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STATE OF NEW JERSEY 

-->I1902K- 



Z GE R A L D 



'For Library Use Only 

DO NOT CIRCULATE 



STATE OF NEW JERSEY. 



MANUAL 



7 3:^8 



Legislature of New Jersey 



One Hundred and Twenty-Sixth Session. 



1902. 




BY AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATURE. 
Copyright, 1900, by T. F. Fitzgerald. 



Trenton, N. J. : 
T. F. Fitzgerald, Legislative Reporter, 

Compiler and Publisher. 



Entered according to act of Congress, in iqoo, by 

THOMAS F. FITZGERALD, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



Jgf^^The newspaper press are welcome to use such parts of the 
work as they may desire, on giving credit therefor to the Manual. 



MacCrellish & Quigley, Printers, 
Trenton, N. J. 



Calendar for 1902. 



1902 







EH 


4 






51 

Hi 


1902 





•d 
g 








.a 


p4 




Jan. 








1 


2 


3 


41 


July 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


111 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






Feb. 














i 

8 


Aug. 


■3 


"4 


"5 


"6 


"7 


i 

8 


2 

9 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


j 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


1 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


j 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


Mar. 














1 
8 


Sep. 


31 


1 


"2 


'3 


"4 


"5 


"6 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


1 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


i Apr. 


30 


31 












Oct. 


28 


29 


30 


1 


"2 


"3 


"4 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19: 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




27 


28 


29 


30 






.. 


1 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




May 


■4 


... 
"5 


'6 


"7 


1 
8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


j Nov. 














1 
8 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


June 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


Dec. 


23 
30 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




29 


30 










...1 




28 


29 


30 


31 






... 



PERPETUAL CALENDAR 

FOB ASCKKTAINING THE DAY OF THE WEEK FOR ANV YEAR 
BETWEEN 1700 AND 2499. 



Table of Dominical 
Lettero. 



YEAR of the 
CENTURY. 

N. B.—A star 
071 the left 
denotes leap 
year. 



0*28 



#4*32 



♦8*36 
9 37 



*12 *40 



*56 
57 
68 
69 

*60 
61 
62 
63 

*64 
65 
66 
67 

*68 
69 
70 
71 



*16 *44 *72 



*20 *48 *76 



49 77 

50 78 
61 79 



*24 *52 



*84 
85 
86 



*88 
89 
90 
91 

*92 
93 
94 
95 

*96 
97 
98 
99 



CENTUR'S. 



D F 

c'e 

BjD 
A C 



Month. 



Jan. Oct. 

Feb. Mar. Nov. 

Jan. Apr. July 

May 

June 

Feb. Aug. 

Sept. Dec. 



Dominical Letter. 



8 


15 


22 


29 


s 


9 


16 


23 


30 


M 


10 


17 


24 


31 


Tu 


11 


18 


25 




W 


12 


19 


26 




Th 


13 


20 


27 




F 


14 


21 


28 




S 



s 
S 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 
F 



F 

S 

s 

M 
Tu 
W 
Th 



Th 
F 

S 

S 

:m 

Tu 

w 



E 


F 


A 


B 


D 


E 


F 


G 


B 


(; 


G 


A 


C 


D 



W 


Tu 


Th 


^^■ 


F 


Th 


S 


F 


S 


s 


M 


s 


Tu 


M 



Tu 

W 

Th 

F 

S 

S 



EXPL,AXATION. 

"Under the Century, and in the line with 
the Year of the Century, is the Dominical 
Letter of the Year. Then in the line with 
the month find the column containing 
this letter ; in this column, and in line 
with the day of the Month, is the day of 
the Week. In Leap Years, the letters for 
January and February are in the lines 
where these months are printed in Italics. 

EXAMPLES. 

For December 31st, 1875 : for 1875, the 
letter is C ; under C, in a line with 31, is 
Friday ; and for January 1st, 1876, the 
letter is A ; under A, and in a line with 
1, is Saturday. 



OUTLINE HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 



Within the limits of what is now the State of New Jer- 
sey, aside from any evidences of the presence of prehis- 
toric man in the "Trenton Gravels," the original inhabi- 
tants of the commonwealth were Lenni Lenape, or Dela- 
ware, Indians. This subdivision of the great Algonkin 
family occupied the river valleys of the State, had made 
some progress in agriculture and in elementary arts, were 
peaceable but small in numbers, and at last have become 
totally extinct in this portion of the United States. 

In its settlement, New Jersey was not an English colony. 
The claims of the Crown, based upon early discovery and 
various grants, were totally ignored by two great com- 
mercial nations of Europe— Holland and Sweden. It was 
not until 1664, practically a half century after the first 
occupancy of New Jersey by a white man, that England 
had aught more than a slight influence upon the destinies 
of the State. In settlement, Holland was first to send out 
planters, under the auspices of the Dutch West India 
Company. Claiming both the valleys of the Hudson and 
the Delaware, by virtue of the explorations of Hudson and 
Mey, land was taken up upon the banks of the Hudson, 
Passaic, Hackensack, Raritan and smaller streams tribu- 
tary to New York harbor, as well as at Gloucester upon 
the Delaware. By 1630 these claims were well established 
by occupancy, and by the creation of a centre of local 
government in what is now New York city. Upon the 
rapidly growing influence of Holland, Sweden looked with 
jealous eye. Gustavus Adolphus, in his plan to make 
Sweden a world-power, saw the Dutch to be dangerous 
rivals in America. In 1638 there was equipped a Swedish 
expedition to settle the valley of the Delaware. What 
is now the State of Delaware, the valley of the Schuylkill 
and isolated portions of the west bank of the Delaware 
River were occupied, civil and military government was 
established, and the colony of farmers and traders entered 
upon a brief career of prosperity. The death of Gust^ivus 
Adolphus, internal dissentions in Sweden, the inherent 
weakness of the Delaware settlements, and the constantly 
increasing power of Holland brought matters to a crisis. 
Jn 1655 New Sweden was conquered by New Netherlands, 

(7) 



8 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

and for nine years the soil of New Jersey was absolutely 
under Dutch control. 

Emerging- from the interregnum of the Cromwells, the 
restoration of the House of Stuart brought peace to Eng- 
land. On the 12th of March, 1664, Charles H., with royal 
disregard for previous patents, grants and charters, deeded 
to his brother James, Duke of York, a vast tract embrac- 
ing much of New England, New York and all of what is 
now New Jersey. This was accompanied by active prep- 
arations to drive the Dutch from America, as they, in 
alien claims to New Jersey, practically separated the New 
England colonies from Virginia, Maryland and the Caro- 
linas. In the summer of 1664 armed vessels appeared in 
New York harbor. After negotiations, the Dutch sur- 
rendered and the power of Holland in North America be- 
came simply a matter of history. In the meantime James. 
Duke of York, transferred to two favorites of the House 
of Stuart— John, Lord Berkeley, and Sir George Carteret— 
practically what is now the State of New Jersey. In 
honor of Carteret's defense of the Island of Jersey (Cae- 
sarea) during the Parliamentary wars, the territory was 
called New Jersey (Nova Caesarea). 

Carteret and Berkeley, in granting a liberal frame of 
government and extolling the advantages of their colony 
so well located for agriculture, commerce, fishing and 
mining, attracted settlers not only from England, but 
from Scotland and New England, particularly Long Island 
and Connecticut. These planters were largely Calvinists, 
from Presbyterian and Congregational communities, and 
mainly occupied land in Newark, Elizabeth and upon the 
north shore of Monmouth county. The valley of the Dela- 
ware remained unsettled. The Calvinists brought into 
East Jersey distinctive views upon religious and civil mat- 
ters. Early legislatures punished many crimes by death, 
the penalties being similar to those of the Jewish dispen- 
sation, while the "town-meeting" strengthened the indi- 
vidual action of the small communities. There was an 
intense individualism in every phase of political and relig- 
ious development, the life of the people centering around 
the church and the school house, the head of both, as in 
New England, being the minister. 

In 1676 a division of the interests of Carteret and Berke- 
ley occurred. In the meantime Berkeley had disposed of 
his rights to a company of English Quakers, a conflict had 
ensued, and to establish the claims of all parties concerned, 
the two colonies of East and West Jersey came into 
existence. A line was drawn from a point in Little Egg 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 9 

Harbor to the Delaware Water Gap. Berkeley and his 
assigns retaining West Jersey as their moiety, Carteret 
obtaining East Jersey. 

By Berkeley's transfer the dominant Influence in West 
Jersey was that of the Society of Friends. Salem was 
settled in 1675, Burlington, Gloucester and the site of Tren- 
ton about five years later, while within ten years there- 
after the "shore" communities of Cape May and Tucker- 
ton came into existence. The Society of Friends estab- 
lished in West Jersey a series of communities in which 
the life of the people was different from that of East Jer- 
sey. As East Jersey resembled New England in civil gov- 
ernment, so West Jersey resembled Virginia. The political 
and social centres of the large plantations were the shire- 
towns, slave owning was common, a landed aristocracy 
was established, prominent families intermarried, and 
under the advice of William Penn and his friends good 
faith was kept with the Indians. Capital punishment was 
practically unknown and disputes were settled frequently 
by arbitration. 

Two elements of discord marked the genesis of East Jer- 
sey and of West Jersey. One, external, was the attitude 
of the Duke of York after he became James II. In 1673 
New Jersey was recaptured by the Dutch, who held the 
colony until the early spring of 1674. A question arose as 
to the Duke of York's title after 1674, reconveyances were 
made, but in spite of past assurances. James II. claimed 
the proprietary right of government. To that end Sir Ed- 
mund Andros was commissioned Governor of New Jersey, 
and a climax was reached in 16S0 when the proprietary 
governor of East Jersey was carried prisoner to New York. 
In 1681 the Crown recognized the justice of the proprietors' 
contention, and local government was re-established, but 
not before the seeds of discontent were sown that bore 
fruit in the Revolutionary War. 

An internal disturbance was a contest between the 
Boards of Proprietors and the small land owners. Both 
in East and West Jersey, Carteret and Berkeley and their 
assigns had transferred to wealthy combinations of capi- 
talists—most of whom were non-residents — much of the 
broad acreage of the colonies. With the land went the 
right of selection of Governors and of members of Execu- 
tive Councils, which right Berkeley and Carteret had 
derived from the Crown. This, with "quit-rent" agita- 
tions in East Jersey, led to much bitterness. Finally, dis- 
gusted with turmoil, and viewing a sentiment of revolt 
on the part of the people, the Boards of Proprietors sur- 



10 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

rendered to the Crown, in 1702, their rights of government, 
retaining only their interest in the soil, East and West 
Jersey were united, and the two provinces became the 
royal colony of New Jersey. 

From 1702 until the outbreak of the Revolution the polit- 
ical history of the colony was quite uneventful. Through- 
out the period of seventy-five years there was almost con- 
stant friction between the Legislature and the Governor 
and his Council. The governors, in the main, were Crown 
favorites sent over the sea without a personal knowledge 
of the colony and with but an ill-concealed ambition to 
wrest from the people as much money as could be secured 
for the support of themselves and the executive office. 
The Councils, composed of wealthy land owners of the 
Society of Friends and rich merchants from East Jersey, 
were quiescent, and even the members of the popular 
branch of the Legislature were chosen by those possessing 
property qualifications. The small non-voting farmers 
raised the cry of "aristocracy," and the equivalent of 
"taxation without representation," and while loyal to the 
Crown were open in their expressions of dissatisfaction 
to the personal attitude of their governors. In 173S New 
Jersey, in recognition of this sentiment, was given a gov- 
ernor separate from the one appointed jointly for the colo- 
nies of New York and New Jersey. 

During this period the farm was the centre of the activi- 
ties of the life of the people; particularly was this true in 
the western part of the colony, where favoring climate 
and soil, slave labor and the proximity of Philadelphia led 
to abundant crops and a good market. In East Jersey a 
commercial spirit was more active. Perth Amboy threat- 
ened to rival New York, and Jersey ships from Newark, 
Elizabeth and the Monmouth villages were to be found 
from Boston to Charleston. The repressive economic 
policy of the Crown precluded the development of manu- 
factures. In the southern part of the State, sand and un- 
limited forests of oak and pine led to the development of 
glass making, while "bog iron," with abundance of lime 
from oyster shells, gave an impetus to the erection of 
forges and bloomaries. These, as well as the copper mines 
of the trap rock region, were throttled by adverse Parlia- 
mentary legislation. Ship building was a recognized in- 
dustry, and cedar was extensively "mined" from the 
sunken forests of the tide-water district. Whaling and 
other fisheries were unhampered, and were profitable, as 
was also the trade in skins and in hay from the salt 
meadows of the coast, 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 11 

Throughout the years from 1702 to 1776 gold and silver 
and copper money was scarce. In obedience to the de- 
mand of the English merchants that competition should 
be crushed, legislation was enacted to draw "hard" money 
away from the colony. An inflated paper currency, first 
issued in 1707 to provide ways and means to aid the Cana- 
dian expedition against the French, poured from the 
printing presses. Trade was reduced to barter, and gold, 
silver and copper were practically at a premium for nearly 
three generations. 

Of the more prominent incidents during the period were 
the organized attempts to suppress piracy in New York 
and Delaware bays, the growth of a well-defined system 
of transportation by land and water between New York 
and Philadelphia, the establishment of ferries and post 
roads, the reclamation of waste land, the injection of 
Hugenot. Scotch-Irish and Palatinate German elements 
into the settled population, the chartering of Princeton 
University and Rutgers College, the religious revival led 
by Whitefield, the propogation of abolition doctrines by 
Woolman, the erection of a series of barracks owing to the 
French and Indian war, and what is probably of supreme 
importance, the growth of a sentiment of independence 
fostered by the stupid policy of the Crown, and carried 
from hamlet to hamlet, as much by itinerant hawkers and 
by "Redemptioners," who had served their time, as by any 
other cause. 

The opening of the Revolution found New Jersey's senti- 
ment unevenly crystalized. Few, if any. were favoring 
absolute independence. There were three elements. One, 
the Tory party, was led by Governor William Franklin, 
the illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin. This conserva- 
tive class embraced nearly all the Episcopalians, a vast 
proportion of the non-combatant members of the Society 
of Friends and some East Jersey Calvinists. Another ele- 
ment was composed of men of various shades of belief, 
some in favor of continual protest, others desirous of com- 
promise. This included at the outbreak of the struggle 
most of the Calvinists. some few Quakers of the younger 
generation, and the Scotch-Irish. The third party drew 
its support from a few bold, aggressive spirits of influence 
Vv'hose following included men who believed that war 
for independence would benefit their fortunes. 

The part played in the Revolution by New Jersey has 
been frequently told. Events passed rapidly after the 
affairs of Trenton and Princeton; Monmouth and Red Bank 
will never be forgotten, while the raids at Salem, Spring- 



12 HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 

field, Elizabeth, in the valley of the Hackensack, and the 
winter at Morristown are a part of national history. Oc- 
cupying- a position Toetween New York and Philadelphia, 
its soil was a theatre where the drama of war was always 
presented. At no time was the Tory element suppressed, 
finding its expression in open hostility, or in the barbaric 
cruelties of the "Pine Robbers" of Monmouth, Burlington. 
Gloucester and Salem counties. Though under suspicion, 
the Society of Friends were neutral, for conscience sake, 
remaining close to the teachings of their creed. 

The close of the struggle found the people of New Jersey 
jubilant and not disposed to relinquish their sovereignty. 
The Articles of Confederation were weak and had become 
a by-word and a jest. There was much State pride and 
much aristocratic feeling- among the old families who con- 
tinued to dominate State politics. The Constitution of 1776, 
adopted by New Jersey as a makeshift war measure, pro- 
vided that all State officers of prominence should be elected 
by a Legislature, which was chosen by voters possessing 
property qualifications. As in the colony, the Governor 
was Chancellor, and class distinctions were closely drawn. 
In spite of agitation, all proposed changes were rejected, 
and a strong federal union with the other States was 
viewed with dislike and suspicion. The State, in a quarrel 
with New York, at one time refused to obey the requests 
of Congress, and, in the exercise of her sovereignty, estab- 
lished a Court of Admiralty and coined money. 

While the spirit of "State rights" was dominant, it was 
recognized by leaders of public thought that New Jersey 
was too weak to stand alone. She entered the Annapolis 
convention called to revise the Articles of Confederation, 
and whose lasting monument was the present Federal 
Constitution adopted in Philadelphia in 1787. Upon the 15th 
of June of that year the "New Jersey Plan" was pre- 
sented, which, while lost as a measure, led to the famous 
compromise upon representation, whereby in the Senate 
of the United States the States were given equal vote, with 
a representation based on population in the House. 

The adoption of the Constitution of the United States 
led to the rapid growth of political parties in New Jersey 
as elsewhere. In spite of the intense conservatism of the 
State, led by the Quakers of West Jersey, who were Fed- 
eralists almost to a man, the anti-Federalist sentiment de- 
veloped rapidly, spurred by a virulent party press, the 
death of men who had been trained in colonial methods of 
thought and the democratic tendency of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, which grew in strength in West Jersey. 



HISTORY OF NEW JERSEY. 13 

In the eastern part of the State there was among the indi- 
vidvialistic Calvinists a strong- anti-Federal spirit. This, 
in 1800, led to the election of Thomas Jefferson as President 
of the United States, and in 1801 the election of his political 
ally, Joseph Bloomfield, as Governor of the State of New 
Jersey. The death of Hamilton at the hands of Burr, and 
the death of Livingston, the "war" Governor, tore down 
the strongest pillars of Federalism in New Jersey, and led 
to the absolute domination of the State by the anti-Feder- 
alists, who held power until the outbreak of the second war 
with England. 

The period from 1790 to 1812 in New Jersey was marked 
by a demand for internal improvements and better trans- 
portation. The agitation concerning the Delaware and 
Raritan Canal, Stevens' experiments in 1802 with steam, 
along the lines laid down in 1785 by Fitch, the project of 
the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures at Pat- 
erson as early as 1791, and highways conducted through the 
northwest portion of the State, indicate the trend of public 
sentiment. 

The second war with England was not altogether a pop- 
ular measure in New Jersey. The Federalists, the "Peace 
Parts'," secured control of the Legislature and elected 
their Governor. Nevertheless the State furnished her 
quota of troops. The one permanent effect of the struggle 
upon the State was indirect. Owing to the movement of 
supplies and the necessity of quick transportation between 
Philadelphia and the exposed port of New York, the wagon 
roads between Bordentown and Perth Amboy, and between 
Trenton, New Brunswick, Metuchen, Rahway, Elizabeth 
and Newark, were improved and their advantages as 
"short routes" demonstrated. Upon these lines two later 
railroads, now a part of the Pennsylvania Railroad system, 
were constructed. 

The era following the close of the war of 1812 until the 
opening of the Civil War was one of stupendous activity. 
Interrupted only by the financial depressions of 1817 and 
1837, and slightly retarded by the Mexican War, the pro- 
gress of the State was beyond the wildest dreams of the 
enthusiast, Alexander Hamilton. In the eastern part of 
the State, aided by a constantly increasing foreign popula- 
tion, Jersey City rose from the marshes, Newark grew 
toward her present greatness, Paterson became a centre 
of industry, while in the west, Camden was recognized as 
an available site for manufactures. The public school 
system was established and extended, reforms in the car- 
ing for the criminal, defective, delinquent and dependent 



14 List of governors.- 

classes were instituted, railroads were reaching every towil 
of size, in the vicinity of New York and Philadelphia, fer- 
ries were erected, banks established, post offices opened 
and newspapers printed. In 1844, when social unrest was 
most marked, the present State Constitution was adopted 
by a large popular majority and needed reforms tending to 
elevate the legal position of married women, imprisoned 
debtors and bankrupts were adopted. 

The year 1860 brought a termination to the then impend- 
ing conflict. While every other State north of Mason and 
Dixon's line by 1850 had set the black man free, there were 
still 236 negroes in bondage in New Jersey. The abolition 
movement made slow progress and an anti-war party had 
a decided following. But when the die was cast New Jer- 
sey responded to the call for men and money. She fur- 
nished 88,305 men, or within 10,501 of her entire militia. For 
organizing, subsisting, supplying, supporting and trans- 
porting her troops she paid $2,894,385, and upon the field 
sustained the reputation for bravery she had won during 
the days of Trenton and Monmouth. 

Since the Civil War New Jersey has become the centre 
of marvelous activity in nearly every line of human pro- 
gress. Her mills clothe multitudes; within her borders are 
found the termini of every railroad system of the United 
States, with one exception, penetrating the South and 
West; her market gardens feed 5,000,000 people; a series of 
cities arisen upon the desolate sands of the sea shore fur- 
nish health and pleasure to hundreds of thousands of vis- 
itors; her mines supply iron, zinc and copper; her fisheries 
are world-famous, and her farms and dairies are models. 



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF GOVERNORS OF NEWJERSEY. 

GOVERNORS OF EAST JERSEY. 

Philip Carteret 1665 to 1681 

Robert Barclay 1682 to 1683 

Thomas Rudyard, Deputy Governor 1683 

Ga wen Laurie 1683 

Lord Niel Campbell 1685 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse 1698 to 1699 

GOVERNORS OF WEST JERSEY. 

Samuel Jenings, Deputy 1681 

Thomas Oliver, Governor 1684 to 1685 

John Skein, Deputy 1685 to 1687 



T.TST OF GOVERNORS. 15 

William Welsh, Deputy ](^g 

Daniel Coxe, Governor lt;87 

Andrew Hamilton 1692 to 1697 

Jeremiah Basse. Deputy ir.OT to 1699 

Andrew Hamilton. Governor, 1699 till surrender 

to the Crown 1702 

EAST AND WEST JERSEY UNITED. 

Edward, Lord Cornbury, Governor 1703 to 1708 

John, Lord Lovelace (died in office) 1708 

Richard Ingoldsby,, Lieutenant-Governor 1709 to 1710 

General Robert Hunter 1710 to 1719 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1719 to 1720 

William Burnet ". 1720 to 1727 

John Montgomerie 1728 to 1731 

Lewis Morris (President of Council) 1731 to 1732 

William Crosby 1732 to 1736 

John Anderson (President of Council) 1736 

John Hamilton (President of Council) 1736 to 1738 

(The foregoing- were also Governors of New York at the 
same time.) 

SEPARATE FROM NEW YORK. 

Lewis Morris 1738 to 1746 

John Hamilton (President of Couiicil) 1746 to 1747 

John Reading (President of Council) 1747 

Jonathan Belcher 1747 to 1757 

Thomas Pownall, Lieutenant-Governor 1757 

John Reading (President of Council) 1757 to 1758 

Francis Bernard 1758 to 1760 

Thomas Boone 1760 to 1761 

Josiah Hardy 1761 to 1763 

William Franklin 1763 to 1776 

FROM THE ADOPTION OF THE STATE CONSTI- 
TUTION. 

William Livingston (Federalist) 1776 to 1790 

William Paterson (Federalist) 1790 to 1792 

Richard Howell (Federalist) 1792 to 1801 

Joseph Bloomfield (Democrat) 1801 to 1802 

John Lambert, President of Council and Acting 

Governor (Democrat) 1802 to 1803 

Joseph Bloomfield (Democrat) 1803 to 1812 

Aaron Ogden (Federalist) 1813 to 1813 

William S. Pennington (Democrat) 1813 to 1815 

Mahlon Dickerson (Democrat) ISlr to 1817 

Isaac H. Williamson (Federalist) 1817 to 1829 



16 LIST OF GOVERNORS. 

Garret D. Wall (Democrat) 1829 decl'd 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1829 to 1832 

Samuel L. Southard (Whig) 1832 to 1833 

Elias P. Seeley (Whig) 1833 to 1833 

Peter D. Vroom (Democrat) 1833 to 1836 

Philemon Dickerson (Democrat) 1836 to 1837 

William "Pennington (Whig) 1837 to 1843 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1843 to 1844 

Charles C. Stratton (Whig) 1845 to 1848 

Daniel Haines (Democrat) 1848 to 1851 

George F. Fort (Democrat) 1851 to 1854 

Rodman M. Price (Democrat) 1854 to 1857 

William A. Newell (Republican) 1857 to 1860 

Charles S. Olden (Republican) 1860 to 1863 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1863 to 1866 

Marcus L. Ward (Republican) 1866 to 1869 

Theodore F. Randolph (Democrat) 1869 to 1872 

Joel Parker (Democrat) 1872 to 1875 

Joseph D. Bedle (Democrat) 1875 to 1878 

George B. McClellan (Democrat) 1878 to 1881 

George C. Ludlow (Democrat) 1881 to 1884 

Leon Abbett (Democrat) 1884 to 1887 

Robert S. Green (Democrat) 1887 to 1890 

Leon Abbett (Democrat) 1890 to 1893 

George T. Werts (Democrat) 1893 to 1896 

John W. Griggs (Republican) 1896 to 1898 

Foster M. Voorhees (Rep.), Acting Governor... 

Feb. 1, '98, to Oct. 18, '98 

David O. Watkins (Rep.), Acting Governor 

Oct. 18, '98, to Jan. 16, '99 

*Foster M. Voorhees (Republican) 1899 to 1902 

Franklin Murphy (Republican) 1902 to 



♦President of the Senate William M. Johnson served as 
Acting Governor from May 21 to June 19, 1900, when Gov- 
ernor Voorhees was absent from the State. 



UNITED STATES SENATORS. 17 

UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



The following is a list of the United States Senators for 
New Jersey from 1789 to date: 

Jonathan Elmer, March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1791. 
William Paterson, March 4, 1789, to November 23, 1790. 
Philemon Dickinson, November 2.3, 1790, to March 3. 179.3. 
John Rutherford, March 4, 1791, to December 5, 1798. 
Frederick Frelinghuysen, March 4, 1793, to November 12, 

1796. 
Richard Stockton, November 12, 1796, to March 3, 1799. 
Franklin Davenport, December 5, 1798, to February 14. 1799. 
James Schureman, February 14, 1799, to February 26, 1801. 
Jonathan Dayton, March 4. 1799, to March 3, 180.5. 
Aaron Ogden, February 26. ISUl, to March 3, 180.3. 
John Condit, September 1, 1803, to March 3, 1809. 
Aaron Kitchell, March 4, 1805, to March 21, 1809. 
John Lambert, March 4, 1809, to March 3. 181.5. 
John Condit, March 21. 1809, to March 3. 1817. 
James Jefferson Wilson, March 4, 1815. to January 26, 1821. 
Mahlon Dickerson, March 4. 1817, to March 3. 1829. 
Samuel L. Southard, January 26, 1821, to November 12, 1823. 
Joseph Mcllvaine, November 12. 1823, to November 10, 1826. 
Ephraim Bateman. November 10, 1826, to January 30, 1829. 
Theodore Frelinghuysen, March 4, 1829, to March 3, 1835. 
Mahlon Dickerson, January 30. 1829, to March 3, 1833. 
Samuel L. Southard, March 4. 18.33, to June 26, 1842. 
Garret D. Wall, March 4. 1835, to March 3, 1841. 
Jacob W. Miller, March 4. 1841. to March 3, 1853. 
William L. Davton, July 2, 1842. to March 3, 1851. 
Jacob W. Miller, January 4, 1841, to March .3. 1853. 
Robert F. Stockton. March 4. 1851, to February 11, 1853. 
W^illiam Wright, March 4, 18.53, to March 3, 1859. 
John R. Thomson (died), February 11, 1853, to December, 

1862. 
Richard S. Field (vacancy), December 12, 1862, to January 

13, 1863. 
John C. Ten Eyck, from March 17, 1859, to March 3. 1865. 
James W. Wall (vacancy), January 14, 1863. to March 3, 1863. 
William Wright, March 4, 1863, to November. 1866. 
F. T. Frelinghuysen, November, 1866, to March 3, 1869. 
John P. Stockton. March 4. 1865, to March 27. 1866. 
Alexander G. Cattell. March 27. 1866. to March 3. 1871. 
John P. Stockton. March 4. 1869, to March 3. 187.5. 
F. T. Frelinghuvsen, March 4. 1871. to March 3. 1877. 
T. F. Randolph. March 4, 1875, to March 3. 1881. 
John R. McPherson, March 4. 1877, to March 3. 1895. 
William J. Sewell. March 4. 1881, to March 3. 1887. 
Rufus Blodgett, March 4, 1887, to March 3, 1893. 
James Smuth, Jr., March 4, 1893. to March 3, 1899. 

William J. Sewell. March 4, 1895, to . 

John Kean, March 4, 1899, to . 



18 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES. 



When, in the course of human events, it becomes neces- 
sary for one people to dissolve the political bands which 
have connected them with another, and to assume, among 
the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to 
which the laws of nature and of nature's God entitle them, 
a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that 
they should declare the causes which impel them to the 
separation. 

We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are 
created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with 
certain unalienable rights; that am.ong these are life, lib- 
erty and the pursuits of happiness. That, to secure these 
rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving 
their just powers from the consent of the governed; that 
whenever any form of government becomes destructive of 
these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish 
it, and to institute a new government, laying its founda- 
tions on such principles, and organizing its powers in such 
form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their 
safety and happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that 
governments long established should not be changed for 
light and transient causes; and accordingly, all experience 
hath shown that mankind are more disposed to suffer, 
while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by 
abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But, 
when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing in- 
variably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them 
under absolute despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, 
to throw off such government, and to provide new guards 
for their future security. Such has been the patient suffer- 
ance of these colonies, and such is now the necessity which 
constrains them to alter their former systems of govern- 
ment. The history of the present king of Great Britain is 
a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having, 
in direct object, the establishment of an absolute tyranny 
over these States. To prove this, let facts be submitted to 
a candid world: 

He has refused his assent to. laws the most wholesome 
and necessary for the public good. 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 19 

He has forbidden his Governors to pass laws of imme- 
diate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their 
operations till his assent should be obtained; and when so 
suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. 

He has refused to pass other laws for the accommodation 
of large districts of people, unless those people would re- 
linquish the right of representation in the Legislature— a 
right inestimable to them, and formidable to tyrants only. 

He has called together legislative bodies at places un- 
usual, uncomfortable and distant from the repository of 
their public records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them 
into compliance with his measures. 

He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for 
opposing, with manly firmness, his invasions on the rights 
of the people. 

He has refused, for a long time after such dissolutions, 
to cause others to be elected; whereby the legislative 
powers, incapable of annihilation, have returned to the 
people at large for their exercise; the State remaining, in 
the meantime, exposed to all the dangers of invasions from 
without, and convulsions within. 

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these 
States; for that piirpose, obstructing the laws for the nat- 
uralization of foreigners; refusing to pass others to en- 
courage their migration hither, and raising the conditions 
of new appropriations of lands. 

He has obstructed the administration of justice, by re- 
fusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers. 

He has made judges dependent on his will alone, for the 
tenure of their offices,' and the amount and payment of 
their salaries. 

He has erected a multitude of new offices, and sent hither 
swarms of officers to harass our people, and eat out their 
substance. 

He has kept among us in times of peace, standing armies, 
without the consent of our Legislatures. 

He has affected to render the military independent of, 
and superior to, the civil pov/er. 

He has combined, with others, to subject us to a jurisdic- 
tion foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by 
our laws; giving his assent to their acts of pretended leg- 
islation: 

For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us; 

For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishment, 
for any murders which they should commit on the inhab- 
itants of these States; 

For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world; 



20 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

For imposing taxes on us without our consent; 

For depriving us, in many cases, of the benefit of trial by 
jury; 

For transporting- us beyond seas to be tried for pretended 
offenses; 

For abolishing the free system of English laws in a 
neighboring province, establishing therein an arbitrary 
government, and enlarging its boundaries, so as to render 
it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing 
the same absolute rule into these colonies; 

For taking away our charters, abolishing our most valu- 
able laws, and altering, fundamentally, the forms of our 
governments; 

For suspending our own Legislatures, and declaring 
themselves invested with power to legislate for us in all 
cases whatsoever. 

He has abdicated government here, by declaring us out 
of his protection, and waging war against us. 

He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burned 
our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. 

He is, at this time, transporting large armies of foreign 
mercenaries to complete the works of death, desolation and 
tyranny, already begun, with circumstances of cruelty and 
perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and 
totally unworthy the head of a civilized nation. 

He has constrained our fellow-citizens, taken captive on 
the high seas, to bear arms against their country, to be- 
come the executioners of their friends and brethren, or to 
fall themselves by their hands. 

He has excited domestic insurrection among us, and has 
endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the 
merciless Indian savages, whose known rule of warfare is 
an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and con- 
ditions. 

In every stage of these oppressions, we have petitioned 
for redress, in the most humble terms; our repeated peti- 
tions have been answered only by repeated injury. A 
prince whose character is thus marked by every act which 
may define a tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people. 

Nor have we been v.'anting in our attentions to our Brit- 
ish brethren. We have warned them, from time to time, of 
attempts by their Legislature to extend an unwarrantable 
jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the cir- 
cumstances of our emigration and settlement here. We 
have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, 
and we have conjured them, by the ties of our common 
kindred, to disavow these usurpations, which would inev- 



DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 



21 



itably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They, 
too, have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consan- 
guinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, 
which denounces our separation, and hold them, as we 
hold the rest of mankind, enemies in war, in peace, friends. 
We, therefore, the representatives of the United States 
of America, in General Congress assembled, appealing to 
the Supreme Judge of the World for the rectitude of our 
intentions, do. in the name and by the authority of the 
good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and de- 
clare, that these United Colonies are, and of right ought 
to be, Free and Independent States; that they are also ab- 
solved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that 
all political connection between them and the State of 
Great Britain, is, and ought to be. totally dissolved; and 
that, as Free and Independent States, they have full power 
to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish 
commerce, and do all other acts and things which Inde- 
pendent States may of right do. And, for the support of 
this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of 
Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other, our 
lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor. 

JOHN HANCOCK. 



Georgia- 
Button Gwinnett. 
Lyman Hall. 
Geo. Walton. 

South Carolina- 
Edward Rutledge. 
Thos. Hayward, Jr. 
Thomas Lynch, Jr. 
Arthur Middleton. 

Virginia- 
George Wythe. 
Richard Henry- Lee. 
Thos. Jefferson. 
Benjan. Harrison. 
Thos. Nelson, Jr. 
Francis Lightfoot Lee. 
Carter Braxton. 

Delaware — 

Caesar Rodney. 
Geo. Read. 

New Jersey— 

Richd. Stockton. 
Jno. Witherspoon. 
Fras. Hopkinson. 
John Hart. 
Abra. Clark. 



Maryland- 
Samuel Chase. 
Wm. Paca. 
Thos. Stone. 
Charles Carroll, 

of Carrollton, 

Pennsylvania— 
Robt. Morris. 
Benjamin Rush. 
Benja. Franklin. 
John Morton. 
Thomas McKean, 
Geo. Clymer. 
Jas. Smith. 
Geo. Taylor. 
James "Wilson. 
Geo. Ross. 

New York — 

Wm. Floyd. 
Phil. Livingston. 
Fran's Lewis. 
Lewis Morris. 

New Hampshire — 
Josiah Bartlett. 
Wm. Whipple. 
Matthew Thornton. 



22 DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. 

Massachusetts Bay— Rhode Island and Provi- 

Saml. Adams. dence, &c. — 

John Adams. Step. Hopkins. 

Robt. Treat Paine. William Ellery. 

Elbridge Gerry. Connecticut- 
North Carolina- Roger Sherman. 

Wm. Hooper, Saml. Huntington. 

Joseph Hewes. Wm. Williams. 

John Penn. Oliver Wolcott. 

Ordered: IN CONGRESS, January 18, 1777. 

That an authenticated copy of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendency, with the names of the Members of Congress 
subscribing the same, be sent to each of the United States, 
and that they be desired to have the same put on record. 

By order of Congress. JOHN HANCOCK, 

Attest, Chas. Thomson, A true copy. President. 

Secy. John Hancock, 

Presidt. 



CONSTITCTrON OP THE U. S. 23 

CONSTITUTION 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.* 



We, the people of the United States, in order to form a 
more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tran- 
quillity, provide for the common defense, promote the gen- 
eral welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to our- 
selves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Con- 
stitution of the United States of America. 

ARTICLE I. 

LEGISLATIVE POWERS. 

Section I. 
All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a 
Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a 
Senate and House of Representatives. 

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

1. The house of representatives shall be composed of 
members chosen every second year by the people of the 
several States; and the electors in each State shall have 
the qualifications requisite for electors of the most numer- 
ous branch of the State legislature. 

MEMBERS' QUALIFICATIONS. 

2. No person shall be a representative who shall not have 
attained to the age of twenty-five years, and been seven 
years a citizen of the United States, and who shall not, 
when elected, be an inhabitant of that State in which he 
shall be chosen. 

RULE OF APPORTIONING REPRESENTATIVES 
AND DIRECT TAXES. 

3. Representatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned 
among the several States which may be included within 

*This Constitution went into operation on the first Wed- 
nesday in Marchj 1789. 



24 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

this Union, according to their respective numbers, which 
shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free 
persons, including those bound to service for a term of 
years, and excluding Indians not taxed, three-fifths of all 
other persons. The actual enumeration shall be made 
within three years after the first meeting of the congress 
of the United States, and within every subsequent term 
of ten years, in such manner as they shall by law direct. 
The number of representatives shall not exceed one for 
every thirty thousand, but each State shall have at least 
one representative; and until such enumeration shall be 
made, the State of New Hampshire shall be entitled to 
choose three; Massachusetts, eight; Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantations, one; Connecticut, five; New York, 
six; New Jersey, four; Pennsylvania, eight; Delaware, 
one; Maryland, six; Virginia, ten; North Carolina, five; 
South Carolina, five; and Georgia, three. 

FILLING OF VACANCIES. 

4. When vacancies happen in the representation of any 
State, the executive authority thereof shall issue writs of 
election to fill such vacancies. 

OFFICERS— IMPEACHMENT. 

5. The house of representatives shall choose their speaker 
and other officers, and shall have the sole power of im- 
peachment. 

SENATE— HOW COMPOSED. 

Section III. 

1. The senate of the United States shall be composed of 
two senators from each State, chosen by the legislature 
thereof, for six years, and each senator shall have one 

ROTATION OF SENATORS. 

2. Immediately after they shall be assembled, in conse- 
quence of the first election, they shall be divided as equally 
as may be into three classes. The seats of the senators of 
the first class shall be vacated at the expiration of the 
second year; of the second class, at the expiration of the 
fourth year; and of the third class, at the expiration of 
the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every 
second year. And if vacancies happen by resignation, or 
otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of any 
State, the executive thereof may make temporary appoint- 
ments until the next meeting of the legislature, which 
shall then fill such vacancies. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 25 

THEIR QUALIFICATIONS. 

3. No person shall be a senator who shall not have at- 
tained to the age of thirty years, and been nine years a 
citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when 
elected, be an inhabitant of that State for which he shall 
be chosen. 

PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE. 

4. The Vice-President of the United States shall be presi- 
dent of the senate, but shall have no vote unless they be 
equally divided. 

SENATE OFFICERS. 

5. The senate shall choose their other officers, and also a 
president pro tempore, in the absence of the Vice-Presi- 
dent, or when he shall exercise the office of President of 
the United Sta.tes. 

THE SENATE'S POWERS. 

6. The senate shall have the sole power to try all im- 
peachments. When sitting- for that purpose, they shall be 
on oath or affirmation. When the President of the United 
States is tried, the chief justice shall preside. And no 
person shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of the members present. 

7. Judgment, in cases of impeachment, shall not extend 
further than to removal from office, and disqualification 
to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under 
the United States; but the party convicted shall, never- 
theless, be liable and subject to indictment, trial, judg- 
ment and punishment according to law. 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS— HOW ELECTED. 

Section IV. 

L The times, places and manner of holding elections for 
senators and representatives shall be prescribed in each 
State, by the legislature thereof; but the congress may, at 
any time, by law, make or alter such regulations, except 
as to the places of choosing senators. 

WHEN CONGRESS SHALL MEET. 

2. Congress shall assemble at least once in every year; 
and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in Decem- 
ber, unless they shall by law appoint a different day. 



26 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF EACH HOUSE. 

Section V. 

1. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members; and a majority of 
each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, in 
such manner and under such penalties as each house may 
provide. 

RULES, &C. 

2. Each house may determine the rules of its proceedings, 
punish its members for disorderly behavior, and, with the 
concurrence of two-thirds, expel a member. 

JOURNALS. 

3. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts 
as may, in their judgment, require secrecy; and the yeas 
and nays of the members of each house, on any question, 
shall, at the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered 
on the journal. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

4. Neither house, during the session of congress, shall, 
without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than 
three days, nor to any other place than that in which the 
two houses shall be sitting. 

COMPENSATION, PRIVILEGES AND INCAPACITIES. 

Section VI. 

1. The senators and representatives shall receive a com- 
pensation for their services, to be ascertained by law, and 
paid out of the trea.sury of the United States. They shall, 
in all cases, except treason, felony, and breach of the 
peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance 
at the session of their respective houses, and in going to 
and returning from the same; and for any speech or de- 
bate in either house, they shall not be questioned in any 
other place. 

APPOINTMENT TO OFFICE. 

2. No senator or representative shall, during the time for 
which he was elected, be appointed to any civil oflfice under 
the authority of the United States, which shall have been 
created, or the emoluments whereof shall have been in- 
creased, during such time; and no person holding any office 



CONSTITUTION OP THE U. S. 27 

under the United States, shall be a member of either house 
during- his continuance in office. 

REVENUE BILLS. 

Section VII. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the house 
of representatives; but the senate may propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

PASSING BILLS, «S:C. 

2. Every bill which shall have passed the house of repre- 
sentatives and the senate, shall, before it become a law, 
be presented to the President of the United States; if he 
approve, he shall sign it; but if not, he shall return it. with 
his objections, to that house in which it shall have origi- 
nated, who shall enter the objections at large on their jour- 
nal, and proceed to reconsider it. If. after such reconsid- 
eration, two-thirds of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved by two-thirds of that house, it shall be- 
come a law. But in all such cases the votes of both houses 
shall be determined by yeas and nays, and the names of 
the persons voting for and against the bill shall be en- 
tered on the journal of each house respectively. If any 
bill shall not be returned by the President within ten days 
(Sundays excepted) after it shall have been presented to 
him, the same shall be a law, in like manner as if he had 
signed it, unless the congress, by their adjournment, pre- 
vent its return, in which case it shall not be a law. 

ORDERS AND RESOLUTIONS. 

3. Every order, resolution or vote, to which the concur- 
rence of the senate and house of representatives may be 
necessary (except on the question of adjournment), shall 
be presented to the President of the United States, and 
before the same shall take effect, shall be approved by 
him. or. being disapproved by him, shall be repassed by 
two-thirds of the senate and house of representatives, ac- 
cording to the rules and limitations prescribed in the case 
of a bill. 

POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section VIII. 
The congress shall have power: 

1. To lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, 
to pay the debts and provide for the common defense, and 



2S CONSTITUTION OP THE U. S. 

geiitrul welfare of the United States; but all duties, im- 
posts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United 
States. 

2. To borrow money on the credit of United States; 

3. To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among 
the several States, and with the Indian tribes; 

4. To establish an uniform rule of naturalization, and 
uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout 
the United States; 

5. To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of for- 
eign coins, and fix the standard of weights and measures; 

6. To provide for the punishment of counterfeiting the 
securities and current coin of the United States; 

7. To establish post offices and post roads; 

8. To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by 
securing, for limited times, to authors and inventors, the 
exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries; 

9. To constitute tribunals inferior to the supreme court; 

10. To define and punish piracies and felonies committed 
on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; 

11. To declare war, grant letters of marque and reprisal, 
and make rules concerning captures on land and water; 

12. To raise and support armies; but no appropriation of 
money to that use shall be for a longer term than two 
years; 

13. To provide and maintain a navy; 

14. To make rules for the government and regulation of 
the land and naval forces; 

15. To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the 
laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel in- 
vasions; 

16. To provide for organizinz, arming and disciplining the 
militia, and for governing such part of them as may be 
employed in the service of the United States, reserving to 
the States, respectively, the appointment of the officers, 
and the authority of training the militia according to the 
discipline prescribed by congress; 

17. To exercise exclusive legislation, in all cases whatso- 
ever, over such district (not exceeding ten miles square), 
as may, by cession of particular States, and the accept- 
ance of congress, become the seat of government of the 
United States; and to exercise like authority over all places 
purchased by the consent of the legislature of the State 
in which the same shall be, for the erection of forts, maga- 
zines, arsenals, dock-yards and other needful buildings; 
and— 

18. To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 20 

for carrying into execution the foregoing powers and all 
other powers vested by this constitution in the govern- 
ment of the United States, or in any department or officer 
thereof. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF CONGRESS. 

Section IX. 

1. The migration or importation of such persons as any 
of the States now existing shall think proper to admit, 
shall not be prohibited by the congress, prior to the year 
one thousand eight hundred and eight, but a tax or duty 
may be Imposed on such importation, not exceeding ten 
dollars for each person. 

2. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be 
suspended, unless, when in cases of rebellion or invasion, 
the public safety may require it. 

3. No bill of attainder, or ex post facto law shall be 
passed. 

4. No capitation or other direct tax shall be laid, unless 
in proportion to the census or enumeration hereinbefore 
directed to be taken. 

5. No tax or duty shall be laid on articles exported from 
anj' State. No preference shall be given, by any regulation 
of commerce or revenue, to the ports of one State over 
those of another; nor shall vessels bound to or from one 
State, be obliged to enter, clear or pay duties in another. 

6. No money shall be drawn from the treasury, but in 
consequence of appropriations made by law; and a regular 
statement and account of the receipts and expenditures of 
all public money shall be published from time to time. 

7. No title of nobility shall be granted by the United 
States; and no person holding any office of profit or trust 
under them, shall, without the consent of the congress, 
accept of any present, emolument, office or title of any kind 
whatever, from any king, prince or foreign State. 

LIMITATIONS OF THE POWERS OF INDI- 
VIDUAL STATES. 

Section X. 

1. No State shall enter into any treaty, alliance or con- 
federation; grant letters of marque and reprisal; coin 
money; emit bills of credit; make anything but gold and 
silver coin a tender in payment of debts; pass any bill of 
attainder, ex post facto law, or law impairing the obliga- 
tion of contracts; or grant any title of nobility. 

2. No State shall, without the consent of the congress, 



?.0 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except 
what may be absolutely necessary for executing its in- 
spection laws; and the net produce of all duties and im- 
posts laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for 
the use of the treasury of the United States; and all such 
laws shall be subject to the revision and control of the 
congress. 

3. No State shall, without the consent of congress, lay 
any duty of tonnage, keep troops or ships of war in time 
of peace, enter into any agreement or compact with an- 
other State, or with a foreign power, or engage in war, 
unless actually invaded, or in such imminent danger as will 
not admit delay. 

ARTICLE 11. 

THE EXECUTIVE POWER. 

Section I. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of 
the United States of America. He shall hold his office dur- 
ing the term of four years, and, together with the Vice- 
President, chosen for the same term, be elected as' follows: 

HOW ELECTED. 

2. Each State shall appoint, in such manner as the legis- 
lature thereof may direct, a number of electors equal to 
the whole number of senators and representatives to which 
the State may be entitled in congress; but no senator or 
representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit 
under the United States, shall be appointed an elector. 

ELECTORAL COLLEGES. 

3. The electors shall meet in their respective States, and 
vote by ballot, for two persons, of whom one, at least, shall 
not be an inhabitant of the same State with themselves. 
And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and 
of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign 
and certify, and transmit, sealed, to the seat of the gov- 
ernment of the United States, directed to the president of 
the senate. The president of the senate shall, in the pres- 
ence of the senate and house of representatives, open all 
the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The 
person having the greatest number of votes shall be the 
President, if such number be a majority of the whole num- 
ber of electors appointed; and if there be more than one 
who have such majority, and have an equal number of 
votes, then the house of representatives shall immediately 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 31 

choose by ballot, one of them for President; and if no per- 
son have a majority, then from the five highest on the 
list, the said house shall in like manner choose the Presi- 
dent. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be 
taken by States, the representation from each State having 
one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a mem- 
ber or members from two-thirds of the States, and a ma- 
jority of the States shall be necessary to a choice. In 
every case, after the choice of the President, the person 
having the greatest number of votes of the electors, shall 
be the Vice-President. But if there should remain two or 
more who have equal votes, the senate shall choose from 
them, by ballot,- the Vice-President. [See Xllth amend- 
ment.] 

4. The congress may determine the time of choosing the 
electors, and the day on which they shall give their votes, 
which day shall be the same throughout the United States. 

WHO MAY BE ELECTED PRESIDENT. 

5. No person except a natural born citizen, or a citizen of 
the United States at the time of the adoption of this con- 
stitution, shall be eligible to the office of President; neither 
shall any person be eligible to that office who shall not 
have attained to the age of thirty-five years, and been 
fourteen years a resident within the United States. [See 
Xllth amendment.] 

ON THE DEATH, REMOVAL, &C., OF THE PRESI- 
DENT, THE POWERS AND DUTIES DE- 
VOLVE UPON THE VICE- 
PRESIDENT. 

6. In case of the removal of the President from oflEice, or 
of his death, resignation or inability to discharge the pow- 
ers and duties of the said oflEice, the same shall devolve on 
the Vice-President; and the congress may, by law, provide 
for the case of removal, death, resignation or inability, 
both of the President and Vice-President, declaring what 
officer shall then act as President, and such officer shall 
act accordingly, until the disability be removed, or a 
President shall be electecl. 

COMPENSATION OF THE PRESIDENT. 

7. The President shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation which shall neither be increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected; and he shall not receive, within that period. 



32 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

any other emolument from the United States or any of 
them. 

8. Before he enters on the execution of his office, he shall 
take the following oath or affirmation: 

THE OATH. 

"I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully 
execute the office of President of the United States, and 
will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect and defend 
the constitution of the United States." 

POWERS, &C., OP THE PRESIDENT. 
Section II. 

1. The President shall be commander-in-chief of the army 
and navy of the United States, and of the militia of the 
several States, when called into actual service of the 
United States; he may require the opinion, in writing, of 
the principal officer in each of the executive departments, 
upon any subject relating- to the duties of their respective 
offices, and he shall have power to grant reprieves and 
pardons for offenses against the United States, except in 
cases of impeachment. 

TREATIES, AMBASSADORS. &C. 

2. He shall have power, by and with the advice and con- 
sent of the senate, to make treaties, provided two-thirds 
of the senators present concur; and he shall nominate, and 
by and with the advice and consent of the senate shall 
appoint, ambassadors, other public ministers and consuls, 
judges of the supreme court, and all other officers of the 
United States whose appointments are not herein other- 
wise provided for, and which shall be established by law. 
But the congress may, by law, vest the appointment of 
such inferior officers as they think proper in the President 
alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of department. 

APPOINTING POWER. 

3. T4ie President shall have power to fill up all vacancies 
that may happen during the recess of the senate, by grant- 
ing commissions, which shall expire at the end of their 
next session. 

DUTIES OF THE PRESIDENT. 
Section III. 
He shall, from time to time, give to the congress infor- 
mation of the state of the Union, and recommend to their 



CONSTITUTION OF THE tJ. S. 33 

consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary 
and expedient; he may, on extraordinary occasions, con- 
vene both houses, or either of them; and in case of disa- 
greement between them with respect to the time of ad- 
journment, he may adjourn them to such time as he shall 
think proper; he shall receive ambassadors and other pub- 
lic ministers; he shall take care that the laws be faithfully 
executed, and shall commission all the officers of the 
United States. 

IMPEACHMENT, &C. 

Section IV. 

The President, Vice-President and all civil officers of the 
United States shall be removed from office on impeachment 
for, and conviction of, treason, bribery or other high 
crimes and misdemeanors. 

ARTICLE III. 

THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

Section I. 

The judicial power of the United States shall be vested 
in one supreme court, and in such inferior courts as the 
congress may from time to time ordain and establish. The 
judges, both of the supreme and inferior courts, shall hold 
their offices during good behavior, and shall, at stated 
times, receive for their service a compensation, which shall 
not be diminished during their continuance in office. 

EXTENT OF THE JUDICIAL POWER. 

(See Amendments, Art. XI.) 

Section II. 

1. The judicial power shall extend to all cases in law and 
equity arising under this constitution, the laws of the 
United States, and treaties made, or which shall be made, 
under their authority; to all cases affecting ambassadors, 
or other public ministers and consuls; to all cases of ad- 
miralty and maritime jurisdiction; to controversies to 
which the United States shall be a party; to controversies 
between two or more States; between a State and citizens 
of another State; between citizens of different States; be- 
tween citizens of the same State, claiming lands under 
grants of different States, and between a State, or the 
citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens or subjects. 



84 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ORIGINAL AND APPELLATE JURISDICTION OF 
THE SUPREME COURT. 

2. In all cases affecting- ambassadors, other public min- 
isters and consuls, and those in which a State shall be 
party, the supreme court shall have original jurisdiction. 
In all the other cases before mentioned, the supreme court 
shall have appellate jurisdiction, both as to law and fact, 
with such exceptions and under such regulations as the 
congress shall make. 

TRIALS FOR CRIMES. 

3. The trials of all crimes, except in cases of impeach- 
ment, shall be by jury, and such trial shall be held in the 
State where the said crime shall have been committed; but 
when not committed within any State, the trial shall be at 
such place or places as the congress may by law have 
directed. 

TREASON— WHAT AND HOW PUNISHED. 

Section III. 

1. Treason against the United States shall consist only in 
levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, 
giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be con- 
victed of treason- unless on the testimony of two witnesses 
to the same overt act, or on confession in open court. 

2. The congress shall have power to declare the punish- 
ment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work 
corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of 
the person attainted. 

ARTICLE IV. 

ACTS, RECORDS, &C., OF EACH STATE. 

Section I. 

Full faith and credit shall be given, in each State, to the 
public acts, records and judicial proceedings of every other 
State. And the congress may, by general laws, prescribe 
the manner in which such acts, records and proceedings 
shall be proved, and the effect thereof. 

PRIVILEGES OF CITIZENS. 

Section. II. 

1. The citizens of each State shall be entitled to all privi- 
leges and immunities of citizens in the several States. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 35 

FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. 

2. A person charged in any State with treason, felony or 
other crime, who shall flee from justice and be found in 
another State, shall, on demand of the executive authority 
of the State from Vvhich he fled, be delivered up. to be 
removed to the State having jurisdiction of the crime. 

SERVANTS, &C., TO BE SURRENDERED ON CLAIM. 

3. No person held to service or labor in one State, under 
the laws thereof, escaping into another, shall, in conse- 
quence of any law or regulation therein, be discharged 
from such service or labor, but shall be delivered up, on 

claim of the party to whom such service or labor may be 
due. 

HOW NEW STATES ARE ADMITTED. 
Section III. 

1. New States may be admitted by the congress into this 
Union; but no new State shall be formed or erected within 
the jurisdiction of any other State, nor any State be 
formed by the junction of two or more States or parts of 
States, without the consent of the legislatures of the 
States concerned, as well as of the congress. 

THE DISPOSITION OF TERRITORIES. 

2. The congress shall have power to dispose of. and make 
all needful rules and regulations respecting, the territory 
or other property belonging to the United States; and 
nothing in this constitution shall be so construed as to 
prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any par- 
ticular State. 

GUARANTY AND PROTECTION OF THE STATES 
BY THE UNION. 

Section IV. 

The United States shall guarantee to every State in this 
Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect 
each of them against invasion; and, on application of the 
legislature or of the executive (when the legislature can- 
not be convened), against domestic violence. 



36 CONSTITITTION OP THE U. S. 

ARTICLE V. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION- 
HOW MADE. 

The congress, whenever two-thirds of both houses shall 
deem it necessary, shall propose amendments to this con- 
stitution; or, on the application of the legislatures of two- 
thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for 
proposing amendments, which in either case shall be valid, 
to all intents and purposes, as part of this constitution, 
when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the 
several States, or by conventions in three-fourths thereof, 
as the one or the other mode of ratification may be pro- 
posed by the congress; provided, that no amendment which 
may be made prior to the year eighteen hundred and eight 
shall in any manner affect the first and fourth clauses in 
the ninth section of the first article, and that no State, 
without its consent, shall be deprived of its equal suffrage 
in the senate. 

ARTICLE VI. 

FORMER DEBTS VALID. 

Section I. 

All debts contracted, and engagements entered into, be- 
fore the adoption of this constitution, shall be as valid 
against the United States under this constitution as under 
the confederation. 

THE SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND. 

Section II. 

This constitution, and the laws of the United States 
which shall be made in pursuance thereof, and all treaties 
made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the 
United States, shall be the supreme law of the land; and 
the judges in every State shall be bound thereby, anything 
in the constitution or laws of any State to the contrary 
notwithstanding. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL OATH NO RELIGIOUS TEST. 
Section III. 

The senators and representatives before mentioned, and 
the members of the several State legislatures, and all ex- 
ecutive and judicial oflflcers, both of the United States and 
of the several States, shall be bound by oath or affirmation 
to support this constitution; but no religious test shall ever 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 



37 



be required as a qualification to any office of public trust 
under the United States. 



ARTICLE Vll. 

WHEN THE CONSTITUTION TO TAKE EFFECT. 

The ratification of the conventions of nine States shall be 
sufficient for the establishment of this constitution be- 
tween the States so ratifying the same. 

Done in the convention, by the unanimous consent of the 
States present, the seventeenth day of September, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty- 
seven, and of the independence of the United States of 
America the twelfth. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto subscribed our 

names. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON, President, 

And Deputy from Virginia. 



New Hampshire- 
John Langdon, 
Nicholas Gilman. 

Massachusetts- 
Nathaniel Gorman, 
Rufus King. 

Connecticut — 

William Samuel Johnson, 
Roger Sherman. 

New York- 
Alexander Hamilton. 

New Jersey- 
William Livingston, 
David Brearle, 
William Paterson, 
Jonathan Dayton. 

Pennsylvania — 

Benjamin Franklin, 
Thomas Mifflin, 
Robert Morris, 
George Clymer. 
Thomas Fitzsimons, 
Jared IngersoU, 
James Wilson, 
Gouv. Morris. 



Attest 



William Jackson, 

Secretary. 



Delaware- 
George Reed, 
Gunning Bedford, Jun., 
John Dickinson, 
Richard Bassett, 
Jacob Broom. 

Maryland— 

Dan'l of St. Thos. Jeni- 
fer, 
James McHenry, 
Daniel Carroll. 

Virginia- 
John Blair, 
James Madison, Jun. 

North Carolina- 
William Blunt, 
Richd Dobbs Spaight, 
Hugh Williamson. 

South Carolina- 
John Rutledge, 
Chas. Coatesworth Pinck- 

ney, 
Charles Pinckney, 
Pierce Butler. 

Georgia- 
William Few, 
Abraham Baldwin. 



38 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 



AMENDMENTS 



TO THE CONSTITUTION of the United States, Ratified 
According to the Provisions of the Fifth Article of the 
Foregoing Constitution. 



The following articles proposed by congress, in addition 
to and amendments of the constitution of the United 
States, having been ratified by the legislatures of three- 
fourths of the States, are become a part of the consti- 
tution. 

First Congress, First Session, March 5th, 1789, 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHT OF CONSCIENCE. FREEDOM OF THE 
PRESS, &C. 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment 
of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or 
abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the 
right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition 
the government for a redress of grievances. 

ARTICLE 11. 

OF THE MILITIA. 
A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security 
of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear 
arms shall not be infringed. 

ARTICLE III. 

OF QUARTERING SOLDIERS. 
No soldier shall in time of peace be quartered in any 
house without the consent of the owner; nor in time of 
war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law. 

ARTICLE IV. 

OF UNREASONABLE SEARCHES AND SEIZURES. 

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 39 

and seizures, shall not be violated; and no wai-rant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affir- 
mation, and particularly describing' the place to be 
searched, and the persons or things to be seized. 

ARTICLE V. 

OF CRIMES AND INDICTMENTS. 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or other- 
wise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indict- 
ment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land 
or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service 
in time of war or public danger, nor shall any person be 
subject, for the same offense, to be twice put in jeopardy 
of life and limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal 
case to be witness against himself; nor to be deprived of 
life, liberty or property, without due process of law, nor 
shall private property be taken for public use without just 
compensation. 

ARTICLE VI. 

OF CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS. 

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the 
right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of 
the State and district wherein the crime shall have been 
committed, which district shall have been previously ascer- 
tained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause 
of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses 
against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining 
witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of coun- 
sel for his defense. 

ARTICLE VII. 

OF TRIAL BY JURY IN CIVIL CASES. 

In suits at common law, where the value in controversy 
shall exceed twenty dollars, the right of trial by jury shall 
be preserved; and no fact tried by a jury shall be other- 
wise re-examined in any court of the United States, than 
according to the rules of the common law. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

OF BAILS, FINES AND PUNISHMENTS. 

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines 
imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted. 



40 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

ARTICLE IX. 

RESERVED RIGHTS. 

The enumeration in the constitution, of certain rights, 
shall not be construed to deny or disparage others, retained 
by the people. 

ARTICLE X. 

POWERS NOT DELEGATED RESERVED. 

The powers not delegated to the United States by the 
constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved 
to the States respectively, or to the people. 

Third Congress, Second Session, December 2d, 1783. 

ARTICLE XL 

THE JUDICIAL POWER— SEE ART. 3, SEC. 2. 

The judicial power of the United States shall not be con- 
strued to extend to any suit, in law or equity, commenced 
or prosecuted against one of the United States, by citizens 
of another State, or by citizens or subjects of any foreign 
State. 

Eighth Congress, First Session, October 17th, 1803. 

ARTICLE XIL 

HOW THE PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT 
ARE ELECTED. 

The electors shall meet in their respective States,* and 
vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of 
whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same 
State with themselves; they shall name, in their ballots, 
the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots 
the person voted for as Vice-President; and they shall 
make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, 
and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the 
number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and 
certify, and transmit sealed.f to the seat of the government 
of the United States, directed to the president of the sen- 



*On the first Wednesday in December, by act of Congress, 
1st March, 1792. 

tBefore the 1st Wednesday in January, ]jy act of Con- 
gress, 1st March, 1792, 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 41 

ate; the president of the senate shall, in the presence of 
the senate and house of representatives, open all the cer- 
tificates,* and the votes shall then be counted; the person 
having- the greatest number of votes for President shall 
be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed. And if no person have such 
majority, then from the persons having the highest num- 
bers, not exceeding three, on the list of those voted for as 
President, the house of representatives shall choose imme- 
diately, by ballot, the President; but in choosing the Presi- 
dent, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation 
from each State having- one vote; a quorum for this pur- 
pose shall consist of a member or members from two- 
thirds of the States, and a majority of all the States shall 
be necessary to a choice; and if the house of representa- 
tives shall not choose a President, whenever the right of a 
choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of 
March next following-, then the Vice-President shall act as 
President, as in the case of the death or other constitu- 
tional disability of the President. The person having- the 
greatest number of votes as Vice-President shall be the 
Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole 
number of electors appointed; and if no person have a ma- 
jority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the 
senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the 
purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of 
senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be 
necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineli- 
gible to the office of President, shall be eligible to that of 
Vice-President of the United States. 

ARTICLE XIII. 

SLAVERY ABOLISHED— 13TH AMENDMENT, 

PASSED 1865. 

Section I. 

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a 
punishment for crime, whereof the party shall have been 
duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any 
place subject to their jurisdiction. 

Section II. 

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by ap- 
propriate legislation. 



*0n the 2d Wednesday in February, by the same act- 



42 CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 

CITIZENS AND THEIR RIGHTS— 14TH AMENDMENT. 

Section I. 

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and 
subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the 
United States, and of the State wherein they reside. No 
State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge 
the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United 
States. Nor shall any State deprive any person of life, 
liberty or property without due process of law, nor deny 
to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection 
of the laws. 

APPORTIONMENT OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

Section II. 

Representatives shall be apportioned among the several 
States according to their respective number, counting the 
whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians 
not taxed; but whenever the right to vote at any election 
for electors of President and Vice-President, or for United 
States representatives in congress, executive and judicial 
officers, or the members of the legislature thereof, is de- 
nied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being 
twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, 
or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebel- 
lion or other crime, the basis of representation therein 
shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of 
such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male 
citizens twenty-one years of age in such State. 



DISABILITY OF PERSONS ENGAGED IN THE 
REBELLION. 

Section III. 

No person shall be a senator or representative in con- 
gress, elector of President and Vice President, or hold any 
office, civil or military, under the United States, or under 
any State, who, having previously taken an oath as a 
member of congress, or as an officer of the United States, 
or as a member of any State legislature, or as an executive 
or judicial officer of any State to support the constitution 
of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or 
rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the 
enemies thereof; but congress may, by a vote of two-thirds 
of each house, remove such disability. 



CONSTITUTION OF THE U. S. 43 

VALIDITY OF PUBLIC DEBT NOT TO BE QUES- 
TIONED. 

Section IV. 

The validity of the public debt of the United States au- 
thorized by law, including debts incurred for the payment 
of pensions and bounties for service in suppressing insur- 
rection or rebellion, shall not be questioned, but neither 
the United States nor any State shall assume or pay any 
debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebel- 
lion against the United States, or claim for the loss or 
emancipation of any slave, but all such debts, obligations 
and claims shall be held illegal and void. 

Section V. 

The congress shall have power to enforce, by appropri- 
ate legislation, the provisions of this article. 

ARTICLE XV. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE NOT TO BE IMPAIRED. 

Section I. 

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall 
not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any 
State, on account of race, color or previous condition of 
servitude. 

Section II. 

The congress shall have power to enforce this article 
by appropriate legislation. 

[The fifteenth amendment passed at the Fortieth Con- 
gress.] 



44 PRESIDENTS. 

PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES 



Year of 

Qualification. Name. Where From. Term of Office, 

1789 George Washington... Virginia 8 years. 

1797 John Adams Massachusetts.. 4 years. 

1801 Thomas Jefferson Virginia 8 years. 

1809 James Madison Virginia 8 years. 

1817 James Monroe Virginia 8 years. 

1824 — John Quincy Adams.. Massachusetts.. 4 years. 

1829 Andrew Jackson Tennessee 8 years. 

1837 — Martin Van Buren New York 4 years. 

1841 — Wm. Henry Harrison*. Ohio 1 month. 

1841.... John Tyler Virginia 3 yr., 11 mos. 

1845 — James Knox Polk Tennessee 4 years. 

1849 — Zachary Taylort Louisiana lyr., 4mo., 5d 

1850.... Millard Fillmore New York 2y., 10m., 26d 

1853 — Franklin Pierce N, Hampshire. .. 4 years. 

1857 — James Buchanan Pennsylvania 4 years. 

1861 Abraham Lincoln^ Illinois 4y., Im., lOd. 

1865 — Andrew Johnson Tennessee 3y . , 10m. , 20d. 

1869.... Ulysses S. Grant Illinois 8 years. 

1877....Rutherford B. Hayes.. Ohio 4 years. 

1881.... James A. Garfield**... Ohio 6m., 15d. 

1881.... Chester A. Arthur New York .3y., 5m., 15d. 

1885 — Grover Cleveland New York 4 years. 

1889.'. ..Benjamin Harrison — Indiana 4 years. 

1893.... Grover Cleveland New York 4 years. 

1897.... William McKinleytt- . .Ohio 4y., 5m., lid. 

1901 — Theodore Roosevelt. . .New York 

*Died in office April 4, 1841, when Vice-President Tyler 
succeeded him. 

tDied in office July 9, 1850, when Vice-President Fillmore 
succeeded him. 

^Assassinated April 14. 1865; died April 15, 1865, when Vice- 
President Johnson succeeded him. 

**Assassinated July 2, 1881; died September 19, 1881, when 
Vice-President Arthur succeeded him. 

tfAssassinated September 6, 1901; died September 14, 
1901, when Vice-President Roosevelt succeeded him. 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 45 

VICE-PRESIDENTS OF UNITED STATES. 



Year of 

Qualification. Name. Where From. 

17S9 John Adams Massachusetts. 

1797 .Thomas Jefferson Virginia. 

1801 Aaron Burr New York. 

1804 George Clinton New York. 

1813 Elbridge Gerry Massachusetts. 

1817 Daniel D. Tompkins New York. 

1824 John C. Calhoun South Carolina. 

1833 Martin Van Buren New York. 

1837 Richard M. Johnson Kentucky. 

1841 John Tyler Virginia. 

1842 Samuel L. Southard* New Jersey. 

1845 George M. Dallas Pennsylvania. 

1849 Millard Fillmore New York. 

1851 William R. King* Alabama. 

1853 David R. Atchinson* Missouri. 

1855 Jesse D. Bright* Indiana. 

1857 John C. Breckenridge Kentucky. 

1861 Hannibal Hamlin Maine. 

1865 Andrew Johnson Tennessee. 

1865 Lafayette C. Foster* Connecticut. 

1869 Schuyler Colfax Indiana. 

1873 Henry Wilsont Massachusetts. 

1875 Thomas W. Ferry* .Michigan. 

1877 William A. Wheeler New York. 

1881 Chester A. Arthur New York. 

1883 George F. Edmunds Vermont. 

1885 Thomas A. Hendricks|. . . Indiana. 

1886 John S-herman* Ohio. 

1889 Levi P. Morton New York. 

1893 Adlai E. Stevenson Illinois. 

1897 Garret A. Hobart** New Jersey. 

1899 William P. Frye* Maine. 

1901 Theodore Roosevelt New York. 

1901 William P. Frye* Maine. 

*Served as President pro tem. of Senate. 
tDied in office November 22, 1875. 
JDied in office November 25, 1885. 
**Died in office Novem.ber 21, 1899. 



46 STATE CONSTITUTION. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 



A CONSTITUTION agreed upon by the delegates of the 
people of New Jersey, in convention begun at Trenton 
on the fourteenth day of May, and continued to the 
twenty-ninth day of June, in the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four, ratified by the 
people at an election held on the thirteenth day of 
August, A. D. 1844, and amended at a special election 
held on the seventh day of September, A. D. 1875, and 
at another special election held on the twenty-eighth 
day of September, A. D. 1897. 

We, the people of the State of New Jersey, grateful to 
Almighty God for the civil and religious liberty which He 
hath so long permitted us to enjoy, and looking to Him 
for a blessing upon our endeavors to secure and transmit 
the same unimpaired to succeeding generations, do ordain 
and establish this Constitution: 

ARTICLE I. 

RIGHTS AND PRIVILEGES. 

1. All men are by nature free and independent, and have 
certain natural and unalienable rights, among which are 
those of enjoying and defending life and liberty; acquir- 
ing, possessing and protecting property, and of pursuing 
and obtaining safety and happiness. 

2. All political power is inherent in the people. Govern- 
ment is instituted for the protection, security and benefit 
of the people, and they have the right at all times to alter 
or reform the same, whenever the public good may re- 
quire it. 

3. No person shall be deprived of the inestimable privi- 
lege of v/orshiping Almighty God in a manner agreeable to 
the dictates of his own conscience; nor, under any pretense 
whatever, to be compelled to attend any place of worship 
contrary to his faith and judgment; nor shall any person 
be obliged to pay tithes, taxes .or other rates for building 
or repairing any church or churches, place or places of 
worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or min- 
istry, contrary to what he believes to be right, or has de- 
liberately and voluntarily engaged to perform. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 47 

4. There shall be no establishment of one religious sect 
in preference to another; no religious test shall be required 
as a qualification for any office or public trust; and no 
person shall be denied the enjoyment of any civil right 
merely on account of his religious principles. 

5. Every person may freely speak, write and publish his 
sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse 
of that right. No law shall be passed to restrain or abridge 
the liberty of speech or of the press. In all prosecutions 
or indictments for libel, the truth may be given in evidence 
to the jury; and if it shall appear to the jury that the 
matter charged as libelous is true, and was published with 
good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be ac- 
quitted; and the jury shall have the right to determine the 
law and the fact. 

6. The right of the people to be secure in their persons, 
houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches 
and seizures, shall not be violated; and no warrant shall 
issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirm- 
ation, and particularly describing the place to be searched 
and the papers and things to be seized. 

7. The right of a trial by jury shall remain inviolate; but 
the legislature may authorize the trial of civil suits, when 
the matter in dispute does not exceed fifty dollars, by a 
jury of six men. 

8. In all criminal prosecutions the accused shall have the 
right to a speedy and public trial by an impartial jury; to 
be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to 
be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have 
compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, 
and to have the assistance of counsel in his defense. 

9. No person shall be held to answer for a criminal of- 
fense, unless on the presentment or indictment of a grand 
jury, except in cases of impeachment, or in cases cogniz- 
able by justices of the peace, or arising in the army or 
navj'; or in the militia, when in actual service in time of 
war or public danger. 

10. No person shall, after acquittal, be tried for the same 
offense. All persons shall, before conviction, be bailable 
by sufficient sureties, except for capital offenses, when 
the proof is evident or presumption great. 

11. The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not 
be suspended, unless in case of rebellion or invasion the 
public safety may require it. 

12. The military shall be in strict subordination to the 
civil power. 

13. No soldier shall, in time of peace, be quartered in 



48 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

any house without the consent of the owner; nor in time 
of war, except in a manner prescribed by law. 

14. Treason against the State shall consist only in levying 
war against it, or in adhering to its enemies, giving them 
aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason, 
unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt 
act, or on confession in open court. 

15. Excessive bail shall not be required, excessive fines 
shall not be imposed, and cruel and unusual punishments 
shall not be inflicted. 

16. Private property shall not be taken for public use 
without just compensation; but land may be taken for 
public highways as heretofore, until the legislature shall 
direct compensation to be made. 

17. No person shall be imprisoned for debt in any action, 
or on any judgment founded upon contract, unless in cases 
of fraud; nor shall aiiy person be imprisoned for a militia 
fine in time of peace. 

18. The people have the right freely to assemble together, 
to consult for the common good, to make known their 
opinions to their representatives, and to petition for re- 
dress of grievances. 

19. No county, city, borough, town, township or village 
shall hereafter give any money or property, or loan its 
money or credit, to or in aid of any individual association 
or corporation, or become security for or be directly or 
indirectly the owner of any stock or bonds of any associa- 
tion or corporation. 

20. No donation of land or appropriation of money shall 
be made by the State or any municipal cofporation to or 
for the usei of any society, association or corporation what- 
ever. 

21. This enumeration of rights and privileges shall not be 
construed to impair or deny others retained by the people. 

ARTICLE II. 

RIGHT OF SUFFRAGE. 

1. Every male citizen of the United States, of the age of 
twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of this 
State one year, and of the county in which he claims his 
vote five months, next before the election, shall be entitled 
to vote for all officers that now are, or hereafter may be, 
elective by the people; provided, that no person in the 
military, naval or marine service of the United States 
shall be considered a resident in this State, by being sta- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 49 

tioned in any garrison, barrack, or military or naval place 
or station within this State; and no pauper, idiot, insane 
person, or person convicted of a crime which now excludes 
him from being a witness unless pardoned or restored by 
law to the right of suffrage, shall enjoy the right of an 
elector; and provided further, that in time of war no 
elector in the actual military service of the State, or of 
the United States, in the army or navy thereof, shall be 
deprived of his vote by reason of his absence from such 
election district; and the legislature shall have power to 
provide the manner in which, and the time and place at 
which, such absent electors may vote, and for the return 
and canvass of their votes in the election districts in 
which they respectively reside. 

2. The legislature may pass laws to deprive persons of the 
right of suffrage who shall be convicted of bribery. 

ARTICLE III. 

DISTRIBUTION OF THE POWERS OF GOVERNMENT. 

1. The powers of the government shall be divided into 
three distinct departments— the legislative, executive and 
judicial; and no-person or persons belonging to, or consti- 
tuting one of these departments, shall exercise any of the 
powers properly belonging to either of the others, except 
as herein expressly provided. 

ARTICLE IV. 

LEGISLATIVE. 
Section I. 

1. The legislative power shall be vested in a senate and 
general assembly. 

2. No person shall be a member of the senate who shall 
not have attained the age of thirty years, and have been 
a citizen and inhabitant of the State for four years, and 
of the county for which he shall be chosen one year, next 
before his election; and no person shall be a member of 
the general assembly who shall not have attained the age 
of twenty-one years, and have been a citizen and inhab- 
itant of the State for two years, and of the county for 
which he shall be chosen one year next before his election; 
provided, that no person shall be eligible as a member of 
either house of the legislature, who shall not be entitled 
to the right of suffrage. 

4 



50 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

3. Members of the senate and general assembly shall be 
elected yearly and every year, on the first Tuesday after 
the first Monday in November; and the two houses shall 
meet separately on the second Tuesday in January next 
after the said day of election, at which time of meeting 
the legislative year shall commence; but the time of hold- 
ing such election may be altered by the legislature. 

Section II. 

1. The senate shall be composed of one senator from each 
county in the State, elected by the legal voters of the 
counties, respectively, for three years. 

2. As soon as the senate shall meet after the first election 
to be held in pursuance of this constitution, they shall be 
divided as equally as may be into three classes. The seats 
of the senators of the first class shall be vacated at the 
expiration of the first year; of the second class at the ex- 
piration of the second year; and of the third class at the 
expiration of the third year, so that one class may be 
elected every year; and if vacancies happen, by resigna- 
tion or otherwise, the persons elected to supply such 
vacancies shall be elected for the unexpired terms only. 

Section III. 

1. The general assembly shall be composed of members 
annually elected by the legal voters of the counties, re- 
spectively, who shall be apportioned among the said coun- 
ties as nearly as may be according to the number of their 
inhabitants. The present apportionment shall continue 
until the next census of the United States shall have been 
taken, and an apportionment of members of the general 
assembly shall be made by the legislature at its first ses-. 
sion after the next and every subsequent enumeration or 
census, and when made shall remain unaltered until an- 
other enumeration shall have been taken; provided, that 
each county shall at all times be entitled to one member; 
and the whole number of members shall never exceed 
sixty. 

Section IV. 

1. Each house shall direct writs of election for supplying 
vacancies, occasioned by death, resignation, or otherwise; 
but if vacancies occur during the recess of the legislature, 
the writs may be issued by the governor, under such regu- 
lations as may be prescribed by law. 

2. Each house shall be the judge of the elections, returns 
and qualifications of its own members, and a majority of 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 51 

each shall constitute a quorum to do business; but a small- 
er number may adjourn from day to day, and may be 
authorized to compel the attendance of absent members, 
in such manner, and under such penalties, as each house 
may provide. 

3. Each house shall choose its own officers, determine 
the rules of its proceedings, punish its members for dis- 
orderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two-thirds, 
may expel a member. 

4. Each house shall keep a journal of its proceedings, and 
from time to time publish the same; and the yeas and nays 
of the members of either house on any question shall, at 
the desire of one-fifth of those present, be entered on the 
journal. 

5. Neither house, during the session of the legislature, 
shall, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more 
than three days, nor to any other place than that in which 
the two houses shall be sitting. 

6. All bills and joint resolutions shall be read three times 
in each house, before the final passage thereof: and no bill 
or joint resolution shall pass unless there be a majority of 
all the members of each body personally present and agree- 
ing thereto; and the yeas and nays of the members voting 
on such final passage shall be entered on the journal. 

7. Members of the senate and general assembly shall re- 
ceive annually the sum of five hundred dollars during the 
time for which they shall have been elected and while they 
shall hold their office, and no other allowance or emolu- 
ment, directly or indirectly, for any purpose whatever. 
The president of the senate and the speaker of the house 
of assembly shall, in virtue of their offices, receive an ad- 
ditional compensation, equal to one-third of their allow- 
ance as members. 

8. Members of the senate and general assembly shall, in 
all cases except treason, felony and breach of the peace, 
be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the 
sitting of their respective houses, and in going to and re- 
turning from the same; and for any speech or debate, in 
either house, they shall not be questioned in any other 
place. 

Section V. 

1. No member of the senate or general assembly shall, 
during the time for which he w^as elected, be nominated or 
appointed by the governor, or by the legislature in joint 
meeting, to any civil office under the authority of this 
State which shall have been created, or the emoluments 
whereof shall have been increased, during such time. 



52 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

2. If any member of the senate or general assembly shall 
be elected to represent this State in the senate or house of 
representatives of the United States, and shall accept 
thereof, or shall accept of any ofHce or appointment un- 
der the government of the United States, his seat in the 
legislatvire of this State shall thereby be vacated. 

3. No justice of the supreme court, nor judge of any other 
court, sheriff, justice of the peace nor any person or per- 
sons possessed of any office of profit under the government 
of this State, shall be entitled to a seat either in the sen- 
ate or in the general assembly; but, on being elected and 
taking his seat his ofl^ce shall be considered vacant; and 
no person holding any office of profit under the government 
of the United States shall be entitled to a seat in either 
house. 

Section VI. 

1. All bills for raising revenue shall originate in the 
house of assembly; but the senate m.ay propose or concur 
with amendments, as on other bills. 

2. No money shall be drawn from the treasury but for 
appropriations made by law. 

3. The credit of the State shall not be directly or indi- 
rectly loaned in any case. 

4. The legislature shall not, in any manner, create any 
debt or debts, liability or liabilities, of the State which 
shall, singly or in the aggregate with any previous debts 
or liabilities, at any time exceed one hundred thousand 
dollars, except for purposes of war, or to repel invasion, 
or to suppress insurrection, unless the same shall be au- 
thorized by a law for some single object or work, to be 
distinctly specified therein; which law shall provide the 
ways and means, exclusive of loans, to pay the interest of 
such debt or liability as it falls due, and also to pay and 
discharge the principal of such debt or liability within 
thirty-five years from the time of the contracting thereof, 
and shall be irrepealable until such debt or liability, and 
the interest thereon, are fully paid and discharged; and 
no such law shall take effect until it shall, at a general 
election, have been submitted to the people, and have re- 
ceived the sanction of a majority of all the votes cast for 
and against it at such election; and all money to be raised 
.by the authority of such law shall be applied only to the 

specific object stated therein, and to the payment of the 
debt thereby created. This section shall not be construed 
to refer to any money that has been, or may be, deposited 
with this State by the government of the United States. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 53 

Section VTT. 

1. No divorce shall be granted by the legislature. 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the leerislature or 
otherwise in this State, and no ticket in any lottery shaH 
be bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, 
book-making or gambling of any kind be authorized or 
allowed within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by law be 
legalized, or the remedy, penalty or punishment now pro- 
vided therefor be in any way diminished. 

3. The legislature shall not pass any bill of attainder, 
ex post facto law, or law impairing the obligation of con- 
tracts, or depriving a party of any remedy for enforcing 
a contract which existed when the contract was made. 

4. To avoid improper influences which may result from 
intermixing in one and the same act such things as have 
no proper relation to each other, every law shall embrace 
but one object, and that shall be expressed in the title. 
No law shall be revived or amended by reference to its 
title only; but the act revived, or the section or sections 
amended, shall be inserted at length. No general law 
shall embrace any provision of a private, special or local 
character. No act shall be passed which shall provide 
that any existing law, or any part thereof, shall be made 
or deemed a part of the act, or which shall enact that any 
existing law, or any part thereof, shall be applicable, ex- 
cept by inserting it in such act. 

5. The laws of this State shall begin in the following 
style: "Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assem- 
bly of the State of New Jersey. " 

6. The fund for the support of free schools, and all 
money, stock and other property which may hereafter be 
appropriated for that purpose, or received into the treas- 
ury under the provision of any law heretofore passed to 
augment the said fund, shall be securely invested and re- 
main a perpetual fund; and the income thereof, except so 
much as it may be judged expedient to apply to an increase 
of the capital, shall be annually appropriated to the sup- 
port of public free schools, for the equal benefit of all the 
people of the State; and it shall not be competent for the 
legislature to borrow, appropriate or use the said fund, 
or any part thereof, for any other purpose, under any 
pretense whatever. The legislature shall provide for the 
maintenance and support of a thorough and efficient sys- 
tem of free public schools for the instruction of all the 
children in this State between the ages of five and eigh- 
teen years. 



tA STATE CONSTITUTTON. 

7. No i;rivatc or si^ecial law shall be passed authorizing 
the sale of any lands belonging- in whole or in part to a 
minor or minors, or other persons who may at the time be 
under any legal disability to act for themselves. 

8. Individuals or private corporations shall not be au- 
thorized to take private property for public use, without 
just compensation first made to the owners. 

9. No private, special or local bill shall be passed unless 
public notice of the intention to apply therefor, and of the 
general object thereof, shall have been previously given. 
The legislature, at the next session after the adoption 
hereof, and from time to time thereafter, shall prescribe 
the time and mode of giving such notice, the evidence 
thereof, and how such evidence shall be preserved. 

10. The legislature may vest in the circuit courts, or 
courts of common pleas within the several counties of this 
State, chancery powers, so far as relates to the foreclosure 
of mortgages and sale of mortgaged premises. 

11. The legislature shall not pass private, local or special 
laws in any of the following enumerated cases; that is to 
say: 

Laying out, opening, altering and working roads or high- 
days. 

Vacating any road, town plot, street, alley or public 
grounds. 

Regulating the internal affairs of towns and counties; 
appointing local offices or commissions to regulate munici- 
pal affairs. 

Selecting, drawing, summoning or empaneling grand or 
petit jurors. 

Creating, increasing or decreasing the percentage or al- 
lowance of public officers during the term for which said 
officers were elected or appointed. 

Changing the law of descent. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual 
any exclusive privilege, immunity or franchise whatever. 

Granting to any corporation, association or individual the 
right to lay down railroad tracks. 

Providing for changes of venue in civil or criminal cases. 

Providing for the management and support of free public 
schools. 

The legislature shall pass general laws providing for the 
cases eniimerated in this paragraph, and for all other cases 
which, in its judgment, may be provided for by general 
laws. The legislature shall pass no special act conferring 
corporate powers, but they shall pass general laws under 
which corporations may be organized and corporate powers 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 55 

of every nature obtained, subject, nevertheless, to repeal 
or alteration at the will of the legislature. 

12. Property shall be assessed for taxes under general 
laws, and by uniform rules, according to its true value. 

Section VIII. 

1. Members of the legislature shall, before they enter on 
the duties of their respective offices, take and subscribe 
the following oath or affirmation: 

"I do solemnly swear [or affirm, as the case may be,] 
that I will support the constitution of the United States 
and the constitution of the State of New Jersey, and that 
I will faithfully discharge the duties of senator [or mem- 
ber of the general assembly, as the case may be,] accord- 
ing to the best of my ability." 

And members-elect of the senate or general assembly 
are hereby empowered to administer to each other the said 
oath or affirmation. 

2. Every officer of the legislature shall, before he enters 
upon his duties, take and subscribe the following oath or 
affirmation: "I do solemnly prom.ise and swear [or af- 
firm] that I will faithfully, impartially and justly perform 

all the duties of the office of , to the best of my 

ability and understanding; that I will carefully preserve 
all records, papers, writings or property intrusted to me 
for safe-keeping by virtue of my office, and make such 
disposition of the same as may be required by law." 

ARTICLE V. 

EXECUTIVE. 

1. The executive power shall be vested in a governor. 

2. The governor shall be elected by the legal voters of 
this State. The person having the highest number of votes 
shall be the governor; but if two or more shall be equal 
and highest in votes, one of them shall be chosen gov- 
ernor by the vote of a majority of the members of both 
houses in joint meeting. Contested elections for the office 
of governor shall be determined in such manner as the 
legislature shall direct by law. When a governor is to be 
elected by the people, such election shall be held at the 
time when and at the places where the people shall re- 
spectively vote for members of the legislature. 

3. The governor shall hold his office for three years, to 
commence on the third Tuesday of January next ensuing 
the election for governor by the people, and to end on the 



56 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

Monday prececiing the third Tuesday of January, three 
years thereafter; and he shall be incapable of holding 
that office for three years next after his term of service 
shall have expired; and no appointment or nomination to 
office shall be made by the governor during the last week 
of his said term. 

4. The governor shall be not less than thirty years of 
age, and shall have been for twenty years, at least, a citi- 
zen of the United States, and a resident of this State seven 
years next before his election, unless he shall have been 
absent during that time on the public business of the 
United States cr of this State. 

5. The governor shall, at stated times, receive for his 
services a compensation 'which shall be neither increased 
nor diminished during the period for which he shall have 
been elected. 

6. He shall be the commander-in-chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; he shall have power to con- 
vene the legislature, or the senate alone, whenever in his 
opinion public necessity requires it; he shall communicate 
by message to the legislature at the opening of each ses- 
sion, and at such other times as he may deem necessary, 
the condition of the State, and recommend such measures 
as he may deem expedient; he shall take care that the laws 
be faithfully executed, and grant, under the great seal of 
the State, commissions to all such officers as shall be re- 
quired to be commissioned. 

7. Every bill which shall have passed both houses shall 
be presented to the governor; if he approve he shall sign 
it, but if not, he shall return it, with his objections, to the 
house in which it shall have originated, who shall enter 
the objections at large on their journal, and proceed to re- 
consider it; if, after such reconsideration, a majority of 
the whole number of that house shall agree to pass the 
bill, it shall be sent, together with the objections, to. the 
other house, by which it shall likewise be reconsidered, 
and if approved of by a majority of the whole number of 
that house, it shall become a law; but in neither house 
shall the vote be taken on the same day on which the bill 
shall be returned to it; and in all such cases, the votes of 
both houses shall be determined by yeas and nays, and 
the names of the persons voting for and against the bill 
shall be entered on the journal of each house respectively. 
If any bill shall not be returned by the governor, within 
five days (Sunday excepted) after it shall have been pre- 
sented to him, the same shall be a law in like manner as 
if he had signed it, unless the legislature by their adjourn- 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 57 

ment prevent its return, in which case it shall not be a 
law. If any bill presented to the governor contain sev- 
eral items of appropriations of money, he may object to 
one or more of such items while approving of the other 
portions of the bill. In such case he shall append to the 
bill, at the time of signing- it, a statement of the items to 
which he objects, and the appropriation so objected to 
shall not take effect. If the legislature be in session he 
shall transmit to the house in which the bill originated, 
a copy of such statement, and the items objected to shall 
be separately reconsidered. If, on reconsideration, one 
or more of such items be approved by a majority of the 
members elected to each house, the same shall be a part 
of the law, notwithstanding the objections of the governor. 
All the provisions of this section in relation to bills not 
approved by the governor shall apply to cases in which 
he shall withhold his approval from any item or items 
contained in a bill appropriating money. 

8. No member of congress, or person holding an office 
under the United States, or this State, shall exercise the 
office of governor; and in case the governor, or person 
administering the government shall accept any office un- 
der the United States or this State, his office of governor 
shall thereupon be vacant. Nor shall he be elected by the 
legislature to any office under the government of this State 
or of the United States, during the term for which he shall 
have been elected governor. 

9. The governor, or person administering the government, 
shall have power to suspend the collection of fines and for- 
feitures, and to grant reprieves, to extend until the expira- 
tion of a time not exceeding ninety days after conviction; 
but this power shall not extend to cases of impeachment. 

10. The governor, or person administering the govern- 
ment, the chancellor, and the six judges of the court of 
errors and appeals, or a major part of them, of whom the 
governor, or person administering the government, shall 
be one, may remit fines and forfeitures, and grant pardons, 
after conviction, in all cases except impeachment. 

11. The governor and all other civil officers under this 
State shall be liable to impeachment for misdemeanor in 
office during their continuance in office, and for two years 
thereafter. 

12. In case of the death, resignation or removal from of- 
fice of the governor, the powers, duties and emoluments 
of the office shall devolve upon the president of the sen- 
ate, and in case of his death, resignation or removal, then 
upon the speaker of the house of assembly, for the time 



5^ STATE CONSTITUTION. 

being-, until another srovernor shall be elected and quali- 
fied; but in such case another governor shall be chosen at 
the next election for members of the legislature, unless 
such death, resignation or removal shall occur within 
thirty days immediately preceding such next election, in 
which case a governor shall be chosen at the second suc- 
ceeding election for members of the legislature. When a 
vacancy happens, during the recess of the legislature, in 
any ofRce which is to be filled by the governor and senate, 
or by the legislature in joint meeting, the governor shall 
fill such vacancy and the commission shall expire at the 
end of the next session of the legislature, unless a suc- 
cessor shall be sooner appointed; when a vacancy hap- 
pens in the office of clerk or surrogate of any county, the 
governor shall fill such vacancy, and the commission 
shall expire when a successor is elected and qualified. No 
person who shall have been nominated to the senate by 
the governor for any office of trust or profit under the 
government of this State, and shall not have been eon- 
firmed before the recess of the legislature, shall be eligible 
for appointment to such office during the continuance of 
such recess. 

13. In case of the impeachment of the governor, his ab- 
sence from the State or inability to discharge the duties 
of his ofllce, the powers, duties and emoluments of the 
office shall devolve upon the president of the senate; and 
in case of his death, resignation or removal, then upon the 
speaker of the house of assembly for the time being, until 
the governor, absent or impeached, shall return or be ac- 
quitted, or until the disqualification or inability shall cease, 
or until a new governor be elected and qualified. 

14. In case of a vacancy in the office of governor from 
any other cause than those herein enumerated, or in case 
of the death of the governor-elect before he is qualified into 
oflSce, the powers, duties and emoluments of the office shall 
devolve upon the president of the senate or speaker of the 
house of assembly, as above provided for, until a new gov- 
ernor be elected and qualified. 

ARTICLE VI. 

JUDICIARY. 

Section I. 

1. The judicial power shall be vested in a court of errors 
and appeals in the last resort in all causes as heretofore; 
a court for the trial of impeachments; a court of chancery; 



STATE CONSTITUTION. r)fl 

a prerogative court; a supreme court; circuit courts, and 
such inferior courts as now exist, and as may be here- 
after ordained and established by law; which inferior 
courts the legislature may alter or abolish, as the public 
good shall require. 

Section II. 

1. The court of errors and appeals shall consist of the 
chancellor, the justices of the supreme court, and six 
judges, or a major part of them; v/hich judges are to be 
appointed for six years. 

2. Immediately after the court shall first assemble, the 
six judges shall arrange themselves in such manner that 
the seat of one of them shall be vacated every year, in 
order that thereafter one judge may be annually ap- 
pointed. 

3. Such of the six judges as shall attend the court shall 
receive, respectively, a per diem compensation, to be pro- 
vided by law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

5. When an appeal from an order or decree shall be 
heard, the chancellor shall inform the court, in writing, 
of the reasons for his order or decree; but he shall not sit 
as a member, or have a voice in the hearing or final sen- 
tence. 

6. When a writ of error shall be brought, no justice who 
has given a judicial opinion in the cause in favor of or 
against any error complained of, shall sit as a member, or 
have a voice on the hearing, or for its affirmance or re- 
versal; but the reasons for such opinion shall be assigned 
to the court in writing. 

Section III. 

1. The house of assembly shall have the sole power of 
impeaching, by a vote of a majority of all the members; 
and all impeachments shall be tried by the senate; the 
members, when sitting for that purpose, to be on oath or 
affirmation "truly and impartially to try and determine 
the charge in question according to evidence;" and no per- 
son shall be convicted without the concurrence of two- 
thirds of all the members of the senate. 

2. Any judicial officer impeached shall be suspended from 
exercising his office until his acquittal. 

3. Judgment in cases of impeachment shall not extend 
farther than to removal from office, and to disqualification 
to hold a.nd enjoy any office of honor, profit or trust under 



60 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

this State; bvit the party convicted shall, nevertheless, be 

liable to indictment, trial and punishment according to law. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the clerk of this court. 

Section TV. 

1. The court of chancery shall consist of a chancellor. 

2. The chancellor shall be the ordinary or surrogate gen- 
eral, and judge of the prerogative court. 

3. All persons aggrieved by any order, sentence or decree 
of the orphans' court, may appeal from the same, or from 
any part thereof to the prerogative court; but such order, 
sentence or decree shall not be removed into the supreme 
court, or circuit court if the subject-matter thereof be 
within the jurisdiction of the orphans' court. 

4. The secretary of state shall be the register of the pre- 
rogative court, and shall perform the duties required of 
him by law in that respect. 

Section V. 

1. The supreme court shall consist of a chief justice and 
fovir associate justices. The number of associate justices 
may be increased or decreased by law, but shall never be 
less than two. 

2. The circuit courts shall be held in every county of this 
State, by one or more of the justices of the supreme court, 
or a judge appointed for that purpose, and shall, in all 
cases within the county except in those of a criminal na- 
ture, have common law jurisdiction, concurrent with the 
supreme court; and any final judgment of a circuit court 
may be docketed in the supreme court, and shall operate 
as a judgment obtained in the supreme court from the 
time of such docketing. 

3. Final judgments in any circuit court may be brought 
by writ of error into the supreme court, or directly into 
the court of errors and appeals. 

Section VI. 
- 1. There shall be no more than five judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas in each of the counties in this 
State, after the terms of the judges of said court now in 
office shall terminate. One judge for each county shall be 
appointed every year, and no more, except to fill vacancies, 
which shall be for the unexpired term only. 

2. The commissions for the first appointments of judges 
of said court shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of April next; and all subsequent commissions for 
judges of said court shall bear date and take effect on the 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 61 

first day of April in every successive year, except commis- 
sions to fill vacancies, which shall bear date and take ef- 
fect when issued. 

Section VII. 

1. There may be elected under this constitution two, and 
not more than five, justices of the peace in each of the 
townships of the several counties of this State, and in each 
of the wards, in cities that may vote in wards. When a 
township or ward contains two thousand inhabitants or 
less, it may have two justices; when it contains more than 
two thousand inhabitants, and not more than four thou- 
sand, it may have four justices; and when it contains more 
than four thousand inhabitants, it may have five justices; 
provided, that whenever any township not voting in wards 
contains more than seven thousand inhabitants, such town- 
ship may have an additional justice for each additional 
three thousand inhabitants above four thousand. 

2. The population of the townships in the several coun- 
ties of the State and of the several wards shall be ascer- 
tained by the last preceding census of the United States, 
until the legislature shall provide, by law, some other 
mode of ascertaining it. 

ARTICLE VII. 

APPOINTING POWER AND TENURE OF OFFICE. 

Section I. 
MILITIA OFFICERS. 

1. The legislature shall provide by law for enrolling, or- 
ganizing and arming the militia. 

2. Captains, subalterns and non-commissioned officers 
shall be elected by the members of their respective com- 
panies. 

3. Field officers of regiments, independent battalions and 
squadrons shall be elected by the commissioned officers 
of their respective regiments, battalions or squadrons. 

4. Brigadier-generals shall be elected by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

5. Major-generals, the adjutant-general and quarter- 
master-general shall be nominated by the governor, and 
appointed by him, with the advice and consent of the 
senate. 

G. The legislature shall provide, by law, the time and 
manner of electing militia officers, and of certifying their 
elections to the governor, who shall grant their commis- 



62 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

sions, and determine their rank, when not determined by 
law; and no commissioned officer shall be removed from 
office but by the sentence of a court-martial, pursuant to 
law. 

7. In case the electors of subalterns, captains or field offi- 
cers shall refuse or neglect to make such elections, the 
governor shall have power to appoint such officers, and 
to fill all vacancies caused by such refvisal or neglect. 

8. Brigade inspectors shall be chosen by the field officers 
of their respective brigades. 

9. The governor shall appoint all militia officers whose 
appointment is not otherwise provided for in this consti- 
tution. 

10. Major-generals, brigadier-generals and commanding 
officers of regiments, independent battalions and squad- 
rons shall appoint the staff officers of their divisions, bri- 
gades, regiments,, independent battalions and squadrons, 
respectively. 

Section II. 

CIVIL OFFICERS. 

1. Justices of the supreme court, chancellor, judges of 
the court of errors and appeals and judges of the inferior 
court of common pleas shall be nominated by the gover- 
nor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate. 

The justices of the supreme court and chancellor shall 
hold their offices for the term of seven years; shall, at 
stated times, receive for their services a compensation 
which shall not be^ diminished during the term of their 
appointments; and they shall hold no other office under 
the government of this State or of the United States. 

2. Judges of the courts of common pleas shall be ap- 
pointed by the senate and general assembly, in joint meet- 
ing. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
appointed to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unex- 
pired term only. 

3. The state treasurer and comptroller shall be appointed 
by the senate and general assembly, in joint meeting. 

They shall hold their offices for three years, and until 
their successors shall be qualified into office. 

4. The attorney-general, prosecutors of the pleas, clerk 
of the supreme court, clerk of the court of chancery, sec- 
retary of state and the keeper of the state prison shall be 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 63 

nominated by the governor, and appointed by him, with 
the advice and consent of the senate. 
They shall hold their offices for five years. 

5. The law reporter shall be appointed by the justices of 
the supreme court, or a majority of them; and the chan- 
cery reporter shall be appointed by the chancellor. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

6. Clerks and surrogates of counties shall be elected by 
the people of their respective counties, at the annual elec- 
tions for members of the general assembly. 

They shall hold their offices for five years. 

7. Sheriffs and coroners shall be elected by the people of 
their respective counties, at the elections for members of 
the general assembly, and they shall hold their offices for 
three years, after which three years must elapse before 
they can be again capable of serving. Sheriffs shall an- 
nually renew their bonds. 

8. Justices of the peace shall be elected by ballot at the 
annual meetings of the townships in the several counties 
of the State, and of the wards in cities that may vote in 
wards, in such manner and under such regulations as may 
be hereafter provided by law. 

They shall be commissioned for the county, and their 
commissions shall bear date and take effect on the first 
day of May next after their election. 

They shall hold their offices for five years; but when 
elected to fill vacancies, they shall hold for the unexpired 
term only; provided, that the commission of any justice 
of the peace shall become vacant upon his ceasing to re- 
side in the township in which he was elected. 

The first election for justices of the peace shall take place 
at the next annual town-meetings of the townships in the 
several counties of the State, and of the wards in cities 
that may vote in wards. 

9. All other officers, whose appointments are not other- 
wise provided for by law, shall be nominated by the gov- 
ernor, and appointed by him, with the advice and consent 
of the senate; and shall hold their offices for the time pre- 
scribed by law. 

10. All civil officers elected or appointed pursuant to the 
provisions of this constitution, shall be commissioned by 
the governor. 

11. The term of office of all officers elected or appointed, 
pursuant to the provisions of this constitution, except 
when herein otherwise directed, shall commence on the 
day of the date of their respective commissions; but no 



64 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

commission for any office shall bear date prior to the ex- 
piration of the term of the incumbent of said office. 

ARTICLE Vlll. 

GENERAL PROVISIONS. 

1. The secretary of state shall be ex officio an auditor of 
the accounts of the treasurer, and as such, it shall be his 
duty to assist the legislature in the annual examination 
and settlement of said accounts, until otherwise provided 
by law. 

2. The seal of the State shall be kept by the governor, 
or person administering the government, and used by him 
officially, and shall be called the great seal of the State of 
New Jersey. 

3. All grants and commissions shall be in the name and 
by the authority of the State of New Jersey, sealed with 
the great seal, signed by the governor, or person adminis- 
tering the government, and countersigned by the secretary 
of state, and it shall run thus: "The State of New Jersey, 

to , greeting." All writs shall be in the name of 

the State; and all indictments shall conclude in the follow- 
ing manner, viz., "against the peace of this State, the gov- 
ernment and dignity of the same." 

4. This constitution shall take effect and go into operation 
on the second day of September, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-four. 

ARTICLE IX. 

AMENDMENTS. 

Any specific amendment or amendments to the constitu- 
tion may be proposed in the senate or general assembly, 
and if the same shall be agreed to by a majority of the 
members elected to each of the two houses, such proposed 
amendment or amendments shall be entered on their jour- 
nals, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred 
to the legislature then next to be chosen, and shall be pub- 
lished for three months previous to making such choice, 
in at least one newspaper of each county, if any be pub- 
lished therein; and if in the^ legislature next chosen as 
aforesaid, such proposed amendment oi" amendments, or 
any of them, shall be agreed to by a majority of all the 
members elected to each house, then it shall be the duty 
of the legislature to submit such proposed amendment or 
amendments, or such of them as may have been agreecj 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 65 

to as aforesaid by the two legislatures, to the people, in 
such manner and at such time, at least four months after 
the adjournment of the legislature, as the legislature shall 
prescribe; and if the people at a special election to be held 
for that purpose only, shall approve and ratify such 
amendment or amendments, or any of them, by a majority 
of the electors qualified to vote for members of the legisla- 
ture voting thereon, such amendment or amendments so 
approved and ratified shall become part of the constitu- 
tion; provided, that if more than one amendment be sub- 
mitted, they shall be submitted in such manner and form 
that the people may vote for or against each amendment 
separately and distinctly; but no amendment or amend- 
ments shall be submitted to the people by the legislature 
oftener than once in five years. 

ARTICLE X. 

SCHEDULE. 

That no inconvenience may arise from the change in the 
constitution of this State, and in order to carry the same 
into complete operation, it is hereby declared and ordained, 
that— 

1. The common law and statute laws now in force, not 
repugnant to this constitution, shall remain in force until 
they expire by their own limitation, or be altered or re- 
pealed by the legislature; and all writs, actions, causes of 
action, prosecutions, contracts, claims and rights of indi- 
viduals and of bodies corporate, and of the State, and all 
charters of incorporation, shall continue, and all indict- 
ments which shall have been found, or which may here- 
after be found, for any crime or offense committed before 
the adoption of this constitution, may be proceeded upon 
as if no change had taken place. The several courts of 
law and equity, except as herein otherwise provided, shall 
continue with the like powers and jurisdiction as if this 
constitution had not been adopted. 

2. All officers now filling any office or appointment shall 
continue in the exercise of the duties thereof, according 
to their respective commissions or appointments, unless by 
this constitution it is otherwise directed. 

3. The present governor, chancellor and ordinary or sur- 
rogate-general and treasurer shall continue in office until 
successors elected or appointed under this constitution 
shall be sworn or affirmed into office. 

4. In case of the death, resignation or disability of the 

5 



66 STATE CONSTITUTION. 

present governor, the person who may be vice-president of 
council at the time of the adoption of this constitution 
shall continue in office and administer the government un- 
til a governor shall have been elected and sworn or af- 
firmed into office under this constitution. 

5. The present governor, or in case of his death or inabil- 
ity to act, the vice-president of council, together with the 
present members of the legislative council and secretary 
of state, shall constitute a board of state canvassers, in 
the manner now provided by law, for the purpose of ascer- 
taining and declaring the result of the next ensuing elec- 
tion for governor, members of the house of representa- 
tives, and electors of president and vice-president. 

6. The returns of the votes for governor, at the said next 
ensuing election, shall be transmitted to the secretary of 
state, the votes counted, and the election declared in the 
manner now provided by law in the case of the election of 
electors of president and vice-president. 

7. The election of clerks and surrogates, in those counties 
where the term of office of the present incumbent shall 
expire previous to the general election of eighteen hun- 
dred and forty-five, shall be held at the general election 
next ensuing the adoption of this constitution; the result 
of which election shall be ascertained in the manner now 
provided by law for the election of sheriffs. 

8. The elections for the year eighteen hundred and forty- 
four shall take place as now provided by law. 

9. It shall be the duty of the governor to fill all vacancies 
in office happening between the adoption of this constitu- 
tion and the first session of the senate, and not otherwise 
provided for, and the commissions shall expire at the end 
of the first session of the senate, or when successors shall 
be elected or appointed and qualified. 

10. The restriction of the pay of members of the legisla- 
ture, after forty days from the commencement of the ses- 
sion, shall not be applied to the first legislature convened 
under this constitution. 

11. Clerks of counties shall be clerks of the inferior 
courts of common pleas and quarter sessions of the several 
counties, and perform the duties, and be subject to the 
regulations now required of them by law until otherwise 
ordained by the legislature. 

12. The legislature shall pass all laws necessary to carry 
into effect the provisions of this constitution. 



STATE CONSTITUTION. 67 

State of New Jersey: 

I, George Wurts, Secretary of State of the State of New- 
Jersey, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true copy 
of the Constitution of the State of New Jersey as amended, 
as the same is taken from and compared with the original 
Constitution and amendments thereto, now remaining on 
file in my office. 

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my 
[Ij. S.] hand and affixed my official seal, this twenty-sixth 
day of October, A. D. eighteen hundred and ninety- 
seven. GEORGE WURTS. 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 

SENATE. 

rui.es adopted this year. 



PRESIDENT. 



1. The President shall take the chair at the time appoint- 
ed; and a quorum being present, the Journal of the preced- 
ing- day shall be read, to the end that any mistake therein 
ma.y be corrected. 

2. He shall not engage in any debate without leave of the 
Senate, except so far as shall be necessary for regulating 
the form of proceedings. 

3. He shall rise to put a question, but may state it sitting. 
He shall, on all occasions, preserve the strictest order and 
decorum. 

4. When two or more Senators shall rise at the same 
time, he shall name the one entitled to the floor. 

5. He shall have the right to name a Senator to perform 
the duties of the Chair, but such substitution shall not 
extend beyond one day. 

6. He shall decide every question of order without de- 
bate, subject to an appeal to the Senate; and he may call 
for the sense of the Senate upon any question of order. 

7. He shall cause all persons to be arrested or removed 
from the Senate chamber who shall interrupt the proceed- 
ings of the Senate or conduct themselves improperly in the 
lobby or gallery. 

8. The Senate may elect a President pro tempore, who 
shall possess all the powers and discharge all the duties 
of the President, when the latter is absent in discharge 
of his constitutional duty of administering the government 
of the State. 

QUORUM. 

9. A majority of the members of the Senate shall consti- 
tute a quorum; and whenever a less number than a quo- 
rum shall convene at a regular meeting, and shall ad- 
journ, the names of those present shall be entered on the 
journal. 

10. Whenever a less number than a quorum shall convene 
at any regular meeting, they are hereby authorized to send 
the Sergeant-at-Arms. or any other person or persons by 
them authorized, for any or all absent Senators, 



Rin.KS OF THE SENATE. fiO 

ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

11. After the President has taken the Chair the order of 
business shall be as follows: 

I. Prayer. 
II. Calling the Roll. 

III. Reading- the Journal. 

IV. Presentation and reference of petitions and memo- 

rials, 
V. Introduction of bills. 
VI. Reports of Committees. 

1. Standing- Committees (in accordance with 
Rule 13). 

2. Select Committees. 
VII. Unfinished business. 

VIII. Senate bills on second reading-.^ 
TX. Senate bills on third reading-. 
X. Assembly bills on second reading. 
XI. Assembly bills on third reading. 

COMMITTEES. 

12. All Committees shall be appointed by the President, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Senate. 

13. The following Standing Committees, consisting of 
three members each, except the Appropriation Committee, 
which shall consist of four members, shall be appointed at 
the commencement of each session, until otherwise or- 
dered, with leave to report by bill or otherwise: 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Appropriations. 

A Committee on Revision and Amendment of the Laws. 

A Committee on Finance. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Railroads, Canals and Turnpikes. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance Companies. 

A Committee on the Clergy. 

A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 

A Committee on Federal Relations. 

A Committee on Stationery and Incidental Expenses. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Militia, 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries, . 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Agriculture. 



70 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business. 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Public Health. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Labor and Industries. 

A Committee on Boroughs and Townships. 

A Committee on Printed Bills, whose duty it shall be to 
examine all bills and joint resolutions before they shall be 
put upon their third reading, and who shall report the 
same to the Senate, and the Secretary shall enter upon 
the journal that the same have been correctly printed. 

Special Committees shall consist of three members, un- 
less otherwise ordered by the Senate. 

The several Joint Committees shall consist of three 
members each, and shall be also appointed to act conjoint- 
ly with corresponding committee to be appointed by the 
House of A£sembly. 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 

A Committee on the Library. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings. 

A Committee on Public Printing. 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes. 

BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

14. When a memorial or bill is referred to a committee, 
praying or providing for an act of incorporation, or for 
any other act, notice of the application for which is re- 
quired by law to be previously advertised, the committee 
shall not have leave to report such bill unless satisfactory 
evidence has been presented to the committee that the ap- 
plication for such act has had a bona fide advertisement 
according to law; and all committees reporting such bills 
referred to them shall certify to the Senate that such 
proof has been presented and is deemed satisfactory. 

15. The titles of all bills and the parts of bills affected 
by amendments, together with the amendments, shall be 
entered on the Journal. 

16. When leave is asked to bring in a bill, its title shall' 
be read for the information of the Senate, and if objected 
to it shall be laid over for one day; and all public and pri- 



RULES OF THE SENATE. 71 

vate bills and joint resolutions shall, after the tirst read- 
ing", be printed for the use of the Senate, but no other 
paper or document shall be printed without special order. 

17. All bills and special reports of committees shall be 
numbered by the Secretary as they are severally intro- 
duced, and a list made of the same, and such bills and re- 
ports shall be called up by the President for consideration, 
in the order in which they are reported and stand upon 
the calendar, unless otherwise ordered; and the Secretary 
shall read from the said list or calendar, and not from the 
files of bills or reports. 

18. No bill shall be committed or amended until it shall 
have been ordered to a second reading-, after which it may 
be referred to a committee. 

19. All bills may be made the order of a particular day, 
and public bills when called for shall have the preference 
of private bills; and when two or more bills shall be called 
for by Senators, they shall be taken up according to their 
seniority, reckoning from the date of their introduction. 

20. On the second and third readings of bills and joint 
resolutions, printed copies thereof shall be used. 

21. When bills or joint resolutions are introduced, the 
Secretary of the Senate shall forthwith deliver the same 
to the Supervisor of Bills, who shall prepare them for 
printing, in conformity with the rules defining the duties 
of said ofhcer. 

22. Original bills and joint resolutions, after being print- 
ed, shall be delivered by the Supervisor of Bills to the 
Secretary. 

23. Bills and joint resolutions originating in and passed 
by the Senate and amended by the House, when concurred 
in by the Senate, ^hall be delivered by the Secretary to the 
Supervisor of Bills for re-printing. 

24. Bills and joint resolutions which have passed their 
second reading, together with all amendments thereto, 
shall be delivered by the Secretary to the Supervisor of 
Bills, who shall see that the same are in proper form for 
printing for third reading. 

25. When the Supervisor of Bills receives from the print- 
er the bill or joint resolution ordered to a third reading 
and the same shall be found correct, he shall affix his offi- 
cial stamp to each page of the copy to be used as the 
official copy and intended to be submitted to the Governor 
for his approval, and shall deliver the same to the Sec- 
retary. 

26. Two copies of every bill and of every joint resolution 
ordered to a third reading shall be printed on good bond 



72 RULES OP THE SENATE. 

l)ai)cr, to lie approved by the Supervisoi- of Bills, one of 
which copies shall be retained in his office and the other 
of which shall be delivered to the Secretary to be used 
thereafter as the offleial copy of said bill or joint resolu- 
tion. 

27. The Supervisor of Bills shall have printed for the use 
of the members of the Legislature at least one hundred 
copies of every bill or joint resolution ordered to a third 
reading-, which shall be known and designated as "Official 
Copy Re-print." The Supervisor of Bills shall deliver 
twenty-one copies of all bills and joint resolutions desig- 
nated as "Official Copy Re-print" to the Secretary of the 
Senate, and sixty copies to the Clerk of the House, and 
he shall retain the remainder in his own custody for the 
use of State and Legislative officers. 

28. Except as otherwise provided, the system and pro- 
cedure which have heretofore prevailed shall be followed 
in the preparation of all bills and joint resolutions for 
their various readings as far as practicable. 

29. The consent of the majority of the Senators present 
shall be sufficient to print or re-print any bill or joint 
resolution, but no bill or joint resolution shall pass unless 
there shall be a majority of all the Senators personally 
present and agreeing thereto, and the yeas and nays of 
Senators voting on the final passage of anj^ bill or joint 
resolution shall be entered on the Journal and the like en- 
try on any other question shall be made at the desire of 
any Senator. 

30. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three 
readings previous to its being passed; and the President 
shall give notice at each reading whether it be the first, 
second or third, which readings shall be on three different 
days. 

31. The final question upon the second reading of every 
bill or joint resolution originating in the Senate shall be 
whether it shall be read a third time; and no amendment 
shall be received at the third reading unless by unanimous 
consent of the Senators present, but it shall be in order, 
before the final passage of any such bill or joint resolution, 
to move its recommitment, and should such recommit- 
ment take place and any amendment be reported by the 
committee, the said bill or resolution shall be again read 
a second time and considered and the aforesaid question 
again put. 

32. When a bill or joint resolution shall have been lost, 
and reconsidered and lost again, the same shall not again 
be reconsidered but by the unanimous consent of the 
Senate. 



RULES OF THK SENATE. 73 

33. Bills and joint resolutions, when passed by the Sen- 
ate, shall be signed by the President. 

34. When a Senate bill or joint resolution shall have been 
passed, the same shall be signed, taken to the House of 
Assembly, and its concurrence therein requested, without 
a motion for that purpose. 

35. When a bill or resolution passed by the Senate shall 
be carried to the House of Assembly, all papers and docu- 
ments relating- thereto on the files of the Senate shall be 
carried by the Secretary, with such bill or resolution, to 
the House of Assembly. 

MOTIONS AND THEIR PRECEDENCE. 

36. When a motion shall be made, it shall be reduced to 
writing by the President or any Senator, and delivered 
to the Secretary at his table and read before the same 
shall be debatable. 

37. All motions entered on the Journal of the Senate 
shall be entered in the names of the Senators who make 
them. 

38. If the question in debate contains several points, any 
Senator may have the same divided; but a motion to strike 
out and insert, or to commit with instructions, shall not 
be divided. 

39. The rejection of a motion to strike out and insert one 
proposition shall not prevent a motion to strike out and 
insert a different proposition, nor prevent a subsequent 
motion simply to strike out; nor shall the rejection of a 
motion simply to strike out prevent a subsequent motion 
to strike out and insert. 

40. On filling- blanks the question shall be first taken on 
the largest sum, the greatest number, and the most dis- 
tant day. 

41. When motions are made for reference of the same 
subject to a Select Committee, and to a Standing- Com- 
mittee, the question of reference to a Standing Committee 
shall be put first. 

42. When a question is before the Senate, no motion shall 
be received but — 

1. To adjourn. 

2. To proceed to the consideration of Executive business. 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. To postpone indefinitely. 

5. To postpone to a certa'in day. 

6. To commit. 

7. To amend. 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the or- 
der in which they stand arranged. 



74 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

43. The motion to adjourn, or to fix a day to which the 
Senate shall adjourn, shall always be in order. exoeY)t 
when a vote is being taken or while a Senator is addressing 
the Senate. 

44. The motions to adjourn, to proceed to the considera- 
tion of Executive business, and to lay on the table, shall 
be decided without debate. 

45. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill 
shall have precedence of a motion to amend, and if car- 
ried shall be equivalent to its rejection. 

46. When a motion shall have been once made and car- 
ried in the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for 
any Senator who voted on the prevailing side to move a 
reconsideration thereof on the same day or next succeed- 
ing day of actual session; but no motion for the reconsid- 
eration of any vote shall be in order after a bill, resolu- 
tion, message, report, amendment or motion upon which 
the vote was taken, announcing their decision, shall have 
gone from the possession of the Senate, and they shall 
not pass from the possession of the Senate until the ex- 
piration of the time in which a reconsideration is permit- 
ted; and every motion for reconsideration shall be decid- 
ed by a majority of votes, except a motion to reconsider 
the vote on the final passage of a bill or joint resolution, 
which shall require the same majority as is necessary for 
their final passage. 

MEMBERS. 

47. The seats within the bar shall be reserved exclusively 
for the Senators, the officers of the Senate, and the re- 
porters of the press who may have seats assigned them. 

48. No Senator shall speak in any debate without rising, 
nor more than three times on any subject of debate, un- 
less he shall first obtain leave of the Senate. 

49. Every Senator, in speaking, shall address the Presi- 
dent, confine himself to the question under debate, and 
avoid personality. 

50. Any Senator may change his vote before the decision 
of the question shall have been announced by the Chair. 

51. No Senator shall have his vote recorded on any ques- 
tion, when the yeas and nays are called, unless he shall 
be present to answer to his name. 

MESSAGES. 

52. All messages shall be sent to the House of Assembly 
by the Secretary, under the direction of the President, 
as a standing order, without a vote- thereon. 



RTU.es of the senate. 75 

5o. Messages may be delivered at any stnge of the busi- 
ness, except when a vote is being taken. 

54. When a message shall be sent from the Governor or 
House of Assembly to the Senate, it shall be announced 
at the door by the Sergeant-at-Arms. 

SENATE BILLS TN THE HOUSE. 

55. When an amendment made in the Senate to a bill 
from the House of Assembly shall be disagreed to by that 
House, and not adhered to by the Senate, the bill shall 
be considered as standing on a third reading. 

56. An amendment of the House of Assembly to a Senate 
bill shall not be divisible. 

57. In case of disagreement between the Senate and 
House of Assembly, the Senate may either recede, insist 
and ask a conference, or adhere, and motions for such 
purposes shall take precedence in that order. 

58. When a Senate bill shall be returned, amended by 
the House of Assembly, the sections of the bill so amend- 
ed, together with the amendments, shall be read by the 
Secretary for a first reading and be entitled to a second 
reading without special motion, at which reading the 
proposed amendments shall be open to the action of the 
Senate. And if, at its third reading, upon the question be- 
ing put by the President, "Will the Senate concur in the 
House amendment to Senate bill No. — ?" a majority of the 
whole Senate should, by a vote of years and nays, con- 
cur, the question shall then be upon ordering the bill to 
be re-printed. If so ordered, the bill shall be re-printed, 
the amendments embodied therein and the re-printed bill 
examined and reported by the Committee on Printed Bills 
and read in open Senate, to the end that it may be known 
to be correctly printed, and shall be then signed and certi- 
fied as other bills. 

DISORDER. 

59. In case of any disturbance in the gallery or lobby, the 
President shall have power to order the same to be 
cleared. 

60. The Sergeant-at-Arms shall aid in the enforcement of 
order, under the direction of the President. 

61. No Senator, in speaking, shall mention a Senator 
then present by his name. 

SPECIAL ORDERS. 

62. When the hour shall have arrived for the considera- 
tion of a special order, the same shall be taken up, and 



76 RULES OF THE SENATE. 

the Senate shall proceed to consider it, unless it shall be 
postponed by the Senate. 

63. The unfinished business in which the Senate shall 
have been engaged at the last preceding adjournment shall 
have the preference in the special order of the day. 

64. No concurrent resolution shall pass unless by the 
consent of a majority of the Senators elected. 

SECRET SESSION. 

65. On motion made and seconded to shut the doors of the 
Senate on the discussion of any business which may, in the 
opinion of a Senator, require secrecy, the President shall 
direct the chamber to be cleared, and during the discus- 
sion of such motion the doors shall remain shut. 

RULES. 

66. No standing rule or order of the Senate shall be sus- 
pended unless by the consent of two-thirds of the Senators 
elected, nor rescinded or amended but by the same num- 
ber, and one day's notice shall be given of the motion for 
rescission or amendment. 

EXECUTIVE SESSION. 

67. When nominations shall be made by the Governor 
to the Senate, they shall, unless otherwise ordered by the 
Senate, be referred to appropriate committees; and the 
final question on every nomination shall be, "Will the 
Senate advise and consent to this nomination?" which 
question shall not be put on the same day on which the 
nomination is received, nor on the day on which it may 
be reported by a committee, unless by the unanimous con- 
sent 'of the Senate. 

68. When acting on Executive business the Senate shall 
be cleared of all persons except the Senators and Secre- 
tary. 

69. All information or remarks concerning the character 
or qualifications of any persons nominated by the Gover- 
nor to office shall be kept a secret. 

70. The Legislative and Executive proceedings of the 
Senate shall be kept in separate and distinct books. 

71. All nominations approved by the Senate, or other- 
wise definitely acted on, shall be transmitted by the Secre- 
tary to the Governor, with the determination of the Senate 
thereon, from day to day, as such proceedings may occur; 
but no further extract from the Executive journal shall 
be furnished, published or otherwise communicated, ex- 
cept by special order of the Senate. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 77 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

RULES ADOPTED THIS YEAR. 



OF THE MEETING OF THE HOUSE. 

1. Any member or members less than a quorum may 
meet and adjourn the House from day to day, when neces- 
sary. 

2. Every member shall attend in his place precisely at 
the hour to which the House was last adjourned; and in 
case of neglect, he shall be subject to a reprimand from 
the Chair, unless excused by the House; nor shall any 
member absent himself from the House for more than the 
space of a quarter of an hour without leave previously ob- 
tained. 

3. In case a less number of members than a quorum shall 
be present after the arrival of the hour to which the House 
stood adjourned, they are hereby authorized to send their 
Sergeant-at-Arms, or any other person or persons by them 
authorized, with a warrant duly executed, for any and all 
absent members, as the majority of such as are present 
may agree, and at the expense of such absent members, 
respectively, unless such excuse for non-attendance shall 
be rendered as the House, when a quorum is convened, 
shall judge sufiicient. Immediately after the appointment 
of the Standing Committees, the members shall arrange 
among themselves their several seats appropriated to their 
counties; and in case of disagreement, the same shall be 
decided by lot. 

OF THE DUTIES OF THE SPEAKER. 

4. He shall take the chair at the hour to which the House 
shall have adjourned, and immediately call the members 
to order; and on the appearance of a quorum, shall cause 
the journal of the preceding day to be read, which may 
then be corrected by the House. 

5. He shall preserve order and decorum, and in debate 
shall prevent personal reflections, and confine members 
to the question under discussion; but he shall not engage 
in any debate, nor propose his opinion on any question, 
without first calling on some member to occupy the chair. 
When two or more members rise at the same time, he 
shall name the one entitled to the floor. 



78 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

6. He shall decide questions of order, subject to an ap- 
peal to the House, when demanded by any four members, 
on which appeal no member shall speak more than once, 
unless by leave of the House. 

7. All questions before the House shall be stated by the 
Speaker, and distinctly put in the following- form, to wit: 
"As many as are in favor of (the question) will say aye;" 
and after the affirmative is expressed, "Those of a con- 
trary opinion, no." If the Speaker doubts, or a division be 
called for, the House shall divide; those in the affirmative 
of the question shall first rise from their seats, and after- 
wards those in the negative; and in case of an equal divi- 
sion, the Speaker shall decide. 

8. All Committees shall be appointed by the Speaker, un- 
less otherwise specially directed by the House. 

9. All acts, addresses and joint resolutions shall be signed 
by the Speaker; and all writs, warrants and subpoenas is- 
sued by the order of the House shall be under his hand 
and seal, and attested by the Clerk. If the Speaker be ab- 
sent, a less number of members than a quorum may ap- 
point a Speaker pro tempore, who may sig-n any warrants, 
or perform any act requisite to bring in absent members. 

10. He shall have a g^eneral direction of the hall, and he 
may name a member to perform the duties of the Chair; 
but such substitution shall not extend beyond a second 
adjournment. 

OF THE ORDER OF BUSINESS. 

11. After the reading of the journal, the business of the 
first meeting of each day shall be conducted in the follow- 
ing manner, to wit: 

I. Letters, petitions and memorials, remonstrances and 
accompanying documents may be presented and dis- 
posed of. 

II. Reports of Committees may be read. 

III. Original resolutions may be offered and considered; 
items of unfinished business referred; motions to recon- 
sider and to appoint additional members of Committees 
made; and leave of absence, leave to withdraw documents, 
and leave to introduce bills asked. 

LEAVE FOR BILLS AND TO INTRODUCE BILLS. 

IV. Bills and joint resolutions on a third reading may be 
taken up. 

V. The House shall then proceed in the order of the day, 
preference being always given to the unfinished business 
of the previous sitting; after which bills and joint resolu- 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 79 

tions on a second reading shall be taken in their order; 
and the House, in its afternoon session, will proceed to 
business as though there had been no adjournment of its 
morning session, excepting that original resolutions, and 
leave to introduce bills of Committees, be the first business 
in the afternoon session; and shall, on demand of the ma- 
jority, proceed with the order of the day. 

12. The Clerk shall make a list of all public bills and 
joint resolutions. He shall keep a separate calendar of 
private bills. No bills for granting, continuing, altering, 
amending, or renewing a charter for any corporation, 
other than a municipal corporation, shall be placed on the 
calendar of public bills. All bills, public and private, shall 
be numbered according to the time of their introduction 
into the House. They shall be taken up and considered 
in the order of time in which they were reported, or or- 
dered to a third reading, as appears by the calendar; and 
the calendar shall be proceeded in until all the bills there- 
on are called up before the commencement of the calendar 
anew. 

13. All messages shall be sent from this House to the 
Senate by the Clerk. 

OF DECORUM AND DEBATE. 

14. When a member is about to speak in debate, or com- 
municate any matter to the House, he shall rise from his 
seat and respectfully address himself to the Speaker, con- 
fining himself to the question under debate, and avoiding 
personality. 

15. If any member in debate transgress the rules of the 
House, the Speaker shall, or any member may, call him 
to order, in which case the member so called to order shall 
immediately sit down, unless permitted to explain. The 
House shall, if appealed to, decide on the case, but with- 
out debate; if there be no appeal, the decision of the Chair 
shall be submitted to. If the decision be in favor of the 
member called to order, he shall be at liberty to proceed; 
if otherwise, he shall not be permitted to proceed without 
leave of the House, and if the case require it, he shall be 
liable to censure of the House. 

16. If a member be called to order for words spoken in 
debate, the person calling him to order shall repeat the 
words excepted to, and they shall be taken down in writ- 
ing at the Clerk's table; and no member shall be held to 
answer, or be subject to the censure of the House, for 
words spoken in debate, if any other member has spoken, 



80 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

or other business has intervened after the words spoken, 
and before exception to them shall have been taken. 

17. No member shall speak more than twice, or longer 
than five minutes each time, without leave of the House. 

18. While the Speaker is putting any question, or ad- 
dressing the House, none shall walk out of or across the 
hall; nor in such case, or when a member is speaking, 
shall anyone entertain private discourse; nor shall anyone, 
while a member is speaking, pass between him and the 
Chair. 

19. No member shall vote on any question in the event of 
which he is particularly interested, nor in any case where 
he was not within the bar of the House when the question 
was put. 

20. Every member who shall be in the House when the 
question is put shall give his vote, unless the House for 
special reasons shall excuse him. All motions to excuse a 
member from voting shall be made before the House di- 
vides, or before the call of the yeas and nays is com- 
menced; any member requesting to be excused from vot- 
ing may make a brief verbal statement of the reasons for 
such request, and the question shall then be taken without 
further debate. 

21. Petitions, memorials and other papers addressed to 
the House shall be presented by the Speaker, or by a mem- 
ber in his place; a brief statement of the contents thereof 
shall be made by the introducer, and, if called upon, he 
shall declare that it does not, in his opinion, contain any 
indecent or reproachful language, or any expressions of 
disrespect to the House, or any committee of the same. 

22. It shall be the duty of the Sergeant-at-Arms, at all 
times, not to allow any person to smoke in the Assembly 
chamber. 

ON MOTIONS. 

23. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if the 
Speaker or any member desire it. 

24. When a motion is made and seconded, it shall be 
stated by the Speaker, or being in writing, it shall be- 
handed to the Chair and read aloud by the Clerk, when it 
shall be deemed to be in the possession of the House and 
open to debate; but it may be withdrawn at any time be- 
fore a decision or amendment. 

25. When a question is under debate no motion shall be 
received but — 

1. To adjourn. 

2. A call of the House. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 81 

3. To lay on the table. 

4. For the previous question. 

5. To postpone indefinitely. 

6. To postpone to a day certain. 

7. To go into a Committee of the Whole on the pending 

subject immediately. 

8. To commit to a Committee of the Whole. 

9. To commit to a Standing- Committee. 

10. To commit to a Select Committee. 

11. To amend. 

Which several motions shall have precedence in the order 
in which they are stated, and no motion to postpone to a 
day certain, to commit, or to postpone indefinitely, being 
decided, shall be again allowed on the same day, and at 
the same stage of the bill or proposition. 

26. A motion to strike out the enacting clause of a bill or 
joint resolution shall have precedence of a motion to 
amend, and if carried shall be considered equivalent to its 
rejection. 

27. A motion to adjourn shall be always in order, except 
when the House is voting, or while a member is addressing 
the House, or immediately after the question to adjourn 
has been negatived; that, and the motion to lay on the 
table, shall be decided without debate. 

28. Any member may call for a division of the question, 
which shall be divided if it comprehends questions so dis- 
tinct that one being taken away from the rest may stand 
entire for the decision of the House; a motion to strike 
out and insert shall be deemed indivisible; but a motion to 
strike out being lost, shall preclude neither amendment 
nor a motion to strike out and insert. 

29. When any motion shall be made and seconded, the 
same shall, at the request of any two members, be en- 
tered on the Journal of the House. 

30. When a motion has been once made and carried in 
the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for any 
member who voted with the prevailing party to move for 
the reconsideration thereof, on the same day or on the 
next day of actual session of the House thereafter; all 
motions may be reconsidered, by a majority of the mem- 
bers present; but bills, to be reconsidered, must have the 
same majority that would be necessary to pass them; and 
such vote, on motion to reconsider, shall be by taking the 
yeas and nays. 

31. When a blank is to be filled, the question shall first 
be taken on the largest sum, or greatest number, and re- 
motest day. 

6 



82 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

32. The yeas and nays shall be entered on the Journal of 
the House, when moved for and seconded by five members, 
and in taking- the yeas and nays the names of the mem- 
bers, including the Speaker, shall be called alphabetically. 

33. The previous question shall be put in this form: 
"Shall the main question be now put?" It shall only be 
admitted when demanded by a majority of the members 
present, and its effect shall be, if decided affirmatively, to 
put an end to all debate, and bring the House to a direct 
vote upon amendments reported by a committee, if any, 
then upon pending amendments, and then upon the main 
question; if decided in the negative, to leave the main 
question and amendments if any, under debate for the 
residue of the sitting, unless sooner disposed of by taking 
the question, or in some other manner. All incidental 
questions of order arising- after a motion is made for the 
previous question, and pending such motion, shall be de- 
cided, whether on appeal or otherwise, without debate. 

34. After the Clerk has commenced calling the yeas and 
nays on any question, no motion shall be received until a 
decision shall have been announced by the Chair. 

OF COMMITTEES. 

35. The following- Standing Committees shall be appoint- 
ed at the commencement of the session, until otherwise 
ordered: 

A Committee of Ways and Means. 

A Committee on Bill Revision. 

A Committee on the Judiciary. 

A Committee on Agriculture and Agricultural College. 

A Committee on Appropriations. 

A Committee on Education. 

A Committee on Elections. 

A Committee on Printed Bills. 

A Committee on Municipal Corporations. 

A Committee on Boroughs and Borough Commissions. 

A Committee on Militia. 

A Committee on Claims and Revolutionary Pensions. 

A Committee on Corporations. 

A Committee on Banks and Insurance. 

A Committee on Unfinished Business. 

A Committee on Incidental Expenses. 

A Committee on Stationery. 

A Committee on Riparian Rights. 

A Committee on Revision of Laws. 

A Committee on Game and Fisheries. 

A Committee on Miscellaneous Business. 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 83 

A Committee on Railroads and Canals. 
A Committee on Labor and Industries. 
A Committee on Towns and Townships. 
A Committee on Public Health. 
A Committee on Federal Relations. 
A Committee on Commerce and Navigation. 
Which several committees shall consist of five members 
each. 

JOINT COMMITTEES. 

The following- Joint Committees, of five members each, 
shall also be appointed to act conjointly with correspond- 
ing committees to be appointed by the Senate: 

A Committee on the Treasurer's Accounts. 

A Committee on the State Prison. 

A Committee on Printing. 

A Committee on the State Library. 

A Committee on the State Hospitals. 

A Committee on Public Grounds and Buildings, 

A Committee on Passed Bills. 

A Committee on Sinking Fund. 

A Committee on Soldiers' Home. 

A Committee on Reform School for Boys. 

A Committee on Industrial School for Girls. 

A Committee on the New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes. 

36. The several Standing Committees of the House shall 
have leave to report by bill or otherwise. 

37. No com.mittee shall sit during the sitting of the House, 
without special leave. 

38. All committees appointed at the first sitting shall con- 
tinue to act during every subsequent sitting of the same 
Legislature, or until they have reported on the business 
committed to them, or have been discharged. 

OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE HOUSE. 

39. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the 
Speaker shall leave his chair, and a chairman to preside 
in committee shall be appointed by the Speaker. 

40. The rules of proceeding in the House shall be ob- 
served, as far as practicable, in Committee of the Whole, 
except that any member may speak oftener than twice 
on the same subject, but shall not speak a second time 
until every member choosing to speak shall have spoken; 
nor shall a motion for the previous question be made 
therein. 

41. All amendments made in Committee of the Whole 
shall be noted by the Clerk, but need not be read by the 



84 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

Speaker on his resuming the chair, unless required 'jy the 
House. 

ON BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTIONS. 

42. All bills and joint resolutions shall be introduced by 
motion for leave, or on the report of a committee, and 
the member offering- the same shall Indorse his name on 
them, that the committee may confer with him should 
they so desire. 

43. Every bill and joint resolution shall receive three sep- 
arate readings in the House previous to its passage, but no 
bill or joint resolution shall be read twice on the same 
day, without special order of the House. 

44. All bills and joint resolutions shall, after their first 
reading, be printed for the use of the members, and re- 
ferred to their appropriate committees. 

45. All bills and joint resolutions may be made the order 
of a particular day, on which day they shall be taken up 
in, preference to others on the calendar; and the calendar 
of private bills shall not be taken up until the calendar of 
public bills shall have been been gone through with. 

46. All bills and joint resolutions, previous to their final 
passage by the House, all petitions, motions and reports, 
may be committed at the pleasure of the House. And the 
recommitment of any bill or resolution, when the same 
has been ordered to a third reading, shall have the effect 
of placing the same upon the second reading. 

47. Printed bills and joint resolutions shall be used on 
their second and third readings, and no amendment shall 
be received to any bill or joint resolution on its third read- 
ing. 

48. When bills or joint resolutions are introduced, the 
Clerk of the House shall forthwith deliver the same to the 
Supervisor of Bills, who shall prepare them for printing 
in conformity with the rules defining the duties of said 
officer. 

49. Original bills and joint resolutions, after being print- 
ed, shall be delivered by the said Supervisor of Bills to the 
Clerk. 

50. Bills and joint resolutions originating in and passed 
by the House and amended by the Senate, when concurred 
in by the House, shall be delivered by the Clerk to the 
Supervisor of Bills for re-printing. 

51. Bills and joint resolutions which have passed their 
second reading, together with all amendments thereto, 
shall be delivered by the Clerk to the Supervisor of Bills, 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 85 

who shall see that the same are in proper form for print- 
ing' for third reading. 

52. When the Supervisor of Bills receives from the printer 
the bill or joint resolution ordered to a third reading 
and the same shall be found correct, he shall affix his 
official stamp to each page of the copy to be used as the 
official copy and intended to be submitted to the Governor 
for his approval and shall deliver the same to the Clerk. 

53. Two copies of every bill and of every joint resolution 
ordered to a third reading shall be printed on good bond 
paper, to be approved by the Supervisor of Bills, one of 
which copies shall be retained in his office and the other 
of which shall be delivered to the Clerk, to be used there- 
after as the official copy of said bill or joint resolution. 

54. The Supervisor of Bills shall have printed, for the 
use of the members of the Legislature, at least one hun- 
dred copies of every bill or joint resolution ordered to a 
third reading, which shall be known and designated as 
"Official Copy Re-print." The Supervisor of Bills shall 
deliver twenty-one copies of all bills and joint resolutions 
designated as "Official Copy Re-print" to the Secretary of 
the Senate, and sixty copies to the Clerk of the House, and 
he shall retain the remainder in his own custody, for the 
use of State and Legislative officers. 

55. Except as otherwise provided, the system and pro- 
cedure which have heretofore prevailed shall be followed in 
the preparation of all bills and joint resolutions for their 
various readings, as far as practicable. 

56. On a motion to strike out any item in the incidental 
bill, the question to be submitted to the House shall be, 
"Shall the item be retained in the bill?" and a majority 
of all the members of the House shall be necessary to 
adopt the sa-me. 

57. After the introduction of any private bill, the appli- 
cants for said bill shall, a-t their own expense, furnish the 
usual number of copies for the use of the members, unless 
the printing thereof be dispensed with by a special order 
of the House. 

58. On the question of the final passage of all bills and 
joint resolutions, the yeas and nays shall be entered on 
the Journal of the House. 

59. Whenever a bill or resolution that has passed the 
House shall be carried to the Senate, all papers and docu- 
ments relating thereto, on the files of the House, shall be 
carried with such bill or resolution to the Senate, 



86 RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 

OF RULES. 

60. No standing rule or order of the House shall be .re- 
scinded or changed without one day's notice being given of 
the motion therefor; nor shall any rule be suspended ex- 
cept by a vote of the majority of the whole number of 
members of the House. 

61. When an Assembly bill is returned amended by the 
Senate, the report thereof by the Secretary of the Senate 
shall be taken as the first reading, and the same be en- 
titled to a second reading, without a motion for that pur- 
pose; after its second reading, the question shall be, "Shall 
the Senate amendments to Assembly bill No. — have a 
third reading?" If ordered to a third reading, the amend- 
ments shall be read, but these readings shall be on differ- 
ent days; the question shall then be, "Will the House of 
Assembly concur in the Senate amendments to Assembly 
bill No. — ?" upon which question the votes shall be by 
yeas and nays. If concurred in by a majority of the whole 
House, the bill shall be re-printed, the amendments em- 
bodied therein, and the re-printed bill examined and re- 
ported upon by the Committee on Printed Bills, and read 
in open Assembly, to the end that it may be known to be 
correctly printed, and then signed and certified as other 
bills. 

62. Cushing's Manual shall in all cases, when not in con- 
flict with the rules adopted by the House, be considered 
and held as standard authority. 

6.3. No person shall be allowed on the floor of the House 
during its sessions except State officers and members and 
officers of the Senate, unless by written permission of the 
Speaker. 

64. No committee of this House shall report a bill ad- 
versely without notifying the introducer of the bill; nor 
shall such adverse report be acted upon unless the intro- 
ducer of the bill is in his seat. 

65. After the calling of the roll has been commenced upon 
any question, no member shall be permitted to explain his 
vote. 

66. Every bill amended in the House, after its report by 
the committee to which it was referred upon introduction, 
shall, when ordered to be printed and have a third reading, 
be delivered to the Committee on Bill Revision, whose duty 
it shall be to examine the same, and if it be found that 
such amendment agrees with the context the" bill shall 
then be printed. If in the opinion of the committee such 
amendm.ent is, as to form, improper, they shall report to 



RULES OF THE ASSEMBLY. 87 

the House with such recommendation as they think fit. 
Such report shall be made promptly. 

67. That hereafter any motion or resolution which will 
result in relieving a standing committee of a bill referred 
to it, shall not be entertained unless twenty-four hours' 
notice shall be given the House of the introduction of such 
motion or resolution. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS. 

JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 

OF TrTK 

SENATE AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



1. In every case of an amendment of a bill agreed to in 
one House and dissented from in the other, if either House 
shall request a conference and appoint a committee for 
that purpose, and the other House shall also appoint a 
committee to confer, such committee shall, at a conven- 
ient hour, to be agreed on by their respective chairmen, 
meet in conference, and state to each other, verbally or 
in writing, as either shall choose, the reasons of their re- 
spective houses for and against the amendment, and con- 
fer freely thereon. 

2. After each House shall have adhered to its disagree- 
ment, a bill or resolution shall be lost. 

3. When a bill or resolution which shall have passed in 
one House is rejected in the other, notice thereof shall be 
sent to the House in which the same shall have passed. 

4. Each House, in which any bill or resolution shall have 
passed, shall transmit therewith to the other House, all 
papers and documents relating to the same. 

5. When a message shall be sent from either House to 
the other it shall be announced at the door of the House 
by the doorkeeper, and shall be respectfully communi- 
cated to the Chair by the person by whom it is sent. 

6. After a bill shall have passed both Houses it shall be 
delivered by the Clerk of the Assembly or the Secretary 
of the Senate, as the bill may have originated in one House 
or the other, to a Joint Committee on Passed Bills, of 
two from each House, appointed as a Standing Commit- 
tee for that purpose, and shall be presented by said Com- 
mittee to the Governor for his approbation, it being first 
indorsed on the back of the bill certifying in which House 
the same originated, which indorsement shall be signed 
by the Secretary or Clerk, as the case may be, of the 
House in which the same did originate, and shall be en- 
tered on the Journal of each House. The said committee 
shall report on the day of presentation to the Governor, 
which time shall also be carefully entered on the Journal 
of each House. 



CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION. 89 

CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION 

OF 1844. 



List of Delegates elected to the Convention to form a 
g-overnment for the people of the State of New Jersey, 
which met at Trenton, on May 14th, 1844, and continued 
to June 29th of the same year. The constitution was agreed 
to in convention by a vote of 55 to 1 (Mr. Condit), Mr. 
Stokes being excused from voting. It was ratified by the 
people on August 13th, 1844, by a vote of 20,276 for, and 
3,526 against, 69 ballots being rejected. The figures indicate 
the ages of the respective members. The compiler of this 
work is indebted to Hon. G. D. W. Vroom, of Trenton, for 
the important data given. 

Atlantic County. — Jonathan Pitney, 46, physician. 

Bergen County.— John Cassedy, 47, gentleman; Alexander 
Westervelt, 50, gentleman. 

Burlington County. — William R. Allen, 42, farmer; Jon- 
athan J. Spencer, 51, physician; Charles Stokes, 52, farm- 
er; John C, Ten Eyck, 30, lawyer; Moses Wills, 51, mer- 
chant. 

Camden County.— Abraham Browning, 33, lawyer; John 
W. Mickle, 50, mariner. 

Cape May County. — Joshua Swain, 66, farmer. 

Cumberland County. — Joshua Brick, 62, farmer; Daniel 
Elmer, 59, laiwyer; William B. Ewing, 68, physician. 

Essex County.— Silas Condit, 66, gentleman; Oliver S. 
Hals ted, 51, lawyer; Joseph C. Hornblower, 67, lawyer; 
David Naar, 43, farmer; William Stites, 52, merchant; 
Elias Van Arsdale, 73, lawyer; Isaac H. Williamson, 71, 
lawyer. 

Gloticester County.— John R. Sickler, 43, physician; 
Charles C. Stratton, 48, farmer. 

Hudson County.— Robert Gilchrist, 52, county clerk. 

Hunterdon County.— Peter I. Clark, 53, lawyer; David 
Neighbour, 46, merchant; Jonathan Pickle, 45, farmer; 
Alexander Wurts, 48, lawyer. 

Mercer County.— Richard S. Field, 39, lawyer; Henry W. 
Green, 39, lawyer; John R. Thomson, 43, gentleman. 

Middlesex County.— Moses Jaques, 73, farmer; James 
Parker, 68, farmer; Joseph F. Randolph, 40, lawyer; James 
C. Zabriskie, 40, tailor. 

Monmouth County.— Bernard Connolly, 40, printer; Geo. 



90 CONSTITUTTONAT. CONVENTION. 

F. Fort, 35, physician; Thomas G. Haight, 49, farmer; Dan- 
iel Holmes, 50, farmer; Robert Laird, 32, physician. 

Morris County.— Francis Child, 51, farmer; Mahlon Dick- 
erson, 73, lawyer; Ephraim Marsh, 48, farmer; William N. 
Wood, 38, lawyer. 

Passaic County.— Elias B. D. Ogden, 44, lawyer; Andrew 
Parsons, 53, merchant. 

Salem County.— Alexander G. Cattell, 28, merchant; John 
H. Lambert, 45, merchant; Richard P. Thompson, 39, attor- 
ney-general. 

Somerset County.— George H. Brown, 34, lawyer; Ferdi- 
nand S. Schenck, 54, physician; Peter D. Vroom, 52, law- 
yer. 

Sussex County.— John Bell, 58, merchant; Joseph E. Ed- 
sall, 54, manufacturer; Martin Ryerson, 29, lawyer. 

Warren County.— Samuel Hibbler, 44, painter; P. B. Ken- 
nedy, 42, lawyer; R. S. Kennedy, 41, farmer. 

Presidents of the Convention— Isaac H. Williamson, Es- 
sex (resigned June 28th, 1844); Alexander Wurts, Hunter- 
don. 

Vice President— Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 

Secretary— William Paterson, 27, lawyer, Middlesex. 

Assistant Secretary— Th. S. Saunders, 35, physician, Glou- 
cester. 

Recapitulation.— Lav/yers, 20; farmers, 14; physicians, 7; 
merchants, 7; other professions, 10; ex-Governors, 3; ex- 
Members of Congress, 7. Four between 70 and 80 years of 
age; six between 60 and 70; seventeen between 50 and 60; 
twenty between 40 and 50; nine between 30 and 40; two 
under 30. 

The only survivor on January 1st, 1901, was Robert Laird. 



CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 187.3. 91 

CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 

OF 1873. 



On April 4th, 1873, the Legislature passed a concurrent 
resolution empowering- the Governor to appoint, by and 
with the advice of the Senate, a commission of two persons 
from each Congressional District, to suggest and propose 
amendments to the State Constitution for submission to 
and consideration by the next two Legislatures, and after- 
wards to be submitted to a vote of the people. 

On April 24th, of the same year, Governor Parker nomi- 
nated the following gentlemen, who were duly confirmed 
by the Senate: 

First District— Benjamin F. Carter, Woodbury; Samuel 
H. Grey, Camden. Second District— Mercer Beasley, Tren- 
ton; John C. Ten Eyck. Mount Holly. Third District- 
Robert S. Green, Elizabeth; John F. Babcock, New Bruns- 
wick. Fourth District— Martin Ryerson and Jacob L. 
Swayze, both of Newton. Fifth District— Augustus W. 
Cutler, Morristown; Benjamin Buckley, Paterson. Sixth 
District— Theodore Runyon and John W. Taylor, both of 
Newark. Seventh District— Abraham O. Zabriskie and 
Robert Gilchrist, both of Jersey City. 

Shortly afterwards Chief Justice Mercer Beasley declined 
to serve, and Philemon Dickinson, of Trenton, was ap- 
pointed in his stead. Martin Ryerson resigned and Joseph 
Thompson, of Somerset, was appointed to fill the vacancy. 
Chancellor Theodore Runyon also declined and George J. 
Ferry, of Orange, was appointed in his stead. Ex-Chan- 
cellor Zabriskie was unanimously elected president of the 
Commission, and upon his decease, which occurred in a 
short time afterwards, Dudley S. Gregory, of Jersey City, 
was appointed to fill the vacancy in the Seventh District. 
John C. Ten Eyck was elected president, vice Zabriskie, 
deceased. The secretaries were Joseph L. Naar and Ed- 
ward J. Anderson, both of Trenton. Subsequently Robert 
Gilchrist resigned and William Brinkerhoff, of Jersey City, 
was appointed in his place. John W. Taylor also resigned 
and Algernon S. Hubbell, of Newark, was appointed in his 
place. 

The first session of the Commission was held on May 8th, 
1873, and the last on December 23d, of the same year. The 
amendments submitted were partially adopted by the two 
succeeding Legislatures, and were ratified by a vote of the 
people at a special election held on September 7th, 1S75. 



92 CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION, 1894. 

CONSTITUTIONAL COMMISSION 

1894. 



In pursuance of a Joint Resolution of the Legislature, 
approved on May 17th, 1894, "for the appointment of Com- 
missioners to report amendments of the system of juris- 
prudence of this State, and provide for the election of cer- 
tain officers by the people," Governor Werts sent the fol- 
lowing- nominations to the Senate, all of which were con- 
firmed: 

At Large— John P. Stockton, Trenton; Allan L. McDer- 
mott, Jersey City; Samuel H. Grey, Camden;, and William 
Walter Phelps, Englewood. 

First District— George Hires, Salem; Howard Carrow, 
Camden. Second District— William M. Lanning, Trenton; 
Edward D. Stokes, Mount Holly. Third District— Henry 
Mitchell. Asbury Park; George C. Ludlow, New Bruns- 
wick. Fourth District— John Franklin Fort, East Orange; 
Carman F. Randolph, Morristown. Fifth District— Garret 
A. Hobart, Paterscn; John D. Probst, Englewood. Sixth 
District— Edward Balbach, Jr., and Frederick Freling- 
huysen, Newark. Seventh District— Edwin A. Stevens, 
Hoboken; Joseph D. Bedle, Jersey City. Eighth District- 
John Kean, Jr., Elizabeth; John McC. Morrow, Newark. 

Messrs. Hobart and Balbach declined to serve on the 
Commission, and their places were filled by the appoint- 
ment of Eugene Emley, of Paterson, and E. Cortlandt 
Drake, of Newark. 

On Tuesday, June 5th, the Commission met in the Senate 
Chamber, at Trenton, and organized by the election of 
Samuel H. Grey as President; George C. Ludlow, Vice 
President, and Joseph L. Naar, of Trenton, Secretary. 
The last session of the Commission was held on Septem- 
ber 25th. Several amendments were suggested by the Com- 
mission and submitted, through the Governor, to the Leg- 
islature, none of which were adopted by that body. 



SPECIAL ELECTION, 1897. 03 

SPECIAL ELECTION— 1897. 



A special election was held on Tuesday, September 28th, 
1897, on proposed amendments to the State Constitution. 

One made paragraph 2, Section VII., of Article IV., read 
as follows: 

2. No lottery shall be authorized by the legislature or 
otherwise in this State, and no ticket in any lottery shall 
be bought or sold within this State, nor shall pool-selling, 
book-making or gambling of any kind be authorized or 
allowed within this State, nor shall any gambling device, 
practice or game of chance now prohibited by law be 
legalized, or the remedy, penalty or punishment now pro- 
vided therefor be in any way diminished. 

This was adopted by a vote of 70,443 to 69,642. 

Another made the following addition to Section XII. of 
Article V. : 

No parson who shall have been nominated to the senate 
by the governor for any office of trust or profit under the 
government of this State, and shall not have been con- 
firmed before the recess of the legislature, shall be eligible 
for appointment to such office during the continuance of 
such recess. 

This was adopted by a vote of 73,722 to 66,296. 

Another amended Section I., Article II., as follows: 

And every female citizen of the United States of the age 
of twenty-one years, who shall have been a resident of 
this State one year and of the county of which she claims 
her vote five months next before said meeting, shall be 
entitled to vote at any school meeting held in any school 
district of this State, in which she may reside, for mem- 
bers of boards of education and all other school officers 
that now are or hereafter may be elected at such meet- 
ings. 

This was defeated, the affirmative vote being 65,021 and 
the negative 75,170. 

The amendments adopted became a part of the Consti- 
tution on October 26th, 1897, the date of the Governor's 
proclamation to that effect. 

The following is the vote in detail by counties: 



SPECIAL. ELECTION, 1897. 



COUNTIES. 



Anti- 
Gambling. 

^ A ^ 

t. 
5' 



•=1 

o 



Ad-interim 
Ap'ntm'ts. 



o 



P 

5* 



Woman 
Suffrage. 



o 



P3 



a- 

(D O 
O l-h 

■^ ST 



Atlantic 1,193 1,173 1,210 1,155 1,150 1,216 13 

Bergen 2,926 2,099 3,130 1,895 2,703 2,432 41 

Burlington 3,437 2,279 3,563 2,151 3,431 2,286 43 

Camden 5,406 5,304 5,577 5,124 4,899 5,804 59 

Cape May 784 202 800 186 755 231 4 

Cumberland 2,957 586 2,925 619 2,662 881 14 

Essex 12,089 12,213 12,713 11,590 10,445 13,853 211 

Gloucester 2,332 1,190 2,271 1,251 2,035 1,491 5 

Hudson 7,342 16,512 8,293 15,558 7,43116,413 160 

Hunterdon 2,320 753 2,320 753 2,142 931 14 

Mercer 3,560 4,673 3,795 4,433 3,412 4,S18 73 

Middlesex 3,096 2,619 3,428 2,282 2,518 3,196 29 

Monmouth -. 3,633 4,429 4,061 4,002 3,906 4,154 82 

Morris 3,384 1,191 3,397 1,153 3,14D 1,435 48 

Ocean 857 616 888 585 803 670 12 

Passaic 4,051 5,734 4,188 5,582 3,752 6,031 51 

Salem 1,658 524 1,619 563 1,573 609 3 

Somerset 1,900 733 1,892 741 1,616 1,017 8 

Sussex 921 323 982 262 892 352 4 

Union 4,543 5,766 4,607 5,696 3,915 6,413 80 

Warren 2,054 723 2,063 715 1,841 937 7 

Totals 70,443 69,642 73,722 66,296 65,021 75,170 961 

Majority 801 7,426 10,149 

The following counties gave majorities in favor of the 
anti-gambling amendment: 

Atlantic, 20; Bergen, 827; Burlington, 1,158; Camden, 102; 
Cape May, 582; Cumberland, 2,371; Gloucester, 1,142; Hun- 
terdon, 1,567; Middlesex, 477; Morris, 2,193; Ocean, 241; 
Salem, 1,134; Somerset, 1,167; Sussex, 598; Warren, 1,33L 
Total, 14,910. 

The following counties gave majorities against the 
amendment: 

Essex, 124; Hudson, 9,170; Mercer, 1,113; Monmouth, 796; 
Passaic, 1,683; Union, 1,223. Total, 14,109. 

Net majority for the amendment, 801. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 95 



THE EXECUTIVE. 



PREROGATIVES AND DUTIES OF THE GOVERNOR. 

The Governor is Commander-in-Chief of all the military 
and naval forces of the State; is President (ex-officio) of 
the Board of Trustees of Princeton and Rutgers Colleges, 
and also of Burlington College, and of the Board of Man- 
agers of the Geological Survey. He is Chairman of the 
State Board of Canvassers, and has power to fill any 
vacancy for New Jersey that may occur in the United 
States Senate, during a recess of the Legislature. 

He is a member of the following Boards: Trustees of 
School Fund; Riparian Commissioners; Court of Pardons; 
Commissioners of Agricultural College Fund; Premium 
Committee of the New Jersey State Agricultural Society; 
Commissioners of the State Library and State House Com- 
mission. 

With the advice and consent of the Senate, he has the 
power of appointing the folio v.ing officers: Chancellor, 
Chief Justice; Judges of the Supreme Court and Circuit 
Courts; Inferior Courts and Lay Judges of the Court of 
Errors and Appeals; Attorney-General, Secretary of State, 
Clerk of the Court of Chancery, Clerk of the Supreme 
Court, Keeper of the State Prison, a Commissioner of 
Banking and Insurance, a Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, Prosecutors of the Pleas, Visitors to the State 
Board of Agriculture, State Board of Assessors, State 
Board of Education, Chief of Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
Major-General, Quartermaster-General, Adjutant-General, 
Inspector of Factories and Workshops, Supervisor of the 
State Prison, six Inspectors of the State Prison, Commis- 
sioners of Pilotage, the Board of Managers of the State 
Hospitals, the Trustees of the Jamesburg Reform School 
and the State Industrial School for Girls, Judges of the 
District Courts, Riparian Commissioners, Commissioners 
of Fisheries, Managers for the Home for Feeble-Minded 
Women, Port Wardens and Harbor Masters, State Board 
of Medical Examiners. 

Without the consent of the Senate: Foreign Commis- 
sioners of Deeds; New Jersey State Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, and State Board of Health, State Board of 
Dentistry, Inspectors of Steamboats, Private Secretary, 
Notaries Public, Moral Instructors of the State Prison, 



% THE EXECUTIVE. 

Railroad Policemen, and fill all vacancies that occur in any 
ofRce during a recess of the Legislature, which offices are 
to be filled by the Governor and Senate, or Legislature 
in Joint Meeting: also, vacancies happening in the offices 
of Clerk or Surrogate in any county; issues warrants for 
the admission of blind and feeble-minded children into 
institutions; grants requisitions and renditions, and has 
power to offer rewards for apprehending and securing 
persons charged with certain crimes; signs or vetoes all 
bills and joint resolutions passed by the Legislature; has 
power to convene the Legislature, or Senate alone, if, in 
his opinion, public necessity requires it; grants, under 
the Great Seal of the State, commissions to all such officers 
as require to be commissioned; has right to borrow money 
for the State; sign all leases or grants issued by the Ripar- 
ian Commissioners; he has power to reprieve in cases of 
capital punishment, and to suspend fines at any time not 
exceeding ninety days after conviction, and in case of par- 
don or commutation of sentence, the Governor's vote in 
the affirmative is necessary. 

Besides all these duties, the Governor finds it necessary 
to read and answer a large mass of correspondence, which 
comes to the department daily. All bills and joint resolu- 
tions passed by the Legislature are compared, and then 
indexed in the Executive Department, before presentation 
to the Governor. 

He receives a salary of $10,000 a year, and is not allowed 
any fees or perquisites whatever. 

His term of office is three years. 

OFFICES FILLED BY THE LEGISLATURE IN JOINT 
MEETING. 

State Treasurer, State Comptroller, Commissioners of 
Deeds and State Director of Railroads and Canals. 



COUNTIES, CITIES AND BOROUGHS. 97 

CLASSIFICATION OF COUNTIES, CITIES 
AND BOROUGHS. 



COUNTIES. 

(See act of March 22, 1901.) 

First Class— Having a population exceeding 200,000. 
Hudson, 386,048; Essex, 359,053. 

Second Class — Having a population of not less than 
50,000 nor more than 200,000. Passaic, 155,202; Camden, 107,- 
643; Union, 99,353; Mercer, 95,365; Monmouth, 82,057; Middle- 
sex, 79,762; Bergen, 78,441; Morris, 65,156; Burlington, 58,241; 
Cumberland, 51,19.3. 

Third Class— Having a population of not less than 20,000 
nor more than 50,000. Atlantic, 46,402; "Warren, 37,781; Hun- 
terdon, 34,507; Somerset, 32,948; Gloucester, 31,905; Salem, 
25,530; Sussex, 24,134. 

Fourth Class— All counties not embraced in the first, sec- 
ond or third class. Ocean, 39,747; Cape May, 13,201. 

CITIES. 

(See act of March 18, 1901.) 

First Class— Having a population exceeding 150,000. 
Newark, 246,070; Jersey City, 206,433. 

Second Class— Having a population of not less than 12,000 
nor more than 150,000. Paterson, 105,171; Camden, 75,935; 
Trenton, 73,307; Hoboken, 59,374; Elizabeth, 52,130; Bayonne, 
32,722; Passaic, 27,777; Orange, 24,141; East Orange, 21,506; 
New Brunswick, 20,006; Perth Amboy, 17,699; Plainfield, 
15,369; Bridgeton, 13,913. 

Third Class— All cities not embraced within either the 
first or second class, except cities binding upon the Atlan- 
tic Ocean and being seaside and summer resorts. 

Fourth Class— All cities binding upon the Atlantic Ocean 
and being seaside or summer resorts. 

BOROUGHS. 

(See act of March 23, 1883, and Supreme Court decision, 

State, Borough of Hightstown, pros., vs. James Glenn, 

18 Vr., page 105.) 

First Class — Having a population exceeding 3,000. 

Second Class — Having a. population between 1,500 and 
3,000. 

Third Class— All boroughs and incorporated villages not 
contained in the first and second classes. 
7 



98 THE STATE CAPITOL. 



STATE INSTITUTIONS. 



THE STATE CAPITOt. 

This edifice, a massive structure, erected at sundry times 
and various periods, is located on West State street, at 
the corner of Delaware street, running thence westerly 
along State street to the grounds of the late ex-Chancellor 
Green, and southerly to the Water Power. The location 
is a good one, and although the style of the building is 
not modern, yet it answers the purposes for which it was 
intended, even if it does not present a very imposing 
appearance. 

The seat of Government was fixed at Trenton by an act 
of the Legislature, approved November 25th, 1790. James 
Cooper, Thomas Lowery, James Ewing, Maskell Ewing, 
George Anderson, James Mott and Moore Furman were 
appointed commissioners to select, purchase or accept so 
much land as was needed, and to erect thereon suitable 
buildings for the use of the Legislature. They purchased 
the present site, containing about three and three-quarters 
acres— a frontage on Second street (now West State street) 
of 247 feet and 6 inches, and a depth from the front to low 
water line of the Delaware river of 666 feet— at a ccst of 
£250 5s. The old State House was a plain, bare-looking, 
rought-cast building, and was erected at a cost of £3,992 
3s. ^/^d. By an act of March 4th, 1795, a building was erected 
to serve as an office for the Secretary of State, and for the 
preservation of the public records, at a cost of £620 19s. lOd. 
Numerous improvements and repairs were made, and on 
March 3d, 1806, an act was passed appointing commission- 
ers to make certain repairs to the State House, to provide 
and hang a suitable bell, &c. This was done, and the bell 
was used for informing the members of both houses, as 
well as the courts, of the hour of meeting. The bell was 
eventually discarded, and an American flag substituted, 
which waves from the building unto this day, when the 
Legislature is in session, and upon holidays and State occa- 
sions. In 1848, the State House was altered by the removal 
of the rough-casting, and changing the front to the style 
of the Mercer County Court House, placing neat porticoes 
over the front and rear entrances, and erecting two addi- 
tional buildings adjoining the main one, as offices for the 
Clerks of the Chancery and Supreme Courts. The rotunda 



THE STATE CAPITOL. 99 

was also erected, and the grounds fenced, erraded, laid out 
and shade trees planted, all at a cost of $27,000. The com- 
missioners under whose directions the work was com- 
pleted, were Samuel R. Gummere, Samuel R. Hamilton 
and Stacy A. Paxson. In 1863, '64 and '65. appropriations 
were made and expended in building additions for the 
State Library, Executive Chambers, &c. In 1871, Charles 
S. Olden, Thomas J. Stryker and Lewis Perrine were 
appointed commissioners to cause a suitable addition to be 
built— mere commodious apartments for the Senate and 
Assembly, «S:c. The sum of $50,000 was appropriated, and 
the buildings for the Legislature were ready for occupancy 
in time for the meeting of the Legislature in 1872. In 1872, 
$120,000 was appropriated for completing the building. $3,000 
for fitting up the Executive Chamber, $4,000 for fitting up 
the Chancery and Supreme Court rooms, and $2,000 for fit- 
ting up the offices on the first fioor of the east wing. In 
1873, the sum of $43,000 was appropriated for the improve- 
ment of the front of the building, completing unfinished 
repairs and improvements, and for fitting up the Library, 
&c. On March 18th, 1875, the sum of $15,000 was appro- 
priated for the purpose of putting a new three-story front 
to the building, and to fit up offices on the second floor 
for the Clerks of the Court of Chancery and Supreme 
Court, and for providing a suitable museum for geological 
specimens, and the battle-flags of New Jersey volunteer 
regiments, carried during the war of the Rebellion. 

On March 21st, 1885, the front portion was destroyed by 
fire, and the Legislature appropriated $50,000 for rebuilding, 
and, in 1886, an additional appropriation of $225,000 was 
granted. 

The new building was finished In 1889. It is of rectangu- 
lar shape and of the Renaissance style of architecture, 
with a frontage of one hundred and sixty feet on State 
street, a depth of sixty-seven feet, and three and a half 
stories high, with a rotunda thirty-nine feet across, which 
connects the new section of the Capitol with the original 
part. The rotunda is surmounted by a dome one hundred 
and forty-flve feet high. 

The building has about sixty feet more frontage than 
the former one, and approaches about ten feet nearer the 
street. 

The walls are constructed of solid, fire-proof, brick 
masonry, faced with a light-colored stone from Indiana, 
known as Salem Oolitic, with foundations and trimmings 
of New Jersey free stone, from the Prallsville quarries, in 
Hunterdon county. The portico, door-head and trimmings 



100 THE STATE CAPITOL. 

about the door are of the same material. The portico, 
with balcony, is supported by massive pillars of polished 
granite and surmounted by the coat of arms of the State. 

The apartments used for offices are very spacious, fitted 
throughout in the most approved modern style, and each 
department is supplied with one or more of the finest fire- 
proof vaults. The first and second stories are set aside 
for offices, and the entire third story is used for the State 
Library. 

The old State Library apartments have been improved 
and extended, and are now used as offices for the Attor- 
ney-General, State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
and Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. A new 
story was added, which is used for the Geological Museum 
and State offices. 

In 1891, a new Assembly Chamber was erected. The old 
one was too small and poorly ventilated, and besides, 
there was a lack of suitable committee rooms. The Legis- 
lature of 1891 passed a Joint Resolution, which was 
approved on March 20th, authorizing the Governor "to 
provide a suitable chamber and committee rooms for the 
use of the General Assembly of this State," &c., and also, 
"to make such additions and alterations as will afford the 
necessary accommodations for the Supreme Court and 
Court of Errors and Appeals, or for other State offices, 
and sufficient money is hereby appropriated for that pur- 
pose, to be paid by the Treasurer of this State on the war- 
rant of the Comptroller, after approval by the Governor." 

The new chamber was built by James W. Lanning, of 
Trenton, from plans prepared by James Moylan, of Jersey 
City, and under the superintendency of Bernard J. Ford, of 
Newark. It covers the site of the former chamber, and 
extends beyond it to Delaware street on the east and to 
the water power on the south. It has a frontage on Dela- 
ware street of 120 feet and a depth of 75 feet. The exterior 
finish and design of the building are similar to the adjoin- 
ing portion of the Capitol. The foundation is of brown 
stone, from the Stockton quarries, and the trimmings of 
light Indiana stone. The interior is finished in Trenton 
tile, quartered oak and Italian statuary marble. It is a 
fire-proof building throughout, and is specially ventilated. 
The committee rooms are ample and convenient, and the 
interior design, arrangement and finish make it a model 
legislative chamber. It cost the State $140,500. The cost 
of the steam heating and ventilating systems was about 
$25,000. 

The other new addition to the Capitol provides a consul- 



THE STATE LIBRARY. 101 

tation room for the Judges of the Supreme Court and the 
Court of Errors and Appeals and a private room for the 
Governor, a room for the Museum of the Geological Sur- 
vey, and other offices, and cost $34,500. 

An electric light apparatus was also placed in the Cap- 
itol, which cost $23,000. Every department in the building 
is now lighted by electricity. 

A new Otis elevator has been placed in the front part of 
the building, which gives easy access to all the upper 
floors. 

In 1900 the Legislature appropriated $96,000 for additions 
and alterations to the Capitol, which included the cost of 
an electric light plant. 



THE STATE LIBRARY. 

This valuable collection of books is located on the third 
floor of the State Capitol. The old saying, "Great oaks 
from little acorns grow," most appropriately applies to 
this institution. 

The flrst library of the State was a case ordered to be 
procured by Maskell Ewing, Clerk of the House of Assem- 
bly, for the keeping and preservation of such books as be- 
longed to the Legislature. It was ordered by a resolution 
passed March 18th, 1796. This was the nucleus of the 
present extensive library. On February 18th, 1804, William 
Coxe, of Burlington; Ezra Darby, of Essex, and John A. 
Scudder, of Monmouth, were appointed a Committee on 
Rules, and to make a catalogue; they reported that there 
were 168 volumes belonging to- the State, and presented a 
code of seven rules, which was adopted. On February 10th, 
1813, an act (the first one) was passed, entitled "An act 
concerning the State Library." Up to 1822 it appears that 
the Clerk of the Hovise had charge of the books, as Librar- 
ian, and, on November 16th, 1822, an act was passed for 
the appointment of a State Librarian, annually, by joint 
meeting. In 1846, on April 10th, an act was passed making 
the term of office three years. The Law Library at that 
time belonged to the members of the Law Library Asso- 
ciation. The only persons allowed the use of the Library 
were members of the Association, the Chancellor, and the 
judges of the several courts. Stacy G. Potts was Treas- 
urer and Librarian of the Association. The Law Library 
was kept in the Supreme Court room until 1837, when the 
Legislature authorized the State Librarian to fit up a 
room adjoining the Library for the care and reception of 
the books and papers belonging to the State Library. 



102 THE STATE ARSENAL. 

Thus the two Libraries were consolidated. On March 13th, 
1872, $5,000 per year for three years was appropriated for 
the Library by the Legislature, and by the act of March 
15th, 1876, the sum of $2,500 was appropriated for finishing 
and refurnishing the Library room. In 1890, the Library 
was removed to the third story of the new part of the 
Capitol. 



THE STATE ARSENAL. 

The building now used as the State Arsenal was formerly 
the old State Prison. It is situate on Second street, in the 
Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton, and has on its front 
the following inscription: 

Labor, Silence, Penitence. 

The Penitentiary House. 

Erected by Legislative Authority. 

Richard Howell, Governor. 

In the XXII. Year of American 

Independence, MDCCXCVIL 

That Those Who Are Feared for Their 

Crimes May Learn to Fear the Laws 

And be Useful. 

Hie La^or, Hoc Opus. 

In the messages of Governors P. D. Vroom and S. L. 

Southard, recommending the erection of the new prison, 
it was proposed that the old one be converted into an 
Arsenal for the safe keeping of the arms and military 
property of the State, which, previous to that time, had 
been kept in the old State Bank, corner of Warren and 
Bank streets, with accoutrements and camp and garrison 
equipage at the State House. After the removal of the 
State convicts from the old prison, permission was given 
to the county of Mercer to occupy it as a jail until its jail, 
then in course of completion, was finished, and when it 
was again vacated it was converted into an arsenal. 

Among the stores, &c., at the Arsenal are one bronze 
gun, French, of the date of 1758; two bronze guns, English, 
four-pounders, and two iron six-pounders. There is also 
one gun captured at the battle of Trenton, December 26th, 
1776, and two guns captured at Yorktown, October 19th, 
1781. There are also a large quantity of fire-arms, ammu- 
nition, ordnance, tents, clothing, blankets, &c. 



STATE HOSPITALS. 103 

STATE HOSPITAL. 

Trenton. 

This institution is located on the right bank of the Dela- 
ware River, about two miles northwest of the City Hall. 
The buildings are constructed of reddish sandstone, ob- 
tained from quarries near the hospital, and are located on 
an elevation of about seventy-five feet above the river. 
The front of the Main or Administration Building is orna- 
mented by a handsome porch of Ionic architecture, de- 
signed by the celebrated Notman, from which may be ob- 
tained one of the finest landscape views in the State. 

In 1844. after repeated and unsuccessful attempts to 
cause action to be taken by the Legislature for the build- 
ing of a State institution for the special care and treat- 
ment of the insane, a commission was appointed, chiefly 
through the earnest efforts of Dr. Lyndon A. Smith, of 
Essex, and Dr. Lewis Condict, of Morris, and the eminent 
philanthropist, Miss D. L. Dix, to select a site. An appro- 
priation of $35,000 was made to purchase the land, and 
to commence the erection of the building. The present site 
was selected by the commissioners from among many that 
were offered in various sections of the State because of 
the large spring of excellent water found on the place. 
This spring was developed, and furnished a daily supply 
of about one-half millions of gallons of pure water for 
many years. In the severe drought of 1880 the supply was 
greatly diminished, falling off nearly two hundred and 
fifty thousand gallons, and it has never regained its full 
and former capacity. The spring is now supplemented by 
driven wells, three in number, and each one over three 
hundred feet deep. These with the spring, are capable of 
supplying dally a half million gallons of excellent water. 
In 1896 a standpipe for storing water and securing a fire 
pressure was erected, with a capacity of five hundred 
thousand gallons. 

Work was commenced on the main building in November 
of 1845, and the hospital was opened for the reception of 
patients on the 15th day of May, 1848. Numerous additions 
have been made from time to time to the building, increas- 
ing its capacity from fifty patients, in 1848, to eight hundred 
and fifty patients, in 1898. 

In 1887, the Legislature passed an act appropriating 
$100,000 for providing additional accommodations. The 
new building is a handsome structure of red sandstone, 
and similar to that used in the main building. This is five 



104 STATE HOSPITALS. 

hundred feet long', three stories in height, and capable of 
accommodating three hundred patients, one hundred and 
fifty of each sex. The building is designed to accommo- 
date the chronic incurable class, and was a great relief 
from the overcrowded state that existed in the main build- 
ing prior to its completion. The building was completed 
within the appropriation, and opened for the reception of 
patients in the month of October, 1889. 

Since the opening of the institution in May, 1848, there 
have been received and treated 9,860 patients. At the close 
of the fiscal year, October 31st, 1900, there were under care 
in the hospital 1,117 patients. Much has been done for 
the comfort and pleasure of the patients. A green-house 
has been erected for the purpose of furnishing plants and 
flowers for the patients' corridors, handsome pictures 
adorn the walls, and everything about the hospital presents 
a comfortable and homelike appearance. 

The institution possesses a library, one of the largest, 
if not the largest, in this country connected with a hos- 
pital for the insane. The books are accessible to all mem- 
bers of the household. They have been freely used, and 
do much to relieve the monotony of many an hour of hos- 
pital life. The library now consists of about 4,000 volumes, 
and is the result of the bequest of a former nurse (Anne 
Robinson), who, by will, bequeathed her earnings for sev- 
eral years as a nurse and attendant in this hospital. She 
made the bequest, as she herself expressed it when making 
her will, for the purpose of purchasing books to be used 
for the pleasure and benefit of those to whom she had, 
for so many years, endeavored to minister. 

During the year 1898, a handsome amusement room, 
capable of seating about four hundred, was finished; also, a 
large and commodious chapel, in which religious exercises 
are held from time to time; various clergymen, without 
regard to denominational preference, officiate every Sun- 
day. The new chapel is capable of seating about five hun- 
dred patients. 



STATE HOSPITAIi. 

Morris Plains. 

In order to relieve the crowded condition of the Trenton 
Asylum, and make further provision for the increasing 
number of the insane, commissioners were appointed by 
the Legislature of 1871 to select a site and build an insti- 
tution in the northern portion of the State. About 408 



NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 105 

acres of land were purchased, at a cost of $78,732.36, in 
Hanover township, Morris county, and a site for the insti- 
tution was selected on the foot hills of the Watnong- range 
of the Blue Ridge Mountains, at an elevation of 520 feet 
above the sea level. The location is ideal for an institution 
of its kind, being- unsurpassed in this particular by any 
similar institution in this country. A magnificent view 
of the surrounding country is commanded. The air is 
cool and balmy in summer, and crisp and stimulating in 
winter. 

The institution is a four-story building, of granite quar- 
ried on the premises, and trimmed with brown sandstone. 
The total length is 1,243 feet, and the depth, from the front 
of the main center building to the rear of the extreme 
wings, is 542 feet, constituting at present the largest insti- 
tution for the insane under one roof in the world, and one 
of the finest buildings of its kind in the United States. 

The building was planned and constructed to accommo- 
date 800 patients, but at present has a population of more 
than 1,250 insane. The total cost was about $2,250,000. It 
was first occupied by patients on August 17th, 1876. 

The Legislature of 1895 appropriated $125,000 for addi- 
tional buildings and improvements. The foundation of 
the new building was laid to accommodate 600 patients, 
and provide suitable laboratory facilities for the further 
prosecution of scientific work. An appropriation was also 
made for the extension of the water-supply, and an addi- 
tional tract of land was purchased, bringing the total 
extent of the hospital's property up to about 720 acres. 
On a 'portion of this land an additional reservoir, with a 
capacity of 6,500,000 gallons, has since been built. The 
Legislature of 1898 appropriated $150,000, enabling the man- 
agement to give out contracts looking to the completion 
of the administration portion of the building, the north 
wing, associate dining-rooms, amusement hall, and patho- 
logical laboratories. 

The barns and outbuildings belonging to the institution 
are in excellent condition, and the farm is in a high staie 
of cultivation. 



NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

These schools are the property of the State, and arc 
located at the junction of Perry street and Clinton avenue, 
Trenton. There are two buildings, the one for the schools 
located on the west side of Clinton avenue, the other, con- 
taining the boarding halls and dormitories, situated on the 
east side of the avenue. These schools were established in 



106 NORMAL AND MODEL SCHOOLS. 

1855 by an act of the Legislature. The purpose of the Nor- 
mal School was defined to be "the training- and education 
of its pupils in such branches of knowledge, and such 
methods of teaching and governing, as will qualify them 
for teachers of our common schools." The Model School 
was designed to be a place where "the pupils of the Nor- 
mal School shall have opportunity to observe and prac- 
tice the modes of instruction and discipline inculcated in 
the Normal School, and in which pupils may be prepared 
for the Normal School." 

The following figures show the original cost and present 
valuation of the Normal School property: 
Original cost of the Normal and Model School 

buildings, with lot $72,000 

Estimated value of furniture, books, &c 8,000 

Value of boarding halls 65,000 

Value of boarding hall furniture , — 10,000 

$155,000 

The above original values have appreciated til\ che tables 
should now read as follows: 

Former Normal and Model buildings $60,000 

Former school furniture, apparatus, &c 8,000 

Lot 115,000 

Appropriation of 1890 for new building 40,000 

Appropriation of 1891 for alterations, furniture, &c.. 8,000 
Principal's residence and boarding halls, including 

addition of 1892 99,000 

Boarding hall furniture , 15,000 

Appropriation of 1893 for new building 12,000 

Appropriation of 1894 10,000 

Additional furniture and apparatus 13,000 

Appropriation of 1897 for heating and ventilation... 25,000 

Purchase price of Umpleby property, 1899 20,400 

Total $425,400 

The enrollments in 1855 were as follows: Normal School, 
43; Model School, 125. For the year ending June 30th, 1900, 
these enrollments had increased to 639 in the Normal and 
568 in the Model. During its history the Normal School 
has graduated 2,735 students. 

The Principals of the schools have been as follows: 
William F. Phelps, A. M., October 1st, 1855, to March 15th, 
1865; John S. Hart, LL. D., March 15th, 1865, to February 
7th, 1871; Lewis M. Johnson, A. M., February 7th, 1871, to 
July 1st, 1876; Washington Hasbrouck, Ph. D., July 1st, 
1876, to February 10th, 1889; James M. Green, Ph. D., Feb- 
ruary 10th, 1889, to the present, 



STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 107 



THE STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

"The New Jersey State Reform School" was established 
by act of the Legislature approved April 6th, 1865. A farm 
of 490 acres was purchased for the purpose near James- 
burg-, Middlesex county. 

The first boy was received July 6th, 1867. Its first Super- 
intendent was Rev. Luther H. Sheldon, who was in office 
from April 10th, 1867, till April 1st, 1874, and was succeeded 
by James H. Eastman, who was Superintendent from 
April 1st, 1874, till September 15th, 1884. Upon his with- 
drawal Ira Otterson was made acting Superintendent, 
and on December 10th, 1884, he was unanimously ele-cted 
Superintendent, and is still the executive head of the insti- 
tution. 

From the opening of the school till the close of the fiscal 
year (October 31st, 1899), there had been received by com- 
mitment into the care of the school, 3,236 boys. 

Owing to the probable opening at an early date of the 
State Reformatory, for an older class, it was thought best 
by the Legislative Committee on The Reform School, of 
the session of the Legislature of 1900, to change the name 
of The Reform School to "The State Home for Boys," so 
as to avoid confusion in matters of business, and unjust 
reflection upon boys going out with honorable parole from 
the institution. 

Since founding the school, beside the Administration 
building, there have been erected on the campus seven 
family buildings (one of them a double building), capable 
of accommodating fifty boys each, a chapel, hospital, store 
and cook house, industrial building, electric light, heat 
and power generating station, and farm buildings, all of 
brick, many of the buildings constructed with bricks 
manufactured by the boys on the place. 

Beside domestic and farm labor, all boys are instructed 
in the rudiments of an English school education, and many 
receive instruction in different mechanical branches and 
band music. 

In 1900 there was erected by boys' labor, under regular 
instructors, a building 40 by 100 feet, two stories high, in 
which are established schools for trade teaching. "While 
in the past, so far as the accommodations would permit, 
a number of boys have received instruction in mechanical 
trades, and wuth the accommodations furnished in the 
new building, it is hoped a greater number of boys may 
receive a more thorough knowledge in lines of skilled 



108 STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

handicraft, which will the better prepare them to become 
good citizens. 

The members of the Board of Trustees realizing the 
needs of the boys, and deeply interestediin the future wel- 
fare of these wards of the State, devote much time to the 
conduct of its affairs, and in consideration of that which 
will promote its greatest good. Their services are given 
without compensation, their actual expenses being paid 
by the State. 



STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

This institution is located on the line of the Trenton 
Branch of the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, in 
Ewing township, near the Trenton Lunatic Asylum, and is 
located on a farm of about 79 acres of land. A substantial 
building was erected, at a cost of $23,334, and other im- 
provements made, which bring the value of the place, with 
furniture, &c., up to $37,740. Previous to the erection of 
the new building, the school was at "Pine Grove," in the 
Sixth Ward of the city of Trenton. This place had been 
leased so as to afford room for persons sentenced under 
the act of April 4th, 1871. The Legislature of 1900 appro- 
priated $30,000 for the erection of an additional building. 



THE STATE PRISON. 

The New Jersey State Prison, situated on the block 
enclosed by Federal, Third, Cass and Second streets, in the 
city of Trenton, is one of the finest institutions of its kind 
in the country. Its erection was authorized by an act of 
the Legislature passed February 13th, 1832, and it was 
completed in the year 1836, having 150 cells, at a cost of 
$179,657.11. It was built of red sand-stone, from the Ewing 
quarries, and the style of its architecture is Egyptian, 
having four Egyptian columns in front of the main 
entrance, on Third street. It consists of a main building, 
used as a residence for the Keeper and as reception rooms 
and offices. From time to time the prison has been en- 
larged, and although there is not sufficient room to afford 
separate confinement for each prisoner, as required by 
law, the provisions of the act are carried out as far as 
possible. The rules and -regulations now in force have 
brought the internal affairs of the institution, as to clean- 
liness, discipline, victualing, &c., to a much higher stand- 
ard than was ever before reached, and a visit thereto will 



THE STATE PRISON. 109 

convince the visitor that the management is as perfect as 
can be. 

On March 4th, 1847, $5,000 was appropriated to build an 
additional wing to the original building. On March 25th, 
1852, $15,000 was granted for the erection of a new wing for 
hospital purposes. On March 22d, 1860, the sum of $17,000 
was voted for the purpose of building an additional wing 
for cells, and on February 16th, 1861, a further sum of 
$2,243.01 was appropriated to complete the same. On April 
16th, 1868, $6,000 was appropriated for the building of an 
additional wing to provide room for female convicts. An 
act passed April 2d, 1869, provided for the appointment of 
commissioners to extend the grounds of the prison to the 
wall of the State Arsenal, to build an additional wing and 
work shops, and made an appropriation of $50,000 for that 
purpose, and in the same month $9,734 was appropriated for 
the purpose of completing the wing of the female depart- 
ment. On April 4th, 1871, the sum of $75,000 was appropri- 
ated for the purpose of completing the new or east wing, 
and on April 4th, 1872, a further sum of $28,700 was appro- 
priated for the completion of the same, March 3d, 1874, 
$12,000 was voted for the construction of gas works for the 
supply of illuminating gas for the prison. On March 8th, 
1877, the sum of $100,000 was appropriated for the enlarge- 
ment of the prison and the purchase of a burial ground 
for deceased convicts. The north wing was remodeled out 
of this last appropriation, and a burial ground purchased. 
The Legislature of 1895 appropriated $150,000 for the en- 
largement and improvement of the prison. The Legisla- 
ture of 1899 appropriated $14,000 for alterations in the 
women's wing of the prison. 

Previous to the year 1798 there was no State Prison, and 
prisoners were confined in the county jails. On March 1st, 
1797, Jonathan Doane was appointed by an act of the Leg- 
islature as an agent to purchase a lot of land from Peter 
Hunt, situate at Lamberton, containing six and a half 
acres, and to erect suitable buildings thereon. This was 
done at an expense of £9,852 Os. 3d., and what is now the 
State Arsenal, at Second and Cass streets, is the result. 
Solitary confinement was not practiced previous to 1836, 
in which year the old prison was vacated and the present 
one occupied. 



no SCHOOL FOR DEAF-MUTES. 

SOLDIERS' HOME. 

This institution is located in Kearny township, Hudson 
county, to which place it was removed from Newark in 
1888. It was organized under a joint resolution of the LrCg- 
islature approved April 12th, 1862. The Home in Newark 
was opened July 4th, 1866. The Legislatures of 1886 and 
1887 appropriated $175,000 for the erection of a new Home, 
under the direction of Commissioners appointed by the 
Legislature. The present site, consisting of 17% acres, was 
selected, and six new and commodious buildings were 
erected thereon. The Home has a frontage of 600 feet on 
the Passaic river, and contains over three hundred in- 
mates. 



SCHOOL FOR DEAF-MUTES. 

This institution, which is located at Trenton, is a part of 
the public school system of the State, and is open to deaf 
residents of the State between the ages of eight and 
twenty-one years. The pupils are instructed in the 
branches of common-scho61 education, and are also trained 
in some handicraft. Speech is taught to all who can 
acquire it, and with such success that in some classes it 
becomes the principal means of communication. 

The industrial department is larger and better equipped 
than in most schools of this kind. From the printing office 
is issued monthly a paper, the Silent Worker, which, in 
point of mechanical execution and of quality of contents, 
ranks as the best issued from any institution in the coun- 
try. AH the work on this paper is performed by pupils 
of the school. 

The wood-working department, under the charge of a 
graduate of a technical school of high rank, has a course 
in which theory and practice are united in an unusual 
degree. 

A course of kindergarten work, especially adapted to the 
deaf child, has been worked out in the school, and has been 
followed by some of the best schools of the kind in this 
country. 

A building for hospital purposes, designed in accordance 
with the best modern practice and ample to meet any pos- 
sible need, was opened in 1899. 

The attendance of pupils has risen from 125 in June, 1896, 
until at the present time it is about 150. 

The school possesses a well chosen library, which at 
present contains about 1,500 volumes, and is rapidly 
growing. 



INSTITUTION FOR FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. Ill 

INSTITUTION FOR FEEBL.E-MINDED WOMEN, 

Vineland. 
This institvTtion was established under an act of March 
27th, 1888, with the late Prof. S. O. Garrison, who drafted 
the original law, as the first superintendent. On Novem- 
ber 15th of the same year he was succeeded by Mary J. 
Dunlap, M. D. It is one of the most admirably situated 
public buildings in the State. Lying opposite the New 
Jersey Training School for Feeble-Minded Children, and 
facing Landis avenue, Vineland's main street of several 
miles in length, it enjoys f.acilities of the city yet sur- 
rounded by acres of fruit, vineyards and orchards. The 
main building is well arranged, and a large annex was 
erected in the winter of 1891-92. It is a home for females, 
of whom there are nearly 100. Extensive additions have 
recently been made, giving hospital and other accommo- 
dations. 



TRAINING SCHOOI. FOR FEEBLE-MINDED CHILDREN. 

Vineland. 

This public institution is an outgrowth of a private one, 
which Prof. S. Olin Garrison established in Millville, Cum- 
berland county, on September 1st, 1887. It was opened at 
Vineland, on March 1st, 1888, with an enrollment of ten 
inmates. Adjacent properties were soon acquired and a 
handsome building, costing about $18,000, was erected in 
1890-91. There are nine cottages, besides a hospital, large 
barn, shops and manual training-rooms, located on a farm 
of 120 acres. The school has a fine assembly hall, seating 
over 600, and also containing seven (7) school-rooms, an 
armory, drill-room and a gymnasium. 

The plan and scope of training and education by the 
school, require fourteen teachers in English, Kindergarten, 
Military, Music, Physical Culture and Manual Trades de- 
partments, thereby indicating the special and comprehen- 
sive fields of instruction. There is also a custodial depart- 
ment for the idiotic, and a hospital department for epi- 
leptics. 

The property is worth over $150,000, real and personal, 
with a debt of only $8,000. Besides very good property 
acquisitions at low cost, at least $50,000 have been donated 
to the school since its organization, to aid in the current 
expenses, in improvements and new buildings. 

On May 24th, 1900, there were 233 boys and girls in the 
institution. 



112 STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

STATE VI1.L.AGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Skillman, Somerset County. 

This village Is located in Montg-omery township, Somer- 
set county, about one mile from Skillman Station, on the 
line of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. The loca- 
tion is one of the most beautiful and healthful in the State, 
and Is admirably adapted for the purposes of this kind of 
an institution. The managers ha\'e secured three adjoin- 
ing farms containing in all about five hundred acres. 

The three farm houses are now being used, one for the 
Administration building, one for male and one for female 
patients. 

In 1884 Dr. John W. Ward, Superintendent of the State 
Hospital at Trenton, realizing the necessity of separating 
the epileptics from the insane, went before a legislative 
committee and strongly urged the appropriation of $50,000 
to erect a building upon the grounds of that institution 
for the proper care of the epileptics. The late Prof. S. Olin 
Garrison, Principal of the New Jersey Training School for 
Feeble-Minded Children, at Vineland, early recognized the 
necessity of separate provision for the epileptics in that 
institution, and was indefatigable in his efforts to estab- 
lish the present village. 

For a number of years the subject was agitated, and in 
1895, in accordance with a resolution passed by the Legis- 
lature, the Governor appointed a commission to investigate 
the number and condition of epileptics in the State. The 
report of the commission was presented to the Legislature 
of 1896 and a bill was introduced for the establishment of a 
colony on a plan recommended by the commission. The bill 
failing to become a law, the New Jersey State Medical Soci- 
ety, by resolution at their annual meeting in 1896, endorsed 
the necessity of such legislation. In 1897 the President, 
Dr. Thomas J. Smith, of Bridgeton, most ably presented 
the necessity of providing for the epileptics, and urged 
that the State authorities be importuned most earnestly 
to revive the movement initiated the year before to estab- 
lish an industrial epileptic colony in our State. The Society 
reaffirmed its position, and appointed a committee to urge 
the matter further. 

Through the combined efforts of those interested and 
with the zealous co-operation of Senator Stokes, of Cum- 
berland, who had charge of the legislation, an act was 
passed by the Legislature of 1898, and promptly signed by 
Acting Governor Voorhees, making the necessary provi- 



NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 113 

sions for the establishment of the institution. The sum 
of $15,000 was appropriated for the purchase of a site and 
to pay for the equipment and maintenance of the village. 
The "Maplewood Farm," containing about 187 acres, was 
purchased for $11,500, and the village was opened for the 
reception of male patients November 1st, of the same year. 
The Legislature of 1900 appropriated $.30,000 for the erec- 
tion of two cottages for patients, and $16,000 for the pur- 
chase of two farms adjoining the property. As the Legis- 
lature provides the buildings, all epileptics of either sex, 
over five years of age, and not insane, will be admitted. 



NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

Rahway. 

The Legislature of 1895 passed an act, which was ap- 
proved by Governor Werts on March 28, providing for the 
appointment of a commission consisting of six persons to 
build an intermediate prison for the criminal classes. The 
act authorized the commission to set apart for the use of 
the reformatory the property known as the Edgar farm, 
belonging to the State Sinking Fund, located in Union 
county, and also such other portion of said farm located 
in Middlesex county, and, if necessary, to purchase ad- 
joining property for the completion of the site at a cost 
not exceeding $10,000. The institution when completed shall 
have a capacity of not less than one thousand prisoners. 
The sum of $100,000 was appropriated to begin the work. 
The criminal courts of the State are empowered to sen- 
tence prisoners between the ages of sixteen and thirty 
years to the reformatory instead of to the State Prison. 
The act provided that the commission shall be constituted 
of a board of managers upon the completion of a part of 
the reformatory. 

The act of 1895 was repealed in 1901, when a new law was 
enacted, which provided for a Board of Managers to con- 
sist of nine persons including the Governor, no more than 
four to be of the same political party. En substance, the 
new act does not differ much from the original act. The 
original commissioners were: Patrick Farrelly, George S. 
Mott, David M. Chambers, William A. Ure, John T. Daly 
and Thomas M. Gopsill. 

The Reformatory is about one and a half miles from the 
city of Rahway. The cost, exclusive of the appropriation 
of 1901, was about $575,000. The central or guard room 



114 NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

building and one wing- are all that has been completed of 
the main building. The domestic building and the power 
house have also been completed. The cell accommodation 
in the present building is 258. The buildings are built of 
brick and stone. The architect was John R. Thomas; the 
builders, E. W. Hooper, of Trenton, and John Gunn & Co., 
Orange. 

To double the capacity of the Reformatory it will be 
necessary to add one wing. Four wings in all are contem- 
plated for its completion. The space between the central 
building and the domestic building has been enclosed with 
a temporary wooden stockade and the grounds have been 
laid out. The trade school was established in 1901 and the 
plan and scope of the Reformatory enlarged. The institu- 
tion was opened for the reception of inmates on August 5, 
1901, and in October of that year there were 26 prisoners 
confined there. 

The following Board of Managers was appointed by the 
Governor in 1901: George A. Squire, Patrick Farrelly, 
Charlton T. Lewis, Percy R. Pyne, Dr. Benjamin Edge, 
Richard H. Wilson, George W. Fortmeyer and Thomas M. 
Gopsill. Mr. Squire is president, Mr. Gopsill, secretary, 
and Col. James E. Heg, superintendent. 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



115 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT. 1888 



FOR HARRISON, REP. 

California 8 

Colorado 3 

Illinois 22 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 9 

Maine 6 

Massachusetts 14 

Michigan 13 

Minnesota 7 

Nebraska 5 

Nevada 3 

New Hampshire 4 

New York 36 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania 30 

Rhode Island 4 

Vermont 4 

Wisconsin 11 

Total 233 

Harrison's majority. 65 



FOR CLEVELAND, DEM. 

Alabama 10 

Arkansas 7 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 12 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Maryland 8 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 16 

New Jersey 9 

North Carolina 11 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 13 

Virginia 12 

West Virginia 6 

Total 168 



U6 



ELECTORAL. VOTE. 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1892. 



For Cleveland, Dkm. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware , 3 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Maryland 8 

Michigan 5 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Carolina 11 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio 1 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 12 

Texas , 15 

Virginia 12 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 

277 



For Harrison, Rep, 

California , 1 

Iowa 13 

Maine 6 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 9 

Minnesota 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

New Hampshire 4 

North Dakota 1 

Ohio 22 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania... 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Dakota 4 

Vermont 4 

Washington 4 

Wyoming 3 

145 
For Weaver, Pop. 

Colorado... 4 

Idaho 3 

Kansas 10 

Nevada ••• 3 

North Dakota -. 1 

Oregon 1 

22 



Cleveland over Harrison, 132. 

Cleveland over Harrison and Weaver, 110. 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



li; 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1896. 



For McKinley, Rep. 

Cvilifornia 8 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware.. 3 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kentucky 12 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota 9 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

Vermont 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 

271 
McKlnley's majority, 95. 



For Bryan, Dem. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

California 1 

Colorado 4 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Idaho * 3 

Kansas 10 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana 8 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

Montana 3 

Nebraska 8 

Nevada 3 

North Carolina 11 

South Carolina 9 

South Dakota 4 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Utah 3 

Virginia 12 

Washington 4 

Wyoming 3 

176 



118 



ELECTORAL VOTE. 



ELECTORAL VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1900 



FOR M'KINLEY, REP. 

State. Vote. 

California 9 

Connecticut 6 

Delaware 3 

Illinois 24 

Indiana 15 

Iowa 13 

Kansas 10 

Maine 6 

Maryland 8 

Massachusetts 15 

Michigan 14 

Minnesota 9 

Nebraska 8 

New Hampshire 4 

New Jersey 10 

New York 36 

North Dakota 3 

Ohio 23 

Oregon 4 

Pennsylvania 32 

Rhode Island 4 

South Dakota 4 

Utah 3 

Vermont 4 

Washington 4 

West Virginia 6 

Wisconsin 12 

Wyoming 3 

292 

McKinley's majority.. 137 



FOR BRYAN, DEM. 

State. Vote. 

Alabama 11 

Arkansas 8 

Colorado 4 

Florida 4 

Georgia 13 

Idaho 3 

Kentucky 13 

Louisiana 8 

Mississippi 9 

Missouri 17 

Montana 3 

Nevada 3 

North Carolina 11 

South Carolina 9 

Tennessee 12 

Texas 15 

Virginia 12 

155 



PRESIDENTIAL, VOTE. 



119 










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PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



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122 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



PRESDENTIAL VOTE, 1880 AND 1884. 





1884. 


1880. 


STATES. 

(38) 


Blaine, 
Rep. 


Cleve- 
land, 
Dem. 


Butler, 
Gr'b'k. 


St. John 
Pro. 


Garfield, 
Rep. 


Han- 
cock, 
Dem. 


Alsib&nia 


59,444 

50,895 

100,816 

36,277 

65,898 

12,788 

28,039 

47,964 

837,449 

238,480 

197,089 

153,158 

118,674 

46,347 

72,209 

85,699 

146,724 

192,669 

111,923 

42,774 

♦202,261 

76,877 

8,381 

43,166 

123,433 

562,001 

125,068 

400,082 

26,852 

474,268 

19,030 

21,733 

124,078 

88,353 

39,514 

139,356 

♦63,096 

161,147 


92,973 

72,927 

88,307 

27,627 

67,182 

17,054 

31,769 

94,567 

812,320 

244,992 

♦177,288 

89,466 

152,757 

62,546 

52,140 

96,932 

122,352 

♦191,225 

70,144 

78,547 

235,972 

♦54,354 

7,000 

39,166 

127,784 

563,048 

142,905 

868,280 

24,593 

893,510 

12,391 

69,764 

133,258 

223,208 

17,n31 

14f;,497 

67,317 

146.454 


762 

1,844 

1,975 

1,957 

tl,685 

6 


610 


56,221 

42,436 

80,348 

27,450 

67,071 

14,133 

23,654 

54,086 

318,037 

232,164 

183,927 

121,549 

106,306 

238,637 

74,039 

78,515 

165,205 

185,341 

93,903 

34,854 

153,567 

54,979 

8,732 

44,852 

120,555 

555,444 

115,874 

875,048 

20,619 

444,704 

18,195 

58,071 

107,677 

57,893 

45,567 

84,020 

46,243 

144,000 


91,185 


Arkansas 


60,775 


California 

Colorado 


2,640 

759 

12,492 

55 

74 

184 

11,824 

3,018 

1,472 

4,495 

8,106 


80,426 
24,647 


Connecticut 

Delaware 


64,415 
15,275 


Florida 


27,964 


Georgia 


125 

10,753 

8,176 

"'leViio 

1,655 


102,470 


Illinois 


277,321 


Indiana 


225,522 


Iowa 


105,845 


Kansas 


69,801 


Kentucky 

Louisiana . . . 


149,068 
65,067 


Maine 


3,953 
531 

24,382 
tt763 
3,587 


2,160 
2,794 
9,923 
18,403 
4,691 


♦65,171 


Maryland 

Massachusetts- 
Michigan 


93,706 
111,960 
131,59" 


Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 


53.315 
75,750 




2,153 
2,858 


208,609 


Nebraska 




28,523 


IINevada 




9,613 


N. Hampshire.. 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina 


552 

8,494 

16,955 


1,573 

6,155 

24,999 

448 

11,269 

488 

15,366 

928 


40,794 
122,565 
534,511 
124,208 
340,821 


Ohio 


6,170 

723 

16,942 

422 


Oregon 


' 19,948 


Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina 


407,428 
10,779 
112,312 
128,191 
156,428 


IfTennessee 

Texas 


957 

8,321 

785 


1,131 
8,511 
1,752 
143 
939 
7,649 


Vermont 


18,316 


Virginia 


al28,586 


West Virginia... 
Wisconsin 


tt810 
4,597 


57,391 
114,649 


Total 


4,844.002 


4,914,947 
70,945 


134,599 


151,531 


4,454,416 
9,464 


4,444,952 


Plurality... 



1884— Scattering and imperfect, 7,876 ; Lockwood, 5 ; total vote. 

10,053,770. 
1880— Greenback, 308.578; Prohibition, 10,305; American, 707; 

scattering, 989; total vote, 9,219,947. 



♦Fusion, t Including 160 misspelled, t Including 232 misspelled. 
% One county missing in 1884. || One county estimated in 1884. g Vote 
for the two Republican tickets (Regular, 27,676; "Beattie, ]0,340) 
combined, ft Straight Gremback, oRegular (96,912) and Readjuster 
(31,674) votes combined. 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



123 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1888. 



States. 


Harrison. 


Cleveland. 


risk. 


Labor. 


Alabama 


57,197 

58,752 

124,809 

50,766 

74,584 

12,978 

26,650 

40,453 

370,470 

263,361 

211,598 

182,914 

155,134 

30,184 

73,734 

99,986 

183,456 

236,370 

136,359 

30,096 

236,325 

108,425 

7,238 

45,728 

144,344 

650,338 

134,709 

415,792 

33,293 

526,091 

21,969 

13,740 

138,815 

83,280 

45,192 

150,438 

78,491 

176,553 

5,430,607 


117,310 

85,962 

117,729 

37,542 

74,920 

16,414 

39,561 

100,472 

348,258 

261,013 

179,877 

102,738 

183,800 

89,941 

50,482 

106,168 

151,990 

218,404 

99.664 

85,476 

261,957 

80,552 

5,326 

43,358 

151.493 

635,965 

148,336 

399,969 

26,524 

446,200 

17,530 

65,825 

159,079 

234,883 

16,788 

151,977 

79,330 

155,232 


583 

614 

5,761 

2,100 

4,234 

400 

403 

1,802 

21,386 

9,881 

3,550 

6,779 

5,225 

130 

2,690 

4,766 

8,636 

20,942 

15,000 

218 

4,954 

9,424 

45 

7,585 

7,904 

30,327 

5,787 

4,618 

1,677 

20,743 

1,251 


10,643 


Arkansas 


California 


1,591 

1,265 

240 


Colorado 


Connecticut 


Delaware 


Florida 




Georgia 

Illinois 


136 

7,410 

2,694 

9,10) 

37,787 

622 


Indiana 


Iowa 


Kansas 


Kentucky 


Louisiana 


Maine 


1,345 


Maryland 


Massachusetts 




Michigan 


4,542 


Minnesota 


Mississippi 




Missouri 


*i5,'853 


Nebraska 


Nevada 




New Hampshire 


42 


New Jersey 


New York 


5,050 


North Carolina 


Ohio 


3,452 

363 

3,865 

18 


Oregon 


Pennsylvania 


Rhode Island 


South Carolina 


Tennessee 


5,669 
4,749 
1,450 
1,678 


43 


Texas 


Vermont 


35 


West Virginia 




Wisconsin 


14,277 


8,522 






5,538,045 


257,248 


114,623 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE, 1892. 



STATES. 



Alabama .... 
Arkansas.... 
California ... 
Colorado .... 
Connecticut 
Delaware..., 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

* Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana „ 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

N. Hampshire 
New Jersey ... 

New York 

N. Carolina... 
N. Dakota,... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania.. 
Rhode Island.. 

S. Carolina 

S. Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington ... 
West Virginia, 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



Totals . 



U 



138.138 

87,834 

118,174 



82,395 

18,581 

30,143 

129,386 

2 

426,281 

262,740 

196.367 



175,461 

87,622 

48,044 

113,866 

176,858 

202,296 

100,920 

40,237 

268,398 

17,581 

24,943 

714 

42,081 

171,066 

654,908 

133,098 



404,115 
14.243 

452,264 

24,336 

54,698 

9,081 

136,594 

239 148 
16,325 

163,977 
29,844 
84,467 

177,335 



5 554.561 



9,197 

46,974 

118,027 

38,620 

77,032 

18,077 

22 

48,305 

8,599 

399,288 

255,616 

219,795 

157,241 

135,441 

26,134 

62,878 

92,736 

202 927 

222 708 

122,823 

1,406 

226,918 

18,851 

87,227 

2,811 

45,658 

156,101 

609,459 

100,565 

17,519 

405 187 

35,002 

516,011 

26,975 

13,384 

34,888 

99,851 

77,475 

37,992 

113 266 

36,460 

80,293 

170,846 

8,454 



5,185,028 



85,181 
11.831 
25 311 
53,584 
809 



4 843 
42,939 
10,520 
22,207 
22,208 
20,595 
163.111 
23,500 
27,903 

2,381 
796 

3,348 
19,796 
29313 
10.256 
41,213 

7,334 
83,134 

7,264 
293 
985 
16,436 
44,732 
17.700 
14,852 
26,965 

8,714 
228 

2,410 
26,544 
23,780 
99,688 
42 
12 274 
19 054 

4,166 

9.909 

7,722 



241 
113 

8,096 

1,687 

4,026 

564 

570 

988 

288 

25,870 

13,050 

6,402 

4,553 

6.442 



3 062 

5,877 

7,539 

20,857 

14,182 

910 

4,331 

549 

4,902 

89 

1,297 

8,134 

38,191 

2,636 

899 

26,012 

2,281 

25,123 

1,654 



U ffi 



128,941 

40,860 

147 



5,363 

504 

30 121 

81,081 



26,993 
7,125 



40,020 
61,488 



21,130 



38,831 
41,480 



14,965 
45,449 
32,533 



4.776 
2,165 
1,424 
2,736 
2,553 
2,145 
13,132 
530 



1.055,8711 270,876 918.145 548,612 



41,314 



36,743 
161,673 



50,721 



4,174 
6,489 



S o 

fc > > 



38,620 



8,597 



23,428 
157,241 



14,834 



26 069 
20,412 
21,903 



1,270 

62,2&4 

2,097 

3,677 



17,519 

1,072 

20,759 

63,747 

2,639 



25,807 



21,667 



8,464 



Cleveland's plurality, 369,533. 

Wing, Socialist-I^abor, received in Connecticut, 333 votes; 
in Massachusetts, 676; in New Jersey, 1,337; in New York, 
17,958; in Pennsylvania, 898. Total, 21,202. 

*In Louisiana the Republican and People's parties voted 
each for four of the other's eight candidates for electors. 
Thus some of the Louisiana voters are counted twice in the 
above table, and while all the Presidential candidates re- 
ceived a total of 12,098,668 votes in the whole country, there 
were only 12,070,766 actual voters. 

(124) 



PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 



125 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, i8q6. 



STATES. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine.. 

Maryland 

Massachusetts..., 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina . 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina .. 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia.... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total 

Pluralitv 



a 



64,737 

37,512 
146,588 

26,279 
110,285 

20,452 

11,257 

60,091 
6,314 
607,130 
323,748 
289,293 
159,345 
218.171 

22,037 

80,465 
136,978 
278,976 
293,327 
193,503 
5,123 
304,940 

10,4901 

102,564 

1,939 

57,444 
221.367 
819,838 
155,222 

26,335 
525,991 

48,779 
728,300 

37,437 
9,313 

41,042 
148,773 
162,506 

13,461 

50,991 
135,388 

39,153 
104,414 
268,359 

10,072 



7,105,729 
613,752 






131,226 

110,103 

144,766 

161,269 

56,740 

16,615 

31,958 

94,672 

23,135 

464,523 

306,206 

223,741 

170,636 

217,890 

11 Mb 

34,588 

104,746 

105,711 

237,251 

139,735 

46,283 

363,667 

43,680 

115,624 

8,369 

21,650 

133,675 

551,513 

174,488 

20,686 

477,497 

46,739 

433,230 

14,459 

58,801 

41,225 

168,176 

368,289 

67,053 

10,607 

154.985 

51,646 

92,927 

163,441 

10,861 



6,491,977 









6,462 



1 

4,336 

969 

1,772 

2,708 



6,390 
2,146 
4,616 
1,209 
5,104 
1,834 
1,870 
2,507 
11,749 
6,930 
3,216 
7,517 
2,355 



2,797 



3,420 

6,378 

18,972 

578 



1,858 

977 

11,000 

1,166 

824 



1,951 
4,853 



1,329 
2,127 
1,668 
677 
4,244 



1^ 

CO _ • 

> Cd 
a> 4) a 



133,554 



2,147 

839 

2,573 

2,104 

1,806 

602 

644 

6,716 

172 

10,611 

6,241 

3,544 

2,231 

4,781 



1,570 
6,058 
2,998 
6,777 
4,363 
390 
2,462 



1,993 



776 

5,614 

16,075 

921 

358 

7,784 

919 

19,274 

1,165 



600 
3,098 
5,030 



728 
2,344 
1,116 
1,203 
6,659 

159 



142,491 






893 



150 
1,223 



1,147 
343 
453 



588 
2,114 



948 



595 
"186 



228 

3,985 

17,731 



1,167 



6,103 
558 



llg 



694 



39,221 



126 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



POPULAR VOTE FOR PRESIDENT, 1900. 



Alabama 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts. . . 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New York 

North Carolina.. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania . . . 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 



i^ 










u 








>> 


., 


Q 


?iy^ ■ 






=32 


M 





>- 


u« 


P^ 


a^ 


0)72 


^m 


§ 


pq 


^ 


W 


Q 


N 


53,669 


96,368 


1,407 


3,797 






44,800 


81,142 


584 


972 






164,755 


124,985 


5,024 




7,572 




93,072 


122,733 


3,790 


389 


684 


7i4 


102,572 


74,014 


1,617 




1,029 


908 


22,560 


18,863 


546 




57 




7,499 


28,007 


2,239 


1.090 


603 





35,036 


81,700 


1,396 


4,584 






27,198 


29,414 


857 


213 






597,985 


503,061 


17,626 


1,141 


9,687 


1,373 


336,063 


309,584 


13,718 


1,438 


2,374 


663 


307,808 


209,265 


9,502 


613 


2,742 


259 


185,955 


162,601 


3,605 




1,605 




226,801 


234,899 


2,429 


2,6i7 


760 


289 


14,233 


53,671 











65,435 


36,832 


2,585 




878 




136,212 


122,271 


4,582 




908 


39i 


239,147 


157,016 


6,208 





9.716 


2,610 


316,269 


211,685 


11,859 


833 


2,826 


903 


190,461 


112,901 


8,555 




3,065 


1,329 


5,753 


51,706 




1,644 






314,093 


351,913 


5,963 


4,244 


6,i28 


1,294 


25,373 


37,146 


298 





708 


116 


121,835 


114,013 


3,686 


1,104 


823 




3,849 


6,347 











: 54,798 


35,489 


i,27i 




790 





221,707 


164,808 


7,183 


669 


4,609 


2,074 


821,992 


678,386 


22,043 




12,869 


12,622 


133,081 


157,752 


1,009 


830 






, 35,891 


20,519 


731 


110 


518 





, 543,918 


474,882 


10,203 


251 


4,847 


1,688 


46,526 


33,385 


2,536 


275 


1,494 




, 712,665 


424,232 


27,908 


638 


4.831 


2,936 


33,784 


19,812 


1,529 






1,423 


3,525 


47,283 











. 54,530 


39,544 


1,542 


339 


169 




, 123.008 


145,250 


3,900 


1,368 


410 




. 1.30,641 


277,432 


2,644 


20,981 


1,846 


i62 


. 47,089 


44,949 


205 




717 


106 


. 42,569 


12,849 


383 


367 






. 115,865 


146,080 


2,150 








. 57,457 


44,833 


2,345 




1,906 


1,066 


. 119,851 


98,791 


1,586 


279 


286 




. 265,866 


159,285 


10,124 




7,095 


524 


. 14,482 


10,164 




2 







7,217,677 6,357,883 207,368 50,188 94,552 33,450 



NEW JERSEY ELECTORAL VOTE. 127 

ELECTORAL VOTE OF NEW JERSEY. 



FOR PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, FROM 
MARCH 4, 1789. 

1789— Georg-e Washington, of Virginia 6 

John Adams, of Massachusetts 1 

John Jay, of New York 5 

1793— George Washington, of Virginia 7 

- John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

1797— John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

Thomas Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1801— John Adams, of Massachusetts 7 

C. C. Pinckney, of South Carolina 7 

1805 — Thomas Jefferson, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1809— James Madison, of Virginia 8 

George Clinton, of New York 8 

1813— DeWitt Clinton, of New York 8 

Jarard Ingersoll, of Pennsylvania 8 

1817— James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1821 — James Monroe, of Virginia 8 

Daniel D. Tompkins, of New York 8 

1825— Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

John C. Calhoun, of South Carolina 8 

1829— John Q. Adams, of Massachusetts 8 

Richard Rush, of Pennsylvania 8 

1833— Andrew Jackson, of Tennessee 8 

Martin Van Buren, of New York 8 

1837— William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

Francis Granger, of New York 8 

1841— William H. Harrison, of Ohio 8 

John Tyler, of Virginia 8 

1845— Henry Clay, of Kentucky 7 

Theodore Frelinghuysen, of New Jersey 7 

1849— Zachary Taylor, of Louisiana 7 

Millard Fillmore, of New York 7 

1853— Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire 7 

William R. King, of Alabama 7 

1857— James Buchanan, of Pennsylvania 7 

John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky 7 



128 NEW JERSEY PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 

1861 — Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois 4 

Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine 4 

Stephen A. Douglas, of Illinois 3 

Herchel V. Johnson, of Georgia 3 

1865— George B. McClellan, of New Jersey 7 

George H. Pendleton, of Ohio 7 

1869— Horatio Seymour, of New York 7 

Francis P. Blair, of Missouri 7 

1873— Ulysses S. Grant, of Illinois 7 

Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts 7 

1877— Samuel J. Tilden, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1881— Winfleld Scott Hancock, of Pennsylvania 9 

William H. English, of Indiana : 9 

1885— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Thomas A. Hendricks, of Indiana 9 

1889— Grover Cleveland, of New York 9 

Allan G. Thurman, of Ohio 9 

1893— Grover Cleveland, of New York 10 

Adlai E. Stevenson, of Illinois 10 

1897— William McKinley, Ohio 10 

Garret A. Hobart, New Jersey 10 

1901— William McKinley, of Ohio 10 

Theodore Roosevelt, of New York 10 



PRESIDENTIAIi VOTE OF NEW JERSEY FROM 1840 

TO DATE. 

1840— Harrison, Whig, 33,351; Van Buren, Dem., 31,034. 
Harrison's majority, 2,327. 

1844— Clay, Whig, 38,318; Polk, Dem., 37,495. Clay's major- 
ity, 823. 

1848— Taylor, Whig, 40,015; Cass, Dem., 36,901; Van Buren. 
819. Taylor's plurality, 3,114. 

1852— Pierce, Dem., 44,305; Scott, Whig, 38,556; Hale, Free 
Soil, 350. Pierce's plurality,, 5,749. 

1856— Buchanan, Dem., 46,943; Fremont, Rep., 28,338; Fill- 
more, Amer., 24,115. Buchanan's plurality, 18,605. 

1860— Dem. Fusion ticket, 62,869; Lincoln, Rep., 58,346. 
Fusion majority, 4,523. (Three Douglas electors, Cook, 
Parker and Runyon, were chosen, the highest vote being 
62,869 for Cook, and four Lincoln electors were chosen, 
Hornblower, Hay, Elmer and Ivins, the highest vote being 
58,346 for Hornblower. The highest vote cast for a Breck- 
inridge elector (Wurts) was 56,237.) 

1864— McClellan, Dem., 68,024; Lincoln, Rep., 60,723, Mq- 
Clellan's majority, 7,301. 



NEW JERSEY PRESIDENTIAL VOTE. 129 

1868— Seymour, Dem., 83,001; Grant, Rep., 80,131. Sey- 
mour's majority, 2,870. 

1872— Grant, Rep., 91,656; Greeley, Dem., 76,456. Grant's 
majority, 15,200. 

1876— Tilden, Dem., 115,962; Hayes, Rep., 103,517. Tilden's 
majority, 12,445. 

1880— Hancock, Dem., 122,565; Garfield, Rep., 120,555. Han- 
cock's majority, 2,010. 

1884— Cleveland, Dem., 127,784; Blaine, Rep., 123,433. Cleve- 
land's majority, 4,351. 

1888— Cleveland, Dem., 151,493; Harrison, Rep., 144,344; 
Fisk, Pro., 7,904. Cleveland's plurality, 7,149. 

1892— Cleveland, Dem., 171,066; Harrison, Rep., 156,101; 
Bidwell, Pro., 8,134; Wing, Social.-Lab., 1,-337; Weaver, 
People's, 985. Cleveland's plurality, 14,965. 

1896— McKinley, Rep., 221,367; Bryan, Dem., 133,675; Palmer, 
Nat. Dem., 6,373; Levering, Pro., 5,614; Matchett, Soc.-Lab., 
3.985. McKinley' s plurality, 87,692. 

1900— McKinley, Rep., 221,707; Bryan, Dem., 164,808; Wool- 
ley, Pro., 7,183; Debs, Soc.-Dem., 4,609; Malloney, Soc.-Lab., 
2,074; Barker, People's, 669. McKinley's plurality, 56,899. 



130 NEW JERSEY GUBERNATORIAL VOTE. 

NEW JERSEY'S VOTE FOR GOVERNOR 

From 1844 to Date. 



1844— Stratton, Whig, 37,949; Thomson, Dem.. 36.591; Park- 
hurst, 76. Whig plurality, 1,358. 

1847— Haines, Dem., 34,765; Wright, Whig. 32.166; William 
Right, 87; Moses Jaques, 146; Scattering, 109. Democratic 
pluralit3^ 2,599. 

1850— Fort, Dem., 39,723; Runk, Whig, 34,054. Democratic 
majority, 5,669. 

1853— Price, Dem., 38,312; Haywood, Whig, 34,530. Demo- 
cratic majority, 3,782. 

1856— Newell, Rep., 50,903; Alexander, Dem., 48,246. Re- 
publican majority, 2,657. 

1859— Olden, Rep., 53,315; Wright, Dem., 51,714. Republican 
majority, 1,601. 

1862— Parker, Dem., 61,307; Ward, Rep., 46,710. Democratic 
majority, 14,597. 

1865— Ward, Rep., 67,525; Runyon, Dem., 64,736. Repub- 
lican majority, 2,789. 

1868— Randolph, Dem., 83,619; Blair, Rep., 79,072. Demo- 
cratic majority, 4,547. 

1871— Parker, Dem., 82,362; Walsh, Rep., 76,383. Demo- 
cratic majority, 5,979. 

1874— Bedle, Dem., 97,283; Halsey, Rep., 84,050. Demo- 
cratic majority, 13,233. 

1877— McClellan, Dem., 97,837; Newell, Rep., 85,094; Hoxsey, 
Greenback, 5,069; Bingham, Tax and Pro., 1,439. Demo- 
cratic plurality, 12,746. 

1880— Ludlow, Dem., 121,666; Potts, Rep., 121,015; Hoxsey, 
Greenback, 2,759; Ransom, Pro., 195. Democratic plu- 
rality, 651. 

1883— Abbett, Dem., 103,856; Dixon, Rep., 97,047; Urner, 
Nat., 2,960; Parsons, Pro., 4,153. Democratic plurality, 6,809. 

1886— Green, Dem., 109,939; Howey, Rep., 101,919; Fiske, 
Pro., 19,808. Democratic plurality, 8,020. 

1889- Abbett, Dem., 138,245; Grubb, Rep., 123,992; La Monte, 
Pro., 6,853. Democratic plurality, 14,253. 

1892— Werts, Dem., 167,257; Kean, Jr., Rep., 159,362; Ken- 
nedy, Pro., 7,750; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 1,338; Bird, People's, 894. 
Democratic plurality, 7,625. 

1895— Griggs, Rep., 162,900; McGill, Dem., 136,000; Wilbur, 
Pro., 6,661; Ellis. People's, 1,901; Keim, Soc.-Lab., 4,147. Re- 
publican plurality, 26,900. 

1898— Voorhees, Rep., 164,051; Crane, Dem., 158,552; Lan- 
don. Pro., 6,893; Maguire, Soc.-Lab., 5,458; Schrayshuen, 
People's, 491. Republican plurality, 5,499. 

1901— Murphy, Rep., 183,814; Seymour, Dem., 166,681; 
Brown, Pro., 5,365; Vail, Soc, 3,489; Wilson, Soc. Labor, 
1,918. Republican plurality, 17,133. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 131 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



FROM 1774 TO THK PRESENT TIME. 

CONTINENTAL CONGRESS. 

1774-5, James Kinsey; 1774-6, John Cooper, Stephen Crane, 
John De Hart, Francis Hopkinson. William Livingston, 
Richard Smith, Richard Stockton; 1776-7, Jonathan D. Ser- 
geant; 1776-S, Abraham Clark, Jonathan Elmer; 1776-9, John 
Witherspoon; 1777-8, Elias Boudinot; 1777-9, Nathaniel Scud- 
der; 1778-9, Frederick Frelinghuysen, Elias Dayton; 1778, 
John Neilson; 1778-80. John Fell; 1779, Thomas Henderson; 
1779-81, William Ch. Houston; 1780-1, William Burnett, Wil- 
liam Paterson; 1780-3, Abraham Clark; 1780-2, John Wither- 
spoon; 1781-3, William Paterson; 1782-3, Frederick Freling- 
huysen; 1781-4, Silas Condict. Jonathan Elmer; 1783-5, John 
Beatty. Samuel Dick; 1783-4, John Stevens, Sr. ; 1784-5, 
Charles Stewart, William Ch. Houston; 1784-7, Lambert 
Cadwalader; 1785-6, John Cleaves Symmes, Josiah Horn- 
blower; 1786-7, James Schureman; 1786-8, Abraham Clark; 
1787, William Paterson; 1787-8, Jonathan Elmer; 1787-9, Jona- 
than Dayton. 



FROM 1789 TO DATE. 

L 1789-91— Elias Boudinot, Burlington; Lambert Cadwal- 
ader, Hunterdon; James Schureman, Middlesex; Thomas 
Sinnickson, Salem. 

II. 1791-3— Elias Boudinot, Burlington; Abraham Clark, 
Essex; Jonathan Dayton, Essex; Aaron Kitchell, Morris; 
James Schureman, Middlesex. 

HI. 1793-5 — John Beatty, Hunterdon; Elias Boudinot. 
Burlington; Lambert Cadwalader, Hunterdon; Jonathan 
Dayton, Essex; Abraham Clark, Essex (died 1794); Aaron 
Kitchell, Morris (to fill vacancy). 

IV. 1795-7— Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex; Thomas 
Henderson. Monmouth; Aaron Kitchell, Essex; Isaac 
Smith, Hunterdon; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

v. 1797-9— Jonathan Dayton (Speaker), Essex; James H. 
Imlay, Monmouth; James Schureman, Middlesex; Thomas 
Sinnickson. Salem; Mark Thompson, Sussex. 

VI. 1799-1801— John Condit, Essex; Franklin Davenport, 
Gloucester; Samuel H. Imlay, Monmouth; Aaron Kitchell, 
Morris; James Linn, Somerset. 



132 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

VII. 1801-3— John Condit, Es?ex; Ebenezer Elmer, Cum- 
berland; William Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlir.gton; 
Henry Southard, Somerset. 

VIII. 1S03-5— Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; James Mott, Burlington; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam Boyd, Ber- 
gen. 

IX. 1805-7— Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland; William 
Helms, Sussex; John I^ambert, Hunterdon; James Sloan, 
Gloucester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Ezra Darby, 
Essex. 

X. 1807-9— William Helms, Sussex; John Lambert, Hun- 
terdon; Thomas Newbold, Bur-lington; James Sloan, Glou- 
cester; Henry Southard, Somerset; Ezra Darby, Essex 
(until 1808) ; Adam Boyd, Bergen (from 1808-9). 

XT. 1809-11— James Cox, Monmouth (until 1810); William 
Helms, Sussex; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; Thomas New- 
bold, Burlington; Henry Southard, Somerset; Adam Boyd, 
Bergen. 

XII. 1811-13- Adam Boyd, Bergen; Lewis Condict, Mor- 
ris; Jacob Hufty, Cumberland; George C. Maxwell, Hun- 
terdon; James Morgan, Middlesex; Thomas Newbold, Bur- 
lington. 

XIII. 1813-15— Lewis Condict, Morris; William Cox, Bur- 
lington; Richard Stockton, Somerset; Thomas Ward, Es- 
sex; James Schureman, Middlesex; Jacob Hufty, Cumber- 
land (until 1814); Thomas Binns, Essex (1814-15). 

XIV. 1815-17— Ezra Baker, Middlesex; Ephraim Bateman, 
Cumberland; Benjamin Bennett, Monmouth; Lewis Con- 
dict, Morris; Henry Southard, Somerset; Thomas Ward, 
Essex. 

XV. 1817-19— Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Benjamin 
Bennett, Monmouth; Joseph Bloomfield, Burlington; 
Charles Kinsey, Essex; John Linn, Sussex; Henry South- 
ard, Sussex. 

XVI. 1819-21— Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland; Joseph 
Bloomfield, Burlington; John Linn, Sussex; Barnard Smith, 
Middlesex; Henry Southard, Somerset; John Condit, Essex 
(until 1820); Thomas Binns, Essex (1820-1). 

XVn. 1821-3— George Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth; James Matlack, 
Gloucester; Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland, Samuel 
Swan, Somerset. 

XVIII. 1823-5— George Cassady, Bergen; Daniel Garrison, 
Salem; G. E. Holcombe, Monmouth; James Matlack, Glou- 
cester; Lewis Condict, Morris; Samuel Swan, Somerset. 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 133 

XIX. 1825-7— George Cassady, Bergen; Lewis Condict, 
Morris; Daniel Garrison, Salem; G. E. Holcombe, Mon- 
mouth; Samuel Swan, Somerset; Ebenezer Tucker, Bur- 
lington. 

XX. 1827-9— Lewis Condict, Essex; Isaac Pierson, Essex; 
Samuel Sv/an, Somerset; Ebenezer Tucker, Burlington; 
George E. Holcombe, Monmouth (until 1828); Hedge 
Thompson, Salem (until 1828); James Fitz Randolph, Mid- 
dlesex (1828-9); Thomas Sinnickson, Salem (1828-9). 

XXI. 1829-31— Richard M. Cooper, Gloucester, Lewis Con- 
dict, Morris; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May; Isaac Pier- 
son, Essex; James Fitz Randolph, Middlesex; Samuel 
Swan, Somerset. 

XXII. 1831-3— Lewis Condict, Morris; Richard M. Cooper, 
Gloucester; Thomas H. Hughes, Cape May; James Fitz 
Randolph, Middlesex; Isaac Southard, Somerset; Silas 
Condit, Essex. 

XXIII. 1833-5— Philemon Dickerson (D.), Essex; Samuel 
Fowler (D.), Sussex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; 
James Parker (D.), Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), 
Somerset; William N. Shinn (D.), Burlington. 

XXIV. 1835-7— Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic (re- 
signed and elected Governor); Samuel Fowler (D.), Sus- 
sex; Thomas Lee (D.), Cumberland; James Parker (D.), 
Middlesex; Ferdinand S. Schenck (D.), Somerset; William 
N. Shinn (D.), Burlington; William Chetwood (D.), Essex 
(vacancy 1836-7). 

XXV. 1837-9— John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), Warren; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones York (W.), Salem. 

XXVL 1839-41— Witliam B. Cooper (D.), Gloucester; 
Philemon Dickerson (D.), Passaic; Joseph F. Randolph 
(W.), Monmouth; Daniel B. Ryall (D.), Monmouth; Joseph 
Kille (D.), Salem; Peter D. Vroom (D.), Somerset. 

XXVII. 1841-3— John B. Aycrigg (W.), Bergen; William 
Halstead (W.), Mercer; John P. B. Maxwell (W.), Warren; 
Joseph F. Randolph (W.), Monmouth; Charles C. Stratton 
(W.), Gloucester; Thomas Jones Yorke (W.), Salem. 

XXVIII. 1843-5— Lucius Q. C. Elmer (D.), Cumberland; 
George Sykes (D.), Burlington; Littleton Kirkpatrick (D.), 
Middlesex; Isaac G. Farlee (D.), Hunterdon; William 
Vv^right (W.), Essex. 

XXIX. 1845-7— James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland; 
Samuel G. Wright (W.) (died 1845), Monmouth; George 
Sykes (D.), (vacancy), Burlington; John Runk (W.), Hun- 



134 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

terdon; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex; William Wright 
(W.), Essex. 

XXX. 1847-9— James G. Hampton (W.), Cumberland; 
William A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van Dyke (W.), 
Middlesex; Joseph E. Edsall (D.), Sussex; Dudley S. Greg- 
ory (W.), Hudson. 

XXXI. 1849-51— Andrew K. Hay (W.), Camden; William 
A. Newell (W.), Monmouth; John Van Dyke (W.), Middle- 
sex; Isaac Wildrick (D.), Warren; James G. King- (W.), 
Hudson. 

XXXII. 1851-3— Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberland; 
Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer; George H. Brown (W.), Som- 
erset; Isaac Wildrick (D.), Warren; Rodman M. Price 
(D.), Essex. 

XXXIII. 1853-5— Nathan T. Stratton (D.), Cumberland; 
Charles Skelton (D.), Mercer; Samuel Lilly (D.), Hunter- 
don; George Vail (D.), Morris; A. C. M. Pennington (W.), 
Essex. 

XXXIV. 1855-7— Isaiah D. Clawson (R.), Cumberland; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; James Bishop (N. A.), 
Middlesex; George Vail (D.), Morris; A. C. M. Pennington 
(R:), Essex. 

XXXV. 1857-9— Isaiah D. Clawson (R-), Cumberland; 
George R. Robbins (R.), Mercer; Garnet B. Adrain (D.), 
Middlesex; John Huyler (D.), Bergen; Jacob R. Worten- 
dyke (D.), Hudson. 

XXXVI. 1859-61— John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; John 
L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington; Garnet B. Adrain (D.), 
Middlasex; Jetur R. Riggs (D.), Passaic; William Penning- 
ton (R.) (Speaker), Essex. 

XXXVII. 1861-3— John T. Nixon (R.), Cumberland; John 
L. N. Stratton (R.), Burlington: William G. Steele (D.), 
Somerset; George T. Cobb (D.), Morris; Nehemiah Perry 
CD.), Essex. 

XXXVIII. 1863-5— John F. Starr (R.), Camden; George 
Middleton (D.), Monmouth; William G. Steele (D.), Somer- 
set; Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex; Nehemiah Perry (D.), 
Essex. 

XXXIX. 1865-7— John F. Starr (R.), Camden; William A. 
Newell (R.), Monmouth; Charles Sitgreaves (D.), Warren; 
Andrew J. Rogers (D.), Sussex; Ed. R. V. Wright (D.), 
Hudson. 

XL. 1867-9— William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles Haight 
(D.), Monmouth; Charles S-itgreaves (D.), Warren; John 
Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex. 

XLI. 1869-71— William Moore (R.), Atlantic; Charles 



NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 135 

Haight (D.), Monmouth; John T. Bird (D.), Hunterdon; 
John Hill'(R.), Morris; Orestes Cleveland (D.), Hudson. 

XLII. 1871-3— John W. Hazleton (R.), Gloucester; Sam'i 
C. Forker (D.), Burlington; John T. Bird (D.). Hunterdon; 
John Hill (R.), Morris; George A. Halsey (R.), Essex. 

XLIII. 1873-5— John W. Hazleton (R.), Gloucester; Sam- 
uel A. Dobbins (R.). Burlington; Amos Clark, Jr. (R.). 
Union; Robert Hamilton (D.), Sussex; William Walter 
Phelps (R.), Bergen; Marcus I^. Ward (R.), Essex; Isaac 
W. Scudder (R.), Hudson. 

XLIV. 1875-7— Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem; Sam- 
uel A. Dobbins (R.), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middle- 
sex; Robert Hamilton (D.), Sussex; Augustus W. Cutler 
(D.), Morris; Frederick H. Teese (D.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XL.V. 1877-9— Clement H. Sinnickson (R.), Salem; J. 
Howard Pugh (R.). Burlington; Miles Ross (D.). Middle- 
sex; Alvah A. Clark (D.), Somerset; Augustus W. Cutler 
(D.), Morris; Thomas B. Peddle (R.), Essex; Augustus A. 
Hardenbergh (D.), Hudson. 

XLVI. 1879-81— George M. Robeson (R.), Camden; Heze- 
kiah B. Smith (D.), Burlington; Miles Ross (D.), Middle- 
sex; Alvah A. Clark (D.), Somerset; Charles H. Voorhis 
(R.), Bergen; John L. Blake (R.), Essex; Lewis A. Brigham 
(R.), Hudson. 

XLVII. 1881-3— George M. Robeson (R.), Camden; John 
Hart Brewer (R.), Mercer; Miles Ross (D.), Middlesex; 
Henry S. Harris (D.j, Warren; John Hill (R.), Morri3; 
Phineas Jones (R.), Essex; Augustus A. Hardenbergh (D.), 
Hudson. 

XLVTII. 1883-5— Thomas M. Ferrell (D.), Gloucester; 
John Hart Brewer (R.j, Mercer; John Kean, Jr. (R.), 
Union; Benjamin F. Howey (R.), Warren; William Walter 
Phelps (R.), Bergen; William H. F. Fiedler ^D.), Essex; 
William McAdoo (D.), Hudson. 

XLIX. 1885-7— George Hires (R.), Salem; James Bu- 
chanan (R.), Mercer; Robert S. Green (D.), Unioii; James 
N, Pidcock (D.), Hunterdon; William Walter Phelps (R.), 
Bergen; Herman Lehlbach CR-)> Essex; William McAdoo 
(D.), Hudson. 

L. 18S7-9— George Hires (R.), Salem; James Buchanan 
(R.), Mercer; John Kean, Jr. (R.), Union; James N. Pid- 
cock (D.), Hunterdon; William Walter Phelps (R.), Ber- 
gen; Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; William McAdoo (D.), 
Hudson. 

LL 1889-91— Christopher A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James 



136 NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 

Buchanan (R.), Mercer; Jacob A. Geissenhainer (D.). Mon- 
mouth; Samuel Fowler (D.). Sussex; Charles D. Beckwith 
(R.), Passaic: Herman Lehlbach (R.), Essex; William 
McAdoo (D.), Hudson. 

LIT. 1891-3— C. A. Bergen (R.), Camden; James Buchanan 
(R.), Mercer; J. A.. Geissenhainer (D.), Monmouth; Samuel 
Fowler (D.), Sussex; C. A. Cadmus (D.), Passaic; T. D. 
English (D.), Essex; *E. F. McDonald (D.), Hudson. 

LIII. 1893-5— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; 
John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; J. A. Geissenhainer (D.), 
Monmouth; Johnston Cornish (D.), Warren; C. A. Cadmus 
(D.), Passaic; T. D. English (D.), Essex; George B. Fielder 
(D.), Hudson; John T. Dunn (D.), Union. 

LIV. 1895-7— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; 
John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), 
Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.), Morris; James T. Stewart 
(R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; Thomas Mc- 
Ewan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union. 

LV. 1897-9— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; 
John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), 
Middlesex; Mahlon Pitney (R.), Morris; James T. Stewart 
(R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; Thomas Mc- 
Ewan (R.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union. 

LVI. 1899-lSOl— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; 
John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), 
Middlesex; Joshua S. Salmon (D.), Morris; James T. Stew- 
art (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; fWilliam 
D. Daly (D.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union. 

LVII. 1901-3— Henry C. Loudenslager (R.), Gloucester; 
John J. Gardner (R.), Atlantic; Benjamin F. Howell (R.), 
Middlesex; Joshua S. Salmon (D.), Morris; James T. Stew- 
art (R.), Passaic; R. Wayne Parker (R.), Essex; Allan L. 
McDermott (D.), Hudson; Charles N. Fowler (R.), Union. 



*Mr. McDonald died November 5th, 1892, and he was suc- 
ceeded by George B. Fielder. 

fMr. Daly died after the first session of this Congress, 
and Allan L. McDermott was elected to fill the unexpired 
term. 



THE JUDICIART. ISJ 

THE JUDICIARY. 

(From 1704 to date.) 



CHANCELLORS. 

(Term, seven years— Salary, $10,000.) 
184.5, Oliver S. Halsted; 1852, Benjamin Williamson; 1860, 
Henry W. Green; 1866, Abraham O. Zabriskie; 1873, Theo- 
dore Runyon; 1887, Alexander T. McGill; 1900, William J. 
Magie. 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
(Term of office, seven years— Salary, $10,000.) 
1704, Roger Mompesson; 1709, Thomas Gordon; 1710. David 
Jamison; 1723, William Trent; 1724, Robert Lettis Hooper; 
1728, Thomas Farmer; 1738, Robert Hunter Morris; 1758. 
William Aynsley; 1764, Charles Read; 1764, Frederick 
Smyth; 1776, Richard Stockton (declined; 1776, John De 
Hart (declined); 1777, Robert Morris; 1779, David Brearley; 
1789, James Kinsey; 1803, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 1824, Charles 
Ewing; 1832, Joseph C. Hornblower; 1846, Henry W. Green; 
1853, Peter D. Vroom (declined); 1853, Alexander Wurts (de- 
clined); 1861, Edward W. Whelpley; 1864, Mercer Beasley; 
11897, William J. Magie; 1900, David A. Depue; 1901, William 

S. Gummere. 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT. 
(Term of office, seven years— Salary, $9,000 each.) 

1704, William Pinhorne; 1705, William Sandford; 1705, An- 
drew Bowne; 1706, Daniel Coxe; 1708, Thomas Revel; 1708, 
Daniel Leeds; 1710, Peter Sonmans; 1710, Hugh Huddy; 1711, 
Lev/is Morris; 1711, Thomas Farmer; 1721, Peter Bard; 1734, 
Daniel Coxe; 1735, John Hamilton; 1739, Joseph Bonnel; 1739, 
John Allen; 1748, Samuel Nevil; 1749, Charles Read; 1754, 
Richard Salter; 1764, John Berrien; 1772, David Ogden; 1774, 
Richard Stockton; 1776, Samuel Tucker; 1776, Francis Hop- 
kinson (declined); 1777, Isaac Smith; 1777, John Cleves 
Symmes; 1788, John Chetwood; 1797, Andrew Kirkpatrick; 
1798, Elisha Boudinot; 1804, William S. Pennington; 1804, 
William Rossell; 1813, Mahlon Dickerson; 1815, Samuel L. 
Southard; 1820, Gabriel H. Ford; 1826, George K. Drake; 
1834, Thomas C. Ryerson; 1838, John Moore White; 1838, 
William L. Dayton; 1838, James S. Nevius; 1841, Daniel 
Elmer; 1841, Ira C. Whitehead; 1845, Thomas P. Carpenter; 
1845, Joseph F. Randolph; 1845, James S. Nevius; 1848, Elias 
B. D. Ogden; 1852, Lucius Q. C. Elmer; 1852, Stacy G. Potts; 



138 THE JUDICIARY. 

1852, Daniel Haines; 1855, Peter Vredenburgh; 1855, Martin 
Ryerson; 1855, Elias B. D. Ogden; 1858, Edward W. Whelp- 
ley i 1859, Daniel Haines; 1859, William S. Clawson; 1859, 
John Vandyke; 1861, George H. Brown; 1861. L. Q. C. Elmer; 
1862, Peter Vredenburgh; 1862, L. Q. C. Elmer; 1862, Elias 
B. D. Ogden; 1865. Joseph D. Bedle; 1866, Vancleve Dalrim- 
ple; 1866, George S. Woodhull; 1866, '73, '80, '87 and '94, David 
A. Depue; 1869, '76, '83. '90 and '97, Bennet Van Syckel; 1869, 
'76, '83 and '90, Edward W. Scudder;j 1875, '82 and '89, Man- 
ning M. Knapp; 1875, '82, '89 and '96, Jonathan Dixon; 1875, 
'82 and '89, Alfred Reed; 1880 and '87, Joel Parker; 1880, '87 
and '94, William J. Magie; 1888 and '95, Charles G. Garrison; 
1892, George T. Werts; 1893, Job H. Lippincott; 1893, Leon 
Abbett; 1895, William S. Gummere; 1895, George C. Ludlow; 
1897, Gilbert CoUins; 1900, John Franklin Fort; 1900, Abram 
Q. Garretson; 1901, Charles E. Hendrickson; 1901, Mahlon 
Pitney. 

ATTORNEY-GENERALS. 
(Terra, five years— Salary, $7,000.) 
1704, Alexander Griffith; 1714, Thomas Gordon; 1719, Jere- 
miah Basse; 1723, James Alexander; 1728, Lawrence Smith; 
1733, Joseph Warrel; 1754, Cortland Skinner; 1776, William 
Paterson; 1783, Joseph Bloomfield; 1792, Aaron D. Woodruff; 
1811, Andrew S. Hunter; 1817, Theodore Frelinghuysen; 1829, 
Samuel L. Southard; 1833, John Moore White; 1838, Richard 
S. PMeld; 1841, George P. Mollesson; 1844, Richard P. Thomp- 
son; 1845, Abraham Browning; 1850, Lucius Q. C. Elmer; 
1852, Richard P. Thompson; 1857, William L. Dayton; 1861, 
P. T. Frelinghuysen; 1867, George M. Robeson; 1870, Robert 
Gilchrist; 1875, Joel Parker; 1875, Jacob Vanatta; 1877, John 
P. Stockton; 1897, Samuel H. Grey (term expires April 5th, 
1902). 

CLERKS IN CHANCERY. 
(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1831, Stacy G. Potts; 1840, Samuel R. Gummere; 1851, Dan- 
iel B. Bodine; 1856, William M. Babbitt; 1861, Barker Gum- 
mere; 1871, Henry S. Little; 1881, George S. Duryee; 1886, 
Allan L. McDermott; 1896, Lewis A. Thompson; 1901, Ed- 
ward C. Stokes (term expires March 30, 1906), 

CLERKS OF SUPREME COURT. 
(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1776, Jonathan D. Sergeant (declined); 1776, Bowes Reed; 
17S1, William C. Houston; 1788, Richard Howell; 1793, Jona- 
than Rhea; 1807, William Hyer; 1812, Garret D. Wall; 1817. 
Zachariah Rossell; 1842, Eli Morris; 1842, James Wilson; 
1852, William M. Force; 1857, Charles P. Smith; 1872, Benja- 
min F. Lee; 1897, William Riker, Jr. (term expires Novem- 
ber 2d, 1902). 



STATE OFFICERS. 139 

STATE OFFICERS. 

(From 1776 to date.) 



SECRETARIES OF STATE. 
(Term, five years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1776, Charles Pettit (resigned October 7th, 1778); 1778, 
Bowes Reed; 1794, Samuel W. Stockton; 1795, John Beatty; 
1805, James Linn; 1820, Daniel Coleman; 1830, James D. 
Westcott; 1840, Charles G. McChesney; 1851, Thomas S. 
Allison; 1861, Whitfield S. Johnson; 1866, Horace N. Congar; 
1870, Henry C. Kelsey; 1897, George Wurts (term expires 
April 1st, 1902). 

STATE TREASURERS. 
(Term, three years— Salary, $6,000.) 
1776, Richard Smith (resigned February 15th, 1777); 1777, 
John Stevens, Jr.; 1783, John Schureman (declined); 1783, 
James Mott; 1799, James Salter; 1803, Peter Gordon; 1821, 
Charles Parker; 1832, William Grant; 1833, Charles Parker; 
1836, Jacob Kline; 1837, Isaac Southard; 1843, Thomas Ar- 
rowsmith; 1845, Stacy A. Paxson; 1848, Samuel Mairs; 1851, 
Rescarrick M. Smith; 1865, David Naar; 1866, Howard Ivins; 
1868, William P. McMichael; 1871, Josephus Sooy, Jr.; 1875, 
Gershom Mott; 1876, George M. Wright; 1885, Jonathan H. 
Blackwell; 1885, John J. Toffey; 1891, George R. Gray; 1894, 
George B. Swain (term expires April 2d, 1903). 

STATE COMPTROLLERS. 

(Term, three years— Salary, $6,000.) 

1865, William K. McDonald; 1871, Albert L. Runyon; 1877, 
Robert F. Stockton; 1880, Edward J. Anderson; 1891, Wil- 
liam C. Heppenheimer; 1894, William S. Hancock (term ex- 
pires April 2d, 1903). 

ADJUTANT-GENERALS. 

(Salary, $2,500.) 

1776, William Bott; 1793, Anthony Walton White; 1803, 
John Morgan; 1804, Ebenezer Elmer; 1804, Peter Hunt; 1810, 
James J. Wilson; 1812, John Beatty; 1814, James J. Wilson; 
1814, Charles Gordon; 1816, Zachariah Rossell; 1842, Thomas 
Cadwallader; 1858, Robert F. Stockton, Jr.; 1867, William S. 
Stryker; 1900, Alexander C. Oliphant. 



14C STATE OPFICERS. 

QUARTERMASTER-GENERATES. 
(Salary, $2,500.) 

1776, John Mehelm; 1778, Matthias Williamson; 1813, Jona- 
than Rhea; 1821, James J. Wilson; 1824, Garret D. Wall; 
1830, Samuel R. Hamilton; 1855, Lewis Perrine (died 1889); 
1890, Richard A. Donnelly. 

STATE PRISON KEEPERS. 

(Term since 1876, five years— Salary, $3,500.) 

Crooks; Henry Bellerjeau; Francis Labaw; 1829, 

Ephraim Ryno; 1830, Thomas M. Perrine; 1836, Joseph A. 
Yard; 1839, John Voorhees; 1841, Jacob B. Gaddis; 1843, 
Joseph A. Yard; 1845, Jacob B. Gaddis; 1851, William B. 
Vanderveer; 1857, Robert P. Stoll; 1862, T. V. D. Hoagland; 
1863, Joseph B. Walker; 1866, Peter P. Robinson; 1868, Joseph 
B. Walker; 1869, David D. Hennion; 1871, Robert H. Howell; 
1873, Charles Wilson; 1876, Gershom Mott; 1881, P. H. Lav- 
erty; 1886, John H. Patterson; 1896, Samuel S. Moore (term 
expires March ISth, 1902). 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 141 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



Below is a record of the length of feach session, the date 
of meeting and adjournment of, and the number of laws 
enacted by the various Legislatures since the adoption of 
the new Constitution in 1844: 

[Special Sessions. — An extra session convened on April 
30th, and adjourned on May 10th, 1861, called in obedience 
to Gov-^rnor Olden's proclamation, to raise troops for the 
war. Laws enacted, 13; Joint Resolutions, 2. A special 
session of the Senate was convened in 1877, for the purpose 
of acting on the Governor's nominations of District Court 
Judges; it met on March 28th, and adjourned on March 
30th. A special session of the Senate was convened in 1884, 
to act on the Governor's nominations for members of the 
State Board of Assessors; it met on April 23d, and lasted 
two hours. A special session of the Legislature was called 
on May 25th, 1897, to correct an error in a law providing 
for the submission to the people of proposed amendments 
to the Constitution. The session met at noon, and ad- 
journed sine die the same day at 6:47 P. M.] 

Joint 













Laws 


Resolu- 


Year. 


Meeting. 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted 


. tions. 


1845— January 14, 


April 


4, 


12 Weeks 




., 


1846— 


13, 


" 


18, 


14 


i44 




1847— 


12, 


M'ch 


5, 


8 


109 


is 


1848— 


11, 


" 


9, 


9 


136 


14 


1849— 


9, 


" 


2, 


8 


136 


12 


1850— 


8, 


" 


8, 


9 


123 


9 


1851— 


14, 


" 


19, 


10 


171 


3 


1S52— 


13, 


" 


30, 


11 


213 


9 


1853— 


12, 


" 


11, 


9 


198 


12 


1854— 


10, 


" 


17, 


10 


223 


13 


1855— 


9, 


April 


6, 


13 


258 


5 


1^56— 


8, 


M'ch 


14, 


10 


ISO 


11 


1857— 


13, 


" 


21, 


10 


223 


2 


1858— 


12, 


" 


18, 


10 


215 


8 


1859— 


11, 


" 


23, 


11 


231 


1 


1860— 


10, 


" 


22. 


11 


270 


6 


1861— 


8, 


" 


15, 


10 


181 


2 


1862— 


14, 


" 


28, 


11 


194 


5 


1863— 


13, 


" 


25, 


11 


279 


3 


1864— 


12, 


April 


14, 


14 


446 


7 


1865— 


10. 


" 


6, 


13 


514 


5 


1866— 


9, 


" 


6, 


13 


487 


6 


1867— 


18, 


" 


12, 


12 


480 


12 


1868— 


14, 


" 


17. 


14 


566 


11 


1869— 


12, 


" 


2, 


12 


577 


5 



142 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 















Joint 












Laws 


Resolu- 


Year. Meetin 


&• 


Adjournment. 


Length. 


enacted 


. tions. 


1870— January 


11. 


M'ch 


17, 


10 Weeks, 


. 532 


6 


1S71— 


10, 


April 


6, 


13 


625 


9 


1872— 


9, 


" 


4. 


13 


603 


10 


1873— 


14, 


" 


4, 


12 


723 


1 


1874— 


13, 


M'ch 


27, 


11 


534 


1 


1875— 


12, 


April 


9, 


13 


439 





1876— 


11, 


" 


21, 


15 


213 


6 


1877— 


9, 


M'ch 


9, 


9 


156 


6 


1878— 


8, 


April 


5, 


13 


267 


7 


1879— 


14, 


M'ch 


14. 


9 


209 


3 


1880— 


13, 


" 


12, 


9 


224 


4 


1881— 


11, 


" 


25, 


11 


230 


10 


1882— 


10, 


" 


31, 


12 


190 


7 


1883— 


9, 


" 


23, 


11 


208 


6 


1884— 


8, 


April 


18, 


15 


225 


9 


1885- 


13. 


" 


4, 


12 


250 


4 


1886—* " 


12, 


June 


2. 


15 


279 


3 


1887— t " 


11, 


April 


7, 


13 


182 


3 


1888— 


10, 


M'ch 


30, 


12 


337 


11 


1889— 


8, 


April 


20, 


15 


297 


8 


1890— 


14, 


May 


23, 


19 


311 


3 


1891— 


13, 


M'ch 


20. 


10 


285 


6 


1892— 


12, 


" 


11. 


9 


296 


1 


1893— 


10, 


" 


11, 


9 


292 


2 


1894—1 " 


9, 


Oct. 


2, 


20 


354 


7 


1895—11 " 


8, 


June 


13, 


13 


434 


8 


1896— 


14, 


M'ch 


26, 


11 


219 


2 


1897— 


12, 


" 


31, 


12 


206 


1 


1898— 


11, 


" 


25, 


11 


242 


2 


1899— 


10, 


" 


24, 


11 


219 


3 


1900— 


9, 


" 


23, 


11 


198 


3 


1901- 


8, 


" 


22, 


11 


210 


2 



*After a session of 14 weeks the Houwe took a recess on 
April 16th till June 1st. The Senate continued in session, 
as a Court of Impeachment, till April 22d, when a recess 
was taken till June 1st. Up to the time of taking the recess 
the Senate and House were in session together 14 weeks, 
and the Senate by itself one week. Both Houses re- 
assembled on June 1st, and an adjournment sine die took 
place at 5 o'clock P. M., on Wednesday, June 2d. The 
Laverty impeachment trial was opened before the Senate, 
sitting as a court, on March 11th, and ended on Wednesday, 
April 21st, at 9 o'clock P. M., when a verdict of guilty on 
two counts, by a two-thirds majority, was returned. The 
trial lasted 19 days. See Senate Journal, session of 1886, 
pages 905 to 959. 

tThe Senate did not organize till February 1st. 

lOn May 26th a recess was taken until October 2d, when 
the Legislature re-assembled, and without transacting any 
business adjourned sine die at 3:30 in the afternoon. 

iiOn March 22d a recess was taken until June 4th, when 
the Legislature re-assembled, and, remaining in session 
two weeks, adjourned sine die on June 13th. 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 143 

POLICITAL COMPLEXION OF NEW JER- 
SEY'S LEGISLATURES. 

(From 1840 to date.) 



1840— Council, 13 Whigs; 5 Dems. House, 41 Whigs, 12 
Denis. 

1841— Council, 9 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, 35 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1842— Council, 10 Whigs; 8 Dems. House, 32 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1843— Council, 6 Whigs; 12 Dems. House, 23 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1884— Council, 13 Whigs; 6 Dems. House, 40 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1845— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 30 Whigs; 
Dems.; 1 Native American. 

1846— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 40 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1847— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 38 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1848— Senate, 12 Whigs; 7 Dems. House, 39 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1849— Senate, 10 Whigs; 9 Dems. House, 33 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1850— Senate, 9 Whigs; 11 Dems. House, 25 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1851— Senate, 10 Whigs; 10 Dems. House, 28 Whigs; 
Dems. 

1852— Senate, 13 Dems.; 7 Whigs. House, 45 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1853— Senate, 13 Dems.; 7 Whigs. House, 39 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1854— Senate, 13 Dems.; 7 Whigs. House, 40 Dems. 
Whigs. 

1855— Senate, 10 Dems.; 9 Whigs; 1 Native American. 
House, 29 Dems.; 25 Whigs; 6 Native American. 

1856— Senate, 11 Dems.; 5 Whigs; 4 Native American. 
House, 30 Dems.; 14 Whigs; 1 Ind. Dem. ; 15 Native Amer- 
ican. 

1857- Senate, 11 Dems.; 6 Whigs; 3 Know Nothings. 
House, 38 Dems.; combined opposition, 22. 

1858— Both Houses Democratic. 

1859— Senate, Democratic. House, Opposition. 

1860— Senate, Democratic. House, 30 Dems.; 28 Reps.; 2 
American. 

1861— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 
1862— Senate, Democrats and Republicans, tie; Independ- 
ent, 1. House, Democratic. Democratic majority on joint 
ballot, 3. 



23 
26 
35 
18 
27 
18 
20 
19 
25 
3.5 
30 
15 
21 
20 



144 



NEW JERSEY LEGISLATURES. 



8 Democrats. House, 41 



House, a tie. 



House, 35 



House, 32 



1863 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1864 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1865— Senate, Democratic. House, a tie. 

1866— Both Houses Republican. 

1867— Both Houses Republican. 

1868 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1869— Both Houses Democratic. 

1870 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1871— Both Houses Republican. 

1872— Both Houses Republican. 

1873— Both Houses Republican. 

1874— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats. House, 32 Re- 
publicans; 28 Democrats. 

1875 — Senate, 13 Republicans; 
Democrats; 19 Republicans. 

1876 — Both Houses Republican. 

1877— Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans. 

1878 — Both Houses Democratic. 

1879— Both Houses Republican. 

1880— Both Houses Republican. 

1881— Both Houses Republican. 

1882— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1883— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. 
Democrats; 25 Republicans. 

1884— Senate, Republican. House, Democratic. 

1885— Both Houses Republican. 

1886— Both Houses Republican. 

1887— Senate, 12 Republicans; 9 Democrats. 
Democrats, 26 Republicans; 2 Labor Democrats. 

1888— Senate, 12 Republicans; 
publicans; 23 Democrats. 

1889— Senate, 11 Democrats; 10 Republicans. House, 32 
Democrats; 28 Republicans. 

1890— Senate, 11 Republicans; 
Democrats; 23 Republicans. 

1891— Senate, 14 Democrats; 
Democrats; 20 Republicans. 

1892- Senate, 16 Democrats; 
Democrats; 18 Republicans. 

189.3- Senate, 16 Democrats; 
Democrats; 21 Republicans. 

1894— Senate, 11 Republicans; 10 Democrats, 
publicans; 20 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1895— Senate, 16 Republicans; 5 Democrats, 
publicans; 6 Democrats. 

1896— Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats. 
pul)licans; 16 Democrats; 1 Ind. Dem. 

1897— Senate, 18 Republicans; 3 Democrats. 
pul)licans; 4 Democrats. 

1898— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats, 
publicans; 23 Democrats. 

1899- Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats, 
publicans; 23 Democrats. 

1900— Senate, 14 Republicans; 7 Democrats, 
publicans: 16 Democrats; 1 vacancy. 

1901— Senate, 17 Republicans; 4 Democrats, 
publicans; 15 Democrats. 

1902— Senate. 17 Republicans; 4 Democrats, 
publicans; 14 Democrats. 



9 Democrats. House, 37 Re- 



10 Democrats. House, 37 
7 Republicans. House, 40 



Republicans. 
Republicans. 



House, 42 
House, 39 



House, 39 Re- 
House, 54 Re- 
House, 43 Re- 
House, 56 Re- 
House, 37 Re- 
House, 37 Re- 
House, 43 Re- 
House, 45 Re- 
House, 46 Re- 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 145 

VICE-PRESIDENTS OF COUNCIL AND 

SPEAKERS OF THE HOUSE 

OF ASSEMBLY. 

(From 1776 to 1844, when the new Constitution was formed.) 



VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

1776-81— John Stevens, Hunterdon. 

1782 —John Cox, Burlington. 

1783-84 — Philemon Dickinson, Hunterdon. 

1785-88— Robert Lettis Hooper, Hunterdon. 

1789-92— Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 

179.3-94 — Thomas Henderson, Monmouth. 

1795 — Elisha Lawrence, Monmouth. 

1796-97— James Linn, Somerset. 

1798-1800 — George Anderson, Burlington. 

1801-04 — John Lambert, Hunterdon. 

1805 — Thomas Little, Monmouth. 

1806 —George Anderson, Burlington. 

1807 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 

1808 —Ebenezer Seeley, Cumberland. 

1809 —Thomas Ward. Essex. 
1810-11— Charles Clark, Essex. 

1812 — James Schureman, Middlesex. 

1813 —Charles Clark, Essex. 
1814-15— William Kennedy, Sussex. 
1816-22— Jesse Upson, Morris. 
1823-25— Peter J. Stryker, Somerset. 

1826 — Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland. 

1827 —Silas Cook, Morris. 

1828 —Charles Newbold, Burlington. 
1829-30— Edward Condict, Morris. 
1831-32— Elias P. Seeley, Cumberland. 

1833 — Mahlon Dickerson, Morris. 

1834 — Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 

1835 —Charles Sitgreaves, Warren. 

1836 — Jeptha B. Munn, Morris. 
18.37-38— Andrew Parsons, Passaic. 
1839-40 — Joseph Porter, Gloucester. 

1842 — John Cassedy, Bergen. 

1843 —William Chetwood, Essex. 

1844 —Jehu Patterson, Monmouth. 

10 



146 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

SPEAKERS. 

1776-78— John Hart, Hunterdon. 

Second Session 1778— Caleb Camp, Essex. 

1779 —Caleb Camp, Essex. 

1780 — Josiah Hornblower, Essex. 

1781 —John Mehelm, Hunterdon. 
1782-83— Ephraim Harris, Cumberland. 
1784 —Daniel Hendrickson, Monmouth. 
1785-86— Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1787 —Ephraim Harris, Cumbexland. 

1788 — Benjamin Van Cleve, Hunterdon. 

1789 —John Beatty, Middlesex. 

1790 —Jonathan Dayton, Essex. 

1791 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1792-94— Silas Condict, Morris. 

1795 —Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 

1796 —James H, Imlay, Monmouth. 

1797 —Silas Condict, Morris. 
1798-1800— William Coxe, Burlington. 

1801 —Silas Dickerson, Sussex. 

1802 —William Coxe, Burlington. 

1803 —Peter Gordon, Hunterdon. 
1804-07— James Cox, Monmouth. 
1808-09— Lewis Condict, Morris. 
1810-11— William Kennedy, Sussex. 

1812 —William Pearson, Burlington. 

1813 —Ephraim Bateman, Cumberland. 
1814-15— Samuel Pennington, Essex. 

1816 —Charles Clark, Essex. 

1817 — Ebenezer Elmer, Cumberland. 
1818-22— David Thompson, Jr., Morris. 

1823 —Lucius Q. C. Elmer, Cumberland. 

1824 — David Johnston, Hunterdon. 
1825-26— George K. Drake, Morris. 
1827-28— William B, Ewing, Cumberland. 
1829-31— Alexander Wurts, Hunterdon. 
1832 — John P. Jackson, Essex. 
1833-35— Daniel B. Ryall, Monmouth. 
1836 —Thomas G. Haight, Monmouth. 
1837-38— Lewis Condict, Morris. 

1839 —William Stites, Essex. 
1840-41— John Emley, Burlington. 
1842 —Samuel B. Halsey, Morris. 
1843-44 — Joseph Taylor, Cumberland. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 147 

SENATE OFFICERS. 



PRESIDENTS. 
1845-48— John C. SmaJlwood, Gloucester. 
1849-50— Ephraim Marsh, Morris. 

1851 —Silas D. Canfield, Passaic. 

1852 — John Manners, Hunterdon. 
1853-56— W. C. Alexander, Mercer. 
1857-58— Henry V. Speer, Middlesex. 

1859 —Thomas R. Herring-, Bergen. 

1860 — C. L. C. Gifford, Essex. 

1861 —Edmund Perry, Hunterdon. 

1862 —Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 

1863 —Anthony Reckless, Monmouth. 

1864 — Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 

1865 —Edward W. Scudder, Mercer. 

1866 —James M. Scovel, Camden. 

1867 — Benjamin Buckley, Passaic. 
1868-69— Henry S. Little, Monmouth. 
1870 —Amos Robbins, Middlesex. 
1S71-72— Edward Bettle, Camden. 
1873-75— John W. Taylor, Essex. 

1876 — W. J. Sewell, Camden. 

1877 —Leon Abbett, Hudson. 

1878 — G. C. Ludlow, Middlesex. 
1879-80— W. J. Sewell, Camden. 
1881-82— G. A. Hobart, Passaic. 

1883 —J, J. Gardner, Atlantic. 

1884 — B. A. Vail, Union. 

1885 —A. V. Schenck, Middlesex. 

1886 —John W. Griggs, Passaic. 

1887 —Frederick S. Fish, Essex. 

1888 —George H. Large, Hunterdon. 

1889 —George T. Werts, Morris. 

1890 — H. M. Nevius, Monmouth. 
1891-93— Robert Adrain, Middlesex. 

1894 —Maurice A. Rogers, Camden. 

1895 —Edward C. Stokes, Cumberland. 

1896 —Lewis A. Thompson, Somerset; Robert Williams, 

Passaic. 

1897 —Robert Williams, Passaic. 

1898 —Foster M. Voorhees, Union; William H. Skirm (pro 

tem.), Mercer. 

1899 — Charles A. Reed, Somerset. 

1900 —William M. Johnson, Bergen. 

1901 — Mahlon Pitney, Morris. 



148 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

SECRETARIES. 

1845-47— Daniel Dodd, Jr., Essex. 
1848-50— Philip J. Gray, Camden. 
1851 —John Rogers, Burlington. 
1852-53— Samuel A. Allen, Salem. 

1854 —A. R. Throckmorton, Hudson. 
1855-56— A. R. Throckmorton, Monmouth. 
1857-58— A. B. Chamberlain, Hunterdon. 
1859-60— John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
1861 —Joseph J. Sleeper, Burlington. 
1862-63— Morris R. Hamilton, Camden. 
1864-65— John H. Meeker, Essex. 
1866-67— Enoch R. Borden, Mercer. 
1868-69— Joseph B. Cornish, Warren. 

1870 —John C. Rafferty, Hunterdon. 
1871-74— John F. Babcock, Middlesex. 
1875_76_N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
1877-78— C. M. Jemison, Somerset. 
1879 _N. W. Voorhees, Hunterdon. 
1880-82— George Wurts, Passaic. 
1883-85- W. A. Stiles, Sussex. 
1886-88— Richard B. Reading, Hunterdon. 

1889 —John Carpenter, Jr., Hunterdon. 

1890 —Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1891-92— John Carpenter, Jr., Hunterdon. 

1893 —Samuel C. Thompson, Warren. 

1894 —Wilbur A. Mott, Essex. 
1895-97— Henry B. Rollinson, Union. 
1898 —George A. Frey, Camden. 
1899-1900— Augustus S. Barber, Jr., Gloucester. 
1901 —Walter E. Edge, Atlantic. 

SPEAKERS. 

1845 — Isaac Van Wagenen, Essex. 

1846 —Lewis Howell, Cumberland. 
1847-48— John W. C. Evans, Burlington. 

1849 — Edw. W. Whelpley, Morris. 

1850 — John T. Nixon, Cumberland. 

1851 —John H. Phillips, Mercer. 

1852 — John Huyler, Bergen. 

1853-54 — John W. Fennimore, Burlington. 

1855 — William Parry, Burlington. 

1856 — Thomas W. Demarest, Bergen. 

1857 — Andrew Dutcher, Mercer. 

1858 — Daniel Holsman, Bergen. 

1859 —Edwin Salter, Ocean. 



LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 149 

1860 —Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1861 — F. H. Teese, Essex. 

1862 —Charles Haight, Monmouth. 

1863 —James T. Crowell, Middlesex. 

1864 — Joseph N. Taylor, Passaic. 

1865 —Joseph T. Crowell, Union. 

1866 —John Hill, Morris. 

1867 — G. W. N. Curtis, Camden. 

1868 —Aug. O. Evans, Hudson. 

1869-70— Leon Abbett, Hudson. » 

1871 —Albert P. Condit, Essex. 

1872 —Nathaniel Niles, Morris. 

1873 —Isaac L. Fisher, Middlesex. 

1874 — Garret A. Hobart, Passaic. 

1875 — George O. Vanderbilt, Mercer. 

1876 — John D. Carscallen, Hudson. 

1877 —Rudolph F. Rabe, Hudson. 

1878 — John Eagan, Union. 

1879 — Schuyler B. Jackson, Essex. 

1880 —Sherman B. Oviatt, Monmouth. 

1881 — Harrison Van Duyne, Essex. 

1882 —John T. Dunn. Union. 

1883 —Thomas O'Connor, Essex. 

1884 —A. B. Stoney, Monmouth. 
1885-86— E. A. Armstrong, Camden. 

1887 —William M. Baird, Warren. 

1888 —Samuel D. Dickinson, Hudson. 

1889 —Robert S. Hudspeth, Hudson. 

1890 — W. C. Heppenheimer, Hudson. 
1891-92 — James J. Bergen, Somerset. 

1893 —Thomas Flynn, Passaic. 

1894 —John I. Holt,* Passaic; Joseph Cross,* Union. 

1895 —Joseph Cross, Union. 

1896 —Louis T. Derousse, Camden. 

1897 —George W. Macpherson, Mercer. 
1898-99— David O. Watkins, Gloucester. 

1900 — Benjamin F. Jones, Essex. 

1901 —William J. Bradley, Camden. 

CLERKS. 

1845 —Alexander D. Cattell, Salem. 

1846 —Adam C. Davis, Hunterdon. 
1847-50— Alex. M. Gumming, Mercer. 
1851-52 — David Naar, Essex. 

■^Speaker Holt resigned on May 26th, and Mr. Cross suc- 
ceeded him. 



150 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

1853-54— David W. Dellicker, Somerset. 
1855 —Peter D. "Vroom, Hudson. 
1856-57— William Darmon, Gloucester. 

1858 — Daniel Blauvelt, Essex. 

1859 —John P. Harker, Camden. 

1860 — D. Blauvelt, Jr., Essex. 
1861-62— Jacob Sharp, Warren. 
1863-64— Levi Scoby, Monmouth. 
1865-66— George B. Cooper, Cumberland. 
1867 —Ed. Jardine, Bergen. 
1868-70— A. M. Johnston, Mercer. 

1871 —A. M. Gumming, Mercer. 

1872-74— Sinnickson Chew, Camden. 

1875 —Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1876-77— John Y. Foster, Essex. 

1878 — Austin H. Patterson, Monmouth. 

1879-81— C. O. Cooper, Morris. 

1882-83— Arthur Wilson, Monmouth. 

1884 —Henry D. Winton, Bergen. 

1885-86— Samuel Toombs, Essex. 

1887 — Joseph Atkinson, Essex. 

1888 —James P. Logan, Burlington. 
1889-90— John J. Matthews, Union. 
1891-92— Thos. F. Noonan, Jr., Hudson. 

1893 —Leonard Kalisch, Essex. 

1894 —J. Herbert Potts, Hudson. 
1895-97— James Parker, Passaic. 
1898-99— Thomas H. Jones, Essex. 
1900-01— James Parker, Passaic. 



STATE CENSUS. 151 

CENSUS OF NEW JERSEY, 1900. 



Population of New Jersey by '\liiioi' Civil Divisions, 
1890 and 1900. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

1900. 1890. 

Absecon town 530 501 

Atlantic City 27,838 13,055 

First ward 6,236 

Second ward 5,830 

Third ward 7,656 

Fourth ward 8,116 

Brigantine city 99 

Buena "Vista township 1,646 1,299 

Egg- Harbor city 1,808 1,439 

Egg- Harbor township 1,863 3,027 

Galloway township 2,469 2,208 

Hamilton township 1,682 1,512 

Hammonton town 3,481 3,833 

Lin wood borough 495 536 

Longport borough 80 

MuUica township 880 697 

Pleasantville borough 2,182 

Somers Point borough 308 191 

South Atlantic City borough 69 

Weymouth township 972 538 



BERGEN COUNTY. 



46,402 28,836 



Allendale borough 694 

Bergen township 346 

Bergenfields borough 729 

Bogota borough 337 

Carlstadt borough 2,574 1,549 

Cliff side Parte borough 968 

Cresskill borough 486 527 

Delford borough 746 

Dumont borough 643 

East Rutherford borough 2,640 1,438 

Englewood city 6,253 

First ward 1,535 

Second ward 1,463 

Third ward 2,126 

Fourth ward 1,129 

Englewood Cliffs borough 218 

Fairview borough 1,003 

Franklin township 2,139 

Garfield borough 3,504 1,028 

Harrington township 3,224 

Hasbrouck Heights borough 1,255 

Hillsdale township 891 

Hohokus township 2,610 

Leonia borough 804 

Little Ferry borough 1,240 781 

Lodi borough 1,917 998 



152 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Lodi township 448 

May wood borough 536 

Midland township 1,298 

Midland Park borough 1,348 

Montvale borough 416 

New Barbadoes township, coextensive with 

Hackensack town 9,443 6,004 

Hackensack town: 

First ward 2,608 

Second ward 2,324 

Third ward 2,079 

Fourth ward 1,870 

Fifth ward 562 

North Arlington borough 290 

Old Tappan borough 269 

Orvil township 1,207 

O verpeck township 1,987 

Palisades township 860 

Palisades Park borough 644 

Park Ridge borough 870 

Ridgefield borough 584 

Ridgefield township 2,612 

Ridgewood township, coextensive with 

Glenn Rock borough and Ridgewood vil- 
lage 3,298 

Glenn Rock borough 613 

Ridgewood village 2,685 1,047 

Riverside borough 561 

Rutherford borough 4,411 2,293 

Saddle River borough 415 

Saddle River township 1,954 

Teaneck township 768 

Tenafly borough 1,746 1,046 

Undercliff borough 1,006 

Union township 1,590 

Upper Saddle River borough 326 

Wallington borough 1,812 

Washington township 782 

Westwood borough 828 

Woodcliff borough 329 

Woodridge borough 582 575 



BURLINGTON COUNTY. 



78,441 47,226 



Bass River township 800 853 

Beverly city 1,950 1,957 

Beverly township 1,804 1,451 

Bordentown city 4,110 4,232 

First ward 1,669 

Second ward 1,569 

Third ward 872 

Bordentown township 488 858 

Burlington city 7,392 7,264 

First ward 1,637 

Second ward 2,083 

Third ward 1,853 

Fourth ward 1,819 

Burlington township 1,061 958 

Chester township 4,420 3,768 



STATE CENSUS. 153 

1900. 1890. 

Chesterfield township 1,143 1,253 

Cinnaminson township 1,078 2,891 

Delran township 890 2,267 

Easthampton township 584 C54 

Evesham township 1,429 1,G01 

Fieldsboro borough 459 

Florence township 1,955 1,922 

Lumberton township 1,624 1,799 

Mansfield township 1,518 1,671 

Medford township 1,969 1,864 

Mt. Laurel township 1,644 1,699 

New Hanover township 1,827 1,962 

Northampton township ; 5,168 5,376 

Palmyra township 2,300 

Pemberton borough 771 834 

Pemberton township 1,493 1,805 

Riverside township 2,581 

Riverton borough 1,332 

Shamong township 910 958 

Southampton township 1,901 1,849 

Springfield township...- 1,382 1,670 

Washington township 617 310 

Westhampton township 567 688 

Willingboro township 673 739 

Woodland township 398 327 



CAMDEN COUNTY. 



58,241 58,528 



Camden city 75,935 58,313 

First ward 8,283 

Second ward 7,158 

Third ward 4,592 

Fourth ward 4,950 

Fifth ward..; 7,971 

Sixth ward 7,373 

Seventh ward 8,151 

Eighth ward 7,760 

Ninth ward 6,337 

Tenth ward 4,886 

Eleventh ward 3,894 

Twelfth ward 4,580 

Center township 2,192 1,834 

Chesilhurst borough 283 

Collingswood borough 1,633 539 

Delaware township 1,679 1,457 

Gloucester city 6,840 6,564 

First ward 2,750 

Second ward 4,090 

Gloucester township 4,018 3,091 

Haddon township 2,012 888 

Haddonfield borough 

Merchantville borough 

Pennsauken township 

Voorhees township 

Waterf ord township 

Winslo w township 

107,643 87,687 



2,776 


2,502 


1,608 


1,225 


3,145 




969 




2.161 


2,421 


2,392 


2,408 



154 STATE CENSUS. 



CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

Anglesea borough ; 

Avalon borough 

Cape May city 

Cape May Point borough 

Dennis township 

Holly Beach borough 

Lower township 

Middle township 

Ocean City 

First ward 626 

Second ward 681 

Sea Isle City borough 

South Cape May borough 

Upper township 

West Cape May borough 

Wildwood borough 



1900. 


1890. 


161 


161 


9.3 




2,257 


2,136 


153 


167 


2,778 


1,707 


569 


217 


1,141 


1,156 


2,191 


2,368 


1,307 


452 


340 


766 


14 




1,351 


1,381 


696 


757 


150 





13,201 11,268 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 



Bridgeton city 13,913 11,424 

First ward 2,557 

Second ward 3,031 

Third ward 3,434 

Fourth ward 3,075 

Fifth ward 1,816 

Commercial township 2,982 2,344 

Deerfield township 3,066 2,614 

Downe township 1,833 1,793 

Fairfield township 1,911 1,688 

Greenwich township 1,283 1,173 

Hopewell township 1,807 1,743 

Landis township 4,721 3,855 

Lawrence township 1,658 1,729 

Maurice River township 2,132 2,279 

Millville city 10,583 10,002 

First ward 3,296 

Second ward 1,934 

Third ward 3,007 

Fourth ward 2,346 

Sto we Creek township 934 972 

Vineland borough 4,370 3,822 



ESSEX COUNTY. 



51,193 45,438 



Belleville township 5,907 3,487 

Bloomfield town 9,668 7,708 

Caldwell borough 1,367 

Caldwell township 1,619 3,638 

Clinton township 1,325 3.684 

East Orange city 21,506 13,282 

First ward 3,017 

Second ward 4,847 

Third ward 5,548 

Fourth ward 3,413 

Fifth ward 4,681 



STATE CENSUS. 155 

1900. 1890. 

Franklin township .' ^'oRn ^'^^ 

Glen Ridge borough ^-^^^ 

Irvington town...... ^'^^^ y:ij 

Livingston township ^-^if ^'^..^ 

Milburn township 4'°-^' '^'(.Xa 

Montclair town •••- 13,9b2 8,656 

First ward ^-^'^ 

Second ward ^'^-^ 

Third ward ^'^°^ 

Fourth ward ' oar mn i«i s^o 

Newark city •••••• 246,0^0 181,8^0 

First ward it' c-n 

Second ward oi o-n 

Third ward ^1-^'^ 

Fourth ward -Tr '-.no 

Fifth ward 15'1^^ 

Sixth ward }'>^^^ 

Seventh ward it' k-i 

Eighth ward i-^-^o^ 

Ninth ward M Jvq 

Tenth ward ^^'^-kf, 

Eleventh ward i^oio 

Twelfth ward }^'^lj 

Thirteenth ward io q-1 

Fourteenth ward i f'cio 

Fifteenth ward l^.bi/i 

North Caldwell borough f\ ••••• 

Orange city ••••• 24,141 18,844 

First ward o,/4U 

Second ward 4,u <z 

Third ward o-^o^ 

Fourth ward ^' 'P 

Fifth ward ^'^^^ . „„„ ., ^.^j. 

South Orange township 1.6^^ ^'^'° 

South Orange village 4,608 d,iub 

Vailsburg borough ^-''^ '*" 

Verona township j'^^l ■■^;.^ 

West Orange town ^'^^^ ^'"^^^ 

. 359,053 256,098 



GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

Clayton borough 1.951 1,807 

Clayton township ^ -^^ . ^gf 

Deptford township 2,114 l,b«l 

East Greenwich township i,^^;j -^.-^^^ 

Elk township..... f^ ■■■- 

Franklin township f.^o^ ^"^^ 

Glassboro township ^677 Ab4Z 

Greenwich township 4^o^ \'Tfd 

Harrison township l-oo^ |'2^^ 

Logan township 1.444 l,o23 

IVIantau township Ai^jL i,tvi 

Monroe township -^.40^ ^'^t^ 

South Harrison township Wb y a 

Washington township l.^o^ i.^o^ 

Wenonah borough 498 6^6 

W^est Deptford township l,yol ^,^^^ 



156 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Woodbury city 4,087 3,911 

First ward 1,006 

Second ward 1,812 

Tiiird ward 1,269 

Woolwich township 2,291 2,035 



31,905 28,649 

HUDSON COUNTY. 
Bayonne city ' 32,722 19,033 

First ward 4,582 

Second ward 13,156 

Third ward 5,572 

Fourth ward 3,593 

Fifth ward 5,819 

East Newark borough 2,500 

Guttenberg town 3,825 1,947 

Harrison town 10,596 8,338 

First ward 1,885 

Second ward 1,175 

Third ward 3,045 

Fourth ward 4,491 

Hoboken city 59,364 43,648 

First ward 10,955 

Second ward 8,472 

Third ward 14,218 

Fourth ward 14,983 

Fifth ward 10,736 

Jersey City 206,433 163,003 

First ward 19,190 

Second ward 19,185 

Third ward 17,392 

Fourth ward 13,133 

Fifth ward 14,204 

Sixth ward 15,540 

Seventh ward 14,186 

Eighth ward 19,112 

Ninth ward 14,937 

Tenth ward 15,505 

Eleventh ward 22,754 

Twelfth ward 21,295 

Kearney town 10,876 

First ward 3,166 

Second ward 2,946 

Third ward 2,111 

Fourth ward 2,673 

North Bergen township 9,213 5,715 

Secaucus borough 1,626 

Union town 15,187 10,643 

First ward 4,922 

Second ward 5,215 

Third ward 5,050 

Weehawken township 5,325 1,943 

West Hoboken town 23,094 11,665 

First ward 7,781 

Second ward 7,940 

Third ward 7,373 

West New York town 5,267 

First ward 1,475 

Second ward 1.554 

Third ward 2,238 

386,048 275,136 



STATE CENSUS. 157 



HUNTERDON COUNTY. 



Alexandria township 

Bethlehem township 

Clinton borough 

Clinton township 

Delaware township 

East Amwell township 

Franklin township 

Frenchtown borough 

High Bridge borough 

Holland township 

Junction borough 

Kingwood township 

Lambertville city 

First ward 1,322 

Second ward.- 1,345 

Third ward 1,970 

Lebanon township 

Rariton township 

Readington township 

Stockton borough 

Tewksbury township 

Union township 

West Amwell township 



1900. 


1890. 


1,045 


1,250 


1,634 


1,790 


816 


913 


2,296 


1,975 


1,953 


3,037 


1,327 


1,375 


1,258 


1,287 


1,020 


1,023 


1,377 




1,652 


1,704 


998 


518 


1,304 


1,424 


4,637 


4,142 


2,253 


2,337 


4,037 


3,798 


2,670 


2,813 


590 




1,883 


2,034 


918 


1,134 


839 


866 



34,507 35,355 



MERCER COUNTY. 



East Windsor township 894 881 

Ewing township 1,333 3,129 

Hamilton township 4,164 4,163 

Hightstown borough 1,749 1,875 

Hopewell borough 980 

Hopewell township 3,360 3,750 

Lawrence township 1,555 1,448 

Pennington borough 733 588 

Princeton borough 3,899 3,422 

Princeton township 955 809 

Ttenton city 73,307 57,458 

First ward 4,901 

Second ward 3,895 

Third ward 5,361 

Fourth ward 8,146 

Fifth ward 8,706 

Sixth ward 3,091 

Seventh ward 4,475 

Eighth ward 3,688 

Ninth ward 6.933 

Tenth ward 6,358 

Eleventh ward 7,679 

Twelfth ward 2,544 

Thirteenth ward 5,081 

Fourteenth ward 2,449 

Washington township 1,157 1,126 

West Windsor township 1,279 1,329 



95,365 79,978 



158 STATE CENSUS. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

1900. 1890. 

Cranbury township 1,428 1,422 

Dunellen borough 1,239 1,060 

East Brunswick township 2,423 2,642 

Helmetta borough 447 

Jamesburg borough 1,063 887 

Madison township 1,671 1,520 

Metuchin borough 1,786 770 

Milltown borough 561 

Monroe township 1,899 2,153 

New Brunswick township, coextensive with 

New Brunswick city 20,006 18,603 

New Brunswick city: 

First ward 3,305 

Second ward 3,346 

Third ward 3,178 , 

Fourth ward 3,276 

Fifth ward 3,575 

Sixth ward 3,326 

North Brunswick township 847 1,238 

Perth Amboy township, coextensive with 

Perth Amboy city 17,699 9,512 

Perth Amboy city: 

First ward 1,728 

Second ward 1,953 

Third ward 3,437 

Fourth ward 3,183 

Fifth ward 2,749 

Sixth ward 4,649 

Piscataway township 2,628 2,226 

Raritan township 2,801 3,018 

Sayreville township 4,155 3,509 

South Amboy township, coextensive with 

South Amboy borough 6,349 4,330 

South Brunswick township 2,337 2,403 

South River borough 2,792 1,796 

Woodbridge township 7,631 4,665 



MONMOUTH COUNTY. 



79,762 61,754 



Allenhurst borough , 165 

Allento wn borough 695 

Asbury Park city 4,148 

Atlantic township 1,410 1,505 

Atlantic Highlands borough 1,383 945 

Belmar borough 902 

Bradley Beach borough 982 

Deal borough 70 

Eatontown township 3,021 2,953 

Englishtown borough 410 444 

Freehold town 2,934 2,932 

Freehold township 2,234 2,165 

Highlands borough 1,228 

Holmdel township 1,190 1,479 

Howell township 3,103 3,018 

Keyport town 3,413 3,411 

Long Branch town 8,872 7,231 

Manalapan township 1,435 1,558 



STATE CENSUS. 159 

1900. 1890. 

Manasquan borough 1,500 1,506 

Marlboro township 1,747 1,913 

Matawan borough 1,511 1,491 

Matawan township 1,310 1,692 

Middletown township 5,479 5,650 

Millstone township 1,509 1,782 

Neptune township 7,943 8,333 

Neptune City borough 1,009 

North Spring Lake borough 361 277 

Ocean township 4,251 2,978 

Raritan township 1,524 1,368 

Red Bank town 5,428 4,145 

Seabright borough 1,198 

Shrewsbury township 3,842 4,222 

Spring Lake borovigh 526 

Upper Freehold township 2,112 2,861 

Wall township 3,212 3,269 



82,057 69,128 



MORRIS COUNTY. 



Boonton township, including Boonton town 4,710 3,307 

Boonton town 3,901 2,981 

Chatham borough 1,361 780 

Chatham township 620 1,432 

Chester township 1,409 1,625 

Dover township 5,938 

Florham Park borough 752 

Hanover township 5,366 4,481 

Jefferson township 1,341 1,611 

Madison borough 3,754 2,469 

Mendham township 1,600 1,266 

Morris township 2,571 1,999 

Morristown town 11,267 8,156 

First ward 3,311 

Second ward -2,924 

Third ward 2,522 

Fourth ward 2,510 

Mt. Arlington borough 275 

Mt. Olive township 1,221 1,848 

Montville township 1,908 1,333 

Netcong borough 941 

Passaic township 2,141 i,82i 

Pequanac township 3,250 2,862 

Port Oram borough 2,069 775 

Randolph township 2,246 7,197 

Rockaway borough 1,483 

Rockaway township 4,528 6,033 

Roxbury township 2,185 2^739 

Washington township 2,220 2*367 



65,156 54,101 

OCEAN COUNTY 

Bay Head borough 247 

Beach Haven borough 239 

Berkeley township 694 786 

Brick township 2,130 4,065 

Dover township 2,618 2,609 



160 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Eagleswood township 563 791 

Harvey Cedars borough 39 

Island Heig-hts borough 316 271 

Jackson township 1,595 1,717 

Lacey township 718 711 

Lake wood township 3,094 

Lavalette city 21 

Little Egg Harbor township 1,856 

Long Beach township 152 

Manchester township 1,033 1,057 

Ocean township 436 482 

Plumsted township 1,204 1,327 

Point Pleasant Beach borough 746 

Seaside Park borough ; 73 

Stafford township 1,009 1,095 

Surf City borough 9 

Union township 955 1,063 

19,747 15,974 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

Acquackanonk township 5,351 2,562 

Hawthorn borough 2,096 

Little Falls township 2,908 1,890 

Manchester township 3,989 2,576 

Passaic city 27,777 13,028 

First ward 12,663 

Second ward 4,338 

Third ward 3,444 

Fourth ward 7,332 

Paterson city 105,171 78,347 

First ward 10,950 

Second ward 15,009 

Third ward 23,780 

Fourth ward 14,178 

Fifth ward 12,898 

Sixth ward 3,910 

Seventh ward 6,693 

Eighth ward 17,753 

Pompton township 2,404 2,153 

Pompton Lakes borough 847 

Totowa borough 562 

Wayne township 1,985 2,004 

West Milford township 2,112 2,486 

155,202 305,046 

SALEM COUNTY. 

Alloway township .. 1,528 1,675 

Elmer borough 1,140 842 

Elsinboro township 445 524 

Lower Alloways Creek township 1,242 1,308 

Lower Penns Neck township 1,424 1,289 

Mannington township 1,745 1,870 

Oldmans township 1,382 1,432 

Pennsgrove borough 1,826 

Pilesgrove township 1,744 1,796 

Pittsgrove township 2,092 1,914 

Quinton township 1,280 1,307 



STATE CENSUS. 161 

1900. 1890. 

Salem city 5,811 5,516 

East ward :{,227 

West ward 2,584 

Upper Penns Neck township 775 2,239 

Upper Pitisgrove townsliip 1,725 1,923 

Woodstown borough 1,371 1,516 



SOMERSET COUNTY. 



SUSSEX COUNTY. 



25,530 25,151 



Bedminster township 1,925 1,749 

Bernards township 3,066 2,558 

Bound Brook borough 2,622 1,462 

Branchburg- township 1,012 1,152 

Bridgewater township 1,601 1,444 

East Millstone town 447 475 

Franklin township 2,398 2,478 

Hillsboro township 2,439 2,825 

Millstone borough 200 

Montgomery township 1,243 1,655 

North Plainfield borough 5,009 

North Plainfield township 654 4,250 

Rar4 an town 3,244 2,556 

Rocky Hill borough .354 

Somerville town 4,843 S,861 

South Bound Brook town 883 801 

Warren township 1,008 1,045 



32,948 28,311 



Andover township ; 987 1,126 

Branchville borough 526 

Brooklyn borough 75 

Byram township 1,235 1,380 

Deckertown borough 1,306 993 

Frankford township 932 1,459 

Green township 627 636 

Hampton township 775 866 

Hardys on township 3,425 2,542 

Uafayette township 717 742 

Montague township 710 797 

Newton town 4,376 3,003 

Sandyston township 939 1,084 

Sparta township 2,070 1,724 

Stillwater township 1,108 1,296 

Vernon township 1,7.38 1,756 

Walpack township 371 436 

Wantage township 2,217 2,419 



24,134 22,259 

UNION COUNTY. 

Clark township 374 367 

Cranf ord township 2,854 1,717 

Elizabeth city 52,130 37^764 

First ward 5,299 

Second ward 4,015 

11 



162 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Third ward 6,378 

Fourth ward 3,931 

Fifth ward 4,761 

Sixth ward 3,611 

Seventh ward 4,548 

Eighth ward 6,178 

Ninth ward 4,154 

Tenth ward 2,699 

Eleventh ward 3,334 

Twelfth ward 3,222 

Fanwood borough 399 

Fanwood township 1,200 1,305 

Linden borough '; 402 936 

ijinden township 619 125 

Mountainside borough 367 

New Providence borough 565 

New Providence township 469 839 

Plainfield city 15,369 11,267 

First ward 3,209 

Second ward 3,614 

Third ward 3,030 

Fourth ward 5,516 

Rahway city 7,935 7.105 

First ward 1,739 

Second ward 1,712 

Third ward 1,953 

Fourth ward 1,50U 

Fifth ward 1,031 

Fvoselle borough 

Springfield township 

Summit city 

Union township 

Westfield township 

99,353 72,467 



1,652 


996 


1,073 


959 


5,302 


3,502 


4,315 


2,846 


4,328 


2,739 



WARREN COUNTY. 

Allamuchy township 588 759 

Belvidere town 1,784 1,768 

Blairstown township 1,576 1,662 

Franlilin township 1,280 1,283 

Frelinghuysen township 797 879 

Greenwich township 909 825 

Hackettstown town 2,474 2,417 

Hardwick township 400 503 

Harmony township 1,080 1,152 

Hope township 1,144 1,332 

Independence township 805 904 

Knowllon township 1,210 1,411 

Lopatcong township 1,962 1,738 

Mansfield township 1,324 1,362 

Oxford township 3,095 4,002 

Pahaquarry township 257 291 

Phillipsburg town 10,052 8,644 

First ward 2,222 

Second ward 2,269 

Third ward 1,767 

Fourth ward 1,911 

Fifth ward 1,883 

Pohatcong township 2,215 1,483 



STATE CENSUS. 163 

1900. 1890. 

Washington borough 3,580 2,8.34 

Washington township 1,249 1,304 

37,781 36,553 



Population by Counties. 

1900. 1890. Inc. 

Atlantic 46,402 28,836 17,566 

Bergen 7S.441 47,226 31,215 

Burlington 58,241 58,528 *287 

Camden 107,643 87,687 19,956 

Cape May 13,201 11,268 1,9.33 

Cumberland 51.193 45,438 5,755 

Essex 359,053 256,098 102,955 

Gloucester 31,905 28,649 3,256 

Hudson 386.048 275,126 110,922 

Hunterdon 34.507 35,355 *848 

Mercer 95,365 79,978 15,387 

Middlesex 79,762 61.754 18,008 

Monmouth 82,057 69,128 12,929 

Mc^rris 6.5,156 54,101 11,055 

Ocean 19,747 15,974 3,773 

Passaic 155,202 105,046 50,156 

Salem 25,530 25,151 379 

Somerset .32,948 28,311 4,637 

Srtssex 24,134 22,2.59 1,875 

Union 99,.353 72,467 26,886 

Warren 37,781 36,553 1,228 



1,883,669 1,444,9.33 438.736 

*Decrease. 



Population of the Incorporated Cities, ToAvns, A'illages and 
Borouglis of New Jersey (100 Altogether). 

1900. 1890. 

Absecon town 530 501 

Allendale borough 694 

Allenhurst borough 165 

Allentown borough 695 

Anglesea borough 161 161 

Asbury Park city 4,148 

Atlantic City 27,8-38 13,055 

Atlantic Highlands borough 1..383 945 

Avalon borough 93 

Bay Head borough 247 

Bayonne city 32,722 19,0.33 

Beach Haven borough 239 

Belmar borough 902 

Belvidere town 1,784 1,768 

Bergenfields borough 729 

Beverly city 1.950 1,957 

Bloomfield town 9,668 7,708 

Bogota borough 337 

Boonton town 3.901 2,981 

Bordentown city 4,110 4,232 

Bound Brook borough 2,622 1^462 

Bradley Beach borough 982 

Branchville borough 526 

Bridgeton city 13,913 11,424 

Brigantine city 99 

Brooklyn borough 75 



164 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Burlington city 7,392 7,264 

Caldwell borough 1,367 

Camden city 75,935 58,313 

Cape May city 2,257 2,136 

Cape May Point borough 153 167 

Carlstadt borough 2,574 1,549 

Chatham borough 1,361 780 

Chesilhurst borough 283 

Clayton borough 1,951 1,807 

Cliff side Park borough 968 

Clinton borough , 816 913 

Collingswood borough 1,633 539 

Cresskill borough 486 527 

Deal borough 70 -... 

Deckertown borough 1,.306 993 

Delford borough 746 

Dover town 5,938 

Dumont borough 643 

Dunellen borough 1,239 1,060 

East Millstone town 447 475 

East Newark borough 2,500 

East Orange city 21,506 13,282 

East Rutherford borough 2,640 1,438 

Egg Harbor city 1,808 1,439 

Elizabeth city 52,130 37,764 

Elmer borough 1,140 842 

Englewood city 6,253 

Englewood Cliffs borough 218 

Englishtown borough 410 444 

Fairview borough 1,003 

Fanwood borough 399 

Fieldsboro borough 459 

Florham Park borovigh 75Z 

Freehold town 2,934 2,932 

Frenchtown borough 1,020 1,023 

Garfield borough 3,504 1,028 

Glenn Rock borough 613 

Glen Ridge borough 1,960 

Gloucester city 6,840 6,564 

Guttenberg town 3,825 1,947 

Hackensack town 9,443 6,004 

Hackettstown town 2,474 2,417 

Haddonfield borough 2,776 2,502 

Hammonton town 3,481 3,833 

Harrison town 10,596 8,338 

Harvey Cedars borough ,39 

Hasbrouck Heights borough 1.255 

Hawthorne borough 2,096 

Helmetta borough 447 

High Bridge borough 1,377 

Highlands borough 1,228 

Hightstown borough 1.749 

Hoboken city 59„364 

Holly Beach borough 569 

Hopewell borough 980 

Irvington town 5,255 

Island Heights borough 316 

Jamesburg borough 1,063 

Jersey City 206,433 

Junction borough 998 

Kearney town 10,896 



1,875 

43,648 

217 


27i 

887 

163,003 

518 



STATE CENSUS. 163 

1900. 1890. 

Keyport town 3,41.3 3,411 

Lambertville city 4,637 4,142 

Lavalette city 21 

Leonia borough 804 

Linden borough 402 936 

liinwood borough 495 .536 

Little Ferry borough 1,240 781 

Lodi borough 1.917 998 

Long Branch town 8.872 7,231 

Long-port borough 80 

Madison borough 3,7-54 2,469 

Manasquan borough 1,500 1,506 

Matawan borough 1,511 1,491 

May wood borough 536 

Merchantville borough 1.608 1,225 

Metuchen borough 1,786 770 

Midland Park borough 1,348 

Millstone borough 200 

Milltown borough .^61 

Millville ci'^y 10.583 10,002 

Montclair town 13,962 8,656 

Montvale borough 416 

Morristown town 11,267 8,156 

Mountainside borough 367 

Mt. Arlington borough 275 

Neptune City borough 1,009 

Netcong borough 941 

Newark city 246.070 181,830 

New Brunswick city 20,006 18,603 

New Providence borough 565 

Newton town 4,376 3,003 

North Arlington borough 290 

North Caldwell borough 297 

North Plainfield borough 5,009 

Nor- h Spring Lake borough 361 277 

Ocean City 1,.307 452 

Ol d Tappan borough 269 

Orange city 24,141 18,844 

Palisades Park borough 644 

Park Ridge borough 870 

Passaic city 27,777 13,028 

Paterson city 105,171 78,347 

Pemberton borough 771 834 

Pennington borough 733 588 

Pennsgrove borough 1,826 

Perth Amboy city 17,699 9,512 

Phillipsburg town 10.052 8,644 

Plainfield city 15,369 11,267 

Pieasantville borough 2,182 ■ 

Point Pleasant Beach borough '746 ..... 

Pompton Lakes borough 847 ..... 

Port Oram borough 2.069 "775 

l-'rinceton borough 3*899 3 422 

Rahway city 71935 7405 

Rari»an town 3,244 2,.556 

Red Bank town 5 428 4 145 

Ridgefield borough '584 

Ridgewood village 2,685 1047 

Riverside borough '56I 

Riverton borough [ 1,332 i'o75 

Rockaway borough 1,483 



166 STATE CENSUS. 

1900. 1890. 

Rocky Hill boroug h 354 

Roselle borough 1,652 996 

Rutherford borough 4,411 2,293 

Saddle River borough 415 

Salem city 5,811 5,516 

Seabright borough 1,198 

Sea Isle City borough 340 766 

Seaside Park borough 73 

Secaucus borough 1,626 

Somers Point borough 308 191 

Somerville town 4,843 3,861 

South Amboy borough 6,349 ' 4,330 

South Atlantic City borough 69 

South Bound Brook town 883 801 

South Cape May borough 14 

South Orange village 4,608 3,106 

South River borough 2,792 1,796 

Spring Lake borough 526 

Stockton borough 590 

Summit city 5,302 3,502 

Surf City borough 9 

Tenafly borough 1.746 1,046 

Totowa borough 562 

Trenton city 73,307 57,458 

Undercliff borough 1,006 

Union town 15,187 10,643 

Upper Saddle River borough 326 

Vailsburg borough 2,779-^ 786 

Vineland borough 4,370 3,822 

Wallington borough 1,812 

Washington borough 3,580 2,834 

Wenonah borough 498 383 

West Cape May borough 696 757 

West Hoboken town 23,094 11,665 

West New York town 5,267 

West Orange town 6,889 4,3.58 

Westwcod borough 828 

AA'ildwood borough 150 

Woodbury city 4,087 3,911 

Woodcliff borough 329 

Woodridge borough 582 575 

Woodslown borough 1,371 1,516 



Population of New Jersey, ITOO to 1900. 

, Increase. 

Census Years. Population. 

1900 1,883,669 

1890 1,444,9.33 

1880 1,131,116 

1870 906,096 

1860 672,035 

1850 489,555 

1840 373,306 

1830 320,823 

1820 277,426 

1810 245,562 

1800 211,149 

1790 184,139 





Per 


Number. 


cent. 


438,736 


30.4 


313,817 


27.7 


225,020 


24.8 


234,061 


34.8 


182,480 


.37.3 


116,249 


31.1 


52,483 


16.4 


43,397 


15.6 


31,864 


13.0 


34,413 


16.3 


27,010 


14.7 



U. S. CENSUS. 167 

POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 

CENSUS OF I'JOO. 



Per 

States and Territories. 1900. 1890. Increase, cent. 

Alabama 1.828.697 1,.513.017 315,680 20.9 

Alaska 63,592 

Arizona 122.9.31 59,620 .39.930 67.0 

Arkansas 1,-311,564 1,128,179 183,385 16.3 

California 1.485,053 1,208.130 274.049 22.7 

Colorado .539.700 412.198 126,357 30.7 

Connecticut 908,420 746,2.58 162,162 21.7 

Delaware 184,735 168.493 16.242 9.6 

District of Columbia.. 278.718 2.30,.392 48.326 21.0 

Florida 528,542 391,422 137,120 35.0 

-Georgia 2,216.331 1-8.37,353 378,978 20.6 

Hawaii 154,001 

Idaho 161,772 84,385 74,762 88.0 

Illinois 4,821,550 3,826,.351 995,199 26.0 

Indiana 2,516.462 2,192,404 324,058 14.8 

Indian Territorv 392,060 

-^lowa 2,231.853 1.911.896 .319,572 16.7 

Kansas 1.470,495 1,427,096 41,373 2.9 

-^Kentucky 2,147,174 1,858,635 288,539 15.5 

'^Louisiana 1.381,625 1,118,587 263,0.38 23.5 

Maine 694.466 661,086 .33,380 5.0 

Maryland 1,188,044 1.042..390 145,654 14.0 

Massachusetts 2,805.346 2.238,943 .566.403 25.3 

Michigan 2,420.982 2,093.889 .327,093 15.6 

Minnesota 1.751,394 1,.301,826 440,160 .33.8 

Missippi 1.551.270 1.289,600 261,670 20.3 

Missouri .3,106,665 2,679,184 427.481 16.0 

Montana 243.329 132,159 99.400 75.2 

Nebraska 1.066..300 1,058,910 7,390 0.7 

Nevada 42..3.35 45,761 *5.099 11.1 

New Hampshire 411.588 .376.530 35,058 9.3 

New Jersey 1,883,669 1.444.933 438,7.36 30.4 

New Mexico 195.-310 1-53.593 29,727 19.4 

New York 7.268.894 5.997.853 1.265.257 2.11 

North Carolina 1.89-3.810 1,617.947 27-5.S63 17.1 

North Dakota 319,146 182,719 129.520 70.9 

Ohio 4,157,545 3.672,316 485.229 1-3.2 

Oklahoma 398,3-31 61.8-34 -320.407 518.2 

Oregon 413,536 313,767 95.-518 .30.4 

Pennsylvania 6,302,115 5,2-58.014 1.044.020 19.9 

Rhode Island 428.556 345.-506 83,050 24.0 

South Carolina 1,340.-316 1,151.149 189,167 16.4 

^South Dakota 401,570 328,808 55,079 16.8 

)^ennessee 2,020.616 1,767.518 253.098 14.3 

Texas 3.048,710 2.235,523 813,187 36.4 

Utah 276,749 207.905 67.047 -32.2 

Vermont 343.641 332,422 11.219 -3.4 

Virginia 1,854,184 1.655.980 198,204 12.0 

Washington -518,103 349.390 162.194 46.4 

West Virginia 958,800 762,794 196,006 25.7 

•.Wisconsin 2.069.042 1,686.880 -376,036 22.3 

'Wyoming 92,531 60.705 29,865 49.2 



76,303,387 62,622,250 12,937,008 20.7 

♦Decrease. 



168 U. S. CENSUS. 

Cities Having 35,000 Inlialiitants and Mor*'. 

Inc. 

1900. 1890. P.C. 

New York N. Y 3,437,202 2,492,591 37.8 

Chicago, 111 1,698,575 1,099,850 54.4 

Philadelphia, Pa 1,293,697 1,046,964 23.5 

St. Louis, Mo 575,238 451,770 27.3 

Boston, Mass 560,892 448,477 25.0 

Baltimore, Md .-^ 508,957 434,439 17.1 

Cleveland, Ohio 381,768 261,353 46.0 

Buffalo, N. Y 352,387 255,664 37.8 

San Francisco, Cal 342,782 298,997 14.6 

Cincinnati, Ohio 325,902 296,908 9.7 

Pittsburg, Pa .321,616 238,617 34.7 

New Orleans, La 287,104 242,039 18.6 

Detroit. Mich 285,704 205,876 38.7 

Milwaukee, Wis 285,315 204,468 39.5 

Washington, D. C 278,718 230,392 20.9 

Newark, N. J 246,070 181,830 35.3 

Jersey Ciiy, N. J 206,433 163,003 26.6 

Louisville, Ky 204,731 161,129 27.0 

Minneapolis, Minn 202,718 164,738 23.0 

Providence, R. 1 175.597 1.32,146 32.8 

Indianapolis, Ind 169,164 105,436 60.4 

Kansas City, Mo 163,752 132,716 23.3 

St. Paul, Minn 163,065 133,156 22.4 

Rochester, N. Y 162,608 133,896 21.4 

Denver, Col 133,859 106,713 25.4 

Toledo, Ohio 131,822 81.434 61.8 

Allegheny, Pa 129,896 105,287 23.3 

Columbus, Ohio 125,560 88,150 42.4 

Worcester, Mass 118,421 84,655 39.8 

Syracuse, N. Y 108,374 88,143 22.9 

New Haven, Conn 108,0ii7 81,298 32.8 

Paterson, N. J 105,171 78,347 34.2 

Fall River, Mass 104,863 74,398 40.9 

St. Joseph, Mo 102,979 52,324 96.8 

Omaha, Neb 102,555 140,452 *26.9 

Los Angeles, Cal 102,479 50,395 103.3 

Memphis, Tenn 102,320 64,495 58.6 

Scranton, Pa 102,026 75,215 35.6 

Lowell, Mass 94,969 77,696 22.2 

Albany, N. Y 94,151 94,923 *0.8 

Cambridge, Mass 91,886 70,028 31.2 

Portland, Ore 90,426 46,385 94.9 

Atlanta, Ga 89,872 65,533 37.1 

Grand Rapids, Mich 87,565 60,278 45.2 

Dayton, Ohio 85,333 61,220 39.3 

Richmond, Va 85,050 81,388 4.4 

Nashville, Tenn 80,865 76,168 6.1 

Seattle. Wash 80,671 42,837 88.3 

Hartford, Conn 79,850 53,230 50.0 

Reading, Pa 78,961 58,661 34.6 

Wilmington, Del 76,508 61,431 24.5 

Camden, N. J 75,935 58,313 30.2 

Trenton, N. J 73,307 57.458 27.5 

Bridgeport, Conn 70,996 48,866 45.2 

Lynn, Mass 68,513 55,727 22.9 

Oakland, Cal 66,960 48,682 37.5 

Lawrence, Mass 62,559 44,654 40.0 

New Bedford, Mass 62,442 40,733 53.2 

*Decr©ase. 



U. S. CENSUS. 169 



1900. 

Des Moines, Iowa 62,139 

Springfield, Mass .- 62,059 

Somerville, Mass 61,64.3 

Trov, NY 60,651 

Hoboken, N. J 59,364 

Evansville, Ind 59,007 

Manchester, N. H 56,987 

Utica, N. Y 56,383 

Peoria, 111 56,100 

Charles' on, S. C 55,807 

Savannah, Ga 54,244 

Salt Lake City, Utah 53,531 

San Antonio, Tex 53,321 

Duluth, Minn 52.969 

Erie, Pa 52,733 

Elizabeth, N. J 52,130 

Wilkesbarre, Pa 51,721 

Kansas City, Kan 51,418 

Harrisburg, Pa 50,167 

Portland, Me 50,145 

Yonkers, N. Y 47,931 

Norfolk. Va 46,624 

Waterbury, Conn 45,859 

Holyoke, Mass 45,712 

Fort Wayne, Ind 45,115 

Youngstown, Ohio 44,885 

Houston, Tex 44,633 

Covington, Ky 42,938 

Akron, Ohio 42,728 

Dallas. Tex 42,638 

Saginaw, Mich 42,.345 

I-ancaster, Pa 41.459 

Lincoln, Neb 40,169 

Brockton, Mass 40,063 

Binghamton, N. Y .39,647 

Augusta, Ga 39,441 

Pawtucket. R. 1 39,231 

Al+oona, Pa 38,973 

Wheeling, W. Va 38,878 

Mobile, Ala 38,469 

Birmingham, Ala 38,415 

Little Rock, Ark 38,307 

Springfield, Ohio 38,253 

Galveston , Tex 37,789 

Tacoma, Wash 37,714 

Haverhill , Mass 37,175 

Spokane, Wash 36,848 

Terre Haute, Ind 36,673 

Dubuque, Iowa 36,297 

Quincy, 111 36,252 

South Bend, Ind 35,999 

Salem, Mass 35,956 

Johnstown, Pa .35.936 

Elmira. N. Y 35,672 

Allentown, Pa 35,416 

Davenport, Iowa 35,254 

McKeesport, Pa 34,227 

Springfield. Ill 34.159 

Chelsea, Mass 34 072 

Chester, Pa 33,988 

*Decrease. 





Inc. 


1890. 


P.C. 


50,093 


24.0 


44,179 


40.4 


40,152 


53.5 


60,956 


*0.5 


43,648 


.36.0 


50,756 


16.2 


44,126 


29.1 


44,007 


28.1 


41,024 


36.7 


54,955 


1.5 


43,189 


25.5 


44,843 


19.3 


37,673 


41.5 


33,115 


59.9 


40,634 


29.7 


37,764 


38.0 


37,718 


37.1 


38,316 


34.1 


39.385 


27.3 


36,425 


37.6 


32,033 


49.6 


34,871 


33.7 


28,646 


60.0 


35,6.37 


28.2 


.35,.393 


27.4 


33,220 


35.1 


27,557 


61.9 


37,371 


14.8 


27,601 


54.8 


38,067 


12.0 


46,322 


*8.5 


32,011 


29.5 


55,154 


*27.1 


27,294 


46.7 


35,005 


13.2 


33,300 


18.4 


27,6.33 


41.9 


30,337 


28.4 


34,522 


12.6 


31,076 


23.7 


26.178 


46.7 


25,874 


48.0 


31,895 


19.9 


29,084 


29.9 


36,006 


4.7 


27,412 


35.6 


19,922 


84.9 


30.217 


21.3 


30,311 


19.7 


.31.494 


15.1 


21,819 


64.9 


30,801 


16.7 


21,805 


64.8 


30,893 


15.4 


25,228 


40.3 


26,872 


.31.1 


20,741 


65.0 


24,963 


36.8 


27,909 


22.0 


20,226 


68.0 



170 U. S. CENSUS. 

Inc. 

1900. 1S90. P.C. 

York Pa 33,708 20,793 62.1 

Maiden. Mass 33,664 23,031 46.1 

Topeka, Kan 33,608 31,007 8.3 

Newton, Mass 33,587 24,379 37.7 

Sioux City, Iowa 33,111 37,806 *12.4 

Bayonne, N. J 32,722 19,033 71.9 

Knoxville, Tenn , 32,637 22,535 44.8 

Chattanooga, Tenn 32,490 29,100 11.6 

Schenectady, N. Y 31,682 19,902 59.1 

Fitchburg. Mass 31,531 22,037 43.0 

Superior, Wis 31,091 11,983 159.4 

Rockford, 111 31,051 23,584 31.6 

Taunton, Mass 31,036 25,448 21.9 

Canton, Ohio 30,667 26,189 17.0 

Butte, Mont 30,470 10,723 184.1 

Montgomery, Ala 30,346 21,883 38.6 

Auburn, N. Y 30.345 25,858 17.3 

East St. Louis, 111 29,655 15,169 95.4 

Joliet, 111 29,353 23.264 26.1 

Sacramento, Cal 29,282 26,386 10.9 

Racine, Wis 29,102 21,014 38.4 

La Crosse, Wis 28.895 25,090 15.1 

Williamsport, Pa 28,757 27,132 5.9 

Jacksonville, Fla 28,429 17,201 65.2 

Newcastle, Pa 28,339 11,600 144.3 

Newport, Ky 28,301 24,918 13.5 

Oshkosh, Wis 28,284 22.836 23.8 

Woonsccket, R. 1 28,204 20,830 35.4 

Pueblo. Col 28,157 24,558 14.6 

Atlantic City, N. J 27,838 13,055 113.2 

Passaic, N. J 27,777 13,028 113.2 

Bay City, Mich 27,628 27,839 *0.7 

Fort Worth, Tex 26,688 23,076 15.6 

Lexington, Ky 26,369 21.567 22.2 

Gloucester, Mass 26,121 24,651 5.9 

South Omaha, Neb 26,001 8.062 222.5 

New Britain, Conn 25,998 16,519 57.3 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 25,802 16,519 57.3 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 25,656 18,020 42.3 

Easton, Pa 25,238 14,481 74.2 

Jackson, Mich 25,180 20,798 21.0 

*Decrease. 



CONGRESSIONAL APPORTIONMENT. 171 

NEW CONGRESS APPORTIONMENT LAW 
AND NEW ELECTORAL COLLEGE. 

(To take effect March 4, 1903.) 



According to this law the number of Representatives to 
which each State is entitled is as follows: 

New 
Previous Electoral 
Rep. Inc. College. 

Alabama 9 9 — 11 

Arkansas 7 6 1 9 

California 8 7 1 10 

Colorado 3 2 1 5 

Connecticut 5 4 1 7 

Delaware 11 — 3 

Florida 3 2 1 5 

Georgia 11 11 — 13 

Idaho 1 1 — 3 

Illinois 2.5 22 3 27 

Indiana 13 13 — 15 

Iowa 11 11 — 13 

Kansas 8 8 — 10 

Kentucky 11 11 — 13 

Louisiana 7 6 1 9 

Maine 4 4 — 6 

Maryland 6 6 — 8 

Massachusetts 14 13 1 16 

Michigan 12 12 — ]4 

Minnesota 9 7 2 11 

Mississippi 8 7 1 10 

Missouri 16 15 1 IS 

Montana 1 1 — 3 

Nebraska 6 6 — 8 

Nevada 1 1 — 3 

New Hampshire 2 2 — 4 

New Jersey 10 8 2 12 

New York 37 34 3 3l< 

North Carolina 10 9 1 12 

North Dakota 2 114 

Ohio 21 21 — 23 

Oregon 2 2 — 4 

Pennsylvania 32 30 2 34 

Rhode Island 2 2—4 

South Carolina 7 7 — 9 

South Dakota 2 2—4 

Tennessee 10 10 — li: 

Texas 16 13 3 IS 

Utah 1 1 _ 3 

Vermont 2 2 — 4 

Virginia 10 10 — 12 

Washington 3 2 1 ," 

West Virginia 5 4 1 7 

Wisconsin 11 lo l 13 

Wyoming 1 i _ 3 

Total 386 357 29 476 

The previous Electoral College contained 447 votes. 



172 STATE COMMITTEES. 

STATE COMMITTEES. 



REPUBLICAN. 

Headquarters, Newark. 

Franklin Murphy, Newark, Chairirian; Edward C. Stokes, 
Millville, Vice-chairman; William Hiker, Jr., Orange, 
Treasurer; John S. Gibson, Newark. Secretary. 

At Large— Franklin Murphy, Newark; William Bettle, 
Camden; Charles N. Fowler, Elizabeth: Thomas N. Mc- 
Carter, Newark. 

Atlantic— John J. Gardner, Egg Harbor. 

Bergen — C. E. Breckenridge, Maywood. 

Burlington— R. C. Hutchinson, Bordentown. 

Camden— David Baird, Camden. 

Cape May— Robert E. Hand, Erma. 

Cumberland — Edward C. Stokes, Millviile. 

Essex— Henry M. Doremus, Newark; Henry A. Potter, 
East Orange. 

Gloucester— H. C. Loudenslager, Woodbury. 

Hudson— Samuel D. Dickinson, Jersey City; Edward Fry, 
Jersey City. 
Hunterdon— Richard B. Reading, 1-ambertville. 

Mercer — William H. Skirm, Trenton. 

Middlesex — Henry H. Banker, New Brunswick. 

Monmouth— C. Asa Francis, Long Branch. 

Morris — D. S. Voorhees, Morristown. , 

Ocean— A. M. Bradshaw, Lakewood. 

Passaic— Robert Williams, Paterson. 

Salem— John C. Ward, Centreton. 

Somerset— E. J. Anderson, Somerville. 

Sussex— H. D. Van Gasbeek, Sussex. 

Union— John Kean, Elizabeth. 

Warren— A. Blair Kelsey, Belvidere. 

Camden— Charles N. Robinson, Camden. 

Auxiliary Members— R. Henri Herbert, Trenton; A. B. 
Cosey, Newark. 

Finance Committee— Winton C. Garrison, Newark; 
Charles N. Fowler, Elizabeth; Henry A. Potter, East 
Orange; W. S. Hancock, Trenton; William Barbour, Pat- 
erson. 

Executive Committee— Thomas N. McCarter, Newark; 
Edward C. Stokes, Millville; John Kean, Elizabeth; E. J 
Anderson, Somerville; William Bettle, Camden; Samuul 



STATE COMMITTEES. 173 

D. Dickinson, Jersey City; C. E. Breckenridge, Maywood; 
David Baird, Camden; Richard B. Reading, Lambertville; 
Robert Williams, Paterson. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

Headquarters, Jersey City. 

William^ B. Gourley, Paterson, Chairman; William K. 
Devereux, Asbury Park, Secretary; William C. Heppen- 
helmer, Jersey City, Treasurer. 

At I-arge — William B. Gourley, laterson; James Smith, 
Jr., Newark; E. Livingston Price. Newark; William C. 
Heppenheimer, Hoboken; Howard Carrow, Camden. 

Atlantic— Robert L. Warke, Atlantic City. 

Bergen— Luther A. Campbell, Hackensack. 

Burlington— Eckard P. Budd, Mount Holly. 

Camden — John A. Smith, Camden. 

Cape May— Lemuel E. Miller, Cape May. 

Cumberland— Samuel Iredell, Bridgeton. 

Essex— James P.. Nugent. Newark. 

Gloucester— Bowman S. Cox, Paulsboro. 

Hudson— Edward F. C. Young, Jersey City. 

Hunterdon— James N. Pidcock, White House Station. 

Mercer— Michael Hurley, Trenton. 

Middlesex— Oliver Kelly, Metuchen. 

Monmouth— David S. Crater, Freehold. 

Morris— Willard W. Cutler, Morristown 

Ocean — William J. Harrison, Lakewood. 

Passaic— Louis F. Braun, Paterson. 

Salem— Robert Gwynne, Salem. 

Somerset— William J. Keys, Somerville. 

Sussex— Lewis S. Iliff, Newton. 

Union— Peter Egenolf, Elizabeth. 

Warren— Johnston Cornish, Washington. 

Executive Committee— E. F. C. Young, Chairman; John- 
ston Cornish, E. Livingston Price, David S. Crater. Will- 
iam C. Heppenheimer. 

STATE REPUBLICAN LEAGUE OF NEW JERSEY. 

F. F. Meyer, Jr., President, Newark; E. C. Hill, Treas- 
urer, Trenton; George P. Coles, Recording Secretary, New- 
ark; C. J. Ahlstedt, Corresponding Secreta.i-v, Newark. 

Vice-Presidents— H. W. Johnson, Merchantville; T\'. E 
Edge, Atlantic City; Benjamin F. Howell, New Brunswick; 
J. B. R. Smith, Washington; William McKenzie, East 
Rutherford; James M. Baxter, Newark; Robert Carey, 
Jersey City; G. E. Ludlow, Cranford. 



174 STATE COMMITTEES. 

Executive Committee— Atlantic, George G. Clinton, At- 
lantic City; Bergen, Ernst Neithardt, Rochelle Park; Bur- 
lington, A. J. Briggs, Riverton; Camden, E. E. Jefferies, 
Camden; Cape May, Lewis T. Stevens, Cape May City; 
Cumberland, Dr. N. S.- Greenwood, Carmel; Essex, William 
F. Boucher, East Orange; Gloucester, David O. Watkins, 
Woodbury; Hudson, John T. Bechtold, Bayonne; Hunter- 
don, Walter F. Hay hurst, Lambertville; Mercer, C. K. 
Barnhart, Trenton; Middlesex, J. Bromley Adams, Me- 
tuchen; Monmouth, L. E. Watson, Asbury Park; Morris, 
Samuel G. Harris, Boonton; Ocean, Joseph M. Thompson, 
New Egypt; Passaic, Charles B. Lovell, Paterson; Somer- 
set, C. J. Grummersbach, Bound Brook; Salem, Joseph B. 
Crispen, Mannington; Sussex, Dr. E. C. Tuttle, Decker- 
town; Union, Edmund B. Horton, Cranford; Warren, John 
I. Blair Reiley, Phillipsburg. 

New Jersey Vice President National Republican League. 
Frank J. Higgins; New Jersey member Executive Com- 
mittee National Republican League, F. F. Meyer, Jr. 

THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY OF NEW JERSEY. 

George H. Lambert, President, Newark; James F. Min- 
turn. Treasurer, Hoboken; George W. Kane, Secretary, 
Paterson. 

NEW JERSEY LOCAL OPTION COMMITTEE. 
Executive Committee — Frederic L. Colver, Chairman, 
Tenafly; J. N. Voorhis, Treasurer, Cherry Hill; F. H. Gum- 
ming, Secretary, Tenafly; Rev. H. W. Hathaway, Eliza- 
beth; A. M. Hulbert, Cresskill; Donald MacColl, Newark; 
Robert Alberts, Jersey City; George H. Lincks, Jersey 
City; Hobert E. Speer, Englewood; Rev. A. W. Spooner, 
D.D., Camden: Rev. Father William McNulty, Paterson; 
Joel Borton, Woodstown; Rev. Cornelius Brett, D.D., Jer- 
sey City; Rev. E. Morris Ferguson, Trenton; Arthur N. 
Pierson, Westfield; Rev. J. T. Kerr, Elizabeth; Rev. C. E. 
Wyckoff, Trvington; David D. Ackerman, Closter; James 
Leach, Park Ridge; Rev. A. G. I^awson, <'amden; John 
William Gaynor, Salem. 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 175 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 



REPUBLICAN. 



(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, Thurs- 
day, September 26, 1901.) 

The representatives of the Republican party of New Jer- 
sey, assembled in convention, September 26th, 1901, deplore 
the untimely death of President McKinley. His achieve- 
ments and his character, which will link his name in his- 
tory with that of the martyr, Lincoln, will ever be held in 
grateful remembrance by the American people. 

We earnestly approve and commend to the consideration 
and judgment of the people of this State the following wise 
and far-seeing declarations made by him in his last and 
most impressive public utterances: 

"We have a vast and intricate business, built up through 
years of toil and struggle, in which every part of the 
country has its stake, which will not permit of neglect or 
of undue selfishness. No narrow, sordid policy will sub- 
serve it." 

"Our capacity to produce has developed so enormously 
and cur products have so multiplied that .the problem of 
our markets requires our urgent immediate attention. 
Only a broad and enlightened policy can keep what we 
have. No other policy will get more " 

"A system which provides a mutual exchange of com- 
modities is necessarily essential to the continued and 
healthful growth of our export trade." 

"We must encourage our merchant marine; we must 
have more ships; they must be under the American flag, 
iDuilt and manned and owned by Americans." 

"We must build the Isthmian Canal." 

"Let us ever remember that our interest is in concord, 
not in conflict; and that our real em.inence rests in the vic- 
tories of peace, not those of war." 

The blow which ended the life of our beloved President 
was cruel, inhuman and lawless. It was aimed, not at the 
gentle and lovable McKinley, but at the republic and the 
majesty of law which guarantees liberty of person and 
safety of property. Any doctrine which justifies or en- 
courages assassination is utterly hostile to civilization and 
the welfare of mankind and must be no longer tolerated in 



17G PARTY PLATFORMS. 

this country, and we demand and insist that laws, State 
and National, be enacted for the effective suppression of 
such teachings. 

The pledge of President Roosevelt, that he will continue 
absolutely unbroken the policy of President McKinley, has 
our unqualified approval, and entitles him to our loyal sup- 
port. The wisdom, patriotism and courage shown by him 
in every public capacity in which he has served command 
the universal confidence of his countrymen. 

The Republican party since its organization has been the 
friend of labor. Its industrial policies have brought Amer- 
ican labor and its compensation to the highest standard 
ever attained in the world. It pledges itself to maintain 
the rights and liberties of the working people and protect 
them from any encroachment thereon. 

We heartily approve and endorse the administration of 
Governor Voorhees. Under his watchful care, reforms 
have been accomplished, the interests of the people have 
been made paramount to partisan ends, the resources of 
the State have been carefully husbanded and the public 
moneys wisely and economically employed. 

Under the policy inaugurated by the Republican party 
in this State, over eight hundred thousand dollars was ap- 
propriated at the last session of the Legislature, toward 
the payment of the State school tax, every dollar of which 
is a contribution toward the reduction of local taxes. More 
than one million, five hundred thousand dollars of the 
State's income is now annually disbursed to our various 
taxing districts as their dividend from a wise administra- 
ton of State affairs. 

These achievements are in part the fulfillment of pledges 
made. If continued in power, the Republican party pledges 
itself to guard the sources of income of the State and to 
use the surplus thereof for the further reduction of the 
rate of local taxation, the enlargement of our school sys- 
tem, the extension of our good roads, the benefit of our 
agriculture and our industries and the common interest 
and welfare of the whole people. 

The fidelity with which the party has redeemed its 
pledges warrants us in again appealing to the patriotic 
voters of New Jersey for continued confidence and sup- 
port. 

Believing that the principles and declarations herein set 
forth will commend themselves to all patriotic citizens, 
and recalling the fact that great good has come to our 
common country and our State through their united efforts 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 177 

in recent years, we confidently ask for the support of the 
people of the State of New Jersey, to the end that the wise 
policies which have been established by long- and arduous 
effort, and which have been so productive of good, may be 
continued. 

DEMOCRATIC. 

(Adopted at the State Convention held at Trenton, Tues- 
day, October 1, 1901.) 

The representatives of the Democratic party of the 
State of New Jersey, in convention assembled, do hereby 
adopt the following principles as a declaration of our 
aprty faith: 

The issues of the pending campaig-n are exclusively State 
issues, and we purpose, therefore, to address ourselves to 
the correction of the gross abuses of power by the Republi- 
can party made so manifest during their recent domination 
of public affairs in this State. 

We deeply deplore the blow that fell upon the republic 
in the death of its Chief Magistrate by the hand of an as- 
sassin. In common with all our citizens, we feel a sense 
of shame that there should be any man beneath our flag 
who would raise his hand against the President of the 
United States. We demand the. enactment of proper laws 
in order to provide effectively for the future. There is no 
room within our borders for an Anarchist. 

The partisan control of legislation by the Republican 
State Committee has been the most marked in our history. 
Orders have been issued to the Legislature by this irre- 
sponsible body for the enactment of such legislation as 
would best secure its control over the State. Salutary 
measures in the interest of the people have been defeated 
in obedience to their demands. It is not disguised that the 
Republican party of this State is under the domination and 
control of the great corporations and trusts of the country, 
and that without the approval of these gig^antic combina- 
tions of wealth no legislation can be passed in the interest 
of the general public and of individual competition. 

The conduct of public affairs by the Republican party 
has been expensive, incompetent and conducted without 
reg-ard to the interest of the State. Every effort has been 
made to fasten upon this State permanent Republican rule. 
It has, for its own selfish purpose, destroyed in the cities 
of the State the opportunity of our fellow-citizens to con- 
duet their local elections untrammelled by State or Na~ 
tional issues. Other States, in the interest of real munici- 
pal reform, have been engag'ed in the work of separating 

12 



178 PARTY PLATFORMS. 

the local and State elections. Here the Republican party 
has taken a step backward and deprived our cities of an 
independent opportunity to correct the errors in their mu- 
nicipal affairs. This law has been created because the 
three largest cities in the State have Democratic Mayors. 

It has also, in order to deprive the cities of the State of 
their rights to divide their respective municipalities into 
wards, enacted a law vestng in the Governor the right to 
say when, in his discretion, such cities should be so divided. 
No greater interference in local affairs, in open defiance of 
the Constitution, has ever been attempted by a political 
party in this State. This act has been declared unconsti- 
tutional by the Supreme Court, but the attempt to pass it 
will not be forgotten or forgiven by the people. 

The Supreme Court itself has been used as a reward for 
party services. It has been lowered in public esteem by the 
act of Governor Voorhees in elevating to its bench a 
formidable opponent of the present Republican candidate 
for Governor, in order to smooth his path to the Republi- 
can State Convention. We charge such conduct to be 
reprehensible and an offense to the State. 

The efficiency of the National Guard has been impaired. 
Regiments have been disbanded without any defined public 
purpose, and when such acts were challenged as wanting 
in legal force, recourse was had again to the Legislature to 
ratify such illegal acts. 

The scandal of the State Reformatory for Girls at Tren- 
ton, and the management of the Asylum for the Insane, 
in the same city, have been a shock to the State. Not- 
withstanding these disclosures, the chief offenders are re- 
tained in their high office unmolested and in high esteem. 

We demand a rigorous investigation of all the State in- 
stitutions, that the people may know whether their serv- 
ants in these posts of honor and profit are faithful ofRcials 
and worthy of the great trust reposed in them. 

We believe that the fee system should be abolished. 
Public officials should be paid in salaries, thereby saving 
to the people large sums of money annually, which will 
be paid into the public treasury, instead of being retained 
in the pockets of the office-holders of the State. 

We again declare for eqvial taxation and again demand 
a thorough revision of the tax laws of the State. All prop- 
erty, real and personal, not used for religious, charitable 
or educational purposes, should be assessed at its true 
value, in accordance with the Constitution, which says: 

"Property shall be assessed for taxes under general laws 
and by uniform rules, according to its true value." 



PARTY PLATFORMS. 179 

Every attempt on the part of organized labor to secure 
legislation in its interest has been defeated by the Republi- 
can riirty. It has shown that it is hostile to the wage- 
workers of the State. Every important act on the statute 
hooks in the interest of labor was placed there by Demo- 
cratic Legislatures. We believe that the true interest of 
labor and capital lies in a complete comprehension of their 
respective rights and duties and a common desire to have 
a complete understanding between them. They are friends 
and not foes. Great loss has fallen upon the industrial 
interests of the State by bitter struggles, which have re- 
sulted in strikes and discontent. 

The preservation of the forests of the State is becoming 
a pressing question, affecting vitally the welfare of all our 
citizens, and should receive careful consideration from the 
Legislature. 

The cities and towns of our State, with their rapidly in- 
creasing populations, must depend for their water supplies 
upon the preservation of our forests. 

We believe in the rigid enforcement of the child labor 
legislation. The open and avowed failure of Republican 
officials to execute these salutary laws is notorious. These 
laws were enacted by Democratic Legislatures for the 
benefit of the children of the State, and should be efficiently 
enforced. 

A thorough and efficient system of free public schools 
should be in obedience to the mandate of the Constitution 
provided for all the children of the State of school age, so 
that every child may attend school the whole of every 
school day. This is a primary obligation resting upon the 
State. An effective kindergarten system should be estab- 
lished for the benefit of the younger children of the State. 

We extend our sympathy to the band of gallant men 
struggling heroically in South Africa for the inestimable 
privilege of being free and independent. 

We advocate the election of United States Senators di- 
rectly by the people. 

We charge that the Republican administration of this 
State has been reckless and improvident m the expenditure 
of public moneys. 

The prosperous condition of the State treasury is due 
entirely to the corporation tax laws, initiated and passed 
during Democratic administrations. The expenses of the 
State Government, not including payments on the public 
debt, have increased from $1,735,917.27 for the year ending 
October 31, 1893, the last year of Democratic control, to 



180 PARTY PLATFORMS. 

$2,701,226.97 for the year ending October ol, 1900, being an 
increase of over 55 per cent. 

We demand a return to the time-honored Democratic 
principle of economy in State expenditures. We insist that 
all revenues not absolutely required for an economic ad- 
ministration of our affairs should be applied to a reduc- 
tion of the State taxes now levied for school purposes; 
such a reduction be permanent and not simply spasmodic 
and in gubernatorial years. 

The incompetency of the Republican administration is 
further shown by the fact that the effort to amend the 
Constitution of the State has been rendered fruitless by 
their failure to advertise properly the amendment sug- 
gested by the Lregislature, thus preventing for years a pop- 
ular vote on amendments to the organic law. 

In this, as in other matters, the Constitution, its letter 
and spirit, has been a sealed book to the Kepublican party. 

In conclusion, we pledge ourselves and our representa- 
tives to rigid economy in public expenditures, to a fair ad- 
ministration of government with equal rights to all and 
privileges to none, and to the selection of competent and 
faithful public servants who shall obey the voice of the 
people and not the orders of a political machine. 

To the support of these principles of State and local gov- 
ernment we invite the aid and suffrage of the people of the 
whole State. 



CONSTITUTIONAL, AMENDMENTS. 181 

AMENDMENTS TO THE CONSTITUTION 
OF NEW JERSEY. 

PROPOSED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF 1901. 



Be it resolved by the Senate (the House of Assembly 
concurring), That the following amendments to the Con- 
stitution of this State be and the same are hereby pro- 
posed, and when the same shall be agreed to by a majority 
of the members elected to the Senate and House of As- 
sembly, the said amendments shall be entered on their 
journals, with the yeas and nays taken thereon, and re- 
ferred to the Legislature next to be chosen, and shall be 
published for three months previous to the first Tuesday 
after the first Monday of November next (being the fifth 
day of said month in at least one newspaper of each 
county, if any be published therein, the said newspapers 
to be designated by the President of the Senate, the 
Speaker of the House of Assembly and the Secretary of 
State: 

ARTICLE V.-EXECUTIVE. 

Insert in lieu of Paragraph 10, a new paragraph as fol- 
lows: 

10. The Governor or person administering the Govern- 
ment, the Chancellor and the Attorney-General, or two of 
them, of whom the Governor or person administering the 
Government shall be one, may remit fines and forfeitures 
and grant pardons after conviction, in all cases except im- 
peachment. 

ARTICLE VI.— JUDICIARY. 
Insert in lieu of Section II., a new section as follows: 

1. The Court of Errors and Appeals shall consist of a 
Chief Judge and four Associate Judges or any four of them. 

2. In case any judge of said court shall be disqualified to 
sit in any cause, or shall be unable for the time being to 
discharge the duties of his office, whereby the whole num- 
ber of judges capable of sitting shall be reduced below 
four, the Governor shall designate a Justice of the Su- 
preme Court, the Chancellor or a Vice Chancellor, to dis- 
charge such diities until the disqualification or inability 
shall cease. 

3. The Secretary of State shall be the clerk of this court. 

4. When a writ of error shall be brought, any judicial 



182 CONSTITUTIONAL, AMENDMENTS. 

opinion in the cause, i'n favor of or ag-ainst any error com- 
plained of, shall be assigned to the court m writing. When 
an appeal shall be taken from an order or decree of the 
Court of Chancery, the Chancellor or Vice Chancellor mak- 
ing such decree or order shall inform the court in writing 
of his reason therefor. 

5. The jurisdiction heretofore exercised by the Supreme 
Court by writ of error shall be exclusively vested in the 
Court of Errors and Appeals; but any writ of error pending- 
in the Supreme Court at the time of the adoption of this 
amendment shall be proceeded upon as if no change had 
taken place. 

Section IV. 

Insert in lieu of Paragraph 1, a new paragraph as fol- 
lows: 

1. The Court of Chancery shall consist of a Chancellor 
and such number of Vice Chancellors as shall be provided 
by law, each of whom may exercise the jurisdiction of the 
court. The court shall make rules governing- the hearing 
of causes and the practice of the court, where the same is 
not regulated by statute. 

Section V. 
At the end of Paragraph 1, add the following: 
The court mas'- sit in divisions at the same or different 
times and places. 
Strike out Paragraph 3. 

Section VI. 
Insert in lieu of Paragraphs 1 and 2, the following: 
The Court of Common Pleas shall be constituted and 

held in each county in such manner as may be provided by 

law. 

ARTICLE VII.— CIVIL OFFICERS. 
Section II. 

Insert in lieu of Paragraph 1, a new paragraph as fol- 
lows: 

1. Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, Justices of 
the Supreme Court, the Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor 
and the Judges of the Circuit Court and of the Court of 
Common Pleas shall be nominated by the Governor and 
appointed by him with the advice and consent of the Sen- 
ate. All persons now holding any office in this paragraph 
named, except the Judges of the Court of Errors and Ap- 
peals as heretofore existing-, shall continue in the exercise 



CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 183 

ot the duties of their respective offices according to their 
respective commissions or appointments. The Judges of 
the Court of Errors and Appeals, except those first ap- 
pointed; the Justices of the Supreme Court, the Chan- 
cellor and the Vice Chancellors shall hold their offices for 
the term of seven years, and shall at stated times receive 
for their services a compensation which shall not be 
diminished during the term of their appointment; and 
they shall hold no other office under the Government of 
this Slate or the United States. 

The Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals first ap- 
pointed shall be appointed one for three years, two for five 
years and two for seven years. Judges of the Court of 
Com-mon Pleas shall hold their offices lor the term of 
five years. 

Strike out Paragraph 2. 

1. Resolved (the House of Assembly concurring), That 
the following amendments to the Constitution of this 
State be and the same are hereby proposed, and when the 
same shall be agreed to by a majority of the members 
elected to the Senate and House of Assembly, the said 
amendments shall be entered on their journals with the 
yeas and nays taken thereon, and referred to the Legisla- 
ture next to be chosen, and published for three months 
previous to the first Tuesday after the first Monday of 
November next, being the fifth days of said month, in at 
least one newspaper of each county, if any be published 
therein, the said newspapers to be designated by the Pres- 
ident of the Senate, the Speaker of the House of Assembly 
and the Secretary of State. 

1. Amend Paragraph 3, of Section 1, of Article IV., so as 
to read as follows: 

3. Members of the Senate and General Assembly shall be 
elected on the first Tuesday after the first Monday in No- 
vember; in the year nineteen hundred and three members 
of the General Assembly shall be elected for the term of 
one year, and in the year nineteen hundred and four, and 
every second year thereafter, they shall be elected for the 
term of two years; each House of the Legislature shall 
meet separately on the second Tuesday in January next 
after each election for members of the General Assembly; 
the time for holding such elections may be altered by the 
Legislature. 

2. Amend Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Section II., of Article 
IV., so as to read as follows: 

1. The Senate shall be composed of one Senator from 
each county in the State, elected by the legal voters of the 



184 CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS. 

counties respectively for four years, except as provided in 
the following- paragraph: 

2. The terms of the Senators elected in the year nineteen 
hundred and two shall be extended to four years from the 
commencement of their terms; as scon as the Senate shall 
meet after the election to be held in the year nineteen hun- 
drd and three the Senators elected in that year shall be 
divided by lot under the direction of the Senate into two 
classes, as nearly equal as may be; the seats of the Sen- 
ators of one class shall be vacated at the expirtion of three 
years, and of the other class at the expiration of five 
years; the seats of the Senators elected in the year nine- 
teen hundred and four, and of all Senators elected there- 
after, shall be vacated at the expiration of four years from 
the commencement of their terms, so that one-half the 
number of Senators, as nearly as may be, shall be elected 
every second year, at the same time that members of the 
General Assembly are elected; and all vacancies caused 
by resignation or otherwise shall be filed for the unex- 
pired terms only. 

3. Amend Section III., of Article IV., by striking out the 
word "annually." 

4. Amend Paragraph 7, of Section IV., of Article IV., so 
as to read as follows: 

7. Members of the Senate and General Assembly shall 
each receive the sum of five hundred dollars for each year 
of their term, and no other allowance or emolument, di- 
rectly or indirectly, for any purpose whatever; the Presi- 
dent of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of As- 
sembly shall, in virtue of their offices, receive an addi- 
tional compensation equal to one-third of their allowance 
as members. 

5. Amend Paragraph 3, of Article V., so as to read as 
follows: 

3. The term of the Governor elected in the year nineteen 
hundred and four shall be extended to four years from 
the commencement of his term, and he shall hold his office 
until the third Tuesday of Janviary, nineteen hundred and 
nine; thereafter the Governor shall hold his office for four 
years, to commence on the third Tuesday of January next 
ensuing- his election, and to end on the Monday preceding 
the third Tuesday of January four years thereafter, and 
he shall be incapable of holding that ofl^ce for four years 
next after his term of service shall have expired, and no 
appointment or nomination to office shall be made by the 
Governor during the last week of his said term. 



STATE SENATORS. 

STATE SENATORS. 

BY COUNTIES, FKO>I 1845 TO 1902. 



185 



Atlantic County. 



45 — 47, Joel Adams. 
48—50, Lewis M. Walker. 
51—5.3, Joseph E. Potts. 
54—56, David B. Somers. 
57—59, Enoch Cordery. 
60—62, Thomas E. Morris. 
6.3—65, Samuel Stille. 
66—68, David S. Blackman. 



45—47, 
48—49, 
50—51, 
52—53, 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60—62, 
63-65, 
66—68. 
69—71, 



45—46, 
47^9, 
50—52, 
53—58. 
59—61. 
62. 
63—64. 
65—67, 
68—70, 
71—73, 



I?ergen 

Richard R. Paulison. 
Isaac I. Haring. 
John Van Brunt. 
Abraham Hopper. 
Daniel D. Depew. 
Thomas H. Herring. 
Ralph S. Demarest. 
Daniel Holsman. 
John T. Dater. 
James J. Brinkerhoff. 

Kiirling 

James S. Hulme. 
Thomas H. Richards. 
Joseph Satterthwaite 
Joseph W. Allen. 
Thomas L. Norcross. 
Joseph W. Pharo. 
William Garwood. 
Geo. M. Wright. 
Job H. Gaskell. 
Henry J. Irlck. 



69—71, Jesse Adams. 
72—74, William Moore. 
75—77, Hosea F. Madden. 
78—92, John J. Gardner. 
93—98. Samuel D. Hoffman. 
99—1901. Lewis Evans. 
02—04. Edward S. Lee. 



County. 

72 — 74, Cornelius Lydecker. 
75—77, George Dayton. 
78—80, Cornelius S. Cooper. 
81—83, Isaac Wortendyke. 
84—85, Ezra Miller. 
86—89, John W. Bogert. 
90—95. Henry D. Winton. 
96—1900. William M. Johnson. 
01—04, Edmund W. Wakelee. 

ton County. 

74—76, Barton F. Thorn. 
77—79, Caleb G. Ridgway. 
80—82, Wm. Budd Deacon. 
8.3—85. Hezekiah B. Smith. 
86—91, William H. Carter. 
92—94, Mitchell B. Perkins. 
95—97. William C. Parry. 
98—1900, Howard E. Packer. 
01—03, Nathan Haines. 



Camden County. 



45, Richard W. Howell. 
46—48, Joseph C. Stafford. 
49—51, John Gill. 
52—54, Thomas W. Mulford. 
55—60, John K. Roberts. 
61—63, William P. Tatem. 
64—66, James M. Scovel. 

Cape Mi 

45--16, Reuben Willets. 
47—49, James L. Smith. 
50 — 52, Enoch Edmunds. 
5.3—55, Joshua Swain, Jr. 
56—58, Jesse H. Diverty. 
59—61, Downs Edmunds. 
62—64, Jonathan F. Learning 
65—67. Wilmon W. Ware. 
68—70, Leaming M. Rice. 



67—72, Edward Bettle. 
73—81, William J. Sewell. 
82—84, Albert Merritt. 
85—87, Richard N. Herring. 
88—90. George Pfeiffer. 
91—96, Maurice A. Rogers. 
97—1902, Herbert W. Johnson. 

ij- County. 

71—73, Thomas Beesley. 
74 — 76, Richard S. Leaming. 
77 — 79, Jonathan F. Leaming. 
80—85, Waters B. Miller. 
86—88, Joseph H. Hanes. 
89—91, Walter S. Leaming. 
92—94, Lemuel E. Miller. 
95—97, Edmund L. Ross. 
98—1903, Robert E. Hand. 



186 



STATE SENATORS. 



Cumberland 

72- 

75- 



45-46, Enoch H. More. 
47—50, Stephen A. Garrison 
51—53, Reuben Fithian. 
54—56, Lewis Howell. 
57—59. John L. Sharp. 
60—62, Nat. Stratton. 
63-68, Providence Ludlam. 
69—71, James H. Nixon. 



78- 
81- 
87- 
90- 
93- 
02- 



County. 

-74, C. Henry Shepherd. 
-77, J. Howard Willets. 
-80, George S. Whiticar. 
-86, Isaac T. Nichols. 
-89, Philip P. Baker. 
-92, Seaman R. Fowler. 
-1901. Edward C. Stokes. 
-04, Bloomfield H. Minch. 



45, 
46—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55—57. 
58—60, 
61—63. 
64—66, 
67—69, 



45—48, 
49—51, 
52—54, 
55-57, 
58-60, 
61—63. 
64—66. 
67—69, 
70—75, 



45—47, 

48—49, 
50, 
51—53. 
54—56, 
57—59, 
60—61, 
62—65, 
66—68, 
69—71, 
72—74. 



45—46, 
47—49, 
50—52. 
53— 55, 
56—58. 
59—61, 
62—64, 
65—67, 
68—70, 
71—73. 



Essex 

Joseph S. Dodd. 
Stephen R. Grover. 
Asa Whitehead. 
Stephen Congar. 
George R. Chetwood. 
Charles L. C. Gifford. 
James M. Quinby. 
John G. Trusdell. 
James L. Hays. 



County. 

70—75, John W. Taylor. 
76—78, William H. Kirk. 
79—81, William H. Francis. 
82—84, William Stainsby. 
85—87, Frederick S. Fish. 
88—90, A. F. R. Martin. 
91—93, Michael T. Barrett. 
94—99. George W. Ketcham. 
1900—02, Thos. N. McCarter, Jr. 



Gloucester County. 



John C. Smallwood. 
Charles Reeves. 
John Burk. 
Joseph Franklin. 
Jeptha Abbott. 
John Pierson. 
Joseph L. Reeves. 
Woodward Warrick. 
Samnel Hopkins. 

H lid son 

Richard Outwater. 
John Tennele. 
John Cassedy. 
Abraham O. Zabriskie. 
Moses B. Bramhall. 
C. V. Clickener. 
Samuel Wescott. 
Theo. F. Randolph. 
Charles H. Winfield. 
Noah D. Taylor. 
John R. McPherson. 



76—78, Thomas P. Mathers. 
79—81, John F. Bodine. 
82—83, Thomas M. Ferrell. 
84—87, Stacy L. Pancoast. 
88—90, Joseph B. Roe. 
91—93, George H. Barker. 
94—96. Daniel J. Packer. 
97—1902, Solomon H. Stanger. 

County. 

75—77, Leon Abbett. 
78—80, Rudolph F. Rabe. 
81—83, Elijah T. Paxton. 
84—86, William Brinkerhoff. 
87—89, William D. Edwards. 
90—91, *Edward F. McDonald. 

92, Robert S. Hudspeth. 
93—98, William D. Daly. 
99, 1900, Allan L. McDermott. 
01—04, Robert S. Hudspeth. 



Hunterdon County. 



Alexander Wurts. 
Isaac G. Farlee. 
John Manners. 
Alexander V. Bonnell. 
John C. Rafferty. 
Edmund Perry. 
John Blane. 
Alexander Wurts. 
Joseph G. Bowne. 
David H. Banghart. 



74—76, Fred. A. Potts. 
77—79, James N. Pidcock. 
80—82, Eli Bosenbury. 
83—85, John Carpenter, Jr. 
86—88, George H. Large. 
89—91, Moses K. Everitt. 
92—94, William H. Martin. 
95—97. Richard S. Kuhl. 
98—1900. John R. Foster. 
01—03, William C. Gebhardt. 



♦Mr. McDonald was unseated the last day of the ses- 
sion of 1890. and William S. Stuhr was given his seat. The 
first week of the session of 1891 Mr. Stuhr was unseated 
and Mr. McDonald resumed his seat. 



STATE SENATORS. 



1S7 



Mercer 

45—50, Charles S. Olden. 
51—56, William C. Alexander. 
57—59, Robert C. Hutchinson. 
60—62, Jonathan Cook. 
63—65, Edward W. Scudder. 
66—68, Aug. G. Richey. 
69—71, John Woolverton. 
72—74, Charles Hewitt. 



County. 

75—77, Jonathan H. Blackwell. 

78— SO, Crowell Marsh. 

SI— 83, John Taylor. 

84—86, George O. Vanderbilt. 

87—92, John D. Rue. 

93—98, William H. Skirm. 

99—04, Elijah C. Hutchinson. 



IMiddlesex County, 



45- 


-46. 


47- 


-49, 


50- 


-52, 


53- 


-55. 


56- 


-58, 


59- 


-61, 


62- 


-70, 


71- 


-76. 




45, 


46- 


-48, 


49- 


-51, 


52- 


-54, 


55- 


-57, 


58- 


-60, 


61- 


-63, 


64- 


-71, 




72, 


45- 


-47. 


48- 


-50, 


51- 


-53, 


54—56. 


57- 


-59, 


60- 


-62, 


63—65. 


66- 


-70, 




71, 


51- 


-53, 


54- 


-56, 


57- 


-62. 


63- 


-68, 


69- 


-71, 


72- 


-74, 


75- 


-77, 


45- 


-46, 


47- 


-49, 


50- 


-52, 


5.3- 


-55, 


56- 


-58, 


59- 


-67. 


68- 


-70, 


71- 


-73, 



David Crowell. 
Adam Lee. 
Edward Y. Rogers. 
Ralph C. Stults. 
Henry V. Speer. 
Abra. Everitt. 
Amos Robbins. 
Levi D. Jarrard. 

Monmou 

Thomas E. Combs. 
George F. Fort. 
John A. Morford. 
William D. Davis. 
Robert S. Laird. 
W"m. H. Hendrickspn. 
Anthony Reckless. 
Henry S. Little. 
Wm. H. Conover. Jr. 

Morris 

John B. Johnes. 
Ephraim Marsh. 
John A. Bleecker. 
Alexander Robertson. 
Andrew B. Cobb. 
Daniel Budd. 
Lyman A. Chandler. 
George T. Cobb. 
Columbus Beach. 

Ocean 

Samuel Birdsall. 
Jas. Cowperthwaite. 
William F. Brown. 
George D. Horner. 
John Torrey, Jr. 
John G. W. Havens. 
John S. Schultze. 

Passaic 

Cornelius G. Garrison. 
Martin J. Ryerson. 
Silas D. Canfield. 
Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
Jetur R. Riggs. 
Benjamin Buckley. 
John Hopper. 
Henry A. Williams. 



77—79, George C. Ludlow. 
80-82, Isaac L. Martin. 
83—85, Abraham V. Schenck. 
86—88, Daniel C. Chase. 
89—94, Robert Adrain. 
95—97, Charles B. Herbert. 
98—1900. James H. Van Cleef. 
01—03, Theodore Strong. 

til County. 

7.3—78, Wm. H. Hendrickson. 
79—81, George C. Beekman. 
82—84, John S. Applegate. 
85—87, Thomas G. Chattle. 
88—90, Henry M. Nevius. 
91—92, Thomas S. R. Brown. 

93, Henry S. Terhune. 
94—96, James A. Bradley. 
97—1902. Charles Asa Francis 

County. 

72—74. Augustus W. Cutler. 
75—77, John Hill. 
78—80. Augustus C. Canfield. 
81—86, James C. Youngblood. 
87—92, George T. Werts. 
93—95, Ellas C. Drake. 
96—98, John B. Vreeland. 
99—1901. Mahlon Pitney. 
02—04, Jacob W. W^elsh. 

County. 

78—80. Ephraim P. Emson. 
81—83, Abram C. B. Havens. 
84 — 92, George T. Cranmer. 
93—95, George G. Smith. 
96—98. Robert B. Engle. 
99—1901. George G. Smith. 
02—04, George L. Shinn. 

County. 

74—76, John Hopper. 
77—82, Garret A. Hobart. 
83—88, John W. Griggs. 
89-91, John Mallon. 
92—94, John Hinchliffe. 
95—97, Robert Williams. 
98-1900. Christian Braun. 
01—03, Wood McKee. 



188 



STAJE SENATORS. 



Salem County. 



45, William J. Shinn. 

46 — 48, Benjamin Acton, Jr. 

49 — 51, John Summerill, Jr. 

52—54. Allen Wallace. 

.55—57, Charles P. Smith. 

58—60, Joseph K. Riley. 

61—63, Emmor Reeve. 

64—66, Richard M. Acton. 

67—69. Samuel Plummer. 

70—72, John C. Belden. 



73—75, Isaac Newkirk. 
76—78, Charles S. Plummer. 
79 — 81, Quinton Keasbey. 
82—84, George Hires. 
85—87, Wyatt W. Miller. 
88—90, William Newell. 
91—93, James Butcher. 
94—96. John C. Ward. 
97—1902, Richard C. Miller. 



Soinei'set County. 



45, George H. Brown. 
46—48, William H. Leupp. 
49—51, John W. Craig. 
52—54, Moses Craig. 
55—57, Samuel K. Martin. 
58 — 60, James Campbell. 
61—63, Rynier H. Veghte. 
64 — 66, Joshua Doughty. 
67—69, John H. Anderson. 



70—72, Calvin Corle. 
73—75, Elisha B. Wood. 
76—78, Charles B. Moore. 
79—81, John G. Schenck. 
82—84, Eugene S. Doughty. 
85—90, Lewis A. Thompson. 
91—93, William J. Keys. 
94—96. Lewis A. Thompson. 
97—1902, Charles A. Reed. 



Sussex County 



45—46, Benjamin Hamilton. 
47—49, Nathan Smith. 
50—52, Joseph Greer. 
53 — 55, Isaac Bonnell. 
56 — 58, Zachariah H. Price. 
59—61, Edward C. Moore. 
62—64, Peter Smith. 
6.5—67, Joseph S. Martin. 
68—73, Richard E. Edsall. 



74—76, Samuel T. Smith. 
77—79, Francis M. Ward. 
80—82, Thomas Lawrence. 
83—85, Lewis Cochran. 
86—88. John A. McBride. 
89—91, Peter D. Smith. 
92—94, John McMickle. 
9.5—97. Jacob Gould. 
98—1903, Lewis J. Martin. 



Union County. 



58—60, John R. Ayres. 
61—63, Joseph T. Crowell. 
64 — 65, James Jenkins. 

66, Philip H. Grier. 
67—69, Amos Clark, Jr. 
70—72, James T. Wiley. 
73—75, J. Henry Stone. 



76—78, William J. Magie. 
79—84, Benjamin A. Vail. 
85 — 87, Robert L. Livingston. 
88—90, James L. Miller. 
91—93, Frederick C. Marsh. 
94—98. Foster M. Voorhees. 
99—1902, Joseph Cross. 



Warren County. 



45, Charles J. Ihrie. 
46—48, Jeremy Mackey. 
49—51, George W. Taylor. 
52—54, Charles Sitgreaves. 
55-57, William Rea. 
58—60, Philip Mowry. 
61—63, James K. Swayze. 
64—66, Henrv R. Kennedy. 
67—69, Abraham Wildrick. 
70—72. Edward H. Bird. 



73—75, Joseph B. Cornish. 
76—78, William Silverthorn. 
79—81, Peter Cramer. 
82—84, George H. Beatty. 
85—87, James E. Moon. 
88—90, Martin Wyckoff. 
91—93, Johnston Cornish. 
94—96, Christopher F. Staates. 
97—99. Isaac Barber. 
1900—1902, Johnston Cornish. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



189 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 

BY COL'NTIKS, FKOM 1845 TO 190^. 



Atlantic County, 



45, 46, Joseph Ingersoll. 
47—49, Mark Lake. 

50, 51, Robert B. Risley. 

52, John H. Boyle. 

53, Thomas D. Winner. 

54, Daniel Townsend. 

55, Nicholas F. Smith, 

56, 57, David Frambes. 

58, John B. Madden. 

59, Thomas E. Morris. 
60—62, Charles E. P. Mayhew. 

63, John Godfrey. 

64, Simon Hanthom. 

65, Simon Lake, 

66, 67, P. M. Wolfseiffer. 
68, 69, Jacob Keim. 

70, 71, Benj. H. Overheiser, 
72, 73, Samuel H. Cavileer, 
74, 75, Lemuel Conover. 

IJergen 

45, William G. Hopper. 
45, Jacob C, Terhune, 

46, 47, John G, Banta. 

46, 47, Jacob J, Brinkerhoff, 
48, 49, John Ackerman, Jr. 
48, 49, Henry H. Voorhis, Jr. 
50—52, John Huyler. 
50, 51, John H. Hopper. 

52, John Zabriskie. 
53, 54, Jacob I. Demarest. 
53, 54, Abraham Van Horn, 
55, 56, Ralph S. Demarest. 
55, 56, Thomas W. Demarest. 

57, 58, Daniel Holsman. 

57, 58, Aaron H. Westervelt. 

59, Andrew C. Cadmus. 
59, 60, Enoch Brinkerhoff. 

60, John A. Hopper, 
61, 62, Abram Carlock, 
61, 62, John R. Post. 

63, 64, Thomas D. English, 
63, 64, John Y. Dater. 
65, 66, Isaac Demarest, 
65, 66, Abraham J. Haring. 

67, 68, Cornelius Christie. 
67, A. Van Emburg. 

68, 69, Henry G. Herring. 

69, 70. Eben Winton. 

70, 71, Henry A. Hopper. 

71, 72, Jacob G. Van Riper. 



76, 



79, 



84, 
86, 



85, 
87, 



77, Leonard H. Ashley. 

78, Israel Smith. 

80, James Jeffries. 

81, George Elvins. 

82, Joseph H. Shinn. 

83, John L. Bryant, 
Edward North. 
James S. Beckwith. 
James B. Nixon. 

89, 90, Shepherd S. Hudson. 

91, Smith E. Johnson. 

92, Samuel D. Hoffman, 

93, Charles A. Baake. 

94, Frederick Schuchardt, 

95, Wesley C. Smith. 

96, 97, Marcellus L. Jackson. 
98, 99, Leonard H. Ashley, 
1900—01, Charles T. Abbott 
02, Thomas C. Elvins. 



County, 



'"> 


to, 

73, 


74, 


75, 


74, 


75, 


76, 


77, 


76, 


77, 




78, 


78, 


79, 


79, 


80, 




80, 


81- 


-83, 


81, 


82, 


81, 


84, 




84, 




85, 


85, 


86, 


87, 


88, 




87, 


88, 


89, 


89, 


90, 


90, 


91, 




91, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93, 




94, 


94, 


95, 


95, 


96. 


96. 


97, 


97, 


98, 



98, 99, 



George J. Hopper. 
John J. Anderson. 
Henry C. Herring. 
John W. Bogert. 
John H. Winant. 
Barney N. Ferdon. 
M. Corsen Gillham. 
Southey S. Parramore. 
John A. Demarest. 
Oliver D. Smith. 
86, John Van Bussum. 
Elias H. Sisson. 
Peter R. Wortendyke. 
*Jacob W. Doremus. 
Peter Ackerman. 
Eben Winton. 
Anderson Bloomer. 
Peter Ackerman. 
Charles F. Harrington. 
Abram De Ronde. 
George Zimmermann. 
John H. Huyler. 
Samuel G. H. Wright. 
John J. Dupuy. 
Walter Dewsnap. 
David D. Zabriskie. 
Fred'k L. Voorhees. 
Jacob H. Ullman. 
Abram C. Holdrum. 
John M. Bell. 



*John W. Doremus was first elected, but died before 
Legislature convened. 



190 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



99. 1900, Edmund W. Wakelee.Ol— 02, Joseph H. Tillotson. 
1900, Vacancy caused by deathOl— 02, James W. Mercer. 
of John Li. C. Graves. 



Burlington County. 



45, Joseph Satterthwait. 
45, Isaiah Adams. 
45, 47, 48, John W. C. Evans. 
45, Edward Taylor. 

45, William Biddle. 

46, Clayton Lippincott. 
46, William Malsbury, 
46, Garrit S. v^annon. 
46, Stephen Willets. 

46, Wm. G. Lippincott. 
47—49, John S. Irick. 

47 — 49, Benjamin Kemble. 
47, 48, Joseph W. Allen. 

47, William Biddle. 
48—50, Edward French. 
49—51, Samuel Stockton. 
49—51, William R. Braddock. 
50—52, William Brown. 

50, 51, William S. Embley. 
51 — 53, Allen Jones. 
52—54, John W. Fennimore. 
52—54, Charles Haines. 

52, Benajah Antrim. 
53, 54, Mahlon Hutchinson. 
53, 54, Jacob L. Githens. 

54, Job H. Gaskill. 
54—56, William Parry. 

55, Josephus Sooy, Jr. 

55, Benjamin Gibbs. 

55, 57, Thomas L. Norcross. 

55, 56, Elisha Gaunt. 

56, Richard Jones. 

56, William M. Collom. 

56, 57, Jervis H. Bartlett. 

57, 58, Samuel Keys. 
57—59, Charles Mickle. 
57 — 59, Ezra Evans. 

58, Samuel C. Middleton. 

58, 59, Charles S. Kemble. 

59, 60, John Larzalere. 

59 — 61, Samuel A. Dobbins. 
00, 61, George B. Wills. 
60—62, Robert B. Stokes. 
60—62, William Sooy. 

61, Joseph L. Lamb. 
62—64, Wm. P. McMichael. 
62, 63, John M. Higbee. 
63—65, Israel W. Heulings. 
63—65. Henry J. Irick. 

64, Jarett Stokes. 

65, Samuel Stockton. 

65, 66, Charles C. Lathrop. 

66, 67, George W. Thompson. 



73, 



75- 



66, 67, Samuel Coate. 
66, 67, Andrew J. Fort. 
67—69, Wallace Lippincott. 
68—71, John J. Maxwell. 

68, Chas. E. Hendrickson. 

68, Charles Collins. 
69—71, Thomas C. Alcott. 

69, Theophilus I. Price. 
70, 71, Abraham Perkins. 

70, Levi French. 

71—73, Edward T. Thompson. 

72, Robert Aaronson. 
72—74, E. Budd Marter. 
72—74, George B. Borton. 

74, Townsend Cox. 

74, Joseph P. Adams. 

75. Levi French. 
75, Charles J. Gordon. 

75, Henry Moffett. 
-77, Samuel Taylor. 

76, Daniel L. Piatt. 
76—78, John Cavileer. 
76—78, Edward F. Mathews. 
77—79, George Sykes. 

78, 79, Wm. Budd Deacon. 

79, SO, John W. Haines. 
79, Wm. R. Lippincott. 

80—82, William H. Carter. 
80—82, Henry C. Herr. 

81, John Cavileer. 

80, 81, Abraham Marter. 

82, Thomas M. Locke. 
83-86, Theodore Budd. 
83, 84, 87, Stacy H. Scott. 

83, Horace Cronk. 
84—86, Thomas J. Alcott. 
85, 86, Allen H. Gangewer. 
87, 88, 90, R. C. Hutchinson. 

88, 89, William H. Doron. 

89, Albert Hansell. 
89, George C. Davis. 
91, Mitchell B. Perkins. 

91, Lewis L. Sharp. 

92, A. H. White. 

93, Howard E. Packer. 

93, Micajah E. Matlack. 

94, Augustus C. Stecher. 

95, Micajah E. Matlack. 

96, 97, George Wildes. 

97, Joshua E. Borton. 
98—1902, Cliarles Wright. 
98—1900. Joel Horner. 
01—02, John G. Horner. 



87, 



90, 
90, 
91, 
92, 



94, 
95, 
96, 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



ISl 



Camden 

Joseph Kay, Jr. 
John Recfield. 
Joel G. Clark. 
Gerrard Wood. 
Edward Turner. 
Joseph B. Tatem. 
John C. Shreeve. 
John E. Marshall. 
Jacob Troth. 
Joseph Wolohon. 
Charles D. Hineline. 
Thomas W. Hurff. 
J. O. Johnson. 
J. Kay. 

Jonathan Day. 
Samuel Lytle. 
John K. Roberts. 
Samuel S. Cake. 
James L. Hines. 
Reiley Barret. 
Evan C. Smith. 
John P. Marker. 
*Samuel Scull. 
T. B. Atkinson, 
Joseph M. Atkinson. 
Edmund Hoffman. 
Samuel M. Thorne. 
Zebedee Nicholson. 
John R. Graham. 
Joseph Stafford, Jr. 
George Brewer. 
Joel P. Kirkbride. 
James L. Hines. 
Daniel A. Hall. 
Edwin J. Osier. 
James M. Scovel. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Samuel Tatem. 
Paul C. Brinck. 
Isaac W. Nicholson. 
John F. Bodine. 
George W. N. Custis. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Edward Z. Ceilings. 
John Hood. 
James Wills. 
Chalkley Albertson. 
Henry S. Bonsall. 
William C. Shinn. 
Thomas H. Coles. 
Samuel Warthman. 
Charles Wilson. 



re. 



79, 
80, 
81, 
81, 



S3, 

84- 



78, 
79, 
78. 
80, 



County. 

71, Isaac W. Nicholson. 

72, Fred. Bourquin. 
71, 72, Stevenson Leslie. 
72—74, George B. Carse. 

73, Isaac Foreman. 
73, 74, William H. Cole. 

74, Chalkley Albertson. 
75—77, Alden C. Scovel. 

75, 76, 79, 80, R. N. Herring. 

75, Henry B. Wilson. 
77, Oliver Lund. 
77, Samuel T. Murphy. 

Isaiah Woolston. 
Alonzo D. Nichols. 
Andrew J. Rider. 
Edward Burrough. 

81, Henry L. Bonsall. 

82, Chris. J. Mines, Jr. 
82, John H. McMurray. 

82, Robert F. S. Heath. 

83, George W. Borton. 

83, John Bamford. 

84, 93, Clayton Stafford. 
87, Edward A. Armstrong. 

84, John W. Branning. 

85, Benjamin M. Braker. 
85, 86, Henry M. Jewett. 

86, George Pfeiffer. 

87, Philip Young. 
87, Henry Turley. 

88, 89, Adam Clark Smith. 
88, 89, 90, John Harris. 
88, 89, George H. Higgins. 

90, Franklin C. Woolman. 

91, 92, Abram W. Nash. 

92, Joseph M. Engard. 

92, also 73, 74, Wm. H. Cole. 
94, 95, Clayton Stafford. 

93, George W. Henry. 

94, William J. Thompson. 

94, William Watson. 

95, George W. Barnard. 

96, 97, Louis T. Derousse. 

97, Frank T. Lloyd. 
97, Henry S. Scovel. 

98—1902. William J. Bradlev. 
98, 99. John H. McMurray. 
98, 99, Edgar J. Coles. 
1900, F. F. Patterson, Jr. 

00, 01, 02. Ephraim T. Gill. 

01, 02, George A. Waite. 



90, 
91, 
91, 
93, 

93, 



95, 
96, 
96, 



48, 



Cape 3Iay County. 

45, John Stites. 50, 51, Mackey Williams. 

46, Samuel Townsend. 52, Joshua Swaim. 

47, Richard S. Ludlam. 53, Waters B. Miller. 
49, Nathaniel Holmes, Jr. 54, 55, Jesse H. Diverty. 



*In 1857 Mr. Scull was unseated by T. B. Atkinson. 



192 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



56—58, Downs Edmunds, Jr. 80, 
59, 60, Abram Reeves. 81, 

61, Jonathan F. Learning. 86, 
62—64, Wilmon W. Ware. 
65—67, 69, 70, Thos. Beesley. 89, 

68, Samuel R. Magonagle. 82, 



71—73, Richard S. Learning. 

74, Alexander Young. 

75, Richard D. Edmunds. 
76—78, William T. Stevens. 

79, Daniel Schellinger. 



95, 



99, 
01, 



83—85, Jesse D. Ludlam. 
82, Furman L. Richardson 

87, Alvin P. Hildreth. 

88, Walter S. Leaming. 
90, 91, Eugene C. Cole. 
93, 94, Edmund L. Ross. 

96, Furman L. Ludlam. 

97, Robert E. Hand. 

98, Eugene C. Cole. 
1900, Ellis H. Marshall. 
02, Lewis M. Cresse. 



Cunil)erlaiitl Countv. 



45, 
45. 



47, 
48, 
48, 
50, 
50, 
51, 



55, 

55, 



58, 



61, 
61, 
63, 
63, 
65- 
65- 



69- 



45, 

45, 
45, 
45, 
45, 
46, 
46, 
47, 
47, 
47. 



Josiah Shaw. 
George Heisler. 
Lewis Howell. 
Stephen A. Garrison. 
Leonard Lawrence. 
Jeremiah Parvin. 
Uriah D. Woodruff. 
Reuben Fithian. 
Richard Lore. 
Benj. Ayres. 
Joel Moore. 
Samuel Mayhew. 
David Campbell. 
Enos S. Gandy. 
Lewis Woodruff. 
Daniel Harris. 
Morton Mills. 
James M. Wells. 
John F. Keen. 
Uriah Mayhew. 
Elias Doughty. 
Elwell Nichols. 
Robert Moore. 
Aaron S. Westcott. 
Ebenezer Hall. 
John Carter. 
William Bacon. 
J. Edmund Sheppard. 

B. Rush Bateman. 
Edward W. Maylin. 
Robert Moore. 
James H. Nixon. 
Thomas D. Westcott. 

C. Henry Shepherd. 
William A. House. 

Essex 

Isaac Van Wagenen. 
William M. Scudder. 
John Runyon. 
Hugh F. Randolph. 
Jabez Pierson. 
Keen Pruden. 
Alvah Sherman. 
47, George W. McLane. 

47, Parker Teed. 

48, A. S. Hubbeel. 
48, Jabez G. Goble. 

48, Francis B. Chetwood. 



45, 
46, 
46, 
46, 
47, 
47, 
48, 
49, 
49, 
51, 
51, 
52, 
52, 
53, 
53, 
54, 
54, 
56, 
56, 
57, 
57, 
58, 
59, 
59, 
60, 
60, 
62, 
62, 
64, 
64, 
-67, 
-68, 
68, 
69, 
-71, 



45, 
46, 
45, 
46, 
46, 
46, 
46, 



70, 71, Charles C. Grosscup. 
72, 73, George S. Whiticar. 
72, 73, J. Howard Willets. 
74, 75, Lewis H. Dowdney. 

74, George B. Langley. 
75—77, George W. Payne. 

76, Isaiah W. Richman. 
77, 78, Isaac T. Nichols. 

78, James Loughron. 
79, 80, Robert P. Ewing. 
79, 80, Arthur T. Parsons. 
81, 82, Charles Ladow. 

81, John H. Avis. 

82, Philip P. Baker. 

83, Isaac M. Smalley. 

83, 84, John B. Campbell. 

84, 85, Jeremiah H. Lupton. 

85, 86, Wilson Banks. 

86, 87, Franklin Lawrence. 

87, Thomas H. Hawkins. 

88, Mulford Ludlam. 

88, Isaac M. Smalley. 

89, Thomas W. Trenchard 

89, 90, Reuben Cheesman. 

90, 93, 94, John N. Glaspell. 
91, James L. Van Syckel. 

91, 92, Edward C. Stokes. 

92, 93, Wilber H. Baxter. 
94—96, Thomas F. Austin. 
95—97, Bloomfield H. Minch. 

97, 98, James J. Hunt. 

98, 99. Wilson L, Shropshire. 
99—1901, Jesse S. Steelman. 

00, 01, 02, William J. Moore. 
02, Louis H. Miller. 

Comity. 

47, 48, Abraham Van Riper. 

47, 48, Elston Marsh. 

48, Hngh H. Bowne. 

48, 49, Charles Harrison. 

49, 50, Joel W. Condit. 
49, 50, Obadiah Meeker. 
49, 50, William F. Day. 

49, 50, Stephen Personett. 

49, Hugh H. Bowne. 
49, Lewis C. Grover. 

50, 51, Jonathan Valentine. 
50, 51. David Wade. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



193 



Isaac H. Pierson. 61, 62 

Beach Vanderpool. 61, 62 

John C. Beardsley. 61, 62 

Wm. M. Whitehead. 61 

Cornelius Boice. 62, 63 

Thomas McKirgan. 62, 63 

John M. Clark. 62, 63 

William M. Sandford. 62, 63 

Silas Merchant. 62, 63 

John Munn. 63 

James S. Bell. 63 

John B. Clark. 63, 64 

Stephen Day, Jr. 63, 64 

Grant J. Wheeler. 64, 65 

Edward T. Hillyer. 64, 65 

Charles T. Day. 64, 65 

Charles O. Bolles. 64, 65 

Abiathar Harrison. 64, 65 

Daniel Price. 64 

William Dennis. 64 

David S. Craig. 65 

Daniel H. Noe. 65 

James N. Joraleman. 65 

David Ripley. 65, 66 

Hngh Holmes. 66 

Daniel D. Benjamin. 66, 67 

Charles O. Bolles. 66, 67 

Daniel P. Tompkins. 66, 67 

Nehemiah Perry. 66, 68 

James A. Pennington. 66 

Apollos M. Elmer. 66 

Joseph T. Hopping. 66 

Warren S. Baldwin. 67 

Samuel R. Winans. 67 

James E. Bathgate. 67 

George H. Doremus. 67, 68 

Wm. K. McDonald. 67, 68 

John C. Denman, 67, 

Moses P. Smith. 68, 69 

John L. Blake, Jr. 68, 69 

William B. Baldwin. 68, 69 

Charles L. C. Clifford. 68, 69 

Elihu Day. 68, 69 

Charles C. Stewart. 68 

John C. Thornton. 69, 70 

Simeon Harrison. 69, 70 

James McCracken. 69, 70 

Joseph Booth. 69, 71 

Ira M. Harrison. 70, 71 

Thomas Kirkpatrick. 70, 71 

Adolphus W.Waldron. 70, 71 

James F. Bond. 70 
Amzi Condit. 

Gashier De Witt, Jr. 70 

David Ayres. 71 

Isaac P. Trimble. 71, 72 

David A. Hayes. 71, 72 

James McCracken. 71, 72, 

J. W. Hale. 71 

Frederick H. Teese. 72, 73 

James Wheeler. 72, 73 

George A. Halsey. 72, 73 

13 



James M. Lang. 
David Oakes. 
John Flintoft. 
James E. Smith. 
Walter Tompkins. 
Corra Drake. 
John D. Freeman. 
John P. Jackson. 
Thomas McGrath. 
Amzi Dodd. 
John C. Littell. 
Adolph Schalk. 
James Smith. 
Rufus F. Harrison. 
Charles A. Lightplpe. 
Thumas B. Peddle. 
John C. Seiffert. 
Bernard Kearney. 
Jeremiah DeCamp. 
Ira M. Harrison. 
J. B. S. Robinson. 
John H. Landell. 
James D. Cleaver. 
David Anderson. 
William Bodwell. 
Albert P. Condit. 
Isaac P. Trimble. 
William H. Murphy. 
Edward L. Price. 
John F. Anderson. 
David Ayres. 
James L. Hays. 
Israel D. Condit. 
Daniel Ayres. 
William R. Sasnre. 
Samuel Atwater. 
Edward Hedden. 
M. H. C. Vail. 
Josiah Speer. 
James Peck. 
John Kennedy. 
Timothy W. Lord. 
Francis Macken. 
Josiah L. Baldwin. 
James L. Gurney. 
John Hunkele. 
William W. Hawkins. 
James G. Irwin. 
Joseph F. Sanxay. 
Farrand Kitchell. 
Henry W. Wilson. 
Chauncey G.Williams. 
70, William R. Sayre. 
Matthew Murphy. 
Albert P. Condit. 
Edmund L. Joy. 
Theodore Horn . 
Rochus Heinisch, Jr. 
William A. Ripley. 
Samuel Wilde. 
Joseph G. Hill. 
Theodore Macknett. 



194 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



72 

72, 
72 
73 
73 
73, 74 
73, 74 

73, 74 
74 

74, 75 
74, 75 

74, 75 
74, 

73—75 
75 
75 
75 
75 

75, 76 

76, 77 
76, 77, 
76, 77, 
76, 77 

76 
76 
76 

76, 80 
77 

77. 78 
77, 78 
77. 78 

77, 78 

78, 79 
78, 79 
78. 79 
78. 79 

78, 79 
78 
78 

79—81 

79, SO 

79, 80 
79 
80 

80, 81 

80. 81 
79—81 

81 
81 
81 

81. 82 
80. 81 

82. 83 
82, 83 

82 
82 
82 



David Anderson. 
Daniel Murphy. 
Moses H. Williams. 
L. M. Armstrong. 
John W. Campbell. 
Elias O. Doremus. 
Phineas .Jones. 
Aaron G. Baldwin. 
Moses E. Halsey. 
Thomas S. Henry. 
Julius C. Fitzg-erald. 
William H. Kirk. 
James T. Vanness. 
Samuel Morrow, Jr. 
Andrew Teed. 
Hugh Kinnard. 
Patrick Doyle. 
William Carrolton. 
David Dodd. 
Albert D. Traphagen. 
Francis K. Howell. 
S.V.C.Van Rensselaer. 
Elkanah Drake. 
Charles H. Harrison. 
Marcus S. Richards. 
Philip W. Cross. 
James M. Patterson. 
Joseph H. Wightman. 
Gottfried Krueger. 
Charles Gomer. 
James Malone. 
Edward D. Pierson. 
Edward W. Crane. 
George S. Duryee. 
82, Wm. H. P. Fielder. 

82, Wm. H. F. Fiedler. 
Schuyler B. Jackson. 
Alexander Phillips. 
Charles Holzwarth. 
Harrison Van Duyne. 
Peter J. Gray. 

83. 89. John Gill. 
Charles A. Felch. 
♦William H. Brown. 
Elias A. Wilkinson. 
Thos W. Langstroth. 
83. Thomas O'Connor. 
Joseph L/. Munn. 
William Wright. 
**Chas. G. Bruemmer. 
Michael McMahan. 
William R. Williams. 
John H. Parsons. 
David Young. 
Robert McGowan. 
Roderick Robertson, 
Ulysses B. Brewster. 





S2, 




82, 




82, 




83, 




83, 




83, 




83, 


83, 


84, 


83- 


-87, 


84, 


85, 


84, 


85, 


84, 


85, 


84. 


85, 


84, 


85, 




84, 




84, 




84, 


85, 


86. 


85, 


86. 


85, 


86, 




85, 


86, 


87, 




86, 


86, 


87, 




86, 




86, 


86, 


87, 


87, 


88. 


87, 


88, 




87, 




87, 


87- 


-89, 


87, 


88, 




87, 


88. 


89, 


88, 


89, 




88, 




88, 


88, 


89, 




88, 




89, 


89, 


90, 


89, 


90, 




89, 


89, 


90, 




89, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90—92. 


90. 


91, 


90, 


91, 


90, 


92, 


90, 


91, 


91, 


92, 


91, 


92, 


91, 


92, 




91, 



Edw'd R. Pennlngrton. 
Adam Turkes. 
Edwin B. Smith. 
Lucius B. Hutchinson. 
James N. Arbuckle. 
John H. Murphy. 
William Hill. 
93, John L. Armitage. 
93, William Harrigan. 
George B. Harrison. 
David A. Bell. 
Edward Q. Keasbey. 
William E. O'Connor. 
Charlese Holzwarth. 
Herman Lehlbach. 
Rush Burgess. 
Frederick S. Fish. 
Henry M. Doremus. 
R. Wayne Parker. 
Augustus F. R. Martin 
Franklin Murphy. 
Charles P. Underhill. 
Henry A. Potter. 
Elias M. Condit. 
Edwin Lister. 
Jacob Schreihofer. 
93. John H. Peal. 
James Peck. 
Charles E. Hill. 
Michael T. Barrett. 
Elvin W. Crane. 
Frank M. McDermitt. 
James Marlatt. 
William Harrigan. 
Thomas McGowan. 
Adrian Riker. 
DeForrest P. Lozler. 
Augustus Dusenberry. 
Joseph Schmelz. 
James A. Christie. 
John Gill. 
Richard A. Price. 
92. Leonard Kalisch. 
Moses Bigelow. 
Reuben Trier. 
Geo. W. Wiedenmayer 
George Rabenstein. 
Thomas H. Pollock. 
Thomas Smith. 
Charles Trefz. 
John J. Bertram. 
Edward H. Snyder. 
Edward W. Jackson. 
John NIeder. 
John R. Hardin. 
George W. Ketcham. 
Edward M. Taylor, 



*Tn 1880, W. H. Brown was unseated by William R. Wil- 
liams. 

**Mr. Bruemmer was elected for 1882, but died before 
Legislature convened. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



195 



92. 
93, 

93. 
93, 
93, 
93. 



93, 



94, 
94, 
94. 
94, 
95, 
95, 
95, 
95, 
95, 
95, 

96, 
96, 

96, 
97. 
97, 



92, 
92. 
92, 
92, 
93, 
94, 
93, 
94, 
94, 
94, 
94, 
93, 
93. 
94. 
93, 
94, 
95, 
95, 
95, 
95, 
96, 
96, 
96. 
96, 
96, 
96. 
95. 
97. 
97, 
96. 
97. 
98. 
98. 



97. 
97, 

97, 
97, 
97, 

98, 



99, 
99, 



Thomas F. Cavanagh 
James A. Dempsey. 
Benedict Ulrich. 
William L. Glorieux. 
Augustus C. Studer. 
William Harrigan. 
John L. Armitage. 
Joseph P. Clarke. 
Joseph M. Byrne. 
Thomas A. Murphey. 
Dennis F. Olvaney. 
William J. Kearns. 
John H. Peal. 
J. Broadhead Woolsey. 99, 
Timothy Barrett. 99, 

Thomas P. Edwards. 99, 
96, Charles B. Duncan. 99, 
John C. Eisele. 99, 

Charles B. Storrs. 99, 

George P. Olcott. 99, 

Amos W. Harrison. 
Alfred F. Skinner. 00, 
James A. Christie. 01, 
George L. Smith. 01, 

David E. Benedict. 01, 
Charles A. Schober. 01, 
Frederick W. Mock. 01, 
Thomas H. Jones. 01, 

Albert J. Simpson. 01, 
Hayward A. Harvey. 01, 
James J. Hogan. 01, 

Charles W. Powers. 01, 
George W. W. Porter. 



98, Edwin F. Steddig. 
98, Alvin C. Ebie. 

97, George B. Harrison. 

98, Jacob Rau, Jr. 

98, Peter B. Fairehild. 
98, Carl V. Bauman. 

98, Joseph B. Johnson. 

99, Albert T. Guenther. 
98, Oliver B. Dawson. 

98, William C. Schmidt. 

99. John L. Bullard. 
1900, Jacob Clark. 

1900, John W. Weseman. 
1900, John Kreitler. 
1900, Frederick J. Deleot. 
1900, G. F. Brandenburgh. 
1900, William Mungle. 
1900, John N. Klein. 
1900, John P. Dexheimer. 
1900. Benjamin F. Jones. 
1900. George S. Campbell. 

01, 02, J. Henry Bacheller. 

02, Wm. B. Garrabrants. 
02, John Howe. 

02, Robert W. Brown. 
02, Ralph B. Schmidt. 
02, Edward E. Gnichtel. 
02, William G. Sharwell. 
02, Edgar Williams. 
02, Fred'k Cummings. 
02, Robert M. Boyd, Jr. 
02, William A. Lord. 



Gloucester Coiintv- 



45, 
45. 

47, 
47, 
49, 



51, 



58, 
58, 
60, 

60, 



46, Samuel W. Cooper. 
46, Benjamin Harding. 
48, John B. Miller. 

48, John B. Hilliard. 
50, John Duell. 

49, John Burk. 

50, Thomas Gaskell. 

52, Benjamin C. Tatem. 
51. Edmund Weatherby. 

52, Thomas Mills. 

53, Jeptha Abbott. 

53, John V. Parch. 

54, John Franklin. 

54, Benjamin Beckett. 
56, Jacob G. Tomlin. 

56, James B. Albertson. 

57, John H. Bradway. 
57, Benjamin Smith. 
59, John F. Thomas. 

59, George C. Hewitt. 
61. John Starr. 

60, 'Joseph Harker. 

61, *Joseph H. Duffield. 



62, 


63, 


Allen Moore. 




62, 


Thomas G. Batten. 


63, 


64, 


E. C. Heritage. 


64, 


65, 


Nathan S. Abbott. 


65, 


66, 


William D. Wilson. 


66, 


67, 


William W. Clark. 




67, 


Jacob J. Hendrickson. 




68. 


Charles T. Molony. 




68, 


Wm. B. Rosenbaum. 


69- 


-71, 


Nimrod Woolery. 


69, 


70, 


Leonard F. Harding. 


71, 


72, 


John S. Rulon. 




72, 


John R. Middleton. 


73, 


74, 


Obadiah Eldridge. 


73, 


74, 


D. W .C. Hemmingway 


75, 


76, 


Thomas B. Lodge. 




75, 


Simeon Warrington. 


76, 


77, 


Samuel Moore. 


77- 


-79, 


Caleb C. Pancoast. 


78, 


79, 


Lawrence Lock. 


80, 


81, 


George Craft. 


80, 


81, 


Thomas M. Ferrell. 




82, 


Abijah S. Hewitt. 



*Mr. Harker died during the session of 1860, and Mr. 
Duffield was elected to fill the vacancy. 



196 



ASSEMBLTMEN. 



83—85, Job S. Haines. 
86, 87, Joseph B. Roe. 
88—90, James West. 
91, 92, James J. Davidson. 



93—96, Solomon H. Stanger. 
97—99, David O. Watkins. 
1900. '01. William P. Buck. 
02, John Boyd Avis. 



Hudson County, 



45, 


46, 




47, 




48, 




49, 




50, 


51, 


52, 




52, 




52, 




53, 




53, 




53. 




54, 




54, 


54, 


55, 




55, 




55, 




56, 




56, 


56, 


57, 




57, 


57, 


58, 




58, 


58- 


-60, 




59, 




59, 




60, 




60, 




61, 




61, 


61, 


62, 




az. 


62. 


63. 


62. 


63. 


62, 


63, 


62—64. 


63. 


64, 


63, 


64. 




64. 


64. 


65. 


64, 


65, 




65. 




65. 




65. 


65. 


66. 


66- 


-68. 


66. 


67. 


66, 


67, 




66. 




66. 


67. 


68. 


67. 


68. 


67. 


68. 




68. 


6S. 


69, 


69, 


70, 



Hart' an VanWagenen 69, 70, 
Benjamin F. Welsh. 69, 

Oliver S. Strong. 69, 71, 

Jas. J. Van Boskerck. 70, 71, 
Edward T. Carpenter. 70, 

John Van Vorst. 70, 

Edmund T. Parker. 71, 

Joseph W. Hancox. 71, 

John Dunn Littell. 71, 

James S. Davenport. 71, 

Jacob M. Vreeland. 72, 73, 

Clement M. Hancox. 72, 73, 

Aug. F. Hardenbergh. 72, 73, 

Jacob M. Merseles. 72, 73, 

Dudley S. Gregory, Jr. 72, 73, 

John M. Board. 72, 73, 
John D. Ward. 72, 

James T. Hatfield. 72, 

George V. De Mott. 73, 

Robert Gilchrist, Jr. 73, 74, 

Robert C. Bacot. 74, 75, 

William Voorhees. 74, 75, 

Garret M. Van Horn. 74, 75, 

Wm. H. Hemenover. 74—76, 
Samuel A. French. 74, 

W. H. Peckham. 74, 

N. C. Slaight. 74—77. 

Franklin B. Carpenter 75, 76, 
Theo. F. Randolph. 75, 

Michael J. Vreeland. 75, 

Hid ward D. Reiley. 76, 

George McLaughlin. 76, 

Josiah Conley. 76, 

John B. Perry. 76, 78. 

Joshua Benson. 76, 77, 

James Lynch. 77. 78. 

Garret D. Van Reipen 77. 78. 

John B. Drayton. 77, 78. 
John Van Vorst. 77. 

Abraham W. Duryee. 77. 
Delos E. Culver. 77. 

William E. Broking. 78. 

Hiram Van Buskirk. 78. 

69, 70. Leon Abbett. 78. 79. 

Noah D. Taylor. 78, 79. 
O D. Falkenburg. 79, 

De Witt C. Morris. 79, 

John Ramsay. 79, 

Charles F. Ruh. 79. 

Hosea F. Clark. 79. SO, 

A. O. Evans. 79. 80. 

John Dwyer. SO. 81, 

John Van Vorst. 80. 81. 

Henry C Smith. SO, 81. 

Sidney B. Bevans. 80, 81, 



James B. Doremus. 
Elbridge V. S. Besson. 
Michael Coogan. 
Herman D. Busch. 
Abel I. Smith. 
William Brinkerhoflf. 
James F. Fielder. 
John Anness. 
George Warrin. 
Josiah Hornblower. 
George H. Farrier. 
Dennis Reardon. 
George S. Plympton. 
Henry Gaede. 
Jasper Wandel. 
Anthony J. Ryder. 
James Stevens. 
John A. O'Neill. 
John Lee. 

Richard C. Washburn 
Alexander T. McGill. 
Patrick Sheeran. 
Alexander McDonnell 
John D. Carscallen. 
Henry Coombs. 
James K. Selleck. 
Rudolph F. Rabe. 
John J. Toffey. 
Thomas Carey. 
Edward F. McDonald. 
William A. Lewis. 
Henry Brautlgam. 
Thomas C. Brown. 
Alex. Jocobus. 
Thomas J. Hannon. 
Marmaduke Tilden. 
Alexander W. Harris. 
.Tames Stevens 
Martin M Drohan 
Lewis A. Brigham. 
Eliiah T. Paxton. 
Dudley S. Steele. 
Edward P. C. Lewis. 
81. T. J. McDonald. 
Henry Dusenberry. 
John Owen Rouse. 
Frank C Frey. 
G A. Lilliendahl. 
.Tohn A. Tangeman. 
.Joseph Meeks. 
Samuel W^. Stilsing. 
Noah D, Taylor. 
Allan L. MoDermott. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
James Curran. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



197 



Thomas B. Usher. 
J. Herbert Potts. 
Simeon H. Smith. 
James Moylan. 
Henry Puster. 
John F. Madden. 
William D. Daly. 
Thomas Magner. 
James Tumilty. 
George A. Heaney. 
Timothy J. Carroll. 
Martin Lawless. 
Michael J. Coyle. 
Cornelius J. Tahen. 
John Zeller. 
Ebenezer Berry. 
Max Salinger. 
Henry H. Holmes. 
Hugh A. Kelly. 
Adam J. Dittmar. 
S. V. W. Stout. 
Thomas Egan. 
George W. Harding. 
John Kerr. 

Thomas McEwan, Jr. 
Charles Erlenkotter. 
James Usher. 
William N. Parslow. 
Pierce J. Fleming. 
Henry C. Gruber. 
Richard M. Smart. 
David M. Cagney. 
James F. Blackshaw. 
Henry M, Nutzhorn. 
Frederick Schober. 
Robert McAndrew. 
William E. Drake. 
Carl H. Ruempler. 
John W. Queen. 
John E. Hewitt. 
Edward Hoos. 
Joseph P. Mullin. 
Horace L. Allen. 
Charles T. Bauer. 
Elmer W. Demarest. 
William M. Klink. 
Robert D. Urquhart. 
Isaac F. Goldenhorn. 
William G. Nelson, 
John E. McArthur. 
Theodore C. Wildman. 
Charles M. Evans. 
Clement DeR. Leonard 
William H. Dod. 
William O. Armbruster 
Alexander Simpson. 
Adolph Walter, Jr. 
1900, Allan Benny. 

•Mr. Short was elected to a second term of office, but 
he died before the Legislature met. Mr. Francis was 
chosen for the vacancy. 



81, 

81. 82, 
80, 82, 

82. 83, 
82—84, 
82-84, 

82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
82, 
83, 
83, 
83—85, 

83. 84, 
83. 84, 
83. 84, 

83. 84, 

84, 85, 

84, 85, 
84, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 
85, 

85, 86, 
86. 

86, 87, 
86, 
86. 

86, 87, 

86, 87, 

86, 

86, 87, 

86, 87, 
87. 

87—90, 
87—89. 

87, 88, 
88, 

88, 89. 
88. 89. 



89, 92. 
89. 

89, 90. 
89. 

90, 91. 
90, 91. 

90. 

90. 

90, 

90, 91, 



Patrick Sheeran. 
Frederick Payne. 
James J. Casey. 
David W. Lawrence. 
Thomas V. Cator. 
James C. Clarke. 
Dennis McLaughlin. 
William McAdoo. 
Robert McCague, Jr. 
George H. Farrier. 
David M. Durrell. 
John O'Rourke. 
Peter F. Wanser. 
John M. Shannon. 
Edwin O. Chapman. 
Martin Steljes. 
Augustus A. Rich. 
Frank O. Cole. 
Joseph T. Kelly. 
Cornelius S. See, 
87. 88, S. D. Dickinson. 
Michael J. O'Donnell. 
Thomas H. Kelly. 
Isaac Romaine. 
John W. Heck. 
James J. Clark. 
John Wade. 
Fred. Frambach, Jr. 
John C. Besson. 
R. B. Seymour. 
Philip Tumulty. 
D. A. Peloubet. 
A. B. Dayton. 
John Pearson. 
89, R. S. Hudspeth. 
T. J. McDonald. 
Thomas F. Noonan. 
Edward Lennon. 
Edwd T. McLaughlin. 
Wm. C. Heppenheimer. 
John P. Feeney. 
William H. Letts. 
Joseph Gallagher. 
•Tames F. Norton, 
Richard Brown. 
Charles W, Fuller, 
Edward P. Farrell. 
*E. Frank Short, 
Patrick H. O'Neill. 
Peter T. Donnelly. 
Laurence Fagan. 
Judson C. Francois. 
Michael MuUone. 
Henry Byrne. 
James Murphy. 
James S. Erwin. 
John F. Kelly. 
Andrew J. Boyle, 



90, 


91, 


90- 


-92, 




91, 


91, 


92, 




91, 




91, 




91, 




92, 




92, 




92, 


92- 


-94, 


92, 


93, 


92- 


-94, 


92, 


93, 


92, 


93, 


93, 


94, 


93, 


94, 




93, 


93, 


94, 




93, 




93, 




94, 




94, 




94, 




94, 




94, 


94, 


95, 


95, 


96, 


95, 


96, 




95, 


95. 


96, 


95, 


96, 




95, 




95, 




95, 




95, 




95, 




96. 




96, 




96, 




96, 




96, 


96, 


98, 


96, 


98. 




97. 




97. 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97, 




97. 




98, 




98. 


98. 


99, 



19S 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



98, 99, 1900, James J. Murphy. 00, 01, 02, John J. Fallon. 



98, 99, James P. Hall. 
98, 99, Fergus T. Kelaher. 
98, 99, Michael J. Bruder. 
98, 99, John J. Marnell. 

98. 99. 1900, Tim. J. Carroll. 
99—1901, Leon Abbett. 
99—1901, Maurice Marks. 
99—1901, John H. Vollers. 

99, 1900, J. Emil Walscheid. 
1900, '01, P. Anthony Brock. 
00, 01, 02, George G. Tennant. 

Hunterdon County 



00, 01, 02, Edward J. Rice. 

01, 02, John A. Dennin. 
01, 02, Patrick H. Connolly. 
01, 02, Peter Stillwell. 
01, 02, Kilian V. Lutz. 

02, James A. Hamill. 
02, William F. Hurley. 
02, C. G. A. Schumann. 
02, John J. Treacy. 
02, Pred'k Weismann. 



45, 48, 49, Jonathan Pickel. 
45, John Swackhammer. 
45, Amos Moore. 

45, John H. Case. 

46, Henry Stevenson. 

46, 47. Isaac R. Srope. 
46, 47, Joseph Fritts. 

46, 47, Frederick Apgar. 
47 — 49, John Lambert. 
48, 49, Andrew Banghart. 
48. 49, David Van Fleet. 
50, 51, John Marlow. 
50, 51, Luther Opdycke. 
50, 51, William Tinsman. 
50—52, John R. Young. 



52, 
52, 

53, 
53. 
54, 
54, 



56, 
56, 
56, 

56, 
58, 
58, 
58. 
58, 
60, 
60, 
60, 

61, 
62, 



46, 
46, 
46, 

48, 



53, Peter H. Aller. 

53, Andrew Vansickle. 
52, Hiram Bennett. 

54, John Lambert. 

54, Samuel H. Britton. 

55, Lewis Young. 

55, Peter E. Voorhees. 
55, Jacob S. C. Pittenger. 
55, Edward Hunt. 
57, William Sergeant. 
57, John M. Voorhis. 
57, Joseph W. Willever. 
57, John P. Rittenhouse. 
59, John H. Horn. 
59, William Snyder, 
59. Cornelius B. Sheets. 

59, Frederick Apgar. 
61, Charles Denson. 
61, Ambrose Barcroft. 

61, D. D. Schomp. 

60, Thos. Banghart, Jr. 

62, Jacob H. Huffman. 

63, S. R. Huselton. 

3Iercer 

45, Israel J. Woodward. 

45, Richard J. Bond. 

45, *John Lowrey. 

47, Isaac Pullen. 

47, John M. Vancleve. 

47, William White. 

49, James M. Redmond. 



48—50, Josiah Buzby. 



64, Joseph W. Wood. 

64, David H. Banghart. 

65, David B. Boss. 
67, William I. Iliff. 

66, James J. Willever. 

67, Richard H. Wilson. 

68, Baltes Pickel. 

69, John Williamson. 
-70, Theodore Probasco. 

70, John P. Lare. 

71, John Kugler. 

72, Peter Voorhees. 
72, Aug. E. Sanderson, 
74, W. L. Hoppock, 
74, John Carpenter, Jr, 
76, James Bird. 
76, William W. Swayze. 
78, Henry Britton. 
78, John Hackett. 
80, Charles W. Godown. 
80, James N. Ramsey. 
82, George H. Mathews. 
82, Jacob Hipp. 
84, John V, Robbins. 
84, W. Howard Lake. 

-87, John C. Arnwine. 
85—87, Chester Wolverton. 
88—90, William H. Martin. 
88—90, Laurence H. Trimmer. 
91, 92, William B. Niece, 
91—93, Benjamin E, Tine. 
93, J. L. Chamberlin. 
94, 95, Charles N. Redding. 
94—96, William C. Alpaugh, 
96—98, David Lawshe. 
97—99, George F. Martens, Jr. 
99—01, Oliver I. Blackwell. 
00, 01, 02, W^ A. Laudenberger 
County. 

48, Samuel C. Cornell. 

49, John R. Dill. 

50, John F. Hageman, 
50, 51, John H. Phillips, 

51, Eli Rogers. 

51, Westley P, Danser. 

52, William Napton. 
52, John C. Ward. 



62, 
63, 
64, 
65, 
65, 
66, 
67, 



69, 
70, 
71, 
71, 
73, 
73, 
75, 
75, 
77, 
77, 
79, 
79, 
81, 
81, 
83, 
83, 
85- 



*Died in office. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



199 





52, . 




53, 




53, 




53, 




54, 




54, 




54, 




55, 




55, 




55, 


56, 


57, 


56, 


57, 




56, 


57, 


58, 


58, 


59, 




58, 




59, 


59, 


60, 


60, 


61, 




60, 




61, 


61, 


62, 


62, 


63, 




62, 




63, 


63, 


64, 




64, 


64, 


65, 


65, 


66, 


65, 


66, 


66, 


67, 


67, 


71, 




67, 


68, 


69, 




68, 




68, 




69, 


69, 


70, 


70, 


71, 




70, 




71, 


72, 


73, 




72, 




72. 


73, 


74, 


73, 


74, 


74, 


75. 




75, 




75, 




76, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46, 


45, 


46. 


45, 


46, 




47, 




47, 




47, 


47, 


. 48, 




48, 


48, 


, 49, 


48^ 


. 49, 



Jeremiah Vandyke. 
Abner B. Tomlinson. 
Elijah L. Hendrickson 
Randal C. Robbins. 
James H. Hill. 
Franklin S. Mills. 
Runey R. Forman. 
James Vandeventer. 
William Jay. 
Garret Schenck. 
Geo. R. Cook. 
Andrew Dutcher. 
Samuel Wooley. 
Jacob Van Dyke. 
Augustus Li. Martin. 
Jonathan S. Fish. 
Robert Aitken. 
Ed. T. R. Applegate. 
Joseph Abbott. 
Harper Crozer. 
William S. Yard. 
Morgan F. Mount. 
Geo. W. Johnston. 
John G. Stevens. 
Peter Crozer. 
James G. West. 
James F. Bruere. 
John A. Weart. 
Alex, P. Green. 
Samuel Fisher. 
Thomas Crozer. 
Joseph H. Bruere. 
Charles W. Mount. 
Absalom P. Lanning. 
Thomas J. Corson. 
Thomas C. Pearce. 
John P. Nelson. 
James C. Norris. 
William H. Barton. 
Charles O. Hudnut. 
Liscomb T. Robbins. 
Alfred W. Smith. 
Richard R. Rogers. 
John H. Silvers. 
John N. Lindsay. 
Andrew J. Smith. 
Geo. O. Vanderbilt. 
Samuel M. Youmans. 
Robt. S. Woodruff, Jr. 
Enoch H. Drake. 



77, 



76, John Hart Brewer. 

76, Robert L. Hutchinson. 

78, Horatio N. Burroughs. 

77, William S. Yard. 
77, J. Vance Powers. 

79, 82, Eckford Moore. 
79, John D. Rue. 
79, William Roberts. 
81, Charles S. Robinson. 
81, Richard A. Donnelly. 
81, John V. D. Beekman. 
83, Nelson M. Lewis. 

83, William J. Convery. 

84, Joseph H. Applegate. 

85, A. Judson Rue. 
85, John Caminade. 
85, Benj. F. Chambers. 

S. B, Hutchinson. 
James C. Taylor, Jr. 
William Ossenberg. 
Frederick Walter. 
George D. Scudder. 
Charles H. Olden. 
Josiah Jones. 
Lyman Leavitt. 
Uriel T. Scudder. 

89, Thomas S. Chambers. 

90, John Schroth. 

91, Jacob R. Wyckoff. 

90, Howell C. Stull. 

91, James H. Mulheron. 

92, Patrick T. Burns. 

93, James W. Lanning. 
93, Barton B. Hutchinson. 
93, Charles G. Roebling. 
95, William L. Wilbur. 
95, John Ginder. 
95, William T. Exton. 
97, Elijah C. Hutchinson. 
97, Geo. W. Macpherson. 

97, J. Wiggans Thorn. 
99, John B. Yard. 

98, Frank M. Weller. 

99, Henry J. Nicklin. 
1900, Ira W. Wood. 

1900, '01, J. Warren Fleming. 
1900, '01, Frederick P. Rees. 
01, 02, George W. Page. 

02, Harry D. Leavitt. 

02, Bertrand L. Gulick. 



87, 
86, 
86, 
87, 
87, 
88, 



89, 



91, 
92, 
92, 

94, 
94, 
94, 
96, 
96, 
96, 
98, 

98, 
99, 



Middlesex County, 



Simeon W. Phillips. 
Ralph C. Stults. 49, 

Daniel C. Dunn. 
Charles Abraham. 
Garret G. Voorhees. 
Theodore F. King. 
John A. Davison. 
Richard McDowell. 
Melancton F. Carman 51, 
Lewis S. Randolph. 
Aaron Gulick. 52, 



49, William A. Gulick. 

50, James Bishop. 
50, Henry Vandyke. 
50, Charles Abraham. 

50, Israel R. Coriell. 

51, David Dunn. 
51, Peter F. Dye. 

51, J. B. Johnson. 

52, Robert M. Crowell. 

52, James Applegate. 

53, Josephus Shann. 



200 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



53—55, 

53, 54, 

54, 55, 

55, 56, 
56, 

56, 57, 
57, 

57, 58, 
58—60, 

58, 59, 
59, 
60, 
60, 

61. 62, 

62. 63, 
62, 

63. 64. 

63, 64, 

64, 65, 
65—67, 

65, 

66, 67, 

66, 67, 

68, 

68, 69, 

68, 69, 

70. 71, 

70, 

71—73, 

71, 

72, 73, 

72, 

73, 

74, 

74, 

74, 75 

75, 

75, 

76, 

76. 77. 

76, 77, 

77, 

45, 
45—47, 

45, 46, 
45—47. 

45, 

46, 47, 
46, 47, 

47, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

48, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 

49, 50, 

49, 



78, 
78, 
78, 



80, 
81, 
81, 



Martin A. Howell. 
Abraham Everett. 
Samuel E. Stelle. 
William Hutchinson. 
John T. Jenkins. 
Amos Robbins. 
Henry Stults. 
John D. Buckelew. 
Ellis B, Freeman. 
Garret I. Snedeker. 
Andrew McDowell. 
Thomas Booraem. 
Elias Dey. 
Elias Ross. 
James T. Crowell. 
Orlando Perrine. 
Miles Ross. 
David B. Wyckoff. 
Abraham C. Coriell. 
69, 70, Levi D. Jarrard. 
James G. Goble. 
Nathan H. Tyrell. 
John W. Perrine. 
George E. Strong. 
Alfred W. Jones. 
William M. Cox. 
Albert L. Runyon, 
George E. Brown. 
Isaac L. Fischer. 
Edward F. Roberts. 
Joseph C. Letson. 
Johnston Holcombe. 
H. F. Worthington. 
John Von Deursen. 
John F. Ten Broeck. 
Joseph C. Magee, Jr. 
James H. Van Cleef. 
Josephus Shann. 
Isaiah Rolfe. 
Charles A. Campbell. 
Daniel Z. Martin. 
John Waldron. 

Monnioiitli Count\ 



79, Isaac L. Martin. 
79, Patrick Convery. 

79, Vincent W. Mount. 

80, Robert G. Miller. 

80, John M. Board. 

81, Stephen M. Martin. 



James H. Van Cleef. 

Manning Freeman. 

John Adair. 

James H. Goodwin. 

William R. Jernee. 

Edward S. Savage. 

Robert Carson. 

John Martin. 
87, John F. Ten Broeck. 
87, R. R. Vandenbergh. 

John Mulvey. 

Ephraim Cutter. 

Daniel M. Kane. 

Charles B. Herbert. 

Ijuther H. Tappen. 

William C. Jacques. 

Charles H. Manahan. 
94, John W. Beekman. 
93, John H. Daly. 

93, Hezekiah Warne. 

94, William F. Harkins, 
94—96, Andrew H. Slover. 
95, 96, Edward W. Hicks. 

96, George H. Tice. 

97, Alexander C. Litterst. 
Jacob H. Whitfield. 
James Fountain. 
Adam Eckert. 
Joseph H. Ridgeway. 
John J. Quaid. 



82, 
83, 
84, 
84, 
85, 
86, 
86, 
87, 



90, 
90, 
90, 
92- 
92, 
92, 



82, 
83, 
82, 
83, 
84, 
85, 
85, 
86, 



89, 
89, 
89, 
91, 
91, 
91, 



95, 



97, 
97, 
99, 
99, 
99, 



98, 

98, 

98 

1900, 01, Adrian Lyon. 

1900, '01, H. Raymond Groves 

00, 01. 02.J. E. Montgomery. 

02, Myron J. Whitford. 

02, W. H. C. Jackson. 



George F. Fort. 
Hartshorne Tantum. 
Andrew Simpson. 
Joseph B. Coward. 
*Jas. H. Hartshorne. 
William Vandoren. 
John Borden. 
Andrew Simpson. 
William W. Bennett. 
Joel Parker. 
Ferdinand Woodward. 
♦Samuel Bennett. 
Joel W. Ayres. 
Alfred Walling. 
George W. Sutphin. 
James D. Hall. 
James Hooper. 



49, John B. Williams. 

50, William G. Hooper. 

50, Charles Butcher. 
52, William H. Conover. 
52, Garret S. Smock. 

51, Bernard Connolly. 
Charles Butcher. 
Samuel W. Jones. 
Charles Allen. 
Daniel P. Van Doren. 
Robert Allen. 
Forman Hendrickson. 

.54, John L. Corlies. 
54—56, Henry E. Lafetra. 
55, John Vandoren. 
55, Thomas B. Stout. 
55, William H. Johnson. 



51, 
51, 



52, 
51—53, 
53, 



53, 



53, 
54, 
54, 



♦Died In office. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



201 



56, 57, 
56, 57, 
56, 57, 
57—59, 
58, 59, 
58, 59, 
57—60, 
60, 61, 

60, 61, 
60, 

61, 62, 
61, 62, 

62, 
63, 65, 
63, 64, 
63, 64, 
65, 66, 
65, 66, 

66, 
67, 68, 
67, 68, 
67, 68, 

69, 
69, 70, 
69, 70, 
70—72, 

71, 
71, 72, 

72, 
73—75, 
73, 74, 
73, 74, 
75, 76, 

75, 76, 

76, 77, 

77, 78, 
77, 
78, 

78, 79, 

79, 80, 



45, 
45, 46, 
45, 46, 

45, 46, 

46, 47, 
47, 
47, 
47, 

48, 49, 

48, 49, 

48, 49, 

48, 49, 

50, 

50, 

50, 

50, 

51, 

51, 

51. 

51. 52, 

52, 53. 



Jacob Herbert. 79, 80 

John R. Barricklo. SO, 81 

Samuel Beers. 81 

John V. Conover. 81, 82 

George Middleton. 82, 83, 

Richard B. Walling. 82, 

Austin H. Patterson. 83, 84 

William H. Mount. 83, 84, 

James Patterson. 84, 85 

J. J. McNinney. 85 

William V. Ward. 85, 86 

Charles Halght. 86, 87, 

George C. Murray. 86 

Michael Taylor. 88, 89 

Osborn Curtis. 88, 89 

David H. Wyckoff. 89, 

Daniel A. Holmes. 90, 91, 

George Schenck. 90, 91 

William C. Browne. 90, 91 

Charles Allen. 92, 93 

Francis Corlies. 92, 93 

Thomas S. R. Brown. 92, 93, 

William H. Conover. 94, 

Daniel H. Van Mater. 94, 95 

Andrew Brown. 94 

Austin H. Patterson. 95, 96 

William S. Horner. 95, 96 

John T. Haight. 96 

Wm. B. Hendrickson. 97 

George W. Patterson. 97 

John B. Gifford. 97 

John S. Sproul. 98, 99 
Chas. D. Hendrickson. 98, 99 

William V. Conover. 98, 99 

James D. Rue. 1900, ' 

William H. Bennett. 1900, ' 

James H. Leonard. 1900, ' 

George J. Ely. 02, 

Arthur Wilson. 02, 
87, Sherman B. Oviatt. 02, 



92, 93, John D. Honce. 

87, 88, G. H. Lufburrow 
, Holmes W. Murphy. 
, David A. Bell. 

Peter Forman, Jr. 

Benjamin Griggs. 

Alfred B. Stoney. 

Thomas G. Chattle. 

Charles H. Boud. 

William H. Grant. 

Frank E. Heyer. 

W. S. Throckmorton. 

William Pintard. 

Edward B. Potts. 

Archibald A. Higgins. 

William F. Patterson. 

Aaron E. Johnston. 

William D. Campbell. 

Charles H. Ivins. 

John D. Honc*» 

Reuben G. Strahan. 

William Taber Parker, 

Charles L. Walters. 

David D. Denise. 

Richard Borden. 

Charles A. Francis. 
, George B. Snyder. 
, Alfred Walling, Jr. 
, William H. Reid. 

Oliver H. Brown. 
, Daniel E. Van Wickle. 
I, Joseph L. Butcher. 

Joseph C. Heyer, 
. B. Drummond Woolley 
01, Charles R. Snyder. 
01, Sam'l W. Kirkbride. 
01, William Hyres. 

William T. Hoffman. 

John A. Howland. 

Somers T. Champion. 



3IoiTis County. 



Timothy Kitchel. 52, 

Matthias Kitchel. 52, 

Henry Seward. 
George H. Thompson. 54, 
Calvin Howell. 54, 

Richard Lewis. 54, 

Charles McFarland. 
Samuel Hilts. 55, 

Andrew I. Smith. 
David T. Cooper. 56, 

Samuel Van Ness. 56, 

Edward W. Whelpley. 57, 
John L. Kanouse. 57, 

Andrew Cobb, 58, 

Freeman Wood. 58, 

George H. Thompson. 
Horace Chamberlain. 59, 
Jonathan P. Bartley. 
Josiah Meeker. 60- 

Cornellus B. Doremus. 60- 
C. S. Dickerson. 



53, John D. Jackson. 

53, Robert Albright. 
.53, John L. Kanouse. 

55, William P. Conkling. 
55, William Logan. 

55, Aaron Pitney. 

54, Andrew B. Cobb. 

56, Edward Howell. 

56, Wm. M. Muchmore. 

57, William A. Carr. 

57, Daniel Budd. 

58, Benjamin M. Felch. 

58, Richard Speer. 

59, Lyman A. Chandler. 
59, John Naughright. 

59, A. H. Stansborough. 

60, James H. Ball. 

60, Eugene Ayres. 
-62, Nelson H. Drake. 
-62, Nathan Horton. 

61, William W. Beach. 



202 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



61, 
62. 

63- 

64. 



66, 
66. 



68- 
69, 
69, 
71, 
71, 
71- 
73, 
73, 
74- 
75, 
75, 



77, 
79, 

51— i 

55, 
57- 



62, 
63, 
63, 

-65, 
64, 
65, 
65, 
66, 
67, 
67, 
67, 
68. 
68. 

-70. 
70, 
70, 
72, 
72, 

-73, 
74, 
74. 

-76. 
76. 
76, 
77, 
77, 
78. 
78, 
78, 
80, 



64, 
66, 
68, 
70, 



53, 
54, 
56, 
■59, 
60, 
61, 
62, 
63, 
65, 
67, 
69, 
71. 
72. 
73, 
74. 



45. 46, 
45, 46, 

47, 
47, 48, 

48, 

49. 50. 
49, 

50. 51. 

51. 52, 
52, 



John Hill. 
Jacob Vanatta. 
William J. Wood. 
Jesse Hoffman, 
Henry C. Sanders. 
John Bates. 
Alfred M. Treadwell. 
John Hill. 
James C. Tawger. 
Ellas M. White. 
Lewis Estler. 
Daniel Coghlan. 
George Gage. 
Jesse M, Sharp. 
Theodore W. Phoenix. 
Columbus Beach. 
Nathaniel Niles. 
W. B. Lefevre. 
August C. Canfleld. 
W. H. Howell. 
Jacob Z. Budd. 
Elias M. Skellinger. 
James C. Youngblood. 
Edmund D. Halsey. 
Abm. C. Van Duyne. 
♦Cummins O. Cooper. 
C. P. Garrabrant. 
Francis J. Doremus. 
Joshua S. Salmon. 
Charles F. Axtell. 

Ocean 

Joel Haywood. 
A. O. S. Havens. 
William F. Brown. 
Edwin Salter. 
Thomas W. Ivlns. 
Charles H. Applegate. 
Ephraim Emson. 
Edwin Salter. 
Jacob Birdsall. 
Job Edwards. 
G. W. Cowperthwaite. 
Albert M. Bradshaw. 
Richard B. Parlcer. 
John S. Shultze. 
Edward M. Lonan. 

Passaic 
George W. Colfax. 
Chileon F. De Camp. 
Abm. Prall. 
Henry M. Van Ness. 
John M. Demarest. 
C. S. Van Wagoner. 
Oscar Decker. 
Thomas D. Hoxsey. 
Benjamin Geroe. 
J. S. Fayerweather. 



79, 80, James H. Bruen. 
79, 80, HoUoway W. Hunt. 
81, 82. William C. Johnson. 
81, 82, 91, 92, John F. Post. 
81, 82, Oscar Lindsley. 
83—85. George W. Jenkins. 
83, 84, James H. Neighbour. 
83, 84, Amzi F. Weaver. 
85, 86, John Seward Wills. 

85, 86, Elias C. Drake. 

86, 87, John Norwood. 

87, 88, Samuel S. Lyon. 

87, 88, John R. Pitney. 

88, 89. Carnot B. Meeker. 

89, 90, John Norris. 

89, 90, William S. Nauright. 

90, 91, Jas. Preston Albright. 

91, 92, Ford D. Smith. 

93, Thomas J. O'Brien. 

93, Sylvester Utter. 
94, 95. Charles A. Baker. 
94, 95, William C. Bates. 
96, 97, Charles F. Hopkins. 
96, 97, Joseph B. Righter. 
98—1900, Jacob W. Welsh. 
98, 99, George E. Poole. 
1900. '01, Samuel L. Garrison. 
01, 02, Chas. R. Whitehead". 

02, William T. Brown. 



County. 

75, 87, 88. 89, J. S. Goble. 

76, Ephraim P. Emson. 

77, Isaac A. Van Hise. 
78—80, Rufus Blodgett. 

81, William H. Bennett. 

82, Clifford Horner. 

83, George T. Cranmer. 

84, Augustus W. Irons. 
85, 86, George G. Smith. 
90—92, Adolph Ernst. 

93, 94, John T. Burton. 
95, 96, Abraham Lower. 
97, 98. Roderick A. Clark. 
99—1901, Courtney C Carr. 
02, George W. Holman, Jr. 

County. 

53, J. V. R. Van Blarcom. 

53, Cornelius Van Winkle 
53, 54, Philip RafCerty. 

54, Charles H. May. 
51, 52. 54. John L, Laroe. 

55, William C. Stratton. 

55, William M. Morrell. 
55, 56, John Schoonmaker. 
56—58, Benj. Buckley. 

56, Peter H. Whitenor. 



♦In 1878, Cummins O. Coo per was unseated by Joshua 
Salmon. 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



203 



58, 
59- 



60, 
61, 
62- 
62- 

63, 
63, 
64, 
65, 
65, 
67, 
67, 

68. 
69. 
69. 



71, 
71. 
72. 

73, 
74, 
74, 
76, 
76. 
76, 

78, 
79, 
80, 
80, 



82. 
82. 
82- 



47. 



57, 
57, 
58, 
59, 

-61, 
59, 
60, 
61, 
62, 

-66, 

-66, 
63, 
64, 
64, 
65, 
66, 
66, 
68, 
68, 
67, 
69, 
70, 
70. 
70. 
70, 
78, 
72, 
73, 
73, 
74. 
75, 
75, 
77, 
77, 
77, 
78, 
79. 
80, 
81, 
81, 
81, 
82, 
83, 
83, 

-85, 



45, 
45, 
45, 
46, 
46, 
46, 
47, 
47, 
48, 
48, 
48, 
49, 
49, 
49, 
50, 
50. 



John J. Brown. 
James B. Beam. 
Patrick Maginnls. 
Richard Van Houten. 
Samuel Pope. 
Joel M. Johnson. 
Isaac Stagg. 
Isaac P. Cooley. 
Socrates Tuttle. 
John N. Terhune. 
Chandler D. Norton. 
Samuel Pope. 
Joseph N. Taylor, 
Charles F. Johnson. 
Aaron Klnter. 
Garret Van Wagoner. 
Isaac D. Blauvelt. 
David Henry. 
Joseph R. Baldwin. 
E. A. Stansbury. 
A. A. Van Voorhees. 
Hugh Reld. 
72, C. Hemmlngway. 
Henry Hobbs. 
Charles P. Gumee. 
79, John O'Brien. 
75, Robert M. Torbet. 
Henry McDanolds. 
George Barnes. 
Garret A. Hobart. 
David Henry. 
John P. Zeluff. 
John W. Griggs. 
John Sanderson. 
Jos. L. Cunningham. 
John Kennell. 
John H. Robinson. 
George W. Conkling. 
Robert B. Morehead. 
Thomas B. Vreeland. 
Jacob Latus. 
Joseph A. Greaves. 
Patrick H. Shields. 
William F. Gaston. 
92, 93. Thomas Flynn. 



90, 
90, 

90, 

92, 
92. 
92, 

93, 



95, 
95, 
95, 



98, 
98, 

99- 



91, 
91, 
93, 



83, 84, Clark W. Mills. 

84, William Prall. 

84, Cornelius A. Cadmus. 
85, 86, John Scheele. 
85, 86, De Witt C. Bolton. 
85, 86, George H. Low. 

86, William B. Gourley. 
87, 88, George Law. 

87, John Donohue. 

87, Robert A. Carroll. 
87, 88, 89, James Keys. 

88, James H. Rogers. 

88, Eugene Emley. 

89, John I. Holt. 
89, Chas. T. Woodward. 

89, William W. Welch. 
91, John King. 

91, John F. Kerr. 

90, Thomas McCran. 
Robert Williams. 
Richard Carroll. 
Frank Gledhill. 

93. 94. Thomas Flynn. 

93, John F, Smith. 

92, James Parker. 

94, John I. Holt. 
94, John McKelvey. 

94, William I. Lewis. 

95, Samuel Frederick. 

96, James Robertson. 
96. Samuel Bullock. 

96, 97, 99, 1900, John King. 
96—98, Henry W. Gledhll} 

97. Frank Atherton. 

97, Phineas Bridge. 
99, Wood McKee. 
99. John W. Sturr. 

98. John Donohue. 

01, Vivian M. Lewis. 

00, 01. 02, Edmund G. Stalter. 

1900. Richard Berry. 

01, 02, Wm. B. Davidson. 
01, 02, Hiram Keasler. 

02, Raymond Bogert. 

02, Fred. W. VanBlarcom. 



Salem County. 



David Wiley. 
Isaiah Conklyn. 
Robert Hewitt. 
Ephralm Carel. 
Charles Bilderback. 
George Remster. 
Joseph M. Springer. 
James Vanmeter. 
Joseph Foster. 
Benj. F. McCollIster. 
Joseph R. Chew. 
James H. Trenchard. 
Isaac Lippincott. 
John Fowler. 
Charles B. Newell. 
David Slthens. 



57- 



50, Benjamin Remster. 

51. Smith Bilderback. 
51, Charles Benner. 

51. Harman Richman. 

52. Jacob Hitchner. 

52, John C. Lummis. 

53, Nathaniel G. Swing. 

53, John Blackwood. 

54, Isaiah D. Clawson. 

54, Richard Grler. 

55, Joshua Thompson. 

55, John Harris. 

56, Joseph Kllle. 

56, Samuel Plummer. 

57, William Beckett. 
-59. Thomas B. Jones. 



204 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



58, 


59, 


60, 


61, 




60, 




61, 




62, 




62, 


63, 


64, 




63, 




64, 




65, 


65, 


66, 


66, 


67, 




67, 




68, 


68, 


69, 


69, 


70, 




70, 




71, 




71, 


72, 


73, 




72, 




45, 




45, 




45, 




46, 


46, 


47, 




46, 


47—49, 


47—49, 


48- 


-50, 


50, 


51, 




50, 




51, 


51, 


52, 




52. 


53, 


54, 


54—56, 




55, 


56, 


57, 




57. 


58, 


59, 


59, 


60. 


60, 


61, 


61- 


-63, 


62, 


63, 


64, 


65, 


65, 


66, 




45, 




45, 




45, 




46, 


46, 


47, 


46- 


-48, 


47- 


-49, 


48- 


-50, 




49. 


50, 


51, 



Alfred SImpkins. 73, 74, 

Joshua Lippincott. 74, 75, 

Samuel Habermayer. 75, 

Owen L. Jones, 76, 

William P. Somers. 76—78. 

Samuel D. Miller. 77, 

Joseph W. Cooper. 78, 

Joseph Waddington. 79—81, 

William N. Hancock. 79—81, 

William Callahan. 82—84, 
A. M. P.V.H. Dickeson85, 86, 

Samuel Garrison. 87, 

John S. Newell. 88, 

Henry M. Wright. 89, 90, 

Andrew S. Reeves, 91, 92 

Charles F. H. Gray. 93, 94 

David Evans, 95, 96, 

John W, Dickinson. 97, 98 

John Hitchner, 99 

Daniel P. Darrell. 1900. ' 

Smith Hewitt. 02, 



William Tszard. 

William B. Carpenter. 

Charles P. Swing, 

Richard Coles. 

Quinton Keasbey, 

John S. Elwell, 

William C, Kates, 

Henry Barber. 

John D. Garwood. 

Henry Combs. 

Joseph D, Whitaker. 

William Newell. 

Millard F. Riley, 

John C, Ward. 
, James Strimple, 

William Diver, 

Charles W, Powers, 

Joseph B. Crispen, 

Frank Wright. 
01. Henry J. Blohm. 

John Tyler. 



Somerset Coiintj\ 



Peter Voorhees. 
Samuel Reynolds. 
Peter Kline, 
James B, Blmendorf. 
Peter T, Beekman. 
Jonathan Cory. 
Samuel K. Martin. 
F, V, D, Voorhees. 
John M, WyckofP, 
53, John De Mott. 
Samuel S. Doty. 
Frederick D, Brokaw. 
Eugene S, Doughty. 
Michael R, Nevlus. 
John H. Anderson. 
John S, Hoagland, 
Alvah Lewis. 
Cornelius M, Schomp, 
Cornelius N, Allen. 
Nehemiah V. Steele. 
Elisha B. Wood. 
70, J, W, Arrowsmlth. 
John G. Schenck, 
John M, Mann. 
Daniel Corey, 
Rynler A, Staats. 



66, 

68, 

69—' 

72, 
73, 

74, 

75- 
76, 
78- 
78- 
81, 

83, 

85, 



89, 

94, 

97, 
99, 
01, 



67, Ralph Davenport, 

67, Peter A. Voorhees. 
69, John J. Bergen, 

68, Abraham T. Huff. 
71, John R, Staats. 
71, James Doty. 

73, David D. Smalley. 

74, John G. Schenck. 

75, William P. Sutphin. 
-77, Joseph H. Voorhees. 

77, 91, 92, Jas. J, Bergen, 
-80, John Ringelmann, 
-80, J. Newton Voorhees. 
82, William A, Schomp. 
81, John L, Oakey. 
84, Cornelius S, Hoffman. 

86, John Vetterlein. 

87, George E. Pace, 

88, Oscar Conkling, 
90, Jacob Klotz. 

93, George H. Cramer. 

95, Frank W, Somers. 

96, Charles A. Reed. 

98. Peter V, D. VanDoren. 
1900. Edward E. Cooper. 
02, Henry W. Hoagland. 



Sussex County. 



Absalom Dunning. 
Jesse Bell, 
Timothy H, Cook. 
Juhn Hunt. 
Peter Young. 
Thos, D. Armstrong, 
Peter Hoyt, 
Jacob Hornbeck, Jr. 
Martin Ryerson. 
Guy Price. 



50, 51, William Slmurson. 

51, Daniel D. Decker. 

52, George W. Collver. 

52, 55, Aaron K. Stinson, 
52—54, Timothy E. Shay. 

53. 54, Beniamin Hamilton. 
53, 54. Luther Hill, 

55, James L. Decker. 
55—57, Daniel D. Gould, 
56—58, William Smith, 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



205 



56—58, John W. Opdyke. 71, 72, 

58, Sanford McKeeby. 71, 

59, 60, Martin Cole. 75, 76, 

60, 61, Charles Mackerly. 77, 78, 
60, 61, Daniel D. Decker. 79—81, 

61, William Price. 82—84, 
62—64, William H. Bell. 85—87, 

62, Thomas N. McCarter. 88—90, 
63, 64, Robert Hamilton. 91—93. 

65, Samuel Fowler. 94—96. 

65-67, William M. IlifC. 97, 

66, 67, 73, 74, F. M. Ward. 98, 99, 

68—70. Hiram C. Clark. 1901, 

68—70, Samuel H. Hunt. 02, 



Lebbeus Martin. 
Peter Smith. 
William Owen. 
George Greer. 
Lewis J. Martin. 
William E. Ross. 
Horatio N. Kinney. 
Andrew J. Bale. 
Jacob Swartwout. 
William P. Coursen. 
Horace E. Rude. 
1900, Elvin E. Smith. 
Theodore M. Roe. 
Lewis S. Hiff. 



I'liioii County. 



58, Benjamin M. Price. 



59, 
60, 

62, 

63, 
64, 



68, 
70, 



72- 
72- 

74, 
H, 
76- 
76, 
76, 
78- 

79. 
79- 



Cooper Parse. 
William Stiles. 
Elston Marsh. 
David Mulford. 
Israel O. Maxwell. 
Samuel L. Moore. 
62, John J. Hig-h. 

64, Noah Woodruff. 

65, Philip Dougherty. 

65, Joseph T. Crowell. 

66, John R. Crane. 
66, Thomas J. Lee. 

A. M. W. Ball. 
Enos W. Runyon. 
John H. Whelan. 
DeWitt C. Hough. 
71, 75, Ferd. Blancke. 

70, Albert A. Drake. 

71, Joseph W. Yates. 

72, Andrew Dutcher. 
-74, William McKlnley. 
-74. John H. Lufberry. 

73, Jabez B. Cooley. 
75, William H. Gill. 
75, Elias B. Pope. 

-78, John Egan. 

77, Moses F. Cary. 
77- Benjamin A. Vail. 

-80, George M. Stiles. 

78, Joseph B. Coward. 
80. Philip H. Vernon. 

-82, John T. Dunn. 



58, 
59, 
60, 
61, 
61. 
63, 



67, 
67, 
69, 
69, 



T\ar 

45, 46, Robert C. Caskey. 

45. Abram Wildrick. 

45, Stephen Warne. 
46—48, Jonathan Shotwell. 
46—48, Amos H. Drake. 
47 — 49, Samuel Mayberry. 
49—51, Andrew Ribble. 
49—51, Benjamin Fritts. 
50, 51, 53. John Loller. 
52—54. John Sherrer. 
52—54, David V. C. Crate. 



81, 82, George T. Parrott. 
81—83, Frank L. Sheldon. 
83, 84, Edward J. Byrnes. 
83, 84, Asa T. Woodruff. 

84, DeWitt C. Hough. 

85, 86, Peter L. Hughes. 
85—87, William H. Corbin. 

85, Jacob Kirkner. 

86, 87, Wm. Chamberlain. 

87, 88, John J. xviatthews. 
88—90, Foster M. Voorhees. 
88—90, John Ulrlch. 

89, 90. Frederick C. Marsh. 
91, 92, John Carroll. 
91—93, George Kyte. 
91—93, Thomas F. Lane. 

93, Timothy M. Kelly. 
94, 95, John N. Burger. 
94, 95, Joseph Cross. 
94, 95, Charles N. Codding. 
96, 97, Henry Clauss. 
96. 97, J. Martin Roll. 
96. 97, William R. Codington 
98, 99, George A. Squire. 
98, 99, Roger F. Murray. 
98, 99. Robert G. Houston. 
1900, '01, Ellis R. Meeker. 
1900, '01, Chester M. Smith. 
1900. '01, Charles S. Foote. 

02, Frederick Miller. 

02, William Newcorn, 

02, William F. Hall. 



ren County. 

52, John Cline. 
54—56. George H. Beatty. 
55—57. Archibald Osborn. 
55—57, John White. 
57—59, Isaac Leida. 
58, 59, William Feit. 

58, Abm. S. Van Horn. 
59—61, Robert Rusling. 
60—62. John C. Bennett. 

60, Philip Shoemaker. 
61, 63, David Smith. 



206 



ASSEMBLYMEN. 



62-^4, William W. Strader. 
63—65, Elijah Allen. 
64—66, Charles G. Hoagland. 
65, 66, Silas Young. 
66—68, Andrew J. Fulmer. 
^7. 68, John N. Givens. 
67—69, Nelson Vliet. 
69—71, Absalom B. Pursell. 
69—71, Caleb H. Valentine. 
70—72, William Silverthom. 
72—74, Valentine Mutchler. 
73—75, Joseph Anderson. 

75, John M. Wyckoff. 

76, William Carpenter. 
76—78, Elias J. Mackey. 
77—79, Silas W. De Witt. 
79—81, Coursen H. Albertson. 
80—82, William Fritts, 



82, Robert Bond. 
83—85, Stephen C. Larison. 
83—85, Isaac Wildrick. 

86, Thomas L. Titus. 
86, 87, William M. Baird. 
87—89, Samuel B. Mutchler. 
88—91, Eliphalet Hoover. 
90—92, Daniel W. Hagerty. 
92—94, L. Milton Wilson. 

93, Richard H. Sheppard. 
94, 95, Samuel V. Davis. 

95, George W. Smith. 
96—98, Alfred L. Flummerfelt. 
96—98, William K. Bowers. 
99—1901, Hiram D. White. 
99—1901, Jacob B. Smith. 

02, William R. Laire. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 207 

THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

(For the Year Ending October 31. 1903.) 



CHAPTER 210. 

An Act making- appropriations for the support of the state 
government and for several public purposes for the fiscal 
year ending October thirty-first, one thousand nine hun- 
dred and two. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the 
State of New Jersey: 

1. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be 
necessary, be and they are appropriated out of the state 
fund for the respective public officers and for the several 
purposes herein specified, for the fiscal year ending on the 
thirty-first day of October, in the year one thousand nine 
hundred and two, namely: 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

For the governor, for salary, $10,000; 

For the private secretary of the governor, for salary, 
$2,000; 

For compensation for assistants in the executive depart- 
ment, $2,500; 

For blanks and stationery for the use of the executive 
department, $300; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the executive department, $850. 

OFFICE OF THE COMPTROLLER. 

For the comptroller, for salary, $6,000; 

For the first assistant in the comptroller's office, for 
salary, $2,500; 

For compensation for other clerical service in the comp- 
troller's oflace, $4,000; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
comptroller, $600; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the comptroller's office. 



OFFICE OF THE TREASURER. 

For the treasurer, for salary, $6,000; 

For compensation for clerical services in the office of 
the treasurer, including assistants employed in the man- 
agement of the sinking fund, $5,900; 



20? THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For additional compensation for clerical services in th'? 
office of the treasurer, including assistants employed in 
the management of the sinking fund, $1,100; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
treasurer, $450; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expense?^ 
for the office of the treasurer, $650. 

OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 

For the secretary of state, for salary, $6,000; 

For the assistant secretary of state, for salary, $3,000; 

For compensation for all clerical services in the office 
of secretary of state $12,250; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of secretary of state $1,600; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
secretary of state, $4,700; 

For compiling and indexing the election laws, $200; 

For preparing a new index of the record of wills, intes- 
tates, et cetera, in the office of the secretary of state, $300. 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the attorney-general, for salary, $7,000; 

For compensation and expenses of assistants employed 
by the attorney-general, $5,500; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
attorney-general, $250; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the attorney-general's departm.ent, $300; 

For master's fees for taking affidavits for the attorney- 
general's office, which shall include all such service re- 
quired for the year, $100; 

For the contingent fund, to be expended only with the 
approval of the governor and comptroller, for the fees of 
assistant attorneys and counsel in litigations which may 
arise under chapter one hundred and fifty-nine of the laws 
of one thousand eigiit hundred and eighty-four and chap- 
ter two hundred and eight of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-eight, in the enforcement of cor- 
porate taxation, $1,000. 

STATE BOARD OF ASSESSORS. 

Bor the members of the state board of assessors, for 
salaries, $10,000; 

For secretary of the state board of assessors, for salary, 
$2,500; 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 209 

For compensation for clerical service in the office of the 
state board of assessors. $4,500; 

For blanks and stationery for vise in the office of the 
state board of assessors, $500. 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the state board of assessors, $750. 

For compensation of local assessors and witnesses, and 
compensation and expenses of surveyors, pursuant to 
chapter one hundred and one of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-four, $5,000; 

For compensation for clerical service in the office of the 
state board of assessors, for the purpose of carrying into 
effect the provisions of chapter one hundred and ninety- 
five of the laws of nineteen hundred, $1,500. 

DEPARTMENT OF BANKING AND INSURANCE. 

For the commissioner of banking and insurance, for sal- 
ary, $4,000; 

For the deputy commissioner of banking and insurance, 
for salary, $2,500; 

For compensation for assistants in the department of 
banking and insurance, $7,180; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the department of 
banking and insurance, $1,800; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the department of banking and insurance, $1,500; 

For compensation of building and loan association ex- 
aminers, $1,200; 

For actual and necessary traveling and incidental per- 
sonal expenses of building and loan association exam- 
iners, $6,200; 

For necessary appraisals of real estate and all other 
incidental expenses in connection with examinations of 
building and loan associations, $2,500. 

STATE BOARD OF TAXATION. 

For the members of the state board of taxation, for 
salaries, $10,000; 

For the members of the state board of taxation for ex- 
penses incurred in attending to their official business, 
$1,200; 

For the secretary of the state board of taxation for ex- 
penses incurred in attending to his official business, $300. 

For assistants in the office of the state board of taxation, 
$2,970; 

14 



210 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
state board of taxation, $150; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of state board of taxation, $500. 

STATE LIBRARY. 

For the librarian, for salary, $2,0CK); 

For compensation for assistants in the state library, 

$2,100; 

For the repair, preservation and purchase of useful 
books for the state library, $3,500; 

For blanks, stationery, postage, expressage and other 
incidental expenses for the state library, $500. 

STATE TRAVELING LIBRARIES. 
For the board of commissioners of the state library, 
$500, pursuant to chapter one hundred and seventy-five of 
the lows of one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For the state board of health, pursuant to the provisions 
of chapter sixty-eight, laws of one thousand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-seven, $7,440; 

For compensation to the secretary of said board, pur- 
suant to said chapter, $2,500; 

For expenses to be incurred pursuant to chapter two 
hundred and twenty-flve, laws of one thousand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-six, $1,000; 

For blanks and stationery for use in office of state board 
of health, $1,200; 

For maintenance of the bacteriological laboratory, $4,000; 

For legal expenses incurred by the state board of health, 
$2,000; 

For postage required in sending to the physicians of this 
state the annual report of the state board of health and 
of the bureau of vital statistics, $294; 

For additional clerical assistance in the office of the 
state board of health, $300. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

For the purpose of carrying into effect the provisions 
of "An act to secure the purity of foods, beverages, con- 
fectionery, condiments, drugs and medicines, and to pre- 
vent deception in the distribution and sales thereof," 
passed at the legislative session of nineteen hundred and 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 211 

nue, and "An act to prevent deception in the sale of oleo- 
margarine, butterine or any imitation of dairy products, 
and to preserve the public health," pursuant to chapter 
84 of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
six, $12,000. 

BUREAU OF STATISTICS. 

For the chief of the bureau of statistics, for salary, 
$2,500; 

For the deputy chief of the bureau of statistics, for sal- 
ary, $1,800; 

For the current expenses of the bureau of statistics, 
$6,000; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
bureau of statistics, $300. 

STATE HOUSE COMMISSION. 

For the governor, treasurer and comptroller, for the care 
and safe keeping of the state capitol, the property therein 
and adjacent public grounds, and for expenses to be in- 
curred in carrying out the provisions of chapter three 
hundred and thirty-nine of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and ninety-four, $55,000; 

For the governor, treasurer and comptroller, to be ex- 
pended for supervising services in carrying out the pro- 
visions of chapter four hundred and thirteen of the laws 
of one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, $500. 

STATE MUSEQM. 

For curator, for salary, $1,500; 

For the commission to acquire new material for the 
museum and for blanks, stationery and other incidental 
expenses, $500. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY". 

For salaries and expenses of department of geological 
survey and for the completion of the geological survey 
of this state, pursuant to chapter three hundred of the 
laws of one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, and 
for the continuance of forestry investigation, $10,000; 

For expenses in connection with the publication of the 
reports and maps of the geological survey, $5,000. 

SUPREME COURT. 
For the chief justice and associate justices of the 
supreme court, for salaries, $82,000. 
For the judges of the circuit courts, for salaries, $22,500; 



212 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For compensation of sergeant-at-arms and criers, $1,300; 

For the payment of expenses incurred by the order of 
the supreme court, pursuant to chapter one hundred and 
forty-nine of the laws of one thousand nme hundred, $2,000. 

OFFICE OP CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

For the clerk of the supreme court, for salary, $6,000; 

For compensation for clerical service in the office of the 
clerk of the supreme court, $15,000; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
clerk of the supreme court, $1,250; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of the clerk of the supreme court, $1,300. 

COURT OF CHANCERY. 

For the chancellor, for salary, $10,000; 

For the vice-chancellors, for salaries, $54,000; 

For compensation of sergeants-at-arms, $3,700. 

For compensation of stenographers, $7,500; 

For compensation and allowance of advisory masters, 
$3,000; 

For rent of rooms in Camden, Jersey City and Newark, 
for the use of chancellor, vice-chancellors and advisory 
masters, $4,750; 

For miscellaneous expenses in connection with such 
rooms, $200; 

For compensation of stenographer for the chancellor, 
$600; 

For allowance for stationery for the court of chancery, 
$500. 

OFFICE OF CLERK IN CHANCERY. 

For the clerk in chancery, for salary, $6,000; 

For compensation for clerical service in the office of the 
clerk in chancery, $24,500; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the office of the 
clerk in chancery, $1,800; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the office of the clerk in chancery, $1,400. 

COURT OF ERRORS AND APPEALS. 

For compensation of judges of the court of errors and 
appeals, $12,000; 

For compensation of officers of the court of errors and 
appeals, $525; 

For furnishing printed or typewritten copies of draft 
opinions under the direction of the presiding judge, $500. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 213 

COURT OF PARDONS. 
For per diem allowance and mileage for judges of court 
of pardons, $1,000; 
For compensation of subordinate officers, $300. 

LAW AND EQUITY REPORTS. 
For the publication of the chancery reports, $4,500; 
For the publication of the law reports, $4,000; 
For salary of chancery reporter, $500; 
For salary of supreme court reporter, $500; 
For binding- chancery and law reports, $1,200. 

NATIONAL GUARD. 

For expenses for division, brigade and regimental head- 
quarters, $3,500; 

For allowances for two gatling-gun companies, $1,500; 

For allowances to two cavalry troops, $2,000; 

For allowances to companies of the national guard, at 
the rate of $500 each, $24,000; 

For transportation for battalion drills, inspections, 
parades and miscellaneous service, and pay of brigade 
inspectors, $4,000; 

For compensation of officers and employes and expenses 
incLirred in connection with rifle range and practice, 
$10,000; 

For pay of officers and enlisted men and expenses in- 
curred in connection with the annual encampment, $.35,000; 

For compensation of superintendent and employes and 
for forage, fuel and maintenance of the state camp 
grounds, $7,000; 

For expenses, repairs, water and maintenance of the 
state arsenal, $2,000; 

For expenses of military boards and court-martial, $500; 

For military expenses incident to the signal and tele- 
graph corps, $1,000; 

For transportation of disabled soldiers to the home at 
Kearny, $50; 

For maintaining, heating and lighting the armories in 
Jersey City, Camden, Newark and Paterson, the sum of 
$4,000 for each armory, $16,000; 

For pay and expenses of officer detailed from United 
States army for military instruction to officers and en- 
listed men of the national guard, $600; 

For insuring regimental armories, state military prop- 
erty and buildings at state camp grounds at Sea Girt, 
$1,000; 



214 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For ordnance stores, uniforms, camp and garrison 
equipage, quartermaster's stores, miscellaneous supplies 
and freight and express charges, $15,000. 

NAVAL RESERVE. 

First battalion, in lieu of company allowances, $1,500; 
For pay and expenses of officers and men on annual 
cruise, $2,500; 
For battalion headquarters, $300; 

For pay of ship-keeper, maintenance and expenses, $6,000; 
Second battalion, in lieu of company allowances, $1,500. 
For battalion headquarters, $300; 
For pay of ship-keeper, maintenance and expenses, $4,500. 

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT. 

For the adjutant-general, for salary, $2,500; 

For compensation for clerical service in the adjutant- 
general's office, $4,000; 

For additional allowance for clerical service in the 
adjutant-general's office, $1,200; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the adjutant-gen- 
eral's office, $1,100; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the adjutant-general's office, $500; 

For printing' and binding roster of officers and men of 
New Jersey in the revolutionary and other wars, pursuant 
to joint resolution number one, approved March twenty- 
second, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight, 
$2,000. 

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL' S DEPARTMENT. 

For the quartermaster-general, for salary, $2,500; 

For compensation for assistants in the department of the 
quartermaster-general, $8,700; 

For blanks and stationery for use in the quartermaster- 
g-eneral's department, $200; 

For postage, expressage and other incidental expenses 
for the quartermaster-general's department, $2.50. 

MONMOUTH BATTLE MONUMENT. 

For the commission having- in charge the Monmouth 
battle monument and groimds, pursuant to chapter one 
hundred and eighteen of the laws of one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six, $500, 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 215 

TRENTON BATTLE MONUMENT. 

For the Trenton battle monument association, for the 
purpose of keeping said property in good condition and 
repair, $500. 

PENSIONS. 

For amount required to pay pensions, pursuant to vari- 
ous acts relative thereto, $4,284. 

HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS. 
For support of the New Jersey Home for disabled sol- 
diers and for the chaplain thereof, $22,500. 

SOLDIERS' STATE PAY. 

For claims of volunteers in the civil war, for state pay, 
pursuant to chapter thirteen of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-one, $100. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION OF NEW JERSEY. 
For trustees of the Washington association of New 
Jersey, $2,500. 

STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 

For the state board of agriculture, $6,000; 

For the state board of agriculture for the purpose of 
carrying out the provisions of an act to prevent the intro- 
duction into and spread of injurious insects in New Jer- 
sey, to provide a method for compelling their destruction, 
to creat the office of state entomologist, to authorize in- 
spection of nurseries and to provide for certificates of 
inspection, $1,000. 

TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 

For expenses and payments by the state tuberculosis 
commission, $10,000; 

For additional allowance for expenses and payments by 
the state tuberculosis commission, $5,000; provided, such 
sum shall be authorized by enactment of the present legis- 
lature; 

For expenses and payments by the .state tuberculosis 
commission, pursuant to chapter one hundred and eighty- 
one of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and ninety- 
nine, $500. 

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION. 

For salaries and expenses of the agricultural experiment 
Station, $15,000; 



216 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For printing bulletins of the agricultural experiment 
station, $1,000; 

For expenses incurred by the New Jersey agricultural 
experiment station in carrying out the provisions of "An 
act concerning the regulation of the sale of concentrated 
commercial feeding stuffs," $3,000. 

BOARD OF VISITORS TO THE AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. 

For the board of visitors to the agricultural college of 
New Jersey, for personal expenses incurred pursuant to 
chapter three hundred and sixty-five of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-three, $50; 

For advertising pursuant to chapter nine of the laws of 
one thousand eight hundred and seventy-nine, $90. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

For traveling expenses of managers, $600; 

For expenses in transferring insane convicts, $200; 

For medical examination of insane convicts. 



STATE HOSPITAL AT TRENTON. 

For maintenance of county patients, $50,000; 

For support and clothing of insane convicts, at the rate 
of $5 per week for each insane convict, $9,000; 

For support of indigent patients, at the rate of $3 per 
week, and cost of clothing, $11,000; 

For salaries of officers, $12,000; 

For appraisement of personal property, $75. 

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORRIS PLAINS. 

For maintenance of county patients, $50,000; 

For support and clothing of insan^ convicts, at the rate 
of $5 per week for each insane convict, $15,000; 

For support of indigent patients, at the rate of $3 per 
week, and cost of clothing, $15,000; 

For salaries of officers, $12,600. 

For appraisement of personal property, $75. 

COUNTY LUNATIC ASYLUMS. 

For the support of county patients in the Essex county 
lunatic asylum, $90,000; 
In the Hudson county lunatic asylum, $60,000; 
In the Camden county lunatic asylum, $20,000; 
In the Burlington county lunatic asylum, $5,000; 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 217 

In the Passaic county lunatic asylum, $4,000; 
In the Gloucester county lunatic asj'lum, $1,700; 
In the Cumberland county lunatic asylum, $12,000; 
In the Salem county lunatic asylum, $2,000; 
In the Atlantic county lunatic asylum, $5,700. 

STATE PRISON. 

For maintenance of convicts, $90,000; 

For furniture, appliances and repairs of state prison, 
$10,000; 

For the principal keeper, for salary, $3,500; 

For the supervisor, for salary, $3,000; 

For the deputy keepers and employes, for salaries, 
$90,000; 

For the six inspectors, for salaries, $3,000; 

For the keeper, for payments to discharged convicts, 
$3,000; 

For teacher and moral instructor to the convicts in the 
state prison, pursuant to section seven, chapter one hun- 
dred and fifty-five of the laws of one thousand eight hun- 
dred and seventy-six, for salary, $1,000. 

STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

For the trustees of the New Jersey state home for boys, 
$62,000; 

For the trustees of said home, for expenses incurred by 
them in the discharge of their duties, $250. 

STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

For the trustees of the New Jersey state home for girls, 
for the support of and necessary repairs to the home, 
$24,000; 

For the trustees of said home, for expenses incurred in 
the discharge of their duties, $300. 

STATE BOARD OF ARBITRATION. 

For the members of the board of arbitration, for sal- 
aries, $6,000; 

For the secretary of the state board of arbitration, for 
salary, $200; 

For blanks, stationery and other incidentals for use in 
the ofljce of the state board of arbitration, $50. 

BOARD OF FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONERS. 
For the fish and game wardens, including the fish and 
game protector, for compensation, $15,600; 



218 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For expenses of the fish and game wardens and flsh and 
game protector, $5,100; 

For the purpose of stocking the waters of the state with 
food fishes and for defraying the cost of maintaining a 
hatchery and for the protection and propagation of birds 
and game animals within this state, $4,000; 

For expenses of the fish and game commissioners, $1,000. 

BLIND AND FEEBLE MINDED. 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction of 
the blind persons, inhabitants of this state, $11,800; 

For clothing, maintenance, support and instruction of 
the feeble minded persons, inhabitants of this state, $52,000; 

For maintenance, support and instruction of feeble 
minded women, $20,000; 

For the board of managers of the home for feeble 
minded women, for the purpose of constructing a sewer 
to connect with the sewer in the city of Vineland, $3,500. 

FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS. 

For the inspector and six deputy inspectors of factories 
and workshops, for salaries, $8,500; 

For the necessary expenses incurred by the inspector 
and his deputies in the discharge of their duties, $2,000. 

STATE CHARITIES AID ASSOCIATION. 
For expenses of the association, $600. 

STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

To the treasurer of the New Jersey state horticultural 
society, the sum of $400. 

SINKING FUND ACCOUNT. 

For the state treasurer for "sinking fund account," for 
payment of interest on civil war debt falling due January 
first, one thousand nine hundred and two, $2,130; 

For the state treasurer for expenses in foreclosure and 
other necessary legal proceedings relative to sinking fund 
account, $500. 

ADVERTISING. 
For advertising proclamations issued by the governor, 
notices of the attorney-general in relation to delinquent 
miscellaneous corporations, and notices of the comptroller 
ip regard to public printing, et cetera, $3,000, 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 219 

PRINTING. 

For printing- and binding- public documents, $35,000; 

For compensation of an expert printer for services in 
preparation of specifications for bids, supervision of work, 
examination of bills, and such other duties as may by- 
law be imposed upon him, $600; 

For preparing index of session laws, $100; 

For printing- and circulation of the laws, $9,000. 

PUBLIC ROADS. 

For public roads, pursuant to the provisions of chapter 
forty-three of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-nine, $150,000; 

For the state commissioner of public roads, for salary, 
$2,500; 

For compensation of supervisor for assisting the state 
commissioner of public roads in supervising, construc- 
tion, and performing- such other duties as necessity may 
require, $1,000; 

For expenses for clerk hire, attorney and consulting en- 
gineer, fees, stationery and actual traveling- expenses, 
$1,500. 

OYSTER COMMISSION. 

To promote the propagation and growth of seed oysters 
and to protect the natural oyster seed grounds of this 
state, $10,000; 

For the preservation of clams, $2,000. 

NEW JERSEY OYSTER AND SHELL COMMISSION. 
For the purpose of carrying- into effect the provisions of 
chapter one hundred and eighty-five of the laws of nine- 
teen hundred, $1,000. 

LEGISLATURE. 

For compensation of senators and members of the gen- 
eral assembly, $40,83.3.32. 

For compensation of officers and employes of the legis- 
lature, $30,150; 

For stationery for use of the legislative session, pur- 
suant to chapter two hundred and eig-ht of the laws of 
one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, $500; 

For manuals of the legislature of New Jersey, .$2,000; 

For indexing the journal of the senate and minutes of 
the executive sessions and the minutes of the house of 
assembly, and other incidental and contingent expenses 
of the legislature, $6,700; 



220 . THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

For toilet and other necessary supplies for use at the 
legislative session, to he furnished by the state house 
commission, $700. 

COLLATERAL INHERITANCE TAX. 

For surrogates' fees, appraisers' compensation and ex- 
penses, legal and other disbursements, pursuant to chap- 
ter two hundred and ten of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-four, $10,000. 

INSURANCE. 

For insurance upon state house and contents thereof, 
$1,900. 

REFUNDING TAXES ON EXEMPTED MISCELLA- 
NEOUS CORPORATIONS. 

For taxes improperly levied upon exempted corporations 
and to be refunded pursuant to law, $500. 

WEATHER SERVICE. 

For the continuance of weather stations and prepara- 
tion, printing and distribution of reports, pursuant to 
chapter two hundred and fifty-eight of the laws of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two, $1,000. 

BODIES THROWN UPON SHORES OF THE STATE 
BY SHIPWRECK. 

For expenses incurred in viewing bodies cast upon shores 
by shipwreck, $100. 

BOARD OP PILOT COMMISSIONERS. 

For expenses inc\irred bj'' the commissioners, pursuant 
to chapter three hundred and seven of the law^s of one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, $1,200. 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND. 

To the treasurer of Rutgers College, for interest on 
$48,000, certificate of indebtedness of the state of New Jer- 
sey, due January first and July first, one thousand nine 
hundred and two, pursuant to the provisions of chapter 
one hundred and thirty-five of the laws of one thousand 
eight hundred and ninety-six, $2,400. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 221 

PRESERVATION OF RECORDS. 

For the pui-pose of publishing the early records of this 
state, known as "New Jersey Archives," $3,500. 

RIPARIAN COMMISSION. 

For salaries of riparian commissioners, $6,000; 
For expenses incurred in the prosecution of the work of 
the commissioners, $6,000; 

OBSTRUCTION TO NAVIGATION. 

For expenses incurred in removing- any boat, barge or 
scow stranded or sunk in any of the navigable rivers of 
this state, $500. 

MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 
FOR COLORED YOUTH. 

For maintenance of the manual training and indus- 
trial school for colored youth, at Eordentown, $5,000. 

NEW JERSEY SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF. 

For the New Jersey school for the deaf for the teach- 
ing, maintenance and clothing of pupils taught therein, 
for purchase and repair of furniture, school apparatus 
and other appliances, for making needed improvements 
and repairs in the buildings and grounds, for insurance 
thereof, and for maintaining the system of manual and 
industrial education in said school, $45,000. 

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. 

For the support of the state normal school, $48,000; 
For necessary repairs to the grounds, buildings and 
furniture, and for keeping the same insured, $4,000. 

FREE SCHOOL LIBRARIES. 

For the formation of libraries in the free public schools 
of the state, $5,500. 

FARNUM PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

For the support of the Farnum preparatory school at 
Beverly, $1,200. 



222 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION. 

For payments to schools established for industrial edu- 
cation, pursuant to chapter one hundred and sixty-four 
of the laws of one thousand eight hundred and eighty- 
one, $10,000; 

For payments to schools for manual training, pursuant 
to chapter ninety-six of the laws of one thousand nine 
hundred, $36,000. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

For salary of state superintendent of public instruction, 
$3,000; 

For salary of assistant state superintendent and for 
clerical services in the office of state superintendent of 
public instruction, $7,500; 

For stationery and blanks, $2,000; 

For necessary incidental expenses incurred by the state 
superintendent of public instruction in the performance 
of his official duties and for supervision of manual train- 
ing, $2,500. 

SCHOOL FUND EXPENSES. 

For necessary legal and other expenses incurred by or 
under the direction of the trustees for the support of pub- 
lic schools in the investment and protection of the school 
fund, and in the collection of the income thereof, $4,000. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

For necessary expenses of the state board of education, 
$2,500; 

For procuring plans for school-houses, $500; 

For supervising plans of new school-houses by state 
board of education, $1,000. 

TEACHERS' INSTITUTES. 
For expenses of teachers' institutes, $3,000. 

TEACHERS' LIBRARIES. 

For the establishment of libraries for use of teachers, 
$600. 

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS. 

For county superintendents of schools, for salaries, 
$26,000. 



THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 223 

EMERGENCY. 

For the governor, to enable him to meet any emergency- 
requiring the expenditure of money not otherwise appro- 
priated, the sum of $10,000, said sum, or any part thereof, 
to be paid by the treasurer on the warrant of the comp- 
troller upon accounts approved by the governor, 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

For expenses incurred by the state board of examiners 
and compensation for the person appointed by the state 
board of education, $250. 

BOARD OF STATE CANVASSERS. 

For per diem allowance and mileage for members of the 
board of state canvassers and incidental expenses con- 
nected therewith, $250. 

STATE SEWERAGE COMMISSION. 

For salaries of commissioners, $7,500; 

For salary of secretary, $750; 

For rent and necessary expenses of the commissioners, 
$2,500; provided, said expenses are approved by the gov- 
ernor. 

NEW JERSEY HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS. 
SAILORS, MARINES AND THEIR WIVES. 

For salaries and expenses, $10,000. 

STATE OYSTER COMMISSION. 

For the better regulation and control of the taking, 
planting and cultivating of oysters on lands lying under 
the tidal waters of the Delaware bay and Maurice river 
cove, in the state of New Jersey, .$12,323; 

For expenses incurred for making survey of the grounds 
of the Delaware bay and Maurice river cove, $1,000. 

STATE BOARD OF CHILDREN'S GUARDIANS. 

To the state board of children's guardians for expenses, 
$5,000. 

CIVIL WAR DEBT. 

For amount required to pay the last int^tallment of the 
principal of the civil war debt, due January first, nineteen 
hundred and two, $71,000. 



224 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION. 

For the pui-pose of carrying- into effect the provisions 
of chapter sixty-two, laws of nineteen hundred, $1,000; 

For necessary traveling and other incidental expenses 
incurred by the commission, 



TRENTON ARMORY. 

For the purpose of erecting an armory in the city of 
Trenton, pursuant to chapter fifteen of Lhe laws of nine- 
teen hundred and one, $50,000. 

NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

For traveling and other official expenses of commission- 
ers, $1,000; 

For the superintendent, for salary, $3,000; 

For the subordinate officers and employes, for salaries, 
$25,000; 

For maintenance of prisoners, $30,000; 

For furniture, appliances and repairs, $5,300; 

For superintendent for payments to discharged prison- 
ers, $1,000. 

For expenses in transferring prisoners to and from 
state prison, $500. 

STATE OYSTER COMMISSION. 

For the enforcement of the laws of this state for the 
protection of the oyster beds and seed oysters thereon 
under the tidal waters of the Delaware river and Dela- 
ware bay, $2,000; provided, such sum is authorized by leg- 
islative enactment. 

For the director of the biological department of the 
New Jersey agricultural college experiment station, at 
New Brunswick, to establish and maintain one or more 
stations for the scientific investigation of oyster propaga- 
tion, $200; provided, such sum be authorized by legislative 
enactment. 

MORRIS CANAL COMMISSION. 

For expenses in connection with the proposed abandon- 
ment of the Morris canal for navigation purposes and the 
proposed devotion of the property of the Morris canal 
and banking company, or of its lessee, the Lehigh Valley 
railroad company, to other public uses, $5,000; provided, 
such sum shall be authorized by legislative enactment. 



THK APPROPRIATION LAW. 225 

COMMISSIONERS OF THE PALISADES INTER- 
STATE PARK. 

For the purchase of lands as provided in "An act to 
amend an act entitled 'An act to provide for the selection, 
location, appropriation and management of certain lands 
along the palisades of the Hudson river for an interstate 
park, and thereby to preserve the scenery of the palisades,' 
approved March twenty-second, nineteen hundred," $50,000; 
provided, this sum shall not be available unless the gov- 
ernor shall be assured that sufficient sums from other 
sources shall be forthcoming to fully complete the palisade 
park scheme as now contemplated; and provided further, 
that such sum shall be authorized by legislative enact- 
ment. 

VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

For the superintendent, for salary, $2,500; 

For the warden, for salary, $1,000; 

For maintenance, $13,000; 

For repairs to buildings and roads, improvements to 
grounds, building and repairing fences and purchase of 
stock, $2,500; 

For ice house, $1,000. 

STATE SCHOOL TAX. 

For the purpose of reducing the state school tax to be 
assessed for the year nineteen hundred and two, a sum 
equal to thirty-five per centvim of the entire amount to be 
so raised is hereby appropriated, approximating $813,750. 

2. The following sum is hereby appropriated out of the 
income of the school fund for the purpose specified for the 
fiscal year ending on the thirty-first day of October, in 
the year one thousand nine hundred and two: 

FREE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

For the support of free public schools, $200,000; 

There shall be paid from the income of the school fund 
such sums required to pay premiums and accrued interest 
on bonds purchased by the trustees for the support of 
public schools. 

3. No money shall be drawn from the treasury except for 
objects as herein above specifically appropriated, and ex- 
cept such sums which are by law devoted to specific pur- 
poses, namely, state school tax. United States appropria- 
tion to agricultural college. United States appropriation 

15 



226 THE APPROPRIATION LAW. 

for disabled soldiers, United States appropriation for dis- 
abled soldiers, sailors, marines and their wives, agricul- 
tural college fund and taxes for the use of taxing districts 
in this state, and loans to "state school fund," which last- 
named sums shall be paid pursuant to the laws applicable 
thereto. 

4. This act shall take effect on the first day of November, 
one thousand nine hundred and one. 

Approved March 22, 1901. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 227 

NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 



The following is a list of the titles of newspapers pub- 
lished in the State of New Jersey; town and county where 
published; time of publication; political or special charac- 
ter, and names of editors and publishers: 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 

DER PILOT (German).— Egg Harbor City. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. H. Mass & Co., publishers. 
H. Mass, editor. 

DER BEOBACHTER (German).— Egg Harbor City. Week- 
ly, on Saturday. Wilhelm Mueller, publisher. 

DEUTSCHER HEROLD (German).— Egg Harbor City. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. George F. Breder. 

SOUTH JERSEY REPUBLICAN.— Hammonton Weekly, 
on SaturdaJ^ Republican. Hoyt «fe Son, publishers. 

ATLANTIC REVIEW.— Atlantic City. Daily, every morn- 
ing except Sunday, and Weekly on Saturday. Repub- 
lican. J. G. Shreve, editor and proprietor. 

ATLANTIC TIMES-DEMOCRAT, STAR GAZETTE.— At- 
lantic City. Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic. Daily 
Union Printing Co. J. F. Hall, editor and manager. 

ATLANTIC CITY DAILY PRESS.— Atlantic City. Daily, 
every morning, except Sunday. Republican. Walter 
E. Edge, publisher and proprietor. 

MAYS LANDING RECORD.— Mays Landing. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. E. C. Shaner, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

DAILY UNION.— Atlantic City. Every afternoon, except 
Sunday. Daily Union Printing Co. J. F. Hall, editor 
and manager. 

SUNDAY GAZETTE.— Atlantic City. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Republican. William McLaughlin, editor and propri- 
etor. 

WEEKLY PRESS.— Pleasantville. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day'. Republican. Hugh Collins, proprietor. 

FREIE PRESSE (German).— Atlantic City. Weekly, on 
Friday. Carl Voelker, publisher. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 
BERGEN COUNTY DEMOCRAT.— Hackensack. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Henry D. Winton, editor. 
Bergen County Democrat Publishing Co., publisher. 



228 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE HACKENSACK REPUBLICAN.— H ackensack. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. Eugene K. Bird, 
editor and publisher. 

TPIE BERGEN INDEX.— Hackensack. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. S. E. Clapp. 

THE RECORD.— Hackensack. Evening. Independent. 
Caleb Van Husen Whitbeck, editor and proprietor. 

CARLSTADT FREIE PRESSE (German).— Carlstadt. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 

THE ENGLEWOOD TIMES.— Englewood. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. 

THE ENGLEWOOD PRESS.— Englewood. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Joseph H. Tillotson, editor and 
proprietor. 

BERGEN COUNTY HERALD.— Hackensack. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Caleb Van Husen Whitbeck. 
editor and proprietor. 

RUTHERFORD NEWS.- Rutherford. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. Caleb Van Husen Whitbeck, editor 
and proprietor. 

RECORD.— Tenafly. Weekly, on Thursday. J. Z. Dem- 
urest, editor. 

THE NEWS.— Ridgewood. Weekly, on Friday. F. A. 
Baxter, publisher. 

THE PARK RIDGE LOCAL.— Park Ridge. Published 
weekly, on Wednesday. James B. H. Storms and John 
C. Storms, editors and proprietors. 

RUTHERFORD AMERICAN.— Rutherford. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. John E. Tyler, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE ENTERPRISE.— East Rutherford. Weekly, or 
Wednesday. Independent. The Petrie Press, publisher 

THE SENTINEL.— Fort Lee. Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent. J. N. Race, publisher. 

THE NEWS-LETTER.— Hasbrouck Heights. Weekly, on 
Tuesday. Alonzo Chamberlain, editor and publisher. 

RIDGEFIELD PARK BULLETIN.— Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. J. E. Hoey, editor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 

NEW JERSEY MIRROR.— Mount Holly. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. Charles H. Folwell, editor 
and proprietor. 

THE MOUNT HOLLY HERALD.— Mount Holly. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. William B. Wills, editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 229 

NEWS.— Mount Hully. Weekly, on Tuesday. Republican. 
H. L. Walters, George W. Hand and Joseph C. Kingdon, 
publishers. J. C. Kingdon, editor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY DEMOCRAT.— Mount Holly. 
Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. Weber Watkinson, 
editor and proprietor. 

BURLINGTON GAZETTE.— Burlington. Daily and weekly. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Daily, in l^he afternoon. Demo- 
cratic. James O. Glasgow, editor and proprietor. 

THE NEW JERSEY ENTERPRISE.-Burlington. Daily, 
in the afternoon, and weekly, on Saturday. Republi- 
can. Enterprise Publishing Co., proprietors. 

BORDENTOWN REGISTER.— Bordentown. AVeekly, on 
Friday. Independent. James D. Flynn, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

BEVERLY BANNER.— Beverly. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. L. W. Perkins, editor and proprietor. 

MOORESTOWN CHRONICLE.— Moorestown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. W. J. Lovell, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY PRESS.— Riverside. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Independent. Hiram D. Torrie & Bro., 
editors and proprietors. 

THE REPUBLICAN.— Moorestown. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. Charles Laessle, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

THE NEW ERA.— Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Riverton and Palmyra. Walter L. Bowen, publisher. 
J. D. Janney, M.D., editor. 

THE WEEKLY NEWS.— Palmyra. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. C. F. Sleeper, editor and proprietor. 

THE CENTRAL RECORD.— Marlton. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. Heister Clymer, editor. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 

WEST JERSEY PRESS.-Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. Sinnickson Chew & Sons' Company, pub- 
lishers and proprietors. 

THE CAMDEN DEMOCRAT.— Camden. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. C. S. Magrath, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

CAMDEN POST-TELEGRAM.-Camden. Daily, in the 
afternoon. Republican. Post-Telegram Co., proprie- 
tors. Upton S. Jefferys, editor. F. F. Patterson, Jr., 
manager. 



230 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE COURIER.— Camden. Daily, in the afternoon. Re- 
publican. Courier Publishing Association, proprietors. 

CAMDEN REVIEW.— Camden. Daily. Democratic. Harry 
B. Paul, publisher. 

NEW JERSEY GAZETTE.— Camden. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. A. C. Graw, editor and publisher. 

ATLANTIC COAST GUIDE.— Camden. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. T. F. Rose, editor and proprietor. 

CAMDEN COUNTY JOURNAL (German).— Camden. 
Weekly, on Friday. Louis Hoeller, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

ECHO.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. Religious. A. A. 
Holt, editor and proprietor. 

ADVERTISER.— Gloucester City, WeeKiy, on Saturday. 
Democratic. William D. Jenkins, editor and publisher. 

HERALD AND TIMES.— Atco. Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent. M. J. Skinner, editor and publisher. 

THE TRIBUNE.— Haddonfield. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican, W. G. Taylor, editor and publisher. 

STOCKTON TIMES.— Camden. Weekly, on Saturday. 
John J. Tischner, publisher. 

EAST SIDE PRESS.— Camden. Weekly, on Thursday. 
George Carpenter Connor, editor and publisher. 

MERCHANTVILLE TIMES.— Merchantville. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Herbert Hoffman, editor and publisher. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

STAR OF THE CAPE.— Cape May City. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday, during the whole year, and Daily during July 
and August. Republican. Star of the Cape Publishing- 
Co., proprietors. Aaron W. Hand, editor. 

CAPE MAY WAVE.— Cape May City. Weekly, on Satur- 
day, during the whole year, and Daily during July and 
August. Democratic. Richard B. Gilpin Gardner, edi- 
tor. James H. Edmunds, publisher. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY GAZETTE.— Cape May Court 
House. Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. Alfred 
Cooper, editor. 

SENTINEL.— Ocean Citj^ Weekly, on Thursday. Repub- 
lican, R, Curtis Robinson, editor and proprietor. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY TIMES,— Sea Isle City. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. James T. Chapman, editor 
and proprietor. 

FIVE MILE BEACH JOURNAL.— Wildwood. Independ- 
ent. Weekly, on Thursday. Jed Dubois, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 231 

OCEAN CITY LEDGER.— Weekly, on Saturday. Prohibi- 
tion. Ocean City Ledger Publishing Co., proprietors. 
Rev. W. K. Fisher, editor. C. Burtnett, business 
manager. 

FIVE MILE BEACH SUN.— Wildwood. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Republican. T. C. Hamilton. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

BRIDGETON CHRONICLE.— Bridgeton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Chronicle Printing Co., pub- 
lishers. 

DAILY CHRONICLE.— Bridgeton. Democratic. John B. 
Clevenstine, editor. The Chronicle Printing Co., pub- 
lishers. 

BRIDGETON PIONEER.— Bridgeton. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. George W. Mc- 
Cowan, editor and publisher. 

NEW JERSEY PATRIOT.— Bridgeton. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. John Cheeseman & Sons, editors 
and publishers. 

BRIDGETON EVENING NEWS.— Bridgeton. Republican. 
Evening News Company, publishers. J. W. Richardson, 
editor and nrianager. 

DOLLAR WEEKLY NEWS.— Bridgeton. Independent, 
Weekly, on Saturday. Evening News Company, pub- 
lishers. 

WEEKLY INDEPENDENT.— Vineland. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Populist. J. J. Streeter, editor and publisher. 

THE EVENING JOURNAL.— Vineland. Afternoon. Dem- 
ocratic. B. Franklin Ladd, editor. 

MILLVILLE REPUBLICAN.— Millville. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. J. B. Rumbf, editor and publisher. 

MILLVILLE REPORTER.— Daily. Republican. J. B. 
Rumbf, editor and publisher. 

MILLVILLE TRANSCRIPT.— Millville. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Independent. Transcript Company, publishers, 

THE VINELAND NEWS.— Vineland. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. News Company, proprietor. 

EVERY SATURDAY AND REPUBLICAN.— Vineland. 
Weekly. Republican. Charles F. Graff, publisher. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

NEWARY DAILY ADVERTIBER.-Newark. Afternoon. 
Independent. Advertiser Publishing Co., proprietors. 
Matthias C. Ely, managing editor. Redmond P, Ker- 
nan, business manager. 



232 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

NEWARK EVENING NEWS AND NEWARK SUNDAY 

NEWS. — Afternoon. Independent. Evening News 
Publishing- Co. Wallace M. Scudder, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

NEW JERSEY FREIE ZEITUNG ((^lerman).— Newark. 
Daily, also Sunday edition. Republican. Mrs. B. Prieth, 
proprietress. Frederick Kuhn, editor. Benedict Prieth, 
business manager. 

SUNDAY CALL.— Newark. Weekly, on Sunday. Inde- 
pendent. The Newark Printing and Publishing Co., 
publishers. G. Wisner Thorne, president and treasurer; 
C. G. VanGorden, secretary; William T. Hvmt, G. Wis- 
ner Thorne and Louis Hannoch, directors. William T. 
Hunt, editor. 

SENTINEL OF FREEDOM.— Newark. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. Published at the Daily Advertiser Office. 

DER ERZAHLER (German).— Newark. Sunday edition 
of New Jersey Freie Zeitung. Weekly, on Sunday. Re- 
PLiblican. Published at the New Jersey Freie Zeitung 
Office. 

NEWARK PIONEER (German).— Newark. Weekly. In- 
dependent. F. E. Adler & Co., publishers. 

TOWN TALK.- Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. Illus- 
trated Politico-social. T. E. Burke ana Herman E. L. 
Beyer, editors and publishers. 

NEW JERSEY TRADE REVIEW.— Newark. Semi- 
monthly. Commercial. Paul V. Flynn, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

RAILROAD EMPLOYEE.— Newark. Monthly. B. E. 
Chapin, editor and publisher. 

THE NEWARK LEDGER.— Newark. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Democratic. M. J. O'Connor, proprietor. 

LA MONTAGNA (THE MOUNTAIN) (Italian).— Repub- 
lican. Newark. Weekly, on Saturday. F. A. Fiore, 
editor. 

LASSERVATORE (Italian).— Newark. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Democratic. John Ponzini & Co., publishers. 

THE ORANGE CHRONICLE.— Orange. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. Frank W. Baldwin, editor. 
Orange Chronicle Publishing Co., publishers. 

THE ORANGE JOURNAL.— Orange. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. Edgar Williams, editor. Orange 
Journal Publishing Co., publishers. 

THE ORANGE ADVER-TlSER.- Orange. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. F. C. Shann, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 232 

OitANGE VpT.KSBOTE (German).— Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. Ernest Temme, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

I.A COMETA (Italian).— Orange. Weekly, on Sunday. In- 
dependent. R. Gori, editor and publisher. 

EAST ORANGE GAZETTE.— East Orange. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. Charles Starr, East Orange 
Gazette Publishing Co., proprietors. 

EAST ORANGE RECORD.— East Orange. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. L. C. Gilles, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

SOUTH ORANGE BULLETIN.— South Orange. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. Edgar Williams, editor. 

THE BLOOMFIELD CITIZEN.— Bloomfield. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. William A. Ritscher, Jr., editor 
and proprietor. 

MONTCLAIR TIMES.— Weekly, on Saturday. Republican. 
A. C. Studer, editor and publisher. 

THE MONTCLAIR HERALD.— Montclair. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Francis Leon Chrisman, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

ITEM.— Short Hills. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Gibbs & Wright, editors and publishers. 

THE CALDWELL NEWS.-Caldwell. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. C. M. Harrison, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

NEWS. — Irvington. Weekly, on Saturday. Independent. 
Irvingtcn News Publishing Co., editors and publishers. 

ESSEX COUNTY NEWS.— Nutley. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Established 1892. Parker Norton, editor. Essex 
County News Publishing Co., publishers. 

SUN.— Nutley. Weekly, on Friday. Established 1895. 
William Taylor, editor and publisher. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

THE CONSTITUTION.— Woodbury. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. Nelson W. Sparks, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY DEMOCRAT. — W^oodbury. 
Weekly, on Thursday. Democratic. J. D. Carpenter, 
editor and publisher. 

WEEKLY ITEM.— Newfield. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. A. C. Dalton, editor and publisher. 

ENTERPRISE.- Glassboro. Weekly, on Saturday. Re- 
publican. A. M. Seabrook, editor and publisher. 



234 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

SWEDESBORO NEWS.— Swedesboro. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Independent. George W. Pither, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

PAULSBORO PRESS.— Paulsboro. Weekly, on Friday. 
Independent. E. L. Leonard, editor and publisher. 

WOODBURY DAILY TIMES.— Woodbury. Daily, except 
Sunday. Independent. Hawn & Wilson, editors and 
publishers. 

REPORTER.— Clayton. Weekly, on Wednesday. Inde- 
pendent. Bowen, editor and publisher. 

HUDSON COUNTY. 

THE EVENING JOURNAL.— Jersey City. Afternoon. 
Republican. Evening Journal Association, proprietors. 
Elbert Rappleye, editor. Joseph A. Dear, business man- 
ager. 

JERSEY CITY HERALD AND GAZETTE.— Jersey City. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Democratic. Jersey City Herald 
Publishing Company, proprietors. Robert Langdon 
McDermott, editor. 

JERSEY CITY DEMOCRAT.— Jersey City. Weekly. Dem- 
ocratic. Robert Davis, proprietor. 

THE CHRONICLE.— Jersey City. WeeKiy, on Wednes- 
day. Chronicle Publishing Co., publishers. 

TH:e jersey city news.— Jersey City. Afternoon. 
Democratic. James Luby, editor. The City Publishing 
Company, publishers. 

THE MIRROR.— Jersey City. Weekly. Independent. 
Abraham Lincoln Graham, editor. 

PALISADE ADVERTISER AND EAGLE.- Jersey City. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Neutral. 

THE OBSERVER.— Hoboken. Afternoon. Democratic. 
Hoboken Printing and Publishing Company, publishers. 
Thomas McKeon, editor. 

THE REPUBLICAN.— Hoboken. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. The Hoboken Printing and Publishing 
Company, proprietors. John R. Havens and John 
Breen, editors. 

WACHT AM HUDSON (German).— H:oboken. Afternoon. 
H. E. Schneider & Co., publishers and editors. 

[They also publish the BELLES-LETTRES JOUR- 
NAL, NEWS FROM GERMANY, SAXON JOURNAL 
and NEW PRUSSIAN GAZETTE, and RUNDSCHAU, 
weekly German journals.] 

LIGHT.— Hoboken. Evangelical. Monthly. Rev. Henry 
T. Beatty, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
editor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 235 

THE CRUSADER.— Hoboken. Weekly, on Saturday. By 
the Crusader Publishing Company. Dixie Anzer, 
editor. 

DEMOCRAT (German).— Hoboken. Weekly, on Saturday. 
William Faas, publisher. 

BAYONNE HERALD.— Bayonne. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. H. C. Page, editor and publisher. 

BAYONNE STANDARD (formerly BUDGET).— Bayonne. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Democratic. J. T. R. Proctor, 
editor and proprietor. 

BAYONNE TIMES.— Bayonne. Daily. Republican. W. 
M. Park, editor. Bayonne Ptg. and Pub. Co., pub- 
lishers. 

BAYONNE DEMOCRAT.— Bayonne. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Michael R. Freel, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

HUDSON COUNTY DISPATCH.— Union Hill. Daily. 
Democratic. 

KEARNY RECORD.— Harrison. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Democratic. Philip A. McAviney, editor and proprietor. 

KEARNY OBSERVER.— Arlington. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. J. E. Beckwith, editor and proprietor. 

WEST HUDSON PRESS.— Kearny. Formerly the KEAR- 
NY REPUBLICAN. Weekly, on Saturday. Independ- 
ent. L. E. Travis, editor. Kearny Publishing Co., pro- 
prietors. 

SATURDAY POST.— Union Hill. Weekly. Independent. 
Post Publishing Company. 

HUDSON COUNTY REVUE (German).— Union Hill. Dem- 
ocratic. Weekly. Michel & Rank, publishers. 

THE REPORTER.— West Hoboken. Weekly. Democratic. 
Benjamin E. Reynolds, editor. 

NORTH HUDSON WORLD.-Union Hill. Weekly. Demo- 
cratic. J. W. Block, editor. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY DEMOCRAT. — Flemington. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Democratic. A. Killgore, editor 
and manager. 

DEMOCRAT-ADVERTISER.— Flemington. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. H. M. Voorhees, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

HUNTERDON REPUBLICAN.— Flemington. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. William G. Callis, editor and 
proprietor. 



236 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE BEACON.— Lamberlvillc. Weekly, on Friday. Tiidc- 
pendent. Phineas K. Hazen, editor and publisher. 

THE LAMBERTVILLE RECORD.— Bambertville. Week- 
ly, on Wednesday. Republican. Clark Pierson, editor 
and publisher. 

DEMOCRATIC WAGE-WORKER.— Lambertville. Weekly. 
John Kearns, publisher. 

Tj-iE CLINTON DEMOCRAT.— Clinton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. J. and W. H. Carpenter, edi- 
tors and publishers. 

HUNTERDON INDEPENDENT.— Frenchtown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Independent. John R. Hardon, editor and 
publisher. 

THE STAR.— Frenchtown. Weekly, on Wednesday. Inde- 
pendent. William H. Sipes, editor and publisher. 

MILFORD LEADER.— Milford. Weekly, on Thursday. In- 
dependent. W. H. Farrand, proprietor. 

THE AVALANCHE.— Glen Gardner. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. E. W. Rush, editor and publisher. 

THE HUNTERDON GAZETTE.— High Bridge. Weekly. 
Republican. High Bridge Publishing Co., proprietors. 

WEEKLY REVIEW.— White House Station. George W. 
Shampanore, publisher. 

THE STOCKTON ADVANCE.— Stockton. Weekly. T. G. 
Kitchen, publisher. 

MERCER COUNTY. 

STATE GAZETTE.— Trenton. Daily and Weekly. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Republican. The John L. Murphy Pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. Thomas Holmes, editor. 

TRUE AMERICAN.— Trenton. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. Joseph L. Naar, edi- 
tor and proprietor. 

THE TRENTON EVENING TIMES. Trenton. Afternoon 
and Weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Independent Re- 
publican. Trenton Times Co., publishers. 

THE NEW JERSEY STAATS JOURNAL (German).- 
Trenton. Semi-weekly. Republican. Ernest C. Stahl, 
editor and proprietor. 

SUNDAY ADVERTISER.— Trenton. Weekly, on Sunday. 
Independent. Advertiser Publishing Co., editors and 
proprietors. 

AMERICAN POTTERS' JOURNAL.— Trenton. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Labor. John D. McCormick, editor and 
proprietor. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 237 

THE TRENTON COURIER.— Trenton. Weekly, on Sun- 
day. Independent Democrat. John Briest, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE TRENTON DEUTSCHE ZEITUNG (German).- 
Trenton. Weekly. Republican. Otto Erdlen, editor 
and publisher. 

HIGHTSTOWN GAZETTE.— Hightstown. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Independent. Thomas B. Appleget, pub- 
lisher. Fred. B. Appleget, editor. 

HIGHTSTOWN INDEPENDENT.— Hightstown. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Independent. R. M. J. Smith, editor and 
proprietor. 

PRINCETON-HIGHTSTOWN SIGNAL-ENTERPRISE.— 
Princeton. Weekly, on Friday. Independent. Her- 
bert E. Shaffer and Richard D. Norton, editors and 
publishers. 

PRINCETON PRESS.— Princeton. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Republican. C. S. Robinson & Co., editors and pub- 
lishers. 

THE DAILY PRINCETONIAN.— Princeton. Published 
daily, except Sundaj^s, during the college year. Devoted 
to the interests of Princeton University. Edited by stu- 
dents. 

THE HOPEWELL HERALD.— Hopewell. Weekly, on 
Tuesday. Independent. C. E. Voorhees, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

THE PENNINGTON POST.— Pennington. Independent. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. W. B. R. Mason, publisher 
and proprietor. T. D. Durling, editor. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

THE HOME NEWS.— New Brunswick. Every afternoon, 
except Sunday. Independent. Hugh Boyd, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE WEEKLY HOME NEWS.— New Brunswick. Pub- 
lished every Thursday afternoon. Independent. Arthur 
H. Boyd, editor. 

DAILY PRESS.— New Brunswick. Morning. Republican. 
New Brunswick Publishing Co. William B. Prickitt, 
editor and manager. 

THE TIMES.— New^ Brunswick. Afternoon and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. The Times Pub- 
lishing Co., publishers. Francis W. Daire, editor. 

THE RECORD.— New Brunswick. Weekly. Republican. 
Robert Rastall, editor and manager. 



238 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE ENTERPRISE.— New Brunswick. Weekly. Demo- 
cratic. Edward W. Canse, editor and proprietor. 

THE CHRONICLE.— Perth Amboy. Daily. Perth Amboy 
Publishing Co., publishers. James S. Wight, editor. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY DEMOCRAT.— Perth Amboy. 
Weekly, on Saturday. Democratic. St. George Kemp- 
son, editor and proprietor. 

THE REPUBLICAN.— Perth Amboy. Daily and weekly. 
Republican. American Publishing Co. (C. W. Boynton, 
president), publishers. Misses Louise and Georgia 
Boynton, editors. 

PERTH AMBOY CITIZEN.— Perth Amboy. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Democratic. William P. O'Mara, editor. 

FOLKEBLAD (Danish - Norweigen).— Perth Amboy. 
Weekly. Independent, J. P. Holm, editor and pub- 
lisher. 

WEEKLY REGISTER.— Woodbridge, Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican, R. D. Uhler, editor. H. B, Rollinson, 
publisher, 

THE NEWS.— Woodbridge. Weekly. Woodbridge News 
Publishing Co., proprietors. M, F, Coffey, editor. 

THE RECORDER.— Metuchen. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent Republican. S. B. D. Prickitt, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE INQUIRER.— Metuchen, Weekly, on Saturday, Dem- 
ocratic, Metuchen Publishing Co,, publishers. 

THE RECORD.— Jamesburg. Weekly, on Saturday. Inde- 
pendent. E. S. Hammell, editor and publisher. 

THE ADVANCE.— Jamesburg. Weekly, on Thursday, 
Printed and published by the New Jersey State Reform 
School. 

THE CITIZEN,— South Amboy. Weekly, on Saturday. In- 
dependent. M. N. Roll, editor and publisher. 

THE PRESS.— Cranbury. Weekly, on Friday. Republi- 
can. George W, Burroughs, editor and proprietor, 

THE DUNELLEN WEEKLY CALL.— Dunellen. Weekly, 
on Thursday. George W. Day, proprietor. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

THE MONMOUTH INQUIRER.— Freehold. Weekly, on 

Thursday, Republican. Maxey Applegate, editor and 

publisher, 
THE MONMOUTH DEMOCRAT,— Freehold. Weekly, on 

Thursday. Democratic. Joseph A, Yard, editor and 

manager. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 239 

THE TRANSCRIPT.— Freehold. Weekly, on Friday. Dem- 
ocratic. Moreau Bros. (Alex. L. Moreau), publishers 
and proprietors. 

NEW JERSEY STANDARD.— Red Bank. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. Longstreet & Hawkins, publishers. 
. RED BANK REGISTER.— Red Bank. Weekly, on Wednes- 
day. Republican. John H. Cook, editor and proprietor. 

KEYPORT ENTERPRISE.— Keyport. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. Fred F. Armstrong, editor and proprietor. 

KEYPORT WEEKLY.— Keyport. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. E. D. Pettys, editor and proprietor. 

THE LONG BRANCH RECORD.— Long Branch. Weekly, 
on Saturaay. Independent. F. M. Taylor, Jr., editor. 

LONG BRANCH TIMES-NEWS.— Long Branch. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. Holmes A. Wheeler, publisher. 

THE LONG BRANCH PRESS.— Long Branch. Weekly. 
Independent. Joseph A. Poole, editor and proprietor. 

CITY JOURNAL.— Long Branch City. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. D. H. Van Brunt, publisher. 

THE MATAWAN JOURNAL.— Matawan. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Republican. Benjamin F, S. Brown, editor 
and proprietor. 

THE JOURNAL.— Asbury Park. Daily and Weekly. 
Weekly, on Friday, Republican. 

THE SHORE PRESS.— Asbury Park. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. J. L. Kinmouth, publisher and pro- 
prietor. 

THE DAILY PRESS.— Asbury Park. Daily. J. L. Kin- 
mouth, publisher and proprietor. 

THE DAILY SPRAY.— Asbury Park. Afternoon, June, 
July and August. Howard D. Le Roy, publisher and 
proprietor. 

OCEAN GROVE TIMES.— Ocean Grove. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Republican. J. E. Quinn, editor. E. N. Wool- 
ston, manager. 

OCEAN GROVE RECORD.— Ocean Grove. Weekly, on 
Saturday. Methodist. J. E. Quinn, editor. E. N. 
Woolston, manager. 

THE ADVERTISER.-Eatontown. Weekly, on Friday. 
Democratic. William T. Cole, editor, publisher and 
proprietor. 

THE COAST STAR DEMOCRAT.— Manasquan. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Democratic. W. E. Hoskins, editor and 
proprietor. 
MANASQUAN NEWS.— Manasquan. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Independent. Theo, F. Hults, editor and pro- 
prietor. 



240 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE COAST ECHO.— Belmar. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Democratic. Conrad Pinches, editor and publisher. 

THE JOURNAL.— Atlantic Highlands. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. A. C. Hart, editor and proprietor. 

SEASIDE GAZETTE.— Spring Lake Beach. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. Seaside Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers. E. S. V. Stultz, manager. 

MONMOUTH PRESS.— Atlantic Highlands. Republican. 
Weekly, on Saturday. William J. Leonard, editor. 

SEA BRIGHT SENTINEL.— Sea Bright. Weekly, on 
Thursday (May to September). Independent. Sentinel 
Co., publishers. 

SEA BRIGHT NEWS.— Sea Bright. Weekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. Sea Bright Publishing Co. 

MORRIS COUNTY. 

THE JERSEYMAN.— Morristown. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican. Pierson & Surdam, proprietors. I. R. 
Pierson, editor. 

TRUE DEMOCRATIC BANNER.— Morristown. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. Vogt Brothers, editors and 
proprietors. 

THE MORRIS COUNTY CHRONICLE.— Morristown. 
Weekly, on Friday. Republican. The Morris County 
Chronicle Co., proprietors. J. Frank Lindsley, editor. 

THE EXPRESS.— Morristown. Democratic. Saturday. 
Abraham L. Adams, editor and proprietor. 

THE IRON ERA.— Dover. Weekly, on Friday. Republi- 
can. Dover Printing Co., editors and publishers. 

DOVER INDEX.— Dover. Weekly, on Jf'riday. Demo- 
cratic. Hummell & Tillyer, proprietors. Frank F. 
Hummell, editor. 

THE BULLETIN.— Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Re- 
publican. Samuel L. Garrison, editor and publisher. 

THE TIMES.— Boonton. Weekly, on Thursday. Inde- 
pendent. Charles H. Grubb, editor and proprietor. 

THE EAGLE.— Madison. Weekly, on Friday. Independ- 
ent. Eagle Printing Co. William D. Greer, editor and 
manager. 

THE RECORD.— Rockaway. Weekly, on Friday. Inde- 
pendent. H. C. Rowell, editor and publisher. 

THE STANHOPE EAGLE.— Netcong. Independent. 
Weekly, on Wednesday. George T. Keech, editor and 
proprietor. 

CHATHAM PRESS.— Chatham. W^eekly, on Saturday. 
Independent. J. Thomas Scott, editor and proprietor, 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 241 

THE CHURCH AND HOME.— Rockaway. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Religious. Rev. William Stout, editor. 

THE ARGUS.— Butler. Weekly, on Friday. Independent. 
Coe Finch, editor. 

THE DAILY RECORD.— Morristown. Independent. E. H. 
Tomlinson, proprietor. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 

NEW JERSEY COURIER.— Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. W. H. Fischer, editor and pro- 
prietor. 

OCEAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT.— Toms River. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles S. Haslett, editor and 
publisher. 

TIMES AND JOURNAL.— Lakewood. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Republican. George D. Roe, editor and publisher. 

THE BEACON.— Point Pleasant. Weekly, on Saturday. 
D. C. Leaw, editor and proprietor. 

THE TUCKERTON BEACON.— Tuckerton. Weekly. Ben- 
jamin H. Crosby, editor and publisher. 

LAKEWOOD CITIZEN.— Lakewood. Weekly, on Friday. 
Harry T. Hagaman, editor and publisher, 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

PATERSON GUARDIAN.— Paterson. Afternoon and 
Weekly. Weekly, on Friday. Democratic. Guardian 
Printing and Publishing Co.. publishers and proprie- 
tors. Edwin W. R. Lawrence, editor. 

THE PATERSON PRESS.— Paterson. Afternoon and 
Weekly. Weekly, on Thursday. Republican. The Press 
Printing and Publishing Co., publishers and proprietors. 
George Wurts, editor. 

THE MORNING CALL.— Paterson. Daily, except Sunday. 
Republican. The Call Printing and Publishing Co., pro- 
prietors and publishers. Joseph E. Crowell, editor. 

EVENING NEWS.— Paterson. Daily, afternoon, except 
Sunday. Democratic. News Printing and Publishing 
Co., proprietors. E. B. Haines, editor. 

THE PATERSON PEOPLE.- Paterson. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Socialist-Labor. Matthew Maguire, editor. 

SUNDAY CHRONICLE.— Paterson. Sunday. Independ- 
ent. Paterson Chronicle Co., proprietors. Charles A. 
Shriner, editor and manager. 

PATERSON VOLKS-FREUND (German). — Paterson. 
Daily, afternoon. Democratic. The German-American 
Printing and Publishing Co., proprietors and publishers. 
16 



242 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

DE TELEGRAP (Holland).— Paterson. Semi-weekly. Re- 
publican. Tanis & Schrauder, publishers. 

THE LABOR STANDARD.— Paterson. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Labor. J. P, McDonnell, editor and proprietor. 

PATERSON CENSOR.— Paterson. Monday. Printed rec- 
ord of the counties of Bergen and Passaic. A. E. & B. 
Vanderhoven, editors and proprietors. 

THE ITEM.— Passaic. Weekly, on Saturday. Independ- 
ent. Alfred Speer, editor and proprietor. 

PASSAIC HERALD.— Passaic. Daily, afternoon. Repub- 
lican. Thomas Hughes, editor. 

PASSAIC DAILY NEWS.— Passaic. Afternoon. Repub- 
lican. George M. Hartt, editor. News Publishing Co., 
proprietors and publishers. 

THE RECORD.— Passaic. Weekly. Republican. O. Free- 
man, editor and publisher. 

PASSAIC WOcHENBLATT (German).— Passaic. Weekly, 
on Saturday. Herman Otto, publisher and proprietor. 
Max Miller, editor. 

LA QUESTIONE SOCIALE (Italian).— Passaic. Weekly. 
Pedro Stevene, editor. 

SALEM COUNTY. 

NATIONAL STANDARD.— Salem. Weekly, on Wednes- 
6siy. Republican. Sinnickson Chew & Brother, proprie- 
tors. William H. Chew, editor. 

SALEM SUNBEAM.— Salem. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. Robert Gwynne, editor and publisher. 

THE SOUTH JERSEYMAN.— Salem. Weekly, on Tues- 
day. Republican. William H. Harris, proprietor. 

THE MONITOR-REGISTER.- Woodstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Independent. Benjamin Patterson, proprietor. 

PENNSGROVE RECORD.— Pennsgrove. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. W. A, Sum.merhill, proprietor. 

ELMER TIMES.— Elmer. Weekly, on Friday. Indepen- 
dent. S. P. Foster, editor and publisher. 

THE WAGE EARNER.— Salem. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Union Labor. Wage Earner Publishing Co. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 

THE SOMERSET MESSENGER.— Somerville. Weekly, 
on Wednesday. Democratic. John H. Mattison, editor 
and publisher. 

THE UNIONIST-GAZETTE.— Somerville. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. The Unionist-Gazette Associa- 
tion, publishers. Charles H. Bateman, editor and 
manager. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 243 

THE SOMERSET DEMOCRAT.— Somerville. Weekly, on 
Friday. Democratic. Somerset Publishing Co., pub- 
lishers. D. N. Messier, editor and manager. 

BOUND BROOK CHROinICLE.— Bound Brook. Weekly, 
on Friday. Republican. W\ B. R. Mason, editor and 
publisher. 

STATE CENTRE.— Bound Brook. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Independent. Daniel Clark, editor and publisher. 

DER SOMERSET BOTE (German).— Bound Brook. 
Weekly, on Tuesday. Democratic. Walter Reiss, edi- 
tor and publisher. 

THE RECORD.— Bound Brook. Weekly, on Thursday. 
Democratic. Daniel Clark, editor. 

THE NEWS.— Bernardsville. Weekly, on Friday. Demo- 
cratic. J. E. Wells, editor. 

THE ROYAL CRAFTSMAN.— Somerville. Monthly. De- 
voted to Masonry. Somerset Publishing Co., publishers. 

NORTH PLATNFIELD WEEKLY REVIEW.— North 
Plainfield. Weekly, on Friday. Republican. Harry 
H. Webb, publisher. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 

THE SUSSEX REGISTER.— Newton. Weekly, on Wed- 
nesday. Republican. Richard F. Goodman, editor and 
publisher. 

THE NEW JERSEY HERALD.— Newton. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Jacob L. Bunnell, editor and 
proprietor. Henry C. Bunnell, assistant editor. 

SUSSEX INDEPENDENT.— Deckertown. W^eekly, on 
Friday. Independent. J. J. fatanton and C. A. Wilson, 
editors. 

THE WANTAGE RECORDER.— Deckertown. Weekly, 
on Thursday. Democratic. C. E. S;ickney, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE MILK REPORTER.— Deckertown. Monthly. Agri- 
culture. John J. Stanton, editor and proprietor. 

SUSSEX RECORD AND BRANCHVILLE TIMES.-New- 
ton. Weekly, on Thursday. Independent. Little & 
Cox, proprietors. 

PEACH GROWERS' JOURNAL.— Deckertown. Monthly. 
Agricultural. James E. Stanton, editor and proprietor. 

UNION COUNTY. 

ELIZABETH DAILY JOURNAL.— Elizabeth. Afternoon. 
Republican. Charles C. McBride, editor. Augustus S. 
Crane, business manager. 



244 NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 

THE LEADER.— Elizabeth. Afternoon. Independent. J. 

Madison Drake, editor and publisher. 
THE EVENING TIMES.— Elizabeth. Democratic. Will- 
iam W. St. John, editor and publisher. 
FREIE PRESSE (German).— Elizabeth. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Democratic. Charles H. Schmidt, editor and 
publisher. 
UNION COUNTY RECORD.— Ehzabeth. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Republican. W. H. Morse, editor and pub- 
lisher. 
THE UNION DEMOCRAT.— Rahway. Weekly, on Thurs- 
day. Democratic. Lewis S. Hyer, editor. J. I. Collins, 
business manager. 
THE NEW JERSEY ADVOCATE.— Rahway. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Republican. H. B. Rollinson, editor and 
publisher. 
NEW JERSEY LAW JOURNAL.— Plainfield. Monthly. 
New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Co., publishers. A. 
V. D. Honeyman, editor. 
THE DAILY PRESS.— Plainfield. Published at the office 
of the CONSTITUTIONALIST. Democratic. A. L. 
Force, proprietor. 
CENTRAL NEW JERSEY TIMES.— Plainfield. Weekly, 

on Wednesday. Republican. Times Publishing Co. 
THE CONSTITUTIONALIST.— Plainfield. Weekly, on 

Thursday. Democratic. A. L. Force, publisher. 
THE PLAINFIELD COURIER-NEWS.— Plainfield. After- 
noon. Republican. F. W. Runyon, editor and pro- 
prietor. 
THE SUMMIT RECORD.— Summit. Democratic. Week- 
ly. Alfred J. Lane, proprietor. 
THE SUMMIT HERALD.— Summit. Weekly, on Satur- 
day. Republican. J. W. Clift, publisher. 
THE UNION COUNTY STANDARD.— Westfield. Week- 
ly, on Saturday. The Standard Publishing Concern. 
Alfred E. Pearsall, editor. C. E. Pearsall, manager. 
THE CRANFORD CHRONICLE.— Weekly, on Wednesday. 

John Alfred Potter, editor and publisher. 
THE CRANFORD CITIZEN.— Cranford. Weekly, on Sat- 
urday. Independent. E. R. Clyma, editor and manager. 
THE WESTFIELD LEADER.— Westfield. Weekly, on 

Wednesday. Republican. G. A. V. Hankinson, editor. 
NORTH JERSEY ENTERPRISE.— Roselle. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Walter Scott, editor. Thomas H. Evans, 
business manager and publisher. 



NEW JERSEY NEWSPAPERS. 245 

WARREN COUNTY. 

BELVIDERE APOLLO.— Belvidere. Weekly, on Friday. 
Republican. Josiah Ketcham, editor and publisher. 

THE W^ARREN JOURNAL.— Belvidere. Weekly, on Fri- 
day. Democratic. Smith Brothers, editors and pub- 
lishers. 

HACKETTSTOWN GAZETTE.— Hackettstown. Weekly, 
on Friday. Democratic. Charles Rittenhouse, editor 
and publisher. 

WARREN REPUBLICAN.— Hackettstown. Weekly, on 
Friday. Republican. Curtis Brothers, proprietors. 
George P. Curtis, editor. 

WARREN DEMOCRAT.— Phillipsburg. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. News and Democrat Publish- 
ing Co., proprietors. 

WARREN DAILY NEWS.— Phillipsburg. Evenings, ex- 
cept Sunday. Democratic. News and Democrat Pub- 
lishing Co., proprietors. 

THE WASHINGTON STAR.— Washington. Weekly, on 
Thursday. Democratic. Charles L. Stryker, editor and 
proprietor. 

THE BLAIRSTOWN PRESS.— Blairstuv.-n. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Independent. De Witt C. Carter, editor 
and publisher. 

THE WARREN TIDINGS.— Washington. Weekly, on 
Wednesday. Republican. Flint & Boss, publishers. 

THE POST.— Phillipsburg. Evenings, except Sunday. Re- 
publican. Lynch & Sterner, proprietors and publishers. 

SUMMARY. 

There are 31.3 daily, weekly and other papers altogether 
in the state, of which 93 are Republican, 80 Democratic, 
75 independent, 46 neutral, 6 labor, 3 religious, and one 
each as follows: Agricultural, Peach Growers, Populist, 
Railroad Employes, Commercial, Theatrical, State School 
for Boys, Law, Masonic, Milk, Prohibition, and College. 
Twenty-two are published in the German language, three 
in Italian, one Holland and one Danish-Norweigan. 

The summary by counties is as follows: Atlantic, 12; 
Bergen, 17; Burlington, 14; Camden, 15; Cape May, 8; Cum- 
berland, 13; Essex, 30; Gloucester, 8; Hudson, 30; Hunter- 
don, 14; Mercer, 15; Middlesex, 20; Monmouth, 27; Morris, 
15; Ocean, 6; Passaic, 16; Salem, 7; Somerset, 10; Sussex, 7- 
Union, 19; Warren, 10. Total, 313. 



246 NEW CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

NEW CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

(Formed by an act of the Legislature of 1901, approved 
March 19. See page 94, pamphlet laws.) 



FIRST— The counties of Camden, Gloucester and Salem. 
Population, 165,078. Vote cast in 1901, at gubernatorial 
election: Republican. 20,006; Democratic, 14,343; Prohibi- 
tion, 924; Socialist, 162; Social-Labor, .31. Total vote, 35,466. 
Republican plurality, 5,663. 

SECOND— The counties of Cape May, Cumberland, At- 
lantic and Burlington. Population. 169,037. Vote cast in 1901, 
at gubernatorial election: Republican, 20.372; Democratic. 
13,470; Prohibition, 1,2.32; Socialist, 136; Social-Labor, 4L 
Total vote, 35,251. Republican plurality, 6,902. 

THIRD— The counties of Middlesex, Monmouth and Ocean. 
Population, 181,566. Vote cast in 1901, at gubernatorial 
election: Republican, 18,699; Democratic, 16,661; Prohibi- 
tion, 632; Socialist, 71; Social-Labor, 83. Total vote, 36,126. 
Republican plurality, 2,038. 

FOURTH— The counties of Hunterdon, Somerset and 
Mercer. Population, 162,820. Vote cast in 1901, at guberna- 
torial election: Republican, 17,422; Democratic, 16,316; 
Prohibition, 701; Socialist, 223; Social-Labor, 51. Total vote, 
34,713. Republican plurality, 1,106. 

FIFTH— The counties of Union, Morris and Warren. Pop- 
ulation, 202,290. Vote cast in 1901 at gubernatorial election: 
Republican, 19,469; Democratic, 17,933; Prohibition, 805; 
Socialist, 280; Social-Labor, 215. Total vote, 38,702. Repub- 
lican plurality, 1,536. 

SIXTH— The counties of Bergen, Passaic and Sussex. 
Population, 257,777. Vote cast in 1901 at gubernatorial elec- 
tion: Republican, 23,184; Democratic, 21,193; Prohibition, 
452; Socialist, .591; Social-Labor, 428. Total vote. 45,848. 
Republican plurality, 1,991. 

SEVENTH— The First, Fourth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth. 
Eleventh and Fifteenth wards of the city of Newark, and 
the city of Orange, and the towns of Bloomfield, Montclair 
and West Orange, and the boroughs of Glen Ridge, Cald- 
well and North Caldwell, and the townships of Franklin, 
Belleville, Livingston, Verona and Caldwell, all in the 
county of Essex. Population, 177,106. Vote cast in 1901 at 
gubernatorial election: Republican, 19,133; Democratic, 
15,434; Prohibition, 224; Socialist, 220; Social-Labor, 171. 
Total vote, 3.5,082. Republican plurality, 3.699. 

EIGHTH— The Second, Third, Fifth, Ninth, Tenth, 
Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth wards of the city of 



NEW CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 247 

Newark, and the city of East Orange, and the town of 
Irving-ton, and the borough of Vailsburgh, and the village 
and township of South Orange, and the townships of Clin- 
ton and Milburn, all in the county of Essex. Population, 
181,947. Vote cast in 1901, at gubernatorial election: Repub- 
lican, 17,647; Democratic, 14,451; Prohibition, 170; Socialist, 
491; Social-Labor, 315. Total vote, 33,074. Republican plur- 
ality, 3,196. 

NINTH— The city of Bayonne, the Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, 
Tenth, Eleventh and Twelfth wards of the city of Jersey 
City, and all the Sixth ward of said city of Jersey City 
excepting the first and second precincts, or that portion 
which lies north of the Morris canal and east of Summit 
avenue, and the towns of Kearney and Harrison, and the 
borough of East Newark, all in the county of Hudson. 
Population, 176,319. Vote cast in 1901, at gubernatorial 
election: Republican, 15,586; Democratic, 15,379; Prohibi- 
tion, 151; Social, 688; Social-Labor, 198. Total vote, 32,002. 
Republican plurality, 207. 

TENTH— The First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth wards 
of the city of Jersey City, and all that portion of the Sixth 
ward of said city (the first and second precincts) which 
lies north of the Morris canal and east of Summit avenue, 
and the city of Hoboken, and the towns of West Hoboken, 
Union, West New York and Guttenburg, and the town- 
ships of North Bergen and Weehawken, and the borough 
of Secaucus, all in the county of Hudson. Population, 
209,7.35. Vote cast in 1901, at gubernatorial election: Re- 
publican, 12,296; Democratic, 21,501; Prohibition, 94; Social, 
627; Social-Labor, .385. Total vote, 34,903. Democratic plur- 
ality, 9,205. 

SUMMARY. 

Popu- 

Districts. lation. 

First 165,078 

Second 169,037 

Third 181,566 

Fourth 162,820 

Fifth 202,290 

Sixth 257,777 

Seventh 177,106 

Eighth 181,947 

Ninth 176,319 

Tenth 209,729 



Total 


Rep. 


Dem. 


Vote. 


Plur. 


Plur. 


35,466 


5,663 




35,251 


6,902 




36,126 


2,038 




34,713 


1,106 




38,702 


1,536 




45,848 


1,991 




35,182 


3,699 




33,074 


3,196 




32,002 


207 




34,903 




9,205 



Total 1,883,669 361,267 26,338 9,205 

Net Republican plurality, 17,133. 



248 BIOGRAPHIES. 

BIOGRAPHIES. 



GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY. 



FRANKLIN MURPHY. 

Governor Murphy was born in Jersey City, N. J., Janu- 
ary 3, 1846. He comes of a conspicuonsly patriotic lineage. 
His ancestors were intensely loyal to their country. In 
earlier days they served with distinction in the Indian 
and Colonial wars; some fought valiantly in the war for 
independence, and a later generation was engaged in the 
war of 1812. The paternal ancestor, Robert Murphy, came 
to this country from Ireland in 1756, and settled in Fair- 
field county, Connecticut. His son Robert, born in 1759, 
removed to Jersey City in early youth, since which time 
the family has lived in New Jersey and has been identi- 
fied with its interests. Among the branches of his family 
are some of the original settlers of Newark and Eliza- 
bethtown. 

The Governor inherited his ancestors' love of country 
so strongly that soon after the outbreak of the Rebellion, 
at the age of sixteen years, he left his school work at the 
Newark Academy and joined Company A of the Thir- 
teenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, which was 
recruited in the summer of 1862. Remainmg with his regi- 
ment until the close of the war, he participated in the 
battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and 
saw service in the western army under General Sherman, 
and v.'as with him on that memorable march from Atlanta 
to the Sea and up through the Carolinas to Washington. 
Although he had not attained his majority when the war 
closed, he reached the rank of a first lieutenant, having 
received his several promotions for gallant and meritorious 
service. 

It was in September, 1865, that Mr. Murphy, having just 
returned from his service In the army, laid the foundation 
of his extensive business as a varnish manufacturer, his 
firm being known as the Murphy Varnish Company. 
Bringing to this enterprise the same earnestness and devo- 
tion which had characterized him in his every undertaking, 
he soon built up a large and successful trade, with 
branches and manufactories in several important trade 
centers in this country and in Europe. The success of this 



BIOGRAPHTES. 249 

and several other industrial and financial enterprises is 
due almost entirely to Mr. Murphy's honorable dealing, 
business sagacity and executive ability. Success in busi- 
ness is not the only one of Mr. Murphy's achievements. 
In matters both municipal and state he has long taken a 
deep interest, both as a public servant and private citizen. 

His official life has been, however, much more largely 
a recognition of his merits than of his own seeking. He 
served as a member of the Newark Common Council dur- 
ing the years 1883 to 1886, and was president of that body. 
He was a member of the House of Assembly of the ses- 
sion of 1885 and was highly regarded as a conservative and 
able leader. As Trustee of the Reform School for Boys 
during the three years' term beginning March 24, 1886, he 
brought to that institution the benefit of all his business 
sagacity and wide experience. In 1900 the President ap- 
pointed Mr. Murphy a Commissioner of the United States 
to the Paris Exposition, a delicate position which he filled 
with rare tact and with credit to himself and his coun- 
trymen. He has served as Park Commissioner of Essex 
county, and the noble system of parks there is due in 
large degree to his labors. 

In politics Mr. Murphy has been a lifelong Republican 
and has served his party with an unselfish devotion and 
loyalty equalled by few. In 1892, at the request of Hon. 
John Kean, the then Republican candidate for Governor, 
he accepted the chairmanship of the State Committee. 
Since that period the Republican campaigns under him 
have been uniformly successful. New Jersey has been 
brought prominently into the list of Republican states; 
Griggs and Voorhees have been triumphantly elected as 
Governors, and the electoral vote of New Jersey has 
twice been cast for McKinley. Mr. Murphy was a dele- 
gate to the Republican conventions at St. I^ouis and Phila- 
delphia, and cast his vote both times for the nomination 
of William McKinley. Upon the death of Hon. Garret A. 
Hobart, Mr. Murphy was unanimously chosen his suc- 
cessor as the New Jersey representative on the national 
Republican Committee, and was in turn immediately ap- 
pointed one of the members of the Execiitive Committee. 

His business and political affairs, however, have not 
been allowed to engross all his time. He has given special 
attention to the movement to organize and develop the 
patriotic societies of the country. He is a member of the 
Society of Colonial Wars and Sons of the American Revo- 
lution. Of the latter organization he has served as vice- 



250 BIOGRAPHIES. 

president of the state society and as secretary-general and 
later as president-general of the national society. He is 
one of the most popular officers this organization has ever 
had, and his arduous labor and untiring efforts in its be- 
half have contributed much to its success. He is also a 
member of the Loyal Legion and of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. 

His capacity for handling public matters is well illus- 
trated by his management of the state Republican Com- 
mittee, where it has shown to a remarkable extent the 
capacity to grasp and dispose of complex questions with 
great ease. He is a ready student of human nature and 
has a large acquaintance with men of all stations of life. 

The Governor lives in Newark, and his loyalty to the 
city of his home is evidenced by the fact that he makes 
it the headquarters of his business, instead of New York, 
as is the case with so many New Jersey industries. His 
family consists of his wife, born Janet Colwell, and a 
surviving son and daughter. 

A busy man with large affairs entrusted to his care and 
with many responsibilities, the Governor has still found 
time to cultivate art and literature and to enjoy social life, 
and his business successes have not diverted him from 
higher pursuits. A uniform courtesy and grace of man- 
ner, and geniality of disposition, inherent to the man, 
have made him friendships which his qualities of heart 
and mind have never failed to hold and endear. As a pub- 
lic speaker, he has a persuasiveness and grace that lend 
charm to his practical business views. He has traveled 
widely and is a man of culture and. refinement. 

Upon several occasions he has been urged to become a 
candidate for the Republican nomination for Governor, 
but always yielded to the interests of others. At the State 
Convention of the Republican party held September 26, 
1901, he was the unanimous choice of that body and was 
nominated by acclamation. 

He was elected by a plurality of 17,133 over James M. 
Seymour, the Democratic candidate. 

Murphy, Republican, 183,814; Seymour, Democrat, 166,681; 
Brown, National Prohibition, 5,365; Vail. Socialist, 3,489; 
Wilson, Social-Labor, 1,918. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 251 

UNITED STATES SENATORS. 



General William J. Sewell, the senior Senator from New 
Jersey, who was born in Ireland, December 6, 1835, died 
on December 21, 1901, and he was buried on December 31 
with mJlitary honors at Camden, N. J. He was first elect- 
ed to the United States Senate in 1881 and served a full 
term of six years. In 1895 he was elected for another term 
and was re-elected in 1901. His successor was not chosen 
by the Legislature before this part of the Manual went 
to press. 

Upon his death the following order was issued by Gover- 
nor Voorhees: 

The Governor and Commander-in-Chief announces with 
great sorrow that Major-General William J. Sewell, com- 
manding division, National Guard, died at his home in the 
city of Camden, December 27, instant. 

General Sewell's record as a soldier was a long and dis- 
tinguished one, dating from the earliest days of the war 
of 1861-65. He was commissioned Captain of Company C 
in the Fifth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
on the 28th day of August, 1861. On the 7th day of July, 

1862, he was made Lieutenant-Colonel of the regiment, and 
on the 21st of October, in the same year, its Colonel. He 
took an active part in all of the many engagements in 
which this regiment participated, down to the battle of 
Spottsylvania, in May, 1864. At the battle of Chancellors- 
ville he assumed command of the Second New Jersey Bri- 
gade, which was the Third Brigade of the Second Division 
of the Third Army Corps. On this occasion he led forward 
his brigade in a brilliant charge, which, under his leader- 
ship, achieved one of the brilliant successes of the war. 
Eight stands of the colors of the enemy were captured, 
and one belonging to a New York regiment was retaken. 
For niost distinguished gallantry in this action he was 
awarded a medal of honor bv Congress. 

At the battle of Gettysburg, on the 2d and 3d of July, 

1863, he performed gallant and conspicuous services. He 
was severely wounded in the actions at Chancellorsville 
and Gettysburg. 

On account of disability incurred in line of duty he re- 
signed as Colonel July 2, 1864. He again offered his serv- 
ices to his State, and on the 31st of August, 1864, was com- 
missioned by Governor Parker to raise and organize the 
Thirty-eighth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteer Infantry, 
and was mustered in as Colonel thereof on the 1st of Octo- 
ber in the same year. With this regiment he took part in 
the active operations before Petersburg,. Virginia, which 
resulted in its capture on the 2d of April, and the surrender 
of General Lee at Appomattox on the 9th of April, 1865. 
With his command he returned to his home at the close 
of the war, and was honorably mustered out on the 30th 
of June, 1865. 

For his gallant and meritorious services at Chancellors- 
ville he was commissioned, by brevet, a Brigadier-General 



252 BIOGRAPHIES. 

of United States Volunteers; and for like services during 
the war he was brevetted a Major-General, both commis- 
sions bearing date March 13, 1865. 

His services and his labors in behalf of the National 
Guard of this State were equally conspicuous and deserv- 
ing. He was commissioned Brevet Major-General on the 
26th of March, 1872; as Brevet Major-General and Aide-de- 
Camp he served on the personal staff of Governor Parker, 
Com.mander-in-Chief, his commission dating from the 24th 
of January, 1872. He became Colonel of the Sixth Regi- 
ment of the National Guard. January 22, 1873, and was 
promoted Brigadier-General, Second Brigade, on the 7th 
of September, 1877. He was nominated February 15, 1899, 
as Major-General of Militia, and unanimously confirmed 
as such, without reference, and immediately assigned to 
command of the division of the National Guard. 

The great confidence and esteem in which he was held by 
those highest in authority, and who knew him well, was 
manifested in his appointment and commission by Presi- 
dent McKinley as Major-General of United States Vol- 
unteers during the Spanish-American War, on the 4th 
of May, 1898. At the unanimous and urgent request of his 
colleagues in the United States Senate, he declined this 
appointment on the 14th of May, 1898, to remain in the 
Senate, where he might be of use to his country as a mem- 
ber of ihe Committee on Military Affairs. 

The record of General Sewell as a brave soldier in times 
of war and in the military service of the State has been 
alike honorable and long. He was a type of the soldier 
whom all loved to honor and follow. Courageous, strict 
in discipline, devoted to the interests of his men, ever 
mindful of their comfort and well-being, he had the love 
and loyal devotion of those who served under him. He 
was bold and inspired others with a conjfidence and a 
courage akin to his own. He led where any dared to 
follow. 

None the less distinguished was he in the civil walks of 
life. By reason of his force of character, his executive 
ability, his prompt decision and untiring energy, he at- 
tained the highest honors in civil life. He was for nine 
years a member of the State Senate, serving three times 
as its President, and was three times elected to represent 
New Jersey in the Senate of the United States. 

He owed nothing to fortune. His own unaided efforts 
brought to him his successes. His friendshin was strong, 
his nature masterful. As a commander of armies he was 
a leader, and in the walks of civil life he occupied no sec- 
ond pcsition. 

His life was one of activity, snent in defense of his 
country in times of danger and distress, and devoted to 
its interests in times of neace. He died at work. Death 
came to him not at the time he wished, but in the manner 
he \yould have had it come. The State has lost a distin- 
guished citizen, the National Guard its beloved military 
chief. ************* 

JOHN KEAN, Elizabeth. 
Senator Kean was born at Ursino, Union county, New 
Jersey, in the house where he now resides, on December 
4th, 1852, The house is historic, being known as "Liberty 



BIOGRAPHIES. 253 

Hall," and was erected by Governor Livingston in 1772. 
Washington held many conferences with his Generals 
within its walls, and Alexander Hamilton studied law 
there. And in the same house John Jay was married to 
one of the daughters of the Governor. Another home, at 3 
East Fifty-sixth street. New York city, also belongs to 
Mr. Kean, where he spends much of his time during the 
winter. 

When a young boy the Senator was sent to a boarding- 
school in Stockbridge, Mass., and was transferred from 
there to a private academy at Sing Sing on the Hudson, 
where he received a much higher education than was neces- 
sary for him to enter Yale College, which he did in 1872. He 
afterward took a course in the Columbia College Law 
School, and was admitted to the bar of New Jersey in 1877. 

Mr. Kean was elected to Congress in 1882, and again in 
1886. In 1892 he was defeated for Governor by his Demo- 
cratic opponent, George T. Werts. 

The Senator is a prominent business man, and is engaged 
in numerous manufacturing, mercantile, railroad and 
financial enterprises, which furnish employment to a large 
number of mechanics and artisans, especially in the city 
of Elizabeth, where he is so well and favorably known. 
He has helped materially in promoting the growth of that 
city, and to him, more than to any other person, is due its 
present prosperity. He fills many positions of honor and 
trust in the banking and commercial communities. He is 
President of the National State Bank, of Elizabeth, and a 
director in the Elizabeth Banking Company. He is also 
President of the Elizabeth Water Company and the Gas 
liight Company of the same city. He holds the largest 
interest in the Elizabeth Street Railway Company, and his 
latest undertaking was the construction of a trolley line 
from Elizabeth to Plainfield, for the franchise of which 
he paid a large sum of money. 

The Senator has always been an active Republican, and 
for several years he served as the Treasurer of the State 
Committee of his party. He was the unanimous choice of 
the Republican caucus for United States (Senator in Janu- 
ary, 1899, and received the full vote of his party when he 
was elected to that office in a joint meeting of the Legis- 
lature, held soon afterward, his Democratic opponent be- 
ing the then incumbent, James Smith. Senator Kean was 
elected for a term of six years, which will not expire until 
March 4th, 1905. 



254 BIOGRAPHIES. 

NEW JERSEY CONGRESSMEN. 



FIRST DISTRICT. 

Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Salem 

Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 198,193; Census of 1900, 229,472.) 

HENRY C. LOUDENSLAGER. 

(Rep., Woodbury.) 

Mr. Loudenslager was born in Mauricetown, Cumberland 
county, N. J., May 22d, 1852. His parents moved to Pauls- 
boro, Gloucester county, in March, 1856, where he has con- 
tinuously resided ever since. His education was obtained 
in the common schools. After leaving the farm of his 
father, he entered the produce commission business in 
Philadelphia, and continued in it for ten years, from 1872 
to 1882. During- this time his father was the County Clerk 
of Gloucester, and except when engaged in the market 
during the produce season, the son was employed in the 
office. He was elected to the office in 1882, and was re- 
elected in 1887. At both of his elections he ran far ahead 
of his ticket, his plurality the last time being 946. He is a 
member of the State Republican Committee. Mr. Louden- 
slager is well known all over the State from his secret 
sociey connections. He has been the Great Keeper of 
Wampum, Improved O. R. M., of this State. He is a mem- 
ber of Florence Lodge, No. 87, F. & A. M., and is a 32d- 
degree Mason. In 1900 he was elected to a fifth term in Con- 
gress by a plurality of 12,773. 

1898— Loudenslager, Rep., 23,864; Iredell, Dem., 18,092; 
Haven, Pro., 1,859; Mills, Soc.-Lab., 164. Loudenslager's 
plurality, 5,772. 

1900— Loudenslager, Rep., 31,942; Pfeiffer, Dem., 19,169; 
Haven, Pro., 1,928; Eberding, Soc.-Dem., 374; Wellenbach, 
Soc.-Lab., 101. Loudenslager's plurality, 12,773. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 
Atlantic, Mercer, Burlington and Ocean Counties. 

(Population. Census of 1890, 183,316; Census of 1900, 219,755.) 

JOHN J. GARDNER. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Mr. Gardner was born October 17th, 1845, in Atlantic 

county, N. J., and since 1856 has resided in Atlantic City, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 255 

except during his term of service in the army during the 
Civil War. He is in the real estate and insurance business. 
He was elected Mayor of Atlantic City in 1868, '69, '70, '73 
and '74 — having declined the nomination in 1872 and 1875. In 
the latter year he was elected a member of the Common 
Council, and one of the Coroners of the county. He was 
elected Senator in 1877, and was re-elected in 1880, '83, '86 and 
'89. He beat the record, with regard to the length of ser- 
vice, of any State Senator in the history of the State, hav- 
ing served five consecutive terms, or fifteen years alto- 
gether. In the session of 1883 he was President of the 
Senate, when he discharged the duties of the position with 
much ability and impartiality. He always took a promi- 
nent part in legislation, and during many years was the 
leader of his party in the Senate. He is noted for his readi- 
ness in debate, repartee and quick and forcible expression 
of ideas. He was a delegate-at-large to the National Re- 
publican Convention at Chicago in 1884. He is a member of 
the State Republican Committee. He was elected to a fifth 
term in Congress in 1900 by a plurality of 14,u08. 

1898- Gardner, Rep., 24,035; Hall, Dem., 17,367; Currie, Pro., 
1,294; Weigel, Soc.-Lab., 153. Gardner's plurality, 6,668. 

1900— Gardner, Rep., 31,359; Prickett, Dem., 17,351; Powell, 
Pro., 1,419; Pancoast, Soc.-Dem., 418; Wegener, Soc.-Lab., 
75. Gardner's plurality, 14,008. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 
Somerset, Middlesex and Monmouth Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1880, 159,913; Census of 1900, 194,767.) 

BENJAMIN F. HOWELL. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Howell was born in Cumberland county, N. J., Jan- 
uary 27th, 1844, and is President of the People's National 
Bank of New Brunswick. He was Surrogate of Middlesex 
county for ten years, from November, 1882, until November, 
1892. He served with the Twelfth New Jersey Volunteers 
throughout the Civil War. He came to South Amboy, 
where he entered business, and continued his residence 
there until 1882, when he was elected Surrogate and re- 
moved to New Brunswick. He served three years as a 
member of the Township Committee, and two years as 
Chosen Freeholder, during the last year of which he was 
Director of the Board. He is a Director of the New Bruns- 



256 BIOGRAPHIES. 

\\ick Savings Bank, and holds many other positions of 
trust. He was elected to Congress in 1894 by a plurality of 
3,976 over Jacob A. Geissenheimer, Democrat, who two 
years before carried the district by 3,327. In 1900 he was 
elected to a fourth term in Congress by a plurality of 5,505. 

1898— Howell, Rep., 19,412; Convery, Dem., 18.683; Bird, 
Pro., 670; Williams, Soc.-Lab., 183. Howell's plurality, 729. 

1900— Howell, Rep., 24,286; Bergen, Dem., 18,781; Garrison, 
Pro., 768; Freedman, Soc.-Dem., 190; Herrschaft, Soc.-Lab., 
108. Howell's plurality, 5,505. 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 
Sussex, Warren, Hunterdon and Morris Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 148,268; Census of 1900, 161,578.) 

JOSHUA S. SALMON. 

(Dem., Boonton.) 

Mr. Salmon was born near Mount Olive, Morris county, 
N. J., February 2d, 1846, and is a lawyer by profession. He 
is of Scotch origin, while his ancestry in this country dates 
back to 1640. He was educated in the seminaries of Char- 
lotteville, N. Y. , and Schooley's Mountain, N. J., and 
studied law with the late Charles E. Schofield, of Jersey 
City. Later he matriculated in the Albany Law School, 
where he was graduated in 1873 with the degree of LL.B. 
In March of that year he was admitted as an attorney and 
counselor to the bar of New York, and in November, 1875, 
he was admitted as an attorney in New Jersey. He after- 
wards became a counselor, and on December 21st, 1894, he 
was admitted as an attorney and counselor of the Supreme 
Court of the United States. Since his admission to the bar 
he has pKacticed his profession at Boonton. He takes high 
rank both as a civil and criminal lawyer. He has been 
counsel in many notable cases and enjoys an extensive and 
lucrative practice. 

In March, 1893, he was appointed by Governor Werts as 
Prosecutor of the Pleas for Morris county, and served a full 
term of five years. On April 1st, 1897, he opened an office 
in Morristown, and he now divides his time between that 
and the Boonton office, having a son in each office reading 
law and assisting in legal work. As a citizen Mr. Salmon 
has always been active and influential in the welfare and 
advancement of the place of his residence, substantially 
supporting its leading institutions and liberally encourag- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 257 

«»ing- its worthy enterprises. He has been one of the direc- 
tors of the Boonton National Bank since its organization 
in 1890. His activity in political affairs has continued since 
his admission to the bar, and he is a recognized leader in 
the Democratic party in Morris county. In 1876 he was 
elected a member of the City Council of Boonton and held 
that office for six years. In 1877 he was elected a member 
of the House of Assembly and served on important com- 
mittees and was also a recognized leader on the floor of 
the House. He was counsel for the Board of Chosen Free- 
holders of Morris county from 1880 until 1893, has been 
counsel for the town of Boonton and for various townships 
in Morris county, holding such an incumbency during the 
greater part of the time since his admission to the bar. He 
was the Democratic candidate for County Clerk in 1878, and 
the nominee of his party for State Senator in 1883. 

Mr. Salmon was re-elected to Congress in 1900 by a plu- 
rality of 1,644. 

1898— Salmon, Dem., 17,866; Reiley, Rep., 15,207; Lefferts, 
Pro., 1,571; Campbell, Soc.-Lab., 70. Salmon's plurality, 
2,659. 

1900— Salmon, Dem., 19,661; Herr, Rep., 18,017; Osborn, 
Pro., 1,255; Strobell, Soc.-Dem., 235; Wilson, Soc.-Lab., 64. 
Salmon's plurality, 1,644. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 
Passaic and Bergen Counties. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,272; Census of 1900, 2.33,643.) 

JAMES FLEMING STEWART. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Stewart was born at Paterson, N. J., June 15th, 1851, 
and is a lawyer by profession. He attended both school 
and college, and occupied his summer vacations in various 
departments of labor to acquire the means to defray the 
expenses of his education. In the law class of the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York, in 1870, which comprised 
many men who have since attained eminence in their pro- 
fession, he took the $250 prize for the best examination — a 
fact of which he is particularly proud. He has been three 
times appointed Recorder of the city of Paterson, a position 
which he held when he was elected to Congress, but he was 
legislated out of office in 1892 by the Democratic Legisla- 
ture, and was restored in the spring of 1894, owing to Re- 
publican ascendancy in the Legislature. He resigned the 
17 



258 BIOGRAPHIES. 

office in November, 1S95. In 1900 he was electod to a fourth^ 
term in Congress by a plurality of 4,615. 

1898— Stewart, Rep., 18,367; Marley, Dem., 16,342; Stocking, 
Pro., 354; Magnat, Soc.-Lab., 1,270. Stewart's plurality, 
2,025. 

1900— Stewart, Rep., 24,323; Johnson, Dem., 19,708; Dor- 
mida, Pro., 430; Wyatt, Soc.-Dem., 514; Magner, Soc.-Lab., 
395. Stewart's plurality, 4,615. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 

The City of Newark and the Township of East Orange, 
Essex County. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 195,112; Census of 1900, 267,576.) 

RICHARD WAYNE PARKER. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Parker was born in Morristown, N. J., August 6th, 
1848, and is a lawyer by profession. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1867, studied law in the Columbia Law 
School, New York, and was admitted to the bar in 1870. He 
then became the law partner of his father, Cortlandt 
Parker, and the partnership still exists. He was a member 
of Assembly from Essex county in 1885 and 1886, when he 
took a prominent part in legislation. In 1892 he was de- 
feated for Congress by Thomas Dunn English. In 1900 he 
was elected to a fourth term in Congress by a plurality 
of 13,353. 

1898— Parker, Rep., 23,843; Atwater, Dem., 20,150; Raub, 
Pro., 395; Carless, Soc.-Lab., 1,035. Parker's plurality, 3,693. 

1900— Parker, Rep., 32,830; Lambert, Dem., 19,477; Gray, 
Pro., 395; Jones, Soc.-Dem., 848; Hoffman, Soc.-Lab., 534. 
Parker's plurality, 13,353. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 
All of Hudson County Excepting the City of Bayonne. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 256,093; Census of 1900, 353,326.) 

ALLAN LANGDON McDERMOTT. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. McDermott was born in South Boston, Mass., on the 
30th of March, 1854. His father was Hugh Farrer McDer- 
mott, who, to use the language of the memorial resolutions 



BIOGRAPHIES. 259 

adopted by the New York Press Club, on his decease, in 
1S90, "in the wide scope of his literary labors, as journalist, 
dramatist, author and poet, made a conspicuous place and 
earned enduring fame for himself." His mother's maiden 
name was Annie J. Langdon, and she was of one of the 
oldest families in New England. In 1870 the subject of this 
sketch determined to follow journalism, and, as a prelim- 
inary step, learned to set type and run a press. A few 
verses published in a Boston paper, and reprinted in the 
New York Telegram, in 1870, show that Mr. McDermott had 
a very narrow escape from a literary tomb. In 1876 he 
entered the law school of the University of the City of New 
York, and was graduated the following year, delivering an 
essay on "The Sanction of the Law," at the commencement 
exercises held at the Academy of Music in June, 1877. The 
same year he was admitted to the bar of New Jersey, be- 
coming a counselor in 1880. While he was a student in the 
office of the late Leon Abbett there was formed a friend- 
ship between preceptor and pupil which had grown with 
the years, and had on more than one occasion evidenced a 
steadfastness which is rarely found in the harsh lines of 
political association. In 1878 Mr. McDermott was defeated 
as a candidate for Assembly from the Fourth District of 
Hudson county, but was elected in 1879 and 1880, and in 1881 
was the Democratic candidate for Speaker of that body. 
From 1878 to 1883 he was Corporation Attorney of Jersey 
City, resigning that position when appointed Judge of the 
Second District Court by Governor Ludlow. In 1884 Gov- 
ernor Abbett appointed Mr. McDermott a member of the 
State Board of Assessors. In that position he formulated 
the rules which have ever since been followed in the taxa- 
tion of railroad property and corporate franchises in New 
Jersey. In 1886 Governor Abbett nominated him as Clerk in 
Chancery, and he was confirmed by the Senate. In com- 
municating the fact to the Legislature, the late ex-United 
States Senator Cattell, also a member of the State Board, 
wrote: "The Hon. Allan L. McDermott, one of the original 
members of the Board, was during the last session of the 
Legislature appointed and confirmed as Clerk in the Court 
of Chancery, and on the 1st of April resigned as a member 
of this Board to enter upon his new position. Much of the 
success of the early work of this Board is due to the intelli- 
gent and faithful service of Mr. McDermott, largely sup- 
plemented by his legal knowledge, which was invaluable. 
The Board parted with him most regretfully, and we are 
free to say that in our judgment it will be difficult to find 
one who will in all respects fill his place." In 1884, '85 and 



260 BIOGRAPHIES. 

'86 Mr. McDerniott was President of the Board of Finance 
and Taxation of Jersey City. Upon his retirement from 
that position the Argus said: "The withdrawal of Allan L. 
McDermott from the management of our municipal 
finances is a public calamity. His clear head, his honesty 
of purpose and untiring energy have rendered him of ines- 
timable value to our city. He has introduced and enforced 
rigid principles of economy in our local expenditures, and 
has, with the aid of his colleagues, established an ad- 
mirable financial system, which has placed our credit 
above cavil or suspicion." He was renominated for Clerk 
in Chancery, in 1891, by Governor Abbett, and he was again 
confirmed by the Senate. In 1892 Mr, McDermott was, be- 
cause of dissatisfaction with the existing local govern- 
ment, defeated in a canvass for the Mayoralty of Jersey 
City. In 1894 he was nominated by Governor Werts as a 
member of the commission appointed to revise the State 
Constitution. He was chairman of the State Democratic 
Committee from 1886 until 1896, and drafted every platform, 
with one exception, adopted by a State Democratic Con- 
vention during that time. 

In 1898 he was appointed by Mayor Hoos Corporation 
Counsel of Jersey City. In that year he was elected to the 
State Senate by a plurahty of 9,528. He served two years 
in that body, and resigned the office in the fall of 1900. He 
was nominated for Congress to fill the unexpired term of 
the late William D. Daly, and he was also nominated for a 
full term, with small opposition in his own party. He was 
elected for the short term by a plurality of 3,426 and for the 
long term by a plurality of 3,241 over Marshall Van Winkle, 
the Republican candidate. 

1898— Daly, Dem., 30,270; Pangborn, Rep., 20,162; Brown, 
Pro., 258; Herrschaft, Soc.-Lab., 1,723. Daly's plurality, 
10,108. 

1900 (short term)— McDermott, Dem., 33,898; Van Winkle, 
Rep., 30,472; Hickey, Ind. Work., 20. McDermott's plu- 
rality, 3,426. 

1900 (full term)— McDermott, Dem., 33,713; Van Winkle, 
Rep., 30,472; Brown, Pro., 303; Kraft, Soc.-Dem., 1,336; 
Jacob, Soc.-Lab., 479; Hickey, Ind. Work., 10. McDermott's 
plurality, 3,241. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 261 



EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

Tlie County of Union, the City of Bayonne (Hudson County) 

and all the County of Essex Exceptina: the City of 

Newark and Township of East Orange. 

(Population, Census of 1890, 152,486; Census of 1900, 223,552.') 

CHARLES NEWELL FOWLER. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Mr. Fowler was born at Lena, Illinois, November 2d, 1852, 
and is in the banking business. His earlier j^ears were 
passed on his father's farm, where he remained until his 
eighteenth year, when he became a student at Beloit Col- 
lege, Wisconsin. Two years later he entered Yale College, 
from which he was graduated in 1876. He read law in the 
office of Williams & Thompson, in Chicago, and attended 
the Chicago Law School, and was graduated in 1878. He 
has been more or less engaged in active politics since he 
came to Elizabeth, seventeen years ago, and for some time 
he has been Chairman of the City Republican Central Com- 
mittee. He has served as a member-at-large of the Re- 
publican State Committee since 1898. He took an active 
part in the campaign for the election of Foster M. Voorhees 
as Governor. He was elected to a fourth term in Congress 
in 1900 by a plurality of 9,611 over Man, Dem. 

1898— Fowler, Rep., 20,230; Snyder, Dem., 15,878; Davis, 
Pro., 561; Campbell, Soc.-Lab., 740. Fowler's plurality, 4,352. 

1900— Fowler, Rep., 27,121; Man, Dem., 17,510; Kennedy, 
Pro., 501; Koch, Soc.-Dem., 670; Grieb, Soc.-Lab., 327. 
Fowler's plurality, 9,611. 



STATE SENATORS. 



Atlantic County. 

(Population, 46.402.) 

EDWARD SPROGELL LEE. 

(Rep., Atlantic City.) 

Senator Lee was born in Philadelphia, October 22, 1857, 
and is a builder and contractor, and has been a resident 
of Atlantic City since 1877. His first political position was 
as a member of the Board of Health in 1886-87, of which 



262 BIOGRAPHIES. 

body he was Treasurer in the latter year. In March, 18S8. 
he was elected to the City Council, for three years, and 
was re-elected in '91-'94, '97 and 1900, being five consecutive 
terms. In 1901 he was elected to the State Senate by a 
plurality of 211 over William B. Loudenslager, the Demo- 
cratic candidate. 

1898— Evans, Rep., 3,982; Schuchardt, Dem., 2,869; Clark, 
Pro., 270. Evans' plurality, 1,113. 

1901— Lee, Rep., 4,752; Loudenslager, Dem., 4,541; Benje, 
Pro., 144. Lee's plurality, 211. 



Bergen County. 

(Population 78,441.) 
EDMUND ^. WAKELEE. 

(Rep., Demarest.) 

Senator Wakelee was born at Kingston, N. Y., November 
21st, 1869, and is a lawyer by profession. He is the youngest 
member of the present Senate. He was graduated from the 
Kingston Academy and then entered the New York Uni- 
versity, from which institution he was graduated in 1891. 
He was admitted to the bar in the same year. He made his 
home in Bergen county, where he is now practicing law, 
having an office in Englewood, and also in New York city. 
He is a member of Alpine Lodge, No. 77, F. & A. M., of 
Closter, and of Northern Valley Lodge, Knights of Honor, 
Tenafly, and all the prominent clubs in Bergen county. He 
served two years in the House of Assembly, in 1899 and 1900. 
and during the latter year he was the Republican leader 
on the floor of the House. He took a prominent part in 
legislation and made himself so popvilar that, when William 
M. Johnson resigned his seat in the Senate as a representa- 
tive from Bergen county to accept the office of First As- 
sistant Postmaster-General of the United States, Mr. 
Wakelee was nominated by his party to fill the vacancy, 
and he was elected by a plurality of 2,163 over his Demo- 
cratic opponent, Frank O. Mittag. In the session of 1900, 
Mr. Wakelee was the leader of his party on the floor of the 
House and served as Chairman of the House Committees 
on Appropriations and Judiciary, and as a member of the 
Committees on Boroughs and Borough Commissions, In- 
dustrial School for Girls, Soldiers' Home and Treasurer's 
Accounts. 

In 1901 the Senator was elected for a full term of three 
years by a plurality of 1,321 over Conkling, the Democratic 



BIOGRAPHIES. 263 

candidate. Last year he served as Chairman of the Com- 
mittees on Public Health and School for Deaf-Mutes, and 
as a member of the Committees on Railroads and Canals, 
Unfinished Business, and Industrial School for Girls. 

1900— Wakelee, Rep., 8,844; Mittag, Dem., 6,681; Colling- 
wood, Pro., 209; Schmidt, Soc.-Dem., 172. Wakelee's plu- 
rality, 2,163. 

1901— Wakelee, Rep., 7,355; Conkling-, Dem., 6,034; Ware, 
Pro., 74; Wyatt, Soc, 94. Wakelee's plurality, 1,321. 



Burlington County. 

(Population, 58,241.) 

NATHAN HAINES. 

(Rep., Burlington.) 

Senator Haines was born at Woodstown, Salem county, 
N. J., December Sl.st, 1833. He is cashier of the Mechanics 
National Bank of Burlington, a position he has occupied 
since January, 1869. Previously he was a teller in the old 
Burlington Bank for a period of six years. Formerly he 
was a farmer and at another time a druggist. For three 
years he was President of the Common Council of Burling- 
ton, during which period the present water works system 
was established. For two years he was City Treasurer, 
and since 1871 to the present time he has been treasurer of 
a successful building and loan association. He was Chair- 
man of the County Board of Elections since the creation 
of that body and until he was elected to the Senate, when 
he resigned that office. He is President of the Burlington 
Electric Light and Power Company and the Delaware River 
Navigation Company. He is a member of the Union 
League of Philadelphia. He has always taken an active 
part in the politics of Burlington county and for many 
years was a member of the Republican County Executive 
Committee. For some years the Senator was prominent 
in Masonic circles, for six years he was grand master of 
his lodge. No. 32, and for two years deputy grand mas- 
ter of the state. He served in the National Guard 
of New Jersey from 1880 until 1896 on the staff of the Sixth 
Regiment, and he was appointed by Governor Griggs as 
Aide-de-Camp, with the rank of Colonel, on his staff. He 
was also on the staff of General Grubb, on special duty 
with the New Jersey Battalion at Yorktown, in 1881, and 
assisted in winning the trophy and bringing it to Trenton. 

The Senator was educated at the schools of his native 



264 BIOGRAPHIES. 

place and later at the Chesterfield Academy. He taught 
school for five years, and in 1860 moved to Burlington. He 
is of Quaker ancestry. He was elected to the State Senate 
by a plurality of 1,823 over Howard E. Packer, Democrat, 
who sought a re-election. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Militia and Industrial School for Girls and as a member 
of the Committees on Public Health, Unfinished Business 
and Treasurer's Accounts. 

1897— Packer, Dem., 6,300; Borton, Rep., 5,684; Landon, 
Pro., 386. Packer's plurality, 616. 

1900— Haines, Rep., 7,796; Packer, Dem., 5,973; Vail, Pro., 
523. Haines' plurality, 1,823. 



Camden County. 

(Population, 107,641.) 

HERBERT W. JOHNSON. 

(Rep., Merchantville.) 

Senator Johnson was born in Bucks county. Pa., Novem- 
ber 24th, 1850, of Quaker parentage, and is a seed merchant, 
being the senior member of the firm of Johnson & Stokes, 
the largest seed and agricultural house in Philadelphia, 
which he established in 1880. He was educated in the 
Friends' schools of Philadelphia. He has resided in Mer- 
chantville, Camden county, since 1887, and is prominently 
identified with the growth and progress of that town. He 
served three years in the Common Council, and at the end 
of his term he was elected Chief Burgess of that borough. 
The Senator was serving a second term as a member of 
the Camden County Board of Freeholders when he was 
elected to the State Senate. He then resigned the Free- 
holder office. He has always taken an active part in 
county matters, and has filled the Chairmanships of the 
most important committees of the County Board. He is an 
active member of the Commercial Exchange of Philadel- 
phia, and also of the Philadelphia Bourse. In 1899 he was 
re-elected to the Senate by a plurality of 8,928 over Russell, 
the regular candidate of the Democratic party. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Banks and Insurance, Printing, and State Library, and 
as a member of the Committees en Municipal Corpora- 
tions, Elections, Labor and Industries, and State Library. 

1896— Johnson, Rep., 16,308; Armstrong, Dem., 6,449; Haven, 
Pro., 406; Weisbrod, Soc.-Lab., 97. Johnson's plurality, 9,859. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 265 

1899— Johnson, Rep., 11,357; Russell, Dem., 2,429; Hall, 
County Dem., 1,117; Bacon, Pro., 477; Sauers, Soc.-Lab., 166. 
Johnson's plurality, 8,928. 



Cape May County. 

(Population, 13,201.) 

ROBERT E. HAND. 

(Rep., Erma.) 

Senator Hand was born at Erma, Cape May county, June 
28th. 1854, where he still resides. He was educated in the 
public schools, and at an early age gave evidence of busi- 
ness ability of an unusual order. He is now extensively 
engaged in oyster-planting and general contracting. He 
is the owner of hundreds of acres of valuable timber lands, 
from which he cuts railroad ties, piling, poles, &c., in great 
quantity. He employs more labor than any other man in 
the county. He married Lizzie W., daughter of Captain 
William S. Hoffman, of Cold Spring, N. J., in 1878. He be- 
gan his public career as a member of the local Board of 
Education, and was its District Clerk for twelve years. 
He was an active and influential member of the Board of 
Freeholders from 1887 to 1892, and was elected Sheriff in the 
latter year, after one of the most masterly campaigns in 
the history of the county. He attended as a delegate the 
National Republican Convention at St. Louis, June 16th, 
1S96. He was elected to the Assembly in 1896, by a plurality 
of 469 over Roden, Democrat. In November, 1897, he was 
elected State Senator for a term of three years over David 
W. Roden, by a plurality of 205, after one of the hottest 
contests ever known to have taken place in the county, 
being the only Republican Senator elected in New Jersey 
at that time. His many friends throughout the State con- 
gratulated him on his brilliant and decisive victory, and in 
their appreciation of his abilities are of the unanimous 
opinion that, in politics as well as in business, he is in the 
foremost rank of enterprising citizens. He was re-elected 
to the Senate in 1900 by the increased plurality of 325 over 
Miller, Democrat. He is the only Republican Senator who 
was ever re-elected in Cape May. Last year he served as 
Chairman of the Committees on Commerce and Naviga- 
tion, Riparian Rights and Treasurer's Accounts, and as a 
member of the Committees on Boroughs and Townships, 
Militia, Public Printing, and School for Deaf-Mutes. 



266 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1897— Hand, Rep., 1,526; Roden, Dem., 1,321; Lake, Pro., 20.3. 
Hand's plurality, 205. 

1900— Hand, Rep., 1,791; Miller, Dem., 1,466; Lake, Pro., 220. 
Uand's plurality, 325. 



Cumberland. County. 

(Population, 51,193.) 
BLOOMFIELD H. MINCH. 

(Rep., Bridgeton.) 

Senator Minch was born in Hopewell township, near 
Bridgeton, N. J., October 10, 1864. He was graduated at 
the South Jersey Institute in 1883, took a business course 
in the Bryant & Stratton College in Philadelphia, and 
entered into business with William O. Garrison at Bridge- 
ton under the firm name of Garrison & Minch, dealing 
extensively in farmers' supplies and doing general con- 
tracting. The Senator is a director in the Bridgeton 
National Bank, the Cumberland Trust Company, Bridge- 
ton, and the Security Trust Company, Camden. 

He was for three years a member of the House of Assem- 
bly, being first elected in 1895, and served u.pon important 
committees during his term of service, being Chairman 
of the Committee of Municipal Corporations in 1897. As 
a candidate for Senator Mr. Minch led his ticket in Cum- 
berland county, having a plurality of 1,977. 

1898— Stokes, Rep., 5,174; Grosscup, Dem., 3,921; Steppard, 
Pro., 583. Stokes' plurality, 1,253. 

1901— Minch, Rep., 5,554; Burt, Dem., 3,577; Bateman, 
Pro., 566. Minch' plurality, 1,977. 



Essex County. 

(Population, 359,053.) 

THOMAS NESBITT M'CARTER. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Senator McCarter was born in Newark, N. J., October 20, 
1867, and is a lawyer by profession. He was educated at 
the Newark Academy and Dr. Pingry's School in Eliza- 
beth. H6 was graduated at Princeton University in 1888 
and studied law at Columbia Law School and in his 
father's (the late Thomas N. McCarter) office in Newark. 
He was a member of the firm of McCarter, "Williamson & 



BIOGRAPHIES. 267 

McCarter from July 1, 1891, to May 1, 1899, when he with- 
drew and began the practice of his profession alone. On 
September 1, 1900, he formed the firm of McCarter & 
Adams, consisting of himself and Edwin G. Adams. From 
April 1, 1896, to April 1, 1899, he was Judge of the First 
District Court of Newark, when he resigned, having two 
years yet to serve. Governor Griggs appointed him to the 
judgeship. During the time he was on the bench he wrote 
and published McCarter's New Jersey Disirict Court prac- 
tice, which is the recognized book of practice for the Dis- 
trict Courts in use throughout the state. 

Senator McCarter was especially active during the last 
campaign in his advocacy of the nomination and election 
of Franklin Murphy for Governor. He made the speech 
before the State Convention placing Mr. Murphy in nomi- 
nation, and served throughout the campaign, at Mr. Mur- 
phy's personal request, as Chairman of the Executive 
Comm.ittee of the Republican State Com.mittee, in which 
capacity, owing to Mr. Murphy's absence campaigning 
through the state, he was in practical charge of the Re- 
publican campaign. 

On January 1, 1902, he dissolved his partnership with 
Mr. Adams and withdrew from the general practice of 
law to accept the position of general counsel and second 
vice-president of Fidelity Trust Company of Newark, 
one of the largest financial corporations in the state, of 
which company Mr. McCarter has long been solicitor, and 
the legal business of which company, with its ramifica- 
tions, has grown to such an extent as to require constant 
attention. 

In 1899 he was elected to the Senate after a most excit- 
ing campaign by a plurality of 5,040 over Samuel Kalisch. 
one of the strongest and most aggressive Democrats in 
Essex county. Last year he served as Chairman of the 
Committee on Municipal Corporations and as a member 
of the Committees on Judiciary, Banks and Insurance, 
Federal Relations, and Soldiers' Home. 

1896— Ketcham, Rep., 41,856; Lambert, Dem., 20,933; Liver- 
more, Nat. Dem., 1,045; Anderson, Pro., 541; Wilson, Soc. 
Lab., 899. Ketcham's plurality, 20,923. 

1899— McCarter, Jr., Rep., 27,404; Kalisch, Dem., 22,364; 
Davis, Pro., 612; Herman, Soc. Dem., 859; Wilson, Soc. Lab., 
832. McCarter's plurality, 5,040. 



268 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Gloucester County. 

(Population, 31,905.) 

SOLOMON H. STANGER. • 

(Rep., Glassboro.) 

Senator Stanger was born at Glassboro, N. J., March 27th, 
1836, on a farm. His boyhood days were spent with these 

surroundings. His education was attained in the old school 
house at Glassboro, after which he entered into the indus- 
try of tilling the soil, which he pursued faithfully and suc- 
cessfully until the year 1881, when he moved from the farm 
into the famous "Temperance House," opposite the M. E. 
Church, Glassboro, and opened a general store, which has 
grown to be the largest and most successful of its kind in 
the county. 

In 1885 he was elected to the Board of Freeholders, serv- 
ing in that capacity for ten successive years, holding the 
most important positions the Board could place upon him. 

In 1892 he was elected to the Assembly, and has been re- 
elected three times since, serving four years altogether, 
and being the only person from Gloucester county ever 
returned for so many successive terms. He served on some 
of the most important committees. In 1896 he was Chair- 
man of the House Committee on Education, also a member 
of the Committees on Labor and Industry, Riparian Rights 
and School for Deaf-Mutes. 

Senator Stanger has always been closely identified with, 
and is a leader of, the Republican party, having at heart its 
principles, and doing all in his power to promote the same. 
His many friends, recognizing his sterling qualities and 
faithful service, have shown their appreciation by electing 
him to the high and honorable position as their representa- 
tive in the Senate for two terms. 

In 1899 he was re-elected to the Senate, after a most ex- 
citing and hard-fought campaign, by a plurality of 169 over 
his opponent, Thomas M. Ferrell, the strongest Democrat 
in the county. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Game and Fisheries, Printed Bills and Sinking Fund, and 
as a member of the Committees on Agriculture and Agri- 
cultural College and Public Grounds and Buildings. 

1896— Stanger, Rep., 4,637; Myers, Dem., 3,001; Holmes, 
Pro., 216. Stanger's plurality, 1,636. 

1899-Stanger, Rep.. 3,498; Ferrell, Dem.. 3,,329; Gardiner, 
Pro., 223. Stanger's plurality, 169. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 269 

Hudson County. 

(Population, 386,048.) 

ROBERT S. HUDSPETH. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Senator Hudspeth was born at Coburg, Canada, October 
27th, 1853, and is a lawyer by profession. He practices in 
New York and New Jersey, having been admitted to the 
bar in both States. He represented the old Sixth district 
of Hudson county in the Legislature of 1886, '87 and '89. In 
1887 he was the regular Democratic nominee for Speaker, 
but was defeated for the office owing to a bolt in his party. 
At the close of the session of that year he was presented 
with a costly gold watch and chain by his Democratic col- 
leagues. In 1889 he was unanimously nominated for the 
Speakership by the Democratic caucus, and was elected to 
the office by a party vote over his Republican competitor. 
He discharged the duties of the Chair very acceptably to 
the members of both parties, and was complimented by 
them just before the adjournment of the Legislature. In 
1891 he received a unanimous nomination for Senator in 
Hudson county to till the unexpired term (one year) of 
Edward F. McDonald, who had resigned to become a mem- 
ber of Congress, and he was elected bj^ a plurality of 7,255 
over Carr, the Republican candidate. In 1893 he was nomi- 
nated by Governor Werts for Law Judge of Hudson county 
to succeed Job H. Lippincott, who had resigned to become 
a Justice of the Supreme Court, and he was confirmed by 
the Senate and served a term of five years. He was again 
elected to the Senate in 1900 to fill the unexpired term (one 
year) of Allan L. McDermott, who had resigned to accept a 
nomination for Congress. His plurality over his Repub- 
lican opponent, Mark M. Fagan, was 3,850. In 1901 he was 
elected for a full term of three years by a plurality of 
7,279 over George L. Record, the Republican candidate. 

Last year he served on the Committees on Finance, Mis- 
cellaneous Business, Federal Relations, Revision of Laws, 
Riparian Rights, and Pxiblic Grounds and Buildings. 

1900— Hudspeth, Dem., 36,947; Fagan, Rep., 33,097; Wilson, 
Pro., 333; Victor, Soc.-Dem., 1,064; Oakes, Soc.-Lab., 489. 
Hudspeth's. plurality, 3,850. 

1901— Hudspeth, Dem.,. 35,964; Record, Rep., 28,685; 
Kearns, Soc, 1,332; Jacob, Soc.-Lab., 590; Burger, Pro., 
233. Hudspeth's plurality, 7,279. 



270 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Hunterdon County. 

(Population, 34,507.) 

WILLIAM C. GEPHARDT. 

(Dem., Clinton.) 

Senator Gebhardt was born at Croton, Hunterdon county, 
N. J., March 28, 1859, and was graduated in the Clinton 
Institute. He was admitted at the June term, 1884, as an 
attorney, and at the June term, 1887, as a counselor. He 
began the practice of his profession at Clinton, N. J., and 
still retains an office there, having one also at 259 Wash- 
ington street, Jersey City. He served as Corporation 
Counsel of the town of Clinton for ten years, and as Presi- 
dent of the Board of Education for three years. He has 
also filled the position of School Principal. He was elected 
to the Senate by a plurality of 1,281 over his Republican 
opponent, Albert C. Gandy. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Agriculture, Corporations, Public Health, 
and Industrial School for Girls. 

1897— Foster, Dem., 4,074; Reading, Rep., 3,290; Craig, Pro., 
375. Foster's plurality, 784. 

1900— Gebhardt, Dem., 5,120; Gandy, Rep,, 3,839; Bodine, 
Pro., 314. Gebhardt's plurality, 1,281. 



Mercer County. 

(Population, 95,365.) 

ELIJAH C, HUTCHINSON. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Senator Hutchinson was bom at Windsor, Mercer county, 
N. J., August 7th, 1855, and is a merchant miller. Before 
his election to the House of Assembly, in 1895, the only 
public office he ever held was that of Township Clerk, 
which he filled for three years. He has been treasurer of 
the Trenton Bone and Fertilizer Company since its organ- 
ization in July, 1889, and its manager since 1892. He is a 
director of the Interstate Fair Association, and was its first 
treasurer, having served three years in that position. He 
does a large business with his fiour mill and grain elevator, 
which are situated in Hamilton township. He was elected 
to the Assembly in 1895 by a plurality of 3,273 over McGal- 
liard. Democrat, and in 1896 by 7,736 over Gill, Democrat. 
In the Legislature of 1896 he served as Chairman of the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 271 

Committee on Clergy, and as a member of the Committees 
on Appropriations, Game and Fisheries and State Prison, 
and also of the Inaugural Committee. In 1897 he was 
Chairman of the Committees on Agriculture and School for 
Deaf-Mutes, and a member of the Committees on Appro- 
priations and Revision of Laws. 

In 1898 he was elected to the Senate by a plurality of 1,461 
over his Democratic opponent. Bayard Stockton, and in 
1901 he was re-elected by the increased plurality of 1,904 
over former Judge Robert S. Woodruff, the Democratic 
candidate. 

During his career in the Legislature the Senator has been 
a very busy man indeed, as he has always taken an active 
interest in matters that came up for legislation, and has 
ever been alert for the promotion of the welfare of the 
people of the State, and more particularly that of his own 
constituency. Last year he served as Chairman of the 
Committees on Agriculture, Stationery and Incidental Ex- 
penses and Public Grounds and Buildings, and as a member 
of the Committees on Appropriations, Clergy, Printed 
Bills and Sinking Fund. 

1898— Hutchinson, Rep., 10,037; Stockton, Dem., 8,576; 
Burgner, Pro., 468. Hutchinson's plurality, 1,461. 

1901— Hutchinson, Rep., 10,861; Woodruff, Dem., 8,957; Bor- 
den, Pro., 322; Pancoast, Soc, 180. Hutchinson's plurality, 
1,904. 



Middlesex County. 

(Population, 79,762.) 

THEODORE STRONG. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 
Senator Strong was born at New Brunswick, N. J., Jan- 
uary 15th, 1863, and is a lawyer by profession. He was 
graduated from Rutgers College in 1883, studied law with 
the firm of Woodbridge Strong & Sons, and was admitted 
to the bar in 1886 and became a member of the foregoing 
firm, which was dissolved when Woodbridge Strong was 
appointed County Judge of Middlesex in 1896. Then the 
Senator formed a co-partnership with his brother, Alan H. 
Strong, which has continued ever since. The Senator was 
County Solicitor from May, 1895, to Ma5^ 1897. He was 
elected to the Senate by a plurality of 2,072 over James H. 
Van Cleef, his predecessor in ofRce. Last year he served 
as Chairman of the Committees on Unfinished Business 



272 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and State Prison and as a member of the Committees on 
Banks and Insurance, Militia, Municipal Corporations, 
Passed Bills. Soldiers' Home, and State Library. 

1897_Van Cleef, Dem., 6,747; Pownall, Rep., 6,238; Mar- 
shall, Pro., 276. Van Cleef s plurality, 509. 

1900— Strong, Rep., 9,296; Van Cleef, Dem., 7,224; Crowell, 
Pro., 198. Strong's plurality. 2 072. 



Monmouth County. 

(Population, 82,057.) 

CHARLES ASA FRANCIS. 

(Rep., North Long Branch.) 

Senator Francis was born at Keyport, N. J., October 
28th, 1855, and is a merchant. He received his education 
in the old Turkey school and at Freehold. He was formerly 
a clerk for the New Jersey Central Railroad Company at 
Sandy Hook. In 1881 he formed a co-partnership under the 
firm name of Hoyt & Francis, in the grocery business, at 
North Long Branch, which is one of the most prosperous 
in Monmouth county. He was elected a Commissioner of 
that town in 1884, and was re-elected in 1885, '86 and '87. 
In 1893 he was placed on both tickets for Commissioner-at- 
Large, and received the total vote cast at the municipal 
election. He was made Chairman of the Finance Commit- 
tee, and a member of the Sanitary, Ordinance and Printing 
Committees by Mayor Blodgett. He has been a member of 
the Board of Education since 1886, and in 1889 he was elected 
its Secretary. He served as Postmaster at North Long 
Branch under Presidents Arthur and Harrison. He is a 
fireman and an active church worker, and belongs to the 
following lodges: Long Branch Lodge, F. & A. M. ; Stand- 
ard Chapter, R. A. M. ; Corson Commandery, Knights Tem- 
plar; Sea View Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; Hollywood Council, Jr. 
O. U. A. M.; Long Branch Council, Royal Arcanum, and 
Progressive Council, Local Additional Benefit Association, 
a branch of the Royal Arcanum. He served two years in 
the House of Assembly, and in 1896 he was elected to the 
Senate by a plurality of 231. In 1899 he was re-elected by a 
plurality of 526 over Johnson. Democrat. Last year he 
served as Chairman of the Committees on Education and 
Clergy and as a member of the Committees on Game and 
Fisheries, Finance, Stationery and Incidental Expenses, 
and Slate Hospitals. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 273 

1896— Francis, Rep., 9,389; Stevens, Dem., 9,158; Brown, 
Pro., 255. Francis' plurality, 231. 

1899— Francis, Rep., 9,025; Johnston, Dem., 8,499; Shotwell, 
Pro., 359. Francis' plurality, 526. 



Morris County. 

(Population, 65,156.) 
JACOB W. WELSH. 
(Rep., German Valley.) 

Senator Welsh was born at Middle Valley, Morris county, 
N. J., March 19, 1853, and is a dealer in wagons, harness 
and farm implements. For ten years he has been a direc- 
tor in the Clinton (N. J.) National Bank, has served on 
the Township Committee three years, and been Town Clerk 
for a similar period. He served three years as an Assem- 
blyman from Morris county — in the sessions of 1898, '99 and 
1900. During- his term of office he was a member of some 
of the most important committees. In 1901 he was elected 
Senator by a plurality of 709 over Thomas H. Hoagland, 
the Democratic candidate. 

1898— Pitney, Rep., 6,606; Hoagland, Dem., 5,775; Miller, 
Pro., 488. Pitney's plurality, 831. 

1901— Welsh, Rep., 6,239; Hoagland, Dem.. 5,5.30; Vaughan, 
Pro., 842. Welsh's plurality, 709. 



Ocean County. 

(Population, 19,747.) 

GEORGE L. SHINN. 

(Rep., New Egypt.) 

Senator Shinn was born at New Egypt, N. J., November 
5, 1862, and is a merchant. He attended the public school 
at New Egypt and later the New Egypt Seminary (under 
the charge of ex-Senator George D. Horner, a former pro- 
fessor of Pennington Seminary). He studied law with 
Robbins & Hartshorn, at Freehold, N. J., and subse- 
quently assumed charge of his father's mercantile busi- 
ness, in which he is now engaged, and he owns one of the 
largest department stores in Ocean county. 

The Senator was elected County Collector of Ocean 
county in 1893 without opposition, and was re-elected in 
18 



274 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1896 by the largest majority ever given a candidate for 
that office in the county. He is a director of the P. & H. 
Railroad Company, the First National Bank of Hights- 
town, and the New Egypt Water Company; and is vice- 
president of the New Egypt Fire Company, and secretary, 
treasurer and principal stockholder of the Union Cran- 
berry Company. He has business interests in Atlantic 
county, N. J., and Baltimore, Md. He is treasurer of the 
William J. Sewell Republican Club of New Egypt. 

Mr. Shinn received the Republican nomination for Sen- 
ator without the least opposition as a compliment to his 
splendid party service, and he was elected by a large ma- 
jority over a popular opponent, leading both the Guber- 
natorial and Assembly candidates on his ticket. He car- 
ried his own township of Plumsted by one of the largest 
majorities ever given a candidate for public office. 

1898— Smith, Rep., 2,679; Rogers, Dem., 1,330; Simpson, 
Pro., 120. Smith's plurality, 1,349. 

1901— Shinn, Rep., 2,495; Hoyt, Dem., 1,316; Westcott, Pro., 
165. Shinn's plurality, 1,179. 



Passaic County. 

(Population, 155,202.) 

WOOD McKEE. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Senator McKee was born in Paterson, N. J., November 
10th, 1866, and is a lawyer by profession. He has always 
been connected with the Republican party since he had a 
vote, either as a worker or a member of the leading com- 
mittees. He is very well known throughout Passaic county, 
and at the elections in 1897 and 1898, when he was chosen 
as an Assemblyman, he was the highest man on his ticket. 
For nine years he has been a member of the Passaic 
County Republican Executive Committee, and was Vice- 
Chairman of the Campaign Committee when John W. 
Griggs was elected Governor and subsequently when the 
late Garret A. Hobart was chosen Vice-President of the 
United States. He never held a public office before he was 
elected to the Assembly. During his two years' service in 
the House he was a member of leading committees and 
always took an active part in legislation. In the session of 
1899 he was the leader of his party on the floor of the 
Assembly chamber. He was elected to the State Senate 



BIOGRAPHIES. .' 275 

by a plurality of 3,185 over Van Cleve, Democrat. Last 
year he served as Chairman of the Committees on Miscel- 
laneous Business and State Hospitals and as a member of 
the Committees on Corporations, Game and Fisheries, 
Sinking- Fund, State Library and State Prison. 

1897— Braun, Dem., 11,276; Williams, Rep., 9,084; Pretty- 
man, Pro., 266; Duff, Soc.-Lab., 941. Braun's plurality, 2,192, 

lOOO^McKee, Rep., 15,783; Van Cleve, Dem., 12,598; Forfar, 
Pro., 247; Schmidt, Soc.-Dem., 319; Butterworth, Soc.-Lab., 
355. McKee's plurality, 3,185. 



Salem County. 

(Population. 25.530.) 

RICHARD C. MILLER. 

(Rep., Alloway.) 

Senator Miller, who is a son of the late ex-Sheriff Samuel 
W. Miller, was born at Alloway, N. J., March 28th, 1848. 
He is in the lumber, coal and fertilizer business, which he 
vmdertook, as successor to his father, in 1876. He has lived 
in Alloway all his life, and he never held public ofRce until 
he was elected to the Senate. He had been repeatedly 
solicited to accept office, and always refused until, through 
the irresistible pressure of his friends, he consented to 
stand for the State Senate in 1896, when he was elected by 
the largest majority in the history of Salem county. In 1899 
he was re-elected, after a spirited campaign, by a plurality 
of 64, over Strimple, one of the most popular and strongest 
Democrats in the county. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committees on 
Federal Relations and Railroads and Canals. 

1896— Miller, Rep., 3,761; Riley, Dem., 2,768; Lecroy, Pro., 
245. Miller's plurality, 993. 

1899— Miller, Rep., 3,074; Strimple, Dem., 3,010; Lindzey, 
Pro., 267. Miller's plurality, 64. 



Somerset County. 

(Population, 32,948.) 

CHARLES ARTHUR REED. 

(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Senator Reed was born at Fort Wayne, Ind.. December 
4th, 1857, and is a lawyer by profession. He was educated 



276 BIOGRAPHIES. 

in the public schools and entered Rutgers College in the 
Class of 1878. He lived on a farm from 1866 to 1882, when he 
was admitted to the bar of New Jersey. He was appointed 
a Special Examiner U. S. Pension Bureau in 1883 and served 
as such until July, 1885. He has served as Corporation 
Counsel of the borough of North Plainfield from 1888 until 
the present time. He stands high in his profession and 
enjoys a large practice in Somerset and Union counties. 
He is President of the Somerset County Bar Association, 
and was one of the first trustees of the New Jersey State 
Bar Association. At the election in 1895 his home, North 
Plainfield, gave him the largest majority ever given in that 
town to any candidate on any ticket, and he was elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 587. At the election in 1896 
the whole force of the opposition was concentrated against 
him as a candidate for the Senate, when his own town gave 
him an increased majority over the year before, which was 
unprecedented. His plurality in the county was 1,390. 
Again in 1899 he demonstrated his popularity when he was 
re-elected to the Senate by a plurality of 1,007 over his 
Democratic opponent, former Speaker James J. Bergen. 
Since 1899 the Senator has been Chairman of the Somerset 
County Republican Executive Committee. In 1899 he was 
President of the Senate, when he discharged the duties of 
that office in a most able, dignified and impartial manner, 
making a record for himself which had not been surpassed 
by any of his predecessors. 

Lasc year he was the leader of the majority on the floor 
of the Senate. He served as Chairman of the Committees 
on Boroughs and Townships, and Judiciary, and as a 
member of the Committee on Revision of Laws. 

1896— Reed, Rep., 4,148; Cramer, Dem., 2,758; Vanderveer, 
Nat. Dem., 186; Barrett, Pro., 122. Reed's plurality, 1,390. 

1899— Reed, Rep., 3,706; Bergen, Dem., 2,699; Lunger, Pro., 
179. Reed's plurality, 1,007. 



Sussex County. 

(Population, 24,134.) 

LEWIS J. MARTIN. 

(Dem., Newton.) 

Senator Martin is a lawyer by profession, and was born 
near Deckertown, Sussex county, N. J., February 22d, 1844. 
He was chief clerk in the County Clerk's office of Sussex 
county during the latter part of his father's (James J. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 277 

Martin's) term, and until his decease in January, 1869. 
when he was appointed by the Governor and commissioned 
as Clerk to serve the unexpired term of his father, which 
terminated in the fall of that year. Senator Martin was a 
member of the House of Assembly in 1879, 1880 and 1881, and 
he was Law Judge of Sussex county from 1881 until 1896, 
when he was succeeded by James F. Conklin, Republican, 
who was appointed by Governor Griggs. He has been the 
attorney of the Board of Freeholders of Sussex county 
since May, 1896. He was elected a member of the Town 
Committee of the town of Newton in March, 1896, for a 
term of three years, and was Chairman of that committee 
during that year. He was elected to the Senate in 1897, to 
succeed Senator Gould, Republican, by a plurality of 281 
over Daniel Bailey, Republican, and in 1900 he was re- 
elected over Margerum, Republican, by a plurality of 92. 
In 1899, 1900 and '01 he was the leader of his party on the 
floor of the Senate. Last year he served on the Commit- 
tees on Boroughs and Townships, Judiciary, Education, 
State Hospitals, Clergy, and Printing. 

1897— Martin, Dem., 2,833; Bailey, Rep., 2,552; Sanford, 
Pro., 166. Martin's plurality, 281. 

1900— Martin, Dem., 3,170; Margerum, Rep., 3,078; Roe, 
Pro.. 128; Rosewall, Soc.-Dem., 50. Martin's plurality, 92. 



Union County. 

(Population, 99,353.) 

JOSEPH CROSS. 

(Rep., Elizabeth.) 

Senator Cross was born near Morristown, N. J., Decem- 
ber 29th, 1843. He graduated from Princeton University in 
the class of 1865. Immediately thereafter he began the 
study of law in the office of William J. Magie, Esq. He also 
took a course of lectures at Columbia College Law School, 
and was admitted to practice as an attorney-at-law in 
June, 1868, and as a counselor in 1871. Upon his admission 
to the bar he was taken into partnership by his preceptor, 
under the firm name of Magie & Cross, which relation ex- 
isted until 18S0, when Mr. Magie was appointed one of the 
Justices of the Supreme Court. Mr. Cross has resided in 
Elizabeth since the spring of 1858, and has always been a 
staunch Republican. In 1888 he was appointed Judge of the 
District Court of the city of Elizabeth, but in common with 



278 BIOGRAPHIES. 

all of the other Republican District Court Judges of the 
State, was legislated out of office in April, 1891. 

Mr. Cross was elected a member of the Assembly from 
Union county in the fall of 1893, and again in 1894. When 
Speaker Holt resigned the chair, May 26th, 1894, Mr. Cross 
was chosen his successor for the remainder of the session. 
In 1895 he was re-elected Speaker by the unanimous vote of 
his Republican colleagues. In November, 1898, he was 
elected Senator, to fill the vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Senator Voorhees, who had been nominated as the 
Republican candidate for Governor. 

He was re-elected to the Senate for a full term in 1899 by 
a plurality of 2,471, being an increase of 491 over that of the 
previous year. Last year he served as Chairman of the 
Committees on Elections and Revision of the Laws, and 
as a member of the Committees on Appropriations and Re- 
form School for Boys. 

1898-Cross, Rep., 9,054; Ford, Dem., 7,074; Brookfield, 
Pro., 259; Miller, Lab., 495. Cross' plurality, 1,980. 

1899— Cross, Rep., 8,704; Hillman, Dem., 6,233; iViassett, 
Pro., 320; Burns, Soc.-Lab., 321, Cross' plurality, 2,471. 



Warren County. 

(Population, 37,781.) 

JOHNSTON CORNISH. 

(Dem., Washington.) 

Senator Cornish was born at Bethlehem, Hunterdon 
county, N. J., in 1857. He is the junior partner in the well- 
known firm of Cornish & Co., manufacturing the Cornish 
American pianos and organs, at Washington, N. J., one of 
the largest concerns in the State and the only manufactur- 
ers of pianos and organs in the country who sell to the 
consumer direct without the intervention of agents and 
middlemen. The instruments manufactured by this old- 
established firm are not only sold extensively in this coun- 
try, but Cornish & Co. enjoy a large and unique foreign 
trade. The products of their great factories are shipped to 
every part of the habitable globe. North and South Amer- 
ica, the West Indies, North, South, East and West Africa, 
Australia and New Zealand, the East Indies, China, Japan, 
Corea, Russia, Iceland, Norway and Sweden; in fact, there 
is no country in which the Cornish product is not found and 
appreciated. This enterprising firm are also large export- 
ers to Great Britain and Ireland. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 279 

Senator Cornish was Mayor of Washington in 1SS4, '85 
and '86, In 1890 he was elected to the State Senate by a 
handsome majority, and before his full term expired he 
resigned to qualify himself as a Member of Congress, to 
which office he was chosen in 1892. Mr. Cornish has ever 
been an active and enthusiastic Democrat and has always 
taken an interest in his party, having been a member of 
the State Committee for a number of years. In 1899 he was 
again elected to represent Warren county in the State 
Senate by a plurality of 1675 over the Republican candidate. 
Last year the Senator served on the Committees on Ap- 
propriations, Elections, Labor and Industries, Printed 
Bills, Railroads and Canals, and Treasurer's Accounts. 

1896— Barber, Dem., 5,079; Cramer, Rep., 3,949; McKinstry, 
Pro., 370. Barber's plurality, 1,130. 

1899— Cornish, Dem., 4,335; Nunn, Rep., 2,660; Dufford, 
Pro., 299. Cornish's plurality, 1,675. 



Summary. 

Senate— Republicans... 17 Democrats 4=21 

House — Republicans... 46 Democrats 14=60 

63 18 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 45. 



When Regular Senatorial Elections Occur. 

In 1902— Essex, Monmouth, Union, Somerset, Gloucester, 
Salem and Camden, now represented by Republicans, and 
Warren, now represented by a Democrat— 8. 

In 1903— Burling-ton, Middlesex, Passaic and Cape May, 
now represented by Republicans, and Hunterdon and Sus- 
sex, now represented by Democrats— 6. 

In 1904— Cumberland, Atlantic, Ocean, Mercer, Bergen 
and Morris, now represented by Republicans, and Hud- 
son, now represented by a Democrat— 7. 

The Senators who will be elected in each of those three 
years will each have a vote for United States Senator to 
succeed John Kean, whose term will expire on March 3, 
1905, and those who will be elected in 1904 will each have 
a vote for a successor to United States Senator Sewell, 
whose term will expire on March 3, 1907. 



280 BIOGRAPHIES. 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 



Atlantic County. 

THOMAS CLOHOSEY ELVINS. 

(Rep., Hammonton.) 

Mr. Elvins was born at Hammonton, Atlantic county, 
N. J., March 28, 1871, and is a merchant. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native town and later he at- 
tended Dickinson Preparatory School, Carlisle, Pa., for 
two years, entered Amhurst College in the fall of 1892 and 
was graduated from the latter institution in 1896. He is 
a son of George Elvins, who was an Assemblyman from 
Atlantic county in 1881. Mr. Elvins has been a member 
of the Board of Education of Hammonton for about four 
years and has been a director of the Hammonton Loan and 
Building Association for two years. He was elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 2,928, running ahead of his 
ticket. 

Elvins, Rep., 6,116; Adams, Dem., 3,188; Race, Pro., 243. 



Bergen County. 
JOSEPH H. TILLOTSON. 
(Rep., Englewood.) 
Mr. Tillotson was born in New York city. May 12, 1855. 
and for twenty-two years has been the proprietor of a 
newspaper in Englewood. He founded the Englewood 
Press in March, 1890, and ever since has been editor and 
proprietor of that paper. At the age of thirteen years he 
entered a printing office and he has been at the same busi- 
ness ever since. He never held a public office until he was 
elected to the Assembly, although he has been identified 
with public matters in Englewood for the past twenty 
years. He is a director of the Englewood Lyceum Com- 
pany, of the Englewood Loan and Building Association, 
Citizens' Bank and Englewood Fire Association, and he 
is a member of the Englewood Incorporation Committee, 
of Company F, Second Battalion, National Guard, and of 
the I. O. O. F., and also of other associations. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality oC 1,331 over John- 
son, the highest candidate on the Democratic Assembly 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on Ap- 
propriations, Education, and State Library. 



BIOGRAPHIES. M 

JAMES WRIGHT MERCER. 

(Rep., Liodi.) 

Mr, Mercer was born at Earlston, Scotland, May 10, 1866, 
and is a coal dealer. He was a member of the Borough 
Council for three years— 1896 to 1899— and of the Board of 
Freeholders from 1899 to the present time. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,502 over John- 
son, the highest candidate on the Democratic Assembly 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees en Bor- 
oughs and Borough Commissions, Elections, and Sinking 
Fund. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Republicans. Dem.ocrats. 

Mercer 7,521 Johnson 6,019 

Tillutson 7,350 Van Emburgh 5,912 

Prohibition — Stevens, 172; Hopper, 174. 

Social- -Thompson, 193; Dobbelaar, 194. 



Burlington County. 

CHARLES WRIGHT. 

(Rep., Columbus.) 

Mr. Wright was born on December 19th, 1849, on the farm 
on which he now resides, and which has been owned by 
the family for three generations. It is situated in Mans- 
field township, about two miles from the village of Colum- 
bus, Besides being a farmer, he is a dealer in cattle. He 
received as good an education as was obtainable from the 
schools in that vicinity, and then completed his studies as 
a student for two years at the Westtown boarding-school, 
controlled by the Society of Friends. Being the last re- 
maining son of a large family, he was obliged then to 
return to the farm to assist his father during the spring, 
summer and fall. He began teaching school when twenty 
years of age, and for seven winters he continued in the 
work. For over twenty-seven years he has been interested 
in the handling of different grades of cattle, and in this 
business has been quite successful. Since before he was a 
voter Mr. Wright has been actively identified with the 
politics of Mansfield township, and has served upon the 
Township Committee, having been elected thereto in 1877, 
and again in 1878 and 1879. In the last-mentioned year he 
served as Treasurer of the township. He served as School 



282 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Trustee for five yea,rs, during the last two of which he was 
District Clerk. In the spring- of 1899, he was elected to the 
presidency of the DeCou Brothers Company, manufactur- 
ers and jobbers in boots and shoes in Philadelphia, to fill 
a vacancy caused by death. He has been connected with 
that company since its incorporation in 1892. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly for a fifth term, by a plurality of 
1,867 over Lippincott, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic Assembly ticket. Last year he served as Chairman 
of the Committee on Printed Bills, and as a member of the 
Committees on Agriculture, Federal Relations, and 
Passed Bills. 

JOHN G. HORNER. 

(Rep., Palmyra.) 

Mr. Horner was born on his father's farm near Penns- 
ville, Camden county, N. J., November 17th, 1872, and is a 
lawyer by profession. He is now attorney for Palmyra 
township, which is the only office he ever held before his 
election to the Assembly. He is a son of the late Judge 
Asa P. Horner of Camden county. He attended the public 
schools; Farnum Preparatory School at Beverly, N. J.; 
South Jersey Institute at Bridgeton, N. J., and was grad- 
uated in June, 1890. He was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in June, 1893. He studied law with 
Lindley M. Garrison and Lewis Starr, at Camden, N. J., 
was admitted to the bar as an attorney in June, 1895, and 
as a counselor in June. 1898. His offices are at Camden and 
Palmyra. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plural- 
ity of 2,064 over Lippincott, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic Assembly ticket. Last year he served on the 
Comm.ittees on Revision of Laws, Towns and Townships, 
and State Library. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Horner 7,134 Lippincott 5,070 

Wright 6,937 Kimble 5,000 

Prohibition— Yerkes, 375; Hunter, 374. 



Camden County. 

WILLIAM J. BRADLEY. 
(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Bradley was born in Wicomico county, Md., May 6th, 
1852, and is a mechanical engineer. He came from Mary- 
land to Wilmington, Del., in 1870, and thence to Camden in 



BIOGRAPHIES. 283 

1S73, where he has since resided. He is connected with 
many business enterprises in Camden and vicinity. He 
was elected to the Camden City Council in 1892, was legis- 
lated out of office in 1893, when he was re-elected for a full 
term of two years. He was President of Council from 
1893 to 1894. He was a delegate to the National Republican 
Convention held at Philadelphia in 1900. He was re-elected 
to the Assembly for a fifth term— breaking the record in 
Camden county— by a plurality of 4,754 over Old, the high- 
est ccindidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
served as Speaker, when he discharged the duties of the 
office with ability and impartiality, so much so that all 
the members of the House united m presenting him with 
a handsome testimonial of their appreciation. 

GEORGE A. WAITE. 

(Rep., Camden.) 

Mr. Waite is a native of Massachusetts, having been 
born in Chicopee, in that State, June 21, 1864. When he 
was but a few years old his parents moved to Westfield, 
Mass., and in that town he spent his youth, taking the 
usual course of study in the public schools. After spending 
some years as a traveling salesman, in 1889 he became a 
reporter on the Philadelphia Times, and quickly demon- 
strated his ability as a news-gatherer and pungent writer. 
In 1891 he became a member of the city staff of the Phila- 
delphia Call, was made city editor in 1892 and editor-in-chief 
of the paper in 1898, retaining that position until the sus- 
pension of the Call in November, 1900. He is now on the 
staff of the Evening Telegraph of Philadelphia. Mr. 
Waite has been a resident of Camden county since 1894. 
and resides in the Eleventh ward, formerly a part of the 
town of Stockton. He was re-elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 4,708 over Old,' the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Lrast year he served on the Commit- 
tees on Incidental Expenses, Municipal Corporations, and 
Public Grounds and Buildings. 

EPHRAIM TOMLINSON GILL. 

(Rep., Haddonfleld.) 

Mr. Gill was born at his present residence in Haddon- 
field, N, J., on March 14, 1861. He belongs to a family long 
prominent in social and political interests in Camden 
county. His ancestors came from England and were 



284 BIOGRAPHIES. 

among the earliest Quaker colonisis in that section of the 
state. He is an agriculturalist and a breeder of thorough- 
bred stock, and is also in the real estate business. He was 
elected to the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Camden 
county in 1890 and served until 1892. In 1894 he was again 
elected to the same office and served continuously until 
1900. In 1899 he was elected to the Assembly, was re-elected 
in 1900 and again in 1901 by a plurality of 4,708 over Old, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year 
he was Chairman of the Committees on Agriculture and 
School for Deaf-Mutes and a member oi the Committee 
on Banks and Insurance. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Bradley 13,524 Old 8,770 

Gill 13,512 Williams 8,755 

Waite 13,478 Jackson 8,729 

Prohibition— Sharp, 421; Butterworth, 421; Bacon, 418. 
Socialist— Eberding, 100; Crane, 100; Aumont, 100. 



Cape May County. 

LEWIS M. CRESSE. 

(Rep., Ocean City.) 

Mr. Cresse was born at Swainton, Cape May county, 
N. J., September 12, 1867, and received his early education 
in the public schools of the county, and after graduating 
from them pursued higher studies in Philadelphia. He 
taught in public schools of the state for a time, after 
which he was graduated from the National College of 
Commerce, and ever since most of his time has been de- 
voted to banking. He is now president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Ocean Cify, and also of the Board of Trade. 
He is serving a second term as a member of the Board 
of Education. Mr. Cresse is also president of the Pleasant 
Mills Paper Manufacturing Company, with offices in Phil- 
adelphia. He is a Mason and a member of other secret 
orders. He was first elected to the Assembly in 1900 with 
the largest plurality ever given a candidate for that office 
in Cape May county. He was re-elected by the highest 
vote of any candidate on his ticket, hisplurahty being 753. 
Last year he served on the Committees on Boroughs and 
Borough Commissions, Public Health, Stationery, and 
School for Deaf-Mutes. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 285 

Cresse, Rep., 1,898; Williams, Dem., l.HC: Lake, Pro., 164. 
Cresse's plurality, 753. 



Cumberland County, 

WILLIAM J. MOORE. 

(Rep., Bridgeton.) 

Mr. Moore was born at Franklin ville, N. J., August .31st, 
1S51, and is the proprietor of Moore's Opera House, Bridge- 
ton. He was formerly in the retail hat and shoe business. 
His grandfather, Joel Moore, then of Deerfield, represented 
Cumberland county in the House of Assembly in 1850 and 
'51. He was a member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders 
of Cumberland, from March 1st, 1890, to March 1st, 1896, 
having been elected for two terms of three years each. On 
March 1st, 1897, he was elected in the First ward of Bridge- 
ton to the City Council for a term of three years. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly for a third term by a plurality 
of 1,849 over Steelman, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 

Last year he served as Chairman of the Committee on 
Banks and Insurance and as a member of the Committees 
on Labor and Industries, Commerce and Navigation, and 
Reform School for Boys. 

LOUIS H. MILLER. 

(Rep., Vineland.) 
Mr. Miller was born at W^illiamsburg, Mass., May 11, 
1870. and is a lawyer by profession. He is a son of Edwin 
H. Miller, Lieutenant Commander, U. S. N., who died iri 
the service in 1874. He was graduated from the Vineland 
High School in 1888. He has been a resident of Vineland 
since 1881. Mr. Miller studied law with Leverett Xevr- 
comb of Vineland, was admitted to the bar as an attorney 
in November, 1894, and as a counselor three years later. 
He stayed with Mr. Newcomb after his admission to the 
bar and until 1897, when he opened an office in Millville, 
where he has practiced ever since, while residing in Vine- 
land. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
1,667 over Steelman, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Moore 5,565 Camp .3,534 

Miller 5,383 Steelman 3,716 

Prohibition— Pepper, 601; Stanford, 564. 



286 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Essex County. 

JOSEPH HENRY BACHELLER. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Bacheller was born in Newark, N. J., February 1st, 
1869, and is in the real estate' business. In April, 1897, he 
was elected Alderman from the Ninth ward in Newark and 
was re-elected in 1899 and 1901. He is the leader on the 
Republican side in the Board of Aldermen. He was re- 
elected to the Assembly for a third term by a plurality of 
12,283 over Freeman, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Last year Mr. Bacheller served as Chair- 
man of the Committee on Municipal Corporations, and 
State Library, and as a member of the Committees on' Ap- 
propriations, and Bill Revision. 

WILLIAM B. GARRABRANTS. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Garrabrants was born in Washing-ton Heights, New 
York, on April 2d, 1854, and is a son of the late William B. 
Garrabrants, who was born in the same State in 1799. He 
comes of good old Holland Dutch stock on his father's 
side.-" One of his uncles died on the English prison ship in 
New York harbor. His mother was born in Lowham, 
Somersettshire, England, of English parents. He began 
business at the age of twenty, first dealing in butter and 
then doing a general grocery business, which he conducted 
at 231 Plane street, Newark, for sixteen years. He then 
disposed of his business and took the management of the 
Standard Brick Company. Mr. Garrabrants has always 
been an ardent Republican, in spite of an uncongenial 
political atmosphere at home, all the male members of his 
family being strong Democrats. He has been a member of 
the Halsey Street M. E. Church for many years, and is 
Vice-President of the First Ward Republican Club and a 
member of St. Albans Lodge, No. 68, F. «& A. M. He is 
also an enthusiastic wheelman. He entered actively in 
politics through the urgent request of his friends that he 
become a candidate for Alderman in the spring of 1897. He 
consented, and was elected by 52 majority. The following 
spring the Democrats carried the ward by 18 majority. 
In 1899 he was renominated and re-elected by 370 majority. 
Mr. Garrabrants was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 12,259 over Freeman, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 287 

mittees on Elections, Incidental Expenses, and Federal 
Relations. 

JOHN HOWE. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Howe was born in the Fifth ward of Newark 
thirty-three years ago, where the family have resided 
for over half a century. He is engaged in the 
express business, operating the People's Newark and 
New York Express. He received his education in 
the public schools of Newark, has always been an active 
party worker, and is a member of the Essex County Re- 
publican Committee, Kane Lodge, No. 55, F. & A. M., and 
other organizations. He was re-elected to the Assembly 
by a plurality of 12,314 over Freeman, the highest candi- 
date on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served on 
the Committees on Labor and Industries, Ways and 
Means, and Industrial School for Girls. 

ROBERT W. BROWN. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Brown was born in the city of Newark thirty- 
eight years ago, where he received his education 
in the public schools and the New Jersey Business 
College. He served a four years' apprenticeship at 
hat finishing, but had to abandon the trade because 
it did not agree with his health. He then went into 
the hardware business, and has been a salesman in the 
well-known hardware house of Bannister & Pollard for the 
past eleven years. He has represented the Sixth ward in 
the Board of Education for three years. He is a member 
of St. John Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M., and a number of 
social organizations. Mr. Brown was re-elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 12,310 over Freeman, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Games and Fisheries, Sta- 
tionery, and Sinking Fund. 

RALPH B. SCHMIDT. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Schmidt was born in Jersey City, N. J., on March 
20th. 1868. He moved to Newark in 1872 and has been a resi- 
dent there ever since. He is engaged in- the plumbing, 
steam and gas fitting business and also as a sheet metal 
worker, at 152 Ferry street and 62 Ann street. He is a 



288 BIOGRAPHIES. 

member of the following organizations: Northern Lodge, 
No. 25, F. & A. M. ; Improved Order Heptasophs, Newark 
City Conclave; Royal Arcanum, Alamo Council, 1749; M. 
G. V. Concordia, Newark City Republican Club, Fourth 
Ward Republican Club, East End Republican Club, Equita- 
ble Bowling Club, the Bellwood Pleasure Club and others. 
He never held public office before his election to the As- 
sembly. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 12,526 over Freeman, the highest candidate on the Dem- 
ocratic ticket. Mr. Schmidt received the largest vote of 
any candidate on his ticket in 1901. Last year he served on 
the Committees on Passed Bills, Public Health, and Sol- 
diers' Home. 

EDWARD E. GNICHTEL. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Gnichtel was born in Newark, N. J., on April 25, 
1869. He is a manufacturer of brushes. For a number of 
years he has been a member of the Essex County Repub- 
lican Executive Committee and has always taken a deep 
interest in politics. He was re-elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 12,130 over Freeman, the highest candidate 
on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Banks and Insurance, Education and 
State Hospitals. 

WILLIAM G. SHARWELL. 

(Rep., Newark.) 

Mr. Sharwell was born on the 23d of March, 1857, in the 
Eleventh ward of Newark, and has been a resident of it 
ever since. He attended the public schools of the city of 
Newark until seventeen years of age, and was then ap- 
prenticed to the carpenter trade and worked at that until 
he started in the building business in the year 1882. He 
has been engaged in that business continually since that 
time, and has executed a great many public contracts. He 
is a member of Kane Lodge, No. 55, F. & A. M. ; Roseville 
Council, No. 992, Royal Arcanum; Newark Lodge, No. 31, 
A. O. U. W. ; Roseville Conclave, No. 251, Improved Order 
Heptasophs; Roseville A. A., the Lincoln Club, and is Vice- 
Chairman of the Eleventh Ward Executive Committee. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 12,301 
over Freeman, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on Sta- 
tionery, Unfinished Business, and Reform School for Boys, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 289 

EDGAR WILLIAMS. 

(Rep., East Orange.) 
Mr. Williams was born in Orange, Essex county, in 1863, 
and is the youngest of four sons (all Republicans) of the 
late Leander Williams, of honored memory in Orange, 
v/here he was a leading citizen and stalwart Republican. 
He received his education in the public schools of that city 
and at Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H. In 1885 he purchased 
the Orange Journal from the late Samuel Toombs, Clerk 
of the Assembly in 1885-6. In 1890 he purchased the South 
Orange Bulletin, both of which papers he now conducts. 
He was Engrossing Clerk of the Assembly in 1894-5, and of 
the Senate in 1896-7-8-9. During the years Mr. Williams 
filled those positions, especially in the Assembly, there was 
probably more work for the engrossing department than 
in any previous year, and during the deadlock of 1895 all 
bills were engrossed in duplicate. Mr. Williams took an 
active interest in politics early in life, and was a worker 
at the polls in the old First ward of Orange before he was 
of age. He moved to East Orange in 1887 and continued 
his active interest in political aitairs there, so that in 1895 
he was elected to the Chairmanship of the East Orange 
Republican Executive Committee, and has been successful 
in conducting the work of the organization in that Repub- 
lican stronghold. He is a member of the Essex County 
Republican Committee, East Orange Republican Club, 
Orange Council, Royal Arcanum; Hope Lodge, No. 124, 
F. & A. M. ; Society of the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion, and New England Society. He was re-elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 12,189 over Freeman, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Boroughs and Borough Com- 
missions, Corporations, Riparian Rights, Passed Bills, and 
Treasurer's Accounts. 

FREDERICK CUMMINGS. 
(Rep., West Orange.) 

Mr. Cummings was born in Bernardsville, Somerset 
county, N. J., in 1845. He started to learn the trade of hat 
making with the firm of Clarkson & Son, of South Orange. 
Later he w^as employed by the hat firm of Venino & Heike, 
of Mitchell street. Orange, whom he afterw'ard bought out 
and then started in business for himself. For five years 
Mr. Cummings served West Orange as Township Commit- 
teeman and Treasurer, succeeding Robert Drew in the 
latter office. His management of the township funds was 
19 



290 BIOGRAPHIES. 

highly commended. In 1892 he ran for Assembly, but had 
to contend with the Democratic landslide of that year, Mr. 
Cummings is a veteran of the late Civil War, with a record 
that he may well be proud of. During the famous battle 
of Fort Fisher he was a member of the crew of the man-of- 
war Monticello, commanded by Captain Gushing, which 
engaged the Confederate ram Albemarle and vanquished 
her. Mr. Cummings distinguished himself during the en- 
gagement for his bravery. His hat manufacturing business 
is conducted under the firm name of Frederick Cummings, 
Son & Co., and is located on South Jefferson street, Orange 
Valley. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality 
of 12,089 over Freeman, the highest candidate on the Demo- 
cratic ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on 
Miscellaneous Business, Railroads and Canals, and State 
Prison. 

ROBERT M. BOYD, Jr. 
(Rep., Montclair.) 
Mr. Boyd was born in Montclair, N. J., May 5th, 1863. His 
great-grandfather on his mother's side was Israel Crane, 
who resided in Newark and Montclair (then West Bloom- 
field) in the early part of the century, and was often spoken 
of as "King Crane." Many of the old residents of Essex 
county will remember his name. Mr. Boyd's family have 
lived in Montclair ever since. Mr. Boyd attended the public 
school in Montclair for ten years, and graduated from the 
Montclair High School as valedictorian of his class. He 
entered Yale at the age of seventeen, and after taking a 
Latin prize, a high oration junior appointment, and the 
Cobden Club medal, was graduated in 1884, being appointed 
on the list of commencement speakers. After leaving col- 
lege he attended the Columbia Law School, graduating in 
1886 with the degree of LL.B. At the same time he took 
his degree as Master of Arts from the Columbia School of 
Political Science. He then became a clerk in the office of 
Davies, Cole «& Rapallo, of New York. The following year 
he entered the service of the Title Guarantee and Trust 
Company, and continued with them until January 1st, 1889, 
when he became a member of the law partnership of Mur- 
phy, Lloyd & Boyd, which connection lasted until Novem- 
ber, 1899. Since that time he has been practicing without 
partners. He is a member both of the New York and New 
Jersey bar, is a member of the New York Bar Associa- 
tion, and has a general practice. He has never before held 
public office except as trustee of the Montclair Free Public 
Library. He has been connected with some of the local 



BIOGRAPHIES. 291 

flubs and political organizations. He was re-elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 12,270 over Freeman, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Judiciary, Towns and Town- 
ships and Public Grounds and Buildings. 

WILLIAM ADGATE LORD. 

(Rep., Orange.) 

Mr. Lord was born in Jersey City, N. J., October 7th, 1870, 
and is a son of the late Charles Douglas Lord. He was 
graduated from the High School of Orange, N. J., in 1889, 
and entered the newspaper profession, writing for the 
Newark Daily Advertiser, the Newark Evening News, the 
New York Times, the New York Sun and other papers in 
turn. He was appointed Clerk of the Orange District Court 
in 1896, a position which he resigned three years later to 
begin the practice of law, he having been admitted to the 
bar in February, 1899. Mr. Lord was Second Lieutenant of 
Company H. Second Regiment, N. G. N. J., when the 
Spanish-American War broke out and he served in that 
capacity in the Second New Jersey Volunteer Infantry. He 
is Commander of Colonel Emerson H. Liscum Camp, No. 94, 
Spanish-American War Veterans, is Captain of the Mc- 
Kinley and Roosevelt Rough Riders of Orange, is a Past 
Archon of the Improved Order Heptasophs, is a member 
of Orange Lodge, No. 135, B. P. O. E., of Corinthian Lodge, 
No. 52, F. and A. M., and of a number of other lodges and 
clubs. He has always been a Republican and a hard w^ork- 
er for his party. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 12,110 over Freeman, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Militia, Revision of Laws, and Printing. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Bacheller 39,442 Zimmerman 27,158 

Garrabrants 39,418 Crane 27,133 

Howe 39,473 Freeman 27,159 

Brown 39,469 Butler 26,994 

Sharwell 39,460 King 27,060 

Schmidt 39,685 McGlynn 26,915 

Gnichtel 39,289 Zeitler 26,863 

Williams 39,348 Moihtt 26,J45 

Cummings 39,248 Unangst 27,043 

Boyd 39,429 Backus 27,075 

Lord 39,269 Corbett 26,838 



292 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Prohibition— Millikin, 403; Courter, 384; Hopper, 381; Best, 
381; Duff, 381; Haviland, 380; Armstrong. 381; Smith, 382; 
Spear, 383; Neis, 382; Ayers, 380. 

Social-Labor— Duggan, 564; Hoffman, 565; Papp, 565; Dud- 
ley, 564; Murphy, 560; Carlson, 563; Lunberg, 563; Burgholz, 
564; Johnson, 564; Franzen, 564; Holland, 564. 

Socialist— Schneider, 770; Shannon, 736; Frackenpolil, 738; 
Maquette, 738; Hedden, 737; Wind, 741; Woodruff, 743; 
Neben, 747; Barwicki, 740; Berg, V40; Zimmet'man, 741. 



Gloucester County. 

JOHN BOYD AVIS. 

(Rep., Woodbury.) 

Mr. Avis was born in Deerfield. Cumberland county, 
N. J., July 11, 1875, and is an attorney and counselor at law. 
He attended the public schools of Deerfield until Decem- 
ber 1, 1890, when he began the study of law in the office of 
John' S. Mitchell, at Bridgeton. He continued his studies 
until February, 1894, when a change of residence made it 
necessary to relinquish them, and for the next three years 
he was engaged in mercantile pursuits in Philadelphia 
and Long Branch. In December, 1897, he entered the law 
office of Hon. David O. Watkins, and in February of the 
following year he was admitted to the bar as an attorney 
and three years later he became a counselor. In March, 
1900, Mr. Avis formed a co-partnership with Mr. Watkins, 
under the firm name of Watkins & Avis, which still con- 
tinues. Mr. Avis has always been a zealous Republican 
and for several years has been prominently identified with 
the Young Men's Republican Club of Woodbury. He is 
the financial secretary of that club, and much of its suc- 
cess is due to his capable management. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,231, being 506 more 
than the head of the Republican ticket received. 

Avis, Rep., .3,722; Cox, Dem., 2,491; Walker, Pro., 325. 



Hudson County. 

PATRICK H. CONNOLLY. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 
Mr. Connolly was born in Jersey City, October 14th, 1865, 
and is a contractor. He is connected with the M. T. Con- 
nolly Contracting Company, of which his brother is the 



BIOGRAPHIES. 293 

head. He served two terms in the Jersey City Board of 
Aldermen, from 1890 to 1894. He was re-elected to the As- 
sembly by a plurality of 7,057 over Chamberlain, the high- 
est candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Public Health and Soldiers' 
Home. 

JOHN A. DENNIN. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 
Mr. Dennin was born at Elizabethport, N. J., April ISth, 
1865, and is a lawyer by profession. He removed to Jersey 
City in early childhood; w^as educated at St. Peter's Col- 
lege in that city; studied law in New York city; was ad- 
mitted to the New York bar in March, 1886, and to the New 
Jersey bar in June of the same year. He has practiced his 
profession ever since his admission, in Hudson county. 
He enjoys a large clientage and has been engaged as coun- 
sel for the defense in many of the important criminal 
cases in the Hudson county courts. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plui^ality of 7,210 over Chamberlain, the 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Passed Bills and Unfinished 
Business. 

JOHN J. FALLON. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Fallon was born in New York city, December 19th, 
1870. When not quite one year old his parents moved to 
Hoboken, where he has since resided. He is a lawyer, hav- 
ing been admitted to the bar in June, 1895, as an attorney, 
and in November, 1899, as a counselor. His early educa- 
tion was received in St. Mary's Parochial School, Hoboken, 
from which he graduated. He then attended the public 
schools of Hoboken, graduating in 1885. He obtained em- 
ployment in a broker's office in New York city, where he 
remained but a short time, and then worked in a wholesale 
drug house for a year. He was afterward employed by the 
Western Union Telegraph Company as a messenger, and 
rapidly advanced to the position of receiving and delivery 
clerk in the Maritime Exchange office, which position he 
held until 1890, when he resigned because of ill health and 
a desire for outdoor employment. He then entered the 
employ of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of 
New York as an agent in the Hoboken district, which posi- 
tion he occupied for one year, when he was promoted to 
the position of assistant superintendent, which he held for 
four years. In 1892 he enrolled as a student in the Metrop- 



294 BIOGRAPHIES. 

olis Law School, which has recently been merged with the 
University Law School of the City of New York, attending 
the evening sessions and graduating therefrom in 1895. 

Subsequent to his admission to the bar the officers of the 
insurance company offered him the position of superin- 
tendent, which offer was declined by Mr. Fallon, h<» having 
determined to practice law, and in February, 1896, he sev- 
ered his connection with the companj'^ and formed a co- 
partnership with ex-Judge William E. Skinner and ex- 
Assemblyman John J. Marnell, under the firm name of 
Skinner, Marnell & Fallon. This partnership continued for 
two years, when the same became dissolved. Mr. Marnell 
and Mr. Fallon then formed a co-partnership under the 
firm name of Marnell & Fallon, which was dissolved on 
November 6, 1901, by mutual consent. Mr. Fallon then 
continued his practice alone. He was associated with 
former Judge William T. Hoffman in the defense of Mrs. 
Vencedora Chatrand, who was charged with the murder 
of her husband, John Chatrand. The case was one of ex- 
ceptional interest owing to the fact that Chatrand was an 
athlete and expert gunner of renown. Mr. Fallon has 
been active in politics for a number of years. He was 
elected to the Assembly in 1899 by a plurality of 9,410 over 
Wolmesdorf, the highest candidate on the Republican 
ticket, and he was re-elected by a plurality of 6,744 over 
Voll, the highest candidate on the Republican ticket. 
Again he was re-elected for a third term by a plurality of 
7,200 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket. In every political campaign for the past 
seven years his voice has been heard in advocacy of the 
Democratic party. He is affiliated with numerous socie- 
ties, among which are Hoboken Lodge, No. 74, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks; Hoboken Council, No. 159, 
Knights of Columbus, of which order he is state treasurer; 
Court Sastle Point, No. 54, Foresters of America; Robert 
Davis Association, and M. J. Coyle Association. Last year 
he served on the Committees on Riparian Rights, School 
for Deaf-Mutes, and Claims, and Revolutionary Pensions. 

JAMES A. HAMILL. 
(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Hamill was born in the old Sixth ward of Jersey 
City, March 31, 1877, and has resided in that city continu- 
ously since his birth. In the year 1890 he entered St. 
Peter's College of Jersey City and was graduated from 
that institution in 1899, receiving the degrree of bachelor 



BIOGRAPHIES. 295 

of arts. Returning the subsequent year, he completed the 
post graduate course in philosophy and received the de- 
gree of master of arts. He studied law in the ofRce of 
Isaac S. Taylor, a former law partner of the late Chan- 
cellor Alexander T. McGill. While a student in the office 
of Mr. Taylor, Mr. Hamill attended the lectures of the 
New York Law School, and on the completion of the reg- 
ular course of two years was awarded the degree of bach- 
elor of laws. In the year 1900, at the June term of the 
Supreme Court, he was admitted to the bar and is now 
engaged in the practice of his profession in Jersey City. 
For the last three years he has been actively engaged in 
politics and as a campaign speaker has achieved consid- 
erable distinction. At a meeting of the citizens of Jersey 
City held at Parmly Memorial Baptist Church to express 
sympathy and sorrow at the lamented death of President 
McKinley, Mr. Hamill delivered an eloquent and impres- 
sive eulogy. He was a member of the Cooper Union lit- 
erary and debating class and at the last open debate of 
that society was warmly complimented by the presiding 
officer, John W. Goff, Recorder of New York. At the last 
election in Hudson county he received the next to the 
highest number of votes which were cast for the candi- 
dates for member of Assembly. His plurality was 7,35(3 
over Chamberlain, the highest candidate on the Repub- 
lican ticket. 

WILLIAM F. HURLEY. 

(Dem., Hoboken.) 

Mr. Hurley was born in New York city, January 7, 187S. 
is a lawyer by profession and is the youngest member of 
the present House of Assembly, and he is also the young- 
est Assemblyman ever elected in Hudson county. He was 
graduated from Public School No. 3, Hoboken, in June, 
1891, and was a member of the class of 1894, Hoboken High 
School, He studied law in the offices of former Assembly- 
men Henry H. Nutzhorn and Horace L. Allen and com- 
pleted his law course at the New York University Law 
School in June, 1898. When but tv/enty years of age ne 
passed the New Jersey Bar examination in November, 

1898. He was not sworn in as an attorney until January 6, 

1899, when he was of age. On January 10 of the same year, 
he v/as sv/orn in as a Master in Chancery, just four days 
after he became an attorney. He was the youngest mem- 
ber of each class at grammar, high and law schools. He 
was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 7,048 over 



296 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Chamberlain, the highest candidate on the Republican 
ticket. 

KILIAN V. LUTZ. 

(Dem., Guttenberg.) 

Mr. Lutz was born in Germany the 10th day of November, 
18.59, and received his education in the public schools of his 
native town. In 1874 he came to this country, and in 1876 he 
enlisted in the regular army and was assigned to the 5th 
U. S. Cavalry. In 1877 he made application to be discharged 
for the purpose of entering the special service until 1878. 
At the expiration of that time he re-enlisted and served 
until 1881, when he was honorably discharged on a surgeon's 
certificate because of injuries received in the service. 

Mr. Lutz's entire military experience was in the line of 
active service, being stationed on the frontier, where he 
took part in the campaign against the Sioux Indians in 
1876; the Cheyennes in 1878 and '79, and the Utes in 1879-80. 

Upon leaving the army in 1881, Mr. Lutz went to Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., where he was engaged in the lumber business, 
and remained there until 1888. In 1889 he moved to New 
Jersey, taking up his residence in Guttenberg, where he 
organized The Lutz Company, of which he is President. 
This company is a corporation engaged in the manufacture 
of drawing instruments and artists' materials. Ever since 
taking up his residence in Guttenberg Mr. Lutz has taken 
an active interest in politics. In 1895 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education of Guttenberg for a term of 
one year; in the year 1897 he was again elected, and he is 
still a member of that body. He served as President of 
the Board during the years he was elected as a member. 

Although loath to assume any burdens in addition to his 
educational duties, in 1898, in response to an almost uni- 
versal demand, Mr. Lutz consented to be a candidate for 
the Town Council, to which office he was elected for a term 
of two years. As a member of the Board of Education and 
Town Council, Mr. Lutz devoted all his energies to the 
securing of a new school house for Guttenberg— a most 
crying need. His entire career in these municipal bodies 
has been marked by a singleness of purpose; every other 
object has been made subservient to this one— the building 
of a new school house— and largely as a result of his untir- 
ing efforts its accomplishment is nearing fulfillment, as a 
sixteen-room brick structure is now rapidly nearing com- 
pletion. 

Mr. Lutz was elected a member of the Assembly in 1900 
by a majority of 6,606 over Voll, the highest candidate on 



BIOGRAPHIES. 297 

the Republican ticket, and in 1901 he was re-elected by a 
plurality of 7,146 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate 
on the Republican ticket. Last year he served on the 
Committee on Elections. 

EDWARD J. RICE. 

(Dem., Harrison.) 

Mr. Rice was born at Harrison, N. J., July 13th, 1853, and 
is engaged in the grocery business. When five years old 
he moved to Albany, N. Y., where he went to the public 
schools, and later to the Christian Brothers' Academy. 
When he returned to Harrison he became engaged in his 
present business. In 1875 he was Secretary of the Board of 
Education, and in 1876 was President of that body. He 
served nine terms in the Common Council, was five times 
its President, and he served three terms as Police Justice 
and Chief of Police. He has been actively identified with 
the People's Building and Loan Association for twenty- 
two years, and is a member of many social and business 
organizations. He was re-elected to the Assembly for a 
third term by a plurality of 7,036 over Chamberlain, the 
highest candidate on the Republican ticket. Last year he 
served on the Committees on Commerce and Navigation, 
Miscellaneous Business, and Towns and Townships. 

CARL GEORGE ALBERT SCHUMANN. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Schumann was born in New York city, February 12, 
1865, and is a lawyer by profession. He was formerly a 
commercial traveler. This is the first time he has held 
public office. He was employed by Vom Cleff & Co., New 
York, importers of hardware and cutlery, from 1880 to 1890, 
and represented them as salesman throughout the west- 
ern slates. Mr. Schumann read law with Cephas Brain- 
ery of New York and Vredenburgh & Garr'etson of Jersey 
City. He attended the Law School of the University of the 
City of New York and graduated with the degree of LL.B. 
in 1893. He was admitted to practice in New Jersey in Feb- 
ruary, 1895, and has since followed his profession in Jersey 
City. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
7,402 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket. Mr. Schumann received more votes than 
any other candidate on the Assembly ticket in Hudson 
county. 



298 BIOGRAPHIES. 

JOHN J. TREACY. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Treacy was born in Jersey City and is a lawyer by 
profession. This is the first time he has held public office. 
He was graduated from St. Peter's College, Jersey City, 
in 1891, attended the New York Law School the following 
year and received the degree of bachelor of laws in 1894. 
In the ensuing November he was admitted to the New 
York Bar and became associated with the law firm of 
Reed, Simpson, Thacher & Barnum, of which former 
Speaker Thomas B. Reed is now the head. For a number 
of years Mr. Treacy was the managing clerk of that firm.. 
He is now a member of the New Jersey Bar and has offices 
in the Commercial Trust Company Building of Jersey 
City. He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 
7,302 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket. 

PETER STILLWELL. 

(Dem., Bayonne.) 

Mr. Stillwell was born at White House, Hunterdon 
county, N. J., August 22d, 1863, and is a lawyer by pro- 
fession. He was graduated from Rutgers College in the 
class of 1886. He studied law with Cortlandt and R. Wayne 
Parker, of Newark, N. J., and was admitted to the bar of 
New Jeisey in 1889. He then located at Bayonne, where he 
has practiced his profession ever since. He was elected a 
member of the Board of Education of Bayonne in 1896, and 
was re-elected in 1899. He served as President of the Board 
for two years. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 7,230 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate 
on the Republican ticket. Last year he served on the Com- 
mittees on Incidental Expenses, and Public Grounds and 
Buildings. 

FREDERICK WEISMANN. 

(Dem., Town of Union.) 

Mr. Weismann was born in West Hoboken, Hudson 
county, June 1, 1874, and is a druggist. He is a member of 
the Board of Edvication of West Hoboken and was elected 
clerk of that body and served as such from May 1, 1899. 
to May 1, 1900. He was appointed Register of "Vital Sta- 
tistics for Hudson county' in 1885, an otfice he still holds. 
On May 1, 1901, he was appointed apothecary to the North 



BIOGRAPHIES. 299 

Hudson General Hospital, a position he still holds, but 
receives no salary. Mr. Weismann was one of the organ- 
izers of the Old People's Home Benevolent Association of 
Hudson county, is a sustaining member of the Y. M. C. A., 
a member of the Tax Reform Association, of the Elks and 
Jr. O, U. A. M. He passed an examination before the 
New Jersey Board of Pharmacy, September 18, 1890, being 
then only sixteen years old. He married the same year, 
and the following year opened a drug store in Union Hill, 
where he is still in business. He contemplates the study 
of medicine next fall. He was elected to the Assembly by 
a plurality of 7,192 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate 
on the Republican ticket. 

GEORGE G. TENNANT. 

(Dem., Jersey City.) 

Mr. Tennant was born in Jersey City, February 1, 1869. 
and has always lived there. He graduated from Public 
School No. 1, in Jersey City, and afterwards attended the 
High School, where he graduated in 1888. He afterwards 
attended Columbia College and graduated from the Law 
School of Columbia in 1891, with the degree of LL.B. 
During the time he was in attendance at the Columbia 
Law School he was a law student in Jersey City and was 
admitted as an attorney of the New Jersey Bar in 1892, and 
as a counselor in 1895. Since he was admitted to the bar 
Mr. Tennant has been active in the practice of the law. In 
1897 he formed a partnership with the present Corpora- 
tion Attorney, John W. Queen, the firm being known as 
Queen & Tennant. Mr. Tennant stood second on the list 
of Assembly candidates in the election of November, 1899, 
when his plurality over Womelsdorf, the highest man on 
the Republican ticket, was 9,792. In the election of No- 
vember, 1900, he stood first on the list of Assembly candi- 
dates, having 7,126 votes more than Voll, the highest man 
on the Republican ticket. In 1901 he was re-elected by a 
plurality of 7,292 over Chamberlain, the highest candidate 
on the Republican ticket. In 1900 he served on the Com- 
mittee on Militia and in 1901 he was appointed by Speaker 
Bralley as minority member of the (^ommittees on Revi- 
sion of Laws, Industrial School for Girls and Bill Revision. 
The sajne year he received the Democratic nomination 
for Speaker. He is now serving his third term in the 
House. 



SOO BIOGRAPHIES. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Democrats. Republicans. 

Tennant 36,085 Eicke 28,773 

Lutz 35,939 McKowen 28,743 

Fallon 35,893 Swain 28,719 

Hamill 36,149 Maxwell 28,703 

Rice 35,829 Steffens 28,748 

Schumann 36,195 Chamberlain 28,793 

Treacy 36,095 Gallagher 28,503 

Dennin 36,003 Daudt 28,711 

Stillwell 36,023 Dwyer 28,675 

Connolly 35,850 Mason 28,756 

Hurley 35,841 Coyle ... 28,657 

Weismann 35,985 Hespe 28,300 

Socialist— Mantz, 1,325; Kamps, 1,314; Reed, 1,334; Oswald, 
1,340; Vetters, 1,333; Ufert, 1,336; Firth, 1,336; Fiedler, 1,332; 
Willhausen, 1.-333; Paine, 1,333; Greiner, 1,333; Yockel, 1,330. 

Social-Labor— Oakes, 570; Betsch, 584; Greene, 582; Blome, 
586; Brown, 582; Thuemmel, 584; Schrafft. 583; Fricke, 586; 
Mende, 583; Edelman, 586; Campbell, 581; Wegener, 584. 

Prohibition— Bluhm, 217; Bruden, 212; Young, 216; Stevens. 
215; Prentice, 220; Harner, 220; Artz, 220; Ferree, 220; Lock- 
ton, 221; Whitehurst, 220; Merscheimer, 215; Yale, 216. 



Hunterdon County. 

WARREN O. LAUDENBERGER. 

(Dem., Junction.) 

Mr. Laudenberger was born in Springtown, Bucks 
county, Pa., May 28th, 1861. When he was five years old 
his parents moved to South Bethlehem, Pa. In 1872 his 
family came to Junction. When he was nineteen years of 
age he entered the employ of Edward Humphrey, of Glen 
Gardner, remaining there until 1881, when for a year he 
lived in Philadelphia. In December, 1882, he re-entered the 
employ of Mr. Humphrey. In 1891 he returned to Junction, 
where he has since made his home. In September, 1900, he 
formed a co-partnership with George N. Knox, under the 
firm name of Knox & Laudenberger, at 32 Broadway, New 
York, as wholesale coal dealers. 

He has always been an active worker in the Democratic 
party, and has attended many conventions as a delegate. 
In 1893 and in 1897, and again in 1898, he was chosen Secre- 



BIOGRAPHIES, 301 

tary of the County Convention. From 1889 to 1893, inclusive, 
he was a member of the Democratic Executive Committee. 
He was First Assistant Engrossing Clerk of the Assembly 
in 1893, and received the caucus nomination of his party 
for the same position in 1894. He was instrumental in se- 
curing the incorporation of Junction, and on December 
29th, 1894, was elected Secretary of the committee organized 
tor the purpose. In 1895 he was elected Assessor for Junc- 
tion Borough for a term of three years, and re-elected in 
1898 without opposition. He was Assistant Clerk of the 
County Board of Assessors in 1895 and '96, and Clerk of that 
Board in 1897, '98 and '99. 

He has been a member of Minerva Lodge, No. 60, I. O. 
O. F., of Junction, for eighteen years, in which he is a 
Fast Grand, as well as present Permanent and Recording 
Secretary. He was re-elected to the Assembly for a third 
term by a plurality of 785. Last year he served on the 
Committees on Railroads and Canals and Sinking Fund. 

Laudenberger, Dem., 3,861; Arnett, Rep., 3,076; Sunderlin, 
Pro., 235. 



Mercer County. 

BERTRAND LITTELL GULICK. 
(Rep., Kingston.) 

Mr. Gulick was born in Princeton township, N. J., March 
1, 1866, and is a farmer. His ancestors, the Gulicks, landed 
in Long Island in 1635 and soon after came to New Jersey 
and were the first people to carry passengers from New 
York to Philadelphia by stage coach, which was called the 
"Auld Diligence Line." They settled in 1793 where the 
present Assemblyman now lives. He is a nephew of 
Captain John S. Gulick of the U. S. Navy. Mr. Gulick is 
a member of the Township Committee, having been elected 
in the spring of 1893, has served continuously until the 
present time, and when his term expires he will have 
served ten years altogether. He has been Township 
Treasurer for five years, and was a member of the County 
Board of Election from August 1. 1899, until he resigned, 
when he was elected to the Assembly. His plurality over 
Coleman, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket, 
was 1,699. 

GEORGE W. PAGE. 
(Rep., Tl-enton.) 

Mr. Page was born in Trenton, N. J., April 25th, 1861, 
and is a collector for the People's Brewing Company, He 



302 BIOGRAPHIES. 

was formerly an operative potter. He was elected a mem- 
ber of the Mercer County Board of Freeholders in the 
spring of 1895 and re-elected in 1897 and 1899. He was 
re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1,298 over 
Coleman, the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 
Last year he served on the Committees on Militia, Printed 
Bills, and Commerce and Navigation. 

HARRY D. LEAVITT. 

(Rep., Trenton.) 

Mr. Leavitt was born in Trenton, September 13, 1871, and 
is a bank clerk. He is a member of the Masonic Frater- 
nity. He served two terms in the Trenton Common Coun- 
cil, having been first elected in April, 1897, and he retired on 
January 1, 1902. He was elected to the Assembly by a plur- 
ality of 1,809 over Coleman, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Republicans. Deniocrats. 

Gulick 11,045 Margerum 8,797 

Page 10,644 Coleman 9,346 

Leavitt 11,155 Malone 8,664 

Prohibition— Holcombe, 328; Jones, 319; Atchley, 328. 
Socialist— Coll, 217; Dennis, 183; Niedermeier, 181. 



Middlesex County. 
MYRON J. WHITFORD. 

(Rep., New Market.) 

Dr. Whitford was born at Adams Centre, N. Y., August 
31, 1858, and is a physician by profession. He is descended 
on the maternal side from Captain John Greene of the 
Revolutionary Army, who was an officer of the Rhode 
Island troops and later of the New York troops. His great- 
grandfather, Joshua Whitford, was also a Revolutionary 
soldier, and his grandfather, Captain Edward Whitford, 
served with the New York troops in the War of 1812. The 
doctor removed to Farina, Illinois, with his parents in 
1868. He entered MixLon College, Wisconsin, in 1876, and 
he was graduated from that institution with class honors. 
He was graduated from the Chicago Homeopathic Medical 
College in 1883, and practiced medicine in Wisconsin until 
1887, since which time he has followed his profession in 



BIOGRAPHIES. 303 

New Market and Dunellen, N. J. In 1894 he was electeu a 
member of the Piscataway Township School Board, and 
with the exception of one year he has been either president 
or secretary of that body since that time. He served in 
no other pubUc office until he was elected to the Assem- 
bly. His plurality was 198 over Reynolds, the highest can- 
didate on the Democratic ticket. 



WILLIAM HOWARD CROSBY JACKSON. 

(Rep., New Brunswick.) 

Mr. Jackson was born in New Brunswick, N. J., Janu- 
ary 26, 1867, and is the representative in New York for 
Hay Foundry and Iron Works of Newark, N. J. He has 
never before held public office. He is a thirty-second de- 
gree Mason, a member of Union Lodge, No. 19, F. & A. M., 
Scott Chapter No. 4, R, A. M., New York Consistory, 
thirty-second degree, A. A. S. R., Mecca Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S., an exalted ruler of New Brunswick Lodge, No. 
324, B. P. O. E., and president of the Brunswick Club. He 
is also vice-president of the Young Men's Republican Club 
and a member of the Y. M. C. A. Mr. Jackson was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 204 over Reynolds, the 
highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

JOHN EDGAR MONTGOMERY. 

(Rep., South Amboy.) 

Mr. Montgomery was born at Old Bridge, May 13th, 1844, 
and is a merchant. He was formerly a clerk. He served 
one year in the United States Navy during the Civil war 
and is a member of St. Stephen Lodge, F. and A. M. He 
was re-elected to the Assembly for a third term by a plur- 
ality of 241 over Reynolds, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Last year he served as Chairman of 
the Committee on Labor and Industries and as a member 
of the Committees on Railroads and Canals, and Printing. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

Whitford 7,637 Reynolds 7,439 

Jackson 7,643 Straub 7,400 

Montgomery 7,680 O'Harra 7,368 

Prohibition— Marshall, 203; Lahne, 132; Warner, 127. 



304 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Monmouth County. 

WILLIAM T. HOFFMAN. 

(Rep., Jersey City and Englishtown.) 

Judge Hoffman is one of the best known public men in 
New Jersey. For a number of years he has been one of 
the leading membei-s of the New Jersey Bar, and during 
his professional career has been engaged in many impor- 
tant cases before the higher courts of the state. He was 
born in Middlesex county sixty-one years ago. He was 
prepared for college, but engaged in business pursuits, 
which, however, he abandoned for the study of the law. 
He studied with the late Governor Bedle and was admitted 
as an attorney at the November term, 18G2, and he became 
a counselor in 1872. From 1863 and until the close of the 
war he served in the Paymaster's Department of the 
army. For five years he was President of the Hoboken 
Board of Education, being then the only Republican in 
that body. He served as presiding Judge oi Hudson county 
from 1873 to 1878. 

For over twenty years the Judge has taken an active 
part in politics, national as well as state, and has always 
rendered good service to his party. He presided over the 
State Convention which nominated Frederic A. Potts for 
Governor, was a member of the Republican State Com- 
mittee from 1880 to 1883, and a delegate to the Republican 
National Convention which was held at Minneapolis in 
1892, and which nominated Benjamin Harrison for Presi- 
dent. He participated in every national and gubernatorial 
campaign in New Jersey since 1880, and as an orator he 
took first rank. In 1892 he was a candidate for Congress. 

The Judge was counsel for the defense in the noted Lav- 
erty impeachment trial, which occurred before the State 
Senate in 1886, and he was also engaged in the Stuhr- 
McDcnald contested election case before the Senate in 
1890. He was counsel for the state in the celebrated raJl- 
road taxation cases, and appeared in the famous Lewis 
will case and in the Brockaway counterfeiting trial in the 
United States Court. Among other cases in which he was 
engaged as counsel were the well-known homicide trial 
of Smith and Bennett, Jersey City; Rockwell of Toms 
River; Klankowski of Jersey City; Eli Shaw of Camden, 
and more recently the Bosscheiter murder trial in Pater- 
son. For a score of years the Judge has been one of the 
busiest lawyers in New Jersey. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 305 

He was elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 568 
over McDonald, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. 

JOHN A. HOWLAND. 

(Rep., Long Branch.) 

Mr. Howland was born at Long Branch, April 2, 1852, and 
is a clerk in the Sheriff's office of Monmouth county. He 
was educated at the Glenwood Institute at Matawan; was 
for three years connected with the Philadelphia Ledger 
office, assisted his father for a number of years in con- 
ducting the Howland House at Long Branch, was secre- 
tary of the Long Branch Gas Light Company, from which 
he resigned to take the Postmaster&hip of Long Branch, to 
which he was appointed by President Grant without solic- 
itation upon his part, and served twelve years, two years 
being under President Cleveland. For the past eight years 
he has been a deputy in the Sheriff's office, serving under 
Sheriffs Woolley, Fields and Davis. At the age of twenty- 
two years Mr. Howland was Chairman of a Republican 
Convention at Freehold, and he was a delegate to the con- 
vention at Cincinnati which nominated Hayes for the 
Presidency. He has for years been a member of the Re- 
publican County Executive Committee. Mr. Howland is 
one of the charter members of the Atlantic Fire Company 
of Long Branch and has also served as a vestryman in St. 
James' Church, Long Branch. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 752 over McDonald, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

SOMERS T. CHAMPION. 

(Rep., Atlantic Highlands.) 

Mr. Champion was born at Absecom, N. J., May 28, 1840. 
He was formerly in the real estate business, but now leads 
a retired life. He became a resident of Monmouth county 
in 18S1. In 1862 he raised a company of volunteers in At- 
lantic county, of which he was commissioned Captain by 
Governor Olden, served a full term of enlistment and holds 
an honorable discharge. He was Sergeant-at-Arms of 
the New Jersey Senate in 1874, '75 and '76. He is one of the 
incorporators of the Atlantic Highlands Association, which 
purchased 250 acres of land on the bay shore at a cost of 
$100,000. For a number of years he was secretary and sup- 
erintendent of that association. He has served as Com- 
missioner and Borough Clerk of Atlantic Highlands, is 
20 



306 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Secretary of the Board of Health, and is serving a third 
term as Justice of the Peace. He is an incorporator, direc- 
tor and secretary of the Lake Submarine Company, He 
has always been a staunch Republican and he cast his 
first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He is prominently iden- 
tified with numerous fraternal organizations, is a Past 
Commander in Clinton B. Fisk Post, G. A. R., has been a 
grand lodge officer of the Knights of Pythias, and in 1899 
was grand chancellor of the state. At the present time 
he is state superintendent of the insurance department 
of the latter order. Mr. Champion was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 477 over McDonald, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. 



Republicans. Democrats. 

Hoffman 8,398 McDonald 7,830 

Howland 8,582 Lefferson 7,686 

Champion 8,307 Posten 7,790 

Prohibition— Clark, 310: Shotwell, 319; Brown, 314. 



Morris County. 

CHARLES RUSSEL WHITEHEAD. 

(Rep., Morristown.) 

Mr. "Whitehead was born at Washington Valley, N. J., 
September 1st, 1860, and is a practical farmer. He served 
as a member of the Morris Township Committee from the 
spring of 1894 to 1897, was elected a member of the Morris 
County Board of Freeholders from Morris township in the 
spring of 1897, and was re-elected to the same office in the 
spring of 1899. He was re-elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 822 over Porter, the highest candidate on the 
Democratic ticket. Last year he served on the Commit- 
tees on Incidental Expenses, Miscellaneous Business, and 
Reform School for Boys. 

WILLIAM THOMPSON BROWN. 

(Rep., Madison.) 

Mr. Brown was born at Cliffwood, Monmouth county, 
November 10, 1858, and is a pharmacist. He spent his boy- 
hood' days at South Amboy and attended the Stevensdale 
Institute, a private school in that city. He came to Madi- 
son iu 1880, was a clerk in a store for one year and then 



BIOGRAPHIES. 307 

went to Staten Island, where he was in the drug business 
for a year. Two years later he returned to Madison, pur- 
chased a drug- store and has continued in that business 
ever since. He was a member of the Madison Board of 
Health from 1890 to 1892, was Postmaster of that town for 
one term of four years under President Harrison, and on 
March 14, 1899, was elected Councilman for three years by a 
majority of 136, the largest ever given in the borough. 
Mr. Brown is a member of the State Board of Pharmacy^ 
serving- as its treasurer. He was formerly President of the 
State Pharmaceutical Association. He was elected to the 
Assembly by a plurality of 782 over Porter, the highest 
candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 

Republicans. Democrats. 

"Whitehead 6,307 Peters 5,418 

Brown 6,267 Porter 5,485 

Prohibition— Quimby, 352; Bockeron, 359. 



Ocean County. 

GEORGE W. HOLMAN, Jr. 

(Rep., Bayville.) 

Mr. Holman was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., May 12, 1860, 
and i? a son of Dr. George W. Hoiman, one of the leading 
physicians of that city. He was graduated from the 
Brooklyn High School and also the Media (Pa.) Academy. 
He passed through the course on the New York nautical 
schooiship St. Mary and served liix years in Brooklyn's 
crack regiment, the Twenty-third, N. G. N. Y., retiring as 
a veteran of that organization. Mr. Holm.an belongs to 
the Masonic order and is a member of Mannahassett Tribe 
of Red Men of Toms River. He was married in 1882 to 
Miss Jennie L. Rawlins, a ward of General U. S. Grant, 
and daughter of General John A. Rawlins, who was 
Grant's chief of staff and later his Secreiary of War. Mr. 
Holman took up his residence in Barnegat Park in August, 
1889. He has represented the Holland Trust Company of 
New York since June, 1892, and was proprietor of the 
Pines Hotel until it was borned on July 5, 1895. The Trust 
Company's tract at Barnegat Park comprises about 6,000 
acres. Although always an active Republican, he has 
never held but one office, that of Commissioner of Ap- 



308 BIOGRAPHIES. 

peal, before his election to the Assembly. His plurality for 
the latter office was 976. 

Holman, Jr., Rep., 2,364; Kirkpatrick, Dem., 1,388; Cran- 
mer. Pro., 171. 



Passaic County. 

EDMUND G. STALTER. 
(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Stalter was born at Paterson, January 8th, 1875, and 
is a lawyer by profession. He leceived his early education 
in the public schools of Paterson, graduating from the 
High School of that city in 1S90. He prepared for college 
at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden, New Hampshire, 
graduating from that institution in 1892, and entered Yale 
University in the fall of the same year, and graduated in 
the class of 1896. 

He studied law at the Yale University Law School, taking 
the three years' course in two years, and graduated in 1898, 
then entering the law office of Z. M. Ward, of Paterson, 
from whose office he was admitted to the bar of this State. 

While in college Mr. Stalter did some newspaper work, 
and was a member of the Glee Club for tour years. He 
has always been active in politics, but never held office 
before he became an Assemblyman. His brother, William 
W. Stalter, is a member of the Board of Aldermen of Pat- 
erson, and was President of the Board at the time of the 
outbreak of the war with Spain, when ne left with the 
Second Regiment of N. J. Volunteers, as a lieutenant of 
Company C. 

Mr. Stalter was re-elected to the Assembly for a third 
term by a plurality of 1,055 over Hughes, the highest can- 
didate on the Democratic ticket. Last year he served as 
Chairman of the Committee on Miscellaneous Business 
and as a member of the Committees on Muncipal Corpora- 
tions Revision of Laws, and Federal Relations. 

WILLIAM B. DAVIDSON. 

(Rep., Passaic.) 

Mr. Davidson was born in Paterson, N. J., June 24th, 
1868, and is a lawyer by profession. He was formerly a 
plumber. He was educated in the Paterson public schools 
and afterward attended the New York trade schools. He 
studied law in the office of James A. Sullivan, of Passaic, 
and was admitted to the bar of New Jersey at the February 



BIOGRAPHIES. 309 

term, 1S90. He now holds the office of Inspector of Plumb- 
ing in Passaic, which he has filled lor the past eight years. 
He was re-elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 953 
over Hughes, the highest candidate on the Democratic 
ticket. Last year he served on the Committees on Bill 
Revision, Claims and Revolutionary Pensions, Education 
and State Prison. 

HIRAM KEASLER. 

(Rep., Allwood.) 

Mr. Keasler was born in Acquackononk township, Pas- 
saic county, N. J., thirty-two years ago. He is a farmer 
and lives on the farm where he was born. He was elected 
as a member of the Township Committee in 1894 and served 
five years, and in 1898 he was elected to tne Board of Free- 
holders for the term ending in 1901. He is a member of 
the Republican County Committee. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 631 over Hughes, the high- 
est candidate on the Democratic ticket. Last year hr 
served on the Committees on Militia, Towns and Town- 
ships, and Industrial School for Girls. 

RAYMOND BOGERT. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Bogert was born on June 23, 1865, in the city of Pat- 
erson and is a plumber by trade, being engaged with the 
Passaic Gas and Electric Company. He entered politics 
when only sixteen years of age and has been very active 
for his party ever since. In 1898, after an exciting three- 
cornered fight, he was elected Alderman of the First ward 
of Paterson. He was elected for a second term without 
opposition. He was the Republican candidate for President 
of the Board when there was a deadlock and over five hun- 
dred ballots had been taken. The Democrats subsequently 
organized the Board. Mr. Bogert was a member of the 
Passaic County Republican Committee in 1895 and served 
as a member of the Executive Committee until October, 
1901. He belongs to numerous organizations, being a char- 
ter member of the First Ward Republican Club, a member 
of Benevolent Lodge, No. 45, F. & A. M., and Benevolent 
Lod?e, No. 60, B. & P. O. E. He was elected to the Assem- 
bly by a plurality of 409 over Hughes, the highest candi- 
date on the Democratic ticket. 



310 BIOGRAPHIES. 

FREDERICK W. VAN BLARCOM. 

(Rep., Paterson.) 

Mr. Van Blarcom was born in Paterson, August 3, 1874, 
and is a counselor at law. This is the first time he has 
held public office. He was graduated from Montgomery 
Academy, Montgomery, N. Y,, in 1890, and from the Pat- 
erson High School in 1892. He studied law with Eugene 
Emley, the present Prosecutor of the Pleas of Passaic 
county, was admitted as an attorney at the June term, 
1896, and as a counselor at the June term, 1900. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 999 over Hughes, 
the highest candidate on the Democratic ticket. 

THE TOTAL VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Stalter 13,770 Ulrich 11,790 

Davidson 13,668 Hughes 12,715 

Keasler 13,346 Van Houten 11,903 

Bogert 13,124 Lyons 11,777 

Van Blarcom 13,714 Dechert 11,638 

Prohibition— Monington, 164; Bradshaw, 160; Grenfell, 
170; Dickinson, 159; Tilt, 161. 

Socialist— Gilbert, 370; Hueck, 374; Schmidt, 380; Morgen- 
stern, 381; Lindner, 374. 

Social-Labor— Slingland, 367; Platz, 359; Tully, 365; Butz, 
364; Schmitter, 363. 



Salem County. 

JOHN TYLER. 
(Rep., Salem.) 

Mr. Tyler was born on a farm near Greenwich, Cumber- 
land county, N. J., March 17, 1850, and is at present a resi- 
dent of Mannington township. He is engaged in the dairy 
and farming business and as a breeder of Guernsey cattle. 
He owns one of the finest herds of dairy cattle in New 
Jersey. He is a member of the Township Committee, the 
Board of Education and is Road Supervisor. He was 
president of the Cumberland County Agricultural and 
Horticultural Society in 1887 and '88, and has been a direc- 
tor of the Farmer's Reliance Insurance Company for nine 
years. Mr. Tyler was elected to the Assembly by a plur- 
ality of 211. 

Tyler, Rep., 2,938; Summerill, Dem., 2,727; Woolman, Pro., 
195. 



Biographies. §11 

Somerset County. 
HENRY WYCKOFF HOAGLAND. 

(Rep., Rocky Hill.) 

Mr. Hoagland was born at Grlggstown, N. J., November 
24th, 1836, and is a farmer, a vocation he has always fol- 
lowed, with the exception of eight years' residence in Chi- 
cago, when he was in the grain commission business and 
was then a member of the Chicago Board of Trade. For 
seven years he was Clerk of Montgomery township, Somer- 
set county, and for three years a member of the Board of 
Education of the same township. He was re-elected to 
the Assembly by a plurality of 44 over Childs, the Demo- 
cratic candidate. Last year he served on the Committees 
on Agriculture, Public Health, and Sinking Fund. 

Hoagland, Rep., 3,344; Childs, Dem., 3,300; Trumpore, 
Pro., 172. 



Sussex County. 
LEWIS S. ILIFF. 
(Dem., Newton.) 
Mr. Iliff was born at Andover, Sussex county, N. J., 
December 8, 1855, and is a dealer in lumber, Coal, etc. He 
was Water Commissioner of the town of Newton for five 
years from May 20, 1896, to May 20, 1901. He was elected 
to the Assembly by a plurality of 309. 
Iliff, Dem., 2,767; Roe, Rep., 2,458; Irving N. Roe, Pro., 135. 



Union County. 

FREDERICK MILLER. 
(Rep., Elizabeth.) 
Mr. Miller was born in Germany, October 9, 1857, and is 
a mechanic. He has been a member of the Elizabeth Fire 
Department for the last eighteen years and is also a mem- 
ber of the Exempt Firemen's Association. He is a past 
grand master of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
belongs to the Independent Order of Forresters and also 
to the Friendship B. A. Council and other organizations. 
He was a member of Common Council from 1889 to 1891. 
He is also a member of the Union County Board of Free- 
holders, having been first elected in 1894, and four times 
altogether. His present term will not expire until Janu- 



212 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ary 1, 1903. Mr. Miller was elected to the Assembly by a 
plurality of 1,671 over Sulzer, the highest candidate on 
the Democratic ticket. 

WILLIAM NEWCORN. 
(Rep., Plainfield.) 

Mr. Newcorn was born in Cracow, Austria, March 4, 186i^, 
and is a lawyer by profession. In 1870 his family located 
in New York city, where he attended the grammar schools, 
and from which he was graduated. He then accepted a 
position with the Knickerbocker Ice Company, which he 
held for four years, and next engaged in the wholesale 
and retail tobacco business for himself. In 1889 he located 
in Plainfield and opened a, store devoted to sporting goods. 
He continued in that business until January 1, 1897. While 
engaged in commercial pursuits he devoted his leisure 
moments to reading law. He was admitted to the bar in 
1897. In 1893 he was elected a Justice of the Peace and 
resigned that office in 1897. For the last six years he has 
been a member of the Union County Republican Commit- 
tee; for eight years he has been a member of the City Re- 
publican Committee, during the last two of which he has 
been its Secretary and Treasurer. 

Mr. Newcorn is a member of Miantonomon Tribe, No. 18, 
Improved Order of Red Men of Plainfield; on February 
23, 1900, he was elected great sachem of the Great Reserva- 
tion oi New Jersey, and is one of the present great repre- 
sentatives to the Great-Great Council of the United States. 
He is a member of lona Council, No. 14, D. of P., is past 
master workman and financier of Central Lodge, No. 48, 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, and besides he is a 
member of Protective Council, No. 507, Improved Order of 
Heptasophs, a member of Passaic Lodge, No. 387, Benevo- 
lent Order of Elks; consul commander of Robin Hood 
Camp, No. 7, W. O. W., and of Unity Lodge, No. 102, K. of 
P. Mr. Newcorn was elected to the Assembly by a plur- 
ality of 1,327 over Sulzer, the highest candidate on the 
Demccratic ticket. 

WILLIAM FERGUSON HALL. 

(Rep., Cranford.) 

Mr. Hall was born in New York city, July 17, 1866, and 
is a dry goods merchant. He was formerly a salesman 
in the same business. He has been a member of the Cran- 
ford Township Committee since the spring of 1901. He was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 1927 over Sulzer, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 3l3 

the highest candidate on the Deraocratic ticket. He re- 
ceived more votes than any other candidate on the Re- 
publican ticket at the election in November, 1901. 

THE TOTAL. VOTE. 
Republicans. Democrats. 

Miller 10,362 Sulzer 8,691 

Newcorn 10,018 Deweer 8,366 

Hall 10,618 Moffett 8,660 

Prohibition— Reeve, 211; Brookfield, 223; Myher, 209. 
Social-Labor— Kunolt, 147; Brandt, 147; Merquelin, 147. 
Socialist— Taake, 181; Rahm, 182; Koch, 183. 



Warren County. 

WILLIAM RUTSER LAIllE. 
(Rep., Belvid3re.|) 

Mr-. Laire was born at Hamden, N. J., November 3, 1846. 
and is agent for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at 
Belvidere. He was formerly a printer. He is a member 
of the Masonic order and also of the Masonic Veteran 
Association of New Jersey. At the present time he is 
serving his eighth year as a member of the Board of 
Chosen Freeholders of Warren county. He served two 
years as Chairman of the Warren County Republican 
Committee, a similar term in the C'ommon Council of Bel- 
videre, and was a member of the Warren County Board 
of Elections from the time of ics formation and until 
October 24, 1901, when he resigned the office. Mr. Laire was 
elected to the Assembly by a plurality of 279. With the 
exception of Samuel V. Davis, who represented the county 
in 1894, '95, and George W. Smith, in 189-5, Mr. Laire is the 
only Republican who has ever been elected to the Assem- 
bly in Warren county. Peter Cramer, Republican, was 
Senator in 1879, '80 and '81. 

Laire, Rep., 3,370; Kitchen, Dem., 3,091; Farrow. Pro. 
274. 



Summary. 

House— Republicans.. 46 Democrats 14=60 

Senate— Republicans. . 17 Democrats 4=21 

63 18 81 

Republican majority on joint ballot, 45. 



314 BiOGllAPHtEg. 

THE JUDICIARY. 



United States District Court. 

ANDREW KIRKPATRICK, Newark. 

Judge Kirlcpatrick was born in Wasliington, D. C, Octo- 
ber 8tli, 1844. His fatlier was J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, of 
New Brunswick. Andrew Kirkpatrick, a Justice of tlie 
Supreme Court in this State from 1797 to 1803, and Chief 
Justice from 1803 to 1824, was his grandfather. After re- 
ceiving a thorough preliminary education he entered Rut- 
gers College, and there he had for a classmate the late 
Vice-President Hobart. The Judge, after leaving Rutgers, 
went to Union College, Schenectad5^ N. Y., and from there 
he graduated. He was an apt student, and in 1866 he was 
admitted to the bar. Three years later he was made a 
counselor, and soon after he began the practice of law in 
Newark with the late Frederick H. Teese, who at one 
time represented the Essex district in Congress. 

Governor Abbett, in 1885, appointed Mr. Kirkpatrick to 
succeed Judge Ludlow McCarter, as Law Judge of the 
Essex County Court of Common Pleas, and he held that 
position until December 1st, 1896, when he resigned to 
occupy his present position. His commission is dated No- 
vember 20th, 1896, and he was appointed to fill the vacancy 
caused by the death of Judge Edward T. Green. His salary 
is $5,000 a year, and his office has a life tenure. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 



COURT OP CHANCERY. 

Chancellor. 

"" '""' ' WILLIAM J. MAGIE, Elizabeth. 

(Term seven years, salary $10,000 per annum.) 

Chancellor Magie was born at Elizabeth, Union county, 
N. J., December 9th, 1832. His father, David Magie, was for 
nearly forty-five years pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Elizabeth, and was also a native of the same 
town. He entered Princeton College in 1852 and graduated 
in 1855. He studied law with the late Francis B. Chetwood, 
of Elizabeth, was admitted as an attorney in 1856 and as a 
counselor in 1859. For six years he was associated in prac- 
tice with Mr. Chetwood, and after practicing alone for 
some time he formed another co-partnership with Mr. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 315 

Joseph Cross. From 1866 to 1871 he was Prosecutor of the 
Pleas for Union county. He has been connected with the 
banks of Elizabeth, and has acted as counsel for several 
corporations. He was elected to the State Senate from 
Union county in 1875 for a term of three years, and in 1880 
he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court by Gov- 
ernor McClellan. He was re-appointed by Governor Green 
in 1887 and by Governor Werts in 1894. On March 1st, 1897, 
he was nominated by Governor Griggs as Chief Justice to 
succeed the late Mercer Beasley, and he was at once con- 
firmed by the Senate. He served in that office until May 2d, 
1900, when he was appointed by Governor Voorhees to fill 
the vacancy in the office of Chancellor caused by the death 
of Alexander T. McGill. On January 14, ISOl, he was nomi- 
nated for a full term of office by Governor Voorhees, and 
the nomination was at once confirmed by the Senate. His 
term will expire January 14, 1908. In politics he is a Re- 
publican. 



Vice-Chancellors. 

(Term seven years, salary $9,000 a year.) 

HENRY C. PITNEY, Morristown. 

Vice-Chancellor Pitney, LL.D., was born at Mendham, 
Morris county, N. J., January 17th, 1827, He was graduated 
from Princeton College in the class of '48, which has since 
conferred on him the honorary degree of LL.D. He was 
admitted to the bar as an attorney in July, 1851, and as a 
counselor in November, 1854. He is regarded as one of the 
ablest constitutional lawyers in New Jersey. He was ap- 
pointed Vice-Chancellor for a term of seven years in the 
spring of 1889 and in 1896 he was re-appointed for another 
full term. In politics he is a Republican. His term expires 
in 1903. 

JOHN R. EMERY, Newark. 

Vice-Chancellor Emery was born in Flemington, Hunter- 
don county, N. J., July 6th, 1842. He was graduated from 
Princeton College in 1861, and studied law under Bennet 
Van Syckel, now a Justice of the Supreme Court, and also 
under the late Vice-Chancellor Van Fleet. In 1865 he was 
admitted to the bar, when he formed a partnership with 
Mr. Van Fleet, which continued for one year. Then he 
went to Trenton, where he formed a partnership with the 
late Augustus G. Richey, which was continued until 1874. 
The next year he moved to Newark, where he opened a 



8ie BlOCRAPHieg. 

law office and soon built up an extensive practice. About 
seventeen j^ears ago Mr. Emery was made an Advisory 
Master. He has never held any political office. He was ap- 
pointed Vice-Chaneellor by Chancellor McGill on January 
2&th, 1895, for a full term of seven years, to succeed the late 
Vice-Chancellor Van Fleet. In politics he is a Republican, 
His term will expire in January, 1902. 

ALFRED REED, Trenton. 

Vice-Chancellor Reed was born December 23d, 1839, in 
Ewing township, Mercer county. He attended the Law- 
renceville High School in 1856 and the Model School at 
Trenton in 1857-58, and entered Rutgers College, at New 
Brunswick, in 1859. In the fall of 1860 he was matriculated 
at the State and Normal Law School, at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., and in the summer of 1862 admitted to the practice 
of law in New York. He returned to Trenton and renewed 
his study of law, and was admitted to the bar of New Jer- 
sey at the June Term, 1864. In the spring of 1865 he was 
elected to the Common Council of Trenton, of which body 
he was made President. He was elected Mayor of Trenton 
in 1867, serving for one year, and in the spring of 1869 he 
was appointed Law Judge of Mercer county, a position he 
held for a full term of five years. On April 8th, 1875, he was 
appointed by Governor Bedle a Justice of the Supreme 
Court; in 1882 he was re-appointed by Governor Ludlow, 
and in 1889 by Governor Green. In June, 1895 he was ap- 
pointed a Vice-Chancellor by Chancellor McGill, to succeed 
the late Robert S. Green, for a term of seven years. His 
term will expire in June, 1902. In politics he is a Democrat. 

FREDERIC W. STEVENS, Newark. 

Vice-Chancellor Stevens was born in Hoboken, N. J., 
June 9th, 1846. He was graduated from Columbia Law 
College in 1865; was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as 
an attorney in November, 1868, and as a counselor three 
years later. He first came into public life in 1873, when he 
was appointed Judge of the Second District Court of New- 
ark. He remained in that position for two years. In 1889 
the Judge was appointed County Counsel of Essex county, 
and filled that office for some years. Although he has not 
held any other public offices, Mr. Stevens has always been 
a prominent figure in some of the biggest legal fights ever 
made in the State and County Courts. One of those was 
the settlement of the back taxes of the Delaware, Lacka- 
wanna and Western Railroad Company. In that case he 



BIOGRAPHIES. 317 

and Judge Dillon acted as arbitrators. He is a member 
of the Ecclesiastical Law Committee of the Protestant 
Episcopal Diocese of Newark, and, with Cortlandt Parker, 
revised all of the canons governing that body. He was 
appointed Vice-Chancellor in 1896, as a successor to John 
T, Bird. His term will expire in 1903. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

MARTIN P. GREY, Camden. 
Vice-chancellor Grey was born at Camden (then in Glou- 
cester county), New Jersey, December 20th, 1841. He was 
the third son of Philip James Grey, Esq.. and Sarah Wool- 
ston Grey, his wife. He was educated in the schools of his 
native town and in the city of Philadelphia. He was admit- 
ted as an attorney-at-law at the June Term of the Supreme 
Court in New Jersey in 1863. He was called to the bar as 
counselor at the June Term, 1866. He began the practice 
of law at Salem in June, 1863, and there continued until 
January 1st, 1887, when he formed a partnership with his 
older brother, Samuel H. Grey, Esq., now Attorney-Gen- 
eral, at Camden, N. J., and continued the practice of law 
at the latter place, associated with his brother, under the 
firm name of Grey & Grey, until May 19th, 1896, when he 
was tendered by the late Alexander T. McGill, Chancellor, 
the appointment of Vice-Chancellor, which he accepted. 
In politics he is a Republican. His term will expire in 1903. 

EUGENE STEVENSON, Paterson. 
Vice-Chancellor Stevenson was born in Brooklyn, N. T., 
June 28, 1849. He moved to Paterson with his parents in 
1866, and has since resided there. He was graduated from 
the New York University as a Bachelor of Arts in the 
class of 1870, and was also graduated from the Law De- 
partment of the same institution. Subsequently he en- 
tered the law office of Socrates Tuttle, father-in-law of 
the late Vice-President Hobart, where he continued his 
studies. In June, 1874, Mr. Stevenson was admitted to the 
bar as an attorney-at-law, and three years later was 
made a counsellor. In 1881 he was appointed a Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for Passaic county by Governor Ludlow. He 
served a full term of five years in that office. He did not 
seek a reappointment. Since that time he has never held 
a public office, although he has often been sought as a 
candidate for such. Prior to his elevation to the bench he 
enjoyed a very large practice in the higher courts of the 
State. He was appointed Vice-Chancellor on April 16, 1901, 
for a full term of seven years. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. His term will expire in 1908. 



318 BIOGRAPHIES. 

JUSTICES OP THE SUPREME COURT. 

Term of office, seven years. The salary of the Chief Justice 

is $10,000 a year, and that of each Associate 

Justice, $9,000.) 

Chief Justice. 
WILLIAM S. GUMMERE, Newark. 
Chief Justice Gummere was born in Trenton, June 24th, 
1852, and is a son of the late Barker Gummere, who for 
many years was one of the acknowledged leaders of the 
bar of New Jersey. The Justice was educated at the old 
Trenton Academy and the Lawrenceville School, and was 
graduated from Princeton College in 1870. He studied law 
with his father, and upon being admitted to the bar he 
practiced for a time in the office of G. D. W. Vroom, when 
that gentleman was Prosecutor of the Pleas for Mercer 
county. Subsequently Mr. Gummere formed a co-partner- 
ship vrith his uncle, the late ex-Governor Parker, in New- 
ark, and after that had been dissolved he was associated 
with Oscar Keen, of the same city. This continued until 
the late Edward T. Green was made Judge of the United 
States District Court, when Mr. Gummere succeeded him 
as counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with 
offices in Trenton. On February 18th, 1895, he was ap- 
pointed by Governor Werts as a Justice of the Supreme 
Court, to succeed the late Justice Abbett for a term of 
seven years, and he was unanimously confirmed by the 
Senate on the day following. On January 28, 1901, he was 
nominated by Governor Voorhees lor Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court, to take effect on November 16, 1901, and he 
was confirmed on February 4th following. The nomination 
was made to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of 
Chief Justice David A. Depue, who, after serving a period 
of thirty-five years on the bench, vacated the office on 
November 16th, 1901. Chief Justice Gummere took the oath 
of office on November 19, 1901. In politics he is a Republi- 
can. His term will expire in 1908. His circuit comprises 
Essex county. Population, 359,053. 



Associate Justices. 
Eight altogether. Salary, $9,000 a year. 
BENNET VAN SYCKEL, Trenton. 
Justice Van Syckel was born April 17th, 1830, in Bethle- 
hem, Hunterdon county, N. J. He was prepared for col- 
lege at Easton, Pa., entered Princeton College in 1843, and 



BIOGRAPHIES. 319 

was graduated in 1846, in the same class with David A. 
Depue, lately Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Imme- 
diately after graduating he entered the law office of Alex- 
ander Wurts, of Flemington, in which he remained until 
he was admitted to the bar, in 1851. He at once began the 
practice of his profession at Flemington, In 1869 he was 
appointed to a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court, 
and was re-appointed in 1876, again in 1883, again in 1890, 
and by Governor Griggs in 1897. He is a Democrat in poli- 
tics. His present term expires February 15th, 1904. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Union and Ocean. 
Total population, 119,100. 

JONATHAN DIXON, Jersey City. 

Justice Dixon was born in the city of Liverpool, England, 
July 6th, 1839. He remained there until his eighth year, 
having attended the public schools for two or three years. 
His family then removed to Marypont, Cumberland county, 
in the same country, where his education was continued. 
His father came to the United States in 1848, and his fam- 
ily followed him two years later, and settled in New 
Brunswick, N. J. Jonathan became an inmate of the home 
of Cornelius L. Hardenberg, a lawyer, who suffered from 
blindness, and to him the lad acted as attendant and aman- 
uensis for nearly five years, or until September, 1855. In 
that year he entered Rutgers College, and graduated from 
that institution in 1859. He then entered the law office of 
his former tutor, Warren Hardenberg, and studied there 
for twelve months. Upon Mr. Hardenberg removing to 
New York, Mr. Dixon entered the office of George R. Dut- 
ton, and subsequently that of Robert Adrain, both of these 
gentlemen being members of the bar of New Brunswick. 
While studying law he taught school as a means of liveli- 
hood. He was admitted as an attorney in November, 1862, 
and three years later as a counselor. After being admitted 
as an attorney he moved to Jersey City and entered the 
law office of E. B. Wakeman in a clerical capacity, and in 
the spring of 1864 he formed a co-partnership with his em- 
ployer, which lasted one year. For five years he practiced 
by himself, and then formed a co-partnership with Gilbert 
Collins, now a Justice of the Supreme Court. In April, 
1875, he was appointed a Justice of the Supreme Court by 
Governor Bedle; in 1882 he was re-appointed by Governor 
Ludlow, in 1889 by Governor Green, and in 1896 by Governor 
Griggs. He is a Republican in politics, and was the can- 
didate of his party for Governor in 1883, when he was de- 



320 BIOGRAPHIES. 

feated by the late Leon Abbett. His present term expires 
in 1903. 

liis cireviit comprises the counties of Passaic and Bergen. 
Total population, 233,643. 

CHARLES GRANT GARRISON, Camden. 

Justice Garrison was born in Swedesboro, Gloucester 
county, N. J., August 3d, 1849. He is a son of Rev. Joseph 
Fithian Garrison, D. D., a well-known divine of the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church, who was a professor in a Phila- 
delphia college for a number of years, and died in 1893. 
The Judge was educated at Edgehill School, Princeton, at 
the Episcopal Academy, Philadelphia, and in the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, from which he- graduated as a physi- 
cian in 1872. He practiced that profession until 1876, at 
Swedesboro, and then entered the law office of Samuel H. 
Grey, of Camden, where he remained until he was admit- 
ted to the bar in 1878. He was made Judge-Advocate Gen-' 
eral of New Jersey in 1884, and in 1882 he was made Chan- 
cellor of the Southern Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church of New Jersey. He was appointed to the Supreme 
Court bench in January, 1888, in the place of the late ex- 
Governor Joel Parker, for a full term of seven years. He 
was re-appointed in 1895 by Governor Werts. In politics 
he is a Democrat. His term expires in 1902. 

His circuit consists of the counties of Burlington, Cam- 
den and Gloucester. Total population, 197,789. 

GILBERT COLLINS. Jersey City. 

Justice Collins was born August 26th, 1846, in Stonington, 
Conn., where his family had long been settled, and where 
his father was engaged in manufactures. He received a 
classical education. In 1863 he removed to Jersey City, 
N. J., where his father, then recently deceased, had had 
business interests. He studied law under Jonathan Dixon, 
now a Justice of the Supreme Court. Justice Collins was 
admitted to practice in this State as an attorney February. 
1869. and as a counselor in February, 1872. He practiced 
his -profession in Jersey City, first as a partner of Judge 
Dixon, ♦and afterward with Charles L. and William H. 
Corbin, under the firm name Collins & Corbin. 

He was Mayor of Jersey City from May, 1884, to May, 
1886. On March 2d, 1897, he was appointed Associate Jus- 
tice of the Supreme Court of this State by Governor Griggs, 
and on March Sth, his nomination was by the Senate unan- 
imously confirmed. He is a Republican in politics. His 
term will expire March Sth, 1904. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 321 

His circuit comprises the county of Hudson. Total popu- 
lation, 333,048. 

JOHN FRANKLIN FORT, East Orange. 

Justice Fort was born at Pemberton, Burlington county, 
March 20, 1852, and is the eldest child and only son of An- 
drew H. and Hannah A. Fort, and a nepnew of the late 
George F. Fort, who was Governor of New Jersey in 1852. 
He received his early education at the Mount Holly Insti- 
tute and later attended Pennington Seminary. He began 
the study of the law in Philadelphia in the office of Edward 
Paxson, afterward Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Pennsylvania. When Mr. Paxson was appointed Judge of 
the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia, Mr. Fort con- 
tinued his studies with Ewan Merritt, Esq., then one of 
the foremost lawyers in Burlington county, and for nine 
months of his student term he was in the office of Garrit 
S. Cannon, then Prosecutor of the Pleas for Burlington 
county. He graduated from the Albany Law School in 
1872 with the degree of LL.B. 

Mr. Fort was admitted to the bar as an attorney at the 
November term of 1873 and as a counselor in 1876. His polit- 
ical career began before he had attained his majority in 
the Presidential campaign of 1872. He served as Journal 
Clerk of the House of Assembly during the sessions of 1873- 
74. In May, 1874, he located in Newark and began the 
practice of the law in Essex county. In 1878 he was ap- 
pointed by Governor McClellan as Judge of the First Dis- 
trict Court of the city of Newark, for the term of five 
years, at the expiration of which he was re-appointed by 
Governor Ludlow, but resigned the office in the third year 
of his second term to resume active practice. 

For a number of years he has been a prominent figure 
in local and State politics. He served on the Republican 
State Committee and was Vice-President of that body in 
1889. He was a delegate-at-large to the National Republi- 
can Convention of 1884 which nominated Mr. Blaine for 
President. He presided over the State Republican Conven- 
tions of 1889 and 1895, when General Grubb and John W. 
Griggs were respectively nominated for Governor. At the 
National Republican Convention held in St. Louis in 1896 
Mr. Fort, speaking for New Jersey, placed in nomination 
for Vice-President of the United States the name of Garret 
A. Hobart. He was a member of the Constitutional Com- 
mission of 1894, and is now one of the three New Jersey 
members of the Constitutional Commission on Uniform 
Laws for all the States, and is active in that national body. 
21 



822 BIOGRAPHIES. 

On December 1st, 1S9C, Governor Griggs appointed Mr. 
Fort as Judge of the Essex County Court of Common 
Pleas to fill a vacancy caused by the resignation of Andrew 
Kirkpatrick, who had accepted the office of Judge of the 
United States District Court for New Jersey. When the 
Legislature assembled Judge Fort was nominated for a 
full term of five years and was unanimously confirmed by 
the Senate. In May, 1900, Judge Fort was appointed by 
Governor Voorhees as a Justice of the Supreme Court to 
fill a vacancy caused by the elevation of Justice Depue to 
the office of Chief Justice of the Supremo Court. On Janu- 
ary 141h, 1901, he was nominated by Governor Voorhees for 
a full term of seven years, and the nomination was con- 
firmed by the Senate on January 22d. His term will expire 
in 1908. In politics he is a Republican. 

Justice Fort's circuit is composed of the counties of Mon- 
mouth and Middlesex. Population, 161,819. 

ABRAM QUICK GARRETSON, Morristown. 

Justice Garretson was born in Franklin township, Som- 
erset county, N. J., March 11, 1842. He is a descendant of 
two of the earliest families in Somerset county, both being 
of Holland-Dutch stock. His parents were Martin 
Schenck and Ann (Quick) Garretson, and his maternal 
great-grandfather, Abram Quick, was a Colonel of New 
Jersey Militia in the Revolutionary war. His ancestors 
took an active part in public and commercial affairs, held 
posts of honor and trust, and were always among the fore- 
most citizens of their time. 

In 1859 Mr. Garretson entered the sophomore class of 
Rutgers College, from which he received the degree of 
A. M., standing first in his class. He decided upon the law 
as his profession, and almost immediately after he had 
graduated at Rutgers he registered as a student in the 
office of Abraham O. Zabriskie, of Jersey City, who was 
afterward Chancellor of New Jersey. He subsequently at- 
tended Harvard Law School, and in November, 1865, was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey as an attorney, and 
three years later as a counselor. Subsequently he was 
admitted to practice before the United States Supreme 
Court at Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Garretson began the active practice of his profession 
in Jersey City in 1865, being associated with the late Robert 
Gilchrist, afterward Attorney General of New Jersey. In 
1867 he took up his professional work alone, and in Febru- 
ary, 1869, was appointed by Governor Randolph as Prose- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 323 

cutor of the Pleas of Hudson county for a term of five 
years, at the expiration of which, in 1874, he was re- 
appointed by Governor Parker. In 1878, after serving in 
this capacity for nine consecutive years, he resigned to 
accept at the hands of Governor McClellan the office of 
President Judge of the Hudson County Court of Common 
Pleas, which position he filled for a full term of five years. 
Since then he devoted his time to the practice of his pro- 
fession, and until he was appointed to his present office. 
In 1883 he formed a co-partnership with James B. Vreden- 
burgh. under the firm name of Vredenburgh & Garretson, 
which continued until his elevation to the bench of the 
Supreme Court. He was a member of the staff of the late 
Governor Bedle, and in politics Justice Garretson has 
always been a Democrat. Upon the death of Justice Lip- 
pincott in July, 1900, Governor Voorhees appointed Mr. 
Garretson to fill the vacancy on the bench, and he was 
sworn into office July ISth of that year. On January 14th. 
1901, he was nominated by Governor Voorhees for a full 
term of seven years, and the nominated was confirmed by 
the Senate on January 22d. 

His circuit comprises the counties of Morris, Somerset 
and Sussex. Total population, 122,238. 

CHARLES E. HENDRICKSON, Mount Holly. 

Justice Hendrickson was born at New Egypt, Monmouth 
county (now Ocean), N. J., January 8th, 1843. He pre- 
pared for college at the academy in his native town. In 
September, 1860, he entered the Sophomore Class of Union 
College, Schenectady, N. T., but continued there only one 
term, joining the Sophomore Class of Princeton College, 
N. J., the following January, where he graduated at the 
age of twenty with the class of 1863. On leaving college 
he conducted a classical school for one year at Pemberton, 
N. J. He studied law with Abraham Browning and Garrit 
S. Cannon, successively, and was admitted to the bar of 
New Jersey as an attorney at the November term of the 
Supreme Court, 1866, and three years later as counselor. 
He settled at Mount Holly upon his admission to the bar, 
where he has since resided. He was appointed Prosecutor 
of the Pleas for Burlington county by Governor Randolph 
in March, 1870, and was re-appointed by Governors Bedle, 
McClellan and Abbett, thus serving twenty years in the 
office, from which he voluntarily retired at the close of his 
fourth term, in March, 1890. 

He was elected to the House of Assembly from the Third 
district of Burlington county in 1867. He represented the 



324 BIOGRAPHIES. 

New Jersey Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church as one of the two Lay Delegates from that body 
to the General Conference of that Church held at Balti- 
more in May, 1876. He was there appointed by the Board 
of Bishops one of the Committee to Revise the Hymnal of 
the Church, a work that was completed by the committee 
and presented to the Board of Bishops at their meeting in 
Cleveland, O., the following year. He has further served 
the New Jersey Annual Conference as Trustee of Dickinson 
College and of Pennington Seminary, and was President 
of the Board of Trustees of the latter institution for a 
number of years. He was also a Lay Delegate to the 
Methodist Ecumenical Conference held in "Washington, 
D. C, in 1891, having been designated by the Board of 
Bishops as one of the representatives from the New Jersey 
Conference District. 

He was appointed by Governor Griggs a Judge of the 
Court of Errors and Appeals on March 26th, 1896, for a 
term of six years. On January 28th, 1901, he was nomi- 
nated by Governor Voorhees for Justice of the Supreme 
Court, to fill a vacancy caused by the death of George C. 
Ludlow, and the nomination was confirmed by the Senate 
on February 4th. In politics the Justice is a Democrat. 
His term will expire in 1908. His circuit comprises the 
counties of Atlantic, Cape May, Cumberland and Salem. 
Population, 136,326. 

MAHLON PITNEY, Morristown. 

Justice Pitney was born at Morristown, N. J., February 
5th, 1858, and is a son of "Vice-Chancellor Pitney. He ob- 
tained his early education in the schools of his native town, 
and entered Princeton College in 1875, and was graduated 
in 1879. Upon graduation he at once commenced the study 
of law in the office of his father, who was then practicing 
in Morristown. He was admitted to the bar as an attorney 
in June, 1882, and became a counselor-at-law in 1885. He 
opened an office in Dover, Morris county, in 1882, and re- 
mained there until 1889, when he returned to Morristown, 
where he practiced law until his elevation to the bench 
of the Supreme Court. He acted as Temporary Chairman 
of the Republican State Convention in 1895, which nomi- 
nated John W. Griggs for Governor. He was elected to 
Congress in 1894, in the old Fourth District, by a plurality of 
1,407 over Johnston Cornish, although the district was con- 
sidered Democratic. In 1896 he was re-elected by the in- 
creased plurality of 2,977, his own county of Morris giving 



BIOGRAPHIES. 325 

him a plurality of 3,627, despite the fact that his Demo- 
cratic opponent, Augustus W. Cutler, was also a resident 
of that county. In 1898 he was elected to the State Senate 
from Morris county by a plurality of 831. In 1900 he was 
the nsajority leader on the floor of the Senate, and in 1901 
he served as President of the Senate. He always took an 
active part in legislation both in the National House of 
Representatives and in the State Senate. On February 
5th, 1901, Senator Pitney was nominated by Governor 
Voorhees for Justice of the Supreme Court, to succeed Jus- 
tice Gummere, resigned, to take effect November 16th, 
1901, and the nomination, without reference, was at once 
confirmed by the Senate. Mr. Pitney was sworn into office 
on November 19th, 1901, for a term of seven years. In 
politics he is a Republican. His term will expire in 1908. 
His circuit comprises the counties of Mercer, Warren and 
Hunterdon. Populaton, 167,653. 



Circuit Court Judees. 

(Term of office, seven years. Salary, $7,500.) 
HENRY M. NEVIUS, Red Bank. 

Judge Nevius was born near Freehold, Monmouth county, 
N. J., January 30th, 1841. He was educated at the Freehold 
Institute, and also at the High School, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
I'ntil the Civil war broke out he studied law in that city, 
V. hen he enlisted as a private in Company K, Lincoln Cav- 
alry, and served until January, 1863, when he was promoted 
for gallantry to the Second Lieutenancy of Company D, 
Seventh Michigan Cavalry. He fought with General 
George A. Custer until the winter of 1864, when he resigned 
his commission to accept a position in a New Jersey regi- 
ment, then forming at Trenton, but it turned out a failure. 
He re-enlisted as a private in Company D, Twenty-fifth 
New York Cavalry. He was soon promoted to the rank 
of Captain for bravery on the field. When the war closed 
he returned to New Jersey and resumed the study of law. 
He was admitted to the bar as an attorney in February, 
1873, and as a counselor three years later. He was in part- 
nership for four years with ex-Senator John S. Applegate. 
He has held several offices of local importance, and has 
served as Deputy Revenue Collector. In 1883 he was elected 
Commander of the Grand Army Posts of New Jersey, and 
was re-elected the following year. He was elected to the 
State Senate from Monmouth county in 1887, served a full 



326 BIOGRAPHIES. 

term of three years, and was President of that body in 
1890. He was appointed Judge of the Circuit Court by 
Governor Griggs on March 2d, 1896, and was promptly and 
unanimously confirmed by the Senate. In politics he is a 
Republican. His term expires in 1903. 

FRANCIS J. SWAYZE, Newark. 

Judge Swayze was born in Newton, Sussex county, May 
15th, 1861, and is a son of Jacob L. Swayze. He was grad- 
uated from Harvard College in 1879, and afterward studied 
law in the office of Martin Rosenkrans, in Newton. He 
also took a course at Harvard Law School, and was admit- 
ted to the bar of New Jersey in June, 1882, and was made 
a counselor-at-law three years later. 

The Judge served as Chairman of the Sussex Republican 
County Committee from 1886 to 1889. He was a member of 
the Republican State Committee from 1889 to 1892, and was 
a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1892. 
In that year he removed to Newark and thereafter confined 
himself to the practice of his profession. He became a 
member of the law firm of Colie & Swayze, later Colie, 
Swayze & Titsworth. On February 13th, 1900, he was nom- 
inated by Governor Voorhees as a Circuit Court Judge to 
succeed Francis Child and he was unanimously confirmed 
by the Senate for a term of seven years, which will not 
expire until March 11th. 1907. 

JAMES H. NIXON. Millville. 

Judge Nixon was born in Cumberland county, N. J., in 
1838. He was graduated from Princeton University in 1858, 
and then taught for three years in the Lawrenceville Acad- 
emy, near Princeton. Afterwards he studied law in the 
office of Hon. John T. Nixon, in Bridgeton, was admitted 
to the bar in 1863, at the November Term of the Supreme 
Court, and began practice at Millville. He was for twenty- 
one years Solicitor of that city, was a member of the 
New Jersey House of Assembly for four years (1865-1869), 
and of the New Jersey Senate for three years (1869-1872), 
anu was Chairman of the Judiciary Committee in each of 
those bodies. In 1876 he was named on the Republican 
Electoral ticket of New Jersey. He was an Assistant At- 
torney-General during the administration of President 
Harrison, and for more than a year and a half under the 
second administration of President Cleveland. He was 
appointed Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals by 
Governor Griggs, on the 2d day of March, 1896, and on 
February 19th, 1900, he was nominated for Circuit Coyrt 



BIOGRAPHIES. 327 

Judge by Governor Voorhees to succeed Richard T, Miller, 
and was at once confirmeu by the Senate. His term will 
not expire until March 11, 1907. 



Lay Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals. 

(Term of office, six years. Compensation, $20 a day for 
actual service. No mileage.) 

JOHN W. BOGERT. Hohokus. 

Judge Bogert was born in Hohokus, Bergen county, Sep- 
tember 3d, 1839. His ancestors settled in that locality some 
time before the Revolution. He has held several township 
offices, and was Collector of Bergen county for fourteen 
years. He was a member of the House of Assembly from 
the Second District of Bergen county in the sessions of 
1874-75, and he served as State Senator for four years. He 
is an executor and administrator for several large estates. 
He was appointed by Governor Abbett Judge of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals in 1891, and re-appointed by Gover- 
nor Griggs in 1897. His term will expire in 1903. In politics 
he is a Democrat. 

GOTTFRIED KRUEGER, Newark. 

Judge Krueger was born in Baden, Germany, November 
4th, 1837, and came to this country February 13th, 1852, 
when he settled in Newark, where he has resided ever 
since. He is extensively engaged in the brewing business. 
He served as an apprentice with Adams & Laible, Newark, 
and when the firm dissolved, Mr. Laible built a new brew- 
ery for himself, and made Mr. Krueger foreman, a position 
he filled until 1865. He then formed a co-partnership with 
Gottlieb Hill, and they purchased the old brewery in which 
Mr. Krueger had served his time, -and also adjoining prop- 
erty. The business rapidly increased, and several addi- 
tions were, from time to time, made to their brewery. In 
1875 Mr. Hill, owing to ill health, was forced to retire from 
business, and Mr. Krueger became the sole proprietor. 
The brewery is now one of the most extensive in the State. 
The Judge served as a member of the Assembly in 1877 and 
1880. In 1872 he served as a member of the Essex County 
Board of Freeholders. In 1880 he was chosen a Presidential 
Elector, and he, together with the other electors from New 
Jersey, cast their votes for Hancock and English, the 
Presidential nominees of the Democratic party. He was 
appointed Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals in 



328 BIOGRAPHIES. 

1891 by Governor Abbett, to succeed the late Judge John 
McGregor, and in 1897 he was re-appointed by Governor 
Griggs. His term will expire in 1903. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

FREDERIC ADAMS, Summit. 

Judge Adams was born on October 9th, 1840, at Amherst, 
N. H. He was graduated from Phillips Academy at An- 
dover in 1858, and from Yale College in 1862. He read law 
at the Harvard Law School in 1863 and '64, and was admit- 
ted to the bar of New York city in 1864. He was admitted 
to practice in New Jersey as an attorney in February, 1868, 
and as a counselor in November, 1873. Nearly his entire 
practice has been in the city of Newark, where he has 
been much occupied by his duties as Special and Advisory 
Master in Chancery. The only political offices he ever held 
were as Clerk of East Orange township, Essex county, and 
as counsel for the same township. On March 23d, 1897, he 
was nominated as Judge of the Court of Errors and Ap- 
peals by Governor Griggs to succeed Judge Barcalow, who 
had been appointed as Judge of the Passaic County Courts. 
He was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on March 
25th, 1897. In politics Judge Adams is a Republican. 

WILLIAM H. VREDENBURGH, Freehold. 

Judge Vredenburgh comes from a very old New Jersey 
family, being the second son of the late Judge Peter Vre- 
denburgh. The first generation of the family on this side 
of the Atlantic, as appears from ancient records, sprang 
from William I. Vredenburg, who came to New Nether- 
lands from The Hague in May, 1658, in the ship Gilded 
Beaver. 

Peter Vredenburg, father of the present Judge, was a 
prominent jurist in both State and nation. He served two 
terms as an Associate Justice of the New Jersey Supreme 
Court, being first appointed by Governor Price, in 1855, and 
again by Governor Olden in 1862. Many of his decisions are 
regarded as being among the ablest reported. 

Judge Vredenburgh was born August 19th, 1840; was 
graduated at Rutgers College in 1859; studied law in the 
office of the late Governor Joseph D. Bedle; was admitted 
to practice as an attorney in June, 1862, and as a counselor 
in June, 1865. He is one of three sons, all of whom were 
lawyers. 

After his admission, young Vredenburgh began the prac- 
tice of his profession at Freehold, his native town, and has 
continued to carry on the law business there ever since, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 329 

with the exception of about a year, 1864, when he was 
located at Eatontown, to continue the business of his 
brother, Major Peter Vredenburgh, Jr., who was absent 
in the military service, and who was killed September 19th, 
1864, at the battle of Winchester, Va., at the head of his 
regiment. 

In 1865 Mr. Vredenburgh formed a law partnership with 
Philip J. Ryall, which continued for about five years, until 
Mr. Ryall's failing health compelled his retirement from 
practice. In the exciting general election of 1884, Mr. Vre- 
denburgh was nominated by the Republicans of Monmouth 
county for State Senator, and was only defeated by the re- 
tirement of the regular Democratic candidate a few days 
before the election and the fusion of the Democrats and 
Prohibitionists, and by a very narrow majority. 

In 1897 he was one of the special Commissioners to con- 
sider the question of railroad taxation, whose report be- 
came enacted into the body of the tax laws. 

In November, 1897, he was appointed a Judge of the Court 
of Errors and Appeals by Governor Griggs, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the death of Judge Dayton. On January 12th, 
1898, he was nominated for a full term of six years by Gov- 
ernor Griggs, and he was confirmed by the Senate on the 
18th of the same month. In politics the Judge is a Repub- 
lican. 

PETER VAN VOORHEES, Camden. 

Judge Voorhees is of Holland Dutch descent on both 
sides and is connected with one of the oldest and most 
prominent families in New Jersey. He is a lineal descend- 
ant of Steven Coerte Van Voorhees, who emigrated from 
Holland to America in April, 1660. His parents were John 
S. Voorhees and Sarah A. Van Doren, his wife, and he was 
born at Franklin Park, near New Brunswick, N. J., June 
ISth, 1852. After obtaining his preparatory education at 
the grammer school in New Brunswick he entered Rutgers 
College in 1869 and was graduated therefrom in 1873 as A.B., 
receiving the degree of A.M. in course in 1876. He pursued 
his law studies in the office of the late Peter L. Voorhees, 
of Camden, was admitted to the bar of New Jersey as an 
attorney in June, 1876, and as counselor in June, 1879, and 
was associated in practice with his preceptor from his 
admission and until the death of P. L. Voorhees in 1895, a 
period of nearly twenty years. 

Judge Voorhees is a director of the Camden Safe Deposit 
and Trust Company, of the First National Bank of Cam- 
den, and of the West Jersey Title and Guarantee Company, 



330 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a manager of the Cooper Hospital, a trustee of the Cooper 
estates, and a vestryman of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 
of Camden. He was nominated by Governor Voorhees as 
a Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals for a term of 
six j^ears on March 6th, 1900, and was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate. In politics the Judge is a Republican. 

GARRET DORSET WALL VROOM, Trenton. 

Judge Vroom, son of the late Governor Peter Dumont 
Vroom and grandsoti of United States Senator Garret D. 
Wall, was born in Trenton, December 17th, 1843. After a 
preparatory course at the Trenton Academy, he entered 
Rutgers College, graduating therefrom in the year 1862. 
Among his classmates was Judge Abram Q. Garretson, 
Justice of the Supreme Court. After studying law with 
his father, Mr. "Vroom was admitted to the bar as an at- 
torney at the June term, 1865, and three years later he 
was made a counselor. He at once began the practice of 
his profession in Trenton. He was elected City Solicitor 
of Trenton in 1866, and held that office until 1870, and again 
from 1873 to 1876. He was appointed Prosecutor of the 
Pleas of Mercer county in May, 1870, to succeed General 
C. K. Hall, deceased, which office he resigned in December, 
1873, on being appointed Reporter of the Supreme Court, 
a position he has held ever since. From 1881 to 1884 Mr. 
Vroom was Mayor of the city of Trenton, and on the cre- 
ation of the Board of Public Works of that city, was ap- 
pointed a member of that body, and held the office of 
President during its existence. In 1877, in conjunction 
with the late John H. Stewart, he prepared for publication 
the "Revision of the Statutes of New Jersey," under the 
direction of the Commissioners, which publication included 
the statutes revised as well as the entire body of the 
statute laws of the State. In 1887 Mr. Vroom and Coun- 
selor William M. Lanning issued the supplement to the 
Revision, and in 1894 they were authorized to prepare a 
New Revision in three volumes, entitled "The General 
Statistics of New Jersey." 

Judge Vroom is Vice President of the General Society of 
the Sons of the Revolution and one of those most instru- 
mental in the organization of that body in the State. He 
was a member of the National Commission to promote uni- 
formity of laws throughout the United States. He is a 
member of the New Jersey Historical Society and Presi- 
dent of the Trenton Battle Monument Association, the 
Trenton Board of Health, the Board of Managers of th$ 



BIOGRAPHIES. 331 

New Jersey State Hospital at Trenton, and the Trenton 
Savings Fund Society. 

In 1000 Mr. Vroom was offered a seat on the bench of 
the Supreme Court by Governor Voorhees, which he de- 
cUnoA. When Judge Hendrickson was made a Justice of 
the Supreme Court, a vacancy occurred in the Court of 
Errors and Appeals, which was filled by the nomination 
of Mr. Vroom by Governor Voorhees. The nomination was 
made on February 5th, 1901, for a full term of six years, 
and it was confirmed by the Senate on the 12th of the sam-j 
month. 

The Judge has always been a member of the Democratic 
party, and ever since he has been a voter, until recent 
years, he has been a leader in its councils, and an active 
participator in National, State and local campaigns. 



U. S. OFFICERS FOR NEW JERSEY. 



District Attorney. 
DAVID O. WATKINS, Woodbury. 

Mr. Watkins was born at Woodbury, N. J., June 8th, 
1S62. He worked on a farm in his neighborhood, studied 
law at night time and was admitted to the bar as an 
attorney at the November term of the New Jersey Supreme 
Court, in 1893, and as a counselor at the February Term, 
1897. He was Mayor of Woodbury for four terms of one 
year each, from 1886 to 1890. He was Councilman from the 
Third Ward of Woodbury from 1892 to 1895, when he was 
re-elected and served until 1898. He was elected President 
of the City Council in March, 1895, again in 1896, and again 
in 1897. He has served for some time as Solicitor of the 
city of Woodbury, and counsel to the Board of Freeholders 
for Gloucester county. He was elected to the State Assem- 
bly in 1896 by a plurality of 1862, the largest ever given a 
candidate for public office in Gloucester. He was re-elected 
in 1897 and 1898. 

Mr. Watkins served as Speaker of the House of Assembly 
in 1898 and 1899, when he made a record for dignity, upright- 
ness and impartiality which has been seldom equalled in 
the Legislature of New Jersey. At the close of the session 
of 1898 he was presented on behalf of the members with a 
suitable testimonial in recognition of his worth, and the 
phrase, "As fair as Watkins" there and then originated to 
be handed down as an example for future occupants of 



332 BIOGRAPHIES. 

the chair. And at the close of the session of 1899 he was 
paid a similar compliment. On both occasions the Demo- 
cratic minority vied with the Republican majority in be- 
stowing the meed of praise. 

Speaker Watkins became Acting Governor of the State 
on October 18ih, 1898. That office had been held by Presi- 
dent of the Senate Voorhees from January 31st, that year, 
and until the date mentioned, when his resignation as Sen- 
ator from Union county was presented and filed, thus cre- 
ating a vacancy also in the higher office, which was at 
once filled by the Speaker of the House, In accordance with 
the requirements of the Constitution of the State. The 
vacancy in the office of Governor in the first place was 
caused by the resignation of John W. Griggs, the then 
incumbent, that he might accept the position of Attorney- 
General of the United States. In his new sphere of duties 
Mr. Watkins gave eminent satisfaction, and he served in 
the office until January 16th, 1899, when Foster M. Voor- 
hees was sworn in as Governor for a term of three years, 

Mr. Watkins was appointed United States Attorney for 
the District of New Jersey in February, 1900, for a full term 
of four years. His salary is $3,000 a year. 



Clerk U. S. Circuit Court. 

S. DUNCAN OLIPHANT, Trenton. 

General Oliphant was born at Franklin Forge, on the 
Youghiogheny river, Fayette county, Pa., in 1824. He was 
graduated from Jefferson College, Washington county. Pa., 
in September, 1844; from Harvard Law School, Cambridge, 
Mass., in July, 1847, and was admitted to practice in Fay- 
ette county, Pa., in September of the same year. In the 
fall of 1849 he entered into partnership with the Hon. 
Thomas Williams, of the Pittsburg bar, and practiced law 
there until the spring of 1852, and then, on account of the 
health of his family, removed to Vincentown, and resumed 
and continued in the practice of law there until April, 1861. 

On the 19th of April, 1861, he recruited a volunteer com- 
pany of one hundred men, entered the military service of 
the United States with the rank of Captain, and was, from 
time to time, promoted to the rank of Major, Lieutenant- 
Colonel and Colonel, and near the close of the war to the 
rank of Brigadier-General by brevet, "for faithful and 
m.eritorious services," and assigned to the command of the 
Second Brigade of the garrison of Washington, and was 



BIOGRAPHIES. 333 

honorably discharged and mustered out of service in Sep- 
tember, 1866. 

In the spring of 1867 he moved from Fayette county, Pa., 
to Princeton, and was admitted to practice law at the bax 
of New Jersey. In September, 1870, he was appointed Clerk 
of the Circuit Court of the United States for the District 
of New Jersey, by the late Hon. William McKennan, which 
position he continues to hold. In the spring of 1874 he 
moved from Princeton to Trenton, where he now resides. 
No fixed salary, but instead, fees. 



Clerk U. S. District Court. 
GEORGE T. CRANMER, Trenton. 
Mr. Cranmer was born at Barnegat, N. J., December 6th, 
1848. He was formerly engaged in the banking and broker- 
age, real estate and insurance business. He has been an 
active member of the State National Guard for a number 
of years, and from 1875 to 1899 was Quartermaster of the 
Seventh Regiment. In 1878 he was the Republican candi- 
date for member of Assembly, but was defeated by Hon. 
Rufus Blodgett, since a United States Senator. In Sep- 
tember, 1879, without his solicitation, he was appointed by 
President Hayes Collector of Customs for the District of 
Little Egg Plarbor, N. J., which oflEice he resigned July 1st, 
1880. In 1882 he was again nominated for member of As- 
sembly and elected over William J. Harrison by a majority 
of 477. In 1883 he was unanimously nominated for Senator, 
and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a plur- 
ality of 36. In 1886 he was renominated for Senator, and 
elected over Judge Richard H. Conover by a plurality of 
743. In 1889 he was again unanimously renominated for Sen- 
ator, and elected over ex-Senator Ephraim P. Emson by a 
plurality of 272. He always took an active part in the pro- 
ceedings of the Senate, and for many years was Chairman 
of the Senate Republican caucus, and also of the joint 
Republican caucus. In 1889 he was unanimously nominated 
by the Republican caucus for President of the Senate. He 
was an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Repub- 
lican Convention at Chicago in 1888, and also to the Minne- 
apolis Convention in 1892. In October, 1891, at a convention 
of the State League of Republican Clubs, he was elected 
an alternate Delegate-at-Large to the National Convention 
of Republican Clubs. He was appointed to his present 
office by the late Judge Green, in January, 1893, to succeed 
Linsly Rowe, who had resigned. No fixed salary, but in- 
stead, fees. 



334 BIOGRAPHIES. 

United States Marshal. 

THOMAS J. ALCOTT, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Alcott was born in Mount Holly, N. j., January 24th, 
1840. In the year 1855 he commenced the study of pharmacy, 
and in 1859 entered Pennington Seminary, where he pursued 
his studies until the beginning of 1863, when he enlisted in 
the Twenty-third Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, and 
served as Quartermaster Sergeant in the Army of the 
Potomac, under Generals Burnside and Hooker. In 1865 he 
became junior partner with his father, Hon. Thomas C. 
Alcott, who was a member of the Legislature in 1869, '70 and 
'71, in the foundry and machine business, under the name 
of T. C. Alcott & Son. Upon the death of his father, in 
1872, Mr. Alcott became sole proprietor of the business. He 
is the patentee and manufacturer of Alcott's improved 
turbine water-wheel, which is so favorably known through- 
out the United States, as well as in European and South 
American countries. He was a member of the House of 
Assembly in 1884, '85 and '86, when he took a prominent 
part in legislation. He was appointed United States Mar- 
shal for New Jersey early in 1897, to succeed George Pfeif- 
fer, whose term had expired. His salary is $3,000 a year. 



STATE OFFICERS. 



Secretary of State. 

GEORGE WURTS, Paterson. 

Mr. Wurts was born at Easton, Pa., in 1829, but has been 
a resident of New Jersey from his boyhood. Early in life 
he looked forward to journalism as a profession, and at the 
outbreak of the War of the Rebellion he engaged as a 
reporter with the Newark Daily Advertiser. After a brief 
service with that paper he was offered a position on the 
Newark Mercury, then owned by Mr. E. N. Miller, and 
edited by the late John Y. Foster, upon whose resignation 
he became the editor. While engaged in those duties he 
corresponded for the New York Times and Evening Post. 
On the starting of the Brooklyn Daily Union he accepted 
the associate editorship of that paper, which he held until 
February 1st, 1865, when he resigned to become editor and 
one-half owner of the Paterson Daily Press, and has since 
been actively engaged in the service of that influential 



BIOGRAPHIES. 335 

journal. Besides his regular editorial work, Mr. Wurts has 
written considerably in prose and verse for some of the 
leading periodicals of our country, including the old Knick- 
erbocker Magazine, Continental Monthly, Harper's Maga- 
zine, Northern Monthly, Harper's Weekly, Scribner's, etc. 
He was President of the New Jersey Editorial Association 
in 1876 and served as Secretary of the New Jersey State 
Senate during the legislative sessions of 1880, 1881 and 1882. 
He has been a Trustee of the Free Public Library of Pat- 
erson from its organization, in 1885. He has been often 
solicited to become a candidate for elective office, but has 
steadily declined. He was appointed as Commissioner of 
Banking and Insurance by Governor Griggs on November 
4th, 1896, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of George 
S. Duryee. He served in that office until April 1st, 1897, 
when he was commissioned as Secretary of State, to suc- 
ceed Henry C. Kelsey, for a term of five years, he having 
been nominated by Governor Griggs and unanimously con- 
firmed by the Senate. His salary is $6,000 a year, and his 
term will expire on April 1st, 1902. 



Assistant Secretary of State. 

ALEXANDER H. RICKEY, Trenton. 
Mr. Rickey was born in Trenton in 1847. He received a 
public school education and graduated from Eastman's 
Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. T. He studied law 
with Hon. Alfred Reed, now a Vice-Chancellor of New 
Jersey. He has held several municipal offices, and was a 
m.ember of Common Council of the city of Trenton from 
1871 to 1875. He has been an attache of the office of the 
Secretary of State since 1866, and for many years chief 
clerk in the department. He was commissioned Assistant 
Secretary of State January 1st, 1890, and re-commissioned 
April 1st, 1892 and 1897. His powers and duties, defined by 
statute, are: He "shall, during the absence or inability, 
through sickness or other cause, of the Secretary of State, 
have the same powers and perform all the duties which 
are now imposed by law upon the Secretary of State." 



State Treasurer. 

FRANK O. BRIGGS, Trenton. 

Mr. Briggs was appointed State Treasurer by Governor 

Voorhees on January 3, 1902, to fill the vacancy caused by 

the death of George B. Swain, of Newark, which occurred 

on December 25, 1901. The appointment of Mr. Briggs is 
22 



336 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ad interim. A State Treasurer for a full term of three 
years was elected by the Legislature of 1902, but not in 
time to a,ppear in this edition of the Manual. 

Mr. Brig-gs was born in New Hampshire and was grad- 
uated at West Point in 1872. He served in the army until 
1877, when he moved to Trenton and became associated 
with the well known firm of John A. Roeblings' Sons Com- 
pany, wire rope manufacturers, bridge builders, &c., of 
which he is assistant treasurer. He was elected Mayor of 
Trenton on April 11, 1899, by a majority of 816 over Joseph 
A. Corey, Democrat, and served as such until January 1st, 
1902. He was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Education by Governor Voorhees in 1901 for a term of 
three years. 

During a residence of twenty-five years in Trenton Mr. 
Briggs has taken a deep interest in all matters which 
tended to promote the welfare of the city. As a public- 
spirited citizen he enjoys a high degree of popularity, and 
in politics he has always been a steadfast Republican. 

[The death of State Treasurer George B. Swain was 
deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. He was born 
in Warren county, March 6, 1835, and resided in Newark 
from 1852 until the time of his death. During his career 
he held many positions of honor and trust and had been 
State Treasurer since April 2, 1894, until his decease on 
December 25, 1901.] 



State Comptroller. 

WILLIAM S. HANCOCK, Trenton. 

Mr. Hancock was born in Trenton, N. J., October 19th, 
1854. He received his education at the State Model School 
and Trenton Business College. In 1871 he entered the live 
stock and provision business with ex-Senator John Taylor, 
of Trenton, and remained with him nine years. This was 
his first experience in the business world. Mr. Hancock 
was one of the organizers of the Crescent Pottery Com- 
pany, of Trenton, which was formed in July, 1881. This 
company was absorbed by the Trenton Potteries Company 
in May, 1892, when Mr. Hancock was made Vice-President 
of the new organization, which position he still holds. He 
was elected a member of the Trenton Common Council 
from the Second ward in 1888, and served his entire term 
of three years as Chairman of the Finance Committee. It 
was during this period that Chambersburg and Millham 
were consolidated with Trenton, when a re-appraisement 
of all the city property was necessitated, and also a sewer 
system was established, a public park purchased and a 



BIOGRAPHIES. 337 

paid fire department created. The management of the 
tinances of the city in those years required rare skill and 
experience in order to be successful, and Mr. Hancock ac- 
quitted himself with much credit in the performance of the 
duties assigned to him. He was elected State Comptroller 
by a joint meeting of the Legislature in 1894, and re-elected 
in 1897 and 1900, each time for a term of three years. His 
salary is $6,000 a year, 'and his term of office will expire on 
April 2d, 1903. 



Attorney- General. 
SAMUEL H. GREY, Camden. 

Mr. Grey was born in Camden, N. J., April 6th, 1836, and 
is a son of Philip James Grey, for many years a leading 
man in that section of the State, and Sarah Woolston 
Stephens, his wife, a member of an Orthodox Quaker fam- 
ily. He spent his entire life in Camden, where he was 
educated at private schools kept by Hon. La Fayette 
Grover, afteru ards Governor of Oregon and Senator from 
that State, and his brother Talleyrand. He studied law 
vv'ith Hon. Abraham Browning, the first Attorney-General 
appointed under the new Constitution, and was admitted 
as an attorney at the Novem.ber Term, 1857, and as a coun- 
selor at the February Term, 1861. 

The Attorney-General long since achieved for himself a 
high reputation as a lawyer, a pleader and an orator. He 
has figured in many prominent legal battles, in nearly all 
of which he has come out crowned with victory. His 
masterly conduct of the impeachment proceedings in the 
case of Prison Keeper Patrick H. Laverty, in 1886, when 
he acted as counsel for the House of Assembly, brought 
about conviction by the State Senate sitting as a High 
Court of Impeachment, and which was presided over by 
John W. Griggs, since Governor of New Jersey, and lately 
Attorney-General of the United States. His argument be- 
fore the Supreme Court in 1888, in support of the constitu- 
tionality of the Local Option law, won for him a favorable 
decision, and the statute was not disturbed. With other 
eminent lawyers as his associates, he distinguished him- 
self in the famous controversy over the organizaiion of the 
State Senate in 1894, when a full bench of the Supreme 
Court sustained his interpretation of the constitutional law 
bearing on the case. Chief Justice Beasley delivered the 
opinion of the Court, which declared that Maurice A. 
Rogers, Republican, was the duly elected President of the 
Senate. 



338 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Twice has the Attorney-General been a Presidential 
Elector for New Jersey— in 1872, when the vote of the State 
was cast for Grant and Wilson, and in 1896, when it was 
recorded for McKinley and Hobart. He served as a mem- 
ber of the Constitutional Commission of 1873, and was 
President of the Constitutional Commission of 1894. 

In 1866 Mr. Grey was appointed Prosecutor of the Pleas 
for the county of Cape May, and served seven years. He 
served as a member of the Republican State Executive 
Committee from 1868 to 1871. Several times he has refused 
judicial and political honors. He could have gone to Con- 
gress in 1874, when he declined a nomination in the First 
Congressional District. Governor Griggs offered him the 
office of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 1897, which 
he declined. On March 1st of the same year he was nomi- 
nated for Attorney-General, to succeed John P. Stockton, 
and he was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on the 
8th of that month. The Atlorney-Cjeneral has been a 
Director of the Camden Safe Deposit and Trust Company 
since its organization, in 1873, and he is President of the 
West Jersey Title and Guaranty Company, a position he 
has occupied since its formation. 

His term as Attorney-General will expire on April 5th, 
1902, and his salary is $7,000 a year. 



Commander of the National Guard. 

Major General William Joyce Sewell, commander of the 
National Guard, died on December 27, 1901, and the va- 
cancy had not been filled when the Manual went to press. 



Adjutant-General- 

ALEXANDER C. OLIPHANT, Trenton. 

General A. C. Oliphant was born in Uniontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 25, 1860. In 1867 his family removed to New 
Jersey, where they have resided ever since. The General 
is the sixth of a family of ten sons, all of whom, with the 
exception of one, who is pursuing a pro^erous career as 
a civil engineer in Michigan, are successful business and 
professional men in Trenton. He is a son of General S, 
Duncan Oliphant, who served with distinction in the Civil 
war and is now Clerk of the United States Circuit Court 
for the District of New Jersey, a position which he has 
occupied for over thirty years. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 339 

General A. C. Oliphant received his early education in the 
Slate Model School at Trenton and at the Hill School at 
Potlstown, Pennsylvania. His first active military train- 
ing- was received while a member of Company A, Seventh 
Regiment, National Guard of New Jersey, during- the rail- 
road rio's in August, 1877, and was with his company at 
Phillipsburg, when that important strategic point was 
guarded by the Provisional Brigade unaer the command 
of Major-General William J. Sewell. Upon his return from 
this duty he received an appointment to the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1881. He at once received orders to join 
the U. S. S. Lancaster, the flagship of the European squad- 
ron, ihen commanded by Captain (now Rear-Admiral) 
Bancroft Gherardi. General A. C. Oliphant was in the 
force that was landed at Alexandria in July, 1882. to re- 
pulse the anticipated attack on that city by the Egyptian 
rebels. 

In 1883, upon passing his examination for promotion to 
the rank of Ensign, he was honorably discharged, with 
additional pay, by reason of the action of Congress in re- 
ducing the number of naval officers of all ranks. In 1886 
he was appointed Major and Engineer on the staff of 
Major-General William J. Sewell, then commanding the 
Second Brigade, National Guard of New Jersey, and later 
was made Colonel and Inspector of Division. 

At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war. General 
A. C. Oliphant applied to Washington for a commission 
in the volunteer service. At the suggestion of his prede- 
cessor, the late Adjutant-General William S. Stryker, he 
v/as specially detailed as Acting Aide-de-Camp and Mili- 
tary Secretary to the Hon. Foster M. Voorhees, Governor 
and Commander-in-Chief, on duty at the State Headquar- 
ters at camp at Sea Girt, and assisted in the enlisting and 
organizing of troops called for by the national government 
in that war. 

By reason of his special training and his wide acquaint- 
anceship with officials prominent in military and civil life, 
he was able to render most valuable service to the State 
and its officers. 

At the conclusion of the war. Governor Voorhees, in rec- 
ognition of His experience and efficiency, appointed him 
Assistant Adjutant-General of the State. 

Upon tl^e death of Genera] William S. Stryker, who had 
served as Adjutant-General for thirty-three years, the 
Governor commissioned Colonel Oliphant to fill the 
vacancy. The appointment was a most popular one and 



340 BIOGRAPHIES. 

was received with approval throughout the State and in 
the Kiilitary and naval circles of the nation, where General 
Oliphant is well known. 

General A. C. Oliphant is a son-in-law of United States 
Senator Stephen B. Elkins, of West Virginia, and his social 
prominence and military and naval connections particu- 
larly equip him for the office of Adjutant-General. His 
salary is $2,500 per year. 



Quartermaster-General. 
RICHARD GRANT AUGUSTUS DONNELLY, Trenton. 

General Donnelly was born at Richmond, Staten Island, 
in the year 1841, of an Irish father and an American mother 
of Scotch descent. He was educated in the district school 
of Richmond, and at a select boarding school near Belle- 
ville, Essex county. N. J. In ISZ-i ne removed to Hoboken, 
N. J., and entered the law office of Hon. J. Dunn Littell, 
remaining there until the decease of his instructor, which 
occurred in 1857. He then entered into mercantile pursuits 
as a clerk. He began his military career in February, 1860, 
as a private in Company B, First Regiment, Hudson Bri- 
gade. At the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion he 
enlisted as a private in Company I, First New Jersey Vol- 
unteers, attached to Kearny's Brigade, Army of the Poto- 
mac, and was advanced to the grades of Corporal and 
Sergeant respectively, passing a credi.able examination for 
promotion just previous to the battle of Gaines' Mills. At 
this engagement he was twice wounded, slightly in the left 
arm during the early part and severely during the latter 
part of the fight. Left on the field of battle, he was taken 
prisoner and confined in Libby Prison until exchanged. 
He was discharged from the United States service at 
McKim's Mansion Hospital, Baltimore, Md., by reason of 
physical disability caused by gunshot wounds received in 
battle. He returned home, and, after a period of four 
months, was capable of resuming his position in New York 
city as a salesman. 

In the year 1867 he removed to Trenton and embarked in 
the hosiery and furnishing goods business, which he still 
carries on. General Donnelly re-entered the military ser- 
vice of New Jersey March 18th, 1879, as Paymaster of the 
Seventh Regiment, National Guard. He was promoted 
Major, January 20th, 1881; Lieutenant-Colonel, May 31st, 
1882, and Colonel, September 7th, 1882. He was appointed 
(Quartermaster-General by Governor Green, January 13th, 



BIOGRAPHIES. 341 

1890, which appointment was sent to the Senate by Gover- 
nor Abbett and unanimously confirmed by that body March 
5th, 1890. 

General Donnelly was Major of the provisional battalion 
which distinguished itself at Yorktown at the centennial 
celebration in 1881, and was proffered by Governor Green 
the command of the veteran camp at Gettysburg-, during 
the ceremonies of the unveiling of the monuments, in 1888, 
to the New Jersey heroes of the battle of Gettysburg, 
which he was obliged to decline in consequence of other 
engagements. He was Chairman of the Board of Commis- 
sioners to select grounds and erect buildings for the new 
Soldiers' Home at Kearny, which was completed some 
years ago. He was appointed a Trustee of the New Jersey 
State Reform School at Jamesburg, by Governor Abbett, in 
1885. He was re-appointed by the joint meeting of the 
Legislature in 1888. He is one of the Managers of the 
Home for Disabled Soldiers; is interested in several stock 
companies and land associations as a director, and is a 
member of many beneficial and social sooio.ties. He is a 
Past Commander of Aaron Wilkes Post, No. 23. In 1892 he 
was chosen Commander of the G. A. R., Department of 
New Jersey. He was twice elected to the House of Assem- 
bly, and has served two terms as Mayor of the city of 
Trenton. He served as Treasurer of the Democratic State 
Committee from September, 1895, until October, 1901. On 
February 15th, 1899, he was nominated by Governor Voor- 
hees for appointment as Major-General by brevet for his 
long and meritorious services as Quartermaster-General, 
and on February 28th, the nomination was unanimously 
confirmed by the Senate. 

The office of Quartermaster-General carries with it the 
responsible positions of Commissary-General, Paymaster- 
General and Chief of Ordnance. Salary, $2,500. 



Clerk of the Supreme Court. 
WILLIAM RIKER, JR., Orange. 

Mr. Riker was born in Newark, N. J., January 14th, 1850. 
His father, William Riker, Sr., was for many years a suc- 
cessful manufacturing jeweler, and retiring from active 
business was succeeded by two of his sons, one of whom 
is the subject of this sketch. Mr. Riker completed his 
education in the Newark Academy, and thereupon engaged 
in the jewelry business with his father, afterwards becom- 



342 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ing a partner, and later one of his successors, and is still 
engaged in that business. 

He was chosen as a delegate to the National Republican 
Conventions of 1884 and 1896; elected Alderman of the city 
of Orange in 1893 and Register of Deeds and Mortgages for 
Essex county in the same year. The latter office he re- 
signed before the completion of his term in order to accept 
the appointment by Governor Griggs as Clerk of the 
Supreme Court. 

He has served as member and Treasurer of the Essex 
County Republican Committee for a number of years. He 
was chosen Treasurer of the Republican State Committee 
in 1898. His salary is $6,000 a year, and his term of office, 
which is for five years, will expire on November 2d, 1902. 



Clerk in Chancery. 

EDWARD CASPER STOKES, Trenton. 

Mr. Stokes was born in Philadelphia, Pa., December 
22d, 1860, and is President of the Mechanics National Bank 
of Trenton. He was educated in the public schools in Mill- 
ville and at Brown University, Providence, R. I. He was 
elected City Superintendent of Public Schools in Millville in 
1889, ?. position he held until 1898. He served as a member of 
Assembly from the Second district of Cumberland county 
in 1891 and 1892. In the latter year, when he was only two 
years over the required age, he was elected Senator from 
Cumberland county; he was re-elected in 1895, and again 
in 18D8, thus receiving a third term of office, an honor which 
never before had been conferred on a Senator from that 
county. In 1895 he served as President of the Senate, when 
he discharged the duties of that office with rare tact, 
ability and impartiality. During his eleven years' service 
as a legislator he made a brilliant record. He took a lead- 
ing part in all matters of importance, and as a debater he 
displayed much talent and ability. He was very active 
in bringing about the nomination of Foster M. Voorhees 
for Governor, and in the campaign which followed ren- 
dered effective service for the election of his friend and 
associate. In 1900 he was chosen Vice-Chairman of the 
Republican State Committee, and in the campaign of the 
year following he took a prominent part in furthering the 
election of Franklin Murphy as Governor of New Jersey. 
"Very few young men who have entered upon legislative 



BIOGRAPHIES. 343 

service in New Jersey have met with as much success as 
Mr. Stokes. In the brief period of ten years, by sheer force 
of character, he carved his way to the front rank of 
leadership in his party. 

Mr. Stokes was nominated for the office of Clerk in Chan- 
cery by Governor Voorhees on March 22, 1901, and the nomi- 
nation was at once confirmed by a unanimous vote of the 
Senate. His term of office is for five years, which will not 
expire until March 30, 1906, and his salary is $6,000 a year. 



Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
CHARLES J. BAXTER, Plainfield. 

Mr, Baxter was born at Glen wood, Sussex county, N. J., 
on November 8th, 1841. He attended the district school 
there until he was twelve years of age, after which he 
went to work on his father's farm, continuing his studies 
by himself and with the help of an uncle who had gradu- 
ated from Lafayette College and then lived on the next 
farm. On his eighteenth birthday he rt^^^ted his educa- 
tional work as a teacher in the district school at Frankfc"* 
Plains, N. J. After twelve years of teaching in several 
district schools, Mr. Baxter was appointed Principal of 
the Franklin Furnace District School. He gradually im- 
proved the condition of the school until it was converted 
into a High School, remaining in that position for thirteen 
years. After leaving Franklin Furnace, about eleven years 
ago, he moved to Plainfield, where he became connected 
with the Provident Life and Trust Company, of Philadel- 
phia. 

In 1875 Mr. Baxter was nominated and renominated as 

County School Superintendent of Sussex county by the 
State Board of Education, but was rejected by the Demo- 
cratic Board of Freeholders because of his party affilia- 
tions. This started the agitation which resulted in that 
power being taken from the Board of Freeholders and 
given to the Board of Education. He was appointed to his 
present position by Governor Griggs on March 24th, 1896, as 
a successor to Addison B, Poland, who had resigned. Two 
days later Mr. Baxter was confirmed by the Senate for a 
full term of three years. In 1899 he was re-appointed for 
another term of three years. His salary is $3,000 a year. 



344 BIOGRAPHIES. 

Keeper of the State Prison. 

SAMUEL S. MOORE, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Moore was born in Easton, Pa., March 29th, 1834. He 
is of an old New Jersey family. His great-great-grand- 
father, Nathaniel Moore, left Newtown, Long Island, in 
1708, and settled in Hopewell, N. J. He, Thomas Reed, 
John Cornwall and John Mott, bought 1,800 acres of land 
on which Pennington is now situated. Mr. Moore died 
September 6th, 1759, leaving a large family. His son. Cap- 
tain John Moore, was born in Hopewell in 1718, and died 
September 3d, 1768. He was in Colonel Samuel Hunt's regi- 
ment in the French-Indian wars. His son Samuel was 
born in Hopewell, Hunterdon county, in 1754, and removed 
to Easton, Pa., in 1782, and died there March 9th, 1799. He 
was a Minuteman in the Revolution, and afterwards served 
in Captain John Mott's company, First Regiment (Hunter- 
don county). His son, the father of the present Prison 
Keeper, was born at Easton, Pa., September 28th, 1794, and 
died at Easton, June 18th, 1883. He was educated in Phila- 
delphia; was Second Sergeant, First Company, First Regi- 
ment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Thomas Hum- 
phrey Ward, in 1812-14. He was editor of the Spirit of Penn- 
S5'lvania and the Belvidere Apollo; Clerk of the Court, Jus- 
tice of the Peace, and Chief Burgess of Easton, etc. 

The present Keeper of the State Prison settled in Eliza- 
bethtown, N. J., in 1855. When a boy he was a telegraph 
operator, and since then has been an accountant, and was 
lor ten years connected with the National State Bank at 
Elizabeth as Notary, etc. He has also been a real estate 
broker. He was Collector for the county of Union in 1875- 
76; Overseer of the Poor of Elizabeth four years; Post- 
master at Elizabeth under the Harrison administration, 
and was for nearly twenty-five years a member of 
the Union County Republican Committee; also the Repub- 
lican Committee of the city of Elizabeth. He was ap 
pointed Keeper of the State Prison ad interim April 22d, 
1896. On March 1st, 1897, he was nominated, and on the 18th 
of the same month unanimously confirmed by the Senate 
for a full term of five years. His term will expire on March 
18th, 1902, and his salary is $3,500 a yeai-. 



State Prison Supervisor. 

EDWARD J. ANDERSON, Somerville. 
Major Anderson, who was born at Flemington, HunTer- 
don county, N. J., December 15ih, 1830, is of pre-Revolution- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 345 

ary stock. His great-grandfather, on his father's side, ^n-as 
a native of the Colonies, and held an office in the British 
service prior to the Revolution, but jointed the patriot 
cause on the breaking out of hostilities and fought through 
the war on the side of liberty. On his mother's side the 
Major's earliest ancestor in this country was Samuel 
Fleming, who, in 1756, founded and gave his name to Flem- 
Ington, the county seat of Hunterdon county, and whose 
daughter Esther married Colonel Thomas Lowrey, who 
commanded a regiment of the New Jersey contingent 
troops during the Revolutionary war, subsequently held 
many important public trusts in this State, and in 1790 
was designated by the Legislature as a member of the 
Commission which selected the site upon which the present 
State Capitol stands. His son, William Lowrey, was also 
an officer of the New Jersey troops during the Revolution- 
ary war, and his daughter was the grandmother of the 
subject of this present sketch. 

After receiving a common school education, the Major 
engaged in mercantile pursuits in Philadelphia, Pa., until 
the breaking out of the Civil war, when he returned to 
New Jersey and was appointed principal assistant in the 
Adjutant-General's Department of the State, which posi- 
tion he held until the close of the war, when he resigned 
and engaged in business in New York city, retaining, how- 
ever, his residence in New Jersey. In 1871 he was appointed 
first assistant in the office of the State Comptroller, which 
he held until 1880. In that year he was elected Comptroller 
by the Legislature, and held the office until 1891, when he 
was succeeded by General Heppenheimer, Democrat. He 
was appointed Fish Commissioner in 1878, and held that 
ofRce until 1883. The Major is an active and ardent Repub- 
lican. For thirteen years he was a member of the Mercer 
County Republican Committee, and has been for twenty- 
two years a member of the Republican State Committee, 
and for several years served as Vice-Chairman of the latter 
body. He was nominated by Governor Werts for Prison 
Supervisor in 1894, to succeed James M. Seymour, a Demo- 
crat, and was confirmed by the Senate for a term of three 
years. In 1897 he was renominated by Governor Griggs and 
was confirmed for another full term. In 1900 he was again 
nominated by Governor Voorhees for another term and 
was confirmed by the Senate. His term expires June lltJ 
1903, and his salary is $3,000 a year. 



346 BIOGRAPHIES. 

State Librarian. 

HENRY C. BUCHANAN, Trenton. 

Mr. Buchanan was born in Falls township, Pa., within a 
few miles of Trenton, March 7th, 1851. His father was 
William Buchanan, who came to this country from Scot- 
land in 1842, when a young man. The State Librarian 
attended the public schools in his native place until he was 
about eleven years of age, when he entered the Trenton 
Academy. When thirteen years old he become employed 
in the State Gazette establishment as office boy. He left 
this place shortly afterward and took a similar position 
in the job printing office of Murphy & Bechtel, where the 
Monitor, a daily paper owned by Joseph C. Potts, was then 
being printed. When the Monitor owners fitted up their 
own printing office young Buchanan went with them and 
remained until the Monitor was bought by the then owners 
of the Gazette. This brought him back to the Gazette 
office, where he remained until 1868, when he went to New 
York. During the next year, being anxious to see some- 
thing of the country, he worked at his trade in New York, 
Harrisburg and Cincinnati, but in 1869 he came back to 
Trenton and -went to work again on the Gazette. After 
four years there he went to Hartford, where he worked 
the next four years, coming back to Trenton and accepting 
a position as foreman and proofreader for MacCrellish & 
Quigley, with both of whom he had worked at the case 
when learning his trade as a printer. Remaining with 
MacCrellish & Quigley until January 1st, 1882, Mr. Buchan- 
an next went back once more to the Gazette, then owned 
by Mr. Murphy alone, and remained continuously there 
until his appointment as State Librarian. When he went 
to the Gazette office in 1882 it was as proofreader, but soon 
afterward he was made news editor, and subsequently city 
editor as well. 

Besides being city and news editor on the Gazette, Mr. 
Buchanan, for sixteen years, was the Trenton corre- 
spondent of the Paterson Press, and for live years he acted 
ill a like capacity for the New York Sun. He was for 
several years also the Trenton correspondent of the Phila- 
delphia Inquirer. On February 1st, 1899, he received his 
commission as State Librarian as sucoessor to Morris R. 
Hamilton, for a term of five years, at a salary of $2,000 a 
year. 



BIOGRAPHIES. 347 

State of Board of Assessors. 
DAVID BAIRD, Camden. 

Mr. Baird was born in Ireland, April 7th, 1839. When a 
lad he came to the United States, and in 1859 located in the 
city of Camden, which since has been his place of resi- 
dence. Mr. Baird is pre-eminently a self-made man. Com- 
mencing life in this country in a very humble way, he is 
to-day, and has been for some years, one of the foremost 
business men of his section of New Jersey, being extens- 
ively engaged in the business of handling spars, timber, 
piling, etc., in the city of Camden as well as being largely 
interested in lumber operations in other parts of the 
country. 

For the past thirty years Mr. Baird has been so closely 
identified with the politics of Camden city and county that 
the history of one would almost seem to be the history of 
the other. In 1874 he was elected a member of the Board 
of Chosen Freeholders, and was re-elected for and served 
four consecutive terms, during which period he was a 
member of some of the most important committees. In 
the fall of 1887 he was nominated and elected Sheriff of 
Camden county, at a time when, through existing condi- 
tions, nothing but the personal popularity of David Baird 
secured to the county a Republican Sheriff. And again 
he was elected to the same office in 189fi, by the largest 
majority ever given any candidate for any office in the 
county. He was a delegate from New Jersey to the Re- 
publican National Convention of 1892, held at Minneapolis. 
He was chosen a Presidential Elector in 1900, when he cast 
his vote for McKinley and Roosevelt. For a number of 
years he has represented Camden county on the Republi- 
can State Committee and as a member of the Executive 
Committee of that body. 

He was appointed a member of the State Board of As- 
sessors by Governor Werts in 1895, for a term of four years, 
and served as such for one year and six months, when 
he resigned the office to become Sheriff of Camden county. 
In 1901 he was again appointed a member of the same 
State Board, by Governor Voorhees, for a term of four 
years, beginning in May of that year. 

ROBERT STOCKTON GREEN, Elizabeth. 

Mr. Green was born in Elizabeth, N. J., on the 16th day 
of October, 1865. He was graduated from the College of 
New Jersey in June, 1886, and in January of 1887 he was 



348 BIOGRAPHIES. 

appointed Private Secretary to the Governor of New Jer- 
sey, which office he held until 1890. He was admitted to 
the bar of this State in June, 1891, and to the bar of the 
State of New York in October, 1892, from which time until 
the first of December, 1896, he was connected with the 
well-known law firm of Seward, Guthrie, Morawitz & 
Steele, of New York city. He was appointed a member of 
the State Board of Assessors by Governor Griggs, in April, 
1896, for a full term of four years, and in 1900 he was re- 
appointed by Governor Voorhees for another full term. 
On the first day of December, 1896, he formed with Albert 
C. Wall a copartnership for the general practice of the 
law, under the firm name of Wall & Green, with offices 
in the Fuller Building, No. 1 Montgomery street, Jersey 
City. His term will expire in April, 1904. 

STEPHEN J. MEEKER, Newark. 

Mr. Meeker was born in Newark, N. J., March 17th, 1843, 
where he has always lived. He received a common school 
education, and after a year's service in the counting-room 
of a large hardware house in New York city, William 
Bryce & Co., he learned the foundry business with his 
father, David M. Meeker joining him in partnership in 1873, 
and upon his father's death succeeded to the business. 

He comes of a strong Democratic family. He never held 
public office until appointed a Commissioner to the World's 
Fair, at Chicago, by Governor Abbett, March 31st, 1891. 
He was one of the Temporary Essex County Park Com- 
missioners, selected by Judge Depue, and was re-appointed 
by him on the present Commission. Governor Griggs ap- 
pointed him on the State Board of Assessors, to succeed 
Colonel A. R. Kuser, and he was confirmed by the Senate 
on March 3d, 1896, for a full term of four years. In 1900 he 
was appointed for another full term by Governor Voorhees. 
His term will expire in March, 1904. 

JOHN C. RANKIN. JR., Elizabeth. 

Mr. Rankin was born at Simla, Hindoostan, July 15, 1847. 
He was for two and a half years a member of the Class 
of 1867 of Princeton College, and in September, 1867, com- 
menced his business career in New York city, in the sta- 
tionery and printing establishment of Wm. H. Arthur, 
corner Liberty and Nassau streets. Later he was asso- 
ciated with E. Wells Sackett in the same business, and in 
January, 1881, was admitted to the firm, the co-partner- 
ship being known as E. Wells Sackett & Rankin. Subse- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 349 

quently Mr. Rankin purchased the interest of Mr. Sackett. 
and in January, 1891, reorganized the business under the 
corporation laws of the State of New Jersey, the corpora- 
tion being known as the John C. Rankin Co., located at 34 
Cortlandt street, New York city. 

Mr. Rankin has been a resident of Elizabeth since 1869, 
during which time he was for six years a member of the 
Board of Education (three years its President); for seven 
years a member of City Council (four years its President), 
and for eight and a half years from January 1st, 1890, 
Mayor of the city, having been four times elected to thai 
office. He was appointed a member of the State Board of 
Assessors by Governor Voorhees in January, 1901. His 
trem will expire January 29th, 1905. 

IRVINE E. MAGUIRE, Secretary, Palmyra. 

Mr. Maguire was born in Camden, N. J., on January 22d. 
1853, in which city he lived continuously until 1886, when he 
removed to his present residence at Palmyra, Burlington 
county. He received his education in the public schools 
of Camden and Philadelphia, and in 1868, at the age of fif- 
teen years, entered the counting-room of Alexander G. 
Cattell Sz Co., then the largest grain exporting house in 
the city of Philadelphia, and of which firm the late ex- 
United States Senator Alexander G. Cattell was the senior 
member. Mr. Maguire remained in the service of the 
Messrs. Cattell until the year 1884, rising from the position 
of office boy to that of cashier and chief bookkeeper. In 
the latter year, shortly after the organization of the State 
Board of Assessors, he was appointed Assistant Secretary 
of that Board, and placed in charge particularly of the 
figures and accounting of the department. He was elected 
Secretary of the Board June 18th, 1895. 



State Board of Taxation. 

CHARLES C. BLACK, Jersey City. 

Mr. Black was born on a farm in Burlington county, near 
Mount Holly, N. J., on July 29th, 18-58. He was prepared 
for college at the Mount Holly Academy, and entered 
Princeton College in 1874, being graduated with the class 
of '78. He studied law with Colonel James N. Stratton, of 
Mount Holly; Messrs. Coult & Howell, of Newark, and at 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. He was admit- 
ted to the bar of New Jersey as an attorney in June, 1881, 



S50 BIOGRAPHIES. 

and as a counselor in June, 1884. After being- admitted to 
the bar he located at Jersey City, and has practiced law 
there ever since. For eleven years he has been a member 
of the law firm of Randolph, Condict & Black. 

He served for five years as a member of the Hudson 
County Board of Registration under the Ballot Reform 
Law, and was appointed as a member of the State Board 
of Taxation on March 21st, 1891, for a term of five years, 
was re-appointed for another term in 1896, and again in 
1901. Mr. Black has made two valuable additions to the 
literature of the law in his "Proof and Pleadings in Acci- 
dent Cases" and "New Jersey Law of Taxation." His 
term will expire in 1906. 

HENRY J. WEST, President, Gloucester City. 

Mr. West was born in Rhode Island in 1850, and is the 
eldest son of Henry J. West, for over thirty years the 
manager of the Washington Cotton Mills, at Gloucester 
City. He attended the public schools at Gloucester City, 
Professor Gregory's Classical and English School in Phila- 
delphia, and subsequently took a course in civil engineering 
at the Philadelphia Polytechnic College, leaving that insti- 
tution to engage in the practical work of the mills. He 
served a regular apprenticeship in the machine shops and 
other departments of the works, after which he was made 
assistant in the management of the concern, retiring from 
that position in June, 1885. He was appointed Under-Sheriff 
by Sheriff Baird, in November, 1887, and was elected Sheriff 
of Camden county in 1890. He was nominated by Governor 
Werts as a member of the State Board of Taxation, which 
nomination was unanimously confirmed by the Senate on 
May 18th, 1894, for a term of five years. He was re- 
appointed in 1899 and his term will expire in May, 1904. 

CARL LENTZ, Newark. 

Major Lentz was born at Bamberg, Bavaria, July 1st, 
1845, and came to the United States at an early age. When 
only sixteen he enlisted in the First Connecticut Cavalry 
Volunteers, First Brigade, Third Division, Cavalry Corps. 
From private he became a non-commissioned officer, and 
after the battle of the Wilderness he was promoted, in 
May, 1864, to a lieutenancy. In one of the cavalry fights, 
which took place July 12th, 1864, in the vicinity of Wash- 
ington, D. C, during the invasion of Early, he lost his 
right arm, and thus disabled he was mustered out of service 
December 24th, 1864. As soon as he had sufficiently recov- 



BIOGRAPHIES. 351 

ered from the effects of his wounds he entered Columbia 
University, Washington, D. C, and was graduated there- 
from in 1869. Subsequently he became a student in the law 
department of the same university, and in 1873 received the 
degree of LL. B. In November of the latter year he was 
admitted to the bar of New Jersey, and soon afterward 
settled in Newark, where he began the practice of his pro- 
fession. He has always been an active Republican, and 
he has served as Chairman of the Essex County Republican 
Committee for several years. He was appointed a member 
of the State Board of Taxation by Governor Griggs, for a 
full term of five years, on February 18th, 1896, and was con- 
firmed by the Senate on March 3d following. He was re- 
appointed by Governor Voorhees in 1901. His term will 
expire in March, 1906. 

JOSEPH THOMPSON, Atlantic City. 

Mr. Thompson was born at May's Landing, N. J., Sep- 
tember 21st, 1853, and is a son of William W. and Hester 
T. Pennington Thompson. He was admitted to the bar 
of this State in June, 1878, and located in Atlantic City in 
June, 1880. He was Collector of Atlantic county from May, 
1881, to May, 1883; Prosecutor of the county for ten years, 
from March, 1881, to March, 1891, and from April, 1892, to 
April, 1898, was Law Judge of the county of Atlantic. On 
March 9th, 1898, he was elected Mayor of Atlantic City. On 
January 25th, 1898, he was nominated by Governor Griggs 
as a Manager of the State Hospital at Trenton, to fill a 
vacancy caused by the death of Dr. Joseph F. Edwards, 
and he was confirmed on the 31st of the same month. In 
July, 1898, he was appointed a member of the State Board 
of Taxation, to fill a vacancy, and in 1899 he was nominated 
and confirmed for a full term of five years. In 1882 he was 
elected Solicitor of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of 
Atlantic county, and has been re-elected every year since 
that date. He was one of the organizers of the Second 
National Bank and the Atlantic Safe Deposit and Trust 
Company, and has been a Director and Solicitor of both 
institutions since their organization. He has been Solicitor 
for the Atlantic City Railroad for the past twelve years. 
His term will expire in 1904. 

THOMAS B. USHER, Secretary, Trenton. 

Mr. Usher was born at Bonnsville, in the northern part 
of Hudson county. N. J., on the 30th of March, 1861. in 
which locality he still resides. He comes of sturdy Scotch 
23 



V.B2 BIOGRAPHIES. 

ancestry- He received a common school education, supjolc- 
mented by a business course at Cooper Union, New York 
city. He was a member of the House of Assembly for two 
terms, 1890 and 1891, and has been the Secretary of the 
State Board of Taxation since its inception. 



Commissioner of Banking and Insurance. 

WILLIAM SETTLE, Oaklyn, Camden County. 

Mr. Bettle is of an old Quaker famjly, and was born in 
Philadelphia in 1830, where he resided until he was sixteen, 
when he removed to New Jersey. For four years he lived 
near Yardville, Mercer county, obtaining a practical 
knowledge of farming, when he purchased a farm in Had- 
don township, Camden county, about four miles from the 
city of Camden, which has been his home ever since. He 
has always been much interested in the management of 
his large farm, which is considered one of the best in South 
Jersey, and is somewhat noted for the good crops raised, 
and for the neatness and care with which everything is 
kept. Mr. Bettle has taken an active interest in political 
affairs since early manhood, but has "always refused to be 
a candidate for office, although repeatedly solicited to do 
so. He had never held any office until appointed by Gover- 
nor Griggs to his present position in April, 1897. He was 
re-appointed by Governor Voorhees in 1900. He has been a 
Member~at-Large of the Republican State Committee for 
a number of years and his advice and judgment are much 
valued by his colleagues. Mr. Bettle is an active Director 
in most of the railroads in South Jersey in the Pennsyl- 
va.nia Railroad system, and is interested in many business 
enterprises. His term of office is three years, and will ex- 
pire in 1903, and salary $4,000 a year. 



Chief of the Bureau of Labor and Statistics. 

WILLIAM STAINSBY, Newark. 

Mr. Stainsby was born in England, July 3d, 1829, and 
came to this country when but two years of age. He 
learned the trade of a hatter, which he followed for some 
time, and subsequently he spent fifteen years in the sad- 
dlery and hardware business. For a number of years he 
was engaged in the wholesale and retail business of oils 
and paints in the city of Newark. He served as a member 



BIOGRAPHIES. 353 

of the Board of Aldermen of that city from January 1st, 
1866, to January 1st, 1879, and again from 1890 to 1894, making 
a total of sixteen years' and four months' service alto- 
gether. He was President of that body in 1876 and 1877, and 
in other years he was Chairman of the most important 
committees. He represented Essex county in the State 
Senate in 1882, 1883 and 1884, during the period when, the 
railroad and corporation taxation measures were before 
that body. He took a leading part in that legislation and 
also in the consideration and discussion of all other ques- 
tions of importance. He was a member of the Board of 
Works of the city of Newark from May, 1895, to May, 1898, 
when he made a most creditable record. Mr. Stainsby has 
ever been a loyal supporter of the Republican party, and 
he is a leader of much prominence in Essex county. He 
was nominated by Governor Voorhees as Chief of the 
Bureau of Labor and Statistics on March 24th, 1898, for a 
term of five years, and he was confirmed by the Senate on 
the following day. His salary is $2,500 a year, and his terro 
will expire in 1903. 



Inspector of Factories and Workshops. 

JOHN C. WARD, Centreton, Salem County. 

Mr. Ward was born in Camden, N. J., September 9th, 
1853, and Is a farmer. He was Sergeant of Company E, 
Centennial Guard, of Philadelphia, in 1876, at the Centen- 
nial Exhibition. He served as a member of the House of 
Assembly in 1889 and 1890, and as State Senator from 1894 
to 1896, from Salem county. He was appointed to his pres- 
ent office by Governor Griggs, on March 26th, 1896, and 
was promptly confirmed by the Senate. He was re-ap- 
pointed by Governor Voorhees in 1901. His term of office 
is five years, and salary .|2,.500. His term will expire in 1906. 



Custodian of the Capitol. 
JOHN W. WESEMAN, Newark. 

Mr. Weseman was born in Germany (his father being a 
citzen of the United States at the time) in 1861. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools and business 
colleges of Newark. For fourteen years he conducted a 
grocery store in that city, which he has relinquished that 
he might devote his whole time to the duties of his present 
position. At the November election in 1896 he was elected 



354 BIOGRAPHIES. 

a member of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of Essex 
county from the Fourth Ward of Newark, for a term of 
two years. In 1888 he was elected a member of the House 
of Assembly by a plurality of 5,607, and the year following 
he was re-elected by a plurality of 7,068. While in the 
Assembly he served on some of the most important com- 
mittees. He was appointed Custodian of the Capitol in 
July, 1901, by the State House Commission, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of John H. Bonnell, which 
occurred on June 7th of that year. Mr. Weseman has 
always been a steadfast Republican and a hard worker 
for the success of his party. His salary is $2,000 a year. 



Commissioner of Public Roads. 

HENRY I. BUDD, Mount Holly. 

Mr. Budd was born March 21st, 1836, on the Budd home- 
stead, between Pemberton and Vincentown, Southampton 
township, Burling-ton county. His ancestors were among 
the original colonial proprietors of West Jersey, and their 
descendants for over two hundred years have been, mostly 
in one locality, largely interested in agriculture. Mr. Budd 
was prepared for college at Pennington and Mr. Colloms' 
Academy, and graduated in 1855 at Bucknell University, Pa. 

He has resided for thirty-five years in Mount Holly. 
He is extensively engaged in farming, and has always 
taken a great pride in agricultural pursuits. Aside from 
this, he gratifies his tastes and occupies much of his time 
with educational and other institutions. He has for a 
number of years acted as President of the Burlington 
County Agricultural Society; Mount Holly, Lumberton and 
Medford Railroad; Vice-President, Trustee and Curator of 
the Burlington County Lyceum of History and Natural 
Sciences; Secretary of the Burlington County Board of 
Agriculture; Secretary of the New Jersey Horticultural 
Society; also a member of other State, county, historical, 
literary and agricultural organizations. He is thoroughly 
imbued with the idea that agriculture should rank higher 
than any other profession or industry; is an earnest advo- 
cate of road improvement or any measure that will advance 
the producing interests. Mr. Budd was, on the 21st of May, 
1S95, appointed by Governor Werts to his present position, 
to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Edward Burrough, 
and in 1S96 he was appointed by Governor Griggs for a 



BIOGRAPHIES. 355 

full term of three years. In 1899 he was re-appointed by 
Governor Voorhees. His term will expire in 1902, and his 
salary is $2,500 a year. 



Executive Clerk. 
EDWARD D. FOX, Trenton. 

Mr. Fox, better known as Eddie Fox, for the last thirty- 
six years has the proud distinction of having- served in the 
position he now holds as Executive Clerk, with twelve 
consecutive Governors and three Acting Governors, be- 
ginning' with Marcus L. Ward and continuing- with Gov- 
ernors Randolph, Parker, Bedle, McClellan, Ludlow, Ab- 
bett. Green, Abbett (second term), Werts, Griggs and 
Voorhees, and with Acting- Governors Voorhees, Watkins 
and Johnson. 

At the outbreak of the Civil War Mr. Fox. at an early 
age. went forward in defense of his country, with the Fifth 
Regiment of New Jersey Volunteers, as a drummer boy. 
While at the front he made the acquaintance of Marcus 
L. Ward, who took a great interest in New Jersey's soldier 
boys and was known by thein as the "soldiers' friend." He 
made his regular visits to the camps, no matter where 
they might be, and on one of these occasions he took a 
great liking to Fox, having had his attention drawn toward 
him by the officers of the regiment on account of his being 
small of stature and an expert drummer. 

At the end of the Rebellion, on the election of Governor 
Ward, Mr. Fox was offered and accepted the position 
which he still holds. He was a great favorite with the 
officers of his regiment, as he has been with each and all 
of the Governors; so mvich so that at the end of the terms 
of six Governors they presented him with a beautiful gold 
watch and chain, in recognition of his long and faithful 
services. 

Mr. Fox, by his long experience, has the routine duties 
of the Executive Office at his fingers' ends. His recollec- 
tion of various incidents connected with the different ad- 
ministrations with which he has been connected are in- 
teresting and numerous enough to filll a book. Many of 
his valued friends are dead, among whom are nine of the 
Governors with whom he served. Not a State officer is 
living now who held position when he first assumed his 
duties; neither is there a Judge of the Supreme Court or 
of the Court of Errors alive to-day who then occupiecl 



356 BIOGRAPHIES. 

that office. Former Chief Justice Depue was appointed a 
Supreme Court Justice about six months after Mr. Fox's 
appointment. The Chief Justice was the last survivor of 
Governor Ward's appointments, with the exception of Mr. 
Fox. 

The affable manner and the courtesy which Mr. Fox has 
exhibited toward all who visit the Governor's office have 
won for him many friends, and it is safe to say that he 
knows and is known by more of New Jersey's public men 
than any other person in the State. 

Governor Murphy appointed Mr. Fox for another term 
of office as Executive Clerk. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 357 

EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 



1903. 

Justice Of the Supreme Court— Charles G. Garrison, Feb- 
ruary 1st. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court— William Riker, Jr., No- 
vember 2d. 

Secretary of State— George Wurts, April 1st. 

Attorney General — Samuel H. Grey, April 5th. 

Judges of County Courts— Camden, E. Ambler Arm- 
strong; Gloucester, John S. Jessup; Ocean, Albert C. Mar- 
tin; Passaic, John S. Barkalow; all April 1st. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Ocean, Theodore S. R. Brown. 
March 31st. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction— Charles J. 
Baxter, March 27th. 

State Board of Education — Edmund Wilson, Charles E. 
Surdam, Edward Maher, Edward Russ, March 22d. 

Public Library Commissioner — Dr. Ernest C. Richardson, 
January 29th, Leonard J. Gordon, ad interim. 

Keeper of the State Prison— Samuel S. Moore, March 
18th. 

Inspector of the State Prison— Cornelius A. Cadmus, ad 
interim. 

New Jersey Reformatory— Richard H. Wilson and George 
W. Fortmeyer, May 1st. 

State Home for Boys— Frank S. Gaskill, Edward Spaeth, 
May 25th. 

State Home for Girls— Martin C. Ribsam, Noble C. Bris- 
tol, Miss Anna Augusta Allinson, February Uth. 

State Hospital— Morris Plains— David St. John, James 
W. Smith, John A. McBride, May 25th. 

State Hospital— Trenton— N. Newlin Stokes, Cornelius 
• S. Hoffman, Benajah W. Andrews, Henry W. Baldwin. 
Joseph Thompson, May 25th. 

State Village for Epileptics— Howard P. Reynolds and 
James M. Buckley, February loth. 

Managers New Jersey Home for Feeble-Minded Wom- 
en—Mrs. Annie E. Gile, Mrs. Caroline B. Alexander. 
March 31st. 

State Board of Medical Examiners— E. L. B. Godfrey, 
Charles A. Groves, Davis P. Borden, July 4th. 

Commissioner of Public Roads— Hen rv I. Budd, March 
26th. 



358 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

State Sewerage Commission — John Hinchliffe and 
Charles W. Fuller, May 7th. 

Commissioners of Palisades Interstate Park— Nathan F. 
Barrett, Abram De Ronde, February 12th. 



GOVERNOR ALONE. 

State Board of Health— Cyrus T. Brackett, May 3d. 
Inspectors of Steamboats— Charles Edv^ards, June 22d. 
State Board of Pharmacy— George W. Parison, April 21st. 
State Board of Dentistry— George Emery Adams, first 
Tuesday in October. 
State Oyster Commission— E. L. Riley, June 16th. 

1903. 

Justice of the Supreme Court— Jonathan Dixon, April 8th. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals— Gottfreid 
Krueger, March 29th; John W. Bogart, April 10th; Fred- 
eric Adams, April 1st. 

Circuit Court Judge— Henry M. Nevius. March 2d. 

Supervisor of the State Prison— Edward J. Anderson, 
June nth. 

Chief of the Bureau of Labor Statistics— William Stains- 
by, April 4th. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance— William Bet- 
tie, April 2d. 

Judges of County Courts— Atlantic, Allen B. Endicott; 
Bergen, David D. Zabriski'e; Hudson, John I. Blair; Mor- 
ris, John B. Vreeland; Union, Benjamin A. Vail; Warren, 
George M. Shipman; all April 1st. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas — Atlantic, Joseph E. P. Abbott, 
March 7th; Cape May, Eugene C. Cole, March 21st; Hud- 
son, James S. Erwin, February 9th; Mercer, William J. 
Crossley, February 7th; Morris, Alfred Elmer Mills, April 
1st; Sussex, John L. Swayze, March 29th; Union, Nicholas 
C. J. English, March 11th. 

District Court Judges— Hoboken, Abel I. Smith, January 
18th; Jersey City, Charles W. Parker, February 9th. 

Commissioners of Pilotage— John R. Dewar, Henry W. 
Miller, Henry C. Gulick, Daniel C. Chase, John C. Weaver, 
Mark Townsend; all May 25th. 

Board of Managers New Jersey State Hospital at Tren- 
ton—Joseph Rice, January 18th. 

State Board of Education— Louis Bevier, Sweeting 
Miles, Everett Colby, Ulamor Allen, March 22d, 



' EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 359 

New Jersey Reformatory— Charlton T. Lewis and Percy 
R. Pine, May 1st. 

Trustees State Home for Boys— Nathaniel S. Rue and 
David W. Lawrence, May 25th. 

Trustees State Home for Girls— John D. Rue, January 
29th; Alfred D. Carnagy and Mrs. Lydia G. Bergen, Feb- 
ruary 11th. 

State Board of Medical Examiners— John W. Bennett 
and John J. Baumann, July 5th. 

Board of Managers of the Village for Epileptics— Theo- 
dore Foote and James J. Bergen, March 14th. 

State Sewerage Commission— Charles F. Harrington and 
William T. Hunt, May 7th. 

Commissioners of the Palisades Interstate Park- Joseph 
Troutman and William A. Linn, February 12th. 

Public Library Commission — Unexpired term of Frank 
P. Hill, January 29th. 

Port Warden, Hudson County— John J. Toffey, February 
7th. 

Twenty Members of the Board of Visitors to the State 
Agricultural College, March 29th. 

GOVERNOR ALONE. 

Inspectors of Steamboats— Three. 
State Board of Health— Henry W. Elmer, May 1st. 
State Board of Pharmacy— George H. White, April 21st. 
State Board of Dentistry— Frederick C. Barlow, first 
Tuesday in October. 
State Oyster Commission— Jeremiah N. Ogden, June 16th. 

1904. 

Justices of the Supreme Court — Bennet Van Syckel, Feb- 
ruary 15th; Gilbert Collins, March 8th. 

Judge of the Court of Errors and Appeals— William H. 
Vredenburgh, January 18th. 

County Court Judges— Burlington, Joseph H. Gaskill; 
Cumberland, Thomas W. Trenchard; all April 1st. 

Prosecutors of the Pleas— Cumberland, J. Hampton 
Fithian, April 20th; Essex, Chandler W. Riker, May 17th. 

District Court Judges — Newark, First district, Elwood 
C. Harris, March 15th. 

State Board of Assessors— Robert S. Green, March 2d: 
Stephen J. Meeker, March 10th. 

Board of Riparian Commissioners— John I. Holt, William 
Cloke, Willard C. Fisk and John J. Farrell, May 17th. 

Inspectors of State Prison— Lysander E. Watson, Will- 
iam H. Carter, Samuel F. Stanger, Thomas F. Brennan, 



360 EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Jacob Van Winkle; all May 25th, and one for unexpired 
term of Markham Staples. 

State Board of Taxation— Henry J. West, June 1st; 
Joseph Thompson, March 22d. 

Board of Fish and Game Commissioners— Howard P. 
Frothingham, Richard T. Miller, Benjamin P. Morris, 
William A. Halsey; all May 17th. 

State Board of Arbitration— William H. Cawley, William 
W. Simpson, George Berdine, Jacob Van Hook, Samuel 
Berry; all March 25th. 

Managers Home for Feeble-Minded Women— Charles H. 
Anderson and Mrs. Emily H. Williamson, March 28th. 

Managers New Jersey State Hospital at Trenton— John 
Taylor and Garret D. W. Vroom, May 25th. 

Managers New Jersey State Hospital at Morris Plains- 
Romeo F. Chabert, Richard A. McCurdy, John C. Eisele, 
Patrick Farrelly and James M. Buckley, May 25th. 

Trustees State Home for Boys— Gervas Ely and James 
M. Parsons, May 25th. 

Trustees State Home for Girls— Howell C. Stull, Mrs. 
Annie V. P. Emley, Miss Mary S. Atterbury, February 
nth. 

State Board of Education— Edward E. Grosscup, Frank 
O. Briggs, James M. Seymour, William D. Forbes, March 
22d. /' 

State Board of Medical Examiners — Armin Uebelacker, 
William H. Shipps, William Perry Watson, July 4th. 

Board of Managers of the Village for Epileptics— John 
R. Hardin and Thomas J. Smith, February 15th. 

Board of Managers of the New Jersey Home for Dis- 
abled Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and their Wives— Gilbert 
D. Bogert, Amos R. Dease, Ernest C. Stahl, February 15th. 

State Sewerage Commission — David L. Wallace, May 7th. 

Palisade Interstate Park Commission— J. Du Pratt 
White, Franklin W. Hopkins, February 12th. 

Public Library Commission — Everett T. Tomlinson, Jan- 
uary 29th. 

GOVERNOR ALONE. 

Deputy Factory Inspectors— Louis H. Barrett, William 
H. Dod, William L. Conklin, Heber Wells, Joseph Milburn, 
William B. Tucker. 

State Board of Health— Henry B. Rue, May 1st. 

State Board of Pharmacy— William T. Brown, April 21st. 

State Board of Dentistry— Charles A. Meeker, first Tues- 
day in October. 

Police Justice, City of Orange— Joseph P. Bray, May 1st. 



UNITED STATES GOA^ERNMENT. 361 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 



President— Theodore Roosevelt, New York. Salary. 
$50,000. 

Vice-President— Vacancy. 

Secretary of State— John Hay, of the District of Col- 
umbia. 

Secretary of the Treasury— Leslie M. Shaw, of Iowa. 

Secretary of War— Elihu Root, of New York. 

Secretary of the Navy— John D. Long-, of Massachusetts. 

Secretary of the Interior— Ethan Allen Hitchcock, of 
Missouri. 

Postmaster-General— Henry C. Payne, of Wisconsin. 

Attorney-General— Philander C. Knox, of Pennsylvania. 

Secretary of Agriculture— James Wilson, of Iowa. 

The salary of each Cabinet officer is $8,000. 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court— Melville W. Fuller, 
of Illinois. Salary, $10,500. 

Associate Justices— John M. Harlan, of Kentucky; Hor- 
ace Gray, of Massachusetts; David J. Brewer, of Kansas; 
Henry B. Brown, of Michigan; George Shiras, Jr., of Penn- 
sylvania; Edward Douglass White, of Louisiana; Rufus 
W. Peckham, of New York; Joseph McKenna, of Cali- 
fornia. 

Salary of each Associate Justice, $10,000. 

United States Army— Lieutenant-General, Nelson A. 
Miles. Salary, $11,000. Major-Generals, John R. Brooke, 
Elwell S. Otis, Samuel B. M. Young, Adna R. Chaffee, 
Arthur MacArthur, Lloyd Wheaton. Salary, $7,500. Adju- 
tant-General Corbin also has the rank of Major-General. 
Brigadier-Generals, James F. Wade, Henry C. Merriam, 
John C. Bates, George W. Davis, Samuel S. Sumner, Leon- 
ard Wood, Robert H. Hall, Robert P. Hughes, George M. 
Randall, William A. Kobbe, Frederick D. Grant, J. Frank- 
lin Bell, Jacob H. Smith, Frederick Funston, James M. 
Bell. Salary, $5,500. 

United States Navy— Admiral, George Dewey. Salary, 
$1.3,500. Rear- Admirals, John A. Howell, George C. Remey, 
Norman H. Farquhar, John C. Watson, Silas Casey, Will- 
iam T. Sampson, Bartlett J. Cromwell, Francis J. Higgin- 
son, P'rederick Rodgers, Louis Kempff, George W. Sumner, 
Albert S. Barker, Charles S. Cotton, Robley D. Evans, 
Silas W. Terry. Merrill Miller, John J. Read, Henry C. 
Taylor, Mortimer L. Johnson, Edwin W. Shepard, Frank 
Wildes, Henry Glass. Salary, from $4,675 to $7,500. 

President McKinley died on September 14th, 1901, and he 
was succeeded by Theodore Roosevelt, who took the oath 
of office on the same date. 



362 



UNITED STATES COURT OFFICIALS. 



U. S. COURT OFFICIALS. 



The United States District Court was organized at New 
Brunswiclc, on Tuesday, December 22d, 1789. 

DISTRICT JUDGES. 



David Brearley 1789 

Robert Morris 1790 

William S. Pennington. .1817 

William Rossell 1826 

Mahlon Dickerson 1840 



Philemon Dickerson 1841 

Richard S. Field 1863 

John T. Nixon 1870 

Edward T. Green 1889 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 1896 



CLERKS. 



Jonathan Dayton 1789 

Andrew Kirkpatrick 1790 

Robert Boggs 1791 

William Pennington 1817 

Joseph C. Potts 1840 

Edward N. Dickerson. . .1844 
Philemon Dickerson. Jr.lS53 



Andrew Dutcher 1862 

Ralph H. Shreve 1863 

E. Mercer Shreve 1868 

Robert C. Belville 1871 

William S. Belville 1875 

Linsly Rowe 1882 

George T. Cranmer 1893 



MARSHALS. 



Thomas Lowry 


...1789 


John Heard 


, . . .1802 


Oliver Barnett 


,...1802 


Oliver W. Ogden 


,...1808 


Robert S. Kennedy.., 


....1849 


George H. Nelden 


....1853 


Benijah Deacon 


....1866 


W. Budd Deacon 


....1868 



Samuel Plummer 1869 

Robert L. Hutchinson. . .1877 

W. Budd Deacon 1882 

A. E. Gordon 1886 

W. Budd Deacon 1889 

George Pfeiffer 1893 

Thomas J. Alcott 1897 



DISTRICT ATTORNEYS. 



Richard Stockton 1789 

Abraham Ogden 1732 

Lucius H. Stockton 1798 

George C. Maxwell 1802 

Joseph McUvaine 1804 

Lucius Q. C. Elmer 1824 

Garret D. Wall 1828 

James S. Green 1837 

William Halsted 1849 



Garrit S. Cannon 1853 

Anthony Q. Keasbey 1861 

Job H. Lippincott 1886 

Samuel F. Bigelow 1887 

George S. Duryee 1888 

Henry S. WhitQ 1890 

John W. Beekman 1894 

J. Kearny Rice 1896 

David O. Watkins 1900 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS. 263 

U. S. OFFICIALS, 1902. 



Circuit Justice George Shiras, Jr. 

r Marcus W. Acheson, 
Circuit Judges 4 Cr eorge M. Dallas , 

L George Gray. 

District Judge Andrew Kirkpatrick. 

District Attorney David O. Watkins. 

Assistant District Attorney Courtlandt Parker, Jr. 

Marshal Thomas J. Alcott. 

Deputy Marshal Edwin R. Semple. 

Clerk of District Court George T. Cranmer. 

Deputy Clerk of District Court Benjamin F. Havens. 

Clerk of Circuit Court S. Duncan Oliphant. 

Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court Henry D. Oliphant. 

Postmaster at Trenton Alexander C. Yard. 

Internal Revenue Collector— 1st Dist. Isaac Moffatt. 

5th Dist..H. C. H. Herold. 



S64 STATE OFFICIALS. 

STATE OFFICERS. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Governor— Franklin Murphy, 1905. 

Private Secretarj^ — 

Executive Clerk— Edward D. Fox. 

STATE DEPARTMENT 

Secretary of State— George Wurts, 1902. 
Assistant Secretary — Alexander H. Rickey, 1902. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

State Treasurer — Frank O. Briggs, ad interim. 
State Comptroller— William S. Hancock, 1903. 
Chief Clerk, Treasurer's Office- L. Kensil Wildrick. 
Chief Clerk, Comptroller's Office— Frederic S. McNeely. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Attorney-General— Samuel H. Grey, 1902. 

THE JUDICIARY. 

Court of Errors and Appeals— The Chancellor, the Chief 
Justice and Justices of the Supreme Court; Judges John 
W. Bogert, 1903; Gottfried Kreuger, 1903; Frederic Adams, 
1903; William H. Vredenburgh, 1904; Peter V. Voorhees, 
1906; Garret D. W. Vroom, 1907. Clerk, Secretary of State. 

Court of Chancery— Chancellor William J. Magie, 1908; 
Vice-Chancellors, Henry C. Pitney, 1903; John R. Emery, 
1902; Alfred Reed, 1902; Frederic W. Stevens, 1903; Martin 
P. Grey, 1903; Eugene Stevenson, 1908. 

Vice-Ordinary and Vice-Surrogate-General— Alfred Reed, 

Clerk in Chancery — Edward C. Stokes, 1906. 

Chancery Reporter — S. Meredith Dickinson, 1905. 

Supreme Court — Chief Justice William S. Gummere, 1908; 
Associate Jiastices, Bennet Van Syckel, 1904; Jonathan 
Dixon, 1903; Charles G. Garrison, 1902; Gilbert Collins. 
1904; John Franklin Fort, 1908; Abram Q. Garretson, 1908; 
Charles E. Hendrickson, 1908; Mahlon Pitney, 1908. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court— William Riker, Jr., 1902. 



JsTATE OFFICIALS. 365 

Deputy Clerk— ChiLi'les N. Codding. 

Law Reporter— Garret D. W. Vroom, 1903. 

Circuit Court Judges— Henry M. Neviue. 190.3; Francis J. 
Swayze, 1907; James H. Nixon, 1907. 

Court of Pardons— Governor, Chancellor and Lay Judges 
of the Court of Errors and Appeals; Clerk, Secretary of 
State. 

District Court Judges — Camden, C. V. D. Joline, 1906; 
Elizabeth, Edward S. At water, 1906; Jersey City, Charles 
W. Parkex', 1903; Otto Crouse, 1905; Nev,^ark, Elwood C. 
Harris, 1904; Thomas J. Lintott, 1905; Paterson, William I. 
Lewis, 1906; Trenton, George W. Macpherson, 1905; Orange, 
Charles B. Storrs, 1906; Hoboken, Abel I. Smith, 1903; Pas- 
saic, William W. Watson, 1906; Atlantic City, Robert H. 
Ingersoll, 1906; Bayonne, Horace Roberson, 1906; New 
Brunswick, Edward W. Hicks, 1906; Perth Amboy, Adrian 
Lyon, 1906. 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

Commander-in-Chief— Governor Murphy. 
. Major-General — Vacancy. 
Adjutant-General— Alexander C. Oliphant. 
Assistant Adjutant-General — Henry W. Freeman. 
Quartermaster-General— Richard A. Donnelly. 
Inspector-General— Joseph W. Congdon. 
Judge Advocate-General— Edward P. Meany. 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT. 

Trustees of the School Fund— Governor, Secretary of 
State, President of the Senate, Speaker of the Assembly, 
Attorney-General, State Comptroller and State Treasurer. 

State Board of Education — Edward E. Grosscup, Wino- 
nah, 1S04; George A. Frey, Camden, 1905: James B. Wood- 
ward, Bordentown, 1906; Silas R. Morse. Atlantic City, 
1905; Louis Bevier, New Brunswick, 1903; Edmund Wilson, 
Red Bank, 1902; Samuel St. John McCutchen, Somerville, 
1906; Frank O. Briggs, Trenton, 1904; Benjamin H. Camp- 
bell, Elizabeth, 1905; Charles E. Surdam, Morristown, 1902; 
Sweeting Miles, Alpine, 1903; Francis Scott, Paterson 1906; 
James M. Seymour, Newark, 1904; Everett Colby. West 
Orange, 1903; James L. Hays, Newark, 1906; Edward 
Maher, Newark, 1902; Ulamer Allen, Jersey City, 1903; Otto 
Crouse, Jersey City, 1905; Edward Russ, Hoboken, 1902; 
William D. Forbes, Hoboken, 1904. President, James L. 
Hays; Vice-President, Francis Scott; Secretary, Charles 
J. Baxter; Treasurer, James B. Woodward. 



366 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Principal State Normal and Model Schools, James M. 
Green, Ph.D.; Steward, John S. Neary. 

Principal New Jersey School for Deaf-Mutes, John P. 
Walker; Steward, Thomas F. Hearnen. 



PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

State Superintendent—Charles J. Baxter, 1902. 

Assistant State Superintendent— J. Brognard Betts. 

County Superintendents— Atlantic, Samuel D. Hoffman, 
Atlantic City; Bergen, John Terhune, Hackensack; Bur- 
lington, Herman A. Stees, Beverly; Camden, Charles S. 
Albertson, Magnolia; Cape May, Aaron W. Hand, Cape 
May; Cumberland, John N. Glaspell, Bridgeton; Essex, 
Elmer C. Sherman, South Orange; Gloucester, William H. 
Eldridge, Williamstown; Hudson, M. H. Kinsley, Arling- 
ton; Hunterdon, Jason S. Hoffman, Flemington; Mer- 
cer, A. W. Hartwell, Titusville; Middlesex, H. Brewster 
Willis, New Brunswick; Monmouth, John Enright, Free- 
hold; Morris, Watson B. Metthews, Dover; Ocean, F. A. 
North, Toms River; Passaic, Homer A. Wilcox, Passaic 
City; Salem, J. Harry Smith, Pennsgrove; Somerset, Rev. 
J. A. Mets, Somerville; Sussex, Luther Hill, Andover; 
Union, William J. Shearer, Elizabeth; Warren, Franklin 
T. Atwood, Hackettstown. 

City Superintendents— Asbury Paik, Fred S. Shepherd; 
Atlantic City, C. B. Boyer, Supervising Principal; Bay- 
onne, J. H. Christie; Bridgeton, W. E. Cox; Camden, Mar- 
tin V. Bergen; East Orange, Vernon L. Davey; Elizabeth, 
W. T. Shearer; Gloucester, Horatio Draper; Hoboken, A. 
J. Demarest; Jersey City, Henry Snyder; Millville, S. C. 
Smith; Montclair, Randall Spaulding; Morristown, W, L. 
R. Haven; Newark, Dr. A. B. Poland; New Brunswick, 
W. C. Armstrong; Orange, W. M. Swingle; Passaic, F. E. 
Spaulding; Paterson, L. A. Goodenough: Perth Amboy, 
S. E. Shull; Phillipsburg, H. Budd Howell; Plainfield, 
Henry M. Maxson; Rahway, W. O. Robinson; Salem, M. 
H. Stratton; Town of Union, Otto Ortel; Trenton, Leslie 
C. Pierson; West Hoboken, Robert Waters. 

STATE LIBRARY. 

Commissioners— Governor, Chancellor, Chief Justice, At- 
torney-General, Secretary of State, Treasurer and Comp- 
troller. 

State Librarian— Henry C. Buchanan, 1904, 



STATE OFFICIALS. 3G7 

Public Library Commissioners— Dr. Ernest C. Richard- 
son, Princeton University, 1902; Moses Taylor Pyne, 
Princeton, 1906; William C. Kimball, Passaic, 1905; Everett 
T. Tomlinson, Elizabeth, 1904; Leonard J. Gordon, ad in- 
terim. 

STATE HOUSE COMMISSjON. 

The Governor, State Treasurer and State Comptroller. 
Custodian of the State House and Public Grounds— John 
W. Weseman. Assistant, Thomas R. Watson. 

RIPARIAN BOARD. 

Commissioners— The Governor, President; Willard C. 
Fisk, Vice-President, Jersey City, 1904; John I. Holt, Pat- 
erson, 1904; William Cloke, Trenton, 1904; John J. Farrell, 
Newark, 1904; Secretary and Engineer, John C. Payne. 
Jersey City; Counsel, George L. Record, Jersey City. 

ASSESSMENT AND TAXATION. 

State Board of Assessors— Robert S. Green, Elizabeth, 
1904; Stephen J. Meeker, Newark, 1904; John C. Rankin, 
Elizabeth, 1905; David Baird, Camden, 1905. Secretary, Ir- 
vine E. Maguire. 

State Board of Taxation— Charles C. Black, 1906, Jersey 
City; Henry J. West, President, 1904, Camden; Carl Lentz, 
1906, Newark; Joseph Thompson, Atlantic City, 1904. Sec- 
retary, Thomas B. Usher. 

BANKING AND INSURANCE. 

Commissioner— William Bettle, 1903. 

Deputy Commissioner — Thomas K. Johnston. 

LABOR BUREAU. 

Chief— William Stainsby, 1903. 
Deputy— James T. Morgan. 

FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS. 

Inspector- John C. Ward, 1906. 

Deputies — Lewis H. Barrett, Pleasantville; William H. 
Dod, Hoboken; William H. Conklin, Newark; Heber Wells, 
Paterson; Joseph Milburn, Trenton; William B. Tucker, 
Elizabeth; all in 1904. 
24 



368 • STATE OFFICIALS. 

STATE BOARD OF ARBITRATION. 

Members— William H. Cawley, Somerville; William W. 
Simpson, Long- Branch; George Berdine, New Brunswick; 
Jacob Van Hook, Lodi; Samuel Berry, Millville; all in 
1904. 

STATE PRISON. 

Head Keeper— Samuel S. Moore, 1902. 

Supervisor— Edward J. Anderson, 1903. 

Inspectors — William H. Carter, Bordentown; Samuel P. 
Stanger, Harrisonville; Thomas F. Brennan, Orange; Ly- 
sander E. Watson, Asbury Park; Jacob Van Winkle, Mor- 
ristown; Cornelius A. Cadmus, Paterson; all in 1904 ex- 
cepting Cadmus, who is ad interim. 

NEW JERSEY REFORMATORY. 

Commissioners— George A. Squire, Elizabeth, 1905, Pres- 
ident; Patrick Farrelly, 1905; Charlton T. I-ewis, 1903; Percy 
R. Pyne, 1903; Dr. Benjamin Edge, 1904; Richard H. Wil- 
son, 1902; George W. Fortmeyer, 1902; the Governor is an 
ex-officio member. Thomas M. Gopsill, Jersey City, Sec- 
retary, 1904. Superintendent, James E. Heg. 

STATE HOME FOR BOYS. 

Trustees— James M. Parsons, New Brunswick, 1904; Na- 
thaniel S. Rue, Cream Ridge, 1903; David W. Lawrence, 
Jersey City, 1903; Gervas Ely, Lambert ville, 1904; Frank 
S. Gaskill, New Egypt, 1902; Edward Spaeth, Newark, 
1902. Superintendent, Ira Otterson. 

STATE HOME FOR GIRLS. 

Trustees— Martin C. Ribsam, Trenton. 1902; Noble C. 
Bristol, Newark, 1902; Miss Anna Augusta Allinson, Tren- 
ton, 1902; John D. Rue, Trenton, 1903; Alfred D. Carnagy, 
Trenton, 1903; Mrs. Lydia G. Bergen, Elizabeth, 1903; How- 
ell C. Stull, Tl^enton, 1904; Mrs. Annie V. P. Emley, Pat- 
erson, 1904; Miss Mary S. Atterbury, Trenton, 1904. 

STATE HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS. 

Managers— Colonel Edward H. Wright. Newark; Amzi 
Dodd, Newark; Marcus L. Ward, Newark; James E. Flem- 
ming, Newark; General E. Burd Grubb, Edgewater Park; 
General Richard A. Donnelly, Trenton. Offlcers— Superin- 



STATE OFFICIALS. 369 

tendent, Major Peter F. Rogers; Surgeon, Dr. Archibald 
Mercer; Adjutant, Bishop W. Mains; Chaplain, Rev. John 
D. Ferguson; Matron, Mrs. Peter F. Rogers. 

STATE HOME FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS, SAILORS. 
MARINES AND THEIR WIVES. 

Managers— Gilbert D. Bogert, Amos R. Dease, Ernest C. 
Stahl, in 1904; John Shields, 1905; J. Howard Willets, 1906. 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Members— Laban Dennis, 1908. Newark; William H. Mur- 
ray, 1906, Plainfield; Cyrus T. Brackett. President, 1902, 
Princeton; Henry B. Rue, 1904, Hoboken; George P. Olcott, 
1907, East Orange; Henry Mitchell. 1905. Asbury Park; 
Henry W. Elmer, 1903, Bridgeton. The Secretary of State, 
the i^ttorney-General and the State Geologist, ex-ofRcio. 
Secretary, Hendry Mitchell, Asbury Park. 

Chief Inspector of Foods and Drugs — George W. Mc- 
Guire. Trenton. 

STATE HOSPITALS. 

Board of Managers .at Morris Plains — Romeo F. 
Chabert, Hoboken, 1904; James M. Buckley, Morristown, 
1904; Patrick Farrelly. Morristown, 1904; John C. Eisele, 
Newark, 1904; David St. John. Hackensack, 1902; James 
W. Sm.ith, Paterson, 1902; John A. McBride. Deckertown, 
1902; Richard A. McCurdy, Morris Plains, 1904. Secretary. 
Charles H. Green. 

Board of Managers at Trenton— Garret D. W. Vroom. 
President, Trenton, 1904; John Taylor, Trenton, 1904; Joseph 
Rice, Trenton. 1903; N. Newlin Stokes, Moorestown. 1902; 
Cornelius S. Hoffman, Somerville. 1902; Benajah W. An- 
drews, Woodbury, 1902; Henry R. Baldwin, New Bruns- 
wick, 1902; Joseph Thompson, Atlantic City, 190.3. Secre- 
tary, Scott Scammell. 

OiRcers at Morris Plains— Medical Director, Britton D. 
PJvans, M. D.; Treasurer, Guido C. Hinchman; Warden, 
Moses K. Everitt. 

Officers at Trenton — Medical Director, John W. Ward, 
M. D.; Treasurer, Harvey H. Johnson; Warden, William 
P. Hayes. 

STATE VILLAGE FOR EPILEPTICS. 

Board of Managers— Rev. James M. Buckley. Morris- 
town, 1902, President; Thomas J. Smith, M. D., Bridgeton, 
1904, Treasurer; John H. Ewing, M. D., Flemington, 1905; 



l- 



370 STATE OFFICIALS. 

James J. Bergen, Somerville, 1903; Theodore Foote, Vine- 
land, 1903; John R. Hardin, Newark, 1904; Alexander W. 
Mack, Somerville, 1905; Howard P. Reynolds, North Plain- 
field, 1902. Superintendent, Henry M. Weeks, M. D. 

FEEBLE-MINDED WOMEN. 

Board of Managers— Benjamin F. Lee, President, Tren- 
ton, 1906; Charles H. Anderson, Vineland, 1904; Mrs. Emily 
H. Williamson, Elizabeth, 1904; Mrs. Annie E. Gile, Or- 
ange, 1902; Mrs. Caroline B. Alexander, Hoboken, 1902; Bar- 
ton F. Thorn, Treasurer, Burlington, 1906, and Zebina K. 
Pang-born, Jersey City, 1906. 

FEEBUE-MINDED CHILDREN. 

New Jersey Training School for Feeble-Minded Girls 
and Boys, Vineland — Directors, Governor, ex-dfficio; D. 
Wilson Moore, Clayton, 1903; William H. Nicholson, Had- 
donfield, 1903; Thomas J. Smith, M. D., Bridgeton, 1903; 
George Davidson, Vineland, 1904; Rev. H. H. Beadle, 
Bridgeton, 1904; Daniel Thackara, Woodbury, 1904; Benja- 
min C. Reeve, Camden, 1905; W. Graham Tyler, Philadel- 
phia, 1905; Charles Keighley, Vineland, 1905; P. P. Baker, 
Vineland, 1902; E. C. Stokes, Millville, 1902; Howard Car- 
row, Camden, 1902; Rev. R. B. Moore, Vineland, 1904. 
Officers of the Board: Philip P. Baker, President; William 
H. Nicholson, Vice-President; George Davidson, Treas- 
urer; Edward R. Johnstone, Secretary and Principal. 
Board of Lady Visitors: Mrs. Charles Keighley, Vice- 
President, Vineland, 1902; Mrs. Fanny A. Sheppard, Green- 
wich, 1902; Miss Susan N. Warrington, Treasurer, Moores- 
town, 1902; Miss Kate A. Mott, Bordentown, 1902; Miss 
Caroline Hunt, Secretary, Woodstown, 1903; Mrs. Josiah 
Bacon, Oaklyn, 1903; Miss Rachel E. AUinson, Yardville, 
1903; Mrs. Charles M. Allen, Beverly, 1903; Miss Julia 
Frame, Bridgeton, 1904; Mrs. Thomas J. Craven, President, 
Salem, 1904; Mrs. Edward P. Shields, Bridgeton, 1904; Mrs. 
William H. Skirm, Trenton, 1903; Mrs. Harriet Townsend, 
Elizabeth, 1904. 

AGRICULTURAL. 

State Board of Agriculture— President, E. B. Voorhees, 
New Brunswick; Treasurer, William R. Lippincott, Fel- 
lowship; Secretary, Franklin Dye, Trenton. 

Commissioners of Agriculture College Fund— Governor, 
Secretary of State, Treasurer, Attorney-General and 
Comptroller. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 371 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural College— First 
district, Ephraim T. Gill, Robert Gwynne; Second district, 
John E. Darnell, Winfield S. Bonham; Third district, 
David D. Denise, James Neilson; Fourth district, Samuel 
B. Ketcham, George Fritts; Fifth district, Josiah Ketch- 
am, James H. Burnett; Sixth district, Abram C. Holdruni, 
George H. Blakeley; Seventh district, George E. DeCamp, 
Cyrus B. Crane; Eighth district, George Dorer, Ira C. Kil- 
burn; Ninth district, Rynear J. AVortendyke, Lucius F. 
Donahue; Tenth district, John B. Williams, Philip M. 
Brett; all in 1903. Secretary, Irving S. Upson. 

New Jersey State Agricultural Experiment Station 
No. 1— Board of Managers: Governor, Professors Austin 
Scott and Edward B. Voorhees, together with the mem- 
bers of the Board of Visitors to the State Agricultural 
College. Director, Professor Voorhees; Chief Clerk, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer, Irving S. Upson. 

Station No. 2— Board of Control: The Trustees of Rut- 
gers College. Director, Professor Edward B. Voorhees. 

MEDICAL, PHARMACY AND DENTISTRY. 

State Board of Medical Examiners— Armin Uebelacker, 
Morristown, 1904; William P. Watson, Jersey City, 1904, 
and William H. Shipps, Burlington, 1904; E. L. B. Godfrey, 
Camden; Charles A. Groves, Newai'k, and Davis P. Bor- 
den, Paterson, 1902; Edward Hill Baldwin, Newark, ad 
interim; John J. Baumann, Jersey City, 1903; John W. Ben- 
nett, Long Branch, 1903. 

State Board of Dentistry— Frederick C. Barlow, Jersey 
City; George Emory Adams, South Orange; W. E. Truex, 
Freehold; J. Allen Osmun, Secretary, Newark; Charles A. 
Meeker, Newark. 

State Board of Pharmacy— George H. White, Jersey 
City, 1903; William T. Brown, Madison, 1904; Harry O. 
Ryerson, Newton, 1905; Henry A. Jorden, Bridgeton, 1906; 
George W. Parisen, Perth Amboy, 1902. 

FISH AND GAME. 

Commissioners — Howard P. Frothingham, Pompton 
Lakes; William A. Halsey, Newark; Benjamin P. Morris, 
Long Branch, all 1904; Richard T. Miller. Camden, 1904. 

Protector— George Riley, Newark. 

Wardens— Emanuel C. Shaner, Mays Landing; Howard 
L. Mathis, New Gretna; George Ricardo, Hackensack; 
William Guthridge, Camden; James Hunt," Camden; 



S72 STATE OFFICIALS. 

George Phifer, Manumuskin; Frederick S. Connor, Bridge- 
Ion; Gus Hilton, Anglesea; Adon W. Muller, Almonesson; 
John Kerr, Harrison; H. E. Park, Flemington; Robert 
Richards, Dover; Harry L. Cook, Trenton; James M. 
Stratton, North Long Branch; Charles Ayres, Metuchen; 
Anson J. Rider, Tuckerton; Louis E. Voulks, New Egypt; 
Alexander Hughes, Paterson; Jacob B. Hendershott, New- 
ton; Thomas J. Torton. Pennsgrove; E. K. Davis, Salem; 
George H. Miller, Somerville; Charles M. Hawkins, Ros- 
elle; Edward Hill, Rocksburg. 

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Board of Managers— Franklin Murphy, Governor, ex- 
ofRcio President of the Board. First district, Clement H. 
Sinnickson, Salem; vacancy; Second district, Edward C. 
Stokes, Millville; Emmor Roberts, Moorestown; Third 
district, Plenry S. Little, Secretary, MaLawan; M. D. Val- 
entine, Woodbridge; Fovirth district, Washington A. Roeb- 
ling, Trenton; vacancy; Fifth district, Frederick A. Can- 
field, Dover; Ernest R. Ackerman, Plainfield; Sixth dis- 
trict, George W. Wheeler, Hackensack; William F. Hall, 
Pompton Lakes; Seventh district, Wendell P. Garrison, 
Orange; vacancy; Eighth district, Frederick W. Stevens, 
Newark; vacancy; Ninth district, vacancies; Tenth dis- 
trict, S. Bayard Dod, Hoboken; vacancy. Henry B. Kum- 
mel. Assistant State Geologist, in charge. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

State Director of Joint Companies— Charles Bradley. 
Newark. 

Commissioner of Public Roads— Henry I. Budd, 1902. 

State Geologist— Vacancy. Assistant. Henry B. Kum- 
mel. 

State Director of Weather Service— Edward W. McGann. 
New Brunswick. 

State Oyster Commission— Jeremiah N. Ogden, 1903; Ed- 
ward Stiles, Jr., 1904; E. L. Riley, 1902. 

Inspectors of Steamboats— Charles Edwards, Lake Ho- 
patcong, 1902. Two vacancies. 

Commissioners of Pilotage— Henry W. Miller, Morris- 
town; John R. Dewar, Jersey City; Henry C. Gulick, Bar- 
negat; Mark Townsend, Linwood; Daniel C. Chase, South 
Amboy; John C. Weaver, Haley ville; all in 1903. 

State Sei-^erage Commission— William T. Hunt, Newark, 
1903, President; John Hinchliffe, Paterson, 1902, Treasurer; 



STATE OFFICIALS. 373 

Charles W. FulU r, Bayonne, 1902; Charles F. Hairington. 
Lyndhurst, 1903; David L.. Wallace, Newark, 1904. Secre- 
tary, Boyd McLean, Jersey City. 

State Board of Children's Guardians— Anthony T. Will- 
iams, Trenton; Emily E. Williamson, Elizabeth; Hugh F. 
Fox, Bayonne; Katherine E. Abbey, Mount Holly; Joseph 
McCr>-stal, Paterson; Frederick G. Burnham, Morristown; 
Rev. J. R. Atkinson. 

Police Justices— Orange, Joseph P. Bray, 1904. 

Commissioners of the State Museum— The State Geolo- 
gist, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the Pres- 
ident of the State Board of Agriculture, President of the 
Senate and Speaker of the Assembly. Curator, S. R. 
Morse, Atlantic City. 

Commissioners of the Palisades Interstate Park— George 
AValdridge Perkins, New York city, 1906; Abram S. Hewitt, 
Ringwood, N. J., 3906; D. McNeely Stauffer, Yonkers, 
N. Y., 1905; Edwin A. Stevens, Hoboken, 1905; J. DuPratt 
White, Nyack, N. Y., 1904; Franklin W. Hopkins, Alpine, 
N. .T., 1904; Ralph Troutman, New York city, 1903; William 
A, Linn, Hackensack, 1903; Nathan F. Barrett, New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y., 1902; Abram De Ronde, Englewood, 1902. 

Managers New Jersey Firemen's Home — Benjamin W. 
Cloud, William M. Jefferies, William T. Corliss, Charles 
N. Reading, John McKiernan, William H. Brown, George 
T. Werts, Egbert Seymour, all June 23, 1904. 

Trustees Newark Technical School — John B. Stabaeus, 
1902; Benjamin Atha, 1902; Francis M. Tichenor, 1903; 
George W. Ketcham, 1903; Moses Straus, 1904; Daniel T. 
Campbell, 1904. 

Trustees Industrial Education, Hoboken— William Keuf- 
fel. 1902; Abraham J. Demarest, 1902; Edward Russ, 1903; 
William D. Forbes, 1903; William R. Jenvey, 1904; Richard 
Stevens, 1904. 

Commission to Promote the Propagation and Growth of 
Seed Oysters— Abram Hance, William Britton, Jr., Joseph 
L. Ridgeway, Josiah H. Gaskill, S. Rockhill Parker, Maja 
Mathife, Watson T. Sooy, George A. Mott, John W. John- 
son ,EIphira S. Sooy, Robert Carson, George Dickinson, 
Major McDaniels, David Claypole, all in 1902. 

SENATORS AND CONGRESSMEN. 

United States Senators— John Kean, 1905; vacancy. 

Representatives in Fifty-sixth Congress— First district, 
Henry C. Loudenslager; Second district, John J. Gardner; 
Third district, Benjamin F. Howell; Fourth district, 



f:74 STATE OPPICIALS. 

Joshua S. Salmon; Fifth district, James F. Stewart; Sixth 
district, Ricliard Wayne Parker; Seventh district, Allan 
L. McDermott; Eighth district, Charles N. Fowler. 



Terms of Office and Salaries of State Officers, and 
Members and Officers of the Legislature. 

Governor, three years, $10,000. Private Secretary, three 
years, $2,000. 
Secretary of State, five years, $6,000. Assistant, five years, 

$;:!.ooo. 

State Treasurer, three years, $6,000. 

State Comptroller, three years, $6,000. 

Attorney-General, five years, $7,000. 

Adjutant-General, $2,500. 

Quartermaster-General, $2,500. 

Chancellor, seven years, $10,000. 

Vice-Chancellors, seven years, $9,000. 

Clerk in Chancery, five years, $6,000. 

Chief Justice Supreme Court, seven years, $10,000. 

Associate Justices of the Supreme Court, seven years, 
$9,000. 

Clerk of the Supreme Court, five years, $6,000. 

Judges of the Court of Errors and Appeals, six years, $20 
a day for attendance at court and $20 a day, not exceeding 
fifteen days, when engaged in examination of cases or 
writing of opinions. 

Circuit Court Judges, seven years, $7,500. 

District Court Judges, five years, $2,500 and $3,000. 

Chancery Reporter, $500. Law Reporter, $500. 

State Librarian, five years, $2,000. 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction, three years, 
$3,000. 

Person in charge of the School Census, $1,500. 

Keeper of the State Prison, five years, $3,500. 

Inspectors of the State Prison, five years, $500. 

Supervisor of the State Prison, three years, $3,000. 

Superintendent of the New Jersey Reformatory, five 
years, $3,000. 

Commissioner of Banking and Insurance, three years, 
$4,000; Deputy, $2,500. 

Custodian of the State House, at pleasure of the Gover- 
nor, State Treasurer and State Comptroller, $2,000; Assist- 
ant, $1,200. 

Riparian Commissioners, five years, $1,500. 

State Board of Assessors, four years, $2,500; Secretary, 
$2,500. 



STATE OFFICIALS. 375 

State Board of Taxation, five years, $2,500 and $300 for ox- 
penseK. Secretary, $2,250 and $300 for expenses. 

Chief of the Bureau of Lalior Statistics, five years, $2,500; 
Deputy, $2,000. 

Inspector of Factories and Workshops, five years, $2,500; 
Assistants, three years, $1,000. 

State Board of Arbitration, three years, $1,200. 

Chief Inspector of Foods and Drugs, $2,000. 

Curator State Museum, $1,500. 

State Commissioner of Public Roads, three years, $2,500. 

Commissioners of Pilotage, three years, fees. 

State Board of Education, five years, no salary. 

State Board of Health, seven years, no salary; Secretary, 
$2,500. 

Superintendent of the Village for Epileptics, $2,500. War- 
den, $1,000. 

State Sewerage Commission, three years, salary, $1,500. 
Secretary, $750. 

Board of Managers of State Hospitals, five years, no sal- 
ary; Treasurers, each, $500. 

State Hospital officials, appointed by Board of Managers, 
salaries— Medical Directors, each $3,500; First Assistants, 
at Morris Plains, $1,800; at Trenton, $1,500; Second Assist- 
ants, Morristown, $1,800; Trenton. $1,500; Third Assistants. 
each $1,000; Fourth Assistants, each $1,000; Wardens, each 
$2,500; Secretaries, each .$500. 

Fish and Game Commissions, five years, no salary; Fish 
and Game Protector, $1,200 and expenses, $300; Fish Ward- 
ens, each $600, and expenses, $200. 

Trustees State Home for Boys, three years, no salary. 

Trustees State Home for Girls, three years, no salary. 

Board of Visitors to State Agricultural Cor.ege, two 
years, no salary. 

State Board of Medical Examiners, three years, no 
salary. 

State Board of Pharmacy, five years, no salary. 

State Board of Dentistry, five years, no salary. 

Inspectors of Steamboats, three years, no salary. 

State Board of Children's Guardians, six years, no salary. 

State Senators, three j-ears, and members of the Assem- 
bly, one year, $500. 

Senate Officers— President, $666.66; President's Private 
Secretary, $600; Secretary, $1,500; Assistant Secretary, $1,200; 
Supervisor of Bills, $1,200; one Assistant, $600; Journal 
Clerk, $1,000; Assistant Journal Clerk, $500; Sergeant-at- 
Arms, $700; Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms, $500; Calendar 



876 STATE OFFICIALS. 

Clerk, $500; Bill Clerks, $500; five Door and Gallery Keepers, 
each $350; four Pages, each $200; Clerk to Committee on 
Printed Bills, $500. 

House of Assembly Officers— Speaker, $666.66; Speaker's 
Private Secretary, $600; Assistant Secretary, $400; Clerk, 
$],500; Assistant Clerk, $1,200; Supervisor of Bills, $1,300; two 
Assistants, $600 each; Journal Clerk, $1,000; Assistant Jour- 
nal Clerk, $500; Sergeant-at-Arms, $700; two Assistant Ser- 
geant-at-Arms, each $500; twelve Doorkeepers, each $^M; 
ten Pages, each $200; Clerk to Committee on Printed Bills, 
$500; Bill Clerk and Assistant, $500 each; four Clerks to 
Committees, each 



MILITARY. 377 

MILITARY. 



Roster of Officers of the National Guard. 

Commander-in-Chief— Governor Franklin Murphy. 

Staff— Adjutant-General, Brigadier-General Alexander C. 
Oliphant; Quartermaster-General, Brigadier and Brevet 
Major-General Richard A. Donnelly; Surgeon-General, 
Brigadier-General John D. McGlll; Inspector-General, 
Brigadier-General Joseph W. Congdon; Inspector-General 
of Rifle Practice, Brigadier-General Bird W. Spencer; 
Judge Advocate-General, Brigadier-General Edward P. 
Meany. 

Department Staff— Assistant Adjutant-General, Lieut. 
Colonel Henry W. Freeman; Deputy Adjutant-General. 
Lieut. -Col5nel James S. Kiger; Deputy Quartermaster- 
General, Colonel William H. Earley, Colonel George G. 
Felton, Colonel George P. Olcott; Paymaster, Captain 
Samuel S. Armstrong; Military Storekeeper, Captain 
Charles F. Snowden; Assistant Surgeon-General, Colonel 
Edmund L. B. Godfrey; Medical Inspector, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Mortimer Lampson; Assistant Inspectors-Generai, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis T. Bryant, Lieutenant-Colonel 
John R. Beam; Assistant Inspectors-General of Rifle Prac- 
tice, Colonel Charles A. Reid, Lieutenant-Colonel Richard 
B. Reading. 

Division — Vacancy. 

Staff— Assistant Adjutant-General, Colonel Thomas S. 
Chambers; Inspector, Colonel Daniel B. Murphy; Surgeon, 
Colonel George W. Terriberry; Judge-Advocate, Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel and Brevet Brigadier-General George E. P. 
Howard; Chief of Artillery, Colonel A. Judson Clark; 
Aides-de-Camp, Major James W. Howard, Major D. Stew- 
art Craven. 

First Brigade— Brigadier-General P. Farmer Wanser. 

Staff— Assistant Adjutant-General. Lieutenant-Colonel 
John A. Parker; Inspector, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles 
Boltwood; Surgeon, Lieutenant-Colonel Charles F. W. 
Myers; Quartermaster, Major Thomas F. Bedle; Paymas- 
ter, Major Allan B. Wallace; Judge-Advocate, Major 
Robert I. Hopper; Engineer, Major S. Wood McClave; 
Aides-de-Camp, Captain Hobart Tutlle, Captain Theodore 
E. Beck. 

Second Brigade— Brigadier-General AVilliam H. Cooper, 



n78 MILITARY. 

Staff— Assistant Adjutant-General, l^ieutenant-d'olnnel 
Christopher S. Magrath; Surgeon, Lieutenant-Colonel Dan- 
iel Strock; Quartermaster, Major William J. Browning; 
Judge-Advocate, Major E. Ambler Armstrong; Aides-de- 
Camp, Captain William H. Sl^irm, Jr., Captain Edwin B. 
Broadaway. 

First Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Newark — Colonel 
and Brevet Brigadier-General Edv.ard A. Campbell; Adju- 
tant, Captain Alvin H. Graff. 

Second Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Trenton— Col- 
onel Quincy O'M. Gillmore; Adjutant, Captain Frederick 
Gilkyson. 

Third Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Camden— Col- 
onel John I. Shinn; Adjutant, Captain George S. West. 

Fourth Regiment Infantry, Headquarters, Jersey City- 
Colonel, Robert G. Smith; Adjutant, Captain Benjamin M. 
Gerardin. 

Battery A, Field Artillery, Orange— Captain, Walter B. 
Adams. 

Battery B, Field Artillery, Camden— Captain, Ulysses 
Grant Lee. 

First Troop Cavalry, Newark— Captain, Richard Wayne 
Parker. 

Second Troop Cavalry, Red Bank— Captain, Edwin Field. 

Signal and Telegraplr Corps, Headquarters, Jersey City- 
Captain Henry G. Opdycke, Signal Officer. 



Roster of Officers of the Naval Reserve. 

First Battalion, Headquarters, U. S. S. "Portsmouth," 
Hoboken, N. J.— Commander, Washington Irving. 

Second Battalion, Headquarters, U. S. S. "Huntress," 
Camden, N. J.— Commander, James Boyd Potter; Execu- 
tive Officer, Lieutenant-Commander Albert De linger; 
Signal Officer and Aide, Lieutenant (Jr. Grade) Louis H. 
Miller. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 379 

COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



County Officers, With the I>ate of the Expiration of Their 
Term of Office, Time of Holding Courts, «&c. 

ATLANTIC COUNTY. 
County Seat— Mays Landing". Population, 1,359. 

Sheriff— Smith E. Johnson, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners- Lewis H. Smith, 1903j George W. Swift. 1902; 
Albert C. Stephany, 1904. 

County Clerk— Lewis P. Scott, 1905. 

Surrogate— John S. Risley, 1902. 

County Collector — L. C. Albertson, Atlantic City. 

Circuit Judge— Charles E. Hendrickson, 1908. 

County Judge— Allan B. Endicott, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Joseph E. P. Abbott, 1903. 

County Board of Elections— Henry S. Scull (1902), John T. 
French (1903), Dems; James D. South wick (1902), Henry 
Burley (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court — April, September and December— second 
Tuesday. 

BERGEN COUNTY. 

County Seat— Hackensack. Population, 9,443. 

Sheriff— Charles R. Soley, Rep., 1904. 

Coroners— Charles Hoffman, 1902; Willis W. Curry, 
Charles S. Robertson, both 1904. 

County Clerk— John R. Ramsey, 1905. 

Surrogate— David A. Pell, 1903. 

County Collector— James H. Coe, Englewood. 

Circuit Judge— Jonathan Dixon, 1904. 

County Judge— David D. Zabriskie, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Ernest Koester, 1905. 

County Board of Elections— William Ely (1903), James 
Young (1902), Dems; Albert Hoffman (1902), Aaron C. Dem- 
arest (1903). Reps. 

Terms of Court— April, first Tuesday; September, second 
Tuesday; and December, second Tuesday. 

BURLINGTON COUNTY. 
County Seat— Mount Holly. Population, 5,168. 
Sheriff— Charles R. Fenton, Rep., 1902. 
Coroners— Barclay C. Seeds, Joshua D. Janney. 1902; 
Thomas S. Wells, 1904. 



380 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

County Clerk— William Roland Warrick, 1904. 

Surrogate— Franklin P. Endicott, 1906. 

Auditor— W. W. Worrell. 

County Collector— Joseph Powell, Mount Holly. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G. Garrison, 1902. 

County Judge— Joseph H. Gaskill, 1904. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Samuel Atkinson, 1905. 

County Board of Elections— Jacob C. Hendrickson (1903), 
Samuel W. Semple (1902), Dems.; Samuel K. Robbins (1902), 
John R. Howell (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday, January; second Tues- 
day, May and October. 

CAMDEN COUNTY. 

County Seat— Camden. Population, 75,935. 

Sheriff— John Wesley Sell, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— Frank Neall Robinson, Henry S. Gaskill, 1902; 
Paul N. Litchfield, 3904. 

County Clerk— Frank F. Patterson, Jr., 1906. 

Register of Deeds— Isaac W. Coles, 1905. 

Surrogate— George S. West, 1902. 

County Collector— Mahlon F. Ivins, Camden. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G. Garrison, 1902. 

County Judge— Edward Ambler Armstrong, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Frank T. Lloyd, 1905; Assistant. 
F. Morse Archer, 1905. 

Port Warden— A. B. Frazee. 

County Board of Elections— John W. Beaston (1902), 
David E. Barry (190.3), Dems.; Thomas A. Walton (1903), 
Joseph M. Engard (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday, April: second Tuesday, 
September and December. 

CAPE MAY COUNTY. 

County Seat— Cape May Court House. Population, . 

Sheriff— Samuel E. Ewing, Dem., 1904. 

Coroners— George Sayre, Jr., 1901.; J. SLratton Ware, Ed- 
ward F. Duncan, 1902. 

County Clerk— Julius Way, 1905. 

Surrogate— E. Clinton Hewitt, 1902. 

County Collector— Edmund L. Ross, Cape May Court 
House. 

Circuit Judge— Charles E. Hendrickson, 1908. 

County Judge— Harrison H. Voorhees, 1906. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 381 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Eugene C. Cole, 1903. 
County Board of Elections— William J. Tyler (1903), Will- 
iam Porter (1902), Dems. ; William T. Bate (1902), Joseph K. 
Hand (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday in April, September 
and December. 

CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 
County Seat— Bridgeton. Population, 13,913. 

Sheriff— William C. Hendee, Dem., 1902. 

Coroners— Ferdinand Jones, Jr., 1904; Clayton McPherson, 
1902; Herbert L. Cooper, 1903. 

County Clerk— George W. Betchner, 1904. 

Surrogate— Frank C. Bray, 1903. 

County Collector — William O. Garrison, Bridgeton. 

Circuit Judge — Charles E. Hendrickson, 1908. 

County Judge— Thomas W. Trenchard, 1904. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— J. Hampton Fithian, 1904. 

County Board of Elections— John Ogden (1902), George W. 
Eckhart (1903), Dems.; Charles S. Bellows (1903), John R. 
Radcliffe (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court — First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

ESSEX COUNTY. 

County Seat— Newark. Population, 246,070. 

Sheriff— George Virtue, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— James H. Grant, Joseph M. Malatesta, Otto C. 
Fischer, 1902. 

County Clerk— William O. Kuebler, 1902. 

Surrogate— Joseph W. Ellor, 1904. 

County Collector— Richard W. Booth, Franklin. 

Register of Deeds— George E. De Camp, 1905. 

Circuit Judge— Chief Justice William S. Gummere. 1908. 

County Judge- Alfred F. Skinner. 1906. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Chandler W. Riker, 1904. 

Assistant Prosecutor— Louis Hood, 1904. 

County Board of Elections— Leonard Kalisch (1902), Ed- 
win A. Raynor (1903), Dems.; Noah Guter (1903), Samuel 
C. Martin (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 
County Seat— Woodbury. Population, 4,087. 
Steriff— Franklin D, Springer, Rep., 1902. 
Coroners— Harry A. Stout, 1903; Charles S. Heritage, 1904; 
WillLam H. Miller, 1902. 



382 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

County Clerk— Frank B. Ridgway, 1902. 

Surrogate— Millard F. Du Bois, 1904. 

County Collector— George E. Pierson, Woodbury. 

Circuit Judge— Charles G. Garrison, 1902. 

County Judg-e— John S. Jessup, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Lewis Starr, 1906. 

County Board of Elections— Thomas C. Dilkes (1902), 
Charles Wolforth (1903), Dems.; George E. Pierson (1902), 
William H. Hoffman (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in February and fourth 
Tuesday in May and October. 

HUDSON COUNTY. 
County Seat— Jersey City. Population, 206,433. 

Sheriff-Carl H. Ruempler, Dem., 1902. 

Coroners— William N. Parslow, Stephen F. Wyse, 1903; 
John Gschwind, 1902. 

County Clerk— Maurice J. Stack, 1905. 

Surrogate — James T. Lillis, 1906. 

County Collector— Hugh Dugan, Jersey City. 

Register of Deeds— James C. Clarke, 1905. 

Circuit Judge— Gilbert Collins, 1903. 

County Judge— John A. Blair, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— James S. Irwin, 1903. 

Assistant Prosecutor— George T. Vickers. 

Port Warden— John J. Toffey. 

Harbor Masters— Vacancies. 

County Board of Elections— Michael J. Coyle (1902), 
Augustus A. Rich (1903), Dems.; Joseph J. Gusto (1902). 
Thomas M. Coughlin (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

HUNTERDON COUNTY. 
County Seat — Flemington. Population, 2,060. 

Sheriff— George M. Freeh, Dem., 1902. 

Coroners— Peter D. Rockafellow, 1902; Edgar Allen, 1904; 
David Treftz, 1903. 
Covnty Clerk— Andrew R. Dilts, 1905. 
Surrogate— Paul A. Queen, 1904. 
County Collector — E. Humphrey, Glen Gardner. 
Circuit Judge— Mahlon Pitney, 1908. 
County Judge— John L. Connett, 1906. 
Prosecutor of the Pleas— H. Burdett Herr, 1906. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 383 

County Board of Elections— Joseph L. Chamberlain 
(1902), Johnson Warford (1903), Dems.; John J. Nunn (1902), 
J. J. Thorn (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court — Second Tuesday In April, second Tues- 
day in September and second Tuesday in December. 

MERCER COUNTY. 

County Seat— Trenton. Population, 73,307. 

Sheriff— Samuel T. Atchley, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— John R. D. Bower, Edmund R. Nutt, James B. 
Clugston, 1902. 

County Clerk — Barker Gummere, Jr., 1903. 

Surrogate— John W. Cornell, 1904. 

County Collector — Thomas H. Thropp, Trenton. 

Circuit Judge— Mahlon Pitney, 1908. 

County Judge— John Rellstab, 1905. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— William J. Crossley, 1903. 

County Board of Elections— Samuel J. Brown (1903), John 
D'Arcy (1902), Dems.; William A. MacCrellish (1902), 
Charles H. Mather (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in January, second Tues- 
day in May and second Tuesday in October. 

MIDDLESEX COUNTY. 

County Seat— New Brunswick. Population, 20,006. 

Sheriff— Isaiah D. Barclay, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— Frank C. Henry, 1903; Arthur L. Smith, John 
Albright, 1902. 

County Clerk— John H. Conger, 1904. 

Surrogate— Leonard Furman, 1902. 

County Collector— David Serviss, New Brunswick. 

Circuit Judge— John Franklin Fort, 190S. 

County Judge— Woodbridge Strong, 1906. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— John S. Voorhees, 1906. 

County Board of Elections— Hendrick H. Brown (1902), 
Oliver Kelly (1903), Dems.; William B. Prlckett (1903), John 
L. Suydam (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

MONMOUTH COUNTY. 

County Seat— Freehold. Population, 2,934. 
Sheriff, Obadiah E. Davis, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— Edgar I. Vanderveer, John Flock, John T. 
Tetley, 1902. 

County Clerk— Joseph McDermott, 1904. 
26 



S84 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

Surrogate— David S. Crater, 1903. 

County Collector— Asher T. Applegate, Freehold. 

Circuit Judge— John Franklin Fort, 1908. 

County Judge— Wilbur A. Heisley, 1905. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— John E. Foster, 1905. 

County Board of Elections— John P. Walker (1902), Fred 
F. Armstrong (1903), Dems.; John C. Patterson (1902), 
David D. Denise (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday after the first day of Jan- 
uary, first Tuesday in May and October. 

MORRIS COUNTY. 

County Seat— Moi'ristown. Population, 11,267. 

Sheriff— Charles A. Baker, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— James Hagan, Samuel Leonard, George C. 
Coates, 1902. 

County Clerk— Daniel S. Voorhees, 1903. 

Surrogate— David Young, 1903. 

County Collector— Joseph F. McLean, Butler. 

Circuit Judge— Abram Q. Garretson, 1908. 

County Judge— John B. Vreeland, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Alfred Elmer Mills, 1903. 

County Board of Elections— Clifford A. Fairchild (1902), 
Romeo Robinson (1903), Dems.; Ernst W. Schoneberger 
(1903), George L. Clark (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Third Tuesday in January, first Tuesday 
in May and second Tuesday in October. 

OCEAN COUNTY. 
County Seat— Toms River. Population, about 1,300. 

Sheriff— Adam W. Downey, Rep., 1902. 

Coroners— John Hagaman, 1904; Harry C. Shoemaker, 
Benjamin P. Bussom, 1902. 

County Clerk— Abram C. B. Havens, 1903. 

Surrogate— Joseph Grover, 1902. 

County Collector — Wilkinson G. ConracT, Barnegat, 

Circuit Judge— Bennet Van Syckel, 1904. 

County Judge— Albert C. Martin, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Theodore S. R. Brown, 1902. 

County Board of Elections— David C. Brower (1903), Rem 
L. Disbrow (1902), Dems.; Arthur B. Clute (1903), Charles 
H. Ward well (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Second Tuesday in April, first Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 385 

PASSAIC COUNTY. 

County Sea.t — Paterson. Population, 105,171. 

Sheriff— John W. Sturr. Rep., 1903. 

Coroners— Georg-e McClary, 1904; John S. Yates, Tunis 
Vermeulen, 1902. 

County Clerk— John J. Slater, 1906. 

Surrogate— Charles M. King, 1905. 

County Collector— P. Henrj^ Shields, Paterson. 

Circuit Judge— Jonathan Dixon, 1904. 

County Judge— John S. Barkalow, 1902. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Eugene Emley, 1906. 

Assistant Prosecutor of the Pleas— Ralph W. Shaw. 

County Board of Elections— John W. DeMott (1902), Frank 
T. Forbes (1903), Dems.; Robert Bustard (1902), Stephen 
Dawson (1903), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday after the first day of Jan- 
uary, fourth Tuesday in April and September. 

SALEM COUNTY. 
County Seat— Salem. Population, 5,811. 

Sheriff- Robert M. Vanneman, Dem., 1902. 

Coroners— James D. Torton, John McDonnol, George W. 
Fitch, 1902. 

County Clerk- S. Luther Richmond, 1904. 

Surrogate— Loren P. Plummer, 1902. 

County Collector— James Butcher, Salem. 

Circuit Judge— Charles E. Hendrickson, 1908. 

County Judge— Clement H. Sinnickson, 1906. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— J. Furman Sinnickson, 1905. 

County Board of Elections— Charles C. Ford, Jr. (1902), 
Millard F. Riley (1903), Dems.; B. Frank Wood (1903), 
Henry Coombs (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court- Third Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 

SOMERSET COUNTY. 

County Seat— Somerville. Population, 4,843. 
Sheriff— Calvin D. McMurtry, Dem., 1904. 
Coroners— Frank L. Field, 1903; Claudius R. P. Fisher 
and Mahlon C. Smalley, 1904. 
County Clerk— Frank W. Sorrters, 1905. 
Surrogate— Henry N. Spencer, 1903. 
County Collector— E. B. Allen, Somerville. 
Circuit Judge— Abram Q. Garretson, 1908. 



386 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

County Judge— Louis H. Schenck, 1905. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas-James L. Griggs, 1905. 

Courty Board of Elections-Jacob Shurts (1903), John H. 
Mattison (1902), Dems. ; William H. Cawley (1902). William 
H. H. Wyckoff, 1903. 

Terms of Court-Third Tuesday in April, fourth Tuesday 
in September and fourth Tuesday in December. 

SUSSEX COUNTY. 
County Seat— Newton. Population, 4,376. 

Sheriff— John M. Hotalin. Dem., 1902. 

Coroners-Charles E. Dowling, 1904; Charles M. Dun- 
ning, Bruno Hood, 1902. 

County Clerk— Ora C. Simpson, 1902. 

Surrogate— Jacob M. Demarest, 1903. 

County Collector— William E. Ross, Sparta. 

Circuit Judge— Abram Q. Garretson, 1908. 

County Judge— Henry Huston, 1906. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— John L. Swayze, 1903. 

County Board of Elections-Robert T. Smith (1903), Will- 
iam D. Wilson (1902), Dems.; William H. Dalrymple (1903), 
Charles Fredenburg (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in April, second Tuesday 
in September and second Tuesday in December. 

UNION COUNTY. 
County Seat— Elizabeth. Population, 52,130. 

Sheriff— Robert G. Houston. Rep., 1902. 

Coroners-P. DuBois Bunting, 1903; John W. Gray, 1902; 
Horace R. Divengood, 3904. 

County Clerk— William Howard. 1904. 

Surrogate— George T. Parrot, 1902. 

County Collector— E. M. Wood, Elizabeth. 

Circuit Judge^Bennet Van Syckel, 1904. 

County Judge— Benjamin A. Vail, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— Nicholas C. J. English. 1903. 

Harbor Master, Elizabeth and Elizabeth Creek— John P. 
Arnold. 

County Board of Elections— Patrick J. Ryan (1903). John 
L. Crowell (1902). Dems.; William C. Carr (1903), John W. 
Murray, Jr. (1902), Reps. 

Terms of Court— First Tuesday in January, May and 
October. 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 3S7 

WARREN COUNTY. 

County Seat— Belvidere. Population, 1,834. 

Sheriff— George Cole, Dem., 1902. 

Coroners— Charles N. Shrope, 1903; Clinton Kerr, Peter F. 
Hagerty, 1902. 

County Clerk— Rowland Firth, 1905. 

Surrogate- Charles B. Sharp, 1904. 

County Collector — James A. Allen, Oxford. 

Circuit Judge— Mahlon Pitney, 1908. 

County Judge— George M. Shipman, 1903. 

Prosecutor of the Pleas— George A. Angle, 1906. 

County Board of Elections— J. William Miller (1902), 
Henry M. Vliet (1903), Dems. ; A. Blair Kelsey (1902), An- 
drew Merrick (190.3), Reps. 

Terms of Court— Fourth Tuesday in April, fourth Tuesday 
in September and the first Tuesday after the fourth Tues- 
day in December. 

Time of Holding Courts. 

The Court of Chancery meets on the first Tuesday in 
February, the third Tuesday in May and the third Tues- 
day in October. 

The Supreme Court meets on the third Tuesday in Feb- 
ruary, the first Tuesday in June and the first Tuesday in 
November. 

The Court of Errors and Appeals meets on the first Tues- 
day in March, the third Tuesday in June and the third 
Tuesday in November. 

The Court of Pardons meets on the second Tuesday in 
March, the third Tuesday in June and the third Tuesday in 
November. 

The Prerogative Court meets on the first Tuesday in Feb- 
ruary, the third Tuesday in May and the third Tuesday in 
October. 

The U. S. Circuit Court meets on the fourth Tuesday in 
March and the fourth Tuesday in September. 

The U. S. District Court meets on the third Tuesday in 
January, April, June and September. 

United States Court of Appeals meets first Tuesday in 
March and the third Tuesday in September. 

The Circuits of New Jersey are divided as follows: 

1st District— Cape May, Cumberland, Salem and Atlantic. 
justice Hendrickson. 



288 COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

2d District— Gloucester, Camden and Burlington. Justice 
Garrison. 

3d District— Mercer, Hunterdon and Warren. Justice 
Pitney. 

4th District— Middlesex and Monmouth. Justice Fort. 

5th District— Somerset, Morris and Sussex. Justice Gar- 
retson. 

6th District — Bergen and Passaic. Justice Dixon. 

7th District— Essex. Chief Justice Gummere. 

8th District— Hudson. Justice Collins. 

9th District— Union and Ocean. Justice Van Syckel. 

For the time of holding county courts, see County Di- 
rectory. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 389 

REPORTS OF STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



state Treasurer's Report. 

The annual report of State Treasurer Swain for the fis- 
cal year ending October 31st, 1901, makes the following 
exhibit: 

STATE FUND. 

Receipts. 

Attorney-General's Department $1 00 

Board of Fish and Game Commissioner.^ 317 79 

Clerk in Chancery 46,968 48 

Clerk of the Supreme Court 48,353 67 

Collateral Inheritance Tax 163,740 62 

Commissioner of Banking- and Insurance 65,996 80 

Commissions 3,290 00 

Discharged Convicts 543 12 

Dividends 18,870 00 

Geological Survey 345 00 

Judicial Fees 33,498 91 

Loans to School Fund (repayment of loan) 156,500 00 

New Jersey Oyster and Shell Commission 2,570 00 

Oyster Commission 25 00 

Official Fees 44,006 28 

Refunded Railroad Tax 169 53 

Secretary of State 588,319 30 

Sinking Fund Account 14,000 00 

Spanish- American War 9,827 80 

State Board of Health 356 88 

State Dairy Commissioner 3,000 00 

State House Commission 286 71 

State Oyster Commission (Delaware Bay, etc.). 9,183 79 

State Prison Receipts 88,552 98 

State Tax from Railroad Corpora- 
tions $1,097,816 19 

Less amount allotted to Taxing Dis- 
tricts pursuant to Act approved 

March 31, 1897 202,802 75 

895,013 44 



Tax from Miscellaneous Corpora- 
tions $1,630,574 19 

Tax from Paterson Savings Institu- 
tion 2,500 00 



1,633,074 19 



$3,826,8U 29 



390 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

Disbursements. 

Adjutant-General's Department $10,496 34 

Advertising 2,994 90 

Agricultural College Fund, "Interest" 2,400 00 

Agricultural Experiment Station 19,000 00 

Assembly Committee of Inquiry 38 50 

Attorney-General's Department 12,734 73 

Blind and Feeble-Minded. 78,554 14 

Board of Fish and Game Commissioners 24,000 00 

Board of Pilot Commissioners 1,100 00 

Board of Visitors to Agricultural College of 

New Jersey 140 00 

Bodies Thrown Upon Shores of the State by 

Shipwreck 24 12 

Bureau of Statistics 9,955 12 

Burial Grounds 100 00 

Census Enumerators 436 00 

Collateral Inheritance Tax 14,983 21 

County Lunatic Asylums 198,431 63 

County Superintendents 22,739 92 

Court Expenses 440 00 

Court of Chancery 76,823 37 

Court of Errors and Appeals 11,891 90 

Court of Pardons 743 80 

Deaf -Mutes 43,000 00 

Department of Banking and Insurance 31,546 81 

Discharged Convicts 2,000 00 

Electoral College and Board of State Canvassers 372 00 

Emergency 16,988 30 

Executive Department 15,230 40 

Factories and Workshops 9,893 76 

Farnum Preparatory School 2,700 00 

Fish and Game Commission 750 00 

Free School Libraries 5,500 00 

Geological Survey 13,000 00 

Home for Disabled Soldiers 37,200 00 

Home for Feeble-Minded Women 6,997 75 

Industrial Education 43,000 00 

Inauguration of the President of the United 

States 10,000 00 

Insurance 3,299 50 

Late Adjutant-General 782 77 

Law and Equity Reports 10,438 76 

Legislature 88,169 24 

Loans to School Fund 194,000 00 

Manual Training and Industrial School at Bor- 

dentcwn 5,000 pQ 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 391 

Manual Training" and Industrial School for 

Colored Youth $1,000 00 

Meeting- of the Civic Federation on Trusts 66 70 

Medals 1,000 00 

Monmouth Battle Monument 381 53 

National Guard 106,841 74 

Naval Reserve 14,543 47 

Nevv^ark Armory 50,000 00 

New Jersey Home for Disabled Soldiers, Sailors, 

Marines, etc 15,198 61 

New Jersey Oyster Shell Commission 442 35 

New Jersey Reformatory 43,267 13 

Office of Clerk in Chancery 33,679 33 

Office of Clerk of the Supreme Court 22,937 37 

Office of Comptroller 13,982 17 

Office of Secretary of State 30,411 52 

Office of Treasurer 13,407 23 

Oyster Commission 9,936 49 

Oyster Commission (Clams) 1,998 05 

Palisades 2,500 00 

Pan-American Exposition 27 500 00 

Pensions 4,462 03 

Preservation of Records 4,100 00 

Printing 41,699 94 

Port of Perth Amboy 643 45 

Public Library Commission 200 00 

Public Roads 155,605 00 

Quartermaster-General's Department 12,089 86 

Refunded Taxes on Exempted Miscellaneous 

Corporations 4,116 11 

Refunded Railroad Tax 169 53 

Riparian Commission 12,477 58 

School Census 1,500 00 

School Fund Expenses 3,118 34 

Sinking- Fund Account 4,260 00 

Sinking Fund Legal Expenses ■ 396 23 

Spanish-American War 2,465 73 

State Board of Agriculture 7,000 00 

State Board of Arbitration 6,220 00 

State Board of Assessors 23,382 11 

State Board of Children's Guardians 3,989 00 

State Board of Education 3,535 00 

State Board of Health 15,737 68 

State Board of Taxation 14,568 78 

State Charities Aid Association 600 00 

State Dairy Commissioner 13,000 00 

State Home for Boys 61,195 61 



S92 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

State Home for Girls $38,464 83 

State Horticultural Society 399 00 

State Hospitals 801 18 

State Hospital at Trenton 78,409 34 

State Hospital at Morris Plains 135,705 46 

State House Building- Commission 50,000 00 

State House Commission 54,999 65 

State House Commission "Special" 14,255 16 

State House Commission "Special No. 1" 500 00 

State Library 7,599 92 

State Museum 1,999 36 

State Normal School 51,997 83 

State Oyster Commission (Delaware Bay, etc.).. 17,155 42 

Sta' ■ Prison Maintenance 89,974 08 

State Prison Furniture, Appliances and Repairs 11,670 40 

State Prison Salaries 99,795 29 

State Sewerage Commission 9,409 83 

State Board of Examiners 153 91 

State School Tax (Chapter 96, Laws of 1900) 800,588 25 

Stnte Traveling- Libraries 1,000 00 

Supreme Court 107,248 84 

SuiK-rintendent of Public Instruction 12,498 75 

Teachers' Institutes 3,000 00 

Teachers Libraries 574 25 

Trenton Battle Monument 750 00 

Tuberculosis Commission 10,490 95 

Villag-e for Epileptics 63,886 00 

Washington Association of New Jersey 2,500 00 

Weather Service 999 94 

$3,480,350 28 

Receipts over Disbursements 346,461 01 



$3,826,811 29 

EXTRAORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS. 
The following- extraordinary disbursements are included 
in the above statement: 

State School Tax $800,588 25 

State House Extension and Furniture 64,255 16 

Newark Armory (final payment construction ac- 
count) 50,000 00 

Village for Epileptics 46,587 93 

New Jersey Reformatory 42,490 73 

State Hospital at Morris Plains 38,787 63 

Pan-American Exposition 27,500 00 

gtate Home for Girls 16,191 IQ 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 393 

Home for Disabled Soldiers at Kearny $14,700 00 

Inauguration of the President of the United 

States 10,000 00 

Home for Disabled Soldiers, Sailors, Marines 

and their Wives 7,698 61 

Home for Feeble-Minded Women at Vineland.. 6,997 75 
Survey of Grounds of the Delaware Bay and 

Maurice River Cove 2,700 66 

Spanish-American War 2,465 73 

Farnum Preparatory School 1,500 00 

Medals for the First Defenders in the late Civil 

War 1,000 00 

State Hospital at Trenton 600 00 



$1,134,063 55 
SCHOOL FUND. 

Receipts. 

State School Tax for the year 1900 $2,317,825 00 

Interest on Bonds other than School 
District Bonds and those secured by 

Mortgages $80,783 38 

Rents from Riparian Leases 41,380 79 

Interest on School District Bonds 26,918 77 

Interest on Bonds and Mortgages 20,218 42 

Dividends 14,650 00 

Licenses 1,118 00 

Rents from Real Estate 1,359 01 

$186,428 37 
Loans to School Fund (from State 
Fund) 194,000 00 

380,428 37 

Securities paid off- 
Stocks and Bonds $132,575 00 

School District Bonds .34,470 00 

Bonds and Mortgages 10,376 50 

Riparian Leases 6,554 95 

Real Estate 11,250 00 

$195,226 45 
Loss on sale of Real Estate 5,750 00 

200,976 45 

Grants 104,586 35 

Balance in bank November 1, 1900 79,439 70 

$3,082,255 87 



394 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

Disbursements. 

State School Tax for the year 1900 $2,317,825 GO 

Investments of School Fund 274,070 00 

Loss on sale of Real Estate 5,750 00 

Free Public Schools $200,000 00 

Loans to School Fund (repayment to 

State Fund) 156,500 00 

Premium and Accrued Interest on 

Loans 15,273 88 

371,773 88 

Balance in Bank October 31, 1901 113,836 99 

$3,083,255 87 
Total amount of School Fund Securities $3,773,351 17 



State Board of Assessors. 

FOR THE ASSESSMENT AND TAXATION OF RAIL- 
ROAD AND OTHER CORPORATE PROPERTY. 

David Baird, Robert S. Green, Stephen J. Meeker, John 
C. Rankin, Jr., Irvine E. Maguirei, Secretary; George Will- 
iam Barnard, Assistant Secretary. 

This department of the State Government was created 
under an act of the Legislature entitled "An act for the 
taxation of railroad and canal property," approved April 
10th, 1884. 

The work of the Board was increased during the same 
year by the passage of another act, entitled "An act to 
provide for the imposition of State taxes upon certain cor- 
porations, and for the collection thereof." approved April 
18th, 1884. 

By an act of the Legislature of 1900 (taking effect Janu- 
ary 1st, 1901), this Board is further charged with the assess- 
ment and apportionment of the municipal franchise tax 
to be paid by persons, copartnerships, associations or cor- 
porations using or occupying public streets, highways, 
roads or other public places. 

The report of the Board for the year 1901 shows that 
117 railroad and canal companies within the State are sub- 
ject to taxation. These companies represent about 2,300 
miles of railroads and 173 miles of canals. 

The following table is a summary of the valuation and 
assessment of railroad and canal property for the year 1901, 
subject to review by the Board, which review is now in 
progress; 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



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396 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



MISCELLANEOUS CORPORATIONS. 

Under the provisions of the act of April 18th, 1884, and its 
supplements, the Board has assessed for the year 1901 a 
State franchise tax against 7,303 corporations, amounting 
to $2,325,384.78 tax. 

The following table shows the comparison with previous 
years of the number of corporations assessed under this 
act, and the amount of tax levied: 



Inc. in Inc. in 

No. of Amount No. of Amount 
Corporations of Tax Corporations of Tax 
Years. Assessed. Assessed. Assessed. Assessed. 



1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888, 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1899. 
1900. 
1901. 



619 
797 
917 
1,132 
1,457 
1,698 
2,103 
2,377 
3,149 
3,889 
4,283 
4,450 
4,593 
4,777 
5,188 
5,469 
6,602 
7,303 



$195,273 51 

235,769 40 

244,035 81 

287,702 13 

360,197 59 

438,893 42 

574,048 16 

629,659 62 

788,486 86 

973,417 19 

1,077,066 39 

1,092,744 59 

1,060,056 52 

1,075,278 52 

1,197,030 54 

1,332,635 95 

2,048,008 03 
2,325.384 78 



178 


$40,495 89 


120 


8,266 41 


215 


43,666 32 


325 


72,495 46 


241 


78,695 83 


405 


135,154 74 


274 


55,661 46 


772 


158,827 24 


740 


184,930 33 


394 


103,649 20 


167 


15,678 20 


143 





184 
411 
281 
1.133 
701 



15,222 00 
121,752 02 
135,605 41 
715,372 08 
277.376 75 



Dec. in 
Amount 
of Tax 

Assessed. 



$32,688 07 



State Board of Health. 

The State Board of Health was created by the Legisla- 
ture in 1877, and the annual reports show the work which 
has been accomplished during the past twenty-four years. 
Professor C. F. Brackett, M.D., LL.D., Is President of the 
Board, and Henry Mitchell, M.D., is Secretary. The Secre- 
tary of State, the Attorney-General and the State Geolo- 
gist are members ex offlcio. The other members are Laban 
Dennis, M.D., Newark; Henry W. Elmer, M.D., Bridgeton; 
Henry B. Rue, M.D., Hoboken; William H. Murray, M.D., 
Plainfield; George P. Olcott, C.E., East Orange. 

In addition to the duties assigned to the Board by the 
act under which it is constituted, it has charge of the 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 397 

execution of the laws for the prevention of the spread of 
contagious diseases of animals, for regulating the sale of 
petroleum, for preventing the Sale of contaminated milk, 
for regulating maritime quarantine, for conducting the 
State laboratory of hygiene and for preventing the sale 
of diseased meat and other unwholesome foods. 

The act approved March 21, 1901, gives to the Board more 
definite duties relating to the prevention of the sale of 
adulterated foods and drugs. Under this act George W. 
McGuire has been appointed Chief Inspector of Foods and 
Drugs. 

Besides its special work the Board is constantly con 
suited by local health authorities concerning methods for 
restricting the spread of preventable diseases, the abate- 
ment of nuisances, the prevention of the pollution of 
streams, and for the improvement of sanitary administra- 
tion. 

As a Bureau of Vital Statistics the Board receives and 
records all marriages, births and deaths which occur in 
the State, and tabulates these records for use in proving 
descent; in ^the relations of guardians and wards; in the 
disabilities of minors; in the administration of estates; 
the settlement of insurance and pensions; the requirements 
of foreign countries concerning residence, marriages and 
legacies; for proving marriages in our own country; in 
voting and in the jury and militia service; in the right to 
admission and practice in the professions and in public 
office; in the enforcement of the laws relating to education 
and to child labor; the determination of the "age of con- 
sent," &c. 

The following table shows the number of marriages, 
births, still-births and deaths registered each year since 
the establishment of the Bureau of Vital Statistics. 

Non- 
Still- Resident 
Year. Marriages. Births. Deaths. Births. Marriages. 

1878 542 1,845 1,501 

1879 7,188 23,205 20,575 1,306 

1880 8,100 24,292 19,125 1,475 

1881 8,336 24,268 21,039 1,492 

1882 9,094 23,812 26,082 1,409 

1883 9,911 25,667 23,445 1,511 

1884 9,329 26,539 21,821 1,400 

1885 9,348 25,189 23,966 1,782 

1886 12,838 27,382 22,923 1,494 2,572 

1887 15,639 28,016 24,556 1,580 4,332 



398 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



Year. Marriages. 

1888 16,574 

1889 15,962 

1890 15,954 

1891 15,847 

1892 16,572 

1893 17,627 

1894 16,690 

1895 16,537 

1896 18,774 

1897 18,171 

1898 13,213 

1899 13,336 

1900 15,875 

1901 17,015 

318,472 

Grand total, 1,672,831. 









Non- 






Still- 


Resident. 


Births. 


Deaths. 


Births. : 


Marriages, 


29,084 


27,479 


1,739 


4,475 


30,407 


26,778 


1,859 


4,072 


31,770 


28,773 


1,819 


4,187 


30,023 


29,179 


1,809 


3,411 


32,726 


33,016 


1,848 


3,767 


34,639 


30,929 


1,892 


4,073 


35,108 


30,355 


2,022 


3,881 


33,198 


30,901 


1,933 


3,282 


33,006 


31,315 


2,033 


4,132 


31,595 


29,822 


2,031 


4,090 


32,515 


27,337 


2,060 


262 


29,419 


30,999 


1,877 


64 


36,837 


32,204 


2,045 


50 


37,591 


31,777 


1,913 


— 



688,133 625,897 40,329 
Yearly average, 69,701. 



State Bureau of Vital Statistics. 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1901. 

Marriages. Births. Deaths. 

Atlantic 523 857 799 

Bergen 406 1,288 1,137 

Burlington 387 749 892 

Camden 1,445 1,701 1,914 

Cape May 103 188 192 

Cumberland 441 940 659 

Essex 3,125 8,010 6,165 

Gloucester 216 482 456 

Hudson 3,439 8,371 7,263 

Hunterdon 217 422 454 

Mercer 776 817 1,436 

Middlesex 629 1,483 1,234 

Monmouth 572 940 1,251 

Morris 365 845 1,040 

Ocean 166 320 310 

Passaic 1,527 3,220 2,647 

Salem 199 354 332 

Somerset 234 468 418 

Sussex 165 265 272 

Union 626 1,616 1,640 

Warren 212 468 537 

15,873 33,804 31,048 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 399 

STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1901. 

Cities. Marriages. Births. Deaths. 

Atlantic City 376 483 522 

Bayonne 223 1,064 509 

Bloomfield 61 145 136 

Bordentown 62 59 76 

Bridgeton 110 273 207 

Burlington 22 48 133 

Camden 1,275 1,206 1,369 

Dover 66 96 89 

East Orange 1.38 324 221 

Elizabeth 311 823 956 

Englewood 36 75 84 

Gloucester City 45 136 185 

Hackensack 82 203 167 

Harrison 50 205 229 

Hoboken 762 1,491 1,164 

Jersey 'City 1,838 3,895 3,970 

Long Branch 78 111 188 

Millville 143 276 140 

Montclair 73 304 243 

Morristown 72 175 210 

Newark 2,575 6,064 4,615 

New Brunswick 202 336 364 

Orange 125 576 418 

Passaic City 595 , 971 583 

Paterson 837 1,940 1,816 

Perth Amboy... 201 401 306 

Phillipsburg 120 135 152 

Plainfield 118 297 280 

Rahway 74 142 112 

Red Bank 55 58 83 

Salem City 67 66 83 

South Amboy 38 141 90 

Town of Union 170 341 223 

Trenton 673 646 1,165 

West Orange • 20 132 90 

11,693 23,638 21,178 



Road Improvement in New Jersey for the Year 1901. 

As a beautiful stream flows steadily onward, gathering 
volume in its course, until it carries the commerce of the 
nation, so the work of road building in New Jersey pro- 
ceeds ever forward towards its goal— the improvement of 
26 



400 STATE DEPARTMENTS. 

the leading- highways of the State— until the commodities 
of a commonwealth move with little friction into the finest 
markets of the world. 

The State Aid for this year has been responsible for the 
building- of one hundred and nine miles of roads at a cost 
of four hundred and fifty thousand dollars, one-third of 
which will consume the State appropriation for the year, 
namely, one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. The 
counties of Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, 
Essex, Gloucester, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, 
Passaic, Somerset and Warren are this year's recipients 
of the State's bounty. Cumberland, Hudson, Ocean and 
Salem were applicants, but did not commence their pre- 
liminary work soon enough to receive a portion of this 
year's appropriation. 

The demand for good roads is constantly increasing. 
Many more miles could be added to our annual list were 
the appropriation large enough. The ability tO' construct 
with rapidity has been much lessened this year by climatic 
influences. Our contractors lost nearly two months by 
insects, the excessive rains, and intensely hot periods and 
the diseases of horses common to the unusually wet 
weather that prevailed during the first and best part of 
the building season. Although the fall has been un- 
usually fine, the returns from finished work were late for 
our general summary of cost. The different causes men- 
tioned prevented several roads from being finished in time 
to receive the benefit of this year's appropriation. The 
great number of roads applied for in the different counties 
of the State, and the intense desire of many to have them 
immediately improved, so that the present generation can 
reap the advantages thereof, makes it quite embarrassing, 
with the limited means at our disposal, to be unable to 
supply the necessary funds. This leads us to the point 
that only by increased State appropriation can we in a 
measure satisfy the great demands of our people. An ad- 
ditional appropriation of one hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars would be none too much to make the working of 
the State Aid law easy, and to facilitate the improvement 
as rapidly as the larger part of our citizens desire. Not 
only this, but the law should be amended so that counties, 
if they so desire, could expend one-half of one per centum 
for road improvement, instead of one-fourth as the law 
now allows. The necessities of some counties are so great, 
especially agricultural ones, that the inhabitants of such 
counties are fighting like hungry wolves each to have 
their roads first improved. In no way can the State add 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 401 

to its wealth more rapidly than by giving of its surplus to 
the hardening of its roadbeds. By this process so many 
millions of dollars would be added to the wealth of the 
State, that if the present sources of State revenue should 
by any means cease and the State thereby be forced to 
impose a direct tax, property values would be so increased 
that the taxes would rest but lightly upon its inhabitants. 
During the past year the taxable value of the State has 
increased more than twenty-seven millions of dollars, and 
although this is not all attributable to good roads, yet a 
large part of it is, and most of the added wealth and pop- 
ulation settle in greatest volume along gcod roads. Much 
of the immense wealth in the cities near us is rapidly 
moving into our State and permanently remaining where- 
ever the roads present similar conditions to the streets 
of the cities. 

In cur travels around the State we often hear expres- 
sions made by men of liberal means, dwelling during the 
summer in many portions of our State, that if their neigh- 
borhood would have roads such as they could pleasantly 
travel over all winter, they would spend the fall and most 
of the winter months at their country homes. Their con- 
stant affirmation is that if they could travel to lectures, 
schools, churches and trading centers through the winter 
over hard, smooth highways, the city would have but 
little attraction for them. They would no longer be cooped 
up in narrow streets and closely crowded houses, where 
comfort only is attained, but would reside where wide 
spreading landscapes and plenty of fresh air give oppor- 
tunity for health and strength not afforded in populous 
cities. 

There are several localities in our State where the im- 
provement of the common roads has been instrumental in 
increasing and attracting to each from one to three or four 
millions of wealth during the few years we have been en- 
gaged in this work. In no State in the Union can road 
improvement add so largely to the population as in New 
Jersey, for the largest part of our territory is situated 
within short distances of the greatest cities in the Union. 
Our Slate in all parts has frequent and rapid communica- 
tion with them by steam roads, while trolley lines are 
being projected and built in all directions. Now, if our 
common roads are rapidly improved, our population will 
be increased beyond the calculation of the most optimistic 
and much wealth will be added to our State. 



402 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



NEW JERSEY ELECTION RETURNS. 



OFFICIAL, 1901. 



Atlantic County. 

t — Governor — ^ , 



-Senate- 



Assembly 



Absecon 

Atlantic City — 
I St Ward, ist 
I St Ward, 2d 
2d Ward, I St 
2d Ward, 2d 
2d Ward, 3d 
3d Ward, I St 
3d Ward, 2d 
3d Ward, 3d 
4th Ward, ist 
4th Ward, 2d 
4th Ward, 3d 



District 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 
District, 



>> 



432 
478 
323 
352 

200 
372 
467 
408 
271 
311 

394 






9^ 



56 
248 
137 

7Z 

85 

133 



204 
188 
262 
315 



9 

14 
149 
229 
179 



Brigantine, ist Precinct, . 

" 2d Precinct, 

Buena Vista Township, . 
Egg Harbor Township, . 

City, 

Galloway, ist District 136 

" 2d District, .... j}, 

Hamilton Township, 286 

Hammonton, ist Precinct,... 167 

" 2d Prec, .... 172 

T^inwood Borough, 50 

Longport Borough, 17 

Mullica, 94 

Pleasantville, 288 

Somers Point zy 

South Atlantic Borough, .... 4 

Weymouth, 79 



I 

4 
114 
162 
156 
121 

75 

119 

80 

40 

Z7 
6 

57 

153 

54 

26 

Z2 





C A 


a 


« c 





Id w 


WPi 




<u 





h-T 


h-r 


74 


57 



CJ o 

be u 



309 367 
372 261 



229 
306 
158 
319 



227 
"3 



177 



15 

5 207 
10 262 



366 293 
297 318 



27 



249 
310 
216 491 



3 
6 

13 









> -^ 4:; — : 



< 



11 55 

439 236 
479 153 



322 
356 
202 
379 
474 
396 
283 
33" 



3 
5 
6 

13 

2 

10 

5 
19 



9 
38 



13 
134 
180 

173 
96 

74 
229 
128 
135 

4 

70 

246 

24 

1Z 



4 
3 
130 
201 
161 
162 
76 
166 
117 

74 
61 
16 
84 
201 
48 
6 
40 



4 

3 

12 



3 
16 

7 

4 



14 
140 

235 

172 

137 

75 

279 

191 
191 
50 
18 
94 
277 
29 
1 1 
80 



137 
68 
8r 
127 
186 
216 
176 
238 



378 318 



4078 2053 93 311S 2991 50 4115 1991 



4 
121 

155 
164 
121 

7^ 

126 

62 

23 

Z7 

5 

57 

143 

52 

19 

31 



1973 1237 132 1637 1551 94 2001 1197 



Total vote in county,. 6051 3290 225 4752 454: 
Plurality in county,.. 2761 210 

Socialist, 16; Social-Iyabor, 10. 



144 61 16 3ii 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



403 



Bergen County. 

Governor -Senate- 



-ASSEMBLY- 



Allendale Borough, 77 

Bergen, 13 

Bergen Fields Borough, 42 

Bogota Borough, 45 

Carlstadt Borough 218 

Cliffside Park Borough, .... 61 

Cresskill Borough 44 

Delford Boruogh, 82 

Dumont Borough, 68 

East Rutherford Borough, ... 301 

Englewood Cliffs Borough, . . 14 

Edgewater Borough, 91 

Englewood, ist Ward 187 

" 2d Ward, .... 129 

" 3d Ward, .... 167 

" 4th Ward, .... 120 



Fairview Borough, 

Franklin, 

Garfield Borough, 

Glenrock Borough, 

Hasbrouck Heights Borough,. 

Harrington, ist District, . . . . 

" 2d District, 

Hillsdale, 

Hohokus, 

Leonia Borough, 

Little Ferr}^ Borough, 

Lodi 

Lodi Borough, 

Maywood Borough, 

Midland Park Borough, .... 

Midland, 

Montvale Borough, 



[659 

65 

175 

213 

53 

152 

246 

96 

122 

235 

91 

39 

24 

193 

46 

105 

121 

20 



o S 

>p\ 

o 
'Jj. 

55 

26 

80 

30 

289 

135 

29 

59 

45 

194 

I" 
118 
127 
131 
253 
159 

1747 

91 
1 10 
158 

52 

51 
185 

96 

54 
113 
50 
83 
44 
91 
51 
76 
61 
40 



7Z 
13 
41 
47 
232 

58 
43 
81 
66 

291 
15 
91 

191 

133 
178 
127 

1680 

65 
182 
226 

52 

142 

269 

T05 

122 

231 

93 

39 

24 

199 

39 

106 

122 

19 



;=£ 


w. - 
4) a 


. 




^£ 


^ w 








1—1 


"—1 4> 


5« 








49 
26 
80 
26 
273 
135 
28 
60 

44 
205 

16 
118 
121 
128 
241 
152 

[702 

88 

104 

145 

52 

58 

157 

86 

54 

115 

48 

81 

44 

8S 

57 

74 

61 

40 



80 
13 
43 
45 
227 

55 
47 
84 
66 

307 
15 
91 
176 
124 
164 
119 

1656 
66 
182 
241 
52 
144 
248 

97 

122 

232 

92 

39 

31 

244 

39 
109 
122 

19 



80 
13 
43 
44 
223 

54 
47 
83 
66 

307 
16 
90 
167 
116 
168 



1629 

56 
182 
219 

50 
148 
244 

96 

I 2.2. 

230 

86 

39 

24 

196 

39 

105 

120 

19 



51 

26 

80 

29 

280 

140 

25 

57 

44 

190 

15 
119 

153 
151 
253 
173 

1786 

95 

105 

134 

52 

54 

187 

94 

54 

114 

51 
81 
42 
80 
58 
71 
61 

41 



51 
26 
80 
26 
283 

135 

26 

58 

44 

190 

16 

118 

123 

129 

248 

150 

1703 
88 

105 
149 

53 
53 

183 
95 
54 

III 
48 
81 
40 
47 
55 
75 
61 
40 



New Barbadoes, ist Dist.,. 

2d Dist., 

3d Dist., 

" 4th Dist., 

" 5th Dist., 



1996 1406 2075 1349 2079 1975 1374 1338 

. 148 209 148 208 149 148 207 200 

. 234 227 241 218 242 240 215 218 

. 282 152 283 152 282 283 152 153 

256 113 262 107 260 258 112 III 

77 58 79 56 78 78 57 57 



997 759 1013 741 loii 1007 743 739 



North Arlington, 15 

Overpeck 223 

Old Tappan Borough, 7 

Orvil, 121 

Palisades, 38 



40 


18 


Zl 


17 


17 


38 


39 


43 


222 


140 


229 


223 


140 


135 


42 


ID 


40 


7 


7 


43 


43 


73 


120 


73 


118 


117 


72 


79 


93 


38 


92 


39 


38 


91 


91 



404 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Bergen County — Continued. 

Governor -Senate- < Assembi^y — -^ 

bo 
u 

rs 

Id §S -^d ;IS io. Id si li 

P^u P<u ^1^ ^<u uiJ o« Si:^ a 

^« I.Q -^^ |q ^^ ^^ ^Q cG 

r^ v:i ;> w» p^ r-i i-> ►-* 

Palisades Park Borough, 56 38 7- ^3 57 55 39 38 

Park Ridge Borough, 61 92 54 95 64 62 91 89 

Ridgefield, 199 241 207 234 I99 198 241 234 

Ridgefield Borough, 74 40 77 37 77 61 52 37 

Ridgewood, ist District 166 75 167 74 160 159 74 89 

2d District, ... 182 93 181 93 178 i77 9-2 loi 

Riverside Borough, 55 59 55 59 55 55 58 59 

Rutherford, ist District, 291 118 224 183 290 299 109 120 

2d District, .... 341 86 264 162 346 346 80 81 

Saddle River, 120 156 121 154 124 121 153 1S2 

Saddle River Borough 65 28 64 28 64 63 27 29 

Tenafly Borough, 176 131 181 124 181 177 128 127 

Teaneck, 89 38 91 37 90 87 38 37 

Union, 131 162 123 167 132 132 160 160 

Upper Saddle River Borough, 12 23 12 23 12 12 23 23 

Washington, 51 77 54 74 5i 5i 77 17 

Wallington Borough, 113 "3 "9 106 122 129 102 106 

Westwood Borough, 75 106 75 104 75 75 105 104 

Woodcliff Borough, 26 40 25 40 25 25 40 40 

Woodridge Borough, 62 42 63 43 ^2> 63 43 4? 

2749 2149 2637 2242 2765 2739 2116 2132 

Total vote in county, .. 7401 6061 7405 6034 75" 735o 6019 5912 

Plurality, 1340 I37i 

Prohibition, 163; Socialist, 199; Social-I.abor, 52. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 405 

Burlington County. 

t — Governor — ^ r Assembly ^ 



S« ^.^ ofi; ^pi •£::< gp £C 

S en M "ffi ^ ;j i2 

Bass River, 41 122 2 51 51 109 109 

Beverly City, 240 133 17 245 243 130 128 

Beverly Township, 188 126 30 186 175 134 114 

Bordentown, ist District, 268 154 19 266 281 142 140 

" 2d District, 166 177 6 168 174 166 168 

3d District, 94 138 2 96 98 134 135 

Bordentown Township, 55 35 4 53 56 34 36 

Burlington, ist Dist., 204 171 3 213 211 165 164 

" ist Dist., 2d Ward, . 160 126 i 167 159 121 125 

" 2d Dist., 2d Ward, . 154 104 .... 157 156 100 102 

" 3d Dist., 215 2.2y 3 228 226 212 213 

" 4th Dist., 263 163 6 273 268 162 161 

2048 1676 93 2103 2098 1609 1595 

Burlington Township, 136 71 3 140 137 69 66 

Chester, East District, 248 92 24 246 242 88 86 

" West District, 233 173 25 238 235 163 161 

Chesterfield, 133 73 9 130 126 tj 76 

Cinnaminson, ist District, 176 75 6 183 177 71 dj 

" 2d District, 84 126 3 102 82 iii 119 

Delran, 56 122 20 56 57 119 115 

Eastampton, 58 49 3 65 65 43 44 

Evesham, 190 126 18 185 179 135 126 

Fieldsboro Borough, 61 50 2 63 58 48 51 

Florence, 283 174 18 294 274 159 183 

Eumberton, 185 93 11 191 190 84 86 

Mansfield, 165 167 10 167 170 158 161 

Medford, 221 174 34 219 219 171 172 

Mount Laurel, 151 82 2 150 148 81 81 

New Hanover, 142 178 8 138 142 180 177 

Northampton, ist District, 282 153 i 295 291 140 138 

" 2d District, 168 157 .... 189 190 135 135 

** 3d District, 261 230 6 312 309 178 179 

Palmyra, 326 119 14 371 319 86 95 

Pemberton Township, 146 142 2 146 147 141 141 

Pemberton Borough, iii 93 6 no no 93 91 

Riverside, 264 277 13 280 248 297 252 

Shamong, 68 66 ... . 70 41 89 59 

Southampton, 260 213 5 269 264 207 210 

Springfield, 122 136 i 121 117 135 135 

Tabernacle, 61 39 3 62 62 38 38 

Westampton, 78 30 ... . 79 78 29 28 

Willingboro, 52 78 2 54 53 Tj 76 

Woodland, 42 35 i 42 43 35 34 

Washington, 66 25 i 66 66 24 23 



4829 3618 251 5033 4839 3461 3405 



Total vote in county, 6877 5294 344 7136 6937 5070 5000 

Plurality in county, 1583 

Socialist, 24; Social-Eabor, 10. 



m 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Camden County. 

Governor , 



-ASSEMBLY- 



^Pi ^Q g;vj ^p^ -jSp^ -oP, rs^ i$iH 

?. a; m O ^ O ^ ^i3. 
City of Camden — 

istPrec, I St Ward, i88 79 186 184 184 80 79 83 

^d Prec, ist Ward, 113 85 iii iii no 33 84 83 

3d Prec, ist Ward, 242 105 237 237 236 107 106 106 

4th Prec., ist Ward, 195 134 195 196 193 128 128 128 

5th Prec, 1st Ward, 226 139 126 223 224 139 139 138 

6th Prec, ist Ward, 174 131 175 175 175 130 130 130 

1138 673 1130 1126 1122 667 666 668 

ist Prec, 2d Ward, 185 63 183 183 181 65 63 61 

2d Prec, 2d Ward, 203 87 200 200 198 91 88 87 

3d Prec, 2d Ward, 228 136 225 226 226 136 136 136 

4th Prec, 2d Ward, 167 167 169 169 169 164 164 164 

5th Prec, 2d Ward, 237 133 238 239 240 133 131 130 

1020 5g6 lois 1017 1014 589 582 578 

ist Prec, 3d Ward, 129 91 128 128 128 90 90 90 

2d Prec, 3d Ward, 127 93 126 127 127 93 93 93 

3d Prec, 3d Ward, 108 52 105 105 104 53 52 53 

4th Prec, 3d Ward, 147 116 151 151 150 114 114 113 

5th Prec, 3d Ward, 157 84 154 154 i55 83 81 81 

668 436 664 665 664 433 430 430 

ist Prec, 4th Ward, 148 95 147 146 146 95 95 95 

2d Prec, 4th Ward, 150 77 149 149 149 77 77 77 

3d Prec, 4th Ward 115 84 114 114 113 81 80 80 

4th Prec, 4th Ward, 139 100 140 140 140 96 96 96 

5th Prec, 4th Ward, 225 no 220 220 219 no no in 

778 466 770 769 767 459 458 459 

ist Prec, 5th Ward, 192 108 192 192 192 108 108 108 

2d Prec, sth Ward, 165 147 165 164 164 147 146 147 

3d Prec, 5th Ward, 164 154 160 161 161 155 154 154 

4th Prec, 5th Ward, 254 150 250 251 250 154 153 151 

5th Prec, 5th Ward, 182 156 184 184 184 154 152 152 

6th Prec, 5th Ward, 96 162 98 98 98 160 159 159 

1053 ^77 1049 1050 1049 878 872 871 

1st Prec, 6th Ward, 147 139 148 143 143 138 139 137 

2d Prec, 6th Ward, 132 91 131 130 130 91 91 91 

3d Prec, 6th Ward, 96 68 98 98 98 65 65 65 

4th Prec, 6th Ward, 79 89 78 77 77 90 90 89 

5th Prec, 6th Ward, 133 49 i3S I3S i3S 48 48 48 

6th Prec, 6th Ward, in 82 no no no 82 82 82 

7th Prec, 6th Ward, 79 79 80 79 80 79 78 78 

8th Prec, 6th Ward, 140 139 140 140 138 139 138 138 

9th Prec, 6th Ward, 121 94 114 116 117 97 97 97 

1038 830 1034 1028 1028 829 828 826 



ELECTION REtUHNS. 



407 



Camden County — Continued. 

Governor , Assembly- 



5^ xG rt^^ =K "rtSi -^P r^P -SO 

^5 -^ (5 '"- ^ r^ f^ ._? 

City of Camden — Con. 

ist Prec, -th Ward, 199 139 199 198 197 139 i39 i39 

2d Prec, 7th Ward, 118 98 117 117 117 98 98 98 

3d Prec., 7th Ward, 144 102 143 143 143 103 103 103 

4th Prec., 7th Ward, 121 113 122 122 122 iii iii iii 

5th Prec, 7th Ward, 307 67 309 309 309 (i6 66 66 

6th Prec, 7th Ward, 93 106 92 92 92 108 108 108 

7th Prec, 7th Ward, ..... 122 158 121 122 122 158 158 158 

1104 783 1103 1103 1102 783 785 783 

ist Prec, 8th Ward, 150 109 149 149 149 109 109 109 

2d Prec, 8th Ward, 161 95 162 162 161 94 94 95 

3d Prec, 8th Ward, loi 76 100 100 loi 75 -Ji 74 

4th Prec, 8th Ward, 144 113 144 144 144 113 113 113 

5th Prec, 8th Ward, 127 65 128 128 128 64 64 64 

6th Prec, 8th Ward^ 223 38 221 221 221 38 38 38 

906 496 904 904 904 493 493 493 

ist Prec, 9th Ward, 144 74 139 140 140 yd 76 yd 

2d Prec, 9th Ward, 182 76 178 179 178 yy 75 74 

3d Prec, 9th Ward, 97 65 97 96 96 6(i 65 65 

4th Prec, 9th Ward, ...'.. 163 156 163 163 163 155 155 155 

5th Prec, 9th Ward, 141 88 137 137 138 91 90 90 

6th Prec, 9th Ward, 185 112 183 184 184 115 115 115 

7th Prec, 9th Ward, 136 69 137 137 137 68 68 68 

1048 640 1034 1036 1036 648 644 643 

1st Prec, loth Ward, .... 164 109 161 160 159 109 109 110 

2d Prec, loth Ward, .... 108 68 iii iii no 65 65 65 

3d Prec, loth Ward, .... 169 56 169 170 171 54 54 54 

4th Prec, loth Ward, .... 215 84 213 214 211 87 83 83 

656 317 654 655 651 315 311 312 

ist Prec. ; nth Ward, .... 139 107 142 141 140 103 102 100 

2d Prec, nth Ward, .... 154 89 157 157 149 85 85 85 

3d Prec, nth Ward, .... 128 76 126 128 122 78 81 "j-j 

4th Prec, nth Ward, .... 112 16 114 114 113 16 17 16 

533 288 539 540 524 282 285 278 

ist Prec, 12th Ward, .... 123 152 122 123 123 152 153 153 

2d Prec, i2th Ward, .... 193 126 193 193 193 126 128 126 

3d Prec, i2th Ward, .... 189 58 182 182 179 65 71 63 

4th Prec, 12th Ward, .... loi 37 99 99 94 43 40 39 

606 373 596 597 589 1173 392 381 

Center Twp., ist Prec, 73 65 71 71 71 dj, 66 69 

" " 2d Prec, ... 176 7 175 169 17s 7 7 12 

Chesilhurst, 18 n 18 18 18 n 11 n 

Collingswood, 176 71 178 177 177 65 65 65 

Delaware Township, 122 71 122 120 122 6y 68 67 



40S 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Camden County — Continued. 

Governor , Assembly- 



^ . P - b . . . eS.--.Ce 

-Sa^ciic- aJo. HrtCoS 

3P< >,c <^-jl ^pi -rtrt ^Q jpP -^P 

S 'JO Ph 'O ^ O ?^ ^ii, 

Gloucester City — 

ist Ward, 294 387 298 297 301 380 380 376 

2d Ward, ist Precinct, ... 190 276 204 206 204 261 261 261 

2d Ward, 2d Precinct, ... 171 328 170 171 170 319 317 328 

1220 1216 1236 1239 1238 1173 1175 1189 
Gloucester Township — 

1st Precinct, 163 103 167 168 166 94 95 97 

2d Precinct, 190 94 184 185 184 97 96 98 

Haddonfield Borough, 325 84 322 314 316 82 82 82 

Haddon Twp., ist Prec, .... 83 32 84 84 84 31 31 31 

2d Prec, .... 93 50 92 93 92 49 49 49 

Merchantville, 192 70 191 194 194 69 68 67 

Pensauken, ist Precinct, .... 207 86 207 207 207 83 84 84 

2d Precinct, 138 51 138 138 138 51 51 51 

Voorhees Township, 121 65 125 125 125 61 61 61 

Waterford Township, 134 116 132 132 130 115 116 115 

Winslow Township, 130 69 128 127 128 69 69 69 

Wood Lynn, 27 14 26 26 26 14 14 14 

1803 834 1796 1793 1790 816 8x6 818 

Total vote in county, 13571 8815 13524 13512 13478 8771 8755 8720 

Plurality, 4756 

Prohibition, 398; Socialist, 98; Social-Labor, 21. 



ELECTTON RE'TURNS. 409 

Cape May County. 

,- G0VI;rN0R ^ r ASSEMBLY ^ 



,^ C/} — 

Anglesea, 31 22, • • • • 

Avalon 14 9 .... 

Cape May City 314 228 48 

Dennis, 1st Precinct, 135 163 3 

" 2d Precinct, 71 88 12 

Holly Beach, 128 47 5 

Lower Township, 208 1 1 1 9 

Middle Township, ist Precinct, 192 144 6 

" " 2d Precinct, 114 108 4 

Ocean City, ist Ward, 141 73 17 

" " 2d Ward, 145 48 7 

Sea Isle City, 44 53 1 

Upper Township, 177 55 13 

Wildwood, 48 28 I 

West Cape May, loi 51 16 

South Cape May, 14 i .... 

Total vote in county, 1877 1230 142 1898 1145 164 

Plurality in county, 647 

Socialist, 10; Social-Iyabor, 6. 



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410 



lELECTlON RETURNS. 



Cumberland County. 

Governor -Senate- r Assembly ^ 

C c 

P-t^ go 'Ztj +j-(u i?o luc 2"u ^ ^ 

^v^ ?.Q CK i:.C §r4 ?=« Sq SiP 

<. y; 5^ cq ^ S U -x 
City of Bridgeton — 

ist Ward, ^y-j 253 279 248 277 ztj 247 256 

ist Prec, 2d Ward, 163 105 159 loi 162 169 100 106 

2d Prec, 2d Ward, 160 123 165 108 165 173 iii 11 1 

ist Prec, 3d Ward, 252 139 259 131 251 254 134 141 

2d Prec, 3d Ward_, 200 140 198 142 202 202 131 136 

ist Prec, 4th Ward, 241 116 223 135 227 238 117 121 

2d Prec, 4th Ward, 194 109 190 iii 189 194 108 107 

Sth Ward, 169 154 168 155 173 181 143 149 

1656 1139 1651 1131 1646 1688 1091 1127 
City of Millville— 

ist Prec, ist Ward, 223 109 214 no 220 212 108 no 

2d Prec, ist Ward, 225 89 221 91 226 203 87 no 

2d Ward, 323 95 313 98 322 302 93 104 

ist Prec, 3d Ward, 176 133 175 128 176 167 127 135 

2d Prec, 3d Ward, 133 128 132 130 134 125 129 137 

4th Ward, 340 115 334 112 343 320 105 129 

1420 669 1389 669 1421 1329 649 725 
Borough of Vineland — 

ist Precinct, 257 115 258 123 256 235 123 140 

2d Precinct, 277 140 286 140 287 241 134 181 

534 255 544 ^(>2 543 476 257 331 

I^andis Twp., ist Prec, 99 75 100 76 100 93 "jd 80 

" " 2d Prec, 113 64 114 63 115 92 61 811 

" " 3d Prec, 130 122 133 121 133 122 119 131 

" " 4th Prec, 70 49 67 49 69 57 49 60 

412 310 414 309 417 364 305 352 

Deerfield Twp., ist Prec, ... 66 145 47 158 64 62 143 144 

" " 2d Prec, ... 136 71 129 Tj 132 137 70 69 

Downs Twp., ist Prec, .... 79 136 105 109 87 87 126 124 

" " 2d Prec, .... 69 59 61 56 60 61 52 52 

Commercial Twp., ist Prec, 160 182 195 139 182 173 140 134 

" " 2d Prec, . 71 ^2, 73 S8 69 69 62 62 

Maurice River Township, 

ist Precinct, 80 24 79 24 77 80 23 22 

2d Precinct, 142 149 138 151 138 123 172 140 

Stow Creek, 87 59 89 55 87 88 58 58 

Hopewell, 161 120 161 117 157 157 121 121 

Greenwich, 151 71 148 74 147 148 71 68 

Fairfield, 198 86 199 75 198 201 78 79 

lyawrence, 145 117 132 112 140 140 116 116 

1545 1282 1556 1205 1538 1526 1232 1189 

Total vote in county,. .5567 3655 5554 3577 5565 5383 3534 3714 

Plurality in county, ... 1912 i977 

Prohibition, 521; Socialist, 86; Social-Labor, 15. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



411 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 






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413 



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Ol 


m 


in 


in 


m 


en 


- 



PQQQCQPP 
M CI CO Tj- inNO t^oo 



CO t^ On M 'I M CO 
VO CO " " t^ ci l^ 

m CI Ci w CI M 1-1 



in w o t^ Tf CO t^ 
O 1-1 '^ (1 On in On 

CI CO Ci 1-1 CI CI CI 



t-x OnOO O CO t^NO 
fO CI O 00 " " -)- 

Tt CI CI 1-1 CI 1-1 M 





:, 


:, 


;, 


;, 


:. 


o 


u 


o 


o 


o 


o 


u 


u 


t. 


k. 


L. 


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Cfi 


t/J 


t/J 


(/) 


C/) 



pppppp 



X) T3 td Ta 13 T3 "C 

^ l-i U W U li ^ 

rt rt rt rt rt rt rt 



T3'CUt3'X3T3'0'T3 



!_, t- I- W. t- 1-, 

rt rt rt rt rt Cu 
>>>>>> 



-O "1:3 'O "O "Ti -C-^ 

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 



Ti-^-*-*-i-T)-^-+ 



in in in in in in 

u 



<L> 



414 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



*UI3rT to 0^ O On txVO J^ 

U. OOO •'d-OO O - " 

•;;3qjo3 (s w <N -. « >- - 



OOO ■* M Ov o 
O M 00 ^O Tj-\0 
fj 0) >-( PJ N CS 



■uiar r lo « o ^ r^^ oo roo-<t"'*-*(^t-^M 

SUJ^Oliy^ N M P) W HH hH 



0\ VO "VOOO 0\ M 

jN. o rooo vo ■* jx 

O CO <N w M CM CM 



•luarr too o mo r^^coo 

'TcSTTpTrr. ° C^'^OO O " « 
:^S3UEUQ p^ i_, cq M w M 1-r 



lo o looo t^ N 

O rooovo ^^ 
fi M M P) M M 



'«iyoi\[ (v^ « p, 



CO O U-) lOOO 00 
O rooovo ■*'0 
fO M M (S N P) 



'a3Ilp2 CI w 04 



0\ VO >-i t^ ci tx\o 
1^ O COOO M -^VO 
O ro P) M P< M CI 



U 



■c 

3 
C 

1 < 

O 

O 



•uiarr to o\ o vo t^vo t^ 

'iiiTX'rrC-iT\T °oo ^°o O " " 
UUA|Q3J\r p, „ r^ M w w w 



■man Ti- w o vo oo u-!oo 

'WrTixr ° OS -+00 O « " 



'a3j4na; <N « N 



'UBUI33aj <S I-. M 



<M VO O ■* l^ 0\V0 
tx O roOOVO '^VO 
O CO N w N N Cq 



1^00 »0 tT 0\V0 
O cq 00 VO -^MS 

CO CI w cq N cq 



t^ O COOO vo -rfVO 

o CO cq 1-1 o M CM 



0\ 00 CM MD l^VO ■* 
00 O COOOVO TfVO 

O CO cq w c^i cq CM 



£ 
3 

o 

o 

X 

a> 

(0 
(0 

UJ 



•irT3/T lO CO m t^ t>. »o O 

'•'-^^U. O o rhOO O '-' C) 

'3UBJ3 cq M 01 M w w H 



CO w O VO l^ lO Ix. 
O 0\ Tt-CO O M " 
UBIUJ31UIUI2 PI H (M >-! « M « 



•uiaa 



•ds^r ^ o^MD -tco o lo 
a. lonor^oMsio 

paC^J Cj P) P) HH cq H PI 



M3 vo :^^ t^VOVOOO^ 
I^ 00 TfOO o oo o COVO 
■<:). „>-,Mi-fPlC0t-ii-< 



w vo OvVO O\00 o 
00 O cqoovo T)- tx 
O CO P< w p^ P( CM 



OS lo osvo^ <:^ o 
r^ o p) oo vo Tf rx 

O CO M i-i P4 P< P) 



CM i-i(X) w lO 0\0 
P) pr, n M cq 1-1 t>. 

iri cq pq w cq M 1-1 



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(/) 


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I-. P) CO ■* lOVO W 

-73 "O 73 "Td "C T3 13 
:_ ;h ;-. Ih I-. ii ;_ 
c^ r3 cd c^ c^ c^ ni 



•13 t3 tS 73 t3 "O t; 

CO CO CO CO CO PO CO 



u 


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QPQQQQQQ 






Tl-^^t';^'*Tl■T)■ 



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CJ 


CJ 


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w 


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UJ 


en 


t« 


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cn 


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QPCPQO 

tn^3 >^ *j +j +j 
>-. pq CO ^ li-.^ 



^0 13 tS 'O 'T3 ^3 

1^ U 1-. li V-, Vh 
c^ CTJ cti c^ c^ cd 

^^^^^^ 

■^ -i-J -M ^-> +J -*-> 

U-) ir> ir> liO lO to 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



AM 



•iItm i» i^ !-• rv c*5 1^ M lo 
•j£ 'pAOg^ M w w M « ro M M 



t>. 11 M M 1-1 fi ri i-i 



00 ODOO I^I^O fOO f^- 
0\ l^l^C—'-VOOOOfO 
CO CO fO M ■-< ri w IN n -. 



'sSuiufmn3 ^ ;:'::' ^ti 'r^'fi « 



ro t^ -+00 M 1-^ M O 
0\ fO O Tj-00 in t^ - 
„ c) I- «-• ci ri >-■ 



►- t^oo mt^ On CO O CO 1^1 
O t^t^ONi-iOvoOOOCO 
-rf cocoMi-«f)i-iC^C^'-i 



■Cl3>T VOOO O t^ COOO O Tt- 
•ciTiwttiTA* O CO in rl-00 ^< 0\ t^ 



COVO r)-00 OOO " 00 
On CO O TfOO m t^ O 
n 01 M w CI M w 



00 t>»Ovt-xts.MPOO-*f) 
0\ tvt^ONw "VO OOO CO 
CO cocoM>iP<iiCIN>i 



•da^ 



'pHi: 



t^vo C< t^ CO Ov o >o 
O CO in "^OO Cl On t^ 
UQ C) « « ci w CO CI " 



C) iotj-OnN t^i On 
On CO O 1*00 m t^ o 
M n " 1 PI PI " 



ONVOt^inrxO Tj-w coci 
ON l^t^OvMiiVOOOOCO 
CO CO CO PI n N II C( Cl II 



■(l;iM r^ONOOO con lOTj- 

«J. o comTi-oo CO o t^ 

'jpiUIlpg P^wiiMiicop^ii 



t^ 11 in COOO PI l>. CO On 
CO On CO O T)-00 m tN o 
VO w PI M w PI PI w 



00 \OOOt1-ioOcoiicoP) 
On »>.t^O\iiiiVOO00co 

CO COCOP)llP)l1P)P)l1 



■d3>T m in w inoo O •+ tJ- 
, "^„Ocoin-i-t^coo\t^ 

'^aMJEqg p^ H „ PI « CO PI w 



PI 00 rx itOO Tj- On PI ON 
n On CO O -^00 in t^ O 

t>vllP|liliPlPI n 



" 00 0>int>.ONP) o mo 

n t>.txONllO\OOO0CO 
Tt COCOP|iiP)>iP|P|ii 



3 
C 

C 

o 
O 



•d3M "^ O ^ O Tf CO COOO 

, Cl O -rt m lOOO CO On t^ 

UA\Ojg[ PI n M P< w CO PI M 



■dsM co^^ON^NT^t^p^^x 
^"a. o CO Tf- -^oo PI on:^ 

3A\OJJ[ PI w M M n CO PI M 



'SiUBJqBJJBQ P|iiiiP|ihCOP|ii 



n PI\0^CNT^0^110 
Ti" On CO O rj-oo m t->. n 

t^MPIMIIPIPI II 



vo m in ■^vo COOO CO on 
M On CO O Tj-00 m t^ o 
»xiipqiiiiP|Pl w 



00 -* t^ COOO w On 1 0^ 
M On CO O -^OO in t^ o 

tX 11 PI M II PI PI M 



in l^ C\ txNO On CO O ■* PI 
O t^t^ONiOvOOOOco 
rj- CO CO PI w PI K- PI M M 



CO t>> OiVO »^ 0\ CO On ■* P) 

C t-x t^ On M O NO OnOO co 
rj- cococ^wPliiiiPlii 



PI\ONOOt^OP<iiCOPI 
O t^t^ONMiiNOOOOco 
■+ COCOPiwPJiiNPlii 



c 

3 
O 

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<u 

(0 
(0 

UJ 



o 

O 

I 



•rl-i-VT t^^ m J^ COOO t^\0 

*^''a o CO in 'i-oo pioo J^ 
'jajpipBg PI w « PI 1 CO PI -< 



'anouiA.'jg " PI M PI PI PI PI w 



•d3^ 



'itqd 



CO CO pooo vo M ON ^ 

t^ 't CO " NO O inNO 
jnj^ 11 n 11 PI M CO PI 11 

cjoooycjycj 

■^.i-»-l-i-*-i-n-n-t-*-ii 

c/1 (fi a: t/) c/) U5 t/; 'y, 

M PI CO -;!■ mNO t^CO 

cjrtrtrjcSrtrtcS 

>>>>>>>> 

^^^^^^^ — 



On co\0 •*00 w 00 w On 
" On CO O Tl-00 m t>. O 
t^ M 01 M M PI PI w 



CO in t^ t^ ONOO 00 CO Tt 
O PI PI Pi 00 -* O O PI 
00 M PI PI n PI Pi pi 1 



Pi CO Ov pi On pi in O m 
NO ONPIOiCOCOPIt^M 
in M PI n PI PI n 



;, 


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:, 




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o 


o 


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tj 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


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m 


(fi 


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p^ 


CO rl- ino 


t-«oo 



l.,;-il.lit.uV'ii 
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-*00 mvo O PI On PI PI 
I^VO Ov n i-i VO OnOO co 
COCOPIiiPliiiiPlii 



" ootN.pifxPicoONOPO 

in in On ^ il- CO OnOO 00 On 



m -+ Ov C0\0 O PI n n CO 
On Tf •+ l^ O O Tf 00 ts. PI 
PI COCOPInPliiiiPlii 



:, 


:, 


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:, 


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o 


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CJ 


o 


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u 


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u 




















<fi 


in 


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■J) 


tfl 


!/) 


(A 


!S1 


<Sl 


r\ 


n 


r^ 


^-^ 


/-^ 


/■^ 


r-* 


r^ 


r^ 


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'~^ 


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'" 


— 


— ' 


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13 


T3 


•^ 


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rtc«c3c3r3rtc:rtcfl 



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u 
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27 






oococooooooooooooo 



416 



ELECTION RETUHNS. 



'4J3qj03 H n KH H ri c) « « 



^1 -^ <^ lo o in lo M o\ 
PI O i-H ►-. 00 CMn. O " 

>0 MClOlMMMfNn 



•irorr " t^ " ^' 0\ -^ m 0\ 
snJ^OCg M ^^ M (N) iM 0) M M 



)0 to u^ O 00 lO 0) a\ 

rji-iwooOir^O'-' 
M 0) 0) w M w ri W 



^ « w « 






Tj- 11 xo >0 O r^vO M On 
CO NMi-oOONt^O" 



rl- W W W M 



Mii3/-r rhTl-roo ONMOO 0\ 



o\ vo -^ "^00 fx i/^ N o\ 

\0 >-iC\|C^i-(Mi-iO)i-( 



M- -I 1-1 I-. ^ 



u 



•uiaa 



■*\o tx o >0 w O\00 



.E ^ 

- < 

O 
O 



"^"='U. Tl-\0 ts,OVO w OOO 






■uiarr vo^o^ofOMOoro 

't^tVikt '^'^ wo r^HH O\00 



t"<<»J[ ^^ t^ O t^x i-H O\00 

'uEuiaaaq; « c^ w m m cj « « 



0\ •rt-inmo^O^O<-iO\ 

n CIMHOOONt^O'-' 
\0 hMOImumC^Jw 



fO 04K-i-i00O\t^Op-i 
VO w c-1 pq M 1-1 M O) M 



-* VO tN. IT) O CNVO f^oo 
ro Mi-ii-i00O\r^OM 
VO mMC\|1-ii-ii-iCSi-< 



00 lO lO Tf O O'AO t^OO 
ro c^ii-i"00O-. r^O" 

VO 1- 0) l>) 1-. i-i 1-. 01 I-. 



01 t^inioOOtN.fCO\ 
M- 0)i-ii-iOOOt>NOi-i 
VO mOImmMi-iOIi-i 



Tt 1-1 W W M 



-* 1-1 1-1 1-1 " 



tJ" t-i 1-1 1-1 1-1 



O C4 1-1 00 woo oq O W 0) 
ro fq i^ 1-1 CO 1-1 t^ t^vO 00 

-* 1-1 1-1 w w 



VO 0)i-.04VOOvO;oO\Otvi 
PO CM W 04 fO 1-. INVO V3 00 

PO n 1-1 ^ w 



3 
O 

O 

X 

<u 

(0 
(0 

111 



•III3/-T OvO0)i-iO-<tO\O 

'aUEJ^ i-iO)i-iMCNMi-ii-i 



'UBUia3UJUII2 HH0)hH04CSM«M 



•rfavr woo o w o\ woo fO 

"''Cl OrOiOTj-WOtOOW 

p.IO*][ CI 1-1 M CI 1-1 CO 01 1-1 



01 00 '^VO 0) 01 W CO Os 

T^ o)i-ii-HooorxO>H 

VO i-iO1c1w01m04m 



0\ Tj-ioioOONiOCOO\ 
CO OlMi-iOOOWOi-i 
VO 1-iOicii-ii-ii-iOii-i 



j^ 1-1 lo xi-cc COOO 1-1 0\ 

o ov CO o -^00 to w o 

^ M 01 >H M 01 01 1-1 



1-1 VO >O00 W 1-1 0) VO O 0) 

Tf- CI 00 01 CO 01 w t^ woo 

^"1-11-1 1-1 



O 0) 1-1 C^vo OV M O 00 01 

CO 01 r^ 1-1 CO 11 w wvo 00 

r^ d n n n 



0\ VO W covo VO M On O 01 
0\ W W 0\ 11 O VO OnOO CO 
CO COCOCliiOJiiiiOlii 



V 


;, 


u 


:, 


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:, 


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o 


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u 


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U) 


en 


U3 


2 


w 


C/) 


u> 



QQCCOapQ 



cT3Cjcdc3rtc^rtcT3 
>>>>>>>> 



vovovovovovovovo 



;, 


•^ 


:, 


:, 


i 


:, 


:. 


•^ 


o 


u 


CJ 


u 


o 


o 


o 


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u 


Ih 


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v- 


1- 


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QQQQQCCQ 



t^t^wwwwwt^ 







istrict, 
istrict, 
istrict, 


istrict, 
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istrict, 
istrict, 
istrict, 



QQPQPQQQQ 

cn'O'C^'tjTfTJ-i-i+J 
n 0) 00 rj- lovo woo 0\ 

^^^^^^^^^ 
oooocooooooooooooo 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



417 



JJ^ pAOg (vj po "^ f^ CO <"^ 01 



C» O^O\Tj-c<00<NO 
M Tf moo ■^ M rs. o> lo 

>-< n M t\| M (S CM 1-1 CI 



0\ ro ID O "^ '-' 0\vO fO 0^ 
lO CO ts. Ci ^ -"too C) 'J- o 



•d3^ 



— ojTj-r^PO-i-vOMrO lOOO ■* M tx 0\ "^ 

SSUIUIlUn^ n CO ro ro ro PI (N >-< C) 01 (S r< P) 01 w 0| 



ro 0) 0) o lo ►-< in r^ rooo 
lo oo rx o< ■* Tfoo oo Tf o 
0\ 1-1 c) « (*5 00 n o oo 01 



'SIUEIJII^ CO 00 oo fo ro 01 oi 



r^ o '+ o\ oo M ■<^vo o 

w Tf irjOO Tj- 1-1 tx 0\ lO 

1-1 OlOlOlOlOlOlMOl 



tv, ooiOO\m>-i OMTSfOOV 
to ro r^ « Tj- rl-OO M Tf o 
0» i-ioiwoococirooooi 



•rT^-vT ■* O t^ in O O oo 

"'*a. 01 Tt 01 CO" "VO 

'TS^qOIUQ oo o^ oo CO 00 PI 01 



C\ O 00 >n t^ 01 t^ 01 o 
o 00 m lo 01 w r^oo m 

" 01 01 01 01 01 01 w Ol 



in oovo 00 0) O\00 oo 01 On 
On oo f^ >-■ ■<4- 0000 01 rl- O 
00 i-iOlMOOOOOlcOfOOl 



•d3>r t^ '* ON 1^ M 1-1 ^1- 

O- 0lTt01fOi-i"<O 

^pilUqOg ro oo ro 00 00 01 01 



•d3>r >o -^ t^ t^ CN " -i- 

'rt^MTPriO 01 T^o^ roo "\0 

[jaMJBqg CO CO 00 CO oo 01 oi 



CO 1-1 w w TtoO On tx -tt 

01 ■>i-NO O ■* 01 P-1 ON t^ 
1-1 01 01 oo 01 01 CO 1-1 01 



t^ OoiONinoot^wi-i 
1-1 -^ moo -^ »- r^ 0\ m 

M 01 M M M 01 01 1-1 01 



Oino 00" Ovt^'^ON 
00 tx 01 -^ Tj-OO M •<t O 
M 01 p-i CO CO 01 CO oo 01 



00 « VOOO -:1- Cv ■* On Oq 00 
in cot^i-i i^cooi 01 rfo 
On i-iO<i-.cococococooi 



•d3>r VO 01 On t^ w w -rf 

, "■ 01 -}• 01 fO M >H NO 

UM.OJ2 CO oo oo CO oo 01 01 



3MOJJ CO CO 00 CO CO 01 01 



•d3^ 



CO w CO \0 On I CO 

0) T)- 01 CO O 1-1 ^ 

SlUCjqBJJBQ oo CO 00(0 CO 01 oi 



O\OOco01\Oi-'O 
Tl-inONTl-1-1 t^Oiin 
01 01 01 ot 01 Oi 1-1 oq 



On ONTj-ONini-ir^coo 
" CO moo Tl- «-i IX On m 

1-1 OlOlOIOlOlOli-iOl 



VO ON->d-ON-+0ltx0io 
1-1 oo moo -^ 1-1 ix On m 
" O^OlOIOlOlOli-iOl 



CO ■^t^OvoOONO Tj-oO 
m cotxoi -ii-Ti-ooi Tfo 

On i-iOlh-iCOCOOiCOOOOq 



00 vor^CN-i-OXNO rj-oo 
m CO ix " ^ oooO 01 T)- o 
On mOImcocooicooooI 



tv oo •^00 m O 00 to CO On 
>n CO tx " "^ ^00 01 rj- o 
On MOli-irococicocooi 



'jajpqoBg oo co co oo oo o< oi 



-1 O ^>. ■'tOO^O On 
, -p 01 01 -^ m O Jx lO 

'jnOUlA3g HI « « « M 



■msa 



•d9>i 



'Aqd, 



01 00 O m mco " 

M 01 O P| On Ov Tj- 
Jnj\[ CO 00 CO CO 01 >-> "i 



o_u o y o -J cj 
tn tn 'j> (/) ir, 'j^, ir. 



01 GrJ-r^i-ii-itxTfON 
O ■* moo -^ " tx ON -Jt 

>-■ 010,010101011-101 



m mcoooi-ioocNONi-i 
00 M3 moo »o O o 00 O 
tx >H « 01 01 CO 01 1-1 01 



TtCO C inl^iocot^ON 
On " t^ m 01 00 01 tx 1-1 

On oioioioii-ioiMOl 



O O Cl'J O O U CJ 
'S. tr^ It. u^ t/i (T^ in Hi 

555ScS25 



oo CO ^ OnOO Th ^\0 oo On 
m ootxi-i-^-^ONOOtj-o 
On iiOli-iCOOOOlcOCOO* 



Tt\o " ooi-i co-*tx OnVO o 
mvocoTj-oocoOTi-cooi 01 

tN^OOOlOll-llHl-ll-lt-IHI VO 



1-1 ix O^AO m 1-1 i-i \0 rf 

OlOlOOlMtxOlOlOO 
i-i01i-.COOO010O0OiH 



_o_o -JO o o o o y 

'u'u'u'u'i-u'n'u'c 



•-■ 01 CO T^ m\o ix 



-H -1 00 •T^ inNO t>,cc 



:^^^^^>> ^^-^^i^^-^ 



On On On On On On On 


^ X ^ jn j:: j: ^ j= 
oooooooo 


U 




^:: : : : : : 


^:: ::::::- :: 


;5 





TD'C -J "T^ "C^T ~ "^ TJ 



^' 



418 



ELECTION HETURNS. 



';pqjor) - ^ « " 



CO O fO lO 'n\0 €!• i-'^a I T)- "I I- Iv. tr.oo OO " v6 
>r) (r> »r> Tf ro <^ Tf t^vo 11 <r>00 ro " O VO ■* " 

vOi-Hi^inpii-ii-ii-iint^ii-it^wi-i nw 



•uiaa 



"^ Tj- -^ rf c^ t^ LO i^\0 

\0 Mi-ir^ririuMfM 



Tj- u-;00 CO " O t^ rr M O 

lOfOl-ir-|>HM Ml-..-, 



•uiarr o\oooo « fo-vo 

, <=„ji_ O OS w \h On^ pO 



lO Tt- CO Tf CO tX IDVO VO 



N rcwVOVOOOOOOOVOM 
PO in(X3 ro " O t^ fO ►-< O 
u-jrO'-iDi-ip-i Mwi-i 



'l^WOH " - " 



lo Tt" CO Tt CO r^ in i^\o 



M n moo u~/ On CO M 00 1-1 
CO iriOO CO " O 00 T)- M O 

mCOl-HClMI-l |_>Hl-l 



u 



'J3i;i92 



•luarr "^oo o\ n co cs lo 

O0si-i'^0\*0co 
'UUAJQDJ\[ „ "^ „ „ "^ ^ 



i-i -Tt- 0\ t^ "1 l^ ■* O lO 
lo Tf- CO Tj- CO t^ in t>.>o 

VO Ml-HOlC^OIl-ll-tlH 



11 ^^|-^T^u^T^-l-^|0^ 
lO ^ -+ '^- COVO CO t^ in 
vri ._< n ri n M — ^ n 



"T ^JM-i CO 1^ "J 

01 n M « M M 



1-1 Mi-<l^rxt^O\Mt^i-i 

CO moo CO M o \o CO 1-1 o 

lOCOtiC^i-ii-i HMH 



M COOO\CCO-+OVOC-) 
0\ moo CO M O 00 Tt " o 
■^COmO^mi-i mwm 



3 

c 
o 

o 



c 

3 
O 

O 

X 

(0 
0) 

Ul 



'aut>i ^ ^ :: 2^ 



'•"''U o 0\ " -t OnVO CO 



•uiaa 

'3UBJ3 



O Os w Tj- 0\V0 CO 

'uEuia3iuuii7 11 M H 



01 CO n CO n n \0 

pjO'J CO CO CO CO CO M 01 



OO NO.O\ml^ooO\m 
m Tt- c*2 Tj- CO t^ mvo VO 

VO mhOIOIMmiiii 



m o< On OS -1-00 CO O t^ 
m -rl- CO Tf CO t~N lo t^vo 

VO II M 01 01 01 11 11 11 



m T)-OomONioiiON 
VO Tl" •* in CO ^N m J^vo 

VO iiiiO)0101miiii 



CO Tt OS t^ mco in O in 
VO Tf CO Tf CO t^ in J^vo 

VO M W 01 -^l 0) M M M 



in N 00 0\ N.00 t^ o t^ 
m T}- CO Ti- CO t^ in rxvo 

VO wiiOlOlOliiiiii 



-t 0\ COOO ^ OS t^oo 00 
o 00 inoo M- o r^oo -* 

M OlOlO^MOlO^nCsi 



Os OSOJOVO'^'^i-'OstJ- 
01 vooO'^MiOO'^iiO 

incOwNwii MMW 



M 00 11 IX VO OS n 00 Os 11 
CO inoO CO « O 00 CO " O 

inCOMOlMM MUM 



CO O txOO VO 11 CO 00 O M 
Tj- inoo CO M M 00 Tt- <M o 

inCOM0<WM MMM 



CO CO TtCO ON O M cq i-i 
CO inoO CO w M 00 •+ N 

inCOMOlMM MM 



00 moooO'^ocoooom 
CO intxcoMMOOTi-MO 

mCOMOlMM MMM 



VO coooOsCOOstx-^MO\ 
Tl- CO tx M T)- 0000 M -i- O 
Os M 01 M OO CO 01 CO CO M 



:, 


:, 


U 


:, 


:, 


:, 


:, 


o 


o 


<J 


o 


o 


<j 


o 


ii 


u 


■^ 


1- 


\- 


1-. 


1-. 
















t/j 


m 


t/j 


ryj 


U) 


U) 


t/i 



CGQCCQQ 

i« TS "C^w "^J l^ 4^ 
M 01 CO -rj- mvo tx 

u ^ U i-, ••^ u u 
ci rt c^ 03 c3 rt 03 



4-1 +-> 1m +J *Ii -M "Zi 

Os Os OS Os Os OS OS 



:, 


;, 


:, 


:, 


;, 


:, 


:. 


:, 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


u 


ii 


U 


u 


l1 


t- 


i- 


tn 


















Ul 


U) 


CO 


t/i 


tn 


(fl 


.- 


!« 



QQQCCQ;GQ 



*t3 73 'O 'O '^ T!3 TI? 713 

j:: J= ^ X J= ^ j:= ^ 
ooooooco 



:, 


;, 




V 


:, 


■M 


+-1 




:, 


u 


<j 


u 


o 


u 


<J 


o 


u 


o 


u 


u 


V. 


u 


u 


t- 


u 


I. 


;_, 




















tfl 


u> 


m 


u> 


<J1 


Cfl 


C/J 


C/J 


C« 



QQQPCPGQQ 

OlTJTDj-i-t-i-i-i^-M-M 
M 01 CO Tf invo i>^00 OS 

TZ! '^ '^ '^ "^ '^ '^ X3 'T^ 
I-iIiVh^IiI-iI-^Ih 



;^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•419 



•d3^ 



O Th ^ ^1 i^t - 1 
i r .„ r-„„ 00 ~ 00 \0 VO r< I 

'■j£ 'pAog « -, ^ M « 



<*5 »/^o ■^mooo^'^tOio 

0\ fO M M M PI n r*) i-< ro « 



00 ri»»5t^-Mtv.ovo'* 
00 Tfoo 1-1 vr> i-c o PO «*5 t^ 
1^1 11 « f) !-■ CI r< N M p) 



•d3^ 



p( T^ o\ po tx ovoo vo <s o 00 

PI "OOOTj-i-iioPioOOOvO 

OS t»5 D "H M PI f 1 P) " CO ■-. 



Ttoo i-< lo 1-1 o PI po t^ 

« -1 M 1-1 PI PI PI PI PI 



•d3^ 

'siuBiiijAV ti 



" 1- Tf PI ►H « 

00 " 00 >o >o PI 

« PI w 



f»5\0 OPOt^i-iOO tx'^l CnO 

PI 1-1 o 00 Tt PI IT) PI 00 t^ »^ 

0\ PO PI 11 11 PI PI PI 1-1 CO >-i 



PI n PI t^ O PO t^vo mvO 
0\ •^oo 1 ir> 11 o PI CO t^ 

PI n n PI w M PI PI PI M 



•d3>T I- CO --I « PI w 
i „ooi-<oo^sopi 



O VO TtOPOOirit^'l-O 11 

'I " n 00 Tj- 01 m PI 00 00 t^ 

0\ PO PI 11 >-i PI PI PI M CO 11 



0\ PI vo o "+00 00 o\ tmo 

0\ Tj-OO H lil M O CO PO t^ 

PI 11 11 PI 11 PI PI PI PI PI 



■d3>T yj^ rt-\0 PI coiO 

a. pi-oovoooco 

'jpiUIlpg PI « 11 p. ►, 



lo t^iiooooo\t^tvPiooo 
o iiiioo-<i-iiiopioot^t^ 

O CO PI 11 1 M PI PI 11 CO n 



t>. CO Tt t--« PI 00 t~^ lOVO CO 

c\ ■■'too " to « o PI CO t>. 

PI wiiPliiPIPIPIPIM 



•d3H 



CO CO Tf CO CO Os 
'IT-IAA TPTTO °° 'i00VO>O " 

lpA\JBl{§ „ „ 11 PI « 



»o -^OO Tj-t^oOO t^O "^O 

PI iiooO'*Pi>oPioot^t-x 

O POPlMwciPIPIiiCOii 



CO PI PI 00 11 Tj-\0 \0\0 "~i 

00 Ti-00 11 "1 11 o PI CO tx 

PI n 11 PI 11 PI PI PI PI M 



•da^ v^ -)- -f CI n " 



Tj-vonii-, r^^ocpopioo 
PI 1 " 00 rt PI lo PI 00 00 i^ 

0\ CO PI " -H PI PI PI - PO « 



"da'JJ OO -+ Tj- PI covO I t^ coo-t-iO"I^in-OOii 

'3\\nTj oo-oovo^oPi 1 po ii-oOTi-piioPicct^r^ 

'*'""-' XX HI " PI H [ OV CO PI " H PI PI PI M CO 11 



•d3>[ II Tj- Tf n „ -H 



CO "I CO Tj- "I 00 ■^VO lO u^ 

a> -"too PI vo 11 o PI CO t^ 

PI « H PI M PI PI PI (V) PI 



in MHOO-Pii^t^in-* 
00 Tfoo 11 m « o PI CO J-^ 

PI 11 H PI II PI PI PI PI PI 



CO " H co^ Oco»xP|OsOvI " PI POOO PI -"t^O OsVO "^ 

p< HHOO-^PitnPioo rx\o 00 ^00 1 lo 11 o PI po t^ 

0\COMiiiiP(P|PIiiCOii COhhPIhPIPiPIPIPI 



•d3>T " -+ ^ '^1 PI 1- 

a. 00 " 00 ^o \o PI 
'jaipqoBg « « ~ pi « 



rl- 't I CO r>N C-AO \0 PI VO O 
PI --oOTj-ninPioot^tx 

O, PO PI -^ M •^l PI PI « CO II 



•ai3Q PO " Pi Tt-rtON 

' Tn/-viiT a'-.(~> COOO ^ PI fx\0 1 T ^T uj rx ^'1 U^ SJ i^'l "^vo \o 

jnouiAatj PI CO PI CO "I " \ \o PI PI H 11 -I PI PI 11 11 « 



, r I *^ lO O 00 VC - 

'XqdjiijY; — _ ^, 



rf PI POtxi -Tt^POtr-, -t 

00 ■^oo 11 m 11 o PI CO t>. 

PI i-iip|iiP|P|CSCjP| 



vo n 1/1 txVO O O t>^ co^ I "t 
O t^ O VO 00 "~. OS OnvO t^ O 

C\ M PI Pi PI PI H PI 1 OS 



C X int^'lsOCsC-fOOCOOlOO 

- I -I 00 -t^ to PI 00 'I Csso ir. tn i o 

- loo -|-.-,i-"|««rO" I O 



t^ CO PI \C O O. i/". — -t 
"IVOOO coo. I^H " ^ 

-■-""1111PIPIPI 



u o_o o y o 
X 7^ X 'X v: X 

11 PI CO -j- tr-,vo 



ucj o y y u o o y'H 
X X x X X X tc t: 1/: -^ 

-^ PI CO ^ t/-;vO f^OO OS H 



o o o u y o o y y 

X X X X X Hn X X X 



u •— V- •— u u 
r; rt rt rt c3 rt 



-I ^1 ^1 ^1 -I -I 



-f-f-r-:frt--f^^-f 



^z z 



y 



420 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



';43qao3 « con ro n m 



00 o N Ov n o\oo chvo n ^i- 
n M cq CO o mvo 00 <^ •* fo 

lO (S04>-11-I1-.W1-<MMM 



1- M- f^ o^ ^^>o o w 00 •* 
o moo ►-' \o N \o t>. fO ■^ 



•UI3Q 00 fOOO o \o l^ 



04 w Ci 00 Tj- 0\ O\00 \0 fO Tj- 

M M 0) po o io\o 00 fo •* n 



Tj- tJ-VO >-< 0\ CO t^OO lO 
vrjOO 0) I^ N VO 00 fTi Tf 






M M 0) ro o lO'O 00 fO ■'t ro 
lO 0)c>(wi-ii-ii-ii-iMi-i>H 



O "^00 N t^ M VO 00 PO ■* 

\0 iii-iNCSrqiH Mm 



++ytJOJ\[ H PO M to M " 



Tj- int^OMOOVOiorOTt 
M M w ■>t O >0 t^GO CO -rl- ro 

lO MC^I-HHHI-IMl-HMhHI-H 



M ^O O\00 ^n <-< rJ-VO O CO 
O lO 0\ M t^ rOVO 00 Tj- Tt 

VO MH-lMMMl-l c»i- 



O 



o 
O 



' TnTTT^r? l." l^ "i ^ U "J 



•IU3Q 0\ lOOO w CO ■* 



•UI3Q 00 "^^ O vo tx 
'Stit-vt CMx lo CO O lo 
•°":A 1-1 COM COM I-I 



•uiarr o\ cooo o :^ t^ 

J'='l + l'y. w CO M CO M i-< 



•uiaQ vo cooo o o\co 

'ttpttt:>3 it O\t^toco0>0 

UEuiaaj^ 1-1 CO M CO M I-I 



00 CO M CO M t^ 0\ (^VO t^ CO 
n w M 'd- O »ovo 00 CO CO CO 
m MOji-ii-twH-ti-ttHi-tt-i 



O i-i M 00 M \0 O t-x\0 Tj- CO 
O M N CO O irivo 00 CO •* CO 
IT) MMi-*i-i'-i*-ii-ii-i'-i»-i 



C) "MOMOOOOOOtxlOTj- 
M " M ■* O »OVO 00 CO •* CO 

lO MMi-ii-i^HMiHi-ii-ii-i 



Tt- M CO O CO o ooo vo t^ ■* 

M i-iMTfOVOVOOOCO-^CO 
lO MM'-'i-ii-'t-i'-ii-i'-i'-i 



Tf ■*M C0tN.Tt-O M O^OO 

0) i-iM-*ovot^a\'<t'*co 

lO MMi-ii-ii-ii-iMi-ii-ii-i 



On coiOO\0\0\voM t^io 
0\ "^00 covo M MD 00 CO -^ 
iowmMMMi-i Mi-i 



00 CO in IT) On On coio 00 Os 
On moo M NO M NO 00 co -^ 
lOiHi-iMClMi-i C«*^ 



lO Tl-lQlOI-IONI-IVOOOt^ 
O lOOO CN« t^ M NO 00 CO ■'t 
NO>-ii-iMNMi-i Mi-i 



M -^VO Tf ON On CO -rt " Tj- 
1-1 moo M NO M NO 00 •* ■* 
NO wiiMOM'-' Mi-i 



lo Tj- moo M NO CO -^ 0\ On 
CO moo M »x CO tvoo CO ■* 

NOi-iwMClMi-i Mi-i 



C 
3 
O 

O 

X 

a> 

(0 
U) 

111 



•UiarT On cooo O 00 ^ 

'aiip i"v 00 ts. m CO O m 
<juea^ 1-1 CO M CO M >-i 



■UI3Q m M 00 O O t-^ 

'UBIUJ3UJUII7 00 J^V?!?;:^ ■" 

M /J t-i CO M CO C^l i-i 



■da'g 1^ ^ .^ ;,| o Q 
'oao'T (^"00 NO NO ci 

r " JL w 1-1 M M 1-1 



M M CI n M M m i-i m lo m 
M i-iM^OM3txONCOTl-co 
to C)Mi-ii-'i-ii-i>-<i-ii-i>-i 



M l-loooMONONOs■^^^OT^ 

>-i 1-1 M CO O lONO 00 CO Tt CO 
to C'lMi-il-il-li-^i-'l-ll-ii-' 



0\ lOnOONOt^t^t^i-ilOlO 

1-1 l-l>-lt^Tt>HU-)MOO t^NO 

On cOMni-iMMMMCOi-i 



Tt CO t^ i-i 00 -^OO O m 
>O00 M l^ M NO 00 '^ r}- 
i-ii-iMMM»-i CIM 



0\ -^ CO Tl- 1-1 On cooo I^OO 
On moo M 1^ M NO 00 co -rt 

lOMllMMMl-l Mm 



M w On 11 t^OO tx t^ ON 
■*00 O lO O On M CONO 
1-. M M M M i-i M C4 M 



O O U O O O 



1/3 O) (/) u> t/D (/; 

QQQCSS 



^3 t3 t3 13 t3 "TD 

|_ l-i ;-i ^ Vh Si 

rt c^ rt rt c3 rt 

;> .-^ ?* K^ K-* ,-- 

M CI M M M M 



UOOOOOOOOli 
(/ii/)cnt/)(/3t/)t/)(/i<«Q 

tn "C T! "J^ t^ "I^ in T! TI O 
M M CO ■^ miNO :^CO 0^ " 

■T3'0'T3T3'T3'OX)'t3'd'C 

V,t<VH^-UlUlll-l-.U- 

r-'i-'^K^K-.-'.^^i--*-^ 



rocococococococoroco 



O O O O O O u.u.^ 
.l->-l-»-*i+-'-)-»-*J-*-'-*i-|i 

qqqqqqSqc 



. M CO -^ 1 



-.NO t^CO o> 



-CJ'T3'T3't3T3t3X!t3'0 
i_w<;-<i-cUi4iiiiii 

K-'>-''-^K-*i^l--^r^>^i-^ 



J?q 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



421 



'"■![ 'pitog c) M w cs n CI 



•d3>T i^vO 00 CO '-' ro 

SUlBm^W 0) M « M M C-) 



■d3>T t^vOOO ^ O f^ 

P+HJluy PI ft w ot C) ci 



•d3^ 

';piaiqDS 



t^vo 00 CO " t^ 

ro -i- lO lOVO ■rt- 
ci c) 1-1 M <M r< 



T3 

a> 

3 
C 

'■H 

c 
o 
O 



c 

3 
O 

O 

X 

0) 
(0 
(0 

LU 



*^^H t>^\o CO in o " 
'■^ ^"-^ w P) M n P) ri 

'^^H vo "".00 t^ ro •* 
'UMOJJT fO-^iou^^o ^ 

*-■■ P) P) 1-1 P^ 01 P) 



•d3^ 



t^vo 00 0\ PI lO I l^ 
PO ■* lO iov£) "* o 
PI PI M PI PI PI Tt 



o 



T n v^PiPli-iPtPjPi 

■Q3^ VOVOOO t^ O Tt- 

II n a. 01 PI M p) p) pi 

•uiarr 

*a M o PI o " rx 

jnoiuAoc t^ ONoo o\ Lo p) 

1-1 PI « PI PI 



, ^ .tl 0\iO Tf PI Tf 0\ 

Audanw ''' id lo n- ro m 

-• «■ PI PI M PI PI PI 



_o_o o o o o 

'ui'v-u'cnn 

</) tn tn in </^ tn 



en "D "vS '^ Z; T; 
1-1 P< PO -^ u~,vO 

U, U •-! Vh Vh 1-, 

rt rt c3 rt rt c; 



vo lO 

o ^ 



2;S 



0\ o\ o\ 

lO I^ tv. 

PI « 


rv 

m 


- 1- t^ t^ Tj- 

Ov in 1- J-^ 11 

PI « fO >-i Pi 


o 
in 


t^O\0C 
lO t^ t^ 

PI w 


to 


GOO r^OO rt 
Ov ■* -1 m o 

P) 1- PO 1-1 PI 


n 


O^00 00 

lo r^ t^ 

PI « 


in 


PI " (^ O 1-1 
0\ in 1-1 ^ -1 

P) 1-1 CO ►- PI 


CO 


t^c»oo 

lO I^ tx 

P) 1-1 


IT) 


t-^ P) O O O 
00 m PI r^ « 
PI « CO 1-1 PI 


o\ 

PO 

n 


o^coco 
lo r^ i^ 

PI « 


lO 
lO 


m 11 CO li- CO 
Ovin PI r^ " 

PI M CO " PI 


in 


On Cv 0» 
in t^ t^ 

PI 1-1 


in 


in 11 CO t^ m 

Ov m PI ts. " 

PI M CO " PI 


vo 


t^ O\oo 
m t^ t^ 

PI w 


in 


PI 11 tJ- in Tf 

0^ 0\ PI t^ - 

PI 1 PO 11 PI 


in 



txO\ii I rx l10^T^ln-3- 
inJ^t^ O 0\'^Plt^" 

PI 1 m M w CO " PI 



lO. 0\ 0\ I t^ •^- n CO \f^ 

int^t^ w cMnpit^i 

PI n lO PI n CO 11 PI 



a.co o\ vo in PI -* in n 
inr^t-^ n Osmpit^ii 

PI n in PI n CO 11 PI 



in 0\vo 
00 n O 

M CO n 



CO fOOO 

-t r^vo 



QQ 



73 (T/ 

55 



tn U3 M 

555 



u •- u li u 
rt.rt ri 03 rt 
>>>>> 



-t M t^ o O- m I PI 
°2. CO ^ O m Oi I oc 
"* -1 - CO 1 1 o 



lO in in in in in 



o j: 



422 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



O 



■o 

3 
C 

"■? 

C 

o 
O 



3 
O 

O 

X 

V 
(0 
(0 

LU 



_ VO 0\ tx t^ O OS 

*;;aqao3 mm-, ^^ m 



■uiarr coosi^Tt-mt^ 
'«;nMTPrr ^ On t^ t^ oi Os 

bllJ^JKJJ^ „ M M 04 M 



in OS ts,vo coso 

4SoUBU£2 M M M C) M 



•uiaQ 



\0 0\ l^ tx <s| OS 



'a3pp2 *^ ^ 1-1 ^1-1 



'UUXlQOJ\[ M M M C4 M 



'SUT}J M M M rq M 

•lusrr ^ " tx <*5 -* t^ 

■ISn^^S M C>< M CS M 



vo o r^ tx 04 OS 

*UBIU33J^ M M M rj M 



•uiarr ■* os t^ i^ -^ os 

, *-!■ vo OS t^ tx (s) OS 

'aUBJ^ W M M 04 M 



. „ \0 ON t^ IX 0< 0\ 

uEiua3iuuii2 M M M 0) M 



■da'ST >o tsoooo M w 
a. CO ■* lo toso ^ 

paO'3 04 C<) M M 04 04 



CO to en tn tn c/) 

PQPQCQ 

M T3 xJ ■:r; t^ 4^ 

M M CO Tf lOVO 

'O 'O "O "O Id 'O 

V^ ;-< Ih li l^ v^ 

c^ c^ cfl 03 c^ c^ 
^^^^^^ 

+-»+-•-*-» +J -M -M 
U-j to to lO lO VO 



1-1 HH HH l-( \^ 



QQQ 



(55 



w en 

QQ 



Vh >- t, Vh t- 

rt^"3 cu o! rt 



MM IT) 



M M M VO 



O MSO 

IX M OS 

M CO 


tx 00 \0 l-O >o Os 

tX :X M lO M CO 

in M M M M 


M 04 r^ 

tX M OS 
M CO 


o 
in 


M tX M lO OS 

00 M vo 1-1 CO 


00 " CO 
\0 " o 

M CO M 


04 
00 
lO 


lO O covo t~^ 

OS 04 Jx IT) Tj- 


O MVO 
tx M OS 

M CO 


tx 
tx 


00 invo CO OS 

tX M lO M CO 

M M M M 


00 OSO 
vo 1-1 OS 

M CO 


lO 


GO lO lO ■^VO 
tx M lO M CO 


O 1-1 tx 

t^M OS 
M CO 


00 M so lO -* o 

tx 00 1-1 lO M T^ 

lO M M M M 


OS "VO 
\0 " Os 

M CO 


VO 

tx 

lO 


00 VO lO lO OS 

tX M lO M 00 


OS 1-1 so 
<0 1-1 OS 
M CO 


so 
tx 

lO 


Osso lovooo 

tX M LO 1-1 CO 


Osi-ivo 

\o *-< O, 

M CO 


so 
OS 
lO 


oovooovo O 

tX M lO M Tf 


O 1-1 ^ 

r>> 1-1 OS 

M CO 


tx 00 t^oo "^ o i 

tX tX M lO M -^ 
lO M M M M 


M CO r^ 

tX M OS 
M CO 


00 

lO 


M vo M lOOO 
00 M SO M CO 


OS ON tx 
m tx OS 
04 M 


tx 

lO 


Tt- OsOO o ^ 

OS '^ M tX M 

04 M CO M 04 



w ^H w H-. vo 



»-( M t-H M VO 



H ^ 



W 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



423 



■d3M 0\ O irir'3 0\i>'tl^<^ 

jj^ pAog ►- M M 01 n n w cs M 



lo (^ 1^00 o o ►- -Tf 

IT) M n n 1-1 M PI p, 



•d3^ 



biiUlUXUXn^ „ „ „ 0, „ 01 w M 01 I vo PI PO 



vo i-^oo 00 1-1 >o po p^ 
N ■'t Oi Tt-00 o>vo t^ 

lO P) PI P4 M w PI M 



•Cl3>T '- '- "^"^t>0 -l-t^'-i 

, *-■■ PO to PI p^ n ir-j\Q •>+ i— 

'SlUBllll^V M « H, PI CI P. „ p[ PI 



■+ t^ O\00 O u-i PI Tt 
fl -+0 TfOO 0\\0 t^ 
lo PI Pi PI l-l 1-1 PI P) 



•(I3\T '^' " "+ '^' n CO "-> hv " 

""cl fO in PI P, O u->VO •* 1-1 

'p;ipiuQ 1-1 1-1 i-H PI PI 01 1-1 PI P( 



o 


lO 


o 


PI 


PI 


PO 



•O txOO 00 00 ID P< -^ 
PI T)- 0\ Tj- tx O\vo t^ 

in PI PI Pi >-< 1-1 PI PI 



•da-VT PI ^ \o P0\O O ■* t^ o 
'jpiuiqo^^ M M w Pi 01 PI « PI PI 



•da^ 



PI i-< in 1-1 o\ o in\o PI 
POmPi P0i-i\0"0 -1-1-I 
{pAVJtjqg 1-1 1-1 1-1 PI PI PI 1-1 PI 01 



^ t^oo ^» o m 01 PO 

01 rt 0\ TfcO 0\V0 tx 
in 01 PI 01 n 1-1 p< PI 



Tj- i%oo 00 o in p< Tj- 
PI Tf o\ Tj-oo o\vo t^ 
in PI PI PI M M PI PI 



3 
C 

C 

o 
o 



■d3>T ^1 O inoo in om i^ w 

UAVOJtg i-1mmP|i-,pii_p^p| 



■d3>r '"' ^' ^'^^ in o m t^x 1- 

"■ PO in 01 O O in^o -t -^ 

'3AVOH « „ „ p, „ P, „ f[ 0, 



•tl3H 



l-l i-< iofOt^O\rftxi-i 
PO in PI PO M mvo ■<t 



"-^ PO in PI PO ►- mvo ■<*• w 
s:jUBjqEajBQ i-i«h,p)pip,hi^pi 



o 


in 


o 


01 


PI 


PO 



01 


Ov in 


Ov 


a\ 0) 


« 


11 PO 



m i^ O\00 o m Pt Tf 
01 •+ 0\ rtOO On\0 t^ 
m 01 01 PI 1-. 1-1 01 01 



1^ O-iCO O in PI -j- 

T ov •^^oo o\^o t^ 

PI PI PI w tH 01 01 



in t^oo 00 o m PO Tt 
0) ■<:}■ o\ Ttoo 0\vo ^x 
m PI PI PI w w PI PI 



O 

O 

X 

(0 
(0 



■d3^ 



" o inw f^OvPor^o 
— PO in PI oo M mvo rj- 1-1 
J3[I3qoBg "«i-piPiP)MPiPi 






•d3H 



'Xqd 



0\0V0 -toi 01 C^O^PO 
01 in >-< 01 1- vo in oo o 

-tnj\[ « ►. „ 01 p| 01 w 01 01 



o 


PO 


o 


01 


PI 


PO 



00 j^oo 00 o m oo PO 

01 Tt- 0\ rfoo OvVO tx 
in 01 PI PI « w P) 04 



•<t00Pl o mnooo-t^t-N-^ 11 
(X 0\V0 \0 m o PI ts, invo t^ vo 
00 1-1 PI n « PI i^ 



Tf OOVO 
0\ 0\ PI 
vo 1- PO 



rt OOOO PI PI mvo 
^ o> PO tx o\ invo 

01 PI 01 1-1 HI 01 01 



'v'v C'^ 



^ — a n n 

00 0, j; « 01 on 

be .. 

O 



c.S" 
Ji > 



2§ 



X c/j t/: t/) (/: U2 

2 -^ '"■ S f^ •^ 



.-^ "^ -c:: TS t: TS 

-; 1- u I, ii V- V- 
ra rt oj c3 rt rt rt 



" - o» PI PO ro -^ 



K 



424 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'U3qJ03 « 



■IU3CT NOO fOOv»xO\«^ OVO 






VO t^) lOOO " iH O >n M C 
IT) lO 0\ i-i t^vrjvOVO 11 >-i 
c>) ►-« (^ t^ 



•uiaa 






'jappZ 



VO Tf o 
1- I CO '-' 



U 



T3 
0) 

3 
C 

"■^ 

C 

o 
O 



3 
O 

O 

X 

(U 
(0 
(0 



■UI3Q \oro''l"^f<oOsfOO>o r^ ■^" 
■IU3Q (^ ^ rv^oO M O (S O 00 



■IU3Q i^-^rooo N O POOoO 



■U19Q i^TtroOnOPlOrs» 

'UEIU93J j[ 00 ;:; f^^ VO t^ (S O c^ 



■IU3Q t^ rt fovo Tl- O Tt O vo 

'IIBUU3UJIU12O0 " WOOD t^ M 0\ iM 

* H M « P) N rj 1-1 M fl 



■+ 


-+ " 




0\\0 


00 


" 


ID 


^ " 


HH 


OnMD 


00 


*"* 


^ 


^o 


M 


0\\0 


00 


*"* 


't 


-t o 


C) 


OnVO 



o 


m 


o 


01 


CI 


fo 



lO O\00 00 OS lO ro •<J- 
0( Tf On ^ t~- OsMS t^ 
U-) IN 01 01 M M oq 01 



QQ 



1-1 U Vh 



^ M J - ^ ^ 

c' c.E' ' 









m I/) (/)(/) CO C/) 
-1 Ol „ tv| „ 0) 

"d "tS 13 73 "C T) "d 
^ 1-1 1-1 l-« l-t 1-1 *-* 
f^ rt 03 a! rt rt rt 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



425 



■d9>T Ov fo fo o o <r)00 pooc IS. r^'O 

,..- ,„9- txCO IN. Tj-vo r^ lo O r^O •* Ov 

JJT pAOJJ M f) « fc - 0) ^^ « w « N 



i-c O ul 0\ 
in « ri HH 



in r^vo 
\0 N n 



■d3H 

bXSUlLULUllJ 01 CJ 11 ro M 01 D -I i-i « 04 



CO nvooo 
0\ 0\ in On 
Tj- >-i N " 



O tsOO 



•daji 

*CIITr>TTTT \\ ^-^--^ *^ -vj vw »>. "V w t^v^ 
S>LUt:i[(ly\\ 01 01 1-. OO i-< 01 01 ii M p-i 



m OS 01 jN. 
■-I 00 m 0\ 
in " 01 M 



CO t^ t^ 

O 01 01 



'daM" O oo rooO O OS ts COOO ts I^VO 

(.-,,,_„, ^ rooo ts fO l^\0 mo t^vo -^ 0\ 
I'^+H'^. vJ 01 01 1-1 en i-i 0^ 01 « M « 01 



>-i in o "O 

•-< 0>.V0 0\ 
in w 01 1-1 



« mOO 
in t^ >H 

VO 01 01 



•d9^ 



on n « o o\ ix. oooo t^ t^vo I ^ Tj- tx t^ 

OOOO ts Tj- t^\o m o f^sO ■^ Os I 1-1 Os in 0\ 

01 01 11 M w 01 m « 01 M 



00 vooo 

^ 01 01 



«> 

3 
C 

C 

o 
O 



a o fo oo o o " oo OOOO fs tsvo i >o 01 t^vo 



^^a. o oo m -1 o o 00 o^oo t-v i^\o 
'UAVOJfT '^^ ts -^ t^ l^ m o r^vo •rl- 0\ 
"- 0, 01 -I fn - 01 01 w 1 M 01 



\0 oo ts ts 

n Ov in o\ 
in hH 01 w 



'^^H O ro ro n O 01 00 0^00 t^ O >0 | n 

'aMOTT '^'^ ts ■ri- tv t-~. m o ts\0 in 0\ 

•tl oiO^MOOi-iOlOliw-HOl 



00 ts'O 
01 o\ m 0\ 
in w 01 w 



•d3H 



^ wO^onooioonoots t>«so I -t 00 t^ r-v 
'SIUBJQBJJBO '^^O tv. -t tx. ts in o t^vo Tj- ov " OMn Os 

-t n w'oioii-iooi-ioioiHHMMOi innoii-i 



in -^00 
vo N 01 



ts 00 o 

^ \0 01 
vo 01 01 



\0 01 01 



r^ ts 0\ 

■rf vo 1 
\0 01 01 



c 

3 
O 

O 
X 

(0 
CO 

UJ 



^^^ Oooooo^O\OOOOlln r^vo \0 
'a3TT3lJ3B<T '^'^ ts oo\0 is m o tsvo t}- 0\ 
IL n ti. 01 01 H, ro -• 01 M 1 1 « 01 



•uxarr 

*-■: 01 00 1-1 VO ^ -^ ^vo 11 M in in 

jnoiuAac oivovooo o oo^o " rxo^ooo 

" n 01 Ol 01 w 01 01 01 01 1 01 M 



, . , CI- 00 " 01 rovo 01 f<0 0\ fOCO ^VO 

'Alia an w « vo \o « mvo "^oo m -^ oooo 
"■ 01 01 11 rn 11 01 01 „ „ 01 



00 Th tsvo 
O 0\ >n 0\ 
in M M M 



0\ oo ts O 
in oo m m 
in 01 M 1 



m 01 00 m 
o< CO looo 

00 -. 01 1 



rs tsoo 

Tj- vo 1 
vo M 01 



o 00 o 

•* 01 00 

in 0) 1 



» 


t^ 


lO 


^ 


01 


01 



■^ u u vn'u'ti'u'u'u'u'il^'u 
•yi ^ Xi </i f/i (/i V) :r. v: tn yj u: 

3552qc2SgSS5 

1 01 oo M 01 M 01 M 01 oo ►- 01 

-3 -C T3 -a tJ" 13 "UTS "C "3 -3 -C 

liV-.Uv.UUUt.Ul-UV- 

oSwoirtrtrtanJrtrJrtrt 



m tn 05 tJ t3 t3 13 "^ *-. 12 lli ^ 
1 M n 01 oirooo-t'^Tfinin 



y 


o 


CJ 








u 


u 


u 








rn 


t/1 


7. 








(2; 


QG 


t/i 


T3 


"^ 




01 


OO 



S C3 
JO o 



426 



KLECTION RETURNS. 



'^jaqjo^ M c>) (s n (") PI n M M m 



XT) 01 ID fO 

■+ M W M 



0"^i-'OsfOONOs'NfO<*5>-<»o| O 0>OV0 



•luaa 



<"l 


o -t- 


o 


w ro 


lO 


D M 



*^Sj3U^U[\ i-h 0^ 0) cm Cl cm C) C^ hh ^1 



^ :>.^vo 


P< O 1-v 


VO PI lO CO 


i-i »- CO 


rO PI M rH 


in PI « 



'jJtJ^OJ\[ wPIP^PI PlPlwPli-cP^ 



U-) P) 


TJ-fO 


P) 01 


lOCO 


PO PI 


IH >-4 


P) 





o\ 


t^^ 


O 


O fO 


U-) 


PI w 



•III3/-T O-+fOOP4 00O\wOPI"rj-| Tj-OO'tin 

"^''VJ i-(TtioioO\'-''+Omt^PlOv m i-ivofO 

'a3ni97 MpiPiP) p)MPjMi-iP) popiMw 



o o <^ \ -t 

m PI " p^ 



'UUAlQDJ/\r wPjPjP) P)P|P)P4WP| 



VO P) lo PO 
ro P) w 1-1 



M O T)- 

M M PO 
IT) PI ►- 



0) 

3 

c 

C 
O 

O 






0''^POO^T^-POO^P^OPO^-llO 
>-, TtvoiOO\P) i+O lOt^Pl 0\ 
wPIPlP) P|P|P4P)>-iPl 



'aaung mmpip) piinp^pi 



•iiiarr o'+i-ir^popoovpiopo>-cir) 
vJ. w Ti- m ir> o\ '>i ^-omt^Pi 0\ 
'UIJUI93JJ^ H PI p; PI PI PI PI PI " PI 



^ >-■ VO t^ 
1^ PI ir> P^ 

ro P4 M w 



lO 00 VO ^ 
t^ M lo PO 

fO PI M 1-1 



OO PI VO "^ 
VO PI lo <^ 

PO PI M 1-1 



^ 


PO -t 1 




*-* 


PO 


ID 


PI 


^ 



o 


O PO 


HH 


w f»5 


IT) 


PI " 



PO o\ ^ 
M O fO 
ID PI M 



n 
o 
O 

X 

a> 

(0 
(0 

UJ 






^Pl C>P0'+O\Pl O\P0O>D 

TflOlDOvPI -+0 Ttt-NP) OS 

PI PI PI PI P4 Pl Pl 1-1 PI 



'UUlUjaiUUIl^^ H PI P4 P) PI PI PI PI " r^ 



•daM- t^ " ov o po o\oo -+ OS Tt o '^ 
"" a. oi o\ r^vo (^ t^ ID o t^vo id o 
'pao'3 p),p)i-ipoi-iPiP("i-i"Pii-i 



o w VOOO 

t^ PI ID f^ 

PO PI 1-1 " 



0\ 


VO 


tH 


00 


30 


PI VO 


PTJ 


PO 


PI 


l-l 


t-l 


PI 









OO P) t^vVO 
VO O ID 0^ 
ID i-i 1^1 H- 



ID 00 VO I -t 
-t VO " 00 
VO PI PI Tt 






cfi "O TJ tfl -O In t; cnTSTJ («-C 
«PIPOmP)i-iP1>hP1POi-iP| 

-O t3 t3 -o tT'O 'cT'O "^tT tTtJ 



(/) en tnT3'T3i3'T:)'Z'-i-i-"-'TI'+j 

M >-i 1-. P4P|P0fOTt--+'*iDiD 



O tj O 

I/) 1/1 t/V 

G S 'Q 



3 


rt 


^ 


C 


!« 


£ 


rt 


u 



>p' 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



42'i 



•d3>r o n " >o 



, u tl 00 to fovo I M 

sSuuuuiiT^ « « n vo 



■d3^ 



00 fo -i-vo 



"^H OS CO -r^o 



w 
en 
(A 



T3 

3 
C 

"■? 

C 

o 

O 



';piuii[Og >- - r< 



0\ CO T)-\0 
'ipMJEqg « « rt 



"''a. c> CO Tf vo 
'uAvojg " " 01 



O CO 'rfO 
9MOJJ « « r< 



's;uBjqBjaEQ « n n 



c 

3 

o 

o 

X 

4) 
(0 
(0 

111 



'jajpqoBg^ « « m | vo 



•uigrr «^oo ^ o\ 
'jnouiXag ^-, „ HH 



,. , - 00 CO co\o 

Ai[djnj\[ I-. « 0) 



U ^ k- Lh 

cfl cs r3 rt 



t~vOO 

txoo 

vo vo 



o s 



■I P) COtJ- 



o^ » , 



5^ Cm 



428 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



u 



T5 « 
« % 

C <" 
O 

O 



c 

3 
O 

O 

X 

v 

(0 

in 
LU 



'^ J. \o\o min 
';;3qao3 « « « 

•lU3f7 TtOO o r^ 
•luarr hhoo o i^. 



■uiarr o vo <^^ 



'aappZ " - - 

■UX3Q rooo OM3 

•LU3Q ^00 w t^ 

•uiarr -+00 o o. 



^00 n t^ 
'UEiuaaa^ « ^ « 



•uiaa 






U-) tx CO IX 

— txVO VO m 

'uBmj3UJun2 -^ " " 



•uiaa 



-^ 00 fO -^vo 

'P.IO'7 HH M (S 



►4 



S-. u w ;-' 



03 c^ rt CTJ 





^^^^ 


n 




*'"' 




V 


" 0» CO^ 





•s 


^ 


a> 




be 


*—« 


C 


rt 


n! 







H 



CM 



ELECTION RETURNS 429 

Gloucester County. 

f — Governor — ^ , — Assembly- 



r-iT go^ ^2 -iT .« Mu 

2P< >.Q opn -Ik ><q "rtf^ 

;§ r/> m <; u ^ 

Clayton, 256 170 21 253 160 23 

Deptford, 205 118 8 231 90 9 

East Greenwich, 156 92 14 158 90 13 

Klk, 98 86 10 98 86 10 

Franklin, 150 236 20 170 218 18 

Glassboro, ist District, 146 125 25 160 99 31 

" 2d " 89 109 10 97 lOI II 

Greenwich, 250 186 61 242 184 60 

Harrison, 230 137 13 231 133 12 

lyOgan 104 154 10 109 147 10 

Mantua, 205 228 22 204 223 25 

Monroe, 239 259 2^ 266 227 23 

South Harrison, 92 48 6 86 48 7 

Washington, 95 143 16 99 139 16 

West Deptford, 199 114 24 207 105 22 

Wenonah, 61 21 11 62 21 10 

Woodbury, ist Ward, 151 74 5 169 52 5 

" 2d " 273 155 4 319 108 5 

3d " 189 156 4 233 108 2 

3188 2611 307 3394 2339 312 

Woolwich, 316 168 13 328 152 13 

Total vote in county, 3504 2779 320 3722 2491 325 

Plurality in county, 725 

Socialist, 12; Social-Labor, 5. 



430 



ELECTION RETURNS. 





•do>i 

'uosi;j\[ 




•d3^ 

'a3AA\Q 




•da^ 
'ipnuQ 




•d3^ 

'jaqSBnHO 




<1 


J 'UIB|.I3qiUBlQ 

2 'suajja^s 

< 




•da^ 




•da^ 

'UIEAVg 


3 


•da^ 

'uaA\o^jo]/\[ 


o 

£ 
O 
(0 

■a 

3 

U 


•da^ 
'a>loiJ[ 

J 'q^aaspnn 

^ ^ -dan 
■i 'pjooa^ 




5 'jnouiXag 


c 





ro CT. ro f«o O \0 w M 

OOONOOOMTt-M 



\C O ro -t- O lO 01 ri 

C0ChOOO^''t'-' 

^H M M n « 1-H 



M „ M w M M M 



00O^OOO"•^l--^ 

M M M 01 M M 



\0 00 01 ro " to 01 01 

COOnOOO"-!-" 

►H " " 01 ^^ 1-1 



\0 Oooooi-i mM 01 
00C>OOO>-i^M 

M W I-. PI M W 



IOONOOOOm lOOOO) 
O0O^OOOl-l■!j-^-( 

1-1 ►-< M C^ t-( h-l 



VO ONOOOOmIOw 01 

00O\OOOi-i'*n 

M M M 01 W M 



^OOOOOmiOmO) 
OOOOOO'-i'^M 

M M h- M 01 M W 



^ O'^ r^i r^ OOVO m oi 

00O\OOOi-i-+i-< 

M H, M 04 w 1-1 



00 o o\ lo IT) :^<o 01 
00 01 Tj-M P0O\^-<t 

d 01 w CO 0^ 01 01 01 



VO 00 oj Tt oq o Tt 01 
COOnOOONtj-m 



01 M ro 00 01 01 0^ 



W 1^ >n -t ""I PI >c ro >o 00 H- I 6 

l-O -t- lO 01 lO 1-. l-N oo\0 " •* 01 

ON - " •-. M I 00 



1-c [^ 1J-, lO 01 oo\0 -+ (^ 00 oi 
\0 -t ><"' "1 'O 1-1 l^ ro^O " '^ 

CN 1-1 - l-i 1-1 



to ON 0) OO 01 -j- w ID w 00 <n 

J^ m\0 ro lo ■-< 00 oooo 1-1 ■* 
On 1-1 1-1 MM 



I^ \0 NO lO Ol fO li-) -}-00 04 IT) NO 
lO t1- LO 01 U-) M (^ C«^NO M rt 01 

ON 1-1 M M M 00 



On r^ -t lO 01 OO lO rj- t^ 01 ^ 

lo Tj- lo 01 in M (^ fONO M Tj- 

ON M 1-1 MM 



O NO to lo 01 ro ^ ooNO 01 Tf 

NO -i- to 04 lO M t^ OONO M 't 

On M M MM 



M NO to lo N n\o 1^ tx 0) -r)- 

\0 ■<:^ to 0» lO M t^ roNO M Tt 

On M M MM 



O f^ to lO 04 OONO TJ-NO 01 CO 
NO r)- to 01 to M t^ OONO M Tj- 

ON M M MM 



M NO to to 01 CONG tJ-NO 04 00 
NO t:1- to 01 to M r^ COVO M Tj- 

On M M MM 



01 toNO 01 Tj- O 00 04 04 O\00 
On 00 0\N0 00 to to to to ■<4-^ 
On 04m00 01mCOm0Om04 



00 0N0\00\-rf0t>^0Mio 

NO Tj-lOOllOMOOOOt^M^ 

0\ M M MM 



On 04 0100M04f0tO0100<N) 
O On O NO 0\ lONO ti-)NO ^ t^ 
O 0401oooiMOOMrOM01 



MM OImmIONM M 



M M t^ 



p-i Ph pL| fu CL, Ph Ph (l^ 



Pli fl( Ph Ph Ph Ph Ph P-i P- 



M 01 oo -:f tONO 1^00 



,^J=^^J=^' 



J 73 "O 'Id ^3 T3 T3 TS X) 

K* f-- K- P- I-* P> r^ P- 
(U4->-l->4-).4_>.f-l-M4->-)-> 

05t/)ait/)t/icflU3ait/3 



Id 'O '^ 'cj Td "^ t3 '^ nd '^ 

(-.lil-cl^Ul-il-il-iUil-i 

>>>>>>>>>> 



•^ "TS "^ '^ "^ "^ "T^ 'O ^3 '^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



131 






CO OvOO Tj- tx N 00 "* 
00«Tl->-ifOO->4-Tf 

^H ri w po CO po N N 



00 CO o^m m\r>in tj-vo 

MHC^CIwPOwCOihN 



•IU3CI 



t^ o-.oo \o t^ f 1 CO Tf 

00"T}-i-lO0OTj-Tf 

►1 n 1-1 ro fO fo 0) rj 



w \o « ro M >-' On lOVO tx C. 

o oc ovo o\"^"^ioio •^^ 



•uiaa 
'yfliouuo;^ 



cc^ooo^o i^oioo Tj- 
cO"Ti-M<r>OTtTt 

■-•rii-iroPOfOMN 



00 0\>0 C\ to in lO to -^fvo 



•utaa 



00 o-.oo 'O t^ f 1 r^ T^ 
00i-i'<*-i-iroOTt-^- 
►H 01 « CO ro CO PI 01 



i-i t^ 1-1 ro " M Ov "TO 00 On 
O 00 OVO 0\tri irtmm -rfvo 
O fl M PO 01 « CO « ro w ci 



•ITT3/T IO30 0OVO00 oivo -^l- 

'-"'^V.l 00>-irfi-ifOO-^-4- 

'UIUU3Q i-iOli-ifOfOrooiP^ 



j^vOi-irOi-''-iONio O\00 On 
O\00 OVO Ovtoioiom TfVD 
Ov C^NOOOli-icowroi-iM 



0) 

C 

O 

O 






■UIOQ 

'uucuinqog 



•uiaa 



COOCOVOCOOIOtJ- 
GOri-^t-i-iroom'* 
wOlwrocooONOl 



00 OO OnVO vO M 00 ■* 
i-iOli-ifOrOfOOlN 



00 0\CC VO -t M 00 ri- 
COi-iTl-^iroO-^T)- 
M 01 M CO ro PO <N M 



1-1 OOOVOVO 01 00 ■* 
O\01 •^1-' OOO •^•^ 
« 01 ►-. f^ PO 00 M 01 



lO w PO " " On ICOO 00 0\ 

00 OVO 0\inir>inin tj-vo 
MOlPOOli-ifOMOOi-'Ol 



w VO M 01 w WOO "-,00 00 0\ 
O 00 OVO 0\"^"^"1"^ TtVO 
O OlOlCOOlwPOi-ifOi-iOl 



0\VO'-i'+i-'>-'0\"~' "-<oo o\ 
O\00 ovo 0^"^"^"^"^ -^vo 
0\ O1010O01i-iP0>-<PO>-iM 



m vo " rf ■-■ 1-1 CO "^VO 00 0\ 
O 00 OVO o^"^"^"^"^ tJ-vo 
O POOlPOOii-irowrowOi 



O 

O 

c 
o 

(0 

3 
I 



•ui9a 

•uiaa 
■maa 



vo OsOO VO vo 01 0\ ^ 
CO"'<ti-cP0O-<i-T)- 
w 01 1-1 PO 00 OO 01 01 



00 t^OO vo vo 01 ts, Th 

CO-Tt-WPOO-^Tl- 

"'Ii-iPOPOOOMOl 



00 1-^00 VO "-J OOOO ■* 

oo-'-*«fooTi-^ 

1-1 01 w PO PO fO 01 01 



o r^i-ioiiHi-iON"^ "-jOO 00 
O 00 OVO 0\in\J-i\r) IT) tJ-vo 
O 01 01 CO 01 1-1 OO w PO 1-1 01 



00 IX Ov -1 ■* I-" 00 fovo 00 o\ 
Ov t^O\^nO\minm-rl- ^tvo 
0\ olwrOMMPOi-iPOi-iOl 



OvOO On"10 t-iOO ■* tvOO 0\ 
0\ 00 OsVO 0\m m m u^ 'i-vo 

OV 01 -H PO 01 1-1 OO >-• CO " 01 



'adsajj 



tx Cv Povo 1-1 "^ >-i 01 
OOCvOOO"-*-^ 

l-l W tH 01 ^ HH 



Tj- tx'l-"-. 0|O0LorO"^ro^ 
vo M- u~, 01 "-, -I tx oovo >-i Tf 
0\ w 1- -1 " 



•d3^ 

'3pC03 






O tx 0\V0 01 -^ IS. 'S- Is. 00 ■+ 
VO rf ir> 01 "^ " tx oovo " Tl" 



oyouoouo 

UUllUUI-ll-llH 



(unjcuuiuiuajiuw'-" 

i^v^t,w,v«ui-.j-i l-tQ-i 

p.^ O, 2h Ph Cl^ fl. 2- Ph Ph 



1-1 01 ro Tj- ii-)VO tvOO 

r? !-■- u u I- '.-•.-. •- 



W ■ 



(/icncnuiuiuicouiM 






"■<■<'<■ 



•^ '^ 'O Td '^ Ti Ti "^ 'O 'O 
01 M 01 PI 01 01 01 01 01 0( 



28 



432 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



cl \OMU-)ot^ooooa> 

'UOSE];\[ MHMC>)WC^C<WH 



00 0IO"O>-iroO avOOTfinMr'5i-i<*3t>. 

lO N Cq C) 01 f'l -I M M l-l M W W I-, M « 






ID nMMMnWI-l 



CO CO-+ioi-HrO"COt^ 



■tl3>T ■* 0) fO T}- rovo 00 O i-i 

'innp/-T ^'-'l^o^^ooooc^ 

4pili;Q n „ „ fq M 0) M M M 



M r-i M fO t^ O rO CO 
On Oi O >-' 0\ " rn o 
in c^ CI 0) I- CI M w 



O OroWOjoOM'-'VO 
00 00\fmOfOi-'<*5t^ 



'aanSBjiBQ HHHHwo)«c)(^«i-i 



1-H t^OOt^ONWfO 

00 i-iO"00OrOO 
U-) c^i M c^l 1-1 PI n M 



t>» t^ C^l l^ C0>0 f O 1-1 VO 

ID t^TJ-T}-OfOi-ifOt^ 
C^ l-11-il-il-ii-ll-il-i 



•(Ism CO " 1-1 CI m moo o pi 

cl voi-iioor^ooooo\ 

'uiBiaaquiTJiQ i_-.woii-,a)o^i-ii-i 



00 clO^^ONi-ifOO 

IT) M Cl PI M C^l 1-1 M 



55 ro „ M <v) ro lOOO O " 

(Ji 'tlSN vO"u->or^OO00O\ 

^ , i-ji— ii-iCll— iOJCll-11-1 



rh M P) m\o cq ro CO fO O 00 0\ O\00 fO w vo 
00 piOi-'0\mc*50 OOOOrOTf-OrOMfor^ 
iDMMP)i-iM>-iM CN wwi-ii-ii-ii-itH 



•a 

0) 

c 



•flnXT CO" O ^-1 COtt-t^OiM 

^^a. loi-iiooJ^oot^cfi 

'|pMXB]/\[ i-11-iMiMnPiiMi-.i-i 

■d3>T CO w OS M CO iDVO O Cl 

UlEjWtj nnnc^Mt^lNi-ii-i 



O c^i-ciOt^OOfO OsO>nt^ OsOO M 1-1 lO 
00 MOmOni-iCOO t^OOTf-^OCOwCOt^ 

lO M M c>i i-i rj 1-1 M Cl 1-1 1-1 M i-i 



O PI 1-1 VO VO C| c>i M i-H O \o Cl t^ t^ P< 1-1 vo 
00 ciO>-iO\i-icOO OOOO-i^iOOcOMrot^ 

lOClClNi-iC|i-ii-i 



o 
O 



• Htvt coi-ii-ii-i"ino\0.-i 

li3i± \Oi-iioOt^OO00O\ 

'U3A\O5[0]A[ ""-ci^cidMH, 



M Cl 1-1 u-)00 CO CO CO 
00 ClOi-iONi-iCOO 
m MMOi-iCii-ii-i 



IT) o \o Cl O\oo o " «^ 

00 OOTt-mOrOi-iCOl^ 

Cl M M W 1-1 M 1-1 1-1 



3 

o 

o 

E 
O 
(/} 

■o 

I 



o 



^ VOi-imO\I^OO00ON 
*3>10X3; i-iHi-ii-MCiciwi-. 



M\0 t^t^C0iO-+0 lO 

"UiSQ vo M o t^»ooo^ a\oo 

dClCli-ii-ii-ii-iMi-i 



'ipadspujj 



•rTa-vT lo Cl vo ^ p) Os ci pi ci 

'^"(i \oi-imorvOMOoo\ 

'pjooa^ H^wM-ii-icid^-iw 



■IU3(T w co^ c^^O lo c) m lo 

'jnouiXao t^Nwooioosr^ONON 
aiiULUAds^ cicicii-iMi-ii-i"i-i 



'Aqcl-inpj 



„ W M d W Cl Cl M W 



J~^ dMlDtxCllOfO 

(^ PIO>-iOsi-icoo 

U-) PIPICHWPIMI-I 



00 MDOO 10\0 CO >OVO 
CO O 'I- Cl Tf-OO CO 1-1 
t^ CO Cl PI 1-1 M PI PI 



CO rf CO 0\ Cl f^ -t 
Cl O Cl 0\ 1-1 CO O 
PI Cl Cl 1-1 Cl 1-1 1-1 



VO 00 1-1 -l-l^iOOsiO 
O O >0 CO lOOO lO 1-1 
00 CO Cl Cl 1-1 " Cl Cl 



lOOOOOVOOO OOOlO 
CO i-iO\i-<00nC0O 
lO Pli-iCli-iCli-w 



lO i-vOdONOsO'-i^ 
00 OOi^»OOrOi-ico:^ 
Cl 1-iwi-ii-ii-ii-ii-i 



0\ lO OnVO 00 O O "O 0\ 
lO t1-vo CO •-■ " 1-1 O Cl 

VO MI-ll-ll-lClPIPlrH 



-t\0 w \o >o lovo O 
ir>\0 -t- 1-1 1-1 " Cl CO 

H, H. W M PI Cl Cl >-l 



ycjuooocjoo 

C ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

(^ 1-1 Cl CO -1- u^\0 1^00 On 






o o o o y o o 
<u i; u <u K <u <u 
i^ ih Vh Si ;-i vi i^ 

Pi Ph 0, Ph Ph Ph Pi 



li t- li Ii 1^ v< u 

03 c^ rU CO c^ c^ c^ 

^ Kj )> K> S> t> K^ 



liliV^lnVnliliti 

Ph Ph Ah CL, Pi Ph P-i fl^ 



^lllld^WtHll 



■■^^l 



^ ^^ ^ ^^rt 



u^iriu-iiniriXTiirt^n 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



433 



VO " i-i 00 "^ O^VO O\00 I \0 O lO to -^X ro -" 00 -t-vC ro -H " " >-. CO c^ 
UBlUSia^YV o<MMi-<««i-ii-ir-< t-xro04<^|i-i-iMOi io^^«^«0)r)M« I po 



•uiaa 



'^"''LL VO " - OO IT) o\o O^00 

•AaiJnjj 01 n C4 « " " « i-i 1-. 



ID r^ c^ " CO fOCO fx 
\o o -t to -^00 to "- 
r^ to ti fi I-. H- 01 'M 



to 00 -tvO '^ ■* t) Tt- o 

t^ -i->o to — 1-H >-i « to 

1/-, « „ _ „ tl "t t) w 



'AlTOUUO^ t)(MOIi-i«Mi-ii-iw I i^ro'^I'M-i-'Oiti I U-) _„rt„c^^^^, j,, 



•ITI3/T \OOtli-itotlt>.>-\0 I u^^O^•*lOto r-^00 I oi 0^•*lO■^^u^"Tl-0 

L"^Q MD t) M 00 "^ 0\V0 O\00 j \0 O -t to -1-00 to ►- I I^ -i-VO to « " H- i-i to I to 

*[[3AV{IHg 01 ti tq „ « « - - 



t^ to '"I '^1 -^ »- t) O) u^ « „ „ „ 01 01 01 1- 



lil^Cr toco 01 ,_, r, jy, _|. „ ^ , .^ 00 O Tfco ^co r^l Ov t^i/-. ^^'t'*^T^O I in 

'uiuuarr ^ " " oo u^oo ^o ovoo u^ o lo to ^i-oo to -i t-^ •t\o to - « >-■ « co ro 

VJ. o|"i"i-r--,-«i-i t-^ too^tlM'-it^ltl m r.-H_--H(\10lMl-. 00 



•X3B9JJ[^ 01 01 01 



0\ 00 O -t to in o^oo 
r^. o m to ir-,00 to " 
f^ to "1 ^1 — — t| ^1 



t^ ■+ i^vo o toco Tj- O 

00 ^TiKO ^ 01 01 M I-. ro 
ir; — -< w .-, 01 01 01 I- 



0) 

3 
C 



O 



■U.13Q rfoo ro^oo-lN,^io] to 0^0-fC>-rC>I^l - -l-iot^Tt^Ol^o 

'iiTir>Tiinit-io *^ " ■- OO lO 0-\0 OCO <0 O "t to -tOO to - j CO •^'O to — — " >- oo 

UUKIUUHJ^ 01 -1 ^1 1 i^ oo -I n „ ^ ^1 r, ly-, „ „ „ „ p, A^ tv, „ 

■U13Q to 0\ to to -t tooo "VO ' O t^OThONtoOvt^l O\00 ^-O ■* Tt- 01 Tt o 

'mr\T ^ I-* " 00 iJ^ 0\0 ooo 1 t^ o lo to Tj-oo to " I tN, -t^ to •- ^ m ►, to 

'=''^:a. 01 01 t| _ „ _ ^ _ ^ i^ to "I '^1 " H-' ti 01 iri - - M M 01 01 01 M 



c 
o 

o 

I 
I 

-M 

c 
o 

o 

c 
o 

■a 

3 

I 



to O to X^ LC - CO TfCO j CO O "I lO t^ '"1 " t^ I Tt- O t^X, 00 O ^ Tt O I oi 

vo " " 00 "". ovo c^oo t^ K^intoioo-t'-' o -t^ to — ti ^h ►- co \o 

'rnUiBJT 01 01 01 -I «-..-.« « t^ to 'I oi « « -^l -1 \ \r, rt „ „ „ 01 -^1 01 H- to 



■1113(1 



'UiarT fl On to\0 oi«ioOiol to t^toirixtOTt-txIvo t~-. Tt-<o t1- -t ►-i Tt O 

it,^tt,, _ ^ -' " t^ "^ ON^ O\0C vn o Tt to T)-00 to " VO TtVO to " " m « to 

UO[[e^ 01 01 01 i-i -. — ^^ w ►-. t^ to oi "^1 — M f^i ti U-) ^ „ „ „ 01 01 01 " 

'^''Q 01 1>^ lO O ^1 O '^1 M lo I Tt CO — mCO 01 O. t^ o t-^ u-.\0 Tt "l O Tt\0 

'zin'T ^ - c 00 IT) o'-o o^oo I Tt o lo to Ttoo to -i oo Tt>o to - -< i-. n oi 

1 01 <-i 01 ri — — ^ — w t^ to 01 01 ,- i-i o< oi u-j ^ „ _i „ 01 01 01 M 



'lUBUUaj^ 01 01 01 



t^ to ^1 ""l — 1-1 01 01 



■(Ja^ to HH " 00 - "", ov i- o I o o c- -t 'I 



- -- - - 01 01 01 " 






- '-I -' -too - — I -^1 o On^O C>Tt--tl to Oi^t, oocto«>o 
u~. Ot^OO00O^l00 tlO^-'C^-toO loOOO-tm-^to-tot^ 
M 01 ™ 01 n I-. r-i in t| _ Ol „ 01 •- « 01 ^ — K- - - — „ 



oyotjoo'joo 

I 1-iV-t-V-i^^l-iJ-U 
v^ M 01 to Tt u-,\0 1^00 C 

u rototototototototo 



'I to -t "-.vO r^X 



-TTt-*TtTtTt-t U-, u-)u->ir-. ioii-)u-3ir. 



434 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



"davr "^00 f 1 \0 OO " O lO -t- fO 0> '-o (N. t-,. m^O 1^ 

, O- ro PI OsvO ro r^ P) '^1 t~^ 00 t^ O 00 PI t^ n 0\ 



""^a. po Pi ov t^ n-^ ''I PI 



'davr ■*oo ^ o\ o\ o oo lo 

'innp/T^ ""^ ''' "^^ PO t^ " PI 
jpriBQ „ w CO M « P) i-H 



" POtN.ir)Or^>Oiol-^ 

OO CO t^ O 0\ P| I^ P) o\ 

CO „PlHMl-.«M 



in -Tt ID Lo rv. t^ T^MD t^ 
i^oot^ooopjt^Pio 

PO HHPIMMWWM 






-tov'-'vo c^r^o PO 

OVO PO^O PI P) 

PO M hH CI M 



Ti-0\M txO\OsO>iO 
PO P< On^O covo " M 
UIBI.l3qiUBl{3 WW CO M H P) 11 



w 



•a 
o 

3 

£ 
O 

O 



c 




3 


V 


O 




O 


r 


r 


w 


o 


< 


(0 


^ 


■D 


W 


3 


U7 


X 


I 






Ti-oo PI t^ o\ o 00 -"t 

PO P4 On^O PO t^ " PI 

MM CO M M ri M 



'da'^ rtoo p) tx o\ o OMo 

'tTTAWPTAT '^ '^ O^^ PO t^ M PI 

[iaA\XKJ/\[ ^ „ CO M M PI M 



t^00t-xO00P^l^P4O\ 
PO mPJmmmmm 



PI Th t^ i/-)oo t^ Lo Tf t^ 
i^OOt^OOOPIl^PlOv 
PO mP)mmmmm 



-t pooo "^00 t^ 1/1 1^ t% 

i^oot^oooPirxMO> 

CO mPImmmmm 



•fliXT '^'^ Plt^ooooiol CO ^t^iot^J^ lovo r^ 
""^cl CO PI o^ p^r^Mpi t^oot^ooop)t^pio\ 

'UIBA\0 "'-' POmmMmCO mPImmmmm 



•da^ 

'll3MONlD]/\[ '^'^ 



■^00 POOO CT\ O 00 IT) 
CO M 0\\0 CO t^ M p) 

CO „ M PI M 



•davr 'l'°0 PO On On C\ l^ -t 

'-'"fl CO '-I On^ pOVO m pi 

'a>iai^ " " CO " M PI M 

, Q t^ PO t^ P^OO M irjoo 

'uiadspnTJ m looo lo m co n lo 

' ■• -^'-PJM oImmPJm 



■da>T lo p) poco o o CO lo 

JJJUJaj]^ MM CO M M P| M 



•iuac[ 



On M t^ M lo lOVO 0\ 
VO P) CO CO »0 

PI M M PI M 



U-, T^VO in\0 tN, lO lO tN, 

I^OOt-^GOONt^PJOs 

CO mPImmmmm 



PO ir;\o "IVO t^ lO^O m 

j^ 00 t-^ o 00 PI (^ PI o\ 

CO n CI M M M M M 



P) ri- COM3 PI On PI 'O ID 
■* M-00 lO Tt- 0\ t^ P) ■^ 

COmmmm mmm 



CO P0iOM-rfO\P^00ON 

00 inoo m lo onoo pi ■* 

COMMMM MMM 



On On ■^ pi On i-^ lO 
r-^ 00 CO w t^CC CO 
^I PI CO P) PI PI "I 



On 1^ "I O OnnO CO 
t^ OO CO 1/5 t^oO CO 
PI PI CO PI PI PI PI 



in V£) M O t^ tV. M 

i^ 00 PO m t^oo CO 

PI PI CO PI PI PI PI 



o Tt pi 00 NO ^ i^ 

t^ 00 CO •+ t^CO P| 
PI PI PO PI PI PI PI 



00 ON -t M M NO ^ 

t^ 00 PO moo 00 CO 

PI PI PO PI PI PI "l 



t^.t^ CO M C) 1^ to 

t^ 00 PO u-,00 00 CO 
PI PI PO PI PI P| PI 



O On M 00 O J-v "^I 
t^ 00 PO -^00 OO PO 
PI CI PO PI PI PI "I 



00 On M c| c) j^ ~| 
t^ 00 PO lOOO GO CO 
P) PI PO PI P) PI PI 



m On O On OnNO P! 
1^ CO PO 't t^OO CO 
PI PI PO PI PI PI PI 



LO NO M vo NO lO CO 

tN. 00 PO ^ t^oo PI 

PI PI CO P4 PI PI PI 



O NO U-; On t>» PI t^ 
Tf 00 PI Tf t^OO PI 
P| PI CO PI PI PI PI 



M PI 00 "~, On t^ -t 
O ^ PI CO Tf^ PI 



•da>T Tt- PI CO O coNO On CO 

, , _i '-'- CO PI Onno CONO O PI 

'XijdjnjAI ^ " to M M n M 



M lo 0\ lo in o t^ 
'i- 00 PI Tt- tN.00 "I 
PI PI PO n p| PI PI 



ouooooyo 

rj M PI CO -+ invo t^oo 
.rtrtnJaJt\Jti3rtrtrt 



ooououoo 

Pm pL| 0, Ph Ch Cu C- &. 



a3rtP3aJ:^c3CT)c3 



o o y o y cj 

uj y u 0^ y n 

t, 1^ t. V-. u u 

CHO^PHpHp^a^ 

IT; "O 'O "T! jl^ 1j 
M ^I PO Tt lONO 

t- U t- U 1-. tH 

C3 03 c^ rt p3 Cu 

K> l> KT* i> ^ I.-- 



UhNONOnOnonOnonono 



JN. (N, t^ J^ (N t^ t^ t^ 



00 00 00 CO 00 03 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•IU3Q 
'UEUISpyVV 



Cl ^ -1 ,- „ r| « 






C\ On 1-^ ^- 0^ O t^ O 

n - r| „ ►_ ^1 „ • 



in o " ^ f I OO -I- "^ t^ 
ir, m.cc 1- "I- 0\ t-^ (S ■<t 



'X|puuo3 



On On l^ -t O^00 n£3 On I 
■-1 u->c»3 lo I- fN| o) m ■ 

P) „ D „ „ r, H- 



lO -+ f-. -I- -t CN t^ t^l -rf 






OnCC f^ tJ- on M On On I 
1-1 moo in " ro PI m 

r| w r-i „ M D w 



•uiaa 

'UIUU3Q 



OnCO t^ino N vo On 
M inoo mo CO N m 

c) -■ n 1-1 w N >-< 



C - ^ 

._ « 

c « 






'uuBuini^og 






ONOC 00 m ov o " o 

w lOOO in M ro N NO 

0^ M f^l « M fl HH 



OnOOCC '1 t-^ " i^ o 
1-1 inoo "■' — fo ^1 NO 

N " ') ^ „ r, „ 



O\00 00 J^ On " 0\ o 
*-* moo in i-i ro '^1 NO 

C^ ►- -1 -. K- r, ^ 



O\oo 00 fo 1^ fo o fN) 
•-« inoo in ^ CO roNO 

Cq 1-1 M M M CN) M 



O w OVO GOO 'tNO 1^ 
m moo 'd- •rl- 0\ i^ c^ ■* 



O O ro\0 -+ On NO CnOO 
NO moo •* Tt On l-x (Nj -^ 

OOl-tl-ll-'l-i t-lMM 



C 

o 
O 

c 
o 

(0 
73 

3 
I 



•uiaa 



OOO rx CN| 00 OO On ro 
— moo m w C) IN) \o 

r| „ r, „ w ^1 « 



O^00 t>. fO On ►- f>x00 
" moo m M CO (N) m 

n 1- PI M M M M 



Tt- O O NO " 00 ^00 t^ 
m moo T|- Tj- On t^ M -^ 

1^-1 — — ►- i-ii-ii-i 



^1 o o 1^00 CO -t "^ ^x 

m moo •* fO On t^ M Tf- 
rOi-ii-iH-1-1 wiii-i 



';UT2UU3J^ PI " 



PI - " PI " PO 



■*00 P) NO 0> O m ro 
'03'^ PO PI Onno fO J^ 1-1 P< 

'3dS3]^ 



►- >-< PO l-H M PI l-H 



i-^ -sf i^ moo ■+ PO 1^ t^ 

NO 00t^O00P»t^P,ON 
ro i-(P|i-iMi-ii-ii-. 



m 11 po 1^00 tv. po 
i^ PO ■^t t-^oo PO 

PI PO PI PI PI PI 



PO PI OnnO pOno 1-1 PI 
'31^03 " - PO -H 1-1 PI 1-1 



t^ PONO io\o ■* m JN. tx 

NO OOt^OOOPIl^NON 

PO KlPlMl-ll-ll-lW 



CO 00 1- O 00 NO •* 
tx 00 PO m j^oo PO 

PI PI PO PI PI P< N 






C ^ r. r- r- r- r^ 

o [fi t; "c z; ~ "zi "z; "^ 

(_^ 1- PI PO Tt m,NO t^CO 



O'JOOCJOCJO 



- '1 PO rt invo t^OO 



CJ O O O CJ o 

Qj QJ V O ^ <0 



PI PO -)- mvo 



w. 



■>>> 



^.nononOnononOnonO 



txi^t^r>,t^t-,,rxtx 



CO 00 00 00 00 00 



436 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•daji 



UOSEJ\[ M P) M 01 l^ ro C) h- ''I ro 01 h- i-i M 



'.13AM(^ oi 01 0) 01 



oooot>N-tor)t^O| t~^c^ 

CO 01 M 0) CO '^1 M 01 l-H 



w oo " ro oo 
■C13>T \0 -t O oo 0\ 

, *-■- ri fVl f^l ^1 



fC ■^wIv.i-ii-iOOOlVOOS 
0^ i-'V004-^'<tOO\Oioo 
MD fO 0( M 0) fO 01 h- ^1 M 



On 0100t^O\O\O0)i-it^ 
ON ONONt^-^l^OOOOOVO 

O MM 01 MMI-II-I 



•d3M O Tt- O ro "1 

'-'^Cl \0 'i- O fO ON 



u-)vo " 00 M i/i oo ^-00 

1-1 IQOI lOTtO OnojoC 

ro 01 M 01 ro 01 M 01 ►-■ 



NO M 01 CO On OOO i-i O t^ 
On On O I^^ •* J^ 0\00 00 NO 
O "-l " o| M M I- 



•do^ 



(^ incotx'^i-i 1^01 t^Ov 
O mVOO^vO-tJ-OOnOIOO 
t^ 00 01 >H 01 CO 01 1-. 01 w 



01 On l^ 01 OvOO i-> O t^ 
ON On t^ in t^ O-C50 00 NO 

1-1 " 01 M M H- 



'SU3JLJ31S 



01 01 1^1 01 



NO iOOi\OiO"00'^lt^ON 
O i-.nO0|u-)t|-OOn'^100 
(^ ro 01 M 01 00 01 « 01 1-1 



(U 

3 

*+* 

C 

o 
O 



•(13>T 1- li^ o 01 01 
«-•- NO -"f o ro On 
'jpMXBJAf 01 01 ., 01 



•d3^ 



vj. O lo o 01 ro 

'UIPA\C NO ^ O oo On 
"f'-^^b 01 n 01 01 



•d3^ 



1-1 vo O 00 oo 
NO ■* O oo On 
'U3MON[3]/\[ 01 01 01 01 



t^ ino t^Tj-rJ-t^olNO ON 
0\ mMD 01 mTj-O On 01 00 
NO ro 01 M 01 oo 01 M 01 M 



ro lO n t^ -+ i/-,oO ►- t^ On 

O MNOO^lO-t-OONi-lOO 
1^ CO 01 l-i 01 OO 01 i-i 01 1-1 



r^ Tti-.\O0OOl>.Ot^ON 
On i-iVDOiio-rj-oONOioo 
NO ro 01 M 01 CO 01 1-1 01 M 



t^ oi OO t^ O O OO 01 1-. NO 
M On O t>. lOOO OnOO 00 NO 

M 01 M 01 M M M 



01 M tx On OnOO CO m no 
On O t^ tJ- fx ONOO 00 NO 

01 M 01 M M M 



C 
3 
O 

O 

c 
o 

(0 

I 



'3MDI'J >o ^ o COON 
' -^01 01 01 ri 



•luafT •+ ONVONO M 

I I NO -t " I^ I^ 

'ipadspnj-j „ „ M 



'paoo3>i "' 



NO CO OnnO ^ -t oo O^ 01 (yt 
NO OCOOliOCOOOOOloo 
NO CO 01 l-l 01 CO 0] r-i 01 M 



a\ t^coooioO>OooOir5 

O 01 OONO VO 01 1-1 t^ 00 00 



NO t^ioioiooiO"t^" 

NO 1-1 NO 01 ID Tf o ON 01 On 
NO CO 01 M r| CO 01 ►-, 01 w 



01 On u-/ O On On 01 O U") 
On On t^ lo ts, O\00 00 NO 

1-1 M 01 M M M 



m ooOni-inoi-ii-ii-iOnOn 
u^ O On 01 irjNO 00 O t^ On 

01 MMMMl-lOlOll-l 



CO 00 "+C0 On^ On 1-1 ih lo 

1-1 00 " rx Tt- 1^ ONOO 00 NO 

1_ C-l W 01 M 1-1 M 



'.mouiAac^ m « « 



r^ u-5 CO 1-1 lo -t 01 VO On O 
CO CO -tNO NO CO O t^ 01 CO 



Tt -^NO On CO 01 On t^ vrOO 
t^ OOli-iNONOOOOOOO 

Ol M 01 1-1 M 1-1 01 01 1-1 M 



■d3>T r^NO 00 lo to 

«X-ii(lTnT.T "-'CO On 01 CO 









1, 


'^ 


- 


' 


' 


<J 


u 


o 


o 


o 


V 


V 


<u 


([J 


o 


u 


u 


1 1-, 


u 


u 


lHr-< 


1 (IhPMPh 




































c^ 




•^ 


o 


M 


U t^OO 


On 


" 


" 


L'6'6't5't£ 


^' 


^ ^ 


u 


u 


!^ 


u 


.ti a 


a 


03 


Cti 


cC 


U> 


^I>^^ 




r-r-'i^ 


K^ 


>. 










w^ 


























-4-1 


1- 00 00 00 OO 00 



01 o 1^00 NO i^ t^oo o r^ 

-t i-.u-)OirocoOOOooO\ 

NO OO 01 « 01 CO 01 r-1 01 IH 



OOOCJCJUOOO 

pL| Ph Ph IX p., Ph (li Ph (^ 



U)'d"dTJ■l->■l-l■^-l^-l'^ 
M M CO -i- tONO ^^00 On 






0\OnOiOnOnOnOnOnOn 



NOOONTtt^coioioiri 

01 00 ONt^Tft^ONf^I-^lO 

O 1-1 M 01 ►-!•-.« 



V-t<VHl-il-it<l-.V-V-. 

Ph Ph Ph Ph !^ Ph 1^ Ph Ph 



w 01 00 '^j- lONO t^OO ON 

-O 'O TJ Id 'T3 T3 "73 T3 13 
!^)-.S-^l^l_l_l_i-,V-, 



OOOOOOOOO 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



437 



•uiof r I " U-. IT! o\ 
. '•I in lo 1-1 txvo 

'UElUSPyW M KH H. 



t^ CO i^vo irt M O r^ to CO 

fO"-l<N l-ll-ll-CI-ll-IM 



vo 0\^■^MVOO^f^OC^C^ 
lo 0\ i-i eg »o tnoo o J^ Ov 



rt 1-1 IT) ro 0\ 
•IU3Q lo vo " I^VO 

'Xajanj-j " " '-' 



•+ vo O P) \0 lO ro i^) 'M :^ I n 00 ro a vo OC <S O 0\V0 
t^ n 'tvo lotsot^foro vn 0\Hi"vn lOOO O t^ Ov 

CO >H 0) W M M 1-1 ll W CS 01 1-H l-< 1-1 01 PI M 



■III3/-T -* O lO ro 0\ 

'^='U lo lo -1 t^\0 

'AIIOUUO3 1^ -1 « 



1^00CsOroiorO'1-P)t^ 
vo 0^ CO^O 10 0) O \0 00 fO 
roMM 1-1MM1-11-.1-1 



1-1 O 01 00 vo O P) O OvOO 
■1+ O 1-1 — vo toOO O JN. o\ 

01 «0|h-ii-i)-iP)Pl>-i 






t^ -^ONPIvOi-trOPli-il^ 
vo 04 rovo vo CO o r^ 00 CO 

COl-lOl MM,,„^-lM 



10 0\— -vOQoOOCsOs 
vo o^ 1- 01 vovo 00 o r^ 0\ 

01 ri ^ ^ ^ ri r^ « 



, -^ irj IT) l-l 

'UIUU3Q i-i « ^ 

•IU3Q T^ M 10 CO 0\ 

'ADB3JJL Jfl' ^ H; *^^ 



00 N00PlP)VOP)Ncot^ 
t^ CO covo vo 01 o 1^ CO CO 

COMd HHWHr-ll-ll-l 



vom r--o coii Ovi^ 
" PI lovo 00 o rv Ov 

01 „ M M 0) 01 M 



0) oop»oooT)-i-i"t^ p) ovo ovo o CO o 000 

00 ■* -^VO iOO)Ot^coco t^Oi-i-i vovo 00 O t^ 0\ 

COIHO) HI-lhHMMl-l 01 ,-oi"i-i>-0)-|-^ 



iqog " " " 



0\vot}-C\i-i COVOOI t^ 
O !-• 01 vovo 00 O 00 c> 

01 1-1 1-1 « P^ PI 1-1 



■U13Q CO 1-1 vo CO C\ 

<-,->, -VT vo vo l-i t^VO 
'^''.'fl ►-( 1-1 M 



o-. ^ o t^o coo 0^0^ 

C\ 1- M vovo 00 O t^ 0\ 

PI l-l HH t-l PI 01 ^ 



"1113(7 '^ '■" "^ vo CO 

'iiiuiBH ::';:':'"'" 

•ra3Q ^ Q loco o> 

'UOJIBj; >0 vo " IN.VO 



TfMOl wt-il-t^HHl-l 



CO o 00 P) 00 o\ PI " p) w 

t^ Tf covo vo W O tx CO CO 

COl-lPl MliMMMI- 



0V0i-il-^0C000\0\ 
O M 01 v/^vo 00 O t>. <?v 

— 01 — 1-1 1-1 01 01 1-1 



0\ ovo ovo O CO 0> O l^ 
vo O — — vo vooo OvOO On 
01 -I _ -- _ 01 « 1-1 



•UI3Q 



CO M rj- CO 0\ 
l^,„»-, vo vo -1 l^vo 

'z^n'j H „ K, 



00 OOPlvOTj-coPli-its. 
r~^ -rf covo vo 01 O tN CO CO 

COt-^Pl t-(t-ll-ttHI-il-l 



Ti- O\PI0t^0^Ov OnOO 
vo On " PI vovo 00 ON t-^ Ov 

Pi 01 « hH M M „ M 



vo "^ i-H rv i^ 

4UHUU3J^ w « « 



■d3^ o "2 o ^ t^ 

-H. 01 PI 01 01 



1-1 w 000 vo rf PI Ov PI 0\ 

01 •* covo vo CO -H t>. T^ CO 

-+I-1OI HMMWIHI-. 



00 voOVOTfcot^OtvOv 
O i-iVO01vOt)-OO\P100 
tJ- CO01i-iMCO01i-(P|i-i 



o 000 000 " O O Ov o 

1-1 Cv — " vovo 00 O tx O 
CO "li-i--^0101l-ll-i 



1-1 oiOt^O\000\Ovo 

n o o t'. -* t^ ov r-voo vo 

1-, '1 w 01 1-1 1- 1-1 



•d3>r M "2 ^ ^ f^ 

. 9- _ vo ^ o coo 

'3^X03 PI ^' PI 01 



1-1 vOp-hVO-^cowGVOOO 
O "VOPlvo-^OOPlOO 
IX coc^wMCOPlOlPlM 



• rH C4 Cw C3 C^ C^ 

1-^ 00 00 00 00 X 



- - 




r r r 
u <u <u 

U <U 0) I- >- 

I.CLiPhPLi 

o5'£-:D O" 
D txoo ov " 1-1 


666666666 

UUCJUWOUtLiy 

■t^ ^ ^ j:: J= ^ ^ ^ .^ 
>-i PI CO -^ vovo txoo 


1 'd'tf'O'C-o' 
?p V, 1^ ^- u 1- 





^^^^^^>>> 



C\0\CnO\0\0\0\C>C\ 



u 


CJ 


c3 


u 








<J 





u 


u 


iJ 


CJ 


V 


CJ 


4J 


<U 


4J 


w 


t- 






u 


t- 


t- 


u 


;- 


^ 


^ 


— 


-\ 


^ 




^ 


Ph 


Oh 


Ph 


^ 


., 


-a 


■^ 


_^ 


/-* 


^ 


/^ 


^ 


















" 


PI 


CO 


't vovo 


txoo 









OOOOOOOOO 



43S 



BLeCriON RETUtlNS. 



•d3>j 
'uoscp^ 



'cla'VT n Tt Tj- >H 00 -^vo 00 o^ GO 






ro T^ lO !-■ 00 -"t^ 00 tN. i-vOO 
00 00 to •* o o M-\o vo \o 0\ 



'aaqSBiiBQ 



00 00 lO \J- O O -^VO io\0 o\ 

WHiWI-lCtl-li-ll-iMM 



C) in t^ t^ IT) Tj- 1-H 00 vo N -^ 
O CO -^00 0\ PO fO to\0 PI ro 

t^Ml-l Ml-ll-ll-IMl-(IH 



•d3>i 
'uiBiaaquiEiQ 



•d3^ 



3 



_ , rt\n\n i-ioo invo MOO t^oo 

C19il 00 00 in -"t O O Tj-t^vovo O 



•d3^ 

'UIBMg 



oo ooi^t^ionTfniorqTt- 

M 00 "+00 On fO m ■* tx 1-1 fO 



c 
o 

o 



'da^ (-1 »0 m M 00 mvo O vo moo 

'iiawnxTiTAT 00 00 in -^ o o -^-J^vo^ os 



'-' 0\t^l^inrO';f-0»nc>)'<^ 
<N CO ■'too 0\ t^ CO ■* t^ M CO 



3 

o 

o 

c 
o 

CO 

3 

I 






•da>i 



'madspnjj 



<\i M Ch ■^ o r^oo CO 't J^ m 
•UI3Q 00 ^ <^ O PI 1-1 t>v t^OO 0\ \|- 



MO^^^Nc^^l-^l-.l-ll-lMl-. 



•dsM vo'OOO 1-1 i-<^ int^t^inCN 

'-'^a. 0000 m Tt 11 o 'tvovoMD o 

'pjOD3^ ^^MM„t^„„„i-ii-i 



in MOOOOO^OONfOt^Ovo 
00 o 00 1-1 f^ w rn\0 t^ invo 

O MMdl-lMl-lHHl-lWM 



" OS ro t^oo in Tt 1-1 vo O Tt 
ro 00 ^OO Os ro CO -rj- t^ 1-1 ro 
t^MM „„„M1-1>-11-1 



00 i ►-■ 



« 
w 
> 

o 

o 



•UI3Q « M 01 1-1 vo O Tj- CO t^OO O 

'innriTX'ao °° 'o ^ m c-i ci O) CO 0> Osm 
aiiuuj^rf^ (-iMOMClnwt-ii-i>-ii-i 



•d3>T 

'Xqdjnj^ 



co\0 N lOVO Tt- w c^ tx cq 0\ 
00 t^ m CO o o Tt^ mvo 0\ 



1-^00 fO-^-trtr^-* TfOO 00 
1-1 t^ tS 00 cs -^vo 00 vo i^ m 
Mi-iO<i-iC)i-ii-ii-ii-c>-i (>» 



i^ >-<lnc^ovooooovOr^ 
t^ CO itOO OS C^ CJ rt t^ OS M 

VOMl-l MMl-lWl-l M 



rrrrrrrrrocj 

I PL, qiH Cl, Ph Ph Oh Ph CL, Oh 
S 05 '^ "d ^^ 'X: ^^ '^ "^ '^ O - 

M cq CO ^ invo rxoo 0\ >-i - 

1 -O "0 13 t; "O 'O T3 "O "13 "w 'C 

I )_l-il-V.l-.Ut-,l-t-t-;- 



o 



<JCJ00000004J 



CLhCU(1hP1hPhPhA-PhPh 



'^T3'CwT3'C^'0'U 



ri Cl ^1 C) csl ci ci Ct C4 ci 



U 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



439 






<n CO f^i -^ fO i^ i^'C "~- "^ O 

CO ri- "t o n >- 1^ 1^00 ov ^- 

« M ri f^l M I-. I-. - « « - 



^VO l^'O t>. 1^ ►- CO CO \o ' o 

o i^ — t^ " 'O'O t^ -^vo I CO 

►.„(^^„l^, „„„„„ \0 



•UI3([ 
'A3H 



-' 0) ri Tf ro ro'vC "", mm o I vo - vO X t^"0 l-v '■> OO OC VC 
„^^ 00 ■* •^ O "I - r^ t^cO C-' ID 00 O t^ - 1^ w <^,\o t-^ -i-'O 



^^Q - N ts (V) fr> m t-, \n ^ -t 0\ 

'Xriouuo"\ 00 ■* ■* o ^i - t^ txoo o\ -fi- 

" V-' — tvjfirin — — — — i-< — 



-^ '1 lo -t "1 a> r^ ooo 00 vo 






- PI ^1 -f ro r^ i^vo ""' -t a. 
00 -i- -+ O (M H- t^ t^OO ON -1- 

-I M 01 01 CI — — — — - — 



- fo t-vX i^ i^ ts. ~i X X vo 

O --01-01-----. 



'UIUU3Q 



" fO 01 rf OOSO I^ fx •* -^X 

X •+ T^ o fi ►^ tx r^x o\ ■* 

— N 01 01 01 — — -1 l-H — — 



OS <r) t^x X 00 tx - c-.x \o I ^n 

QO O t^ - t>> " rovO t^ rt-\0 I 00 
O --0I-011-I---1-IVO 



•o 



•iu9a 

•UI3Q 

'uuBuinipg 



01 PO OJ rf oo^ txvo rr ■+ 0\ 
X ■<J- ■* O 0) H^ rx r^oo c^ Tf 

- 01 01 01 01 ----- - 



-tvooivo " J^':^o^ <*5ror^ 
X -^Tt-O OOOIOOX 0\0 ^ 

1-1 01 01 01 01 - - 1- - — - 



O o^. l-v l^X t^ t^ 'I X X >o I ^ 

0\ C I^ - (^ " rovo tx Ti-\o CO 
O --ri-0)----i-(\O 



Tt- OO '-I "I rove t^\0 vo Tt C> 
X 'I- ^ O 01 - (^ txX C> ^ 
- 01 01 01 01 ----- - 



o^^o CC -\ m t^ t^oc X \C ' O 

O t-v- f^- OOtOl-v TfVO I t^ 

---1-01----- IVO 



c 
o 

o 



'niuiBH 



01 0) — -^ po in ts. lo^o Ti" o\ 
X ■* Tj- o 0) - (x t^oo OS ■^- 

- 01 01 01 ^1 - - w - - - 



X 01 rxX t^ r-x r^ — o-.oo m 
00 O W - f^ " <0\0 l^ -tl-vo 

O --01-0^----- 



C 
3 
O 

O 

c 
o 

0) 

•a- 

3 
I 



•uiaa 






X ^--to 01 -r^t^txOv'* 
- 01 01 01 01 — — « - - - 



'1 "1 '1 01 ►----" - 



•iiiarr •+ "' " "+ <^ ^00 vo lo oo Ov 

"■'''(.I X ^ -t O 01 M fx t^X ON Tt 

;UBUU3JL - 01 01 0) 01 ----- - 



- -t-^o t^X Ov (^ 01 ixX fx I ^n 
X o r^ - r^ " ooNO tN. -tvo I X 
O -i-,o)-oi-^^---ivo 



n oOtxXX ONtxooXX t^ 
0\ O r^ — t^ — ro\0 r^ ■<tvO 

O — MOll-lOJl-.- — -W 



01 ro 1^ t^ J^ t-xX -+XXNO I "^ 
Ov O t-N — t^ '-' OONC t^ t"0 X 

O —ii 01 — 01 M — — — — MO 



■(la^J Loroio— ro— OJir> t^x Ov 

'nrlcnTT O^^) m-^o O 'S-VO vO vo On 



0\ t^ONOOOv-r>-ii0010\Tj-| 00 
O X ■* Ov Ov OO OO oovo O ro OO 
t^i-iK^ — WM — — — i-i-rl- 



■rla-VT rot^Tt-M txooooOXX t^ 

""^a. XXio-tOO-^ txNO NO 0\ 

'3lX03 ----01----- 



tJUOOOOOCJCjOOJ 

I CL| il-( C-i Ch ;^ !^ C- Ph f-i 

Ch t/i "^ T? 1^ "^ "^ "^ x^ ^ o — 
O 1-1 0) OO Tj- in\0 t^X ON - - 

IUl-iUiUUt.UUUV.U 






IH ts.X ts-ioiortOi+fOTt-l t^ 

0| X Tf X Ovrooo-1-t^-ool 3: 
j^„- j;^ 

: : : r r r : r : <j 

OOUOOOOOOIU 



01 01 01 01 01 01 '~1 01 01 01 



o 



440 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'UOSEI\[ 



MM V-H -:f-CN(MfOC0l-IWM M 



M « vo 






lo a\ t^ •* 



O t^ POVO O ■+ 
O I^ ro fO t^ •+ 

00 M M 1-1 M 









M Tt 



P) PI PO 



-* 00 po vooo lo 
o r^ po po^o Ti- 

CO M M M 1-1 



1-1 1-1 M \0 






't CO t^ PO 
IT) On\0 PO 

•t M P) CO 



'UIT3IJ3qiUBl[3 



Oi 


1-1 


PI 1 


C^ t~^ PO 1 


" 


M 


PO 



P) <o po m o Tf 
o r^ po po t^ Tj- 

00 M M W M 



< 



•d3^ 



P) 


M 


^ 1 


o 


t^PO 1 


o\ 


PI 


PO 



t^ M P0\0 00 '^ 
O 00 PO P0\0 ^ 

00 M M M M 



1-1 1-1 1-1 I vo 



c 
o 
O 



•d3^ 

'n9MXBI\r 

•d9>X 



•d3^ 



o 


TfTl- 


o 


t^ PO 


^ 


M PO 



m 0\ ^ ^ 

lO 0\ t^ PO 
-t- 1-. PI PO 



M hH M -^ 



P) P) On 
O r^ PO 
P) P) PO 



00 t^ POVO 00 ■+ 
O tv, PO PO t-^ Tt 

05 „ „ w ,_, 



O t^ PO PO^O -^ 

CO M M M M 



PO t^ moooo Tt- 

>-i t-v PO COVO Tt 

00 M 1-1 l-l 1-1 



MM M \0 



3 

o 

o 

c 
o 

(0 
■D 

3 
I 



L 



•d3^ 

•UISQ 

'H^adspnii 



•d3^ 

'pjOD3^ 



^ 


PI^O 


O 1 


00 


^a\-+ 


■* PI M 


PO 



PO M 0\ M 

t^ P) O lO 

rf P^ PO PO 



Tf \o o o 
\o O 00 t^" 
PI PO M PI 



0\ 


O PI 


^ 


\ri 


o\o 


to 


•* 


PI M 


PO 



M M POCO O Tf 

00 On PO PO t^ ^ 

CO M M M M 



\o M povo 00 PO 

lO 0\ On M PO PI 
00 PI PI PO PI PI 



\0 Th M ON M Tt 
0\ t-v PO PO t^ -* 

In, M M M M 



PI ir> 0\ ^N00 NO 00 
\0 PO PO Tt On ■* On 
PO M M pq p.) M PI 



'anouiAac; 



lO 


„ 


in On 1 


00 


in On "* 1 


■* M 


M CO 



O tN. CO M 

00 M OO 00 
P) CO PI PI 



M \0 •* PO O CO 
00 O P) O ^ P) 
00 PO PO PO P4 N 



NO M 00 M CO NO M 
On -rf Tt in O Tf m 
PO M PI PI PO PI PO 



•d3^ 

'Xiidan]Al 



M O >0 t^ CO t^ O lO 

J^ONOO TfOONOP) 

MM M rt M PI CO 



PI -^- PO M 00 ^ 

t^ lO PO PI \o •* 

I^ M M M M 



MM M NO 



t-l Ul 1-1 Lh 



<D o o 

<U V v 
'^ u u 



Ih I-. U ll ll 



kH t.1 u ;-. ;-i Ui 



M PI PO rt 



W. V-. Vh 1-, 

I rt rt c^ 03 
?, > ^ < > 



l^ 1-. l-( 



"TJ tD 13 t3 tS 
t- t. ^- v^ t^ 
p3 c3 03 rt rt 



"C^ "Xj tH 'T3 Tj ■ 
u. 1- Vh w, 1- t^ 
rd 03 Pj 03 rt rt 



J2 (« tn oi tn 

O " M M M 



^ ^ •* ■* Tt -^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



441 



'uEiuspAV 



CO in -t « I ro OC- O CO 
00 t 0\ Tt I \o O t^vO 



-t 00 0\ M fO C^ 



PO i/> o< "^ t^ f^ o 
VO ro ro Tf OS T}- o 
CO ■-< N CI fl CS fO Tj- 






OO C ro ') ro 0\ fO lO 
I>^ -too 't •* O^sOvO 
-t 'I - CO PI ''I P) P) 



•4- "- O Cv >o 
I^ 0\ PI ro PI 

-^1 ''I n PI PI 



ON ■* O.OO fO Tt tv. 
■rt CO <*2 'I- 0\ Tl- 0\ 
PO >-i PI PI PI PI PI 



•uiaa 
'X[[ouuo3 



PI 


^ ^CO 1 


00 


rfOsI- 


Tt PI « PO 



CO •+ irvvo 
so O S0\0 
PI CO PI PI 



\n Ov '-' C. O CO i PI so 0.^0 Os 1/1 OS 
POOOOSK^PI so coco-+O\^0s 
00 PI PI CO PI "I CO >-' "I PI PI PI PI 



'IP'VVIIIJS 



-t "~- -t PO I so Os u~. t^ 
00 -t OS -t 'O O l^so 
Tl- PI ii CO PI PO PI f^l 



~sO"OsOs'l I t^soOs "^00 ■* OS 
moOOv'-co'^l lo POCo-^Os-^Os 
00 PI PI PO PI 'N CO I- PI PI PI PI PI 



•uiaQ 

'UIUU9Q 



Tj-so m PO I 00 CO " tx 
00 •* OS •* \o o t^\o 

-* PI l-l CO PI CO PI PI 



" t^ M o OS PO 
Tt 00 0\ PI PO PI 
00 PI PI CO PI PI 



VO O in " m O 

co-i- 'i-o ^o 

w PI PI PO PI CO 



'uuBumnog 



•UI3Q 
'331^ 



-t 


IT, 


-i- 


PI 1 


00 


t OS -t 1 


-;fpl 


•"■ 


PO 



PI CO PI P| 



T}- l-( Tj-CO 

VO •- J^ t^ 

P| CO PI PI 



-r CO " 
o r^ t^ 

CO '^X PI 



OS tx " 00 OsOO I CO SO 00 <A 0>V0 O 
■^OOOs-coPI so cocOTtOv-^O 
00 PI PI CO PI ''I PO i-< PI PI PI PI PO 



00 00 >-i OSOO tx I CO VO o moo PO 0\ 

lOOOOsOPOP) m PO-1--i-OST)-Os 
00 PI P| CO P^ PI CO HH PI PI PI PI PI 



00 so>-CnOspo|00 voi^ moo 't Os 
-i-OOO— P0"1 I to P0COt1-O>-*0s 

00 PI ""I CO PI "1 I CO >-< p» PI PI PI "^1 



■UI3Q 

'nuuHH 



^ -+ ^ PI 

00 rf OS ^ 

Tf PI " CO 



-+ t^ CO "H 

VO O t^ tx 

PI PO PI PI 



►- tx >- 0\ OS PO I OS VO 00 VOOO VO 00 
mOOOs-iPOPI I lO COCO-rOs-^Ov 
00 PI PI CO PI PI I CO " P! P| PI PI PI 



'UOllB^ 

•uisa 



•UI3Ci 
'lUBUUSJ^ 

•d3^ 

'3dS3J-J 



•Cl3VI 
'31A03 



so o t^ r^ 



Tj-VO 


PO 


'- 1 


00 'J-Os Tj- 1 


Tj-Pl 


HH 


CO 



00 -1- 0\ ^ 



O -too t^«COI CO ^0"t^ POVO 
iOC000"t)-PI I vn coco-^-os. TtO^ 
00 PI "1 CO PI PI PO '-' PI PI PI PI PI 



00 VO 00 lo OS COOO 
\r) PO PO -^ O' •+ Os 
PO 1- PI PI PI PI PI 



•*Os PI 
OVO t^ 
PO PI PI 


VO 

00 


VO PO t^ OS CO 
00 OS « CO PI 
PI PI PO PI PI 


VO m o 

0\VO I^ 

PI PI -I 


CO 

00 


VO — I^ Cs PO 
00 0-. - PO "1 
PI PI PO P| PI 


tv. OsVO 
C-.VO CO 
- PI PO 


PI 

o 
oo 


t^ CO lOOO lO 

r^ PO POVO •* 


OS " PI 
Csvo CO 

« PI CO 


'^1 

OS 


t^ CO ID O -t 
tv. CO CO t^ -1- 



VO VO OS "~.00 lO t^ 
\n CO CO ■^ OS Tf Ov 
CO >-■ PI PI PI PI PI 



OS -H lO O OS PI SO 
VO ir> OS VO i/'-OO PI 

so ,- ^ H- 



o u y u 
D u <u u 
u \-, u u 

PhP-iPhP-c 


Prec 
Prec. 
Prec. 


o u o o o 

QJ CI <U Qi O 

v. vm ;.- k- ii 

^ ^ ~ ^ r. 


o o o u o o 

U V <U U lU u 
u I- u v< v- :- 


i-l PI CO Tj- 


"K-c-c 

- PI CO 


— PI PO -I" to 


" '1 PO -f ir.vc 


<en — 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


,^ (fi en «3 tn 
C -< " " " 


PI PI PI 


PO CO CO PO CO 


"^ ^"^^ T-"^ 



442 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'UOSEJ\[ 

'aaA.WQ 



•d3^ 

•d3^ 
'aaqSEiiBQ 



•d3^ 

uiH|a3qiuBq3 



1- r^ 0\ ^- I - ] - 



o 


C^CO Tj- 


o 


\o 


<*500 VO 


-+ 


" 


<*5 ri h- 


ON 



" O lOTt 


O 


\0 0000 \o 


■T 


>- ro PI 1- 


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a. 



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oo - " - -t " 



-1 ^1 ^1 I \0 VO H- ^C I oo OC ON 0\ 
VC 1^00 " OVOOO O i-lOOOO 

„ ro ►- I- >-H Tt ^ 



ri0OPO|00\O"\O I 00 0\0" 
VO txOO - Ovooo O 0)O\O\ 

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CO ro 00 ! 0\ t^ 1^00 
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„ I OO 1- " " 



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►H 00 M M 



0) VO •-' M 

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l-H oo n W 



1/1 fO 0< O 
lo O t^vo 



00 00 t^ T^ 


tx 


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00 


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0\ 



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00 


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t^ 


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NO txOO 01 i-vooo| 1- ooOnOn 

„ 1 oo h-H « M i -:)- « 



^^looicOOO-tX) I I^"00 
NO t^OO I " Ovooo o ooOnOn 



^- O) 00 I On rv 1- 00 
VO t^OO I 1-1 ONO OO 

„ I oo M « M 



OOOOPOI On l^OI'^l 00 CNi-it^ 
VO t^OO I ■- O NO 00 O 0) O\00 

1-1 I CO „ „ „ ^ „ 



OOlPOItrjoMOi] ooi-iM-^j-lVO 
t^ txOO I 01 COtj- w ooOnOn 1-1 
„ iooi-ii-i-iTt-i-i fO 



ooroiol ■- 00oo-s|-| lO ooooi 
-oiOvl oovooOTtI ONOOr^o) 

OIOI^VO i-ii-iOIUOni-iO) 



lo ir-, r^ I j^ uo 01 00 
NO 1^00 I 01 O NO oo 

H, 00 M H. 1-. 



00 01 'Nl 

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01 f-i 01 



01 O\00 ON 
"0 nOOC Tf 
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O 00 01 I O OONO oo 01 01 On M 
VOVOOO I " Oioro On oioOOn 
„ I OO 1-1 " 1-1 I oo 1-1 



o u o o 


C 


o o o 


o o u 


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01 01 01 


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ELECTION RETURNS. 



443 



•ui3(r o '^J2"2, I *"- 

'UCIUSID Y\ CI r^ n " o 



— f^ Oi I CO "I U-, o-. I "O I - S "I 

— CI O CO VO 1^ ^- 00 00 1-^ "1 

CI C) « \o -. « "I ID « - -( 



•lU3(f 



t-^ CO "-• lO 



CI I/-, t^ I -)■ -T C) -H I t^ -t O CO 
-C10\| covooo-^loocot^- 
ci n « I vo .-. -H CI IT) - i-< 'I 



•uiarr "O co o o 

"-'''vi O cioo Ov 

'XIIOIIUO3 CI CO C< " 



-1 u-j Cn I ^C -T 'J- - 1 o -tx o 
-cio> fOVOX-i-OOOC^O- 
CI CI M vo ►- -I cj I ir; - ^ ^1 



•UI3([ 



PI o\ o o 



lo^o 01 O 10 'I- m 

" ON I ■+ vo 00 ■+ 

^1 CI -I I \o ►H « CI 



luaQ -H cioo ov I -- 

'UtUUSQ CI coc< « I C 



-t ^ 00 
-H C) 0\ 

-1 -) « 



00 ci -+ -^ I o -t 0.00 
co\ooo-^l 0000- 

\0 - rH CI 10 - - "I 



o 



+* S 



•UISQ 



Tj- ON " O 

'anivr " ci 0\ o\ 
^'^ia CI CO CI w 



•luarr -h t^o\o 1 t^ 

, - ^-'- -■ ci 00 On >- 

ADT33J J^ CI CO CI ii I o 



•uiarr 

NO ^O On O I -• 

UUBUinilDC -H CI On ON I CO no 

CI CO CI .-. I ^ — 



I -< 



:^"3a -toxoN: « 

'[[IlUBfJ - COOOOO I CI 
ii -I CO CI « I o 



10 U-. O I O -1- rf CO 

-H CI O T}- NO 00 -J- 

CI ?1 CI NO -H I- CI 



NO NO X I o -i-x t^ I a O C 0\ 
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Cl PI p-1 NO 1-1 « CI U-, — -^ CI 



Tj- 10 On 

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CI CI -1 



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PI C| CI 



X Tt- IT) rt I CO ■* 0>X 

CONOX-^I OnXNO- 
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" ii-,NO 't I "". -I- O-X I - 
TfNOX-r)-| 0<XO- t^ 

NO i-HMCiio— -^"llm 



■luarr •^i o -i o 1 'i 

'TIOTIP J O C4 t^ON o. 

^^U^d C| CO CI 1-1 ON 



CONO -tl COClTflOl ►- coot^ 

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'z;tr*J - cox On ci 



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"1 u". On 


NO 


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CO 


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NO 


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T^NO On i On PI CO PI I l>> r)- OX ' - 
wPIOnI ponOX-^XXNO- 1 t^ 

Cl CI i-H I NO 1-1 1-. f I I U-, ,-, -, "I I IT) 



O t^ — O 

C| O NO -t 
CO - ~ ~ 



X U-. - - tv. 

O CI 0-. On O 
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•dax X CO o CI 

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3IA03 „ f,, r, „ 



Prec. 
Prec. 
Prec. 
Prec. 


y 
-a 



Prec. 
Prec. 
Prec. 


Prec. 
Prec. 
Prec. 


Prec. 
Prec. 
Prec. 


«) "e'en 

-. PI CO .^ 





1 in'C'C 
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War 

War 


War 
War 


m 


"rt 


"5 tn !« tn 

y M 11 11 


-1 -) -1 


-r^-r 



444 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



•d3^ 
'uosBjvr 



T}-\0 O O O O t^ " o 



H 


t^<SOO 


^ 


GO 0\ fO 


OS 


l-l n ^ 






O O O O O) " 00 
\t- M M M w M (N 



M |S,00 O 

Tt- C50CO fC 
Ch w M IN 



•d3^ 
'ipnEQ 



w h-i -i- 



t o 

PI w 



■* in O Tf 0) t^ O 
O O O O M " O 
Tt H M M w M (S 



00 t^OO 0^ 

!r> 00 00 f^ 
o\ 1-1 w PI 






P) l-H 



VO VO 0\ ■* PI MD VO 
O O On O PI " CO 

-t M M M M « p) 



<^ t^OO 00 

po 00 00 po 

0\ " N P» 



•d3^ 

'UTBiaaqiuBiQ 



O\00 t^ w lO 
IT) PO PO o m 

P^ M 1-1 



Tf P) 
P) l-l 



VO VO P) lO P) vo o 
O O O O P) w 0\ 

■^ M PI M M M P< 



w t^oo t^ 

Tf OOOO P^ 
OS " P) PI 



< 



•d3^ 

'SU3^3;S 



vo >o " m " i^ o 
O O O O PI n On 
-J- M PI i-< w w PI 



o 


t^NOO 1 


Th 00 


Os PO 


0\ 


^ 


P) PI 



£ 

£ 
O 

O 



•da^ 

'jpMXEI\[ 

•d3^ 

'UIBAVg 



•d3^ 

'U3A\OXJ3J\[ 



►-, F- ^ 



PI HH 



" >- ^ 



■<t t-x PI lO PI t^ 0\ 
O O O O PI "00 
rt- w PI l-l w M M 



VO VO " VO PI t-^ O 
O O O O M ►-< 0\ 
tJ- m pi m m m pi 



VO \0 O VO PI t^ O 
O O O C PI " 0\ 
rf M PI « M w P) 



PI 00 


PI lO 


■* 00 


0\ -i- 


o\ >-, 


PI PI 



P| tx " On 
Tl- 00 On PO 
0\ M PI PI 



n NO O On 
Tj- 00 On PO 
On >H N P) 



c 

3 
O 

O 

O 
(0 
T3 

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•uiaa 



'ipads 



M " I ^ 



O O P) GOO 



0\ PO 
PO fO 
l-l PO 



-t in O NO PI NO t^ 

O O O O PI - 00 

^ „ ^1 „ « K, PI 



■*NO PONO ro " 
t^NO l-l P< On l-l 

PI M PI M l-l 



•d3>I 

'paoD3'a^ 


ON pioo P) o 

-+ ro On On PO 


p| 
o 
in 


ro -+ 
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PI M 


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1- 


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O On O P^ " 00 

►H HH W hH ... ^1 


•IU9Q 
.U101UA3C; 


in Lo PO PO t^ 

NO in p| n -rf 

1^1 " PO PI PI 


P-) 
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PI 


PI NO 


00 
GO 

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PO t^ m Tt- PO PO 
t>^ in ►-. P| On 1- 

P| M PI l-l M 


•d3>l 

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NO ON " PO in 
-t PI 00 00 >-i 


in 


1- P| 

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PI M 


PO 
On 
fO 


1.^ .-. in -tNO m 
O O C PI ^ 00 

M PI W M M PI 



NO t^ ON On 
PO 00 00 PO 
On m pi P) 



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PI 00 


so o 


■* ON 


On " 


l-t l-l 



M « l-l Tf 



On Tj- t^ w 
" 00 00 PO 
On M PI PI 



„ I ON " l-l M 



P^ Tj- Tt PO 

PO 00 00 PO 
On l-l P) P4 



cntSXl ^-> 



pq 



y u <j o o u 







u u 

PhPm 


^ ^ QJ QJ ^ QJ 
U 1.1 Lh V. V' 1- 

fli CLi fL, fLi Ph P- 


V V V 
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-. 1^1 




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[/, "^a T3 'z; z; ti; 

M PI PO -1- lONO 


M PI PO 




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tn V- u ;_ 1-, 1-, 

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PI PI PI PI PI PI 


PO PO PO 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



445 



•uiarr o -*• ^r «o fo vc 



•uiaa 



-to "^ ro 
v£5 lO O O <r) 

01 M n ?) ri 









o o\oo foo c 00 

tx VO lO I- 01 CTi O 

■^ 01 -. 01 ►-. ►-. 



</1 0\ t^ OOVO O 00 
t^ VO iri « 01 0\ O 

-* 01 i-i 01 11 « 



Tf o o o 



00 woo o 
vo o <r)00 
(^■--11- 



"^"U. vo lO O O oo 

'AIIOUUO3 01 « r»3 '^i -1 



0\ vo 
OO 00 



■+ 000 lOVO O 00 
t^ VO U-) HH 01 On O 

Tf 01 M 01 „ M 



\o 


HH 


l^ Tt- 


VO 





<r>oo 


Ov 


■^ 


y-t t-1 



IU3Q o Th -T m ro 

VO "~/ o o 00 

01 w rt 01 "1 



'IP'^HIHS 



too 

Tj- 00 

1-1 PO 



H- CO O 01 M 
t>>vo !-■ 01 0\ " 

01 M 01 1-1 M 



0\ 01 O Tj- 

0\ 1-1 W tH 



•uiaa 

'UIUU3Q 



"* m >o 00 

vo m o O oo 

01 11 00 01 01 



ooool r^ t^vn—oic\o 

" 00 rf 01 M Cl 1-. W 



•t " :^o 
O O 00 0\ 

0\ - >-, HH 



V 

3 
C 

O 

O 



•uiaa 

•U13Q 

'uuHumipg 



•uiaa 

•UI3Q 



Tf-vo 10 00 
vO 10 O O 0^ 

01 « 00 'I '■1 



Tj- ir-, 10 -t 
vo 10 o O fO 

01 i-c ro '^1 01 



t^irico '"I t^ 
00 00 1000 Os 

0| « 01 « w 



-t'O ""> ""i 
vo m o O 0^- 

01 ^ ro 01 01 



0\ 10 
00 00 

" 00 



O 00 
00 00 

w 00 



O O OOVO fOOO 
t-x 10 -I 01 0\ o 

"I 1-1 01 " 1-1 



00 oo\o 0000 
t^ m -H 01 o\ O 

01 1-1 01 M l-l 



Osvo I u^ O 00 oovo '^l 00 
ooooj IX txinwOiONO 

-l PO I -t 01 M 01 W 1-1 



C-co I rx O 00 000 00 C\ 
oooo| rx txioi-iOiONO 

- ro I ^ 01 1-, 01 w rt 



On 01 00 "-i 
NO O 00 ON 

On 1-1 t-t M 



00 O O 00 
M3 O Tt Ov 



N. 


w 


,_, 


1 


NO 





-^On 1 


Ov 


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"1 



ON " tJ- 01 

NO o -t o 

O. " « 1-1 



c 

3 
O 

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c 
o 

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TJ 

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■uiaa 



■UI3Q 



Tt\o NO 00 
NO >^ o 000 

01 M ro 01 01 



O 01 10 li^ 01 

NO ic O O ro 
C) M 00 01 01 



-tNO U-) -+ 
NO 10 O O 00 

01 " 00 01 01 



" " -1- 



Ov to I ^ O tx PONO 01 01 
OOfO tx tXlOH-lOlONl-l 

1-1 00 -^ 01 w 01 l-H 1-1 



O- -f I 00 O tx fONO OOOO 
0000 tx txioi-iOiONO 

" ro Tf "I w o| -, 



10 O 00 oovO fOOO 
tx tv 10 1-1 01 On O 

^ M 1-1 01 " 1-1 



— 0| I CO NO 01 NO 01 00 O 

-tNO O O O O 01 1-1 ON 

01 " -t- « n « w w 01 



O O Tj- w 

tx O Tt ON 

On 1-. M M 



»x ■- -t On 
NO O rfOO 

ON w « - 



00 >-< 00 tx I 1- 

NO O -TOO i 00 
On i-< -1 >-c rt- 



-+ 


tx 


u 


On 1 


-i- 00 


ON 00 1 


ON 


'"' 


01 


01 



'31A03 



-H ^ 



'^rj- 00NOi-iNO01l>vOi 
•^NO O O O O 01 I-. 00 

OlW T^MC, „|_„p, 



" 00 Tj- On m 

Tj- 00 00 CO 

ON 1-1 01 01 






' S rt rt ^ ^ 



u 

















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1» 


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Wi 




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i- t- 1- t. ;- 



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01 01 01 n CI -1 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



'uosB]\;^ 



^ IT, IT) C\ i fO O ■- \0 
00 rr^OO in \ ^ ■-< O 00 









■^ i/j ir.OO 

00 pooo >o 



0-, O ■- VO 



1^ rooo t^ 
0\ O c^.VO 

01 w M 



•d3^ 



" iTivo 00 I O O " vo 
00 COOO i^ I VO " O 00 

CO 01 (-1 CO Ol " " 



t^ CO t^ rs. 

0\ O co\0 

01 w i-i 



'j[3llSB[lE') 



O lo -too I I^ CO " lO I -+ cooooo 

00 coco lO ! lO O O 00 O O COVO 

CO ^1 "^1 CO I 01 ■- « 01 n iH 



•d9>i 



t^l^^OsI r^ O"io 
00 Tl-00 "^ I t^ " O 00 
CO 01 01 ro 1^1 '-I -■ 



>0 CO o t^ 
OS O COVO 

01 l-l l-H 






00 COOO "1 vo M O 00 
ro <^1 N CO 01 rH l-H 



t^ oo OS 0) 

0\ O CO tx 

01 M M 



0) 

3 

c 

c 
o 

o 



3 

o 

o 

o 
(/) 

T3 

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•d3>I 

•d3^ 

'UIBAVt; 

•d3^ 



■d3>i 

■uiaa 
'madspnji 



•d3^ 
'pjooay; 



•d3^ 
'AijdjnjY^ 



-t CO 1 


o 


•^ 


-* 





o ^ 



r^ 


01 w 


Tj- 


ITi Os 


lO 


M 01 



„ 


„ 


CO 1 


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u-> Os 1 


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^ 


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y u 


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<U (U 


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^ 


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lO lO 



PI lO o^ 0> 0\ O " u~- 

00 oooo lo 1/1 ^H o 00 

CO t^l t"! CO 01 MM 



01 lO "-.00 O O M t^ 

00 COOO "^ VO " ooo 
CO t^i 01 CO 01 MM 



00 CO Os ^N 

Oi O COVO 

01 l-l w 



,_, 


w lO Tf t^ 


t^ 


OS M in 


in 


cooooo 


lO 


00 <ooo 


lO 


lO 


o coo 


OS 


O COVO 


OO 


CO f) N 


CO 


01 


M l-H 


01 


l-H M 


to 


O VOsO 


Os 


„ 


O MSO 


t^ 


01 00 so 


Tt 


00 f^oo 


lO 


VD 


M Geo 


Os 


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CO 


fO^ 'M 


00 


01 


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01 


hH HH 


01 






" 








so 


lO O COOO 


^ 


lO -"t lO 


^ 


lOOO VO 


00 


lO ^00 


'^ 


01 


01 Tj- 01 


Os 


OVO t^ 


00 


0< " 


M 


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IH M 01 


■* 


00 1-1 01 


01 














00 


00 cosooo 


ll-> 


O M t^ 


00 


0000 OO 




i^cooo 


U-) 


U-) 


M ooo 


OS 


O COVO 


OO 


01 01 01 


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01 


l-H M 


01 


hH hH 


01 






" 








^ 


VO ■* ^^ 


o 


0^ ^so 


01 


U-) O l-H 


o 


t^>ooo 


lO 


r^ 


N Tf 01 


OS 


O t-NOO 


Os 
01 


01 " 


" 


vO 


M M 01 


^ 


CO 1-1 01 


00 


^ooo 


o 


01 


-+ 01 tx 


CO 


OO t^ 00 


o 


VO '"loo 


lO 


01 


M ooo 


o 


O oovo 


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CO f^l "1 


CO 


t^l 


'd'OxJ 

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. . . 


»- 








c^ rt 03 




-M +j 4J 


4J 








i^^ 




tn OT JO 

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inTiTi 








>^ b b b 




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u 
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w 


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f^H 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



447 



•iiiaa 



•UI9a 
•U13Q 

'X110UU03 
•uiaa 



'UIUU3Q 



O ■* ^ 10 OS 



O rl- 
Tl-i-. 



•^00 >C (VJ I O U-, ITi t^ 

IT) fOOO rj- ^1 CI T^ ri 

CJ l-H "^ SO 1-1 l-< 01 



I^ iri »H 1-1 

0^ O t^ tN. 



so «S M 


CO 


■+ 10 OS 


■* 


10 w <s) 


'^ 



o Tt 



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IT) CI 1-1 


fD 


'^ >o o\ 


'l- 


to 1-1 D 


T^ 



ro 0\ "^ ro 
10 rooo Tf 
N 1-1 1-1 



0\ OS 10 ■-> 



0\ iTi inso 

so " w M 



Tj- U-, uoso 

w n ^ CI 
so " ►-■ c-l 



so 


10 tx 1-1 


OS 


OVO t^ 


t 


CO ►- 01 



OS 


M 1-1 


CO 


^ 


\r, OS 


^ 


10 


1-1 ts) 


Th 



Cl M 


CO 


10 OS 


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11 Cl 


^ 



10 Oi \J- CO >-< >n lOSO 
LO rooo Tt CI CI T}- M 

CI 1-1 1-1 so i-i ►H N 



CO OS 10 CI I Os m voso 

10 COOO '^ 1-1 M T)- CS) 

CI w 1-1 so 1-1 w 0) 



so 10 tx tTi 

Ov O VO (^ 
't CO " o 



so >o t^so 
0\ Qso t^ 
■* CO w CJ 








•a 




1 


u 


1 


3 


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c 


n 


+3 


1^ 


c 


w 





to 





< 



c 

3 
O 

O 

c 
o 

00 

3 
I 



'X0B3JJL 


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rt 


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to 


l-l 

to OS 

1-1 M 


? 

^ 


CO 
so 
CO 

Cl 


CO Os 10 Cl 
to COGO ^ 
Mm 1-1 


Os 
SO 


to to so 

M Tj- M 
1-1 w M 


so 

Ov 


to l^so 
OSO t-. 

CO " Cl 


00 
'I 


•IU9Q 

uuBuinqog 


CO CO 

Th 


so 

t 

to 


Cl ►- 
10 0\ 

HH Cl 


CO 


Cl 

so 

CO 

Cl 


COOO to CO 
to COOO •^ 
Cl 1-1 1-1 



sS 


10 10 t^ 

'■I -+ Cl 

« w Cl 


OS 


to jx\o 
OVO N. 
CO" M 


00 


•uiaa 


COC) 

't 


to 
to 


C) HH 

10 OS 

« Cl 


CO 


Cl 

so 
00 
M 


1-1 t>^ CO 
Tj- ClOO ^ 
Cl M 


to 


10 to I^ 

--I -t Cl 

" - Cl 


Os 


to t^ 10 

OSO tN. 

CO" M 




•luaa 
'nuiiBH 


CO CO 

Tf 


so 
10 


Cl 1-1 
to Os 

►H Cl 


CO 


Cl 

00 

Cl 


to OSSO CO 

to cooo M- 


CO 
Cl 

so 


to loso 
Cl rf Cl 

•X - Cl 


SO 

Os 


10 OsSO 
CO t^ 

CO " M 




Cl 




CO 

'^ 


to 
to 


to Os 

M Cl 


CO 


so 
00 
Cl 


Cl Os -t ''1 

to COOO -i- 

M l-l 


•0 


to loso 

Cl -t Cl 
~ " Cl 


so 
OS 


to Os 10 

CO t-N 

CO " CI 


Os 




CO CO 

Tt 


so 
to 


Cl w 

10 Os 

1-1 n 


CO 


CO 
so 
00 

Cl 


■* Os to CO 
to COOO "+ 

M HI « 


Cl 

so 


00 toso 

Cl Tf Cl 

l-l -H Cl 


OS 
OS 


t^ OsSO 

CO t^ 
CO " Cl 


Cl 
Cl 


'UI9Q 

';UBUU3J^ 


CO CO 

Tt- 


so 
to 


Cl 1-1 

10 0\ 

-1 Cl 


CO 


CO 

so 

00 
CS| 


to OS 10 CO 
to COOO -f 

Cl M 1-1 


Cl 

Cl 

so 


to toso 
"1 1- Cl 

" « Cl 


SO 

Os 


to OS to 

COtv 
CO " Cl 


Ov 


*d3H 
'sdsajj 


H CI 
M 


OS 

CO 


"00 1 

1 


Os 


10 

CO 
Cl 


1-1 to rj- 
00 COOO SO 
COM M CO 



SO 

Cl 


" 10 
I- 000 

M 1-1 


SO 
Os 
M 


CO Os 

CO ^N 


Cl 

CO 


'31^03 


to -rf 

1-. CI 

t-4 


O^, 

CO 


"oo 


Os 
1-1 


00 

CO 
Cl 


to tooo 1 

00 COOO to 1 
CO N M CO 


00 

to 

Cl 


"SO 

" 000 


Os 

M 


COOO Jx 

coso 


00 


CO 



u 

V V 

u u 


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P4Ph 


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-M , 

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Ward, 
Ward, 


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to to 



c 
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Ii Ii ;-• Ii 

cTj c^ c3 c3 

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29 



448 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'-"'O. o CO M M cq t^ 

'UOSBJ\[ H M 1-1 w M w 



•d3^ 



lo 


m 0\ 


rx 


ovo 


rx 


IH 



t^ 00 00 t^ "^ I O f^OO 



Tj-0vot^0>0 1-1 OOO 00 

«T->x"'^*/T^ oc^i-'nMt^ txovo \o oooot^"^ 



■*vo tv. Tt- M 1-1 o\ 

o «ooo 

in 1-1 



1-1 


ro tx 


t~> 


OVO 


t^ 


*~^ 



T3 

3 
C 

'■? 

C 

o 
O 



o 
O 

o 

(0 
"D 

3 
I 



""^a o fo " 0) N i^ 

'^PUBQ 1-1 1-1 HH W H 1-1 

•d3>T xr,6\D 0\ O w 



• /i-^-^T loo OOO PI ON 

cia jj o po N cq p) 1^ 

•uiEiaaquiBiQ m m « « m « 

•dSM ^ "-* ^ 0\ vo "I 

tl o fo " r^ <^l t-^ 
SU3iJ3;S M M « « « - 



, in o NO t^ M t^ 

■U3^ O fO " W P) ^ 

'[[3MXBJ,\r " " '-^ " w " 

■d3>T VO O t-^00 "\0 

*^^H CO ro txOO t^ ro 

'U3MONT3I\T i-i CON t^ <^00 

-^■*- -*^M1-1MI-(1-II-1 



•d3\T NO o\NO rx 1-1 t^ NO -^No 

, O-^ OMi-iMMl^ l>,ONO 
3Jj0lj£ Mi-ii-ii-iMM txi-i 



o 


<V5NO 

OVO 

1-1 


On 
NO 
1-1 


00 CO t^ lo 


00 


moo 

OVO 

M 




■<t "1 tx ■* 
00 00 t^io 

hH 1-1 


00 


^00 

ONO 

1-1 


tN» 

1-1 


^NO t-^-t 

00 00 t^ m 

1-1 1-1 




u-iOO 
ONO 




NOOO t^ -t 
00 00 t^ui 


00 


IT) 00 

ONO 




Tj- t-^VO -t 

00 00 tx. LO 


00 


ONO 


O 


On ^ rONO 
00 O On VO 

01 ^ 



O 


O On 


Oi 1 


O 


rOOO 


1-1 


lO 




M 



I^ 


M OV 


O 


ON 


fOOO 


p) 


^ 


" 


c^ 



U13Q NONOO'-l'-'t^l M lOlO 

" fO O I NO -+ ►-I VO 
fO M N 



■inadspuH r;^:^^^ ^ 



< 

W 
I 



O 

w 
> 

o 

O 

I 



'pjooa^ „ « « « 1-1 HH I t^ 



■U13(J 1-1 On 1-1 NO (OOO 00 t^ f^l 

•moiuA'-! ^ ^t^>^vo roo :^ ^ (^1 



'Al[djaj;^ KHHWMHW t^l-1 



-t lO O " O ro rj- 
lo ro 1-1 O O w lo 

W hH M M VO M 1-1 



Tj- cs VO Tt I Wi On ON 
00 00 t^ VO I On f^ 00 



■* •+ to 0< CO >0 VO 

VO to 1-1 O O "^1 »o 

M „ „ „ lO C) 1-. 



Tt -^ r^ ro I 't M 00 
00 00 t^ m I On cn) 00 

MM I Tt -1 





•j 






600666 


jj tn 




^ I. ^ 1. 


D QJ U 1> IJ <U 


S5 






u V- u ii li Ih 




.y.y.y.H 


eLHa^c^PL,PH(l^ 




"H'cn'u 










C c«'^ tnlS cn"d 
Q w M „ cq « 01 


■4-» C/3 




cn c« u) c« 


►^ 13 -d TS -ra -Td T3 

|_) V- l-i V- 1-1 V- tn 




i 


tn'Ci'OVI 


be 


5 


1- PI f^ -f 


cu c^ rt rt rt rt 


Vh 


.is; 




? -M -W , , , , 

g M 1-1 M N tOtO 


^0 

3 


5 


North, 
North, 
South, 
South, 


H 








^ = 



Wc^ 



M HH On 





fOOO 


M 


VO w 


N 



m 1-1 On 





toco 


0) 


VO 1-1 


n 



1-1 


M ON 








CO 00 


M 


10 


" 


t^ 



r^ M On 





Tt- COOO 


M 


10 1-1 


M 



NO 


On 


On 





to GO 


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VO 


1-1 


C) 



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VO t^ 



000 
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>.ti 



"5^ 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



449 



'llBlUSp^Y M « PI PI PI PI 



•U13Q 



i^ PI t^ 



m Tt- IT) t^ r^vo I PI >A t^ 
roi^-<l-»nPlO 1 -^ •*-' 
PI -< PI PI PI pq oo PI M 



•UI3(T T}-^ O PI Os\0 r^ Tt t^ 

A[[OUUOJ PI p-i M PI PI PI ro PI PI 



•J^^d n t^ tovo po o vo ^ w 
'iiavvTinc ^' " '^' ^' '^' ^1 "^ ^1 ^' 






T}- www 



Tj- w W - w 



O C LO 


\n 


0\ w lO 


>o 


-t PI " 


PO 



Ov w 't 
t^ w lO 

•+ PI " 



-I w rt 

00 - lO 
1- 'I w 






u 



, PO tx u-)\o 1 ^ 

UIUU3Q PI w PI PI PI PI 



\0 «« ►- PI 0\V0 I 0\ vo t^ 

'.t3B3Jx ^" " ^ ^"^ « j ::? ^' ^' 

•in:3/-T w\o fO PI Oi PI I 

'uuEuinnDg p) « p) <"> p< ^1 



■ IU3(T t^vo i/^ w 00 fO 

(>^i,.-. ro r^ TfVO PI o 
"^^'cl PI w PI PI PI PI 



fO 
fO 


PI PI 


— 





o 


l/^ tx 1 


lO 


T1- 


w 


PO 


Pl 


PI 


" 













^ w w w w 



fO I- rf 

•i- PI w 



PO Tt Tt 

Tj- PI W 



o 
O 



'IIIUIBH ^' " ^' ''" ^' ''' 



w lO t^ 

PO PI PI 



E 
3 
O 

O 

c 
o 

(0 
T3 

3 

I 



•luarr i^io « "oo lo 

, '-'^ CO t^ mvo Pi O 

UOfJBJ^ PI w PI PI PI PI 



IU3Q 3 lo fo -t 0\ 0\ 

'7in'-r ■* t^ "^vo PI O 

■' + " I PI -, PI --I PI rvi 



•d3^ Tt LO Ti- " O O 

•ads3H 2 - w w w - 



IT) Tf w 
PO PI PI 



';UBUU3J^ PI w P< PI PI PI j PO 



On to t^ 
in Tj- w 
PO PI PI 



^ tooc 
lO O VO 

r^ - 



^ w w w w 



Tt w w w w 



o - -+ 

O^ w lO 

^ PI " 



Ov w »0 

Tf PI w 



<» la 

PO ^ 



U-. o CO I 00 I w 



'c^ 



•/[3AT '"Iw"*t^0\0 I PO POhx 





■J 




cJ cj 6 d 'J J 


^J t/) 


^ 1 ^ ^ 


U <U QJ CJ CJ w 


r/) '^ 


•4-> -4.1 -4-> 4^ 


u !-r u u ;-. I-. 


*/-> "^ 


u cj y u 


Ch?-.^-:ihCh 


^-. 


X 'il 'H 'C 








Q w PI w r| .^ P) 




T; 72 X x 






1 *j_ - 


J V- !- Vh U U 1- 


bO 


C ti'S'C't: 


4^ w PI CO -1- 


rt rt rt rt c3 rt 


'•-' 


^ 


^':^^^>>> 




^•5 -5 -5-* 


^ CO cn'Cw'C'^ 
g w „ c^ 01 roPO 


3:: 

3 

O 


Weeh, 

Nor 
Nor 
Sou 
Sou 


H 






^^ 



tN. to 
\n 1-1 
vo PO 



o c« 



° r-" 



Ph 



450 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Hunterdon County. 

f — Governor. — ^ , — Assembly. 



M 



p-w Su ^t, <u<u -a'^ "^i^ 

^(V rq pfL, gCi: pC rpLi 

;^ J^; c3 < I; X 

Alexandria 43 125 i 44 123 i 

East Bethleliem, 34 55 2 34 52 3 

West Bethlehem, 57 145 2 57 143 3 

Clinton, 156 259 17 153 255 16 

Clinton Borough, 113 109 5 no 108 6 

Delaware, 95 236 38 96 232 40 

Kast Amwell, 112 150 3 no 149 4 

Franklin 58 144 15 57 142 15 

Frenchtovvn Borough, 120 118 14 118 113 15 

High Bridge Borough, 236 130 9 225 132 11 

Holland, 128 118 8 1 24 119 8 

Junction Borough, 107 86 i 83 103 2 

kingswood, in i35 18 112 131 20 

1370 1810 133 132 1802 144 

Lambertville, ist Ward, 88 206 2 131 113 2 

" 2d " 185 181 ... 219 146 

3^1 " 275 267 5 351 191 4 

548 654 7 701 500 6 

Hast Lebanon "72 140 7 80 

West Lebanon, 98 97 3 95 

East Raritan 181 223 13 169 

West Raritan 166 230 20 166 

North Readington 104 239 9 106 

South Readington 93 105 7 90 

Stockton Borough 64 74 3 65 

East Tewksbury, 73 i47 6 72 

West Tewksbury, 74 132 4 7 - 

Union, 46 126 2 45 

West Amwell, 89 74 i 92 

1060 1587 75 1052 1559 85 

Total vote in county, 29784051 215 3076 3861 235 

Plurality, 1073 

Socialist, 22; Social-Labor, 15 



129 


8 


97 


3 


221 


20 


227 


20 


234 
106 


9 
8 


72 
146 


3 
6 


132 


4 


124 


3 


'^ 


I 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



451 



'ouo['::]\[ KH „ „ 



lovooo " 00 " 00 t^ CN>o -I t^oo o i-i lo o\ 



+ -*."^'"' 1 w M CI -i M ««►-.«-, „ _ ^1 _ ro ro 






•(:-i\i "^ ^'' ■* o " o ^ Ch m a fo CI 00 t^oo -^ fi 

^ ^ » I -^^ O>O\O00 f^O O f^O 0\ Tt 0\ ^ O^ 'Tl 



r 

< 






E 




3 


^ 


O 


1 


O 


O 




z 


s_ 


o:! 


(U 


W 


o 


> 


L. 


O 


9i 


O 



■luarr °° >ovo o o looo \o 'i- ro m vc fo u-- lo m o 

4 ,,- ^„H=^^ mvooo M 0\ H-OO tx 0\0 •-. t^ o> O « Tt o 



•d3>[ 



'Aqda 



M n w o\ f"! c\ OS o^o t^ >-H osoo ■- CO o vo 

TfVO O ir,\o t^'lOOf^OCOroOrOOCI 



CI 

O 


0\ PI Ki 


"5 


•-I TffO 

OS lOCO 


00 
PI 

'4- 


CO 


SO SO OS 
I^ "00 


CO 


tJ~t Cl t^ 

C| t^ O 

CI « I-I 


o 
in 




ID 1-1 O 

Tj- O fx 


so 
5- 


so M in 
OS so 00 




00 

o 

fO 


-t OS a. 

CO O "-, 

PI D n 


CI 


00 so ■* 

oooso 

Cl i-i « 


00 
in 


so 

CI 


O t~^ H-C 

IxOO ->*• 
n HH 01 


.00 

OS 
so 


CO MOO 
" t^ CO 

Cl i-i i-i 


CO 

Cl 

in 


c> 
o 


so ^1 so 
CO C lO 

n pi CI 


-t 


Os C) -^ 
ciooso 
Pl — 1-1 


in 
in 


00 


00 cooo 

IT) O l^ 


OS 
CO 


00 -^ OS 
OsSOOO 


m 


OS 
SO 

o 

CO 


i-H o CI 

00 O LT) 

CI Cl I-I 


CO 
CO 

so 


O OSO 
CO t^so 
Cl « w 


OS 

SO 

in 


O 
OS 

i-i 


so J%00 
u->0 I^ 


i-i 


VO txOs 

OstnoO 


P< 


00 lo in PI 
^x 00 Os lO 

O (S) „ (^ 


CI 
CO 


Ct 00 I-I 
cooo so 
Cl ►^ « 


CO 



OH 



•n'nT '->*i 



(J (J 
tn to 



2 S 
^c^ 



u </> 






HI en 






o o ^- 

O C GO o 

r- J5 O !- ^ 

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M 



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y o y 
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u Ul u 

PhPhCh 



452 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



O "^ fO o 
w On "^ ^) 
'OUO[i?I,\[ H w N 



•iLioa 



00 t^ t^ " •+ 
t^ T|- >n o MD 

lO .-. w CS M 



■^ CO O Tj- M \£) t^ 0\^ 
C^COM " lOiOOVO 

'UEU13I03 MHhHCS VO MhHC^M 



•uiaa 



o o •+ o\ 

-- 1-1 OMO H 



•uioa 



•day 



00 " cvoo 

CO O (^i, fx 

j;tab3']; m n m « 



, y <r)OM>i ts, 
'asBj M n " w 



OS 00 "^ " ■+ lO 

\0 CO ■-■ 0) 1-1 HI 



" 0\0 O 1-1 
po lONO in lo 
ro >-< n w M 



ro 0\ t^ w t^ I ■* >0 -+>0 W t^ 

lOiil-iCSiHVO C^mC1>-ii-i 



^o „ ooo " 
•+ 00 " o o 



Tf t^ O lO lO 

(M t-x " 1-c O 

tN. 1-1 IH 1-1 t-H 



o o 1- r^ f"! lo 

O Tf " fOMD '^1 
lO 1-1 1-1 1-1 i-i 1-1 



t-^ Ttoooo in o 

O Tt O P0\0 ro 

to IH 1-1 1-1 W 1-1 



00 o\ -J- 

O w W 



IT) \0 ^ 



N. GOO 00 

\o 00 '^ I- 

PO 1-1 11 M 



rn 


Tf in PI 


0\ 


o in^t 


re 


0^ w n 



o \o 00 fo 

t^ 00 •* N 

ro e^ 1-1 N 



''I invo C) 
On J^ m « 
Cl 1-1 PI PI 



<r5 M 00 o\ 
t^ in 'too 
p| « M " 



■o ! 

(D W 

O ^ 



W 

O O 



day H t^ in in 

^3fl" J 01 M M HH 



*^'- i-i 0\ in cs 

'jLjnjpooAV « - PI 



ro O <^ t^ 

'uosuupinj^ PI PI w H 



•luarr m t^. •* ■* 

, ^1= PI ONM3 PI 

'jUOUIi^Og 1-1 MP! 



'.'Ci[cl.ui] 



- - *- • t^vo 00 Tf 
,.in"['\r PI On " t^ 



00 00 O 0\ ON 
PI t^ i-> O On 



P| Pq 00 »^ M 
On in in o t^ 

m 1-1 M PI M 



On ro tn tJ- O no 
00 po TfNO in in 

NO PO " PI " >-i 



PI inoo f)NO I i-i ON"\OPiin 

fOt^OOONOO PO" PONO PI 

tXl-ll-H" -f„l-l««« 



O ON O ^ On 
■"i 'tNO QNO 

VO 1-1 « Pj M 



M TtOO VO PI w 
00 PO T}-\o invo 

VO CO « N 1-1 1-1 



m O NO t^ On I PI t^ O PO P| •* 
"OOOOOn OnpO"NOnop| 
t^K^Mi-i I'ti-'MMi-iw 



00 On m 
't t^O 
O 1-1 M 



PO 


POfO 1 


t^ 


NO 


o 


NO 







On NO 

tN.O 

M M 



NO On On 
00 NO O 
NO 1-1 -< 



Ward 
Ward 
W^ard 
Ward 


Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 


Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 


T3X) 
u u 
CT3 a! 


CO fO fO ro 




in in in in in 


NO NO 


Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 


Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 


Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 
Precinct, 


y y 

5.S 

■y'y 
<u y 

Sh !-i 


W PI PO Tf- 


" fN) ro -f 


"00-0 la's '5 


05 TJ 
1-1 PI 


C 
O 


o 


C 
O 


o 



in o t^NO 
00 :^ in o 

PI M P| PI 



Tj- ONIO 1- 

00 t^ in PI 

PO M « PI 



-t MOO 

t^ m o 

M PI PI 



in 00 00 00 
00 00 m PI 

PO M M PI 



00 On On in I PO 
t^ NO 't O I PI 
PI w PI PI I NO 



rt rt rt 



PhPhPh 



C: - - 



Gz 



H 



^H 



•UIOQ 



ELECTION RETI^RNS. 



^1 D - I ro -tCO '<-, -t 
'3UO[UJ,^ M w p, „ „ (M 



fO Gn '^ 
•IU3Q IT) O f^ 

'uBm3{o3 "^ " 

•I'll/- r vo >-< <*5 

'uinj3§ai3x\[ " " 






C\ 00 m O 0\ 
ri « " iM 



c\ \o "~. o 00 

N M 11 N 



^ n P) 1-1 M 



•d3H 



OsOO fC I o -t O PO ■* 
'aSBJ^ i-i t"' I rl- Oi N « M 






OS ID lO i-H 00 

o >o O t>. fO 

•5j- M P< 1-1 1-1 



„ 


CO t^ <*5 


00 


O OM^ 


:^. 


CO «H n 



w 11 00 m 

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454 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



'Oll01BJ\[ 



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ELECTION RETURNS. 



455 



Middlesex County. 

Governor. , 



-Assembly. - 



Perth Amhoj', ist Ward,. 

2d Ward,. 

3d Ward,. 

4th Ward,. 

5th Ward,. 

6th Ward,. 



Woodbridge, ist District,. 

2d District,. 

" 3d District,. 





5 


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. 

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^ 


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172 


316 


322 


2,22 


174 


lbs 


166 


• ■ • 250 


276 


249 


252 


255 


274 


268 


272 


. . . 223 


251 


2T2 


223 


222 


247 


250 


266 


. . . 249 


196 


249 


2.SI 


249 


195 


196 


201 


• • • 137 


2S^ 


127 


136 


131 


254 


250 


270 


• . • 195 


23« 


197 


195 


192 


23« 


2Z7 


252 



1370 1389 1350 1379 I37I 1382 1366 1427 

241 170 230 231 235 167 166 168 

126 128 126 149 149 156 

180 181 180 149 150 154 



128 



I.tI 



03 



Raritan, ist District, 183 

2d District, 88 

Metuchen, 177 

Piscataway, 240 

Dunellen, 137 



New Brunswick- 
ist Ward, ist 
ist Ward, 2d 
2d Ward, ist 
2d Ward, 2d 
3d Ward, ist 
3d Ward, 2d 
4th Ward, ist 
4th Ward, 2d 
5th Ward, ist 
5th Ward, 2d 
6th Ward, ist 
6th Ward, 2d 



825 




District, 187 

District, 254 

District, 218 

District, 204 

District, 112 

District, 120 

District, 308 

District, 218 

District 243 

District, 239 

District, 209 

District, 184 



2496 

North Brunswick, 126 

Milltown, 80 

East Brunswick, ist Dist.,. ... 109 
" 2d Dist.,. ... 92 

South River, 241 

Helmetta, 52 

Cranbury, 248 

Monroe, 160 

Jamesburg, 143 

South Amboy, ist Dist., 227 

" 2d Dist., 2\2 

" 3d Dist., 139 



235 
182 

215 
189 

274 
304 
155 
212 
249 
217 

237 
260 

2729 

54 

44 

125 

123 

262 

34 

82 

82 

89 

207 

223 

225 



i»5 
265 
225 
211 
III 
116 
310 
219 
241 

235 
2g8 

18; 



i«9 
267 
217 
211 

113 
119 

313 
223 
246 
243 
203 
186 



182 
264 
226 
21 1 
III 
118 
310 
220 
240 
238 
210 
18; 



244 

169 

217 

181 

271 . 

310 

1.53 
209 

257 

222 

243 
260 



231 
172 
208 
182 
271 
303 
147 
208 
247 
214 
237 
259 



231 
171 
208 
181 
271 
302 

145 
208 
248 
215 
238 
260 



2511 2530 2515 2736 2679 26; 



127 
82 

I ID 

92 

235 

47 
248 
t6o 
142 
223 
208 
140 



127 

83 
1 10 

95 
2Z7 

44 
248 

159 

141 

22J 
212 
140 



128 

82 

109 

97 
237 

43 
244 
161 
143 
253 
231 
148 



53 

41 

124 

123 

261 

39 

80 

82 

89 

194 



53 

41 

125 

123 

260 

46 

84 

83 

91 

198 



209 223 



40 

124 

116 

259 

39 

80 

81 

87 
191 
213 



219 221 



1829 1550 1814 1823 1876 1516 1546 1503 



456 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Middlesex County — Continued. 

Governor. ,• Assembl,y.- 



Madison, 125 

Sayreville, 147 

South Brunswick, 1st Dist.,.. 166 

" 2d Dist.,. . 118 



§s 


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122 


124 


364 


148 


148 


98 


162 


162 


77 


117 


117 



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125 


114 


114 


114 


ISO 


362 


361 


359 


ib2 


100 


100 


100 


117 


77 


77 


77 



556 654 549 551 554 653 652 650 



Total vote in county, . .7627 7517 7637 7643 7680 7439 7400 7368 
Plurality in county,... no 
Prohibition, 126; Socialist, 29; Social-Labor, 38. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



457 



Monmouth County. 

Governor , 



-ASSEMBLY- 



•5a °c cci. "^ci. =<— o^ 1^1^ j^, n 

r-u S 'u £o -r: oj S :j -^o 4j<u ijaj 

i^*' >,p. '^^i; ^Z^ TtC^ '~Z. tC tJ;^ 

<1 Ol HH I— .^ f< H- — 

Atlantic 138 174 137 140 135 172 174 175 

I'.atontown, ist District, 177 95 176 176 176 96 93 93 

2d District, 125 119 125 135 124 116 108 116 

Freehold, ist District, 166 256 162 160 157 264 257 254 

2d District, 143 226 136 146 141 233 225 223 

3d District, 244 272 250 249 2^2 279 257 255 

993 1142 986 1006 965 1160 1114 1116 

Howell, Eastern District,.... 148 146 147 149 148 145 148 143 

Western District.... 92 132 83 93 90 135 132 130 

Hclmdel, 88 143 87 88 85 144 14-2 i44 

Manalapan Township, 176 192 135 176 175 2Z3 190 188 

Englishtown Borovigh, 61 50 44 59 58 7Z 49 5o 

Matawan Borough, 165 134 155 162 158 136 134 143 

" Township, 126 130 124 126 125 129 128 129 

Middletown, ist District,.... 175 144 184 180 163 131 121 147 

2d District,.... 160 203 144 156 117 206 199 266 

" 3d District,.... 218 126 220 216 207 121 118 135 

" Flighlands, 4th Dist. 88 87 81 85 _ 79 89 88 94 

1497 1487 1404 1490 1405 1542 1449 1569 

Atlantic Highlands Borough,. 151 139 145 139 134 138 134 174 

Millstone, 145 177 140 144 140 180 178 178 

Marlboro, 176 227 ^ 171 173 171 228 227 228 

Asbury Park, ist Ward, 277 201' 282 283 280 199 196 192 

" 2d Ward, 226 100 240 240 232 90 85 86 

Neptune Twp., ist Ward,.... 315 115 313 315 316 116 114 113 

2d Ward,.... 127 179 134 131 131 171 174 i74 

" 3d Ward,.... 204 188 205 205 205 184 181 181 

" 4th Ward,... 216 93 216 215 214 89 89 89 

Avon, 23 26 24 24 24 25 24 25 

Bradley Beach, 59 98 70 68 69 88 88 87 

Neptune City 43 72 45 45 44 68 70 69 

Ocean, ist District, 167 190 159 177 157 187 181 180 

2d District, 112 123 no 107 108 124 121 121 

" 3d District, 259 287 257 260 255 287 280 280 

4th District, 177 93 179 187 180 86 84 89 

5th District, 166 200 157 181 154 201 192 195 

6th District, 262 270 256 282 255 268 254 252 

" 7th District, 139 209 138 153 137 199 199 204 

3244 2987 3241 3329 3206 2928 2870 2917 

Seabright Borough, 114 114 in 115 107 112 112 115 

Allenhurst Borough, 33 7 33 33 33 7 7 7 

Deal Borough 21 12 24 23 20 12 9 9 

Raritan, ist District, 229 138 218 229 204 147 139 154 

2d District, 326 134 351 315 339 131 106 129 

3d District, 70 80 68 68 60 80 80 88 



45g ELECTION RETURNS. 

Monmouth County — Continued. 

CiOVIvRNOR r ASSEMBLY- 



" i-< G ^ r rt JJ 

>. 't S S -S 2 • o . » . 

-So. 2C gCL rtO. ^z. oS ulC ^. t 

S-< j:,Q ^K |« S-; Oq SttG |C 

Shrewsbury, Eastern Dist.,.. 196 197 204 204 196 196 196 203 

Southern Dist.,. 168 11 1 169 168 170 114 107 107 

" Middle Dist.,... 296 168 295 297 294 171 167 173 

" Western Dist.,.. 340 164 za 337 334 166 160 170 

" West Red Bank, 134 123 133 131 130 123 123 126 

1927 1248 1939 1920 1887 1259 1206 1281 

Upper Freehold, ist Dist.,. . . . 146 132 142 144 146 136 134 133 

" 2d Dist...... 69 62 67 67 67 62 62 62 

AUentown Borough, 121 49 121 122 120 49 48 46 

Wall, ist District, 97 234 92 94 96 233 zn 233 

" 2d District, 119 144 115 108 113 142 162 143 

Manasquan Borough, 155 154 137 119 125 167 225 149 

North Spring Lake Borough,. 50 ZZ 4i 47 47 35 43 33 

Spring Lake Borough, 37 25 27 35 33 26 37 25 

Belmar Borough, loi 84 86 loi 97 91 99 83 

895 917 828 837 844 941 1047 907 

Total vote in county, . .8556 7781 8398 8582 8307 7830 7686 7790 
Plurality in county,... 775 

Prohibition, 320; Socialist, 30; Social-Labor, 38. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 459 

Morris County. 

Governor -Senate- i Assembly ^ 

.. u -no. 

>: ^ ^ . . ^A '^ . •,• 

•^c oc ^C.^C % .^ Co, to'S t-c 

r^ <u gu tnu b/jy +-'4; >dj ^u '^o 

2^ >.Q i:c^ 5Ci is^jj o^v iJQ trc 

<; 'x> P ^ ;::: p ;:. t. 

Butler, . . 237 144 275 107 245 231 122 146 

IJconton, East District, 262 118 249 123 248 238 119 144 

West District, 262 184 243 202 237 22^ 184 232 

Chatham, y2 40 71 41 y^ y2 39 38 

Chatham Borough, 182 106 204 83 182 181 T04 104 

Chester, 99 251 104 248 loi 100 248 249 

Dover, ist District, 172 158 165 158 161 158 176 152 

2d District, 120 121 115 126 116 117 127 121 

3d District, 149 115 140 122 146 139 123 115 

4th District, 197 132 192 139 185 188 153 132 

1752 1369 1758 1349 1694 1667 1395 1433 

Flcrham Park Borough, y:^ 59 74 58 75 80 53 58 

Hanover, North District,.... 119 49 122 46 119 116 49 52 

South District,.... 161 138 163 136 162 164 137 135 

West District, 97 98 98 94 96 96 98 98 

Jefferson, ist District, y2 yz 67 75 70 70 y2 y2 

" 26. District, 66 42 63 43 65 65 41 42 

^ladison^ Bore, North Dist.,. 171 167 174 166 175 179 160 161 

,^ , " South Dist.,. 275 175 271 181 271 28^ 168 176 

Mendham, 161 158 168 152 166 165 154 1^3 

Montyille, 142 54 139 55 138 136 53 59 

Morris, 222 222 232 206 243 228 214 203 

Morristown — 

ist Ward, ist District,.... 145 124 146 119 146 144 12^ 121 

'j*,^,y^^?' -^ S?^*^^'^*^' ^93 140 195 139 193 193 138 140 

2d Ward, ist District, 145 131 144 139 156 148 125 122 

2d Ward, 2d District, 128 184 127 174 122 125 176 189 

3d Ward, ist District 158 129 160 125 160 157 126 129 

3d Ward, 2d District, 140 82 144 175 143 140 76 81 

4th Ward, 184 233 187 226 187 187 223 230 

2652 2257 2674 2209 2687 2676 2186 2221 

Mount Arlington Borough,... 38 13 40 11 40 40 11 11 

Mount Olive 89 153 100 141 80 90 151 152 

Netcong Borough, 54 55 52 57 53 52 56 56 

i assaic, loi m 102 109 loi loi iio iio 

Pequannock, ist District, 114 93 109 97 113 114 93 g4 

r, .'A -o"^ District, 246 57 247 59 247 246 58 61 

Port Oram Borough, 154 149 150 154 151 151 155 153 

Randolph, ist District,..-.... 74 no 64 120 yy 76 107 108 

Ti ," -^ District 88 99 89 97 83 85 104 100 

Kockaway, Borough 216 149 118 256 209 208 155 157 

^P''^'^ SJ^^H'^^' ^-7 144 83 187 127 126 144 144 

^^^t district, 87 III 51 147 89 91 109 107 

South District, no 95 104 103 108 103 96 100 

Koxbury, Succasunna Dist.,.. 149 168 161 158 156 156 161 160 

" Port Morris 46 60 42 65 43 43 68 60 

Washington, North District.. . 85 83 loi 69 86 86 82 8-' 

South District,.. 153 179 194 142 155 156 177 176 

1931 1829 1807 1972 1926 1924 1837 1831 

Total vote in county. .6335 5455 6239 5530 6307 6267 5418 548=; 

Plurality, 880 709 

Prohibition, 343; Socalist, 41; Social-Labor, 42. 



460 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Ocean County. 

, — Governor — ^ , Senate — -^ Assembly 



>> . 3 



\- ~ 



^d 2^^ 5d cc. -a u6 jHd *i ^ 

^« >.Q oOh -Sk -C S?^ -qK ^C 

Bay Head, 24 20 3 24 20 3 24 20 

Beach Haven, 35 16 3 35 16 3 34 16 

Berkeley, 68 64 7 67 64 7 67 57 

Brick, East District, 148 91 22 148 91 22 146 93 

West District, 104 47 2 105 46 2 102 46 

Dover, 373 158 11 368 152 12 326 152 

Kagleswood, 75 54 5 75 53 5 7i 54 

Harvey Cedars, 12 4 ... 12 4 ... 11 5 

Island Heights, 39 17 2 38 17 3 37 17 

Jackson, 150 109 14 145 108 14 139 109 

Lacey, 89 43 9 90 42 9 76 55 

Eakewood, 370 172 28 349 159 29 384 146 

Lavallette, 7 S ••• 8 4 ... 7 s 

I.ittle Egg Harbor, 52 75 i 54 73 151 74 

Eong Beach City, 20 9 i 18 9 i 18 10 

Manchester, 102 80 i 99 78 ... 91 85 

Ocean, 50 44 2 52 43 2 50 44 

Point Pleasant Beach, 201 107 5 218 92 3 204 105 

Plumsted, 105 74 4 105 74 4 105 74 

Sea Side Park, 16 9 5 16 9 5 M 10 

Stafford, 96 52 5 94 5^ 5 90 52 

Surf City, 8 6 ... 8 6 ... 8 6 

Tuckerton, 213 64 28 208 60 27 199 63 

Union, 159 43 8 159 44 8 no 90 

Total vote in county, .. 2516 1363 166 2495 1316 165 2364 1388 

Plurality in county, ... 1 153 "79 
Socialist, 12; Social-Eabor, 6. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



461 



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462 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



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PI 


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District,.. . 
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District,.. . 
District,.. . 


District,.. . 
District,. . . 
District,.. . 


District,.. . 
District,.. . 
District,.. . 
District,.. . 
District,. . . 


District,.. . 
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District,.. . 
District,.. . 


«5 13 T) ■;;:; +3 

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Ward, 
Ward. 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 
Ward, 


t^ M p) PI PI 


CO CO CO 




•S-S43.£3 
-I-' +j +j +j 
m lo m m 



Pk 



Ph 



PL, 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



463 



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lO 


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■a 

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3 
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30 



464 



ELECTION RETURNS. 






•uiaa o o 



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+-'■30 



ELECTION RETURNS. 465 

Salem County. 

t — Governor — s , — Assembly — , 






-\ll?way, 1.3 204 

tlsmboro, 60 3^ 



Lower Allovvays Creek, 168 go 

Lower Penns Neck, i-^o 17- 

Mannington, ; ^gg 114 

Oldmans, j, j j ,q 

Pennsgrove, ....."..'.' -o > ^40 

Pilesgrove, ,07 13^ 

Iittsgrove, ^^ i^^ 

Ouinton, -,n , „. 

~- -'-'4 / o 

\22 

6 192 

13 89 



Upper Penns Xeck, 46 

Upper Pittsgrove, 2-6 

Woodstown 



. -. ^303 1949 

City of halem. East Ward, ist Prec.,... 146 136 

1] " East Ward, 2d Prec.,... 245 272 

" West Ward, ist Prec.,.. 145 156 

West Ward, 2d Prec.,.. 92 236 



Is 






^0 
1^ 


17 


124 


202 


18 


I 


63 


S3 


I 


17 


97 


151 


17 


8 


149 


I 12 


8 


16 


128 


175 




3 


286 


95 


3 


12 


143 


115 


13 


18 


162 


^77 


17 


17 


205 


1 3-' 


17 


4 


192 


171 


4 


I I 


214 


56 


1 1 


3 


44 


121 


3 


12 


250 


194 


12 


-'4 


216 


83 


25 


163 


^^72, 


1947 


149 


6 


154 


126 


5 


30 


257 


260 


32 





154 


155 


6 


2 


100 


239 


3 


43 


665 


780 


46 



628 800 

Total vote in county, 2931 2749 "T^ ~^ 1^27 ^9^ 

Plurality in county, 182 ^'o / / yj 

Socialist, 52; Social-Labor, 5. 



466 ELECTION RETURNS. 



Somerset County. 

, — Governor — s , — Assembly- 



A A o S 



Bedminster, ■ i3i 258 

Bernards, ist District, 236 269 

2d District, 84 114 

Branchburg, ist District, 78 64 

2d District, 66 5« 

Bridgewater, ist District, 255 177 

2d District, 171 i75 

3d District, 102 ' 186 

4th District, 257 220 

5th District, 171 160 

6th District, 48 59 

Bound Brook Borough, 219 232 

Fianklin, ist District, ii7 60 

2d District i73 i30 

3d District, 120 62 

Hellsboro, ist District, 151 i33 

2d District, 132 104 

Millstone Borough 34 18 

Montgomery, ^So i07 

Rocky Hill Borough, 37 33 

North Plainfield Township 307 i7« 

North Plainfield Borough, ist District,.. 292 189 

2d District,.. 67 58 

Warren, ^ _^ 

Total vote in county, 3490 3181 170 3344 3300 172 

Plurality, 309 

Socialist, 16; Social-Labor, 9. 





Ti 




\^ 




c 







>? 




«5H 

1:;: <u 




pp., 


§« 




5p- 

I.. 


PQ 




U 


M 


12 


127 


258 


12 


7 


159 


345 


7 


->, 


80 


117 


3 




75 


66 




3 


66 


57 


13 





246 


186 


8 


6 


168 


"^77 


7 


I 


89 


199 


1 


6 


257 


2ig 


7 


I 


155 


173 


I 


9 


49 


56 


10 


-Z 


220 


229 


2?, 


I 


116 


67 


I 


16 


171 


130 


16 




119 


63 




3 


154 


128 


2 


2 


130 


104 


2 




33 


19 




5 


165 


98 


5 




39 


31 




18 


302 


181 


20 


31 


285 


195 


31 


9 


66 


59 


9 


5 


73 


143 


4 



,j^^m 



ELECTION RETURNS. 467 

Sussex County. * 

( — Governor — ^ r — Assembly — < 



"U G^ l^*- .' <ii • ■_ - l-< 

H« >.Q CfL, ^osj ttrC ^fL 

:< r/j PC K ^ Ci 

Andover, 64 145 7 67 134 7 

Branchville, 69 83 12 86 67 12 

Byram, 139 loi 7 133 99 7 

Frankford, 108 158 6 142 119 8 

^ra&rv, 71 75 3 73 71 5 

Hampton, 78 144 2 114 109 3 

Hardyston, 267 217 16 262 218 16 

Hopatcong, 21 16 ... 24 13 ... 

Lafayette, 89 102 3 92 99 3 

Montague, 51 93 i 55 89 i 

Newton, ist District, 248 294 20 246 296 19 

" 2d District 228 279 13 228 z-jj 1 1 

Sandyston, 116 138 2 138 116 2 

Sparta, North, 81 118 2 82 116 2 

_" South, 82 149 12 86 144 12 

Stillwater, 95 192 3 122 165 3 

Vernon, 138 142 7 163 121 8 

Walpack, ij 66 i 137 144 8 

Wantage, North, 86 142 i 28 65 i 

" South, 87 176 I 98 126 I 

Sussex, 165 123 7 82 179 6 

Total vote in county 2302 2953 131 2458 2767 135 

Plurality, 651 

Socialist, 18; Social-Labor, 8. 



468 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Union County. 

-Governor- , 



-Assembly- 













§6 










a; . 
OS 


11 










:§ 


'Si 




^ 


i-i-i 


V) 


u* 


§ 


Elizabeth — 






















I St 


Ward, 


I St 


Dist 


40 


218 


46 


47 


46 


213 


209 


210 


I St 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


.. 69 


267 


86 


82 


82 


249 


250 


251 


I St 


Ward, 


3d 


Uist. 


52 


139 
624 


69 
201 


61 
199 


63 
191 


131 
593 


124 

583 


126 




161 


587 


2d 


Ward, 


I St 


Dist. 


81 


291 


84 


8s 


8S 


286 


284 


282 


2d 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


.. 136 
217 


156 
,447 


149 
233 


151 


152 


144 
430 


139 
423 


138 




236 


237 


420 


3d 


Ward, 


I St 


Dist. 


.. 136 


382 


169 


1.58 


162 


358 


370 


353 


3d 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


242 


259 
641 


267 
436 


257 
415 


260 


237 


236 
606 


236 




37.8 


422 


593 


589 


4 th 


Ward, 


I St 


Dist. 


,.. 187 


218 


190 


192 


192 


215 


21 1 


210 


4th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


204 


190 


208 


212 


213 
405 


186 


180 
391 


81 




391 


408 


398 


404 


401 


291 


sth 


Ward, 


I St 


Dist. 


. . 25'6 


248 


282 


280 


286 


218 


217 


218 


5th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


• • 154 


182 


177 


182 


182 


151 


150 
367 


147 




410 


.430 


459 


462 


468 


369 


36s 


6th 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


121 


227 


132 


131 


131 


220 


215 


212 


6th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


.. 165 
28.6 


139 
366 


156 


171 


171 


142 


137 
352 


134 




288 


302 


302 


362 


346 


7th 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


.. 126 


266 


164 


142 


142 


239 


241 


244 


7th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


• • 133 


201 


159 
323 


154 


154 


180 


174 
415 


177 




■259 


467 


296 


296 


419 


421 


8th 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


.. 268 


'157 


262 


276 


277 


163 


147 


147 


8th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


200 


n6 


187 


196 


203 


1S8 


132 


128 


8th 


Ward, 


3d 


Dist. 


.. 78 


212 


86 


86 


88 


204 


199 


203 


8th 


Ward, 


4th Dist. 


146 
692 


166 
671 


158 


162 
720 


163 
731 


160 
68s 


149 
627 


150 




693 


628 


9th 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


• • 245 


•188 


240 


253 


260 


194 


167 


181 


9th 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


• • 175 


263 


175 
415 


180 
433 


180 


259 


255 
422 


255 




420 


•451 


440 


453 


436 


loth 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


• • zz(^ 


196 


327 


353 


355 


208 


173 


^73 


nth 


Ward, 


ISt 


Dist. 


■ ■ 304 


144 


294 


299 


307 


157 


134 


139 


nth 


Ward, 


2d 


Dist. 


220 


106 


204 
498 


222 


224 


no 


95 
229 


93 




524 


.250 


521 


531 


267 


232 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



46d 



Union County — Continued. 

-Governor- ,• Assembly- 



EHzabeth — 

1 2th Ward, ist Dist., 
1 2th Ward, 2d Dist., 



Fanwood Borough, . . , 

Linden Borough, 

Mountainside Borough 
New Providence Boro. 
Roselle Borough, .... 

Clark Township, 

Cranford, ist District, 
" 2d District, 

Fanwood Township, . . 
Linden Township, . . . 
New Providence Twp., 
Springfield Township,. 



-S d 2 2 
31^ bQ 



248 63 

i;2 218 



400 

55 

38 

35 

72 

241 

39 

175 

207 

141 

68 

32 

12.^ 



Plainfield — 

ist Ward, ist Dist., , 
ist Ward, 2d Dist... 



323 
109 



2d Ward, ist Dist.,. 
2d Ward, 2d Dist.,. 



3d Ward, xst Dist.,, 
3d Ward, 2d Dist.,. 



4th Ward, ist Dist. 
4th Ward, 2d Dist. 
4th Ward, 3d Dist. 



102 



22 
30 

22 

52 
76 

43 
1 10 
84 
93 
42 
30 
64 






152 

370 
52 
39 
36 
73 

226 

45 

175 

211 

138 

71 

35 






240 
160 



/ ^ 
237 

36 
173 
203 
III 

69 

26 

123 



151 
78 



432 229 

342 134 
69 



444 203 
336 no 
107 44 



443 154 

234 162 

229 159 

208 104 



671 425 

Rahway, ist Ward, 182 223 

" 2d Ward, 187 245 

3d Ward,. . 265 198 

4th Ward, 188 150 

" 5th Ward, 165 121 

987 937 

Roselle Park, 174 104 

Summit Twp., ist Dist.,.. 296 187 

2d Dist.,'. . 283 262 



325 
109 



434 
327 



429 

327 
98 

425 

235 
220 
214 

669 

178 
197 
276 
187 
165 

1003 

162 
294 
287 



230 
87 



380 
209 
177 
155 

541 

177 
192 

273 
186 

165 

993 

174 
295 
288 



rtK -= 



251 
165 



400 416 
52 
41 
36 



337 
III 



317 


448 


245 

86 


340 
104 


331 


444 


292 
88 


337 
107 



«- c 

-5Q 



54 

41 

35 

73 

243 

37 

182 

219 

136 

68 

34 
127 



1228 668 1227 1179 1249 



106 
229 

335 
23 
29 

22 

49 

86 

41 
1 10 

85 
97 
40 
28 
61 

671 

144 
77 



444 
241 
225 
214 



150 
167 

lOI 



181 
196 
275 
185 
168 



223 
235 
183 
146 
117 






58 
204 



27 
21 

49 
75 
45 
107 
82 
96 
40 
29 
61 



57 
199 



262 256 
22 24 
27 
21 
50 
71 
40 

95 

67 

119 

39 
34 
62 



654 649 

136 220 
77 95 



221 


213 


315 


138 

68 


130 
69 


224 
82 


206 


199 


306 


109 
51 


106 
43 


147 
59 



160 149 206 



149 
157 



680 418 404 



219 
240 

184 

159 
117 



203 

153 

544 
220 
235 
187 
146 
119 



1005 904 919 907 

169 no 102 100 

293 188 186 186 

287 259 258 259 



753 553 



■43 



757 



749 557 546 545 



416 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Union County — Continued. 

-Governor- ,- Assembly- 



Union Twp., ist Dist.,. 
?d Dist.,. 



"5. ^ 



lOI 

153 



254 



Westfield Twp., ist Dist., 257 
" 2d Dist., 272 






197 
104 
154 



529 258 



ii& 


9.% 




.-=« 


t^ 


7=« 


Icn 






<< 


■ '>^< 





CO 



103 

154 


103 
159 


103 

160 


109 

81 


257 


262 


263 


190 


259 
275 


255 
271 


260 
282 

542 


lOI 

146 


534 


526 


247 



> 
109 



99 

147 



109 

77 



186 186 



104 
154 



246 258 



Total vote in county,. . 10215 8856 10362 10018 10618 8691 8366 8660 
Plurality, 1359 

Prohibition, 200; Socialist, 250; Social-Labor, 150. 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



471 



Warren County. 

, GOVERNOR- 



-ASSEMBtY- 



Prv S^ ^2 i^tT^S o£ 

^^ >.Q oPh .= « «0 fcfi, 

Ji o ^ " •" rt 

§ X ;p hJ ^ t^ 

Allamuchy 57 64 i 56 65 1 

Belvidere, 261 176 28 339 104 22 

Blairstown, 144 179 9 163 156 10 

Franklin, 70 119 6 70 117 7 

Frelinghuysen, 86 72 2 88 69 2 

Greenwich, 93 95 2 92 96 2 

Hackettstown, ist District, 96 122 15 96 iii 18 

*' 2d District iii 113 22 120 100 24 

Hardwick, 20 45 i 23 42 i 

Harmony, 40 67 6 47 59 5 

Hope, 123 103 10 136 87 12 

Independence, 61 82 5 63 78 5 

Knowlton, 88 192 4 143 128 5 

Lopatcong, 100 99 4 117 77 5 

Mansfield, 77 165 9 79 157 9 

Oxford, I St District, 61 146 19 106 99 17 

" 2d District, 122 129 9 125 118 9 

Pahaquarry, 15 39 i 15 39 i 

1625 2007 153 1878 1702 155 

Phillipsburg, ist Ward, 201 215 5 230 186 5 

" 2d Ward, 150 224 2 212 162 2 

" 3d Ward, 176 137 7 181 129 8 

" 4th Ward 108 174 7 157 124 7 

5th Ward 132 157 3 140 146 3 

767 907 24 920 747 25 

Pohatcong, 136 127 6 137 123 6 

Washington Borough, East District 152 205 40 166 185 43 

" " West District,... 163 232 32 182 204 38 

Washington Township, 76 143 7 87 130 7 

527 707 85 572 642 94 

Total vote in county, 2919 3621 262 3370 3091 274 

Plurality, 702 

Socialist, 51; Social-Labor, 28. 

Total Number of Election Precincts in the State. 



Atlantic, 29 

Bergen, 63 

Burlington 43 

Camden, 88 

Cape May, 16 

Cumberland, 33 

Essex 175 

Gloucester, 20 

Hudson, 183 

Hunterdon, 27 

Mercer, 60 



Middlesex, 42 

Monmouth, 56 

Morris, 45 

Ocean, 24 

Passaic, 61 

Salem, 18 

Somerset, 24 

Sussex, 21 

Union, 59 

Warren, 27 

Total, 1 1 14 



472 



ELECTION RETURNS. 
Vote for Governor, 1901. 



COUNTIES. 



Atlantic, . . . 
Bergen, .... 
Burlington, . 
Camden, . . . 
Cape May, . . 
Cumberland, 

Essex, 

Gloucester, 
Hudson, .... 
Hunterdon, . 
Mercer, .... 
Middlesex, . 
Monmouth, . 
Morris, .... 

Ocean, 

Passaic, .... 

Salem, 

Somerset, 
Sussex, .... 

Union, 

Warren 



0) 

Co 
o 



i: *-■ 



9706 
14092 
12656 

24052 

3304 

IOI66 

69I5I 
6749 

68045 
7312 

20789 

15512 

I69IO 

12404 

4II6 

26998 

5974 
6902 

5549 

19861 

6923 



PC. 

92 

lOI 

88 

2T,2 

14 

54 
431 

22 
538 

23 
167 

98 
173 
113 

44 

99 

22 

31 
113 
159 

57 



>% 





OP 




C u 





















'a, 






'ci 


.Tl rt 


Pluralities. 


3 C 


OJ 

<^ 


^ 2 

pq£ 


> 
tn'rt 




Lt.:' 




C '^ 


OJ <D 


rt 


u 


C 






2^ 


rt 



1 — , 


u 


rtC/2 




6051 


3290 


225 


16 


10 


2761 




7401 


6061 


163 


199 


52 


1340 .. 




6877 


5294 


344 


24 


10 


1583 •■ 




I3571 


8815 


398 


98 


21 


4756 . . 




1877 


I23I 


142 


10 


6 


646 .. 




5567 


3655 


521 


86 


15 


I9I2 




36780 


29885 


394 


711 


486 


6895 • • 




3504 


2779 


320 


12 


5 


725 •• 




27882 


368SO 


245 


1315 


583 


8998 


2978 


4052 


215 


2.2 


15 


.... 10 


74 


10954 


9083 


316 


185 


27 


1871 .. 




7627 


7517 


126 


29 


38 


1 10 




8556 


7781 


320 


30 


38 


775 • • 




6335 


5455 


343 


41 


42 


880 .. 




2516 


1363 


166 


12 


7 


II 53 •• 




13481 


12179 


158 


374 


368 


1302 . . 




2931 


2749 


206 


52 


5 


182 . . 




3490 


3181 


170 


16 


9 


309 . . 




2302 


2953 


131 


18 


8 


.... 651 


IO215 


8856 


200 


205 


150 


1359 •• 




2919 


3622 


262 


34 


23 


7 


03 



Total, 367171 2671 183814 166681 5365 3489 1918 28559 11426 

Plurality, ... 171 33 17133 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



473 



Average Vote by Counties for Members of the General 

Assembly. 



COUNTIES. 



Atlantic, 6116 

Bergen, 7436 

Burlington, 7036 

Camden, 13505 

Cape Ma}' 1898 

Cumberland, 5474 

Essex, 3Q4 1 2 

Gloucester, Z7 -- 

Hudson -8674 

Hunterdon, 3076 

Mercer, 10948 

Middlesex, 7653 

Monmouth, 8429 

Morris, 6287 

Ocean, -2364 

Passaic 13524 

Salem, 2938 

Somerset, 3344 

Sussex, 2458 

Union, 10333 

Warren, 337o 





■+3 






Pluralities. 




, 


• 


_i_j . 








"A -^ 


.« 


.2 c 






s 


3'^ 


c 
X 




r^ 


3 


3188 


243 






2928 




5966 


173 


194 




1470 






5035 


375 






2001 






8756 


420 


100 




4749 






1145 


164 






753 






3625 


583 






1849 






27017 


385 


743 


564 


12395 






2491 


325 






1231 






35991 


217 


1332 


583 




7317 


3861 


235 








785 


8936 


325 


194 




2012 




7402 


154 






251 




7768 


314 






661 




5452 


356 






835 




1388 


171 






976 




11965 


163 


374 


364 


1559 




2-J27 


195 






21 1 




3300 


172 






44 




2767 


135 








309 


8607 


214 


182 


147 


1726 




3091 


274 






279 





Plurality, 



187997 160478 5593 3119 1658 35930 8411 
27519 27519 



474 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Presidential Election, 1900. — Average Vote for Electors, 
by Counties. 



Pluralities. 



COUNTIES. ^ ^ 

rt o 
C o 

^•^ 

or: 

o 

6 o. 

Atlantic, 9178 

Bergen, 16155 

Burlington, .... 14648 

Camden, 24838 

Cape May 3590 

Cumberland, ... 11623 

Essex, 74172 

Gloucester, .... 7824 

Hudson, 73574 

Hunterdon, .... 9520 

Mercer, 227-^2, 

Middlesex 17126 

Monmouth, .... 19703 

Morris, 14319 

Ocean, 4877 

Passaic, 29769 

Salem, 6768 

Somerset 794i 

Sussex, 6531 

Union, 21426 

Warren, 9555 

Total, 40S874 

Plurality 



15 





h 
V 


P5 


« 


Q 


no 


6122 


2566 


105 


9086 


6456 


106 


8381 


5476 


147 


16148 


7281 


6 


2241 


1 1 10 


52 


6780 


4036 


603 


45318 


25735 


38 


4471 


2829 


557 


32341 


38025 


44 


3873 


5136 


169 


13874 


7858 


136 


9348 


7191 


143 


10363 


8568 


70 


7739 


5793 


29 


3182 


1414 


146 


15619 


12891 


32 


3398 


2981 


40 


4438 


3183 


38 


2874 


3395 


119 


12522 


766s 


61 


3589 


5219 



!75i 



56899 









^ 


uj 


u 


t-i 











"a, 



a 






s 

<u 


'A 


■Si 


■Ti 


P-i 


K 


U 


277 


49 


9 


23 


3556 






165 


179 


50 


28 


2630 






507 


75 


10 


33 


2905 






553 


215 


48 


43 


8867 






186 


1 1 


7 


8 


1131 






642 


66 


14 


24 


2744 






544 


1003 


617 


77 


18583 






342 


87 


12 


22 


1642 






303 


1373 


515 


21 




5684 


312 


34 


3 


17 




1263 


450 


210 


38 


68 


6016 






216 


90 


54 


39 


2157 






419 


63 


43 


58 


1795 






490 


92 


35 


58 


1946 






183 


25 


5 


27 


1768 






259 


ZZ7 


349 


28 


2728 






272 


32 


9 


18 


417 






170 


50 


12 


25 


1255 






138 


52 


10 


10 




5 


21 


317 


494 


220 


30 


4857 






388 


72 


9 


12 




1630 


7183 4609 


2074 


669 


65997 


9098 










56899 







For Congress, 1900. 

First District. 



COUNTIE?^. 



nt 
In 

O S 

bow 



Camden, 15756 

Cape May, 2186 

Cumberland, 6502 

Gloucester, 4199 

Salem 3299 

31942 

Plurality, 12773 



is 

O, (U 

Q 



C 

7668 
1177 
4248 

2993 
3083 



-efU 






o 



531 
181 

627 

338 

251 



w 





M u 




y 


boS 




cJi 


Xi nJ 


■^Q 


; Ci-r 




H-Tii 


V 


tn S 


03 


■5^c^ 



Ph 



193 

10 

54 
88 
29 



57 
I 

23 

13 

7 



Pluralities. 



« 
8088 
1009 
2254 
1206 

216 



19169 1928 374 loi 12773 



ELECTION RETURNS. 47") 

Second District. 



COUNTIES. ^ ^? A^^ f go 

uc r-.^s >i?+i c-y 

CrtU Gu«J t-ort TCJO 

xi'^X 2^C -^.^ "^^t^ 
or;;—; 

Atlantic, 6040 2587 280 45 

Burlington 8398 5471 507 66 

Mercer, i3747 7874 447 282 

Ocean, 3174 1419 185 25 

31359 17351 1419 418 

Plurality, 14008 

Third District. 



_o 


Plurali 


ities, 


u^ 






U rt 






.ca 






^ be • 












:::i> 




y 






<^ 


I r 


3453 




I z 


2927 




47 


5873 




5 


1755 




75 


14008 





'^ » • c P t; 2 Pluralities. 



COUNTIES. .S:= ^_£ . ^JCh ^S 

S > • OC !^ ?j'C! • tfi (U . 

rt^C- c«u" Jr-'ti -raju 

— , o (u osji-i i-rtrt r^o 

cKci Sc:^ 2'j;;^ 5fec/; 



Middlesex, 9438 7103 192 86 

Monmouth, 10432 8516 412 66 

Somerset, 4416 3162 164 38 

24286 18781 768 190 108 

Plurality, 5 5'>3 

Fourth District. 



COUNTIES. 5 . ^5 ^ £ ^ '^^^ 

3 1-. a 5^C rt^+j Mpy 

_SCi V/-/'^ FO;^ glXc/; 

Hunterdon, 3925 5087 254 24 

Morris, 7590 5984 477 89 

Sussex, 2854 3415 134 52 

Warren, 3648 5175 390 70 

18017 19661 1255 235 

Plurality, 1644 

Fifth District. 



>+- 


Plu 


rt^ 




■^X. r: 



















<%>* 


^ 




53 


2335 


43 


I916 


12 


1254 



COUNTIES. fal3 o .5^^ 



-'^ 



«l& cli •S.StS K^-g 

Bergen, 8957 6614 162 178 

Passaic, T5366 13094 268 336 

24323 19708 430 514 395 461; 

Plurality, 4615 





Plura 


litics. 


^P 






tn . 






^rn <-> 






c>> 




^ 


CIL 


— 








n 


'y 


^ 


8 




1 162 


37 


1606 




10 




561 


9 




1527 


64 


1606 


32.=;o 

1644 


^ 


Plura 


Hties. 














< Ji^' 












ta ,\ 






u", cu " 






"1 ^-< y 


^• 


p; 


-^ 


y 







-y 










45 


2 34.^> 




350 


2272 





476 



ELECTION RETURNS. 



Sixth District. 





C 
















>. 








l_i 




1 • • 




rt 






r^ 


c ° 


I'lura 


ilities 


COUNTIES 






c P 


<1 c 

en en 










^-Sd 


S>ss 


5 rt ti 


c c y 


-^0 






•^ 


" c^i <l> 


w, rt <u 




o^r^ 


•r- Q 




E 




t3?LH« 




-oC^ 


oKt/2 


c 




ecj 




cs: 


H 


r< 




P 


Essex (part of),. , 


. . 32830 
•• 13353 


19477 


395 


848 


534 


13353 




Plurality, 











Seventh District. 



Pluralities. 



COUNTIES. 



tn rt w 



cog grt 



4; 03 cj 



.a 






Hudson (part of), 30472 337 1 3 303 1336 479 



Plurality,. 



3241 



• • 3^41 



Seventh District. 
(To Fill Vacancy.) 










COUNTIES. 


shall 
an Wi 

ep. 


S 

. u 

c 5 




«>« 


^§Q 




<ii 


<-" 


Hudson (part of),. 


■ 30472 


33898 


Plurality , 




3426 






Pluralities. 



3426 



Eighth District. 



COUNTIES. 



Essex (part of),. . 
Hudson (part of), 
Union 12419 



Plurality, . 





m 






u 


Plu 


ral 


ities. 


"i^C 


< 






43 

0^ 








a^y. 


-rt ^ . 


tn r- 


K/ 








Iiarle 
Fow 
Rep. 


dwar 
Man 
Dem 


homa 
Ken 
Nat. 




1^ 


cj 








— / 


W 


H 


.—I 


pL 




« 


Q 


12072 


6683 


151 


140 


87 


5389 






2630 


3050 


42 


46 


17 






420 


12419 


7777 


308 


484 
670 


223 

327 


4642 
10031 






27121 


17510 


501 


420 


9611 










9611 







INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 41 

INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

OF 

GOVERNOR FRANKLIN MURPHY. 



Gentlemen of the Senate and General Assembly: 

I have just taken the oath required by the Constitution 
of the State of everyone chosen to All the high office of 
Governor. I have taken it without any reservation, and, 
to the best of my ability, I propose to be faithful to it. 

The provision of the Constitution which postpones the 
inauguration of a new Governor until after the assembling 
of the Legislature enables the outgoing Governor, from 
his laiger knowledge and experience, to discuss in his an- 
nual message those matters which he regards as important 
to the State. The exceptional experience of my distin- 
guished predecessor and his familiarity with the legisla- 
tion and the institutions of the State has caused this to 
be done recently with signal ability and fullness. Later on 
I shall doubtless have occasion to communicate with you 
on special subjects, but at present it does not seem ad- 
visable to do more than to call your attention to a few 
matters whose importance has already caused them to be 
a subject of pub-c discussion and upon some of which 
opinions have bee;: already expressed. 

THE POLLUTION OF THE PASSAIC RIVER. 

The most important subject to which I can call your at- 
tention at this time is the pollution of the Passaic river 
from the adjacent population, which has destroyed the use 
and beauty of a noble stream and gravely injured manu- 
facturing and property interests on its banks. To remedy 
this condition is merely to pay the penalty of crowding 
population. The situation which permits this violation of 
natural conditions must be replaced by wise legislation. 
The State's responsibilities extend to all its branches of 
government, and in this case the fact that political divis- 
ions do not conform to natural drainage, makes it neces- 
sary for the State to provide for common action in sew- 
erage by methods different from those which prevail in 
other functions of government. The regulation is partly 
provided for by the State Sewerage Commission act, and 
much preliminary work has been done. Legislation for 



• 



478 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

carrying out the work is asked at the hands of the Legis- 
lature. Six years have elapsed since the Legislature first 
considered this question, and it is high time for final de- 
cision and immediate action. The fact that great injury 
has been done is made the more apparent by threatened 
suits for damages against cities discharging sewage into 
the river. Evidently a delay in legislation would cause 
litigation of an expensive and injurious character. The 
general method of State supervision on sewerage which 
has been adopted meets with approval; each local com- 
munity should be required to so regulate its sewerage as 
to avoid nuisance to adjoining communities; and the regu- 
lation of this subject through proper authority is the sole 
means of preventing disaster to the public health and of 
obtaining the best results for each. I strongly urge 
prompt action. 

CHANGES IN THE ELECTION LAW. 

The State of New Jersey has an Election law which has 
produced, upon the whole, excellent results. Theoretically 
and practically, if the voter so desires, it secures a secret 
ballot; it enables a voter to deposit his ballot with abso- 
lute independence. One hundred feet from the ballot-box 
extraneous influence comes to an end; the citizen enters 
the polling-place alone; he enters the booth; he selects and 
prepares his ballot without assistance or supervision; he 
knows, unless he so desires, that no one can know how he 
votes; his ballot may be the expression of his own con- 
clusions and wishes. 

But however excellent the law may be, and I think it is 
admitted by all who are competent to judge that it is a 
great improvement upon former laws, it is still possible to 
make it better. I have said the ballot is theoretically 
secret. Experience has demonstrated that it may be so 
only in theory, and that the ingenuity of the wicked is 
quite equal to the task of destroying its t;ecrecy. The law 
now allows ballots practically without number to be in 
possession of all parties outside the polls, and it is not 
difiicult to so mark these ballots that when finally counted 
they may be known. So long as ballots are allowed out- 
side the polling-places, so long will the use of money at 
the polls for the purchase of votes be likely to continue. 

I do not need to take, nor will I take, your time in dis- 
coursing upon the importance of keeping the ballot pure. 
The necessity of doing so is recognized by every thought- 
ful citizen, and the danerers and evil results of a corrupt 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 479 

ballot have been shown by a long line of sad and unfortu- 
nate experiences. It is in the interest of good government 
to make corruption at the polls impossible. It does not 
answer to make it difficult— human nature is weak— it 
should be made impossible. It is easy so long as ballots 
are allowed outside the polls. 

Two ways of improvement suggest themselves. 

The first is by amending the present law so that no bal- 
lots shall be obtainable by the voter except from the elec- 
tion officer, and if the law should be so amended, I suggest 
the Massachusetts form of ballot as perhaps the best form 
yet devised. 

The second is the use of the voting machine in place of 
the ballot. I am informed that this machine has been so 
perfected that it is entirely practical, and in those cities 
where it has been used it has given results that have been 
altogether satisfactory. The only objection I have heard 
to its use is on account of the expense, but with the large 
amount of money in the treasury, that is not a serious 
matter; no expense is unwisely incurred that will make 
corruption at the polls impossible, and the expense might 
easily be met by appropriating from the treasury of the 
State a sufficient sum to provide each county with the 
necessary number of machines. 

I also recommend to the Legislature tne amendment of 
the present law so that the polls will close at five o'clock. 
It may be said by some that this change was tried a few 
years ago and was found unpopular, and the present hour 
of closing was returned to. It is true the experiment was 
tried and abandoned, but it was done for party reasons and 
not because a majority of the people were dissatisfied with 
it. If the law works well in New York (and it is so con- 
ceded), there is no reason why it should not work well in 
New Jersey. It is admitted by those who have had practi- 
cal experience at the polls that a large proportion of the 
illegal voting is done after sundown. Crookedness of all 
kinds thrives better in the dark than in the sunlight, and 
it is for this reason probably that so many of the States 
have thought it wise to enact what is known as a Sunset 
law. New Jersey should not be behind her sister States. 

I also recommend the passage of a Primary Election law^ 
Our primaries are still under the conduct of party agencies. 
The existing provisions of the law not only permit, but 
encourage the conduct of the primaries by the agents 
selected by the dominant organization within the party 
under which the primary is held. It will probably be con- 

31 



480 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

cetled by all that an immense advantage is thereby af- 
forded for the execution of an'y purpose that may have 
been formed by the party leaders, and that the free and 
untrammeled expression of the party voters is well-nigh 
impossible. It is currently reported, and perhaps generally 
believed, that in more than one case the popular will has 
been unable to express itself, the popular choice set aside, 
by practices and proceedings rendered possible by the 
methods under which primaries are conducted. This is a 
very serious matter. In order to have an election there 
must be a regular nomination. If the will of the legal 
voters within a party is defeated or controlled as to the 
choice of a candidate, the right of suffra.ge, the right of 
choice, is trammeled and perhaps altogether set at naught. 
The Legislature has already given expression to the moral 
sense of the citizens of this State by attempting to regu- 
late primaries. Violations of the statutory regulations are 
classed as criminal offenses, and he question now remain- 
ing is not one of moral sense, but of method. It is earnest- 
ly suggested that further legislation upon this subject be 
enacted, and it is recommended that the primaries of the 
two leading parties be held under the supervision of the 
regular Boards of Election, and that the expense of hold- 
ing the same be met out of the public funds in the same 
manner in which the expenses of the elections are de- 
frayed, with similar penalties for any violation of the 
statutory regulations under which they are held. It is not 
forgotten that all laws depend very largely for their effi- 
ciency upon the persons who execute them, and that un- 
less the statutory provisions are complied with and any 
violations of duty are promptly and vigorously dealt with 
by courts and juries, the requirements of statutes are of 
little avail. It is believed that the suggestions made will 
contribute in no small degree to secure results in which 
the voters will have confidence. 

FINANCES. 

The finances of the State continue to be in excellent con- 
dition. The receipts for the last fiscal year were $3,826,811.29, 
and the disbursements $3,480,350.28; the receipts over the 
disbursements being $346,461.01. The extraordinary dis- 
bursements included in the total, and not properly charged 
to the current expenses of the State and its institutions, 
amounted to the large sum of $1,134,063.55, leaving as the 
sum expended for the total annual expenses $2,346,286.73. 
and the amount of receipts over running expenses $1,480,- 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 481 

524.50. The surplus in the treasury October 31st was $2,- 
or)],(j<S3.17. The State is entirely free from debt, and this 
exhibit of the financial condition of the State is as excep- 
tional as it is gratifying. 

I am informed that the State receives no interest on tlie 
balances in the various banks, nor has it ever received 
such interest. Why, I do not know. One treasurer has 
followed the example of his predecessor in distributing the 
funds of the State to the various banks throughout the 
State who have had at times large amounts on deposit on 
which they have made money, but for which they have 
paid no interest. This is all right for the banks, but the 
State is deprived of an income which every business man 
under the same circumstances would insist upon. If the 
average balance in the treasury is two and a quarter mill- 
ions, an interest of two per cent, would net the State the 
important sum of $45,000 a year. Some legislation may be 
necessary to provide a plan which shall authorize the 
treasurer to arrange with the banks for the payment of 
interest. If so, I recommend it without delay. If instead 
of distributing the money of the State to favored banks in 
various localities it should be placed, under proper safe- 
guards, in a smaller number of banks of undoubted safety, 
an important sum can be earned for the State each year. 

The disposition of a portion of the large surplus now in 
the treasury is an important subject that will come before 
the Legislature for its action. Last year a special appro- 
priation of $800,588.25 was made from this fund for the pur- 
poses of public education, and was used by the various 
counties of the State either in reducing the local school 
tax or in increasing school facilities. No better use of a 
portion, and a large portion of the surplus can, I think, be 
made. The action of last year will doubtless be repeated 
this year, but I think other uses of the surplus can wisely 
be made. Too large a surplus should not be allowed to 
accumulate. It is larger now than a safe and conservative 
regard for the interests of the State require. It belongs to 
the people of this generation and should not be held for the 
benefit of the next. The people are entitled to receive the 
benefit of it now, and a reasonable portion of it may be 
used either in the reduction of school taxes, the repair and 
enlargement of the institutions of the State, where such 
are needed, the substantial increase in the appropriation 
for public roads (which I cannot too highly commend to 
you) or in such other manner as the Legislature may in 
its wisdom decide upo^^ 



482 INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

It may be remarked, and with justice, that the largest 
source of receipts — that from miscellaneous corporations, 
and which last year amounted to the large sum of $1,630,- 
574.19— is uncertain and is likely to vary from year to year 
with the general condition of business throughout the 
country. That is true, but I am not speaking of income— 
but of surplus— of money in hand. It is hardly to be ex- 
pected that the income of the State even in times of busi- 
ness depression will not be sufficient for the necessary ex- 
penses of the State, and the extraordinary expenses may 
be adjusted from year to year according to the condition 
of the treasury, without bringing hardship to the tax- 
payer. 

THE NATIONAL GUARD. 

The National Guard now consists of forty-eight com- 
panies of infantry, organized into four regiments; two 
batteries of artillery and two troops of cavalry, compos- 
ing two brigades and one division. The present infantry 
force should be enlarged. I think it wise that it be in- 
creased to five regiments of infantry, of twelve com- 
panies each, and that the artillery and cavalry remain as 
they now are, and that the headquarters of these regi- 
ments be located in Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Tren- 
ton and Camden. 

In each of these cities commodious armories have been 
built by the State at large expense, and too much money 
has been expended upon these buildings to permit them 
to be useless or to be damaged by neglect. That, however, 
is the smallest of reasons for urging their use. 

The importance of a National Guard of reasonable size 
cannot be disputed. We are a people given to ways of 
peace. The Nation does not maintain a large standing 
army. The chief reliance of the people in times of war, 
as well, in necessity, as in times of peace, in upholding the 
supremacy of the law and in protecting public and private 
property, is in a thoroughly organized and perfectly disci- 
plined National Guard. The valor of the sons of New 
Jersey, their patriotism and their sacrifice has never 
failed either the State or the Nation. I regard it as of 
high importance that the militia of the State should be 
maintained in reasonable numbers and at the highest point 
of efficiency. 

HOSPITAL FOR THE CONSUMPTIVE POOR. 

I am inclined to bring to your attention the subject of 
providing a State Hospital for the consumptive poor. If 
1 have had any doubts of the wisdom of doing so it is not 



INAUGURAL. ADDRESS. 483 

because there is any question in my mind of the good such 
an institution would be to those afflicted with this disease, 
but for economic and other reasons. The dreadfulness of 
this disease (do I characterize it too strongly?) is not ap- 
preciated by the average layman. It is not so loathsome 
as smallpox, people do not fear it as they do scarlet or 
typhoid fever or diphtheria, and yet the statistics show 
that in the last twenty-two years in the State of New 
Jersey the deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis have been 
more than diphtheria, croup, typhoid fever, scarlet fever, 
whooping cough, malarial fevers, measles and smallpox 
combined. If one has any of these diseases he has a 
chance for his life, but if the grip of the "white scourge" 
ever takes hold of him, however gentle may be its first 
touch, it strengthens its hold month by month, never re- 
laxing, never weakening, until the final end. 

At least this is so with the poor. The rich, with their 
cleaner general habits of life, the better air they breathe, 
the better food they eat, stand a fighting chance, and if 
they take the disease in time and submit themselves to 
skill 3d treatment they may recover. But with the poor 
the bullet of the rifle pointed at the heart is hardly more 
certain. It is swifter, but not more sure. 

It has been demonstrated that with proper treatment the 
disease is preventable and in its early stages, curable — 
isolation, fresh air, proper food— but these are impossible 
to the poor. 

That it is contagious is now as fully recognized as that 
under most conditions it is fatal. It is a proper subject for 
legislative investigation and action, and I am of the opin- 
ion you would be doing a lasting service to the State if you 
were to make a reasonable appropriation for the establish- 
ment of a hospital for this purpose. 

Gentlemen of the Legislature — You in your province, I 
in mine, are intrusted with high responsibility by the 
State we love. The history of New Jersey, the patriotism 
and sacrifices of her sons in the days that are gone, give 
us all just cause for pride in the past of our State. Her 
recent remarkable development and her increasing influ- 
ence in the sisterhood of States appeal not less to our pride 
in her present. Let us dedicate ourselves fully to her serv- 
ice. Such at least is my determination, and in my work 
I ask the assistance of my associates, the considerate 
judgment of my fellow-citizens and the favor of Almighty 
God. 

FRANKLIN MURPHY. 

Trenton, January 21st, 1902. 



484 MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 

MEMBERS OF THE 

126TH Legislature of the State of 
New Jersey. 

Postoflice Address and Expiration of Term of Senators. 



SENATE. 



Atlantic— Edward S. Lee, R., 1905, Atlantic City. 
Bergen— Edmund W. Wakelee, R., 1905, Demarest. 
Burling-ton — Nathan Haines, R., 1904, Burlington. 
Camden— Herbert W. Johnson, R., 1903,t MerchantvilTe. 
Cape May— Robert E. Hand, R., 1904, Erma. 
Cumberland— Bloomfield H. Minch, R., 1905, Bridgeton. 
Essex— Thomas N. McCarter, Jr., R., 1903,t Newark. 
Gloucester— Solomon H. Stanger, R.,t 1903, Glassboro. 
Hudson — Robert S. Hudspeth, D., 1905, Jersey City. 
Hunterdon— William C. Gebhardt, D., 1904, Clinton. 
Mercer— Elijah C. Hutchinson, R., 1905, Trenton. 
Middlesex — Theodore Strong, R., 1904, New Brunswick. 
Monmouth— C. Asa Francis, R., 1903, t North Long 
Branch. 
Morris— Jacob W. Welsh, R., 1905, German Valley. 
Ocean— George L. Shinn, R., 1905, New Egypt. 
Passaic— Wood McKee, R., 1904, Paterson. 
Salem— Richard C. Miller, R., 1903,t Alloway. 
Somerset — Charles A. Reed, R., 1903,t Piainfleld. 
Sussex — Lewis J. Martin, D., 1904, Newton. 
Union— Joseph Cross, R., 1903,t Elizabeth. 
Warren — Johnston Cornish, D., 1903,t Washington. 
Republicans, 17; Democrats, 4. 

HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY. 

Atlantic — Thomas C. Elvins, R., Hammonton. 

Bergen— Joseph H. Tillotson, R., Englewood; James W. 
Mercer, R., Lodi. 

Burlington— Charles Wright, R., Columbus; John G. Hor- 
ner, R., Palmyra. 

Camden— William J. Bradley, R., Camden; Ephraim T. 
Gill, R., Haddonfield; George A. Waite, R., Camden. 

Cape May — Lewis M. Cresse, R., Ocean City. 



I Successor to be elected in 1903. 



MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE. 485 

Caumberland— William J. Moore, R., Bridgeton; Louis 
H. Miller, R., Vineland. 

Essex— J. Henry Bacheller, R., Newark; William B. Gar- 
rabrants, R., Newark; John Howe, R., Newark;' Robert 
W. Brown, R., Newark; William G. Sharwell, R., Newark; 
Ralph B. Schmidt, R., Newark; Edward E. Gnichtel, R.. 
Newark; Edgar Williams, R., East Orange; Frederick 
Cummings, R., West Orange; Robert M. Boyd, Jr., R., 
Montclair; William A. Lord, R., Orange. 

Gloucester— John Boyd Avis, R., Woodbury. 

Hudson— Patrick H. Connolly, D., Jersey City; John A. 
Dennin, D., Jersey City; John J. Fallon, D., Hoboken; 
James A. Hamill, D., Jersey City; William F. Hurley, D., 
Hoboken; Kilian V. Lutz, D., Guttenberg; Edward J. Rice, 
D., Harrison; Carl G. A. Schumann, D., Jersey City; John 
J. Treacy, D., Jersey City; Peter Stillwell, D., Bayonne; 
Frederick Weismann, D., Town of Union; George G. Ten- 
nant, D., Jersey City. 

Hunterdon— Warren O. Laudenberger, D., Junction. 

Mercer— Bertrand L. Gulick, R., Kingston; George W. 
Page, R., Trenton; Harry D. Leavitt, R., Trenton. 

Middlesex— Myron J. AVhitford, R., New Market; Will- 
iam H. C. Jackson, R., New Brunswick; John E. Mont- 
gomery, R., South Amboy. 

Monmouth— William T. Hoffman, R., Englishtown; John 
A. Howland, R., Long Branch; Somers T. Champion, R., 
Atlantic Highlands. 

Morris— Charles R. Whitehead, R., Morristown; William 
T. Brown, R., Madison. 

Ocean— George W. Holman, Jr., R., Bayville. 

Passaic— Edmund G. Stalter, R., Paterson; Wilham B. 
Davidson, R., Passaic; Hiram Keasler, R., All wood; Ray- 
mond Bogert, R., Paterson; Frederick W. Van Blarcom, 
R., Paterson. 

Salem— John Tyler, R., Salem. 

Somerset— Henry W. Hoagland, R., Rocky Hill. 

Sussex— Lewis S. Iliff. D., Newton. 

Union— Frederick Miller, R., Elizabeth; William New- 
corn, R., Plainfield; William F. Hall, R., Cranford. 

Warren— William R. Laire, R., Belvidere. 

Republicans, 46; Democrats, 14. 



486 LEGISLATIVE OFFICERS. 

ORGANIZATION 

• OF THE 

One Hundred and Twenty =Sixth Legislature. 



SENATE OFFICERS. 

President— Charles Asa Francis, Monmouth. 

President's Private Secretary— William L. Gillin, Mon- 
mouth. 

Secretary— Walter E. Edge, Atlantic. 

Assistant Secretary — Howard T. Tyler, Cumberland. 

Journal Clerk— Robert A. Waterbury, Union. 

Assistant Journal Clerk— William H. E'ischer, Ocean. 

Serg-eant-at-Arms- John T. Garwood, Salem. 

Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms— Arthur Bedell, Camden. 

Supervisor of Bills — Jesse R. Salmon, Essex. 

Assistant Supervi