers, Skinner, Usher. 



Joint Committees. 

treasurer's accounts. 
Senate — Hoffman, Thompson, Winton. 
House— Derousse, Zabriskie, Eisele, F. Schober, Codding. 

STATE PRISON. 

Senate— Thompson, Herbert, Kuhl. 

House— Ginder, Stanger, Benedict, Somers, Cagney. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

Senate — Voorhee?, Ward, Smith. 

House — Bates, McAndrew, Olcott, Davis, Alpaugh. 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 409 

STATE LIBRARY. 

Senate — Skirm, Bradley, Gould. 

House — Nutzhorn, Storrs, Matlack, Exton, Usher. 

PUBLIC GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

Senate — Ketcham, Skirm, Packer. 

House— Powers, Coursen, Mock, Wildes, Gruber. 

PRINTING. 

Senate — Parry, Ketcham, Kuhl. 

House — Blackshaw, Stafibrd, King, Harrison, G. W. Smith. 

PASSED BILLS. 

Senate— Smith, Voorhees, Daly. 

House — Hicks, Austin, Denise, Mock, Bullock. 

COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION. 

Senate— Gould, Thompson, Staates. 

House — W. C. Smith, Olcott, C. A. Schober, Stanger, Fleming. 

FEDERAL RELATIONS. 

Senate — Bradley, Ward, Drake. 

House — Frederick, C. A. Schober, Minch, Codding, Powers. 

soldiers' HOME. 

Senate— Ross, Herbert, Drake. 

House — Lower, Christie, King, Voorhees, Beading. 

reform school for boys. 
Senate— Hoffman, Packer, Staates. 
House -Slover, Francis, Baker, F. Schober, Christie. 

SINKING FUND. 

Senate — Ketcham, Voorhees, Daly. 

House— Robertson, Mc Andrew, G. L. Smith, Ludlam, Smart. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

Senate— Smith, Bradley, Kuhl. 

House— Ludlam, Drake, Barnard, Wilbur, Parslow. 

SCHOOL FOR deaf-mutes. 

Senate — Skirm, Rogers, Winton. 

House— Tice, Burger, Skinner, Snyder, W. C. Smith. 

COMMITTEE ON CLERGY. 

Senate — Skirm, Ketcham, Parry. 
House— Exton, Davis, Cagney. 

18 



410 LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENTS. 



LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENTS. 

Lawrence S. Mott — ^ew; York Commercial Adveriiser, Newark 
Daily Advertiser. 

Charles H. Levy — United Press, New Jersey Freie Zeitung, 

John J. Cleary — Philadelphia Ledger. 

Henry C. Buchanan — Paterson Press, New York Sun. 

James Martin — New York World. 

William H. Koons — New York Herald, Philadelphia Press, 
New York Times, Paterson Morning Call, New York Mail and 
Express. 

William K. DeTereux — State Gazette, True American. 

James E. Burt— jTrue American, State Gazette. 

T. Edward Burke — Newark Evening News. 

Charles A. Ransom — Jersey City News, New York Press. 

J. S. Grunow — Jersey City Journal. 

Charles H. Bateman — New York Evening Post, True Ameri- 
can, Philadelphia Telegraph. 

W. Holt Apgar — Hohoken Evening News, Hunterdon County 
Democrat. 

W.Scott Snyder — New York Evening World, Lakewood Times 
and Journal. 

Harry B. Salter — New York Evening World, New York 
Recorder. 

Harry C. Valentine — New York Tribune. 

John P. jyaUard— Trenton Times, Associated Press. 

William S. F otter— Somerset Messenger, Plainfield Daily 
Press. 

Upton S. Jefferys — Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Louis T. Peale — Neiv York Evening Sun. 

Alfred H. Biles — Philadelphia Times. 

G. Frank Sutherland — Hoboken Daily Observer. 

John J. Farrell — Newark Times. 

William H, Cole — Camden Courier. 

Walter H. Fell — New- York Standard Press Association. 

Thomas F. Fitzgerald — Philadelphia Record, Paterson Guar- 
dian, Trenton Sunday Advertiser, State Gazette. 



INDEX, 



A. PAGte 

Addenda 405 

Adjutant-Generals SINCE 1776 83 

Amendments, Constitutional, recommended in 1894, 170 

Appointments, Executive, 1895-96-97-98 287-291 

Appointments, Joint Meeting 169 

Assembly Officers, 1845 to 1894 110 



Assembly Rules 65 

Bills and Joint Resolutions 71 

Bills, Leave to Introduce 66 

Committees 70 

Committee of the Whole House 71 

Decorum and Debate 67 

Duties of Speaker , 65 

Joint Committees 70 

Joint Rules and Orders 74 

Meeting of the House 65 

Motions , 68 

Order of Business 66 

Rules 72 

Assemblymen by Counties, 1845 to 1893 90-105 

Assemblymen by Counties 1894-95 165-167 

Assemblymen, with Post Office Addresses 402, 403 

Attorney-Generals since 1704 81 

B. 

Biographies — Assemblymen — 

Alpaugh Hunterdon 239 

Austin Cumberland 226 

Baker Morris 244 

Barnard Camden 225 

Bates Morris 245 

Benedict Essex 230 

Blackshaw Hudson 236 

Bullock Passaic 246 

Burger Union 250 

Cagney Hudson 238 

*18 (411) 



4l^ INDEX. 

BiOGR A pn lES —Assemblymen— ( Continued) — page 

Christie ....Essex 229 

Codding Union 249 

Coursen Sussex 248 

Cross Union 249 

Davis Warren 251 

Denise Monmouth 242 

Derousse Camden 225 

Drake Hudson 237 

Duncan Essex 229 

Eisele Essex 231 

Exton Mercer 241 

Fleming Hudson 237 

Francis Monmouth 243 

Frederick Passaic 247 

Ginder Mercer 240 

Gruber Hudson 234 

Harrison Essex 228 

Hicks Middlesex... 242 

King Passaic 247 

Lower Ocean 245 

Ludlam Cape May 226 

Matlack Burlington 224 

McAndrew Hudson 237 

Minch Cumberland 227 

Mock Essex 232 

Nutzhorn Hudson 235 

Olcott Essex 227 

Parslow Hudson 234 

Powers Salem 248 

Reading Hunterdon 239 

Robertson Passaic 246 

Schober Essex 231 

Schober Hudson 236 

Skinner Essex 229 

Slover Middlesex 242 

Smart Hudson 237 

Smith Atlantic 223 

Smith Essex 230 

Smith Warren 251 

Snyder Monmouth 244 

Somers Somerset 248 

Stafford.... Camden 225 

Stanger Gloucester 233 

Storrs Essex 228 

Tice Middlesex 241 

Usher Hudson 235 



INDEX. 413 

Biographies— Assemblymen— (Confinwec?)— page 

Voorhees... Bergen 223 

Wilbur Mercer 240 

Wildes Burlington 224 

Zabriskie Bergen 223 

Congressmen— 

Fowler.. 206 

Gardner 202 

Howell 203 

Loudenslager 202 

McEwan 206 

Parker , 205 

Pitney , 204 

Stewart 205 

Judiciary — 

Beasley, Chief Justice.... 255 

Bird, Vice Chancellor 253 

Bogert, Judge 262 

Brown, Judge 261 

Child, Judge 261 

Depue, Justice 256 

Dixon, Justice 257 

Garrison, Justice 259 

Green, Vice Chancellor and Judge 254 

Krueger, Judge 262 

Lippincott, Justice 259 

Magie, Justice 258 

McGill, Chancellor 252 

Miller, Judge 260 

Pitney, Vice Chancellor 254 

Eeed, Justice 258 

Sims, Judge 263 

Smith, Judge 261 

Van Syckel, Justice 257 

Senators— 

Bradley Monmouth 216 

Daly Hudson 213 

Drake Morris 217 

Gould Sussex 220 

Herbert Middlesex 216 

Hoffman Atlantic 207 

Ketcham Essex 211 

Kuhl Hunterdon 214 

Packer Gloucester 212 

Parry Burlington 209 

Rogers Camden 210 



414 INDEX. 

BiOGRAPHiis — Senators — ( Continued)— page 

Ross Cape May 210 

Skirm Mercer 215 

Smith Ocean 218 

Stokes Cumberland 211 

Staates Warren 221 

Thompson Somerset 220 

Yoorhees Union 221 

Ward Salem 219 

Williams Passaic 219 

AVinton Bergen.., 208 

State Officers— 

Anderson, Supervisor State Prison 279 

Bonnell, Custodian State House 286 

Donnelly, Quartermaster-General 272 

Duryee, Commissioner Banking and Insurance, 283 

Hamilton, State Librarian 280 

Hancock, State Comptroller 268 

Kelly, State Assessor 282 

Kelsey, Secretary of State 266 

Kuser, State Assessor 282 

Lee, Clerk Supreme Court 273 

McDermott, Clerk in Chancery 275 

McMaster, Private Secretary to Governor 284 

Patterson, State Prison Keeper 277 

Plume, General 270 

Poland, Superintendent Public Instruction 276 

Rickey, Assistant Secretary of State 267 

Simmerman, Chief Labor Bureau 285 

Spencer, State Assessor 281 

Stockton, Attorney-General... 269 

Stryker, Adjutant-General 271 

Swain, State Treasurer 268 

Van Cleef, Secretary State Assessors.,... 282 

Werts, Governor 199 

Wismer, State Assessor 281 

United States Officials for New Jersey — 

Beekman, District Attorney 264 

Cranmer, District Court Cierk 265 

Green, Judge 252 

Oliphant, Clerk Circuit Court 264 

Pfeiffer, United States Marshal 266 

United States Senators — 

McPherson, John R 200 

Smith, Jr., James 200 



INDEX. 415 



O. PAGE 

Census of New Jersey 140 

Census of United States 151 

Chancellors since 1845 80 

Chief Justices since 1704 80 

Cities, Towns, &c., with Mayors 196 

Clerks in Chancery since 1831 81 

Clerks of Supreme Court since 1776 81 

Classification, Counties, Cities and Boroughs Ill 

Cleveland and Thurman Vote 1888 128, 136 

Cleveland and Stevenson Vote 1892 137, 138 

Committees, Legislative 407-409 

Congress Vote for 1894 379 

Congress, Continental 75 

Congressional Districts, New 202-206 

Congressional Districts' Vote and Population... 207 

Congressmen, Biographies of 202-207 

Congressmen, List of 300 

Congressmen from 1789 to Date 75-79 

Constitution of New Jersey 37-56 

Constitution, United States 17-36 

Constitutional Commission, 1873 , 115 

Constitutional Commission, 1894 170 

Constitutional Convention, 1844 113 

Correspondents of Press, List of 410 

County Officials— 

Atlantic 305 

Bergen 305 

Burlington 306 

Camden 306 

Cape May 307 

Cumberland 307 

Essex 308 

Gloucester 308 

Hudson 309 

Hunterdon 309 

Mercer 310 

Middlesex 310 

Monmouth 311 

Morris 311 

Ocean 312 

Passaic 312 

Salem 312 

Somerset 313 

Sussex 313 



416 INDEX. 

County Officials — ( Continued) — page 

Union 314 

Warren 314 

Courts — 

Circuits 315 

Chancery Court, Judges of 294 

County Courts (see County Officials). 

District Court Judges 294 

Errors and Appeals, Judges of. 294 

Pardons, Court of, Members of. 294 

Supreme Court, Members of. 294 

Terms of County Courts 305-314 

Terms State Courts 315 

United States Circuit, Officials of. 293 

United States District, Officials of 293 

D. 

Debts of Cities and Towns 139 

Declaration of Independence 13 

Democratic Society of New Jersey, Officers 154 

E. 

Election Precincts, Number of, by Counties 377 

Election Keturns, 1894 329-382 

Election Keturns for all States, 1892 137 

Election, Special, on Constitutional Amendments, 

1890 106 

Electoral College (old) 128 

Electoral College (new) 128 

Electoral Vote of New Jersey since 1789 129 

Electoral Vote of the Union, 1892 138 

Executive Appointments, 1895, '96, '97, '98 287-291 

G. 

Governor, Vote for, 1892 379 

Governor, Vote for since 1844 162 

Governor's Appointments, 1895, '96, '97, '98 287-291 

Governors, List of, since 1665 10 

Governor's Message, Extracts from 387-401 

Governor's Prerogatives 168 

Governor's Staff 303 

qubernatorial tickets, 1892 160 



INDEX. 41? 



H. PAGE 

Sarrison and Morton Vote, 1888 ..128-136 

Harrison and Keid Vote, 1892 137-138 

History of New Jersey , 7 

J. 

Joint Meeting Appointments 169 

Joint Kules and Orders 74 

Judiciary, Members of, since 1704 80 

Justices of Supreme Court since 1';04 80 

L. 

Legislature— 

Members of, from 1845 to 1893 86-105 

Members of, 1894-95 165 

Officers, 1895 406, 407 

Political complexion since 1840 163 

Sessions of, from 1845 to 1894 84 

M. 

Map of New Jersey opp. page 121 

Mayors, Cities, Boroughs 196 

Military Officers, 1895 303 

N. 
Newspapers, List of New Jersey...... 175-195 

P. 

Platforms, State Democratic 155 

Platforms, State Kepublican 157 

Population of New Jersey by Counties 149 

Population of Cities and Towns 150 

Population and Vote each Cong. District 1892-94, 207 

Population of United States 151 

Presidential Elections since 1852 132 

Presidential Tickets, 1892 159 

Presidential Vote, 1880 and 1884 135 

Presidential Vote, 1888 136 

Presidential Vote, 1892 137 

Presidential Vote of New Jersey, 1840 to date.. 161 

Presidents of the Senate since 1845 109 

Presidents and Vice Presidents, List of, since 

1789 130-131 

Public Koads, Keport 385, 386 



416 1n1)EX. 

Q. PAGte 
Quartermaster Generals since 1776 83 

R. 

Kepublican League of New Jersey, Officers 154 

KoADS, Public, Keport 385, 386 

S. 

Salaries and Terms of Office, State Officials.. 300 

Secretaries of State since 1776 82 

Senate Controversy, 1894 404, 405 

Senate Officers, 1845 to 1894 109 

Senate Officers, 1895 406 

Senate Rules — 

Bills and Joint Resolutions 59 

Committees 58 

Disorder 63 

Executive Session 64 

Joint Rules and Orders 74 

Members 62 

Messages 62 

Motions and their precedence 61 

Order of Business 57 

President 57 

Quorum 57 

Secret Session 63 

Senate Bills in the House 62 

Special Orders 63 

Rules 64 

Senatorial Elections, when they occur 222 

Senators, with Post Office Addresses 402 

Senators by Counties, 1894-95 165-167 

Signers Declaration of Independence 16 

Speakers of the House, 1776 to date 108-110 

State Boards, Institutions, &c., Managers, Mem- 
bers, Trustees, Reports, &c. — 

Agricultural College, Board of Visitors to 298 

Agricultural College Fund Commissioners 296 

Agricultural Experimental Station, Managers of. 298 

Agriculture, State Board, Officers 296 

Agriculture, State Board of. Report 3S3 

Arbitration, State Board of 297 

Assessors, State Board, Members 296 

Assessors, State Board, Report 317 

Asylums — Morris Plains State Hospital Report 6 



INDEX. 419 

State Board?, Institutions, &c. — [Continued)— page 

Asylums — Trenton State Hospital Report 325 

Asylums (State Hospitals), Managers, &c 295 

Charities and Corrections, Board of. Members 297 

College, State Agricultural, Officers 298 

College, State Agricultural, Visitors to 298 

Deaf-Mute School, Report 322 

Dentistry, State Board of. 297 

Education, State Board of. Members 295 

Factories and Workshops, Inspectors and Deputies.. 297 

Feeble-Minded Children, Home, Managers 299 

Feeble-Minded Women, Home, Managers 299 

Fish Commissioners and Wardens 298 

Geological Survey, Managers 299 

Health, State Board of. Members 296 

Health, State Board of. Report 323 

Industrial School for Girls, Trustees 297 

Industrial School for Girls, Report 328 

Labor Statistics, Chief of Bureau 295 

Library, State, Commissioners of.' 296 

Medical Examiners, State Board of 297 

Miscellaneous Corporations, Revenue 319 

National Guard, List of Officers 303 

Normal and Model Schools, Report 319 

Pharmacy, State Board of. 297 

Pilotage, Commissioners of 296 

Public Instruction, County and City Superintendents, 300 

Railroad Taxation, Revenue 318 

Reform School for Boys, Trustees 297 

Reform School for Boys, Report 327 

Riparian Commissioners, List of. 296 

School Fund, Trustees of 295 

Soldiers' Home, Managers 297 

Soldiers' Home, Report 326 

State Board of Education 295 

State Board of Taxation 296 

State Prison, Inspectors 297 

State Prison, Report 328 

State Treasurer's Report for 1894 .. 316 

State Treasurers since 1776 82 

Statistics, Vital, Report of. 324 

Weather Service, Chief of. 296 

State Buildings, &c., Sketches of— 

Arsenal, State 120 

Asylum (State Hospital), Trenton 121 

Asylum (State Hospital), Morris Plains 122 

Deaf-Mute School 125 



420 INDEX. 

State Buildings, &c. — {Continued) — page 

Feeble-Minded Women 126 

Feeble-Minded Children 127 

Industrial School for Girls 123 

Library, State 119 

Normal and Model Schools... 122 

Reform School for Boys 123 

Soldiers' Home 125 

State Capitol 116 

State Prison 124 

State Comptrollers since 1865 82 

State Executive Committees 153 

State Officers from 1776 to date 82 

State Officers, List of, 1895 294 

State Prison Keepers since 1829 83 

State Senatorial Elections, when occur 222 

State Senators, by Counties, since 1845 86-89 

State Treasurers since 1776 82 

Supreme Court Justices, 1895 80 

T. 

Terms of Office and Salaries, State Officials... 300 
Time of Holding Courts 315 

U. 

United States Census 140 152 

United States Court Officials, 1895 293 

United States Court Officials since 1789 293 

United States Government, 1895 292 

United States Population 151 

United States Senators since 1789 12 

V. 

Vice Presidents of Council, 1776 to 1844 107 

Weather Service, State Director of 296