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Full text of "Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey"

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J328 C^Py ^ 

M29U N. J. Manual oi the Legisla- 
ture of New Jersey 

1899 



J328 



M291I M. J. Manual of the Legi 
AUTHOR ''^^^ ^ ^ ^^ N ^^ ^ J o r ^o y 



Copy 3 



TITLE 



1899 



DATE DUE 



lORROWER'S NAME 



New Jersey State Library 

Department of Education 

Trenton, New Jersey 08625 



(Wf PWNTtt IN \i.mjL 




^O^J^^ ^ . (/^>0^-£tjUt; 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



MANUAL 



Legislature of New Jersey. 



One Hundred and Twenty-Third Session. 



1899. 




€&^^ i 



BY AUTHORITY OF THE LCGISLATURE. 

Copyright, 1899, bj' T. F. Fitzgerald. 



TRENTON. N. J.: 

T. F. FITZGERALD, LEGISLATIVE REPORTER, 

Compiler and Publisher. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in 1899, by 

THOMAS F. FITZGERALD, 

In the office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



^r- The newspaper press are weicome to use such parts of the work 
as they may desire, on giving credit therefor to the Manual. 



MaLCrellish & Quigley, Printers, 

!rBfrrJEBS.5:y STATE LIBRARY 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIOK 
TRENTON, N?:W JT.RSEY 



(^alendaf for I899. 







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Feb. 


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Aug. 


30 


31 












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.. 






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Mar. 








1 


2 


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4 


Sep. 












1 


2 




5 


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8 


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11 




3 


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26 


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28 


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30 


31 


,. 




24 


25 


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27 


28 


29 


30 


Apr. 


... 
2 


■3 


■4 


■5 


6 


■7 


1 
8 


Oct. 
















1 


2 


3 


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5 


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9 


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12 


13 


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15 




8 


9 


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16 


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19 


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22 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


i 


23 
30 


21 

... 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




22 
29 


23 
30 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


! May 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


Nov. 








1 


2 


3 


4 


■ 


7 8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




14 


15 


16 


17 


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19 


20 




12 


13 


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18 




21 


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23 


24 


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26 


27 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




28 


29 


30 


31 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






June 




... 






1 


2 


3 


Dec. 












1 


2 




4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




















31 












i= 




5= 




^^- 


— 


ILLi 



1 
PERPETUAL CALENDAR 


FOB ASCERTAINING THE DAY OF THE WKKK FUR ANY VKAK 


BETWEEN 1700 AND 2499. 


Table of Dominical 


Month. 


Dominical Letter. 


Letters. 




1 


YEAR OF the 


'centub's. 


Jan. Oct. 


A 


B 


c 


bIe 


F 


G 


century. 


1 


1 


Feb. Mar. Nov. 
Jan. Apr. July 


D 
G 


E 
A 


F 
B 


G A 


B 

K 


c 

F 


o" 


j_. 


^ 


I 


C 


1) 


iV. B.—A star 


2 


'P 


o 


May 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


on the left 


"^ 




it 


IM 


June 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


C 


1> 


denotes leap 


8 


o 
E 


s 


o 


Feb. Aug. 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


A 


B 


year. , 


r-l 

C 


5> 


A 


Sept. Dec. 


F 


G 


A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


*28'*56 


J. 


ih 


is' 2-. 


29 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


7 


7 


1 29 


57 


So 


B 


D 


F 


G 


2| 9 


16 23 


80 


M 


S 


s 


F 


Th 


\\- 


Tu 


2 30 


58 


86 


A 


C 


E 


F 


3 10 


17124 


31 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


F 


Th 


W 


3 31 


59 


87 1 


G 


B 


D 


E 


4 


11 


18,25 




W 


Tu 


M 


s 


S 


F 


Th 
















5 


12 


19,26 




Th 


W 


Tu 


INI 


§ 


s 


F 


*4*32 


*60*88! 


E 


G 


B 


C 


6 


13 


20' 27 




F 


Th 


W 


Tu 




s 


5 


33 


61 


89: 


I) 


F 


A 


B 


7 


14 


21128 




S 


F 


Th 


W 


Tu 


M 


S 


6 

7 

*8 
9 


34 
35 

*36 
37 


62 
63 

*64 

65 


90 
91 

*92 
93 


c 

B 

G 
F 


E 
D 

B 
A 


G 

I 

C 


A 

G 

E 
D 
























EXPI.ANATION. 


10 
11 


38 
39 


66 
67 


94 
95 


E 
D 


G 
F 


B 
A 


C 
B 


Under the Century, and in the line with 
the Year of the Century, is the Dominical 


*12 *40 


*68 


*96 


B 


D 


F 


G 


Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 


13 
14 


41 

42 


69 
70 


97 
98 


A 
G 


C 
B 


E 
D 


1 


the month find the column containing 


15 


43 


71 


99 


F 


A 


C 


D 


this letter ; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 


*16*44 
17| 45 

IS 46 


*79 




D 

n 


F 

E 
D 


A 

G 
F 


5 

G 


the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 




B 


January and February are in the lines 


19 47 


75 




A 


C 


E 


F 


where these mouths are printed in Italics. 


*20 *48 


*76 




F 


A 


c 


D 




2L 


49 


77 




E 


G 


B 


C 


EXAMPLES. 


22 


50 


78 




D 


F 


A 


B 




23 


51 


79 




c 


E 


G 


A 


For December 31st, 1875 : for 1875, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 


' *24 *52 
25 53 


*80 
81 




A 


c 


E 


F 


Friday; and for January 1st, 1876, the 


2-3 54 


82 




F 


A 


C 


D 


letter is A ; under A, and in a line with 


27 55 

i 


83 




^ 


G 


B 


C 


1, is Saturday. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY, 



In 1606, King James of England granted a new patent 
for Virginia (ignoring that of Sir Walter Raleigh, dated 
in 1584), in which was included the territory now known 
as the New England States and New York, Ntw Jersey, 
Pennsylvania and Maryland. The possession of Eastern 
New Jersey was claimed by the Dutch, the Swedes claim- 
ing the right to the Western portion. The former built 
Fort Nassau, on the Delaware, near Gloucester; Fort 
Orange, on the Hudson, near Albany; and the Hirsse of 
Good Hope, on the Connecticut; t^e latter found the set- 
tlements along the Delaware river, after the Dutch built 
Nassau, the t )rt not being of sufficient strength to main- 
tain their shadowy claims. Disputes as to the rightful 
possession of territory continued for years, until the early 
spring of 1 664, when Charles II. sold to his brother James, 
Duke of York, "all that tract of land adjacent to New 
England, and lying and being to the westward of Long 
Island ; bounded on the east part by the main sea 2iud 
part by the Hudson river, and hath upon the west Dela- 
ware bay or river, and extendeth southward to the main 
ocean as far as Cape May, at the mouth of Delaware bay, 
and to the northward as far as the northernmost branch 
of said bay or river of Delaware, which is forty-one de- 
grees and forty minutes of latitude, and worketh over 
thence in a straight line lo Hudson river, which said tract 
of land is hereafter to be called by the name or names of 
Nova C^sarea or New Jersey." James soon sold this 
to Lord Berkeley and Sir George Carteret. 

The name was given in honor of Carteret, on account 
of his gallant defense of the Island of Jersey, at the time 
he was Governor of the island. 

This grant regarded the Dutch and Swedes as intruders, 
and Berkeley and Carteret not only became rulers, but 
acquired the right to transfer the privilege to others. 
Measures were speedily devised for peopling and govern- 
ing the country. The proprietors published a constitu- 
tion, dated February 10th, 1664, by which the government 
of the province was to be exercised by a Governor and 
Council and General Assembly. The Governor was to 
receive his appointment from the proprietors; the Coun- 
cil was to be selected by the Governor, who might make 
choice of six Councilors, at least (or twelve, at mosf), or 
any even number between six and twelve. 

On the same day that the instrument of government 
wras signed, Philip Carteret, a brother of one of the pro- 

(7) 



8 EISTOR Y OF NEW JERSEY. 

prietors, received a commisson as Governor of New Jersey. 
He landed at Elizabeth in August, 1665. 

The precise date of the first settlements in New Jersey 
is not known, though it is believed that the Danes or Nor- 
wegians, who crossed the Atlantic with the Dutch colo- 
nists, began a settlement at Bergen about the year 1624. 
About ten years previous, an attempt was ma le to form a 
setilement at Jersey City. In 1623, the Dutch West India 
Company sent out a ship under the command of Capt. 
Cornelius Jacobse Mey , who entered the Delaware bay and 
gave hianame to its northern cape, and, sailing up the river 
to Gloucester, built Fort Nassau, which may be considered 
the first permanent settlement of the State. 

Upon the arrival of Governor Carteret, he entered at 
on e upon a vigorous discharge of his duties. A large 
number of settlers flocked thither, and at an early period 
1 he executive authority of the province was established by 
the appointment of a Cc uncil, composed of Captain Nich- 
olas Varlett, Daniel Pierce, Eobert Bond, Samuel Edsall, 
Kobert Varquellen ai.d William Pardon. James Bollen 
was appointed Secretary of the province. 

The first Legislative Assembly in the history of New 
Jersey met at Elizabethtown, on the 26th of May, 1668, 
The session lasted four days, and was characterized by har- 
mony and strict attention to the business for which the 
Burgesses and Kepresentatives were summoned by Gov- 
ernor Carteret. It may be noted that this Assembly passed 
laws by which twelve distinct offenses were made punibh- 
able with dtath. The Assembly adjourned sine die, and 
seven years elapsed before another convened. The cap- 
ture of New York by the Datch, July 30th, ]673, was fol- 
lowed by the subjection of the surrounding country, 
including the province of New Jersey. The whole of the 
territory, however, swung back to the possession of the 
English crown, by the treaty of peace with Holland, on 
the 9th of February, 1674. 

The second General Assembly began its session on the 
5th of November, 1675. Eight members of Council, in- 
cluding the Governor, were present, and fourteen Repre- 
sentatives appeared from the towns. Laws were enacted 
lookiEg to the proper military defense of the province, 
for the institution of regular courts, and for the assessment 
of taxes. A code of capital laws was also adopted, similar 
in its provisions to that passed in 1668. 

On the 18th of March, 1673, Lord Berkeley, one of the 
original proprietors of New Jersey, disposed of his right 
and interest in the province to John Fenwick and Edward 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 9 

Byllinge, members of the Society of Quakers, or Friends, 
who paid the sum of £1,000 for the same. John Fenwick 
received the conveyance in trust for Edward Byllinge, and 
a dispute as to the terms having arisen, William Penn was 
called in as arbitrator. He gave one tenth of the province 
and a considerable sum of money to Fenwick, and the 
remainder of the territory was adjudged to be the property 
of Byllinge. A permanent settlement was made at Salem, in 
Jime, 1675, and settlements were made at Burlington, "ye 
falls of ye Delaware" or Trenton, and a flourishing whaling 
station established at Cape May. 

Owing to the continued disputations and dissensions, a 
division of the territory of the province was agreed upon. 
By this "Indenture Quintipartite," dated July Ist, 1676, the 
line of division was made to extend across the province, from 
Little Egg Harbor to a point in the Delaware river in forty 
one degrees of north latitude. These divisions were known 
respectively as East and West Jersey, until the charters of 
both were surrendered, and the two portions included 
together under a royal government 

By the retrocession of New Jersey to Great Britain, by 
the treaty of 1674, the question arose whether the title re- 
turned to the proprietors or to the King To avoid all diffi- 
culty, the King recognized the claim of Carteret, and made a 
new grant to the Duke of York, who also executed a fresh 
conveyance to Carteret, covering, however, only a part of the 
original territory of New Jersey. But, before making this 
conveyance, the Duke included the province in a commission 
given to Sir Edmund Audros, Governor of New York, who 
refused to recognize the authority, as Governor, of Philip 
Carteret, arrested all magistrates who would not submit to his 
own jurisdiction, and finally, on April 30th, 1680, carried 
Carteret himself prisoner to New York The Duke was 
finally prevailed upon to acknowledge the claims of the pro- 
prietors, and in 1681 the government of Andros came to an 
end. 

East Jersey, in February, 1682, was purchased by William 
Penn and eleven other Quakers for £3,400. The first Gov- 
ernor under the new proprietors was Robert Barclay, a 
Scotchman, and one of the twelve purchasers, under whom 
the country became an asylum for the oppressed members of 
his creed, and f<ir a time enjoyed great prosperity. But the 
number of proprietors, the frequent sub-divisions and trans- 
fers of shares, and various other difficulties in the way of 
good government, soon involved the province in trouble, and 
in 17o2 the proprietors surrendered the rights of government 
to the Crown. 



10 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

Queen Anne appointed Lord Cornbury Governor of New 
York and New Jersey, but each continued to have a sep- 
arate Assembly. In 1738, New Jersey petitioned for a dis- 
tinct administration, and Lewis Morris was appointed 
Governor. The population was then about 40,000 The 
last Royal Governor was William Franklin, the illegiti- 
mate son of Benjamin Franklin. A State Constitution 
was adopted July 2d, 1776, and some of the most import- 
ant battles of the Revolution took place upon its soil. 
Among these were the battles of Trenton, Princeton, Red 
Bank and Monmouth. 

The first Legislature met at Princeton, in August, 1776, 
and chose William Livingston, Governor. The Federal 
Constitution was adopted by a unanimous vote, Decem- 
ber 18th, 1787. The State Capital was established at 
Trenton, in 1790. 

New Jersey, out of 98,806 men liable to do military duty, 
furnished 88,305 during the civil war, being 10,057 in ex- 
cess of the number called for by the general government, 
and within 10,501 of her entire militia at that time. 01 
this number 79,348 served with State organizations, and 
the remainder in regiments of other States. The naval 
and marine enlistments from New Jersey numbered 4,853. 
The entire expense to the State for organizing, equipping, 
subsisting, supplying and transporting her troops, was 
$2,894,384.99. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF GOVERNORS OF NEW JERSEY. 

GOVEKNOKS OF EAST JEKSfcY. 

Philip Carteret 1 605 to 1^8 L 

Robert Barclay, 1682 to 1683 

Thomas Rudyard, Deputy Governor, 16«3 

Gawen Lau ie, 16s3 

Lord Nie! Campbell, 1685 

Andrew Hamilton, 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse, 1698 to 1699 

GOVERNORS OF WEST JERSEY. 

Samuel Jenings, Deputy, 1681 

Thomas Oliver, Governor, 1684 to 1685 

John Skein, Deputy, 1685 to 1687 

William Welsh, Deputy, 1686 

Daniel Coxe, Governor, 1687 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1607 

Jeremiah Basse, Deputy, 1697 to 1699 

Andrew Hamilton, Gov , 1699 tiil surrender to the Crown, . . 1702 

EAST AND WEST JERSEY UNITED. 

Edward, Lord Cornbury, Governor, 1703 to 17it8 

John, Lord Lovelace (died in office), 1708 

Richard Ingoldsby, Lieutenant-Governor 1709 to 1710 



LIST OF GOVERNORS. il 

General Robert Hunter, 1710 to 1719 

Lewis Morris (President of Council), 17lytol72C 

VViiliam Burnet 1720 to 1727 

John Montgomerie, 1728 to 1731 

lewis Morris (President of Council), 1731 to 1732 

William Crosby, 1732 to 173G 

John Anderson (President of Council), 1736 

John Hamilton (Presid<:nt of Council), 1730 to 1738 

(The foregoing were also Governors of New York at the same time.) 

SEPARATE FKOM NEW YORK. 

Lewis Morris, 1738 to 1746 

John Hamilton (Pres'dent of Council), 174G to 1747 

John Reading (President of Council). 1747 

Jonathan Belcher, 1747 to 1757 

Thomas Pownall, Lieutenant-Governor, 17o7 

Jo' n Rearing (President of Council), 1757 to 1758 

Francis Bernard, 1768 to 1760 

Thomas Boone, 17fiO to 1761 

Josiah Hardy, 1761 to 1763 

William Franklin, 1763 to 1776 

FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE STATE CONSTITUTION. 

William Livingston (Federalist), ... 1770 to 1790 

William Paterson(Federalit), 1790 to 1792 

Richard Howell (Federalist), 1792 to 1801 

Joseph Bloo^nfield (Democrat), l80l to 1802 

John Lambert. Pres'; ot Council and Act'g Gov. (Dem.), . . . 1^02 to 1803 

Joseph Bloomfiell (Democrat), IS^S to 1812 

Aaron Ogden( Federalist) 1813 to 1813 

William S ^'enning■.on (Democrat), 1813 to 1815 

Mahlon Dickerson (Democrat), 1815 to 1817 

Isaac H. Williamson (Federalist), . . . . ' 1817 to 1829 

Garret D. Wall (Democrat) 1829 deci'd. 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat), 1829 to 1832 

Samuel L. Southard (Whig), 1832 to 1833 

Elias P. Seeley (Whia), 1833 to 1833 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat), 1833 to 183n 

Philemon Dickei son (Democrat), 183G to 1837 

William Pennington (Whig), 1837 to 1843 

Daniel Haines (Democrat), 1843 to 1844 

Charles C. Stratton (Whi?), 1845 to 1848 

Daniel Haines (Democrat), 1848 to 1851 

George F. Fort (Democrat), 1851 to 1854 

Rodman M. Price (Democrat), 1854 to 1857 

William A. Newell' (Republican), 1857 to 1860 

Charles S. Olden (Republican), 1860 to 1863 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1803 to 1866 

Marcus L. Ward (Republican), 1806 to 1869 

Theodore F. Randolph (Democrat), lSt9tol872 

Joel Parker (Democrat), 1872 to 1875 

Joseph D. Bedle (Dem crat), 1875 to 1878 

George B. McCIellan (Democrat), 1878 to 1881 

George C. Ludlow (Democrat), . . « . . 1H81 to 1884 

Leon Abbett( Democrat) » . 1884 to 1887 

Roberts. Green I Democrat), 1887 to 1890 

Leon Abbett( Democrat) 1890 to 1893 

George T. Werts (Democrat), 1893 to 1896 

John W. Griggs (Republican), 1896 to 1898 

Foster M. Voorhees (Republicat ), Act'g Gov , Feb. 1, '98, to Oct. 18, 98 
David O Watkins (Republican), Act'g Gov , Oct. 18, '98, to Jan. 18, 99 
Foster M. Voorhees (Republican), 1899 to 



12 LIST OF UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



The following is a list of the United States Senators for New 
Jersey from 1789 to date: 

Jonathan Elmer, March 4th, 1789, to March 3d, 1791. 

William Pater&on, March 4lh, 1789. to November 23d, 1790 

Philemon Dickinson, November 23d, 1790, to March 3d. 1793. 

John Rutherford, March 4th, 1791, to December 5th, 1798. 

Frederick Frelinghuvsen. March 4th, 1793, to November r2th, 1796. 

Richard Stockton, November 12th, 1796. to March 3d, 1799. 

Franklin Davenport, December 5th. 1798, to February 14th. 1799. 

James Schureman. February 14th, 1799, to February 26th, 1801. 

Jonathan Dayton, March 4th, 1799, to March 3d, 1805. 

Aaron Ogden, February 26th, 1801, to March 3d, 1803. 

John Condit, September 1st, 1803, to March 3d, 1809. 

Aaron Kitchell, March 4th, 1805, to March 21st, 1809. 

John Lambert. March 4th. 1809, to March 3d, 1815. 

John Condit, March 2lJ-t, 1809, to March 3d, 1817. 

James Jefferson Wilson, March 4th, 1815, to January 26th, 1821. 

Mahlon Dickerson. March 4th, 1817. to March 3d, 1829 

Samuel L. Southard, January 26th, 1821, to November 12th, 1823. 

Joseph Mcllvaine, November 12ch, 1823, to November 10th 1826. 

Ephraim Batema i, November 10th. 1826. to January 30th, 1829. 

Theodore Frelinghuysen, March 4th, 1829 to March 3d, 1835. 

Mahlon Dickerson, January 3Cth, 1829. to March-Sd. 183a. 

Samuel L Southard, March 4th, 1833, to June 26th, 1842 

Garret D. Wall, March 4th, 1835, to March 3d, 1841. 

Jacob W. Miller, March 4th, 1841. to March 3d. 1853. 

William L Dayton, July 2d, 1842, to March 3d, i»oi. 

Jacob W. Miller, Januarv 4th. 1841, to March 3d, 1853. 

Robert F. Stockton, March 4th, 1851, to Febiuaiy 11 ih. 1853. 

William Wright, March 4th, 1853, to March 3d, 1859 

John R. Thomson (died), February nth, 1853, to December, 1862. 

Richard S. Field (vacancy), December 12th, lJ-62, to January 13'h, 

1863. 
JohnC. Ten Evck, from March 17th, 18:9. to March 3d. 186->. 
James W Wall (vacancv). January 14th, 1863, to March 3d, 1863. 
William Wright, March 4th, 1863, to November, 1866 
F. T. Frelinghuysen, November, 1866. to March 3d. 1869. 
John P. Stockton, March 4th, 1865, to March 27th, 1866. 
Alexander G Cattell, March 27th. 1866. to March M. 1871, 
John P. Stockton, March 4th, 1869. to March 3d, 1875. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen, March 4th, 1871. to March 3d, 1877. 
T. F. Randolph, March 4th, 1875, to March 3d, 1881. 
John R. McPherson, March 4th, 1877, to March 3d. 1895. 
William J. Sewell, March 4th, 1881. to March 3d, 1887. 
Rufus Blodgett, March 4th. 1887. to March 3d, 1«93. 

James Smith, Jr., March 4th, 1893, to . 

William J. Sewell, March 4th, 1S95 lo — . 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary 
for one people to dissolve the political banck which have con- 
nected them with another, and to assume, among the powers 
of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the laws 
of nature and of nature's God entitle them, a decent respect 
to the opinions of mankind reqtiires that they should declare 
the causes which impel them to the separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are 
created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain nnalienul)le rigiits; that among these are life, liberty 
and the pursuits of happiness. That, to secure these rights, 
governments are instituted among men, deriving their just 
powers from the consent of the governed ; that whenever any 
f )rra of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is 
the right of the people to alter or abolish it, and to institute a 
new government, laying its foundations on such jn-inciples, 
and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem 
most likely to effect their safety and happiness. Prudence, 
indeed, will dictate that governments long establislied shouhl 
not be changed for light and transient causes ; and accordingly, 
all experience hath shown that mankind are more dispts.d to 
suffer, while evils are sutlerable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invari- 
ably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them imder 
absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw 
off such government, and to provide new guards fir their 
future s 'curity. Such has been the patient sufferance of tliese 
colonic^, and such is now the necessity whicii constrains them 
to alter iheir former systems of government. The history (-f 
the present \ing of Great Britain is a history of repeated 
injuries and usurpations, all having, in direct object, the estab- 
lishment of an absolute tyranny over these States. To prove 
this, let facts be submitted to a candid world: 

He has refused his assent to laws the most wholesome and 
necessary for the public good. 

(13) 



14 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

He lias forbidden his Governors to pass laws of immediate 
and ])ressing importance, nnless suspended in their operations 
till his assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he 
has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

Pie has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation of 
large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish 
the right of representation in the Legislature— a right ines- 
timable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, 
uncomfortable and distant from the repository of their public 
records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance 
with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for 
opposing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights of 
the i)eople. 

Pie has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, to 
cause others to be elected ; whereby the legislative powers, 
incapable of annihilation, have returned to the people at large 
for tlieir exercise ; the State remaining, in the meantime, 
exposed to all the dangers of invasions from without, and con- 
vulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States; for that purpose, obstructing the laws for the natural- 
ization of foreigners ; refusing to pass others to encourage 
their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new 
appropriations of lands. 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by refusing 
his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has nuide judges dependent on his Avill alone, for the 
tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their 
salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our Legislatures. 

He has affected to render the military independent of, and 
superior to, the civil power. 

He has combined, with others, to subject us to a jurisdiction 
foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by our laws; 
giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation : 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us ; 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishnient, for 
any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of 
these States ; 

For cutting off" our trade with all parts of the world ; , 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent ; 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 15 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefit of trial by 

For transporting us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses ; 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a neigh- 
Doring province, establishing therein an arbitrary government, 
and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render it at once an 
example and lit instrument for introducing the same absolute 
rule into these colonies ; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valuable 
laws, and altering, fundamentally, the forms of our govern- 
ments ; 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring them- 
selves investetl with power to legislate for us in all cases 
whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out of 
his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned our 
towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

;He is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign 
mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and 
perfidy 6;;arcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on 
the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to become 
the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to fall 
themselves by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrection among u^, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is an 
undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and c(mditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned for 
redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated petitions 
have been answered only by repeated injury. A prince 
whose character is thus marked by every act which may 
define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been wanting in our attentions to our British 
brethren. We have warned them, from time to time, of 
ttempts by their Legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
urisdiction over us. We have reminded tliem oT the circum- 
litances of our emigration and settlement here. We have 
appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we 
have conjured them, by the ties of our common kindred, to 
disavow these usurpations, which would inevitably interrupt 
our connections and correspondence. They, too, have been 
deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, 



IS DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



therefoie, "acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our 
separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, 
enemies in war, in peace, friends. 

We, tlierefore, the representatives of the United States of 
America, in General Congress assembled, appealing to the 
Supreu)e Judge of the World for the rectitude of our inten- 
tions, do, in the name and by the authority of the good people 
of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these 
United Colonies are, and of right ought to be, Free and 
Independent States; that they are also absolved from ail 
allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connec- 
tion between them and the State of Great Britain, is, and 
ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that, as Free and Inde- 
pendent States, they have full power to levy war, conclude 
peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and do all other 
acts and things which Independent Staves may of right do. 
And, for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance 
on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge 
to each other, our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 

JOHN HANCOCK. 



GEORGIA. 

Button Gwinnett. 
Lyman Hall. 
Geo. Walton. 

SOUTH CAKOLINA 

Edward Rutledge. 
Thos. Hay ward .Ir. 
Thomas Lynch. Jr. 
Arthur Middleton. 

VIRGINIA. 

George Vl'ythe. 
Richard Henry Lee. 
Tbos Jefferson. 
Hen Jan. Harrison. 
Tho<. Nelson, Jr. 



Fras. Hopkinson. 
John Hart. 
Abra. Clark. 

MASS VCHl'SETTS BAY. 

Saml. Adams. 
John Adams 
Robt. Treat Paine. 
Elbridge Gerry. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 

Wm. Hooper. 
Joseph Hewes. 
JoLu Penn. 

MARYLAND. 

Samuel Chase. 
Wm. Paca. 



Francis Lightfoot Lee. Thos. Stone. 



(Elinor Braxton. 

DELAAVARE. 

( sesar Rodney. 
Ot!0. Read. 



Charles Carroll, 

of Carrollton. 



Geo. Clymer. 
Jas. Smith. 
Geo. Taylor. 
James Wilson. 
Geo. Ross. 

NEW YORK. 

Wm. Floyd. 
Phil. Livingston. 
Fran's Lewis. 
Lewis Morris. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Josiah Bartlett. 
Wm. Whipple. 
Matthew rhornton. 

RHODE ISLAND AND 
PROVIDENCE, AC. 

Step. Hopkins. 
William Ellory. 

CONNECTICUT. 

Roger Sherman. 
Saml. Huntington. 
Wm. Williams. 
Oliver Wolcott. 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

Robt. Morris. 
NEW JERSEY. Beujamia Rush. 

Richd. Stockton. Benja. Franklin. 

Juo. Witherspoon. John Morton. 

Thomas McKean 
Ordered: IN CONGRESS. JANfAkY 18, 1777. 

That an authoriticated copy of the Declaration of Independency, 
wi:h the names of the Members of CoJigress subscribing the seme, be 
sen' tf! each of the United States, and that they be desired to have 
the same put o i record. 

By order ol Congress. JOHN HANCOCK, 

A^te^t, Cxi AS. Thomson, A true oopv. President 

Secy. John Hancock, 

Preiidt. 



CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.* 



We, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
(juility, provide for the common defense, promote the general 
welfare, and se-iire the blessings of liberty to ourselves and 
our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution of the 
United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

LEGISLATIVE POWERS. 

Section I. 

All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a 
Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

1. The house of representatives shall be composed of mem- 
bers chosen every second year by the people of the several 
States; and the electors in each State shall have the qualifica- 
tions requ:sit3 for electors of the most numerous branch of the 
State legislature. 

members' QUALIFICATIONS. 

2. No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven years 
a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, 
be an inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. 

RULE OF APPORTIONING REPRESENTATIVES AND 
DIRECT TAXES. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several States which may be included within this 

*This Constitution went into operation on the first Wednesday in 
March, 1789. 

2 (17). 



la CONSTITUTION OF THE V. 8. 

Union, according to their respective numbers, which shall be 
determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, 
including those bound to service for a term of years, and 
excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all other persons. 
The actual enumeration shall be made Avithin three years after 
the fii'st meeting of the congress of the United States, and 
within every subsequent term of ten years, in such manner as 
they shall by law direct. The number of representatives shall 
not exceed one for every thirty thousand, but each State shall 
have at least one representative; and until such enumeration 
shall be made, the State of New Hampshire shall ])e entitled 
to choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Ehode Island and 
Providence Plantations, one; Connecticut, five; New York, 
six; New Jersey, four; Pennsylvania, eight; Delaware, one ; 
Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; South 
Carolina, five ; and Georgia, three. 

FILLING OF VACANCIES. 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any 
State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of elec- 
tion to fill such vacancies. 

OFFICERS — IMPEACHMENT. 

5. The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other oflScei-s, and shall have the sole power of impeach- 
ment. 

SENATE — HOW COMPOSED. 

Section III. 

1. The senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two senators from each State, chosen by the legislature thereof, 
for six years, and each senator shall have one vote. 

ROTATION Oy SENATORS. 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in consequence 
of the first election, they shall be divided as equally as may 
be into three classes. The seats of the senators of the first 
class shall be vacated at the expiration of the second year ; of 
the second class, at the expiration of the fourth year; and of 
the third class, at the expiration of the sixth year, so that 
one-third may be chosen every second year. And if vacancies 
happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the 
legislature of any State, the executive thereof may make tem- 
porary appointments until the next meeting of the legislature, 
which shall then fill such vacancies. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE V. 8. 19 

THEIR QUALIFICATIONS. 

3. No person shall be a senator who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a citizen of the 
United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an inhab- 
itant of that State for which he shall be chosen. 



PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE. 

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

5. The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-President, or 
when he shall exercise the office of President of the United 
States. 

THE senate's powers. 

6. The senate shall have the sole power to try all impeach- 
ments. When sitting for that purpose, they shall be on oath 
or affirmation. When the President of the United States is 
tried, the chief justice shall preside.- And no person shall be 
convicted without the concurrence of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers present. 

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office, and disqualification to 
hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the 
United States; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be 
liable and subject to indictment, trial, judgment and punish- 
ment according to law. 

members of congress — HOW ELECTED. 
Section IV. 

1. The times, places and manner of holding elections for 
senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each State, 
by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at any time, 
by law, make or alter such regulations, except as to the places 
of choosing senators. 

WHEN CONGRESS SHALL MEET. 

2. Congress shall assemble at least once in every year ; and 
such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless 
they shall by law appoint a different day. 



20 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF EACH HOUSE. 

Section V. 

1. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members ; and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business ; but a smaller 
number may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized 
to compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner 
and under such penalties as each house may provide. 

RULES, &c. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

JOURNALS. 

3. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as 
may, in their judgment, require secrecy ; and the yeas and 
nays of the members of each house, on any question, shall, 
at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

4. Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three 
days, nor to any other place than that in which the two houses 
shall be sitting. 

COMPENSATION, PRIVILEGES AND INCAPACITIES. 

Section VI. 

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and paid 
out of the treasury of the United States. They shall, in all 
cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the peace, be privi- 
leged from arrest during their attendance at the session of 
their respective houses, and in going to and returning from 
the same ; and for any speech or debate in either house, they 
shall not be questioned in any other place. 

APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE. 

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil ofiice under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, ortheeaioluments whereof shall have been incre^ed, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 21 

during such time ; and no person holding any office under the 
United States, sliall be a member of either house during his 
continuance in office. 

REVENUE BILLS. 

Section VIL 

1. All bill for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of representatives ; but the senate may propose or concur with 
amendments, as on other bills. 

PASSING BILLS, &C. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the house of repre- 
sentatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, be 
presented to the President of the United States ; if he approve, 
he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it, with his objec- 
tions, to that house in which it shall have originated, who 
shall enter the objections at large on their journal, and pro- 
ceed to reconsider it. If, after such reconsidei'ation, two-thirds 
of that housQ shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, 
together with the objections, to the other house, by which it 
shall likewise be reconsidered, and if approved by two-thirds 
of that house, it shall become a law. But in all such cases 
the votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and 
nays, and the names of the pei-sons voting for and against the 
bill shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the President within ten 
days (Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the congress, by their adjournment, prevent 
its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 

ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

3. Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concurrence 
of the senate and house of representatives may be necessary 
(except on the question of adjournment), shall be presented 
to the President of the United States, and before the same 
shall take effect, shall be approved by him, or, being disap- 
proved by him, shall be repassed by two-thirds of the senate 
and house of representatives, according to the rules and 
limitations prescribed in the case of a bill. 

POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section VIIL 



The congress shall have power; 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, t< 
pay the debts and provide for the common delense, and gen 



22 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

eral welfare of the United States ; but all duties, imposts and 
excises shall be uniform throughout the United States. 

2. To borrow money on. the credit of United States ; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several States, and with the Indian tribes ; 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and uni- 
form laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the 
United States ; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of foreign 
coins, and fix the standard of weights and measures ; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the 
securities and current coin of the United States ; 

7. To establish post offices and post roads^ 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by 
securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court ; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed 
on the high seas, and oflfenses against the law of nations ; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, 
and make rules concerning captures on land and water ; 

12. To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the 
laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions; 

16. To provide for organizing, arming and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be eui ployed 
in the service of the United States, reserving to the States, 
respectively, the appointment of the officers, and the authority 
of training" the militia according to the discipline prescribed 
by congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatsoever, 
over such district (not exceeding ten miles square), as may, 
by cession of particular States, and the acceptance of congress, 
become the seat of government of the United States; and to 
exercise like authority over all places purchased by the con- 
sent of the legislature of the State in which the same shall 
be, for the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, dock-yards 
and other needful buildings ; and — 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, 
for carrying into execution the foregoing powers and all other 
powers vested by this constitution in the government of the 
United States, or in any department or officer thereof. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 23 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section TX. 

1. The migration or importation of such pei-sons as any of 
the States now existing shall think proper to admit, shall not 
be prohibited by the congress, prior to the year one thousand 
eiglit hundred and eight, but a tax or duty may be imposed 
on s;ich importation, not exceeding ten dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless, when in cases of rebellion or invasion, the 
public safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder, or ex post facto law shall be passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless in 
proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore directed 
to be taken. 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
any State. No preference shall be given, by any regulation 
of commerce or revenue, to the ports of one State over those 
of another ; nor shall vessels bound to or from one State, be 
obliged to enter, clear or pay duties in another. 

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law ; and a regular 
statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of all 
public money shall be published from time to time. 

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United 
States ; and no person holding any office of profit or trust 
under them, shall, without the consent of the congress, accept 
of any present, emolument, office or title of any kind what- 
ever, from any king, prince or foreign State. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF INDIVIDUAL STATES. 

Section X, 

1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance or confed- 
eration ; grant letters of marque and reprisal ; coin money ; 
emit bills of credit ; make anything but gold and silver coin a 
tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of attainder, ex post 
facto law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts; or 
grant any title of nobility. 

2- No State shall, without the consent of the congress, lay 
any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may 
be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws ; and 
the net produce of all duties and imposts laid by any State 
on imports or exports, shall be for the use of the treasury of 
the United States; and all such laws shall be subject to the 
revision and c<jntrol of the congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of congress, lay any 



24 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time of peace, 
enter into any agreement or compact with another State, or 
with a foreign power, or engage in war, unless actually invaded, 
or in such imminent danger as will not admit delay. 

AKTICLE II. 

THE EXECUTIVE POWER. 

Section I. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of the 
United States of America. He shall hold his office during 
the term of four years, and, together with the Vice-President, 
chosen for the same term, be elected as follows : 

HOW ELECTED. 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legisla- 
ture thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to the 
whole number of senators and representatives to which the 
State may be entitled in congress ; but no senator or repre- 
sentative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under 
the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGES. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and 
vote by ballot, for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. And 
they shall make a list of all the pei^sons voted for, and of the 
number of votes for each ; which list they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the government of 
tiie United States, directed to the president of the senate. 
The president of the senate shall, in the presence of the 
senate and house of representatives, open all the certificates, 
and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the 
greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number 
be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed ; and 
if there be more than one who have such majority, and have 
an equal number of votes, then the house of i-epresentatives 
shall immediately choose by ballot, one of them for President; 
and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest 
on the list, the said house shall in like mannner cho'se the 
President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each State having 
one vote ; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member 
or members from two-thirds of the States, and a majority of 
the States shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 25 

the choice of the President, the person havmg the greatest 
number of votes of the electors, shall be the Vice-President, 
But if there should remain two or more Avho have equai 
votes, the senate shall choose from them, by ballot, the Vice- 
President. [iSee Xllih amendment.'] 

4. The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes, 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

WHO MAY BE ELECTED PRESIDENT. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this constitu- 
tion, shall be eligible to the ofifice of President ; neither shall 
any person be eligible to that office who shall not have attained 
to the age of thirty-five years, and been fourteen years a resi- 
dent within the United States. \_See Xllth amendment.'] 

ON THE DEATH, REMOVAL, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT, 

THE POWERS AND DUTIES DEVOLVE UPON 

THE VICE-PRESIDENT. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from office, or of 
his death, resignation or inability to discharge the powers and 
duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice- 
President ; and the congress may, by law, provide for the case 
of removal, death, resignation or inability, both of the Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, declaring what officer shall then act 
as President, and such officer shall act accordingly, until the 
disability be removed, or a President shall be elected. 

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his ser- 
vices a compensation which shall neither be increased nor 
diminished during the period for which he shall have been 
elected ; and he shall not receive, within that period, any 
other emolument from the United States or any of them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation : 

THE OATH. 

" I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully exe- 
cute the office of President of the United States, and will, to 
the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend the con- 
stitution of the United States" 



26 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

POWERS, &C., OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section 11. 

1. The President shall be commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the several 
States, Avhen called into tiie actual service of the United States ; 
he may require the opinion, in writing, of the principal officer 
in each of the executive departments, upon any subject rehit- 
ing to the duties of their respective offices, and he shall have 
jwwer to grant reprieves and pardons for offenses against the 
United States, except in cases of impeachment. 

TREATIES, AMBASSADORS, &C. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and consent 
of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds of the 
senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and by and 
with the advice and consent of the senate shall appoint, ambas- 
sadors, other public ministers and consuls, judges of the supreme 
court, and all other officers of the United States whose appoint- 
ments are* not herein otherwise provided for, and Avhich shnll 
be established by law. But the congress may, by law, vest the 
appointment of such inferior officers as they think proper in 
the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of 
department. 

APPOINTING POWER. 

3. The President shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by granting 
commissions, which shall expire at the end of their next session. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 

Section III. 
He shall, from time to time, give to the congress information 
of the state of the Union, and recommend to their consider- 
ation such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient ; 
he may, on extraordinary occasions, convene both houses, or 
either of them; and in case of disagreement between them 
with respect to the time of adjournment, he may adjourn them 
to snch time as he shall think j^roper; he shall receive ambas- 
sadors and other public ministers; he shall take care that the 
laws be feithfully executed, and shall commission all the 
officers of the United States. 

IMPEACHMENT, &C. 

Section IV. 
The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the 
United States shall be removed from office on impeachment 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 27 

for, and conviction ot, treason, bribery or other high crimes 
and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

Section I. 

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested in 
oiie supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the congress 
may from time to time ordain and establish. The judges, 
botli of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold their offices 
during good behavior, and shall, at stated times, receive for 
their service a compensation, which shall not be diminished 
during their continunnce in office. 

EXTENT OF THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

{See Amendments, Art. XL) 
Section IT. 

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the United 
States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, under their 
authority; to all cases afiecting ambassadors, or other public 
ministers and consuls; to all cases of admiralty and maritime 
jurisdiction; to controversies to which the United States shall 
be a party; to controvei-sies between two or more States; 
between a State and citizens of another State ; between citizens 
of different States ; between citizens of the same State, claim- 
ing lands under grants of different vStates, and between a State, 
or the citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens or subjects. 

ORIGINAL, AND APPELLATE JURISDICTION OF THE 
SUPREME COURT. 

2. In all cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers 
and consuls, and those in which a State shall be party, ihe 
supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. In all the 
other cases before mentioned, the supreme court shall have 
appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, with such excep- 
tions and under such regulations as the congress shall make. 

TRIALS FOR CRIMES. 

3. The trials of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, 
shall be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the Slate 
where the said crime shall have been committed ; but wlien 
not committed within any State, the trial shall be at such 
place or places as the congress may by Idw have directed. 



28 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. 8. 

TREASON — WHAT AND HOW PUNISHED. 

Section III. 

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in 
levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted 
of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same 
overt act, or on confession in open court. 

2. The congress shall have power to declare the punishment 
of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption 
of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person 
attainted. ' 

AKTICLE lY. 

ACTS, EECOEDS, &C., OF EACH STATE. 
Section I. 

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each State, to the 
public acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other 
t-t;ite. And the congress may, by general laws, prescribe the 
manner in which such acts, records and proceedings shall be 
proved, and the effect thereof. 

PRIVILEGES OF CITIZENS. 

Section II. 

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
leges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 

FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in another 
State, shall, on demand of tbe executive authority of the State 
from which he fled, be delivered up, to be removed to the 
State having jurisdiction of the crime. 

SERVANTS, &C., TO BE SURRENDERED ON CLAIM. 

3. Xo pei^son held to service or labor in one State, under 
the laws therecf, escaping into another, shall, in consequence 
of any law or regulation therein, be discharged from ssuch 
service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on claim of the 
party to whom such service or labor may be due. 

HOAV NEW STATES ARE ADMITTED. 

Section lU. 
1. New States may be admitted by the congress into this 
Union: but no new State shall be formed or erected within 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 29 

the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be formed 
by the junction of two or more States or parts of States, with- 
out the consent of the legislatures of the States concerned, as 
well as of the congress. 

THE DISPOSITION OF TERRITORIES. 

2. The congress shall have power to dispose of, and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory or 
other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing 
in this constitution shall be so construed as to prejudice any 
claims of the United States, or of any particular State. 

GUARANTY AND PROTECTION OF THE STATES BY THE UNION. 

Section IV. 

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion ; and, on application of the legis- 
lature or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be con- 
vened), against domestic violence. 

AETICLE V. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION— HOW MADE. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this constitu- 
tion ; or, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds 
of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing 
amendments, which in either case shall be valid, to all intents 
and purposes, as part of this constitution, when ratified by the 
legislatures of three-fourths of the several States, or by con- 
ventions in three-fourths thereof, as the one or the other mode 
of ratification may be proposed by the congress ; provided, that 
no amendment which may be made prior to the year eighteen 
hundred and eight shall in any manner affect the first and 
fourth clauses in the ninth section of the first article, and that 
no State, without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal 
sufirage in the senate. 

AETICLE VI. 

FORMER DEBTS VALID. 

Section I. 

All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, before 
the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid against the 
United States under this constitution as under the confederation. 



30 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND. 

Section IT. 
This constitution, and the laws of the United States which 
shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties made, or 
which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, 
yhall be the supreme law of the land ; and the judges in every 
State shall be bound thereby, anything in the constitution or 
laws of any State to the contraiy notwithstanding. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL OATH NO RELIGIOUS TEST. 

Section III. 
The senators and representatives before mentioned, and the 
members of the several State legislatures, and all executive 
and judicial officers, both of the United States and of the sev- 
eral States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation to support 
this constitution ; but no religious test shall ever be required 
as a qualification to anv office of public trust under the Unitec 
States. 

AETICLE YII. 

WHEN THE CONSTITUTION TO TAKE EFFECT, 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution between the 
States so ratifying the same. 

Done in the convention, by the unanimous consent of the 
States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, 
and of the independence of the United States of America the 
twelfth. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our nanus. 

GEO. WASHINGTON, President, 

And Deputy from Virginia. 

NEW HAMPSHIEE. DELAWAEE. 

John Langdon, George Eeed, 

Nicholas Oilman. Gunning Bedford, Jun., 

John Dickinson, 
MASSACHUSETTS. Eichaed Bassett, 
Nathaniel Gorman, Jacob Broom. 

Kufus King. 

MAEYLAND. 
CONNECTICUT. Dan'l of St. Thos. Jenifer, 

William Samuel Johnson, James McHenry, - 
EoGEB Sherman. Daniel Carroll. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U/S. 



31 



NEW YORK. 
Alexander Hamilton. 

NEW JEESEY. 
William Livingston, 
David Breakle, 
William Paterson, 
Jonathan Dayton. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 

Benjamin Franklin, 
Thomas Mifflin, 
Robert Morris, 
George Clymer, 
Thomas Fitzsimons, 
Jared Ingersoll, 
James Wilson, 
Gouv. Morris. 



VIRGINIA. 
John Blaie, 
James Madison, Jun. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 
William Bllnt, 
Rich'd Dobbs Spaight, 
Hugh Williamson. 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 
John Rutledge, 
Chas. Coatesworth Pinck* 

NEY', 

Charles Pinckkey, 
Pierce Butler. 

GEORGIA. 
William Few, 
Abraham Baldwin. 



Attest ; 



William Jackson, 

Secretaiy. 



AMENDMENTS 



TO THE constitution OF THE UNITED STATES, RATIFIED 
ACCORDING TO THE PROVISIONS OF THE FIFTH ARTICLE 
OF THE FOREGOING CONSTITUTION. 



The following articles proposed by congress, in addition to 
and amendments of the constitution of the United States, hav- 
ing been ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the 
States, are become a part of the constitution. 

First Congress, First Session, March 5th, 1789. 
ARTICLE I. 

RIGHT OF CONSCIENCE, FREEDOM OF THE PRESS, &C. 

Congress .shall make no law respecting an establishment of 
religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging 



32. CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

the freedom of speech, or of the press ; or the right of the 
people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government 
for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE II. 

• OF THE MILITIA. 

-A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of 
a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms 
shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

OF QUARTERING SOLDIERS. 

No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any house 
without the consent of the owner ; nor in time of war, but in . 
a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OF rXREASONABLE SEARCHES AND SEIZURES. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, 
papers and eflects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, 
shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue but upon 
probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particu- 
larly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or 
things to be seized. ^ 

ARTICLE V. 

OF CRIMES AND INDICTMENTS. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise 
infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a 
grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, 
or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or 
public danger, nor shall any person be subject, for the same 
otfense, to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall 
be compelled in any criminal case to be witness against him- 
self; nor to be deprived of life, liberty or property, without 
due process of law, nor shall private property be taken for 
public use without just compensation. 

ARTICLE YI. 

OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S 83 

State and district wherein the crime shall have been com- 
miued, which dis rict shall have been previously ai^ceriained 
by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the 
accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; 
to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, 
and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense. 

ARTICLE VII. 

OF TRIAL BY JURY IN CIVIL CASES. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall 
be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury shall be otherwise 
re-examined in any court of the United States, than accord- 
ing to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

OF BAILS, FINES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 

ARTICLE IX. 

RESERVED RIGHTS. 

The enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, shall 
not be construed to deny or disparage others, retained by the 
neople. 

ARTICLE X. 

POWERS NOT DELEGATED RESERVED. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the con- 
stitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the 
States respectively, or to the people. 



Third Congress, Secona Session, December 2d, 1783. 
ARTICLE XL 

THE JUDICIAL POWER— SEE ART. 3, SEC. 2. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit, in law or equity, commenced or 
prosecuted against one of the United States, by citizens of 
another State, or by citizens or subjects of anv foreign State. 
3 



84 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

Eighth Congress, First Session, October 17th, 1803. 
AETICLE XII. 

HOTV THE PEESIDENT AKD VICE-PRESIDENT ARE ELECTED. 

The electors shall meet in their respective States,* and vote 
by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at 
least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same State with them- 
selves; they shall name, in their ballots, the person voted for 
as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as 
Vice-President; and they shall make distinct lists of all 
persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as 
Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each ; which 
list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed,! to the 
seat of the government of the United States, directed to the 
president of the senate ; the president of the senate shall, in 
the presence of the senate and house of representatives, open 
all the certificates,^ and the votes shall then be counted ; the 
pei*son having the greatest number of votes for President shall 
be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed. And if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers, 
not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as President, 
the house of representatives shall choose immediately, by 
ballot, the President; but in choosing the President, the votes 
shall be taken by States, the representation from each "State 
having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a 
member or members from two-thirds of the States, and a 
majority of all the States shall be necessary to a choice _; and 
if the house of representatives shall not choose a Presided, 
whenever the right of a choice shall devolve'^ upon them, 
before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice- 
President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or 
other constitutional disability of the President. The person 
having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall 
be the Vice-President, if such niunber be a majority of the 
whole number of electors appointed ; and if no person have a 
majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 
senators, and a majority of the Avhole number shall be neces- 
sary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to 

= 0n the first Wednesday in December, by act of Congress, 1st 
March, 1792. 

f Before the 1st Wednesday in January, by act of Congress, let 
March, 1792. 

lOn the 2d Wednesday in February, by the same act. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 35 

the office of President, shall be eligible to that of Vice-Presi- 
dent of the United States. 



ARTICLE XIII. 

SLAVERY ABOLISHED— 13th AMENDMENT, PASSED 186 5. 

Section I. 

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment tor crime, whereof the party shall have been 
duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Section II. 

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appro- 
priate legislation. 

CITIZENS AND THEIR RIGHTS— 14tH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United 
States, and of the State wiierein tliey reside. No State sh;dl 
make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privilei^e-; or 
immunities of citizens of the United States. Nor shall any 
State deprive any person of life, liberty or property without 
due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdic- 
tion the equal protection of the laws. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective number, counting the 
whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not 
taxed; but whenever the right to vote at ivny election iur 
electors of President and Vice-President, or for United States 
representatives in congress, executive and judicial officers, or 
the members of the legislature thereof, is denied to any of 
the male inb.abitants of such State, being twenty-one years of 
age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, 
except for participation in rebellion or ether crime, the basis 
of representation ttierein shall be reduced in the proportion 
which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the 
whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in 
such Slate. 



86 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

DISABILITY OF PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE EEBELLION. 

Section III. 

No person shall be a senator or representatfve in congress, 
elector of President and Vice-President, or hold any ofBce, 
civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, 
who, having previously taken an oath as a member of congress, 
or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any 
State legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any 
State to support the constitution of the United States, shall 
have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or 
given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof; but congress may, 
by a vote of two-thirds of each house, remove such disability. 

VALIDITY OF PUBLIC DEBT NOT TO BE QUESTIONED. 

Section IV. 

The validity of the public debt of the United States author- 
ized by law, including debts incurred for the payment of 
pensions and bounties for service in suppressing insurrection 
or rebellion, shall not be questioned, but neither the United 
States nor any State shall assume or pay any debt or obligation 
incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United 
States, or claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave, but 
all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and 
void. 

Section V. 

The congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate 
legislation, the provisions of this article. 

ARTICLE XV. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE NOT TO BE IMPAIRED. 

Section I. 

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not 
be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State, 
on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude. 

Section II. 

The congress shall have power to enforce this article by 
appropriate leaislation. 

[The fifteenth amendment passed at the Fortieth Congress.] 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 



A Constitution agreed ujon hij the delegates of (he people of 
Ntw Jerfif-y, in convention began at Treutoa on the fourteenth 
day of May, and continued to the iireniy-ninth day <f Juve, 
in the year (f our Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
four, ratified by the people at an election held on the thirteenth 
day of August, A. D. 1S44, and amended at a special election 
held on the seventh day of September. A. D. 1S75, anyd' at 
another special election, held on the twenty-eighth dmj of Sep- 
tember, A. D. 1S97. 

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to 
Almighty God for the civil and religions liberty which He 
hath so long permitted ns to enjoy, and looking to Him for a 
blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit the same 
unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain and establish 
this Constitution : 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHTS AND PEIVILEGES, 

1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have 
certain natural and unalienable rights, among which are those 
of enjoying and defending life and liberty ; accpiiring, pos- 
sessing and protecting property, and of pursuing and obtaining 
safety and happiness. 

2. All political power is inherent in the people. Govern- 
ment is instituted for the protection, security and benefit of 
the people, and they have the right at all times to alter or 
reform the same, whenever the public good may require it. 

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privilege 
of worshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to the 
dictates of his own conscience; nor, under any pretense what- 
ever, t > be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary 
to ids faith and judgment; nor shall any person be obliged to 
pay tithes, taxes or other rates for building or repairing any 
church or churches, place or places of worship, or for the 
maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he 
believes to be right, or has deliberately and voluntarily engaged 
to jierform. 

4. Tiiere shall be no establishment of one religious sect in 
preference to another; no religious test shall be required as a 
aualification for any office or public trust; and no jjcrsou 

(37) 



38 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right merely on 
account of his religious principles. 

5. Every person may freely speak, write and publish his 
sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of 
that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge the 
liberty of speech or of the press. In all prosecutions or 
indictments lor libel, the truth may be given in evidence to 
the jury ; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter 
charged as libelous is true, and was published wdth good 
motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted; 
and the jury shall have the right to determine the law and 
the fact. 

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and 
seizures, shall not be violated ; and no warrant shall issue but 
upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and 
particularly describing the place to be searched and the papers 
and things to be seized. 

7. The right of a trial by jury shall remain inviolate; but 
the legislature may authorize the trial of civil suits, when 
the matter in dispute does not exceed fifty dollars, by a jury 
of six men. 

8. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury ; to be 
informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be 
confronted with the witnesses against him ; to have com- 
pulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to 
have the assistance of counsel in his defense. 

9. No person shall be held to answer for a criminal offense, 
unless on the presentment or indictment of a grand jury, 
except in cases of impeachment, or in cases cognizable by 
justices of the peace, or arising in the army or navy ; or in 
the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public 
danger. 

10. No person shall, after acquittal, be tried for the same 
offense. All persons shall, before conviction, be bailable by 
sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses, when the proof 
is evident or presumption great. 

11. The i)rivilege of the Avrit of habeas corpus shall not be 
sus|)ended, unless in case of rebellion or invasion the public 
safety may require it. 

12. The military shall be in strict subordination to the civil 
powder. 

1 3. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in any 
house without the consent of the owner ; nor in time of war, 
except in a manner prescribed by law. 

14. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 39 

war against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them aid 
and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason, unless 
on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on 
confession in open court. 

15. Excessive bail shall not be required, excessive lines 
shall not Ije imposed, and cruel and unusual punisliments 
shall not be inflicted. 

16. Private property shall not be taken for public use with- 
out just compensation ; but land may be taken for public 
highways as heretofore, until the legislature shall direct com- 
pensation to be made. 

17. No person shall be imprisoned for debt in any action, 
or on any judgment founded upon contract, unless in cases of 
fraud ; nor shall any person be imprisoned for a militia fine 
in time of peace. 

18. The people have the right freely to assemble together, 
to consult for the common good, to make known their opinions 
to their representatives, and to petition for redress of griev- 
ances. 

19. No county, city, borough, town, townsliip or village 
shall hereafter give any money or property, or loan its money 
or credit, to or in aid of any individual association or corpora- 
tion, or become security for or be directly or indirectly the 
owner of any stock or bonds of any association or corporation. 

20. No donation of land or appropriation of money shall 
be made by the State or any municipal corporation to or for 
the use of any society, association or corporation whatever. 

21. This enumeration of rights and privileges shall not be 
construed to impair or deny others retained by the people. 

AKTICLE II. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

1. Every male citizen of the United States, of the age of 
twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this State 
one year, and of the county in which he claims his vote five 
months, next before the election, shall be entitled to vote for 
all officers that now. are, or hereafter may be, elective by the 
people; provided, that no person in the military, naval or 
marine service of the United States shall be considered a resi- 
dent in this State, by being stationed in any garrison, barrack, 
or military or naval place or station within this State ; • and no 
pauper, idiot, insane person, or person convicted of a crime 
which now excludes him from being a witness unless pardoned 
or restored by law to the right of suffrage, shall enjoy the 
right of an elector; and provided further, that in time of war 
no elector in the actual military service of the State, or of the 



40 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

United States, in the array or navy thereof, shal . be deprived 
of his vote by reason of his absence from sucli election dis- 
trict ; and tlie legislature shall have power to provide the 
manner in which, and the time and place at which, such 
absent electors may vote, and for the returr and canvass of 
their votes in- the election districts in Avhicli they respectively 
reside. 

2. The legislature may pass laws to deprive persons of the 
right of suffrage who shall be convicted of bribery. 



ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. The powers of the government shall be divided into 
three distinct departments — the legislative, executive and 
judicial ; and no person or persons belonging to, or consti- 
tuting one of these departments, shall exercise any of the 
powers properly belonging to either of the others, except as 
herein expressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 

Section I. 

1. The legislative power shall be vested in a senate and 
general assembly. 

2. No person shall be a member of the senate who shall 
not have attained the age of thirty years, and have been a 
citizen and inhabitant of the State for four years, and of the 
county for which he shall be chosen one year, next before his 
election; and no person shall be a member of the general 
assembly who shall not have attained the age of twenty-one 
years, and have been a citizen and inhabitant of the State for 
two years, and of the county for which he shall l)e chosen 
one year next before his election ; provided, that no pei"son 
shall be eligible as a member of either house of the legisla- 
ture, who shall not be entitled to the right of suffrage. 

3. Members of the senate and general assembly shall be 
elected yearly and every year, on the first Tuesday after the 
first Monday in November; and the two houses shall meet 
separately on the second Tuesday in January next after the 
said day of election, at which time of meeting the legislative 
year shall commence ; but the time of holding such election 
may be altered by the legislature. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 41 

Section II. 

1. The senate shall be composed of one senator from each 
county in the State, electeil by the legal voters of the counties, 
respectively, for three years. 

2. As soon as the senate shall meet after the first election to 
be held in pursuance of this constitutiou, they shall be divided 
as equally as may be into three classes. The seats of the 
senators of the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of 
the first year; of the second class at the expiration of the 
second year; and of the third class at the expiration of the 
third year, so that one class may be elected every year ; and 
if vacancies happen, by resignation or otherwise, the persons 
elected to supply such vacancies shall be elected for the unex- 
pired terms only. 

Section III. 

1. The general assembly shall be composed of members 
annually elected by the legal voters of the counties, respect- 
ively, who shall be apportioned among tbe said couuties as 
nearly as may be according to the number of their inhabitants. 
The present apportionment shall continue until tbe next census 
of the United States shall have been taken, and an apportion- 
ment of members of the general assembly shall be made by 
the legislature at its first session after the next and every 
subsequent enwmeration or census, and when made shall 
remain unaltered until another enumeration shall have been 
taken ; provided, that each county shall at all times be entitled 
to one member; and the whole number of members shall 
never exceed sixty. 

Section IV. 

1. Each house shall direct writs of election for supplying 
vacancies, occasioned by death, resignation, or otherwise ; but 
if vacancies occur during the recess of the legislature, the 
writs may be issued by the governor, under such regulations 
as may be prescribed by law. 

2. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of each 
shall constitute a quorum to do business ; but a smaller num- 
ber may adjourn from day to day, and may be authorized to 
compel the attendance of absent members, in such manner, 
and under such penalties, as each house may provide. 

3. Each house shall choose its own officei's, determine the 
rules of its proceedings, punish its members for disorderly 
behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, may expel 
a member. 

4. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 



42 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

from time to time publish the same ; and the yeas and nays 
of the members of either house on any question shall, at the 
desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the journal. 

5. Neither house, during the session of the legislature, 
shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the two 
houses sliall be sitting. 

6. All bills and joint resolutions shall be read three times 
in each house, before the final passage thereof; and no bill or 
joint resolution shall pass unless there be a majority of all the 
members of each body personally present and agreeing thereto; 
and the yeas and nays of the members voting on such final 
passage shall be entered on the journal. 

7. Members of the senate and general assembly shall ;^'eceive 
annually the sum of five hundred dollars during the time for 
which they shall have been elected and while they shall hold 
their office, and no other allowance or emolument, directly or 
indirectly, for any purpose whatever. The president of the 
senate an(l the speaker of the house of assembly shall, in virtue 
of their ofl[ices, receive an additional compensation, equal to 
one-third of their allowance as members. 

8. Members of the senate and general assembly shall, in all 
cases except treason, felony and breach of the peace, be privi- 
leged from arrest during their attendance at the sitting of their 
respective houses, and in going to and returning from the 
same; and for any speech or debate, in either house, they 
shall not be questioned in any other place. 

Section V. 

1. No member of the senate or general assembly shall, 
during the time for which he was elected, be nominated or 
appointed by the governoi-, or by the legislature in joint meet- 
ing, to any civil office under the authority of this State which 
shall have been created, or the emoluments whereof shall 
have been increased, during such time. 

2. If any member of the senate or general assembly shall 
be elected to represent this State in the senate or house of 
representatives of the United States, and shall accept thereof, 
or shall accept of any office or appointment under the govern- 
ment of the United States, his seat in the legislature of this 
State siiall thereby be vacated. 

3. No justice of the supreme court, nor judge of any other 
court, sheriff", justice of the peace nor any person or persons 
possessed of any office of profit under the government of this 
State, shall be entitled to a seat either in the senate or in the 
general assembly; but, on being elected and taking his scat, 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 43 

his office shall be considered vacant ; and no person hold- 
ing any office of profit under the government of the United 
States shall be entitied to a seat in either house. 

Section Vl. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of assembly ; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2 No money shall be drawn from the treasury but for 
appropriations made by law. 

8 The credit of the State shall not be directly or indi- 
rectly loaned in any case. 

4. The legislature shall not, in any manner, create any 
debt or debts, liability or liabilities, of the State which 
shall, singly or in the aggregate with any previous debts 
or liabilities, at any time exceed one hundred thousand 
dollars, except for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, 
or to suppress insurrection, unless the same shall be au- 
thorized by a law for some single object or work, to be 
distinctly specified therein ; which law shall provide the 
ways and means, exclusive of loans, to pay the interest of 
such debt or liability as it falls due, and also to pay and 
discharge the principal of such debt or liability within 
thirty-five years from the time of the contracting thereof, 
and shall be irrepealable until such debt or liability, and 
the interest thereon, are fully paid and discharged ; and 
no such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general 
election, have been submitted to the people, and have 
received the sanction of a majority of all the votes cast 
for and against it at such election ; and all money to be 
raised by the authority of such law shall be applied only 
to the specific object stated therein, and to the payment 
of the debt thereby created. This section shall not be 
construed to refer to any money that has been, or may 
be, deposited with this State by the government of the 
United States. 

Section VII. 

1. No divorce shall be granted by the legislature. 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the legislature or 
otherwise in this State, and no ticket in any lottery shall 
be bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, 
book-making or gambling of any kind be authorized or 
allowed within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by law be 
legalized, or the remedy, penalty or punishment now pro- 
vided therefor be in any way diminished. 

3. The legislature shall not pass any bill of attainder, 
ex post /ado law, or law impairing the obligation of con- 
tracts, or depriving a party of any remedy for enforcing 
a contract which existed when the contract was made. 



44 STATE CONSTITU'IION. 

4. To avoid improper iufiuences which may result from 
intermixing in one and the same act such things as have 
no proper relation to each other, every law shall embrace 
but one object, and that shall be expressed in the title. 
No law shall be revived or amended by reference to its 
title only ; but the act revived, or the section or sections 
amended, shall be inserted at length. No general law 
shall embrace any provision of a private, special or local 
character. No act shall be passed which shall provide 
that any existing law, or any part thereof, shall be made 
or deemed a part of the act, or which shall enact that any 
existing law, or anj' part thereof, shall be applicable, 
except by inserting it in such act. 

5. The laws of this State shall begin in the following 
style : " Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assem- 
bly of the State of New Jersey ' ' 

6. The fund for the support of free schools, and all 
money, stock and other property which may hereafter be 
appropriated for that purpose, or received into tlie treas- 
ury under the provision of any law heretofore passed to 
augment the said fund, shall be securely invested and 
remain a perpetual fund ; and the income thereof, except 
so much as it may be judged expedient to apply to an 
increase of the capital, shall be annually appropriated to 
the support of public free schools, for the equal benefit 
of all the people of the State ; and it shall not be compe- 
tent for the legislature to borrow, appropriate or use the 
said fund, or any part thereof, for any other purpose, 
under any pretense whatever. The legislature shall pro- 
vide for the maintenance and support of a thorough and 
efficient system of free public schools for the instruction 
of all the children in this State between the ages of five 
and eighteen years. 

7. No private or special law shall be passed authorizing 
the sale of any lands belonging in whole or in part to a 
minor or minors, or other persons who may at the time 
be under any legal disability to act for themselves. 

8. Individuals or private corporations shall not be au- 
thorized to take private property for public use, without 
just compensation first made to the owners. 

9. No private, special or local bill shall be passed unless 
public notice of the intention to apply therefor, and of the 
general object thereof, shall have been previously given. 
The legislature, at the next session after the adoption 
hereof, and from time to time thereafter, shall prescribe 
the time and mode of giving such notice, the evidence 
thereof, and how such evidence shall be preserved 

10. The legislature may vest in the circuit courts, or 
courts of common pleas within the several counties of 
this State chancerj- powers, so far as relates to the fore- 
closure of mortgages and sale of mortgaged premises. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 45 

11. The legislature shall not pass private, local or 
special laws in any of the following enumerated cases ; 
that is to say : 

Laying out, opening, altering and working roads or 
highways. 

Vacating any road, town plot, street, alley or public 
grounds. 

Regulating the internal affairs of towns and counties ; 
appointing local offices or commissions to regulate muni- 
cipal affairs. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or empaneling grand or 
petit jurors. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing the percentage or allow- 
ance of public officers during the term for which said officei"s 
were elected or ajipointed. 

Changing the law of descent. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual any 
exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise wliatever. 

Granting to any coi-poration, association or individual the 
right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or criminal cases. 

Providing for the management and support of free public 
schools. 

The legislature shall pass general laws providing for the 
cases enumerated in this paragraph, and for all other cases 
which, in its judgment, may be provided for by general laws. 
The legislature shall pass no special act conferring corporate 
powers, but they sliall pass general laws under which corpora- 
tions may be organized and corporate powei-s of every nature 
obtained, subject, nevertheless, to repeal or alteration at the 
will of tlie legislature. 

12. Property shall be assessed for taxes under general laws, 
and by uniform rules, according to its true value. 

Section VIIL 

1. Members of the legislature shall, before they enter on 
the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe the 
following oath or affirmation : 

" I do solemnly swear [or aflirm, as the case may be,] that 
I will support the constitution of the United States and the 
constitution of the State of Kew Jersey, and that I will faith- 
fully discharge the duties of senator [or member of the general 
assembly, as the case may be,] according to the best of my 
ability." 

And members-elect of the senate or general assembly are 
hereby empowered to administer to each other the said oath 
or affirmation. 

2. Every officer of the legislature shall, before he enters 
upon his duties, take and subscribe the following oath or 



46 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

affirmation : " I do soleiunly promise and swear [or affirm] 
that I will faithfully, impartially and justly perform all the 

duties of the office of , to the best of my ability and 

understanding; that I will carefully preserve all records, 
papers, writings or property intrusted to me for safe-keeping 
by virtue of my office, and make such disposition of the same 
as may be required by law." 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a governor. 

2. The governor shall be elected by the legal votere of this 
State. The person having the highest number of votes shall 
be the governor ; but if two or more shall be equal and highest 
in votes, one of them shall be chosen governor by the vote of 
a majority of the members of both houses in joint meeting. 
Contested elections for the office of governor shall be deter- 
mined in sncli manner as the legislature shall direct by law. 
Wlien a governor is to be elected by the people, such election 
shall be held at the time when and at the places where the 
people shall respectively vote for members of the legislature. 

3. The governor shall hold his office for three years, to 
commence on the third Tuesday of January next ensuing the 
election for governor by the people, and to end on the Monday 
preceding tlie third Tuesday of January, three years there- 
after ; and he shall be incapable of holding that office for 
three years next after his term of service shall have expired; 
and no appointment or nomination to office shall be made by 
the governor during the last week of his said term. < 

4. The governershall be not less than thirty years of age, 
and shall have been for twenty yeai-s, at least, a citizen of 
the United States, and a resident of this State seven years 
next before his election, unless he shall have been absent 
during that time on the public business of the United States 
or of this State. 

5. The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his services 
a compensation which shall be neither increased nor dimin- 
ished during the period for which he shall have been elected. 

6. He shall be the commander-in-chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State ; he shall have power to convene 
the legislature, or the senate alone, whenever in his opinion 
public necessity requires it ; he shall communicate by message 
to the legislature at the opening of each session, and at such 
other times as he may deem necessary, the condition of the 
State, and recommend such mea.sures as he may deem expe- 
dient ; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed, 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 47 

and grant, under the great seal of the State, commissions to 
all such officers as shall be required to be commissioned. 

7. Every ])ill which shall have passed both houses shall be 
presented to the governor ; if he approve he shall sign it, but 
if not, be shall return it, with his objections, to tlie bouse in 
whicb it shall have originated, who shall enter the objections 
at large on their journal, and proceed to reconsider it ; if, 
after such reconsideration, a majority of tbe whole number of 
that house shall agree to pass the bill, it shall be sent, together 
with the objections, to the other house, by which it shall 
likewise be reconsidered, and if approved of by a majority of 
the whole number of that house, it shall become a law; but 
in neither house shall the vote be taken on the same day on 
which the bill shall be returned to it ; and in all such cases, 
(he votes of both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, 
and the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each house resi:)ectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor, within live 
days (Sunday excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the legislature by their adjournment prevent 
its return, in which case it shall not be a law. If any bill 
presented to the governor contain several items of appropria- 
tions of money, he may object to one or more of such items 
while approving of the other portions of the bill. In such 
case he shall append to the bill, at the time of signing it, a 
statement of the items to which he objects, and the appropria- 
tion so objected to shall not take effect. If the legislature be 
in session he shall transmit to the house in which the bill 
originated, a copy of such statement, and the items objected to 
shall be separately reconsidered. If, on reconsideration, one 
or more of such items be approved by a majority of the 
members elected to each house, the same shall be a part of 
the law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor All 
the provisions of this section in relation to bills not approved 
by the governor shall apply to cases in which he shall with- 
hold his approval from any item or items contained in a bill 
appropriating money. 

8. Xo member of congress, or person holding an office under 
the United vStates, or this State, shall exercise the office of 
governor; and in case the governor, or person administering 
the government shall accept any office under the United 
States or this State, his office of governor shall thereupon be 
vacant. Nor shall he be elected by the legislature to any 
office under the government of this State or of the United 
States, during the term for which he shall have been elected 
g(jvernor. 



48 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

i) The governor, or person administering the government, 
shall have power to suspend the collection of fines and for- 
feitures, an(i to grant reprieves, to extend until the expiration 
of a time not "exceeding ninety days after conviction ; but this 
power shall not extend to cases of impeachment. 

10 The governor, or person administering the government, 
the chantelUr, and the six judges of the court of errors and 
appeals, or a major part of them, of whom the governor, or 
person administering the government, shall be one, may remit 
fines and fori'eitures, and grant pardons, after conviction, in 
all cases exce. l impeachment 

11. The governor and all other civil oflBcers under this 
Slate shall be liable to impeachment for misdemeanor in 
office during their continuance in office, and for two years 
thereafter. 

12. in case of the death, resignation or removal from office 
of the governor, the powers, duties and emoluments of the office 
shall devolve upon the president of the senate, and in case of 
his death, resignation or removal, then upon the speaker of 
the house of assembly, for the time being, until another gov- 
ernor sli" 11 be elected and qualified ; but in such case another 
governor shall be chosen at the next election for members of 
the legislature, unlet* such death, resignation or removal shall 
occur within thirty days immediately preceding such next 
election, in which caae a governor shall be chosen at the 
second succeeding election for members of the legislature. 
When a vacancy happens, during the recess of the legislature, 
in any office which is to be filled by the governor and senate, 
or by the legislature in joint meeting, the governor shall fill 
such vacancy and the commission shall expire at the end of 
the next session of the legislature, unless a successor shall be 
sooner appointed ; when a vacancy happens in the office of 
clerk or surn^gate of any county, the governor shall fill such 
vacancy, and the commission sliull expire when a successor is 
elected and qualified. Xo person who shall have been nomi- 
nated to the senate by the governor for any office of trust or 
profit under the government of this State, and shall not have 
been confirmed before the recess of the legislature, shall be 
eligible for appointment to such office during the continuance 
of such recess. 

13. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his absence 
from the Stale or inability to discharge t he duties of his office, 
the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall devolve 
upon the president of the senate ; and in case of his death, 
resignation or removal, then upon the speaker of the house 
of assembly for the time being, until the g-overnor absent or 
impeached, shall return or be acquitted, or until the disquali- 
fication or inability .shall cease, or until ;i new governor be 
elected an<l qualified. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 4^ 

14. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor from any 
other cause than those herein enumerated, or in case of the 
death of th governor-elect before he is qualified into cffiee, 
the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall devolve 
upon the president of the senate or speaker of the house of 
assembly, as above provided for, until a new governor be 
elected and qualified. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Section I. 
1. The judicial power shall be vested in a court of errors 
and appeals in the last resort in all causes as heretofore ; a 
court for the trial of impeachments ; a court of chancery ; a 
prerogative court; a supreme court; circuit courts, and such 
inferior courts as now exist, and as may be hereafter ordained 
and established by law; which inferior courts the legislature 
may alter or abolish, as the public good shall require 

Section II. 

1. The court of errors and appeals shall consi-t of the 
chancellor, the justices of the supreme court, and six judges, 
or a major part of them ; which judges are to be appointed 
for six years. 

2. Immediately after the court shall first assemble, the six 
judges shall arrange themselves in such manner that the seat 
of one of them shall be vacated every year, in order that 
thereafter one judge may be annually appointed. 

3. Such of the six judges as shall attend the court shall 
receive, respectively, a per diem compensation, to be provided 
by law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

5. When an appeal from an order or decree shall be heard, 
the chancellor shall inform the court, in writing, of the reasons 
for his order or decree ; but he shall not sit as a member, or 
have a voice in the hearing or final sentence. 

6. When a writ of error shall be brought, no justice who 
has given a judicial opinion in the cause in favor of or against 
any error complained of, shall sit as a member, or have a voice 
on the hearing, or for its affirmance or reversal ; but the reasons 
for such opinion shall be assigned to the court in writing. 

Section III. 
1. The house of assembly shall have the sole power of 
impeaching, by a vote of a majority of all the members; and 
all impeachments shall be tried by the senate ; the members, 
when sitting for that purpose, to be on oath or affirmatir.n 
"truly and impartially to try and deleimine the clmrge in 
4 



50 STATE CONSTITUTION'. 

question according to evidence ;" and no person shall be con- 
victed without the concurrence of two-thirds of all the members 
of the senate. 

2. Any judicial officer impeached shall be suspended from 
exercising his office until his acquittal. 

3. Judgment in cases of impeachment sliall not extend 
farther than to removal from ofhce, and to dis(]ualiii<.ation to 
hold and enjoy any office of honor, profit or trust under ihis 
State; but the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be liable to 
indictment, trial and punishment according to law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

Section IV. 

1. The court of chancery shall consist of a chancellor. 

2. The chancellor shall be the ordinary or surrogate general, 
and judge of the prerogative court. 

3. All persons aggrieved by any ordei', sentence or decree 
of the orphans' court, may appeal from the same, or from 
any part thereof to the prerogative court; but such order, 
sentence or decree shall not be removed into the supreme 
court, or circuit court if the subject-matter thereof be within 
the jurisdiction of the orphans' court. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the register of the pre- 
rogative court, and shall perform the duties required of him 
by law^ in that respect. 

Section V. 

1. The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice and 
four associate justices. The number of associate justices may 
be increased or decreased by law, but shall never be less than 
two. 

2. The circuit courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more of the justices of the supreme coui-t, or 
a judge appointed for that purpose, and shall, in all cases 
wathin the county except in those of a criminal nature, have 
common law jurisdiction, concurrent with the supreme court; 
and any final judgment of a circuit court may be docketed in 
the supreme court, and shall operate as a judgment obtained 
in the supreme court from the time of such docketing. 

3. Final judgments in any circuit court may be brought by 
writ of error into the supreme court, or directly into the court 
of errors and appeals. 

Section VI 

1. There shall be no more than five judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas in each of the counties in this State, 
after the terms of the judges of said court now in office shall 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 51 

terminate. One judge for each county shall be appointed 
eveiy year, and no more, except to fill vacancies, which shall 
be for the unexpired term only. 

2. The commissions for the first appointments of judges of 
said court shall bear date and take effect on the fii-st day of 
Ai)ril next; and all subsequent commissions forjudges of said 
court shall bear date and take effect on the first day of April 
in every successive year, except commissions to fill vacancies, 
which shall bear date and take effect when issued. 

Section YIL 

1. There may be elected under this constitution two, and 
not more than five, justices of the peace in each of the town- 
ships of the several counties of this State, and in each of the 
wards, in cities that may vote in wards. When a township or 
ward contains two thousand inhabitants or less, it may have 
two justices; when it contains more than two thousand inhab- 
itants, and not more than four thousand, it may have four 
justices ; and when it contains more than four thousand inhab- 
itants, it may have five justices; provided, that whenever any 
township not voting in wards contains more than seven thou- 
sand inhabitants, such township may have an additional justice 
for each additional three thousand inliabitants above four 
thousand. 

2. The population of the townships in the several counties 
of the State and X)f the several wards shall be ascertained by 
the last preceding census of the United States, until the legis- 
lature shall provide, by law, some other mode of ascertaining it. 



ARTICLE VII. 

APPOINTING POWER AND TENURE OP OFFICE. 

Section I. 

MILITIA OFFICERS. 

1. The legislature shall provide by law for enrolling, organ- 
izing and arming the militia. 

2. Captains, subalterns and non-commissioned officers shall 
be elected Ijy the members of their respective companies. 

3. Field officers of regiments, independent battalions and 
squadrons shall be elected by the commissioned officers of their 
respective regiments, battalion;j or squadrons. 

4. Brigadier-generals shall be elected by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

5. Major generals, the adjutant-general and quartermaster- 



52 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

general shall be nominated by the governor, and appointed 
by him, with the advice and consent of the senate. 

6. The legislature shall provide, by laAV, the time and 
manner of electing militia officers, and of certifying their 
elections to the governor, who shall grant their commissions, 
and determine their rank, when not determined by law ; and 
no conmiissioned officer shall be removed from office but by 
the sentence of a court-martial, pursuant to law. 

7. In case the electors of subalterns, captains or field officers 
shall refuse or neglect to make such elections, the governor 
shall have power to appoint such officers, and to fill all vacancies 
caused by such refusal or neglect. 

8. Brigade inspectors shall be chosen by the field officers of 
their respective brigades. 

9. The governor shall appoint all militia officers whose 
appointment is not otherwise provided for in this constitution. 

10. Major-generals, brigftdier-generals and commanding 
officers of regiments, independent battalions and squadrons 
shall appoint the staff officers of their divisions, brigades, 
regiments, independent battalions and sc^uadrons, respectively. 

Section II. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

1. Justices of the ^supreme court, chancellor, judges of the 
court of errors and appeals and judges of the inferior court 
of common pleas shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the senate. 

The justices of the supreme court and chancellor shall hold 
their offices for the term of seven years ; shall, at stated times, 
receive for their services a compensation which shall not be 
diminished during the term of their appointments ; and they 
shall hold no other office under the government of this State 
or of the United States. 

2. Judges of the courts of common pleas shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

'They shall hold their offices 'for five years; but when 
appointed to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only. 

3. The state treasurer and comptroller shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

' They shall hold their offices for three years, and until their 
successors shall be qualified into office. 

4. The attorney-general, prosecutors of the pleas, clerk of 
the supreme court, clerk of the court of chancery, secretary 
of state and the keeper of the state prison shall be nominated 



biTATE CONSTITUTION. 53 

by the governor, and appointed by him, with the advice and 
consent of the senate. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

5. The law reporter shall be appointed by the justices of 
the supreme court, or a majority of them ; and the chancery 
reporter shall be appointed by the chancellor. 

They shall hold their offices for five years, 

6. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected by the 
people of their respective counties, at the annual elections for 
members of the general assembly. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the people of 
their respective counties, at the elections for members of the 
general assembly, and they shall hold their offices for three 
years, after which three years must elapse before they can be 
again capable of serving. Sheriffs shall annually renew their 
bonds. 

8. Justices of the peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties of 
the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in wards, 
in such manner and under such regulations as may be hereafter 
provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their com- 
missions shall bear date and take effect on the first day of May 
next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years ; but when elected 
to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired term only; 
provided, that the commission of any justice of the peace shall 
become vacant upon his ceasing to reside in the township in 
which he was elected. 

The first election for justices of the peace shall take place 
at the next annual town-meetings of tlie townships in the 
several counties of the State, and of the wards in cities that 
may vote in wards. 

9. All other officers, whose appointments are not otherwise 
provided for by law, shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the senate; 
and shall hold their offices for the time prescribed by law. 

10. All civil officers elected or appointed pursuant to the 
provisions of this constitution, shall be commissioned by the 
governor. 

11. The term of office of all officers elected or appointed, 
pursuant to the provisions of this constitution, except when 
herein otherwise directed, shall commence on the day of the 
date of their respective commissions ; but no commission for 
any office shall bear date prior to the expiration of the term 
of the incumbent of said office. 



54 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

AETICLE VIII. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

1. The secretary of state shall be ex officio an auditor of the 
accounts of the treasurer, and as such, it shall be his duty to 
assist the legislature in the annual examination and settlement 
of said accounts, until otherwise provided by law. 

2. The «eal of the State shall be kept by the governor, 
or person administering the government, and used by him 
officially, and shall be called the great seal of the State of 
New Jersey. 

3. All grants and commissions shall be in the name and by 
the authority of the State of New Jersey, sealed with the 
great seal, signed by the governor, or person administering 

the government, and countersigned by the secretary of state, 

and it shall run thus: "The State of New Jersey, to -, 

greeting." All writs shall be in the name of the State ; and 
all indictments' shall conclude in tiie following manner, viz., 
"against the peace of this State, ^the government and dignity 
of the same." 

4. This constitution shall take effect and go into operation 
on the second day of September, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four. 

AETICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any specific amendment or amendments to the constitution 
may be proposed in the senate or general assembly, and if the 
same shall be agreed to by a majority of the members elected 
to each of the two houses, such proposed amendment or 
amendments shall be entered on their journals, with the yeas 
and nays taken thereon, and referred to the legislature then 
next to be chosen, and shall be published for three months 
previous to making such choice, in at \ez^-t one newspaper of 
each county, if any be published therein ; and if in the legis- 
lature next chosen as aforesaid, such proposed amendment or 
amendments, or any of them, shall be agreed to by a majority 
of all the membei-s elected to each house, then it shall be the 
duty of the legislature to submit »;uch proposed amendment 
or amendments, or such of them as may have been agreed to 
as aforesaid by the two legislatures, to the people, in such 
manner and at such time, at least four months after the 
adjournment of the legislature, as the legislature shall pre- 
scribe ; and if the people at a special election to be held for 
that purpose only, shall approve and ratify such amendment 
or amendments, or any of them, by a majority of the electors 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 55 

qualified to vote for members of the legislature voting thereon, 
such amendment or amendments so approved and ratified shall 
become part of the constitution ; provided, that if more than 
one amendment be submitted, they shall be submitted in such 
manner and form that the people may vote for or against each 
amemlment separately and distinctly ; but no amendment or 
amendments shall be submitted to the people by the legislature 
oftener than once in five years. 

AETICLE X. 

SCHEDULE. 

That no inconvenience may arise from the change in the 
constitution of this State, and in order to carry the same into 
complete operation, it is herein- declared and ordained, that — 
■ 1. Tiie connnon law and statute laws now in force, not 
repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until they 
expire by their own limitation, or be altered or repealed by 
the legislature; and all writs, actions, causes of action, prose- 
cutions, contracts, claims and rights of individuals and of 
bodies corporate, and of the State, and all charters of incor- 
poration, shall continue, and all indictments which shall have 
been found, or which may hereafter be found, for any crime 
or oflense commitied before the adoption of this constitution, 
may be proceeied upon as if no change had taken place. The 
several courts of law and equity, except as herein otherwise 
proviiled, shall continue with the like powei-s aud jurisdiction 
as if this constitution had not been adopted. 

2. All officers now filling any office or apiDointment shall 
continue in the exercise of the duties thereof, according to 
their respective commissions or appointments, unless by this 
constitution it is otherwise directed. 

H. The present governor, chancellor and ordinary or surro- 
gate-general and treasurer shall continue in office until suc- 
cessors elected or ai)pointed under this constitution shall be 
swi)rn or affirmed into office. 

4. In c:ise of the death, resignation or disability of the pres- 
ent governor, the person wiio may be vice-president of council 
at the time of the adoption of this constitution shall continue 
in office an 1 administer the government until a governor shall 
have been elected and sworn or affirmed into office under this 
constitution. 

5. The present gov-ernor, or in case of his death or inability 
to act, the vice-president of council, together with the present 
members of the legislative council and secretary of state, shall 
constitute a board of state canvassers, in the manner now pro- 
vided by law, for the purpose of ascertaining and declaring 



56 STATE CONSTITUTION, 

the result of the next ensuing election for governor, members 
of the house of representatives, and electors of president and 
vice-president. 

6. The returns of the votes for governor, at the said next 
ensuing election, shall be transmitted to the secretary of state, 
the votes counted, and the election declared in the manner 
now provided bv law in the case of the election of electors of 
president and vice-president. 

7. The election of clerks and surrogates, in those counties 
where the term of office of the present incumbent shall expire 
previous to the general election of eighteen hundred and forty- 
five, shall be held at the general election next ensuing the 
adoption of this constitution; the result of which election 
shall be ascertained in the manner now provided by law for 
the election of sheriffs. 

8. The elections for the year eighteen hundred and forty- 
four shall take place as now provided by law. 

9. It shall be the duty of the governor to fill all vacancies 
in office happening between the adoption of this constitution 
and the first session of the senate, and not otherwise provided 
for, and the commissions shall expire at the end of the first 
session of the senate, or when successor shall be elected or 
appointed and qualified. 

10. The restriction of the pay of members of the legislature, 
after forty days from the commencement of the session, shall 
not be applied to the first legislature convened under this 
constitution. 

11. Clerks of counties shall be clerks of the inferior courts 
of common pleas and quarter sessions of the several counties, 
and perform the duties, and be subject to the regulations now 
required of them by law until otherwise ordained by the 
legislature. 

12. The legislature shall pass all laws necessary to carry 
into effect the provisions of this constitution. 



State of New Jersey: 

I, George Wurt.*, Secretary of State of the State of New 
Jersey, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy of 
the Constitution of the Stale of New Jersey as amended, as 
the same is taken from and compared with the original Con- 
-titution and amendments thereto, now remaining on file in 
my office. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
[l. s.] hand and affixed my official seal, this twenty-sixth 
day of October, a. d. eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven. 

GEOKGE WUETS. 



SENATE. 

RULES ADOPTED THIS YEAR. 



President. 



1. The President shall take the chair at the time ap- 
pointed ; and a quorum being present, the journal of the 
preceding day shall be read, to the end that any mistake 
therein may be corrected 

2. He shall not engage in any debate without leave of 
the Senate, except so far as shall be necessary for regu- 
lating the form of proceedings. (Rule 6.) 

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it 
sitting. He shall, on all occasions, preserve the strictest 
order and decorum. ( Rules 7, 43, 53. ) 

4. "When two or more Senators shall rise at the same 
time, he shall name the one entitled to the floor. 

5. He shall have the right to name a Senator to per- 
form the duties of the Chair, but such substitute shall not 
extend beyond one day. 

6. He shall decide every question of order without 
debate, subject to an appeal of the Senate ; and he may 
call for the sense of the Senate upon any question of 
order. • 

7. He shall cause all persons to be arrested or removed 
from the Senate chamber who shall interrupt the pro- 
ceedings of the Senate or conduct themselves improperly 
in the lobby or gallery. ( Rule 53. ) 

8. The Senate may elect a President pro tempore, who 
shall possess all the powers and discharge all the duties 
of the President, when the latter is absent in discharge of 
his constitutional duty of administering the government 
of the State. 

Quorum. 

9. A majority of the members of the Senate shall con- 
stitute a quorum ; and whenever a less number than a 
quorum^ shall convene at a regular meeting, and shall 
adjourn, the names of those present shall be entered on 
the journal. 

10. Whenever a less number than a quorum shall con- 
vene at any regular meeting, they are hereby authorized 
to send the Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or per- 
sons by them authorized, for any or all absent Senators. 

' Order of Business. 
11 After the President has taken the chair, the order 
of business shall be as follows : 

• (57) 



58 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

I. Praver. 
II. CalUng the Roll. 

III. Reading the Journal. 

IV. Presentation and reference of petitions and memo- 

rials 
V. Reports of Committees. 

1. vStanding Coiuiiiittees (according to Rule 13.) 

2. Select Committees. 
VI. Unfinished business. 

VII. Introduction of bills. 
VIII. Senate bills on second reading. 
IX. Senate bills on third reading. 

X. Assembly bills on second reading. 
XI. Assembly bills on third reading. 

Committees. 

12. All Committees shall be appointed by the President, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. (Rule 34.) 

13. The following Standing Committees, consisting of three 
members each, shall be appointed at the commencement of 
each session, until otherwise ordered, with leave to report by 
bill or otherwise: 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Coniniittee on Appropriations. 

A Committee on Revision and Amendment of t'he Laws. 

A Committee on Finance. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Railroads, Canals and Turnpikes. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance Companies. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Agriculture. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business. 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Public Health. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Labor and Industries 

A Committee on Boroughs and Townships. 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills, whose duty it shall 
be to examine all bills and joint resolutions before they 
shall be put upon their third reading, and who shall 
report the same to the Senate, and th^ Secretary shall 
enter upon the journal that the same have been correctly 
engrossed. 

Special Committees shall consist of three members, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 59 

The several Joint Committees shall consist of three 
members each, and shall be also appointed to act con- 
jointly with corresponding committees to be appointed 
by the House of Assembly, 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 

A Committee on the Library. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Public Printing. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Relations. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes. 

Bills and Joint Resolutions. 

14. When a memorial or bill is referred to a committee, 
praying or providing for an act of incorporation, or for any 
other act, notice of the application for -which is required by 
law to be previously advertised, the committee shall not have 
leave to report such bill unless satisfactory evidence has been 
presented to the committee that the application for such act 
has liad a bona fide advertisement according to law ; and all 
committees reporting such bills referred to them shall certify 
to the Senate that such proof has been presented and is deemed 
satisfactory. 

15. Tlie titles of all bills, and such parts thereof only as 
shall be affected by proposed amendments, shall be entered 
on the journal. 

16. When leave is asked to bring in a bill, its title shall 
be read for the information of the Senate, and if objected to 
it shall be laid over for one day ; and all public bills and 
joint resolutions shall, after the first reading, be printed for 
the use of the Senate ; but no other paper or document shall 
be printed without special order, except private bills, as pro- 
vided by Eule 17. 

17. No private bill shall be read a second time, unless 
printed copies thereof, procured by the applicants, shall be in 
tlie possession of the Senate. 

18. All bills and special reports of committees shall be 
numbered by the Secretary as they are severally introduced, 
and a list made of the same, and such bills OvUd reports shall 
be called up by the President for consideration in the order 
in which they are reported and stand upon the calendar, unless 



60 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

otherwise ordered ; and the Secretary shall read from the said 
list or calendar, and not from the files of bills or reports. 

19. No bill shall be committed or amended until it shall 
have been ordered to a second reading, after which it may be 
referred to a committee. 

20. All bills may be made the order for a particular day, 
and public bills, when called for, shall have the preference of 
private bills ; and when two or more bills shall be called for 
by Senators, they shall be taken up according to their seniority, 
reckoning from the date of their introduction. (Eule 56.) 

21. The consent of a majority of the Senators present shall 
be sufficient to engross or re-engross any bill or joint resolu- 
tion ; but no bill or joint resolution shall pass unless there 
shall be a majority of all the Senators personally present and 
agreeing thereto ; and the yeas and nays of Senators voting 
on. the final passage of any bill or joint resolution shall be 
entered on the journal ; and the like entry on any other ques- 
tion shall be made at the desire of any Senator. 

22. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three read- 
ings previous to its being passed ; and the President shall give 
notice at each reading whether it be the first, second or third, 
which readings shall be on three different days. 

23. The final question upon the second reading of every bill 
or joint resolution originating in the Senate shall be whether 
it shall be engrossed and read a third time; and no amend- 
ment shall be received at the third reading unless by unani- 
mous consent of the Senators present, but it shall be in order, 
before the final passage of any such bill or joint resolution, to 
move its recommitment ; and should such recommitment take 
place, and any amendment be reported by the committee, the 
said bill or resolution shall be again read a second time and 
considered, and the aforesaid question again put. 

24. All bills ordered to be engrossed shall be executed in a 
fair, round hand. 

25. When a bill or joint resolution shall have been lost, 
and reconsidered and lost again, the same shall not again be 
reconsidered but by the unanimous consent of the Senate. 

26. Bills and joint resolutions, when passed by the Senate, 
shall be signed by the President. 

27. When a Senate l>ill or joint resolution shall have been 
passed, the same shall be signed, taken to the House of 
Assembly, and its concurrence therein requested, without a 
motion for that purpose. 

28. When a bill or resolution passed by the Senate shall be 
carried to the House of Assembly, all papers and documents 
relating thereto on the files of the Senate, shall be carried by 
the Secretary, with such bill or resolution' to the House of 
Assembly. ^ 



nVLES OF THE SENATE. 61 



Motions and their Precedence. 

29. When a motion shall be made, it shall be reduced to 
writing by the President or any Senator, and delivered to the 
Secretary at his table, and read before the same shall be 
debatal)le. 

30. All motions entered on the journal of the Senate, shall 
be entered in the names of the Senators who make them. 

31. If the question in debate contains several points, any 
Senator may have the same divided ; but a motion to strike 
out and insert, or to commit with instructions, shall not be 
divided. (Rule 49.) 

32. The rejection of a motion to strike out and insert one 
proposition shall not prevent a motion to strike out and insert 
a different proposition, nor prevent a subsequent motion 
simply to strike out ; nor shall the rejection of a motion 
simply to strike out," prevent a subsequent motion to strike 
out and insert. 

33. On filling blanks the question shall be first taken on 
the largest sum, the greatest number, and the most distant 
day. 

34. When motions are made for reference of the same sub- 
ject to a Select Committee and to a Standing Committee, the 
question of reference to a Standing Committee shall be put 
fii-st. 

35. When a question is before the Senate, no motion shall 
be received but — 

1. To adjourn. (Rules 36, 37.) 

2. To proceed to the consideration of Executive business. 

3. To lay on the table. (Rules 37, 39.) 

4. To postpone indefinitely. (Rule 39.) 

5. To postpone to a certain day. (Rule 39.) 

6. To commit. (Rule 39.) 

7. To amend. (Rules 38, 39.) 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they stand arranged. (Rule 39.) 

36. The motion to adjourn, or to fix a day to which the 
Senate shall adjourn, shall always be in order except when 
a vote is being taken, or while a Senator is addressing the 
Senate. 

37. The motion to adjourn, to proceed to the consideration 
of Executive business, and to lay on the table, shall be decided 
without debate. 

38. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill 
shall have precedence of a motion to amend, and if carried 
shall be equivalent to its rejection. 



62 nULES OF THE SENATE. 

39. When a motion shall have been once made and carried 
in the j<ffirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any 
Senator who voted on the prevailing side, to move a recon- 
sideration thereof on the same or next succeeding day of 
actual session; but no motion for the reconsideration of any 
vote shall be in order after a bill, resolution, message, report, 
amendment or motion upon which the vote was taken, 
announcing their decision, shall have gone from the posses- 
sion of the Senate, and they shall not pass from the possession 
of the Senate until the expiration of the time in which a 
reconsideration is permitted ; and every motion for reconsid- 
eration shall be decided by a majority of votes, except a 
motion to reconsider the vote on the final passage of a bill or 
joint resolution, which shall require the same majority as is 
necessary for their final passage. 

Members. 

40. The seats within the bar shall be reserved exclusively 
for the Senators, the officei's of the Senate, and the reporters 
of the press, who may have seats assigned them. 

41. No Senator shall speak in any debate without rising, 
nor more than three times on any subject of debate, unless he 
shall first obtain leave of the vSenate, 

42. Every Senator, in speaking, shall address the President, 
confine himself to the question under debate, and avoid 
personality. 

43. Any Senator may change his vote before the decision 
of the question shall have been announced by the Chair. 

44. Ko Senator shall have his vote recorded on any ques- 
tion, when the yeas and nays are called, unless he shall be 
present to answer to his name. 

Messages. 

45. All messages shall be sent to the House of Assembly 
by the Secretary, under the direction of the President, as a 
standing order, without a vote thereon. 

46. Messages may be delivered at any stage of business 
except when a vote is being taken. 

47. When a message shall be sent from the Governor or 
House of Assemby to the Senate, it shall be announced at the 
door by the Sergeant-at-Arms. 

Senate Bills in the House. 

48. When an amendment made in the Senate to a bill from 
the House of Assembly shall be disagreed to by that House, 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 63 

and not adhered to by the Senate, the bill shall be considered 
as standing on a third reading. 

49. An amendment of the House of Assembly to a Senate 
bill shall not be divisible. 

50. In case of disagreement between the Senate and House 
of Assembly, the Senate may either recede, insist and ash a 
conference or adhere, and motions for such purposes shall take 
precedence in that order. 

51. When a Senate bill shall be returned, amended by the 
House of Assembly, the sections of the bill so amended, 
together with the amendments, shall be read by the Secretary 
for a tirst reading, and be entitled to a second reading, without 
special motion, at which reading the proposed amendments 
shall be open to the action of the Senate. (Rule 50.) And 
if, at its third reading, upon the question being put by the 
President, "Will the Senate concur in the House amendment 
to Senate bill ISTo. — ?" a majority of the whole Senate sliould, 
by a vote of yeas and nays, to concur, the question shall then 
be upon ordering the bill to be re-engrossed. If so ordered, 
the bill shall be re-engrossed, the amendments embodied 
therein, and the re-engrossed bill examined and reported by 
the Committee on Engrossed Bills, and read in open Senate, 
to the end tliat it may be known to be correctly engrossed, and 
shall be then signed and certified as other bills. 

Disorder. 

52. In case of any disturbance in the gallery or lobby, the 
President shall have power to order the same to be cleared. 

53. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall aid in the enforcement of 
order, under the direction of the President. 

54. No Senator, in speaking, shall mention a Senator then 
present by his name. 

Special Orders. 

55. When the hour shall have arrived for the consideration 
of a special order, the same shall be taken up, and the Senate 
shall proceed to consider it, unless it shall be postponed by the 
Senate. 

56. The unfinished business in which the Senate shall have 
been engaged at the last preceding adjournment shall have the 
preference in the special orders of the day. (Rule 20.) 

57. No concurrent resolution shall pass unless by the con- 
sent of a majority of the Senators elected. 

Secret Session. 

58. On a motion made and seconded to shut the doors of 
the Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in 



64 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

the opinion of a Senator, require secrecy, ilie President shall 
direct the chamber to be cleared, and (hiring the discussion 
of such motion the doors shall remain sliut. 

Rules. 

59. Xo standing rule or order of the Senate shall be sus- 
pended unless by the consent of two-thirds of the Senators 
elected, nor rescinded or amended but by the same number, 
and one day's notice shall be given of the motion fur rescission 
or amendment. 

Executive Session. 

60. When nominations shall be made by the Governor to 
the Senate, they shall, unless otherwise ordered by the Senate, 
he referred to appropriate committees; and the final ijuestion 
on everv nomination shall be, "Will the Senate advise and 
consent to ihis nomination?" which question shall not be put 
on the same day on which the nomination is received, nor on 
the day on which it may be reported by a committee, unless 
by the'unanimous consent of the Senate. 

61. When acting on Executive business, the Senate shall 
be cleared of all persons except the Senatoi-s and Secretary. 

62. All information or remarks concerning the character or 
qualifications of any person nominated by the Governor to 
office shall be kept a secret. 

63. The Legislative and Executive proceedings of the Senate 
shall be kept in separate and distinct books. 

64. All nominations approved by the Senate, or otherwise 
definitely acted on, shall be transmitted by the Secretary to 
the Governor, with the determination of the Senate thereon, 
from tlay to day, as such proceedings may occur ; but no fur- 
ther extract from the Executive journal shall be furnished, 
published or otherwise communicated, except by special order 
of the Senate. 



HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

KULES ADOPTED THIS YEAR, 



Of the Meeting- of the House. 

1. Any member or members less than a quorum may meet 
and adjourn tlie House from day to day, when necessary. 

2. Every member shall attend in his place precisely at the 
hour to which the House was last adjourned ; and in case of 
neglect, lie shall be subject to a reprimand from the Chair, 
unless excused by the House ; nor shall any member absent, 
himself from the House for more than the space of a quarter 
of an hour without leave previously obtained. 

3. In case a less number of members than a quorum shall 
be present after the arrival of the hour to which the House 
stood adjourned, they are hereby authorized to send their 
Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or persons by them 
authorized, with a warrant duly executed, for any and all 
absent members, as the majority of such as are present may 
agree, and at the expense of such absent members, respect- 
ively, unless such excuse for non-attendance shall be rendered 
as the House, when a quorum is convened, shall judge suffi- 
cient. Immediately after the appointment of the Standing 
Committees, the members shall arrange among themselves 
their several seats appropriated to their counties ; and in case 
of disagreement, the same shall be decided by lot. 

Of the Duties of the Speaker. 

4. He shall take the chair at the hour to which the House 
shall have adjourned, and immediately call the members to 
order ; and on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause the 
journal of the preceding day to be read, which may then be 
corrected by the House. 

5. He shall preserve order and decorum, and in debate shall 
prevent personal reflections, and confine members to the ques- 
tion under discussion ; but he shall not engage in any debate, 
nor propose his opinion on any question, without first calling 
on some member to occupy the chair. When two or more 
members rise at the same time, he shall name the one entitled 
to the floor. 

6. He shall decide questions of order, subject to an appeal 
to the House, when demanded by any four members, on w hich 

5 (65) 



66 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

appeal no member shall speak more than onoe, unless by leave 
of the House. 

7. All questions before the House shall be stated by the 
Speaker, and distinctly put in the following form, to wit : "As 
many as are in favor of (the question) will say aye ; '' and after 
the affirmative is expressed, " Those of a contrary opinion, no." 
If the Speaker doubts, or a division be called ior, the House 
shall divide; those in the affirmative of the question shall first 
rise from their seats, and afterwards those in the negative ; and 
in case of an equal division, the Speaker shall decide. 

8. All Committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, unless 
otherwise specially directed by the House. 

9. All acts, nldresses and joint resolutions shall be signed 
by the Speaker; and all writs, warrants and subpoenas issued 
by the order of the House shall be under his hand and seal, 
and attested by the Clerk. If the Speaker be absent, a less 
number of members than a quorum may appoint a Speaker 
pro tempore, who may sign any warrants, or perform any act 
requisite to bring in absent membei-s. 

10. He shall have a general direction of the hall, and he 
may name a member to perform the duties of the Chair ; but 
such substitution shall not extend beyond a second adjourn- 
ment. 

Of the Order of Business. 

11. After the reading of the journal, the business of the first 
meeting of each day shall be conducted in the following man- 
ner, to wit : 

I. Letters, petitions and memorials, remonstrances and 
accompanying documents may be presented and disposed of. 

II. Reports of Committees may be read. 

III. Original resolutions may be offered and considered ; 
items of unfinished business referred ; motions to reconsider 
and to appoint additional members of Committees made ; and 
leave of absence, leave to withdraw documents, and leave to 
introduce bills asked. 

Leave for Bills and to Introduce Bills. 

lY. Bills and joint resolutions on a third reading may be 
taken up. 

Y. The House shall then proceed in the order of the day, 
preference being always given to the unfinished business of 
the previous sitting; after which bills and joint resolutions on 
a second reading shall betaken in their order; and the House, 
in its afternoon session, will proceed to business as though 
there had been no adjournment of its morning session, except- 
ing that original resolutions, and leave to introduce bills of 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 67 

Committees, be the fii-st business in the afternoon session; and 
shall, on demand of the majority, proceed with the order of 
the day. 

12. The Clerk shall make a list of all public bills and joint 
resolutions. He shall keep a separate calendar of private 
l)ills. No bills for granting, continuing, altering, amending, 
or renewing a charter for any corporation, other than a munici- 
pal corporation, shall be placed on the calendar of public bills. 
All bills, public and private, shall be numbered according to 
the time of their introduction into the House. They shall be 
taken up and considered in the order of time in which they 
were reported, or ordered to a third reading, as appears by the 
calendar; and the calendar shall be proceeded in until all the 
bills thereon are called up before the commencement of the 
calendar anew. 

13. All messages shall be sent from this House to the 
Senate by the Clerk. 

Of Decorum and Debate. 

14. When a member is about to speak in debate, or com- 
municate any matter to the House, he sball rise from his seat 
and respectfully address himself to the Speaker, conlining him- 
self to the question under debate, and avoiding personality. 

1"). If any member in debate transgiess the rules of the 
Hoiise, the Speaker shall, or any memler may, call him to 
order, in which case the member so called to order shall im- 
mediately sit down, iniless permitted to explain. The House 
shall, if appealed to, decide on the case, but without debate; 
if there be no appeal, the decision of the Chair shall be sub- 
mitted to. If tlie (!eclsi()n be in favor of the member called 
t!) order, he shall be at liberty to ])roceed ; if otherwise, he 
shall not be permitted to proceed without leave of the House, 
and if the case require it, he shall be liable to censure of the 
House. 

IG. If a member be called to order for words spoken in 
debate, the person calling him to order shall repeat the words 
excepted tt\ and they shall be taken down in Avriting at the 
Clerk's table; and no member shall be held to answer, or be 
subject to 1 he censure of the House, for words spoken in debate, 
if any other moniher has spoken, or other business has inter- 
vened after the words spoken, and before exception to them 
thall have been taken. 

17. No member shall epeak more than twice, or longer 
than five minutes each time, without leave of the House. 

18. While IheSpeakerisputtingany question, oraddress- 
\ug the House, none shall walk out of or across the hall ; nor 



68 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

in such case, or when a member is speaking, shall anyone 
entertain private discourse; nor shall anyone, while a 
member is speaking, pass between him afid the Chair. 

19. No member shall vote on any question in the event 
of which he is particularly interested, nor in any case 
where he was not within the bar of the House when the 
question was put. 

20. Every member who shall be in the House when the 
question is put shall give his vote, unless the House for 
special reasons shall excuse him. All motions to excuse a 
member from voting shall be made before the House di- 
vides, or before the call of the yeas and nays is commenced; 
any member requesting to be excused from voting may 
make a brief verbal statement of the reasons for such re- 
quest, and the question shall then be taken without fur- 
ther debate. 

21. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to 
the House shall be presented by the Speaker, or by a mem- 
ber in his place ; a brief statement of the contents thereof 
shall be made by the introducer, and, if called upon, he 
shall declare that it does not, in his opinion, contain any 
indecent or reproachful language, or any expressions of 
disrespect to the House, or any committee of the same. 

22. It shall be the duty of the Sergeaut-at-Arms, at all 
times, not to allow any person to smoke in the Assembly 
chamber. 

On Motions. 

23. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker or any member desire it. 

24. When a motion is made and seconded, it shall be 
stated by the Speaker, or being in writing, it shall be 
handed to the (hair and read aloud by the Clerk, when 
it shall be deemed to be in the possession of the House 
and open to debate; but it may be withdrawn at any 
time before a decision or amendment. 

25. When a question is under debate no motion shall 
be received but — 

1. To adjourn. 

2. A call of the House. 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. For the previous question. 

5. To postpone indefinitely. 

6. To postpone to a day certain, 

7. To go into a Committee of the Whole on the pend- 

ing subject immediately. 

8. To commit to a Committee of the Whok 

9. To commit to a Standing Committee. 

10. To commit to a Select Committee. 

11. To amend. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 69 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they are stated, and no motion to postpone to a day 
certain, to commit, or to postpone indefinitely, being decided, 
shall be again allowed on the same day, and at the same stage 
of the bill or proposition. 

26. A motion to strike out the enacting clause cf a bill or 
joint resolution shall have precedence of a motion to amend, 
and if carried shall be considered equivalent to its rejection. 

27. A motion to adjourn shall be always in order, except 
when the House is voting, or while a member is addressing 
tlie House, or immediately after the question to adjourn h;is 
been negatived ; that, and the motion to lay on the table, shall 
be decided without debate. »" 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, 
which shall be divided if it comprehends questions so distinct 
that one being taken away from the rest may stand entire for 
the decision of the House; a motion to strike out and insert 
shall be deemed indivisible; but a motion to strike out being 
lost, shall preclude neither amendment nor a motion to strike 
out and insert. 

29. When any motion shall be made and seconded, the same 
shall, at the request of any two members, be entered on the 
Journal of the House. 

30. When a motion has been once made and carried in the 
affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any member 
who voted with the prevailing party to move for the reconsid- 
eration thereof, on the same day or on the next day of actual 
session of the House thereafter ; all motions may be reconsid- 
ered, by a majority of the members present ; but bills, to be 
reconsidered, must have the same majority that would be 
necessary to pass them ; and such vote, on motion lo recon- 
sider, shall be by taking the yeas and nays. 

31. When a blank is to be tilled, the question shall first be 
taken on the largest sum, or greatest number, and remotest 
day. 

32. The yeas and nays shall be entered on the Journal of 
the House, when moved for and seconded by five members, 
and in taking the yeas and nays the names of the members, 
including the Speaker, shall be called alphabetically. 

33. Tlie previous question shall be put in this form : 
"Shall the main question be now put?" It shall only be 
admitted when demanded by a majority of the members 
present, and its effect shall be, if decided affirmatively, to put 
an end to all debate, and bring the House to a direct vote 
upon amendments reported by a committee, if any, then upon 
pending amendments, and then upon the main question ; if 
decided in the negative, to leave the main question and 



70 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

amendments if any, under debate for the residue of the sit- 
ting, unless sooner disposed of by taking the question, or in 
some other manner. All incidental questions of order aris- 
ing after a motion is made for the previous question, and 
pending such motion, shall be decided, whether on appeal or 
otherwise, without debate. 

34. After the Clerk has commenced calling the yeas and 
nays on any question, no motion shall be received until a 
decision shall have been announced by the Chair. 

Of Oomraittees. 

35. The following Standing Committees shall be appointed 
at the commencement of the session, until otherwise ordered : 

A Committee of Ways and Means. 

A Commiitee on Bill Revision. 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Agriculture aud Agricultural College. 

A Committee on Appropriations. 

A Committee on E<1uc:xtion. 

A Commiitee on i-llections. 

A Committee on Engrossed Bills. 

A Commit' ee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Boroughs and Borough Commissions. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Claims and Revolutionary Pensions. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance. 

A ComrLittee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Incidental Expenses. 

A Committee on Stationery. 

A Committee on Kiparian Rights. 

A Committee on Revision of Laws. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committtee on Miscellaneous Business. 

A Committee on Railroads aud Canals 

A Commitee on Labor and Industries. 

A Committee on Towns and Townships 

A Committee on Public Health. 

Which several committees shall consist of five members 
each. 

Joint Committees. 

The following Joint Committees, of five members each, 
shall also be appointed to act conjointly with correspo aid- 
ing committees to be appointed by the Senate : 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on Printing. 

A Committee on the State Library. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 71 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Relations. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf- Mutes. 

36. The several Standing Committees of the House shall 
have leave to rep- rt by bill or otherwise 

37. No committee shall sit during the sitting of the House, 
without special leave. 

38. All committees appointed at the first sitting shall con- 
tinue to act during every subsequent sitting of the same Legis- 
lature, or until they have reported on the business committed 
to them, or have been discharged. 

Of the Committee of the "Whole House. 

39. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the 
Speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman to preside in 
committee shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

40. The rules of proceeding in the House shall be observed, 
as far as practicable, in Committee of the Whole, except that 
any member may speak oftener than twice on the same subject, 
but shall not speak a second time until every member choosing 
to speak shall have spoken; nor shall a motion for the pre- 
vious question be made therein. 

41. All amendments made in Committee of the Whole shall 
be noted by the Clerk, but need not be read by the Speaker 
on his resuming the chair, unless required by the House. 

On Bills and Joint Resolutions. 

42. All bills and joint resolutions shall be introduced by 
motion for leave, or on the report of a committee, and the 
member offering the same shall indorse his name on them, 
that the committee may confer with him should they so desire. 

43. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three sepa- 
rate readings in the House previous to its passage, but no bill 
or joint resolution shall be read twice on the same day, with- 
cut speci?il order of the House. 

44. All bills and joint resolutions shall, after their first 
reading, be printed for the use of the members, and referred 
to their appropriate committees. 

45. All bills and joint resolutions may be made the order 
of a particular day, on which day they shall be taken up in 
preference to others on the calendar; and the calendar of pri- 
vate bills shall not be taken np until the calendar of public 
bills shall have been gone through with 



72 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

46. All bills and joint resolutions, previous to their final 
passage by the House, all petitions, motions and reports, may 
be committed at the pleasure of the House. And the recom- 
mitment of any bill or resolution, when the same has been 
ordered to a third reading, shall have the effect of placing the 
same upon the second reading. 

47. All bills and joint resolutions ordered to be engrossed 
shall be executed in a fair, round hand, and no amendment 
by way of rider shall be received to any bill or joint resolution 
on its third reading. 

48. On a motion to strike out any item in the incidental 
bill, the question to be submitted to the House shall be, " Shall 
the item be retained in the bill?" and a majority of all the 
members of the House shall be necessary to adopt the same. 

49. After the introduction of any private bill, the applicants 
for said bill shall, at their own expense, furnish the usual 
number of copies for the use of the membei"s, unless the print- 
ing thereof be dispensed with by a special order of the House. 

50. On tlie question of the final passage of all bills and 
joint resolutions, the yeas and nays shall be entered on the 
journal of the House. 

51. Whenever a bill or resolution that has passed the House 
shall be carried to the Senate, all papers and documents relat- 
ing thereto, on the files of the House, shall be carried with 
such bill or resolution to the Senate, 

Of Rules. 

52. No standing rule or order of the House shall be rescinded 
or changed without one day's notice being given of the motion 
therefor ; nor shall any rule be suspended except by a vote of 
the majority of the whole number of members of the House. 

53. When an Assembly bill is returned amended by the 
Senate, the report thereof by the Secretary of the Senate shall 
be taken as the first reading, and the same be entitled to a 
second reading, without a motion for that purpose; after its 
second reading, the question shall be, "Shall the Senate amend- 
ments to Assembly bill Xo. — have a third reading?" If 
ordered to a third reading, the amendments shall be read, but 
these readings shall be on different days; the question shall 
then be, "Will the House of Assembly concur in the Senate 
amendments to Assembly bill No. — ?" upon which question 
the votes shall be by yeas and nays. If concurred in by a 
majority of the whole House, the bill shall be re-engrossed, 
the amendments embodied therein, and the re-engrossed bill 
examined and reported upon by the Committee on Engros-sed 
Bills, and read in open Assembly, to the end that it may be 



MULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 73 

known to be correctly engrossed, and then signed and certified 
as other bills. 

54. Cushing's Manual shall in all cases, when not in conflict 
with the rules adopted by the House, be considered and held 
as standard authority. 

55. No person shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
during its sessions except State officers and members and 
officers of the Senate, unless by written permission of the 
Speaker. 

56. No committee of this House shall report a bill adversely 
without notifying the introducer of the bill; nor shall such 
adverse report be acted upon unless the introducer of the bill 
is in his seat. 

57. After the calling of the roll has been commenced upon 
any question, no member shall be permitted to explain his vote. 

58. Every bill amended in the House, after its report by 
the committee to which it was referred upon introduction, shall, 
when ordered to be engrossed and have a third reading, be 
delivered to the Committee on Bill Revision, whose duty it 
shall, be to examine the same, and if it be found that such 
amendment agrees with the context the bill shall then be 
engrossed. If in the opinion of the committee such auiend- 
ment is, as to form, improper, they shall report to the House 
with such recommendation as they think fit. Such report 
shall be made within t\s o days from the receipt of the bill, 

59. That hereafter any motion or resolution which will 
result in relieving a standing committee of a bill referred 
to it, shall not be entertained unless one day's notice shall 
be given the House of the introduction of such motion 
or resolution. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 

OF THE 

SENATE AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



1. In every case of an amendment of a bill agreed to in 
one House and dissented from in the oilier, if either House 
shall request a conference and appoint a committee for that 
purpose, and the other House shall also appoint a committee 
to confer, such committee shall, at a convenient hour to be 
agreed on by their respective chairmen, meet in conference, 
and state to each other, verbally or in writing, as either shall 
choose, the reasons of their respective Houses for and against 
the amendment, and confer freely thereon. 

2. After each House shall have adhered to their disagree- 
ment, a bill or resolution shall be lost. 

3. When a bill or resolution which shall have passed in 
one House is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be sent 
to the House in which the same shall have passed. 

4. Each House in which any bill or resolution shall have 
passed shall transmit thercMith to the other House all papers 
and documents relating to the same. 

5. When a message shall be sent from either House to tlie 
other, it shall be announced at the door of the House by the 
doorkeeper, and shall be respectfully communicated to the 
Chair by the person by whom it is sent. 

6. After a bill shall have passed both Houses, it shall be 
delivered by the Clerk of the Assembly, or the Secretary of 
the Senate, as the bill may have originated in one House or 
the other, to a Joint Committee on Passed Bills, of two from 
each House, appointed as a Standing Committee for that pur- 
pose, and shall be presented by said committee to the Governor 
for his approbation, it being first indorsed on the back of the 
bill, certifying in whicli House the same originated, which 
indorsement shall be signed by the Secretary or Clerk, as the 
case may be, of the House in which the same did originate, 
and shall be entered on the journal of each House. The said 
committee shall report on the day of presentation to the 
Governor, which time shall also be carefully entered on the 
iournal of each House. 

(74) 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

FKOM 1774 TO THE PRESENT TIME. 



Continental Congress. 

1774-5, James Kinsey; 1774-6, John Cooper, Stephen 
Crane, John De Hart, John Hart, Francis Hopkinson, Wil- 
liam Livingston, Richard Smith, Eichard Stockton; 177G-7, 
Jonathan D. Sergeant; 1776-8, Abraham Clark, Jonathan 
Elmer; 1776-9, John Witherspoon; 1777-8, Elias Boudinot; 
1777-9, Nathaniel Scudder; 1778-9, Frederick Frelinghuy- 
sen, Elias Dayton; 1778, John Neilson; 1778-80, John Fell; 
1779, Thomas Henderson; 1779-81, William Ch. Houston; 
1780-1, William Burnett, William Paterson; 1780-3, Abra- 
ham Clark; 1780-2, John Witherspoon; 1781-3, AVilliam 
Paterson; 1782-3, Frederick Frelinghuysen ; 1781-4, Silas 
Condict, Jonathan Elmer; 1783-5, John Beatty, Samuel 
Dick ; 1783-4, John Stevens, Sr. ; 1784-5, Charles Stewart, 
William Ch. Houston ; 1784-7, Lambert Cadwalader ; 1785-6, 
John Cleaves Symmes, Josiah Hornblower; 1786-7, James 
Schureman ; 1786-8, Abi-aham Clark ; 1787, William Pater- 
son; 



From 1789 to Date. 

I. 1789-91. Elias Boudinot, Burlington ; Lambert Cad- 
walader, Hunterdon ; James Schureman, Middlesex ; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem. 

II. 1791-3. Elias Boudinot, Burlington ; Abraham Clark, 
Essex ; Jonathan Dayton, Essex ; Aaron Kitchell, Morris ; 
James Schureman, Middlesex. 

III. 1793-5. John Beatty, Hunterdon ; Elias Boudinot, 
Burlington ; Lambert Cadwalader, Hunterdon ; Jonathan 
Dayton, Essex ; Abraham Clark, Essex (died 1794) ; Aaron 
Kitchell, Morris (to fill vacancy). 

IV. 1795-7, Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex ; Thomas 
Henderson, Monmouth ; Aaron Kitchell, Essex ; Isaac Smith, 
Hunterdon; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

V. 1797-9. Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex; James 
H. Imlay, Monmouth ; James Schureman, Middlesex ; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem ; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

(75j 



76 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

VI. 1799-1801. John Condit, Essex; Franklin Daven- 
port, Gloucester ; Samuel H. Imlay, Monmouth ; Aaron Kit- 
chell, Morris ; James Linn, Somerset, 

VII. 1801-3. John Condit, Essex; Ebenezer Elmer, 
Cumberland ; William Helms, Sussex ; James Mott, Burling- 
ton ; Henry Southard, Somerset, 

VIII. 1803-5. Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlington; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Adam Boyd, Bergen. 

IX. 1805-7. Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland ; William 
Helms, Sussex ; John Lambert, Hunterdon ; James Sloan, 
Gloucester ; Henry Southard, Somerset ; Ezra Darby, Essex. 

X. 1807-9. William Helms, Sussex; John Lambert, 
Hunterdon ; Thomas Newbold, Burlington ; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Ezra Darby, Essex 
(until 1808) ; Adam Boyd, Bergen (from 1808-9). * 

^ XL 1809-11. James Cox, Monmouth (until 1810) ; Wil- 
liam Helms, Sussex ; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland ; Tliomas 
Newbold, Burlington; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam 
Boyd, Bergen. 

XII. 1811-13, Adam Boyd, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; George C, Maxwell, 
Hunterdon; James Morgan, Middlesex; Thomas Newbold, 
Burlington. 

XIII. 1813-15. Lewis Condict, Morris; William Cox, 
Burlington ; Richard Stockton, Somerset ; Thomas Ward, 
Essex ; James Schu reman, Middlesex ; Jacob Hufty, Cumber- 
land (until 1814); Thomas Binns, Essex (1814-15). 

XIV. 1815-17. Ezra Baker, Middlesex ; Ephraim Bate- 
man, Cumberland ; Benjamin Bennett, Monmouth ; Lewis 
Condict, Morris ; Henry Southard, Soraei*set ; Thomas Ward, 
Essex. 

XV. 1817-19. Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Benja- 
min Bennett, Monmouth ; Joseph Bloomtield, Burlington ; 
Charles Kinsey, Essex; John Linn, Sussex; Henry South- 
ard, Sussex. 

XVI. 1819-21. Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland ; Joseph 
Bloomfield, Burlington; John Linn, Sussex; Barnard Smith, 
Middlesex ; Henry Southard, Somerset ; John Condit, Essex 
(until 1820) ; Thomas Binns, Essex (1820-1). 

XVII. 1821-3. George Cassady, Bergen ; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth; James Matlack, Glou- 
cester ; Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland ; Samuel Swan, Som- 
erset, 

XVIII. 1823-5. George Cassady, Bergen ; Daniel Garri- 
son, Salem ; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth ; James Matlack, 
Gloucester j Lewis Condict, Morris ; Samuel Swan, Somerset. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 77 

XIX. 1825-7. Gleorge Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris ; Daniel Garrison, Salem ; G. E. Holcombe, Mon- 
mouth ; Samuel Swan, Somerset ; Ebenezer Tucker, Burling- 
ton. 

XX. 1827-9. Lewis Condict, Essex ; Isaac Pierson, Es- 
sex ; Samuel Swan, Somerset ; Ebenezer Tucker, Burling- 
ton; George E. Holcombe, Monmouth (until 1828); Hedge 
Tliompson, Salem (until 1828); James Fitz Kandolph, Mid- 
dlesex (1828-9) ; Thomas Sinnickson, Salem (1828-9). 

XXI. 1829-31. Eichard M. Cooper, Gloucester; Lewis 
Condict, Morris ; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May ; Isaac Pier- 
son, Essex ; James Fitz Randolph, Middlesex ; Samuel Swan, 
Somei"set. 

XXII. 1831-3. Lewis Condict, Morris; Richard M. 
Cooper, Qloucester ; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May ; James 
Fitz Randolph, Middlesex ; Isaac Southard, Somerset ; Silas 
Condit, Essex. 

XXni. 1833-5. Philemon Dickerson (D.), Essex ; Sam- 
uel Fowler (D.), Sussex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; 
James Parker (D.)> Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), 
Somerset; William N. Shinn (D.), Burlington. 

XXIV. 1835-7. Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic (re- 
signed and elected Governor); Samuel Fowler (D.), Sussex; 
Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; James Parker (D.), Middle- 
sex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), Somerset; William N. 
Shinn (D.), Burlington; William Chetwood (D.), Essex (va- 
cancy 1836-7). 

XXV. 1837-9. John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen ; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell ( VV.j, Warren; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones York (W.), Salem. 

XXVI. 1839-41. \Villiam B. Cooper (D.), Gloucester; 
Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic; Josej)h F. Randolph 
(W.), Monmouth; Daniel B. Ryall (D.), Monmouth; Joseph 
Kille (D.), Salem; Peter D. Vroom (D.), Somerset. 

XXVH. 1841-3. John B. Avcrigg (W.), Bergen; Wil- 
liam Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), 
Warren; Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. 
Stratton ( W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones Yorke (W.\ Salem. 

XXVIII. 1843-5. Lucius Q. C. Elmer (D.), Cumberland ; 
George Sykes (D.), Burlington; Littleton Kirkpatrick (D.), 
Middlesex ; Isaac G. Farlee (D.), Hunterdon ; William Wright 
(W.), Essex. 

XXIX. 1845-7. James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland ; 
Samuel G. Wright (W.) (died 1845), Monmouth; George 
Svkes (D.) (vacancy), Burlington; John Runk (W.), Hunter- 
don ; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex ; William Wright (W,), 
Essex. 



78 NEW JERSEY CONGliESSMEN. 

XXX. 1847-9. James G. Hampton (W.\ Cumberland; 
William A. Kewell (W.), Monmouth ; John Van Dyke ( W.), 
Middlesex ; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex ; Dudley S. Greg- 
ory (W.), Hudson. 

XXXI. ^ 1849-51. Andrew K. Hay {^Y.), Camden ; Wil- 
liam A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van Dyke (W.), 
Middlesex ; Isaac Wildrick (D.), Warren ; James G. Kinf 
(W.), Hudson. 

XXXII. 1851-3. Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberland ; 
Charles Skelton (D. ^, Mercer; George H. Brown (W.\ Som- 
erset; Isaac Wildrick (D.), Warren; Rodman M. Price (D.j, 
Essex. 

XXXIII. 1853-5. Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberla .id ; 
Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer ; Samuel Lilly (D.), Hunterdon ; 
George Vail (D.), Morris; A. C. M. Pennington (W.), Essex. 

XXXIV. 1855-7. Isaiah D. Clawson (R.), Cumberland ; 
George R. Robbins (R.)> Mercer; James Bishop (N. A. i, 
Middlesex ; George Vail (D. j, Morris ; A. C. M. Pennington 
(R.), Essex. 

XXXV. 1857-9. Isaiah D. Clawson (R.\ Cumberland ; 
George R. Robbins (R.i, Mercer; Garnet B. Adrain (DJ, 
Middlesex; John Huyler (D.), Bergen; Jacob R. Worten- 
dvke (D.), Hudson, 

'XXXVI. 1859-61. John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.),. Burlington ; Garnet B. Adrain ( D. \ 
Middlesex ; Jetur R. Riggs (D.), Passaic ; William Penning- 
ton (R.) (Speaker), Essex. 

XXXVIL 1861-3. John T. Nixon (R.\ Cumberland; 
John L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington; William G. Steele 
(D.), Somerset; George T. Cobb (D.), Morris; Nehemiah 
Perry (D.), Essex. 

XXXVIII. 1863-5. John F. Starr (R.), Camden ; George 
Middleton (D.), Monmouth; William G. Steele (D.), Somer- 
set ; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex ; Nehemiah Perry (D.), 
Essex. 

XXXIX. 1865-7. John F. Starr (R.), Camden ; William 
A. Newell (R.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), War- 
ren ; Andrew J. Rogers (D.j, Sussex ; Ed. R. V. Wright (D,), 
Hudson. 

XL. 1867-9. William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 
Haio-ht (D. i, Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), Warren; 
John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex. 

XLI. 1869-71. AVilliam Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 
Haight (D.), Monmouth; John T. Bird (Dj, Hunterdon; 
John Hill (R.i, Morris; Orestes Cleveland (1). t, Hudson. 

;XLII. 1871-3. John W. Hazleton (R. i, Glou»^ester; 
Sam'l C. Forker (D.), Burlington; John T. Bird (D.), Hunter- 
don; John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 79 

XLIII. 1873-5. John W Hazleton 'R), Gloucester ; Samuel A. Dod- 
bins (R ), Burlington; Amos Clark, Jr (R.', Union; Robert Hamilton (D. , 
Sussex; William Walter Phelps (R.), Bergen; Marcus L. Ward (R.), 
Essex; Isaac \V. Scudder (R.'>, Hudson. 

XLIV. ls7i-7. Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem ; Samuel A. Dob- 
bins (R ), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex; Robert Hamilton (D ), 
Sussex; Augustus VV. Cutler (D ), Morris; Frederick H. Teese (D), 
Essex; Augustus A. Hardenbergh D.), Hudson 

XLV. 1877-y Clement H. Sinnickson iR.), Salem; J. Howard Pugh 
(R.), Burlington; Miles Ross D.), Middlesex; Alvah A. Llark (D.), 
Somerset; Augustus \V. Cutler (D), Morris; Thomas B Peddie (R >, 
Essex; Augustus A Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVI. 187l)-8l George M. Robeson Ri, Camden; Hezekiah B. 
Smith D.), Burlington; Miles Ro^s (U.), Middlesex ; Alvah A Clark(D.', 
Somerset; Charles H. Voorhis (R.), Bergen; John L. Blake (R }, Essex; 
Lewis A Brigham (R.), Hudson. 

XLVn. 1881- V George M. Robeson (R.), Camden ; John Hart Brewer 
(R.', Mercer; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex; Henry S. Harris (D.), War- 
ren; John Hill (R. , Morris; Phineas Jones (R.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVUI. 1883-5. Ihomas M. Ferrell (D ), Gloucester-, John Hart 
Brewer (R.), Mercer; John Kean, Jr. R.), Union; Benjamin F. Howey 
(R.), Warren; William Walter Phelps (R ), Bergen; William H F Fiedler 
,D ), Essex; William McAdoo (D ), Hudson. 

XLIX. 1885-7. George Hires (R.), Salem; James Buchanan (R.), 
Mercer; Robert S. Green (D.), Union; James N J^idcock (U.), Hunter- 
don; William Walter Phelps (R.>, Bergen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; 
William McAdoo ( D.), Hudson 

L. 1887-9. George Hires (R.), Salem ; James Buchanan (R.), Mercer ; 
John Kean, Jr. (R.), Union; James N. Pidcock (D.), Hunterdon; William 
Walter Phelps (R ), Bergen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex ; William Mc- 
Adoo (D.), Hudson. 

LI. 1889-91. Christopher A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James Buchanan 
(R.), Mercer; Jacob A. Geissenhainer (D.), Monmouth; Samuel Fowler 
(D.). Sussex; Charles D. Beckwith (R.), Passaic; Herman Lehlbach (R.), 
Essex; William McAdoo (D.», Hudson. 

LII. lK91-9i. C. A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James Buchanan (R.), 
Mercer; J. A. Geissenhainer iD.), Monmouth; Samuel Fowler (D.), Sus- 
sex ; C. A. Cadmus (D.), Passaic ; T. D. English (D.), Essex ; * E. F. Mc- 
Donald (D. , Hudson 

LIII. 1893-95. Henry C. Loudenslager R.), Gloucester; John J. Gard- 
ner (R.), Atlantic ; J. A. Geissenhainer D.), Monmouth ; Johnston c'ornish 
(D.i, Warren; C. A. Cadmus (D.>, Passaic; T D English (D ), Essex; 
Georee B. Fielder D.), Hudson ; John T. Dunn (D.), Union. 

LIV. 1895-07. Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; John J. Gard- 
ner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney 
(R.), Morris; James T. Stewart iR.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), 
Essex; Thomas McEwan (R ), Hudson ; Charles N. Fowler 'R.), Union. 

LV. 1897-99 Henry C. Loudenslager (R.i, Gloucester; John J. Gardner 
(R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.\ 
Morris; James T. Stewart (R ), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; 
Thomas McEwan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union, 

LVI. 1899-1901. Henry C. Loudenslager (R ), Gloucester; John J. 
Gardner (R.). Atlantic ; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), Middlesex; Joshua S. 
Salmon (D.), Mor'is : James T. Stewan (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker 
(Rj. Essex- William D. Daly (D.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), 
Union 



* Mr. McDonald died November 5th, 1892, and he was succeeded by 
George B. Fielder. 



THE jaDICIARY. 

(From 1704 to date.) 



CHANCELLORS. 

(Term, seven years— Salary, $10,000.) 
1845, Oliver S. Halsted ; 1852, Benjamin Williamson ; 1860, 
Henry W. Green; 1866, Abraham O. Zabriskie; 1873, Theo- 
dore Kunyon ; 1887, Alexander T. McGill (term expires May 
1st, 1901). 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
(Term of office, seven years— Salary, $10,000.) 
1704, Roger Mompesson ; 1709, Thomas Gordon ; 1710, 
David Jamison; 1723, William Trent; 1724, Robert Lettis 
Hooper ; 1728, Thomas Farmer ; 1738, Robert Hunter Morris ; 
1758, William Aynsley ; 1764, Charles Read ; 1764, Frederick 
Smyth; 1776, Richard Stockton (declned); 1776, John De- 
Hart (declined) ; 1777, Robert Morris; 1779, David Brearley; 
17.-9, James Kinsey ; 1803, Andrew Kirkpatrick ; 1824, 
Charles Ewing ; 1832, Joseph C, Hornblower; 1846, Henry 
W. Green ; 1853, Peter D Vroom (declined) ; 1853, Alexan- 
der AVurts (declined); 1861, Edward AV. Whelpley ; 1864, 
Mercer Beasley ; 1897, William J. Magie (term expires March 
2d, 1904). 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME 
COURT. 

(Term of of&ce, seven years— Salary, $9,000 each.) 
1704, William Pinhorne ; 1705, W^illiam San d ford ; 170% 
Andrew Bowne ; 1706, Daniel Coxe ; 1708, Thomas Revel ; 
1708, Daniel Leeds; 1710, Peter Sonmans; 1710,HiighHuddy ; 
1711, Lewis Morris; 1711, Thomas Farmer; 1721, Peter 
Baid; 1734, Daniel Coxe; 1735, John Hamilton; 1739, Jo- 
seph Bonnel ; 1739, John Allen ; 1748, Samuel Nevil ; 1:49, 
Charles Read ; 1754, Richard Salter ; 1764, John Berrien ; 
1772, David Ogden ; 1774, Richard Stockton; 1776, Samuel 
Tucker; 1776, Francis Hopkinson declined); 1777, Isaac 
Smith ; 1777, John Cleves Symmes ; 1788, John Chetwood ; 
1797, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 1798, Elisha Boudinot ; 1804, 
William S. Pennington; 1804, William Rossell ; 1813, Mah- 
lon Dickerson ; 1815, Samuel L. Southard ; 1820, Gabriel H. 
Ford; 1826, George K. Drake; 1834, Thomas C. Rversrn; 
1838, John Moore White; 1838, William L. Davton; 1838, 
James S. Nevius ; 1841, Daniel Elmer; 1841, Ira C. White- 
head ; 1845, Thomas P. Carpenter ; 1 845, Joseph F. Randolph ; 
1815, James S. Nevius; 1848, EliasB. D. Ogden; 1852.Lucius 
Q. C Elmer; 1852, Stacy G Potts; 1852, Daniel Haines; 
1855, Peter Vredenburgh; 1855, Martin Ryerson ; 1855, Elias 
(80) 



THE JUDICIARY. SX 

B. D. Ogden; 1858, Edward W. Whelpley; )859, Daniel 
Haines; 1859. William S. Clawson ; 1859, John Vandvke; 
1861, George H Brown; 1861, L Q. C Elmer; 1862, Peter 
Vredenburgh ; 1862, L. Q. C. Elmer ; 1862, Elias B. D. Ogden ; 
1863, Joseph D. Bedle; 1866, Vancleve Dalrimple; 1866, 
Gec.rge S. VVoodhuU; 1866, 73 '80, '87 and '94, David A. 
Depue; 1869, '76, '83, '90 and '97, Bennet Van Syckel ; 1869, 
'76, '83 and '90, Edward W. Scudder; 1875, '82 and '89, 
Manning M. Knapp ; 1875, '82, '89 and '96, Jonathan Dixon ; 
1875, '82 and '89, Alfred Reed; 1880 and* '87, Joel Parker; 
1880, '67 and '94, William J. Magie; 1888 and '95, Charles 
G. Garrison; 1892, George T. Werts; 1893, Job H. Lij)pin- 
cott; 1893, Leon Abhett; 1895, William S. Gummere; 1895, 
George C. Ludlow ; 1897, Gilbert Collins. 

ATTORNBY-QENERALS. 
(Term five years— Salary, S7,000.) 
1704, Alexander GriflBth; 1714, Thomas Gordon; 1719, 
Jeremiah Basse; 1723, James Alexander; 1728, Lawrence 
Smith; 1733, Joseph Warrel ; 1754, Cortland Skinner ; 1776, 
William Paterson ; 1783, Joseph Bloomfield ; 1792, Aaron D. 
Woodruff; 1811, Andrew S Hunter; 1817, Theodore Freling- 
huysen; 1829, Samuel L, Southard; 1833, John Moore White; 
1838, Richard S. Field* 1841, George P. Mollesson ; 1844, 
Richard P. Thompson; 1845, Abraham Browning; 1850, 
Lucius Q. C. Elmer ; 1852, Richard P. Thompson ; 1857, Wil- 
liam L. Dayton ; 1861, F. T. Frelinghuysen; 1867, George M. 
Robeson; 1870, Robert Gilchrist; 1875, Joel Parker; 1875, 
Jacob Vanatta; 1877, John P. Stockton; 1897, Samuel H. 
Grey (term expires April 5th, 1902). 

CLERKS IN OHANOERY. 

(Term, five years— Salary, 86,000.) 
1831, Stacy G. Potts; 1840, Samuel K. Gummere; 1851, 
Daniel B. Bodine; 1856, William M. Babbitt; 1861, Barker 
Gummere; 1871, Henry S. Little; 1881, George S. Duryee; 
1886, Allan L. McDermott; 1896, Lewis A. Thompson 
(terra expires March 28th, 1901). 

CLERKS OP SUPREME COURT. 

(Term, five years- Salary, 86,0f 0.) 
1776, Jonathan D. Sergeant (declined) ; 1776, Bowes Reed ; 
1781, William C. Houston; 1788, Richard Howell; 1793, 
Jonathan Rhea; 1807, William Hyer; 1812, Garret D. Wall; 
1817, Zach-riah Rossell ; 1842, Eli Morris; 1842, James Wil- 
son ; 1852, William M. Force; 1857, Charles P. Smith ; 1872, 
Benjamin F. Lee ; 1897, William Riker, Jr. (term expires 
November 2d, 1902). g 



STATE OFFICERS. 

(From 1776 to date.) 



SECRETARIES OF STATE. 

(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 

1776, Charles Pettit, resigned October 7th, 1778 ; 1778, Bowes 
Reed; 1794, Samuel ^V. Stockton; 1795, John Beatty ; 1805, 
James Linn ; 1820. Daniel CV)leman ; 1830, James D. West- 
cott ; 1840, Charles G. McChesnev ; 1851, Thomas S. Allison ; 
1861, Whitfield S. Johnson; 1866, Horace N. Congar; 1871, 
Henry C. Kelsey ; 1897, George Wurts fterm expires April 
1st, 1902). 



STATE TREASURERS. 
(Term, three years— Salary, §0,000.) 

1776, Richard Smith (resigned Febrnary 15th, 1777) ; 1777, 
John Stevens, Jr.; 1783, John Schureman (declined); 1783, 
James Mott; 1799, James Salter; 1803, Peter Gordon; 1821, 
Charles Parker; 1832, William Grant ; 1833, Charles Parker; 
1836, Jacob Kline; 1837, Isaac Southard; 1843, Thomas Ar- 
rowsmith ; 1845, Stacy A. Paxson ; 1848, Samuel Mairs ; 1851, 
RescarrickM. Smith; 1865, David Naar; 1866, Howard Ivins; 
1868, William P. McMichael ; 1871, JosephusSooy, Jr.; 1875, 
Gershom Mott; 1876, Gecree :\[. Wridit; 1885, Jonathan H. 
Blackwell; 1885, John J. Toffey; 1891, George R. Gra,N ; 
1894, George B. Swain (term expires April 2d, 1900). 



STATE COMPTROLLERS. 

(Term, three years— Salary, §6,000.) 

1865, William K. McDonald ; 1871, Albert L. Runyon; 
1877, Robert F. Stockton; 1880, Edward J. Anderson; 
1^01. William C. lleppenheimer ; 1894, William S Hancock 
(term expires April 2d, 1900). 

(82) 



STATE OFFICER. ^3 



ADJUTANT-GENERALS. 

(Salary, 81,200.) 
1776, William Bott ; 1793, Anthony Walton White ; 1808, 
John Morgan; 1804, Ebenezer Elmer; 1804, Peter Hunt; 
]810, James J. Wilson; 1812, John Beatty ; 1814, James J. 
Wilson; 1814, Charles Gordon; 1816, Zachariah Rossell; 
1842, Thonias Cadwallader; 1858, Eobert F. Stockton, Jr.; 
1867, William S. Strvker. 



QUARTERMASTER-GENBRAIiS. 

(Salary, $1,200.) 

1776, John Mehelm ; 1778, Matthias Williamson; 1813, 
Jonathan Rhea; 1821, James J. Wilson; 1824, Garret 1). 
Wall; 1830, Samuel R. Hamilton; 1855, Lewis Perrine 
(died 1889) ; 1890, Richard A. Donnelly. 



STATE PRISON KEEPERS. 

(Term since 1876. five years— Salary, S3,500) 

Crooks; Henry Bellerjeau ; Francis Labaw; 

1820, Ephraim Ryno ; 1830, Thomas M. Perrine; 1836, 
Joseph A. Yard; 1839, John Voorhees ; 1841, Jacob B. 
Gaddis; 1843, Joseph A. Yard ; 1845, Jacob B. Gaddis ; 
1851, William B. Vanderveer; 1857, Robert P. Stoll; 1862, 
T. V. D. Hoagland; 1863, Joseph B. Walker; 1800, Peter 
P. Robinson; 1868, Joseph B.Walker; 1869, David D. 
Hennion ; 1871, Robert H. Howell; 1873, Charles Wilson; 
1876, Gershom Mott; 1881, P. H. Laverty; 1886, John H. 
Patterson ; 1896, Samuel S, Moore (term expires March 2^th, 

iyo2). 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



Below is a record of the length of each session, the date of meeting 
and adjournment of, and the number of laws enacted by the various 
Legislatures since the adoption of the new Constitution in 181i : 

[Special Sessions.— An extra session convened on April 30th, and 
adjourned on May 10th 1861, called in obedience to Governor Olden's 
proclamation, to raise trcops for the war. Laws enacted, 13 ; Joint 
Resolutions, 2. A special session of the Senate w as convened in 1S7 7, 
for the purpose of acting on the Governor's nominations of District 
Couit Judges; it met on March 28th and adjourned on March 3Cth. 
A special session of the Senate was convened in 1851, to act o:i the 
Gpvernor's nominations for members of the State Board of Assessors ; 
it met on April 2:d, and h'.sted two hours. A special ?e<^sion of the 
Legislature was called on May '25th, 1897, to correct an error in a law 
providing fur the submission to the people of proposed amendments 
to the Constitution . The session met at noon, and adjourned sine die 
the same day at 6:i7 p. m.] 













Laws 


Joint 


Year. 


Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted. 


Resolutions. 


1845— January 14, 


April 


4, 


12 Weeks. 






1846— 


13, 


" 


18, 


14 " 


144 




1847— 


12, 


March 


0, 


8 " 


109 


13 


1818— 


11, 


" 


9, 


9 " 


136 


14 


1819- 


9, 


" 


2 


8 " 


136 


]V. 


1850- 


8, 


•' 


8, 


9 " 


123 


y 


1851— 


" 14, 


«« 


19, 


10 " 


171 


3 


1852- 


13, 


«' 


30, 


11 " 


213 


9 


1853— 


" 12, 


" 


11, 


9 " 


198 


12 


18>4— 


10, 


" 


1", 


10 " 


223 


13 


1855- 


9, 


April 


6, 


13 " 


258 


5 


1856- 


8, 


March 


14, 


10 " 


180 


11 


1857- 


13, 


" 


21, 


10 " 


223 


2 


1858— 


12, 


•' 


18, • 


10 " 


215 


8 


1859— 


11, 


" 


23, 


11 " 


231 


1 


1860— 


10, 


" 


22, 


11 " 


270 


6 


1861— 


8, 


" 


15 


10 " 


181 


2 


1862— 


14, 


«' 


28, 


11 " 


194 





1853- 


13, 


'• 


25, 


11 " 


279 


3 


1861- 


12, 


April 


14, 


14 " 


446 


7 


1865- 


" 10, 


" 


6, 


13 " 


514 


5 


1866- 


9, 


" 


6, 


13 " 


487 


6 


1857- 


18, 


'< 


12, 


12 " 


480 


12 


isr.s- 


14, 


" 


17, 


14 " 


566 


11 


1869- 


" 12, 


•• 


2, 


12 " 


677 


6 



(84) 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURE. ?5 













Laws 


Joint 


Year. 


Meeting, 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted 


Resolutiuus 


1870— January 11, 


March 


17. 


10 Weeks. 


532 


6 


1871- 


10. 


April 


6, 


13 " 


625 


9 


1872— 


9, 


" 


4, 


13 ' 


608 


10 


1873- 


14, 


" 


4, 


12 " 


723 


1 


1874— 


13, 


' March 


27, 


11 " 


534 


1 


1875— 


12, 


April 


9, 


13 " 


439 





1876— 


" 11. 


" 


21, 


15 " 


213 


6 


1877- 


9, 


March 


9, 


9 " 


156 


6 


1878— 


8, 


April 


5. 


13 " 


267 


7 


1879— 


14, 


March 


11, 


9 " 


209 


3 


1880— 


13, 


" 


12, 


9 " 


224 


4 


1881— 


11, 


•' 


2'i 


11 " 


230 


10 


1882- 


10, 




31. 


12 " 


190 


7 


1883- 


9, 




2:3. 


11 " 


208 





1884- 


8, 


April 


18, 


15 " 


225 


9 


18So- 


1.-^, 


" 


4, 


12 " 


250 


4 


ISSO- * 


12. 


June 


2, 


15 " 


279 


3 


1SS7- t 


11, 


April 


7, 


13 " 


182 


3 


18S8- 


10, 


March 


30, 


12 " 


337 


21 


188!)- 


8, 


April 


20, 


15 " 


297 


8 


1890— 


14, 


May 


23, 


19 " 


311 


3 


1891— 


13, 


March 20, 


10 " 


285 


6 


1892— 


12, 


" 


11, 


9 " 


296 


1 


1893— 


10. 


" 


11. 


9 " 


292 


2 


isy4-j 


9. 


Oct. 


2. 


20 


8.il 


7 


1895-? 


8. 


June 


13. 


13 " 


431 


3 


189fi— 


" H. 


March 


20. 


11 


219 


2 


1897— 


" 12, 


" 


31, 


12 


206 


1 


1898— 


" n. 




25, 


11 


242 


2 



*A;1er a session of 14 weeks the House lOok a recess on April IPth 
till June 1st. The. Senate continued in session, as a Court of Impeach- 
ment, till April 22d, when a recess was taken till June 1st. Up to the 
time of taking- the recess the Senate and House were in session to- 
gether 14 weeks, and the Senate by itself one week. Both Houses 
re-assembled ou June 1st, and an adjournment sine die took place at 
5 o'clock p. M., on Wednesday. June 2d. The Laverty Impeachment 
trial was opened before the Senate, sitting as a court,"on March lltli, 
and ended on Wednesday, April 21st, at 9 o'clock p. m., when a ver- 
dict of guilty ou two counts, by a two-thirds majority, was returned. 
The trial lasted 19 days. See "Senate Journal, session of 1886, patres 
905 to 959. 

fThe Seaat" dii not; oraranize till February l>t. 

t On May 26th a recess was taken until October 2d, when the Legis- 
lature re-assembled, and witnout transacting any business adjourned 
SI 'If (lie at 3:30 in the aflerno )n 

gOn March 22d a recess was taken until June 4th, when the Legls- 
lai ure re-assembled, and. remaining in session two weeks, adjourned 
svi6 die on June 13th, 



STATE SENATORS. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM 1845 to 1899. 



Atlantic County. 



45 — 47, Joel Adams. 
48—50, Lewis M. Walker. 
51—53, Joseph E. Potts. 
54 — 56, David B. Somers. 
57—59, Enoch Cordery. 
60—62, Thomas E. Morris. 
63—65, Samuel Stille. 



45-^7, 
48—49, 
50—51, 
52—53. 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60—62, 
63—65. 
66—68, 



45—46. 
47—49, 
50—52, 
5.3—58, 
59—61, 
62. 
63—64. 
65—67, 
68—70, 



Bergen 

Richard R. Paulison. 
Isaac I. Haring. 
John Van Brunt. 
Abraham Hopper. 
Daniel D. Depew. 
Thomas H. Herring. 
Ralph S. Demarest. 
Daniel Holsman. 
John Y. Dater. 



66—68, David S. Blackman. 
69—71, Jesse Adams. 
72—74, William Moore. 
7.5—77, Hosea F. Madden. 
78—92, John J. Gardner. 
93—98, Samuel D. Hoffman. 
99—1901, Lewis Evans. 

County. 

69—71, James J. Brinkerhoff. 
72—74, Cornelius Lydecker. 
75—77, George Dayton. 
78-80, Cornelius S. Cooper. 
SI— 83, Isaac Wortendyke. 
84—85, Ezra Miller. 
86-89. John V^\ Bogert. 
90—95. Henrv D. Winton. 
96—1901, William M. Johnson. 



Kurlingt 

James S. Hulme. 
Thomas H. Richards. 
Joseph Satterthwaite. 
Joseph W. Allen. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Joseph W. Pharo. 
William Garwood. 
Geo. M. Wright. 
Job H. Gaskell. 



on County. 

71—73, Henry J. Irick. 
74—76, Barton F. Thorn. 
77—79, Caleb G. Ridgway. 
80—82, Wm. Budd Deacon. 
83—85. Hezekiah B. Smith. 
86—91, William H. Carter. 
92—94, Mitchell B. Perkins. 
95—97. William C. Parry. 
98—1900, Howard E. Packer. 



Camden Countv, 



45, Richard W. Howell. 
46—48, Joseph C. Stafford. 
49—51. John Gill. 
52—54, Thomas W. Mulford. 
55—60. John K. Roberts. 
61—63. T^^illiam P. Tatem. 
64—66. James M. Scovel. 

Cape Ms 

4.5—46. Reuben Willets. 
47—49, James L. Smith. 
50—52. Enoch Edmunds. 
53 — .55, Joshua Swain, Jr. 
56—58. Jesse H. Diverty. 
59—61. Downs Edmunds. 
62—64, Jonathan F. Leaming, 
65—67. Wilmon W. Ware. 
68—70, Leaming M. Rice. 

. C86) 



07- 72. Edward Bettle. 
73— SI. William J. Sewell. 
S2— 84. Albert Merritt. 
85—87, Richard N. Herring. 
SS— 90. George Pfeiffer. 
91—96, Maurice A. Rogers. 
97—99. Herbert W. Johnson. 

ly County. 

71—73. Thomas Beesley. 
74—76. Richard S. Leaming. 
77—79, Jonathan F. Leaming. 
SO— 85. Waters B. Miller. 
S6— 88. Joseph H. Hanes. 
89—91. Walter S. Leaming. 
92—94, Lemuel E. Miller. 
95—97. Edmund L. Ross. 
98—1900, Robert E. Hand. 



STATE SENATORS. 



87 



Cumberland County. 



45—46, Enoch H. More. 
47—50, Stephen A. Garrison. 
51—53, Reuben Fithian. 
54—56, Lewis Howell. 
57—59, John L. Sharp. 
60—62, Nat. Stratton. 
63—68, Providence Ludlam. 
69—71, James H. Nixon. 

Essex 
45, Joseph S. Dodd. 
46—48, Stephen R. Grover. 
49—51, Asa Whitehead. 
52—54, Stephen Congar. 
55—57, George R. Chetwood. 
58—60, Charles L. C. Gifford. 
61—63, James M. Quinby. 
64—66, John G. Trusdell. 
67—69, James L.. Hays. 



72—74, C. Henry Shepherd. 
75—77, J. Howard Willets. 
78—80, George S. Whiticar. 
81—86, Isaac T. Nichols. 
87—89, Philip P. Baker. 
90—92, Seaman R. Fowler. 
93—1901, Edward C. Stokes. 



County. 

70—75, John W. Taylor. 
76—78, William H. Kirk. 
79—81, William H. Francis. 
82—84, William Stainsby. 
85—87, Frederick S. Fish. 
88—90, A. F. R. Martin. 
91—93, Michael T. Barrett. 
94—99, George W. Ketcham. 



Gloucester County. 



45—48, John C. Smallwood. 
49—51, Charles Reeves. 
52—54, John Burk. 
55— .57, Joseph Franklin. 
58-60, Jeptha Abbott. 
61—03, John Pierson. 
64—66, Joseph L. Reeves. 
67— «9, Woodward Warrick. 
70—75, Samuel Hopkins. 



76—78, Thomas P. Mathers. 
79—81, John F. Bodine. 
82—83, Thomas M. Ferrell. 
84—87, Stacy L. Pancoast. 
88—90, Joseph B. Roe. 
91—93, George H. Barker. 
94—96, Daniel J. Packer. 
97—99, Solomon H. Stanger. 



Hudson 

4.5—47, Richard Cutwater. 
48—49, John Tennele. 
50, John Cassedv. 
51—53. Abraham O. Zabriskie. 
51—56. Moses B. Bramhall. 
57—59, C. V. Clickener. 
60—61, Samuel Wescott. 
62—65, Theo. F. Randolph. 
66—68, Charles H. Winfield. 
69—71, Noah D. Taylor. 



County. 

72—74, John R. McPherson. 
75—77, Leon Abbett. 
78—80, Rudolph F. Rabe. 
81—83. Elijah T. Paxton. 
84—86. William Brinkerhoff. 
87—89, William D. Edwards. 
90—91. *Edward F. McDonald. 

92. Robert S. Hudspeth. 
93-98. William D. Daly. 
99—1901, Allan L. McDermott. 



Hunterdon County. 



45 — 46, Alexander Wurts. 
47—49. Isaac G. Farlee. 
50—52. John Manners. 
53—55, Alexander V. Bonnell. 
56—58. John C. RafCerty. 
59—61, Edmund Perry. 
62—64, John Plane. 
65—67, Alexander Wurts. 
68—70. Joseph G. Bowne. 
71—73, David H. Banghart. 



74—76, Fred. A. Potts. 
77—79, James N. Pidcock. 
80—82, Eli Bosenbury. 
83—85, John Carpenter, Jr. 
86—88, George H. Large. 
89—91, Moses K. Everitt. 
92—94, William H. Martin. 
95—97. Richard S. Kuhl. 
98—1900, John R. Foster. 



*Mr. McDonald was unseated the last day of the ses- 
sion of 1890, and William S. Stuhr was given his seat. The 
first week of the session of 1891 Mr. Stuhr was unseated 
and Mr. McDonald resumed his seat. 



STATE SENATORS. 



Mercer County. 



45—50, Charles S. Olden. 

51—56, William C. Alexander. 78—80, Crowell Marsh. 

57—59, Robert C. Hutchinson. 81—83, John Taj-lor 

60— 62, Jonathan Cook. -. -- ^ - -- 

63—65, Edward W. Scudder. 

66—68, Aug-. G. Richey. 

69—71. John Woolverton. 

72—74, Charles Hewitt. 



75—77, Jonathan H. Blackwell. 



84—86, George O. Vanderbilt. 
87—92, John D. Rue. 
93—98, William H. Skirm. 
99—1901, Elijah C. Hutchinson. 



3Iiddlesex County. 



45—46, 
47—49, 
50—52, 
53-55, 
56-58, 
59—61, 
62—70, 
71—76, 



45, 

46-^8, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—71, 
72, 



David Crowell. 
Adam Lee. 
Edward Y. Rogers. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Henry V. Speer. 
Abra. Everitt. 
Amos Robbins. 
Levi D. Jarrard. 



77—79, George C. Ludlow. 
80—82, Isaac L. Martin. 
83—85, Abraham V. Schenck. 
86—88, Daniel C. Chase. 
89—94, Robert Adrain. 
95—97, Charles B. Herbert. 
98—1900, James H. Van Cleef. 



3Ionmouth Con 

Thomas E. Combs. 73—78, 
George F. Fort. 79—81, 

John A. Morford. 82—84, 

William D. Davis. 85—87, 

Robert S. Laird. 88—90, 

Wm. H. Hendrickson. 91—92, 
Anthony Reckless. 93, 

Henry S. Little. 94—96, 

Wm. H. Conover, Jr. 97—99, 



nty. 

Wm. H. Hendrickson. 
George C. Beekman. 
John S. Applegate. 
Thomas G. Chattle. 
Henry M. Nevius. 
Thomas S. R. Brown. 
Henry S. Terhune. 
James A. Bradley. 
Charles Asa Francis. 



Morris 

45—47, John B. Johnes. 
48—50, Ephraim Marsh. 
51—53, John A. Bleecker. 
54—56, Alexander Robertson. 
57—59, Andrew B. Cobb. 
60—62, Daniel Budd. 
63—65, Lyman A. Chandler. 
66—70, George T. Cobb. 
71, Columbus Beach. 

Ocean 

51—53, Samuel Birdsall. 
54—56, Jas. Cowperthwaite. 
57—62, William F. Brown. 
63—68, George D. Horner. 
69—71, John Torrey, Jr. 
72—74, John G. W. Havens. 
75—77, John S. Schultze. 

Passaic 

45 — 46, Cornelius G. Garrison. 
47—49, Martin J. Ryerson. 
50—52, Silas D. Canfield. 
53—55, Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
56—58, Jetur R. Riggs. 
59—67, Benjamin Buckley. 
68—70, John Hopper. 
71—73, Henry A. Williams. 



County. 

72—74, Augustus W. Cutler. 
75—77. John Hill. 
78-80, Augustus C. Canfield. 
81 — 86, James C. Youngblood. 
87—92, George T. Werts. 
93—95, Eiias C. Drake. 
96—98, John B. Vreeland. 
99—1901, Mahlon Pitney. 



County. 

78—80, Ephraim P. Emson. 
81-83, Abram C. B. Havens. 
84—92, George T. Cranmer. 
93—95, George G. Smith. 
96—98, Robert B. Engle. 
99—1901, George G. Smith. 



County. 

74—76, John Hopper. 
77—82, Garret A. Hobart. 
83—88, John W. Griggs. 
89—91, John Mallon. 
92—94, John Hinchliffe. 
95—97. Robert Williams. 
98—1900, Christian Braun. 



STATE SENATORS. 



45, 
46-^8, 
49—51, 
52—54. 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61-63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 



45, 
46-48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57, 
58—60, 
61—63, 
64—66, 
67—69, 



45—46, 
47-^9, 
50—52, 
53—55, 
56—58, 
59—61, 
62—64, 
65—67, 
6^-73. 



58—60, 
61—63, 
64—65. 
66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 
73—75, 



45, 
46—48, 
49—51, 
52—54. 
55—57, 
58-60, 
61—63. 
64—66, 
67—69, 
70—72, 



Salem 

William J. Shinn. 
Benjamin Acton, Jr. 



John Summerill 
Allen Wallace. 
Charles P. Smith. 
Joseph K. Riley. 
Emmor Reeve. 
Richard M. Acton 
Samuel Plummer. 
John C. Belden. 



Jr. 



County. 

73—75, Isaac Newkirk. 
76—78, Charles S. Plummer. 
79—81, Quinton Keasbey. 
82—84, George Hires. 
85—87, Wvatt W. Miller. 
88—90, William Newell. 
91—93. James Butcher. 
94—96, John C. Ward. 
97—99, Richard C. Miller. 



Somerset County. 



George H. Brown. 
William H. Leupp. 
John W. Craig. 
Moses Craig. 
Samuel K. Martin. 
James Campbell. 
Rynier H. Veghte. 
Joshua Doughty. 
John H. Anderson. 



Benjamin Hamilton. 
Nathan Smith. 
Joseph Greer. 
Isaac Bonnell. 
Zachariah H. Price. 
Edward C. Moore. 
Peter Smith. 
Joseph S. Martin. 
Richard E. Edsall. 



70—72, Calvin Corle. 
73—75, Elisha B. Wood. 
76_78, Charles B. Moore. 
79—81, John G. Schenck. 
82—84, Eugene S. Doughty. 
85—90. Lewis A. Thompson. 
91—93, William J. Keys. 
94—96, Lewis A. Thompson. 
97—99, Charles A. Reed. 

County. 

74—76, Samuel T. Smith. 
77—79, Francis M. Ward. 
80—82, Thomas Lawrence. 
83—85, Lewis Cochran. 
86—88. John A. McBride. 
89—91, Peter D. Smith. 
92—94, John McMickle. 
95—97, Jacob Gould. 
98—1900, Lewis J. Martin. 



iiion County. 



John R. Ayres. 
Joseph T. Crowell. 
James Jenkins. 
Philip H. Grier. 
Amos Clark, Jr. 
James T. Wijey. 
J. Henry Stone. 

Warren 

Charles J. Ihrie. 
Jeremy Mackey. 
George W. Taylor. 
Charles Sitgreaves. 
William Rea. 
Philip Mowry. 
James K. Swayze. 
Henry R. Kennedy. 
Abraham Wildrick. 
Edward H. Bird, 



76—78, William J. Magie. 
79—84, Benjamin A. Vail. 
85—87, Robert L. Livingston. 
88-90, James L. Miller. 
91—93, Frederick C. Marsh. 
94—98, Foster M. Voorhees. 
99, Joseph Cross. 

County. 

73—75, Joseph B. Cornish. 
76—78, William Silverthorn, 
79—81, Peter Cramer. 
82—84, George H. Beatty. 
85—87, James E. Moon. 
88—90, Martin Wvckoff, 
91—93, Johnston Cornish. 
94—96. Christopher F. Staates. 
97—99, Isaac Barber. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 

BY COUNTIES, FROM 1845 to 1899. 



Atlantic County. 

Joseph Ingersoll. 



45, 46, 

47—49, Mark Lake. 
50, 51, Robert B. Risley. 

52, John H. Boyle. 

53, Thomas D. Winner. 

54, Daniel Townsend. 

55, Nicholas F. Smith. 

56, 57, David Frambes. 

58, John B. Madden. 

59, Thomas E. Morris. 
60—62, Charles E. P. Mayhew. 

63, John Godfrey. 

64, Simon Hanthom. 

65, Simon Lake. 

66, 67, P. M. Wolfseiffer. 
68, 69, Jacob Keim. 

70, 71, Benj. H. Overheiser. 
72, 73, Samuel H. Cavileer. 

IJergen 

45, William G. Hopper. 
45. Jacob C. Terhune. 

46. 47, John G, Banta. 

46, 47, Jacob J. Brinkerhoff. 
48, 49, John Ackerman, Jr. 
48, 49, Henry H. Voorhis, Jr. 
50—52, John Huyler. 
50, 51, John H. Hopper. 

52, John Zabriskie. 
53, 54, Jacob I. Demarest. 
53, 54, Abraham Van Horn. 
55, 56. Ralph S. Demarest. 
55, 56. Thomas W. Demarest. 

57, 58, Daniel Holsman. 

57, 58, Aaron H. Westervelt. 

59, Andrew C. Cadmus. 
59, 60, Enoch Brinkerhoff. 

60, John A. Hopper. 
61, 62. Abram Carlock. 
61, 62, John R. Post. 

63, 64. Thomas D. English. 
63, 64, John Y. Dater. 
65, 66. Isaac Demarest. 
65, 66, Abraham J. Haring. 

67, 68, Cornelius Christie. 
67. A. Van Emburg. 

68, 69. Henry G. Herring. 

69, 70, Eben Winton. 

70, 71, Henry A. Hopper. 

71, 72. Jacob G. Van Riper. 

72, 73, George J. Hopper. 



74, 75, Lemuel Conover. 
76, 77, Leonard H. Ashley. 

78, Israel Smith. 
79, SO, James Jeffries. 

81, George Elvins. 

82, Joseph H. Shinn. 

83, John L. Bryant. 
84, 85, Edward North. 

86, 87, James S. Beckwith. 

S8. James B. Nixon. 
89, 90, Shepherd S. Hudson. 

91, Smith E. Johnson. 

92, Samuel D. Hoffman. 

93, Charles A. Baake. 

94, Frederick Schuchardt. 

95, Wesley C. Smith. 

96, 97, Marcellus L. Jackson. 
98, 99, Leonard H. Ashley. 



73, John J. Anderson. 
74, 75, Henry C. Herring. 
74, 75. John Vi. Bogert. 
76, 77, John H. Winant. 
76, -77, Barnev N. Ferdon. 

78, M. Corsen Gillham. 

78, 79, Southey S. Parramore. 

79, 80. John A. Demarest. 
80, Oliver D. Smith. 

81—8:3, 86. John Van Bussum. 

81, 82, Elias H. Sisson. 

81, 84, Peter R. Wortendyke. 

84, *Jacob W. Doremus. 

85, Peter Ackerman. 
85, 86, Eben Winton. 

87, 88. Anderson Bloomer. 
87, Peter Ackerman. 

88. 89, Charles F. Harrington. 

89, 90, Abram De Ronde. 

90. 91, George Zimmermann. 
91. John H. Huyler. 

92. 9.3. Samuel G. H. Wright. 
92, 93. John J. Dupuy. 
94. Walter Dewsnap. 

94. 95, David D. Zabriskie. 

95. 96. Fred'k L. Voorhees. 

96. 97. Jacob H. Ullman. 

97. 98, Abram C. Holdrum. 

98. 99, John M. Bell. 

99, Edmund W. Wakelee. 



♦John W. Doremus was first elected, but died before 
Legislature convened. 



190) 



ASSEMBL YMEN, 



91 



45, 

45, 

45, 47, 

45, 

45, 

46, 

46. 

46, 

46, 

46, 

47—49, 

47—49, 

47, 48, 

47, 

48—50, 

49—51, 

49—51, 

50—52, 

50, 51, 

51—53, 

52—54, 

52—54. 

52, 

53, 54, 

53. 54. 

54, 

54—56, 

55, 

55, 

55. 57, 

55, 56, 
56. 
56. 

56, 57, 

57, 58, 
57—59. 
57—59. 

58, 

58, 59, 

59, 60, 
59—61, 

60, 61, 
60—62, 
60—62. 

61. 

62—64. 

62, 63, 

63—65. 

63—65. 
64, 
65, 

65. 66. 

66, 67, 



Kurlington County. 

Joseph Satterthwait. 66, 67, Samuel Coate. 



Isaiah Adams. 



66, 67, Andrew J. Fort. 



48, John W. C. Evans. 67—69, Wallace Lippincott. 



Edward Taylor. 
William Biddle. 
Clayton Lippincott. 
William Malsbury. 
Garrit S. Cannon. 
Stephen Willets. 
Wm. G. Lippincott. 
John S. Irick. 
Benjamin Kemble. 
Joseph W. Allen. 
William Biddle. 
Edward French. 
Samuel Stockton. 
William R. Braddock. 
William Brown. 
William S. Embley. 
Allen Jones. 
John W. Fennimore. 
Charles Haines. 
Benajah Antrim. 
Mahlon Hutchinson. 
Jacob L. Githens. 
Job H. Gaskill. 
William Parry. 
Josephus Sooy, Jr. 
Benjamin Gibbs. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Elisha Gaunt. 
Richard Jones. 
William M. Collom. 
Jervis H. Bartlett. 
Samuel Keys. 
Charles Mickle. 
Ezra Evans. 
Samuel C. Middleton. 
Charles S. Kemble. 
John Larzalere. 
Samuel A. Dobbins. 
George B. Wills. 
Robert B. Stokes. 
William Sooy. 
Joseph L. Lamb. 
Wm. P. McMichael. 
John M. Higbee. 
Israel W. Heulings. 
Henry J. Irick. 
Jarett Stokes. 
Samuel Stockton. 
Charles C. Lathrop. 
George W. Thompson. 



Camden County, 

Joseph Kay, Jr. 48, John C. Shreeve. 



71, John J. Maxwell. 
68, Chas. E. Hendrickson. 

68, Charles Collins. 
69—71. Thomas C. Alcott. 

69, Theophilus I. Price. 
70, 71. Abraham Perkins. 

70, Levi French. 

71—73. Edward T. Thompson. 

72, Robert Aaronson. 
72—74, E. Budd Marter. 
72—74. George B. Borton. 
73, 74. Townsend Cox. 

74, Joseph P. Adams. 

75. Levi French. 

75, Charles J. Gordon. 

75, Henry Moffett. 
75—77, Samuel Taylor. 

76, Daniel L. Piatt. 
76—78, John Cavileer. 
76—78, Edward F. Mathews. 
77—79, George Sykes. 

78, 79, Wm. Budd Deacon. 

79, SO, John W. Haines. 
79, Wm. R. Lippincott. 

80—82. William H. Carter. 
80—82. Henry C. Herr. 

81, John Cavileer. 

80, 81. Abraham Marter. 

82, Thomas M. Locke. 
83—86. Theodore Budd. 
83, 84, 87, Stacy H. Scott. 

83, Horace Cronk. 
84—86. Thomas J. Alcott. 
85, 86, Allen H. Gauge wer. 
87. 88, 90, R. C. Hutchinson. 

87. 88. 89. William H. Doron. 

88, 89, Albert Hansell. 
89, George C. Davis. 

90. 91, Mitchell B. Perkins. 

90, 91, Lewis L. Sharp. 

91, 92, A. H. White. 

92, 93, Howard E. Packer. 

93, Micajah E. Matlack. 

94. Augustus C. Stecher. 

94, 95, Micajah E. Matlack. 

95, 96, 97. George ^^ildes. 

96, 97, Joshua E. Borton. 
98, 99, Charles Wright. 
98, 99, Joel Horner. 



John Redfield. 
Joel G. Clark. 
Gerrard Wood. 
Edward Turner. 
Joseph B. Tatem. 



48, John E. Marshall. 

49, Jacob Troth. 

49, Joseph Wolohon. 
50, 51, Charles D. Hineline. 
50, 51, Thomas W. HurfC, 



92 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



52, 53. 

52, 
52, 
53, 

53, 54, 

54, 55, 
55, 

54—56, 
56, 

56, 57, 

57—59, 
57, 
57, 
58, 

58, 59, 
59, 

60, 61, 
60, 
60, 

61, 62, 
61, 
62, 

62, 63, 
63, 

63, 64, 
64, 

64, 65, 

65, 66, 
65, 

66, 67. 
66, 67. 

67. 
68, 



69, 70. 

69, 70, 
69. 
70, 
71, 
71, 
72, 
71, 72, 
72—74, 



45, 

46, 

47, 

48, 49, 

50, 51, 

52, 

53, 

54, 55, 

56—58. 

59, 60, 

61, 

62—64, 

65—67, 

68, 

71—73, 



J. O. Johnson. 




73, 


J. Kay. 


73, 


74, 


Jonathan Day. 




74, 


Samuel Lytle. 


75—77, 


John K. Roberts. 


75, 


76, 


Samuel S. Cake. 




75, 


James L. Hines. 


76, 


77, 


Reiley Barret. 




77, 


Evan C. Smith. 




78, 


John P. Marker. 


78, 


79, 


*Samuel Scull. 




78, 


T. B. Atkinson. 


79, 


80, 


Joseph M. Atkinson. 


80, 


81, 


Edmund Hoffman. 


81, 


82, 


Samuel M. Thorne. 


81, 


82, 


Zebedee Nicholson. 




82, 


John R. Graham. 




83, 


Joseph Stafford, Jr. 




83, 


George Brewer. 


83, 


84, 


Joel P. Kirkbride. 


84-S7, 


James L. Hines. 




84, 


Daniel A. Hall. 




85, 


Edwin J. Osier. 


85, 


86, 


James M. Scovel. 




86, 


Chalkley Albertson. 




87, 


Samuel Tatem. 




87, 


Paul C. Brinck. 


88, 


89, 


Isaac W. Nicholson. 


88, 


89, 


John F. Bodine. 


88, 


89, 


George W. N. Custis. 




90, 


Thomas PI. Coles. 


90, 


91, 


Edward Z. Collings. 


91, 


92, 


John Hood. 


91, 


92, 


James Wills. 


93, 


94, 


Chalkley Albertson. 




93, 


Henry S. Bonsall. 


93, 


94, 


William C. Shinn. 




94, 


Thomas H. Coles. 




95, 


Samuel Warthman. 


95, 


96, 


Charles Wilson. 


96, 


97, 


Isaac W. Nicholson. 


96. 


97, 


Fred. Bourquin. 


98, 


99, 


Stevenson Leslie. 


98, 


99, 


George B. Carse. 


98, 


99, 



Cape May Con 

John Stites. 74, 

Samuel Townsend. 75 

Richard S. Ludlam. 76—78 
Nathaniel Holmes, Jr. 79 

Mackey Williams. 80, 83 

Joshua Swaim. 
Waters B. Miller. 
Jesse H. Diverty. 
Downs Edmunds, Jr. 
Abram Reeves. 
Jonathan F. Learning 
Wilmon W. Ware. 
69, 70, Thos. Beesley. 98 

Samuel R. Magonagle. 99 
Richard S. Learning. 



81, 


82, 


86, 


87, 




88, 


89, 


90, 


92, 


93, 


95, 


96, 




97, 



Isaac Foreman. 
William H. Cole. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Alden C. Scovel. 
79, 80, R. N. Herring. 
Henry B. Wilson. 
Oliver Lund. 
Samuel T. Murphy. 
Isaiah Woolston. 
Alonzo D. Nichols. 
Andrew J. Rider. 
Edward Burrough. 
Henry L. Bonsall. 
Chris. J. Mines, Jr. 
John H. McMurray. 
Robert F. S. Heath, 
George W. Borton. 
John Bamford. 
93, Clayton Stafford. 
Edward A. Armstrong. 
John W. Branning. 
Benjamin M. Braker. 
Henry M. Jewett. 
George Pfeiffer. 
Philip Young. 
Henry Turley. 
Adam Clark Smith. 
90, John Harris. 
George H. Higgins. 
Franklin C. Woolman. 
92, Abram W. Nash. 
Joseph M. Engard. 
also 73, 74, Wm. H. Cole. 
95, Clayton Stafford. 
George W. Henry. 
William J. Thompson. 
Wi41iam Watson. 
George W. Barnard. 
97, Louis T. Derousse. 
Frank T. Lloyd. 
Henry S. Scovel. 
William J. Bradley. 
John H. McMurray. 
Edgar J. Coles-. 

nty. 

, Alexander Young. 
, Richard D. Edmunds. 
, William T. Stevens. 
, Daniel Schellinger. 
—85, Jesse D. Ludlam. 
, Furman L. Richardson 
, Alvin P. Hildreth. 
, Walter S. Leaming. 
, 91, Eugene C. Cole. 
, 94, Edmund L. Ross. 
, Furman L. Ludlam. 
, Robert E. Hand. 
, Eugene C Cole. 
Ellis H. Marshall. 



*In 1857 Mr. Scull was unseated by T. B. Atkinson. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



Cumberland Coxiuty. 





45, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 




46, 




47, 




47, 


47, 


48, 


48, 


49, 


48. 


49, 


50, 


51, 


50, 


51, 


51, 


52, 




52, 




53, 




53, 




54, 




54, 


55, 


56, 


55, 


56, 




57, 




57, 




58, 


58, 


59, 




59, 




60, 




60, 


61, 


62, 


61, 


62, 


63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 


65-67, 


65-68. 




68, 



Josiah Shaw. 
George Heisler. 
Lewis Howell. 
Stephen A. Garrison. 
Leonard Lawrence. 
Jeremiah Parvin. 
Uriah D. Woodruff. 
Reviben Fithian. 
Richard Lore. 
Benj. Ayres. 
Joel Moore. 
Samuel Mayhew. 
David Campbell. 
Enos S. Gandy. 
Lewis Woodruff. 
Daniel Harris. 
Morton Mills. 
James M. Wells. 
John F. Keen. 
Uriah Mayhew. 
Elias Doughty. 
Elwell Nichols. 
Robert Moore. 
Aaron S. Westcott. 
Ebenezer Hall. 
John Carter. 
William Bacon. 
J. Edmund Sheppard. 

B. Rush Bateman. 
Edward W. Maylin. 
Robert Moore. 
James H. Nixon. 
Thomas D. Westcott. 

C. Henry Shepherd. 



09—71, 
70. 71, 
72, 73, 
72, 73, 
74, 75, 

74, 
75—77, 

76, 
77, 78, 

78, 
79, 80, 
79, SO, 
81, 82, 



83, 84, 

84, 85, 

85, 86, 

86, 87, 
87, 



89, 90, 

90, 93, 
91, 

91, 92, 

92, 93. 
94—96, 
95—97, 
97, 98, 

•98, 99, 
99, 



William A. House. 
Charles C. Grosscup. 
George S. Whiticar. 
J. Howard Willets. 
Lewis H. Dowdney. 
George B. Langley. 
George W. Payne. 
Isaiah W. Richman. 
Isaac T. Nichols. 
James Loughron. 
Robert P. Ewing. 
Arthur T. Parsons. 
Charles Ladow. 
John H. Avis. 
Philip P. Baker. 
Isaac M. Smalley. 
John B. Campbell. 
Jeremiah H. Lupton. 
Wilson Banks. 
Franklin Lawrence. 
Thomas H. Hawkins. 
Mulford Ludlam. 
Isaac M. Smalley. 
Thomas W. Trenchard 
Reuben Cheesman. 
94, John N. Glaspell. 
James L. Van Syckel. 
Edward C. Stokes. 
Wilber H. Baxter. 
Thomas F. Austin. 
Bloomfield H. Minch. 
James J. Hunt. 
Wilson L= Shropshire. 
Jesse S. Steelman. 



Essex Coiintv. 



45, 
45, 46, 

45, 



45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46. 


45, 


46, 


46, 


47. 


46, 


47, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 


47, 


48, 


47. 


48, 


47, 


48, 




48, 


48, 


49. 


49, 


50, 


49, 


50, 


49, 


50, 


49, 


50, 




49, 




49, 


50. 


51, 


50. 


51, 


50. 


51, 



Isaac Van Wagenen. 51, 52, 

William M. Scudder. 51, 52, 

John Runyon. 51, 

Hugh F. Randolph. 51, 

Jabez Pierson. 52, 

Keen Pruden. 52, 

Alvah Sherman. 52, 

George W. McLane. 52. 

Parker Teed. 52, 

A. S. Hubbeel. 52, 

Jabez G. Goble. 52, 53, 

Francis B. Chetwood. 53. 

Abraham Van Riper. 53, 

Elston Marsh. 53, 

Hugh H. Bowne. 53, 

Charles Harrison. 53, 

Joel W. Condit. 53, 54, 

Obadiah Meeker. 53, 54, 

William F. Day. 53, 54, 

Stephen Personett. 54, 

Hugh H. Bowne. 54, 

Lewis C. Grover. 54, 

Jonathan Valentine. 54, 

David Wade. 54, 55. 

Isaac H. Pierson. 54. 55. 



Beach Vanderpool. 
John C. Beardsley. 
Wm. M. Whitehead. 
Cornelius Boice. 
Thomas McKirgan. 
John M. Clark. 
William M. Sandford. 
Silas Merchant. 
John Munn. 
James S. Bell. 
John B. Clark. 
Stephen Day, Jr. 
Grant J. Wheeler. 
Edward T. Hillyer. 
Charles T. Day. 
Charles O. Bolles. 
Abiathar Harrison. 
Daniel Price. 
William Dennis. 
David S. Craig. 
Daniel H. Noe. 
James N. Joraleman. 
David Ripley. 
Hugh Holmes, 
Daniel D. Benjamin. 



04 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 





55, ' 




55, ; 


55, 


56, : 


55, 


56, , 


55, 


56, . 


55, 


56, . 




56, 


55, 


56. 




56, 




56. 


56, 


57, 




57, 




57, 




57, 




57, 




57, 




57, 


57, 


58, 


57, 


58, 




58, 




58, 




58, 




58, 




58, 


59, 


60, 


59, 


60, 


59, 


60, 




59, 




59, 




59, 




59. 




60, 




60, 


60, 


61, 


60, 


61, 


61, 


62, 


61, 


62, 


61, 


62, 


61, 


62, 




61, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 




63, 




63, 


63, 


64, 


63, 


64, 


64, 


65, 


64, 


65, 


64, 


65. 


64, 


65. 


64, 


65, 




64. 




64, 




65, 




65. 




65, 


65, 


, 66, 




66, 


66, 


, 67, 



Charles O. Bolles. 
Daniel F. Tompkins. 
Nehemiah Perry. 
James A. Pennington. 
Apollos M. Elmer. 
Joseph T. Hopping-. 
Warren S. Baldwin. 
Samuel R. Winans. 
James E. Bathgate. 
George H. Doremus. 
Wm. K. McDonald. 
John C. Denman. 
Moses P. Smith. 
John L. Blake, Jr. 
William B. Baldwin. 
Charles L. C. Clifford. 
Elihu Day. 
Charles C. Stewart. 
John C. Thornton. 
Simeon Harrison. 
James MeCracken. 
Joseph Booth. 
Ira M. Harrison. 
Thomas Kirkpatrick. 
Adolphus W.Waldron. 
James F. Bond. 
Amzi Condit. 
Gashier De Witt, Jr. 
David Ay res. 
Isaac P. Trimble. 
David A. Hayes. 
James MeCracken. 
J. W. Hale. 
Frederick H. Teese. 
James W^heeler. 
George A. Halsey. 
James M. Lang. 
David Oakes. 
John Flintoft. 
James E. Smith. 
Walter Tompkins. 
Corra Drake. 
John D. Freeman. 
John P. Jackson. 
Thomas McGrath. 
Amzi Dodd. 
John C. Littell. 
Adolph Schalk. 
James Smith. 
Rufus F. Harrison. 
Charles A. Lightpipe. 
Thomas B. Peddie. 
John C. Seiffert. 
Bernard Kearney. 
Jeremiah DeCamp. 
Ira M. Harrison. 
J. B. S. Robinson. 
, John H. Landell. 
James D. Cleaver. 
David Anderson. 
, William Bodwell. 
Albert P. Condit. 



66, 


67, : 


66, 


67, 


66, 


68, : 




66, 




66, 




66, 




67, 




67, 




67, 


67, 


68. 


67, 


68, 




67, 


68, 


69, 


68, 


69, 


68, 


69, 


68, 


69, 


68, 


69, 




68, 


69, 


70, 


69, 


70. 


69, 


70, 


69. 


71, 


•70, 


71, 


70, 


71, 


70, 


71, 




70, 




70, 




70, 




71, 


71, 


72, 


71, 


72 


71, 


72* 




7l! 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, 


72, 


73, 




72, 




72, 




72, 




73, 




73, 


73 


74, 


73! 


74, 


73, 


74, 




74, 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75. 


74, 


75, 




74, 


73- 


-75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 




75, 


75, 


76, 


76, 


, 77, 


76, 


77, 


76, 


77, 


76, 


. 77, 




76, 




76, 




76. 



Isaac P. Trimble. 
William H. Murphy. 
Edward L. Price. 
John F. Anderson. 
David Ayres. 
James L. Hays. 
Israel D. Condit. 
Daniel Ayres. 
William R. Sayre. 
Samuel Atwater. 
Edward Hedden. 
M. H. C. Vail. 
Josiah Speer. 
James Peck. 
John Kennedy. 
Timothy W. Lord. 
Francis Macken. 
Josiah L. Baldwin. 
James L. Gurney. 
John Hunkele. 
William W. Hawkins. 
James G. Irwin. 
Joseph F. Sanxay. 
Farrand Kitchell. 
Henry W. Wilson. 
Chauncey G.Williams. 
William R. Sayre. 
Matthew Murphy. 
Albert P. Condit. 
Edmund L. Joy. 
Theodore Horn . 
Rochus Heinisch, Jr. 
William A. Ripley. 
Samuel Wilde. 
Joseph G. Hill. 
Theodore Macknett. 
David Anderson. 
Daniel Murphy. 
Moses H. Williams. 
L. M. Armstrong. 
John W. Campbell. 
Elias O. Doremus. 
Phineas Jones. 
Aaron G. Baldwin. 
Moses E. Halsey. 
Thomas S. Henry. 
Julius C. Fitzgerald. 
William H. Kirk. 
James T. Vanness. 
Samuel Morrow, Jr. 
Andrew Teed. 
Hugh Kinnard. 
Patrick Doyle. 
William Carrolton. 
David Dodd. 
Albert D. Traphagen. 
Francis K. Howell. 
S.V.C.Van Rensselaer. 
Elkanah Drake. 
Charles H. Harrison. 
Marcus S. Richards, 
Philip W. Cross. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



9$ 



76, 80, 

77, 

77, 78, 
77, 78, 
77, 78, 

77, 78, 

78, 79, 
78, 79, 
78, 79, 
78, 79, 
78. 79, 



79—81, 
79, SO. 

79. 80, 
79. 
80, 

80. 81. 

80, 81, 
79—81, 

81, 
81, 
81, 

81, 82, 
80, 81, 

82, 83, 

82, 83, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
S2, 
82. 
82, 
83, 
83, 
83, 
83, 

83, 84. 
83—87, 

84, 85, 
84, 85. 
84, 85, 
84, 85, 

84, 85, 
84, 
84. 
84. 

85, 86, 
85, 86. 

85, 86, 
85, 

86, 87, 
86. 

86, 87, 
86. 
86, 



James M. Patterson. 86, 87, 
Joseph H. Wightman.87, 



Gottfried Krueger, 

Charles Gomer. 

James Malone. 

Edward D. Pierson. 

Edward W. Crane. 

George S. Duryee. 

82, Wm. H. F. Fielder. 88, 89 

82, Wm. H. F. Fiedler, 
Schuyler B. Jackson. 
Alexander Phillips. 
Charles Holzwarth. 
Harrison Van Duyne. 
Peter J. Gray. 

83, 89, John Gill. 
Charles A. Felch. 
♦William H. Brown. 
Elias A. Wilkinson. 
Thos W. Langstroth. 
83, Thomas O'Connor. 
Joseph L. INIunn. 
William Wright. 
**Chas. G. Bruemmer. 90, 91. 
Michael McMahan. 90. 91, 
William R. Williams. 
John H. Parsons. 
David Young. 
Robert McGowan. 
Roderick Robertson. 
Ulysses B. Brewster. 
Edw'd R. Pennington. 
Adam Turkes. 
Edwin B. Smith. 
Lucius B. Hutchinson. 
James N. Arbuckle. 
John H. Murphy. 
William Hill. 



87, 88, 

87, 

87, 

87-89, 

87, 88, 

87, 



88, 
88, 

88, 89, 

m, 

89, 

89, 90, 
89, 90, 

89, 

89, 90, 
89, 

PO. 91, 

90. 91. 
9t>— 92, 



90, 92. 

90, 91, 

91, 92, 
91. 92, 

91, 92, 
91, 
92, 
92. 
92, 
92. 

92, 93, 

93, 94. 
93, 



93, John L. Armitage. 93, 94, 



93, William Harrigan 
George B. Harrison. 
David A. Bell. 
Edward Q. Keasbey. 
William E. O'Connor 
Charlese Holzwarth, 
Herman Lehlbach. 
Rush Burgess. 
Frederick S. Fish. 
Henry M. Doremus. 
R. Wayne Parker. 
Augustus F. R. Martin 94 
Franklin Murphy. 
Charles F. Underh 
Henry A. Potter. 
Elias M. Condit. 
Edwin Lister. 
Jacob Schreihofer. 



93. 94 

93. 94, 

93. 94. 

93, 

93. 

93. 94, 
93. 
94, 

94. 95. 
94, 95, 
94. 95, 



95, 

95, 96, 

95, 96. 

95, 96. 

95, 96, 

95, 96, 

95, 96, 



93, John H. Peal. 
James Peck. 
Charles E. Hill. 
Michael T. Barrett. 
Elvin W". Crane. 
Frank M. McDermitt. 
James Marlatt. 
William Harrigan. 
Thomas McGowan. 
Adrian Riker. 
DeForrest P. Lozier. 
Augustus Dusenberry. 
Joseph Schmelz. 
James A. Christie. 
John Gill. 
Richard A. Price. 
92, Leonard Kalisch. 
Moses Bigelow. 
Reuben Trier. 
Geo. W. Wiedenmayer 
George Rabenstein. 
Thomas H. Pollock. 
Thomas Smith. 
Charles Trefz. 
John J. Bertram. 
Edward H. Snyder. 
Edward W. Jackson. 
John Nieder. 
John R. Hardin. 
George W. Ketcham. 
Edward M. Taylor. 
Thomas F. Cavanagh. 
James A. Dempsey. 
Benedict Ulrich. 
William L. Glorieux. 
Augustus C. Studer. 
William Harrigan. 
John L. Armitage. 
Joseph P. Clarke. 
Joseph M. Byrne. 
Thomas A. Murphey. 
Dennis F. Olvaney. . 
William J. Kearns. 
John H. Peal. 
J. Broadhead Woolsey. 
Timothy Barrett. 
Thomas P. Edwards. 
96. Charles B. Duncan. 
John C. Eisele. 
Charles B. Storrs. 
George P. Olcott. 
Amos W. Harrison. 
Alfred F. Skinner. 
James A. Christie. 
George L. Smith. 
David E. Benedict. 
Charles A. Schober. 



*In 1880, W. H. Brown was unseated by William R. Wil- 
liams. 

**Mr. Bruemmer was elec ted for 1882, but died before 
Legislature convened. 



ASSEMBL VMEN. 



97, 
97, 



Frederick W. Mock. 
Thomas H. Jones. 
Albert J. Simpson. 
Hayward A. Harvey. 
James J. Hogan. 
Charles W. Powers. 
George W. W. Porter. 
Edwin F. Steddig. 
Alvin C. Ebie. 
George B. Harrison. 
Jacob Rau. Jr. 
Peter B. Fairchild. 
Carl V. Bauman. 
Joseph B. Johnson. 



99, 



Albert T. Guenther. 
Oliver B. Dawson. 
William C. Schmidt. 
Jacob Clark. 
John W. Weseman. 
John Kreitler. 
Fredericlv J. Deleot. 
Geo. F. Brandenburgh 
"William Mungle. 
John L. Billiard. 
John N. Klein. 
John P. Dexheimer. 
Benjamin F. Jones. 



51, 



Glouces 

Samuel W. Cooper. 
Benjamin Harding. 
John B. Miller. 
John B. Hilliard. 
John Duell. 
John Burk. 
Thomas Gaskell. 
Benjamin C. Tatem. 
Edmund Weatherby. 
Thomas Mills. 
Jeptha Abbott. 
John V. Parch. 
John Franklin. 
Benjamin Beckett. 
Jacob G. Tomlin. 
James B. Albertson. 
John H. Bradway. 
Benjamin Smith. 
John F. Thomas. 
George C. Hewitt. 
John Starr. 
■•Joseph Harker. 
♦Joseph H. Duffield. 
Allen Moore. 
Thomas G. Batten. 
E. C. Heritage. 



ter County. 

64, 65, Nathan S. Abbott. 

65, 66, William D. Wilson. 

66, 67, William W^ Clark. 

67, Jacob J. Hendrickson. 

68. Charles T. Molony. 
68, Wm. B. Rosenbaum. 

69—71, Nimrod W^oolery. 

69, 70, Leonard F. Harding. 

71, 72, John S. Rulon. 

72, John R. Middleton. 
73, 74, Obadiah Eldridge. 
73, 74, D. W .C. Hemmingway 

75, 76, Thomas B. Lodge. 
75, Simeon Warrington. 

76, 77, Samuel Moore. 
77—79, Caleb C. Pancoast. 
78, 79, Lawrence Lock. 
80, 81, George Craft. 

80, 81, Thomas M. Ferrell. 

82, Abijah S. Hewitt. 
S3— 85, Job S. Haines. 
86, 87, Joseph B. Roe. 
88—90, James T\^est. 
91, 92, James J. Davidson. 
93—96. Solomon H. Stanger. 
97—99, David O. Watkins. 



Huilsoii Countv, 



45, 46, 
47, 
48, 
49, 
50, 

51, 52, 
52, 
52, 
53, 
53, 
53, 
54, 
54, 

54, 55, 
55, 



Hart' an VanWagenen 
Benjamin F. Welsh. 
Oliver S. Strong. 
Jas. J. Van Boskerck. 
Edward T. Carpenter. 
John Van Vorst. 
Edmund T. Parker. 
Joseph W. Hancox. 
John Dunn Littell. 
James S. Davenport. 
Jacob M. Vreeland. 
Clement M. Hancox. 
Aug. F. Hardenbergh. 
Jacob M. Merseles. 
Dudley S. Gregory, Jr. 



55, John M. Board. 

56, John D. Ward. 

56, James T. Hatfield. 

56, 57, George V. De Mott. 

57, Robert Gilchrist, Jr. 

57, 58, Robert C. Bacot. 

58, William Voorhees. 
58—60. Garret M. Van Horn. 

59, Wm. H. Hemenover. 

59, Sftmuel A. French. 

60, W. H. Peckham. 

60, N. C. Slaight. 

61, Franklin B. Carpenter 
61, Theo. F. Randolph. 

61, 62, Michael J. Vreeland. 



*Mr. Harker died during the session of 
Duffield was elected to fill the vacancy. 



and Mr. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



97 





62, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62, 


63, 


62-64, 


63. 


64, 


63, 


64, 




64, 


64. 


65. 


64, 


65, 




65. 




65. 




65. 


65. 


66, 


66- 


-68. 


66. 


67. 


66. 


67. 




66. 




66. 


67. 


68. 


67. 


68. 


67. 


68. 




68, 


68. 


69. 


69. 


70. 


69. 


70, 




69. 


69. 


71. 


70. 


71. 




70. 




70. 




71, 




71. 




71. 




71. 


72, 


73. 


72. 


73. 


72. 


73. 


72 


73. 


li. 


73. 


72. 


73 




72.' 




72. 




73, 


73. 


74. 


74, 


75. 


74. 


75. 


74. 


75. 


74-76. 




74. 




74. 


74- 


-77. 


75. 


76. 




75. 




75. 




76. 




76. 




76, 


76. 


78. 


76, 


77, 


77. 


78. 


77, 


78, 



Edward D. Reiley. 
George McLaughlin. 
Josiah Conley, 
John B. Perry. 
Joshua Benson. 
James Lynch. 
Garret D. Van Reipen 
John B. Drayton. 
John Van Vorst. 
Abraham W. Duryee. 
Delos E. Culver. 
William E. Broking. 
Hiram Van Buskirk. 
69, 70. Leon Abbett. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
O D. Falkenburg. 
De Witt C. Morris. 
John Ramsay. 
Charles F. Ruh. 
Hosea P. Clark. 
A. O. Evans. 
John Dwyer. 
John Van Vorst. 
Henry C. Smith. 
Sidney B. Bevans. 
James B. Doremus. 
Elbridge V. S. Besson. 
Michael Coogan. 
Herman D. Busch. 
Abel L Smith. 
William Brinkerhoff. 
James P. Fielder. 
John Anness. 
George Warrin. 
Josiah Hornblower. 
George H. Farrier. 
Dennis Reardon. 
George S. Plympton. 
Henry Gaede. 
Jasper Wandel. 
Anthonv J. Ryder. 
James Stevens. 
John A. O'Neill. 
John Lee. 

Richard C. Washburn 
Alexander T. McGill. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Alexander McDonnell 
John D. Carscallen. 
Henry Coombs. 
.Tames K. Selleck. 
Rudolnh P. Rabe. 
.Tnhn J. Toffey. 
Thom.as Carey. 
Edward P. McDonald. 
William A. Lewis. 
Henry Brautigam. 
Thomas C. Brown. 
Alex. Jocobus. 
Thomas .T. Hannon. 
Marmaduke Tilden. 
Alexander W. Harris. 

7 • 



77, 


78. 




77, 




77, 




77, 




78, 




78, 


78, 


79, 


78, 


79, 




79, 




79, 




79. 




79, 


79. 


80, 


79, 


80, 


80, 


81, 


80, 


81, 


80, 


81, 


80, 


81, 




80, 




81, 


81, 


82, 


80, 


82, 


82, 


83, 


82- 


-84, 


82- 


-84, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




82, 




83. 




83, 


8.3- 


-85. 


83, 


84, 


83, 


84, 


83, 


84, 


S3, 


84, 


84, 


85, 


84, 


85, 




84, 




85. 




85, 




85, 




85, 




85, 




85, 


85, 


86, 




86, 


86, 


87, 




86, 




86, 


86, 


87, 


86, 


87, 




86, 


86, 


87, 


86, 


87, 




87, 


87- 


-90, 


87- 


-89, 


87, 


88, 



James Stevens. 
Martin M. Drohan. 
Lewis A. Brigham. 
Elijah T. Paxton. 
Dudley S. Steele. 
Edward P. C. Lewis. 
81, T. J. McDonald. 
Henry Dusenberry. 
John Owen Rouse. 
Prank C. Prey. 
G A. Lilliendahl. 
John A. Tangeman. 
Joseph Meeks. 
Samuel W. Stilsing. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
Allan L. McDermott. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
James Curran. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Frederick Payne. 
James J. Casey. 
David W. Lawrence. 
Thomas V. Cator. 
James C. Clarke. 
Dennis McLaughlin. 
William McAdoo. 
Robert McCague, Jr. 
George H. Farrier. 
David M. Durrell. 
John O'Rourke. 
Peter P. Wanser. 
John M. Shannon. 
Edwin O. Chapman. 
Martin Steljes. 
Augustus A. Rich. 
Prank O. Cole. 
Joseph T. Kelly. 
Cornelius S. See. 
87. 88, S. D. Dickinson. 
Michael J. O'Donnell. 
Thomas H. Kelly. 
Isaac Romaine. 
John W. Heck. 
James J. Clark. 
John Wade. 
Fred. Frambach, Jr. 
John C. Besson. 
R. B. Seymour. 
Philip Tumulty. 
D. A. Peloubet. 
A. B. Dayton. 
John Pearson. 
89, R. S. Hudspeth. 
T. J. McDonald. 
Thomas P. Noonan. 
Edward Lennon. 
Edw'd T. McLaughlin. 
Wm. C. Heppenheimer. 
John P. Peeney. 
William H. Letts. 
Joseph Gallagher. 
James P. Norton. 



98 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



89. 92. 



89, 
90. 91. 
90, 91, 

90, 

90. 

90, 
90. 91. 

90, 91, 
90—92, 

91, 

91, 92, 
91, 
91, 
91, 
92, 
92, 
92, 

92—94. 

92, 93, 
92—94, 
92, 93, 

92, 93, 

93. 94. 
93, 94, 

93, 

93. 94, 
93. 
93. 
94, 
94, 
94. 
94, 
94. 

94, 95, 



45, 4S, 
45, 
45, 
45. 
46, 

46. 47, 
46, 47. 
46, 47, 
47^9, 
48. 49, 
48, 49. 
50. 51, 
50, 51, 
50, 51. 
50—52, 



Richard Brown. 


95, 


96, 


Charles W. Fuller. 


95, 


96, 


Edward P. Farrell. 




95. 


*E. Frank Short. 


95, 


96, 


Patrick H. O'Neill. 


95, 


96, 


Peter T. Donnelly. 




95, 


Laurence Fagan. 




95, 


Judson C. Francois. 




95, 


Michael Mullone. 




95, 


Henry Byrne. 




95, 


James Murphy. 




96, 


James S. Erwin. 




96, 


John F. Kelly. 




96, 


Andrew J. Boyle. 




96, 


Thomas B. Usher. 




96, 


J. Herbert Potts. 


96, 


98, 


Simeon H. Smith. 


96, 


98, 


James Moylan. 




97, 


Henry Puster. 




97, 


John F. Madden. 




97, 


William D. Daly. 




97, 


Thomas Mag-ner. 




97, 


James Tumilty. 




97, 


George A. Heaney. 




97, 


Timothy J. Carroll. 




97, 


Martin Lawless. 




97, 


Michael J. Coyle. 




97, 


Cornelius J. Tahen. 




97, 


John Zeller. 




98, 


Ebenezer Berry. 




98, 


Max Salinger. 


98, 


99. 


Henry H. Holmes. 


98, 


99, 


Hugh A. Kelly. 


98, 


99, 


Adam J. Dittmar. 


98, 


99, 


S. V. W. Stout. 


98. 


99, 


Thomas Egan. 


98, 


99, 


George W. Harding. 


98, 


99, 


John Kerr. 




99, 


Thomas McEwan, Jr. 


99, 


Charles Erlenkotter. 




99, 


James Usher. 




99, 


Hunterdon Com 


49, Jonathan Pickel. 


52, 


53, 


John Swackhammer. 


52, 


53, 


Amos Moore. 




52, 


John H. Case. 


53, 


54, 


Henry Stevenson. 


53, 


54, 


Isaac R. Srope. 


54, 


55, 


Joseph Fritts. 


54, 


55, 


Frederick Apgar. 




55, 


John Lambert. 




55. 


Andrew Banghart. 


56, 


57, 


David Van Fleet. 


56, 


57, 


John Marlow. 


56, 


57, 


Luther Opdycke. 


56, 


57, 


William Tinsman. 


58, 


59, 


John R. Young. 


58, 


59, 



, William N. Parslow. 
, Pierce J. Fleming. 
, Henry C. Gruber. 
, Richard M. Smart. 

David M. Cagney. 

James F. Blackshaw. 

Henry M. Nutzhorn. 

Frederick Schober. 

Robert McAndrew. 

William E. Drake. 

Carl H. Ruempler. 

John W. Queen. 

John E. Hewitt. 

Edward Hoos. 

Joseph P. Mullin. 

Horace L. Allen. 

Charles T. Bauer. 

Elmer W. Demarest. 

W^illiam M. Klink. 

Robert D. Urquhart. 

Isaac F. Goldenhorn. 

William G. Nelson. 

John E. McArthur. 

Theodore C. Wildman. 

Charles M. Evans. 

Clement DeR. Leonard 

William H. Dod. 

William O. Armbruster 

Alexander Simpson. 

Adolph Walter, Jr. 

Allan Benny. 

James J. Murphy. 

James P. Hall. 

Fergus T. Kelaher. 

Michael J. Bruder. 

John J. Marnell. 

Timothy J. Carroll. 

Leon Abbett. 

Maurice Marks. 

John H. Toilers. 

J. Emil Walscheid. 

nty. 

Peter H. AUer. 
Andrew Vansickle. 
Hiram Bennett. 
John Lambert. 
Samuel H. Britton. 
Lewis Young. 
Peter E. Voorhees. 
Jacob S. C. Pittenger. 
Edward Hunt. 
William Sergeant. 
John M. Voorhis. 
Joseph W. Willever. 
John P. Rittenhouse. 
John H. Horn. 
William Snyder. 



♦Mr. Short was elected to a second term of office, but 
he died before the Legislature met. Mr. Francis was 
chosen for the vacancy. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



99 



58. 59. Cornelius B. Sheets. 75, 76, 

58, 59, Frederick Apgar. 75, 76, 

60, 61, Charles Denson. 77, 78, 

60, 61, Ambrose Barcroft. 77. 78, 

60, 61, D. D. Schomp. 79, 80, 
60, Thos. Banghart, Jr. 79, SO, 

61, 62, Jacob H. Huffman. 81, 82. 

62, 63, S. R. Huselton. 81, 82, 
62, 64. Joseph W. Wood. 83, 84, 
03, 64. David H. Banghart. 83. 84, 

64, 65. David B. Boss. 85—87, 

65. 67. William I. Iliff. 85—87. 
65. 6ti, James J. Willever. 88—90, 
f.G. 67, Richard H. Wilson. 88—90. 
B7. 68, Baltes Pickel. 91, 92. 
fi8, 69. John Williamson. 91—93, 
68—70. Theodore Probasco. 93, 

69, 70, John P. Lare. 94. 95. 

70, 71, John Kugler. 94—96, 

71, 72. Peter Voorhees. 96—98, 
71. 72, Aug. E. Sanderson. 97—99, 
73. 74, W. L. Hoppock. 99, 
73. 74. John Carpenter, Jr. 



.Alcrcev County. 

45, Israel J. Woodward. 60, 

45, Richard J. Bond. 61, 

45, *John Lowrey. 61. 62, 

46. 47, Isaac Pullen. 62, 63, 

46. 47, John M. Vancleve. 62, 

46. 47, William White. 63, 

48. 49, James M. Redmond. 63, 64, 

48-50. Josiah Buzby. 64, 

48. Samuel C. Cornell. 64, 65, 

49. John R. Dill. 65, 66, 

50, John F. Hageman. 65, 66, 
50. 51, John H. Phillips. 66, 67, 

51, Eli Rogers. 67, 71, 

51, Westlev P. Danser. 67. 

52, Williarn Napton. <i^%. 69, 
.-.2. John C. Ward. 68, 

52, Jeremiah Vandyke. 68, 
.53, Abner B. Tomlinson. 69, 

53. Eliiah L. Hendrickson 69. 70, 

53, Randal C. Robbins. 70, 71, 

54, James H. Hill. 70, 
54, Franklin S. Mills. 71, 

54. Runey R. Forman. 72, 73, 

55. James Vandeventer. 72, 
.55. William Jay. • 72. 
.55. Garret Schenck. 73. 74. 

56. .57. Geo. R. Cook. 73, 74. 

56. 57, Andrew- Dutcher. 74. 75, 

56. Samuel Wooley. 75, 

57. .58, Jacob Van Dyke. 75. 
5S, n9. Augustus L. Martin. 76, 

.58. Jonathan S. Figh. 76. 

.5<t, Robert Aitken. 76, 

.59. 60. Ed. T. R. Applegate. 77, 78, 

60, 61, Joseph Abbott. 77, 



James Bird. 
W^illiam W. Swayze. 
Henry Britton. 
John Hackett. 
Charles W. Godown. 
James N. Ramsey. 
George H. Mathews. 
Jacob Hipp. 
John V. Robbins. 
W. Howard Lake. 
John C. Arnwine. 
Chester Wolverton. 
William H. Martin. 
Laurence H. Trimmer. 
T\'illiam B. Niece. 
Benjamin E. Tine. 
J. Li. Chamberlin. 
Charles N. Redding. 
William C. Alpaugh. 
David Lawshe. 
George F. Martens, Jr. 
Oliver I. Blackwell. 



Harper Crozer. 
William S. Yard. 
Morgan F. Mount. 
Geo. W. Johnston. 
John G. Stevens. 
Peter Crozer. 
James G. West. 
James F. Bruere. 
John A. Weart. 
Alex. P. Green. 
Samuel Fisher. 
Thomas Crozer. 
Joseph H. Bruere. 
Charles W. Mount. 
Absalom P. Lanning. 
Thomas J. Corson. 
Thomas C. Pearce. 
John P. Nelson. 
James C. Norris. 
TMlliam H. Barton. 
Charles O. Hudnut. 
Liscomb T. Robbins. 
Alfred W. Smith. 
Richard R. Rogers. 
John H. Silvers. 
John N. Lindsay. 
Andrew J. Smith. 
Geo. O. Vanderbilt. 
Samuel M. Youmans. 
Robt. S. Woodruff. Jr. 
Enoch H. Drake. 
John Hart Brewer. 
Robert L. Hutchinson. 
HoratiQ N. Burroughs. 
William S. Yard. 



^Died in office. 



100 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 





77, 


78, 


79, 


78 


79, 




79, 


80, 


81. 


80. 


81. 


80, 


81, 


82, 


83, 


82, 


83, 


83, 


84, 


84, 


85. 


84, 


85. 




85, 


86, 


87, 




86, 




86. 




87. 




87, 




S8. 




88. 




88, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46. 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46. 




47, 




47. 




47. 


47, 


48. 




48. 


48, 


49. 


48. 


49. 




49. 


49. 


50. 




IS: 






50, 




51. 




51, 




51, 


51, 


52, 




52, 


52. 


53, 


53—55. 


53, 


54, 


54. 


55, 


55. 


56. 




56. 


56, 


57. 




57, 


57. 


58, 


58- 


-60, 


5S, 


59. 




59, 




60. 




60. 


61. 


62. 


62. 


63. 




62, 


63, 


64, 



J. Vance Powers. 
82, Eckford Moore. 
John D. Rue. 
William Roberts. 
Charles S. Robinson. 
Richard A. Donnelly. 
John V. D. Beekman. 
Nelson M. Lewis. 
William J. Convery. 
Joseph H. Applegate. 
A. Judson Rue. 
John Caminade. 
Benj. F. Chambers. 
S. B. Hutchinson. 
James C. Taylor, Jr. 
William Ossenberg. 
Frederick Walter. 
George D. Scudder. 
Charles H. Olden. 
Josiah Jones. 
Lyman Leavitt. 



89, 


90 


90, 


91 




90 




91 


91. 


92, 


92. 


93, 


92, 


93, 




93, 


94, 


95 


94, 


95, 


94, 


95, 


96, 


97, 


96. 


97, 


96, 


97, 


98, 


99, 




98, 


98. 


99, 



Uriel T. Scudder. 
Thomas S. Chambers. 
John Schroth. 
Jacob R. Wyckoff. 
Howell C. Stull. 
James H. Mulheron. 
Patrick T. Burns. 
James W. Lanning. 
Barton B. Hutchinson. 
Charles G. Roebling. 
William L. Wilbur. 
John Ginder. 
William T. Exton. 
Elijah C. Hutchinson. 
Geo. W. Macpherson. 
J. Wiggans Thorn. 
John B. Yard. 
Frank M. Weller. 
Henry J. Nicklin. 
Ira W. Wood. 



Middle.sex County 



Simeon W. Phillips. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Daniel C. Dunn. 
Charles Abraham. 
Garret G. Voorhees. 
Theodore F. King. 
John A. Davison. 
Richard McDowell. 
Melancton F. Carman 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Aaron Gulick. 
William A. Gulick. 
James Bishop. 
Henry Vandyke. 
Charles Abraham. 
Israel R. Coriell. 
David Dunn. 
Peter F. Dye. 
J. B. Johnson. 
Robert M. Crowell. 
James Applegatc. 
Josephus Shann. 
Martin A. Howell. 
Abraham Everett. 
Samuel E. Stelle. 
William Hutchinson. 
John T. Jenkins. 
Amos Bobbins. 
Henry Stults. 
John D. Buckelew. 
Ellis B. Freeman. 
Garret I. Snedeker. 
Andrew McDowell. 
Thomas Booraem. 
Elias Dey. 
Elias Ross. 
James T. Crowell. 
Orlando Perrine. 
Miles Ross. 



63, 


64, 


64, 


65, 


es- 


-67, 




65, 


se. 


67, 


66. 


67. 




68, 


68. 


69. 


68, 


69, 


70, 


71, 




70, 


71- 


-73. 




71. 


"TO 


73, 




72, 




73, 




74, 




74, 


74, 


75 




75, 




75. 




76, 


76. 




76, 


77> 




77 


78. 


79; 


78 


79, 


78, 


79, 




80, 




80, 


80. 


81. 


81. 


82, 


81, 


83. 




82. 


82, 


83. 


83. 


84. 


84, 


85. 


84, 


85, 


85, 


86, 



David B. Wyckoff. 
Abraham C. Coriell. 
69, 70, Levi D. Jarrard. 
James G. Goble. 
Nathan H. Tyrell. 
John W. Perrine. 
George E. Strong. 
Alfred W. Jones. 
William M. Cox. 
Albert L. Runyon. 
George E. Brown. 
Isaac L. Fischer. 
Edward F. Roberts. 
Joseph C. Letson. 
Johnston Holcombe. 
H. F. Worthington. 
John Von Deursen. 
John F. Ten Broeck. 
Joseph C. Magee, Jr. 
James H. Van Cleef. 
Josephus Shann. 
Isaiah Rolfe. 
Charles A. Campbell. 
Daniel Z. Martin. 
John Waldron. 
Isaac L. Martin. 
Patrick Convery. 
Vincent W. Mount. 
Robert G. Miller. 
John M. Board. 
Stephen M. Martin. 
James H. Van Cleef. 
Manning Freeman. 
John Adair. 
James H. Goodwin. 
William R. Jernee. 
Edward S. Savage. 
Robert Carson. 
John Martin, 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



101 



86. 


S7, 


86, 


87, 


87, 


88, 


88, 


89, 




89, 


88, 


89, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 



92, 93, 



45, 
45—47, 

45, 46, 
45—47, 

45, 

46, 47, 
46, 47, 

47, 

48, 

48. 

48, 

48, 

48, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 

49, 

49, 

50, 

50, 

51, 52, 



51, 52, 

51, 

52, 

51—53, 

53, 

53. 

53, 54, 

54, 

54, 

54— 5_6_, 

55. 

55, 

55, 

56, 57, 

56. 57. 

56, 57. 

57—59, 

58. 59, 

58. 59, 

57—60, 

60, 61, 

60, 61, 
60, 

61. 62, 
61, 62. 

62, 



John F. Ten Broeck. 
R. R. Vandenbergh. 
John Mulvey. 
Ephraim Cutter. 
Daniel M. Kane. 
Charles B. Herbert. 
Luther H. Tappen. 
William C. Jacques. 
Charles H. Manahan. 
John W. Beekman. 
John H. Daly. 



George F. Fort. 
Hartshorne Tantum. 
Andrew Simpson. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
*Jas. H. Hartshorne. 
William Vandoren. 
John Borden. 
Andrew Simpson. 
William W. Bennett. 
Joel Parker. 
Ferdinand Woodward. 
♦Samuel Bennett. 
Joel W. Ayres. 
Alfred Walling. 
George W. Sutphin. 
James r). Hall. 
James Hooper. 
John B. Williams. 
William G. Hooper. 
Charles Butcher. 
William H. Conover. 
Garret S. Smock. 
Bernard Connolly. 
Charles Butcher. 
Samuel W. Jones. 
Charles Allen. 
Daniel P. Van Doren. 
Robert Allen. 
Forman Hendrickson. 
John L. Corlies. 
Henry E. Lafetra. 
John Vandoren. 
Thomas B. Stout. 
William H. Johnson. 
Jacob Herbert. 
John R. Barricklo. 
Samuel Beers. 
John V. Conover. 
George Middleton. 
Richard B. Walling. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
William H. Mount. 
James Patterson. 
J. J. McNinney. 
William V. W^ard. 
Charles Haight. 
George C. Murray. 



92, 93, Hezekiah W^arne. 

94, William F. Harkins, 
94—96. Andrew H. Slover. 
95, 96, Edward W. Hicks. 
95. 96, George H. Tice. 

Alexander C. Litterst. 

Jacob H. Whitfield. 

James Fountain. 

Adam Eckert. 

Joseph H. Ridgeway. 

John J. Quaid. 



Michael Taylor. 
Osborn Curtis. 
David H. Wyckoff. 
Daniel A. Holmes. 
George Schenck. 
William C. Browne. 
Charles Allen. 
Francis Corlies. 
Thomas S. R. Brown. 
William H. Conover. 
Daniel H. Van Mater. 
Andrew Brown. 
Austin H. Patterson. 
William S. Horner. 
John T. Haight. 
Wm. B. Hendrickson. 
George W. Patterson. 
John B. Gifford. 
John S. Sproul. 
Chas. D. Hendrickson. 
William V. Conover. 
James L. Rue. 
William H. Bennett. 
James H. Leonard. 
George J. Ely. 
Arthur Wilson. 
87. Sherman B. Oviatt. 
92. 93, John D. Honce. 
87, 88, G. H. Lufburrow 
Holmes W. Murphy, 
David A. Bell. 
Peter Forman, Jr. 
Benjamin Griggs. 
Alfred B. Stonev. 
Thomas G. Chattle. 
Charles H. Boud. 
William H. Grant, 
Frank E. Heyer. 
W. S. Throckmorton. 
William Pintard. 
Edward B. Potts. 
Archibald A. Higgins. 
William F. Patterson. 
Aaron E. Johnston. 
William D. Campbell. 
Charles H. Ivins. 
92, 93, John D. Honce. 





97, 




97. 




97. 


98, 


99, 


98, 


99, 


98, 


99, 


h 


Con 


63. 


65, 


63, 


64, 


63. 


64, 


65. 


66, 


65, 


66. 




66, 


67. 


68, 


67. 


68, 


67, 


68, 




69, 


69. 


70, 


69. 


70. 


70—72, 




71, 


71, 


79 




72,' 


73- 


-75. 


73, 


74, 


73, 


74, 


75, 


76, 


75. 


76, 


76. 


77. 


77, 


78. 




77, 




78, 


78. 


79, 


79, 


80, 


79, 


80, 


80, 


81, 




81, 


81, 


82. 


82, 


83, 




82, 


83. 


84. 


83, 


84, 


84, 


85, 




85. 


85, 


86, 


86, 


S7, 




86, 


88, 


89, 


88, 


89, 




89, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90. 


91, 



*Died in office. 



102 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



92, 93, Reuben G. Strahan. 
92, 93, William Taber Parker, 
94, Charles L. Walters. 

94, 95, David D. Denise. 
94, Richard Borden. 

95, 96, Charles A. Francis. 
95, 96, George B. Snyder. 



98, 



96, Alfred Walling, Jr. 

97, William H. Reid. 
97, Oliver H. Brown. 

97, Daniel E. Van Wickle. 
99, Joseph L. Butcher. 
99, Joseph C. Heyer. 
99, B. Drummond Woolley 







3ioiii.s 


Co 


unty. 




45, 


Timothy Kitchel. 




66, 


John Hill. 


45, 


46, 


Matthias Kitchel. 


66, 


67, 


James C. Yawger. 


45, 


46, 


Henrj' Seward. 


66, 


67, 


Elias M. White. 


45, 


46, 


George H. Thompson. 




67, 


Lewis Estler. 


40, 


47, 


Calvin Howell. 




68. 


Daniel Coghlan. 




47, 


Richard Lewis. 




68, 


George Gage. 




47, 


Charles McFarland. 


68-70. 


Jesse M. Sharp. 




47, 


Samuel Hilts. 


69, 


70, 


Theodore W. Phoenix. 


48, 


49. 


Andrew I. Smith. 


69, 


70, 


Columbus Beach. 


48, 


49, 


David T. Cooper. 


71, 


72, 


Nathaniel Niles. 


48, 


49, 


Samuel Van Ness. 


71, 


72, 


W. B. Lefevre. 


48, 


49, 


Edward W. Whelpley. 


71- 


-73, 


August C. Canfield. 




50, 


John L. Kanouse. 


73, 


74, 


W. H. Howell. 




50, 


Andrew Cobb. 


73, 


74. 


Jacob Z. Budd. 




50, 


Freeman Wood. 


74^76, 


Elias M. Skellinger. 




50, 


George H. Thompson. 


75, 


76, 


James C. Youngblood. 




51, 


Horace Chamberlain. 


75, 


76, 


Edmund D. Halsey. 




51, 


Jonathan P. Bartley. 




77, 


Abm. C. Van Duyne. 




51. 


Josiah Meeker. 




77. 


*Cummiiis O. Cooper. 


51, 


52, 


Cornelius B. Doremus, 


, 77, 


78, 


C. P. Garrabrant. 


52, 


53, 


C. S. Dickerson. 




78, 


Francis J. Doremus. 


52, 


53, 


John D. Jackson. 




78, 


Joshua S. Salmon. 


52, 


53, 


Robert Albright. 


79, 


80, 


Charles F. Axtell. 




•53, 


John L. Kanouse. 


79, 


SO, 


James H. Bruen. 


54, 


55, 


William P. Conkling. 


79, 


SO, 


Holloway W. Hunt. 


54, 


55, 


William Logan. 


81, 


S2, 


William C. Johnson. 


54, 


55, 


Aaron Pitnej'. 


SI, 


82. 


91, 92, John F. Post. 




54, 


Andrew B. Cobb. 


81, 


82, 


Oscar Lindsley. 


55, 


56, 


Edward Howell. 


83-85. 


George W. Jenkins. 




56, 


Wm. M. Muchmore. 


83, 


84, 


James H. Neighbour. 


56, 


57, 


William A. Carr. 


83, 


84, 


Amzi F. Weaver. 


56, 


57, 


Daniel Budd. 


85, 


86, 


John Seward Wills. 


57, 


58, 


Benjamin M. Felch. 


85, 


86, 


Elias C. Drake. 


57, 


58. 


Richard Speer. 


86, 


87, 


John Norwood. 


58, 


59, 


Lyman A. Chandler. 


87, 


88, 


Samuel S. Lyon. 


58, 


59, 


John Naughright. 


87, 


88, 


John R. Pitney. 




59, 


A. H. Stansborough. 


88, 


89, 


Carnot B. Meeker. 


59, 


60, 


James H. Ball. 


89, 


90, 


John Norris. 




60, 


Eugene Ayres. 


89, 


90, 


W^illiam S. Nauright. 


60—62, 


Nelson H. Drake. 


90, 


91, 


Jas. Preston Albright. 


60- 


-62, 


Nathan Horton. 


91, 


92, 


Ford D. Smith. 




61, 


William W. Beach. 




93, 


Thomas J. O'Brien. 


61. 


62, 


John Hill. 




93, 


Sylvester Utter. 


62, 


63, 


Jacob Vanatta. 


94, 


95, 


Charles A. Baker. 




63, 


William J. Wood. 


94, 


95, 


William C. Bates. 


63- 


-65, 


Jesse Hoffman. 


96, 


97, 


Charles F. Hopkins. 




64, 


Henry C. Sanders. 


96, 


97. 


Joseph B. Righter. 


64, 


65, 


John Bates. 


98. 


99, 


Jacob W. Welsh. 




65, 


Alfred M. Treadwell. 


98, 


99, 


George E. Poole. 



*In 1878, Cummins O. Cooper was unseated by Joshua 
S. Salmon. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



103 



Ocean Covintv, 



51—53, Joel Haywood. 

54, A. O. S. Havens. 
55, 56, William F. Brown. 
57—59, Edwin Salter. 

60, Thomas W. Ivins. 

61, Charles H. Applegate. 

62, Ephraim Emson. 

63, Edwin Salter. 
64, 65, Jacob Birdsall. 

66, 67, Job Edwards. 

68, 69, G. W. Cowperthwaite. 
70, 71, Albert M. Bradshaw. 

72, Richard B. Parker. 

73, John S. Shultze. 

74, Edward M. Lonan. 

Passaic 

45, 46, George W. Colfax. 
45, 46, Chileon F. De Camp. 

47, Abm. Prall. 

47, 48, Henry M. Van Ness. 

48, John M. Demarest. 

49, 50, C. S. Van Wagoner.. 

49, Oscar Decker. 

50, 51, Thomas D. Hoxsey. 

51, 52, Benjamin Geroe. 

52, J. S. Fayerweather. 

53, J. V. R. Van Blarcom. 

53, Cornelius Van Winkle 
53, 54, Philip Rafferty. 

54, Charles H. May. 
51, 52, 54, John L. Laroe. 

55, William C. Stratton. 

55, William M. Morrell. 
55, 56, John Schoonmaker. 
56—58, Benj. Buckley. 

56, Peter H. Whitenor. 

57, John J. Brown. 

57, James B. Beam. 

58, Patrick Maginnis. 

58, 59, Richard Van Houten. 
59—61, Samuel Pope. 

59, Joel M. Johnson. 

60, Isaac Stagg. 

60, 61, Isaac P. Cooley. 

61, 62, Socrates Tuttle. 
62—66, John N. Terhune. 
62—66, Chandler D. Norton. 

63, Samuel Pope. 
63, 64, Joseph N. Taylor. 

63, 64, Charles F. Johnson. 

64, 65, Aaron Kinter. 

65, 66, Garret Van Wagoner. 
65, 66, Isaac D. Blauvelt. 

67, 68, David Henry. 

67, 68, Joseph R. Baldwin. 
67, E. A. Stansbury. 

68, 69, A. A. Van Voorhees. 

69, 70, Hugh Reld. 

69, 70, 72, C. Hemmingway. 
70, Henry Hobbs. 



75, 87, 88, 89, J. S. Goble. 

76, Ephraim P. Emson. 

77, Isaac A. Van Hise. 
78—80, Rufus Blodgett. 

81, William H. Bennett. 

82, Clifford Horner. 

83, George T. Cranmer. 

84, Augustus W. Irons. 
85, 86, George G. Smith. 
90—92. Adolph Ernst. 

93, 94, John T. Burton. 
95, 96, Abraham Lower. 
97, 98, Roderick A. Clark. 
99, Courtney C. Carr. 



Coun 

70, 
71, 78, 

71, 72, 

72, 73, 
73, 

73, 74, 

74, 75, 
74, 75, 
76, 77, 
76, 77, 
76, 77, 

78, 

78, 79, 

79, 80, 

80, 81, 
80, 81, 

SI, 

82, 

82, 83, 

82, 83, 
82—85, 

83, 84, 
84, 
84, 

85, 86, 

85, 86, 

85, 86, 

86, 

87, 88, 

87, 

87, 

87, 88, 



89, 

89, 
90, 91, 
90, 91, 

90, 
90, 91, 

91, 
92, 93, 
92, 93, 



ty. 

, Charles P. Gurnee. 
. 79, John O'Brien. 

75, Robert M. Torbet. 

Henry McDanolds. 

George Barnes. 

Garret A. Hobart. 

David Henry. 

John P. Zeluff. 

John W. Griggs. 

John Sanderson. 

Jos. L. Cunningham. 

John Kennell. 

John H. Robinson. 

George W. Conkling. 

Robert B. Morehead. 

Thomas B. Vreeland. 

Jacob Latus. 

Joseph A. Greaves. 

Patrick H. Shields. 

William F. Gaston. 

92, 93, Thomas Flynn. 

Clark W. Mills. 

William Prall. 

Cornelius A. Cadmus. 

John Scheele. 

De Witt C. Bolton. 

George H. Low. 

William B. Gourley. 

George Law. 

John Donohue. 

Robert A. Carroll. 

89. James Keys. 

James H. Rogers. 

Eugene Emley. 

John I. Holt. 

Chas. T. Woodward. 

William W. Welch. 

John King. 

John F. Kerr. 

Thomas McCran. 

Robert Williams. 

Richard Carroll. 

Frank Gledhill. 

94, Thomas Flynn. 



104 



ASSBMBL YMEN. 



92, 


93, 




92, 


93, 


94, 




94, 




94, 




95, 


95, 


96, 


95, 


96, 




45, 




45, 




45, 




46, 




46, 




46, 




47, 




47, 


47, 


48, 




48, 




48, 




49, 




49, 




49, 




50, 




50, 




50, 




51, 




51, 




51, 




52, 




52, 




53, 




53, 




54, 




54, 




55, 




55, 




56, 




56, 




57, 


57- 


-59. 


58, 


59, 


60 


61, 



61, 



45, 

45, 

45, 

46, 

46, 47, 

46, 

47—49, 

47—49, 

48—50, 

50, 51, 
50, 
51, 

51, 52, 
52. 



John F. Smith. 
James Parker. 
John I. Holt. 
John McKelvey. 
William I. Lewis. 
Samuel Frederick. 
James Robertson. 
Samuel Bullock. 

Saleui 

David Wiley. 
Isaiah Conklyn. 
Robert Hewitt. 
Ephraim Carel. 
Charles Bilderback. 
George Remster. 
Joseph M. Springer. 
James Vanmeter. 
Joseph Foster. 
Benj. F. McCollister. 
Joseph R. Chew. 
James H. Trenchard. 
Isaac Lippincott. 
John Fowler. 
Charles B. Newell. 
David Sithens. 
Benjamin Remster. 
Smith Bilderback, 
Charles Benner. 
Harman Richman. 
Jacob Hitchner. 
John C. Lummis. 
Nathaniel G. Swing. 
John Blackwood. 
Isaiah D. Clawson. 
Richard Grier. 
Joshua Thompson. 
John Harris. 
Joseph Kille. 
Samuel Plummer. 
William Beckett. 
Thomas B. Jones. 
Alfred Simpkins. 
Joshua Lippincott. 
Samuel Habermayer. 
Owen L. Jones. 



95, 96, 97, 99, John King. 
96—98, Henry W. Gledhill. 
97, Frank Atherton. 

97, Phineas Bridge. 
98, 99, Wood McKee. 
98, 99, John W. Sturr. 

98, John Donohue. 

99, Vivian M. Lewis. 

County. 

62, William P. Somers. 

62, Samuel D. Miller. 
63, 64, Joseph W. Cooper. 

63, Joseph Waddington. 

64, William N. Hancock. 

65, William Callahan. 

65, 66, A. M. P. V. H. Dickeson 

66, 67, Samuel Garrison. 

67, John S. Newell. 

68, Henry M. Wright. 

68, 69, Andrew S. Reeves. 

69, 70, Charles F. H. Gray. 

70, David Evans. 

71, John W. Dickinson. 
' 71, John Hitchner. 

72, 73, Daniel P. Darrell. 

72, Smith Hewitt. 

73, 74, William Iszard. 

74, 75, William B. Carpenter. 

75, Charles P. Swing. 

76, Richard Coles. 
76—78, Quinton Keasbey. 

77, John S. Elwell. 

78, William C. Kates. 
79—81, Henry Barber. 
79—81, John D. Garwood. 
82—84, Henry Combs. 

85, 86, Joseph D. Whitaker. 

87, William Newell. 

88, Millard F. Riley. 
89, 90, John C. Ward. 
91, 92, James Strimple. 
93, 94, William Diver. 

95, 96. Charles W. Powers. 

97, 98, Joseph B. Crispen. 

99, Frank Wright. 



Somerset County, 



Peter Voorhees. 53, 54, 

Samuel Reynolds. 54—56, 

Peter Kline. 55, 

James B. Elmendorf. 56, 57, 

Peter T. Beekman. 57, 

Jonathan Cory. 58, 59, 

Samuel K. Martin. 59, 60, 

F. V. D. Voorhees. 60, 61, 

John M. Wyckoff. 61—63, 

53, John De Mott. 62, 63, 

Samuel S. Doty. 64, 65, 

Frederick D. Brokaw. 65, 66, 

Eugene S. Doughty. 66, 67, 

Michael R. Nevius. 67, 



John H. Anderson. 
John S. Hoagland. 
Alvah Lewis. 
Cornelius M. Schomp. 
Cornelius N. Allen. 
Nehemiah V. Steele. 
Elisha B. Wood. 
70, J. W. Arrowsmith. 
John G. Schenck. 
John M. Mann, 
Daniel Corey. 
Rynier A. Staats. 
Ralph Davenport. 
Peter A. Voorhees. 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



105 



68. 69, 

68, 

69—71, 

71, 

72, 73, 

73, 74, 

74, 75, 
75—77, 
76, 77, 
78—80, 
78—80, 
81. 82. 



45, 

45, 

45, 

46, 

46, 47, 

46—48, 

47—49, 

48—50, 

49, 

50, 51, 

50. 51, 

51, 

52, 

52, 55, 
52-54. 

53, 54. 
53, 54, 

55, 
55 — 57, 
56—58, 
56—58, 

58, 
59, 60, 



John J. Bergen. 
Abraham T. Huff. 
John R. Staats. 
James Doty. 
David D. Smalley. 
John G. Schenck. 
William P. Sutphin. 
Joseph H. Voorhees. 
91, 92. Jas. J. Bergen. 
John Ringelmann. 
J. Newton Voorhees. 
William A. Schomp. 



Sussex County. 

Absalom Dunning, 



81, John L. Oakey. 
83, 84, Cornelius S. Hoffman. 
85, 86, John Vetterlein. 

87, George E. Pace. 

88, Oscar Conkling. 
89, 90, Jacob Klotz. 

93, George H. Cramer. 
94, 95, Frank W. Somers. 

96, Charles A. Reed. 
97. 98, Peter V. D. VanDoren. 
Edward E. Cooper. 



99. 



62, 



70. 



Jesse Bell. 
Timothy H. Cook. 
Juhn Hunt. 
Peter Young. 
Thos. D. Armstrong. 
Peter Hoyt. 
Jacob Hornbeck, Jr. 
Martin Ryerson. 
Guy Price. 
William Slmurson. 
Daniel D. Decker. 
George W. Collver. 
Aaron K. Stinson. 
Timothy E. Shay. 
Benjamin Hamilton. 
Luther Hill. 
James L. Decker. 
Daniel D. Gould. 
William Smith. 
John W. Opdyke. 
Sanford McKeeby. 
Martin Cole. 

I'liioii 

Benjamin M. Price. 
Cooper Parse. 
William Stiles. 
Elston Marsh. 
David Mulford. 
Israel O. Maxwell. 
Samuel L. Moore. 
John J. High. 
Noah Woodruff. 
Philip Dougherty. 
Joseph T. Crowell. 
John R. Crane. 
Thomas J. Lee. 
A. M. W. Ball. 
Enos W. Runyon. 
John H. Whelan. 
DeWitt C. Hough. 
75, Ferd. Blancke. 
Albert A. Drake. 
Joseph W. Yates. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
William McKinley. 
John H. Lufberry. 



60, 61, Charles Mackerly. 
60, 61, Daniel D. Decker. 

61, William Price. 
62—64, William H. Bell. 

62, Thomas N. McCarter. 
63, 64, Robert Hamilton. 

65, Samuel Fowler. 
65—67, William M. IlifC. 
66, 67, 73, 74, F. M. Ward. 
68—70, Hiram C. Clark. 
68—70, Samuel H. Hunt. 
71, 72, Lebbeus Martin. 

71, Peter Smith. 

75, 76, William Owen. 
77, 78, George Greer. 
79—81. Lewis J. Martin. 
82—84, William E. Ross. 
85—87, Horatio N. Kinney. 
88—90, Andrew J. Bale. 
91—93, Jacob Swartwout. 
94—96, William P. Coursen. 

97, Horace E. Rude. 
98, 99, Elvin E. Smith. 

County. 

73, Jabez B. Cooley. 
74, 75, William H. Gill. 
74, 75, Elias B. Pope. 
76—78, John Egan. 

76, 77, Moses F. Gary. 
76, 77, Benjamin A. Vail. 
78-80, George M. Stiles. 

78. Joseph B. Coward. 
79, 80, Philip H. Vernon. 
79—82, John T. Dunn. 
81, 82, George T. Parrott. 
81—83, Frank L. Sheldon. 
83, 84, Edward J. Byrnes. 
83, 84, Asa T. Woodruff. 

84, DeWitt C. Hough. 

85, 86, Peter L. Hughes. 
85—87, William H. Corbin. 

85, Jacob Kirkner. 

86, 87, Wm. Chamberlain. 

87, 88, John J. Aiatthews. 
88—90, Foster M. Voorhees. 
88—90, John Ulrich. 

89, 90, Frederick C. Marsh. 



106 



ASSEMBL YMEN. 



91, 92, John Carroll. 
91—93, George Kyte. 
91—93, Thomas F. Lane. 

93, Timothy M. Kelly. 
94, 95, John N. Burger. 
94. 95, Joseph Cross. 
94, 95, Charles N. Codding, 

AVarren 

45, 46, Robert C. Caskey. 

45, Abram Wildrick. 

45, Stephen "Warne. 
46—48, Jonathan Shotwell. 
46-^8, Amos H. Drake. 
47 — 19, Samuel Mayberry. 
49 — 51, Andrew Ribble. 
49—51, Benjamin Fritts. 
50, 51, 53, John Loller. 
52—54, John Sherrer. 
52—54, David V. C. Crate. 

52, John Cline. 
54—56, George H. Beatty. 
55—57, Archibald Osborn. 
55—57, John White. 
57—59, Isaac Leida. 
58, 59, William Feit. 

58, Abm. S. Van Horn. 
59—61, Robert Rusling. 
60—62, John C. Bennett. 

60, Philip Shoemaker. 
61, 63, David Smith. 
62—64, William W. Strader. 
63—65, Elijah Allen. 
64—66, Charles G. Hoagland. 
65, 66, Silas Young. 
66—68, Andrew J. Fulmer. 
67, 68, John N. Givens. 



97, Henry Clauss. 

97, J. Martin Roll. 

97, William R. Codington. 

99, George A. Squire. 

99, Roger F. Murrav. 

99, Robert G. Houston. 



County. 

67—69, Nelson Vliet. 
69—71, Absalom B. Pursell. 
69—71, Caleb H. Valentine. 
70—72, William Silverthorn. 
72—74, Valentine Mutchler. 
73 — 75, Joseph Anderson. 

75, John M. Wyckoff. 

76, William Carpenter. 
76—78, Elias J. Mackey. 
77—79, Silas W. De Witt. 
79—81, Coursen H. Albertson. 
80—82, William Fritts. 

82, Robert Bond. 
83-85, Stephen C. Larison. 
83—85, Isaac Wildrick. 

86, Thomas L. Titus. 
86. 87, William M. Baird. 
87—89, Samuel B. Mutchler. 
88—91, Eliphalet Hoover. 
90—92, Daniel TV- Hagerty. 
92—94, L. Milton Wilson. 

93, Richard H. Sheppard. 
94, 95, Samuel V. Davis. 

95, George W. Smith. 
96—98, Alfred L. Flummerfelt. 
96—98, T\Hliam K. Bowers. 

99, Hiram D. White. 

99, Jacob B. Smith. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OP COUNOIL AND 

SPEAKERS OP THE HOUSE 

OP ASSEMBLY, 

PBOM 1776 TO 1844, 

WHEN THE NEW CONSTITUTION WAS FORMED. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



John Stevens, Hunterdon. 



17761 
1777 

1778 
1779 
1780 
1781 
1782— John Cox, Burlington. 

H|? I Philemon Dickinson. 
^^^*-' Hunterdon. 

1785"! 

]l^ !► Robert Lettis Hooper, 
J^l^ Hunterdon. 

17891 

HS [ Elishd Lawrence, 

JJ^^J Monmouth. 

1-70^ I Thomas Henderson. 

^'^i Monmouth. 

1795— Elisha Lawrence. 

,«Q-» Monmouth. 

j,lg° 1^ James Linn, Somerset. 

1798) 

1799 vGeo. Anderson, Burlington. 

1800 j 
1801 1 

1803 ( ^°^^ Lambert, Hunterdon. 

1804 I 

1805— Thomas Little, Monmouth. 
1806— Geo. Anderson, Burlington. 
1807— Ebenezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1808— Ebenezer Seelev, 

Cumberland. 
1809— Thomas Ward, Essex. 



Charles Clark, Essex. 



Peter J. Stryker, Somerset. 



18101 
1811 J 
1812— James Schureman, 

Middlesex. 
1813— Charles Clark, Essex. 

1815 1 William Kennedy, Sussex. 

18161 

1817 

1818 1 

1819 y Jesse Upson, Morris. 
1820 
1821 
1822J 
1823" 
1824 
1825 
1826— Ephraim Bateman, 

Cumberland. 
1827— Silas Cook, Morris. 
1828— Charles Newbold. 

Burlington. 

JIIq I Edward Condict, Morris. 

J^JUEliasP.Seeley, 
^^^^i Cumberland. 

1833— Mahlon Dickerson, Morris. 
1834— Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 
1835— Charles Sitgreaves. Warren. 
1836— Jeptha B. Munn, Morris. 

1838 1 -^^d^^w rarsons, Passaic. 

1840 [ J*^^^P^ Porter, Gloucester. 
1842— John Cassedy, Bergen. 
1843— William Chetwood, Essex. 
1844— Jehu Patterson, Monmouth 

(107j 



iOo 



SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE, 



177G) 

Mil wohn Hart, Hunterdon. 

1778J 

Second session 1778— Caleb Camp, 

Essex. 
1779— Caleb Camp. Essex. 
1780— Josiah Hornblower, Essex. 
1781— John Mehelm, Hunterdon. 

JifsJEphraim Harris, 

l'^^> Cumberland. 

1784— Daniel Hendrickson, 

Monmouth. 

1 if 5 1 Benjamin Van Cleve, 
"'*°-> Hunterdon. 

1787— Ephraim Harris. 

Cumberland. 
1788— Benjamin Van Cleve, 

Hunterdon. 
1789— John Beatty, Middlesex. 
1790— Jonathan Dayton, Essex. 
1791— Ebeuezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1792) 

1793 Vsilas Condict, Morris. 
1794) 
1795— Ebenezer Elmer. 

Cumberland. 
1796— James H. Imlay, 

ISIonmomh. 
J.797— Silas Condict, Morris. 
1798) 
1799 > William Coxe, Burlington. 

igoo) 

1801— Silas Dickerson, Sussex. 
1802— William Coxe, Burlington. 
1803— Peter Gordon, Huuterdon. 
1804 ~] 

1806 h J^™6S Co^' ^lonmouth. 

1807 J 

Jonn \ Lewis Condict, Morris. 



SPEAKERS. 

1810 



J|55[ William Kennedy,* Snssex 

1812— William Pearson, 

Burlington. 
1813— Ephraim Bateman, 

Cumberland. 

IgH I Samuel Pennington, Essex. 

1816— Charles Clark. Essex. 
1817— Ebenezer Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
18181 

1819 1 

1820 !- David Thompson. Jr., 

1821 I Morris. 

1822 J 

1823— Lucius Q C.Elmer, 

Cumberland. 
1824— David Johnston, 

Hunterdon. 

Jl^ j- George K. Drake, Morris. 

If-JHwiUiamB. Ewing. 

^^-^i Cumberland. 

1829) 

1830 ^Alexander Wurts. 

1831 ) Hunterdon. 

1832— John P. Jackson, Essex. 

1833) 

1834 y Daniel B. Ryall. 

183 1 ) Monmouth. 

18o6— Thomas G. Haight, 

Monmouth. 

jpg I Lewis Condict, Morris. 

1839— William Stites, Essex. 

JI^JI John Emley, Burlington, 

18^2— Samuel B Halsey, Morris. 

Jff I Joseph Taylor. 

1W4J Cumberland 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



109 



SENATE OFFICERS. 



18451 

1846 1 

1847 I 
1848 

1849 1 

1850 J 
1851- 
1852- 
1853] 
1854 
1855 
1866, 

1857 1 

1858 J 
1859- 
1860- 
1861- 
1862- 
1863- 
1864- 
1865- 
1866- 
1867- 
186S1 



PRESIDENTS. 

John C. Small wood, 

Gloucester, 

Ephraim Marsh, Morris. 

-Silas D. Canfield. Passaic. 
-John Manners, Hunterdon. 

W C. Alexander, Mercer, 



Henry V. Speer, Middlesex. 

-Thomas R. Herring, Bergen. 
-C. L. C. Giflford, Essex. 
-Edmund Perry, Hunterdon. 
-Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 
-Anthony Reckless. Mon'lh 
-Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 
-Edward W Scudder. Mercer 
-James M. Scovel, Camden, 
-Benjamin Buckley, Passaic 

Henry S Little, Monmouth, 



1870— Amos Robbins. Middlesex. 
J|!^2 } Edward Bettle, Camden, 
1873) 

1874 Wohn W, Taylor, Essex, 

1875 j 

1876 -W. J. Sewell, Camden. 
1877— Leon Abbett, Hudson, 
1878— G C. Ludlow, Middlesex. 



1879 



}w. 



J. Sewell, Camden, 



1882 }^-^ Hobart, Passaic, 

1883— J J Gardner, Atlantic. 

1884— B. A. Vail, Union. 

1885— A, V. Schenck, Middlesex, 

1886— John W, Griggs, Passaic 

1^87— Frederick S. Fish, Essex, 

l>-88— Geo. H. Large, Hunterdon, 

1889— George T, Werts. Morris. 

1890— H, M. Nevius, Monmouth, 

1891) 

1892 VRobert Adrain, Middlesex. 

1893) 

1894— Maurice A, Rogers. 

Camden, 
1895— Edward C. Stokes, 

Cumberland, 

(Lewis A, Thompson, 
•1896-^ Somerset, 

I Robert Williams, Passaic. 
1897— Robert Williams, Passaic. 
1898 — Foster M Voorhees, Union. 
" —William H, Skirm (/ro tent.'). 



SECRETARIES. 
1845) 

1816 ^Daniel Dodd Jr , Essex. 
1847 i 
1848) 

1849 ^Philip J. Gray, Camden. 
1850) 
1851— John Rogers, Burlington. 

}^^3 1 Samuel A. Allen, Salem. 
1854— A, R, Throckmorton, 
locc, Hudson. 

^^^5 I A, R, Throckmorton 
^^^^^ Monmouth. 

18571 A, B. Chamberlain. 

1858 j Hunterdon 

1859 I John C, Rafferty. 

1860 1 Hunterdon. 

1861— Jos. J. Sleeper Burlington 
1862 ) Morris R. Hamilton 
1«6^ i Camden 

J^^* [ John H, Meeker, Essex, 
}^^^ I Enoch R, Borden, Mercer, 

1869 1 J^s^P*^ 2- Cornish, Warren. 
1870— John C. Rafferty. 

Hunterdon. 
1871) 

1872 ' John F, Babcock, 
1873 1 Middlesex. 

1874 J 
1875 
1876 

1878 [ ^' ^^' Js^^ison, Somerset, 

1879— N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 

1880) 

1881 VGeo. Wurts, Passaic. 

1882 ) 

1883) 

1884 VW. A, Stiles, Sussex, 

1885 j 

}|e§l Richard B, Reading, 
Jl^j Hunterdon, 

1889— John Carpenter, Jr„ 

Hunterdon, 
1890— Wilbur A, Mott, Essex. 
1891) John Carpenter, Jr.. 
1892/ Hunterdon. 

1893— Samuel C. Thompson, 

Warren, 
1894— Wilbur A, Mott, Essex 
189)) 

1896 > Henry B, Rollinson, Union. 
1897) 
1898— George A, Frey, Camden. 



N, W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 



no 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 



HOUSE OFFICERS. 



SPEAKERS. 

1845 — Isaac Van Wagenen, Essex. 
1846 — Lewis Howell, Cumberland. 

1848 1 J°^" ^^- ^- ^^'^"^' Burlington. 
1849— Edw. W. Whelpley, Morris. 
1850 — John T. Nixon, Cumberland. 
1851— John H. Phillips, Mercer. 
1852 — John Huyler, Bergen. 
1853) John W. Fennimore, 
1854/ Burlington. 

1855— William Parr>', Burlington. 
1856 — Thos. W. Demarest, Bergen. 
1857— Andrew Dutcher, Mercer. 
1858 — Daniel Holsman, Bergen. 
1859— Edwin Salter, Ocean. 
1360 — Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 
1861— F. H. Teese, Essex. 
1862— Charles Haight, Monmouth. " 
1863— James T. Cr well, Middlesex. 
1864— Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic. 
1865— Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 
1866— John Hill, Morris. 
1857 — G. W. N. Curtis, Camden. 
1868— Aug. O. Evans, Hudson. 
J^^gj Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1871— Albert P. Condit, Essex. 
1872— Nathaniel Niles, Morris. 
1873— Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex. 
1874— Garret A. Hobart, Passaic. 
1875— George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer. 
1876— John D. Carscallen, Hudson. 
1877 — Rudolph F Rabe, Hudson. 
1878— John Egan, Union. 
1879— Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex. 
1880— Sherman B. Oviatt, Monm. 
1881— Harrison Van Duyne, Essex. 
1882— John T. Dunn, Union. 
1883— Thomas O'Connor, Essex. 
1884- A. B. Stoney, Monmouth. 

loo^^E. A. Armstrong, Camden. 
looD J 

1887— William M. Baird, NN arren. 
18S8— Sam'l D. Dickinson, Hudson. 
1889— Robert S. Hudspeth, Hudson. 
1890— W.C Heppenheimer,Hudson. 
}^^J| James J. Bergen, Somerset. 

1S93— Thomas Flynn, Passaic. 
John 1. Holt,* Passaic, 
loseph Cross,* Union. 
1895— Joseph Cross, Union. 
1896_Louis T. Derousse, Camden. 
1897_Geo. W. Macpherson, Mercer. 
1898_David O. Wattsins, Gloucester. 



iS91 



CLERKS. 



-Alexander D. Cattell, Salem. 
-Adam C. Davis, Hunterdon. 

Alex. M. Gumming, Mercer. 



1845- 
1846- 
1847' 
1848 
1849 
1850 J 

1852 [ ^^^'^^ ^3i3.r, Essex. 

J^^J I David W. Dellicker, Somerset 

1855— Peter D. Vroom, Hudson. 

j^p I William Darmon, Gloucester. 

1858— Daniel Elauvelt, Essex. 
18.59— John P. Harker, Camden. 
1860— D. Blauvelt, Jr., Essex. 

J^^U J^cob Sharp, Warren. 
]lf', I Levi Scobv, Monmouth. 



1864 J 
1865 



George B. Cooper, Cumberl'd. 



1867 — Ed. Jardine, Bergen. 

1868) 

1809 ^A. ]\L Johnston, Mercer. 

1870 j 

1871 — A. M. Gumming, Mercer. 

1872) 

187tJ VSinnickson Chew, Camden. 

1874) 

1875 — Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 

1876 



1877 



John V. Foster, Essex. 



1878— Austin H. Patterson, Monm. 

1879) 

188i» >C. O. Cooper, Morris. 

1881 ) 

J^^^ I Arthur Wilson, Monmouth. 

1884— Henry D. Winton, Bergen. 

1^^^ \ Samuel Toombs, Essex. 

1887 — Joseph Atkinson, Essex. 
18^8— James P. Logan, Burlington. 

J^^n John J. Matthews, Union. 

I8q2 [ ^^°^" ^" ^'0°°^"' J*" ' f^"<3sor. 
1893— Leonard Kalisch, Essex. 
1J591— J. Herbert Polls, Hudson. 
1895) 

1896 yjames Parker, Passaic. 

1897 j 

1898— Thomas H. Jones, Essex. 



* Speaker Holt resigned on May 26th, and Mr. Cross succeeded him. 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1844. 



List of Delegates elected to the Convention to form a gov- 
ernment for the people of the State of New Jersey, which met 
at Trenton, on May l-lth, 1844, and continued to June 29th of 
tlie same year. The constitution was agreed to in convention 
by a vote of 55 to 1 (Mr. Condit), Mr. Stokes being excused 
from voting. It was ratified by the people on August 13th, 
1844, by a vote of 20,276 for, and 3,526 against, 69 ballots be- 
ing rejected. The figures indicate the ages of the respective 
members. The compiler of this work is indebted to Hon. G. 
D. W. Vroom, of Trenton, for the important data given. 

Atla-NTIC County. — Jonathan Pitney, 46, physician. 

Bergen County. — John Cassedy, 47, gentleman ; Alexan- 
der Westervelt, 50, gentleman. 

Bl^rlington County. — William K. Allen, 42, farmer ; Jon- 
athan J. Spencer, 51, physician; Charles Stokes, 52, farmer; 
John C. Ten Eyck, 30, lawyer; Moses Wills, 51, merchant. 

Camden County. — Abraham Browning, 35, lawyer; John 
W. Mickle, 50, mariner. 

Cape May County. — Joshua Swain, 66, farmer. 

Cumberland County. — Joshua Brick, 62, farmer ; Daniel 
Elmer, 59, lawyer; William B. Ewing, 68, physician. 

Essex County. — Silas Condit, Q6, gentleman; Oliver S. 
Ilalsted, 51, lawyer; Joseph C. Hornblower, 67, lawyer; 
David Naar, 43, farmer; William Stites, 52, merchant; Elias 
Van Arsdale, 73, lawyer; Isaac H. Williamson, 71, lawyer. 

Gloucester County. — John E. Sickler, 43, physician; 
Charles C. Stratton, 48, farmer. 

Hudson County. — Kobert Gilchrist, 52, county clerk. 

Hunterdon CouNTY.^Peter I. Clark, 53, lawyer ; David 
Neighbour, 46, merchant ; Jonathan Pickle, 45, farmer ; Alex- 
ander Wurts, 48, lawyer. 

Mercer County. — Richard S. Field, 39, lawyer; Henry 
W. Green, 39, lawyer; John R. Thomson, 43, gentleman. 

Middlesex County.— Moses Jaques, 73, farmer; James 
Parker, 68, farmer; Joseph F. Randolph, 40, lawyer; James 
C. Zabriskie, 40, tailor. 

Monmouth County.— Bernard Connolly, 40, printer ; Geo. 
F. Fort, 35, physician; Thomas G. Haight, 49, farmer; Dan- 
iel Holmes, 50, farmer ; Robert Laird, 32, physician. 

(Ill) 



112 CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, 

Morris County. — Francis Child, 51, farmer ; Mahlon Dick- 
erson, 73, lawyer; Ephraim Marsh, 48, farmer; William N. 
Wood, 88, lawyer. 

Passaic County. — Elias B. D. Ogden, 44, lawyer ; Andrew 
Parsons, 53, merchant. 

Salem County, — Alexander G. Cattell, 28, merchant ; John 
H. Lambert, 45, merchant ; Eichard P. Thompson, 39, attor- 
ney-general. 

Somerset County.— George H. Brown, 34, lawyer; Fer- 
dinand S. Schenck, 54, physician ; Peter D. Vroom, 52, lawyer. 

Sussex County.— John Bell, 58, merchant; Joseph E. Ed- 
sall, 54, manufacturer ; Martin Ryerson, 29, lawyer. 

Warren County. — Samuel JBQbbler, 44, painter; P. B. 
Kennedy, 42, lawyer; R. S. Kennedy, 41, farmer. 

Presidents of the Convention— ls?inc H. Williamson, Essex 
(resigned June 28th, 1844) ; Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

9'ice President — Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

Secretary — William Paterson, 27, lawyer, Middlesex. 

Assistaiit Secretary — Th. S. Saunders, 35, physician, Glou- 
cester. 

Recapitulation. — Lawyers, 20; farmers, 14; physicians, 
7 ; merchants, 7 ; other professions, 10 ; ex-Governors, 3 ; ex- 
Members of Congress, 7. Four between 70 and 80 years of 
age ; six between 60 and 70 ; seventeen between 50 and 60 ; 
twentv between 40 and 50 ; nine between 30 and 40 ; two un- 
der 30. 

The only i^urvivors on January 1st, 1894, were Robert 
Laird, and William Paterson, who was Secretary, and .John 
B. Faussett, of Trenton, who was page of the Convention. 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 

OF 1873. 



On April 4tli, 1873, the Legislature passed a concurrent 
resolution empowering the Governor to appoint, by and with 
the advice of the Senate, a commission of two persons from 
each Congressional District, to suggest and propose amendments 
to the State Constitution for submission to and consideration by 
the next two Legislatures, and afterwards to be submitted to a 
vote of the people. 

On April 24tli, of the same year. Governor Parker nominated 
the following gentlemen, who were duly confirmed by the 
Senate : 

First District — Benjamin F. Carter, Woodbury ; Samuel H. 
Grey, Camden. Second District — Mercer Beasley, Trenton ; 
John C. Ten Eyck, Mount Holly. Third District— Kobert S. 
Green, Elizabeth ; John F. Babcock, Kew Brunswick. Fourth 
District — Martin Ryerson and Jacob L. Swayze, both of New- 
ton. Fifth District — Augustus W. Cutler, Morristown ; Benja- 
min Buckley, Paterson. Sixth District — Theodore Punyon 
and John VV. Taylor, both of Newark. Seventh District — 
Abraham O. Zabriskie and Eobert Gilchrist, both of Jersey 
City. 

Shortly afterwards Chief Justice Mercer Beasley declined to 
serve, and Philemon Dickinson, of Trenton, -was appointed in 
his stead. Martin Eyerson resigned and Joseph Thompson, 
of Somerset, was appointed to fill the vacancy. Chancellor 
Theodore Punyon also declined and George J. Ferry, of 
Orange, was appointed in his stead. Ex-Chancellor Zabriskie 
was unanimously elected president of the Commission, and 
upon his decease, which occurred in a short time afterwards, 
Dudley S. Gregory, of Jersey City, was appointed to fill the 
vacancy in the Seventh District. John C. Ten Eyck was 
elected president, vice Zabriskie, deceased. The secretaries 
were Joseph L. Naar and Edward J. Anderson, both of Tren- 
ton. Subsequently Robert Gilchrist resigned and William 
BrinkerhofF, of Jersey City, was appointed in his place. John 
W. Taylor also resigned and Algernon S. Hubbell, of Newark, 
was appointed in his place. 

The first session of the Commission was held on May 8th, 
1873, and the last on December 23d, of the same year. The 
amendments submitted were partially adopted by the two 
succeeding Legislatures, and were ratified by a vote of the 
people at a special election held on September 7th, 1875. 

(113) 



114 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1891 
CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION OF 1894. 



In pursuance of a Joint Resolution of the Legislature, 
ap[»ioved on May 17th, 1894, 'for the appointment of Com- 
missioners to report amendments of the system of jurispru- 
dence of this State, and provide fur the election of certain 
officers by the people," (Governor Werts sent the following 
nominations to the Senate, all of which were coitfirmed: 

At Large— John P. Stockton, Tjentcn; Allan L. Mc- 
Dermott, Jersey City ; Samuel H. Grey, Camden ; and William 
Walter Phelps, Engiewood. 

First District— George Hires, Salem; Howard Carrow, 
Camden, Second District — William M. Lanning, Trenton; 
Edward D. Stokes, Mount Holly. Third District — Heniy 
Mitchell, Asbuiy Park; George C. Ludlow, New Brunswick. 
Fourth District John Franklin Foit, East Orange; Carman 
F. Randolph, Morristown. Fifth District — Garret A. Hobart, 
Paterson ; John D. Probst, Engiewood. Sixth District — 
Edward Balbach, Jr , and Frederick Frelinghuy.'-en, Newark. 
Seventh District — Edwin A. Stevens, Hobuken ; Joseph D. 
Bedle, Jersey City. Eighth District- John Kean, Jr., Eliza- 
beth ; John McG. Morrow, Newark. 

Me.'^srs. Hobart and Balbach declined to serve on the Com- 
mission, and their places were filled by the appointment of 
Eugene Emley, of Paterson, and E Cortlandt Drake, of 
Newark. 

On Tuesday, June 5tli, the Commiss-ion met in the Senate 
Chamber, at Trenton, and organized by the election of Samuel 
H Grey as President; George C. Ludlow, Vice President, 
I nd Joseph L Naar, of Trenton, Secretary. The last session 
of the Commisi-iin was held on September 25th. Several 
amendments were suggested by the Commission and sub- 
mitted, through the Governor, to the Legislature, none of 
which were adopted by that body. 



CLASSIFICATION OF COU^'TlES, 
CITIES AND BOROUGHS. 



COUNTIES. 
(See Act of February 7th, 1883.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 150,000. 
Hudson, 328,080 ; Essex, 312,000. 

Second C/ass— Having a ])opulation between 50,000 and 
150,000. Passaic, 1:^3,^27 ; Camden, 100,101 ; Mercer. 8',5;-;8 ; 
Union, 85,504 ; Monmouth, 75,543, • Middlesex, 70,058; Ber- 
gen, 65,251 ; Morris, 59,536 ; Burlington, 69,1 17. 

Third C/as.s- Having a prpnlation between 20,0f0 and 
50,000. Cumberland, 49,815; Warren, 37,283; Hunterdon, 
35,334; Atlantic, 34,750; Gloucester, 31,191; Somerset, 
30,447; Salem, 26,084; Sussex, 22,586. 

Ftmrth C^oss— Ocean, 18,739 ; Cape May, 12,855. 

CITIES. 

(See Act of March 4th, 1882.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 100,000. 
Newark, 215,806; Jersey City, 182,713. 

Second Class — Having a population between 12,000 and 
100,0( 0. Paterson, 97.344 ; Camden, 63,467 ; Trenton, 62,518 ; 
Hoboken, 54,083; Elizabeth, 43,^31; Orange, 22,792; New 
Brunswick, 19,910; Bayonne, 19,856; Passaic, 17,894; Plain- 
field, 13,629; Bridgeton, 13,292; Perth Amboy, 13,030. 

Third Class — All cities not embraced in the first and second 
classes, except cities lying on the Atlantic ocean, and having 
seaside or summer resorts. 

Fourth Class— AW cities lying on the Atlantic ocean and 
being seaside and summer resorts. 

BOROUG-HS. 

(See Act of March 23d, 1883, and Supreme Court decision, State, Bor- 
ough of Hightstown, pros., vs. James Glenn, 18 Vr., page 105 ) 

First Cicws— Having a population exceeding S-jOOO. 

Second Class — Having a population between 1,500 and 
3,000. 

Third Class — All boroughs and incorporated villages not 
contained in the first and second classes, 

(115) 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



THE STATE OAPlTOL. 



This edifice, a massive structure, erected at sundry- 
times and various periods, is located on West State street, 
at the corner of Delaware street, running thence westerly 
along State street to the grounds of the late ex-Chancellor 
Green, and southerly to the Water Power. The location 
is a good one, and although the style of the building is 
not modern, yet it answers the purposes for which it was 
intended, even if it does not present a very imposing 
appearance. 

The seat of Government was fixed at Trenton by an 
act of the Legislature, approved November 25th, 1790. 
James Cooper, Thomas Lowery, James Ewing, Maskeli 
Ewing, George Anderson, James Mott and Moore Fur- 
man were appointed commissioners to select, purchase or 
accept so much land as was needed, and to erect thereon 
suitable buildings for the use of the Legislature. They 
purchased the present site, containing about three and 
three-quarters acres— a frontage on Second street (now 
West State street) of 247 feet and 6 inches, and a depth 
from the front to low water line of the Delaware river of 
666 feet — at a cost of £250 53. The old State House was a 
plain, bare-looking, rough-cast building, and was erected 
at a cost of £3,992 3s. ^d. By an act of March 4th, 1795, 
a building; was erected to serve as an office for the Secre- 
tary of State, and for the preservation of the public 
records, at a cost of £620 193. lOd. Numerous improve- 
ments and repairs were made, and on March 3d, 1806, an 
act was passed appointing commissioners to make certain 
repairs to the State House, to provide and hang a suitable 
bell, &c. This was done, and the bell was used for inform- 
ing the members of both houses, as well as the courts, 
of the hour of meeting. The bell was eventually dis- 
carded, and an American flag substituted, which waves 
from the building unto this day, when the Legislature 
is in session, and upon holidays and State occasions. In 
1848, the State House was altered by the removal of the 
(116) 



THE STATE CAPITOL 117 

rough-casting, and changing the front to the style of the 
Mercer County Court House, placing neat porticoes over 
the front and rear entrances, and erecting two additional 
buildings adjoining the main one, as otfices for the Clerks 
of the Chancery and Supremo Courts. The rotunda was 
ilso erected, and the grounds fenced, graded, laid out 
and shade trees planted, all at a cost of $27,000. The 
commissioners under whose directions the work was 
completed, were Samuel K. Gummere, Samuel R. Hamil- 
ton and Stacy A. Paxson. In 1863, '64 and ^Qb, appro- 
priations were made and expended in building additions 
for the State Library, Executive Chambers, &c. In 1871, 
Uharles S. Olden, Thomas J, Stryker and Lewis Perrine 
were appointed commissioners to cause a suitable addi- 
tion to be built — more commodious apartments for the 
Senate and Assembly, &c. The sum of $50,000 was appro- 
priated, and the buildings for the Legislature were ready 
for occupancy in time for the meeting of the Legislature 
of 1872. In 1872, $120,000 was appropriated for complet- 
ing the building, $3,000 for fitting up the Executive 
Chamber, $4,000 for fitting up the Chancery and Supreme 
Court rooms, and $2,000 for fitting up the offices on the 
first floor of the east wing. In 1873, the sum of $43,000 
was appropriated for the improvement of the front of 
the building, completing unfinished repairs and improve- 
ments, and for fitting up the Library, &c. On March 
18th, 1875, the sum of $15,000 was appropriated for the 
purpose of putting a new three-story front to the build- 
ing, and to fit up offices on the second floor for the Clerks 
of the Court of Chancery and Supreme Court, and for 
providing a suitable museum for geological specimens, 
and the battle-flags of New Jersey volunteer regiments, 
carried during the war of the Rebellion. 

On March 21st, 1885, the front portion was destroyed 
by fire, and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for re- 
building, and, in 1886, an additional appropriation of 
$225,000 was granted. 

The new bailding was finished in 1889. It is of rect- 
angular shape and of the Renaissance style of architec- 
ture, with a frontage of one hundred and sixty feet on 
State street, a depth of sixty- seven feet, and three and a 
half stories high, with a rotunda thirty-nine feet across, 
which connects the new section of the Capitol with the 
original part. The rotunda is surmounted by a dome 
one hundred and forty-five feet high. 



118 THE STATE CAPITOL. 

The building has about sixty feet more frontage than 
the former one, and approaches about ten feet nearer 
the street. 

The walls are constructed of solid, fire-proof, brick 
masonry, faced with a light-colored stone from ludiaoa, 
known as Salem Oolitic, with foundations andtrimmmgs 
of New Jersey freestoiie, from the Pjallsville quarries, in 
Hunterdon county. The portico, door-head and trim- 
mings about the door are of the same material. The 
portico, with balcony, is supported by massive pillars of 
polished granite and surmounted by the coat of arms of 
the State. 

The apartments used for offices are very spacious, fitted 
throughout in the most approved modern style, and each 
department is supplied with one or more of the finest 
fire-proof vaults. The first and second stories are set 
aside for offices, and the entire third story is used for the 
State Libiary. 

The old State Library apartments haT<3 been improved 
and extended, and are now used as offices for the Attor- 
ney-General, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
and Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. A new 
story was added, which is used for the Geological Museum 
and State offices. 

In 1891, a new Assembly Chamber was erected. The 
old one was too small and poorly ventilated, and besides, 
there was a lack of suitable committee rooms. The 
Legislature of 1891 passed a Joint Resolution, which 
was approved on March 20th, authorizing the Governor 
" to provide a suitable chamber and committee rooms for 
the use of the General Assembly of this State," &c., and 
also, " to make such additions and alterations as will 
aff'ord the necessary accommodations for the Supreme 
Court and Court of Errors and Appeals, or for other State 
offices, and sufficient money is hereby appropriated for 
that purpose, to be paid by the Treasurer of this State on 
the warrant of the Comptroller, after approval by the 
Governor." 

The new chamber was built by James W. Lanning, of 
Trenton, from plans prepared by James Moylan, of Jer- 
sey City, and under the superintendency of Bernard J. 
Ford, of Newark. It covers the site of the former cham- 
ber, and extends beyond it to Delaware street on the 
east and to the water pc wer on the south. It has a front- 
age on Delaware street of 120 feet and a depth of 75 feet. 
The exterior finish and design of the bnilding are similar 
to the adjoining portion of the Capitol. The foundation 



THE ST A TE LIBRA RY. 119 

is of brown stone, from the Stockton quarries, and the 
trimmings of light Indiana stone. The interior is fin- 
ished in Trenton tile, quartered oak and Italian statuary 
marble. It is a fire-proof building throughout, and is speci- 
ally ventilated. The committee rooms are ample and 
convenient, and the interior design, arrangement and 
finish make it a model legislative chamber. It cost the 
State $140,500. The cost of the steam heating and venti- 
lating systems was about $25,000. 

The other new addition to the Capitol provides a con- 
sultation room for the Judges of the Supreme Court and 
the Court of Errors and Appeals and a private room for 
the Governor, a room for the Museum of the Geological 
Survey, and other offices, and cost $34,500. 

An electric light apparatus was also placed in the 
Capitol, which cost $23,000. Every department in the 
building is now lighted by electricity. 

A new Otis elevator has been placed in the front part 
of the building, which gives easy access to all the upper 
floors. 



THE STATE LIBRARY, 



This ivaluable collection of books is located on the 
third floor of the State Capitol. The old saying, " Great 
oaks from little acorns grow," most appropriately applies 
to this institution. 

The first library of the State was a case ordered to be 
procured by Maskell Ewing, Clerk of the House of 
Assembly, for the keeping and preservation of such 
books as belonged to the Legislature. It was ordered 
by a resolution passed March 18th, 1796. This was the 
nucleus of the present extensive library. On February 
18th, 1804, William Coxe, of Burlington; Ezra Darby, 
of Essex, and John A. Scudder, of Monmouth, were 
appointed a Committee on Rules, and to make a cata- 
logue; they reported that there were 168 volumes 
belonging to the State, and presented a code of seven 
rules, which was adopted. On February 10th, 1813, an 
act (the first one) was passed, entitled "An act concern- 
ing the State Library." Up to 1822 it appears that the 
Clerk of the House had charge of the books, as Librar- 
ian, and, on November 16th, 1822, an act was passed for 



120 THE STATE ARSENAL. 

the appointment of a State Librarian, annually, by joint 
meeting. In 1846, on April 10th, an act was passed 
making the term of office three years. The Law Library 
at that time belonged to the members of the Law Library 
Association. The only persons allowed the use of the 
Library were members of the Association, the Chan- 
cellor, and the judges of the several courts. Stacy G. 
Potts was Treasurer and Librarian of the Association. 
The Law Library was kept in the Supreme Court room 
until 1837, when the Legislature authorized the State 
Librarian to fit up a room adjoining the Library for the 
care and reception of the books and papers belonging to 
the State Library. Thus the two Libraries were consoli- 
dated. On March 13th, 1872, $5,000 per year for three 
years was appropriated for the Library by the Legisla- 
ture, and by the act of March 15thf 1876, the sum of 
$2,500 was appropriated for finishing and refurnishing 
the Library room. In 1890, the Library was removed to 
the third story of the new part of the Capitol. 



THE STATE ARSENAL.. 



The building now used as the State Arsenal was for- 
merly the old State Prison. It is situate on Second 
street, in the Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton, and 
has on its front the following inscription : 

Labor, Silence, Penitence. 

The Penitentiaey House, 

Erected by Legislative Authority. 

Richard Howell, Governor. 

In the XXII. YEAR of American Independence, 

mdccxcvii. 

That those who are Feared for their Crimes, 

May learn to fear the laws and be Useful. 

Hic Labor, Hoc Opus. 

In the messages of Governors P. D. Vroom and S. L. 
Southard, recommending the erection of the new prison, it 



N. J. STA TE HOSPITALS. 121 

was proposed that the old one be converted into an 
Arsenal for the safe keeping of the arms and military 
property of the State, which, previous to that time, had 
been kept in the old State B^k, corner of Warren and 
Bank streets, with accoutrements and camp and garrison 
equipage at the State House. After the removal of the 
State convicts from the old prison, permission was given 
to the county of Mercer to occupy it as a jail until its 
jail, then in course of completion, was finished, and 
when it was again vacated it was converted into an 
arsenal 

Among the stores, &c., at the Arsenal are one bronze 
gun, French, of the date of 1758; two bronze guns, 
English, four-pounders, and two iron six-pounders. 
There is also one gun captured at the battle of Trenton, 
December 26th, 1776, and two guns captured at York- 
town, October 19th, 1781. There are also a large quantity 
of fire-arms, ammunition, ordnance, tents, clothing, 
blankets. &c. 



NEW JERSEY STATE HOSPITAL. 

TRENTON. 

This institution is located in Ewing township, in 
Mercer county, about two miles northwest of Trenton, 
on the right bank of the Delaware river. The buildings 
are constructed of reddish sandstone, obtained from 
quarries near the hospital, and are located on an elevation 
of about seventy-five feet above the river. The front of 
the Main or Administration Building is ornamented by a 
handsome porch of Ionic architecture, designed by the 
celebrated Notman, from which may be obtained one of 
the finest landscape views in the State. 

In 1844, after repeated and unsuccessful attempts to 
cause action to be taken by the Legislature for the build- 
ing of a State instution for the special care and treatment 
of the insane, a commission was appointed, chiefly 
through the earnest efforts of Dr. Lyndon A. Smith, of 
Essex, and Dr. Lewis Condict, of Morris, and the emi- 
nent philanthropist, Miss D. L. Dix, to select a site. An 
appropriation of $35,000 was made to purchase the land, 
and to commence the erection of the building. The 
present site was selected by the commissioners from 
among many that were offered in various sections of the 



122 N.J. STATE HOSPITALS. 

State because of the large spring of excellent water 
found on the place. This spring was developed, and fur- 
nished a daily supply of about one-half millions of gal- 
lons of pure water for many years. In the severe 
drought of 1880 the supply was greatly diminished, fall- 
ing off nearly two hundred and fifty thousand gallons, 
and it has never regained its full and former capacity. 
The spring is now supplemented by driven wells, three 
in number, and each one over three hundred feet deep. 
These with the spring, are capable of supplying daily 
a half million gallons of excellent water. In 1896 a 
standpipe for storing water and securing a fire pressure 
was erected, with a capacity of five hundred thousand 
gallons. 

Work was commenced on the main building in Novem- 
ber of 1845, and the hospital was opened for the reception 
of patients on the 15th day of May, 1848. Numerous 
additions have been made from time to time to the build- 
ing, increasing its capacity from fifty patients, in 1848, to 
eight hundred and fifty patients, in 1898. 

In 1887, the Legislature passed an act appropriating 
$100,000 for providing additional accommodations. The 
new building is a handsome structure of red sandstone, 
and similar to that used in the main building. This is 
five hundred feet long, three stories in height, and 
capable of accommodating three hundred patients, one 
hundred and fifty of each sex. The building is designed 
to accommodate the chronic incurable class, and was a 
great relief from the overcrowded state that existed in 
the main building prior to its completion. The build- 
ing was completed within the appropriation, and opened 
for the reception of patients in the month of October, 
1889. 

Since the opening of the institution in May, 1848, there 
have been received and treated 9,328 patients. 4,693 men 
and 4,635 women. At the close of the fiscal year, 
October 31st, 1898, there were under care in the hospital 
1,119 patients, 555 men and 564 women. Much has 
been done for the comfort and pleasure of the patients. 
A green-house has been erected for the purpose of 
furnishing plants and flowers for the patients' corridors, 
handsome pictures adorn the walls, and everything about 
the hospital presents a comfortable and homelike appear- 
ance. 

The institution possesses a library, one of the largest, 
if not the largest, in this country connected with a 
hospital for the insane. The books are accessible to all 



N. J, STATE HOSPITALS. 123 

members of the household. They have been freely used, 
and do much to relieve the monotony of many an hour 
of hospital life. The library now consists of about 4,000 
volumes, and is the result of the bequest of a former 
nurse (Anne Robinson), who, by will, bequeathed her 
earnings for several years as a nurse and attendant in 
this hospital. She made the bequest, as she herself 
expressed it when making her will, for the purpose of 
purchasing books to be used for the pleasure and benefit 
of those to whom she had, for so many years, endeavored 
to minister. 

During the year 1898, a handsome amusement room, 
capable of seating about four hundred, was finished ; 
also, a large and commodious chapel, in which religious 
exercises are held from time to time ; various clergymen, 
without regard to denominational preference, officiate 
every Sunday. The new chapel is capable of seating 
about five hundred patients. 



NEW JERSEY STATE HOSPITAL. 

MORRIS PLAINS. 

In order to relieve the crowded condition of the Trenton 
Asylum, and make further provision for the increasing 
number of the insane, commissioners were appointed by 
the Legislature of 1871 to select a site and build an insti- 
tution in the northern portion of the State. About ^08 
acres of land were purchased, at a cost of |>78,732.36, in 
Hanover township, Morris county, and a site for the insti- 
tution was selected on the foot hills of the Watnoag range 
of the Blue Ridge Mountains, at an elevation of 520 feet 
above the sea level. The location is ideal for an institu- 
tion of its kind, being unsurpassed in this particular by 
any similar institution in this country. A magnificent 
view of the surrounding country is commanded. The 
air is cool and balmy in summer, and crisp and stimulat- 
ing in winter. 

The institution is a four-story building, of granite 
quarried on the premises, and trimmed with brown 
sandstone. The total length is 1,243 feet, and the 
depth, from the front of the main center building to the 
rear of the extreme wings, is 542 feet, constituting at 
present the largest institution for the insane under one 
roof in the world, and one of the finest buildings of its 
kind in the United States. 



124 NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

The building was planned and constructed to accom- 
modate 800 patients, but at present has a population 
of more than 1,250 insane. The total cost was about 
$2,250,000. It was first occupied by patients on August 
17th, 1876. 

The Legislature of 1895 appropriated $125,000 for addi- 
tional buildings and improvements. The foundation of 
the new building was laid to accommodate 600 patients, 
and provide suitable laboratory facilities for the further 
prosecution of scientific work. An appropriation was 
also made for the extension of the water-supply, and an 
additional tract of land was purchased, bringing the total 
extent of the hospital's property up to about 720 acres. 
On a portion of this land an additional reservoir, with a 
capacity of 6,500,0U0 gallons, has since been built. The 
Legislature of 1898 appropriated $150,000, enabling the 
management to give out contracts looking to the com- 
pletion of the administration portion of the building, the 
north wing, associate dining-rooms, amusement hall, and 
pathological laboratories. 

The barns and outbuildings belonging to the institution 
are in excellent condition, and the farm is in a high state 
of cultivation. 



THE NEW JERSEY STATE NORMAL AND 
MODEL SCHOOLS. 



These schools are the property of the State, and are 
located at the junction of Perry street and Clinton avenue, 
Trenton. There are two buildings, the one for the schools 
located on the west side of Clinton avenue, the other, 
containing the boarding halls and dormitories, situated 
on the east side of the avenue. These schools were 
established in 1855 by an act of the Legislature. The 
purpose of the Normal School was defined to be "the 
training and education of its pupils in such branches of 
knowledge, and such methods of teaching and governing, 
as will qualify them for teachers of our common schools." 
The Model School was designed to be a place where " the 
pupils of the Normal School shall have opportunity to 
observe and practice the modes of instruction and disci- 
pline inculcated in the Normal School, and in which 
pupils may be prepared for the Normal School." 

The following figures show the original cost and present 
valuation of the Normal School property : 



IJSDUiSTRlAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 125 

Original cost of the Normal and Model School buildings, with 

lot $72,0C0 

Estimated value of furniture, books, &c 8,000 

Value of boarding halls 65,000 

Value of boarding hall furniture 10,000 

8155,000 

The above original values have appreciated till the tables 
should now read as follows : 

Former Normal and Model buildings $60,000 

Former school furniture, apparatus, &c 8,000 

Lot 115,000 

Appropriation of 1890 for new building 40,000 

Appropriation of 1891 for alterations, furniture, &c 8,000 

Principal's residence and boarding halls, including addi- 
tion of 1892 99,000 

Boarding hall furniture 15,000 

Appropriation of 1893 for new building 12,000 

Appropriation of 1891 10,000 

Additional furniture and apparatus 13.000 

Appropriation of 1897 for heating and ventilation 25,000 

Total $105,000 

The enrollments in 1855 were as follows : Normal School, 
43; Model School, 125. For the year ending June 30th, 
1897, these enrollments had increased to 656 in the Normal 
and 562 in the Model. During its history the Normal School 
has graduated 2,075 students. 

The Principals of the schools have been as follows: Wil- 
liam F. Phelps, A.M., October 1st, 1855, to March 15th, 1865 ; 
John S. Hart, LL.D., March loth, 1865, to February 7th, 
1871 ; Lewis M. John&on, A.M., February 7th, 1871, to July 
1st, 1876; Washington Hasbrouck, Ph.D., Julv 1st, 1876, to 
February 10th, 1889 ; James M. Green, Ph.D., February 10th, 
1889, to the present. 

♦ 

STATE REFORM SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 



This institution is situate at Jamesburg, Middlesex county, 
and was authorized by an act of the Legislature, passed April 
6lh, 1865. Juvenile criminals between the ages of eight and 
sixteen years are here cared for, and every influence tending 
to their reformation is brought to bear upon them. Numerous 
additions have been made to the original building, to which is 
attached a farm of 490 acres. The first pupils were received 
July 6th, 1867. 

STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 



This institution is located on the line of the Trenton Branch 
of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, in Ewing town- 
ship, near the Trenton Lunatic Asylum, and is located on a 



126 THE STATE PRISON. 

farm of about 79 acres of land. A substantial building was 
erected, at a cost of $23,334, and other improvements made, 
(vhich bring the value of the place, ■with furniture, &c., up to 
i$37,740. Previous to the erection of the new building, the 
school was at " Pine Grove," in the Sixth Ward of the city 
of Trenton. This place had been leased so as to afford room 
for persons sentenced under the act of April 4th, 1871. 



THE STATE PRISON. 



The New Jersey State Prison, situated on the block enclosed 
by Federal, Third, Cass and Second streets, in the city of 
Trenton, is one of the finest institutions of its kind in the 
country. Its erection was autliorized by an act of the Legis- 
lature passed February 13th, 1832, and it was completed in 
the year 1836, having 150 cells, at a cost of $179,657.11. It 
was built of red sand-stone, from the Ewing quarries, an 1 the 
style of its architecture is Egyptian, having four Egyptian 
columns in front of the main entrance, on Third street. It 
consists of a main building, used as a residence for the Keeper 
and as reception rooms and offices. From time to time the 
prison has been enlarged, and although there is not sufficient 
room to affi)rd separate confinement for each prisoner, as re- 
quired by law, the provisions of the act are carried out as far 
as possible. The rules and regulations now in force have 
brought the internal affairs of the institution, as to cleanliness, 
discipline, victualing, &c., to a much higher standard than 
was ever before reached, and a visit thereto will convince the 
visitor that the manaoement is as perfect as can be. 

On March 4th, 1847, $5,000 was appropriated to build an 
additional wing to the original building. On March 25th, 
1852, $15,000 was granted for the erection of a new wing for 
hospital purposes. On March 22d, 1860, the sum of $17,000 
was voted for the purpose of building an additional wing for 
cells, and on February 16th, 1861, a further sum of $2,243.01 
was appropriated to complete the same. On April 16th, 1 868, 
$6,000 was appropriated for the building of an additional wing 
to provide room for female convicts. An act passed April 2d, 
1869, provided for the apiwintment of commissioners to extend 
the grounds of the prison to the wall of the State Arsenal, to 
build an additional wing and work shops, and nuu1e an appro- 
priation of $50,000 for that purpose, and in the same month 
$9,734 was appropriated for the purpose of completing the 
wing of the female department. On April 4th, 1871, the sum 



SOLDIERS' HOME AT NEWARK. 127 

of $75,000 was appropriated for the purpose of completing the 
new or east wing, and on April 4tli, 1872, a furtlfer sum of 
$28,7(0 was appropriated for the completion of the same. 
March 3d, 1874, $12,000 was voted for the construction of gas 
works for the supply of illuminating gas for the prison. On 
March 8th, 1877, the sum of $100,000 was appropriated for 
the enlargement of the prison and the purchase of a burial 
ground for deceased convicts. The north wing was remodeled 
out of this last appropriation, and a burial ground purchased. 
The Legislature of 1895 appropriated $150,000 for the en- 
largement and improvement of the prison. 

Previous to the year 1798 there was no State Prison, and 
prisoners were confined in the county jailg. On March 1st, 
1797, Jonathan Doane was appointed by an act of the Legis- 
lature as an agent to purchase a lot of land from Peter Hunt, 
situate at Lamberton, containing six and a half acres, and to 
erect suitable buildings thereon. This was done at an expense 
of £9,852 Os. 3d., and what is now the State Arsenal, at Second 
and Cass streets, is the result. Solitary confinement was not 
practiced previous to 1836, in which year the old prison was 
vacated and the present one occupied. 



SOLDIERS' HOME. 



This institution is located in Kearny township, Hudson 
county, to which place it was removed from Newark in 1888. 
It was organized under a joint resolution of the Legislature 
approved April 12th, 1862. The Home in Newark was opened 
July 4th, 1866. The Legislatures of 1886 and 1887 appro- 
priated $175,000 for the erection of a new Home, under the 
direction of Commissioners appointed by the Lej^islature. 
The present site, consisting of 17^ acres, was selected, and six 
new and commodious buildings were erected thereon. The 
Home has a frontage of 600 feet on the Passaic river, and 
contains over three hundred inmates. 



NEW JERSEY SCHOOL FOR DEAF-MUTES. 



This institution, which is located at Trenton, is a part of 
the public scIkoI system of the State, and is open to deaf resi- 
dents of the State between the ages of eight and twenty-one 
years. The pupils are instructed in the branches of common- 
school education, and are also trained in some handicraft. 
Speech is taught to all who can acquire it, and with such 
success that in some classes it becomes the principal means 
ol communication. 



128 HOME FOR FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 

The industrial department is larger and better equipped 
than in most schools of this kind. From the printing office 
is issued monthly a paper, the Silent Worker, which, in point 
of mechanical execution and of quality of contents, ranks as 
the best issued from any institution in the country. All the 
work on this paper is performed by pupils of the school. 

The wood-working department, under the charge of a 
graduate of a technical school of high rank, has a course in 
which theory and practice are united in an unusual degree. 

A course of kindergarten work, especially adapted to the 
deaf child, has been worked out in the school, and has been 
followed by some of the best schools of the kind in this 
country, 

A building for hospital purposes, designed in accordance 
with the best modern practice and ample to meet any possible 
need, ha.s been partially completed during the year. 

The attendance of pupils has risen from 125 in June, 1896, 
until at the present time it is about 150. 

The school possesses a well chosen library, which at present 
contains about 1,500 volumes, and is rapidly growing. 



THE STATE INSTITUTION FOR FEEBLE- 
MINDED WOMEN, VINELAND. 



This institution was established under an act of March 
27th, 1888, with Prof. S O. Garrison, who drafted the original 
law, as the first superintendent. On November loth of the 
same year he was succeeded by Mary J. Dunlap, M.D. It is 
one of the most admirably situated public buildings in the 
State. Lying opposite the New Jersey Training School for 
Feeble Minded Children, and facing Landis avenue, Vine- 
land's main street of several miles in length, it enjovs facili- 
ties of the city yet surrounded by acres of fruit, vineyards and 
orchards. The main building is well arransjed, and a large 
annex was erected in the winter of 1891 -'92 It is a home 
for female-, of whom there are nearly 100. Extensive addi- 
ti ns have recently been made, giving hospital and other 
accommodations 



SCHOOL FOR FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN. 129 

NEW JERSEY TRAINING SCHOOL FOB 

FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN, 

VINELAND. 

S. Olin Garrison, PRiNciPAii. 



This public institution is an outgrowth of a private one, 
which Prof. S. Olin Garrison established in Millville, Cum- 
berland county, on September 1st, 1887 It was opened at 
Vineland, on March 1st, 1888, with an enrollment of ten 
inmates. Adjacent properties were soon acquired and a 
handsome building, costing about $18,000, was erected in 
1890 -'91. There are nine cottages, besides a hospital, large 
barn, shops and manual training-rooms, located on a farm of 
120 acres. The school has a fine assembly hall, seating over 
600, and also containing seven (7) school-rooms, an armory, 
drill-room and a gymnasium. 

The plan and scope of training and education by the school, 
require fourteen teachers in English, Kindergarten, Mili- 
tary, Music, Physical Culture and Manual Trades depart- 
ments, thereby indicating the special and comprehensive 
fields of instruction. There is also a custodial department for 
the idiotic, and a hospital department for epileptics. 

The property is worth over $150,000, real and personal, 
with a debt of only $8,000. Besides very good property 
acquisitions at low cost, at least $50,000 have been donated 
to the school since its organization, to aid in the current 
expenses, in improvements and new buildings. 

There were, in 1898, over 200 boys and girls enjoying 
the advantages of this most excellent School. 



THE NE-W JERSEY STATE VILLAGE FOR 
EPILEPTICS. 

SKII.I,MAN, S0MERSE;T COUNTY. 



This village is located on the '• Maplewood Farm,* 
containing about 187 acres, one mile and a half from 
Skillman station, Somerset county, and on the line of 
the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The location is 
beautiful and most admirably adapted for the purposes 
of the institution. It was purchased for the sum of 
$11,500. The Managers of the institution have secured 
an option on an adjacent farm of 215 acres for $8,000. It 
will require 400 acres, altogether, to make the project 
practicable. There are three dwelling-houses on the 

9 



130 STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

*• Maplewood Farm." The Village was formally opened 
on November 1st, 1898, for the admission of 20 male 
epileptics. The Legislature of 1898 appropriated $15,000 
for the purchase of a site and the equipment and mainte- 
nance of the Village. As the Legislature provides the 
buildings, all epileptics of either sex, over five years of 
age, will lae admitted. 

The success of this meritorious undertaking is, in a 
large measure, due to the indefatigable efforts made by 
Professor S. Olin Garrison, of Vineland, in its behalf. 
For a number of years he agitated the subject, and at 
last an act was passed by the Legislature of 1898, and was 
signed by Acting Governor Voorhees, making the neces- 
sary provisions for the establishment of the institution. 
A similar act was passed by the Legislature of 1896, but 
it was vetoed by Governor Griggs. Senator Stokes, of 
Cumberland, who had charge of the legislation, showed 
great zeal in the task he had undertaken. 

According to a report made by a legislative commission 
appointed in 1895 to investigate the subject of epileptics, 
it was then estimated that there were over 2,000 such 
afflicted persons in the State. The two State Hospitals 
for the Insane then contained 168 epileptics. Their pres- 
ence in those institutions was considered alike injurious 
to the insane and the epileptic. The commission made 
an exhaustive report, and concluded by strongly recom- 
mending the establishment ©f a Village for those afflicted 
people. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 



ISl 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1896. 



STATES. 


B 

Mo. 


fe 




11 
III 


II 

II 




54,737 
37,512 

146,588 

26,279 

110,285 

20,452 
11.257 

60;091 
6,314 
607,130 
323,748 
289,293 
159,345 
218.171 

22,037 

80,465 
136,978 
278,976 
293,327 
193, 505 
5.123 
304,940 

10 490 

102,564 

1,9 9 

57,444 
221.367 
819,838 
155.222 

26.335 
521.991 

48,779 
728,300 

37.437 
9 313 

41,042 
148,773 
162,506 

13,461 

50,991 
135,388 

39,153 
104,414 
2fi8.3S9 

10,072 

7,10J.729 
6137521 


131,226 

110,103 

144,766 

161,269 

56,740 

16615 

31,958 

94,672 

23,135 

464,523 

306,206 

223,741 

170,6^6 

217,890 

77,175 

34,588 

104,746 

105,711 

237.251 

139,735 

46,283 

363,667 

43,680 

115,624 

8,869 

21.60 

133,675 

551,513 

174,488 

20,5S6 

477,497 

46,739 

433,230 

14,459 

58,801 

41,225 

168,176 

368,289 

67,053 

10,607 

154.985 

51.646 

92,927 

163,441 

10,861 


6,462 


2,147 

839 

2,573 

2,104 

1,806 

602 

644 

5,716 

172 

10,611 

5,241 

3,544 

2,231 

4,781 






893 


California 






Colorado 


1 

4,336 

969 

1,772 

2.708 


150 


Connecticut. 


1,223 


Florida 





Georgia 







'" 


Illinois 


6,390 
2,146 
4,516 
1,209 
5,104 
1,834 
1,870 
2,507 
11,749 
6,930 
3,216 
7,517 
2,355 


1,147 
343 




Iowa 

Kansas 


453 


Kentucky 




Louisiana 




Maine 


1.570 
6,058 
2,998 
6,777 
4,363 
390 
2,462 




Maryland 


588 


Massachusetts 

Michigan 


2,114 


Minnesota 

MiSJ-issippi 


918 


Misj^ouri 


595 


Montana 




Nebraska 


2,797 


1,993 


186 
186 


Nevada 




New Hampshire.. 


3,420 

6,373 

18,972 

578 


776 

5,614 

16,075 

921 

358 

7,784 

919 

19,274 

1,165 


228 
3,985 
17,731 


New York 

North Carolina... 


North Dakota 




Ohio 

Oregon 


1,858 

977 

11,0C0 

1,166 
824 


1,167 


Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island .... 
South Carolina ... 


6,103 
558 


South Dakota 


500 
3,098 
5.030 





Tennessee 


1.951 
4,853 


*****"* 


Texas. 





Utah 




Vermont 


1,329 
2,127 
1,668 
677 
4,244 


728 
2,344 
1,116 
1,203 
6,659 

159 


* **" 


Virginia 

Washington 


115 


West Virginia 


■ 


Wisconsin 

Wyoming 


594 








To^al 

Plurality 


6,491,977 


133,554 


142,491 


39,221 



* Taken from the New York Tribune almanac of 1897. 



132 



PnESTDEKTlAL VOTE. 



t .s^»e^ X -r < ^.« I- = e5c^r^_co^ c S~ -r 
i-^Otc coco O c^ro o — 5c'~'cs — 'n lOn' 



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tCraoo_. — - ~ — ■ " — - - — 



; 3~. ^ 3 — *-, C^ 31 '^ I— »^j w^ -^ ,^ ^v » — w V- «.. ^^ s_. ^. 
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CM — CO ■a'COCO OCM ■»— :N-<»< NCMCOM :aO <0— tc 



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; r: r5_co © t^cM 

roc3»'-»'cM'2-r^ 

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• J;^«cmx-3 355x'£mS^ ■■ox 

' un" c' tC cm' x£ — © >C r-" r,* CM irf c<>" £2 

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oc •>»■ r~ -x N X -xi 

•<»■ X T O X O CM 

in ci^— o x_= o 
h-' oTtc X V oT CM 
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a 
■ti se"S 






PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



133 



^ i 






n » X* oc'v^c'w'o" 00*00 — oc*^-*o"<o-- c*'.c'm NO — o'i-^cooi'ooq' 
as I h3 



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C5 



g:;: 



Otct^!CooN«oojir~r-o<owao-»e*<0'»tc — •» — 
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■^m^t^ootct^c<j~-oemcmt^e<5'wo c<5t~aot~->»> 



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;oo c^-voo-^CiasCMcsinc:* 
> 3> t 0>C> O-^OO CM -» CO -w < 

ijT^c ■ ------- 



■<»■—< C Oi «c t^- 



•«eo oST^ocCoc^seotooor-co 
cioj— eocr-'j"a>-»'totcoicor~>n-w 
O tCai ~ W^-I^CO ©_tf5 csi_-.r •* -w 0^>0, 

lO J'-c "C t - iM CO eo CO t^ eo CO c>j "»< 



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cocoes — o 

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134 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 









I 3 



t^ c4 itTn f ?o o ^- o» «o 
— cs o> <o f-i a> e^ 00 



«00tCO»'OC:30«O--2 



. r- 00 ■«T' •* o> e<5 o 



& o 



m M 00 t^ 3» 

esi 00 ■*eo p< 



1 a>^eo to_ 



=s a 



oOC<5^tD 



. . «8 

• * _ t< aj . . ; wj u 



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^^rt^^^^t?^^ 2 



^i; 






®- • 






2§ 2 

-2-. S. 



H H 









PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 



136 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 
1880 and 1884. 



STATES. 

(38) 



1884. 



Blaine, 
Rep. 



Cleve- 
land, 
Dem. 



Butler, 
Gr'b'k. 



1880. 



St. John Garfield, 
Pro. Rep. 



Han- 
cock, 
Dem. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts- 
Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

II Nevada.. 

N. Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina 

ITTennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 



59,444 

50,895 

100,816 

36,277 

65,898 

12.788 

28,039 

47.964 

337.449 

238,480 

197,089 

153,158 

118,674 

46,347 

72.209 

85,699 

146,724 

192.669 

111,923 

42.774 

*202,26I 

76 877 

8,381 

43,166 

123,433 

562,001 

125,068 

400,082 

26,852 

474,268 

19,030 

21.733 

124,078 

88,353 

39,514 

139,356 

*63,096 

161,147 



92.973 

72,927 

88.307 

27,627 

67,182 

17,054 

31.769 

94,567 

312,320 

244,992 

♦177,288 

89,466 

152,757 

62.546 

52,140 

96.932 

122,352 

*191,225 

70,144 

78,547 

235.972 

*54,354 

7,000 

39,166 

127,784 

563.048 

142.905 

368,280 

24,593 

393,510 

12,391 

69,764 

133,258 

223,208 

17,"31 

14-^497 

67,317 

146.4^4 



762 

1,814 

1,975 

1,957 

tl,685 



610 



125 
10,753 
8,176 



16,110 
1,655 



2,640 

759 

12,492 

55 

74 

184 

11,824 

3,018 

1,472 

4,495 

3,106 



3,953 

531 

24.382 

tt763 

3,587 



2.160 
2,794 
9,923 
18,403 
4J 



2,153 
2,858 



552 
8 494 
16,955 



5,170 

723 

16,942 

422 



1,573 

6.155 

24,999 

448 

11,269 

488 

15,366 



957 

8,321 

785 



tt810 
4,697 



1.131 
8.511 
1,752 
143 
939 
7.649 



Total 4,844.002 4.914.947 

Plurality 70.915 



134,599 



56,221 

42,436 

80.348 

27,450 

67,071 

14,133 

23,654 

54,086 

318,037 

232,164 

183,927 

121,549 

106,306 

§38 637 

74,039 

78,515 

165.205 

185,341 

93.903 

34,854 

153,567 

54.979 

8,732 

44,852 

120,555 

555,4441 

115,8741 

375,048 

20.619 

444.704 

18,195 

58,071 

107 677 

67,893 

45,567 

84,020 

46.243 

144,000 



91,1 «5 

60.775 

80,426 

24,647 

64,415 

15,275 

27.964 

102,470 

277,321 

2-25,522 

105 845 

59 801 

149 068 

65,067 

*65,17l 

93,706 

111,960 

131,597 

53 3'5 

75,7£0 

208,609 

28,523 

9,613 

40,794 

122,565 

534,511 

124,208 

340,821 

19,948 

407,428 

10,779 

112,312 

128,191 

156 428 

18,316 

al28,586 

57,391 

114,649 



151,531 4,454,416 4,444,952 
9.464 



1884— Scattering and imperfect, 7,876 ; Lockwood, 5 ; total vote. 

10,053,770. 
1880— Greenback, 308.578; Prohibition, 10,305; American, 707; 

scattering, 989; total vote, 9,219,947. 

♦Fusion, t Including 160 misspelled. J Including 232 misspelled. 
^ One county missing in 1884. || One county estimated in 1884 ? Vote 
for the two Republican tickets (Regular, 27,676; "Beattie, 10.349) 
combined. ftStraight GreT'Uback. oRegular (96,912) and Readjuster 
(31,674) votes combined. 



136 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1888. 



States. 


Harrison. 


Cleveland. 


risk. 


Labor. 




57,197 

58,752 

124,809 

50,766 

74,584 

12,978 

26,650 

40,453 

370,470 

263,361 

211,598 

182.914 

155.134 

30,184 

73,734 

99,986 

183,456 

236,:i70 

136,359 

30,196 

236,325 

108,425 

7,238 

45,728 

144,344 

650,338 

134,709 

415,792 

33,293 

526,091 

21,969 

13,740 

138,815 

83,280 

45,192 

150,438 

78.491 

176,553 


117,310 

85,962 

117,729 

37,542 

74.02 

16,41-1 

39,561 

100,47.' 

348,25^ 

261, OlS 

179,877 

102,738 

183,800 

89,941 

50,482 

106,168 

151,990 

218,404 

99,664 

85,476 

261,957 

80,552 

5,326 

43,358 

151.493 

635,965 

148,336 

399,969 

26,524 

446,200 

17,530 

65,825 

159,079 

234,883 

16,788 

151,977 

79,330 

155,232 


583 

614 

5 761 

2,100 

4,234 

400 

403 

1,802 

21,386 

9,881 

8.550 

6,779 

5,225 

130 

2.690 

4,766 

8,636 

20,942 

15,000 

218 

4,954 

9,424 

45 

7,583 

7,901 

30,327 

5,787 

i,618 

1,677 

20,743 

1,251 


10,643 
1 .591 


Arkansas 

C'llifornia. 


Colorado 

Connecticut 


1,205 
240 


Delaware 








Georgia 

Illinois 


136 
7,410 


Indiana 


2,691 


ToWrt .. . 


9 105 




37 767 


Kentucky 


622 


Louisiana • 






1,345 


Miiryland 








Michigan 


4,=4.> 


Minnesota 










15,8j3 


Nebraska 






New Hampshire...^ 

New Jersey 


42 




5,050 


North Carolina 




Oliio 


3,'452 
363 


I'ennsylvania 


3,865 


Khode Island .. ., 


18 


S 'Uth Carolina 




Tennessee 

Texas 


5.669 
4,749 
1,450 
1,678 


43 


Vermont 


35 






West Virginia 




Wisconsin 


14,277 


8,522 


Total 


5,430,607 


5,538,045 


257,248 


114,623 







PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1892. 




Cleveland's plurality, 369,533. 

Wing, Socialist-Labor, received in Connecticut, 333 votes ; in Masschu- 
setts, 676; in New Jersey, 1,337; in New York, 17,958; in Pennsylvania, 
898. Total, 21,202. 

*In Louisiana the Republican and People's parties voted each for four of 
the other's eight candidates for electors. Thus some of the Louisiana 
Toters are counted twice in the above table, and while all the Presidential 
candidates received a total of 12,098,668 votes in the whole country, there 
were only 12.070,766 actual voters. 

(137) 



138 NEW JERSEY ELECTORAL VOTE. 

ELECTORAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY, 
For President and Vice-President, from March 4tli, 1789. 



1789— George Washington, of Virginia 6 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 1 

John Jay, of New York S 

1793— George Washington, of Virginia 7 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

1797— John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

Thomas Pinckney, of South CaroHna 7 

1801 — John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

C. C. Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1805— Thomas J'-fferson, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1809— James Madison, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1813— DeWitt Clinton, of New York.... 8 

Jarard Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania 8 

1817— James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

182i — James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1825 — Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

John C. Calhoun, of South Carohna 8 

1829— John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts 8 

Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania 8 

1833— Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

Martin Van Buren, of New York 8 

1837— William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

Francis Granger, of New York 8 

1841— William H. Harrison, of Ohio.., 8 

John Tyler, of Virginia 8 

1845 — "Henry Clay, of Kentucky.. 7 

Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey 7 

1849— Zachary Taylor, of Louisiana 7 

Millard Fillmo-e, of New York 7 

1853— Franklin Pierce, of New Hamsphire 7 

William R. King, of Alabama 7 

1857— James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania 7 

John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky 7 

1861 — Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois 4 

Hannibal Haml n, of Maine 4 

Stephen A. Douglass, of Illinois 3 

Herchel V. Johnson, of Georgia 3 

1865— George B. McClellan, of New Jersey 7 

George H. Pendleton, of Ohio '. 7 

1869— Horatio Sevmour, of New York 7 

Francis P. Blair, of Missouri 7 

1873— Ulysses S. Grant, of Illino's 7 

Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts. 7 

1877— Samuel J. T Iden, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1881— Winfield Scott Hancock, of Pennsylvania 9 

William H. English, of Indiana 9 

1885— Grover Cleveland, of New York : 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1889— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Allan G 'I'hurman, of Ohio " 

1893— Grover Cleveland, of New York J° 

Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois ^° 

1897 -William McKinley.Ohio '° 

Garret A. Hobart, New Jersey *o 



STATE CENSUS 1895. 



The following is a copy of the tabulation of the State Census of 
1895, as prepared by the Secretary of State ; and for the purpose of 
comparison, the United States Census of 1S90 is also given : 

Atlantic County. 1895. 1890. 

Absecon 522 601 

Atlantic City 18,329 13,055 

First ward 3,622 

Second ward 3,114 

Third ward > 5,720 

Fourth ward 5,873 

Brigantine borough 138 

Buena Vista township^ 1,424 1,299 

Egg Harb6r City 1,557 1,439 

Egg Harbor township (not including borough 
of South Atlantic City) 1,372 

Borough of South Atlantic City 85 

1,457 3,754 

Galloway township 2,375 2,208 

BLamilton township (not including Mays 

Landing) 462 

Mays Landing 1,359 

1,821 1,512 

Hammonton township 3,428 3,833 

Lin wood borough 536 

Mullica township 825 697 

Pleasantville borough 1,543 

Soraers Pointborough 230 

Weymouth borough 575 538 

34,750 28,836 

Bergen County. 

Boiling Springs township 1,438 

Bergen township (not including boroughs 

of Carlstadt and Woodridge) 499 

Borough of Carlstadt 1,965 

Borough of Woodridge 526 

2,990 

Borough of Bergenfields 544 

Borough of Bogota 1C4 

Borough of Delford 594 

Borough of East Rutherford 2,250 

Borough of Eastwood 360 

Englewood township 5,433 4,785 

Borough of Englewood Cliffs 257 

Borough of Fair View 623 

Franklin township (not including borough of . 

Midland Park) 1,825 

Borough of Midland Park 1,254 

3,079 2,307 

Borough of Glen Rock 634 

(139) 



140 



STATE CENSUS. 



Harrington township (not including borough 1895. 

of Old Tappan) 2,989 

Borough of Old Tappan 261 

3,2o0 

Hohokus township 2,377 

Borough of Little Ferry 1,113 

Lodi township (not including boroughs of 

Hasbrouck Heights and Lodi) 638 

Borouah of Hasbrouck Heights :. 842 

Borough of Lodi 1,403 

2 883 

Borough of May wood. 283 

Midland township 1,192 

New Barbadoes township (coextensive with Hack- 

ensack) 7,282 

Orville township (not including boroueh of 

Allandale) .^ 993 

Borough of Allandale 539 

1,532 

Palisade township (not including the boroughs 

of Cresskill, Schraalenburgh and Tenafly) 689 

Borough of Cresski 11 450 

Borough of Schraalenburgh , 572 

Borough of Tenafly 1,532 

8,243 

Ridgefield township- 
Borough of Cliffside Park 592 

Borough of Leonia 665 

Borough of Kidgefield 518 

Borough of Uudercliflf. 1,072 

C'oytesville 573 

Fort Lee 1,617 

Nordhoff 130 

Palisade Park 402 

Ridgefield Park 1,359 

6,918 

Ridgewood township 2,435 

Borough of Riverside 569 

Borough of Rutherford 3,972 

Borough of Saddle River 396 

■-^addle Kiver township 3,662 

Teaneck township 811 

Union township 1,852 

Borough of Upi)Hr Saddle River 321 

Borough of VVal ingrou 1,063 

Washington township- 
Borough of Nronlvale 354 

Borough of Park Ridge 753 

Borough of Westwood 646 

Borough of Woodcliflf 421 

Etna 342 

Hillsdale 760 

Penn Vale 157 



Burling-ton County. 

Bass River township 

Hevprly township (not including Delanco and 

Edgewater Park) 608 

Delanco 712 

Edgewater Park 2*^1 



65,415 



853 



1890. 



2 769 
2,373 



5,1S1 
'i',829 
6,004 



2,590 



5,477 
1,841 

'2/293 

'2,197 

'"i",56b 



2,942 
47,226 



853 



1.461 



STATE CEJSSUS. 141 

1896. 1890. 

Beverly city 1,924 l,9o7 

. Borden town township (not including Borden* 

town borough) ~... 991 

Bordentown borough 4,185 

5,176 5,090 

Burlington township 1,062 

Burlington city 7,844 

8.222 

Chester township 4,227 3,768 

Chesterfield township 1,293 1,253 

Cinnaminson township 1,202 3,966 

Delran township 938 2,267 

Eastampton township 591 651 

Kvesham township 1,413 l,50i 

Florence township (not including town of 

Florence) 480 

Florence, town of. 1,282 

1,762 1,922 

Little Egg Harbor township (annexed to Ocean 

county) .- 1,771 

Lumberton township 1,715 1,799 

Mansfield township (not including Colum- 
bus) 1,077 

Columbus.. 535 

1,612 1,671 

Medford township 1,989 1,864 

Mount Laurel township 1,653 1,699 

New Hanover township 1,896 1,962 

Northampton townshlj) — 

Mount Holly 5.750 5,376 

Palmyra township (new) 2,310 

Pemberton township (not including Pember- 
ton borough) 1,704 

Borough of Pemberton 816 

2,520 2,639 

Riverside township (new) 1,661 

Randolph township 3' 2 

Borough of Kiverton ». 1250 

Shamong township 965 958 

Southampton township 2,039 1,849 

Springfield township 1,523 1,670 

Washington township 661 310 

Westampton township „ 593 688 

Willingboro township 704 739 

Woodland township 385 327 

59,117 58,528 

'Camden County. 
Camden city- 
First ward 8,460 

Second ward 10,924 

Third ward 4,500 

Fourth ward 5,175 

Fifth ward 8,225 

Sixth ward 7,250 

Seventh ward 6,805 

Eighth ward 6,896 

NMuth ward 5,232 

C3.167 58.313 



14*i STATE CENSUS. 

1895. 1890. 

Centre township ^ 2,047 1,834 

Delaware townbhip 1,611 1,457 

Gloucester City 6,225 6.564 

Gloucester township 3,479 3,091 

Haddon township (not including boroughs 
of (ollingswood and Haddonfield) 1,266 

Borough of Collingswood I,0i0 

Borough of Haddonfield 2,580 

4,866 3,929 

Merchantville, borough of 1,339 1,225 

Pensauken township (new) 3,966 

Stockton, town of. 8,010 6,445 

Waterford township 2,789 2,421 

Winslow township (not Including borough of 

Chisilhurst) 2,0H4 

Borough of Chisilhurst 271 

2,305 2,408 



1C0.104 87,687 

Cape May County. 

Anglesea borough 247 161 

Avalon borough 105 

Cape May city 2,452 2,136 

Cape May Point borough 136 167 

Dennis township. 2,370 1,707 

Holly Beach borough 300 217 

Lower township (not including borough of 

South Cape May) 1,063 

South Cape May borough 66 

1,128 1.156 

Middle township 2,500 2,368 

Ocean Cilv borough 921 452 

Sea Isle City borough 424 766 

Upper township 1,420 1 381 

West Cape May borough 742 757 

Wildwood borough 109 

12,855 11,268 

Bridgeton- Cumberland County. 

First ward 3,920 

Second ward 3,174 

Third ward 3,218 

Fourth ward 2 980 

13,292 11.421 

Commercial township 2,563 2,344 

Deerfield township 3,115 2,614 

Downe township. 

Newport 1,017 

Dividing Creek 791 

1,808 1.793 

Fairfield township „ 1,802 1.688 

Greenwich township 1,323 1,173 

Hopewell township 1,849 1,743 

Landis township 4,660 3 855 

Lawrence township 1,729 1,7?9 

Maurice River township 2,116 2 279 

Millville— 

First ward 3,307 

J^eroud ward 1.860 

Third ward 3,097 

Fourth ward 2,202 

10,466 10,002 



STATE CENSUS. US 

1895. 1890. 

Stow Creek (ownship 966 972 

Vinelaud borough 4,126 3,»22 

49,815 45,438 

Essex County. 

Belleville township 4,568 3,487 

Bloomfield towiishio — 

First ward '. 2,992 

Second ward 2,425 

Third ward.. 2,676 

8,C93 7,708 

Caldwell towuship 1,658 3,638 

Caldwell borough 984 

Clinton township (not including village of 

Irvingion).... 2,082 

Village of Irvington 3,888 

5,470 8,684 

East Orange- 
First ward 2,606 

Second ward 4,625 

Third ward 4,684 

Fourth ward 2,881 

Fifth ward 3,131 

17,927 13,282 

Franklin township 3,076 2,007 

Glen Ridge borough 1,644 

Livingston township 1,311 1,197 

Millburn township 2,762 2,437 

Montclair— 

First ward 3,130 

Second ward 3,104 

Third ward 3,333 

Fourth ward 2,186 

11,753 8.666 

Newark city- 
First ward 13,011 

Second ward 12,543 

Third wad 19,615 

Fourth ward 11,242 

Fifth ward .^ 13.837 

Sixth ward 14,779 

Seventh ward 13,476 

Eighth ward 10,514 

Ninth ward 10,646 

Tenth ward 16,585 

Eleventh ward 15,592 

Twelfth ward 14,557 

Thirteenth ward 15,903 

Fourteenth ward 20,640 

Fifteenth ward 12,866 

215,806 181,830 

Orange- 
First ward 5,847 

Second ward 4,027 

Third ward 4,726 

Fourth ward „ 5,128 

Fifth ward 3,064 

22,792 18,844 

>)Uth Orange 5,108 4,970 

'eronatowl;^hip (not including Cedar Grove) 1,062 

Cedar Grove 569 

1,631 



144 STATE CENSUS. 

1895. 1890. 

Valesburgh borough 1,563 

West Orange 5.854 4,358 

312,000 256,(98 

Gloucester County. 

Clayton township (not including borough of 

Clayton) 38 

Borough of Clayton 2,130 

2,168 2,299 

Deptford township (not including Wenonah), 1,883 

Wenonah 473 

2,356 2,0f)J 

East Greenwich township 1,363 1,-59 

Elk township 935 

Franklin township 2,256 ^(r^l 

Glassboro township 2,664 2,642 

Greenwich township (not including Pauls- 

boro) 227 

Paulsboro 1,717 

Gibbstown. 213 

2,157 l,9f0 

Harrison township 1,5U8 l,fi4'> 

Logan township 1,526 1,52? 

Manlua township 2,012 1.7H1 

Monroe township 2,512 1.941 

South Harrison township 7'i4 97i 

Washington township 1,206 1,1-6 

West Deptford township 1,717 l.')8» 

Woolwich township (not including Swedes- 

boro) 1,041 

Swedesboro 1,183 

2,224 2,0^^ 

Woodbury, city of. 3,S53 3.^11 

31,191 28,649 

Hudson County. 
Bay onne city- 
First ward 3,0i2 

Second ward 6,001 

Third ward 3,597 

Fourth ward 3,298 

Fifth ward 3,915 

19,8o6 19,0X3 

Guttenberg Town of 3,626 1947 

Harrison, Town of 9,674 8,338 

Huboken citj — 

First ward 10,414 

Second ward 7,711 

Third ward 21,401 

Fourth ward 14,551 

54.083 43,648 

Jersey City— ,„„„„ 

First ward 19,380 

Second ward 18,294 

Third ward 14,495 

Fourth ward 10,576 

Fifth ward U,4>'5 

Sixth ward 15,613 

Seventh ward 13,772 

Eighth war.l 10,7 ri 

Ninth ward 12,213 

Tenth ward 15,08 5 

Eleventh ward 20,199 

Twelfth ward 17.861 

182.713 163,033 



STATE CENSUS. 145 

1895. 1890. 

Kearny township 10,487 7,064 

North Bergen township 8,427 5,715 

Town of Union 13,336 10,643 

Union township 5,005 2,127 

Weehawken township 2.577 1,943 

West Hoboken 18,296 11,665 

328,080 ~275,126 

Hunterdon County. 

Alexandria township 1,202 1,250 

Bethlehem township 1,761 2,308 

Clinton township (not including Clinton borough).. 1,941 ) « gga 

Clinton borough 895/ ^''^^ 

Delaware township 2,819 3,037 

EastAmwell township 1,273 1,375 

Franklin township 1,278 1,287 

Frenchtown borough 1.052 1,023 

High Bridge township 2,032 1,935 

Holland township 1,706 1,704 

Junction borough 975 

Kingwood township 1,375 1,424 

Lambertville— 

First ward 1,350 

Second ward 1,264 

Third ward 2,016 

4,620 4,142 

Lebanon township 1,794 2,337 

Raritan township (uot including Flemington) 1,864) „ -Qg 

Flemington 2,f60i" **''^' 

Readington township, 2,776 2,813 

Tewksbury township 1,942 2,034 

Union township 1,073 1,134 

West Amwell township 8% 866 

35,334 35,355 

Mercer County. 

East Windsor township , 

Ewing township 

Hamilton township 

Hopewell township 

Lawrence township 

Princeton township (not including Princeton 

borough) 923) . „,, 

Princeton borough 3,488 j *'^'- 

Trenton- 
First ward 4,738 

Second ward 3,558 

Third ward 7.046 

Fourth ward 5,040 

Fifth ward 5,491 

Sixth ward 2,955 

Seventh ward 9,832 

Eighth ward 4,620 

Ninth ward 6,646 

Tenth ward 5.830 

Eleventh ward 6,762 

62,518 57,458 

Washington township 1.142 1,126 

West Windsor township 1,244 1,329 



2,671 


2,756 


3,569 


3,129 


3,860 


4,163 


4,418 


4,338 


1,705 


1,448 



U) S.'>.53.S 79.97? 



146 STATE CENSUS. 

Middlesex County. 1895. 1890. 

Cranbury township.- 1,456 1,422 

Dunellen township 1,215 

East Brunswick township 4,928 4,438 

Madison township 1,557 1,520 

Monroe township 8,042 3,040 

New Brunswick- 
First ward 2,404 

Second ward „ 4,106 

Third ward 1,634 

Fourth ward.. 883 

Fifth ward. 5,586 

Sixth ward 6,297 

19,910 18,608 

North Brunswick.. 1,391 1,238 

Perth Amboy— 

First ward 1,632 

Second ward 1,736 

Third ward .,..„ 2,562 

Fourth ward 2,016 

Fifth ward 2,070 

Sixth ward ^ 3,015 

13,030 9,512 

PIscataway township (not including New 

Market) 1,970 

New Market 382 

2,352 3,286 

Raritan township 3,914 3,788 

Sayreville township.. 3,420 3,509 

South Amboy borough 5,571 4,330 

South Brunswick township 2,467 2,403 

Woodbridge township 5,802 4,665 

70,058 61,754 

Monmouth County. 

Atlantic township 1,455 1,505 

Bradley Beach borough 707 

Eatontown township 2,661 2,953 

Freehold township (not including town of Free- 
hold) 2,356) .097 

Freehold town 8,157/ ^•"'" 

Holmdel township „« 1,429 1.479 

Howell township 3,246 3,018 

Manalapan township 1,944 2,002 

Matawan township 2,874 3,183 

Marlboro township 1,851 1,913 

Middletown township (not Including At- 
lantic Highlands) 6,330 

Atlantic Highlands 1,715 

8,045 6,695 

Millstone township 1,723 1,782 

Neptune township (not including Asbnry 

Park and Neptune City 6,615 

Asbury Park 3,761 

Neptune City 638 11,014 8,833 

Ocean township (not including Long Branch 

and Sea Bright) 2,880 

Long Branch, „^,»,^.^ 7,338 

Sea Bright 720 

10,983 10,209 



STATE CENSUS. 147 

1805. 1890. 



Rarltan township (not including Keyport 

town). 1,349 

Keyport town 3,386 

Shrewsbury township (not including Red 

Bank) 3,649 

Red Bank 4,888 

Upper Freehold township (not including 

Allentown borough; 2,247 

Allentown borough 656 

Wall township (not including Manasquan, 

North Spring Lake and Spring Lake) 3,953 

Manasquan borough 1,427 

North Spring Lake 262 

Spring Lake 331 



4,735 4,779 

8,537 8,367 

2,903 2,861 



5,973 6,052 

75,543 69,128 



Morris County. 

Boonton township (not including town of 

Boonton)... 691 

Boonton town 3,276 

3,967 3,307 

Chatham township (not including Madison 

borough) 2,547 

Madison borough 3,250 

5.797 4.681 

Chester township 1.562 ],625 

Hanover township 4,521 4.481 

Jefferson township 1,590 1,611 

Mendham township „ 1,452 1,266 

Montville township , 1,370 1,333 

Morris township 2,525 

Morristown— 

First ward 2,844 

Second ward., 2.419 

Third ward 2,600 

Fourth ward 2,427 

10,290 10,15.s 

Mount Olive township 1,273 1,848 

Net con g 'borough 877 

Passaic township 1.843 1.821 

Pequanuock township 8,166 2,862 

Randolph township (including town of 

Dover) 5,021 8,690 7,972 

Rockaway township (not including Rock- 
away borough) 4,461 

Rockaway borough 1,334 

5,795 6,033 

Roxbury township (not Including Mount 

Arlington borough) 2,189 

Mount Arlington 348 

2,5S7 2.739 

Washington township ., 2,278 2,367 



59,536 54,101 



148 STATE CENSUS, 

Ocean County. 1895. 1890. 

Berkeley township 737 786 

Brick township (not including Bay Head and 
Point Pleasant Beach boroughs) 2,118 

Bay Head 201 

Point Pleasant 660 

2,979 4,065 

Dover township (not including Island 

Heights borough) 2,580 

Island Heights 246 

2,826 2,88« 

Eagleswood township (not including Beach 

H&ven borough) 589 

Beach Haven 230 

819 791 

Jackson township 1,650 1,717 

Lacey township 759 711 

Lakewood township 2,201 

Little Egg Harbor township 1,821 

Manchester township 979 1,057 

Ocean township 526 482 

Plumsted township 1,288 1,327 

Stafford township (not including Long Beach 

City borough) 1,033 

Long Beach City... 66 

1,099 1,095 

Union township (notincluding Harvey Cedars 

borough) 1,009 

Harvey CedaiSM. 46 

1,055 1,063 



18,739 15.974 



Passaic County. 



Acquackanonk township 3,598 2,562 

Little Falls township 2,410 1,890 

Manchester township 4,993 2,676 

Passaic city— 

First ward 7,576 

Second ward 3,244 

Third ward 2,430 

Fourth ward 4,644 

17,894 13.028 

Paterson city- 
First ward 9,751 

Second ward 13,014 

Third Wftrd 19,591 

Fourth V^rd 13 050 

Fifth ward... 11,768 

Sixth ward 4,226 

Seventh ward 7,521 

Eighth ward 18,423 

97,344 78,347 

Pompton Lakes... 675 

Pompton township 2,045 2,153 

Wayne township 2,099 2,004 

West Milford township 2,169 2,486 

133,227 105,046 



STATE CENSUS. 149 

Salem County. i895. 1890. 

Alloway township 1.628 

Elsinboro township 498 524 

Lower Alloways Creek township 1,300 1,308 

Lower Penns Neck township 1,350 1,289 

Mannington township 1,931 1,870 

Oldmans township 1,428 1,432 

Pilesgrove township (not including Woods- 
town borough) 1,779 

Woodstown borough) 1,470 

3,249 8,812 

Pittsgrove township (not including Elmer 

borough)... 1,865 

Elmer 1,145 

8,010 2,756 

Quinton township 1,817 1,307 

Salem city- 
East ward 3,519 

Westward 2,818 

6.337 5,516 

Pennsgrove borough 1,497 

Upper Allowavs Creek township 1,675 

Upper Penns Neck township 803 2,239 

Upper Pittsgrove township 1,741 1,923 

26,084 25,151 

Somerset County. 

Bedminster township 1,789 1,749 

♦Bernards township 2,504 2,558 

Branchburg township 1,074 1,152 

Bridgewater township (not including Raritan 
and Somerville towns and Bound Brook 

borough) 1.700 

Raritan 2,693 

Somerville 4,514 

Bound Brook 2,030 

10,937 9,828 

Franklin township (not including South 

Bound Brook, Middlehurst and East Mill- 
stone) 2.270 

South Bound Brook 833 

Middlehurst 108 

East Millstone 476 

3,687 8,754 

Hillsborough township 2,847 2,825 

Montgomery township 1,644 1,655 

North Plainfield township 6341 . ^.n 

North Plainfield borough 4,245/ *'""" 

Warren township 1,086 1,046 

30,447 28,311 

Sussex County. 

Andover township 1,072 1,126 

Byram township 1218 1,380 

Frankford township 1,430 1,459 

Green township 588 636 

Hampton township 859 866 

Hardyston township 2,631 2,542 

Lafayette township 708 742 



* Census of 1885 ; no returns for 18%. 



150 STATE CENSUS. 

1895. 1890. 

Montague township ^^ 868 797 

Newton township 3,426 3,003 

Sandyston township 1,006 1,084 

Sparta township 1,970 1,724 

Stillwater township 1,225 1,296 

Vernon township 1,837 1,756 

Walpack township 411 436 

Wantage township (not including Decker- 
town borough) 2,362 

Deckertown 1,090 

3,452 8,412 



22,586 22,259 

Union County. 

Clark township 884 867 

Cranford township 2,145 1,717 

Elizabeth city — 

First ward 4,542 

Second ward 3,475 

Third ward 5,324 

Fourth ward.. 3,190 

Fifth ward 3,514 

Sixth ward 2,907 

Seventh ward 3,593 

Eighth ward-. 5,516 

Ninth ward 8,701 

Tenth ward. 2,383 

Eleventh ward- 2,976 

Twelfth ward 2,713 

43,834 87,764 

Fanwood township 1,600 1,305 

Linden township (not including Roselle 

borough) 1,061 

Roselle 1,367 

2,428 2,057 

New Providence township 934 839 

Plainfield city- 
First ward 2,958 

Second ward. 3,322 

Third ward 2,614 

Fourth ward. 4,735 



Rahway— 

First ward 1,560 

Fourth ward 1,535 

Second, Third and Fifth wards 4,850 

Springfield township 

Summit township, not including Beechwood Hotel 

(247) and Convalescent Home (122) 

Union township 

Westfleld township 



18,629 11,267 



"Warren County. 



Allamuchy township 

Bel vldere township 

Blairstown township 

Franklin township.... 

Frelinghuysen township , 



• 7,945 
930 


7,105 
959 


4.450 
3,412 
3,713 


3,502 
2,846 
2,739 






85,404 


72,467 


653 
1,834 
1,616 
1,338 

864 


759 
1.768 
1,662 

879 



STATE CENSUS. 



151 



1895. 

Greenwich township 786 

Hacketislown township 2,594 

Hardwick township.. 470 

Harmony township... 1,110 

Hope township 1,321 

Independence township 960 

Kijowlton township 1,294 

Lopaicong township.. 1,781 



Mansfield township 

Oxford township (not including villages of 

Buttzville, Hazen and Oxford) 916 

Buttzville 800 

Hazen 180 

Oxford 2,040 

Pahaquarry township 

Phillipsburg— 

First ward 2,033 

Second ward 2,290 

Third ward 3,026 

Fourth ward 1,732 



1,368 



3,436 
304 



9,081 



Pohatcong township 1,648 

Washington township 1,287) 

Washington borough 3,538 J 

37,283 



1890. 

825 
2,417 

503 
1,152 
1,332 

904 
1,411 
1.738 
1,362 



4,002 
291 



8,644 
1,483 

4,138 



,553 



SUMMARY BY COUNTIES. 



COUNTIES. 



Atlantic 

Bergen 

Burlington... 

Camden 

Cape May ... 
Cumberland 
Essex 
Gloucester.... 

Hudson 

Hunterdon .. 
Mercer. . .. 
Middlesex .... 
Monmouth .. 

Morris 

Ocean , 

Passaic 

Salem 

Somerset , 

Sussex 

Union 

Warren 



Losa. 



POPULATION. 



1895. 



34.7r)0 
65,415 
59.117 

100.104 
12 855 
49.815 

312000 
31.191 

328,080 
35,334 
85,538 
70.058 
75,543 
59,536 
18.739 

133.227 
26,084 
80,447 
22,586 
85,404 
37,283 



1880. 



28,836 
47.226 
56,757 
87,687 
11,268 
45,438 

256.098 
28,649 

275,126 
85.355 
79,978 
61,754 
69,128 
54,101 
17,745 

105,046 
25 151 
28,311 
22,259 
72,467 
36.553 



1.673 lOG 1,44-1 9^^ 



5,914 

18,189 

2.360 

12,417 

1,587 

4,377 

55,002 

2,542 

52,954 

*21 

5,560 

8,304 

6,415 

5,435 

994 

28,181 

933 

2,136 

27 

12,9-!7 

730 



152 



STATE CENSUS. 



SUMMARY BY CITIES, TOWNS, &c. 

1895. 1890, Increase. 

Newark 215,8C6 181,830 33.976 

Jersey City : 182,713 163,003 19,710 

Paterson 97,844 78,347 18 997 

Camden 63,467 58,313 5,154 

Trenton 62,518 57,458 5,060 

Hoboken 54,083 43,648 10,435 

Elizabeth 43,834 37,764 6,070 

Orange 22,792 18,814 3,948 

New Brunswick 19,910 18,603 1,307 

Bayonne 19,856 19,033 823 

Atlantic City 18,329 13,055 5,274 

West Hoboken 18,296 11,665 6,631 

East Orange 17,927 13,282 4,645 

Passaic 17,894 13,028 4,866 

Plainfield 13,629 11,267 2,362 

TownofUnion 13 336 10,643 2,693 

Bridgeton 13,292 11,424 1,868 

Perth Amboy 13,030 9,512 3,518 

Montclair 11,753 8,656 3,097 

Millville 10,466 10,002 464 

Morristown 10,290 8,156 2,134 

Harrison 9,674 8,338 1,336 

Phillipsburg 9,081 8,644 437 

Rahway 7,945 7,105 840 

Burlington 7,844 7,264 580 

Long Branch 7,333 7,231 102 

Hackensack 7,282 6,004 1,278 

Salem 6,337 5,516 821 

Gloucester City 6,225 6,564 •339 

South Amboy 5,571 4,330 1,241 

Dover 5,021 

Red Bank 4,888 4,145 743 

LambertviUe 4,620 4,142 478 

Somerville 4,514 3,861 653 

Bordentown 4,185 4,232 ^47 

Vineland 4,126 3,822 304 

Woodbury 3,853 3,911 *58 

Washington 3,538 2,834 704 

Princeton 3,488 8,422 66 

Newton 3,426 3,003 423 

Madison 3,250 

Freehold 3,157 2,932 225 

Cape May City 2,4'S2 2,136 316 

Bound Brook 2,030 1,462 568 

• Loss 



U. S. CENSUS. 1^55 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Population. Increase from 
1880 TO 1890. 

States and Territories. 1890. 1880. Percent- 
Number, age. 

The United States, 62,622,250 50,155,783 12,466,647 24.86 

North Atlantic Division, . . . 17,401,545 14,507,407 2,894,138 19.95 

Maine, 661,086 648,936 12,150 1.87 

New Hampshire, 376,530 346,991 29,539 8 51 

Vermont 332,422 332,286 136 0.04 

Massachusetts, 2,238,943 1,783,085 45.'5,858 25.57 

Rhode Island, 34^,506 276.531 68,975 24 94 

Connecticut, 746,258 622,700 123,558 19.84 

New York, 5.997,853 5,082,871 914,982 18.00 

New Jersey, 1,444,933 1,131,116 313,817 27.74 

Pennsylvania, 5,258,014 4,282,891 975,123 22.77 

South Atlantic Division, . . . 8,857,920 7,597,197 1,260,723 16.59 

Delaware, 168,493 146,608 21,885 14.93 

Maryland 1,042,390 934,943 107,447 11.49 

District of Columbia, . . . 230,392 177,624 52,768 29.71 

V^irginia 1,655,980 1,512,565 143,415 9.48 

West Virginia, 762,794 618,457 144,337 23.34 

North Carolina, 1,617,947 1,399,750 218,197 15.59 

South CaroHna, 1,151,149 995,577 155,572 15.63 

Georgia, 1,837,H53 1,542,180 295,173 19.14 

' Florida, 391,422 269,493 121,929 45 24 

Northern Central Division, . 22,362,279 17,364,111 4,998,168 28.78 

Ohio 3,672,316 3,198,062 474,254 14.83 

Indiana, 2,192,404 1,978,301 214,103 10 82 

Illinois, 3,826,351 3,077,871 748,480 24.32 

Michigan 2,093,889 1,636,937 456,952 27. 92 

Wisconsin, 1,686,880 1,315,497 371,383 28.23 

Minnesota, 1,301,826 780,773 521,053 66.74 

Iowa 1,911,896 1,624,615 287,281 17.68 

Missouri, 2,679,184 2,168,380 510,804 23.56 

North Dakota, 182,719 36,909 145,810 395.05 

South Dakota 328,808 98,268 230,540 234 60 

Nebraska, 1,058,910 452,402 606,508 134 06 

Kansas, 1,427,096 996,096 431,000 43 27 

Southern Central Division, . . 10,972,893 8,919,371 2,053,522 23 02 

Kentucky, 1,858,635 1,648,690 209,945 12.73 

Tennessee, 1,767,518 1,542,359 225,159 14.60 

Alabama, 1,513,017 1,262,505 250,512 19.84 

Mississippi, 1,289,600 1,131,597 158,003 13 96 

Louisiana, 1,118,587 939,946 178,641 19 01 

Texas, 2,235,523 1,591,749 643,774 40.44 

Indian Territory (6), .... 

Oklahoma, <:61,834 .... 61,834 . . . 

Arkansas, 1,128,179 802,525 325,654 40.58 

3 The number of white persons in the Indian Territory is not included in 
this table, as the census of Indians and other persons on Indian reserva- 
tions, which was made a subject of special i'lvestigation by law, has not 
yet been completed. 

c Including 5,338 persons in Greer county (in Indian Territory), claimed 
by Texas. 



154 



U. 8. CENSUS. 



Population. Increase from 

1880 to 1891). 

States and Territories. 1890. 1880. Number. Percent- 

age. 

Western Division, 3,027,613 1,767,697 1,259,916 71.27 

Montana, 132,159 39,159 93,000 237.49 

Wyoming, 60,705 20,789 39,916 192.01 

Colorado, 412,198 194,327 217,871 112.12 

New Mexico, 153,593 119,565 34,028 28.46 

Arizona, 59,620 40,440 19,180 47.43 

Utah, 207,905 143,963 63,942 44.42 

Nevada, 45,761 62,266 «16,505 a26 51 

Idaho, 84,385 32,610 51,775 158.77 

Alaska (d), 

Washington, 349,390 75,116 274,274 365.13 

Oregon 313,767 174,768 138,999 79 53 

California, 1,208,130 864,694 343,436 39.72 

The population of the United States in 1870 was 38,558,374. 

a Decrease. 

d The number of white persons in Alaska is not included in this table, as 
the census of Alaska, which was made a subject of special investigation by 
law, has not yet been completed. 



Cities of the United States having a Popula- 
tion of 50,000 and Over According 
to Census of 1890. 



*New York, N. Y., . . . . 1 

Chicago, 111., 1 

Philadelphia, Pa., . . . . 1 

Brooklyn, N. Y., 

St. Louis, Mo., 

Boston, Mass., 

Baltimore, Md., 

San Francisco, Cal., . . . 

Cincinnati, O., 

Cleveland. O., 

Buffalo, N. Y., 

New Orleans, La., .... 

Pittsburg, Pa., 

Detroit, Mich , 

Milwaukee, Wis , 

Newark, N. J., 

Minneapolis, Minn., .... 
Jersey City, N.J.,.,.. 

Louisville, Ky., 

Omaha, Neb., 

Rochester, N. Y., 

St. Paul, Minn., 

Providence, R. I., .... 
Indianapolis, Ind., .... 

Denver, Col., 

Allegheny, Pa., 

Albany, N. Y., 

Columbus, O., 



,513,501 
,098,576 
,044,894 
804,377 
460,357 
446,507 
435,151 
297,990 
296,309 
261,546 
254,457 
241,995 
238,473 
205,669 
204,105 
181,830 
164,738 
163,003 
161,005 
139,526 
138.327 
133,156 
132,043 
107,445 
106,670 
104,967 
94,640 
90,398 



Syracuse, N. Y., 87,877 

New Haven, Conn., 86,981 

Worcester, Mass., 84,536 

Scranton, Pa., 83,450 

Toledo, O., 82,652 

Richmond, Va., 80,838 

Paterson, N. J., 78,347 

Lowell, Mass., 77,605 

Nashville, Tenn., 76,309 

Fall River, Mass., 74,351 

Cambridge, Mass., 69,837 

Atlanta, Ga , 65,514 

Memphis, Tenn., 64,586 

Grand Rapids, Mich., .... 64,147 

Wilmington, Del 61,437 

Troy, N. Y , 60,605 

Reading, Pa., 58,926 

Dayton, O., 58,868 

Camden, N. J , 58,313 

Trenton, N. J., 57,458 

Lynn, Mass., 55,684 

Lincoln, Neb., 55.491 

Charleston, S. C, 54,592 

Hartford. Conn 53,182 

Evansville, Ind., 50,674 

Los Angeles, Cal., 50,394 

Des Moines, la , 50,067 



* A census taken by the police authorities, and completed October 14th, 
1890, makes the population 1,710,715, an increase of 197,214. 



STATE COMMITTEES. 



REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

Franklin Murphy, Chairman ; E. J. Anderson, Vice 
Chairman ; Wm. Riker, Jr., Treasurer ; A. S. Barber, Jr., 
Secretary ; W. Scott Snyder, Assistant Secretary. 

At Large— Oo-XTQi A. Hobart, Paterson ; William Bet- 
tie, Camden ; Franklin Murphy, Newark ; Charles N. 
Fowler, Elizabeth. 

Atla7ttic—]6hn J. Gardner, Atlantic City. 

Bergen — C. E. Breckenridge, 110 Maiden Lane, N. Y. 

Burlington — R. C. Hutchinson, Bordentown, 

Camden — David Baird, Camden ; C. N. Robinson, 
Camden. 

Cape May—^u Iv. Ross, Cape May Court House. 

Cumberland— t. W. Trenchard, Bridgeton. 

Essex— H^nry M. Doremus, Newark ; Henry A. Potter, 
East Orange. 

Gloucester— H. C. Loudenslager, Paulsboro. 

Hudson—^. W. WooUey, Jersey City ; John P. I^an- 
drine, Jersey City. 

Hunterdon—^. B. Reading, Lambertville. 

Mercer— VJiWiam H. Skirm, Trenton. 

Middlesex— John H. Conger, New Brunswick. 

Monmouth—] . W. Danser, Freehold. 

Morris— George Richards, Dover. 

Ocean — A. W. Bradshaw, Lakewood. 

Passaic— ^ohtrt Williams, Paterson. 

Salem, — George Hires, Salem. 

Somerset— 'B. J. Anderson, Somerville. 

Sussex— R. F. Goodman. Newton. 

Union — John Kean, Elizabeth. 

Warren— K. Blair Kelsey, Belvidere. 

Executive Committee— Vranklin Murphy, E. J. Ander- 
son, William Bettle, C. E. Breckenridge, David Baird, 
Charles N. Fowler, John Kean, R. B. Reading, George 
Richards, E. W. Woolley, H. A. Potter. 

Finance Committee — Franklin Murphy, John Kean, 
George Richards, William Barbour, W. S. Hancock. 

(156) 



156 STATE COMMITTEES. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

William B. Gourley, Chairman ; William K. Dever- 
eux, Secretary ; Gen. Richard A. Donnelly, Treasurer. 

At Zar^^— William B. Gourley, Paterson ; Richard A. 
Donnelly, Trenton ; Rufus Blodgett, lyong Branch ; 
William C. Heppenheimer, Hoboken ; Howard Carrow, 
Camden. 

Atlantic— ^o\m T. French, Hammonton. 

Bergen —'^'■AXvAXTL B. Pugh, Ridgefield. 

Burlington — Dr. A, E. Conrow, Moorestown. 

Camdefi — Harry B. Paul, Camden. 

Cape May— Ddividi W. Rodan, Cape May City. 

Cumber latid —W\\\\2t.m. C. Hendee, Vineland. 

Essex — E. Livingston Price, Newark. 

Gloucester — Benman S. Cox, Paulsboro. 

Hudson—^. F, C. Young, Jersey City. 

Hunterdon— WiUisim H. Martin, Frenchtown 

^^rr^r— James W. Ivanning, Trenton. 

Middlesex— Oliver Kelly, Metuchen. 

Monmouth— David S. Crater, Freehold. 

Morris— WiWard W. Cutler, Morristown. 

Ocean — Charles h. Rogers, Manchester. 

Passaic— houis F. Braun, Paterson. 

Salem — Robert Gwynne, Jr. Salem. 

Somerset — William J Keys, Somerville. 

Sussex— Liewis S. Iliff. Newton. 

Union— Feter Egenolf, Elizabeth 

IVatr en— Johnston Cornish, Washington. 

Executive Committee—^. F. C. Young, Chairman, 
Johnston Cornish, E. Livingston Price, Rufus Blodgett, 
David S Crater, James W. Lanning, Harry B. Paul, Wm. 
C. Heppenheimer. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



REPUBLICAN. 

(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, Thursday, September 
22, 1898.) 

The representatives of the Republican party of New 
Jersey, assembled in convention, September 22, 1898, 
hereby resolve and declare : 

That we aflfirm our adhesion and devotion to the funda- 
mental principles of the National Republican party as 
set forth in the platform adopted at the St. Louis conven- 
tion in 1896. 

That we specially declare our undying opposition to 
any proposition to debase the national currency, a propo- 
sition so repugnant to the honest voters of New Jersey 
that when it was presented to them in all its bare iniquity 
in 1896, they promptly buried it under an unprecedented 
majority of 87,000, and declared in favor of representa- 
tives of national honor and honesty, McKinley and 
Hobart. 

We heartily approve and endorse the administration of 
President McKinley. His treatment of domestic ques- 
tions has more than fulfilled all expectations, and the 
wisdom of his foreign policy and the firmness and dignity 
with which it has been maintained have won for him not 
only the confidence and approbation of our own people, 
but the highest respect of the civilized world. Involved 
without due preparation in a war in the interests of 
humanity, he pursued a course which commanded united 
support at home and effectively silenced the assaults of 
interested diplomacy abroad. In three months this con- 
flict was brought to a practical end with a smaller per- 
centage of loss from battle and disease than in any war of 
modern times, and with the result of freeing a suffering 
people from a reign of cruelty and oppression; of acquiring 
new and valuable territory ; of opening to our people new 
avenues of trade and commerce ; furnishing new outlets 
and demands for the agricultural and industrial products 
of our people, and, above all, providing millions of our 
fellow-creatures an open door to those blessings of educa- 
tion and of civil and religious liberty which have for a 
hundred years followed the advance of the American flag. 

(157) 



158 PAR TV PL A TFORMS. 

We take a special pride as Jerseymen that the eminent 
citizen whom this State gave to the national administra- 
tion, elected in 1896, has been so singularly capable and 
potential in the office of Vice-President, and has invested 
that station with rare dignity and influence. 

We approve the annexation of the Hawaiian Islands, 
and view this act as an important step in the advance of 
American civilization. 

We repose entire confidence in the wisdom and patriot- 
ism of the President, and the commission appointed by 
him to negotiate such a treaty of peace as will meet the 
just expectations of our people, by insisting on an ad- 
justment in which the interests of this Republic, and of 
civilization and humanity, will be secured, as far as possi- 
ble, as the fruits of the valor of our soldiers and sailors 
in the war with Spain. Called to the Presidency in a 
time of national bankruptcy, caused by the administration 
of the Democratic party, William McKinley was com- 
missioned by the American people to restore confidence, 
to re-establish a tariff system under which American labor 
and capital might recover from the blighting effects of 
the Wilson bill ; to save our financial system from the 
dangers of Bryanism, so that American enterprise might 
go boldly forward to the development of our resources. 
Under his administration business has revived, labor has 
found employment, and prosperity is returning. These 
things have been accomplished notwithstanding the fact 
that in his effort to execute the people's mandate the 
President has been shackled with a hostile Senate How 
much more can be accomplished if for the remainder of 
his term the President and his administration have the 
support and sympathy of a Congress friendly in both 
branches. 

During the present Congress this State has enjoyed a 
commanding influence by having a Republican Senator 
and a delegation in the Lower House unanimously of the 
same faith. They have been most diligent and successful 
in their labor for the best interests of our State and 
nation, and we cordially indorse their work and thank 
them in the name of the people of New Jersey, 

That we heartily indorse the conduct of our State 
affairs by Governor John W. Griggs during his incum- 
bency, which illustrated the highest ideal of an executive 
and fully met the expectations of a purified administra- 
tion which his election raised in the people of New Jersey, 
and we hold it to be a subject of pride to our State that 
he has been summoned by the President to assume as a 
patriotic duty the charge of one of the most important 



PAR TV PL A TFORMS. 169 

and responsible departments of the National Government. 
The brilliant record he has made as Attorney-General of 
the United States during an unexpected and most trying 
emergency, has given our State renewed occasion for 
gratification. 

We heartily indorse and approve the brief but brilliant 
administration of Acting Governor F. M. Voorhees. 
Coming to the executive chair from a long experience in 
the legislative branch of the government, he was pecu- 
liarly fitted to discharge the civil duties thus unexpectedly 
thrust upon him, and it is known of all men that his 
diligence, fidelity, and a sincere desire for the public 
welfare, have characterized his ever^ executive act. We 
especially commend him for his untiring devotion to the 
interests of our soldiers. Whether encamped in this or 
in other States, they never were beyond the Acting 
Governor's watchful eye nor outside the zone of his 
efiicient care. 

We tender our thanks to the citizens of this and other 
States who, inspired by a patriotic impulse, have left 
their homes and occupations to sustain the arms of the 
State and the nation. We recognize their devotion to 
duty, whether in camp or on the field of combat ; and we 
pledge ourselves to the full and liberal recognition of all 
the proper claims of our patriotic heroes, and if by the 
misconduct or incompetency of any officials their health 
or their lives have been unnecessarily sacrificed or endan- 
gered, we feel assured that the President and his Consti- 
tutional advisers will make such investigations as will 
bring the offenders, regardless of past or present political 
afiiliation, to punishment. 

We recognize the special revenue law as a necessary 
war measure, and recommend its repeal as soon as will be 
justifiable by the reduced expenses of the government. 

Three years ago we appealed to the voters of New 
Jersey to unite in rescuing the State from the grasp of a 
political oligarchy which had brought every department 
and institution of the State, the internal affairs of our 
cities and towns, and even the morals of this Common- 
wealth, into subserviency to their ends 

They squandered the State revenue by the creation of 
useless offices and by falsifying bills of supply, and 
sought to prostitute every branch of the State govern- 
ment to partisan and personal purposes. With splendid 
majorities the people of almost every county in the State 
responded to our appeal and committed the legislative 
and executive branches of the government to the care of 
the Republican party. We promised them a clean 



160 PAR TY PL A TFORMS. 

honest and economical administration of State govern- 
ment, in the interest and for the welfare of the whole 
people. This promise has been faithfully kept. Having 
blotted from the statute-books the laws under which the 
most infamous form of race-track gambling had brought 
ignominy and disgrace upon the State, we have embodied 
in the Constitution an amendment forever prohibiting a 
re-enactment of such laws ; we have banished partisan- 
ship from statutes and delivered the several State institu- 
tions, boards and commissions from political control. In 
offices of the State, and the larger counties, we have 
substituted reasonable salaries for the fee system, and thus 
covered into the public treasury, for the benefit of the 
people, large sums which were formerly used for political 
purposes. 

We have doubled the annual appropriation for the 
support of our free school system. We have relieved the 
taxpayers of the several counties by distributing amongst 
them annually more than $200,000 of the tax received by 
the State from railroad corporations. 

We have increased the appropriation for good roads. 
We have made liberal appropriations for the support and 
proper care of the insane, the feeble-minded and other 
unfortunate defectives of the State. We have paid off 
over half a million of the public debt. We have ex- 
pended in the necessary construction and extension of 
State institutions over $1,000,000, and, notwithstanding 
these disbursements for the public benefit, we are able, 
through a rigid and judicious economy, to show an 
increase in the balance in the State Treasury of |200,000, 
as compared with 1893, the year in which the voters of 
New Jersey set the seal of condemnation upon Democratic 
misrule. 

We have codified and condensed many of the cumber- 
some and complex State statutes, and this important and 
necessary work will be continued to completion. 

The full list of the beneficent legislative acts since the 
State passed under Republican control is too long to be 
recited here, but the statute-books and public records of 
the State are filled with evidences of the faithfulness with 
which we have redeemed the pledges made three years 
ago. 

We here and now renew these pledges. We promise a 
continuance of the policy of rigid economy in every 
department of the State government, liberal appropria- 
tions for purposes of public necessity and welfare, con- 
tinued opposition to extravagant and wasteful use of the 
public money, legislation for the benefit and elevation of 



PAR TV PL A TFORMS. 161 

the laboring people, for the promotion of the agricultural 
and industrial interests of the State and the general good 
and well being of all. 

The time has again come for the people of the State to 
rally around the standard of good government, and we 
appeal to all the patriotic voters of New Jersey to give 
their voices and votes to avert dire calamity, which would 
result from relegating the State again to the hands of the 
political jobbers and unscrupulous ringsters who are 
seeking to regain their lost control. 



DEMOCRATIC. 

(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 28, 1898.) 

We, the representatives of the Democratic party in 
State Convention assembled, re-affirming our devotion to 
all the great and vital principles of the Democratic party 
on National issues and believing, however, that the com- 
ing State campaign should be fought out on State issues, 
and for the redemption of the State from Republican 
extravagance, corruption and misrule, declare the para- 
mount issues in the coming campaig n to be : 

Equal taxation, home rule, honest State and munici- 
pal government, the abolition of useless and expensive 
State commissions, the teduction of the large present 
expenses of the State government to the economical 
standard maintained for years under Democratic rule, the 
reduction of official salaries, the abolishment of the fee 
system and the placing of all officials on a salary basis, 
the enactment of laws in the interest of organized labor 
and for the protection of the wage- workers of the State, 
the repeal of all laws that abridge the right of juries to 
fix the amount of damages in cases where the death of a 
person is caused by wrongful act, and the release of the 
administration of State affairs from the control of cor- 
porations and their restoration to the authority of the 
people. 

We demand that the tax laws of this State be amended 
to provide for the equal taxation of all property, real 
and personal, not used for religious, charitable or educa- 
tional purposes, in accordance with the mandates of the 
Constitution, which says : 

•* Property shall be assessed for taxes under general 
laws, and by uniform rules, according to its true value." 

We charge the Republican party, which has had com- 
plete control of all branches of the State government 

11 



16^ PAR TY PL A TFORMS. 

during the past three years, with having violated the 
pledges it made to the people before being entrusted with 
power. 

We charge the Republican party with having created 
useless and needless State commissions at the expense of 
thousands of dollars to the people of this State, and 
pledge the Democratic party to the enactment of laws 
that will secure their abolishment 

We charge that the Republican party has been guilty 
of gross extravagance in the administration of State 
affairs, and that the expenses of the State government 
under Republican rule have been increased nearly half a 
million dollars annually and are now largely in excess of 
what they should be for an honest and economical admin- 
istration of the government, and beyond the annual 
revenues of the State by thousands of dollars. We 
pledge the Democratic party to a reduction of expenses 
and an economical and business-like administration of 
the affairs of the State. 

We charge that the salaries of public officials are far in 
excess of what they should be, and pledge the Demo- 
cratic party to the enactment of laws that will secure the 
reduction of the same. 

We pledge the Democratic party to the enactment of 
laws that will abolish the fee system in all State and 
county offices and place all such officials on a salary 
basis, thereby saving to the people of this State thou- 
sands of dollars, which will revert to the public treasury 
instead of the pocket of the office-holder. 

We condemn the action of the recent Republican Leg- 
islatures which refused almost every request made for 
legislation in the interest of organized labor and repealed 
acts passed by Democratic Legislatures for the protection 
of the wage-workers of New Jersey ; and we pledge our 
party to give proper consideration to the views adopted 
by the councils of organized labor. 

We charge Foster M Voorhees, the Republican candi- 
date for Governor, with being an enemy of organized 
labor, and that he has proved his hostility by his official 
acts while acting as Governor of the State 

We favor the repeal of all laws abridging the right of 
juries to fix the amount of damages in cases where the 
death of a person is caused by wrongful act, and condemn 
the brutal opinions filed by Republican judges in constru- 
ing such laws. 

We favor an amendment to the laws of the State pro- 
viding severe penalties for discrimination in the fixing of 



PARTY PL A TFORMS. 163 

rates for the transportation of freight in anywise injurious 
to the farmers or other people of this State. 

We charge that the Republican party is under the dom- 
ination and control of the corporations and trusts of this 
State, and refer the voters to the numerous acts passed by 
recent Republican Legislatures for the benefit of corpora- 
tions, foreign and domestic, at the expense of the people ; 
and to the railroad acts, passed ostensibly in the interests 
of the boroughs and villages, but really in the interests 
of the corporations ; and also call attention to the silence 
of the platform adopted by the recent Republican conven- 
tion upon all questions in anywise affecting the interests 
of trusts and corporations. 

We declare that the State of New Jersey owes every 
child within its borders an education unsurpassed by any 
other State. We demand for our school children ample 
and suitable accommodation in every city, town and 
village, so that every child may attend school the whole 
of every school day; the establishment of a thorough 
kindergarten system for the younger children, and a 
compulsory education law which will require attendance 
by every healthy child of school age. 

We advocate the passage of a State law which will 
require the State Treasurer to become the custodian of 
the Teachers' Retirement Fund, without expense to that 
fund. We congratulate the teachers upon their success- 
ful effort to care for the members of their profession in 
old age or sickness out of their own fund. 

We favor the construction of good roads and of proper 
State aid therefor. 

We declare that the thanks of the people of the State 
and nation are due to the soldiers and sailors of the army 
and navy of the United States, who have imperiled their 
lives in defense of their country and in vindication of 
the honor of its flag in the recent Spanish war ; that the 
nation owes to them permanent recognition of their 
patriotism and their valor, and ample and permanent 
provision for those of their survivors who have received 
disabling and honorable wounds in the service of the 
country, and that the memories of those who have fallen 
in its defense shall be held in grateful and everlasting 
remembrance ; that the State, should make suitable pro- 
vision for additional pay to our New Jersey Volunteers. 
While we rejoice and feel thankful to them for their great 
victories on land and sea, we denounce the gross, open, 
criminal incompetency of those placed and defiantly kept 
in charge of the affairs of the War Department of the 
present administration of the government of the United 



164 PAR TY PL A TF0R3IS. 

States, resulting in the needless loss of thousands of 
American soldiers' lives, and the infliction of horrible 
suffering and tortures upon thousands of the brave de- 
fenders of the country's honor; and we charge the present 
administration of the government of the United States 
with being solely responsible for the horrible results of 
this incompetency of government oflQcials, continued 
even after the appalling results were repeatedly brought 
to the attention of the President of the United States and 
his ofl&cial advisers; and we call the attention of the 
people of the State to the fact that up to this time not a 
single example has been made of a government official 
responsible for these monstrous wrongs. 

We deplore the spectacle of an ex-Governor of this 
State, now a member of that Cabinet, appearing at a 
public convention of his party as the apologist and de- 
fender of Algerism and its results. 

We invite and cordially welcome the co-operation and 
support of the honest and patriotic citizens of all parties, 
and the independent press of the State, however differing 
from us in other respects, in support of the principles 
herein declared, and pledge our hearty support to the 
candidate nominated by this convention, and affirm that 
he will not resign if elected until the pledges herein made 
are fulfilled. 



POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS. 



STATE REPUBLICAN LEAGUE OF NEW 
JERSEY. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

F. F. Meyer, Jr., President, Newark ; Edmund C. Hill, 
Treasurer, Trenton ; George P. Coles, Secretary, Newark. 

Vice-Presidents — First District, H. W. Johnson, Cam- 
den ; Second District, W. E. Edge, Atlantic City ; Third 
District, Joseph F. Frelinghuysen, Raritan ; Fourth Dis- 
trict, J. P. R. Smith, Washington ; Fifth District, Wm. 
McKenzie, East Rutherford ; Sixth District, R. M. 
Geddes, Newark ; Seventh District, Robert Carey, Jersey 
City; Eighth District, G. E.- Ludlow, Cranford. 

National Vice-President— Frank J. Higgins, Jersey 
City, N. J. 

National Executive Committee7nan — V. F. Meyer, Jr., 
Newark, N. J. 

Executive Committee— Atlantic, R. E. Stephany, At- 
lantic City ; Bergen, John M. Bell, Rutherford ; Burling- 
ton, Even F Benners, Moorestown ; Camden, E. E. 
Jefferies, Camden ; Cape May, Lewis T. Stevens, Cape 
May City ; Cumberland, M. E. Applegate, Bridgeton ; 
Essex, Wm. F. Poucher, East Orange ; Gloucester, Dr. 
Geo E Reading, Woodbury ; Hudson, Thos. D. Mills, 
Jersey City ; Hunterdon, Walter F. Hayhurst. Lambert- 
ville ; Mercer, C. K. Barnhart, Trenton ; Middlesex, 
Benj. F. Howell, New Brunswick ; Monmouth, L. E. 
Watson, Asbury Park ; Morris, H. B. Frothingham, Mt. 
Arlington ; Ocean, Joseph M. Thompson, New Egypt ; 
Passaic, Andrew Foulds, Jr. , Passaic ; Somerset, Henry 
N. Spencer, North Plainfield ; Salem, Joseph B. Crispen, 
Mannington ; Sussex, Dr. E. C. Tuttle, Deckertown ; 
Union, J. Fred. McDonald, Plainfield ; Warren, John I. 
Blair Reiley, Phillipsburg. 



THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY OF NEW 
JERSEY. 

George H. Lambert, President, Newark , James F. 
Minturn, Treasurer, Hoboken ; George W. Kane, Secre- 
tary, Paterson. 

(165) 



166 N. J. PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 

PBESIDENTIAL VOTE OP NEW JERSEY 
FROM 1840 TO DATE. 

1840— Harrison, Whig, 33,351 ; Van Buren, Dem., 31,034. Harrison's 
majority. 2,327. 

1«44— Clay, Whig, 38,318 ; Polk. Dem., 37,495. Clay's majority, 823. 

1848— Taylor, Whig, 40,015; Cass, Dem., 36,901; Van Buren, 819. 
Taylor's plurality, 3,114. 

1852 -Pierce, Dem,, 44,305; Scott, Whig, 38,556; Hale, Free Soil, 350. 
Pierce's plurality, 5,749. 

1856— Buchanan, Dem.. 46,913; Fremont, Rep, 28,338; Fillmore, 
Amer., 24,115. Buchanan's plurality, 18,605. 

1860— Dem. Fusion ticket. 62 869; Lincoln, Rep , 58,346. Fusion 
majority, 4,523. (Three Douglas electors, Cook, Parker and Runvon, 
were chosen, the highest vote being 62,fc69for Cook, ami four Lincoln 
electors were chosen, Hornblower, Hay, Elmer and Ivins the highest 
vote being 58,346 for Hornblower. The highest vote cast for a Breck- 
enridge elector (Wurts) was 56,237.1 

1864-McClellan, Dem., 68,024; Lijieoln, Rep., 60,723. McClellan's 
majority, 7,301. 

1868— Seymour, Dem., 83,001; Grant, Rep., 80,131. Seymour's 
majority, 2,870. 

Is72— Grant, Rep., 91,656; Greeley, Dem., 76,456. Grant's majority, 
15,200. 

1876— Tilden, Dem.. 115,962 ; Hayes, Rep., 103,517. Tilden's major- 
ity, 12,445. 

1880— Hancock, Dem., 122,565; Garfield, Rep., 120,555. Hancock's 
majority, 2,010. 

1884— Cleveland, Dem., 127,784; Blaine, Rep., 123,433. Cleveland's 
majority, 4,351. 

1888— Cleveland, Dem., 151,493 ; Harrison, Rep., 144,344 ; Fisk, Pro., 
7,904. Cleveland's plurality, 7,149. 

1892— Cleveland, Dem., 171,066; Harrison, Rep., 156,101; Bidwell, 
Pro.. 8,134 ; Wing, Social. -Lab., 1,337 ; Weaver, People's, 985. Cleve- 
land's plurality, 14,965. 

1896— McKinley, Rep., 221,367; Bryan, Dem., 133,675; Palmer. Nat. 
Dem., 6,373; Levering, Pro., 5,614; Matchett, Soc.-Lab., 3,985. McKin- 
ley's plurality, 87,692. 



N. J. GUBERNATORIAL VOTE. 167 

NEW JERSEY'S VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 
FROM 1844 TO DATE. 

1844— Stratton, Whig, 37,949 ; Thomson, Dem., 36,591 ; Parkhurst, 76. 
Whig plurality, 1,358. 

1817— Haines, Dem., 34,765; Wright, Whig, 32,166; William Right, 
87; Moses Jaques. 146 ; Scattering. 109. Democratic plurality, -2,599. 

1850— Fort, Dem , 39,723 ; Runk, Whig. 34,054. Democratic major- 
ity, 5,669. 

1853— Price, Dem., 38,312; Haywood, Whig, 34,530. Democratic 
majority, 3,782. 

1856— Newell, Rep., 50,903; Alexander, Dem., 48,246. Republican 
major tv, 2.657. 

]«59_01den. Rep., 53,315; Wright, Dem., 51,714. Republican 
majority, 1,601. 

1862— Parker, Dem,, 61,307; Ward, Rep., 46,710. Democratic major- 
ity, 14.597. 

1865— Ward. Rep., 67,525; Runyon, Dem., 64,736. Republican 
majority. 2,789, 

1868— Randolph, Dem, 83,619; Blair, Rep., 79,072. Democratic 
majority, 4,547. 

1871- Parker, Dem., 82,362 ; Walsh, Rep., 76,383. Democratic major- 
ity, 5,979. 

1874— Bedle, Dem., 97,283 ; Halsey, Rep., 84,050. Democratic major- 
ity, 13,233. „ 

J877— McClellan, Dem , 97,837 ; Newell, Rep ,85,09( ; Hoxsey. Green- 
back, 5 069; Bingham, Tax and Pro., 1,439. Democratic plurality, 
12.746. 

1880— Ludlow, Dem.. 121,666; Potts, Rep., 121,015; Hoxsey, Green- 
back, 2.7o9 ; Ransom, Pro , 195. Democratic plurality, 6=»1 

1883— Abbett, Dem , 103,856 ; Dixon. Rep , 97,047 ; Urner, Nat., 2,960; 
Parsons, Pro , 4, 53. Democratic plurality, 6,809. 

1886— Green, Dem.. 109.9:^9; Howey, Rep., 101,919; Fiske, Pro., 
19.808 Democratic plurality, 8 020. ' 

1889— Abbett, Dem., 138,245; Grubb, Rep., 123,992; La Monte, Pro., 
6,853. Democratic plurality, 14,253. 

1892— Werts, Dem , 167.257 ; Kean, Jr , Rep., 159,362 ; Kennedy, Pro., 
7,750; Keim, Social.-Lab., 1,338; Bird, People's, 894. Democratic 
plurality, 7,625. 

1895— Griggs, Rep., 162,900; McQill, Dem., 136,000; WUbur, Pro., 
6 66l^lis People's, 1.901 ; Keim, Socialist-Labor, 4,147. Republican 
plurality, 26.900. ^ ^ 

1898— Voorhees, Rep., 164,051; Crane, Dem , 158,552 ; Landon, Pro., 
6.893 ; Maguire, Soc. Lab., 5,458 ; Schrayshuen, People's, 491. Republican 
plurality, 5,499. 



168 NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 

POLITICAL COMPLEXION OP NEW JER- 
SEY'S LEGISLATURES FROM 
1840 TO DATE. 

1840— Council, 13 Whigs ; 5 Dems. House, 41 Whigs ; 12 Dems, 

1841— Council, 9 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, 35 Whigs; 23 Dems. 

1842— Council, 10 Whigs ; 8 Dems. House, 32 Whigs ; 26 Dems. 

1813— Council, 6 Whigs ; 12 Dems. House, 23 Whigs; 35 Dems. 

1844— Council, 13 Whigs; 6 Dems. House, 40 Whigs ; 18 Dems. - 

1845— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 30 Whigs; 27 Dems; 1 
Native American. 

1846— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 40 Whigs ; 18 Dems. 

1847— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 38 Whigs; 20 Dems. 

1848— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 39 Whigs ; 19 Dems, 

1849— Senate, 10 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, S3 Whigs; 25 Dems. 

1850— Senate, 9 Whigs ; 11 Dems. House, 25 Whigs; 35 Dems. 

1851— Senate, 10 Whigs ; 10 Dems. House, 28 Whigs ; 30 Dems. 

1852— Senate, 13 Dems. ; 7 Whigs. House, 45 Dems ; 15 Whigs. 

1853— Senate, 13 Dems ; 7 Whigs. House, 39 Dems. ; 21 Whigs. 

1854— Senate, 13 Dems ; 7 Whigs. House, 40 Dems. ; 20 Whigs. 

1855— Senate, 10 Dems ; 9 Whigs; 1 Native American. House, 29 
Dems. ; 25 Whigs; 6 Native American. 

1856— Senate, 11 Dems ; 5 Whigs; 4 Native American. House, 30 
Dems. ; 14 Whigs; 1 Ind. Dem. ; 15 Native American. 

1857— Senate, 11 Dems.; 6 Whigs; 3 Know Nothings. House, 38 
Dems. ; Combined opposition. 22. 

1858— Both Houses Democratic. 

1859— Senate, Democratic. House, Opposition. 

1860— Senate, Democratic. House 30 Dem ; 28 Rep. ; 2 American. 

1861— Senate, Republican. House. Democratic. 

1S62— .Senate, Democrats and Republicans, tie; Independent, 1. 
House, Democratic. Democratic majority on joint ballot, 3. 

1863— Both Houses Democratic. • 

1864— Both Houses Democratic. 

1865 — Senate, Democratic. House, a tie. 

1866— Both Houses Republican. 

1867— Both Houses Republican. 

1868— Both Houses Democratic. 

1869— Both Houses Democratic. 

1870 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1871— Both Houses Republican. 

1872— Both Houses Republican. 

1873— Both Houses Republican. 

1874— Senate, 14 Republicans, 7 Democrats. House, 32 Republi- 
cans, 28 Democrats. 

1875— Senate, 13 Republicans, 8 Democrats. House, 41 Democrats, 
19 Republicans. 

1876— Both Houses Republican. 

1877— Senate. 11 Democrats, 10 Republicans. House, a tie. 

1878— Both Houses Democratic. 

1879— Both Houses Republican. 

1880— Both Houses Republican. 

1881— Both Houses Republican. 

1882— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1883— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 35 Democrats, 
25 Republicans. 

1884— fcenate. Republican. House, Democratic. 

18>5— Both Houses Republican. 

1886— Both Houses Republican. 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 169 

1887— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 32 Democrats, 
26 Republicans, 2 Labor Democrats. 

1888— Senate, 12 Republicans, 9 Democrats. House, 37 Republicans, 
23 Democrats. 

1889— Senate, 11 Democrats, 10 Republicans. House, 32 Democrats, 
28 Republicans. 

1890— Senate, 11 Republicans, 10 Democrats. Hovise, 37 Democrats, 
23 Republicans. 

1891— Senate, 14 Democrats, 7 Republicans. House, 40 Democrats, 

20 Republicans. 

1892— Senate, 16 Democrats, 5 Republicans. House, 42 Democrats, 
18 Republicans. 
1893— Senate, 16 Democrats, 5 Republicans. House, 39 Democrats, 

21 Republicans. 

1894— Senate. 11 Republicans, 10 Democrats. House, 39 Republi- 
cans, 20 Democrats, 1 Ind Dein. 

1895— Senate, 16 Republicans, 5 Democrats. House, 54 Republicans, 
6 Democrats. 

1896 — Senate, 18 Republicans, 3 Democrats. Hoiue, 43 Republicanfi, 
16 Democrats.] Ind. 

1897— Senate, 18 Republicans, 3 Democrats. House, 56 Republicans, 
4 Democrats. 

1898— Senate, 14 Republicans, 7 Democrats. House, 37 Republicans, 
23 Democrats. 

1899— Senate, 14 Republicans, 7 Democrats. House, 37 Republicans, 
23 Democrats. 



170 



NEW ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 



THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 



The new Electoral College has a total of 447 votes, diyided among 
the forty -five States as follows : 



Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 9 

Colorado 4 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Idaho 3 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana i 8 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota 9 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

Montana 8 



Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Carolina 11 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 4 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Utah 3 

Vermont 4 

Virginia 12 

Washington 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 

Wyoming 3 



Total ; 447 



At the election for President and Vice President of the United 
States, held in November, 1888, the following was the result, by 
States, for the tick/sts of the two great parties— Republican and 
Democratic : 

Votes foe Harrison and Morton (Rep.)— California, 8 ; Colorado, 
3 ; Illinois, 22 ; Indiana, 15 ; Iowa, 13 ; Kansas, 9 ; Maine, 6 ; Massa- 
chusetts, 14; Michigan, 13; Minnesota, 7; Nebraska, 5; Nevada, 3; 
New Hampshire, 4; New York, 36; Ohio, 23; Oregon, 3; Pennsyl- 
vania, 30 ; Rhode Island, 4 ; Vermont. 4 ; Wisconsin, 11. Total, 233. 

Votes FOR Cleveland AND ThtjrmanCDem.)— Alabama, 10; Arkan- 
sas, 7 ; Connecticut, 6 ; Delaware, 3 ; Florida, 4 ; Georgia, 12 ; Ken- 
tucky, 13 : Louisiana, 8 ; Marvland, 8 ; Mississippi, 9 ; Missouri, 16 ; 
New Jersey, 9 ; North Carolina, 11 ; South Carolina, 9 ; Tennessee, 
12; Texas, 13 ; Virginia, 12; West Virginia, 6. Total, 168. 

Since then the following new States have been admitted : Montana, 
Washington, South Dakota, North Dakota, Wyoming, Idaho and 
Utah. 

For Electoral vote for President, 1892, see page 138. 



ELECTORAL VOTE, 



171 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1892. 



For Cleveland, Dem. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Maryland 8 

Michigan 5 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Carolina 11 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio : 1 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Virginia 12 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin „ 12 

277 



For Harrison, Rep. 

California 1 

Iowa 13 

Maine 6 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 9 

Minnesota ,... 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

New Hampshire 4 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio 22 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania.. 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Dakota 4 

Vermont 4 

Washington 4 

Wyoming 3 

145 
For Weaver, Pop. 

Colorado 4 

Idaho 3 

Kansas 10 

Nevada 3 

North Dakota „ 1 

Oregon 1 

22 



Cleveland over Harrison, 132. 

Cleveland over Harrison and Weaver, 110. 



172 



ELECTORAL VOTE, 



ELBCTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1896. 



For McKinley, Rep. 

California 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kentucky 12 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota 9 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

Vermont 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 



McKinley's majority, 95. 



271 



For Bryan, Dem. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 1 

Colorado 4 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Idaho 3 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana 8 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

North Carolina 11 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 4 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Utah 3 

Virginia 12 

Washington 4 

Wyoming 3 

176 



THE EXECUTIVE. 



PREROGATIVES AND DUTIES OF THE 
GOVERNOR. 

The Gov^ernor is Commander-in-Chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; is President {ez-officio) of the 
Board of Trustees of Princeton and Kutgers Colleges, and 
also of Burlington College, and of the Board of Managers 
of the Geological Survey. He is Chairman of the State 
Beard of Canvassers, and has power to fill any vacancy for 
New Jersey that may occur in the United States Senate, 
duriug a recess of the Legislature. 

He is a member of the following Boards: Trustees of 
School Fund; Kiparian Commissioners; Court of Pardons; 
Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund ; Premium 
Committee of the New Jersey State Agricultural Society; 
Commissioners of the State Library and State House Com- 
mission. 

With the advice and consent of the Senate, he has the 
power of appointing the following officers : Chancellor, Chitt 
Justice; Judges of the Supreme Court and Circuit Courts; 
Inferior Courts and Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and 
Appeals; Attorney-General, Secretary of State, Clerk of the 
Court of Chancery, Clerk of the Supreme Court, Keeper of 
the State Prison, a Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, 
a Superintendent of Public Instruction, Prosecutors of the 
Pleas, Visitors to the State Board of Agriculture, State Board 
of Assessors, State Board of Education, Chief of Bureau of 
Labor Statistics, Major-General, Quartermaster-General, Ad- 
jutant-General, Inspector of Factories and Workshops, Super- 
visor of the State Prison, six Inspectors of the State Prison, 
Commissionei*s of Pilotage, the Board of Managers of the 
State Hospitals, the Trustees of the Jaraesburg Kefoim School 
and the State Industrial School for Girls, Judges of the 
District Courts, Riparian Commissioners, Commissioners of 
Fisheries, Managers for the Home for Feeble-Minded Women, 
Port Wardens and Harbor Masters, State Board of Medical 
Examiners. 

Without the consent of the Senate : Foreign Commissioners 
of Deeds; New Jersey State Pharmaceutical Associaiii n, and 
- U73) 



1?4 THE EXECUTIVE. 

State Board of Health, State Board of Dentistry, Inspectors 
of Steamb ats, Private Secretary, Notaries Public, Moral 
Instructors of the State Prison, Railroad Policemen, and fill 
all vacancies that occur in any office during a recei-s of the 
Legislature, which offices are to be filled by the Governor 
and Senate, or Legislature in Joint Meeting; also, vacancies 
happening in the offices of Clerk or Surrogate in any county ; 
i-snes warrants for the admission of blind and feeble-minded 
children into institutions; grants requisitions and renditions, 
and has power to offer rewards for apprehending and secur- 
ing persons charged with certain crimes; signs or vetoes 
all bills and joint resolutions passed by the Legislature; 
has power to convene the Legislature, or Senate alone, if, 
in his opinion, public necessity requires it; grants, under 
the Great Seal of the State, commissions to all such officers 
as require to be comraisbicned; has right to borrow money 
for the State; sign all leases or grants issued by the Riparian 
Commissioners; he has power to reprieve in cases of capital 
puni.-hraent, and to suspend lines at any time not exceeding 
ninety days after convictii n, and in case of pardon or com- 
mutation of sentence, the Governor's vote in the affirmative 
is necessary. 

Besides all these duties, the Governor finds it necessary 
to read and answer a large mass of corre>pondence, which 
comes to the department daily. All bills and joint reso- 
lutions passed by the Legislature are compared, and then 
indexed in the Executive Department, before presentation 
to the Governor. 

He receives a salary of $10,000 a year, and is not allowed 
any fees or perquisites whatever. 

His term of office is three years. 



OFFICES FILLED BY THE LEGISLATURE 
IN JOINT MEETING. 

State Treasurer. State Comptroller, Commissioners of 
Deeds and State Director of Railroads and Canals. 



PRKStDENTS. 



m 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Year of 
Qualificat'n. 



1789 

1797. 

1801. 

1809. 

1817. 

18-24., 

1^2^., 

1837. 

1841.. 

1811. 

1845 

1849 

1850., 

1853., 

1857.. 

1861., 

1865. 

1869. 

1877. 

1881. 

1881. 

1885.. 

1889.. 

1893. 

1897. 



Name. 



George Washington 

John Adams 

Thomas Jefferson 

James Madison 

James Monroe 

John Qiiincy Adams 

Andrew Jackson 

Martin Van Buren 

\Vm. Henry Harrison*.. 

John Tyler 

James Knox Polk 

Zachary Taylorf 

Millard Fillmore 

Franklin Pierce 

James Buchanan 

Abraham Lincoln* 

Andrew Johnson 

Ulysses S. Grant 

Rutherford B. Hayes.... 

James A. Garfield** 

Chester A. Arthur 

Grover Cleveland 

Benjamin Harrison 

Grover Cleveland ' 

William McKinlev .... 



Term of Office. 



Virginia 

Massachusetts .. 

Virginia . 

Virginia.. 

Virginia 

Massachusetts .. 

Tennessee 

New York 

Ohio 

Virginia 

Tennessee 

Louisiana 

New York.. 

NewHampshire 
Pennsylvania ... 

Illinois 

Tennessee 

Illinois 

Ohio 

Ohio 

New York 

New York 

Indiana 

New York 

Ohio 



8 years. 
4 years. 
8 years. 
8 years. 
8 5'ears. 
4 years. 
8 years. 
4 years. 
1 month. 

3 yrs., 11 mos. 

4 years. 

1 yr., 4 mos., 5 d. 

2yrs.,10mo.,26d. 

4 years. 

4 years. 

4yrs.,l mo., 10 d. 

3yrs.,10mo.,20d. 

8 years. 

4 years. 

6 mns., 15 days. 

3 yrs., 5 mo., 15 a 

4 years. 
4 years. 
4 years 



* Died in office April 4, 1841, when Vice-President Tyler succeeded him. 
■f Died in office July 9, 1850, when Vice-President Fillmore succeeded him. 
I Assassinated April 14 , 1865, when Vice-President Johnson succeeded him. 
** Assassinated July 2, ISSI ; died September 19. 1881, when Vice-Presi- 
dent Arthur succeeded him. 



176 



VICE PRESIDENTS. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Year of Qualification. 


Name. 


Where From. 


1789 






1797 


Thomas Jefferson 


Virginia. 
New York 


1801 


Aaron Burr 


1804 


G orge Clinton 

Elbridge Gerry 


New York. 


1813 


Massachusetts 


1817 




New York. 


1824 






1833 




New York. 


1837 




Kentucky. 
Virginia. 
New Jersey. 
Pennsylvania. 
New York. 


1841 


John Tyler 


1842 




1845 


George M. Dallas 


1849 


Millard Fillmore 

William R. King§ 


1851 


Alabama. 


1853 


David R. Atchinsong 




1855 


Jesse D. Brightg.. 

John C Breckenridge 


Indiana. 


1857 


Kentucky. 
Maine. 


1861 




1865 


Andrew Johnson 


Tennessee. 


1865 


Lafayette C. Fosterg 


Connecticut. 


1869 






1873 


Henry Wilsonlj 


Massachusetts. 


1875 


Thomas W. Ferry? 


Michigan. 
New York. 


1877 . .. 


William A. Wheeler 


1881 


Chester A Arthur 


New York. 


1883 




Vermont. 


1S85 


Thomas A. Hendricksft 




1886 




Ohio. 


1889 




New York. 


1893 


Adiai E Stevenson.................... 


Illinois. 


1F97 


Garret A Hobart 


New Jersey. 







4 



Ex-officio as President pro tern, of Senate. 
Died in office November 22, 1875. 
Died in office November 25, 1885. 



SPECIAL ELECTION-1897. 



A special election was held on Tuesday, September 28th, 
1897, on proposed amendments to the State Constitution. 

One made paragraph 2, Section VII , of Article IV , read 
as follows : 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the legislature or 
otherwise in this State, and no tickei in any lottery shall be 
bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, book- 
making or gambling of any kind be authorized or allowed 
within this State, nor shall any gambling device, practice or 
game of chance now prohibited by law be legalized, or the 
remedy, penalty or punishment now provided therefor be in 
any way diminished. 

This was adopted by a vote of 70,443 to 69,642. 

Another made the following addition to Section XI [. of 
Article V. : 

No person who shall have been nominated to the senate by 
the governor for any office of trust or pro6t under the govern- 
ment of this State, and shall not have been confirmed before 
the recess of the legislature, shall be eligible for appointment 
to such office during the continuance of such recess. 

This was adopted by a vote of 73,722 to 66,296. 

Another amended Section I , Article II , as follows : 

And every female citizen of the United States of the age 
of twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this 
State one year and of the county of which she claims her 
vote five months next before said meeting, shall be entitled to 
vote at atiy school meeting hel<i in any school district of this 
State, in which she may reside, for members of boards of 
education and all other school officers that now are or here- 
after may be elected at such meetings. 

This was defeated, the affirmative vote being 65,021, and 
the negative 75,170. 

The amendments adopted became a part of the Constitution 
on October 26th, 1897, the date of the Governor's proclamar 
tion to that effect 

The following is the vote in detail by counties; 

(177) 
32 



178 



SPECIAL ELECTION— 1897. 





ANTI- 
GAMBLING. 


AD-INTERIM 
APPOINTM'NTS 


WOMAN 
SUFFR.aGE. 


h 


COUNTIES. 


1 

1.193 
2,926 
3 437 
5,406 

784 
2,957 
12,189 
2,332 
7,342 
2,320 
3,560 
3,096 
3.633 
3,384 

857 
4,051 
1,658 
1900 

921 
4,543 
2,054 


< 

2,099 

2.279 

5,304 

202 

586 

12,213 

1,190 

16,512 

753 

4,673 

2,619 

4,429 

1,191 

616 

5,734 

524 

733 

323 

5,766 

723 


1 


I 

< 


J., 

1,15(' 
2,703 
3,431 
4,899 

755 
2,66 i 
10,445 
2.03i 
7,431 
2,U2 
3,412 
2,518 
3,906 
3,140 

803 
3,752 
1,573 
1,616 

892 
3,915 
1,841 


a 

< 


i 

^2 


Atlantic 


1,210 
3,130 
3,563 
5,577 

800 
2,925 
12,713 
2,271 
8,293 
2,320 
3,795 
3,428 
4,(61 
3,397 

888 
4,188 
1619 
1,892 

982 
4,607 
2,063 


1,155 

1,895 

2,151 

5,124 

18h 

619 

11,590 

1,251 

15,558 

753 

4,433 

2.282 

4,002 

1,153 

585 

5,582 

563 

741 

262 

5,696 

715 


1,26 
2,432 
2,286 
5,804 

231 

881 

13,853 

1,491 

16,413 

931 
4,818 
3,196 
4,15t 
1,435 

670 
6,031 

609 
1,017 

352 
6,413 

937 


13 
41 


Burlington 


43 




59 


Cape Maj' 

Cumberland 

Essex 


4 

14 

211 

5 




160 


Hunterdon 


14 




73 


Middlesex 


29 




8? 


Morris 


48 




12 


Passaic 


51 


Salem 

Somerset 


3 

8 


Sussex 


4 


Union 

Warren 


80 
7 






Totals 


70 443 

8U1 


69,642 


73,722 
7.426 


66,296 


65,021 


75.170 
10,149 


%1 


Majority 





The following counties gave majorities in favor of the 
anti-gambling amendment: 

Atlantic, 20; Bergen, 827; Burlington, 1,158; Camden, 
102; Cape May, 582; Cumberland, 2 371 ; Gloucester, 1,142 ; 
Hunterdon, 1,567; Middlesex, 477; Morris, 2,193; Ocean, 
241; Salem, 1,134; Somerset, 1,167; Sussex, 598; Warren, 
1,331. Total, 14,910. 

The following counties gave majorities against the amend- 
ment : 

Essex, 124; Hudson, 9,170; Mercer, 1,113; Monmouth, 
796; Passaic, 1,683; Union, 1,223. Total, 14,109. 

Net majority for the amendment, 801. 



g^" A question as to the adoption of the anti-gambling 
amendment was before the courts at the time the Manual 
went to press. 



PRESIDENTIAL TICKETS, 1896. 



REPUBLICAN. 

For President, William McKinley, of Ohio ; for Vice- 
President, Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 

Presidential Electors -Samuel H. Grey, John F. Dry- 
den, Thomas W. Trenchard. Washington A. Roebling, 
Adolph Mack, Alfred R. Whitney. J. Hull Browning, 
James T. Ball, George F Perkins, Ernest R. Ackerman. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

For President, William Jennings Bryan, of Nebraska ; 
for Vice-President, Arthur Sewall, of Maine. 

Presidential Electors — Johnston Cornish, Theodore 
Budd, David M. Chambers, Isaac W. Carmichael, James J. 
Meehan, William C. Barrick, Carleton M. Herrick, Jere- 
miah O'Rourke, James F. Minturn, Edwin A. Rayner. 

NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC. 

For President, John M Palmer, of Illinois ; for Vice- 
President, Simon B. Buckner, of Kentucky. 

Presidential Electors -Ashbel Green, Joseph Wills, 
Thomas P. Curley, Gardner H Cain, Richard V. Linda- 
bury, Carman F. Randolph, William P. Ellery, Eugene 
Vanderpool, I'Jelson J. H. Edge, Stephen M. Williams. 

NATIONAL PROHIBITION. 

For President, Joshua Levering, of Maryland ; for Vice- 
President, Hale Johnson, of Illinois. 

Presidential Electors -Adna B. Leonard, William H. 
Nicholson Thomas Annadown, Henry B. Howell, George 
La Monte, Franklin P. Lefferts, Peter L Conklin, Rich- 
ardson Gray, Joel W. Brown, Joel G. Van Cise. 

SOCIALIST-LABOR. 

For President, Charles H. Matchett, of New York; for 
Vice President, Mathew Maguire, of New Jersey. 

Presidential Electors -Thomas Walsh, William Walker, 
Randolph S. Miller, James Bell, Cornelius Zimmerman, 
Gustave Evvald, Albin Strobel, Ferdinand Williams, Ed- 
ward Gilmore, Richard Sperling. 

(179) 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 



CHAPTER 214. 

An Act making appropriations for the support of the 
state government and for several public purposes for 
the fiscal year ending October thirty-first, one thou- 
sand eight hundred and ninety-nine. 
Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of 
the State of New Je^ sey : 

1. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary, be and they are hereby appropriated out of 
the state fund for the respective public oflScers and for 
the several purposes herein specified, for the fiscal year 
ending on the thirty-first day of October, in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, namely : 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

For the governor, for salary, ten thousand dollars; 

For the private secretary of the governor, for salary, 
two thousand dollars; 

For compensation for assistants in the executive depart- 
ment, two thousand dollars; 

For blanks and stationery for the use of the executive 
department, three hundred dollars; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the executive department, eight hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

Ojffic'e of the Comptroller. 

For the comptroller, for salary, six thousand dollars; 

For the first assistant in the comptroller's ofiice, for 
salary, twenty-five hundred dollars; 

For compensation for other clerical service in the 
comptroller's ofiice, four thousand dollars; 

For blanks and stationery for vise in the office of the 
comptroller, five hundred dollars; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the comptroller's office, eight hundred dollars. 

Office of the Treasurer. 

For the treasurer, for salary, six thousand dollars; 
For compensation for clerical services in the office of 

(180) 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W, 181 

the treasurer, including assistants employed in the man- 
agement of the sinking fund, fifty-nine hundred dollars; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the ojQ5ce of the 
treasurer, five hundred dollars; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of the treasurer, six hundred dollars. 

Office of the Secretary of State. 

For the secretary of state, for salary, six thousand 
dollars : 

For the assistant secretary of state, for salary, three 
thousand dollars ; 

For compensation for all clerical services in the office 
of secretary of state, ten thousand five hundred and sixty 
dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of secretary of state, one thousand three 
hundred and fifty dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
secretary of state, four thousand seven hundred and fifty 
dollars ; 

For compiling and indexing the election laws, two 
hundred and fifty dollars. 

attorney-general's department. 

For the attorney-general, for salary, seven thousand 
dollars ; 

For compensation and expenses of assistants employed 
by the attorney-general, seventy-three hundred dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
attorney-general, four hundred dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the attoiney-general's department, seven hundred 
dollars ; 

For master's fees for taking affidavits for the attorney- 
general's office, which shall include all such service 
required for the year, one hundred dollars ; 

For the contingent fund, to be expended only with 
the approval of the governor and comptroller, for the 
fees of assistant attorneys and counsel in litigations 
which may arise under chapter one hundred and fifty- 
nine of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-four and chapter two hundred and eight of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight in 
the enforcement of corporate taxation, twenty-five hun- 
dred dollars. 



182 THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 



STATE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

For the members of the state board of assessors, for 
salaries, ten thousand dollars ; 

For secretary of the state board of assessors, for salary, 
twenty-five hundred dallars ; 

For compensation for clerical service in the ofi&ce of the 
state board of assesssors, forty-five hundred dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
state board of assessors, seven hundred dollars ; 

For postage expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the state board of assessors, five hundred and fifty 
dollars ; 

For compensation of surveyors, local assessors and wit- 
nesses, pursuant to chapter one hundred and one of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four, 
five thousand dollars ; 

DEPARTMENT OF BANKING AND INSURANCE. 

For the commisioner of banking and insurance, for 
salary,. four thousand dollars ; 

For the deputy commissioner of banking and insurance, 
for salary, twenty-five hundred dollars ; 

For compensation for assistants in the department of 
banking and insurance, forty seven hundred and eighty 
dollars ; 

For blanks and stationer}^ for use in the department of 
banking and insurance, twelve hundred and fifty dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the department of banking and insurance, six hundred 
dollars. 

STATE BOARD OF TAXATION. 

For the members of the state board of taxation, for sal- 
aries, ten thousand dollars ; 

For assistants in the office of the state board of taxation, 
two thousand nine hundred and seventy dollars ; 

For blanks and stationer}^ for use in the office of the 
state board of taxation, one hundred and fifty dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of state board of taxation, three hundred 
dollars. 

STATE I.IBRARY. 

For the librarian, for salary, two thousand dollars ; 

For compensation for assistants in the state library, two 
thousand one hundred dollars ; 

For the repair, preservation and purchase of useful 
books for the state library, three thousand dollars ; 



THE APPRO PR I A TION LAW. 183 

For blanks, stationery, postage, expressage and other 
incidental expenses for the state library, five hundred 
dollars. 

STATE BOARD OF HEJAI^TH. 

For the state board of health, pursuant to the provi- 
sions of chapter sixty- eight, laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-seven, six thousand dollars ; 

For compensation to the secretary of said board, pursu- 
ant to said chapter, twenty-five hundred dollars ; 

For expenses to be incurred pursuant to chapter two 
hundred and twenty five, laws of one thousand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-six, fifteen hundred dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in office of state board 
of health, twelve hundred dollars ; 

For maintenance of the bacteriological laboratory, three 
thousand dollars ; 

For legal expenses incurred by the state board of 
health, one thousand dollars ; 

For postage required in sending to the physicians of 
this state the annual report of the state board of health 
and of the bureau of vital statistics, two hundred and 
twenty-five dollars ; 

For additional clerical assistance in the office of the 
state board of health, one thousand two hundred dollars. 

BUREAU OF STATISTICS. 

For the chief of the bureau of statistics, for salary, 
twenty-five hundred dollars ; 

For the secretary of the bureau of statistics, for salary, 
fifteen hundred dollars ; 

For the current expenses of the bureau of statistics, 
four thousand dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
bureau of statistics, two hundred and fifty dollars. 

STATE DAIRY COMMISSIONER. 

For the commissioner, for salary, two thousand dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery and for the actual necessary 
expenses of the dairy commissioner in enforcing the 
laws relating to milk, oleomargarine, foods and drugs, 
and in performing all other duties charged upon him by 
law, ten thousand dollars. 

STATE HOUSE COMMISSION. 

For the governor, treasurer and comptroller, for the 
care and safe keeping of the state capitol, the property 



184 THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 

therein and adjacent public grounds, and for expenses 
to be incurred in carrying out the provisions of chapter 
three hundred and thirty-nine of the laws of one thou- 
sand eight hundred and ninety-four, fifty-five thousand 
dollars; 

For the governor, treasurer and comptroller, to be 
expended for supervising services in carrying out the 
provisions of chapter four hundred and thirteen of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, five 
hundred dollars. 

STATE MUSKUM. 

For curator, for salary, fifteen hundred dollars; 
For the commission to acquire new material for the 
museum, five hundred dollars. 

GE01.0GICAI, SURVEY. 

For salaries and expenses of department of geological 
survey and for the completion of the geological survey 
of this state pursuant to chapter three hundred of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, 
eight thousand dollars; 

For expenses in connection with the publication of the 
reports and maps of the geological survey, five thousand 
dollars. 

SUPREME COURT. 

For the chief justice and associate justices of the 
supreme court, for salaries, eighty-two thousand dollars; 

For the judges of the circuit courts, appointed pursuant 
to chapter seventy-eight, laws of one thousand eight hun- 
dred and ninety -three, for salaries, twenty-two thousand 
five hundred dollars; 

For compensation of sergeants-at-arms and criers, one 
thousand three hundred dollars. 

OFFICE OF CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

For the clerk of the supreme court, for salary, six thou- 
sand dollars ; 

For compensation for clerical service in the oflSce of the 
clerk of the supreme court, fifteen thousand nine hundred 
dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
clerk of the supreme court, twelve hundred and fifty dol- 
lars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expeUvSes 
for the oflGice of the clerk of the supreme court, twelve 
hundred and fifty dollars. 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 185 

COURT OF CHANCKRY. 

For the chancellor, for salary, ten thousand dollars ; 

For the vice-chancellors, for salaries, forty-five thousand 
dollars ; 

For compensation of sergeants-at-arms, thirty-five hun- 
dred dollars ; 

For compensation of stenographers, seven thousand five 
hundred dollars ; 

For compensation and allowance of advisory masters, 
fifteen hundred dollars ; 

For rent of rooms in Camden, Jersey City and Newark, 
for use of chancellor, vice-chancellors and advisory mas- 
ters, forty-five hundred dollars ; 

For miscellaneous expenses in connection with such 
rooms, two hundred dollars. 

OFFICE OF CI.FRK IN CHANCERY. 

For the clerk in chancery, for salary, six thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For compensation for clerical service in the office of 
the clerk in chancery, twenty-two thousand dollars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
clerk in chancery, one thousand eight hundred dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of the clerk in chancery, twelve hundred 
dollars, 

COURT OF ERRORvS AND APPEALS 

For compensation of judges of the court of errors and 
appeals, five thousand five hundred dollars ; 

For compensation of officers of court of errors and 
appeals, five hundred and twenty-five dollars. 

COURT OF PARDONS. 

For per diem allowance and mileage for judges of 
court of pardons, twenty-one hundred dollars ; 

For compensation of subordinate officers, two hundred 
and fifty dollars. 

LAW AND EQUITY REPORTS. 

For the publication of the chancery reports, four 
thousand dollars ; 

For the publication of the law reports, thirty-four 
hundred dollars ; 

For salary of chancery reporter, five hundred dollars ; 

For salary of supreme court reporter, five hundred 
dollars : 



186 THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 

For binding chancery and law reports, fourteen hun- 
dred dollars. 

NATIONAI, GUARD. 

For expenses for division, brigade and regimental head- 
quarters, forty-five hundred dollars ; 

For allowances for gatling-gun companies, fifteen hun- 
dred dollars ; 

For allowances to cavalry troops, two thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For allowances to companies of the national guard, at 
the rate of five hundred dollars each, twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars ; 

For hospital and ambulance corps, one thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For transportation for battalion drills, inspections and 
parades, and pay of brigade inspectors, three thousand 
dollars ; 

For compensation of officers and employes and expenses 
incurred in connection with rifle range and practice, ten 
thousand dollars ; 

For pay of officers and enlisted men and expenses 
incurred in connection with annual encampment, forty- 
one thousand dollars ; 

For compensation of superintendent and employes and 
for forage, fuel and maintenance of the state camp 
grounds, seven thousand dollars ; 

For expenses, repairs, water and maintenance of the 
state arsenal, fifteen hundred dollars ; 

For expenses of military boards and courts-martial, 
five hundred dollars . 

For military expenses incident to the signal and tele- 
graph corps, pursuant to chapter three hundred and sixty- 
nine of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-five, six hundred dollars ; 

For transportation of disabled soldiers to the home at 
Kearny, fifty dollars ; 

For maintaining, heating and lighting the armories in 
Paterson, Jersey City and Camden, the sum of four thou- 
sand dollars for each armory, twelve thousand dollars ; 

For pay and expenses of officer detailed from U. S. aimy 
for military instruction to officers and enlisted men of the 
national guard, six hundred dollars. 

ADJUTANT GENERAI^'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the adjutant-general, for salary, one thousand two 
hundred dollars ; 

For compensation for clerical service in the adjutant- 
general's office, four thousand dollars ; 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 187 

For blanks and stationery for use in the adjutant-gen- 
eral's oflfice, seven hundred dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the adjutant-general's office, four hundred dollars. 

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAI^S DEPARTMENT. 

For the quartermaster-general, for salary, twelve hun- 
dred dollars ; 

For compensation for assistants in the department of 
the quartermaster-general, seventy-seven hundred dol- 
lars ; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the quartermaster- 
general's department, two hundred dollars ; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the quartermaster-general's department, one hundred 
dollars. 

MONMOUTH BATTI^E MONUMENT. 

For the commission having in charge the Monmouth 
battle monument and grounds, pursuant to chapter one 
hundred and eighteen of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six, five hundred dollars 

PENSIONS. 

For amount required to pay pensions, pursuant to 
various acts relative thereto, thirty-two hundred and 
eighty-four dollars ; 

For traveling expenses incurred in examining pension 
claims of New Jersey volunteers, four hundred dollars. 

HOME FOR DIS.\BLED SOI^DIERS. 

For support of the New Jersey home for disabled 
soldiers and for the chaplain thereof, twenty thousand 
dollars ; 

For the purchase of additional ground for a burial plot 
for the home for disabled soldiers at Kearny, New 
Jersey, three thousand dollars. 

SOI.DIERS' STATE PAY. 

For claims of volunteers in the late war, for state pay, 
pursuant to chapter thirteen of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-one, one hundred dollars. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY. 

For trustees of the Washington association of New 
Jersey, twenty-five hundred dollars ; 



188 THE APPROPRIA TION LA IV. 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICUI^TURE. 

For the state board of agriculture, six thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For the state board of agriculture for the purpose of 
carrying out the provisions of an act to prevent the intro- 
duction into and the spread of injurious insects in New 
Jersey, to provide a method for compelling their destruc- 
tion, to create the office of state entomologist, to authorize 
inspection of nurseries and to provide for certificates of 
inspection, five hundred dollars. 

TUBERCUI.OSIS. 

For expenses and payments by the state tuberculosis 
commission, pursuant to chapter three hundred and sixty 
of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
five, five thousand dollars ; 

For expenses and payments by the state tuberculosis 
commission, the additional sum of twenty-five hundred 
dollars ; provided^ such sum shall be authorized by enact- 
ment of the present legislature 

AGRICUIvTURAI, EXPERIMENT STATION. 

For the expenses of the agricultural experiment station, 
fifteen thousand dollars. 

BOARD OF VISITORS TO THE AGRICULTURAI. COI.I.EGE 
OF NEW JERSEY. 
For the board of visitors to the agricultural college of 
New Jersey, for personal expenses incurred pursuant to 
chapter three hundred and sixty-five of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-three, fifty dollars ; 
For advertising, pursuant to chapter nine of the laws 
of one thousand eight hundred and sevent3'-nine, ninety 
dollars. 

STATE HOSP1TAI.S. 

For traveling expenses of managers, six hundred dol- 
lars ; 

For expenses in transferring insane convicts, two hun- 
dred dollars ; 

For medical examination of insane convicts, three 
hundred dollars. 

State Hospital at Trenton. 
For maintenance of county patients, fifty thousand 
dollars ; 
For support and clothing of insane convicts, at the rate 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 189 

of five dollars per week for each insane convict, seven 
thousand dollars ; 

For support and clothing of indigent patients in state 
hospital at Trenton, four thousand five hundred dollars ; 

For salaries of resident officers twelve thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For appraisement of personal property, seventy-five 
dollars. 

State Hospital at Morris Plains. 

For maintenance of county patients, forty-eight thou- 
sand five hundred dollars ; 

For support and clothing of insane convicts, at the rate 
of fi\^ dollars per week for each insane convict, fifteen 
thousand dollars ; 

For support and clothing of indigent patients in state 
hospital at Morris Plains, thirteen thousand dollars ; 

For salaries of resident officers, twelve thousand one 
hundred dollars : 

FoY appraisement of personal property, seventy-five 
dollars ; 

For improvements at the state hospital at Morris 
Plains, pursuant to chapter two hundred and ninety- 
seven of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-five, provided that no contract shall be awarded 
without the approval of the governor, one hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

COUNTY I.UNATIC ASYLUMS. 

For the support of county patients in Essex county 
lunatic asylum, seventy-five thousand dollars ; 

In the Hudson county lunatic asylum, fifty thousand 
dollars ; 

In the Camden county lunatic asylum, seventeen thou- 
sand five hundred dollars ; 

In the Burlington county lunatic asylum, six thousand 
dollars ; 

In the Passaic county lunatic asylum, forty-two hun- 
dred dollars ; 

In the Gloucester county lunatic asylum, nineteen hun- 
dred dollars ; 

In the Cumberland county lunatic asylum, seventeen 
hundred dollars ; 

In the Salem county lunatic asylum, twelve hundred 
dollars ; 

In the Atlantic county lunatic asylum, four thousand 
five hundred dollars. 



190 THE APPROPRIA TION LA IV. 



STATE PRISON. 

For maintenance of convicts, ninety thousand dollars ; 

For furniture and repairs of state prison, ten thousand 
dollars ; 

For the principal keeper, for salary, three thousand 
five hundred dollars ; 

For the supervisor, for salary, three thousand dollars ; 

For the deputy keepers and employes, for salaries, 
eighty-four thousand dollars ; 

For the six inspectors, for salaries, three thousand dol- 
lars ; 

For the keeper, for payments to discharged convicts, 
three thousand dollars; 

For teacher and moral instructor to the convicts in 
the state prison, pursuant to section seven, chapter one 
hundred and fifty-five of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and seventy-six, for salary, one thousand dollars. 



REFORM SCHOOI< FOR BOYS. 

For the trustees of the New Jersey state reform school 
for boys, pursuant to chapter one hundred and ninety- 
five of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety- hree, sixty-two thousand dollars; 

For the trustees of said school, for expenses incurred 
by them in the discharge of their duties, pursuant to 
chapter four hundred and seventy-nine of the laws of 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, two hundred 
and fifty dollars; 

For the trustees of said school, for the purpose of erect- 
ing and furnishing a suitable chapel for the use of the 
school, provided, that no contract shall be awarded until 
approved by the governor, fifteen thousand dollars. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

For the trustees of the New Jersey state industrial 
school for girls for the support of and necessary repairs 
to the school, pursuant to chapter eighty-six of the laws 
of one thousand eight hundred and ninety, twenty-one 
thousand dollars; 

For the trustees and lady managers of said school, for 
expenses incurred in the discharge of their duties, pur- 
suant to chapter four hundred and twenty-eight of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one, 
one hundred dollars. 



THE APPRO PR I A TION LAW. 191 

STATE BOARD OF ARBITRATION. 

For the members of the board of arbitration, for 
salaries, six thousand dollars ; 

For the secretary of the state board of arbitration, for 
salary, two hundred dollars ; 

For blanks, stationery and other incidentals for use in 
the office of the state board of arbitration, one hundred 
dollars. 

BOARD OF FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONERS. 

For the fish and game wardens, including the fish and 
game protector, for compensation, fifteen thousand six 
hundred dollars ; 

For expenses of the fish and game wardens and fish 
and game protector, five thousand one hundred dollars ; 

For expenses of the fish and game commissioners, 
eight hundred dollars ; 

For the purpose of stocking the waters of the state 
with food fishes and for defraying the cost of maintaining 
a hatchery, five thousand dollars. 

BLIND AND FEEBLE-MINDED. 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction of 
the blind persons, inhabitants of this state, fourteen 
thousand five hundred dollars ; 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction of 
the feeble-minded persons, inhabitants of this state, 
forty-seven thousand five hundred dollars ; 

For maintenance, support and instruction of feeble- 
minded women, twenty thousand dollars. 

FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS. 

For the inspector and six deputy inspectors of factories 
and workshops, for salaries, pursuant to chapter one hun- 
dred and eight, laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty-nine, eighty-five hundred dollars ; 

For the necessary expenses incurred by the inspector 
and his deputies in the discharge of their duties, pursuant 
to said law, two thousand dollars. 

STATE CHARITIES AID ASSOCIATION. 

For expenses of the association, six hundred dollars. 

WAR DEBT. 

For amount required to pay on account of the principal 
of the war debt, due January first, one thousand eight hun- 



192 THE APPRO PR I A TION LA W. 

dred and ninety-nine, one hundred and thirteen thousand 
dollars. 

SINKING FUND ACCOUNT. 

For the state treasurer for " sinking fund account," for 
payment on account of principal of the war debt falling 
due on the first day of January, one thousand eight hun- 
dred and ninety -nine, ten thousand dollars ; 

For the state treasurer for "sinking fund account," for 
payment of interest on war debt falling due January first 
and July first, one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
nine, seven thousand nine hundred and fifty dollars ; 

For the state treasurer for expenses in foreclosure and 
other necessary legal proceedings relative to sinking fund 
account, one thousand dollars. 

ADVERTISING 

For advertising proclamations issued by the governor, 
notices of the attorney-general in relation to delinquent 
miscellaneous corporations, and notices of the comptroller 
in regard to public printing, two thousand five hundred 
dollars. 

PRINTING. 

For printing and binding public documents, thirty-five 
thousand dollars ; 

For compensation of an expert printer for services in 
preparation of specifications forbids, supervision of work, 
examination of bills, and such other duties as may by law 
be imposed upon him, six hundred dollars ; 

For preparing index of sessions laws, one hundred 
dollars ; 

For printing and circulation of the laws seven thousand 
five hundred dollars. 

PUBUC ROADS. 

For public roads, pursuant.to the provisions of chapter 
two hundred and twenty-three of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety five, one hundred thousand 
dollars ; 

For public roads, the additional sum of fifty thousand 
dollars provided such sum shall be authorized by enact- 
nient of the present legislature ; 

For the state commissioner of public roads, for salary, 
fifteen hundred dollars ; 

For expenses for clerk hire, attorney and consulting 
engineer, fees, stationery and actual traveling expenses, 
one thousand five hundred dollars. 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 193 



OYSTER COMMISSION. 

To promote the propagation and growth of seed oysters 
and to protect the natural oyster beds of this state, to the 
close of the terms of commissioners, March thirtieth, one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, as provided in 
chapter one hundred and thirty-two of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-six, four thousand 
dollars ; 

For the preservation of clams, pursuant to chapter three 
hundred and fourteen of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-five, two thousand dollars. 

I.EGISI.ATURE. 

For compensation of senators and members of the gen- 
eral assembly, forty thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
three dollars and thirty-two cents ; 

For compensation of oflficers and employes of the legis- 
lature, thirty thousand one hundred and fifty dollars ; 

For stationery for use of the legislative session, pur- 
suant to chapter two hundred and eight of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, five hundred 
dollars ; 

For manuals of the legislature of New Jersey, pursuant 
to chapter eighteen of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-one, two thousand dollars ; 

For indexing the journal of the senate and minutes of 
the executive sessions and the minutes of the house of 
assembly, and other incidental and contingent expenses 
of the legislature, sixty-seven hundred dollars ; 

For toilet and other necessary supplies for use at the 
legislative session, to be furnished by the state house com- 
mission, seven hundred dollars. 

COI,I.ATERAL INHERITANCE TAX. 

For surrogates' fees, appraisers' compensation and 
expenses, legal and other disbursements, pursuant to 
chapter two hundred and ten of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-four, ten thousand dollars. 

INSURANCE. 

For insurance upon state house and contents thereof, 
two thousand dollars. 

REFUNDING TAXES ON EXEMPTED MISCELI^ANEOUS 
CORPORATIONS. 

For taxes improperly levied upon exempted corpora- 
tions and to be refunded pursuant to law, one thousand 
dollars. 

13 



194 THE A P PRO PR I A TION L A W 



WEATHER SERVICE. 

For the continuance of weather stations and prepara- 
tion, printing and distribution of reports, pursuant to 
chapter two hundred and fifty-eight of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two, one thousand 
dollars. 

BODIES THOWN UPON SHORES OF THE STATE BY 
SHIPWRECK. 

For expenses incurred in viewing bodies cast upon 
shores by shipwreck, one hundred dollars. 

BOARD OF PILOT COMMISSIONERS. 

For expenses incurred by the commissioners, pursuant 
to chapter three hundred and seven of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, twelve hundred 
dollars. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

To the treasurer of Rutgers college, for interest on 
forty-eight thousand dollars, certificate of indebtedness 
of the state of New Jersey due January first and July 
first, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-nine, pur- 
suant to the provisions of chapter one hundred and 
thirty-five of the laws of one thousand eight hundred • 
and ninety-six, two thousand four hundred dollars. 

PRESERVATION OF RECORDS 

For the purpose of publishing the early records of this 
state, known as " New Jersey Archives," three thousand 
five hundred dollars. 

RIPARIAN COMMISSION. 

For salaries of riparian commissioners, six thousand 
dollars; 

For expenses incurred in the prosecution of the work 
of the commissioners, six thousand dollars. 

OBSTRUCTIONS TO NAVIGATION. 

For expenses incurred in removing any boat, barge or 
scow stranded or sunk in any of the navigable rivers of 
this state, five hundred dollars, 



THE APPRO PR I A TION LA W. 195 



MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL AT 
BORDENTOWN. 

For maintenance of the manual training and industrial 
school at Bordentown, pursuant to the provisions of 
chapter three hundred and forty-nine of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, three thousand 
dollars. 

DEAF-MUTES. 

For the trustees of the New Jersey school for deaf- 
mutes, for the teaching, maintenance and clothing of 
pupils taught therein, for purchase and repair of furni- 
ture, school apparatus and other appliances, for making 
needed improvements and repairs in the buildings and 
grounds, for insurance thereof, and for maintaining the 
system of manual and industrial education in said school, 
forty-two thousand dollars. 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL- 

For the support of the state normal school, forty-two 
thousand dollars; 

For necessary repairs to the grounds, buildings and 
furniture, and for keeping the same insured, four thou- 
sand dollars. 

FREE SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 

For the formation of libraries in the free public schools 
of the state, five thousand five hundred dollars. 

FARNUM PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

For the support of the Farnum preparatory school at 
Beverly, twelve hundred dollars. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

For payments to schools established for industrial edu- 
cation, pursuant to chapter one hundred and sixty-four 
of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
one, nine thousand dollars ; 

For payments to schools for manual training, pursuant 
to chapter thirty-eight of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-eight, thirty-three thousand dollars ; 

For payments to schools established for industrial edu- 
cation, pursuant to chapter one hundred and fourteen of 
the laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight, 
three thousand dollars. 



196 THE A PPROPRIA TION LAW. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBI^IC INSTRUCTION. 

For salary of state superintendent of public instruction, 
three thousand dollars ; 

For clerical service in office of state superintendent of 
public instruction, five thousand dollars ; 

For stationery and blanks, two thousand dollars : 

For necessary incidental expenses incurred by the state 
superintendent of public instruction in the performance 
of his official duties and for supervision of manual train- 
ing, two thousand dollars. 

SCHOOL, FUND EXPENSES. 

For necessary legal and other expenses incurred by or 
under the direction of the trustees for the support of 
public schools in the investment and protection of the 
school fund, and in the collection of the income thereof, 
four thousand dollars 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

For necessary expenses of the state board of education, 
two thousand dollars. 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 

For expenses of teachers' institutes, three thousand 
dollars. 

TEACHERS' LIBRARIES. 

For establishment of libraries for use of teachers, six 
hundred dollars. 

SCHOOL CENSUS. 

For compensation of the person having in charge the 
taking of the school census, fifteen hundred dollars 

EMERGENCY. 

For the governor, to enable him to meet any emer- 
gency requiring the expenditure of money not otherwise 
appropriated, the sum of ten thousand dollars, said sum, 
or any part thereof, to be paid by the treasurer on the 
warrant of the comptroller upon accounts approved by 
the governor. 

NEWARK ARMORY. 

For the purpose of erecting an armory in the city of 
Newark, pursuant to chapter sixty-two of the laws of 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven, fifty thou- 
sard dollars. 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA IV. 197 



STATE REFORMATORY. 

For appropriation, pursuant to chapter three hundred 
and fifty-seven of the laws of one thousand eight hundred 
and ninety-five, five thousand dollars. 

NAVAI, RESERVE. 

Battalion of the west, for allowance for three divisions, 
at the rate of five hundred dollars each, fifteen hundred 
dollars ; 

For battalion headquarters, three hundred dollars ; 

For pay of ship-keeper, maintenance and expenses, 
four thousand five hundred dollars ; 

Battalion of the east, for allowance for three divisions, 
at the rate of five hundred dollars each, fifteen hundred 
dollars ; 

For battalion headquarters, three hundred dollars ; 

For pay of ship-keeper, maintenance and expenses, 
five thousand five hundred dollars. 

STATE BOARD OF CANVASSERS. 

For amount required to pay per diem and mileage of 
members and officers of state board of canvassers, and 
for preparing tabular statement for the board, two hun- 
dred and fifty dollars, 

ANDERSONVILLE MONUMENT. 

For the purchase and erection of a suitable monument 
or marker to the memory of soldiers and sailors from the 
state of New Jersey who died in confederate military 
prison, at Andersonville, Georgia, and for the necessary 
expenses of the persons appointed to carry out the pro- 
visions of chapter seventy-six of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-eight, two thousand dollars 

VII.I,AGE FOR EPII^EPTICS. 

For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of an 
act to establish a village of epileptics, fifteen thousand 
dollars. 

TRENTON BATTI,E MONUMENT. 

For the Trenton battle monument association, for the 
purpose of keeping said property in good condition and 
repair, five hundred dollars. 

For the commissioners appointed under an act to pro- 
vide for the organization of the New Jersey home for 



198 THE APPRO PR I A TION LAW.' 

disabled soldiers, sailors, marines and their wives, five 
thousand dollars. 

2. The following sum is hereby appropriated out of 
the income of the school fund for the purpose specified 
for the fiscal year ending on the thirty-first day of Octo- 
ber, in the year one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
nine : 

FREE PUBUC SCHOOI.S. 

For the support of free public schools, two hundred 
thousand dollars. 

STATE SCHOOI, TAX. 

3. For the support of public free schools, for the equal 
benefit of all of the people of the state, there shall be paid 
to the county collectors of the several counties, in the 
manner provided by law, the following amounts on account 
of the annual state school tax, being ninety per centum 
of the amount paid by said counties, to wit : 

To the collector of the county of Atlantic, forty-four 
thousand five hundred and forty-one dollars and fifty- 
seven cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Bergen, sixty-four 
thousand and seventy-three dollars and nine cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Burlington, fifty- 
seven thousand six hundred and twenty-four dollars and 
eighty-eight cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Camden, ninety-four 
thousand and eleven dollars and sixty-four cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Cape May, fifteen 
thousand eight hundred and ninety three dollars and 
eighty cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Cumberland, forty- 
two thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven dollars and 
forty cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Essex, four hundred 
and eighty-six thousand one hundred and sixty-four dol- 
lars and sixty-five cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Gloucester, thirty -six 
thousand two hundred and eighty-three dollars and 
seventy-three cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Hudson, three hun- 
dred and ninety-five thousand one hundred and sixteen 
dollars and sixty cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Hunterdon, forty-five 
thousand five hundred and seventy-three dollars and 
fourteen cents ; 



THE APPROPRIA TION LA W. 199 

To the collector of the county of Mercer, one hundred 
and ten thousand and thirty-eight dollars and thirty-two 
cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Middlesex, sixty-nine 
thousand seven hundred and sixty-nine dollars and 
eighty-three cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Monmouth, one hun- 
dred and fifteen thousand five hundred and ninety-seven 
dollars and eighty-two cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Morris, sixty-six 
thousand seven hundred and sixteen dollars and thirty- 
six cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Ocean, sixteen thou- 
sand one hundred and forty-five dollars and forty-seven 
cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Passaic, one hundred 
and forty-four thousand three hundred and ninety-four 
dollars and fifty-nine cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Salem, thirty-five 
thousand five hundred and ninety-nine dollars and 
ninety-nine cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Somerset, forty-five 
thousand sixty-five dollars and sixty-five cents ; 
* To the collector of the county of Sussex, twenty-six 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven dollars and 
ninety-nine cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Union, ninety-six 
thousand seventy-seven dollars and twenty-four cents ; 

To the collector of the county of Warren, forty-seven 
thousand three hundred and ninety-five dollars and 
twenty -four cents. 

In addition to the sums appropriated in this section, 
there shall be paid to the several counties such amounts 
from the " reserve fund " of two hundred and twenty- 
eight thousand four hundred and thirty-one dollars, 
being ten per centum of the amount of the state school 
tax paid by said counties, as shall be apportioned to them 
by the state board of education, as required by law ; in 
all the sum of two million two hundred and eighty-four 
thousand three hundred and ten dollars. 

UNITED STATKS APPROPRIATION TO AGRICUI^TURAI, 
COI^LEGE. 

4. That there be paid to the treasurer of Rutgers col- 
lege for the agricultural department thereof, for the more 
complete endowment and maintenance thereof for the 
benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts, such sums 



200 THE APPRO PR I A TION LA W. 

as may be received from the United States under the act 
of congress approved August thirtieth, one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety, estimated to be twenty-four 
thousand dollars. 



AGRICULTURAI, COI.I.EGE FUND. 

5. That there be paid to the treasurer of Rutgers col- 
lege for the agricultural department thereof the income 
of the agricultural college fund established under the 
act of congress of July second, one thousand eight hun- 
dred and sixty seven, held by the state treasurer, esti- 
mated to be four thousand and eighty dollars. 

UNITED STATES APPROPRIATIONS FOR DISABI^ED 
SOI.DIERS. 

6. That there be paid to the New Jersey home for dis- 
abled soldiers such sum as may be received from the 
United States under the act of congress to provide aid 
to state and territorial homes for disabled soldiers and 
sailors, approved August twenty-seventh, one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty- eight, estimated to be thirty- 
six thousand dollars. 

7. No money shall be drawn from the treasury except 
for the objects as herein above specifically appropriated. 

8. This act shall take effect on the first day of Novem- 
ber, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

Approved June 13, 1898. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 



The following is a list of the titles of newspapers pub- 
lished in the State of New Jersey; town and county where 
published; time of publication; political or special char- 
acter, and names of editors and publishers: 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

Der Pilot (German).— Egg Harbor City. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. H. Mass & Co., publishers. 
H. Mass, editor. 

Der Beobachtet (German) — Egg Haibor City. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Wilhelm Mueller, publisher. 

Deutscher Herold {G&rm2in).—^g^ Harbor City. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Republican. George F. Breder. 

Atlantic Star Gazette.— KXlaintic City. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Ernest Beyer, proprietor. 

South Jersey Republicart. — Hammonton. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Hoyt & Son, publishers. 

Atla7itic Review. — Atlantic City. Daily, every morning 
except Sunday, and Weekly on Saturday Repub- 
lican. J. G. Shreve, editor and proprietor. 

Atlantic Times- Democrat, — Atlantic City. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Daily Union Printing Co. 
J. F. Hall, editor and manager. 

Atlantic City Daily Press. — Atlantic City. Daily, every 
morning, except Sunday. Republican. Edge & 
Wallace, publishers and proprietors. 

Mays La7idifig Record. — Mays Landing. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. E. C. Shaner, editor and 
publisher. 

Daily Unio7i. — Atlantic City. Every afternoon, except 
Sunday, at the office of the Atlantic Times-Democrat. 
Democratic. Daily Union Printing Co. J. F. Hall, 
editor and manager. 

Sunday Gazette.— Kilsiniic City. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican. William McLaughlin, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

(201) 



202 NE W J ERSE Y NE WS PAPERS, 

Weekly Press. — Pleasantville. Weekly, on Wednesday. 

Republican. Hugh Collins, proprietor. 
Freie Presse (German). — Atlantic City. Weekly, on 

Friday. Carl Voelker, publisher. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

Bergen County Democrat. — Hackerisack. Weekly, on 

Friday. Democratic. Henry D. Winton, editor and 

publisher. 
The Hackensack Republican.— Hackensaick. Weekly, on 

Thursday. Republican. Hugh M. Herrick, editor 

and publisher. 
The Bergen Index. — Hackensack. Semi-weekly, on 

Tuesday and Friday. Independent. S. E. Clapp. 
The ^^ror^.— Hackensack. Evening. J. A. Romeyn, 

managing editor. 
Carlstadt Freie Presse (German).— Carlstadt, Weekly, 

on Saturday. Independent. 

The Carlstadt iV<?z£/.j.— Carlstadt. Weekly. Goff & Hol- 
lenstein, proprietors. 

The Englewood 71j'w<?^,— Englewood. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. Stockton & Sterling, proprie- 
tors and publishers. 

7heE7iglezuoodPress.—'Eng\^'woo6.. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Joseph H. Tillotson, editor and 
proprietor. 

Bergen Coimty Herald. — Hackensack Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. Addison Ely, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Rutherford iV;?z£/5.— Rutherford. Weekly, on Saturday, 
Democratic. Rutherford News Publishing Company, 
proprietors. 

Record. — Tenafly. Weekly, on Thursday, Jno. P. Pratt, 
editor. 

The News. — Ridgewood. Weekly, on Friday. Baxter & 
Babcock, publishers 

The Park Ridge Local. — Vark Ridge. Published weekly, 
on Wednesday. James B. H. Storms and John C. 
Storms, editors and proprietors. 

Rutherford American.— Rutherford. Weekly, on Thurs" 
day. Republican. John E. Tyler, editor and pro" 
prietor. 



NE IV JERSE Y NE WSPAPERS 203 

Bergen County Advertiser. — Ridgefield Park. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. W. J. Morrison, editor 
and publisher 

The Enterprise. — East Rutherford. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Democratic. The Petrie Press, publisher. 

The Sentinel.— ^ort Lee. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. J. N, Rail, publisher. 

Ridgewood 7^^a)rt/. — Weekly, on Saturday. F. Eugene 
Farrell, editor and publisher, 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 

New Jersey Mirror. — Mount Holly. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. Charles H. Folwell, editor and 
proprietor. 

Ihe Mount Holly Herald.^'MoMnt Holly. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. William B. Wills, editor. 

Nezvs.— Mount Holly. Weekly, on Tuesday. Republi- 
can. H. L. Walters, George W. Hand and Joseph C. 
Kingdon, publishers. J. C. Kingdon, editor. 

Burlifigton Comity Democrat. — Mount Holly. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Burlington County Pub- 
lishing Co. 

Burlifigton Gazette. — Burlington Daily and weekly. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Daily, in the afternoon. 
Democratic. James O. Glasgow, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

The New Jersey Enterprise. — Burlington. Daily, in the 
afternoon, and Weekly, on Friday. Enterprise pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. Republican. David V. 
Holmes, editor. 

The Evening Reporter. — Burlington. Daily, in the after- 
noon. Republican. D. W. Murphy, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Bordefitozan Register. — Bordentown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. James D. Flynn, editor and 
proprietor. 

Beverly Banner. —Beverly . Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent. L. W. Perkins, editor and proprietor, 

Moorestown Chronicle. — Moorestown Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. W. J. Lovell, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Burlington County Press. — Riverside Weekly, on Sat- 
day. Independent. Hiram D. Torrie & Bro., editors 
and proprietors. 



204 NE W J ERSE Y NE WS PAPERS. 

The Republican. — Moorestown. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican, Charles I^aessle, editor and proprietor. 

The Neiu Era. — Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Riverton and Palmyra. Walter L. Bowen, publisher. 
J. D. Janney M.D., editor. 

The Weekly News. — Palmyra. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. C. F. Sleeper, editor and proprietor. 

The Central Record. — Marlton. Weekly, on Friday. In- 
dependent. Heister Clymer, editor. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 

West Jersey Press.— Camden. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew & Sons, publishers 
and proprietors. 

The Camden Democrat.— Camden. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. C. S. Magrath, editor and pro 
prietor. 

The Camden Daily Post —Camden Afternoon. Repub- 
lican. The Post Printing and Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers. H. L. Bonsall, editor. 

The Courier. — Camden. Daily, in the afternoon. Re- 
publican. Courier Publishing Association, proprie- 
tors. 

The Daily Teleg-ram. —Csimden. Daily. Republican. 
Camden Daily Telegram Company, proprietors. F. 
F. Patterson, Jr., president. 

Cafnden Review.— Camden . Daily. Democratic. Harry 
B. Paul, publisher. 

New Jersey Gazette.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
A. C. Graw, editor and publisher. 

Atlantic Coast Guide. — Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
T. F. Rose, editor and proprietor. 

Camden County Journal [German).— Camden. Weekly, 
on Friday. Louis Hoeller, editor and publisher. 

Independent.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent Publishing Co. 

Echo —Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Religious A. 
A. Holt, editor and proprietor. 

Advertiser.— Gloucester City. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. William D. Jenkins, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

Herald and Times.— Atco. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. M. J. Skinner, editor and publisher. 



NE W J ERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 205 

The Tribune. — Haddonfield. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. W. G. Taylor, editor and publisher 

Camden County Star. — Merchantville. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Fred C Alexander, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The Independent. — Stockton. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Samuel Wheeler, editor and proprietor. 

Stock/on Times. — Stockton Weekly, on Saturday. 
Charles Miller, editor and proprietor. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

Star of the Cape.—Qsii>e May City. Weekly, on Saturday, 
during the whole year, and Daily during July and 
and August Republican. Star of the Cape Pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. Aaron W. Hand, editor. 

Cape xMay IVaze —Cape May City. Weekly, on Satur- 
day, during the whole year, and Daily during July 
and August. Republican. Lewis T. Stevens, editor. 
James H. Edmunds, publisher. 

Cape May County Gazette.— Qa.pe May Court House. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. Alfred Cooper, 
editor. 

Sentinel.— Ocean City. Weekly, on Thursday. Repub- 
lican. R. Curtis Robinson, editor and proprietor. 

Cape 3/ay County Times. —Sea. Isle City. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. T. E Ivudlam, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Eiz'e Mile Beach Journal. — Wildwood. Independent. 
Weekl)^ on Thursday. Jed Dubois, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Ocean City Ledger. — Weekly, on Saturday, Indepen- 
dent. C. W. Carter, editor and proprietor. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Bridgeton Chronicle. — Bridgeton. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day Democratic. W. A. Gwynne, publisher. 

Bridgeton Pioneer. — Bridgeton. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday Republican. George W. 
McCowan, editor and publisher. 

New Jersey Patriot .—^x\^%e\.on Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. John Cheeseman & Son, editors and 
publishers. 



206 NE W JERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 

Bridgeton Evening News. — Bridgeton. Republican. 
Evening News Company, publishers J. W. Richard- 
son, editor and manager. 

Dollar Weekly News. — Bridgeton. Independent. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Evening News Company, publishers. 

Weekly Independent. -N\x\^\2Si.dL. Weekly, on Friday. 
Populist. John Wilcox and J. J. Streeter, editors and 
publishers. 

The Evening J otirnal. — Vineland Afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. B. Franklin Ladd editor. 

Millville Republican. —WiXWxW^. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican Thomas R. Fort, Jr., editor and pub- 
lisher. 

Millville Reporter. — Daily. Republican. Thomas R. 
Fort, Jr., proprietor 

Millville Transcript. — WC\X\\)X&. Weekly, on Friday 
Democratic. C. E. Woodmansee, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

The Vineland NeiC's.—Yineland. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Edward and Lewis Miller, editors and 
proprietors. 

Every Saturday. — Vineland. Weekl3\ Republican, C. 
W. Groscup, publisher. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

Newai'k Daily Advertiser. — Newark Afternoon. Re- 
publican Advertiser Publishing Co., proprietors. 
Chas, D. Fisk, managing editor. John J. Leidy, 
editor. E. H. Emory business manager. 

Neiuark Evening Nccvs. — Newark. Afternoon. Inde- 
pendent. Evening News Publishing Company Wal- 
lace M. Scudder, business manager. Henry A. 
Steele managing editor. 

Neiu Jersey Ereie Zeitung ( German 1.--I>Iewark. Daily, 
also Sunday edition. Republican. Mrs. B. Prieth, 
proprietress. Frederick Kuhn, editor. Benedict 
Prieth, business manager. 

New Jersey Deutsche Zeitung (German) — Newark. 
Daily, including Sunday. Democratic New Jersey 
Deutsche Zeitung Co , proprietors. Abner Kalisch, 
manager 

Stmday Call.— ^^war\i. Weekly, on Sunday Independ- 
ent. James W. Schoch, G. W. Thorne, W. T. Hunt, 
Louis Hannoch and H. C. McDougall publishers. 
W. T. Hunt, editor. 



NE WJERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 207 

Sentinel of Ereedom. —'Sewarli. Weekly, on Tuesday, 
Republican. Published at the Daily Advertiser 
Office. 

Der Erzahler (German"),— Newark. Sunday edition of 
New Jersey Freie Zeitung. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican. Published at the New Jersey Freie Zei- 
tung office. 

Newark Tribune (German) — Weekly, on Sunday. Dem- 
ocratic. Published at the New Jersey Deutsche Zei- 
tung office 

Newark Pioneer (German). — Newark. Weekly. Inde- 
pendent. F. E Adler & Co., publishers. 

Town Talk. — Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Illustrated 
Politico-social. T. E. Burke and Herman E. Iv. 
Beyer, editors and publishers. 

New Jersey Trade Review. — Newark. Semi-monthly, 
Commercial. Paul V. Flynn, editor and publisher. 

Railroad Employee.— ^^vids^. Monthly. B. E. Campin, 
editor and publisher. 

The Newark Ledg-er.—l<^ewaT]s.. Weekly, on Saturday, 
Democratic. M. J O'Connor, proprietor. 

The Orange Chronicle. — Orange. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. Frank W. Baldwin, editor. Orange 
Chronicle Publishing Co., publishers. 

The Orange Journal.— Orange. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Edgar Williams, editor. Orange Jour- 
nal Publishing Co , publishers. 

Orange l^olksbote (German). — Orange, Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. Ernest Temme, editor and 
proprietor. 

Orange Sonnlagsdlall (German).— Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. August Koehler editor and proprietor. 

East-Orange Gazette.— 'East Orange Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. Charles W. Starr, editor and 
proprietor. 

South Orange Bulletin. — South Orange. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican Edgar Williams, editor. 

The Bloomfield Record.— ^\oom'ne\^. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. S M. Hulin, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The Bloomfield Citizen. — Bloomfield. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican William A. Ritscher, Jr., editor 
and proprietor. 



208 NE W J ERSE Y NE WSPA PERS. 

Montdair Times. — Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. 
A. C Studer, editor and publisher. 

The Montdair Herald. — Montclair. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Francis Leon Chrisman, editor and proprietor. 

//<?m.— Short Hills. Weekly, on Saturday. Indepen- 
dent. Gibbs & Wright, editors and publishers. 

The Caldwell iV«?z£/.y.— Caldwell. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. C. M. Harrison, editor and proprietor. 

The Belleville /V^^jj.— Belleville. Weekly, on Saturday, 
Harding and Wylie, lessees. William Wylie, editor. 

The Irviu^ton News. — Irvington. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Irvin .ton News Publishing Com- 
pany. E M. Bonnell, editor. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

The Constitution afid Farmers' and Mechanics' Adver- 
tiser. — Woodbury. Weekly, on Wednesday. Re- 
publican. A. S. Barber, Jr., editor and publisher. 

Liberal Press —^oo^hvixy. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent Charles N. Bell, editor and publisher. 

Gloucester County Democrat. — Woodbury. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. J. D. Carpenter, editor and 
publisher. 

Weekly Item.— ^ewHeld. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. A. C. Dalton, editor and publisher. 

Enterprise.— Glasshoro, Weekly, on Saturday. Repub- 
lican A M. Seabrook, editor and publisher. 

Swedesboro i\^<?av5.— Swedesboro Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. George W. Either, editor and pub- 
lisher, 

HUDSON COUNTY. 

The Evening Journal.— ]ersey City. Afternoon Re- 
publican. Joseph A. Dear and Sheffield Phelps, 
editors and proprietors. 

Jersey City Herald and Gazette.— ]ers&y City Weekly, 
on Saturday Democratic. Jersey City Herald Pub- 
lishing Company, proprietors. Robert Langdon Mc- 
Dermott, editor. 

Jersey City Democrat .—]evs&y City. Weekly. Demo- 
cratic. Robert Davis, proprietor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 209 

The Chronicle. — Jersey City. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Chronicle Publishing Company, pub- 
lishers. 
The Jersey City Neius. — Jersey City. Afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. James Luby, editor. The City Publishing 
Company, publishers. 
77^^ J//;T6»r. —Jersey City. Weekly. Prohibition. Abra- 
ham Lincoln Graham, editor. 

Palisade Advertiser and Eagle. —Jersey City. Weekly, 

on Saturday. Neutral. 
The Observer. — Hobokeu. Afternoon. Democratic. Ho- 
boken Printing and Publishing Company, publishers. 
Thomas McKeon, editor. 

The Republican. — Hoboken. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. The Hoboken Printing and Publishing 
Company, proprietors. George E. Mott, editor. 
Wacht am Hudson (German). — Hobokeu. Afternoon. 
H. E. Schneider & Co., publishers and editors. 
[They also publish the Belles-Lettres Journal, News 
Jrom Germany, Saxon Journal and New Prussian 
Gazette^ and Rundschau, weekly German journals ] 

Z/]^/?/.- Hoboken. Evangelical. Monthly. Rev. Henry 
T. Beatty, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
editor. 

Bayonne Herald. — Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. H. C. Page, editor and publisher. 

Bayonne Budg-et.— Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. T. R. Proctor, editor. 

Bayonne Times.— Bayonne. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Bloomfield Gardiner, editor. 

Bayonne Democrat. — Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Michael R. Freel, editor. 

Bayonne Star. — Bayonne. Weekly, on Friday Repub- 
lican. Wm. P. Caruthers, editor and publisher. 

Bayonne Teutonia (German). — Bayonne. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. Charles Peters, editor. 

Hudson County Dispatch. — Union Hill. Afternoon. 
Democratic. John T. O'Brien, editor. 

North Hudson Leader.— VJ est Hoboken. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. Bergen Brothers, editors and 
proprietors. 

Hudson Times. — West Hoboken. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Republican. Gregory Brothers, editors and proprie- 
tors. 

H . • 



210 NE W J ERSE } ^ NE WSPAPERS. 

Kearny Record. — Harrison. Weekly, ou Saturday. Dem- 
ocratic. Philip A. McAviney, editor and proprietor. 

Kearny Observer. — Arlington. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Iv. M. Brock, editor. Stephen Wood publisher. 

Wtst Hudson Press. — Kearny. Formerly the Kearny 
Republican. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
L. E. Travis, editor. 



HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

Hunterdon County Democrat. — Flemington. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Democratic. A. Killgore, editor and 
manager. 

Democrat- Advertiser. — Flemington. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. H. M. Voorhees, editor and proprietor. 

Hunterdon Republicaji. — Flemington. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. William G. Callis, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Beacon. — Lambertville. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. Phineas K Hazen, editor and publisher. 

The Lambertville Record.— l^SLmh&rtviW^. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. Clark Pierson, editor and 
publisher. 

The Cli7iton Democrat — Clinton Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. J. and W. H. Carpenter, editors 
and publishers. 

Hunterdon hidependent. — F'renchtown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. John R. Hardon, editor and 
publisher. 

77/*? 5/'«r.— Frenchtown. Weekly, on Wednesday. Inde- 
pendent, William H. Sipes, editor and publisher. 

Home Visitor.— Vlemington. Weekly. Prohibition. W. 

V. Ramsey, editor 
Milford Leader. —lASXior^. Weekly, on Thursday. In 

dependent. W. H. Far rand, proprietor. 

The Avalanche.— Ql^n Gardner. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. E. W. Rush, editor and publisher. 

The Hunterdon Gazette.— High Bridge. Weekly. Re- 
publican. High Bridge Publishing Co., proprietors. 

Weekly Review. — White House Station. George W. 
Shampanore, publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NE WSPAPERS. 211 



MERCER COUNTY. 

State Gazette. — Trenton. Daily and Weekly. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. The John L. Murphy 
Publishing Co., proprietors Thomas Holmes, editor. 

True American. — Trenton. Dail}' and Weekly. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Joseph Iv. Naar, editor 
and proprietor. 

1 he Trenton Evening Times.— Trenton. Afternoon and 
Weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. Ed- 
mund C. Hill, publisher and proprietor. 

T/ie New Jersey Staats Journal (German).— Trenton 
Semi-weekly. Independent. Ernest C. Stahl, editor 
and proprietor. 

Sunday Advertiser — Trenton. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Independent. Advertiser Publishing Co., editors 
and proprietors. 

American Potters' Journal —Trenton. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Labor. John D. McCormick, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

The TreJiton Courier. —Trenton. Weekly. Indepen- 
dent Democratic John Briest, editor and proprietor. 

The Trenton Deutsche Zeittmg. — Trenton. Weekly. Re- 
publican. Otto Erdlen, editor and publisher. 

Hightstown Gazette. — ^\g\its,town. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Thomas B. Appleget, publisher. 
Fred. B. Appleget, editor. 

Hightstown Independent — Hightstown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. R. M. J. Smith, editor 
and proprietor. 

Princeton Press. — Princeton Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. C. S. Robinson & Co., editors and 
publishers. 

The Princetonian. — Princeton. Tri-weekly, on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday Devoted to the interests of 
Princeton University. Edited by students 

The Signal.- Vrinaeton. Weekly. Independent. John 
H Stillwell, editor and publisher. 

The Hopewell H^erald. — Ho-pewell. Weekly, on Tues- 
da)\ Independent. C E. Voorhees, editor and pub- 
lisher. 



212 NE W JERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 



MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

The Home News — New Brunswick. Every afternoon, 
except Sunday. Independent Hugh Boyd, editor 
and proprietor. 

The Weekly Home News. — New Brunswick. Published 
every Thursday afternoon. Independent. Arthur 
H. Boyd, editor. 

The Eredonian. — New Brunswick. Afternoon and Week- 
ly. Weekly, on Friday. Republican New Bruns- 
wick Publishing Co. George W. Burroughs, business 
manager. William Cloke, editor. 

The Times. — 'i^^&vj Brunswick. Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic The Times Pub- 
lishing Company, publishers. F. W. Daire, editor. , 

The Chrofiic/e. — Terth Amboy. Bi-weekly. Perth Am- 
boy Publishing Company, publishers. James S. 
Wight, editor. 

Middlesex Counly Democrat .—Y^xW\ Amboy. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. St George Kempson, 
editor and proprietor. 

Middlesex Coufity Herald. —Perth Amboy. Every even- 
ing, except Sunday. Independent. St. George Kemp- 
son, publisher. A. E Daniel, editor. 

The Republican —Perth Amboy. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican American Publishing Co. (C. W. Boyn- 
ton, president), publishers. Miss Louise Boynton, 
editor. 

The Independent Hour. — Woodbridge. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic Peter K. Edgar, editor and 
publisher 

Weekly i?^^/5/^r. —Woodbridge. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. R. D Uhler, editor. H. B. Rollinson, 
publisher. 

The Recorder. — 1sI^\.\xqSi^x^. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent Republican. J. A. MacLauchlin, editor 
and proprietor. 

The Inquirer.— ^l^tnoh^n. Weekly, on Saturday. Dem- 
ocratic. St George Kempson, publisher. 

The Record — Jamesburg. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. E. S. Hammell. editor and publisher. 

The Advance. - Jamesburg. Weekly, on Thursday, 
Printed and published by the New Jersey State Re- 
form School. 



NE W J ERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 213 

The Citizen. — ^oM'Ca Amboy. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. M. Roll, editor and publisher. 

The /V^55.— Cranbury. Weekly, on Friday. Republi- 
can. George W. Burroughs, editor and proprietor. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

The Monmouth Inquirer.— Vrt^h.o\di. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican Maxey Applegate, editor and 
publisher. 

Monmouth Democrat. — Freehold. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Democratic. James S. and Joseph A, Yard, editors 
and proprietors 

The Transcript. — Freehold. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Alexander L. and John B. Moreau, editors 
and proprietors. 

New Jersey Standard.— Red Bank. Semi-weekly, on 
Tuesday and Thursday. Democratic. Longstreet & 
Hawkins, publishers 

Red Bank Register. — Red Bank. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican, John H. Cook, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Keyport Enterprise.— Y.eygott. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Fred. F. Armstrong, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Keyport JVeekty.— Keyport. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent E. D, Pettys, editor and proprietor. 

The Long Branch Record.— \,on% Branch. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Independent. F. M. Taylor, Jr., editor. 

Long Branch Times-Neius. — Long Branch. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Stults & Wheeler, pro- 
prietors. 

The Matawan Journal. —Matawan. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Benjamin F. S Brown, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Journal.— Asbury Park Daily, during July and 
August. Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. J. K. 
Wallace, editor and publisher. 

The Shore Tress.- Asbury Park. Daily and Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. J. L. Kinmonth publisher 
and proprietor. 

Ths Daily Spray. — Asbury Park. Afternoon, June, July 
and August. Le Roy & Bedell, publishers and pro- 
prietors. 



214 JVEIV J ERSE Y NE WS PAPERS. 

Evening N^ews .— Ashnry Park. Every evening, except 
Sunday. J. H. Youmans, editor and publisher. 

Ocean Grove Times.- Ocean Grove. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. William H. Beegle, publisher. 

Ocean Grove Record. — Oc^'a.m Grove Weekly, on Satur- 
day Methodist. William H. Beegle, publisher. 

The Advertiser — Eatontown Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. William T. Cole, editor, publisher and pro- 
prietor. 

The Coast Star Democrat. — Manasquan. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. W. E. Hoskins, editor and 
proprietor. 

Manasquari A^<?z£/j-. — Manasquan. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. Theo. F. Hults, editor and proprietor. 

The Coast Echo. - Belmar. Weekly, on Thursday. Demo- 
cratic. Conrad Pinches, editor and publisher. 

The Journal. — Atlantic Highlands. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. A. C. Hart, editor and proprietor. 

Seaside Gazette. — ^^ring Lake Beach Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. Seaside Publishing Company, 
publishers. E. S. V. Stultz, manager. 

Monmouth Press. — Atlantic Highlands. Republican. 
Weekly, on Saturday. William J. Leonard, editor. 

City Journal.— \,ovig Branch. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. D H. Van Brunt, publisher. 

Sea Bright Sentinel.— Sea Bright. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day (May to September). Independent. Sentinel 
Company, publishers. 

MORRIS COUNTY. 

The Jerseyinan.— yioxrisX.o^u. Weekly, on Friday. Re- 
publican. Pierson & Rowell, editors and proprietors. 

True Democratic Banner. — Morristovpn. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Vogt Brothers, editors and 
proprietors 

The Morris County Chronicle. — Morristown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. J. Frank Lindsley, editor 
and proprietor. 

The Iron Era.— Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Republi- 
can. Dover Printing Company, editors and publishers 

Dover Index. — Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Frank F. Hummell, editor. 



NE W JERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 215 

The Morris Journal.— T>o\&t. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent Republican. The Morris Printing Co , 
publishers. David Spencer, editor. 

The Bnlletm. — Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Samnel 1^. Garrison, editor and publisher. 

The Times. — Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. Charles H. Grubb, editor and proprietor. 

The Eagle.— Islsidiison. Weekly, on Friday. Indepen- 
dent. Eagle Printing Company. Wm . Greer, editor 
and manager. 

The Record.— Rockaway. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent W. Burd, Jr., editor and publisher. 

The Ex-press — Morristown. Democratic. Saturday. 
Abraham h. Adams, editor and proprietor. 

7 he Stanhope ^rt^/d".— Stanhope. Independent. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. George T. Keech, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 

New Jersey Courier.— Toms River. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. W. H. Fischer, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

Ocean Coufity Democrat. — Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles S. Haslett, editor 
and publisher. 

Times and Journal. — Ivakev^^ood. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. George D. Roe, editor and publisher. 

The Beacon. — Point Pleasant. Weekly, on Saturday. 
D. C. Leaw, editor and proprietor. 

The Tuckerto7i Beacon. — Tuckerton. Weekly. Benj. 
H. Crosby, editor and publisher. 



PASSAIC COUNTY. 

Pater son Guardian. — Paterson. Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. Carle ton M. Her- 
rick, editor, publisher and proprietor. 

The Patersofi Press.— VatQvson Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. The Press 
Printing aud Publishing Co., publishers and proprie- 
tors. George Wurts, editor. 



216 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

The Morning Call. — Paterson. Daily, except Sunday. 
Republican. The Call Printing and Publishing Com- 
pany, proprietors and publishers. Joseph E. Crowell, 
editor. 

Evening News. — Paterson. Daily, afternoon, except 
Sunday. Democratic News Printing and Publish- 
ing Co., proprietors. E. B. Haines, editor. 

The Paterson People.— 'Paterson. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Socialist-I/abor. Matthew Maguire, editor. 

Sunday Chronicle. — Paterson. Sunday. Independent. 
Paterson Chronicle Co , proprietors. Charles A. 
Shriner, editor and manager. 

Paietson Volks-Freund (German). — Paterson. Daily, 
afternoon. Democratic. The German-American 
Printing and Publishing Company, proprietors and 
publishers. 

De Telegraf (Holland).— Paterson. Semi-weekly. Re- 
publican. Tanis & Schrauder, publishers. 

The Labor Standard.— PateTson. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Ivabor. J. P. McDonnell, editor and proprietor. 

Paterson Censor. — Paterson. Monday. Printed record 
of the counties of Bergen and Passaic. A. E. & B. 
Vanderhoven, editors and proprietors. 

The Item. — Passaic. Weekly, on Saturday. Indepen- 
dent. Alfred Speer, editor and proprietor 

Passaic Herald. — Passaic. Daily, afternoon. Republi- 
can. Fred. C. Clough, publisher. D. W. Mahony, 
editor. 

Passaic Daily News. — Passaic. Afternoon. Republican. 
William J. Pape, editor. News Publishing Co , pro- 
prietors and publishers. 

The Advertiser. — Passaic. Weekly. Independent. Rev. 
Robert Offord, editor and publisher. 

The Record — Passaic. Weekly. Republican. O. Free- 
man, editor and publisher. 

SALEM COUNTY. 

National Standard.— Salem. Weekly, on Wednesday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew & Brother, proprie- 
tors. William H. Chew, editor. 

Salem Sunbeam. Salem. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Robert Gwynne, editor and proprietor. 
Robt. Gwynne, Jr., assistant editor. 



NE W J ERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 21 7 

The Sotiih Jersey man. — SaX^m, Weekly, on Tuesday. 
Republican. William H. Harris, proprietor. 

The 3foniior-Reg-isier. —Woodstovfu. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent Benjamin Patterson, proprietor. 

Pemisgrove Record. — Pennsgrove Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. W. A. Summerill, proprietor. 

Elmer Times. — 'Elmer. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. S. P. Foster, editor and publisher. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 

The Somerset Messefig-er.—SomerviUe. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Democratic, John H. Mattison, editor 
and publisher. 

The U7iio?iist-Gazette. — Somer\'\\\e. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Republican. The Unionist-Gazette Association, 
publishers Charles H. Bateman, editor. 

The Somerset Democrat.- ^omerviWe. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic Somerset Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers. D. N. Messier, editor and manager. 

Bound Brook Chronicle. — Bound Brook. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. W. B. R. Mason, editor and 
publisher. 

State Centre.— Bound Brook. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Democratic. Nathaniel Wilson, manager. 

Der Somerset Bote (German).- Bound Brook. Weekly, 
on Tuesday. Democratic. Walter Reiss, editor and 
publisher. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

The Sussex Register.— Ne^vton. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. Richard F. Goodman, editor and 
publisher. 

The New /ersey Herald.— l<!evfton. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic, Jacob L. Bunnell, editor and 
proprietor. Henry C. Bunnell, assistant editor. 

Sussex County Independent. — Deckertown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. J. J. Stanton and C. A. Wil- 
son, editors. 

The Wantage Recorder.— V)e(iV.ex\.o^r\. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. C. K. Stickney, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Milk Reporter.— Deckertown. Monthly. Agricul- 
ture. John J. Stanton, editor and proprietor. 



218 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

Branchville 7"zV«<?^.— Branchville. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. John H. Burch, editor. 

UNION COUNTY. 

Elizabeth Daily Journal. — Elizabeth, Afternoon. Re- 
publican. Charles C. McBride, editor. Augustus S. 
Crane, business manager. 

The Leader. — Elizabeth. Daily. Independent. J. Mad- 
ison Drake, editor and publisher. 

Freie Presse (German).— Elizabeth. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. Charles H. Schmidt, editor and 
publisher. 

Union Coufity Record. — Elizabeth. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Isaac N. Lewis, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

New Jersey Contractor and Gazette. — Elizabeth. 
Weekly, on Saturday. The Staples Publishing Co. 
H. F Morgan, editor. 

Elizabeth News. — Elizabeth. Weekly, on Saturday. 
The Staples Printing and Publishing Co. G. Howard 
Hobart, editor. 

The Union Democrat.— 'R.sihvfaiy. Weekly, on Friday- 
Democratic. Lewis S Hyer, editor. J. I. Collins, 
business manager. 

The New Jersey Advocate. — Rahway. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. H. B. RoUinson, editor 
and publisher. 

Central New Jersey Times. — Plainfield. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican, Times Publishing Co. 

The Constitutionalist. — Plainfield. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. A. L. Force, publisher. 

The Plainjield Courier-News. — Plainfield, Afternoon. 
Republican. F. W. Runyon, editor and proprietor. 

The Royal Crajtsfnan.— Rahway. Monthly. Devoted 
to Masonry. Valentine N. Bagley, proprietor. 

The Stimmit Record.— Summit. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Thomas F. Lane, editor and proprietor. 

The Summit //era Id. —Summit. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. J. W. Clift, publisher. 

The Union County Standard. — Westfield. Semi- weekly, 
on Tuesday and Friday. The Standard Publishing 
Concern. Alfred E. Pearsall, editor. C. E. Pearsall, 
manager. 



NE W J ERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 219 

New Jersey Law Journal. — V\2i\n^Q\^. Monthly. New 
Jersey Law Journal Publishing Co., proprietors. Ed- 
ward Q. Keasbey and C. L. Borgmeyer, editors. 

The Daily Pi-ess. ~ Plain field. Published at the office of 
the Constitutionalist. Democratic. A, L. Force, 
proprietor. 

The Cranjord Chronicle. — Weekly, on Wednesday. John 
Alfred Potter, editor and publisher. 

The IFest^eld Leadez-.— Westfield. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. Alex. G. Anderson, editor. 

The Westfield Republican. — V^&si^^ld. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. W, H. Morse, editor. 

Roselle Star. — Roselle. Weekly, on Thursday. John F. 
Lennon, editor and proprietor. 

WARREN COUNTY. 

Belvidere Apollo. — Belvidere. Weekly, on Friday. Re- 
publican. Josiah Ketcham, editor and publisher. 

The Warren Journal. — Belvidere. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Simerson & O'Neil, editors and pub- 
lishers. 

Hackettstown Gazette — Hackettstown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. Charles Rittenhouse, editor and 
publisher. 

IVatren Republican.— Hackettstown. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Curtis Bros., proprietors. George P. Curtis, 
editor. 

Warren Democrat. — Phillipsburg. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Schultz & Pilgrim, proprietors. 

Warden Daily A^(?z£/.y.— Phillipsburg. Evenings, except 
Sunday. Democratic. Schultz & Pilgrim, proprie- 
tors. 

The Washington 6/rtr. —Washington. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day, Democratic. Charles h. Stryker, editor and 
proprietor. 

The Blairstoctm /V'^.s.s.— Blairstown. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Independent. De Witt C. Carter, editor 
and publisher. 

The Warren TzV////^^^. — Washington. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. J. B. R. Smith, editor and 
publisher. 



220 NE IV J ERSE Y NE WSPAPERS. 

The Post. — Phillipsburg. Evenings, except Sunday. 
Republican. Lynch & Sterner, proprietors and pub- 
lishers. 



SUMMARY. 

There are 286 daily, weekly and other papers altogether 
in the State, of which 93 are Republican, 79 Democratic, 
63 Independent, 34 Neutral, 3 Religious, 2 Prohibition, 1 
Populist, 1 Law, 2 Labor, and one each as follows: Semi- 
nary, Politico-Social, Commercial, Railroad Employes' 
Interest, Reform School for Boys, Social-Labor, Agricul- 
tural and Masonic. Twenty-six are published in the 
German language and one in Holland. 

The summary by counties is as follows: Atlantic, 13 
Bergen, 18; Burlington, 15; Camden, 16; Cape May, 7 
Cumberland, 12; Essex, 27; Gloucester, 6; Hudson, 23 
Hunterdon, 13; Mercer, 14; Middlesex, 16; Monmouth, 
25; Morris, 12; Ocean, 5; Passaic, 15; Salem, 6; Somer- 
set, 6; Sussex, 6; Union, 21; Warren, 10. Total, 286. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 



GOVERNOR OF NEW^ JERSEY. 



Foster m. Voorhees. 

Governor Voorhees was born at Clinton, Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey, November 5th, 1856, his father being 
the cashier of the bank there established, and who comes 
of Dutch-English ancestors. The Governor was gradu- 
ated from Rutgers College in 1876, and studied law at 
Elizabeth with the Honorable William J. Magie, now 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He was licensed as 
an attorney-at-law in 1880, and as a counselor in 18S4. 
His success in his profession was instantaneous, and his 
high standing at the bar is evidenced by the fact that 
although of different political faith from the appointing 
power, he was nominated by Governor Werts in 189 i 
to the ofl5ce of Circuit Court Judge. He declined the 
honor on the ground that he owed his first allegiance to 
his constituents who had elected him to the office of 
Senator. This was during the exciting and memorable 
session of 1894, and the sacrifice he made in this instance 
saved the State Senate to the Republican party and made 
possible the enactment of reform measures, of which the 
Governor himself was the foremost champion 

Governor Voorhees has always been an ardent, sincere 
and conscientious Republican. At the same time, his 
fairness and conservatism have won for him the admira- 
tion of the Independents and Democrats, as well as the 
members of his own party. He has never been an offen- 
sive partisan, and his whole career has been an exemplifi- 
cation of the truth of President Hayes' famous declara- 
tion, '*He serves his party best who serves his country 
best." 

Mr. Voorhees was a School Commissioner of Elizabeth 
for four years, from 1884 to 188S, and during that time 
was instrumental in inaugurating a number of educa- 
tional reforms. He was a member of the House of 
Assembly during the years '88, '89 and '90, and was the 
leader of the Republican minority in the two latter years, 

(221) 



222 BIOGRAPHIES. 

receiving the Republican vote for Speaker in both of 
these sessions. His ability as a parliamentarian and a 
debater won for him a State reputation. The year 1889 
was one of partisan legislation on the part of the Demo- 
cratic majority, and notwithstanding the tactics it em- 
ployed to carry through its measures, Mr. Voorhees so 
skillfully led the minority that the opposition were even 
in danger of defeat, and on one occasion the Democrats 
were compelled to leave their seats in the Assembly and 
break a quorum in order to save themselves from parlia- 
mentary rout. In these trying emergencies he achieved 
a reputation for wisdom, courage and readiness in action 
which commanded the respect of his friends and foes 
alike, and which at once ranked him among the Repub- 
lican leaders of the State. Indeed, in the year following, 
the Republican State Convention commended by resolu- 
tion the course of the Republican minority under his 
leadership. 

In lb9U Governor Voorhees served as a member of the 
special committee of the House and Senate to prepare a 
ballot reform law. This law today bears evidence of his 
judgment and wisdom. His popularity with the voters 
was evinced in 1890, when he ran in a district which 
had given Governor iVbbett a plurality of 613, but which 
he carried by 163 ; and again in 1893, when he was 
elected to the Senate from Union county by a plurality of 
1144. In 1894 the Senate was Republican by a majority 
of one, and the Democrats attempted to control the 
organization of that body and to prevent a number of the 
Republican Senators from taking their seats. The forci- 
ble seizure of the Senate Chamber and the barring of its 
doors on that occasion are matters of recent history. In 
this crisis Senator Voorhees, by his counsel and action, 
averted what might have been a scene of conflict and riot 
and placed his party in such a position that the Supreme 
Court eventually decided the controversy in favor of the 
Republicans. In the work of reform, which was a con- 
spicuous feature of that session of the Legislature, Sena- 
tor Voorhees was always courageous, always progressive 
and always statesmanlike. Notwithstanding the fact that 
the partisan feeling had been stimulated by the unlawful 
tactics of the minority, no extreme or retaliatory measures 
were enacted by the Republican Legislature. This was 
in marked contrast to the partisan legislation of the pre- 
vious years under Democratic control, and was due largely 
to the influence of Senator Voorhees. The year 1893, 
however, was destined to bring him more conspicuously 
into the public favor. Prior to the organization of the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 223 

Legislature in 1895 rumors of official corruption and mal- 
feasance were current throughout the State. When the 
Legislature met a select committee was appointed from 
the Senate, consisting of Senators Voorhees, Ketcham, 
Skirm Herbert and Daly, of which Senator Voorhees was 
chairman, to investigate the charges of extravagance on 
the part of certain public officials. This committee dis- 
closed a degree of official extravagance and corruption 
which startled the citizens of the State, and which was 
perhaps the most instrumental factor in determining the 
gubernatorial contest in the fall of that year. The work 
of this committee was so skillfully done, so free from 
prejudice and partisan bias and so convincing in its dis- 
closures, that its verdict was accepted without question 
by the members of both political parties. In the special 
session of 18i'5 Senator Voorhees followed up the work of 
the investigating committee by introducing a large num- 
ber of reform measures calculated to remedy the then 
existing ills and to prevent the recurrence of such evils in 
the future. Conspicuous among these was the preparation 
of an annual appropriation bill Heretofore appropria- 
tions had been made by separate bills and the total appro- 
priation was known only to a few. Senator Voorhees 
provided for an annual budget, itemizing the several 
appropriations and yet collecting them in one act, so that 
the aggregate could be comprehended at a glance, not 
only by the legislators but by the public at large In the 
fall of the same year his friends urged his name as a can- 
didate for the Republican nomination for Governor. A 
gallant fight was made for the young leader from Union 
but was unsuccessful, Hon. John W. Griggs receiving the 
nomination. Senator Voorhees loyally supported his suc- 
cessful competitor during the campaign, and he was then 
proclaimed by the prophets as the successor of Governor 
Griggs. In 1896 Governor Griggs offered him the position 
of Clerk in Chancery, which he generously declined in 
order that some of his friends might receive appointments 
rather than himself. In 1898 he was elected President of 
the Senate without opposition, and upon the appointment 
of Governor Griggs as Attorney-General of the United 
States he became Acting Governor of the State. In that 
capacity he fulfilled the expectations of his friends He 
displayed a courage of conviction and an executive 
capacity and a devotion to duty that added to his already 
brilliant reputation as a public man. His administration 
fell upon troublous times. War was declared with Spain 
and he became the War Governor of New Jersey. In this 
capacity he won new laurels. 



224 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Following the precedent established by those noble war 
Governors, Olden and Parker, Governor Voorhees entered 
enthusiastically into the active work of preparing New 
Jersey's quota for the war with Spain. Realizing the 
difficulties that arise in an emergenc}' of this nature, he 
sought to restrain, by wise and prudent counsel, all whose 
absence would entail privation i nd suffering upon those 
depending upon themf or support, and urged others, whose 
interests were not likely to suffer, to offer their services. 
He watched with careful scrutiny each detail of the 
equipment of the force and endeavored to make efficient 
organizations of New Jersey's contingent in the service 
of the United States. His success in this mobilization 
was quick and pronounced. 

His care for and interest in the soldiers, however, con- 
tinued even after they were mustered into service, and he 
gave his time and influence to the promotion of their 
welfare and comfort, even a^'ter they had left the borders 
of the State. 

His long public service and his record as Acting Gov- 
ernor of the State, at once brought him to the front as a 
prominent candidate for the Republican nomination for 
Governor, and when the Republican State Convention 
assembled in September, at Trenton, he was selected as 
the standard-bearer by acclamation, an honor that has 
fallen on no other man, in recent years, in the State of 
New Jersey. He was elected by a plurality of 5,499 over 
Elvin W. Crane, the Democratic candidate, after an 
exciting campaign. 

Voorhees, Rep., 164,051 ; Crane, Dem., 158,552; Lan- 
dou, Pro, 6,^93 ; Maguire, Soc.-Lab., 5,458 ; Sclirayshuen, 
Peop., 491. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



James Smith, Jr., Newark, 

Senator Smith was born in 1851, at N'ewark, N. J., and 
was educated at private schools in his native city up to 
the time he went to college at Wilmington, Del. After 
graduating he located in New York in the drygoods busi- 
ness, his father having been in this line for many years 
in the same city. He did not like the business, however, 
and soon returned to Newark, where he engaged in the 
manufacturing of patent and enameled leather. He is 
now the sole owner of one of the largest concerns in that 



BIOGRAPHIES. 225 

line of business in the country and the product of his 
factories is shipped to all parts of this country and 
Europe The business is conducted under the firm name 
of J. H Halsey & Smith. It has earned the reputation of 
manufacturing the finest carriage leathers in the world. 
Mr. Smith's first political office was that of Councilman 
of the city of Newark, having been elected in 1883, when 
the Council was a tie. While the ward he ran in was 
Republican, he was elected by more majority than the 
Republican candidate received votes. He at once became 
a leader, and in the following fall he was unanimously 
nominated for Mayor, notwithstanding that he wrote a 
letter to the convention that he would not accept. He 
stood by that letter, and declined the nomination, where- 
upon the convention was reconvened and Mayor Haynes 
was named, 

Mr. Smith was President of the Board of Public Works 
of the city of Newark from the time of its creation and 
until a short period after he was elected United States 
Senator, when he resigned. Previous to his connection 
with that Board he had declined several offices which had 
been tendered him by his party. He was nominated for 
United States Senator to succeed Mr. Blodgett, in 1893, 
by a unanimous vote of the caucus, and he received every 
Democratic vote in each house on Tuesday, January 24th, 
when the election was held, the Republicans voting for 
General William J. Sewell The vote stood — Senate: 
Smith, 16; Sewell, 5; House: Smith, 39; Sewell, 21. In 
1892 Mr. Smith was a delegate-at-large to the National 
Democratic Convention at Chicago and urged the renom- 
ination of President Cleveland. He served as chairman 
of the New Jersey delegation to the National Democratic 
Convention at Chicago in 1896 

Senator Smith's rise in politics has been rapid and re- 
markable. In a period of ten years he was advanced 
from the office of Alderman to that of United States 
Senator. He has always been a zealous and an active 
Democrat, and during recent years he has been recognized 
as a prominent leader of his party. His term as United 
States Senator will expire on March 3d, 1899. 

W1LI.IAM J. SEWEti., Camden. 

Senator Sewell was born in Ireland in 1835. He came 
to this country at an early age. At the outbreak of the 
late war he was mustered into the United States service 
as Captain in the Fifth New Jersey Regiment, August 
28th, J 861, and participated in all the engagements in 
15 



226 BIOGRAPHIES. 

which his regiment took part, down to the battle of 
Spottsylvania, in May, 1864. In the battle of Chancel- 
lorsville, General Mott was disabled by a severe wound, 
and Sewell assumed charge of the brigade. At a critical 
point in the engagement he led it forward in a resistless 
charge and achieved one of the most brilliant successes of 
the war. He captured eight colors from the Confederates, 
and retook the regimental standard of a New York regi- 
ment. His services were scarcely less brilliant at Gettys- 
burg and other important points. He was wounded twice, 
at Gettysburg and Chancellorsville He was made Ivieu- 
tenant-Colonel of the Fifth Regiment, July, 1862, and 
Colonel three months later. In September. 1864, after 
recovering from illness, he became Colonel of the Thirty- 
eighth Regiment, and remained with it in the field until 
the close of the war. 

He was made Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers. 
April 9th, 1866, for "gallant and meritorious conduct in 
the battle of Chancellorsville," and Major- General at the 
close of the war, for meritorious services. When Joel 
Parker became Governor, General Sewell was appointed 
a member of his personal staff. During the railroad 
strikes of 1877, he was sent by Governor Bedle to the most 
critical point in New Jersey ( Phillipsburg), with the Sixth 
and Seventh Regiments, and was appointed Provisional 
Commander of the forces at that point. He guarded his 
post so well that not a ripple of trouble occurred. He is 
now, and has been for several years, Commander of the 
Second Brigade, National Guard of New Jersey. 

He was elected to the State Senate from Camden county 
for three successive terms of three years each, and in the 
years 1876, '79 and '80 he was President of that body. His 
career as a legislator was one of brilliant usefulness, and 
his record is remarkable for strict integrity, honorable 
bearing and dignified deportment. When he was elected 
to the Uniterl States Senate by the Legislature of 1881, 
and on severing the ties of friendship which bound him 
to those on both sides of the Chamber, an impressive 
scene occurred, when Democrats as well as Republicans 
vied with each other in complimenting him on the high 
honor which had been conferred on him, and expressing 
regret that the State was about to lose so valuable a mem- 
ber of its law-making body. Appropriate resolutions 
were unanimously passed, and Senator Sewell took his 
leave a few days before the meeting of the United States 
Senate, on the 4th of March, 1881. He was elected in 
joint meeting over his predecessor, Hon. Theodore F. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 227 

Randolph, by a strict party vote. He was a delegate to 
the Republican National Conventions of 1876 and 1880. 
He was chairman of the New Jersey delegation to the 
Republican National Convention at Chicago, in 1S81, and 
was a staunch suf)porter of Blaine for the Presidency. In 
1888 he was also chairman of the New Jersey delegation 
to the Republican National Convention, when he sup- 
ported General Harrison for the Presidency ; and again 
in 1892, when he took a similar position. In 189tt he 
also served as chairman of the New Jersey delegation to 
the National Republican Convention held at St Louis. 
He was succeeded by Rufus Blodgett as United States 
Senator in 1887. In J 895, being the choice of the Repub- 
lican caucus, he was elected to succeed John R. McPher- 
son in the United States Senate. His term will expire 
on March 3d, 1901. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



First District. 

Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem 
Counties. 

( Population, Census of 1890, 198,193 ; C--nsus ot 1895, 220,049.) 

Henry C Loudensi.ager. 

(Rep., Woodbury.) 

Mr. Ivoudenslager was born in Mauricetown, Cumber- 
land county, N. J., May 22d, 1852 His parents moved 
to Paulsboro, Gloucester county, in March. 1856, where 
he has continuously resided ever since. His education 
was obtained in the common schools. After leaving the 
farm of his father, he entered the produce commission 
business in Philadelphia, and continued in it for ten 
years, from 1872 to 1882. During this time his father 
was the County Clerk of Gloucester, and except when 
engaged in the market during the produce season, the 
son was employed in the office He was elected to the 
office in 1882, and was re-elected in 1887. At both of his 
elections he ran far ahead of his ticket, his plurality the 
last time being 946. He is a member of the State Repub- 
lican Committee. Mr. Loudenslager is well known all 
over the State from his secret society connections. He 
has been the Great Keeper of Wampum, Improved O. R. 
M. , of this State. He is a member of Florence Lodge, No. 



228 BIOGRAPHIES. 

87, F. & A. M., and is a 32d-degree Mason. This is his 
fourth term in Congress. In 1898 he was re-elected by a 
plurality of 5,772. 

1896-Loudenslager, Rep., 33,659; Wright, Dem. and 
Silver, 17,118; Bingham, Pro., 1,516; Mills, Soc-Ivab., 
150 Loudenslager's plurality, 16,541. 

1898 - Ivoudensiager, Rep., 23,864; Iredell, Dem , 18,092; 
Haven, Pro., 1,859; Mills, Soc.-Lab , 164. Loudenslager's 
plurality, 5,772. 



Second District. 

Atlantic, Mercer, Burlington and Ocean Counties. 

(Population.'Censusof 1893, 183,316; Census of 1895,198,144.) 

John J. Gardner. 

(Rep., Atlantic City ) 

Mr. Gardner was born October 17th, 1845, in Atlantic 
county, N. J., and since 1856 has resided in Atlantic City, 
except during his term of service in the army during the 
Civil war. He is in the real estate and insurance busi- 
ness. He was elected Mayor of Atlantic City in 1868, '69, 
'70, '73 and '74— having declined the nomination in 1872 
and 1875. In the latter year he was elected a member of 
the Common Council, and one of the Coroners of the 
county. He was elected Senator in 1877, and was re- 
elected in 1880, '83, 86 and '89. He beat the record, with 
regard to the length of service, of any State Senator in 
the history of the State, having served five consecutive 
terms, or fifteen years altogether. In the session of i883 
he was President of the Senate, when he discharged the 
duties of the position with much ability and impartiality. 
He always took a prominent part in legislation, and dur- 
ing many years was the leader of his party in the Senate. 
He is noted for his readiness in debate, repartee and quick 
and forcible expression of ideas. He was a delegate-at- 
large to the National Republican Convention at Chicago 
in 1884. He is a member of the State Republican Com- 
mittee. This is his fourth term in Congress. He was re- 
elected in 1898 by a plurality of 6,G68. 

1896— Gardner, Rep., 31,4 8; Conrow, Dem. and Silver, 
13,969; Adams, Pro., 1,036; Temple, Nat. Dem., 1,076; 
Yardley, Soc.-Lab., 115; Gardner's plurality, 17,449. 

1898-Gardner, Rep , 24,035 ; Hall, Dem., 17.367 ; Cur- 
rie. Pro., 1.294; Weigel, Soc-Lab., 153. Gardner's plu- 
rality, 6,668. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 229 

Third District. 

Somerset, Middlesex and Moumoutli Couaties. 

(Population, Census of 1880, 159,913; Censu; of 1895, 176,048 ) 

Benjamin F. Howei,i. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Howell was born in Cumberland county, N J , 
January 27th. 1844, and is President of the People's 
National Bank of New Brunswick. He was Surrogate of 
Middlesex county for ten years, from November, 1882, 
until November. 1892 He served with the Twelfth New 
Jersey Volunteers throughout the Civil War He came to 
South Amboy, where he entered business and continued 
his residence there until 18^2, when he was elected Surro- 
gate and removed to New Brunswick. He served three 
years as a member of a Township Committee, and two 
terms as Chosen Freeholder, during the last year of which 
he was Director of the Board. He is a director of the 
New Brunswick Savings Bank and holds many other 
positions of trust He was elected to Congress in J 891 by 
a plurality of 3,976 over Jacob A Geissenheiner, Demo- 
crat, who two years before carried the district by 8,327. 
In 1896 he was re-elected by the increased plurality of 
8,221. This is his third term in Congress 

1896- Howell, Rep , 24,308 ; Wells, Dem., 16,087; Mar- 
shall, Pro., 511; Jones, Nat Dem., 986; Henry, Soc - 
Lab., 148 Howell's plurality, 8,221. 

1898— Howell. Rep, 19,412; Convery, Dem, 18,683; 
Bird, Pro , 670; Williams, Soc. -Lab , 183. Howell's plu- 
rality, 729. 



Fourth District. 

Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon and Morris Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890. 148,2r38 ; Census of 1S95, 151,739.) 

Joshua S. Sai^mon. 

(Dem., Bconf«n,) 

Mr. Salmon was born near Mount Olive, Morris county, 
N. J., February 2d. 1846. and is a lawyer by profession. 
He is of Scotch origin, while his ancestry in this country 
dates back to 1640. He was educated in the seminaries 
of Charlotteville, N. Y , and Schooley's Mountain, N. J., 
and studied law with^he late Charles E. Schofield of Jer- 
sey City. Later he matriculated in the Albany Law 
School, where he was graduated in 1873 with the degree 



2E0 BIOGRAPHIES. 

of LL. B. In March of that year he was admitted as an 
attorney and counselor to the bar of New York, and in 
November, 1875, he was admitted as an attorney in New 
Jersey. He afterward became a counselor, and on Decem- 
ber 2 1 , 1894, he was admitted as an attorney and counselor 
of the Supreme Court of the United States. Since his 
admission to the bar he has practiced his profession at 
Boonton. He takes high rank both as a civil and crimi- 
nal lawyer. He has been counsel in many notable cases 
and enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice. 

In March, J 893, he was appointed by Governor Werts 
as Prosecutor of the Pleas for Morris county, and served 
a full term of five years. On April 1st, 1897, he opened 
an office in Morristown, and he now divides his time be- 
tween that and the Boonton office, having a son in each 
office reading law and assisting in legal work. As a citi- 
zen Mr. Salmon has always been active and influential in 
the welfare and advancement of the place of his residence, 
substantially supporting its leading institutions and liber- 
ally encouraging its worthy enterprises He has been 
one of the directors of the Boonton National Bank since 
its organization in 1890. His activity in political affairs 
has continued since his admission to the bar, and he is a 
recognized leader in the Democratic party in Morris 
county. In 1876 he was elected a member of the City 
Council of Boonton and held that office for six years. In 
1877 he was elected a member of the House of Assembly 
and served on important committees, and was also a 
recognized leader on the floor of the House. He was 
counsel for the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Morris 
county from 1880 until 1893, has been counsel for the 
Town of Boonton and for various townships in Morris 
county, holding such an incumbency during the greater 
part of the time since his admission to the bar. He was 
the Democratic candidate for County Clerk in 1878, and 
the nominee of his party for State Senator in 1883. 

Mr. Salmon was elected to Congress by a plurality of 
2,659 over John I. Blair Reiley, the Republican candidate. 
Two years before, Mahlon Pitney, Republican, carried the 
district by a plurality of 2,977. 

1896~Pitney, Rep., 20.494; Cutter, Dem., 17,517; 
I/Ogan, Pro., 1,054; Pitney's plurality, 2,977. 

1898-Salmon, Dem., l7,^66; Reiley, Rep, 15,207; 
Ivefferts, Pro., 1,571; Campbell, Soc -Lab., 70; Salmon's 
plurality, 2,659. » 



BIOGRAPHIES. 231 

Fifth District. 

Passaic and Bergen Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,272 ; Census of 1895, 193,642 ) 

James Fi^eming Stewart. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Stewart was born at Paterson, N. J., June 15th, 
1851, and is a lawyer by profession. He attended both 
school and college, and occupied his summer vacations in 
various departments of labor to acquire the means to 
defray the expenses of his education. In the law class of 
the University of the City of New York, in 1870, which 
comprised many men who have since attained eminence 
in their profession, he took the $250 prize for the best 
examination — a fact of which he is particularly proud. 
He has been three times appointed Recorder of the city 
of Paterson, a position which he held when he was elected 
to Coiigress, but he was legislated out of ofifice in 1892 by 
the Democratic Legislature, and was restored in the spring 
of 1894, owing to Republican ascendency in the Legisla- 
ture. He resigned the office in November, 1895. This is 
his third term in Congress. 

1896 -Stewart, Rep., 23,845; Ely. Dem , 13,667; Reed, 
Pro,, 370; Banks, Nat. Dem., 920; Wilson, Soc.-Lab,, 
1 ,04 1 . Stewart's plurality, 10, 178. 

1898— Stewart, Rep. 18,367; Marley, Dem, 16,342; 
Stocking, Pro., 354 ; Magnat, Soc.-Lab., 1,270. Stewart's 
plurality, 2,025. 



Sixth District. 

The City of NcAvark and the Township of East Orange, 
Essex County. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 195,112 ; Census of 1895, 233,733.) 

Richard Wayne Parker. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr, Parker was born in Morristown, N J., August 6th, 
1848, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated 
from Princeton College in i867, studied law in the Colum- 
bia Law School, New York, and was admitted to the bar 
in 1870. He then became the law partner of his father, 
Cortlandt Parker, and the partnership still exists. He 
was a member of Assembly from Essex county in 1885 
and 1886, when he took a prominent part in legislation. 



232 BIOGRAPHIES. 

In 1892 he was defeated for Congress by Thomas Dunn 
English. This is his third term in Congress, having been 
first elected in 1894. 

1896— Parker, Rep., 31,059; Beecher, Dem., 15,393; 
Harden, Pro., 328; People's Nat Dem., 791; Billings, 
Soc.-Lab , 781. Parker's plurality, 15,666. 

1898— Parker, Rep., 23843 ; Atwater, Dem., 20,150 ; 
Raub, Pro., 395 ; Carless, Soc.-Lab., 1,035. Parker's plu- 
rality, 3,693. 



Seventh District. 

All of Hudson County Excepting the City of Bayonne. 

(Pcpulation, Census of 1890, 256,093 ; Census of 1895, 308,224.) 

William D. Daly. 

(Dem., Hoboken ) 

Mr. Daly was born in 1851, in Jersey City, and he has 
always resided within the limits of Hudson county. His 
early education was acquired in Public School No. ] , in 
Jersey City, and among his schoolmates were some who- 
have since become prominent, as, for instance, ex-Mayor 
Wanser, Samuel D. Dickinson, City Treasurer of Jersey 
City, and the late City Clerk John E. Scott. At the age 
of fourteen he went to work in Cory's iron foundry as an 
apprentice, and later he was employed in the foundry of 
the Erie Railroad Company and at Blackmore's. Among 
his shopmates in Blackmore's was Mayor Pagan, of 
Hoboken. But the legal profession had always offered an 
attractive field to Mr. Daly, and in J 870 he entered the 
office of Blair & Ransom, in Jersey City. Four years 
later he was admitted to the bar as an attorney, and later 
he was made counselor. 

Mr. Daly entered upon the practice of law with the tact 
and energy peculiar to self-made men. He has practiced 
law in all the courts of the State and has represented the 
defense in more capital cases than any lawyer in the State, 
and now stands in the front rank of criminal lawyers in 
the State of New Jersey. 

In the great Erie Railroad strike of 1878 Mr. Daly ap- 
peared as counsel for the arrested freight-handlers and 
secured their acquittal. In 18S7 he conducted the defense 
of the Cigarmakers' Union in Jersey City, whose leaders 
were charged with conspiracy. In this case also he suc- 
ceeded in obtaining a verdict of acquittal. His early 
associations have made Mr. Daly entertain a very kindly 
feeling toward laboring men and labor organizations. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 233 

In appreciation of his legal ability, President Cleveland, 
during his first term, appointed Mr. Daly Assistant United 
States District Attorney, and this office he held for three 
years, handing in his resignation to an incoming admin- 
istration. In 1888 he was made alternate delegate to the 
National Democratic Convention at St. Louis, and again, 
in 1892, to the Chicago Convention. In 1896 he was a 
district delegate to the National Democratic Convention 
at Chicago. In 1891 he was urged to accept the nomina- 
tion for member of the House of Assembly from the 
Eighth District of Hudson county. Elected by a rousing 
majority, he took his place on the floor of the House as 
the practical leader of his party. The same courtesy 
which had characterized his work as a practitioner won 
for him hosts of friends as a legislator, even from the op- 
position, and at the close of the session he was appointed 
Judge of the Hoboken District Court. This office he re- 
signed upon his election to the Senate in 1892. 

The election which resulted in the choice of Judge 
Daly to the Senate was won after a most exciting cam- 
paign, J Herbert Potts, a man of great strength and 
popularity, was nominated on the Republican ticket, but 
Mr. Daly had such a hold on the popular heart that 
he was triumphantly elected by 5,645 plurality, the 
largest vote ever given a Senatorial candidate in Hudson 
county. He was re-elected in 1895 by a plurality of 4.ii59 
over ex-Assemblyman Max Salinger, the Republican 
nominee. 

During his six years' service in the Senate he gained a 
high reputation as a legislator, and for more than half 
that period he was the leader of his party on the floor. 
He made a brilliant record in 1895. when the riparian 
rights question was before the Senate, during his oppo- 
sition to the Creamery Trust, and while serving as a mem- 
ber of the Special Investigating Committee of the Senate. 
During the Presidential campaign of 1896 he rendered his 
party valuable service on the stump and also as a mem- 
ber of its State Committee. He was a prominent candi- 
date for the Democratic Gubernatorial nomination in 
1898, and would have received a majority of the votes of 
the convention had not a stampede been engineered just 
in the nick of time in favor of the opposing candidate. 
Still, despite his disappointment, Mr. Daly worked hard 
for the election of Mr. Elvin W. Crane, the nominee. 
Mr. Daly was elected to Congress by a plurality of 10,108. 
the largest ever given to a candidate for Congress in the 
district. 



234 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1896— McEwan, Rep., 80,557; Young, Dem., 26,080; 
McCracken, Pro., 175; Wortendyke, Nat. Dem., 875; 
Campbell, Soc.-Lab., 1,073 ; Ginner, Silver, 235. Mc- 
Ewan's plurality, 4,477. 

1898-Daly, Dem, 30,270; Pangborn, Rep., 20,162; 
Brown, Pro , 258 ; Herrschaft, Soc.-Ivab., 1,723. Daly's 
plurality, 10,108. 



Eighth District. 

Tbe County of Union, the City of Bayonne (Hudson County), 

and all the County of Essex Excepting the City 

of Newark and Tow^nship of East Orange. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,480 ; Census of 1895, 183,527 ) 

ChARI.es NEWEI.!. FOWI.ER. 

(Rep , Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Fowler was born at Lena, Illinois, November 2d, 
1852, and is in the banking business His earlier years 
were passed on bis father's farm, where he remained until 
iiis eighteenth year, when he became a student at Beloit 
College, Wisconsin. Two years later he entered Yale 
College, from which he was graduated in 1876. He read 
law in the office of Williams & Thompson, in Chicago, 
and attended the Chicago Law School, and was graduated 
in 1878. He has been more or less engaged in active 
politics since he came to Elizabeth, fourteen years ago, 
and for some time he has been Chairman of the City 
Republican Central Committee. He served as a member- 
at-large of the Republican State Committee in 1898, and 
took an active part in the campaign for the election of 
Foster M. Voorhees, as Governor. This is Mr. Fowler's 
third term in Congress. 

1896-Fowler, Rep., 25,131; Willey, Dem.. 13,487; 
Wilson, Pro , 443 ; Noyes, Nat. Dem , 1.083; Campbell, 
Soc.-Lab. , 572. Fowler's plurality, 1 1 ,644. 

1898-Fowler, Rep., 20,^30; Snyder, Dem., 15,878; 
Davis, Pro., 561; Campbell, Soc.-Lab., 740. Fowler's 
plurality, 4,352. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 235 

Population and Vote Cast in Each District for Congress in 
1896 and 1898. 

Population. Total Vote. 

District. 1890. 1895. 1896. I898. 

First 198,193 220,049 52,4'13 43,979 

Second 183,316 198.144 47,614 42,849 

Third 159,913 176,'i48 42,040 38,948 

Fourth 148,268 154,739 39,065 34,714 

Fifth 152,272 198,642 39,843 36,333 

Sixth 195,112 233,73i 48,352 45,423 

Seventh 256,093 308,224 58,995 52,413 

Eighth 152,486 183,527 40,718 37,409 

1,444.938 1,073,106 369,070 332,068 

1898. 

Total Republican vote 105,120 

" Democratic vote 154,648 

" Prohibition vote 6,962 

" Social Labor vole 5,338 

332,068 
Republican plurality 10,472 



STATE SENATORS. 
Atlantic County. 

(Population, 34,750.) 

Lewis Evans. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Senator Evaus was born at Estellville, Atlantic county, 
N. J., in 1842, and is a railroad agent. When fifteen 
years of age, he left home and settled at Mays Landing for 
a short time, and then removed to Camden, where he 
served as a messenger boy between that city and Phila- 
delphia before the cable had been laid across the Dela- 
ware. He learned telegraphy, and for three summers 
served as an operator. Next he was appointed as station 
agent at Atco, on the West Jersey and Sea Shore railroad, 
and subsequently he was promoted to a larger office at 
Hammonton. In 1863, he removed to Atlantic City, still 
serving as railroad agent He remained in the railroad 
company's employ until 1885. when he was elected 
County Clerk of Atlantic, an office he held for ten years. 



236 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He was City Clerk of Atlantic City for two years and was 
a member of the Board of Education for nine years. 

At the organization of the first building and loan asso- 
ciation of Atlantic City, he was elected as one of its 
Directors, which ofiice he still holds He also is one of 
the Directors of the Second National Bank, of that city. 

Mr. Evans was one of the originators and incorporators 
of the Neptune Hose Company, when it was organized in 
Atlantic City fifteen years ago, and has been its president 
successively all that time. 

He is also a Past Master of Trinity Lodge, No. 79, 
F. & A. M., a Past Grand of American Star Lodge, I. 
O. O. F., and was one of the originators of the Atlantic 
City Hospital, and one of its Board of Governors, being 
also Treasurer of the institution. 

1895— Hoffman, Rep., 3,472; Osgood, Dem , 2,836; 
Adams, Pro., 202; Jacobs, People's, 49 Hoffman's plu- 
rality, 636. 

1898 — Evans, Rep., 3,982; Schuchardt, Dem., 2,869; 
Clark, Pro., 270. Evans' plurality, 1,113. 



Bergen Comity. 

(Population, 65,415.) 

William M. Johnson. 

(Rep., Hackensack.) 

Senator Johnson was born in Newton, Sussex county, 
N. J., December 2d, 1847. and is a lawyer by profession. 
His father was Whitfield S. Johnson, who was Secretary 
of State from 1861 to 1866. The Senator removed from 
Newton to Trenton in 1862, He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1867, and practiced law in Trenton 
from 1870 until 1874, In the latter year he removed to 
Hackensack, where he has been in the active practice of 
his profession to the present time. 

He has been a School Trustee and a member of the 
Hackensack Improvement Commission. In 1884 he was 
a member of the Republican State Committee, and was a 
district delegate to the Republican National Convention 
at Chicago in 188S. He is the first Republican Senator 
ever elected in Bergen county. In 1892 Senator Winton 
carried the county by a plurality of 573. Senator John- 
son's plurality was 1,119. He was re-elected in 1898 by a 
plurality of 723. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 237 

Last year he was the leader of his party on the floor of 
the Senate, and he served as chairman of the Committees 
on Judiciary, Appropriations, and State Library, and as a 
member of the Committees on Boroughs and Townships 
and State Hospitals. 

1895— Johnson, Rep., 6,287; Doremus, Dem., 5,168; 
Mowbray, Pro , 117. Johnson's plurality, 1,119. 

1898- Johnson, Rep., 6,999; Currie, Dem., 6,276; Ar- 
mann, Soc.-Labor, 140. Johnson's plurality, 723. 



Burlington County. 

(Population, 59,117.) 

Howard E. Packer. 

(Dem., Burlington.) 

Senator Packer was born at Trenton, N. J., September 
2d, 1859, and is a coal merchant in Burlington city. He 
was elected a Chosen Freeholder in Burlington township 
in 1890 for a term of two years, and was re-elected in 
1897, and is now a member of that body. He was a mem- 
ber of the House of Assembly in 1892 and 1893, when he 
took a prominent part in legislation. In November, 
1897, he was elected to the State Senate by a plurality of 
616 over the Republican candidate, Joshua E. Borton, 
after an exciting campaign, despite the fact that Burling- 
ton county gave McKinley, for President, a plurality of 
4,761 in 1896. In 1894, Dr. William C. Parry, Repub- 
lican, carried the county for Senator by a plurality of 
2,830. Last year the Senator served on the following 
committees: Riparian Rights, Labor and Industries, 
Federal Relations, Industrial School for Girls and Clergy. 

1894-Parry, Rep., 7,147; Prickett, Dem ,4,317; Wright, 
Pro , 474. Parry's plurality, 2,830. 

1897— Packer, Dem., 6.3C0; Borton, Rep., 5.684; Lan- 
don. Pro., 386. Packer's plurality, 616. 



Camden County. 

(Population, 100,104.) 

Herbert W. Johnson. 

(Rep., Merchantville ) 

Senator Johnson was born in Bucks county. Pa., No- 
vember 24th, 1850, of Quaker parentage, and is a seed 
merchant, being the senior member of the firm of John- 



238 BIOGRAPHIES. 

son & Stokes, the largest seed and agricultural house in 
Philadelphia, which he established in 1880. He was edu- 
cated in the Friends' schools of Philadelphia He has 
resided in Merchantville, Camden county, since 1887, and 
is prominently identified with the growth and progress of 
that town. He served three years in the Common Coun- 
cil, and at the end of his term he was elected Chief Bur- 
gess of that borough The Senator was serving a second 
term as a member of the Camden County Board of Free- 
holders when he was elected to the State Senate. He 
then resigned the Freeholder office. He has always taken 
an active part in county matters, and has filled the Chair- 
manships of the most important committees of the County 
Board. He is an active member of the Commercial Ex- 
change of Philadelphia, and also of the Philadelphia 
Bourse Last year he served as Chairman of the Senate 
Committees on Finance, Miscellaneous Business, and La- 
bor and Industries, and as a member of the Committees 
on Corporations, Militia, State Library, and Printing. 

1893— Rogers, Rep., 11,073; Dickinson, Dem., 9,416; 
Nicholson, Pro., 490 ; Cooper, Cit. League, 663. Rogers* 
plurality, 1,657. 

1896 -Johnson. Rep., 16,308 ; Armstrong, Dem., 6,449 ; 
Haven, Pro., 406; Weisbrod, Soc.-Lab., 97. Johnson's 
plurality, 9,859. 



Cape May County. 

(Population, 12,855.) 

Robert E. Hand. 

(Rep., Erma.) 

Senator Hand was born at Erma, Cape May county, 
June 28th, 1854, where he still resides. He was educated 
in the public schools, and at an early age gave evidence 
of business ability of an unusual order. He is now 
extensively engaged in oyster-planting and general con- 
tracting. He is the owner of hundreds of acres of valu- 
able timber lands, from which he cuts railroad ties, 
piling, ])oles, &c., in great quantity. He employs more 
labor than any other man in the county. He married 
Lizzie W., daughter of Captain William S. Hoffman, of 
Cold Spring, N. J., in 1878. He began his public career 
as a member of the local Board of Education, and was its 
District Clerk for twelve years. He was an active and 
influential member of the Board of Freeholders from 1 887 



BIOGRAPHIES. 239 

to 1892, and was elected Sheriff in the latter year after 
one of the most masterly campaigns in the history of the 
county. He attended as a delegate the National Repub- 
lican Convention at St. lyouis, June 16th, 1896. He was 
elected to the Assembly in 1896, by a plurality of 469 
over Roden Democrat In November, 1897, he was 
elected State Senator for a term of three years, over 
David W. Roden, by a plurality of 205, after one of the 
hottest contests ever known to have taken place in the 
county, being the only Republican Senator elected in 
New Jersey at that time. His many friends throughout 
the State congratulated him on his brilliant and decisive 
victory, and in their appreciation of his abilities, are di 
the unanimous opinion that in politics as well as in busi- 
ness, he is in the foremost rank of enterprising citizens. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Printing and Commerce and Navigation, and as a member 
of the Committees on Education, Miscellaneous Business 
and Unfinished Business. 

1894-Ross, Rep , 1,557 ; Ewing, Dem., 1,087 ; Phillips. 
Pro , 115 ; Townsend, People's. 54. Ross' plurality, 47Q. 

1897— Hand, Rep.. 1,5"J6 ; Roden, Dem., 1,321 ; Lak^ 
Pro., 203. Hand's plurality, 205. 



Cumberland County. 

(Population, 49,815.) 

Edward Casper Stokes. 

(Rep., Millville.) 

Senator Stokes was born in Philadelphia, Pa., Decem- 
ber 22d, 1860, and is a bookkeeper. He was educated in 
the public schools at Millville and at Brown University, 
Providence, R. I. He was elected City Superintendent 
of Public Schools in Millville in 188 ^ a position he held 
until 1898. He served as a member of Assembly from the 
Second district of Cumberland county in ls91 and 1892. 
He was elected Senator by a plurality of 830 over Isaac 
C. Smalley in 1892, and in j895 he was given an increased 
plurality of 2,077 over Ludlam. Dem. In 1898 he was 
re-elected by a plurality of 1,253, thus receiving a third 
term, an honor which had never before been conferred on 
a Senator from Cumberland county. Mr. Stokes is the 
youngest member of the present Senate. In 1895 he was 
President of the Senate, when he discharged the duties 



240 BIOGRAPHIES. 

of the office with marked dignity, ability and impartial- 
ity. Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees 
on Corporations, Industrial School for Girls, and Soldiers' 
Home, and as a member of the Committees on Appropria- 
tions and State Prison. 

1895-Stokes, Rep , 5,231; Ludlam, Dem., 3,154; Ran- 
dolph. Pro., 494; Starkweather, People's, 602. Stokes' 
plurality, 2,077. 

1898— Stokes' Rep., 5.174; Grosscup, Dem., 3,921; 
Sheppard, Pro., 583. Stokes' plurality, 1,253. 



Essex County. 

(Population, 312,000.) 

George W. Ketcham. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Senator Ketcham is decended from an old Jersey family 
that settled in Pennington early in the eighteenth cen- 
tury. He was born in Newark, and has always made 
that city his home, His early training was at the New- 
ark Wesleyan Institute, and later at the Flushing Insti- 
tute, Long Island. He is a graduate of Princeton Col- 
lege, United States Senator George Gray being one of 
his classmates. 

Since leaving Princeton the Senator has been engaged 
in the manufacture of tinware and sheet-metal goods, 
employing many hundreds of persons. The firm of E. 
Ketcham & Co., with which he was connected from 1859 
to 1885, was merged into a new corporation, one of whose 
factories is in Newark. The Senator is a Director as well 
as Secretary and Treasurer of the Central Stamping Com- 
pany. During the years 1884-5 he represented the Elev- 
enth ward in the Newark Board of Education. In 1886 
he was elected to the Common Council, and for four years 
he was an active member of that body. Besides being 
chairman of important committees and a member of the 
Committee on Finance, he took a leading interest in mu- 
nicipal questions, notably those of a new water-supply 
and rapid transit. He is also a Director of the American 
Insurance Company of Newark, the largest company of 
its kind in the State of New Jersey. He was a member of 
the House of Assembly from Essex county in 1891-2. 
The Senator was the author of the Saturday half-holiday 
law which was passed in 1892. In 1895 he served on the 
Special Investigating Committee of the Senate. He was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 241 

re-elected to the Senate iu 1896, by the increased plural- 
ity of 20,923. Last year he served as Chairman of the 
Committees on Banks and Insurance, Municipal Corpora- 
tions, Militia and State Prison, and as a member of the 
Committees on Treasurer's Accounts, Soldiers' Home, and 
Clergy. 

1893— Ketcham Rep., 28,542; Barrett, Dem., 25,746; 
Jones, Pro., 663; Scheer, Soc, 585 Ketcham 's plurality, 
2,796 

1896-Ketcham, Rep , 41,856; Lambert, Dem., 20,9:^3; 
Livermore, Nat. Dem., 1,045; Anderson, Pro., 541; Wil- 
son, Soc. -Lab., 899. Ketcham 's plurality, 1^0,923. 



Gloucester County. 

(Population, 31,191.) 

Solomon H. Stanger. 

(Rep., Glassboro ) 

Senator Stanger was born at Glassboro, N. J., March 
27th, 1836, on a farm. His boyhood days were spent 
with these surroundings. His education was attained in 
the old school-house at Glassboro, after which he entered 
into the industry of tilling the soil, which he pursued 
faithfully and successfully until the year 1881, when he 
moved from the farm into the famous "Temperance 
House" opposite the M. E. Church, Glassboro, and 
opened a general store, which has grown to be the largest 
and most successful of its kind in the county. 

In 18S5 he was elected to the Board of Freeholders,, 
serving in that capacity for ten successive years, hold- 
ing the most important positions the Board could place 
upon him. 

In 1892 he was elected to the Assembly, and has been 
re-elected three times since, serving four years altogether, 
f.nd being the only person from Gloucester county ever 
returned for so many successive terms. He served on 
some of the most important committees. In 1896 he was 
Chairman of the House Committee on Education, also a 
member of the Committees on Labor and Industry, Ri- 
parian Rights and School for Deaf-Mutes. 

Senator Stanger has always been closely identified with, 
and is a leader of, the Republican party, having at heart 
its principles, and doing all in his power to promote the 
same. His many friends, recognizing his sterling quali- 
ties and faithful service, have shown their appreciation 
16 



S42 BIOGRAPHIES. 

"by electing him to the high and honorable position as 
their representative in the Senate. Last year he served 
as Chairman of the Committees on Engrossed Bills and 
Public Health, and as a member of the Committees on 
Agriculture, Public Grounds and Buildings, Reform 
School for Boys and Passed Bills. 

1893— Packer, Rep., 3,735 ; Barker, Dem., 3,145 ; Mor- 
gan, Sr., Pro., 243. Packer's plurality, 590. 

1896~Stanger, Rep., 4,637 ; Myers, Dem., 3,001 ; 
Holmes, Pro., 216. Stanger's plurality, 1,636. 



Hudson County. 

(Population, 328,080.) 

A1.1.AN Langdon McDermott. 

(Dem , Jersey City.) 

Senator McDermott was born in South Boston, Mass., 
on the 30th of March, 1854. His father was Hugh Farrer 
McDermott, who, to use the language of the memorial 
resolutions adoped by the New York Press Club, on his 
decease, in 1890, "in the wide scope of his literary labors, 
as journalist, dramatist, author and poet, made a con- 
spicuous place and earned enduring fame for himself." 
His mother's maiden name was Annie J. Langdon, aad 
she was of one of the oldest families in New England. In 
1870 the subject of this sketch determined to follow 
journalism, and, as a preliminary step, learned to set type 
and run a press. A few verses published in a Boston 
paper, and reprinted in the New York Telegram, in 1870, 
show that Mr. McDermott had a very narrow escape from 
a literary tomb. In 1876 he entered the law school of the 
University of the City of New York, and was graduated 
the following year, delivering an essay on *' The Sanction 
of the Law," at the commencement exercises, held at the 
Academy of Music, in June, 1877. The same year he was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey, becoming a counselor 
in 1880. While he was a student in the office of the late 
Leon Abbett, there was formed a friendship between pre- 
ceptor and pupil which had grown with the years, and 
had on more than one occasion evidenced a steadfastness 
which is rarely found in the harsh lines of political asso- 
ciation. In 1878 Mr McDermott was defeated as a can- 
didate for Assembly from the Fourth District of Hudson 
ccounty, but was elected in 1879 and 1880, and in 1881 was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 243 

the Democratic candidate for Speaker of that body. 
From 1878 to 1883 he was Corporation Attorney of Jersey 
City, resigning that position when appointed Judge of the 
Second District Court, by Governor I^udlow In 1884 
Governor Abbett appointed Mr. McDermott a member of 
the State Board of Assessors. In that position he formu- 
lated the rules which have ever since been followed in the 
taxation of railroad property and corporate franchises in 
New Jersey In 1880 Governor Abbett nominated him 
as Clerk in Chancery, and he was confirmed by the Sen- 
ate. In communicating the fact to the Legislature, the 
late ex-United States Senator Cattell, also a member of 
the State Board, wrote: "The Hon. Allan \,. McDer- 
mott, one of the original members of the Board, was, dur- 
ing the last session of the Legislature, appointed and con- 
firmed as Clerk in the Court of Chancery, and on the 1st 
of April resigned as a member of this Board to enter 
upon his new position. Much of the success of the early 
work of this Board is due to the intelligent and faithful 
service of Mr. McDermott, largely supplemented by his 
legal knowledge, which was invaluable. The Board 
parted with him most regretfully, and we are free to say 
that in our judgment it will be difficult to find one who 
will in all respects fill his place." In 1884, '85 and '86 
Mr. McDermott was President of the Board of Finance 
and Taxation of Jersey City. Upon his retirement from 
that position the Argus said : " The withdrawal of Allan 
L. McDermott from the management of our municipal 
finances is a public calamity. His clear head, his hon- 
esty of purpose and untiring energy have rendered him 
of inestimable value to our city. He has introduced and 
enforced rigid principles of economy in our local expen- 
ditures, and has, with the aid of his colleagues, estab- 
lished an admirable financial system, which has placed 
our credit above cavil or suspicion." He was renomi- 
nated for Clerk in Chancery, in 1891, by Governor Abbett, 
and he was again confirmed by the Senate. In 1892 Mr. 
McDermott was, because of dissatisfaction with the exist- 
ing local government, defeated in a canvass for the May- 
oralty of Jersey City. In 1894 he was nominated by 
Governor Werts as a member of the Commission ap- 
pointed to revise the State Constitution. He was Chair- 
man of the State Democratic Committee from 1886 until 
1896, and drafted every platform, with one exception^ 
adopted by a State Democratic Convention during that 
,time. 

Mr. McDermott was Chairman of the New Jersey dele- 
gation at the National Convention held in Chicag^o in 1898. 



1244 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He refused to accept the platform adopted by that con* 
vention, and being nominated for Congress, declined to 
run. In 1898 he was appointed by Mayor Hoos Corpora- 
tion Counsel of Jersey City. In that year he was elected 
to the Senate by a plurality of 9,528. 

1895— Daly, Dem., 26,033; Salinger, Rep, 21,474; 
Campbell, Soc -Lab , 1,120; McCracken, Pro., 350. 
Daly's plurality, 4,559. 

1898— McDermott, Dem., 32.138; Brantigan, Rep.. 
22 610 ; Wilson, Pro , 286 ; Krafft, Soc-Lab., 1,726. Mc^ 
Dermott's plurality, 9,528. 



Hunterdon County. 

(Population, 35,334.) 

John R. Foster. 

(Dem., Three Bridges.) 

Senator Foster was born at Neshanic, Somerset county, 
N. J., March 1st, J 844, and is a farmer. He served 
on the Town Committee for three years, and in the 
spring of 1897 he was elected to a second term of office 
in that body. Last year he served on the Senate Com- 
mittees on Agriculture, Miscellaneous Business, Treasur- 
er's Accounts and Passed Bills. 

1894-Kuhl, Dem., 3,950; Shields, Rep., 3,826; Shu- 
man, Pro., 437; Foster, People's, 153. Kuhl's plurality, 
124. 

1897— Foster, Dem.. 4,074; Reading, Rep., 3,290; 
Craig, Pro., 375. Foster's plurality, 784. 



Mercer County. 

(Population, 85,538.) 

EwjAH C. Hutchinson. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Senator Hutchinson was born at Windsor, Mercer 
county, N. J., August 7th, 1855, and is a merchant miller. 
Before his election to the House of Assembly, in 1895, 
the only public office he ever held was that of Township 
Clerk, which he filled for three years. He has been 
Treasurer of the Trenton Bone and Fertilizer Company 
since its organization in July, 1889, and its manager since 
1892. He is a Director of the Interstate Fair Association, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 245 

and was its first Treasurer, haviug served three years in 
that position. He dftes a large business with his flour- 
mill and grain elevator, which are situated in Hamilton 
township. He was elected to the Assembly in 1895 by a 
plurality of 3,273 over McGalliard, Democrat, and in 1896 
by 7,736 over Gill, Democrat. In the Legislature of 1896 
he served as Chairman of the Committee on Clergy and 
as a member of the Committees on Appropriations, Game 
and Fisheries, and State Prison, and also of the Inaugural 
Committee. In 1897 he was Chairman of the Committees 
on Agriculture and School for Deaf-Mutes, and a mem- 
ber of the Committees on Appropriations and Revision of 
Ivaws. 

In 1S98 he was elected to the Senate by a plurality of 
1,461 over his Democratic opponent. Bayard Stockton. 

1895-Skirm, Rep., 10,6s4 ; Bergen, Dem., 8,113 ; Nor- 
cross. Pro., 306; Abrams, People's, 114; Keitz, Soc.-Ivab., 
64. Skirm's plurality, 2,571. 

1898 -Hutchinson, Rep , 10,037 ; Stockton, Dem., 8,576; 
Burgner, Pro., 468. Hutchinson's plurality, 1,461. 



Middlesex County. 

(Population, 70,068.) 

James H. Van Ci,kef. 

(Dem., New Brunswick.) 

Senator Van Cleef was born at Branch ville, Somerset 
county, N. J , July 12th, 1841, and is an attorney and 
counselor-at-law. He was educated at Rutgers College 
grammar school at New Brunswick, N. J., and Lafayette 
College, Easton, Pa. Upon leaving college he entered 
the law office of Hon Mercer Beasley, and when Mr. 
Beasley was elevated to the Supreme Court bench Mr. 
Van Cleef continued his studies under Edward T. Green, 
late Judge of the United States District Court at Trenton. 

Mr. Van Cleef completed his preparatory studies in 
1867, in June -of which year he was admitted to the bar. 
Immediately on the expiration of the term fixed by law 
he took his second examinations and was licensed as a 
counselor. He began the practice of his profession in 
New Brunswick, where he has continued it to the present 
time, having built up a large and lucrative business. 

He was counsel for the Middlesex county Board of 
Chosen Freeholders in 1873 and 1874. In 1875 he was 



246 BIOGRAPHIES. 

made Assemblyman by over 400 majority, although his 
opponent received the year before 700 majority. The 
Board of Aldermen elected him City Attorney in 1877. 
The board was then a political tie. Although a Demo- 
crat and a fervent partisan, so satisfactorily did Mr. Van 
Cleef fulfill the duties of his office that he was continued 
in office in 1878 by a Board of Aldermen that was then 
largely Republican. 

In 1880 he was again elected to the Legislature by 655 
majority. The year previous the Republican candidate 
had P59 majority. Mr. Van Cleef was elected to the 
Assembly in 1881 for the third time and without any op- 
position. While a member of the Legislature Mr. Van 
Cleef drafted and had passed some of the most important 
laws of that period. In 1889 he was elected Mayor of 
the city of New Brunswick, and so honestly and effi- 
ciently did he conduct the duties of Executive that in 
1891 he was unanimously re-elected to that office— the 
Democrats having renominated him and the Republicans 
having placed his name on their ticket. He was again, 
renominated by the Democrats and indorsed by the Re- 
publicans, and served a third term. The Senator holds 
the degree of A. M., which was conferred upon him by 
his Alma Mater in 1872. He comes of good, sturdy, Dutch 
stock on his father's side, and when recently made a 
member of the Holland Society, traced his ancestry back 
to 1641. He is a member of the Odd Fellows, Masons, 
New Jersey Historical Society, Knights of Pythias, Zeta 
Psi (college society), and several other organizations, and 
is President of the New Brunswick Fire Insurance Com- 
pany. 

Last year he served on the Committees on Revision 
of Laws, Corporations. Banks and Insurance State Hos- 
pitals, and Reform School for Boys. 

1894-Herbert, Rep., 7,252; Van Cleef, Dem., 6.011; 
Hults, Pro., 215; Tice, People's, 826; Pyatt, Soc.-Lab., 
172. Herbert's plurality, 1,241. 

1897- Van Cleef, Dem., 6,747; Pownall, Rep , 6,238 ; 
Marshall, Pro., 1:76. Van Cleef 's plurality, 509. 



Monmouth County. 

(Population, 75,.543.) 

Charles Asa Francis. 

(Rep., North Long Branch.) /" 

Senator Francis was born at Keyport, N. J., October 
28th, 1 865, and is a merchant. He received his education in 



BIOGRAPHIES. 247 

the old Turkey school and at Freehold. He was formerly 
a clerk for the New Jersey Central Railroad Company at 
Sandy Hook. In 188 L he formed a copartnership under 
the firm name of Hoyt & Francis, in the grocery busi- 
ness, at North Long Branch, which is one of the most pros- 
perous in Monmouth county. He was elected a Commis- 
sioner of that town in 1884, and was re-elected in 1885, 
'8G and '87. In 1893 he was placed on both tickets for 
Commissioner-at-Large, and received the total vote cast 
at the municipal election. He was made Chairman of the 
Finance Committee, and a member of the Sanitary, Ordi- 
nance and Printing Committees by Mayor Blodgett. He 
husbeen a member of the Board of Education since 1886, 
and in !889 he was elected its Secretary. He served as 
Postmaster at North Long Branch under Presidents 
Arthur and Harrison. He is a fireman and an active 
church worker, and belongs to the following lodges: 
Long Branch Lodge, F. & A. M.; Standard Chapter, R. 
A.M.; Corson Commandery, Knights Templar; Sea View 
Lodge, I O. O. F ; Hollywood Council, Jr. O. U. A. M., 
Long Branch Council, Royal Arcanum, and Progressive 
Council, Loyal Additional Benefit Association, a branch 
of the Royal Arcanum He served two years in the 
House of Assembly, and in 1896 he was elected to the 
Senate by a plurality of 231. Last year he served as 
Chairman of the Committees on Elections and Riparian 
Rights, and as a member of the Committees on Game 
and Fisheries, Engrossed Bills, Public Health, and School 
for Deaf-Mutes. 

1893— Bradley, Rep., Pro. and Cit. League, 8,171; Ter- 
hune, Dem. and Jack Dem., 7.904. Bradley's plurality. 
267. 

1896— Francis, Rep., 9,389; Stevens, Dem., 9,158; 
Brown, Pro., 255. Francis' plurality, 23 L 



Morris County. 

(Population, 59,536 ) 

MAHI.ON Pitney. 

(Rep., Morristown.) 

Senator Pitney was born at Morristown, N. J., February 
5th, 1858, and is a lawyer by profession. He is a son of 
Vice-Chancellor Pitney. He obtained his early education 
in the schools of his native town, and entered Princeton 



48 BIOGRAPHIES. 

College in 1875, and was graduated in 1879. Upon 
graduation he at one commenced the study of law in the 
office of his father, who was then practicing in Morris- 
town. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney in 
June, 1882, and became a couuselor-at-law in 1885. He 
opened an office in Dover, Morris county, in 188', and 
remained there until 1^89, when he returned to Morris- 
town, and has since resided and practiced law in that 
place. His law practice is quite general in its character. 
He acted as Temporary Chairman of the Republican 
State Convention in 1895. which nominated John W. 
Griggs for Governor. At the election of 1894 for Con- 
gress he carried the Democratic counties of Sussex and 
Warren, the latter county being the home of his opponent, 
Hon. Johnston Cornish. In 1896 he made a most bril- 
liant campaign and was re-elected by the increased 
plurality of 2,977. He had the indorsement of the Gold 
Democrats. His own county of Morris gave him a 
plurality of 3,627, despite the fact that his opponent, 
Augustus W. Cutler, was also a resident of that county. 
He made a brilliant record in Congress, and was one 
of the most influential members ever sent from New 
Jersey. 

He was elected to the State Senate by a plurality of 
831 over his Democratic opponent, Thomas H. Hoagland. 

1895— Vreeland, Rep , 5,^74 ; McCracken, Dem., 4,448 ; 
Hedges, Pro , 446 \ Milligan, People's, 224. Vreeland's 
plurality, 1 526. 

1898— Pitney, Rep., 6,606; Hoagland, Dem., 5,775; 
Miller, Pro., 488. Pitney 's plurality, 831. 



Ocean CJounty. 

(Population, 15,074.) 

George Greei^ey Smith. 

(Rep , Lakewood.) 

Senator Smith was born in Clinton, Worcester county. 
Mass, January 5th, 1854. He came to Lakewood when 
thirteen years of age, and subsequently attended Peddie 
Institute at Hightstown for two years He is related, 
through his mother's family, to the late Horace Greeley, 
from whom he gets his middle name. After leaving 
Peddie Institute he attended the Eastman Business Col- 
lege at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., from which he was gradu- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 249 

ated in 1870. The next two years he spent learning the 
practical part of the dry goods business at his old home 
in Clinton, Mass. In 187z he engaged in the dry goods 
business in Lakewood His enterprise and business tact 
made him successful from the first, and he is now at the 
head of the largest dry goods establishment in Ocean 
county, and one of the largest in that section of the 
State. The business block rebuilt by him some years ago 
contains three of the leading stores in the town, besides 
his own and the Park View House. This is only one of 
the several evidences of Mr. Smith's public spirit and en- 
terprise in one of the most attractive villages in the State. 

Mr Smith was elected to the House of Assembly in 
1884 and 1885 by the largest majority ever received for 
that oflBce in Ocean county. During his first year in the 
Assembly he was Chairman of the Committee on Deaf 
and Dumb Asylum and a member of the Committees on 
Fisheries and Commerce, and Navigation. In 18-6 he 
was Chairman of the Committees on Riparian Rights and 
Education and a member of the Committees on Indus- 
trial Schools and Fisheries. He is at present a member 
of the Board of Trustees, and Chairman of the Property 
Committee of Peddie Institute, Vice-President of the 
Lakewood Trust Company, and President of the Lake- 
wood Republican Club. In 1892 he was elected to the 
Senate by a much larger majority than was ever given to 
any candidate for that office up to that time, over one of 
the most popular opponents ever nominated by the Demo- 
cratic party Again in 1898 he was elected by a still 
larger majority — 1,349 -in fact, the largest ever given to 
a candidate for the Legislature in Ocean county. 

1895-Engle, Rep.. 2,475; Irons, Dem., 1,299; Lippin- 
cott, Pro., 155. Engle's plurality, 1,176. 

1898 -Smith, Rep.. 2,679; Rogers, Dem., 1,330; Simp- 
son, Pro., 120. Smith's plurality, 1,349. 



Passaic County. 

(Population, 133,227.) 

Christian Braun. 

(Dem., Paterson.) 

Senator Braun was born in Paterson, N. J., September 
5th, 1858, and is a brewer. He served as Mayor of the 
city of Paterson for two terms, from May 1st, 1893, to 
May 1st, 1897. Last year he served on the Committees 



250 BIOGRAPHIES. 

on Finance, Elections, State Prison, Public Grounds and 
Buildings, and Commerce and Navigation. 

1894-Williams, Rep., 10.973; Van Hovenburg, Dem., 
6.861; Reed. Pro., 40;); Wilson, Soc. -Lab., 2,285. Wil- 
liams' plurality, 4,112. 

1897— Braun, Dem., 11.276; Williams, Rep., 9,084; 
Prettyman. Pro., 266; Duff, Soc.-Lab., 941. Braun'splu-. 
rality, 2,192. 



Salem County. 

(Population, 26,081.) 

Richard C. Mii^lkr. 

(Rep., Alloway.) 

Senator Miller, who is a son of the late ex-Sheriff 
Samuel W. Miller, was born at Alloway, N. J , March 
28th, 1848. He is in the lumber, coal and fertilizer busi- 
ness, which he undertook, as successor to his father, in 
1876. He has lived in Alloway all his life, and he never 
held public oflSce until he was elected to the Senate in 
1896. He has been repeatedly solicited to accept ofl&ce, 
and always refused until, through the irresistible pressure 
of his friends, he consented to stand for the State Senate. 
He was elected by the largest majority in the history of 
Salem coanty. Last year he served as Chairman of the 
Committees on Unfinished Business. Agriculture, and 
Federal Relations, and as a member of the Committees 
on Railroads and Canals, and Industrial School for Girls. 

1893-Ward, Rep., 3,105; Gwynne, Jr., Dem., 3,014; 
Lecroy, Pro. .226. Ward's plurality, 91. 

1896-Miller Rep.. 3.761; Riley, Dem, 2,768; Lecroy„ 
Pro., 245. Miller's plurality, 993. 



Somerset County. 

(Population, 30,447.) 

Charles Arthur Reed. 

(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Senator Reed was born at Fort Wayne, Ind., December 
4th, 1857. and is a lawyer by profession. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools and entered Rutgers College 
in the Class of 1878. He lived on a farm from 1866 to 



BIOGRAPHIES. 251 

1882, -when he was admitted to the bar of New Jersey. 
He was appointed a Special Examiner U. S, Pension 
Bureau in 1883 and served as such until July, 1885. He 
has served as Corporation Counsel of the borough of 
North Plainfield from 1888 until the present time. He 
stands high in his profession and enjoys a large practice 
in Somerset and Union counties. At the election in 1895 
his home, North Plainfield, gave him the largest majority 
ever given in that town to any candidate on any ticket, 
and he was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 587. 
At the election in ] 896 the whole force of the opposition 
was concentrated against him as a candidate for the 
Senate, when his own town gave him an increased 
majority over the year before, which was unprecedented. 
His plurality in the county was 1,390. Last year he 
served as Chairman of the Committees on Boroughs and 
Townships, Treasurer's Accounts and Sinking Fund, and 
as a member of the Committees on Judiciary and Revision 
of Laws 

1893— Thompson. Rep.. 3,317; Peekman, Dem., 2,424; 
Bache, Pro, 218. Thompson's plurality 893. 

1896-Reed, Rep, 4.U8; Cramer, Dem., 2,758; Van- 
derveer. Nat. Dem., 186 ; Barrett, Pro., 122. Reed's 
plurality, 1 390. 



Sussex County. 

(Population, 22,586.) • 

Lewis J. Martin. 

(Dem., Xewton.) 

Senator Martin is a lawyer by profession, and was born 
near Deckertown, Sussex county, N. J., February 22d, 
1844 He was chief clerk in the County Clerk's office of 
Sussex county during the latter part of his father's 
(James J. Martin) term, and until his decease in January, 
1869. when he was appointed by the Governor and com- 
missioned as Clerk to serve the unexpired term of his 
father, which terminated in the fall of that year. Senator 
Martin was a member of the House of Assembly in 1879, 
1880 and 1881, and he was Law Judge of Sussex county 
from 18S1 until 1896, when he was succeeded by James F. 
Conklin, Republican, who was appointed by Governor 
Griggs. He has been the attorney of the Board of Free- 
holders of Sussex county since May, 1896. He was 
elected a member of the Town Committee of the town of 



252 BIOGRAI^IES. 

Newton in March, 1896, for a term of three years, and 
was chairman of that committee during that year ; and 
was elected to the Senate in 1897 (to succeed Senator 
Gould, Republican), by a plurality of 281 over Daniel 
Bailey, Republican. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Militia, Game and Fisheries, Boroughs 
and Townships, and Printing. 

1894— Gould, Rep., 2,593; Bale, Dem., 2,412 ; Conklin, 
Pro., 166. Gould s plurality, 181. 

1897— Martin, Dem., 2,833 ; Bailey, Rep., 2,552; San- 
ford, Pro., 166. Martin's plurality, 281. 



Union County. 

(Population, 85,404.) 

Joseph Cross. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Senator Cross was born near Morristown, N. J., Decem- 
ber 29th, 1843. He graduated from Princeton University 
in the class of 1 865. Immediately thereafter he began the 
study of law in the office of Wm. J. Magie, Esq. He also 
took a course of lectures at Columbia College I^aw School, 
and was admitted to practice as an attorney -at-law in June, 
1868, and as a counselor in 1871. Upon his admission to 
the bar he was taken into partnership by his preceptor, 
tinder the firm name of Magie & Cross, which relation 
existed until 1880, when Mr. Magie was appointed one of 
the Justices of the Supreme Court. Mr. Cross has resided 
in Elizabeth since the spring of 1858, and has always 
been a staunch Republican. In 1888 he was appointed 
Judge of the District Court of the city of Elizabeth, but, 
in common with all of the other Republican District 
Court Judges of the State, was legislated out of office in 
April, 1891. 

Mr. Cross was elected a member of the Assembly from 
Union county in the fall of 1893, and again in 1894. 
When Speaker Holt resigned the chair. May 26th, 1894. 
Mr. Cross was chosen his successor for the remainder of 
the session. In 1895 he was re-elected Speaker by the 
mnanimous vote of his Republican colleagues Last No- 
vember he was elected Senator, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Senator Voorhees, who had been 
aominated as the Republican candidate for Governor. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 253 

189G— Voorhees, Rep., 11,556; Powers, Dem., 6,041:; 
Pollak, Nat. Dem , 557; Hufnagel, Soc.-Lab., 476; Bige- 
low, Pro., 267. Voorhees' plurality, 5,515. ^ 

1898— Cross, Rep , 9,054; Ford, Dem., 7,074; Brook- 
field, Pro., 259; Miller, Lab., 495. Cross' plurality, 1,980- 



Warren County. 

(Population, 37,283.) 

Isaac Barber. 

(Dem., Phillipsburg.) 

Senator Barber was born at Forty Fort, I^uzerne county« 
Pa., September 4tli, 1854, and is a physician by profes- 
sion. His father, a native of Warren county, removed to 
his native State in 1858. The Senator received his early 
education in the public schools, entered Blair Presbyte- 
rian Academy to prepare for college in 1869, entered La- 
fayette in 1872 and graduated in 1 876. He studied medi- 
cine under the preceptorship of Professor Traill Green, 
of Easton, Pa., and graduated from the University of 
Pennsylvania in 1879. He served as Medical Referee of 
the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in New York 
City for one year, located in Phillipsburg in July, 1880, and 
has since continued in active practice. He has served as 
City Physician, and was a member of the Board of Health 
for two years. He was appointed Pension Examining 
Surgeon under the Cleveland administration July 1st, 
1893. Last year he served on the Committees on Unfin- 
ished Business, Public Health, State Library, Soldiers* 
Home, and School for Deaf-Mutes. 

1893— Staates, Dem., 3,754; Lommasson, Rep. andCit. 
League, 3,224; Davis, Pro., 251. Staates' plurality, 530. 

1896 -Barber, Dem., 5,079; Cramer. Rep., 3,949; Mc- 
Kinstry, Pro., 370. Barber's plurality, 1,130. 



Summary. 

Senate— Repubwcans, 14 Democrats, 7=21 
House — Repubwcans, 37 Democrats, 23=60 

51 30 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 21. 



254 BIOGRAPHIES. 



When Regular Senatorial Elections Occur. 

In 1899— Essex. Monmouth, Union, Somerset, Glouces- 
ter, Salem and Camden, now represented by Republicans, 
and Warren, now represented by a Democrat — 8. 

In 1900— Burlington, Middlesex, Passaic, Sussex and 
Hunterdon, now represented by Democrats, and Cape 
May, now represented by a Republican— 6. 

In 1901— Cumberland, Atlantic, Ocean, Mercer, Bergen 
and Morris, now represented by Republicans, and Hud- 
son, now represented by a Democrat. 

The Senators who will be elected in 1899 and 1900 will 
each have a vote for a United States Senator to succeed 
General William J. Sewell, whose term will expire on 
March 3, 1901. 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

Atlantic County. 

Leonard H. Ashi^ey. 

(Rep., Mays Landing.) 

Mr. Ashley was born at Port Republic, Atlantic county, 
N. J , about fifty -seven years ago. He was formerly in 
the mercantile, real estate and insurance business. He 
held the office of Collector of Taxes in Galloway town- 
ship for three years and was chosen one of its Freholders 
for a similar period. In 187'i and 1877 he was a member 
of the New Jersey House of Assembly, and from 1881 to 
1890 was a Deputy Keeper of the New Jersey State 
Prison. In 1893 he was appointed Deputy Sheriff of 
Atlantic county, which office he held for five years. In 
1897 he was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 501 
votes, and in 1898 he was re-elected by a plurality of 834. 
Last year he served as Chairman of the Committee on 
Unfinished Business, and as a member of the Committees 
on Bill Revision, Riparian Rights, State Prison, State 
Library, and Passed Bills. 

Ashley, Rep., 3,869; Doughty, Dem., 3,035; Monfort, 
Pro , 240. 



Berg-en County. 
John M. Bei^l. 

(Rep., Rutherford ) 

Mr. Bell was born in Kells, Ireland, August 3d, 1860, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He came to America with 



BIOGRAPHIES. 255 

his parents on June 20th, 1866, and settled in Schuylkill 
county, Pa. He attended a public school there, and came 
to Rutherford on September 3d, 1891, wherehe has since re- 
sided. He studied law in the office of Addison Ely, Esq , 
and finished his studies in the office of Luther Shafer, 
Esq He was admitted to the bar at the November Term, 

1894, and began the practice of law on March 1st, 1895, 
in the Shafer Building. Rutherford, N. J. He has been 
counsel to the Borough of Rutherford since April 23d, 

1895, to the present time, and he has also been counsel 
to the Borough of Lodi since March 12th, 18^7 

He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 239 
over Zimmerman, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on 
Bill Revision, Boroughs and Borough Commissions, 
Judiciary, Federal Relations, and Soldiers' Home. 

Edmund W. Wakei^ke. 

(Rep., Demarest.) 

Mr. Wakelee was born at Kingston, N. Y., November 
21st, 1869, and is a lawyer by profession. He was grad- 
uated from the Kingston Academy and then entered the 
law office of Beuard & Fiero, now of Albany, where he as- 
sisted Mr. Fiero in the preparation of his new recognized 
authorities— Fiero on Special Proceeedings, and Fiero 
on Special Actions Afterward Mr. Wakelee became a 
student in the University of the State of New York, from 
which institution he was graduated in 1891. He was 
then admitted to the bar. He made his home in Bergen 
county, where he is now practicing law, also having an 
office in New York city. He has taken a most active 
part in Bergen county politics for the past five years, and 
has been President of the Republican Club of Harrington 
township. He is conspicuous in firemanic affairs, being a 
life member of the State Association, and is now Presi- 
dent of the Demarest Firemen's Association He is a 
member of Alpine Lodge, No. 77, F. and A. M., of Clos- 
ter, and of Northern Valley Lodge, Knights of Honor, 
Tenafly. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 361 over Zimmerman, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAI, VOTE 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Bell 6,753 Zimmerman... 6,514 

Wakelee 6,875 Demarest 6,378 

•. Soc.-Labor— Doelertz. 158; Marshall, 163. - ., 

' Pro.-Earle, 87 ; Holland, 78. 



256 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Burlington County. 
Charles Wright. 

(Rep , Columbus.) 

Mr. Wright was born on December 19th, 1849, on the 
farm on which he now resides, and which has been owned 
by the family for three generations. It is situated in 
Mansfield township, about two miles from the village of 
Columbus. Besides being a farmer, he is a dealer in cat- 
tle. He received as good an education as was obtainable 
from the schools in that vicinity, and then completed his 
studies as a student for two years at the Westtown board- 
ing-school, controlled by the Society of Friends. Being 
the last remaining son of a large family, he was obliged 
then to return to the farm to assist his father during the 
spring, summer and fall. He began teaching school 
when twenty years of age, and for seven winters he con- 
tinued in the work. For over twenty-five years he has 
been interested in the handling of different grades of 
cattle, and in this business has been quite successful. 
Since before he was a voter Mr. Wright has been actively 
identified with the politics of Mansfield township, and 
has served upon the Township Committee, having been 
elected thereto in 1877, and again in 1878 and 1879. In 
the last-mentioned year he served as Treasurer of the 
township. He served as School Trustee for five years, 
during the last two of which he was District Clerk. He 
was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,213 
over White, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served as Chairman of the Commit- 
tee on Agriculture and as a member of the Committees 
on Unfinished Business and Federal Relations, 

Joel Horner. 

(Rep., Palmyra.) 

Mr. Horner was born near Merchantville, Camden 
county, October 12th, J 850, and is a son of the late Judge 
Joel Horner, who served ten years upon the Camden 
county bench. He is a farmer and nurseryman, and with 
the exception of one year spent in Alabama and three 
years in the commission business in Philadelphia he has 
followed those occupations the greater part of his life. 
He attended the public schools of Camden county, and 
afterwards Professor Fewsmith's school, in Philadelphia. 
Mr. Horner has been a resident of Burlington county 



BIOGRAPHIES. 257 

about thirteen years, and has represented the township 
of Palmyra in the Board of Chosen Freeholders since 
May, 1894. He was elected Director of the Board in 
May, 1896, and again in May, 1897. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 1,159 over White, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year 
he served on the Committees on Game and Fisheries, 
Labor and Industries, Towns and Townships, Treasurer's 
Accounts, and Printing. 

THE TOTAI. VOTE- 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Wright 6.653 White 5,440 

Horner 6,609 Hires 5,267 

Pro.— Currie, 383; Worrell, 374. 

People's— Merritt, 115; Crammer, 50. 



Camden County. 
W1L1.1AM J. Bradley. 

(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Bradley was born in Wicomico county, Md., May 
€th, 18i2 and is a mechanical engineer. He came from 
Maryland to Wilmington, Del., in 1870. and thence to 
Camden in 1873, where he has since resided. He is con- 
nected with many business enterprises in Camden and 
vicinity He was elected to the Camden City Council in 
1892, was legislated out of office in 1893, when he was re- 
elected for a full term of two years. He was President of 
Council from 1893 to 1894. He was re-elected to the As- 
sembly by a plurality of 6,846 over Davis, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he was 
Chairman of the Committee on Game and Fisheries and 
a member of the Committees on Elections, Railroads and 
Canals, Reform School for Boys, and the Special Com- 
mittee to Investigate Hudson County Affairs. 

John H. McMurray, 

(Rep., Gloucester City.) 

Mr, McMurray is a son of the late Rev. Joseph McMur- 
ray, formerly pastor of the First Presbyterian Church at 
Gloucester. He is a native of Morris county, but has re- 
sided in Camden county since 1861. He is a newspaper 
17 



258 BIOGRAPHIES. 

man, having been interested in the publication and 
editorship of the Gloucester City Reporter and Tribune 
and the Camden Daily CoH?'ier. When twenty-one years 
of age Mr. McMurray was elected Clerk of Gloucester 
City, serving two terms Subsequently he served as a 
member and President of the Board of Education. He 
was a member of the Legislature in 1881 and 1882, and 
served as Engrossing Clerk of the Senate from 1885 to 
1887. He was elected to the Assembly in 1897 by a plu- 
rality of 5,359 over Goodwin, the highest candidate on 
the regular Democratic ticket, and served as Chairman of 
the Committee on Municipal Corporations ; also as a 
member of the House Committee on Engrossed Bills, and 
the Joint Committees on State Hospitals and Deaf-Mute 
Schools. He was re-elected to the Legislature by a plu- 
rality of 6.834 over Davis, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. 

Edgar J. Coi^ES. 

(Rep., Blackwood.) 

Mr. Coles was born in Gloucester township, Camden 
county, N. J., June 23d, 1851, and is in the general mer- 
chandise business, which he has followed for twenty-four 
years at that place. He was formerly a clerk and a book- 
keeper. He was Township Assessor from 1878 to 1886, 
Township Collector one year, a Chosen Freeholder two 
years, and was a member of the Township Committee in 
1895, '896 and 1897. He was re- elected to the Assembly 
by a plurality of 6,760 over Davis, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Miscellaneous Business, and a member 
of the Committees on Agriculture, Appropriations, State 
Library and Commerce and Navigation. 

the: toTai. vote. 
Republicafis. Democrats. 

Bradley 10,858 Davis 4,012 

McMurray... 10.846 Horner 4,010 

Coles 10,772 Stansbury 3,954 

County Detnocracy. Prohibition. 

Magrath 2,867 Bowden 563 

Bryant 2,845 Gates 550 

Lippincott 2,955 Hurlock 551 

Soc.-Lab.— Kreck, 129 ; Boyson, 129 ; Heffelfinger, 129. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 269 

Cape May County. 
Ei,i.is Hughes Marshai^l. 

(Rep. Seaville.) 

Mr. Marshall was born at Tuckahoe. N. J., September 
18th, 1845, is a son of the late Randolph Marshall, M. D., 
and is in the mercantile business at Seaville. He has 
been Postmaster of that town for twenty-seven years. 
He received his early education in the schools of his native 
town, and afterward he entered the Quaker City Business 
College, Philadelphia, from which he was graduated in 
1865. He then began business as a harness-maker, which 
he conducted for two years, when he entered into mer- 
cantile pursuits. He has been a member of the Board 
of Education for several years, and at present is a 
Director of the Seaville Camp Meeting, Recording Stew- 
ard of the Seaville M. E. Church, and President of the 
Board of Trustees of that body. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 400. 

Marshall, Rep., 1,040; Miller, Dem., 1,240; Wh-eaton, 
Pro.. 149. 



Cumberland County. 
Wii^soN Lek Shropshire. 

(Rep., Port Norris.) 

Mr. Shropshire was born at Haleyville, N. J , June 
19th, 1870, and is a wholesale shipper of oysters, fruits 
and produce. He received a common school education, 
and at the age of eighteen went to Salem. N. J., and re- 
ceived private tuition for two years from Professor Rich- 
ards. He always has been active in lodge work, and last 
year he served as District Grand Chief of the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle. He is treasurer of that lodge, a position 
he has held since November, 1892. He was elected Tax 
Collector in 1807, an office he still holds. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,483 over Bart- 
lett, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last 
year he was Chairman of the Committee on Printing, and 
a member of the Committees on Miscellaneous Business, 
Riparian Rights, Stationery, and Passed Bills. 



269 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Jesse S. Steelman. 

(Rep., Millville.) 

Mr. Steelman was born at Tuckahoe, N. J., April 21st, 
1872, and is a glass-blower. He attended school in the 
neighborhood of his birthplace, and finished his educa- 
tion in the public night schools of Millville At the age 
of ten years he began his trade as a glass-blower. He is 
an active member of the American Flint Glass-Blowers 
Association of the United States and Canada, and for two 
years he has represented his local branch in the National 
Conventions. This is the first time he has held public 
office, although he has always taken an active interest in 
politics and every question of importance that concerned 
the general good of the people. Mr. Steelman is a con- 
tributing member of the Methodist Church of Millville. 
He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,331 
over Bartlett, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 

THE TOTAI. VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Shropshire 5,362 Adams 3,710 

Steelman 5,210 Bartlett 3,879 

Pro.— Hettinger, Jr., 582; Tweed, 599. 



Essex County. 
Jacob Clark. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Clark was born at Westbrookville, Sullivan county, 
N. J., June 10th, Jh46. and is a stone contractor. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 5,593 over Mills, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

Al^BERT T. GUENTHER. 
(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Guenther was born in Newark on September 6th, 
1856, and is in the wholesale drug business in that city, 
having been graduated from the New York College of 
Pharmacy in 1878. He has always been an active Republi- 
can. In 1894 he was made chairman of the Board of Ex- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 261 

cise, and held that place until 1896. In 1897 he was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 6,639. Mr. 
Guenther was the only one of the eleven Essex Assembly- 
men renominated last year. He is a son of the Rev. J. W. 
Guenther, for forty-four years pastor of the First Presby- 
terian (German) Church in Newark. He was re-elected 
by a plurality of 5,48^ over Mills, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. I^ast year he was a member of 
the Committees on Corporations, Ways and Means, and 
Sinking Fund. 

John W. Weseman. 

(Rep. Newark.) 

Mr. Weseman was born in Germany (his father Jt>eing 
a citizen of the United States at the time) in 1861. For 
the last twelve years he has conducted a grocery business 
at 104 Green street. Newark. He received his education in 
the public schools of Newark and business colleges. At 
the November election in 1H96 he was elected a member 
of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Essex county from 
the Fourth VVard of Newark for a term of two years. He 
is a member of St. John's Lodge, No. 1, F. and A. M., 
and other social organizations. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 5,607 over Mills, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

John Kreiti^er. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr Kreitler was born in Newark, N J., October 4th, 
1856. and is a master painter and decorator of the firm of 
John Kreitler & Bro. He was a member of the Newark 
Board of Education in 18S8-89, a member of the Essex 
County Board of Freeholders, 1897-98, a member of the 
Republican County Committee and Chairman of the 
Seventh Ward Executive Committee in 1897-98. For 
ten years Mr. Kreitler has been Treasurer of the Reliable 
B. and Iv. Association, and is Secretary of the Prudential B. 
and L. Association. He received the highest number of 
votes on the Assembly ticket, and had a plurality of 5,656 
over Mills, who was at the head of the poll on the Dem- 
ocratic ticket. 

Frederick J. Dei.eot. 

(Rep , Newark.) 

Mr. Deleot was born at Albany N. Y., January 14th, 
1856, and is a toll-gate keeper. He was formerly 



262 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a gold-pen maker. He received his education at 
Public School No. 1, Jersey City, and was in the class 
with Congressman Daly. Afterwards he attended a 
private school. He learned the gold-pen business with 
E. S. Johnson & Co. , of New York, and was foreman for 
the Ludden Pen Company, of Brooklyn, before he was 
twenty-one years of age. He entered the employ of the 
J. C. & B. R. R. in 1876, and since August 10th, J 877, he 
has been gate-keeper at the Passaic river on the Newark 
Plankroad. He was once a candidate for the Assembly, 
and at another time a candidate for Alderman against 
William Harrigan, and was defeated both times He is 
at present chairman of the Twelfth Ward Republican 
Executive Committee. He is a member of Triluminar 
Lodge, F. & A. M., No. 112 ; of St. Paul Lodge, No. 29, 
K. of P , and of Radiant Star Lodge, No. 190, 1. O. O F. 
Mr. Deleot's father was a strong Democrat, with four 
sons who are staunch Republicans. He is the son of a 
soldier of the Civil War and grandson of a soldier who 
fought under Bonaparte. For a number of years he has 
been interested in politics, and has always worked hard 
for the success of the Republican party. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 5,523 over Mills, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

George F. Brandenburgh. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Brandenburgh was born in Newark, N. J., October 
2d, 1866, and is a wagon manufacturer. He received the 
major part of his education in the old Third ward school- 
house on Washington street 

After graduating from there he took a commercial 
course of study in Chicago, returning to Newark in 1883, 
and learned his trade — that of letterer— in the establish- 
ment of Brandenburgh & Novelle, wagon manufacturers, 
with whom he remained until about two years ago, when 
he succeeded them in business, and to-day he conducts 
the best regulated and most profitable wagon factory 
within the range of the State. 

Mr. Brandenburgh resides in the Fourteenth ward, 
which he represented as School Commissioner in 1895. 
He is prominent in lodge circles, being at present Master 
of Cosmos Lodge 106, F. and A. M.; is a past grand of 
Protection Lodge, 28,1. O. O. F. ; associated with "Unity 
Conclave," I. O. O. F., and has identified himself in the 
chairs of several societies. He was elected to the Assem- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 263 

bly by a plurality of 5,574 over Mills, the highest candi- 
date on the Democratic ticket. 

WlI,I,IAM MUNGI^K. 
(R^p., Newark.) 

Mr. Mungle was born at Blackburn, Scotland, in 1848. 
He came to this country in l>-68 and established a retail 
grocery in Newark, in which business he has since been 
engaged. Mr. Mungle served two years in the Common 
Council, from 1895 to 1897, as a representative of the 
Fifteenth ward. He is a member of the Northern Republi- 
can Club and of Northern Lodge, F. and A.. M. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 5,534 over 
Mills, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

John Lincoln Bui.i,ard. 

(Rep,. Short Hills.) 

Mr. BuUard was born at Clinton, La., August 17th, 
1840, and since 1868 has been a commission mer- 
chant in cotton and cotton bagging in New York 
city. He was graduated at Harvard University in 
1861, In 1862 he was commissioned by President Lin- 
coln as Captain and Commissary of Volunteers, served 
through the Civil War and was brevetted Major by Presi- 
dent Johnson in 1865. He has been a member of the 
Board of Managers of the New York Cotton Exchange 
for four years, and is now serving as Secretary of the 
Exchange. He was Chairman of the Committee on Trade 
of the Exchange for two years, and is now Chairman of 
the Committee on Membership. He is a member of the 
Milburn Board of Education, having been elected in 1895 
for a term of four years. From 1895 to 1897 he was Presi- 
dent of the Milburn Republican Club, and he has been a 
member of the Essex County Republican Executive Com- 
mittee since 1895. Mr. Bullard was elected to the As- 
sembly by a plurality of 5,601 over Mills, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

John Nevin Klein. 

(Rep., Belleville ) 

Mr. Klein was born at Bellefonte, Pa., April 24th, 1862, 
and is a druggist Formerly he was a day laborer, school 
teacher, and a clerk. He has been a member of the 
Township Committee, and was Town Treasurer in 1892. 



264 BIOGRAPHIES. 

At the last school election he was chosen a member of the 
Board of Education for three years. He was elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 5,559 over Mills, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

John Peter Dexheimer. 

(Rep., Orarge) ' 

Mr. Dexheimer was born in Caldwell township, N. J., 
October 4th. 1861 , and is a contractor. He was a mem- 
ber of the Common Council of the city of Orange from 
April, 1893, to April, 1895, and was Street Commissioner 
from April, 1895, to April, lh98. He is a member of Union 
Lodge, No. 11, F, and A. M., and Orange Chapter, R. A. 
M.; also of Plato Lodge, No. 122, K. of P., Grand Prel- 
ate of Grand Lodge of N. J., of Orange Lodge, 135, B P. 
O. K., and of Longfellow Council, 675, Royal Arcanum. 
He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 5,458 over 
Mills, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

Benjamin Franki^in Jones. 

(Rep., South Grange.) 

Mr. Jones was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., December 31st> 
1869, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated 
from the New York University in June, 1895, with the de- 
gree of LL. B., and received the degree of LL. M. in June, 
1898. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
5,450 over Mills, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 

THE TOTAI, VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Clark 32,693 Vanderpoel 26,903 

Guenther 32,583 Hausling 27,036 

Weseman 32,707 Mills 27,100 

Kreitler 32,766 Barrett 26 814 

Deleot 32,623 Jackson 27,088 

Brandenburgh. .32,674 Dimond 26,964 

Mungle 32,ri34 Connelly 26,860 

Bullard 32,704 Klemm . ..27,003 

Klein 32,659 Rollinson 26.979 

Dexheimer 32,558 Dusenberry 26,934 

Jones 32,550 Scales 26,951 

Social-Labor— Walker, 1,215; Magnette. 1217; Dug- 

gan, 1,216; Thompson, 1,216; Wittel, 1,216; Billings, 1,217; 

Hedden. 1,216; Lawn, 1,214; Hoefler, 1,216; Lundberg, 

1,216 ; Carlson, 1,215. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 265 

Prohibition— Jones, 658; Ribbans, 674; Ellethorpe, 661 ; 
Armstrong, 669; Neis, 656; Hall, 678; Backert, Sr , 679; 
Speer, 669; Franks, 658; Weden, 664; Woodruff, 657. 



Gloucester County. 
David Ogden Watkins. 

(Rep., Woodbury ) 

Mr. Watkins was born at Woodbury, N. J., June 8th, 
1862, and is an attorney and counselor-at-law. He 
worked on farms in his neighborhood, studied law at night 
time and was admitted to the bar as an attorney at the 
November term of the Supreme Court, in 1893, and as a 
counselor at the February term, 1897. He was Mayor of 
Woodbury for four terms of one year each, from 1 -86 to 
1890. He was Councilman from the Third ward of Wood- 
bury from 1892 to 1895, when he was re-elected and 
served until 1898. He was elected President of the City 
Council in March. 1895, again in 1896, and again in 1897. 
He is at the present time Solicitor of the city of Wood- 
bury, and Council to the Board of Freeholders for 
Gloucester county. He was elected to the Assembly in 
1896 by a plurality of 1,8^2, the largest ever given a can- 
didate for public oflSce in Gloucester, and he was re- 
elected in 1897 by a plurality of 1,40S, which was con- 
sidered large for an off year. Again he was re-elected in 
1898 by a plurality of 1,184. 

Mr. Watkins served as Speaker of the House of Assem- 
bly during the session of 1898, when he made a record for 
dignity, uprightness and impartiality which has been 
seldom equalled in the Legislature of New Jersey. In 
behalf of the members of the House at the close of the 
session he was presented with a suitable testimonial in 
recognition of his worth and the phrase '* as fair as 
Watkins " there and then originated to be handed down 
as an example for future occupants of the chair. 

Speaker Watkins became Acting Governor of the State 
on October Ihth. The office had been held by President 
of the Senate Voorhees from January 31st, and until that 
date, when his resignation as Senator from Union county 
was presented and filed, thus creating a vacancy also in 
the higher ofiSce, which was at once filled by the Speaker 
of the House, in accordance with the requirements of the 
State Constitution. In his new sphere of duties Speaker 
Watkins made a most creditable record. 

Watkins, Rep., 3,896; Stratton, Dem., 2,712; Gardiner,. 
Pro., 271. 



266 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Hudson County. 
lyEON Abbett. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Abb&tt, the only surviving son of the late Governor 
Abbett, was born in Jersey City, March 27th, 1S67, and 
is an attorney and counselor-at-law. He received his 
early education in Hasbrouck Institute and in Public 
School No. 3, of Jersey City, under Principal Beal. He 
attended the Jersey City High School, and graduated in 
the class of 1883 He then went to the Columbia Law 
School, from which he graduated in 1886. but was not 
then old enough to be admitted to the bar. so he went 
-abroad and studied for a year at the University of Berlin. 

On returning to the United States, in 188S, he was ad- 
mitted as attorney and counselor-at-law in New York, 
being then twenty-one years old. A few months later he 
was admitted to practice as attorney at the New Jersey 
"bar, and three years subsequently he became a counselor. 
Mr. Abbett acted as private secretary to Governor Abbett 
during his second term, but has never held an elective 
office For two years he was Township Attorney for 
Weehawken and is now a Supreme Court Commissioner. 
Judge Kirkpatrick, of the United States District Court 
■for New Jersey, recently appointed him Referee for Hud- 
son county under the Bankruptcy act. Mr, Abbett has 
been practicing law in Hoboken since 1892, having offices 
in the Second National Bank Building. 

At the election last November he received the largest 
number of votes of any candidate on the Democratic As- 
sembly ticket, and his plurality over Basse, who headed 
the poll on the Republican ticket, was 8,423, and over the 
lowest candidate, Davies, 11,168. 

Ai^LAN Benny. 

(Dem., Bayonne.) 

Mr Benny was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., July 12th, 
1867, and is a lawyer by profession, having been admitted 
to the bar at the age of twenty one. He is of Scotch 
parentage. He was a member of the Board of Council- 
men. Bayonne. from 1892 to 1894, representing the First 
ward. At the expiration of his term, in April, 1S94, he 
was a candidate for re-election against William J. 
O'Brien (now deceased), late President of Council, 
Bayonne (Dem.), and Wilson J. Haver (Rep ) The 
election returns gave Mr. Haver 114 votes, Mr. O'Brien 



BIOGRAPHIES. 267 

260 votes and Allan Benny 259 votes, and "Benny" 1 
vote. Mr, Benny claimed the vote cast for "Benny" 
should be counted for him, and contested the election 
before Judge Lippincott. in the Hudson County Circuit 
Court, who decided that he should have the "Benny" 
vote, but it appearing in the case that his father was a 
Scotchman, and not naturalized here at the time of his 
son's birth, Judge Lippincott decided that therefore 
he was not a citizen of the United States, and declared 
O'Brien elected. Upon an appeal to the Supreme Court, 
Judge Lippincott's decision was reversed. Mr. Benny 
was declared to be a citizen by virtue of his birth in this 
country, and the election was declared a tie. . See case 
reported in 29th Vroom, page 36. ) Mr. O'Brien, who had 
taken the seat because of Judge Lippincott's decision, was 
forced to vacate, and it remained vacant the remainder of 
the term. Mr. Benny was elected to the Assembly in 
1897 by a plurality of 8,623 over Lees, the highest candi- 
date on the Republican ticket, and he was re-elected last 
November by a plurality of 8,345 over Basse, the highest 
candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he served 
on the Committees on Claims and Pensions, and Passed 
Bills. 

Maurice Marks. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Marks was born in Jersey City, October 23d, 1871, 
and is an attorney and counselor-at-law both in New 
York and New Jersey. He was graduated at No. 1 
Public School, Jersey City, in 1884; at the Jersey City 
High School in 1H88, and at the University of New York 
in 1892 with the degree of LL. B. He has been counsel in 
many litigations. He is a member of numerous fraternal 
and benevolent organizations, and of the Robert Davis 
Association of Hudson county. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 8,234 over Basse, the highest 
candidate on the Republican ticket. 

James J. Murphy. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Murphy was born in New York City about thirty 
years ago, and came to Jersey City when he was a year 
old. He attended School No. 13, and subsequently be- 
came a student in St. Peter's College. After that he 
attended Gaskell's Business College, and he graduated 



268 BIOGRAPHIES. 

from that institution in February, 1885. In April of the 
same year he began the study of law in Prosecutor Win- 
field's office, and in November, 1889, he was admitted to 
the bar. In May, 1890, he was graduated from the New 
York University Law School, and in February, 1893, he 
became a counselor-at-law. Soon afterward Mr. Murphy 
formed a law partnership with Assistant Collector of the 
Port Fagen. and this partnership still continues in the 
Weldon Building. Mr. Murphy became active in politics 
several years ago, when he began to work and speak in 
advocacy of the Democratic ticket, and his services have 
been in demand at every election since I89i. He is a 
member of the Catholic Club, All Saints' Catholic Lyceum 
of Lafayette, Order of Red Men and the Sixth Ward Dem- 
ocratic Club. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 8,301 over Basse, the highest candidate on 
the Republican ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Ways and Means and Sinking Fund. 



Timothy J. Carroli,. 

(Dem , Jersey City.) 

Mr. Carroll was born at Piermont, Rockland county, 
N. Y , June 10th, 1858, and is a clerk. He attended the 
public and parochial schools, and has lived in Jersey City 
since 1860 He served as an Assemblyman in 1892, '93 
and '94 from the old Sixth district of Hudson county, 
when he took an active part in legislation. He held im- 
portant positions on leading committees. In 1893 he 
succeeded in passing the first firemen's pension bill, and 
in the same year he was instrumental in securing the 
passage of the bill doing away with the "Buffalo" sys- 
tem and providing for a fire department composed exclu- 
sively of permanent men Among other bills that were 
pushed through the Legislature largely owing to his 
efforts was the one providing for the new Fourth Regi- 
ment Armory. His bill for the protection of linemen, 
known as the Insulation bill, failed in the Senate. His 
Erie Track Elevation bill in 1894 shared the same fate, 
although he worked energetically for its success. He 
served in the Legislature of 1898, when he was a member 
of the Committee on Bill Revision. Last November he 
was re-elected by a plurality of 8,259, over Basse, the 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 269 

James P. Hai,i.. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Hall was born in New York City about forty-five 
years ago, and came to Jersey City when about a year 
old. His father was in business from 1854 to 1875, wh^n 
the son, after a course at private schools, became man- 
ager, which position he held until 1886. In that year he 
formed a partnership with the late John M. Shannon, 
under the firm name of Shannon & Hall, in the business 
of dealing in masons' supplies. At the end of a year Mr. 
Hall purchased his partner's interest, and has been in that 
business ever since. Mr. Hall has been a prominent mem- 
ber of the Jersey City Board of Trade for many years, 
and is at present the First Vice-President. He was the 
founder of the Pavonia Building and Loan Association, 
and was for five years its President. He belongs to sev- 
eral clubs, and is also a member of the Building Material 
Association of New York City and of the Robert Davis 
Association. He was re elected to the Assembly by a plu- 
rality of 8,863 over Ba.sse, the highest candidate on the 
Republican ticket Last year he was a member of the 
Committees on Riparian Rights and State Library. 

John H. Voi.i,krs. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Vollers was born in New York city, February 7, 
1863. When he was two years old his parents moved to 
Jersey City. He was educated in public school No. II, 
of that city, and later entered the Hoboken Academy, 
where he took a full course. Then he entered business 
in New York, which he cont nued for eight years. About 
ten years ago he became very active in politics and ren- 
dered faithful service to his party. As a recognition of 
his fidelity he was, eight years ago, appointed Deputy 
Warden of the Hudson County Penitentiary, a position 
he held until 1896, when, upon a re-organization of the 
Board of Freeholders, he was succeeded by John Fields, 
a Republican. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of h,242 over Basse, the highest candidate on the 
Republican ticket, and by 10,758 over his opponent 
Samuel H. Monroe. 

John J. Marnei,!,. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Marnell was born in Hoboken, N. J., February 
6th, 1868, and is a lawyer by profession. He attended 



270 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the public schools until the age of fourteen, was gradu- 
ated from the Hoboken High School, and then went to 
work in a printing oflBce and learned the trade of a com- 
positor. After being there five years he left on account 
of ill health and secured employment with the Metropol- 
itan Life Insurance Company of New York. He rapidly 
rose to the position of Superintendent. While with that 
company he attended the evening sessions of the Metrop- 
olis Law School of New York, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1895. He was admitted to the Bar of New Jersey 
at the June Term, 1895. He resigned his position as in- 
surance superintendent in January, 1896, and formed a 
law partnership with ex-Judge William E. Skinner and 
John J. Fallon, under the firm name of Skinner, Marnell 
and Fallon, with offices in Hoboken. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 8,274 over Basse, the 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year 
he was a member of the Committees on Boroughs and 
Borough Commissions and School for Deaf-Mutes. 



Fergus T. Kelaher. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Kelaher was born in New York City, June 9th, 
1852, and is engaged in the plumbing business in Jersey 
City. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 8 380 over Basse, the highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. Last year he was a member of the Commit- 
tee on Municipal Corporations. 

JUWUS EmII. WAI.SCHEID. 

(Dem., Town of Union.) 

Mr. Walscheid was born in the Town of Union, Decem- 
ber 23d, J 872, and is a lawyer by profession. He is a 
graduate of the Hoboken Academy and of the New York 
University, where he received the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy ( Ph. B.), and also of the law school of New 
York University, where he received the degree of LL. B. 
He is a member of Greek letter college fraternity of 
Phi Gamma Delta and of Greek letter legal society of 
Phi Delta Phi. He was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 8,144 over Basse, the highest candidate on 
the Republican ticket. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 271 

MiCHAEIv J. BRUDER. 
(Dem., Harrison.) 

Mr. Bruder was born on a farm near Hamilton Square, 
Mercer County, N. J., about five miles from Trenton, in 
1854. When quite a child he moved to Harrison. N. J., 
and has lived there for the past thirty-six years. His 
early education was obtained in the Christian Brother's 
School, connected with St. Patrick's Cathedral parish, 
Newark, N J. He has been closely identified with the 
growth and prosperity of Harrison and the adjoining 
township of Kearny. He is a house builder and con- 
tractor by occupation, and is one of the organizers of that 
greatest of building and loan societies, the People s Build- 
ing and Loan Association of Harrison. The stockholders 
of that organization have elected Mr. Bruder a member of 
the Board of Directors for the past sixteen years. Mr. 
Bruder is certainly very proud of the success of this big 
co-operative society, and as one of its managers he con- 
siders his connection with it more creditable than any 
political record could be. He is also connected with the 
Knights of Columbus, and is an active member of the 
Catholic Benevolent Legion. He has been in politics 
about sixteen years. He served in the Board of Alder- 
men of Harrison two years. He is a ready and forcible 
debater, and an uncompromising defender of the people's 
rights and measures. His unsullied reputation and ag- 
gressive public career, combined with straightforward- 
ness, has won for him the respect of his opponents and 
the trust and confidence of the people. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 5,775 over Basse, the 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. 

THK TOTAI. VOTE. 

Democrats. Republicans. 

Abbett 33,010 Hooker 21,941 

Benny 32,932 King 22,084 

Marks 32,821 Washburn 22,127 

Murphy 32,888 Story 22,133 

Carroll 32,846 Pringle 22,147 

Hall 32,950 Munroe 22,071 

Vollers 32,829 VoU 22,342 

Marnell 32,861 Schwartz 22,084 

Kelaher 32,967 Bogert 22,139 

Walscheid 32,731 Basse 24,587 

Bruder 30,362 Davies 21,842 



272 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Social-Ivabor— Connelly, 1,770; Schraft, 1,777; Kamps, 
Jr., 1,776; Kitz, 1,776; Morhart, 1,795; Herrscliaft, 1,793; 
Mende, 1,795; Zolenski, 1,793; Betsch, 1,791; Orgonik, 
1,789; Schwenk, 1,791. 

Prohibition— Parker. 30?; Ferree, 302; Black, 304; 
Meschutt, 303; Allan, 304; Woodruff, 304; Anderson, 304; 
Hester, 304 ; Vanderhoff, 302 ; McCracken, 304 ; Wood, 
300. 



Hunterdon County. 

Ol^IVER I. BLACKWEI,!,. 
(Dem , Ringoes.) 

Mr. Blackwell was born in Raritan township, Hunter- 
don county, N. J., October 3d, 1857, and is a lawyer by 
profession. He has always resided near Ringoes, and is 
the owner of the old family homestead, comprising two 
hundred acres. He was educated at a seminary at Rin- 
goes, and for four years studied law with ex Senator 
Richard S. Kuhl, at Flemington. He was admitted to 
the bar at the November Term, 1879, and has been in ac- 
tive practice since that time. In connection with his legal 
business he has followed land surveying. He is a member 
of Ringoes Grange, and also of Pomona Grange, No. 3, 
Hunterdon county. He has been a member of Powhatan 
Lodge, No. 72, I. O. O. F., of Ringoes, for twenty years, 
during ten of which he acted as its secretary. He has 
represented East Amwell township on the Hunterdon 
County Democratic Executive Committee for ten years, 
and is now secretary of that body. Since he has been a 
voter he has always done his full share of party work as 
a speaker and otherwise. He is a member of the Execu- 
tive Committee of the New Jersey State Association of 
Democratic Clubs. He has been attorney for Hunterdon 
county, and also a member of the County Board of Elec- 
tions He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
1,604 over Johnson the highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. 

George F. Martens, Jr. 

(Dem , New Germantown.) 

Mr. Martens was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., February 
21st, 1867, and is a produce commission merchant. He 
was formerly a law clerk. This is his third term in the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 273 

Assembly. His plurality last November over Johnson, 
the highest candidate on the Republican ticket, was 
1,570 Last year he served on the Committees on Cor- 
porations, Public Health, Industrial School for Girls, 
and State Hospitals. 

THE TOTAI, VOTE. 

Democrats. Republicans. 

Blackwell 4,779 Wood 3,088 

Martens 4,745 Johnson 3,175 

Prohibition— Sharp, 400 ; Potter, 377. 



Mercer County. 
John B. Yard. 

(Rep , Robbinsville.) 

Mr. Yard was born in Hamilton township, Mercer 
county, N. J., January 12th, 1838, and lives on a farm, 
where he carries on the business of blacksmithing and 
wheelwrighting. His early education was limited to the 
common country school. Ln December, 1861, he left 
home and went to Washington, D. C , where he worked 
for the Government in repair shops He helped in putting 
brakes on twenty wagons for the use of General George B. 
McClellan in his campaigns. He returned home in 1862, 
and on August 27th enlisted in Company E, Twenty-first 
Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers (Captain Joseph S. 
Mount's company ). He served with the " nine months' 
men," and participated in the battle of Fredericksburg 
on December I2th and 13th of that year, and also in the 
famous mud march under General Burnside. He shook 
hands and talked with President Lincoln in January, 
1862, while in Washington, and became well posted with, 
and visited, every public institution of any note in that 
city. He was elected to the Township Committee, of 
Hamilton in March, 1871, and was re-elected in 1872, '73 
and '74, and during that period served as Chairman. In 
1880 he was elected Township Assessor, and was re-elected 
every year thereafter until 1891, when he was chosen a 
member of the Board of Freeholders for a term of two 
years. He was legislated out of office, but in 1H94 he 
was appointed by the Township Committee a member of 
the Board, under the present law, to serve until the next 
•election, when he declined a renomination. In March, 
1897, he was elected Township Assessor for a term of 

18 



274 BIOGRAPHIES. 

three years without opposition. He is a member of the 
Mercer County Republican Committee, a position he has 
held since 1884. He is also a member of Hamilton 
Lodge. No. 97, I O. O. F. Mr. Yard was re-elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 1,636 over Mai shall, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
was a member of the Committees on Agriculture, Banks 
and Insurance, Ways and Means, School for Deaf-Mutes 
and Soldiers' Home. 

Ira W. Wood. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr Wood was born at Wilkesbarre, Pa., June 19th, 
1856, and is a counselor-at-law. He is an alumnus of 
Princeton College, class of 1877. He was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney at the June term of 1880, and as a coun- 
selor three years later. He was a member of the Trenton 
Board of Education for two terms and was elected to the 
Trenton Common Council in 1896, and re-elected in 1898. 
He is President of the Trenton Board of Trade, He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1 ,402 over Mar- 
shall, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

Henry J. Nicki^in. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Nicklin was born in England, February 20th, 1842, 
and is a designer and turner of rolls for the manufacture 
of iron and steel. He came to this country with his 
parents when but two years old, and settled in the State 
of New York. In 1859 he came to New Jersey, and for 
over thirty years has been employed by the New Jersey 
Steel and Iron Company and the Trenton Iron Company. 
He received his education in the public schools. He 
served in the Board of School Trustees of the city of 
Trenton from the Third Ward for one year, and was 
legislated out of ofiSce in 1892. He was elected a mem- 
ber of Common Council from the Sixth Ward in 1895, 
and served a full term of two years. He is a member of the 
Mercer County Republican Committee. Mr Nicklin was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,558 over 
Marshall, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on Inci- 
dental Expenses, Municipal Corporations, Stationery, 
State Prison and Treasurer's Accounts, and was Chair- 
man of the Committee on Passed Bills. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 275 

THE TOTAL, VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Yard 10,184 Chattin 8,421 

Wood 9,950 Janevv^ay 8,508 

Nicklin 10,106 Marshall 8.548 

Prohibition— Harrison, 489; Barker, 485; Hart, 509. 
Soc -Labor -Heidrick, 103 ; Friedman, 108; Fenzell, 107. 



Middlesex County. 
Adam Eckert. 

(Dem., Perth Amboy.) 

Mr. Eckert was born in Germany September 13th, 1850, 
and is a member of the firm of Schantz & Eckert, engine 
builders and iron founders. He served as Councilman of 
Perth Amboy two years, 1891-92 ; was Superintendent of 
Water Works three years, 1892 to 1896, and is at present 
a member of the Board of Freeholders. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 380 over Van 
Anglen, the highest candidate on the Republican ticket. 
Last year he was a member of the Committee on Re- 
vision of Laws. 

Joseph Howard Ridgkway. 

(Dem., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Ridgeway was born in New Brunswick, N. J.,, Au- 
gust 9th, 1867. He was nominated in 1897 for the Assem- 
bly. The county's representation in the Legislature 
then consisted of three Republicans, and the year before 
it had given the Republican ticket a majority of 3,500. 
That majority was wiped out, and a Democratic majority 
instead, of between three and four hundred, was given on 
the Assembly ticket. Mr. Ridgeway was renominated 
for the Assembly in 1898, and was re-elected by a plurality 
of 365 over Van Anglen, the highest candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket. Last year he served on the Committee 
on Stationery. 

John Joseph Quaid. 

(Dem., Sayreville.) 

Mr. Ouaid was born at Sayreville, N. J., October 3d, 
1865, and is in the real estate business. He was formerly 



276 BIOGRAPHIES. 

in the coasting trade. He was elected to the Township 
Committee of Sayreville for a three-year term, in March, 
1892, was re-elected in March, 1«95, and was Chairman of 
that body for three years. He was re-elected to the As- 
sembly by a plurality of 248 over Van Anglen, the high- 
est candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he 
advocated Bill No 16^, known as the "Anti-Company 
Store Order bill," and succeeded in having it passed by 
the House by a vote of 43 to 4. He then served on the 
Committee on Towns and Townships. 

THE TOTAI, VOTE. 

Democrats. Republicans. 

Eckert. 7,479 Edgar 6,960 

Ridgeway 7,464 Van Anglen 7,099 

Quaid 7,347 Silvers 7,078 

Prohibition —Marshall, 144; Garrison, 139; Horner, 
137. 



Monmouth County. 
Joseph L. Butcher. 

(Dem., Farmingdale.) 

Mr. Butcher was born at Ardena, Monmouth county, N. 
J., March 20th, 1851. His occupation is that of farming. 
He is of good ancestry. His father, Charles Butcher, was 
prominent in the affairs of Monmouth county for many 
years. He was a member of the Legislature in 1>»50 and 
1852, served on the Board of Chosen Freeholders for 
seventeen years, and as Judge in the Monmouth county 
courts for ten years The present Assemblyman received 
a good common school education, and is a man of rare 
good judgment and ability in business affairs. He is 
still, and has been for the past fourteen years, a member 
of the Board of Chosen Freeholders. Mr Butcher has 
the confidence of his fellow-townsmen, regardless of poli- 
tics, and is well known and popular throughout Mon- 
mouth county. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 655 over Brown, the highest candidate on the 
Republican ticket. Last year he served on the Commit- 
tee on Labor and Industries. 

Joseph C. Heyer. 

(Dem., Holmdel.) 

Mr. Heyer was born at Holmdel, Monmouth county, 
N. J.,* May 21st, 1859, and is a butcher. He was formerly 



BIOGRAPHIES. 277 

a mechanical engineer. He is a son of Captain John 
Henry Heyer, who was born in the township of Atlantic, 
was an oflScer in the late war, and is now a Director of the 
Board of Freeholders of Monmouth county. Both of the 
Assemblyman's great-grandfathers served in the Revolu- 
tionary War. He was elected Township Clerk on March 
13th, 1 883, which oflSce he now holds, having been re- 
elected at every term since. He was re-elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 627 over Brown, the highest 
candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he was a 
member of the Committee on Unfinished Business. 

B. Drummond Wooi.i,ey. 

(Dem., Long Branch.) 

Mr. Woolley was born at Long Branch, N. J., about 
twenty-three years ago, and is the youngest member of 
the present House of Assembly. He is engaged in the 
banking business. He is the only son of the Hon. Thomas 
R. Woolley, for many years Mayor of Long Branch, and 
who is one of the recognized leaders of the Democratic 
party in Monmouth county, and grandson of ex-Sherifif 
Jordan Woolley. Mr. Woolley's election as Assemblyman, 
in 1897. was the first public office he ever held. He is an 
active volunteer fireman, having served as Secretary, also 
as Second Assistant Foreman and First Assistant Foreman, 
and is at present Foreman of the Atlantic Fire Engine and 
Truck Company, No. 2, of Long Branch, and is also a 
representative to the Firemen's Relief Association. For 
several years he served as Secretary of the Tutelos Club, 
of Long Branch, and also as President of the St. James 
Institute. He is a member of the Central Gun Club, of 
Long Branch, and was formerly President of the Long 
Branch Athletic Club. Mr. Woolley has, also, for sev- 
eral years p? st been a member of the Ocean Township 
Democratic Executive Committee. He is a member of 
the Long Branch Lodge, No. 78, F. & A. M ; of Standard 
Chapter, No. 35, R. A. M.; of Carson Commandery, No. 
15, Knights Templar, and of Arioch Lodge, No. 77, I. O. 
O. F. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 501 over Brown, the highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket Last year he served on the Committee on 
Game and Fisheries. 

THE TOT A I, VOTE 

Democrats. Republicans. 

Butcher 9,068 Reid 8,087 

Heyer 9,040 Brown 8,413 

Woolley 8,914 Van Wickle 8,065 

Prohibition— Russell, 360; Garnsey, 355; Read, 344. 



278 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Morris County. 
Jacob W. Welsh. 

(Rep., German Valley ) 

Mr. Welsh was born at Middle Valley. Morris county, 
N. J , March 19th, 1853, and is a dealer in wagons, har- 
ness and fat m implements. He has been seven years a 
Director in the Clinton (N, J.) National Bank, and has 
served on the Township Committee three years, and been 
Town Clerk for a similar period. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 821 over Bartley, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Ivast year he 
served on the Committees on Appropriations, Claims and 
Pensions, Miscellaneous Business, Unfinished Business, 
Industrial School for Girls, and Reform School for Boys. 

George E. Pooi,e. 

(Rep., Chatham.) 

Mr. Poole was born in Newark, N. J., October 21st, 
1869, and is an architect. He is a member of an old Mon- 
mouth county (N. J.) family. He is the present Secre- 
tary of the Morris County Republican Committee. He 
was Collector of Chatham township from 1894 to 1897; 
has been a member of the Board of Education from 1895 
to the present time, and Treasurer of Chatham Borough 
from 1897 to date. He was re-elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 821 over Bartley, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Labor and Industries and a member of 
the Committees on Railroads and Canals, Public Grounds 
and Buildings, and State Hospitals. 

THE TOTAI, vote. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Welsh 6,585 O'Brien 5,655 

Poole 6,585 Bartley 5,764 

Prohibition — Quimby, 529; Vaughan, 548. 



Ocean County. 
Courtney Crane Carr. 

(Rep., Manahawkin.) 

Mr. Carr was born near Manahawkin and in the vicin- 
ity of Carrtown, N. J., February 4th, 1819, and is super- 



BIOGRAPHIES, 279 

mtendent of the manufacturing, wholesaling and retail- 
ing of cedar lumber, and is also in the fire insurance busi- 
ness. He was a carpenter and builder for about sixteen 
years. He is the son of the late Joseph Carr, who was 
known throughout the county for more than fifty years 
as a dealer in cedar lumber. He is one of the sixth gen- 
eration of his family that was raised on the same farm, 
and one of the seventh now living there. He has voted 
the Republicau ticket ever since he became of age. Be- 
ginning on March 13th, 1876, he served for three years as 
a Commissioner of Appeal for Stafford township and 
from March 9th, 1880, he served for three years on the 
Township Committee. When the law changed the term 
to three years he was elected a member on March 11th, 
1884, being the first man in the township to receive that 
honor. On March 10th, 1891. he was elected to the Board 
of Freeholders for one year to fill a vacancy caused by the 
death of Dr. P. K. Hilliard, Democrat. In 1892 he was 
elected for three years, and in 1895 and 1898 he was re- 
elected for similar terms. At present he is Chairman 
of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds and a 
member of other leading committees. He was a National 
census enumerator in 1880 for the township of Stafford. 
He was elected to the Assembly by a pluralty of 1,239 
over Kelly, Democrat. 

Carr, Rep., 2,640; Kelly, Dem., 1,401 ; Bunnell, Pro., 
123. 



Passaic County. 
Wood McKee. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. McKee was born in Paterson, N. J., November 
10th, 1866, and is a lawyer by profession. He has always 
been connected with the Republican party since he had a 
vote, either as a worker or a member of the leading com- 
mittees. He is very well known throughout Passaic 
county, and at the elections in 1897 and 1898 he was the 
highest man on his ticket. For six years he has been a 
member of the Passaic County Republican Executive 
Committee, and was Vice-Chairman of the Campaign 
Committee when John W. Griggs was elected Governor 
and Garret A. Hobart was chosen Vice-President of the 
United States. He never held public ofifice until he be- 
came an Assemblyman. He was re-elected by a plurality 
of 779 over Donohue, the highest candidate on the Demo- 



280 BIOGRAPHIES. 

cratic ticket. Last year Mr. McKee was Chairman of the 
Committee on Incidental Expenses, and a member of the 
Committees on Education, Municipal Corporations, and 
Sinking Fund. 

Vivian M. Lewis. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Lewis was born June 8th, 1869, at Paterson, N. J. 
He was educated in the public schools of Paterson, and 
studied law with his brother, Judge William I. Lewis. 
He was admitted as an attorney February 18th, 1892, 
and as a counselor June, 1897. Prior to his admission he 
did some newspaper work, and has since acquired a good 
practice at his profession 

He has always taken an active part in politics, and 
stumped the State soon after his majority in the interest 
of the Republican party. In 1897 he was a candidate for 
the Assembly, and carried the primaries in his district; 
but the County Convention split, and he was nominated 
by the delegates in a convention which was declared 
irregular. He declined the nomination. Last November 
he was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 562 over 
Donohue, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

John W. Sturr. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Sturr was born at Paterson, N. J., July 22d, 1862, 
and is a manufacturer and bottler of mineral waters. He 
was elected to the Board of Aldermen of the city of Pater- 
son in the spring of 1894, for a term of two years, becom- 
ing President of the Board the second year, and was re- 
elected Alderman in the spring of 1896. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 130 over Donohue, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year 
he was Chairman of the Committee on Militia, and a mem- 
ber of the Committees on Claims and Pensions, Public 
Health and Industrial School for Girls. 

John King. 

(Rep., Passaic.) 

Mr. King was born in Dublin, Ireland, February 10th, 
1850. He was formerly in the grocery business, and at 
one time a gold miner. In April, 1876, he assisted the 
late John J. Breslin in rescuing six political prisoners 
from West Australia who were sentenced by the British 



BIOGRAPHIES, 281 

Government for treason-felony to imprisonment for life. 
Mr. King was a member of the Assembly in 1890, '91, 
'95, '96 and '97, and this is his sixth year as a legislator. 
He has always served on leading committees, and has 
been very successful in his sphere as a lawmaker. He 
is so influential and popular that he has never yet been 
defeated for a public office. Last November he had a 
close shave, however, when his plurality over Donohue, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket, was 
only 34. 

The totai, vote. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

McKee 11,496 Donohue 10.717 

Lewis 11,279 Braun 10,547 

Sturr 10,847 Conradi 9,536 

King 10,751 Dunn 9,988 

Social-Labor- Butterworth, 1,094; Berdan, 1,097; Fruch, 
1,106; McCuliough, 1,105. 

Prohibition -Stam, 409; Birch, 344; West, 275; Mc- 
Glashan, 275. 

American Democrat — Gardner, 119. 



Salean County. 
Frank Wright. 

(Dem., Woodstown.) 

Mr. Wright was born at Alloway, Salem county, N. J., 
September 10th, 1864. and is in the retail shoe business. 
When only twenty-five years old he was elected to Coun- 
cil in Woodstown. He was Chairman of the Committee 
of Three who had charge of erecting the water-works, 
and owing to the satisfaction he gave in that capacity he 
was given a re-election. At his election to the Assembly 
Pilesgrove township, including the borough of Woods- 
town, gave him a majority of 16, although it is the Re- 
publican stronghold of Salem county, and usually gives 
a Republican majority of from 'JOO to 300. Mr Wright 
enjoys the distinction of being the only Democrat who 
ever received such a majority. His plurality in the 
county was 173. 

Wright, Dem., 3,106; Gray, Rep., 2,933; Burgess, 
Pro., 231. 



282 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Somerset County. 
Edward Everett Cooper. 

(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Mr. Cooper was born at South Sterling, March 17th, 
1865, and is a farmer. He is the son of John Cooper, one 
of the pioneer residents of Warren township. He has 
been a loyal Republican all his lifetime, and, in proof of 
the esteem in which his friends hold him, he carried his 
own township, which is one of the Democratic strong- 
holds of Somerset. The only public office he ever held 
before his election to the Assembly was as a member of 
the Board of Education of Warren township for three 
years. His plurality for the Assembly was 361. 

Cooper, Rep., 3,510; Childs, Dem., 3,149; Rhodes, 
Pro., 168. 



Sussex County. 
E1.VIN Eugene Smith. 

(Dem., Bevans.) 

Mr. Smith was born at Bevans, Sussex county, N. J., 
January 20th, 1860, and is a farmer. He served as Town- 
ship Clerk of Sandyston for five years, from March, 1891, 
to March. 1896. In March, 1897, he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Township Committee, and at its first meeting 
was chosen President. He was re-elected to the Assem- 
bly by the increased plurality of 483 Last year he served 
on the Committees on Agriculture and Soldiers' Home. 

Smith, Dem., 3,030; Armstrong, Rep., 2,547; Allen, 
Pro., 194. 



Union County. 
RoDERT G. Houston. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Houston was born in Elizabeth, N. J., in March, 
1846, and is a machinist, being employed in the tool de- 
partment of the Singer Manufacturing Company. He 
was educated in the public schools He was a member of 
the Board of Freeholders of Union county in 1887, '88 and 
^89, and a member of the City Council in 1892, '93, '94, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 283 

'95 and '96. He has been a member of Essex Lodge, No. 
49, F. and A. M , for over twenty-five years; is a member 
of Franklin Lodge, No. 9, I. O. O F., and is also an ex- 
empt fireman. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 2,311 over Scudder, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he was Chairman of 
the Committee on Federal Relations and a member of the 
Committees on Boroughs and Borough Commissions, La- 
bor and Industries, Towns and Townships, and Public 
Health. 

George A. Squire. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Squire was born in New York city, September 
29th, 1844 He was in the employ of the Singer Manu- 
facturing Company for thirty years, in charge of one of 
their departments, and resigned his position in 1892, when 
he bought the business of M. H. Dingee & Co., manu- 
facturers and dealers in lubricating oils and greases, which 
he now continues. He was a member of the Elizabeth 
Board of Education, having been appointed by the Mayor 
to fill an unexpired term. He served as a member of the 
City Council of Elizabeth in 1876-77. Mr. Squire was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,118 over Scud- 
der, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last 
year he was Chairman of the Committee on State Prison 
and a member of the Committees on Corporations, Re- 
vision of Laws, Stationery, and the special committee 
appointed to investigate Hudson county affairs. 

Roger Franki.in Murray. 

(Rep., Phinfield.) 

Mr. Murray was born in New York city, December 6th, 
1864, and is in the fire insurance business in that city, 
which he has always followed. He is a member of the 
Royal Arcanum, Loyal Additional Benefit Association, 
Knights of the ancient Assceaic Order. Red Men, and 
Exempt Firemen's Association. He is foreman of Alert 
Hose Company, No. 1 ; Vice-President of the Republican 
City Executive Committee of Plainfield; a member of the 
Union County Republican Committee; of the Union 
County Country Club, and one of the original members of 
the League of American Wheelmen. While serving in 
the Assembly last year he so strongly advocated the in- 
terests of Plainfield that he was usually called the "Gen- 
tleman from Plainfield." He was Chairman of the Com- 



284 BIOGRAPHIES. 

mittee on Sinking Fund and a member of the Committees 
on Banks and Insurance, Education, and Riparian Rights. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 2,067. 

THE TOTAI, VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Houston 9,292 Collins 6,857 

Squire 9,099 Scudder 6 981 

Murray 9,048 Higgins 6,826 

Prohibition - Chandler, 310; Sayre, 274 ; Maasett, 274. 
Soc -Labor, Scott, 508 ; Dahmen, 522 ; Peterson, 522. 



"Warren County. 
Hiram D. White. 

(Dem., Beattystown ) 

Mr. White was born near Beattystown, June 9th, 1837, 
and is a merchant miller. He was formerly a farmer 
and a stock raiser. After leaving school he became a 
clerk in the store of W. L. & G. W. Johnson at Hack- 
ettstown, where he worked for three years. Afterward 
he followed farming and stock raising until 188^, when 
he engaged in the milling business, which he now con- 
ducts with his son under the firm name of H. D. White & 
Son. He was elected Town Clerk of Mansfield township 
in the spring of 1860, and filled that ofiSce for four years. 
He served as Township Committeeman for three years, 
and Township Collector for a similar period. Mr White 
was appointed Lay Judge for Warren county by the late 
Governor Abbett, in 1890, to fill a vacancy, and a year 
later he was appointed for a full term, and served until 
the oflQce was abolished - six years altogether. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,028 over John- 
son, the highest candidate on the Republican ticket. 

Jacob B. Smith. 

(Dem , Phillipsburg.) 

Mr. Smith was born in Easton, Pa., May 18th, 1846, 
and is a moulder. When six years of age his father 
moved to Scranton with his family. Here he received 
his early education in the public schools. After leaving 
school he learned the iron moulders' trade. In 1865 he 
removed to Oxford, N. J., and resided there ten years. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 285 

At the expiration of that time he made his home at 
Phillipsburg, and for twenty-one years was employed in 
the Warren Foundry, eighteen of which in the capacity 
of foreman He was elected and served three terms as a 
member of the Phillipsburg Board of Education. At the 
age of seventeen he responded to both calls of Governor 
Curtin, as member of the militia, to repel the invasion of 
Pennsylvania. He was elected to the Assembly by a plu- 
rality of 932 over Johnson, the highest candidate on the 
Republican ticket. 

THE TOTAI. VOTE. 

Democrats. Republica7is. 

White 4,133 Johnson 3,105 

Smith 4,037 Taylor 2,994 

Prohibition— Huntling, 502 ; Pyatt, 490. 



Summary. 

House — Republicans. 37 Democrats 23=60 

Senate— Repubi^icans. 14 Democrats 7=21 

51 30 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 21. 



THE JUDICIARY. 



United States District Court. 

Andrew Kirkpatrick, Newark. 

Judge Kirkpatrick was born in Washington, D. C, 
October 8th, 1844. His father was J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, 
of New Brunswick. Andrew Kirkpatrick, a Justice of 
the Supreme Court in this State from 1797 to 1803, and 
Chief Justice from 1803 to 1824, was his grandfather. 
After receiving a thorough preliminary education he en- 
tered Rutgers College, and there he had for classmates 
Vice-President Hobart and G. D. W. Vroom, formerly 
Mayor of Trenton. The Judge, after leaving Rutgers, 
Tvent to Union College, Schenectady, N. Y., and from 
there he graduated He was an apt student, and in 



286 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1866 he was admitted to the bar. Three years later he was 
made a counselor, and soon after he began the practice of 
law in Newark with the late Frederick H. Teese, who at 
one time represented the Essex district in Congress. 

Governor Abbett, in 1885, appointed Mr. Kirkpatrick to 
succeed Judge Ludlow McCarter, as Law Judge of the 
Essex County Court of Common Pleas and he held that 
position until December 1st, 1896, when he resigned to 
occupy his present position. His commission is dated 
November 20th, 1896, and he was appointed to fill 
the vacancy caused by the death of Judge Edward T. 
Green. His salary is $5,000 a year, and his office has a 
life tenure. In politics he is a Democrat. 



Court of Chancery. 
AI.EXANDER T. McGii,!., Chancei,i.or, Jersey City. 

(Term, seven years. Salary, f 10,000 per annum.) 

Chancellor McGill, LL. D., was born in Pittsburg, Pa., 
about fifty-four years ago. He came to New Jersey in 
1854, when his father accepted a professorship in the 
Theological Seminary of the College of New Jersey. 
The Chancellor graduated from that college in 1864, 
which has since conferred on him the honorary degree of 
LL.D., and from Columbia Law School, New York, in 
1^66. He continued the study of the law with the late 
Supreme Court Justice Edward W Scudder, at Trenton, 
and was admitted to the bar as an attorney in 1867, and 
as a counselor in 1870. He was counsel for the city of 
Bayonne for two years, in 1874 and 1875, when he also 
represented the then First district of Hudson county in 
the House of Assembly. He served on leading commit- 
tees, and took a very active part in legislation. He was 
at one time the law partner of the late ex-Attorney-Gen- 
eral Gilchrist. He served one term as Prosecutor of the 
Pleas of Hudson county, succeeding A. Q. Garretson, who 
was appointed Law Judge, and when the latter resigned 
that office Mr. McGill again succeeded him as Judge, an 
office he held when he was appointed Chancellor by Gov- 
ernor Green, on March 29th, 1 887. He was unanimously 
confirmed by the Senate the 31st of the same month. He 
was re-appointed by Governor Werts in 1894, and unani- 
mously confirmed by the Senate. He was the Democratic 
candidate for Governor in 1895, when he was defeated by 
John W. Griggs by a plurality of 26,900. His term will 
expire on May 1st, 1901. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 287 

Vice-Chancellors. 

(Term, seven years. Salary, $9,000 a year.) 

Henry C. Pitney, Morristown. 

• Vice-Chancellor Pitney, LIv. D. , was born at Mendham, 
Morris county, N J., January 17th, 1827. He was grad- 
uated from Princeton College in the class of '48, which 
has since conferred on him the honorary degree of LL D. 
He was admitted to the bar as an attorney in July, 1851, 
and as a counselor in November, 1854 He is regarded as 
one of the ablest constitutional lawyers in New Jersey. 
He was appointed Vice-Chancellor for a term of seven 
years, in the spring of 1889, and in 1896 he was re- 
appointed for another full term. In politics he is a Re- 
publican His term expires in 1903. 

John R. Emery, Newark. 

Vice-Chancellor Emery was born in Flemington, Hun- 
terdon county, N. J., July 6th, 1842. He was graduated 
from Princeton College in 1861, and studied law under 
Bennet Van Syckel, now a Justice of the Supreme Court, 
and also under the late Vice-Chancellor Van Fleet, In 
1865 he was admitted to the bar, when he formed a part- 
nership with Mr. Van Fleet, which continued for one 
year Then he went to Trenton, where he formed a part- 
nership with the late Augustus G. Richey, which was 
continued until 1874. The next year he moved to New- 
ark, where he opened a law ofiice and soon built up an 
extensive practice. About fourteen years ago Mr. Emery 
was made an Advisory Master. He has never held any 
political ofl&ce. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor by 
Chancellor McGill, on January 29th. 1895, for a full term 
of seven years, to succeed the late Vice-Chancellor Van 
Fleet. In politics he is a Republican. His term will ex- 
pire in January, 1902. 

AI.ERED Reed, Trenton. 

Vice Chancellor Reed was born December 23d, 1839, in 
Ewing township, Mercer county. He attended the Law- 
renceville High School in 1856 and the Model School at 
Trenton, in 1857-58, and entered Rutgers College, at New 
Brunswick, in 1859. In the fall of 1860 he was matricu- 
lated at the State and Normal Law School, at Poughkeep- 
sie, N. Y., and in the summer of 1862 admitted to the 



^88 BIOGRAPHIES. 

practice of law in New York He returned to Trenton 
and renewed his study of law, and was admitted to the 
Bar of New Jersey at the June Term, 1864. In the spring 
of 1865 he was elected to the Common Council of Tren- 
ton, of which body he was made President. He was 
elected Mayor of Trenton in 1867, serving for one year, 
and in the spring of 1869 he was appointed Law Judge of 
Mercer county, a position he held for a full term of five 
years. On April 8th, 1875, he was appointed by Governor 
Bedle a Justice of the Supreme Court ; in 18S2 he was re- 
appointed by Governor Ludlow, and in 1889 by Governor 
Green. In June, 1895. he was appointed a Vice-Chancel- 
lor by Chancellor McGill, to succeed the late Robert S. 
Green, for a term of seven years. His term will expire in 
June, 1902. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Frederick W. Stevens, Newark. 

Vice-Chancellor Stevens was born in Hoboken, N. J., 
June 9th, 1846. He was graduated from Columbia Law 
College in 1865 ; was admitted to the Bar of New Jersey 
as an attorney in November, 1868, and as a counselor 
three years later. He first came into public life in 1873, 
when he was appointed Judge of the Second District 
Court of Newark He remained in that position for two 
years. In 1^89 the Judge was appointed County Counsel 
of Essex county, and filled that office for some years. 
Although he has not held any other public offices Mr. 
Stevens has always been a prominent figure in some of 
the biggest legal fights ever made in the State and County 
Courts. One of these was the settlement of the back 
taxes of the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad 
Company. In that case he and Judge Dillon acted as 
arbitrators. He is a member of the Ecclesiastical Law 
Committee of the Protestant Episcopal Diocese of New- 
ark, and, with Cortlandt Parker, revised all of the canons 
governing that body. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor 
in 1896, as a successor to John T Bird. His term will ex- 
pire in 1903. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Martin P. Grey, Camden. 

Vice-Chancellor Grey was born at Camden (then in 
Gloucester county). New Jersey December 20th, 1841. 
He was the third son of Philip James Grey, Esq., and 
Sarah Woolston Grey, his wife. He was educated in the 
schools of his native town and in the city of Philadelphia. 
He was admitted as an attorney-at-law at the June Term 



BIOGRAPHIES. 289 

of the Supreme Court of New Jersey in 1863. He was 
called to the bar as counselor at the June Term, 1866. He 
began the practice of law at Salem in June, 1863, and 
there continued until January 1st, 1887, when he formed 
a partnership with his older brother, Samuel H. Grey, 
Esq , now Attorney-General, at Camden, N. J., and con- 
tinued the practice of law at the latter place, associate<l 
with his brother, under the firm name of Grey & Grey, 
until May I9th, 18^6, when he was tendered by the Honor- 
able Alexander T. McGill, Chancellor, the appointment 
of Vice-Chancellor, which he accepted. In politics he 
is a Republican. 



JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

iTerm of office, seven years. The salary of the Chief Justice is $10,000 a 
year, and that of each Associate Justice, $9,000.) 

Chief Justice. 
WiniAM J. Magie, Elizabeth. 

Chief Justice Magie was born at Elizabeth, Union 
county, N, J., December 9th, 1832. His father, David 
Magie, was for nearly forty-five years pastor of the Second 
Presbyterian Church of Elizabeth, and was also a native 
of the same town. He entered Princeton College in 1852 
and graduated in 1855 He studied law with the late 
Francis B. Chetwood, of Elizabeth, was admitted as an 
attorney in 1856, and as a counselor in 1859. For six 
years he was associated in practice with Mr. Chetwood, 
and after practicing alone for some time he formed an- 
other copartnership with Mr. Joseph Cross, From 1866 
to 1871 he was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Union county. 
He has been connected with the banks of Elizabeth, and 
has acted as counsel to several corporations. He was 
elected to the State Senate from Union county in 1875, for 
a term of three years, and in 1880 he was appointed a 
Justice of the Supreme Court by Governor McClellan. 
He was re-appointed by Governor Green in 1887, and by 
Governor Werts in l»9i. On March 1st, 1897, he was 
nominated by Governor Griggs as Chief Justice, to suc- 
ceed the late Mercer Beasley, and he was at once con- 
firmed by the Senate. His term will expire on March 1st, 
19' 4. In politics he is a Republican. 

His circuit consists of Morris, Sussex and Somerset coun- 
ties. Total population, 112.569. 
19 



290 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Associate Justices. 

(Eight altogether. Salary, $9,000 a year.) 

David Ayres Dkpue, Newark. 
Justice Depue, LL. D.. was born at Mount Bethel, North- 
ampton county, Pa , October 27th, 1826. He is of Hugue- 
not descent, and his ancestors were among the earliest 
settlers of Pahaquarry, Warren county, N J. The family 
moved in 1840 to Belvidere Warren county. The Justice 
entered Princeton College in 1843, and he was graduated 
three years later. He studied law under John M. Sher- 
rerd, and was admitted to the bar in 1849. In the same 
year he began practice in Belvidere. In 1866 he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Ward a Justice of the Supreme 
Court, to succeed Justice Haines, and was assigned to the 
Essex and Union circuit, when he removed to Newark^ 
where he has since resided. Union county was detached 
from this district when two additional judicial districts 
were created by the act of April 6th, 1875. He was re- 
appointed by Governor Parker in 1873. In 1880 he was 
re-appointed by Governor McClellan for another term of 
seven years, and again in 1887 by Governor Green, and 
in 1894 by Governor Werts. He received the honorary 
degree of LL. D , from Rutgers College in 1874, and also 
from Princeton College, his Alma Mater, in 1880. Iti 
politics he is a Republican. His present term expires in 
1901. 

His circuit comprises Essex county. Population, 
312,000. 

BENNET Van SyckeIv, Trenton. 

Justice Van Syckel was born April 17th, 1830, in Beth- 
lehem, Hunterdon county, N. J, He was prepared for col- 
lege at Easton, Pa., entered Princeton College in 1843, and 
was graduated in 1846, in the same class with David A. 
Depue, now one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme 
Court. Immediately after graduating he entered the law 
office of Alexander Wurts, of Flemington, in which he 
remained until he was admitted to the Bar, in 18ol. He 
at once began the practice of his profession at Fleming- 
ton. In 1869 he was appointed to a seat on the bench of 
the Supreme Court and was re-appointed in 1876, again in 
1883, again in 1890, and by Governor Griggs in 1897. He 
is a Democrat in politics. His present term expires Feb- 
ruary 15th 1904. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Union and Ocean. 
Total population, 104,143. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 291 

Jonathan Dixon, Jersey City. 

Justice Dixon was bora in the city of Iviverpool, Eng- 
land, July 6th, 1839. He remained there until his eighth 
year, having attended the public schools for two or three 
years. His family then removed to Marypont, Cumber- 
land county, in the same country, where his education 
was continued. His father came to the United States in 
1848, and his family followed him two years later, and 
settled in New Brunswick, N J. Jonathan became an in- 
mate of the home of Cornelius L. Hardenbergh, a law- 
yer, who suffered from blindness, and to him the lad 
acted as attendant and amanuensis for nearly five years, 
or until September, 1855. In that year he entered Rut- 
gers College, and graduated from that institution in 1859. 
He then entered the law office of his former tutor, War- 
ren Hardenbergh, and studied there for twelve months. 
Upon Mr. Hardenbergh removing to New York, Mr. 
Dixon entered the office of George R Dutton. and subse- 
quently that of Robert Adrain, both of these gentlemen 
being members of the Bar of New Brunswick. While 
studying law he taught school as a means of livelihood. 
He was admitted as an attorney in November, 1862, and 
three years later as a counselor. After being admitted as 
an attorney he moved to Jersey City and entered the law 
office of E B Wakeman in a clerical capacity, and in the 
spring of 1864 he formed a copartnership with his em- 
ployer, which lasted one year. For five years he prac- 
ticed by himself, and then formed a copartnership with 
Gilbert Collins, now a Justice of the Supreme Court. In 
April, 1875, he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme 
Court by Governor Bedle; in 1882 he was re-appointed by 
Governor Ludlow, in 1889 by Governor Green, and in 
189 ) by Governor Griggs He is a Republican in politics, 
and was the candidate of his party for Governor in 1883, 
when he was defeated by the late Leon Abbett. His 
present term expires in 1903. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Passaic and Ber- 
gen. Total population, 198,642. 

Chari.es Grant Garrison, Camden 

Justice Garrison was born in Swedesboro. Gloucester 
county, N. J., August 3d, 1849. He is a son of Rev. 
Joseph Fithian Garrison, D. D., a well known divine of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, who was a professor in 
a Philadelphia college for a number of years, and died in 



292 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1893. The Judge was educated at Edgehill School, Prince- 
ton, at the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, and in the 
University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated as 
a physician in 1872. He practiced that profession until 
1876 at Swedesboro, and then entered the law office of 
Samuel H. Grey, of Camden, where he remained until he 
was admitted to the l-ar in 1878 He was made Judge- 
Advocate General of New Jersey in 1884, and in 1882 he 
was made Chancellor of the Southern Diocese of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church of New Jersey. He was 
appointed to the Supreme Court bench in January, 1888, 
in the place of the late ex-Governor Joel Parker, for a full 
term of seven years. He was re-appointed in 1895 by 
Governor Werts. In politics he is a Democrat. His term 
expires in 1902. 

His circuit consists of the counties of Burlington, Cam- 
den and Gloucester. Total population, 190,412. 



Job H. IvIPPIncotT, Jersey City. 

Justice Ivippincott was born near Mount Holly, N. J., 
November 12th, 1842. He was reared on his father's farm 
at Vincentown, N. J., and received a common-school edu- 
cation. When eighteen years of age he attended a pri- 
vate academy at Vincentown, conducted by John G Her- 
bert, for one year. Afterward he attended the Mount 
Holly Institute, under the tuition of the Rev. Samuel 
Aaron, for about a year. He entered, as a law student, 
with Ewan Merritt, Esq., at Mount Holly, January 1st, 
1863. During his period of service as a law student he 
attended the Dane Law School of Harvard University at 
Cambridge, Mass , and in July, 1865, he graduated there- 
from with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and at the 
February term, 1867, of the Supreme Court, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this State. 

In May, 1867. he located in Hudson county, and opened 
A law office at the court-house in what was then the city 
of Hudson. He was a member and President of the Board 
of Education of the city of Hudson from 1868 to 1871, 
when the three cities of Bergen, Jersey City and the city 
of Hudson were consolidated into one city. In 1874 he 
was elected counsel of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of 
the county of Hudson, which office he held, by annual 
election, for thirteen successive years. In 1886 he was 
appointed by President Cleveland United States Attorney 
for the District of New Jersey, which office he held one 
jear, and then resigned to accept the position of Law 



BIOGRAPHIES. 293 

Judge of the county of Hudson, to which he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Green, to fill the unexpired term of 
Chancellor McGill, who held that office at the time of his 
appointment as Chancellor. 

In 1888 he was re-appointed as Law Judge by Governor 
Green for a full term of five years. In January, 1893, he 
resigned this position, and was appointed by Governor 
Werts one of the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court 
for the full term of seven years, to succeed Justice Werts, 
who had resigned to become Governor. In politics he is 
a Democrat. His term will expire in 1900. 

His circuit consists of Hudson county. Population, 
328,080. 

William S. Gummere, Trenton, 

Justice Gummere was born in Trenton, June 24th, 1852, 
and is a son of the late Barker Gummere, who for many 
years was one of the acknowledged leaders of the bar of 
New Jersey The Justice was educated at the old Trenton 
Academy and the Lawrenceville School, and was gradu- 
ated from Princeton College in 1870 He studied law 
with his father, and upon being admitted to the bar he 
practiced for a time in the office of G. D W. Vroom. when 
that gentleman was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Mercer 
county. Subsequently Mr Gummere formed a copart- 
nership with his uncle, the late ex-Governor Parker, in 
Newark, and after that had been dissolved he was asso- 
ciated with Oscar Keen, of the same city. This con- 
tinued until the late Edward T. Green was made Judge 
of the United States District Court, when Mr. Gummere 
succeeded him as counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company, with offices in Trenton. On February 18th, • 
1895, he was appointed by Governor Werts as a Justice of 
the Supreme Court, to succeed the late Justice Abbott, 
for a term of seven years and he was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate on the day following. In politics 
he is a Republican. His term will expire in February, 
1902. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Mercer, Warren 
and Hunterdon. Population, 158,155. 

George C. Ludlow, New Brunswick. 

Justice Ludlow was born at Milford, Hunterdon county, 
N. J , April 6th, 1830. At the age of five years he re- 
moved to New Brunswick, where he has ever since 
resided He was graduated from Rutgers College in 
1850, and soon afterward began the study of law in the 



294 BIOGRAPHIES. 

office of W. H. Ivcupp, in New Brunswick. He also 
studied in the. office of Robert Van Arsdale, of Newark. 
In 1853 he was admitted to the bar, and immediately com- 
menced the practice of his profession in New Brunswick. 
Soon afterward he was admitted as a counselor. He 
served as City Counsel of that city, as a member of the 
Board of Freeholders, and as President of the Board of 
Education. He was elected State Senator in 1876, and in 
1878 he served as President of the Senate. He was elected 
Governor of New Jersey in 1880 by a plurality of 651 over 
the late Frederic A. Potts. He was a member of the Con- 
stitutional Commission of 1894. He was appointed a 
Justice of the Supreme Court June 13th, 1895, for a full 
term of seven years, to succeed Justice Alfred Reed, who 
had resigned to become a Vice-Chancellor. In politics 
he is a Democrat. His term will expire in 1902. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Atlantic, Cumber- 
land, Cape May and Salem. Population, 123,504. 

Gilbert Collins, Jersey City. 

JusticeCollinswas born August 26th, 1816, inStonington, 
Conn., where his family had long been settled, and where 
his father was engaged in manufactures. He received a 
classical education In 1803 he removed to Jersey City, 
N. J , where his father, then recently deceased, had had 
business interests. He studied law under Jonathan Dixon, 
now a Justice of the Supreme Court. Justice Collins was 
admitted to practice in this State as an attorney, Feb- 
ruary, 1869, and as a counselor in February, 1872. He 
practiced his profession in Jersey City, first as a partner 
of Judge Dixon, and afterward with Charles L. and Will- 
*iam H. Corbin, under the firm name of Collins & Corbin. 

He was Mayor of Jersey City from May, 1884, to May, 
1886. On March 2d. 1897, he was appointed Associate 
Justice of the Supreme Court of this State by Governor 
Griggs, and on March 8th his nomination was by the 
Senate unanimously confirmed. He is a Republican in 
politics. His term will expire March 8th, 1904. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Monmouth and 
Middlesex. Total population, 145,601. 



Circuit Court Judges. 

(Term of office, seven years. Salary, $7,.500 ) 

Richard' T. Miller, Camden. 
Judge Miller was born in Cape May City, N. J., Decem- 
ber 16th, 1845. He studied law with the late Thomas P. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 295 

Carpenter, who was a Justice of the Supreme Court. He 
was admitted to the Bar as an attorney in 1867, and as a 
counselor in 1870. He was City Solicitor of Cape May 
during 1869 and 1870; District Court Judge of the city of 
Camden from March 3d, 1877, until July 11th, 1888. He 
was appointed Prosecutor of the Pleas of Cape May 
county, April 19th, 1889, and resigned that ofl&ce on 
March 30th, 1892. He was appointed President Judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas of Camden county, April 1st, 
1892, and resigned on March Uth, 1893. Governor Werts 
appointed Judge Miller a Circuit Court Judge of New Jer- 
sey, March Uth, 1893, for a term of seven years. In pol- 
itics he is a Democrat. His term will expire in 1900. 

Francis Chii^d, Morristown. 

Judge Child is a native of New Jersey and about fifty- 
five years of age. He was admitted to the Bar as an at- 
torney in June. 1866, and as a counselor in February, 1877. 
He filled the office of President Judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas of Morris county from April 1st, 1878, and 
until he was appointed Circuit Court Judge on March 
Uth, 1893. In politics he is a Democrat. His term will 
expire in 1900. 

Henry M. Nevius, Red Bank. 

Judge Nevius was born near Freehold, Monmouth 
county, N. J., January 3Uth, 1841. He was educated at 
the Freehold Institute and also at the High School, 
Grand Rapids, Mich. Until the war broke out he studied 
law in that city, when he enlisted as a private in Com- 
pany K, Lincoln Cavalry, and served until January, 1863, 
when he was promoted for gallantry to the Second Lieu- 
tenancy of Company D, Seventh Michigan Cavalry. He 
fought with General George A. Custer until the winter of 
1864, when he resigned his commission to accept a posi- 
tion in a New Jersey regiment, then forming at Trenton, 
but it turned out a failure. He re-enlisted as a private in 
Company D, Twenty-fifth New York Cavalry. He was 
soon promoted to the rank of Captain for bravery on the 
field. When the war closed he returned to New Jersey 
and resumed the study of law. He was admitted to the 
Bar as an attorney in February, 1873, and as a counselor 
three years later. He was in partnership for four years 
with ex-Senator John S. Applegate. He has held several 
offices of local importance, and has served as Deputy 
Revenue Collector. In 18S3 he was elected Commander 



296 BIOGRAPHIES. 

of the Grand Army Posts of New Jersey, and was re- 
elected the following year. He was elected to the State 
Senate from Monmouth county in 1887, served a full term 
of three years, and was President of that body in 1890. 
He was appointed Judge of the Circuit Court by Governor 
Griggs on March L^d, 1896 and was promptly and unani- 
mously confirmed by the Senate. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. His term expires in 1903. 



Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

(Term of office, six years. Compensation, $8 for each day's attendance, and 
$1 for every ten miles going and returning.) 

John W. Bogert, Hohokus. 

Judge Bogert was born at Hohokus, Bergen county, 
September 3d, 1839. His ancestors settled in that locality 
some time before the Revolution. He has held several 
township offices, and was Collector of Bergen county for 
fourteen years He was a member of the House of As- 
sembly from the Second District of Bergen county in the 
sessions of 1874-75, and he served as State Senator for 
four years. He is an executor and administrator for sev- 
eral large estates. He was appointed by Governor Abbett 
Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals in 1891, and re- 
appointed by Governor Griggs in 1897. His term will 
expire in 1903. In politics hj is a Democrat. 

Gottfried Krueger, Newark. 

Judge Krueger was born in Baden, Germany, Novem- 
ber 4th, 18:-)7, and came to this country February 13th, 
1852, when he settled in Newark, where he has resided 
ever since. He is extensively engaged in the brewing 
business. He served as an apprentice with Adams & 
lyaible, Newark, and when the firm dissolved, Mr. Laible 
built a new brewery for himself, and made Mr, Krueger 
foreman, a position he filled until '865. He then foriiied 
a copartnership with Gottlieb Hill, and they purchased 
the old brewery in which Mr. Krueger had served his 
time, and also adjoining property. The business rapidly 
increased, and several additions were, from time to time, 
made to their brewery. In lh75 Mr. Hill, owing to ill 
health, was forced to retire from business, and Mr. Krue- 
ger became the sole proprietor. The brewery is now one 



BIOGRAPHIES. 297 

of the most extensive in the State. The Judge served as 
a member of the Assembly in 1877 and 1880- In 1872 he 
served as a member of the Essex County Board of Free- 
holders, In 1«80 he was chosen a Presidential Elector, 
and he, together with the other electors from New Jersey, 
cast their votes for Hancock and English, the Presiden- 
tial nominees of the Democratic party. He was appointed 
Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals in 1891 by 
Governor Abbett, to succeed the late Judge John Mc- 
Gregor, and in 1897 he was re-appointed by Governor 
Griggs. His term will expire in 1903. In politics he is 
a Democrat. 

James H. Nixon, Millville. 

Judge Nixon was born in Cumberland county, N. J., in 
1888. He was graduated from Princeton University in 
1858, and then taught for three years in the Lawrence- 
ville Academy, near Princeton. Afterwards he studied 
law in the office of Hon. John T. Nixon, in Bridgeton, 
was admitted to the bar in 186;:{, at the November Term 
of the Supreme Court, and began practice at Millville. 
He was for twenty-one years Solicitor of that city, was a 
member of the New Jersey House of Assembly for four 
years (1865-1869), and of the New Jersey Senate for three 
years (1869-1872). and was Chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee in each of those bodies. In 1876 he was 
named on the Republican Electoral ticket of New Jersey. 
He was an Assistant Attorney General during the admin- 
istration of President Harrison, and for more than a year 
and a half under the second administration of President 
Cleveland. He was appointed Judge of the Court of Er- 
rors and Appeals by Governor Griggs, on the id day of 
March, 1896. In politics he is a Republican His term 
will expire in 1902. 

Chari^es E. Hendrickson, Mount Holly. 

Judge Hendrickson was born at New Egypt, Monmouth 
county (now Ocean), N. J., January Sth, 1843. He pre- 
pared for college at the academy in his native town. In 
September, 1860, he entered the Sophomore Class of 
Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. , but continued there 
only one term, joining the Sophomore Class of Princeton 
College, N J., the following January, where he graduated 
at the age of twenty with the class of 1863. On leaving col- 
lege he conducted a classical school for one year at Pember- 
ton, N. J. He studied law with Abraham Browning and 



298 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Garrit S. Cannon successively, and was admitted to the bar 
of New Jersey as an attorney at the November term of the 
Supreme Court, 1866, and three years later as counselor. 
He settled at Mount Holly upon his admission to the bar, 
where he has since resided. He was appointed Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for Burlington county by Governer Ran- 
dolph in March, 1870, and was re-appointed by Governors 
Bedle, McClellan and Abbett, thus serving twenty years 
in the office, from which he voluntarily retired at the 
close of his fourth term, in March, 1890 

He was elected to the House of Assembly from the 
Third district of Burlington county in 1867. He repre- 
sented the New Jersey Annual Conference of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church as one of the two Lay Delegates 
from that body to the General Conference of that Church 
held at Baltimore in May. 1876. He was there appointed 
by the Board of Bishops one of the Committee to 
Revise the Hymnal of the Church, a work that was 
completed by the committee, and presented to the Board 
of Bishops at their meeting in Cleveland, O., the fol- 
lowing year. He has further served the New Jersey 
Annual Conference as Trustee of Dickinson College and 
of Pennington Seminary, and was the President of the 
Board of Trustees of the latter institution for a number 
of years He was also a Lay Delegate to the Methodist 
Ecumenical Conference, held in Washington, D. C, in 
1891, having been designated by the Board of Bishops as 
one of the representatives from the New Jersey Confer- 
ence District 

He was appointed by Governor Griggs a Judge of the 
Court of Errors and Appeals on March 26th. 1896, for the 
term of six years. In politics the Judge is a Democrat. 
His term will expire in 1902. 

Frederic Adams, Summit. 

Judge Adams was born on October 9th, 18-tO, at Am- 
herst, N. H. He was graduated from Phillips Academy 
at Andover in 1858, and from Yale College in 1862. He 
read law at the Harvard Law School in 1863 and '64, and 
was admitted to the bar of New York city in 1864. He 
was admitted to practice in New Jersey as an attorney in 
February, 1868, and as a counselor in November, 1873. 
Nearly his entire practice has been in the city of Newark, 
where he has been much occupied by his duties as Special 
and Advisory Master in Chancery. The only political 
offices he ever held were as Clerk of East Orange town- 
ship, Essex county, and as counsel for the same township. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 299 

On March 23d, 1897, he was nominated as Judge of the 
Court of Errors and Appeals by Governor Griggs to suc- 
ceed Judge Barcalow, who had been appointed as Judge 
of the Passaic County Courts. He was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate on March 25th, 1897. In politics 
Judge Adams is a Republican. 



WiLWAM H. Vrkdenburgh, Freehold. 

Judge Vredenburgh comes from a very old New Jersey 
family, being the second son of the late Judge Peter Vre- 
denburgh. The first generation of the family on this side 
of the Atlantic, as appears from ancient records, sprang 
from William I. Vredenburgh, who came to New Nether- 
lands from The Hague in May, 1658, in the ship Gilded 
Beaver. 

Peter Vredenburgh, father of the present Judge, was a 
prominent jurist in both State and nation. He served two 
terms as an Associate Justice of the New Jersey Supreme 
Court, being first appointed by Governor Price, in 1855, 
and again by Governor Olden, in 1862. Many of his de- 
cisions are regarded as being among the ablest reported. 

Judge Vredenburgh was born August 19th, 1840; was 
graduated at Rutgers College in 1859; studied law in the 
office of the late Governor Joseph D. Bedle; was admitted 
to practice as an attorney in June, 1862, and as a coun- 
selor in June, 1865. He is one of three sons, all of whom 
were lawyers. 

After his admission, young Vredenburgh began the 
practice of his profession at Freehold his native town, 
and has continued to carry on the law business there ever 
since, with the exception of about a year, 1864, when he 
was located at Eatontown, to continue the business of his 
brother. Major Peter Vredenburgh, Jr., who was absent 
in the military service, and who was killed September 
19th. 1864, at the battle of Winchester, Va., at the head 
of his regiment. 

In 1865 Mr. Vredenburgh formed a law partnership 
with Philip J Ryall, which continued for about five years, 
until Mr. Ryall's failing health compelled his retirement 
from practice. In the exciting general election of 1884. 
Mr. Vredenburgh was nominated by the Republicans of 
Monmouth county for State Senator, and was only de- 
feated by the retirement of the regular Democratic candi- 
date a few days before the election and the fusion of the 
Democrats and Prohibitionists, and by a very narrow 
mjority. 



300 BIOGRAPHIES. 

In 1897 lie was one of the special Commissioners to con- 
sider the question of railroad taxation, whose report be- 
came enacted into the body of the tax laws. 

In November, 1897, he was appointed a Judge of the 
Court of Errors and Appeals by Governor Griggs, to fill a 
vacancy caused by the death of Judge Dayton. On Janu- 
ary 12th, 1^98, he was nominated for a "full term of six 
years by Governor Griggs, and he was confirmed by the 
Senate on the 18th of the same month. In politics the 
Judge is a Republican. 



U. S. OFFICERS FOR NEW JERSEY. 

District Attorney. 
J. Kearny Rice, New Brunswick. 

Mr. Rice was born in Washington city in 1849, and has 
lived in New Brunswick since the war, his family having 
removed there in 1865. He studied law in the office of 
Woodbridge Strong, and is also a graduate of the Law 
School of the University of New York. He was admitted 
as attorney of the Bar of New Jersey in the November 
Term, 1876, and four years afterward he was admitted as 
counselor. In 1882 he was appointed by Governor Lud- 
low Prosecutor of the Pleas for Middlesex county, and 
was re-appointed by Governor Green. In 1890 he resigned 
the office of Prosecutor to accept that of Law Judge of 
Middlesex county, to which he was appointed by Governor 
Abbett. In 1895 he was re-appointed as such Judge by 
Governor Werts, and in January, 1896, was appointed 
United States Attorney for New Jersey, to succeed the 
Hon. John W. Beekman, who had resigned. His salary 
is $3,000 a year. 



Clerk U. S. Circuit Court. 

S. Duncan Oliphant, Trenton. 

General Oliphant was born at Franklin Forge, on the 
Youghiogheny river, Fayette county. Pa., in 1824. He 
was graduated from Jefferson College, Washington county. 
Pa., in September. 1844 ; from Harvard Law School, Cam- 
bridge Mass., in July, 1847, and was admitted to practice 
in Fayette county, Pa., in September of the same year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 301 

In the fall of 1849 he entered into partnership with the 
Hon, Thomas Williams, of the Pittsburg Bar, and prac- 
ticed law there until the spring of 1852, and then, on ac- 
connt of the health of his family, removed to Vincen- 
town, and resumed and continued in the practice of law 
there until April, 1861. 

On the 19th of April, 1861, he recruited a volunteer 
•company of one hundred men, entered the military ser- 
vice of the United States with the rank of Captain, and 
was, from time to time, promoted to the rank of Major, 
Ivieutenant-Colonel and Colonel, and near the close of 
the war to the rank of Brigadier-General by brevet, "for 
faithful and meritorious services." and assigned to the 
command of the Second Brigade of the garrison of Wash- 
ington, and was honorably discharged and mustered out 
of service in September, 1866. 

In the spring of 1867 he moved from Fayette county, 
Pa., to Princeton, and was admitted to practice law at the 
Bar of New Jersey. In September, 1870, he was ap- 
pointed Clerk of the Circuit Court of the United States 
for the District of New Jersey, by the. late Hon. William 
McKennan, which position he continues to hold. In the 
spring of 1874 he removed from Princeton to Trenton, 
where he now resides. No fixed salary, but instead, fees. 



Glerk U. S. District Court. 

George T. Cranmer, Trenton. 

Mr. Cranmer was born at Barnegat, N. J., December 
6th, 1818. He was formerly engaged in the banking and 
brokerage, real estate and insurance business He has 
been an active member of the State National Guard for a 
number of years, and, since 1875, Quartermaster of the 
Seventh Regiment. In 1878 he was the Republican can- 
didate for member of Assembly, but was defeated by Hon. 
Rufus Blodgett, since a United States Senator. In Sep- 
tember, ls79, without his solicitation, he was appointed 
by President Hayes Collector of Customs for the District 
of Little Egg Harbor, N, J., which office he resigned 
July 1st, 1880, In 1882 he was again nominated for mem- 
ber of Assembly, and elected over William J. Harrison 
by a majority of 477. In 1883 he was unanimously nom- 
inated for Senator, and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim 
P. Emson by a plurality of 36. In 18s6 he was renom- 



302 BIOGRAPHIES. 

inated for Senator, and elected over Judge Richard H. 
Conover by a plurality of 743. In 18b9 he was again 
unanimously renominated for Senator, and elected over 
ex-Senator Ephraim P Emson by a plurality of 272. He 
always took an active part in the proceedings of the Sen- 
ate, and for many years was Chairman of the Senate Re- 
publican caucus, and also of the joint Republican caucus. 
In 1889 he was unanimously nominated by the Repub- 
lican caucus for President of the Senate. He was an 
alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Republican 
Convention at Chicago in 1888, and also to the M nne- 
apolis Convention in 1892. In October, 1891, at a con- 
vention of the State League of Republican Clubs, he was 
elected an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National 
Convention of Republican Clubs. He was appointed to 
his present office by the late Judge Green, in January, 
1893, to succeed Linsly Rowe, who had resigned. Na 
fixed salary, but instead, fees. 



United States Marshal. 

Thomas A. Ai.cott, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Alcott was born in Mount Holly, N. J., January 
24th, 1840. In the year 1855 he commenced the study of 
pharmacy, and in 1859 entered Pennington Seminary, 
where he pursued his studies until the beginning of 1863, 
when he enlisted in the Twenty-third Regiment, New Jer- 
sey Volunteers, and served as Quartermaster Sergeant in 
the Army of the Potomac, under Generals Burnside and 
Hooker. In 1865 he became junior partner with his 
father, Hon. Thomas C Alcott, who was a member of the 
Legislature in 1869, '70 and '71, in the foundry and 
machine business, under the name of T. C, Alcott &Son. 
Upon the death of his father, in 1872, Mr. Alcott became 
sole proprietor of the business. He is the patentee and 
manufacturer of Alcott's improved turbine water-wheel, 
which is so favorably known throughout the United 
States, as well as in European and South American coun- 
tries. He was a member of the House of Assembly in 
1884, '85 and '86, when he took a prominent part in leg- 
islation. He was appointed United States Marshal for 
New Jersey early in 1897. to succeed George Pfeiffer, 
whose term had expired. His salary is |3,000 a year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 303 



STATE OFFICERS. 



Secretary of State. 

George WurTS, Paterson. 

Mr. Wurts was born at Easton, Pa., in 1829, but has 
been a resident of New Jersey from his boyhood. Early 
in life he looked forward to journalism as a profession, and 
at the outbreak of the War of the Rebellion he engaged 
as a reporter with the Newark Daily Advertiser . After 
a brief service with that paper he was oifered a position 
on the Newark Mercury, then owned by Mr. E. N. Miller, 
and edited by the late John Y. Foster, upon whose resig- 
nation he became the editor. While engaged in those 
duties he corresponded for the New York Times and 
Evening Post. On the starting of the Brooklyn Daily 
Union he accepted the associate editorship of that paper, 
which he held until February 1st, 1865, when he resigned 
to become editor and one-half owner of the Paterson 
Daily Press, and has since been actively engaged in the 
service of that influential journal. Besides his regular 
editorial work, Mr. Wurts has written considerably in 
prose and verse for some of the leading periodicals of our 
country, including the o\d\L Knickerbocker Magazine, Con- 
tinental MoJithly, Harper's Magazine, Northern Monthly, 
Harper's Weekly, Scribner's, etc. He was President of 
the New Jersey Editorial Association in 1876, and served 
as Secretary of the New Jersey State Senate during the 
legislative sessions of 1880, 1881 and 1882. He has been 
a Trustee of the Free Public Library of Paterson from its 
organization, in 1885. He has been often solicited to be- 
come a candidate for elective office, but has steadily 
declined. He was appointed as Commissioner of Banking 
and Insurance by Governor Griggs on November 4th, 
1896, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of George S. 
Duryee. He served in that office until April 1st, 1897, 
when he was commissioned as Secretary of State, to suc- 
ceed Henry C Kelsey, for a term of five years, he having 
been nominated by Governor Griggs and unanimously 
confirmed by the Senate. His salary is $6,000 a year, and. 
his term will expire on April 1st, 1902. 



504 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Assistant Secretary of State. 
Ai,EXANDKR H. Rickey, Trenton. 

Mr. Rickey was born in Trenton in 1847. He received 
a public school education and graduated from Eastman's 
Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He studied law 
with Hon. Alfred Reed, now a Vice-Chancellor of New 
Jersey. He has held several municipal offices, and was a 
member of Common Council of the city of Trenton from 
1871 to 1875. He has been an attache of the office of the 
Secretary of State since 18f)6. and for many years chief 
clerk in the department. He was commissioned Assist- 
ant Secretary of State January 1st. 1890, and re-com 
missioned April 1st, 1892 and 1897. His powers and 
duties, defined by statute, are: He "shall, during the 
absence or inability, through sickness or other cause, of 
the Secretary of State, have the same powers and perform 
all the duties which are now imposed by law upon the 
•Secretary of State." 



State Treasurer. 

George B. Swain, Newark. 

Mr. Swain was born in Warren county, N. J., March 
6th, 1835. When he was quite young the family moved 
to Morris county (near Dover), where he lived till after 
his father's death In 1852 he came to Newark, where 
he has since resided. In 1853 he secured a position as 
clerk with Mr. George A. Van Wagenen, a lumber dealer, 
and succeeded to the business, with Mr J. M. Randall as 
a partner, in 1865. He has continued in the business and 
occupied the same premises to the present time. The 
present firm of. Swain & Jones was formed in 1875. Mr. 
Swain has voted for every Republican candidate for Presi- 
dent from Lincoln down to McKinley. In 1871 he was elect- 
ed a member of the Newark Board of Education, and, by 
successive re-elections, served as a member of that body for 
twelve years, and during the last three years as its Presi- 
dent, In 1881 he was appointed by Governor Ludlow a 
member of the Board of Trustees of the State Reform 
School for Boys at Jamesburg, and served one term. At 
the Newark city election in April, 1893, he was elected a 
Trustee of the Newark City Home for two years. He is 
interested in many local associations and institutions, in- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 305 

eluding the German National Bank of Newark, of which 
he is a Director and Vice-President. He was elected by 
a Joint Meeting of the Legislature of 1894 as State Treas- 
urer to succeed George R. Gray, and he was re-elected in 
1897. His term of office is three years, and it will expire 
April 2d, 1900. Salary, $6,000 a year. 



State Comptroller. 

Wir^WAM S. Hancock, Trenton. 

Mr. Hancock was born in Trenton, N. J , October 19th, 
1854. He received his education at the State Model 
School and Trenton Business College, In 1 871 he entered 
the live stock and provision business with ex-Senator 
John Taylor, of Trenton, and remained with him nine 
years. This was his first experience in the business 
world. Mr. Hancock was one of the organizers of the 
Crescent Pottery Co npany, of Trenton, which was formed 
in July, 1881. This company was absorbed by the Tren- 
ton Potteries Company in May, 1892, when Mr. Hancock 
was made Vice-President of the new organization, which 
position he still holds. He was elected a member of the 
Trenton Common Council from the Second ward in 1888, 
and served his entire term of three years as Chairman of 
the Finance Committee. It was during this period that 
Chambersburg and Millham were consolidated with Tren- 
ton, when a re-appraisement of all the city property was 
necessitated, and also a sewer system was established, a 
public park purchased and a paid fire department created. 
The management of the finances of the city in those 
years required rare skill and experience in order to be 
successful, and Mr. Hancock acquitted himself with much 
credit in the performance of the duties assigned to him. 
He was elected State Comptroller by a joint meeting of 
the Legislature in 1894, and re-elected in 1897 for a term 
of three years. His salary is $6,000 a year, and his term 
of office will expire on April 2d, 1900. 



Attorney-General. 

Samuei, H. Grky, Camden. 

Mr. Grey was born in Camden, N. J., April 6th, 1836, 
and is a son of Philip James Grey, for many years a lead- 
20 



306 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ing man in that section of the State, and Sarah Woolston 
Stephens, his wife, a member of an Orthodox Quaker 
family. He spent his entire life in Camden, where he 
was educated at private schools kept by Hon. La Fayette 
Grover, afterwards Governor of Oregon and Senator from 
that State, and his brother Talleyrand. He studied law 
with Hon. Abraham Browning, the first Attorney- General 
appointed under the new Constitution, and was admitted 
as an attorney at the November term, lfe57, and as a coun- 
selor at the February term, 1861. 

The Attorney-General long since achieved for himself a 
high reputation as a lawyer, a pleader and an orator. He 
has figured in many prominent legal battles, in nearly all 
of which he has come out crowned with victory. His 
masterly conduct of the impeachment proceedings in the 
case of Prison Keeper Patrick H. Laverty, in 1886, when 
he acted as counsel for the House of Assembly, brought 
about conviction by the State Senate sitting as a High 
Court of Impeachment, and which was presided over by 
John W. Griggs, since Governor of New Jersey. His 
argument before the Supreme Court in 1888, in support 
of the constitutionality of the Local Option law, won for 
him a favorable decisiot], and the statute was not dis- 
turbed. With other eminent lawyers as his associates, he 
distinguished himself in the famous controversy over the 
organization of the State Senate in 1894, when a full 
bench of the Supreme Court sustained his interpretation 
of the constitutional law bearing on the case. Chief Jus- 
tice Beasley delivered the opinion of the Court, which de- 
clared that Maurice A. Rogers, Republican, was the duly 
elected President of the Senate. 

Twice has the Attorney-General been a Presidential 
Elector for New Jersey— in 1872, when the vote of the 
State was cast for Grant and Wilson, and in 1896. when it 
was recorded for McKinley and Hobart. He served as a 
member of the Constitutional Commission of 1873, and 
was President of the Constitutional Commission of 1894. 

In 1^66 Mr Grey was appointed Prosecutor of the Pleas 
for the county of Cape May, and served seven years. He 
served as a member of the Republican State Executive 
Committee from 1868 to 1871. Several times he has re- 
fused judicial and political honors. He could have gone 
to Congress in 1874, when he declined a nomination in 
the First Congressional District. Governor Griggs offered 
him the ofiice of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 
1897, which he declined. On March 1st of the same year 
he was nominated for Attorney General, to succeed John 
P. Stockton, and he was unanimously confirmed by the- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 307 

Senate on the 8th of that month. The Attorney-General 
has been a Director of the Camden Safe Deposit and 
Trust Company since its organization, in 1873, and he is 
President of the West Jersey Title and Guaranty Com- 
pany, a position he has occupied since its formation. 

His term as Attorney- General will expire on April 5th, 
1902, and his salary is $7,000 a year. 



Commander of the National G-uard. 
Major-Generai. Joseph W, Pi,ume, Newark. 

General Plume was born in Troy, N. Y., on the 23d of 
August, 1839. His grandfather was William Turk, M D., 
of the United States Navy, a descendant of Antonie Jan- 
sen Salers, a wealthy Hollander, who settled in Gravesend 
(now a part of Brooklyn, L I.) in 1631 

On his father's side, General Plume is a lineal descend- 
ant of Samuel Plum, one of the colony from Bradford, 
Conn., which settled Newark in 1666. 

General Plume has been a resident of Newark since 
1843. In early life he entered the banking business, 
which calling he followed during the greater part of his 
career. He is now the cashier of the Manufacturers' Na- 
tional Bank of Newark, having held the office since the 
establishment of the institution, in 1.h71. His military 
life was begun in 1857, when he entered the ranks of Com- 
pany C of the " City Battalion " of Newark. He served 
nearly all through the late war, and while connected with 
the Army of the Potomac he participated in the battles of 
First Bull Run, Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Seven Pines, 
Gaines' Mills, Peach Orchard, Savage Station, White 
Oaks Bridge, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, Antietam 
and Fredericksburg. 

On the 4th of November, 1863, he was appointed Major 
and Brigade Inspector of the National Guard of the State 
of New Jersey. On the 6th of July, 1865, he was com- 
missioned Colonel of the Second Regiment, New Jersey 
Rifle Corps, and on April 26th, 1869, he was elected Colo- 
nel of the Second Regiment, N. G. N. J. On the 8th of 
May. 1869, he was commissioned Brigadier-General of the 
First Brigade, N G. N. J., and on the tenth anniversary 
of the date of his commission he was also commissioned 
Brevet Major-Generalby General (then Governor' George 
B McClellan. On the 4th of April, 1885, he was com- 



308 BIOGRAPHIES. 

missioned Major-General of the National Guard of the 
State of New Jersey, to succeed the late General Ger- 
shom Mott. 



Adjutant-General. 

William S. Stryker, Trenton. 

General Stryker was born at Trenton, N. J. June 6th, 
1838. He was educated at the College of New Jersey, 
graduating there in the year 1858. He commenced the 
study of the law, and had nearly completed the course, when 
the war broke out. As stated in "New Jersey and the 
Rebellion," he entered the military service of the country 
in response to the first call for troops. He then assisted 
in organizing the Fourteenth Regiment, New Jersey Vol- 
unteers, and in February, 1863, was ordered to Hilton 
Head, South Carolina, and made Major and Aide-de- 
Camp to Major-General Gillmore, then in command of 
the Tenth Army Corps He participated in the capture 
of Morris Island and the bloody night attack on Fort 
Wagner. Subsequently, he was transferred to the North, 
on account of illness, and placed in charge of the Pay 
Department, U. S. Army, at Parole Camp, Columbus. O. 
He was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel for meritorious 
service during the war, and resigning in June, 1866, was 
soon after placed on the staff of the Executive of New 
Jersey. On April 12th, 1867, he was made Brigadier- 
General and Adjutant-General of New Jersey, which po- 
sition he holds at the present time. He was brevetted 
Major-General for long and meritorious service, February 
9th, 1874. He has compiled, officially, and published a 
•'Roster of Jersey men in the Revolutionary War," a 
*' Roster of New Jersey Volunteers in the Civil War," 
and several works on historical subjects relating to New 
Jersey He was made a counselor-at-law of the State of 
Ohio in the year 1866 ; was at one time President and is 
now a Director of the Trenton Banking Company ; is a 
member of a large number of State and county historical 
societies ; a Fellow of the American Geographical So- 
ciety, and a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. He 
is now President of the Trenton Saving Fund Society. 
JHis salary is $1,200 per year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 309 

Quarter master- G-eneral . 
Richard Grant Augustus DoNNEti^v, Trenton. 

General Donnelly was born at Richmond, Staten Island, 
in the year 1841, of an Irish father and an American 
mother of Scotch descent. He was educated in the dis- 
trict school of Richmond, and at a select boarding-school 
near Belleville, Essex county, N. J. In 1854 he removed 
to Hoboken, N. J., and entered the law ofiBce of Hon. J. 
Dunn Littell, remaining there until the decease of his in- 
structor, which occurred in 1857. He then entered into 
mercantile pursuits as a clerk. He began his military 
career in February, 1860, as a private in Company B, 
First Regiment. Hudson Brigade. At the breaking out 
of the War of the Rebellion he enlisted as a private in 
Company I, First New Jersey Volunteers, attached to 
Kearny's Brigade, Army of the Potomac, and was ad- 
vanced to the grades of Corporal and Sergeant respec- 
tively, passing a creditable examination for promotion 
just previous to the battle of Gaines' Mills. At this en- 
gagement he was twice wounded, slightly in the left arm 
during the early part and severely during the latter part 
of the fight. Left on the field of battle, he was taken 
prisoner and confined in Libby Prison until exchanged. 
He was discharged from the United States service at Mc- 
Kim's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, Md., by reason of 
physical disability caused by gunshot wounds received in 
battle. He returned home, and, after a period of four 
months, was capable of resuming his position in New 
York city as a salesman 

In the year 1867 he removed to Trenton, and embarked 
in the hosiery and furnishing goods busines, which he 
still carries on. General Donnelly re-entered the mili- 
tary service of New Jersey March 18th, 1879, as Paymas- 
ter of the Seventh Regiment National Guard. He was 
promoted Major, Januarv 20th, 1881; Lieutenant-Colonel, 
May 31st, 1882, and Colonel. September 7th, 1882. He 
was appointed Ouartermaster-General by Governor Green, 
January 13th, 1890, which appointment was sent to the 
Senate by Governor Abbett, and unanimously confirmed 
by that body March 5th, 1890. 

General Donnelly was Major of the provisional bat- 
talion which distinguished itself at Yorktown at the cen- 
tennial celebration in 1881, and was proffered by Gov- 
ernor Green the command of the veteran camp at Gettys- 
burg, during the ceremonies of the unveiling of the mon- 



310 BIOGRAPHIES. 

uments, in 1888, to the New Jersey heroes oi the battle of 
Gett3'sburg, which he was obliged to decline in conse- 
quence of other .engagements. He was Chairman of the 
Board of Commissioners to select grounds and erect 
buildings for the new Soldiers' Home at Kearny, which 
was completed some years ago. He was appointed a 
Trustee of the New Jersey State Reform School at James- 
burg, by Governor Abbett, in 1885. He was re appointed 
by the joint meeting of the Legislature in 1888. He is 
one of the INIanagers of the Home for Disabled Soldiers; 
is interested in several stock companies and land associa- 
tions as a Director, and is a member of many beneficial 
and social societies. He is a Past Commander of Aaron 
Wilkes Post, No. 23. In 1892 he was chosen Commander 
of the G. A. R., Department of New Jersey He was 
twice elected to the House of Assembly, and has served 
two terms as Mayor of the city of Trenton. He has served 
as Treasurer of the Democratic State Committee since 
September, 1895. 

The office of Ouartermaster-General carries with it the 
responsible positions of Commissary-General, Paymaster- 
General and Chief of Ordnance. Salary, $1,200. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court. 
Wii,i.iA.M RiKER, Jr , Orange. 

Mr. Riker was born in Newark, N. J., January 14th, 
1850. His father, William Riker, Sr., was for many years 
a successful manufacturing jeweler, and retiring from 
active business was succeeded by two of his sons, one of 
whom is the subject of this sketch. Mr. Riker com- 
pleted his education in the Newark Academy, and there- 
upon engaged in the jewelry business with his father, 
afterward becoming a partner, and later one of his suc- 
cessors, and is still engaged in that business. 

He was chosen as a delegate to the National Repub- 
lican Conventions of 1884 and 1896 ; elected Alderman of 
the city of Orange in 1893 and Register of Deeds and 
Mortgages for Essex county in the same year. The latter 
oflSce he resigned before the completion of his term in 
order to accept the appointment by Governor Griggs as 
Clerk of the Supreme Court. 

He has served as member and Treasurer of the Essex 
County Republican Committee for a number of years. 
He was chosen Treasurer of the Republican State Com- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 311 

mittee in 1898. His salary is $6,000 a year, and his term 
of oflQce, which is for five years, will expire on Novem- 
ber 2d, 1902. 



Clerk in Chancery. 

Lb; WIS A. Thompson, Somerville. 

Mr. Thompson was born at Basking Ridge, Somerset 
county, N. J., July 19th. 1845. He taught school for five 
years, and then engaged in the millinery and fancy goods 
business at Somerville. He was elected Sheriff of Somer- 
set county in 1880 for a term of three years, and he was 
President of the Board of Commissioners of Somerville 
two years, 1888 and 1884. He was elected Senator in 
1884 over Lane, Dem., by a plurality of 89 ; re-elected in 
1887 over Bergen , Dem., by a plurality of 450, and again 
in 1893 by a largely-increased plurality of 893 over Beek- 
man, Dem. During his service in the Senate he was a 
member of the most important committees and always 
took an active part in legislation. In 1896 he served as 
President of the Senate, when he discharged the duties of 
the ofiice with signal ability and marked impartiality. 
He resigned on March 6th to accept the position of Clerk 
in Chancery, to which he had just been nominated by the 
Governor and unanimously confirmed by the Senate. His 
term is five years, and will expire in 1901. His salary is 
|6,000 a year. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Chari.es J. Baxter, Plainfield. 

Mr. Baxter was born at Glenwood, Sussex County, N. 
J., on November 8th, 1841. He attended the district 
school there until he was twelve years of age, after which 
he went to work on his father's farm, continuing his 
studies by himself and with the help of an uncle, who 
had graduated from Lafayette College and then lived on 
the next farm. On his eighteenth birthday he started ' 
his educational work as a teacher in the district school 
at Frankfort Plains, N. J. After twelve years of teaching 
in several district schools, Mr. Baxter was appointed 
Principal of the Franklin Furnace District School. He 
gradually improved the condition of the school until it 



312 BIOGRAPHIES. 

was converted into a High School, remaining in that posi- 
tion for thirteen years. After leaving Franklin Furnace, 
about ten years ago, he moved to Plainfield, where he 
became connected with the Provident Life and Trust Com- 
pany, of Philadeljihia. 

In 1875 Mr. Baxter was nominated and renominated as 
County School Superintendent of Sussex county by the 
State Board of Education, but was rejected by the Demo- 
cratic Board of Freeholders because of his party aflfilia- 
tions. This started the agitation which resulted in that 
power being taken from the Board of Freeholders and 
given to the Board of Education. He was appointed ta 
his present position by Governor Griggs on March 24th, 
1896, as a successor to Addison B. Poland, who had re- 
signed. Two days later Mr. Baxter was confirmed by the 
Senate for a full term of three years. His salary is 
$3,000 a year. 



Keeper of the State Prison. 
Samuel S. Moore, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Moore was born in Easton, Pa., March 29th, 1834. 
He is of an old New Jersey family His great-great- 
grandfather, Nathaniel Moore, left Newtown. Long: 
Island, in 1708. and settled in Hopewell. N. J He. 
Thomas Reed, John Cornwall and John Mott bought 1, SOD" 
acres of land on which Pennington is now situated. Mr. 
Moore died September Hth, 175H, leaving a large family. 
His son, Captain John Moore, was born in Hopewell in 
171)^, and died September 3d, 1768. He was in Colonel 
Samuel Hunt's regiment in the French-Indian wars. His 
son, Samuel, was born in Hopewell, Hunterdon county, 
in 1754, and removed to Easton, Pa., in 1782, and died 
there March 9th, 17H9. He was a Minuteman in the 
Revolution, and afterwards served in Captain John 
Mott's Company, First Regiment (Hunterdon county). 
His son, the father of the present Prison Keeper, was 
born at Easton. Pa., September 28th, 1794, and died at 
Easton, June 18th, 188S. He was educated in Philadel- 
phia, was Second Sergeant, First Company, First Regi- 
ment. Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Thomas Hum- 
phrey Ward, in 1812-14. He was editor of the Spirit oj 
Pennsylvania and the Belvidere Apollo ; Clerk of the 
Court, Justice of the Peace, and Chief Burgess of Easton„ 
etc. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 313: 

The present Keeper of the State Prison settled in 
Elizabethtown, N. J , in 1855. When a boy he was a tele- 
graph operator, and since then has been an accountant, 
and was for ten years connected with the National State 
Bank at Elizabeth as Notary, etc. He has also been a 
real estate broker. He was Collector for the county of 
Union in 1875-76; Overseer of the Poor of Elizabeth four 
years ; Postmaster at Elizabeth under the Harrison ad- 
ministration, and has been for nearly twenty-five years a 
member of the Union County Republican Committee; 
also the Republican Committee of the city of Elizabeth. 
He was appointed Keeper of the State Prison ad interitn 
April 22d, 189H. On March 1st, 1897, he was nominated, 
and on the 18th of the same month unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate for a full term of five years. His 
term will expire on March 18th, 1902, and his salary is 
$3,500 a year. 



State Prison Supervisor. 
Edward J. Anderson, Somerville. 

Major Anderson, who was born at Flemington, Hun- 
terdon county, N. J., December 15th, 1830, is of pre-Rev- 
olutionary stock. His great-grandfather, on his father's 
side, was a native of the Colonies, and held an ofiice in 
the British service prior to the Revolution, but joined the 
patriot cause on the breaking out of hostilities and fought 
through the war on the side of liberty. On his mother's 
side the Major's earliest ancestor in this country was 
Samuel Fleming, who, in 1756. founded and gave his 
name to Flemington the county seat of Hunterdon 
county, and whose daughter Esther married Colonel 
Thomas Lowrey, who commanded a regiment of the New 
Jersey contingent troops during the Revolutionary War, 
subsequently held many important public trusts in this 
State, and in 1790 was designated by the Legislature as a 
member of the Commission which selected the site upon 
which the present State Capitol stands His son, William 
Lowrey, was also an officer of the New Jersey troops dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War, and his daughter was the 
grandmother of the subject of this present sketch. 

After receiving a common-school education, the Major 
engaged in mercantile pursuits in Philadelphia, Pa., 
until the breaking out of the Civil War, when he re- 
turned to New Jersey and was appointed principal assist- 



314 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ant in the Adjutant-General's Department of the State, 
which position he held until the close of the war, when 
he resigned and engaged in business in New York City, 
retaining however, his residence in New Jersey. In 1871 
he was appointed first assistant in the office of the State 
Comptroller, which he held until 1880. In that year he 
was elected Comptroller by the I^egislature, and held the 
office until 1891, when he was succeeded by General 
Heppenheimer, Democrat. He was appointed Fish Com- 
missioner in 1878, and held that office until 1888. _ The 
Major is an active and ardent Republican For thirteen 
years he was a member of the Mercer County Republican 
Committee, and has been twenty years a member of the 
Republican State Committee, and is now Vice-Chairman 
of the latter body. He was nominated by Governor 
Werts for Prison Supervisor in 1894, to succeed James M. 
Seymour, a Democrat, and was confirmed by the Senate 
for a term of three years. In 1897 he was renominated 
by Governor Griggs and was confirmed for another full 
term. His term expires June 11th, 1900, and his salary is 
$3,000 a year. 



State Librarian. 

Morris R. Hamilton, Trenton. 

Colonel Hamilton was born at Oxford Furnace, Sussex 
county, N. J., May 24th, 1820, and is the son of the late 
General Samuel R. Hamilton, of Trenton, who was Quar- 
termaster-General of the State for twenty-five years, being 
the immediate predecessor of General Lewis Perrine in 
that office He was of Scotch descent, Colonel Hamilton 
being a great-grandson of John Hamilton, Provincial 
Governor of New Jersey from 1736 to 1747, and of Andrew 
Robeson, Surveyor- General of the Province at the same 
time, both being Scotch immigrants. The State Librarian 
was ediicated at the old Trenton Academy, Lavvrenceville 
High School and Princeton College, from which he grad- 
uated in 1«39. He studied law with his father, and was 
admitted to the Bar in 1842. He practiced in Camden 
two years, and in Philadelphia two years, in addition to 
being employed in the Philadelphia Post Office from 1844 
to 1849, when he resigned to take editorial charge of the 
Trenton True American, which he conducted until 1853, 
when it was sold to Judge Naar Since that time he has 
been professionally connected with the press of New Jer- 
:sey, New York, Missouri and Pennsylvania, having occu- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 315 

pied editorial positions upon the New York National 
Democrat, ihe Sussex Herald, the Camden Democrat^ 
Nezuark /ournal, Sussex Record, Kansas City News, 
Elizabeth Herald and Philadelphia Record, during a 
period of thirty-five years. He obtained the title of 
Colonel by serving upon Governor Fort's staff from 1851 
to 1854:. He was elected State Librarian, by the Com- 
missioners, February 27th, 1884, for a term of five years, 
and was re-elected in 1889 and 1894. His salary is $2,000 
a year. 



State Board of Assessors. 
Bird W. Spkncer, President, Passaic. 

General Spencer was born in New Jersey in 1845. He 
entered the service of the New York, I/ake Erie and West- 
ern Railroad Company January 1st, I860, where he re- 
mained for twenty-five years. During that period he 
served as clerk, division superintendent, paymaster, 
cashier, assistant treasurer and treasurer. In 1863 he en- 
listed in the Seventh Regiment, N Y., and has served 
•continuously in the militia from that year to the present 
time On May 4th, 1876. he was appointed Colonel and 
Aide-de-Camp on the staff of Governor Bedle; June 4th, 
1878, Major and Deputy Quartermaster, and on May 23d, 
1881, Brigadier-General and Inspector-General of Rifle 
Practice. 

He is now a member of the firm of Campbell, Morrell 
& Co., merchants, Passaic, and is also President of the 
People's Bank and Trust Company. He has been Mayor 
of the city of Passaic three terms, or six years altogether, 
from 1879 to 1885. He was a member of Common Coun- 
cil for five years, prior to his election as Mayor, and he 
has held the former ofifice since 188^^. He was appointed 
a member of the State Board of Assessors by Governor 
Green in May. 1889, for a term of four years, and was re- 
appointed by Governor Werts in 1893, and by Governor 
Griggs in 1897. He served as President of that body in 
1893, and again in 1895, '9H. '97 and '98, and still holds 
that position. His term will expire May 4th, 1901. 

Robert Stockton Green, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Green was born in Elizabeth, N. J., on the 16th 
day of October, 1865. He was graduated from the Col- 



316 BIOGRAPHIES. 

lege of New Jersey in June, 1886, and in January of 1887 
he was appointed Private Secretary to the Governor of 
New Jersey, which office he held until 1890. He was ad- 
mitted to the bar of this State in June, 1891, and to the 
bar of the State of New York in October, 1892, from 
which time until the first of December, 1896, he was con- 
nected with the well known law firm of Seward, Guthrie, 
Morawitz & Steele, of New York city. He was appointed 
a member of the State Board of Assessors by Governor 
Griggs, in April, 1896, for a full term of four years. On 
the first day of December, 1896, he formed with Albert 
C. Wall a copartnership for the general practice of the 
law, under the firm name of Wall & Green, with offices 
in the Fuller Building, No. 1 Montgomery street, Jersey 
City. 

Stephen J. Meeker, Newark. 

Mr. Meeker was born in Newark, N. J., March 17th, 
1843, where he has always lived. He received a common 
school education, and after a year's service in the count- 
ing-room of a large hardware house in New York city, 
William Bryce & Co , he learned the foundry business 
with his father, David M. Meeker joining him in part- 
nership iu 1873, and upon his father's death succeeded to 
the business. 

He comes of a strong Derhocratic family. He never 
held public office until appointed a Commissioner to the 
World's Fair, at Chicago, by Governor Abbett, March 
31st, 1891. He was one of the Temporary Essex County 
Park Commissioners, selected by Judge Depue, and was 
re appointed by him on the present Commission. Gov- 
ernor Griggs appointed him on the State Board of As- 
sessors, to succeed Colonel A. R. Kuser, and he was 
confirmed by the Senate on March 3d, 1896, for a full 
term of four years. 

Amos Gibes, Mount Holly. ■ - 

Mr. Gibbs was born in Columbus, Burlington county, 
N. J., in 18;!8. He was educated in the common schools 
and at the boarding-school of Samuel J. Gummere, at 
Burlington. He was elected Clerk of Burlington county 
in 1863, when he removed to Mount Holly. He was also 
the first Auditor of Burlington county, being named by 
the Legislature in 1872 the year the act was passed, and 
elected to the same office the three succeeding years. He 
is now President of the Mount Holly Insurance Company, 
the Mount Holly Electric Light Company and the Mount 



BIOGRAPHIES. 317 

Holly Street Railway Company. For a number of years 
"he was engaged in the manufacture of phosphorus and 
fertilizers, retiring from business in 1891. He is now 
Chairman of the Burlington County Republican Com- 
mittee, a position he has held for several years. He was 
appointed a member of the State Board of Assessors by 
Governor Griggs in January, 1897, for the term of four 
years. 

Irvine E. Maguire, Secretary, Palmyra. 

Mr. Maguire was born in Camden, N. J., on January 
22d, 1853, in which city he lived continuously until 1886, 
when he removed to his present residence at Palmyra, 
Burlington county. He received his education in the 
public schools of Camden and Philadelphia, and in 1868. 
at the age of fifteen years, entered the counting-room of 
Alexander G. Cattell & Co., then the largest grain export- 
ing house in the city of Philadelphia, and of which firm 
the late ex-United States Senator Alexander G. Cattell 
was the senior member. Mr. Maguire remained in the 
service of the Messrs Cattell until the year 188 ^ rising 
from the position of office boy to that of cashier and chief 
bookkeeper, [n the latter year, shortly after the organ- 
ization of the State Board of Assessors, he was appointed 
Assistant Secretary of that Board, and placed in charge 
particularly of the figures and accounting of the depart- 
ment He was elected Secretary of the Board June 18th, 
1895. 



State Board of Taxation. 

Chari^es C. Br,ACK, Jersey City. 

Mr. Black was born on a farm in Burlington county, 
near Mount Holly, N. J., on July 29th, i858. He was 
prepared for college at the Mount Holly Academy, and 
■entered Princeton College in 1874 being graduated with 
the class of 78 He studied law with Colonel James N. 
Stratton, of Mount Holly; Messrs. Coult & Howell, of 
Newark, and at the University of Michigan, at Ann Ar- 
bor. He was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as an at- 
torney in June, 1881, and as a counselor in June, 1884. 
After being admitted to the bar he lucated at Jersey City, 
and has practiced law there ever since. For ten years he 
has been a member of the law firm of Randolph, Condict 
& Black. 



318 BIOGRAPHIES. 

He served for five years as a member of the Hudson 
County Board of Registration under the Ballot Reform 
law, and was appointed as a member of the State Board of 
Taxation on March 21st, 1891, for a term of five years, 
and was re-appointed for another term in 1896. Mr. 
Black has made two valuable additions to the literature 
of the law in his "Proof and Pleadings in Accident 
Cases," and " New Jersey Law of Taxation." 

Henry J. West, President, Gloucester City. 

Mr. West was born in Rhode Island in 1850, and is the 
eldest son of Henry J West, for over thirty years the 
manager of the Washington Cotton Mills, at Gloucester 
City. He attended the public schools at Gloucester City, 
Professor Gregory's Classical and English School in 
Philadelphia, and subsequently took a course in civil 
engineering at the Philadelphia Polytechnic College, 
leaving that institution to engage in the practical work of 
the mills. He served a regular apprenticeship in the 
machine shops and other departments of the works, after 
which he was made assistant in the management of the 
concern, retiring from that position in June, 1885. He 
was appointed Under Sheriff by Sheriff Baird in Novem- 
ber. 1887, and was elected Sheriff of Camden county in 
1890. He was nominated by Governor Werts as a mem- 
ber of the State Board of Taxation, which nomination 
w^as unanimously confirmed by the Senate on May 18th, 
1894, for a term of five years. 

Cari, Lentz, Newark. 

Major Lentz was born at Bamberg, Bavaria, July 1st, 
1845, and came to the United States at an early age. 
When only sixteen he enlisted in the P'irst Connecticut 
Cavalry Volunteers, First Brigade, Third Division, 
Cavalry Corps. From private he became a non-com- 
missioned officer, and after the battle of the Wilderness 
he was promoted, in May 1864, to a Lieutenancy. In 
one of the cavalry fights, which took place July 12th, 
1864, in the vicinity of Washington, D. C, during the 
invasion of Early, he lost his right arm, and, thus 
disabled he was mustered out of service December 24th, 
1864. As soon as he had sufficiently recovered from the 
effects of his wounds he entered Columbia University, 
Washington, D. C, and was graduated therefrom in 
1869 Subsequently he became a student in the law 
department of the same university, and in 1873 received 



BIOGRA PHIES. 3 1 9^ 

the degree of LL B. In November of the latter year he 
was admitted to the Bar of New Jersey, and soon after- 
ward settled in Newark, where he began the practice of 
his profession. He has always been an active Republi- 
can, and he is now Chairman of the Essex County 
Republican Committee, a position he has occupied for 
several years. He was appointed a member of the State 
Board of Taxation by Governor Griggs, for a full term of 
five years, on February 18th, 1896, and was confirmed by 
the Senate on March 3d following. 

Joseph Thompson, Atlantic City. 

Mr. Thompson was born at May's Landing, N J , Sep- 
tember 21st 1853, and is a son of William W. and Hester 
T. Pennington Thompson. He was admitted to the bar 
of this State in June, 1878, and located in Atlantic City 
in June, 1880. He was Collector of Atlantic county from 
May, 1881 to May, 1883; Prosecutor of the county for ten 
years, from March, 1881 to March, 1891, and from April, 
1892, to April, 189S, was Law Judge of the county of Atlan- 
tic. On March 9th, 1898, he was elected Mayor of At- 
lantic City On January 25th, 1898, he was nominated by 
Governor Griggs as a Manager of the State Hospital at 
Trenton, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Dr. Joseph 
F. Edwards, and he was confirmed on the 31st of the same 
month In July, 1898, he was appointed a member of the 
State Board of Taxation. In 18^2 he was elected Solicitor 
of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Atlantic county, 
and has been re elected every year since that date. He 
was one of the organizers of the Second National Bank 
and the Atlantic Safe Deposit and Trust Company, and 
has been a Director and Solicitor of both institutions 
since their organization. He has been Solicitor for the 
Atlantic City Railroad Company for the past ten years. 



Thomas B. Usher, Secretary, Trenton. 

Mr. Usher was born at Bonnsville, in the northern part 
of Hudson county, N. J., on the 30th of March. 1861, in 
which locality he still resides. He comes of sturdy 
Scotch ancestry. He received a common-school educa- 
tion, supplemented by a business course at Cooper Union, 
New York city. He was a member of the House of As- 
sembly for two terms, 1890 and 1891, and has been the 
Secretary of the State Board of Taxation since its in- 
ception. 



320 BIOGRAPHIES. 



Oommissioner of Banking- and Insurance. 

WiLi^iAM Betti^e, Oaklyn, Camden County. 

Mr. Bettle is of an old Quaker family, and was born in 
Philadelphia in 1830, where he resided until he was six- 
teen, when he removed to New Jersey. For four years 
he lived near Yardville, Mercer county, obtaining a prac- 
tical knowledge of farming, when he purchased a farm in 
Haddon township, Camden county, about four miles from 
the city of Camden, which has been his home ever since. 
He has always been much interested in the management 
of his large farm, which is considered one of the best in 
South Jersey, and is somewhat noted for the good crops 
raised, and for the neatness and care with which every- 
thing is kept. Mr. Bettle has taken an active interest in 
political affairs since early manhood, but has always 
refused to be a candidate for office, although repeatedly 
solicited to do so. He had never held any office until 
appointed by Governor Griggs to his present position in 
April, 1897. He has beeu a Member-at-Large of the Re- 
publican State Committee for a number of 5'ears and his 
advice and judgment are much valued by his colleagues 
Mr Bettle is an active Director in most of the railroads 
in South Jersey in the Pennsylvania Railroad S^'stem, 
and is interested in many business enterprises. His term 
of office is three years, and salary $4,000 a year. 



CJhief of the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. 

Wii,i,iAM Stainsby, Newark. 

Mr. Staiusby was born in England, July 3d, 1829, 
and came to this country when but two years of age. He 
learned the trade of a hatter, which he followed for some 
time, and subsequently he spent fifteen years in the 
saddlery and hardware business. For a number of years 
he was engaged in the wholesale and retail business of 
oils and paints in the city of Newark. He served as a 
member of the Board of Aldermen of that city from 
January 1st, J 866, to January 1st, 1879, and again from 
1890 to 1894, making a total of sixteen years' and four 
months' service altogether. He was President of that 
body in 1876 and 1877, and in other years he was Chair- 
man of the most important committees. He represented 
Essex county in the State Senate in 1882, 18S3 and lh84, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 321 

during the period when the railroad and corporation 
taxation measures were before that body. He took a 
leading part in that legislation and also in the considera- 
tion and discussion of all other questions of importance. 
He was a member of the Board of Works of the city of 
Newark from May, 1895, to May, 1898, when he made a 
most creditable record. Mr. Stainsby has ever been a 
loyal supporter of the Republican party, and he is a 
leader of much prominence in Essex county. He was 
nominated by Governor Voorhees as Chief of the Bureau 
of Labor and Statistics on March 24th, 1898, for a term 
of five years, and he was confirmed by the Senate oa 
the following day. His salary is $2,500 a year, and his 
term will expire in 1903. 



Inspector of Factories and "Workshops. 
John C. Ward, Centreton, Salem County. 

Mr Ward was born in Camden, N. J., September 9th, 
1853, and is a farmer. He was Sergeant of Company E, 
Centennial Guard, of Philadelphia, in 1876, at the Cen- 
tennial Exhibition. He served as a member of the House 
of Assembly in 1889 and 1890, and as State Senator from 
1894 to 1896, from Salem county. He was appointed to 
his present office by Governor Griggs, on March 26th, 
1890, and was promptly confirmed by the Senate. His 
term of office is five years, and salary $2,500. 



Custodian of the Capitol. 
John H. Bonneli,, Newark. 

Mr. Bonnell was born in Newton, Sussex county, N. J., 
January 5th, 1849, which was his home until 1873, when 
he removed to Newark, N. J. In 1887 he was elected 
Superintendent of the Court House at Newark, N. J., by 
the Republican Board of Freeholders, which office he held 
for three years. He was appointed Supervisor of the 
Census of Essex county for 1890, and at the close of the 
census work he was appointed by Charles Foster, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, to a position in the customs service, 
which he held until Grover Cleveland was elected Presi- 
dent ; he then sent in his resignation, which was accepted 
in due time. He has always been very closely identified 
with the interests of the Republican party, and is an active 
21 



322 BIOGRAPHIES. 

member of the Republican Indian League of New Jersey, 
and is serving his ninth term as Treasurer of that organi- 
zation. He was appointed Custodian of the Capitol in 
1894, and his salary is |2,000 a year. 



Ooinniissioner of Public Roads. 
Henry I. Budd, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Budd was born March 21st, 1836, on the Budd 
homestead, between Pemberton and Vincentown, South- 
ampton township, Burlington county. His ancestors 
were among the original colonial proprietors of West Jer- 
sey, and their descendants for over two hundred years 
have been, mostly in one locality, largely interested in 
agriculture. Mr. Budd was prepared for college at Pen- 
nington and Mr. Colloms' Academy, and graduated in 
185;i at Bucknell University, Pa 

He h? s resided for thirty-three years in Mount Holly. 
He is extensively engaged in farming, and has always 
taken a great pride in agricultural pursuits. Aside from 
this, he gratifies his tastes and occupies much of his time 
with educational and other institutions. He has for a 
number of years acted as President of the Burlington 
County Agriciiltural Society; Mount Holly, Lumberton 
and Medford Railroad; Vice-President, Trustee and Cu- 
rator of the Burlington County Lyceum of History and 
Natural Sciences; Secretary of the Burlington County 
Board of Agriculture; Secretary of the New Jersey Horti- 
cultural Society; also a member of other State, county, 
historical, literary and agricultural organizations. He is 
thoroughly imbued with the idea that agriculture should 
rank higher than any other profession or industry; is an 
earnest advocate of road improvement or any measure 
that will advance the producing interests. Mr. Budd was, 
on the 21 St of May. 1895, appointed by Governor Werts 
to his present position, to fill a vacancy caused by the 
death of Edward Burrough, and in 1896 he was appointed 
by Governor Griggs for a full term of three years His 
term will expire March 26th, 1899, and his salary is $1,500 
a year. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



1899. 

State Board of Taxation.— Henry J. West, June 1st ; 
Joseph Thompson, ad interim. 

Superintendent of Public Instruction. — Charles J. Bax- 
ter. March 26th. 

Road Commissioner. — Henry I. Budd, March 26th. 

State Board of Education. — Bond V. Thomas, George 
A. Frey, Silas R. Morse, T. Frank Appleby, Stephen C. 
Larison, Joseph P. Cooper, James M. Seymour, Evan 
Steadman, Benjamin H Campbell, James Owen ; all May 
25th ; George W. Howell, ad interim. 

Board of Managers New Jersey State Hospitals —At Mor- 
ris Plains, John C. Eisele, George Richards, Romeo F. 
Chabert, James M. Buckley. Patrick Farrelly ; all May 
25th ; at Trenton, G. D. W. Vroom, May 25th, John Tay- 
lor. May 25th. 

Riparian Commissioners. — Willard C Fisk, Miles Ross, 
John' I. Holt, William Cloke ; all May 17th 

Inspectors of State Prison — Markham E. Staples, Wil- 
liam H. Brown, William H. Carter, Edward H. Holcombe, 
Samuel F Stanger, Wells Lawrence ; all May 25th. 

Trustees State Reform School for Boys. — Frank S. Gas- 
kill, Walter J. Knight ; both May 25th. 

Fish and Game Commissioners — George Pfeiffer, Jr., 
Parker W. Page, H. O. Frothingham, May 17th ; William 
A Halsey, ad interim. 

Harbor Master.— Elizabeth, John P Arnold, March 31st. 

Board of Visitors to the State Agricultural College. — 
Sixteen members ; all March 29th. 

County Judges. — Burlington, Joseph H. Gaskell ; Cum- 
berland, James R. Hoagland ; both April 1st 

Prosecutor of the Pleas.— Cumberland, William A. 
Logue, April 20 ; Essex, Elvin W. Crane, May 17th. 

Two Harbor Masters, Hudson county. 

State Board Medical Examiners.— E. L. B. Godfrey, 
Charles A. Groves, Davis P. Borden ; all July 4th. 

Board of Managers of Village for Epileptics.— James 
M.. Buckley, S. Olin Garrison, John W. Ward, John H. 
Ewing, Thomas J. Smith, William S. Combs; all ad interim. 

(323) 



324 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Board of Managers of New Jersey Home for Disabled 
Soldiers, Sailors and Their Wives.— Gilbert D. Bogert, 
Jarvis Wanser, George B. Fielder, Amos R. Dease^ 
Ernest C. Stahl ; all ad interim. 

GOVERNOR AI.ONE. 

state Board of Health,— John A. Githens, December 
30th. 

State Board of Dentistry.— Charles A. Meeker, first Tues- 
day in October. 

State Board of Pharmacy.— William T. Brown, April 
21st ; Frederick C. Barlow, holding over. 

Police Justice City of Orange. — Michael Davis, May 1st. 

Inspectors of Steamboats. — Charles Edwards, June lst» 
two vacancies. 

1900. 

Justice Supreme Court.— Job H. Lippincott, January 
18th. 

Circuit Court Judges. — Francis Child and Richard T. 
Miller, March 11th. 

Supervisor of State Prison.— E. J. Anderson, June 11th. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. — William 
Bettle, April 1st. 

Commissioners of Pilotage. — Henry W. Miller, John 
R. DeWar, Henry C. Gulick, Mark Townsend, Daniel C. 
Chase, John C. Weaver ; all May 25th. 

State Board of Assessors. —Robert S. Green, March 2d ; 
Stephen J. Meeker, March 10th. 

Trustees of the State Industrial School for Girls. — 
George C Maddock, Edward H. Stokes, Aaron Carter, 
Patrick J. Fitzgibbon ; all May 25th. 

State Reform School for Boys — Nathaniel S. Rue, 
Horace L. Dunham ; both May 25th. 

Managers of the New Jersey Home for Feeble-Minded 
Women. — Benjamin F. Lee, Zebina K. Pangborn, Barton 
F. Thorn ; all May 17th. 

County Judges.— Mercer, Robert S. Woodruff, April 
1st ; Monmouth, J. Clarence Conover, April 1st ; Somer- 
set, John D. Bartine, April 4th ; Essex, J. Franklin Fort, 
April 1st. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas.— Bergen, Peter W. Stagg, 
March 18th ; Burlington, Eckard P. Budd, April 4th ; 
Camden, Wilson H. Jenkins, March 22d ; Salem, Jona- 
than W. Acton, April 22d ; Somerset, Nelson Y. Dungan, 
February 19th. 

State Board Medical Examiners.— Aaron K. Baldwin, 
George F. Wilbur, Edwin DeBaun ; July 5th. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 325 



GOVERNOR ALONE. 

State Board Health— Edward R. O'Reilly, August 3d. 

State Board of Dentistry— Edward M. Beesley, first 
Tuesday in October. 

State Board of Pharmacy— George R. Davis, April 21st. 

Police Justice, West Orange — Edmund Condict, Jan- 
uary 29th. 

1901. 

Chancellor— A. T. McGill, May 1st. 

Justice of the Supreme Court — David A. Depue, No- 
vember 15th. 

Clerk in Chancery— lyC wis A. Thompson, March 30th. 

State Board of Education— Samuel St. John Mc- 
Cutcheon, Francis Scott, James L. Hays, Otto Crouse; 
all April 1st. 

, State Board of Assessors— Bird W. Spencer, May 4th; 
Amos Gibbs, January 26th. 

State Board of Taxation— Charles C. Black, Carl Lentz; 
both April 1st. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops— John C. Ward, 
March 26th. 

Trustees of the State Industrial School for Girls— 
Lewis Parker, E. Rezeau Cook; both April 20th. 

Trustees of State Reform School for Boys— Gervas Ely, 
James M. Parsons; both May 25th. 

State Board of Arbitration— James Martin, John W. 
Dent, James O. Smith, William M. Doughty, Jacob Van 
Hook; all March 25th. 

County Judges— Cape May, Harry S. Douglass; Hunter- 
don, H. Burdett Herr, April 1st; Middlesex, Woodbridge 
Strong, April 1st; Salem, Clement H. Sinnickson, April 
1st; Sussex, Henry Huston, April 1st. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas.— Gloucester, Lewis Starr, Jan- 
uary 28th ; Hunterdon, Walter F. Hayhurst, April 6th ; 
Middlesex, John S. Voorhees, February 17th ; Passaic, 
Eugene Emley, April 1st; Warren, George A. Angle, 
April 1st. 

State Board of Medical Examiners. — Armin Uebelacker, 
William P. Watson, William L. Newell ; all July 4th. 

District Court Judges — Camden, C V. D Joline, April 
1st; Elizabeth, Edward S. Atwater. April 1st; Jersey 
City, Joseph D. Bedle, February 19th ; Newark, Freder- 
ick F. Guild, April 1st; Thomas N. McCarter, Jr., April 
1st ; Paterson William I. Lewis, April 1st ; Trenton, John 
Rellstab, April I st ; Orange, Charles B. Storrs, March 26th. 



326 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



GOVERNOR AI^ONE. 

Deputy Factory Inspectors — Lewis H. Barrett, William 
H. Dod, George W. Taylor ; all July 19th ; John Hunter, 
Joseph Milburn, both August 6th ; William B. Tucker, 
October 1 7th. 

State Board of Health.— Laban Dennis, May 2d. 

State Board of Pharmacy. — Henry A. Jordan, April 
21st. 

State Board of Dentistry. — G. Carleton Brown, first 
Tuesday in October. 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 



President.— William McKinley, of Ohio. Salary, 
$50,000. 

Vice President. — Garret A. Hobart, of New Jersey. 
Salary, $10,000. 

Secretary of State. — John Hay, of the District of Co- 
lumbia. 

Secretary of the Treasury. —Lyman J. Gage, of Illinois. 

Secretary of War. — Russell A. Alger, of Michigan. 

Secretary of the Navy. — John D. Long, of Massachu- 
setts 

Secretary of* the Interior. — Ethan Allen Hitchcock, of 
Missouri. 

Postmaster-General. — Charles Emory Smith, of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Attorney-General. — John W. Griggs, of New Jersey. 

Secretary' of Agriculture. — James Wilson, of Iowa. 

The salary of each Cabinet officer is $8,000. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.— Melville W. Ful- 
ler, of Illinois. Salary, 5)10,50' I. 

Associate Justices.- John M. Harlan, of Kentucky; 
Horace Gray, of Massachusetts ; David J. Brewer, of Kan- 
sas ; Henry B. Brown, of Michigan ; George Shiras. Jr., 
of 'Pennsylvania ; Edward Douglass White, of Louisiana ; 
Rufus W. Peckham, of New York ; Joseph McKenna, of 
California. 

Salary of each Associate Justice, $10,000. 

United States Army. — Major-Generals, Nelson A. Miles, 
Wesley Merritt and J. R. Brooks. Pay, $7,500 each. 
Brigadier-Generals, E. S. Otis, Guy V. Henry, W. R. 
Shatter, J. F. Wade, H C. Merriam and T. M. Anderson. 
Pay, $5,500 each. All of these officers receive an allow- 
ance for "quarters, fuel and forage." 

United States Navy.— Rear Admirals, George Dewey, 
Fred. V. McNair, John A Howell, William T. Sampson. 
Winfield S. Schley, Henry L Howison, Albert Kantz, 
Pay, $6,000. The ten Commodores on the active list re- 
ceive $5,000 each ; the Captains, $4,500 each ; the Com- 
manders, $3,500 each. 



(327) 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 



The United States Disbict Court was oraanized at New 
Brunswick, on Tuesday, December 22d, 1789. 



DISTRICT JUDGES. 



David Brearley 1789 

Robert Morris 1790 

William S. Pennington 1817 

William Rossell 1826 

Mahlon Dickerson 1840 



Philemon Dickerson 1841 

Richard S. Field 1865 

John T. Nixon 1870 

Edward T. Green 1889- 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 1896 



CLERKS. 



Jonathan Dayton 1789 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 1790 

Robert Boggs 1791 

William Pennington. 1817 

Joseph C. Potts 1840 

Edward N. Dickerson 1844 

Philemon Dickerson, Jr.. 1853 



Andrew Dutcher 1862 

Ralph H. Shreve 1865 

E. Mercer Shreve ,...186» 

Robert C. Belville 1871 

William S. Belville 1875 

Linsly Rowe 188^ 

George T. Cranmer 1895 



MARSHALS. 



Thomas Lowry 1789 

John Heard 18(i2 

Oliver Barnett 1802 

Oliver W. Ogden 1808 

Robert S Kennedy 1849 

George H Nelden 1853 

Benijph Deacon .1866 

W. Budd Deacon 1868 



Samuel PlummeK. 186» 

Robert L. Hutchinson 1877 

W. Budd Deacon 1882 

A. E. Gordon. 1886 

W. Budd Dearon 1889' 

George Pfeiffer 189S 

Thomas J. Alcott 1897 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 



Richard St'ickton 

Abraham Ogden 

Lucms H Stockton., 
George C. Maxwell.. 

Joseph Mcllvaine 

Lucius Q C Elmer.. 
Garret D Wall 



, 1789 

1792 

1798 

1802 

1804 

1824 

1828 

James S. Green 1837 

William Halsted 1849 



Garritt S. Cannon 1855 

Anthony Q. Keasbey 1861 

Job H. Lippincott 1886 

Samuel F. Bigelow 1887 

George S. Duryee 1888 

Henry S. White 1890 

John W. Beekman 1894 

J. Kearny Rice 189& 



U. S. OFFICIALS, 1898. 



Circuit Justice George Shiras, Jr. 

-^. .^ T J f Marcus W. Acheson. 

Circuit Judges { ^^^^^^ ^^ ^^,,^3 

District Judge Andrew Kirkpatrick. 

District; Attorney J. Kearny Rice. 

Assistant District Attorney VVarren Dixon. 

Marshal Thomas J. Alcott. 

Clerk of District Court George T. Cranmer. 

Deputy Clerk of District Court Frank R. Brandt. 

Clerk of Circuit Court S Duncan Oliphant. 

Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court Henry D. Oliphant. 

Po>tmaster at Trenton Alexander C. Yard. 

Internal Revenue Collector — First District.. Isaac Moffatt. 

Second District H. C. H. Herold. 

(328) 



STATE OFFICIALS. 



Governor -Foster M. Voorhees, 1902. 

Private Secretary— 

Secretary of State— George Wurts, 1902. 

Assistant Secretary of State— Alexander H. Rickey^ 
1902. 

Treasurer — George B. Swain, 1900. 

Comptroller— William S. Hancock, 1900. 

Attorney-General— Samuel H. Grey, 1902. 

Adjutant-General— William S. Stryker. 

Assistant Adjutant-General— Henry P. Perrine. 

Quartermaster-General— Richard A. Donnelly. 

Inspector-General — Joseph W. Congdon, 

Judge Advocate-General — Edward P. Meany. 

Major-General -Joseph W. Plume. 

Chancellor— Alexander T McGill, 1901. 

f Henry C. Pitney, 1903. 
I John R. Emery, 1902. 

Vice Chancellors- ^ Alfred Reed, 1902. 

. Frederic W. Stevens. 1903. 
[Martin P. Grey, 1903. 

Vice Ordinary and Vice Surrogate-General— Alfred 
Reed 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court - William J. Magie, 
1904 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court — Bennet Van 
Syckel, 1904 ; David A. Depue, 1901 : Jonathan Dixon, 
1903 ; Charles G. Garrison, 1902 ; Job H. Lippincott, 1900; 
William S. Gummere, 1902; George C, Ludlow, 1902; 
Gilbert Collins. 1904. 

Court of Errors and Appeals— The Chancellor, the 
Justices of the Supreme Court, and Lay Judges John W. 
Bogert, 1903 ; Gottfried Krueger, 190;-5 ; James H. Nixon, 

1902 ; Charles E. Hendrickson, 1902 ; Frederic Adams, 

1903 ; William H. Vredenburgh, 1904. Clerk, Secretary 
of State. 

Court of Pardons -Governor, Chancellor and Lay 
Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. Clerk, Sec- 
retary of State. 

Circuit Court Judges- Francis Child and Richard T. 
Miller. 1900 ; Henry M. Nevius. 1903 

District Court Judges.— Camden, C. V. D. Joline ; Eliza- 
beth, Edward S. Atwater ; Jersey City, Joseph D. Bedle,. 

(329j 



330 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Charles W. Parker ; Newark, Frederick F. Guild, Thomas 
N McCarter, Jr.; Paterson, William I. Lewis ; Trenton, 
John Rellstab ; Orange. Charles B. Storrs ; Passaic, 
William W, Watson. All in 1901, excepting Judges 
Parker in 1903 and Watson in 1902. Hoboken, Abel I. 
Smith ; Atlantic City. Robert H. IngersoU, both in 1903- 

Clerk of Supreme Court— William Riker, Jr., 1902. 

Clerk in Chancery— Lewis A. Thompson, 1901. 

Chancery Reporter — S. Meredith Dickinson, 1900. 

Law Reporter— Garret D. W. Vroom, 1903. 

State Librarian— Morris R. Hamilton, 18^9. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction — Charles J. 
Baxter, 1899. 

Keeper of State Prison— Samuel S. Moore, 1902. 

Supervisor of the State Prison— Edward J.Anderson, 
1900. 

Commissioner of Public Roads — Henry I. Budd, 1899. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance— William Bet- 
lie, 19('0; Deputy, Thomas K. Johnston. 

Supervisor of the School Census— Lloyd Wilbur, 1899. 

State Geologist -John C. Smock. 

Chief of Bureau of Labor Statistics —William Stainsby, 
1903; Secretary, James T. Morgan. 

Custodian of the State House and Public Grounds — 
John H. Bonnell; Assistant Custodian, Thomas R. Wat- 
son. 

State Board of Education— Bond V. Thomas, Millville, 
1899 ; George A. Frey, Camden, 1899 ; James B. Wood- 
ward, Bordentown, 1903 ; Silas R. Morse, Atlantic City, 
1899 ; Samuel St. John McCutcheon, Plainfield, 1901 ; T. 
Frank Appleby, Asbury Park 1»99 ; Stephen C. Larison, 
Hackettstown, ls99 ; George W. Howell, Morristown, ad 
interim ; Francis Scott, Paterson, 1901 ; Joseph P. Cooper, 
Rutherford, 1899 ; James M. Seymour, Newark, 1899 ; 
James L Hays, Newark, 1901 ; Otto Crouse, Jersey City, 
1901 ; Evan Steadman, Hoboken, 1899 ; Benjamin H. 
Campbell. Elizabeth, 1899 ; James Owen, Montclair, 1899. 
President, James L. Hays ; Vice-President, Samuel St. 
John McCutcheon ; Secretary, Charles J. Baxter ; Treas- 
urer, J. Bingham Woodward. 

Principal State Normal and Model Schools — James M. 
Green. Ph. D. Steward, John S. Neary. 

Principal New Jerse}'^ School for Deaf-Mutes —Weston 
Jenkins, A. M. Steward, Thomas F. Hearnon 

Trustees of the School Fund— Governor, Secretary of 
State, President of the Senate, Speaker of the Assembly, 
Attorney-General, State Comptroller and State Treasurer. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 331 

Boards of Managers of New Jersey State Hospitals — At 
Morris Plains- George Richards, President, Dover, 1899 
Romeo F. Chabert, Hoboken, 1899 ; James M. Buckley 
Morristown, 1899 ; Patrick Farrelly, Morristown, 1899 
John C. Eisele, Newark. 1899 ; David St. John, Hacken 
sack, 1902 ; James W. Smith, Paterson. 190J ; John A 
McBride, Deckertown, 1902. Secretary, Charles H Green 
At Trenton - Garret D. W. Vroom, President, Trenton 
1899; John Taylor, Trenton, 1899; Joseph Rice, Trenton 
19113; N. Newlin Stokes, Moorestown, 1^02; Cornelius S 
Hoffman, Somerville. 1902; Benajah W. Andrews, Wood 
"bury, 1902; Henry R. Baldwin, New Brunswick, 1902 
Joseph Thompson, 1903. Secretary, Gouverneur V 
Packer.' 

Officers of the State Hospitals At Morris Plains— 
Medical Director. Britton D. Kvans, M D. ; Treasurer, 
Guido C. Hinchman ; Warden, Moses K. Everitt At 
Trenton — Medical Director, John W. Ward, M. D. ; 
Treasurer, Harvey H. Johnson; Warden, William P. 
Hayes. 

Commissioners of State Library— Governor, Chancellor, 
Chief Justice, Secretary of State, Treasurer and Comp- 
troller. 

Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund — Gov- 
ernor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, Attorney-General 
and Comptroller. 

Riparian Commissioners — The Governor, President; 
Willard C. Fisk, Vice-President, Jersey City, 1899; Miles 
Ross, New Brunswick, 1899; John I Holt. Paterson. 1899; 
William Cloke, Trenton, 1899. Engineer, R. C. Bacot, 
Jersey City; Secretary and Assistant Engineer, J. C 
Payne, Jersey City ; Counsel, George Iv. Record, Jersey 
City. 

Commissioners of Pilotage — Henry W. Miller, Morris- 
town ; John R Dewar, Jersey City ; Henry C. Gulick, 
Barnegat ; Mark Townsend, Pleasantville ; Daniel C. 
Chase, South Amboy ; John C. Weaver, Haleyville ; all 
in 1900. 

State Board of Health— Laban. Dennis, 1901, Newark ; 
Edward R. O'Reilly, 1900, Elizabeth ; Cyrus T. Brackett, 
President. 1902, Princeton; Henry B Rue. 1904, Hoboken; 
John A Githens, 1899, Asbury Park ; Henry Mitchell, 
1905, Asbury Park; Franklin Gaunt, 1903, Burlington. 
The Secretary of State, the Attoney-General and the 
State Geologist are members ex officio. Secretary, Henry 
Mitchell, Asbury Park. 

State Board of Assessors— Bird W. Spencer, President, 
Passaic, 1901 ; Robert S. Green, Elizabeth, 1900 ; Stephen 



332 STA TE OFFICIALS. 

J. Meeker, Newark, 1900 ; Amos Gibbs, Mount Holly ^ 
1901. Secretary, Irvine E. Maguire. 

State Board of Taxation— Charles C. Black, 1901, Jersey 
sey City ; Henry J West, President, 1899, Camden ; Carl 
Lentz, 1901, Newark; Joseph Thompson, Atlantic City, 
ad interim. Secretary. Thomas B. Usher. 

State Board of Agriculture — President, D. D. Denise, 
Freehold; Vice-President, E. B. Voorhees, New Bruns- 
wick ; Treasurer. Willim R. Lippincott, Fellowship. 
Secretary, Franklin Dye, Trenton. 

State Director of the Weather Service— Edward W. 
McGann, New Brunswick. 

Inspectors of Steamboats— Charles Edwards, Lake Ho- 
patcong, 1899. Two vacancies. 

State Dairy Commissioner— George W, McGuire,^ 
Trenton. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops -John C. Ward, 
1901. Deputies Lewis H. Barrett, Pleasantville ; Wil- 
liam D. Dod, Hoboken ; George W. Taylor, Newark ; 
John Hunter, Paterson ; Joseph Milburn, Trenton ; Wil- 
liam B. Tucker, Elizabeth ; all in 1901. 

Inspectors of State Prison— Markham E. Staples, Jer- 
sey City; William H. Brown, Newark ; William H. Car- 
ter, Bordentown ; Edward H. Holcombe. Lambertville ; 
Samuel F. Stanger, Harrisonville ; Wells Lawrence, Mend- 
ham ; all in 1899. 

Trustees of State Industrial School for Girls — George C. 
Maddock, President, 1900, Trenton ; Edward H. Stokes, 
1900, Trenton ; Aaron Carter, 1900, Newark ; Lewis Par- 
ker, 1901, Trenton ; E. Rezeau Cook, 1901, Trenton ; Pat- 
rick J Fitzgibbon. 1900, Trenton. 

Trustees of Reform School for Boys— James M. Parsons, 
New Brunswick, 1901 ; Nathaniel S. Rue, Cream Ridge, 
1900; Horace L. Dunham. Dover, 1900; Gervas Ely, Laui- 
bertville. 1901; Frank S. Gaskill, New Egypt, 1899; 
Walter J. Knight, Newark, 1899. Superintendent, Ira 
Otterson 

State Board of Medical Examiners—Armin Uebelacker, 
Morristown; William P. Watson, Jersey Citv, and William 
L. Newell, Millville, 1901. E. L. B. Godfrey, Camden; 
Charles A. Groves, Newark, and Davis P. Borden, Pater- 
son, 1899 ; Aaron K. Baldwin, Newark ; George F. Wil- 
bur, Asbury Park, and Edwin De Baun, Passaic, 1900. 

State Board of Dentistry— Edward M. Beesley, Belvi- 
dere. 1900; George Emory Adams, South Orange, 1902; 
Frederick C. Barlow, Jersey City, holding over; G Carle- 
ton Brown, Elizabeth, 1900; Charles A. Meeker, Newark^ 
1899. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 333 

State Board of Pharmacy— George H. White, Jersey 
City, 1903; William T. Brown, Madison, 1899; George R. 
Davis, Orange, 1900; Henry A. Jorden, Bridgeton, 1901; 
George W. Parisen, Perth Amboy, 1902. 

State Board of Arbitration- -James Martin, Secretary, 
Newark; John W. Dent, Bound Brook; James O. Smith, 
Camden; William M. Donghty, Millville; Jacob Van 
Hook, Lodi ; all in 1901. 

New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers - Managers, 
Colonel Edward H. Wright, Newark ; Amzi Dodd New- 
ark ; Marcus L. Ward, Newark ; James E Fleming, 
Newark ; General E. Burd Grubb, Edgewater Park ; Gen- 
eral Richard A. Donnelly, Trenton. Officers— Superin- 
tendent, Major Peter F. Rogers ; Surgeon, Dr. Archibald 
Mercer ; Adjutant. Bishop W. Mains ; Chaplain, Rev. 
John D. Ferguson ; Matron, Mrs. Peter F. Rogers. 

State Director of Joint Companies— W. Campbell Clark, 
Newark (yearly). 

Fish and Game Commissioners- George Pfeiffer, Jr., 
Camden ; Parker W. Page, Summit ; H. P. Frothingham, 
Mount Arlington, all in 1899; William A. Halsey, New- 
ark, ad ill te rim. 

Fish and Game Protector— Charles A. Shriner, Pater- 
son 

Fish Wardens —Thomas J. Torton, Pennsgrove ; Char- 
les P. Sebring, Bound Brook ; George W. Phifer, Manu- 
muskin ; Charles Ayres. Metuchen ; Henry Schneider, 
Atlantic City ; William G. Wise, Burlington City ; How- 
ard P. Mathis, New Gretna ; George Ricardo, Hacken- 
sack ; William Guthridge, Camden ; James Hunt, Camden; 
Henry R. Dare, Bridgeton ; Gus Hilton, Anglesea ; 
George Riley, Newark ; A. W. Muller, Almouesson ; 
John Kerr, Harrison ; George W. Dunham. Flemington ; 
Frank L. Schafer, Mt. Arlington ; James Huston, Jr , 
Trenton ; Richard A. Wood, West Creek ; Jacob B Hen- 
dershott, Newton ; William Newell, Salem ; John H. 
Pheasant, Summit ; Edward Hill, Rocksburgh. 

Board of Visitors to the State Agricultural College - 
First District, Elwood Evans, T. F. D. Baker; Second 
District, Samuel B. Ketcham, John E. Darnell; Third 
District, David D. Denise, James Neilson : Fourth Dis- 
trict, George Fritts, Elias N. Millen; Fifth District, 
George H. Blakely, Samuel R. Demarest Jr.; Sixth Dis- 
trict, Iv. H. Muller, Charles L. Jones; Seventh District, 
Abraham W. Duryee, Rynear J. Wortendyke; Eighth 
District, George E. De Camp, George W. Doty. All in 
1899. Secretary, Irving S. Upson. 



334 STATE OFFICIALS. 

New Jersey State Agricultural Experiment Station No, 
1 — Board of Managers : Governor Voorhees, Professors 
Austin Scott and Edward B. Voorhees, together with the 
members of the State Board of Visitors to the Agricultural 
College. Director, Professor Voorhees; Chief Clerk and 
Treasurer, Irving S Upson. 

Station No. 2— Board of Control : The Trustees of Rut- 
gers College. Director, Professor Voorhees. 

Board of INIanagers of the State Institution for Feeble- 
Minded Women— Benjamin F. Lee, President, Trenton, 
1900; Charles H. Anderson, Vineland, 1904; Mrs. Emily 
H. Williamson, Elizabeth, 1904; Mrs. Annie C. Gile, 
Orange, 1902; Mrs. Caroline B. Alexander, Hoboken, 
1902; Barton F. Thorn. Treasurer, Burlington, andZebina 
K. Pangborn. Jersey City, 1900. 

New Jersey Training School for Feeble-Minded Chil- 
dren, Vineland— Directors : Governor Foster M Voor- 
hees, ex officio ; John M. Moore, Clayton, 1899; William 
H. Nicholson, Haddonfield, 1899; Thomas J Smith, M. D., 
Bridgeton, 1899; Hon. George T. Cranmer, Trenton, 1900; 

B. D. Maxham. Vineland, 1900; Rev. H H. Beadle, Bridge- 
ton, 1900 ; Daniel Thackara, Woodbury, 1900 ; Benjamin 

C. Reeve. Camden, 1901 ; W. Graham Tyler, Philadel- 
phia, 1901 ; Charles Keighley, Vineland, 1901 ; Hon. P. P. 
Baker, Vineland, 1902; Hon. E. C Stokes, Millville. 
1902; Howard Carrow, Esq , Camden, 1902. Officers of 
the Board -Hon. Philip P. Baker, President ; William H. 
Nicholson, Vice President ; George Davidson, Treasurer ; 
S. Olin Garrison, Secretary aud Principal. Board of Lady 
Visitors — Mrs. Charles Keighley, Vice-President, Vine 
land, 1899; Mrs. Fanny A. Sheppard. Greenwich. 1899; 
Miss Susan N, Warrington, Treasurer, Moorestown, 1899; 
Miss Kate A. Mott, Bordentown, 1899; Miss Caroline 
Hunt Secretarv, Woodstown, 1900; Mrs. Josiah Bacon, 
Oaklyn, 1900; Miss Rachel E. Allinson, Yardville. 1900; 
Mrs Charles M. Allen, Beverly, 1900; Miss Lucy C. Kel- 
logg, Englewood, 1900; Miss Rebecca H. Thompson, 
Salem, 1901 ; Miss Julia Frame, Bridgeton, 1901 ; Mrs 
Thomas J. Craven, President, Salem, lyoi ; Mrs. Edw. P. 
Shields. Bridgeton, 1901. 

The New Jersey State Village for Epileptics -Board of 
Managers : Rev. James M. Buckley, Morristown, Presi- 
dent ; Professor S. Olin Garrison, Vineland Secretary ; 
Thomas J. Smith, M. D., Bridgeton, Treasurer; John H. 
Ewing, M. D., Flemington ; John W. Ward, M. D., Tren- 
ton ; W^illiam S. Combs, M D., Freehold. 

Geological Survey— Board of Managers : Governor 
Voorhees, President ex officio. First District, Edward C. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 335- 

Stokes, Millville ; Clement H. Sinnickson, Salem. Sec- 
ond District, Enimor Roberts, Moorestown ; Washington 
A. Roebling, Trenton. Third District, M. D. Valentine, 
Woodbridge ; Henry S. Little, Matawan. Fourth Dis- 
trict, George Richards, Dover ; Frederick A. Canfield, 
Dover, Fifth District, William Frank Hall, Pompton 
Lakes ; George W. Wheeler, Hackensack. Sixth Dis- 
trict, Thomas T. Kinney, Newark ; Frederic W. Stevens, 
Newark. Seventh District. Samuel B. Dod, Hoboken ; 
Lebbeus B. Ward, Jersey City Eighth District, Wendel 
P. Garrison, Orange ; (vacancy). 

Commissioners of the State Museum— The State Geol- 
ogist, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the 
President of the State Board of Agriculture, President of 
the Senate and Speaker of the Assembly. Curator S. R. 
Morse, Atlantic City. 

County Superintendents of Public Instruction— Atlan- 
tic, Sarnuel D. Hoffman, Atlantic City ; Bergen, John 
Terhune, Hackensack ; Burlington, Herman A. Stees, 
Beverly ; Camden, Charles S. Albertson, Magnolia ; Cape 
May, Aaron W. Hand, Cape May ; Cumberland, John N. 
Glaspell, Bridgeton ; Essex, Elmer C. Sherman, South 
Orange ; Gloucester, William H. Eldridge, Williams- 
town ; Hudson, Edward A. Murphy, New Durham ; Hun- 
terdon. Jason 3, Hoffman, Flemington ; Mercer, A. W. 
Hartwell, Hopewell ; Middlesex, H Brewster Willis, New 
Brunswick ; Monmouth John Enright Freehold ; Morris, 
Martin Luther Cox, Dover ; Ocean, F A. North, Lake- 
wood ; Passaic, Homer A. Wilcox, Passaic City ; Salem, 
Thomas G. Dunn, Salem ; Somerset, Rev, J A Mets, 
Somerville ; Sussex, Luther Hill, Andover ; Union. Wil- 
liam J. Shearer, Elizabeth ; Warren, Franklin T. Atwood, 
Oxford. 

City Superintendents of Public Instruction — Atlantic 
City, Dr. W. M. Pollard; Bayonne, Charles M. Davis; 
Bridgeton, John S. Turner; Camden, Martin V. Bergen; 
Egg Harbor City, Herman Deitz; Elizabeth, William J. 
Shearer; Gloucester City, J. C Stinson; Hoboken, A, J. 
Demarest; Jersey City Henry Snyder; Millville, E. Dun- 
can Yocum , Morristown, W. L- R. Haven; Newark, Dr. 
C. B. Gilbert; New Brunswick, George G Ryan; Orange, 
William M. Swingle; Passaic, Frank E Spaulding; Pater- 
son. A. B. Poland; Perth Amboy, Samuel E. Shull; Phil- 
lipsburg, H, Budd Howell; Plainfield, H, M, Maxson; 
Rah way, W. O Robinson; Salem, Morris H. Stratton; 
Trenton, Leslie C. Pier.son. 

State Reformatory Commission — Patrick Farrelly, 
George S. Mott, David M. Chambers, President; John 



336 STATE OFFICIALS. 

G. Ferguson, Benjamin A. Vail, Thomas M. Gopsill, 
Secretary. 

Board of Managers of New Jersey Home for Disabled 
Soldiers and Their Wives— Gilbert D Bogert, Jarvis Wan- 
ser, George B. Fielder, Amos R. Dease, Ernest C. Stahl. 
All ad inter iyn. 

United States Senators -James Smith, Jr , 1899; William 
J. Sewell, 1901. 

Representatives in Fifty-sixth Congress— First District, 
Henry C. Loudenslager; Second District, John J. Gard- 
ner; Third District, Benjamin F Howell; Fourth Dis- 
trict, Joshua S. Salmon; Fifth District, James F. Stewart; 
Sixth District, Richard Wayne Parker; Seventh District, 
William D. Daly; Eighth District, Charles N. Fowler. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 337 

TERMS OF OFFICE AND SALARIES OF 

STATE OFFICERS, AND MEMBERS 

AND OFFICERS OF THE 

LEGISLATURE. 

Governor, three years, $10,000. Private Secretary, 
three years, $2,000. 

Secretary of State, five years, |i6,000. Assistant, five 
years, $3,000. 

State Treasurer, three years, |6,000. 

State Comptroller, three years, ;p6,000. 

Attorney-General, five years, $7,000. 

Adjutant-General, $1,200. 

Quartermaster-General, $1,200. 

Chancellor, seven years, $10,000. 

Vice Chancellors, seven years, $9,000. 

Clerk in Chancery, five years, $6,000. 

Chief Justice Supreme Court, seven years, $10,000. 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, seven years, 
19,000. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court, five years, $6,000. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, six years, 
per diem, $8, and mileage. 

Circuit Court Judges, seven years, $7,500. 

District Court Judges, five years, $2,500 and $3,000. 

Chancery Reporter, $500. . Law Reporter, $500. 

State Librarian, five years, $2,000. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, three years, 
$3,000. 

Superintendent of the School Census, two years, $1,500. 

Keeper of the State Prison, five years, $3,500. 

Inspectors of the State Prison, five years, $500. 

Supervisor of the State Prison, three years, $3,000. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, three years, 
$4,000 ; Deputy, $2,500. 

Custodian of the State House, at pleasure of the Gov- 
ernor, State Treasurer and State Comptroller, $2,000 ; 
Assistant, $1,200. 

Riparian Commissioners, five years, $1,500. 

State Board of Assessors, four years, $2,500 ; Secretary, 
$2,500. 

State Board of Taxation, five years, $2,500 ; Secretary, 
$2,000. 

Chief of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, five years, 
$2,500 ; Secretary, $1,200. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops, five years, $2,500; 
Assistants three years, $1,000 

State Board of Arbitration, three years, $1,200. 
22 



338 STATE OFFICIALS. 

State Dairy Commissioner. $2,000. 

Curator State Museum, $1,500. 

State Commissioner of Public Roads, three years, $1,500. 

Commissioners of Pilotage, three years, fees. 

State Board of Education, five years, no salary. 

State Board of Health, seven years, no salary ; Secre- 
tary, $2 500. 

Board of Managers of State Hospitals, five years, no 
salary; Secretary, $1,000; Treasurers, each $500. 

State Hospital officials, appointed by Board of Mana- 
gers, salaries— Medical Directors, each $3,500 ; First As- 
sistants, each $1,500 ; Second Assistant, Morristown, 
$1,400, Trenton, $1,200 ; Third Assistants, each $1,000 ; 
Fourth Assistant, Morristown, $1,000 ; Wardens, each 
$2,500. 

Fish and Game Commissioners, five years, no salary ; 
Fish and Game Protector, $1,200 and expenses, $300 ; 
Fish Wardens, each $600 and expenses, $200 

Trustees State Reform School for Boys, three years, no 
salary. 

Trustees State Industrial School for Girls, three years, 
no salary. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College, two 
years, no salary. 

State Board of Medical Examiners, three years, no 
salary. 

State Board of Pharmacy three years, no salary. 

State Board of Dentistry, five years, no salary. 

Inspectors of Steamboats, three years, no salary. 

State Senators, three years, and members of the Assem- 
bly one year, salary $50*^0. 

Senate Officers President, $666.66 ; President's Private 
Secretary, $600 ; Secretary, $1,500; Assistant Secretary, 
$1,100; Engrossing Clerk, $1,200; Assistant Engrossing 
Clerk-, $6(i0; Journal Clerk, $1,000 ; Assistant Journal 
Clerk, $500 : Sergeant at-i\rms, $700 ; Assistant Sergeant- 
at-Arms, $500 ; Calendar Clerk, $500 ; Bill Clerks, $500 
five Door and Gallery Keepers, each $350 ; four Pages 
each $200 ; Clerk to Committee on Engrossed Bills, $500 
House of Assembly Officeis— Speaker, $666.66; Speak 
er's Private Secretary, $600 ; Assistant Secretary, $400 
Clerk, $1,500 ; Assistant Clerk, $1,200 ; Engrossing Clerk 
$1,30<» ; two Assistant Engrossing Clerks, each $600 
Journal Clerk, $1,000; Assistant Journal Clerk, $500 
Sergeant-at- Arms, S700 ; two Assistant Sergeants-at-Arms, 
each $500 ; twelve Gallery and Doorkeepers, each $350 ; ten 
Pages, each $.00 ; Document Clerk. $400 ; Clerk to Com- 
mittee on Engrossed Bills, 8500 ; Bill Clerk and Assist- 
ant, $500 each ; four Clerks to Committees, each $300. 



MILITARY. 



Roster of Oflacers of the National Guard. 

Com^nander-in-Chief— Governor Foster M. Voorliees. 

5/^«^— Adjutant-General, Brevet Major-General William 
S. Stryker ; Quartermaster- General, Brigadier General 
Richard A. Donnelly ; Surgeon-General, Brigadier-Gen- 
eral, John D, McGill ; Inspector-General, Brigadier-Gen- 
eral Joseph W. Congdon ; Inspector-General of Rifle 
Practice, Brigadier-General Bird W. Spencer ; Judge 
Advocate-General, Brigadier-General Edward P. Meany. 

DepaHmeJit Staff— Kssistsint Adjutant-General, Colonel 
Henry P. Perrine ; Deputy Adjutant-General Lieuten- 
ant Colonel James S. Kiger; Deputy Quartermaster- 
Generals, Colonel Cyrus F. lyoutrel, Colonel William H. 
Earley, Colonel George G. Felton, Colonel George P. Ol- 
cott; Paymaster, Captain Samuel S. Armstrong; Military 
Storekeeper, Captain Charles F. Snowden; Assistant Sur- 
geon-General, Colonel Edmund L. B Godfrey; Medical 
Inspector. Lieutenant- Colonel Mortimer Lampson; Hos- 
pital and Ambulance Corps Officers, Captain Roy Inglis, 
First Lieutenant Charles Buttner; Assistant Inspector- 
Generals of Rifle Practice, Colonel William F. Decker, 
Colonel Charles A. Reid. 

Division— M9i]or-G&nera.\ Joseph W. Plume, command- 
ing. 

Staff — Assistant Adjutant-General Colonel Marvin 
Dodd; Inspector, Colonel Alexander C. Oliphant; Sur- 
geon, Colonel George W. Terriberry; Quartermaster, 
Lieutenant-Colonel William Strange; Paymaster, Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel William S. Righter; Judge Advocate, 
Lieutenant-Colonel John A. Miller; Chief of Artillery, 
Colonel A, Judson Clark; Aides-de-Camp, Major James 
W. Howard, Major Charles A. Gilford, Major J. S. Henry 
Clark. 

First ^r?j^«^^— Brigadier-General P. Farmer Wanser, 
commanding. 

5/«^— Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel 
John A. Parker ; Inspector, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles 
Boltwood ; Surgeon, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles F. W. 
Myers ; Quartermaster, Major Thomas F. Bedle ; Pay- 

(339^ 



340 MILITARY. 

master, Major Allan B. Wallace ; Judge- Advocate, Major 
Robert I. Hopper ; Engineer, Major S. Wood McClave ; 
Aides-de-Camp, Captain Hobart Tuttle, Captain Theodore 
E Beck. 

Second Brigade — Brevet Major-General William J. 
Sewell, commanding. 

Staff — Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Thomas S. Chambers ; Inspector, Brevet Colonel Daniel 
B. Murphy ; Surgeon, Lieutenant - Colonel Franklin 
Gauntt ; Quartermaster, Major William M. Palmer ; Pay- 
master, Major Kenneth J Duncan ; Judge-Advocate, 
Major E. Ambler Armstrong ; Engineer, Major Hamilton 
Markley ; Aides-de-Camp, Captain William H. Skirm, 
Jr., Captain William Joyce Sewell, Jr. 

First Regiment Infantry , Headquarters, Newark— Col- 
onel, Edward A. Campbell ; Adjutant, Captain James L. 
Marsh, 

Second Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Paterson — 
Colonel, Edwin W. Hine ; Adjutant, Captain John T. 
Hilton. 

Third Regiment Infantry ^ Headquarters, Elizabeth — 
Colonel, Benjamin A. Lee ; Adjutant, Captain Louis J. 
McVicker. 

Fourth Regiment Infafitry, Headquarters, Jersey City — 
Colonel, Robert G. Smith ; Adjutant, Captain Benjamin 
M. Gerardin. 

Sixth Regiment Iffantry, Headquarters, Camden — 
Colonel, William H Cooper; Adjutant, Captain Christo- 
pher S. Magrath. 

Seventh Regiment l7ifa?itry. Headquarters, Trenton — 
Colonel, Charles Y. Bamford; Adjutant, Captain Charles 
H. W. Van Sciver. 

Catling Gun Compafiy A, Newark— Captain, William 
L. Fish. 

Catling Cjin Co^npany B, Camden— Captain, Claude S. 
Fries. 

Fifst Troop, Newark— Captain, Frederick Freling- 
iuysen. 

Second Troop, Red Bank— Captain, Edwin Field. 



Hoster of Oflacers of the Naval Reserve. 

Battalion of the East, Headquarters, U. S. S. "Ports- 
mouth," Hoboken, N. J.— Commander, Washington Ir 



MILITARY. 341 

ving; Lieutenant-Commander, Robert H. McLean; Adju- 
tant, Lieutenant (Jr Grade) Farnham Yardley; Paymas- 
ter, Lieutenant (Jr. Grade) Arthur H. Colby. 

Battalion of the West, Headquarters, U. S. S. "Hunt- 
ress." Camden, N. J.— Commander, ; Lieu- 
tenant-Commander, Harry R. Cohen; Adjutant Lieu- 
tenant (Jr. Grade) Willis De Unger; Paymaster, Lieuten- 
ant (Jr. Grade) William H. Fulper. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



County Officers, with the Date of the Expira- 
tion OF Their Term of Office, Time 
of H01.DING Courts, &c. 



Atlantic County. 
County Seat — Mays Landing. Population, 1,359. 

^ Sheriff - Samuel Kirby, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners— Charles Cunningham, 1900; Elisha S. Inger- 
soll, 1899; Lemuel Wooten, 1901. 

County Clerk— Lewis P. Scott, 1900. 

Surrogate John S. Risley, 1902. 

County Collector — L. C. Albertson, Atlantic City. 

Circuit Judge— George C. Ludlow, 1902. 

County Judge— Allan B. Endicott, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Joseph E. P. Abbott, 1903. 

County Board of Elections— Henry S. Scull (1900), John 
T. French (18991, Dems.; James D. Sou h wick (1900), 
Joseph Hammill (1899). Reps. 

Terms of Court —April, September and December — sec- 
ond Tuesday. 

Bergen County. 

County Seat— Hackensack. Population, 7,282. 

Sheriff— Jacob L. Van Buskirk, Dem., 1901. 

Coroners —William H. Tracy, William L. Vroom, both 
1901 ; Cornelius Collins, 1899.' 

County Clerk— John R. Ramsey, 1900. 

Surrogate -Dayid A. Pell, 190i. 

County Collector— James H. Coe, Englewood. 

Circuit Judge— Jonathan Dixon, 1904. 

County Judge— Dayid D. Zabriskie 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Peter W. Stagg, 1900. 

County Board of Elections— William Ely (1899), James 
Young (1900), Dems.; Jacob Rohrbach (1900), Fred W. 
Schaaf (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court— April, first Tuesday ; September, sec- 
ond Tuesday ; and December, second Tuesday. 

(342) 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 343 

Burlington County. 
County Seat— Mount Holly. Population, 5,750. 

Sheriff Joseph S. Fleetwood, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners -Augustus B. Grohler, Frank G. Stroud, 1899; 
William M Wells, 1901. 

County Clerk— William H. Warrick, 1903. 

Surrogate— Elwood H. Kirkbride, 1901. 

Auditor —Joseph S. Gibson. 

County Collector— Joseph Powell, Mount Holly. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G. Garrison, 1902. 

County Judge -Joseph H. Gaskill. 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas Eckard P. Budd, 1900. 

County Board of Elections Howard Mathis (1899), 
Samuel W. Semple ( l«00), Dems.; Nathan Haines (1900), 
John R. Howell ( 1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday, January; second 
Tuesday, May and October. 

Camden County. 
County Seat— Camden. Population, 63,467. 

Sheriff —David Baird, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners— Sylvan G. Buskey, 1901; Frank O. Stern, Ed- 
gar H. Landis, 1899. 

County Clerk— Robert L. Barber, 1901. 

Register of Deeds— Jacob Sickler, 1900. 

surrogate— George S. West, 1V^02. 

County Collector— Mahlon F. Ivins, Camden. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G Garrison, 1902. 

County Judge — Edward Ambler Armstrong, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas -Wilson H. Jenkins, 1900 ; 
Assistant. William H Carson. 

Port Warden -William C. Scudder. 

County Board of Elections— John W. Beaston (1900), 
Joseph W Devinny (1899), Dems. ; John Cherry (1899), 
Henry L. Bonsall (19001, Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday, April ; second Tues- 
day, September and December. 

Cape May County. 
County Seat— Cape May Court House. Population, 

Sheriff -John W. Reeves, Rep., 1901. 
Coroners— John S. Douglass, Wilson A. Lake, Daniel 
C. Eldridge ; all 1899. 



344 COUNTY DIRECTORY.- 

County Clerk— Edward L. Rice, 1901. 

Surrogate— E Clinton Hewitt, 190i. 

County Collector — Edmund L. Ross, Cape May Court 
House 

Circuit Judge— George C. Ludlow, 1902. 

County Judge — Harry S. Douglass. 1901. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas -Eugene C. Cole, 1903. 

County Board of Elections -William J. Tyler (1899), 
William Lake (1900), Dems ; William T. Bate (1900), 
Joseph K. Hand (1899), Reps 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday in April, September 
and December. 

Curaberland County. 
County Seat— Bridgeton. Population, 13,292. 

Sheriff- Reuben Cheeseman, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners— W^aldo F. Sawyer, 1900; Leslie L. Hand, 
1901 ; Paul J. Davis, 1899. 

County Clerk— William B. Treuchard, 1899. 

Surrogate— Frank C. Bray, 1903. 

County Collector — William O. Garrison, Bridgeton. 

Circuit Judge— George C. Ludlow, 1902. 

County Judge— James R^Hoagland, 1899. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — William A Logue, 1899. 

County Board of Elections — John Ogden (1900), George 
W. Eckhart (1899), Dems.; Morris Davis (1899), Harry 
O. Newcomb (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

Essex County. 
County Seat— Newark. Population, 215,806. 

Sheriff— Henry M. Doremus, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners - Charles E Terrill, Albert J HoUe, Benjamin 
M. Skinner; all 1899. 

County Clerk -W^illiam O Kuebler, 1902. 

Surrogate— Edward W\ Jackson, 1899. 

County Collector— Henry L. Keepers, Newark. 

Register of Deeds-Alfred F. Skinner, 1902. 

Circuit Judge— David A. Depue, 1901. 

County Judge- John Franklin Fort, 1900. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas- Elvin W Crane, 1899. 

Assistant Prosecutor — Louis Hood, 1899. 

County Board of Elections— Leonard Kalisch (1900), 
Edwin A. Ray nor (1899), Dems ; Augustus F. Eggers 
(1899), Samuel C. Martin (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tues- 
day in September and second Tuesday in December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORS . 345- 

Grloucester County. 
County Seat— Woodbury. Population, 3,853. 

Sheriff— William Collins, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners— James Hunter, Jr., 1900 ; Samuel S. Ledden, 
1901 ; Thomas J. Gaskill, 1899 

County Clerk— Frank B. Ridgway, 1902. 

Surrogate -Millard F. Du Bois, 1904. 

County Collector Augustus S. Barber, Jr., Woodbury. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G. Garrison, 1902. 

County Judge— John S Jessup, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas -Lewis Starr, 1901. 

County Board of Elections— Austin H. Swackhamer 
(1900\ Charles Wolforth 1899). Dems. ; George E. Pierson 
(1900), William H. Hoffman (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in February and fourth 
Tuesday in May and October. 

Hudson County. 
County Seat— Jersey City. Population, 182,713. 

Sheriff— William Heller, Dem., 1899. 

Coroners— William Delaney, Charles Hoffman, 1900 ; 
Cornelius Greenleaf , 1899. 

County Clerk —John G Fisher, 1900. 

Surrogate - James T. Lillis, 1901. 

County Collector— Hugh Dugan, Jersey City. 

Register of Deeds— George B. Fielder, 1900. 

Circuit Judge— Job H. Lippincott, 1900. 

County Judge— John A. Blair, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas -James S. Irwin, 1903. 

Assistant Prosecutor - Marshal Van Winkle. 

Port Warden— John J. Toffey. 

Harbor Masters — Vacancies. 

County Board of Elections - Michael J. Coyle (1900),. 
Augustus A. Rich (1899j, Dems.; Joseph J. Guisto (1900), 
Thomas M. Coughlin (1899\ Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tues- 
day in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Hunterdon County. 

County Seat— Flemington. Population, 2,060. 

Sheriff— John Ramsey Dem., 1899. 
Coroners— Frederick L. Johnson, Patrick F. McNa- 
mara, 1900; Alfred B. Nash, 1899. 

County Clerk— William S. Closson, 1903. 



•346 CO UN TV DIRECTOR Y. 

Surrogate— Obadiah H. Sproul, 1899. 

County Collector — E. Humphrey, Glen Gardner. 

Circuit Judge— William S. Gummere, 19U2. 

County Judge -H Burdett Herr, i901. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Walter F. Hayhurst, 1901. 

County Board of Elections — Joseph L,. Chamberlain 
(1900), George M. Pidcock ( 1899), Dems.; John H. Nunn 
(1900), William F. Holcombe (1899\ Reps. 

Terms of Court— Second Tuesday in April, second 
Tuesday in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Mercer County. 
County Seat— Trenton. Population. 62,518. 

Sheriff— Harry A. Ashmore. Rep, 1899. 

Coroners— William Glenn, William M. Disbrow, Charles 
H.Walker; all 1899. 

County Clerk - Barker Gummere, Jr , 1903. 

Surrogate— John W. Cornell, 1899. 

County Collector -Thomas H. Thropp, Trenton. 

Circuit Judge -William S. Gummere, 1902. 

County Judge -Robert S. Woodruff, 1900. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— William J. Crossley, 1903. 

County Board of Elections— Walter S. Grover (1899), 
John D'Arcy (1900), Dems.; William A. MacCrellish 
(1900), Bertrand L. Gulick (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in January, second 
Tuesday in May and second Tuesday in October. 

Middlesex County. 
County Seat -New Brunswick. Population, 19,910. 

Sheriff -George J. Litterst, Dem., 1899. 

Coroners— Thomas F. Burke, 1900; Charles R. Moke, 
Edward E Haines, 1899. 

County Clerk- John H. Conger, 1899. 

Surrogate— Leonard Furman, 1902. 

County Collector — David Serviss, New Brunswick. 

Circuit Judge-Gilbert Collins, 1903. 

County Judge— Woodbridge Strong, 1901. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— John S. Voorhees, 1901. 

County Board of Elections— Hendrick H. Brown (1900), 
St. George Kempson (1899N Dems. ; John E. Elmendorf 
(1899), John L. Suydam (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tues- 
<lay in September and second Tuesday in December. 



CO UN TV DIRECTOR V. 347 

Monmouth County. 
County Seat— Freehold. Population, 3,157. 

Sheriff -Houston Fields. Dem , 1 899. 

Coroners — William T. Hopper, Henry Herbert, Theo- 
dore M Anderson, 1899. 

County Clerk— Joseph McDermott, ad interim. 

Surrogate— David S Crater, 1903. 

County Collector— Asher T. Applegate, Freehold. 

Circuit Judge— Gilbert Collins, 1903. 

County Judge— J Clarence Conover, 1900. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas - Wilbur A. Heisley, 1902. 

County Board of Elections -John P. Walker (1900), 
Morgan D. h. Magee (1899), Dems. ; John C. Patterson 
(1900), George A. Fountain U899) Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day of 
January, first Tuesday in May and October. 

Morris County. 
County Seat— Morristown. Population, 10,290. 

Sheriff -Edgar h. Burling. Rep., 1899. 

Coroners — George W. Wilkinson, Cornelius B. Gage, 
Charles V. D. Romondt, 1899. 

County Clerk -Daniel S. Voorhees, 1903. 

Surrogate— David Young, 1903. 

County Collector— Joseph F. McLean, Butler. 

Circuit Judge— William J Magie, 1904. 

Countv Judge -John B. Vreeland, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Alfred Elmer Mills, 1903. 

County Board of Elections -John V. Wise (1900), Oscar 
Lindsley (1899), Dems.; William O. Freeman (1899), 
Charles F. Axtell (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in January, first Tues- 
day in May and second Tuesday in October. 

Ocean County. 
County Seat— Toms River. Population, about 1,300. 

Sheriff— Howard Jeffrey. Rep , 1899. 
Coroners— Moses E. Johnson, 1901; Alfred Palmer, 
George H Nunemaker, 1^99. 

County Clerk— Abram C. B. Havens, 1903. 

Surrogate —Joseph Grover, 1902. 

County Collector— George h. Shinn, New Egypt. 



348 COUNTY DIRECTOR Y. 

Circuit Judge— Bennet Van Syckel, 1904. 

County Judge— Albert C. Martin, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Theodore J. R. Brown, 1902. 

County Board of Elections-John Beatty (1899), Rem 
L. Disbrow (1900), Dems. ; George H. Holman (1899), 
Charles H Wardwell (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court- Second Tuesday in April, first Tues- 
day in September and second Tuesday in December. 



Passaic County. 
County Seat — Paterson. Population, 97,344. 

Sheriff— Peter H. Hopper, Dem., 1900. 

Coroners— Abraham Vermeulen, Charles W. Booth, 
1899 ; Herbert S. Emerson, 1901. 

County Clerk— Albert D Winfield, 1901. 

vSurrogate- Chailes M King, 1900. 

County Collector— P. Henry Shields, Paterson. 

Circuit Judge— Jonathan Dixon, 1904. 

County Judge—John S. Barkalow, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Eugene Emley, 1901. 

Assistant Prosecutor of the Pleas— Ralph W. Shaw. 

County Board of Elections— John W. De Mott (1900), 
Frank T. Forbes (1899), Dems ; Alfred G. Booth (1900), 
George W. Pollitt (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday after the first day of 
January, fourth Tuesday in April and September. 

Salem County. 
County Seat— Salem. Population, 6,337. 

Sheriff -Benjamin B. Westcott, Rep., 1899. 

Coroners— William N. Carpenter, John G. Campbell, 
Thomas J. Torton ; all in 1899. 

County Clerk -S. Luther Richmond, 1899. 

Surrogate— Loren P. Plummer, 1902. 

County Collector — Richman Coles, Woodstown. 

Circuit Judge— George C Ludlow, 1902. 

County Judge— Clement H. Sinnickson, 1901. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas Jonathan W. Acton, 1900. 

County Board of Elections— Charles C. Ford, Jr. (1900), 
Millard F. Riley (1899), Dems.; Edward R. Davis (1899 j, 
Henry Coombs (1900), Reps 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 



CO UN TV DIRECTOR Y. 349 

Somerset County. 
County Seat— Somerville. Population, 4,514. 

Sheriff -Selah Schoonmaker, Dem., 1901. 

Coroners— Benjamin K. Hoppock, 1899; Louis T. Reed, 
Henry DeMatt, 1^01. 

County Clerk -Frank W. Somers, 1900. 

Surrogate— Henry N. Spencer, 1908. 

County Collector — E. B Allen, Somerville. 

Circuit Judge— William J. Magie, 1904. 

County Judge— John D. Bartine, 1900. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Nelson Y. Dungan, 1900. 

County Board of Elections -Jacob Shurts (1899), John 
H. Mattison (1900), Dems.; C. H. Bateman (1900), George 
W. Cooper (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in April, fourth Tues- 
<iay in September and fourth Tuesday in December. 

Sussex County. 
County Seat —Newton. Population, 3,426. 

Sheriff— Joseph C. Andress, Dem., 1899. 

Coroners— Lewis C. Burd, 1900; Sidney B. Straley, 
1899. 

County Clerk— Ora C. Simpson, 1902. 

Surrogate— Jacob M. Demarest, 1903. 

County Collector— Theodore Morford, Newton. 

Circuit Judge —William J. Magie. 1904. 

County Judge— Henry Huston, 1901. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— John L. Swayze, 1903. 

County Board of Elections-Emmett H. Bell (1899), 
Peter B. Swarts (1900 , Dems.; William H. Dalrymple 
(1899). Charles Fredenburg (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court -First Tuesday -in April, second Tues- 
day in September and second Tuesday in December. 

Union County. 
County Seat— Elizabeth. Population, 43,834. 

Sheriff —William T. Kirk. Rep., 1899. 
Coroners— Charles W. MacConnell, 1900; Robert R. 
Sinclair, 1899; John M. Randolph, 1901. 
County Clerk— William Howa'rd, 1899. 
Surrogate -George T. Parrot, 1902. 
County Collector— E M. Wood, Elizabeth. 
Circuit Judge — Bennet Van Syckel, 1904. 



350 CO UN TV DIRECTOR Y. 

County Judge — Benjamin A. Vail, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Nicholas C. J. English, 1903. 

Harbor Master, Elizabeth and Elizabeth Creek— John 
P. Arnold. 

County Board of Elections— Patrick J. Ryan (1899), 
John Iv. Crowell (1900), Dems.; Edward C. Woodruff 
(1899), John W Murray, Jr (1900), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

Warren County. 

County Seat — Belvidere. Population, 1,834. 

Sheriff— Elias J. Mackey, Dem., 1899. 

Coroners— Jesse Smith, 1900; Michael Kenny, Joseph 
Hilbert, 1899. 

County Clerk— Charles E. Harris, 1900. 

Surrogate- -George L. Shillinger, 1899. 

County Collector — Louis Merrell, Vienna. 

Circuit Judge— William S Gummere, 1902. 

County Judge, George M. Shipman, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas — George A Angle, 1901. 

County Board of Elections— J. William Miller (1900), 
Henry U. Vliet (1899), Dems ; A. Blair Kelsey (1900), 
William R. Laire (1899), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday in April, fourth Tues- 
day in September, and the first Tuesday after the fourth 
Tuesday in December. 



TIME OF HOLDING COURTS. 

The Court of Chancery meets on the first Tuesday in 
February, the third Tuesday in May and the third Tues- 
day in October. 

The Supreme Court meets on the third Tuesday in Feb- 
ruary, the first Tuesday in June and the first Tuesday in 
November. 

The Court of Errors and Appeals meets on the first 
Tuesday in March, the third Tuesday in June and the 
third Tuesday in November. 

The Court of Pardons meets on the second Tuesday in 
March, the third Tuesday in June and the third Tuesday 
in November. 

The Prerogative Court meets on the first Tuesday in 
February, the third Tuesday in May and the third Tues- 
day in October. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 351 

The U. S. Circuit Court meets on the fourth Tuesday in 
March and the Fourth Tuesday in September. 

The U. S. District Court meets on the third Tuesday in 
January, April, June and September. 

United States Court of Appeals meets first Tuesday in 
March, third Tuesday in September. 

The Circuits of New Jersey are divided as follows : 

1st District— Cape May, Cumberland, Salem and At- 
lantic. Justice Ludlow. 

2d District — Gloucester, Camden and Burlington. Jus- 
tice Garrison. 

3d District— Mercer, Hunterdon and Warren. Justice 
Gummere 

4th District — Middlesex and Monmouth. Justice Col- 
lins. 

5th District - Somerset, Morris and Sussex. Chief Jus- 
tice Magie 

6th District— Bergen and Passaic. Justice Dixon. 

7th District— Essex, Justice Depue. 

8th District— Hudson. Justice Lippincott. 

9th District— Union and Ocean. Justice Van Syckel. 

For the time of holding county courts, see County 
Directory. 



REPORTS OF STATE DEPART- 
MENTS AND INSTITUTIONS. 



STATE TREASURER'S REPORT. 

The annual report of State Treasurer Swain, for the 
fiscal year ending October 31st, 1898, makes the follow- 
ing exhibit : 

STATE FUND. 

Receipts. 

Assessment on Private Acts $75 00 

Clerk in Chancery 46,264 41 

Clerk of the Supreme C jurt 43,903 43 

Collateral Inheritance Tax 112,93i: 39 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance 51,200 93 

Commissions 1,460 00 

Discharged Convicts 80 65 

Dividends 18,870 00 

Geological Survey 395 00 

Insurance 39 37 

Judicial Fees 28,146 81 

Loans to School Fund (repayment of loan) 170,000 00 

Tax from Miscellaneous Corporations $329,941 78 

Tax from Paterson Savings Institution..... 1,000 00 

830,941 78 

Tax from Railroad Corporations (for use of the 

State) $909,211 54 

Tax from Railroad Corporations ^for use of the 

Taxing Districts) 199,133 61 

1,108,345 15 

Secretary of State 163,544 47 

Sinking Fund Account 57,000 00 

State Board of Health 315 77 

State Dairy Commissioner 1,400 00 

State House Commission. 485 86 

State Prison Receipts 86,769 34 

State Board of Assessors 5 20 

State Prison Building Commission 688 82 

World Columbian Exposition 891 28 

$2,723,755 66 

Less amount transferred to Taxing Districts Account.. 199,133 61 



Disbursements. 

Adjutant-General's Department 

Advertising 

Agricultural College Fund, " Interest" 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Attorney-General's Department 

Assembly Committee of Inquiry 

Blind and Feeble-Minded 

Board of Fish and Game Commissioners 



$2,524,622 05 

$8,387 90 

2,500 00 

2,400 00 

15,000 00 

13,774 38 

3,505 83 

76,940 11 

26,500 00 



(352) 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



353 



Board of Pilot Commissioners 

Board of Visitors to Agricultural College of New Jersey..., 

Bureau of Statistics 

Collateral Inherit nee Tax 

County Lunatic Asylums 

Court of Chancery 

Court of Errors and Appeals , 

Court of Pardons 

Commissions 

Camden Armory ,. 

Deaf-Mutes , 

Department of Banking and Insurance 

Di. charged Convicts .. 

Digest of the Law and Chancery Reports 

Escheats 

Executive Department 

Emergency 

Factories and Workshops 

Farnum Preparatory School 

Free School Libraries 

Fish and Game , 

Geological Survey 

Home for Di-abled Soldiers 

Home for Disabled Soldiers, "Special " 

Industrial Education 

Industrial School for Girls 

Insurance 

Law and Equity Reports 

Legislature.. 

Loans to School Fund. 

Manual Training and IndustMal School at Bordentown 

Monmouth Battle Monument 

National Guard 

Naval Reserve 

Newark Armory 

Obstructions to Navigation 

Office of Clerk in Chancery 

Office of I Jerk of the Supreme Court 

Office of the Comptroller 

Office of the Secretary of State 

Office of the Treasurer 

Oyster Commission 

Oyster Commission (Clams) 

Pensions 

Preservation of Records 

Printing 

Public Roads 

Quartermaster General's Department 

Reform School for Boys 

Refunded Taxes on Exempted Miscellaneous Corporations. 

Riparian Commission 

School Census 

School Fund Expenses 

Sinking Fund Account 

Sinking Fund Account, " Legal Expenses " 

Soldiers' State Pay , 

State Board of Agriculture 

State Board of Arbitration 

State Board of Assessors _ 

State Board of Education 

State Board of Health 

State Board of Taxation 

State Charities Aid Association 



$1,200 00 


140 00 


7,932 45 


9,995 74 


158,626 43 


73,225 09 


7,022 GO 


2.450 00 


2,675 59 


6,000 00 


45,600 00 


12,688 94 


2,000 00 


3,750 00 


274 17 


14,9118 31 


1,669 35 


10.091 70 


3,700 00 


4,880 00 


100 08 


27,287 81 


20,000 00 


7,997 85 


40,535 83 


21,000 00 


3,330 00 


10,01)4 16 


82,517 48 


170,000 GO 


4,000 00 


387 61 


169,325 36 


14,922 77 


50,(100 00 


134 21 


31,000 00 


23,613 62 


■ 13,609 81 


25,825 34 


12.746 18 


8,<i90 30 


1,953 23 


3,700 00 


3,825 00 


36,450 86 


102,839 18 


9,159 21 


61,902 10 


252 25 


11,469 08 


1,500 00 


3.256 20 


27,640 00 


890 91 


60 06 


6,500 00 


6,214 85 


21,612 75 


5,995 77 


15,104 90 


12,K9l 24 


600 00 



23 



354 STA TE DEPAR TMENTS. 

State Dairy Commissioner $11,970 62 

State Hospitals 162,074 54 

State Hospital at Morris Plains (Improvements) 49,973 71 

State House Commission 47,866 46 

State H use Commission, "Special" 500 00 

State House Commission, " Special Appropriation" 14,723 00 

Slate Library 6,862 52 

State Museum 1,693 55 

State Normal School 65,240 77 

State Prison Maintenance 89,990 69 

State Prison Furniture and Repairs 9,797 74 

State Prison Salaries 93,956 06 

State Reformatory 5,000 00 

Supreme Court 105,879 66 

Superintendent of Public Instruction 10,943 94 

Teachers' Institutes 2,099 60 

Teachers' Libraries...,, 600 00 

Trenton Battle Monument 300 00 

Tuberculosis 7,386 64 

War Debt 190,000 00 

Washington Association of New Jeasey 2,5' 00 

Weather Service 1,000 00 

Allotment of Taxes on Railroad and Canal Property to the 

Taxing Districts 199,133 61 

82,667,577 10 

Less amouct transferred to Taxing Districts 199,133 61 

$2,468,443 49 

Receipts over Disbursements 56,178 56 

§2,524,622 05 
EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS 

The following extraordinary disbursements are included 
in the above statement : 

Newark Armory $50,000 00 

Improvement*; State Hospital, Morris Plains 49,973 71 

Heating and Ventilating Normal School 21,300 19 

Repairs to Executive Department and Assembly Chamber... 14,723 00 

New Build ng at Home for Disabled Soldiers.. 7,997 85 

State Reformatory 5,<JO0 00 

Hospital at Deaf-Mute School 4.495 95 

Digest of Law and Chancery Reports 3,750 00 

Assembly Committee of Inquiry 3,5'i5 83 

Special Commissions 2,640 84 

Repairs to Farnum Preparatory School 2,500 00 

Emergency 1,669 35 

Office of Clerk of the Supreme Court 23,613 62 

$191,170 34 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1897 $945,345 89 

Balance on hand November 1st, 1898 ,. 1,001,524 45 

State Fund Securities 1,027,487 11 

SCHOOL FUND. 

Receipts. 

State School Tax for the year 1897 $2,194,845 Oft 

Interest on bonds other than School District 

bonds and those secured by mortgages $72,373 45 

Rents on Riparian Leases 47,285 43 



STA TE DEPAR TMENTS. 355 

Interest on bonds secured by mortgages $29,240 48 

Interest on School District bonds 20,046 51 

Dividends 14,540 00 

Real Estate 883 31 

Licenses 875 00 

$185,244 18 

Loans to School Fund (from State Fund) 170,000 00 

§355,244 18 

Securities paid off- 
Stocks and Bonds $229,075 00 

School District Bonds 28,270 00 

Bonds and Mortgages 27,750 00 

Riparian Leases 21,500 75 

Real Estate 21,500 00 

$328,095 75 

Loss on Sale of Real Estate 2,500 00 

330,595 75 

Grants 13,409 30 

Balance in Bank, November 1st, 1897 54.644 99 

$2,948,739 22 
Disbursements. 

State School Tax for the Year 1897.. $2,194,815 00 

Loans of School Fund $290,500 00 

Premium on Bonds 352 50 

Interest Advanced on Loans 435 83 

291,288 33 

Loss on Sale of Real Estate 2,500 00 

Free Public Schools $200,000 00 

Loans to School Fund (Repayment to State 

Fund) 170.000 00 

370,000 OO 

Balance in Bank, October 31st, 1898 90,105 89 

$2,948,739 22 
To:al Amount of School Fund Securities $3,585,054 26 



STATE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

For the Assessment and Taxation of Railroad 
AND Other Corporate Property. 

Bird W. Spencer, President ; Robert S. Green, Stephen 
J. Meeker, Amos Gibbs. Irvine K. Maguire, Secretary ; 
George William Barnard, Assistant Secretary. 

This department of the State Government was created 
under an act of the Legislature entitled *' An act for the 
taxation of railroad and canal property," approved April 
10th, 1884 

The work of the Board was increased during the same 
year by the passage of another act, entitled " An act to 



356 STA TE DEPAR TMENTS. 

provide for the imposition of State taxes upon certain 
corporations, and for the collection thereof," approved 
April 18th. 1884. 

The report of the Board for the year 1898 shows that 
115 railroad and canal companies within the State are 
subject to taxation. These companies represent about 
2,300 miles of railroads and 173 miles of canals. 

The following table is a summary of the valuation and 
assessment of railroad and canal property for the year 
1898, subject to review by the Board, which review is now 
in progress. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS, 



357 



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358 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



MISCEI,I,ANEOUS CORPORATIONS. 

Under the provisions of the act of April 18t^, 1884, and 
its supplements, the Board has assessed, for the year 
1898, a State franchise tax against 5,190 corporations, 
amounting to $1,201,469.14 tax. 

The following table shows the comparison with pre- 
vious years of the number of corporations assessed under 
this act, and the amount of tax levied: 





J 


, 


U 1 


^ 


^ 




















^ rt 












S ■" 


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^ 


p 


W84 


619 


$195 27 .'i 51 








1885 


797 


235,769 40 
244,035 81 


178 


$40,495 89 
8,266 41 




1886 


917 


120 




1887 


1,132 


287,702 13 


215 


43,666 32 





1888 


1,457 
1,698 
*> 103 


360,197 59 
438,893 42 
574 048 16 


825 


7\495 46 




1889 .... 


241 


78,695 83 




1890 


405 


135,154 74 




1891 


'> 377 


6-^9 659 62 


274 


55,611 46 
158,827 24 
184,930 33 




1892 


3,149 
3 889 


788,486 86 


772 




1893 


973,417 19 
1,077,066 39 
1,092,744 59 
1,060,056 52 
1,075,278 52 
1,201,469 14 


740 




1894 


4,283 
4,450 
4,593 
4,377 
5,190 


394 


103,649 20 
15,678 20 




1895 .. 


167 




1896 


143 




$32,688 07 


1897 


184 


15 222 00 


1898 ."..".. 


413 


126,190 62 





STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

The State Board of Health was created by the Legisla- 
ture in 1877, and the annual reports show the work which 
has been accomplished during the past twenty years. 
Professor C. F. Brackett, M.D., LL.D., is President of 
the Board, and Henry Mitchell, M.D., is Secretary. The 
Secretary of State, the Attorney-General and the State 
Geologist are members ex officio. The other members 
are John A. Githens, Esq., Asbury Park ; Edward R. 
O'Reilly, M.D., Elizabeth; Laban Dennis, M.D., New- 
ark ; Franklin Gauntt, M.D., Burlington ; Henry Mitchell, 
M D., Asbury Park ; Henry B Rue, M.D., Hoboken. 

In addition to the duties assigned to the Board by the 
act under which it is constituted, it has charge of the 
execution of the laws for the prevention of the spread of 
contagious diseases of animals, for regulating the sale of 
petroleum, for preventing the sale of contaminated milk, 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 359 

for regulating maritime quarantine, for conducting the 
State laboratory of hygiene and for preventing the sale of 
diseased meat and other unwholesome foods. 

Besides its special work the Board is constantly con- 
sulted by local health authorities concerning methods for 
restricting the spread of preventable diseases, the abate- 
ment of nuisances, the prevention of the pollution of 
streams and for the improvement of sanitary administra- 
tion. 

As a Bureau of Vital Statistics the Board receives and 
records all marriages, births and deaths which occur in 
the State, and tabulates these records for use in proving 
descent ; in the relations of guardians and wards ; in the 
disabilities of minors ; in the administration of estates ; 
the settlement of insurance and pensions ; 'he require- 
ments of foreign countries concerning residence, mar- 
riages and legacies ; for proving marriages in our own 
couatry ; in voting and in the jury and militia service ; 
in the right to admission and practice in the professions 
and in public office ; in the enforcement of the laws relat- 
ing to education and to child labor ; the determination of 
the ' age of consent," &c 

The following table shows the number of marriages, 
births, still-births and deaths registered each year since 
the establishment of the Bureau of Vital Statistics, with 
all supplements included, and also the number of re- 
corded marriages which occurred among non-residents : 

Non- 
Still- Resident 
Year. Marriages. Births. Deaths. Births. Marriages. 

1878 542 1,845 1,501 

lajS 7,188 23,205 20,575 1,306 

1880 8,100 24,292 19,125 1,475 

1881 8,336 24,268 21,039 1,492 

1882 9,094 23,812 26,082 1,409' 

1883 9,911 25,667 23,445 1,511 

1884 9,329 26,539 21,821 1,400 

1885 9,348 25,189 23,966 1,782 

1886 12,838 27,382 22,923 1.494 2,-572 

1887 15,639 28,016 24,556 1,580 4,332 

1888 16,574 29,084 27,479 1,739 4,475 

1889 15,962 30,407 26,778 1,8.'.9 4,072 

1890 15,954 31,770 28,773 1,819 4,187 

1891 15,847 30,023 29,179 1,809 3.411 

1892 16,572 32,726 33.016 1,848 3,767 

1893 17,627 34,639 30,929 1,892 4,073 

1894 16,690 35,108 30,355 2,022 3,881 

1895 16,537 33,198 30,901 1,933 3,282 

1896 18.774 33,006 31,315 2,033 4,132 

1897 18,171 31,.595 29,822 2.031 4,090 

1898 13,213 32,515 27,3.37 2,060 262 



272,246 534,286 530,917 34,491 46,536 

Grand total, 1,421,943. Yearly average, 67.711. 



360 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



State Bureau of Vital Statistics. 
Statement for the Year Ending June 3Gth, 1898. 

Counties. Marriages. Births. Deaths. 

Atlantic 341 818 595 

Bergen 374 1,223 910 

Burlington 323 795 762 

Camden 1,062 1,811 1,762 

Cape May 99 227 158 

Cumberland 351 897 59C, 

Essex 2,522 7,016 5,312 

Gloucester 206 535 404 

Hudson 2,788 7,912 6,789 

Hunterdon 235 491 43<i 

Mercer 734 1,051 1,451 

Middlesex 449 1.307 1,011 

Monmounth 597 1,031 958 

Morris 363 912 801 

Ocean 130 .336 261 

Passaic 1,241 2,901 2,347 

Salem 185 314 410 

Somerset 237 487 359- 

Sussex 156 222 249 

Union 555 1,725 1,324 

Warren, 265 504 453 



13,213 



32,515 



27.337 



Cities. Marriages. 

Atlantic City 210 

Bayonne , 233 

Bordentown 31 

Bridgeton 85 

Burlington 63 

Camden 824 

Dover 51 

Elizabeth 309 

Englewood 26 

Gloucester City 47 

Hackensack 72 

Harrison 68 

Hoboken 660 

Jersey City ;. 1,393 

Long Branch 88 

Millville 96 

Montclair 77 

Morristown 109 

Newark 1,979 

New Brunswick 138 

Orange 151 

Passaic City 306 

Paterson 849 

Perth Amboy 94 

Phillipsburg 83 

Plainfield 86 

Rahway 61 

Salem Citv , 74 

South Amboy 51 

Town of Union.. 162 

Trenton 583 

9,049 



Births. 


Death 1 


424 


363 


781 


5(19 


63 


95 


286 


189 


90 


133 


1,170 


1,186 


129 


7» 


1,067 


736 


69 


7i> 


108 


114 


114 


92. 


129 


249 


1,831 


1,090 


3,723 


3,727 


53 


134 


241 


133 


311 


160 


199 


201 


5,051 


3,932 


351 


3('5 


565 


480 


681 


413 


1,955 


1,728 


324 


226 


137 


162 


268 • 


2ia 


58 


121 


43 


125 


118 


83 


289 


203 


764 


1,013 



18,273 



STA TE DEPAR TMENTS. 36t 



STATE MUSEUM. 

The State Museum was established by act of the Legis- 
lature, approved March 20th, 1895. A Commission, con- 
sisting of the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the 
House of Assembly, the State Geologist, the Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction and the President of the 
State Board of Agriculture, was created, the members to 
serve without compensation This Commission appointed 
Professor Silas R. Morse, of Atlantic City, Curator of the 
Museum. 

The Museum had its origin in the collections made by 
the State for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chi- 
cago, in 1893, and the geological exhibits that were al- 
ready on exhibition in the State House. 

New exhibits are constantly being added, and all the 
available room on the third floor of the State House has 
been filled. The exhibits are designed to keep the gen- 
eral public in touch with the State's life, to illustrate its 
natural resources and capabilities, and constitutes an 
important part of its educational auxiliaries. 



STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

President, Hon. D. D. Denise, Freehold; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Professor E. B. Voorhees. New Brunswick; Treas- 
urer, William R. Lippincott, Fellowship; Secretary, 
Franklin Dye, Trenton; Executive Committee, H. F. 
Bodine, Locktown; Dr Joseph B Ward Lyons Farms; 
Walter Heritage. Mickleton; also the President, Vice- 
President, Secretary and Treasurer. 

There are nineteen County Boards now organized; also 
a State Horticultural Society and a State Poultry Asso- 
ciation. All these societies, except the last named, re- 
ceive financial aid from the State Board appropriation. 

The market value of lands now devoted to farming 
purposes varies in different parts of the State, running 
from $30 to |60, 180 and $100 per acre, being cheaper in 
New Jersey, considering all the advantages, than any 
other State in the Union. The number of farms in the 
State is 30,828, having an average size of 86 acres. Total 
acreage, 2,662,009, of which 75 per cent, is improved. 
(Census of 1889.) 

During the past year farm crops in the State were 
varied as to yield. The wheat yield per acre, average as 
made up from county reports, is 17.4 bushels ; rye, 16- 



362 STA TE DEPAR TMENTS. 

bushels; oats. 21 bushels ; buckwheat, 21 bushels ; hay, 
H tons ; white potatoes, 75 bushels ; sweets, 140 bushels. 
Apples and peaches were a short crop. 

Number and value of farm animals in the State in 1897: 
Horses, 79,980; value, $5,1:^7,961. Mules, 7,342; value, 
1592.786 Milch cows, 208,421 ; value, $^7,523,998 (Milch 
cows are much higher in price than they were last year 
and the total value would be greatly increased at this time) , 
Other cattle, 42,40d ; value, 51,066,254. Sheep, 41,067 ; 
value, $155,193. Swine, 150,368; value, $1,090,545. 
Total valuation, $15,566,737. Fruit, market garden and 
poultry products, if correct returns could be procured, 
would largely increase this amount The Annual Report 
of the Board comprises an edition of 5,000 copies, these 
are quickly demanded by farmers and others interested 
in such matters. 

The Board holds its annual meeting at the State Houge, 
convening the day immediately following the organiza- 
tion of the Legislature. The members of the I/Cgislature 
are cordially invited to attend its sessions. 



PUBLIC ROADS UNDER STATE AID LA^SV. 

There is no subject that is agitating the public mind to 
a greater extent than the improvement of the wagon ways 
of the United States. The greatest monuments of the 
State are the long lines of improved highways it is yearly 
instrumental in creating. There is no form of public 
expenditure that the people are so generally well satisfied 
with as the bounty the State is giving to the different 
counties to aid them in making hard and permanent high- 
ways. The zeal for hard roads is becoming each year 
more and more intense throughout the State. 

During the year of '98 the State Aid has been spread 
over about eighty-five miles of roads This is an exten- 
sion of the bounty over a larger area than any previous 
year. The construction in '95 was about forty-six miles ; 
in '96 about fifty miles ; in '97 about seventy miles, and in 
'98 about eighty-five miles. The ability to construct a 
greater number of miles each year arises from cheaper stone 
and a better understanding on the part of the State and 
counties of the principles of road-building. On account of 
the greater demand, larger plants for the crushing of stone 
are being placed on the trap ridges in different parts of 
the State These plants are being erected with the most 
improved devices, with immense crushing capacity and 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 363 

facilities for handling material at the miDimum cost ; 
therefore, the consequent competition for the sale of 
stone is bringing the price down to a small profit per ton, 
thus working in harmony with the prevalent commercial 
idea — immense sales at small profits These are some of 
the factors that are lessening the cost of hard roads. 
Then, too, observation and experience have demonstrated 
that the earth properly drained is as good a foundation as 
can be obtained for any road superstructure ; therefore, 
it is not necessary to deposit any more thickness of metal 
for a foundation than is required to stand up under the 
wear until the roads have to be resurfaced ; thus the 
principal construction of the State has been changed 
from roads ten, twelve and fourteen inches in thickness 
into those four, six, and eight inches deep. The result 
has also been that stone has been substituted on many of 
the lines where gravel was intended, because it has been 
found that a sufificient depth of stone can be supplied and 
placed almost as cheaply as the gravel, and with less cost 
when the gravel has to be carted long distances. Then, 
the cost of maintaining is less and the stability of the 
stone beds greater, they not being weakened by the 
changes of seasons. Still, many miles of gravel roads 
are being constructed through thinly-settled counties 
where there is an abundance of gravel in close proximity 
to the improvements 

We are also learning to cheaply maintain the surface 
of stone roads We have discovered that the application 
of coarse sand, of gravel or loam, in which there is oxide 
of iron, will maintain the integrity of the surface by 
keeping the wear of the wagons and horses' shoes from 
the stone, and makes a soft cushion for their feet. This 
coating also prevents the stone dust from blowing away, 
holding beneath the necessary moisture to maintain its 
cementation qualities, the dust, when moist, being a most 
powerful binder for broken stone Thus, by utilizing the 
materials that lie along or near the lines of the roadbeds, 
we are supporting the heavy traflSc and preserving the 
surface from wear at a very small expense. 

The desire for improved roads is greatly on the increase 
There are now many counties that would immediately 
cover all their leading lines with stone if they could pro- 
cure the necessary means. There are now on file appli- 
cations for 425 miles of roads, and the applications are 
constantly increasing. Some counties are becoming so 
impatient they cannot wait for State aid, but are con- 
structing many miles of improved roads without the 
assistance of the State. 



364 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

On many of the roads of this State, where the traffic is 
mostly moving in one direction, a macadamized or gravel 
width of eight feet would be amply sufficient ; on roads 
more important, where it is necessary to provide for the 
frequent passing of vehicles, a stone width of sixteen feet 
is necessary. It is probable, however, that a minimum 
width of ten or twelve feet would be better than eight 
feet, as the traffic would not be so closely confined to one 
track, and the edges of the roadbed would be less likely 
to be pushed out. Drivers should be instructed to drive 
over all parts of roads, to prevent the formation of ruts, 
which are great destroyers of roads. We have settled 
upon the widths of ten, twelve and fourteen feet as ample 
for the traffic in the country and sixteen feet in the towns, 
as the limit for State aid. 

The roads are now costing all the way from twenty to 
seventy cents a square yard : in the lower part of the 
State the cost ranges from fifty to seventy cents. In 
Morris and Passaic counties they are building the bed of 
stone four and six inches deep ; consequently the expense, 
where rock is mined along the road, ranges only from 
twenty to forty five cents per square yard. 

We have adopted a system of continuous avenues, nd 
have now nearly completed a line which runs all the way 
from Atlantic City in the Southern part of the State, to 
Jersey City, and from Jersey City to the extreme western 
boundaries of Morris and Passaic counties. West of these 
we are building other sj^stems, crossing at Trenton, 
which are almost parallel with the first, so that in a few 
years there will be several continuous lines north and 
south, east and west through the State. 

Three continuous lines have been started from the city 
of Trenton, portions of which are already built. The 
first one leads from Trenton through Pennington, Hope- 
well, Blawenburg and Belle Mead to Somerville, where it 
will connect with the northern system of roads running 
east to Newark ; another line, already built from Tren- 
ton through Princeton to Kingston, is projected from 
there to Belle Mead, thence to Somerville ; also from 
Kingston by the way of Millstone to New Brunswick. 
The third line, already built to Edinburg, is projected by 
the way of Cranbury over the Cranbury pike to New 
Brunswick. These lines, with laterals, will supply a 
large area with hard roads all leading from Trenton, 
through good farming districts, to the most important 
cities in the north central and eastern portions of the 
State 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 365 

From the City of Camden there are seven continuous 
lines mostly built, leading southwest, south, southeast, 
east, north and northeast, over highly cultivated farming 
districts, and through the largest towns in Burlington, 
Camden and Gloucester counties. Lines are building 
and projected in Monmouth county which will, in time, 
connect the cities named with the farming districts of 
Monmouth, and with the rapidly growing towns of the 
richly-developed Monmouth county seashore. Several 
lines are completed from New Brunswick and Metuchen, 
east to Plainfield ; north to Rahway, and west to Perth 
Amboy. 

Many lines are completed, and others nearly so, lead- 
ing from Paterson and Newark west, through Essex, Pas- 
saic, Morris and Somerset counties. In Morris county 
several lines are being built, and others contemplated, 
leading from Morristown through all sections of the 
county, and connecting east and south with the improved 
roads of the adjacent counties, making fine drives for 
the wealthy New Yorkers that have settled in great num- 
bers in these picturesque sections, and great market 
lanes over which the farmers easily transport their 
produce to the great population residing in Newark and 
the Oranges. 

The wheelmen were ' he early advocates for stone roads, 
but now farmers are the pleaders and workers, and they 
have filed hundreds of petitions and daily filing more. 
The reason is they are yearly saving, in the use of the 
hard roads, many thousands of dollars in the wear and 
tear of the teams, in the cash cost of sending their pro- 
duce to market, and in the better condition of the prod- 
ucts when delivered. These statements are strikingly 
illustrated in our southern counties, where thousands of 
immense loads of produce are daily carted to the Phila- 
delphia markets at a saving of from eight to ten dollars a 
team per day over the old plan of transportation. The 
result is the farmers are rapidly buying larger, heavier 
wagons with broad tires. If the present rate of increase 
continues, the capacity of each wagon will be almost 
equal to that of the small boat formerly used in this 
carrying trade The railroads are rapidly destroying the 
carrying trade of the canals ; so the macadamized roads 
are rapidly superseding the streams as highways over 
which the nearby products can be more easily and cheaply 
transported 

Governing bodies of counties are also learning to cheapen 
construction by finding they cannot afford to pay by 
expensive mistakes for the education of engineers, so they 



366 STA TE DEPA R TMENTS. 

are now tnainly employing them without regard to their 
party affiliations, giving them fixed salaries instead of 
percentages, thus destroying all temptation to increase 
the cost of the work The frequent changes of engineers 
has, in the past, lost the counties thousands of dollars 
from the ignorance of new incumbents of the first princi- 
ples of road-building Eight counties have adopted this 
principle of continuous service, and are receiving benefits 
from so doing far beyond the amount of the salary of the 
engineer. 

TROI.I.EY I,INES. 

Governing bodies of townships and counties should 
long hesitate before allowing trolley lines in the center 
of their macadam roads. They destroy the crowns of 
these roads, making them doubly expensive and impos- 
sible to maintain They cause rutting and heavy draft- 
ing, by forcing the weight of the wagon loads to the lower 
side of the bed, strain the wheels of wagons and destroy 
their rims, make driving dangerous, and entirely unsafe 
for women and children, and cause many runaways from 
fright, forcing many to desert the highways to avoid the 
danger of the rapidly passing car. 

Trolleys are a necessity, and of great benefit to com- 
munities, but they should obtain their lines outside of, 
and not be permitted to destroy our highways, dedicated 
to free and unobstructed public use for personal vehicles. 

STKEI< RAIi:.S. 

The Road Department at Washington is making, in 
several Western States, some very satisfactory experi- 
ments with steel rails for wagon roads. The form of the 
rail is an inverted trough, the surface flat, with a slightly 
raised bead to guide the wheel. There are no wooden 
ties ; the rails are tied hy rods Every rail-joint is so ar- 
ranged as to serve as a remount for wheels. There is a 
fair prospect of their coming into use in sections where 
stone is scarce or entirely absent. 

Through the kindness of the Massachusetts Highway 
Commission we have been enabled to test some of the 
different varieties of trap in our State as to their co- 
efficient of wear. 

We hope the State will, in the near future, make an 
appropriation for mechanical and chemical test of its road 
stone. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



367 



NEW JERSEY STATE ELECTION RETURNS. 

OFFICIAL, 1898. 



Absecon 





Atlantic County. 














Gov. 




Cong 




-Sen.- 


-ASSEM.- 




Is- 


uS 


^9 






T ? 


ss- 


•66 

3 t) 


ig-lg: 




§Pi 


5a 


S^ 


InP^ 


«Q 


i^i 


5p^ 


•f^^ 


^^ §Q 




> 


CJ 


J3 


O 


W 


u 


w 


in 


< Q 




59 


85 
168 


10 
5 


51 
276 


87 
133 


9 
6 


51 

286 


81 
124 


29 114 


City, 1st Pre 


,lstWd... 256 


248 164 


"2d " 


" " ... 289 


147 


11 


305 


124 


10 


303 


127 


279 152 


" 1st " 


2d " ... 209 


92 


6 


220 


72 


7 


217 


81 


198 99 


" 2d " 


" " ... 325 


112 


10 


331 


98 


10 


326 


111 


291 145 


" 1st " 


31 " ... 232 


114 


4 


260 


86 


4 


234 


114 


206 143 


" 2d " 


" " ... 200 


172 


4 


228 


133 


5 


209 


163 


l?l 180 


" 3d " 


" " ... 244 


170 


10 


251 


157 


10 


242 


167 


22;^ 188 


" 1st " 


4th " ... 133 


183 


6 


133 


177 


6 


131 


183 


115 198 


" 2d " 


" " ... 174 


178 


12 


178 


170 


12 


172 


179 


163 18* 


" 3d " 


" " ... 177 


156 


23 


178 


153 


22 


177 


154 


159 176 



t239 US: 
Brigamine City, 1st Precinct 6 

" 2d '« 17 

Buena Vista Township 138 

Egg Harbor Township 197 

City 161 

Galloway Township, 1st Pre,..,. 163 

2d " 69 

Hamilton Township 241 

Hammonton Town, 1st Pre 142 

" 2d •' 150 

Linwood Borough 60 

Longport Borough 12 

Mullica Township 110 

Pleasantville Borough 237 

Somers Point Borough 26 

South Atlantic Borough II 

Weymouth Township. 69 



4 

132 

132 

169 

139 

108 

136 

90 

56 

41 

3 

52 
97 
34 
10 
60 



91 2360 1S03 92 2297 IkOS 2073 1633 

5 6 5 6 6 

6 18 

6 127 

20 179 



19 
135 



20 157 

.... 160 

5 159 

... 65 

7 221 

16 133 

13 146 



11 104 

57 216 



2 

136 

168 

158 

141 

111 

121 

87 

55 

40 

3 

51 

116 

33 

10 

47 



5 164 

.... 55 

7 240 

16 140 

13 148 



65 219 

3 26 

.... 12 

10 70 



3 17 4 

141 132 143 

149 169 169 

253 156 172 

137 174 129 

123 73 104 

124 249 119- 
84 135 84 
51 145 55 
42 57 45 

3 12 

70 107 

113 241 114 

34 26 34 

8 8 13 

50 70 49 



51 



Total vote in county 4107 2830 266 4103 2669 264 3982 2869 3869 3035 

Plurality 1277 lltS!, 1113 S3U 

Social-Labor vote in county, 14; People's, 24; Clark, Pre, for Senator, 270 
Monforr, Pro., for Assembly, 240. 



368 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Bergen County. 

— Cov. — — Con. — — Sen. Assembly. - 



gpi rtQ %^ SQ ^<A s^ %^ "^^ EQ «Q 

Allendale Boiough 80 59 82 57 82 57 80 70 59 69 

Bergen Township 32 24 20 35 41 21 17 84 41 20 

Bergen Fields Borough 43 82 43 79 40 84 42 43 82 83 

Bogota Borough 45 23 44 23 45 23 44 '*4 23 23 

Carlstadt Borough 214 244 203 251 216 237 174 207 296 233 

Cliffside Park Borjugh...„ 47 110 47 108 47 108 46 47 110 199 

Cresskill Borough 48 47 49 46 47 48 44 44 51 61 

Delford Borough 82 69 83 68 75 75 76 83 73 69 

Dumont Borough 52 52 50 53 51 54 50 53 51 53 

Englewood, 1st Ward 149 121 153 116 135 136 152 151 118 119 

" 2d " 122 99 124 96 102 119 122 124 99 98 

3d " 167 211 169 208 139 212 168 169 211 211 

4ih " 83 157 84 155 67 176 85 86 155 154 

521 588 530 575 U'S 673 527 530 583 582 

Englewood Cliffs Borough 15 29 16 29 12 36 15 15 29 28 

Franklin 211 185 209 188 209 188 213 214 183 184 

Fairview Borough 71 63 65 68 71 61 68 67 64 63 

Garfield Borough 230 106 199 129 224 109 217 223 117 110 

Glen Rock Borough 45 63 44 64 45 63 43 43 63 66 

Harrington, 1st District 245 202 246 195 237 201 240 226 198 201 

2d " 76 122 76 122 78 120 76 94 120 106 

Hasbrouck Heights Borough 162 52 157 57 164 51 156 163 55 57 

Hillside 106 64 105 64 109 62 76 105 88 69 

Hohokus 248 185 248 182 256 177 248 236 194 187 

Lodi Township 23 48 16 55 30 41 22 22 54 43 

Lodi Borough 158 78 154 78 165 65 147 156 81 77 

Little Ferry Borough 38 89 38 87 42 83 38 39 87 85 

Leonia Borough 100 55 101 53 90 66 100 99 55 55 

Midland Ill 83 112 82 109 82 111 100 83 94 

Midland Park Borough 125 77 128 73 122 75 132 130 67 75 

Maywood Borough 35 55 37 52 40 49 39 37 50 52 

Montvale Borough 33 34 32 32 34 32 32 34 33 33 

New Barbadoes, 1st District 114 238 114 236 143 215 113 113 237 235 

2d " 211 278 222 265 253 236 207 216 278 272 

" " 3d " 230 163 231 160 248 143 228 233 163 160 

4th " 247 131 249 128 270 105 247 247 131 131 

5th " 48 54 46 65 52 50 47 47 50 54 

North Arlington Borough 13 41 12 42 13 41 13 13 41 41 

Old Tappan Borough 8 41 8 41 8 41 8 7 42 41 

Orvil 150 90 137 102 154 85 145 114 91 128 

Overpeck 182 125 177 129 190 116 180 185 124 122 

Palisades 46 115 46 115 45 116 45 48 114 114 

Park Kidge Borough 58 95 58 92 59 90 58 59 91 90 

Ridgefield Township 201 357 199 359 186 375 198 203 362 355 

Ridgefield Borough 62 38 60 38 60 37 63 62 35 36 

Ridgewood.. 355 146 351 151 357 146 354 335 144 171 

Riverside Borough 52 45 51 46 53 46 49 50 49 46 

Rutherford Borough, 1st Dist.... 282 125 282 123 282 122 265 278 139 128 

2d " .... 321 95 322 94 323 94 316 324 104 89 



ELECTION RE TURNS. 369 

Berg-en County - Continued. 

— Gov. — —Con — —Sen — Assembly. 

e 

9. H lo, a id.jrs d-^o. ^s \i 






e S 



§« §Q l^ Isa :^X 5Q =C^ ;|pi5 SQ £Q 

East Rutherford Borough 253 206 245 209 254 202 239 247 222 207 

Saddle River Township 89 184 84 181 81 181 84 93 179 174 

Saddle River Borough 68 35 67 36 71 33 68 63 36 41 

Teaneck 103 45 101 44 96 48 101 101 44 44 

Tenafly Borough .157 120 169 109 156 120 156 167 114 117 

Underciiff Borough 69 140 64 142 68 138 66 66 140 140 

Union 129 168 129 165 128 167 129 125 169 167 

Upper Saddle River Borough.... 23 39 21 40 21 40 18 20 40 44 

Washinaton 42 98 42 98 43 98 42 40 100 98 

Wallington Borough 100 74 88 85 101 74 92 100 84 74 

Westwood Borough 65 94 65 94 64 93 65 65 93 94 

Woodcliff Borough 44 41 44 41 44 41 44 43 41 42 

Woodbridge Borough 49 46 45 53 55 42 40 51 61. 46 

Total vote in county 6964 6355 6863 6378 6999 6276 6753 6875 6514 6378 

Plurality 609 U85 723 

Prohibition vote in county for Governor, 85; Social-Labor vote, 165 ; People's, 21. 



24 



370 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Burling-ton County. 

Gov Con. — 



gpi 3a ccL, jjpi -sQ fc:5: Saj -=35 :sa 2q 

Bass River 45 118 1 37 122 1 35 25 133 119 

Beverly City 274 126 32 233 107 30 204 213 90 108 

Township 180 119 22 180 109 25 178 177 115 116 

Bordentown, 1st District 210 115 25 215 105 23 212 212 110 110 

2d " 173 218 23 220 162 21 196 175 183 206 

3d " 80 110 9 126 56 8 80 81 103 102 

k6S kkS 57 561 S23 5% h88 h68 396 U18 

Burlington, 1st Dist 177 191 6 198 168 6 178 176 190 182 

" " " 2d Ward 161 144 9 160 135 10 154 155 151 144 

2d " " " 161 111 2 175 94 2 160 153 113 107 

" 3d " 185 246 6 197 233 6 178 182 251 245 

" 4th " 244 163 10 258 146 8 248 240 167 153 

928 855 S3 988 776 S2 918 906 872 831 

Burlington Township 150 63 4 151 61 4 149 151 63 61 

Chester, East District 251 94 27 247 95 28 246 248 99 97 

West " 263 161 31 266 147 30 237 265 171 154 

Chesterfield 145 72 5 146 68 5 145 147 72 69 

Cinnaminson, 1st District 167 82 6 174 74 6 167 162 74 90 

2d " 86 156 4 92 151 4 96 82 150 152 

Delran 81 125 10 82 121 10 82 81 121 119 

Eastampton.., 56 67 3 59 63 3 50 54 74 66 

Evesham 150 113 11 133 121 11 135 146 125 109 

Fieldsboro Borough 67 44 2 67 44 2 67 68 44 44 

Florence 275 160 29 277 146 28 277 276 146 146 

Lumberton 182 132 7 183 126 8 183 185 181 125 

Mansfield 185 188 1 184 179 10 184 192 179 168 

Medford 257 141 35 261 129 37 261 263 133 129 

Mount Laurel 209 106 1 207 103 3 207 208 108 102 

New Hanover 179 217 9 176 212 9 159 176 231 210 

Northampton, 1st District 271 137 1 279 126 3 262 272 146 131 

2d " 181 132 4 181 129 4 173 177 139 123 

•' 3d " 251 206 3 274 182 3 241 258 214 196 

703 U75 8 7SU IS7 10 676 707 A99 U50 

Palmyra 314 133 20 312 129 23 319 272 101 172 

Pemberton Township 122 233 3 125 229 3 113 117 247 233 

Borough 102 113 5 102 109 8 86 96 134 108 

Riverside 219 209 9 219 206 9 217 219 209 205 

Shamong 108 118 2 110 114 2 106 108 119 115 

Southampton, East 100 111 98 109 91 97 118 107 

West 142 117 2 142 111 2 136 138 120 110 

Springfield 127 149 3 126 152 3 115 121 169 147 

Washington 69 34 1 68 33 1 68 70 33 30 

Westampton 101 30 1 102 29 1 100 102 29 29 

Willingboro 75 89 3 72 85 5 73 71 89 86 

Woodland 44 44 2 44 43 2 41 42 46 43 

Total vote in county 6819 5437 389 6958 5063 407 6609 6653 5440 5267 

Plurality 1382 1895 

Social-Labor TOte in county, 17 ; Paople's, 51. 



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ELECT/0 JV RE TURNS. 371 

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•marr icr-MC^'^'-i |<54Ct-ocoiCiooom l^iMioo Is^oeii-ii-'.-i |'--5 

'j3§B|Saapn0q — Ir-lr- — t-H-l j<3jr-(r-.r-CrHr-i<M,-(r-l |^^,-<r-. |«Op-,-,r-r,-Ht-H |-sO 

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ELECTION RETURNS. 

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marr Xirinri~v ■^'-O'MMt-W |itit-cC(MX>5eoo5Deoco |t-.e<lO(Mooi> 
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fl3>j^ oaci-M(NeOM I r-( c; lO •* 00 CO a> (M ■* -:< i Cs to ^ sc lO o; 

'XBJJnpV^N "^ '^ ^ '^ "^ '^ I '^ '^ '^ "^ ^"^ rHrH|Or-lr-.(N« 

•fTaM f-l O CO — ' .-< CO I <3i — ' CO ■^ O 00 05 CO lO -^ I t^ <35 -J «D IC 03 

USy O CD » (M lO O? S^ ■* (M O O — O 00 -- O «5 r- lO -J ■>) 00 

•da-vr •^coc<l?5CDco |~*— 'asooit-c. Oit-<N |CoaiOoo>Ci = 
'aaSeisaapnoq '-' " ^ =^ '-' " I '=^ - ^ '-I '-'^ r^r-.|ci-«r-i<Nco 

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ELECTION RETURNS. 



373 



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374 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 375 

Cape May County. 

Gov. Con. Assembly. 



Is- iili l%%i \i le-il Is 

gpi £0 l^ gpi ^Q |(^ ^^ 5Q ^f^ 

Ocean City, 1st Ward 119 48 18 116 50 17 114 51 22 

" 2d " 91 33 8 98 31 8 98 33 7 

Upper Township 224 80 16 222 79 15 216 84 13 

DennisTownship, 1st Precinct 90 171 13 106.156 13 97 163 11 

2d " 91 112 15 86 117 14 88 119 13 

Sea Isle City 44 63 32 71 1 39 66 

Avalon 21 13 1 22 12 1 22 12 1 

Middle Township, 1st Precinct 235 124 4 170 174 4 180 173 4 

2d " 130 96 3 114 104 3 121 97 3 

Anglesea. 24 16 26 20 26 18 

Wildwood 21 16 9 28 10 27 

Holly Beach 61 43 1 62 43 1 68 33 1 

Lower Township ^ 205 108 9 207 101 11 197 114 9 

West Cape May 99 47 14 l.>3 44 13 102 46 12 

Cape May City 255 195 58 256 192 57 246 203 63 

South Cape May 16 1 16 1 16 1 

Total vote in county 1726 1166 160 1645 1223 158 1640 1240 149 

Plurality 560 h^'2 hOO 

Social-Labor vote in county, 8 ; People's, 5. 



376 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS, 



377 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



579 



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Ci'H'-^tOOOOO'M-' 
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l«O00t-O5t^O»©«*« 



O 

O 

I 

>> 
-p 

a 

O 

O 


OS 
02 



'UOS>lDBf '-' 

^''U. OiO000000t-C3C><'^« 

^''U. — iO00003it»O3<N'*i» 

'3ai[ssnBiJ '-' •-' 



'[3odi3pue^ '-' 

'daM *^ ^ CC O t^ O tM h- Oi t^ 

'sauof -J fuag '-c^^owcoiNMr-cNiN 
daM --osowMio-MO-^cooo 

J3UII9l{X3Q •-lO'SOCOCOtMCOr-lWC^ 



Ol lO O OS — ' C? ift . 



soirj'^ooiai'^ioo 

Q0r-(i-li-l(N<NCO — 



Oi — i-i>ii4(Me^>-i 



(N (N !M©J I- 



I « 1-1 S? !N IM I 



O00»t-'»l<eOC<5t~- 



g>OOOOOU5CO-*<t- 



S< ^ ^ (N (N — 1 



eo ^ r-i C^ (N I— . 



<W t- 00 . 
__i 'X. ■>!*< (N c 
■ (NOIrHf-H , 



I (M (M r- r- r- 



""< 00 t- O !N O! 'S 'O 
^ O t- fO O lO <>> CI 
«SMr-(NO»(NM« 



C^ 00 t- t^ lO CO CO I 



•api:x 



C-IMMOOCCINCOr-ieOCI 



I ^ » 05 o e<i oj o I 

'--SMr-i<N(NlNeOW 



I o "O <M (N e< 



CI ?3 TT ic ;c t- 



« - ^ x; ^. j= x: 



7 . -o - -c . -t: . 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



I I 

fl I 

O o 

O % 

QQ 
H 



day 

•day 
'aiSunj^ 

day 

'SinqaapuEJa 

•day 
'4oa[aa 

•day 
•jaijiaj^ 

■day 
'uEuiasa^w^ 

•day 
'aaqutanf) 

■day 



CflC<IKlr-lrHr-i(M 'S'^i-Hp^i-Ii-IWCC '^Ir-lrH rHi-H, 



1— ' lO O! f- O >0 I 

■^ o o ro t- (N c 

(M M 3^1 1-1 rH rH C 



rHiOlOCOtMOCO I Oil 



IM tN M 1-1 1-1 i-H (M 



(M M C^ r^ F^ — <M 



.-( vO as t- o lo -^ 

-r C O M 1^ M -M 

C-l N ?4 r-( -< r-l<M 



-J lO 05 1^ O U5 lO 
•^ w O ?0 r- •>! !M 
(M >1 :q r-. rH 1— Ol 



<M M —I as 05 <>) CO 



~H O OS O ■«*:■<* M 



;S2 s§ 



<5* ;d -- —( to r; ^^ 

'-I O lO CO I^ O CO 



15* UO -^ T*l C£ QO (M 






M --o m r- o >-3 lO 

•^ O O M t^ -M -M 
C) M m f-l — 1 ^ -N 



'ssa[aB3 


gJ^TiiSS^^ 


•OJJ 


CO.- : : : :eo 


'qney 




•uiaa 
'jajBMiy 


ilaSSIS 


•day 
'ja>{JBj 


SlisSal 


•uiaa 
'auEJ3 


SsisSSS 


■day 
'saaqjoo\ 


sssSgSS 



~* -^ rH —1 lO Tt" -- 

'-S .rs o «o s<i o CO 

-O -• rH r-( i-< CO CO 



■-•*M;=iC0OOO(N lii'#; 



. r^-^(^^c<^^:tf> ia'<*(N 



<vi CO :o (M CO o 
^} 00 (M 00 O -a' -^ 
-5* -1 Tf< rH CO ■ 



i-lCOrH.-< M^ C^ 1-1 CO CO CM (M 



l-H OCO ON. 



>-< o a; o r-' lo 

f- >0 ■«*< (M (M OS 
■51 -H r-i rl ri (N M 



C10000Ot~C0CS |»-^ 



: lO CS — ' lO in CS 



->0-«*<(M(MOS3'1 IvOOOOOOSCOOlM !© 
1 1-1 rH I- r-l ■-( OO 



w -a -TD -S ■= -z -2 a) T3 -a -s -t: • 

r^c^ico-fioor- ^^icC'TiiC: 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



381 



•ui3a 



* 52 ^ 



? oc ?? r? iM o i— 



l-H rli-l ?^ ri ■ 



>.l — IN !N C oo ^: 

'^ t* 00 CO — ' C5 OO 
»^ N l-l <N CO (M (M 



•uiaa 



M 'i Tj" 05 . 
-.00=055; 



(M r- <M C^I ■— f- t 



ir-MrHi-l l'<f(N^IMC^(M:M 






<N r- CM N ri i-l r- 



"C «-.£■* C2 I— 00 

n 3J ivi 00 o ic "*< 



I — (M •* 00 t- ■<»< 
! r- 00 CO o: 3i oc 
? Oq i-l(M IN CI <M 



-UI3Q 



CO o T»< o < 

CO 00 CO CO I 
0<l r- <N (N 1 



i 

I 

o 
O 

o 



•uiaQ 

•lUSQ 
'puOUIIQ 

•uiaa 
•uiaa 

•uiaQ 

'sillIM 

•UlSQ 

'Sui ssnBpj 

•ui3a 

'[3odi3pue^ 

•d3>i 
'saaof j fuag 

dan 

'j3UII3qX3Q 

•dan 



C<N — 0< 
CO 00 CO CO ( 
IN r-i IN !N c 



"-"S >! tf> «e «*< IN 1 



Ut) 00 CO (N 00 ■ 
Ci -^ ffl. M C: C: I 

1 IN ! 



s": 0^ ^ (N 0-1 IN 5^1 



Oi CO lO •^ 00 t- • 



IN iC ^ C5 O 50 «C 



I IN o r-i M^ cr. ' 



Oi -- IN r*l 00 t- •* 
O (^ 00 C<^ OS C5 oc 
-* C<I r-< IN <M <N !N 



ic M es o t-m 

CO 00 CO CO IN O •— 
C-1 r- Ca <N r- T-l ^ 

c:; o ^ 05 o 00 I- 

<M 00 CO CJ >J C -- 

IN r- oa (N rl ^ r- 

cs '^ lo o o o ;r 

CO X 00 CO (N r- 1— 

01 r^ IN IN r-i '^ t-( 

C- CO •«*< 3> O 00 IC 
CO J>- CO CO ?1 O I- 
O; i-((N <N l-H »-i r^ 

O ;a 05 l> O « IC 



^ 13 0> t- O ^ "3 
t" O C CO t- (N IN 
IN ?1 IN rH r-i ri !N 



00 M lo to o es in 

;ji 3; IN 00 O 'S' 'J' 
^J _ -^ ^ CO r- rH 



I cr lO to 1-1 1~ 

, (M 00 O «0 ■^ 



51 ^ ^ ^ CO ^ . 



0- n » «0 lO 00 t 
<^l C5 C<I 00 O T ' 



O^ O lOlO<N^ 

r:< lo in s<i (N o CO 

a-, ,H r-l ,-1 ,-. CO CO 



t-H T*< — — •* CO O 

j; lO lO CO IN O CO 



I -- CJ «* 00 »- ' 



' CO CO Oi C5 CO 



S^ ;0 •* ■* Tj< 00 o 
OS 00 m OS t~ =: CO 



- ,,-. , .._-. ,<3500030St-OCO 

IN SJ !N r^ rH 1-1 (N SO rl i-H i-l .-1 CO CO 2 "-l «-! r- l-l i-l 



i-i 04 CO TTlO «D 



»: : ^ ; : : 



382 



ELECTTON RETURNS. 



PI 

I 
I 

o 
O 



•day 

'Sanquapu^jg 

■day 
'loapa 

•day 

■day 

'uBUiasajYV 

•day 
•aaqnianQ 

day 

'ssa|aE3 

•OJJ 

'qney 

•inaa 
'jajBMjv 
•day 
'ia>lJBj 

•inaQ 
'aupjQ 

•day 
'saaqjooy\^ 



1 •^ 00 



O — — O ' 

eo<N<M o. 

<N ri CQ (N I 



C^l t-i C4 IN r-l C^ . 



•># (M lO 05 CO « 
(M (N (M i- 
(M.-<(M. 



(M (N (M 0-. r-H -q. . 



ceo«i o c 

« 3^ 0-1 O (M 

!M r- 5^ IM r-^ 



•«*> 00 
<Mi-c 



:q -- 05 ^ lO •* C5 



©^ r-l i-l .-I t-i IN <N 



^ r^ P^ r^ ^ (M Cq 



^ 00 O to »-l t» T 



Ci oseo 

^ >c •<*• 

c> CO r: 



c; ;o o OS 

00 CO oc « 

CO <-i ec r^ 



1 C. O IM to 
00 CO CC CO 
ICOfCO--. 



s^ o — oo in C5 «o 



so OQ (M t 

c5 CO CO < 



O IM «C 00 OS < 

cc !N oi a; .- ■ 

(M ri CM r- i-l( 



1 <N lO OS 00 lO c; 



t- !M CO 1ft CO iO <M 



eo t- «D -- c; 



I r-lr-l (N (M C; CO CO < 



^ O ift 05 t- »C CO 



§coco 



■<!*< 00 CO OC CO I "Vl 



I ^ «D CO (M 
, _l r-1 CC ^ !— 



S5 00 CS r-1 CC . 



COt-i (M 

r-l (M (M 00 <M I 



(N IM t- 00 O CO «0 
I— ' O !N t- lO r- IM 
(N so N r- (N 1-1 l-H 



I IN 1-1 r-^ S^ f- 



« O O lO IM 1 



'-Hlft (M O O OS N 
?^ 00 "*< ^ Ol O 00 

~* iM •<* CO <N r-l 



^ •* — COOO OOO 
■^1 aO 00 r- 50 — T-l 
^. r-i rl T-l i-l (M IM 



^ OS CO (M CO Ol 



'^ i-i — i-l 



00 ci OS o ca 



oo<NOseooo;t~ leo — wosift. 



CO r- Oi 



»« t- CO OS »o 



04 r-l <M i-i r- <N 1 



O Ift (M ! 

^» lO CO I 
2 M CO ( 



^ (N CO Tti IC O I 
-C. w _ > . 



&- 

^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



383: 



I 

o 
O 





H 



'S31B0S 

'XjnquasnQ 

'no5ui[[0^ 
•uiaa 

'Xipuao3 
•uiaQ 

'pUOUIIQ 

'aos>tDBf 

'uajiBg 

uiaQ 

'sil!l\[ 

•uiaa 
'3u!issnEjj 

tuaa 
'podjapuE^ 

'sauof J fu^a 

'jatupqxaQ 
■da^ 



)'*iaiO^ 00 N 



(N P5 (M ^ <M r-c r- 



IN M -M ^ C^ rH i-l 



!N rO (>» rH 04 ^ f^ 



<N •* CO C^ rH 



(NTH COMi-i 



! >0 lO O •* t- ?5 



30 •<*< T«< t- ■»*< in lO I 3; 



^ OJ CO lO 00 'l" 'J 



00 ■^ CO IM 35 1 

^ o Ki r- in 1 
(M M d -- OJ 1 



so CO ■M eo 00 in • 



(M N ^■i eo •<*< I 



eo (M 00 lO 00 • 



1 e^(N r-< (Nr- 



^-l O rji eC -J ■* M 
:a C5 lO '-' o: — 05 



0I-* ««« p^ 



Or) sn^ ^^lO>* 
HI 00 lO -^ * •-' 00 
~* !M ■«»< so 0» rt 



;;> O t- -^ (M C'l la 

t^ OiAN 05 — 00 
•<f -H S^ ^ eO 0« rH 



>o to ea N r- ^^' 

l^ 00 lO "^ 00 — c 



"H t2 «5 CO -< CO eo 

;o OJ lO -" C» -" 00 
^ <N ■*< CO <M i-H 



■^ OS CO lO 00 00 « t^ 

^c5?3«oooM«> I J::; 

J5 rlrH rH I ^ 

on *0 00 lO t- t- (M I 1-, 

^r:, Oi m iO 00 -^ <o \ ^ 



O -- lO o t- 
COOfl <N O^ 
(N rl Cfl e* i-t 






'05C0 |00-t<lMOlO««g l:-, 
1 — 00 |~*55CO«300MtO f:; 



"--O5-H00 «rjo>coioaoeo«o 



50 r-l f- rH r- IM (M 0«( 



:0 — 00 r- r- !« "-H 
'M 00 50 r- 50 — — < 
^ rH i-H r- rH Ofl N 



;o ^ 0» ^ r-lO '^ 



O r^O^eOTflO^tl:- 



>; : J : : ; 

V 

55 



384 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



o 
O 

I 

I 

o 
O 



•d3H 

'SjnquapuBja 

■d3H 
d3H 
•da-g 
•d3^ 
•day 
•qBT -DOS 

'qne-a 

•uiaa 
'jajBAVJV 

'J3>[JBJ 

•UI3(I 
'3UBJ3 

■d3>j 
'saaqjoo^ 



' -t< IM •>* t^ "* r-l -* 
^- ^ «C 00 O t* cc 
(M <M i-l r- (N i-H ^ 



i^ (M t- 

-:*C^ CO 



00 0> t- lO CD t- 
CO •* ?0 CO 00 "O 
!N C^ M p- (M (M 



c; "M ?^ <N t~ 

(ic n oo — r> 



'5OOi.-l'*'*t^00OJ« 
f^^^3X00O<O< 
<JOM(N<MrHr-!Nr-l| 



lOr-KMOgiMCOi-KMtM 



CJ (M "* (M lO I ?>^ O ^ Tt" 



CO t~C CO «o 
— • = «0 CO — t- 00 
(M (M ^ r^ (M r-l .-( 



t- 00 "-1 IM 1 



l(N IN CO I— (M : 



O <M S^ "-I "O 
CO 35 OC — C5 
CO CO CO .-O CO 



,„ - - _' -x> 00 cn t- oc 



I O CO -^ lO O Ci < 
I — O CC 00 -- «5 < 
I !N iM rH r^ IM rH t 



I CM <N (N CO nn IM Cvl 



05 05 05 «0 •># J 



CO CO CO CO CO SS s* 



IC C<1 Ift JC- O; CO eg 

55 55 i^ r-«55 



;-,^ i2,-i<N 



(T (51 CO to t- to 
rl^COCO 00 lO 
<M (M COi-i(M iM 



00 IM O ■M CO 
uc 05 OC — C2 
CO ^ CO CO CO 



C5 CO t- CO o 
00 03 00 — 2 
CO CO CO cc ^ 



■^i-MCOt-OOt-CCvCt- 



■^ 5^1 -M O] i-l — ca i-i I 



CJ CN r-1 r^ <N rl 1-1 

00 CO O O IM 



; CO Oi C5 ■* '^ t- 

I •>*< -^ cc CO as lO 

I (M (M CO i-i <N (N 



«'iC0iC05i0<MO'M'»tl 



S^ ^ '^^ 



.-JO • CO lO 00 (M 



cc oc 

CO M 



oc r- 00 s oj 

CO M CO CO CO 

N o SI o CO I 55 < 

CM -NO \^ 



(N r-1 rl rl C* r^ 1 



(M IN CM CO i-l (N IN 



■ ■<*< r- 00 ^^ O CO ■»*' 

— CJ5 in 00 — CD 00 
IIN i-l r-i ^ *^ r-i 1-1 



IOl ^ 00 IM «5 
■^J — ^J CO ■<»■ 
11 r-1 <N IN IN 



(M «5 ?r IM t- O 

CO ■<»■ CO CD JO It: 

IN IN CO ^ IN I^ 



^-a-a"— <n-a xJ- 



I CM CO -vr; CO r- 00 



EL ECU ON RETURNS. 



385 



o 
o 

I 

§ 
Q 





|2|§^ 


ISaliisIS 


'XinquasnQ 


SSSI^ 


SSsigsgSS 


'UOSUJUO^ 


|g||S 


138 
127 

2(;o 

281 
263 
137 
183 
148 




SSJSSg 


$5g|||g|S 




S5is* 


Ssiiiim 


3 'puOUIlQ 


22||§; 


SSaiilHss 


J 'UOS>jDBf 


1511" 


liiisills 


= 'jjaiiBg 


SiSs^ 


SBIisiIss 




|2||S 


3Ssi»l2is 


'SuijssnBfi 


r->r-><-l 1-4 


SliiSIBsS 


'laodjapoBA 


t'i.t^'^- 


liSiiisss 


1 < r *^"r^ 




I87h 
221 
213 
202 
164 
180 
208 
172 
186 


■d3H 




psisSgsl 


•d3H 


?C CO M C5 « 


paisSiSs 



^ o J- ei o5 N « M « 









S'.OiOOlMl«(Nt-i-# 

eiint-coWNiococi 



ac'-'tecoOi-iTtiajco 



>--5«OJoci>a'*iNO« 

-*iO-J(Na>!NiOC<305 

'-'^ 'J' FN JO 1—1 <-l 



i-->0ai~t»MM(NO5c0 

'^ '»" i-l CO >— > rH 



^^cocsoo*^^<IC50co 

'■;•«*< r-l CO l-> 1-1 



; — lOOl'^'OO'^lCiO 
j-MCOOf^M^OOio 
i-KNCNINCOr-ilMsq 



~Hi-it-csc;i^s<i«Oic 

'-■5iMcoeO'»'ro«oooio 



■M r- 00 o» 50 lO o 1 



MMM-O r--M;C-*iO«St-< 



i -D T3 1: - w - 1: TS -a -o t: « -a - 



55 



386 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



g 
O 

o 
I 

o 
O 

(D 
QQ 

m 



•da^ 
'3jnqu9puBjg 

■d3H 
'loapQ 

■dsH 

■day 
'uEuiasa YV 

da-a 
'aamnanf) 

dan 

■qBq cos 
'ss3yjE3 

'qnB^ 
•uiaa 

'J31BMJV 

■day 
'jajfjBj 

•uiaQ 
'auBJ3 

•day 

'saaqjoo^ 



(r-l t^ e^ — C^ I— 1-(I 






(N 05 1-1 O 03 tH 
lO Oi 00 •<*< t- O 



»-<t-0a00OSM"-O5COr-l 
«OiOCOQOOOcOOO«OMlO 



in 0> OO lO 00 O I <0 lO <» 00 00 O 00 <X) CO lO I Ci sq CO ri 0<» t-l CO fO co 



.-1 IN ri OJ r- « F-l 



1I> <M < 
i^ <M 1-1 <N „ rt rH I 



'OSOOCCr-O 5Ou3C©O000-^00«OOTi 



C(Mt~iOoo^oir»o 

3ilMC»3—<Mi-l<MiMt- 

^rti-(<Ni-<Sqr-ICO.^ 



o c: OS m 00 ' 



i-ll-<.-H li^(Ni-l!N ^,-li-rH.-^ 



O M (N Tf ^ '*' 
iC OS 00 >o OO o 



^ TJ" CO ■*! C ■<*< 
lO 05 00 lO 00 O 



74t-(M00O5CO--00COIN 

^m^oooo«oo«ocoio 



e*!«t>-CCO5--r-<0000 
PSNCOr-ltN'-COINtD 

:oi-ii-(c>i,-iiMi-ieci-i 



^ a<i t- •* 05 1-1 r-< I 



'--5 r- r- (M rH N f-l ! 



01-^(MtJ<;0<M ^ 

TI<0500«Ot^O '--SiOCOOOOO^OOCOMiO CI'MCO-HC-J — 00!M^ l"^ 



l(NO0O5e>3--t»t~C^ 

>CO0000<»00<OMi- 

t^ (M ^ IM r-l 1-1 rH ^ 1 



;o iM 00 N O r» I 

^ -H C-J — 00!M <_ 

(M i-l (N r- « rH 



O CO 00 «» O t- 



£^ lO 00 t- in rl < 
*>. N f-< (N (N rH 



^OC^lMi-frH^lOl 



lO C<l ?? •- IN t- I O CO lO 0> O 00 lO ^ IC t- ITHQOOI 
OOOOnOJOO'^ |e*Ot-OOOOS(NlOO>t- l-OcOOi 






OlOifNiCt-OCNCOeCO 



ooooocinococco 



i^^OOuOCOMS^IM 

•~i(Nco--coi-ico53t~ 

"O'-lr-'N'-IINr-iCOf-l 



oscct-TpcDi^iOLc;c 

i5^C-Ot^05U5i-^IN» 
-jr-iC^IN.>:<Nr-r-<N 



f>.OCO'*lNO'0-<*lO 

<J-!NCOO!NO(Nr-iC 
iQi-ir-llNr-INr-lCiir- 



IN CC •<*< lO '-0 



,j: J3J= jcj:x 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



387 





'S3IBDS 




•maa 
'XanqaasnQ 




■uiaQ 
'aosofiioy 




•lusa 

'U1UI315I 




•ui^a 


T 


3 ui^a 

i 'pUOlUIQ 


^ 


3 UlSQ ^ 






•Si 


• uiaa 
: 'sil'IM 

■UJ3Q 

'§aijssnBjj 




•uiaa 

'p0dj3pUE^\ 


•day 
•ssuof •j fuag 




day 
'jaiuianxsQ 

•day 



O <M CO lOfMr- 
OSr- 00 CI 00 lO 
^ ■* CI CO — 1— 



= 00 <M -Xi ^ ^ 
Ol O 00 (M 00 lO 
I-C-* (N « ^ — 



O O <N Tf<^r- 

as ,_i at' »q X lO 



(N lO «0 00 IM T*< 
— r- 00 ^ CJ >0 
SI 1* (M CO •« r- 



00 r-i CO la r-l 1 
00 —< 00 CO 00 I 
1— '* IM CO I— I 



r- ■»!< !W eC rH ^ 

O « r-l IC 1-^ ^ 
05 ^ 00 <M OOlO 



s."5 'J t^ r- ■* OS SO ic cr. o 

»c ^ .-c C4 !-> I 



c5'*t-co(MooiMm 

l5^lot-ooooJCOlO 



§i 



<N ^ r^ C^ •- tl r 



I (M IT) (M C5 ^ — I ^1 



■^ — -- t-(N(M.-oeeo 

QOt-OiftOO'T'-O ~ 



:=£^ 



W5 ^.-H ?1 

^t>o^-cooo5co>oo( 



0;T*««i^(M00O«t»t- 



■<!j<icir:i«s<oo?q^co 
■lot-cxocoirscoo 

i-< rH C^ ri I— .-( 



l'-S^^IC^C<J'-i^N 



• (N !N 01 (M — ^ e-I 



'-r-r-oo'«"0(Nco — o 
^tiot-ooooeotsooo 



lis 
IIS 

IIS 

I ^1 ( 



— — (M (M O <M <N 



' -r © CI .- '- o o 

• O <0 00 ^ "^ rl lO 
' M ri (N CJ •- »- •>! 



* ^ u1 O « O CO 
C: to 05 ■«< O 1— lO 
— C^1(M 5^ — ■- (N 



^ S !M CO C C M 

55§ *SSSoi 



1 e^< ?5 5^ <N <-i ^ ?^ 

I 2 — IM 01 3 00 T»< 
J C ^ 00 -*• — © g 



CiO!NaoO>OI©t»t-e<l 

toiotoxocooooeOiO 



-^r-ciM©eo©05iaF- 

^icoaoaocawtoeom 



<tt-<MOO — COOOSUSI 

voiotfjoowtoooweoi 



>-'i ^ p- -.1 -< (M 1^ W . 



1 S« F- N r- CO F-l 



C to- 

Z —I 

c3 ^- 

X > 

2 -^ 

t/5 S. 



.xxjs^jsj: 



388 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



«5 O Ci i^ 30 -V 



■dan -oo^c^co-^ 
'3l3unt\[ <M -H r- N o5 CM 



'SjnquapuBjg s^ .- ^ in 5^ ^i 



|i 

Of 

' 'J 

O I 

M i 

SQ I 






•J3[ipa-5I 



-# -M c; CO 00 I 

-M 00 u- -M M • 
CM — 1-. ^4 !N ; 



u^il — .00 o <M £;; — 
'UBUI3S3AV 2^ - '^ =^ '^ ^' 



3 ' 
^1 



'jamuaiiQ 



3^ 1— 1— oa :m 3-J 



•qeq -DOS ® >« <» «■! oo -; 

•SS3[JB3 

•oj(£ e«3 -^ c~) ic i-i -J 
'qne^ 

•iiia/'T ^- iC I'l IS m «^ 

'asiBMiy =^' <=^ '■' *^ ^ 

o o o t- «o '*' 
r) 30 tce«« — 

M r- r< ?1 CM M 



•dan 



-- 05 ■* t- t~ — 1 ■<<■ 



'aUBJ^ <M tM r-c =M r- 

•ssaqiooA <>' -^ ^ *> =^ *" 



Q 

55 -a "O 4J w « 
ill -N ?: ■* >c -J 



c< 






H a. 



•dan ?;53S 

■dan S^So 
'pjBuna *^ '^ 

'aiSanjv =^ '" 

'ginquapuBJa ^'^ '-' 

m -davr (M '-< 00 

S 'loapa =^ "^ 

< dan t^SS 

•d^H £ S S8 

'uBUiasay^ ^'-' 
■d^H lo S X 



•d3^ 5 ?g §8 

■uiaQ g-Sg 
'japi^ug '"' "^i 

'J31A\0 j ^ '- 

•uiaa S^S 

•day J£F=^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'S3IEDS 



'XanqaasnQ 



•inaQ 
'aosaijioy 



t- •^ i« ic •* « 
(M e^i .-I ci -H 



(>» ^ r- C^^ 



C« 5^ 1-1 !M i-i 



I 

2 

O 
O 



6 



•ai3Q 

•uiaa 

'paouiiQ 

'UOS>(DBf 
•UISQ 

•uiaa 

•uiaQ 
'SujissneH 

■UI3(I 

'podaapue^Y 
'sauof jfuaa 

•da^ 



2 M t- 00 Tl< CO 

o •* o t- I-I r- 

C^ C<l i-i Cfl ^ 



e«<Ni-i (N— 1 



■MvNrH ^^ O ^ 



(M :M ^ M -H 



•-^ (M lO ic : 

OTJilOl-- 
=■1 0« 1- !M I 



■^ rO W t-<M « 
O -* la t-r-l t- 
(M C^ 1-1 *l 1-1 



"*> lO I— f-i t~- 



•*• W « lO Cfl « 

o -I" o t- ^ r- 



«c -- c; lO oc re 

r-l GO lO 2J M ^ 
<M ^ P^ (M 34 iM 



t- r» c; t- « 0-1 

— 00 >0 -M CC — 
C>J ,H ^ *1 SJ IM 



t- ea C-. to 00 M 

-- 00 lO N rt — ' 



i-i 


Q 


.: 


IS-o-n-S-S 


z 




o 


» 


u 


■s 


s 


i' • 



o Tj< «o I- — r- -c 



■uiaa 
'saiBOS 

•uiaa 
'XjnqaasnQ 

inaQ 
'uosaijio-^ 

•maa 
'ujuiai^ 

uiaci 
'Xiiauao3 

•uiaa 

'puOUlIQ 

•tUPQ 
'U0S>l-Bf 

mari 
•jjaJJeg 

•inaQ , 
'sit'N 

uiaa 
'SaiisitiBfj 

■uiaa 
'[aodjapue^ 

•da^ 
'ssuof -jfuag 

•day 
'jaujiaqxaa 



ec 5^ t^ 

00 OStf 
1— CJ 



o «5 r- 

00 00 «c 
^ (M 



<M 05 to 
00 00 •£ 
r-l H 



O 00 t- 
00 00 ^ 



390 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•day 

■day 

•day 
'ajSunp^ 

•day 
. , 'SjnquapnBjg 

•d9-H 
'loapQ 

•day 
'aai}iai;>I 

•day 
'uBuiasa;^ 

•day 

'lamuanf) 

■day 

■uiaa 
'japXas 

•day 
'jajAioj 

•IU3Q 

'auEJ3 

■day 
'saaqaoo\ 



CO C^ r-l ■«*< .-I 
•# «<3 CC >0 Oi 
(N ^^ CO ■— r- 



P5 -- r- CO i— 
Tf CO eC lO C35 
•M ^ CCi-H ,- 



•^ CC to O OS 



CJ i-H r-l r- .-l(N <N 



e* t- CO lo CD o ec 

O 1-t <-l r- T-i n (M 



O I— rH r- 1-1 <N S>1 



^ 00 00 

«o o3eo 



05 <M r- o ■^ <N 



I o -- ■* C) 

: O ee (M «o 

I (M i-< (M r-l 



i ?5 CO < 



O •<*< c 00 so CO 



^ CO c oos cow 






t- 2^ »0 05 O — 



; ct 
.M w S 



I 00 (M eo <N 
) o; «c iM to 



CS rH r-n— r- (M S^ i-l (N rH 



e^ CO ^ M M ; 



S<lr-CO--r- Oi-li-lr-i-ICvlOl r-^CIi 



■^ CO M »o C 



l~ (N CO O-j O 

— 00 o> oc r^ 
lO CO eo !X o: 



Cj r-l ^ r- r- (M (M 



<S t> US ^ Cft to CO 
^ It- (M O 00 O — 
O ri ^ 1-C ,— C<1 (M 



JQi t- O «* c:; ( 

'-'5 r- <N ic 00 I 



-^ lO oo r- to ■>*' ; 



' -^ f— r- ^ ?i n 



05 CO t* 



■ (Mr- 



CtO C 
<O<NC0 



'-H * t- 

«OIM CO 



t-CO r- ( 
00 CO CO < 
r- ;Me<l( 



r- CO —I OS CO ■* • 



IS 

125 



<— MS'^ (M 



I M 00 I 05 •* 



cneot- 

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t- OC 00 



O t^ CO o 
(M r- <N!N 

(M CO O 10 



>-"i S^ CO 



, (M to to US 

I O to (M r- 

I (M 1-1 (M 1 



00 -^ <M O to (M 00 



UOCJfa 



a c- 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



391 



• 1113(1 
'S3IB0S 



I CO o «o I 



t- 1- (N ea lo iM o I »<a 



Si C-l rH , 



'XjnqnastiQ 

•maa 
'uosai({o-a 



«;©)■* O O >~i. 



IIN lO<N 00 I <t 



Ie-5. 
2; 



lO O O 50 »o t- = 



i-H ©« tf) rOjOOlO l> 00 CO « ICI IM ( 



1 O lO c. 0«0i0 t- < 



•lUSQ 



«t (N rH 1-H 






'Xjpaaoo 



«0 00 O 
e* CI 



t~ 00 IN « «D <N 35 

00 O lO O O «0 IC t- tc 



I 
>< 

■J 
83 

•S 

§ 

o 

I 

t 

(D 

m 
m 



•uiaa 
'paouitQ 

'UOS^OBf 

•uiaa 
'naxiBg 

•uiaa ; 

'SatissnBjj 

•uiaQ < 
'[aodiapuB^ 

•day : 
'saaof -j-faag "^ 

■daa 



oo^-** oo 



05--;5-. 



'-H CO 00 t-» 00 <N M lO (N I 
b* 00 © lO O O to lO t- I 



IM t-(r-i 



i-i 



op 05 lO i^ so in oi a> yi ■ 



;0 -M «0 05 •"*! O OS 
rn 1-1 OJ t- t- to 00 



o to to t- to 



lO 00 (N <M (N CO "^ 



00 05 C^ ■* O M < 

«o o o to to t- < 



00 05 IC to •>*< O CI 
C5 O 05 00 t^ to 00 



00 ^: u-5 C5 eo o o 



1 CO P5 O I 
> O to iC I 



C>005I>t-t005 ot^osltooo— ooo 



05MC 
to 00 — 

e^ CI 



O 1-H I— rl i-H (M IM 



C-li—COi—i— •Si-ir-i—i-iC-ieil 



O ■^ O 00 ^5 M < 



05 CO t- o •* c 



-ctM to 

o •* <~ 

50 C^l I 



to * — oi e^ -.i* CM 

00 CO so 05 to CO to 
l-l CO CO — I- C^ rl 



a 

■J) t; 

rH C-1 



o 
o 

aa 



rt C-) r- C^ — <M 

f 



\^ s 



392 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



® 

I 

o 
D 

I 

t 

pi 
o 
O 





g 


>O00O» — OiOtO» 
<M IN CO N (M S'J .-1 (M 


|SSI 


isE 


Sis- 


1 


•da>i 
'piBung 


g 


iiiiiiSi 


pis 


|ISS 


COr-(4C« 


|l 


•da-a 
'aiSunj\r 


t^ 


iiiSissi 


Ipss 


sss 


l§S- 


|l 


•da^ 
SinquapuBig 


S 


iliSilSi 


pss 


IS£ 


ssl" 


1 


da^ 
'joapQ 


5 


ilisilsi 


|ssa 


isS 


SSi* 


1 


•da-^ 
•jailtaj:^ 


05 
C2 


IM(NO0iM(N(Nr-(N 


||SSI 


iss 


sli" 


|l 


■dan 
'oBuiasa^ 


05 




|SSS 


iiS 


S5l^ 


1 


da>T 

'jaqjnanf) 


§ 


iSiiiIsi 


psi 


Isg 


11^- 


1 


•da>i 




SiisiiSi 


|SsS 


ISS 


gS|^ 


^ 


'japiCas 


00 


OC0C0t~^05F-Tj< 
OOi^C-^COlOiO-'t- 
i—iTtlCOlN.MCICQtM 


§iis 


SsS 


gsgs 


g 
'-■i 


•dan 
'jaiMO^ 


§ 


iSlilall 


iiai 


|S2 


sssis 


1 


■uiaa 
*auBJ3 


Ci 


siiiiiii 


^ O c; <c 




«0 00 IT. iC 


g 


■dsH 
'saaqjoo^ 


g 




PsS 


ill 


SSi^ 


i 



Q 









ELECTION RETURNS. 



393 



■% 

o 
O 

I 

§ 

o 

0) 



'AanquasnQ 

uiaa 
'nosujiio-jj 

•UI3Q 
•UJ3Q 
•U13Q 

'paomiQ 

•UI30 

uiaQ 

'SniissnBjj 

•uiaa 
'laodwpuB \^ 

•da^ 
'sauof • j fa^^ 

•day 

'j3UipqX3Q 



■—•Tirtc-JC^coiMr^i 



1^^ 



;0 <M t- O — ■ 

- CO th in — L 

ly) <N « IM 3^ 



lO iTi CO th in — t- 



00 o t- I<I '*• 

o lo ir: r- t- 

iM s-1 eo 'M OJ 



'^^; 



t~ CO — (M 

I •* iC 1-1 (~ 

I CO (M "M CO (N (M 



CDiOiOCO'*if:i-'(~ 



1 ■^ S^ •« 5C — CJ 

. o o "s" lO i-i r- 
i « rM (M M iq >1 



;Diooo"!'<iOi-"r- --^(Mr-co 



00 iMicr-wt^Oi-irc 
eciCio<S'*<>0'— 'r- 

^•*C0(N(NC05<IS-l 



, M ■*! CO 
; OQ t- CO 
. !M»- 1- 



. rj< <M CD to ^ CO 
I lO CO ■^ lO ^ 1- 

I CO M ?a CO OJ <M 



! t- o t- in o c<j 
i -^ lO •^ lO — r- 

' CO (M OQ ?0 (N <N 



' CC 00 O CO 1— CO 

' 1/; j^ Tj< lo -> t- 
' r? (N CJ M IN (N 



O ■>^ 00 CO ^ •* 
lO CO "9< 'i~ — I t- 
CO !M CI M IN IM 



I t^ 05 0» IC CD 



OCO. 
>0 00 ( 

(N i<i : 



rt ; ; : 



W5 t- *J 

, iMt-CO 
N ^ r- 



3i 

O 



CO K W X 00 O-l C5 

?! •^ » "H" 00 «B r- 



C3 lO TJ< 00 C IM I 



f -^ TT OC T*" t- 



-^ C-. 'J- O c: < 



^! lo -^ a-. Tj- 1- in 

"1 ■»*< CS -*i 05 iC t- 



C5 C t-l^ 



. 3 o: 
J2 o 



I CM 

■■^ IS 

m 

1 IM 



394 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Grloucester County. 

Gov. Cong. -Assembly.- 



S 



i Jo S d = E ,= o •§ d S 6 



gpij rtQ §0, %A "SQ ^Pk ^^ 2Q Sf^ 

Clayton Township 254 211 12 220 221 15 268 195 13 

Depttord Township 252 127 13 236 131 12 255 116 12 

East Greenwich Township.... 156 130 13 139 137 13 155 125 13 

Elk Township 118 116 7 104 122 7 114 111 7 

Franklin Township... 174 238 26 165 241 28 177 226 27 

Glassboro, 1st Discrict 188 98 24 174 99 24 180 102 25 

2d " 103 129 15 100 129 15 102 124 15 

Greenwich Township 276 220 10 267 214 10 280 210 10 

Harrison Township 249 156 15 221 171 16 229 174 14 

Logan Township 121 188 14 106 194 14 126 173 15 

Mantua Township. 206 243 28 197 245 27 208 232 29 

Monroe Township 285 226 9 233 239 10 302 201 9 

South Harrison Township 102 55 11 95 54 11 99 53 11 

Washington Township 110 158 112 154 14 114 149 14 

West Deptford Township 205 125 10 180 122 10 219 104 10 

Wenonah Borough 66 29 11 61 32 11 67 28 9 

Woodbury, 1st Ward 141 65 9 138 64 9 162 43 10 

2d " 261 132 6 219 155 5 285 100 6 

3d " 192 123 11 147 140 12 225 86 10 



59U 320 26 SOU 359 26 

Woolwich Township 313 189 12 301 187 13 329 160 12 



Total vote in county. ..3772 2958 256 3415 3051 276 3896 2712 271 
Plurality 81U SOU 118', 

Social-Labor vote in county. 4; People's, 5. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



395 



•uiaa 
■uiaa 

'II^H 

•ra9Q 
•uiaQ 
•uiaQ 

•nsqqv 
•maa 

•ds-a 

'uiBSpuBja 

•maa 

'XlBQ 

•da^ 
'ujoqSuBj 

•maa 

'aaBJ3 

•da^ 
'saaqjoo^ 



N 00 O rO ■>1- N O 
ON t^ •<«-00 >0 MOO 
« x M !N CO N >< 



IT) I ^ ■»»- O O 00 



OnONHVO I^OONMNOfO 

t^ N OnOO 00 0» h O On 



On '4' M NO 00 I t^ 

M W M W M I 00 



N 00 O fONO O\00 •* 



N 00 ■<*■ ro (*> cooo •*■ 
ON «^ •♦oo NO rooo in 



1^ NO >n O •♦OO ON 0\ •-■. -Nh 
er> ■♦OnOOO O t^N OnOO 
Q0«CtrOC<M!MMWN 



IQ NO N/N O 

e:i TT o NO I 
00 « ^ 



e:i TT o NO 00 o t^ < 



r«. On ON «^oo 



00 ON M o a> ■ 



•S On On I 
00 ON O I 
r-i CI n I 



»-< mt^N -^r^ONONON- 
§5 ThONOoo o r^pioo < 

Q0C«NrONl-l(NMN< 



f-i « M N IH M W 



O N fO 1- VO 00 I «o 

<?"« o :* t? P^ |2 



N CO O <^ 3-NO ON •* 
ON r* ■"TOO NO rooo m 



O>00 -^OO NO rooo in 



ONOO of^'nfooN'<h|'--''i--* 



vo c^NO in t^ m ON 



^1 



1 J J-Sf 11 S'S.f 


r^ M ooo 


w H « M N >" 


1 


piHi?rH 




WNO ON« t*. t^ 

on-^on-* mON 

« M IH M N « 


1 


lisifs^sit 


||n2| 


2^2-82-?2^ 


1 


1-s ■+ ■♦ w moo 00 On ■-' t^ 


|li1 


S'^I'S-^^ 


1 


i^.^srsfr-sf 


pss??^??? 


II 


ssa<s^::r??i5:^ 


8!r,js 


S5:^S8nJS- 


|g 



00 W M fO ! 



«^ On >n O OnNO no t>.NO N I g 

S5 g^SS 2^2-8 J??§ ^ 

1^ ONf^t^fn-*» ononm I >5 



§5 On O N •* ■* ■<*• moo 00 
OOOn- m On-^O romON 



•x- in m O o 



i t^ in On O 50 ON -"l-NO 



I moo NO m t^ On •<»-no 



, j= j3 j= j3 j: _= 



■o ■£ -5 "S - ■£ •£ 

m -"f inNO t^oo On 



396 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



if V. 

a 



■da^ ,2 ^vg* g, fi. :;!, g, 8 

'SIABQ " " 


|5.?^^-^ 


^" 


"3 a vio t^^O in t^ in a^ 

'sssBg - - 


gS.^vH^'S 


;?;s 




gs^^^i?;?;?;^ 


•day vg ^Iv^ ?> S. Si, 5s 8 




n S 



•ziiBAvqDc; 



IIOA 



CIS a lo r-vc in r- m CN o 
'ojanj^ " " 

dvr Pl-*'>4-OMmmo 

Q'd; vo t^\c in i^in oo 

•d3M N■<^^lOclN^^o 
'oJnqqs^AV " " 

u^a vo t^^ lnf^lnc^o 
d3H vo " vo 5>S ?; 5. 3 

'J3>100JJ " "^ 

■TirD/-T O ^~•0 m-«-0\t^"i- 
"^"^Cl ON t^ -"S-oo >o M 00 m 

'japnjg '^"►-"><^f^«N 

'"•^U. oM^ -^00 \o moo in 
'paiqoAjB^^Y " " ^ '^ '^^ '^ ^ 

UJ3Q CM^-*-oovo moo m 



0\ -c 00 vo t^ CM 



■>»■ f) m ■* I "-i o\>o ooOO«f^Ct~|^ 
-■~-MtxMm-«-'»-*o>m' — 



M ^ iT.vo in -^ 



>o o\ Trvo <N 



vc in in N mm 



On^ ooi-'0'->£30in-c 
-<r^i-im-*Tr-<»-ovm 



;- o\ -^vo M 



vO in m n •♦ rs I ^i o>00 00«mNt^0t^|i;~ 



r.\c in in N m m 



; \0 >0 N mi 



N vo ^c in\o N m ( 



*« t^Hi lO■♦•^T^c^; 



C\ t^OO -"J- M N VO OOO I ^-^ 



in -^ «»■ ■<*-oo 



m (N -«• o\ --■ - tv w 



?-; O f^oo O ■* - t^ 0» t^ I ^^ 
~l CM r> iH m ■<*• •♦ -s-oo f- 



<? OMn o •♦00 m in o vo 



OS O 00 « r^ O 



^~ ■•l- '4- r^ -^00 00 OS r^ 0\ I Cj < 



is •* <N O -^oo OS OS O "It- 



Tl-TfO 1^00 OsOlMVO 



OS O t>- 1- 00 ■«• OssC 00 



O O t^N Os-^wsOl 

O .. o - - ' — 
m N c< 



o - o c\-^o -wmosj^ 



^ j=^ j= 



■a •£■£•£ -£-5:5 

m -^ inso t^co o> 



^ ■«■ inso «>.oo Os 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



)97 



g 

1 i 



•uiaQ 
•maa 
•uiaa 

'Xaaag 

•ma(j 
'uaqqV 

•uiaa 

'«0UIJ3aDI\[ 

•da^ 
' uJoqSuB J 

•UI3Q 

'auBJO 

•da^ 
'saaqJooA 



N O M f) IN N 



^j- O O ^ -^ "^ r^-T 



M « O « 



C) e) « « N M 



p) N M (S N 



•- 00 ■^00 ■<»• t^ 

N N 11 N « P) 



rO 0\ •*<> N 00 

o e» w c* t< N 



t^ ro t^oo -"t-oo 

>0 r<l Ov N ^ N 



m -* t^ O 00 t^ 



-♦ O 00 in o\ o\ 



C> O •"• M •♦XO 

en xo t^ m t*>oo 

U'S « "I i-> N IH 



8>?; 



COt>.0\roO - MVO»0 



^ \o i~» in f^oo m lo 



sti in o N « in o\vo f^ I i-H O g\ » ;* in £• fi I S 
OS -^ O •* f>ioo ro N ■>*• I e^ vo vo ■<«• <*>oo en in 00 



O ^ o ■* fooo -4- « ■*• 



ej t>. (yfO « in O J>. J 






ft 


vS 


JJ. 


a 


Tj- M 


5- 


5n 




N 






N « 


M 




■^ 














^ 


% 


ti. 


&. 


cninoo 
rooo « 


in 


is 








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<* 


% 


a 


s> 


^^ 


% 




■^ 


<N 








f) 





'5-?rs;-|i^v8a 



O ^ oc N in 
m moo o in 



2 



00 moo o m OMO ci ■* t^>o J- ;♦ « on 



m ■♦ ts. •*■ o f» I >« 

vo moo mvo o d 



■;}■ M ■<■ moo -^ m i»- -;*i 



S.-5 M ►- -^ mo M 00 
i-i «n « ■«■ moo ■* N 

•|»W«I1H10P«0 



»o \o vo ■* r^ m 



>s in O O OO t^ 
t^ -^ t^xo m in « 
t^ H C4 (s n 



xs-o-ot; -■= 



•i3T3t:t:~~ — 



3! 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



1 

O 

I 

I 

?! 
O 

O 

§ 
-d 



'SIABQ 

•assBg 
•d3H 

'zlJBAVllDg 

•da^ 
'aojonj^ 

•da^ 
'ajg uj 

•da-a 
•day 
•da>i 

•day 

'jajjooH 

•UISQ 

'japnjg 

■uiaQ 
'piailOAiBAv 

uiaa 
'aaqcp^JI 



VO vo <o -^oo 



ONl^OnvOrON-* 



(MOO O 



b« moo fi c\ fo M o I Ok. 



vo vo « ■♦oo •«»- 



rOOO I 50 M M \0 fO N tN. 



N I &^ in o\ ( 
in I po i«-\o v 



fOM O I Ok. 



vo vo « '*oo ■»>-toooooMooo»no\>noo-* two '♦•■*« Ov I ^^ 

MMIINM lOjM M M le^ MNNP) |c> 

•♦mCONOOOO lOoNHVOrOOVOOON lQO>nONWM(NO\lO 

vo\o«'*t^-*'Qoooowooo>noMn»^-* t>.vo ■*•<»- n oo I *^ 



\a Tj- ev> „ 00 < 
\0 vo vo ■♦ r> 

H H H M H 



IO « M ts. CO N tnoo CO I r^ m o rooo ■* n eo I C 
toooooMooomoiinOo-^ t^vo co ■>*■ cfl oo 8^ 
0>M H H It* HMNM l<S 

vo ■♦rorooN I k 



vo vo »o -^00 ■«r«ococ0N00O'noN>n 



00 Tl- c< covo 0\ I e^ 
\0 vo vo 'i-OO TJ- j^ ( 



Meomco>novml«* ^ -- .- - - 
-"pioop>novto|po ■^^ vp ^ 5" M CT> I r^ 



w cj rrs w | i-* 



ooinp»piroov|Oif»Mt^coovoooco|e* moo •>*■ O m tN, m i <to 
vo vo vo -n-oo -^itooooocioootnoNioloo •*vo vo i- ■* w o\ I e^ 

MMmNM OJH M H ?; MMWW |C| 

ooin«n'*uio\|;o(Nwvo-«»-in moo coi«*»nc»N>ii-ivoM ioq 
vo vo vo ^00 ■<*•^^ooooc^ooo«nov«nlQo•* t^\o •*•■*« ov I t^ 

MIHMNM 05M M H |?: HMO« jO 

t>.inNroNO\|OoNHO»rr)Nvor>-*|^vr>Ovc<%OinNM |«q 
vo vo vo ■♦OO Tj-IJoOOOOMCOO^^Ovmoo ■^VO vo -"f Ti- « Ov I N. 

OcnOvmHO lOof«^|-'OOM(^l^*o^co|i»>nMroovC^vOM if.. 
vo vo m cooo inl^oooowooQinovmloo'* t^vo m •«»■ m ov I to 



wooNcoiHOO i&jvog\-*w»no\t^fn|~» ovoo o vo m o ■* i e* 

vowovNvON lOi-^O-* cooo CO w ■* I 6» in m in rooo co m I »^ 

(MNMNNN e^MWMMNNNM lU^OHMNHMM ISTJ 

w Ov fn >*• cnoo lOiVoov-^McnOt^cnicoOMM •*vo o •* i to 

voSovNvoN Ci-<»-o-<J- fOOO •*N-*l^vot^inrroocoin|oo 

Nf)M«NN eowPlMl-lMONlH |«i«>-lMCgi-iMw erj 



in moo en «n 






T •<♦• invo tvoo 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



399 



I 

k 

I 

o 






•uiaa 
'sjanOA 

•uiaa 
'IFH 

103(1 
•UISQ 

•uiaa 
'Xnuag 

•uiaQ 
•uiaa 

'110UIJ3Q0I\[ 

•da-a 
'uJoqSuBj 

UISQ 

•aoBJO 

•da^ 
'sasqJooA 



ro ro ro CTi O >0 



f) M -^ N mOO ao 
■♦ ro f»l 0\ O »0 iQ, 



>QiwwO\'»P^"<'^'^ IXSrOt^ rOOO t^ O Ox I g 
,-.O^O^OtnfOM^o^N|^0 « ^ f? J^^ VQ I g 



O OsO 00 ro O 00 00 I ?^ C< f?^ " «0'g 00 I ::• 
« MC3^■^^»« »^M >o t^*^ <^00 t«. O 0\ o 



ro ro ro t> O ui 



»^ O 00 vo in >o o>oo ON 1 O _ 



fn t^-*00 00 O OS 



0\ N ■*• ■♦ M 0\ Oi 
<rj CO O^ Ox O >n >J5 



i\O-^cOWO00 le^NNO; O 00 irivo I e« 
I Ox •*►- wOOH l<of^'^<*»0\t^OOx'-< 



0\ O •* iri N CO 
f<i m ro OS O «A 



ro N ro Ox 0\ >n 



^ 2 s'S^S^S-s* 5 I §^'?F s-e^l ^ 



II 



Ox xrivo •♦ -♦ oxxo ooM I255"^iri$^ 'Zf^^ I ?* 
SSwciSofOwcojOfOfiwncnHiH |5o 

toO«Osr^'nr*t«.M lS-*-N" Os ox « 5 I »i 
Oc»w8«NCOHfo|^«ciP)Nro«M Ijo 



is CO t^ r<i00 xo O Ox I 00 






Ol. 



, J= J5 J= JS JC 



(«j ; ; ; 



JJ 

r 



400 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



day 

'StABQ 

•day 

day 
'jwSog 

■day 

•day 
. 'IPA 

•day 
'aojunj^ 

•day 
'aiguuj 

•day 

•day 

•day 

•day 
'ja5(ooH 

■uiaQ 
'japnig 

•uiaa 
'piaqDAiByw 

uiaa 

'jaqBpx 



t^OO irivo t^vO 



-a- N to t~« O "^ 



fj fi O vo O >o 
r~00 irjvo tv\0 



ro I O w f) w 

^ dvo lOWOvrvt^O |0OOO-*nO 0\V0 t> 
'rif^'*0'«-t^f0t^f0M^OWP«>00vnir> 



« N d N M 



m ^ N N PI « fO I 



t^OO lO^O t>.vO ^ 



^ P> f) N « 



t^CX) U1\0 tvvO 



- M « M 1 



t^cD lOO t^vo I ^ 






05 N 



N 0< O N O 

>*• tx ii-oo rn 

N N f<^ M CD 



■>-H 

i 






?S! 






O « -^vo O 00 t^ 
O « ^^-<^ « in>o 
ro P) w w fo M M 



•* r>. t^ -^00 o> 1 



§8 



c t^\o \o w 00 o\oo o I to N m w vo mvo "^ 
•-I N ■♦O ■♦t~-<N t^rO«o 0\P1\0 ■^0 iT)"^ 
iSNc<«<NeiroMcnc>cspi«picoMM 



P) ovo P) 
ro r>. rooo 

M.M P) 






«n-<«^.^^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



401 



tU3Q 






oovo c* mmfOON-^M 
r^ o^ o m ■♦oo o r^ M 






•rasa 

'l[0iJB3 



o\ -^00 t^ m lo t^ ro w 
t^ o\ o\ >o -foo o t~ M 

M M H N PI W M 









M H N N M M 



i-Hrot^rvoeiooo«n 
•ooovo «vo o O moo 



131^ rovo rf> O 0\ m f» O O 

-$i-iN(N«MnMi-ip) 



~* rooo 00 N o 00 « C3\ •* 
«i 00 vo N \o O o moo o 

-^MINNNPIOl-IMW 



hoovo p)\o o\o mo\0 

t-MNMCNMNl-iMp) 



N N W M N 



»5 t^M O f<ir>.0»'*c^ 

o5 o\ mvo 00 m ■♦vo O 



vo mo •*■*« Noo 

0\ m\0 00 m ■♦^O 0\ 

H M M N c< '-' 



00 o» m \r)00 



SI m N o> m 



ON m moo m m<0 O 



;o f-- rooo N i^^ N t^ 
ci 0\ m moo m ■♦vo o 
00 mmmnowm 



III 



•uiaa 

uiaa 
'MaqqV 

•clan 

'uJoq3uE(j 

'auBjf) 

■dan 

'saaqjoo^ 



00 m M -^vo M t"- ■ 



O mvo 00 m mvo o 



>o N mvo "*• t^ ■* M 
O O m ■♦oo o f^ H 



e*Noor<.f«pioo>iom 
"Ssoovo wvo O O movO 



50 O vo fooo M 00 m ■♦vo 
c^oovo « mo\omr^ON 

-*MMINNMI-IMMM 



mvo 00 00 00 ov ov ■♦vo 



» OvOv- 
►« mvo ► 



oo « M mvo moo m co 

■2^;?s 



o\OvmN -Tt-sov" 



Ovoo m mvo m o> CO ro 



O m o> I 
■<roo O I 



M!*C«<MM<Nl-l>->W 



M N M M « 



eovOOt^^MNNWWt^ 

tooo f^fivo o M movO 







1 M 


^ 8 mvot»*mmvO O 


1 


00 
00 


>s moovo ■♦Mm moo 
00 ** M "n "S w S I? "^ 


£5 

5 






Is 


If 


Ss^i^HH^ 


1 


8. 

00 


SliJ^vS-^KSS^^ 


IS 


J? 



05 \o m Ov Ov ■♦ OvvO t^ 
O Ov lo moo vo ■♦vO O 

Oi HNMNWMM 



Qomr^Ooo N 0-, ■♦ovlto 



I j3 J5 j: jr j= ja 



,j:^j3*j3j: 



,^ J2 j3 J3J3 



26 



402 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



H in 

o 
O 



'SIABQ 

•dan ' 
'assBg 

•d3H 
'uaSog 

•da^ 

'zjJBAVtJOS 

•d3>j 

'IFA 

•day 
'aoJunj^ 

•dan 
'aiSuuj 

•day 

•day 

'nanqqsB^ 

■day 

•day 
'aanooH 

•uiaa 
•aaprug 

•maQ 
'piaqoAiBAV 

•maa 
'jaq«ia;5I 



M 1/100 o M lo >n o O 



©5 w moo o 



o\OTfN-^f^OMC» l9:iH >Aoo o 1-1 to m o o 



iOOO 0^00 lO-^in-* 
OOMOO -^t^O M CM 



1.-5 r<1vO CJ vo 0\vO t". O 00 
5(5 M inoo o O lo m o O 



f) t^ rovo 00 00 M N vo 
M moo o O lONO O O 



I VO •«»■« w 00 M M 00 

1 looo o M in m O O 



flMD -^ fO O mvo H o 






moo o H >o m I 



l-vO t^ O M 1-1 ■>!■ 0\ ■ 

I VO N VO O ►< "100 < 

« N M N W M M < 



^ ro I i~-f ro r^oo N 0\ 



t^OO N 0\ 0\ N O •<»• 



o CO <n o\ •* o» I »^ 






• 00 vo o H m N IP 



m rs o oo ro 



M O fO I p 



it^OOO M 0\'*0\l ^ 



~* m I- O w N t^ M^ 
t^ Oi lovo 00 m •*»o o 

00 MNMMNWM 



to O N t~ N t^ OVO 00 I >~l 

oi o\ lo "100 m -^^o O I to 

00 M«I-1C1NM«I~* 



vg^ 



fivo o\ m t^ "--J 



I H 

,2^ 



H 

Q 

d 
z 

o 


•Gi : : ; : : 2 : 


u 


i--'-----'-'- 


m 


0= - — 5 ; : : 




G: : 5 ; i : : : 
>> 



ro ■* mvo t^oo o\ 



M N ro ■^ mvo t^oo 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



403 






^O (»0 00 I Oi 00 o •<*• 



»-< ro CTioo I !-< fO I 



ro 0\vO t^ P) ■* 



>5vO t^oo *-i 



•UI3Q 

'SJ3110A 



«5S -t tr\ ■* \rt crt xrt ^^^o t^oo I S't 






•raaa , 






•S5fJBI\[ 



§_? -r o\oo St (*> • 



^<g^|S5 



S ro MOO M 
50 <N rO <N ■♦ 



•«»■ CTi H fOOO ■>*• 
w N « N PI M 



<3i ■<*-oO ro 
Jo VO t^oo 
ers M PI rf> 



IIQ •>*• PI O 00 I <t 
S^ rOM ONPi Ko 



I ^ H t^ PI 

I ij^vo r^oo 



C5 W 00 M O 00 •* 
to •<*• f^ •<*- m ro tn 
5SJ M N N « PI « 



&5 PI VO ON OS O ■* 
<3. -^h m N ro ro lo 

St M P« « PI « PI 



«o vo t^oo 
eo M M CO 



n\ 2 



•uiaa 



•uiaa 
'nsqqV 



O C< MM 

eti O N 00 



•uiaa 
'noiuaaQDi^ 

•da^ 

•UI3Q 

'ujoq3aB(j 

•uiaa 
'atiBJQ 

ds^ 

'saaqjoo^ 



OOOOO PI 

r^ t> T^oo 
m w n p< 



On lO fi O ro 

>H PO M OS PI 
to PI PO N •* 



.-Hir)Ov>-< O 0\t^l>H 



IOi t^OO PO O 00 IT) I ,~| 
to •^ro-'Mnrom ^^^ 
S?WPIPIPIPI« ?^ 



N ro 00 w 



to o "•jvo o\ o\ ■*• 



§5 roosoo 

O N HI M 



00 000 PO 



p» P< o o>o 

«o p* m« ■>*• 

U5 PO (*> fovo 

©^ t^oo vo ei 



•-* M PI ro 

^^ N O 00 
>~i\o r^vo 



»Q)\0 vo I 
-^ PO -^ I 



ivS I pj PI I 



J* in t». o in lo »>. 

fet M PI PI N PI PI 



■fH ro ■* tx ovo vo I «^ p< 



g| ^ 



OT -o -a-z ^-o-o ti -o -a -s 



fl - - - 



404 



ELECTION RETURNS. 





•day 

'SIAEQ 


«<3i;?gi 


e^ w (N M 


Ci ro in M m 

0\0 t^\o O 


§ 


J^fO P-OO V0>0 


8 = H 




•day 
'assBg 


N "I M 


Sss^f 


|S8^?5^ 


eo<c t-M ino M 


|i 


fff* 






2<S^c3 


so « N M 


gglCS? 


s 


^^?.^«S^^ 


g = ?l 




•d.H 

ZJJBMUDg 


n'oO lATO 


50 N W N 


S^'^s 




SS{t^<gv? 


i 


s?l 




•day 

'llOA 


roSs.S'cg' 


&i o\oo in 

?-. w M H 


;^ S-c? f^ ^ 




¥^^'SS;S^ 


§18^ 




> day 

'aojunj^i 


ID M VO <S 
« 00 lOOO 


?,-< H (N « 


i^^^2 


§ 

-* 


JJ^^R^vSs^ 


8 


m 




•day 


Noo indo 


5ri w N M 


§^--2 


3 


Jf! :;?-?§ vgvS- 


i 


!H 






NOO lOOO 




gStQ^g^ 


13 


SSjRcg^vSv^ 


i 


o in w 


1^ 


•day 
'ujnqqsB^v 


ro moo f> 

N C» IDOO 


gs^^^ 


i^"^2 




8 


n% 


a 

1 


•day 


(^ N 00 M 
CJOO "^00 


Is's? 


g^^-^ 


1 


ro (v^ t^co ■© \0 


1 


i^% 


1 

-P 


•day 
'ja>tooH 


^'^^^ 


i^H 


«fi com t^o 


5 


l^ivg^SvSvS- 


i 


m 


•uiaQ 
'japrug 


N IT'S '^ 


e^ M 11 M 


Is^ss^s^ 


so 


H O\00 VO (» 00 


If?!' 


S^ 


•luaa 
'piaqoAiB^ 


l,^H 


^-lOO ■- M 


||>2<g^ 


5? 


H N N W (N N 


1^*?^ 


1 


•uiaa 
'i3ilBia:>I 


00 0\ lO o\ 


Sl CM M M 




1 


J^^JSS, 


1 


lO t^ f) 
O t^OO 



cS • 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



405 





•UlSQ 


■♦00 t^ 


05 


11^ 


11 


t 


1 


IH%1 


1 





t^ in in M vo 

■♦ t^OO M o 




•uiaa 
'saaiioA 


"2S"S 


1 


??!■ 


1 




I 


1 


N K N H O 


1 





t^inin M\o 
2" tj-oo H On 




•uiaa 


^s^ 


§ 


J?l 


S 


IS 


"IS 


llT^l 


i 


s 


t^ U-. in M «o 






■??? 


1 


jS| 


§ 


5r 


t 


1 


r^r^i 


l-H 


o 


•<f m m M \o 

■<»■ t^OO M C> 




1 tuaa 
- 'XqdjnjM 


^?a 


§ 


5- Oro 


Ss 


%. 


i 


nr^i 


1 


2 


^K<^2^ 




uiaQ 


»:?? 


1 


^ 0>ro 


ig« 


% 


S 


llT^l 


p 


5:K^2^ 




'Auaag 


■2 1-2 


s 


^^? 


?J8 


I 


S 


iir^i 


1 


o 


?^«=^ 


1:3 


'ijaqqV 


M N K 


1 


^oi^ 




\ 


1 


sHss 


1 


2 


^2:ss^ 


%-. 


•ui9a 

^ •»OUIJ3Q0I\[ 


H N w 


i 


IH 1-1 « 


1 


g 


I 


1 


O « N » (N 


llfc^sa 


r 


' -do-a 

'lUKSpaBjg 


i~- 


s 


ff?? 


S 


fOOO 

M H 


i 


^s:gs?SI 


i 


2^2^S-8 = ^ 


t. 


•man 
5 ^FQ 


-rr? 


i^ico in in 

00 M 0\ fO 


s 


« 


I 


«5 


sH-ls^s 


1 


o 


-* t^OO M Ov 


1^ 


'luoqSuBj 


8- 


g 


2SS 


8 


Ss 


i 


5- M\o in o> 


I 


N ■♦ M r«.co ON 
o\ o> t>. 0\ >H t^ 

W M « M H M 


S . 




00 rovS 


i 


??J 


i 


l\ 


1 


l^ag;? 


so 


H 


?^*^^ 


1 <^ 


5 d^H 

'saaqjoo^ 


8;<s^ 


^ 


H= 


^-^ 


s, 


J 


to 


5.S>|^^ 


T. 


Is^^s^^? 



rt - ^ 



St3 



406 



ELECTION RETURNS, 





'SIABQ 


^^■^ 




%l\ 


:c 


^?!|vgS§ 


il" s^s^g 




'assBg 


fn 


8^ 


S^^? 


l~2^ 


g 


Si>?'?,vgi§ 


is^gs-r 




d3>T 


8 


g:S 


?? 2 n S 


iE^2 


5-5 


^^^Ir^S. 


STs^^r 




da-a 


^"i^S 


?^2?n 




CO 


W N -<-vo ro 
■♦ fo\o in o\ 


|Ss^?-8° 




•doy 

'IIOA 


c\ a\ 


:c ^ (^ f^ 


r; ~ "^ 


CO 


(S m t^ ro 


|Ss^^8J° 




'3oanni\[ 


8 


^^ 


r.0^2-^ 


-_; O-S- 




N ro -* r^ ro 

■^ roo "-> o 


|Sn^^8" 




) '31§UUJ 


1 


?:S 


IjO'^^ 


s?^ 


1 


(S ro rf r> fO 
-a- mvo lo o\ 


§2^2^5-8° 




J -da^ 

5 'XiOlS 

^ dan 
; 'ujnqqsE^w 


8 


ss 


t?^2-^ 




% 


rj ro 'J- t^ ro 
^ roo in 0\ 


|Sn^S.8 = 


.S 1 


§ 


^s 


^2^2 


;( MVO 


i- 

-"^i 


w ro fooo ro 
■* rovO in o 


00 o\»fi. o' 


6 

1 


■day 


I 


?:vg^ 


^~2?? 


J"* Si,"? 




^ rovo m ON 


00 o\o\ t^ o' 


1 


'«>looH 


I 


g:S 


15 ^ ^ ^ 


iE>2 


i 


I- ro o\\0 N 
'i-rojninoN 


is^l^^s^' 


?3 

6 


•uiaa 
'japnje 


M N " 


i'^'2 8' 




O \0 iH t^ On ■>!- 
*> OS rooo 0\ ro 
■<r M M (N « M 


f^ -4- ■«■ ro 


i 


uiaQ 
'ppqDAjBAV 


00 


%'^ 


l?f S^ 


•is f) ro 


00 

•3 


IHs^i 


i2^P 




•uiaa 


=2 


P4 " 


;^^§v^ 




?;t 


-^ -"J-OO 
O -»-»0 ONN 


1^2^^* 






ELECTION RETURNS. 



407 



•5 1 



•uiaa 
•uiaa 

'SJ3110A 

•uiaa 
'IFH 

•uiaa 

•uiaa 
'AqdJnj^ 

•uiaa 

•uiaa 

'naqqV 

•maa 
'MouijaQDjAj 

•day 
•uiaa 

'uJoqSuBj 
•uiaa 

'3UBJ3 

•day 
'saaqjoo^ 



"^ W M « 



to N N N N 



t~- tvvo 

-M PI " 



« ro m -M (M m t^ 



00 t^vO O 



ONOO o 
M M « 



o>oo o 

« <^ IT) 

11 1-1 N 



C3N0O H 
PH M N 



Xb N M M 



00 t^vD On I 
«S P< IH H I 



?-» VO VO 0\ O 
>~< P» rOVO ■* 

IQ « « M w 



00 00 VO O O 

'-I « mvo ■* 

UJ M H H H 



•fj 00 VO ! 



00 r-. p) •«• ( 



•«■ '-I p» ro r~ ■* 



5 p) c; 



fot^-^lt^vo ooomrom 



^ M ■* t^ t^vo PI I e^ VO O 
b^voot^tnwinoo" C3\ 

toWNPlPlNM -*PI« 



t~ fi o>m m I 



tor«wp)W«ci -*M 



PI N 
OvOO 



§ OVO 

^ p< ~ 



S^ VO 

j^ in 



to P) O « C« P» 



e-5 -^ t^ o\ o VO 
- O ^^vo fi 
p« PI « M 



|§2vS I 
I i* N PI I 



§?v8^ 



Psi rn t^ I O VO O 



M M M >-'i 



00 t>. PI -"T PO 



O O VO VO VO 

00 t^ PI •^^ m 



S^ 


N PI PI PI PI 


SI'S 


§8^^ 


^« 


S22~2 


iH~ 


iH 


Sf 


PI m ovin PI 


p2^ 


12-: 


ScS 


in m ovvo t^ 

(M " 00 PI 


l]E?8v 


23 -^-^ 



to ov 
t^ in 

■-* PI 






8.§ 



?|vg 



a, 



Q 

ll 






408 



ELECTION RE TURNS. 







T^ 


i 


vH^S*^^ 


|<S'2§;^<sg 




2~ 


Si 


^l 






•assBg 


OO O IT) 

o 


1 


^%vS? 


gSvS^S^I 


is" 


50 


\l 


ir 




da-a 
'laagog 


o'ovcw 


i 


g.^^^ 


^cS'SgJ'SSS- 


1 


S~ 


15* 


?? 


ir 






0^<» 


i 


in>o NO 


r:~2^g^8.?^ 


s 


p»oo 


^ 
S 


r^ 


^00 




■d3H 
'11° A 


o'o^t» 


i 




%-^r,^l-l 


1 


2~ 


St 


? = 


gioo 




3 d^H 
3 'aojunp^ 


8^^ 


i 


O vn ir,\0 


S-s-^"2 


1 


2~ 




8? 


c 




ONcS 


i 


?.^^^ 

" 


e» M M M 


1 


2~ 


s 


1? 


S-f 


%\ 


- dan 
5 'Xjois 


S^^ 


i 


as^^^ 


|:<g'2g^=S<S'^ 


1 


NM 


6* 


H 


2^°° 




^ ' d9>i 


S^cS 


s 


?.^^^ 


r:^2^s;2^.^'S 




2~ 


?3 


?5 


1? 




O 

1 


■d3H 


S^<5 


^ 


as'^^ 


|«2^8;Scrs^ 


i 


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fO 


8? 


1 


day 
'ja^ooH 


S'§^cg 


i 


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WS O. O ON O in yr^ 
tN, t>. M 0\ ►> 00 N 

!M 1- H K 


1 


fj>^ 


^ 

s 


en 


8^ 


6 
o 


•uiaa 
'japnjg 


in .o o 
PI fO in 




ro moo N 
N <M in ro 


^ t^ in in in t^ m 


1 


^81 


1 




I-: 


53 


•uiaQ 


- VO O 


1 


p» ro t~ •* 


to « M W N N M 


1^81 


1 


^J 


^ PI 




•UI3Q 




GO 


rxvo 
CM m r^ -"l- 


« P) P) P) N N p. 


§5 2^ 


1 


M VO" 


Sl> 



^ ■ 






;z;'^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



409 



:3 

o « 

i ' 

^ 'i. 

S ° 

o 'o 

O t 



17 






•uiaa 






»* M w N ►* w 






90 fOM 






•UI3Q 



ll«H 






^ 



> >0 N fO N ■«• 



iH I 50 row 



00 o> N I 1-1 m ■♦ 






•luaa 






■uj^a S s; 



in r<i I 00 ►- O •* "i^o 



OOMM ^. COM WJWN I 



?^ ro ■ 
*■> t^ ( 

50 fO ( 






'iwqqV 



•uiaa 

'jjouiaaQOJV " " 

•dan SP; 

'uiBSijuBjg "^ " 

'jspAug ^ " 
■dan Sv^ 

'auBij) '" " 



00 3ivO « f) N ■<^ 



sjoo 5j 
Oi m o 



Ci I- 00 o\ f^ t^ 
eo \n c^vo 00 •>*■ 

PO w fO 






vo N ro PI •'T 



00 >0 w vo 00 00 

G^ moo vo 00 •«■ 



-c» ro 11 \o vo O 



^ OVO 
eo ■«• lA 

t^ fO « 



I Oi ro O I 



og ov t^ 



2IS>S |i5 



CO (N I iQl 



%* 00 ir> I eo 
ao ■*<) -A 



i-O) o vo I «o 



So °>» 



2s 



410 



ELECTION RETURNS. 





•d3H 


00 >n 


ft-5 


rOMVOVO 0\ 


■>.-5 


OM 


S 


-4- o\ 


eooov3 


^ 


N 






00 m 


e* 


lOOOVOOO ■«»• 


so 


roin 


O M 


so '«-<o 




•^ 






'SIABQ 


M M 


e^ 








«s 




»~l 


'"' 


00 






•d3H 


N N 


^ 


M VOOOOO vo 


C5 


■*■* 


00 


N 0\ 


i-^OO -<*■ 


1 


^ 






OMO 


-* 


r^woo M tn 




in t^ 




(N ■* 


^^. t^o 


00 






'assEg 




■n 


IN M f»l 


00 


ro N 


'O 








Tn 






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^S'gxlS'v^g;^ 


§ 


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^^ 


2^ 


^?^^^ 


to 


35 






'jjagog 




o 


« CO 


t^ 


ro N 


to 




^ 


^ 


s 






•d3^ 


5vro 


^ 


?;<s^,3-s> 


^ 


in M 
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^ 


2^ 


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;2 


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'z^JBAi^DS 




^^ 


M m 


S^ 


ro P) 


'"■' 




■M 


~^ 


1 






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M ■* 


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•<t- MVO -* M 


i^OO M 


s 


H 0\ 


^•^s 


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0\ m 




looo >o 00 in 


^ 


rom 


00 


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Tj- 




•1 


i 'IIOA 




S^ 


M m 


«^ 


CO N 


lis 




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^ 


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^i^oo^ooo >n 


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P) 


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^' 


M ro 




mci 


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■^ 


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ri 


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rrv 




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moovooo ■* 




rom 




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1? 


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2~ 


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■30 


M m 


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+3 




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i^ 


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1 


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i 


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c 


fl 


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§ 


wvo ■♦in M 


^ 


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^ 


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M S" 


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ro M 


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M N N " w 


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1 






H H 



ELECTION RETURNS. 411 

Hunterdon County. 

Gov. —Con, Assembly.-^—- 



§05 gQ =i. •spi |q §« xoj JsQ «Q ^Oh ^piH 

Alexandria 68 210 8 67 208 74 68 201 203 8 9 

East Bethlehem 34 78 6 34 77 34 34 77 77 6 6 

West Bethlehem 66 177 4 68 171 65 64 172 175 4 4 

Clinton 189 305 39 185 302 171 224 275 272 67 38 

Clinton Borough 145 84 119 109 119 124 110 103 1 1 

Delaware 121 324 48 121 321 121 119 314 320 49 51 

East Amwell 146 218 9 145 218 132 137 235 220 '• 16 

Franklin 90 176 15 87 174 83 84 179 175 18 16 

Frenchtown 136 110 16 137 106 130 136 106 105 17 17 

High Bridge 159 128 8 150 125 151 153 123 127 8 8 

Holland 165 197 10 164 195 157 IGl 199 196 11 11 

Kingwood 126 229 20 134 212 151 125 197 217 18 18 

Lambertville, 1st Ward 81 220 4 81 211 78 78 214 215 4 4 

2d " 174 176 5 179 174 173 173 178 177 5 5 

3d " 260 243 8 268 232 261 261 240 237 8 9 

515 639 17 528 617 512 512 632 629 17 18 

East Lebanon 79 141 20 80 134 72 74 138 138 23 23 

West Lebanon 122 111 9 121 110 120 122 110 108 10 10 

East Raritan 163 269 22 165 265 154 167 271 260 22 24 

West Raritan 176 280 36 178 280 173 182 275 275 36 36 

North Readington 116 247 16 117 235 117 121 233 231 17 16 

South Readington 99 150 7 97 148 95 99 148 146 6 7 

East Tewksbury 78 172 12 79 171 80 80 169 167 11 12 

West Tewksbury 86 151 11 86 150 82 86 151 143 15 11 

Union 78 151 4 73 154 70 70 158 157 4 5 

West Amwell 84 109 5 82 106 83 85 108 106 5 5 

Junction Borough 86 115 12 90 111 89 92 112 112 12 11 

Stockton Borough 55 85 5 57 83 53 56 86 83 6 4 

Total vote in county 3182 4856 359 3164 4782 3088 3175 4779 4745 400 377 

Plurality 167U 1618 

Social-Labor vote in county, 17 ; People's, 10. 



412 



ELECTION RETURNS. 







-013(1 gs?g8 

'lIBqSJBjM - - - 


ogi 


|^g52^ 


^s:^ 

-^^ 


%tt 


ll'iJ? 


\% 








§8^§ 


|£;g§^S 


ss 


|Sg 


Ss^s 


\% 






S52g 


S*2^S^ 


IS 


sis 


|3I-S 


% 




1 •d.H S'^g^ 




Islsis 


^S3 


ass 


1 So2i"'S 


1 






dan ^^SS 


o tc lo 


ll^lll 


§SJ 


mi 


S 00 =■ — 


.? 






•da-a ^ ^ 22 s; 


iiS 


Isssis 




Sll 


ISiSi 


kI 




i 




^2g 


|§2;^gg 


II 


§11 


»5E = 


i 







' da^ gj;??^ 
'uosaiqDjnH '^ '^'"^ -' 


gis 


|22gg| 


1 ?^a^ 


t^ to c 


ts. (>S IM ?1 


s 


t 

1 

u 




; II^H -- '^ '- 


828 


i-s^s^ 


sg 


%t^ 


Is^s 


i 


c 


5 -da-a S^-Ei 

'j3Upj£Q '-' 0» <N 0« 


sis 


^SSisI 


11 


III 


gaSi 


1 


c 
C. 


'auEJf) '- "- r- 

'saaqjoOA '-' "^^ ="' =^1 


C O lO 


119 105 
114 124 

170 50 
107 124 
107 65 


8S3 

3i 


sis 


775 U50 
247 145 
214 03 
246 156 





° i: 

: o ^ - 



^s..s, 






<« in •^ 



•v. O o 

t; Sec 






5^- 



0.~ u 

Co t) " * 

o -^ O^ 

,-. C-l cc 



;^ « ~ 



V. (J : 
& .E 

J Oh 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



413 



1 1 

o V 



•m3(7[ J2 

'aaj}Bq3 '- ="' 
•dan SS 

'POOAV "^ '^' 

•UI3Q *2g5 

'aoiJtoojg -^ 1^ 
'uosuiqDjn jj — <=^ 

'jaapjBQ -■ s^ 
•uiaa j2S 



<cr- i^ccioosico 



^ so Oi CO <N C5 

9S r- 1-1 r- rH 



I "to <M rH 0-1 



'<5i-'>-ii-l!N I«OrHlM 



2. M "91 I t^ 



»«5 1-1 r-< 1-1 r 



<3S lO ■»< lO . 



:SS I 



>o » o I t>. 



^i-iiNi-i 1-1 



; o o «e to (M 



^_o^_ _ 



•^ (N — rH 



w c 00 I 55 <o c-j 



^05 loeo. 
15 <o c-i — ! 

©^ ,-. oi ,_< , 



g M — 00 



»~i eo — < 



<t> (>J r- N 



•-I O 00 to 



O ■»»< ooO t- 

gj to — r^ M< 

«^ i-i(Nf-"i-( 

gJrH to eC — 
«5 » C^ ri to 
«0 f-HCl rH rH 

C> 00 r- «C lO 

p o la m — 

to rH r- rH CQ 

~* O !M O 05 
^ to 0-1 rH lO 

SfJ r- 0-1 rH rH 

Oi <0 •* lO — 



5S;|§ 



to rH rH ^ 



I 00 rH I Oi 

1 rH rH I *« 

! XI O I Ji^ 

lrH(N I ^ 



Qoo o go 



rH 00 25 lO 



25 oio oc-1 I r^i 



QOrHr.r-i- ; 

e^-H o OOt-: 

og 00 o o I- ( 

~4rH!NrH , 



e^ N o<« ( 



;0 C5 t^ IC 

Saeo ©00 



!H -- C<l "O »0 
P to •«»< lO — 



•<»< O I «? 



tOrHrH S* 

I to^(N I «:> 

Ito Mt- I o 



(« ; 
^ 




= = = 


S: 


T3. , ^ , 
CO- - - .. 








: : : 


3S 


2SSII 


2S^ 



414 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•TTTa/T ^^ ITT g^ ^T *— ' r— 

"'''Q o ci lO eo «D cc 

'll^qSJ^I^ CO ^ (M ^ r-i »- 



<M CC t- <0 »fi ( 



•IU3Q o O il CO iC <M 
•jf 'X^AVaUBf M ^ O) ^ ^ ^ 



'a3MBq3 



> lO CO 'O (M 



e^ 00 LO 



<0 t- lO 
»"* !Nr-1 



©i (>« lO CO t- 






>0 «0 00 Tf 



»*r— Ti< CO 

Kjr-lr-lr-l 



•da-sT ■^lOooo^3co |?oooio 
"''a. cor-HCocO'** 'oeoco 



) f? CO 00 05 

) ec 00 <M ■* 



ec 00 <M ■* cs o5 1~ 



O CO Oi 
-- 05 t- Oi 



QOO O—l 



■cc -- eo t^ 



»-< CO COM I ^ 



CClMO^iftCS ll^t^^ 



'"^H «D (M rt O CO •'t' 

'PJ^A -^ - O' ^ -^ • 



\i 

>5 1 

o ' 
2 

® 



'uoj>{oo;s 
'nosuiqojnfj 



Oi T*< I— I lO O 
©^ <N lO 00 t^ 

6>. CO OJ 0^ lO 



r-li-l(NIM^r- Ci<M(N -*(Mr-< 



^ 



•TII3/T 00 i-" ■^ IM lO » 

'janpjBf) <-! 1-H (M (N i-< ri 
'3aBJ3 CO IM <N i-i -- r- 



'saaqjoo^ .-c ,-h oi ; 



FO •^ O CO OS 

60 eqio 00 to 



'~l COift 

2? ^ •* 

05 (M iM 



25 •»*< 00 I "^^^ t^ ■<!»< lo ( 

O 00 CO lO IM lO 0> J 



$0-00 00 
Ci 05t-0 



t^ CO ri »< 



QQ 00 00 05 



05 ic oii; 
b~. t- ooeo 



^!0 OC CO 00 

-*IM i-i<N I CO 

e^ 00 h- u-5 I o 

*g t-00 " S 



CO (M i^i- 
eo «D X CO 
-* IM r- (N 



■-*>C 00 «> 



|0 ■^ t~ (M \ ^ 



■>C I> 00 ■>*< 



I'** Mo coeo i> 



«D1> CO O 

eooooflio 



<3iio(Nco loosuseo it^ 



'iZ 
^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



415 






if 

I 



s 



•IU3Q 2 

•uiaa § 
'pooAV 



•inaQ 2 
'll^H '" 

'jSUpJBQ <^ 



o o I CC 

= 2 g 



N 13 -^ ^ 



■d3H 



f> O CO I ■* 






f^ — c 

05 <N "O 



>-( C30 00 I Ca >^ 

00— '- SjSo 



05 00 I OC f^ C* 



S H 



IS o-g 

<n in 



ho. g 

a, 



416 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Middlesex County. 

Gov — Con. — Assembly. — 



opi §Q cji^ Ic^ §Q ^fs5 g« ^os -t^Q :sQ go 



Perth Amboy, 1st Ward.. 


.. 156 132 


4 


145 


138 


151 


152 


153 132 129 126 


" 2d " .. 


.. 195 172 


2 


190 


178 


192 


197 


191 173 173 171 


" 3d " .. 


.. 247 240 


6 


254 


218 


250 


246 


248 226 223 223 


" 4th " .. 


.. 156 129 . 




152 


129 


155 


158 


159 131 127 127 


" 5th " .. 


.. 97 208 


3 


84 


218 


86 


96 


94 217 206 207 


6th " .. 


..127 236 


5 


126 


223 


120 


126 


126 236 228 228 




918 1117 


20 


951 


llOU 


9oU 


975 


971 1115 1086 1082 


Woodbridge, 1st Poll 


.. 253 184 


3 


254 


175 


255 


256 


256 175 173 171 


2d " 


.. 15^ 184 


3 


152 


178 


148 


153 


148 184 180 178 


3d " 


. 133 195 


1 


139 


190 


138 


131 


133 194 194 198 



53S 5G3 7 5U5 5U3 5U1 SkO 537 553 5k7 5U7 

Raritan, 1st Poll 154 166 13 165 154 154 157 165 163 161 156 

2d " 152 161 9 163 149 150 150 162 162 161 159 

3d " 149 123 1 159 104 145 145 152 125 119 110 



k55 U50 23 hS7 h07 US i52 hB9 hoO hUl h^k 

Piscataway 273 171 7 274 161 267 267 266 172 171 172 

Dunellen 128 154 10 154 124 143 14} 143 140 140 140 

New Brunswick — 

1st Ward, 1st Poll 101 173 109 166 101 105 103 172 172 172 

" 2d " '146 170 4 164 147 149 156 151 163 163 157 

2d " 1st " 310 282 8 327 264 315 318 319 274 274 278 

"2d " 224 158 234 143 224 229 226 155 159 157 

3d " 123 319 141 299 124 1.37 124 319 313 310 

4th " 112 158 1 124 144 113 119 113 154 159 151 

5th " 1st Poll 356 286 3 377 262 362 370 359 276 277 273 

" 2d " 386 315 4 401 296 386 396 390 307 307 308 

Gth " 1st " 212 437 227 423 207 205 208 433 444 442 

" 2d " 218 340 3 234 317 218 228 217 335 .330 338 



2188 2638 23 2338 2U61 2199 2263 2210 2588 2598 2586 

North Brunswick 121 73 124 68 122 127 123 69 68 69 

Milltown...> 88 33 100 20 88 89 89 .33 33 31 

South River 214 275 10 226 254 209 215 217 269 269 270 

East Brunswick, 1st Poll... 123 1.3G 159 100 123 138 125 131 134 126 

2d " ... 99 156 4 108 134 100 105 105 147 150 144 

Helmetta 23 51 45 29 23 29 36 44 53 37 

Cranbury 256 102 7 279 78 257 259 264 100 98 88 

Monroe „ 2<i3 151 5 213 133 203 204 2^4 142 146 144 

Jamesburg 127 104 4 138 87 131 131 13^ 97 96 93 

South Brunswick, 1st Poll.. 185 132 3 197 116 187 191 190 126 126 122 

2d " .. 132 104 5 134 97 129 131 134 104 106 99 

South Amboy, 1st Poll 199 219 9 203 207 198 199 198 217 218 221 

2d " 162 259 5 180 232 165 167 170 249 253 248 

3d " 124 228 2 136 229 124 124 124 229 229 229 



Madison 122 



Ui5 


706 


16 519 


668 


4^7 


U90 


IS2 695 


700 


698 


. 122 


206 


2 157 


161 


139 


139 


151 184 


182 


164 


. 211 


325 


1 214 


315- 


209 


210 


220 320 


320 


311 



Total vote in county. ..6949 7647 147 7362 7060 6960 7099 7078 7479 7464 7347 

Plurality 698 302 

Social-Labor vote in county, 152; People's, 32. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 417 

Monmouth County. 

Gov —Con— Assembly. 



o:^ §q c^ l^ §Q :^x i« %:< ^Q S-Q |0 

AtlanUc 95 239 2 103 221 104 100 93 231 230 233 

Eatontown, 1st District 144 124 2 161 114 149 149 151 119 118 118 

" 2d " 109 166 2 114 160 112 115 109 161 163 165 

Freehold, lit District 153 322 1 170 301 168 180 159 307 294 308 

2d " 129 283 7 142 266 148 142 130 278 262 277 

3d " 237 345 2 257 318 262 259 238 328 315 326 

519 950 10 569 8S5 578 581 527 91S 871 911 

Howell, Eastern Dist 138 256 12 143 263 126 144 126 274 260 248 

Western " 104 196 7 111 188 114 135 101 186 187 170 

Holmdel 82 246 4 84 235 77 73 76 241 269 242 

Manalapan Township 204 206 3 209 199 255 210 202 190 178 196 

Englishtown Borough 62 53 1 65 49 72 59 51 52 50 54 

Middletown, 1st District..,. 193 164 7 201 153 190 195 192 163 163 159 

2d " .... 155 186 5 157 182 150 156 157 189 185 183 

3d " .... 224 1.30 31 259 102 226 253 223 115 132 127 

4th " .... 85 147 6 82 147 84 86 84 146 144 144 



657 en U9 699 58U 650 690 656 613 62U 61S 

Atlantic Highlands Boro.... 146 123 12 154 111 140 142 139 124 13'J 124 

Millstone 145 276 3 151 263 159 140 138 276 275 271 

Marlboro 110 364 2 134 336 117 108 109 362 359 365 

Asbury Park, 1st Ward 263 156 7 285 133 253 285 260 1.50 139 142 

" 2d " 238 67 5 249 56 237 245 237 63 63 59 

Neptune, 1st District 383 113 21 387 108 375 387 877 119 112 106 

" 2d " 349 234 12 353 228 348 356 347 236 233 228 

3d " 227 228 12 231 214 226 233 227 220 217 215 

Bradley Beach Borough 72 70 7 73 66 73 76 74 67 66 65 

Neptune City Borough 63 106 9 70 104 60 74 65 116 108 99 

Ocean, 1st District 161 169 168 169 148 149 147 172 176 185 

" 2d " 88 162 1 90 154 84 86 85 160 160 156 

" 3d " 257 296 9 270 280 255 253 257 296 294 297 

" 4th " 165 87 6 164 84 153 162 159 86 98 91 

" 5th '* 231 333 5 243 319 218 212 222 329 329 358 

" 6th " 187 287 5 190 285 182 183 185 286 282 299 



lOSn 1331, 26 1115 1291 lOW 10U5 1055 1329 1339 1386 

Seabright Borough 117 87 3 121 77 108 112 107 89 94 92 

Deal Borough 14 15 11 15 11 9 9 15 15 18 

Allenhurst Borough 24 4 24 4 24 25 24 3 4 4 

Raritan 1st District 208 210 11 218 196 202 214 207 201 218 204 

" 2d " 248 229 19 261 214 244 251 248 230 230 229 

" 3d " 73 129 80 122 73 75 72 128 129 126 

Shrewsbury, Eastern Dist.. 146 249 6 144 245 145 146 143 239 247 240 

Southern " ., 174 163 7 188 148 117 183 177 156 220 154 

" Middle " .. 281 153 11 293 139 280 281 278 153 161 153 

Western " .. 291 165 5 301 154 286 289 282 168 173 167 

W. R. Bank.. 114 132 3 117 24 113 113 110 132 137 133 



1006 862 32 10U3 810 9U1 1012 990 81S 93S 8!f7 

27 



418 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Monmouth County— (Continued.) 

Gov. — Con — Assembly ■ 



^ d «• S § <^ = li « S . d a" d. ^ d J S if £ :S 6 

§« gn C£ |(i. gQ .-Hf^ gpi Cpj ^Q >.Q §Q 

Upper Freehold, 1st Dist... 149 195 2 168 174 154 145 142 202 197 192 

2d " ... 80 67 13 80 67 81 80 80 67 67 64 

Allentown Borough 88 55 41 91 53 90 89 88 55 55 57 

Wall, 1st District 146 279 1 153 261 147 192 146 272 268 242 

" 2d District 155 189 8 161 180 148 200 145 192 187 158 

Manasquan Borough 173 162 14 181 155 171 197 175 169 154 139 

North Spring Lake Bor 36 31 36 29 36 52 36 31 22 21 

Spring Lake Borough.., 21 37 20 38 20 32 19 38 33 31 

Belmar Borough 101 75 6 107 69 103 110 101 77 74 66 

Matawan Township 100 243 4 103 239 102 102 149 234 203 240 

Matawan Borough 168 190 2 173 173 167 169 207 175 171 174 

Total vote in county.. ..8108 9193 364 8481 8667 8087 8413 8065 9068 9040 8914 

Plurality 1085 186 

Soc'al-Labor vote in county, 23 ; People's, 19. 



ELECTION RE TURNS. 419 

Morris County. 

Gov. —Con— —Sen— Assembly.- 



^ d a;'S So Sfci § S jfd 1,6 X d «'d. .H S S'S 

g»J 2Q =£ ^^ |q Spi §Q ^pi op4 cqQ rp 

Boonton, East District 280 142 9 250 170 277 142 276 278 142 144 

West " 273 205 3 255 217 275 200 271 272 208 203 

Chatham, North District... 61 58 1 59 59 65 51 62 63 53 55 

East " ... 72 46 1 72 46 80 39 71 77 '40 46 

Borough 169 101 13 169 102 179 92 163 210 100 65 

Chester 118 277 8 117 274 111 286 125 115 265 276 

Dover, 1st Ward 172 131 39 176 129 173 141 172 170 135 133 

" 2d " 135 115 29 140 111 135 118 131 136 117 114 

" 3d " 177 146 23 178 149 174 155 173 174 149 150 

" 4th " 203 125 38 200 124 194 134 200 201 124 124 

687 517 129 69U 513 676 . 5h8 676 681 525 521 

Hanover, North District.... 163 65 4 159 68 164 68 162 162 64 65 

South " .... 196 132 7 196 133 198 130 198 198 129 128 

West " .... 108 123 2 105 123 103 125 106 104 116 121 

Jefferson 158 113 11 145 123 135 136 150 155 113 118 

Madison Borough, N. Dis. 137 189 9 136 190 136 190 137 140 187 188 

S. " 220 176 16 220 181 229 174 219 220 181 176 

Mendham 178 175 23 176 178 181 175 181 178 167 177 

Montville 192 59 17 185 69 196 58 194 194 59 59 

Morris 242 227 18 251 219 258 210 249 255 214 216 

Morristown — 

1st Ward, 1st District 168 99 6 176 93 177 91 174 175 92 91 

" 2d " 170 169 7 181 158 176 161 173 174 165 165 

2d " 1st " 115 129 9 120 125 123 121 112 118 128 125 

" 2d " 124 185 15 132 181 139 175 129 128 177 181 

3d " 1st " 150 164 11 155 158 163 147 155 151 154 158 

" 2d " 141 102 8 146 103 150 97 144 150 95 100 

4th " 207 223 3 213 216 225 202 204 203 229 219^ 

1075 1071 59 1123 lOSU 1153 99U 1091 1099 lOUO 1039 

Mt Arlington Borough 51 26 1 52 26 54 24 52 52 26 26 

Mount Olive 109 156 4 107 158 113 152 110 86 143 186 

Netcong Borough 71 83 8 76 82 79 81 75 76 82 82 

Passaic 171 209 3 171 206 173 206 165 172 207 207 

Pequannock, 1st District... 211 56 3 208 60 205 58 212 213 54 55 

2d " ... 238 137 10 22G 164 259 117 239 244 135 131 

Port Oram Borough 129 115 17 138 126 120 154 140 140 129 129 

Randolph 161 2S7 22 159 289 168 256 161 160 263 265 

Rockaway Borough 208 119 34 207 120 167 167 209 211 114 121 

Rockaway, North District. 161 154 17 161 151 180 135 146 160 163 152 

West " 133 113 4 135 112 123 123 134 136 113 111 

South " 119 102 11 116 106 107 115 119 121 96 104 

1,13 369 32 kl2 369 hlO 373 399 U17 372 367 

Roxbury, Succasunna Dis. 156 183 116 148 191 165 171 163 145 179 187 

" Port Morris " 62 64 15 63 61 69 58 66 67 59 59 

Washington, N. District.... 92 110 14 91 110 85 117 103 82 100 120 

" S. " .... 125 221 18 125 225 123 223 160 119 194 230 

Total vote in county. ...6526 5791 527 6495 5856 6606 5775 6585 6585 5655 5764 

Plurality 735 659 831 

Social-Labor vote in county, 56; People's, 32. 



420 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Ocean County. 

— Gov. CON.- 



-SeN. — -ASSEM. 



Bay Head 24 

Beach Haven 41 

Berkeley 89 

Brick, East District 140 

Middle " 155 

Dover 380 

Eagleswood 112 

Harvey Cedars 7 

Island Heights 32 

Jackson 164 

Lacey 114 

Lakewood 379 

Lavallette 14 

Little Egg Harbor 299 

Long Beach City 7 

Manchester 86 

Ocean 63 

Point Pleasat Beach 102 

Plumsted 191 

Sea Side Park 15 

Stafford 170 

Union 169 



= 4J '2 2 



146 

95 

7 

15 

163 

36 

102 

1 

94 

5 

142 

48 

48 

122 

4 

68 

53 



c a 5 
24 12 



41 
89 
141 

156 



380 140 

112 64 

7 7 

32 14 

160 165 

114 36 

378 101 

14 1 
299 93 

7 5 

89 133 

62 48 

101 47 

189 118 

15 4 
173 65 
171 51 



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2 62 

1 102 

3 189 

2 15 
1 169 

12 171 



35 



69 140 

60 154 

141 379 



163 160 

35 110 

101 328 

2 13 

79 172 

5 8 

153 85 

49 62 

46 102 

120 192 

4 15 

68 175 

51 170 



12 
19 



41 

143 

140 

6 

14 

164 

40 

101 

3 

110 

4 

138 

48 

46 

120 

4 



Total vote in county.. .2753 1319 117 2754 1290 119 2679 1330 2640 1401 
Plurality IkSU U61, 131,9 1239 



Social-Labor vote in county, 6 ; People's, 3. 



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EI0ECTION RETURNS. 



421 



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432 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



423 



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424 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Salem County. 

-Gov. —-Con. Assembly.' 



%^ §Q cf^ gftj "SQ ^ci: gos TQ g-fi; 

AUoway 133 248 26 130 249 26 124 260 20 

Elsinboro 58 59 3 58 53 3 53 63 3 

Elmer 115 176 29 02 215 31 105 179 29 

Lower Alloways Cr«ek 198 102 6 184 115 6 182 113 5 

Lower Penns Neck 131 188 27 132 187 27 125 188 26 

Mannington 233 172 8 237 166 6 228 181 4 

Oldmans 161 160 9 152 166 9 154 165 9 

Pennsgrove 174 204 23 169 203 23 173 203 23 

Pilesgrove 261 166 11 254 164 11 218 214 6 

Pittsgrove 199 176 16 181 190 15 198 181 12 

Quinton 226 83 13 226 83 13 220 89 12 

Upper Penns Neck 51 128 7 50 129 7 49 127 7 

Upper Pittsgrove 264 203 19 221 220 23 274 194 12 

Woodstown 226 142 23 215 141 23 181 201 10 

City of Salem — 

Eastward, 1st Precinct.... 160 114 9 159 112 9 157 117 9 

" 2d " .... 255 262 29 251 261 30 250 272 25 

West " 1st " .... 145 146 10 141 146 10 133 152 10 

" 2d " .... 119 198 10 112 200 10 109 207 9 



679 no 58 663 719 59 6lt9 7U8 



Total vote in county 3109 2927 278 2934 3000 281 2933 3106 231 

Plurality 182 66 173 

Social-Labor vote in county, 9 ; People's, 17. 



ELECTION RETURNS, 425 

Somerset County. 

Gov. Con Assembly. 



gaJ §0 =0. laJ §Q %^ 80S 50 ^a^ 

Bedminster 128 268 9 127 254 9 119 267 8 

Bernards, 1st Dist 201 251 10 217 224 11 167 287 5 

2d •• 73 101 6 71 98 6 70 102 5 

Branchburg 158 113 4 159 106 5 151 117 5 

Bridgewater, 1st Dist 273 179 16 284 164 15 260 190 14 

2d " 164 145 11 167 138 11 160 145 11 

3d " 128 169 130 165 136 158 

4th " 281 224 5 290 206 6 281 219 6 

5th " .„ 191 154 6 194 150 6 211 134 5 

6th " 45 72 11 47 70 11 45 70 12 



1082 9U5 h9 lin 893 1,9 1093 916 1,8 

Bound Brook Borough 196 195 33 205 176 34 198 189 34 

Franklin, 1st Dist 145 86 1 149 80 1 140 90 1 

2d " 178 127 16 185 117 15 177 123 16 

3d " 120 94 1 136 83 1 123 97 1 

Hillsboro, 1st Dist 165 138 6 169 122 7 162 187 6 

2d " 148 114 7 158 102 7 152 107 8 

Millstone Borough 30 24 33 20 30 24 

Montgomery 145 153 2 181 113 2 163 133 2 

Rocky Hill Borough 33 37 3 33 34 2 30 38 3 

North Plainfield Township... 58 49 2 58 49 2 57 50 2 
North Plainfield Borough— 

1st Dist 320 184 7 328 180 7 306 197 8 

2d " 256 172 12 262 165 12 262 166 12 

Warren 87 133 3 86 133 3 110 109 4 



Total vote in county 3529 3182 171 3669 2949 173 3510 3149 168 

Plurality SU7 720 S61 

Social-Labor vote in county, 12 ; People's, 12. 



426 ELECTION RETURNS. 

Sussex County. 

— Gov. Con. — Assembly- 



§p^ «Q ca< -spi |q iccL, gfvi cQ ;Soh 

>UJPiw5H-5<Uc^<} 

Andover 66 180 5 65 180 5 71 173 5 

Brooklyn 25 17 24 18 21 21 

Byram 1.36 121 10 139 117 9 140 114 10 

Branchville 49 65 24 52 64 22 46 68 24 

Deckertown 171 136 23 175 131 22 173 130 24 

Frankford 94 133 25 93 133 26 92 134 24 

Green 70 96 1 62 104 1 76 90 1 

Hampton 82 127 5 81 127 5 86 123 5 

Hardyston 274 257 26 273 253 27 279 247 28 

Lafayette 122 91 2 120 92 2 100 110 2 

Montague 79 85 86 75 86 75 

Newton, 1st District. 221 206 17 225 200 17 238 185 19 

2d " 273 298 19 281 286 18 304 266 18 

Sandyston 84 189 2 82 188 2 92 175 2 

Sparta, North District 84 159 4 94 149 4 94 150 4 

" Sou;h " 106 179 7 107 209 2 120 165 7 

Stillwater 106 212 2 206 166 2 109 207 2 

Vernon 199 175 2 27 89 3 206 165 2 

Wallpack 27 88 4 86 144 5 27 88 4 

Wantage, North District 87 145 5 96 205 8 89 141 5 

South " 97 206 8 119 166 7 98 203 8 



Total vote in county 2452 3165 1912493 3096 187 2547 3030 194 

Plurality 713 603 h83 

Social- Labor vote in county, 11 ; People's, 18. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



427 



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428 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



429 






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430 



ELECTION RETURNS. 






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ELECTION RETURNS. 



431 



"Warren County. 



Gov. 

i 

-sg* §i 

> u 

AUamuchy 79 71 

Belvidere 176 196 

Blairstown 156 175 

Franklin 75 149 

Frelinghuysen 101 82 

Greenwich 75 93 

Hackettstown, 1st Dis.. 103 129 

2d '•' .. 120 118 

Hardwick. 35 56 

Harmony 75 119 

Hope 94 144 

Independence 73 86 

Knowlton 92 200 

Lopatcong 121 166 

Mansfield 98 174 

Oxford 1st District 48 175 

" ' 2d " 71 176 

Pahaquarry 16 51 

Phillipsburg, 1st Ward.. 188 259 

2d " .. 168 283 

3d " .. 173 154 

4th " .. 104 225 

5th " .. 124 240 



757 1161 

Pohatcong 165 156 

Washington Bor. E. Dis. 122 252 

" W. " 134 264 

Township... 71 200 





Cong 




Assembly 






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78 


71 


70 


76 


189 


169 


84 


190 


174 


194 


174 


26 


164 


160 


27 


267 


149 


129 


113 


26 


75 


148 


27 


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76 


147 


148 


7 


101 


79 


7 


119 


98 


67 


69 


3 


78 


89 


3 


75 


80 


90 


85 


18 


If 9 


123 


18 


108 


103 


127 


123 


28 


120 


116 


21 


121 


119 


115 


113 


1 


45 


45 


1 


59 


29 


49 


36 


7 


72 


117 


12 


76 


88 


111 


104 


13 


92 


142 


15 


101 


97 


136 


138 


11 


74 


85 


10 


78 


73 


86 


81 


21 


82 


202 


23 


109 


90 


187 


184 


5 


145 


138 


4 


126 


137 


151 


148 


15 


102 


169 


15 


99 


98 


172 


169 


40 


50 


169 


42 


47 


49 


174 


171 


7 


79 


165 


9 


81 


81 


165 


156 


2 


16 


51 


2 


22 


16 


45 


46 


8 


204 


246 


7 


192 


190 


250 


246 


8 


194 


255 


8 


172 


213 


242 


252 


24 


188 


140 


19 


178 


182 


143 


141 


8 


151 


176 


8 


102 


123 


206 


216 


15 


143 


219 


14 


122 


144 


226 


213 


59 


S80 1036 


56 


766 


852 


1067 1068 


6 


162 


157 


7 


166 


173 


152 


145 


62 


122 


249 


64 


129 


127 


243 


244 


50 


135 


262 


50 


140 


137 


261 


259 


15 


73 


192 


15 


72 


70 


194 


194 



Total vote of county.. .2857 4393 499 3045 4132 514 3105 2994 4133 4037 

Plurality 15S6 1087 

Social-Labor vote in county, 23 ; People's, 9. 



Total Number of Election Precincts in the State, t»y 
Counties. 



Atlantic 28 

Bergen „ 61 

Burlington 42 

Camden 74 

Cape May 16 

Cumberland 33 

Essex 156 

Gloucester 20 

Hudson 164 

Hunterdon 27 

Mercer 56 



Middlesex 40 

Monmouth.. 53 

Morris 42 

Ocean 22 

Passaic 54 

Salem 18 

Somerset 23 

Sussex 21 

Union 56 

Warren 27 

Total 1033 



432 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Vote by Counties for G-overnor. 



2 E 

COUNTIES. ^^ . ^ cQ a-u 

^>pi ^Pu iJ^ 

fe w H 

Atlantic 4107 2830 266 

Bergen 6964 6355 85 

Burlington 6819 5437 389 

Camden.... 10912 6807 539 

Cape May 1726 1166 160 

Cumberland 5443 3766 586 

Essex 32262 27575 647 

Gloucester 3772 2958 256 

Hudson 22134 33023 294 

Hunterdon 3182 4856 359 

Mercer 10028 8711 491 

Middlesex 6949 7647 U7 

Monmouth 8108 9193 364 

Morris 6526 5791 527 

Ocean 2753 1319 117 

Passaic 11147 10418 262 

Salem 3109 2927 278 

Somerset 3529 3182 171 

Sussex 2452 3165 191 

UnioH 9272 7033 265 

Warren 2857 4.393 499 

164051 158552 6893 

Plurality 54t)9 

Total number votes on poll books, 338,967. 
Total number rejected ballots, 2261. 



.^1 

14 
165 


III 

■Sow 
JJcrtCM 

24 
21 
51 
27 

5 
22 
38 

5 
26 
19 
66 
32 
19 
32 

3 
18 
17 
12 
18 
27 

9 

491 


Plurali 

1277 

609 

1382 

4105 

560 

1677 

4687 

814 


ties. 
E 


17 




124 




8 




26 




1207 




4 

1796 


"lo's's^ 


17 
111 
152 


""izih 


1674 
' '*698 


23 
56 


""735 

1434 

729 

182 

347 

"2*239 


1085 


6 
1161 





9 
12 





11 
516 


713 


23 


1536 


5458 


22094 
5499 


16595 



For Congress. 

First District. 



COUNTIES. 
Camden 


11084 


1i 

r 

6574 


Cape May 

Cumberland 

Gloucester 


1645 

4786 

3415 


1233 
4244 
3051 


Salem , 


2934 


3000 








Plurality , 


23864 
5772 


18092 



o 

561 
158 
583 
276 
281 

1859 



1°' 

125 

5 

22 

3 

9 

164 



Pluralities. 



Pi 

4510 
422 
544 
364 



66 



5840 
5772 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



433 



Second District. 



COUNTIES. 



^(s< 



Atlantic 4103 

Burlington 6958 

Mercer 10220 

Ocean 2754 



Plurality. 



24035 



a 


U 


^-^ 


Pluralities. 


. 


I—* 


^ 




fag 


•— > 




Rep. 
Dem. 


2669 


264 


13 


1434 


5063 


407 


16 


1895 


8345 


504 


118 


1875 


1290 


119 
1294 


6 
153 


1464 


17367 


6668 




6668 



Third District. 



COUNTIES. c'E ;^t A 3 " 

m ai O 

Middlesex 7362 7060 143 

Monmouth 8381 8674 354 

Somerset 3669 2449 173 

19412 18683 670 

Plurality 729 

Fourth District. 






150 
24 



183 



Pluralities. 

d E 
^ Q 
302 , 



720 



1022 

729 



296 
293 



COUNTIES. " ^ . ^ I • B% 

^^^ 1^50 rtJOn 

•—>•-» fa 

Hunterdon ..'. 3164 4782 369 

Morris 6495 5856 501 

Sussex 2f03 3096 187 

Warren 3045 4132 514 

15207 17866 1571 

Plurality 2659 



'% rt Pluralities. 
-^§" 

fa Pi Q 

16 1618 

39 639 

15 593 

108-? 

70 639 3298 



434 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



COUNTIES. 



Bergen 

Passaic^.... 

Plurality 



Fifth District. 

d S 2 

. , ►_• w -^ Pluralities. 

sE -gs -SS .l^g . -• 

p is Jc^ gSc^ & I 

A fa U .3 « Q 

6863 6378 91 162 485 

11504 9964 263 ' 1108 1540 

18367 16342 354 1270 2025 

2025 2025 



Sixth District. 





£d 


5 


3 










Q 


^ 




Pluralities. 


COUNTIES. 


-o « 


O ii 


PQ 






53^ 

.a Oh 


11 


II 


ll 


s- i 




^ 


K 


P 


ffi 


^ Q 


Essex (part) 

Plurality 


23843 


20150 


395 


1035 


3693 


3693 











Seventh District. 



COUNTIES. 


'■^i 




o 




Pluralities, 






?l 


11^ 


g- i 




N 


^ 


^ 


O 


oi Q 


[udson (part) 


20162 


30270 


258 


1723 


10108 


Plurality 





10108 









Eighth District. 



COUNTIES. 



Essex (part)... 
Hudson (part) 
Union 

Plurality 



4> « O 

"^ C ^ C t'\^ '->'1'^ Pluralities. 

9078 6516 255 172 2562 

1908 2561 37 41 653 

9244 6801 269 527 2443 

20230 15878 561 740 5005 653 

4362 4352 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



435 



Average Vote by Counties for Members of the 
General Assembly- 1898. 



Pluralities. 



Counties. . ^• 

« Q 

Atlantic 3869 3035 

Bergen 6814 6446 

Burlington 6631 5354 

Camden 10826 6881 

Cape May 1640 1240 

Cumberland 5286 3795 

Essex 33562 26965 

Gloucester 3896 2712 

Hudson 22318 32654 

Hunteidon 3132 4762 

Mercer 10080 8492 

Middlesex 7046 7430 

Monmouth 8188 9007 

Morris 6585 5709 

Ocean 2640 1401 

Passaic 11093 10197 

Salem 2933 3106 

Somerset 3510 3149 

Sussex 2547 3030 

Union 9147 6888 

Warren 3050 4085 



Ph {fl 

240 

83 161 

379 

554 129 

149 

591 

666 1216 

271 

303 1786 

389 

494 108 

140 

353 



S 

o 

834 
368 
1277 
3945 
400 
1491 
6597 
1184 



123 

326 1101 

231 

168 

194 

286 517 



876 
1239 



361 
'2259 



10336 
1630 



384 
819 



173 
"483 
'i035 



164793 156338 6975 5018 
Plurality 8455 



83 23315 14860 
8455 



436 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Vote for President of the United States— 1896. 



Counties. ^ P? 

^^ 

Atlantic 7636 

Bergen 13899 

Burlington 14866 

Camden 23866 

Cape May 3289 

Cumberland 11568 

Essex 66184 

Gloucester 8067 

Hudson 64819 

Hunterdon 9699 

Mercer 20879 

Middlesex 16060 

Monmouth 19247 

Morris 14021 

Ocean 4705 

Passaic 26461 

Salem 6>«86 

Somerset 7328 

Sussex 6238 

Union 19162 

Warren 9596 



•^ 


c 


.1^ 




F 




Pluralities. 


<2^ 


1 


el 


I 




i 


d 


i 


P3 


pi 


Q 


^ 


^ 


m 


Pi 


Q 


43 


5005 


2233 


200 


119 


19 


2772 




97 


8545 


4531 


113 


451 


126 


4014 




99 


9371 


4610 


306 


406 


19 


4761 




126 


16395 


6380 


390 


280 


97 


10015 




16 


2136 


929 


135 


60 


12 


1207 




58 


7018 


3877 


487 


78 


28 


3141 





503 


42587 


20509 


540 1004 


885 


22078 




32 


4727 


2981 


216 


77 


8 


1746 





523 


33626 


28133 


2(i7 


927 1140 


5493 




35 


4264 


4992 


289 


93 


8 




728 


118 


13847 


5970 


400 


430 


71 


7877 




142 


9304 


5976 


149 


350 


64 


8328 




86 


10611 


7799 


294 


474 


19 


2812 




63 


8190 


4936 


468 


331 


26 


3254 




29 


3384 


1068 


123 


80 


7 


2316 




127 


15437 


9280 


233 


357 


940 


6157 




21 


3717 


2802 


247 


67 


3 


915 




23 


4388 


2608 


126 


159 


10 


1780 




29 


3045 


2975 


123 


49 


11 


70 




100 


11707 


6073 


224 


529 


477 


5634 




39 


4063 


5013 


344 


62 


15 




950 



Total 374476 2309 221367 133675 5614 6373 3985 89370 1678 

Plurality 87692 87692 



Inaugural Address of Hod. Foster M. Voorhees. 



Gentlemen of the Senate and General Assembly : 

The duties of the office upon which [ am about to enter 
are assumed with a deep sense of all that is implied in 
the words of the oath just taken I shall strive to observe 
it both in letter and in spirit. 

Although chosen through the favor of my fellow citi- 
zens, as representing one of the great political parties of 
the State, I am not unmindful of the obligation to devote 
my services to the common good of all. I have no 
apology to offer for being a partisan. Under a republican 
form of government parties will of necessity arise. A 
people, free to learn and free to think for themselves, can 
only find in organization the instrument to enforce their 
wishes respecting government. Political parties are not 
to be considered as unmixed evils. Their existence is an 
evidence of active interest in public affairs. Their ad- 
herents are quick to assert their individual rights and to 
exact a full and faithful performance of every public 
duty. Through their agency the ends of government are 
best to be secured. But governments do not exist merely 
for the sake of parties. With public power comes the 
duty to exercise it for the public good Viewed from a 
selfish standpoint, I believe that they best serve a party 
who, in the conduct of their office, pay heed to the in- 
terests of the greatest number. This duty is especially 
imposed upon the Executive by the oath of office which 
he takes In his acts he is not to seek partisan advantage 
only. He is to promote the peace and prosperity of the 
State and maintain its lawful rights. He is to see that 
its laws, civil and criminal, are enforced alike for all and 
against all He is to secure equal protection to rich and 
to poor. Violators of the law are to be punished without 
distinction. He must demand honesty and economy, and 
oblige public servants to render a faithful and efficient 
service.* Personal prejudice or passionate partisanship 
have no place in the discharge of his duties. On the 
contrary, everything which will promote the honor, the 
happiness and the common welfare of the State are to be 
the objects of his solicitude and care. 

Such, in brief, are the views I entertain of the office 
which I now assume At all time's and under all circum- 
stances I shall, to the best of my ability, act in accord- 

(437) 



438 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

ance with these views, indulging the hope that to the 
commonwealth which I serve there may come no harm 
and that its happiness and prosperity may be advanced. 

The limitation which custom has put upon an address 
of this character prevents me from making more than a 
brief reference to policies or measures which I think 
should especially engage legislative attention. As occa- 
sion may arise, it will be my privilege to communicate to 
the Legislature special recommendations upon those sub- 
jects which I may deem worthy of consideration. 

It is fortunate for the interests of the State that there 
are no subjects of a purely partisan character likely to 
present themselves Matters can be considered dispas- 
sionately and wnthout party bias, and all can claim an 
equal share in the credit and responsibility for what may 
be done. 

The reforms inaugurated within recent years have re- 
moved many subjects which formerly called for and 
received legislative action. 

The policy, so recently begun of managing our State 
institutions upon a non-partisan basis, has, during the 
short time of trial, demonstrated the wisdom of those 
who favored it. It has received the emphatic approval of 
the public and cannot now be abandoned without injury 
to the public service. Legislative interference with local 
self-government is contrary to the spirit of our institu- 
tions, and the fate of those who have offended in this 
regard in the past warns us against future violations of 
our duty. In these days when independence of thought 
characterizes the average voter, when party allegiance is 
quickly shifted, when those who prefer good government 
to success of party can, by their action, affect the results 
of an election, higher considerations than those purely 
partisan must influence the law-maker if he would win 
public confidence and favor for himself and those whom 
he represents. 

Except in a few notable instances, the Legislature will 
have to deal with matters mainly local in character and 
without political significance. 

The recommendation of the distinguished Governor 
who immediately preceded me, that legislative action 
should be restricted, has been wisely followed. It is 
known and observed by all that the volume of laws has 
notably decreased without prejudice to the interests of 
the general public. For the most part such measures 
only have been enacted as were demanded by some press- 
ing and general necessity. The reform thus auspiciously 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 439 

begun in our own State, and so urgently recommended 
in others, has the approval of all, irrespective of party. I 
trust that the same spirit may continue to prevail, and 
that favorable action will be limited to those measures 
only which are worthy of assuming the form of positive 
enactment I/et us abandon the notion that in some form 
of law it is desirable to find means to remove every 
fancied evil or temporary inconvenience and to provide 
for every imaginary method of conduct. It is better that 
the laws should be fewer in number, and comprehend 
within their scope objects of moment, than that numer- 
ous enactments which are limited in operation and only 
temporary in importance should find place on the statute- 
book. The evil effects and inconvenience resulting from 
legislation of the last-mentioned character has made 
necessary the appointment of the several commissions to 
codify the laws relating to various subjects. They have 
been obliged to harmonize provisions of numerous con- 
flicting statutes, remove redundancies, and correct obscure 
or careless forms of expression, in order to embody in one 
clear, concise and explicit act all laws relating to the 
topic which formed the subject of their labors. It has 
required the exercise of great skill and care, and especial 
credit is due to these gentlemen who have gratuitously 
given their time and services in the prosecution of a 
work so advantageous to the State. There is need for a 
similiar revision and codification of laws relating to other 
topics, and it is my intention in due time to appoint 
commissions for this purpose. 

In this connection one subject presents itself, which, 
by reason of the great interests involved, calls for earnest 
and immediate attention. I refer to the laws relating to 
cities and other municipalities. Scattered through many 
pages of the statute-books, and forming the subject-mat- 
ter of numerous chapters of laws, are to be found the 
provisions relating to this form of government. They 
are conflicting, doubtful and obscure. They have fre- 
quently been the subjects of litigation and have received 
judicial interpretation. At times they have received con- 
struction seemingly contradictory. Few dare hazard 
an opinion as to the constitutionality of a proposed enact- 
ment, so great is the uncertainty in which the power of 
the Legislature relating to this subject is now involved, 
and so subtle have been the distinctions made as to the 
required tests of a valid act. I believe radical measures 
are required to remove the present embarrassing con- 
dition. Some general and uniform act for all cities i§ 



440 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

necessary if the present uncertainty is to be removed. A 
mere codification of existing laws will not remove the 
trouble. It may be necessary to modify or repeal the 
provisions of some special charters if a general form of 
municipal government be devised, but in doing this the 
common good of all would be promoted at the possible 
expense of the few who might be temporarily affected. 
In such a scheme provision could be made for simpler 
and more effective methods for the administration of 
municipal affairs, the necessity for which is manifested 
in the general dissatisfaction and desire for change which 
now exists. The advantages which would follow the 
adoption of some such carefully devised law are manifest. 

I think the Legislature should appoint or authorize the 
Executive to name a commission to consider the subject, 
and prepare such a plan for the government of cities as 
» they may think proper after a full investigation. 

I wish also to direct attention to the growing surplus 
in the treasury. So prolific are the State's sources of 
revenue that its annual income during the last fiscal year 
amounted to more than two million dollars, exclusive of 
the proceeds of the school tax 

Keeping pace with the growth of the receipts, the State 
fund balance has now reached a large amount. A defi- 
ciency existed in 1889, but this balance fund is now rep- 
resented by about one million dollars. The amount 
therein has increased, notwithstanding the fact that dis- 
bursements out of State and school funds have each year 
been larger, and have increased in amount from about 
fifteen hundred thousand dollars in the year of the defi- 
ciency to more than two millions of dollars in the last 
fiscal year. 

The increase in disbursements is partly to be accounted 
for by the sums required for the needs of a growing 
State, and partly by the sums expended for educational 
purposes and in the erection and improvement of State 
institutions, including armories. In so far as the reve- 
nues of the State have been spent for these objects, there 
is little ground for just criticism or complaint. Some- 
thing of a permanent and useful character stands in 
place of the moneys expended, or benefits have been re- 
ceived by the public which fully compensate them for the 
disbursements. But one of the largest items of increase 
is to be found in the amount annually appropriated for 
charitable and reformatory purposes. This sum has in- 
creased from about two hundred thousand dollars, spent 
in 1884, to more than four hundred thousand dollars, 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 441 

spent in 1898. The amount now annually disbursed rep- 
resents about seventeen per cent, of the State's total 
yearly expenditures This increase is so striking, and has 
grown so rapidly, as to suggest the inquiry whether there 
cannot be devised some means of retrenchment without 
injury to those entitled to the bounty of the State It 
may well be that many of the inmates of our institutions 
are now supported at public expense who are not rightly 
entitled to receive the help of the State. 

There is little likelihood of further demands for large 
extraordinary expenditures in the immediate future, 
except in one or two instances. If economy be practiced, 
and the income received by the State shows no appre- 
ciable falling off, the State fund is not likely to decrease. 
It is more likely to assume proportions which will be far 
larger than the needs of the State require. Its existence 
will ])rove a constant inducement to extravagance or 
unwise expenditure The funds should be maintained at 
such an amount as prudence and a due regard to the de- 
mands thereon, which may be reasonably anticipated, 
may suggest. Any sum in excess thereof should be 
wisely disposed of in relieving the burdens of local taxa- 
tion. Already some measures in this direction have been 
adopted without endangering the State's interests or 
seriously affecting its balances. To what extent, if any, 
further distribution should be made requires very careful 
consideration. Many ways in which it can be done 
readily suggest themselves. There might be returned to 
the different municipalities that part of the income which 
is derived from taxes assessed against property therein 
located. This method is open to the very serious objec- 
tion that the revenues of the State are uncertain in 
amount and vary from year to year, as do also the 
amounts required for legitimate objects of expenditure. 
A permanent diversion of a portion of its funds might 
seriously hamper the State and prevent it from meeting 
just and pressing demands. It is questionable whether 
this plan would bring about the local relief which those 
favoring it believe would come from its adoption. It is 
y> a matter of common observation that expenditures in 
y^ muoicipalities are usually limited by the amounts subject 
to their disposal, and it is within the range of probability 
that means would be found to dispose of moneys thus 
returned without a corresponding reduction of tax rate. 
It would be better, in my judgment, under existing 
circumstances, if any action s taken by the legislature, 
to devise some plan whereby the amount diverted should 



442 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

not be a fixed annual sum, but one varying according to 
the condition of the treasury and the claims likely to be 
made thereon. Appropriations could be made for objects 
for the support of which the people of the State are now 
paying direct taxes. In this way the amount now 
annually raised for the support of public schools could 
be reduced, or some means might be devised whereby, 
upon an equitable apportionment, the expenses of the 
various counties for the support of their courts could in 
part be defrayed 

In this connection, and as constituting one of the 
objects for which extraordinary expenditure may be 
needed, I wish to call your attention to the incompleted 
buildings of the State Reformatory at Rahway. From 
time to time there have been appropriated and expended 
on their account various sums, aggregating one hundred 
and eighty-five thousand dollars. Work on these build- 
ings is now and has been practically for more than a year 
at a standstill. In its incompleted form the building now 
partly erected stands as a monument to the folly with 
which the undertaking was conceived or to the lament- 
able lack of good judgment shown in not pushing the 
work to completion. There may be room for honest dif- 
ference of opinion as to the wisdom of finishing the 
buildings in accordance with the extensive plans origin- 
ally authorized. The sum estimated to be necessary for 
this purpose is a large one -in the minds of many larger 
than is warranted in accomplishing the objects of a 
Reformatory. There is a need however, for some new 
buildings in which to confine our criminals. Increased 
accommodations must be provided either here or else- 
where. From the annual report it appears that the State 
Prison is again overcrowded, notwithstanding the recent 
addition to the number of its cells Increased accommo- 
dation, however, is not all that is demanded. It is of 
the greatest importance that we should begin at the 
earliest possible moment a system of prison treatment 
which, wherever tried, has proved so beneficial in the 
reformation of criminals. Motives of humanity and 
selfish interest alike prompt this undertaking. It will be 
within the province of the Legislature to determine 
whether the work shall be completed as originally de- 
signed, or whether the present plans shall be so modified 
as to call for the expenditure of a less sum of money 
without interfering with the method of treatment of 
prisoners which it is proposed to follow These state- 
ments are not intended to impute a reckless extravagance 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 443 

in the work already done. I believe that the strictest 
honesty has characterized every disbursement. The 
buildings are models in simplicity of design, and there is 
an absence of elaborate and exterior ornamentation call- 
ing for useless expenditure. I hope that the Legislature 
will give earnest attention to the matter, in order that 
the interests of the State may be served and the inaugura- 
tion of a great and beneficial work no longer delayed. 

There is another subject to which reference can be ap- 
propriately made at this time, for it is one in the proper 
solution of which the public at large are greatly inter- 
ested. I refer to the great and increasing value of fran- 
chises possessed and exercised by corporations who 
render public services for pay. Ample proof of this 
value is to be found in the vast increase in the amount of 
interest- bearing securities and stock issued by them. 
This increase in value is due to many causes Among 
those that readily suggest themselves are the rapid 
growth of our cities, the diminished cost of constructing 
and extending quasi public works, and inventions that 
facilitate and at the same time decrease the expense of 
operation. Corporations which supply public necessities 
in this State have been capitalized in recent years at 
many times the cost of their property, and vastly in ex- 
cess of what it would cost to reponstruct them, [t is 
admi ted that the public have derived great benefit from 
the growth of these corporations in the way of better 
service and lower rates, but this benefit, it is estimated, 
is less than it might have been if obligations had not 
been unnecessarily incurred to pay interest on bonds issued 
to represent the estimated value of the franchises enjoyed. 
It is not the policy of these companies to pay large divi- 
dends on their stock, but rather to find reasons from 
time to time for increasing issues of their bonds. These 
are often widely distributed among small investors, and 
thereby such transactions are rendered more secure If 
the charges are true and there are good reasons why past 
proceedings of this kind cannot be undone, it is all the 
more important that they should be regulated in the 
future. 

We all fully realize the importance of dealing with this 
matter in a conservative spirit. The prosperity of a State 
depends largely on the security which it gives to the capi- 
tal invested therein. Those obligations, however, which 
are issued for the estimated value of a franchise do not 
properly represent capital, if that value is based upon re- 
ceipts from excessive charges made for public service. 



444 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

Popular discontent has led to much unwise and injurious 
legislation on this subject in other States. We should 
profit by the mistakes that have been made, and devise 
some just and effective remedy, if one be needed. In 
some of the States maximum rates have been arbitrarily 
fixed by statute, but this is a crude method of dealing 
with the problem, and often unfair in its application to 
the differing conditions of various localities. A rate that 
is reasonable in one place may be unreasonable in an- 
other. In other States, commissions have been author- 
ized by law to fix rates after a semi- judicial investigation 
of conditions in each particular case. Experience has 
shown, however, that it is diflScult to confine such legis- 
lation and proceedings within rational bounds. In sev- 
eral instances rates thus fixed have been so manifestly 
unfair that the courts have been constrained to enjoin 
their enforcement in order to prevent confiscation. Such 
legislation draws into our courts questions that are not 
properly of a judicial character, and it would be unfor- 
tunate, indeed, if this State should be compelled to enact 
laws of the kind referred to in order to find a remedy for 
the alleged evil. If legislation is to be enacted, it should 
be only after a full investigation into all of the facts and 
should be free from the objectionable features which I 
have mentioned. 

Events which have been most notable in the history of 
our country have transpired since the Legislature last 
convened. A war has been waged and brought to an 
honorable and successful close. Victories on land and 
sea, the most splendid in the history of the world, have 
been won. Our brave soldiers and sailors knew not a 
single defeat. For them no odds were too great — no dif- 
ficulties brought dismay. Important and lasting will be 
the influence of the contest thus waged. We are now, as 
never before, respected as a powerful and a just people — 
fearless in the cause of right ; forbearing in time of vic- 
tory. Henceforth our place is prominent in the councils 
of the nations New conditions confront us ; new prob- 
lems demand solution ; but we meet them courageously. 
A special significance is to be found in these momentous 
and swiftly passing events. Our national spirit has been 
quickened and our people united in sentiment. Old 
prejudices have disappeared and old wounds have been 
healed. No section, no class, has yielded to another in 
display of loyalty and devotion. When the honor of the 
country was at stake and its safety was threatened, there 
came from all over this broad land an eager response to 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 445 

the summous to arms. To day, as citizens of one State, 
we can rejoice with the citizens of other States over the 
victories won and the honors achieved, and gladly share 
with them the glory that belongs to all. 

New Jersey has cause for special pride in the zeal and 
patriotism shown by its citizens. Quick, and in numbers 
greater than allotted, was their response to the call for 
soldiers, and bitter was the disappointment of those 
whoj^e eager proffer of service was refused. Whether on 
land or on sea, New Jersey soldiers and sailors so demeaned 
themselves that honor and credit came to the State. For 
fidelity, for intelligence, for willing and patient service 
during trying times and under discouraging circum- 
stances, they pre-eminently distinguished themselves, 
and by their conduct won the commendation of all. To 
them is due all honor, and from the people of the State a 
grateful recognition of their valor and patriotism. 

Many, if not all of them, have made unusual sacrifices. 
Their continued service has entailed upon them, and 
upon those dependent on them for their support, unusual 
hardships and burdens. The compensation which they 
have received from the national government, limited as 
it is, cannot be expected to fully reimburse them for their 
financial losses In what especial way, whether by 
pecuniary compensation or otherwise, the State shall 
make recognition of their sacrifices is for the Legislature 
to determine. In the justice and the wisdom of its con- 
clusions I have every confidence. 

I desire on this occasion to renew my pledge to serve 
unselfishly and without fear the people of our great com- 
monwealth. I shall to the utmost of my power and with 
earnest purpose endeavor at all times to guard their 
interests and promote their happiness. In my efforts I 
bespeak the generous aid and support of my fellow-citi- 
izens, and look for guidance and help to the Supreme 
Ruler of all nations. 



ORGANIZATION 

OF THE 

One Handled and Tteent^-ThiPd LBgiglatoPe 



SENATE OFFICERS. 

President— Charles A. Reed, Somerset. 

President's Private Secretary— Charles H. Bateman, 
Somerset. 

Secretary— Augustus S. Barber. Jr., Gloucester. 

Assistant Secretary - J. Frank Lindsley, Morris. 

Journal Clerk— Walter E. Edge, Atlantic. 

Assistant Journal Clerk -John W. Clift, Union. 

Sergeant-at-Arms— Samuel T. Atchley, Mercer. 

Assistant Sergeant- at- Arms— William W. Binning, 
Bergen. 

Engrossing Clerk— Edgar Williams, Essex. 

Assistant Engrossing Clerk— James Shoemaker, Cape 
May. Second Assistant Engrossing Clerk— Stephen V. 
Gifford, Monmouth. 

Bill Clerk -George W. Cooper, Somerset. 

Calendar Clerk -William H. Fischer, Ocean. 

Doorkeepers — George R. Hoyt, L,ippincott Coles, Isaiah 
F. Barnes, Victor Carlson, William Penn Carson, Samuel 
Kyle, Joseph Leonard. 

ASSEMBLY OFFICERS. 

Speaker— David O. Watkins, Gloucester. 

Speaker's Private Secretary— George E. Pierson, Glou- 
cester. 

Speaker's Assistant Private Secretary— Edgar Shivers, 
Gloucester, 

Clerk— Thomas H. Jones, Essex. 

Assistant Clerk— Charles F. Hopkins, Morris. « 

Journal Clerk — Noah F. Morrison, Union. 

Assistant Journal Clerk— Aaron C. Demarest, Bergen. 

Engrossing Clerk— Charles H. Folvs^ell, Burlington. 

First Assistant Engrossing Clerk— Elmer Freeland, 
Essex. 

Second Assistant Engrossing Clerk— Carl A. Weidel, 
Mercer. 

(446) 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES, 447 

Sergeant-at-Arms— John R. Flavell, Essex. 

First Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms— Horatio E. Havens, 
Ocean. 

Second Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms —John V. A. Van 
Cleef. Somerset. 

Bill Clerk— George Powell, Essex. 

Assistant Bill Clerk— Joseph Hinger, Camden 

Assistant to Clerk of the House— Herbert H. Matts, 
Essex. 

Doorkeepers— Curtis R. Somers, Samuel C. Beetle, 
William H. Jones, Christopher Cunningham, Theodore 
Hutchins, Clark Flock, John R. Carlough, John Wenting, 
William Kline John A. Wagner, Isaac Snedeker, Edward 
Lanniug. 

Gallery Keepers— Martin P. Welsh, Henry Mueller. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

Senate. 

Judiciary — W. M Johnson, Pitney, Martin. 

Revision of Laws - Pitney, Cross, McDermott. 

Appropriations— W. M. Johnson, Stokes, Hutchinson, 
Braun. 

Finance— H. W. Johnson, Evans, Braun. 

Corporations— Stokes, Hutchinson, Packer. 

Municipal Corporations— Ketcham, H. W. Johnson, 
Van Cleef. 

Railroads and Canals— Miller, Francis, Barber. 

Banks and Insurance— Francis, Hand, Packer. 

Education — Francis, Evans, Van Cleef. 

Militia— Ketcham, H. W. Johnson, Foster. 

Game and Fisheries -Stanger, Francis, Foster. 

Riparian Rights -Hand, Smith, McDermott. 

Agriculture— Hutchinson, Stanger, Foster. 

Miscellaneous Business — H. W. Johnson, Evans, Mc- 
Dermott. 

Unfinished Business— Stokes, Ketcham, Van Cleef. 

Engrossed Bills — Stanger, Hutchinson, Barber. 

Labor and Industries— Smith, Miller, Van Cleef. 

Boroughs and Townships— Cross, W. M Johnson, 
Martin. 

Elections— Miller, Cross, Braun. 

Public Health— Hand, Ketcham, Martin. 

Stationery — Hutchinson, Francis, Stokes. 



448 LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 



House. 

Agriculture and Agricultural College— C. Wright, Yard, 
Coles, Shropshire, E K. Smith. 

Appropriations— McKee, Dexheimer, Coles, Welsh, 
Eckert. 

Banks and Insurance — Murraj', Yard. Shropshire, Wese- 
man, Marnell. 

Bill Revision— Ashley, Wakelee, Marshall, Kreitler, 
Carroll. 

Boroughs and Borough Commissions Sturr, Wakelee, 
Steelman, Brandenburgh, Vollers. 

Claims and Revolutionary Pensions— Welsh, Dex- 
heimer, Carr, Cooper. Marks. 

Corporations— Squire, Bullard,Wood, McMurray, Ridge- 
way. 

Education Yard, Ivcwis, Deleot, Houston, F Wright, 

Elections - Bradley, Wakelee, Guenther, Ivcwis, White. 

Engrossed Bills — Guenther, Squire, Steelman, King, 
J. B. Smith. 

Game and Fisheries— Bradley, Horner, Mungle, Mar- 
shall, Woolley. 

Incidental Expenses -Shropshire, McKee, Weseman, 
Nicklin, Bruder. 

Judiciary — McKee, Bell, Wood, Jones, Murphy. 

Labor and Industries— Horner, Poole, Kreitler, Hous- 
ton, Butcher 

Militia -King, Wood, Cooper, Deleot, Hall. 

Miscellaneous Business— Coles, Brandenburgh, Sturr, 
Welsh, Abbett. 

Municipal Corporations— McMurray, Clark, Nicklin, 
Sturr, Kelaher. 

Railroads and Canals— Poole, Bradley, Nicklin, Clark, 
Martens. 

Revision of Laws— Bell, Jones, McKee, Squire, Benny. 

Riparian Rights— Bullard, Steelman, Ashley, Murray, 
Walscheid. 

Stationery — Houston, Mungle, Yard, Ashley, Heyer. 

Towns and Townships - Klein, Murray, Horner, Coles, 
Quaid. 

Unfinished Business— Nicklin, Bell, Guenther, Cooper, 
Blackwell. 

Way? and Means— Lewis, Weseman, Carr, Marshall, 
Butcher, 

Public Health— Dexheimer, Sturr, C. Wright, Carr, 
Martens. 

Rules— McKee, Bell, Bradley. 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 449 

Joint Comraittees. 
treasurer's accounts. 

Senate— Hand, Ketchara, Foster. 

House— Clark, Carr, McKee, Squire, Smilh of Warren. 

STATE PRISON. 

Senate— Ketcham. Stokes. Brauu. 

House— Horner, Squire, Nicklin, Weseman, Wright of 
Salem. 

STATE HOSPITAI.S. 

Senate— Francis, W. M, Johnson, Van Cleef. 
House— Nicklin, Coles, Dexheimer, Poole, Hall. 

STATE WBRARY, * 

Senate— W. M. Johnson, H W. Johnson, Barber. 
House— Jones, Wakelee, Marshall, Wood, Abbett. 

PUBUC GROUNDS AND BUII^DINGS. 

Senate — Hutchinson, Stanger. Braun. 
House— Sturr, Deleot, Pool, Carr, White. 

PRINTING. 

Senate — H. W. Johnson, Hand, Martin. 
House— Shropshire, Wakelee, Mc Murray, Branden- 
burgh, Butcher. 

PASSED BII.I.S. 

Senate— Smith, Cross, Foster. 

House— Wood, Kreitler, Shropshire, Ashley, Benny. 

COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION. 

Senate— Evans, Hand, Braun 

House— Guenther, Steelman, Coles, Ashley, Bruder. 

FEDERAI, REI.ATIONS. 

Senate — Miller, Evans, Packer. 

House—Houston, Weseman, Bell, Wright of Burling- 
ton, Marks. 

SOI.DIERS' HOME. 

Senate — Stokes, Ketcham, Barber. 

House— Yard, King, Klein, Bell, Smith of Sussex. 

29 



450 LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEES. 

REFORM SCHOOL, FOR BOYS. 

Senate— Cross, Miller, Van Cleef . 

House— Wright of Burlington, Bradley, McKee, Welsh, 
Murphy. 

SINKING FUND. 

Senate— Stanger, Hutchinson, McDermott. 
House— Cooper, Lewis, Bullard, McMurray, Carroll. 

INDUSTRIAI< SCHOOI. FOR GIRI,S. 

Senate— Evans, Pitney, Packer. 

House— Murray, Marshall, Welsh, Sturr, Martens. 

SCHOOI, FOR DFAF-MUTES. 

Senate— Pitney, Smith, McDermott. 

House— Welsh, Steelman, Mungle, Yard, Marnell. 

COMMITTEE ON CLERGY. 

Senate— Francis. Hutchinson, Martin. 
House —Welsh, Yard, Guenther. 



LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENTS, 451 

LEGISLATIVE CORRESPONDENTS. 



Alexander ^Id^^iAXi— Jersey City Jour 7ial. 

Lawrence S. Mott — Nezu York Mail and Express. 

Charles H. \,^vy — New York Tribmie. 

Henry C. ^xxchsiVidin — Patet son Press, New York Sun 

William H. Y.oons—Philadelephia Press, Trenton 
Times. 

William K. Devereux— 5/a/<? Gazette, True America^i. 

John J. V2lXxq\\— Newark Evening Neivs. 

T. Edward Burke— A^<?Z£/«r^ Tozun Talk. 

Charles A. ^o^v^sova.— Jersey City News, New York 
Herald. 

Charles H. Bateman — Paterson Morning Call Phila- 
delphia Eveni7ig Telegraph, New York Commercial Ad- 
vertiser. 

James Kerney— 7>/^<? American. 

Julius F. Qrnnow —Jersey City Journal. 

W. Holt K-pgSir— State Gazette, True America?t. 

John J. Qleary— American Press Association. 

William W. 'MiUs—New York Tribune. 

William A. OxdiUO: — Newark SuTiday Call. 

John P. DuMard— Associated Press, New York Even- 
ing Post. 

Joseph D, Byrne —iV(?2e/ York World. 

Charles J. ^^n—Nezuark Daily Advertiser. 

William S. Yoii^r— Somerset Messenger, Plaifijield 
Daily Press. 

Harry B. Salter —7V"<?Z£/ York Evening IVorld. 

Charles R. Bacon — Philadelphia Record. 

Upton S ^^Q^rys— Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Howard B. Tindell — New York Press. 

Walter H. V€W~-New York Commercial, Philadelphia 
Ledger. 

William H Qo\q— Camden Daily Post. 

William D. Brown — Camden Daily Telegram 

Joseph M Y.&\\y—Paterso7i Guardian, New York 
Evening Sun. 

Hugh YL.^\\y— Philadelphia Times. 

S, Conard Ott— Camden Daily Courier. 

John Cloke — N'ew Brunswick Fredonian. 

Thomas C. Hill— Publishers' Press Association 

James Polk — Philadelphia North A^nerican. 

Thomas F. Fitzgerald -5/a/^ Gazette, Philadelphia 
Record, Paterson Guardian, Trenton Sunday Advertiser . 



ADDENDA. 



On page 329. Governor's Private Secretary— Hobart 
Tuttle, of Passaic 

On page 302. The name of the United States Marshal 
should be Thomas J. and not Thomas A. Alcott. 

See page 82. The term of office of former Secretary of 
State Henry C. Kelsey began on July 1, 1870, and termi- 
nated April 1, 1897. 

See page 206. Since the newspapers for the Manual 
were compiled the Newark Daily Advertiser changed 
ownership, and the proprietors now are George B. M. 
Harvey, Mathias C. Ely and Redmond F. Kernan. Mr. 
Ely is managing editor and Mr. Kernan is business 
manager. It is independent in politics. 



(452) 



INDEX 



A. 

PAGE. 

Addenda 452 

Adjutant-General, Biography 308 

Adjutant-Generals, List of 83 

Agriculture, Members of State Board 332 

•• Report of State Board 361 

Amendments to Constitution U. S. 31 

♦• Constitutional, 1897 177 

Appeals, Lay Judges Court of Errors and 329 

Appointments, List of , by Governor 323 

Appropriation lawfor 1899 180 

Arsenal, State, Sketch of 120 

Assembly, Committees of 448 

•' Joint Rules of, and of Senate 74 

•♦ List of Officers of 110 

** List of Speakers of 110 

Officers of 1899 446 

" Rules of House of 65 

Assemblymen, List of, 1845 to 1899 90 

*' Biographies of 254 

Assessors, State Board of, Biographies 315 

'• Report of State Board of 355 

Attorney-General. Biography 305 

Attorney- Generals, List of 81 

Attorney, U. S. District, Biography 300 

Attorneys, List of U. S. District 328 

B. 

Banking and Insurance, Commissioner, Biography 320 

Boroughs, Classification of 115 

Boys, Trustees of Reform School for 332 

C- 

Cabinet, Officers of President's 327 

Capitol, Sketch of State 116 

*' Custodian, Biography 321 

Census, State, 1895 139 

•* United States •. 153 

Chancellor, Biography of 286 

Chancellors, List of, since 1845 80 

30 (453) 



454 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

Chancery, Clerk in, Biography 311 

•' Clerks of, since 1831 81 

" Court of, Chancellor and Vice-Chancel- 
lors, Biographies 286 

Cities, Classification of 115 

" of over 50,000 population 154 

C1.ASSIFICATION of Counties, Cities and Boroughs 115 

Ci,ERK IN Chancery, Biography 311 

of U. S. Circuit Court, Biography 300 

" of U. S. District Court, Biography 301 

" of Supreme Court, Biography 310 

CivERKS in Chancery, List of 81 

•' of House of Assembly, 1845 to 1898 110 

*• of Supreme Court, List of 81 

•• of U. S. District Court. List of 328 

Commission, Constitutional, of 1894 114 

of 1873 113 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, Biography 320 

•• of Public Roads, Biography 322 

Committees, State Executive 155 

" Joint, Senate and House 449 

House 448 

Senate 447 

Comptroi,i,er, State, Biography 305 

Comptroli^ers, List of, since 1865 82 

Congressmen, List of . to date 76 

" Biographies of 227 

♦• Vote for, by districts 235 

" Vote for, by counties 432 

Constitution OF United States 17 

•' 4« 4« .« amendments to... 31 

" " New Jersey 37 

" " " " amendments to, 1897, 177 

CONSTITUTIONAI, CONVENTION, 1844 Ill 

" Commissions, 1873 and 1894... 113-114 

Corporations, Assessed valuation of 358 

Correspondents. Legislative 451 

Council, List of Vice-Presidents of 107 

Counties, Classification of 115 

Officers of 342 

Court, Lay Judges of, Errors and Appeals 329 

•• Judges of Supreme 329 

•' Clerk of Supreme 330 

*' Judges of United States Supreme 327 

" Judge of United States District 328 

Courts, Judges of Circuit 329 



INDEX. 455 

PAGE, 

Courts, State, Time of holding 350 

Custodian of Capitoi,, Biography 321 

D. 

Deaf-Mutes, School for 125 

Deci^aration of Independence 13 

E. 

Education, State Board of 330 

Election Precincts, Total in State 431 

Special, 1897 177 

Elections -Presidential, vote 1852 to 1892 132 

Time of, for State Senators 254 

of 1898, N. J. vote at 367 

Electoral College 170 

Electoral Vote for President, 1896 172 

1892 171 

1888 170 

" *• of New Jersey since 1789 138 

Epileptics, 6tate Village for 129 

P. 

Factories and Workshops, Inspector, Biography.. 321 

Feeble-Minded Children, Board of Managers 334 

Institution, Viueland.. 129 

" " Women, Board of Managers 334 

" *• '♦ Institution, Viueland 128 

Fish Protector and Wardens 333 

G. 

Governor, Biography 221 

*' List of appointments by 323 

** Prerogatives and duties of 173 

Vote of 1898 for 432 

'-• Vote for, from 1844 to date 167 

Governors, List of , since 1665 10 

Governor's Message, 1899 437 

H. 

Health, Members of State Board of.. 331 

Report of State Board of 358 

Home for Disabled Soldiers, Sketch of 127 

'• " " ♦• Managers of 333 



456 INDEX. 

PAGE. 

HosPiTAi. FOR Insane, Morris Plains 123 

" " ♦' Trenton 121 

HosPiTAi., State, Managers 331 

House, Committees of •• 448 

I. 

Independence, Declaration of 13 

Insane, Hospital for. Morris Plains 123 

" Trenton 121 

Institutions, State 116 

Instruction, Superintendent of Public, Biography. 311 



Joint Meeting, Offices filled by 174 

Judiciary, List of State, to date 80 

Judges, Associate of Supreme Court, Biographies 290 

" Circuit Court, Biographies 294 

" Lay, of Court of Errors and Appeals, Biog- 
raphies 296 

" List of City District 329 

of U. S. Supreme Court 329 

Justice, Chief, Biographical Sketch of 289 

Justices, List of Associate 80 

List of Chief 80 



K. 

Keeper of State Prison, Biography 312 

Keepers of State Prison, List of 83 



Labor and Industries, Chief of Bureau of. Biog- 
raphy 320 

Laws, Number of, at various sessions 84 

Legisi^ative Correspondents. 451 

Legislature, Salaries of members and officers 338 

LegisIvATures, Length of various sessions 84 

** Political complexion of 168 

Librarian, State, Biography 314 

Library. State. Sketch 119 



INDEX. 457 
M. 

PAGE. 

Marshal, United States, Biography 302 

Marshals, List of U. S 328 

Museum, State 361 

N. 

National Guard, Commander of , Biography 307 

Officersof.. 339 

Naval Reserve, Ofi5cersof.. 340 

Newspapers, List of 201 

New Jersey, Constitution of 37 

*♦ '• Electoral vote of 138 

" History of 7 

'♦ '• Presidential vote of, since 1840 166 

" " Vote for Governor since 1844 167 

O. 

Officers appointed by Joint Meeting.. 174 

List of U. S.. for N. J., 1899 328 

Listof State 329 

of Assembly, 1899 446 

*• of previous Assemblies 110 

•♦ of Legislature, Salaries of 338 

•• of National Guard 339 

'* of Senate, List of previous 109 

" of Senate, 1899 446 

" State, Terms and Salaries of 337 

Organizations, Political 165 

P. 

Platforms of Parties 157 

Political Organizations 165 

Population of Cities and Towns, N. J. ]52 

of Cities of over 50,000 154 

of United States 153 

President of United States 327 

Electoral Vote for, 1840 to date 166 

♦• Electoral Vote for, in 1892 171 

N. J. Vote for, in 1896 436 

Presidential Elections, Votes of various, in U. S.. 132 

Presidential Vote, 18S0 and 1884 135 

•' 1888 136 

•• 1892 137 

" Tickets, 1896 179 



458 INDEX. 



Presidents, List of U. S., since 1789 175 

of Senate, 1845 to 1S97 109 

Prison Inspectors , 332 

•' Keeper of State, Biography 312 

'• List of Keepers of State 83 

" State, Sketch 126 

" Supervisor of State, Biography 313 

PuBwc Instruction, Superintendents S35 

Q. 

QuartERMASTER-Generai,, Biography 309 

Ouartermaster-Generai^s, List of, since 1776 83 

R. 

Railroads, Assessed Valuation of 357 

Report of Bureau of Vital Statistics 360 

of Commissioner of Public Roads 362 

of State Board of Assessors 355 

of State Board of Agriculture 361 

of State Board of Health 358 

of State Treasurer S52 

Returns of State Election, 1898. '. 367 

Riparian Commissioners 331 

Roads, Commissioner Public, Biography 322 

" Public, Report of Commissioner 362 

Ruizes of Assembly 65 

" of Assembly and Senate, Joint 74 

" of Senate 57 

S. 

Salaries of Members and OflBcers of Legislature ... 338 

of State Officers 337 

School for Deaf-Mutes 127 

" Fund Trustees 330 

" Industrial, for Girls 125 

" Reform, for Boys . 125 

State Normal and Model 124 

Secretaries, State Senate, 1845 to 1893 109 

" of State, List of previous 82 

Secretary Board of Assessors, Biography 317 

" Board of Taxation, Biography 319 

•' of State, Biography 303 

" of State, Assistant, Biography 304 



INDEX. 459 



Senate, Committees of 447 

*• Joint Rules of House and 74 

" Officers of 446 

" Rulesof 57 

Senates, List of Officers of Previous 109 

Senators, Biographies of Present United States 224 

" Biographies of State 235 

Next Election for State 254 

" List of Previous State 86 

" List of Previous United States 12 

" Present State 235 

Present United States 224 

Soldiers' Home 127 

Speakers of House, List of, 1776 to 1844 108 

List of, 1845 to 1898 110 

Special Ei^ECTioN, 1897 177 

State Board of Health, Report of 358 

" Comptrollers, List of 82 

•* Institutions, Sketches 116 

" Prison Keepers 83 

•' Treasurers. List of .. 82 

Superintendent Public Instruction, Biography, 311 

Supervisor OF State Prison, Biography.. 313 

Supreme Court, Clerk of, Biography 310 

List of Clerks of 81 

•' Listof Judges 329 



Taxation, State Board of, Biographies 317 

Terms of Office of State Officials 337 

Treasurers, List of vState 82 

Treasurer, Report of State 352 

State, Biography 30t 



United States, Amendments to Constitution 31 

Constitution of 17 

Judge, Biography 285 

Officers of. 1899 328 

Marshal, Biography 302 

Population of 153 



460 INDEX, 

PAGE. 

Vice CHANCEI.I.ORS, Biographies 287 

Vice Presidents, of Council, 1776 to 1844 107 

'• ♦* List of, since 1789 176 

ViTAi, Statistics, Report of Bureau of 360 

Vote for Congressman by Counties 432 

for Congressmen. 1^96 and 1898 235 

for Constitutional Amendments, 1897 178 

for Governor, 189^ 432 

of United States for President, 1896 436 

of New Jersey for President, 1896 131 

for Members of Legislature, 1898 367 

W. 
Weather Service, State Director of 332 




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